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■The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Puis - 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich,:'. 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 
The Hague and Marseille 

S 38 & WEA 1 HBI BWA WEAR ON PAGE 1 6 

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INTERNATIONAL 



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Published With The New York Tunes and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1985 


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^ By Bob Hagerty 

hn entauuud Hmij Tribune 
JEDDAH — An oil price war 
wn . appears fikely next year and could 
send the cost of crude temporarily 

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: u: ' lev,.! h fSn tin Jp below $20 a band, Shakh Ahmed 
Yamani, Saudi Arabia’s oil 


... th'T ^cai^k mimsier, said in an interview 

Michei F £*' * Thursday. 

"ii ••:. . ur Szn& Arabia, tbe biggest export- 

's ,, “^kluri • erin the Organization of Petroleum 
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I' : J-. -rv - f* Pofj^ Exporting Countries, is the only cril 
1 O' it producer with sufficient flexibility 

'" rk - . to be able to dramatically influ- 


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• ■■*••» ' I ‘* ho * piakL^ ence< itself, world ofl prices by 
Thujj^t adjustingits production. 

*'5 .'-'-ni.lderj ? aft, in an. -apparent signal to both 
r ,J rw, pW3??*OPEC and non-OPEC countries. 


the minister said that an ofl price 
‘■'^tMcd war couldbe averted if alFproduc- 

i ■' •’ntui jyT^> era agreed to restrain production 
'hr pkv"H before an expected seasonal drop 
Hiit, ^ : demand next spring or snumer. 

lie ^ Bm he. arid that non-OPEC pro- 

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Deliberate, 
Carbide Says 

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LONDON — A top executive of 
the Union Carbide Corp. said 
MJDOUE49 Thursday that a gas leak in the 
. company’s plant in Bhopal, India, 
Kl/wo * iu ® %faai killed mate than 2,000 people 
m December was almost certainly 
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“We have all but ruled om any- 
thing but a deliberate act,*’ said 
Jackson Browning, rice pesident 
for health, safety and environmen- 
tal affairs. Mr. Browning addressed 
an international conference here 
that weighed the effects of the di- 
saster on the world chemical indos- 
uy. 

He appeared to go further than 
Warren M. Anderson, Union Car- 
bide’s chairman, who said in July 
that he ooald aoi rule oat sabotage 
as the. cause of the weald’s worst 
industrial disaster. 

Mr, Browning said company sri- 
^mtarists had established that tin- 
H 1 !PL 0 j*J inown persons had introduced 120 
-rjyjjf to 240 gallons (456 to 912 liters) of 
w " ,rf water into a storage tank, setting 
off a chemical reaction that caused 
a huge cloud - of lethal methyl isocy- 
anate gas to leak from the insecti- 
cide factory. 

He said the Bhopal plant, “for 
reasons which we have been unable 
to ascertain,” h«fl begun violating 
standard safety procedures in July 
1984. 


ousiy and they w03 go into s juice 
war," he said. “Maybe the summer 
of 198? is the time they w£Q realize 
the facts of life." 

If such non-OPEC pmpljers as 
Britain. Norway am! the Soviet 
Union enotinne to ignore OPEC 
warnings. Sheikh Yamani said, 
those facts probably will include 
“very VKilcnr fluctuations in price. 

From the correct range of rough- 
ly S25 to S30 a band for most 
grades of crude, prices could 
plunge below $20 during the sum- 
mer. that resinge to present levds 
or higher in winter, he said. 

Despite- the tide of a price-drop, 
he said. Saudi Arabia was deter- 
mined to keqj production near its 
quou of 4J5 xxulKos bands a day 
set by OPEC agreement. He esti- 
mated that his country, which owns 
about a quarter Of proven world oil 
reserves, would produce four mil- 
lion bands a day this month, up 
from a 20-year low of about two 

miiltfwi tug q immr r 

He said that “for the Hme being” 
the kingdom did not intend to ex- 
ceed its quota- But if other OPEC 
members continued to exceed 
theirs, theSaurfis would be free to 
do the same, Shdkh Yamani said. 

“Our policy is that if it's free for 
some, it’s free for all,” he said. 

ftairrii Arabia b«* capacity to 
produce as much as lOnnffion bar- 
rels a day, more .than a sixth of 
world co nsu mpt i on, as it did at 
tunes in the late 1970s, the minister 
noted.- 

The actual production level 
would depend on market condi- 
tions, SibHi Yamani said, but he 
emphasized that, the would 
no longer reduce their output uni- 
laterally to prop up prices. 

“We abandoned the policy of 
carrying the burden alone,” he said. 

For OPEC members in general, a 
greater share of the world market is 
“a most,” he Said. The cartel’s share 
has slumped to roogbly a third of 
world sales from two- thirds in the 
late jOT tk SjfrfliVli Vimwm <nid that 
he thought that a price war would 
increase OPECs mare. 

During the coming winter, 
Sheath Y amani predicted that oil 
would , be, stahle to slightly 
Extremely low inreacories 
of crude and some refined products 
have buoyed prices in recent 
months. 

Like many ofl executives and an- 
alysts. however, the Saudi minister 
expected downward pressure to re- 
turn by next spring. 

At an OPEC meeting scheduled 
for early next month in Geneva, the 
best option would be an rgreeroeut 
by all members to strictly adhere to 
official prices, ending flic wide- 
spread use of hidden discounts, 
Shdkh Yamani said. 

“To be realistic,” he said, “1 
don't dunk we can achieve this." 

. More fikdy was that OPEC 
would continue to try to control its 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 8) 



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Troops Storm 
Ministry Held 



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Bogota; 42 Die 


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A Cotombian Army armored vehicle batters down die door of the Justice Ministry in an assault on occupying guerrillas. 



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INSIDE 

■ Yasser Arafat said the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization 
opposed terrorist acts against 
unarmed dvilians. Page i 

■ U.S. officials described Mik- 

hail S. Gorbachev as combative 
as he prepared to meet Ronald 
Reagan. Page 2- 

■ Three f*hn»»«i<i were, killed 
and mere than 750 arrested in 
protests in Santiago. Page 3. 

■Acme famine is ending in the 
sub-Sahara nations, a UN offi- 
cial said. Page 5. 

WEEKEND 

■ The sounds of exotic cultures 
are entering the mainstream of 
Western music. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ International Tin Council 
failed to find a solution to the 
tin-market crisis. Page 1L 

■ The dollar dosed sharply 
higher in Europe on reports 
that central banks were unlikely 
to try todrive it-lower. Page 11- 


116 Aircraft 
To United 


. The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — United Air- 
lines has agreed iopurdtase 116 jet 
aircraft, including six long-range 
Boeing 747s, from Boring Co. in a 
transaction worth more than $3 bil- 
lion, the airline announced Thurs- 
day. 

It was die second trig order for 
Boeing air craft within a month. In 
October, Northwest Airlines an- 
nounced h was buying 10 new- 
model 747-400s as pan of a $2- 
triUion order. 

The .United order came as the 
Transportation Department gave 
final approval to die proposed 
S 7 15- million purchase by United 
of Pan American World Airways’ 
Pacific routes, a move that for the 
first time wfll make United a major 
overseas air carrier. 

Hie purchase gives United, the 
largest U.S. airline, its fast major 
presence in the international airline 
market with a route system that 

stretches from the West Coast to 
Tokyo. 

Connecting routes wiH link Unit- 
ed wiih ; China, Taiwan, Hong 
Kong, Thailan d, Sing a p ore and the 
Philippines. The system also in- 
cludes eights between Los Angeles 
and destinations in Australia and 
New Zealand. ■ 

The United-Pan Am transaction 
must still be approved by the Japa- 
nese and other countries, where 
United needs landing rights. 

President Ronald Reagan has 60 
days in which he could reverse tire 
approval derision, but government 
sources said ihai was tmlikdy since 
he may do so only on narrow 
grounds of Foreign relations or na- 
tional defense, and not on econom- 
ic or competitive’ arguments. 

James J. Hartigan, United’s 

president and chief executive offi- 
cer, said the order from Boeing was 
the largest single phne order in the 

(Cbotnmed on P*se lX CoL 5) 


JAL Airliner 
Goes Astray 
Near Soviet 


[ohn Burgess 

tyasbngitm Post Service 

TOKYO — Soviet fighter jets 
were scrambled last week as a Ja- 
pan Air Lines jetliner strayed off 
course with 132 people aboard and 

r reached ftiltluhn Island near 
spot where the Soviet Union 
shot down a Korean Air Linesjet in 
1983, Japanese officials said Thurs- 
day. 

The Japanese jet’s crew on tire 
Ocl 31 flight discovered they had 
made a navigational error and cor- 
rected their course before the air- 
liner improperly entered Soviet air- 
space, tire officials said. The plane 
never came into contact with the 
Soviet fighters. 

- “The incident happened due to 
insufficient checking by the pilot,” 
Hideo Hirasawa, the airline's man - 
aging director, said Thursday. “We 
are going to make strung efforts 
that it does not happen again.” 

The pilot, Morihiko Nishiola, 
39, appeared Thursday before re- 
porters and said: ”1 deeply apolo- 
gize that my mistake causal so 
much trouble. I deeply regret it. I 
wish to go back and stan my career 
from Square One: I am teni- 
ashamed.” 

incident recalled Korean Air 
Lines Flight 007, which was shot 
down Sept. 1, 1983, by a fighter oil 
Sakhalin after Dying through Sovi- 
et airspace. All 269 people aboard 
were killed. 

Moscow contended that the Ko~ 
mission. 
Korea have 
denied that and said it was proba- 
bly off course due to navigational 
error. 

Last week’s incident came sever- 
al weeks after the Soviet Union, 
United States and Japan signed a 
special air safety agreement to help 
prevent recurrence of the Korean 
Air Lines tragedy along the Siberi- 
an coastline, which is bcavfly trav- 
eled by commercial and military 
aircraft 

Officials from the three countries 
are «fli discussing technical details 
and it has not gone into effect 
Nonetheless. Japanese officials 
said the Soviet handling of the inci- 
dent suggested a change in attitude. 

“The spirit of the agreement was 
behind the resolution of this inci- 
dent, " a Japanese Foreign Ministry 

(Combined on Page 5, CoL 2) 


Caller in Beirut Says L ,S. Hostages 
Are Dead; Police Doubt It Is True 


By Ihsan A. Hijozi 

V« Yurie Times Semcc 

BEIRUT — An anonymous call- 
er purporting to represent the Is- 
lamic Jihad guerrilla group told a 
Western news agency on Thursday 
that the Moslem fundamentalist 
group had derided to kill its Amcri- 
can hostages. 

In a second call a few hours bier, 
an Arabic-speaking man claimed 
that the “execution” had been car- 
ried out and that the bodies of the 
victims were dumped in the Cola 
quarter of West Beirut. But a 
search of the area turned up no 
corpses. 

Police said the claim should be 
treated with caution. Analysts say 
that Islamic Jihad may be trying to 
increase pressure on the United - ' 


States to gain the c-f po rt- 
ers held In Kuwait. lae grc-ip u> 
believed to be nuie up of Shiite 
Moslem activists \y : sl to trie Irani- 
an religious leader. A; a v! iris Ru- 
hollab Khomeini 
The analysts said that ri the kid- 
nappers really intended to *tii: the 
hostages they would have done so 
without issuing a warring 
la the first call Thursday, the 
man read on: a brief statement :n 
Arabic in which he said the organi- 
zation had derided to “execuie the 
American hosLxges 'ey a firing 
squad.” 

The decision was made because 
“the negotiations that have beer, 
conducted indirectly between us 
and America have airiv ed a: a dead 
end." the mar. said. 

He called the United State: “the 


enemy of Siam." and warned that 
'the ere cf the American hostages 
will r.o! be the lost.” 

“We shall shak e the earth under 
the feet of .America and its agents." 
he said. 

He promised to telephone again 
at i P.M. “in connection wilh the 
status of the corpses of the .Ameri- 
can hostages.” 

On Oct. 4. a typewritten state- 
ment signed by Islamic Jihad and 
distributed to i he local press said 
the group had killed an American 
captive. The slatement identified 
him as William Buckley, a political 
officer 2 t the U.S. Embassy who 
was abducted in Moslem-con- 
trolled West Beirut in March 1984. 

l! said he was murdered in re- 
venge for the Israeli air strike 

(Continued on Page & CoL 4) 


Tre Aiz-.ruZcJ her. 

BOGOTA — The president of 
Colombia’s Supreme Conn and 41 
other persons were found dead 
Thursday inside the Justice Minis- 
try after soldiers using dynamite 
blasted their way into die building 
in an attempt to end a two-day 
siege by leftist guerrillas, Colombi- 
an radio stations reported, quoting 
military officials. 

Soldiers freed *S hostages after 
the assault, the radio stations said, 
but rebels were still holding out in 
the charred and smoldering build- 
ing and apparently suii bolding 
captives. 

The bodies of 42 persons were 
found inside the mini sir. when sol- 
diers entered, radio station RCN 
said, quoting army officers who 
had been inside. 

The dead included Alfonso 
Reyes, the Supreme Court presi- 
dent. according to Caracol and 
RCN radio stations, again quoting 
military authorities. 

The report did not say how many 
of the dead were hostages o: hew 
they might have died. 

The army said earlier that 17 
persons had died in the fighting 
since the siege began. If radio re- 
ports are true. 59 people have died. 

[.An army spokesman said that 
the leader of the M-19 guerrillas in 
the building. .Andres Al mantles, 
had been killed, Reuters reported. 

[Earlier unconfirmed reports 
said Mr. Almarales. a co-founder 
of the rebel army 15 years ago. had 
been captured.]' 

Radio station Tnddar said the 
guerrillas shot Judge Reyes on 
Thursday morning. The station did 
not give the source of its informa- 
tion. 

Rebels with the M-19 guerrilla 
movement shot their way into the 
building Wednesday, trapping sev- 
eral hundred persons. 


Soldiers rescued 3? hosmgss 
Thursday after the army used dy- 
namite to blast through mminry 
walls. RCN and Caracol said. 

Several guerrillas remained :c- 
sde the palace and there apparent*' 
ly were still hostages inside, the 
radio stations said, quoting ar 
army coicneL .Aifcnso PJaaas" 

After blasting into the palace 
Thursday, troops rushed indue ar.d 
fought their way up to the rebels’ 
fourth-floor stronghold, where the 
leftists were reportedly holding ft, 
hostages, including the Supreme 
Court president and seven 'other 
judges. 

Gunfire between the two sides 
was sc- heavy Thursday u almost 
drowned out radio reporters an the 
air from positions itiO yards i9! 
meters i away. 

Troop assaults Wednesday freed 
scores of captives. Then. Thursday 
morning, troops freed sever gov- 
ernment drivers in a brief baliie, 
the mayor's office reported. 

The rebels had sent one of ib: 
federal judges. ReynaJco .Arcirae- 
gas. outside the minis ir- Thursday 
with a message for Preiicent Bsj- 
sartu Beiancur. Colonel Plazas 'ric 
in a broadcast interview with RCN. 

Colcne! Plazas said the rebels 
claimed in the note that they had "0 
combatants inside the building arc 
enough weapons and ammunition 
for a long siege. 

The rends, according to Coiond 
Plazas, said they wanted President 
Beiancur to name his brother. Fed- 
eral Judge Jaime Beiancur. and 
Senator Jose Manuel Arias to me- 
diate the standoff. 

A source close to the president 
said that the government would no: 
negotiate with the insurgents of the 
April 19 Movement, known here as 
M-19. 

The movement takes its name 

(Continued on Pay 5, CoL Sj 


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Gorbachev and His Family 
Attend Red Square Parade 

Mikhail S. Gorbadiev watched his first Revolution Day 
parade as the Soviet leader from atop Lenin’s tomb 
Thursday as troops, tanks and missile carriers passed 
through Moscow’s Red Square in light rain. Standing 
before tbe microphones and taking the salute was Defense 
Minister Sergei L. Sokolov'; Mr. Gorbachev was at his 
right, and to Mr. Sokolov's left were President .Andrei A. 
Gromyko, Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov and 
Mengistu Haile Mariam, the Ethiopian leader. Western 
diplomats said that several new weapons systems were 
displayed. Al left, Mr. Gorbachev's daughter. Irina, his 
granddaughter, Oksana, and his son-in-law looked on. 


Tr» •uo o ofwi 


Winston Lord: On to Beijing, at Last 

U.S- Envoy Was Instrumental in Changing China Policy 


By Jane Gross 

JKpv York Times Semce 

NEW YORK —Bette Bao Lord 
cannot lock at the photograph 
without laughing. There, on a wall 
of her Park Avenue duplex, her 

husband, Winston, is playing ping- 
pong with Henry A. Kissinger, 
Doth of their faces’ grim with deter- 
mination. 

Mr. Lord may have won that 
game — his wife does not recall — 
bit be lost tbe next, a mismatch 
arranged by Mr. Kissinger with a 
C hinese champion as the oppo- 
nent. 

"Henry went around telling the 
Chinese that Winston was a good 
pingpong player,** Mrs. Lord said, 
shaking her head at the temerity of 
such an assertion. “That’s like cell- 
ing the Russians you’re a good bal- 
let dancer.” 

The photograph of Mil Lord is 
one of many in the couple's Man- 
hattan apartment that could sene 
as his rtsumi for the position of 
ambassador to C hina, a post he is 
expected to take up soon. 

The Senate approved his nomi- 


nation Tuesday night after Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan intervened to 
break a five-week impasse caused 
by the opposition or Senator Jesse 
Hchns. 

The North Carolina Republican 
bad blocked Mr. Lord’s confirma- 
tion in an attempt to win assur- 
ances from the administration that 
it would provide no aid to China's 
population control programs. 

In a gallery off the foyer of the 
apartment, there is Mr. Lord greet- 
ing Richard M. Nixon or Gerald R. 
Ford, shaking hands wilh Pope 
John Paul II. smiling with Zhou 
Enlai or Mao Zedong, and leaving 
the house in Paris where the Viet- 
nam peace treaty was negotiated. 

“I'm really a generalist,” said 
Mr: Lord, who most recently was 
president of the Council on For- 
eign Relations and was formerly 
one of Mr. Kissinger’s lop advisers 
on the National Security Council 
and in the State Department in the 
years when relations were reopened 
with China. “Tm not a China ex- 
pert in the sense that's it’s my sole 
preoccupation. But 1 was some- 


body with a world view cf how it ill 
fit together." 

“He's not a China specialist ir. 
the sense of being a scholar." said 
Mrs. Lord, a native c: Shanghai 
and the best-selling author of sev er- 
al books, among them “Spring 
Moon,” a saga of her homeland” 
"What he was able to do was inte- 
grate China's Opening into interna- 
tional policy.” 

Mr. Lord's passion for China, a 
matter of accident more than de- 
sign. has nonetheless been the cen- 
terpiece of his career. .After gradu- 
ating magna cum iaude from Yale 
and first in his class from the 
Fletcher School of Law zed Diplo- 
macy, Mr. Lord, now 4£. excelled 
at the State Depanzcen: and the 
Defense Department in matters 
unrelated to China, and a: one 
point was warned that his marriage 
would prohibit an assignment re- 
lated to China. 

By the time Mr. Lord joiaod Mr. 
Kissinger's staff in 1965. suca pro- 
hibitions no longer existed. He 
traveled with his best cr. asd Mr. 



CIA Is Said to Tell Panel 
Of Erring on Defector 


Winston Lord 

Niton and Mr. Ford, on rune dip- 
lomatic missions to Beijing. 

“Of ali the things 1 did,” Mr. 
Lord said in the interview earlier 
this year, “that certainly was the 
most dramatic i a all of its human 
and emotional dimensions. You 
can argue that was one of the most 
impsT-aru geopolitical events in 
history — the world’s most popu- 
lous nation and the world's most 
powerful nation, groping inward 

ctsii other.” 


By Ronald J. Oscrow 

Lea An teles Times Sen: re 

WASHINGTON — ClA offi- 
cials have acknowledged that the 
ag,ency made mistakes in its han- 
dling of Vitaly Yurchenko, the de- 
fector who returned to the Soviet 
Union, and agreed to appoint an 
independent expert :o review' its 
actions, according to a spokesman 
for the Senate Select Committee on 
Intelligence. 

“The committee’s conclusion 
was that security was lax." the 
spokesman said Wednesday after 
“working-level” GA officials pri- 
vately briefed the pane! Tuesday 
night. He said die officials prom- 
ised to give the committee the re- 
sults of the review in six weeks. 

While ClA officials refused to 
specify any agency errors, the com- 
mittee spokesman said, the CIA 
officials who briefed the committee 
"were very straightforward. They 
said some mistakes were made.” 

A CIA spokesman declined 10 
comment on the briefing, citing a 

“very firm” agency policy against 


talking about any aspect of the 
Yurchenko matter. 

Mr. Yurchenko, whom u.5. au- 
thorities have identified is the head 
of the KGB intelligence operation 
in North .America, bearded a spe- 
cial Aeroflot jet at Dulles Interna- 
tional Airport on Wednesday and 
flew to Moscow after U S. officials 
had determined that he m. an ted 
return to the Soviet Union of j.i> 
own volition. 

Mr. Yurchenko, 50, held a press 
conference Monday inside ihr So- 
viet Embassy here and accused 
U.S. intelligence agent? of abduct- 
ing him. drugging him and holding 
him against his will until he man- 
aged to escape Saturday. The Unit- 
ed States has called lhc-.-e allega- 
tions false. 

Some current and former intelli- 
gence officials said Wednesday 
[“.at the ioss of Mr. Yurchenko 
shows the need for the CIA to get 
“bad; to the basics" in handling 
Communist-bloc defectors. 

TV. cited what they rejiard as 

(Continued on Page 3. CoL ?> 







Page 2 


U.S. Officials Describe 
A Combative Gorbachev 
Preparing for Reagan 



By Bernard Gwertzman 

•'Vh York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — With less 
than two weeks remaining before 
the Geneva meeting between Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev, there is only the 
slimmest possibility that the’ talks 
will produce more than a thorough 


backdrop to what now seems to be 
the main goal of the summit meet- 
ing: having Mr. Reagan and Mr. 
Gorbachev get to know each other 
and the issues better, and to agree 
on the need to keep in contact on a 
more regular basis. 

But the hopes expressed recently 
by some American officials that an 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVTflvrmru 8, 1985 

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discussion of e^d i side's views. agreement on arms-control princi- 


L T .S. officials who attended talks in P les might be worked out along 
Moscow said. with a communique on East-West 

They also said there was a radons that did more than list 
chance there could be some accords differences seemed to have been 
on modest issues. dashed, officials said. 

Secretary’ or Stale George P. , Mr. Gorbachev struck the Amer- 
Shultz and Robert G McFarlane. '“mi . 35 mugh and intelligent, 
the national security adviser, re- American officials said, but not 
turned to Washington on Wednes- we ^ rersed on foreign affairs and 



iV » MUi VU CUXi W 

day to report to Mr. Reagan about ^ nns control 

their two davs in Moscow. They A l0 P -American official corn- 

said the discussions in Moscow- plained Wednesday about the con- 


their two days in Moscow. They 
said the discussions in Moscow- 
ended with the United States and 
the Soviet Union still far apart on 
arms control issues and regional 
disputes. 


tinued Soviet demand for an end to 
the space-based missile defense 
program. The Kre mlin leadership 
“really hasn’t yet absorbed the 


Viktor P. Karpov, left, tfae chief Soviet arms negotiator, 
faced U.S. arms negotiators Thursday in Geneva to begin 
the final session of talks before a meeting of die leaders of 


the two countries. The U.S. team standing on the other side 
of the table is, from left, John G. Tower, an unidentified 
translator. Max M. Kampelman and Maynard W. GStman. 


UU|.>UiUT. “ J * J “V9VI UJl* 

U.S. officials indicated that the technical aspects of arms control. 
American side in Moscow was an- nor die conceptual aspects of deter- 


noyed by the way Mr. Gorbachev, 
the Soviet leader, handled himself 
in a four- hour meeting Tuesdav 
with Mr. Shultz and others. 


rence," he said. 

The senior official said Mr. Gor- 
bachev believed that “American 
policy is heavily influenced by a 


OUUi U. OU.U UUICId, * — — _ B 

Mr. Gorbachev was said to have circle of extremists who are 
struck Mr. Shultz and Mr. McFar- anti-Soviet" 


EC Must Pay London, Dublin Are Reported dose 

Informant of To an Accord on Northern Ireland 

Price-Fixing London -^Britain ^ 


“ . . Reuters 


States that was as offensive to the 
administration as Mr. Reagan's de- 
piction of the Soviet Union as an , - . • oisciosea netans at m«.ai nnrv nr 

evil empire was to the Kr emlin. lhe Soviet system, was more than bv the Swiss 
The officials said Mr. Gorbachev- ready to live with it and that this mike? HoffiSSu 
sought tojoust with Mr. Shultzand «* not recognized by Moscow. T 

Mr. McFarlane about what he said Andean officials said there was had faiW?o?mt^f SET? 

was the mili tan-industrial complex 3 3ack of concrete suggestions on ^ 3 f Q ?_ executive 

running the United States. He was arms control from the Soviet side in 

eager to get his ideological points Mmw* and suggested that the ^ ItofdeSdE 

across, the officials said and often So™ leadership had made a po- identified him as the infer- 

burst into the conversation without Bcv decision not to make any im- 

waiting to hear what Mr. Shuliz P°rtant agreements with the Unit- . 7“ e 0356 I s ^ l" 1151 m 'vhich an 
hadiosav. ed States before the Communist individual has successfully sued the 

The officials said there was un- Part y congress due in February. commission, the European Corn- 
certain ty over whether the two Nevertheless, the officials said “unity's executive body, for dam- 
sides would conclude a cultural- ^at for the first time in anv high- ®g®s after a breach of confidence. 

I . . C« A r r “l om IKnJimrA.4 *• I/. 4 J 


Easi-West relations.”'' 

The official insisted that Mr. 


to pay damages of about 500,000 
pounds (S715.000) to a Briton who 


Reagan, though not an adorer of a ° nt0fl T° 

the Soriet system, was moretLm of *** P nce ^7 

ready to live with k and rh*. ,h;, m S. b > *5. Swiss phannacenucal 


maker Hoffmann- La Roche & Co. 

The court said the commission 
had failed to pro tea Stanley Ad- 


i r»vir>r»vT * !T. . firess ^ a two-hour meeting be- bor Party, boycotts the local Parlia- 

LONDON — Bntam and Ire- tween Sir Geoffrey Howe, the Brit- mem, where the province’s 941,000 
kind are dose to a pact aimed at ish foreign secretary, Tom King, Protestants have an absolute ma- 
drawing the Irish republic into the the Northern Ireland secretary, and jority. 
search for peace m Northern Ire- Deputv Prime Minister Dick a hn»t an pe ^ Son ^ m . a w 5y ■^f fS ?.° ar L was 

land, official Irish and British Spring and Foreign Minister pier n n ^Sri ,u 

sources said Thursday Barry of Ireland populaoon has openly swi tched its prison by a U.S. judge who sari Ac 

They said details of the agree- BritSi and tosh ministers hav* 5*5?2 ? SSrSSIS 1- con ^ onshadbeen ^ se f °°" aB 
ment were discussed Wedmsday been meeting regularly for a year to SLUS** SmSs?. 3?!^ , to pemn than rea- 

by senior ministers from both devise an approach tomdingMlit- Carter has been mpnscm 

countries in London in preparation ical violenoein Ulster thafficost “^^^y and g° veEQ ^ t£rom nearly 20 years, 
for a meeting between Prime Min- 2^500 lives since 1969. 

ister Garret FitzGerald of Ireland The aim is to give Dublin a Brilish officials suggest that a 
and Prime Minister Margaret meaningful role in the British-ruled new arran S emenl ^ith Dublin 
Thatcher of Britain. North to encournee ihe Gathnlir- woald ta ^ e the form of ajoint min- 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Guinea-Bissau Aides Accused of Hot 

BANJUL, Gambia (Renters}. — Guinea-Bissau’s first vice prisktot 
and other officials, inriading a top army p ornmanri e r , have been an esijg 
fof plotting to overthrow PresicteQt Jo£o Bernardo Vieira, accmding to 

monitored broadcasts of Kssaa ndkt. . . 

State radio in PortngaL the former colonial power, said Paulo Conria. 
the first vice president; Tne Nambanga, the cc mnumdcr ofgie N ovember 
14th Tank Brigade; Tagme Nawae, the military police co mmander , and 
the head of the presidential household bad beoa detrioed. ^ 

Quo ting Bissau radio and its correspondem in the West Afritam state, 
it said that the plot was started more than a year ago by Mr: Correia, and a 
supreme court judge, Yiriafo Rodrigues. Mr. Correia was. arrested 
Wednesday, it said. 

Japanese Says EC Relations Are Tense 

TOKYO (AF) — A Foreign Mbnstzy official describing Trillions 
between Japan and the European Community as very tense, said Thurs- 
day that a ministerial meeting next week could provide a chance to xfijje 
differences. ■ 

The official who spoke on condition that he not be named, also sari 
Japan could not accept a request by the EC Co un ci l of Ministers that 
Japan announce targets for increased imports from the community, 
European officials have sharply- criticized Japan for its penastou 
surpluses in trade with the EC The Europeans estimate the surplus was 
1 5 billion European currency units (S 12.8 biEBon) last year. During a visit 
by Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone of Japan to Brussels in July. 
Jacques Dekns, president of the EC Cammssian, proposed a nimiaeria] 
conference to discuss economic relations between Japan and the 10- 
nation community. It will be held in Tokyo on Nov. 15. 

Judge Orders Release ci Rubin Carter 

NEWARK, New Jersey (UPI>— 

Rubin (Hurricane} Carter, the 
black middleweight boxer convict- 
ed twice of murdering three white 
persons in a New Jersey bar, was 


North ’ U.S. District Judge a Lee Saio- 

British officials suggest that a Idn ordered Mr. Carter, 48, freed 
new arrangement with Dublin on hail, ruling that the boxer and 
would take the form of a joint min - his co-defendant, John Artis, were 
isterial commission through which denied their civil ri ghts in P a p a ir: 

DifMrrt nmnlJ Uai.a «■ — ■* JT* . . -“-V- ! 1 1 


eager to get his ideological points Moscow, and suggested that the 
across, the officials said, and often So™ 1 leadership had made a po- 
burst into the conversation without ^ decision not to make any im- 
waiting to hear what Mr. Shultz P 01 ^ 1 agreements with the Unit- 
had to say. ed Slates before the Communist 

The officials said there was un- Party congress due in February, 
certainty over whether the two Nevertheless, the officials said 
sides would conclude a cultural- ^ at f° r the first time in anv hieh- 


□y that identified him as the infor- the end of November. 


hatcher of Britain. North to encourage the Catholic 

The meeting is expected before minority to return to the political 
le end of November. mainstream without provoking a 

« I II. , , . _ r D 


J'VJWI -VUIU LVUUUUC a VUlLUIBi- . _ — — — — U1 ■ m gil- 

exchange accord and some other ' eve l Sovict-.American meeting, im- 
pacts. such as a consular exchange 111311 risk 1 * was discussed at length, 
in Kiev- and New York, in the re- At the talks Monday, Mr. Shultz 
maining time before the Geneva P 0101 ^ 031 that the United States 


meeting Nov. 19 and 20. 

Such agreements could provide a 


Leftists in Belgium 
Say Aim of Attacks 
Is to Crush State 


BRUSSELS — The Fighting 
Communist Cells, an extreme Iefr- 


was a nation of immigrants and 
that politicians reflect the stronglv 
held .American belief that people 
should have a right to emigrate. 

In response, the Soviet foreign 
m i ni ster, Eduard A. Shevardnadze, 
and Mr. Gorbachev countered with 
the Soviet view that human rights 
was best served by full employ- 
ment. free medical and educational 
services and inexpensive hous ing, 
which the Soviet Union provides its 
citizens. 

■ Gorbachev Expresses Hope 


ist group that has claimed responsi- M* - - Gorbachev told guests at a 
bQity for attacks on four banks in Kremlin reception Thursday that 


reception Thursday that 


lV1 VU 1UU| UallULd ill IMU4 0UUJ UX42il 

Belgium this week, said in a state- * BW ^e opportunity for a “fruit- 


ment received Thursday by news 
organizations that it intends to 
crush what it called the “bour- 
geois” state. 

The seven-page statement ear- 


ful” summit meeting! The Wash- 
ington Post reported. 

Mr. Gorbachev called for an in- 
ternational climate that would help 
remove “distrust hatred and suspi- 

mrin M rhd 


tied photographs of the four banks don,” the official Soviet press 
bombed on Monday and Tuesday, agency Tass said, 
and the group said it would not “If a businesslike, constructive 
compromise in its effort to set up a approach — and we are ready for it 
dictatorship of the proletariat. — prevails, then the forthcoming 
The statement was sent to news S? 5 ??, 8 m ? eneva ““Y prove to be 
organizations from Charleroi, f™ 11 ™ 1 “w toward unprov- 
wfaere two of the attacks took ,ntera auonaJ situation,” he 


individual has successfully sued the 
commission, the European Com- 
munity's executive body, for dam- 
ages after a breach of confidence. 

“I am vindicated,” Mr. Adams 
said after the verdict. 

“This was a fight so the little 
man and woman will not be fright- 
ened by money, power or govern- 
ments," he said. 

Mr. Adam's began supplying the 
commission in 1973 with docu- 
ments detailing illegal price-fixing 
and market sharing by La Roche in 
the European vitamin market, 
which it dominates. 

His disclosure led to a fine of the 
equivalent of S360.000 for the Ba- 
sel-based company for breaking 
EC trade laws. 

La Roche reamed by bringing a 
charge of industrial espionage 
against Mr. Adams, who was ar- 
rested when he entered Switzerland 
from Italy in 1974. He was released 
on bail three months later. 

His wife Marilene, 31, commit- 
ted suicide while be was awaiting 
trial after bang told by police that 
he could be jailed for 20 years. Mr. 
Adams lata was given a one-year 
suspended sentence. 

The European Court ruled Mr. 


m - -- — W. ■ . . VIV’VAUiX a 

We are not qinte there yet,” one backlash from the Protestant ma- 
or the sources said. “There are still jority. 


some outstanding issues but we are 
getting close.” 

They said there had been pro- 


Dublin would have a consultative County trials in 1967 and 1976. 
role in the North’s affairs. A bartender ^d two patrons is 

Protestant leaders see this as the the Lafayette Bar and GnD in Pat- 
firs: step toward eventual Irish uni- erson were killed by pistol and 


— niLuvui ptUVlfXtilig al . . . .. ,, ” , J — * 

icklash from the Protestant ma- ro e m North s affairs. a bartender and two patrons in 

nty- Protestant leaders see this as the the Lafayette Bar and GriH in Pat- 

The group rep resmiting most of first step toward eventual Irish uni- erson were killed by pistol and 
Northern Ireland 1 s 563.000 Catbo- fi cation and have warned that there shotgun fire on June 17, 1966. The 
tics, the Social Democratic and La- could be violent opposition. prosecution . argued the IriHings 




Arafat Issues 
limits on 
Violence 


prosecution argued the killings 
were racially motivated and carried 
out in revenge for die slaying of a 
black bartender. The case became a 


Rabin (Hnnicane}Oa^er 


cause ctlfcbce, and in 1975IWbDy- 
lan recorded a song chttriag the 
boxer had been framed. . 


Xe h York Times Service 

CAIRO — Yasser Arafat said 
Thursday that the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization opposed terror- 
ist acts against unarmed Chilians 
anywhere and that violators would 
be pu n ish e d for carrying out at- 
tacks outside Israeli-held lands. 

“The PLO denounces and con- 


Bowen Nominated to Succeed Heftier f . 

WASHINGTON (AP) — A fanner governor of Indhu£e^Nnr K, : t 
Bowen, has been nominated as secretary of (he DcpartnralSf Hwdft f 
and Human Services, Preadent Ronald Reagan amwuncetfThnraday. • j. 
The appomtment must be ccmfumed by the USu Senate. : - V ... 

Mr. Bowen, 67, would succeed Mnpret M. Heckler, who last month 
acceded to Mr. Reagan’s request that she resign the cabinet post t? j ’ 
become ambassador to Ireland. Mr. Bowen is duncal professorofS# j v’ 


_ — 4 J - —— ****** UMi vauiiibl UUM, UJ|_ 

Mwine ambassador to Ireland, Mr. Bowen is dimcai professoral faw 
medicare at tfte Indiatut Unraratfy School of Medicme. . 

The forme- governor, who also served 14 years in the Indiana Geaeial 
Assembly, would take ovw die government’s hugest agency, wMi a 
budget of $348 billion and about 130,000 employees. 


^ puuiouwi ,vi uujjymg OUI ax- r v ■ 1 n Wi-fc * ■ ’ . 

tacks outside Israeli-held lands. liUlCD iTOpOSe 12 a& Afi0 Ol Consent ‘ 

innocentS^wh^Ae ^ ^ 1,01 ^ 

PLO chairman smdaftCTmeetiae SSSj 9 &J£L 1 * Nfimstiy spokeswoinan said 

with President Hosni Mubarak of SS^?™ 001811 S8ld a J e P ro P osaI be submitted to the 

nosm Muoaraic ot parhament m Fdnuary as part rf an overidl revision of laws on sex. 

Anotbo* proposal would make 


....... /wwuOTpiOTosat would make r^c between married partners an offense 

agency tass saio. '-ourx xuieu Mr. n» Am**** ft*. . “i^ - AraIat aIe<1 a 1974 PLO Adnaan Kaland, a spokesman for the Christian Democrats, the saaor 

“tf a businesslike, constructive bUme “ Yasser Arafat, left, with President Hosni Mubarak of Eevot 811 SS 0 ® - m ^ S*™™ 8 said his party was “not at all pleased” 

approach —and we arc ready for it ^ because he did not warn the ^ ^ watr i Mld o mni#orv operauons and all forms of tenor- ^th proposals to lower the age of consent. 

— prevails, then the forthimina commission that, the documents he mey a ™l«taiy air show at a base in the Sahara, ism.” He said the organization now 

meeting in Geneva may prove to be supplied could identify him, and " was reaffirming “the en mmi twv^t /> ** — 

fruitful vwt unu : ... awarded him rtnTv ahruil half nf tk A 


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fruitful and serve toward improv- 
ing the international situation,” he 
said. 

■ Talks Galled Productive 
The chief U.S. arms control ne- 
gotiator, Max M. Kampe lman, stid 
Thursday that the final round of 


pms talks with the Soviet Union such actions. 


awarded him only about half of the 
950,000 pounds he had sought in 
da m a g es and lost earnings. 

The commissioa had denied the 
charges, maintaining that there was 
no breach of confidence and that, 
in any event, the case was older 
than the five-year time limi t for 


before the summit was productive, 
Reuters reported from Geneva. 
But he also said that Washington 


The information supplied by Mr. 
Adams included details of price- 
fixing agreements between La 


T •! ri 1 1 rx ai -m “.ad ns mstituttons and factions tc 

Libya Could Strike Back ™” asoftodJy ™ llKlkl 

A tt all punitive measures against viola- 

At U.S., Qadhafi Warns 

operations and “unarmed inno- 

__ ne Ax3 ctio:ai press terrorism” and “totally opposed to F 6111 civilians anywhere” seemed to 

TRIPOLI, Libya — Colonel hijackings.” ' imply that the only attacks the PLO 

Moamer DaHTipfi cai/T Tkn«wJ M > Q n « -j «* ■ . « nnw rvmcS/l»rr m. 


-- -- D UCLWCCH La 

would prefer being closer to agree- Roche and six other European drug 
ment on nuclear missfles and space companies to keep up vitamin 


weapons. 

The U.S. goal remained “to ob- 


Moamer Qadhafi said Thursday But he condemned the United now considers ; acceptable would be 
133 tjf reports of U.S. plans to de- States for intercepting and forcing kunched against the military or 
stabilize Libya were true, Libyans down the Egyptian plane carry ing security forces in Israel or the terri- 
would be forced to “subvert Ameri- the four hijackers and a PLO offi- ^ 11 occupies in the West Bank 
ca from the inside." . - — _ . 


wdi rcai r i rmm g me commitment p T tt . •« T _ 

c^a^s^titutions and factions to vxTeece Is Urged, to JLet Bulgarians Stef 

The PLO as of today wfll take 

^tire^agLtviota- gr^Si 

His use of the phrases “outside autiwriti^^ 

operations and “unarmed inno- Turkish minority. It said Yusuf Bilalov Said Mr rtti 

cent riwtians anywhere” seemed to Mestanwcc^ 

imply that the only attacks the PLO against human rights abuses there. nuigana for speakmgoot 

now considers acap table would be Amnesty International said it had Men testimonv fmm iK* ow 
launched against the milimrv nr arrests and dearh« dnrino « testimony rrom^the men Mont 


prices. 

The case was made into a televi- 


se four hijackers and a PLO offi- ^ 11 occupies in 
dal from Cairo after the surrender 311(1 *be Gaza Strip. 


tam deepwts m offensive nuclear son film in Britain recently, and 
weapoiu, Mr. Kampelman said. Mr. Adams wrote a book about the 
The Talks resume Jan. 16. affair. 


v JUltUlULt 

Me said a Washington Post re- of the suspects. 

hT? Rea 8 an “fi is very grave and serious thai 

^ l ° Um3er " SUch 3 co ™ tl T * engaged in acts of 


In Geneva 
one hotel is both 
intimate and international. 
And the location is superb. 

HOTEL 

INTERCONTINENTAL 

GENEVE 


.7'7v . we nave always uuu m an possroie ways wrm the 

J; “ J|f “ty America is om tried in good faith to have relations aim of the withdrawal of thelsrae- 

rr. _ should be confronted, with America, but you can't reason lis from these lands.” 

Reagan m Mr * "*? Amenran govemmenL" .[A senior aide to Mr. Mubarak 

“fftinb S « a Colonel Qadhafi said that such satd that, in Egypt’s view, Mr.Ara- 

violatKrf tklfijl 3 ^ XT ^ “** 8® ve Libya and other Arab fat’s statement renouncing violence 

th _ 3 ^ nations the “justification" to “unite applied to Israel Rwtore report- 

SLtel. ESSTLiSJ *• to - ^Vncrican ed.] ^ 


think he should be tried according 
to American law," Colonel Qadhafi 
said at a news conference attended 
by Western, Libyan and Sudanese 
reporters. 

Later, speaking to Western tele- 
virion reporters, he went further. 


. ... , [Osama d-Baz, a presidential ad- 

He was asked what the Libyan viser, said the statement confined 
response would be should a genu- PLO military operations to' the Is- 
me plot be uncovered against his raeli -occupied West Bank and 

nn w in nwn l nr hie lifii n n. - i 


reiterated the Palestinians’ right 

“to fight against the Israeli occupa- p ^ 

tion in all possible ways with the a: OT UtG K6COrd 

aim of the withdrawal of thelsrae- -tv- . c _ . .? V'- 

hs from these lands.” UniOTa ff««J to resnme aamiai coated 

[A senior aide to Mr. Mubarak The reswrm rim? 00 dangerous rnriri^t^ atjea. ■ 

said that, in Egypt’s view, Mt!aS- ■«?. after SiuS, Jl£ 

Fat s statement renouncing violence a 3<Mioar J? 3 ^ rea ^ own in the taflss. . : (AP&. 

gpl^d «. IsraeL Reu,™ 



reponers. government or his life. Gaza Strip;] 

virim^SS^L 10 V T£L** ~ U ^ reaches that The PLO has been accused of 

“If itWu^we^vrTn stage t „ th 5, f* lb y a ° P«>P le are involyement in several recent vio- 
““*« to fight, he armed, Colonel Qadhafi said, lent incidents, including the Ocl 7 
said, according to an official Liby- “There are more than a million hijacking of an iStn^Sin 
“, ust , subvert Libyans in arms and the whole na- the AdJle Lauro, in which a oSh 
d«.wiu fight- 

elaborate. I “ ■ — — 

American passenger a^afd the Gulf Rulers Wamof f Esa 

Adriile Lauro, the Italian cruise * 


111 Tmtay on ThmKjff. 

attevSi^ ! Sr IOO * d if il W 

confined to barracks 

tentatively scheduled for JaTn ^ Presidential deetkas 

— ' (Re am). 


Supreme Court in U.S. 


GidfBulers Wamof 'Escalation’ in Iranrlran War I 

By John Kifncr accomplishmenr and repeated the CouncO was unease th«ttu*u a- ^ 

SaSyasasi 

WASHINGTON -"ita Si- S WMethu^ Arab Golf state tave 24h^Tj.* ^w S’". 

Freedom of navigation in its n-aiere. ^ ! 

Constitution prohibits states from “ats^thar there “aiwSnSSSL* ^ 

regulating priate sexual activities “« te !J onsm 111 ^ Middle -East ^ would like to mm , A military sndkfaSn named ! X 

were the major topics at the sixth Saudi Arabia, Shetkhlssa nons with Iran, lareelv mu,?; *>y L 

meeting of the Gulf Cooperation •* Jcn Sahaan al-Khalifa, the emir of warding attacks INA, sanity 

CoS officials and Bahrain, Steikh Khalifa bid h“ Su? " atteni P te * nu^ TL^l 

>aid. mad al-Tham of Qatar, Sheikh a™.-,, ' . Nfisan , fO'hh, the east _ rfi 

n.. ^ Zayed ben Sultan aiSahyaTSS ijSv./' 


- -“v hi, iha.ul BMia- oitt In^fTiiir na- 
tion" of the Iran-lraq war threat- tL, hhet f . . • _ _ wa ' 

ened the stability of the region and , «« Arab Gulf 

freedom of navigation in its watere. 


regulating prfrate sexual activities ^fonsm m the Middle- East ^wiwgatoffMflerewOTKmg 
between consenting adults. **" ^ “«h S4 3 £J 3U * Shetkh Issa 

The coun announced Mondw S 661 ™® Cooperation ben Salman al-Khahfa, the emir of 

that it would hear a case challeni Council officials and diplomats Bahram, Siakh KMifa bm Ha- 

in* a Georam law ih». d-Ham of Qatar, Shrikh 


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ing a Georgia law that prohibits “ M ta wJ-SBLT 1 ? 

oral and anal sex and is enforced But the communique issued is ruler of Abu Dhabi 
aW abusively against homo- Wednesday at theendof the four- of SSd^S^SSd 

JSS* 1 ”■ day session disclosed little specific Sheikh Jabgal-Ahmed 

I Kuwait 


. - — -j™ amts of this — _ me souia-canau 

“ore evenhanded toS? 3t unspea&A 

5!2to»to ^ 


^ uic statement kwvd north. 

^dnaday noting that .tkJd£! said Uw fictai* 

^eto^the recent escalation” an. Hawizahmarriwi 


\ \ 






** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDA Y, NOVEMBER S, 1985 


Page 3 


*4U \\A 






•C „ 

T-w ( ' _ . 


■ • J !” 

: h M 




./I 










r-v 


» j 
11 


J »f Hub 



Th» Asodmid Pnm 



Qj Police jbxvsfjug Santiago Pereira, a labor leader, and Ins son daring a protest in the capital. 

750 Arrested 
r Leaders 




■Siwrica^f 


-- - 1~. 


^‘Sureed^ 


:-c.r 

‘. 1 : 






: J;i- 




cc: 




i J* 


! Bulgarian? 


.e- 


lran^ r(l( ^ 


■ . -T.-r^ 


■ The Associated ‘Pwasr 

SANTIAGO^ Tfae Chilean po- 
lice said Thursday that three. per- 
sods hhd been shot to* death and 
mare flan 750 anatoLia two days 
: of protests, against the nnEtary gpv- 
*' gmrrieht nf Preadeal AngustoPi- 
. nochetG 

’ „ Riot potice bnW.ednesdaymght 
;; stormed the University of Chile's 
Engineering School campus near 
central Santiago, what students 
who had battled police in the 
- streets were seeking sanctuary. 

-Police said they arrested 396 
people In the raid. . . 

Soldiers and police patrolled 
’ Santiago’s streets Thursday to. pre- 
vent a renewal of the protests, 
which were organized by opposi- 
tion groups, inducting the National 
, Workers Command. The union 
federation has demanded freedom 
for six jaded labor leaders. 

Police said 40 people were in- 
jured Wednesday, including eight 
who suffered gunshot wounds. 
Thirteen persons have been hospi- 
talized with bullet wounds since the 
protests a gainst the military gov- 
ernment began Tuesday. 


: The po&cesmd tiuy also fought 
demonstrators m- Valparaiso, 75 
miles (121 kilometers) northwest of 
the capital, and in Antofagasta, 930 
miles to the north. .* '• 

. Polk»saidEtmEaUIloa,21, was 
shot to death Wednesday by gun- 
men firing from a pickup truck as 
she took part in a demonstration in 
Santiago's Pudahnel zone. 

- Erwin Itorra, 21, died of gunshot 
wounds in a shun district in west- 
ern Santiago, police sources said. 

Police reported that Hugo Penai- 
liila, 40, was shot in the head in a 
working-class district of southern 
Santiago where demonstrations 
were taking places Newspaper re- : 
ports quoted witnesses as saying 
police bad opened fire. 

More than 20 people were 
wounded Tuesday in the street vio- 
lence, and 300 were arrested, ac- 
cording to police. They said they 
arrested 460 more people Wednes- 
day, ind nding the students and five 
labor leaders. 

Reporters were kept at a distance 
as the police sunourided the engi- 
neering budding at the university, 



cott 


Agjmce Frmc&Presse 

PORT ELIZABETH, South Af- 
rica — A Hack consumer boycott 
that has copied white businesses 
in this Indian Ocean city since it 
’ was called four months ago is to be 
suspended for two weeks from Fri- 
day, the organizers said TMrsday. 

The boycott, regarded as the 

- most successful peaorful protest by 
black South Africans, - was ordered 

•. suspended after an apparent agree- 
ment Tuesday between the white 
business community and the local 
. security forces. • 

The security forces were expect? 
ed to make an announcement-soon 
agreeing to some of the bqycotters* 
demands. 

A spokesman for the boycott or- 
ganizing committee^ which went 

• underground when a state ofemer- 
. geneywasimposed July 21,said the 

action was being called off tempo- 
rarily to see what concessions the 
authorities might offer. 

Many white businesses have 
closed and others have been 
brought to the verge of bankruptcy 
by the boycott 

The actum was imposed to press 
. demands for the withdrawal of sc- 

• curity forces from black townships; 

• an end to a ban oil political meet- 
ings; the bringing to justice of the 

- killers of four political activists, 

- and information on the ■ where- 
■ abouis of three other black activists 

• who disappeared earlier this year. 

Tony Gilson, director of the Port 
Elizabeth Chamber of Commerce, 
said he welcomed the suspension. 
-- But ihe local Fedauted Chamber 
of Industry said, it -would be “im- 
possible” to meet most of the boy- 

- cotters’ demands. 

. ■ Offer to Talk Is Renewed 

Deputy Foreign Minister Rot 


Miller renewed an government of- 
fer Thursday to negotiate with op- 
ponents of apartheid, including 
Bishop Desmond Ml Tutu and the 
Reverend Allan Boesak, United 
Pres International reported from 
Johannesburg. 

-Mr. MOkr said in Pretoria that 
thegovemmenlwodd negotiate re- 
visions of its policy of apartheid, or 
racial ftgregatiOT, with black and 
mixed-race “men of influence” 
such as Bishop TUtu and Mr. Boe- 
sak if they would renounce vio- 
lence. Similar offers have been 
made by President Pieter W. Bertha. 

“We will not speak to them on a 
one-to-one basis, " Mr. Miller said, 
“but rather around a negotiating 
table at which various leaders from 
all communities are represented.” 

Bishop Tutu, the 1984 Nobd 
Peace Prize winner, welcomed Mr. 
Miller’s statement “If the group is 
not too large, conditions might be 
favorable for constructive talks.. 
My mind is certainly not dosed to 
fbeidea,” he said. 

■ Reagan Urges Negotiations 

President Ronald Reagan has 
told tiw new South African ambas- 
sador to the United States, Herbert 
Beokes, that he counts on the Smith 
African government “to lake tin 
lead in beginning negotiations that 
win lead to a political system based 
an the consent of all those gov- 
erned,” The Associated Press re- 
ported Thursday. 

Mr. Reagan said he was optimis- . 
tic that South -Africans amid find 
solutions to their problems. - 

The president presented the writ- 
ten remarks to Mr. Beukes when be 
was formally installed, a move the 
United States had delayed for sev- 
eral months because of the unrest 
in South Africa. 


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lobbed tear gas grenades through 
the windows and stormed iL 

Anted Cruz, a student, said that 
the national police “acted in an 
extremely tough manner and beat 
several students.” Patricio Basso, 
president of the university profes- 
sors’ association, said some of his 
colleagues were arrested. 

Santiago Pereira, a labor leader 
and a former Christian_Democratic 
Party congressman, was arrested a 
block from the presidential palace 
as labor activists tried to deliver a 
tetter demanding the release of 
their jailed colleagues. 

An organizer of the march even- 
tually was allowed to deliver the 
letter to the office of the palace 
guard’s commander. 

Police reported nine bomb ex- 
plosions, including one that blew 
down a power pylon Tuesday night 
south of Santiago and blocked out 
the city of five milli on people and 
its suburbs. 

An anonymous telephone caller 
to The Associated Press claimed 
for the bombing on 
of the leftist Manuel Rodri- 
guez Patriotic FronL - 


U.S. Senator 
Bids to Delay 
Departure of 
Soviet Sailor 

By Philip Shenon 

jVw York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON —Senator Jes- 
se Helms has decided to subpoena 
a. Soviet sailor, who jumped ship in 
Louisiana, to appear before the 
Senate Agriculture Committee, 
aides said. They termed the move 
an effort to delay the man’s depar- 
ture from the United Stares. 

The decision came as the Justice 
Department announced that a Ro- 
manian sailor bad left his ship 
Wednesday near Jacksonville, 
Florida. 

That sailor, identified as Stefan 
Vemea, was interviewed Wednes- 
day by immigration officials and 
has sought political asylum, offi- 
cials said. 

Congressional aides said that 
Mr. Helms, a Republican of North 
Carolina who is c hairman of the 
Agriculture Committee, had the 
power to subpoena the Soviet sail- 
or, Miroslav Medvid. 

But was unclear whether the Sen- 
ate would be able to remove Mr. 
Medvid from the Soviet freighter, 
the Marshal Konev, anchored in 
the Mississippi. River. 

The ship was scheduled to leave 
the United States on Friday. Mr. 
Medvid leaped into the river on 
Oct. 24 but was remmed to the ship 
by U.S. authorities in circum- 
stances that remain in dispute. 

He was later interviewed by offi- 
cials of the State Department The 
Stale Department said it was con- 
vinced the sailor wanted to return 
to the Soviet Union. The decision 
infuriated conservative groups and 
Ukrainian- American activists. 

According to aides to Mr. 
Helms, Mr. Medvid would be 
brought to Washington, ostensibly 
lo testify before the committee 
about the incident's consequences 
for trade in grain. 

A Senate lawyer who asked not 
to be named said, however, that it 
might be imposable to find a feder- 
. al judge to enforce the subpoena 
since the matter was primarily one 
of foreign policy, which is not the 
responsibility of the courts. 

