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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris •/'.'• 
Printed Simultaneously .• 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 


INTERNATIONAL 





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No, 31,952 46/85 





PARIS, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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Soviet Leatfa’sProbiemstt : 

WiU Restrict Hint} KS. Analysts Say 


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By David K, Shi pier ; ■ 

New York Times Service ' 

WASHINGTON -^-'When'U.S. 
President Ronald Reagan and Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet lead- 
er, meet in Geneva on Nov. 19 and 
20, each will carry his domestic 
political burden into the talks. 
Each is restricted in his maneuver- 
ability by factors inside his own 
country. 

As a result, Mr. Gorbachev’s' 


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problems at home — especially his the United 
short period of eight months in believe, is the 
office and the inefficiencies of Iris 
country’s economic system —have 
become a focus of major interest to 
American specialists on Soviet af- 
fairs who are watching develop- 
ments in Moscow as the ' summit 
meeting approaches. 


dictory . effect •; from Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s internal political situation. 

. “On the one hand, it increases 
his stake in lessening some tensions 
with the: USi" he said. "On the 

other hand, it makes it difficult for. 

him to cut a compromise because 
he doesn't have the power to im- 
pose it I think his aulhbrip' is sol- 
id; his power is relatively limited." 

A key factor in Mr. Gorbachev’s 
search for improved relations with 


some analysts 

S ’drity he has 
it effort to 
change some dements of the Soviet 
economy. 

Experts see two reasons for this. 
First, his economic proposals in- 
volve some political maneuvering 
' inter- 


^ Adam B. Ulam, a professor of *** both the Communist Party 


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temational relations at Harvard 
University, is one of many experts 
who believe that a newly 
leader of the Soviet Communist 
Party heeds a period of time to", 
consolidate his. political power be- 
fore he can afford to make conriEa- 
tory moves in foreign policy., 

“I think he has to have some 
consensus behind Hwn, and he can- 
not develop an individual style,” 
said Mr. Ulam, who joined .five 
other experts who briefed Mr. Rea 1 - 
gan last week. 

Mr. Gorbachev's tough up-., 
pro achin recent, talks with the UJS. 
secretary of state, George P. Shultz, 
in Moscow was “to show heis nota 
weak leader,” Mr.. Ulam- said. ' - 
“In the Soviet Union most peo- 
ple believe he is in a very strong 
position already" Mr. Uuua said- 
of Mr. Gorbachev, comparing his 
position to that of theformer Sovi- . 
el leader, Leonid L .Brezhnev, who 
led the Soviet Communist Party 
during the era of ditente. 

But to my. mind, ” Mr. Ulnm . 
id, “it would not- be right to say . 
at he has the land' of mfhienra- 
Brezhnev had In the *708, so he is 
still voy limited in initiating his 
own peoiHar style of foreign policy 
or domestic reform.' He wauld like . 
to have a degree of detente with the 
United Stales, but not at the cost of 
creating the impressioiybf die Sbvi- 


and the government, and the Soviet 
leader may be eager to avoid inter- 
national crises that would distract 
from these movestoward economic 
changes 

: Secondly, some experts thhilc 
that an agreement with the United 
States on strategic nuclear arms 
would help contain Soviet military 
spending, freeing resources for the 
consumer sector. 

“Ix is almost a historic opportu- 
nity,” said Stephen F. Cohen, a 
professor of history and Soviet 
poHtics at Princeton University. 
“What Gorbachev wants to do at 
home requires that he freeze his 
aims expenditures. They have to 
make a massive expenditure in the 

(Cootmaed on Page 15, CoL 1) 


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Charles, Diana’s U.S. Visit: Roy< 



- - By Brands 3 L Clines 

Atov York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — .The 
' Prince of Wales held a rare news 
conference Sunday, decreeing 
that his wife finds John Travolta 
to be a good dancer and that the 
prince himself finds George III to 
be a better king than Americans 
might admit. 

“King George ID felt that he 
had a bit of a raw deal m history,” 
Prince Charles said in politely 
contradicting what he called 
“propaganda” about his fore- 
bear, who was denounced as a 
tyrant by the American revolu- 
tionaries. “I think slowly but 
surely people are realizing he 
wasn't such an ogre as they made 
out” 

aers with gentle 
hear apparent to the 
Jritisb throne deftly handled the 
one nonhistorical question on ev- 
eryone’s mind: how did his wife 
enjoy dancing with Mr. Travolta, 
who starred in “Saturday Night 
Fever,” in the White House state 
dining room Saturday night? 

As the band played music from 
the movie; other dancers on the 
floor slopped to watch the blonde 
princess and dark-haired actor 
offer a whirling, syncopated dis- 
ay of charming touch-dancing 
abed as flawless by witness- 
es. 

. Attempting an answer Sunday 
at the National Gallery of An, 
the prince smiled and glanced 
bade at the princess. She re- 
mained sQent, eyes down, fight- 
ing a smile that blossomed on her 
lips. 

“She would be an idiot if she 
didn't enjoy dancing with John 
Travolta, wouldn’t she?" he said. 



The Auooated Pros 

Prince Charles gets a glance from his wife as be meets 
the press at the National Gallery of Art in Washington. 


after first disavowing any intent 
of speaking for her. He looked 
back at her, inquiring whether the 
answer was correct, and received 
another shy smile of dear assent. 

After the dance, Mr. Travolta 
had praised his royal partner. 

“1 found her refr eshing and 


down to earth,” he said. “She has 
style and rhy thm ” 

The prince and princess had 
just spent 90 minutes touring 
“Treasure Houses of Britain,” an 
exhibition of more than 700 
works of an and furnishings from 
200 country estate houses. 


Charles, a patron of the show, 

invited Americans to visit it be- 
fore it is disbanded in March. 

“1 only hope they manage to 
get all the pieces back in the right 
places,” he joked Saturday night 
at the White House dinner. 

Before the museum tour, the 
royal couple attended morning 
services at Washington Cathedral 
as crowds watched outside. The 
Episcopal bishop of Washington, 
John Walker, surveying the 
friendly interest in the visitors, at 
one point speculated whether the 
American Revolution might 
come unraveled “if the prince 
said, ‘All is forgiven, come 
home.* ” 

The prince and princess then 
set off for the hill country of Vir- 
ginia for a private lunch ai Oak 
Spring, the estate of Paul Mellon, 
the philanthropist and an patron, 
followed bv a dinner with Vice 
President George Bush and his 
wife, Barbara, at the British Em- 
bassy residence. 

The prince seemed fairly at 
ease at his news conference. He 
denied playing a hard “sales- 
man's” role in promoting the 
British an show Sunday and jour- 
neying to a J.C. Penney depart- 
ment store Monday to celebrate a 
nationwide sales campaign for 
imports from Britain. 

“I think it might be a bit em- 
barrassing for people to know 
whether I was a salesman or 
whatever,” he said. 

Near the end of what British 
reporters said was the prince's 
first free-form news conference in 
several years, be admitted he was 
still suffering jet lag. 

“Well survive," he said. “It's 
all in the breeding, you know.” 


Israel, Jordan 
Reach In formal 
Accord on Talks 


Budget Cuts in U.S. Delay Research on SDI 


By Walter Pincus 

. - Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan's timetable for a 
space-based defense against strate- 
gic nuclear missiles has been sub- 
stantially eroded by coogresskmal 
budget cuts, according to adminis- 
tration officials and documents. 


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At the tale that Congress has 

„ , been appropriating money -for the 

ct Union- as jycalqimid not to-ap**". Strategic Defense Initiative, a cdh- ' 
pear as a weak or vaa^ating lead- gressional aide estimated, the re- 
search program will receive only 
about half, of the S26 billion the 
- adm ini stration wanted by fiscal 
1989. 

In the long run, the budget cuts 
could affect some of the most fun- 
damental decisions about the pro- 
gram, popularly known as “Star 
Wars,'’ including whether a defense 
against enemy missiles should be 
primarily based in space or on the 
ground. _■ 

An appropriations trilL appraved 
Oct 30 by the House of Represen- 
tatives included 525 MEon for the 
program in fiscal 1986. While this 


As a general, nde,: Western ex- 
perts beHeve; it ^politically safer 
in the Communist Party's Politbu- 
ro for a Soviet leader on the rise to 
be tough than to seem soft, whether 
on questions of internal dissent, 

Jewish emigration, jmHtary bud- 
gets, or Sovkt-American relations. 
• On the other hand, improvement in 
the Soviet economy may be helped 
by a redaction in Soviet-Amcrican 
1 Arsons, specialists say. 
vt Zbigniew . Brzerinski, who was 
national security adviser to Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter, saw a contra- 


rep resents a funding increase of 80 
percent over the previous fiscal 
year, it fell more than a billion 
dollars short of Mr. Reagan's re- 
quest for the program. 

The Senate is considering its own 
version of the appropriations bill. 
But experiments with space-based 
weapons, originally scheduled for 
as eariy^s 1991, are already being 
pushed back. . .• 

-testimony before a Senate 
Armed Sendees subcommittee last 
month,' lieutenant General James 
A. Abrahamson, director of the 
Strategic Defense Initiative, said 
that “budget cuts have caused ma- 
jor, and I would emphasize mqor, 
revisions in our program." 

One of ihe programs “that we 
have regrettably had to delay in a 
very significant way is work on the 
space-based laser concept,” Gener- 
al Abrahamson said. 

In a reference to objections by 
Soviet officials and American crit- 
ics that the experiments would vio- 
late the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile 
Treaty, he said, “We are more 


fund-limited than we are treaty- 
limited.” 

General Abrahamson told the 
senators that it was too early to 
speculate on relative merits of 
ground-based and space-based de- 
fenses, but he noted that “it ap- 
pears that the potential for large, 
effective ground-based lasers is 
very reaL" 

Tests of ground-based lasers, al- 
ready undertaken^ by the Soviet! 
Union, tire not barred by the 1972 
ABM Treaty as long as they are 
done at a treaty-approved test site. 

A document distributed to the 
Congress by the Strategic Defense 
Initiative Organization, the admin- 
istration office coordinating the re- 
search program, says that the SI 
billion reduction already approved 
by Congress in the fiscal 1986 au- 
thorization budget for the program 
“postpones by six months to a 
year” resolution of key technical 
issues on “boost phase engage- 
ment," the crucial question of bow 
to destroy enemy missiles shortly 
after they leave their sflos. 


In addition, major experiments 
on kinetic-energy weapons, which 
destroy their targets by impact, 
“will be delayed up to approxi- 
mately one year," the paper says. It 
says that following the funding 
cuts, the air force has recommend- 
ed a 28-montb delay in experimen- 
tal flights of the space-based “ki- 
netic kill vehicle." 

The paper from the administra- 
tion’s Strategic Defense Initiative 
office warns thai any further redac- 
tions “wall require a major devi- 
ation in the program and signifi- 
cantly delay completion.” 

But further reductions in fund- 
ing for the program are almost cer- 
tain to continue in the coming 
years, one senior congressional 
aide said. The program’s spending 
plan calls for $4.9 billion in fiscal 
1987, which would be an increase 
of $2.2 billion over the level autho- 
rized this year. 

That is far more money than 
Congress is likely to approve, the 
aide said. He noted that “as the 
Pentagon has to cut back on pn> 



James A. Abrahamson 

grams that are already producing 
weapons, SDI is trying to grow 100 
percent ... to prove principles for 
some weapons in the distant- fu- 
ture." 

Pentagon aides have said pri- 
vately that White House refusal to 
(Continued on Page 7, CoL 6) 


Sources Soy 
Palestinian 
Role Is Key 

By Thomas L Friedman 

\’ew York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres and King Hussein 
of Jordan have reached an informal 
agreement to work toward negotia- 
tions in which Israel will agree to 

King Hussein admitted that anti- 
Syrian activists had operated 
from Jordan. Page 2. 

attend some kind of international 
conference in return for Jordan's 
agreement to bring to the confer- 
ence only Palestinians who are ac- 
ceptable to IsraeL according to Is- 
raeli government sources. 

This informal understanding ap- 
parently was arranged through 
U.S. mediation and oiher contacts 
over the last month. It lies at the 
heart of the diplomatic maneuver- 
ing and public declarations that 
have been taking place in the Mid- 
dle East in recent weeks, the Israeli 
officials said Sunday. 

To achieve a mutually accept- 
able format for negotiations — 
something that still appears to be a 
long way off — Hussein and Mr. 
Peres are working on parallel 
tracks, Israeli political analysts 
said. 

Mr. Peres is said to be “squeez- 
ing" his coalition partners from the 
Likud bloc to agree to an interna- 
tional framework of negotiations to 
satisfy Hussein. 

At the same time, the analysis 
said, the king is said to be “squeez- 
ing” Yasser Arafat, the Palestine 
Liberation Organization leader, to 
get him either to recognize Israel or 
to agree to participation at the ne- 
gotiating table by Palestinians who 
are not members of the PLO. 

This process is complicated and 
slew-moving. Israeli officials said, 
because of continuing differences 
between Mr. Peres and Hussein 
over how negotiations should be 
conducted, and because of the 
problems the two leaders face with 
their respective domestic oppo- 
nents. 

Another problem, the Israeli of- 
ficials said, is an unexpected dis- 
pute that has arisen betweea Egypt 
and Jordan over the question of 
PLO participation. 

“It is clear to us that the Egyp- 
tians and Jordanians are competing 
over who is going to control the 
PLO, and this is playing havoc with 



King Hussein 



Shimon Peres 


Beuw 


the diplomacy,” a senior Israeli of- 
ficial said. “Arafat, us usual, is ex- 
ploiting this competition to keep 
himself in the game.” 

The competition became obvi- 
ous in the contrast between the way 
Mr. Arafat was received in Am- 
man, Jordan, two weeks ago. when 
he met with Hussein for the first 
time since the hijacking on Ocl 7 of 
the cruise ship Achille Laura, and 
the way Mr. Arafat was received in 
Cairo last week by President Hosni 
Mubarak. 

Hussein treated Mr. .Arafat cool- 
ly, not even offering to let him stay 
in a government guest house and 
not joining him in any final state- 
ment after their talks. Mr. Mu- 
barak extended a red -carpel recep- 
tion and even brought Mr. Arafat 

(Continued on Page 7, CoL 7) 


Increase in Arms Traffic 
i0 To Manila Gted by U.S. 


gl 





By Jay Mathews 

Washington Post Service 

■ SAN FRANCISCO — Federal 
agents have detected what appears 
to be a growing volume of illegal 
U.S. firearms shipments to the 
Philippines and have arrested sev- 

^Tbe Philippine d^ense minister 
> expects a 10-year struggle with 
Communist rebels. Page 5. 

eral Filipinos, including some with 
close ties to the government of 
President Ferdinand E Marcos. 

Although the suspected smug- 
glers usually have said they are gun 
collectors with no political intent, 
federal officials ana opponents of 
Mr. Marcos here say they suspect 
that the weapons are bong bought 
by guerrillas who oppose the Mar- 
cos regime and private armies who 
support Mr. Marcos. 

Among five illegal shipments in- 
tercepted in eight months, investi- 
gators have seized Uzi sub m achine 
guns, assault rifles, shotguns, pis- 
tols, militazy-style laser scopes, 
-submachine g»n parts and conver- 
sion kits to turn MAC! I sennaoto- 
tic weapons into fully automatic 
le guns. 

. Nolan Douglas, special agent in 
charge erf the Treasury Depart- 
ment's Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco 


; INSIDE 

I A far-right candidate, lost his 
■campaign for a key post in Gen- 
eva. - Page! 

■Colombian judges boycotted 
services held for their slain coF 
. tefl gnes Pag* 4. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Dance Theater of Harlem 
rafcw: a novel “creole" version 
of “Giselle” to Paris. Pfcge* 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ The Dow Joo«s industrial av- 
erage rose 27.52 points, its larg- 
est rise-in 10 months. Pafi® 1" 


arid Firearms office here, said that 
federal efforts to stop the traffic 
were proceeding nationwide bui 
that much of the smuggling activity 
was centered in the San Francisco 
area. _ ' ’ 

San Francisco is a principal air- 
line and shipping hub for trips to 


Humanity of Filipino immi grants 
i Seizures “seem to have picked up 
quite a bit recently,” said Thomas 
McDermott, assistant special agent 
in. charge for the U.S. Customs Ser- 
vice here. 'Ihe suspected smugglers 
always say thein tended recipient is 
“a pro-government official, ” Mr. 
McDermott said. . . 

A State Department official said 
concern oyer gun smuggling “has 
been a factor in oar bilateral rela- 
tions.” 

The United States,. with its large 
number of Philippine immigrants, 
appears to be the source of most if 
not all of the arms smuggled into 
the Philippines lor anti-Marcos 
forces. 

Steve E Psinakis, an author 
based in San Francisco who is a 
director of the Ninoy Aqnino 
Movement opposed to President 
Marcos, said some of the weapons 
apparently were bound for non- 
Marxist opponents of the Manila 
government who have friends and 
relatives in the United States. 

The New People’s Army, the mil- 
iiaiy arm of the Communist Party 
that is fighting a rural insurgency 
against Mr. Marcos? appears to 
steal or capture its weapons from 

government troops or. buy them 
from corrupt officials. 

Many of the aims, Mr. Psinakis 
said, are going io'wealthy Filipinos 
who want to protect their own in- 
terests and have armed dout in the. 
nation’s often violent poHtics. 

\ The most prominent Filipino ar- 
rested this year for the export erf 
illegal firearms is Douglas Lu Ym, 
acknowledged by his attorney to be 
one of the most important men in 
the Philippine coconut industry. 

He was handcuffed and taken off 

a Philippine Airlines flight at the 

(Continued on Page 7. CoL 2) 



Afrikaner Right: Reacting to Uncertainty 




Afrikaners near Pretoria acting out a scene of a 19th 
century family guarding against attacking black tribes. 


By Glenn Frankel 

Washington Post Service 

BETHLEHEM, South Africa — 
They came in ox-drawn wagons, 
fleeing the British Empire, hauling 
their Bibles, rifles and children into 
an uncharted wilderness populated 
by waiy, often hostile African 
tribes. 

Those who survived, and many 
did not. believed themselves a cho- 
sen people and this their Promised 
Land. 

They settled on these sweeping 
plains under the big sky, formed an 
all-white republic and consecrated 
their covenant with God by naming 
this town Bethlehem and the 
stream that runs through it the Jor- 
dan River. 

More than a century later, the 
spirit of righteous certainty that 
ruled the lives of that pioneer gen- 
eration of whiles known as Afrika- 
ners is fast fading for many of their 
heirs. 

Growing resistance from the 
long-oppressed black majority, in- 
ternational opprobrium and eco- 
nomic malaise are contributing to 
the sense that whiles are losing con- 
trol that the years of ascendancy 
and privilege may be corning to a 
dose. 

“There is a lot of fear in the 
Afrikaner's heart.” said Dolf Brits, 
a Dutch Reformed minister here. 
"It's not easy to admit we're going 


the same way as Rhodesia,” South 
Africa’s formerly white-ruled 
neighbor that became black-ruled 
Zimbabwe in 1980 after a pro- 
longed dvil war. 

Thai anxiety was reflected last 
month when Afrikaners, who for at 
least two generations have over- 
whelmingly supported the ruling 
National Party, split almost down 

South Africa has made contin- 
gency plans to expel foreign 
black workers. Page 7. 

the middle between the party and 
its growing rightist opposition in 
the first parliamentary by-elections 
since the government declared a 
state of emergency last July. 

The electoral stakes were small: 
five of 178 seals in the main, 
whites-only body of Parliament, 
and the Nationalists held onto 
four. But the results set off alarm 
bells in Pretoria, the Af rikaner cap- 
ital 

To understand why the loss of 
one parliamentary seat and a re- 
duced victory margin in four others 
throws such a fright into South Af- 
rica's white rulers, it is instructive 
to examine a small fanning town 
Like Bethlehem, whose white popu- 
lation of 15,000 is 90 percent Afri- 
kaner. 

Tucked into the heart of the Or- 
ange Free State, a traditional 
stronghold of Afrikaner conserva- 


tism, Bethlehem was one of the five 
districts up for grabs last month. 
The Nationalists held onto it, but 
at a far reduced margin than in the 
past. 

Modem Afrikaners are the heirs 
of Dutch. French and German 
Protestants who began settling Af- 
rica’s southern tip in the 17th cen- 
tury. 

Their ties to Europe gradually 
unraveled as they developed their 
own African-tinged vernacular and 
culture. 

Today they make up 60 percent 
of South Africa's ruling white mi- 
nority, and unlike the white colo- 
nists who returned to Europe when 
the rest of Africa gained indepen- 
dence, for the Afrikaner there is no 
going back. 

Not far from Bethlehem a visitor 
still can glimpse the remains of 
stone farmhouses destroyed by the 
British during the Anglo-Boer War 
at the turn of the century. 

Many here boast ancestors who 
fought in that conflict, and many 
have family members who died in 
the British concentration camps 
that claimed 26,000 Afrikaner men, 
women and children. 

Bethlehem's Afrikaners say they 
no longer hate the British, nor the 
English speakers who make up 
meet of the remainder of South 
Africa's white minority. But while 


they raav forgive, they do not for- 
get. * 

They have proved even more un- 
yielding with another traditional 
foe: the blacks who fought them in 
six tribal wars in the mid- 1800s and 
who vastly outnumber them today. 

Those allowed to Hive in Bethle- 
hem are confined to the matchbox 
houses and shacks of its black 
township or to the bleak huts of its 
white-owned farms. 

Thirty miles (48 kilometers) 
away, hundreds of thousands of 
others are confined to Qwaqwa, 
one of the most squalid and over- 
crowded of South Africa’s black 
“homelands” slated for nominal in- 
dependence. 

History imprinted these lessons 
on ihe .Afrikaner soul: to survive 
they must stay united and vigilant 
and keep their enemies divided. 
Power and privilege are not divisi- 
ble: what another group gains, you 
lose. 

"The past has a great hold over 
us,” says Cehill Pienaar, a local 
farmer who ran as the Conservative 
Party’s parliamentary candidate 
and who can Lrace his blood lines to 
French Huguenots who came to 
Cape Town in the 1680s. He still 
has a bloodstained family bible 
with a gash in its pages from an 
African spear. 

“My people fled France for their 

(Continued on Page 7. CoL 2) 


Smoking , Enduring Among U.S. Women, Now Worst Threat to Their Health 


By Susan Okie 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Cigarette smoking 
has become the single greatest threat to the 
'health of U-S. women, with an impact so 
profound that demographers say the edge 
m life span women traditionally have en- 
joyed may disappear. 

ITto American Cancer Society estimates 
that this year, for (he first time in U.S. 
history, lung cancer, a disease most often 
associated with men. wifl kill more women 

than will breast cancer. 

Women in their teens and 20s now are 
smoking more than young men. an espe- 
cially signifi cant tread because of the 
threats to women smokers and their ba- 


bies: stillbirths, sudden infant deaths and 
miscarriages, lowered fertility, and danger 
of strokes and heart attacks in users of 
birth-control pills. 

While many men have given up smoking, 
the proportion of American women who 
smoke has risen from 1 S percent in 1935 to 
just under 30 percent in 1983. 

The statistics are beginning to reflect the 
words of Joseph A. Gilifano Jr, a former 
secretaiy of health, education and welfare, 
that “women who smoke like men, die like 
men.” 

The view of the tobacco industry, how- 
ever, is that a cause- and-effeci relationship 
has not been established between cigarettes 
and lung cancer, heart disease, chronic 


lung diseases pregnancy complications or 
other disorders. 

Walker Merryman, rice president of the 
Tobacco Institute, a Washington-based in- 
dustry trade group, said, “What we are 
saying is, let’s find out for certain. Yes, give 
people information about the possible 
health hazards. Let people make up their 
own minds about whether or not they wish 
to be smokers. And Jet's admit that we 
don'L know what we don’t know.” 

In interviews with health and federal 
officials and an examination of the latest 
medical and statistical findings, the magni- 
tude of the problem emerges: 

• More women than men trill be smok- 
ers in about five years if present trends 


continue, according to Pauick L Reming- 
ton, an epidemiologist with the national 
Centers for Disease Control. 

• Lung cancer deaths in women have 
increased 350 percent in the last 35 years. 
By the year 2000, more women than men 
will die of lung cancer, a reversal of the 
present pattern, according to Dr. Robert J. 
McKenna, president of the American Can- 
cer Society. So strong is the addiction that, 
despite risks of miscarriage or Stillbirth, 70 
to 80 percent of smokers continue while 
they are pregnanL 

• Working women are more likely to 
smoke than housewives, according to the 
society. 

Amid the mounting evidence establish- 


ing smoking as a major killer of women, 
feminist leaders are divided over whether 
to attack a habit that many view as a 
personal choice. 

At least one tobacco company. Philip 
Morris Inc„ which sponsors the Virginia 
SUms women's tennis tournaments, has 
been an eager benefactor of feminist orga- 
nizations. Virginia Slims is a brand target- 
ed almost exclusively at women. At ihe 
National Organization for Women, a dis- 
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continue accepting the company's advertis- 
ing. 

Why so many women are adopting ihe 

habil and why women appear less success- 
(Cootinued on Page 15, Col II 








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Far-Right Candidate 
Loses Campaign for 
Key Post in Geneva 


of an island 
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Remen 

GENEVA — Voters in the Swiss 
canton of Geneva, a home to the 
United Nations and other interna- 
tional bodies, have rejected an at- 
tempt by the far-right Vigilance 
Party to win a place on the execu- 
tive coundl. 

According to results of the week- 
end poll, the canton will instead 
continue to be nm by a mixture of 
moderates from the Social Demo- 
crats. Radicals. Liberals and Chris- 
tian Democrats. 

Vigilance bad hoped to repeat 
the success or last month's elections 
to the cantonal assembly, where it 
emerged sharing the largest num- 
ber of seats with the Liberals. Both 
won 19 out of a possible 100. 

