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The Global Newspaper 
• ■ Edited in Paris -, 

- Printed Simuhaneot 

in Pans, London, Zuric 


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INTERNATIONAL 




’ ^ fc ' WEATMa WTA APPEAR ON PAGE U 

X-.ks.. 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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45/85. • 


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PAMS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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ItoAuDdatad Prao 

A woman held hostage by guerrillas is led from the Justice 
Ministry in Bogotft by troops after they retook the building. 


Hussein Calls on PLO 
To Reaffirm Peace Plan 


M*vi - •: •, 


By Judith Miller 

New York Times Sente* 

PARIS — King Hnssem of Jor- 
vi ii rcTir ^ *“s welcomed a statement by 
t rs- r- | Jf^sser Arafat chairman of the Pal- 
_ • Jl * ^Stine liberation Organization, re- 
- 1 noimcing terrorist acts outside of 

Israeli-occupied- territory. He 
called h “a positive step." 

But Hussein said Friday that the 
PLO would have to do far more to 
position itself as -an acceptable 
'partner in peace" with Jordan.. He 




C: 


-4 "Av<ttr 57, 


Asked what was an “appropri- 
ate” time, he replied: “When we see 
the other side evolve to the point 
where it is ready to attend an inter- 
national peace conference, when 
there is an agreement in principle 
— by Israel and the United States 
— to move towards such a confer- 
ence within a set time frame." .. . - 
His remarks appeared to reflect 
not only determination to prevent 
the PLO horn undermining efforts 
to win international and Israeli 


spoke in an interview it the did of ~ fJFPOri fo-an intcniaponal con^ 


i». ■ 
Jtl*. - a 


5 IN' 1 '. FH 


HOTHS 


a three-day viar to Prariec. 

He said that Mr. Arafat would 
have to declare at an “appropriate" 
time the FLO’S acceptance of Unit- 
ed Nations Security Council Reso- 
lutions 243 and 33S, which implic- 
itly recognize Israel's right to dost, 
to declare its willingness to negoti- 
ate with Israel at an international 
conference, and to renounce all vi- 
olence. ... 

The king declined to say whim he 
. tjj. expected Mr. Arafat to make such 
“ 7 . declarations publicly, but said he 
'.r- - asked him to “reaffirm” pri-; 
vaieh/ his commitment to joint 
peace moves. 





Terence, but also Jjrigermgr-tre ovcr 
PLO involvement in the bracking 
last , month of. the Italian ' cruise 
-ship, the Achille Lauro, and the 
collapse of a meeting between Pal- 
estinian representatives and British 
officials. • 

The London talks broke down 
last.month after a PLO member of 
a Jordaurian-Palestiman delegation . 
refused to sign a statement recog- 
nizing Resolutions 242 and 338 and 
Israel's right to exist, and renounc- 
ing terrorism. 

Soon after, Hu ssein launched a 
“review” of relations with the PLO, 
which prompted a tense confronta- 
tion with Mr. Arafat in late Octo- 
ber in Amman. 

The king said Friday that those 
discussions were “thorough and 
candid..” 

Jordan had shown its good faith, 
he said, by reaffirming privately 
and publicly its continued commit- 
ment to the agreement that Jordan 
and the PLO signed on Feb. 11 
outlining a joint bid for peace. 

“I stressed the need for the PLO 
10 appear cohesive,” he said. “We 
can’t make progress when you pre- 
sent different faces of what is sup- 
posed to be a common front.” 

“We discussed the need for the 
PLO to ensure that no actions are 
taken anywhere that are contrary 
to our agreement and, hence, self- 
d ef eating." Hussein said. 

The king said be had asked for a 
private reaffirmation of PLO will- 
ingness to “do what is needed at (he 
right time" specifically, to endorse . 
UN Resolutions 242' and 338, and 
its wilimgness to negotiate with Is- 
rael at a peace conference. 

Asked whether be thought the 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 


s Retake 
n Rebels 


The Assotiaed Press 

BOGOTA — Colombian au- 
thorities said Friday that at least 92 
persons had died during the two- 
day seiznre of the Justice Ministry 
by leftist guerrillas that ended 
when troops blasted their way into 
the budding in central Bogota in a 
fourth and final assault. 

Army troops, backed by artillery 
and armored cars, used dynamite 
and cannon fire to force their entry 
into the ministiy Thursday. 

They ended a siege during which 
scores of people were held hostage 
for 27 hours. Police sources, wit- 
nesses and relatives of some of the 
dead said that 12 of Colombia's 24 
Supreme Court justices,- including 
Chief Justice Alfonso Reyes, were 
among those lolled. 

Hostages who survived said the 
rebels decided to till the judges 
early Thursday when it 
their demands would not 
and their situation was hopeless. 

[Leaders of the nation's 30,000 
court workers called a strike and 
threatened mass resignations Fri- 
day, d eman ding to know why the 
government had ignored a plea 
from Chief Justice Reyes to stop 
firing and negotiate with the rebels, 
United Press International report- 
ed.] 

Army sources said that all 41 of 
the invading rebels bad died, as 
well as al lust 17 soldiers, the 12 
judges and 22 other persons. 

There were often several hun- 
dred visitors in the building, in- 
cluding students who used the li- 
' braiy. Officials said it would be 
some time before the actual death 
toll became dear. 

According to witnesses, the guer- 
rillas slipped into the building 
through the basement garage and 
hid in a stolen government tele- 
phone company truck. 

They shot police and private 
guards with automatic weapons 
and beaded for the fourth floor, 
where the justices have their of- 
fices, witnesses said in interviews 
with radio reporters. 

A tape recording played over the 
telephone in a call to a newspaper, 
El Ti&npo, said the guerrillas want- 
ed to put President Bdisario Beian- 
cur on trial for “betraying” his own 
program of trying to get the coun- 
try’s leftist insargent groups to dis- 
band. 

The recording also .demanded 
that. the. guerrillas be given one 
hour a day on all of the country’s 
radio channels and government- 
controlled television stations, pre- 
sumably to give the rebel version of 
tire mock trial, El Tifanpo said. 

The siege began at about noon 
Wednesday when at least 25 guer- 
rillas belonging to M-19, a Colom- 
bian guerrilla group, attacked and 
seized the modem five-story build- 
ing. 

President Belisario Betancur 
called the siege a “terrible night- 
mare." In a speech broadcast on 
television and radio Thursday 

(Continued on Face 3, CoL 6) 



’■Slice, in Shift, 
©ins European 
fighter Project 


Th« A u ooofad PreH 

Francois Mitterrand, left, with Helmut KohL at their news conference in Bonn. 


L bdlU LUC 

JsS 4 American Hostages in Lebanon 
Appeal to Reagan for Negotiations 


The Associated Press 

BEIRUT — Four kidnapped 
Americans sent a letter to President 
Ronald Reagan on Friday appeal- 
ing to him to negotiate their release 
because their Shiite Moslem cap- 
tors were “growing impatient." 

“It is in your power to have us 
home by Christmas," the four men 
said in a letter addressed to Mr. 
Reagan and delivered to The Asso- 
ciated Press office in Beirut along 
with a package of other letters. 
“Win you not have mercy on us and 
our families and do so?" 

'But the White House spokes- 
man. Larry Speakes, said in Wash- 
ington, "We do not negotiate with 
terrorists." 

Mr. Speakes said that Mr. Rea- 
gan had been briefed on news re- 


rts about the letter and that the 
Embassy in Beirut was exam- 


GS 

uring it to verify that it was genu- 
ine. The handwriting of two of the 
hostages was verified by former co- 
workers or relatives in Beirut. 

The hostages said they would be 
killed if any aiionpt was made to 
rescue them. They also said their 
physical and mental health was de- 
teriorating. 

The package contained several 
other letters, including ones to the 
families of each hostage. 

The letter noted it was UJS. po- 
licy not to negotiate with terrorists, 
but said “there is no alternative.” 

“Mr. President,” it said, “how 
long do you suppose these people 
wifi wait? We have no chance of 
escaping, and our captors say if any 


attempt is made to rescue us they 
and we will all die." 

The letter carried the signatures 
of Terry A Anderson, chief Associ- 
ated Press correspondent for the 
Middle East: the Reverend Law- 
rence Man in Jenco, a Roman 
Catholic priest; David Jacobsen, 
director of the American Universi- 
ty Hospital in Beirut, and Thomas 
M. Sutherland, dean of agriculture 
at the American University in Bei- 
ruL 

A fundamentalist Shiite Moslem 
group. Islamic Jihad, has claimed 
responsibility for the kidnappings. 

The letter to Mr. Reagan was 
dated Friday, the day after tele- 
phone callers in Beirut claimed the 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 2) 


Soviet Said to Join West 
Against UNESCO Head 


By Paul Lewis 

New York Tima Service 

SOFIA — A senior East Bloc 
diplomat indicated Friday that the 
Soviet" Uhiohandits East BlocaJ^ 
lies would join Western nations in 
opposing a third term of office for 
UNESCO’s controversial director- 
general, Amadou Mahtar M’Bow, 
when his mandate expires in 1987. 

The East Bloc diplomat, who 
spoke on condition that he not be 
identified further, said Mr. 
M’Bow’s withdrawal in two years’ 
time was necessary to “reconcile" 
UNESCO and the United States. 

The United States withdrew 
from the United Nations Educa- 
tional, Scientific and Cultural Or- 
ganization at the end of 1984. com- 
plaining of bad management and 


persistent bias against Western val- 
ues. 

“Two terms is enough," the East 
Bloc official told reporters attend- 
ing the closing session of UNES- 
CO’s 23d general conference, 
which is coming to the end of a 
five-week meeting in Sofia. 

In the past, the Soviet Union and 
its East Bloc allies have supported 
UNESCO’s Senegalese-bom direc- 
tor-genera] and the anti-Western 
slant he has, (pven many of the 
agency’s activities. But Friday the 
East Bloc diplomat made dear that 
the Soviet Union and its allies saw 
Mr. M’Bow’s departure in 1987 as 
necessary to persuade the United 
States to return to UNESCO. 

The return of the United States, 
the diplomat said, was essential for 
economic and political reasons. 



Amadou Mabutr M’Bow 

The reference was apparently to 
the loss of the United States’ 25- 
percent share of UNESCO's bud- 
get — $43 million a year — and to 
the risk that an organization domi- 
nated by the Soviet Union would 
(Continued on Page 3, CoL 6) 


By Warren Geder 

I/uermuional Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — President 
Frantss Mitterrand, in a major 
reversal of policy, said Friday that 
France was prepared to participate 
in ajoint project to build a Europe- 
an combat plane for the 1990s. 

Britain, West Germany and Italy 
had agreed early in August to pro- 
ceed without France in the project 
known as the European Fighter 
Aircraft, after France complained 
of “technical disagreements" over 
the plane’s combat role and said it 
would develop its own fighter in- 
stead The three coumries were 
joined later by Spain. 

France's decision not to lake 
part was viewed at the time as a 
blow to European cooperation and 
was criticized widely in view of a 
French push to encourage joint Eu- 
ropean high-technology' programs. 

Mr. Mitterrand said Friday in 
Bonn that the need to show a fur- 
ther commitment to European co- 
operation stood behind the deci- 
sion to take part in the fighter 
project. He had met earlier with 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl as part of 
biannual French-German talks. 

“If we want to foster this, we 
must show good will," Mr. Mitter- 
rand said at a news conference. “So 
I said France is ready to take part 
in the joint plane project," 

The French leader said he ex- 
pected his government’s stake in 
the development of the plane to be 
no greater than 10 percent. 

Linder the original agreement, 
Britain and West Germany were 
each to have 38 percent, participa- 
tion, while Italy was allocated 24 
percent. Since Spain joined, no fig- 
ures have been released on the new 
division of participation. 

Mr. Mitterrand made it clear 
that, in addition to joining in the 
building of the European fighter, a 
heavy plane geared for air-to-air 
combat, France would continue to 
develop its own fighter. This will be 
a lighter aircraft designed chiefly 
for an air-to-ground role, 

A West German Defense Minis- 
try official said of the French an- 
nouncement: “We’re going to look 
very carefully at this proposal, par- 
ticularly in light of the fact that the 
four nations that agreed to go 
ahead with the project have deter- 
mined a time schedule, a configura- 
tion plan and operational require- 
ments for the plane." 

Defense Ministiy officials said 
they knew of the French plan to 
join the project a few days before 
Mr. Mitterrand’s announcement. 

They said the derision probably 
was taken to avoid creating the 
impression, as one source put it, 
that “Europe cannot get its act to- 


Gorbachev’s Tough Pose Plays to Home Audience 


By Serge Schraemann 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Flanked by burly marshals, Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev stood on the Lenin Mausoleum with a defiant set 
to his jaw as his defense minister issued the traditionally 
tough military invocations of Revolution Day. 

“A source of the greatest danger today is the new spiral of 
the nuclear weapons race unleashed by the United States, its 
plans to militarize outer space," intoned Marshal Sergei L, 
Sokolov on Thursday, as the traditional tanks , missiles and 
troops paraded past under a November drizzle. 

Diplomats note that Soviet leaders usually retreat into an 
aggressive pose when they feel challenged, and the question 
in Moscow is whether Mr. Gorbachev senses trouble ahead 
at his meeting in Geneva with President Ronald Reagan, 
now less than two weeks away. . 

American officials, on their return to Washington from 
meetings in Moscow with Mr. Gorbachev, said with annoy- 
ance that he bad beat argumentative and combative in bis 
discussion with Secretary of State George P. Shultz. 

What those officials might not have appreciated is that 
Mr. Gorbachev also must contend with a domestic audience, 


and the marshals standing with him Thursday were an 
important part of it The marshals may be wondering why 
Mr. Gorbachev is heading for the Novi 19-20 meeting if all 
he stands to get there is a lecture on human rights and 
regional conflicts, and no concession on the' U.S. program to 
develop a space-based missile defense. Mr. Gorbachev’s 
bravado may be his response. 

In agreeing last spring to meet with Mr. Reagan. Mr. 
Gorbachev took a calculated risk. For several years, Mr. 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Reagan had been depicted by the Russians as incorrigibly 
anti-Soviet and as a hard-line militarist. In going to the 
s ummi t meeting, Mr. Gorbachev risked appearing to bow 
before Mr. Reagan's strength and to confirm the notion that 
the Russians respond only to tough talk 

The Kr emlin 's gamble was that, politically, Mr. Reagan 
needed the meeting — and an overall improvement in 
relations with the Soviet Union — enough to make conces- 
sions on his defense program, which has been the main target 
of recent Soviet diplomacy. The program became the leitmo- 
tiv of Soviet preparations for the meeting. 


The Soviet buildup for the summit meeting went into high 
gear after Mr. Gorbachev returned on Aug. 21 from vaca- 
tion, with an interview with Tune ma gazin e, a visit to Paris, 
the meetings between Foreign Minister Eduard A Shevard- 
nadze and Mr. Shultz and Mr. Reagan, and Lhe proposal for 
a 50-percent cut in nuclear arsenals. 

In Lhe public preparations for the summit meeting, the 
agenda-has been batted back and forth, arms proposals have 
been handed out to the press before being preferred formal- 
ly, and both Mr. Gorbachev and Mr. Reagan have tried to 
appeal directly to the public through news interviews. 

The intensity of ;he maneuvering is iOusuated by the 
suspicion voiced by Mr. Reagan that recent incidents in 
which Soviet citizens seemed to make moves to defect and 
then changed their minds may have been part of a Soviet 
ploy to embarrass the United States. 

In this context it was only natural that the return of Vitaly 
Yurchenko, the KGB defector, to the Soviet Union should 
have been seen in Washington as part of Lhe maneuvering. 
Whether it is, as Mr. Reagan suggested, may never be 
known. But a senior KGB officer such as Mr. Yurchenko 
(Continued on Page 5, CoL 2) 


geiher in joint defense projects” — 
an image that could hurt European 
credibility abroad, particularly in 
arms exports. 

Some sources speculated that 
France's action might have been 
encouraged by derisions this week 
by Britain and Wesi Germany to 
provide financial support for the 
French-proposed program to de- 
velop European cooperation in 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 


U.S. to Bloch 
Departure of 
Soviet Sailor 

By Philip Shenon 

New York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Customs Service has announced 
that it will block the departure of a 
Soviet freighter from American wa- 
ters until a seaman aboard is per- 
mitted to appear before Congress. 

The sailor. Miroslav Medvid. a 
Ukrainian, was subpoenaed Thurs- 
day by a Senate committee in a 
last-minute attempt to pre\ent him 
from tearing lhe United States 
aboard the grain freighter, which is 
in the Mississippi River north of 
New Orieans. 

Mr. Medvid jumped from the 
ship, the Marshal Konev, into the 
‘Mississippi on Oct. 24, but was 
returned by U.S. border agents. 

The Customs Service said it 
would deny the ship permission to 
leave until Soviet officials complied 
with the subpoena, which orders 
the sailor to appear before the Sen- 
ate Agriculture Committee. 

“Under the law. we have to with- 
hold granting clearance" for the 
ship to depart, said Dennis Mur- 
phy, a spokesman for the Customs 
Service. “Until the subpoena is 
complied with or something else 
har»r«r.s, we don't really have an 
option." 

[Congressional envoys tried un- 
successfully Thursday to serve the 
subpoena. The Associated Press re- 
ported. The couriers said they 
would return to the ship Friday to 
meet with Soviet officials who 
would fly in from Washington. 

[David Sullivan, who is an assis- 
tant to Senator Jesse Helms and 
was one of those who tried to serve 
the subpoena, said: "The ship’s 
captain indicated he was instructed 
by his government not to accept the 
subpoena until a representative of 
his government can get down 
here.” 

[Asked what might happen if the 
Marsha] Konev tried to leave with- 
out clearance, Terrance Wear, dep- 
uty counsel for the Senate Agricul- 
ture Committee, replied: “I 
'understand the coast guard would 
prevent that.”] 

The* ship had been expected to 
leave this weekend. 

The subpoena was drafted in En- 
glish, Russian and Ukrainian and 
signed by Mr. Helms, a North Car- 
olina Republican who chairs the 
Agriculture Committee. It ordered 
Mr. Medvid to appear before the 
panel for unspecified reasons. 

Mr. Helms, who has been critical 
of the administration’s handling of 
the situation, acted shortly after the 
full Senate approved a non binding 
resolution unpng President Ronald 
Reagan to use “all legal and legiti- 
mate means" to bring the incident 
to a "just resolution." 

In the House, the Foreign Af- 
fairs Committee approved a resolu- 
tion calling on U.S. officials to seek 
an additional interview with Mr. 

I Continued on Page 5, CoL I) 






iiF- , 


_ - 


: « irt ” 

>• « ' 


' . - . 71 


.. I’’ 



Anthony Heard, a Cape 
Town editor, was 
charged under security 
laws fOTpubjtishhig an in- 
terview with a black na- 
* tionalist leader. Page 2. 

■ Bulgaria, beset by economic 

problems, has fallen from Sovi- 
et favor. Pag* ^ 

■ Italy’s coalition government 

won a second crucial vote of 
confidence P»ge3- 

ARTS/LEISURE . . 

■ Dr. Qaribd and Miss Etta 

Cone, Baltimore friends of Ger- 
trude Stein, proved to be canny 
art collectors. Page 6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Tin trading wifi resume on the 
London Metal Exchange Nov. 
IS. the LME said. . Page9. 

MONDAY 

Cashing in bn Wan Street's 
takeover game takes savvy - — 
and luck. Personal Investing. 


AIDS in Africa: The Menace Grows 

Scientists Focus on Virus in Heterosexuals and Newborns 


By Lawrence K. Altman 

New York Times Service. 

KIGALI, Rwanda — AIDS has 
become a major public health con- 
cern iii central Africa, is emerging 
as one in East Africa, and scientists 
now generally believe that Africa’s 
experience with the disease will al- 
most certainly contain lessons vital 
to the health of people throughout 
the world. 

These scientists here are involved 
in two related battles: controlling 
the incurable disease and fi ghting 

Suppression of information crucial 

(0 the international search for its 
origin, cause and cure. 

Perhaps of greatest long-term 
importance in .Africa, where birth 
rates are.boommg, is that an on- 
choked spread of AIDS among 
sexually active women has caused 
many babies to be born with the 
disease and could lead to many 
more such births. The AIDS virus 
can pass. from mother to fetus in . 
pregnancy and through breast milk 
10 an infant after birth. 

Thus, there is the potential of a 
posable health menace of stagger- 
ing proportions. 


AIDS appears to be spreading by 
conventional sexual intercourse 
among heterosexuals in Africa and 
is striking women nearly as often as 
men , a omitting to the scientists. 

- Why the pattern of communica- 

In Rwanda, children 
accounted for 22 
percent of cases, a 
;• proportion that 

■ contrasts sharply 
with that of the 
United States. 

bility seems to differ so drastically 
in Africa from that elsewhere is one 
of the major mysteries of one of the 
most confounding medical stones 
of this century. 

Medical scientists believe that 
far more research, testing and re- 
porting on the disease in Africa 
need to be done before those pat- 


terns can be fully understood and 
before any condusioQS can be 
drawn from them for people in oth- 
er parts of the world. 

Africa has been the focus of at- 
tention for some time, in part be- 
cause some scientists have suggest- 
ed that the disease may have 
originated there. However, others 
point out that it was first recog- 
nized in the United States, and not 
in Africa. No scientific evidence 
has proved any theories about 
where it originated 
The epidemiology of AIDS in 
Africa, where homosexuality does 
not seen to be common, contrasts 
radically with finding s elsewhere. 
Except for Haiti. AIDS has oc- 
curred in other areas of the world 

mostly among homosexual men, al- 
though some experts are concerned 
that it may become an increasing 
risk among heterosexuals in those 
areas as well 

. In the United States, more than 
70 percent of the more than 14,000 
AIDS victims have been homosex- 
ual or bisexual men. U.S. authori- 
ties attribute only 1 percent of the 
(Continued on Page S, CoL 4) 


In Moscow, Imetda Marcos Played the Soviet Card 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 

MANILA — According to pal- 
ace go^ip, the firsL lady of the 
Philippines, Imelda R. Marcos, 
was inspired to visit the Soviet 
Union last week by a soothsayer 
who told her she had a mission to 
convert the Russians to Chris- 
tianity. 

But political analysis here say 
she had a less exalted mission: to 

President Marcos agrees to 
resign, bat not until the elec- 
tion is over. Page 2. 

play the Soviet card against Ma- 
nila’s allies, lhe Americans. 

■ Back home in Manila, she 
raised a toast Thursday morning 
together with the Soviet ambassa- 
dor, Yiui A. Srolmov, to Soviet- 
Philippine friendship, on the oc- 
casion of the Soviet Union's 
Revolution Day. 

Mr. Sholmov, for his part, 
seemed pleased to accept her 
overtures. “The Philippine nation 
is a happy one to have such a first 
lady, and we are happy to have 
such a friend in the Philippines as 


Imelda Romualdez Marcos," he 
said. 

The past two weeks have been 
rough ones for the Marcos gov- 
ernment in its relations with 
Washington, with almost every 
day last week bringing some new 
criticism from U.S. officials. 
They warned that President Fer- 
dinand E_ Marcos was ill and 
losing control of the political and 
military situation. 

In apparent response to the 
UJS. pressure, Mr. Marcos said 
Sunday that he would call for 
early elections, a move he had 
been reluctant to take over recent 
months. 

But in the pro-government 
press, the bad news from Wash- 
ington shared front pages with 
vivid accounts of Mrs. Marcos’s 
reception in the Soviet Union. 

While her husband struggled 
with his U.S. critics, Mrs. Marcos 
toured a dairy plant in the Geor- 
gian city of Tbilisi, discussed im- 
proved Soviet-Phfljppines eco- 
nomic ties, met for 90 minutes 
with President Andrei A_ Gromy- 
ko and sang “Avc Maria” in 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 



Imelda Marcos visiting a theological school in Zagorsk, 
near Moscow, accompanied by Metropolitan Filaret, 
the head of the Orthodox church for Kiev and Gaiida. 










Bulgaria , Once a Soviet Favorite, Faces a Squeeze 


By Jackson Diehl 

Purr S* .v*uv 

SOFIA — Long among the mosi 
economical!;. successful and politi- 
cally favored of the Soviet Union's 
East European allies. Bulgaria is 
showing signs of faltering under the 
aggressive new Kremlin leadership 
of Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

Bulgaria, boosted by Soviet sup- 
port. had one of the highest eco- 
nomic growth rates in Europe over 
the past decade. But the country 
has plunged toward crisis this vear 
as tougher Soviet trade terms have 
combined with bad weather, poor 
management and a crumbling in- 
dustrial infrastructure. 

The country's nine million peo- 
ple. accustomed to steady increases 
in their modest standard of living, 
now endure austerity measures 
ranging from daily cutbacks of 
electricity and curtailed shop hours 
to large price increases for gasoline, 
food and drinking water. 

Life among the nation's political 
elite appears little more secure. 
Last month, the state p lannin g 
minister was removed from his post 
and the economic bureaucracy 
drew sharp criticism from the me- 
dia. 

During a visit last month to So- 
fia, Mr. Gorbachev noted that his 
discussions with Todcr Zhivkov, 
the Bulgarian leader, had included 
“ways To cope with the existing 
difficulties." He said the talks were 
conducted “without shunning the 
sharp edges." 

In an Interview in July with a 
Bulgarian magazine, the Soviet am- 
bassador to Bulgaria more blunth 
criticized the country's sagging la- 
bor productivity, the quality of its 
exports t-t the Soviet Union, and its 
failure to '■proletarianize'' the 
working class. 

Bulgaria appears to be entering a 
difficult period of economic and 
political adjustment, diplomats in 
Sofia say. 

its resource-starved industries 


**■< «f -•¥ tt 


■v. yt* •&*'•#* 



ueeze South Africa WORLD BRIEFS 

other imports. Not long after Holds Editor Iran Sara It Bombed Mill, Base in Iraq 

Soviet ambassador’s public u J . . . . ...... 

rism, the Soviet Union re- T) . - fil /V y _„ . TEHRAN (Reuters) — Iran said «» 

si a shipment of Bulgarian JjI'lGllV l/VCF sou them Iraq and a military base in ** con f^ ^ 

s because of their poor quality. davs after Iraqi planes attacked a large Iranian serf nil war the 


mmwcM lRUihui wy . - - . , 

The Iranian news agency, quoting a war communique, said die Iraq 
pai m nt «, south of al-Amarah. 186 miles 1.300 kik-roetml southeast of 


uib Lrvnv.i uuiouajuuvi o r . . > » ,« » -it 

criticism, the Soviet Union re- 13 • r A . TEHRAN < Reuters) — Iran said * S'! '% 

turned a shipment of Bulgarian jinGlly UVCF sou them Iraq and a military base in the myth of 

shoes because of their poor quality. 171 ^ / days after Iraqi alwcked a *■“*“ ** * ** 

Western sources said. n-t ■* CSm southwest Iranian city of Ahwa2. 

The new economic strains have Tamh o StOrV ' The Irxxm nw .gw?- 
coincided with excepuonallv bad J steel mill is south oT al-Amarah. 186 miles 1305 Nnm»M wuuirast of 

Return Baghdad, and .he milium SjSETlJ 

downs to produce an economic rAPFTDWN Anlhonv Heard. capital It was nol dear what factory getJC- as 

zzszzzr™* *, d ** , 

Power plants bro„ down 

factories ground toe hall last ,«n- er. was detained bnefly Friday and ^ he ^ no further derails of the incident. The tanker- 'hod 

ter, and a summer drought badly charged I under the Internal Secunty ga rasboat after the missile attack, 

damaged crops and reduced water Act with quoting a banned person. Deen “™ ™ low - 

supplies both for consumption and Mr. Heard, who was escorted by « • • t> Ta« T « W I o^mIak 

hydroelectric power. security police from his officeat the J. IlfllS ia KeStHCtS I Op LaDOr LOTCT 

Prices increased 35 percent in Cape Times to a local police sta- TUNIS fAP) The government placed Tunisia's top union lesdjr 

September for gasoline. 41 percent tion. was not asked to plead when Fridav. and anion officials reported that three rJl 


criticism, the Soviet Union re- 
turned a shipment of Bulgarian 
shoes because of their poor quality. 
Western sources said. 

The new economic strains have 
coincided with exceptionally bad 
weather and infrastructure break- 
downs to produce on economic 
squeeze that was far more severe 
than planners expected. 


supplies both for consumption and 
hydroelectric power. 

Prices increased 35 percent in 
September for gasoline. 41 percent 
for household electricity and 66 
percent for drinking water. 

Though government economists 
cite bad weather and poor world 
economic conditions, the official 
press increasingly has blamed plan- 
ners and managers. 

In a recent editorial, the Com- 


y police from his officeat the Tunisia Restricts Top Labor Leader 


he appeared in a magistrates ccnxrt- 
Conviciion carries a maximum 
penalty of three years in jaiL 
He was released, ordered to ap- 
pear in court again Dec. 9 and was 
told by Magistrate J.C. Tolken that 
funher charges might be added. 
The Cape Times oa Monday 


in a TOCUI eoumnu, ^ publisfaed 3 interview con- 
muiust Party nevrapaper Rabomi- Jj ucted bv Nlr . ^ard in London 


cheskoDeJo said that planners tad 


TUNIS fAP) — The gowemmem placed Tunisia’s top union lcs*r 
under house arrest on Friday, and union of ficia ls reported that three Fi- 
nnic® demonstrators bad been killed in recent iaboe protest. 

Govemmem sources said that Habib Acfaonr. 76. secretary-general of 
the General Union of Tunisian Workers, the country’s only authorized 
labor federation, had been forbidden to have any outside contacts. They 
said the anion was aimed at ending “social agitation and violence." 

The government and the union have been locked! in an intense power 
struggle for the last week. Union officials dam Che gowerzuneu is trying 
to replace regional union leadens with people dose to official circles. The 
government contends die union has been infiltrated by Libyan agents. 


Todor Zhivkov, right with Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, in Sofia last month. 


handled problems in “a common outlawed African National Con- 
and routine manner, allowing in- The group is 

efficient use of raw materials and 


Vietnam to Give U.S- More Remains 


may be as much as 30 percent lower 
this year than in recent years. 

The share of re-exported Soviet 


are bring forced to restructure, in vulnerable to increasing prices and may be as much as 30 percent lower 
pan because of a decline in Soviet demands for higher-quality export this year than in recent years, 
largesse. And challenges may be goods. * The share of re-exported Soviet 

posed 10 its Communist leadership. In the past, Bulgaria’s ability to oil in Bulgaria's energy exports fell 
which was ioug comfortable in its avoid the energy shortages and for- by 50 percent from 1983 to 1984. 
identification with Leonid l. Brezh- rign payments troubles of other and Bulgarian earnings from ener- 
nev. the former Soviet leader. East-bloc countries was ensured by gy sales in the West decreased al- 
“There's no doubt that tbe privileged deals with the Russians; most as much in the same period, 
squeeze is on." one Western diplo- it was allowed, for example, to buy Stefan Stoilov, chief of the Eco- 


fodder." 

Such attacks have spurred specu- 


fighiing to topple white role in 
South .Africa. 

Mr. Tam bo, like a number of 


lation in Sofia that the stage may be ^ * 

« for ® “ 8° verame ? banned, a South African gagging 

leadership. Mr. Zhivkov, apparent- ^ cSb| 


fy healthy at 74. is now r flanked by- - ^ ± pcrinissioD of 

several technocrats in their law 40s v®}®" 

cr\- Pi inin LfirilcfM* IXIC IflW 3DQ OLQCT TH ITU S t ST. 

or 50s. mrinding Prune Master ^ - Times said when it 
Gnsha Fihijov’; Oenvan Doinov. .,,*7 _■ . L _. 


nev. the former Soviet leader. 

“There's no doubt that tbe 
squeeze is on." one Western diplo- 


mat said. “The Soviets are out to oil at low ruble prices for process- 
rationalize the relationship. Zhiv- ing and resale for dollars in the 


kov was close to Brezhnev. Now, 
it's a different generation." 
Economic pressure from Mos- 


West. 

The current cutback in Soviet 
assistance, however, appears to be 


cow is testing governments as dramatic as Moscow’s past gen- 
throughout Eastern Europe, a phe- erosity. Although official figures 


no men on that predates Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s rise to power. Bulgaria, how - 
ever. has been particularly 


are secret. Western experts believe 
that Soviet supplies of oil to Bul- 
garia began to drop last year and 


gy r sales in the West decreased al- 
most as much in the same period. 

Stefan Stoilov, chief erf' the Eco- 
nomics Research Institute of the 
Bulgarian Academy of Science, 
said that Sofia and Moscow' con- 
cluded a new agreement this month 
limiting Soviet energy exports to 
Bulgaria to the 1980 level for the 
next five years. 

The Bulgarians also must accom- 
modate the Soviet insistence on 
higher-quality goods to pay for fuel 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Hanoi has ieforawd the United States it will 
soon ram over seven additional remains that may be UJS. servicemen, 
and a team of U5. expats will be allowed later tins month 10 conduct a 
search of a B-52 crash site inade Vietnam for remains, the Penragoa sad 
Friday. 

In addition Vietnam has agreed to hold another meeting of technical 
experts from the two countries 00 Nw. 13 to discuss the con tinuing 
search for Americans mssag or kiBed in the Vietnam War. 


*) V 1 

I f 


.orb; 


Grisha Filipov; Ognyan Doinov, 
the minis ter of machine building; 


primed the interview that it was “a 


Richard L. Artmtage, the assistant defease secretary for international 
security affairs, also announced that an army laboratory in Honolulu 
identified some more of the remains turned over by the Vietnamese ihu 
summer. He also said the Laotian gow a c m ne a t, which allowed die first 
excavation of a crash ate inside dm cotsttty in February, has now 
“agreed in principle” to ratil bpio-site excavations. 


u contribution to peaceful solutions 

and Chudomir Alexandrov, a new 


Politburo member who has been 
named to head a state energy com- 
mission. 

Some diplomats believe that Mr. 


in South Africa in a matter of over- 
whelming public importance." 

The article was the first substan- 
tial interview with Mr. Tambopub- 


7i,iZlvr!3 tl. Tr* Ushed in South Africa since the 

&£SJr2E. ( tK2 African National Congrcs, .as 


Eastern Europe's aging leaders to ^ nca ^ iN3UOIWi 

countries banned a quarttr of a centuiy ago. 


Seoul Blocks Dissidents From Meeting 


step down as Soviet-bloc countries 

. T, a,*. He was quoted m the interview as 

hold Communist Pam congresses . „ r2 A , nrin tn , r i;m«- 


eariy next year. 


Answering Critics, Marcos Will Resign but in His Own Way 


By Serh Mydans 

Vch t o*x T;rr±i Str.uv 

MANILA — In a complicated 
maneuver. President Ferdinand E. 
Marcos announced Thursday that 
he would resign as president' to fa- 
cilitate elections but that he would 
remain in office during the cam- 
paign. 

He sard he would send a letter of 
resignation to the National Assem- 
bly on Monday along with his pro- 
posal for on election in January. He 
said the resignation would take ef- 
fect only upon the assumption of 
office bv the winner of the election, 
in which Mr. Marcos is the favored 
candidate. 

The announcement was designed 


to counter opposition criticism and 
circumvent a constitutional re- 
quirement that he resign before an> 
election. 

Mr. Marcos' current six-year 
term does not expire until l’9S“. 
The Philippine Constitution pro- 
vides for earl> elections in the event 
of the death, incapacitation, re- 
moval or resignation of a president. 

Jovito Salonga. a former senator 
who heads one faction of the divid- 
ed Liberal Pony, oiled Mr. Mar- 
cos' move “a masterpiece in absur- 
dity .** 


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rated they might accept it in order Adaza said. “We have to accept 
to allow ihe elections to go ahead, reality and deal with Marcos on his 
But thev said a challenge before the . own terms.” 

Supreme Corn was possible from su i on I0 

some of lie presidents other oppo- [he who , e ^ govtra . 

nen15, mem is used to his maximum ad- 

vantage to make him win at all 
costs,” said a former senator. Rene 


Mr. Marcos said. “If we must be 
technical. 1 ask the question: When 
the constitution says resignation, 
does it say immediate resignation? 
It does not." 

Many opposition politicians ap- 


Mr. Marcos called his action on 
Friday. “A voluntary surrendering 
of a part of the terra of the presi- 
dent because of his deep feeling, his 
passionate judgment, that the time 
has come to get a new mandate 
from the people.” 

He added, “There has been no 


pearcd to accept tbe fact that Mr. 
Marcos could not be persuaded to 


While condemning Mr. Marcos 
maneuver as a legal gimmick that 
was probably still unconstitutional, 
some opposition politicians indi- 


Marcos could not be persuaded to 
leave the office he has held for 20 
years, even for the election cam- 
paign. 

“We have no choice but 10 accept 
it.” Assemblvman Homobono 


^ M IVIUIWI ilbUUIVI I IVU4V rn - , *• 

Espina. Mr. Espinals a member of prosairefromanysource inducting 

the United Nationalist Democratic They're too good laws that required than to report to 

Organization, a coalition of a doz- ^P^nais to be dying to pressure a the police before entering a towu- 

en onooritinn names head of state, espeaally Marcos. ship m which there was unrest 

v v Mr. Marcos indicated that he Louis Nel, who beads a special 

Mr. Marcos announced Sunday was prepared to hold elections South African information office . , 

that he planned to call for early slightly later than the Jan. 17 Hite dealing with the foreign press, al- Kim Dae Jung were placed trader house arrest, 

elections following two weeks of he is proposing in the face of com- leged that foreign television crews 

intense pressure from Washington plaints from some members of the had helped a man to escape arrest, T C l»f « ■ tt o 

to institute reforms in the face of a opposition that a date in March filmed arson attacks qayd for JURWlIlaKClo n (Hi X uuftl (HI IJtlQMCl 

growing insurgency and an eco- would give them more time to pre- their benefit and paid children to • WASHINGTON (WP) — Congress has to the troubles it wffl 

nomic ensis. pare. burabooks. face next w^m a showdown over babaced-bud^ iegi sia ritm as eat 

Mr. Nd also said the govern- dwm tiwvnt^ ,h ^ tv 

9 • T]ii • Q • ,r» J ment had mi informant, a South Senate and Haro also ex^dedJe size of iidr diSSge team 

S Mission: l^yaie SOVWt Lard ^P^’^^SforafOTn^tdc- bargainers who eariier had failed to reach apeoaenL. 

J ^ V ? S10 “ network, who regularly as- /House-Senate conference isachednled tebeam work -Riesdav ana 


urging Pretoria to create a climate 
for tal ks with his guerrilla organiza- 
tion. 

In another press development, 
seven journalists, two of them from 
the Cape Times, and an opposition 
politician were picked up by police 
outside a Cape Town township and 
held for questioning for more than 
an hour Friday. Last Saturday. 
South Africa imposed tight restric- 
tions on press coverage of the coun- 
try's racial unrest. 

The eight, who were released 
without charges being filed, said 
they had not violated emergency 
laws that required than to report to 
the police before entering a town- 
ship in which there was unrest 

Louis Nel, who beads a special 



Kim Dae Jung 


SEOUL (AP) — Kim Dae Jung 
arid several other South Korean 
dissidents were placed under house 
arrest Friday before they were to 
attend a meeting cm the all eged 
torture of people held by the gov- 
enmaem. 

Aides to Mr. Kim, a former pres- 
idential candidate who is barred 
from political activity because of a 
suspended jail sentence for sedi- 
tkm, said be was lold that he could 
not auead nub “pofiticaT meet- 
ings. Tbe bearing was one of a 
series planned by a human rights 
organization that was formed 
Monday. 

' Mr. Kim semes as an adviser for 
tbe group, die JotiU Committee 
Against Torture and Fabricatf 
Conspiracies. It was not immeu- 
atriy known -bow many rfiwiffc nn 
were placed trader house arrest 


intense pressure from Washington plaints from some members of the 
to institute reforms in the face of a opposition that a date in March 
growing insurgency and an eco- would give than more time to pre- 


nomic crisis. 


Jmdda Marcos’s Mission: Playing Soviet Card 


Senate and Home also expanded the size of tfeu already large team it 
bargainers who earlier bad failed to reach a giecucu L 
A House-Senate conference is sdredukdLto begin woik Tuesday on a 


(Continued from Page 1) 
Moscow's Roman Catholic church. 

Ties between the two nations 
haw entered “a new era of friend- 
ship and mutual cooperation,” she 
announced. 

Philippine officials concede that 
most of this was simply for show. 
Nobody, including Moscow, they 
say. really expects the Philippines 
to abandon its traditional alle- 
giance with the United States and 
invite in the Russians. 

“Any leader who did this would 
be a leader without followers.” said 
a Filipino who attended the nation- 
al-day reception Thursday morn- 
ing. 

But neither were people here sur- 
prised at the sudden effusiveness 
toward the Russians. Mr. Marcos 
has played bis Soviet card in the 


last spring when he accepted a So- 
viet medal at a time when Congress 
was debating a cut in military assis- 
tance to Manila. 

“I guess he needs to remind him- 
self when things get rough that this 
is an independent country." said a 
Western diplomat. 

The Soviet Union treads careful- 
ly in the Philippines, avoiding stri- 
dent criticism of the pro-American 
Marcos regime while taking pains 
not to be seen to be aiding the 
Communist rebels who are chal- 
lenging him. 


a little peeved that he wasn’t noti- 
fied earlier.” 

The journey by Mrs. Marcos was 
dubbed “the Moscow miracle'' by 


tisied the police in their investiga- compromise on the rival measures to force a balanced budget by 


tl0ns - _ of the decade. But a dfibt-cgihng extension is attached, Which must be 

■ US. Group Cancels Visit passed by next Thursday or Friday to avoid a possible default 

A group of 18 Americans, in- by ^ government. Became the two measures are linked, a budget 
tiding three members of the compromise must be^ achieved before the debt caEng cam lmiwsed to 
ause of Representatives, has can- prevent a cutoff of the government's fine of credit , 1 
led a fact-finding trip to South Separately, the Senate Finance Committee was fold Thursday that 


ihe pro-government press and was eluding three members of the 
accompanied by several small ges- House of Representatives, has can- 


tures on the home front 


ceded a fact-finding trip to South 


The resort town of Baguio was Africa after the Pretoria govern- because the Treasury has dipped into Social Security long-tenn tnist 

proclaimed a sister city of theSovi- meat refused to issue visas to all foods four times in. the past two yean amid government debt-cafag 

el town of Kislovodsk, and a dele- but four of them. The Washington problems, tbe funds may loseas much as $1 3 biHion in interest payments 

tion from Lithuania traveled to Post reported Friday from Wash- over no* IS years. .Jt 

nnilo ic nart nf a reilhiml av. lnatAn ... 



gation from Lithuania traveled to Post reported Friday from Wash- 
M anil a as pan of a cultural ex- ington. 




change. 


The reception Thursday mom- spokesman said the visas bad ndt 24th Game Will Decide Chess Match 




lenguig him. ing demonstrated something of tbe been denied but said “the sensitive 

“They know the stakes are high spirit of the relationship: correct and delicate polit 
here,” a Western diplomat said, and cordial, but with an undertone stances prevailing in 
“and they are keeping their options of cynicism. would make a visit 

open. JThey’re playing a cautious “The last people who can fool us contemplated by th 
game.” are the Soviets,” said a Filipino Development Policy, 


“and they are keeping their options 
open. They’re playing a cautious 
game.” 


and ddicateDolitical Sroum MOSCOW (Reuterc) — A 14-month dud for the world chess ebampi- 
stances prev4£g m SouthSS SfSi. iKJ?' duun P ioa * 


-Nm* m 


The president generally leaves guest privately. “They have no sub- 
relations with the Russians to his tlety about them." 


Anatoli Karpov, and his challenger, Gaiv Kasparov. 

contemDlauxMjv the GrateM?* After 23 games in their second match, the Soviet world champion needs 

W “ 1 ^ CMeng=r ormmDd£r 

intended, inopportune. Mr. Kamov U traik n f 1 f inH tiamW fA min ahmia «n wnJ ih* 


past when he felt under pressure 
from Washington, most recently 


wife, who has made seven visits to 
Moscow since 1972. 


When the labor minister, Bias 
Ople, who is chairman of the Phil- 


She has been known to receive ippine-Soviet Friendship Society, 
Mr. Sholmov in her Malacanang launched into a speech that empba- 


The only members of the ddega- * “*? 1 J. and to win the gara: to end the 
r!on to rwMw ui«c n-an* match at 12 to 12 and retain his crown by virtue of bong reigning 

Democratic rcmesentetives^ Mide^ the ^ye^d chaitogeS 


palace study at the same time Mr. sized the cordial relations between 
Marcos was talking with the U.S. the two countries, one Filipino 


Democratic reoreseatatives. MIct- , UIC ^z-year-raa c n aue ng cr will nave i tn 

ev Leland o^lSS SdF SL P 0 ™** “ d beconw ^ youngest champion. Thor first match, which 
BlacTSu^ £1L hSs? £ Sq,tea,ber , 984 ’ games, 40of which were 


■* 

* m 


CHURCH SERVICES I ambassador, Stephen W. Bos- guest whispered, “you listen to him. 


Douglas HL Bosco and George 
Miller of California. 


worth, in the next room. 


It's always the samejjolite speech. 


Mr. Marcos seems to relish any and he says no thing 1 


CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 13 Rue du 
Vroox-Colomtjiar, 75006 Para. Mstro SL- 
SuIpJcn. Sunday warship in EngSsh 9U5 
a.m., Rav. A. Sommerville. Tel.: 
(1)46.07.67.02. 


discomfiture he senses among the At the next table, one Russian of contrcrf by the Sooth African 
Americans. When he received his leaning toward another, was heard government to the United States by 
Soviet medal, he said in an inter- to whisper, “each time, the same selecting who can and cannot be 
view last week. Mr. Bosworth “was speech.” part of a delegation.” • 


Mr. Leland said the visit would For tllP Hpp/yinI 
be called off because the group was 111(1 ftCW,ra 
“not going to permit the extension Spain’s air controllers hare called a f i 




of control by the Sooth African 19 for improved working conditions 
government to the United States by Controllers Confederation said Friday. 


strike for Nov. 13, R-K 
more pay, the Air Trafiff 
(Reuters) 


PARS SUBURBS 

EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH, 56 Rue das 
Bans-Raisiru, Rueil-Malmabon. English 
spooking, avangatkol, all danomincittons. 
SJ. 9i4S ; Wonh^s: 10*i5. Oilwr octMties. 
Cali Dr. S.C. Thomas, Pastor. I 
(1)47^9.1 5 39. 


Pinochet Dismisses Army Head From Junta 


R*uten testers a second day demonstrated 

SANTIAGO — President Au- against the military government, 
gusto Pinochet has dismissed the Four persons were shot and killed 
Chilean Army’s representative on and at least 100 were injured in tbe 
the four-man military junta, which Thursday protest. 


STOCKHOLM 

IMMANUB. CHURCH near city confer. 
Friendly Christian fellowship. Sunday 1 1 ;00. 
Tri.= (0B) 316051. 131225. 


acts as Chile's legislature, in what Government sources said tbe 


was seen as one of the most signifl- chang e had been pen ding for sev- 
cant changes in the institution's top eral weeks and were not directly 


ranks since he took power 12 years linkvd to tbe recent anti-govern- 


ago. 

Tbe dismissed general, Cfear 
Benavides, has been a close coQab- 


ment demonstrations. 

General Pinochet, who turns 70 


this month, is commander in chief nists last March. 


power in the corps of general offi- 
cers, a tightly knit body that is the 
General Pinochet’s main support 
now that most civilian parties 
openly oppose him. 

General Benavides's departure 
from the junta comes just three 
months after General C£sar Men- 
doza, head of tbe police, resigned 
over allegations that members of 
his force murdered three Commu- 


New US. rules on waste landfills went into effect Friday, and may force 
the closure of 30 to 40 'percent or the dumps, Environmental Protection 
Agency officials est im ated. The roles wfll monitor underground water 
sources and require insurance. (NTT) 

Indonesia has warned three foreign journalists about their reporting on 
? C J C ? U SH* ^ rmed forccs ’ fo® military said Friday. The three were 
Andree Fefflmd d : Asiaweek, Lincoln Kaye of the Far Eastern Economic 
Review and Paul Handley, a free-lance writer for the Review. (UPI) 




■‘4* 

••• * tt 


Anti-Immigration Party Seeks 
A Seat in Geneva Canton 




tO?.: 


To place an advertisement 
in this section 
pSeaae contact: 

Ms Elizabeth HERWOOD 
181 At*. Ch--de-Gaalle, 
92521 NenlOv Cedex. France. 
TcL; 747.12.65. 


orator of General Pinochet since of the army and holds executive 
the 1973 coup and was his ulterior power as president 


Reuters 

GENEVA — Rightist parties. 


minister during the undeclared war His chief of staff, General Santi- 


Since 1981, General Benavides campaigning against illegal immi- 
has been General Pinochet’s per- grants and the large number of 

»U,|>I — - - ■ .1-. ■ - hiahlu T rvr 


against leftists from 1974 to 1978. ag° Sinclair, was promoted to take 
The general is to be succeeded by General Canessas post as deputy 


General Julio Canessa, the army's co m mande r of the army. General 
deputy commander. * Sinclair is secretary-general of the 


iff, General Santi- sooal representative on the junta, kghly paid UN diplomats in Gene- 
promoted to take which also includes the command- v?. wul be testing what appears to 
is post as deputy ers in chief of the navy, air force ** stu B e of support as local dec- 
be army. General and police. lions are held Sunday. 


BODY FITNESS AND BETTER HEALTH 

WITH PORTDGUESE OYSTER POWER 

Feel young again with P.O.P. 


across his desk. 

The brief statement announcing 
the changes gave no reason for the 
removal of Genoa! Benavides. He 


■ Police Headquarters Bombed The Vigilance Party, which made 

A powerful car-bomb exploded 8X1 strong showing in 

outside the headquarters of Chile's pafoamentary elections last month, 
security police early Friday, Reu- wlU raate Jls fo® 1 attempt to cap- 
ters reported from Santiago. rure °? e of the seven seats erf the 


irs reported from Santiago. 

The blast blew a hole in the wall 


had denied rumors last month that of the building, the National Infor- 


execuhve council, which governs 
the canton of. Geneva. 


he was in ill health. 


matioti Center, and shattered win- 


ABSOLUTB.Y NATURAL DIETETIC PRODUCT, UNEQUALLED IN 
CONCENTRATION OF MOST NATURAL ELEMENTS REQUIRED BY 
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P.O.P. is a sure way to better hedth, 

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Stores, etc, if not available, write toi 


Diplomats said the shake-up ap- dow$ of surrounding buildings, 
pearcd to be a move to balance the The police said no one was injured.' 


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• PARIS 8 e . 


Arnold Schlaepfer, . 69, of -the 1 
Vigilance Party and a well-known 
lawyer in Geneva, is one of 11 can- 
didates seeking the seven seats, 

“Geneva for the Genevans" is 
the party’s slogan, and the platform 
calls for the expulsion of illegal 
immigrants and for-forbidding any 
more international organizations 
from using-Geneva as tEeirbase. 

• Anxiety about the number of 
foreigners in tins country of 6J 
miHion has -risen sharply and is 
directed at lepl wockats and seek- 
ers erf political asylum in addition 
to clandestine workers. 

The Swiss authorities this month 


ordered oat of the country 59 Zair- 
eans, 12 Turks and about 70 Chil- 
eans. 

Geneva, officials estimate that 
foreigners comprise a third of.thft 
canton’s population of 350,0®? 
Many of them are members of the 
Z19 government missions accredit- 
ed to the UN and 14 major interna- 
tional organizations or art bureau" 
crats. 

Their number often provokes 
more anger among the Swiss than 
do illegal foreign workers who car* 
ry out menu! taefr^ 

The international civil servants, 
many of whom are paid salaries 
that are high even by Swiss start* 
dartiS) have been blamed for dri** 
jng up rents and tbe price of 
houses, and for traffic ana parking 
problems. ' 

. fo* recent poll for the Tribune 
de Genfroe newspaper on the city's 






most pressing prribkms, houafo^l 
and.traffic led the list by widena^ 


gins. 

However, many commentaters 
say Geneva and the zie^bborfog 
canton of Vand, with its capt« 
L au sa n n e , are unique and do not 
rcffocz sentiment in the’ country *5 s 
adiofe. 




«fe?- ***< 





r *sxe 


"Si 




Mrir' 


'’i J U 


■’•■ :-'vw 

I’-x* 


'As 


By Stephen Engelbert; 

■Vflii /art; Tuner Service 

WASHINGTON —The U:S. 
government is divided over 
whether Vitaly Yurchenko was a 
genuine defector or an agent 
planted as part oTa Soviet* ploy, 
according to officials in the Rea- 
gan administration. • 

The officials said the Central 


. ’ • ■ • INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 

'eetum Was Reed; White House Suspects It Was a Plant 


the KGB’s North American op- 
erations may well have- been 
planted. - ;: 

“Hus whole thing was very 
good theater,” a White House 
official said “And to me, theater 
is- something that is staged.” 

In an interview .Wednesday, 
President* Ronald Reagan ' ap- 
peared tip share the views of 


Intelligence Agency and the Na-. - members of his National Securi- 
tional Security Council: staff O' Council staff.' He said there 
were split not only over die in- was a suspicion that Moscow 
tendons of Mr. Yurchenko, but had staged the Yur chenk o affair 




-V f * 


IftreR 


also over the .value of the infor- 
mation he provided. 

The prevailing view in tbe CIA 
is that- Mr. Yurchenko was - a 
valuable catch, officials said. The 
agency told Congress that', be 
provided significant information 
about Soviet .intelligence, prac- 
tices before he derided to go 
home. 

Officials said the QA would 
now try to check whether Mr. 
Yurchenko's information could 
be verified. 

At the White House, staff 
members of the National Securi- 
ty Council are sad to believe 
that his revelations have proved 
of minimal use. These officials 
see this as evidence that the man 
identified as a deputy director of 


as weQ as two other incidents in 
which. Soviet citizens seemed ea- 
ger to defect and then changed 
th ear -minds. - 

Mr. Reagan also said that Mr. 
Yurehenko lad provided Bide of 
value, thiis contradicting state- 
ments 1 made by William J. Casey, 
the director of . the CIA, to mem- 


comminecs. have no 

If the CIA eventually con- tails ah 
dudes that the KGB man pro- any use 
rided nothing new, -this would Other 
undermine the theory that be tration 
was a genuine defector. - Yorcher 

. Senator William S. Cnhwi a that, if i 
Republican of Maine and a historic* 
member of the Senate Sdect “Whai 
Committee on Intelligence, was domain,’ 
one of several' senators Who ex- nothing:' 


pressed doubts about Mr. Yur- 
chenko’s legitimacy. 

“Wc were toH. it was very im- 
portant information,'" the scata- 
tor said. “The agency believed he 
was valid and the information 
they were receiving was veiy im- 
portant. We have said go bade 
and re-examine it in retrospect 
and see whether it was really im- 
portant” 

Another committee member. 
Senator Patrick J. Leahy, a Dem- 
ocrat of Vermont, believes Mr. 
Yurchenko was planted. 

The committee chairman, Da- 
vid F. Dnrenberger, a Republi- 
can of Minnesota, acknowledged 
the possibility, but maintained 
that “there is more reason to be- 
lieve this was a person with a 
problem.” 

Those who doubt Mr. Yur- 
chenko’s legitimate defection 
have noted that he provided de- 
tails about agents no longer of 
any use to the Soviet Union- 

Other sources in the adminis- 
tration and Congress said' Mr. 
Yurchenko had provided leads 
that, if verified, were more than 
historical. 

“What you see in (he public 
domain,” an official said, “is 



President Ronald Reagan gesturing during a meeting with 
Soviet experts at the White House. At left are Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz and Nina Turmaridn. The others 


... • **/' 

. . ' h- 

'1PM 


.S. Stores 


; "-"''it-nuK 


romlli, 


By Herbert Mtcgang 

He h- York Times Service 

NEW YORK — On the eve of 
die summit meeting with President 
Ronald Rcagaru_a New York pub- 
lisher is bringing out a book that 
identifies Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
the Soviet leader, as its author and 
has the copyright in his name. " 

In ft, Mr. Gorbachev gives his 
views on the Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative and on other arms issues on 


indnde s unp ublis he d ma terial in 
Mr. Gorbachev’s introduction and 
in the biographical section, accord- 
ing to Stewart Richardson, the 
company president. 

The new material includes the 
following passage, which Mr. Rich- 
ardson said was added in recent 
days: \ 

. .“Peace is the most important 
goal of the Communist Party and 
the Soviet Slate. This is. demon- 
strated by Mikhail Gorbachev's an- 
nouncement, in the name of the 


son and Alexei Pushkov, president wish my American readers prosper- 
of the Novosti Press Agency Pnb- ity and a peaceful future!” 


fishing House. 


Asked if the book might be con- 


- ' ■ 'V 

/■ rV‘ -• ■ - ' -V 


Mr. Richardson said (hat he ne- adered as propaganda for the Sovi- 
gotiated the book on his own with- et Union and its leader, Mr. Rich- 
out talking to the U.S. Embassy in ardson said: 

Moscow or to American officials in “My answer is that it’s important 

Washington. Michael Guest, a that the head of the Soviet Union, 
member of (he White House press who will be speaking at the summit, 
office, said the White House was be understood. We will have to deal 
unaware of the Gorbachev book. with him for a long time and we 
In an introduction to the book, had better know what he is saying 
doted Oct 1, 1985, Mr. Gorbachev and thinking.” 



The Auooared ftew 

present at the meeting are Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger, Richard Pipes and Robert Gates, deputy 
director of intelligence of the Central Intelligence Agency. 

Soviet Said to Join West 
Against U1NESCO Head 


(Continued from Page l) 


term for Mr. M’Bow, who will be 


lose credibility with the rest of the 66 hi 1987. 

world. ’ The UNESCO conference was 

Recently, Western diplomats at a 11 ® 1 ** b y™ re ^ -J 300 dele - 
the Sofia conference have become gates from 152 nations. It was to 
concerned that Mr. M’Bow may be wind U P ^ lurda - v , resol ™S 
planning to seek a third seven-year * f the problems created by 

term in office after 1987, and is U.S. withdrew^ and attempt- 
seeking support to that end from »j\S r ? e further reforms de- 


the agenda of the Nov. L9-20 meet- ^ *** Union *“ book, priced at $15.95,1 

mg m Geneva. Soviet leadership and people, that plcdg{ ^ n ? t 10 deploy weapons in • first printing of 25,000 copies 

The book, which is being pub- - i tw ffl never originalc^varhi the ^ ace , lf „ otbcr natl f IK do not do so. is to be rushed to bookstores b< 


fished in English next week by the 
New York firm of Richardson & 
Sldrman, an independent Ameri- 
can publishing company, is called 
“A Time for Peace.” The firro said 


it will never ongmate war m the 
Soviet Union and the Soviet State 
will never start a war.” 


The book, priced at $15.95, has a 
st printing of 25,000 copies and 
to be rushed to bookstores before 


We shall not conduct nuclear tests the^umnm meeting. 


and explosions if the United States 
joins the moratorium we have de- 
clared. We would like this moraio- 


can publishing company, is called Several of Mr. Gorbachev’s dazed. We would like this moraio- 
“A Time for Peace.” the fimi said speeches and statements, Mr. Rich- rium to be the first step on the road 
that negotiations for the book, ard ?° 11 said,- “haw been revised, towards reducing and eventually 
which has not been published in the “““ty ty shortening for the sake el im in a ting midear weapons." 
Soviet Union, were completed in of cknty and readability, by Mr. Mr. Gorbachev added: “I would 
September in Moscow. Gorbachev himself, according to consider my aim achieved if the 


Mikhail S. Gorbachev 

Brezhnev had a book about him, 
based on a Soviet manuscript. 


Mr. Gorbachev added: “1 would 
consider my aim achieved if the 


A clause in the contract says that Brezhnev had a book about him, 
Mr. Gorbachev will receive a royal- based on a Soviet manuscript, 
ty of 15 percent of the retail price of brought out by Simon & Schuster, 
the book in American dollars. Mr. The book, titled “Leonid Brezh- 
Richardson stud that Mr. Gorba- nev: Pages From His Life,” was 
chev did not receive an advance, written by a team of unnamed writ- 
Under the terms of the contract, ers. 


An advance copy of the galleys information wehave received in the American reader gains a better un- 


shows that most of the book con- 
sists of Mr. Gorbachev’s speeches 


last few weeks.” 

The Gorbachev contract was 


derstanding of our plans and inten- 
tions, and if he feds our desire for 


any royalties will be paid to Soviet 
Life magazine in Washington. 

This is not the only book about a 
Soviet leader published by an 


*' and statements this year. Butit also signed in Moscow by Mr. Richard- peace and cooperation. I sincerely American firm. In 1978, Leonid L 


The book, titled “Leonid Brezh- 
nev: Pages From His Life,” was 
written by a team of unnam ed writ- 
ers. 

Two special copies of “A Time 
for Peace” are now bang bound in 
leather, Mr. Richardson said. One 
will be given to the author and the 
other to Mr. Reagan. 


African and other Third World na- 
tions. 

In the past few days, he has ma- 
neuvered to place African allies on 
UNESCO's 50-nation executive 
board, which screens candidates 
for the director-general's job. 

Western nations, which are criti- 
cal of the way Mr. M’Bow runs 
UNESCO, strongly oppose giving 
him a third term as director-gener- 
al, a post in which he has already 
served 1 1 years. On Friday, 
Frances delegate to UNESCO, Gi- 


manded by Britain. The British 
have threatened to leave at the end 
of this year unless UNESCO ac- 
cepts more changes. 

Many other Western countries 
have warned that they will recon- 
sider their membership in UNES- 
CO if further reforms were not 
agreed at the Sofia meeting. 

On Thursday, a government 
source in London said that little 
had emerged so far from the Sofia 
conference to persuade the govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Marearet 




AMERICAN TOPICS 



Duarte’s Daughter Praised Guerrillas Siege Ends 

fat Rebel Taping, She Said She Admired Their 'Solidarity’ In Bogota; 

. By Madise Simons 

New York Times Service " -oB9 JVLLIxHl 


sile Halimi, said her government Thatcher to reverse its decision of 
was “completely against” another principle to leave UNESCO. 

At the start of the general confer- 
■ - ■ - - ■ ence, Britain's overseas develop- 
ment minister, Timothy Raison, 
klPfTP rl Yirlfi warned that “without thoroughgo- 

kI/JUCe£CJ JLjJLIUo ing and comprehensive reform our 

" decision to withdraw will be con- 

T*. "D ~ . firmed.” 


Page 3 

Death Toll 
Put at 42 as 
Mid-Atlantic 
Mops Up 

By Robert D. McFadden 

.Veit York Time i Service 

NEW YORK — Flood waters 
have killed at least 42 persons and 
left scores of others missing in the 
Middle Atlantic region this week. 

On Thursday, waters surged into 
Washington; Richmond, Virginia, 
and other cities and towns along a 
half-dozen major rivers. 

Farther upstream, thousands of 
flood survivors surveyed Iosl 
homes and businesses, fouled water 
supplies, waterborne health haz- 
ards. closed shipping routes and 
other problems. 

Damage in Virginia, Wesi Vir- 
ginia, Pennsylvania and Maryland 
was estimated at $350 million. 

The four days of heavy rain, 
which ended Wednesday, pushed 
rivers in some areas to their highest 
crests in more than a century. 
About 20,000 people were evacuat- 
ed. As the Appalachian rivers were 
receding Thursday, the floodwaters 
rolled downstream, laying siege to 
new targets. 

f President Ronald Reagan de- 
clared eight West Virginia counties 
eligible for federal ’disaster aid 
Thursday night, and Pennsylvania 
Governor Richard L Thornburgh 
said he probably would request a 
similar declaration. United Press 
International reported. 

[The floods killed at least 20 peo- 
ple in Virginia, 20 in West Virginia 
and one each in Maryland and 
Pennsylvania. The Associated 
Press reported.) 

The James River, cresting 24 feet 
above flood stage, surged Thursday 
onto the cobbled streets of down- 
town Richmond and turned many 
low-lying parts of the city into a 
lake, disrupting commerce and 
travel. 

Virginia officials said nearly 900 
roads and 30 bridges had beet) 
knocked out statewide. 

In Washington, spillover from 
the Potomac River covered the his- 
toric Georgetown section by sever- 
al feet as merchants sandbagged 
fashionable shops and carried ex- 
pensive merchandise to safer 
ground. 

The Washington Monument and 
the Lincoln and Jefferson memori- 
als were closed, a National Park 
Service spokesman said, not be- 
cause they were in any danger but 
to protect tourists. 

Some small riverfront towns in 
West Virginia s Gram and Pendle- 
ton counties were reported to have 
been washed away. 

Several other communities in 
that state remained isolated, and 




Nr. Yortc Tm 

A view of die mansion in central Washington that the 
Peruvian government is seffing. The estimated price, 
inH raffing the 26- acre embassy estate, is S10 irnffion. 