Law enforcement officials said 
Mr. Vemea, the other sailor, re- 
fused to return to a Romanian ship 
docked in Florida. Unlike the Sovi- 
et sailor, who swam to shore, Mr. 
Vemea was on shore leave when he 
decided to seek asylum. 



Floodwaters in Washington 

A park along the Potomac River in Washington was flooded and 
the Washington Monument, background was dosed as waters 
neared their crest after four days of rain that have killed at least 
36 persons in mid- Atlantic states. Forty-four were missing. 



ee 

' s-VJkI 

The taoaned Pits 

Vitaly Yurchenko waved as he boarded a plane at an 
airport near Washington for a return flight to Russia. 

Last Chapter of Defector’s Defection 
Started in a Washington Restaurant 

Sew York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Vitaly Yurchenko’s dramatic return to Mos- 
cow began last Saturday at a fern-decorated restaurant a few blocks 
from the Soviet Union’s embassy compound, according to intelligence 
sources. 

The sources said Mr. Yurchenko arrived at the restaurant, Au Pied 
de Cochon, in the company of a single CIA officer. According to 
intelligence sources, Mr. Yurchenko said: “What would you do if I got 
up and walked out? Would you shoot me?” 

The CIA officer said, “No. we don’t treat defectors that way.” 
“i’ll be back in 15 or 20 minutes." Mr. Yurchenko said. “If Tin not, 
it’s not your fault." A source said that Mr. Yurchenko then left the 
restaurant- He was not pursued up the busy street by the CIA officer. 

Ives Courbois, the restaurant's owner, said he was planning to sell a 
“Yurchenko shooter” a mixed drink. 


Mistrial Ruled 
In Spy Case 
Of Former 
FBI Agent 

Sm York Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — The espio- 
nage trial of Richard W. Miller, a 
former agent of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, has ended in a 
mistrial after the jurors said they 
were hopelessly deadlocked. 

The mistrial was declared 
Wednesday by U.S. District Judge 
David V. Kenyon after the jury had 
deliberated for 14 days. 

Mr. Miller. 4S. was the first FBI 
agent in history to be charged with 
espionage. The charge grew out of 
his activities with a Russian emigre 
couple who the government con- 
tended were agents of the KGB. the 
Soviet intelligence service. 

Until shortly before his arrest on 
Ocl 2. 1984, Mr. Miller had been a 
counterespionage specialist in the 
FBI’s Los Angeles office. 

The prosecution immediately 
said the government would seek to 
retry Mr. Miller as soon as possible 
on the same seven espionage counts 
accusing him of passing FBI docu- 
ments to the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Miller’s two alleged Soviet 
co-conspirators, Nikolai and Svet- 
lana Ogorodnikov, were convicted 
in an earlier trial. 


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CIA Is Said to Tell Panel 
Of Erring on Defector 


(Continued from Page !) 
shortcomings in security as'well as 
an apparent failure to detect that 
Mr. Yurchenko was having second 
thoughts about his reported defec- 
tion. 

[Another, former CIA official. 
Donald Jameson, said the prob- 
lems indude a failure to recognize 
or successfully act upon common 
signs of depression, and to have 
interrogators who speak fluent 
Russian, The Associated Press re- 
ported. 

[“The kind of bond and rapport 
that should have been built be- 
tween Yurchenko and somebody 
wasn’t made,” Mr. Jameson said of 
the three-month long interrogation 
of the Soviet defector. “Maybe the 
root problem in ibe whole case is 
the people handling him saw it as a 
question of paper-shuffling rather 
than dealing with human beings.” 
be said.} 

■ link to Stridde Denied 

Kenneth Freed of the Los Angeles 
Times reported earlier from Toron- 
to: 

The wife of a Soviet trade repre- 
sentative stationed inr Toronto ap- 
parently has committed suiride by 
jumping from a building. 

Canadian government and po- 
lice officials denied Wednesday 
there was any connection between 
her death and the derision of Mr. 
Yurchenko to return to Moscow. 

The suiride of the Soviet woman 
Tuesday set off speculation that 
she might be linked to Mr. Yur- 
chenko. 

CIA officials had told members 
of the Senate Select Committee on 
Intelligence that one reason that 
Mr. Yurchenko decided to return 
to Moscow is that his love affair 
with the wife of a Soviet diplomat 
based in Canada had soured. 

The Soviet woman died Tuesday 
morning after falling from the 27th 
Door of an apartment building in 
the Toronto suburb of Etobicoke, 
police said. 

They would not identify her be- 
cause relatives had not been noti- 
fied, but the Global Television Net- 
work said that she was Svetlana 
Dedkova, the wife of a Soviet citi- 
zen who worked for Omni trade, a 
Soviet trading company. 

■ Treated Like an AmmaT 

Celestine Bohlen of The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Moscow: 

Mr. Yurchenko said in an inter- 
view published here Thursday that 
the CIA had treated him like an 
animal in a zoo during his three- 
month stay in the United Stales. 

Mr. Yurchenko described in 
Komsomolskaya Pravda. the Com- 
munist youth newspaper, how he 
was prepared to meet with William 
J. Casey, director of the CIA. Mr. 
Yurchenko said the two discussed 


major political issues,-induding the 
summiL 

He said that he was kept on a 
5,500-acre (2,200-hectare) estate 
near Fredericksburg, Virginia, 
where his “main torturer" was a 
crazed Vietnam veteran named 
Charlie. 

“He had lost all that is human. It 
is my opinion that he was psycholo- 
gically sick,” Mr. Yurchenko said. 
“For him, killing is usual business.” 

“My tormentors looked at me, to 
tell the truth as if 1 were an animal, 
the resident of a zoo.” he said. 

“When they were preparing me 
for a meeting with the head of the 
department, Casey, they were 
afraid that I would say something,” 
he said. 

“Every day they gave me tablets 
and narcotics.” he said. “Before the 
meeting I received less than the 
normal dose. I remember a bit of it, 
but it is as if in a nrist" 



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Standards in London's Leading Hotels Ever Higher 


R IVALRY among London’s leading hotels is 
intense., and attracting guests in such a 
competitive field is an art. Managers are 
well aware that a full hotel this year does not 
necessarily mean the same thin g next year — how- 
ever faithful your clientele. As a result hotels 
have become more and more opulent, and the 
new entrants in the City of Westminster (and 
very occasionally near the square mile of the 
actual City of London) are immediate objects of 
professional curiosity. 


The AVa» Piccadilly has had : 

what the trade calls ‘a soft I 

opening*, and its emergence i 

to join the select group of top 1 

five-star hotels has been care- < 

fully watched. What new I 

allurements is this hotel ;.act- i 

uallv a grand old Edwardian 1 

hotel, just off Piccadilly 1 

Circus). 1 

Most unusual about this 1 

latest addition to the grand : 

hotels of the city is a restaur- 1 

ant on a terrace, high above i 

busy Piccadilly. There are t 

. . 




actually three restaurants, 
from the Brasserie for infor- 
mal eating in the new Sports 
Centre ithe Gleneagles Club, 
extending three floors down 
below the street, where there 
is also a night club, the Music 
Room' 1 to the smart Oak 
Room where those who don’t 
want too large a lunch will 
find an excellent table d'hote 
at £12 or £15. The Terrace, 
however, has its own staff and 
will be open late - ideal for 
those looking for a romantic 



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location to sup after a theatre 
visit 1 

Romantic too is the restaur- 
ant at Duke's Hotel, hidden off 
St James’s Street and not far 
from its much more obvious 
and architecturally grandiose 
neighbour, the Rita Hotel , 
managed by the urbane J ulian 
Payne. At the Ritz you get the 
feeling of old style 'grande 
luxe* in 123 bedrooms and 17 
suites, all spacious and having 
a sense of roominess rare in 
more modern places. The 
Ritz also boasts that it has the 
prettiest dining room in Lon- 
don - a spacious room by 
their towngarden and the 
wide spaces of Green Park, it 
is decorated in an ebullient 
19th century French style, 
and at night there are cabaret 
acts at 11, Wednesdays 
through Fridays. 

Dukes Hotel, like the Ritz 
and the nearby Stafford, is 
pan of the Prestige independ- 
ent hotel grouping and book- 
ings for rooms may be made 
through a useful centra] num- 
ber (01-439 2365). This 
covers not only the four Lon- 
don members (which also in- 
clude the Inn on the Park, a 
modem hotel with 228 rooms 
and two restaurants - the 
formal Four Seasons and the 
less-formal ‘Lanes’ where you 
can eat lunch or late after the 
theatre) but also a whole 
gamut of country hostelnes 
from such famous names as 
the Lygon Arms in the Cots- 
wolds to Easnveli Alanor in 
Kent and Bodysgallen Hall in 
North Wales - which recently 
won the Chef of the Year 
Award in Wales, carried off 
by Craig Hindley. This is a 
perfect place to stay if you . 
want to explore the Principal- 
ity from a 17th century hotel - 
but forgive me, for I am 
straying rather too far from 
London! 

The dining room at Duke’s 
is one of the most romantic - a 
small room, well-lit and with 
mural panels, the tables are 
well spaced and the service 
under the head-waiter, 
George, is impeccable. Bed- 
room’s at Duke’s have a de- 
cidedly cozy air, with dose 
patterned carpets and drapes 
and reproduction antique 
chairs and tables. Managing 
director Richard Davis is very 


accustomed to North Amer- 
ican guests and you won’t lack 
a welcome once you have 
turned into the narrow street 
in the heart of London’s club- 
land where the Composer 
Chopin once lived. 

[f London’s architecture 
appeals to you, as it does to 
me, you will get a particular 
pleasure from the Montcalm 
just behind busy Oxford 
Street at Marble Arch. Set in 
a handsome early 19th cen- 
tury crescent on Great Cum- 
berland Place, the interior is 
designed to maintain that air 
of grandeur, but the rooms 
facing the crescent are cun- 
ningly designed — they utilise 
large areas of the facade with 
split-level suites so the effect 
when you step inside is of a 
wall of window. Another 
hotel occupying a 19th cent- 
ury building, an ornate ex- 
ample of a London house of 
over a hundred years ago, is 
the Gore Hotel on Queen sgate 
not far from the museums of 
SW7 and the wide spaces of 
Hyde Park. 

A new addition to Lon- 
don’s stock of hotels also util- 
ises the architecture - this 
time a spacious block of Ed- 
wardian flats in a useful loca- 
tion not far from Victoria and 
the Houses of Parliament. 
This is the unusual and 
grandiose Si James Court on 
Buckingham Gate, SW1, a 
narrow street running from 
Buckin gham Palace towards 
Victoria Street. It’s part of the 
Taj group of hotels - the last 
time I stayed in a Taj was in 
Bombay, where they are lux- 
urious modern edifices, offer- 
ing strong contrasts to the 
varied life of India flowing 
around them. With the St 
James Court they have taken a 
vast turn-of-th e-century ap- 
artment building and conver- 
ted it into a hotel of spacious 
style - indeed space is the 
thing you notice first about 
this hotel - the vast lobby, 
created out of a carriageway 
now roofed over, is baronial 
in concept with marble and 
polished wood effects and a 
serried rank of fine pictures in 
shallow framed alcoves. 
There is an interior courtyard 
with a garden and the splash- 
ing of a fountain resounds 
among the trees and shrubs. 


VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 
LONDON 

Have pleasure in announcing their 
annual exhibition of the latest creations 
of jewellery, Christmas gifts and watches 
from Paris to be shown for the first time 
in London. 

November 26 - December 10, 1985 
153 New Bond Street, London, W.l 
Teh 01-491 1405 


The Taj people are still con- 
verting the remaining blocks 
of flats which have their origi- 
nal names - Kings, Queens, 
Almoners, Falconers and so 
on. Part of the restoration has 
included an unusual feature - 
the world’s longest brick 
frieze, it’s claimed, represent- 
ing scenes from Shakespeare’s . 
plays. There are several rest- 
aurants plus a pub and a 
coffee shop. Later additions 
will include health complexes 
and modem business facili- 
ties. It certainly gives a strong 
impression as you approach 
the hotel, with newly cleaned 
brickwork and enormous 
wrought iron gates on the en- 
tryways the St James looks 
like an embassy or palace. 

Sheraton have properties 
throughout Europe, and their 
flagship in London is the 
Park Tower on Knights- 
bridge, a circular building 
□ext to one of London’s very 
smartest department stores, 
Harvey Nichols. Smooth 
marble pavements conduct 
you from the busy shopping 
street into this unusual circul- 
ar building with its central 
round reception room with 
chairs embroidered with 
flame-pattern fabric, and vast 
floral display, to the reception 
lobby on the far side. There 
are prints everywhere - even 
in the elevators, and the shape 
of the building above means 
that you may have views from 
your room of the park, of 
South Kensington, of Bel- 
gravia or of Hyde Park 
Comer. 

Like many other hotels the. 
Sheraton Park Tower is busy 
preparing for the Christmas 
holidays, with special dinners 
and lunches proposed by Gen- 
eral Manager E. Nicolas Be- 
hard. There’s a brochure out- 
lining all the festivities - even 
a Scots piper to bring in the 
New Year in the Champagne 
Bar! But there are other 
Sheratons in town too, and to 
locale one of their smaller 
ones I drove along Chesham 
Place to find on a comer the 
modem and discreet little Bel- 
gravia Sheraton. This hotel 
has an added distinction for 
the Sheraton chain - in 
command there is - their first 
woman general manager, Ms. 
Doreen Bo ul ding, in the div- 
ision which covers Europe, 
Africa, the Middle East and 
South Asia. 

Eating in the restaurant, 
which is small and with cables 
set in a series of alcoves 
against decorated floral pan- , 
els, was a particular pleasure 
with very friendly service 
from assistant Restaurant 
Manager Tony Curtis a name 
easy to reme mber when mak- 
ing further reservations! 
There are (increasingly in 
London hotels it’s nice to 


note) British specialities such 
as Breast of Duck with Goose- 
berry sauce and deep fried 
Lymeswold cheese, and the 
French-made ice creams and 
water ices are irresistible! 
Assume about £25 to £90 per 
person with wine and service. 
The Belgravia Sheraton also 
offers special weekend rates 
until the end of March and in 
a hotel which is 90% a busin- 
ess one it’s very useful to 
know rhar Ms. Bouiding gives 
particular welcome to the bus- 
inesswoman staying at her 
hotel. 

Other London hotels you 
might like to note are the 
Howard if you want to be 
dose to the dry - it’s feeing 
die river beside Waterloo 
Bridge - and the nearby 
Waldorf, which is a Trust 
House Forte as is the smart 
Westbwy Hotel just off New 
Bond Street. Small, and att- 
racting a regular clientele is 
the Chesterfield in Mayfair, 
and if you want to be in the 
heart of the West End for the 
theatre then try the small 
Pastoria just off Leicester 
Square. 

Certainly one of the queens 
among London hotels is the 
Dorchester, lifting its impres- 
sive an d£co front over Park 
Lane. Inside the feeling is of 
understated luxury, and 
though the hotel’s rooms may 
not be sweepingly modern 
their old style comforts appeal 
to many clients from social, 
fashion and business worlds. 
The details are impressive - 
the mirrored opulence of the 
long foyer, stretching almost a 
city block beyond the recep- 
tion area, the 1930’s derailing, 
the carpets with patterns 
specially woven to fit the 
curving corridors, the outlook 
towards the green spaces of 
Hyde Park. Outside fountains 
play, and the nightlife of Lon- 
don is a few steps away - or 
you can stay in the hotel and, 
in the bar with its horseshoe 
leather seats, mirrored ceiling 
and blue-and- white tiled 
murals of birds and cages, 
listen to die piano. 

There are two principal 
restaurants (as well as light 
snacks -and afternoon tea 


[ THE GORE 

This small, exdusrve hotel is a 
grew favourite with the dberirm- 
notmg froveBer. Situated in the 
heart of .Kensington and oriy 5 
minutes ride to Harrods. 

Sngtes from £40. 

Doubles from £SS. 

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London S.WJ. 

ToL: 01 -584 6601. 
Telex: 296244. . 



The Dorchester 
Park Lane , London, W.l. 


taken in. the long foyer, the 
Promenade Room,) and you 
can choose between the 
Terrace Room and the Grill 
Room, which has stayed with 
the samelook for many years. 
Coffered ceilings With ornate 
decorations, pictorial tapest- 
ries, large chandeliers swag- 
ged with gilded ropes and 
tassels, lightly roughcast walls 
and a carpet with patterns and 
colours reminiscent of Lib- 
erty’s. Mr Curry is Manager 
of the Grill and he presides 
with gentle urbanity over a 
menu that is a clever combin- 
ation of dishes with many of 
Chef Anton Mossnxtaon’s cur- 
rent choices of Cuisine Narur- 


elle. There axe many English 
dishes including a selection 
every day of roasts and savory' 
puddings, each according to 
the day of the week - the Grill 
is open every day of die year 
for breakfast, lunch (12.30 to 
3) and dinner (6.30 to 11 ; 
with slight changes of time on 
Sundays.) “The best thing we 
ever did was to go English 
four years ago,” observed Mr. 
Carry, and that could extend 
to the puddings too. Taxes 
ami 15% service are included, 
and at lunch the set 
three-course meal is £I6.50> 
and besides these extras also 
includes a half bottle of wine. 

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Page 5 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1985 




y* 9 hej 


Famine Is 
Endingin 
Sub-Sahara 

. - The Associated Press 

ROME —Tbfi head of the UN 

Food and Agriculture Organiza- 
tion said Thursday that acute fam- 
ine W 35 ending in mnrh q[ Africa 
because the food .supply had im- 
proved^ dramatically in countries 
bordering the Sahara that were af- 
fected by drought 
The agency said that the number 
of African countries with critical 1 



am 






la. Botswana and Mozambique. . 

Speaking on the eve of a biannu- 
al conference of agriculture minis- 
ters freon more than 100 FAO 
member countries, the agency’s di- 
rector-general, Edouard Sarr uma 
said: 

“The conference opens as the 
most painful chapter of tHk decade 
gradually, and thankfully, comes to 
a dose: the acute famine' in Africa. 

“FAO staff and crop assessment : 
missions confirm in many SahAting 
countries the 1985 harvest now 
available anil be an all-time re- 
cord," he said.' 

The total production -of food in 
the eight countries on the semi-arid 
fringe of the Sahara, he said, win be 
6.3 million metric fnn< more «h*n 
50 percent higher than the 4 mHlion 
metric tons last year. 

But these countries — Burkina 
Faso, Cape Verde, Chad, Gambia, 
Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Sene- 
gal — remain heavily dependent on 
imports' to meet chronic food short- 
ages and need long-term planning 
programs, he said. 

FAO surveys also show that the 
number of malnourished people in 
the developing countries has 
dropped significantly, Mr. Saooma 
said. "Ibis is the first time we have 
detected such a decline/* 


Kasparov, Karpov 
Draw 23d Game 

The Associated Prat 

MOSCOW — The 23d game of 
the world chess championship end- 
ed in a draw Thursday after the 
challenger. Gary Kasparov, play- 
ing white, made his 41st move. 

Mr. Kasparov now leads 12 to 1 1 
* in the 24-game match. To retain, his 
world crown, AnatoH Karpov, the 

cham pipn, mint t win the final game 
which is to be played Saturday. But 

Mr. Kasparov needs only a draw, 
which is worth a half point, to win 
the championship. Although the 
champi on can win with 12 points, 

the challenger most have 12&- 
An earlier match between the 
two men was canceled earlier this 
year after the 48th ' game. - That 
match included 40 draws. 


Morihiko Nishioka, a Japan Air Lines plot, explains how 
his passenger jet strayed off course toward Soviet airspace. 

JALJet, 132 Aboard, Strays 
Near Russian Security Zone 

(Co nti n u e d horn Page 1) winds. The jet beaded toward Sa- 
crificial said Thursday. Moscow has kh a lin . 

no public comment on the Several Japanese military radar 
incident. •. rites recognized it was off course, a 

The Japanese plane, a Boeing spokesman for the Japan Defense 
747 operaring as Flight 441, took Agency said Thursday. Military au- 
off from Tokyo’s international air- thooities then alerted Japanese d- 
port at Narila at 12:14 P.M.~on v 2ian controllers and tried to raise 
Oct 31 with 110 passengers and a *e crew on an emergency radio 
crew (rf22 aboard. Itwas bound for frequency. 

Paris with a stop at Moscow However, a Japan Air Lines 

The jet approached a weather spokesman said the volume on the 
front over the Sea of Japan shortly emergency radio bad been turned 
before 1 P.M. The pflot derided to down so low that the crew could 
break course briefly to skirt the not hear the calL 
douds, and he switched off the . Ja P&nese nnhtary radar also 
amnmarir- pflotfs inertial naviga- P ic ked optwo or more unidentified 
tion system, airlfne nffieiak «id. anwaf t arcnng over S akhalin at 

After the douds had been by- ““time. These apparently were the 
passed, he forgot to mm the naw- Soviet fighters waiting to see if the 
nation system back oil according jet would enter Soviet 

to official accounts. airspace there. There are a number 

The plane then followed a mag- of highly sensitive military instaHa- 
netic heading rather than the ante- tto “ S e S? ld - ■ . . t 
made system’s more sophisticated ^ P 1 *^ 

guidanre and began drifting to- abont 60 “d* P 7 kflometers) off 
ward die east because of strong «*ise. the aw finally discovered 

the error, according to Japan Air 
lines. 

With clearance from the Rus- 
sians, the jet made a sharp turn and 
returned to its normal course. It 
entered Soviet airspace at the cor- 
rect point and flew, without further 
trouble, to Moscow. 

The plane never crossed into So- 
viet airspace at Sakhalin and the 
interceptor jets apparently did not 
come doser.than about 30 miles. 


; I Dies, 15 Bart in Iran Blast 

_Reuten 

TEHRAN. — A bomb exploded 
near a crowded street market 
Thursday in Tehran, killing one 
person and injuring 15 others, die 
press agency IRNA reported. 
There was no report chi who might 
have been responsible. 


Caller Says 
U.S. Captives 
^ In Lebanon 
Were Killed 


(Confirmed from Plage 1) 
against the headquarters of the Pal- 
estine Liberation Organization in 
Tunisia three days before. A 
blurred photograph of a dead man 
was later released to the Lebanese 
media, and the faction said it was 
the corpse of Mr. Buckley. 

On Sept 14, another hostage, the 
Reverend Benjamin Weir, a Pres- 
byterian minister, was freed after 
16 months in captivity. 

He said at a news conference 
after returning to the United States 
that his abductors had asked him to 
urge the administration of Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan to meet the 
demands of the kidnappers as soon 
as possible. He said hu captors had 
threatened to kill the other Ameri- 
can captives and also to kidnap 
more Americans to have their wish- 
es meL 

They demanded that in return 
for freeing the American hostages, 
the United States should put pres- 
sure on Kuwait to free 17 funda- 
mentalists convicted for a series of 
bomb attacks there in December 
1983. 

The organization is believed to 
holding five other Americans: Ter- 
ry A. Anderson, the chief Middle 
East correspondent of The Associ- 
ated Press; Lawrence Martin 
Jenco, a Roman Catholic priest; 
Peter Kflburn, a librarian at the 
American University of Beirut; 
Thomas M. Sutherland, the univer- 
sity’s dean of agriculture, and Da- 
vid Jacobsen, the director of the 
university hospital. 

The eaUer said that Islamic Jihad 
would release a videotape of the 
hostages before they were shot. 

Last Sept. 29, an anonymous 
caller telephoned a Western news 
agency with a message that the 
Americans were to be produced at 
a news conference. The conference 
never materi alized , however. 

The rbrirn that the Ame ricans 
had been killed came a week after 
three Soviet Embassy officials were 
released unharmed in West Beirut 
after a month of captivity at the 
hands of Moslem fundamentalists. 

A group callmg itself the Islamic 
liberation Organization claimed 
responribOity for the abductions 
and for killing a fourth Soviet cap- 
tive. 


Lagos to Sednee Staff Abroad 

Reuters 

LAGOS — Nigeria announced 
Wednesday it was decreasing its 
diplomatic staff abroad by 30 per- 
cent as pan of austerity measures 
put into effect by the military gov- 
ernment last month, according to a 
Lagos Radio report. 


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Z 28* 


42 Reported Dead in Bogota Fighting 


(Continued from Page !) 
from the April 19. 1970, presiden- 
tial election that dissidents claim 
was fraudulent 

An anonymous caller who tele- 
phoned radio station RCN played 
a tape recording that declared that 
the rebels had seized the Justice 
Ministry “in the name of peace and 
social justice." 

Last June, the M-19 rebels broke 
a truce with government security 
forces that had lasted for nearly a 
year. 

An army communique earlier 
Thursday said 17 people had been 
killed and 34 wounded in fighting 
that began Wednesday when guer- 
rillas raided and seized control of 
the five-story, block-long federal 
court building in the heart of this 
capital city. 

Hundreds of people were in the 
building Wednesday when the re- 
bels raided it. including Supreme 
Court judges who have their offices 
there. 

Hours later, assault troops 
backed by armored vehicles braved 


submachine-gun fire and surged in- 
side. Scores of captives, including 
10 judges, were freed by late 
Wednesday. 

At 2 AM. Thursday, armored 
vehicles began laying down an hour 
of machine-gun and cannon fire. 
Cannon fire punched half a dozen 
holes in the ministry’s marble fa- 
cade. 

Soldiers cautiously advanced 
again into the ministry. But flames 
kept them from reaching the fourth 
floor, according to a soldier who 
look part in the operation. 

Fire swept through the five-story 
building Wednesday night and ear- 
ly Thursday morning after guerril- 
las set fire to sections of the build- 
ing. apparently to destroy court 
records. 

Tape recordings played Wednes- 
day in telephone calls to RCN and 
Cara col radio stations said M-19 
was demanding to talk with Presi- 
dent Be tan cur at the budding and 
that Colombian newspapers pub- 
lish the text of a rebel communique. 

The recordings also said the 


guerrillas wanted Colombian radio 
stations and stale-controlled televi- 
sion channels to give the rebels an 
hour a day for an undetermined 
time to present their views. 

Thursday’s army communique 
said the 17 persons killed included 
a soldier, four police, two civilians 
and 10 guerrillas. It said 20 civil- 
ians and 14 police were wounded. 

Radio RCN quoted witnesses as 
saying guerrillas, packed inside a 
stolen telephone company truck, 
had driven into the court building’s 
parking lot. leaped out and charged 
through an entrance, shouting 
“Viva Colombia!” 

Hundreds of soldiers and police 
then surrounded the building, con- 
taining courtrooms and offices of 
Colombia’s 24 Supreme Court 
judges and 20 other federal judges. 

President Beiancur and bis cabi- 
net met in a 12-hour emergency 
session at the presidential palace 
300 yards from the Palace of Jus- 
tice. No details of tile meeting were 
given. 


Afghans Say Asian Soviet Troops Revolted 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Af- 
ghan guerrilla sources claimed 
Thursday that dozens of soldiers 
were killed last mouth when ethnic 
Asian troops in a Soviet unit in 
Afghanistan revolted and fought 
ethnic Russian troops. 

The sources, who declined to be 
identified, said the dash broke out 
after an Asian soldier was put to 
death in early October in Kunduz 
province in northern Afgh anistan. 

Up to 80 soldiers were killed as 
rebels battled loyal troops with 
heavy machine guns and mortars, 
the sources said. The fighting went 


on for most of the day, they said. 

The sources said their reports 
were based on guerrilla reports 
from Kunduz and an account from 
a witness who had just arrived in 
Pakistan. But they were unable to 
provide any other evidence. 

The account supplied by the 
guerrilla sources said that ethnic 
Tajik troops bad been receiving 
drugs from local guerrilla units and 
that one of them was persuaded or 
forced to plant a land mine in a 
Soviet base. The mine went off and 
the soldier was captured and killed 
by Soviet troops, they said. 

Tajik troops, angered over their 


comrade's death, revolted and 
fought ethnic Russian troops who 
were called in to suppress them, the 
sources said. 

The report suggested that Mos- 
cow had resumed sending central 
Asian soldiers to the north despite 
earlier fears they might sympathize 
with the local population because 
they came from the same ethnic 
background. 

Moscow initially sent many cen- 
tral Asian soldiers into Afghani- 
stan when it intervened there in 
1979 but soon withdrew them. 

(AP, UP I) 


Rebels Belong 
To Leftist M-19 

The Auiviated Pros 

BOGOTA — The guerrillas 
who seized Colombia's Justice 
Palace are members of a leftist 
insurgent group that broke a 
truce with the government last 
June, accusing President Beii- 
sario Beiancur of not delivering 
on promised social programs. 

The M-19, or April 19 Move- 
ment. takes its name from the 
date of a 1970 presidential elec- 
tion that dissidents said was 
fraudulent. 

In 1979. the guerrillas 
siunned the Colombian mili- 
tary with a raid on an army 
arsenal in die Bogota area in 
which they made off with 5,000 
weapons. A year later, an M-19 
unit shot its' way into the Do- 
minican Republic's embassy in 
Bogota and took dozens of hos- 
tages. including 16 ambassa- 
dors. 


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Page 6 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1985 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


Pub! Wv-d With The V» York Time* ind The Wjahin^um Pv( 


Blaming the Messenger 


The new curbs that South .Africa has im- 
posed on reporting of the country's sorrows 
and disorders will hinder the world's under- 
standing. Worse, they may prolong them. The 
huge, rebellious black majority lacks for any 
real communication in that deeply divided 
society. Independent press accounts have of- 
fered about the only public outlet for their 
grievances. To curtail is to inflame. 

Henceforthjournalists working in South Af- 
rica will need police permission to report on 
disturbances in non- white areas covered by a 
ihrec-month-old emergency decree. Unless 
they agree to a police escort, reporters may 
face up to 10 years in prison for covering 
anything from stone- throwing and school boy- 
cotts to work stoppages. Without permission 
no person may photograph, record or even 
sketch what is happening in these areas for 
dissemination within or outside the republic. 

This b lingering will not affect South .Afri- 
ca's state television, whose reporting of racial 
conflict is routinely sanitised. It will somewhat 
inhibit South .African newspapers, already 
hobbled by censorship. But the real target is 
foreign journalists, especially foreign televi- 
sion. The new restraints, depending on how 


they are enforced, could seal South Africa's 
black townships from outside scrutiny. 

Verifiable reports of unrest have caused 
skittish foreign investors to pull back from 
South Africa. Lack of verifiable accounts risks 
something worse — rumor, exaggeration and 
anger. The Pretoria regime accuses the news 
media of inciting violence. Crowds surely do 

behave differently when the cameras are roll- 
ing. and people who mobilize crowds know- 
television's magnifying, electrifying effect. 
Television coverage of police mauling un- 
armed demonstrators has struck apartheid 
where it hurts: on the world's evening news. 
But H annin g cameras will not restore social 
peace. Nor will it enhance a beleaguered re- 
gime's credibility, at home or abroad. 

President P.\V. Botha has yet to find solid 
political ground between those who clamor for 
reform and extremists who havejust beaten his 
National Pam in a parliamentary by-election. 
Unable to buiid a consensus for reform within 
South .Africa and angry at the world press for 
showing how much it is needed, he now blames 
the messenger for the message. The message, 
however, reverberates: Fire! 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


The Yurchenko Affair 


The turnabout of Vitaly Yurchenko drives 
stunned observers to the full range of theories 
created to deal with the murk of espionage. 
Always a favorite is a theory of Soviet wizardry 
which holds, in this instance, that the KGB 
cleverly planned the defection and redefection 
of one" of its elite officials to embarrass the 
CLA or to weaken Ronald Reagan's summit 
hand. Another is that Mr. Yurchenko was 
caught up in the peculiar confusion of motives 
and* roles to which, if the spy novels have it 
right, people in the business of deception are 
especially prone. A third theory is that in the 
last year or so a cataclysm in the whole system 
of international espionage has created among 
agents and intelligence services a pervasive 
sense of insecurity, of familiar moorings being 
lost and has resulted in a series of defections 
and unmaskings that may not yet have come to 
an end. A fourth school holds that Mr. Yur- 
chenko was not nearly so big a fish as was 
generally supposed when he was caught. 

You do not have to be able to plumb the 
depths of this case on the Soviet side, however, 
to have disturbing questions about the manner 
in which it was handled on the American side. 
From the first exultant leaks to the press about 
the catch of a blue-chip defector, to the glee 
freely expressed in the resultant sure discom- 
fort of the KGB. the CLA and those influenced 


by its briefings in Congress and elsewhere have 
acted in a strangely incautious and amateurish 
way. It is not clear that professional proce- 
dures to ascertain the bona fides of a defector, 
and to retain the confidence of this difficult 
breed, were followed closely. Early on. accord- 
ing to what has been reported. Mr. Yurchenko 
enjoyed cozy meetings in a social setting with 
the CLA's brass. Somehow a ranking Soviet 
officer still in the stage of debriefing was 
watched so laxly that he could make his wav to 
a Soviet haven in Washington. 

Mr. Yurchenko, in his press conference on 
Monday, bad every reason to give a report that 
he thoughL might ease his passage home in 
what are bound to be severe circumstances. 
His observations on the way he was treated by 
his temporary American hosts have to be taken 
skeptically. People who do the work he chose 
can have no illusions about the unforgiving 
nature of the world they inhabit. 

We understand that there are facts and 
relationships that have to be held secret in 
these matters. But Americans also need a reli- 
able explanation of wbat happened in this 
apparently unprecedented case. They need to 
know how the CIA let itself be made a fool of 
in so incredible a fashion, and haw responsi- 
bility for it is to be assumed •— and by whom. 

— THE » ASHISGTOS POST. 


Other Opinion 


Before the Summit, Yurchenko 

Having first taken the propaganda initia- 
tive. the Russians now appear to be playing 
down the summit prospects. Yet both sides are 
wise enough to know that as far as Western 
Europe is concerned this is no longer, if it ever 
was. a propaganda battle but a genuine argu- 
ment about matters of substance. There will be 
some weariness if the main endeav or is to cast 
the blame on the other side. 

It seems just possible that the carefully 
staged [Vitaly] Yurchenko demarche was pan 
of a process of blame distribution, should that 
prove necessary in two weeks' time. If so it was 
not a success. Rather than seek to embarrass 
each other, the two sides could better spend 
the remaining interval on sweetening rather 
than souring the atmosphere. 

— The Guardian (London). 

When the KGB man held his press confer- 
ence, the CIA inexcusably froze, giving the 
Russians a propaganda field day with a phony 
charge that one of their men bad been kid- 
napped and tortured, and had heroically es- 
caped from a restaurant in Georgetown. Belat- 
edly. friends of the CLA are fanning out all 
over town to assure us that poor Vitaly was 
merely a heartbroken lover, rejected by a Sovi- 
et diplomat's wife who was willing to play 
around with a KGB colonel but not a defector. 

Critics of the CIA say that the KGB man 
was not properly “nurtured” by his handlers, 
and that if be had been pampered and loved he 
would never have “changed his mind." 

Both theories overlook the fact that this spy 
is a trained liar who long ago chose deception 
as a way of life. In the grand tradition of Yuri 
Nosenko. he was a fake defector. He came over 
to make America's spooks look like saps and 
titillate the FBI with dark hints about congres- 
sional aides. Presumably he has discredited 
polygraph tests for years to come. 

Task force chief Colin Thompson should 


have given him a rigorous, skeptical debrief- 
ing. and quarantined him on suspicion of car- 
rying contagious disinformation. The slim 
pickings offered, and the Russian's failure to 
supply the names of assets known to have 
reported to him in Canada, should have set off 
warning bells: instead he was embraced and 
touted in the worst example of CLA naivete 
since William Colby fired James Angleton and 
vouched for the planted Yuri Nosenko. No 
wonder so many of us suspect that Mount Alto 
moles burrow where orchids used to grow. 

— Columnist William Safire. 

Hard Times for Oil Exporters 

Tunes are hard for oil producers. Every 
producer, it seems, has its own special need for 
increasing production. Topping the list is 
probably Mexico, which has a billion-dollar 
earthquake repair bQl. The Iranians and Iraqis 
are still at each other's throats and thus sell 
indiscriminately to anyone. Nigeria is cash- 
starved. Britain is running its North Sea wells 
dry and could collapse once its reserves are 
used up. a study on the economy's future 
recently said. Malaysia is in similar straits. 

Compared with others, the country’s prob- 
lems seem mild. But oil production wifi in- 
crease by 18 percent next year to maintain its 
share to government revenue. 

Although OPEC still has an official selling 
price, the fact is that OPECs official price 
structure bears no resemblance to reality to- 
day. [Therefore] OPEC members have no 
choice but to stick to the agreed 16 million 
barrels per day in order to protect the market. 
Declining oil prices mean revenue shortfalls 
and less development among developing oil 
producers. For financially strapped countries 
such as Mexico. Nigeria and Indonesia, it 
means further difficulties in repaying debts, 
and more protectionism. In the end all will 
lose, ofl producers and consumers alike. 

— The Business Times (Kuala Lumpur). 


FROM OUR NOV. 8 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Chinese Demand a Parliament 
PEKING — Ten thousand students paraded 
with bands and lanterns, shouting “b anzai s " 
for the Constitution, the Emperor and China 
[on Nov. 7], in celebration of the decree grant- 
ing an earlier convening of Parliament than 
was at first intended. The enthusiasm shown 
was not, however, reflected in the provincial 
assembly, the Tzuchengyuan. The formal re- 
ception of the Imperial edict precipitated a 
heated debate. Speeches of provincial mem- 
bers revealed disappointment that Parliament 
is not to open earlier than 1913. The keynote of 
the speeches was that the convening of Parlia- 
ment is essential if China is to escape Corea’s 
fate. Leading members hotly demanded that 
the Government show how it hopes to protect 
Manchuria during the ensuing three years. 


1935: Spread of African War Feared 
DJIBOUTI, French Somaliland — The prob-. 
lem confronting France and England in this 
pan of the world is the possible spread of the 
Italo-Abyssinian conflict. Opinion in British 
and French Somaliland is that Premier Musso- 
lini’s program is so definitely outlined that he 
is committed to action which may lead to 
serious incidents. England is malting certain 
she will not be caught by surprise. Protection 
has been assured from the Sudan to Somali- 
land and even to Kenya. She has increased 20- 
fold her air force in the Sudan and has added 
to the number of planes patrolling the Eritrean 
and Libyan frontiers. Defenses in the Suez and 
the Mediterranean have been reinforced, while 
at the southern end of the Red Sea En gland is 
also prepared to combat any warlike moves. 


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Development Works in the Third World 


C OPENHAGEN — The West is more atten- 
tive these days to the twin demons of famine 
and the debt crisis than to the continuing Third 
World drama of development. Yet development 
is the best hope tor overcoming those demons. 

It is fashionable among skeptics in the West to 
assert that development aid has been a waste. 
That charge ignores a striking change that such 
aid has brought about in the Third World — 
what Bradford Morse, the American who heads 
the United Nations Development Program, calls 
the “release of human energy." 

It is not merely that people are living longer 
and are in better health, nor even that literacy is 
on the rise. Nor is it only a question of more 
dams and roads being built. In the 35 years since 
the West began pumping what now amounts to 
an es tima ted S500 billion into development assis- 
tance, there has come about a significant change 
in attitude among Third Woriders. 

A new self-reliance is evident to those of us 
who travel in the Third World. Western aid has 
created a sharp increase in the capacity of people 
to absorb technology. And so, while Third world 
governments may owe a trillion dollars to West- 
ern financial institutions, at the grass roots there 
is greater confidence among people in their own 
capacity to change their living conditions. 

.Another significant change is a growing con- 
viction that private enterprise and the market 
economy are far better tools for economic 
growth than state socialism. The development 
experience suggests that virtually every socialist 
attempt at economic progress in the Third World 
has failed conspicuously. The ultimate triumph 
of market-oriented capitalism may be near. 
During recent travels 1 have seen confirmed 


By Pranay Gupte 

:titioners of state-run socialism — such as 
Surma, China and Tanzania — embarking on 
liberalization of their economies, a startling re- 
modeling based if sot on the concept of laissez- 
faire then at least on a system of incentives. 

Why has this development story not received 
the sort of attention it merits? Why, when the 
subject is raised, is one likely to hear that devel- 
opment is just a license for Third World types to 
buy fancy cars and pay themselves fat, tax-free 
salaries in international agencies? 

Scores of officials from development agencies 
— including the World Bank, the UN Develop- 
ment Program and UNICEF — met in Copenha- 
gen this week to examine such questions. They 
agreed that part of their problem was that devel- 
opment agencies usually tell their stories only to 
others in the development community — preach- 
ing to the converted. The age of propaganda has 
ended and the “development story” needs to be 
told in sharp, human terms. Millions of lives have 
been affected for the better. It is a believable 
story that needs to be told believably. 

Attending their meetings, an observer was 
struck by the candor. Participants did not gloss 
over the perceived failures of “development." 
They took into account criticism that the original 
United Nations development mandate was at 
worst innocuous and at best mildly benign. 

They discussed criticism that the UN develop- 
ment machinery often substitutes international 
bureaucracy for real projects. A frequent charge 
has been that funding mechanisms and gover- 
nance systems sometimes insulate multilateral 


A Historic Chance Because Moscow Needs Detente 


P RINCETON. New Jersey — If 
the United States really wants to 
improve political relations with the 
Soviet Union and end the nuclear 
aims race, the Geneva summit will be 
a historic opportunity. The reason is 
not that the Soviet Union has sud- 
denly become a benign or like-mind- 
ed superpower but that, as Mikh ail 
Gorbachev has made clear repeated- 
ly, his foreign policy is an extension 
of domestic policy; To carry out his 
program of reform at home, be needs 
detente and aims control abroad. 

None of this is acknowledged by 
the Reagan administration, which 
seems to have on acute case of cold 
war myopia about developments in- 
side the Soviet Union. Ever since Mr. 
Gorbachev- became general secretary 
in March, it has portrayed him as a 
slicker but traditional Soviet appar- 
atchik. and his policy statements as 
nothing but “public relations.” 

In reality, everything indicates that 


By Stephen F. Cohen 


Mr. Gorbachev is the first reform- 
minded Soviet leader since Nikita 
Khrushchev in the 1950s. Even be- 
fore talcing office, he pointedly iden- 
tified himself with the reformist wing 
of the party, calling for “deep trans- 
formations" in the state economic 
system. Since March he has outlined 
a* far-reaching decentralization of in- 
dustrial management and curtail- 
ment of ministerial control, while de- 
claring that “more major, important 
decisions" are still to come. If recent 
proposals in Pravda and Izvestia are 
an indication, those decisions may 
introduce, among other things, a con- 
siderably larger role for private enter- 
prise and market relations. 

Such reforms will not bring capi- 
talism or democracy to the Soviet 
Union, but they will, inescapably, en- 
tail liberalizing changes in various 
areas. They may not alter the situa- 


Hie Dupe 
Might Be 

C J 

Yurchenko 

By Allan E. Goodman. 

W ashington — vuaiyYur- 

chenko is lying. Tbe Soviet hs- 
icffigmc e agent says be was "forcibly 
abducted" last August is Rome by 
tbe CLA. brought “uaccaiscious to 
the United Stales, “forced to take 
some dregs" during his debriefing 
and then, “due to a momentary lapse 
of attention" of his case officers, giv- 
en a chance on Saturday to “break 
out to freedom and come to the Son- 
et Embassy" in Washington. 

those etaim* have absolutely no 

basis in fact. UA intelligence ser- 
vices rardv encourage .defections, 
and never do so by the use of force 
and drugs. The CLA would much 
rather persuade the potential defec- 
tor to remain in place; once someone 
defects, his or her connection to in- 
formation dries op. While Soviet de- 
fectors often disclose much-needed 
details about past KGB methods and 
operations, the days of scoops on 
current information are ewer. . 

Once in the U oiled Stales, defec- 
tors are handled with lad gloves. 
Drugs, especially, are anathema. To 
use drugs would deprive the United 
States of the all-important high 
ground in espionage, discourage oth- 
ers from working for America and 
calk into question any information 
derived Cron a defector's debriefing. 

To succeed, debriefers need to es- 
tablish a relationship of trust so as to 
draw out the most detailed picture 
possible of the mirffiggmc group 
with which the defector wotted. 

AB this cannot be pleasant fee the 
defector, who knows ttel he or she is 
an object of contempt not only in the 
country betrayed bat in the new one 
2 S wdl The strain of escape, the 
permanent severing of family and 
cultural bonds and (he endless hours 
of debriefing take drear tott. . 

None of that was evident on Mr. 
YntdRoba'sface in front of the cam- 
eras at his press co nfe rence in the 

_ b Soviet Embassy. Be w» poised. His 

But these internal possibilities chief, Nikolai Baibakov. Bat he must indignant rhetoric about American 
a significant overcome widespread protests, in the “kidnappers” was, Z suspect, meant 

to play weS in Europe and the Third 
World on the eve of the TJ.S. -Soviet 
summit, at which Soviet human 
rights- violations are to he discussed. 
In. short, ! think that he was a 
it, and that his debrief ers proba- 
supeoed him of being one. He 


aid administration, particularly within the Unit- 
ed Nations family, from effective oeooanamy 

All the same, these experts vowed a bdief that 

when you lode at the grass roots you fiudthe 
development process to be working 
in different cadences and at different speeds, to 

be sure, but in a way that gives cause for hope nor 

only to aid recipients but also to the donors. 
Tbe people of the Third World no longer seem 

to be raying, “Give us more." They are reforaimg 

their systems and firming more to themselves tor 
innovative methods to ensure development. 

But the Third World does expect continued 
understanding from the West: less protecti onism 
and a more effective way to tackle uw debt crisis, 
perhaps through debt adjustment so that poor 
countries will have money for internal develop- 
ment. The Third World is pointing out that the 
international debt crisis will not be resolved 
unless Third Worid economies keep growing. 

Ano ther mresag* from Cop enhagen is that 
donor countries cannot hope to keep, throwing 
money at emergency situations. S u ch aid is need- 
ed now, but it is no substitute for 
development. The solution is to help the Third 
World promote further development so that the 
root causes of emergencies such as famine — 
poor food distribution and rampant population 
growth, for example — are tackled effectively. 
Development is the only worthwhile answer for 
the long term. And it has been shown to wort 

The writer, author of “Vengeance: India After 
the Assassination qf Indira Gandhi is completing, 
a book on the impact of development programs in 
the Third World. He contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


tion of active dissidents, but they will 
improve the everyday life of millions 
of ordinary citizens and, by wHimg 
the political atmosphere and specifi- 
cally censorship, respond to the aspi- 
rations of thousands of intellectuals 
and artists. Mr. Gorbachev may be 
preparing to pick up the Khrushchev 
banner of official de-Stalimzation, as 
suggested in September by two prom- 
inent ami-S teBnim. publications by 
Yevgeny Yevtushenko, a bellwether 
of (hat long-suppressed cause. - 


. sible unless mflitaty spending can 
reduced or at least frozen. That 
will require an end to the strategic 
weapons race. It certainly precludes 
anything as costly as President Rea- 
gan's “star wars" program. 

Second, Mr. Gorbachev needs de- 
tente-like relations if he is to become 
a strong reform leader in the deeply 
conservative Soviet system. He has 
brought reform-minded officials into 
the top leadership, and he recently 
ousted two opponents of economic 
change. Prime Minister Nikolai Tik- 
honov and the longtime Gosplan 


stand no chance without a significant 
improvement in U.SL-Soviet relations 
— for two fundamental reasons. 

First, economic reforms wOl re- 
quire major new investments in non- 
defense sectors, especially consumer- 
related industries. Given the lag- 
gardly rate of Sonet economic 
growth, such expenditures win be im- 


party elite and the state bureaucracy, 
that even modest decentralization 
and liberalization .are too dangerous 
because of a “growing American 
threat.” Better relations with Western 
Europe, Japan and China, which the 
leaden^ is also promas- . 



8> narMcre g*4g«sic 


But Gorbachev Has the Weaker Hand 


N EW YORK — Mikhail Gorba- 
chev has one major asset as he 
prepares for Geneva: The West is 
continuing to see what it wants to see 
in Soviet policy and behavior. As- 
sumptions. not Soviet reality, are the 
primary basis for < Western conclu- 
sions. Evidence that contradicts 
those assumptions is ignored. 

By any objective standard, tbe new 
Soviet leader should be coming to 
Geneva as the weaker of the two 
parties. But Western failure to ana- 
lyze Soviet weaknesses wfll allow him 
to bargain with Ronald Reagan from 
a perceived position of equality. 

Soviet officials are themselves of- 
ten astounded by the ease of their 
victories in getting Westerners to see 
only what they want them to see. 
Many Western visitors pose no chal- 
lenge whatsoever. From the intellec- 
tuals who praised the wonders of tbe 
Soviet penal system in (he 1930s to 
BiDy Graham, wbo came to the Sovi- 
et Union in the 1980s and marveled 
at the religious freedom. Western vis- 
itors have demonstrated an infinite 
capacity for self-deception. 

Russians who participate in fo- 
rums of East-West cooperation are 
generally accepted on the terms they 
choose for themselves. Thus, the No- 
bel Peace Prize Committee apparent- 
ly saw little difference between Dr. 
Yev|eny Chazov, co-founder of this 
years prize-winning group, Interna- 
tiona] Physicians for tbe Prevention 
of Nuclear War, and his fellow doc- 
tors in the West, who are moved by 
their individual concerns about the 
arms race. The committee overlooked 
tbe fact that Dr. Chazov represents a 
regime and a medical establishment 
— he is deputy minister of health, a 
member of the Communist Party's 
Central Committee and a personal 
physician to Soviet leaders — that 
have for years been dispatching 
members of the one smalL 
dent Soviet peace group to 
ric hospitals and labor camps. 

Western politicians, bout liberal 
and conservative, are also prone to 
selective perception when it serves 
their interests. During the 1980 presi- 
dential campaign, Ronald Reagan 
opposed Jimmy Cartel's grain em- 
bargo on the grounds that it hun only 
American farmers, not the Soviet 


Correction 

The opinion column “S ummi t Syn- 
drome: Reagan Must Beware” (Nov. 
6). by Daniel Schorr, contained an 
error. It was President Truman who 
attended the Potsdam conference, 
not President Roosevelt. 


By Andrew Nagorski 

Union. Moscow was happy to agree 
with this assessment, never explain- 
ing why it was so infuriated by an 
embargo that allegedly had no im- 
pact. But there was evidence that, at 
least initially, the embargo seriously 
disrupted shipping and inland trans- 
port whole Moscow scrambled to line 
up alternative suppliers, and thar this 
deepened an already serious food cri- 
sis. Mr. Reagan chose to ignore such 
evidence for electoral reasons. 

Today Mr. Gorbachev can look 
strong because Westerners choose to 
view him as strong. He and his agen- 
da for (he s ummi t meeting have dom-- 
inated Western press reports in re- 
cent weeks. The official part of this 
agenda is his crusade against “star 
wars." Tbe unofficial part is his pre- 
sentation of himself as a new breed of 
Soviet leader. For (he most part the 
West has been beguiled by this image. 

To be sure, Mr. Gorbachev has 
inherited a system with proven 
strengths. It maintains highly effec- 
tive mechanisms of repression, based 
on the lasting legacy of wholesale 
terror. Since ms ascension, four dissi- 
dents are known to have died in labor 
camps, and administrative proce- 
dures for confining others to mental 
hospitals have been amplified. 

Centralized planning allows the 
State to concentrate its resources as it 
wishes, particularly on the military, 
even when the economic base shows 
signs of decay. Kit Mr. Gorbachev 
and his planners know how wide- 
spread that decay already is. The 
East-West technology gap is steadily 
growing, no matter how modi tech- 
nology the KGB manages to steal 
from the West A sullen population 
can be forced to dig tunnels for the 
Moscow subway but not to produce 
the next generation of computers. 

The bureaucracy remains pro- 
foundly ambivalent about advanced 


dimin ution of the intimidating pews' 
of the Soviet military. The longer- 
term goal is likely to be to convince 
the West that it should share its tech- 
nology, thereby helping Moscow re- 
solve its high-tech dHernma. 

This gives the West an opportunity 
for some tough bargaining. Any pro- 
gress toward an agreement should be 
conditioned onprogress on. arms con- 
trol but also on human rights, Af- 
ghanistan and Poland. Mr. Reagan’s 
speech at the UN General Assembly 
on regional conflicts was a start to- 
ward broadening the summit agenda. 

The writer is chief of Newsweek’* 
Bonn bureau and author of '‘Rehutaru 
Farewell- An American Reporter's 
Candid Look Inside the . Soviet. 
Union. ” He contributed this comment 
to The New York Times. - 


ing, cannot solve this central prob- 
lem. In official Soviet eyes. America 
is the source of the arms race: 

Despite these compelling domestic 
factors behind Mr. Gorbachev's ap- 
peals for a “revival of d&enie," he 
will not come to Geneva as a suppli- 
cant. Although eager to negotiate po- 
litical and military agreements, be 
wiB be “tough," as tbe American efr- 
chfc goes, partly because aH leaders of 
great powers most be so, but also 
became of his special position as the 
Soviet Union’s youngest arid most 
Westernized leader in 60 years. 

Those personal traits, along with 
his reform program, have aroused re- 
sentment among old-line conserva- 
tives who have been heard to refer to 
him derisively as malduk, or “the 
kid.” Such attitudes no doubt moti- 
vated Andrei Gromyko's tmnsual as- 
surance to the Central Committee: 
“Comrades* this man has a nice smile 
but he's got iron teeth." 

If met by a condHatcny President 
Reagan, Mr. Gorbadwv can show Iris 
teeth back home simply by masti ng- 
on U.S. recognition of tbe Soviet 
Union's right to equal political status 
in world affairs. .Granted that; Mr, 
Gorbachev will negotiate at Geneva 
in accord with his domestic impera- 
tive that substantially unproved rela- 
tions are “extremely necessary." 

At stake is the political agenda of a 
new generation' of Soviet officials. 
Unable to claim credit for the great 
achievements of the past, from indus- 
trialization and the defeat of Nazi 
Germany to the nation’s rise to su- 
perpower status, they may seek their 
generational destiny in reform at 
home instead of more power abroad. 

If the Reagan administration fails 
to seize this opportunity for a new 

and possibly lasting ditaate, it will be 
saying that the United States prefers 
cold war and a nuclear arms race. 


The writer is professor of politics at 
Princeton University and a frequent 
commentator on Soviet affairs. 


would have done better to look a little 
marcbewSdaed. hung over, mis- 
treated, to make his case convincing. 

What happened is probably this: 
Mr. Yurchenko, a seriaor KGB offi- 
cer, believed that he had convinced 
UJ5. mtefli ge n ce operatives in Rome 
that he wished to defect They played 
along, reserving judgment until he 
votnmarily entered UiS. territory. 

There may have been some early 
concrete results from die debriefing 
process if Mr. Yurchenko implicated 
U.S. personnel who appeared to have 
been working for Soviet intelligence. 
But the subsequent hours of debrief- 
ing mutt have caomnocd UJR experts 
(hat he was not genuine. 

How he got away from UH intelli- 
gence officers and to the Soviet Em- 
bassy is aaybod/s guess, but I think 
officials were suspicious enough to 
.tempt him mfo tunning. And he did. 