The Valance Party 's program, 
directed as much against wealthy 
diplomats and foreign businessmen 
as the poor immigrants who do the 
area's menial jobs, calls tor expel- 
ling illegal immigrants and stop- 
ping further international organi- 
zations from moving here. 

But its candidate for the execu- 
tive council .Arnold Schlaepfer. 69. 
managed only 10th place out of 12 
candidates, well out of reach of a 
seat on the seven-member board. 

The main gainer in the poll was 
the Christian Democratic Party, 
which doubled its representation to 
two seats after deciding not to put 
up a joint list with its traditional 
Liberal and Radical allies. 

The Social Democrats and Lib- 
erals both kept two seats while the 
Radicals went down to one for the 
first time in 20 years. 

Vigilance's strong showing in the 
assembly elections'll! Geneva, fol- 
lowed by gains by fellow rightists 
from National Action a week later 
in Lausanne, caused many political 
commentators to wonder if the 
country was swinging io the right. 

No one doubted Geneva's un- 
usual situation. About a third of its 

350.000 residents are foreigners 
and the city itself suffers from a 
chronic housing shortage and traf- 
fic congestion, issues easily exploit- 
ed by the ami-immigrant members 
of Vigilance. 

However, with a voluble public 
debate throughout the country on 
the mounting number of asylum 
seekers, intensified by some highly 
publicized expulsions, some saw 
the right's strong showing here as 
proof of growing ■ami-foreigner 
feeling. 

The belief had seemed to be 


Egypt Says It Arrested 
Libyan Suicide Squad 

The Assi\~.cieJ Pres; 

CAIRO — Security police have 
arrested a heavily armed Libyan 
suicide squad in .Alexandria. Egypt, 
thwarting a plot to kill a former 
Libyan prime minister and another 
exiled opponent of Colonel 
Moamer Qadhafi. Interior Minister 
Ahmed Rushdi said Monday. 

Abdel Hamid Bakoush. the last 
prime minister under the monarchy 
that was overthrown by Colonel 
Qadhafi in 1969. said that two of 
the four Libyans were wounded in 
agunfight with police at a luncheon 
Wednesday 


Sighting of Halley’s Comet 

The A ssociaieJ Press 

PASADENA. California — Two 
California astronomers in the San 
Gabriel Mountains were the first to 
see Halley’s comet on its current 
pass of the Earth without the aid of 
telescopes or binoculars, it was re- 
ported Monday. 


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borne out in a number of opinion 
polls showing that “the asylum 
question" was a key issue for many 
voters. 

■ Sanctuary Movement Grows 

A possible lest of church against 
state took on greater dimensions 
Monday in Switzerland as 44 illegal 
immigrants from Turkey and Zaire 
obtained sanctuary from Protes- 
tant and Roman Catholic churches 
in Geneva, The Associated Press 
reported. 

They followed 59 Chileans who 
w ere granted shelter last month in a 
Protestant church near Zurich. .All 

die immigrants face expulsion fol- 
lowing rejection of their requests 
for political asylum by authorities 
who have come under growing 
public pressure to check a record 

inflow of immigrants. 

Early this month, in a move 
without precedent. 59 Zairians 
whom the government said used 
forged papers in seeking asylum 
were put on a special Swissair night 
to Kinshasa, escorted by 120 Swiss 
police. 

Zaire protested formally, saying 
that the persons expelled were sub- 
jected to "inhuman treatment." 

The Swiss justice minister. Elisa- 
beth Kopp. has not indicated if 
police will be ordered to evict the 
aliens from the Swiss churches. 

More than 23.000 requests for 
asylum are pending in Switzerland, 
w hich already has the highest pro- 
portion of foreigners among Euro- 
pean countries. 


AIDS Patient 
Using Drug 
Dies in Paris 


The AssocuteJ Press 

PARIS — A patient undergoing 
experimental treatment for AIDS 
with the drug cyclosporine-A has 
died, one of the developers of the 
treatment announced Monday. 

Dr. Philippe Even of Laennec 
Hospital here said the 38-year-old 
male patient died Saturday after 
about three weeks of treatment. 

But he said other patients were 
responding well io cyclosporine-A 
and that research and rliniml t«,ts 
of the treatment "would be ex- 
panded to several other French 
hospitals later this week." 

On Ocl 29. Dr. Even and fellow- 
researchers. Dr. Jean-Marie An- 
drieu and Dr. Alain Venet, said at a 
news conference that cyclosporine- 
A had proved effective in fighting 
the spread of AIDS, or acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome. 

AIDS attacks the body’s im- 
mune system and leaves it vulnera- 
ble to a variety of infections that 
often prove fatal to victims. 

Dr. Even said the death of the 
patient Saturday was not unexpect- 
ed, given the advanced stage of the 
man’s illness and his multiple in- 
fections. He said the treatment ap- 
peared “more and more promis- 
ing.” however, and that the number 
of patients being treated with the 
drug would be increased to about 
20 . 

Dr. Even also disclosed that an- 
other patient in the terminal stages 
of AIDS was treated with cyclo- 
sporine- A for two days and died, 
despite showing a “biological im- 
provement." That patient died be- 
fore the OcL 29 news conference. 

Cyclosporine-A is normally used 
to prevent rgection of transplanted 
organs. The French researchers 
have used it to paralyze cells con- 
taining AIDS, hoping to keep the 
disease from spreading and to let 
the body build up its immune sys- 
tem. 

The announcement Oct. 29 was 
widely criticized in medical aides 
as premature, in part because it was 
based on only eight days of tests 
with only two patients. One of 
those patients was the mao who 
died Saturday. 

The second patient, a woman 
with a condition known as .AIDS 
Related Complex, or ARC. had re- 
sponded very well. Dr. Even said in 
an interview on French television. 

"She is doing very well insofar as 
the lymphocyte T-4, those famous 
cells which are essential to AlDti, 
have become completely normal, 
and the swollen glands she had on 
various parts of her body have 
completely disappeared after two 
weeks of treatment," Dr. Even said. 

The doctor said he and his fellow 
researchers now were administer- 
ing cyciosporine-A to nine pa- 
tients, including three with AIDS 
and six with ARC. 

Dr. Even said the experimental 
treatment was being expanded to 
other French hospitals this week 
under stria statistical controls “to 
determine the real therapeutic in- 
terest of this method, which I be- 
lieve is still very great and becom- 
ing more and more so." 



France Celebrates Armistice Day 

French Army soldiers dressed in World War I uniforms parading near the Arc de Triomphe in Paris 
in observation of .Armistice Day. Watched by thousands of onlookers. President Framsois 
Mitterrand of France placed flowers on the tomb of the unknown soldier and reviewed troops. 


Hussein Sets Stage for Syria Talks 
With Concession on Moslem Activists 


By Samira Kawar 

ItiuA/np/iM Post Service 

AMMAN. Jordan — King Hus- 
sein of Jordan conceded Sunday 
that Moslem fundamentalists in 
Jordan had carried out operations 
against Syria. 

The king's statement appeared to 
be a significant concession toward 
Syria on the ere of expected concil- 
iatory talks between the two Arab 
neighbors. 

Hussein, referring to efforts to 
end a six-year period of estrange- 
ment between the two countries, 
said Syrian- Jordanian relations 
were “at the be ginnin g of a new era 
of cooperation to sene mutual and 
wider Arab interests.” 

Hussein's statement came in the 
form of a message to his prime 
minister. Zaid Rifai. that was 
broadcast, over Jordan’s radio -and 
television. Mr. Rifai was scheduled 


to visit Syria on Tuesday for talks, 
and the message clearly was intend- 
ed to prepare the atmosphere for 
reconciliation. 

Hussein's statement, a revision 
of a position maintained for several 
years, indicated a strong urge to 
push ahead with improving rela- 
tions following two Saudi-mediat- 
ed meetings between the Syrian 
and Jordanian prime ministers dur- 
ing the past two months. 

Hussein, who expects to meet 
with President Hafez al -Assad of 
Syria during the next two weeks, 
recently has expressed hope of 
drawing Syria into his Middle East 
peace initiative. 

Syria had accused Jordan of har- 
boring members of the Moslem 
Brotherhood, a fundamentalist 
Sunni opposition faction in Syria 
and encouraging them to infiltrate 
Syria to destabilize Mr. Assad’s re- 
gime. 


2 Officials 
Resign Posts 
In Poland 


Lebanon Talks Linked 
To Summit, Paper Says 




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Reuters 

WARSAW — Foreign Minister 
Stefan Olszewski of Poland re- 
signed Monday from the Commu- 
nist Party’s ruling Politburo, ac- 
cording to an official communique 
that indicated he would also leave 
the government. 

PAP, the official press agency, 
said also that Knzimierz Barci- 
kowslti. another Politburo member, 
who has become a deputy chairman 
of the Council of State, the coun- 
try's collective presidency, had re- 
signed as a Central Committee sec- 
retary. 

Mr. Olszowski was “motivated 
by personal considerations and a 
desire to devote himself to scholar- 
ly activity,” the report added. 

Western sources said the word- 
ing indicated Mr. Olszowski would 
not be a member of the government 
that the new prime minister, Zbig- 
niew Messner, was scheduled to 
announce Tuesday. 

No new members of the Politbu- 
ro were immediately named but 
Marian Wozniak. head of the party 
in Warsaw and a Politburo mem- 
ber. was appointed to replace Mr. 
Barcikowski in the Central Com- 
mittee secretariat. 

The resignations, at a Central 
Committee meeting, were part of a 
wide shake-up of the party and 
government by the Communist 
Party leader, Wojdeck Jaruzelski, 
who resigned as prime minister last 
week in order to become bead of 
state. 

General Jaruzelski has acted to 
consolidate his position before the 
10th party congress next spring at 
which the program of social and 
economic change he has pursued 
since 1982 will be attacked by con- 
servatives. 

Sources said Mr. Barcikowski, 
58. a Politburo member since 1980 
and a former agriculture minister 
in the 1970's, was retiring because 
of ill health after suffering heart 
problems. 

Mr. Olszowski, 55, who has been 
a senior member of the party and 
government since 1970, opposed 
some of General Jaruzelski’s poli- 
cies and had been expected to be 
dropped as foreign minister. 


Reuters 

BEIRUT — Syrian-backed 
peace talks between Lebanon’s mi- 
litias, at a virtual standstill for 
more than a week, will remain sus- 
pended until the outcome of next 
week's U.S.-Soviet summit meeting 
is known, a leftist Beirut newspaper 
said Monday. 

But the newspaper, the daily 
As-Safir, also said that a lull in 
sectarian fighting that kept the 
front lines quiet for most of the last 
week would continue 

It quoted a source in a leftist 
political party allied with Syria as 
saying the “waters would remain 
calm until regional and "interna- 
tional factors are dear.” 

The position of the. Christian 
Lebanese Forces, the main Chris- 
tian militia involved in peace talks 
in Damascus last month with 
Druze and Suite militias, As-Safir 
said, would be determined “in the 
light of what is decided at the sum- 
mit regarding . regional struggles 
and the Syrian role in the region.” 

President Ronald Reagan and 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
leader, are to meet in Geneva on 
Nov. 19 and 20. 


Official sources, meanwhile, said 
that Colonel Simon Kassis, the 
Lebanese army intelligence chief, 
went to Damascus on Monday for 
talks on “important security mat- 
ters” 

Colonel Kassis represents Presi- 
dent Amin GemayeL a Maronite 
Christian, who has not approved a 
draft accord that would involve 
changes to end Christian domi- 
nance of Lebanon's political struc- 
ture. The draft accord, reached 
Oct 26, has been widely criticized 
by Christian leaders. 

The independent An-Nahar 
newspaper quoted Nabih Beni, a 
cabinet member and leader of the 
Shiite militia ArrmI , as saying that 
the situation was “now frozen 
pending a crystallization of posi- 
tions* especially of the other side,” 
, referring to the Christians. 

Damascus Radio accused Wash- 
ington over the weekend of frying 
to obstruct Syria’s peace efforts. 

It said Reginald Bartholomew, 
the U.S. ambassador to Lebanon, 
blocked the agoing of the pact. As- 
Safir said Mr. Bartholomew 
warned Lebanese officials the ac- 
cord would "delay the withdrawal 
of Israel from south Lebanon.” 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Bonn Exdudes Pad With U-S- on SDI 

BONN (Reuters) — West Germany ** 

the Unhed States on joining us Strategic 

participate in the prged by way of a mesaorandum ^ enrage 
letters, a government spokesman said go i teterittoc Suffila. . 

He saidthe ccflter-ngtoStion would not ate 
the project fora space-based smtwmsstte sraem oga i 
as agreed earlier. Foreign Munster Hans»D*«ricfc Gtnscher had ex- 
pressed reservations about signing a treaty because of possible ham to 
relations with the East bloc. 

Contested Hay Canceled in Frankfurt 

FRANKFURT {Reuters) — Frankfort's city said Moadav that 

it had abandoned efforts to put oo a pl»y by the fate Rainer Renter 
Fassbinder that was denounced as anti-Semrac by members of the Jewish 
community here. , , 

Twenty-sx members of the Jewish coffltnuarty ueppea the prennerc of 
the play- “Der MOL die Stadl and der Tod" (Garbage, the City 
Death}, on Oct. 3 1 when they occupied the stage. The theater had plana*!; 
to try again Tuesday night to open the pfay> *wn features a shady 
propertv speculator known as "the rich Jew."- 

But G Umber ROhle, the theater director, m d Monday that the play 
would no: be performed in order to preserve the peace in Frankfurt and 
secure normal working conditions for the theater. 

Uganda Says Hijacking Imperils Talks 

NAIROBI (WF) — The Ugandan government charged Monday that 
the hijacking Sunday of a Uganda Airfares plane, winch it said was 
carried cut by rebels of the National Resistance .Army, aright undermine 
three months of peace negotiatio ns berweert the insurgents and the 
government. 

It remained undear Monday whether or not the rebels wanted to take 
responsibility for the hijacking. Thar chief negotiator is Nairobi, Samp- 
son B. Kisekka. first said that they hijacked (he aircraft is an attempt to 
seize two members of the rnffitary ccancO who were scheduled to take the 
n jg ht but canceled. Later, however, he aid the hijackin g was carried out 
by an army deserter, who would be ©was asytnmby me rebels. 

The aircraft, carrying 49 passengers and crew, including five West 
Germans. wasdivertafl fay a gnmnaoihasu a domestic Bight and flown 
to Kasese, a rebel-held town m wtrimi Uganda. AS the oocmSitarj^ 
passengers and crew were reported safe, 

Benson Is Named as Mormon Leader 

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (UH) 

— Ezra Taft Benson was named on 
Monday as the president of the 
Mormon Church, He succeeds 
Spencer W. Kimball, who died 
Nov. 5. 

Mr. Benson. 86, was secretary cf 


Jordan, which had given refuge 
to a number of Syrian dissidents, 
repeatedly denied the charges, and 
relations between the two countries 
deteriorated to the point of a mili- 
tary buildup on both sides of their 
border is October 1980. 

Io a meeting with Mr. Assad in 
1930, Hussein said Sunday. Mr. 
Assad said that Jordan was harbor- 
ing those causing violence against 
his government. 

“I repeated what I had thought 
to be the troth and said his state- 
ments were categorically untrue,” 
Hussein said. 

But *‘h came to light that some of 
those who were connected to the 
Moody incidents in Syria were pre- 
sent in Jordan and were taking ref- 
uge in the bouses of a deviant mi- 
nority cloaking themselves in the 
gowns of our Moslem religion.” 



Throughout his career in both poK- 
ncs and the c hurch , he has been 
known as an outspoken conserva- 
tive. supporting the John Birch So- 
ciety and opposing the Equal 
Rights Amendment 
Mr. Benson had been senior 
apostle of the Chinch of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints and 
president of the Comal of the 
Twelve Apostles. Mormon tradi- 
tion, established in the 140 years 
since Brigham Young assumed the 
presidency after the death of Jo- 
seph Smith, the church’s founder, 
dictates that the council president 
assume the top post. 



Earn Taft Benson 


South Korean Dissidents Stage Protest 

SEOUL (AP) — About 120 South Korean dissidents began a three-day 
. sit-in Mondav after bolding a rally denouncing the alleged torture of 
detainees daring police interrogation. 

The protesters included Kim Dae Jung and Kim Young Sam. co- 
chairmen of the Cornual for the Promotion of Democracy. The sil-in was 
being conducted at the council's office in SeouL The council was the 
moving force behind the formation of the New Korea Democratic Party, 
the political opposition that won a surprisingly strong second place in 
National Assembly elections in February. 

Government authorities have denied there has been torture, but 
dissidents, hum a n rights activists and family members of people under 
detention have charged the opposite. There was no attempt by authorities 
to break up the sit-in. 

5 Dead After New Jersey Midair Crash 

NEW YORK (NYT) — Two private airplanes collided and fell in 
flames over two New Jersey comronnities near the Hudson River, killing^ 
their occupants and setting off fires in residential and commercial^ 
buildings. 

At least five persons — two in each of the planes and one on the ground 
— were brown dead after the aasb Sunday. Despite destruction and fires 
on the ground; only one other person was listed as missing early Monday. 

At least eight others were reported injured, two of them seriously. 

The plane that fell in Cfifiade Park plunged into a block of residential 
and commercial buildings. It leveled two buildings and, spewing jet fuel, 
touched off a fire in three others that burned out of control for hours. 

For the Record 

West Germany’s national airfine, Lufthansa, canceled two domestic 
flights Monday and others were delayed by ground personnel striking 
over payments in a profit-sharing plan, a spokesman in Frankfurt said. 

(AP) 

Portugal's ojqMsitjon rightist Christian Democratic Party has cnosen 
Adriano Moreara, 63, as its new leader after winning onlv 22 of the 250 
seats in parliamentary elections Oct. 6, a loss of eight seats from the last 
election in 1983. (Reuters) 

British airport immigration officers protesting scheduled staff reduc- m 
tions went on strikes of eight to 24 hours Monday at Heathrow, Gatwick ^ 
and Luton near London and at Glasgow and Edinburgh. An Airports 
Authority spokesman said nonunion officers stayed on duty and there 
were few disruptions. f^pf 

Strikers protesting the killing of two mill workers rampaged Monday 
through Dhaka, Bangladesh, a police spokesman said. Five hundred 
people were arrested. / Reuters ) 

India and China failed Monday to settle a 23-year dispute over their 
Himalayan border, the Press Trust of India news agency reported. Both 
sides agreed to meet again in Beijing. (Reuters) 


Jean Delacour, Ornithologist, Dies Genoa (hurt Issues 


Lot Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — Jean Dela- 
cour. 95, the French- bom former 
director of the Los Angeles County 
Museum and a leading ornitholo- 
gist, died Nov. 5. 

At one time he owned the 
world’s largest private zoo and avi- 
ary, on bis 12th-centmy ancestral 
estates in Normandy. The Nazis 
bombed (he castle, Chateau de 
Clires, during their invasion of 
France in World War U audit had 
to be rebuilt. 

During the war. Mr. Delacour, 
whose family was one of the richest 
in France, served as a liaison offi- 
cer between the French and British 
armies. He dropped oat of sight 
with the fall of France and was not 
heard from by fellow scientists in 
the United States for a year. 

Mr. Delacour came to the Unit- 
ed States in 1941, serving as a tech- 


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nical adviser to the Bronx Zoo and 
a research associate of the Ameri- 
can Museum of Natural History in 
New York. He was naturalized in 
1946. He took over as director of 
die Los Angeles County Museum 
in February 1951 and retired in 
October I960. 

Mr. Delacour was the author of 
four major books in his field and of 
many articles in scientific and pop- 
ular publications. 

He was said by many experts to 
be the world's foremost avicultur- 
isL or breeder of birds in captivity, 
and was an adviser to numerous 
zoos, including those in Los Ange- 
les and San Diego. 

By 1951, he had led seven expe- 
ditions to Indochina, bringing out 

50.000 specimens of rare birds and 

15.000 rare mammals. 

His Normandy estates, which 
were restored to become a major 
zoological park and where he spent 
his summers, have been willed to 
the French government, an asso- 
riatesaid 

Mary MacLaren, 85, 

Star of Sflent Screen 

WEST HOLLYWOOD, Califor- 
nia (AP) — Mary MacLaren, 85, a 
cover gni and star of the sBent 
screen who played opposite Doug- 


las Fairbanks Sr. and Rudolph Va- 
lentino, died hoe Saturday. 

Miss MacLaren starred in such 
silent films as “The Three Muske- 
teers” in 1921, and “Shoes” She 


Photoplay” movie magayW 

James Moroka, 95, 

Led African Congress 
JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) 

■ James Moroka, 95, a former 
president of the African National 
Congress, died Friday in Bloem- 
fontein, South Africa, his family 
said. 

From 1949 to 1962, Mr. Moroka 
served as leader of the congress, 
which the South African govern- 
ment has outlawed became the 
group seeks to overthrow white- 
minority rule. 

■ Other deaths: 

Aiata Les&e, 72, a British writer 
whose books included biographies 
of several relatives of Winston 
Churchill, to whom she was related, 
Nov. 5 in London. . 

Friedridi Trangott Wahten, 86, a 
former "Swiss president cretfited 
with helping Switzerland become 
nearly setf-siffidem in food dnmm 

World War Ii, Thursday in- Bern. 


16 Warrants in 
Ship Hijacking 

Agenee France Preae 
GENOA — The Genoa pr 
tor's office has issued 16 ana 
rams in connection with the 
tinian hijacking of the / 
Lauro cruise ship last moi 
magistrate said Monday. 


wu4u uqi comum u a warn 

been issued for Mohammed 

reader of the Palestine Lib 
Front, whom the United Sta 
accused of mastenumding i 
eration. But be said the w 
concerned both the. suspec 
jackets and their leaders. 

Magistrates in .Sicily hs 
ready issued a warrant for h 
bas’ arrest. 

Mr. Abbas was on boa 
Egyptian plane carrying th 
hijackers when.ii was forced 
m&cfly by U.S. jet Fighters. 

He was allowed to leavt 
despite U8. demands for his 
m a decision that brought ^do 
government of Prime Minist 
hno Oaxi, although the co 
has since been reconstituted 

An American tourist 
Klinr^-" - --- 
was 















Page 3 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 



one size doesn’t fit aH. 


Contrary to what some people 
would have you believe, no one personal 
computer is a perfect fit for every 
business. 

Unless you are willing to squeeze and 
twist your company to suit a particular 
machine’s capabilities. 

Which can, of course, result in a rather 
uncomfortable situation. 

At IBM, we haven’t forgotten why 
these computers were called “personal” 
in the first place. 

We’ve created an entire family of 
PCs for small, medium and larger 
businesses. 

And they’re all expandable. 

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i ii n i iutt|i , i ii mum i iii ii i \*i ii in in Him * im *.i GGK 



age 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 


U'S. Counties Challenge Cities for Power 


By John Hcrbcrs 

-'Vh York Tins Senate 
_^EW YORK — Four years after 
‘f’Swou Ronald Reagan began 
dismantling federal domestic pro- 
Srstns. a new order of local gervem- 
nieni has begun to emerge as cnce- 
dorraani counties in manv areas 
challenge cities For pre-eminence. 

Through legislation, budget cuts, 
sod executive orders, the Reagan 
administration has virtually ended 
Ae relationship the U.S. "govern- 
ment had built, through direct 
grants, with local governments over 
two decades. 

Instead, it returned responsibil- 
ity to the states. leading to turbu- 
lent change at the local leveL The 
cities have historically been at odds 
with the states over local autono- 
my. 


lution," said Matthew B. Coffej. 
executive director of the National 
Association of Counties. Encour- 
aging the rise or the counties, he 
said. 15 the [act that in a time or 
declining federal funds they, rather 
than the cities, have taxing author- 
ity over much of the growth and 
wealth in suburban and ex urban 
areas. 

Thus counties, besides providing 
basic services outside municipal- 
ities. have been taking over metro- 


The Census Bureau reported that 
the number of county employees 
rose pi 4 percent over five years to 
I.S 7 2 jOG 9 in October 1984. The 
number of municipal employees 

declined b> 5 percent to 2,434.000 
in that period. There are about 
3.U00 counties, whose boundaries 
have remained virtually unchanged 
Tor decades, and 19.000 municipal- 
ities. many of them newly formed 
or expanded. 

County functions vary widely 


lion. 275.000 people living in unin- 
corporated places, providing them 
with basic services traditionally 
performed by cities, including law 
enforcement, streets, water, and 
sewers. The county also serves pro- 
pie both inside and outside the cit- 
ies in such areas as welfare, health, 
highways, courts, and corrections. 


But now the expanding county 
governments, long favored by state 
legislatures, are joining the revolt, 
demanding more taxing authority 
and complaining of having to carry 
out state orders without the re- 
sources to do it. 

In the process, the counties, 
which once represented primarily 
rural populations but are now 
deeply involved with gritty urban 
problems, appear to be gaining po- 
litical power, both at the state and 
national levels. 

A broader significance, however, 
is that the states will come under 
considerably more pressure to 
gram autonomy to local govern- 
ments. In the past counties have 
not been active on this issue. 

“It has been a quite rapid devo- 


The counties, which once represented 
primarily rural populations but are now 
deeply involved with gritty urban problems, 
appear to be gaining political power. 


India Picks Shuttle Scientists 


Reuters 

NEW DELHI — Two Indian 
scientists have been selected and 
begun training to be astronauts 
aboard the U.S. space shuttle next 
spring or summer. India's space 
agency stud. 


poll lac- wide functions such as 
parks, hospitals, and libraries. 

The rise of county governments 
is considered important largely be- 
cause of the political ideology they 
bring to bear in both state and 
national arenas. Most city officials 
are Democrats, but most county 
officials are Republicans. Mr. Cof- 
fey said. Whether Democrat or Re- 
publican. he added. 87 percent of 
county officials are conservative in 
the Reagan mold. 