■ r t i 1 


British Hub Facts , 
About an Ex-Colony 

Last Sunday, heralding the 
Washington visit of Prince 
- Diaries and Diana, princess of 
Wales, the British Tourist Au- 
thority produced a dick, 116- 
page magazine cm the “Trea- 
sure Houses of Britain” that 
was inserted in The Washington 
Post 

In the magazine was “A Roy- 
al Message” over the signatures 
of Charles and Diana. It began 
with a sentence containing no 
fewer than three eirora: “Two 
.hundred years ago, John Ad- 
ams, later to be the United Sta- 
tes’s third president, was ap- 
pointed Ambassador to the 
Court of SL James.” 

Adams, of course, was the 
second president. The United 
Stales had no ambassador for 
more than a century after inde- 
pendence; its highest-ra nkin g 

diplomats held the title of min- 
ister until the first ambassadors, 
to Britain, France, Germany 
and Italy, were appointed 'in 
1893. And the British them: 
selves are sticklers about spell- 
ing it St. James’s. 

Short Takes 

The New York Gty subway 
system paid $4 J mOfion over 
the past 12 years to apply a fire 
retardant to 3-9 million trade 
ties, only to discover that the 
■substance bums readily and 
emits thick smoke, according to 
District Attorney Elizabeth 
Holtzman of Brooklyn. The 
transit authority now has dis- 
continued use of the chemical, 
triphenyl phosphate. David 
Feeley, a vice president of the 
authority, said that in any case 
the substance no kmger posed a 
fire hazard; It washes away 
within a year of ns application. 

Of Rhode Island’s 1,214 
square miles (3,148 square kilo- 
meters), only 47 are still under 
cultivation. To protect the last 
vestiges of the tiny state’s rural 
character, its taxpayers are buy- 
ing the development rights of 
•willing farmers. That means the 
land can never be used for any 
purpose other than farming. ; 
The current rate is $3,000 an . 


acre, winch is roughly the mar- 
ket price. 

The Sere« Acton GuOd, cit- 
ing “the lack of a clear and 
consistent medical opinion” on 
how acquired immune deficien- 
cy syndrome, or AIDS, is trans- 
mitted, has declared that actors 
must be told before they are 
hired if they will be required to 
perform “open-mouth” kissing 
scenes. If stub notice is not giv- 
en. the guild said, an actor can 
refuse to perform such a scene 
and still mush the production 
at full pay. Producers are dis- 
puting the guild stand, contend- 
ing that it has no medical or 
legal basis. 

The prosperous Beveriy Hills 

S School, alma mater of 
film stars as Jackie Coo- 
per,' Mickey Rooney, Rhonda 
Fleming and Richard Dreyfuss, 
has an oO well on its grounds 
that nets nearly $1 milli on a 
year Tot a school district budget 
of $26 million. Asked whether 
the oil well does not bear out 
the adage that “the rich get rich- 
er,” Walther Puffer, an assis- 
tant-superintendent, said equa- 
'bly. “I think every school ought 
to have one, and every school 
administ r ator.*’ 

The economy drives of some 
Third Worid countries strapped 
for foreign exchange extend to 
their diplomatic staffs. Brazil 
has told its Washington embas- 
sy to cut expenses or face salary 
redactions. Peru’s 2 6- acre 
( 10 J-hccrare) embassy estate in 
the middle of Washington has . 
gone on sale for an asking price 
estimated at S10 nriDioru. 

Shorter TakecThe 340-roile 
(550-kilometer) Erie Canal, 
connecting the Hudson River 
with Lake Erie, has passed its 
160th year with traffic up re- 
cently because of a blockage in 
the St. Lawrence Seaway 
caused by a collapsed lock. : . . 
At the start of this year the 
United States had about 110 
million cattle, 10 mfllidh sheep 
and 54 nriffioii hogs, the U.l 
Agriculture and. Commerce de- 
partments report, for a total of 
174 million head of livestock. " 


ARTHUR HK 


By Madise Simons 

New York Times Service 

SAN SALVADOR — Salvador- 
an guerrillas have made public a 
tape recording in which the daugh- 
ter of President Jose Napolebn 
Duarte, held hostage by the rebels 
for 44 days, said she came around 
to a different view of the rebels 
during her captivity. 

“My opinion has changed," Infis 
Guadalupe Duarte Duran said, re- 
ferring to the members of the Farar 
bundo Marti National Liberation 
From. “It was completely differ- 
ent. Now I have lived with them, I 
have seen bow they five, the union 
among them, the solidarity. And 
really, from what I have talked with 
tbeth, from what I have seen, they 
fight with conviction and a high 
morale.” 

Mrs. Duarte Dur&n made the 
comment, along with others favor- 
able to the guerrillas, in a tape- 
recorded interview with a rebel be- 
fore her release. 

A copy of the tape was made 
available to reporters and also 
broadcast on Wednesday on Ven- 
ceremos, a guerrilla radio station. 

Government officials and mem- 
bers of the Duarte family are 
known to be concerned about her 
opinions about the rebels. 

According to Archbishop Arturo 
Rivera y Damas of San Salvador, 
who was present at her release, 
Mrs. Duarte Durin “warmly em- 
braced” her captors before leaving 
them. 

President Duarte has said that he 
and his daughter have been receiv- 
ing treatment together from psy- 
chologists from the United States. 


M-19 Is Finished, 
Analysis Assert 

BOGOTA — The army assault 
that ended the guerrilla occupation 
of the Justice Ministry dealt a fatal 
blow to M-19*s top leadership and 
was a major setback for the peace 
process in Colombia, sources said 
Friday. 

“You could say it was the last 
spectacular action of a movement 

which has come to the end of its 
road.” a diplomat said. “M-19 has 
ceased to exist as a structured guer- 
rilla group.” 

Five top Leaders of M-19 died in 
the siege. None of the more than 40 
guerrillas inside survived. “In a sui- 
cidal game, M-19 played its last 
card and lost,” the newspaper El 
Tiimpo, wrote, 

M-19, Colombia’s most active 
guerrilla group in the post five 
years, gamed, notoriety in 1980 
when it held 12 ambassadors hos- 
tage for two months inside the Do- 
minican Republic Embassy. M-19, 
-diplomats say. has been growing 
weaker since the death in 1983 or 
the movement's founder, Jaime Ba- 
teman. Political sources said M-19 
has do mom than 1,000 fighters 
among its 8,000 members. 


, , ‘ p , . , Governor Arch A. Moore Jr. ap- 

Mucb or the general ronference peaJed for redera | ilid for t0U11J> 

has been taken up with strident wjth dwindling supplies of food. 








President Jos£ NapoIe6n Duarte with his daughter, In£s 
Guadalupe Duarte Durin. during their visit to Washington. 


He said the rebels had tried to turn 
bis daughter against him. 

The kidnappers “tried to destroy 
the bond between her and myself, 
but they did not achieve this,” Mr. 
Duarte said. His daughter, he said, 
was “returning to normalcy little 
by little.” 

Mr. Duarte also said last week 
that bis daughter was showing 
symptoms of what is known as the 
Stockholm syndrome, a tendency 
of some hostages to sympathize 
with their captors because of de- 
pendency cm them and the pres- 
sures of confinement. 

The president and government 
officials have also expressed con- 
cern about the fate of the diary 
Mrs. Duarte Duran wrote during 
her captivity. Mr. Duane said dial 


Major Actions of die M-19 Guerrillas 

New York Times Service 

Following is a chronology of the major guerrilla activities of the M- 
19 movement: 

Feb. 27, 1980 — Guerrillas of M-19 seize 16 ambassadors and 36 
others at a reception at the residence of the Dominican Republic’s 
ambassador. They demand $50 million in ransom and the release of 
31 1 leftists but settle for a promise that observers will monitor trials 
and detentions, and, for themselves, passage to Cuba. 

Jan. 19, 1981 — M-19 abducts Chester A. Bitterman 3d, 28, an 
American linguist and lay missionary, accusing him of being a CIA 
spy. He is killed on March 7. 

Ju)y 20, 1981 — Two days before the expiration of a four-month 
amnesty offer by President Julio Cesar Turbay Ayala, M-19 guerrillas 
fire three training mortar shells into the grounds of the presidential 
palace. Only 20 rebels respond to the amnesty. 

Jan. 27, 1982 — M-19 guerrillas hijack a Colombian airliner on a 
flight from Bogota and force it to fly to another city in Colombia. 

Aug. 7, 1982 — Bdisario Betancur is inaugurated as president and 
later si gns an amnesty. By December 60 rebels are freed from prisons. 

Nov. 22. 1983 — National Liberation Army guerrillas seize Jaime 
Betancur, a law professor and brother of the president. He is freed 
Dec. 7, 1983. 

March 28, 1984 —The government signs a cease-fire accord with 
the Colombian Revolutionary Armed Forces, the largest rebel group. 

Aity*. 10, 1984 — President Betancur installs a commission to begin 
negotiating a truce with M-19 and the Popular Liberation Army, 
another guerrilla group. 

Aug. 23, 1984 — The Popular Liberation Army and the Workers 
Self-Defense Force sign the truce. 

Aug. 24, 1984 — M-19 signs a cease-fire. _ 

June 1985 — M-19 breaks Lhe truce, accusing President Betancur of 
not delivering on social reforms. 


m (Continued from Page 1) 

I night, he accepted responsibility 
for launching the army assault 
During the siege, Mr. Betancur 
promised the rebels only that they 
would not be killed and that they 
would get a fair trial if they surren- 
dered. 

Details of about how the rebels 
and their hostages died remained 
sketchy Friday, but it was widely 
reported that most had died during 
the army's final assaulL 
The police said 17 rebels had 
been found dead in a bathroom on 
the third floor of the building. 
There were unconfirmed reports 
the guerrillas had killed themselves 
S in a suicide pact during the final 
U troop assault, bm police officials 
refused to speculate about that, 
ok An officer who commanded the 
assault. Colonel Alfonso Plazas, 
to said the guerrillas had been “anni- 
er hilated" by the attack. 

Radio stations reported that ] 
Andres Alamarales, a leader of the 


has been taken up with strident dwindling supplies of food. 
CTiuasm of the US. withdrawal by rae dicaJ supplies and safe drinking 
J™ , j v ?5 t *- , moo ana its Third watcr . National guardsmen stood 
World allies, coupled with attempts waich in Marlinton, Grantsvfllc 
to punish the Uimed States for Pelcrebur? ^ ]o0unc was 

leav ™^ reported. 

However, the conference finally In Pittsburgh, federal officials 
rqecied an -attempt by these coun- closed the Monongahela River to 
tries to close the diplomatic observ- navigation while they searched for 


er mission the United States estab- 
lished at UNESCO after it 
withdrew. 


as many as 29 submerged barges 
that may have been sunk in the 
floods. 


before her release her captors took An officer who commanded the 
it away from her. assault. Colonel Alfonso Plazas, 

“I imagine that they are gang to said the guerrillas had been “anni- 
try to exploit some of her hilated” by the attack. * 
thoughts,” said the ntinister of in- slations Teported ^at 

formation, Julio Rey Prendes. ■ ^dres Alamarales, a leader of the 
Asked about the rebel mternew rebel unit, was among those kflled. 

The rebels are part of the group M- 
PreQd«ssaid:“WhenyouteUakid- 19> or ^ Apii] 19 Movement, 
napped person that she wiD be re- whjch ils from ±e . ^ 
leased but has to make a declara- of a presidential ] 970 ejection it 
non, I ihmk that anyone will say claims was fraudulent The group is 

twytbin^ J said to number about 8,000. 

Mrs. Duarte Duran, 35, and a rri ... 

companion, Ana Cecilia Vllleda. [Reuters, quoting soldiers and 
23, were kidnapped Sept 10 and su™vmg hostages, said the dead 
freed Oct. 24 after the government guerillas included the chief of the 
released 22 political prisoner and operas Lrns Otero, ins secon- 
permirted about 100 wounded re- d-in-command Mr Almarales. 
bds to leave the country for medi- Md a woman ’ Vera Grabe - 
cal treatment. [Soldiers said Ms. Grabe, who 

carried a submachine gun with two 

smaller submachine guns strapped 
M JO ( 2*umfln c her shoulders, two pistols at her 

K Jfl iTuerifUuS hips, and loaded down with spare 
nes Service cartridge belts, had p laved a large 

najor guerrilla activities of the M- ’ role “ *^8 wo previous 

army assaults on the building.] 

-19 seize 16 ambassadors and 36 

ice of the Dominican Republic’s ^ addr ff reb $ b * n 
lion in ransom and the release of coaaec ^ d “ drug traffickens be- 

that observers will monitor trials t mm! 

i passage to Cuba. 9*** suspects the United 

s ,, States is seeking to extradite. He 

Chester A. Bitter man 3d, 28, an has repeatedly linked the country's 

uy, accusing him of being a CIA leftist rebels to drag trafficking.' 

. . “I personally took all the ded- 

e the expiration of 3 four-month sions, gave the respective orders to 
sar Turbay Ayala, M-19 guerrillas find a solution within the law,’ the 

0 the grounds of the presidential president said, adding that order- 1 

lie amnesty, ing the assault was difficult know- 

hijack a Colombian airliner on a ing so many lives were at stake, 

ly to another city in Colombia. Authorities said that the army 
ir is i na ugurate d as president and freed scores of hostages in an as- 
r 60 rebels are freed from prisons. sault Wednesday but that fires set 

itioti Army guerrillas Jaime by the guerrillas kept troops from 

her of the president. He is freed reaching the ministry’s upper 

floors, where the rebels were. 

mt signs a cease-fire accord with In another assault Thursday 
ad Forces, the hugest rebel group. morning, soldiers breached the 
air installs a commission to begin building and freed up to 48 bos- 

1 lhe Popular Liberation Army, tages inside, radio reporters at 

the scene said. 

iberation Army and the Workers Jorge Antonio Reina, a driver for 

the court who was held hostage, 
ase-fire. told radio station Cancel that he 

», accosing President Betancur of saw M-19 guerrillas kill four 

judges, including Magistrate Ma- 
nuti Ganna Cruz. 



Table dock “ Colorma Bulgari”, solid silver . : 


BV LG AR I 

10 VTA DEI CONDOTTT ROMA 
HOTEL PIERRE NEW YORK 
30. RUE DU RHONE • 1204 GENEVE 
AVENUE DES BEAUX-ART9 ■ MONTE CARLO 
HOTEL PLAZA-ATHENEE PARIS 





Page 4r 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Pablbhrd With The >n Vork Tnuo and The Tarfnajjm Poel 


Sribune, Real Englishmen Come in Clashing Colors 

Tbc Varfringiofl Poel t, J 


Lift-Off for Eureka 


. It is not often that a building stone for 
Europe is dropped into place so quickly. 
Ministers from 1 8 European countries — the 
whole of Western Europe plus Turkey — 
acted with commendable speed in Hannover 
on Tuesday and Wednesday when they 
cleared the way for implementing the first 10 
projects of Eureka, the European scheme for 
high-technology cooperation th3t borrows 
its name from Archimedes and stands for 
European Research Coordination Agency. 

The idea of Eureka is only six months old. 
Il was put-forward hurriedly by France last 
April as a defensive reaction to President 
Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative. At the 
time it was little more than a general con- 
cept, not yet either fully elaborated or nego- 
tiated with potential partners. French offi- 
cials. while stressing its civilian character 
and saving i L was not meant as an alternative 

to the SDI. conceded that their purpose In 
rushing it out was to prevent the SD1 from 
being the only project under discussion for 
international high-tech cooperation. 

More recently, the anti-SDI aspect of the 
project has largely been lost, although in 
West Germany it continues to be debated in 
those terms. Euxeka’s most fervent advocate 
there is Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich 
Genscher. the foremost opponent of the SDI 
in the government. Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl, an SDI backer, remains skeptical. 

The conviction has been gaining ground 
that Eureka has become a viable framework 
to help harness Western Europe's high-tech 
potential for civilian and commercial pur- 


Alfonsin Needs Friends 


President Raul Alfonsin fell short of a 
sweeping vote of confidence in Argentina's 
midterm elections, but his democratic cause 
gained, while the most backward-looking Per- 
onists lost ground. Still friends of freedom can 
scarcely afford to relax. The foreign debt prob- 
lem remains dangerous and V*’ ashin Eton's help 
on this issue remains essential. 

Just getting to die election was a milestone. 
It has been 20 years since any constitutional 
government lasted long enough to reach a 
midterm vote. Politics in Argentina continues 
to be a rough sport, peopled with demagogic 
Peronists and undemocratic generals. Presi- 
dent Alfonsin has rebuilt his traditionally mid- 
dle-class Radical Party into a national coali- 
tion. He has insisted on legal accountability 
for leaders from the lawless past. .And he has 
aggressively challenged the hyperinflation that 
has repeatedly undermined politics. 

His greatest success has been on the political 
front. For the second time now. his Radicals 
have outpolled the once-invindble Peronists. 
And this time Percnism’s least democratic 


faction, built around uitrarutionalists and la- 
bor bosses, was thoroughly repudiated. 

His legal and economic initiatives have had 
a rougher time. Rightist terrorists are trying to 
block the pending verdicts in the junta trials. 
Unable to count on judges mostly appointed 
by the military to detain the terror suspects, he 
was forced to declare a stale of siege a few- days 
before the voting. His original economic pro- 
gram was derailed largely by resistance from 
the Peronist labor hierarchy. He was forced to 
drastic IMF-style austenty. which has sharply 
reduced inflation — but also real income. That 
probably cost the Radicals some votes. 

Mr. Alfonsin has gained a little breathing 
room, but be remains in i tight spot. He has 
pushed back the ultranaticnalisis. but he still 
faces the crushing foreign debt. He has con- 
fronted but not yet v anquished terrorism, even 
with a worrisome state of siege. To complete 
the democratization of .Argentina he will need 
a lot more help from his friends, starting with 
significant financial relief from Washington. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


Doing Right by Medvid 


Miroslav Medvid. a Soviet sailor, jumped 
ship in New Orleans. Sailors do that fairly 
often, and most are not allowed to stay. But 
because he was jumping from a Soviet ship, the 
possibility arose that this seaman was a defec- 
tor fleeing for a political reason. In those 
circumstances U.S. law, official policy and 
public opinion afforded him special opportu- 
nity to stay. Unfortunately, the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service did not give him a 
reasonable chance to indicate his preference. 

As it happened, in the resulting uproar over 
the forcible return of a struggling seaman to a 
Soviet ship, the State Department got into the 
acL It removed him from the ship, conducted 
overnight political and medical interviews, as- 
certained to its satisfaction that he wanted to 
go back and marked the case dosed. 

What we suspect happened is that, having 
been returned to his ship the first time, the 
sailoT was, if not drugged then perhaps threat- 
ened in a way that made him tell the Ameri- 
cans on the second go- around that he was not 
seeking asylum. Suspecting as much, however. 


the .Americans still could not find grounds for 
detaining him against his expressed will. 

The way the State Depan mem handled the 
Medvid case was instantly tested in the federal 
courts, which declined to uphold the attempt 
\o reclaim him for yet a third round of ques- 
tioning. Legal remedies failing, some of those 
embracing his cause next went to the Senate, 
whose Agriculture Committee issued a sub- 
poena for Mr. Medvid. But enforcing such a 
subpoena is going to be extremely complicated 
within the confines of American law. 

The appearance is that Soviet power is being 
exerted cruelly on a young man who has com- 
mitted no known offense. Il is a case bound to 
trouble any conscientious person. The immi- 
gration officials did damage to a vulnerable 
individual in the first set of interviews. It is 
thin consolation that political authorities did 
what they could to erase that damage in the 
second set. Given the importance of trying to 
do right by this young man, the uphill effort 
to conduct a third set is worth making. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Other Opinion 


Little to Sign at die Summit? 


The message which George Shultz has 
brought back from Moscow [is that] it will be 
tough going in Geneva. Not only do ‘'very 
serious* 1 differences exist across the negotiat- 
ing spectrum, but he had a “very vigorous” 
discussion, ie. a shouting match, with the 


Soviet leader. It seems clearer than ever that 
there will be no arras control agreement ready 
for signature. Unless there is some astonishing 
turnaround in the Politburo's thinking not 
much else will be signed either. Sensibly. Mr. 
Shultz has observed that life will not come to 
an end in the middle of November. 

— The Daily Telegraph {London). 


FROM OUR NOV. 9 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Riots Erupt at Welsh Collieries 
LONDON — There were furious riots in parts 
of the South Wales coalfields [on Nov. 8], fresh 
attempts being made by the strikers to capture 
the power of the Glamorgan colliery and to 
prevent the manager and his staff keeping the 
pumps going. Fierce b&ton charges were made 
by police. Violent disorders also occurred at 
other collieries. A “Morning Leader'' corre- 
spondent in Tonyp&ndy wrote: “I have seen 
street rioting in many European cities, but I 
have never seen anything like the unbridled 
disorder here. The market square looks as 
though it had been through a bombardment.” 
In Cwmbach, the fire hose was first tried on 
the rioters, but this proved ineffective and the 
police resorted to their truncheons, the strikers 
being beaten back to a canal into which nearly 
a hundred fell including women and children. 


1935: U.S. Business Activity Surges 
NEW YORK — Business conditions in aD 
sections of the United States are definitely 
better than at any time since I93Z with every 
indication that (be trend will continue upward, 
according to production indices made public 
[on Nov. 8]. Private industry re-employed 
427.000 during September. This is the most 
important increase since 1933. The upward 
trend gauges show increased business activity, 
especially in the central industrial section 
where the heavy goods industries are situated. 
Treasury income tax figures show that many 
businesses began earning profits again during 
1953. Pacific Coast, Gulf and Atlantic ports 
report increased shipping business. The farm 
belt in the Middle West and South West has 
recovered from the drought and the dust 
storms. Prices are high and crops are good. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

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Editor ALAIN LECOUR Aytcdaie PvNokcr 

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International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Chari es-d e-Gaulle, 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine, 

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c 1985, International Herald Tribune. AB rights reserved. 


L ONDON — Western Europe is coming to 
t face a problem of national identity oew to 


poses, with possible military fallout later 
regardless of the future of the SDI. At least 
two leading companies — - Mara of France 
and Fiat of Italy —are listed among partici- 
pants in the first adopted Eureka projects, 
while being on record also as wanting to 
contribute to the SDL The British govern- 
ment. which is committed to the SDI. has 
now given cautious support also to Eureka. 

In Hannover. Britain and West Germany 
made the launching of Eureka possible by 
dropping their past opposition to state sub- 
sidies to the participating companies and 
research institutes. They did not name the 
sums they are willing to contribute, however. 
One of the many remaining uncertainties 
lies in the fact that even the most supportive 
governments are not willing to commit large 
new financial means for Eureka but are 
falling back on funds previously appropriat- 
ed for other research and industrial projects. 

Other basic difficulties also remain. But 
there is little doubt that Eureka, as a scheme 
for enabling Western Europe to enhan ce 
cooperation, has taken on a life of its own. 

It is a stimulus for industrial cooperation 
In traditional fields as well. In a spectacular 
move. President Francois Mitterrand de- 
clared in Bonn on Friday that France would 
join Bri tain. West Germany. Italy and Spain 
in building a European fighter plane that the 
French had opposed. The impression in 
Bonn and Paris was that the French reversal 
responded to the decision of the British and 
West Ger mans to help finance Eureka. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


X-/ face a problem of national identity new to 
the modem age. It has to do with the arrival of 
huge numbers of migrant workers in the last 
quarter century. By now. some of them have 
settled down mid have no intention of leaving. 
The rising generation of their children hold citi- 
zenship in their new homes by right of birth. 

Hus is creating problems of assimilation and 
community frictions that Americans know wefl 
but that challenge basic agaimptinna of old Eu- 
ropean nations about who they are. It may be the 
ironic revenge of colonialism. Europeans who 
were quite content to ran other societies in Africa 
and Asia are finding it hard to deal with what 
they consider exotic aliens in their own countries. 

Are young West Indian blacks who riot in 
Tottenham and Brixton as English as the football 
hooligans of Liverpool? Does the symbolic no- 
tion of France indude North Africans who dus- 
ter around Montmartre in Paris and what is 
called the Casbah of Marseilles? Are Turkish 
youths in Munich and Rotterdam as fully Ger- 
man or Dutch as their neighbors? 

Only in France, so far, is the question being 
put in this harsh, emotional way, and it is going 
to bean issue in next spring’s elections there. But 
it is looming ahead for modi of Western Europe, 
especially as hopes recede for an encompassing 
European identity to absorb old nationalisms in 
an integrated European Community. 

In Britain, at this stage, it is seen as a problem 
of law and order. Government officials deny that 
“inner city” riots are dearly linked to high un- 


By Flora Lewis 


employment and urban decay. Opposition politi- 
cians insist that the connection is obvious,' that 
unrest is scarcely surprising among youths with 
little prospect of ever getting a job and moving 
into the mainstream. Race is evidently a factor. 


lengths to look different from the throng 
cSlat ten lion to themselves. Although tey 
sometimes dress aggressively, they tend to 1 


JUUlLUlitW Vivw "CO- , - • . . mrnm 

peaceable, even a passive group, but they are 
.i«r that thffv do noi belong to the world 


For now. the riots seem to have been apolitical 
plus for Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Up- 
heaval upsets the British, and they tend to see her 
Tory party as the most determined to restore 
order. Home Secretary Douglas Hurd is aware 
though, that it will not be easy and requires a 
better effort at multiracial conciliation. 

Senior British officials show gratitude to the 
Reverend Jesse Jackson because, when he was 
here for an anti-apartheid demonstration recent- 
ly, he publicly urged more blacks to join the 
police force. There are no visible black — or, for 
that matter, Pakistani or Indian — political lead- 
ers of their communities in Britain. Apart from 
sports figures, there are not even people of prom- 
inent achievements to serve as models. 

The importance of the change of faces in 


American television and advertising generally in 
the last generation is highlighted by the contrast 
here. Americans see every day that a face can be 
Oriental or black or brown and still be undoubt- 
edly American. Britons have cone, although of- 
ten grudgingly, to accept a lot of accents as 
English, but not a lot of looks. 


than in any Con’ 


seem to be many more punks in London 
any Continental city. They go to great 


malirtg clear that they do not belong to the world 
of other people- They, too. are on the fringe- 
These are more than passing problems ano 
fads. Thev signal the onset of deep social chmiges 
in a .society that clings to the reassuring weight of 
the pasL Even socialists say they are particularly 
gladof the role of the royal family in this period. 
fcvviiw as head of the whole Commonwealth n 
brings a certain cohesive force. 

Bm some in Britain also regret the failure to 
have moved more energetically with positive 
measures against racial barriers. Sermons obvi- 
ously are not enough, although the British and 

the French see themselves as especially tolerant 
Legislation and affirmative action, are 
necessary tools to overcome the blockage. 

Racism, which many Europeans thought was a 
peculiar fault of Americans, has developed in 
countries that believed they were above it. These 
countries often failed to notice that they’. took 
identity as one race for granted. 

The United States has not solved its own 
problems, but it has surmounted the biggest 
hurdles of ugW habit. How much that has helped 
to sustain .America’s vitality should be remem- 
bered when arguments are made to abandon 
affirmative action now. America has gaine d a 
lead, and it is beginning to inspire Europeans 
who see the same problems ahead for themselves. 

The Sac York Times. 


Srysetunsosu. *w*sr 


0$Nf 


m 

V L, 









Some Americans Still Need Affirmative Action 


B OSTON — One of America’s 
acute problems, by anyone’s 


By Anthony Lewis 


reckoning, is the existence of a 
black underclass: underemployed, 
locked into deteriorating neighbor- 
hoods and bad schools. The whole 
society’s health depends cm break- 
ing the cycle of deprivation. It is a 
matter not only of justice but of the 
majority's urgent sdf-interesL 

Most Americans understand all 
that For a generation there has 
been a national consensus in favor 
of action to undo centuries of dis- 
crimination, to help deprived blacks 
onto the economic ladder. A poll 
two months ago showed more sup- 
port than ever for affirmative action 
programs in jobs and education. 

Bm the attorney general of the 
United States is not pan of that 
consensus. For years now Ed Meese 
and the Justice Department’s civil 
rights chief, William Bradford 
Reynolds, have been working with 
zealous ferocity to sabotage the 


country’s civil rights laws — to 
abandon the whole effort at healing 
the wound is American society. 

• Brad Reynolds was honored 
Wednesday night at a dinner in 
Washington. Some 500 “conserva- 
tives” paid tribute to him, led by 
Attorney General Meese. The din- 
ner was the perfect symbol of what 
has happened to conservatism in 
America. A political philosophy 
that used to be devoted to conserv- 
ing institutions and knitting society 
together has fallen into the hands of 


people who divide and wreck. 
Toe extreme views of Mr. . 


Toe extreme views of Mr. Rey- 
nolds and Mr. Meese have repeat- 
edly pm President Reagan in awk- 
ward political tangles, from which 
he has had to be rescued by conser- 
vatives of the old variety, pragma- 
tists interested not in ideology but 
in keeping the system functioning. 

The Voting Rights Act was a idl- 


ing example. In 1981 the House 
passed a bill to renew, this most 
basic legislation. The vote was 389 
to 24. Mr. Reagan was 'ready to 
endorse the bUL but Brad Reynolds 
stepped in and denounced it. 

The next spring, as obstruction 
of voting rights legislation became a 
political embarrassment. Senate 
Majority Leader Bob Dole rescued 
the administration. He proposed a 
version dose to the House bill, and 
the Senate overwhelmingly passed 
iL To the last minute Mr. Reynolds 
worked to block it But when the bill 
passed, Mr. Reagan hailed it 

Then there was the episode of tax 
exemptions for racist schools. Mr. 
Reynolds tried to slip that through - 
without review in Congress or the 
courts. Congress was outraged, and 
the Supreme Court dismissed the 
Reynolds position by an 8-1 vote. 

Right now Messrs. Reynolds and 


Meese are trying to wreck the 20- 
year-old federal policy of requiring 
government contractors to set goals 
for hiring minorities and women. 
What bothers, the two iriea is plam: 
The polity works. If has actually 
brought some Mads into the eco- 
nomic system — police officers in 
Indianapolis, far example. 

This time the pragmatic conser- 
vatives are trying to stop the Rey- 
nolds-Meese zealotry at an early 
stage, before it becomes policy and 
has to be undone. The opponents 
include Mr. Dole, House Minority 
Leader Robert Mkhd, seven cabi- 
net manbers and the National As- 
sociation of Mamrfactnrera. 

There is no dearer contrast of 
old and new conservatism than in 
the domain of civil rights — or of 
old and new Republicanism. What 
used to be the 6arty of Lincoln is 
now, to a significant extent, a party 
for Brad Reynolds. 

The New York Times. 


The Sailor 
Who Went 


*»r 


OkapMm. 


By Mary McGrory 


W ASHINGTON — Miroslav 
Medvid, a 22-year-old Soviet 


seaman, jumped into the Mississippi 
River twice. But that was not enough 


River twice. But that was not enough 
to convince the U.S. Immigration 
and Naturalization Service that be 
warned to defect — that he wanted, 
as he is quoted at one point as saying, 
to “live in an honest country.” 

Although his actions were elo- 
quent, Mr. Medvid speaks no Eng- 
lish, and he was unable to jump the 
language barrier into the freedom he 



ra/nct urn 

wfmum 

Y0OEECTT? 



l ce UNO is, oy reputation, no orna- 
ment to the federal service. Its reflex 
of turning bade political refugees 
from £1 Salvador and other Latin 
American countries has been fine- 
tuned to the point of farce. So the 
INS took Mr. Medvid bade to his 
ship, and be tried again to communi- 
cate by jumping out of their boaL 

Too late, the State Department en- 
tered the picture, instituted proper 
procedures, filled out the forms and 
accepted Mr. Medvid's word that he 
wanted to go home. U.S. doctors not- 
ed a cut on his arm, which the ship’s 
captain said was self-inflicted, but 
they were satisfied with Mr. Medvid's 
declaration that he did not know if he 
had tried to commit suicide. 

The bureaucratic explanation was 
that the young seaman nad not asked 
for “formal asylum." Of course he 
didn't. Asylum in Russia means an 
insane asylum. It is a place where 
those who denounce the Soviet ns 
gime are drugged and abused on tbc 
grounds that anyone unhappy with 
life in a socialist paradise is dement- 
ed. We can only imagine the tortures 
he is enduring on board and the hell 
that awaits him in home port. 

He might have been better off if 
he had simply told the State Depart- 
ment that he was homesick. A 19- 
year-old Soviet soldier in Afghani- 
stan named Alexander Sukhanov 
took refuge in the U.S. Embassy in 
KabuL He did not want to go to the 


Terrorism: 
A Case for 
New Rules 






By Raymond Price 

TT/ASHiNGTON — "World 
VY peace through law* ranks with 
faith, hope and charity as on expres- 
sion of Western virtue. But 10 proas 
singing psalms and 20 lawyers raat- 
iirg the oacsriaiaon arc no match for 
one tenons! with a machine pm and 
a of b rad grenades. Anyone who 
acts as if they were is going to lose. 

In the lease drama surrounding the 
capture of (be Adtifie Uuro hijack. 
cts. Egypt and Italy RaUowed nation, 
al interest, not law. Each governme^ . 


Qierished concepts of 
kne have to be junked. 


had what it considered bigger fish to 
fry ft™ tbc terrorist leader. Moham- 
med Abbas. Each was driven by fear. 

And in tbc final analysis, was 
more fearful of offending Yasser 
Arafat than the United States. - 
With regard to shon-term costs 
and benefits, each may have calculat- 
ed correctly. But the affair has long- 
term lessons for *sy nation serious 

aboot combating terrorism. - 

Ways must be found to insulate 
the war agttinst terrorism from the in- 
ternal politics of indmdoal nations. 

And the risk of terrorist roomer- 

Americans, mess^^^mnst come jk 
to grips with the need, in dealing wilh 
internatio n al terrorism, to junk some 
cherished concepts of law. 

Today's terrorism is dferingpished 
from other forms of violence by its 
political nature, its oefwocks of orga- 
nization and support and thecapn- 
cious waysit selects innocent victims. 

Terrorism oc cu pies a gray area be- 
tween crime and war. It has aspects 
of both. But the terrorist under- 
ground is a more dush* target than a 
uniformed army, and the ordinary 
strictures of ernmoa) and interna- 
tional law are whofly inadequate to 
deal with terrorist organizations. 

hi war yon don't insist on reading 
the Mirada rights to the membecs of 
an enemy unit before lobbcog artfl- 
fexysfac&ec them. You don’t agonize 
I over the admissSxfity of evidence be- 
fore acting oo imdKgcnce informa- 
tion about enemy movements. 

There is need for la ws and new 
legal institutions specifically de- 
signed for die war on terr oris m, and 
also tor a return to the use of extra- 
legal p roced ur es. The rash to purity 
in which the CIA's Covert action ca-p 
pabffitks were gutted in the 1970s 
was an open invitation to terrorism. 

The United States must be able to 
deal with te r ro ris t s as brutally and as 
deviously as they deal with it. 

Terrorists should be given a swift 
death penalty, not in vengeance but 
as prevention, to avert another inci- 
dent demanding their release. By the 
same token, tbc world’s nations 
should roundup their convicted ter- 
rorists. hold them under internation- 
al auspices and let It be known that 
terrorist acts to secure (heir release 
will result in (heir immediate execu- 
tion. Make the terrorists jhemsdves 
hostages against terrorism. 

Tog aha with any other nation 
willing to join — two or three would 
be enough to start — the United 
Stales should take the lead in estab- 
lishing a new international tribunal 
It should be a Terrorist Court, with “ 
only this as its jurisdiction, to which W 
cases could be referred by sovereign ’ V. 

governments, whether among the ■ 

court’s founders or noL It should be 
empowered to impose the death pen- v 
alty — and only the death penalty— 
for oompHdty in a terrorist act. 

Such a court would put an inter- 0 
national imprimatur on the war 
against terrorism; insulate individual 
governments from the political and 
diplomatic backlash they fear from 
those sympathetic to terrorists; pro- 
vide an alternative drat makes it un- 
necessary to keep convicted terrorists 
in prison; spread die risk of reprisal 
But law alone is not enough. Any- 
one tempted to join the terrorist un- 
derground should be on notice that 
enlistment is his own death warrant. 


U i loin 






exercisa b le wherever he is caught- jA 
No country that gives sanctuary to * ; 


No country th at gives sanctuary to 
terrorists should expect immunity 
from acts of reprisal on its territory. 

Individual terrorists must he made 
to hurt. Their organizations and their 
causes must be made to hurt. Coun- 
tries that give them support and sanc- 
tuary most be maHg to hurt. 

° 1985 Raymond Price. 


M 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Eattor" and must contain the writ- 
er s signature, name and fuB ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
ae subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for die return of 
unsolicited manuscripts 


■.l*,' 1 

:r* dim 


United States, although he was prom- 
ised asylum, presumably in terms 
that did not terrify him. He said he 
wanted to be in Moscow. 

He may survive. At least the Soviet 
ambassador who took him away de- 
clared that his wish would be granted. 
Although the Kremlin certainly does 
not want its soldiers applying for 
home leave through the LIS. Embas- 
sy, Mr. Sukhanov’s crime was so 
much less than it could have been (be 
might have said he wished to declaim 
on Soviet atrocities in Afghanistan) 
that they may let him off. 

Does Mr. Medvid's wretched expe- 
rience mean that INS guards should 
be required to learn Russian? Proba- 
bly not But they ought to be told at 
least that certain types of body lan- 
guage are compelling. They should 
consider that a man who jumps into 
the water twice is not just interested 
in swimming. They might recall that 
U.S. policy is to welcome people 
seeking refuge from co mmun ism. 

Perhaps immigr ation officers who 
fish Soviets out of the water should 


World Law and Order 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


By what dictatorial fiat does Presi- 
dent Reagan decade, without debate 
in Congress, to withdraw the United 
States from the jurisdiction of the 
World Court? If the American nation 
truly believes in law and order, it 


must promote a greater degree oi 
international law, not sabotage it. 
THOMAS J. MIGLAUTSCH. 

.. Oconomowoc. Wisconsin. . 


Union used military might to impose 
Communist tyranny oo half of Eu- 
rope. Today it has military involve- 
ments not only in Afghanistan but 
also, through its Cuban mercenaries, 
in Africa and Central America. And 
the Soviets and the European govern- 
ments under their control ignore the 


Aroa^ca reajjy have to hurt friends^ 
and hu mi l i a te staunch supporters? 

mark van hout. 
Londerzed, Belgium. 

If you harbor a killer in your house. 


■"ki 
'•ft. <4***! 

-VMWI 
sue. .*n 

VIM* 


you slwuld expea to take the heat 


deere erf T K U - d 5 thQrC P n j f0i ^ when the cops come around. The ek>- « If l 1 , 

Sit human nghu accords that they than- quent MrTWeeks might explain that J *)[{«. 1 IV^ 
tagesL selvte signed in Hclsmto. to Tunisians upset bv the Israeli raid ** ” H 

JTS 9 FL . W ithout real change in Soviet on the Palestine UbeLrioQ Organiza- * 

iron s headquaners outside Tunis, 


Tension Has Real Causes 


I was shocked by George F. Ken- 
oaa's comments in “The Main Sum- 
mit Business Is Arms Control" (Nov. 
4). He recommends that at the Gene- 
va summit President Reagan should 
avoid linkage between arms control 
and the actual causes of international 
tens on, namely, Soviet military in- 
volvements and human rights abuses. 
Just such a no-linkage approach was 


selves signed in Helsinki. 

Without a real change in- Sonet 
foreign policy, • would not an arms 
control agreement be; just another 
scrap of waste papei? 

vinttla bratianu. 

Paris. 


After the Tunis Raid 


be instructed to call some higher au- . taken by leading European powers in 
thority before returning would-be the mhM930s at a rime when Hitler 


refugees to their owners. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


could still have been thwarted. 

After World War n, the Soviet 


Regarding “An Erratic United 
States Hurts Its Anies” (Oct 28): 

Willel Weeks's comment on the 
Tunis air raid, cameras quite a relief. 
He expresses the view of the typical 
American worker in the field, so dif- 
ferent from the Opinion of official 
Washington and the American pu b li c 
at home. Israelis may have the right 
to encourage an li-Semhism. but does 


ALLEN. NaCHEMAN, 
Bangkok. 

The Press as Deterrent 

fa his opinion columfl “Some Prac^ 

™ ‘Diptomatic Decqi- 
1,011 (Oa. 26), Charles Krautham- 
mer misses a. tdfing poini One 1 

rh?? uwl1 15 Prewtew in 
the United States, aside from the Pu- 
ri tan ethic, is the free press — seme- : 
32* m et - the rest of the world 
«°KtPeople are less apt to lie when 
they know they risk exposure. ' 

JOE G. MOTHERaL. , 

. . Abu Dhabi 




r— 


** *. 1 

•*.E 







** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 


Page 


Craxi Eases 
PLO Stance, 
Gels 2d Vote 


Text of the Hostages Letter to Reagan AIDS in Africa: Scientists Probe Transmission Pattern 

. . The Associated Press v 



Reuters 

ROME — Italy’s five-party gov- 
ernment coalition won a crucial 
vote of confidence in Senate on- 
Friday, allowing it to continue in 
power, after a crisis over its han- 
dling of the A chille Lauro hijack- 
ing. 

Senators -voted 180 to 102, with 
one abstention, to support the gov- • 
eminent, Jed by Socialist Bettino 


• ;r *-*& 

•r-u.' 


' ;■ siaij 


made Wednesday defending the 
Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion's right to armed struggle: 

The vote followed a similar mo- 
tion that the government won in 
the Chamber of Deputies, the lower 
house, on Wednesday. 

The coalition collapsed three 
weeks ago after the. Republican 
Party, which is pro-Israeli, with- 




• ^ 

! 

r -p; 

adj. 


— > 

-1 

lyC 


meat dealt with tfae aflegedlqick- 
ers of the Italian cruise ship. 

The prime minister’s remarks 
Wednesday, which preceded the 
lower-house vote, were regarded by 
some as a si gnifican t departure 
from a coalition policy document 
.drawn up last week that matte the 
PLO's rejection of violence a con- ' 
ctition of any future support for the 
organization. 

_ On Friday, Mr. Craxi reiterated 
his opposition to violence and said 
'he would follow the coalition po- 
licy document “scrupulously. ” 


The Associated Press 

BEIRUT — Here is the text of a handwritten letter addressed to 
President Ronald Reagan arid bearing the names of ] four Americans held 
hostage by SMite Moslems In Lebanon: 

An Open-Letter to Prudent Reagan 8 Nov. 85 

MrRreadcnfc . 

Weareappealingw you for actioiL We havercadand heard over 
•' the past months ofyour refusal- to negotiate with our captors, and 
your rationale for it. We understand it, but do not agree.- You negoti- 
ated overthe hostages from the TWA plane, and such negotiations 
have been, held repeatedly and success idly by other countries — Is- 
rael, Egypt, H Salvador and the Soviet Union. 

- You, and they, did SO because you believed that saving the lives of 
innocent hostages should be the primary goal. We are asking for the 
' same consideration. There's no alternative, i 

have no tWBnectiou with Syria, Iran or local Shine leaders, j 
notgive in to pressure from them, since no one knows their identity. 

Iney say they will not be moved, and are growing impatient. You 
have tried other routes, but have not won the release of a single hos- 
tage in coore than 1 8 months. We have no chance of escaping, and 
our captors say if any attempt is made to rescue us, they and we will 
all die. . . 

They believe they have shown in unilaterally releasing Pastor Ben 
Weir that their intentions are good — they do not wish to harm us, 
and want to bring this to a rapid and peaceful caodmaao. But they 
say you have so far given no indication, public or private, that you 
are willing to negotiate: Mr. President, tow long do you suppose 
these people will wait? 

We are told William Buddey is dead. Father Lawrence Martin 
Jen co has beeria hostage 10 months, Tory Anderson 8 months. Da- 
vid Jacobsen 6 months, Thomas Sutherland S months. 

The conditions of our captivity are deteriorating again, as is oar 
physical and mental health. ~ 

"We are kept in a small, damp [two words scratched out] 24 boms a 
day, without proper exercise, sanitation, fresh air or balanced diet. 
We have only in termitlent access to outside news. It is difficult to re- 
main cheerful arid optimistic when we see no sign anywhere of pro- 
gress toward otm release. ; - - ’ 

Mr. Reagan, we thank you for the efforts you have made through 
these long months, bat your “quiet diplomacy” is not [underlined]. 

- working; We know of your distaste fen- bargaining with terrorists. Do 
you know the consequences your continued refusal will have for us? 

1 1 is in your power to have us home for Omstmas. Will you not have 
mercy on us md ourfamilies and do so? 

May God be with you. 

LA WRENCE MARTIN JENCO, OSM; DA V1D JA COBSEN, 
TERRY ANDERSON, THOMAS SUTHERLAND. 


France to Join 
Fighter Project 

(Continued from Page lj 


4 U.S. Hostages in Lebanon 
Urge Reagan to Negotiate 


- "( *«-: 

. — u 




high technology, which is known as 
Eureka. 

Mr. Mitterrand said Friday that 
12 nations had been invited to join 
France in the development of the 
lighter plane, expected to be led by 
the Dassault-Briguet aviation 
group of France. • 

Marcel Dassault, chairman of 
: ^ Avion® Marcel Dassault-Briguet 
_ Aviation, was said by industry 

' £ _^^ sources to have played a key role 
; '‘■Readier this year m keeping France 
' out of the other project because of 
his insistence that Ms company be 
gjven the leadership .role for the 
joint plane's design. 

Government sources in Bonn 
suggested that Mr. Mitterrand had 
since swayed Mr. DassahlL 
The European fighter Aircraft is 

- undergoing feasibility studies. The • 
main contractors are British Aero- 

- space PLC, Messerschnritt-BOl- 
kow-Blohm GmbH and Donrier 
GmbH of West Germany, AeritaHa 
of Italy and Coostrucriones A6roh- 
auticas SA, or CASA of Spain. 

Development is expected to be- 
gin next year. West German De- 
fense Ministry sources say the pro- 
ject is expected to produce 800 
aircraft, representing orders of 
about S30 


(Continued from Page 1) 

hostages had been killed by firing 
squads. . - ■ 

In a separate letter to the media, 
also bearing the four signatures, the 
captives said: “We have just been 
told that someone has claimed that 
Islaxmc Jihad has killed all of us. 


?•- 


" V 


. .XTSL 


rc." 

,:r: 


,i ■ ... 


tors say it was an attempt by 
U-S- government to spoil negotia- 
tions.” ■ ■ ■ 

- A telephone caller to a Western 
news agency in Beirut on Thurs- 
day, who claimed to speak for Is- 
lamic Jihad, said the hostages 
would be killed because negotia- 
tions with the United Stales had 
“readied a dead end.” 

Two later callers cl aime d the 
Americans had beat killed and 
tbar bodics bad been dumped in 
Beirut No bodies woe founds . 

The package also contained a let- 
ter to two US. congressmen; a let- 
ter to the archbishop of Canter- 
bury, Robert Rirnde, and personal 
letters to each of their fannhes- 

A letter -from Mr. Anderson to. 
the Beirut staff of The Associated 
Press said all were “written volun- 
tarily, -without coercion, or dicta- 
tion.” . . 

Their captors told them that an- 
other hostage, William Buckley, an 


American diplomat, “is dead,” the 
letter said. 

Islnmir Jihad claimed in a state- 
ment Ocl 4 that Mr. Buckley, 57, 
was killed in revenge for what the 
group called U.S. complicity in Is- 
rael’s Oct. 1 air raid on the Pales- 
tine liberation Organization head- 
quarters in Tunisia. 

The letters did not mention a 
sixth American, Peter Kllburn, 60, 
a librarian at the university missing 
since Dec. 3, 1984. Islamic. Jihad 
initially claimed it kidnapped Mr. 

Oh urn 

The Reverend Benjamin Wear, a 
Presbyterian minister, was freed 
Sept. 14 after 16 months. 

In their letter to Mr. Reagan, the 
hostages said: “We have read and 
heard over the past months of your 
refusal to negotiate with our cap- 
tors, and your rationale for it_ 

“We understand it, but do not 
agree- You negotiated over the hos- 
tages from the TWA plane and( 
such negotiations have been held 
repeatedly and successfully by oUk 
er countries — Israel, Egypt, El 
Salvador and the Soviet Union.” 

The reference to Trans World 
Airlines was to the hijariting of a jet 
airliner in Juno on a flight from 
Athens to Rome. Thirty- nine 
American hostages were held 17 
days and released on June 30. 




* Hussein Seeks 
PLOPIedge 

(Continued from Page 1) 

PLO should renounce all terrorism 
.inside and outside Israel, he said: 
■ “You can’t be involved in serious 
talks and in violence. A renuncia- 
tion of violence by the PLO would 
pave the way for its playing a role.” 

He stressed, however, that the 
PLO could not be asked to make 
such amove unless an international 
-conference was likely to be con- 
vened. 

The king appeared to accept the 
t distinction Mr. Arafat drew in Cai- 
ro on Thursday between the legiti- 
macy of violence inside and outside 
of Israeli-occupied land. 

“Obviously we differentiate be- 
tween actions taken outside those 

- territories and those that come 
from and reflect the misery of Pal- 
estinians living under occupation,” 
the long said. 

“When a West Ranker throws a 
stone, that is not organized PLO 
resistance,” he said. “It is the Pales- 
. tinian people expressing legitimate 
opposition to 18 years of occupa- 
; don and denial of their rights.” 

Asked what would happen if Mr. 

- Arafat did not reaffirm his cmmmt- 
| meats. Hussein said: “Then I will 

go and tell the people the whole 
' stray and the Palestinians will tove 
to deride on further appropriate 
action as they see fit" 

Aides cautioned that this should 
l not be seen as an indication that 
■ Jordan was willing to negotiate 
with Israel alone. 


Gorbachev: Tougher Image 
For the Domestic Audience? 


(Continued from Page 1) 
would have known that he risked 
the death penalty for deserting, and 
the speculation in Moscow is that 
he would- not have returned with- 
out some advance arrangement. 

If the entire episode was 
planned, it was a coup that Mr. 
Goibadiev needed as much for do- 
mestic- purposes as for any embar- 
rassment it caused to Mr. Reagan. 
The coverage given Mr. Yurchenko 
on Soviet television helped the So- 
viet leadership to recoup from its 
embarrassment over the chemical 
dust that the Americans said was 
bring used in Moscow to trade 
Americans and over the defection 
of Oleg; A Gorfievsky, the KGB 
station chief in Britain. ' 

On Monday, when Mr. Shultz 
arrived, in Moscow for talks, 
Pravda published letters from read- 
ers accusing Mr. Reagan of refus- 
ing to focus cm aims control in his 
meeting with Mr. Gorbachev. 

One letter, signed by N. Tasen- 
kov, a Moscow woman, said: 

“It seemed as if ' President Rea- 
gan had been talking of a desire to 
facilitate the resolution of the mam 
pnwni problem — disarmament, 
the liquidation of the nuclear 
standoff, on end to the arms race. 
But suddenly he turned 180 de- 

r s. Now he says that this is not 
mam- thing — - lei's talk, about 
‘regional problems.’ Would he real- 
ly betray the topes of millions of 
people?* 


The Soviet press also has been 
accusing the United States of hu- 
man rights violations. On Wednes- 
day, for example, the bishops of the 
Russian Orthodox Church pub- 
lished an open letter to Mr. Reagan 
charging unspecified reprisals 
against “religious figures and pro- 
gressive church movements unwel- 
come to the government,” 

Diplomats believe that the Sovi- 
et press wants to prepare the public 
for a disappointment a! the summit 
meeting after the intensive buildup. 

Reagan to Address 
Soviet Over VOA 

Sev York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The White 
House has announced that a re- 
quest by President Ronald Reagan 
to appear on Soviet television had 
been turned down, and that he 
would instead uy to speak to the 
Soviet people on Saturday via 
shortwave radio. 

The planned 10- minute address 
to the Soviet Union is to be carried 
over the Voice of America. Offi- 
cials said Thursday it would be 
about Mr. Reagan’s topes for the 
s ummit meeting with Mikhail S. 
Gorbacbev, the Soviet leader, in 
Geneva on Nov. 19 and 20. 

The broadcast will be carried in 
Fngiiith ami simultaneously trans- 
lated into Russian. 


U.S. to Block Departure of Soviet Freighter 


(Conftaned from Page I) 
Medvid to determine whether he 
wanted to defect to the United 
States. 

“It’s dear to me that his life is in 
jeopardy the second that ship hits 
the high seas,” Mr. Helms said. 

After Mr. Medvid jumped ship 
OcL 24, border agents returned him 
to Soviet custody following an in- 
terview in which they understood 
him to say that be did not want to 
defect. He dove into the river again 
as he was heading toward the 
freighter in a private launch, blit- 
was recaptured. 

The State Department later re- 
moved Mr. Medvid from the ship 
and interviewed him ashore: He 
was permitted to return to 'the ves- 
sel after persuading officials that he 


wanted to return to the Soviet 
Union, the department said. 

The derision to seek a subpoena 
was denounced by some legislators. 

Several federal judges also have re- 
fused to beconw involved in the 
case over (he last two weeks, main- 
taining that the courts should not 
interfere with delicate matters of 
foreign policy, ' 

Senator Alan K: Simpson, Re- 
publican of Wyoming and chair- 
man of a Senate judiciary subcom- 
mittee on immigration, said the 
subpoena could invite retaliation. 
“If a Russian citizen is removed 

from Russian property” he. aid, “a 
U.S. citizen may be removed frtoi 
U-S. property.’? 

'But the move received support 


from Robert J. Dole, the Senate 
Republican majority leader, and 
from Senator Richard G. Lugar, 

Republican of TtHtiana and chair - 
man of the Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee. 

The Immi gration and Natural- 
ization Service said it knew of no 
connection between the Medvid in- 
cident and the defection Wednes- 
day of a Romanian sailor in Jack- 
sonville, Florida. 

Immigration officials said the 
Romanian, Stefan Veraea, would 

be granted political asylum. They 
described his case as routine, not- 
ing that sflarrvm from Communist 
nations frequently jump ship in the 
.United States and are granted asy- 
lum. . 


(Continued from Page 1} 
natio n** AIDS cases to intimate 
heterosexual contact, and nearly all 
these cases involve women who 
were apparently infected -with the 
AIDS vims through sexual contact 
with an infected man. 

AIDS, which is an acronym for 
acquired immune deficiency syn- 
drome. was discovered in 1981 and 
has been known to be a worldwide 
public health problem since 1983. 
Countries reporting cases of AIDS 
to the World Health Organization 
in Geneva jumped to 71 in October 
from 40 in August, with the case 
count nearing 17.000. 

At hough individual doctors 
have reported in various medical 
journals on AIDS cases among res- 
idents of almost 20 countries in 
Africa, no country in central. East 
or West Africa has reported any 
cases to the World Health Organi- 
zation. So it is not possible to ob- 
tain an accurate total count of cases 
on that continent. 

To this reporter, who is also a 
physician and who has examined 
AIDS patients and interviewed 
dozens of doctors while traveling 
through Africa, the disease is clear- 
ly a more important public health 
problem than many African gov- 
ernments acknowledge. 

In trying to explain the dimen- 
sions of the problem, and his frus- 
trations in dealing with it, one phy- 
sician pricked up two thick packs of 
green hospital record charts, one 
for AIDS cases, the other for sus- 
pect ed cases, and said quietly: 
“They are growing thicker each 
week.” Yet, he said, the director of 
the hospital has told him to tell 
officials that be has diagnosed only 
two cases of the disease. 

Access to accurate information 
has been shut off in many cases as 
some governments fear an impact 
on tourism which provides vital 
foreign exchange. Some expatriates 
working in central and East Africa 
have said they feel threatened with 
expulsion from their host countries 
if they talk freely without govern- 
ment approval. Some African 
countries have refused visas to 


journalists inquiring about AIDS. 

In some important ways, Rwan- 
da is a notable exception to the 
tendency to suppress information. 
Its doctors have been permitted to 
publish in journals and gram a lim- 
ited number of interviews. 

According to new data provided 
by one expert, the number of cases 
in Rwanda, although an incom- 
plete total, has surged each year 
since 1982 in a pattern similar to 
that in the United States and else- 
where. Most cases have occurred in 
Kigali, the capital, with a prepon- 


in Africa is markedly different 
from what it is in the'resi of the 
world, the disease itself is the same. 
They come to that conclusion pri- 
marily because the virus HTLV-3- 
LAV seems to be the cause of the 
disease the world over, although 
they can detecL seemingly minor 
variations from within various 
countries and from continent to 
continent. 

Sexual contact and blood are two 
of the most common ways AIDS is 
spread the world over. 

Doctors here regard heterosex- 


was now a predominantly urban 
phenomenon, mainly striking up- 
per-income groups. But the disease 
affects all social classes and threat- 
ens to spread to the families that 
toll the steep, lush hillsides of 
Rwanda. 

The small number of prostitutes 
in Rwanda is believed to be a prime 
source of spreading AIDS. 

A study of 33 women who are 
prostitutes in Butare, Rwanda, 
where the national university and 
an important military camp are sit- 
uated, found that 29. or SS percent. 


Access to accurate information has been shut off in many cases as 
some governments fear an impact on tourism . 


dcrau cc among those in the middle 
and upper class who earn the equiv- 
alent of 53,000 to 56,000 each year. 
About 40 percent of the cases have 
been among women. 

The total number of AIDS cases 
has risen sharply since 1982. when 
a single- case was reported. There 
were six reported cases in 1983, 86 
in 1984 and 224 so far this year. 

Children accounted for’ 70 of 
these 317 cases, or 22 percent, a 
proportion that contrasts sharply 
with that of the United Slates. The 
Centers for Disease Control in At- 
lanta report that children account- 
ed for only 206 the 14,519 AIDS 
cases in the United States, or 1.4 
percent of the total. 

The childhood afflictions in 
Rwanda and elsewhere in Africa 
are of particular concern to medi- 
cal researchers. “Since nearly half 
the cases of AIDS in Africa occur 
among women in their reproduc- 
tive years, and since these women 
are having many babies, perinatal 
transmission is a very important 
problem, said Dr. Peter Pim, a pro- 
fessor of microbiology at the Insti- 
tute of Tropical Medicine in Ant- 
werp, Belgium, who is helping 
coordinate African research pro- 
jects on AIDS. 

Scientists believe that although 
the communicable nature of AIDS 


uai transmission as by far the most 
important factor in the spread of 
AIDS in Africa, and they base 
there conclusions on studies of vic- 
tims and interviews with them and 
their f amili es. 

One difficulty in blood analysis 
is that most of these countries do 
not have the expertise and ad- 
vanced laboratory equipment 
needed to test for evidence of the 
AIDS virus in blood Specimens 
must be sent to Belgium, France or 
the United States for virus testing, 
which, although a slow process, 
eventually does help in overall re- 
search findings. 

The consequence of the lack of 
proper testing is that AIDS-con- 
taminated blood may often be 
transfused every day into patients 
who for various reasons are in need 
of deviated blood According toone 
study of about 100 donors in 
Rwanda, 20 percent had antibodies 
to the virus and presumably could 
pass on the virus. 

Because of the costs of dispos- 
able needles and a somewhat less 
than strict attitude toward the 
problem, doctors and health work- 
ers in Africa often re-use needles 
without sterilizing them. 

Doctors in Rwanda, who spoke 
on the condition that they would 
not be identified said that AIDS 


had been infected by the AIDS 
virus. The researchers also found 
that 25 men who were customers 
had a median number of 31 differ- 
ent sex partners each year with a 
range from 2 to 119, including a 
median of 30 prostitutes. Evidence 
of infection with the AIDS virus 
was found in 7 of the 25 men. The 
researchers found little evidence of 
anal intercourse . and concluded 
that frequency of sexual contacts 
with different partners was more 
important than the type of inter- 
course. 

In another study, prepared earli- 
er and being published in the Unit- 
ed Slates in the Journal of the 
American Medical Association, 
several Belgian physicians working 
in Rwanda and Belgium together 
with American scientists from the 
National Cancer Institute in Be- 
thesda, Maryland also reported 
finding high incidence evidence of 
AIDS infection among prostitutes; 
they said they found the virus in 80 
percent of a group of 84 prostitutes 
surveyed in Rwanda. 

The scientists concluded that 
“female prostitutes are highly sus- 
ceptible to infections” with the 
AIDS virus and “could be an im- 
portant reservoir of the AIDS 
agent among the heterosexual pop- 
ulation of central Africa.” 


In a study oT 90 prostitutes in 
Kenya by a team of Kenyan, Amer- 
ican and Canadian doctors 49, or 
54 percent, were infected by the 
AIDS vims and more than three- 
fourths of these women had evi- 
dence of significant illness such as 
swollen lymph nodes throughout 
their bodies. 

The figures cited for AIDS cases 
in Rwanda, as in other African 
countries, must be regarded as min- 
imal because not all AIDS victims 
seek medical treatment; physicians 
do not recognize all cases of AIDS 
as such: intensive care units either 
do not exist or rarely meet Ameri- 
can standards; Few autopsies are 
performed in most African coun- 
tries: most doctors in Africa have 
less chance to compare notes with 
their colleagues practicing else- 
where, even in the same country” 
and it is difficult to keep up with 
medical advances because Ameri- 
can and European scientific jour- 
nals do not circulate widely in Afri- 
ca. 

In Kenya, government officials 
say there are only a few cases of 
AIDS. But doctors say privately 
that there are many more, though 
the numbers do not approach the 
levels in Rwanda, Zaire and other 
central African countries. 

Among the points being learned 
in Zaire, according to unconfirmed 
reports reaching other countries, 
are these: 

• AIDS has had a heavy impact 
on workers in some of the country's 
leading institutions. About one- 
half the staff of a bank in Kinshasa 
has been stricken by AIDS. 

• Some reports say about 10 new 
cases of AIDS are bring seen each 
week at a hospital in Kinshasa and 
that as many as half the patients in 
that hospital are infected. 

• Doctors are recognizing with 
increasing frequency that renewed 
attacks of malaria and fulminant 
tuberculosis, which are very com- 
mon infections in Zaire, are addi- 
tional examples of infections that 
kill patients with AIDS. 



Photos by: Bischof, Bum, Capa, Cartier-Bresson, Erwitt, Hass, and other Magnum photographers. 

From the archives of Magnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe 
in the immediate postwar years — str ikin g images of a continent shaking 
off the debris of destruction and coming to life. 

Mary Blume, the International Herald Tribune’s distinguished 
feature journalist, sets the postwar scene and interviews many of the 
photographers in her introduction. The I.H.T. is pleased to present this 
unique volume that captures a decisive epoch and commemorates the 
work of some of the 20th century’s master photojournalists. 

Here you’ll find some Of the most famous images and faces of our 
time. Once you open its pages, you will want to spend hours poring over 
this magnifi cently produced collection. Truly this is a book to treasure for 
yourself, and a beautiful gift -as welL 

Available from the International Herald Tribuae. Order today. 

■■ m mmmmwmmmmmmmmm ■ itcralD^^enbimc 

AFTER THE WAR WAS OVER 

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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 


ARTS / LEISURE 


1 1 it o 


Dr . Claribel 9 Miss Etta and Their Artistic Legacy to Baltimore 




i «L 


By John Russell 

•Vrw JVtfA 7 *«wj St^vrcr 


quest is one of the ketones of the from Dec. 14 through Feb. 9. at the 
Baltimore Museum of An. Ac- Kim bell Art Museum in Fort 


N EW YORK — Collectors 
come in all shanes and sizes. 


1 ~ come in all shapes ar.d sizes. 
They develop in different ways and 
at different speeds. Some of them 
bum out fast. Thereafter and forev- 
er they reseat the loss of the indis- 
pensable something — flair, in* 
stinct, appetite or very good ad\ire 
— that made their first successes 
possible. In others, the acquisitive 
instinct hesitates, lies dormant, and 
then finishes in triumph. 

Two slow starters who ended in 
glory were - the Cone sisters. Dr. 
Oaribel and Miss Eua. whose Re- 


quired m 1950. after the death of Worth. The show is remarkable not 
• Etta, the surviving sister, it consists only for its representation of Ma- 


above all of a majestic holding of tisse but for the substantial works 
Matisse — 42 oil paintings. 18 by Courbet. Cezanne. Marie Lau- 


seulptures. 36 drawings. 155 prints, rencin, Felix Vallotton, van. Gogh, 
seven illustrated books and about Gauguin. Redon and Picasso. 


tions were also after what was she put on some of her spectacular She was subject, however, to over- 
known to be one of the most Lmpor- pieces of French 18th-century riding private affections that she 
tam private holdings of 20lh-caitn- paste jewelry, did her hair in a formed, sometimes fought against, 
ty art in the United States. But she psyche knot held in place by silver sometimes discarded altogether but 
won out. And now, 35 years later, skewers from India, and draped her in any case lived very intensely. ^ 
the Baltimore Museum has pro- ample figure with either a silk “Two Women," Gertrude Stem s 

_ i i_ - « r • a ▼ i*. . « ... i i «_ - (irArne rtf 


w? w 


<-■ j 
yiT’ii 



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mA 


duced a book, in which not only the shawl from India or a burnoose remarkable portrait in words of 


Cone collection but the lives of the from North Africa. 