Toe KGB will not be pleased with 
Mri Yurchenko's performance. He 
coukl not have learned much in a 
month to add to what the Soviet 
intenigence service already knows 
about tiie CXA and bow it handles 
defe ct ors. He probably did scare So- 
viet agents in the United States 
whose cover might have been shaky. 
He certainly scared Soviet agents 
who know the KGB’s willingness to 
oepose low-level operatives in order 
to establish a plant as bona fide. 

Mr. Yurchenko win probably re- 
turn to Moscow to a much-publicized 
hero’s welcome — and ostracism by 
Ms colle agu es, then early retirement. 

I would not be a bit surprised to learn 
some months from now that an alleg- 
edly despondent Vitaly Yurchenko is 
in a Soviet mental institution and will 
never be heard from a g»tn 

The writer is associate dean 
at Georgetown University’s School qf 
™yjgn Service. He famed the CIA in 
1975, and in 1 979-80 was the presiden- 
tial briefing coordinator for the ogen- 
ty"s director. He contributed this com- 
ment to the Las Angeles Times. 


UTTERS TO THE EDITOR 

There’s Business to Do tion are created in these and Other 

Along with a chance to meet Rus- 
sian people, American visitors to the 
Soviet union get an opportunity -to 
see America from fresh perspectives. 

For example; I found the view of 
President Reagan from the streets 
and mi tbe television screens of Mos- 


cow as enlightening as our delega- 
tion's visit to the K remlin or our 
conference with a panel that included 
a Soviet general. As a member of a 
traveling group that included two 
U.S. congressmen, a journalist and 

arms control negotiators, I return 

from Russia with an impression of 
Ronald Reagan as a leader who says 
nyet and little else when h comes to 
dialogue with his Soviet counterparts. 

Perhaps he underestimates the ef- 
fect of his definition of the Soviet 
Union as an “evil empire." Russian 
commentators repeat the phrase so 
often that it has become part of the 


institutions and have become aii hi cdsis ^ aU1 ^ resolved 

pressivemade-m-U^^pSduct. r 21“ P 3 ? **“* Mr ’ 

This is one export we nerri Beagsn must be seen to take, 

limit. Tojudgelrcm his past perfc£ Sff- Wstaikali y a 

mances. however, President rSLh ^ St ■ Sttps * but ,l 

create negotiation to the 

the name-calling and replace the 
stone wall of rhetoric with a tapestry 
or proposals for creative disarms- 
meat. In so dome, the United States 
wm be acting in us best tradition — 
one winch has given America a global 
unage that is now ^ of some 
redemption. The world has Mstori- 


top of the list of products prohibited 
for export to the Soviet Union. 

His timing seems off. Mikhail Gor- 
bachev is the Gist Soviet leader since 
the revolution who can be called .an 

educated man in the classic sense. His 

two imiyasity degrees, his wortdli- 
ness and Ms «m^>rdienskwi of the 

^rtfrwuMs^S^S^Nmo^ Americ as tbe-mosi 

can he be expected lo avoid any indi- sponsor of systems for con- 

cation that he refuses u> commnni- 2S; resototM5n - Gorbachev 


popular language. A national culture 
technology, both coveting it and fear- . known for its anxiety is imEkdy to 
ing its potential. Xri a society where a toss off this son of evidence. I heard 


Xerox machine is considered a dan- 
gerous weapon, the idea of giving 
ordinary citizens broad access to 
computers, with tbe information they 
can provide, isprofoundly unsettling. 

What should be expected from Mr. 
Gorbachev in Geneva? His first pri- 
ority is to block “star wars" because 
it raises the specter of a Western 
spurt in technology that could leave 
Ms system in the dust He probably 
does’not truly fear that the develop- 
ment of “star ware" would tempt the 
West to make a first strike^-but be has 
to be frightened try the prospect of a 


the phrase repeated everywhere. It is 
offered as evidence that America 
does not want and will not encourage 
dfelente or significant arms reduction. 

This image of my country concerns 
me for several reasons, but p rimarily 
because it is not accurate. 

The United Skates is historically 
the world leader in . the science of 
conflict resolution. A review of labor- 
management policies and practices 
would indicate that Americans are 
m asters at nonviolent negotiation. 
Universities offer courses in negotiat- 
ing skills; patterns foe conflict resola- 


j° raake 811 ^ Proposals 
Reagan continues to 
Jfi* theworid will begin 
araw!ra £ different conclusions. • 

„ JOHN P. DUNFEY. 
Hampton, New Hampshire. 

In Stockholm at the end of a busf- 
L?P China, the Soviet 


4 COmmnni. 

cat^ fie can be cotmtetTomo take the 
initiative, to make offers that will 
have many Americans wondering 
whyMn Reagan refuses out oThand 
The Soviet Union and the United 
States have made progress since the 
days when Nikita Khrushchev took 
off a shoe and used ii to pound fnr 

attention at the United £ uStSLX 0 ^ ** Soviet 

too often these days ftaSSuff lean* upon 

m appears to want the woridtn STuT^ 30 m wtech a letter 
believe that the shoe has dianJS e * tor ‘replied that Annand 

hands. The posture is countcmrodi^ was a collaborationist — a 

and becomes more soasthe date fiEg r horse -r Nothing could 1* 
of the Geneva. summit draws near. wishm truth> n “ Iess - vou 

I do not mean u> oversimplify busimSj 3L5 e i saine ^ othaf 

negotiation process. Both as a busi- utive s C ^? a F la ^^ cxec- 
■ nes&mmtand as one of many Individ- reentiJ^ e “««ives,.noi to 
imls Mm.Mdped frame proposals f?r S^/ KS ? fiat5 ' «*waries of 
the UB. Institute of. Peace, j aS ^itassadors. Naturally, 

aware of the complexities and diffi- (heir 93 b“tinesses ac* “ 

culties inherent m reaching anySL 

uificant agreement. Buttodav ™ accfiS5, trenst)f unpatriotismT^ 

have a planetary crisis on our imndj 


* 


m 



ft 

S4 


international 





H ' November 8, 1985 


WEEKEND 


Page 7 



to Go? 

The Lofty Tour d’Argent Establishes 
A Grocery Outpost at Street Level 

— He wears a blue cornflower in bis lapel (“I would 
without ii”) as if h were a. toucfi of imperial 


Sounds of Exotic Cultures 
Enter Musical Mainstream 


by John Rockwell 


‘•S 


fed naked without it") as if h were a „ 

purple, and why not? Claude Terrail can trace the history of 
. Torn- d’Argent, his three-star restaurant, back four 
roaierual grandfather was the proprietor of the 
Card ; Anglais, a famous 1 9th-century restaurant mentioned by Proust 
great and unapproachable chef Adolphe Duglfei* 

Terrafl’s eye is vigilant, hi$ waistline slim despite 40 years in his 
tower, his dress impeccable; his charm is both , as crisp and as 
unctuous as his famous canard pressi and his flourishes as expansive 
as a Chateau Lafite *45. 

Why on earth would such a man want to become a grocer? 

For the truth is that right across the street from the Tour d’Argent, 
at 2 Rue Cardinal-Lemome, there; is now a shop called Les Comp- 
toirs de la Tour d’Argent that sells edibles under the Tour d’Argent 

Mary Blume 

label and also Claude TerraiJ napery. peignoirs and neck ties decorat- 
ed with' sitting ducks or silver towers. Not the sort of cravat that Mr. 
TerraiJ would be caught dead in. 

His own necktie is elegantly tachiste. “It’s four years old, I could 
hardly expect people to buv something that old, could I?" Sometimes 
fondant wouldn’t melt in bis mouth. 

He has gone into groceries, he explains, for a sole reason: to 
protect the Tour's customers. The shop across the street became 
vacant and, fearing that a low-class restaurant might open whose 
customers would offend his own with. uncouth words and g**stnres. 
he promptly decided to take over the premises. Now not only tan his 
guests descend from his fastness without fear of running an unsightly 
and u nmann erly gantlet, but. they can also, .as Mr. Terrail puts it, 
“leave Paris with a foie gras frais de canard tucked under their arm to 
eat in Hong Kong or New York or Timbuktu." 

The duck and goose livers at the Comptoirs are prepared under the 
supervision of the Tour’s chef. Dominique Boucbet, and are the only 

‘Some people talk about a return to 
the source. I talk about a return to 
the sauce. I am for sauces because I 
am a restaurateur. Otherwise every- 
one might as well stay home and eat 
porridge,’ says Claude Terrail. 

fresh foodstuffs available, the rest being bottled or canned The 
prices range from eight francs for SOgrams of Dijon mustard, to 
17,000 francs for a bottle of Fine Gos du Griffier 1788. 

There are 22 kinds of tea, 14 jams, 9 olive mis, 4 honeys, a 
vinaigrette frangaise salad dressing every bit as good as Paul New- 
man’s and canned Sauce Montmorency, canned Sauce Mazarine and 
canned Sauce Marco Polo. 

. The Sauce Maico Polo can.be served with poultry, meat, shellfish 
and fish smd ; is Mr. Terrafl’s pride and Joy am ce it’ introduced 
Parisians to green-peppercorns some 25 years before they became as 
common as petit pois. 

*T defy anyone to tell the .difference between this sauce and one 
made at the last minute!" says Mr. Terrail. “I have taken the gamble 
and put my name at risk.” 

He would 'not dream of selling meat to accompany his sauce. 
“Meal is a personal affair he says sternly. “One person likes it rare, 
another well-done, another medium. It is not a responsibility I can 
take. My sauce awaits them — they can prepare their chicken or meat 
or fish as they wish. 

“Some people talk about a return to the source. I talk about a 
return to the sauce. I am for sauces because I am a restaurateur. 
Otherwise everyone might as well stay home and eat porridge” 

I NSTEAD of porridge, he would like to see them eat his foie gras 
eToie truffi da Trois Empereun (810 francs for 600 grams) as 
prepared for the first time by Duglfcrfe in October 1867, at the 
Dinner Of the Three Emperors at the Caffe Anglais. The host was 
TerzaiTs grandfather, Gaudius Burdd, the occasion was the Paris 
World’s Fair, the three emperors were Wilhelm L of Prussia, Czar 
Nicholas and the future Nicholas n (Bismarck also came along) and 
the foie gras became a classic. It must be eaten within two days but 
Terrail hopes eventually to have a preserved or semi-preserved 
version. 

He is also going to have Claude Terrail chocolates by Christmas- 
time, and until the fine weather changed be sold ice cream cones, at 
his 5-year-old son’s suggestion, at five francs or nine francs for a 
double; His prices are not tower-high. 

"The shops are a showcase for pretty things. The Tour cT Argent 
does well, thank God. If we sell enough to pay the rent, fine. But I 
wouldn't want it thought that Les Comptoirs de la Tour <f Argent are 
a harness. 

Still, there is the inevitable comparison with Pierre Cardin who has 
splashed his nam e on countless products and whose recently ac- 



yet 


Claude Terrail and the view from the tower. 


quired former three-star restaurant (it is no longer listed in the 
MIchdin guide) Maxim’s, has everything packaged under its label 
from spaghetti to sardines. 

“Cardin is very intelligent," Terrail says. “The idea is the same. All 
I can say in aD simplicity is that Maxim's hasn’t a star and each tune I 
do something T put my three stars at risk. If Maxim’s does something 
only so-so, it’s not a drama. If I do something less than perfect, it is. 

“That is the only difference. Cardin is certainly more intelligent 
than I am. He has boutiques, hotels, airplanes, things everywhere all 
over the world. That’s not my aim." 

There is no reason to disbelieve Temurs view that bis shop is a 
way. of defending his tower and its guests from unruly oafs. On the 
side, it might inspire his guests to respond with proper dignity to his 
seigneurial welcome and to stop pinching the coffee spoons (“Even 
the French do it,” he sighs). These can now be purchased for 140 
francs at the Comptoirs, as well as the frequently purloined Tour 
ashtrays, which means that for only 25 francs a guest can leave the 
restaurant with a free conscience and without a suspicious bulge in 
the pocket 

T HOSE who wish to economize on having a meal at the Tour 
butlet the folks back borne think they did, can spend 90 francs 
on an authentic Tour tf Argent menu rather than about 1,000 
francs a person on an authentic Tour d’Argent dinner. 

Before the Paris venture, Terrail had already sold some prepared 
foods in Tokyo and the United States and he thinks the future may 
even be spacious enough to accommodate a Claude Terrail mens- 
wear line. Despite his disclaimers, it looks as if Terrail really is in 
business with his Comptoirs and after some hesitation he agrees that 
he is. 

“I think,” he finally says, “that we shouldn’t have complexes about 
being, as you call it, grocers. The Claude Terrail line — that's it. if we 
do it in good taste. After all,” he states, “we are the creators of taste.” 


N EW YORK — Ever since West- 
ern explorers ventured out be- 
yond the known limits of civiliza- 
tion, those back home have been 
fascinated by exotic cultures. In the late 19th 
century, at the height of colonialism, this 
fascination had begun to express itself overt- 
ly in Western art, so much so that the Muse- 
um of Modern Art here could mount a whole 
show last season documenting the influence 
of “primitive" an on the modernists. This 
influence has continued unabated (except 
for the disruptions of war) to the present 
day. and forms the bedrock for any attempt 
to explain the recent sharp increase in popu- 
larity of non -Western music in New York 
and the West in general. 

In the colonial past. Westerners may have, 
been titillated by the exotic, but they also 
looked down upon the arts of other cultures 
as lower on the evolutionary scale — or less 
imbued with divine grace — than their own. 
Today, shaken in our world-conquering self- 
confidence, we are more willing — eager, 
even — to seek out the exotic for enlighten- 
ment. 

Mare and more Westerners, especially 
among the young, seem to be yearning for 
alternatives to the drab normality of too 
much mainstream art Non-Western arts in 
general, and music in particular, provide 
such alternatives — music that is overtly 
religious, tied to man’s mystical aspirations 
and kinetic energies in a more direct 
mysterious way than our own music. 

“Z sense a bit of boredom in the music 
business in the West, both classical and pop- 
ular,” says Robert Browning, whose non- 
Western concerts at the tiny downtown Al- 
ternative Museum over the last decade laid 
the groundwork for his newly founded 
World Music Institute, designed to present 
such music on a broader scale. Browning 
adds that a healthy portion of his Alternative 
Museum audiences consisted of composers 
and musicians, mostly from the experimen- 
tal, jazz and popular areas. 

“People want something new and differ- 
ent, something they aren't finding in West- 
ern art forms,” suggests Peter Grilli, director 
of the performing arts program at the Japan 
Society. 

No city in the world can offer a wider 
variety of such exotic musical alternatives 
than New York This week alone, Soh 
Daiko, a troupe specializing in Japanese 
dramming, will be at the Japan Society on 
Friday and Saturday nights. And on Satur- 
day, Carnegie Hall will be the site of another 
of the many Festival of India presentations 
this season, this one an ambitious concert 
sponsored by Browning's World Music In- 
stitute. The program will feature Nikhil Ban- 
eijee, one of the masters of the sitar (the 
same ornately decorated, guitar-like instru- 
ment played by Ravi Shankar), as well as the 
Langas and Manghaniyars. folk musicians 
from the remote Thar Desert region of the 
northwestern Indian state of Rajasthan. 

But these are the mere iceberg-tips that 
happen to be surfacing this week. New York- 
ers are being positively deluged these days 
with concerts representing the high-art tradi- 
tions of India, the Middle East, Indonesia, 
Japan and even, belatedly, China; with folk 
and popular music from Africa, Latin Amer- 
ica and the Caribbean, and now, slowly, with 
noncommercial folk traditions from the en- 
tire planet. Sometimes, these musicians ac- 
company dance or theater troupes. But more 
and more often, they appear here on their 
own. 

The big troupes and the smaller musical 
groups appear not just in major mid town 
spaces. They also frequent the new down- 
town Triplex Theater, where the World Mu- 
sic Institute is offering the bulk of its con- 
certs. And now there are several glamorous 
spaces consecrated to non -Wes tern perform- 
ers, chief among them the Asia Society, 
whose fancy new building on Park Avenue at 
70th Street, completed in 1981, indudes a 
lovely 258-seat basement theater, and the 
Japan Society, whose handsome building 
near the United Nations contains a 279-seat 


theater that is being used more and more for 
performances of traditional Japanese arts — 
like the Soh Daiko troupe. 

The present popularity of non-Westem 
concerts was preceded by what seems now to 
have been an anticipatory burst of interest in 
in the late 1960s, sparked by the Beaties' 
involvement with all things Indian. Shankar 
suddenly found himself a star of the counter- 
culture. to his considerable bemusement. 

While that mass popularity faded by the 
early *70s. it seems in retrospect to have 
helped provide the foundation for today's 
more sophisticated audience. Partly that’ is 
because a generation that had its interest 
piqued in die late ’60s studied the music 
seriously and is now coming into positions of 
influence within the presenting organiza- 
tions and in the media. 

A growing number of Westerners have 
attended eihncmusicology courses — both 
the academic study of non-Westem music 
and, more strikingly, its actual performance. . 
Ethnomusicologisis were also primarily re- 
sponsible for the easy availability of non- 
Westem music on recordings, especially the 
popular Nonesuch Explorer series. Ethno- 
rausicology students have come to the fore in 
such academic bodies as the American Insti- 
tute of Indian Studies, which organized the 
American tour of the folk musicians at Car- 
negie Hall Saturday. Or they have founded 
or taken over actual performing or present- 
ing institutions. 

O NE example is Browning, the En- 
glishman widely credited as the cata- 
lytic force behind the current popu- 
larity of non-Westem concerts here. Another 
is Ralph Samudson, an American expert on 
the sbakuhachi. the Japanese flute. Samuel- 
son is also associate director of the Asian 
Cultural Council, which funds artists* ex- 
changes, and president of the Society for 
Asian Music, which offers a Sunday after- 
noon concert series at the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of ArL 

One other explanation for New York’s 
growing centricity in world music lies in its 
growing world centricity. Other Western 
capitals — London or Paris, for example — 
remain centers primarily for the kinds of 
non-Westem music played in lands they 
once colonized. Thus Indian music flour- 
ishes in London and African music in Paris, 
partly because there are large ethnic commu- 
nities there who want to hear the music of 
"the old country.” 


New York's ethnic communities span a 
wider range, probably, than those of any 
other Western city. There are Latins of every 
description here. Africans, Chinese. Japa- 
nese. Koreans. Iranians. Indians. Southeast 
Asians, enough people from the Caribbean 
to sustain huge annual festivals. And New 
York’s approximation of a microcosm of the 
world's ethic variety has been made more 
exact in the past decade, with an enormous 
influx of Asian and Latin peoples. 

Some of these immigrants were well-to-do 
in their homelands; others have risen on the 
economic scale once they got here. Browning 
estimates that at least half the audiences at 
his recent weekend of Triplex Theater con- 
certs of Indian music came from the New 
York Indian community. Soh Daiko. the 
Japanese drummers, consist of members of 
the New York Japanese- American commu- 
nity. “There are second- and third-genera- 
tion Americans who are trying to rediscover 
the cultural roots their parents turned their 
backs on,” says Grilli. 

h is not just a rise in the number of New. 
York outlets for foreign musicians that ex- 
plains the recent increase in such concerts 
here. There is now a growing nationwide 
network of independent promoters (many 
within black or ethnic communities), univer- 
sities and museums that can make extensive 
lours possible. And no one has done more to 
organize that network than Beate Gordon, 
the longtime director of the performing arts 
department at Lhe Asia Society (that society 
at the outset as well as the Asian Cultural 
Council were funded by the late John D. 
Rockefeller 3d. whose role in the fostering of 
non-Westem music here deserves special 
mention on its own). Gordon makes at least 
one extensive trip abroad each year to scout 
out new performers for lhe society and the 
country at large. 

Such tours are facilitated by a new willing- 
ness by foreign governments and corpora- 
tions to underwrite them. Japan, which Grilli 
says has grown increasingly sensitive to the 
need for international public relations, has 
the semi-governmental Japan Foundation' 
for such purposes, and the similarly orga- 
nized Indian Council for Cultural Relations 
in New Delhi has helped fund many of the 
Festival of India tours. National airlines will 
sometimes help with transportation. And in 
/ynerica. the Japan Society has actively so- 
licited corporate support for major tours — 

Continued on page S 



Nikhil Banerjee, a master of the sitar. 


Authors Become Public Figures as Dutch Fiction Booms 


by Mariise Simons 


a MSTERDAM — If a nation's reading habits arein 
an s- way a measure of its frame of mind, then 
/A the Netherlands is in a state of. ebullience 
J. A- Reports that Europe is slumped in cultural 
fatigue appear not to have reached here. Poets, play- 
wrights and essayists have always had an audience in the 
Netherlands, but of late people have responded strongly 
to fiction writers in search of a new social cohesion. Not 
since the Eiahtiers, the Dutch modernist literary move- 
ment of the 1880s, have the novel and novelists earned 
such authority. 

Dutch authors have become public figures and are 
’4 called on to produce columns, speeches and interviews on 
a broad range of subjects, as though they were society’s 
newly appointed arbiters. In the last few years, ficnon 
(excluding crime novels, science fiction and romances) has 
jumped from 10 to 17 percent of total book sales. “More 
than before, people are buying Dutch writers, both the 
established names and the new people who are not writing 
from an ivorv tower ” said Laurens van Krevden, the . 
director of Meuleahoff, a leading literary pubhdier. 

Some skeptics argue that all this activity is a superficial 
trend created by the media and its culturau. Writers and 
their private lives, this argument goes, are merely the latest 
distraction in a country with increasingly short working 
hours. and high. unemployment- Readers, it is said, are 
more likely to thumb through the new book supplements 
to keep up with betietristic chaiier than actually to read 

and finish the books. . , , 

But the buyers of fiction are mainly people between 18 
and 30 years old. a new generation of readers for whom 
books aroear to play an iraporjantroteJ^e slowly 
dismantled our common idealsand 
Kester Frerik said in one of the Amsterdam caffes that 
wroas Lhcraiv salons. “Now we’re seeing novels again 
that try to look for a philosophy, a vusk»i, that do more 

than hold up a mirror of society. . . ' 

The views c*f Frerik. who will be lectunrm this year on 
Dutch literature at the University of 
Shared by others who think artists have gained in authority 


as the traditional guides — politicians and priests — have 
lost status and credibility. "As we've taken things apart, 
power, religion, the university, we've made everything 
more complex,” Hans Maarten van den Brink, a respected 
literary critic, said. “People are searching again for coher- 
ence. but not from experts who make things more compli- 
cated They are turning to the arts. Museum visits have 
increased enormously. And people are looking to writers 
for a synthesizing voice.” . 

The young men and women, writing fiction here are not 
ranctly providing answers. But their work, varying widely 
in style and theme, has a new optimistic tone, a daring 
shift in a nation where optimism has long been seen as 
naivete or opportunism. "The difference today is that it is 
slowly becoming acceptable again to write about ethics, 
values, to touch on religious ideas, to be lyrical about 
nature,” Van den Brink said Oek de Jong, 32 years old. 
whose mo novels, “Blowing Summer Dresses” and “Cir- 
cle in the Grass,” have had runaway sales, describes 
himself as a mystic. Ari van der Hdjden, 32, has been 
chronicling the '60s and "70s, when educated youth turned 
to drug use. street violence and urban squatting as a way 
of life. He has called his trilogy in progress “A Toothless 
Tune,” a study of a generation stuck in adolescence but 

searching for its own values. 

H ARRY MULISCH, one of the Netherlands* most 

revered authors, is himself a man of irreverence. 
“The writer has become a kind of pop star, he's 
visible, be appears on TV," he said pouring black coffee in 
his studio, which is unusually spacious and tidy for Am- 
sterdam’s normally overstulfed canal houses. “Young 
people nowadays have more money, and they must have 
the new books; it’s the done tiling. Of course, as a writer, I 
think that’s great. Snobbism. has always beat a drivh 
force for the arts. The Renaissance monarchs attract* 
writers and painters and musicians and let them work. 
Snobbism is good for art." 

His first novel sold 6,000 copies in six years and was, be 
recalls, “no worse that what I did afterward." His latest 
book, "The Assault," has already sold a near-record 
250,000 copies in the Netherlands. “The Assault,*' tells of 


the killing of a Dutch collaborator during World War II 
that has consequences in the present A compelling para- 
ble of war, it is being widely translated and appeared in 
the United States this year. ' 

Publishers here say there is an awakening interest 
abroad in Dutch writing. Translations are being made into 
Swedish, German and French, and there are English- 


The young men and women 
writing fiction here are not 
exactly providing answers. 
But their work, varying wide- 
ly in style and theme, has a 
new optimistic tone, a daring 
shift in a nation where opti- 
mism has long been seen as 
naivete or opportunism. 


language versions of Mulisch’s “Two Women" and “The 
Slone Bridal Bed," of “Rituals” by Cees Nooteboom, of 
“Turkish Fruit” by Jan Wolkars and of books by Marga 
Minco, Frans Kellendonk and Maarten bet Hart. 

But the process has been slow, in spite of all the literary 
activity in the Netherlands. “We need a Dutchman to win 
the Nobel Prize," Mulisch quipped. “That would change 
the whole outlook on our literature. In 1979 Louis-Paul 
Boon [a Flemish poet] got a letter from the Swedish 
ambassador inviting him to an audience. Everyone knows 
what that means. A few’ days later Boon died of a heart 
attack." Another candidate, the novelist Simon Vestdijk, 
“also died too soon." 

One impediment, Mulsich said, is that there have been 


no great writers to draw attention to the others- “Even the 
Scandinavians had Strindberg, Ibsen, Kierkegaard. Some 
people abroad may have heard of our Muliaiuli. Of 
course, a lot of Dutch writing has always belonged to the 
naturalistic drawing room tradtion. which doesn't do well 
abroad — portraits of daily life. Vermeer on paper. We 
have no great problems. We are a small country under a 
gray sky with a Calvinist past." 

The Dutch have been a nation of avid book buyers and 
primers since the 17th century, when their pape making, 
printing and engraving turned the nation mto Europe's 
center of publishing. Work from other countries was 
printed here because it was cheaper or because it was 
censored back borne. The Netherlands' mixture of liber- 
tarian and mercantile spirit led Descartes and Pascal to 
publish here what they could not bring out in France. 
They were followed by Rousseau and Voltaire; the latter 
had such spats with his sting) 1 Dutch publisher that he 
even modeled an unpleasant character in “Candide" after 
him. 

According to the Institute for Book Research in Am- 
sterdam. the Dutch nowadays spend close to S40 a person 
annually on books. The English spend less than SI 2. For a 
population of 14 million people, there are more than 1 , 100 

public libraries. There is a bookshop for every 7.000 
people, not counting the multitude of secondhand book- 
stores, elegantly known here as “antiquarian.” 

The Athenaeum bookshop, on Amsterdam's central 
Spui Street, is one of the city's choicest spots for literature, 
with a stock of more that 15.000 titles. Athenaeum is a fine 
barometer of shifting tastes; literary accounts of travels, 
old and new, occupy a prominent place, and an entire 
room is still devoted to classical texts and studies, ran g in g 
from the illustrated “Love and Seduction in Antiquity” to 
21 titles on and by Aristotle. Purchases of French litera- 
ture have dropped, the bookstore’s director, Guus Sdiui 
said, since studying French ceased to be obligatory in high 

schooL 

By contrast. Lhe importers of Penguin Books here say 
the Netherlands is the company's largest customer outside 

the English-speaking world. Popular American authors 
include Norman Mailer, Philip Roth, John Updike. John 
Irving, Raymond Carver and Ann Beanie. 


Behind their jovial and broadminded manner, the 
Dutch are also a nation of quarrelsome citizens who like to 
exercise their considerable capacity for indignation. The 
primmer Calvinists criticize the Roman Catholics, and the 
Catholics argue among themselves about the authority of 
the Vatican. Satire and parody thrive — but of late people 
have expressed concern that more bitter and insulting 
language has found its way into print. 

T HIS year the Netherlands’ most prestigious literary 
prize became an object of strife and indignation 
and was not awarded at all. At issue was the work 
of Hugo Brandi Corstius. a Firebrand essayist and colum- 
nisL variously described here as a brilliant wit and a verbal 
terrorist. Brandt has invented a tongue of his own. L>pper- 
lands. with which he aims to free the Dutch language from 
the ‘clutches of prattle emanating from radio and mouth, 
from newspaper and postcard." 

But he has also attacked many members of the estab- 
lishment. particularly Catholics. Some months ago. when 
the jury of the national P. C. Hooft Prize for Literature 
awarded Brandt the prize for I9S4, the minister of culture 
vetoed the choice. The writer, the minister argued, had 
“injured pan or Lhe population" and his systematic insults 
did not deserve to be encouraged with a national award.” 

Brandt retorted that the “minister against culture" had 
"declared war on literature.” A noisy and lengthy national 
debate ensued — involving the cabinet, the prime minis- 
ter. writers, artists' guilds and the press — on whether 
literary merit is separate from morality and therefore not 
in the government’s domain. One effect of the ruckus has 
been the suggestion by some cultural critics that literary 
awards are better left to private rather than public institu- 
tions. The P.C. Hoofi Prize jury has resigned, and while 
Dutch literature flourishes, it is uncertain whether the 
much-coveied prize will be awarded Lhe next year. ■ 


Mariise Simons, who reports from Latin America fix’ The 

\'m- York Times, is u frequent visitor to her native Nether- 
lands. She wrote this article for The A’eu York Times Book 
Re view. 


t 



iWKSfe. 


Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 8, 1985 


FOCI 


TRAVEL 


Relaxed Exploration in New Orleans 


jilt ! 1 


r E 

I I 1 




i ■ i 


by Frances Frank Marcus 


N EW ORLEANS — New Orlea- 
nians ore deriving great satisfac- 
tion from the Fact that the rest of 
the world has discovered black- 
ened Tedfish. They have always known that 
their food was the best, along with their jazz 
and their Victorian architecture. Now news 
about Cajun cooking and its attempted clon- 
ing Trom Manhattan to Singapore has given 
the citv an added lift. 


Southern Louisiana has a tradition of 
good cooks, trained by the French who ar- 
rived in the 18th century. A surge of new 
restaurants combined with a slow economy 
has kept them striving to please. Fall and 
winter weather, which ranges from Indian 
summer to cool with an 'occasional cold 
snap, encourages the appetite. In addition. 
November brings camellias: December, 
poinsettias: Jan. T. the Sugar Bowl, followed 
by the Super Bowl on Jon. 26. Two weeks 
later there is Mardi Gras. Feb. 1 1 . a day that 
most people take os a holiday. 


Few cities offer more relaxed exploring. 
The narrow streets of the French Quarter, 
the Vieiix Carre, are ideal for walking, with 
refreshments at hand and eclectic possibili- 
ties For Christmas shopping. Royal Street is 


good for antique hunting: Jackson Square 

for relaxing. 

For observing the port, uy Moon Walk 
beside the Mississippi in the French Quarter 
or a riverboat like the Natchez, a siemwheel 
steamboat, which offers two-hour cruises. 

from 11:30 A.M. to 2:30 P.M. The fare is 
S9.50. $4.75 for children. 

A 60-cent ride on the St. Charles streetcar, 
the city's only remaining line, is also a must. 
Board a car on Carondolet Street just off 
Canal Street and try for a seat on a mahoga- 
ny bench trimmed with brass. The route 
skins the Garden District, a neighborhood 
of 19th-century mansions. To visit th<* zoo 
(9:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. weekdays, to 5 P.M. 
weekends), get off at Audubon Park. Entry- 
fee: S4.50. S2 for children. 

Jean Lafitte National Historical Park 
rangers lead four different free walking tours 
in and around the French Quarter. Some 
tours go to the historic Sl Louis Cemetery' 
No. 1 and the Garden District. Walks begin 
in the French MarkeL at Decatur and Du- 
maine Streets. For details, call 504-589-2636. 

The Delta Queen, a paddlewheeler deco- 
rated in gold leaf and Tiffany glass, and its 
younger sister, the Mississippi Queen, begin 
fail cruises on the lower Mississippi in early 
November. From their new terminal the 
boats will paddle upriver, visiting various 
plantations. Cruising to Vicksbura and back 


from Dec. 20 to 27.' the Mississippi Queen 
will celebrate a Cajun Christmas complete 
with cooking lessons. Other cruises range 
from two to seven nights, and the cost of a 
cabin for two runs from about 5375 to 5700 a 
night. Further details: 504-586-0631 or 800- 
543-1949. 

Fall brings country festivals. The Destre- 
han Plantation House Festival will be held 
Nov. 9 and 10 on the Mississippi 20 miles 
upstream. Tables laden with regional food, 
arts and crafts will occupy the lawn beside 
the 1787 house built in West Indies and 
Greek Revival style. Entry fee: 52. 

The French Quarters annual caroling will 
take place by candlelight in Jackson Square 
from 7 to 8 Dec. 22. 

Christmas country-style is celebrated at 
Madewood, a plantation house on Bayou 
Lafourche 72 miles from New Orleans from 
5:30 to 8:30 P.M. on Dec. 14. There will be 
carolers on the balcony and turkey dinner 
for 200. Tickets are $40. There are hotels in 
Thibodaux. a half-hour's drive away, for 
those who want to stay overnight. Accom- 
modations at Madewood have been booked 
for months, but if you're interested in mak- 
ing reservations for next year, write to 420 
Julia Street, New Orleans, 70130 or call 504- 
524-19S8. 

One of the best small museums in the 
country, the 1857 Gallier House in the 






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French Quarter, which contains authentic 

furnishin gs and offers changing exhibits on 
dining habits, plumbing, linens and other 
apsects of the 19th century, will be decked 
out for Christmas beginning Dec.7, Open 
from 10 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. Monday to Satur- 
day (last tour: 3:45; S3). 


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M USIC is thriving in New Orleans. 
Young bands, modem jazz groups 
and Dixieland are beard in hotel 
lobbies, shopping malls, restaurants and mu- 
sic clubs and on the street. On Saturday 
nights about 60 dubs offer live jazz, rhythm 
and blues or Cajun music. On week nights 
live music can be found at 30 or so clubs. 

Preservation Hall (726 St Peter Street: 
504-522-2238 or 504-523^8939) is still the 
first stop for traditional jazz from 8:30 to 
12:30 nightly. Thanksgiving and Christmas 
included but not Mardi Gras. Admission: 
52. Food and beverages are not sold, but 
spectators may bring drinks. 

The Raspberry Rag timers. Creole Rice, 
the T -nni^iana Repertory Jazz Ensemble and 




to <a a w «o yj ■ 

3 2 «£* * 

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BOURBON ST 


ROYAL ST 


Preservations 

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JACKSON 

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Orleans. 


other jazz bands play from 9 to midnight 
Tuesday to Saturday in Le Jazz Meridien in 
the Hotel Meridien (614 Canal Street: 504- 
525-6500). Drinks start at 53.25. 

Sundays from I to 3 P.M. jazz players 
offer free concerts in die performance tent in 
the French Market’s Dutch Alley. The 
French Market information booth at Deca- 
tur and Sl Ann Streets has program details.' 

Bird lovers are in luck this year. The 
Spanish Colonial-style Presbytere, a state 
museum on Jackson Square, will open a 
John James Audubon show on Dec. 6. Orga- 
nized bv the American Museum of Natural 
History, it will run to Feb.2. Hours: 10 A.M. 
to 6 P.M. Tuesday to Sunday. Entry fee: 52. 

From Nov. 10 to Jan. 12 the New Orleans 
Museum of Art in City Park will display- 
works by David, Ingres,” Degas. Renoir and 
Picasso among others, all collected by the 
local philanthropist Muriel Bui t man Fran- 
cis. From Dec. 8 to Jan. 26 the museum will 
focus on painters admired by French kings 
from the time of Louis XIV to the French 
Revolution. Open from 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. 
Tuesday to Sunday: entry fee: S3. 

Thanks to overly optimistic hotel builders. 
New Orl eans is now prime ground for bar- 
gain hunting, especially for those who would 
like a room in a small French Quarter hotel. 

One of the best is Grenoble House (329 
Dauphin Street: 504-522-1331). an all-suite 
hotel occupying three Victorian town 
houses. The 17 suites have kitchens and 
china. Sherry on arrival and Continental 
breakfasts included in the rate. One- bed- 
room suites start at S110, reduced to SS5 
from Dec. 1 to 26. Arnaud’s. a first-rate 
restaurant around the corner, delivers meals 
to guests who want to dine in. 

Closer to the river is Le Richelieu ( 1234 
Chartres Street; 504-529-2492: 800-535- 
9653), a smalL quiet motel occupying a 1 9th- 
centuiy mansion and 3 former macaroni 
factory. A small cafe overlooks the patio and 
pOoL Rates for two start at S70, including 
parking, somewhat less during slow seasons. 

The Royal Orleans (621 St Louis Street; 
504-529-5333) is near fine French Quarter 




AUDUBON 
L PARK 


LOUISIANA 




restaurants and ha«t its own deluxe restau- 
rants. Ask for an outside room. Current rales 
for two range from $150 to S170 a night: 
next year they wQl range from $158 to Sl SO. 

There are newer hotels than the Pontchar- 
train (2031 Sl Charles Avenue: 504-524- 
0581). a step away from the Garden District 
but none with a more loyal following. 
Rooms are spacious, the service friendly. 
Rates for two begin at 5105, suites at S205. 


dinner only . Monday so Friday. Be prepared 


to wait up to two tours. 

Galatoirt's ( 209 Bourbon Street;504-525- 
2021) is a New Orleans landmark that insists 
cm coats and tics after 5 P.M. arid all dav 
Sunday, but the French-Creole food is wejl 
worth' the effort. Eggplant sniffed with 
shrimp and crabtnean, a meal in itself for. 
S10. is highly recommended. No reservations 
accepted 

Alter a decline, Anutufs (813 BeenviBe 
Street: 304-523-5433), with double glass 
windows and mosaic ole fkwx, is once again 
in favor. There are more than 100 items on 
the Freocb-Creoie menu. A favorite is fillet 
or pompano stuffed with scallop mousse 
(S19.50). 

The plusbgnfl room a ttbe Wmdsor Court 
(300 Grrar Street 504-523-6000>griHsrrd- 
frsh with mesqoite: also cm the menu me 
Alaska caribou and Norwegian salmon; For 
Inoch the redftsh is 59; a larger dinaer por- 
tion is S 14.50. 

Begto'stn the Royal Soocstt (300 Bour- 
bon Street; 504-5586-0300) serves a boontir 
ful seafood buffet at Friday lunch, $15^5 for 
shrimp. oysters, catfish and 65 other items. 


N AMING good restaurants is like 
naming them in Paris. The list quick- 
ly gets out of band. Expandable 


1 ly gets out of band. Expandable 
waistbands are usefuL 

Local food critics rive high marks to Hen- 
ri. (614 Canal Street; 504-527-6708), the Ho- 
ld Meridien ’s handsome new restaurant. 
The c uisin e is Alsatian: die defer, white 
orchids and green marble. The menu du scar 
is S39J0 with choices changing daily. One 
lineup: small quiche appetizer, foie gras with 
truffles. Scotch salmon souffle, sherbet, rab- 
bit stuffed with watercress mousse and fresh 

pear in puff pastry with icecream and cham- 
pagne sauce, coffee and perils fours. 

Commander's Palace (1403 Washington 
Avenue; 504-899-8221) in the Garden Dis- 
trict prepares iocal seafood and other Louisi- 
ana specialties with a light and appealing 
touch. Reservations are imperative. For 
shrimp lemoulade. house salad, trout with 
roasted pecans, and chocolate fudge cake 
and coffee, the price is S24 3 person. 

K- Paul's Louisiana Kitchen (416 Chartres 
Street; 504-524-7394) is Paul Pnidhomme’s 
homely temple of blackened redfish, the 
place for spicy Cajun fare, served flippan tly. 
When available, the black redfish is S26. 
Other main dishes start at 522. Open for 


Tbe hotels leafy patio is the place to stop for 
a drink, 5350 for a glass of wine. 

Weekend jazz brunches abound. The 
Crescent City Jazz Band plays at the Fair- 
moat (University Race; 504-529-7111) from 
10:30 AJt to 2:30 P.M. Sundays in the Blue 
Room. It's best if yon have a hearty appetite: 
omelets to carter, eggs Benedict, fired duck- 
en, seafood, pancakes Oscar and on and cm. 
520. ■ 


. Frances Frank. Marta fives in iVcw Qrkans 
andisafrtqueMamtributarto TheNtw York 
Tunes, far which ihsamdc wm wnntn. 


Mexico Acts to Reassure Tourists 


by Morris D. Rosenberg 


I N the wake of the tragic earthquake 
that struck Mexico City SepL 19. the 
Mexican government has begun an 
urgent campaign to reassure tourists 
about their safety and protect its vital high 
season winter travel business. 

Officials in Mexico emphasize that the 
extensive destruction was confined to a rela- 
tively s m all, older section of the dry — 
primarily Colonia Roma, but also affecting 
parts of downtown and the Zona Rosa, a 
major tourist area. Power, water, sewage, 
transportation and local phone systems in 
the capital are nc»w operating, all 53 airports 
around the country are handling traffic, and 
all highways are open. The initial quake and 
aftershock left major tropical resorts like 
Acapulco and Can cun unharmed. 

More than 8,000 bodies have been recov- 
ered from the wreckage in Mexico Gty and 
thousands of Mexicans are still missing. 
More than 400 buildings collapsed, about 
300 are believed ready to fall and some 
already have been tom down. Damages are 
estimated at S4 billion. 

Travel agents have been concerned that 
the tragedy in the capital might cause many 
Americans and other tourists to bypass — at 
least for a time — that center of culture, 
business and government The city is the 
main destination for tourists, who generally 
combine it with one of the beach resorts as 
part of a package. 

The capital is a major airline gateway — 
though not the only one — to the popular 
recreational historical and archaeological 
rites scattered throughout the country that 
last year drew nearly five million visitors. 
Almost a million stopped in Mexico Gty at 
least for a few days. 

For Mexico, already suffering from seri- 
ous inflation, high unemployment and a con- 
timring flight of capital to the United States, 
the 52.2 billion tourism industry is second' 
only to oil as a producer of much-needed 
hard currency. A sharp drop in arrivals from 
the United States, which supplies 85 percent 
of the visitors, would be another blow to its 
shaky economy even as the country begins 
the long process of restoration. 

With these sobering facts in mind. Tour- 


ism Minister Antonio Enriquez Savignac 
flew to New York recently with a message 
for navel industry leaders: “Many of the 
television reports . . . tend to give the im- 
pression that the capital was completely dev- 
astated. That impression is incorrect," 

And as Mexico launched its advertising 
and public relations offensive, a group of 
U. S. tour operators returned from a one- 
week inspection trip to the capital and three 
resort cities. 

“Tins is a slower fall season than normal 
but people arc still traveling to Mexico," said 
Anna Di Leo of Alexander Charters and 
Tours, a New York wholesaler-retailer spe- 
cializing in packages to M erica 

Mexico was not enjoying a super season 
before the earthquake, although business 
was increasing. That was because its hotel 
rates and airline fares — despite some earlier 
benefits from devaluation — could not com- 
pete effectively with European prices due to 
the strong dollar abroad, one tour operator 
said. 

Full restoration of international phone 
soviet and normalization of communica- 
tions with the rest of Mexico were expected 
momentarily. Earlier, to enable memb ers of 
the travel industry to communicate with ho- 
tels, tour operators and airlines in Mexico, 
the government set up an air courier service 
from New York. 


H ERE is a summary of current condi- 
tions affecting visitors to Mexico 
Gtv, accordine to n ffn w r nnu ii)_ 


-LJ-City. according to a government- 
sponsored survey: 

HOTELS: Of the capital's 507 hotels with 
° f 35 ”- 50 rooms ’ 153 hotels with 
19,167 rooms were in the areas hit by the 
tremors Six hotels with 888 rooms were 
totaUy destroyed, and seven with 848 rooms 
were partially destroyed and probably win 
not be restored. Twenty-two hotels suffered 
major damage. 25 have minor dam 51 
nave decorative damage such as fallen plas- 
ter, and 42 holds remain in perfect condi- 
tion. 

While 9 percent — 1,73 6 — of all hotel 


Versailles and Central: the Continental De ;. 
Carlo, Reridenda and Montreal were among T j - 
those “semi-destroyed.” 

HEALTH: The Pan American Health Or- , 
ganization said last week there is no danger 
of epidemics in tbe.capital and tourists do 
not need any vaccinations to visit arw area of : 
Mexico. The Mexican Ministry of Health & " 
has reco m mended that, as 3 precaution, yisi- ^ 
tors to the capital avoid drinking any water * * • 
that has not been boiled or bottkd . 
standard rule over the years for many tour- . . 
ists, especially in the tropics, ihe govern- . 
ment also suggests that visitors avoid food 
and drinks sold on the capital's streets. 

TOURIST ATTRACTIONS: The major- 
ity of Mexico City’s attractions —such as ^ 
the Metropolitan Cathedral National Pal- 
ace. Palace of Fine Arts and the National 1. .. 
University — are reported to be in perfect ■ 
condition, but in some cases tour operators 
have had to modify routes because, scone • 
areas are cordooed ctfL The famous National . 
Museum of Anthropology in Chapriltepec. 

Park also cs capfri nrrerattwf 

Among places damaged but resteaWe are • 
the well-known typical tourist zones: La _ . 
L a g i n il la . La Mated, Tepilo, ; Plaza G mr- iu ■ 
baldi and Zona Rosa. The only arcfcaeologi 1 ' 
cal zone affected was the Temple in .. 

the Pino Suarez subway station. All nouhofct 
bars and nightclubs were untouched. Of 354 ' 
restaurants belonging to the Mexican Res- ; ; - 
taurant Association, only 12 (scored dam- . 
ages that forced them- to close: 


Tv, a luisuiccieo. Mexi- 

co City hotels destroyed were: the Reins 
Pnncipado, Finistena, Romano Downtown^ 


OTHER TOURIST AREAS: Ixtapa-Zi- 
huatanejoon the Pacific Coast was the only ’ 
mjyoT resort area to suffer damages from the 
tremors of Sept. 1 9 and 20. Th^ 1 were mainly 
superficial and affected only the buddings 1 
masonry and external *« rfm, according to 
the town officials. Three of the 2& teitds to 1 _ 
the area remain dosed. 

Gub Med-lxtapa was undamaged but will.' - 
be dosed until Nov. 15 to permit a thorough ' 
inspection. Three other Chib Med Median 
resort villages —^at Ftaya Blanca, Guaymas : 
and Cancun — were unt oodt ed and remain, 
open. Also undamaged and open are die 
Club’s five archaeological villages — ihree in 
the Yucatan ami ^ two outside Mexico City at : ,i 
Teotihuacan and Chnhiln ■ ' 3 S' 


Teotihuacan and Chohita. 

2 /555 The Itastegau Ptfff 


Exotic Sounds 




as with Matsushita (Panasonic elsewhere) 
underwriting the Grand KabukL 


S Continued from page 7 

audiences. There was also, Browc 


T HE varying degree of governmental 
and corporate assistance also helps 
explain some imbalances that still ex- 


JL explain some imbalances that still ex- 
ist in the range of non-Western music of- 
fered abroad. Korean and Burmese music 
gets shorter shrift here, says Gordon, be- 
cause those governments have less foreign 
hard currency with which to support their 
touring artists. 


The long-time isolation of mainland Chi- 
na and the interna! repression there or tradi- 
tional culture discouraged the spread of tra- 
ditional Chinese music to Western 


audiences. There was also. Browning sus- 
a lingering association in Westtra 
mmtb Mth amphste pentatonic mu^f 
Hollywood films. And. 
flunks Gordon, Westerners believed all 

uese mmne sounded as abrasive and percS- 

6 Whjch accoin Panies Peking Op- 
era, which was onginaiiy intended 
outdoor performance. But now, such stric- 
tures are loosening, with a tour of traditiraS 
musicians from Peking scheduled 
ary^nd the New Yori, ChiuSTcS™^ 
^beginning to muster fairly. sopltiSated 
performances of traditional music 
Another disparity exists betweeri classical 
high-art musical traditions, folk rai5?Sd 
commercial popular music. New 
ample.high-an musicians, and an iucreJxJ 


? | 0p U i^ lrou P«, fike the Setog*-, 

riStSS? r T0Ure KtoKia - the' more ;snr , 
cwntfolk forms, nncomaminate^bv-West- . 


rorm s, uncon taminate^by West- , 
era; influence, have been harder to btmg. • 


Now, however, more and more govenr '. t v 
Pnvatt impresarios lie Gordon^ .ij- 
^sedpng^rhefoOcimisk^toaBti^. c’ 
the bulk of the foreign imports, apart (rom ~ ^ ^ 

popular brmds. trZ ^ ‘ 

nitore^ whidi has as modi to do with qoea- . *• 

lvae^^^ U ? ffl,al Pranas with strict- " ; je 

: fcSS 2 S-? , S! y - ^ °«» of the v, V ; f . 

likes to put£& 

more glamorous foot forward fint” W-ff f 

* 1985 *** York Taho ' ^ 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1985 


FOR fun AND PROFIf 



ents 





ty Paul Grimes 

- ^ you asked Pan 

American World Airways to sell 

you an unrestricted economy- 

dass ticket from New York to 
Hong K.ong and hack, you would recently 
have been quoted a price of $2,246. But a 
creatiye travel agent can arrange, for about 
5800 more, flights not just to Hong ££ 
and back but around the world with unlimit- 

eAstopovers —all in first dass. 

puch rarely publicized possibilities can 
hap vntexnationaLair travelers "benefit great- 
ly from today’s highly competitive market- 
place. Airlines hesitate to tread in such areas 
themselves because itineraries can be com- 
plicated to arrange and may lessen their 
revenues. They are perfectly legal, however, 
under agreements between governments and 
the.rules of the 100-odd member airlines of 
the International Air Transport Asso ciatio n. 
(IATA). The airlines usually welcome what- 
ever business travel agents bring them. 

You need more, however, than ah agent 
who amply consults a computer. You need 
one fa mili a r with the IATA fare structure, 
knows how it can be used to best advantage 
and is up-to-date on currency fluctuations 
and their impact on the price erf flying. 

If you amply want to go to one point in 
Europe or Asm and back at the lowest possi- 
ble round-trip fare and can malty your plans 
far in advance, your best option is dear Pay 
lowest available promotional fare. 

But if you must travel on short notice, 
have a complicated itinerary with lots of 
stopovers, want the freedom to flang e. your 
plans en route without penalty or, above all, 
want to bask in the luxury of first class at 
bargain prices, read on. 

Helping clients do just that is a specialty - 
of Mark H. Stratton, president of Stratton 
Travel Inc. of Franklin Lakes, New Jersey. . 
Many of his clients fly internationally on 
business and demand both maTimnm flexi- 
bility- and minimum price. 

Last year a representative of Singapore 
Airlines recommended Stratton to me as a 
Lravel agent who knows a lot about fares. A 
few months ago I asked him by telephone to 
construct an itinerary that my wife and I 
could use to travel around the world— a trip 
that we hoped to take but later hati to cancel 
We originally intended to fly economy 
class and follow one of the many round-the- 
world itineraries that use two connecting 
- airlines. At this writing, the price for that 
_ . method was $2,099 a person, and the tickets 
' . are substantially restricted regarding stop- 

. ; , overs and routing. 

■J But Stratton showed how, for $2,638 each, 
~~ could seac * 115 ar0Qn( i the world in first 
' -re tCass with unlimited stopovers, using many 
"X airlines, and be able to make chang es en 
" route with no penalties. Such a ticket would 
i cost at least $5,000 if bought from an airline 
in New York. One reason for the difference 
■ - was that Stratton planned to charge.us the 
t-' dollar equivalent of what the tickets would 
- * have cost az the time in Irish pounds. 

If his calculations had been made this fall, 


'-if 


ourisfc 


Irish pound, like most European currencies, 
had strengthened against the dollar. But it 
still would have been a substantial bargain. 
In capsule, here is how all this is possible: 

In 1972, the airlines in the IATA cartel 
attempted to bring order to a chaotic inter- 
~ national pricing situation by establishing 
what are called fare construction units, or 
FCU’s. Each FCU was made equal to $1, 
and the fares in foreign countries were based 
~ on the values of their respective currencies at 
that time in relation to the dollar. 

Thus, one FCU represented 038377 of a 
r-*$ritish or Irish pound, 5.11 French francs, 
: 335 West German marks and 581.5 Italian 
.. lire. So, if you applied the longstanding air- 
- line rule dial that a fare had to be based on 
- the currency of the country where the trip 
, : started, it made no difference in cost wheth- 
er, for example, a trip between New York 


and London began in either city: If the price 
was $1,000 from New York, it was £383 from 
London, the amounts being equivalent. 

That was in 1972. As currencies fluctuat- 
ed, the system was thrown off balance. So 
IATA members would meet and impose sur- 
charges to bridge gaps. If the dollar doubled 
in value in relationship to the French franc, 
for example, the French could not be asked 
to pay double for their international air 
tickets: they could sot afford to. 

Over they cars, more than stopgap adjust- 
ments were clearly needed. So IATA mem- 
bers instituted what they called a currency 
adjustment factor, or a percentage surcharge 
based on the highest one-way direct fare 
between the point of origin and any point on 
the way. That was to be applicable to an 
entire journey beyond those countries, even 
if it was around the world and then some. 

In planning our trip, Stratton searched for 
a country where the dollar was strong and 
where be could apply a highly favorable 


A tale of how 
economy and 
luxury can mix 


currency adjustment factor. He had to fol- 
low the rule of basing our air fare chi die 
currency of the country where the trip theo- 
retically started, but he did not have to 
. charge us for it in that currency and we did 
not, in fact, have to leave from there. 

So he selected Ireland as the origin and 
Hong Kong as the direct destination with the 
highest one-way fare, even though we would 
not actually be flying that route. A currency 
adjustment factor of 343 could thus be ap- 
plied to our entire journey. The Irish pound 
was worth $1.05 at the time. 

To "begin his calculations, Stratton used 
the round-trip first-class fare between New 
York and Hong Kong of $4326, or 4326 
FCU’s, which is what I would have had to 
pay Pan Am if I had bought from the airline 
directly for such a ticket via the Pacific. 
Stratton originated each ticket in Shannon, 
however, which meant that he had to in- 
crease the price of each ticket by 552 FCU’s 
. — the Shannon-New York economy-class 
fare — even though we would not actually 
travel that leg. This brought the total fare to 
4,878 FCU’s a person. Then, using the IATA 
exchange rate of 0.38377 Irish pounds to the 
dollar, he converted the FCU’s to 1,872. He 
then multiplied this by the currency adjust- 
ment factor of 343, or 1343 percent, which 
raised thefare to £2,512. Then, using the rate 
of $1.05 to the pound, he determined that the 
fare was $2,638 for each ticket 

Under airline rules, there was no need for 
us to stop in Ireland at alt In fact, it was 
suggested that we complete our journey by 
flying from London to New York on the 
British Airways Concorde. As . our fare, was 
constructed, it would have cost us only $262 
extra per tidcet 

To find an inventive agent who can save 
you money, look for one who deals heavily in 
international business travel but has time for 
vacationers as welL An airline probably will 
not recommend anyone, but it may give you 
the names of several in. your vicinity. 