Count} 1 leaders have met fre- 
quently with Mr. Reagan since be 
entered the White House, while 
thdr city counterparts were not in- 
vited. Yet die National Association 
of Counties was instrumental in 
organizing a coalition of state and 
local governmental groups to fight 
his proposal to disallow state and 
local tax deductions on federal in- 
come tax returns. 

One indication of the rise of 
county government is new census 
figures showing substantial growth 
in county employment, in contrast 
to stagnation in municipal jobs. 


from state to state. Two states. 
Connecticut and Rhode Island, 
have no counties, Rhode Island be- 
cause it is too small and Connecti- 
cut because it abolished them two 
decades ago when they were 
thought useless in the complex of 
small industrial cities that make up 
that suue. 

Elsewhere in New England 
counties have little authority, but 
in most other states, the picture is 
different. New York and New Jer- 
sey counties are heavily involved in 
education, highways, welfare, 
health, police protection, recrea- 
tion. and many other functions. 

Los .Angeles County in Califor- 
nia provides the extreme example 
in county influence. It has a budget 
of S6.7 "billion, said to be larger 
than that of 17 states, and a payroll 
of 79,000 people, almost twice that 
of the City of Los Angeles. 

More typical is Salt Lake County 
in Utah. Salt Lake City, the largest 
of 1 1 municipalities in the county, 
has a population of 160,000, but 
the county serves a larger popula- 


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Mistakes 
Piled Up 
In Bombing 
Of MOVE 




Judges Boycott Rites 
For Colleagues Slain 
During Bogota Siege 

■ vice Sunday. M' p - 


A leading analyst of county gpv- 
mments nationally, D. Michael 


enunents nationally, D. Mi chad 
Stewart, who is chairman of the 
Salt Lake County Comnnsskm. 
sees trouble for the counties under 
the new order, in spite of their 
growth. 


He said county governments of- 
ten do not have the constitutional 
or legal power to carry out thdr 
increasing responsibilities. In addi- 
tion, he said, tins “is aggravated by 
the additional work load devolving 
upon them from state-required, ser- 
vices and mandates." An example, 
he said, is that states crowd county 
jails when state prisons overflow 
but do uot give me counties ade- 
quate funds to expand their jails. 

Although many counties are 
flush with revenue from new hous- 
ing and commercial development 
outside dties, Mr. Stewart said 
their future is threatened because 
most are almost totally dependent 
on the property tax, a levy despised 
by many taxpayers and one that is 
on the decline nationally. 

Under the U.S. Constitution, 
counties are dependent on state 
legislatures to grant both taxing 
and legislative authority. The 
states, Mr. Stewart said, are pre- 
venting them from broadening 
thdr revenue base even to that ex- 
ercised by cities. 

Nor do counties in many states 
have the authority* to enact laws 
and rules they need, said Mr. Stew- 
arL As a result, county officials are 
organizing lobbies at all levels to 
gain more authority. 


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’Opening 1986 Hue center < in- locations 


cky. i. 


By Bill Peterson 

Washington Post Service 

PHILADELPHIA — Five 
weeks or hearings about the May 
13 bombing by police of a radical 
black back-io-oature group, and 
the subsequent fire that killed II 
people and destroyed 230 homes, 
nave produced no single explana- 
tion of the day’s events. 

But the bearings have begun to 
change the political landscape of 
the fifvh-largest city in the United 
States. 

The hearings put the inner work- 
ings of the city government on pub- 
lic display in a way that few city 
governments have experienced. 
The pictnre they painted was not 
pretty. 

The bearings showed official 
bumbling, paralysis, arrogance, 
miscalculations and communica- 
tion breakdowns. 

They showed a dty government 
failing at almost every step in its 
attempts to cope with MOVE, a 
small but intransigent radical 
group. The group's initials do uot 
stand for anything. 

“The people of Philadelphia 
have been able to look deeply into 
an incredible debacle," the Phila- 
delphia Inquirer editorialized Fri- 
day. 

“They have seat a police com- 
missioner pleading ignorance so 
deep that — if he is idling the truth 
— such ignorance alone should be 
grounds for dismissal; seen a fire 
commissioner who agreed to let a 
fire grow out of control; seen a 
managing director who may better 
have remained on vacation. 

“They saw a mayor, too, who did 
not say ‘no' to dropping a bomb; a 
mayor who opted for the sidelines 
as police confronted MOVE and a 
neighborhood was consumed." 

Almost everything that could go 
wrong did. Orders were disobeyed 
or ignored. Fire Commissioner 
William C. Richmond, for exam- 
ple, revealed that he never received 
an order from Mayor W. Wilson 
Goode to put out the fire caused by 
the bomb. 

The policeman who made the 
bomb ured C4, a military explosive 
not authorized by Police Commis- 
sioner Gregore J. Sambor. It was 
likely to trigger a fire and was un- 
stated for the job it was supposed 


i t *^1 


By Joseph B. Treastef 

* Sew York Tima Service 
BOGOTA — The 12 judges who 
survived a 27-hour siege at Colom- 
bia's Justice Ministry Iasi week 
have boycotted an elaborate me- 
morial service Fra the scores of peo- 
ple who died. 


»jr.v '* 


policy the so v err.^t- ■■ > - * 
not enter iato ses^-t^-; M Bc . 
He acknowiA-i 5 :** 





said other ^ 


Mayor W. Wilson Goode 


to do — blow up a rooftop bunker 
and knock a hole in the roof, ac- 
cording to testimony. 

When fire engulfed the house, a 
police videotape recorded officers 


oct Supreme Court died of a Heart g^^^ba.! offered ! tiif 
In a brief address ai the memori- surrender. 


laughing at the misfortune or 
MOVE membeis inside. 


MOVE members inside. 

The hearings raised questions 
about pl anning . Police had spent 
three months planning for a 1978 
confrontation with MOVE in 
which one officer died, and another 
three mouths planning for an antic- 
ipated confrontation in 1984. 

P lanning (his year did not begin 
until two weeks before pohee acted. 
Two of the city’s four chief ded- 
skm-makers — Fire Commissioner 
Richmond and Leo A. Brooks, the 
former city managing director — 
were not told of any plans until 
May 1 1 , two days before the opera- 
tion took place. 

Police Commissioner Sambor 
called his plan “the most conserva- 
tive. controlled, disciplined and 
safe operation which we could de- 
vise." 

But the city acted too hastily, 
Mr. Brooks said last week. 

“If there was one thing wrong, it 
was we moved too fast," he said, 
adding, “We should have had a dry 
ran." 

Mayor Goode had an intimate 
knowledge of MOVE He said he 
met with two former MOVE mem- 
bers, Louise James and LuVerae 
Sims, IS times while he was dty 
manag in g director between 1980 
and 1952. From meetings with 
MOVE’S neighbors, he knew of the 
disruptions the radical group had 
caused. 


sought to explain his decision not - a , - 

uTHgotiue with the Irfda rebds fed “““T. £ .. 
who seized the justice building ■ Rebels Explain Raid 
shortly before noon on Wednes- Leaders of the M-W gi 
day. The rebels were membeis of a ja a clandestine meeting * 
group known as M-19. gj foreign journalists Sut 

He suggested he had had no al- t hev took over the Justice 


Leaders of the M-W group rani 
in a clandestine meeting wi* scv t ef ' 
al foreign journalists Sunday uwt 
.ZZu Z . — »*,» iiwikv Ministry 


giuuy Oh 1*1-1^. 21 lOTOgn jguiuoiw . — 

He suggested he had had no al- jj,— . took over the Justice Ministry 
tentative but to refuse negotiations ^ a bid to draw attention to their 
with the rebels and order the re- ^nc*. and were stunned by the 


attacks by soldiers and po- govennaent's derision w end the 

l takeover by force. United Press In- 

The government has issued no ^n^tiona! reported from Bogota, 
port on the cumber of people Arche! leader who called himself 


■ — 1 — r- A rcua K51UCI " uuwnw " — , , 

in the ministry, but accord- Alfonso said the group had 


ing to numerous accounts about 
100 people died. 


planned to bold the Justice Palace f ' 
for a few hours and then negolia- 


i or a jew dout 5 iiuu uiw 

at the end of a mass led dons for the release of the judges. 


by Bogota's archbishop. Mario Re- «w e never expected the bestial* 
bolta, Mr. Betancur said that wfafle - lt y of tfnving tanks through the 
he mourned the loss of life, the front door," said the rebel leader, a 
tragedy had “fortified the principle toexdba of M-I9’s 35 -member na- 


of legality." . rinnol board of directors. 

“The choice,” the president said. domed gov- 

> between democracy and terror- cnune ^^^ s ^ the takeover 
ism. b et we en the law and anarchy, *- j j 


« cramem that tne takeover 

wa5 financedby drug trafTicto 
between hberty ana tear. , aDcaations that they executed 

Mr. Betancur, 61, who was elect- : . , svnrt lurimk after the 


ed three years ago on a pledge to 
bring an end to Colombia's long 
guerrilla war, had several times nes- 


1 1 Supreme Court judges after the 
final army assault began. 

Alfonso g»rf the Soviet-aligned 


mjnuii wu, uni uuio ut- — — — r . — , 

gotiated with rebel groups on the group wanted the juduaary to rule 
tems of a cease-nrc. In respond lo »" 


to iua ui d wwi ut. ui trauwuu iv . , r r , . . h 

rebel demands in the peace talks, the rebels that accused Mr. Be tan - 
he had pardoned and freed hnn- cur of not oompJying with a peace 


dredsof captured rebels. -n- — . , _ 

In a Saturday with Jus- cease-fire agreement with Mr. Bc- 

tice Minister Enrique Parejo. the tanenr’s government in June after 

• - - 1 Aknvmnn wUm amni hdrf ffWllM V 


agreement- The rebdi. broke off a 


But as May 13 approached, he 
took an increasingly distant role. 
He left key derisions to subordi- 
nates. He says they misled, misin- 
formed and disobeyed him. 


uwc ivuiiaiQ uuupib raiqu. ■ - or 

surviving judges said that not only charpng the army had repeatedly 
would they not take part in the violated the truce, 


memorial on Sunday, but also ihai Alfonso said rebels took over the 
they did not want government offi- bitikfing “because it was the only 
rials to attend any burial services way they would listen to us in tire 
for their slain colleagues. country. We wanted the court to go 

Shortly after the memorial ser- into session and resolve the suit," f 


U.S. Group Enlists Students to Monitor Prof essors 


By Alison Muscatine 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Cynthia 
McClintock, an associate professor 
of political science at George 
Washington University, requires 
students in her two courses on Lat- 
in American politics to read more 
than a dozen books and watch five 
films, including one film that is 
critical of the rebels backed by the 
United States in Nicaragua. 

Although her course syllabus in- 
cludes U.S. government papers and 
a textbook published by the conser- 
vative Hoover Institution, Miss 
McClintock’s name is now on file 
with a newly formed university 
watchdog group. Accuracy in Aca- 
demia Inc. 


The group said h has enlisted 
students on 150 college campuses, 
mostly through college Republican 
dubs, to monitor faculty membeis 
and to report back if their classe s 
failed to indude diverse ideological 
points of view. 

The organization recruited stu- 
dents who began monitoring col- 
lege dasses in September and has 
published its first monthly newslet- 
ter, focusing on a political science 
professor at Arizona State Univer- 
sity who devotes much of apolitical 
survey course to the issue of uncle- 
ar freeze. 

The newsletters will be issued 
only after professors have been 
contacted and given an opportuni- 
ty to respond to students’ com- 


plaints, said the group’s rounder, 
Reed Irvine, and its executive di- 
rector, Les Csorba 3d. 

Mr. Irvine, who founded Accu- 
racy in Media 14 years ago to 
counter what he considered a liber- 
al bias in the national news media, 
said he derided to font) Accuracy 
in Academia because ooBegp stu- 
dents were being saturated with 
one print erf view. 

“It seems to be pretty wdl estab- 
lished that liberal-arts colleges are 
hotbeds of liberalism and turn out 
little liberals who go kne&jerfcing 
their way through life,” Mr. Irvine 
said. 


.won’t," Mr. Irvine said. “But they 
have a responsibility to . present 
other prints of view.” ' 


“Any professor is going to teach 
his potnl of view, and it would be 
unreasonable to expect that they 


Academics and college presi- 
dents nationwide say the group Is 
pofiacaBy motivated md mresDsns 
the tracfitioMJooocqrt of academic . 
freedom. The American Assoda- , 
don of Umveisty Professors has f 
deaotmeed the grasp, j 

Offhaabof tire association wrote V 
in a recent issue of Academe: “Stav 
dents wifi be discouraged from test- 
ing their ideas. Professors wifi hea- L 
tate before presenting new or 
unpopular theories that would , 
stimulate robust intellectual dis- f 
cussion." \ 


You’ll always be recognised by your taste in Scotch. 


’ A special assistant to the US, 
edneatto p secretary, Wil liam J. 
Bennett, said last week that “it 
would be awkward" for Mr. Ben- 
nett to comment on Accuracy in 
Academia until he knew more 
abouliL . 



But* the assistant secretary, Wil- 
liam Kristri, on leave from the fac- 
ulty at Harvard University’s Ken- 
nedy School of Government, said 
he opposed the group's tactics. 

■ “Of course there is a bias on 
utnq Ais, but this kind of scrutiny 
by an external group isn’t the way 
to attack it," he said. 


Mr. Kristol, who teaches politi- 




self as a conservative, said his col- 
leagues at Harvard were 
“predominantly liberal, but very 
tolerant." 










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10-Year Insurgency 


By Sech Mydans . . . 

New Yorli Tima Service • .- 

MANILA — Defense Minister 
Juan Ponce Enrilesaid Monday 
that it would take at least a decaife 
before the Communist insurgency 
could be contained in.tbe Philip, 
pines. His estimate differed sharply 
with that made last week by Presi- 
dent Ferdinand E Marcos. 

Mr. Entile said he believed that 
Mr. Marcos's prediction that the 
insurgency would be defeated in 
one year had been made “to buoy 
up the confidence of the nation.” 

The struggle will go do for a 
long fame," Mr. Enrile said. “It. 
could be a matter of a Jew years. It 
could be decades. It will be at least 

f a decade before the situation is . 
contained.” ■ . - 

Asked in an interview Ocl 31 for 
his prediction about the counterin- 
surgency drive, Mr. Marcos said: ■ 
“In one year we’D wipe them out, if - 
we geL the proper backing from : 
both governments and the compen- 
sation military, package” ’ 1 

He was referring to military aid 
from the United States that is in- 
cluded in a $ 900-million compen- 
sation package for the use of two 
large bases in the Philippines. 1 - 
Meeting reporters Monday, Mr. 
EnrOe said: “He’s the- president 
and Tm noL I would rather rake a 
more cautious approach than that, 
with due respect to my president.*’ 


He added; Tm not optimistic 
' that weeando that ovenugbi-ofin 
r..Tnis is a 


six months or a year, 
protracted effori.” 

It was the second time in recent 
- weeks that tpidmistic assessments 
of the insurgency by Mr. Marcos 
. have been contradicted by his mDi- 
. tanrnwi.', 

On. Oct. 25, General Fidel C. 
Ramos, ading chief of staff of the 
armed forces, said the insurgency 
bad grown to a fighting strength of 
. 12^00 men, considerably higher 
than an estimate of 9,000 made by 
Mr. Marcos -the week before. Mr. 
Marcos later said that be would 
accept the 12^00 estimate of Gen- 
‘ eral Ramos, although he said that 
■ only 70 percent of that number was 
aimed. 

Appearing . Monday with Mr 
Emile, General Rairirn empha sized 
the need to seek poE deal as wdl as 
military solutions to the insurgent- 

\ 

*Tbe problem is not a military 
problem," he said. “It is more a 
political, economic and social one.” 

This is in accord with the analy- 
sis of U.S. officials, who have beat 
urging Mr. Marcos to institute 
wide-ranging reforms to combat 
the insurgency. 

.U.S. analysts have estimated re- 
bel strength at 16,000 or more and 
have' warned: that the insurgency 
could reach, a position.. of. parity. 


PhOippini 
ree to five 


tines armed forces 
'eyeare. 

■ Aquino Mistrial Sought 

• Abby Tan. of The Washington 
Post reported from. Manila: 

A group of prominent Filipinos 
petitioned the Supreme Court on 
Monday to declare a mistrial in the 
Aquino murder case. 

The petitioners accused both the 
trial court and the prosecution of 
failing to serve the interest of the 
people through “manifest partiality 
and injudicious and irregular con- 
duct.” They also demanded that 
the court be stopped from handing 
down a verdict, which is expected 
soon. 

The petitioners included Jose 
Bengzon, Cecilia Muhoz-Palma 
and Jose B.L. Reyes, all retired jus- 
tices of the Supreme Court. Also 
included were several businessmen, 
human rights lawyers and promi- 
nent priests and nuns. 

The trial for the 1983 murder of 
Benigno S. Aquino Jr_, an opposi- 
tion leader who was returning to 
Manila from self-imposed exile, 
ended in September, after seven 
months of hearings. Summations 
by both defense and the prosecu- 
tion were completed two weeks 
ago. 

The motion for mistrial charged 
that the prosecution was under tre- 
mendous pressure and that it could 


not act freely. It cited several exam- 
ples of what it deemed to be lack of 
vigor by the prosecution . 

The petitioners also charged that 
the trial court, led by Judge Manuel 
Pamaron, was prejudiced. They 
cited an assertion by Raul Gon- 
zales, a lawyer who acted as private 
prosecutor during the trial, that a 
judge passed notes to help the de- 
fense. 


Election BiD Submitted 


Mr. Marcos submitted his post- 
dated resignation as president 
Monday to pave the way for a pres- 
idential election on Jan. 17. The 
Washington Post reported. 

In a letter addressed to Nicanor 
Yniguez. speaker of the National 
Assembly. Mr. Marcos made it 
clear that his “irrevocable” resigna- 
tion would become effective “only 
when the election is held and after 
the winner is proclaimed and quali- 
fied as president by taking his oath 
of office 10 days ’after his procla- 
mation.” 

Mr. Marcos’s move enables him 
to run for re-election without hav- 
ing to leave office as the constitu- 
tion requires. His letter was at- 
tached to a cabinet bill laying down 
the election ground rules. The bOl 
was referred immediately to the 
parliamentary committee on revi- 
sion of laws and was expected to be 
passed by next week 


Zia Agrees to Trim Powers, but Some Are Skeptical 




By Steven R. Wrisman 

New York Tuna Sen Ice 
1 ISLAMABAD. ' Pakistan — 
General Mohammed Zia ul-Haq 
has agreed to a modest dilution of 
his powers as president, striking a 
compromise with the Pakistani 
parliament that could pave the way 
for martial law' to be lifted by next 
year: 

But politicians and dip loma ts 
say that evm if martial law were 
removed. General Zia mid the army 
wonld probably retain enormous 
power. 

The compromise, approved by 
Ihe National Assembly in October, 
curbs General ■ Zia’s authority to 
dissolve the legislature and appoint 
provincial governors. .. 

“This is a unique step in the 
history of our country,” said Fi- 
nance Minis ter Mahbubul. Haq, 
one of the authors of the compro- 
mise.- “It shifts the discretionary 
power from the president to parlia- ■ 
meat and clears the way for a re- 
newal of political activity.” 

General Zia and Prime Minister 
Mohammad Khan Junejo have set 
Jan. \ as the deadline for lifting 
martial law: Skeptics point to Gen- 
eral Zia’s many 1 broken promises, 
inchiding his pledge torestorccivil- 


Mohammed Zia al-Haq 


ian rale withra 90 days after seizing 
power in a 1977 military coup. 

Arrests of opposition politicians, 
including Benazir Bhutto, daughter 
of Zolfikar Ali Bhutto, the prime 
minister General Zia deposed and 
then executed m 1979, have fueled 
doubts. 

But politicians say that a consen- 
sus has emerged in parliament that 
General Zia wfil move the counfay 
toward a measure of control by a 


representative civilian government. 

General Zia is stiB expected to 
wield considerable power. In recent 
interviews, politicians, diplomats 
and other analysts said he probably 
would continue some censorship 
and some restrictions on political 
meetings. 

A civilian government with Gen- 
eral Zia os brad also would contin- 
ue to have broad police powers to 
arrest poGticians deemed guilty of 
threatening the coon try’s stability, 
according to these analysts. 

'Hie main difference in a future 
civilian government, they said, 
would be that citizens would have 
recourse to civilian courts to chal- 
lenge the government's actions. 
Thar only recourse now is to mili- 
tary courts. 

Government traders who sup- 


ing parties to register with the gov- 
ernment, hold internal elections, 
open their books to public scrutiny, 
bar foreign contributions and re- 
nounce violence. 


Mr. Junejo said in an interview: 
“We are going to allow the parties 
lo function. But they will hare to 
abide by certain rules and regula- 
tions. I can assure you one thing. 
We are not going to have one-party 
rule in this country.” 


Vigorous opposition to General 
Zia exists only among 30 or 40 
members of the 236-member Na- 
tional Assembly, the legislature's 
lower house, but Mr. Junejo said he 
had tried to avoid forcing passage 
of anything over the opposition of 
this minority. 


port General Zia sa^ that once 


martial law is lifted, the rules gov- 
erning political activities will be 
liberalized. Others disagree. 

For years, Pakistan has outlawed 
political parties and periodically 
imprisoned their leaders or subject- 
ed them to bouse arrest 


T feel it is vital that we do things 
by consensus,” he said. The com- 
promise was adopted, he said, “af- 
ter we talked to everybody and 
took their views into account.” 


Whether political parties will 
function after January is to be de- 
termined by the pa rliam ent There 
is talk now of enacting laws requir- 


The many analysts who see the 
slow process of restoring civilian 
rale as a superficial exercise say the 
military wfll continue to act as a 
shadow government. 


A key question is whether Gen- 
eral Zia win resign as army chief of 
staff once martial law is removed. 


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Page 6 


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 


Heral 



__ Pabltrfifd \Thh Tbf V* \ork Tiaw and The tfiJunpon Port 

Soft Options Won’t Work 


tri bune An Editor in Trouble for Doing His Job 


Most debtor countries reject Fidel Cas- 
tro s advice to default, but they increasingly 

* resent the austere conditions imposed by 
. creditors. To some extent their protests are 
“popularist declarations to satisfy home audi- 

€nces - Creditor countries. like tax collectors, 
are seldom loved. And if the International 
Monetary- Fund, a professional creditor, is 
■becoming unpopular, it can console itself 
with the reflection that its role is to influence 

- people rather than make friends. 

Still the debtors' complaints merit close 
attention. A response of sorts was made by 
.. the U.S. Treasury last month. Will the U.S. 

■ proposal give the debtors more room to 
., expand their economies? Or does it, like 
, Europe’s architects a couple of centuries 

ago. simply make the room look bigger by 
putting mirrors at both ends? One hopes it 
will herald an increase in the flow of sorely 
i needed funds to the debtors. When the rhet- 
„ oric is interpreted, however, it seems clear 
that America is not proposing to soften the 
conditions on which the funds are granted. 
Many of the debtor governments repre- 
'sent fragile democracies that have taken 
‘bold initial steps to reverse the economic 
•■collapse that their military predecessors fos- 
' tered. One can sympathize when, after a year 

• or so. they fed impelled to relax the austerity 
l that has been the condition of bailout loans. 

■ But sympathy, by itself, is not much help. 

’ It the debtors’ economies are to be 

- brought back to a decent growth path, there 
' is probably little real choice between unpop- 
. alar disinflationary policies and indulgence 
] of hyperinflation. Current suggestions that 
! the creditors should put less stress cm stabili- 

■ zadon and more on getting the economies of 
the indebted countries growing again may 


not be helpful if they condone the persist- 
ence of runaway price increases. 

Inflation in these countries is unlikely to 
match North American or European rates in 
the near future, but it must come down from 
triple-digit heights. Most debtors want to 
move away from state control toward freer 
market conditions, but local enterprise is 
unlikely to flourish when high inflation and 
the resulting political instability make risk- 
taking investment foolhardy. And inflows of 
foreign private capital are discouraged by 
the economic and social chaos that threatens 
when money has no lasting value. 

It would be enormously useful if govern- 
ments in the rich world stepped up spending 
on aid. But the shaming truth is that aid hit a 
bad patch long ago from which it wffl not 
emerge soon. So debtors have little choice 
but to seek private funds from abroad. 

The rich governments can do something, 
at relatively small expense, to help the in- 
debted in this quest They can devise ar- 
rangements to reduce the immediate burden 
of interest payments. They can draw up new 
multilateral schemes to guarantee business 
capital flowing from north to south. They 
can cautiously modify regulations that in- 
hibit fresh bank lending to the debtors. 

But all that depends for its success on 
orderly financial conditions inside the debt- 
or countries. Disorder will simply make new 
capital flow out again as fast as it comes in, 
because with high inflation those lucky 
enough to earn more than a subsistence 
income will always send it abroad for safety. 
This is why the debtors have to resolve the 
dilemma between soft political options and 
the pursuit of hard economic policy. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


No News Is Bad News 


Pretoria is tightening up on the news. On 
Friday it invoked the apartheid system's dra- 

- coni an internal security legislation against the 
white editor of the Cape Times, Tony Heard, 

- for publishing the first substantial interview in 
the South African press in 25 years with a 
black guerrilla leader. In the interview, Oliver 
Tambo of the African National Congress 
urged the government to create a climate for 
talks. The newspaper deemed publication “a 
contribution to peaceful solutions in South 
Africa in a matter of overwhelming public 
importance.’’ The government saw an intru- 
sion upon its chosen course of roughing it qul 
Others will see an insistence on flying blind. 

New government curbs will now substan- 
tially chin the news flowing to the international 
public as well as to South Africans. Television, 

' radio and photographic correspondents are 
henceforth barred from areas of unrest News- 
paper and magazine journalists can enter those 
areas only with police permission. 