250 items relating to Matisse's il- .All this makes it clear all over two sisters are set out in greater Though near the top of her pro- 


lustra ted edition of the poems of again that it was a great day for 


Stephane Mallartne. 


Baltimore when the city was 


Until May 1986. the Cone wing deemed to have fulfilled ihe condi- 


seen through Nov. 24 at the Los 
Ansde» Countv Museum, and 




they appeared in the Baltimore 
Evening Sun. When Henry Cowell 
came to Baltimore in 1923 as a 
young composer, there were dis- 
cerning individuals who realized at 
once that, thanks in part to the use 
of forearm and fists, he drew 
sounds from the piano that no one 
had ever drawn before. 

So Breeskin had serious competi- 
tion when Alfred Barr sounded out 
Etta Cone on behalf of the Muse- 
um of Modem Art. Other inslitu- 


Efeabe than Moral Fotmd 


MONTPARNASSE CIRCLE — Jules Pascin's “The Ac- 
cordionist" (1924) is among 114 works in “The Circle 
of Montparnasse: Jewish Artists in Paris 1905-1945" at 
the Jewish Museum in New York through Feb. 2. The 
artists indude Chagall and Soutine (from Russia). Modlig- 
liani (Italy), Pastin (Bulgaria) and Lipchitz (Iithuania). 


Lni;ea Press International 

LONDON — Workmen reno- 
vating a 600-year-old tavern in St. 
Albans have uncovered a wall 
painting believed by some experts 
to depict a scene in Shakespeare's 
first published work, the narrative 
poem “Venus and Adonis.” 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


SWITZERLAND 


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next course will start in JANUARY 


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Adviser Mr. Paul A. Mavnr. 


Adviser Mr. Paul A. Mavnr. 
SCHOLASTIC SStVICE “TRANSWORLD LA” - GENEVA 

2 Sue du Vicalre-SaTovard. Phone: 44 IS 65. 


Contact: Leys in American School 
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Telex: 456.312 
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COMPLETE ALL-DAY IMMERSION, ONLY IN FRENCH: Dotty 8:30-1700 
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v 10 aj ^ m t*® 1 surroundings near Mon/e Carta. 

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Jr Jiecrs of excenenct Whatever ,w level, you may exmreo mosery of 

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jJF 1 2-week coun« dating eodt month. CiBwBefctoi* «id ftney 

are avatabfe to student ajpennsed by a professor. 

952 Brodnm Wi erreflmem fees, done or with board and lading- 


since 1952 Brochure Wi erteflment fees, don* or with board and loctyng- 

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EDUCATION DIRECTORY 

will be published on 

DECEMBER 7, 1985. 


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90049, Dept. 23, USA. 



latArnartn rMl 
edneadoB IN rectory 

appem every Saturday 


derail than ever before. Brenda fe&sion at a relatively early age, she 
Richardson, assistant director of had time for other pursuits and 


in the Baltimore Museum is closed tion laid down, though only as “a 


lor renovations, and group of 35 Suggestion-” in Oaribel Cone’s 
items from the collection can be wilL She asked Etta to consider 


the Baltimore Museum, is the au- other kinds of people. When Ger- 
thor of “Dr. Claribel and Miss crude Swan was living in Baltimore 


giving the collection to the Balti- 
more Museum ‘ in the event the 
spirit of appreciation for modem 
an in Baltimore becomes im- 
proved.” Claribel died in 1929. and 
it was not until 18 anxious years 
later that the family's attorneys 
save the museum an assurance that 
Elia Cone had decided to formalize 
the bequest. 

The decision was due largely to 
the diplomatic skills of Adelyn £. 
Breeskin. then director of the Balti- 
more Museum, who had (o over- 
come an ingrained resistance on 
Etta's pan. Baltimore had always 
been the sisters' base, and Oaribel 
bad long been recognized as one of 
its outstanding citizens, but they 
□ever lost the feeling that Balti- 
more had no feeling for quality. 

Both disliked their “cramped, 
narrow, crowded, high-above civili- 
zation rooms in Eutaw Place.” 
They deplored the tone of H.L. 
Mencken's views on modem an. as 


Etta," which will be as valuable to in the late 1890s, she became a 
the social historian as to the aes- close friend both of Claribel, with 


thete. (It is also very amusing.) whom she walked to work every 


The Cone sisters did not set out morning, and of Eua, who soon 
to be big-time collectors. (Oaribel formed what would then have been 
made that quite clear when she said called “a crush” upon Stein. Intdli- 


in 1928 that “I didn’t even know gent people of many kinds — sden- 
that the things 1 had could be called lists, musicians, artists and writers 


a collection until people began to — were welcome on Saturday eve- 
use the term in talking to me about ning at CLaribd's house in Balti- 


tbem.”) Thanks to a family fortune more, and they came in large num- 
that derived in part from owner- bers. These were not people who 


ship of the world's largest denim- needed a collection to mak e them 
manufacturing plant, they never “interesting.” 


had to worry about money. Qari- Quite obviously, Oaribel was 


beL born in 1864. was a brilliant busy from morning till night, and 
student of medicine who became a she had often to go to Europe in the 
professor of pathology at the age of interests of medical scholarship. 


31 and president of the Women’s Etta's was. on the contrary, a do- 
Medical College in Baltimore when mestic existence. The ninth of 13 


she was only 36- 


children, she never married, never 


In person, she was majesty per- had a profession and was free, 
sonified, and all the more so when therefore, to go where she liked. 


Claribel and Etta, is included in 
full in Richardson'S book. Though 
sibylline in tone, it is full of insights 
into the relationship between Clan- 
bel and Etta. To begin with, there 
was the fan that “certainly each 
one of them were ones that nught 
have been belter looking,” in 
Stein's view. Of Claribel. she said 
that “the older one was more some- 
thing than the older one. Of Etta, 
she aid that “the younger one was 
so metimes not with any one and 
certainly this was not what this one 
was needing.” . . 

It was initially through mend- 
ship with Stein and her tiresome 
and opinionated brother Leo that 
from 1905 onward Etta became in- 
terested in Matisse and Picasso. It 
was to Ft* a . not to Claribel, that 
Picasso sent a tiny self-portrait, in- 
scribed “Bonjour. MBe. Cone” m 
1907. But when the Cone collection 
began to take its final shape, in the 
1920s, Claribel was very much an 
equal partner, and it was sbe, not 
Etta, who was the subject in 1922 of 
a mon um ental drawing by Pic ass o. 








i 


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!*V1 









m* 


m 


M 1 

J^Lx 


SELF-PORTRAITS — Pol Bury’s mnttipfe usage of 
himseif is among 80 self-portraits by modem artists on new 
ai the Mus^e-Galerie de la Seita in Paris through March 1. 


Failures of Qiinese Art at Drouot Suggest Cautious Mood 


International Herald Tnbimc 


P i AR1S — A low-key sale of Chi- 
nese art conducted by Jean 


A nese art conducted by Jean 
Louis Picard on Tuesday offered 
insights into the frame of mind of 
buyers in this field. The mood is 
apparently not an optimistic one. 

Money is getting scarce. The two 
pieces judged by the organizers as 


SOUREN MeUKIAN 


the most important failed to seQ. 
each failure holding a specific les- 
son. 

The first object was a Tang pot- 
tery figure of a rider mounting a 
horse in arrest. The animal is better 
molded than most, and its head, 
tilled three quarters with an expec- 
tant expression, is quite appealing. 
The honey-colored glaze, which 
turns into a deeper rusty brown 
where it gets thicker, is beautiful 
but marred by some din incrusta- 
tions. The rider wears an almond- 
green cloak with honey-colored la- 
pels and a tall cap. in the f ashio n 
spread by the Sogdiaus, an Eastern 
Ir anian people which lived in pre- 
sent-day Chinese Turkestan and 
left a deep imprint on Chinese life 
and culture. 

The estimate of 120,000 to 


150,000 Cranes (about S 15.000 to 
$19,000) given 1^ the experts Guy 
Portier and his son Thierry was 
high, but plausible. Yet there were 
hardly airy bids from the room, 
although Picard could be heard 
calling out figures. A French dealer 
based in London raised his finger 
at 100,000 francs. Picard countered 
it by saying 102,000 francs, as if he 
had a commission bid, and brought 
down his hammer, leaving the 
horse unsold. The fact that some 
professionals suspected the French 
dealer of being the owner of the 
object may explain why they did 
not take up the bidding: deale rs 
hate buying a competitor's piece at 
auction. Had the market beat more 
buoyant, however, such prq'udice 
might have been overcome and the 
Tang horseman would have been 
sold. 


It is elaborate but unaccountably 
clumsy in execution. In the upper 
part of the mask, two interlacing 
volutes are terminated with leopard 
heads at one extremity and snarling 
dragon snouts at tire other. The 
curves of the volutes do not flow. 
They are uneven, almost hesitant. 
The leopard heads are a bit too 


dose to a cartoon. They are topped 
by stranee manes that look like 


The failure of the second piece 
presents a different case. This is a 
jade made of an animal stylized 
beyond recognition and q>H«T too 
rieh by specialists. 

Too tieh masks are often seen on 
bronze vessels of the late Shang 
( 1 2th- 1 1 th century B. C.) and Chou 
(10th-8lh century B. C) periods. 
The design of this one, however, 
does not seem to have any pantHeL 


by strange manes that look tike 
Tang horse rails snick in the wrong 
place: 

When asked whether he thought 
the mask was authentic, an interna- 
tional dealer with a very good eye 
said he “rather thought”’ it was, but 
that it would be difficult to get 
buyers to believe in iL A well- 
known Loudon dealer commented 
that the estimate — 100,000 to 
150,000 francs — was so high that 
be did not even bother to examine 
it. 


He will have ample time to do so 
now. The mask was bought in at 
82,000 francs. It may have beat a 
mistake to include il in that auc- 
tion. When something is so rare 
that no one can think of a precise 
parallel and has to be pr oven right 
before any attempt at selling it, the 
auction house is not the ideal place 
to negotiate it At the very least, the 


seller shook! do Ins homework, in 
other words, first gp to a recog- 
nized authority on airhaic Chinese 
jades for an opinion and say so in 
the auction catalog. 

The failure of the mask, however, 
after the failure of the Tang horse, 
also points loan attitude of caiitioc 
on the part .of dealers, which is 
generally an indication that times 
are getting difficult. 

Thi<gx plimirt ion fmAt «vme!qqv 
port in the enthusiasm with winch 
the best pieces in a lower- price 
bracket were greeted by profession- 
als. At the beginning there was a 
gray earthenware bone of the 4th 
or 5th century A.D. with faint 
races of its original pdyefaromy. 
An opening ifewgnwi Hie t h e ntri 
of a bottle rises from the back of 
the horse, identifying it as a rare 
animal-shaped wine container. The 
body is heavy and squat, and tire 
h«>ri bent down as if tire wwmI 
was refitting to go, anticipates the 
Tang period horses in arrest. Ex- 
ceedingly rare, the horse went to a 
bidder representing Spink of Lon- 
don. 


lustratcs a type an historians con- 
sider to bea “pillow.” The type is 
common but tire decoration was 
Basque: The face of a snarling de- 
mon — rather than a “dragon” as 
tire catalog says — is flanked by 

j two rows of rosettes borrowed front 

the Eastern Iranian repertoire. 

The e n grav ed motif painted in 
-yellow and (tine under the glare is 
OBtlmcd in a way that is unusual in 
pottery. One is reminded of some 
drawings in India ink on paper 
found izr cadres in the Buddhist 
eaves at Tun Hoang, the Sogdian 
outpost bn the edges of China 


VTLHYlTHj 


..iru'itv e*l 




proper. The pillow may well hail 
from such an area, where the Chi- 


Three minutes later came an 


even rarer object The smalt piece, 
4.7 indies (1 22 centimeters) long 
with rectangular incurving sxdes,~3- 


AUCTION SALES 


M* Pierre CORNETTE DE SAINT CYR 

Audionnar 

24, Ave. Georgu-V 75008 PARIS 
ToLt (1)47.20.75.94, 4732J7M. J723A7J2. 
Tolox: 21 031 IF/ 608 ' 


from such an area, where the Chi- 
nese potter's technique might have 
been applied to execute a piece that 
is not in the Chinese taste. Indeed, 
tire enamd. wfodt is not of the best 
quality, is flaking off. A unique 
object of considerable art-histori- 
cal interest, the pillow was underes-^ 
timated at 2,000 to 3,000 francs.' 
Spink’s agent, again, got it at 
17.500 francs. 

ft was in tire lowest category that 
bidding was mast enthusiastic. The 
counties pots with (anal shapes, 
ogiygi&aesand damage not always 
desofited in detail, were selling like 
hot cakes. A little pot 45 inches 
high with a molded lotos chalice on 
tire underside, lotos petals on the 
shoulder and a neck that had been 
repaired bdd no special appeal, 
and a grcasj Tooking glaze made 
tire 12th-century object seem wildly 
over-priced at 4,000 francs. But so 
was loo a creamy glazed bowl with 
fl a rin g tides knocked down at 
1.000 francs. 


- ‘^i a 










-.cun-*?! immrn 

■zm 


■* **#H 


4NDRC 


FOUNDED 1744 


DOONESBURY 


Important Sale 


HOTEL DROUOT - PARIS 

A<OC4 Y r NOVEMBER 25, 1985 at 230 pan. - ROOMS 5 & 6 


IMPORTANT MODERN PAINTINGS 

BOUGUBSAU, J®40R UTRILLO, Maria BLANCHARD. 
POLIAKOFF, HARTUNG, BUFFET, efc_ 


OLD MASTER PAINTINGS 

mcrnly XVI hh century Renxsh and Dutdrpamtings 


menaB,MKe* . 

UttBSOUJCKTID 

mternuNpmrim 

NHR/NBtB 81 . 
- \ 


.a -ills 


^.COLUM* 


'Si**#* 


20th-22nd FEBRUARY 1986 

Jewellery and Precious 
nbjeCT 55 


HAUTE EPOQUE OLD WEAPONS 

canvas by DETAHLE “Buds pour la frasque du fcrth&xT “Vers la Gfc»re“ 
earty XVWb certury hcrquebus, a»ed pistds by LEPAGE PARIS, area 1822 






FURNITURE AND OBJETS D’ART 

very important pair of Russian porcelain vases decorated vwlh two 
scenes from XVJ 1th century flemish paintings. H 77. 

RUGS - TAPESTRIES 

EMtUon Saturday November 23 from 11 am. to 6 pjn. and from 9 to Upon, 
Experts: Camard, Anonoff, Breast Dsy, Ls FW, Praquin, Moreou-Gobcxd. 
Cahdogua an imaumt FJr. 150 


A pink, sapphire and diamond 
bow-knot brooch, sold in Su Moritz in 
February 1985 for S.Fr. 27.500 


Sotheby’s jewel experts will be visiting the 
following towns to value items for the sale. 

Amsterdam Thursday 21st November 

Brussels Monday 25th and Tuesday 26th November 

Cologne Monday 25th November" 

Frankfurt Tuesday 26th November 

Hamburg Wednesday 27th November 

Lausanne Friday 6th* December 

Lugano Monday 2nd December 

Madrid Thursday 28th and Friday 29th November • 

Milan Tuesday 3rd December 

Monte Carlo Monday 25th and Tuesday 26th November 

Munich Friday 29th November 

Paris Tuesday 1 7th -Thursday 19th December 

Rome Wednesday 4th December 

Stockholm Friday 22nd November 

Vienna Thursday 28th November 


— Efienne LIBERT - Akim CASTOR ■ 

Associated Auctioneers 

3, rue Rossini, 75009 PARIS. Tel. (1) 4&24.51.20 

HOTEL DROUOT PARIS 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1 985 ot 2^0 pjn. - Rooms 5 & 6 

IMPORTANT DRAWINGS AND PAINTINGS 

PR fMATl CClO'S ATELIER - Series of three compositions “Utysse se 
garontit des charmes de Grce”, “Utysse et les Sirenes” "Lflysse 
se venge des Prefendants’’. 

This exceptional series of paintings, formerly part of she kept tinea 
the XVIlHh century in Chateau de Fontenay-en-Cotentin, Is one of 
the rare examples from the period of the famous Gaierie cTUKrsse 
in Fontainebleau destroyed in 1 738. 

— Expert: Mr. PVA»nr 



EXH* 




Jient 


If you wish to make an appointment, please 
telephone or write to: 

102 Rofcin. 1012 KZ Amsterdam Tel: 24 6215/6 
32 Rue de 1'Abbaye, Brussels 1050 Td: S4S 5007 
St. Apem-Strasse 17-29, (Kreishaus Gaierie), 5000, Cologne 1 
Tel: 221 249 330 

Steinlestrasse 7, 6000 Frankfurt/M. 70 Tel: 62 20 27 
24 Rue de la Cite, CH-J024 Geneva TeL- 21 33 77 
Alsterkamp 43. 2000 Hamburg 13 Teh 4 10 60 23 
Plaza de la Independence 8, 23001 Madrid TeL* 232 6488 
Via Pietro Mascami 15/2, 20121 Milan Td: 788911 
Lr Sporting d’Hiver, Place du Casino, Monte Carlo Td: 30 88 80 
Odeonsplatz 16, 8000 Munich 22 Tel: 22 23 75/6 
3 Rue de Miromesnii, 75008 Fans Td: 266 4060 
Arsen alsga tan 4. 1 ] 1 47 Stockholm Tel: 101473/9 
Singers trasse 16, 1010 Vienna TeL 524772/3 


M* detonne M* binoche- aodeou 

• Auctioneer Auctioneers 

14, av V d ? PARK 5, ru* la Bottie, 75008 PAHS 

TeL (1) 456231.19 TeL (1) 42657960 

HOTEL DROUOT PARIS 

Ihuredoy, November 28 1985 at 9 pjn. - Rooms I and 7 



itewsrsocwN . 
Romm-W/W 

I fTTfl^JG HERE OH A 
FLOOR., 

appfEmzixEm- 

NG ABOUT IHE FU7VFB- 


OLD MASTER, 
XIXth century and 
MODERN PAINTINGS 

by 


Roybet; de Penne. Renoir 
O. Friesz, Utrillo, Picabia* 
LraouRG, Foujtta 


XVlIlfh cent. FURNITURE 


Rook. "The de Jane IW. Jl x 2S m. 


PubSc mwinglhinday, Nowmbar 28 
from 11 ojti. to 6 pun. . 
Experts MM. FadW, ItadebaeC l**e3le 



Art exhibitions & Auction Sales 

’ appears -every -Saturday - ! 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 


Page 7, 


$ 

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i*** 



ARTS / LEISURE 


The W it of Joshua Reynolds 


By Michael Gibson 

Iwtmaamai Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — - The Pre-Raphaelites, 
X reseating the style Sir Joshua 
Reynolds had set for the Royal 
Academy, referred to him as “Sir 
Soshna". — but then look at how 
they painted* 

Reynolds (1723-1792), one of the 

founders of the Royal Academy 
and its first president, friend of 
Samuel -Johnson and with Mm 
founder of “The Chib,” was the 
chief English portraitist of his 3ge, 
and the current exhibition at the 
Grand Palais shows why this was 
SO. 

Reynolds is a delightful painter, 
with a keen understanding of social 
niceties an A it would seem, a pleas- 
ant sense of humor. His subjects 
(68 of them are on view in Paris) 
afford us a vision of 18th-century 
English society transfigured and 
improved by his poetic talent The 
women appear pretty and witty, the 

^Mousetrap’ in London 
To Start on Its 34th Year- 

United Pros International , 

LONDON — Agatha Christie’s 
“The Mousetrap” celebrates its. 
33rd anniversary on Nov. 25 as the 
workTs longest running play. 

The anniversary wiB made the. 
13,73 1 st performance in London of 
the play, which has been presented 
in 43 countries and in 23 languages. 
Richard Attenborough was the 
star of the first performance. 


men have ' a certain heightened 
presence that usually makes them 
appear interesting — at least in the 
theatrical sense. . 
i This idealization of the subject is 
something me expects of society 
portraitists, evehihough me may 
deplore ji_ What makes Reynolds 
so special? Perhaps the fact that . 
other artists of the age (Gainsbor- 
ough, for instance, and, later, 
Thomas Lawrence) present por- 
traits of self-contained perfection 
that idealize — rather naively, in 
Gainsborough’s case — a social 
style and status, whereas Reynolds, 
while accepting the style and nring 
it brilliantly, tends instead to ideal- 
ize character or at least tohdghten 
iL 

- He manages to present his sub- 
jects as living and active beings, 
next to which Gainsborough’s fig- 
ures look like dummies, and his 
portraits, whose- every muscle 
seems governed by an intelligent 
intent, appear as. models of lucid 
purposefulness that the subject 
mighrWell feel impeded to live up 
to. 

It was acknowledged, as Nicho- 
las Penny pants oat in in the cam- 
log, that Reynolds’s “fashionable 
women were less graceful, his 
mothers less affectionate, his 
princes less dignified, his bishops 
less wise, ins commanders less 
brave than he would lead us to 
believe.” But if this were all, the 
interest and value of Reynolds’s 
work would be limited to its obvi- 
ous painterly qualities. Instead we 


do take an interest in the persons he 
portrays, as we would in historical 
characters transposed to the stage. 

There is often a stay behind a 
Reynolds portrait. One arrogantly 
befeatbered young man rejoices in 
the name of Charles Coote, Count 
of Bellamont, and also in the Order 
of the Bath, whose fancy costume 
(metoding a hat decked out with a 
mess of ostrich feathers) be is 
showing off. The informative cata- 
log reveals that Coote distin- 
guished himself by various duels 
and scandals, and that he once se- 
duced the daughter of a respectable 
tradesman by dressing his valet as a 
priest and having him perform a 
mock wedding ceremony. 

Miss Kitty Fisher, a courtesan, 
is shown in the guise of Cleopatra, 
dropping a large pearl into a cup. 
Cleopatra, as one may recall, 
dropped the pearl into vinegar, 
where h dissolved, whereupon, for 
reasons best known to herself, she 
drank the lot As for Kitty Fisher. 
Casanova reports that she had an 
excellent appetite for money, once 
sticking a £20 note into a buttered 
bun and eating iL - 

Garrick, the actor, looks delight- 
fully ingratiating, set between an 
enticing girl representing Comedy 
and a stem yotmg woman standing 
for. Tragedy. Tragedy grasps the 
actor by the wrist, but he looks 
back at her with a disarming and 
self-deprecating smile as he walks 
away with Comedy.. This, taken 
with Reynolds's excellent chil- 
dren’s portraits, shows how the art- 



A Great Voice From the Past 


“Mrs. Lloyd” (detail), by Joshua Reynolds. 


INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 

Andre et Berthe NOUFFLARD 

DEUX PEINTRES T&MOINS D’UNE &POQUE 
1910 - 1970 ... 

Documents sur Madame LANGWEIL et la famille HALEVY 

8 NOVEMBRE - 8 DECEMBRE 1985 
MUSEE THIERS 27 Place Saint Georges Paris 9* 

Toils les jours 10 h-12 h / 14 h-I8 h sauf Lundi matin 


DENISE RENE 


1 96 Btvd.'St.-Germdin, 75007 PARIS - TbI. : A7.72J7.S7 * 

LES FEMMES 

ET (.’ABSTRACTION CONSTRUCTIVE 

Aimi Albers - Martha Bote - Marafle Cahn-Chryssa - 
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AurtOe Nemours - Edda Renouf - Bridget Riley - Squatfrifi - 
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. Vernissage Tfwrsdby November 14 1985 at 7 pjn. 


r GALERIE hUNNE SASSI 


1 4 Avenue Matignon, 75008 Paris - Tel.: 47.23.40.38 

Presentation of the 1986 calendar 
illustrated by ' 

ANDRl BRASILIER 

imb on permanent and exclusive exhibit ■■■§ 


GALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

„6, Rue Jeon-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 43J9.82.44 




BERNARD CHILDS 

Graphic exhibition 

S to SO Ntrvembnr at 

Biblioteca Cenwnale 
Maxxo Sorman] - MBcei - Holy 


DOUGLAS GORSUNE 

Paintings and wotercolon 

Galerie Horizon 

21 , rue de Bourgogne 
75007 Paris - 45.55.58^7 
From November 5 to 26, 1 985 
Daily from 1 to 7 pjn. 

_ Except Sunday end Monday 




EXHIBITION 

DECEMBER iO ^ 11. 1CSC 
Holicluv inn M;ivf:iir. London. 


SILVER AND GILT BRONZE 

Warring Scutes up to the Tang Dynasty 

EuiA iihi.sti.tud c:K.i !«);• 

Giristi.tn i)< i2 R!;:uk> Street. London Wl. 


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6 ABmarto Street, London W1X4BY. 

R.B. KITAJ 

November 8 - until December. 20 
IBustrated catalogue ovcriW* 
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or Frengaise CLEMENT 

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ZABRISKIE 

WILLIAM KLEIN 

Photographs 

724 Fifth Ave, New York 

PHOTOS 

SURREALISTES 

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EXHIBITION 

IMCHELtilNRYl 

Permanent exhibition of 
ADAMC3EF, ARDtSSONE, AUGE, 
BOUDET, BOURRE, CANU, 
CASSIGMBUgCHAURAY, 0UCABE, 
BTa, FABIEN, GALL, GANTNBi, 

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A V1DAW3UADRAS: Portraits 

BALARfN: Sculptures 

Hotel George V - 47.23.54.00 
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kmrtva.BXlOJOam.1 pm.4L10 to 9 pa. 
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PARIS 


XIII e EXPOSITION 

"MATURES 
IIMPRESSIONNISTESI 
ET 

MODERNES” 



du 7 novembre 
au 14decembre 

Mraud, Calder, Cfisar, Chagall, 
Fautrier, Sauguin, H6lion, Henner, 
Jongkind, Klee, Laurens, Liger, 
Ltpine. Marquet, Matisse, Malta, 
Metzinger, Montezin, Picasso, 
Stael, Utrillo, Vuillard. 

Catalogue upon request 1 0 3 

daniel 

malingue 

26, avenue Matignon 
75008 PARIS 
T61. : (I) 42.66.60.33 


FAR1S 


ROBERTO BARNI 

his hrsr exhibition in Puns 

OILS and DRAWINGS 

Xo'-cmixT i - November ■><>. lySS 

GALERIE EOL1A 

10, me de Seine - PARIS VP‘ 

(1)43 3fi 54 


ist worked a playfulness into much 
of his wort that saves some of Ms 
traditional subjects from being 
boringly pretentious. While doing 
children's portraits, Reynolds told 
them fairy tales, or cavorted with 
them through the studio, catching 
the lively and fleeting expressions 
found in many of his works. The 
playfulness is also apparent when 
he dresses fashionable young Ladies 
in Grecian robes or involves them 
in a graceful transposition of an- 
cient fertility rites, which might 
easily have become ridiculous un- 
der the brush of a lesser artist. It is 
this constant presence of humor, 
which acknowledges the social 
code but reads into it an element of 
play in a lighter vein than that 
implied in the Shakespearean axi- 
om **The world's a stage,” that 
makes Reynolds such good compa- 
ny today. 

There are some “naughty" paint- 
ings too, though their naughtiness 
is not apparent at first sight. Two 
urchins (or “link boys”) personify- 


ing Cupid and Mercury were paint- 
ed for the duke of Dorset. Cupid is 
shown making a traditionally 
coarse gesture and bolding a phal- 
lic torch; Mercury, locking a bit 
wan, bolds an empty purse. When 
the duke once bought a painting of 
Venus, an English paper remarked 
that “be had her for four hundred 
[pounds] while others had cost him 
much more.” 

Nearly every painting invites 
commentary, and presents a facet 
of a r emar kable moment of English 
society. The social interest must be 
set on the same level as the artistic 
here: The portraits themselves were 
eminently determined by social 
codes, since they were commis- 
sioned to serve the social persona 
of the subject, and were generally 
H ung , not in private rooms, but in 
the rooms in which guests were 
received. 

“Reynolds, ” Grand Palais, 
through Dec 16. then ax the Royal 
Academy of Arts in London, Jan. 16- 
March 30. 


By Henry Pleasants 

L ONDON — To collectors and 
' connoisseurs of recordings by 
older singers, word of a new series 
of reissues of records made by the 
great Neapolitan tenor Fernando 
de Lucia (1860-1925) was exciting 
enough. The shocker has been to 
learn that they are being pressed 
and released in England on 78-rpm 
discs from the original metal plates. 

It is as if someone had the notion 
of providing collectors of old auto- 
mobiles with newly manufactured 
Rolls-Royce Silver Ghosts. Most 
record turntables today revolve at 

33K and 45 ipm. Even a stylus for 

playing a 78-rpm record is not easy 
to come by. although specialist 
firms can supply both 78 turntables 
and stylL 

A daunting prospect, then. But 
Eliot Levin, founder and proprietor 
of Symposium Records, a small 
producer operating from his home 
in East Barnet. Hertfordshire, is 
undaunted. Himself a lifelong col- 
lector of old 78s, he knows his col- 
lectors and their appetite for the 
authentic “un enhanced” sound of 
the great singers, instrumentalists 
and conductors of the past. 

Symposium Records is. of 
course, a hobby — or sideline. One 
does not get rid) pressing 78s in the 
age of the LP and compact disc. 
Levin is an engineer, lecturing on 
physics, mathe matics , philosophy 
and music appreciation at the Bar- 
net College of Further Education. 
His engineering experience has 
proved invaluable in devising 
means of making old metal plates 
suitable for pressing on modern 
presses. 

The de Lida pressings are only 
the centerpiece of a stQl small cata- 
log of reissues that includes Wil- 
helm Furtw angler, Otto Klemperer 
and even the pianist and composer 
Eugen d' Albert (1864-1 932k but 
for me the de Lucia records are the 
most ear and eye-catching. 

The tenor, vividly remembered 
as one of the greatest singers of his 


time, or any other, also was the 
artist chosen to sing at the funeral 
in Naples of Ms younger Neapoli- 
tan contemporary. Enrico Caruso, 
in 1921. He left about 40 0 records, 
the earliest dating back to 1902, 
many of them available on LP reis- 
sues of sometimes indifferent qual- 
ity. 

Other great singers have left a 
similarly rich recorded legacy — 
Caruso, McCormack and Tauber 
among them — but none has in- 
cluded 300 recordings made be- 
tween the ages of 57 and 62 with 
voice still in splendid form. These 
late de Lucias were produced by a 
small Neapolitan firm, the Phono- 
type Record Company, in which de 
Lucia may have nad a financial as 
well as an artistic interest. 

Phonotype was, and still is, a 
family concern, now in the hands 
of a third generation, and normally 
devoted to light music. It is from 
the Phonotype recordings, both op- 
eratic and popular, possibly three- 
quarters of them never made avail- 
able on LP reissues, that Levin is 
drawing 

“Original Phonotype pressings." 
he said, “are very rare. Some exist 
in only one or two known copies. 
Some were probably never issued. 
Many of the known copies have 
been found in the New York area. 
It seems that an Italian emigre bar- 
ber imported a few crates and sold 
them from the back of his shop. 

“The company must, however, 
have treasured the original plates 
of the de Lucia records, for they 
were not handed in as scrap during 
the war (almost certainly at great 
risk to the family, which could have 
been charged with boarding pre- 
cious copper), and a considerable 
number have survived. The story 
goes that they were secreted in a 
churchyard.” 

About a dozen discs, mostly dou- 
ble-sided, have been released by 
Symposium (distributor: Peter 
LacL 3 Grosvenor Gardens. Lon- 
don, NIO), displaying a replica of 


the original label and including 
selections from “Pagliacri” '“An- 
drea Chenier.” “La Favorita,” 
“L'Elisir d'Araore.” “Iris." “LV^.- 
mico Fritz,” etc., as well as songs 
by Tosti and Robert Siolz. The 
arias from Mascagni's "Iris" an<3 
"L' Ami co Fritz” are especially 
noteworthy, as de Lucia created the 
principal tenor in both operas. ! 

“Pressings are made with special 
dies to give a uniform thickness, 
which at once reduces any chance 
of waip — bad enough 'at 33>o. 
disastrous aL 78! — and gives the 
‘feel’ of a traditional shellac record 
without, of course, its fragility and 
noise." Levin said. 

"It should be emphasized that 
these 78-rpm reissues are from 
original metal shells. They are not 
re-recordings. In a few instances 
the shells have noi survived the 
decades entirely unscathed. The 
decision to issue rests on the per- 
formance value.” 

They are of special historical in- 
terest because de Lucia is reckoned 
to have been not only the last repre- 
sentative of an older bel canto style 
of tenor singing that went out of 
fashion with Caruso, but also a 
pioneer in the shaping of the dia- 
metrically opposite style now com- 
monly designated verismo. 

It seems incredible that a tenor 
so closely associated with the op- 
eras of Rossini. Bellini and Doni- 
zetti could also have been the first 
London and Metropolitan Canioin 
“Pagliacci," the first London Ca- 
varadossi in “Tosca" and a favor- 
ite partner of Emma Calve in “Ca- 
valleria Rusticana" and “Carmen.” 
But he was, and these new press- 
ings tell why. 

My own favorite of those I have 
heard is the “Improwiso” from 
“Andrea Chenier," one of the most 
interpret! veiy exacting set pieces in 
the tenor repertoire. 


Henry Pleasants is a London- 
based writer who specializes in music 
and opera. 


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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Hton Low Lost dm. 


FedNM 

Eud 

24 

S’.n 

24 


PWIPIS 

E33 

I.T.1 

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13= 

+ ’» 

AT&T 

18925 

21% 


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17M9 

a.k 

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17% 

11% 



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15030 

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13852 

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36 

39 

+3 

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11E0I 

133 

131% 

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10319 

33= 

32% 

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PSvEG 

10250 

9?83 

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31 

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S4IB 

42% 

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42 


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3293 


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Open HIM Low Last Cbg. 


Indus 1397.94 1410X4 1391X4 I40A36 + 412 

Trans 675X4 eBIJO 670X6 US.I1 + 281 

uni IMLSS 16101 159.57 161.93 + 1J3 

Comp S46X0 572.14 54121 $69X4 + 241 


NYSE Index 


Composite 

Industrials 

Trams. 

Utilities 

Finance 


High Low Clou Chtee 
111.75 111J9 111.91 + 0.64 
12804 1Z7J3 128X4 + 0X0 
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B0J2 

7042 

8122 


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1128 
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tramp. 


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30642 + 255 
30043 +2*3 
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21420 21361 21490 +145 
175^ 174.18 17565 +864 
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251* 23 ANRpt 
22 19 AN Rot 

1373 7= APL 

61 = 32% ASA 
27 101-a AVX 

toft 19= AZP 
60* 38** AblLoB 
25* 196* AccoWa 
24% ID’* AcmeC 
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19 IS 1 * AdaE? 

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141* 15= AOObPlB 
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74% 40 AlaP Dl 
246* 12+i AlskAIr 

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51 37 BalseC 


Dow Average Hits a New Hig h 


United Press liuermtioruit 


NEW YORK — Forecasts for lower interest 
rates, including a possible discount rate cut to 7 
percent, sent prices on the New York Stock 
Exchange to a record high close Friday. 

The market maintained a mixed' pattern 
through early afternoon as investors taking 

profits pressured blue chip issues. 

The Dow Jones industrial average moved 
into plus territory in mi daft era oog trading afier 
the chief economist at Salomon Brothers, Henry 
Kaufman, said “an easing of monetary policy, 
including a reduction in the discount rate to 7 
percent, may be imminent." 

The Dow- rose 4.82 to 1.404.36, surpassing its 
previous record dose of 1.403.44 set Wednes- 
day. For the week the Dow jumped 14.11 
points. 

Broader market indicators also advanced. 
The New York Stock Exchange index rose 0.65 
to 1 11.95. Standard & Poofs 500-stock index 
increased 1.10 to 193.71 The price of an average 
share added 20 cents. 

Advances outnumbered declines by more 
than a 2-1 ratio. Volume totaled 115 million 
shares, down from 1 19 million Thursday. 

“The market has been climbing because of a 
lower interest rate scenario that generates hopes 
for a better economy." said Wayne Nordberg of 
Prescott Ball & Turben. 

Trade Latimer of Evans & Co. said the mar- 
ket is consolidating recent gains. 

“Whether the consolidation ends up taking 
the form of a 20-point pullback in the Dow or a 
churning in a narrow 10-point range, the market 
will be above 1.400 by year end." she said. 

The market, she added, is in a transition 


phase in which activity in the heavily capitalized 
Dow and household' name stocks will calm 
down. 

“These stocks have bad their moves." she 
contended. “Institutional portfolio managers 
will have to hunt for bargains among issues that 
have performed less well" 

Federal National Mortgage Association was 
the most active NYSE-listed issue, up to 24. 
Phillips Petroleum followed, up Vk to 13Vs. 
AT&T was third, adding H to 21 Vi. 

Among high-tech issues, IBM rose ft to I32Vi, 
Honeywell ft to 64Jk and Cray Research *4 to 
43. Digital Equipment fell 1H to 1 14 Vi. Digital's 
president told shareholders that he does not 
expea a revival of the depressed computer 
industry in the near future. 

Maud lost another 3i to 12?i in active trad- 
ing. It reported lower third-quarter earnings 
Thursday. 

American Standard climbed l'i to 32. The 
company said it plans to sell off certain busi- 
nesses with combined annual sales of about 
$500 milli on. 


General Dynamics rose 2 ft to 67, aided by a 
report that the Reagan administration will not 
agree to cut fiscal 1986 defense spending. 

Some retailers improved. Gap Inc. rose to 
49 3 i and Allied Stores rose 1ft to 63ft. 

Gainers in the food sector included Genera] 
Mills, up Its to 65 Vi, Campbell Soup, up 1 Vs to 
44. and Wiliam Wrigley, up 1% to 88Vi 
The insurance sector was strong, aided by a 
lower interest rate environment. General Re 
jumped 2 to 96V&, Aetna gained ft to 51 ?4 and 
Kemper climbed \V* to 59ft. 


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18= 12= CascNG 1JB 
16= 9= CastlCk 
29 15= CstICDf 1S8I 

15= 12 CstICpr .90 

38'4 28= CatrpT 60 

27= 19= Coco SO 

132V4 74= Cetansa AS0 . 

44 V. 36 Colon Pf 460 10.1 

10= 7= Cengv X= 6 26 

45 34= Centel 238 56 9 

26= 20= Centex 35 IX 10 

27 20= Censow 2X2 SS 7 

31 Vi 23 On Hud 2.06 I1X 6 

46 36Vi CnILtpf A60 106 

21= 16= Dll I PS 164 

29= 20= CnLaEI 108 

37 31= CLoElpf A1B 11S 

13= 9= CeMPw 1A0 106 107 
21= 16= CV1PS 1.90 96 6 
11= 2= Control 
12= 1= CntrvTl 
23= 17= Convtll 
28= 19= Crr-teed 
30= 16= CessAIr 
25= 19 Chmpln __ 

27= 22 Chml pf 130 
54= 46= Chml Pf A60 


13 

2.9 II 
37 11 


9= 7= ChomSp 60 AS 15 
4= 1 viCbrlC 

1= Vi vlOitwt 
4= 1= viChrt pf 

63= 41= Chase 360 66 6 
49*. «= Chase pt SJS 10.7 
56 'h 51= Chase Pf 655el1X 
56= 51 Chase pf BS3el69 
23= 16= Chelsea 72 XI 9 
32V. 24= Cherned 162 il 12 
44= »«■ ChmHY 268 63 5 

44= 30= ChNYpf 1X7 AS 
56= 51= ChNY pf A08e 73 
39= 32 Chespk 134 IS 13 
44 Vi 31 CheePn 2X0 
404V 29= Chevm 260 
200 124 ChlMlw 68 

80'i 53= OllMl Pf 
29= 16= ChIPnT 
11= 7Vi QikFull 
58= 31 ChrlsCr 
13V* 7= Christ n 

16*6 9= Chroma 

71 44= Oirm pf 

41= 25= Chrvslr 
53= 30= OhjW>5 


136 1= 1= 144 

336 50= 58 58= + = 

24 11= UV- HU + = 
211 17= 17= 1718 + = 
A5 16 22B? 49= 48= 49’i + = 

57 10 31 26= 26= 26= 

236ellJ 78 20= 20 20V< 

1.16 43 10 2460 27= 26= 27 — = 

1X0 X5 10 33 2B= 28 25= + = 

63 9 8= 9 . + = 

1731 26 25= 25= + = 

925 15= 15= 15= + = 
1558X 22’i 21= 22= + = 
162 50= 50 50U + J4 

145 19= 19= 19= + 48 
22 31= 31 Vi 31= + = 

21 13= 13= 13= + = 

229 22= 22= 22= 

246 2’A 2V8 2= 

23 14 1090 44= 42V* 43= +1= 
502 12= 12= 12= 

35 20= 20= 20*6 + 18 

278 200=196= 200 +3% 

1006 25*i 245* 2S , 

30 100=108=108= + Vi 

36 9= 9= 9= + V8 

491 Z7= Z7V4 Z7= + = 

177 26= 26 26= + = 

379 27= 27= 27= + = 

24 25= 2S= 2SV* 

271 30= 29= 29= — = 

160 7V6 7 7 + = 

57 26= 25= 26= +1= 
145x 29= 29 29'A + V* 

63 45= 45 45= 

47 15*A 14= 15*i + = 
330 12= 12= 12** — = 

1 kh S 21 
38 14*6 14= 14= —Vi 

5908 37= 36= 37= +1= 

41 27= 27= 27= + = 

468 131=129=131 — = 
91 44= 43= 44= +1 
145 941 9= 9= 

140 43 42= 42=— = 

430 24 23= 2318— = 

744 25= 25= 25= + = 

160 27 26= 27 

IDOz 43 43 43 +1= 

86 11 3330 19= 19= 19=— = 
73 7 36 26= 26= 26= + Vi 

3x 35= 35= 35= + = 

580 13 1278 12= 

49 19= 19= 19= + = 

30S 5 4= 5 + = 

110 12= 12 12= + = 

38 18= 17= 18= + = 

75 24= 23= 24V. + = 

35 30 29= 30 + = 

22= 22= 22V + = 

23= 23= 23= . 

51= 51= 51= f = 
8= 8 B= + = 

2= 2 V6 2= + = 

= = *— f* 
2= 2= 2= 

I486 S9* 9916 59= 

11 4916 48= «= 

5 55V* 55Vs 55VJ 
1351x52= 52 52=— = 

14 22= 22= 22= + J8 

47 30 29= 2946— = 

2136 39= 38= 39= — *6 

2 39 39 39 — = 

202 554. 55= 55= „ 

.... 100 35= 3J= 35= + * 

A7 13 6425 42= 40= 42= +1= 
64 93796 37= 37= 37= + = 
“ 33 135 133= 135 , +1= 

1 45% 65= 654* — % 

48 21= 20= 21= — = 

66 8= 7= 8 + JS 

52 55= 54= 5516 + = 
97 1114 10= 10= — = 

319 15= 1498 15 — = 
188 71 70 70 — 1 

6116 41= 40V* 41= + J8 
351 53 5T= 52= + = 

13 65= 65 65= + = 


SO 64 8 

mm i 

JO 19 8 
JOl 28 
62 23 
XI 

as 


1323 

10 

10 

199 

76 

19 

54 


40e 16 11 
J4t 3X267 
614 


1X0 


24 3 
14 

66 


65= 50= ChvbOpf A25 _ 

20*6 13= Church s M 24 16 2257 18= 17= 18 + = 
Ute 51* Ch/ron .101) IX 22 104 7= 7= 7= 

IS 16 in 

3.120 63 8 


2.16 IIS 
A 00 126 
9 JO 12J 
7S4 12S 
9J8 126 
J2 Al 


27*4 21 CitaDTP 

51 39= ClnBell 

19= 13= ClnGE 

34= 27 ClnG pf 

75 60 ClnGDf 

61 d8= ClnGDf 

75 61 ClnG pf 

26= 15= ClnMli 

34= 19= DrdK s 

31 1B= Clrdtv 

30= 15 Dreus 

51= 34V4 aricrp . „ 

04= 70 ciilep Pf 7J5e 93 

10OU. 83*4 CHep pfA9JSe 93 

8= 4= Clabir 72 103 

19= 6Vs OairSfi .10 6 

32= 23= ClurkE " 

14 8= ClayHs 

22*4 16= ClvCIf 


.10 6 11 


276 5J 


1.10 


1X0 


192 25= 25** 25= + V8 

18 49= 49= 49= 

1452 19 18= 19 + = 

10Z 32 32 32 — 1= 

1007 75= 75= 7SVS + = 

50z 60 60 60 

80Z 74= 74= 74= + = 

394 17= 16= 17= + = 

716 22 21= 22 + J* 

499 21= 20*4 21= + 9* 

35 25= 25= 25*— = 

4701 <3= 43= 43= 

642x 78= 7798 78 — = 

1003* 96= 96= 96= + = 

74 7 6= 7 

232 11= 11= 11=- = 

337 29 27 29 +2= 

149 13= 12= 13= + = 

257 17= 17 17 — = 

202 20= 20= 20= 

402 23= 22= 22=— = 

421 103*103 1Q3V4 + = 
25 9= 9= W + * 
6 12= 1198 12= + 98 
13 10* 10= 10= + * 
572 45= 44= 45 + * 

39B 21*. 21 71 — = 

16 20 2005*38= 38= 38= + * 
Al 17 24= 24= 24= + = 

3J 13 348 11 1018 1058 + = 

U 11 513 32* 32= 32= f = 

34 7 56 54 54 +1 

X9 15 3663 75= 74= 75= + = 

379 20 19* 199* + = 

1J0 A3 19 232 28= 27= 27=— = 

33= 22= Colo Pal 136 A4 49 2870 31= 30* 31 + * 

26= 16= Col Aiks SO 12 f 194x 25= 24* 25 + V* 

16= 9 ColFds .12 3 309 14= 14 14 + = 

33= 15= Col Pen ISO A2 10 138 33= 33= 33= + = 

65= SO Colllnd 260 Al 9 360609859=60= + = 


5 
23 
18 30 
II 

_ . S3 10 

21* 19* CIvCI Pf 2X0 9.« 
23= 18= CJevEI 2S6 11J 6 
103* 81* CIvEI Pi 10J8e10S 
14= BW aevpk JOl 
17* 10 ClvpRpf 1.111 
18= 9= Civpfcpf SB 
45= 27= CJotTO 
76* 144. ChlbNUf 
39* 25= aucttP 
24* 16*6 Cluetpf 
21= 9= Coadim 
36* 16= Coast I i 
60 29 CiKpf 

75* 5«= Cocoa 
21= 10= Coleco 
32* 25* CoJemn 


1J6 X0 13 
JOe IX 
ISO ■ 


ixo 

so 

so 

1X3 

266 


37* 26* Col Gas X1B 82 
48* 45* CaIGsPf 512 1X9 
53= 45= CefGepf 5.i5el0X 
28= 25 CSOaf 3SS 


13853 40 36 39 +3 

113X 47* 47 47 — * 

159x52 5198 5198— * 

4 28 27* 28 + = 


12 Month 
HtahLow Slack 


51s. 

IMS H Kit Low 


Close 

Quei. arse 


100 IDS 
1S2 10 
1.90 11 J 
2X0 11J 
8JS US 
237 96 
287 ia9 
252 9X 
i jo -- 
JS 


3 12 
16 13 
7 


SO 


114 102= CSOof n!5J5 IAI 

SO 34* Combtn 21* 45 
37= 23* CmbEn 1X0 36 
23= B ComdK 
18= 1S*i CamMlI 
26 8* Camdre 

32= 26 CmwE 
32* 26= CvrE Of 
18* 14* CwE pf 
18= 15= CwE Pt 
76= 62 CwE pf 
24* 14* CwE pf 
26= 22* CwE of 
30* 22= ComES 
38* 22* Comsat 
35* 23= CPsvc 
35* 33= Comoor 
29= 12* CompSC 
44'- »= Cetvsn 

39* 24*: ConAar 
20 16 CormE 

31= 22* CnnNG 
15= 12= Conroe 

38 77'i ConsEd 

241 179 ConEpf 6X0 2S 

47= 36= ConE pf 4S5 10S 
50 40* ConEpf 5X0 IQS 

3»* 25= CnsFrt 1.10 XI 11 
47* 38* CnsNG 232 SJ 9 
8= 4V* ConsPw 

33* 19= CnPofB 460 1AB 
54=8 32= CnPpfD 7A5 1A1 
56 33 CnP pfG 7J6 14J 

31= 15* CnPprV AS0 1A9 
25> 14 CnPprU 3S0 14J 
2T» 14* CnP or T 3J8 1AJ 
S6V. 33* CnPofH 7S8 1A5 
28* 14= CnPprR 4X0 1AB 
28= 14* CnPprP X9B IA7 
29= 14* CnPprN 3X5 14J 


23 14 
SS 13 

^ as f 

SO 2S 17 
its u a 


1X0 

ISO 

2S0 


toozioa* ioi= ioa= 

219 48 47= 47*— = 

686 28* 28* 28* +1 

871 22= 21* 22* + * 

40 19* 18* 19* + * 

880 998 9* 9*— * 
S797 28* 2S* 28* 

1 28* 23* 28* 

435 17* 1618 17 

5 17* 17* 17*- Vi 

350Z 73= 73= 73= 

553 34* 24* 2498 + = 
9 26= 26 26= + = 

38 28* 27* 28 
3S 10 310 31* 30= 31* + * 
1.1 17 2495 25* 24* 25= — Vk 
24 8 14 25V. 24* 25= + = 

13 1164 29* 28* 29* + Vk 

3981 12= 11* 11* + * 

323 37* 37= 37* + = 

4 18* IB* 18*- = 

290 31* 31= 31= 

84 14= 14 14= — * 

318 34* 34= 34* + * 
1 218 218 211 +3* 
10Z 44* 44* 44* + * 
4 48= 48= 48* 

761 35= 34* 35= + = 
156 42* 42 42 — * 

48QZ — - ~ - 

f? 




!!= loya CnPprMlM 136 


ISO 

.72 


17 9= DiPptL 2J3 

29 IS* OiPptS 4X2 1A6 
10 10V. CnP DTK 243 14J 

47* 31= CntICp 260 SS 
io* 4* Comm 

4= * Conti I rt 

3 * CtllHkJ 

13* 4 Cot Info 

24* 20* CentTel 

38* IS* CtDotn 
40= 32 CnDtpf 460 1X6 

I* * vICookU 
39* 27* Coopt 162 18 16 
41* X.= Cooal pf 290 7J 
70* 14* CocrTr M 23 9 
27 15 Cooovls SO 

15* 0* CopwW J2I 
23* 17 Cpwtdpf 2S8 119 
27* 17* Corduro 84 3S 16 
15= 11 Coreln 66 AS U 
S3* 31 CemGs 1 JO 24 23 
5ft* 27* Corfi Ik 1X0 IS 74 
10= 5* CirtCrd J4r 26 15 
39= 32 Crone ISOb A3 11 
59* 23 CrovRs 
19* 17* CreiN pf 218 US 
53= 49= CrckN pf 2S3e 5 X 
24 If* CrmoK ISO 5S 11 
79 43= CrwnCk 

4«* 28= CrwZel 1X0 
50* 44 CrZelpf AS3 
65= 50* CrZelpf CASO 
20= 18= CrysBn 
35= 22 VI Cutbro SO 23 16 
33* 13 Cuflnets 
08= 58= CumEn 220 
10= 9* Oirrlnc l.lOalQJ 

38* 30* CurtW 1J0 3 S 17 
52= 33= C vetoes 1.10 23 0 



17 Z7 24* 

22 27 26* _ 

6 18 17= 18 

'1 % 

22 17 16= 17 

277 2* 2 2 — * 

404 * * * 

182 13* 13= 13* + = 
4998 23= 23= 23*—* 
1708 1B= IT* 10 — = 
400: 33 33 33 +1 

52 1* 1 1* + * 

303 39= 38* 39= + * 
98 40* 40 40* 

i 2 H* ’PH 17* + * 
IS 16 2676 25= 24* 25*— * 
33 9 8= 9 + * 

16 17* 17* T7* + * 
9 24= 24= 24* + Vi 
14 12* 12 12*— * 

1901 54 52 53* +1* 

.235 55* 54= 55 — * 
574 9* 9* 9*— * 

95 37= 36* 37* + * 
29 1399 59* 5B* 59* + * 
1 15* 15= 18= 

488 52* 52* 52* + * 
183x22* 22 22* 

104 74= 72* 74= « 
443 41 40* 40* 

72 49 48* 49 +* 

134 60* 40* 60* + VS 
4396 19= 18= 19= +1= 

18 34* 33= 34* + * 
19 1754 14= 14* 14* 

X3 9 82 67* 66* 67* +1* 

8 10* 10* 10= + * 
8 35= 35= 35= + * 

19 47* 47* 47= 


2S 

9S 

7A 


12 


S4 

J4 

J52 


X9 3B 
76 9 
26 7 


24 19 
SS 13 

A3 IT 

... 7 


23= 15= Oaths 44 AX 30 
14* 9* OamanC JD IS 
30* 22= DanaCe 131 53 7 
9* 5* Dtrohr 7 

15 4= Daniel .IB) 2S 

40= 27= DartKrs 166 

76 31 DctaGn 
5* 4 Datpf n 

11* 6* DtaDsg 
22 14* Davco 

45* 29* DoVtHd 
2D* IS DcvtPL 2X0 106 8 
40* 24* DeanFd 66 IS 17 
33= 24= Deere 1X0 
24* 20= DelmP 152 
52* 34* Del to At 1X0 
10 4* Deltona 

44* 24* DIxChS 1X4 
28* 20* DensMf 1J0 
37* 31= DeSoto ISO _ 
17* 14 DefEd 1S8 11.1 
80 44 DetEpf 9J2 12J 

44 51= DefEpf 7S5 1IJ 

M 52 DefEpf 7J6 US 
24* 22* DEpfF 2J3 106 
20= 23 DE prR X24 1X1 
27* 21* DEPfQ 3.13 12X 
25* 22 , DE PfB X75 10S 
29* 24 DEpfO ISO 1X1 
29* 24= DEpfM 3S2 122 
33* 28 DEorL 4X0 1X7 
34* 29 DEPfK A12 12S 
116=107 DEpfJ 1XS8 137 
20* 16* DetEpr 2J2B 117 

24 18= Dexter SO 36 13 

18* 11* DIGJor Si 38 94 

33* 23= DIGtopf 225 7 S 

21 14* DiomS 167r10J 

38* 34* DloShpf 4X0 11X 

22= 20= DfaSOfn ISOe 66 

U 4= DionoCB 70 X0 3 

57= 31* DlettdS 1X0 ~~ 

125* B5= Digital 

95 56= Dlstnev 

28= 17* DEI 1 

6= 4= Dhmln 

10* 6* Dames 

34* 26* DomRs 
24* 16= Donald 
41* 43* Donley 
36= 23= Dorsey 
42= 32* Dover 
37* 27 DowOl 
50 36= OowJn 

38 B= Downey 

15= 11 Drove 
24= 17* Drear 
21= 16* DrexB 
69= 35 Drevtua 
63* 46* thlPonT 
40 31= duPntpf 360 9J 

50 40 duPntpf A50 96 

35* 27* DufceP 260 76 
85= 70 Duke pf 870 107 
80= 65 Dukepi 8J0 106 

77 61= Dukepf 7X0 1 06 

27 22* Dukepf 269 1BJ 

35= 30* Dukepf 365 11X 

108 97 Dukepf 11X0 186 

95 81* DukpfN 8X4 9J 


74 16* 16* 16*— = 

72 14* 14 W* + * 

47B 34* 24 24= 

119 7* 7* TVs + * 

199 7* 7= 7* + = 

19 13 1011 40= 39* 40* + = 
46 1744 42= 41= 43 — = 

676 5* 5= 5* 

36 10 112 7= 7= 7= — * 

U 9 136 10= 18 II — = 

20 18 3044 41* 41 41= + = 

" 2411 19 18* 19 + = 

79 39 36* 38*— = 

43S 25* 25= 25= + = 

718 25* 25= 25*— = 
1978 40* 39= 48*— = 
252 6= 6= 6= 

462 43 42* 43 + * 

201 22* 22* 22* + * 

18 33* 33* 33* + M 

3067 15= 15 15= 

345Hz 76= 76 76=— 1 

1420z 66 65= 66 + = 

lOOz 64= 64= 64= — 1 = 

7 26= 26= 26= — = 

24 27 26* 2641 + = 

19 26* 26= 26= 

6 25* 25* 25* + * 

43 28 27* 28 + = 

104 28* 27* 25* + = 
21 31* 31* 31*— * 
17 33* 32= 33* + = 

2114=114= 114= 

5 19= 19= 19= 

105 22* 21= 22= + * 

241 17= 16* 17 + = 

2 30* 30* 3J= + = 

3973 15* 15= 15=—* 
a 36* 36* 36* + = 
140 21= 21 21= + * 

37* 10 9* 10 + * 

~ 37= 36* 36= — * 

.. 19 7702116=113 114*— 1* 
U 50 660 73* 92= 93 + * 

364 19= 18* 19= 

412 5= 5= S= + = 

944 8= 0= 8= 

1399 32* 32= J2* + * 

99 24* 24= 24* + * 

401 57= 56* 57 — * 
... W 36= 35* 36= 
as 14 1178 3fi* 35= 36= + * 
A7 16 54SS 3S* 37= 38 + = 

_ 2X 19 016 39* 3S= 39* +1 

SOB 1,1 4 541 37 34= 3S4i— 1= 

60 36 150 14 13* 13* + W 

so is is :ioa ia= is* is* 

2XO 1 0.1 21 M 19= 19* + * 

60a 3 IS 223 68* 68= 68* + * 

3X0 4.9 16 4077k 61* 60* 61= + * 

8 37= 37= J7VJ — = 

9 40* 48 48 + Vk 

1462 33= 33* 33*—* 
1100: 81* 81= 81= 

108Oz 77 77 77 

17QZ 74= 74= 74= +1= 

4 26= 26 26= + = 

31 35= 35* 35* 

35007105 IDS 105 + * 

57DQZ 95= 95= 95= +2* 


X7 14 JS4 


I J0 
ISO 


.17 

X72 

66 

1.16 

1J0 


73 14 
3 


U 9 
27 11 
20 15 
3J 13 


ISO 

79 


83= 60 DunBrd 2J0 29 20 1753 76* 76* 76*— * 


17= 14= DuaLI 2X6 126 

19= 15* DuQPfA 210 116 

17* 13* OMPf 2X0 1X3 

» 14* Dua PfG Z10 1X3 

18 14* OuqprK X10 1X1 

35= 23= Duqpr 7JS 103 

62= SO Dua pf 7 JO 123 

77 20* DvnAm JO S 


7 4188 16= 16* 14 


140Z1B* 18= l8=— 1= 
6002 16= 16= 16= + * 
3002 17= 17= 17= 

10 17* 17* 17*—* 
B30Z 25* 25= 25= + * 
lOz 59 99 59 

83 26* 26= 26* + * 


68 

126 

60 

1X4 

33 


43 29 EGG 

17= 15= EGKn 
32* 23= E5vki 
28= 20 EooleP 
20* 12= Eases 
12= 3* EcstAir 
1* EALwtO 
= EALwfA 
7* EkAIrpf XS3k 
_ . 9= EAlrpfB A20fc 
33= 11* EAlrpfC „ 

28* 21= E««3F 1J? 56 
23* 16* East Lit I 3X6 93 
50 41= EsKedS UD 

60= 49* Eaten iso 
15* 11* EchRns 
32* 20 Eckert 
33= 26= EdisBr 
18* 14 EDO 
11 8 EdCtTiD 


1 J 18 1606 36= 35* 36= + = 


73 
13 15 
A3 9 


5 

2* 

22* 

25= 


312 16= 16= 16*—* 
«4 29= 29= 29* + Vk 

119 24* 23* 24* + * 

108 18* 18= 18* ■ 

3437 7 6* 7 +* 

129 2= 2* 2= 

1* 1* 

16= 17 + * 

18* 19 + * 

58 24* 24 24* 

35 24 23= 23* + * 

, „ , . 598 22= 22= 22= + = 

43 14 5774 45= 44= 44* + * 
24 8 2M 58= 57* 57*- * 
36 11 5976 12= 11* 12= + * 


197 1= 

78 17 
139 19 


1X4 34 14 1915 m. 30* 30= + * 
160 AS 13 23 32* 32 32* + * 


2B 15 13 
.120 15 15 


If* 14 14* + * 

10 9* 9*— * 


17 Month 
HJOBLew Stock 


Div. YU. PE 


Sis. 

life Hl«tl Lew 


O0M 

Quot-Oigt 


34= 22* Edward X0 X7 13 
29* 21= EPS dpi 2J5 9J 
19= 9 EfToro Xte 6 11 

13 7* Elcor J6 35 

5= 2* EleeAs ,16 Afl 12 

24* 15= ElefWS X8 A 23 
U 11= Elphi SO 6X 15 
9= 2 EUctnt 

78= 66 EfTUkEI 2J6 15 13 
Ifik 6* Em Rod 54tl15 9 
20= 15* EmryA 60 X0 14 
33* 26= Emhart 140b AS 10 
Z2= 16+i EmpOs 1X8 86 0 
S= 4 Emppt 47 10J 

6* 4= Emppf 60 ICtO 

*4* 13 Eneroen 1M 7S IQ 
= EnEsc 

22= 22 EmUCo J2 XI 13 
20 11* EntsBdS J* IS 14 


20S 39= 28* 29= + * 
4 25= 25= 25= 

8 10 = 10 * 10 *— * 
*= 8* 9= + * 

43 4 3* 4 

45 30* 19= 20* + * 
47 13* 13 13* + * 

1137 3= 2* 3= + = 

604 71= 70* TO* + * 
598 7* 7= 79k + * 

587 16* 16= 16* + * 

134 29* 29 29= 

5 22 21 * 22 + * 

7DBV 4* 4* 4*— * 

110V S 5 5 — * 

17K 14 13* 14 + W 

95 

627 23 22= 23 

77 19* 19* 19* 


12 Month 
High Lew Stork 


Div. VM. PE 


51% 

ign High Lew 


CM* 

QuoLdrae 


25* ,V HMhAnt 

23= *9* Hit USA 
15= 10= Hocks 
18* 13= HectoM 
23= U* HeMmft 
31= 16* Hefllg 

39* 20= Helrtcs 
Si 13* HelneC 
24* 18 HelmP 


33 Z7 SO W- 13* 

a 1980 12* 10* 12. k +2= 
HttOP n J3e 36 23 21= 21 21 


947 10'- 9= 10 + = 

7* 27 a 12= w* 13* 

26 IS 28 1 m I9+i W> »* + = 


2* 31= Herrols !■» « “ 

19= ID 7 : WerirCs X^ 38 152 

34 21 HerUC *5 


160 


»* 17* Eraerch 160b 7X143 1318 22* 22= 22* +1 


21* 17* EnsExn IJSe AD 9 

2* 1* Eoarce 25 

13* 9= Entero 

191: 13* E/nexE ZSOelAJ 

31* 17* Enfexln 1JA AS 11 

35 21= Equfxs 1J4 36 20 

6= 2* Eouhnk 

rru uu, Eomfcot 3J1 1X2 

30* 25= Eqmkpf 

50= 32 Vi Eat Res L72 36 10 

17 ■= Eaglfee .» 1 J 6 

14* io* Erurrmt JO 12 12 

34= 13= EssBus M XI 13 

24* 15 EsexCS JO 17 14 

28 15 Eafrtae J2 4J 22 ... . „ 

25= T4= Ethyl* 60 26 14 1190 24* 24= 24= — * 

6 1 vIEranP 202 1= 1 1= + Vk 

9= 1= vi E.-an pf 15 1* 1* 1* + Vk 

13= 2* vIEvnpfB 6 2* 2* 2* + = 

43* 33= EkCeto IJ3 Al II 56 42= 41= 42= + W 

17* 14* Exatlsr lSAclQJ 2 17 17 77 

55= 47= Exxon U0 U I 4585 53 52= 53 + V. 


146 20 Vi 19= 20 — = 
74 2= 2* 2= 

95 11* 11= 11*— = 
65 15= 14* IS — * 
72 20 19* 19* 

20 34= 33= 34= 

207 4 J= 4 — = 
7 19 19 19 

1 30 30 30 

44 43* A3* + V. 