- Be aware, however, that creativity has its 
limits. Starting or ending tickets where you 
will not actually travel is common these days 
if exchange rates or fares work in your favor, 
provided the routing seems reasonable. But 
if an agent proposes, for example, that you 
pay for a 100-mfle flight between two remote 
cities in Africa, then theoretically take a boat 
across the Atlantic to be eligible for a cheap 
Concorde fare between New York and Paris, 
Air France may well not honor your ticket. ■ 

© 1985 The Sew York Times 


TRAVEL 



The Chaco: Really Off the Beaten Track 


by Edwin McDowell 


F ILADELFIA, Paraguay — In the- 
ory. at least, no destination is more 
sought after by travelers than Off 
the Beaten Track, that elusive 
Eden unspoiled by civilization. While the 
prospects of finding such places on our 
crowded planet shrmk almost daily, some 
relatively unspoiled places still exist and the 
name of one of them is Filadelfia. 

This Filadelfia is a settlement in Paraguay 
founded early in this century by Mennonites, 
members of a 16th-century Protestant sect 
that fled Europe for the New World in 
search of religious freedom as well as exemp- 
tion from conscription for military service. 

Today, Paraguay, a tiny landlocked pasto- 
ral nation hemmed in by Argen tina. Brazil 
and Bolivia, is largely ignored by travelers to 
Bio, Buenos Aires or La Paz_ And of the few 
tourists who do manage to' find their way to 
Asuncion, the sleepy capital, few ever find 
their way out to Ftladelfia. 

That is because the village is accessible 
only after a bone-jarring 10-hour bus ride 
250 miles northwest into the Chaco Boreal, a 
California-sized wilderness that fans out 
from just beyond Asuncion westward to the 
Bolivian border, almost 500 miles away. And 
even after having arrived in Filadelfia, some 
visitors may find the wilderness too close to 
nature for comfort. 

A few weeks before I arrived, for example, 
a jaguar attacked a hunter on a ranch 50 
miles west of the village. Such incidents are 
rare but they underscore that the Chaco — a 
word apparently derived from the Quechua 
for hunting ground — has not been de- 
spoiled by tourists or tivffizaiion. 

The reasons are geological as well as geo- 
graphical, for the Chaco is a mixture of 
desert, jungle, swamp and forest. "While it 
makes up more than 60 percent of Paraguay, 
the Chaco has only one paved road and 
contains less than 4 percent of the nation's 
33 million residents. Professor John Hoyt 
Williams of In diana State University, who 
has written widely on Paraguay, said that the 
Chaco “has perhaps changed ecologically 
less than any other sizable area of the earth’s 
surface.” 

The wonder is that the Chaco was not 
despoiled years ago. Early in this century 
land barons from Argentina and the United 
States owned milli ons of its acres. Foreign 
oil companies drilled hundreds of explor- 
atory wells. And after oil was discovered at 
the foothills of the Bolivian Andes, Paraguay 
and Bolivia fought a bloody three-year war 
in the Chaco, under the illusion that it was 
rich in oil reserves. 

In retrospect, the Chaco War of 1932-35 


reads like comic opera, complete with Ger- 
man generals, Belgian rifles, British bombers 
and I talian gunboats. Indians brought down 
from the Andes battled Guarani Indians 
with grenades and flamethrowers for control 
of waterholes. Tanks and armored cars, 
bogged down in the mud. were destroyed by 
horse-drawn cannons. In many skirmishes 
the machete proved more effective than the 
machine gun. 

Yet there was nothing comic about the 
conflict, which left 85,000 dead as a result of 
thirst, hunger and summer temperatures that 
soar well above 100 degrees. 

P ARAGUAY won the war, and with it 
possession of two-thirds of the Chaco 
Boreal, but it never discovered oil. To 
this day only the Mennonites — who emi- 
grated from Canada be ginnin g in 1926, un- 
aware that Paraguay invited them in the 
hope of populating the disputed territory as 
a buffer against Bolivian territorial ambi- 
tions — have settled in the region in any real 
numbers. About 12,000 Mennonites live in 
dozens of tiny villages scattered throughout 
three contiguous colonies around Filadelfia. 

There are Filadelfias elsewhere in Latin 
America, including Bolivia, Colombia and 
Costa Rica, all of them apparently named 
after the city mentioned in the Bible. (Pas- 
sages in the Book of Revelation refer to the 
city of Philadelphia — Filadelfia is the Span- 
ish spelling — in Asia Minor, the seat of an 
early Christian church.) 

In contrast to most Paraguayans, who are 
a mixture of Spanish and Guarani In dian, 
the Mennonites tend to be light skinned and 
fair Inured. And they speak a German dialect 
far more often than they speak Spanish or 
Guarani, Paraguay’s national languages. 

The streets of Filadelfia bear such names 
as Friedhofstrasse and Harbinerstrasse. 
Most books in the combination library- 
bookstore are written in German. Instruc- 
tion in the modem elementary school is 
provided almost entirely in Goman, as is 
much of the instruction in the high school 
and at the teacher-training institute. Motion 
pictures shown locally are provided by the 
West German Embassy in Asunddn. And 
Lufthansa posters outnumber those of Gen- 
eral Alfredo Stroessner, the 71 -year-old dic- 
tator who has ruled Paraguay for 30 years 
and whose dour visage is plastered on acres 
of wall space in every comer of the country. 

German is not the only foreign language 
spoken in Filadelfia. “Every year at Easter 
we have a gathering of English speakers in 
the colony, and we always get more than 100 
people,” said Jacob Harder, a Filadelfia 
schoolteacher who graduated from college in 
Canada. Less than 10 percent of the colony’s 




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A weaver at an Indian resettlement near Filadelfia. 


The Mennonite churchin Filadelfia. 


PhcfcBiqphj by Beach 


high school graduates attend college, he said, 
since the Mennonite religion encourages its 
followers to become fanners. But some Fila- 
delfians study abroad, and one of Filadel- 
fia's two doctors graduated from medical 
school in Buenos Aires. 

Why would a traveler come to such a 
remote, bucolic place? Curiosity, mostly. But 
also because Filadelfia, with its communal 
government, is an interesting anachronism. 
It is a settlement where crime is virtually 
unknown. It is one of the dwindling number 
of communities that still do not have televi- 
sion. And it is one of the few communities 
whose only telephone connection with the 
outside world is at the central exchange. 

Moreover, travel agencies in Asuncion 
will book hunting or photography expedi- 
tions into the Chaco, using Filadelfia as the 
base for excursions of anywhere from two 
days to a week. But another reason to visit 
Filadelfia is the opportunity to observe a 
community of industrious men and women 
who take pride in their work and take pride 
at having overcome so much adversity. 

I F Filadelfia is hardly being overrun by 
tourists, the outside world is gradually 
making calls on iL Enough businessmen 
and merchants have found their way to the 
village in recent years for the community to 
have built the Hotel Florida, a spotlessly 
clean red-brick building Lhai serves hearty 
meals, including generous portions of steak, 
rice and beans. Liquor is taboo, but the hotel 
and the other restaurant sell a popular Para- 
guayan beer called Pilsen Dorada. 

Moreover, many products from the out- 
side world are sold in the cooperative store in 
the center of town. Among them: Flying 
Man sewing machines from China and re- 
frigerators from Brazil as well as Honda 
motorcycles and Toshiba fans. 

All these products are transported over 
the Trans-Chaco Highway, built in the 
1960s. The road is the economic lifeline of 
the Chaco, used by the Mennonites not only 
for imports but also for the export of cotton, 
cattle and peanuts. Yet despi te its impressive 
name, and despite official claims to the con- 
trary, the highway is paved for less than half 
its 500-mile length. So, during the rainy 
season, from January through March, the 
unpaved portions of the road are trans- 
formed into rivers of red mud and the Trans- 
Chaco is impassable for days at a time. 

I made the journey during the dry season, 
aboard the rickety bus that leaves Asuncion 
at 5:30 each morning. The dry season not- 
withstanding, it rained steadily for several 
hours, and water poured through the roof of 


the vehicle. The first few times the bus pulled 
into rest stops it looked as if the 17 passen- 
gers — including a half-dozen Paraguayan 
cowboys, who sipped verba mate from 
gourds called recuerdos through silver tubes 
called bombillas — would be conscripted to 
push the vehicle out of the ankle-deep mud. 

Some way. however, the bus managed to 
slip and slither its way back onto the main 
road. And when the skies brightened it was 
easy to appreciate (he stark, quiet beauty of 
the great plain — a plain dotted with cactus, 
shrubs and trees with some of the hardest 
woods known. 

The most prominent tree in the Chaco is 
the quebracho, and from its bark large 
amounts or tannin are extracted for making 
leather. A monument to the quebracho 
stands in the center of Filadelfia, a testimo- 
nial to the value of the tannin; its industrial 
use provided the Mennonites with the means 
to earn a living. Nearby are two Mennonite 
churches; the most modern is a brick struc- 
ture built in 1980 that -would not be out of 
place in any American suburb. Indeed, Fila- 
delfia. with its dusty streets, frame houses 
and wooden buildings, looks the way many 
small towns in the American West and Mid- 
dle West looked at the turn of the century. 

Quiet prevails nearly everywhere in the 
Chaco, which contains thousands of head of 
cattle, but Filadelfia is perfectly still only at 
night. During the day. motorcycles and mo- 
torbikes — many operated by mothers trans- 
porting children to and from school — roar 
down unpaved streets past carts drawn by 
horses and oxen. At 6 A.M. whistles sound 
summoning workers to the local factory, 
then they sound again signaling lunch hour 
and quitting time. 

Nights in the Chaco are heavenly. The air 
is as dear as perhaps anywhere "on earth. 
Tropical fragrances fill the evening hours. 
The Southern Cross — indeed, the entire 
galaxy — appears to be almost within arm's 
reach. The skies appear to be filled with a 
grand fireworks show, with shooting stars 
falling noiselessly to earth, their silver tails 
sweeping the heavens. 

The success of the Mennonites in settling 
the Chaco has inspired few other Paraguay- 
ans, most of whom still associate the region 
with war, hardship and jaguars. 

For the foreseeable future, at least, most 
of the Chaco will continue along its somno- 
lent way. accessible only to those wilting to 
make the effort, yet far enough Off the 
Beaten Track to make that effort worth- 
while. B 

1985 The Set r York Tima 




■ VIENNA, Musikvercin(td: 65^1.90). 
. CONCERTS— Nov. 10: TonkQnsUer 
'. Orchestra, Edgar Serpenbusch con- 
\ ductor, Grigori) Sokolov piano (Rach- 
maninov, Schumann V 
Nov. 11: Franz Schubert Quartet 
: (Schubert).' • 

Nov. 15: New Vienna Vocal Ensemble, 
Peter A) tm an n conductor ( Scb ubert). 
RECITALS — Nov. 9: Detiev EI- 
Unger piano (Bach). 

®Nov. 12: Igo Koch piano (Bach). 

Nov. 14: Kyoto Ogawa piano (Matsu - 
- nrnrn. Srhnmann ) 

•Staatsoper(teL 53240). 

BALLET— Nov. 11: “Sylvia" (Mir- 
ante. Delibes). 

' OPERA — Nov. 9, 12, 15: “La Tra- 
•• viata" (Gounod). 

Nov. 14: “The Escape from the Sera- 
glio" (Mozart). 

BELGIUM 

BRUSSELS, Palais des Beaux Arts 
(tel: 512-50.45). _ 

EXHIBITION —To Dec. 22: “Span- 
ish Splenders and Belgian Villages, 
1500-1700." 

■Musces Rovaux des Beaax-Am de 
Bdgiqne < tel :’S 1335.46). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: 
“Goya.” 

•Musfies Rovaux tTAn et (THisioire 
(id: 733.96.10). „„ „ 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. -22: “Los 
JbetcsJ” 




BRAZIL 


SAO PAULO, 18th Biennial Celebra- 
tion (id: 5717732). 
EXHIBITIONS— To Dec. 15: “Con- 


temponuy Art" (Borofsky, DokoupQ, 
EckeU, Duarte, Semse). 

ToDec. ^“Modern asssKs"(Ponxn- 
uri. Scgnll, Malfatti). 

To Dec. IS: “The Apprentice Tourist: 

reen BiaUiat and Mario de Andrade.” 

DENMARK 

HUMLESAEK, Louisiana Museum 
of Modem Art (td: 19.07. 19). 
EXHIBITION —To Dec. 1: “Russian 
Avant-Garde: 1910-1930” (Male- 
vhch, Kandensky, Gongarova). 

ENGLAND 

BIRMINGHAM. Town Hall (tel: 
236.15.55). 

CONCERT— Nov. 12: Lot don Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Andrew Davis con- 
ductor, Viktoria Mullova violin (Ros- 
sini, Paganini). 

LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
638-41.41). 

CONCERT — Nov. 10: London Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra, Antony Hopkins 
conductor, Erich Grucnbexg violin 
(Mozart, Rossini). 

Nov. 11: Orchestra of Sl John’s Smith 
. Square. Oliver Gilmour conductor, 
Claudio Antondli flute, PhUinpa Da- 
vies harp (Handel, Mozart). Northern 
SinTonia. Jerzy Maksymiuk con due- 
tor, Christian fctlcarias piano (Britten, 
Gounod). _ . . 

Nov. 12: London Oriana Choir, Lean 
Lovett conductor (Haydn, Vivaldi). 
Nov. 14: London Symphony Orches- 
tra, Andrew Davis conductor, Louis 
Lortie piano (Beethoven, Rossini). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 17: 
"J.RJL ToUrien,” paintings by Ray- 


Lidzey.*' 


INTERNATIONAL D ATEBOOK 


ITALY 


To Nov. 24: 


THEATER — Nov. 9, 11-16: “Les 
Miserables" (musical based on novel 
by Victor Hugo). 

•British Museum (tel: 636.1535). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 1986: “Bud- 
dhism: Art and Faith.” 

•Hayward GaBeiy (tel: 928J7.08). 
EXHIBITIONS — Nov. 14-Feb. 16: 
“Torres-Garcia: Grid-Paiirm-Sign,” 
“Homage to Barcelona" 

•London Coliseum (tel: 836.01.11). 
OPERA — Nov. 9: “Faust”(Gounod). 
Nov. 13: “Orpheus in the Under- 
world” (Offenbach). 

•National Theatre (tel: 633.08.80). 
THEATER— Nov. 7-9: “The Real In- 
spector Hound” (Stoppard), “The 
Critic” (Sheridan). 

Nov. 7-14: “Love for Love" (Con- 

&3i -14: “A Chorus of Disapprov- 
al" (Avekbonm). 

Nov. 15: “Mrs. Warren's Profession 
(Shaw). 

•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734.9052). 

EXJBmON — To Dee. 22: “German 
An in the Twentieth Century.” 
•Royal Opera House (td: 240.10.66). 
BALLET— Nov. 12 and 13: “La Ba- 
yadere” (Pelipa/Nureyev, Mmkus). 
■‘The Sons of Horn's” (Bintley, 
Mcgowan). "Elite Syncopations'' 
(MacMillan, Joplin). 

Nov. 15: "The Sleeping Beauty” (Pe- 
tipa. Tchaikovsky). 

OPERA — Nov.9:“Dirovaiore”(Ver- 

diV 

*Tate Gallery (tel: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 10: 
“Pound’s Artists,” “Gwen John, An 
Interior Life.” 

To Dec. 1: “Howard Hodgkin: Prints 
from 1977-1983 ” 

To Dec. 8: “Scott Burton.” 


Noy. 6- Jan. 10: “Kurt Schwitters." 
•Victoria and Albert Museum (tel: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 17: 
“Browne Muggs: English Brown Salt- 
Glazed Stoneware." 

To December: "The Japanese Folk- 
craft Movement: 19th &20th Century 
Textiles and Ceramics.” 

To Jan. 19: “Shots of Style: Great 
Fashion Photographs Chosen by Da- 
vid Bailey.” 

To Jan. 26: "Hats from India.” 

To May 25: “British Watercolours." 

STRATFORD-upoo-AV ON, Royal 
Shakespeare Theatre (td: 293633). 
THEATER— Nov. 9. 12, 16: “As You 
Like If” (Shakespeare). 

Nov. 9 and 14: “The Merry Wives of 
Windsor” (Shakespeare). 

Nov. 9 and 12: 6 a* You Like It” 
(Shakespeare). 

Nov. H, 13-15: “Othello" (Shake- 
speare). 


PARIS, A.D.A.C. Gallerie (tel: 
42.77_96_26). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 28: “Sculp- 
ture. Engraved Glass, Paintings, Pho- 
tography.” 

•American Center (id: 43.35.2! .50). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 30: “Wil- 
liam T. Wiley: California L" 

•Centre Cultural Chaillot-Galliera 
(tel: 47J20.71-S0L 

DANCE — To Nov. 1 1 : Peter Goss 
Dance Company, Compagnie Josiane 
Rivoire. 

Nov. 13-17: Nina Wiener and Danc- 


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•Centre Cultural de Boulogne (tel: 
46.84.77.95). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: "Pali- 
tana: The Sacred Village of Jainism." 
photographs and works by Nicole Tif- 
fen. 

•Centre Georges Pompidon (tel: 
42.77.12J3). 

EXHIBITIONS —To Nov. 1 1 : “Ray- 
mon Mason, Jean- Michel Alberoia, 
Viswanadhan. Gulham. Mohamed 
Sheikh." 

To Dec. 16: “Malta.” 

To Jan. 1 : “Klee et la Musique.” 
•Eglise SL-Severin (tel: 42.77.19.90). 
RECITAL — Nov. 14: Michd Bou- 
vard organ (Bach). 

•Eglise Si.-Vincent-de Paul (tel: 
42.77.19.90). 

CONCERT— Nov. 15: Ensemble Or- 
chestraJc de Paris, Jean- Pierre Wallez 
conductor. 

•Galerie Guign6(id: 42.66.66.88). 
EXHIBITION —To Nov. 23: “Corn- 
mere.” 

■Hflld Mferidaen (tel: 47JS. 12J0). 
JAZZ— To Nov. 16: WDd Bill Davis. 
•Malson de Victor Hugo (tel; 
42.72.16.65). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 31 : “Victor 
Hugo's Drawings.” 

•Music d’Art Modcrne I tel: 
47J23.61.27). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: “Vera 
Szekely,” “Modem Masters from the 
Thysscn- Born emi sza Collection." 
•Music Camavalet (id :42.72J 1 . 1 3). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 15: 
“Claude-Nicolas Ledoux." 

ToNov.24: “Les Grands Boulevards.” 
To Jan. 5: “Eugfcne B^'ol" 

•Mns&e du Grand Palais (tel: 
42.61J4.10). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: “Sir 

Joshua Reynolds: 1723-1 792.“ 

To Jan. 6: "La Globe de Victor Hugo." 
•Muste du Louvre (id: 42.6QJ39.2fi). 
EXHIBITION —To Jan. 6: “Le Bran 
a Versailles." 

• Music du Petit Palais (tel; 
42^5.12.73). 

EXHIBITION — To JanJ: “Soldi 

D’encrc,” Victor Hugo's manuscripts 
and drawings. 

•Salle Pleyd(iel: 45.63.07.96). 
CONCERTS —9: Ensemble Orches- 
tral de Paris, Jerome Kalienbach con- 
ductor, Paul Baduraskoda piano (Bee- 
thoven. Brahms). 

Nov. 13 and 14; Orchestra de Paris, 
Christoph Von Dohnaoyi conductor, 
Ghidon Kremer violin (Brahms, 
Schnittke). 

•Theatre des Champs- EWsecs (tel: 
47.23.47.77). 

DANCE — Dance Theater of Harlem 
— Nov. 9 and 10: “Giselle" (Coralli- 
/Perrot, Adam), "Troy Game” 
(North, Brasilian music). 

Nov. 1 1-1-4: “Caravanserai" (Beauy, 


Santana). “Voluntaries” (Tetley, Pou- 
lenc), “Dougla” (Holder, Leon). 
•Thtfltre du Rood-Point (tel: 
42J6.60.70). * 

RECITAL — Nov. 10: Anne Quefre- 
lec piano, Olivier Charlier viol on, 
Yvan Chiffoleau piano (Beethoven, 
Schumann). 

•Theatre Musical de Paris (tel: 
42.61.19.83). 

JAZZ MUSICAL— Nov. 13-Dec. 19: 
“Black and Blue” (Segovia/ Orezzoli). 
•Tour Montparnasse (tel: 
42.72.93.41). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “Four 
Centuries of Ballet in Paris.” 


GERMANY 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

OPERA — Nov. 9: Madama Butter- 
fly” (Puccini). 

Nov. 10: “Wozzecfc” (Berg). 

Nov. 11: “Lucia di Lammamoor” 
(Donizetti). 

•Philharmonic (tel: 25488-0). 
CONCERTS — Berlin Philharmonic 
Orchestra — Nov. 9:, Vaclav Neu- 
mann conductor, Cecfle Li cad piano 
(Gluck. Mozart). 

Nov. 12 and 13: Seiji Ozawa conduc- 
tor, Pierre Amoyal violin (Bruch. 
Bruckner). 

Nov. 15: Seji Ozawa conductor (Brit- 
ten). 

Nov. 10: Berlin Symphony Orchestra. 
Van Pascal Tortelier conductor. An- 
dreas Blau flute (Gounod, Haydn ). 
Nov, 10 and 1 1 : Berlin Radio Sympho- 
ny Orchestra. Gilmer Wand conduc- 
tor ( Bruckner). 

COLOGNE, Oper dcr Stadi (tel: 
21.25.81). 

JAZZ — Nov. 10: Georee' Winston. 
OPERA — Nov. 10: “The Bartered 
Bride” (Smetana). 

Nov. 12 and 14: ”Madama Butterfly” 
(Puccini). 

Nov. 13: “D Ritorno d'Ulisse in Pa- 
llia" (Monteverdi ). 

FRANKFURT, AlteOper(td: 13400). 

CONCERT — Nov. 12: Alban Berg 
Quart etl (Haydn, Schubert). 
RECITALS— Nov. 9: Bruno Leonar- 
do Gdber piano (Beethoven, Liszt). 
Nov. 10: Nadia Gedda-Nova piano, 
Nikolai Gedda tenor (Bizet. Tchaikov- 

»ky)- 


Staatsoper (tel; 


HAMBURG. 

35.1 5.55). 

OPERA — Nov. 9 and 13: “La Tra- 
viala" (Verdi). 

Nov. 1 5: “Fidelio” (Beethoven). 


MILAN, Teairo alia Scala (tel: 
887 92.11). 

BALLET— Nov. 11-13, 15:“Labisbe- 
tica domata” (Cranko. Scarlatti). 
CONCERTS — Nov. 13-15: Orches- 
tra del Tea tro alia Scala, Eliahu Inbal 
conductor (Mahler). 

RECITAL — Nov. 9: Maria Ewing so- 
prano. Geoffrey Parsons piano (Han - 
del. Schubert). 

ROME, Accademia NazionaJe di San- 
ta Cecilia (tel: 679.03. 89 1 . 
CONCERTS — Nov. 10-12: Orches- 
tra e Coro dell' Accademia NazionaJe 
di Santa Cecilia, Giuseppe Sinopoli 
conductor, Malcolm Frager piano 
(Schumann). 

VENICE, Ca' Vendramin Calergi 
( tel -.70.99.09). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 24: “Felice 
Carena." 

•Musco Cortex (id: 25625). 
EXHIBITION— To Nov. 10: “Opera 
Music: 1946-1985." 

•Museo del Seuecentodel: 70.99.09). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 20:“War- 
saw 1764-1830: Belloio io Chopin." 
•Scuola di San Giovanni Evangelista 
(tel: 70.68.52). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 8: "Mario 
Bona: 1960-1985.” 


JAPAN 


TOKYO. Azabu Museum of An (tel: 
582.14.10). 

EXHIBITION —To Dec. 27: “Beau- 
tiful Women in Ukiyo-E." 

•National Museum of Western An 
(tel: 828 J 1.31). 

EXHIBITION —To Dec. 8: “Vincent 
Van Gogh." 

•Ohta Memorial Museum del: 

403.08.80) . 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 24: "Paini- 
inq-c by Hokusai.” 

•Okura Shukokan Museum (tel: 

583.07.8 1) . 

EXHIBITION —To Dec. 19: “Early 
Modern Japanese Painting Styles." 
•Tobacco and Salt Museum (tel: 
476.20.41). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: “An- 
cient Mexico: History and Civilization 
in Mjeboacan.” 


NETHERLANDS 


AMSTERDAM, Concertgebouwftel: 
71.83.45). 

CONCERTS — Concert gebouw Or- 
chestra — Nov. 9:. Nikolaus Harnon- 
court conductor (Mozart, Schubert). 

Nov. 13-15: Nikolaus Harnoncourt 
conductor, George Pieterson clarinet 
(Haydn. Schubert). 

Nov. II: Japan Philharmonic Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Ken-Ichiro Kobaya- 


shi conductor, Osamu Yamaguchi gui- 
tar ( Rodrigo. Tchaikovsky j. 
RECITALS — Noy. 9: Vladimir Spi- 
vakov violin. Sergei Bezrodny piano 
(Beethoven). 

Nov. 10; Andrea Lucchesini piano 
(Beethoven. Chopin ). 

Nov. 12: TheoOlof violin (Bach). 

SPAIN 

BARCELONA. Gran Tea ire del Liceu 
(tel: 3 J 8.92.77). 

OPERA — Nov. 10: “Moses und 
Aron" (Schbnberg). 

MADRID. Fun dad on Juan March 
(tel: 435.42.40). 

EXHIBITION — Through Novem- 
ber: “Coo temporary Spanish Art." 
RECITAL — Nov. II: Margarita 
Rose organ (Bach). 

•Museo Espano! de Arte Coniempor- 
aneo(id: 449.71.50). 

•Museo Munidpal rtel: 222.57.321. 
EXHIBITION — Through Novem- 
ber: “Utopia and Reality en .Will 
Century Arduiieciure." 



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13933 

44=1 

441 , 



UnCarO 

17103 


50 =. 

60 '. 


Te.OG* 

17085 

I 0 1 . 

15 V. 

15 V. 

l_* 


12075 

i: 




RfcAir 

11335 

10=1 

or 9 



=inEw 

10021 

47 % 





1 D 4&3 

137 =. 

131 % 

tj? 

— '1 

Boetna i 

102«4 

47 % 

46 % 

47 '. 


DowCh 

9807 

37 ~a 

307 , 

37 =. 

is 


1 INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8 , 1985 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Htoft low LUt crip. 

Indus 1400 II 141080 1380 . 0 ) 130054 — LOO 

Trans 474.14 *7986 44048 A 75 J 3 + 1 41 

UNI 16034 U 14 : IS»i 7 140 70 

Camp $4481 571 04 $4284 147113 — 050 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonos 

uuiiim 

indusirlais 


CIom CKOe 

m y; —0.I 4 

78J3 — O.io 

82.18 —010 


I ! NYSE Diaries 


CWSB 

Pn«. 


854 

067 


747 

*42 


433 


Total issue: 

3034 


New Hlph* 

08 






55 J 10.050 


volume down 

50*301830 




NYSE index 


Htob Low Clow Ch'oa 
Composite ill 6*1 111.13 111 JO— 081 

industrials 12738 127 JS 13734 — OJM 

Tronso I0787 10780 107.43 + DJ0 

Utilities 57 JB 57 A4 57.7B +0JB 

Finance 120 JO 110.78 I10J4-0.I3 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


8 uv Salat *sim 

Nov. 4 175.10! 449.044 14617 

NO*. 5 15*843 410.003 04)47 

NOV 4 1 70 JOS 443.702 14.700 

NOV. 1 147305 410.002 15800 

Oct. 31 14X454 397,841 1X307 

-included In ine sales tWurcs 


Thursdays 

MSE 

Clo^ng 


VoLaM PJA 

111858800 

Prev.<PJM.vai 

129488608 

Prev caflulKtated date 

U3J0W08 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the doting an Wall Street ana 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 343 308 

Declined 300 247 

Unchanged ZM 3SS 

Total Irenes 807 S30 

New HHrta !6 10 

New Lows 15 1 

Volume kid 3571850 

Volume down 178*A50 


Standard & Poor's index 


Hleti LOW CISH cove 
Industrfali 214 JS 21139 21185 — 0.18 
Trams. I7SJS i74js 17&10 + ojo 

UIIlltlM MIV. B4J] 85JM +0.18 

Finance ww 2 X 17 212J —all 

ComoosHe 19 X 04 WX 16 K »282 — 0.14 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX Most Actives 


CoitwtH* 

tnauvnan 

Ffnonce 

Insurant* 

utilities 

Bonks 

TrortJ*. 


Week 
C V99 aw 
; *-823 39014 

1 +047 39X5* 

1 + 1 jo sam 

, 4-o£i met 

! 4" 083 277.70 
i + 167 31127 
1—054 54*83 



amex Stock index 



24ft 16 AAR J6 X* 

17ft OX. ASS 

50 X. J0A. AMR 

23ft IBft AMR pt XI 5 = J 

25*3 23 AN Rot 2.47 II. I 
22 10 AMR of 2.17 105 

13ft 7*i APL 

6TH 32ft ASA LOO 55 

r 10= s AVA J2 2.9 

28' '« 19' V AZP 2J3 70.0 


54 Li 15 J 0 22’. 22 22’. + 

13 145 1(T= I4*T 104. + ' 

7 7520 Ills 40': 4!':+l 

.IS =6 SI 23': 22 ' : 22'-.— 

L47 II.I 4 24 24 74 — 'S 

LI? 105 2 20 l - 20'. 30' 4 

70 9"k 0 1 O'* 

100 U 505 35 *. 34 % 34 ft — ft 

52 y 347 1111 itFi ii‘i , 

L72 10.9 7 477 2f 24>. 25 + '» 


Stocks Lower on Profit-Taking 


40 38 ’-a AtjtLab 1A0 U 16 172* 40ft 5«** 5?> + '* 
2P* I 'ft ACCOVVO JO 21 17 15 22=. 22*t ??** — '« 


24*. lift AcmeC JO 34 107 IT. 10*1 11 — - 

ID'-: 7 4cmeE J2b *5 11 4 ”1 2i 7> t 

10 15': Ada Ex ).02elQ8 40 17*. lfti 17*. + '« 

31 13': 4dm WJ J 10 i 44 104. 19ft 10ft 

14*3 Bft AflvSvS JB 17 a 29 14--. 14 14'. + '■ 

34 H 22 ' 1 AMD 34 4170 24=i ?4*i 24ft — 1 

11 ' a 101. Adobe n 74 10 ft 10 ft Id*. — * 

IT* 144, AdobBlA 105 U'n 14>. I4‘1 

14** 15'- Adan PtB 70» 14=1 14*. 76^ + '» 

121* 4', Advest .12 U 14 ZP »-* 9*3 *=- 

14'. 0 Acrflex 13 48 14’. IJ'i 14'*— » 

IS*: AetnLt 284 5J 16 1507 51ft 40'* 50':— ft 


57-. 53'. AeiLpI SJIo 08 40 5« 1 S5h 5o1 

38ft 22' ■ Anmns 1JD 15 6 1T9G 33 r 37 —I 

3*9 2': Alleen 7f 7ft 21. 2 *. 

57 44': AirPrd l.JS 27 17 E14 SS 5Jft 54 : — '• 

24** 17': AIrbPrt jS U U S3 20 1=*: M + 

:>i 1 *. aimoos .me 57 154 t*i iv> 1 *. 

33=1 20’. AloP ntA 10? 7LS 48 31ft 30'* 31’. + % 

8ft 44. AlaPdol 87 102 41 S’* 704 9 ' 3 + '• 

87 44': AlaPot «.{» 116 940: 32 SO 5t +2. 

84 70 AlaPpt 044 118 1410: 34 S5 95ft +l'» 

74 61 AloPpt B.T6 ic.0 1410: 75 73’ : 75 +3 

76*. 40 AloPol B28 114 20: 7T: 72T 3’: 

24*4 12*. AlskAIr .It 2 B 2b 5S 70-= a L0 . + ’* 

29 12*: Albrtos JS U 21 353 2S*t a 2Y. + 

33'- 24»* AlbtwiS JA 25 12 148 TO’s 2«V. 30'» + -5 

31>. 721. Alcan 83 35 49 1802 a': 25' • + ’• 

38': 27>» ALcoStd 150 15 IS 237 31": 34'. 34»k + 

32 21 Ale. Alt 180 3J 7047 301- 30'- SPS— 

30 LIP* Ale«dr 25 4 27*1 27*1 27V*— le 

80': 72'. AlleCa JJ1I 1.0 21 1S8 93*. 93 


a>. W'- Alglnl IaO S~ 
ax. l4'» Aloln of 2.19 118 
98 85'- Alqi otc 1155 11.9 

344* 28': AllgPw 2 70 S-> 0 

24 16'. AlienG -40b 14 1 ? 


a 1 - iri AiiaPd 


22S 24-. 24': 21 A. - kg 

a 19': 18': 19':—'. 

3 »i'i 04’* ®4’» 

750 32 : 32 “ 

a 3 a - * 23 


12 33 70=1 lS^ 19 — . 


42 AldScnn 780 4.1 » 3787 J4'i 4o'l 44 + s 


43 SE4. Aids etc 4.74 115 51 40=1 40'.« oO'.— H 

111 7041. Aids 0(01500 113 9 )04*1 104 104':—'. 

103 101 Vi AldS pfF 5 103 103 102 ♦ *1 

43 47=. Alias tr 120 3J 3 3883 42 40'» 41H— 

91 , 3 1 . AlllsCh 148 3X. 3': 3** + ' 1 

3Ck« 22A. ALLTL 1.94 A7 5 33 ^'i 29*J— '■« 

3*7* 20A. Alcoa 150 16 31 >93 33*$ 33 33': + 

low 10': A max .101 820 II s ! 10'» 11*1+ *$ 

39 20 Amo. of 3 CO I0J I ?»;i S'l 29' s 

Ji 22*. AmHes 1.10 38 24 1316 29** 2!Ti 20!»— *. 

UO's 09 '* AHei Dt 150 28 I 127 127 127 — 1 

’a. I*i AmAgr 79 I ; 11, IVi— '1 

I5X. la ABnkr 1C 423 25=1 2p. : 2S": + 

70 53'. AGrand 190 48 9 03?57-.S6»kS7*. + '-: 

30'.: 25X. ABrd of 175 95 9 30‘* 30 30 — 'l 

70H 54-. ABrd Pt 2A7 4A 5 58 57 58 + 


119*1 54': ABdcsi IjO U 20 204 IIS's 119*: 113“! + 

30’. « a'. ABldM 84 17 M a 3'.: a*: 23’: + ‘1 

3’-: a 1 : ABuSPr 84 13 14 48 a 1 . 3'» * 

6? 47A. Am Can L90 48 13 3524 63'. 5°=i 6l — -- 

25A. 22’. ACanpl 280 11 A 144 244. 24': 24V* + '« 

54 42 ACenPf 180 58 301 55 *t S3 - . S3’. — X 

111 1 . 103 AC on of 13.75 1— 2 113 M3 113 — '< 

21': 18 ACopBd 253 105 50 21- 2i‘a »'l— V* 

JO' j ^ ACcpCv 251e 9J 13 27 75': 24':— 

U 5*1 ACentC 41 5=1 5 ! 4 5 : -— : - 


L'niZfd Frfa fnitnutionul 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange finished mixed Thursday as 
blue chips succumbed to profit- taking in the 
aftermath of Wednesday's record-breaking ses- 
sion. Trading was active. 

.After breaking through 1.400 Wednesday, the 
Dow Jones industrial average declined 3. 90 on 
Thursday, to 1.399.54. 

Broader market indicators also gave up 
ground. The New York Stock Exchange index 
eased 0.0! to 1 11.30. while Standard & Poor's 
500-stock index decreased 0.14 to 192.62. The 
price of an average share lost one cent 

Advances outpaced declines $54-742. Vol- 
ume totaled 119 million shares, down from 
129.5 million Wednesday. 

After the market closed, the Federal Reserve 
reported that M-2. the narrowest measure of the 
U.S. money supply, fell S2.2 billion in the week 
ended Oct 28. 

Christine Callies of Dean Witter Reynolds 
said that after a seven-day runup the market ran 
into some willing sellers. But she said the selling 
pressure would not be strong enough to reverse 
the uptrend, although it might slow it slightly. 

She noted that the best price action has been 
focused in the blue-chip stocks, while strength 
in secondary stocks has been limited. “Short- 
term market leadership seems to change quite 
frequently." she added. Recent strength has 
come from the financial sector, some portions 
of the insurance sector and from department 
and general-merchandise stores, she said. 

"The market is in a new trading range of 
1.550 to 1.425.** said Kevin Keeney" of South- 
west Securities in Dallas. The absence of unani- 
mous bullish semi mem indicates that the mar- 
ket still has room to move higher, he said. 

.Analysts said the view that the Federal Re- 
sene will try to keep short-term interest rates 


57=* 44': ACvoa l.e® L4 15 1*25 St S3- 53'S— ** 

Tn. I0X. APT .92 35 27 427 2^-3 29'* 29 — *i 

24-, 19", AEIPw 254 105 ° 2425 25 . 2 22- 1 

49 =* 34'. AmEkB IJ4 2.9 is 109-1 J-=* 4*=. 44'*— *1 

28=* 14 . AFamts 48 18 14 2K7 27=- 2^: 27'*— U 

34 '- 23=* AGnCo 100 3.1 9 3017 32': 32'. J2=* 

16 9 AGnlwt 105 lr-u I2=i I2A. + 'i 

56V. 52 AGnretA 584*10,1 I 55=. SS=- S5X. 

7U. 47A. AGnpID 26! 4,1 J3J 65 ! s »4=4 44=* 

34=1 78 AHeril 150 38 10 13 3': 3X; IT: 

13V. AHoiSt 55 9=* 9.* 0 ? - 

86 'k 48 AH sire L'X) 58 15 2181 58=. 5e SSVk- : 

4J'» 24 - Ahoa» 1.12 2X 14 4497 44*, 44 — A. 

97' t 73 Amrteh aJO A0 * 472 »5*. 94^ 05 , 4 -t ’•* 


®4': 62 AlnGrp .44 8 24 2(K3 »S 93': 94 — 

157 114 AlCost 585 17 JSS I54'-:15S'.1S4'.:— >: 

29=3 14 AW .72 17 10 23?J 19=* 19'.: 19'*— a* 

4 : 2=. AmMst 701 r : ?=. 2A. 


29 13", APresc (30 XI 

1J': S ASLFI0 
18': 12’- ASLFI pf ’!« 1L2 
15»i 1H* ASfiiP 80 7£ 


JS 5 154'-: 155'. 154.;— 

10 2374 19A* 19’: 19'*- *: 

701 r, ?=. M. 

4 312 U I5H is** + '* 

13 194 9'- 9 2'*— W 

319 14 =, 14*, 14=* + 

5 62 11A* IV-* II':— 


35=: 24=. AmStd 180 55 10 1463 30=. 30*i 30=b + 

47': 35=* AmS'or M \£ V. 3 K 6S=s 63': W:— 2 

m 44' » AStrofA 4J3 58 13 7 5>. 7S=* 75H- 

58=: 51 AStrotB 683 11.7 1 58 58 58 + '* 

24Vj 19 ATA7 1-0 19 1514829 20V. 3>Vk 201:—'. 

41' a 33 AT6.T at 164 19 383 4l=a 41'-, 4l=t-=» 

42 34 ATITpt 3J4 1! 464 4-*i «|-i 42 + '* 

79V. 17 AVVoIrs I i» 38 « 262 3': 237. 

13’. 10 AWalof 155 0.0 20C: 12*» 12U 12=* + ^ 

79 : U Am Hat! 220 138 7 75 14'. UP* 16 — '- 

72>: 41V. ATrpr 5A4 11 20 69': V>'a 60-. 

IS 6': ATrsc 12 14*i 13*= 14 - 1* 

S9U 69 ATrun SM 68 2 S3 B3 83 — =» 

44 ”. 2*\: Ameron 1J0 17 * 17 43Vi *3'* 43U> — =» 

50 24'.: AmesD JO * 2! I3W !?■: 47V. 40's -rl*6 



24'. 12’. ■ AmoDwl 


8 241) 24=1 24-* + *6 


»li l*”: Amrtek 80 13 IS 12) 25 24H 2*Vs — 


28=: IB' i Amfoc 

16 2=- AirieK 


200 23=1 23 23=*+'.: 

45 3 2*1 3 


70'- 50'- Amoco 1300 58 9 2308 46'= 641: 66':— 


X*n r": AMP .72 22 

22=1 11': AmPCO JO 24 

23=1 12=: Amreo 

37*1 221. AmStn 1 JO 17 


.72 2 2 29 1046 32=. 32 32": — ’.« 

JO 14 IS 10 12': 12=i IZ=»— 1 

10 67 22'. 21 A. 3r*— =1 

Afl 17 9 04 37H 37=» 37»: — 


46=i 31'* Amsted 180 15 !7 >44 46=: 46'.. 46'A— '- 


4'- 1=) Anacmp 

24 1 * Id’- Anloo 

77V> 19V. Andw IAS 58 

*4>. 31=* ArCtav 1J2 10 

14 0=4 AndrGr 24 JJ 


298 ZU 2=1 3H-W 
21 276 20 r i 20H ffl’i + 

35 255: 25 1 : 25=4 

33 186 44': 44'X 44=1 + V» 

15 93 13=* 131* 13'*:— '1 

14 92 2SV, 24?: 2*'i— 


27i. j 7 Anaelic 80 14 14 92 25V, -i?: 2*'m— 

39*1 13'A Anne us s JD 13 11 3167 36~: 34k: 36=1 — '* 

78 52 AnheuoflAS 4.9 S8 74'- 73=. 73=-— V. 


78 52 Antwu tx 160 4.0 98 74'- 73=. 73=4 

ir- 131- Anlxlr 29 18 15 160 17V. 1T4 17V. 

16X. 10 Anthem .04 J 23 399 12V. 17=, T7=: + 6, 

ir-a 10*1 Anlhnv .-uo 13 8 24 13'-. 13'. 13'.— ': 

12'n 9^ Apacne 28 14 11 663 12 111 H-'h 

7 '* ApcJlP Hit 55! IV* 1 1=* + 9* 

19-*» 15V* AnctiP unLlO 107 947 10*i 1VM t9=k + =t 

741* *0=1 ApPwpf X13 11J 2320: 73*: 72': 72': — IV, 

p ! 115 IT-? S 32 tl 32>: 32 T i + Vi 

1! ■* ??. fRPw p( 380 128 3 30=: 30=1 30=1 


39'.> 15=1 ApIDta 1.761 82 35 144 20=1 70 209| + ».k 

15V: 8W AppIMs 28 48 13=1 13 13 

24=* 16=. ArchDn .140 8 13 3429 2311 221 23Hi + W 

31JV 2“^ AtJPPf 3J8 11.9 . 3) 30'- 30 30'* + U 

24=. 14 ArVBSt 80 2J 9 103 27 1 * IW, 24=:— V. 

74'. 16 Ark lb 1JB 58 22 1340 70 

■W 'A ArlnCo 113 .1 

VVTl <A* Armco 405 9 BV. 9 + v» 

22'*: 15V+ Armcpl 110 105 10 20 10%. 70 + =1 


24 V. 14 Ark In 1JK 58 22 1340 70. 10^ 19*1—1* 

■V 'A ArlnCo 113 .1 

VVTl <A* Armco 405 9 BV. 9 + v» 

22'*: 15V: Armcpl 110 108 10 20 10%. 70 + =1 

24V'* 13’-= ArmsRb 41 U i 100 14’, i« j*', 

WJ. 28ji Armwin 1J0 14 10 1923 30=* 3E= 38=1— 'J 

34': 23= AroCo 1JB 38 12 9 34VL 

181 * 1 * - 20 ,J W i 2 =: ti?s n^- '.« 

391^ ! 4 . Arlro J2 10125 IE 51 'h 21V. -1'j V. 


17 12=1 ll^k 11^1 — ',j 
IE 21'- 21V. ?l'i— V. 


77=1 14=. Arvlns 80 38 10 334 28 26V. 54',— I* 


44 ktj 40': Arvlnpt 280 11 

27V. 157* Asarco 

37 23=1 AshlOII 180 4A 

46 37-* Ashinpf 4jo 

44 V. 35 AahlOot XH 9J 


3 65 65 65 + Vs 

1J8 161 15V. IJTk— W 

J4 36 35=. 36 +14 

202 44'- 45=1 46 l = + U 

. 4 42=1 CVj 6210— =1 


?4V= DCs 1A0 17 13 315 37Vi 3T« 37=1 


•*. AsdD pt 435 4J 16 120 lfi'i |M + »i 

S? iS* Athlrne 180 9.0 10 51 177, |«S ihS +1=1 

2?V* O 3 " AICyEI 288 9.1 10 446 -g'-a 2B’i 78 1 * 

67=1 J2 AtlRIoi 43X1 6J 3809 63=. 43 'j. 63=»— VI 

'«i- 1 0«* AtjRc pf 280 18 I iS lit iST* -2lJ 

ijy. jovi AtiasCp 51 I]-, hi. it'.: — i: 

15?- Auool .40 18 2* 124 ZPb 231 , 221, 

H,-* “J? Autopi 89 12 B 426 55 1 - ST. S'- + Vi 


17V. 10)1 AtiasCp 
29': 18=i Auool 
56'- 35^1 AtrtbDI 


J!- Awilonn JBelJI 1 112 451 4T, 4^ 

Si? fVEMC 80 13 15 9 35’.. 35'* 351 ’ + ia 

** *1^ J2 A 8 1.9 14 507 35 n=A M +U* 

2L. IS ^ vkJ ’ . !3 3 n": urn mu 


30=1 28V. Avery 

'a lb AvtaM 
33 ki 27 Avn *1 
2 Tn ir» Avon 
28= 16V* Avdln 


88 1.9 14 507 35 33=x 35 +1V1 

13 3 341 24-1 Ml 

JO 18 30 305 32'4 32 S': + 'i 

2J» 7J 14 5259 27 1 : 241 27V? + k, 

17 105 20 I9Vk 10=4 — V. 


.40 



.16 



1J5 

36 

14 

48 



60 


11 

JO 

.1 

19 

J7 

XI 

10 

48 



168 

35 

9 

40 

18 

11 

260 

98 

7 

267 

108 


2.10 

76 

14 

.10 

18 

ll 

SO 

24 

ID 

1J2 

4J 

18 

SO 

16 

16 

IJO 

86 

7 

168k 

.90 

6J 


JO 

14 


M 

26 

11 

460 

X7 

11 

480 

10J 


JD4I 

4 

20 

2J8 

5J 

V 

JS 

16 

10 

262 

86 

7 

2.96 

116 


480 

106 


184 

86 

11 


14ft 

4ft 

35% 

21 ft 



24ft 

18% 

2 % 

% 


7% 

30ft 

20=1 

IBft 

11 % 


7=1 

73% 

18ft 


38% 

24 

15ft 

10 %i 

E =1 

Sft 

1 ft 

62 

48% 

55ft 

38% 

47% 

31% 

33ft 

21 % 

27% 

12 % 

47 

74% 

SS 

16% 

14% 

32% 

75ft 

SS 

27 

21 ft 

15% 

9% 

39% 

19 

25 



»ft 


16% 

12=4 

4% 

35% 

24ft 

16% 

lift 


20 % 

34ft 

25% 

Z2Vj 

19ft 

38ft 

31ft 

47 

78 

(16ft 

52% 

lift 

12 % 

S9ft 

7ft 

*c 

17% 

12V* 


22 % 

97 

76% 

33 

25% 

24% 

19% 

44% 

. 11 % 

57 

41% 

41ft 

rift 

45% 

7«% 

40 

31 

301% 147ft 

33V* 

18 

19% 

6 % 

« 

9 

3% 

15 

10 % 

21 % 

12 % 

49% 

36ft 

74ft 

18 % 

40% 

79 

26% 

I9’1 

24% 

26% 

13% 

17ft 


74% 

27% 

lift 

35 

19ft 

30% 

34% 

51 

17 

61 

50% 

32% 

19% 

44ft 

79ft 

N% 

19% 1 

10 % 

4% 1 

44% 

32% 1 

85 

S7% 1 

11 % 

9% 


28 

3 


13 

68 


25 

IS 

16 

22 

(17 

10 

66 

8 

18 

6 


ZMk ISM, 
26=8 19=1 


126 

SJ 

7J5e 0.1 


95 

77 

106 

.10 

.9 

1.10 

4.1 

160 

56 

260 

9.0 

284 1TJ 

7.40 122 

786 126 

1784)08 

M 


1.111 


166 

36 

JO) 

3 

160 

28 

160 

4.1 

JB 

36 

AO 

1J 

163 

15 

X06 

46 

1J0 

L2 

1JA 

4 4 

4J3 

86 

60 

U 

.12 

.9 

1.40 

4J 

250 

*6 

MB 

86 

5.12 108 

5.15* 9J 

145 


m 

1X9 

4.1 

160 

38 

JO 

.9 

J4 

16 


M-l Down $2.2 Billion 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The narrowest measure 
of the U.S. money supply. M-l. fell $11 
billion in late October, the Federal Reserve 
Board reported Thursday. 

The Fed said M-l dropped to a seasonally 
adjusted $611.4 billion in the week ended 
Oct. 18 from $613.6 billion the previous 
week. 

M-l includes currency in circulation, 
travelers checks and checking deposits at 
financial institutions. 

from rising for the remainder of the year has 
aided the market. 

Sears was the most active NYSE-listed issue, 
adding 1 to 35 M/A-Com Inc. followed. The 
session's biggest loser, it feO S'.z to 13 in active 
trading. Af ter the close Wednesday, the compa- 
ny reported fourth-quarter earnings of 22 cents 
a share, down from 30 cents in the year-ealier 
period and said it expected to have lower first- 
quarter profits. 

Sterling Drug, trading ex-dividend, was third, 
rising to 36^. 

Taft Broadcasting climbed l'i to SO^. A 
group of investors led by the Bass brothers 
raised its stake in the company to 11 percent. 

Federal National Mongage Association 
jumped 1 to 231-a. 

Among actively traded blue chips. AT&T 
eased !* to 201?. .American Express gave up ^ to 
46'a. Dow Chemical added !i to 37^1 and Gen- 
eral Motors lost !i to 67. 

Among retailers, Ames Department Stores 
rose I f i to 49ii and Limited Stores added 7» to 
28Y 


12 Month 
HtodLon Steel 


32-* 26 C 
32=- 24’ > C 


Sts. Close 

Dlv. YI4 PE Mfo High Low OuoLOi ge 


3 Ei 

* * j ao2 

28 + U 1 


32 34 

28 

78 a 

7 

U 

18 

18 0 30 

18 21 1099 
4J ID 241 
28 » 138 
1J I 26 
*.1 10 49 

23 I860 

47 10 18 

J 15038 

U 17 *74 
15 53 

48 14 99 

17 10 1974 
4J IS 1006 
10 11 398 

399 


68 

22 

.33 

L4 

A3 a 28 

JB 

1 J 

JS 

16 

180 

42 

641 


I8B 

48 

180 

36 

62 

3 

80 

22 

50 

24 

.17 

18 

84 

24 

150 

23 

64* 

16 

160 

18 


SB 

18 

260 

9J 

164 

26 

48 

IS 

161 

48 

825 

72 

284 

94 

167*17.1 

40 

24 

229 

92 

40 

If 

43 

38 

62 

15 

61 

28 

80 

L7 

88 

28 

260 

88 


36% 
1«=h 
itm 
27V. 
17V, 

21 VS 
M% 
33% 33*1 
61 63 

63 62 % 

4*kV 08 
64 V* 64 
UIA 13 
Z1 20% 
5V. SMS 
23% 21 
20 20 


% 

S 35 

% 42V, 

% n% m 

IA W6 30 
% 79% 5»% 

=1 Wk 36V* 
HUM 
% 3* IB*. 

3 V* 1% 
% 30% TS 

m Wi 
65% 4BS 
11% 9*h 

13% 4% 
Wk n% 
60% 37% 
45=, 43 
W* 31 


IM 
9% 2ft 
ms 6% 
7W1 SB 
07 64 

53 XH 

30% 31 

98 37 

IS -7% 

M Ift 
**=» » 
2» 1SW 
«% 2S% 

54 Vi 486 

38% Mt 

«n 25% 

M 51% 
ne 65% 

80 sm 

K% 7<% 
3ft 
E 1 
M 9M 
7% Sty 

65% 52 
0ft- 2 
ttft 16% 
7ft 4 . 
82ft 37ft 
IH. 1% 
38% 15% 
27% 26% 
IH Hft 
86 72% 

3*% 29ft 
T0% 1%' 
I ' 4% 
34ft 25% 
2ft % 
aft Hft 
33ft 19ft 

35? 

53% 40%. 
56 41% 

19% 14ft 
5Sft 40ft 
38ft W% 

1“ 

21 % 

3 

54% 

M 
<7 
23% 


i ZM JWT* 1.12 38 17 108 29ft 29 29% - 

23=6 J River JS 18 11 936 35 341% 25 

i 16 Jamtwv .12 8 1! 4Q2 im my mi 

urn JaxiF 183*118 423 12% lift 12% 

36 182 II 7 480 49% 48% 48ft 

60% JerCaf 9J6 1U 2Dz 79 • 79 79 

32ft JerCsf 8.12 128 20 zSB 67% 67% - 

91=6 JerCpt 13 jB> 129 XM05 104% 104% - 

14ft JerCpf 118 1IJ 11 Uft 18ft 10ft • 

6ft Jewier . 22 38 IS 14ft 14% 

33% Jalmin 1J0 27 IS 5313 48% 47=4 48%- 

38ft JohnCfl 186 42 9 555 44ft 44% 44% • 

50% JhnCof 425 78 501 54% 34 54% • 

19% Josten s 88 14 15 46 2616 25% » 

21ft JayMfe 180 6.1 14 185 23% 23 23 - 


JW 24 12 724 10% 9ft 10% + % 
Sly 2.9 8 4448 18ft 17% 17%— 1% 
32ft 
13ft 
14% 

14% 

8=* 

2^ 

19% 


43 29 

17ft 15% 
32ft 23% 
28% » 
20% 12% 
19% 3ft 
5 1=1 

2ft % 

22ft 7ft 
25% 9% 
33% lift 

2m 21% 

23ft 15% 

so am 

60% 49% 

15=1 im 

33ft 2D 
32ft 26% 
im i4 


M 

16 

128 

78 

50 

13 

164 

44 

221 


383k 


4J0k 


160 

SS 

26* 

96 

260 

56 

140 

24 

44 

XT 

164 

38 

140 

56 

2* 

78 

-lie 12 


356 

36% 

35% 

134 

16% 

16% 

2SD 

29% 

29ft 

m 

23% 

23 

3 

18% 

18% 

4729 

Ok 

6% 

12& 

2% 

2% 

201 

1% 

Tft 

88 

T7H 

16ft 

431 

18% 

18% 

36 

24% 

34% 

404 

23=6 

23ft 

134 

27% 

22 

8843 

44% 

43% 

.433 

98 

57 

2633 

12 

11% 

1882 

30% 

29ft 

15 

33 

32 

130 

14% 

14 


17% - % 
21ft + ft 


284*10.1 10 
2ZUUS 


23 

1 JO 66 8 

JO 17375 

244 106 

34 28 IS 
J6 53 181 

287 13J 
200 U 9 
AO 2A 15 
180 43 14 
184 16 » 
JObU 14 
St 1.9 11 


139*118 
30 18 10 

IJ2 10 7 
US 64 
73 14 12 
m u u 
■16 8 32 
184 28 11 

»*?!,* 

80*11 1? 
1801128 13 
3* A 20 
180 38 13 
L44 U 11 


« « 4 


J2 .28 14 
82 >8 17 
87 U 10 
JH 26 TO 

SM « 

60 12 11 


54 23ft 
I 63 29% 
285 lift 

m 

9729 6 

157 l» 

2033 0ft 
! - SO 12ft 
54 25% 
114 7% 

10 23% 
46- 10ft 
18 3ft 
13Tx.ll 
141. 10ft 
16 21% 
291 47% 
17 1S% 

127 40 
29 17% 
17 27% 
IP 2% 

790 2ft 

n 33% 

394 14% 
.66 lift. 
KB 211% 
226 44% 
4 75 
12 30ft 

.IK w* 

9455 29ft 
4 S3 48% 
34 23ft 
n% 

.4485 46% 
,«8 31% 
i5Sx4n* 
.101 27ft 

iS 3® 

553 27ft 
34 3% 
6 S8 20ft 
3U 29ft 
65 sa% 
47H 7% 

* 50z 09 

H J* 3 * 

12.18ft 

nr. 