South Africa ts not the first place where 
officials have been angered by the media, espe- 
cially by television, with its distinctive ability 
to touch the emotions of a broad public. What 
is distinctive is the evident aim to keep pictures 
of discontent from the foreign public, mostly, 
we presume, from the American public. Pre- 


toria has been stunned to find public and even 
official support fading in the United States, a 
country it previously regarded as reliable. 

The government claims that television cov- 
erage of violence incites disturbances — as if 
apartheid dul not light its own fires. It is more 
plausible that the government acted because of 
the "unprecedented intensity of interest" in 
South Africa that a Cape Times journalist 
found in America during a recent visit Noting 
that Bishop Desmond Tutu's "impact as a 
communicator was electrifying" to the Ameri- 
can public. Gerald Shaw wrote, fairly: "But it 
was the police whippings that really did it — 
the sight, night after night on television, of 
South African policemen whipping people in 
the streets of South Africa, whipping them as 
they ran, whipping them on the ground, drag- 
ging them along with one hand and whipping 
away furiously with the ocher." 

To this spectacle, two broad responses were 
possible. One, favored by Gerald Shaw and the 
Cape Times among o theirs in South Africa, was 
political dialogue. The other, that of the gov- 
ernment, was censorship. The reprisals against 
journalists, like the uproar in the townships, 
are likely to strengthen the West in its view 
that apartheid is destroying South Africa. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Tin Cartel Collapses 


The tin cartel is collapsing in a pile of debts. 
The causes extend far bey ond the tin market 
so this is not to be dismissed as the isolated 
misfortune of one relatively small industry. 

Bui the misfortune is genuine. Some of the 
producers are small countries heavily depen- 
dent on tin exports. At least in principle, there 
was something to be said for an international 
attempt to stabilize the price. Tin accounted 
for about a third of Bolivia's export earnings, 
for example, and the failure of the tin agree- 
ment is a disaster for the Bolivian economy. 

Prices of commodities have been falling 
throughout the world for the past year and a 
half. It is not only Arabian ml and American 
grain but a vast range of raw materials and 
foodstuffs. This decline has taken producers 
by surprise. They had assumed thaL as in the 
past, economic growth in the industrial coun- 
tries would tighten demand for commodities 
and push prices steadily upward. But the in- 
dustrial economies have been growing for 
three years, and commodity prices are falling. 

The International Tin Council, a consor- 
tium of 22 governments, had been licking 
along inconspicuously in London for nearly 
three decades. Its method was to impose pro- 
duction quotas on its members and then try to 
hold the world price at agreed levels by buying 


into its buffer stockpile or selling out of it. But 
some important newcomers to the business — 
Brazil and China — were not members, re- 
fused to recognize the quotas and began ex- 
porting large volumes into a weak market 

The decline of the U.S. dollar’s exchange 
rate added another kind of downward pres- 
sure, The council did its business in sterling, 
but many of the major buyers deal in dollars. 
Hie price in pounds fell along with the dollar. 
The tin council was trying to prop it op with 
heavy buying, but that was expensive. Two 
weeks ago the manager of the stockpile ran out 
of money and suspended operations — at a 
point at which the council had more than 5800 
million in debt outstanding to London traders 
and banks. Thai debt has created a medium- 
sized financial crisis in Britain. 

Nobody currently knows what the price of 
tin might be. The big buyers are holding off to 
see what happens next Parallels between tin 
and oil or grain ought not to be exaggerated, 
since each of them follows its own peculiar 
rules. But sheikhs and American fanners 
would probably agree with the stunned pro- 
ducers of tin thaL while the benefits of lower 
prices can be substantial they do not offer a 
free ride to everybody — or a safe ride. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROMOURNOV. 12 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Foreigners Assaulted in China 
HONG KONG — A letter from Lienchou- 
Kwangri reports that rioters have demolished 
many buddings, including the American Pres- 
byterian church, hospital and college. They 
then proceeded to Tsoi-Yuen-Po, intending to 
slay the missionaries, whom the gentry assisted 
to escape in boats to Canton. Three battalions 
have left Canton to quell the disturbances. A 
British gunboat also is proceeding thither. Be- 
cause officials were numbering houses in Lien- 
cbou. the mob became enraged believing this 
to be an excuse for imposing taxation. Mean- 
while, Reuters reports from Shanghai that the 
enforcement of preventive measures against 
the plague has led to disturbances [to the 
Yangtze valley after floods], during which six 
Europeans have been roughly handled 


1935: Short Takes for Baby Stars 
HOLLYWOOD — The real plutocrats of the 
flicker business aren’t the Mayers, the 
Laeramies or the Sc bracks. Nor are they the 
Garbos, the Chaplins or the Barrymores. 
They’re the month-old babies, who, if they 
worked eight hours a day, would earn 5432,000 
a week. Potential film stars a tthat age earn $75 
a half-minute. And that constitutes their nor- 
mal work day. Under state health regulations, 
month-old babies can't be employed for more 
than 30 seconds at a time. The glare of the 
lights wound endanger their sight. When they 
go on a scene they are timed When the dial 
ticks off 30 seconds, off they go back to their 
cradles. It's a painstaking job, these appear- 
ances of the baby stars, and one that always 
brings groans to the director and his staff. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Pubiuker 

PHILIP M. FOES IE Executive Editor REN& BONDY Deputy Pubtuha- 

WALTER WELLS EtBtar ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

SAMUEL ABT Deputy EiStor RICH ARD H. MORGAN .tzsoaair PubUsher 

ROBERT K_ McCABE Deputy Etttor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operation 

CARL GEWfRTZ Assotjate Edmr FRANCOIS DESMA1SONS Director of Circulation 

ROLF 5. KRANEPUHL Director of Advertising Sales 
Intenutfiooal Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charles-de-GanUe. 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine, 

France. TeL: <1)47.47.12.65. Tetae 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

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US. subscription: S322 yearly. Second-doss postage paid at Long Island City, N.Y. 11 101. P*5 E lm 
© 1985, International Herald Tribune. AU rights resented. 


C APE TOWN — A prominent South .African 
newspaper editor once said that editing was 
like walking blindfold through a mine fidd. That 
was in the 1950s. He should try editing now. 

The government has spent 38 years finessing a 
form of press control that places on newspapers 
the onus to publish at their peril but severely 
limits our leeway to inform readers on vital 
matters. It is a twilight world of press freedom. 
The conventional wisdom among South African 
journalists has been that if you are light on your 
feet, lucky and work hard, the public can still be 
informed with a degree of adequacy. 

The ordinary process of simply publishing 
news as it breads is foreign to South African 
conditions, particularly now. 

A prime example is the provision in the Inter- 
nal Security Act that forbids publication of any 
utterance by a person who has been banned by 
the state. Banning has been described as civil 
death, since i L restricts a person's movements and 
associations. Although there are more excessive 
forms of dealing with dissent in the "‘less-free" 
pans of the world, the South African banning 
system is, to my knowledge, unique. 

Anyone who quotes a banned person is in big 
trouble. The penalty is up to three years in 
prison, with no statutory provision made for a 
tine, although sentences can be suspended. Edi- 
tors maintain up-to-date file boxes in their of- 
fices to check whether people are banned. 

It is not difficult to quote a banned person by 
mistake in the production of a daily newspaper, 
which has the equivalent length of a medium- 
sized novel. It happened to me some months ago 
when Zollie Malludi, an .African activist politi- 
cian, was inadvertently quoted in an obscure 
report in the Cape Times — purely by error. 

1 was summoned to coart with the reporter 
who had written the story. In that case, after we 
made several appearances in court, the charges 
were dropped without explanation and 1 was free 
to continue walking through the mine field. _ 
Now I am again the subject of police investiga- 


By Anthony H. Heard 

The writer is editor of the Cape Times. He 
war charged on Friday, under the Internal 
Security Acl with quoting a banned person. 

lion, this time for publishing a 3.600-word inter- 
view on Nov. 4 with Oliver Tambo, president of 
the African National Congress. It would be novel 
but futile to argue in court that 3.600 words 
could get into a newspaper inadvertently. 

There were compelling public- interest reasons 
for the publication. Prominent South Africans 
have been queuing up ro see Mr. Tambo and his 
senior aides as the South African crisis of unrest 
and economic downturn bites hard into white 
confidence and as support for the ANC among 

Publishing Mr. Tombo's views 
can only contribute to 
the inevitable peace process. 

blacks r emains strong Gavin Relly, chairman of 
.Anglo American Corporation, the giant rnimng- 
industrial organization, has seen Mr. Tambo. 
The leader of the liberal Progressive Federal 
Party. Frederich Van Zyl Slabbert, and senior 
party members also have met with die ANC The 
government frowns on these contacts, and is now 
denying passports for such visits. 

It was ironic and unsatisfactory that influen- 
tial South Africans were contacting the ANC and 
yet, because of the government’s restrictions on 
the press, almost all South Africans were being 
denied the opportunity to hear the ANCs posi- 
tions on the most important issues of the day. 

Since 1 was in London recently at the same 
time as Mr. Tambo, 1 took the opportunity to see 
him in his Victorian home in Ninth London. I 
was struck by his essential moderation: He fa- 
vors a mixed economy (here he appears to stand 


almost to the right of the Labor Party in Britain), 

a role for free enterprise, respect for home owner- 
ship and the security of whites as wdl as blacks. 
His views on communism, his dear dislike for 
violence and his keenness for talks with the 
government strike a moderate note. 

Mr. Tambo seemed to be a black African 
moderate in the mold of a Kenneth Kaunda or 
Julius Nyerere. A 6S-year-oid grandfatheriy fig- 
ure, he looked to me more like the last white hope 
in South Africa than the Commumst-tenxmst 
demon presented to South Africans by the gov- 
ernment-controlled broadcasting services. I de- 
scribed him as a reluctant revolutionary. 

The key point is that it would be far easier for 
whites to settle with a man like him than with the 
bitter young militants who are rising through the 
ranks of the ANC So the deal is urgent. 

Even ^airing due allowance for a measure of 
tactics (he was clearly out to impress his London 
audience with his moderation), the view emerged 
of a man quite unlike the one presented to South 
Africans through misleading quotes selected by 
the government and its suppcrrtiBg media. The 
interview was presented to our readers as part of 
the mosaic of viewpoints, ranging from far right 
to far left, that the Cape limes publishes. 

It was as simple as thaL Since 1 had bad 
brushes with the law about quoting banned per- 
sons, I knew the possible consequences. 

Publishing Mr. Tambo’s views can only con- 
tribute to the inevitable peace process: A creator 
understanding of mutual positions can only bdp 
black and white to find accommodation- The 
incident could even serve to move the govern- 
ment to amend its cumbersome and opprcssve 
ways, so thaL unlike the white Rhodesians — 
who were kept in the dark until the day Robert 
Mugabe took over — white South Africans at 
least will know what they are up against 

Soft the price to be paid for trying to serve the 
public's right to know is a measure of personal 
difficulty, that will have to be borne. 

Las Angeles Times. 


Greek Fun 

Isn’t What It 

Used to Be 

Bv Andrian* Ierodi acon * >u 

rived 5 in AibenStO;^ 

Papandreou s Socinlis* S 

sszs&s&s&i 


Israel: Foes 9 Anti-Zionism Is Anti-Semitic Racism 


N EW YORK — Ten years ago 
this week, the United Nations 
General Assembly, in one of its 
mindless flights from rational dis- 
course. adopted the infamous canard 
that “Zionism is a form of racism." 
Attacks on Israel and on Zionism 
have consumed more time and atten- 
tion of the United Nations and its 
various bodies than any other subject 
— more time than the problems of 
world hunger, poverty, genocide, hu- 
man rights violations, the threat of 
nuclear war, terrorism or the fight 
against disease and social disorder. 

Why the focus on Zionism and 
Israel? Of all the issues facing the 
conscience of the world, why this 
one? It is not enough to say that the 
Middle East is an important region, 
or that Jerusalem and the holy places 
are important to all peoples of the 
world. That would not explain the 
concentration of hostility, or the re- 
fusal of the nations of the region to 
address their differences with Israel 
through peaceful negotiation. 

The attack on Zionism and Israel 
derives from a fundamental hostility 
to a Jewish presence in the Jews' 
ancient homeland. It is fueled above 
all by anti-Jewish prejudice. The “Zi- 
onism Is Racism” slogan is grounded 
in anti-Semitism and its propagation 
is itself a manifestation of racism. 

The slogan’s supporters have taken 
a political issue — the dispute be- 
tween Israel and its neighbors — and 
turned it into an emotional crusade 
against an entire people and religion. 

The Arab states, with the exception 
of Egypt, refuse to accept the legiti- 
macy of Israel or to resolve differ- 
ences through negotiation. Their me- 
dia and official spokesmen maintain 
a drumbeat of anti-Semitism, some- 
times crude, sometimes subtle, that 
poisons the minds and inflames the 
passion of their peoples. Little free 
expression, debate or disagreement is 
permitted in these countries. With 
few exceptions, the small Jewish 
communities that remain in Arab na- 
tions live in fear Of persecution. 


Moreover, the anti-Semitism of the 
Arab world has spread beyond the 
Middle East into the rest of Third 
World and the Soviet bloc, which, to 
its eternal discredit, lends its full 
weight to these calumnies. 

The Soviet Union practices its 
brand of anti-Semitism with cat-like 
perversity. It torments those Jews 
who wish to live a Jewish life in the 
Soviet Union yet refuses to let them 
emigrate. Jews whose only “offense” 
is to ask to leave risk being sent to 
internal exile and labor camp. The 
authorities arrest teachers of the He- 
brew language and contrive other, 
even flimsier charges to persecute 
Jewish activists. Jews live in an atmo- 
sphere of fear and intimidation. They 
are regularly denied decent jobs, 
housing opportunities and places in 


By Kenneth J. Bial&in 

Serai tism of the universities. The Soviet press criti- 


XsraeTs enemies and prevented them 
from progressing toward a better life. 
Why. Sen. can these enemies not 


universities. The Soviet press crib- Wire, then, can these enemies not 
dzes Israel and Zionism in blatantly face the reality of modern Zionism? 
propagandists tones, encouraging Why cannot they accept that the Jew~ 


deceiL hypocrisy and hatred. ish people hi 

This policy of harassing Jews yet and dignity i 
refusing to let them emigrate is one of and that the 
the most puzzling aspects or Soviet the world w 
conduct At once irrational and conn- endeavor? Z 
lerproductive. it violates the Helsinki for dcmocra 
agreement and embarrasses Soviet for progress 
representatives wherever they go. For cepl it, and 
ihke reasons, it may be reasonable to and respect 
expect some change in Soviet pohey, It is not too 
but until that happens the Russians that Nov. 10 
must expect to suffer the scam and living by slq 
ostracism of the free world. too late for 

Anti-Semitism is a negative force 
that saps the energy of the haler, The writer 
clouds his mind, fouls his mouth and cnee of Pro 
weakens his community. The cam- Jewish Orga 
paign against Zionism has consumed this comment 


ish people have a right to live in peace 
and dignity in their ancient places — 
and that (he rkht-tlunltiiig peoples of 
the world will support them m that 
endeavor? Zionism provides a model 
for democratic living that offers hope 
for pro gre ss to those who would ac- 
cept it, and a promise of good will 
and respect for those who respect it 
It is not too late, even 10 years after 
that Nov. 10, 1975, resolution, to srop 
living by slogans and slander. It is not 
too late for truth and recondhatioa. 

The writer is dhearnm of dot Confer- 
ence of Presidents of Major American 
Jewish Organizations. He contr&uud 
this common to The New York Tima. 


1 



#• 


Israel: Friends 9 Efforts to Help Can Be Overdone 


W ASHINGTON — Old-timers 
in Congress thought they 
would never see the day. The Senate 
Appropriations Committee was 
meeting routinely to “mark up" the 
foreign operations bilL A couple of 
Israel's faithful friends, Robert Kas- 
tea of Wisconsin and Daniel lnouye 
of Hawaii, had slipped a provision 
into the Israeli-aid program that they 
claimed would add another $500 mil- 
lion or so in economic aid without 
costing U.S. taxpayers anything 
Business as usual, you might say. 
U.S. aid to Israel gets bigger every 
year, systematically, thanks to an 
endlessly energetic Israeli lobby. But 
this time ibe system didn't work. This 
time the Israeli issue gave way to the 
burning issue of budget balancing 
and the public debt. This time there 
was a real, honest-io-God fight, with 
some of Israel’s best Friends saying, 
in effect: Enough is enough. 

“Enough” in this case is something 
close to $3.8 billion annually. Eco- 
nomic assistance in the current fiscal 
year would be about $1.2 billion, up 
from $785 million only three years 
ago. Military aid would total $1.8 
billion, up from $1.4 billion last year. 
Contrary to past practice when the 
Israelis nad to pay for at least pan of 
iL il now comes entirely in the form 
of grants. To help underwrite Israel’s 
economic recovery efforts, a special 
$ l -5-billion fund has been awarded, 
half of it in a supplemental appropri- 
ation to last year's aid and the other 
half in the current fiscal year. 

# But that is noi enough for Senators 
Kasten and lnouye. who wrote into 
the original bill a “buy down" of the 
interest that Israel pays on its loans 
from the United States, from about 
1 1.5 percent to 5 percent. The saving 
to Israel in effect a gift from Wash- 
ington, would be $531,710,682. 

But the U.S. government, under its 
financial workings, would have to 
pay for iL In an effort to seem not to 
be breaking through the budgetary 
ceiling for foreign aid. Senators Lnou- 
ye and Kasten did a little figgery- 
pokery with unused funds of the Ex- 
port-Import Bank, which conven- 
iently totaled around $500 million. 


By Philip Geyelin 


It all lodes so innocent that you 
would hardly know that Israel would 
be getting a whopping increase in 
U.S. aid. Except that Appropriations 
Committee Chairman Marie Hatfield 
did know. So did Lawton Chiles, the 
Florida Democrat whose responsibil- 
ity as ranking member of the Budget 
Committee makes him especially def- 
icit-conscious. And so did the new 
director of the Office of Management 
and Budget James C. Miller 3d. 

Mr. Mmer deplored the use of “ac- 
counting gimmicks that will distort” 
Export-Import Bank budgeting. Aid 
to Israel is already at “extraordinary 
levels," he argued. And the “buy 
down” would “set a costly prece- 
dent" for other borrowers. 

Senator Hatfield said that if there 


Bad Economic Medicine 

With the economic medicine you 
prescribe for Europe’s unemploy- 
ment woes in the editorial “Hope for 
Europe's Jobless?" (On. 29), Europe- 
ans would do well to seek a second 
opinion before agreeing to surgery. 
You argue that an American cure 
would boost income, demand and 
jobs. But the social and fiscal prob- 
lems now faced by Sunbelt cities like 
Houston, bursting at the seams with 
destitute migrants from (he de- 
pressed Snowbdt, are suggestive of 
the dangers in such a prescription. 

The image of the once-proud steel- 
worker and family now forced to sur- 
vive on a minimum-wage service sec- 
tor income is illustrative of the best 
that the so-called economic recovery 
has offered many Americans. For 


was an odd $500 million lying around 
in the foreign aid budget, there were 
American farmers who could use it. 

Senator Chiles pointed out that the 
inouye-Kasten provision, while ap- 
plicable only to this year’s aid pro- 
gram, would almost certainly become 
a fixture; cutting it out next rime 


where in the aid program. With most 
of the larger beneficiaries pretty 
much untouchable, the task of find- 
ing $500 ntiOion in a program which 
itself totals only around $15 billion 
would probably mean wiping out 
some country programs entirely. 

This affair is all the more remark- 
able because Israel neither requested 
the “buy down” nor actively supports 


around in an election year is not • it according to embassy spokesmen, 
something Congress would be likely They don’t quite say that if the issue 


Sf Italian war ultimatum m 

** Still Mr. J£! 

„ without any assurances from the gc f 

wrnnent regarding the 

S eration of bases beyond nud-^ 

That would be the outside dadbne 
for a U.S. pullout, roppoans ** 

L®y Prime Minister Papanareou did not 
terminate the present 
agreement az the first avarf ablc o p- 
ponunity specified ** of 
l j ■ the agreement, in nud-l9S5. . 

The Greek side showed sufficient 
^ interest in improving relations during 

„ Mr. Annscosi’s visit — for example 

. by willingness to expedite the reswu- 

lion of labor problems involving 
Greek personnel at the bases, or to 
Jv improve cooperation against terrer- 

4*1 ism — to encourage hopes that to- 

_ day* s no to tire bases might be- 

come yes before the critical deadline. 

Analysts speculate on, a possible 
’ compro mi se scenario, whereby the 

HeUcmkon air base on the «it«>ns 
^ of Athens might be dismantled and f 
its activities transferred elsewhere - — 
the American side is known t o be 
concerned about the high visibility ctf 
this base, as it has been overtaken by 

the suburbs. ma kl n g it a focus of 
labor unrest ami rasing general ques- 
1 dons of security — mule the other 
three bases could continue to oper- 
ate, possibly under a NATO labeL 
them From one point of view, Mr. Pa- 
£ life, pandreoo has considerable room for 
s not maneuver in executing a U-turn on 
tism? the bases. Daring the week when Mr. 
:Jew- Armacost came to town, 350JXX) civil 
peace servants staged a 24-hour strike and 
xs — the labor movement split in reaction 
ies of wan economic austerity program an- 

i that nounced by the government a fort- 
uodef right earlier. Conversation in Athens 
hope taxis was not about Mr. Armacost or 
Id ac- the bases bat about how high peo- 
1 will pie’s heating bfllsareHkdy Co be this 
ect iL winter, and what die two-year wage 
after freeze imposed by the government 
jsrop wiH do to household budgets, 
is not As foreign po&cy has slipped Low 
itioa. down on the ust of public concerns, 
one semes that anti-Americarism is 
onfer- at its lowest ebb today same the So- 
mean enlists came to power in 1981. 
tinted Mr. Papandreou has nothing to 
ones fear from theriglu. Not only would it 
be hard put to criticize him for decid- 
ing not to sever an important rtfa- 
- tionship with the United Stale* — it 
. . could accuse him of inconsistency, 

tart there is tittle proof that Greeks 

regard tins ns a cardinal failing in 

their politiaans — but it has been 
faction-ridden and demoralized since 
being trounced by the Socialists for 
the second time m four years, in the 
general election last Joan 

Ironically enough, Mr. Fapan- 
dreou’s mam probfan lies with the 
radical left — not only the pro-Mos- 
cowCommmrist and Emooommnnist 
opposition but aho the ideologues he 
has nurtured in hfa own ranks. At this 
moment die g ov ernm ent is pitted, in 
a head-on confraatation over the eco- 
nomic ansterity measures, against the 
trade umbos controlled by these vf 
forces. The outcome of this confron- 
tation is fikdy to be of direct rele- 
vance to issues like the bases. 

If the onions win oat, the govern- 
ment will have to reckon with the fact 
that the Communists and the left 
wing of die Socialist Party, through 
~ die tradeunion movement, can suc- 

cessfully oppose a conservative gov- 
ernment turn turf only in the econo- 
my but also in foreign policy. If the 
gove rnmen t faces the unions down, 
this wQl mean that Mr. Papandreos 
| has tamed the radical left and need 
have nothing to fear in reneging on 
pledges to dose down the bases. 

From an economic point of view, 
jetty this would be just as wdl In its pre- 
v“£r sent economic crisis, with high levels 
■nS! foreign borrowing, Greece cannot -* 
5?°?* 10 jeopardize relations with 
1 OTt Washington and hence the powerful - 
' aAr U.S. banking system. Whether that is 
soeialian, as Mr. Papandieou’s more 
flowers visualized h in 
- 1941, « another question. 

HQi. International Herald Tribune. 


to do. So Congress would be commit- 
ling itself to spending $7 billion over 
the lifetime of the Israeli loans to 
compensate for the “buy down.” 

The outcome of the Inouye-Kasten 
ploy is in doubL At some point it 
will go to the Senate floor, where 
opposition to the Export-Import 
Bank bookkeeping may prompt its 
sponsors to look for the money else- 


turns in ttaar favor they won’t be 
smiling all the way to the bank, but 
you get a certain sense that they, too, 
tied that enough is enough — dial 
more would be pushing their hick. 

What is going on here would ap- 
pear to be yet one more example of 
Israel's best friends in Americaoeing 
more Israeli than the^ Israelis. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


L ette rs intended for publication, 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor* and must contain the writ- 
ar’s signature, name and full ad- 
areas. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


they do largely because they have 
been battered by the threat of layoffs 
and a corporate anti-union drive 
reminiscent of the 1930s. While the 
unions have agreed to big conces- 
sions in wages, benefits and work 
standards in order to ward off further 
blows, capital mobility continues 
apace. The logic of your argument 
would find U.S. and European work- 
ers continuaDy cheapening the cost of 
their labor (with attendant costs to 
their living standards) to compete 
with labor costs in the most de- 
pressed regions of the Third World. 

RICHARD FANTASIA. , 
University of Sussex. 