9= 9W ?li 
13* 13= 13* 

21= 71 'A 21=— = 
19V4 78* 19= 


21 14 Hermn n 

50= 35 Hennv 
10= S’- HeMton 
13= 9 HfOTDt 
38* 28* HewIPfc 
03* 24 Hex cel 
33* IS 1 — Hi Sheer 
13= 9* Hi Watt 

SATk 19= Hllnbrd 
73= 54 HltWl 
37= 26 V: Hitachi 
57* 39 Hd Wav 1X0 
93 65>k Hoflv S 1X0 

30* 10= HomeD 
27= 17= HmFSD 


t4 

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10 3TT: 33 33= + * 
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107 

80 

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70 53 FMC 120 
2t 20= FPL Gp 1.94 
13= 9= FabCtr JB 
U* 9* Facet 
20* I* FalrcfxJ JD 


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77 ■ 
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7 

15 


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160 aj m 
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14*. 11= Folrfd .11 15 

27 1514 FomDI a. JO 

19 13= Fenstm SO 

44* 23 FrWWF 

22* 15* Foroh XI 

11 1= FovDry 

6= 4= Federk 

AS* 32 FedlCo 

52* 31* Fed Exp 

39 30* FdMog 

23= 14 FedNM 

25 16* F#<SPB .. _ 

30= 25* FPoopf X31 86 

16* 12= Fed Bits 1X4 AS 15 

19* 14* FdSem so as u 

68Tk 49 FedD5» Z6f 36 TO 

37 23* Ferro 1J0 19 Id 

35 25* FWest 1X0 36 11 

UV. yu FlnCpA X5I 
37* 39 FlnC* Of 4JSol8.1 
6= 2= FtlSBor 8 

31* 25* FIreFdn JO IX 
22= 14= FI resin JO A3 14 
27* 15V. Ft Aft* Ma 26 10 
43 25= FfBkSv 160 Al 7 

35= 22 FBkPIs 1X0 X? 14 
46* 25* FBcits 1X0 2J 10 
U* 19* FstOilc 1J2 5J 9 
53* 44= FCW O Pt 114*105 
ID 69= FOU DfS 760el 05 
17= 10* FtBTex 60 AS 
48 35 FtBTxpf 564*146 

44= 32* FtST x pf 5J3elS2 
19H 4’A FtOtV A 

29* 12* FFedAz 68b 25 I 
60 43* FFB 113 5S 8 

110= 97* FtFldpf«169e 96 
55* 39* Flmste US 51 7 
34'- 15= Plntst Pf 137 76 
II* 6* FtMh» J4 X2 11 
31* TA RNatnn I 

7* 6= PstPo 
30* 23* FstPopf 262 9S 
31* 2SU FtUnRi 2X0 7J |A 

28 Vk 18 FtVaBk 

35* 19= FfWtec 
AT 23= Bxhb 
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43 2i* RfFflGslSi 

28* 17= FfeefEn S4 


667 69* 68*' 69* +1* 
3148 25= 25 25= + >4 

26 9* 9* 9* 

43 10* 10 RI* + Vi 
T7B 10* 10* 10* 

178 31 30* 30*— * 

DCSH2 11* 11= 

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7 24 44 43= 44 

126 31* 20 Vk 20* + = 
274 f* 8= 0* 

68 4* 4* 4* 

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1442 48= 47* 48V.— Vi 
16 34* 31 36 

23172 24 23= 24 +* 


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313 D= Bti g= + * 

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98 S’- 5= 5* + = 

52* 28= HCA 60 IS 910819 D* E* M= + * 

21= 17* HotlWS 2X0 10X20 ® 2,. 2 TS 

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221 M 11 77 25 24* 34* + = 

SO 36 37 T27 10= Iff* 

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68 XS U 2749 Z7* Z714 27* + * 

5016U li X4 30 30=+* 

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32 

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64 23 13 

ISO 2J 14 
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24 

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28* 20Vi Knutke ^ 6 67 

IB IB HmSFn Ml 26 

A3* 44= Hondo soe 

67* 54 Vi Hanwrtl 2X0 11 
35* 22= HrznBn 1J8 13 W 
a* 22 HrzBnpf2JSe 9J 
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52 38= ISLrfK 

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227k 16* LILPIW 
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27*— Wo LILPfO 
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31= 20* Lowes 36 
as* 19* Loeril I M 
lib 26* Lufrrt » 
24* 16* LoOnS 1.M 
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r 












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23= 17= MACftM 3* 
54* 25= MCA S 
m 13 MOP IX 
14* 70 MDC J3 
38 2Tu MDU 2JT 
47= 35* ME! 60 
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re* ID* WUBtGrptU 
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19* 14* HowICP 
27* 23= Hubbrd 
13* 9* Huffy 
15* 12 HuoflTl 
34 17* HuenSo 

36* 21* Human 
31* 21 HMlIIWf 
41= 26* HuttEF 
33 20* Hydro! 


38= Maev l.M IX 13 703 4A 46* 44= 

31= MaoiCf T.toeXI Ml « fi* 51= 9* +1= 
1* Mat am nine « M i j 


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1J0 18 8 
1X0 XS 
X5C S 175 
36 8 
13 9 


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13* 11= Ftalpf 161 1X9 
29* 20 F Wrists .16 3 18 

25 15* FEoafPt 

45= 31= FlaEC 

29* 22* 

18* 11* 

6* 3= FtwGen 
21* 14* Flower 
20* 13* Fhjor 
69 47V4 FoateC 

51V. 40= ForriM 

13* 11* FI Dear 1J6 106 
45* 28* FtHowl 
15= 10= FostVAl S4 36 12 
13* 7* FaxPhol 68 56 13 
£* 24* Foxhro 1X4 Al 
27 22 Faxmyr 16 

22* II* FMEPn 1.10 b 56 
13* 9= FMGCn IX 

TD* 8* FMOG 2X4e20.1 5 
22* 15* Fro MAC 60b XJ 10 2H2x 
32* 22 Frfgtm 60 XI 36 4X7 

28* 21* Fnwflf 30 23 » 687 

E* *= Fruhfpf 2X0 7S 77 _ 

36* 28* Fuqua SO LX 10 188 31 


112 17* 17* 17*— * 
132 27V. 27 27 + * 

US lA'ji 16 16* + * 

73 U* 18 11* + * 

976 S7* 66* 67*— * 
431*30* 29 X* +2* 
220 34 33* 34 +1 

2705 6* 6 6* + * 

24 34* 34* 34* 

220 6 * 6 6 * + * 
1989 31* 30* 30*— * 
230 19 1 8* IB* — Vi 

IX 27 26* 26*— * 

241 39 38* 39 + * 

X 35= 34* 35 — = 

498 43* <2 43* +1* 

430 24* 24* 24* + * 

200 49 49 49 

1 70 70 70 +* 

201 17 * iri 17 * 

71 39 38 38 — 

1 35 35 35 + = 

21 6* 6* e* 

95 27* 27= 27= 

167 57* 56 57* +1 

15 111=111=111= +3 
451 49* 49 49*— * 

85 30= 29* X — * 
318 7* 7* TVs + * 

12 31* 31* 31* 

264 6= A* 6= + = 

IDO 26= 26* 26*— ft 
24 27= 27= 27ft 
35 26= 26 20* 

TO 34* 33* 34= + ft 
179 26* 25 26* + * 

119 37* 37* 27*— * 
360 19* 18* 19V. + * 

" 12* 12= 17= — * 


37* 25 ICind 
19* 14* I CM a 
11* 8* lCN 

X 22* 104 pf 
18* IS* IN Ain ... 

27* 21= iPTimn IAS* A6 
17= 14* I RT Pr s 163 93 


1S4 XS 16 2183 38* 37* 38* +1* 
28* AJ 135 IS - 14* 14*— * 
75 1573 HU 10= It* + * 
2JD 96 43 29* 28 58= + * 

16! 11.1 TO lift IT- lF«t— * 

172 21* 71= 27* + ft 
49 16* U 16ft— * 


AJ 

AJ 

£C 

46 

66 


8.1 9 


294 .... 

632 21* 20* 21* + * 
140 5* 5’i 5* + * 

7 U54 2M. 23* D* 

17301 1? 19 19 

700x20= » 20* + * 

9AOZ 36= 36= 36= + * 
6I10Z34 37— 33*— * 

100 53* 33* S3* 

13 5« X 28= X +1* 
5 2562 38 37= 38 + * 

19 1160 81* 8* 8* + * 

456 rr* ii* inn— * 

396x74= 14= 74= + * 
6 11* 18* 18*— ft 

12 19* 19= 19* + * 

7 55x25* 25* »* + ft 

865 S* 5ft 5* + * 
343 53= 53 51= + * 

77 37 36= 37 + * 

13 IS 14* 15 + * 

U9 2D* 20= 2016- ft 

4 44 43* 43* 

277 lift 17* 18* + * 
229 5* Aft 5 —ft 

20 2T* 77* 21* + * 
8 26= 26 26= - * 
22 33* 33* 33* + » 
ua i* b a — ft 
22 9= f* 9= 


10 



18 +* 
Ac 

20 =— * 

14* + * 

19 55 54* 54* 

4723 47= 46= 47*+ H 
44x13 12* 12* 

766 47 44* 47 +2* 

358X11= 10* 11= + * 
XxITH 12= 12 
73 25= 24* » 

219 24* _ 



+ * 


+ ft 


10 . _ 

10 = 

IS* 18* + = 
28= + * 

^8*=* 
= 31* 


42* 23= GAP 30 J 12 925 42= 41* 42= 

37= 27* GAT X 130 36 131 30* 30* 30ft + ft 

47= 3 4* GATXpf 250 66 4 38* 33* 38* 

51* 49= GATXpf A33e 86 60 51 51 51 + ft 

32= 5* GCA 6897 4* 4= 5=— * 

787k 54 GEICO ISO 1J 10 43 76* 76= 76= + = 

6* 3 GEO 267 3= 3= 3= + ft 

B 3=GFCp 32 4= 4* 4* + = 

44= 38* GTE 3,16 77 8 2959 41= 41* 41= 

26* 24= GTE pf 2X0 76 3 25= 25= 25= 

24* 20* GTE Pi 248 10J 46 24= 24* 34* + = 

7* 1 GalHou . 137 3* 3* 3* + * 

66= 43* Gannett 1S8 38 18 1272 55= 55 55= + = 
50 20= Goplnc .60 IX 39 799 49* 47* 49* -to* 
JOl 25 
66 XI IT 


36* 25* irren 1X0 IS U 39W 33* 33= 33= + * 
67= SB ITT ofJ 4X0 
AS* 49 ITTcfK A00 
44= 49 ITT pfO 5X0 
a= 35= ITTpfN 2J5 
68 51= ITT pH A5D 

im 11 lUlnl so 
24= 18 kJaboPs 1 J. 

17 5 KtealE 

27= 21* inpowr 264 US 
20* 15= HPowPf XU 112 
21* 17* HPewpi 235 716 
38* 30* llPOWPf AT2 UJ 
36= 28= llPowpf X78 US 
55 50* llPowpf 221» AJ 

36= 26* ITW 72 2A 
mu 31* rmaOun 23U 6X 
12 7= ImptCa 

15* ID INCO JO 13 
76 60= IndiMpf 848 UJ 

19* 15* IndlMDf 2.15 IL5 
S= 14 rmiMpI Z25 114 
28* 22 IndlGSS 2X4 U 7 
7* 4= inexco X7I 
54= 39= Ingres TAB 43 16 
17= 30= InaRpf 2JS A4 
15= 11 IngrTec 6* 36 24 
26 »= InWSH J8I 

48= 38* InfdStpf A» US 
21* 16* irvifo IXOb 55 11 
6= 3* InjpR* 

26= IT* lafgRtc 

21 19 intgRpf 3X3 115 
35ft 25% IntoRpf A2S 126 

9* 7= Inttogn 
9* 9= lottoBPf 160 158 
14= 8 IntRFn 
19* 17* IlcnSt 
73* 57* tnferca 
158 125= Inter pf 
lift 1 intrfU 
S3* 41 Intrtt 
12= ■= Interred 
34ft 15* IntAlu 

138* IU IBM .... _ ... .. 

29= 16= IntCfU SO 16 10 tl 25 24* 34*— * 

35 25 IntRav 1.12 XT JB 2611 38* 34* 36 +2= 

11= «* InfHorv 4522 8 7= 7% + = 

7= 3* IrtHrwt 313 5= 4* 5 + * 

3* 2 lametta 340 2* 2* J* + W 

AO 29= IntHafC 11 51* 51= 51* 

<2 23* IfrtH Pf A 230=30=30= . 

34% 20 imHpfO 14124*23=24* + % 

44 34 IntMfn 260 66 12 1543 39*38*39=+ = 

43= 24% IntMuJI 1J6 A3 12 139 41 40= 41 + * 

57% 44= IntPapr 240 5J 2133 46* 46 46 — ft 

16* 7= Inf Res 390 8= 8ft 8ft + ft 

54* 38 IntNUtl 248 5J 10 3601 47= 45 47 +2= 

78= £1= IntNtpf 6S08J 40x 79 79 79+ = 

US 138 InWfpfJOSO 66 45159 159 1ST +7 

43* 32= IrtodGc 1X8 26 14 SO 41= 40H 41= +1= 

22 14= InfBakr 13 “ - 

22% lift InfStPW 160 92 10 

22 II InPwpf 228 186 

13= Ift liriSecn JOe 1.1 11 
21* 17= Iowa El 1.94 93 11 

35 26 krwllG 174 86 8 

23= 18 towlllpf 131 104 

37* 2*= lowoRs 3X0 « 10 

40 31= I pales 3X4 BS 10 

13% 9* IPCOCP J6 12 I 

40* 28= irvBnk L96 SO 7 

54* 44 IrvBkpf A74T87 


•ft 6* MLCsnvnJBe 2* 
ii* im ml inen 
22= 12* MB Lf« 678 _ 

38* 30% Macro! s JS VJ t? 

46= “ ' 

S3'— 

27% 

77* to* Maitflln J0 16 . 

21* 13= MOBblft J2 26 . 

19= 18= MaorCs JO 6 22 
42= 30* MfrHaa IS 12 S 
56= 44= MfrHpf UJllU 
52* 41 MfrHpf SSJOlLl. .. 

8ft 5ft vIMcnvf 
25* 15= viMnvfPf 
31= 24* MAPCO IB U 1 
5 J Mend 
1ft = Uvcae 
38= 25% Mv«4d U0 LI - 7 

43= » Morton t 36 3 23 

11% 8* MarkC - 32 29 97 H ft* 11 + U 

M0 70 Menial Jt 6 17 444 «9« 9R 9P* + ft 

79* M MrfWA 13» 36 1* 397 ft* 77% 78* + = 

44ft 26ft MT581 U0 as I DU 33* » 37ft— = 

14 Oft Mom ' M XS 340* M to* M - 
34ft 25% MOKB BUM 4T1 38* 36% 34 + U 
3= 1* MceevF 461 2* 2= 2* 

22 MMC» 180 ftj 29 29* 2891 29ft- ft 


‘iU 


. - "■ i 


a?** js sl +* 

433 am 38* 39=—* 
n 53= BL S3*-* 

7t 9ft A* «*+ * 
» M ft H 

.S 

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- •--VW- 


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.• -H-* 


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iora- ntxif 


40= 37= McvDStrUi X2 n 3H 98* 90= 3Mk- * 
45* 43 Moris 2J042U ft4«*2=lJft+m 
31= 71 McDrpf 131 tl 1ft 24* 33= 2f= + *~ 

39= ftftMCOKf MB Kf 800 21* 19* 27= + ft 

9* 7= UcOcIwt 667 Jft 3= 3=— ft 

W = 6* McGtd J «» I] 9* 9* J*— ft 

72 ft 36 U 13 1864 10ft 49ft IS*— = 

87 . 64 MCOeO L84X7KI7316S*«0 68* + ft- 

52 37ft MoGm 140 XT U 185 45= 44= 4S% + = 

3Hk 2S*MCW0 7 36* 21= 26*+* 

SO 37 McKett M A7U 834 59ft 49= 50% +1V. 

79= 60ft MCKpf MB a * * SI 01 toft 

M W«cun U 28 0% 8* S* 

6* T* McLfOwt 58 2ft 2 2 — ft 

29ft 22ft- MOMS 1X0 46 9 11x25=25 25= + * 

44* 33 Mead IX U n SIT 36= 36* 36* 

25% 15* Mesnoc 34 UU 164 24* 24= 24% 

40* 25* Metflin 30 IX U SB* «* 40* « ft 

54= 43* Melton 248 56 r 213 47ft 47Vk 47= 

3Tk M* MMtoPPf2J0 NS 4 20= 20* 2S= 

«= JS= McftfB UK XI U 643 4k* 46* 46* + 1k . 

70 51* Merest 1 JO 10 11 31 65* 64% AS* + * 

128 ' B* Merck UO 27 U mi 179*117*09= +1* 
m 50= MtnHl 1X8 M U 311 41* 61= 67= — * 

34* 25= MerLvn XD 16 ft 6821 31* 20ft 31* + * 


; ■ 'ft# 


''f.'cteih'* 




2100109 _ .. .._ 

3X8 46 n 185 68 67* 48 +* 

773 S3 7 -M7 147 U7 — = 

60 56 12 1784 10* re* reft + ft 
240 54 9 21 4 f= 4Bft 48= + ft 
230 9* 9ft 9ft— ft 


.72 42 I 17 17= n T7= 

440 23 1311786 03 131*132= + * 


US 
ixo 63 
226 96 11 
M AD 27 
ia 44 l« 
274 76 8 


ire 22* 

45* 2D% 
310X21= 
TlAx 9* 
H» 20 


22 = + * 

. 20* + ft 

21 21 = 

9= 9= + ft 
19* 20 +ft 
79 32= 31* 31ft— * 
500x 22ft 22 22ft 

216 33= 33 33ft + ft 

216 36= 3Ai 36 —ft 

10G 11= 11 11= + ft 

144 39= 38ft 39ft + ft 

120 54= 54= 54= + ft 


60e5J 
IJ0b2J 37 
163e 9.1 
1X0 L7 12 
60 " 


220 


JO 

J4 

JS 


14 7= Geartit 

22= 14= Gelca 
12= 9* Gem 1 1C 
12* 10 Gemlll 
63* 31= GnCorp 
10ft 14* GAInv 
59* 31* GrtBcsh 
39= 22* Gdirm 
20= 7ft GnData 
13= 9ft Go Dev n 
3= 2= Go Dev wt 

04 42 GriDvn TX0 

A5V. S3 GCtlEI 
9% 4% GoHme 

19= 11= G Hosts 
12ft 8= GflHous 
23= V2% Gnirat _ 

45= 47% GOMlIls 2J46 14 
57= 52 GMUlwl 
as 44= GMot 5X0r 74 6 
44= 16= GMfr E .fJ5i .1 

43* 36 GMotpf 3J5 93 
5BK. 47= GMotpf 5X0 94 
I* 3ft GffC .16 36 
16 10* GPU I 

94Vs 58U GerRe 164 16 99 
14= 6 GnRefr IS 

53*. 37 GnSWiI ISO 44 11 
13= 10= GTR pf 1JS 93 
13= 10= GTFlPf. UO 104 
4* 2% Gensco 
19% 0 GnRod .10 IX 
26= 19 Geitotg I JD S3 
86= 19* Gstpt 1x8 8J 
36 28* GenuPt L18 3S 13 

27* 20= Go Poe JO 36 88 
37ft 33% GoPcpf 224 6X 
26= 23= GoPwpf 1X0 11J 
30 = 25% GaPwpf 144 1X2 
31ft 27 GaPw Pf 176 126 
23* 19 GaPwpf 266 UX 
23= 10= GaPwpf 262 1IX 
26% 22 GaPwpf 275 10J 
67= 56 GaPwpf 7J2 1X1 
37* 23 GertlPd 1J2 17 14 

23= 12* GerbSc “ 

31% 14ft Gettvs 
12* 8= GIANT 
12= 5= GfcrFn 

27 16* GHfMJU 

69ft 53ft Gillette 
17* lift GleasC 
14= 7= GlenFd 

1= GioblM .._ 

4= GtabMpf L7SI 
B= GklNUfl 

1% GldNwt 
18* GktVVF J4 


62 

260 


.121 


166 A9 


14 


5% 

22 % 

13= 

4 

39 

35 24* GtiHdl 

30= 24= Goodvr 

18% '14= GordnJ 62 

37% 19 Gould 48 

45 35= Groce 2X0 

34= 26ft GtW S 60 2X 14 

21= 11 «AW 48 25 7 

19 M* GfAtPc 8 

f£T= 33= GILkln 1X0 16 15 
21= 15 GNIm IXSelOJ 
41% 32= GtNNk 162 42 16 

29% 22= GtWFTn 1X0 36 " 

20 14= GMP 1J6 ?J 


119 7* 7= 7* 

7 17* 17% T7ft + ft 
95 10* 10= 10=— ft 
66 11= 11* 11= + ft 
1580 65 62* 64* +2* 

2 1§ 17* 18 + ft 

73 59ft 59= 59% + = 

14 11 1770 35* 34* 35 + * 

15 133 10% 10= 10% + * 
4 115 HJft 10% 10ft + = 

7 2* 2* 3* + = 

15 7 2122 <7 65 67 +2= 

36 12 4727 61* 60= 61= + % 

16 12 5= 5V| 5= + ft 

IS 4 176 TV* 19= 19= — = 

24 25 10= 10 10ft— ft 

422S 16 IS 36 +ft 
2594 65= 63= 65* +1% 
89 56= S 56= + * 
6349 67= 66* 67ft + ft 
393 39* 38% 38% — ft 
1? 40= 40 40= 

14 S3* 53= 53* 

45. 4= 4= 4= + ft 

1323 15% 15= 15% + ft 
1587 98* 94= 96= +2 
51 I 7% 7* 

325 41= 41 41*— ft 

30i 12* 12* 12* + * 
100x12= 12= 12= . 

189 3= 3= 3= +\i 

MB 9* 9* 9* 

460 20= 20 20= + = 

2155 22* 21% 22 
1 37= 37= 37= 

7 2% 25* 25% + = 
^re=re=re=- = 

3 SS SS 

15 2S% 25% 25% - 

30x64 64 64 —2= 

191 35% 3SVk S= 

260x T7 16= 17 + * 

956 31 27= 28=— Z= 

241 II* 11= U* + * 
419 8* 8= a* + = 

316 17* 17 - 17ft 

as 13 1103 69= 66* 68* +1% 
.111 48 16% 15ft 14ft + ft 

IS 5 959 77* 17* 12* + = 

1111 1ft 1ft 1* 

103 4= 4= 4=— U 

19 20 10 9ft 9ft 

291 2 -J* ift 

S 6 477x 38 37 38 +1* 


35% 23ft JWT* M2 
37 23% J River J6 

28ft 16 Jamswv .12 S 
13% 10% JaonF 143elU 
50 36 Jeff Pit 132 11 

J9 «= JwCof 9J6 US 
69= Oft -JerCpf B.T2 US 

106 91% JerCpf nS 125 

?a '2ii& Z ”" J 

47= 33= JohnJn 

46= 38* JohnCn 

5«% 50* JhnCpf 425 
S* 21* Jeraen ixo 
Ws 17= J averts 36 
27= 21% JavMfg ISO 


18 17 155x29* 28* 29= + ft 
IS 11 1200 35= 34% 35* + * 


11 


512 20 19* 20 + ft 

115 12ft 12 12 — ft 

804x48% 47* 48= + ft 
540x 79 79 79 

70x69 68 69 +1= 

110X 65* 65= 65= +1 
120II 05= 104= 104= 

39 1ft IB= 18% +ft 
.. 25 14ft 14* Uft 

1J0 27 15 3216 48* 47ft 48= + ft 
1S6 A2 9 92 44* 44* 44* 

20 55 54= S + = 

W 23* 23% 23*+ = 
86X26 25* 26 + = 

143 23= 23 23ft + ft 


J* 1ft 

22 12 = 

J5% 3f*46e*oR Ute SJ 
7* 5ft Mnab JftUX . 
33 25= MfEotC 19f HA 

46= 52 MTEpfF 812 U5 
65* 52 MfEan A 12 T24 
3ft 2 MexFd JMU 

U= 14* MchER 1SD 8.1 12 
7* 4 MJcfckjv X6 U HK 

62ft 37* Midean 2J6 AS M 
15= . 8M AUdSUf 
30= 15ft MWR« 

32= 26= MWE 
15= lOftMUMl 
■6 73= MMM 

39= 27ft MftPL 
10= 1ft Mta wfW 

8 4* Mitel 

34* 25= MaU 
2ft ftvfMoWH 
B* 5* AnodCpf ' U 
33* T9* Maftftsc X 14 11 
n= n. MphkOt 
53ft 40= iWooCn 1X51 11 

54 44= itonCopEun S3 

19ft 14ft Mrerctr JO sa 23 
55* 4M6MOAPPI Z53 - 
30ft U* MonPw 2X0 
TVft 15ft ManSt LSOO 9J 
If* tft MONY SS res 9 
2ift 14 Meerrg J2 14 13 
20 MeerM UK A3 13 
31 24= MOTMpf 250 9J 

54* 34* Moraas 220 41 7 
14 9= MorKeg 12 

47 30= MorKnd 1SS 14 11 

23= 18= MorseS SO U 14 
H W MteRtv 
25= Morion 
39ft 29ft Motorkj 
26ft 15 Munfrd 
16ft 8= Mansgs 
Eft 23= MarpO 
22* 16= MurryO 
14% 12 MutOm 
7 1ft MverL 


466 7* 2= 7= 

no 16* 16% 16= 

15 32= 33= 32= 

1U 5* 5* 5ft + ft 
B8r 3f 31 31 + = 

m 65= 45ft 65=— I* 

are 43 % as* 65 = — = 

*3 2ft 2 2 

34 17* 17ft 17* 

75 5* 4ft 5* + * 

. 9S7 52* 31 52* +lft 

4 413D *ft 9ft 9* 

7IO IS* 15% 15ft 
210 30% 30= 30* + ft 

2137 3* 2= 

1 417 «* 4ft 
7J3B 7J 14 3942 2tPtt 30 
17 * = 

i% i* 

51* 51 





160 

100 

119 

37 


*3*-* 
654 + ft 
38= + = 

5ft 

TS 


■-**#*$ 

tAoMi 


51 50= 

15% 15 


15* + = 


1S0e9J IS 

N 17 1 
S4 IX 34 
54 29 n 
25 

1X0 3J 14 
.SO 13 13 
LA4 HU 


U 12 1120 45= 44* 44% + * 
44 12 428 30= X 1 *, 30* 

38 19= 19 19 

73 ■* 8= Ift 

290 19% We 19% + ft 

238 34= 23* 24ft + ft 

73 27 26ft 27 

4354 S3* 53 SM + * 

14 13 12% 12*— ft 

90 «= 43= 43= 

117 21= 21 2lft — 

.84 18* 17% 18ft 

1137 U* 33ft 33ft 

2215 33= 32* 32ft + ft 

194 18= 18= 18= + ft 

37 14ft 16 16= + * 

107k 31* 31= 31% + ft 

45 19 18% 19 + = 

34 14 13* 14 + ft 

173 2* 7»k 2* + % 



*#* 




Ii * % 


w't 


ISO 

ISO 


22 


SS U 
3S 7 
11 

J2 35 U 
1J2-3S 9 


77 

43 19 
3A 15 
6J 15 


30 

232 


30 

130 


36 


3 12 
4407 


3X571 


ID* 7* KOI 
2D* lift KLM 
4T= 30* Kmart 
17 13% KNEnn 

JW «* KaftrAl .151 
57= 47 KaiAlpf A12 75 
20= 13* KolsCe JD 14 9 
18* 15= KnICpf 1J7 63 ■ 
11= 7* Kantfa SO AS 24 

M= 18 KCtyPL 236 103 5 
39= 31 KCPL pf AS 123 
40 22= KCPL pf AS0 T2J 

20% 15* KCPLpf 2J6 114 
21= 17 KCPL Pi 2X3 TL5 

41= KCSoa 1X8 21 9 
19* 9* KanGE 1.V8 9.1 5 

41* 32% KanPU 2X6 7S 8 

15S£ l r pf 232 93 

45 12* Katytrr 

20 12* KoufBr M 23 5 

18= 14 KaufDf L50 9X 
68% 35* Kellogg IS4 73 16 
45= ^jwd 1J0 27 8 

18* toft KFTpyn M 43 17 
29ft 23= KVUH1 244 
13% 9% KerrGI 

71% 17= KerCpf 
84= 26= KerrMc 
Ji* 21% Keren* 

5 2= KevCort 

1F= 12= Kevltlf S 
37= 26= Kldde UD 
M= 44* Khnfca 232 


6950 
l 
55 
9 
416 
13' 


J4 24 12 466 10= 10 10= 

.STe 30 7 8249 17% 16% T7ft— * 

L40 43 W 7TS 33% 32* 32% 

14* 14* 14= JtTh 

22= 22= 22* + M 
20teM= M= 35=+T= 
ISlz 37 37 37 — 1 

1 19 19 19 — = 

3 20= 20= 

286 52= 51= 52= + % 

^ SS3S3 tl 

251 14* Uft 14* + * 

43* 43* 43*— ft 
Vk \ii 

w ink m* + 

796 16* 15% Ifii 


U 29 
5.1 13 

3J A 
7J3 22 

75 'l 
7 


35 

56 


IX 


118 

ton 



24 17 

i4 10 


51 ^ 35= 


tyu 44* KJm&CJ 232 35 10 S4 60= 59ft in w. 

4«4 26= KngMRd J6 2.1 17 l!S 36% 36*- * 

18% 10= Knogo 18 85 17% 17% T7S 4. 2 

75 24= Kacmt ra Ii n IE Ai ZZ ALT I'J* 7 * 


9 A 48 
22 

5X533 


5J 
XI 23 
XI 

7.1 n 


29= 22% Green T 
22 Gi-erir 


164 32* 31% 31% — ft 
7 1871 27= 26= 27= + % 
49 16* 16* 16* + = 
1012 32* 32= 32*— = 
863 39= 38* 39= +* 
163 34 33% 33% 

664 19= 18% 19ft + ft 
870 19* 18* 19 + = 

43 42% 61= 62= + * 
11 17 17 17 + ft 

267 Uft 36 36ft— * 

7 2337 28= Z7% 28= + * 
9 II 19= — ' 


iS 9S2 KoBrirf »n' 

KopprpflOXO 10A 
16= 12* Korea . ' J3e 3J 
47= 36 Kroger 2X0 4J 12 
M= 23 Kubota Jl. L5 41 
SS Kuhlm t AO 23 13 
63% 28= Kyocer J2e S 20 
23= 15* Kyeor MU 8 


21= 15% MAPCO 
37 23* NED* 

31= 10* NBI 
22= 17= NCH 
44* 31ft NCNB 
36= 34* NCR 
13* 9ft NL Ind 
36% 27 NUI 
Fft = NVF 
59= 35= NWA 
28* 22 Noico 
29* 23* Nashua 
18= 8* NWCnv _ 

35* 23* NctDtSt 2J0 
21% 11= NatEOu 
30= 21* NafFGs 2X8 
37= 22* NlGvns 
-*% 2= NIHom 
33* 24 Nil 
32* 1B% NMedE 
ITW 7ft NAUneS 
30= 23% NtPrest 1X6 
15= 10ft NtSonl 
12? ^ NtSempfiXO 73 
34= 25= NtSvcJn 1X0 3X 12 

18 11* NStand ja 23 A 

H. 10ft Nerro 54 S3 7 
33= 26= NevPw 2S4 63 10 
14 12= NevPpf 160 105 

18ft 15* NevP pf L74 93 
12= 9= NevSvL 59 U J 
46= 36ft N Era El 168 BX 7 

Su. 3 - 7 *" Iai 

29 24= NJRsc 2JD BL6 9 

29= 20= NYSEG 251 u 

20% 16 NYSpf XU IU 

70* 14 Newell M 23 11 
44= 33= Newtral ■ - - - 

19 . 12= Newfltl 
ID 7% NwhIRs 
4M6 34= NewTTrf 

31* 16= nESaP* 2X8 10l5 


1X80 24 16 
4X0BZ4X 5 
J4P7S 10 
1X0 22 3S 


sjsspsm 

§7 3$=- = 
2“ » 14* l| ?= 

9 3= S*S* + = 

» 20ft 19* S J ft 


iXSelzi 
.12 IX 13 
3X4 HU 


1J2 


49 38 GrevhPf ATS 1DJ 

ift 2% Grolitr 
13* 9= GitewGs JO 
12* 6% GroOEl X8 
36* 24* Gram . 1X0 
27= 25= Grampf 
7* 4= Gnirriol 
27* 20 , Goftfrd 
45= 26% GtfWSt 
66 57 GlfWpf 

17* 11= GtttfRs 
16= 11* GtfStUt _ 

S5W 41% GffSU pf 6J4e11 J 
32* 24 GtfSUpr 185 126 
35= 29* GH5UPT4^8 129 
21* 14 GuftWl SO 28 10 


7 352 29= _ 

AJ 12 3703 29= 28= 29= + * 


19ft 19ft 
28* 2? 


9 

10 15 
IX 14 

as 10 

HU 
24 40 

23 13 
21 13 

as 

24 

1X4 127 6 


TDOr 46= 46% 46= 

203 »' 5* 5* 

67 10 9* H 

160 7* 7* _7* + ft 


.16 

JS 

JO 

SJS 


41| 29* 2H£ 29ft— ft 


7 24* 

66 S* 6* S% 

3! 25ft S 2Sft + * 
456 43% 43 43% + Vk 

3 66= 66 66= +1= 

m 15* 15* + 

3241 12* 12* 12* + ft 

iw Su-a 

17 30ft 30* 30* 1 — ft 
56 34= 33* 34 + ft 

7B 21* 21 21* + * ■ 


85 1 
27375 


H 


32ft 22= HollPB 1X01 „ JH 2* » 2fi ... 

32* 24= HotWn 1X0 7X 12 2 220 26 -25* 25*— ft 

1* ft Hdtwd X8 5S M sn 1= 1= 1* 

11* 7= Hdfw^Pt J6 5J 90 1 0= *% ™= + £ 

42* 26* HamP* 1J6 15 14 3771 40= 39* »ft— ft 

15ft 12* KaaJS IXTaltU 
21= 17% HonJ I 1S40 M ^ 

X6 U 20 

XO 21 23 

1X0 1J 14 

J6 IX 2D 

22 


36 16* Hand I j 

20* 16 HandH 
21ft 14= Homo 
68* 19= HarBrJ 
36* 21* HartndS 
12% 7* Vtornteh 
28% 24ft Ham PfB 3X0 137 
29% 34ft Horn pfC 213 73 
22= 15= HrsRws SO 
33 22= Harris SB 

18% W* HorGfp . 

30* 22 Haraco US 
39* 24* Hsrfnpt 1J8 
T7% 14% HatfSe • 

25* 19* HawEI 
13* 9ft HeveaA 
32* 20ft Haztetn 


^ S% LfrnJ I94e 59 10 

13= 5= LTV^ 

25% 8= LTV pfB 2291 
68= 31 LTVpfC INI 
W= 8= LTVpfD J4 
w 10= LGuJrrt 

2]ft UO 

9* 6% Lofarce JD _ 

Hu. ^ ^ if 4 10J 

7ft Lamurs 74 24 15 
1% LamSes 194 

13= 10* Lawilnt 56 53 
S= 10 LearPt JD IS 

■s? ’gasslih’s a 15 

3ffi» W, LswyTr 1 JO SS 14 

2% Tf» LahVlwt 
37 24= LVinnf 

1S5 IS? S^*™ 1 1 Jteio.9 

l»k io* Ltovrar JO IS 10 

Jg IS? , L Jf* eN ** 3 

SBfk 42= LOF 172 3X 8 

25 S5 « 

K= 73Vs LfttvCp 


175 23* 23* 23*— = 

i£ l* » I + ^ 

7 i 3“ j* 

iikK: 

201 ^±1 s 

ffliC A & + * 

. “5 JS JO* IB* 

16 21* 21= 2l* + % 
145 47 46* 4a% +- H 

» k* a-S 

“ 271* 27* . 

W 2= 2* 

25 2ft 2= 2= 


17= toft NfapSh 
Wk U% Nlaotet 
33* 25ft NICOR 
16= 13ft NOfclAf 
17Vk 10= NordRs 
72*6 54= NorfltSo 3X0 AS 
2= 7 Norlln 
<8% 32% Norstr 2X0 SJ 9 
53= 43 Nontrpf A19e 8X 
19 THft NorteJt X8 J 4 
M= 47= HA Coal LIQ 13 8 
H&PW} 1X0 3X 10 
20= 13* NElltO T-iiln « in 
18 13% NoestUt iST'u l 

toft 9* NlndPS L56 I5S 9 

852 73 9 

37 29= NSPWPf -1 | t Q 99 

41 33* NSPwpfATO 10J 

n 43* NSPwpf 7X4 1QJ 
41= 3T= NorTef 50 
= 2ft nttrgat f 
56* 3J* Norirp U0 16 9 
24= 19= NwtPpf 2J0 102 
Wft I NwSIW 

H“ ton 2X0 53 13 
to* 21= Norwst LSD 63 8 
ffl* 2 w3, P f 5JD.T0J 
3S a= Nava J4e LO 10 

47= 28= Nucor AO 9 « 

» 3 nSis Si 3 93 
ri* NYNEX 6X0 7.1 ” 


V m* 16% 17ft + * 

203 36ft 34= 36ft— ft. 
255 11* II* 11* + ft - 
,167 M* 20* 20* + ft 
,, - V696 39% 39= 39= 

25 12 2262 35= 34= 35= + ft 
IS 420 12ft 1J* 1Z%— ft 
8X 8 13 29= 29. 29* + = - 

SS «£ ft ft— ft 
6» S3* 52= 53 + % 

607 24 23= 23*— = 

92 34ft 24* 24* + = 
192S 11 H» II + = 

V2 n% 31ft 31ft- = 

6» 22U 21= 22= + * 

37 TTJ* 26* 27= + * 

289 37Vk 36* 37 + ft : ' 
ID 3ft 3* 3% 

2S 11 2218 21% 21= 21ft- ft 

25 13 173 3Q 7 * 2^ 30* + ft 

30 3H3 Uft 11= lift— ft ■> 
424 50% 50 50= — =- V 

H6 33= 32* 33 
23 13% 13= 13* + = 

1ST 11= 11= II* 

112 37* 31= 31*— = 
TOO: 15= 15= 15= + = . . 
200x 17* 17* tl* + ft, - 
» 11* 11 II — ft - 
119 45= 45 45= + = . 

2 27* 27* 27*— ft 
25 25% 25= 25ft— % 

6JT 26% 26% 74% + * 
SOZ73 73 73 

1 19 19 19 — * 

2 31ft 31ft 3T=— ft 
lT7x »* 20% 20* + =- 

43 62= 61= 62 — * 

10 14ft 16 l£ft — ft 
15 9* 9ft 9% .. 5 

2U 44% 43* 44% + * 

215 1 ft I + ft- 
7 !B* » Wfc +>'■9 

2^ 43= 42ft 42ft— 1= . 

600Z 45 AS 45 

50= 5Bft-»." . 
1B21 2Wk 29* 2M— ft 
10 25ft 25* 25*— ft 
2®z 66* 46* 44*— ftr 
,5 13 15 = + ft 

m 12* 12* 12*— = 

952 2S% 2Sft 28*+- =- - 


-*»■ 


- ' 

• 7 -r-r 






V ! 


■ •’■HP**, m 
*** +** ' 


•dfi 


+t- ■=**; 

*4-' 


' -^vuk 

■*** «r 


t*n%4 fog 





92 


12U S1I0 7908 14* 14= 14*— ft. . 

9 07 U% )4 toft + ft 
9 1311 73% 72% 73*-* 

„ 15 7* 7* 7* + ft 

» 17 45% 45= 45*—* 

75x 32= 52= 52=-+*' 

95 14* 14* .14* + = 

8 64 63= 64 + * 

B» 33% 32% 33ft + %- ■ 

,-5 !**• ™ ii*—* 

]9» 17= 17 17= + ft l A 

«26 10 9% 9*— ft I , 

to3 4*= 48= 48* • 

^36= 35 36ft + ft - 
j^3f= 38= 38=— Ift': 

IS5* 21? Mft 74= — . ft 
6« 3= ^=+ft.. 

« u= n* 15s + ft. 

Jf% 33= »*—«;• '■ 

»* 26= 26=.+ ft . 

25 53= 53= 53= + =‘ 

M6 25= 25 25= „ 

2D 46* 46 46* +%_'• 

176 4% 4= 4ft 

2» n a I9%+» W . 


+ j. 

'i-s+n-jwi 


'***mW* 


M 12 

7.1 6 


JA 14% to* 14* 

74 2ff* 20= 20=— ft 
557 27= 23= 23* + * ntfT1 . 

44 w* 1W 15?* . __ 

683 57* 56* 57* + % 

51x36ft 34 3*8- = 

190 9* 9= 9% + ft 
78 25= 25% 2fi8 , 


IK to* iia n*+j5 


29= 12* LlfRlMs 
,«= WfcUnctm 


32 23 13 
3JB 3X 13 

2X0 


St 

72 7J = 


?3* 95=+l= 


493x< 


93= 61% Litton 


3ST 2** OdcifS. 1J2 

J5JS£S?32f,!! 

B'PSf 
s i iSiiSiii 

OhEapf 7J6 ret 
%, OJlEdpf _GT* is 
w% 55 OhEd sf Ik m 



39= 21= LnSter UO 
54 * AS* LoneS pf £37 


115 20= 20* to* + ft 

B-scsmS- 


I® fc»SS«Bf 

(CootmaedGQ 


^ 2 = 2 * 

3» 27* 29= 29% + * 
397J 35 33* 35 «* 

*3 16* M* 14* + ft ’• 
1W to 25= 25% + * 

32 Tt’U 22* 22=—* 

„ U 3ft 2J% 23*+* 

7JJ9,S.. “ 37 ' 

204 1W= 107= KT7* + = 

W 108* H8HBB* + ft 
5? 21 2B* 38ft— * 

■>21 *3* m . 

128 U= IS* + » 
7TOfe32% 32 32% +3= 

*S?34= 34= 34* + .ft , 
IJSg. 57 57 — 1% 

’SS 1 ®? 5S= 58= + =; 

toft 26* + * 
MJySJ* 4M 63*— * 

|1 to* 27* 27*— % 

V 3T% 30* 31 + % . 

15 W* 15% U% ■ 7 ' 
73ft 73ft**-'. 

"’S? M .n • 

15 Uft 11 tl*. 

Iff 31 .31 31 

AJ39 1 w* re* * - 



! * --**»-* 





+65,' 


I0> 







. 'i:' jV.t ‘ r: t- • 











Statistics Index 


AMEX prim P.u k onion raport* pu 

iSSSTVl 

Nrse urns P, j GnM mari at i ' p 
wvsE hU Pivtowi P.m inimu rain' ** 
canoaiamptta P.14 Morkai.wmmwyji. J 
Currency rain P. 9 Oanam ' p*„ 

ComnwailH p.w ore node p’« 3 

DI-AMm- P..0 OMqwM, -H 


leralbSSribunc. 



saturda y -sunray, November 9 -ip. i 9 bs 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report. Page 8 






■% * 


ECONOMIC scene 

Fears of a 

P ermeate IJ.S.Expansion 

By LEONARD SILK 

•. .New York Times Service 

Z ^ T YORK ~ A paradox haunts the US. 

1^1 securities markets: As the stock market mounts — ■ and 
■'* | ^1 . opting could have been more dramatic *h»n the way 

£ A . j Dow industrials safled over the 1,400 barrier this 
& ^ its rise is based on false hopes and 

. cannot last The commonest question one hears, in whispered 

t IS modi” ’’lMSr' ° £ bUStoe “ Mea,tives “4 invMont&Ts 

S : The paradox is evident also in the way financial executives 

r.: regard the business outloolt here and abroad- Looking at the 
conventional indicators, and the forecasts erf the economists, they 

2 say economic expansion will • 

continue next year,- but they 
also say they are afraid serious 
troubles could explode . the 
conventional expectations. 

Their worries include the 
big US. federal budget defi- 
cit, the trade deficit, rising in- 
terest on Lhe public debt, the 
weakening dollar, the threat 

j, that foreign capital will puli’ away from or out of the United 
'i State s , th econ t inuin g world debt crisis and the threat it implies to 

r A survey of senior financial executives of large multinational 
t g. corporations conducted by Business International, a research and 
j*T consulting organization, provides evidence of this mixture of 
•>. hope and anxiety in the business mood. Most of the 106 firranHal 
l executives surveyed expect moderate. growth next year in the 
major industrial countries, but express fears about the world debt 
crisis. 


Ezeaitrres, investors 
worry about budget, 
trade deficits and : 
world debt problems. 


1‘C. 


*• £ 


HE MULTINATIONAL executives are most confiden t 
about Japan; more than 90 percent predict Japanese eco- 
_ nomic growth in 1986 of 2 to 6 percent, adjusted for 
inflation. More than 60 percent forecast that the United States 
and West Germany wiB grow by 2 to 4 percent. But nearly half 
expect Britain to stagnate or grow by less than 2 percent 
Most said the dollar would continue to decline against the 
Japanese yen and the Deutsche mark in the coming year. Howev- 
er, more than half think the fall will be 10 percent or less. 

The financial executives are not happy about the way interna- 
tional banks are handling problems of world debt Only 15 
percent think the banks are doing “a good job,* 1 while 923 
percent rate the performance 7 from adequate to poor. Conse- 
quently, most of the multinationals’ chief financial officers ex- 
pect the debt crisis to constrain their operations and squeeze (he 
profits of their subsidiaries in developing countries. One chief 
V financial officer wanted: “The Number One problem is how we 
r will operate in Third World countries that are more and more 
| starved for foreign currencies." 

a They are worried that Western b anks will try to cut their 
lending to the developing countries and thereby exacerbate the 
£: Andes of defaults. It is that danger that Treasury Secretary James 
> T A. Baker 3d is trying to head on by urging the banks to increase 
their lending to Third World countries by $20 billion over the 
next three years. 

The nuyor U.S. and European international banks are appar- 
entiy willing to pm in that much, but the question is whether the 
i - scale of lending Mr. Baker is seeking will be adequate. Much 
depends on the pace of world economic expansion, and the 
£ willingness of industrial countries to keep their markets open to 
} imparts from the Third World. _• • / 

s- Chief financial officers say they want to invest in “safe" 
countries, and rqject the conventional wisdom that his necessary 
to take bigger risks to get bigger retrans. 
y\ When asked to rank the countries where they saw the biggest 
" opportunities, they listed, in order of preference, Japan, China, 
the United States, West Germany, Brazil, Italy, Britain, South 
^ Korea, Canada and France. Asked to rank countries by degree of 
L ■ risk they listed Brazil, Mexico, Sooth Africa, Argentina, Venezu- 
ela, Italy, the Philippines, Nigeria, Australia and France. 

Thus, only three high-risk countries —Brazil, Italy and France 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL 4) 



Crew Bales 


Nov. 8 


London th) 

MUan 

NewYorkdJ 
POTlS 
Tokyo 
Zurich 
I ECU 
1 SDR 

Qoshvn hi London amt Zurich, Hxhtns In other European conifers. New York rates at 4 PJA. 
In) Commercial franc lb) Amounts needed to bur on* Pound (e) Amounts a— am Id buy one 
dollar (-1 Units Of 700 (xj Units of! MOO M Unttsaf I0J3O0NJ3.: not Quoted/ NJL/not available. 
( m ) To buy one pound: SUSXtt 

Other D«Oar Valnes 


> 

t 

DlM. 

FF. 

ILL. 

Cl Or. 

BJ. 

SF. 

Y«| 

. 2JSS5 

4.192 

11274- 

37 JO • 

8-1472 - 

— 

i57r 

137235 - 

U24JV 

5X0475 

7520 

202345 

4438 

2995- 

' 17J49 

— . 

2441 

257*75 • 

ZS2* 

17T7 

— 

3241 ‘ 

X4815X 

8B7D- 

4942 ■ 

T2174- 

12735 ’ 

1417 

— — 

17158 

TIJW 

2507 JO 

4.18*5 

7509 

3053# 

29X20 

U57J0 

Z5BU0 

57450 

22X40 

— 

59UB 

32375 

BUS 

8592 

— 

OJtD * 

zen 

7JB25 

1.74800 

2*54 

IIS 

TTip 

205.10 

7993 

11 JOS 

IMS 

— — 

4513* 

27045 

15J61- 

37145 

3JM* 

205X5 

291 48 

70M 

2542 

TUI- 

SMD 

38591- 

9509 

— — 

2.14 

ym? 

8249 ■ 

24J95- 

0.1217 ■ 

7214* 

40*44* 

— 

1*48- 

&M13 

OJWJ 

229*7 

472*5 

14180* 

24877 

444473 

10147 

17118 

U73A1 

07582 

281715 

45*351 

1097* 

11731 

549738 

23124 

22004? 


’ - Currency per 

IIXJ 

Currency per USS 

Currency per -UOLS 

Currency Per IU-5 

Aram, austral 

OJO 

FIo.nwrtkn : 5595 

Mtx.peso 

47400 

Soviet ruMe 

177? 

_ • AustraLS 

TOM 

Break tfrac . 15300 

Nerw. krone 

70775 

Soon, peseta 

. 141X20 

• ’ . icML 

1829 

Hong Knap* 70075 

PMLpaso 

1823 

Swad. krone 

7J675 

' fPBeta.fln.fi’. 

53.15 

Indian rugae 1209 

Port, eacndo 

14250 

TntamS 

3909 

■ ’ Brmfl crux. 841000 

Into, rnpioli 1.12200 

Sown rfvol 

14505 

Thai beta 

25225 

Fnwllfn | 

12775 

IrtshC 00399 

Stao-S 

3.119 

TurkMiftro 

54820. 

■- Ortnese ram 

12015 

Israeli Mb 1.46700 

S. Mr. rand 

25441 

UAEdfeham 

1473 

- - ■* Duntan Krone 

9.4873 

Kewnlft dinar 0293 

S. Kor.Non 

89000 

Venae, boflv. 

1455 

Egypt pound 

125 

Motor, rfm 244 






(Storthm: 1.2017 Irtafit 

Sovran: Bantam du Banotux (Bnasota); Banco CammanMe ItaUana IMHaaJ; Bonqur NO- 
ttanata ua Pom (Paris)/ Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo): IMF (SDR): B.MI (dinar, rtvot, tSrtmn); 
Casoank (nolo). Other data from motors and ap. 



Eneo urety DcpagU s Nm. b 

Swiss Francb 

Dollar p Moi-fc Fnac ShurBno Franc ECU SDR 
1 month Siva* **4* JHrJVi 1IW1* Mrt «««. 7% 

3 manlla BIV8*W 4-W-44C 4-V-4*. Ilyw-llW. 9Wn*ft ; SVrM 7*. 

a meatus BMW. 4IU^ 4v*4*. mum S mk 7w 

Smooths B v. 4 ^ v. 44W4HW llarllw. T0«w-ia«. BM<h 7* 

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Sourcas: Morgan Guaranty (dollaf. OM.SF. Found. FF): Uoyds Bonk (ECU): Routers 
(SDR). Rates eppItaMe to bilarixmkdeoastts of SI million minimum (or twhialant). 


Key Money Baton Non, 8 


mi UnWadShans 
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f . FWorol FwMs 


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<4Mo<lHVMtvrr MBs 7Jt 7J2 


CD's 30-0 dnrs ■ 
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One Monlk urtwaaok 

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tomafli Martafe 
Franca 

MovtaHaakaM 
Coll Ma n ar 
Hae t o a ntt intaroank 
HnooHi imatonk 
Mnonth Inltrbcnx 


7 JO 

7 JO 


7J0 

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■ CnUMoocr 

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OJO 430 
'«0 4J0 

AM AM 


Mk- fft 
9ft 9ft 
9 7/16 91/14 
9ft 9ft 
9ft 9ft 


lift lift 
tin. lift 

- 11SIS 

— 111/1* 


. 5 * 

7ft 71/1* 
713/M 7ft 


Saureao: « tutors. Cammntank. Ci*d» 
Lronoolsr Bf* b) Tokyo 


AriM Dollar Peyori ti 

Abs.a 

1 moan Sft.BH. 

3MBMM 8V.-IK 

3 months Bh-BMi 

4 moatbs BK.-BK. 

lvaar Bft-Rft . 

Source: Reuters. 


U JSS. Nrmt Martwt Funk 

Nos. 8 

Morrill Lynch Rcadv 4mt) 

30day nraraoeylaWt . 7jn 

Toft raM mftrarnt Raw Indox: 7021 

Source (Merrill Lyndi Teterota. 


j Gold | 

Nov. a 

AJrt, P J4. . CW»e 

HOiWKMB 32ZJ0 S238 — 1-« 

U M tomDO XT B 32230 . — — U* 

pmiS OlSWft* 32109 32209 — 19* 

Tarich 32240 32200 -1J0 

L iiniaia . 2 zx.it) BUS — u» 

NewYork — 3H3k . —130 

’ Luxembourg. Ports and London o/flefaf fix- 
ings; Hong Kona and Zurich ootnhio and 
closing prices: No at York Cornu current 
contract. All Prices in UJ3- * per ounce. 
Source: Reuters. . . 


FaQ Seen 


Spending 

US. Poll Shows 
Lower-Sales Fear 


' By John M. Berry 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — U.S. com- 
panies, expecting a tough year with 
little growth in sales, are planning 
no reduce capital spending in 1986 
by I percent, according to a survey 
by McGraw-Hill Economics. 

If capital-goods prices increase 
as much as companies expect, how- 
ever, the decline in real spending 
for new plants and equipment 
would be more than 5 percent. 

With many forecasters expecting 
gains in consumer spending to slow 
next year; a decline in real business 
investment in new plants and 
equipment could mean continued 
slow overall economic growth next 
year, analysts said. 

The forecast, released Thursday, 
was only the fourth in the 32-year 
history of the McGraw-Hill survey 
to predict a decline. The three pre- 
vious instances came daring reces- 
sions, and each proved to be accu- 
rate. 

The poll, taken in September and 
October, drew responses from 540 
major companies that account for 
about 30 percent of capital spend- 
ingin the United States. 

The companies said they expect 
to trim capital outlays to £380.7 
billion in 1986, a 1-percent decline 
from the estimated 1985 level of 
$384.4 billion. 

With inflation in capital-goods 
prices taken into account, the com- 
panies plan to cut real investment 
by more than 5 percent, although 
McGraw-Hill cautioned that com- 
panies usually overestimate how 
fast capital-goods prices will rise. 

Factories, mines and utilities are 
operating at only 80 percent of 
their production capacity, accord- 
ing to the Federal Reserve, and 
businesses are reluctant to invest to 
increase that capacity. 

Other surveys this year have 
shown a fairly steady trend of cut- 
ting bade investment plans. 

A recent poll by Rinfr et & Asso- 
ciates, a New York economic con- 
sulting firnvalso showed a drop in 
capital spending for next year. 

Moreover, the latest Commerce 
Department quarterly survey of in- 
vestment intentions showed only a' 
05-percent increase for all indus- 
tries in 1986. 

Even in the Commer ce Depart- 
ment survey, the total planned in- 
vestment for manufacturing indus- 
try was expected to drop by 0 5 
percent in real terms, while the 
nonman of acturing total was fore- 
cast to rise 1.4 percent, largely be- 
cause of added investment by utili- 
ties and communications 
industries. 

However, the McGraw-Hill sur- 
vey found that HOnmanuf acturing 
concerns are planning to reduce 
their investment spending by 1.7 
percent before adjustment for in- 
flation, while manufacturers are 
planning to increase theirs by 0.2 
percent. 

But after adjustment for infla- 
tion, both sectors will be 
less than in 1985, the McGraw-1 
survey found 


Tohdpriv8teiy4ie!dnwkdabie 
Treasury debt 


marketable U.S. Treasury 

securities 


June 30. 'BS: 

$1,500 

1410.7 J 


/ 

1.000 


500 



• ' : ■. "■ , _ “ • 

0 


*TR m TB Wl *R» 'H 



■71 71 W Til 


Foreign holdings of marketable U.S. notes and bonds 
MEwopa J MW Ottwr* 


Financing the U.S. Deficit Abroad 

Dollar’s Decline 
May Erode Lure 
Of Treasuries 

Keith Schneider 

New York Times Sen-ice 

NEW YORK — In helping to 
finance the largest budget defi- 
cits in American history, over- 
seas investors have stepped for- 
ward with large appetites for 
U.S. government securities. 

Without them, interest rates 
would have been higher, and the 
economic recovery after the 
1981-82 recession possibly less 
robust 

Now, however, economists say 
that the delicate balance these 
investors provide is threatened 
by the new U.S. policy that aims 
to lower the value of the dollar 
against other currencies. And the 
concern is focusing a fresh look 
at where overseas baying is com- 
ing from, how important it is and 
to what extent it might dry up if a 
Iowa: dollar lessens the attrac- 
tiveness of Treasury securities. 

In the first six months of 1985, 
net foreign purchases of Trea- 
sury securities totaled $143 bil- 
lion, more than 17 percent of all 
investment in new Treasury is- 
sues. As recently as 1980, net 
purchases for the full year were 
only $10 billion, accounting for 
less than 10 percent of the in- 
crease in Treasmy debt 

As E Gerald Corrigan, presi- 
dent of the Federal Reserve 
Bank of New York, observed re- 
cently: “We are vitally depen- 
dent on foreign savings Cows.” 

Directly or indirectly, he said, 
they are “financing half or more 
of the budget deficit" 

Even when foreign investors 
put their money into corporate 
bonds or bank certificates of de- 
posit, the UJ3. Treasury benefits 
because the general level of inter- 
est rates remains lower. 

Economists say that the Unit- 
ed States’s attempt to lower the 
value of the dollar could retard 
foreign investment in U.S. Trea- 
suries if it results in a sharp jump 
in foreign interest rates and a 
common perception that the 
American economy is lacking 



Tha New York Taras 

Figures as of Jan. 31 each year, in billions of dollars. 


strength. Then, the only way that 
the Treasury could continue fi- 
nancing the budget deficit would 
be to raise the level of interest 
rates it is willing to pay to attract 
investors. 

For now, most economists and 
financial experts believe that the 
United States can continue to 
attract foreign buyers for its debt 
as it reduces the trade deficit and 
dollar. The key, they say, is that 
the fall in the dollar takes place 
gradually while the federal bud- 
get deficit declines, thus reduc- 
ing the need for huge Treasury 

fhiAncrng. 

But David Wyss, chief finan- 
cial economist at Data Re- 
sources Inc. in Lexington, Mas- 
sachusetts, thinks that “the 
government is walking a tight- 
rope" with its new policies. 

And Richard D. Rippe, senior 
vice president and economist at 
Dean Witter Reynolds Inc., cau- 
tioned: “We can't make changes 
so fast that the appeal of the 


United States as a stable haven 
for foreign investment is 
ruined.” 

Last year, net foreign pur- 
chases of Treasury notes, bonds 
and bills totaled 5253 billion, 
the most since 1977. Japan 
bought nearly 25 percent of all 
UJ>. Treasury securities sold to 
foreigners. The rest was divided 
among British investors ($6. 1 bil- 
lion), oil-producing nations (S2.2 
billion), Switzerland (Sl.l bil- 
lion) and others. 

The biggest turnabout in re- 
cent years has been the sharp 
decline in purchases by ofl-pro- 
during nations, and the increase 
in buying by Japanese investors. 
Such activity in the past has been 
dictated, in large pan, by the 
flow of trade-related dollars into 
their countries, much of which is 
then put back into the United 
States as investments. 

“Foreigners are here because 
of a perception that the U.S. 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL I) 


LME Announces 
Tin Trading to 
Resume Nov. 18 


Compiled in Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — The London Met- 
al Exchange decided Friday to take 
the initiative in the world tin crisis, 
and announced that trading in the 
metal will resume on the LME 
Nov. 18. 

The move comes despite the ab- 
sence so far of any assurances from 
the International Tin Council that 
it will meet its market obligations. 

Analysts estimate that the 1TC 
has debts of about £600 million 
(.5840 million). 

Approximately half of those 
debts are owed to’ 16 financial insti- 
tutions. The rest is owed to 14 LME 
dealers who have bought tin on the 
council’s behalf. 

The London exchange suspend- 
ed tin trading Oct 24, when the 
council a group of consumers and 
producers, said its buffer stock, or 
price support system, had run out 
of money. The buffer stock keeps 
prices above free- marker levels. 

Tr adin g was also halted in Kuala 
Lumpur, Malaysia, the world's oth- 
er major tin trading center. 

Since then, LME officials have 
been pressing the ITC and the Brit- 
ish government to resolve the crisis, 
warning that other commodity 
markets could suffer, with spinoff 
bankruptcies, if the suspension 
continued. 

LME officials had hoped that an 
emergency meeting of the ITC 
Thursday might pave the way for 
resolving the problem. 

But with no firm proposals 
emerging from those talks , the 
LME decided to take the lead. 

Procedures for the resumption of 
trading will be announced by the 
LME at the latest by next Wednes- 
day, one day before the next special 
meetingof the ITC in London. This 
will be the council’s third attempt 
to find a solution. 

Trade sources speculated that 
the LME might introduce a system 
of limits on price fluctuations, simi- 
lar to the system operating in the 


London cocoa terminal market, 
where trading is temporarily sus- 
pended 

Under that system, the limiting 
mechanism comes into operation if 
prices swing £40 a ton or more on 
the previous close in an upward 
direction without finding a seller, 
or in a downward direction without 
finding a buyer. 

A limit on price movements 
would help to remove current fears 
of a sudden, price collapse of 
around £2,000 a ton or more com- 
pared with the level of £8.140 just 
before trading was suspended. 

The decline in prices, widely de- 
scribed as “inevitable," would then 
occur in a controlled and orderly 
fashion, thus restoring much-need- 
ed confidence to the market, 
sources said. 

Meanwhile, the tin council's 16 
creditors have formed themselves 
into a group, under the leadership 
of the senior deputy chairman of 
Standard Chartered Bank, Peter 
Graham. 

The group met Friday to decide 
the next move in iheir efforts to 
recover about £300 million they are 
collectively owed by the council. 

Separately, an official of the De- 
partment of Trade and Industry- 
said that Britain was approaching 
other member governments of the 
ITC through diplomatic and politi- 
cal channels to persuade them to 
accept their share of responsibility 
for the council's debts. 

Despite Friday’s decision to re- 
sume business on the LME ana- 
lysts were still pessimistic about the 
future for tin trading. 

“We are still no clearer as to the 
eventual outcome.'* said Stephen 
Briggs, a metals analyst for the 
Shearson Lehman commodities 
trading firm. “The only thing that 
remains certain is that the price of 
tin will fall substantially and tin 
mines around the world are under 
threat." 

(AFP, Reuters ) 


Reagan Proposes Bill to Bar States’ Unitary Tax 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan on Friday pro- 
posed legislation to bar states from 
taxing multinational corporations 
on income derived outside the 
United States. 

Mr. Reagan said he has instruct- 
ed the Secretary of the Treasury, 
James A Baker 3d, to begin work 
on a bill that would contain such a 
bar and provide for equitable tax- 
ation of foreign-source dividends. 

The president's action follows a 
long-standing controversy over the 
practice of several states of taxing 
income derived by foreign subsid- 
iaries of multinationals that are 
headquartered within their bor- 
ders. Japanese and Europeans have 
protested the practice. 

The president, in a prepared 
Statement, said his administration 
had been working with states, the 
business community and foreign 
governments to resolve issues re- 


sulting from this so-called “world- 
wide unitary method of taxation." 

“At this time I believe it appro- 
priate for the federal government 
to state its support for the concept 
of legislation that would effect a 
requirement that multinationals be 
taxed by states only on income de- 
rived from the territory of the Unit- 
ed States, and address the question 
of equitable taxation of foreign 
source dividends,” the president 
said. 

“We hoped that by this time 
these principles would have been 
enacted by the various states that 
have unitary taxation," he said. 

■ Trade Panel Is Proposed 

Earlier. Clyde H. Farnsworth of 
The Hew York Times reported from 
Washington: 

A proposal to establish a cabi- 
net-level committee to assess the 
strategic implications of trade po- 
licy — such as the impact on the 
American-Japanese defease alli- 


ance of possible U.S. curbs on 
semiconductor imports — has been 
made by Mr. Reagan’s national se- 
curity adviser, Robert C McFar- 
lane. 

The proposal contained in a re- 
cent memo to the secretary of state, 
George P. Shultz, is expected to 
meet significant opposition. Those 
in the government who favor free 
trade, most of whom are in the 
Commerce Department and the 
Office of the Trade Representative, 
fear that such a panel would try to 
subordinate trade issues to nation- 
al-security and foreign-policy con- 
siderations. 

However, with the proposal not 
yet on the president’s desk, oppo- 
nents were unwilling to comment 
on the record. 

The new committee would be 
composed of the Defense Depart- 
ment, the Central Intelligence 
Agency, the National Security 
Councfl, and the Slate Department 


and could operate as a rival power 
to the Economic Policy Council on 
which sit the trade agencies. 

What its relationship would be 
to the policy council is unclear. 
Those in the latter body see the new 
panel as creating a high-level col- 
lective voice for views that until 
now had been expressed by indi- 
vidual agencies or cabinet officers, 
such as Defense Secretary Caspar 
W. Weinberger. 

Asked about the memo, Kama 
Small Mr. McFariane’s spokes- 
woman, said: “I've been instructed 
not to comment on this.” 

Although it was unclear what 
would bring the new committee 
into being, most analysts thought a 
presidential decision " would be re- 
quired. 

Trade policy is now managed by 
the Economic Policy Council under 
the chairmanship of the Treasury 
Secretary. 