W7 »ft 
664 34% 

‘SSS 

T£ 20% 
Z39 2Bft 
s a 


180 36 
M 38 
M W 

2 m u 

2J0 113 

i w ray 

SJ 44 
OAO « 
236 93 
220 IS 
286 93 
680 121 
280* 98 
2.13 Ip 
339 1U 
80 26 
188* 24 
160 2J 


23ft 

29ft 

lift. 

1% 

5%— % 
12 %—% 
M -2ft 

iso— it 

^5 it 

33 — % 

2I%— ft 
Sft + ft 

miiS 

2ft -f % 

f4ft +7 * 

44 — % 

74% —1 

sm 

94ft— ft 
28 ft + ft 
46- + ft 

gu 

«ft + ft 
UK.— % 
+% 
57% +rft 

77=6 

3^ + % 

M% 

B-’+Vst 

™ 4 r » Wl 

im 

»ft *% 
tz — %. 
IBS*— % 

1 4; +.ft 

Dft— ft 

14% +1 

■ + % 


142 SJ n 

150 78 6 

380 34 . 
280 9,» 
2-12 9J 

230 93 

425 118 ■ 

U8 

BS 4 











































































Statistics Index 


AMEX Prion, P.13 
AMEX hfetaffPwiP.13 
HYSfi pried ' fmo 
hySE. Msta/tows P.13 
Canadian ftsda P.ld 
Currency rates P.ll 
Commodities ' P.13 
Divldmat P.13 


Ewninw rworlj pjy- 
FNn* raw hMm p.u 

GoW marfcpts p.n 

im*n*r ratis • P.11 
MarMt tamtnanr P.io 
OeMrt> p _ ra 

OTC stack p .15 

OttW markets p .14 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBElT?n^r 


Hcralbcifc(tribunc, 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report M-l, Page 10 


** 


Page U 


TECHNOLOGY 


Packaging Steals Spotlight 



By ANDREW POLLACK 

' ' Nrv York Tims Service ' . 

I*™*!**-* does Bttle good to build faster and 
faster aatomob 0 es if all they can drive on are dirt roads, 
rae electromes industry is discovering that principle with 

th^„l?? 1CO ! ductor . C *PP® “d dtdr packaging. For 
^ tare the industry has been staving to cram more and more 

SUlC ° 11 for faster arid smaller 

computers. But less attention was paid to the fact that electrical 
signals soil have to be carried into and out of the chip. That 

[hfcSsIStoS 1 by ^ plasric “™“ pads** ™ which 

^ ■*■*■*>■ 



ing to work on thaq die chips 
themselves, and those who did 
were considered a lower caste 
among engineers. But now, 
the packaging is the bottle- 
neck, restricting efforts to in- 
crease the speed and shrink 
the size of computers. 
“P ackagin g is now a perfor- 
IJol 


Now the packaging 
is the bottleneck, . 
limiting efforts to 
increase speed. - 


mance problem, said John J. Cox, vice president of operations of 
Serrucon doctor Research Corp., a consortium of electronics com- 
panies that finances univexsitv research on advanced microelec- 
tronic technology. ‘'Here’s this beautiful little chip and you can’t 
^getout of it what it’s capable of because of the packaging.” 

\ Tn® realization of the problem has set off a finny of responses. 
Microelectronics & Computer Technology Coip., awothp-r indus- 
try research consortium, has picked packaging as one of its four 
■major missions, along with more glamorous topics of adv anced 
computer architectures, software and computer-aided design. 

The package is what many people envision when they think of 
a computer chip. The chip itself is a fiat piece of silicon, no bigger 
than a fingernail, that is etched with tiny circuits. The package 
-around the chip is black plastic or ceramic with many metal 
prongs coming out of it. The most common type of package, 
known as a dual in-line package, resembles a centipede, with the 
metal prongs arranged in two rows like 

T HE metal legs attach to the printed circuit board, which 
contains wires that connect to other chips and other parts 
of the computer, such as display screens. In turn, the chip 
is usually connected to the package by wires that attach to the 
edge of the chip. 

One problem is that as computer chips become more complex, 
more wires are needed to carry signals in and out of the chip. 
Some of the most complex chips require a few hundred such 
wires. It becomes increasingly difficult to place aD those wires 
around the edge of the chip without the signals on the wires 
interfering with one another. 

Hence, while cramming more functions onto a single chip 
should lead to smaller computers, that progress is partly nullified 
because the package around the chip must get bigger and bigger. 
jfcThe package becomes “a great big overcoat, which is 10 to 2D 
• times as big as the chip,” said Barry H. Whalen, vice president 
and manager of the packaging program for Microelectronics & 
Computer Technology Corp. 

Several new types of packages have appeared on the market, 
and more are on the' way. Instead of two rows of legs in a 
rectangular package, packages known as drip carriers are square 
and have leads around all four sides. Another idea is to put the 
prongs under the package, rather than just around the periphery. - 
National Semiconductor Corp. and others are prompting a 
new technology called tape automated bonding. This does away 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 5) 

| Currency Rates 


rrcFafls 

On Crisis 
Solution 

Calls on Britain 

For 'Rescue* 


Agenee Frmce-Pntse 

LONDON — The International 
Tin Council has failed a g ai n to find 
a way of pulling the world tin mar- 
ket out of its crisis. 

In a new development during the 
latest talks, which ended Thursday 
and which are to be resumed on 
Nov. 14, the ITCs six exporting 
members called on Britain, a tin- 
producing consumer ' member of 
the 1TC to provide a financial “res- 
cue packages" The aim would be to 
permit the orderly resumption of 
tin trading on the Loudon Metal 
Exchange, which has been sus- 
pended since Oct 24. 

Britain alienated itself from the 
other members of the European 
Co mmuni ty when it said it was 
willing to contribute its 4-percent 
share of the ITCs debts, which are 
estimated at £600 million (about 
$S40 million). 

In a statement issued at the end 
of the talks, the tut council, a UN 
agency empowered to regulate 
world supplies and prices of tin, 
said it had given “pr eliminar y con- 
sideration” to a rescue plan pre- 
sented by its 16 creditors. The cred- 
itors planned a meeting for Friday. 

The plan, which offered the met- 
al deferment of loan and interest 
repayments in the next 12 months, 
was called “unacceptable" by some 
importing delegates who are mem- 
bers of the EC 

The exchange could now decide 
to prolong the suspension, which 
occurred when the ITCs buffer 
stock manager withdrew from the 
market because of a lack of funds 
to finance his operations. The sus- 
pension is in force through Friday. 

One of the conditions laid down 
by the creditors required the six 
exporters — Indonesia, Malaysia, 
Thailand, Australia, Nigeria and 
Zaire — to produce £60 million 
pledged in September to the buffer 
stock manager. 

Importing members insisted that 
producers should make the first 
move, but producers — led by Ma- 
laysia — wanted to see similar ac- 
tion by consumers first 


Japanese Meet Their Match in Xerox 


Xerox’s Market 
Share Levels Off 

Although a decade ago three of every 
tour copiers sold were made by 
Xerox, market share dropped below 
SO percent tn the late 1870'a. More 
recently, it has begun to level off. 


■ao >«i 

Source: DatncttMt 




Copier Giant 
Restructures to 
Defend Market 

By Steven E. Prokesch 

JVpH’ York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Xerox Corp. 
hac managed to do what hardly 
any other U.S. company has 
done: stop the Japanese advance 
into its market. And its execu- 
tives even maintain that in some 
sectors they are recapturing lost 
ground. 

The turnaround comes only 
after the company gave up more 
than half of the market for plain 
paper copiers, which it created 
and virtually owned in the 1960s. 

Xerox, which, long dictated to 
customers and ignored emerging 
competition, has rethought virtu- 
ally every facet of its business — 
from its approach to developing 
and manufacturing products to 
how it schedules lunch hours for 
employees. In doing so, it has 
narrowed significantly the ad- 
vantage that such Japanese com- 
panies as Canon inti, Sharp 
Corp. and Ricoh Co. had en- 
joyed. 

Other U.S. industries hard- 
pressed by Japanese competi- 
tion, ranging from autos to ma- 
chine tools, are embracing some 
of the same approaches as Xerox 
but without nearly the success, 
so far. One reason is that Xerox 
is not as labor-intensive and has 
a cooperative labor union. Even 



Tha Mew York Timn 

From top: To fix the 102fTs feeder, Xerox used a ‘crisis 
team.’ The firm halved development time on the 9900. 
Users do not have to stop the 1090 to change paper. 


more important, analysts say, is 
Xerox’s superb execution of its 
game plan. 

“We’ve made a comeback,” 
David T. Kearns, the chairman 
and chief executive, said in a 
telephone interview from Xerox 


headquarters in Stamford, Con- 
necticut. “We have come far 
enough to know that we can con- 
tinue to manufacture a substan- 
tial pan of our machines in the 

(Continued on Page 14, CoL 5) 


Shell Group Net 
Tumbled 55% 
In 3d Quarter 


Compiled fo' Our Staff From Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — The Royal 
Dutch/Shell Group reported 
Thursday lhai its profit rumbled 
55.1 perignt in the third quarter 
and said it may be difficult to avoid 
downward pressures on oil prices 
in early 1986. 

Royal Dutch/Shell. lhe world's 
second-largest oil company after 
Exxon Corp.. attributed its lower 
profits to special charges of about 
$280 million expenses related to its 
closing of a refinery in Curasao, 
reductions in its marine fleet, a wri- 
tedown of some U.S. coal assets 
and special incentive payments to 
Shell Oil Co. employees.’ 

Shell, based in Houston, is whol- 
ly owned by Royal Dutch/Shell, 
which has headquarters in both En- 
gland and the Netherlands. 

Profit for the third quarter fell to 
£439 milli on from £978 million a 
year earlier, while revenue fell 7.9 
percent, to £16.95 billion from 
£18.41 billion pounds. 

The results are distorted slightly 
when convened into dollars be- 
cause of fluctuations in exchange 
rates. Based on company calcula- 
tions using average exchange rates 
for the third quarter of tins year 
and a year earlier, profit fell to $606 
million on revenue of S23J9 bil- 
lion, from $1.27 billion on revenue 
of S23.94 billion. 

In its report. Royal Dutch noted 
a recent rebound in crude oil 
prices, which it attributed to sea- 
sonally low inventories in the 
hands of oil companies, coupled 
with a reduction in oil shipments to 
the West by Russia, the world’s 
largest oil producer. 

“Given normal winter condi- 
tions in the Northern Hemisphere, 
the crude oD market may well 
‘muddle through’ for the next few 
months," the company said. 

“But. with the adoption bv most 
producing countries of market-re- 
lated prices designed to regain or 
maintain market share, it may be 
difficult to avoid downward price 
pressures developing in the first 
quarter of 1986." 

For the first nine months of the 
year, profit fell 20.8 percent al- 
though revenue increased 3.5 per- 
cent, Shell said. Profit dropped to 


£117 billion from £2.74 billion 
while revenue increased ic £55.16 
billion from £53.25 billion. 

When convened into dollars, as 
computed by the company on the 
basis of exchange rates in each of 
the first three quarters, profit fell to 
S2.63 billion from $3.77 billion, 
and revenue fell to $68.73 billion 
from $73.42 billion. 

Shell said that the underlying 
performance of its core oil and gas 
business improved relative to its 
manufacturing, marine and mar- 
keting operations. [A P. Reuters) 


New FSUC Unit 
Is Expected to 
Borrow Money 

Washington Post Service 

DALLAS — The Federal 
Savings & Loan Insurance 
Corp. is expected to use the 
institution it created this week 
to borrow money against $3.1 
billion in real estate and other 
assets the insurance fund has 
taken over from failed institu- 
tions, sources in the industry 
say. 

The new organization, called 
the Federal Asset Disposition 
Association, would funnel 
about $2.6 billion to FSL1C and 
use $500 million for operations 
and debt service while deciding 
how to dispose of the assets that 
would bring in the most cash, 
according to sources at a con- 
vention of the U.S. League of 
Savings Institutions. 

Although final decisions on 
how the new organization will 
work have not been made, the 
plan for borrowing funds — 
probably from the Federal 
Home Loan banks — appears 
to be the most likely scenario. 

The idea for the new organi- 
zation was conceived bv a 
group of thrift industry leaders, 
and its petition for a federal 
charter was approved by the 
Federal Home Loan Bank 
Board this week. 


Fed Averse to Pushing 
Rates Up, Volcker Says 




Km. 7 


1 

OM. 

PJF. 

ILL. 

GMr. 

BJ=. 

SJ.' 

Yen 

4.191 

uwt* 

36.99* 

0.1469* 

— 

55J2* 

13701 * 

14387 v 

75285 

»TK 

6630 

28958* 

175445 

' 

345745 

2582- 

171 

— 

31005* 

1681 * 

8881- 

4942* 

12184* 

12765* 



17185 

112925 

269400 

4.1825 

74925 . 

3053 

291625 

151340 

67589 

22158 

— 

59*00 

33396 

B2103 

1817 

07082 M 


882 

1775.15 

2W 

5249 

214 

20530 

115183 

10483 

— 

4514 X 

23035 

15046* 

37053 

38925- 

29148 

78.14 

NJL 

KJL* 

HA. 

RA* 

9587 

— 

38481 

82255" 

27005 * 

0.1218" 

72995- 

48723* 

— 

185- 

059X3 

UUB 

67248 

149089 

HOB 

448553 

18157 

172884 

825303 

380095 

654054 

1892.14 

3. 1584 

568779 

2300 

218804 


Anutartgm IMS 
BrussaWol 5288 
Frankfurt ZS935 
London (D) 1.4173 

M Ml ton U52J» 

VNbwYwYIO 

Ports 7 JOB 

Tokyo 20130 

Zurich 2.U18 

i ECU uses 
1 SDR UW 

Cloalim In London and Zurich, fixings In other European centers. Now YOr* rate* at 4 pm. 

tal Commercial trxmc (0) Amounts needed to buy one pound (c) Amounts nett&rd to buy oim 
Honor Cl Units of tOO (x) Units of LOOOtrt Units ofVMOONJO.: not ouotodt HA.: not available 
(=1 To nor one pound; fVJLUil 


Other Dollar Values 


Currency per list 
Arsen, austral CUB 

AustraLS 1-5152 

Austr.icnU. 1029 
Beto.fin.fr. 53.15 
Brail craz. 881000 
Canadian I U74 
Chinese yuan 32015 
DanMi krone 9393 
Eon*, pound 125 


Currency po 
FY n. marines 

Creek droc. 

Hoop KonsS 
iDdtam rupee 
Inda. ruptab 
Irish f 
Israeli Sbek. 
KowoW dinar 
Malay, fins. 


r USS 

ssts 

153JOO 
7.807 
1X09 
1.12200 
08418 
1.47000 
02914 
24275 . 


Currency po 
Mex.pe» 
Hone, krone 
PWLPMO 
Port, escudo 
Saudi rival 
Stows 

S. Afr.rand 

S. KM*, won 


■ USS 
<300 
7X105 
1073 
16250 
16503 
2.108 
25641 
89000 


currency per 
Smtetrofeto 


5wkL krona 
TahwuiS 
Thai bam 
Turkish lira 
UAB dirham 
Vanes, body. 


11*5 

0779 

16020 

7806 

39.99 

26225 

54020 

16725 

1455 


* Sterling; MBS Irish c 

Sovrcos: Banauc du Benotux (Brussels); Banco Corntnorctato /totkmo (Milan): Banovs No- 
tlonalmdm Paris, (Paris): Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SOP); BAH (Dinar, rival. tBrhom); 
i, Gostamc (rvtfkt). Other data tram Reuters andAP. 


Interest Rates 


Em 


rrwey Deposits 

Swiss 

Dollar EMMoiK Franc 

1 month . HVh . 4 o-4W 3W-3W 

2 moathc 

3 months Mil 4 Vo 4-4W 

4 months Mkfc 4 4W-4 V. *V*-4V. 

l year B'fc-ffto 4’*r4'h. 4tk-4i% 


SterOna 
lltwIMb 
11 1L.11 9k 

n tw-n v. 

iito-n*t 


9-9to 

9U»9Vi 

imt-im 


11 IW-ll N 1WM1 


Jfct 7 

ECU SDR 
OHrOtl. 

OW-Mi 

8 tv-er. . iul 
IMV. 


Sources: Morgan Guaranty ( dollar ; DM, SF. Pound, FF); Lloyds Bank (ECU); Pouters 
ISOPI. Rates anflatflf to Intertask deposits of Si million minimum tor equivalent). 


Spy Money Rate** .W. 


UHadStown Close Prev. 

I TA 7 Vi 

t 8 

ni wr 

Broker Lena Me SVr-9 tM 

Com Paper fe-m days 780 780 

1 Trousov sms 728 725 

Enry BOh 733 7 JO 

CSIltaam 750 750 

. CD’s ca«y oars 750 750 


OverafcMItato 
0M Month InMttnfc 


550 

455 

4JQ 

4.90 

4.9S 


550 

455 

420 

4.99 

4.9S 


tof nEO ul tB u Jteto 
CaUMeonr 
&>*■ month Maroon* 
nmum lattMM* 
tfaem tntwMak 


fto 9V» 

9'l 

91/16 91/16 
eva 

9W, 93/1* 


catMoaer 
ftoov Tram* boi 
luertwh 

Jbpob 

ttKSSBtKUte 

CattMMn 

MerDcHK 


S S 
no. 71/16 
— ‘ 714 


ffwsert caimerz&cs*. Cm# 1 

7okra 


Asian Dollar Depaslta 

Kor. 7 

1 month Bm-8to 

a months B«.-Bw» 

SmoaHH 8k.-8»w 

smooths B tfc-8 1 . 

1 year Bfc-Bfc 

Source: Routers. 


U.S. Mowpy Market Faads 

Noe. 7 

Morrill Lynch Ready Assets 
30 day average yield; 752 

Telerate Interest Rate Index: 7868 
Source: Monitt Lynch, TetetVte. 


By Martin Crucsinger 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Policy- 
makers at the Federal Reserve 
Board have decided against push- 
ing U.S. interest rates higher in 
coming weeks although a key mea- 
sure of money supply is growing 
faster than the target set by the 
Fed, Chairman Paul A. Volcker 
disclosed Thursday. 

Mr. Volcker, in a letter to a 
House of Representatives subcom- 
mittee, said the policy-making Fed- 
eral Open Market Committee 
“chose not to move aggressively to 
tighten reserve availability” to 
banks to “‘constrain M-l growth.” 

M-l, the narrowest measure of 
money supply that includes curren- 
cy and deposits in checking ac- 
counts, has been growing well 
above Fed targets for much of the 
year. The Fed seeks to control the 
growth of the money supply in an 
effort to provide for steady, nonin- 
fladonary economic growth. 

Mr. Volcker said the Fed had 
decided that growth in M-l was 
acceptable even though it.was still 
faster than the liberalized target 
range for the second half of the 
year. 

Some economists have warned 
that the surge in money growth 
carries a risk of rekindling infla- 
tion. But others have urged the Fed 
to ignore the rapid growth, warning 
that any move on its part to restrain 
money growth would send interest 
rates higher and threaten the falter- 
ing U.S. economic recovery. 

The Fed’s Open Market Com- 
mittee met on Monday and Tues- 
day. While Mr. Volcker did not 


mention that session, the fact that 
the letter was dated Thursday sug- 
gested that his information was 
based on events at the meeting. 

The Open Market Committee, 
made up of Fed board members 
and five presidents of regional Fed- 
eral Reserve banks, meets eight 
dines a year to set monetary policy. 
It is unusual for Mr. Volcker or any 
other official to disclose much 
about the committee’s delibera- 
tions until the minutes of the meet- 
ing are made public six weeks later. 

Financial analysts speculated 
that Mr. Volcker’s comments might 
have been a move to support the 
actions of the Reagan administra- 
tion, which reached agreement with 
Britain, France, Japan and West 
Germany in September to work to- 
gether to drive down the value of 
the dollar on foreign exchange mar- 
kets. 

An expectation of downward 
pressure on UJ5. interest rates 
would lend to push the dollar low- 
er. 

In his letter, to the House domes- 
tic monetary policy subcommittee, 
Mr. Volcker referred to the “rela- 
tively high foreign exchange value 
of the dollar” as one of the factors 
the Federal Open Market Commit- 
tee weighed in deciding not to send 
interest rates higher. 

The Reagan administration is 
seeking to push exchange rates of 
the dollar lower in an effort to head 
off growing protectionist sentiment 
in Congress. The high dollar is 
cited as the chief reason for the 
record $1 50-billion trade deficit the 
United States is expected to post 
this year. 


Gold 


Non. 7 


11 ** 

ll'.u 

iito 

Kona Konfl 

AM. 

324.15 

PM 

324.40 

Cbtoe 

- 0 J 0 

IUL 

LnwmWH* 

32480 

— 

— 100 

_ 

11 5.-22 

Pwl» ( 1 W KIWI 

32430 

32487 

— no 

_ 

I137H 

Zurich 

32460 

32380 

— 180 



London 

New Yor* 

32380 

32300 

321 JO 

—180 
— 230 


Luxenaoura. Parts and London official lb- 
mm.- nano Kane and Zorich ooonino and 
ctasino prices: Meet York Camex current 
contract- All Prices tn US. Spot ounce. 

Source: ^ ten. 


To Our Readers 

Because of a strike ai Agenee France-Ptfsse, some stock pn«s are 
missing from ohr World Stock Markets section today. We regret the 
mcon'inieaee ro readers. 


Hang Seng Index of Shares Reaches 
Highest Level in 4 Years in Hong Kong 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Share prices closed sharply higher on the Hong 
Kong stock exchange on Thursday as institutional buying carried the 

Hang Seng index to its highest level in more than four years, brokers 
said. 

The index rose 21.17 to 1,721.93. its highest close since Aug. 19, 
1981, when it stood at 1,728.71. 

Brokers said investors were encouraged by an announcement by 

Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. on Wednesday that it would exercise an 
(ration to buy the remaining 50 percent of an office building from its 
chairman, U Ka-shing. for 258 million Hong Kong dollars fS33 
million). 

Ii wii pay hail the total in stock, issuing 4.7 million shams valued ai 
27.41 dollars each. Hutchison closed 30 cents higher at 27.90. 

Brokers said the market was aided by China Light & Power Co.'s 
report Wednesday of sharply higher annual profit, China Tight shares 
rose 40 cents to 17.80 dollars. 

In addition, Cheung Kong (Holdings) Ltd. rose 40 cents to 20i0 
dollars and Swire Pacific Lid’s A shares 40 cents to 29.00. 

Hongkong Land Co. rose 5 cents to 6.95 dollars and Hongkong & 
Kowloon Wharf & Godown Co. 5 cents to 7 JO. 

New World Development Co. gained 10 cents to 8.40 dollars and 
Sub Hung Kai Properties 10 cents to 13.40. 


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Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1985 


Tliursdaji 


MSE 


Closing 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


::v«iin 

HiW LOm Stock 


Div. Yld. PE 


Si 

lC&MrTn Low 


ucw 

Coal. Ch'ge 


(Continued from Page 10) 


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102 3J5 VO ‘ 


■»; -nm 27’* 77ft— ft 

il« m waive ■+ ■« S3 1 Gh y. 

34 J4=i Wevern 1JO 4J5 27 22a® 28ft M^9 

/n. uA iWflurnf JJfl 70 S J®’* J? 

9J 39 48"% 48ft 4WJ — ft 

111 8 7ft { 7a — 1% 

= 44 — T 

70 


44*9 36=9 Wevrpf 230 
51=9 45’i Weyrpr -LK 
77ft 6=9 ylWhPit 
32ft 10ft vPWhPItpf 


3719 25=3 White 
4i5*s 37*9 WhiVC pfGJO 


2aft 1®*% WlDffok 
12ft 6*9 Wleb^Jf 
15V» 5 Wilfred 
13ft 7=9 WillcxC 


.10 


Sft 2 WlimEI 
7ft 57% WnsnrO .10 10 

38ft 30 WtnDiX 1J4 50 
20-7% 8ft WhTflbg JO 1.9 

a*. 5ft winner 
B'i Jft wir.rerJ 
40 ft 30 U WIscEP 203 60 

9T.: 72ft TMisE of 3.RJ ®0 

SI 63 - W(5E Cf 775 90 

40ft 26’, WIicPL 276 70 

39ft 39V, WIKPS 20* "* 

48V: 3fl : ; VtfifCP ' Jm 

14 9ft Wzl JrVt 

53's, 25 Vi Woiwfh 
73 50': ttolPPt 

4*3 J=% WrtlAr 

8T; 54ft V.rlglv 
4U TV W'jrllsr 
16 10*9 SVvieLS 

23*9 15ft Wrens 



530= 

15! » 

15 

IB 

12C3 

45 

43% 


®2 

31 

X'-: 


5 

40 

39% 

9 

193 

£3% 

22ft 

10 

29B 

20 

19% 


174 

12 

lift 

12 

1BI 

lift 

11 

5 

34 

13 

17ft 

22 

ID 

301% 

29ft 


73 

4U 

41% 


V 

ffft 

6 

a 

TO 

34% 

34ft 

9 

576 

It'S 

10ft 


19* 

71% 

ITb 


4 

7ft 

7ft 

s 

391 

36ft 

364% 


ISOr 

90ft 

89 


MUr 

79 ft 

79 

9 

372 

37 

36% 


+ ft 


4ft— ft 

6*% 


7ft 

7ft — ft 
36ft + V9 
Wft + ft 
79 —1 


_. J 9 
08 00 10 


J4 

200 


77 38A. 38ft ffik— ft 
92 27* 37=9 37=9— ft 

488 ll*i lift lift— ft 

30 71 2145 52*i 52ft 52ft- '+ 

20 5 74VA 7* 74 + ft 

!1®B Jft 5 Jft + ft 

!J0a 21 1* ZA 87ft 86 87 +lft 

B 3ft 3 ft 3ft + ft 
X 23 21 Ml lift 11 lift + ft 

00 28 12 37 16 ISft ISft 


sy-i 35*. Xerox 
2® 19=% XTRA 


100 SJ 19 632S Mft SJ 5*V; +lft 
M 1C It 89 22ft 21ft 21ft— ft 


NYSE H^is4jows 


WCV i *00*90 


AMIL0BS 

Amwyjp 

AmTT efa 

«r*%ilndl 

Avon Prod 

OanPtr* 

cuicnw 

CoenKG 

CravRxn* 

Danakcv 

F«ilCo 

Fmnwds 

GcpRecpnx 

iCIntair 

KeltomCo 

UmthMis 
Marion , 
NBC Ball 
OhPs- TUB* 
RBfiuxPor 


aSSSSb AhH'bW 

itnWfltf4f»5 ««MMt 

m- ^ wt- 

CopntodfP CABKfnfc 
ewcjwp i 


De*£7«of 

ODBantC’ 


Dm** SUM 


Slsrcr BrW 
Tennc Vlpr 
UPiohn Ce 
WrWev 



NSHfLOW tt 


AcntCiw AWSflnoCO MOCmnKo 
BcnkAmoCf o BopiuUnadtP CwMnM 


BcBiHAmodii 

•lEtfonPOiP OCA CP 

WACOM JCWrS 

SoobiPS TfWB 


Bn 


3m rtmbwn 

PyraEagy 


Jobless Rate Declines 
To 7.8% in Australia 


. Amp* 

CANBERRA. Anuntia — The Mautanally 
adjusted unemplo jr meaixate m Australia fdl u> 
7.8 penxm of the wed force in October from 
S.I percent is Septe^eraod BAperecat a year 
earlier, the goner uuKnfc ttasEws bureau said 
Thursday. 

Last isomh's lewd wasibe lowest since Octo- 
ber 1981 - 

The number of jobbss; seasonally adpmed, ^ 
fell to 564JOO from 592^00 in September and 
614.600 a year eadkx: Unadjusted una^doy* 
mem dropped to 533,100, or 73 perccm, of the 
esumatsd work force jn October. The rnunber 
<tf jobless was reported as 587,700, or 8 percent, 
in September and 578.800. or 8.1 percent, in 
October 1984. • -1 



Season Sacnan 
High Low 


Abr. 7 


Open High Low dose Cho. 


Grains 


3.74ft 

482 

3J2V5 

305 

105ft 

EsI.Sde 


207 

£04 

203 

£67 

294ft 


r!‘r 


5®v; 

.. 22ft 

94 18ft 
854 4ft 
IDA 71% 
55 4* 

27 T533 36V 


3’ * Wft Tracrs 02 2D 11 571 i6*i 16 

23 8 : J TWA 650 22*9 22ft 

16 13 TWA Pi 22S 14.1 07 16 15ft 

34j: 18': TWA OfB 2J5 67 21 33ft 33ft 

32ft 24*- Transrn 108 52 16 1856 32ft Kft 

21 ? : 17*» Tronlnc 2J3 10J 15 21 *% 21ft 

14 lift TARItv 100 02 87 20 12ft 1SV% 

cr.3 15V- TmCda nl.12 60 7 " 

S7‘4 44 Tronsco 6.990140 50 

66ft 53 Tmscpf 307 A3 

Mft 1®ft TranEx 236 11.7 

13*% 5-1b Transcn 9 

102 Mft TrGnf 1003 IDJ 

97 US’.: TrGP pf 804 9.0 

25ft 22 TrGP of 250 90 

13*9 Bft TrnsOh 


_ ...... «r% 

12 16ft 16*% 16ft— V* 
635 50ft 49ft 50 + ft 
1 61 61 6T + ft 

126 20ft Mft 20'.%— '% 
492 8ft Bft Bft + ft 
atlOOft 100ft 100ft 
100: 96 96 96 

4 25ft 25ft 25ft + ft 
21 12ft 12Vk 12Vi + 'u 
49fl 45ft 45*i 45ft + 1% 


-TV': 3®v; Tranwy 100 19 13 
4JV- MV- Trnwld 08 10 13 2325 40 1 - 3®v; 37*6— ft 

25 1 : 12ft Twldr/IA 139 22ft 22 ft 22ft— ft 

34‘fc ?7V» Twldof 200 5.9 32 Mft 34 34 — '6 

17ft 15ft TwIdPt l.®0 108 5 17ft 17ft 17ft— ft 

J«W 34 Trawler 204 4J !1 2676 451% 45ft 451%— ft 


5BV: M'% Tray pf 4.16 70 

27ft 22ft Tricon 30BO12.9 

30 22 TriCnpt 250 93 

32 7ft Trlaln S 00 0 

3Tb 23 TrlcPc 

50'- 30ft Tribune 

Aft 4 Trientr 
7ft 5ft Trioo 
17ft 12=: Trfnty 
35W Mft TritEna .... _ 
19ft ®ft TrllE of 1.10 60 
43ft Jlft TucsEP 300 70 9 
17 1 : 9ft Tullex 08 £0 15 


100 28 10 
04 1J 17 
JlelOX 7 
JO 3.1 12 
17 

.10b J 24 


42 549% 54ft 54'i — ft 

91 27 26ft 27 

5 279% 27 27 

420 32 30ft 31ft +IV% 

62 35ft 35ft 35’A — 'A 

651 50*% 50 50ft + '0 
5 SVa 5ft 5ft— ft 

21 6ft 6=9 6*9 — ft 

209 13ft 13ft 13=%— ft 

579 30ft 29*i 30ft + ft 

374 16ft 16ft 16*% + 1% 

250 4099 40=9 4D=i 

62 17 16tt 169%— ft 


WHEAT (CUT) 

5000 bu mini mum-donans per bashei 
303ft 279ft Doc 302ft SJSft 302 304 +00 V. 

Mar 3J8W 130ft 128 3J«i +0O>A 
Altov 112*6 1141a £11 3.13 —01 

Jiri 290ft £92*9 209*6 191 'A — wm 
Seo 293 —ei 

Dec 305ft 305ft 304ft 104ft — 0) 
Prev. Sales 7062 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 30092 UP512 
CORN C CAT) 

5000 bo minimum -dollars per BuslMl 
2®S ZMft Dee 236ft 237ft 204ft 236ft +02*6 
Mar 204*6 205ft 20TA 243*6 +0Oft 
.May 207*- 208*6 246*6 207*6 — XCi 
Jul 209 249*6 247 207*6 —01 

Sep £M 235 2J3ft 2MU —01 
Dec 209ft 230*6 228 Vi £2816 —0116 

- Mar 237ft 237ft 207ft 207ft —01 

Est. Safes Prev. Sales 46010 

Prev. Day Doan Inf.i4a.173 off 66 
SOYBEANS lean 
5000 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 


£97 

£91*. 

206 

£70 

20Sft 

174ft 


£24V% 

201 

203 

£34*5 

220'6i 

233 


60S 
609 
762 
709 
658 
604 
SJO 
602 
503 
EM. Sotos 


497ft 

5.10 

502ft 

5J1'6 

506*6 

SJSft 

509ft 

506ft 

507ft 


-03 

-03 

—03 


Nov 5.16ft 5.19=6 5.15 506'A —0016 

Jan 507ft 500ft 505*6 507 —91% 

Mar 5J9ft 501ft S36 507 —03=6 

May 54*ft 549 504% 545 —04% 

Jul 504 554% 550ft 550% —04ft 

Aug 5521% 552ft 550 550 —03ft 

Sep 507 507% 505 505 

Nov 503ft 504ft 501ft 501% 

Jan 505 MS 544 504 

„ Prev. Sales 46505 

Prev. Day Open hit. 75,165 up 100 
SOYBEAN MEAL (COT) 

100 tons- daUan per tan 

18400 12540 Dec 14850 14900 147.70 M890 

Jan 14850 14900 14750 147J0 

AAor 14900 15000 14800 148J0 

May 15040 ISUO 14900 14950 

JUI 15050 15100 14950 14900 

Aug 15000 15060 14900 14900 

Sep 14800 14850 14750 14850 

OCt 14550 14650 14450 14650 

Dec 14600 14600 14550 14700 

Jon 14700 

Prev.SaJes 17093 


Season Season 
High Low 


Own High Law Close CBa. 


167.10 13553 Jul 158.75 16249 15850 141.13 +I0S 

16708 13275 Sep 15950 16300 15V 50 161J3 +1.U 

16700 CTJB Dec I6C0C 16300 14000 1AZ0I +100 

16705 1425C AAor 76275 +05 

Est.Scwx Prev. Sales L52S 

Prev. Dav Open int. 115SS uoM5 
SUGAR WORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 


Utah Lew 


Oh» KM Law Close Oft. 


HMODOUNB 
slnriMewateetf 
9£17 
9153 8UB 


NT 


9107 9109 


9155 9200 

+276 run 


+03 ' 


mJi 


;js 

IX 


50C 

500 

500 

S03 

—03 

903 

204 

Mar 

xi6 

XI® 

&9l 

5.93 

—09 

7.75 

308 

Alar 

60S 

60S 

X08 

AM 

—00 

6J0 

602 

3J® 

X24 

Ju-' 

Sea 

X53 

XS3 

608 

409 

60S 

—07 

—06 

6.96 

1 as 

402 

60S 

Cct 

Jan 

601 

601 

605 055 

6*9 

—09 

—09 

703 

Est. Sales 

401 

Mar 700 704 

Prev.Saies 10013 

702 

7.15 

—07 


9102 9101 9107 9101 +A 

9L25- 9227 ' tU* T»j7 +02 

H mn tM2 9ui +02 

9S 9* '+« 

9039 MM Jan «U» OOSf BUS +0Z 

IMS Kit to-.tti WOt 8901 81.93 +01 

EsiL Sotos 47 JM Prnv. Salts W®S 
nw.OnOBMM.UUB wUB 



Prev. Dor Open Inf. 91JS6 jcBOS 


X0425 

10318 


COCOA fNYCSCE) 

10 mefr ic tons- Saer ton 


2337 

1945 

Dec 

3S4 

2061 

304 

2059 

+20 

2392 

1955 

Mar 

213Q 

2155 

21M 

2153 

+® 

2422 

I960 

May 

2l®5 

2210 

2191 

2208 

+17 

2429 

1«6C 

Jut 

22S 

2245 

2229 

2245 

+35 

2430 
3425 . 
385 

nm 

70S 

3C29 

Sen 

Dec 

Mar 

2256 

2270 

2254 

2270 

2380 

2298 

+11 

+11 

+11 


7/390 10839 10070 

. _ M*r T0HB I0T» U890 7.3950 

U21S LUOS Jan UM1 £• 4S U79B 10858 
esfcSatrs UI2f Prev-StowTl UU 
Prey.DayOawalJtf. 30293 meMt - 


— 26S 


CSMMMOOUMMM 
IMM 


1BO30 
17TJD 
W255 
75750 
18050 
114 JS 


II2JC: 

11275 

IILrS 

11100 

line 

ms: 


3 


Est. Sales 345* Prev. Sales £564 
Prev. Day Open Int. 208S2 off 56 
ORANGE JUICE (MYCE) 

15000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

IBU0 11222 Nov 11350 11355 11350 TUBS 

Jan 11460 11460 17173 114J* 

AAor 114.73 114JQ 1T3JB 11440 

May 11*50 11*70 I MOO 1M5B 

Ju! 174JQ 

Sep 11200 112X0 11200 11209 

Now TO25 —100 

Jan TEL5B —108 

Var U3J5 11175 11133 HZ75 —100 


iwrOr-lsaMiwMl 

JS66 J806 . Dec JM J2» 3299 

JOB* Jim Mar jm j» * .rm 

J3M J8W. Jto*. J7» J730- J2» 

J3B3 Jin Sep 0325 JZ2S J225 

EstSatee UNO Prev. Saks 3J1* 

Prev. car jOveaM. 70V a oM 


J9tV 

J2S6 

JM2 

7229 


i\ 


— T 


—00 


-100 


TAIJS 
EsL Sotos 


msc 


600 PrevJatos *61 


Prev. Day Open int. 6X03 


-67 

—67 

-67 

-67 


Metals 


16300 

20650 

1*250 

16700 

15270 

16700 

14950 

15O00 

lisumH 

Est. Sales 


12700 

13000 

13250 

13*00 

T3550 

13750 

14000 

14200 

14500 


—M 

—JO 

—JO 

-JO 


COPPER (COMEX) 
2S0OO B&- cents per l& 


-.10 

+50 

+50 

+50 

-00 


Prev. Dav Oo«n Int. 45090 off 1000 


SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 

60000 lbs- dollars per 100 lbs. 
295S 19JB Dec 1950 

2907 19J3 

2860 1960 

2705 2002 

25JS 2000 

25.15 2007 

2405 2050 

2280 2005 

2105 2055 

2100 2015 

EsL Seles 


Jon 20.04 
AAar 2M3 
May 2060 
Jul 21 JH 
Aug 21.15 
Seo 21.10 
Oct 27.10 
Dec 21.10 
Jan 

Pnev.sales 10090 


20.12 

1QW 

2100 

2100 

2105 

2100 

2105 

2105 


1905 

2000 

wn 

2CL75 

Z10O 

21.10 

210S 

21.10 

21.10 


2008 
20.19 
2054 
2088 
21 JO 
21J5 
21.15 
27J2 
2100 
2160 


+.14 

+.10 

+06 

+01 

+03 

+05 

—05 

+.12 

+.10 

+.10 


BOM 

8405 

6X30 

5X53 

NOV 

Dec 

6090 

6105 

6000 —IBS 
6030 6030 —1.10 

8400 

8X00 

5X25 

9®0O 

Jan 

.Mar 

67 JB 

*£00 

6060 —1.10 
6100 *105 —UK 

74-00 

6030 

Aterr 

6230 

6130 

6100 SiM — 1J» 

7X4C 

6005 

JU 

6ZJD 

6200 

6205 .6205 —05 

70-90 

6X90 

Sea 

42J5 

07$ 

6£® 6240 —1410 

7000 

tuc 

Doc 

XUS 

*305 

6305 43J0 —05 

7020 

67.90 

6700 

6130 

fiv. 

'*£90 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

6460 

6X60 

*330 —95 

6175 — 90 

/AM 6420 — -TO 

6X20 

61-80 

*305 

4100 

Jul 

Sea 



44X5 —00 

6505 —JO 

Ert. Sato _ 

Prev.Saies 4A50 



HUNCH nUNCOMW ' 

fNrkMC-lniatKHbaMtt 
.otaii 0K7B Dec .raas jtm .06*5 .nies — uo 

06B JM85 Mar J343B .l|l» .13*18 .12390 —1*0 

02188 .1200 Jam J3IS0 .13*50 .13430 .12315 —160 

EM. lotos 1| Prav.Sotos 0 . . 

Prev.DatrOpeaMfc 13s 08I 
GCJtMAMMAJMCUMM] 

[u*r Dwrk-1m' 

JHB J971 Dee J887 JU9 J7K 0809 

0912 JM AAor 019 JMI 0825 JS41 

JKH 0335 JDR 327 J*» 0173 J»3 

. 0JW Sep jm 4MS JN & MU 

EH. Sotos 3U8I PrevJotostoJTS 
Prev. Day Open tut. 5*711 hpLSM 
JAPANESE YEN(IAW7 ; ' 

iperven- ipeice e p iwm anatBaBr _ 

004901 003ms Dec 0B*m 00(926 0IMSD 004876 

004918 0BOQ5 Maraom *J*M®34 004857 004885 
I *££3L 9 a3D Ju» 0O«fijO4t3» 004872 J0B4W2 

mooo jmm sea 0O*no 004920 00*920004721 
0O4jj| _ 0^ 004985 004185 0049*8 0049*5 
E*r.3atos XUeS Prev. Sotos 23004 
Prev. Day Oeea to*. 39JJ8 
ISWUSPRAMC(IMJR)' 

*prrboo<>l point eaoafsBUWn . 

6728 0SW Ctoc 091 6709 682S 6650 

6771 7KJS M«r 6751 6751 6671 .4498 

A900 6T90 Jun 6795 67*5 6725 6740 

6U0 6 TO Sea 6790 6790 

EASatos 21TO Prev^atos 14067 
. Prev. Oav Open IW. 48L06S tea RUM 


—22 
—23 
— 23 
-23 
-73 


Am Am 


-67 

-a* 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 45JS15 up437 


j London >letols 


Xm. r 

Previous 
Bid Ask 


98500 


Close 

Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per melric Ion 
SBOI MO0O 461.00 *5760 65BJ0 

4BS - M 926.™ 68260 48100 

COPPER CATHODES IHfth Grade) 

Storting per metric ton 
Snot 949.00 950.00 95500 *5600 

Farwrd 9790O 979J0 98200 

COPPER CATHODES fStondard) 

Sterling per metric ton 
Sput 92800 93000 9»60 9 J 1.00 

LEAD 01 ?WlM e6,,M 141 ■°° ?UJKJ 

Sterling per metric ton 

SPC! 27400 77500 77500 77560 

£?C?el 276m zr7 - M 

Sterling per mefric ton 
5P« 780000 281000 77=0. B0 3800 00 

SILVER* 786S.00 207000 204S0O 205000 

Pence per tror ounce 

SP61 *2300 *24.00 *2300 *2100 

Forward 436.00 *3660 43500 43603 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric ten 

Spot n.q. rvo. 854800 85*900 

ZH*C° r0 nA ™ MM M 846,100 

Stefllng per metric ten 
Soo! 397.00 365.00 3®100 3«.M 

Source. 4P. 


L 


LIS. Treasuries 


JVai-. r 



Offer 

BU 

view 

Yield 

Jmonfti Mil 

700 

709 

75* 

"'■SO 

Xmairili Bill 

7J3 

703 

7J2 

7.70 

Freer BUI 

73S 

704 

7 SB 

709 

Prev. 


Bid 

Offer 

Yield 

Yie« 

3+yearbead 104 6/32 1 

104 7/a 

1X17 

1X76 


Source : Sahmoit Brothers. 


Merrill Lredi TrcoSuiY index: 131 JO 
Change tar the dav: +008 
Average yield: 909 1. 

Source: Merrill LvtkK 


Far (he lair*! information on 
De Voe-Holbeiu International nv 
and Cm-Ooek International nv 
please call collecl 31 - 20 - 62 T 76 H 


Investors seeking above average 
capiiaJ gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


Firsi Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Center 
Sirawmskvlaan W7 
1077 XX Amslcrdonu 
The Netherlands 
Telex: I45U7 fircc* nl 



HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
USJ pgr ounce 

Close Prevtaus 
LOW RM Ask Bid Ask 
N.T. 32300 32500 32*00 32600 
N.T. 32600 32800 325.00 327.00 
N.T. 32800 33000 32700 32900 
N.T. 33000 33200 37900 33100 
N.T. 33300 335.00 33300 33500 
Jim _ 33800 33800 33700 33900 33700 329.00 
Auo _ 3*300 343.00 3*200 3*4.00 3*200 34400 
OCt — N.T. N.T. 34600 34100 37600 3*800 
Volume: 2* tots of 100 Pi. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U06 per ounce 


High 
Nov - N.T. 
Dec _ N.T. 
Jan _ N.T. 
Feb _ N.T. 
API _ N.T. 


Dec . 
Feb . 


High 

325.60 

N.T. 


Pre*. 

Low Settle 
323.40 32544) 


N.T. 

Volume: 60 lots of 100 o*. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cents per kilo 

Cl DM 

Bid Aik 

Dec 78100 10200 

Jan 182.00 18300 

Feb HUB 10*00 

Mar 78*00 18500 


Settle 

J26.73 

33800 


volume: 0 lots. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kilo 
Close 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
181.00 18200 
18200 18100 
18300 14400 

18400 18500 


RSS1 Dec- 

RSS 1 Jan 

PSS2 Dec_ 
RSS 3 Dec- 
RSS 4 Dec- 

R5SS Dec- 


Bid 

157.75 

15800 

15000 

1*8250 

14450 

I3®J0 


Ask 
158J5 
15900 
15100 
14900 
14600 
Ml JO 


previous 
BU Ask 


157 75 
15800 
15000 
14800 
144.00 
1390O 


157.75 

15800 

15103 

1*9.00 

1*600 

M10O 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian ringgits per 25 tons 


Nov . 
Dee . 
Jan . 
Feb . 
Mar 


Mav , 
J(v_ 
Sep _ 


Source: Reuters. 


Close 

Prev bias 

Bid 

Ask 

Bid 

ASX 

*50 

660 

645 

*75 

665 

675 

670 

675 

*80 

682 

602 

687 

677 

702 

690 

770 

70S 

715 

ftW 

738 

710 

720 

690 

720 

710 

720 

*90 

720 

710 

TO 

<00 

710 

690 

720 

680 

710 

sot 25 tom. 




fhJ 

s&pjoo 


KX f 

^puonsj 


Aor. 


Cob Led 

tone m w 

'.IS iL K w-* 

15 JE» Mi* ip* ii 

II? 8*% 5=» 4': 7 

“ 29/16 J=s * 

« l '>» 1IN* 1 0.-18 1^1 
ws — 3/16 It L 


PuhnLaa 

Nev Dee Jan Feb 

- 1.16 H14 - 

1/14 l.lt 1/16 7/16 
lil* =1 11/14 Us 

b| I 3.-16 Ik £ 7/14 
1 7.16)'. ]-1 in 

5Vi 4= 7% 8 


Totol adl reume 1*29* 
Tfltoj am a w ini. 525JM 
I2S»; Wume 1B7J11 
TflMlnul aneninT. TBTet/ 
Source: CBOEL 


DM Futures 
Options 


W.Sennantllan-i2Sa»itioru.emtiMrmBr* 


Colls- Settle 


Dec 

MOT 

Jun 

Dec 

£12 

2J8 

XU 

XM 

103 

1.99 

£41 

XI5 

XM 

109 

1.90 

047 

60S 

934 

U3 

!.\l 

007 

0*1 

10$ 

1.97 

ft® 

009 

X74 

— 


Am-. “ 
Pula-SeHto 
Mar Jun 

MS 


003 

101 

l.S* 

£15 


95* 

0«I 

1JI 

l« 

2J8 

302 


EstimaMdf0MMt.S8M 
Coin; VleO. vol 1*31 «wi W. «Jt* 
puls : Wed. YBl. UM mu W.' VMS. 


Source: CMS. 


London 

GonuiMMlities 


Previous 
Bid Ask 


Mar 

May 

Aua 

OCT 


Mar 

May 

Jiy 

Sen 

Dec 

Mar 


.’Aw. 7 

Close 

Hlgb LOW BM A 

SUGAR 
Storting per metric inn 
Dec 149 JO 14120 14700 14300 MS0O 14900 
16100 15500 1SS0O 15520 16100 16100 
16400 15900 15900 15920 16500 16500 
17003 16400 16*20 16400 17000 17100 
17500 16900 14*20 16*00 17500 17600 
Volume: £403 lots oi 50 ions. 

COCOA 

Sterling per melric ton 
DM 1031 7010 1031 1035 1007 1008 

1083 1054 1079 1080 1059 1060 

1.711 1083 1.708 1.709 1089 1090 

1238 1209 1234 1.736 1210 121* 

1258 1233 1254 126J 1238 1242 

1.7SS 1245 1257 1265 1244 1.748 

1.770 1265 1275 1,787 1243 1270 

Volume : 3005 toll of 10 Ions. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric top 

Nov 1070 1035 1070 1078 1070 1075 

1.918 1065 1.905 1,908 1,903 1,905 

1.910 7045 1096 1,900 1080 1082 

1.900 1055 1.901 1,902 1070 1075 

1.910 10SS 1.905 1,910 1065 1075 

1,905 1060 1.905 1.910 1085 1090 

1065 1065 1095 1.915 1090 1097 

Volume: 44®2 tola of 5 ions. 

GASOIL 

UJ. dollars per metric Ion 
NOV 24700 24*25 266. '5 24700 24225 24150 
26400 26125 26175 26400 3*000 54025 
26200 25925 26100 241.75 25700 2S725 
257 JO 25500 25700 257 J 5 253J5 25330 
748.75 246J0 2*8.75 24900 24* J5 24440 
24300 24100 2150 242J5 23800 23125 
23600 235.00 23475 23540 23005 23100 
23X25 23000 23125 23X00 22800 22900 
23240 23100 23100 23300 22775 22800 
Volume: 2004 tots of 100 tom. 

CRUDE OIL IBRENT) 

U4. dollars per barrel 

Dec 2X90 2X60 2809 2800 2X52 2X54 
2808 2775 2808 2X10 2744 2770 
27A7 27 £5 7706 2707 27.10 27.15 
N.T. N.T. 2650 27.10 2400 2X50 
N.T. N.T. 2500 ZX90 2400 2X05 
N.T. N.T. 2X50 2T0Q 2X21 2600 
Volume: 154 lots of 1000 barrels. 

Sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
change /gasoil, crude oil/. 


Jan 

Mar 

May 

Jtv 

Sep 

Nov 


Dec 

Jan 

pea 

Mar 

API 

May 

Joe 

Jlv 


Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

API 

May 


Gonmiml&ie$ 


Mr. 


Close 

High Law Bid Ash Ch'vc 

SUGAR 

French francs per metric ton 
Dec 1021 1013 1012 101* —17 

Mar 10*3 1023 10E 702B —23 

MOV 1067 1060 1050 1040 —24 

A us 1014 14U 1098 1003 —30 

DO 14*0 1038 1020 1030 —20 

Dec 1048 1048 1035 1551 —18 

Ell. vol.: 1 J50 Nils of 50 tons. Prev, actual 
sales • £299 lots. Onen Merest: 2508* 

COCOA 

French francs per 100 kg 
Dec N.T. N.T. 1035 1045 

Mar 1075 1063 1073 1073 

Mav N.T. N.T. 1093 — 

JIV N.T. N.T. 1.900 — 

SCP N.T. N.T. 1,910 - 

D« N.T. N.T. — 1,970 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 1,970 

Es>- vol.: 30 tots of 10 tonx Prev. actual 
sales. 29 toft. Open Interest: 480 
COFFEE 

French francs acr IN kg 
Nov 2055 2055 2060 - -30 

Jan £122 2090 £111 £139 —20 

Mar 2.125 20W 2,110 2.U9 — » 

May N.T. N.T. 2090 £115 — « 

JIV N.T. N.T. — 109G —60 

Sep 2,120 £120 2.120 2,1+0 -30 

Nov N.T. N.T. £105 £150 — 

Esi. vol. : 24 lols of 5 tons. Prev. actual sates: 
9* tots. Onen (merest; 378 
Source . Bourse du Commerce. 


+ 73 
+ 14 
+ 10 
+ 20 
+ 25 
+ 20 
+ 20 



Ant'. 7 


CarnmnEty and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb 

Prfntctotti 64/30 38 ft, vd __ 

Sleel bniels iPitt.), hm 

iron 2 Fdry . Pm la. ton 

Steel scrao No i hw Flff. _ 
Lead Soar, lb , 


Thu 

109 


Copper elec), lb . 
Tin (Straits). lb. 

7lnr 1= Cl i D-, 


ZlfKL E. SI. L. Basil, lb . 

PoUodlam. oz 

Silver N.Y. oi -~ 
Source: AP. 


*7X08 

31190 

75-76 

18-19 

87-70 

NJL 

035 


Year 

Ago 

107 

000 

47300 

31300 

88-89 

2+26 

65-49 

6.TMB 

•05 


102-103 140-142 
6055 7 JO 


d DKIdends 


Abr. 7 


Company 


Per Amt Pay Rec 
DECREASED 

Canadian Marconi s .14 12-9 11-27 
INCREASED 


Arvln Indus 
Humana Inc 
Jestens Inc 
Louslana GenISvc 
NorttiwestPvblSvc 
Nttiwestem FJ. 
Oshkosh B' Gash cf A 
Oshkosh B' Gosh cl B 
w el man Co 


Q ,U 12-13 11-23 

- .19 2-1 1-3 

Q 32 12-2 11-15 

Q .14 ft 2-15 1-17 


Q 05 
Q 05 
Q 09% 
Q 0B 
5 08 


12-1 11-15 
1M 11-15 
12-2 11-15 
12-2 11-1S 
12-2 11-15 


Capitol Feai SSL Assc 
SiFCO indusirles 


PROPOSED STOCK SPLIT 

Galactic Resources— 2-lor-l 
SPECIAL 

ASA Ltd 


J5 11-27 11-19 


Ullllcorp Uld 


A 

STOCK 

S JPC 12-12 13-15 

STOCK SPLIT 


Arvln Indus. — 4-lorO 
Swim Cora — 2-tor-l 


USUAL 

Amer Invectrs Ll Ins 

Anchor Hocking 

ASA Ltd 
Avon Product: 

Brascan Ltd 
Bus. Men's Assur. 