Brighten, England. 


tion of “The Communist Manifesto" propounded in Soviet Russia rim 
published a centmy wp, Karl Marx I9lfr I quote from Leon^otSS . 
wrote as follows: fr the Russian rev- “My Life.” first published in LonSS 
oluuon becomes the signal for a pro- in 1930: “We were all in fWTr ’ 
fetanan revolution in the West, so agitation, of revolutionize 
that both complement each other, the workmgdasses of German v ArLriZ 
present Russian common ownership Hungary and all of EurootV uuaar 
of land may serve as the starting Thai being said, it is Quite -m 
print for a communist developmenL” that the quote oomes 
Anyone familiar with Marxist the- movie «4?UpS!t Wcst£? 
cay knows that this means that the . ^Pper! 

countries that have not passed Hawkins. 

through capitalism can only carry out vmfeans, France, 

a socialist revolution if they spread it m n . 
to those where capitalism has taken ine ramter Van Swiss 
root. Otherwise the socialist program - 

of wealth distribution win. simply “Montenegro, 

come io the spreading of povrity. (Weekend. Oaf* 

Capitalism is indispensable to the rw"^ ^ ° * “Island of the 
creation of wealth, and the Soviets romantic Al- 

knowtfris. ThatB why colonizing the ' ^^ckfm influenced th» 

rest of the world is vital to them. . j? ^«er 

7TBOR. R.MACHAN. JJJfiS* ri hut hc Wa * » 

France College. - ^ lSZ? - «« 

• - Lugano, Switzerland. Hestiidiediu Di 

later taught arthTv!L ni I ? 4S ^ 
CbuJd the quoted sentence simply Weimar. fft* in 

be a paraphrase, developed here and Italy, where he l “ ne ^ 

there over the yean to smt individual JO ™ Iy01 * 

and different purposes, of an idea McMAHQN. 


tor income is Olusirative of the best Lenin Might Not Object 
that the so-called economic recovery ° J . 

has offered many Americans. For Regarding "Lenin According to 
many more, particularly black and Reagan — Tracking a Dubious Quota- 
female. chronic poverty and infant tion " (Nov. 5) by Carl Meyer: 
mortality rates approaching Third Mr. Meyer disputes the aathentic- 
World levels have become character- jty of a supposed Lenin quote cased 
istic of an urban dynamic that creates by President Reagan. Perhaps the. 
appalling numbers of homeless in the quote is insufficiently documented, 
midst of “urban revitalization.” but it makes extremely good sense. 
American unions think the way [n the preface to the Russian edi- 


jenefits and work that both complement each other, the 
to ward off further present Russian common ownership 
tobility continues of land may serve as the starting 
of your argument print for a communist development-” 
id European work- Anyone familiar with Marxist the- 
aperiflg the cost of cay knows that lhis means that the 
attendant costs to countries that have not passed 
lards) to compete through capitalism can only carry out 
in the most de- a socialist revotutuu if thf^ spread it 
the Third World, to those where capitalism has taken 
RD FANTASIA. , root. Otherwise the socialist program 
rersity of Sussex. of wealth distribution will simply 
[sliton, England. «”* J? spreading of poverty. 

Capitalism is indispensable to the 
Nnt OhWi creation of wealth, and the Soviets, 
nuivupx Imowthis-Thatis wi^cotonizmg the 
hm According to rest of the world is vital to them. 
ga Dubious Quota - TDBOR. R. MACHAN. 

'art Meyer . r Franklin College. 

iites the authentic- ' Lugano, Switzerland. 


Could the quoted sentence simply 
be a paraphrase, developed here and 
there over the yeara to srit individual 
and different purposes, of an idea 


ch>i 


iva>. 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 


Page 7 




" ! 


. V 

Vi-:, 


to Expel 


Reuters 

\. JOHANNESBURG — South 
Africa acknowledged Monday that 

• It had made contingency plans, to 

- expel foreign black workers . be- 
’ cause of international economic 

sanctions. 

i' But Pieter TC. du Ptessds, the 
' minister of manpower, said in a 
statement that “there is ho immedi- 
ate plan or desire to summarily 
f repatriate large numbers of foreign 
workers." 

‘ Mr. du Plesas issued the state- 

- mem after a Johannesburg newspa- 
' per said a decision had already 
'been made by Pretoria to expd 
' many, of the estimated 1J million 
‘ blacks who have left neighboring 

- countries to find jobs in South Afri- 
•‘ca. 

Business Day, a fmanri^ l daily, 

1 reported Monday without rating 
sources that major employers bud 

• been informed of the plans 'and 
'- said the government should expect 

an angry international backlash if 
‘ it ordered a mass exodus. 

: Clive Knobbs, the president of 
'the Chamber of Mines, whose gold- 
hnd coal-mining numbers employ 
about 350,000 foreign blacks, said 
he could neither confirm nor deny 
. that he had been told of the ded- 
. siorL 

^ While denying the Business Day 
t report, Mr. du Plessis’s statement 
_ was the latest threat by South Afri- 
, ca to strike back at the economies 
i of black-ruled nations around it 
because of punitive measures over 
{its apartheid policy of racial - separ 
.ration. ' 

1 On July 29, President Pieter W, 
. Botha said that the imposition of 
sanctions could result in the expul- 
. aon of hundreds of thousands of 
.foreign workers. 

' ■ ‘Bogus’ Evidence Alleged 

1 Earlier, Alan Cowell of The New 
' York Times reported from Johan- 
nesburg: 

. A South African newspaper has 
.accused the authorities of using un- 
verified and “bogus" evidence of 
-improper behavior by foreign tde- 
. vision crews to help justify a crack- 
-down on reporting on racial dfstur- 

• ban ccs. - • 

- The Sunday Star of Johannes- 

burg said that the deputy minister 
responsible fra information, Louis 
Nd, had quoted a letter published 
-in the Daily Telegraph of London 
as proof that television crews were 
purportedly stage- manag in g un- 
rest. . . 

• But. the newspaper said, its in- 
■ves ligations had shown that the 
person said to have written the let- 
■ler did not seem to exist .and that 
the people living at the letter writ- 


er's ."supposed address in England 
bad no knowledge of it. In London, 
a statement by the Daily Telegraph 
on Monday seemed , to acknowl- 
edge the letter's dubious origans. 

. It said: “The handwritten letter 
was received through the mail on 
Nov. 4, mth name and address, and 
was published in good faith. It now 
appears that it was intended to de- 
ceive, and we owe our readers a 
sincere apology” 

The letter, signed by a D. Evans, 
said that the writer had returned 

from a two-month visit to South 
Africa, where he had seen a televi- 
sion crew incite schoolchildren to 
riot for the cameras. 

Mr. NeTs statement was issued 
as justification for a total ban im- 
posed Nov. 2 on television and ra- 
dio coverage of modems of unrest 
in the 38 <ukricts covered by South 
Africa’s stale of emergency. 



_ Tbo AMtaaatad 

A group of black community leaders from Fort Elizabeth, South Africa, waiting on a bus 
after being released from detention under the state of emergency. The local chamber of 
commerce had urged that the 19 be set free, apparently because of the effects of a boycott. 


Defiant Right Splitting Solid Front of Afrikaners 


(Continued from Page I) 
religious beliefs,” he said. “They 
left the Cape for their political be- 
liefs. And I'm making a stand here 
for both."-- 

For years the political vehicle for 
Afrikaner aspirations was the Na- 
tional Party, whose leaders 
preached, a straightforward gospel 
of white supremacy and Afr ikaner 
unity. Bethlehem’s parliamentary 
seat is one of only six in South 
Africa that has belonged to the Na- 
tionalists since 1914, the year after 
the party was formed 

After they came to power in 
1948, the Nationalists constructed 
the rigid system of racial domina- 
tion called apartheid But 37 years 
of rule have dulled the Nationalist 
edge and brought forth a genera- 
tion of leaders who speak a blurry 
language of racial accommodation 


and black rights, even if in practice 
they move slowly. 

Their tentative moves toward 
political change have triggered a 
reaction on the Afrikaner right that 
has split Bethlehem and other small 
communities. 

The reaction started with the 
small Herstigte or “Reconstituted" 
National Party that broke off in 
1969 and that won its first parlia- 
mentary seat in an upset in last 
month’s voting. But it came of age 
with the founding of the Conserva- 
tive Party three years ago. 

The Conservatives' solution is to 
return to the fundamentals of 
apartheid: compel blacks to reside 
in the homelands, allow them vot- 
ing rights there but not in “white" 
South Africa and permit those liv- 
ing in urban areas to do so rally as 
alien migrants, not citizens. 


Conservative leaders express 
their views in dispassionate cones. 
But behind the message link the 
deep racial fears of an outnum- 
bered people who are afraid that 
once in power blacks might do to 
them what they have done to 
blacks. 

Wessel Wolmarans, a slim, 
weathered cattle breeder, was one 
of the first to sign on with the 
Conservatives in 1982. He speaks 
two African languages and grew up 
among the black workers cm his 
father’s farm, but he sees most 
blacks as hopelessly inferior, and 
those who are not as a threat. 

“It's the educated ones who 
cause all the trouble," said Mr. 
Wolmarans, adding that his solu- 
tion to the unrest would be the 
same one the government used in 
the SharpeviHe massacre of I960 — 


shoot a large group of rioters. 

Mr. Wolmarans does not go into 
town on Saturdays because too 
many black shoppers crowd the 
area. He does not supply electricity 
to the 1 1 black families living on his 
property because, he said, “they’d 
only break all the light bulbs.” 

The men who lead the Conserva- 
tives tend to shake their heads with 
bemusement at Mr. Wolmarans’s 
blatant racism. But their speeches 
and programs speak directly to his 
fears. 

“If you yield to liberalism, inte- 
gration and multiracialism, you’ll 
commit suicide," An dries Treur- 
nicht, the Conservative Party lead- 
er, said at a recent rally here. “If 
you adapt to sharing power wiLh 
the blacks, you betray your own 
freedom and the future of your 
children and your grandchildren.” 


Increase in Illegal Arms to Manila Is Qted by U.S. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

San Francisco airport Ora. T after 
customs officers found a Belgian- 
made assault rifle, a laser scope and 
a dismantled handgun in Ins lug- 
gage. 

Mr. Lu Ym, said Mr. Psinakis, is 
a dose associate of Eduardo Co- 
juangco, a billionaire who controls 
a sizable portion of the coconut 
industry and is a prime backer and 
possible successor to Mr. Marcos. 

Mr.Cojaangco is afirst cousin of 
Coraztin Aquino, the widow of 
Benigoo.S. Aquino- Jr, the slain 


opposition leader. The cousins 
have been political enemies for 
some time, but there have been 
occasional reports of relatives try- 
ing to bring them together. 

Mr. Lu Ym, free on 550,000 bail 
but barred from leaving California, 
was apprehended after a bomb 
threat led to a special X-ray check 
of luggage aboard the plane. Roger 
Ruffin, his attorney, said Mr. Lu 
Ym was a gun. collector who did 
not realize that his arms purchases 
could not be taken home. 

In March, federal agents found 


two shipments of Uzi submachine 
guns en route to the Philippines, 
one of them addressed to Juan Pon- 
ce Enrfle Jr, son of Mr. Marcos’ 
defense minister. 

A Filipino identified by authori- 
ties here as Howard Mijares, 30, 
was fined 515,000, sentenced to 
two years in prison and deponed 
after he told a federal judge that the 
weapons were for his gun dub. 

He said the club had been 
formed by his friends and universi- 
ty classmates, which included the 
sons of members of the Marcos 


government, including Mr. Enrile. 

Ambassador Romeo Arguelles, 
the Philippine consul general in 
San Francisco, said that although 
firearms smuggling was a serious 
crime, “some of the recent cases 
have been caught with just two or 
three pieces, not for terrorist pur- 
poses. Some people are fond of 
guns, and they just want to collect 
them." On Nov. X Mr. Douglas 
said, his agents arrested two Filipi- 
nos in a motel in San Jose, Califor- 
nia, as the Filipinos tried to pur- 
chase 14 pistols. 


Budget Cuts 
In U.S. Delay 
Research on 
SDIPlan 

(Continued from Pane 11 

entertain any limits on the program 
in U.S.-Soviet arms negotiations in 
Geneva stem partly from a belief 
that the Congress would slash the 
program even deeper if it thought 
the system would never be de- 
ployed. 

In the Congress, however, sever- 
al legislators said that if the presi- 
dent fails to use the program to 
negotiate deep reductions in the 
superpowers’ offensive nuclear 
forces, it probably would lose even 
more funding. 

Much of the program’s support 
“comes from members who do not 
think it is worth much, except as a 
bargaining chip," a House expert 
said last week. 

Mr. Reagan and Defense Secre- 
tary Caspar W. Weinberger have 
said that no deep cuts in offensive 
arms would be worth trading away 
the possibility of finding a missile 
defease that could make nuclear 
weapons obsolete. 

■ Research Boycott Grows 

More than 1.600 scientists and 
nearly 1,200 graduate students on 
90 campuses have pledged to reject 
research funds for work related to 
Mr. Reagan's program. The New 
York Tunes reported, quoting or- 
ganizers of the pledge campaign. 

One organizer, Dr. Michael 
Weiss man. an associate professor 
of physics at the University of Illi- 
nois, said the number of signatures 
on the pledge nearly tripled in the 
last month. 

The campaign has been particu- 
larly successful in physics depart- 
ments, some organizers said. More 
than half the physicists at 23 insti- 
tutions, including some in the fore- 
front of scientific research, have 
signed a pledge not to accept re- 
search funds under the missile de- 
fense program. 

Among the institutions are the 
California Institute of Technology, 
Harvard University, the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, the 
Slate University of New York at 
Stony Brook, Princeton University 
and Yale University. 

But government officials said 
they did not expect the drive to 
affect on the program. “We have 
more proposals than we can ac- 
cept," said Mary Peshak, a spokes- 
man for the Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative Organization. 

The organizers call the missile 
defense program “ill-conceived 
and dangerous" and argues that 
achieving reliable missile defense is 
impossible. 


Israel and Jordan Reach 
An Agreement on Talks 


(Continued from Page I) 
along to review Egyptian military 
exercises. 

Moreover, after Mr. Arafat is- 
sued On ambiguous declaration in 
Cairo renouncing terrorist violence 
outside of Israel Mr. Mubarak's 
aides quickly declared that the 
PLO chairman was now an accept- 
able partner for an international 
peace conference. 

An Israeli official said that Hus- 
sein apparently “hit the ceiling" 
when he heard what the Egyptians 
had to say about Mr. Arafat. 

“Here the king was trying to play 
Arafat down and squeeze conces- 
sions out of him." the official add- 
ed. “and Mubarak starts building 
him up." 

According to Israeli officials and 
political analysts. Mr. Mubarak 
has decided to draw closer to Mr. 
Arafat now for two main reasons. 

First, Mr. Mubarak was embar- 
rassed domestically and regionally 
when U.S. jets intercepted and di- 
verted to Sicily an Egyptian jetliner 
carrying the Achulle Lauro hijack-* 
ers and Mohammed Abbas, a PLO' 
official who the United States says 
masterminded the hijacking. The 
interception made the Egyptian 
president look like a “stooge," Is- 
raeli analysts said. 

By appearing close to Mr. Ara- 
fat, the Egyptian leader was trying 
to improve his nationalist Arab im- 
age and to defuse his domestic op- 
position. 

Second. Mr. Mubarak and his 
national security adviser, Osama 
el-Baz, want to make Egypt the 
central Arab actor in the peace pro- 
cess and hope to. do so by subordi- 
nating Mr. Arafat to themselves, as 
opposed to Hussein, Israeli offi- 
cials said. 

In contrast to Mr. Mubarak. 
Hussein is trying to “deflate" Mr. 
Arafat to a more manageable size, 
the officials say. The king more or 
less dismissed Mr. Arafat’s Cairo 
declarations on terrorism as irrele- 
vant. 


He said that while Mr. .Arafat's 
remarks were "a positive step,” if 
the PLO chairman really wanted to 
be at the negotiating table he would 
have to dearly accept Israel's right 
to exist along with United Nations 
Security Council Resolutions 242 
and 338, which call for Israel to 
withdraw from occupied territory 
in exchange for Arab recognition of 
Israel's right to exist. 

The king, according to Israeli of- 
ficials, is working on several alter- 
natives to fulfill his side of the 
agreement — to bring to the negoti- 
ating table Palestinians acceptable 
to Israel. 

The long is trying again to con- 
vince Mr. Arafat to become “ac- 
ceptable" by recognizing Israel, At 
their recent meeting in .Amman, 
Mr. Arafat was reported to have 
promised to take up the matter 
with his organization. 

■ Arafat Ends Cairo Talks 

Mr. Arafat met Tuesday for 30 
minutes with Mr. Mubarak, ending 
a one-week visit, Reuters reported 
From Cairo. 


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ZURICH 

Raoul de Gendra, Dir. Kurhausstrasse 65, CH-8032 Zurich 
Tatophorw 01/251 62 31. Telex: 816416 grand ch 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


N. Y. Designers Miss Out on Body Craze 

_ _ RmU Tribune colors such os peach or slate blue or less keep playing the same tune Blass’ dolhes, which had a minimal 

M hw VrtDV A • _ . « . . J n ■ a _ M. • 1 1. .1 


■m 


cropped jackets. In a country where 


. jVJ YORK — American de- and printed with delicate flowers, — short-skirted suits with belied or spareness to them. 

S ’ ^ iavc 001 caught up utterly romantic and true to Lau- cropped jackets. In a country where 

*“ b ody craze that is the ten's subtly seductive style. Lauren, black-tie seems to be a way of life, 
stronge st dir ection out of Europe, who already has a shop in London, these three designers offered a 
I inc biggest infl u ences are suQ is opening in Paris on the Rue Roy- great choice of evening wear, in- 


»tu Y, — --WH XM wuu OUbOIJ UO^ d aiiMp Ui MnuiUUt lULgL uun. uouguua V/1IC1I 

■u? * biggest influences are suQ is opening in Paris on the Rue Roy- great choice of evening weai 

i ale in March. chiding lots of evening pajam 

Hebe Dorsey ?-* »«*-. « 

Saint Lwirent, Ungaro. Valentino out. T-shirt necklinnTailonad 


chiding lots of evening pajamas. 

Beene's best dress was long- 
waisied and skinny, with a scooped 


and ArmanL 

Aperts agree that you don't go 
to New York looking for creativity; 
what isimportam is to sefl. Ameri- 
can designers are great fashion pro- 
assets, taking a little here, a little 
there and ending up with clothes 
perfectly suited to their market. 

The Saint Laurent spencer suit, 

lllrtk — J 1 ■_ .it 


ddTCHio) also scored with a look 

inspired by the casual, sloucby chic S c sof,ened ^ fnn S ed s,lk 
of Ka tharine Hep bum. Although 


there were far more pants shown in 
this country than in Europe, Calvin 
Klein is the only designer who can 


Blass’ clothes basically cater to 
p-dollar and conservative clients 
10 want to look pretty without 


deliver mannish tailored suits with rocking the boat Among those 
a distinct degree of grace. This is those attending the shows were the 


T-v. JJz:,. _TT 7_ Tr rf” - due, in pan. to the authority of his television personality Barbara Wal- 
wirh cut as wcQ as the paper-thinness of lets in a red Blass, Pat Buckley in a 

-l_ COTtrast^ buttons, is all over ^ fabric His collection this sea- green Blass, and Nancy Kissinger, 

15 n son was fiill of light. crSpede Chine who has lately shifted allegiance to 

f^ tn ^J? 0tribul i d T. aI1 P^ntsuiis and sQk wrtlenecks. Saint Laurenl 
sorts of little sweaters and Un- . „ A ■ 

mmw j 1 ne sunouette m most Amencan tu. 


sorts of little sweaters and Un- 
garo’s draped dresses were also 

“SWy visibIe - short, dose to the body,' but not ““"V" y* '*"**■“ * w “ “ 

Attheotberendoftbespecmim, ^Su^g the curves, riice Azze- P^jdcdorswaelmedortnmmed 
Rdph Lauren and Calvin Klein’s SSSSS5n5SwS5 wth ^ 
vttion of womanhood is solidly this country to have ■"■*« J* “iS**? 

rooted m American sportswear tra- impact yet. The palette is Wlth black ^lace flowers. Red cash- 

tfition. Laur^howevcr. is chan*- dW^std t£a last 

mg his me from Amencan prame winter, and many of the collections 

to a soft, Amencan version of have a dun-edged, perfectly com- a tt0uld ' bc m SHWe 1 9 0 J- ^ vemn S 

TV~. ni. .L- mm. .1 a. uuu-wup**, wm> lined with the same 


enn^v^^thonT^rr^r^ Thfi W *** strongest 

trend in Ihis collection- Twin in 

”I l pastel colors were lined or trimmed 


Deauville in the 1920s — the land modal „ng 
of dress that would have suited w. rf i.rS 


Great Gatsby heroines. 

He began Ms collection last week 
with simple, long s3k dresses in 


NORMAN f. LAWRENCE 

LnmefMM tj|f 

STORE YOUR OLD EjfS 
FUR IN A NEW I 

SILK RAINCOAT! (wl 
Brochure on request 
<-417 Fifth Avw, NYC 100H- 


^ uuu-cwbbu, were lined with the same 

. . . taffeta as the big, btUowy skirts 

Martha Philips, who as chairman underneath. 


De la Renta's admiration for 
Saint Laurent was obvious in the 
jersey outfits that dominated his 
collection. But be added his own 
hand to crisp, sharp navy-and- 
white or black-and-white outfits. 

Carolina Herrera is a South 
American socialite who has made it 
both in the stores and the soirees in 
five short years. Her clothes, which 
usually feature prominent sleeves, 
have a well-groomed finish to 
them. Made of expensive fabrics, 
they are the typical, grand-entrance 
variety. 

Perry Ellis discarded his favorite 
big shapes for closer-to-the-body 
clothes. This collection was sweet, 
short and to the pretty point, with 
lean belled Chinese dresses, Capri 
pants teamed with simple white 
shirts, and sweaters covered with 
dragons and apple blossoms. The 
collection. which Ellis said was in- 
spired by bis collection of Chinese 
antiques, was earned out in cela- 
don green and ivory white. 

Karl Lagerfeld, who makes an 
American sportswear line, was 



'Creole’ Version of 'Giselle 9 a Success. 
In Harlem Dance Theater’s Paris f isit 

■n adio _T.u n .UMiMn. l t«r to the point than history is that the bad ns prenu •_ 


vm ; - 




By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 

P iARlS — Taking classics out of 
their original context has be- 
come a favorite theatrical sport in 
recent years, bnt very few such 
transpositions have worked as 


dripping with moss and humidity. 


beautifully and sensibly as the and colorful and varied costumes. 
Dance Theater of Harlan’s so- The parallel between this “Gtsdle 


character ha* a mar.y ~ ; . . 
instead of literature and ■ 

daughter’s hand to an 


called “creole” version of “C3- 
seDe,” which was the centerpiece of 


and tbeorigUral U splendidly creal- :i-- 


the company’s opening program of sphere and imagination that any {iaal ™ 

rrSiTiliktai, ^ssfBl-Gisdfe-nreah.™. 1&' " 

Dance Festival. Of course, there is the music of ^^ ri ^ nccd - 

This production, now a little Adolphe Adam and the choreogra- -nmr* hack i-> Par^ 

more thraa year old, transplants phy.that has desoeadai f rom the Jie bag« como teA - 


the story from the medieval Rhine- original of Coralli and JPifroL It 
land to the bayou country of ante- has been adapted for this produc- 
beifum Louisiana. Correspon- tion by Frederic Franklin, whose 


ChriiM 

Gown by Ralfdh Lauren. 


have been found that keep memory of it goes baric to the Mar- 
tfae story intact, the choreography kova-Dolin company of the 1930s. 
has been respected as it has crane The basic text is kept relatively 
down to us — from the 1S41 Paris uncluttered in this handsome ver- 
p remi cre to Sl Petersburg and ston, both main and secondary 
back — - *ti»B attractive compa- characters are sharply d e li n e at ed, 
ny has a genuine novelty that none- and it is app ealingly danced by tins 


■ n r [Wnnii tiidess retains the atmosphere that company. 

ranging from skinny, poor-tittle- ^u. «nisdle” the ultunate Ro- Sieuhani 


tmtlawcks to rare elaborate ^nr- h*\irt 


bodices. All this made for a 


Stephanie Dabney attractively 
bfyriod one of the two casts in the 


of the Martha fashion salons is the 
savvy doyenne of American fash- 
ions, defined, the New York collec- 
tions as “very wearable and smart" 

“I was very impressed with the 
colors, which are flattering, both to 
the face and the body," she said, 
“but I think there should be more 
of a new note." 

This need for a new direction has 
not affected the establishment de- 
signers, Geoffrey Beene, Bill Blass 
and Oscar de la Renta, who more 


show ing for the second tirm» in the sexy and athletic look. 
United States, with a collection It was a limited but highly attrac- 


Arthur Mitchell, the company’s nile part, and Donald WtHi ams, a s 
founder and director, and Cad Mi- Albeh, was flamboyantly convnic- 


was rtanfiri by the great Asic 1 -*-- 
Vestris. 

The ballet - comes back to Pun* 
.now via Stockholm, where - l WJ ’ 
staged in 1804 by a ballet master 
who had studied with Games. -w 
seen “La Dansomame" in Pans 
and notes about the 
hi addition, Ivo Cramer, who to 
recreated the work here as he did m 
Stockhota’(using Mary Skcap&s s* 
choreography for some number?*, 
reports that he also found a re- 
hearsal violin part with the action 
described measure for measure. So 
one c an probably assume that ciu* 
is as faithful a work of balletic 
archaeology as can be expected. 


As Philip Miller, chairman of 
Marshall Field in Chicago, put it: 
“ft's a great collection and right on 
target Blass’ sense of color was 
terrific. 1 think he has style and 
taste and a sense of luxury." 

De la Renta was the most Euro- 
pean in his approach, and his 
clothes were a clever digest of Paris 
trends. Although simple in design, 
they had a few more ruffles and 
generally a more tender finish than 


Umted States, with a collection it was a limited but highly attrac- chd, who designed this production, ing as a scion of the bayou anstoc- J n any case. “La Dansomaiue in 

that was a digest of shapes shown tive line, enhanced by a sober color profess tohaveframd that proCivfl racy- Lorraine Graves was an un- great for and it got a lively first 
n — ’ -* y shakably anthoritarian Myrtha aral performance Saturday with 


e^lier in Paris. The «0ection, scheme' (black, na^ and white, LoSSS tad aSK^ti- 

wbch was better recewed than Ms with an occasional gray) and out- sp^ny of fn* blacks, so the 

last one, had a Parisian sense of standing accessories, including social barriers that separate Giselle 
fun, often missing m American col- high-tech silver jewdry designed by Albert remara ptousTrie. Fur- 

lectjons. Robert Lee Morris. Annm ilvw. sw™ to be hnvon 


lections. Robert Lee Morris. 