United Places 
Orderfor 



KPCs Purchase, Management of Santa Fe Unit Is Underfire 


By Olfar Tohamy 

ImenvmoJiol Herald Tribune 

CAIRO — Kuwait’s ail and in- 
dustry minister, Sheikh Ali Khalifa 
al-Sabah, is facing increasing pres- 
sure to defend his country’s acqui- 
sition and management of Santa Fe 
International Corp. of the United 
States against the parliamentary 
opposition's charges of corruption 
in Kuwait Petroleum Coxp. 

Because erf the increased pres- 
sures, “the minister of o3 and in- 
dustry has some time ago expressed 

his desire to leave his post,” Rashed 
al-Rashed. the government spokes- 
man and minister of state for cabi- 
net affairs, said recently. But Mr. 
Rashed. added that the crown 
prince and prime minister, Saad al- 
Abdullah al-Sabah, has “asserted 
his confidence in the minister, and 
in his capabilities in the vital oil 
sector, and asked him to continue 
his work." 

- The spokesman's statement, late 
' last month, followed weeks of spec- 
ulation about whether Sheikh All 
who had not attended any of the 
parliamentary sessions during 
which he was criticized last sum- 
mer, would step down. 

Sheikh Ali had requested an in- 
vestigation by the attorney general 
into reports of leakage of informa- 
tion to stock traders before the 
1981 acquisition of Santa Fe. the 

CaEfonria-based oil conglomerate, 
by KPC. Official Kuwaiti sources 
said that the investigation had 
started with questioning of Sheikh 
All and Abdeflatif al-Hamad, who 
was Fmafirg minister at the time of 
the takeover. 

Other members of thecommittee 
that had arranged the takeover, in- 
cluding serum: KPC executives, are 
being questioned. The committee 
was beaded by Sheikh All who is 
the state-owned organization's 
chairman. 

The flamboyant oil minister ptu 
together the unprecedented .acquir 
sition, which was opposed by US. 

oil-industry and government offi- 


cials. The move initiated KPCs in- 
ternational expansion drive. The 
S2.5-biIlion purchase hag opened 
the way for a series of upstream 
and downstream acquisitions, in- 
cluding the buyout of Gulf 03 
Corp. retail outlets in Europe. 

A group of opposition members 
of parliament had threatened dur- 
ing a stormy debate in parliament 
on KPCs budget before the sum- 
mer recess to push fra a no-confi- 
dence vote against Sheikh Ali when 
parliament reconvened. The sub- 
ject was brought up again by the 
same members when parliament re- 
sumed its meetings during the last 
week of October. 

Sheikh Ali has been the target of 
opposition attacks during the last 
five months because of losses in- 
curred by several of KPCs subsid- 
iaries. His handling of the crisis 
following the collapse of the unoffi- 
cial Souk el-Manakh stock ex- 
change in 1982. when he held the 
finance portfolio, was also criti- 
cized by the same opposition 
group. 

The partiamem’s opposition, 
representing groups but not formal 
political parties, forced a cabinet 
member belonging to the ruling 
family to resign last May. The out- 
going minister of justice. Sheikh 
Duaij Salman al-Sabah, took the 
unusual step following an interro- 
gation in parliament about use erf 
public funds. The minister has been 
reprimanded, by parliament after 
having had admitted writing a 
check valued at $4.6 million to his 
12-year-old son against money in a 
special fund created by the govern- 
ment to help Souk el-Manakh’s 
small debtors, who had become in- 
solvent as a result of the crash. 
Sheikh Duaij had been supervisor 
of the fund 

During parliament’s last session 
before the summer recess, members 
of the opposition bloc had, accord- 
ing to the stale-controlled press, 
vowed to pursue questioning 
Sheikh Ali about Serna Fc, which 



Ali Khalifa al-Sabah 


has been renamed KPC U.S. Hold- 
ings Inc. 

An opposition leader, Ahmed al- 
Khatib, was quoted as saying in 
parliament: “We are not going to 
give up, and the questioning will be 
harsh" about KPC. The opposi- 
tion’s campaign seems not to have 
dampened Sheikh Ali's interest in 
KPCs opening new markets, and 
the Kuwaiti government has not 
indicated that it was reviewing its 
foreign-investment policy in the 
field. 

In fact, Sheikh Ali has recently 
indicated that Kuwait was seeking 
to penetrate the British market, 
saying that his country was hoping 
to acquire a share erf the market 
through investing in petrochemical 
operations. 

KPCs takeover of Santa Fe re- 
mains its largest foreign venture so 
far, with Santa Fe’s assets totaling 
$4.2 billion at the end of 1983, 
representing dose to a third of 
KPCs assets, officially estimated 
at $15 billion. The 1983 annual 
report of Santa Fe, the latest one 
available, shows that its consolidat- 
ed revenues rose from Sl-2 billion 
in 1980, the year preceding the 
takeover, to $1.6 bQHon in 1983. 

But the report also disclosed a 
plunge into losses Tor the company. 


While for 1 980, Santa Fe report- 
ed net income of $80.9 million, for 
the period from Oct. 1, 1981, the 
effective date of Santa Fe's sale to 
KPC, to Dec. 31, 1982, the compa- 
ny had a net loss of $28 million. For 
calendar year 1983, the last full 
year for which final figures are 
available, Santa Fe posted a net 
loss of $187.8 million. 

Sheikh Ali has firmly denied the 
opposition’s charges that KPCs 
management and other officials 
were invehed in insider trading of 
Santa Fe shares before to the take- 
over, referring to the text of a U.S. 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion letter, which was published by 
the Kuwaiti newspapers. Sheikh 
Ali made the denial in a written 
reply to questions raised in parlia- 
ment by Abdullah al-Nafeesi, an 
opposition member. 

Insider trading, the use in stock 
trading of corporate information 
not generally available to the pub- 
lic, is illegal in Knwait and the 
United States. 

Sheikh Ah has firmly defended 
the acquisition price for Santa Fe 
in the letter, while acknowledging 
that Kuwait had paid a big premi- 
um to buy the company. He said 
Lhat KPC has paid 551 for shares 
quoted on the New York Stock 
Exchange at the time at $24.75. 

A response is awaited from KPC 

to opposition allegations made in 
parliament that the parent corpora- 
tion had subcontracted work to 
KPC U.S. Holdings on excessively 
favorable terms without competi- 
tive bidding, resulting in the waste 
of large sums. The award to KPC 
U.S Holdings of work on die al- 
Rawdhatain oil complex in Kuwait 
has been cited in parliament by 
opposition members as an exam- 
ple. 

Opposition members have as- 
serted that the contract awarded 

was worth 5145 million, while the 
amount initially estimated for the 
project by KPC was less than a 
third of that sum. 


Further questions were also ex- 
pected to be raised about the acqui- 
sition of seven oil tankers by KPCs 
loss-reporting subsidiary, Kuwait 
Oil Tankers Co., at prices that the 
opposition claimed in parliament 
were much higher than the world 
market rates. KPC was also criti- 
cized in parliament by the same 
members for expanding KPCs Pet- 
rochemical Industries Co. unit, 
when the unit's foreign subsidiaries 
as well as its local operations have 
been incurring losses during the 
last few years, as shown by KPCs 
reports. 

In the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1984. KPC had consolidated profit 
of $1.9 billion. 


Reuters 

PARIS - The 110 Boeing 737 
jetliners ordered by United Air- 
lines on Thursday will be powered 
by $800 million worth of engines 
made by the French-American 
consortium CFM International 
SA, a spokesman for the consor- 
tium said Friday in Paris. 

The spokesman said the engine 
order from United was for 250 
CFM56-3 units, the only propul- 
sion plant available for the Boeing 
737-300. 

The French state-owned aircraft 
engine maker, Societe Nationale 
d'Etudes ei Construction de Mo- 
teurs d’Aviation, or SNECMA, 
would receive $500 million and iis 
partner in the consortium. General 
Electric Co., S300 million. 

The $800 million is pan of the 
value of more than S3 billion 
placed on the United order for the 
110 shori-lo-medium range 737- 
300s and six 747s. a Boeing spokes- 
man said in Paris. 

The consortium spokesman, who 
is a SNECMA official, said the 
order was worth more to SNECMA 
than to GE because it included 
thrust reversers made by SNEC- 
MA’s. Spanish subsidiary. Hispan- 
o-Suiza. 

The Boeing spokesman said 
United Airlines would have the op- 
tion to convert some of its orders 
for 737-300 aircraft to 737-20Gs, on 
which the CFM56-3 is not used. 

But he said any such switches 
would be limited and would have 
no effect on the engine order. 


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bertilh. 1985. ' 

Up to December 1 2nd. 1985 16JW bn. die 
KAWa at CDfls 1-jru.h.in Radik Enmpriiea 
Limbed repr 10 common sham may give vooih 
injnjctxjra t> the undais^ped under deporil m 
their CDR& with the undersigned or hv nnrenda 
of a depwa advice of thor bank. IT no voting 
iranzucnone are given lie undeoiigDod will vole 
tor (he dx— t inaitem. 

Farther mfonnstma for QJR -holders will be 
avaihhfe at the office of Pteraoo, Heldring & 
Pfcm»nN.V. m Anmeidani and the undesigned. 
Further atwm a aeetnans will follow eoeoest after 


the SpedaJ Meeting of SfcueboJdea. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Amsterdam. 3Iat October. 1085. 


’t)ll RESERVE 

■v INSURED DEPOSITS TRUST 


RES IN DEP 

An Account for trie Cautious Investor 
to Protect and Increase Capital 


U.5. Dollar Denominated 
Insured by U.5. Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute Confidentiality 


CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 

AND TRUST 
Registrar 


RES IN DEP 

Case Postale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospectus and 
account application to-. 

Name 


Address . 


Nurevaiabb MttM the USA. 







I ■=. 1(9 le: in 


** 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 


Fridays 



slKft 


Ss. 

ISO* Hijn Urn 


Close 

Syot. Ch'ae 


PaPj-or £XC 111 
PaPLer 9J5 I2.C 
--- 65 
7X 


Qosnis: 


Tables indude the nationwide prices 
up la the dosing on wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


•■+» p • 

"S’t it 

■i 1 1 ; is PenwH 2JD 

15^ S Prn» of 1 JO 

50 >:>< Pennrol 210 

10*6 13’. PcooEn IJS 

7*4, 14'. PtBSvs JTO 
ii 7 / 3S'i PeM'Co 1.78 

3J * S2'i PcrfcEl 1.12 . , 

O' ; _ -6 Prmlan J.ilClil & 

lTOr. lfli. PerwD* 

46. 31 Petrie 1XJ 11 

IPs Nto PelKs iTOellX 

IT* 14'. Pel Rt of 1 57 OJ 

Plrinu =0023 7 
iT-i Pfizer 1.43 13 

12’j Fta?i<aD 
w pseianr SCO 9i 
rt PhitrS .54 


I -2- 


■; wain 
rt'JfiLS*, 


a., i.s. ? e 


4oL, 

.V: 


rt 


43: 44 46 66 ■*■ ■- 

?W;?4. 7Z\-. T?.-s -I,i 
JG3 36*4 i* 39‘i + 4 

11 =’» 2T 5 - =3; 4 

. I73J 4T-S 37 dP. * A 

fc ? 7 4J-- ir ; ir-4 ir-5 

J 2 *37 24 t 2* »'!• 'i 

3J 1» 1142 W'3 +i% 44'i— "l 
ij U SMS 2a': Z£r 5» : S + ■ ; 

743 • 3 7"; * 4 

<LH l”a 1-4 173a 

174 J*% ts, 4 P.2 + ' 4 

■s: 27 Js=; It’s + is 

12 7 s" 6 1 54* 16 T B V- -II 

47 r-i ; ; i + j 

>444 Jf’j 477 1 43"i T w — 

£rt 2C 19ft 3) f to 

IS' 51-4 ;i S1‘4 + 4 

U 29 304? 29to JH’j J«'s + >4 

4747 153“ IS IS - 


13 


n 

I'-C Cn» a‘F 

3 

«■ i 


5.-9 

"0a» 

Si On? ofD 

t. a 






hj 

.’A), 

Oi>n 


io- = 

TT~3 

5r; Omr.cre 

12 CneiJS 

_23 

IT 3 - 

3^5 OS EC". 

'io 

rt 

22^91 

LU 

i:»s 

7' : Orange 

j:- 

■•wi 

M OricaC 

. ; 

:u'.- 

?1 Ori3n._ nl 

13ft 

9J-, 

3’i SrianP 

6 m z Orlcn pf 

■u 

J3-» 

2«l Criwi p t 

J 

31': 

'.’•-J Oufcd.V 

. jj 

Jfi') 

Cv.-rTr 


19 


i J 

37 

30'-: Cner.w 

1.43 

M 

JB-» <r*Tnll! 


14’: 

1C- i O.fs-e 

.44 


(Continued from Page 8‘ 

JIMO 6 '; ID*': 729'-. -rt 
:*3«. 'S-.4 TV 3 73*:— r: 

J'.l-Niito i - 4 '3—1 


Il'T 

IS'i 


;o-c 

7*3 


£■’ .. 

. 3 m 2: 2. J 

2oi t-t 


;j'a + 's 


4.1 


1 B . 


:s*4 

3=3 
!4=> - 
rtto - 


r ■ i ?s.i i 


Purl; 

a( 

4+0 

114 

l-Srts 

JS 2Z 25 

+1% 

Ph.i = 

at 

.'.wJ 

UJ 

IDQZ 

5a 54 54 

el 

Pirns 


1 41 

US 

7J 

11 '.3"; 11 

+ ft 

JhilEof 

Im 

513 

711 

13% TO 10ft 

?h,IF 

al 

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1JJ 

lO'r 

i9 5* 59 

— ’• r 

p.-l-.t 

pi 

1..9 

115 

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1C* •'« It 

*■ ■■ 

pf.-i 


'.12 




— ? 

PmlE 

Cl 

i.W 

13 

3C: 

75 74'; 7J-- 

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Pdl E 

Bf 

5 '11 

Hi 

IT: 

71 72 71 

+ 1 

P”|J.- 

rt 

"to 

112 

IJDCJ 

ST; S3 ; 59 

— 1 

Pni'b 

31 

T 

13J 

iriJr 

s r".4 57ft 

— 'A 

Phi.'S 

ut! 

ij: 

i3 i: 

:s 

:i v 

+ ft 


5-1 


22 23=1 -i 


;:c rt : ? 
iS 23 * 
;4* 1' 


22*4 jo*— - 
a :3ft 
:C»; 17 - 


is-. 
3 : 

V-i 


5 - 

PniiAlr 
)S*o ?c.toin 
71 . ph.ip; sl-CC" 
PeiPfnf lC4e 4 
Pf.-7.'N ^so 1 
15ft »'cdAa J3 , 
:« 3 p ifNO ir 7. 
14=3 


4.C0 5J S 424! 


JJto 7S~l +1 

21 4 2l»3 
T2ft 13"; + ft 
. 22“: 23-:— '• 
22*a 23=4 22=4 
tS 2I-ft 31': 31 3 — : a 


B 4 
4i4 ;i-4 
224C2 70 J 
’rt ?3 


lOAionm 

Mi# Lew 5W*K 


Din. YIO. PE 


iflte Htoh Lew 


OuoLOroe 


20=4 14=3 PSECof 217 10J 
63'. 50 3 . PSEGnf 6^9 tl.l 
n-4 ia<4 PSEGpf 2J3 10J 

73*3 Sfl PSEGrt 7JB0 108 

77 SS 7 : PSEGpf 7J2 10J 

6f--> 543k PSEGaf 1.40 10.9 

w*a 73 PS EG of PJ2 107 

l _ ... D..I.IL.1 


!F»a 

8 

I? 


.16 


Publics. 

Tji Pueblo 

6 pBCem 
n=« PuaotP 
a*o PuiPen 
21 A. 1QW PulIBHm .12 1.0 13 
31"l 16* • Punolol 441 17 
10' 4 5H Pvro 7 


10 12 
1.76 IIO 1 


2» am 20v» aw + ^ 
SflOOz 61 61 61 — ft 

66 72*3 Z7V, 22W— W 
33b ms. 72 72 f. + V* 

noot 7D mb 69Vs — ft 
2601 W 67ft 36 
153002 89ft 89ft 89ft + ft 
iST 2% 2ft 27b 
66 15ft 15li 1P& 

14 7ft 77ft 7ft 

402 14ft 14%. 14ft + ft 
1377 7 6ft 7 + ft 

334 lift ll'i. lift + ft 
96 17%. 17ft 17ft 
284 5ft 5=4 5ft + ft 


63 33 

IBS «1 
a 17 
19' i S 
34=4 27 
23' 4 14V* ckRfll 


QuOhOs 140 U IS «63 S7ft 56ft 37U + ft 
QwOO Df 9J6 9.1 10700x1 04ft 104ft 104ft + U 

Quo k 50 40a 14 19 149x 24 23ft 23ft 

Quanok IV 340 6ft Sft S3. + 

Queiior 140 13 11 299 29ft fflft 2VU + ft 

J4a 1.1 15 1Z7 22ft 22V? 22ft + ft 


All 

14W 

35D 

3J5 

JO 


Si 


JU 


~ 31 ? . 
9 a'4 


31'x 31*5 
23 23 1 


+ ft 


44 


i." i' .: -i- 


:= . 3ft 2 J ft - 


±: I* ii 


. J 4 — ! 


Ti' s - ft I 1« 


ICO 


r. it 


I «D 


IS: 


*3 24 13 


S2ft 


31ft 

*> 


2:0 34 £ 


rt 

x3': 

?■' 4 


’p - - 23 ' : PHH 
39 4 31ft PPQ 
Jl ; left PSA 
3'i U'-. PSA am 
U>4 12 PotAS 
.nr'4 IS=4 PciGE 
45=. 37' j 
AT ) 2*ft PcLum 
10 S" s Paiges 
!«:. 13-: Pj;SJjb 
I rtj PxcSd 
aS PaeTeJe 5 - 
«•. Pai Ti.i 
;: ; i Pacific 

30": Paeife* *r ti .. 
25' 4 Pam .Vc 21 .a 

2T-, Pam.'. 3:245 *■ . 

32". Pj.nl: 1.12 _ :• 
TSft =I3!"A=4 ’J J 

i Pa.-.Am 

I >4 PjflA lit 

13ft PcnAZV n 2- 1 -j . 
32ft perrec 2 j: «: ’- 

Z’ : Pant 3 r 
*' .• Pcrd*.' 

11ft Pari El 4iie - •- 
i Per. DC .73 •» .. 
25’. Pc*:* " . * » 

14ft Pari Pi SZ~ 74 72 

3 PesP-r-S 2 

lift P3 ', nP ft 12 
;jft 13 i Pa-CSR ’3 ‘>a 

ift : 4 Pence 
5 S*j aa e °e iCe.i 
fAft AJij Pence. . j-r - - 
27' a 22ft =sPL Taj 

31 Pc-Lri a a;- t. c 
ii’* PcPi-B" i-— s 
"Aft 25ft PcPuix'2 47 "’4 

T41. jj 4 PiP t =r ii.j;. 11 : 

2Al; PaP-JJS r345 1 7.4 
r : Pc ff L dP*S "i 

33 4 Pa=Lr.-U.:: ‘.C.: 


i.'i 4 .ft- 3 A:- : 




32’- P.utr> 

172 1« 

13 *33 

£3"i 

S3S, 

58=i 

2* 

P*?reer 

■ * ■' 

12 579 

25 

34ft 

34 ft 

i;< 

PicnrEI 

72e £ 

13 

15% 

lift 

15% 

23 

Plin.B 

T^J I? 

15 iW 

+! 

ft-l 

Ij'l 

6o 

PlfnB at 

r.’2 1; 

4 

sr 

87 

87 

q: 

P l r1V~. 


3i: 

12-6 

•2‘ 1 

12% 

i? 

PfanF: n 


■IN 

lrt^ 

17% 

,77i 

c 

Plants 

.ZZ M 

■s oXi 

15ft 

JB 

15% 

- 

Fiar:rn 

!4D 1.4 

;: ;i 

I”; 

lift 

’lft 


Pig, be. 


11 ris* 

T; 

7ft 

"’ k 


“lose. 

j-a> 

12 5 

73t 

rtft 

33 ft 


PpgePd 

.60 46 

59 T 

1:% 

13ft 

13% 

24 

Pe'-arld 

•■Jt J Ci 

:1 l.i* 

Eh 

3TT; 

3S% 

’0 

PCflCri 

43 Z 

25 51« 

!6ft 

IS”; 

15"i 

15; 

PwjTo: 


55 44 

19% 

19 

19 4 


Pprt« 

JC J.7 

iC 

left 

15ft 

15ft 


Porirrt 

5X3 M 

TCr 

7^ : 

77" ; 

77% 

To 

5 M3E 

T.T £.1 


:i. 

7C '■ 

31% 


S3-» 

:0A. 

771*5 

16ft 


1”S 

12’e 

Tft 

43ft 


JO 


so 


lift 

ST. 


JO 

144 

2.17 


fi r 
:5 ia 


*'• — 

1 : -4 :r J 

'£ 4 'Aft — 

rr- *:ft 
lift 12ft 


j 1 ' 

£A'-. 

43*; 


PcpC- of 2.10 I2i 
Pcr.-pf 442- 12.9 


-. I _A 


;i . _ _ 

Z'-i PcrGuf Aj? JZZ 
=wifca 1 .ft 
23ft P.'lmEI lit 
ft : °c:E! cl -AC 
:6 
;i 


ZS 7: 7 2rt4 2J‘: + ft 

37 3a 33ft Zi -*■ ft 

5 3A 3a'c il *■ ft 

?6l3 Art. <T. 42 — *4 

3«: "rt; 31 ft 22‘. ■!■ ft 

22C: a 5 ; 65' c AS-; - 




ft ft 4 — 1 ' c* 


'e 1 


21 


From: s 

J; 

[ 4 ^ 

72 

JiVr 

2A*i 

24% 


'4 

prifTfk 


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34 

42' x 

42 

32ft 



3 fimeC 



!l"- 

T- x 

\l-A 

19 


'J 

= nrn.M s 

ns 

J “* 


3f4 

35 

35ft 


4 

Pri»CTG 

iio 

0 i? 

:rn 

«'r 

4T-t 

o5ft 



^rdKISS 

73 

lw Zf 

£j 


Ij'l 

72" s 

— 

; 

Fr 3 l«r 


Is 


W 2 

IS-; 

25 ft 

T 

■4 

PruPCr 



\Q b 

r 

2 

5 



rruB! n 



I ZZ 

£ 3 

j 

5 

— 


FS.Cc-l 

:_■( 

c ; : 



re i 

rtft 



PSCsl Pf 

2.1D 

row 


ro's 

r--a 

30" 1 

+ 

4 

s Slnd 

.:o 


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r*5 


5% 

4- 

'a 


22*5 

J 

IS'ii 


:i :z 
"13 A*I ^ 
!5ft 73 


■34 I1.7 
ICS 12.1 
* AA 1A.A 
BJ2 1A! 


17? 


a 71 :2 j i'~; Si's 




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TS’. 


-ft S | TS 


M': 
31ft 
103 : 


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PSIn Bf 

32' 7 PSlnr! 

J5 PSJnsl 

3 7 PS.r;*. 

*ft =SNf a* 

5ft =N“ =«S 
13 =.\w bIC 

il'l PNt-BlG 

lift =Nho.'£ 

PNM r!" 

’Jft =NfteiO 
22ft PSvNV. 1>2 IftS 
Zi PS*=S Z2. 1 -S 
• 'ft =SEC-pr :.AO ICS 
:u=. PSEGs* A.TS 53." 
3® PSEG of 123 
7C PjEC-a’ ?'s ’TJ 


aCOc : 1 
:H; *' 
!X: i£ 


: tS : 65ft— 2'x I 


;n: :r 

s if 


63ft 

Tft 

la 




5 2ft 
14 22 : 

T22 i"ft ;?■. 
An I« ; ir 
79" Zi 


!Sft * ■ 

ir-. s'- — t 

22ft 

2C-: - a. 


2V-. 29ft 


1*=. 4. 1 1 

11 J T 


22ft 29ft ■* ft 


atis;. 
232 45 


ft 12ft 12ft— ft 


4£'. 45ft ■♦■ ft 


9ft a RBind 
49'S 34 RCA 
40 lift RCA of 

I? ft 32ft RCA pi 

9ft 4ft RLC 
Aft 3 ft RPC 
19ft 14 PTE 
I8ft 8ft Rod use 
Arts dlft SaisPur IOO 
5’.» Romod 
2) . lift Ponco 
» 2' a SarvjrO 

75ft ST*1 Revcm 
16 Y 9ft Kovrnk 

36ft Pdirflin I JO 13 
S-'S Read Br AO &7 
13 ROBOT Pi 2.12 15S 
lift RlIRcf lJ3e 9.4 
8ft RecnEa 
7 Bedmn 
8ft Rcecc 
ft Regal 
276a ReicnC 
Aft Ret Air 
lft PepAwl 
i RbGvds 

36 ReoNY 

22’a 16ft RMS Ot _ 

rtft 23ft PNY pfC 112 I3J 
ST-i ST ; RFAYBfA6J4ellS 
JJ'T 24ft ReoSk 1.64 5.1 

33 23ft PecBk 0(2.13 7J 

1C3 86=. ReoBk ocH.Tle 7J 

?*»* Ifc Rsncot J2 1J 

29' a 22ft RevCB SO 

irt. 10ft Revere 

S3 37' a Pcvlor ISA 

26'.; 23V: Revtnpf 

100'; 93 RvInnIB 

24ft 17*. Re<.nm .70 

15*4 lift fteuird .44 

32' 7 2Aft Rcvnln 5 1-43 

SO 47ft Rev In pf 4.10 

112ft 103': Reyln P< 

ISO's 123ft Rev rnofl 2.96 
41ft 30 PevMtl 1 m 

lift 24 Rev.Wpf 130 

69 27 RctlVck 148 

33-7 lift RireAld SO 

r-i 2»i RvrOkn 
»»« 2T» Pabsftw 1J0 3J 

4(ft 21 ctobKn ISO 7J 

24ft 9-7 vi Robins 
24*; 17ft P.OCflS 2J0 10J1 

42-j 31 RodiTI 7L4A 18 

20ft IB RckClrn 

41*4 rt RocV'Jvl 1.12 

IA7 103 Rklntpf 1J5 
*3 55*. RohmH 120 

40 Pohrln 

Uft RainCin JO 

6 RollnEs SS 

S'; Palllns .44 

To Roman 
tl Rooer 

24 Rarer 

*‘ a Rowan 


zi 25 

94 

9.4 

19 21 


M3 6 5ft n- ft 

2840 47ft 46ft 47'L — ft 

20z 17ft 37ft 37ft 

7 JV 3V 39 -'4 

101Y 6ft Aft 4ft + ft 

113 3ft 3ft 3ft + Hi 

IS 9 44 18ft 1814 18ft +■ ft 

II 130 16ft 16'. lev* + v» 

2.1 15 2239 «ft 47*. 48'. + ft 

21 779 7ft 7ft 7ft — ft 

4i 9 34 17V; 17' 4 Wt-'A 

2851 4W 4 4ft + ft 

A TS 1136* 79ft 76ft 78VS +2ft 



71 

ID 

9ft 

ID 

+ 




48% 


+ 


20S 

6% 

5ft 

6 



95 

11% 

13ft 

13H 


11 

1 

14% 

T4M, 

14% 

+ 

17 

715 

11% 

lift 

11% 

— 

16 

87 

Bft 

8*1 

8% 


34 

22 

11% 

lift 

11% 

+ 



’ft 


Vs 



62 

34ft 

33% 

34% 

+ 


9100 

1(1% 

10% 

IDft 

— 


156 

2'b 

2 

2 


9 

173 

7% 

7% 

7% 


9 

511 

51ft 

51ft 

51% 

+ 


40 

23M> 

23% 

231b 



11 

27% 

27% 


— 




56 

56% 


7 

22S 

31Tn 

31% 

31% 

+ 


103 

27% 

27% 

27% 

— 


so 

(Oft 

03 

103 

+ 


19 16 
3.1 9 


9.9 

II 

9.1 

11 


70 


18 4 

:2ft 

3'. 

rt 


M 

M2 

.12 


W6x 25 24ft 34ft — 'A 
10 29 1236 27ft 26ft 26ft— ft 

2 211 13ft 12ft 13 — ft 

12 18 B55 57ft 57*0 S7ft— ft 

2 26ft 26'-i 26U — U 

2x 98ft 98ft 98ft + ft 

93 24 'A 23'b 24V. + ft 

114i 14ft 14 14 + ft 

4837 2SVa 25 25ft— ft 

172 49ft 47ft 477s + ft 

3 112ft 111** 112ft + ft 

647 131 130ft 131 + ft 

244 31ft 31ft 31ft + ft 

70S 2SU 25». 25ft 

_. _ 17 69 68!* 45 + ft 

10 16 1384 24ft 24 24ft + ft 

16 261 2ft 2ft 2ft + ft 
3SB 4034H 3316 34^-1-48 

7J *0 22ft 21=6 22 + ft 

722 lift 10*8 lift + ft 

177 22 21ft 22 

34 35*k 35=4 3S=» 

855 IBft 18ft 18ft— =* 

1631 34ft 33ft 34ft + ft 

1 121ft 121ft 121ft— lft 
110 671% 67*4 67ft— ft 

228 601b 68 50ft + ft 

96 26ft 25ft 26 

842 14ft 14ft 14ft + ft 

12 lift lift— ft 
2ft lft 2ft + ft 
14ft 14 14V, 


3J 9 
1.1 

3J 11 
10 
IS 31 
A 25 
19 17 


AS 
19 19 


148 

180 

56 


M 70 SI 07 


I'b Bft Bft 


0 sen ^.an Lr» 


tfcBB 


Setaf 

H.,b 


Sea sen 
L;«* 


iecM" Sectcr. 

k -ijn L?.v 
ii"j: :>>.C3 Gee ijv.uO ij*.C3 IJSSS 

'■t'Zi 1A1SC .'.'.ir 

Ev’. Sales P:e-. Sales AJ13 

Prev Cav Cccn ir.t : \AZ'. ZZ 
SUGAR WORLD 11 1NYCSCE1 
1 121*7) !T5 -CftltSfler :: 

" ■; :• JD Usn LT - AC *C; 

*33 :JA .Vcr 


C'cse Cng. 
1{2JI -133 
1:17: —.75 


Sc cun 
Hwn 

SWM" 

LO* 


Oaen 

High 

Low 

aose 

am. 

TO 72 

87J8 

Dec 

90X9 

91X1 

90X7 

91X1 

+.1B 

«CJ9 

B764 

Mar 

90X7 

9060 

90X5 

9060 

+.18 

TO’6 

08 64 

Jun 

9024 

9026 

oq_2S 

90 JS 

+.18 

TO 01 

B9J9 

Sea 

90X0 

90 00 

B9X6 

90.10 

+.18 


Esi. Sales Prcu. Sales 43JS81 

Prev Ear Open lnt.150.733 u*j 3,945 


Cccn k.st l:* 2':se Ca;. 


Grains 


i *(• 

eir 


6.1: 


=£8 

Til 


Set 

Cr 




WHEAT lC8T' 

S 0C0 to miHiriy-v- sjllsr, re- i'.vel 


’75 

13* 


3.:3 
3 "J - 

ACT 2.A 

2:3 

j.A5 li" 

; : i«a 

Ess. Soles 
Pm. Sat Oa:n ;n{ 
CORN tCBT) 

5 57iJ cu mnlmu— • C. 
1*3 


Dec :c. 

*.1cr *rt 
vo- 3.*: 

Jvl L*I 
ire 1 : j L*s 
Gee 

prev Sa-es £;sj 
:: *3 a _=gj: 


31;. Irt 


-.IT 


~s; J :1 

£ a airs 
~-c. Da- Caen: 


Vcr * T 
Pro.' Sr'ev -v f 
rt. *: i'.S rf'iil 

COCOA (NYCSCEJ 
'C rne_Tr |: Tcns- aocMor 

;;j; rtH 

Z£?2 1 *n 

:a;* 


IS" 

C.M 


+ 31 
— 29 
-.1! 
. -a 

7-.11 


-.11 


. oa 


BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

S cer mund- 1 DOlnt equals S10001 
1 +125 1.0230 DC-C 1 J12S 14225 14085 14155 

1«319 1 Ofl£0 Mar 1.4020 14105 1J97S 14035 

' All 5 1 1905 Jun 1J905 1J925 1J890 1J93S 

E sf. Sales 7S£5 Prev. Sales 19.205 
Prev.Uc- Ooen I nr. 30584 up 293 


+85 

+85 

+85 


::ZS 


:i te- 


291 

Its 


LIA 


135- 
2 *J'T 
E>t Sale: 


133 

C1J 

133 


s“ei 

Dec ££: 11? . 

AW 1—-* lAi'; 
Vv3v 2A= 

Jji 

Se* 13i 
iec ::: 

Mar Hi'. 1JJ 
Pro. Ss.et AlTTc 


Xia 

ICrt 


•vcr 

Vcr 

Jv: 

S-7B 

Cs: 


rH ;;Ir 


IS <5 
Hi! 


123:. 1160 m 


r:3 


■»*i0 

m 


t;- 


ir 

243 


2 — 


-s' £nes p-r..5=Jrs 2 S' 

B -ci Da* Cser ini. ;; ; j: 'j; 7* 




J CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

J Soerdrr-loeinTeauals50.000i 

.r*»6 .7CS4 Dec .7250 .7269 

."SOA 6^81 Mar .7235 .7250 

7M .7970 Jun .7730 .7230 

I .7333 7174 Sep .7225 J225 

• Esf Sales ?£* Prev. Sales 1.988 
! Prev DarOcen Int. 7J5A UP 195 


.7238 

.7233 

.7230 

J225 


J262 

.7749 

.7235 

.rat 


l: 1 

225 




— r; 


Prc. Oc. CBenlrf.Ula'j .sAil 
SOYBEANS (CST1 


50C0bu 

minimi.'^ 

i-aBi.crs;e*: 

:-5r.e-' 


6.eS 

+9" : 

NOV 

51- : 

5N : 

5 ;« • 

6T« 

‘.TO 

jsn 

sz: 

t?4 

Irt 

"t.: 

5.:: 


5 JS : 

;.i: : 

SJS 7 

7"0 

5Jlft 

vi'. 

Sic -. 

:S~. 

i.i> : 

ft 58 

f . 

J'4» 

:£Z 

fii 

ir 

e.74 

5. if : 

ijC 

:£Z . 

iff 

IT. 

Ml 

i.rt : 

Se: 

i.Z~: 


5-‘ : 

ill 

5J> : 

Nov 

SZJ 

ii‘ ' 

53: 

S.iZ 

*4- : 

Jen 





ORANGE JUICE CNrCE) 

'5 :->;'C!.-eei'*scc ' 
rj'co 

1 — JO 
T»?4C 
irr; 

::csc 
i'acj 


* “'-Tj 

f nj ; 


-C4-; 


ti^:: 

NCv 

iirtf 

II4X5 

1129* 

1U2S 

-.1C 

■.iz-z-z 


11-LK 

1T5.10 

Dirt 

1* 

--0 

i>_.; 

•’.TO" 


fliJO 

114.42 

iiixo 

+.10 

Ml 55 

vr- 

1 14X0 

115X3 

114*0 

114.'* 

-ZS 

111 4C 

-'Ll 




:iJ4j 

+-2C 

Ml. -3 

5lB 

;-y: 

11^75 

l-?7< 

51 — 25 

+.05 

U'j) 

Nj / 




HUD 

-.05 


;on 




MISS 

tZS 


l.'.sr 




TIC-ID 

-05 


I FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

1 Seer rranc 1 pomi equals 50X0001 
.114 It .rttTO Dec 

11419 .10985 Mar 

i 11A50 .12130 Jun 

: Esi Sates Frev.Sales 16 

! Prev. DUYOeen Inf. 143 up 7 


.12445 

.12390 

.12315 


. 

— Jl's 
-01 


lel. li- 
es: Sates £*.’ Prev Sales o’S 
«*-fv.C<a' ODon'rr :*S3cfrr- 


I GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

5 per merit ■ 1 point eaua >S SO 0001 
2330 J97I Dec J830 J838 

J?1I JOAfl Mar £5361 J869 

J-;35 -U3S Jun J892 J895 

J9TS J742 Sep 

Esf. Scies 24070 Prev. Sales 39423 
Prev. Dos Open inf. 50J15 Off 4396 


J812 

J843 

J883 


JSC 

J863 

J894 

J912 


+23 

+22 

+21 

-2 


Ei-l Seles 


Prw, sales 39J70 


Ml fd 

5 a; : : 


Metals 


Prev Co- ‘leer inf. 74 «J e“ 2:-" 


COPPER (COME X» 

If C03 ibs -cenfs oer it. 


SOYBEAN MEAL 1CBT1 
100 :cns- Sellars uer ran 
TSa OO 125 AC Dec 
TI7M 
1DJ7C0 
«3i£J 
13AM 
IjiiC 
1375* 

lAoao 
1A1CC 
14500 


HIM 
ZHAO 
U1S0 
h-£P 
55*. "0 
167 00 
14950 
150 00 
150.00 
Esf Seres 


jar. 

Mar 

Ma. 


TA-JO 1A2.*C I4'j: *A"4l 
143 1C 143.53 14" TO TA-JI 
•.4«"1 TA"-M 'S'JC 14'JI 
;as.si -asdo 'Ain 

ih:c irj: 'ASio 'tin 

!MC; '55 1C l-CDC -4213 
’ASio 'AiK :a,-:: 747:2 
14551 1AS53 142£t :aj:c 
"45—1 14550 -‘t~, :A522 
1A7£J 14"-: :A£JD :a«+; 


Au« 

Sea 
Oct 
Dei 

Jan - - 

Prev.S::e* -’Dl; 


Prev DcvOcer.ln) 441:2 u bso: 



K-0 

94.25 

S3J3 

\QJ 

Dec 

SJiO 

4125 

SO 40 

4123 

elXJ 

— K 

04 23 

VS N 

£5.rs 

PT3 

Jan 

.vcr 

5142 

62X0 

»14C 

i'.XS 

tZA! 

•4.02 

tax: 

.‘.'J • 

e’.oc 

«s 

4115 

«:+2 

6130 

-10C 

=il 

dll 
— ! “ 
-;!a5 

"4 4.’ 



6X40 


zZZC 

'.’=0 


set 

6135 

5X25 

43X5 

:c3o 

ft23 

Dec 

ft.- 

eJLsS 

Sill 

6435 

r: .rt 
J'.TO 

Jcr 

;£J3 

9i« 

6£CS 

64.46 

eXTO 

e .30 ft-7u v.ay 

taXO 4X25 Ju: 

4150 ftli; 3«= 

Est. 531+3 Pre v Site BUTt 

°rev.Dc» Ossntal. TT6S3 ua! 


4X35 

aX£0 

46—3 


:!z§ 


1 JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

I Sper sen- 1 asm: equals SOJHUOOl 
XC4974 003905 DOC .0MS5 .004889 JKW839 JJ04875 

Mar X04863 JU4893 X04848 JXM882 
Jun 4)04885 X04908 X04870 J0A895 
Sep JKW15 

Dec .004935 


■034934 

C04939 

00493) 

C04+M 


.004035 

JKM220 

JHM490 

004158 


-1 


+1^: 

‘•TW 


Esi. Sales 24.113 Prev. Sale, 30243 
Prcv.DavOpenmr. 39.165 off 125 


—10 


+1.15 

vl.15 

+1.15 

*1.15 

+U5 

Tl.lS 

*1.15 

+1.15 

*1.15 


’ SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

! 5c «L , ^ 0,,c • ,oomrMualsS,, ■ tlal, 

I 472S J531 Dec .4667 

I 47?1 3835 Mar .4709 

I 4800 4790 Jun .4765 

.4813 4790 5ep 

ESI. Sales 15.719 Prev. Sales 25,992 
Prev. Day Open Int. 27,898 off 1,901 


SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 

■SO coo Its- dollar, aer 1 : 0 id* 


20 cc 

N C* 

Dec 

03X5 

rt.=4 

:x:s 


e-XO ; 

rtor 

i«.r: 


:cxc- 


zoa: 

Z07! 

+X? 1 

2860 

10 S3 

.VVjr 

axst 

21X3 

237* 

33.ee 

+ 45 ; 

27.45 

2032 

•WO. 

2105 

2163 

rt :* 

25X0 


2515 

20.4C 

Jul 

3135 

21.90 

rjs 

21X5 

+.25 

25 15 

00.47 

Aug 

21 4S 

21.50 

31.40 

:iw 

+J5 ! 

04.75 

20X0 


2145 

21 -' 

3145 

:ix: 


21.45 

& 

h 

21.45 

0160 

21X0 

:txc 

2IX* 

21X0 


-.40 1 
+JS 1 

21.40 

2X35 

Jan 




:ij3 

-J3 

ESI. Sales 

Pr«?v.Soi« 





ALUMINUM (COMEX1 
AliKOISS.-CCnisperlC. 

N3-. 

ji eo 

4A.R3 
42 =3 
44.13 
A4j0 
46*1 
46.95 


.4682 
-472H 
A 766 


AM 

.4688 

.4758 


MUt 

.4710 

w<758 

j48Q5 


+19 

+20 

+18 

+15 


Industrials 


*6'B 
.-3,60 
64.75 
U.45 
32.10 
49 10 


4230 42.9* 4220 


4150 41? 
4420 44J 

44,90 44.9 


Prev. Dav Oseninj. MA33 chi.ce; 


Livestock 


DC 
Jcr. 

Mar 
Vcv 
JuJ 
Sea 
De: 

Jen 
Mot 
M ay 
Jul 
Sen 

Esf. Sain Prev. Sales 243 

Prev. Dav Own 1 nt. 1.780 up 45 


4A45 

4423 

4490 


53 J5 
KL30 


49.AC 
50 00 


42 JO 
AIM 
4323 
4195 
4465 
4525 
4625 
47.10 
47.45 
48.15 

AHHI 

4935 

5025 


—23 

—25 

:5i 

+.75 

+.75 

+25 

+25 

+25 

+.75 

+.75 


CATTLE (CME) 
aOJMO 1 bs.- ceni 0 per 1 b. 


SILVER (COMEX) 

54X10 Ira v ox.- cents per I roy ox. 


67.35 

5X00 

Dec 

67 05 6762 

4X45 

to.R0 


S*J5 

Feh 

6X52 43X0 

axed 

6301 

67X7 

5530 

Aor 

62j 05 62J7 

61X0 


46X5 

5635 

Jun 

M.75 62X0 

41.40 


AS .40 

55JO 

Aug 

60 JO to 40 

5960 

S“60 

6060 

57X0 

Od 

59X7 59.25 

5X52 

SSX2 

M30 SO jo Dec 60.10 sC.10 

Esi. Sales 21612 Prev. Sales 22,773 
Prev. Dav Open int. &E.1J9 ub20I 

60.10 

60 IQ 


—25 

—50 

—.AS 

—23 


—55 


FEEDER CATTLE ICME) 
44.000 Ibi- cents oer id. 


7X20 

*aio 

Nov 

64X0 

6X15 

6420 



7960 

oOXO 

Jan 

68.70 

68*5 

43 0C 

68.05 



4062 

Mar 

6»XC 

69.10 




71.00 

6060 

Aor 

68.10 

tX25 

67J0 

67X0 



eaio 

Mav 

66X0 

47X5 




MX0 6i 75 Aug 67X0 

Esi. sales 1J8j Prev. Sales 
Pr+v. Dav Oaen Ini. 9672 Otf 1C 

6720 

853 

67.10 

67.10 

—.15 


HOGS (CME I 
304)00 Ib6- cent, per lb. 


50X5 

3oJ5 

Dec 

44J7 

47X0 

4440 

4AX2 

50.4? 

38.10 

Fob 

46.15 

46.77 

45.TO 

4520 

47 J5 

36.1? 

Aor 

41.70 

4220 

41X0 

47.75 

49X5 

39X0 

Jun 

43.70 

4420 

43X5 

43.70 

49X5 

*0-45 

Jul 

4X00 

4460 

43X0 

4192 

51.90 

40X5 

Aug 

4175 

43.12 

4172 

*2-«0 

41.10 

49X0 

4X9C 

3197 

36JT 

*045 

Oct 

Dec 

Feb 

39.97 

4005 

39X0 

39X0 

40X7 

41X0 


—.10 

—.05 

—m 
—.12 
—.03 
+JJS 
— J5 


Esi. Sain 6.112 Prev. Sain 7.191 
Prev. Dav Onen int. 27 474 up 848 


PORK BELLIES (CME) 

384)00 lb,.- cenrsoer lb. 

7e20 55.75 Feb 4225 

73.40 55x5 Mar 6157 

7550 57.05 Mav BUS 

76.00 57 JO Jul 6140 

73.15 5550 Aug 6120 


63 J5 
6147 
6455 
wfO 
62JJ0 


Esi Sain 4.017 Prev. Sain 3.999 
Prev. Dav Oaen Int. 8,284 up 103 


61.90 

6102 

63J5 

6340 

6120 


6250 

6722 

64.11) 

*420 

61.40 


+23 

+.15 

+28 


Food 


COFFEE CINYCSCE) 
37500 lbs.- cent, oer ID. 
16850 12925 Doc 

12850 
131JX) 

13540 
13175 


167 JD 
167.18 
167.10 
16728 


15825 15624 !SaJ» 154.00 
Mar 15859 15955 I54.E2 15A85 

MOV 15959 16050 155.79 156J* 

Jul 161.13 161.13 157.14 15752 

Sen 161.73 16200 158570 13843 


—3.97 

—351 

—351 

—3.10 


620 0 

6030 

Nav 

4025 

MMX 

6025 

6112 

+7J 

1250.0 

5TOX 

Dec 

MMX 

61X0 

604.0 

613X 

+73 

1215.0 

595X 

Jan 

611X 

6T3X 

61 IX 

617J 

+/J 

1193.3 

607X 

Mar 

61X0 

67AX 

616X 

62X3 

+7X 

104X.0 

61 9X 

Mav 

626J 

63X5 

625.0 

63X5 

+7.6 

945.0 

629X 

Jul 


6415 

616X 

642.1 

+7X 

940X 

421 X 

Sea 

64X5 

64X5 

64X5 


+7X 

799.0 

7B9.0 

652X 

666-0 

Dec 

Jan 

eaOX 

66X5 

6SL0 

66X5 

670J 

+7X 

+74 

77QX 

670X 

Mar 

6760 

675X 

674X 

680J 

+7A 

75X0 

AS2X 

May 



68&X 

690X 

+.A 

746X 

695X 

Jul 

wxo 

696X 

695X 

781X 

+7J 

Est. 5a ICS 

Prev. Sain 20022 





Prov. Day Oaen Inf. 86275 off 879 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 1 rov ox.- do 11 or, per fn>v os. 

357.40 331JM Nov 

37350 25750 JDR 32850 33000 324 JM 329 JO 

357.0C 3*450 Aor 32950 33150 32SJW 331.10 

36300 273.00 Jul 333JM 333JB 323JM 334.10 


32550 


34050 30350 Del 

Esi. Sain Prev. Sales 1935 

Prev. Dov Open Inf. 13218 up 102 


33750 


+110 

+2.10 

+110 

+110 

+110 


PALLADIUM (NYME) 
100 fray 02- dollar, per ox 


141X0 

91X0 

Dec 

99X0 

99X0 

97X0 

98X5 

+.75 

127X0 

91 JO 

Mar 99X0 

99X0 

77 ZS 

9BJ0 

+.75 

II4X0 

91X0 

Jun 

99X0 

100.00 

98X0 

100.00 

+2X0 

HSXO 
107 ZS 

104X0 

Sea 99J5 
Dec 

99.75 

99.75 

99X0 

10050 

+J5 

+.75 


Est.Sale, 1.277 Prev. Sates 1209 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 6838 up 183 


GOLD ICOMSX) 

100 troy ox.- Oollors per trov ca. 


32650 

48950 


SIOjOO 

30150 


Nav 


48550 
«650 
A35.7Q 
423.40 
395.70 
rtXOO 
35850 
38640 
39450 
335.00 
Es>. Sain 


306.00 
3)4-70 
33050 
33100 
335 J)0 
34100 

31 3 JO 

3S5JJ0 

3*500 

371M 


32420 

Dec 32130 325X0 322.90 32550 

Jan 32750 

Feb M7.10 329.90 327JJ0 32950 

Aor 33050 33320 33050 33140 

Jun 33450 337.00 334 JM 33750 

Aua 34150 

0« 344.10 

Dec 34750 349JJ0 34750 350.90 

Feb 355.70 

Apr 36050 

Jun 366X0 

Aug 37>J0 

Prev. Sole, 29.J95 


+170 

+250 

+150 

+250 

+150 

+160 

+170 

+170 

+250 

+180 

+250 

+250 

+250 


Prev. Dav Oaen lnt.127207 up2520 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI mlmon- pis of 100 pci. 


j GuTeray Options 


PHILADELPHIA E -.CHANGE 
Option B Strike 
Underlying Priee Colls — Lait 

Nov Dec Mar Nov Dec Mar 
12540 British Pounds-cents per unit. 


Aor. 8 


B Pound 
14213 
14111 
14213 
142.13 
14113 
142.13 


170 

135 

130 

135 

1AD 

145 

150 


17X0 


6-10 


0.50 

OJO 


755 

604 

160 

1.45 


OJO 

3.75 


0.10 

0J0 

1A5 

455 


llsxoo Franca Francs-lDtas qt a cent pot onlf. 
FFrone 125 r r 290 r 
6.750XOO Jaaanne Yen-lOOlhi of a cent oer unit. 


JYen 

40 

i 

8X2 r 

s r 


48.75 

41 

s 

r 7.70 

S r 


48.75 

42 

r 

6X2 r 

r r 


48.75 

43 

r 

r r 

t t 

a os 

48 75 

44 

r 

r 4.4* 

r t 

E.ll 

48.75 

45 

r 

355 r 

r r 

0.19 

43.75 

46 

r 

X63 r 

r 007 

6J7 

48 75 

17 

1B2 

IX* 1M 

0.0? r 

0X5 

48.75 

48 

r 

1.10 1 64 

0.1 0 OXfl 

0.?9 

4B.7J 

4« 

0.17 

0X8 1.20 

0.J2 0.7* 

1.47 

1X'5 50 s 0J2 0.92 

62X00 Swiss Francs-cents oer unit. 

s r 


SFranc 

<3 

r 

335 r 

r t 


46.4* 

44 

r 

r r 

r 02' 


4640 

45 

c 

r 263 

r 021 


44.46 

*6 

7 

1.11 2 OS 

i- 048 

1.10 

46.46 

47 

0.17 

05? r 

r r 


4ft 4ft 

48 

0-03 

02* U6 

f r 


Total call vol. 1X750 

Call open int. 3(0842 

Total DUtvOI. 6X51 

Put open Int. 161,560 


r— Not traded. ^No option altered. 
Last is premium 1 our chose price 1 
Set-rce • 


6108 

8X77 

Dec 

9194 

9104 

92.93 

9103 

+.10 

9193 

84.60 

Mar 

92X2 




+ 13 

92X2 

87X1 

Jun 

92X8 

92X8 

92X7 

92X8 


92JI 

88X0 

Sep 

912* 

92J7 




92.00 

91.65 

89X5 

B9X8 

Dec 

Mar 

91.9* 

92X5 

91.95 

92X6 

91J8 

+.14 

+.15 

90.94 

90X0 

90.83 

Jun 

Seu 

91-36 

91-38 

9136 

91X1 

+.18 

+.18 

ESI. Sales 

Prev. Sales 6.129 




Prev. Da* Open Int. 40.922 up 747 


10 YR. TREASURY (CBTJ 

>Of TOODCt 


S700XOT orln- pis & 32nds c 


88-23 

7SI3 

Dec 

B8-19 

89 

88-15 

88-29 

+14 

87-7? 

75-U 

Mar 

87-17 

88 

87-15 

87-29 

+14 

86-24 

45-30 

8X4 

74-M 

80-7 

80-2 

Jun 

Sen 

Dec 

86-20 

B7-1 

96-20 

86-31 

Bft-4 

85-12 

+14 

+14 

+14 

Esi. Sales 

Prov. Sales 10X57 



Prev. Dov open Int. 73529 up 158 
US TREASURY BONDS [CBT3 
(8 oct-SlOOJOO-Dts & 32m: 5 oflK) cell 


142.13 

155 

r 

r 

0.70 

r 

r 

r 

79-22 

57 -8 

Dec 

IM 

79-25 

7A-4 

79-21 


50X00 Canadian Dotiarv-canls oer unit. 




70-11 

57-2 

Mor 

7B 

78-16 

77-27 

78-13 


CQuilr 


p 


1J» 

r 

ox: 

0X5 

77-6 

56-29 

Jun 

7+27 

77-11 

7+24 

77-9 


72*7 

TO 


ast 

r 

r 

r 

r 



Sen 

7+?ft 

7+9 

75-73 

7+9 


72X7 

74 

r 

O&i 

r 

r 

143 

r 

7M 

5+25 

Dec 

7+37 

7+10 

74-25 

75-8 

+16 

62X00 West German Mgrka-cents per unit. 



7+15 

5+27 

Mar 

74 

74-13 

73-29 

74-13 

+17 

DMork 

3* 


4,15 

r 

■9 

r 

r 

7+26 

63-12 

Jun 

J'J-13 

73-19 

73-10 

73-19 

+17 


3* 


2J4 

r 

r 

r 


72-27 

*3-* 

See 

72-23 

72-38 

72-19 

72-28 

+ 17 

38.14 

37 


1.40 

209 

r 




*2-24 

Dec 




72-7 

+17 

38.14 

38 

M3 

0.72 

1X3 

0.1* 


107 

71-6 

47 

Mar 




71-20 

+17 

3al4 

39 

0X7 

028 

"•04 

r 

r 

r 

68-30 

66-25 

Jun 




71-3 

+17 

3114 

40 

r 

IJ.I1 

170 

r 

r 

r 

Est. Soles 

Prev.SaJes224.906 





Prev. Bar Open Inf J84 J42 up 2X37 
MUNICIPAL BONDS t CBT1 
41 000* index -ef s & Knds oflOO oct 
87-2 81-17 Dec 85-25 86-16 

B6-7 HM Mar SS-4 BS-19 

85-12 7? Jun 8+10 B4-22 

84-20 79-10 Sen 

Est Sales Prev. Sain 3,955 
Prcv.Oov 0«n Inf. 9516 up 605 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- aft of 100 pet 


85-20 

84-29 

84-7 


86-8 

85-14 

84-17 

93-26 


+7 

+3 

+5 


TO50 

8S3* 

D*C 9133 

92,41 92X2 9143 

+.13 

9J.19 

BAX* 

Mar 92.18 

923# 92.18 92J0 

+.16 

91X4 

8&43 

Jun 

91-98 

+ 1/ 

91X4 

87X4 


51X4 

+.17 

90X9 

8134 

□cc 

91 Jl 

+.IB 

9025 SUC Mar 

Est Sales Prev. Sales 

Prev. Dov Doen mt. 1 .903 no 13 

90.98 

73 

+.18 


EURODOLLARS (IMM) 
SI mimon-otsof impel. 


9117 

6193 

91X2 

7157 


84.60 
06.10 
86 73 
SMB 


Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

Sen 


9182 

9154 

9158 

«UJ 


»115 

9159 

91X9 

9145 


9102 

7154 

9156 

9143 


9114 

71.78 

91X8 

91J4 


+.14 

+.16 

+.17 

+.17 


LUMBER (CME) 

130X00 D(L ff.-5 Per 1X00 bd. 1 1. 

184.10 12*50 Nov 140X0 142X0 140 JO 141X0 

133x0 Jqn 143X0 144.10 142X0 141® 

1 rt.70 Mar 14950 15020 149.10 149X0 

14520 May 154X0 155X0 154X0 155X0 

14950 Jul 159X0 159X0 150X0 15920 

15250 s«p 16150 16200 16150 16260 

16250 

2.100 


1S7JJ0 
195.00 
176X0 
133X0 
176.C0 

181 JO 15650 NOV 

Est.SaJn 1X06 Prev. Sales 


+150 

+120 

+1X0 

+1X0 

+X0 

+J0 


Prev. Day Open Int. 7,185 up 35 


COTTON 2 (NYCE) 
50X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 


73X0 

57X1 

Dec 

61X0 

61X3 

6125 

61J4 

— J6 

7175 

5177 

Mar 

62J5 

6172 


6227 

—22 

70X0 

5190 

Mav 

62X5 

6145 

62X5 

6195 

+.12 

70X5 

5120 

Jul 

61.75 

62X0 

61X0 

62.10 

+.HI 

65X0 

5140 

Oct 

53.70 

54J0 

53J0 


+.17 

59 J5 
6175 

50X5 

S2J0 

Dec 

Mar 

51.74 

52X5 

5120 

51X3 

52X3 

+.10 

+30 

Est. 5o les .2X50 Prov. Safes 2X93 





Prev. Day Ooen Inf. 22X93 up 55 


HEATING OIL(NYME) 

42X00eof- cents per aa 1 
8170 *9.15 Dec 

8825 69X0 Jon 

8625 70X0 Fob 

01-95 68X0 Mar 

77 A0 6SJW> Apr 

7450 6800 MOV 

7425 71X0 Jun 

73.10 7120 Jlfl 

7i75 71J0 ADO 

7250 7250 Sea 

Esf. Sales Prev. Sale, 13J46 

Prev. Dav Open ini. 33X84 aft 330 


men 
86X5 
met 
81 JO 
77X0 
74.15 


B72S 
87 JS 
85.98 
8155 
77X0 
7425 


86X5 

8620 

BSl40 

81.15 

7650 

74X8 


86.92 

84X2 

UX6 

8120 

77.10 
74X0 

73.10 
7720 
7225 
7220 


-v0» 

—.19 

+X2 

—24 

+X0 


+X5 


CRUDE OIL (NYME) 


30X4 

23.90 

Dec 

30J4 

30X0 

3032 

30X4 

+JH 

29X0 

24J8 


29J7 

29X0 

29 Jl 

29X8 

+X6 

2946 

2425 

Feb 

28X0 

28.74 

28X8 

28L74 

+416 

rt.45 

24.13 

AAar 

27X8 

28.12 

Z7.*3 

28.12 

+J19 

2945 

2193 


27X0 

27X3 

27X0 

27X4 

+XI 

27.9* 

23X5 

Mav 

27.10 

27 35 

27.10 

2735 

+.14 

2187 

ZL78 


26J8 

26X8 

2165 

2175 

+JM 

2153 

24X5 

Jul 

2134 

2*34 

26J4 

2134 

—JOT 

2125 

2190 


2111 

3120 

2111 


-KGS 

27.00 

24X0 

Sep 

25X5 

25X9 

25X5 

25X9 

+X1 

25X5 

25.15 

Oct 

25X0 

25X0 

25X0 

25X0 

— 04 

25J5 

SJ5 

NBV 

25X7 

7SJJ 

25X0 

25X0 

—.12 

25X0 24X0 Dec 25X0 25X0 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 16X47 

Prev. Dav Oaen int. 68X47 off 164 

2SX0 

23X0 



Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
point, and cents 

700.65 175.70 Dec 192X5 19460 19115 191X5 

20325 182J0 Mar 19195 196J0 19XH5 19560 

20650 18350 Jun 19560 197.15 195J0 197X0 

196.75 187X0 Sep 196X0 19840 196X0 198X0 

Est. Sales 62212 Prev. sales 51X77 
Prev. Dav Oaen mt. 64.910 up 553 


+150 

+1X0 

+1X0 

+120 


VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cent, 

217X5 188X0 Dec 199X0 20250 198.95 20120 

209X0 19050 Mar 200X0 204X0 20020 30X55 

197.70 197X0 Jun ‘3SS5M 

30150 200X5 Sep 207X5 

Est.Sale, Pr ey.SOiK 6.1 » 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. 9X53 Off 65 


+2X0 

+1X5 

+190 

+253 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
saints and cents 

11720 10120 Dec 111.10 112X0 111X0 1T115 

1»825 10550 Mar 112X5 11150 111.95 113.10 

120.00 106,°0 Jun 1I3.S8 114X0 112.95 114X5 

114X5 10050 Sep 114X0 114X0 114X0 115X0 

Est. Sales /X71 Prev.Soiw 6X00 
Prev. Day Open Int. 7X60 up 69 


+1X5 

+1.10 

+1.15 

+125 


MAJOR MKT INDEX (CBT) 

point, end eights 

263ft 249 Nov 362ft 265 

770*11 249ft Dec 3iIVi 265 

Est. Sales „ , Prev.SXles 282 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 3208 up 71 


762ft 

262ft 


264ft 

265 


+2ft 

+2ft 


Commodity Indexes 


AAooav's- 


Reuters. 


D_i. Futures. 


Com. Research Bureau. 


Close 
912X0 f 
1,734X0 
120X3 
226.00 


PrevtaB 
91100 f 
1.736J0 
13078 
225420 


Moody’s : Base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
a- preliminary; f- final 
Reuters : base 100 ; Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Joiios : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 



12 Mam 
n let) Low Stock 


Mft 47ft RavlQ 32fe 52 7 4524 62ft 61ft 63ft 

17ft 10ft Ravi nl 5 20 718 1711, 17 17 — ft 

31 20ft RubmdS M IX 19 568x 30ft 29ft 2+ft— ft 


26 14ft Russer 

M 15ft RUSTOD 

31ft 21 RvanH 

22 Rvders 

» Wb Rykmd 

»ft 8ft Rvmer 
13ft 10ft Rymerntl.17 10J 


13 47 19ft Iff* 19ft— ft 

J6 3X II 24 22ft 22 22ft— ft 

1X0 64 B 3*2 S2V» 29ft 22ft + ft 

X0 2X 12 1077 30ft 38ft 30ft + ft 

X63X13 a 2Bh 25ft 25ft + ft 

4 31 14ft 14ft 14ft 

13 lift lift lift 


JO 1.1 23 
1-78 4A 9 
£2 ZI 12 
L72 8J 7 
1X8 1X7 


15 


74ft Jijb 5 CM 2X0 17 IS 
13ft 9ft SLlnd X2b IS 10 
MH 19ft SPSTec X0 14 16 

I* 15 Sabine JM J » 

» H SabnRv Z38el4J 

3Dft 12ft StOdBL JO 1J 16 

1^6 5ft stgase 22 

3ft lft SfgoSwt 
38ft 23ft SotKJas 
36ft 2Sft Softwv 
34ft m saga 
23 tBft SUaLP 
lift 9ft SPaul 
8ft 3ft ulSoJanf 
36ft 24M ScdllcM ... . 

54 51 SatIM pf 3X2e 7X . ._ . ... 

21ft SDIeGs 2X4 84 9 1149 26ft 26ft 26ft + ft 

9ft 6ft SJvflftB JtOglQX 10 in 8% Bft 8ft + V# 
12ft 8ft SJuonR 18 6 lift It 11 

43ft 291b Sonar X0 1.9 16 327 31ft 31ft 3 Tft— Yt 

25ft 20 5AnltRt 1.94 L2 12 144 Bft 3jft 23ft— ft 

" 3X 13 2124 33ft 221b 33 

XJ 13 047 48ft 47ft 47ft — ft 


.16 


324 

25 
73 

26 

A 16 1214 
2000 


301 73ft 73ft 73ft + ft 
13 lift lift lift 
126 33ft 33 33ft- ft 

SO 15ft 15ft 15ft— ft 
BSx 16 Vj 16ft 16ft— ft 
724 18ft 17% 78ft + ft 
80 9*8 98S 9ft + ft 

2 2 2 — ft 

35% 34% 35ft + ft 
37ft 36ft 37ft +lft 
24ft 23ft 24ft * ft 
20% 20ft 20% + ft 
10ft 10 10ft 
7 6ft 7 + ft 

3|% 36ft 36% + ft 


51% 51% + % 


35% 24ib SFeSoP 1X0 
49ft lift SarsLee lxo 
35ft 29ft SpfWil 1X8 
19ft 15% Soul RE JO 


4J 15 
1.1 47 


23% 17% SavElP 1X0 7X 8 
9ft S Savin 
13ft 8 Savin pf 1.12J 
28ft 21ft SCANA 2.14 
W% 3S>A SchrPla 
Oft 33ft Sdilmb 
14ft Oft SdAtt 
33 23% Scoolnd 

6ift 53ft scoiFer 
45ft 31ft Scott p 
Wft 12ft Scotty* 

45 24% SeaCnt 

13 10ft S»Ctpr 1X6 11X 
16ft I3ik SeaCptBZlO 117 
16ft 13ft SeaCofCZlO 13L5 
27ft 17ft SeaLnd XI 21 11 
5"; 3V; SeaCa 

44ft Soft Seagmi XQ 
21ft lSl-i Seaaul 


34ft XPa SeatAlr 
32ft 22ft SealPw 
3fft 30 Sean 


6x34% 34ft 34ft + % 
6 181b 181b 18ft 

45 21ft 21ft 21% 

88 5ft 5ft 5V; + % 

24 Bft 8% 8ft + ft 

_ . BX 9 <49 26ft 26 26ft + ft 

1X8 11 15 1338 54U 53ft 54ft + ft 

1.3) 3£ 10 37C9 34% 34% 34% + ft 

.12 1.1 15 825 lift 10% 10ft — ft 

.76e 23 13 1046 3Z1b 32ft 32% + ft 

.900 IX 11 29 59% 59 OT* + ft 

“ 4)3 44% 44ft 44ft + ft 

57 13% 13ft 13ft 
225 24% 25% 26ft +11* 
24 12% 12ft 12ft — ft 
15 15% 15% 15% — ft 
85 15% 15 151b 

340 20ft 20ft 20% 

21 4 3% 3ft 

IX 12 2242 42% 42% 42% + ft 
20 16 17% 17% 17% + ft 


tier is* s 


26% 16 StevnJ 130 £5 

33ft 25Yj SlwWm 1X8 X7 31 

M 10 SlkVCpf 1.00 ” . 