Bus. Mona As»r. 
ChetnedCwp 
ClncJnnctl Mllocnm 
Comdisco Inc 
Conrincnral Telecom 
Dart AKrofr 
Del-Vdl Find Care 
Devon Res. invsi. 
Eagle-PIdier Indus 
EnergyNorfti Inc 
Fireman's Fund 
FmC Corn 
GTE 

Hanna IMA) Co 
Houston Oil Ryity Tr 
imasco Lid 
Instnm Core 
Keomev-Natn'l Inc 
Klrmev System 
LearSlegier Inc 
LoctileCorp 

McKesson Core 
Portland Genl Elcc 
Reich ho id etiem 
Saleoocore 
5cietitlfto-Anonta 
Set on Co 
Texas Eastern 
US Truck Line* 

Util leant Uld 
Vernifron Core 

west burn? inti md 


05 11-22 11-8 

07 12+ 11-25 
0D 11-27 11-19 
00 12-3 11-21 

AO 2-28 2-1 

Jo 12-3 11-20 

06 IW 11-20 
09 12-10 11-22 
.IB 13-12 11-22 
05 12-16 11-29 
05 12-2 11-1B 
0® 12-10 11-18 

- .14 ft 1-2 2>3 

« 00 11-29 11-16 

Q 06 12-10 11-22 
Q JO 12-16 12-2 
O 07 ft 13-11 1 1-20 
O 05 12-31 13-13 

- J9 1-1 11-22 
a .10 12-12 11-26 

M JOB 11-25 11-15 

Q .18 12-31 11-22 

Jts 1-3 13-18 

13-4 11-30 
1-9 12-19 
13-3 11-18 
1-2 12* 
1-2 12-2 
1-15 12-27 
12-1 11-2# 
1-27 1-10 
12-4 11-20 
12-9 11-25 
12-1 11-18 
00 12-U 11-39 
05 13-13 IMS 


.10 

05 

00 

JO 

09 


Q 07ft 
Q JO 
D 03 

a 03 
a 02% 

Q J5 
0 
Q 


05 

05 


1-3 12-16 
1-1 12-19 


o-anngal; m-moBthly; g- uuui ig rt r/ s-*«m1- 

annual 


Source: UPI. 


MOTE NEWS IN LESS TIME 

THE WORLD IN 16 PAGES 

DAILY IN THE IHT 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMS) 

*<1000 ib^- cento per lb. 

6705 5500 Dec 

&7A5 5*J5 Feb 

4707 5SJ0 Apr 

6605 5605 Jun 

6540 5500 ADD 

60-40 5700 Oct 

6500 SfM Dec 


Prev. Dav Open lot 77087 uo541 
ALUMINUM(COMEX) 

4Q0OO lbs.- aenis per to. 

Nov 

4100 Dee Cfl 0 4205 
44.70 Jan 

CWJ Mar 4340 4305 
4605 May 
«0B Jm 
4690 Sep - 
4895 D«C 
Jan 
Mar 
49.40 May. 

5900 Jul 
Sep 

EsL Sales Prev. Sates 77 

Prev. Dav Open Int. IJ3S o»78 


7860 

7600 

7160 

66-75 

6305 

52.10 

49.10 


4190 


4300 


5305 

5000 


4175 
4£05 
42 A5 

4300 

4390 

4400 

■«J0 

4605 

46-70 

4700 

4X10 


Industrials 


+0S 

+JS 

+05 

+05 

+05 


UMUERfCMG) 

130000 UtL Hr HW 1000 BCL fL 

38X10 12600 Nov 14100 14108 14000 14000 -MO 

Jan uus insa lew 14200 —100 


ts 


4908 


+05 

+05 

+05 


18700 
19500 
17600 
18300 
T760O 
181 JO 


13160 
139 JO 
MSJO 
14900 
15290 
15600 


Mar 149.90 15000 MAO 14800 —100 


Est. Sales 1077 Prev. Sates L326 
i Prev. Day Open int. 7,150 tv 86 


MOV I54MS 35600 15190 15400 ._ 

Jul 15900 19900 15X60 15X40 —108 

Seo 14200 14030 76200 14200 

NOV _ 142JO 




6705 67,40 

6145 AHW 
4US 42A2 
6140 6195 
6000 6107 

59JW 5900 
40.10 40.10 


Est. Sales 22950 Prev. Sates 25009 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 670TB off 384 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME1 
44J700 Ibs^ cento per IX 
7120 5B.1S Nov 4405 

79-60 6050 Jan 4800 

71 JO 6002 Mar 69.88 

7100 6000 Apr 6802 

70.00 4X70 MOV 6695 

6800 6SJ3 _ Aug 47J0 


6X32 

BIST 

6100 

4100 

6000 

5900 

60.10 


4705 

6157 

62.10 

61JS 

6002 

S2MI 

60.10 


+J5 

+J0 

—JO. 

+.15 


SILVER (COME9Q 
5000 Irev ax- cents per (ray az. 


— 03 


4X75 

4805 

4900 

6X42 

4705 

47.10 


Est. Sales 1J23 Prev. Sates £328 
Prev. Day Open Int 9082 off 13 
HOGS (CME1 
30000 HJ9-- Cents POT to. 

3005 3X33 Dec 4690 47.15 

3X47 3X10 Feb 44 JO 4X50 

473S 34.72 Apr 41J5 4115 

4*05 3900 Jun 4X70 44.15 

4905 40.45 Jul 44.70 4445 

57-90 4X25 Aug 4205 <202 

li'IS SS Oct 3MO 39J0 

4900 3X37 Dec 

4X90 4X45 Feb 

EsL Sales 4092 Prev. Sales 8007 
Prev. Day Osen Int. 2X824 off 84 
FORK BELUE5 (CME) 

380X1tn^ rents per lt>- 
76J0 5X75 Feb <202 4295 

7540 5505 Mar 6280 6305 

W.+3 570S May 6X40 6400 

K0O 5700 Jul 6175 6425 

7X7 5 5500 AUB 6100 6100 

EM. Sates 3.9SS Prev.SateS 4077 
Prev. Oav Open Int 80B3 affS 


4425 

4800 

4800 

4705 

6493 

67.10 


6405 

4800 

6805 

68.10 

4495 

6725 


—07 
—02 
— JO 
— 20 
+2S 
+25 


iso n 
mao 
12150 

nvxo 

I04EJ8 

9450 

9400 

7990 

7890 

7700 

7520 

7460 


6070 

5900 

5950 

6070 

61V0 

6290 

4210 

4520 

67X0 

aw 

6835 

4990 


Nov 
Dec 
Jan 
Mar 
May 
Jul 
Sep 
Dec 

Jem 6460 
Mar 47*0 
May £820 
jui rms 


6060 4040 
MSB MM 
4140 4140 
6220 4214 
6300 01-5 

6490 4*90 

4*80 4490 
6425 6630 


6790 

682fl 

3000 


4030 
60X5 
*100 
4170 . 
mn 
63SJB 
6*50 
4570 
6660 
4730 
4820 
6910 


6027 

6055 

609J 

6T7J 

6259 

6340 

4419 

458.1 

663J 

6729 

/Jn* 

49X1 


—XI 

—65 

-45 

-40 

—40 


61 J® 

SS 

6200 

5X10 


4097 

MJM 

4125 

4000 

SUB 


—70 

A-7.1 

-72 

—70 

—70 

-70 


462S 

4505 

*127 

4X40 

43-75 

4165 

39-45 


4492 

4635 

4727 

4X82 

4395 

4285 

3905 

4097 

4100 


+00 

+00 

+07 

+.10 

-.15 

+.10 

-05 


EsL Sales 14000 Prev. Safer 6,13* 

Prev. Day Oaen Hit 87254 up 1040 
PLATINUM (KYME) 

50lray ox- dollors ner fray oz. 

357 <0 33100 Nov mm —00 

37X50 25700 Jon 32820 33X70 32X56 377_2fl —100 

35700 26X50 APT 33000 33200 32520 32900 —1.70 

36300 27100 Juf 33250 SI? ST 33100 3)200 —190 

36000 30150 OCt 33400 33600 33500 -+«m —7.70 

Est. Sates Prev.Saies 1041 

Prev. Day Open inf. 11)16 off 57 
PALLADIUM UIYME) 

TOO troy or- OoHars per OS 
14100 9100 Dec 10190 10200 

12790 91 JO Mar 107.25 10356 

71400 nm Jun 10275 10300 

11500 97 JO Sep 10X50 70X50 

10725 10400 Dec 

Est. Sales _ Prev.Scdss 139 

Prev. Day Open lot. US5 up 40 


COTTON 2 (NYC® 
saw tolerate p«r Hi 
”00 2-S RK CLIO 

S 5X77 Mar 47.W 

TO0O 5X90 May 4231 

5X20 Juf 6050 

6ZS> 5£40 Oct PM 

2-^ 5® OBC 51 JO 5190 51 JB 

_44J3 5255 Mar 5TT1 5220 T7U 

Est. Sain £500 Prw.!oterUB 
Prev. Day Open Int. ZM38 off 3 
HEA TIPWOlL tKYM® 

<20WoaJ- cento per pal 

215 ?•* SS « 7 -» 8X85 

4900 Jan 87J» 87J5 8690 

Frt 8540 86.15 8540 
Mar 8MQ I1JO 1X30 
APT 77 JD 7700 7490 


429$ t3 

SS +t3 

5300 . +08 - 

SS ts 


7003 


8X75 
«9S 
7700 
7X50 
7X2S 
7250 
7250 
7290 

EsLSatoS 

Prev. Day Open Int 3X414 
CRUDE OILCMYME) 

1000 bbL-danore per ebt 


6800- May 7X25 
71.88 Jon 7230 

f" 0 

7250 Sep 

Prey-Satos 13091 
U*9 


1701 - +0} 
8701 +95 

8504 +95 

1104 +95 

7707 +03. 


7290 

7270 


7225 


7405 HAS +27 

35 - 3 £ IS 

run tvs —as 

7170 FOB ■ 


9700 

9700 

9*25 

9800 


9700 —400 
9725 — _ 
9X00 — 130 
W25 —ASS 
99.75 — 495 


4100 
6105 
6X10 
A1 K 

6090 


4222 . —03 

4257 — J)3 

6182 — JH 

6X50 .10 

6190 +.19 


Food 


03FFEE C (NYCSCE) 

37^00 ibs^ sen Is ear lb. 

1*800 13925 Dec lW-K 15907 15100 15X74 4401 

1g.fi Mar 15X40 16000 15X40 laffi +m 

1*7.10 17100 MOV 157 J5 16100 15700 1»J9 +* 


HOLD (COM EX) 

100 trev ar^doflars per trov ez. 

Nov 3XIM 32200 32270 32100 —230 

Dec 32500 32S20 32210 32210 — £40 

Jan 325.10 2*0 

F»b 32X70 32900 32420 327.10 — £50 

Apr 331 JO 33300 Siea 33090 — 

Jun 33*00 33600 33500 Sx*Q ZiM 

A Up . 34000 34000 33800 — 230 

OCt 34400 34400 S4l3» 3000 — Z7D 

Dec 34990 34900 347M MJO -2JO 

5* 35290 — ( 200 

Apt 35TM .290 

Jun 3*500 36500 36500 36X20 -300 

_ Alls 34890 £10 

i . .. ' Prey. Sales 1*017 

Prev. Day Open lnU2XX?7 up IJ59 


32630 

32800 

48900 

301 JB 

-4B5JS0 30600 

4®60O 

43X70 

8*2 

32050 

42X40 

53100 

39X78 


39X00 


35X50 

31308 

38X40 

»*-■» 

38500 

fM 

ESI. Salas 95000 


3049 

2900 

290* 

2905 

2905 

2796 

2&JD 

2X31 

2X10 

2700 

2503 

2X35 

2500 

2500 

2X90 


2390 



r.;: 


ax: 

2193 
2305 
2171 
HJS 
2490 
2400 
25.75 
7SM 
2X50 
. 25JJ8 
2X90 


Dec 
Jon 


May 77-» 2700 27.08 27.11 +J9 

Jot 2X65 2BJD 24J1" +.19' 

■Ju* 3XS3 2X58 2&35 £(1 +.19 

Aup 2X15 2X25 »J5 SS . +31 

Seo 2X15 2X15 2408 SS' -+19 

QO SS +.M 

2532 +.15 


Nov 


2540 


Stock IntteitAc 


j Currency Options 


Financial 


^MP-^XfCME, 

H IIIIIH. 

EsLSalex 55048 Pm^ScHM^Tn’ 10 1WJ0 19X90 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Options, Strike 
Underlying Price Cane— Last 

..Nay Dec Mar Nov Dec Mar 
120M British PeandMenfs per unH. 


Hoc. 7 


B Pound 

141.16 

141.1* 

141.14 

141.16 

141.16 

1*1.1* 


125 

138 

135 

1*0 

145 

150 

IB 


S 17J0 


S 

r 

£25 


X40 

£30 

045 

X15 

005 


508 

2JO 

105 

045 


000 


005 

]JS 

490 


1.10 
£30 , 
405 
7.90 


US T. BILLS UMBO 
SI mimsn-pto of 100 pet. 

9308 S5J7 Dec 9£99 9300 

. 9293 BX44 Mar 9205 9ZB7 

9208 8701 Jun 9202 

9296 mm Sep 9236 9231 

9192 8905 DSC 9£0« 9200 

9100 8908 1 Mar 9105 9105 

nx «a j« 910* 91* 

909* 9003 Sep 

Est. Sales MBS Prev.Saies 4001 
Prev. Day Opm lot, *8,193 up 962 


9289 

9£78 

SB 

9203 

2J 52 

9103 

9103 


9291 

*201 

9154 

9223 

9192 

9103 

9103 

9107 


—01 

+01 

+01 

+01 

+01 

+02 

+m 

+01 


^ ma S3 KS »» 


Prev. Dav Open InL uSTtfiVi 

lEBuar** 

85 S ' & HHB IW 
mn 55 T 

winy Sea 

P«ix Day Open SO 3 

11720 iflijo 


+JB 

+.15 

+.TJ 

+05 


3000 


-US' 

+«■ 

+J5 

+05 


r;-' 


7-20 


SMW Cancdkin Doflors-conto per unit. 

CDallr 72 r r r r 

72.72 73 r 005 00* r 

72J7 7* r 005 r r 

asoowofl Oenntm Marks-creti per unit. 
DMark 33 s X25 400 s 

379* 3* 1 X25 r s 

37.96 35 r r r ? 

3796 3* r 2Jfl r r 

H-» 37 . r 10p r 002 

3794 38 027 099 102 UB 

3794 39 005 (L22 099 (L77 

379* 40 r 008 041 r 

Tj s j oo French Francs-IHbsaf a amt per unH. 
FFrane 12B r 409 r r 

42M0H JapoMH YM-nottispf pant pgr noK. 

*1 5 f 110 S 

4847 43 r X10 r r 

4807 44 r 508 r r 

4807 45 323 302 420 r 

4M7 4* 205 £53 £W 

4007 4? r 103 20* 

4807 48 .000 10* 123 

4807 49 022 XS4 120 

4X47 50 s JJ7 ft in 

<£500 Swiss Frnacs-cents par nHL 
SFrsnc 42 S 49* r 

4*35 43 r 3.» r 

4625 44 r 00 Or 

M95 *S r 199 300 

4X25 44 T 100 104 

4433 a 0,14 090 100 

4*25 *8 r 022 104 

Total calf *«L 12*72 Can 

Total put vo(- 9,175 . pat 

r— Hot tended, s— No option ottered. 

Lost to pr*mhnn (purchase price). 

Source: ar 


020 055 1 


is yr. treasury (can 
cioaom prfn- PtoSi 32ndsof 100 1 

B+23 75-13 Doc 

87-22 7S-14 Mur 87-20 

86-24 74-30 Jun 86-13 8+17 

85-30 HW S*g 85-71 ^93 

85+ 8M Dec 84-Z7 

Est. Sates . Prev. Sates 20012 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 72071 up £629 


BM 88-15 
87+ 87-15 

8530 85-23 
84-23 84-30 


11X75 wjp SE. JJtiK 1KL80 nuo 

fflS M ® s as a2!«« 


s ^ 


001 

002 


saaBiOBun; 

79-aa 57-8 • Dec - ' 


an 

090 


000 

090 


DCt) 

78-n £|g 5® 78-5* 

11 g 7^24 Vs-24 

B* Z*-27 7t-2T 
S&-0 Mar 2-26 73.jp 

Jun .73 


77+ 
76-3 . 
7SO 
7+15 
7+26 


001 


72-27 

72-11 

»20 

68-30 

Sotos 


63-73 


4+4 sep 

42-24 Dec 
O Mgr 
66-25 Jun 
Prev. 


72-78 


73-2 

72-11 


71+ 71+ 


002 

0.10 

008 


0.14 

00 * 

078 


an 

007 
B03 
092 ; 
107 


7S-24 79+ 
77-15 77-29 
7+11 7+25 
7+12 75-3 
J+13 7+24 
73-19 73-20 
5-36 73-2 
72+ 73-11 

70-31 71-3 

7+18 


S^SSS ,DBC,C "> 

omew, mUST&v,™ 


Prev. Day open imJU£70S off 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT) 
SlM0xire)ex-fK&3£id5f»n00pcf 

87-2 81-17 Dec 8+16 


+6 

+6 

46 

+3 

+5 

+4 

+6 

+6 

+* 

+4 


Commodity indexes 


3 


«flooefvs__ 

Reuters. 


DJ. Future* 

Corn - R^seorcti Burocu“ 


Oast 

nijoQf' 

1J30JO 

13078 

23JL20 


j+7_. iw wiar &ji So? «-! — ll 


'Woody's ; base loo - nl at .tTT 

BlBESSmlnwy; f- hS^ ‘ 1W1 - 


PrtVKW 

1J40M- 

22500- 






2 j«i S-5) I+21 SS SS* ""J3 


r 022 
r £43 
008 - 094 

r , 100 

«*“n tot WI075 
Oita® tot 158042 I 


r 


1+12 

1+28 ... 

Est. Salas Prev. Sates ton 

Prev. Day Opan Ini. 897 Iup 385 
ekftx. DeposiTdMM) 
si miniois- pfygf lOOpct 

-WS II SE SIS 8% » 

9104 BM3 Jun 10 9i,D 

9104 8704 sea SHI 

9009 S&04 , Dec - 91-47 

.9X25 sue Mar . »U3 

Est. Sales 63 Prev.Sates - 54 ■ 9W0 

Prev: oav Oean Hit 1090 off 13 




31, m*. 


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BligWESS ROUNDup 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1985 




Page 13 




Chrysler Restructures Operations 


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V Camp&d by Our Staff From Dispatches 

1 F -DOTgrr - o^ a Com. 

aowxmcwThuisday a repi gaaga- 
liDa ihat will create a corporate 
umbrella, run by ihe chai™. ? n 
A. Iacocca, and four separate oper- 
ating units. 

The realignment appears to re- 
move Mr. Iacocca- farther from 
Chrydert core business of cars and 
wicks. Tbe automotive unit is to be 
called Chrysler Motors and will be 
headed by Chry&IeCs current vice 

chainnan, Gerald C. Greenwald. 

The three other units of Chrysler 
are tobeknowaas Chrysler Finan- 
cial Corp, Gulf stream Aerospace 

f 'orp. and a new group, Chrysler 
ethnologies. 

The automaker, in a siatement 
released by Mr. Iacocca, said it was 
“studying the possibility of formal- 
izing the restructuring to make 
Chrysler Corp. legally a holding 

Banking Changes 
Are to Be Gradual 
bi Hong Kong 

Reuters 

■ HONG KONG — Local banks 
and financial institutions will be 
granted a transition period of 
about two years to comply with the 
proposed reform of Hong Kong's 
thanking laws, David Nendick, the 
v secretary Of monetary affairs, said 
Thursday. 

But he said. some new provisions 
may come into effect earlier than 
others to allow flexibility for the 
supervisory system. 

The government of the British 
colony will give the f inancial com- 
munity adequate time to riisrans 
the biU before it is enacted, he said. 
The draft bill is expected to be 
published by early next year. 

A consensus on new require- 
ments emerged in June, after the 
Hong Kong government took over 
Overseas Trust BankLuL, the sec- 
ond bank rescued since 1983. 

Some banks and deposit- taking 
companies, however, have said they 
might be forced to move their busi- 
ness out of Hong Kong if die new, 
more stringent rales become law. 

“We don’t want to take advan- 
tage of the present situation, where 
there is the mood for change, to 
rush through the legislation,” said 
Mr. Nendick, a Bank of England 
fyifirial who took over as Hong- 
Kong's secretary of monetary af- 
fairs Wednesday after the retire- 
ment of Douglas Blye. 


as subsidiary corporations. 

The changes announced Tburs- 
Mve beat approved by Chrys- 
ler s directors, but the possible ref- 
ormation of Chiysler-as a parent 
jojaing company needs the stock- 
holders approval. . 

“We are modernizing the compa- 
ny’s structure to enable us to man- 
age our businesses better,” Mr. la- 
cocca said. “Chrysler is a growing 
““ipany. expanding its operations 
Rod becoming more international 
and complex. We can no longer 
continue to run it lie a North 
American car-and-truck compa- 
ny.” 

Sources close to the company 
said the reorganization was intend- 
ed to reflect Chrysler’s recent and 
planned diversification to lessen its 
dependence on cars and trucks. ' 

They said the plan b^d been in 
the works for months and bad been 
revised and delayed several times. 

It was unclear what type of cor- 
porate entity is being created -to 
oversee the operating units of the 
company or whether Chrysler 
plans to offer separare categories of 
stock, as General Motors has done 
in the case of cer tain acquisitions.. 
However, the move does give the 
company’s different lines of busi- 
ness separate identities. 

Chrysler this yearhas spent more 
than $1 billion in acquiring Gulf- 
stream Aerospace of Savannah, 
Georgia, a corporate-jet maker, 
and financial-services units from 

COMPANY NOTES 

Bayerisdte Raiffeisen- Zentral- 
bank AG said its management 
board chairman has taken a leave 
of absence until a special audit de- 
manded by the federal Bank Super- 
visory Office is completed. BRZ is 
the Bavarian regional dealing bank 
in West Germany’s co-operative 
banking system. 

Control Data Coqv, which ex- 
pects a “substantial loss” in its 
overall computer business this 
year, said its computer peripherals 
business may break even in 1986 
despite an expected revenue de- 
cline of $700 milli on by then. The 
unit had revenues of SI J trillion in 
1984. 

Eastman Kodak Co. said its East- 
man Technology unit formed a new 
division, Edison, to serve markets 
broadly associated with image pro- 
cessing. The company said it would 
be premature to reveal the specific 
nature of Edison's product plans or 
market direction. 


Bank of America, EF. Hutton & 
Co. and General Electric Co. 

The sources said the new tech- 
nology subsidiary apparently 
would include Chrysler’s Hunts- 
ville, Alabama, dec ironies opera- 
tion and future high-technology ac- 
quisitions. 

Mr. Iacocca in recent years has 
gradually been turning over day-to- 
day control of the automotive busi- 
ness to Mr. Greenwald, who was 
among the first of the Ford Motor 
Co. executives hired to Chrysler by 
Mr. Iacocca. 

“Greenwald win literally be run- 
ning the car company on his own,” 
said Baron Bates, a Chrysler 
spokesman. 

But the move inevitably will fo- 
cus attention on Chrysler’s long- 
torn prospects without Mr. Ia- 
cocca, 61. Colleagues say he is 
spending more and more time in 
New York, where the Statue of lib- 
erty fund-raising effort that he 
heads is based. The new arrange- 
ment appears to free him even fur- 
ther from the demands of DetroiL 

“If there’s a perception that he’s 
withdrawing from the car compa- 
ny, it's going to hurt sales,” said 
Douglas A. Fraser, the retired pres- 
ident of the United Auto Workers 
and a former Chrysler board mem- 
ber. who said he had no knowledge 
of the reorganization. '’From 
Chrysler’s point of view, it’s not 
very wise to get Mm too far re- 
moved.” (JLAT, UP/) 


Honeywell Inc^ Detroit-based 
computer maker, expects its busi- 
ness will show better gains outride 
the United States next year than in 
its home market because of slug- 
gish growth in the U.S. economy. 
The company said it is baring its 
1986 business plan on expectations 
of 2-percent growth in the U.S. 
economy. 

Johnson Mattbey Commodities 
Singapore Ltd. has decided to cease 
operations in Singapore and will 
apply for voluntary liquidation. 
The company, a unit of Johnson 
Matthey Bankers PLC, is engaged 
in gold trading 

Pechiney, the French state- 
owned metals producer, said it ex- 
pects 1985 earnings to exceed last 
year's net of 165.5 million francs 
(about $2 1 million at current rates). 

UnBerer NV said a West Ger- 
man subsidiary, Nordsee Deutsche 
Hochseefischerei GmbH, has ac- 
quired two companies specializing 


GMtoEUminaie 
White-Collar 
Regular Raises 

New York Times Service 

DETROIT — Genera] Mo- 
tors Corp. is notifying most of 
its white-collar workers that be- 
ginning Jan. 1 it wQJ ebmmate 
their automatic cost-of-living 
increases. 

Any new increases will be 
based mostly on performance. 

although length of service and 
other factors wflj be considered, 
GM said in a letter mailed to 
most of its salaried employees 
last weekend. About 125,000 
workers in North America will 
be affected by the change. 

Analysts view the move as a 
way of cutting white-collar 
overhead. Joseph Fhillippi of 
EF. Hutton, said that with the 
lifting of the voluntary quotas 
on Japanese imports early this 
year and “the Japanese adding 
production here in the U.S., as 
well as new competition from 
Korea, Taiwan and Yugoslavia, 
this is where the battle is going 
to be in the second half of the 
1980s.” 

GM”s acquisition of Elec- 
tronic Data Systems Corp., 
which is seeking to eliminate 
paperwork in CATs systems, 
also points to a need for fewer 
employees by the company. 
“It’s cheaper to drive them out 
than to fire them,” Mr. Phillippi 
said. 


in fish delicacies from Colgate-Pal- 
molive’s Riviana International 
unit. Terms were not disclosed. 

United States Steel Corp. said it 
would raise its prices for hot-rolled 
bar and semifinished steel by $40 a 
ton, effective Jan. 1, and elimina te 
its formal price list on the two 
items. It did not disclose the base 
prices. 


Sweden's Jobless Rate Falls 

The Associated Press 

STOCKHOLM — Sweden's un- 
employment rate fell to 25 percent 
in October from 3.2 percent in Sep- 
tember and 3.1 percent in October 
1984, the government reported 
Thursday. In October, there were 
112,000 persons without work, 
compared with 144,000 in October 
and 138.000 in October 1984. the 
government’s statistical agency 
said. 


Italy Debates Future of Mediobanca 


By Andrew Hurst 

Reuters 

MILAN — ■ A move to dismiss a 
director of Italy’s leading merchant 
bank has triggered a dispute be- 
tween private industrialists and the 
government. 

Enrico Cuccia, 78, the director, 
has run the influential government- 
controlled Mediobanca SpA since 
1946. Under his guidance, Medio- 
banca has carved out a unique role, 
weaving alliances between industri- 
al families in return for key hold- 
ings in private companies, such as 
Fiat and Olivetti. 

Last month, ihe state industry 
minister, Cldio Dari da, called for 
Mr. Cuccia to leave the bank. 

Private industrialists, who regard 
Mr. Cuccia as a guardian of their 
interests, oppose his departure un- 
til the bank’s strategy has been 
dearly mapped out. Mr. Cuccia de- 
vised an arrangement in the 1950s 
giving state and private sharehold- 
ers — among them Giovanni Ag- 
nelli of Fiat SpA and Leopoldo 
Pirelli of Pirelli SpA — an equal 
say on the board, even though pri- 
vate capitalists have only a small 
stake in the bank. 

Mr. Dari da, backed by the domi- 
nant Christian Democratic Party, 
has cited Mr. Cucda’s age as 
grounds for retirement. Istituto Ri- 
costruzione Industrial the gov- 
ernment holding company with the 
majority interest in Mediobanca, 
has a mandatory retirement aee of 
70. 

A meeting of shareholders 
scheduled for October to decide 
Mr. Cuccia’s fate was canceled 
when representatives of the three 
IRI -owned banks that control Me- 
diobanca did not appear. A meet- 


ing is expected by the end of No- 
vember. 

Industry Minister Rena to Altis- 
simo said this week that the debate 
over Mr. Cued as age was detract- 
ing from the main issue: that con- 
trol of Mediobanca should be ced- 
ed to private interests. 

“HU, that is the state, must sur- 
render control of Mediobanca to 
private interests in exchange for 
fresh capital,” be was quoted as 
saying in the daily newspaper Cor- 
ners della Sera. ~~ 

Some analysis say the industrial- 
ists are worried that, with Mr. Cuc- 
cia gone. Mediobanca’s strategic 
holdings in their companies would 
fall into less sympathetic hands. 

Cesarc Romiti, managing direc- 
tor of Fiat, has said be feared that 
Mediobanca could fall prey to po- 
litical- interference after Mr. Cuccia 
leaves. 

“UatO sow. despite the fact that 
it is under state control, Cuccia has 


managed to safeguard Medioban- 
ca's neutral role and ward off the 
attentions of the parties,” Mr. Ro- 
nuti said in a recent interview with 
the Turin newspaper La Siampa. 

Mediobanca, with portfolio in- 
vestments valued at 1 5 trillion lire 
($850 million), owns 7.2 percent of 
the Montedison chemicals group. 
3.5 percent of Fiat. 8.2 percent of 
the Zanussi domestic appliance 
company and 4.9 percent of Pirelli 
and minority stakes in many other 
companies. 

Politicians from the Socialist and 
centrist Republican and Liberal 
parties hare accused Mr. Daxida of 
political meddling. 

IRi’s chairman, Romano ProdL 
renewed ^proposal last weekend 
that Mr. Cuccia should be made 
honorary chairman of Medio- 
banca, which would enable him to 
sit at board meetings but deny him 
voting rights. 


Britain to Sell Rest of C&W 


Reuters 

LONDON — Cable & Wireless 
PLC said Thursday that the British 
government would probably dis- 
pose of its remaining shares next 
month. 

The company, which operates 
communications facilities in more 
than 60 countries, said it expected 
the government to sell its remain- 
ing 102.5 milli on shares, or 22.7 
percent, in December. 

C&W also said it intended to 
raise new capital for expansion at 
the same time as the government 
sale by issuing 56.4 million new 
shares, some of which would be 


offered to investors in Japan and 

GanaHa 

The Conservative government of 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, 
which is committed to reducing the 
government's involvement in the 
economy, sold a 49-percent stake in 
C&W in 1981 and disposed of an- 
other block two years later. 

The government has also sold 
large holdings in government- 
owned telephone and aerospace 
companies as well as the Jaguar car 
group. It announced plans 
Wednesday to sell shares in British 
Gas Corp. and the country's air- 
port authority in the next financial 
year. 


Yamani Predicts Oil-Price War Next Year 


(Continued from Page 1) 
members’ production, perhaps as- 
signing smaller quotas in the sum- 
mer, and would leave official prices 
“han ging up in the air as an indica- 
tor,” he said. Actual prices for 
OPEC oQ would continue to float 
up and down with the flee market. 

Until recently. Saudi Arabia was 
alone among OPEC members in 
rigidly adhering to official prices, 
and buyers turned elsewhere for 
cheaper crude. 

In September, the kingdom con- 
firmed that it would make its oil 
competitive again by selling to 
some customers under a “netback 
system.” The netback system bases 
the price of crude on the current 


market value of refined products, 
such as gasoline and heating oiL 

Netback sales, which currently 
total slightly more than one milli on 
barrels a day, are liirntwH to oil 
companies that have their own re- 
fining and marketing networks and 
agree not to dump the oO on the 
spot market. 

So far. Japanese companies have 
been excluded from netback sales 
because their government artificial- 
ly sets o3-product prices. Sheikh 
Yamani said. 

But he said that thought was be- 
ing given to how Saudi Arabia 
might offer some sort of market- 
related price to the Japanese, who 
have begun switching from Saudi 


crude to cheaper supplies from Iraq 
and Iran. 

Because oil-product prices have 
risen recently,' Sheikh Yamani said, 
the netback price of Saudi crude 
has climbed to within $1 of the 
kingdom's official prices, which are 
bared on a rate of $28 a barrel for 
Arab light, a key grade. 

“I won’t be surprised if in the 
winter I reach my official [price] 
and go beyond that, though for a 
short period,” the minister said. 

He also said that Saudi Arabia 
“most probably" would not use oil 
to help pay for its planned pur- 
chase of Tornado military jets from 
Britain. An oil-barter payment bad 
been widely expected. 


Boeing Sells 
116 Planes 
To United 

(Continued from Page 1) 
airline's history. United was incor- 
porated in 19&. 

Mr. Hartigan, in a siatement is- 
sued at the airline's headquarters in 
Chicago, said the order would meet 
United’s fleet needs into the 1990s. 

On news of the sale, Boeing's 
shares rose to close at $47.25 on the 
New York Stock Exchange, up 75 
cents from Wednesday. Shares of 
UAL Inc., parent of United Air- 
lines. moved ahead 87.5 cents to 
$50.50. 

The order calls for delivery of 
110 Boeing 737-300$. the most 
modem of ihe Boring short-range 
aircraft. and six long-range 747-200 
jumbo jets by the end of 1990. 

Under the agreement, some of 
the six Boeing 747-200$ could be 
exchanged for delivery of Boring’s 
most modern 747-400 model, 
which is more fuel-efficient, has a 
longer range and requires only a 
iwo-meraber cockpit crew, instead 
of three, a United spokesman said. 

He said the first 20 Boring 737s 
and two of the six Boeing 747s were 
to be delivered by June 1988. 

With ihe order! United is expect- 
ed to have 478 jet aircraft operating 
through its system. 

The sale of Pan Am's operations 
over the Pacific to United, an- 
nounced in May, had been ap- 
proved tentatively Ocl 1 1 by Eliza- 
beth Hanford Dole, the secretary 
of transportation. 

Apparently she was not swayed 
by arguments since then by the 
Justice Department and a number 
of airlines that the arrangement 
would be ami-competitive. 

“United will confront a more 
competitive market when this 
transaction is completed Lhan ex- 
ists today." she said Thursday. 

She has contended that United, 
because of its domestic feed system 
and a concentration of major hubs 
in the West, might be the only air- 
line to rigorously compete with Ja- 
pan Air Lines, now the largest car- 
rier crossing Lhe Pacific. 

U.S. competitors have com- 
plained that the acquisition from 
Pan Am will make United a domi- 
nant carrier in the rapidly growing 
Pacific market. 

The airline has said it would be 
ready by the end of November to 
take over Pan Am’s Pacific routes, 
along with 18 of Pan Am’s wide- 
bodied jets and its ground opera- 
tions in Asia. 


Thursday^ 

AVffiX 

dosing 


Tobies include the nationwide prices 
up to the dost no on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


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14% 1446 + 46 
7 7 

21ft 21*6 
12ft 1246 + 46 
7ft 7% + ft 
10ft lift 


17 13ft 
20ft IBft 
9% 5% 
21% 1216 
ZP6 Wft 
1716 12% 
26 13 

716 7% 

<9*6 31% 
6% 3% 
1746 lift 
16% lift 
7Vk 5ft 
1346 84k 
2ft 1% 
3% 2ft 
11% 9ft 
37 2946 

5% 2ft 

1% IS 
lift 4% 
12*6 8% 


24V, 1646 
22ft 15% 
12 4 

Wft 1346 
24ft 18% 
27ft 10ft 
7% 3% 

7% 3ft 
8 446 

7ft 446 
25*6 18 
14ft 8% 
14ft SU 


34 13279 
40 20 75 
34 13 19 

.Be 13 
.15 17 28 
JO 17 27 
XL \J 17 
321 SA 12 
30 TJ 31 


13ft 13% 
1846 18% 
8ft 8% 
IB 1746 
17ft 1746 
15% 15% 
25*6 25% 
746 7% 
43ft 42% 
446 4 Vi 
lift lift 
14% 14% 
8*6 Aft 
9% 916 
2% 2% 
24k 2ft 
10 % 10 % 
34ft 34% 

* 

\ ift 


20% 20% 
1941 19% 
5ft 5% 
19% 19 

20% 2D VI 
24ft 24% 
4% 4% 
5 4ft 
5H S% 
5% 5% 

25% 2S 
15 1346 

14% 1416 


13ft 

18%— V. 
8ft 

17V*— % 
1746— % 
15% + 16 
2Sft + % 
7% 

43ft +1V. 
4% + % 
1146— % 
14*6 — % 
4*k'+ % 
94k + % 
2% 

2ft 

1016 

34% — 46 

%-t 

5 

9 +16 


20% 

1941 + V. 
» 

19% + ft 

an— % 

24% — ft 
4%— % 
5 + % 

5*6 

5% + % 
25ft + ft 

14ft +lft 
14% + % 


9% VST n ,95a 9 J 
13 VullvR 5 1J0 AJ 13 
17% Voisnrs J4 1J 15 
2% VerW 


81 9ft 9ft 9ft 
19 20% 20% 20% + ft 
2 24% 2A% 24% — % 
a 6% Aft 8% 


13 

ZAt 88 19 
11 

244 

.18 13 90 

14 1248 
-27t 1 A 27 285 
301 

.101 17 

30 20 11 


23% 

lAVk VtAmC 

M 

LA 

11 

70 

1A% 

15% 

15% — 1% 

A% 

3ft VIRsh 




I 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft + % 

ft 





2 

% 

% 


13% 

8% Vnmll 

30 

2.1 

31 

a 

V% 

9% 

9ft— ft 

Aft 

2ft VarlDle 




8 

4% 

4 

4% 

10ft 

5ft Vialech 




13 

Aft 

5ft 

5ft— % 

ift 

lft Vlniw 




4 

2 

2 

2 — % 

IBft 

12 Vlcco 

JWr 

J 

14 

14 

14ft 

14% 

14%— % 

Attft 

54 Volnll 




7 

48% 

68% 

68% 

12% 

7ft Voolex 

.40 

43 

10 

9 

8ft 

8% 

8ft + ft 

WTk 

1446 VuICCO 

J0O 4J 

II 

S 

18ft 

18% 

18ft + % 

8% 

5 Vyqust 



9 

18 

Aft 

8% 

D% 


34 

33 

A 

19 

38 

33 

12 


846 5% Yank Co 


11 17 71k 7 7% + % 


AlllEX Highs-Loiis 



NEW HIGHS 18 


Am Coni IrtO 
CompuDvne 
OnloArt Co 
Ruuoll 

Boncrtt rod 
FairmniFInl 
Oxford Fsl 
SCESKtri 

Blesslnoss 
ForestCN A 

PoHgSYf 
TolEd 10s» 

CanoooWIne 

ForwlCtv 6 

PltvSau A 

vranSLns 


NEW LOWS IS 


CdnOeelPI 
Destsnirnc 
M5R E*DI 
TgrnorEoi n 

ContOC wt 
Fooie Mini 

PtnEnMt 

VermntAm 

■ DWG Corp 
lntlBV.nl vrt 
5idHawons wt 

Wptfclnvn 

Dolmed 

Jnclvn Inc 

SI ruin wrrti 













































- • : • 2*2te: s.*jsfe v* *r 


Page 14r 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1985 



TERN ATIO N AL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued from Back Page) 


A Revamped Xerox Keeps the Japanese at Bay 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


Canada. 


DOWNTOWN TORONTO LUXURY 

A part mem Hot?; Dij*>;r*r VporTrC 
1 & 2 Beoroom 'tire*, all r«y«ncr. 
d icaOries irduding m leases evcrJ- 
abto njjrhl* sw longer. Fro™ S’tS 1 
mcnln. Cell ct wnte 7n« Hanson cn 
Pov 61-3 3av 5"ee*. Toronto. Orrano 
Coned; MSG :C-4 UIo! 39565 47. 


TCRCNTO, CANADA - LUXURY. 

ruC* n:rt-j*ned ong equipped i & 2 
bec’ocri twin. Superor le-vxvs. 
Short Ictvj •e»it' rorroij M=r«sr Sum* 

SP rrem i- =3T. 5te 222. for onto 
M5E ITi Cenaca. 3t2-IC!fo 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


AllTOS TAX FREE 


ALTO CONVERSION I ENGLISH EXPERTS 


(Continued from Page 11} 


Mainly because of thai success. 




GREAT BRITAIN 


LUXURY EXECUTIVE APARTMENTS. 
Kfligtosbndgf ChcLsea. 'Nf 'X 
fuil. setwaee sr.-dcs. 1 & 2 bedroom 
cpcrtTnen. - *. -VI m»e-n ccnvemencei 
iUlitntm *:;> IT coy* r-ice* fr cm 
£145 aer week. Please csnfoc L^- 
nano Vcun- NGrt Ajermerts, Nell 
iSwvnn House Vo-ve A»« London 

sws t*. o'-es ; ;o 5 . n. 2531 ~ c-. 


cerrsAL lcndcn - &ecinv* 

vKe_ arerr-rentt /a r»„ bv'ldtn^s. 
ODmror“h<v fom'shed VC fo-l- 
eqwpped. Dari* movi se<"»<cr i-Men. 
through Fn.l Color TV. P^ane for cr> 
chjre (01] 365 I5i2 a- wnr* Pres-cer’- 
ftal fetotes [Mavforl Ira.. 1 Urrj»-»tv 
St.. London \vC1 E als. 


74 CHAMPS-&YSEES 8 th 

Srvcio. 2 j 3-room apartment. 
One w* of more. 

I£ CLAJUDGE 4359 6797. 


16TH. OWIKR RENTS tmcrmwitt. 
forge soon, dtrang room, bedroom, 
dressing room, bathroom, kitchen 
hdi. Independent W.C -*■ 1 room 
creFier. Ke> money For wL Tefc I-J7 


SHORT THEM STAY. Advantages of c 
hotel without uvxrtvenimees. feet at 
heme in race studies, one bedroom 
ana mere in Pans. S08BJM 60 rve 
de I Unrvervt*. Pans 7th. 4544 3940 


HEART OF THE MARAIS. Smdi 1 
bedroom duplex pmta loc a tion, so- 
rerb buiding. Elevator. Corporate 
lease CtC Term rent in cavonce. Colt 
far detals New York H 86966623. 


PARIS DIRECT OWNBL Lmrunow. 
long tetri, 5vsna bedroom, drang, 
ijtatet:. scrh, F6200 -e cnerges. 7A 
47 4" *1 1 


PARIS APAjTTMS>fT WANTS). I 

bedrooms, prefer seporcte doing. un- 
furtssheo. with Ameneen Pitmen in 
Mjtcs g cer.mst Pans iJjdTUoS 
evt. 41 U office hours 


EXCHANGE FOR AH 1986. Smch 

apartment near Opera. Pot* for 
some or 1 room m shared Rat >1 
ttanhatgn. Tel- Pari* As 23 3 10 


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Tote ad uonhjtf e of our expenenee. 

HUGHES MOTOR COMPANY 


United States and compete on a profits from Xerox’s copier busi- 
worldwide basis." ness and other infonnation-pro- 

Analysts and others agree. ‘'Xe- cessing products, including ejec- 
rox is one of the first American tronlc typewriters and printers, 
companies in an industry targeted rose 15 percent in the third quartet, 
by the Japanese to stem the inroads $71 million, on revenus of S2.I2 
being made bv ibe Japanese," said billion, although the company as a 
Leonard A. Schlesinger, a former whoie had a loss because of Cram 


an area Xerox ignored until recent- 
ly. 

The Xerox of the late 1970s was a 
bureaucratic company in which 
one function battled another. Dis- 
putes over issues as relatively mi- 
nor as the color scheme of ma- 
chines had to be resolved by Mr. 


customer jatisfacuo" * a ‘ - — ‘ J " 

important. 

As a result. :t took Xurr \ ;. n. * 
2«A yeass and 30C- to 3*» * 

develop its 9900 cc-pax. a ' 
speed madsine introduced :d 
that is the top oi Vroxs 
line, in the past, a ««!*• 


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(01 202 744643 
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Fbcre (212) So9-US4 Tetex- 427765 



Kearns. The result was slow prod- Xerox at least tiw year* ^ 

net development, high manufactar- 35 as l JOO p-xipie. accord.! :.t 
ing costs, copiers hard to service to &&& w. Cnolish. tb*-’ : 


associate professor at the Harvard & Forster. And Wffliam V. Glavin, act dewdopment, high manufactm- 35 n^jv as UO0 pflorB- ^ 

Business School who wTOte a recent Xerox’s vice chairman, says that ing costs, copiers- hard to service to j^acid W. Cnolish. toe projt- 

case studv of Xerox's lumaround. aJfter a l^-year slide, the profit mar- and unhappy customers. duef enpneer. 

“It’s a "signincani achievement," gins on office equipment are. grew- . “Omowts were not only way Out te M tn.im» ^ 

added Eugene G. Glazer. an ana- mg- In an apparent recognition of in left field, they weren t even in lie . j-Jwg coaaKUtorN 

lyse at Dean Witter Rej-nolds Inc. *« comcbacl^ Xerox’s stock was ball paric,” h^Keaim conceded. -nT hv watpar.:-’- 

This achie\ement, though, has at S53 - 50 31 **» close “We were homfirfto find that tie [SSS «I j affa n ^ subadian.. T« - 

been overshadowed by other prob- Wednesday on the New York Smck Japanese wrn: seDin^ thox small ^ Core, 

letns at the company: its troubles Exchange, near its 32-week high of machines for what it cost us to ^fo-ossea ruji .10 

with Crum & Forster Inc„ the S55.5D. ■ make ours.” The 55-year-old Mi. one dung Xerox has leamcc 

property and casually insurer it This is especially impressive, an- Kearns, an IBM alumnus who from the Japanese is tiu: h su“t 
purchased in 1983. and'iis struggles ^ts say. given that falling copier joined Xerox in 1971 and became work more doseiy with fewer 
to expand bej ond copiers into a P ri{ *s mean that Xerox must now chief executive in 1982, has led the pi^ h has pared its vendors fnnn 

hmaH ranee of offiee-auiomarion sell twice as many copier; as five crusade to -overhaul Xerox. 5-000 to 300. 


chief engineer. 

Xerox has gone tc extreme* 
study its Japanese casipcuu.^ \ - ; 
process aided by the comp-iny '■ 
successful Japanese subsidiary . ■ 1 “ 
Icyo-based Fuji Xerox Core. 

One ihmg Xerox has beamed 
from the Japanese is that ii nrnsl 


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POSmONS WANTED 


MOTORS GmbH 


Since 1772. espwiencsd cor trader far 
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Ooeanwida Motor* GmbH, 
Tanfaegonsr. 8. 4 Duenetdort. W. 
Germany p) ZU434646, tlx 8587371. 


broad range of office-automation sell twice as many copier; as five 
products. years ago to gene r ate an equal 

Bui during this period. Xerox’s amount of revenue. ... 
mainstay copier business has no- , Xerox, in a way, was a victim of 
dergone a transformation. This op- early triumphs. The company’s 
eration, which last year accounted — and the world's — - first plain 
for neariv 75 percent of Xerox’s P a P« coP ier - 914, was one of 
operating’ revenues of S8.79 billion, <“ 111051 successful new products 
has cut in half manufacturing costs m corporate history. Thai accom- 
and the time to develop products, plishment earned the 914 a place in 
In addition, quality problems **** Smithsonian Institution earEer 


— ■ have been cut bv two-thirds in two this year. 


SECRETARIAL 
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PORSCHE FROM STOCK 


MINER VE TBiSSr 

Engfah. Belctcr. Duldi c- Genre" 
*eerefcnej. knowledge of rrendi 


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Phone. (02)64^067. Telex: 63270 


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PATENT EAB STOCK INCLUDES 


LONDON MARBLE ARCH "e=r. self- 
catering lirory 2-bedroom flat*. fuPy 
equipped, cater TV. Tmen orj iele- 
ofioraa. £1 5O-C50 per week. Cran- 
ford hciidp. Bss 73 C: 3-ford 
St'eei. Lancer. Wl. 01-402 6lo5. 


LONDON - Hcncsrecw. fonwhed 
TC-t-fomi^-ed let. 1-3 .ec-i. Gcrder 
fiat. 2 bediccre. icrje jw-g rocm 
equipped lutdwn 1 path — vrasfv- 
roctti. daO week. Tel S-itatrlcfo 
821 '75 3a 24 cr Lcndom Ql ~4 53 35 

ST. JOHN'S WOOD. LONDON, "e=r 
.^mencsn JcSocl. 4 tei-oorrs. .'istee 
Defied Sc-jsf. men c aJce. Ad cmet- 
ties. fumishce wforr-*hec syde-i. 
fang let. ££SD Der week. Tek Lozier 

ioira 35e: 

8EHK £ BUTCHOFr. 4 ,rrge weci.n 
cf properties in St. Icon's 'Axe. 
Segtits rant Swiss Catrage. Hcnz- 
stead & environs. 6 menths . Tel 

3)-56s rSal. fa £53169 ACC C- 
LONDON. for r* bn> fo-rtshea fict, 

■snd hefse. Coni.it ne ioeodvv 
rhilncs. hov or*a tewii Tel: Sc-.m sf 
r»*k 352 Sill. North Fork 722 

5135 Teie, - SIDE 3 I 
CENTRAL Lcnirn Lu»c.-v fj-ntfoc 
fioR. American k.tcnens £233 week, 
sleeps i cr £57* week . sleeps 2. ~e'. 
£■64431 22?-4 or 01-iSa .u: S ILHl 
FOE FURNISHED LETTTN® IN S.W. 
.onpor. Sirres i SerksHre. Ccrt=C 
MAYS. 0«.no-t i03T ^ ^11 UX. 
Tele*.- SfoSlil. 

JOHN BfRCH kes 20 yecn evpeoence 
:rj Rentals. Lars or short lene-oe* 
Cer.iral & suburban L-jracn & Abe; 

deen. 5trdi -s Co. 01-499-5SKL 
G8SIS 6 CO. Enceileir Selection of 
Houses 3> Flcts for r enrol in North. ' 
NortS,ejf 6 Central London. Te 1 - 01 • ' 
->2S 5*H. 

INTBtNATlONAL EXECUTTVB Ws- 
Iters »3 London • for qvdrrr rumshed 
aoartmentv & houses C=U HutieK Jon- 
dan tOlHCT 7365. 

SRENHAM OFfBI LUXURY FLATS ‘ 

house! to let for wie m Londm. T-) ; 
01-431 3l°i. Tele- 395238" G 

MAYFAIR, LUXURY APARTMBVTS. 

Fanar Pic pomes Tel- londam 01-62® 
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LONDON W.l . IMMACULATE prop- 
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HOLLAND PARK. 5 bedroom house, 
well furnished. Tel: Gl-o3Q 0494 


GR05VW0R SO, LOFTON. 1-bed- 
room fid. £330/ week. 01-s92 4501 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CB4TRE B.V. 

Deluxe rentals. Valeri iratr. 174, 
Amsterdam. 020-621234 , y £23222. 


FOR RSVT, ZURICH DO IDR high 
dess, luxury 5-rocm a per t m e n t & 2 
room cuest cpartmeni. Socdaus, 240 
sam.. separate dining room, magnifi- 
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oocl. souna gvm. 2 mdsor carcses. 
SF7.I47 mpndL Tel 01. 252 51 41 


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Don't tress 
INTERNATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

m tho IHT □crniEtd Section. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


■ Jaguar 4.2 Sovereign from 
CM59.800 

- MB 280/300' 420/500SL from 
DM83700 

* MB 50OSEL cham pagn e.- leather 

CM94AC0 

* Porsche 91 1 Canere-torga 

5-raeed DM76600 

* Porsche 9285 5^peed/ automatic 

DM39 jOC 

* F errari 308GTS ' 51 28B/T«ro Rossa 



years. Xerox's “cusiomer sati^ac- Xerox had such a stranglehold 
tion index” — compiled from a 011 the cop ier market throughout 
monthly survey of 50,000 Xerox 1960s and early 1970s that il 
customers — has jumped more hardly paid attention when Inter- 
than 30 percent in the same period, national Business Machines Co/p. 
Xerox's new line of office copiers a 11 ^ E a s t man Kodak Co. began 
— the 10. or Marathon, series in- ““long high-speed copiers, the 
traduced in 1982 — has been a most lucrative part of the markeL 
smash success. So far. Xerox has Nor did Xerox worry when the Jap- 
sold more than 600.000 of the ma- begM* 10 offer sniaH inex- 


Since 1980, die company has 
spent neatly $100 nuDion to auto- 
mate manufacturing and materials 
handling. These expenditures have 
helped eatable it to halve the num- 
ber of people in Its manufacturing 
operations and its cost to make a 
copier, for an annual savings of 
about $500 million. 

Xerox has overhauled (be way it 
manages its business. . Nowadays^ 
much of the corporate staff is gone. 
In its place are e nuqnm onal 


pliers. It has pared vendors 

5.000 to 300. 

When a problem with the p-p^ f ; 
feeding system in Xerox's nc» 
desktop copier turned up just be- 
fore the machin e’s scheduled i n 
dsetion* for instance, a crisis team 
that included supplier- correilcd 
the problem in less than 
months. “The same problem in the 
past would have easily cos; us h.u. 
a vear or more." said Way land R.. 
Hicks, the group vice president of 
copier development and produc- 


product-devriopment teams and Don - 


“probfcm-soiving" teams. 


Another practice that Xerox has 


Each new product now has a bwro w ed from the Japanese is no; 


group of design, mannfafJu xing trying to reinvent the wheel every 
and servicing enpneos £hmi con- rimr- around. Qab- 30 to 4C percent 
ceptkm to marketing. While before, oftheco*rsx»entsinihc9900c*ipi' 
budgets and sche du les were key cri- erare tariq ae to that machine That .v. 
toia for deciding bonuses and pro- ramj v nrt with 80 perceni in (he 9 
motions, now product qoafity and moddslr replaced- 


chines, a company record. 


penave copiers in the mid-1970s, motions, now product quality and 


, wNte/blue loariod. 


Europe Auto Broken 
i. AK MnmoMi 1 


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viHcge. Ncn imoi-rt. rruv !.V* aoa. fa 20 rear*. 

IH.L <vi Ace. j 1985 MotW* Kwwn* 
London. wCs ?JH. 280 SL 280 SH_ 5QO 


DOMESTIC 
POSmONS WANTED 


MERCEDES SPECIALISTS 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 

far 20 rear*. 