Donna Karan got an ovation for Two other women designers also 
her clever courting of the body, made their mark last week; Norma 
Deftly using clinging jersey, Karan Kamaii, with a Victorian look, and 


social barriers that separate Giselle 
and Albert remain plausible. Fur- 
thermore, there seem to be bayou 


Keith Saunders an effective Hdar- 
ion. The Inxnoureux Orchestra was 
conducted by Boyd Staplin. 

The company continues at the 


hits that resemble Thi&tre des Champs-Elysies 


Georges PHetta as the danoe-crazy 
ynt j ffiyt p, Patrice Ban as the colo- 
nel, Monique Loudihs the daugh- 
ter arid Jean- Pierre Fcaocbetti as 
the dancing master. Patrice Cau- 


draped short sarong skirts over bo- Caroline Roehm, formerly at de la 
dysuits. The idea, started last sea- Renta’s, with her mentor's spirit of 
son, has evolved so that the body- deluxe clothes that look richer than 
suits now have a variety of tops, they cost. 


Any similarity with our newly enlarged Zurich Airport is purely intentional. 


Numerous and close at hand: 
the conference rooms. V 


Caring and close at hand: 
the nurseries. 


the Wilis of the second act, the through Sunday with its second cheticr's period costumes bad the 
spirits of young girls who died of program, including Talley Beatty’s right pairafistic touch, and the sets 
disappointment in love. As a pro- “Caravanserai,” Glen Tetley’s were modeled on those of the the- 
icxi for a harvest celebration, sugar “Voluntaries" and Geoffrey Hold- atcr at Drotmingbolm. 
cane is as good a crop as anything eris “Dougla." A bonus is the inventive score by 

that grows in the Rhine valley. □ Etienne-Nicolas Mehul. better 

Meanwhile; a far more remote known in the encyclopedias for his 

piece of Paris history has operas. It was conducted with svm- 
been revived by the Paris Opera pathetic verve by Charles Fartt- 
Ballet with a high-spirited proffam combe. 

ktlOrml at the SaDeFavart that pans Pierre The “Napoli” excerpts provide a 

68 Gardens “La Dansomanie” with splendid showcase for some of the 

excerpts from the tinid act of Bour- Optra’s finest young dancers. 
nonvOkTs “Napofc” among them FtarraceOerc, Karin 

Gardd is nowadays hardly more Averty, Charles Jude and the two 
than a name in the dance histories, dancers most recently promoted to 
but he succeeded his brother as Hoik states, Isabelle Gotrin and 
director of the Paris Optra Ballet in Laurent Hilaire- 


Inexpensive and close ai hand: 
the six tax-free shops. 


H 


A3 


Comfonable and close at-hand: 
-the hairdresser’s. - 


Well-stocked and close at hand: 
the gourmet shops. 


On time and close at hand: 
the Swiss Federal Railways. 




‘ tt :• ' jf- 


Experienced and close at hand: 
the banks. 







Practical and close at hand : 
the kiosks and souvenir shops. 




v 


Inviting and close at hand: 
the restaurants and bars. 


Close at hand is also the store 
where you can buy various 
versions qf the Swiss Army Knife. 


> &* z 1 - ~ 


Competent and close at hand: 
the pharmacy. 


Film on Sting Shows How 
Medium Affects the Message 


C APSULE reviews of rams re- 
cently released in the United 
States: 

Janet Masfin of The New York 
Times on “Bring On the 
Mjchad Ap fed’s name doctn 
meniary was intended tpdocnmeni 
a few days in the fives of Sting and 
the Amorican jazz muskiass with 

MOVIE MARQUEE 


whom he was about to begin an 
international tour. What emerges 
instead is the process by which col- 
laborations, friendships and chains 
of command were established, as 
well as a good Castration of how 
powerful a rde a film crew can phy 
in the process it is attempting to 
record. Early in the film, Stmg says 
be hopes it wifi show a band being 
formed, as opposed to other docu- 
mentaries depicting other bands in 
their final stages of dissolution: Bat 
this isn’t an egalitarian group in 
that sense, and the musicians know 
it better than Sting does. As the 
film progresses, however, the musi- 
cians cautious deference toward 
Sting begins to disappear. 

□ 

Pan! Attanasio of The Washing- 
ton Post on “Deatii Wish IQ": 


Munich Culture Center 
Opens at Putsch Site 

The Associated Press 

MUNICH — President Richard 
von Weizsficker has opened a brae 
new culture center on the site of the 
beer hall from which Adolf Hitler 
I led his November 1923 putsch; 

The center, which cost 333 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks (about $138 
million), will house the Munich 
Philharmonic, the city’s central fi- 
M^ry and the Richard Stranss Con- 
servatory. 


Paul Kersey (Charles Bronson), 
coiaerfo the South Bronx, and finds 
Mahon beaten to death by hood- 
Mxns, ^heseguys should know bd- 
teri^i&tsey soon foS* them with 
natotftjded boards. Rube Gold- 
berg bmgiar-proofing contraptions 
and the dftWasMortfcd 

. rhiTnif Uipuj^iipi'ifrritirlonii jnf 
fering fcsadeaos of the budding. It 
also galvanizes Frakez (Gavan 
OTtertihy). uho. In Oo mavis 
“Leave It to Beam?* parlance, is 
the leader of the “creep*." The 
director, Michael Warner, has al- 
ways been a bit sqaeamshfer this 
sort of (Mag: throughout, ^ "Death 
Wish HI" cats nvnryfivxn hx- own 
dhnmrs 

Q 

- Sheila Benson oCtim Los Angles 
Tunes on ‘Targef’: 

What haj^iais to CIA agents 
who choose home; hearth and Cam- 
ay over phone booths, airiine ter- 
minals and excess -stomach add? 
Target" is created around that 
germ of an idea, yet even with Ar- 
thur Penn as its dnectar. It is main- 
ly for connoisseurs of car chases. 
The real meat of the problem is 
botched. How does a son (Mall 
Dfflon) who prefers racing care » a 
college education acfiust to his 
family boring small-businessman 
father (Gene Hackman) suddenly 
br an dis hing a gun and speaking 
bad German and bad French. The 
poor kid must stand about, jaw 
agape, saying, *‘Yon speak 
French!?". “You carry a gun!?" 
“Yon Irifleti people!" while armies 
of trained assassins converge on 
them. Mother (Gayle Hunnicuti, 
who seems to have wafted over 
from another fiha entirely, perhaps 
a Bond movie) is on a group lour of 
Europe whet she is kidnapped by 
forces unknown. The redoubtable 
Josef Sommer is our man jn Paris, 
whose every suggestion Hackman 
instantly ignores. 


Enticing and close at hand: 
the boutiquesandjewellers. 


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Reliable and close at hand: 
the Post, Telephone and 
Telegraph facilities. 


Comprehensively efficient 
and close at hand: 

the information desks. - 

• ’ ‘ Timesaving and dose at hand: 

— — * ihe gale check-in for 

passengers with hand baggage only. 

As you can see, the similarity between a Swiss Army Knife and Zurich Airport is striking. But not really 
surprising: both were constructed on the principle of offering the user as much as possible in a small space. 
So it’s quite in keeping with the compact and practical infrastructure of Zurich Airport that it has now 
been enhanced by the enlargement of Terminal A and an extra 18 finger-docks - additions that are 
specially attractive to the passenger. swissourjj^ 


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TUESDAY, Wu VKMBER 12 l 98 S ~~~ 

FUTURES ANPCH»nOiK 

Odd Mix of New Contracts 
Jains Commodities Markets 

By JAMES STERNGOLD 

Nrw York Times Service 

C HICAGO — For a long time, the real battling in the 
commodities world was between the array of traders 
and invettoo who vied for profits in the “pits” on the 
exchange floors. Today, some of the hottest competi- 
tion is takintr n1n«» *k „ j. 


HcralbSSSribunc. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


13.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 - 

‘i 

Page 9 ± 




BMW Has Talks 
About Buying 
Control of MBB 


** *■ — - lu>. wiyuftii^ Locmaeivcs. 

“ onn ous change and exmsobidation in the 
world of futures. Profit margins have been shrinking, volume in 


— ^ uiugim -urtvc oeen snnniang. volume m 

many areas has tie® in a slump and the competitors have become 
more aggressive than ever. Not only brokers and traders, but 

excbansK tm aw m „ r.u. 


more aggressive than ever. N 
exchanges, too, are in a fieht 
for survival. __ 

New products are in. the Hie search for 

frontline of this battle be- . ‘ . ^ 

tween the exchanges. The ex- prOullCt innovation 

changes lob new types of con- has Rnnwnod ‘ 

tracts at each other like 1138 spawnea gome 

artillery fire. The competition pretty nimsnal ideas, 
has in many regards just con- . - 

fused the public, which has ' 

been slowly withdrawing from the market And even some floor 
traders complain privately that they are being overwhelmed by 
the plethora of products. But, in the view of the exchanges, the 
stakes are too high for them to slow down. 

is kind of a hectic time for the exchanges," ackn o wledged 
Galen Burghardt, vice, president for financial research at the 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange. “Before, you had maybe one hew 
contract a year. Now, you can easily have two, three, four or five. 
It s a little hairy, actually.*' 

The actual number of futures contracts available few trading 
has only increased to 87 from 79 a decade ago, according to the 
Futures Industry Association. But about SO percent of today’s 
products are different from what was around in 1975. And those 
numbers do not include the increasing number of options con- 
tracts. On average, only about one in every five new contracts 
survives. 

The search for product innovation has spawned some pretty 
unusual ideas. Thomas C. Coleman, director of planning at the 
Chicago Board of Trade, said that he has received proposals for 
futures on tinned salmon, wooden railroad ties, insurance, elec- 
tricity and television advertising time. At the Mere, Mr. Burgh- 
ardt said some of the odder, proposals have been on wine, fine 
china and even “illicit smokeables.” 

Mr. Coleman emphasized that one should not be too quick to 
dismiss new suggestions. He acknowledged that he questioned, at 
first, whether fixtures on crude ofl would fly because there were so 
many different grades of ofl traded, only to find that the futures 
have found a market 




Tha N*v» York Tuna 

Ebony Man is the new magazine produced by John H. 
Johnson, publisher of Ebony, who is shown in Chicago 
at the headquarters of his Johnson Publishing Co. 


A Brother Magazine Is Bom to Ebony 


By Jonathan Hicks 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — John H. John- 
son, the 67-year-old founder and 
chairman of the Johnson Publish- 
ing Co, the largest black-owned 
company in the United States, 
bad long resisted putting out a 
men’s fashion magazine. But he 
chan^ wt his r pind last summer, 
associates say, when he saw the 
splash made by such publications 


as Gentlemen's Quarterly and M. 

This month, Johnson " Publish- 
ing’ s Ebony Man, a slick monthly 
carrying articles on fashion, fit- 
ness and personal finance, is 
making its debut, in hopes of 
wooing the growing cadre of up- 
wardly mobile black men. In- 
deed, research indicates that 
nearly 22 percent of Esquire read- 
ers are black. And Gentlemen's 
Quarterly says 17 percent of its 
readers are black. 


The publication of Ebony 
Man, the company’s first new 
magazine in a dozen years, is not 
without risk. Although Johnson 
long ago established itself as a 
successful publisher of magazines 
lor the blahk population — it also 
puts out Ebony and Jet — indus- 
try experts point to a dozen or 
more magazines aimed at black 
men in the last decade, most of 
which survived less than two 
years. Whether Johnson can at- 


tract some of the same readers 
who have flocked to the other 
magazines of this genre remains 
to be seen. 

Moreover, Ebony Man is being 
introduced at a time when the 
company can ill afford failure. It 
is already burdened by a renewed 
foray into television program- 
ming as well as by the recent 
acquisition of two radio proper- 

(Contmned on Page 14, Col 6) 


EC Challenges Japan’s Rules on Alcohol Imports 


r? TI . ~ y ~f E Cited five basic criteria for determining if a futures 

— * ‘ - ’ ^ * liOfl I I contract was feasible: There must be a homogenous, or 

-L-L bellwether, unit for trading; an active underlying cash 
s .j \ I market that is sufficiently big to encourage people to insure 

•- : - • • against price risk; a high turnover in the cjisH market; a price 

i ^ volatility in. the cash market, and an interest on the- part of end 
. r users in ordering the product today for future delivery, known as 
■ forward contracting. 

: Ll- For example, Mr. .Coleman said that a uranium contract had 
been proposed and rejected for the time being because its price 
was too controlled by government regulators. Electricity looked 

..L' (Coutmued on Page 14 , CoL 1 ) 


Agence Fnmce-Presse 

TOKYO — The European Com- 
munity is ^wiring Japanese imports 
of alcohol from the EC a lest case 
for its relations with Japan, Lau- 
rens Jan Briitichorst, bead of the EC 
delegation in Tokyo, said Monday. 

list month the EC presented Ja- 
pan with a plan for changing the 
system of importing and distribut- 
ing wines, whiskies and liqueurs, to 
end what it believes is discrimina- 
tion against European products. 

In the past five years EC alcohol 
accounted for 0.8 percent to 1.0 
percent of the Japanese market. 

The EC wants Japan to lower 
customs rates and alter the tax sys- 
tem. This is a pre-condition for 
increasing the investment of Euro- 


pean alcohol producers in Japan, 
Mr. Brinkhorst said 

He added that the EC was show- 
ing a “political interest" in the alco- 
hol time policies, which affect six 
or seven of the 10 EC members. He 
said the EC hoped for “great bene- 
fit for overall relations.” 

The obstacles to importing alco- 
hol to Japan give protection to a 
sector where local products are of 
inferior quality, less competitive 
and without historical traditions, 
Mr. Brinkhorst said, referring to an 
EC study released Monday. 

The EC is calling for the end of a 
Japanese law that enables a drink 
to be called Japanese wine if it 
contains a minimum 5 percent of 
wine produced in Japan. 


This is why Japanese producers 
have 80 percent of their home mar- 
ket. while actually making only 17 
percent of the wine sold. The rest is 
imported in bulk from Argentina, 
Bulgaria and elsewhere, according 
to the study. 

The EC also wants the end of 
what it called the “artificial dis- 
crimination" of customs duties that 
arc 5.5 to 9.3 times greater for qual- 
ity bottled wine than for bulk wine. 

The EC is also asking for lower 
tariffs on bottled whisky, which are 
6 5 to 7.2 times higher than in Eu- 
rope. 

The EC also wants changes in 
alcohol taxation. Japanese taxation 
is based on the product's price rath- 
er than on volume as in many other 


countries. This penalizes quality 
European sales, the EC believes. A 
European expert who contributed 
to the study said the retail price of 
Scotch whisky could drop by half 
in Japan if the tax structure were 
changed. 

Mr. Brinkhorst said the EC 
wants to be consulted during the 
preparing of tax changes, which are 
expected by April 1987. 

The EC also disputes Japanese 
labeling of alcohol The community 
seeks clarification so that Europe- 
an names are no longer given to 
Japanese products. 

The issue of Japan's alcohol- 
trade policies is expected to be 
raised by EC representatives in To- 
kyo this weekend* 


By Warren Geder 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Baverische 
Motoren Werke, the West German 
automaker, is negotiating with Ba- 
varian government officials about 
acquiring a controlling stake in 
Messerschmitt-BbUcow-Blohm, the 
country's leading aerospace con- 
cern, Bavarian officials said Mon- 
day. The Bavarian state govern- 
ment itself has a large stake — 
about 20 percent — in MBB. 

A link-up between the two Mu- 
nich-based companies would be a 
further step toward consolidating 
West Germany's automotive and 
high-technology industries, follow- 
ing last month's apparently suc- 
cessful takeover bid of AEG AG, 
the electronics conglomerate, by 
Daimler-Benz AG, the maker of 
Mercedes automobiles and trucks. 

Bavarian Finance Ministry offi- 
cials, speaking on the condition 
that they not be identified, said 
that there had been serious talks 
between the minis try and BMW 
about BMW acquiring a control- 
ling interest in MBB of up to 40 
percent. This control would depend 
on Lhe readiness of several state 
governments to sell a major part of 
their large holdings in MBB. Indus- 
try observers believe that control of 
MBB could be obtained in the 30- 
40-percenl-shareholding range. 

Obtaining a controlling interest 
in MBB, which is closely held and 
not listed on a stock exchange, 
would also depend on the willing- 
ness of several corporate share- 
holders. among them Krupp AG 
and Thyssen AG, the engineering 
groups, and two commercial banks, 
Bayerische Vereinsbank and 
Dresdner Bank, to sell some or all 
of their minority holdings in MBB 
to BMW. 

Both Krupp and Thyssen are 
known in industry circles to be ea- 
ger to divest themselves of tbeir 
MBB holdings, which total less 
than 10 percent, and both commer- 
cial banks have indicated that tbeir 
total 10-percent holding in MBB 
may be temporary. 

Eberhard von Kuenheim, 
BMW’s chairman, had said at a 
press conference Iasi week that the 
large governmental stake in MBB 


precluded any serious interest in 
obtaining a shareholding in MBB. 
Mr. von Kuenheim emphasized 
then that BMW did not want to be 
a “junior partner" to the govern- 
ment or any other MBB sharehold- 
er. 

However, sources said Monday 
that Mr. Kuenheim’s comment did 
□ot rule out taking a stake in MBB 
laier on, particularly if the state 
governments indicated a willing- 
ness to reduce their stakes, which 
together total nearly 40 percent of 
MBB’s equity. 

Officials in the Bavarian Finance 
Ministry said that the ministry had 
informed Mr. Kuenheim that Ba- 
varia was prepared to sell some of 
its shares in MBB to BMW to im- 
prove BMW's chances of obtaining 
control of MBB. The Bavarian offi- 
cials said that they were sure the 
governments of Hamburg and Bre- 
men were also prepared to sell 
some of their shares in MBB, which 
is a major defense contractor. 

Bavarian Finance ministry offi- 
cials said Monday that they were 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL 4) 

Japan's Surplus 
In Trade Lower 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Japan’s trade 
surplus in October dipped to 

54.4 billion from $4.55 billion 
in September, but widened 
from a surplus of 53.6 billion a 
year earlier, the Finance Minis- 
try said Monday. 

Overall October exports to- 
taled a record 516.02 billion, up 

7.4 percent from a year earlier, 
while imports were" 511.61 bil- 
lion. up 2.6 percent. The previ- 
ous export record was $15.9 bil- 
lion. in December last year. 

Japan's exports to the United 
States climbed 9.2 percen l from 
October 1984, to $6.03 billion, 
while imports from the United 
Sfatej rose 1.6 percent, to $232 
billion, for a surplus of $3.71 
billion. That was second only to 
the record 53.78 billion surplus 
in September. 


Currency Kales 


Cross Bate* 






1 * 10 . 8/11 

. ■ - 

S 

C 

DM- . 

RF. KJ_ . 

Star. 

B.F. 

SJF. 

Yoa 

Amsterdam 

19426 

4205 

IW 0 S* 

3730 * 11671 - 

— 

5374 * 

13772 * 

14 X 95 V 

r BruMiftta) 




■ pmtf 





Frankfort 

•ten 

X 73 

— . 

3 X 82 *. UDi 

■ 725 * 

4947 * 

12132 * 

1277 * 

-' London (M 

TM 

— 

17298 

1 L 354 1 SH 50 

42025 

7579 

106 

29275 

Milan 

177230 

2319-50 

67473 

22133 

59017 

3 X 415 

02 X 60 

MT 7 

New York (cl 




OaMd 





Porta 




OOMd 





Tokyo 

205.15 

29131 

7 U« 

2 S 69 1 X 61 * 

■31 

38471 * 

9571 

— — - 

Zarldi 

US 48 

U 626 

0123 * 

3499 * 0 .T 21 B * 

7295 * 

40749 * 

— 

UW 7 * 

.. > ECU 




Dowd . 





- 1 SDR 




Claud 






Beecham Board Forces 
Chairman’s Resignation 


k Closings In London and Zurich. fixings in other European centers, - 

- <a) Commercial fnznc lb) Amounts needed to buy one pound fc) Amounts needed to buy me 

- dollar (") Units of WO fx) Units of UNO <y) Units of UUXN NXL: not Quoted; AHA; notovoftabla. 
'. t*l To Unroot pound: WSOaotC 


Other Dollar Value* 

Currency per USX Currency per ujls currency w UA* Currency pur IASS 

Arpeo. mitral 030 Fin. markka £593 mux. pen 474 X 0 • Soviet mbit 0779 

Auttrol. t 1.4903 Greek drac. 13100 Norw. krone 7 X 773 Span, peieta 16020 

Aedr.BtHl. 1029 Hoop Kami 73035 PMLPtsu 1 X 79 Swed. krona 7.8675 

Bern. flu. ir. 5 X 15 IinSpb rupee 1 X 09 PortacKto 14250 Taiwan $ 39.97 

Brazil era. 041000 Indo. rnpkfll U 22 jOO Saadi rtrel MSB Tbalbabt av 285 

Cp po nhm t 13775 IrttOS 03399 StOS-l 2.119 TwUtb Bra 54830 

Chinme jrpon X 2015 Israeli tbek, 1 M 7 JX 1 5 . Air. rood 25641 UAE Artiom X 673 

Danisn krone 94575 KUwaHt rflner 0393 S.Kar.wen 89000 VeatSLMBv. 1455 
EuvpLpcnud 135 Uatay.rtap. xu 

tsreni<Mi:l306irEshc ... 

Sources: Bantam da Benelux (Brussels): Banco Cammerckde ItaOada (MUan); Benaue No- 
donate departs (Parts) t IMF (SDR), ■ BAH IcOnar^nol, (ffrftarrt) ; Baobank (ruble). Other data 
from Reuters onUAP. 


Currency pur 
Soviet ruble 
Span, peieta 
Swan, krona 
Taiwan t 
Tbalbabt 
TurtUbtau 
UAEAtaa 
Venn, batty. 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Beecham Group 
PLC, reporting stagnant profit for 
the latest six months, said Monday 
that Sir Ronald Halstead, chair- 
man and chief executive, had re- 
signed under pressure from other 
directors. 

Si Ronald, 58, had worked for 
the toiletry, drag and food giant for 
31 years, but was only named to the 
top position in mid- 1984. His de- 
parture followed rumors of discord 
among directors of Beecham, 
whose products include Aquafresh 


Interest Rates 


Baroearreney Deposits 'Noe. am 

Swiss Pnncti 

• Dollar D-Mark rente StarHnu reawc ECU sdr 

1 month BHrSh 4fc-«fc TJWVf! lHb-T1«i MW 8U4M 714 

Z months 8 tvs Mi 4'Mr4'M. . 4Mr4 *. . 11 *-11 tk 9VrM4 IW«i 7Wr 

Smooths 8 MrS n. IMU 4Hr4tk 11 Vrll SMHtHl 7*. 

I maatM 4%-l‘tt, 4H-4H. ' 11 tfa-11 to 70 Mr-10 h Btvgtv 7» 

1 rear 8 k. 4 nfe 4 *w 4 w. * JV 4 *, rut- 1 H 4-11 _ ***** 7 v. 

Sooner. /Menton Guaranty (dollar, DM. SF. Pound, FPlt Lloyds Bank (ECU): Reuters 
(SDR). Rates anpnatbto to Interbank deposits of St million minimum for tnutoalent). 


Key Money Bales Noe. li 


Coot PoPer 90-179 days 





do » Pray. 

7Wi 7ft 

CM. 713/1* 
9ft 9ft 

814-9 BW-9 
CM 7*0 

— 7.19 

— 73 * 

— 730 

— 730 


Lombard HMD £» M0 

OmntioU Rat* 4SS 

-Qnr Manta tafrrtianfc — 430 

; 7 -mseSi Utftrtieflk - WO 

{-month istartiai* — 433 

Prone* 

tatanmaHM Rom 9V» 9ft 

Cat) Meaty CM 9ft 

Ore-mntt Mata* - 

T-month In tartt al i — 

i-maata MerUuuk — ** 

MUh 

Book Bure ftatt tlfc 

Galt Homy tw* lift 

91-do* TVcanry PM 7>VU II S/3* 

Swaeam In ta r U m* 11VU ”0™ 


Afiwa Dollar Deposit* 

Not. 8 

I month . Ift-ltti 
2 m o n t hs B fe-Stti 

1 months lh-lh 

6 months Sta-SK 

lyoor awi-as* 

Source: Reuters. 


r^.M« 


ry Market DbumAb 

Not. 11 


Mariin Lynch Ready Auuts 
joday avarapuvMd: - 736 - 

Teferato Intara s t Rati ludox: 7357 
Source: Merrill Lynch. IWm ta . 


Gold 


Jopfln 

HKOMtRflh 
Call Mum 

**6ay interbank 


5 i 

7ft 7U 
NA 7WW 


& * : 

; .. "V 


Sourau*.- Rtutors, CornnerOcnk. Or Ot 
Uwwnte- Bank of Tabu. 


Markets Oosed 


Afltx. 11 

AJA. PM. CVM' 

Hdl» Kooc 32X60 32X50 + U» 

Laxuntboorv 33XS0 ■ — ' +130 

Pari* 1133 kHa) . Ctm. 