45ft 38ft StOtwW 140 J5 9 

S4Vt 24 SlpneC .xo 2.1 35 

Sift 34U Stoothn 1.10 3X ll 

21% 16*6 StarEa IJ92 1W W 

4ft lft vIStorT 
9ift 40 Stortr .40 X 

21% 17 SlrtMtn 1309 U 

Jlft 14ft StrWfit X0 3^ 38 

6% 15b SuavSh , _ 

je 28% 5unCh X 1J 15 
11% 4% SwnEI __ 

56ft 43ft SunCo 230 45 21 

rin m3 sUSpi 2^ H 

49ft 40 SwndStr i» *0 *2 

’ft 7* SunMPf 1-19 1W 

SSI» f 149 « ulSii + 

^ H w’w SSSft S? + % 

I T J 


- »*k ^ . 

fJVrr 13 Hi ; IV 

54 19ft W 1W * fP 

a 21ft zl ; 3 21ft— "« 

ss fil 4% A 
123 171% 36% W-—JJ 

si JO'b 10ft lir.a + % 

246 SlU 30ft S’** a. 

2 lfc^ 105 IDS * < 

82 45% 44% 45 
377 6'i 6 4,. — 2 

ISS 7** Tft r.4 — ,+ 
393 as% 33ft— J* 


1X4 

JS2 

A3 


IE 11 
3S 11 
IX 7 


1X0 

1-76 


21 

J2 *A 24 
it 17 S 
X45e 44 7 

-TO IS 6 
.92 24 12 
10 

X0 4J 14 
1X6 88 11 
40 IX 9 


987 39% JS'b OTA + ft 


Market Guide 


CBT: 

CME; 

IMM; 


NYC5CE: 

NYCE; 

COMEX! 

NYME; 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


Chicago Board of Trade 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
International Monetary Market 
Of Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
New York Cocoa, Sugar. Coffee Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Commodity Exchange. New York 
New York Mercantile Exchange 
Kansas city Board of Trade 
now Yori. «Vvres Exchange 


107% 97% Sears of 9nse bs 
31% 2<% SeePocs 1J4 4A 
19 11% SelgLf 

281b T7lb SvcCoS 
14% it% Shokiee 
26% 1* Shaw In 
.48% 2 sneMT 
30ft 21 ShciGlo 
; <0 2SV; Shrwln 
! 9 5 , + 5hMlwn 

, 15ft 12 Showtjt 

1 Wft 15 sierPac 

- 41 2«% sinoer . _ _ 

33% 28ft SJnprpf 3X0 16J 

17% 12% Skyune 48 16 17 

26% 30% Slanery 
14ft TA Smltnln 
71ft 50% SmkB 
84ft 481b Smucfcr 
41% Tift SnaaOn 
15% 12ft Snyder 
43% 31ft Sonar 
19% Ijft SaavCp 
32% 22% SocUn 
40ft 33% SaurcC 
3% 19ft IrcSpf 240 104 
30ft 24ft SoJerln 248 9X 12 
49ft 3ffb Soudwn IXflb 2J 12 
35 24% SoetBk 1XO 1H 10 

9 A SoetPS Z13I35X 35 
27% 21% SCotEd 2.16 17 8 
23ft 17% South Co 2X4 10X 6 
26% 20% SalnGsS 7X0 72 9 

44 31% 5NETI 2.72 43 11 

39% 32% SoNE pf 3X2 10X 
27% 221b Softy of 2X0 9A 
31 24ft SaUnCo 1-72 63 
41 'i 24% Soutlnd 1X0 
55V; 49V> Sautla pf 4X0 


13 16 282 30 29% 29% — ft 

40 9 511 23ft 24ft 25% + % 

49 10 6344 36 35ft 35% + ft 


5 Wflft 106ft 106% — 1U 
988 29% 28% 29 + ft 

12 18% 78% 18% 

582 30’A 27% 30'ju T2 

815 15% 14% 15% + % 

75 22% 22% 22ft 

1119 38% 37% 38% + ft 

341 26% 24 26 — ft 

368 38% 37% 38% + lb 

97 8% 8ft 8ft — ft 

114 14 13% T3% + ft 

167 U% 18% 18% 

202 38% OTA 38% + U 

7 32% 32% 3Z%+ % 

45 13% 12% 13% + % 

Afle 1J 22 b 3» 21 24+fe 

X JJI 639 8% 8 .8 — % 

3X0 43 11 1843 7Dft 49ft 49% + ft 

1 JO 14 19 54 85 83% 85 +tft 

1.16 13 12 380 35ft 34% 35ft + ft 

2X0 117 18 131 14% 14ft 14% 

2X0 SJ 10 1611 35% 35 35ft 

-16e S 15 2602 18% 1816 I8%— ft 


1J0 

330 


IB lift Sofiov .17 J 3 1813 
Bft 5% Saumrk 34b 2X 5 1770 
51 <7 Sunk at 6J3el3X 3 


71 Wb 59 29ft— ft 

21 39 38% 39 + ft 

12 23 22% 23 

3T7 27% 27% 27% 

125 44ft 43% 43% + ft 

347 JT% 3Tft 31% + ft 

82 6ft 5% 6 
4670 25ft 24% 24% — lb 

2731 20% 20ft 20ft + ft 

124 24% 24% 24ft + % 

589 43 42% 42ft— ft 

22 38% 38ft OTA— % 

4 26ft 26ft 24ft + % 

44 24% 26ft 26% 

Z5 10 1425 40ft 39% 40% 

7 2 108 OTA 54% 55ft— ft 


.13 


124 

6X0 

52 

2X2 

SI 


31 18% SwAIrl 

16% IT* SwtFqr 
19 U SwfGas 
38ft 43% SwEUKl 
3 19** SwEnr 

asft 20 s+tps 

17% ir* Sparlon 
27% 15% SoectP 
59 36% Soerry 

38ft 30*1 Springs 
43% 35% SauorD 
73ft 4C% Squibb 
23ft 18ib Stalev 
23ft 18 SfBPnt 
17% 10ft StMotr 

55% 3*% ShJOOh 

23% 10% SI Pace S XO 
16% Standex £2 
31% 23*1 StanWk 
37ft 2T.» Starrett 
ll’k 9% Sto-MSe 
7ft 2ft Steego 
2 Ca 15*1 Stercht 
T TS 9% StrtHcp 
37* j 24 « SietiDg 


17% 17% 17% 

8% 8% 8% — ft 
48% 48% 48%— ft 


1JW 

1X8 


S 15 1742 27 3H% 24% + % 

78 12% 12% 13% + ft 
AX 8 306 17% 17% 17ft 

7.5 8 2545 80% 78% BO +1% 
ZI 9 141 25 24ft 24ft 
82 9 670x25% 24% 24% — ft 
3-7353 88 14% 14 14%— % 

50 20% 20 20% + % 

4.1 79 2433 47% 44 46ft + ft 

4X 22 119 38ft 37% 38% + ft 

*J 13 313 39% OTA 39% + ft 

24 II 1278x 73ft 71ft 73% +1% 
3XT24 445 24ft 23% 21% + % 
178x21ft 20% 21ft + % 
526x11% Tift 11% 

1364 51% 50ft 50%— ft 

84 17% 17 17 — % 

29 131b 13% 13% — ft 
324 29ft 29ft rt%— 'A 
21 34ft 34 34ft + ft 

36 11 10% 10% 

26 Z* 2% 2% + ft 
10 19ft 19 19% + ft 

16 lift 11% lift + ft 


2A 1_ 
U 15 
SJS 9 
ZX 7 
19 18 
16 11 
3.1 10 
lJOeliJ 
.12 4A 
76 3.9 ?0 
J6 6X 9 


1X0 U 15 1403 36% 36 36% 


Company Results 


Revenue an<3 ora firs ar losses: In millions, are In local 
currencies unless offtrrwlsc tnaianed. 


railed Staten 


Allegheny Int'l 
3rd Ouar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 51 1J 

Ooer Net fa)34£ 

Oner Share— — 

9 Mont In 


516.4 

1A1 

037 


Generol Dynamics 

1984 
1,910. 

ns 

2X5 


SraOnor. 

Revenue 

Oper Net 

Oner Share — 


ins 

2X20. 

100X 

2J8 


1985 


Revenue 1X10. 

— (0)21.1 


1984 

1X30. 

40X 

0X9 


9 Months 

Revenue 

Over Net __ 
OoerShare_ 


ins 

5X00. 

mi 

6X7 


1984 

5X30. 

2562 

5X1 


Doer Net , 

Oper Share— 

Mels exclude tosses ot S353 
million vs S3.9 million In 
Quarter* ana ol SB-2 million 
vs 37.4 million In 9 months 
from discontinued opera- 
tions 


American inf I Group 


M/A Com. 
4ffi Qaar. 

Revenue 

Oner Net — 

Oper Share— 

Year 

Revenue — — 

Oner Net „ 

Oner Share — 


1985 

227J 

10X6 

DOT 

ms 

844.1 

41X8 

0X7 


1»4 

TUX 

13X1 

0J0 

1IM 

7644 

388 

asi 


3rd Quar. 
Oner Nel — 
Oner Share— 


ins 

1003 

129. 


1984 

762 

1X2 


9 Months 1985 1984 

Oner Nel 245J 2797 

Oper Share— 3X0 176 

Nets exclude oo In of SI3.I 
million vs lorn at USA miman 
In Quarters and gain of S3SJ 
million vs loss of S2H3 mill Ion 
in v months 


Quarter nets exclude looses 
Of SU million vs S197AU0 
from discontinued opera- 
tions. 


Mattel 

3rd Quar. IMS 


Capital Haldlnp 
3rd Quar. 1915 19*4 

Revenue 512A 443J 

Oner Net — 36 J 32X 

Oner Share— 0X7 0X9 

9 Months 1965 1984 

Revenue 1X20. 1 JIO. 

Oper Nat — 1002 928 

Oper Share— 1X4 1X6 

Nats exclude eolnofSZJ mil- 
lion vs loss of SIJ million In 
quartan and oaln at 876 mil- 
lion vs taa of SI7M00 hi 9 
months. 


Revenue. 
Oper Net — 
Ooer Share— 
9 Months 

Revenue 

Oper Net 

Oper Shore — 


328.1 

2574 

0X8 

ms 

80*7 

5477 

A97 


1984 

294J 

2777 

0X3 

1904 

6T2X 

«J7 

070 


Universal Foods 

4th Quar. 198S me 

Revenue 137X 1137 

Oper Net — 4X3 ns 

Oper Share— 0X7 0X5 

Year ms 1984 

Revenue— 493 X 4315 

Oper Net 17J9 WAS 

Ocer Share— 2X1' 2J1 

1964 nets exclude fo s s es of S3 
mlllkm fn auarter and of 6X9 
million In rear. 


50ft 30ft TDK 

36% V* JECO 

zv5 13% T§P JX u f 

§ft iTlRW 3J0 It 38 

m%151%TRWPf 4X0 25 
153 126% TRWw 4X0 U 
5Vj lft vITacBt 
87ft 52% TaflBra l.J* M J6 
21 1* 12% Talley .15* .* « 
23% 15 TOUWPIIXO 5.1 

87 56% Tambrd 3X0 AD 15 

38ft 23ft Tandy 

15% W* If Khrett 

68'A 47% TeJrtrrw 1X0 
5<A 2ft Telcaan 
274% 277 Tejtfvn 

74 12% Teirate J2 

50 303* Telex 

40% 31% Temptn AA 

45>a OTA Temwo 3JM 

MSft 94% Tencer 11XO Mi 

84% 72ft Tcncpr 7XO 88 

32% rnv Yorthm 

IS 8% T«*ara , 

27% 20% Tetor pt 2.16 9X 

40’ft 32% Teuaao 

37% 26ft TxABC 

44 25% TexCm 

39 26% Te*E*f 

34% 25 Texlnd 

131% Bd’A Teilnst 

4*k 1 Texlnt 

21% 141b TexOGt 
34% 28% TxPaC 
31% 35% TexUUI 
4% 2 Text! In ... 

59% 31 Textron 1X0 7A 

45 34% Terfrpf 2X9 3.9 

53 28% Texfr pf 1X0 3J 

lift Aft Thock 65 

28 2*Vb Thock of <15 148 

23 10 ThrmE 5 23 

43ft 30% ThrnBct 1J6 3.9 14 

' — JXU 3J 10 


97-7 35 38% OTb »%— > 

“ 7J !I 

43 18% 18 ft Uft + % 

331 «% 79% » — % 
1 T7J%173%1W'e 
2 148 14 MS 
1D0 tft lft lft 
170x81% O 80% + ft 
47 I Tft 17% 17% + ft 

I 19% mb 191b 

439 BSVS 84 84% —1% 

» 1810 37ft 37 37% + . 

15 H 14% 14% 14ft + ft 
ZX 13 748 Sift 5Bft Spb- % 

8 82 3 2ft 3 + ft 

10 1» 268ft 246ft 287 + ft 

2.1 20 80 15% 15% 151* 

12 1180 51% 49% SJ% +1% 
17 10 391 m 37% 3T%— % 

7.9 14 1401 38% 38% 38ft 


<8 St 53 SS + ft 




42% 31ft USt-808 
40% 2fA USSW 

5“ uSsnpi 53 

s rqagiM 
g* (BBT || 

jt S unsrapf 

« ISft W»R^ 1^1 
32% 17ft umtrte -5 

Mft T6ft uafw' ,-S 

38 ■ - 

ZJ% Ip* UnUm 

a «■* v«w* 

127 *3% UpWSL =-=* 

‘3 32% USWPC 1-2, 

10*8 * unfrFO • 

21 U?aPL i-= 
rtft 22% UtFJ.01 

25% &-1 UIW.JJ j* 

B% 79 U«RL3t 3J* W+ 
70 14% UtPL.pt 2^ »0- 

47 If.; UlUid 


VOS *i 4£* 

,$ zi » Sft? »ft OT* W-4- ft 


J 4 H tt 

5 m 


u t; w Jfft r.=k 3tft— % 
'i »: Wft 9& +»ft 
!S « 8 Tl t 7ft*!.* 

*4 '.1 2WJ *1 «k» rtft 

,? *« S5ft 3S*J Bft ♦ s 

« f Wgftgftg-A+ft 

: 27% 7rt* 77% +r* 
4U 'PI W% + 

At 2) OTi left 
141 Vft ttt» ■»,*-- 
a VTu, 7r.B 'JT-i * ft 
£1 31ft W% 2Tft +1 

,’*r. j*> a% 3ft + ft 

779 !2»v, JJSltia * + ft 
1506 OT/V 3* OTa— =4 


U 
U 

TC U 
U 1* 

*a ' 
a: to 
IJB 6* I 
USD *4 - 

*• BR 


JStipS ;caa:u «9 'Oft t*ft- ;■* 

igsf^iS', »g5»-3S^ 

SF 76 rft + ft 

tJA 23 2 Z* 3 + ft 

S 2? E B * ft 

T5C 33ft 22ft ZS* + ft 


TjK» 6C 7 


49ft »% VFConP '- 3 

left 


=*,3 S 


A tab 

‘Al ueSoro ip eu HI* lift Sift + ft 

if 1 V&t 3x4 .»s Oft 

TU yclqrtn 

* 'i»a 


** 52?8Spi SiPfftS 


15. 


! 3 B 
U 3* 

a s 

tjocnj* 


J* 

48 

XO 


u 


.90 it 


1X0 


1J 17 
19 


19% 15% Thomln JB6 3J IB 
18% 1TA ThmMHt AO 10 11 
24% 18% ThrtftV XO 2X 14 
24 13ft Tldwfr 
10% 5% Tiger in 
«i*< 40 Time 
23 ’A 14ft Tbnnhc 
581b 38 TbBMM 
57% 41% Timken 
«W 4% Titan 
lift 8% TRonpf 1X0 9J 
OTb 24% TodShp 1X2 AX 15 
21ft 15ft Tokhots X8 ZJ IT 
21ft 16% TdEdis 12 125 5 
29% 24% TofEdPf 237 111 
JOUi 24% TolEdpf 375 UX 
28% 23ft TolEdpf JAT 127 
33% 28ft TolEdof 4X8 131 
20% 16% TotEdPl 2X6 125 
18% 15% Tel Ed Pf 221 125 „ 
30 9% Tonka i JO A S 

61ft 26 Toot Rot AtO X 


S3 104% KM A 104Vs— ft 
4 86 84 84 + % 

302 30% 19% 30 — % 

110 10ft MJ% HPb— ^ 

W 22 % 22 22 — ft 

JXft 7J 26 1560 »ft 3T* OT% + % 

in 44 9 78 2TA 27 fO — % 

1X6 57 7 1070 27% 27 27ft + % 

^55)1 5 2 ^ &S ^ i 2 

^ “ 77 S 

9 1335 491b 48ft 47% + 

8 54 54 54 — % 

4 43% 43% 43% — % 

22 IVb 8% 8% + ft 
2 38 3 28 

177 23% 19% 20% + % 

302 3Sft 34% OTA % 

131 18% 18% ISVb + % 

134 13% 13% IJVi — Vs 

3» 3 2ZVb 23 + Vi 

174 15% 15ft 15ft 

631 rtb 7% 7% + I* 

936 59 A 50% 5* + % 

D 2 Wk 21 21 — % 

136 JS 12 ins 461b 45ft 46% + % 

T JtOa 4J 54 120 42 41% 41%— Ye 

404 4%6 6% + % 

1 WA Urti Hlft — % 
7 rt 28% 29 
H 17(b 17% 17% + ft 
326 OTa 19% 20% + 1* 
23x2Tb 28ft 28% 

2 SsSfft 28% 28% + % 
37* 27ft 25% 2T6 + ft 
1x32% 32% 32% + ft 
65x19 18% Wfc + ft 

3x 17% 17% 17% — % 
551 23% 23% 23ft + % 
47 60 SFfz 59ft +T* 


26% 14ft Trchm s X0 2* 11 1360 22ft 22% 22% + % 

112 «Sb TrSaf TOJtle 9X „ VO ll«II»Ilft 

18% nib ToroCo A0 11 11 232 

5 j TnSCO 2119 4% 4% 4% + % 

u% s% Towie „ i» » » » + J 

9V» 3% Towle pf AA 9J„rt4%4%4ft + % 
41ft OTA Toy RU i 27 2599 OT* 25ft 34 

28ft 16 Trocrs J2 M119U16ftUI4ft 

23 8% TWA 2102 22% 22% 22% + H 

16 13 TWA pt 125 US 143x 15% 15ft 15% + % 

34% 18% TWAptB225 4J 84 33% 33% 33% + I* 

32ft 24ft Tramm 1XS 5.1 1* 1078 32% 32% 31ft + ft 
21% 17% Traninc 2JZ 107 29 71% 21% 21% 

1* lift TARRY 1X0 12 88 U OTA 12% 12ft + % 

21% 15ft TmCdonl.n 68 7 

57ft 44 Transco 599*118 50 

64% a Trine pf 3X7 63 

Treat of 675 9x 
2i% 19% TraoEx 234 11J 


aft 5ft Tronsai 
102 06ft TrGpf 1032 M3 
25% 22 TrGPot 
13% 8% TrnsOn 
47% 29% Tronwv 
43ft OTA Trawfd 


57 ldib 14% lOb + % 

723 509b 49% 50% + Vs 

2 61% 61 4TW + Vs 

1995 Eft 52 52% 

324 20ft 19% 28 — % 

226 9ft 8% 8% 
TTBzMOft 109ft WOft 


34ft 27% Twld pf 
T7ft 15% TwkJof 


58% SOft Travpf 
27% 22% TrfCoa 
32 7% Triaini 

35ft 23 TrlaPc 
50% 30% Tribune 
6% 4 Tricotr 
7ft 5% Trice 
17% 12% Trintv 


35% 14% TrttEng 
'rite uf 


19% 9% TrttE . 
43% 31% TuesEP 
17% OftTuttW 
20ft 14 TwinOs 
<1 30 TvcoLb 

17% 12% Tylers 


2X3 9.9 

I 25% 

75% 

25% 



Vr 


6 70 12% 

ITft 

nvt 

+ 

ft 

LXO 19 

13 28 45% 

45% 

45% 

+ 

% 

XO 11 

13 1198X39% 

39% 

39% 

+ 

% 

1 

41 22% 

77% 

22% 

+ 

% 

2X0 39 

3x33% 

33% 

.13% 

+ 

% 

110 IM 

6x17% 

ITVk 

17% 



204 44 

11 4562 46% 

45% 

*6% 

+ 

% 

4.16 74 

2S5 55 

54% 

55 

+ 

% 

3x8*1U 

171 27% 

27 

27% 

+ 

% 

JO X 

5 341 31% 

30% 

31% 


to 

1X0 2X 

10 33 35% 

34% 

35% 

+ 

% 

X4 IX 

17 314 51% 

50% 

5IW 

+ 

% 

XleHU 

7 2& 5 

4% 

5 


% 

JO 3X 

13 70 6% 

6% 

6% 

+ 

Va 

X0 3A 

323 13% 

U% 

13% 

+ 

% 

.10b J 

24 343 29% 

28% 

29% 


% 

I.W 19 

137 14ft 

15% 

16 


% 

3X0 7J 

111 261 41 

40% 

41 

+ 

ft 

X8 2X 

15 113 17 

16% 

16% 



JD 4J 

15 i m 

18% 

n% 


ft 

XO 2X 

12 165 esft 


40% 


ft 

X0 29 

12 52 on 

13% 

13% 

+ 

% 


U 


335 “ 15 
4X0 153 U 
2X4 9J 12 
2.75 113 


59% 39% UAL 
36% 28 UAL of 
17% 10% UCCEL 
30 22% UDCn 

24% 18% UGI 
25% 20ft UGI pf 
lift Bft UNCRes 
14 10ft URS 
38% 23% USFG 
44% 26% U5G( 

19% 12% UnIFrst 

71 48 Unftvr 
124% 84% UnfNV 
41ft 33ft UCarap 
64% 37ft UnCarb 14D 5J 

6% 4% urdanC 
19% 14ft LtaEiec 1X4 9J 
59% 44 UnElpf 440 1L5 
3fft 27% UnElPMMXO 12X 

72 55 UEIofL 8X0 114 

32 21% Un El pf 2X8 113 

20% 15% UnEIPf 2.13 1U 
26% 21% UnEIPf 232 MJ 
68 52% UnEIPf 744 114 

72 55 UEIpfH 8J)0 12X 

24 22 UaExpn 4lt IX 


40 34 13 
220 SB 
148 42 6 
20 U 13 
2L13t 3X 8 
232* 22 12 
1X4 44 15 


52ft 37% UnPoC 1X0 
115% 87ft UnPcpf 725 


3771x51ft 50% 51 + % 
921 31% 31 31% +; % 

196 13% 13ft 13%— ft 
Yt 26ft 25% 26ft + % 
514 22 Z!% TL +% 

200:23% 23% 23% 

229 10% 9% 10% + % 

141 n% ii n — ft 

1148 37% 36% 37% + % 
298 39% 39 3Mb 

2 15ft 15% 15% 

8 71 70 71 

106 124 122% 04 +lft 
992 34 35% 35% 

2075 60% 59% 59%—% 
207 4% 5% «k+.% 
747 19% »% 19% + % 
600c 55% 55% 55ft— % 
48 31% 31% 31%— % 
100170ft 70ft 70ft + ft 
149 26% 26% 26%+ % 

3 19ft 19ft 19ft 

5 26% 24 24% 

4901 45% 65% 65% +1 
400x 67 66% 66% —1% 

144 22ft 32% 22% + % 


37 12 1324 49ft 48% 49ft + % 


46 


70 50 URTVlPf 8X0 11X 

UnltDr 


X5* J 12 


2* 

23ft 10ft UnBriut 
18% muBrdpf 
33ft 17% UCbTVs .10 J 51 
43% 24% UnEnra 2X8 57 
24% 73ft U Ilium %m tA 4 
30ft 24 Ullta pf 3X7 137 
19 14ft Ulllupr 220 117 
31% 24ft Ulllupf 4X0 U7 
14% 11% Ulllu Pf 1X0 1X1 
25 15% Unltlnd JO 26 

43% 35% unltlna 72 

36ft 20% ujerBs 1.16 

18% 11% UtdMM 

3% 3 UPkMn 1 

38% 27ft UsoJrG ;12 A 7 

Bft 5 USHom 


£ 37 
37 II 


178 109% 108% 109% + ft 
333ttr 74 72 73 +3 

775 -3 2ft 3 

42 23% 23 23ft— ft 

3 T7% 17% 17% 

U6 32 31% 32 

1» 43% 43ft 43ft + ft 
274 24ft 23ft 23ft + % 
49 29% » » + ft 

BOQz 18% 18 ' 18% + % 

10 29% 29 rtft 

5 14ft 14% 14% + ft 
382 23ft 22% 23ft + ft 
21 42% 42ft 42% + ft 
151 35ft 35% 35ft + % 
141 18 17% 17% — ft 

11 3 2ft ~ 


1152 29% 29ft 2?%-^|5 


1223 4 5% 6 


42% 23% Vpnor. 

1JT* 9% Vor* 

25% U Vbkb 

ri 3H vnaa 

in* 9% Vests* 

13% 11% Vertran 

MV> 29% YICC^, *■- 

■3 M VoEJ»nt 8X4 MX 

W% VOE Pol »7S 07 

75 5Stb VuCrM 772 JJA 

41 SS VoEPPf un MX 

7DVJ 54 VaEPPf 7 AS M* 

27ft. 13% VWKWl J* 

S3 33*b Vonwd » 

OTA M% VoleaM 2J8 U U 


56e 34% 25% 26'-. + L 
B U 12% 13 + 

m T**k 16ft 17ft y 
» ft ft *ft— , 
eg ll* 11% n I*— v* 
M* pft rt rtft + !fe 
1447 56ft JTrt 54 +;% 

90Qk SKt IBft 11% + % 

manft n *i -h 

7l»z J7ft »% T2ft fib 
gate 67ft 6*% M%— lft 

ftmstvm n to 
» m 25ft 25ft- v 





^ Oft 42ft 43ft +2 


(ftp* lft 


31% 25% WICOR W U J 
3*ft 34 Woctav IN U » 
2 57,. uw WodGn At 2A. 
»% 4ft MMooe 
OTft in* winters 
S5S 84 main of 

-£> fMpnt XS t* 17 
25ft l7*W+»ttX 
3*ft at W6C5t 45 U 17 
OTA 28% MWKJoy IX 17 t 
s asftnottjipi Lea xz 


73 V*a 27% 27% 

<H Mft M Wt 
BlNk 24% 21% ♦'% 
29* m 4% 7% "+■ % 

2M* 27% 27 27% 

J IB T2ff T2C +3% 
7B7 21% 26ft 26% . 

392 an 24% 2*te 
J* »6 3Mi ♦ W, 
JOS 37ft 37% 37ft + ft 

i «k rat* sou.— % 


a 21 U 2X37 Xt% 38%. 31 — ft 


19 II 

U 9 

u ■ 

u 

M 1 
IX 2B 

4 Ti 




« 40 


29% 39% + ft 
*• «*. 70 20ft + ft 
147 M 53% 24 T ft 

« 2%-ift 

5m 23% 22% 21 
M 64 49% 63ft — ft 

2» 34% a% +ft 

8% 1% + ft 

« 4% 4% + % 

>7% IP* + ft 
3 W% 19% 19% M 

54 OTA 38 35ft + ft f 


U 8% 


M2 57% 54ft 57ft— ft 


32% 17ft Warns* 

34% IHkWnCa 
44% rtftWarart. L5A 

2r% m* wanes xu. 

28% 2*4* WsRMOt 1X8 
57ft 381* at 236 
34% 17% WpnttTT 1M 
44% 40% UWt .*3 

38% 20ft MU* XX 

lift mwncat 30 
131* J% *MI 
23% 14% W«WD J* 1.1 
20% 19 WeihRn Jri 2S 
35% 22 % Mini X w n 

62ft 44 WWF 16 U 1 ... _ 

50% 42 Y MF p f 4JOt U m 9M ra m 
29IA 231* VM7RK 2X0 UX II 69 3C1a 24 24ft— ft 

19% 13 fMtfil » IX 15 1573 15% 18ft 15ft — '% 

27ft 17 WeNCe A 21 n 7» a 22ft 22ft 

45 OT WttPlP 2J0 13 15 X7X 41ft 49% Aft + ft 

14% 10% VMCfTsiaX 2* <7 12% 12% 17% — ft 

9ft 3ft VtftUrL 6 ZEN 7% 7% rt> + ft 

3% WtAJrwt 120 2% 2% T.T 

am n wait of m u s 23% 23ft zr*- >* 

■% lft WCKA 4809 3% 2% 3% + tt 

SI Ttft WCMA pf 7JS 3L7 166 22% Z2ft 27% +% 

133 ttft WVoci M 3 ns 125% 124 +% 

>7 5% WMM 27*5 13% 13 1T% + % 

47% 34% wain pf 7 3M 37 . 39W+3H 

51% 26 VMnttpfC 3 <1 39 41 +3 

8% ntWMIea 3*7 7% 6% 7% + % 

1416 AkmUpfE 220 12% T3%. 12% + ft 

46% 30 ' WUTfpf 5 30% 37% 38% +1% 

17ft SYrWUTIptA » M% 13% 14%+ ft 

43% W 1 W|£ 130 2S 1317168 43% 42% 43 + ft 

41ft 3«% Westvc 132 IS 10 24* 3t 37% Jft- ft 

34 24ft WevCflt L3B *A 27 leM 2B4* 21ft toft— ft 

44ft 36ft Wrrrpf 2S3 7X 17 49ft Jtft «oft + ft 

51ft 45ft Mtewrpr 4J0 9J 25 <9% 4*ft g + ft 

19% 6ft vfMmPtt II 8ft 8 Mi> + ft 

37% MftvfWPffpiV U*t21% an* 71% 

33% HM vMmPff pf 3SOz 15V* 15ft 15ft + ft 

40ft .Whl(M IN U H 444 45% 44 45% +1% 

Z2ft 25% WtNC (JB 4X 224 31ft Kft 31ft + ft 

481* 46ft WMCpMXO *3 2 47% 47ft 47ft + ft 

45ft 37% mtirCnCQH 13 1 AW. 40V. 40ft A % 

36ft rtft VMMU 9 ItJ 23ft 22ft 23% + ft 

36% 19% Wnmck 68 30 IB - 345 3B 19ft 19% 

I7ft 6ft WleOWt 17 ITS I2U lift 12 

15ft 8 WmrsS tl 38 ITft 11% «%— % 

mt 7% wwexe .» x s «■ n , . m i3 +% 

33% 34ft iHHam US 4J 22 5E OTA 2tft 36, + ft 
9% 7 WlbnEI US 4ft 4 4ft + % 

7ft 5ft tWbhrO .18 W 31 4% 4 4 - % 

38ft 30 WlaOte U» iO 13 08x348* 34ft 34ft + % 
20ft 8% WkmbB JO U Y W M HI* lift 

0ft 5% Wflaner 177 7ft eft 7 — % 

■ft 3ft Water J- 23 7ft 7 7’U + % 

40% 30ft WtecEP 2X1 6J> t 3B7 34ft 3*ft 36% + H 
93% 72ft WOKE Pf 8X0 MB 3Bt 19 0 19 — 1% 

H 43ft WteEef 7JS tt TO t 79 7V 

40ft 28% ymscPL ZM 7 A -9 179 32ft 34% 37% + ft 

.39% rtft WRecPS 2X1 7A 9 90 3Wk M% 38ft + + 

40% 30% Wttca in 45 M 39 37ft 5ft J7ft— he 

M mVMn« J* t) Ml lift lift lift * 

53ft 35V. Watwtti 2M IX 11 I30S Sift 51ft S2*A- % 

75 50% WMwpf .230 10 I 73ft 73ft 73ft- ft 

5ft 2ft wndAr 347 ft* 4ft 4ft— H 

87ft 54% wkrfv IXOalfl H 87888% U% 88% +1ft 
4ft rthWwt&r 60 M 3ft 3ft + V* 

16 M WvMX J2 2X 26 » lift lift llft-M 

ZM 15% Wvnne it V Q 55 1*% 15% 16% + ft 


; f ? 

: i ' 




i^antnn 


'5Mb 35ft Xerae 200 SX It 3081 54ft 54 
55ft 48% Xerox Pf 5L45 9X 
29 nftxrn* a un 
ua as » 

.13 IX 63 

A 111 


S4ft— » 


3385 55ft 55% SB* + % 
TT 21 ft 21 % 21 ft + % 


30ft 24ft ZMeCp 

18 7ft Zooata 

59 32ft ZdVrvc 

25 16ft ZenWiE 

2lft tSft.Zera* 
41% SftZumta 


-32 

U2 


16 17 
3 A 15 


4V 29ft 28ft 29V. + ft 
SO tft Bft Bft— % 
930 5»ft 59% 59% + ft 
1078 17% 17% 17ft + % 
49Xl*ft 19ft 19ft 
20 39ft 38ft 39% + % 



iT»dMTir jlilk 
nSNPK.faW! 

-c'ftMttiii 


NVSE WKsJis-Ltms 





NEW HIGHS 94 


Aereflex 
AOdStra 
AraintGppf 
Arvfnbi2pf 
BeoeflCp 
CIGNA 410pf' 
CocoCoki 
CamNG 
DetE275pf 
PtFIdBcpfB 
GenHast* 
GIAHPae 
IntFIcv Fr 
-Kellogg Co 
UncPlocFd 
McKesson 
OcrtP25Qpf 
PepBavss 
RaMnPur 
ReoBkodlpf 
SatlleMD* 
StoJeyGant 
“ jslntl 
wrigter 


A)aPw9pf AfbertoCuls 
Am Baker AmBasPnf 
AiaWatrWks AmesOptwl 


AVEMCO 
Benef 550Pf 
CarsPtrs 
ColumGas 
Conflinfo 
DowChem 
FtHowdg 
Gen Mills 
GHW575Pf 
lntNrUi440 
Limited s 
LaneStalnd 
McKesson pf 
OBEd7T2rrf 
Polo redd 
Ravchem 
RevnlnpfB 
ScheraPWi 
StaneWeb 
TrlbPoeCa 
Zarres 

NEW LOWS 


Avon Prod 

Burlagf ind 

CetanafA 

CornJMell 

CorngGls 

DakePnm 

GenOxp 

GenRecarp 

HarkSneo 

IntmBakr 

UncNart 

MascoCp 

NatEduc 

OhEd864Pf 

PSEG962pf 

RepNY 

ReynlnpfC 

SvceCps 

Sysco 

Ualrcnralpf 


AJUSanpfF 

AmimGra 

AmSauBcp 

BectonDIck 

CIGNA Cp 

OflGngpf 

CwE237Pf 

CroYRach* 

FMNotMtg 


GeriBqtte 
etteCo 



*$<rn*mw 


Acme ciev 


GCA Cp 
nPS 


AlktSgn pfD 
KNEngn 


BonkAmoalp ComTech 
Playboy En RB kid 


Gomrowlities 


Nov. 8 

dost 

High Low BM Ask Oi'ga 

SUGAR 

French francs per metric ton 
Dec 1X09 1X00 1X94 1X05 — TS 

Mar 1X24 1X08 1X14 1X17 —11 

Mav 1X5* 1X43 >X43 1X48 —10 

Au« N.T. N.T. 1X84 1X98 — 8 

Oct 1X20 1XM 1X04 1X22 —11 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1X24 1X48 —5 

Est. voL: ixno lots of 50 tons. Prev. actual 
safes: 1X21 lots. Open Interest: 25J81 


COCOA 

French francs per 100 kg 
DOC 1X70 1X34 1X44 

Mar 1,900 1X85 1X95 

May N.T. N.T. 1,920 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1X30 

Sep N.T. N.T. 1,945 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1.950 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1,960 


1X70 +27 

1,900 +24 

1.943 + 38 

— +30 

— +35 

— +15 

— +75 


Esi. vdj 27 tots of 10 fans. Prev. actual 
soles: 64 lets. Open Interest: 475 


COFFEE 

French (Tana per 1M kg 
Nov N.T. N.T. 2X44 2.1D2 +5 

Jen 2,110 2X93 2X*5 3.104 —32 

Mar 2.115 2X35 2X80 2,110 — 20 

Mav N.T. N.T. — 2,110 —5 

JIV N.T. N.T. — 1135 +20 

Sep N.T. N.T. LUO 1143 —5 

Now N.T. N.T. — USD +5 

Est. voL: 14 lets el 5 tan*. Prev. actual safes: 
24 fots. Open Interest: 345 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


S&PKK) 

InartTOpw 


Options 


Abo. 8 


Site 

COte- Lari 


PdMjut 


Prkx Rev 

Dk 

Jao 

n» 

R0v 

Ok 

JM 

to* 

1U 

_ 



_ 


_ 

in* 

1/» 

_ 

IN 

IM 

1+5 

Wa 

_ 

im 

l/U 

% 

5/M 

175 

IM 

n 

C 

in* 

l/U 

% 

Yl 

13/16 

180 

6% 

vo 

TO 

M 

W6 

13/14 1% 

1% 

185 

1% 

M 

4U> 

4% 

% 

JVM 3 

3to 

no 

% 

i 

1% 

2% 

3% 

5% 

4 

716 

IH 

1/11 

3/16 

% 

1 

— 

11 

11% 

— 


Total eo« nhane 272L721 
Trial cofl seen mt 536685 
Tririsat vriwes MSffiU 
TsW eat earn M.72MH 
maez: 

HiebUhJ] LoviMJS 

Source; CaOE. 


CtaseiSU7+U2 


DM Futures 

Options 


79. Germgi l/ka^QS/OB marks, emit ptrmark 


Strike Colb-Sritte 


Abr. 6 

PetsXetHe 


Dk 

Mor 

Jun 

DK 

Mar 

Jon 

233 

in 

US 

0X2 

U1 

053 

NJL 

3J7 

ZB 

0.11 

0X7 

-U3 

0X7 

1X5 

2X7 

mss 

093 

1.18 

024 

US 

1X9 

0X1 

Ml 

1X3 

0X8 

OJO 

US 

IJ5 

2X4 

119 

tun 

047 

0X9 

— 

— 

2X7 


EstimatHtgniint.Tti48 
calls; Thu,vol.M06ep« U4IJU - 
Pa«: Thu. *eLU3i own im Ji-483 


Source: CME. 


Goi^oiiities 


Previous 
■id Ask 


Aba. 3 

HONG- KONG COLO FUTURES 
UXJ per ounce 

Close 

High Low Bid * 

Nov _ N.T. N.T. 322X0 324X0 323X0 325X0 
Dec - K.T. N.T. 324X8 32AD0 326J» 321X0 
Jan „ N.T. N.T. 324JW 328J» 320X0 39000 
F*b _ 329X0 329X0 328X0 330X0 330X0 332X0 
API _ N.T. N.T. 33U» 333X0 333X0 33SJW 
Jun — N.T, N.T. 335X0 337X0 337X0 339X0 
Aug -. 339X0 339X0 339X0 341X0 342X0 344X0 
Oct — N.T. N.T. 343X0 345X0 346X0 348X0 
Volume: 24 lots of 100 a*. 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UXJ per ounce 


High 

323.90 

N.T. 


FOb — 

Volume.' IZI lets of 100 az. 


Prev. 

Low 

32X40 

N.T. 


Settle 
32360 
329 JO 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malavsfan cents per kilo 


■M 

Dec 112X0 

Jan . 183X0 

Feb 184X0 

Mar 185X0 

Volume: 0 lot*. 


Ask 

183X0 

184X0 

185X0 

186X0 


Previous 
BM A* 
1B1X0 182X0 

182X0 183X0 

T83XO 184JW 
184X0 18SX0 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kilo 
aose 


R551 Dec- 
RS5 1 Jon— . 
R55 2 Dec— 
RSS 3 Dec — 
RSS4 Dec — 
RS5 5DK. 


BM 

158X5 

149.00 

151X0 

149X0 

143X0 

.140X0 


I58J0 

159X0 

132X0 

i«niw 

147X0 

142X0 


Previ ou s 
BM Ask 

157 JS 138JS 
15BXD 139X0 
180X0 1SU0 

14650 14950 

1A44® 14450 

139 JO 141 JO 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Mcrtanku rtoggHs per » tans 


BM Aik 



May . 
Jfy — 
Sep. 


455 

458 

485 

704 
703 

705 
705 

TO S 
700 


684 

704 

7W 

710 

710 

710 

710 


Volume: 16 lots of 25 tan* 
Source: Reuters, 


Prev Mas 
BM Aril 

690 640 

445 47S 

600 682 

697 702 

705 • -715 
710 720 

7)0 m 

710 720 

690 720 


llS/freasuries 


Abr. 8 


Df SCOIMt 
Offer BM 


Prrr. 
YSM . Ytgid 


hmmtfmai 

ftaionniiMii 
i-v«r bw 


7J3 

7JJ 

7JT 


7J1 
7J5 
7 33 


7X7 

766 

7X4 


7J4 

7J2 

7X8 


BM Offer 
a-warband 1041873210420/32 
Source: Salomon Brothers. 


YUM 

mu 


Prw. 

YMd 

10.17 


Merrill LvncilTreesgrv hM«u 132.10 
Qmiee far th« day: + U7 
Average VMM; 9JI % 

Source: Merrill Lyrrctu . ' 


London 

Commodities 


Nod. 8 


don 

sugar n^ 1 ^ ■“ - 

IturUng per metric ton 


Pr evie ws 
bm Ast 


Dec 


Aug 

Oct 


Jly 


Dec 


Mar 


Jhr 


JJLT. N.T. 14QX0 M4X0 141X0 143X0 

m-SP ’S-S? ,s ’- 40 1“J» 158X0 159J20 
N.T, N.T. 16360 16660 144J0 144X0 
173X0 168X0 17060 171X0 169 JO 14960 
^volume: 1J53 lots of 50 tans. 

Starting per metric taa . 

Dec 1X73 1629 1X44 1X49 1X31 1X38 

Mor I-S l w IJOO 1X79 ixm 

1*2? 1J31 1J32 1.708 U09 

1*725 1J34 1,734 

151 1*25 !*22 1J54 V42 

W” wy 1J75 1JTO 1J37 1J4S 

mar N.T. N.T. 1JB6 1J88 1J75 1J87 

Volume: 4303 lots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Starting per metric tan 

]X70 1X40 1X30 1X34 1X70 1X71 
\m 1X49 1X» 1X53 1X05 1.908 
1XH 1X51 1X51 1X54 1X94 1X00 
1XOT 1X4S 1X40 1X45 1.901 1X02 
1X25 1X50 1X50 1X85 1X05 1,910 
J.9J5 1X45 1X75 1XW 1X05 1X10 
1X05 1X05 1X75 1X17 1X95 1X15 
Volume: 6J90 lets of 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

UX. dollars per metric tan 
NBV J?® 76535 EXP. 268J5 34*75 247X0 
2KB 241 JS 24425 24460 263J3 264X0 

»060 241 JO 26 U3 241X0 241 J5 

257X0 234X0 257 J5 257X0 257X0 2S7JX 

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1 3 5 55 233X0 234X0 235X0 234.75 wa n 
moo 233X0 232X0 m» mxo Sm 
N.T. N.T.23TXOmOTmOOmOO 
Volume: L181 lots of 100 tans. 

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mS v w'S H 39 2747 

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Starting per metric ton 
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8*48X0 8549X8 

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Commodity amt Unft 
Coffee 4 Santos, lft 


Print data 44730 38 %, vd _ 

Steel Witort IPIli.i. tan 

Iron 2 Fdry. PnMa. tan 

Steel scran No 1 hvy PHt * 
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Silver N.Y.ai 

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213X0 213X8 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NO\ r EMBER 9-10, 1985 


COMPANY NOTES 



eiitures 


- . Reuters 

■r ■' • MADRID —Spain's partly star 
^-ovncd iriephonecompauy 
*■ •! C&mpania Telefonica National de 

> ; ?; EspanaSA, plans to move into mil. ’ 

.i'^v2v itaiy Cb nnmin i c aiions to cash in on 
\ Spain’s NATO membership, its 
; "■>< ±a ir m an, Lons Solan a, said in an 
- j :i. interview. Friday. 

; ^V. : CTNE has also joined a group 
. {*} that is bidding for United Press 
- International, the troubled US.' 

- news agency, he disclosed. 

*= i.- “We are talking lo several poten- 
partners about supplying 
ow-bow for mfiitaiy-conmumi- 
j/ cations systems ” be said. Possible 
, ’ t ‘- partners include Ericsson Informa- 

‘ don Systems of Sweden and Ameri- 
can Telephone & Telegraph of the 
* United States, he said. 

->>s “Spain is making enormous 
'±*‘? strides to modernize its -armed 
•' ^ i • forces, and we want to be in that 
‘ market,” he said. “We also see a 
C i.? , market in the export of defense 
r. communications systems to t 
: ’ *• America from Spain.” 

• He added: “We aim to become a 
; j 0 ?■ serious competitor of U.S. and Eu- 

• ; • ; • ropean firms seeking Spanish de- 

- : - fense contracts:” 

• l • - Mr. Solana said that a CINE 
i’ affiliate, Telefoma Sistemas SA, 

■ « a ? was handling the negotiations, 


which should be concluded by next 

:momh. 

CTNE, whichwas listed tMs year 
on the London. Paris, Frankfurt 
and Tokyo stock exchanges, plans- 
to seek aKstingon the New York 
Stock Exchange next year, he add. 

“We have not decided wheth» to 
float commercial paper in the U.S. 
first or go directly for. a listing,” 
Mr. - Solana said. “Negotiations 
with the Securities and Exchange 
Commission, will be completed by 
the end of the year, so we will be 
ready to place our shares in New 
York in. 1986.” 

Mr. SoLana also disclosed that 
CTNE.is part of one of the three 
group now bidding for UPL “Our 
aim is to refloat die company as a 

working, news agency rather than 

sell off bits of it,” he said. ' 

. He said the CINE group includ- 
ed the Russo/ Ameriway Network, 
a Houston-based financial and 
real-estate group, as well as several 


Mr. Solana said that CINE 
would be able this year, for the first 
time in its corporate history, to 
finance its capital spending wi th its 
own equity. “Wenave enough to 
cover this year’s capital outlay, so 
we have not deckled whether to go 
for a capital increase,” he said. 


Scmto Steamship 

Restructuring 

hDeodbcked 

• Reuters 

i TOKYO— Efforts by Sanko 

Steamship -Co.'s receiver to 
compile a draft reconstruction 
plan are deadlocked because 
many trading bouses that fi- 
nanced the building of about 
! 100 bulk carriers for the compa- 
ny are refusingto provide addi- 
tional help, industry sources 
said Friday. 

The receiver, Mitsubide 
Miyata, was expected to hand 
his report to the Tokyo District 
' Court by the end of last month, 
but mil now need more time, 
the sources said. •' 

Sanko, which has debts of 
520 billion yen ($257 billion), 
received court protection from 
creditors in August. The trading 
houses, which want Mr. Miyata 
to guarantee . payment of the 
ships’ bunkering and stevedore 
charges, include Sumitomo 
Cotp. and Marubeni Corp. 

Mr. Miyata asked for II bil- 
lion yen from nine trading 
houses'. The main creditor 
banks, Tokai Bank LfcL, Daiwa 
Bank Ltd. and the Long-Term 
Credit Bank of Japan Ltd^ have 
agreed to extend 20 billion yen. 


financing the U.S. Deficit Abroad 


w H 


• i\ . (Continued from Page 9) 

T] economy is stable.” said Nariman 
"t Behravesh. chief U.S. economist 
p. I for Wharton Econometrics Inc, a 
-.j; Philadelphia -based forecasting 
’ company. “If anything is done to 
•- t ; ■ shake that confidence, it would cre- 
. f &' ate problems. For rnstwnc^ if there 
z - 1 is a sudden decline in the value of 
: n| the dollar, say 25 percent, I could 
'■ / foresee interest rates going up by 1 
\ to 2 percent.” 

j Even so, foreign investors are 
?- 1', still “a small piece of the pie,” said 
/ •' \ Frank Cavanaugh, director of the 
i 7 ; Treasury's office erf government fi- 
; - nance and market analysis. He and 

- ! 7" other experts note that outstanding 
a foreign holdings of Treasuries to- 
T "* Staled $2013 biSion in June, rough- 
.7 - ' ly $100 billion more than in 1980. 

. - s i|Yei total federal debt soared -by 

- .$864.7 billion, to S1.779 trillion, 

’• l ining the same period. 

7’ jj,*Of greater importance to the 
" -/-/Treasury. Mr. Cavanaugh sad, is 
,'\total foreign investment in the 
; ; • United Stales this year, which is 
'■> expected to be about $130 billion. 

» “This is the figure that needs to 

i .-• .■.be watched," Mr. Cavanaugh said. . 
' ;’f: : “As long as total. foreign invest- 
/ ment in the U5. remains at conent 
. - -Mevels^or M levels Sightly less, there ^ 

'* r ‘ would be little effect on Treasury 

- • ’ ^ interest rates, because the total vof- 
— ume of dollars in the economy 

I IioIk-I m would be stable” . 
lll^Itvu.nv ^ avanaugh said he did not 

■■■■■■■■■■expect the total foreign investment 
>> in the United States to dedine any- 
... . . time soon. Other experts agreed. 

^The factors that have, compiled 
. i- foreign investors to buy Treasury 

\ securities and other American fi- 
_ :1 nancial instruments, including low 

^inflation and the high value of the 
l :;'i foliar, are likely to remain largely 
--iinchaaged over the next year, they 
: predicted. 

" - “Foreigners are buying U.S. se- 
.. _ '■! curitjes because they really do not 

. ~ have a better place to go,” said Dan 
Napoli, piesideni of Merrill Lynch 
: ■- Goveniment Securities. “We have 
the laigest, most dynaxnic, most liq- 
•' u *'■ uid and safest markets in the world. 

• It’s no accident the dollars we're 
sending oat of this country are 
— coming back in security par- 

u4.ifr ch “ a - 


Japanese investors in recent 
years have flocked to Treasury 
bonds because they saw them as a 
risk-free investment, said Nobu- 
nhtsu Kaganri, chief economist for 
Nomura Investment Management 
Co. The dollar, he said, had ap- 
peared- impervious to efforts to 
weaken Hs value, and interest rates 
on Treasury issues offered about S 
percentage points in higher yields 
than comparable Japanese govern- 
ment securities. 

Nearly two weeks ago, a move by 
the Bank of Japan, the country’s 
central bank, to raise Japanese in- 
terest rates stored concern among 
analysts and dealers, because it was 
feared that major Japanese inves- 
tors might withdraw funds from 
U.S. securities markets. 

Yields on Japanese bonds rose - 
from 5.8, to 6.6 percent, as a result 
of the central bank’s move. At the 
-same time, U5L rates have been 
fallen, so much so that the interest 
differential between comparable 
. 10-year Japanese bands and UJ5. 
bonds has narrowed to less than 35 
percent. 

The total investment in foreign 
braids by Japanese investors, in- 
cluding Amoican securities; bad 
if already flowed from arecordlagh 
of $8.4 biflkm in July to S2.6 billion 
in September, according to Japan’s 
Ministry of Finance. Most of the 
slowdown took place before, the 
drop in the value of the dollar, 
following the Group of Five’s an- 
; nramcement Sept. 22 that they 
would seek to lower the dollar, and 
the rise in Japanese rates. 

In recent weeks, Mr. Kagan h 
said that Japanese interest in all 
foreign bonds has been .subdued. 
Other Japanese financial experts 
said it was too early to tell, but 
noted dial interest would return 
When investors in that country were 
confident that the. yen had stabi- 
lized a gains t the dollar. 

Japanese investors who purchase 
foreign braids with yen funds are 
the most skittish, said Lokhi Ban- 
jeri, vice president and manager of 
funding and securities at Chase 
Manhattan Bank in Tokyo. 

He said that the primary pur- 
chasers of U.S: government braids 
were life insurance companies and 


trust bank pension-fund managers 
who wanted to buy and hold the 
bonds as a secure investment. 

These investors were attracted 
by higher interest rates and tended 
to use yen funds to buy bonds. 
Since they are the most susceptible 
to currency and interest-rate fluc- 
tuations, these investors have been 
more reluctant about new pur- 
chases in recent weeks. 

Mr. Ban jeri predicted that inves- 
tors would return to the UiL Trea- 
sury market when they fed that the 
yen. has s tabilized against the dol- 
lar, perhaps at what is believed to 
be the target levd erf 200 yen to the 
dollar. . 

Canadian Mining Unifs Plan 

Bauer. t 

VANCOUVER, British Colum- 
bia — Erickson Gold Mines Ltd. 
said Friday that it planned to dose 
its Erickson mill for up to three 
months starting Nov. 23 to upgrade 
equipment 


Uniroyal to Sell 
Chemical Unit to 
Pay Buyout Debt 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Umroyai Inc. 
announced Friday that it would sdl 
most erf its Uniroyal Chemical Co. 
unit to help pay off debts incuned 
in a leveraged buyout (rf die parent 
company in September. 

A prospectus will be circulated 
next week to those interested in 
buying the subsidiary, which will 
be sold as an entity and not as 
individual business units, accord- 
ing lo a spokeswoman, Renee Po- 
toskv. Uniroyal is not negotiating 
with any potential buyers at this 
time, she added. 

The subsidiary produces agricul- 
tural chemicals, industrial chemical 
additives, specialized rubber and 
plastic products, and other special- 
ty chemicals. Minus its plantation 
operations, which are not fra sale, 
the unit had $553 million in sales 
during 1984, the company said 

The management of Uniroyal 
one of the world's largest rubber 
producers, and the New York in- 
vestment firm of Gayton Dubilier 
Inc., took the company private in 
September to prevent a hostile 
takeover by Carl G I calm. 

In the buyout, Mr. Icahn agreed 
to accepL $5.9 million in return Tor 
dropping his $18-a-share bid to 
Uniroyal shareholders. 

Hope, Fear 
On Economy 

(Contmoed from Page 9) 

— made the list of countries with 
the biggest opportunities. Even 
more revealing, nearly a quarter of 
the respondents said they had re- 
duced or divested themselves of op- 
erations in overseas markets be- 
. cause of increased financial risk, 
while another 20 percent said they 
were planning to do so. 

One major difference now from 
1929 could well be both the risk- 
averseness and risk-awareness so ■ 
widespread among corporate ft- 
nancial officers and institutional 1 
investors, as well as in Washington 
and other capitals of the major in- 
dustrial countries. The difficulties 
of dealing with the long list of 
problems ranging from the United 
States budget deficit to the overval- 
ued dollar are serious and cannot 
be easily solved. But the problems 
are well known, and a start has 
been made toward solving them. 


Maryland Sawing 
I& Put Into Receivership 


The 'Associated Press 

BALTIMORE — A judge placed 
Old Court Savings & Loan Associ- 
ation into receivership on Friday 
and halted nearly all interest pay- 
ments on its more than $500 mil- 
lion, in deposits. 

- Deposits have been frozen at Old 
Court since May, when troubles at 
the Baltimore thrift unit led to a 
c ri sis among Maryland's then-pri- 
vately insured savings and loans. 

Circuit Judge Joseph H.H. Ka- 
plan, who has been overseeing 
Maryland's conservatorship of the 
S&L, gave attorneys for Old 
Court’s owner, Jeffrey Levitt, until 
Tuesday to try to persuade him to 
adopt a less drastic plan than re- 
ceivership, a form erf bankruptcy. 

But, the judge said, “Right now, 
the alternative is pie in the sky.” 

Mr. Kaplan gave the receiver, the 
Maryland Deposit Insurance 
Fund, authority to distribute funds 


to depositors ahead of other credi- 
tors who normally have priority. 

The legislature has asked the 
governor to come up with a general 
distribution plan by the first of 
next year. 

Under conservatorship, someone 
is appointed to manage an institu- 
tion's day-to-day affairs. 

The request to place Old Court 
in receivership was made by the 
fund, set up to insure temporarily 
savings ana loans that once were 
privately insured. 

The conservatorship status of 
Old Court was due to expire next 
Wednesday. 

Foreign Slakes Up in Taiwan 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — Foreign investment 
in Taiwan rose to $509 million in 
the first 10 months of 1985 from 
$395 million a year earlier, the Eco- 
nomics Ministry reported Friday. 


Floailn^Raie Notes 


Dollar 











Borden Inc, the UiL food and 
dairy concern, said that it expects 
earnings in 1985 to increase more 
than 10 percent from last year's 
restated $359 a share; 

CSR Ltd. said its subsidiary. 
Western Collieries Lid, of Austra- 
lia. has signed a contract worth 1 
billion Australian dollars (S6612 
million) to supply the Slate Energy 
Commission of Western Australia 
with steaming coal 

Gebrueder Sober AG, the Swiss 
engineering group, said orders in 
flic first nine months of this year 
rose 9 percent to 3.7 billion Swiss 
francs ($1.76 billion) from 3.4 bit 
lion francs a year earlier, and said it 
expects to swing back into profit 
this year after a 18- mil li on -franc 
loss in 1984. 

Hochtief AG, the West German 
construction company, said its U.S. 
subsidiary. Hochtief Inc., has 
bought a 40-percem stake in 
Dames & Moore, a U5. engineer- 
ing company. Financial details 
were not given. 

M esserschmi tt-Bdlko w-Blobm 
GmbH, West Germany's largest 
aerospace group, said it is cooper- 
ating with Total of France to pro- 
duce amorphous silicon for solar 
power cells. 

AUTO CONVERSION I 1 


Mmebea Co. of Japan is wasting 
its assets in defensive moves and 
will face legal moves to stop the 
wastage, the bidding consortium. 
Trafalgar Holdings Ltd- and Glen 
International has warned. The 
U.S.-British group offered $1.4 bil- 
lion fra Mmebea last month. 

Sanyo Electric Co. of Japan said 
it would build a plant in Mexico to 
produce cadmium-nickel batteries 
intended mainly fra U.S. telecom- 
munication equipment makers. 


The plant is expected to begin pro- 
duction in the middle of next year. 

Siemens AG of West Germany 
said it has agreed with Motorola 
Inc. of the United States to create a 
packaging and mounting standard 
tor certain electrical components. 

W.R. Grace & Co. has with- 
drawn for “internal reasons” from 
an agreement that would have 
turned over operation of the B. Alt- 
man stores in New York to Hutzler 
Brothers Co.. 


EVTEMATIOm POSITIONS 


PERSONNEL WANTED 

Following personnel required to work 28/28 in 
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• 4 Toolpushers 5-10 years experience jack-up 

• 2 Drillers 10 years experience 

• 2 Electricians "SCR" 

• 2 Mechanics 

• 2 Rig movers 

• 2 Barge engineers 

Please send full C.V. to: Box No. 034168, 
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LYTERISATIONAL 

POSITIONS 


ANTENNA 

DESIGN 

ENGINEER 

Tta gfltonrta SpAOdSst Company, o 
leading conununtconafi antenna manu- 
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limed Stales, a seeking an Amenta 
Design Engineer with a BSE or Engh 
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following: 

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history ro-. 

Susan Simiona 
Personnel Manager 

THE ANTENNA 
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2030 Antwerp. Belgium 
Tel 323/542 62401x35207 Trans 


ROM STOCK 

Mercedes 500 S3, donond blue, 
'S5 new car, DM84000 
Porsche 928 S. automatic; black, 
H5 new car, DM89 .000. 
other mdees and models upon request. 
Same day re gstration posable. 

ICZKOVTTS 

Ooridnsinwa 36, CK8027 Zurich 
Tet 01/202 76 10. Triau 815915. 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTL DHJVERY 

We keep o large nock of 
mad ccr brands 
Tat 02/648 55 13 
Telex 65658 
42 rue Lera, 

1050 Brunch. 


EXCAUBUR. CLBC, STUIZ, 
XIMMER. JBBBtTTVR. 

Franc* (93) 25 & 91 
The 479550 AUTO MC 


Mercedes 300 SO Turbo DM 
(1983. faaory new, no mieaae with al 
extras. Tab AJ>. Cation, (OS 71 172021 
even in g s between 911 


New/used, hamedkda delivery. Fa AVL 
Tab Germany (3) 62344092, lhn4649B6 

M_B. 300! 

Rafis Boye 

Lnmbcxgf 

308 GTB 
03/231 St 
MBtCEDH 
/aeon 
DM954100 
(01713173 
TAX Free 
ATX, NV 
Bel^um. 

RACING DHVBL Spndst in pur- 


PORTUGAL 

7 DAYS INCUiStVE TOURS 

FROM PARIS TO: 


COSTA VBB3E (OPORTO) -FF2461 

ALGARVE 

MADBRA 

Ptooso Co w* p C f 

Paris Tel: 4742 5557, Tbn 220550 


FROM MOAN TO: 


L740.000 

1740.000 
COSTA VERDE (OPORTO) 1845 ,000 
ALGARVE L5 98,000 

1840.000 

Please Carad' 

Mans Tet 4750659/ 422321 4 
Tlx: 321280/ RXPOR 

For other proy uu e end dstciad 
■tformonon. ask your 

TRAVEL AGENT 


FOR YOUR STATS IDE BOOK Needs, 
write or phone; BOOK CALL, c/a 
New Canaan Bookshop, 59 Bm Si- 
New Canaan CT 06840 USA. 203- 
966-5470. Wri orders welcome. 


HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


GENEVA 

RESIDENCE D£ FRANCE 
4 A*, de France. CH-1202 Geneva 
TeL 0041 22/31 14 79 
Beautiful, firo dost, 
lesfawied fumiihed apartments and 
Studios. Mly equipped latthen. 
ckriy mrad sennee. 

Weekly and ntonlHy rams. 
Breeden) loearion. 


EDUCATION 




HIB4CH TEACHBt, quofified, all laveh 
. pedopogique. Very amerienced. 

FOR SALE & WANTED Spec* B^Wt-Teh Pans42 24 45 99 



ANTIQUES 


HEALTH SERVICES 


OVBtWBC 
bomb - ck 



NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE FROM STOCK 

Best service shippmg, I ne ur u t tp , 

RUTE INC. 

TAUNUSSTR. 52, 6000 FSANKRJKT 
W Germ., tel (0)0-232351, tb 411559 

PORSCHE AND MHKBS 
it OW burinws 

New and/or used, dl types, mmadate 
detvery worldwide. Easy payment 
farms. Use <x»r know-how and fhonad 
strength. 

AUTO-GUTE 5TB94E 
Sacs net ill 314. 4330 Mmfiwim 
W. Gennemy. Tet ffl 206-50589 
Tbt 8561143 UNff D 


LEGAL SERVICES 



US IMMK3RATK3N vow, Attys-SpOas 
& Rodiy 1925 Brickrf Av, Mumi R 
33129. Tel-. (305) 6439600, tx 44140. 


[Vrtlrf»hTltri 


ICBANDAIR 
IAST MMUIE FARE 
reservation authorized wkhn 
3 days prior to departure 

UNIQUE PRICE 


white/blue loaded, 


LMJLSA 

OFFOAL ROLLS ROYCE 
DEALS FOR BB.GRJM 

TAX FREE CARS 
ROUS ROYCE BBfTlEY 
RANGE and LANDROVK 
SAAB 

Aba Und Ccn 
rue MIODQBCXJRG 7442 
1170 Brunets 
TEL: 2^73 33 92 
TlXi 20377 


»X> SEC 86. dher/blod, loaded. 
DM108AD 

PORSCHE 944 TURBO COUPE T6, 
ned/Uack, DM71JM0 
OC COMPANY 
Tet Gemwnv (0) 2151-561091 
Tlx: 8531187 CUC D 


new cars from stock 

'86 PORSO* 930 Turbo 
■86 PORSCHE convertible Turbo 
, B6500SL.Bksh/bksh + red/ cream 
'86 JAGUAR 3.6 convertible 
Other modeh aviriafala 
FA. A.VX, Tot Germany W 
6234 4092 or 4621, Tbu 464986. 