1985 Modal* at Discount Prroaa: 
280 SL 280 SH. 500 sa. 

500 SL 500 SEC 
1986 Mod* from Stack: 


rn 500 SEC 'B6, Aer/ block, loaded, 

ro Ko**o DMlOBjOOO 

L .i , PORSOC 944 TURBO COUK '86. 
Pf®™ rad/Uod, DM71 ,CC0 

^ ^ OC COMPANY 

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Wt 853U& OJC 0 


230E. 3006. 300SL 260 SE, 300 SE, 350 CL modeL 


The 1966 ficcaCbur a now ovolabie. 
The mad hoauiau* ever bu*. Connolly 
leather & counties other feehpe*. Stisv 
dord 305 CJ. engine or the rtgh Otdpei 


BUSINESS EXECUTIVE, vytfe Sat 300 SH, 500 SL 500 SB, 500 SEC 


region Lebmejercfrcnci. 40. Unrver 
srty decree, rated Ewer^v fogli*n. 
French li Arat»c !esrfert fonder, 
experase m -rsuraKo 6 rrorver^S 

*eefe na i ke mg c pcs*ier. wr*r 
dyncnic o rmc eaL W-i» 30* 
2-St Herdc Tribune. Nem-v 
Cedes, ficnce 


FEMALE COLLEGE STUDENT *eeb 

work SS CO pa- £ri in VjtCPt A=rll « 
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CURRENCY markets 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1985 


PEOPLE 


Dollar Closes Hig her in European, L.S. Trading 


Compil'd by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

. YORK — The dollar 
higher Thursday in Europe 
^ New York, gaining i percent 
gainst die yea "and L5 percent 
against the Deutsche mark on re- 
ports that the Back of Japan 
seemed likely to back away from its 
r®cent polio*' of aggressive inter- 
vention to drive the currency lower. 
. The currency also found support 
in a warning by a senior official of 
the Federal Reserve Board that an 
excessive drop in the dollar would 
renew inflation and put upward 
pressure on U.S. interest races. 

^In Tokyo, where the dollar 
F-' 'tiged to a five-year low of 202.70 
yco from Wednesday’s close of 
206-50, the Japanese news agency 
Ryodo quoted a Bank of Japan 
official as saying Thursday that the 
central bank now sees ’“reduced 
chances" that it will continue to sell 
dollars to further boost the yen 
against the U.S. currency'. 

Any further appreciation of the 


yen could lead to a crash in the 
value Of the dollar and also could 
deal a heavy blow to Japan's export 
business, the central bank source 
was quoted as saying. 

Kyodo said the onttial’s remarks 
indicated that the bank is departing 
from the bold intervention policy it 
adopted after the Group of Five 
meeting on Sept. 22 and will in- 
stead intervene only to keep the yen 
“firm.'’ 

A senior currency' dealer in New 
York said the Bank of Japan con- 
tacted him earlier ibis week and 
expressed similar sentiments. 

The official's comments over- 
shadowed remarks earlier in the 
day by the Bank of Japan’s gover- 
nor, Satoshi Surra ta. that the yen's 
five-year high against the dollar did 
“not yet reflect Japan’s economic 
fundamentals'' and that a further 
strengthening was called for. 

In Europe, the dollar ended at 
205.15 yen. up from its opening 
203.35 and Wednesday’s close erf 


205.10. It also rebounded there to 
dose at 2.6238 DM from 2J935 on 
Wednesday; to 2.1550 Swiss francs 
from 2.1392, and to 7.9750 French 
francs from 7.9175. _ 

The advance continued in later 
New York trading, where the dollar 
rose still higher from the London 
dose. The U-S. currency rose to 
205.30 yen from 205-00 on 
Wednesday, to 2635S DM from 
22)970; to 2 1600 Swiss francs from 
2. 1370, and to 8.0200 French francs 
from 7.9100. 

Testimony by Stephen Axilrad, 
the U.S. Federal Reserve Board's 
stafF director for monetary policy, 
that too large and abrupt a drop in 
the dollar would put upward pres- 
sure on U.S. inflation and interest 
rates also aided the dollar, dealers 
said. Mr. Axilrod spoke before a 
House subcommittee on monetary 
policy. 

“Intervention, and exchange rate 
changes, are no substitute for 
sound underlying policies, ’’ he said. 


In other European markets 
Thursday, tbe dollar was fixed at 
midafternoon in Frankfurt at 
23935 DM, down from 2.6048 at 
Wednesday’s fixing; at 7.9080 
French francs in Paris, down from 
7.9290, and at 299425 Dutch guil- 
ders in Amsterdam, up from 
29330. 

Meanwhile, the British pound 
turned sharply lower against tbe 
dollar and continental currencies 
amid widespread speculation that 
oQ prices will falL Worries over the 
finanfiat ramif ications of the tin 
crisis at the London Metal Ex- 
change hurt the pound as well, 
dealers panted out. 

Sterling ended in London at 
$1.4173, down 2 cents from 
Wednesday's dose of SI .4365, and 
at 3.7185 DM, down from 3.7335. 
In later trading in New York, tbe 
pound dosed at 51.4120, down 
from $1.4370 Wednesday. 

(Rotten, AFP, IHT) 


Old Issues Ease Near the Close; EDF Has 2 Warrant Off ers 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — Prices of seasoned 
issues in the dollar-straight and 
Eating-rale sectors of the Euro- 
bond market generally eased to- 
ward the close Thursday on the 
back of declines in U.S. credit mar- 
kets. dealers said. But actual selling 
was limited. 

In the primary market. Hectri- 
cite de France launched two war- 
rant issues. 

The first was a SI 00- million 
bond issue with warrants attached, 
while the second was a warrams- 
ooJy offer in the Swiss market 
whereby the warrants are exercis- 
able for one year into a 200-mil- 
lion-Swiss-Tnmc bond issue. 

The 5100- million warrant bond 
issue pays I OS percent a year over 


10 years and was priced at 1004. It 
is callable after five years. The issue 
has 100,000 warrants attached, 
priced at 516 each, which are exer- 
cisable into a noncallable 10-year 
bond with the same terms. If the 
warrants are exercised in the first 
five years, the host bond must be 
tendered, thereafter if the warrants 
are exercised, it will be at 100 per- 
cent cash. 

The lead manager was Credit 
Commercial de France and the 
host bond was quoted at a a dis- 
count of 1 !i while the warrants rose 
to trade at about 520 each, dealers 
said. 

Tbe company also offered 40,000 
warrants in the Swiss market priced 
at 5137-50 each. Each warrant enti- 
tles the holder to buy into a 200- 
million Swiss- franc braid issue that 


pays 5% percent a year over 10 
years. The bond will be priced next 
week. 

Dealers noted that oaly Wednes- 
day, Electricity de France issued a 
SI 00- million, 10-year “Yankee" 
bond offer in the U.S. market 

Denmark launched a zero-cou- 
pon bond issue with a redemption 
amount of 5100 million. The five- 
year issue was priced at 6414 and 
was quoted inside the 14-percent 
fees at a discount of 1 by tbe lead 
manager, Lehman Brothers Inter- 
national 

Sumitomo Electric Industries 
Ltd. launched a S50-miffion braid 
issue that dealers said was targeted 
at Japanese investors. The seven- 
year issue pays 1014 percent a year 
and was priced at 20134. It did not 
trade widely on the market 


In the floating-rate-note sector, 
tbe State fault of India launched a 
SI 00- million floating-rate- note is- 
sue. Tbe 12-year issue pays 10 basis 
points over the six-month London 
interbank offered rate and has in- 
vestor put options after five, seven 
and 10 years. The lead manager 
was Lloyds Merchant Bank and the 
issue was quoted on the market at 
99.75 bid, compared with the total 
fees of 30 basis points. 

In the secondary markets, the 
dollar-straight sector finished easi- 
er, having initially risen on tbe 
strength of the benchmark 30-year 
U.S. long bond in London trading, 
dealers said. 

Tbe floating-rate-note sector 
also tended to drift off, although 
losses woe basically limited to two 
or three basis points, they added. 


China May Bon 

Imports of TVs 

Return 

BEUING — China, which 
earlier this week announced a 
two-year ban on most vehicle 
imports, may extend the ban to 
other consumer goods, an offi- 
cial of Toshiba Carp, of Japan 
said Thursday. 

“The ban may be extended to 
other goods, especially televi- 
sions." Miyoshi Kousuke, a To- 
shiba director, said. 

China imposed controls in 
March to limit imports, mostly 
from Japan and Hong Kong, 
and to preserve China's foreign- . 
exchange reserves, which Fell to 
S 10.85 billion at the end of 
June, compared with 5(6.47 bil- 
lion a year earlier. 

Packaging 
Is the Focus 

(Continued from Page 11) 
with the need for wires connecting 
the chip to tbe package and with 
the metal prongs. Instead, tbe con- 
nections are etched onto a thin 
sheet of copper foiL Tbe space be- 
tween the leads is only two-hun- 
dredths of an inch, five rimes small- 
er than when legs are spaced on the 
conventional dual in-line package. 

For really high-speed computers, 
where tbe chips must be extremely 
close together, an option is to do 
away with the packages around 
each chip. The chips are connected 
directly to a surface containing 
multiple levels of wiring to link the 
chips. 

International Business Machines 
Crap, is wefl advanced in such mul- 
tichip modules. One of the major 
advances in its mainframe comput- 
ers is its thermal conduction mod- 
ule, which packs chips dose togeth- 
er while removing the heat. 

Tbe Japanese are also working 
on packaging and already domi- 
nate the market for ceramic pack- 
ages. 


P&G Reorganizes Europe Operations 

Bv Brenda Erdmann First National Bank of Onego ***** **£*££;. £s ;?»* 


By Brenda Erdmann Fast Nation* an* *-»c 

Inzmtoaonai HenAt Trihate has appointed Edward GreeM 
LONDON — Procter & Gamble *e new k^doo-taed 


European and British operations die East and AfrK^Jfcmovoio i dem- 
and changes in the composition of London Iran the Chicago herf- bankirwr amt- . , 

CSSS2 "FSBiStSi 

Tbe Cincinnati-based soap, de-. ^ ^^mer products and S’- 2 ? 

tergem and foods company said Juh comoasn Sid it is fornur.a a -r* 

LarrvG Dare, eeneral manaser of stockbroker that is merging with company. saw « “ . ,pt(enM- 

ifSritish ann, ft^rToSile ^L^don-b^ ireaefamt 
LkL, bad beat appointed division 


has appointed Edward Greene to bpaid-H* P- r ' 

the new London-based post of ident of g-sLild-t B *r 1 ' 

manager of financial institutions ent, w 


EsikilJj 


manager for Southern Europe. Mr. 
Dare will be based in Brussels and 


HE Samuel A Co, is opens** tional 

representative office in Tokyo. The Jan-1. The COIO P^- mmer 

office wflL be dared with Hffi Sam- man* dmaon and the ccw » 
iuj numn mmMMnfflt nf Wnnd division of its Akerlund 4 .- 


the company after three months in jne responsouny « . nresident of the 

that position. Spokesmen for the Bra**, ^ onK *roup. The 

ttsttSrs-JS- ss^ss!W^ 

SuccMdumSSI^^ as head of “8 »a m in London for the Tokyo Rnance l Lmd- 

ProcS&Gamble Ltd. wffl be vmtme-Hespent thc^axytera based mBnusefewi* fiStwfai 
Ronald a Pearce He moves to advismgmstininonal^entsouthe Ur 
N ewcastk upon Tyne, England, Japanere^market. __ Sw«hsh Match, serving 


from Geneva, where he has been E nstokl a 1 
general manager of special opera- 
tions ax Procter & Gamble AG. 'J 

With the appointment of Mr. i 
Dare as head of Southern Europe, B 
Procter & Gamble has shifted re- I Reran 
sponsibility for its operations in the 
united Kingdom from its North- ' 
cm European region to Southern ftibdn/Netfc. 
European region- In addition. the o*,*,*** 

company has moved the heaoquar- ^ amr. ims int 
ters for Southern Europe to Bros- 
sels. As division manager for gg gw A. 

Southern Europe, Mr. Meyer was T , nnnl |„ 
based in Paris. — * 

Under the new structure. Procter £ 

& Gamble’s operations in Italy, a: par am ns 
Spain and the United Kingdom *££££1: 
mil report to Mr. Dare. Rsponsi- 
btlity for its operations in France mu* * strung. 
will be transferred from Son them fnandn 
Europe to the Northern European 
region, which will continue to be ^ow. 
beaded by Robert T. Blanchard. — 

Dekey GmbH has named Kari- 
heinz Tretter managing director. — 

He joins tbe West German arm erf 
the French luggage maker from the 
U.S. linage concern, Samsonite, MQaar . 
where he held tbe post of sales 
managw for Europe. 


Enskfida Securities of L o nd on 


Swedish Match, serving os 
man. 


Company Results 

Revenue and profits or lassos. In m/mens, are to kxxti currencies 
unless otherwise buBeatetL 


m Han 
R«V W _ 
Profit 

PirStm— 

Fraerr 


Rovonuc as, 140. suao. 

profit, ixn. vruL 

PerShareA. 0J36 0JS7 
Pur Shore B- 31 M 3M« 
a: per than results t* Shea 
Transports TratBnp PLC. ht 
sterling; b: per share results 
at Royal Dutch Petroleum 
N.V-m gutters. AJl other re- 


!Lr 3§ VS krz.- % ’® 

roll 1 Xt Ml OrorSwo- M3 148 

» aaasss gga g 

siamMioatnf man*** from 

PetMnev aUcoattaueC operation. 

ms itH 

— EfiXbneuKora* 

ViOeo SISS»«_ M 1^ 

iwb m HM nc. — tto w j 

2 S WW Pm Shan — 1m 1 3T 

v Means l*M t|JM 

uriauds now— n tjia rax. 

Mrt Inc- SSi 7TW 

Urt ehPrh AtrfinM ParSnro»_ X31 2-0 


Genstar 

MQwr. IKS 

Rsvmnk itoa 

Profits 513 

Per Star* \a\ 

9 Mantis ms 

Ravenue a 

Prom TO97 

PtrSMt* 244 

imasco 

nfiQoar. ms 

Revenue uwl 

Profits 714 


KUMRylDatdi AJrflnes Pwsnora-. Z3i m 

MOST. ms Mt 

R eva gw 1700. ljm. . 

l0M Profit* HU mt LOSWS 

1*?! Pur Store— a M *01 araanr. IMS 1M4 

V7T 1st Hotf IMS IfiK Revenue ijp a UA 

?^S Revenue Jw KfiMaft tXIM BI.V3 

ST m? OTU Pm Shore— 167 100 

JS* Par Share IXt SM 

% t Menm ms me 

^ VmMiHmim* ' S5TS?~ 5SS USk 

BfiMftdal Pm-Stmrs— SOI M 

OH 3rd Oaw. mi OM OV outs Include pains of 

WJ Uerasas au snymOkneiauarteropdef 

<10 Deer Nat 3U OU IWMBB tifmiiiHWi 

Omt Shore— Ul Off dtscordtnued operations. 


Tliufidai's 

« m 


NASDAQ prices as of 
3 p jn. New York time. 

17a The Associated Press 


«£ 

3 D WVf 19 % 
WkWKjt 
ZM. 7H» ZAk- 


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n* iw us 

SSSR: 

» tt-R-* 

4 MS M— n 
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as «* Rh + *h 


M JKr M-H6 
M» Wfe ttJk + % 
M Ik- Mh 
in m in 

» vS m->Np 

miSm „ 
m uk we- K 



Solution to Prerioos Ptttzie 


ggaoa gaSooiS 

ggnea Egaal 

ODH 00383 aHi 

DEa HSHa [3 0aai aa 
bchq aanas annl 
SEgP"®#® 
EDni^alggaagaa 










































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1985 


iSggUH Hllllia 

“■■■■■■Mil HBBK 
IBB BBBBB BBB 

aBBaa SSu hub 


PEANUTS 


Ji d t!?!5j T®* WHY AM I W N060C7V TEU5 

mS&iSSs^ 

LEAST ANOTHER MONTH ... BpKg* 


NOMPy TELLS ME 
anjthins either, but I 
UKE IT THAT WAY.. 


BOOKS 


:. f ' I ,av 




STN-I 

KIM him maj 





BLOND IE 




INDIA! 

Labyrinths in the Lotos Land - 

By Sanfa Brata. 330 pages. $19.95. 
WilHam Marrow ; 105 Madison Avenue? 
New York. N. Y. 10016. 


WU-. BE SC | [HI.EVBJVONE 

HAP-^y SEE VOJ AGAIN I L , 


ilJP'g! 


n*te ESEENSOlONS J s Jl_CJNtSS?THAN 

■ SfNCe I'VE 3OWLE0 | NOJ^mUsK 


USSM hbbuhhbbb 




^■■■■■B aflBBBBi 
__HBBBB iIHrarad 




VENGEANCE: India After the Assas- 
sination of Indira Gandhi 


By Pranay Gupte. 368 pages. $16.95. 

W. W. Norton & Co. Inc, 500 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. 10110. 


SOLUTION TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE. page 15 1 1 ®'« 

ACROSS 42 Intrinsically 11 Food for Sir 

1 Plantation 46 Comical Francis? 

domicile . character 12 Word with 

6 Bartietts *1 Raised rapidly hanger 

11 Off one’s 49 Area east of 13 Kind of plague 




rocker 

13 Assigned 
quarters 

15 Believer in 
demons, etc. 

16 Parvenu 

17 Current 
exploration of 
scientific 
interest 

19 Jewish month 

20 Get a lode of 
this! 

21 Relish 

22 Vehicle for 
E.T. 

23 Like Down 
Hast speech 

26 Porker pads 

27 Weave a web 

28 Moines 

River 

30 Laurent’s 
laugh 

31 ’’Turandot” 
character 

32 “The r 

Nigel Calder 
book 

36 Eerie, in 
Dundee 

37 Part of H.R.E. 

38 Mimi Kennedy 
TV role 

39 Snub 

40 Mimicked 


42 Intrinsicallv 

46 Comical 
character 

47 Raised rapidly 

49 Area east of 
Amer. 

50 Alert 

52 Hallev, e.g. 

55 They’Ve 
spectacular in 

Ariz. 

57 TV installment 

58 Boot-camp 
G.I. 

59 Connected 

60 Lanchester 

and Maxwell 

61 Ecological 
sequences 


DOWN 


1 "Are you a 
mouse?’’ 

2 Resins in 
varnish 

3 Tom, Dick or 
Harry 

4 “Don’t bet 


5 Irritates 
immensely 

6 Tom in a 
nursery rhyme 

7 Chi. lines 

8 Lady Bird’s 
middle name 

9 Did a bit of 
research 

10 Fokker action 
in U\tt\ I 


11 Food for Sir 
Francis? 

12 Word with 
hanger 

13 Kind of plague 
spread by fleas 

14 Robust 

18 Like many 

budgets 

24 Madison Ave. 
denizen 

25 Actress Jamie 
Curtis 

27 Porcupine's 
protection 
29 Esters of fatty 
acids 

32 Living being 

33 First 

34 Deadlock 

35 Chart 

36 “ thou 

made before 
the hills?": 

Job 15:7 

41 Painter of 
“Four 
Apostles" 

43 Distant 

44 Relatives of 
buckskin 

45 Adhered to the 
Ptolemaic 
system 

48 Leo and John. 

eg- 

51 Greek letters 

53 Shade of green 

54 Glacial ridges 
56 Alfonso's 

queen 


Reviewed by Anita Desai 


S ASTHJ BRATA was obviously commis- 
sioned to write a readable fLe. racvl book 


BEETLE BAILEY 


stoned to write a readable (Le. racy) book 
about India, and be did not heed Nchiu’s 
wanting: "To endeavor to understand and de- 
scribe the India ol today would be (be task of a 


LU MCH f AMP I never beat them 

. BACK ro rHe TE Mr- 



brave man — to say anything about, tomor- 
row's India would verge on rashness." 

He set out visiting his family, staying at the 
best holds if not always their finest suites, and 
collecting the material that he has put together 
with the greatest speed, even considerable effi- 
ciency, but in a manner that leaves one breath- 
less and dizzy. Abstractions are jumbled with 
pithily demotic truisms. Subjects are picked up 
and tossed aside or dropped. One wonders u 
any editor attempted to deal with it all or 
simply gave up. 


ANDY CAPP 


f FAfNCV mvUNG TO THE . 

, furniture Exhibition with 

ME, RUBE ? ANEV . — 

S CflNT/VWcElT ■j—' 


f But he > 

PROMISED 

SVOU.FtO- HE 
'SAID HELL OR 
HIGH WATER 
WOULDN'T < 
i STOP HIM — V 


[HE DfDNTSwJ 

>- ANYTHING 

about snooker 


I »« 




1 11 -6 - , - ~ - 

WIZARD of ID 


CTMS OoHy Mlvrof NMvpapm! USE * J 
Dm Dy Hmi AfflMtca Synocala 


-V«c York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


! ft (xmmz 

L MU. 4NSWSS RJUP iJOeSTiONS 


mmr% { 


. In a foreword that manages to combine 
pomposity with a tumbling style, he Haftnc bis 
book wiB paint for us M a general picture in 
broad brushstrokes.” He nwarn to present In- 
dia's “myriad aspects of despair ana splendor, 
of destitution and opulence, of majestic mo- 
dernity and primitive superstition.'' The result 
reads as though be had set aside the brush and 
flung buckets of paint at the canvas. One is 
surprised to find that he sees htrnerif as a 
latter-day Cavafy “standing at a slight angle to 
the universe,” which he attributes to his having 
left India to live in En gland, a position be finds 
a valuable vantage point. 

His position is a matter of sane fas cinatio n 
to him. At least three times, he mentions that 
he is a Brahmin, and in two explains that he 
lopped off his family name, Chakravarti, so 
that “no one would know what caste or family 
or geographical region I came from.” But then 
he goes on to divulge, unasked, that its transla- 
tion is “suzerain of the realm.” 


Prany Gupte’s "Veageasce: judw After the 
Assassination of IntJira Gandht is a 
sober and staid piece ei investigation. He Ml* 
bis publisher have had the good sense w hunt 
its scope to the politidl aad ew»«mc seme. 
His exposition of the jPuajab enss, *hai led to 
it, and hs aftermath, is ccncse aim woo 
the expense of being simplistic. He gives the 
foreign leader all the information required to 
understand iL although it reads rather like six 
months* of newspaper headlines at one sitting. 

His interpretation is not without bias. Mrs. 
Gandhi is named the sole ussugawr. creator 
and culprit of the crias and all its horrors, 
instead of being one more symptom — and a 
victim more viable (has any other — erf a more 
widespread malaise. Atrocities by Hindus on 
CTrK* are listed. (He calls the murder of 2.000 
to 3,000 Sikhs in the aftermath of Mrs. Gan- 
dhi's assassination a holocaust, which is sunf, 
a mj p psg of the term since there are 14 m i ll i o n 
Sikhs in India). But tittle is made of those 
committed by Sikhs on Hindus. The Air India 
crash and the murder of the Sikh leader Har- 
chand Singh Longpwa! just after be signed the 
accord with Rajiv Gandhi occurred after the 
writing of this book. But such crimes as the 
stopping of buses and slaughtering of aB males 
of one community or the tortures and murders 
committed within the Golden Temple or the 
planting of transistor bombs in the hands of 
innocent people, gp unmennoned. 

Pranay Gupte is naive if be imagines that the 
old priest in the Golden Temple who blessed 
him with “a gentle smile" is in control of the 
Khalutan movement, or if be expects us to 
believe in the Sikh woman encountered oil a 
plane who is reading a volume of verse, conve- 
niently marked at Tagore's famous poem 
“Where the Mind Is Without Fear,” winch 
every schoolchild in India knows by heart. To 
separate the communities into the goodies ao& ' 
the baddies as in a Bombay film will neither 
elucidate nor edify. It creates more of die 
communal tension that he deplores and we. in 
India, fear. . 

Mis. Gandhi comes in for such harsh criti- 
cism in his (i w i w nwiian ' mi fh<» political scene, 
whether in Punjab. Kashmir or Andhra Pra- 
desh, that one feds it is the raison <Ttoe of this 


j f r™F 

. . -i.* * 


•an N** 


r * * i 

.j'iiim-n 


Kjr--gn*r- ■■ 

'v m. 


book. It takes one by surprise, therefore, when 
he goes on to describe India's industrial and 
economic front in glowing terms. Apparently 
this is because be chose to interview only those 
at the hchn. as they say, of industry: such 
luminaries as the chairman of the Great East- 
ern Slipping Company, the editor of India's 
leading; magazine. India Today, the chairman 
of India's Nudear Power Board, a senior num- 
ber of the (£1 and Natural Gas Commission 
and so an. Although initially dubious about 
Rajiv Gandhi's ability to rule, Gupte. an seeing 
his first budget with its till away from the 
public towards the private sector, exuhs. “I 
was disbefeviug at first because no Indian 
administration had ever been so bold in root- 
ing for the private sector, and. of course, I was 

rlnftAkl*4 «L. . ... ■ j* . . .• « 


TJKfe 

m 



mmh*\ 

A yJmfff 1 


In case his readers are still not sufficiently 
instructed, he tells us, “Like the WASPs con- 
sciousness of effortless superiority, most Hin- 
dus, especially Brahmins from the hi ghest 
caste, who have any direct knowledge and 
experience of their rdigknt,inherit a whisper of 
this legacy. The late Indira Gandhi d?d , as does 
her son Rajiv. . . and so perhaps do L" 


i*#u- t tf 

!(-> i 


■ t it 
••fills 


4W| 

'V*. Wfel 

? >:r.TO«#S 


dchghied at the new eoonemte direction in 
which Rajiv Gandhi was now taking I ndia " 

_ It is dear Gupte did not share tin* or 

dianay of those who searcbed the budget to sc& ' 
what was bemg done Tor the poor and ifit 
weak. It is telling first he interviewed no single 
Wxk muon leader, let alone aiifaarer. Instead 
of seeking oat those who Bve ami work in the 
fiddsv the. dims and uaHs. he met and nsmled 
widi, overwhelming, the beautiful people. 


REX MORGAN 


DR JXfr£yF. E T^cTcahtanswer 1 mv 


V HOSPITAL AMD 
* ARE AMGrE FOR 


GJUESTIOK] WITH 

absolute 


CL <£y?JA'f awissiomT CERTAINTY-BLIT 


BfWflU BE y WHATDO YOU J 
TRANSFERRING her S THINK THE 
L N A BO^T AN HOUR ') CHANCES ARE THAT 


THE PSYCHIATRIST THINKS 
THAT WITH THE PROGRAM 
THEY PLAN, THE ODDS ARE 
IN HER FAVOR' 


DR. MORGAN, IT'S 
YOUR OFFICE ON 
THE PHONE/ 


'How IMS HID 1 RUN ON THE RIMS BEFORE I SOT TEETHE 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
» fcy Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to torn 
lour ordinary words. 


NOTIX 


,.v 


LOMOB 


REEVER 


sisfe 



Brata is in fact very good when desafiring 
the minutiae of this hierarchy and its cumbcx- 
some burden ol ritual and custom. His lan- 
guage takes on a crispness, his power of obser- 
vation an acuteness that is just light when 
dealing with arcane and anachronistic rituals 
in a contemporary setting. His description of 
ms parents’ rn a magr is fuQ of- insight and 
sympathy, while remaining coolly objective, It 
js when he takes on the general picture that he 
begins to pour on generalities and superlatives 
by the bucket. The colors run together and arm 
into a riotous mess. 


*’v^ . 

'«Mi 

• **•■■■*» 




• Anita Desai Sms in New DeBn and is the 

*Tn Custom." She^^^d^n^ew%r The 
Washington Poet. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscotc 

the diagramed deal, 
V/ three-diamond respoi 


O N the diagramed deaL the 
three-diamond response 
to the Precision dub opening 
showed a three-suiter with 
shortage in one red soil South 
settled in three no-trump, re- 
ceived a spade lead and was a 
long way from nine tricks. 
From a variety of possible 
plans, he chose to finesse the 
spade queen and the diamond 
queen. The success of both 
seemed promising, but the play 
of the lop diamonds revealed 
the bad break. 


Two tricks were needed in 
the heart sttit, and dummy was 
short of entries. The heart king 
was led and allowed to win. 
Ihe queen was continued, in 
the hope of pinning the jack or 
the nine, and West took the 
ace. The spade king was taken 
by the ace and a third heart 
was led. Hast took the heart 
jack and two diamond win- 
ners, but had to lead from the 
club king at the finish. Yet an- - 
other successful finesse gave 
South the entry to. the dummy 
to score the last heart and 
make her game. 


WEST 

*KJ »2 

4 64 uu,m O 010 8 53 

►»*** *KS5 

SOUTH 

♦ 643 

?KQ< 

9 A K J 7 3 

♦ A7 

North «ad Santa were vofaerabia. 

Dm U&Sng: 

Wm North 

t* Pas 3 o 

5“ 3 NT. Pus Pa*, 

W*« M the spsde nro. 


NORTH 

♦ A4J73 
VU872 
O ? 

♦ Q J84 

111 iW. m a 


HANCUL 


IT'S SOMETIMES 
A CRIME TO CATCH 
F/SH HERE, BUT 
MORE OFTEN THIS, 


W>rld Stock Markets 


Ctow fra*. 

Metal Box 54j <4j 

Midland Bonk 22 

Nat W«l Bank 694 m 

P.O'XI O 438 426 


Cl dm P«r». 


Now arrange me circled letters lo 
form (be surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by (he above cartoon. 


Print answer here: A 


A 

CZtwin^ priers ui local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 

I _ Ciom Preo. I 

- *** _ Commeraank 77s m »* «n I - 


Not. 7 


PI I king Ion NA 

Plessoy 13o 

Prudential 734 

Racoi Elect njl 

Hand Ion Id In mjv. 


t78 428 

NA — 

136 140 

734 754 

NA — 


(Answers tomorrow 

Yesterday's I Jumb| ec TITLE AWARD YEARLY FERVID 

I Answer A confirmed night owl is a man who stays uc 
all night 0AY AFTER DAY 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Alga rve 

Amsterdam 

Athene 

Barcelona 

Belgrade 

Berlin 

Brussels 

Buchar e st 

Budapest 

Copenhagen 

Costa Del Sol 

DabHn 

flainourgfi 

Flo rones 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

lEtanOvi 

Las Palmas 

Utbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

NfCfl 

Oslo 

Porii 

Prague 

Rerklovlk 

Roma 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venire 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zorich 


LOW 
C F 
is n d 
6 43 ct 

16 61 o 
13 55 no 

0 32 tr 

5 41 r 
4 39 a 

6 46 r 
2 36 cl 

2D 68 cl 
18 64 no 
6 43 o 

4 3D tr 

5 41 tr 

1 34 0 

-1 JO r 

S 41 r 

14 57 r 

20 68 fr 
18 64 a 

8 46 ci 

14 57 no 
4 39 tr 


Bangkok 

Beijing 

Hong Kona 

Manila 

New Delhi 

Snm 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Taiml 

Tokvo 


HIGH LOW 

C F C F 

31 es 24 75 st 

10 50 4 39 o 

36 JV 23 73 0 

32 K) 26 79 cl 

29 S4 14 57 Ir 

» 68 12 54 ct 

Cl 70 II 52 cl 

28 82 23 73 r 

27 81 22 72 cl 

79 66 14 57 0 


AFRICA 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Cana Town 

Casablanca 

Harare 

Logos 

Nairobi 

Tunis 


27 81 21 70 Cl 
23 B? 17 »3 Ir 


15 5« no 
17 63 na 


ABN 

ACF Holding 
Aegon 
AK20 
A Hold 
AMEV 
A'Dcnn Rub 
Amrobank 
BVG 

Buemcncnn T 

Caland Hldg 

Elsevier 

Fokker 

Gist Brocades 

Helneken 

Hoogovons 

K.LM. 

Naorden 

Nat. Nedder 

Neddlovd 

Oce VMer G 

Pakfwed 

Philips 

Robeeo 

Rodamco 

Rolmco 

Rorenlo 

Roval Dutch 

Unilever 

Van Ommer 

VMF.Stork 

VNU 

Anp-Cbs Index: NJL 
PrevhHis: NJL 
Source: Reuters, 


Close Prsv. 

552 


Ciom Free. 
Commenoank 775J0 275JO 

Contlgurnml 165 JO 147 
Daimler^xjnz r?23 1157 

DOWM? ' NA — 

Deutsche Bonk 717.20 714 

Drmtto-Bortc 346 348 

Dt-BabOK* NA — 

GHtH 2050 224 


Rank 

Repdlnri 

Reuters 


£7 484 

675 480 

350 3*8 


Roval Dufchc 43 19/3244 45^44 


RT2 
Scat chi 
5alnsburv 


539 542 

NA — 

NA _ 


AECI 

Anglo Amor. 


Haroener 

Hoctttld 

Hoectist 

Hoescti 

Horten 

Hussei 

IWKA 

Kail U. Sat 

Kaniadt 

Kaufno) 

KHD 

Klaeckner- 


NA — 

NA. — 

257 2a2 

148-50 165.40 

210 JD 210 

NjA. — 

NA — 

NA — 

291 287 

NA — 

332 325 


Anglo Am Gold N A — 


Sears Holdings na — 
MS 680 

STC NA 


Krupp stanl : na — 

Unde , 59c 505 

Luflhnroa N A 

AULJi. NA _ 

Mauhcamorm J62 260 

Minmch. > m 

Rueck 2050 

Njjoaorf NA 

PKJ k 72B 

Porsche NA 

Preussag 246 

PWA na 

RWE 206 21 

Rhotameloll . NA 

Scherlno 1 4 T 6 

SEL ££ 

Siemens 473 

Thvssen i«i 

Vebo ' n 

w°Ji , S WOBen N 4 ” « 

COjnmg^'.Me.iNA 
Source: Reuters. 


0 X cl 

11 52 tr 

0 32 0 

6 43 cl 

1 34 D 

■S 23 Ir 

9 45 tr 

1 36 Cl 

1 34 O 

6 43 Cl 


MIDDLE EAST 


Auk urn 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 

Syditcv 


12 54 4 39 


27 81 6 43 


2« 79 11 52 Ir 


30 86 14 57 


IB 64 7 45 Cl 


Wider 25 77 19 66 st 

cl-ctoiMV! to-toggv; lr-tair; h-hall; 
shdhawers; sw-snow; 51- storm v. 


Tunis 20 68 — 

LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Aim 30 86 20 68 Cl 

Caracas 29 e If m cl 

JJma 23 73 16 61 

Mexico City 20 68 6 43 

Rio d6 Janeiro 25 77 21 70 

NORTH AMERICA 

Anchorage - 7 19 . 15 5 
Atlanta 13 64 b 44 

Boston 15 50 8 46 

Chicago 9 48 0 32 

Denver 14 57 -4 25 

DolroH 8 46 3 37 

Honolulu 29 84 19 66 

Houston 23 73 10 50 

Las Angeles 26 79 13 55 

M nml 25 77 n 52 

Minneapolis s 41 -3 27 

Montreol B 46 5 41 

Massau 2S 77 SO 68 

Hew rent 16 6? 9 48 

San Francisco 21 71 11 52 

Seattle 9 48 6 43 

Toronto 9 48 j 41 

Washington 17 63 7 45 


Bnwph 


Arbed 

Botiaeri 

Gockerln 

Cubans 

E0ES 

GB-inno-BM 

GHL 

Gevoorl 

Hoboken 

inlwcom 

KrecDelbonk 

Pel ron na 


SS ■“ 

728 724 

NA — 

240 260 

NA — 

206 21050 

NA - 

.638 437 


Barlows 1135 

Blvwoar 1JJ3 

Buffets 7225 

De Beers 1455 

Driefonteln 4800 

Ekihds NA 

GFSA 345a 

Harmony 2B7S 

HlveW Steel 57a 

Kloof 2100 

Ned bank B20 

Pre3 Slew 6700 

Ruwiat 3150 

SA Brews 445 

Sf Helena 39io 

Soldi NA 

West Holding 7800 

Composite Stock Index: 
Previous: NA 
Source: Reaten. 


Sun Alliance 
Tate & L»le 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 
T.l. Group 


NA — 

510 505 

NA — 

382 384 

396 391 


Trafalgar Hse na _ 

THF 105 146 

Ultramar 203 ]vo 

1=3/321219/44 


^ 1=4/3212 iy/64 

United Biscuits na — 

Vickers 310 31s 

Wool worth s«8 6Q3 

F.T.30 Index; 1D73JM 
Previous: lotljg 
F.T.SJ.160 index: 1384J* 
Previous: tlfSM 

Source: Reuters. 


ACI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Barai 

Bauaalnvliifl 

Castlemalne 

Coles 

Coma ico 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlap 

Elders 

ICI Australia 

Magellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Nat Aust Bank 
New* Corp 
N Broken Hill 
Poseidon 
Old Coal Trust 
Santos 

Thomas Nation 
western Min- 
ing 

Westacc Bank- 
ing 

woodskia 

All ordinaries Id* 
Previous: I8D5JM 
Source: Reuters. 


2.95 2J90 

5JB SJU 
U 8 BJ 2 
NA 3.16 
NA 1.95 

NA 8.10 
4.16 4.10 

NA 1J4 
NA. 5J8 
3J5 3J8 

253 252 

NA 3 
NA 227. 
NA 220 
2A6 142 

355 355 

4 JO 452 
N-A. 8J0 
NA 228 
NA 3AS 
NA 152 
NA 5J0 
NA 243 


Clese Pr 
Asoitl Glass 865 I 

BlCTokva 75< 3 

Bridgestone . 345 j 
Canon i|<> 11 

Casio 1760 iJ 

u. iron 421 a 

go'NlRP'Int 1130 11 

Dahro House na 9 

Dobra Secort- 
ftas 790 a 

7630 77 

Full Bank na 15 

Full Photo 1980 20 

FullhMl 979 B 

Hitachi 486 a 


1 Stocks da AP 


Hitachi Coble NA 


790 0 

7630 77 

NA 15 

7W0 30 

979 91 

*86 71 


KSf Air ™ 

k5B- ^ ‘i 

Konsal Power 1970 m 

KowosalcJ 


5940 631 

499 5t 


353 3J0 


4J2 4J5 

1J9 1j4D 

w: 1 M 2 J 0 - 


Steel 

Kirin Brew 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kvocera 
Matsu ELInd 
Matsu ELWfks 


WO 14 

rai 74 

518 52 

353 35 

3920 402 

1 U 0 110 

913 91 


bNfiiw nj vi 

SISKSiEr ss » 


342 34, 

Mitsubl Heavy 380 38, 

598 £7 

Mitsui Co. 423 434 

MHsufcoshl 620 431 

Mitsumi 7X tv 

NEC 1130 117t 

NGK Insula- 
tors NA m 

Njkkajtac ^ 747 7*. 

ISSSwiea % 

Nippon Steel 159 Ma 

Nippon Yusen 378. 382 

Nissan 592- at 

Nomura Sec isvo 1100 

Olympus H0I0 1020 

Pioneer Tala lorn 

1050 ton 
Sharp 839 846 

fr;'™*; NA 

Milnetso Cham NA 819 


Znrfefe 




Leaden 


85£Sr H-e- - 


A73 669 

1>1 176 

273 27050 
414 40850 
NA — 


2820 2890 

NA — 

213 »0 

NA — 

3750 3750 

5170 5200 

2630 2670 

4040 4658 

sen 5*80 

NA — 

NA — 

6750 6B10 


Bk East Asia ■ 2270 

rhE"? 1 ST® “-W 2 M 0 


roii winru 0/30 flBID 

Soc Getriraie. 22^0 2315 

Safina tw nn am 


8200 B£3) 

5780 5830 


Chfaio Lighi 
Green island 
Hang Sens Bk 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Elec 


1740 1 7.40 

NA 825 
44 4550 

135 230 

.12 1150 
.8.45 8.40 


f™ 3/IW 30*1 

Traction Elec NA — 


1 UCB N JS. - 

Unerg NA — 

VMdftfogne 5900 5850 

C unreal Stack Index: na 
P revious: na 
Source: Reuters. 


HK Realty A (210 1230 

HK Hotels 3423 35 


Hrt Land 
HKShang Bk 
HK Tel 


A95 4.90 

?J0 750 

920 9.10 


HK Youmaiei NA 320 

HKWnort 7JQ 


FranfcfiBt 


owercosT; Dc-caniv , 


FRIDAYS FORECAST — CHANNEL: Choonv. FRANKFliftT- Owrairi . .l 
ram Id ter. Temp. 12-5 154- 41 1. LONDOhrRalnv TenS u-iTiS^ «i h 
MADRID: Cloudy. Temp. 17-15 M3- W FilSvi Ybftlc^Fnt rlJP w 551 * 
154 - 431. PARIS; Rainy. Temp, u -4 IS7-4J1. Rome* aSaJmS^MlTn 
68 - 521. TEL AVIV: Na ZURICH: Ovorcosl With ram loiSTTSma^ Tsl?* 


AEG 

251 

254 

Allianz ven. 

1815 

1820 

oitona 

NA 


BASF 

265^0 

269 

Bayer 

260 

263 

Boyar. Hypo 

NA 


Baver.ver- 



.Bunk 

443 

440 

BBC 

NA 


SHF -Bank 

NA 

_ 

BMW 

560 

as 


Hutch worn- 

«M 27.90 2750 

Hvsan kla n 49 

TO.hr a» 0.98 

Jardlne 1120 1120 

Jardlne sec 1&40 14.70 

Kowtoan Motor 1DJ0 KUO 
Miramar Harr! n'A 4650 
New World .840 BJO 
SHK Props mo ljjo 
Stelux 235 sjr 

'Swire Pacific A » 

Tai Cheung 2,15 iio 
WahKwung 0*6 afiS 
Wins On Co na 1^ 
WInsor AS7S & 

woria inri ua 242s 

Hang Seng index: 772153 
Previous: 778826 
Source: Reuters. 


aa Corn 

Allied- Lyons 

AngloAm Gold 

Ass Bril Foods 

Ass Dairies 

Barclays 

Bass 

BAT. 

Beecham 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boats 

Bowater Indus 
BP 

Brlt.Homo SI. 
Brlt.Teiecom 
grit Aeroeaace 
Briioti 
BTR 
Burmati 
Catale Wireless 
Costfeury Schw. 
Charier Cons 
Commercial U 

Cons. Gold 
Courtaulds 

Dateety 

Do Bears 
Distillers 
Driefonteln 
FI sons 
Free si Ged 
GEC 

Gen Accident 
GKN 

Glaxac 1 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hovyker 

ICI 

Imp Group 
Jaguar 
Lond5ec 
[-eoal General 
Uoyds Bank 
Lonrho 
Lucas 
Marks & So 


89 9/T4S8 11/16 
280 375 

a S54U 84546 

3 NA — 

136 136 

434 427 

NA — 

Si 371 

32S 330 

235 345 

NA — 

S3 M 

ro as 

228 230 

i 313 315 

558 563 

NA — 
192 193 

I NA — 
NA — 
375 37S 

307 306 

613 600 

151 152 

211 NA 
256 259 

472 — 

165 161 

NA — 
*420 «NA 
450 4S 
SI 39k" SNA 

m '»* 

Sl«b SNA 
164 166 

706 713 

252 254 

153/64 15 3/64 

728 733 

NA — 
684 857 ' 

NA - 

431 423 

662 669 

2T5 217 

NA — 

315 3T3 

714 729 

472 472 

NA — 

443 443 

183 185 


win 

CJpohoicts 
Cred Ifni 
Eridanta 
Farmitalla 
Rat 

Generali 

IFI 

I fakement! 
ItaJsas 


NA — 
NA — 
NA - 
NA — 
4490 4636 

65700 65S00 
]IW0 11649 
5 0950 50850 

2QM 2090 


Mediobanca 126100 126500 

MontMHon 2390 2423 

NBA Ma 

Olivetti ran 

raS" 1 52 ”5 

fir** ® 

SME JJ5; - 

iSSda 23! «L S 

Star 3650 3670 

JjU^Currwl Hide*! NA 

Source: Reuters. 


Adlo 
Alusulsse 
Autaphon 
Bank Leu 

Brawn Boverl 
Clba Gdgy 
Credit Suisse 
Electro watt 

HoMerbank 

Interdlscoam 

Jocata Suchard 

Jelmeli 

Landis Gyr 

Moevenpiek 

Nestle 

OerUkon-B 

Raehe Baby 

Sandaz 

Schkuaer 

SuUw 

Surveillance 

Swissair 

SBC 

SwiU Rein. 

Swiss Valla. 
Union Baik 
Winterthur 
Zurich Ins. 

MC Index: 56UO 
Previous; SSUfi 
Source: Reuters. 


NA 885 
ra 768 


NA 890 

794 789 

159 163 

22 - 382 

,592 598 

1090 1100 

1010 1020 

1610 1620 

lose W90 

839 846 

NA 025 


Sony 

Sumlt Bank 
Sumll Chem. 
Sumlt Marine 
Sumlt Metal 
Talsel 
TaishoMor 
Tokeda 
TDK 
Teiim 

Tokfa Marine 


3760 3820 
1700 1730 
■290 251 
717 719 
141 144 
335 340 

SI s 

B?1 S50 
«; 4060 
505 505 
945 932 


Tokyo El Pwr 3470 247B 

Toppan. Print- 
ing 889 88V 

Tor ay 520 525 

Toshiba " 35s ^ 

Toyota H60 Uio 

Yamatchi 726 732 

MMtal-0 J. index: I285L24 
Previous: 1219240 
N«* index: 18MJI 
Preview : Btttas 
Source: Revtn . 


Cold Storage 

DBS 


336 134 

6.10 S.9S 


FraserNeave 6A5 ojq 
H aw Par 244 m 


"“H 390 

AsaitiChem. 792 


390 395 ,4-Q.: nut quoted; NA: not 

792 . 803 ovgjiable; xd: ex-4lfvldend.fi . 


Inchaape 
Mol Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 
DUE 

ShaogrWo 
‘ State Daruy 
S’pgre Land 
SHore Press 
5 Steamship 


St TracBng ^ „ 

United Over- 
seas 163 161 

UOB - NA .3J8 

Strain Timas led. index: NA 
Preview: 769A1 

Source: Reuters. 


108 

W 195 
M0 MS 
3 2.90 

NA UZ7 
M4 2 
1^1 1J1 

155 155 

60S 6J5 

a?o as4 

104 2.98 


7 A3 I A0 

NA . 17B 




2200Aonlca E 
I M7 Acre lint A 
p5MA«£neniv 
■7750 Alta Nat . 
WKAIgamaSt 
3e00Alcolf ■ 
(1300 BP Canada 
■0614 Bank BC — 
p6t52l Bank N si 
I^SSgOrilcko 

UgOBotWiAfl 

«»tt Bonanza I 
praOBraiomrl 
|522Iramai™ 
■1200 Brando M| 
JI5C30 BCPP ■■ 
|^» BC ReM 

usr°d 

■ 640 QCCLB 1 
WOOCod Frv* 
■ItaOOmpeaufB 
'^SCNorwest 
LMQOCPacfcrs mm 

[ 1 j 00 Con Trawl 
4333 C T wig^m 

■ 10 CGE ■ 
M 2479 Cl Bit C«t^ 
■87676 CTIre A f B 

|™SCUHIB| 
(1100 Cara I 

■374 Colon 17sS 

^^Ctoeptaxl 
4MD0COIstbAl 

MKCTLBanlH 
I^CoMka 
1 1900 Conran a| 

■SWCot RmI 

sssnssl 

|HBT 0 Denhon B? 

■ Too Oeve icon 
34 MDWcrw, A j 

1 74100 Dotawn ■ 

| WOODanohue* 
prooDuPantA] 
IJJJJ DytaX A I 
WOOflclbomxl 
■2800 Emco 
P’jMfSvth- svr 
P^TOCFRucond 
If^fgoibrdgeJ 
tf*®" fed tad A | 
(hoo Fed Finn 
2700 F City Fin 

iTTOGendteA ■ 
■i^Geaccott^ 

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Thelntemational Herald Tribune. 
Bringing tbeWcukTs Most 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8. 1985 


~" : -M ■ 


SPORTS 




AA^ 


\6p 


Page 17 




VA 


; 

: ~ 

■ T-'. i.:V 


By Tony Komhcisec 

Washington Post Sernee 


ays at Green Bay: An Older Kramer Remembers 'the Block’ 

nhdser . about a reunion of the 1966 Packers, the team Lombardi told t hem, "but if we chase perfeo- The Block has been replayed so many tini« walks imo the huddle taking requests, b 

Semce that won Super Bowl L It is a book about lovt tion, we can catch excellence.” now that we can almost feel the raw and bitter bow cod is that?) 

16-below-zero temperature (minus 26.6 degrees 


_ WASHINGTON — If you were to compile a how hard it is to express, and about creep- How much the game has changed. Kramer, a 

list of the most memorable plays in National • anonymity, and how bard it is to face. " flat-faced, ham-fisted man, was a 225-pound 

Football League history, these foox would moV* Kramer writes of a recent conversation he (102-kilogram} guard when he reported to the 
it: Alan Ameche’s touchdown run that gave the ^ *** beloved teammate, FuzzyThur- Packers in 1958. Homung ran a five-second-flat 
1^58 Baltimore Colts a sudden-death chaimri- slon: “ We started talking about depressing 40 yards (36 5 meters). “We weren't big. and we 
otuhip over the New York Giants in whatSis ■ tfain 8 s > ■*»“* grow^S old and being forgotten, weren't fast,” Kramer said. “I look at today’s 
called “The Greatest Game Ever Hayed;” the andTraty said somethingnj always remember, players and I'm awed and confused. They’re so 
“Immaculate Reception” by Franco Harrisof “You- know, Jeny, nobody wants to be Fuzzy pumped up, so awesome. Where’s the valve? 
the Pittsburgh Steekrs; Dwight Clark’s catch an ydf®®-’ It captured in six words the sadness They’ve got to have a valve somewhere, where 
that sent the San Francisco 49os to Supra Bow! °f being an ex-athlete, the loss, the void When you put the air in.” 

XVI, and Barr Starr following Jerry Kramer’s wcrc young, when we were champions, ev- How many of the great old Packers would 


been replayed so many times walks into the huddle taking requests. Now, 

almost feel the raw and bitter bow cool is that?) 

nperature (minus 26.6 degrees “Normally, in that situation, everybody’s got 


Celsius) they played in. We can close our eyes a suggestion. 1 might want a trap; Fuzzy’ might 
and remember how condensation turned the want to go off tackle; the ends might want a 
players' breath to fog that rose like papal smoke quick slant, or a post. Everybody's got an idea. 


inm the mean air. 


But in this particular situation, 10 guys looked 


pumped up, so awesome. Where’s the valve? 
They’ve got to have a valve somewhere, where 
you put the air in.” 

How many of the great old Packers would 


Since two timeouts preceded the play, «eh down and checked their shoeshines. Not a 
team had ample time to prepare for the game's sound. Not one sound. 


Mode into the end zone to score on fourth and eiyohe envied us. Everyone wanted, to Jcaowus. definitely make die NFL today? Just on pbysi- 

onewith 13 seconds left, beatina Dallas in the Evoyone.wanted to be us. It wasn't just the Jdds cal talent, not heart, not brains. How manv 


one with 13 seconds left, beating Dallas in the Hveiyonewanted to be i 
1967 NFL championship. in the schoolyard shouti 

r\ AJih, The Block. TmFnzw Thurston!’ I* 


everyone wanted to be us. it warn t just me lads 
in the schoolyard shouting, Tm Paul Homung!' 
Tm Funy Thurston!’ It was the schoolteachers, 


cal talent, not heart, not br ain*. How many 
would not be spit out by the computer as too 
weak, too small, too slow? 


Kramer still hears about it. He was in San too, and !lhe lawyeire and the stockbrokers. Pro- Kramer thought about it, and after a while he huddle when the second timeout was called, and because the field was 
rancisco a oouplc of years ago, about to cross a football was a waring sport, and we cmiiwi Bart went over to talk with Coach, but he came sheet of ice, he would ket 


climactic snap. Today's fan would doubtless 
assume the specific play was called on the side- 
line and given to Starr by the forceful Lombardi. 
In fact, during the fust timeout, Lombardi sug- 
gested that the bail be handed to fullback Quick 
Mercein for the “44-dive," but he left the final 
decision to Starr, who called his own plays. 

The way Kramer tells it, “we were ready to 
huddle when the second timeout was called. 


“And Bart asked again, ‘Anybody? Anybody 
got anything? 1 

“Finally. Gale Gillingham, playing on the left 
ride next to Fuzzy, he says, ‘Run it between 
Jerry and Forrest. They'll get it for us.' 

“Giliy volunteered me. I couldn’t back out of 
it then. Not hardly.” 

Starr said he would run the play. “61-wedge," 
and because the field was frozen, a slippery 



street, when the driver of a car rolled down his we *' e R* soaring stars. We were everybody’s 


“Herb Adder! ey would mak e it,” Kramer said 
convincingly, and he did not push the list any 


,f Hub; 


• m _ __ _ — ie. « _ — a _ _ ' H feT r I MUW T UVUIU 1 1 * ■ - 1 L I VI .IjliL.1 ,TB IM 

wmdow and caned out, “Jcny KnunerT ; heroes, and we knew it would never end." convincingly, and he did not push the list anv 
^Kignt, Kramer acknowledged. What a team that . was. Six Hall of Famers: longer than one. 

Great Node. Starr, Jim Taylor, Ray Nitschke, Willie Davis, But it is apples and oranges, is it not? 

. Kepi a djaiy of that 1967 season that Forrest Gregg, Herb Adderiey. Seven, counting Those Packers were right for their time, and 

he caned Instant Replay:" He is back now with the-revered coach, Vince Lombardi And Hor- perhaps no single play better exemplified what 
me sara co-author, Dick Schaap, and a similar nung, Thurston, Kramer, Max McGee, Willie they were about as a team than the one that 
title, Distant Replay,” a wann renmasccnce Wood, eta, -etc. “Perfection isn’t attainable.” brought Starr and Kramer into history. 


Bart went over to talk with Coach, but he came sheet of ice, he would keep the ball himself 
back rather quickly because Coach was out of rather than risk handing it off to either Mercein 
plays. Bart came back empty. No new sugges- or Danny Anderson. 


slippery Jerry Kramer, in a 1965 photograph. 


ureai Diode. Starr, Jim Taylor, Ray Nitschke, Willie Davis, 

Kramrakepi a diary of that 1967 season that Forrest Gregg, Herb Adderiey. Seven, counting 

V 1 .. , , IF T . ... J ,77° 


lion. Zero. We huddle and Bart says, ‘Has any- Kramer laid The Block on the defensive line- 
body got anything? Anybody'?' ” man Jethro Pugh, Starr nudged into the end 

(Fourth and goal from the one. Dynastic zone. Green Bay had its third straight NFL 


rather than risk handing it off to either Mercein an all- the- time thing; you don't win once in a 
or Donny Anderson. while. You don’t do things righ t once in a while: 

Kramer laid The Block on the defensive line- . vou do them right ail the time. There's no room 
man Jethro Pugh, Starr nudged into the end for second place here. There's a second-place 



title, “Distant Replay," 


European Soccer 
Gels Finnish First 

United Press International 

■.LONDON — Juventus and Kuusyri Lahti, the prince 
nntF the pauper of European soccer, have marched to- 
gether into the quarterfinals of the Champions’ Cup 
tournament. 


brought Starr and Kramer into history. 