Zurich 32X55 an +1.H 

Londee 3ZL2S 32Ufl +1.15 

Mew York '■ - m». -I» 

Luxembourg. Paris and London official nr- 
tnpt; Ham, Kong to*) Zurich eeuntnB and 
cJosinp prices: Ned York Come * current 
contract- All prices In UJLS per ounce. 
Source: Reuters 


Financial markets were dosed Monday in France. Smgsqjore, Bdgmm 
and Malaysia for holidays. Some ***** fso dcsed, 

U.S. awerimimt offices and m«t VS. banks also shut„and thus there, 
was very . light US. foreign-exchange and gpvernmem seconties 
trading Monday. '' 


Lloyd’s Chief 
Steps Down 
To Aid Study 

Reuters 

LONDON — Ian Hay Davison, 
the chief executive and deputy 
chairman of Lloyd's of London, 
said Monday that he was resigning 
to aDow for free discussions over 
proposals to change the role of his 
position. 

A Lloyd's spokesman said his 
resignation, effective May 1 1, 1986, 
had been accepted. 

Mr. Hay Davison said his depar- 
ture would remove an obstacle to 
discussing posable changes in the 
chief executive's status, an idea ini- 
tialed by the 28-member council 
that is Lloyd’s policy-making arm. 

Mr. Hay Davison said his resig- 
nation also would remove an obsta- 
cle to “my freedom to argue for the 
retention of the position of the 
chief executive with independent 
powers without any suggestion of 
seif-interest," 

Lloyd’s, the world’s biggest in- 
surance exchange, has been shaken 
over the last five years by a series of 
scandals that faded a drive for 
stricter surveillance of its opera- 
tions. But the spokesman empha- 
sized that Mr. Hay Davison's de- 
parture had nothing to do with 
these events. 

Mr. Hay Davison, who was 
- named chief executive in February 
1983 at the behest of the Bank of 
England, Mid his resignation had 
been carefully thought out and that 
it did not signal a major disagree- 
: ment between himself and Lloyd’s. 

He had agreed to a term of three 
to five years when he accepted the j 
post 

Mr. Hay Davison said Monday 
that his objectives had been to es- 
tablish a new regulatory framework 
; for Lloyd’s based on higher stan- 
dards of disclosure, and to improve 
the exchange’s staffing, organiza- 
tion and management. 


toothpaste, Yardley cosmetics, 
Horlicks malt drinks and Biyl- 
creem hair dressing. 

The company named John W. 
Robb, 49. a consumer-products ex- 
pert who has been a director since 
1980, as chief executive, and said it 
would seek a chairman from out- 
side Beecham. In the meantime, 
Beecham’s vice chairman. Lord 
Keith of Castleacre, is serving as 
chai rman. 

Beedbam said pretax profit in the 
six months ended SepL 30 rose 24 
patent, to £148.8 million (5209.3 
million), from £145.3 imflJon a year 
earlier. But the increase was due 
solely to recent acquisitions of cos- 
metic and home-improvement 
businesses. 

Net profit edged up jnst 0.7 per- 
cent, to £81.8 million from £81.2 
miDion, although sales jumped 19 
pacent, to £1 34 bfllion from £1.12 
billion. Earnings pa share slipped 
to 10.86 pence from 1127 pence, 
reflecting a larger number of shares 
outstanding. j 

On the London Stock Exchange 
Monday. Beecham shares sank 33 
pence, to dose at 293 pence. 

Lord Keith, a forma merchant 
banka who led a top-management 
shakeup at STC PLC last summer, 
said Beecham’s board had decided 
that the company needed “a youn- 
ger, more dynamic management, 
and that this dynamism should 
start at the top." 

lie said that there was nothing 
fundamentally wrong with Bee- 
cham. but that the company had 
grown complacent after a long pe- 
riod of growth and failed to seize 
certain opportunities, which he did 
not identify. 

Analysts were harsher. “This 
company is in big trouble,” said 
Howard Coates of de Zoete & Bev- 
an, a London stockbrokerage. “It’s 
lost its way." Other analysts said 
the apparent disarray in top man- 
agement would not reassure inves- 
tors, already unhap py with three 

(Continued oa Page 14, CoL 4) 


AIM 

REPUBLIC 

EXTERNAL U.S. $ BONDS 

AND 

BONOS NOM1NAT7VOS 

THE WESTON 
GROUP 

Enquiries to: 

Cfi-1003 LAUSANNE 
2 Sue de la Pabc 
Telex: 25869. 

TeL: 021/20 1741. 


BANCO DE SANTANDER 

is pleased to announce the formation 
of our wholly owned subsidiary 



MERCHANT 


BANCO SANTANDER DE NEGOCIOS 


Banco Santander de Negocios activities are 
Wholesale and Investment Banking, Money 
Market and F/X Trading, Corporate Finance, 
Mergers and Acquisitions, Capital Raising 
and General Financial Advice 


Banco Santander de Negocios, S.A. 

Plaza Marques de Salamanca, 3-4 28006 MADRID 

Telephone: (91) 435 77 66 Telex: 41295 SABNE 

Dex: (91) 431 07 88 



BANCO DE SANTANDER 


Living the future 











Dow Jones Averages 


sin 


NYSE Index 


own HW l» l " 1 M ' 

S5. ^ Ml SM SBSi ^ 





Close 

cne 

Bonds 

8059 

+ 007 

Utilities 

7 U 1 

— OOl 

Industrials 

8277 

+ 0.15 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New hibus 
New Lows 
Volume up 
V olume dawn 


dose Prev. 

1237 1 l£ 

424 47B 

367 646 

3 DI 8 sow 

1 S 3 96 

6 9 


100 . 4 W.no 

16486.140 


kioii uw Close ctive 

Composite mas 111.99 11 M + 1.88 

Industrie!! U 0 i 9 128 .W 1 M .19 + 115 

Tramp. lOtll 1 D 742 IM 7 I + 045 

Utilities 59.25 5679 was +0.97 

Finance 12345 12 MB 123.46 + 27 / 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Buy Bales -Sh+1 

NOV. e 158-805 419-558 6.100 

NOV. B - — , 56JSS t 2]wS2 t ,.106 

iSSw 6 175.104 469446 14.417 

5S3 ! 1S9443 610,963 9447 

Nil 4 170.798 663,703 14J90 

-included in die solos tigwrc 


Mondays 

JV 

i 

VS 

Ja^kng 

1 

H 


AMEX Diaries 


advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New nigh* 
New LOWS 
Volume uo 
Volume down 


date Pro*. 

343 347 

199 234 

354 238 

777 BIB 

16 18 

9 W 

3401790 
1 . 913 JUO 


Compos*!* 

industrials 

Finance 

imufonce 

utmnn 

Banks 

Trans*. 


week 
aree **> 
+ 129 29423 
, +177 29*56 
I +2.41 39084 
I + ST1 34&09 

i + 140 ao.i» 

[ + M3 >1688 

[ + 1.97 264 J 2 



124540700 



prev coruoliOatcd close 

13070X580 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

l ia The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's index 


Hleb low CIom Oitm 

was- «««iH 

“™L*S £S nS £^+087 

cSSoSle twS 19170 19729 + 387 




4 PJM. volume 
Prev. 4 fM. volume 
Prev. cons, volume 


24 V 1 
17 V 

AA 
9 V AG 

R 54 

S 

24 15 

14 

50 V 7 



7 

23 V 1 

-T-.TK 


17 


?pf 257 1 

LB 

22 1 


Rtf X 12 1 

06 

41 V. 3 

2 V AS. 

A 2 JB 0 D 

54 

Sijn 

Di: AV 

ev az. 

X 72 

2.9 

08 7 




27 li 

24 V 

ia* 

ip 

Down jo 
meC 70 
meE 72 D 

35 

45 11 



37 * 

34 

2* 

26 

70 S 3 * 

18 * 56 * 
301 k X* 
29 * 20 V* 
63 V* 47 V 
25 V 22 * 
551*1 42 
03 


Dow Index Jumps 27 .52 Points 


56 V 52 
71 V 47 V 
36* 28* 
13 * 7 * 
66 * 48 
68 * 26 V 
971 a 73 
97 V: 62 
160 
2 BV 


bJ 9 
48 11 
12 12 
57 

X 6 "TS 

M 21 

li 9 no 

142 6 128 


1'niitrJ Prev tuientauaiwl 

NEW YORK — The slock market rose 
sharp I v Monday as both the Dow Jones indus- 
trial average and broader market indexes 
smashed through records. The Dow rose 2732 
points, to 1.43 1.8S. its largest one-da\ gain since 
Jan. 21, 1985. 

The New York Stock Exchange index rose 
l.SS to an all-time high of 113.82 and Standard 
St Poor's 500-stock index increased 3.57 to a 
record high of 197.29. The price of an average 
share jumped 58 cents. 

Advances outpaced declines 1.193-426 
among the 1006 issues traded and Big Board 
volume rose to 126 J million shares from 1 14.9 
i million Friday. 

Analysts said three investment firm buy pro- 1 
grams propelled the market higher. They said 
the advance was all the more remarkable be- 
cause the Veterans' Day holiday Monday, 
which closed the bond market and some bonks, 
was expected to keep activity fairly subdued. 

“Lower interest rates, improved business 
prospects and awareness that there are some 
cheap slocks available have made people decide 
to invest." said George Pirrone of Dreyfus 
Corp. 

“The Dow could sail through 1.330 or 1.340 
or experience a minor pullback at that level, he 
said The latter case would afford people anoth- 
er buying opportunity, he said 

Philip Roth, a technical analyst at E.F. Hut- 
ton. said the market in the short-term is moder- 
ately overbought- About 3.000 issues have made 
net advances over the last 10 days, he said. 

He said the market is likely to have a brief 


setback sometime this week before moving 
higher again next week but that the Dow could 
rise to between 1.440 and 1,450 by year-end 

Sears. Roebuck was the most active NYSE- 
lisied issue, up -^a to 36'i. IBM followed jump- 
ing 2'« to 134 s *. 

Potlatch was third falling 2^ to 39?*. The 
company's board rqecied a 545-a-share offer by 
the Belzberg family and approved a buyback or 
up to 20 percent of its shares. Last week Pot- 
latch rose 6 points. 

Other actively traded blue chips climbed 
Weslinghouse added 1 to 44. Goodyear * to 28, 
AT&T '.i to 2 Hi. General Electric 1 to 62& and 
General Motors 1 to 681*. 

Financial and insurance issues strengthened. 
Merrill Lynch rose l to 32, Phibro-Salomon 
Brothers dimbed Hi to 41. Citicorp added 1 to 
44'*. Fust Boston jumped 2?i to 45*fc and Fed- 
eral National Mortgage Assodation edged up ■>» 
to 24!*. Marsh and McClennan was up 1 »79fc 
and Genera] Re was up Vk to 99. 

Among pharmaceuticals, Merck added 2?s to 
1 2 PL Eli Lilly and Squibb were all up. 

In food stocks. General Mills rose 2v» to 68. 
Kellogg added to 7 Pi and Heinz rose 2V« to 
30 » 4 . 

Walt Disney added 3 to 96. It reported 
fourth-quarter net or $53.7 million, or SI. 60 a 
share, compared with a loss of $64 million a 
year ago. 

Prices were higher in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 

Home Group led the Amex actives, easing s 
to 24'. 4. Dome Petroleum followed, unchanged 
at 1. Damson Oil was third, softening 'i to 3'2. 


44 ErnrsEl 274 38 13 
6* EmRod .947118 9 
IS* EmrvA ,80 10 M 

26* Emtxjrl 1.4C2J 4J3 18 
17V EtnoOs 488 &4 8 
12* Enereen 184 78 10 

2! Ingicp 72 3.1 13 
11V EntaBus ,86 U M 
17V E riser ch 180b 7.1 Ml 
, 17V EniE* n 180e 48 9 
i 1* Erarce 24 

9’* Enters „ . 

: 13* EntaxE X50el&| _ 
i 17V Entexln 184 48 Q 
21 Va Eouhts 184 37 20 
i 2* Equlmk 
MW Eornk Pf 281 127 
i 12« EaiRos 172 19 10 

8* EauUec .14 18 4 

i 10V Erbmnl .» 2.1 13 

E 14 EasBus .44 11 13 

i 15 ElwCs 70 37 14 

15 Eslrllte 72 4.1 22 

t 14* Ethyl G 80 X4 14 

l vIEvanP 

> lVa vIEucn nf 
i 2V vIEvnpfB 
i 33 Vi ExCfitO 172 48 II 
, 15 ExceHr 156*10.9 
i 42* Exxon 380 67 9 


Why have Smart 

Traders Tripled 
Money Buying Our 

TiKgscepar L .".t". w ‘-? - 

■jn-4Co«rS2'i*' tr -• ; ‘ 

deeme to W« 

mcsanfaBoier - 


12 Month 
HIBtl Low stock 


14* 111* 
25V 19V 
3r* 25V 
64V] 47V 
41l 358 
33W 71V 
28V 22 
4V I 
29V 16* 
43V 34V 
24V 30* 
37V 30V 
24V 16 
32V 25 
54 32V 

40V 2SV* 
40V 29 V* 
19V 16 
20 16V 

20*4. 14V 

31V 24V 
48V 45 
7V 4V 
52 47V 

\VU 9V 
U 52 
2nv li 
5V 1 
12V 2 


Sb. Close 

Dm. YU. PE HCs HigbLBw Quti-Cnqe 


72 Month 
High Lon SlocX 


SI 6. Ocs* 

Dlv. Yld. PE 1DQ> HIM1 LOU Puti CHOe 


13V 13VS 
22Vs 22’+ 
27': 24V 
60V 59V 
4 4 

31V 31 
26* 26* 
IV I 
38* 38V 
42V 42 
25V 25V 
33V 33* 
21V 21 U 
3JVS 31* 
S5V 55 
39V 38V 
38 29V 

1BV MV 
1BV 1BV 
14V 16V 
30V 30V 
45V 64* 
7Vl TV 
501h 50 
10V 10* 
5ar s 54V 
14V MU 
• IV IV 
a* ru 


M XI 
X00 38 21 

260 48 27 
175 88 
4.10 78 


280 4J 17 
180 58 10 
284el1.l 
1.16 47 10 
180 X4 10 
456 

" M 14 
M XI 4 
475 97 
75b 17 
80 18 M 
.12 .9 43 

80 

.161 

ITS 27 15 

88 

m 11 

.28 19 

77 38 10 

A 

1J» U 9 
M 18 12 
240 97 7 

247 108 
210 78 M 
.10 18 II 
80 24 18 
172 4.1 19 
80 18 13 
170 78 8 



54V? 

IV 
60V 

jrw 

52H. 49* 
27V 24V 
20V 20V 
Z7Vj 27 

ISVfc 
22 V* 


I 3 ii_ >, i 
22V I 
2711 

40* +1* 

31V— V 
26* 

I — V 
211V 
42V 

25V— V 
33V + V 
21 U— V 
32V + V 
55V + V 
39V + V 
30 — V 
IB* 

18V- V 
16V + V 
30V + V 
65 — V 
7V 

50* + ’i 

!0V 

SB* +1V 
14V + V 
IV— V 
2* + W 


19V + V 
20 ’- + * 
5* + V 
&2V + * 
33 + V 

54V + V 
IV 

60V +2U 
11V + V 
IB + V 
52 +2* 

24* + V 
20V + V 
Z7V + ’« 
29 + V 

9* + V 
26V +1 
15V + * 
22* + V 
51V +1 
20V + V 

V 

V 

V 


1BV 14V CwE tH 1.90 11.1 
IS* 15'i. C*E el 2 M 11.1 
SB 70'+ CwE B*B 8-fiS! 98 31 

24* 19* CwE Of 2^ 98 
24* 22* CwE of 287 11.0 
76V 60 CwE of MO 1IJ 1 
30V 22U CnmE5 XH 08 7 

38V 23 Comsot 38 10 

35V 23V CPsvc 28 1.1 IB 

35V 23V Crnnoor 80 14 B 

29V 13 CompSc 14 

44* 9* Cotvsn 

39V 24V ConAor 180 28 14 

JO 16 ConnE 18H 86 S3 

31V 22V CnnNG 2M 82 9 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 








Page 11 


Malaysian Metals Firm Japanese Industry Responding to Effects of a Lower Dollar 


> 1 ^ 


- -'h 

■ . . I . ' LI * 

- v-[-. . 




n ■ i r- « y iuiq • 

~MMC Metals, one 
°.tj f T or dcaJeis 1 n tin, suspended 
®P dealings on the London Metal 
Exchange on Monday, throwing 
London $ metals markets into fur- 
ther tunxjoO. 

"Hie company is owned by the 
Malaysian Mining Corp. — : one of 
the world's biggest producers of tin 
— and the announcement prompt- 
ed speculation that Malaysia may 
withdraw support for the Interna- 
tional Tin Council, the 22-member 
body that governs tin prices. 

MMC Metals was established in 
1983. Before that, Malaysia used 
existing dealers for trading: The 
company has been mainly active in 
tin and is believed to have acted 
Monday to protest the LMFs deci- 
sion to reopen tin trading Nov. IS. 

Trade sources pointed to the 
fierce “tug-of-war” between those 
LME members who want an early 
resumption of tin trading and those 
with a heavy exposure in tin, such 
as MMC Metals, and who want to 
wait for positive signals from the 

rrc 

The crisis was ignited Oct. 24 
when the ITC announced that it no 
longer had the money to prop up 
tin prices and blamed oveiproduc- 


tioriby non -council members such 
as China,' Bolivia and BrmiL 

The LME suspended trading 
. that day and the Kuala Lumpur 
Bn Market, the second largest m 
the world, followed on Oct. 25. The 
ITCs debts are estimated at about 
£600 million ($840 million) and die 
council has scheduled a new meet- 
ing on the problems for Thursday. 

Jn La Paz on Monday, the min- 
ing minister. Smforoso Cabrera, 
said that Bolivia’s major tin mines 
have been ordered to reduce out- 
put. The country's planning minis- 
ter. GuiUenno Bedregai, said that 
the trading crisis and collapse in tin 
prices threatened to plunge Bolivia 
into “a tremendous depression." 

MeanwhOe in Kuala Lumpur, a 
leading mine official said that 
many small Malaysian tin mines 
have been forced to dose or scale 
down operations. 

Hew See Tong, president of the 
Perak Chinese Miners Association, 
said that no figures on actual.mine 
closures would be available until 
the Mines Department completes 
its monthly census at the end of 
November. 

Malaysia had 449 mines in oper- 
ation at the end of last year. 

(Reuters. AFP. UPf) 


By John Burgess 

• Waihinpm Post Srmcr 

TOKYO— The'mammoih dec- 
tronies producer.Toshiba Corp. has 
told employees to turn off office 
lights during the lunch break C 
Jtob & Ccvoneof Japan’s big trad- 
ing houses, is dragging its feet in 
signing new contracts. Hryashi Ce- 
ramics Inc. is preparing to petition 
the government for financial aid. 

The strong dollar that helped 
power .Japan’s export surge of the 
past year and a half is gone for the 
rime being. Its departure has had 
only minor effect to dale on bal- 
ance sheets here, but corporate 
managers are planning seriously 
far the possibility that itwDJnotbe 
returning soon. - 

Japan has had four bouts with a 
cheap dollar since the world shifted 
to a floating-rate currency system 
in 1973. Through each it has man- 
agpd to prosper, albeit with some 
dislocations, and there is little rea- 
son to expect that things will be 
different for the fifth. 

The dollar’s latest decline began 
in late September, after the so- 
called Group of five — the United 
States, Japan, Britain. West Ger- 
many and France — agreed to 
drive it down with coordinated in- 
tervention in foreign currency mar- 
kets. The dollar was buying about 
240 yen when the campaign began; 




r \\f 


Notice of Redemption 

Transamerica Overseas Finance Corporation N.V. 

Guaranteed Sinking Fund Debentures Due 1986 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the provisions of the Fiscal Agency 
Agreement dated as of December 1,1971, under which the above-designated Debentures are 
issued, $1 ,876.000 aggregate principal amount of such Debentures of the following distinctive 
Webers have been selected for redemption on December 1, 1985 at the redemption price of 
100 percent of the principal amount thereof, pins accrued interest to the date or redemption. 
On or after the redemption date, interest on such Debentures will cease to accrue. 

n.600 COUPON DEBENTURES 

Ml 1081 £551 0915 8067 8773 9852 1019S 10658 12006 13221 13753 14683 15058 18285 19681 

4 1096 3352 6917 8071 8806 9854 10200 10661 12007 13222 18754 14684 15060 18269 19686 

9 1098 3354 6920 8072 8810 9856 10203 10673 12012 13223 13781 14687 15061 18272 19691 

10 1099 3355 6921 8077 8811 9867 10206 10674 12016 13226 13763 14888 15062 18273 19692 

14 1100 8358 6922 8078 6813 9858 10206 10675 12117 13227 13764 14689 15063 18279 19693 

15 1162 3363 .6923 8080 8816 9863 10209 10678 12124 13228 13766 14691 15064 18280 196S5 

19 1163 3364 6924 8081 8821 9665 10210 10680 12128 13231 13767 14697 15065 18282 19697 

259 1165 3365 692S 8085 8910 9886 10213 14681 12133 13235 13768 14700 15069 18283 19698 

426 1608 3412 0926 8066 8911 9889 10216 10683 12134 13241 13769 14701 15074 18285 19700 

431 1609 3413 6933 6087 8913 9676 10218 10684 12135 13243 14024 14703 15075 18286 19701 

433 1011 3414 6934 8089 8914 9877 10219 10688 12136 13244 14054 14704 15079" 18486 19703 

434 1612 3417. 6935 8097 8916 9679 10229 10692 12336 13245 14056 14708 15081 18487 19705 

435 1614 3419 6936 8104 8917 9885 10238 10693 12418 13246 14058 14712 15082 18489 19706 

436 1617 2420 8937 8116 8938 9886 10239 10697 12421 13247 14062 14713 15084 18843 19708 

440 1620 3421 6938 8117 . 8945 9882 10241 10698 12452 13243 14063 14714 15038 19200 19709 

443 1621 3424 6942 8127 8948 9888 10242 10699 12512 13250 14067 14718- 15087 19202 19710 

444 1624 3427 6844 8131 8859 9894 10245 10700 12514 13251 14068 14724 15088 19203 19712 

445 1625 3428 6948 8132 8960 9895 J0248 10701 12516 13252- 14070 14734 15089 18204 19717 

448 1626 3430 6954 8133 9097 9896 10248 10702 12517 13253 14072 14736 15257 19213 19718 

449 1649 3431 6956 8185 9101 9897 10250 10703 12519 13254 14073 14737 15568 19214 19719 

455 1651 3432 6957 8136 9104 9888 I02S3 10705 12520 13255 14074 14742 15571 19215 19720 

458 1676 3435 6958 8187 9106 9889 10257 10706 12521 13256 14075 14744 15572 19217 19721 

.459 1727 8464 7064 8142 9106 9900 10264 10715 12S24 13257 14103 14745 15574 19218 19733 

461 1730 3465 7065 8147 9107 9902 10265 10K24 12530 13260 14109 14746 15575 19221 19734 

463 1731 3466 7070 8152 9108 9904 10267 10856 12531 18282 14111 14747 16676 19225 19741 

464 1733 3467 7071 8156 9116 9906 10268 10860 12567 13265 14114 14760 15578 19229 19743 

467 1734 3468 7072 8157 9118 9907 10277 10861 12571 13272 14115 14761 15579 19230 19745 

473 1735 3471 7075 8161 9119 9917 10279 LQ908 12575 13273 14116 14762 15561 19231 19749 

476 1736 3473 7081 8847 9123 9918 10281 10915 12577 13274 14117 14763 15582 19233 19757 

<79 1742 3474 7088 8351 9124 9925 10282 11038 12578 13279 14119 14761 15586 19234 19759 

481 1743 3475 7084 8353 9127 9927 10284 11039 12593 13280 14122 14767 16587 19237 19760 

496 1744 3479 7088 8354 9128 9928 10296 11042 12594 13281 14123 14769 15593 19239 19782 

499 1746 3882 7089 8856 9129 9933 10300 11044 12596 13287 14126 14772 15594 1924 1 19763 

500 1748 3683 7095 8357 9133 9935 1 0301 11047 12597 13288 14127 14773 15595 19242 19767 

502 1993 3684 7096 8358 -9139 9936- 10302 1106O - 12502 13291 .14123 14774 15596 19245 19788 
504 1994 3691 7099 8869 9142 9837 10304 11053 12604 13293 14130 14775 15567 19246 19779 

507 2005 3692 7102 8860 9148 9989 10806 11055 12605 13303 14135 14776- 15600 19247 19780 


496 1744 3479 7088 8354 9128 

499 1746 3682 7089 8856 9129 

500 1748 3683 7095 8357 9133 


607 2005 3892 7102 8360 9148 9989 10806 11055 12605 13303 14135 14776- 15600 19247 19780 

508 2006 3685 7110 8361 9145 9940 J0310 11060 12606 13304 14141 14760 15602 19255 19782 

509 2007 3706 7111 8362 9194 9941 10311 11060 12619 13308 14148 14784 16478 19259 19763 

510 2011 3707 7124 8366 9199 9942 10312 11062 12822 13311 14182 14786 16479 19260 19785 

511 2012 3720 7140 8387 9200 9946 10320 11063 12823 13317 14184 14790 16480 19277 19794 

512 2013 3722 7143 8378 9211 9949 10326 11716 12626 13326 14187 14791 16632 19280 19795 

513 2408 4957 7145 8375 9226 9954 10328 11718 12641 13328 14168 14794 16639 19282 19796 

517 2484 4962 7148 8376 9227 9956 10329 11719 12642 13229 14189 14795 16642 19288 19799 


512 20?3 3722 7143 8378 9211 9949 10326 11716 12626 13328 14187 14791 18632 19280 19795 

513 2408 4957 7145 8375 9226 9954 10328 11718 12641 13328 14168 14794 16639 19282 19796 

517 2484 4962 7148 8376 9227 9956 10329 11719 12642 13329 14189 14795 16642 19288 19799 

520 2485 4964 7196 8377 9228 9056 10330 11728 12643 13332 14192 14803 16646 19292 19802 