NEW YORK, Vf A5HNGTQN (BWI) 
CHICAGO or DETROff 
from Luxembourg 


• way • dbaut U 
[DM 499, BPR 91 
[SFE 449, FFR If 


HR 


about USS 
(BR 19,980, 5FR 


For further infarmaiion and resarvraion 
cal ICHANDAiS 
Frankfurt (069) 29 99 78 

Brussels (02] 218 0880 

Luxemburg 4798 2470 

Zurah pi] 363 0000 

Paris {1} 47 42 52 26 


ROM 5T0CK 

]B6 Auti 5000 S. US ^ecx. 300 97500 
SL/SXJ SB_ All other mokes new raid 
wM Phone 32/3/2326353 or 32/3 
/2318336. 71* 35291 T8AHM 3. or 
write POB 29, 2000 Antwerp. Brigium 


JAGUAR, R0VB, NBKEUS 
BMW, SAAB, VOLVO, PORSO« 
Bed prices. CaD Holland 

VAN LAARHOVEN B.V. 

PO Bax 2178, 5600 CD Bndkoven 
40-424055, The 51213 HBLA NL 


GIRLS Al® GUYS <4 continents want 

K pdi. Details free Hermes Verlaq, 
U0660/N, D-1000 Bedin IT, 
West Germany. 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

In the 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Phone: Call your local IHT representative with your text. You 
will be informed of the Cast immediately, and once prepayment is 
made your ad will appear within 48 hows. 

Coet: The basic rate is 59J0 per Kite per day + (ocri taxes. There ora 
25 letters, signs and qxseesm the firdfine and 36 in the following tries. 
Minimum space is 2 ines. No abbreviations aaropted. 

Crorfit Cards: American Express. Diner's dub. Eurocard, Master 
Card, Access rax) Visa. 


HEAD OFFICE 


Paris: (For classified only}: 

47-47-4600. 

EUROPE 

Amsterdam: 26-36-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-2421 
Brussels: 343-1899. 
Copenhagen: (Dl) 32 944a 
ftwikfart! (069} 72-67-55. 
Lausanne: 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
London: pi) 836-4802. 
Madrid: 455-2891/455-3306. 
Mlhm: (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (02) 41 29 53. 
Rome: 679-3437. 

Sweden (08) 7569229. 

Tel Avhn 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 

UNITED STATES 

New York: (212) 752-3890. 
West Coash (415) 362-8339. 

SOUTH AFRICA 
B ry a ms to n: 421 399. 


LATIN AMERICA 


Buenos Abet: 41 4031 
(Depr.312) 

Caracas: 33 14 54 
Guayaquil: 51 4505 
lima: 417 857 
Panama: 69 05 11 
San Jas« 22-1055 
Santiago: 6961 555 
Saa Paulo: 852 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bahrain: 246303. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 

Lebanon; 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar: 416535. 

Said Arabia: 

Jeddcdu 667-1500. 

UA.E.: Dubcri 224161. 

FAR EAST 

Bangkok: 390-06-&. 

Hang Kong: 5-213671. 
Jakfota: 510092. 

Manila: 817 07 49. 

Sooul: 735 87 73. 

Singapore; 222-2725. 
Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Melbourne: 690 8231 
Sydney: 929 56 39. 957 43 20. 
Perth: 328 98 33. 

Paddington, Queensland: 

36934 53. 


wS | ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & 


ESCORTS & GUIDES ESCORTS & GUIDES i ESCORTS & GUIDES 


Non Dollar 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SBVKE 

USA ft WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 
330 W. 56th St, N.YX. 10019 U5A 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CRSXT CARDS AND 
CHESS ACCEPTS© 

P rivate Menbeti^e Available 

TWi aw leri -w Inning sendee bos 
been featured as the lap A mast 
exdosive Escort Service by 
USA * i n tore nS n mJ oews media 
fadudag radio and TV. 


* USA ft TRANSWORLD 

A-AMER/CAN 

BCORT SERVICE 
EVSYWHHE YOU ABS OR GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Con free from UA-. l-H»237-«92 
Ctd free from Florida: 1 •600-2824)892. 
Lowefi Eastern welcomes you badd 



LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

Portman Escort Agency 

67 Chatetn Street, 

Teh 486 3724 or 486 1158 

Al major credit cards accepted 


* LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
402 7600 or 499 2225 


ARI5TOCATS 

tendon Escort Sendee 

128 Wigmore St, London W.l. 
Afi major Credit Cards AagMd 
Tel, 437 47 41 / 47« 

12 noon • midnight 


LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK ESCORT SBWKS 
212-885-1666 


CAPRICE-NY 

ESCORT StBVKS IN NEW YORK 
TELi 212-737 329). 


ZUR1CH-GENEVA 

G04G8TS ESCORT SBtVKE. 
TH.- 01/363 DS 64 -022/34 41 86 


ESCORT SEEVKX. 

51 Beauchamp Woe. SW1 
Tet 01 564 6513/2749 (4-12 pen) 


Ewart Servian Tel: (020J 32&QD. 


ZURICH 

CriraBne Escort Sevia 
Tel: 01/252 61 74 


* JASMINE * 

AMSTERDAM ESCORT SERVICE 


ZURICH 

AIS05 ESCORT SERVICE 
7H_- 01/47 55 B2 


MADRS) SHADOWS 

Tet 2509603 ***e*. 
BCORT SERVICE. CRfiXT CARDS 


ROME CUJI BJBOPE BCOKT 

& Guide ServictTet 06/589 2604- 589 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pro) 


** GH«VA-HRST ** 

Ewart Service + weekend 32 34 1 S 


GENEVA * BEAUTY* 

ESCORT SERVICE. 022/29 51 30 


GENEVA ESCORT 

SSnnCE. Tefa 46 11 SI 


******GENEVA BEST 

BCORT SBtVKE 022 / 86 15 95. 


* AMS7BIDAM SHE * 

ESCORT A GUIDES. 020-227837 



LONDON BEST BCCWT SERVICE 
Heathrow. Credit cards. 352 B343 


BSjgSfii S li i ES 


' -a’.’.v.T 




GEhEVArANIA Female & Mole escort 
022/342955. 


BRUSSELS FEW PAMELA'S ESCORT 
raid Grade Service. Tel: 02/538 19 37. 


FRANKFURT, SUS ANNE'S BCORT 
service. Teh 0W/B4 48 75. 


FRANKFURT/ MUNCH Male Eicon 
Service. 069/38M41 & 089/3518226. 



HAMBURG - SABRINA Gam Ser- 
vice. Tel: 040/ 58 65 35. 


HONG KONG: VIP’S Western Escort 
Service, Kowloon 7243301 /668480 




&rmm 


LONDON VBtWIQUE Escort Ser- 
vice. Tet 01-225 2335 


■'-“'■'•'•mm 


if. : 






TH. AVIV DAVFS ESCORT Serve*. 
Tel: 03-377911/998754. 


FRANKFURT POLAND BCORT Ser- 
vice. Tel 069/63 41 59. 


HAMBURG - MADEMOI5SJE Eaocto 
040/55 32914. 


LONDON OLYMPIA BCORT Set- 
vice. MuhfriauaL Tet 3S1 6857 


111. i VI .Vl'J’ry 






HIAMCFURT - PETRA &con S Travel 
Service. Tel. 069 / 68 14 05 


LONDON ARABIC BCORT Service 
Tel: 727 1127 or 521 8458 


MILANO + LUGANO ESCORT Sra- 
vitt. TeL M3an 02/685035 


FRANKFURT J94NY ESCORT 3. iraveJ 
lervice. 069/55-72-10. Credrf <a«k 








ti.VlMV- 




















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 



Fri cM 

AMIN 

dosing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to he closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect lore trades elsewhere. 

Fid The Associated Press 


IZMCnffl 
Htahum Slack 


Olv.YULPE HOs high Low Qwt.Ofoe 


1 HWrUP* • *"■ — " ■ 1 ' " — 


UManm 
Hwn Low StOCA 


SU. Clear 

Di* ric. PE HBsHUn'-cv* QubIQm 


6 * 

3 ft 

IS 

5 * 

14 ft 

3 

5 * 

2 * 

lit 

3 * 

88 * 

69 * 

6 

2 * 

lift 

9 * 

IB* 

9 * 

Sft 

1 ft 


ft 

4 * 

11 ? 

30 * 


8 

3 * 

51 * 

29 ft 


8* 

4* ContoA 


1IL1 

5 

3 

ra 

iSS 

Sft 

14* 

10 * Car RE 

1J8 

9 

IS 

17* 

12* + 1% 

61% 

3ft Cal ton a 



10 

18 

6 

pa 

*at* 

1* 

* Caltn wt 




33 

ft 

* 

10ft 

7V% CpIptop 

501 88 

22 

4 

9!m 

91% 

w%— * 

18* 

|i* Cameo 

M 

u 

9 

41 

161% 

15ft 

16 — ft 

3 

?ft Ccnwn) 




» 

lft 

lft 

114 — * 

17* 

13W CM ore g 

J8 

1J 


70 

!6V% 

15ft 

16V% + ft 

47 * 

77'.i CWIfift 



9 

154 

46* 

45 

46*—* 

13 

4ft Cardiff 



17 

21 

7* 

91% 

91%— V% 

3 

1* Cordll 



!$ 

9 

1* 

!i* 

1* 

15ft 

8ft CnroB 



4 

13* 

13* 

13* 

15* 

8ft CortA 

.10 

J 

16 

X 

14ft 

ttfc 

U 

B* 

4* CareEB 



10 

Z1 

71% 

6* 

7* + ft 

8ft 

6ft CareE A 



IS 

3 

6ft 

6* 

6*- * 

5ft 

2ft CcrtNod 

561 


39 

2* 

2* 

2*— ft 

32ft 

25* Cot Ed 

2200 U 


27 

26* 

26* 

26*— * 

2* 

* CwMii 




68 

1* 

1ft 

lft- * 

7* 

2 Castlnd 




A 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft 

9* 

4 * Centml 




33 

»V% 

8* 

9* + * 

31 

20* CswsMttf 350 122 


50:28ft 

28ft 

23ft 

14* 

ID* CenrSe 

1576125 


1 

12ft 

12* 

I2V3 

17ft 

14 * crrvBu 




17 

16ft 

to* 

16ft— * 

9ft 

5ft Catta 

11= ChmoH 

JO 

IS 

12 

26 

61% 

6ft 

6ft 

4 



30 

473 

2ft 

11% 

2* + * 

16ft 

13* QimoP 

J2 

44 

15 

16 

16ft 


16ft + lk 

29* 

lift OltJWA s 

.16 

8 

U 

856 

19ft 

21ft 

m% + * 

29 

17ft OltMB) 

.16 

5 

T6 

75 

20ft 

Sift + * 

St'.i 

16* ChiRv 

120 a 68 

12 

3 

20 

a 

a + * 

10ft 

6* CWDVO 




113 

8* 

8* 

B* + * 

38ft 

16 Ctllltns 

.17 

5 30 

2S3 

34* 

32 

33ft +1* 

33ft 

13 ft cifadti 



5 

433 

30 

a* 

29* + ft 

35 

19ft CJtFM 

1J0D 3J> 

9 

2d 

33* 

33* 

33*— * 

S6ft 

3T% CitFetPt 250 

44 


X 

54* 

54* 

54*— 1* 

33* 

30* crvGos 

1J0 

3 S 

10 

19 

31ft 

31* 

31*— * 

43 

35* Cfarmt 

1.93a 45 


5 

42* 

42* 

42ft 

13* 

6ft Clark C 

JSc 3.8 

10 

5 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft 

4$ 

24* Ciarosf 

55 a 2 J 

9 

4 

36* 

36ft 

36*— * 

Sft 

lift Oopori 

.16 

1J 


5 

13* 

13* 

13* + 1% 

ft* 

3* Coamrr 




18 

41% 

4 

4'.% 

10* 

6ft Catiu 

JO 

2J 

a 

41 

9ft 

5* 

a*— ft 

5* 

lft CalFwfs 




76 

4* 

4* 

4 * + * 

24 

9ft Cotnfea 



6 

38 

23ft 

22ft 

2Zft— * 

11* 

Sft Camlne 

.16 



19 

8* 

8ft 

a*— * 

12ft 

6ft CamoD 




94 

12* 

12 

12 - ft 

13* 

4 * cmpCn 




152 

6* 

6* 

6* + ft 

to 1 - 

r% CmoFcf 



14 

26 

7ft 

7 

7 — 1 % 

M* 

14 * Cnchm 

40 

21 

14 

41 

19* 

lift 

T9* + * 

2Sft 

13* ConrCo 



6 

714 

lift 

16 

16* + * 

f'i 

Pi CotkiI 


103 

294 

Sft 

B 

Bft 

Ft 

lft Conqwt 




67 

4* 

4 * 

4ft — ft 

10 

4 * ConsOG 




98 

Sft 

4ft 

5ft + * 

* 

CanOCwt 



ID 



+ 

26 

16* C/iStern 



24 

rss 

241% 

23ft 

23ft + ft 

13ft 

Sft CnStrwl 




13 

17ft 

lift 

12* + * 

15ft 

T. wIConfA 



4 

1T6 

13* 

13ft 

13* + * 

20 

9ft vfCnIA Pf 




4 

16* 

16* 

16* 

26'% 

171 , COfltMtl 



a 

4* 

25 

24* 

24ft— * 

14* 

toft Canvst n 

150 163 


i 

n* 

11* 

11*— l% 

19* 

17ft Cooley n 

J9e 15 


14* 19 

lSft 

19 + ft 

3ft 

2* CovCr n 



22 

25 

3 

SI 

H% + * 

1 

^ CovCr wt 




3 

?% 

* 

* 

10. 

9* CntrflAn 




40 

9* 


91% 


1* Court Id 

J36e 2 5 


67 

2* 

2jk 

2* 

35 ‘ 

25* Cross 

144 

4J 

16 

38 

34* 

34* 

34* + '.% 

48 ft 

28* CrawiM 

1.00C 27 

9 

1 

37* 

37* 

37*— \% 

17* 

91 ■ Cm CP 



B 

21 

16* 

16* 

16*— ft 

13ft 

7* CrCPB 



i 

17 

IS* 

12* 

17* + Vk 

a* 

17,% CwCPpI 1.92 

85 


4 

22* 

22* 

7290 

7 * 

4* CrawnC 




3 

r* 

7* 

7* + * 


k CnitcR 



1 

157 

i; 

.1 

■'»— ft 


* CrvstO 




1216 

* 

s 

* + w 

25 

13ft Cubic 

J9 

7.9 

n 

100 

aft 

19ft 

aft + 1 % 

31ft 

23* Curtice 

.92 

27 

9 

ZB 

24V. 

24* 

24ft -r * 

3 

% CwtEn 




67 

* 

* 

*— Vk 


s* u 

4 21* 

12ft 71% 
71% 2* 

2 * * 
41% 21% 
4* 31% 

4* 3* 
4* 23% 

Sft n% 
3* 2 
16ft w* 
3DKi 2 2* 


Keicftm JiSt 
Kevfn^ J0° 


Keren wr 
Kiddawt 
KUarn 
Ktoarfc 
Kirbv 
icir Min 
kjwtV xar 
Knot! 

KooerC 133 


u 19* 19* 

! Tt 

» 33k 31% 
7 m m 

11 R Hi 
m a jb 
1 41% 41% 

10 ,3'* 21% 
3 141% |41k 
81 26ft 26* 


m%— * 
aw +.v% 
*+i 

+ 1% 

» 

3* 

334 + t% 
2* — Vk 
41k 

ru + Yl 
14*— 1% 
26* 


! 2 * 

1* LSB 




a 

2* 

2 

2* +* 

1 3 * 

t* LeBorp 




44 

lft 

1* 

lft + ft 

7 

3* LoPnt 




4 

3* 

3* 

a*— * 

20* 

IT* LndSnn 

M 

M 

11 

90 

20* 

m» 

20* +* 

20* 

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M 

28 

14 

1 

20ft 

20ft 

2014 + * 

14* 

S* Lenar 



33 

53 

9* 

9 * 

9ft— ft 

» 

4* LozKad 




2 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft 

27ft 

lift LeorPP 

380 15J 


7 

19* 

19* 

19*— * 

9* 

2* Leapt) 



11 

47 

6* 

6ft 

6* . 

31* 

19ft Lehlpn s 

JOI 

.7 

9 

J 

28* 

28* 

28*— * 

6* 

4* LerturT 



8 

32 

6* 

6ft 

6* 

a* 

5 Lavitt 



9 

7 

5* 

5* 

5* 

34 * 

9* LbtFPh 

50 

15 

12 

3 

33* 

33* 

33*— * 

3 

1* LifeRst 




<7 

1* 

1* 

T* 

2 * 

1* Ledge 




44 

T* 

1* 

1*.— * 

31ft 

li* Lories 




10 

19* 

to* 

19* + ft 

39* 

27ft Larhnr 



18 

1188 

35ft 

35 

35ft- * 

19 

10ft Lumen 

M 

5 

31 

204 

16ft 

15* 

16ft + ft 

14V* 

S* LundwE 



15 

39 

lift 

11* 

lift + * 

13* 

9* Lurhi 



11 

42 

11* 

lift 

11* 

14* 

W Lvdol 



9 

2 

13* 

13* 

13ft 

26* 

8* LvnCSt 

JO 

15 

12 

167 

12* 

12 

12* + ft 

10ft 

8* LvnchC 

JD 

28 

1? 

3 

10 

10 

10 


U*T 14*_* , , ' I 

« ® * 5 :- 

R'r:^‘ 

14* U* 

S’* S*~* 

» n 

>4* »•% 6 * 


t!«r lift 

W* tf* 

*a* ta*» 

SI Si 

a a 

t^% K* 

aw* 

rm n«a 
r% t* 
rr* 
irtt it 


z* 

U t 4 + V; 
Wtfc— ft 
in«« 
icr:— * 

2H % b> 

331% + Vs 

r*— i% 
1* 

12*- ft 
21* + v, 

Wi *. 2 
7*- v% 
ft* + »i 
1!HM« 




.lot 1.1 


11 

9ft 

9 

9 - ft 



40 

56 


4 

10ft 





JUe 

7 


15 

6 








546 

2ft 


2ft + * 






60 

1* 

1* 




Mr 

J 

1 

15 

74* 

24ft 



13* HonJrds 

50 

28 

15 

210 

25* 

24* 







72 






.15 

5 

10 

1150 

33ft 

32 

32*— 1* 



53 


14 

38* 





MM IJ 

10 

4 

30 

27* 

30 + ft 






114 

9 



17* 


J8I 

24 

9 

19 

IS* 

15ft 







43 

9 


St%— * 





IB 

37 

9ft 

9* 

9ft + * 



JOB 2 A 

a 

9 

E* 

Bft 




.10 

J 

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PERSONAL INVESTING 


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A FRENZY OF TAKEOVERS. 


32 

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JV4VE OF TAKEOVERS, 
MERGERS AND BUYOUTS 
HAS BECOME THE SINGLEi 
MOST/M 
IN THEM 
: 01 
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News hoi: from the 


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ADVERTISEMENT — 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Nov. 8/ 

Net ant vatue quotations an supptlBd by Mm Fond* H*ted trim the excwtloa nf (amenootas based on dm prtca. 

Tlw marginal symbols Mlarte kvaomtey of wriaftaH VPtRloa:(0} -daily; (w) -molar; Cb) -M+noatfily; CrJ - repp (arty; OJ - tiip pulw fy . 


. rt "rr-t— wx 






mm an 

PERSPEC . : 






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■v ** 


BUSINESS PROFILE / 


•~v • : ESTERNATIONAL EfERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY , NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 

. Boia, Goldman’s Merger Chief CURRENCY MARK! 


Jydj 


I ^ I Pa s* 13 


- ’ 'f vi‘ By John Crudele- ■ 

Mrw Ytxk Times Swrtce - 

=. ’■ ■ ‘r NEW YORK “ Rows of tiny 

t i Luotcblocks src hncd up hcstly on 
r S* end tables flanking the sofa in 
. Geoffrey T. Boisi's office at Gdd- 
•-= ,, : • man, Sadis & Co. Eocased in the 

^ blocto are mmianire Rplfcas of 

.Jr newspaper advertisements an- 
> B noundng some of the more brealh- 

• : ; ^ r\* taking transacu'o^ handled by the 

• . : i.ji BOOrgers and acquisitions dcpart- 

*, ’ _ ! meat of Goldman, Sachs, where the 
]an fo dark-haired Mr.Boisi r eign* 
J 1 as chief merger-maker. - - 

• •! h,.. Soon, more mementos will join 

* . v *. the ranks: In recent weeks, "Mr. 

* ilia’s department has unleashed a 
:■ Vi sing of tfeadHue-makiog uansac- 

1 dons — representing management 
' ~ -JJ' in its agreement to boy Texas Oil & 
pss Corp., General Foods Corp. in 
■* its nmer agreement with Philip 
Morris Coa. Procter* Gamble Co. 

• . ^ in its bid for Rtcharilson- Vicks Inc. 

; "* { The super-mergers have had Mr. 

Bohn's mergers and acquisitions 
. r - t e a ms crisscrossing the United 
'■ States. He declares 1985 his departr 
■' ; ment's “best year ever.*’ 

. Smaller transactions, those with 
; .. > • price tags in the mere millions, have 
also kept the merger squad busy 
' - ' •: .• during the past month. The firm 

"• •. has 363. merger transactions to its 

• i P credit since 1980 — 148 of them so 

< • far in this year alone. 
i \ ■ > Mr. JBoisfs labor has brought 38- 
v year-old mergers wizard a salary 
• ■ '/.dpi easily- matches those of his 

i* J 'Tfiggest client’s chief executives, al- 
•’ though he will not discuss the exact 
;i ^figure. And last month, he was 
J named co-head of investment 
- \ banking at Goldman, Sachs, where 
r '.he has spent all of Ids 14 years 'bn 
•' : Wall Street. 

“We are adding to his responsi- 
'"'pbiEties,'' said John L. Weinberg, 

: Goldman’s chairman and senior 

7 — ^partner. “M&A is a very visible 
’ activity,” said Mr. Weinberg, using 
i i ti \ * industry shorthand for mergers and 

’ 1 . \ J liyiJ. .acquisitions. “He’s done an out- 

M |M " ^standing job. He certainly deserves 
^^^■^■a^everyihi ng he gets.” 

1,14 -i Mr. Bcnk’s predecessor as Gold- 
’ man's M&A chief, Stephen Fjied- 
.man, also served as co-head of in- 
..-’i-i-’. ‘vestment banking Mr. Friedman is 


e Multibillion-Dollar Acquisitions 


now co-dnef of the fixed-income 
department, along with “Robot E 
Rubin, and both men . are widely 
considered hr be the top contenders 
.to run the company — a position 
. now shared, by Mir. Weinberg and 
John C. Whitehead. 

. “It's _An expansion," said Mr. 
Beds of his new investment bank- - 
ing title, using the understated style 
that is de ngueur at Goldman, 
Sachs Stars are not -encouraged at 
■ Goldman; team players are. 

■ . Teamwork is what Mr. Boisi in- 
sists on talking about. How his col- 
league, Willard J. Overlock, will 
ably assume the day-to-day leader- 
ship of the department now that 
Mr. Boisi will be busy-with invest- 
ment banking in addition to work- 
ing on the bigger meigers. How 
Goldman, Sachs encourages M&A 
professionals to use. the resources 
of the entire firm. How at least a 
dozen managers in the M&A de- 
partment are qualified, to ' head 
merger teams. . ■ 

Mr. Boisi majored in English at 
Boston College before graduating 
in 1971 from the Wharton School 
hi the University of Pennsylvania. 
He now is cm Boston College’s 
board of directors and on the exec- 
utive board at Wharton. 

One of six children in the family 
of a prominent. real estate lawyer 
and businessman, he joined Gold- 
man, Sachs as a summer intern in 
1 970, before his final year at Whar- 
ton. In 1971, Mr. Boisi returned to 
Goldman, Sachs. 

His intensity pushed him into a 
partnership in 1978 — : he was only 
31 — and theaintothe top merger 
job in 1980, when corporate raiders 
and consolidations were making 
mergers a hotbed of activity. 

“When 1 came, there were only 
four of us in the department,” he 
said. “I grew with the business. I 
came at a good time.” 

During ms first six months in ' 
M&A, Mr. Boisi recalls, he was 
entrusted with the job of meeting 
with the head of Bristol-Myers Co., 
one of Goldman's largest clients, 
about the company’s interest in Ar- 
tec Hobby Product Co. in Lima, 
Ohio. It would have been a $20- 
million transaction. — considered 


large in those days —and though 
Artex was eventually taken over by 
someone else, the experience gave 
Mr. Boisi a feel for. Goldman — 
and the M&A -business. 

One thing be learned is. that 
Goldman does, not represent cor- 
porate raiders. On the contrary. 
Mr. Boisi has often found' himself 
helping to fend' off 1 such attadcs. 
During his tenure as M&A chief, he 
■and his posse helped -Scott Paper 
Co., Mead Corp. and Asaroo Ino, 
among others^stay independent. 

But at other times Mr. Boisi has 
helped a client relinquish indepen- 
dence. 

General Foods is a case in point. 
Long before takeover rumors about 
the company began rumbling last 
summer, Mr. Bolk says, Goldman 
bad warned General Foods that its 
line of business — selling well- 

known consumer brands — might 
soon come imtW a t tack from raid- 
ers. Contingent strategies were put 
into place. Then rumors caused a 
sharp rise in General Foods stock 
in June mid September: - 

On Tuesday, Sept. 24, rumor be- 
came reality. PtaiKp Morris offered 
$111 a share for all General Foods 
stock in a transaction worth more 
than $5 billion. Oyer die next 2 l h 
days of behind-the-scenes scram- 
bling, Goldman and a co-adviser, 
Morgan. Stanley & Gx, formulated 
a defense that included a far-rang- 
ing search for another buyer. . 

In the end. on Friday, Sept. 27, 
Philip Morris raised its bid to $120 
a share and bad itself a food com- 
pany. 

“We wotted round the clock,” 
said Mir. Boisi. adding that one of 
the M&A team’s chief goals was to 
hold off Philip Morris until alterna- 
tives could be investigated. Other 
companies did express interest in 
General Foods, he said, but “when 
we ran the numbers, those compa- 
nies ran out of gas at $120 a share.” 

Mr. Boisi got high ratings for his 
role in the drama, which also fea- 
tured Sherson Lehman Brothers. 
General Foods' other investment 
banker. “Geoff's strongest contri- 
bution was to help us think ratio- 
nally at a time when we might have 
tended to be emotional,” sard Irwin 


Engdman, chief financial officer at 
General Foods. 

Mr. Boisi calls himself a “natu- 
rally a gg ressive, in tense personal- 
ity,” which be believes is a good fit 
at Goldman, Sachs. 

Yet it was a perception that Mr. 
Boisi was perhaps too aggressive 
that caused embarrassment for his 
department last year, as Goldman 
helped Continental Group fi«ht off 
Britain's Sir James Goldsmith. 

Although such campaigns fre- 
quently — and openly — involve 
more than one investment banking 
bouse. Continental's board chose 
to secretly hire Morgan Stanley to 
do essentially the same work that 
Goldman, Sachs was doing. The 
gossip in investment-banking cir- 
cles was that Continental, dis- 
turbed by the fighi-io-dealh stance 
proposed by Goldman and Mr. 
Boisi, brought in Morgan as a mo- 
derating influence. 

In the end. however, it was Gold- 
man — and Mr. Boisi — who ar- 
ranged for David H. Murdock and 
Peter Kiewii Sons Inc. to acquire 
Continental for $2.75 billion. Mr. 
Boisi knew Mr. Murdock, a West 
Coast financier then on the board 
of Occidental Petroleum Co., from 
the $4-billion Occidental-Cities 
Service transaction handled by 
Goldman, Sachs in 1982. 

Qualified as he is to work on 
billion-doilar mergers — his big- 
gest was Iasi year's Texaco Inc. 
acquisition of Getty Oil Co., Gold- 
man's client, for more than $10 
billion — he, like many Wall Street 
merger experts, sometimes finds 
the pace greeting. 

“There have been more limes 
than I care to remember when the 
phone rings, I just pick up my brief- 


Caoadian Unemployment Up 

Reuters 

OTTAWA — Unemployment in 
Canada rose to 10J percent of the 
work force in October from 10.1 
percent in September, compared 
with 11 J percent in October 1984, 
the government reported Friday. 
The figures ore seasonally adjusted. 



Bundesbank Acts to Dampen Dollar Rally 


NEW YORK — West Germa- 
ny’s central bank look the steam 
om of a dollar rally Friday by sell- 
ing an estimated S 1 40 mtition on 
international currency markets. 

Dealers said the dollar was also 
pushed lower on a prediction by 
Henry Kaufman, the influential 
chief economist at Salomon Broth- 
ers. that a reduction in the Federal 
Reserve Board's discount rate, its 
rate on loans to member banks, 
“may be imminent.” 

Dealers said the Bundesbank 
sold nearly S10Q million in the first 
half hour of trading in Frankfurt 

and followed up with 543.4 million 

at the afternoon fixing. It held back 
from intervention throughout the 
afternoon as operators hesitated 
from testing it once more. 

The dollar, which had climbed to 


2.6450 Deutsche marks early Fri- 
day from 2.5990 on Thursday, 
closed in London at 2.6220. Earlier, 
it was fixed in Frankfurt at 2.6240 
DM, up from 2.5935 at Thursday’s 
fixing. 

Die dollar also rose to as high as 
207.65 yen in Asian trading Friday 
before the Bundesbank's interven- 
tion helped push it slightly lower. 
In London, the dollar closed at 
205.50 yen compared with its open- 
ing 206.40 and its finish of 205.15 
there on Thursday. 

In other European markets Fri- 
day. the dollar was fixed in Paris at 
7 .995 French francs, up from 7.908 
on Thursday, and in Amsterdam at 
19555 Dutch guilders, up from 
2.9425. In Zurich, the dollar closed 
at 2.1600 Swiss francs, up from 
2.1418. 

The Bundesbank's intervention 


was its first serious attempt to at- 
tack the dollar for more than two 
weeks, and traders said it under- 
lined again the determination or 
the Group of Five nations to en- 
force an agreement to drive the 
dollar lower. 

In later trading in New York, the 
dollar retreated when Mr. Kauf- 
man wrote in his widely followed 
’‘Comments on Credit'* that the 
Fed’s chairman. Paul A. Volcker. 
had hinted at the possibility of a 
discount-rate cut in a letter to a 
congressman. 

The dollar eased in New York 

trading to 16210 DM from 2.6355 
on Thu.-sday: to 205.10 yen from 
210.30; to 2.1 520 Swiss francs from 
2.1600. and to 7.9825 French francs 
from 8.0200. The British pound 
rose a cent, to S1.4220. 


Geoffrey T. Boisi 

case and go out to the airport. " Mr. 
Boisi says. “No clothes. No tooth- 
brush. A couple of days later the 
clothes arrive. The deal dictates 
your schedule.” 

Still, he says, his wife of ! 6 years. 
Rene, is “extremely supportive." A 
few years back, it was she who 
tracked Mr. Boisi down — it was 
Saturday and be was out jogging — 
when a call came from the Pitts- 
burgh headquarters of U.S. Steel 
Corp. to the family's home. 

U.S. Steel wanted to hire Gold- 
man, Sachs, with whom it did not 
yet have a working relationship, to 
arrange the acquisition of Mara- 
thon Oil Co., at the time a choice 
property. The result for Goldman: 
a mu! tiimlli on- dollar payday. 

Mr. Boisi recalls that tramac- 
tions in the SI 5-million- to-S20-mD- 
Tion range were once considered 
big. Today. Goldman, Sachs — like 
its competitors — pays more atten- 
tion to the merger field, but gener- 
ally will not handle mergers or ac- 
quisitions worth less -than S25 

milli on 

A department expansion is now 
under way. and Goldman's M&A 
teams will start to focus more on 
international business. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Euroyen Sector Is Hurt by r Declines in Japan 


By Christopher Pizzev 

Reuters 

LONDON — The secondary 
Eurobond market generally ended 
little changed Friday from Thurs- 
day's closing levels after a quiet 
day's trading, dealers said. Howev- 
er. the Euroyen sector was weak 
following the further declines on 
the domestic Japanese market 
overnight, dealers said. 

In the primary market, activiry 
was also subdued, with only a cou- 
ple of issues emerging by the end of 
normal trading. The first was a 
small, S35-miJlion floating-rate 
note that dealers felt would not be 
trading widely. The second was a 
SI 00- million straight with warrants 
for a Sumitomo Trust & Banking 
unit. 

The dollar straight was issued by 
Sumitomo Trust Finance (H.K_> 
Ltd. and uses the warrant formula 
recently developed by the lead 
manager. Morgan Stanley Interna- 
tional. The host bond pays 10 1 ? 
percent over 10 years and was 


priced at 101. It is callable after five 
years. 

Under the formula, the warrants, 
priced at SI 7.50 each, are exercis- 
able for 10 years into an identical, 
□on-callable, bond. In the first five 
years the warrants are exchangable 
with the host bond, thereafter for 
cash only. 

The warrants rose to $24 while 
the host bond was trading just out- 
side the total 2 percent fees at a 
discount of 2Vb bid. 

The floater was For the Develop- 
ment Fund of Iceland and pays li 
point over the six-month London 
interbank offered rate. The 12- year 
issue is retractable after 10 years 
and it did not trade widely on the 
market- The issue was jointly lead- 
managed by Svenska Internationa] 
and Nordic Investment Bank 

In the secondary markets. Eur- 
oyen sector was the feature, with 
prices declining by between and 
34 point after the Bank of Japan 
agai □ moved to increase short-term 


interest rates in the Japanese mon- 
ey market. The action was seen by 
dealers as an apparent attempt to 
bolster the yen against the dollar. 

Dealers here said that the Bank 
of Japan's move had shaken some 
professional and retail operators. 

“I think this market's got further to 
fall; my clients don't want to keep 
guessing when the Bank [of Japanl 
is going to intervene in Tokyo." a 
trader commented. Samurai bonds 
were between ’A and a full point 
lower Friday, he added. 

Dollar-s uaight bonds were gen- 
erally unchanged to a fraction firm- 
er and closed die week showing 
gains of around 4 to point com- 
pared with the previous Friday's 
closing levels. 

Floating-rate note issues were a 
shade easier but trading was noL 
active, dealers added. 

The sterling-straight market was 
around '4 point lower following a 
decline in British-government 
bond prices. 


Friday’s 

ore 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices as of 
3 pjh. New Torlt time. 

Via The Associate d Press 



i. 




S* 5M> 5V, + Vt 
r* »ta ws 
Iff* Iff* low— M 

33V> 37* 33 + VS 
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Wit rote* of dMdwnfa ore annual daaur g menfg titaM on 
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q— annual rnt» of dh/htefltf Mu» slock dhfktonH/l 
C — Houldatlns dlvtdwnL/1 
qW— calledL/l 

4— iwwiwnivkowjl _ ' .. _ 

•— (flvhtond declared or nakJ In mcndlna 12 monttmn 
q — rflvfttend In to IS* notnyMonot 

lax. , 

I,— (flvtdena dedored oner saXtt-up or stock aiuldand. 
i— dividend patd this year, omitted, deterred, or no action 
token at kilos] dividend meeilna. 

fc— dividend declared or poW mis year, an accumulative 
tone wttti dividends in arrears. 

new Issue in me past S week*. The Man-low nmae booms 
the start of trading. 

H — next day del i very. 

Pre. — or te a ro omin gs ratio. 

r— dividend detflorod or oakl m arweedino a i-unlfu. ohm 
nock dividend. 

i— stock spot. Dividend wains wtm dole of unit 
sis— sales. 

t— flfvMend petd tn s»ds In erecedtaa 12 months, estimated 
caMivahw on e*4lvldand or ax-dlstiibulton dale. 

o— new yearly Mott. 

v— tnxflno batted. ■ . . • 

vt— toboelcrwma'or nwalverstitoiirbalnB reorsomad un- 
dor the Bankruptcy Ad, or securities assumed Iw weft com- 
nenln. 

wd— when dWtrlMM. 
wt— when Issued. , 
ww— with warrants. 
x—UHtMdendorex-riaME- 
xeUs— Bt-dfstrteuttan... 
xw— without warrants, 
v — esMll vidend and HMB in tulL 
VW-YWfl. 

a— salaslnftriL 


Tie Daily Sc arce for 
International Investors. 


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ACROSS 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


I "Wailing For 
Godot" star 
5 Word with way 
10 Counselor - 


No Ifs, Ands or Buts byjohngreenman 


PEANUTS 


15 Caspian feeder 

19 Tony's cousin 

20 Lead-in. for 

short 


4S Met offering 

49 Relaxation 

50 Sound in a heat 
wave 

51 Boris Becker 
beauty 

52 Trivial 

56 Cubing device 

57 Accentuated 


21 Actor from 
Toronto 

22 Zilch 

23 One who lacks 
manual 
dexterity 

25 Homemade 
libation 

27 Helmsmen 

28 Charteris 
sleuth 

30 Gretzky is one 

31 Pinkish 

32 Played 
charades 

33 Bowlers 
35 Surrogate 

sovereign 

38 Continued 
tiresomelv 

39 Bas- (3-D 

works of an) 

42 Sweetens the 
pot 

43 Second deal 
45 Fourth Arabic 

letter 

47 Ramsgate 
raincoats 


59 Take under 
one’s wing 

60 Settlement 

61 Accounts 

62 Monster and 
N.M. river 

<3 City SW of 
Madras 

64 Sculptor’s tool 

66 Galsworthy 
novel 

67 Town 
legislator 

70 Cl uny products 

71 Singing group 
from 

Minneapolis 

73 Deg. for a 
would-be 
magnate 

74 Prifne 
Minister of 
Somalia: 1969 

75 Matador’s 
cloak 

76 Relinquish 

77 Stratum of ore 

78 Tatami 

79 Architectural 
brace 


83 Hair 
conditioner 

84 Engaged in 
repartee 

86"- You Glad 

You're You?” 

87 Drove in 
forcibly 

88 Crucifix 

89 Strike 

90 Bombay 
weight unit 

91 Odin’s crowd 

94 Perth . 

N.J. 

95 Manhattan. 
e.g. 

99 Eleanor 
Roosevelt 
portrayer 

102 Raymond 

Hubbell ballad 
of 1916 

104 Polynesian 
drinks 

105 Starr of the old 
West 

106 Muse of poesy 

107 Churchill’s 


110 Ml 112 1 13 ltd 


1 15 | io | i 7 Iib 


HOW COULD YOU NOT 
KNOW WHEN HALLEY'S 
COMET IS COMING? 


YOU DIP A REPORT 
ON IT IN SCHOOL 
JUST TWO WEEKS AGO.. 


YOU READ THE REPORT 

to he whole class; 


T I ONLY REAP THE \ 

REPORT..! ttPNT j v 

iustb* to rr.« / 1 




O 


-I.W 



BLONDIE 


THANKS R3R 
THE 0RIOSE t 


BYE-JP! 1 


ISN'T MARSE *’■> 

5emN0HeAWY?. 


HB3 BEST ffiAiUHE 


ri NCW TSA 
TTFR.E P5*TJRE 


Country" 

108 Col. ’s 
command 

109 Fishline leader 

110 Librarian’s 
gadget 

111 Since then, in 
Avr 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


70 



a 

79 



L 

j 

00 

81 

S2 




fl 

83 


E 

34 


35 


_ 



a 

86“ 





H 

87 




■ 

H 

83 




■ 

89 





■ 

90 




M 


93 

— 



I, 





■ 

95 





99~ 





100 

101 




i 

102 



103 






T3T 




9 

105 






106 




■ 

107 

108 





109 






110 




■ 

m 


IBS |97 198 


lw ^ 

BEETLE BAILEY 


WHO 0JMXS TO 
Plav bomb 5 

RACQUeTBALlA 

'iff /M 


li 


1 



-H 





11 

jj/X 


. 


ift—rf 


NOT thEf J HOT MB'. 


1 Zillions 

2 Assisi 
arsonists 

3 Charter 

4 Boston Garden 
whistlers 

5 Adjective for 
theN.Y.P.D. 

6 Fit to be tied 

7 Paths of trav. 

8 Behave 
humanly 

9 "Tancredi" 
composer 

10 Hearer 

11 Course: swing 

12 Spirited song 

13 Hero of a 
Handel 
oratorio 


14 The . rock 

group 

15 Imprudent 

16 Muddy the 
waters 

17 Singer Murray 

IS Salacious look 

24 Thespian 

Jeremv 

26 "Tell it 

Gath" 

29 Disney’s 
inventive 
mouse 

32 World’s fourth- 
la rgest isl. 

33 Yegg's act 

34 Sunburn 
remedy in the 
tropics" 


35 Vishnu 
incarnations 

36 Pass laws 


'!? iVeir York Tones, edited by Eugene Maledsa. 


DOWN- 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


37 Popular 
present 


38 Changed the 
decor 

39 Mirthful 

40 Decalogue 
component 

41 Luster 


43 Soars 

44 Lops crops 
46 Out of killer 
48 Photographer 

Adams 

50 Bricklayer, 
e.g. 


52 "The of 

Greece 

. . Byron 

53 Hob or hang 
followers 

54 Is otiose 

55 Raccoor.hke 
beast 

56 Aims 

58 Pointillist's 
prop 

60 Framework 

62 Dundee daisy 

63 Rungs or luges 

64 Kadiddie- 
hopper 


65 Ishmael’s 
mother 

66 Hypothermal 

67 "Time is 

of Trouble": 
Dickinson 

68 Degrade 

69 Appointed 


71 Like a starfish 

72 Drama 
segment 

75 Giraudoux's 
"Adorable 


/ 4 Frank’s folks 


79 Plant life 

80 Horse’s hock 

81 Columbus's 
fleet, e.g. 

82 Did a secre- 
tarial chore 

83 He wrote 
"Stunden- 
buch” 

85 A confessor 

87 Ophthalmolo- 
gist, e.g. 

89 Sniff 

90 Rich cake 

91 Partly open 

92 Roof rim 


93 Red-tape prob- 
lem 

94 Wheel rod 


95 Chesterfield 

96 Join closely, 
old style 

97 Manchurian 
port • 

98 Greek harp 


100 Some N.F.L. 
defensemen 

101 Suf fix for vel- 
vet 

103 ” pro 

nobis" 


MY DISCOVERY OF AMERICA 

By Farley Mona-. 125 pages. SI 2.95. 

The Atlantic Monthly Fress. S Arlington Street. 
Boston. Mass. 02116. 

Reviewed by T. H. Jackins 

M AKE no mistake about it — Farley Mowai is 
angry . He is furious. If prose could be made 
to sputter in rage, this tiny book would sputter. I; is 
a righteous anger, the kind that bristies'with those 
powerful satisfactions that come when you have 
been done din and can prove it and now have the 
opportunity to tell the world about it in exquisite 
detail. Most of us can only yell at the wife or kick 
the cat. Mowat gets a book. 

You can’t blame him. really. On April 23. 19S5. 
the Canadian author went to Toronto’s Lester B. 
Pearson International .Airport to begin a U. S. pro- 
motional tour for his book "Sea of Slaughter.” an 
account (angry) of the depredations mankind has 
inflicted through history on the wildlife of the North 
Atlantic coasL .After going through a routine cus- 
toms check. Mowat's boarding pass was stamped 
and he look a seal to wait for departure. Then an 
officer of the U. S. Immigration arid Naturalization 
Service appeared at his side and asked him io 
"follow me. please" — perhaps the three ugliest 


BOOKS 


words in the ianguage when they are uttered any- 
where near an international border. 

Mowat followed, only to be told. ’“You are 
excluded from entering the United States.' 

“He issued this stunning dictum with a righteous- 
ness that would have suited St. Peter turning a poor 
sinner awav from the Pearh Gates. 

’■ ‘I whj{?' 

’“You are not permitted to enter the l r nited 
States of America." He was being patient now but I 
suspect, enjoying himself. 

*i. most assuredly, was neither. 

“ ‘Why in blazes can’t I?‘ 

"’I can’t tell you that.' 

“ ‘You know , but you bloody well won't tell me?’ 

“ 'You could say ihaL' 

'• i could say that! Who will tell me? What in 
Christ's sw eet name is going on here?' ” 

What was going on here was the United States of 
.America making a great ass of itself. The immigra- 
tion agent had run a quick check on Mowat and the 
computer had spat his name out as an undesirable. 
His Dame was on a list. There was a folder on him. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last W eek’s Puzzle 


1 

\ N-9 





[non dob anam? □□□□□■ 
■igtigiod anacm □□ddqbI 
□QaaBQBoaanaaaoaEHQno 
ana trnnnn annua □□□□□ 

a oHii uiiutiD oaaao □□□□ 
BDEJUB □□□□□ QBBBE □□□ 
nnnrnm n □nanntn □□□□□□□ 
ddeq aaaa □□□□□ 
□□□□ nan naaan □□□□no 
□□□ □□□□□ aaaaa □□□□□ 
naaaHEBBQDrQHPnanonnQn 
□□DBG E30DDQ □□□□□ □□□ 
□PO BSP □□Baa BBD □□□□ 
^■uraona anna 
□□□□dob oanaBB □□□□□□ 
□□□ Goana □□□□□ ennao 
□□□□ daoiiD aoaaa □□□□ 
□naan oaaaa annan □□□ 
□□□□□nnonHaciniaaBDaaoD 
■BaaBoa Hanna □□□□□□□ 
fcaanuu Banna □□□□□□ ■ 


He was in the immigration agency's “Lookout 
Book” as an official Nasty Person not admissible to 
the United States. The enabling legislation here was 
the McCarran-W alter Act, that relic of the early 
Cold War Lhat stipulated any number of reasons, 
including the theory and practice of anarchy, why a 
person might be considered dangerous to “the wel- 
fare. safety or security of the United States." 

Mowat. it seemed, had been a member of the Fair 
Play for Cuba Committee in the 1960s. He had 
supported the campaign for nuclear disarmament 
He had written a book about Siberia. He had once, 
in 1958, put his name to a slightly drunken manifes- 
to regarding SAC bombers based m Newfoundland 
that the press managed to interpret as threatening. 
Any or all of these were apparently enough to strike 
consternation in the heart of Benedict Ferro, the 
immigration agency's district director, who had or- 
dered Mowat's exclusion. 

Mowat and his publisher wasted no time getting 
the word out to the Canadian media. Not since the 
Fenian Invasion of 1866 had there been such out- 
rage against the United States. The U. S. press was 
only a little less frenzied. The response of the U. S. 
government to this flap was a gummy mix of stupid- 
ity and bureaucratic waffling that finally ended up 
in a son of apology that Mowat sort of rejected. 
And there it might have rested. 

But no. there had to be a book — or a booketle. 
“My Discovery of America” is a little longer than a 
typical John Updike review of an obscure Bulgarian 
novel in The New Yorker and a lot shorter than a 
Travis McGee adventure. It is. in troth, little more 
than a badly written magazine article padded out to 







-■■■■ MM? 
•. j.. 

- :-i‘ 


m 


WIZARD of ID 



\9set- 

teXim IN THE? 

Mhpof w 


omcftPveQWV 


fuu-vrj 



W > 

Vm&eow? 

\ AH&ALU J 



REX MORGAN 



, ‘ REX, A WOMAN ] 

' BY THE NAME Of LUCY DENSON J 
WANTS TO SEE YOU ABOUT HER A 
FATHER f SHE SAYS ITS URGENT— 
BLIT YOU’RE BOOKED 'SOLIDLY ^ 
> — T uhtil zix& cio&^JjR 


because if rr is, I can 

SEE HIM HERE AT THE 
2 HOSPITAL ' J— - 


I DONTTHlMK ITS THAT 
KIND OF AN EMERGENCY.' 
THERE* SOME SORT OF A 
PROBLEM SHE NEEDS TO 
DISCUSS WITH YOU ' ad 





** »*&$& 


pass for a badly written book. The padding is in the 
form of newspaper stories and editorials and radio 


GARFIELD 


form of newspaper stories and editorials and radio 
and television interviews — lots and lots of them, so 
many that the reader's sympathetic outrage over 
this insane twitch of frantic anticommunism is soon 
leached away by an overwhelming boredom. 
Mowai. who has written some good and necessary 
books (“Never Cry Wolf’ and “A Whale for the 
Killing” among them), should have strangled the 


MOST CAT OWNERS 
REFLECT THE GRACE, 
STVLE AND POISE 
OF THEIR CATS f 


■-ar a 


MOST CAT OWNERS 
ARE INFORMER 
SENSITIVE ANP S 
. INTELLIGENT J 


0OZO,TH£ WON PER N£RP 
HERE^ DOESN'T KNOW ^ 
WHAT CENTURA IT IS Ji 




impulse that led to this one, et en if it did make him 
feel better. 


VCC 


T. H. Watkins is the editor of Wilderness, the 
magazine of The Wilderness Society. He wrote this 
review for The Washington Post. 






ICwasi Wl w triMtun Synd l c MMic 


Wirld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Nov. 8 

Closing prices ui local currencies unless othencise indicated. 


'lDlDffr WT Ws COOKIES..-!. JUST 
GOT 'EM SPVZ7ED FOR HIM ! " 


Amterdam 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


AKKinre 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Migrate 

Berlin 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Cop en h age n 

Costa Deism 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Los potrnas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

tike 

Oslo 

Ptteis 

Prague 

Reyklnvlk 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

vealee 

Victim 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

C 

F 



C 

F 

C 

F 


2a 

79 

16 

61 

♦r 

Bangkok 

33 

91 

24 

75 

St 

11 

52 

4 

39 

r 

Belling 

4 

39 

-1 

30 

a 

17 

63 

12 

54 

Cl 

Hong Kona 

27 

81 

23 

73 

r 

— 

— 

13 

55 

no 

Manila 

33 

91 

25 

77 

fr 

70 

an 

0 

32 

d 

New Delhi 

27 

81 

14 

57 

fr 

11 

52 

4 

39 

fr 

Seoul 

18 

64 

12 

54 

el 

12 

54 

8 

46 

0 

Shanghai 

18 

64 

14 

57 

0 

10 

50 

D 

32 

fr 

Singapore 

31 

88 

22 

72 

St 

12 

54 

3 

37 

d 

Taipei 

26 

79 

22 

72 

Cl 

10 

50 

1 

34 

fr 

Tokyo 

25 

77 

15 

59 

0 

14 

57 

19 

9 

66 

48 

no 

0 

AFRICA 






10 

50 

1 

34 

r 

Algiers 

28 

82 

14 

57 

cf 

16 

61 

3 

37 

fr 

Cairo 




21 

70 

na 

10 

50 

7 

45 

r 

Cape Town 





12 

54 

na 

7 

45 

0 

32 

r 

Casablanca 

37 

99 

14 

57 

Ir 

a 

43 

3 

37 

sw 

Harare 

_ 

_ 

12 

54 

na 

14 

57 

B 

46 

0 

Logos 







na 

29 

84 

20 

ea 

Ir 

Nairobi 

21 

73 

15 

59 

a 

21 

17 

70 

63 

18 

10 

64 

50 

0 

sh 

Tunis 

25 

77 

13 

55 

fr 

— 

— 

13 

SS 

na 

LATIN AMERICA 



11 

52 

4 

39 

d 




“ 



7 

45 

2 

36 

0 

Baenos Aires 

32 

90 

18 

64 

0 

9 

48 

1 

34 

r 

Caracas 

29 

84 

18 

64 

cl 

19 

66 

9 

48 

d 

Lima 

25 

77 

16 

61 

0 

5 

41 


27 

Ir 

Mexico CHv 

24 

75 

4 

39 

Ir 

17 

63 

10 

50 

0 

Rio da Janeiro 

— 

— 

— 

— 

na 

9 

1 

48 

34 

1 

34 

28 

0 

Ir 

NORTH AMERICA 




ABN 

ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AKZO 

AhoM 

AMEV 

ADom Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buetirmann T 

Cal and HUg 

ElsevNn-NDU 

Fokker 

Gist Brocades 

Helneken 

Hoagovens 

K UA 

Noarden 

Nat Nedder 

Nedllovd 

Oce Vender G 

Pakhood 

Philips 

R abacs 

Rodamco 

Rollnco 

Rorenio 

Royal Outch 

Unilever 

Van Omnitrm 

VlMF Stork 

VNU 


I Hochtief 

Hoechst 
Hoesch 
5UJX Horten 
NA Huisei 
VBJ0 IWK.A 
127^0 Kall + Sai* 
Karstadl 
7630 Kauthof 
NA Kloeckner H-0 


Close Prov. 
770 NA 
2SSJ0 S7 
167J0 168J0 
206 710JC 
M NA 
309 NA 
321 NA 
288 291 

31130 NA 
329 332 


9850 Kloeckner Werke mjo NA 

NA Krupp Stahl 189 NA 

1« Linde 585 599 

. NA Lufthansa 217 NA 

W50 MAN NA — 

_"■* Monnesmonn . 202 262 

Muench Rueck 2340 2050 

1B950 Nncdorf 56630 NA. 

. 73 PKI NA 728 

5f5» Porsche 1250 NA 

NA Preussoe 247 246 

79J0 PWA 15950 NA 

184^0 RWE 205 206 

36430 Rhelnmofall 475 NA 

7J40 Sctterlng 638 638 

52.90 SEL 350 NA 

79.10 siemens 662 673 

, 25“i2 Thvssen 17630 181 

7130 Veba 270 273 

£.10 voikswogenwerit 412 414 

wello 650 NA 

28.40 Commorzbanh index : 175500 
NA Previous : 177130 

250 


189 NA „ 

S85 599 Composite 5 

217 N A Previous : II 

NA — 

. 202 262 r— 

2340 2050 

56630 NA I “ 

NA 728 

1250 NA AACora 

.247 246 | AlltetW-VOns 


GFSA 

337S 


Harmony 

292S 

2875 

Hive Id Steal 



Klota 

2200 

2100 

Ned bank 

840 


Pres Sleyn 

6700 

6700 

Rusplot 

2250 

2150 

Sa Brews 

655 


5t Helena 

3900 

3960 

Sasot 

870 


west Holding 

8000 

7800 

Composite Stock Index ; NA 
Previous : I10JI 


Shell 

STC 

Std Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tate and Lvie 
TOSCO 
Thom EMI 
T.l. Group 
TrafaloarHse 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever c 
United Biscuits 


665 | - 

1 ■ I- I FuMtsu ' 

449 Httochl 

^ Cold Storage 338 336 Hitach i Cable 

5T0 DBS 6.15 6.T0 Hondo 

Fraser Neave, 675 635 Jcwao Air Uncs - 

S Haw Par 124 Z26 ICallma 

Inchcape 2.15 239 KOnsal Power 

Mol Bank (no 570 535 Kawapikl Steel 

OCBC 170 BJ0 K'rln Brewery 

OUB . L»7 3 Komatsu 

OUE 2J2 NA Kubota 

ShanurWa 2J0 234 KVOCera 

State Darbv 172 1 JI Motsu Elec tads . 

S'poro Land 275 235 Mafsu BeC Wbria 

37or« Press 685 635 Mitsubishi Bank 

S Steamship 038 070. Mitsubishi Ole m 

St Trading 102 104 MJtartrfshl glee 

United Overseas 134 133 Mitsubishi Heavy 

UOB 334 NA Mitsubishi Corn 

Mitsui and Co 

Stentts Times lad index ; 71837 Mftsukoshl 
Previous : 781 M Mitsumi 


.Full Photo 
Fuktsu 


12 123/32 
1*7 NA 
310 310 

593 5M 


F.T. 30 Index ; Id 


F.TAE.108 index : 1370.10 
Prevloos : 130430 


Canadian stocks via AP 


N ,-^. Mol Bank hr»o 
OCBC 
,2“ OUB 
^ OUE 

N ^Z SbartorWa 

S2 state Derby 
" S’pore Land 
sr= ore Press 
S Steamship 
St Trading 
United Overseas 
UOB 


SSOAbtIPrcn 
_. 400 Acklaods 

40S) Agnlco E 
™ 3175 Aura Ind A 

^ 42Si All Energy 
1300 Alta Nat 
‘iS 1753AtoomaSt 
,22 141 AreusC or 

1 S 33450 AtCO I f 
“ 11302 BP Canoda 

^ 125805 Bank BC 

2® 181608 Bank N s 
19018 BorTteko 
fS 1 00 Baton A f 

SS 66S6 Bonanza R 
« 2000Brotorr« 

' 3*00 Bromataa 

vs 6640 Brenda M 

17431 BCPP 

^ 10380 BC Res 

(S 36375 BCnm 
^ 1900Brunswk 
275 Bixld Can 
44150 CAE 
l0TO 600 CCL A 

23420 CCL 8 f 
7S»codFrv 
500 Compeau f 
23800 C Nor West 
4230 C PoOcrs • 

. SCanTrosf 
140 c Tuna 
1787490 Bk.Com 
10BS97CTIro A f 
930 Cora 
2 ^Cetonese 
500 Cel 1 x 1 175 p 
JSZOCentrlTr 
40200 Clneplex 
1630CDietbA 
260 CD tab Bf 
4M0 CTL Bonk 
ZmCosokBR 
5000 Conran A 
52100 Crown* 
12550 Oar Res 
21129 Doan Dev 
6119 Denison A p 
7069 Denison Bf 
£ 500 Devetoan 

10500 Oicknsn B 

“SSSSSS" 

300 Donohue 
imiO DuPont A 
7450 DV lex A 
lOOOEKShomX 
V7D0 Emco 


HIM) Low Oosn CJig. 

Nav.8 


1250 N A I AA Coro 09V. 59 9/16 

,247 246 I Allted-Lvoos 286 280 

Anglo Am Gold SS3V. 554 i- 


205 206 Ass Brit Foods 

SS "ife Da ,r l« 

638 638 Barclays 


ANP.C8S Gem Index : 23CL7S 
Previous : 331 JO 


Ankara 
Be tart 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 

Sydney 


70 

68 

7 

45 

Cl 

Anchorage 

-10 

14 

■19 

■2 

fr 

5 

41 

0 

32 

fr 

Atlanta 

18 

64 

4 

39 

ir 

8 

46 

6 

43 

r 

Boston 

11 

52 

6 

43 

PC 

13 

55 

8 

46 

d 

Chicago 

8 

46 


27 

PC 

U 

57 

8 

46 

cl 

Denver 

14 

57 


30 

fr 

7 

45 

4 

39 

Cl 

Detroit 

6 

43 

■ 1 

30 

oc 

7 

45 

0 

32 

r 

Honoloio 

29 

84 

18 

64 

PC 

1ST 




Houston 

24 

75 

9 

48 

PC 

— 

— 




Las Angeles 

23 

73 

9 

48 

PC 

12 

54 


— 

r 

Miami 

25 

77 

15 

59 

fr 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

Minneapolis 

1 

34 


25 

cl 

26 

79 

7 

45 

0 

Montreal 

B 

46 

6 

43 

d 

25 

77 

IJ 

55 

0 

Nassau 

25 

n 

14 

57 

Ir 

28 

82 

12 

54 

cl 

New York 

13 

55 

5 

41 

fr 





'■ 

San Fraoctsco 

18 

64 

13 

55 

PC 






Seattle 

B 

46 

4 

39 

r 

19 

66 

12 

54 

Ir 

Toronto 

7 

45 

0 

32 

d 

25 

77 

18 

64 

St 

Washington 

16 

61 

4 

3® 

Ir 


Art>ed 

Bei'.oerl 

Cockerill 

Cobeaa 

EBES 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Hoboken 

Intercom 

Kredletbank 

Petr oR re 

Soc Generate 

Soima 

Solvav 

Traction Elac 

UCB 

Unerg 

Vteille Moniogne 


Bk Eosl A sfa 
Cneung Kong 
China Light 
Green island 
Hang Seng Bonk 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Reolty A 

HK Hotels 

HK Land 
HK Shong Bank 


HK Tgteunone 
3S1 HK You motel 
HK Whorf 

SS Huieti Whamnca 
^ Hvsan 
Int'l City 
JJ-A- jordlne 

Jordlne Sac 
2* Kowloon Motor 
5900 Mlromor Hotel 
iu New World 
SHK Props 
Stolux 

□ Swire Pacific A 
Tai Cheung 
WOft Kwong 
Wing On Co 
^ Winser 
.?5J world inn 


Current Stock Index : 282636 
Previous : 283148 


Frankfort 


el-elewdv: fo-toogv; »r-talr; tvhoJl; oevoreosi; oc-portiv ctouoy; r^gm: 
M> g ro wers; sw-vkjw; if -storm v. 


SATURDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Heavy. FRANKFURT: Rota. Tome. 
14 — 4 (57 —481. LONDON: Rain. Temp. 13 — 11 155 — 521. MADRID: Rata. 
TomP. 20—13 148 — 55). NEW YORK: Pair. Tomo. 10—4 (SO— J»i. PARIS: 
Overcast. Tump. IS — ll (5° — 52). ROME: Cloudv.Temn.73— 9 (73—481. TEL 
AVIV: No. ZURICH: Roin. Temp. 14—10 (57 — 501. BANGKOK: Fair. Terno. 
33 — 25 (91-771. HONG KONG: Ctovdv. Temp. 26 — 24 (TO — 7SI. MANILA: 
Fair. Temp. 32 — 24 (90 — 751. SEOUL: Rain. Temp. 18 — 11 164 — 521. 
SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Temp. 30— 241. TOKYO: Fooov.Tomp.2S— 14 
177 - 571. 


AEG-Yatefimken 24A50 251 WorW mn 

Allianz Vers 1783 1B15 

Altana 428 NA Hang Seag Index : NA 

BASF 263.70 26550 Previous : 1721 S3 

saver S6J0 260 

: Bar Hvpo Bank 427 JO NA 

Bov Verelnsbank 435 443. 1*“ - 

BBC 291 NJL Jolwnn 

B HP- Bank 430 NJL 1 

BMW 550 560 

Commerzbank 271 SO 27570 AECI 

Coni Gumml 16530 16550 Anglo Anwrlam 

Ddlmter-Bens 1220 1223 Anglo Am Gold 

□eousso 458 NA Bartows 

Deurscno Babcock 229 NA Blvvoor 

Doulsdie Bank 71150 7I7J0 Buffs Is 

Dresdnor Bank 34350 346 Do Bears 

GHH 219 22150 Drlelonteln 

Harpener 361 NA Elands 


2270 2270 
2040 2050 
IB 1750 
875 NA 

NA 46 
NA 275 
NA 12 
NA &45 
NA 12.10 
NA 3475 
NA 65S 
NA 770 
NA 970 
NA NA 
NA 750 
NA 2750 
NA NA 
NA 059 
NA 1370 
NA 1550 
NA 1070 
NA NA 
NA 850 
NA 1350 
NA 275 
NA » 
NA 2.15 
NA 056 
NA NA 
NA 4J73 
NA 250 


72S 775 

NA 3300 
18750 NA 
1160 1135 
1550 1525 
7225 7725 
1445 1455 
5000 4800 
1630 NA 


BAT. 

Beediam 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BGC Group 
Bools 

Bewaler Indus 
BP 

Brit Homo 5! 

Brit Telecom 

Brit Aeroseaee 

Brlloll 

BTR 

Burmaft 

Cobie Wireless 

Cm&urv Sctiw 

Charier Cons 

Commercial u 

Cora Gold 

Courtoulds 

Dolgoty 

Do Beers r 

Distillers 

□rlefonleln 

Floons 

FreoStGed 

GEC 

Gen Acddent 
GKN 
GloxdS 
Grand Met 
GRE 

Gulimoss 

GUS 

Hainan 

Hawker 

ICI 

imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land SecuH ties 
Legal General 
Ltevdl Bonk 
Lonrho 
Lucas 

Marks and $p 
M e tel Bo 1 
Midland Bank 
Not w«t Bank 
PandO 
FI I king ten 
Plessey 
Pructenllal 
Ratal Elea 
Randfonteln 
Rank 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 


Banco Comm 

OoahoieH 

Cred Itoi 

Erldonki 

Formltalla 

Flat 

Generali 

IFI ' 

itaknmenti 

I taigas 

IterrnobUTori 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

NBA 

Olivetti 

P Irani 

RA5 

Rlnescnnte 


S? S1F 

2^ SME 

l?Sda 

NA 

NA hub Corrent ledax : 1793 1 

37S pravteusttm I Sty* 

S tSIr 

1 1 1 1 BI 1 

1M Air Uouide 577 NA 

NA Alethom AH. 342 NA rSes^ 

« Av Dassault 1210 NA cSSueo 

_450 Bmcotre 724 NA CRA 

473 NA CSR 
1530 NA Bvrriop 

SJA effi^ixi 

£ K* K 

NA {ta»*WtBonk 
NA | EH^quOatae mn NA NB^HUI 

“ NA Poseidon 
ict NA Coal Trust 

» Hit 

Thonw Nation 
^•1 J;-*- Western Mining 



AGA 

Alfa Laval 


■A3fra 

Atlas Copco 

Bolklen 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Essette 

HandeisOortken 

Pharm ucta 

Soab-Scanlo 

SonovOc 

Stonska 

SKF 

SwudlrtiMottJi 

Volvo 


Mitsumi 

. NEC 

NGK Insulators 

NlkfcoSee 

I Nippon Kooaku 
m 1 Nippon Oil 

■ - 1 Nippon steel 

163 NA Nippon Yuan 
242 NA Nissan 
300 NA Nomura Sec 
490 NA Olympus 
142 NA Pione er 


Affaersvaertden Index ; NA 
Previous : 41UB 


482 472 i 

IS J? Alr LtauWo 

N ^r Alsthom AtL 

112 IS Aw Dassoutt 

458 450 ftmeatre 

S14M1 Turk bk: 

_S» * Bongraln 

***** BOUVOUOS 

m 164 BSN-GO 
J" 2S Correfour 
254 232 Quraeurs 

IS 3764 15 3/64 GubMed 
Darty 

733 772 Domex 

216 NA EWftAaultaJn# 


Q u5 __ «£ “4 Europe 1 

Hanson 220 NA cen Eoux 

Hawker 429 421 Hoahefte 

iCi 674 662 LotannCeg 

imperial Group 216 Z15 Lw«Sd 

Jaguar 328 NA Leeteur 

Land Socurl ties 322 315 fOraal 

Legal General 714 714 Martell 

Ltevdl Bank 479 473 Metro 

Lonrho 165 NA Mer(tn 

UlCos 448 443 JSIctwlta 

Marks and $p 184 183 MoetHmassy 

Metal 60S 551 543 

Midland Bank 442 442 O ec tdentote 

Natw«tB«ik m 694 S? 

piMctaohm S J? Perrier 

Pliklngten 293 NA peuaeol 

Ratal Elect 138 na Redouts 

Randfonteln *6 JVj SNA Roussel Ucfarf 

Rank 474 477 sanofl 

Reed Inti 681 675 sxU Rosskml 

Reuters 358 358 rktemram 

Rural DuichC 43 35«443 19^ Thomson C5F 
RTZ 534 539 Tons 

Scotch! 775 NA 

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1B4 NA Ricoh 

181 NA Sharp 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


i 

i 



4- 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dhpauha 
\ _ NEW YORK — Before last weekend’s National -•'• 
^Football League games, the Dallas Cowboys speared ■' 

- to be wiling along as the best team in the smog East t^x 

' 01 Conference. Tbe Washington 

' *u* Re dskins, on the other hand, were tuT -ambtino ~tr> . start at 

£;■ *ack into contention for the divisiratlead, or just to i * rK "‘' h 
“ . make something of what had appeared to be a disap- 

- V ~^>pointing season.- - . ■ ' * : 

**» rj Now look: By losing to the Su Loois Cardinals on 
X ^ Mooday night, the Cowboys are 6-3 and tied with the 
- .---.New York Giants. The Redskins, at 5-4, with four 
?*' victories in their last five games, seem to be wi*K«>g a 
‘ run. 