Green Bay left with one last play, trailing, 17-14. championship and fame was a bottomless cup. 
The NFL’s most celebrated team coached by its “Winning is not a sometime thing here." 
most celebrated man, and the quarterback Lombardi often admonished his players. “It’s 


man Jethro Pugh, Starr nudged into the end for second place here. There's 3 second-place 
zone. Green Bay had its third straight NFL bowl game, and it's a hinky-dinky football 
championship and fame was a bottomless cup. game, held in a hinky-dinky town, played by 
“Winning is not a sometime thing here." hinky-dinky football players. Thai's all second 
Lombardi often admonished his players. “It’s place is: hinky-dinky." 




the. fist Finnish dub to reach the third roundof any 
Eu ropean competition, defeating Zenit T-wringm^ 3 - 1 , 
) in oyertime u> qualify on a 4-3 aggregate. Only 2,S93 
'spectators saw Ruusysfs triumph, but they sounded 
more Eke 28,000 when JannoKarvonunni beat the Soviet 
_ U ni mi’s team by heading in a goal 21 minutes into the 
' overtime. 

In contrast, there were no fans to cheer, the defending 
’-“in •Hurrirs ‘ champion Juventus in a match played behind dosed 
gates at the Stadio Communale. Juventus supporters 
have been banned for two home matches because of 
jf;j crowd misbehavior against Liverpool of En gland in the 
■ ■ r.r i-" Brussels soccer riot last May, when 39 persons were 
?t S £' killed. 

- Juventus, with goals from the French national ream 
•s . rj , captain, Michel Platini, and AMo Serena, made the last 

u'-'TTQ eight with a 2-0 victory over Italian league rival Verona, 
:_, ivi adding to its scoreless draw at Verona two weeks ago. 

- ‘ With English dubs barred from European competi- 

. ZJi tiqn, it was left to Aberdeen of Scotland to cany the 
- • v..:" ' British flag by edging Servette, 1-0, after drawing by a 0-0 
i-ur'iy, score in the first-leg match in Switzerland. 

■ " - -.-.i \irz- Frank McDougaTs 23d-mmote header ensured a vie- 
■ . . *jpry for Aberdeen, which two years ago. won the Cup 
’ • . . ^Vinners’ Cup competition. 

Bayern Munich, three times the European Champion 
-r.- : in the mid-1970s, twice came from behind to tie Austria 
Vi enna, 3-3, and qualify. The Germans, trading by 2rl 
with 10 minutes to play, were rescued by goals from 
\ * 1C Norbert Nachtweih and Michael R rnnmenig ge in Vien- 



Soviet Men Win Team Title 
At Gymnastics Championship 


Compiled fy Our Staff From Dispatcher 

MONTREAL — The Soviet 
Union, getting excellent optional 
routines Wednesday night from 
Yuri Korolev and V ladimir Arte- 
mov, reclaimed the men’s team title 
at Lbe World Gymnastics Champi- 
onship as 1983 champion China 
finished second. 

The Soviet Union scored 585.65 
points in two rounds of competi- 
tion on the floor, pommel horse, 
rings, vault, parallel bars and high 
bar. China, rallying from fourth 
place after Monday's team compul- 
sories, got a perfect 1 0.0 from Tong 
Fei and three scores of 9.90 from Li 
Ning to win the silver medal with 
582.60 points. 

That bumped East Germany to 
third with a total of 581.05 and 
Japan to fourth at 579.70, but the 
Chinese could not overcome the 
Soviet Union's nearly four-point 
lead. 

The United States, the Olympic 
gold medalist only a year ago in 
r Los Angeles, was seventh after a 
*' digm.il night in which both Tim 
i Daggett and Scott Johnson fell off 
4 the high bar and all of the team 
members performed lackadaisical- 
ly ly. 

AH of the team’s scores and mis- 
takes counted, since it was a man 




ti- & •. : =r+;***N+.*i 

-Sr 

y ;■ ‘ V-H- .'K'-y*. 


mm* 


Atledco Madrid’s Arteche, center, went up for a header and almost caught a left as the goalie for Bangor s }PS t ' *pst Dan Hayden to a 
Ofy, Wales, punched away the ball during a Cup Winners’ Cup match. The Spaniards won, 1-0. located ankle reuterm the week. 




[ Hocke) 

NHL Standings 


Basketball 


NBA Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick DtvtiiM 

W L TPS 6F0A 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 

W L PCt. OB 



Ptirrodolutoto 

10 

3 

0 

20 

58 

34 

Boston 

4 1 

M0 

— 


Washington 

7 

5 

2 

16 

54 

49 

New Jersey 

4. 3 

J71 

1 

Bulgarian? 1 

NY Htandera 

4 

4 

2 

14 

48 

44 

PtiUodetptrfa 

3 3 

J00 

Ito 

NY Rangers 

4 

4 

0 

12 

42 

40 

Washington 

2 4 

333 

r*» 

New Jersey 

S 


1 

11 

43 

47 

New York 

0 4 

JB0 

4 Vi 


Pittsburgh 

3 

7 

3 

9 

44 

55 


Central Division 



... -"■* 

aftv Adams DMstaa 




Detroit 

5 2 

714 

— 

• — m £ 

I^Quotoec 

9 

2 

1 

19 

57 

44 

. Milwaukee 

5 2 

714 

— 


* Boston 

8 

3 

1 

17 

59 

37 

CMcoga 

3 3 

JOO 

IV* 


Buffalo 

7 

5 

I 

15 

50 

38 

Atlanta 

3 4 

AS 

S 

■ “ . " -• 

Hartford 

4 

4 

a 

12 

48 

59 

Cleveland 

2 4 

733 

2V» 

■ •- 

Montreal 

5 

6 

2 

12 

54 

40 

Indiana 

1 4 

700 

3 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 







Norris Division 




WESTERN CONFERENCE 


■ 

St Louts 

4 

5 

2 

10 

37 

45 

Midwest Division 




Chicago 

4 

7 

1 

9 

50 

57 

Denver 

5 0 

uno 

— 


Minnesota 

3 

4 

3 

9 

50 

51 

. Houston 

4 2 

AO 

116 


Detroit 

2 

8 

3 

7 

» 

70 

Utah 

3 3 

JOB 

2V> 


■ Taranto 

1 

n 

0 

2 

37 

57 

Dallas 

2 3 

ADO 

3 


Sanitfe Divtahw 




San Antonia 

3 4 

AS 

3 

- .. ’ 

Edmonton 

10 

2 

1 

21 

45 

47 

Sacramento - 

1 3 

750 

3W 


Catoary 

7 

5 

1 

15 

41 

48 


Pacific DMstoa 




Vancouver 

4 

5 

2 

M 

54 

47 

LA. coppers 

5_.0 

1-000 

— 


Winnipeg 

6 

A 

1 

13 

57 

40 

LA- Lakers 

4 1 

700 

1 


Los Angeles 

3 

10 

1 

7 

51 

72 

Portland 

5 2 

714 

1 


WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS 


Seattle 

2 4 

-333 

3W 


N.Y. islanders 




1 

3 1 

1—5 

Golden State 

2 5 

■2B6 

4 


Toronto 




2 

1 1 

1—4 

Phoenix 

a 5 

JXO 

5 


P— SPORTS BRIEFS 

Soccer ~ ~ “ ~ ~ ; — ” 

rr~ .r.::^ J — Cox Voted Manager of the Year in AL 

From xSStf i 1 iMNtd^miia ms- NEW YORK (AP) — Bobby Cox. whose Toronto Blue Jays won their 

voncm on « oaoreoerte). first American League East championship and came within one game of 

^sjwwdoria iiBcntico o i Bentico oovuncH, [he Worfd geries, has been voted the league’s manager of the year by the 
Attettco Madrid t, son«ar city o tAiietico Baseball Writers Association of America. 

Modria advonoev 3«). Wednesday's award came two weeks after Cox left the Blue Jays to 

wdwCTuS become general manager of the Atlanta Braves. He received 16 first-place 


CUP WINNERS' CUP 
(Socond Round, Second Loo) 

From 7. Roald Vienna I (Rapid Vienna m»- 
vonces on 4-2 aaaresate). 


sarov advances, 3-1). 

UEFA CUP 

(Second Round, Second Lea) 


ballots and 104 points from the 28-voter 
Dick Howser. whose Kansas City Royi 


beat the Blue Jays in the AL 


FC Brume i, spariuk Moscow aiiariok playoffs and Sl Louis in the World Series, finished second with four firsts 


Moscow odvonocs, 4-1). 

Nantes 4. Parttnn Belgrade 0 (Nantes ad- 
vances, 5-1). 

Barvssia Moenckenalodbacn 5, Sparta Rat- 
tardam 1 (Borvssla Moenchenaladtech ad- 
vances, Ml. 

Lokomotive Leipzig X AC Milan 1 (Aagrt- 
0Ote3-3; Milan advances on away goals rule i. 


and 66 points. Gene Mauch of California was third with 57 points. 

Europe Leads World Golf Tourney 

KAPALU A, Hawaii (AP) — Bernhard Langer and Sandy Lyle shot the 
European i*atn to a one-point lead over the United States in Wednes- 


Attiieiic Bilbao x Liege i (Athletic Bilbao day’s first round of the Nissan Cup World Championship of Golf. 


Flatter 4 ffl. La Fontaine (*): Terr ton 2 U), 
Maxwell 2 (2). Shots on goal: N.Y. Wonders 
(an Edwards) S-IO-7— 34; Toronto (an Smith) 

w-ir-ax 

Philadelphia . 1 i 

N.Y. Rangers 3 0 0-4 


rrion2(5), WEDNESDAYS RESULTS 

Wonders iMflcma 21 28 2* 14— 91 

on Smith) PfeOaitetpUa » 21 32 23— IIS 

Matone 7-14 7-9 21, Threat! MB 1-1 17; Kel- 

1 2 3-4 logo 10-24 2-3 22, 5>tpano«kii 9-17 3-5 21. Re- 

2 9 0—4 boaods: indtanaSS (wnnamsisi; Phlladri- 


Z#Ml2|4),Propp2n2).EklWKU5);Rldlev phlo » (Malone 13). Assists: indlano 93 
“ MLGagner (2). Stoats oa goal: Phtkxtolnhia (Fleming 5). Philadelphia 27 (ChoeK* 13)- 
(an Vonbiesbroucfc) W-H-32; N.Y. Rang- . Chicago 21 25 34 1»— 1« 


era (Fr«se) 204Mh-!!7. 
Cahmrr 


Detroit 20 24 31 47— 1M 

Thomas P -13 5-S2X TripucftaS-UM 22, Lang 


Tto Emopeans beat Japin, 19-3, in their six medal-match play mat ^s 
sragote i-i; xamax odvoncosonoNiay goals — lbe winning team also got lObonuspoints — and the Amencans beat 

™*.)- Australia, ISA in the new round-robin, four-team competition. ™ "PJ ™ ™ , 

os«uho X warworn i cwarwm od- ^ ^ ^dividual competition, Curtis Strange of the United States and Wednesday night that they had OAKLAND. CaMorai a — In 

I« Cteald of Japan 1«I aT6-m.cier-par 6fi. AI 67 were Ray Floyd. Mark been Jodolheir compuT one iiy. die Golden SuteWamors 

vonces, 5-4). O’Meara and Calvin Peete of the United States, Langer and Ian Woos- exercises Monday m the first changed their complexion from 

intemozionaie a. lask unz o (inter od- T1flm ^ Enrooe group that moramg, when the gloomy to bnght. 

V ‘sS?^'u s t>on 1 di-vk™ T irana a (Sport- judges usuaDy mark lower. The So-' • On tuesday. they were a Nation- 

kte advances. i4».’ Piratpe PfirP FnrmPr Sonilt ub CM viel ,eam was 11110116 die last to do al Basketball Association team go- 

oh ampioiw cup 1 U<IU3) iiuc LUiiiici ijwui do UtiTi. compulsories, Monday nighL ing nowhere with a 1-5 record. 

Avstri?Fc? SIS ^Bovem PITTSBURGH (AP) — The Pittsburgh Pirates hired a former team “I think there is too much differ- °° Wednesday, they announced 
Munich odvonco* on 7-4 oooroooto) scout, Syd Thrift, 56, as their general manager Thursday and said the race between the scores given in dial top draft pick Chns Mullin 

^KjjumiL^nx toiit umingrad t ( Kuuirsi Q f a new manager could be made within several weeks. the davrime and in the evening,” finally had come to terms and that 

ADenjeeni.servsttsoi Aberdeen advoncss. Thrift operates a real estate agency in Vienna, Virginia, a suburb of the Chinese coach. Zhang Jian, said «*ntra« dispute involving the 

w- W ashin gton, D.C., and has not held a full-time baseball job since he through an interpreter. “The com- i lea t Tt s sconng leader, Purvis Short, 

to«,=d roinor operad.ns for (Mdand A's in ]97 5 1976. ^ sbor , 

Money-for-Play at Kentucky Alleged SSrijSStWh*: KSS'S 

NEW YORK (AP) — Dave Banco, a former basketball player at evening.” 101 victory over the Seattle Super- 

Notre Dame, has said he was offered $20,000 by Seth Hancock, the owner Zhang’s comments were trans- So ??* I ;. . . . n , 

of Claiborne Farm, to attend the University of Kentucky, according to lau^j into English, then the Soviet ■ made -.V 0 *- shots / f el ' 

Sports Illustrated magazine. Bat ton, in the issue published Wednesday, team interpreter whispered them in ?"* 1 5 P9™ 1 ? m min V les . of P J?- V ' 

said he was offered the money in October 1973 m return for four Russian to ArkawaSArtemov at ^ **“5 

summers’ work on the famous thoroughbred farm; Hancock denied the a news conference foUowing the r a feini PU 

allegation. awards ceremony. Gl i d “ ^ p 4 " 1 ® 1 -. 

The Lexington Herald-Leader has reported that several former basket- . lj d __ . He said it really fell good. I was 

ball players at Kentucky told the newspaper they received payments of , £f£ aev disagreed }USl irymg to set a pick for Pums 

$50 and $100 from boosters, and more for making public appearances. , . . 1 fell down. Then I found my- 


“On the one hand, they are ready f f fff| ^ 
to perform complicated exercises.’' g 
said the Soriet coach. Leonid Ar- ] ' 

kaev. “On the other hand, they are 

not very strong yet. 1 couldn’t say g'Y?|§ ^ £ 

the impression they left was veiy | K | If 

Aitemov and Sylvio Kroll of ift' . • | * 

East Germany, each with 117.80 I 1.; | Vi w 

prams, led the three dozen gvm- w p^ p| VV^ ‘ N 8 

Dasts who qualified for the individ- BH| - VNt ; % 
uai all-around competition- The I • » MB 

Soviet Union, which will be limited I / |||| : 

to three gymnasts in the all-around, Wk 

landed four in the top 10 and all its „ . , , .. 

team placed in the top 20. AI Wood of the Somes had di 

Korolev was third with II 7 JO Floyd and the other Warrior 
points, followed by teammate Va- 
lentin Mogfinyi at 117.10 and Li at » 1 y j • 

116.95. China’s Xu Zhiqiang was \U arnftfft fl ^ 
sixth with 116.90 and Japan’s MU. J. XVX O vJ ^ 

Olympic champion, Kcgi Gushi- ___ 

ken, was seventh at 1 1635. W rlrf~h/vl~ I %| 

The Chinese, who had 293.15 OUvWJl UlJ Ol 
points in the optionals to the Soviet x 

Unions' 292-50, still were angiy United Press InrerminvuJ 

Wednesday night that they had OAKLAND. California — In 
been assigned to do their compul- one day. the Golden State Warriors 
sory exercises Monday in the first changed their complexion from 
group that morning, when the gloomy to bright, 
judges usually mark lower. The So-' ■ On tuesday. they were a Nation- 





"s 


Seoic/v'JPl 


AI Wood of the Sonics had difficulty' maneuvering past Eric 
Floyd and the other Warriors in Wednesday night's game. 

Warriors Get Two Guns, 
Shoot Up SuperSonics 


New Jersey ■ 2 0—2 _g-i6«22; Woolrm»e 14-2BH1 37 ,Gtmhi 7-14 

Loot) (3), Wilson (7), Bank (7), Covalilni 4-5 IS. RabooMli: Chicago 47 [Green 13); De- 
li). RJsebrougti (5); Preston M), Adams (1). trott 53 (Lalmbeer 11). AMsti: Chicago 74 
Shot* on goal: Calgary 4-13-11—30. Now Jor- (Macy 7); Detroit 27 (Thomas 16). 


I*y 9-13-7—38. 

wasntootoa l 1 2—* 

-Pttso u i ga » 1 •—! 

Gustbtssofi 14), Otrlstkm (4), Murphy C2)< 
HtnwK-m (9); Raokowskl [41. Stoats oa goal: 


San Antonio 23 15 14 17—41 

WtaMngtoa HMD IS— 88 

Robertson 8-12 M IB. Mlicnet! 6-14 1-2 13. 
Moore 6-15 1-1 13; Matone 11-23 M 23, Robw- 
son IB-20 2-2 22. R eto oa n d i: Son Antonio 42 


Washington HB-7— 23. Pittsburgh 4-18-1 5—39. (GUmore, Robertson IB); Washington 37 
St. Laois 9 T 1—4 (RoUmonU). Assists: San Antonio 19 (Moore 


Detroit 3 18-4 

Klhna (6). Clenodel (4). Lodooeeur (2), Goi- 
hmt 18); Hunter (6), Bed (1). Shots aa goal: SL 
Louts -KM3-9-32L Detroit 13-18-5—28. 
Wlnnlpog 8 l 3-4 


10); Washington 19 (Rulond. Bradley 4). 
Portland 31 29 25 11—111 

Dallas 29 24 28 24-189 

Dreidor 13-35 1-2 28. Vandeweghe 7-14 M 28; 
AguhYo 9-19 11-14 39, BtCKhman 10-21 3-4 31 


Iraq 


Buffalo • 4 >—7 Rebounds: raitana 49 (Thompson. Bowie 

FoUgno 2 (71, McKenna (3), Rvrff (5), Hous- 10); Dallas 59 (Perkins Bl. Assists: Portlcmd 
ley («), Rwff (6), Ceding (1); Stewart (1), is (Drexler 4); Dallas 30 (Harper 8). 
Babvch (3). Shots on goal: Whmlpeg 7-8-11— AHanla 30 24 21 27—114 

34; Buffalo S-T3-M— 34. Phoenix . 2t Sl Si 15—184 

Montreal .281 0—3 Wilkins 13-34 9-13 34. Wlinoms 5-10 3-3 13; 

Minnesota 3(0 8-3 Davis M-30 0-2 24, EdwOTOS 4?n 15-17 XL RA- 

Richer (41. Walter (4), Kurvera (3); Lawton bounds: AHaata 40 (Wilkins 9) ; Phoenix 44 
131. Harfsburg (3), McCarthy (4). Stools on ( Edwards 11). Assists: Atlanta 17 (WllUnc 4); 
goal; Montreal 12-M2-3— 3«; AMnnesata 10-?- Phoenix 35 (Davis 8). 


7-0—34. 
a',' emooo ton 
H'Las aikmms 


822 0—4 
1120-4 


Carrot! 1D-T74-4 24. Short 8-188-1024, Floyd 7- 


MocTovfah (4). CoHav (6). Anderaon (11). 12 7-9 21 .-McDaniel 18-15 F4 25. Wood 8-15 8-10 
Gretzky [ID; Dionne (4>.Tayler (OLNIdnUt 24. Retommds: Seattle 45 (Slkma 12); Golden 
(4). Nlcholls (71, Shots on goal: Ed m onton 8-' state 48 (Short 10). Assists: Seattle 25 (Hett- 
11-TM— 32; Los Angeles 25-11-114—49. 4 mm 5); Gotten Slate 24 (Flovd HI. 



Etna! men's tm ltaa«hs> offer nlMM 
exarctses Wedneeday atorirt hi IM23rd Wortd 
Gymnastics Chain pionsMpi at the OtyMPtC 
Velodrome la Moatfwl: 

1. Soviet Union. 585A5. 

8 . Chino, 

X East Germ an y , 5SL0S. 

4. Janon. 579JH 
5l HuaggrY. SWA 5. 
b- Wed Germany, 547J3. 

T. Cuba, 54425. 
a IKht, MUt 
9- United Stoles. 54X00, 

1ft France, 5624a 
11.Canoda.S59.tt. 

12 Bulgaria. SS7J5. 

1ft South Koroo. 04J8. - 

14- SwUserkwL 552.15. 

15- Snahv551R5. 

Ift Sweden, 54TJXJ. 

17. Great Britain, 5fl.lt 
lft Austria 5328ft 
19. Brazil, 531 Ji 


W udacs aoy orttonol roottoas of Hn World 
Gymnastics OwitadonshtoL: 


Transition 


BASKETBALL 

No tto nol Bcoketball Assodattoa 

GOLDEN STATE— Signed Chris Mullin, 
guard, to a tour-year contract Readied 
agreement an contract with Purvis Short, for- 
ward. waived Ron Crevler and Chuck Alek- 
sinas. centers, and Guy Williams, fo r ward. 

NEW YORK— Announced that James Bai- 
ley, forward, will be out tor two to three weeks 
because at partially torn Moaments in his loft 
knee. 

PHILADELPHIA— Signed votoe Winters, 
forward, la O one-year c o ntract. Placed An- 
drew Tonev. guard, on Inlured reserve: 

SEATTLE — Activated Thn McCormick, 
(orward-cenlw, tram the Inlured reserve IM. 
Released Alex Stlvrlns. forward. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football Loagee 

CHICAGO— Extended the co n tract of Dan 
Hamalon, defensive lineman, through 1989. 

CLEVELAND— A n no unced that Gary Dan- 
ielson. Quarterback, will be out For an oddi- 
Hanal two to three weeks with a shoulder 
In lory. Betti le Knar, quarterback, villi re- 
main the Brown's starter for Sunday's game 
against ClndnnatL 

GREEN bay— signed Dan Bracken, punt- 
er. waived Joe Prokop, punier. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Placed Tim Sherwln, 
IkM and, on Inlured reserve. Stoned Kell 
McGregor, HsM end. 

N.Y. G I ANTS— Signed Earnest Gray, wide 

receiver. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Waived jlm Leonard, 
center. Activated John Horty. defensive and. 

SEATTLE— Released Andre Hardy. UHh 
back. Stoned John Williams, fuKbock. 

TAMPA BAY— Signed Mark Studoway.de- 


compulsories, Monday nigbL 

“I think there is too much differ- 
ence between the scores given in 
the daytime and in the evening." 
the Chinese coach, Zhan g Jian, said 
through an interpreter. “The com- 
petition system must be changed so 
it can be the same way for all the 
people. A routine that gets a 9.6 in 
the morning might be a 9.9 in tbe 
evening." 

Zhang's comments were trans- 
lated into English, then the Soviet 
Leam interpreter whispered them in 
Russian to Arkaev and Artemov at 
a news conference foUowing the 
awards ceremony. 


ing nowhere with a 1-5 record. 

On Wednesday, they announced 
that top draft pick Chris Mullin 
finally had come to terms and that 
the contract dispute involving the 
team's scoring leader, Purvis Short, 
had been resolved. 

Hours later, Mullin and Short, 
despite not having practiced with 
the team, led die Warriors to a 105- 
101 victory over the Seattle Super- 
Sonics. 

Mullin made 6-of-9 shots, get- 
ting 1 5 points in 24 minutes of play. 
It was his shot from the baseline 
with 19 seconds (o play that pul 
Golden State ahead, 104-101. 

He said it “really felt good. I was 


Arkaev smiled and disagreed — just trying to set a pick for Purvis 

and 1 ieU down. Then I found my- 
“The men's competition com- self open in the comer, so I took the 
Ouotable miuee tries very hard to make the shot." 

judging the most objective possi- The 6-fcoi-6 < 1.98-meter) former 
Huey Long on Los Angeles Raiders teammate Lyle Alzado: “He's got ble," he said._T would rather say all -Am erica guard from Sl John's 
all the money in the world. He's 36 years old and he’s still playing lime doesn t influence the results, said he was “just glad it’s over and 
defensive end in the National Football League. He’s either stupid or But Td say evening performance is glad I got my feet wet I didn't 
insane.” (LAT) the best time posable.” (AP. UPI) know the olavs — mv same reallv 


a little. 

"The men's competition com- 
mittee tries very hard to make the 
judging the most objective possi- 


Huey Long on Los Angeles Raiders teammate Lyle Alzado: “He’s got ble." he said. “I would rather say all -America gu; 
all the money in the world. He’s 36 years old and he’s still playing lime doesn't influence the results, said he was “jui 
defensive end in ibe National Football League. He’s either stupid or But Td say evening performance is glad I got my 
insane.” (LAT) the best time possible." (AP. UPI) know the plays 


■ my game really 


NB A FOCUS 

hinges on outthinkina the opposi- 
tion, and I really could not do that 
a lot because 1 was unacquainted 
with the offense." 

Short, fourth in the NBA in scor- 
ing last season, had 24 points a* he 
and the center Joe Barn Carroll 
shared scoring honors for their 
team. 

“We talked on the court and read 
each others’ instincts.'' said Short. 
“Il fell Like there was cieai relief in 
the locker room before (he game. 
That level of confidence never ex- 
isted last year.” 

Short said Mullin *' understands 
the game. It was simple basketball 
tonight: just pass and cul" 

Xavier McDaniel. Seattle's icp 
draft pick, scored a game-high 25 
points and A! Wood got 24 for (he 
Sonics. However. Wood was called 
for a traveling violation with 10 
seconds left and his team down by 
three points. 

"We mrned the ball over too 
much." said Sea (tie's coach. Eternie 
Bickerstaff. ‘‘Our major problem so 
far this season has been making too 
manv unforced errors." 


At Denver’s Golf Courses, the Rule Is Putt Up or Shove Off 


L Sylvio ICroU. East Germany, 117.80 fw^enftaml end Placed 


points. 

tto Vladimir Artemov, Sawtot Union. 117.80. 

3. Yuri Korolev, Soviet Unton. 11750. 

4. Valentin MosUnyl. Soviet Union, 117.1ft 
ft U Nina, Oifncb IlftSft 

ft Xu ZNakem. China, llftfQ. 

9. Koii GusMfcan, Jaoan. 11 455. 
ft Yuri Balahonov. Soviet. Union. 11M0. 

. 9. Tone Fat China, 1U30. . 


Jerry BelL running bock, and Larrv Kubln. 
Ilnobackor. on mo knlurod reserve. 

HOCKEY 

Mottoaaf Hockey League 
N.Y. ISLANDERS— Recalled Ken Loiter, 
defenseman, from Sprlnolleld of the Ameri- 
can Hockey Leogvc. 

N.Y. RANGERS— Sant Terry KW»1no*«', 
goal to, to New Havon of the AHU PlotoH 


1ft Helper Beiirgndt, East Germany, 114.1ft George McPAn, left wing.an the tnlurodiut. 


He UH Hoffman, East German*, ntio. 
12. Lou Yun, Oitng, HAAS. 

1 ft Gvorgy GtictootiY, Hungary, IlftRL 


14. AleneyTlkhonkUGh,SavMrt Union. 115> 8ft me season. 


COLLEGE 

EAST TEXAS STATE— Named Eddie 
VowvU fooiboli coach effective al l he and ot 


1ft Kali sotomura, Janon, 11SL4S. 

M. Hlravukl Kwdslti, Japan, 11&80 
. 17, Alexandre ToumUovfcft. Soviet Urtofl. 
I1&55- -■ • •. 

tft Kyop YetiMMcncL Japan. rtMft 


HOFSTRA— Announced the resignation ot 
Tam Lons, soccer coacn. 
HUNTER-Establl$Bed a lunlar vorsiw 

men’i basKrltnH taam and namod 5tan Mofte 
. coach. 


The Associated Press 

DENVER — For golfers who have suffered through 
Those maddening 5- and 6- hour rounds, Denver city offi- 
cials have a cure. 

Il is called “don’t-dawdle g;olf." The concept is simple: 
you either play within a certain time limit or you are told 
to leave the course. 

“All it takes is guts and an administration that will back 
you up” said Denver’s director of golf, Charles Lind. ‘*I 
would say 99.8 percent of tbe golfers like the idea. And if 
anv- complaints got to the mayor, I never heard about 
than.” 

Denver began applying its speeded-up play rule early 
this season at two of its public courses, Wellshire and 
Kennedy, where it was not uncommon to take six hours to 
play IS holes — even on weekdays. 

“The problems we experienced in slow play were most 
predominant at those two courses," said Mike Flaherty, 
the deputy manager for parks and recreation. “Frankly, at 
Wellshire it was getting almost unbearable to play golf. 
Kennedy was not as bad, but it wasn’t pleasant’’ 


The plan has been so successful that golf course opera- 
tors in California. New Mexico, Nevada and Wyoming 
have called to sec how il works, said Flaherty. And Denver 
may expand it to another city course next year. 

“It is getting a lot of attention." he said. “We weren’t 


f If yon have trouble hitting the 
ball, carry it,' read one suggestion 
for slow golfers. 'But hold your 
position on the course.'' 


sure it was going to work. In lad, it has worked very well." 

Country dubs or private courses need only send a lener 
of warning to slow-paced golfers, but city- run courses 
cannot handle it that way, said Lind. That is why he 
decided to impose a time limit. 


Lind said he u as preparing statistics on the impact tlus 

season, but noted ihere were a “good number" of golfers 
who were told to leave the course and were not given a 
rainchecL 

He said he did not think the time of play was unusually 
Limited, but admitted ihzt it did noi give plavers a lot of 
time to stand around. 

Und sei a 2-hour, 20-minute deadline for e3ch nine 
holes. The first four holes had to be finished in one hour. 
Those who failed to meet the deadline were told to iea;e 

Groups ol goiters also were given a list of 1 3 suggest ions 
to speed up play, including a recommendation to find a 
par-3 course if they could not hit the ball reasonably well. 

“If you have trouble hitting Lhe ball, carry jl" was 
another suggestion. "But hold your position on the 
course.” 

Other recommendations called for conceding short 
putts, dropping away from small trees and not wasting 
time looking for lost balls. 

“Hit quickly ond putt fast — your acme will improve, 
read another suggestion. 








Page 18 


INTERNATIONA L HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1985 


OBSERVER 


people 


Looking for a New Car The Hasidic Way of Life 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — For the past 
several months I ha™ been 
trying io buy a new car. I should 
have got it bought months ago. but 
buying a car has presented paralyz- 
IQ g psychological problems. 

Foremost among these is the 
price. Not having bought a new car 
since 1969. 1 was astounded to find 
that nowadays S 24.000 is not con- 
“dered a piratical price tag in the 
United States for a car oF modest 
proportions. This discovery sent 
me reding home, where 1 stayed 
secluded in the den for days trying 
to devise a new philosophy of mon- 
ey in which a S24.000 automobile 
mig h t seem like a sensible purchase 
despite its lacking three bedrooms, 
a during room and a dub cellar. 

You don't know what a dub cel- 
lar is? Then you are probably too 
young to believe that S22,000’once 
bought a brick bouse containing 
the above-mentioned three bed- 
rooms, dining room and club cellar, 
plus an attic, parlor, kitchen, two 
baths, two small back sitting rooms 
upstairs and down, and a garage in 
one of the tonier neighborhoods of 
northwest Washington. 

□ 


$24,000." I immediately reply. 
“Lei's open the trunk." 

He does not lu'e to know I have 
fear of jaeklessnass. and since I 
choose not to mention this odd 
condition to an utter stranger he 
probably thinks. “Any body' inter- 
ested in humdrum detail like the 
trunk has to be ready to buy." 

□ 


Writer Explores Her R oots During Five Years of Research 
In Zealously Religious Community in New York 


To be sure, that house was not 
mounted on four radial all-weather 
tires, nor powered by a turbo- 
charged six-cylinder gasoline en- 
gine, but if I had wanted it so 
rigged it could probably have been 
done for no more than an addition- 
al 51^00. 

Wefl. 1 am talking 1956, of 
course, and this dinky machine 
priced at S24.0OO was l9S5. and 
during the interval Arabs and Met- 
naraese have had their way with the 
dollar. Still — 

Dealing with car salesmen, 
posed a different kind of problem. 
Although 1 feared the idea of car 
salesmen when I entered the buying 
process. I soon came to like them. 
They seemed like such regular guys, 
always eager to send the customer 
off for a nice test drive. 

‘•Why don’t you take it for a test 
drive?” they invariably said as soon 
as I asked them to open up the car 
trunk. Apparently customers who 
want to inspect the trunk are re- 
garded as lively prospects. Don't 
ask me why. All I want to know is, 
does the car have a jack? 

When the salesman says, "And 
this Dream of Paradise XK-S 90 
over here can be yours for only 


In any case, he counters with, 
“Whv don't vou take it for a test 

drive?” 

There are plenty of reasons why I 
don't want to take it Tor a test drive. 
For one. 1 have no intention of 
buying any car that costs more than 
a three- bed room house, so what is 
the point of driving the thing? For 
another. I have driven cars long 
enough to know- that no car will 
reveal its darkest, innermost secrets 
until it has known you for approxi- 
mately 25.000 miles. 

Nevertheless. 1 always take the 
test drive now. out of consideration 
for the salesman’s feelings. Last 
May. when I started shopping, I 
declined the first test drive that was 
offered, and it seemed to embarrass 
the salesman. 

"What’s the point?" I asked. “A 
great test pilot could probably 
wring this thing out and determine 
whether it's a lemon or not. but 
with a driver os lousy as me. you’d 
just be risking a ridiculously over- 
priced car.” 

I am not joking about being a 
very poor driver, so my motives 
here may have more f car in them 
than one cares to admit. It would 
be a' distinct embarrassment to to- 
tal a S24.00Q machine on a test 
drive whOe experimenting with its 
ability to recover smartly after run- 
ning off the road shoulder, a test- 
drive maneuver suggested by the 
author of a book I studied on how- 
to buy a car. 

□ 


By Joseph Berger 

AW York Times Service 

N EW YORK — When Lis Harris decided 
to write about a Hasidic family, some of 
her friends tried to shoo her away from the 
subject “I don't like them." she recalls more 
than one friend saying of the Hasidim. 

Harris plunged in anyway, and after five 
years of spending dozens of Sabbaths and 
assorted holidays, weddings and births with 
the family and their Lubavitcfa community in 
the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, she 
developed an affection for many of the zeal- 
ously re&gkws people she came to know. To 
her surprise, she also found that the kernel of 
Jewish identity within herself, often dormant, 
had begun to quicken. 

Her portrait of Hasidism was recently pub- 
lished as “Holy Days: The World of a Hasid- 
ic Family" (Summit Books. $16.95). a book 
that attempts to give a human, down-to-earth 
texture to a group that many, even secular 
Jews, regard as a mystery. In an interview at 
her office at The New Yorker, where she has 
worked as a staff writer and at other jobs for 
19 years. -Harris described how writing the 
book allowed her to reach her own religious 
roots. 

Not that Harris will become a Hasid her- 
self. But in the middle of her research, Harris, 
a Bennington College graduate and the 
daughter of thoroughly secular and assimilat- 
ed Jewish parents, found herself taking her 
children. Nick and David, now 9 and 7 years 
old. to synagogue on Yom Kippur. 

“1 want my children to be attached to 
Judaism.” she said. “I would like them to find 
a place where they can make sense out of 
what’s going on." 

Her husband, the novelist John Bowers, 
was reared in a Baptist borne, but Harris said 


tion of being apart, may be the condition of 
being a Jew. and I never imagined that be- 
fore. 

Because of her research, she said, she has 
also come to feel an almost “familial protec- 
tiveness" toward the Hasi dim. 

“Some people don't like them and I don't 
like many things about them,” she said, “but 
what I think more about the Hasidim is that 
they almost disappeared from the earth dur- 
ing World War O. and for me it's partly an 
act of restoration to write this book, io say 


they are here and this is what they're doing.” 
Harris began her research in 1979. mod vat- 


that he was not a practicing Baptist and not 
so concerned about passing that religious 
identity on to the children. “He knows that I 
want Judaism to be carried forward.” she 
said. Harris also said that as a result of her 
research, she felt compelled to visit fsraeL 

Until she began the book, Harris said, her 
knowledge of Judaism and her familiarity 
with more observant Jewish ancestors 
amounted to “a kind of gray blob in my 
memory bank.” Writing the book allowed her 
to feel” "attached to that history.” 

She realized, for example, the extent to 
which Judaism had shaped her character. 
“Some of my differentness has to do with 
being a Jew.” she said. “We all have natures, 
and pan of that nature, pan of my disposi- 


Whai I usually do is drive the car 
a couple of blocks away from the 
dealer's shop, park at the curb and 
unlock the trunk to see if it has a 
jack, then listen to the radio for a 
respectable length of time. So far 1 
have brought all test-drive cars 
back without a dent 
Psychologically. I'm ready now 
to live with the' fact that the car 
won’t have a club cellar, but if 
there’s no j3ck. I could be badly 
shaiterecL 


Harris began her research in 1979. motivat- 
ed partly by a desire to understand what 
being a Jew meant to her. “My Jewish identi- 
ty had been fuzzily formed,” she said. She 
noted that in her father’s hometown of Nor- 
wich. Connecticut, the Jews were so absorbed 
into the secular life around them that the 
stones in the Jewish graveyard bear typically 
New England first names like Abby and 
Phoebe. 

“There was a lot of ambivalence,” she said. 
“I wanted to lode at a passionate version of 
Judaism, one that was everyday, and the 
Hasidim seemed to be such an obvious exam- 
ple." 

Hie bearded, dark-hatted Hasidic men and 
the bewigged, modestly garbed women ore 
distinctive from other Orthodox Jews be- 
cause they believe in a more impassioned 
joyous and mystical expression of Judaism 
and they adhere to the guidance of a revered 
spiritual leader, their rebbe. 

Luba vile hers are followers of a rabbinic 
dynasty that once had its seat in the Byelorus- 
sian town of Lubavitch. 

Through die aid oT Lubavitcher officials, 
Harris was put in touch with a family willing 
to let her into their lives; she disguised the 
couple's names, calling them Moshe and 
Shrina Konigsberg. She quickly found that 
she liked the Lubavitchers’ love of talk and 
their intelligence. And while the group strikes 
some outsiders as grim, she relished their 
sense of humor. 

As a woman, she had more access to the 
women in the community, and even im- 
mersed herself in a women’s mikvah, the 
ritual bath women use after menstruation. 
She came to understand that the custom does 
not imply, as commonly thought, that a men- 
struating woman is unclean, but that her 
immersion readies her for the holiness of sex 
and birth. 

“I fed like a new bride every month,” 
Shrina Konigsberg told her. 



Winning and Losing 


An dderiy Californian who won ^ *•' ^ r:r 

most $4 million in 18 days of 


auncsi y* nuiiiuu m *» » 

playing four 525 slot machines at ot resme»-* __ 
the Las Vegas Hilton htt tax all “ j; the 

but S25.000 of it- Darnel May- gKfc Hudson. fs .j 

boefer, 83. of Los Angdes. began ^ 59 ^ an.'-'.- , . , . 

his spree in early October, with a 3^ ttg e deficim?*? .. 

S15.000 jackpot picked up on his 00lhing j R his ™ jtjA. 

first morning. Since then, accord- ootapaRior.. »«« . 

ing to Cedi Fredi, slot manager for relatives. aoK*4ir*S l \ • 

the casino, he has won more than filed in Lcs Aeic.es ^ 1 ■ j • 

S2 million on the S25 slots in 10 r-~.pi dus week. Tec f-Jpcrv**- ' 
days in October, and a further $1-7 ^ ^ ihe actor ‘ ; 

millio n through Wednesday, right ^ remain «*. a trost 1^--“ ;* •, 


have some explaining to ao to me ^vra! any details ot toe .rust ■ ■ — ■ 
Internal Revenue Service, having ^ of the estate, except 
collected a pocketful of crumpled ^ tfian T ' 


Internal Revenue Service forms in- 
dicating gambling earnings of 
S9Z8J0OO. Casinos are required to 


max is HAjiii - tr j . .. r - 

documents showed Hut-j. . 

amended his wiU m 

two months after he discovered .i- 


v^uiw ww -*“1“ -- — nm mOflLuS ail Cl us . t 

fiD out a W2G form, signed by the . . AIDS, to diminaie Gar*- - 1 ■ 
winner, for any win over SIJttL A fonner MGM public relation* v'; ; 
is submitted to the IRS. — - K *•’ 


you’re 80 years old. yon 

become strong and bold” May- ^ThwiaeTmonoa picture coi- 
hoefe- a painter and miner, fad- ^ personal tea*. 


lonncr ivivjwi . ... i »: 

ecutive. The previous *““;• 
named Clark as the redpiefit of to 


Lis Harris 


.Ihe men were less accessible. But she con- 
cluded that this was natural for a group that 
does not encourage relaxed socializing be- 
tween the sexes. 

She deplores that Hasidic women receive 
what she feels is a second-rate education. 
However, she came to believe that it is wrong 
Tor her to impose modem feminist views on 
women who seem to be happy with their lives. 
“You can't say they shouldn’t have the happi- 
ness they want, when they want it,” she said. 

She did not share the Lubavitchers* conser- 
vative politics nor their view that modern-day 
materialism and sensuality are cutting people 
off from their ideal humanity. While her 
rebellious nature wanned to the way Hasidim 
turned their back on conventional society, 
she was not comfortable, die said, with the 
conformity and the veneration for the rebbe. 

To help her understand the Hasidic com- 
mitment to the commandments written in the 
Torah, Moshe Konigsberg compared life to a 
new Volkswagen in which God’s instructions 
are contained in the driver's manual. To try 
to drive as one chooses and ignore the man- 
ual’s instructions, as, he argued, modem sec- 
ular people da will cause the car to break 
down. Bui, Harris recalls thmlringj “There 
are a lot of cars besides a Volkswagen.” 

Since the Lubavitchers are distinct among 
other Hasidim for their aggressi v e efforts to 
get other jews to become observant, Harris 
believes that their encounter with her, despite 
her reawakened spirituality, was disappoint- 
ing. “They think they failed with me,” she 
said. 


- r — ~ — -t-t v — lection otocr . . 

lowed above the din of the huge a ,,^ ]gg 4 will also omitted 
casino. “I have a human spirir that i immediate fjmiN 

likes to wander. No government _ <vv tTCin< - 
has a right to inhibit that.” ... 

In SanJose, California. Jos6 Cabal- n • 

Ion, who woo 52 twDkm in the An Australian native dajsv wa* 
California Lottery, was arrested at named Princess of Wales on Tnurs- 
1ns home Wednesday by Imnrigra- day as the British royal couple visii- 
tion and Naturalization Service cd the National Botanic Gardens in 
agents. They were apparently irked Canberra. “That is the first time 
that he flaunted his illegal status she has ever been a wallflower, 
and his winnings on television. Ca- Prince Claries quipped of bis wife, 
ballero has admitted to being a Diana, Princess of Wales. A bota-. 
Mexican national and entering the nisi sad the daisy, yellow with - 
United States a year ago without # cnpge. is a cross between | 
papers. “If they throw me out of perennial and annual hehchrysum-, 
the country, it will be no problem - bracteatum and is rda lively un-; 
becauscIwfDg 0 5canewhered5eto mmmnn. The royal couple will fl) 
spend my money,” dm furniture- to tie United States today. 


who does not 
reviously made 
1 Spanish. “But 


£200 a week, said in Spanish. “But One dance with a lonely soldier 
if the government allows me to 45 years ago has brought a Mcl- 
stay, I want to stay” “We’re not bourne housewife, Everra Stewart. 


going to let him flaunt it,” said Art 143,000 Australian dollars (about 
Sfcaafc, assistant director of the 5IOO.OOOX “There was never a hug 
agency’s office in San Francisco, or a kiss, no romance or anything 


“If he kept his mouth shut, we’d gel Hke that. I suppose I was simply a 
to him later, btu tire way heft talk- friend when be needed one. she 


ing and getting so much attention, said after haryas tracked her down 
veil see to frm* quickly.” Caballero * A *■** *•“ ■“ 


AW York Timn Service 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


SEAL ESTATE 
FORSAIS 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONTE CABO 

Private Iranian, near Monaco Prince 
Mace, p on orcwic lea «e«. 

Td 93 30 H 54. 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


ST NOM LA BRETECHE 


ALLIED 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


VAN LINES INTI 


ova >3ooo mas 

WORLDWIDE 


‘NEAR CANNES’ 


USA ARed Vbi Lmm hrtl Carp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


PROVBiCAL STONE BUIU HOUSS, 


O ooB our Agency Europeoi office* 

PARIS D e A o t dee Intematienri 

(1)43 43 23 M 

FRANKFURT sJS^SS 

(069) 250066 


5 BBMOOMS, 2 UV1NG ROOMS, 21 
BATHROOMS, 2 SHOWS ROOMS, 
AN ACRE GAKD0i 5W1MMMG 
POOt, GUARDWTS HOUSE, INTE- 
GCAL AND DOUBLE GARAGE SITU- 
ATED COUNTRYSIDE. 12 MINUTE5 
CAMES. IS IWNUTB MCE. I 


». 1 4-1 : 1 *>, N 7i 1 : ic; : 


WORTH H.OOO.OOO, FOR FAST 
SALE WOULD EXOTT F3, 250,000 


Attractive 2-roam oea t m a il 
Far sale an upper floor of recant rest- 
denhal buildng not far bam tfi« beach. 
hJtv equipped tehen, parking space 
and view of the Medterrxneaa 
Fl .600,000. 

AGEDI 

26 bo Bd Pmcesse Chartane 
MC 98000 Menam 
Tak 93 50 66 0a Tete* 479417 MC 


(02102) 45023 UAS. 

MUNICH IMS. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSOS: Ziegler SJV. 

(02) 425 66 14 

GSNEVA sJZS, 

(022) 32 64 40 
Cal far ASeds free ertmate 


PIEA5E CONTACT ON LONDON: 
01-729 0969 


COTE D’AZUR 


SmiATto JU5T OUT5I0E 
ANCIENT VILLAGE OF BIOT 
where artbam ply lhe«' Provengal 
trades. Chamvna woperty vrith beauh- 
fui garden of 18500 sqm 2 receptions, 
5 b edroonu. 4 btfhraarm, cvetakers 
house, pool 


Highly recommended at a price of 
F3SOOJJOO far the company. Ref: 1565. 


F3O00JJ00 far die company. Ref: 156 

Apfiy 

JOHN TAYLOR SA 
55 La Croiidte 
06400 Cannes 

Tel: 93 38 00 66. Tete* 470921 F 



7 large luxury houses 
on 14 acre ptott. 


Prices from Fl ,450,000. 


GAUJCA FRANCE SJV. 

(1) 30.61.54.54 


fuflv equipped k itc hen, parking Space 
and view of the MetSteiTtxwan. 




PALMA DE MALLORCA 

OUTSTANDING 

We are sure vm offer the mart expen- 
sive upm t iB erts in Pokna de Maloroa. 
We are we you ain't find betMr ones. 
Situated h the most u ig yuiC and quits 


regdenbd ritr area Br n4 h tc bng view 
on the *eo, me aly, ihe harbor, ONy 
finw materials have been wed for Ihe 
14 opdtmerts: hofan marble, African 
wood, ftenth odk etc. fiadi oporimmf 
with large Svmg, sepcsote fire- 
place. Icege lenace, uunp t iJ B btchon, 
separctfe mad's area 4 bedroon n vdRi 
bcdv uun i & vmlcet dosai rtc. Teed 
about 360 sqjm. property with 3,800 


sqm, gadi. indo ar & outdo or pool, 
haw, flomga, dr cootShonng, door- 
man service etc. 


MARAIS. Lage studio, facing s outh, I 
bath. kWienette. F300JXXL 647 5283 [ £4(7014 Ad 


hxhooson 

ARMADANS 

Jnee Boria 6, _ 


NEAR PIACE RJRSTBMURG. 16th 
cent, penthouse, 1 10 sqm 43394294 


E-07014 A5rm de Mdk 

let Spdn-71-28 99 00 


PLAINE MONCEAU 

Surrmtuo us 230 sq m, dec orased. 
fumehed, 2 garages, mod’s roam. 
Teh 43 17 29 59 



USA 

COMHBK1U, 
ft INDUSTRIAL 


Ug>od tor Safe 


1W WOUI75 AKST FAMOUS 
Hcoaw NEW YORK OTV1 


Luxury For Sdm 


JHEONCt UURAXejJXP 
HOra. N WASHWGTON. D.CJ( 


LAWT-tOS ANGBS COUNTY. CA. 
40aae JTWK flonAsw* pat Wa8, 
1 14 Hoeberry. Stamford, Q 06902. 


Prinapds Only Please 


WORLD HOTELS GROUP 

llV Bltirfihniih lliinl 
Ufc Bead;. New York 11561 (USA) 
let 5165790300 


CDNEBBUUOTY ASSURED 


EXCEPTIONAL MONTE CARLO 
Beads: Wonderful 108 sqm. fieri in a 
beautiful, aid sty&h house, fanatic sea 


16th IENA 


Write 4 

win; nav®, 4, 


rite: Havc&, 4, rue das Iris, 
Msrte Ofa, No. 2032 


370 sqm, triple reception, office, 

4 bedrooms, top Boa. fw sai. porianq 
Tel: 47 20 05 46 


International Business Message Center 


The F.T. operates early momma day of 
pubfccekm deWy sennc» tor sub- 
scriber! m Ihe Following atiesi 


BASH. - GENEVA - LUGANO - 
ZURICH l LAUSANNE 


For dera te on th ese services and hr 
Further information, contort: 


Peter Lavcela. F.T. Switzerland 
Tel: Geneva (0221 31 16 04 or 
Telex 22589 



NTl 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMfTES MC 
UiA. & WOKUtWH* 


COMMODITIES 


HNANOAL TIMES 
EUROPE’S BUSMeSS NEWSPAPER 


& CLOSEOUTS 


A co mplete penonol & butrnees service 
providng a unique eJeefion of 
xJonted. wmerffo ft mdAguaf 
individuate fa d soda & 
proraonond oc copo nft. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 5*h SL. N.YC 10019 
Serve EapresanMnai 
NeededWoridwide. 


ASCONA 

ri thn wo rld fam ous resort we ofte rfiixr 
doss apartmerts aid housee. Right 
above me oU vBage of Asoana a <xi 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


BSR FOR EXPORT 


MONEY TREES ? 

LIFETIME SECURITY 


fte Into wM> indoor pool, you w8 find 
your home. Prices from SF320 JOO up to 
SR.lOOjm Mortgagee tf km Swiss 


300.000 cases ai Strahs 
10 az. size fresh brewed 


FOR THE FEATURE 

INTERNATIONAL 
REAL ESTATE 

TURN TO PAGE 5 




CBORAL LONDON ntOPBOlES. In- 

tan a ttexnd Company wB find For so- 
phaficated dents the property of 
their den, s p edoterti in renovation, 
refurbishment, at and anhques. Fi- 
nance avsAable if aaptcable. Write: 
BY ANTI SA. Postfodh 6926, CH80ZJ 
ZU»Ot 


hkjoea power plant 


Steelman pas plant 
(20MCF4 


Invest in one of America's most et(r 
cMng tetbnefaglc nl brealdhrougbt 
in the rtA mhomr. Over 30.0X nut 
trees pfanted in 198*. Projected amud 
mcoms eventuafly reaches 52%. 
BROKERS' BtauUBB NVTTHX 
Motend available m Engtsh, F rench. 
German. Bai 2307. Herald Trfeune, 
92521 Neu4ly Cede*. France 


BUSINESS SERVICES LU XEMBOUR G 
Amounting / Company Formciiani & 
Management / Sec reton a) / Tel e ph o n e 
/ Telex / Mcsl l Office space far rent. 


u i j\'i wp. , 


interest rams. These red ertefas are 
free far sde to foreigners. 


RIAiH MWMW. spend dfeQg 


to May, opotmeiTts 

aid a ar. 2 persons one weak O 20 . 4 
panomooevwtek.ElSO.Wacofactat 

»te e. 


Fmser. 12-14 Bd cTAvrmdvs. 1160 
Luxembourg Tel 352/492153. Tlx 1433 


iKIi 








(212) 5934)680 Days/Eves. 
TlX 5101 008980 


Magnavest - N.Y. 

UJSJL 


BROADSTAIRS. KB4T. 


targe 2 bedroom apaMani, part of 
18th century stone farmhouse. Wc*- 




ing dsiance to 3 beaches. 2 rales 


VERY LARGE CHOICE of cansnarad 
iransadiaa. aO artegories, an the 


Ramsgaer Ferry Immaculate. E39.500 
London 01-4B4I71 evenings. 


Cole d'Azur, load end fiscal asm. 
lance assured. Write Cabinet Mar- 
tier, IS U Victor Huge. 0 6000 htee 




LONDON PIHM-IBnE. 1 bedroom. 
I reception, Idtdien & bath, elegant 
buldn tg m t lid Chelsea emyporSng, 
paner C49^sa Tel 01-602-5183. 


I.M V.7' 









BURROUGHS 

ASSEMBLY COMPO NENTS 
mjrroujo Corporation, CFl rtsnxsiocv 
*» recognized loader in producing in. 
formation systems, offers sevwd ines 
of oisembiy com ponents. These asseny 
bly components necessary far nwifoc- HBtO BUSINESS CB4TER 
SS2n* S 2^S. 62 Kdzersgrachi, 1015 CS Amrterdam 

One Burroughs Place. <79 

Detroit. Mehgan 48232 USA 




tTiT jl 


KBANDdUR 
1ACTMMUTEIWK 
msenatian outhorizud vrithfa 
3 days prior to departure 


UNIQUE PRICE 


FOR SAU HOUDAY APARTMENTS 


'ir'1 


from Uocerabeurg 


In pirturesqae Gawil m the hast of 
Switzertai d P0 m fcten UeemeL 
We bald punrafau on banc principle 
to sel apartmeeb to -foreigners. 
For further mformehon 
eat 041/37 19 92. 


TRAVa AGBfl 


OFFICES FOR SALE 


TOLBIAC 710 SQJA. 

ft + 4 . noaf 10 AAF. 

D&flAU 4208 1253 Pam 


FOR IHE IEA1DRE 


nUNCE 




Tet (90) 27. 











well see io hnp quickly.” Caballero to tdl her she was (he sole benefi- 
was freed ao 55,000 bail about six cutty of Laurie Dctauey’s will. De- ■ 
hours later. Raising the bail ajtpar- laney, who led a bemut’s life, died 
eatly w as no problem, since three yean ago leaving a farm .. 
$70,000, the first of 20 such annual worth more than 594.000 and ' 

. payments, has been mailed to Ca- 543,600 in savins. “I have (tied so 
ballero by Lottery officials. In aB, bard to put atace to the name but I ■ 
51.4 nriBnni — 52 min i nn io win- canX" said Srewart, now a mother 
nings, less 30 percent for taxes — cf three. j 



ft 


I