3ut how much the Redskins have improved cfn/v» 

1-3 start wiD be made evident by how wdl they 

NFX. PREVIEW : 


terback Sun- 
day for the 
Rams against 
the Giants. 




K 




The Legacy of Old Gramerey Gym 

Famed Boxing Trainer D ’Amato Is Dead, but Not die Memories 


the Cowboys. The 

who beat them in the season's Gist 
t game, 44-14. 

room refrains from that encounter stfO 


has thrown five passes that were intercepted in the last 
three games, and with Mark Duper injured. Mark 
Clayton has been the only reliable receiver. True, the 
Jets have not wonin Miami since 1980, but they beat 
the Dolphins handily last month, 23-7. Another loss 
by the Dolphins could severely affect their chances to 
make the.playoffs. (Dolphins by 314.) 

Houston (4-5) at Buffalo (1-8): The (Were and die 
three other teams in the Central Division each have a 


W* the Cowboy’s quarierbacfci Danny White, said 
that nigh L In Washington, those words were about as ijavE tound 






y WM tocMt ac™ pk - of ^ g fS&W^^J *™**** « 


alf ■ — and I was very dose —we might have won 64- 


_ upon how cynical one is. 
i* three-game winning streak they 
a way to protect the quarterback, Warren 
Moon; after being sacked 31 times in the first six 
he has been sacked just four times in the last 
while completing 58 of 96 passes (60 percent) for 


7Q8yards and five touchdowns. 

.There is little good to say of the Bills. They rank 
second in penalties assessed and have scored the 
fewest points of any team in the league. Hank Bul- 



T 


Mikely to be forgotten as the score. 

“What did we have, six interceptions?” the Red- 
1 -skins' defensive end, Charles Mann, said -Thursday. 

[“They get the ball in our territory and they score 
L — bdowns, that’s 42 pomts fight there. They had 44 
its, so you don't have to have very much . offense 

' C t£fSS^ise is best told in the coach, has' hinted that Vince^magamc^ the 

twvere. In the first four games, tbe Redskins made be at 

and got just three, for a minus-12 totaL In the last < l aanerf>acfc to Bruce Mathison. (Oflers by 2 Vl) 
e games, they have made rally seven and have' taken 
. sj 3 £s. 3 jX 18,foraphis-lI. 

- Hanah’s Reno Race & Sports Book favors the 
Redskins by two and one-half points. 1 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE - 
= £ Los Angeles (8-1) at New York (63): These teams 
V J^jare remarkably alike; each relying on its defense for 

- y Vr victory. The Giants, however, appear to have several 

— * / J&advamages. They defeated die Rams, 16-13, the last 

S? they played, in the conference wild-card game ots are on a roll, finally matching emotion and enthu- 

~ ~~*- --~!last year. Eric Dickerson, the Rams* prolific running . siasm to a clubhouse full of very good players. Most 
..7 -Jw*. bas been bothered by a sprained ankle. And at agnificant in their last victory, 17-13 over Miami, was 


By Ira Bcrkow 

Nete York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — The steep walk up tbe poorly lit, narrow 
wooden staircase to the shadowed area on (he third floor 
seemed long. The street noises grew muffled and the creak of 

the stairs became louder. 

The climb Tuesday night in the old building at 1 16 East 
14th Street io the Gramerey Gymnasium at the top of the 
stairs — quiet now. because it is just past dosing time, 8 
o'clock, and the punching, skipping, snorting fighters have 
gone home — brought to mind the words of Cos D'Amaio. 

“Any kid coming beneJbr the first time who thinks he 
wants to be a fighter, and who makes the climb up those dark 
stairs," said Cus, “has it 50 percent licked, because he’s 
licking fear." 

Cus D'Axnato, the sometimes strange, usually sweet, often 
suspicious, invariably generous teacher and philosopher and 
boxing manager and trainer, owned this gym for some 30 
years, and, when young, slept in a cot in the back with a 
police dog for a companion. Printed on the front door was. 
the name “Gramacy, misspelled by the painter. 

It was here that one returned to recall the celebrated days 
of D’Amaio, when he was the most successful handler of 
fighters in the world. 

It was here that D’Amaio, short, thick-chested, busby- 
browed, nearly blind in one eye from a childhood accident, 
did battle with the mob-controlled dements of top-level 
boxing in the 1950s and 60s. 

The smell of sweat in the gym seems embedded in the 
woodwork. On a bulletin board, yellowing newspaper clips. 
There is, however, a freshly penciled notice. It reads: 

“Cus D’ Amato. Funeral Services Thursday, 8:30 a-im. 
Cat. skill, New York.” It went on to give driving directions. 


Cus D‘ Amato died Monday night of pneumonia at Mount 
Sinai Hospital in New York City. He was 77 years old. 

“His memory is still alive here," said David Bullock, a 
caretaker of tbe gym. “Look at what he done. He took two of 
the boys who came up those stairs, and made champs out of 
'em — world champs." 

He refereed to Floyd Patterson, who at 21 became the 
youngest to win the heavyweight championship, in 1956. and 
Jose Torres, who won the light-heavyweight ride In 1965. 

D‘ Amato and Patterson developed a father-son relation- 
ship even closer than the dose relationships D’Amato had 
with most of his fighters. Then came an estrangement. 

In later years they reconciled. Last year Patterson said 
that he would change nothing in his life except the time he 
was a pan from D’Amaio. “It turned out,” said Patterson, 
“that whatever Cus said, worked out to be true.” 

D’Amato had insight into human nature. “People who are 
boro round don't die square." be said of basic character. He 
asserted. “No matter what anyone says, no matter the excuse 
or explanation, whatever a person does in the end is what he 
intended to do all along." He said. “Heroes and cowards feel 
exactly the same fear. Heroes just react to it differently." 

D’Amaio had some odd ways. He rarely revealed his home 
address because he feared snipers, and* he never married 
because he believed a wife might be duped by his enemies 
into doing him in. But he was principled to the teeth, and so 
honest that the strangest thing that could befall a fight 
manager befell Cus. He filed for bankruptcy in 1971. His- 
torically, it is tbe fighters who go bankrupt and their manag- 
ers who walk away flush. But there is no record of any of his 
fighters having problems while he was handling them. Tor- 
res, in fact, recalls that be earned close to SI nnOioD in his 
career, “and Cus never took a penny." 



Cus D’Amato, with Floyd Patterson in 1960. 

As Cus got older, and had fewer fighters, he began to 
spend more time in the mountains, where he loved to fish. 
.And about 10 years ago he moved to Caiskiil. where he 
opened a boxing club for teen-agers. 

D’Amato always worried more about the well-being of his 
fighters than anything else. Once, shortly before a big fight, 
Torres, normally a model citizen who now is New York’s 
athletic commissioner, was arrested and taken to the pre- 
cinct house, where be phoned D'Amaio at the Gramerey 
Gym. 

“Cus," said Torres, embarrassed and apologetic. “I’m in 
the police station. I got into a street fight" 

“Jose,” said D’Amaio. with concern in his voice, “did you 
keep your chin down?" 




Cleveland (4-5) at Gncfanati (4-5): The Bengals 
have been the better team in recent weeks, winning 
three of their last four, while the Browns, with the 
rookie Berme Kosar at quarterback, have lost their last 
three. StiD, they match up wdl; Cincinnati has the 
better offense, Cleveland the better defense. So it falls 
an Kosar to generate a few touchdowns; (he Browns 
have just rate in tbe last two games. (Bengals by 2 fc.) 

IndhmapoBs (3-6) at New F-ngfand (6-3): Tbe Patri- 



t 


— -quarterback, Jeff Kemp will replace Dieter Brock; 
” who has started every other g»me Brock had kidney 
stones removed earlier in the week. (The Giants are 
^favored by 3 points.) ■ 

:’\-S ■ Atlanta (1-6) at Pfafladetphn (4-5): Other than Ger- 
a -c *r -y. aid Riggs, a 100-yard rusher in three of his team's last 
• • . . . .f m four games, the Falcons have little to eddnaie, and 
' : certainly not the hope 'of a victory over the Eagles. 

* 'if i, mV Even though they lost to San Francisco last Sunday, 
the Eagles are a formidable opponent for any team, 
specially for one like the Falcons, whose quarterback, 
j David Archer, has completed barely 50 percent of Ids 
rtasses. Worse, the Falcons have even up the most 
joints of any team in die league; (Eagles by 9.) . 

Detroit (54) at Chicago (9-0): The lions have been 
difficult team to trade all season. They seem to play 
itter against strong passing teams, but the Bears 
.'adllate in that regard. If the running. back Walter 
’ayton is having a teg game, and the Bears get an early 


that they rallied with two touchdowns in the fourth 
quarter. That does not bode well for the Colts, a sorry 
group, who the last time trailed the Jets, 35-3, at the 
half and never r ecovered. (Patriots by 9%.) 

Los Angeles (6-3) at San Diego (4-5): The Raiders 
beat the Chargers two games ago, 34-21, but then lost, 
33-3, to Seattle. Maybe those results are to be expea- _ 
ed. In recent seasons, the Raiders have played wdl * 
against the Chargers and badly against the Seahawks. 
But the Chargers beat a good Denver dub last Sunday, 
30-10, with — surprise — solid defense. Given the 
erratic nature of the Raiders' offense, a victory by the 
Chargers could be in the works. (Raiders by 2&.) 

Pittsburgh (4-5) at Kansas Qty (3-6): The Steders 
have been s tumbling along without their r egular quar- 
terback, Mark Malone, and as a result, -without much 
offense. The Chiefs are in tbe midst of a fast fade, with 
five consecutive losses and two more key players. Art 
Stifl, a defensive end, and Henry Marshall, a wide 





bun 


•;£ but Sunday's 16-13 loss to the Vikings, ran for only any previous game. But the Steders have held «*ch of 
\ — ■ .' :c ~f-9 yards and passed for 84. (Bears by II.) their last five opponents to fewer than 135 yards 

' r G» 1 *n Bay (36) at JVfiDpesota Jhe.£»ckgrs_ cus hing. (Qiief 8 byiVL)- ^ . 
ive lost three in arow since bearing tbe Vikings. 20- 
. Part of tbe reason is a stagnating offense and a 
uccession of quarterbacks, the latest being Tun Zom. 

(he Vikings have won two of their last three, and over 
ill their defense i* playing wdL (Vikings by 5.) 

St Lottis (4-5) at Tanya Bay (0-9): It is difficult to 
relieve tbe Cardinals handled the Cowboys so easily. 


twinning by 21-10 without Roy Green, their best re- 
ceiver. I m ag in e, then, what they could do to the 
woebegone Buccaneers, who gave the Giants a fight 


INTERCONFERENCE 
Seattle (5-4) at New Orleans (3-6): The Seahawks 
played their best defensive game of the season Sunday 
in defeating the Raiders, while the Saints lost for the 
fourth straight time. The Saints' biggest problem is 
that because of injuries to their offensive line, they 
have no running game. Their passing game is not all 
that terrific, other, and the Seahawks are unlikely to 
hdp it (Seahawks by 6 .) 

MONDAY NIGHT 

San Francisco (5-4) at Denver (6-3): The Broncos 


last Sunday, only to lose, 22-2Q. StilL the Buccaneers 
ve to win some time, and tins snghl.be as good a 

game as any. Green probably will not play, the Bncca- were clobbered by the Chargers, which may not be so knee as seriously. 

7*® ■ _ wi>pii» ana n+ kranw tknar ilafaMOA Kan (UiIImi a Kftl* Blfrti ><inn o r w riT t 4 ffar dll Anlif atip rtf tkn iname tkA q[ H 3 fj H CTT) 

Jersey, had released the high bar 
for a “reverse hecht,” had done a 
twisting half-somersault over the 
bar and was grabbing it again when 


Irina Baraksanova of the Soviet Union, with a graceful routine on tbe balance beam, placed 
fourth in tbe individual s tanding* Her team dethroned the defending champion, Romania. 


U.S. Gymnast Sey Hurt 
By Hard Fall From Bars 

The Associated Press 

MONTREAL — The U5. gym- 
nast Jennifer Sey fell off the uneven 
parallel bars and dislocated her left 
knee Thursday night. 

She was taken to Queen Eliza- 
beth Hospital for emergency sur- 
gery. Her coach, Don Peteri said 
be had never seen a gymnast hurl a 


- „ . was are at borne, and their defense has gotten a little 

. • ” 1 , r> , fitter week by week. (Cardinals by 114.) 

If ' AMERICAN CONFERENCE 

\ New York (7-2) at Miami (5-4): This has become a 
j :i game of monumental importance for the Dolphins, 
mom 1 J who have lost three of their last four, with poor 
^ 1 f [defense and, now, inconsistent offense. Dan Marino 


■ a result, atter an. umy one of the teams the 
Broncos beat now has a winning record. So maybe this 
one shapes up as a third consecutive victory for the 
49ers. Joe Montana is expected back after a week's 
absence because of injuries to his collarbone and 
shoulder, and the 49ers have won their last three 
Monday night games. (49ers by 3.) (NYT, WP) 


her foot hit 11 , knocking her side- 
ways and to the floor. 



htfera 


%« 





Sentence 
iven London 
Fan for Attack 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 


Hockey 


Transition 




NBA Standings 


NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Dtvttoa 


WALES CONPEREMCB' 
Patrick Division 


United Prets International 

LONDON — A soccer fan who 
an American on the face 
1 wrists with a broken beer g)ass - 
-and left him permanently scarred • 

• > was sentenced Friday to life in pris- 

on. It was the longest sentence ever 

■ handed down by a British court for 

■ -soccer violence. 

Kevin Whitton, 25, fought with 
„• prison officers as be was dragged 
from the dock at the Old Bailey 
- -after sentencing by Judge Michael 
Argyle. Relatives and friends 
;. . screamed and shouted protests. 

Another fan, Stephen Bowden, 

. 23, was given an eight-year sen- 

! -tence for wounding and causing an 

■ ‘‘affray. 

Whitton, a tile layer, was among 

' - London dub C^dsea who terror- 
,ized customers ai a pub near the 
team's playing ground before a 

■ match a gaina Manchester United 
-•[ last December. Part of one nistom- 

ear was bitten off. 

•i; $Neil Hansen, now- a personnel 

• - director in Seattle, said Whitton 
. shouted at him, “You- bloody 

- . Americans, coining here and t aking 
En glish jobs," then slashed him. 
"■ Hansen spent five days in a hospi- 
, ' tal for surgery to repair severed 
- : tendons. - 

Bert Mflfidnp, the chairman of 
the Football Association, wel- 
coined Whit ton’s sentence and 
- said, “Tbe countiy doesn't want to 
; put up with these people anymore 
■' and neither does football" 

. English teams have beat banned 
. jf from European competition after a 
d/p riot started by Liverpool fans at the 

- European Cup final, in Brussels led 

to the deaths of 39 persons in May. 

A Football Association spokes- 
man said, “We like 10 see sentences 
issued by the court which wfll a<> 
f " lively act as a deterrent. I think it is - 
, ■ : . fair to say that in this case the 

■ sentences are likely to send shock 
waves around potential trouble- . 
makers." 



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Philadelphia 

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Pittsburgh 

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Atlanta 

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Buffalo 

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to 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MMTwosr Dtvbtwi 

Donvor 6 0 UMQ — 

Hovatan ... 5 .7 3U. n*. 

Son Antairio 3 4 AB SVi 

Utah • M -® . jvs 

Dallas 2 4 JJJ .4 

Sgcramnln 14 SOS 4W 

Pacific Division 

LA. CIIOPM S 1 £33 — 

LA Lallan 5 I .833 — 

Portland . S 2 JU v* 

Seattle ‘ ‘ ‘ 2 4 J«J 3 

Golden Store J 3 5 2U 3% . 

Phoenix _ 0 5 tm 4fa 

THURSDAYS RESULTS — . 
MterogKM 31 U » M—n 

MOW Yortt 35 ae is 17— «« 

MsnaW «-1l B-ie 21, Cummlnas 7-19 M 17: 
EwMD 10-20 44 24. wmrms 10-15 M 22. Re- 
booWti: Mi lw auk e e SI (Cummlnos 131 ; New 
Yonc 63 (Bannister |6>. AMfsH: Ml(wmikee22 
UMoncneLPremer4) > New York 23 tTuckec, 
WaWer 6)1 ' 

Chlcaoo 24 2* 24 23— 97 

New Amr Ms 35 21— I M 

wHikmisS-ra 7-90, Richardson S-129-ioi?; 
WaoUKtgc M3 7-T0 23, Mncv 6-10 3-3 If. Re. 
bounds: CMeoaa n WN gBMm Green, Oo*> 
IrvMf New Jersey 57 (wlHtamsSTKAitfsts: 
Chicago 16 (ConJne. Wodridoe 3) ; New.Jer. 
sey 20 (Richardson 5>. 

LA. cuppers 2411 *4 36-115 

Houston 34 31 36 36— U7 

Sampson 1S-T9 2-6 2% LlOVd >0-13 1-1 XI.- 
SmWl 13-19 6-12 35. Edworas'8-15 MlLRf 
bounds: Los Aflgeies 40 IDonaMsop, Benkr- 
wJnBI; Houston 51 (sampsw, pfsluww R1. 
Assif*s; Los Angeles 71 (Edwards 7}> Hous- 
ton 34 iUayfl 7>. , 

I— A. Lakers . X7 34 94 s>— »♦ 

Utah 26 33 23 24-166 

Worthy MS M2 26, JoObar 8-13 Ml 25: 

nan Hey 10-19 s-ia 3t. R.Green lumurs. 
bounder Las Anaeles St I Lucas OS: Utah 45 
(80 Key 121. Assists: Lae Anaofet 24 {Jahraan 
T2J; U1«*> 23-tGreen. Hamsn 5). 

DaUdi *4 15.14 46— 99 

Dearer 3i n 43 31-131 

Emrifsh 11-16 6-M XL Cooper 7-M M IL 
H or ner 11-16 0-0 S3. Aaulna 6M « tt 
Schromp* 4-14 T3. Vincent 3->4 S-TO 11 4f 

baands: Dai las 78 (Perkins 12); Donvor 64 
(Wit Ho ms 13). Aunts: Dotas 17 (Homor 5) : 
Denver 30 (Lever 51. ‘ 

Cfcl upland 94 33 31-94-95 

Sacramento 24 22 21 20—04 

Free 9-235*29. Hubbard 54 M 12; Dr«w*-l I . 
2J 2X Jahason M9-A5 20. Rotounds: C w s 
land a (Hinson 10); Socrootorfe 42 {Tborpo 
ft. Assists: Cleveland 14 (Bagley, Free 4); 
SacrtMteatO 21 (Ttwus V). 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Dtvtstaa 

SL Louis 4 S . 2 10 37 45 

Chicago 4 6 1 9 52 63 

Minnesota 3 6 3 9 50 51 

□on-olr 2 8 3 7 29 70 

Toronto 1 n 0 2 37 57 

Smyth* Division 

Edmonton 10 2 I 21 65 47 

Coloary 7 5 1-15 61 46 

Vancouver « 5 2 14 54 47 

Winnipeg 6 6 1 13 57 Ad 

Los Anaeles 3 TO 1 7 51 72 

THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Hartford • o v— l 

Boston 1 1 6—3 

Paslo (2>, Unsemen (31) Crawford (41. 
Stats oo goal: Hartford Ion Keans) 13^-10— 
31; Boston (an Weeks) &-7-9— 22. 

Chicago 1 6 1-1 

PbBadeJphla 2 2 3-6 

Eklund (3), Kerr 3 (131. Ron Sutter (2). 
Howe 2 (4); Brown (1), Fraser (*). SMS on 
goal: Chicago Ion LMdoergni 6-64—20; Pun- 
odelPhla (on Bannerman) 15-12-10—37. 


BASEBALL 
Notional Leaaoo 

HOUSTON — Named Gene Tenooe cooch. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 
UTAH— Announced that Darrell Griffith, 
guard, will be out of the flneuo tor cnorher T 2 
weds or mare while recovering from a bro- 
ken bone fn Ms left fool. 

FOOTBALL 

Canadhm FwBnll League 
SOMONTON— Activated Ron Howard, de- 
fensive bach. Placed Cliff Toney, defensive 
bock, on Jnlured reserve. 

National Football League 
ATLANTA— Waived Lawrence Plllers. de- 
fensive tackle. Signed Willard Goff, defensive 
tackle. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey Leogoe 
MINNESOTA — Assignee Ware Komonoskl, 
goalie, to new York of the Atlcnilc Coast 
Hockey League. 

N.Y. RANGERS— Sent Dave Gogner. cen- 
ter, to the New Haven Nlehmcnivks at the 
American Hockey League. 

WASHINGTON — Announced that Scott Ste- 
vens, de fenseman, may mlse as much as a 
week of action be cause ot o bruised rlghi knee. 
Recalled Wes Beaudoin, defenseman, from 
ihe Binghamton whaler* to replace Slevera. 

COLLEGE 

BROOKLYN COLLEGE-— Announced the 
resignation ot Robert Fox, men's assistant 
basketball coach. Named RkhMlcetlef men's 
fulltime assistant basketball cooch ond Molly 
Perdue women's administrator. 

MONMOUT H Named Paul Schofield 
sports Information director. 

NEBRASKA— Announced the resignation 
ot Bob Pahr* wrest line coach, effective Nov. 
15; named Tim N e u ma nn Interim coach. 


Jennifer Sey screamed in pain after dislocating her knee. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Europe Roots U.S. in Golf Tourney 

KAPALUA, Hawaii (AP) — Sandy Lyle, with an eagle-2 on the 16th 
bole that beat Calvin Peete, helped Europe defeat tbe United States in 



Gymnastics 


World Gymnastics Championships 


• FMmI woman Main standings altar option- 
al exercises Thursday night in the world 
Gymnastics Chomrtonsblps at tbe Olympic 
Vokxhmmt, to Montreal: 

1. 5ovM Union, 391375. 

7. Romania. 38&B50L 

X East Germany. 3B7-500. 

4. Buigana, 382650. 

& CachojIovaMa, 3 81 6 00 . 

6. United Slates, 379.75a. 

7. China. 379.330. 

A Hungary. 377.800. 

9. Canada, 37S 2Q 0. 

JDl Japan, 37L473. 

11- west Germany, 377JI75. 

T2. Spain, 369S75. 

13. South Korea. 36B3Q6. 

14 Italy, 30*0$. 

T3L Switzerland, 3*1475, ' 

14, Great BrIMn, 361250. 

17. Australia 361.«a 

IB. Franca 36L72L 
T9. Sweden. 3I9A2S. 

: 2a BraztL 3S7JSO. 


WOMEN'S INDIVIDUAL STANDINGS 

1. Scatorfna Ssaae. Romania. 7050 

2. ND tafia YurfcMnkA, USSR. 79AS0. 


X Olga MOP e Panova, US5R. 7L57S. 

4. irtna Baraksanova, USSR. 78JOL 

5. Dag mar Kerston, East Germany. 7&25IL 
k-6. Oksana OmeltgntcJdk, USSR, 78.175 
*■7. Elena Shoushoumya. USSR. 7SJJ25. 

S. Gabriele Fohnrlcn. Eau Germany, 
77.773. 

9. Camoria Volnea Rumania. 77AS0. 
la DanWa Slllvas, 77AM, 

*-U. Cetastlnd Popo, Romaila. 77JXXL 
x-n. Laura COilna, Romania. 77.100. 
s-lX Voro Katosnlkoug, USSR, 77AS6. 

14. Ulrlko KJatz, East Germany, 76971 
K-T5. Jana FuftfttaM, 74.900. 

14. Borluna Stoionava Bulgaria 76775. 
17. Satrlna Mar. USA. 76.750. 
x-lB Diana Dudsva. Bulgorie. 7*J0a 
IB Eugenia Goioa Romania 7L700. 

26. Iveta Poiokava. Czechoslovakia. 76A0a 
2L Ha no Ricna Czediostovokig, 76A7S. 

22. Boionka Domlreva Bulgaria. 76450. 
y-VX Jbna Vogel, East Germany, 7ua. 

24. AUno Orevlana. Czounslovatiia. 76JOOL 
(v-Oenohs* exclusions frem me unsomlno 
All-Around Individual Finals because of In- 
ternational Gymnastic Federal ton rules mot 
mace a Jlrall of 36 eomoeHtort but no mart 
than three from each eauntrvJ 


Europe has 38 points, Australia 21, the United States 20 and Japan 8 . 

Australia got second place when David Graham, after hitting out tfi 
bounds, sank a par pull on 18 to beat Japan’s Tommy Nakajnna in the 
deciding match between those fnamg Ray Floyd made up three shots on 
Gordon Brand Jr. on tbe 17tb and 18th holes for the only U.S. victory. 

Suit Filed Against Tennis Agents 

LONDON (UPI) — The governing body of men’s professional tennis 
declared “war” Thursday on the agents who control 40 percent of tbe 
world's top players, charging that the agents were boldine the sport 
hostage and “seeking to strangle it in an illegal web of pervasive conflict, 
intimidation, fraud and corruption." 

The Men’s International Professional Tennis Council announced it 
had filed suit in U.S. District Court in Manhattan against Donald DeD 
and Raymond Benton and their Washington-based management firm, 
ProServ; Mark McCormack and his Ohio-based management firm. 
International Management Group, and the Swedish auto maker Volvo. 

Volvo, IMG and ProServ had opened the battle with an action alleging 
breaches of anti-trust laws and challenging MIPTCs rules requiring 
players to compete in a minimum number of tournaments. 

NCAA Announces Drug Test Penalties 

STORRS. Connecticut (AP) — Penalties for college athletes who test 
positive for drugs will range from a warning to the loss of a year’s 
eligibility under a program expected to gain NCAA approval in January, 
the chairman of a special committee said Thursday. 

Drug testing is being performed independently at 96 of the 283 
Division I schools and is under considers non at 45. Under the program 
developed by the committee headed by a former NCAA president, John 
Toner, the organization would conduct mandatory tests at selected 
Division I bowl games and championships starting next August 

A positive result for any of about 200 banned drugs or chemicals except 
marijuana would result in a 90-day suspension of eligibility, with a repeat 
offender losing eligibility for one year. Only a confidential warning would 
be issued for a first positive test for marijuana. 

For the Record 

Mare Buomconti, 19, the son of the former Miami Dolphins star Nick 
BuoniCtmti, who was paralyzed by an injury while playing a football 
game for the Gtadel, has undergone surgery to fuse and stabilize his 
spine. Doctors said it will permit him to begin therapy. {AP) 

Jimmy Connors has pulled out of next week’s Benson and Hedges 
tennis tournament in London because of an injury, organizers said (A P) 

Quotable 

a If you finish above iOO, the NCAA will investigate you. if you finish 
below .500, the alumni will investigate you.” Father Paul L O’Connor, 
former president of Xavier Universi ty in Ohio. (LA T) 


Soviet Women Win 
Title in Gymnastics 


By Anne S. Crowley 

The Associated Press 

MONTREAL — Oksana Ome- 
liantchik and Elena Shoushounova 
each scored a perfect 10 on the 
floor exercise Thursday night as the 
Soviet Union easily won its third 
straight women’s team title at the 
World Gymnastics Champion- 
ships. 

Ecaierina Szabo and her Roma- 
nian teammates, gold medalists at 
tbe 1984 Olympics and the world 
champions in 1979, placed second 
with East Germany third and Bul- 
garia fourth. 

Czechoslovakia was fifth and the 
United Slates, behind strong op- 
tional exercises, finished sixth. 

Omeliantchik. 16, had the crowd 
on its feet as she laughed and 
danced across tbe carpet to music 
featuring the sound of chirping 
birds. Shoushounova, 16, followed 
with a more mature but equally 
daring and crowd-pleasing routine. 
Both times, spectators in the Olym- 
pic Velodrome chanted, “10! 10! 
10 !" 

The crowd also sought a 10 for 


Daniela SOivas, the liny Romanian 
who performed to Appalachian 
hoed own music. But the judges 
deemed her routine worth only a 
9.875. and followed that with a 9.9 
for a flawless exercise by Szabo. 
Both marks were booed. 

The Soviets. leading after Tues- 
day night's compulsories, finished 
with 393.375 points to Romania's 
388.850. East Germany had 
387.500, Bulgaria 382.650 and 
Czechoslovakia 382.600. The Unit- 
ed States edged out China by four- 
tenths of a point, with 379.750. 

The Soviet team dominated the 
individual all-around standings. 
Szabo was first with a score of 
78.750 of a possible 80.0. but next 
were Natalia Yurchenko, Olga 
Mcstepanova and Irina Baraksan- 
ova, all of the Soviet Union. Yur- 
chenko. the defending world cham- 
pion, scored a 78.650: 
Mostepanova a 78.575, and Barak- 
sanova a 78.500. 

Dagmar Kersten of East Germa- 
ny was fifth with a score of 78.250. 
followed by Omeliantchik. 78.175. 
and Shoushounova, 78.025. 


Flyers Win 9th Straight, 
Dismaying Hawks’ Coach 


The Associated Press 

PHILADELPHIA — The Phila- 
delphia Flyers coasted to their 
ninth straight victory Thursday 
night, but the coach of the Chicago 
Blade Hawks, Bob Pulford, was in 
no mood to give praise. 

Approached after the Flyers’ 6-2 
victory. Pulford said only, “Who 
needs this?" 

The Flyers spotted the Black 
Hawks a goal then reeled off six 
straight, two in each period, to im- 
prove their record to 11 - 2 , best in 
the National Hockey League. 

“Everyone is playing well," said 
the Flyers' right wing, Tim Kerr, 
who got his 12ib and 13th goals. 
“We’re all filling our roles and get- 
ting great goaltending." 

Pdle Lindbergh had to face only 
20 shots to post his sixth victory 
against two losses. The team's 
goals-against average is 2.77, best 
in the league. 

The Flyers had played Wednes- 
day night, beating the Rangers, 5-2, 
in New York, which would have 
been a good excuse for having a 
sluggish game. And, sure enough, 
Keith Brown was left wide open for 
an 18-foot wrist shot that beat 


NHL FOCUS 


Lindbergh just 1:09 into the game. 

But that was it for Chicago, until 
Curt Fraser put in a power play 
goal at 12:58 of the third period. 

“I think you see our Learn is ma- 
turing," said the Flyers' coach. 
Mike Keenan. One of his young 
players, center Ron Sutter, scored 
the Flyers’ third goal and assisted 
on veteran Mark Howe's two goals. 

Chicago's goalie, Murray Ban- 
nerman. who faced 37 shots, said 
his te-ini gave in too easily after 
allowing the two first-period goals. 

“You can’t say rwo quick goals 
and that's it," Bannerman said. 
“There are still two periods left to 
play." 

Sutter bad stolen the puck from 
Bannerman to score his goal, then 
dropped off a nice pass less than 
four minutes later that set up 
Howe’s first goal for a 4-1 lead. 

“When they are hounding the 
puck like they are now, it seis the 
tempo," Keenan said. 

Said Suiter’s brother. Darryl, 
who plays for the Black Hawks: 
“They just work hard.” 



i 'S.;- 






I-'.W 





lCruc^RoyakJimPABSS 








Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNPAY, NOVEMBER 9-10, 1985 


POSTCARD 


people 


Statue of Liberty Fever 


George C. Sc ott: "Calmer, M ore Serene’ JoanComns , the Bride 


By William E. Geisi 

.Vpm York Times Semtc 


N EW YORK — Lei others 
"rouse about Christmas com- 


1 * grouse about Christmas com- 
ing so early ia the year. New York- 
ers are frantically making plans for 
the Fourth of July. 

The city's chronic scramble for 
space — space to walk, space to 
dine, space to rent — focuses on 
finding a spot lo view ihe historic, 
histrionic relighting of the Statue of 
Liberty and related extravangazas. 
Frank Sinatra and an armada of 
tali ships among them. 

Some hotels and restaurants are 
already booked. Rudy Montgom- 
ery has been offered S 3.600 — three 
times his monthly rent — to sublet 
his modest Brooklyn Heights 
apartment, a short walk from the 
Promenade and a view of the stat- 
ue. for the four-day holiday week- 
end. 

Boats that normally charge SZ5 
to $50 per persoo for trips around 
the harbor have raised their fees to 
S 1 .000 per person or more. Nieman 
Marcus has made a Fourth of July 
harbor excursion one of its extrava- 
gant Christinas catalog items. And 
the scramble for a place at the bar 
at Windows on the World has be- 


includvng those restaurants and 
rooms »ith no view of the harbor. 

Reservations are not accepted 
for bar stools, but Gail Draper, a 
spokesman for the restaurant, said 
people are already calling and try- 
ing to pull strings Tor space at the 
bar. 

A lot of peopie who work at the 
World Trade Center ana other 
oflce buildings with a view will be 
spending the weekend at the office, 
according to John Hughes, a 
spokesman for the building. 

One of the unanswered questions 
is: Is there enough water in the 
harbor? The Coast Guard esti- 
mates that there will be at lea^t 
15.000 private pleasure beats Ln the 
harbor to observe the flotilla and 

fireworks. "You will be able to 
walk across the hulls." said one 
boater. "It will be a bumper-boat 
situation." 

Marilyn Vogel, commodore of 
Lhe Sebago Canoe Gub of Brook- 
lyn. said' that a boat at the 7C ’th 
Street Marina that does not run 
was rented for the holiday weekend 
for $“. 000 . 


By Leslie Bennetts 

Vm )«*£ Timet Service 


N EW YORK — He has long been notori- 
ous for beharior that ranees from the 




Elaine Sexton, a magazine adver- 
tising director who lives in Green- 
wich Village, was recently quoted a 
price of SJ0 per person for a birth- 
day party of six people to sail 
around the harbor. But when she 
told Captain Neal Parker of The 
Ethyl that she thought it might be 
more fun to have the pant on July 
4Lh. Parker replied: “Are you sit- 
ting down' 1 " 

And he broke it to her: Tne Eth- 
yl’s price for an all-day outing on 
the Fourth of July would be slightly 
higher: 550.000 (bring your own 
food and beveraaes). 


Sexton now thinks she may just 
want to have the birthday party at a 
restaurant with a view of the statue, 
but she may have to think again. 
“Oh yes." said the reservation clerk 
ai The River Cafe, when asked if 
reservations for the Fourth of July- 
had started coming in. “we’ve been 
receiving calls for reserv ations on 
that date for about three years 


.AU three restaurants and aii of 
the private rooms at Windows on 
the World, atop the World Trade 
Center, are booked from breakfast 
through dinner on the Fourth — 


She said the canoe dub receives 
requests to rent canoes tor that 
weekend, and that the club is con- 
sidering becoming part of the fes- 
tivities. "It would be their last out- 
ing." commented Nichols, who 
predicts “gridlock on the waters.” 

“The only thing they forgot." 
said O’Keefe, “is that there is no- 
where to embark and disembark. 
You figure 1,000 yachts minimum 
and maybe, just may-re. Manhat- 
tan’s three marinas can service 15 
extra boats, so w-hat do the other 
9S5 do?" 

“This will be 10 times the colos- 
sal jam caused by the boats at the 
Brooklyn Bridge celebration.” he 
sjjd "That was a New York party. 
This is national and intemauonal. 1 
get five calls a day from Honda. 
Texas, the Caribbean and every- 
where to tie up at our restaurant." 
"You will see launch services 
springing up to take people out to 
the boats.” he --aid. 

Parker is leasing some dock 
space for $2,500 for the weekend 
and plans to rent it out at high 
rates: about S 3.000 for a single 100 - 
foot boat to pick up passengers. He 
will luce security guirds to make 
sure only customers use the space. 
“Boats will be landing wherever 
they can.” he said. “This will look 
tike Dunkirk." 


1 N ous for behavior that ranges from the 
merely curmudgeonly to the truly alarming, 
his rages having run to the destruction of 
entire hotel rooms, nor to mention himself, as 
on one memorable night when he punched his 
fist into a mirror between acts, gouging his 
hand so badly he had to finish the play 
wearing a rubber clove to collect the blood. 

But on this day 7 George C. Scott is quite 
mild-mannered, or as close to it .as one can 
imagine him coming: as he speaks in that 
familiar rasp, his cold pale eyes quick and 
wary, he is reasonable and conn ecus — al- 
though one still gets the feeling it would be 
unwise to provoke him. Could it be that this 
legendary terror — he who has routinely 
cowed co-stars, colleagues, assorted wives 
and hotel proprietors with his unpredictable 
ferocity — his mellowed? 

When this possibility is suggested, the re- 
sponse is a belly laugh. Has be really stopped 
tearing up the joint? “We’ve kept it quiet," 
Scott said with a grin. But he has just had a 
birthday, his 5Slh. and the thought turns him 
suddenly serious. “I’m much calmer and 
more serene than I was." he said. “It’s a 
process of aging. I can’t go around doing the 
things I did 25 years ago. Life is — I can see 
the end. and why expend all that fruitless 
energy? It’s just not that important to me any 
more, ’it’ being anything that upsets you or 
allows you to" upset yourself." 

So why. for ail those years, did he allow 
himself to be upset? “I don’t know,” he said, 
shaking his grizzled head. “I was aflame — 
with, rden’t” know, desire, passion to prove 
oneself, some considerable anger. A desire to 
achieve, and frustration w-hen that does not 


3 m 

* M. *• 'vAJj 





■ y 


j 7*^ - j 










"■Tony bpono 

The new Scott 



The old ‘“Patton*’ (1970). 


Joan Coffins, 52. the sinister 
Alexis on the U. S. television sene* 
‘-Dynasty.” married PWer Kofea, 
38, 'a Swedish businessman, m las 
Vegas on Wednesday. It was the 
fourth marriage for Collins, who 
has three children. The couple rc- 
nonedlv met in Engl and is 1983, 
when Holm, a former rock star, was 
manufacturing and selling g la rin g 
machinery . . . The -American hu- 
morist Garrison Kefflor is ro many 
a Danish woman he met 25 years 
ago when she was an exchange stu- 
dent at his Minnesota high schooL 
Keillor. who created public radio's 
“A Prairie Home Companion" and 
is the author of the best seller 
“Lake Wobegon Days." and Ufa 
Stowed were reunited is August 
at the 25-year high school reunion 
in Anoka.' near Minneapolis. They 
had not been is touch since 1964. Ii 
will be the second marriage for 
both. 


occur 

Over the years. Scott has arguably achieved 
us much as any living .American actor. He has 
token on Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, Ar- 
thur Miller and Noe! Coward and Neil Si- 
mon: his roles have included Shylock and 
Richard HI. Willie Loraan and Scrooge. 
When Scott wasn’t onstage he was becoming 
a movie star in films like “Patton" and “Dr. 
Stranselcve.” Rang ing from Broadway to 
Hollywood to television and back. Scott'also 
won acclaim as a director with such plays as 
“Design for Living.** “Death of a Salesman" 
and “Present Laughter." starring in the latter 
two as well as directing. 

It is therefore no surprise to find that the 
coming season will see him playing the title 
roles in two big television projects as well as 
starring in a new play. Next month he will be 
seen in a seven-hour NBC-TV miniseries 
piled “Mussolini — The Untold Story." He 
is also planning another go-round -as General 
Patton in a CBS television drama called “The 
Last Days of Patton." which will be broad- 
cast next year. 

And — lest anyone think he is forsaking his 
theatrical roots — Scott will soon start re- 


hearsing for a return to Broadway with “Afri- 
ca." in which he plays what he describes as “a 
broken-down Hollywood screenwriter on the 
verge of insanity," 

The miniseries traces the history of the 
Italian Fascist leader Benito Mussolini, cul- 
minating in his death when he was shot by 
partisans. “He was a psy chotic, a tyrant, but 
he had enormous magnetism," said’ the actor, 
who studied hours of newsreel footage to 
prepare for the role. “He cared nothing for 
money, but he certainly was power-hungry, 
emnivorously ambitious. I play him as a 
functional psychotic." 

As for resurrecting Patton, Scott is, charac- 
teristically. going back to the role because of 
the gnawing fear that he did not do h justice 
the first time around. 

“I never felt satisfied, in ray own mind," he 
said. “I didn't think he'd bean done fair to. I 
thought there was too much blood and guts, 
grab- the- tank -and -kill- the -Germans, and 
very little about the complicated character be 
was. He's a fabulous creature, and I felt a 
kind of longing for him. and a yearning to try 
to communicate that. We hope to bring in his 
inner personality, much more than in the first 
production. I find him bloody interesting: Ins 
unbelievable ability to get hims elf into trou- 
ble with his mouth, which has a certain charm 
to it, and a sadness — and his unbelievable 


courage, with which he faced the most igno- 
minious death.’* 


Both the Mussolini and the Patton dr amas 
will encompass the characters’ private as well 
as political lives — in Mussolini's case, his 
relationship with his mistress, who died with 
him. as well as with his family: and in the 
Patton film, which co-stars Eva Marie Saint, 
the general’s 57-year marriage and a glancing 
look at his love affair with his wife's niece. 


Scott’s own marital history has been color- 
ful enough for several plots — he has been 
married five times, twice to Colleen Dew- 
huzst. and has six children, including an ille- 
gitimate one be later adopted — but he has 
just celebrated his 13Lh wedding anniversary 
with Trish Van. Devete, and he said proudly, 
“That’s the longest I’ve ever been married 
She is, to me, irreplaceable. That doesn't 
mean we live in idyllic splendor, but we try to 
cope with our problems, and I certainly could 
not concave of being married to anybody but 
Trish.” 

He also copes with his drinking problem: 
Scott acknowledges having described himself 
as a “functioning alcoholic." adding, “I’ve 
never ducked it — there’s no way — but I'm. 
apparently still functioning." 

That he is. despite the fact that he has 
complained about acting nearly as long as he 
has been acting, always vowing he wras about 
to give it up for good bait somehow- never 
quite doing so. And if the fierce hungers that 
drive him are tamer now. there are compensa- 
tions. “Tilings get to settling down within the 
psyche." Scott mused “It’s not that you don’t 
want to do well; you do; but the passion 
seems to diminish, like banking a fire. But 
then, of course, you have a kind of savings 
account, a bank of experience that will help 
you along. So you say to yourself, if it isn’t 
explosive, if Halley’s* comet doesn’t go up 
tonight, maybe it wall go up tomorrow night. 
You’ve experienced enough not to expect the 
universe, and that sort of placates you." 

He smiled a crooked rueful smile, and 
shrugged. “I’ve had a pretty good life; I can’t 
moan and complain too much." he said. 
“Maybe ! didn't get all I wanted but I gave it 
my best shot, and that's all any ballplayer can 
do." 


Konrad Kujau. who fabric a t ed 
the “Hitler Diaries." has forged a 
new career — an exhibition at the 
Gaierie Altana in Hamburg. The- 
show consists of his copies of mas- 
terpieces ranging from Rembrandt 
to Picasso, which, he said Wednes- 
day. he copied after his release 
from prison four months ago. Ku- 
j .-in. 47 . was sentenced to a 4&-year 
prison term in July and is free 
pending as appeal. The centerpiece 
of his show is a “Self Portrait with 
Adolf Hitler." which be described 
os "entirely in my own style." He 
hopes to sell this and copies of 
works by great artists at prices 
from 1,000 to 10,000 Deutsche 
marks (S3S0 to S3.SOO). 

O 


ing mankind forward to peace 
based oc protean sober shaa os 
idafiaiion.” AfflMg the i 3 
ents in cef&TWffio eirikr this ycac" 
were Frank Sinatra aod Mother Te- 
resa. The med 3 is arc awarded lor, 
“contributions to the rational ux» t 
teres or security the U. S., to * 
world peace, to cultural or other , 
significant private or puMi: &j ‘ 
deavefs. “ Iwr* Speak**, iftc White ] 
House spokesman, said. Since U 
was inaugurated by President Har- 
ry SL Tnaaaiv the medal has been 
awarded to more than 250 people, 
54 of them by Reagan. 

□ 

The hospitalized Sana? Dtnfe 
Jr. win undergo reconstructive 
surgery Monday to repair an injiJy 
he suffered durt^e fthruag of a tele- 
vision film, his publicist said 
Thursday. Loss* McLean said the 
entertainer sustained injuries 
“wjwaHv fond in dancers and 
athletes" while making the movie 
“Alice In Wbudcrborf* fast sum- 

“■ o 


.lit* B 


iu 


.. 1 A 


The singer Julio Igtesias on 
Thursday became the 1^14ih per- 
son to receive a gold star on the 
Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los 
Angeles. 

a 


President Ronald Reagan award- 
ed the Medal of Freedom, the Unit- 
ed States's highest civilian honor, 
to the veteran arms negotiator Plref 
Nitze and to Albert and Robert* 
WoUstettec, a husband-and-wtfe 
team of national security experts 
who were among President John F. 
Kennedy's advisers during the 1962 
Cuban mhsUe crisis. “They are the 
engineers and archhens of a sys- 
tem that works and has served 
mankind well.” Reagan said. 
‘They are innovator? who are kad- 


Tbe 2-ycar-oid daughter of the 
Irish rack Star Bob GeMof switched 
on Christmas Ohraunations Thiuv 
day in Oxford Street. London, to 
launch “Lights Aid." a new food, 
raising drive for Starving Africans, 
GeMof. who has helped raise mere 
than SSO'mffiktt for famine relief, 
said he hoped lo coBnct £1 mjJlioe 
(about SI.C mffljon) frcoi*happ«* 
viewing the traditional Christmas 
lights in central London. Mfe 
formed his Band Aid trust h 5 y 
Christian by eaEwntg many of the 
most popular British, rack stars for 
a bit rin^e record 
D 

•’ Dkk Cfafc returned to Philadel- 
phia — where it aO stated — to 
sign mudgnpbs and copies of his 
book “Tne History of American 
Bandstand. " ffe is also doing his 
pan for fireracy — he and his c6- 
utthcK, Mdnri Shore, ait donat- 
ing pari of the mcome.ro a Phil*, 
delpfata literacy organization, 
dart, 55, stated dang “Band- 
stand" in Philadelphia in. 1956 aid. 
despite fab boyish looks; he knows 
he wffl hare to give h up some day. 
That's going co.be-.i rerribk, 
w rea dring experience for me,’’ he 
said. “It’s fake marrying off your 
daughter or losing, a loved one. It 
isn’t going to be a happy day* Aa 
far a rcptscnneoL Oort said he 
has "somdwdy secretly stashed 
away in my bead." ■ 


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Herald Tntine. ?i, S.tJ :cr«3S 
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ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS r. 

English. Pars |c»M 5*o£ fc/re 
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PARIS PSYCHC3THBIAPY 
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DOMINICAN DIVORCES. Sc* ~33Z. 

Santo Domingo Cpmmsr- 
SUN. N.Y. TIMES ■ Eurtner deKer.. 
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OWN YOUR OWN HOME .r Ae 

rewn & iaeocn <r »3ur v.-.de 

ieieerz-t ct v*Tr & rpa-rrern l> 

s=ecs;r Kcrsss cv=>sttle. C- 0. 

& zcr% L’i. PO Bo* 'l"f Urcsasl. 
"e>- rrv-7 Tee* 5'3e. 


SUMVY SOUTHBtN SWTTZBUAND 

LAKE LUGANO 


Laltes.ee cocrr-ern .n c 'ar-je 
Swsur.Iu: cc-< wi-h I ~.KC v;.r.. pn, re 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


NICE 

C-bed-com osersmert. so.- r. 
^etft, fried ' We cvNice otv center 
Tema jy.:rrHrq. ->e-. r. e£.X£ Te. 
Ar a .- e.dL.:: . Hcteno 51-2fr^«!& 


=res sw.- 5 .-r -3 pocJ. r nis tg 
snvsre beocK. :« ^uc-n epers-nentj 
8 C 1 . ■ "W - terraces i- 
un haas 3FA63.900 - SFT.;"vS0 
or- tie Resicer^c PvcSs^; ji -ne Secrr- 
erncreocr tYe LcLe Ll^j- wiheserr- 
mens 5? sq.m •iSOic.tn - beerres. 
Also o.eikjcSarc 'die and iiwssm 
Fes: loocnor cn **« lc*e m an old 


MYKONOS-Mcnonene 80 sg.ra. 2 
tedteoms. 2 bartvooms. ting room. 
*rd:er. Lin.rKsus}> Fmrahed. In man 
beautiful comffe* of the aiasd. with 
swimming pod etc. oucfeble to ran} 
from Acnl 10 - Jut y 15 & Sept 1 - Od 


Brand New 


RUBL-MALMABON V«o< 
mg long term 2-room flar. 


from Acfl 10 • Jutv 15 & Sept 1 - Od 
15. 19S6. For irtformahon contact, 
God L-d . 59 SLour'o Aiheni 106 72, 
oeeee. Tel- 3^3311-2-3-4. Tl* 
22AC82 GIAD GR 


HOLLAND 


THE KIMBERLY 

145 E, 50th 
New York 10022 


Pons, comfortably fumafied, fuBjr 
equipped, bash, taehan, bakorry, caL 

* + charges.4708412ieyes 


FAST TRACK ASSISTANT for smr 
esecotne. A m eri c a n rnda, 31, ivy 
Leogoe degrees. 10 yews of ropd 
moveme n t, vntfi AT&T prod u ct man- j 
agement, marketing, business deyet- 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


SHORT RBfTALIN PARIS. Shit&e, 2 
roams & more, qua), central, recently 
redone. Plus large Bet near Variolas. 
Week or month. 39 16 32 IV 


SHORT TERM IN LATIN QUARTS 
No oaerts-Td: 4329 3883. 


ExceSent reput muu & polbhed cam- 
tBumcBtbn sfcfis. Seakmg paoson in 
LSCGecmarryLtdy wilhn the high- 
tech or automotive m&sfcies. C Hunt 
Eggleston, 54 E lake Bkd_ Morris- 
town. NJ 07960 USA. 201-326-91 19. 


CREATIVE PROFESSIONAL 0» 

Franck &/or QrienlaL amire. McB 
retocokr NewOiemt. Uve dot. Moo- 
day-Wday. Private residMoe. Daiy 
shopping, cooktog, serving, dean-upi 
Send complet e denah of cd u c u ri un d 
h o d r fl r mevf Kprofespood txpen- 

tm to Bae 2873, Harold TrAnna. 
92521 NaaiV Cedex. Fronee 


PERSONALS 


r-racd viioce 

Prices. 'F3IU.450 ■ S? -155.450 t*>n- 


Renthouse International 


PAUL- ABU DHABI MClNSt new 

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enough. Please write Susan. Bor 2239. 
Herafc Tribune. C2S2! NeoDv Cede.. 
France 


GREAT BRITAIN 


gages =t low Swiss s. Free 

rc: so« to fo-ergne*-- 


020443751 (4 lines) 

Nederiwvan 19-21. Amsterdam 


HAVE A NICE DAYl BOKB. Have a 
t»ce dav 1 Bokel 


LONDON, SW3, FRfflKJtD, Chelsea 
ho»ee. jaw rrtecorated. readv to 
move into. 3 beth-soms. 3 bathrooms, 
double reception, drang room, kfth- 
en. gerden. covered piling 2 cars. 
E34S.OCO. TeL London (01) 942 27T. 


EMBIALD - HOME LTD. 


Via G. Cotton 3. CH-6900 Lugano 
Tel: CH-91-S42913 - 
Tbu 7S6T1 HOME CH 


DUTCH HOUSING C»ITRE B.V. 
Deluxe rentals. Viderwsstr. 174. 
Amsterdam. 020621234 or 6232ZL 


A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 


6* ST GERMAIN, beauriW 2 raaro 
Ha. 10-12 months. F6000; 4326-1002 


NO AGENT owners hrvwy aportme u, 
funwhed. goropa. 1-4606 04 37 


REAL ESTATE 
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PORTUGAL 


ALLIED 


ALGAXVL Propema! 

& bu4cSng. The r 
choce i*i » be cot 

P.O. Bo* BI92-1S02 


Properties apartments rent 
rg. The most demancBrvs 
rif be completely saisBed. 


SWITZERLAND 

GSTAAD / CHATEAU COEX 


PETS BRUIN MAXELAARDU 
Inti Housing Service-Rental* 
Amsterdam- Tel: 020-768022. 


VAN UNES 1NFL 


OVBl 1300 OFFICES 
WORLDWIDE 


USA AHM Van laws Ml Corp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


MALLORCA 

P&fTHOUSE IN PALMA 


CV caU cxir Agency European offices: 

PARIS Dssbsnks Internationa] 
(1) 43 A3 23 64 


FRANKFURT sJ 

(069) 250066 

DUSSODORF/ RAT1NGEN 

(02102} 45023 I.M3. 

MUNICH uas. 

1089} 142244 

LONDON 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSELS: Ziegter 5. A. 


Thu penthouse a absolutely outstand- 
ing; overlooking the dty. the harbor & 
the sea, it o situated in the besr 5 guar 
City weo of Pokno. only 2 m'nutes f-om 
the dty center and the manna. Only 
finest (notariats hove been used tradi- 
twna#y. 846 sgm. Irving area cmd 404 
sqm. panoramic terrace + 74 iq.rn. 
balcony. Property with 3,800 sqjn. gar- 
den. renns, indoor & outdoor pool, sau- 
na. fitness, private elevator, central 
heating, or co«Sticong. doorman ier- 
wca. Price in USS. ecu 2J00.000 


Attractive 2 to 5 tOOm apartmerCs 
ovtriobfe far foreigners, m typed Swiss 
chdetv Beautihil wew qu et and cen- 
trally located. Prces from SF290,000. 
Favon&le mortgages at 6*6 % interest. 
Apartments Also Avtdabte in 
Monlreu* on Lt^e Geneva & ether 
mountain lesorh. Contod-. 

GLOBE PLAN SJL 
Av Mon Repos 24, 

0+1005 lanne, Swttreriand. 

Tet (21) 22 35 12 TL: 25185 MajS 
EsteMshed Since 1970 


LEIDEN, VERMffll TYPE 17th Cantu 7 
cord house FuHy furnished. 4 bed- 


cord house FuHy furnished. 4 bed- 
rooms. quiet, garden. Schiphd. The 
Hogue 20 aim. tel 01719-19206. 


When in Rome: 

PALAZZO AL VHABRO 
Luxury apartment house with furnished 
Rots, ova lade far 1 week and more 


Phone 6794325, 679345a 
Write Via del Velabro 16. 
00186 Rome 


preopening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr, & 2 yr. leases 

featunng 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and aH with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


PARIS APARTMENT WANTED. 2 
bedrooms, prefer separate dning, un- 
fumnhed, wtfh American kitchen ia 
Ateds or central Paris. 1-47 47 12 65 
ext. 4114 office hours 


MANAGER 44, OVO. ENGtfKSi, 
Engfish/Arcbx: boc kg r ou ndL long ex 
peneioe in dril egmerng prqedi 
» Mid img countries company man- 
aqaoe nt, business efe v fapma nr and 
wr I relations, seeks senior permanent 
position or oompjtyrepresantafwn in 
Kuwdt or grfier Gu» Or Mdecst coon- 
tnas. Contact now: Mr. SMH. Kuwdt: - 
telex No. 22008 A/B AMA KT. Tele- 
phone No. (96^ 538 6161 


OVBSEAS POSITIONS. Hundreds d 
K 9 paying poatem ovdtobte. Tax 
free maxnes. Attractive benefits. Op- 
pcxtunw far dl occupation!. Free 
detais. Overseas Sswlowe* Ser- 


US. FASMYnLaVegaiHdsvnmg 
warned mu (to for long testa, t par- 
son to cm lor 3 young dtUta 
cShar to lend hoasahoM. Soma travL 
jVHn^ndtoMrSmdnsgh- 
ng odicutos end mfarancta. c/o 
ftocaal to Prmq, Urn OAxx AR 
28013 A4cdridL Spds 
AUHUR. 1 ymr old boy. Sgbt bocta- 
knepna. poa aio d us ig, good Enghh. 
driven faensrc *dary, prrvcAe roam S. 

^ 3 R* R i— — — 

LXXllL JHI l no. I, JfIRi IfoVT, Iff.CS - 

oral, photo, dun tor Or. Mom 
Crmcn. \ fil 88 > S»^ New Oriaans, 

| LA 701 15 USA. 


ROW A CARS. Prarim axj 
with phone: toM Spur. Spurt, tern 
Porsdw, Msrcndai. Joguor, MM, 
teMHM. Staff on. 46 r Pwtt 


AUSTRIA A EAST EUROPE USSI5CB 
gar day. ^utahtwiig FnawtnitL 
enstr. 8 . A-I020 Vtomn Tel: 2*1 bW 


AUTO SHIPPING 




5HV YOUR CAR TO 6 FROM USA - 1 
VIA ANIWBP AND SAVE, Free ho ' 
tot Regolcr saffngt. Airport delivery. ' 
AMBOOT Xnttessraof Z Antwerp 
Tab 231 4J 39 Tin- 71469 


vices. Dept. HT, P.Ol Eo« 460. Town 
of Mount toyd. Oucbac; Canada 
K3P3C7. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTH) 


AU PARSANfltANdSCOCtoGcr- 
den home wrth view. 7 staff dffffaa 
Room, band + sdary. Sana togish, 
oornwdar . Pfacsa dal or write as 
soon s posable: P. |Uky,41S788- 
1284, 263 Ftoart St, Sen Wco, 

CA 94133 USA. 

MOTHETS HBISt- BeoatW oxrsiw. 


APARTMBiT WANTED. 2 rooms, fur- 
roshed or unfurnished, with Amenarti 
t*dien m Marais or cerrtrd Paris. Mr. 
#ASche4, Pans 4747 1265 ext 4560. 


LOOKING FOR RANCH to buy . 
in CbBfomia. Peris 4254 2342 

EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE MANAGES 47. Greek 
bom, sngK 5 fcranges. 20 yem 
nn e xpa riance with luxurious hotels 
in responsible positions seeks chd- 
Ita^ng job: (A. Manager or executive 
□aota* nxgwger m 4 star hotel (B. 
Exaortiva. oo an e i dol or marketing 
position. Avdlafafe De c 1, 1985 far 
aqy area. Write Sen 2237, Harold 
Trdxma, 92521 NetiDy Cedw. France ; 


COUNTRY WOMAN of heat Gar-: 
man teacher, governess, atadatf, to- j 
dependent, non-smoker, would Bee to 
spend the cooing yean as tame ond 
travel caw podon of on interwtttna 

alJulu n ., JiTu „ M< ,-u-u-T Lai 

wu*ny taiwwnf, wnrom VtetaA »%■ 

eremt, firing preferably in on idyfiic 
country cottage or baoutifd dty cfe- 
tricL The pouwo of reliable compan- 
ion far dl seosons would be idsd. It 


nity near NYC Conor orate needs 
female to an far nfad. Sday -r 
nx»&boani.Sandrasarae,rafer- 
anoas, photo to: 18 Meadowbook Rd, 
Old Gteetwtith, Cf 06870 USA. 

coupa - Buna a HOUSBam 

far odutt ho u sehold in Gotswdd 
vflage. Nan emckea tautf Bte dam. 
Bar 42064, IJit. 63 Lang Acre, 
london.WC2E9M 


FOR THE FEATURE 

INTONATIONAL 


POSITIONS 

TURN TO PAGE 11 


GERMAN fEMALE EXECUTIVE, ffa- 
ert EngfishTrench. isverd years ex- 
perimea in odwtism^ pr u ra u tion. 
pubfetwig seeks work with art mogo- 
zine, art dealer or auction house Peris 
o. obroad. Write Ban 2238. Herald 
Tnbtme, 92521 NeuBy Cedex, France 


,h<X * 1 r “ y * rg awage, totabfr 
road, tasponsibEty and tactful n 


road, tasoomtiSty rwd taafdiwss. 
nease write to: IHT Bax 221^ Frie- 
drichstr. TR 6000 franfcfart/Moin 

xh. He- 

Eurape- 


AU FAB WANTED NEAR NYC Girl 
5, bay Z Starting Jaraanr far 1 year. 
Drivers knnse. Over 20 years old. 
Sand photo wih letter to: Boynpan, 4 
Magneto PL. Rye. NY 1P58Q (SL 







. *8 


SHVnNG, BONDING / CUSTOMS 
CLEARANCE. Our work n ft* 
GUARANTEES with our US. of«dsi -’ 


in every US. port. We ore AKA met* Vi > It) 

bert.’&ffw write te 1 III 


SWITZERLAND 

Foreigners «r> buy STUDOS'APaCT- 
MB-Ift / CHALETS. LAKE GENEVA - 


(02) 425 66 14 
CaU for fiJbod i free estimate 


HWaO SON ARMADANS 
JOSE BORIA 6 

E-07OT4 PALMA D£ MALLORCA 
Tel: E-71-289900 


MONTRHJX or in these world famous 
resorts: CRANS-MONTANA. LB 
OLABISETS, VSIBtER, VtUARS. 
JURA & t«a«n of G5TAAD. From 
SF1 10,000. Mortgages 60% at 6 *i% 
interest. 

REVAC 5 A. 

52 Monlbdlant. 04-1202 G84EVA. 

Tet 022/341540. Telex. 22030 



Executive Services Available 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MA TRIA LS MANAGST 10+ yam 
mtern^ond e xperience, t te^ee. 
taOtlaae for mme&jte asstgs i wt t. 
A. Wdson 809-77S1510, ext 33H. 


WES AUTO CONVBtSiON, 

P-O. BOX 70 <B 44, 

. T>7tX» STUTTGART 70 ; i . » 

Tat (0J711 76 09 66 or 72 10 13, l-il; s 
tfe 7255968 Ask far Wfe. 


Model Suites 


(212) 371-8866 


DUTCH BUSINESSMAN 38, is ovoB- 
able to represent your company or 
terxie ye ** 1 affairs m Europe. 3 years 
experience m microcontpuler trade, 5 


ROME- B«xmW streer level ceramic 
stirfofwnwhed Also, beautiful 2 
bedroom apartment with roof garden 
behind Vatican Museum. AhOj Tusca- 
ny -3 room rilage bouse 15 mn. from 
Steno. qwet wooded ®iea. naturd hot 
spring. S^ndo 212-563-1680 USA 


PAIUS AREA FURNISHED 1 EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 


Studio^ 2 or 3-r o c-ni apartment. 
One month or more. 

IE QARIDGE 4359 6797. 



Top level jobs 

domestic and 


Rve Opport u nity, For Solo Bsoa i t 
DUPLEX APARTMENT 


of obout 96 sq.m., elegantly farnuhed. 
beavfrfri views, m the heart of Gttoad. 
Several bdaomes Hotel semce if re- 
quired Private swimming pool and fit- 
ness center available in Ihe buiktng. 
For price and other detail 
please phone. CH. MATO, GSTAAD. 
1941/30/4 26 25 


international 


PALM BEACH. New 2 bedroom fur- 
rushed on beach. 305-586-2780. 


$50,000 - $200,000+ 



The “ICA Executive Search Newsletter” is 
a unique publication created in 1974. It has 
readers in 60 countries and lists in exclusi- 
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The newsletter is thus a simple way 
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Write for free specimen copy (and save 50 Tb 
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