527 2542 4967 7218 8378 9229 9960 10332 11730 12644 13342 14193 14804 16647 19293 19805 

534 2547 4968 7220 8449 9244 9961 10833 11734 12645 13343 14195 14810 16653 19300 19612 

538 2550 4970 7221 8451 9247 9962 10334 11786 12646 13350 14196 L4815 16654 19303 19818 

537 2551 5270 7224 8452 9248 9967 10516 11741 12647 13356 14197 14819 16655 19306 19816 

557 2562 5351 722S 8460 9253 9968 10517 11743 12649 13359 14199 14820 15650 19307 19818 

500 2550 6299 7228 8461 9254 9972 10518 11745 12682 13300 14201 14880 10657 19308 19830 

561 2570 -8565 7280 8403 9255 9976 10619 11747 12883 13381 14203 14862 16658 19309 1983S 

564 2572 0556 7231 8464 9304 9979 10520 11748 12688 13362 14205 14863 16082 19313 19830 

665 2579 6559 7233 8473 9305 9980 10521 11749 12694 13363 14210 14864 16685 19314 19837 


557 2502 5351 7225 8460 9253 9968 10517 11743 12649 13359 14199 14820 1S6S6 19307 

560 2550 6299 7228 8401 9254 9972 10518 11745 12882 13380 14201 14880 18657 19308 

561 2570 -8555 7280 8403 9255 9976 10619 11747 12883 13381 14203 14862 16658 19309 

564 2572 6556 7231 8464 9304 9979 10520 11748 12688 13362 14205 14863 16682 19313 

565 2579 0559 7233 8473 9305 9980 10521 11749 12894 13363 14210 14864 16685 10314 

506 2609 6560 7234 8476 9007 9991 10622 11150 12098 13306 14213 14874 16711 19315 


509 2812 -8561 7243 8481 9309 
570 2622 6683 7247 8432 -6311 


10628 11751 12700 IS 


14216 14876 16714 


10627 11752 12702 13380 14219 14877 16716 19846 19841 


572 2814 6S6S 7254 8483 9312 10006 10531 11754 12706 18387 14341 14878 16710 19349 108*2 

573 2615 6568 7261 8485 9316 1U007 10632 11756 12708 13391 14528 14882 16717 19350 19848 

574 2616 0569 7282 8486 9817 10010 10633 11756 12710 13409 14632 14886 16718 19363 19849 

675 2821 0572 7322 8488 9319 10011 10634 11757 12713 13410 14538 14886 18719 19354 19860 

676 2822 6673 7S28 8492 9320 10019 10535 11758 12714 13412 14540 14887 16721 19881 19858 

677 2023 6575 7334 8493 9322 10035 10536 11759 12716 13413 14541 14888 10728 19362 19857 

578 2826 6576 3336 8500 9823 10036 10537 11700 12719 13450 14542 14896 16728 19370 19858 

697 2647 0577 7337 8504 9324 10038 10538 U76I 12734 13459 14544 14900 16729 19371 19859 

568 2651 6678 7358 8505 9328 10040 10540 11706 12736 13463 14546 14904 16731 19372 19860 

681 3081 6579 7359 8506 9334 10041 10641 11767 12737 13464 14547 14905 16733 19876 19863 

682 3064 6580 7418 8507 9335 10042 10542 11774 12741 13465 14549 14906 10734 19377 19864 

683 3085 6584 7419 8608 9838 10048 10544 11779 12746 13406 14551 14907 16736 19378 19866 

085 3086 6585 7420 8601 9339 10052 10546 11781 12753 13467 14552 14912 16737 19380 19867 

687 3087 6587 7423 8604 9340 10063 10650 U782 12756 13473 14555 14913 16738 19432 19868 

688 3068 6589 7424 8605 9341 10054 105S8 11783 12760 13475 14556 14921 16739 19433 19869 

690 3091 *690 7430 8807 9342 10055 10560 11784 12772 13478 14557 14922 16740 19442 19871 

634 3093 6591 7434 *608 8343 10060 10561 11789 12818 13479 14568 14924 16741 19444 19872 

700 3096 6592 7436 8610 9344 10061. 10589 11190 12819 13481 14572 14925 18742 19449 19873 

704 3068 6593 7440 8624 9345 10063 10564. 11791 12821 13482 14578 14920 17370 19460 19878 

714 3103 6594 7529 86SS 9846 J0064 10666 11795 12824 13483 14677 14927 17371 19452 J9879 

764 3104 6695 7531 8639 9347 10005 10667 11801 12825 13484 14678 74932 17374 19453 19383 

816 3108 6596 7535 8641 9349 10071 10669 11810 12828 13486 14583 14933 17375 19454 19891 

886 3111 6668 7537 8642 9360 10072 10570 11811 12830 13487 14584 14984 17377 19457 19894 

887 3114 6601 7538 8643 9352 10073 10571 1X812 12831 13509 14686 14936 17379 19458 19900 

891 3115 6603 7542 8849 9856 10070 10572 11818 12832.13511 14538 14937 17380 19460 19902 

892 3117 6604 7544 8850 9866 10082 1057S 11919 12837 13516 14597 14938 17384 19401 19905 

09S 3134 0665 7546 8651 9857 10089 10581 11920 12852 13517 14604 14939 17461 19402 19907 

901 3135 6058 7554 8059 9380 10091 10583 11921 12853 13518 14610 14940 17462 19464 19908 

915 3139 6668 7555 6068 9303 10093 10584. 11927 72854 13521 14611 14942 17463 19466 19910 

' 917 8140 6673 7559 8607 9365 10096 10688 11938 12856 1*624 14617 14943 17466 19467 19911 

821 3143 6791 7581 8674 9516 10097 10892 11980 12857 13525 14020 14945 17472 19468 19913 

922 8140 6796 7607 8675 9517 10099 10594 11931 12856 13526 14023 14940 17473 19483 19914 

927 3150 6803 7609 8678 9518 10100 10595 11932 12862 13527 14631 14960 17474 19489 19915 

929 3151 6804 7818 8681 9521 10104 10696 11938 12803 13628 14033 14954 17475 19490 19936 

980 3153 6006 7617 6693 9524 10109 10602 11940 12867 13529 14634 14960 17478 19492 19939 

932 3159 6011 7618 8697 9525 10111 10009 11941 12870 13530 14635 14962 17477 19493 19941 

984 3165 6816 7020 8708 9529 10113 10612 11942 12830 13631 14636 24968 17478 19494 19965 

935 3168 6819 7624 8704 9530 10114 10613 11943 12886 13538 14637 14971 17E39 19495 19956 

936 3175 6824 762S 8705 9534 10115 10614 11944 12900 13533 14638 14972 17992 19497 19967 

989 3177 0025 7640 8706 9635 10116 10616 11946 12908 18584 14639 14974 17998 19498 19966 

940 3180 6828 7648 8707 9537 10120 10618 11951 12911 13538 14640 14978.17995 19499 19973 
940 3181 0829 7032 8710 9640 10130 10620 11952 12923 13642 14042 14982 17990 19502 19977 

982 3278 6830 7833 8716 9664 10140 10621 11953 12934 13543 14643 14B8S 17696 19603 19981 

984 3280 6832 7835 8718 9000 10148 10022 11954 12925 13544 14644 14992 17999 19504 19982 

BSI 3281 0833 7830 8720 9067 10IS6 10025 11956 12926-13546 14645 14993 18118 19506 19983 
988 3283 8034 7841 8724 9668 10157 10627 11959 12931 X3540 14046 14995 18120 19506 19987 

969 3284 6835 7843 8725 9675 10158 10035 11902 12832 13553 14655 14997 16121 19608 20000 

990 3285 6853 7850 8727 9762 10159 10636 11965 12938 13560 14058 15000 10122 19510 20011 

992 3310 6854 7854 8728 9763 10160 10637 11966 12935 12664 14600 15002 18123 19571 20012 

995 3319 6856 7855 6729 9764 10161. 10639 11967 13010 18688 14603 15012 18124 19574 

998 3322 6858 7863 8730 9765 10163 10640 11970 18014 13588 14665 15020 18130 19663 

ttjOO B334 0692 7860 8748 9766 10108 10641 11973 13015 13708. 14006 15028 18134 19594 

1001 3337 0895 7888 8749 9770 10172 10043 11976 13016 13707 14070 15031 18135 19055 

1005 3338 0897 8032 8750 9814 10173 10640 11996 13028 13708 14072 15033 18138 19657 

1013 3340 6898 8034 6751 9815 10176 10647 11996 13082 13711 14673 15034 16138 19058 

1017 3343 8899 8035 8752 9836 10183 10649 11997 13033 13713 14674 15036 18139 19669 

1018 8344 6904 8036 875 3 9836 10184 10660 12000 23034 13715 14677 15038 18140 19662 

1020 3346 6911 8064 8754 9837 10185 10651 12001 13085 13735 14678 15046 18243 19663 

ton 3347 0912 8055 8702 9840.10190 10653 12003 13067 13736 14079 15047 18244 19067 
1079 3349 S91S 8062 8771 9643 10192 10654 12004 13069 13738 14680 15061 18257 19689 

1090 8350 6914 8063 8772 9845 10193 10656 12006 13070 13739 14682 15067 18361 19680 

• The Debentures specified above are to be redeemed for the Sinking Fund at the Corporate 
Trot Office of N-A-, 111 W«B Street, Corporate Trust Service*, 5th Floor, in die 

Borough of Manhattan, die City of New York or, subject to any laws and regulations applicable 
a t the main offices of Citibank, N_A. in London (Citibank House) and Frankfurt/Main, 

the main office of Amsterdam-ftoceerdam Bank, N.V. in Amsterdam, the main office of 
Ggn&ale de Basque SA. in Brussels, the main office of Banca d ’America e dltalia 
in Milan, the main offices of Banque de Paris et des Pays-Bas and Compagme Europeenne de 
Banque in Paris, and the main office of Banque de Paris et des Pays-Bas pour le Grande Duche 

de Luxembourg in Luxembourg. Payments by offices outside New York City will be made by a. 
United Stares aollax check drawn on a bank in New -York Gty or by a transfer to a United States 
dollar account maintained by the 'ranee with a bank in New York City, oo December 2, 1985. 
ppynvHir of the redemption price will remade upon presentation and surrender of such Debentures 
with sH coupons appertaining thereto maturing after the date fixed for redemption. 

Coupons due December 1 , 1985 should be detached and presented for payment in the usual 
manner. 

For TRANSAMERICA OVERSEAS FINANCE CORPORATION N.V. 

By: CITIBANK, NJL 

November 4. 1985 Fiscal Agent 

Notice 

Withholding of 20% of gross redemption proceeds may be required by the Interest and Dividend 
Tax Compliance Act of 1983 unless the Paying Agent has the correct tax identification number 
(social security or employer identification number) of the Payee. Please furnish a properly 
completed Form W-9 or equivalent when presenting your securities. 


last week it plunged to a five-year 
low of 202 yen. 

A low dollar means that Japa- 
nese products tend to become more 
expensive for Americans and U.S. 
products cheaper for Japanese con- 
sumers. Japanese and U.S. officials 
hope that this will rein in a gallop- 
ing trade imbalance between the 
two countries, which estimates say 
may reach S5Q billion in Japan's 
favor this year. 

To do that, however, the dollar 
must stay lotv and whether h will is 
anybody’s guess. The five govern- 
ments have vowed to keep up pres- 
sure in the markets, but skeptics 
say that long-terra changes will re- 
quire cuts in what are seen as fun- 
damental causes of the strong dol- 
lar — U.S. interest rates and the 
federal government deficit. 

Even if the U.S. currency does 
stay low, economists here predict, 
impact will come slowly. “The ef- 
fects will not be seen in this fiscal 
year," which ends March 31, pre- 
dicts Kyoji Kitamura, a deputy vice 
minister at the Ministry of Finance. 
“They will begin in the following 
one.” 

The red figures' rate of growth 
might slow that year. But according 
to the Japan Economic Journal, the 
country’s premier financial news- 
paper. tentative calculations by 
“highly placed monetary sources” 
show that if the dollar stahili7.es at 


210 yen. an actual fall in the sur- 
plus will not be seen until the year 
beginning April 1987. 

Delays occur because goods can 
take six months or more to flow 
through the pipeline of internation- 
al trade. Video cassette recorders 
ordered when old rates were in ef- 
fect may not reach their destination 
until weD into next year. And once 
Japanese manufacturers raise their 
prices to compensate for the new 
exchange rate, the market will 
need time to react and start buying 
less. 

Mr. Kitamura says that the gov- 
ernment’s “highest priority” is to 
keep the yen strong. But this effort 
toward international goodwill has 
plunged companies here into a be- 
wildering new financial maze. “We 
are changing all our assumptions,*’ 
says a high-level executive at C. 
Itoh & Co., where negotiations for 
many purchase and sale contracts 
have been frozen pending stabiliza- 
tion of the exchange markets. 

Major exporters were not caught 
cold when the dollar began its 
plunge, however. Some, like C. 
Itoh. say they have turned some 
short-term profits with shrewd 
dealing as it slid. Longer-term pro- 
tection has come through a skill 
learned years ago. smoothing out 
currency rate peaks and valleys 
with forward contracts from for- 
eign exchange markets. 


Dutch to FuRy Open 
Capital Market by Jan. 1 


Reuters 

AMSTERDAM — The Nether- 
lands plans to liberalize its c ap ital 
market fully by Jan. 1 in a bid to 
keep pace with liberalization in 
competing world financial centers. 

A Finance Ministry spokesman 
confirmed on Monday a report in 
the Dutch economic daily, Finan- 
rieele Dagblad, that full opening of 
the capital market was planned. 
Details would be announced Nov. 
20 by Finance Minister Onno Rud- 
ing, the spokesman added. 

Finanaeele Dagblad said the 
plans included the introduction of 
floating-rate notes and zero-cou- 
pon bonds and permission for for- 
eign banks to Jead-manage domes- 
tic issues. 

The Dutch central bank’s issue 
calendar — borrowers have to wait 
their turn to lap the market — will 
be abolished nndtr die new regula- 
tions, Finanaeele Dagblad said. 

Under the proposed system, bor- 
rowers will be able to tap the mar- 
ket at any time, but only with cen- 
tral bank approval. 

Capital-market sources said the 
need to preserve Amsterdam’s po- 
sition in the face of mounting com- 
petition from other markets was a 
major factor behind such plans as 


allowing foreign banks to lead-r 
-manage both domestic and Euro- 
guilder issues. 

Dutch markets are already rela- 
tively open, with no capital restric- 
tions and borrowing in any curren- 
cy allowed. 

Capital-market sources said fur- 
ther liberalization had been widely 
expected since West Germany, the 
Netherlands' main finan cial com- 
petitor, introduced similar mea- 
sures last May. Dutch plans would 
closely follow the West German 
moves. 

The launching of zero-coupon 
bonds and floating-rate notes will 
necessitate the introduction of a 
universally acceptable official Am- 
sterdam interbank offered rate to 
reflect the cosl of overnight funds. 
Finanaeele Dagblad said commer- 
cial banks in Amsterdam and the 
Dutch central bank planned to is- 
sue a daily Aibor rate, in line with 
Libor and Fiber interbank rates 
offered in London and Frankfurt. 

The Amsterdam capita] market 
has an average daily turnover of 
more than 500 million guilders 
(about SI 70 million) in listed do- 
mestic bonds, on a par with Swit- 
zerland and West Germany. 


BMW Is Reported to Seek 
To Acquire Control of MBB 


(Continued from Page 9) 
awaiting a response from Mr. 
Kuenheun in the next week or two 
to see what conditions Mr. Kuen- 
heim suggested for BMW to ac- 
quire a major stake in MBB. If 
these were “realistic," the officials 
said, the chances for an agreement 
were good. 

Sources dose to Mr. Kuenheim 
at BMW headquarters confirmed 
that Bavarian government officials 
had approached the company to 
discuss the prospect of BMW buy- 
ing into MBB. But BMW officials 
said no negotiations were under 
way with MBB’s corporate share- 
holders, which, in addition to 
Kiupp, Thyssen and the two coro- 
roerdal books, include the West 
German electronics groups Sie- 
mens AG and Bosch AG, the West 
German insurer. Allianz AG, and 
the French aerospace group, Aero- 
spatiale. . 

Internationally, a BMW-MBB 
linkage could boost the financial 
! and technological competitiveness 
of West German automakers and 
weapoos-builders in the wake of a 
series of major U.S. auto-aerospace 
mergers, including General Motors 
Corp.’s takeover of Hughes Air- 
craft Co. and Chrysler Corp.’s pur- 
chase of Gulfstream Aerospace. 

In West Germany, a BMw-MBB 
linkup would be seen as an attempt 
by BMW to keep up in the technol- 
ogy race with its archrivaL Daim- 
ler, which recently has made signif- 
icant inroads into BMW’s domestic 
market share. Moreover, a BMW- 
MBB linkup would signal an at- 
tempt by Bavaria to even the ’’high- 
tech” balance between the states of 
Baden-Wiirttemberg — where 
Daimler and its newly acquired 
Doraier GmbH and MTU Union 
aerospace subsidiaries are based — 

and Bavaria, where BMW and 
MBB are based. 

Baden- Womemberg's president, 
Lothar Spaeth, played a highly visi- 
ble role in Daimler’s takeover of 
West Germany's second-largest 

aerospace group. Domier. Premier 
Franz Josef Strauss of Bavaria and 
his finance minister. Max Streibl, 
were believed to be interested in 


seeing a fink-up between BMW, 
' which is listed on the country’s ma- 
jor stock exchanges, and MBB. 

With the division of MBB's 
equity among six major industrial 
groups, not to mention the various 
state government holdings, BMW's 
obtaining outright majority control 
was unlikely, said officials in Mu- 
nich. Should BMW seek to obtain a 
share in MBB of more than 25 
percent. Federal Cartel Office ap- 
proval would be required under 
West German law. The Berlin- 
based anti-trust unit is currently 
examining Daimler's bid for con- 
trol of AEG, approval of which is 
expected. 

For MBB, which is anxious to 


subsidiary. 


just under 16 billion DM.* 


lion DM. but a si 


civilian and military aircraft. 


■' INVESTMENTS ■— U.SJL — 

INCOME PRODUCING REAL ESTATE 

Ideal for Pension Funds and other large Groups 

1. Safe and Secured 

2. Below Market Acquisition 

3. Total Management 

4. High Yearly Returns 

5. Excellent Appreciation. 

Properties $3,000,000 and up 

Principal* only please reply tor 
• Bill U«yd J. WaSane, Realtor 

111 I I 5*39 PM I960 W., Suite 210 

I II I B Houston, Texas 77069. 

Tel.: {713} 5S6-9399. Tbs.: 387356. 


Impact has come much more 
swiftly to smaller export industries, 
where financial planning tends to 
be less sophisticated and the pipe- 
line faster flowing. Japan's porce- 
lain industry, which has exports of 
around SI billion a year, is badly 
squeezed already, says Akira Nisb- 
mura, managing director of the Ja- 
pan Pottery' Manufacturers' Fed- 
eration. “Buyers are coming to 
Japan, but they won’t sign con- 
tracts.” he says." 

Another group already feeling 
bun are foreign tourists. Over- 
night. Japan has gone from bring 

just expensive to being very expen- 
sive. Hotel rooms cost 15 percent 


more than they did two months 
ago. “Those who pay us by cash 
often express surprise at the rate,” 
says a spokesman for Tokyo's New 
Ouni Hotel 

The vulnerability of each compa- 
ny is differenL In the coming 
months, as protection by currency 
futures tapers off, Japanese export- 
ers will face tough choices. “In Jan- 
uary or February, we’ll decide 
whether to raise prices,’’ says 
Sony's managing director. Tsune- 
hike Ishizuka. “It’s too early now." 

Cutting costs is a third option 
open to everyone. The low dollar, 
in fact, could inject new efficiency 
into industries which have grown 


Control Data Plans to Sell 
Some Operations to Xidex 


CompdeJ by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

CHICAGO — Control Data 
Corp. said Monday that it had 
reached preliminary agreement to 
sell key parts of its business-prod- 
ucts group and its mini-micro sys- 
tems to Xidex Corp. for between 
555 million and 575 million. 

The businesses to be sold are in 
Control Data’s Peripheral Products 
Co. They had about 5200 million in 
sales in the last year, a spokesman 
said. 

A final agreement on the trans- 
action should be concluded by 
mid-December, the Control Data 
spokesman said. 

Control Data, based in Minne- 
apolis. reported a loss of $255.6 
million in the third quarter ended 


Sept. JO. including a S 153.8-million 
special charge associated with the 
expected divestiture of the busi- 
ness-products operation. 

This operation makes and sells 
computer disk packs, computer 
tapes and flexible diskettes. It has a 
flexible- media manufacturing 
plant in Omaha. Nebraska, with 
other plants in Britain and Austra- 
lia. About 2,000 Control Data em- 
ployees will be affected by the 
transaction, more than 1.000 of 
them outside the United States. 

Xidex. based in Mountain View. 
California, makes flexible magnetic 
disks, flexible disk drives and ac- 
cessories. It had sales of S17S.2 
million in 1984. (Reuters, API 


flabby on easy profits overseas. 
Auto manufacturing executives, in 
particular, fed that the quick mon- 
ey made in the United Slates has 
caused a dangerous fall in competi- 
tive verve. 

“We are asking our factories to 
cope with tbe possibility of a 210- 
yen dollar in the coming year," says 
Mr. Ishizuka of Sony. Toshiba re- 
ports it is trying to save S25 million 
by March 31 oq business traveL 
office supplies and communica- 
tions and other savings. “We think 
mental pressure is important," says 
a Toshiba spokesman. “So we're 
telling people, let’s tum off the 
lights at lunch when we’re not 
working." 

American Airlines 
Offers Holiday Fares 

The 4B.vutit.iJ Pres* 

NEW YORK — American 
Airlines announced on Monday 
a ’’48-hour Thanksgiving spe- 
cial” slashing regular coach 
fares by up to 85 percent to lure 
impulse travelers who otherwise 
would stay home during the 
four-day U.S. holiday. 

The fares — offered on 
flights from Thanksgiving day. 
Nov. 28. through noon Nov. 30 
—are $29 for trips of 500 miles 
(808 kilometers! or less. $49 for 
flights of 501 to 1 >500 miles, 
and $79 of flights of more than 
1.500 miles, said Mike W. 
Gunn. American's senior vice 
president-passenger marketing. 
Reservations must be made by 
Nov. 26. 


THE TOP FRENCH QUALITY FIRMS 




Comite Colbert 

Lanvin: A Sense of Style 


Bernard Lanvin, President 


Jeanne Lanvin was a remarkable 
lady. A milling apprentice at 13. 
she developed imo one of the legend- 
ary grande dames of French couture 
and rounded a house that almost 100 
years later still epitomizes the ele- 
gant simplicity and sense of orna- 
mentation, the mixture of tradition 
and innovation symbolized by the 
gleaming blade Art Dcco douIc 
Bacon at the incomparable Lanvin 



fragrance, Arpcge. 

"My aunt lived surrounded by musi- 
cians, and poets”, says Bernard Lan- 
vin, grcar-nepbcw of the Gouwtiere and president of 
Lanvin Parfums since 1981. "She created a style that 
has always been with Lanvin and that I am crying to 

perpetuate" 

Jeanne Lanvin’s vibrant imagination celebrated die 
splendors of Art Deco from her sumptuous beaded 
chesses to the dazzling decoration of her private 
Parisian house designed in collaboration with 
Armand Rateau, which, co-sponsored by Lanvin 
Parfums, has been restored and is a star attraction of 
the newly renovated Musce des Arts Decorarifs in 
Paris. 

Today Lanvin has a world gross sales consolidated 
turnover of $160 million divided 30/70 perccnc 
between fragrance and fashion and its perennial 
traditions arc matched by modernization from com- 
puterized systems ro what Bernard Lanvin terms "a 
way of chinking adapted to the world in die 80s”. 
From his great-aunt, an inveterate traveller, Lanvin 
has inherited a penchant for bring on the move and 
circles the world studying how to develop the 
Lanvin style or jumps on his motorcycle to check 


nesidentof 
a style that 



out the competition at Parisian de- 
partment stores. 

"Tbe taste and approach to quality 
products is quite different in each 
country”, says Lanvin. It’s fascinat- 
ing to find out what they think in 
Kansas Gty. When you are creating 
new products, the biggest cask is 
communication”. 

Fashion exports account for about 50 
percent of sales while fragrance ex- 
ports run at about 63 p ercent. Eu- 
rope, the United States and South- 
east Aria are the principal customers. 
Lanvin sees most same for aqansion in fashion. 
"Since my wife, Maryll, has taken over the artistic 
direction of Haure Couture and ready-ro wear, a 
younger spirit has enabled us ro create a new wave 
of customers” This will be translated into more 
US. boutiques. There are 54 Lanvin boutiques 
worldwide with ones planned for Chicago, Hous- 
ton and Los Angeles. 

Linked ro the image of young successful fashion- 
conscious executives, Lanvin menswear is a market 
leader in the UB., Japan and France where fashion 
spotters claim both presidential candidates in the 
fast election campaigned in Lanvin shirts. 

Since it was introduced in 1927, Arpcge has been 
one of tbe world’s rop 10 perfumes. A new fra- 
grance, being prepared for launch in 1987-88, dose 
ro the centennial of the house, will, like Arpcge, 
have a reminiscence of Art Deco and be composed 
of a floral bouquet of natural Bowers, tbe blend of 
quality and simplidiy chat Lanvin says is so bard to 
attain bur remains the hallmark erf the house. 
"Quality”, says Lanvin, "is die name of the game”. 


“‘AN ASSOCIATION OF THE MOST PRESTlGiOUS NA MES OF THE FRENCH ‘ART DEVTVRE. IBIS RUE DE LA RAUME. 750C8 PARIS 

Shm an announcement by the comite colbert mmmammmmmmi 


PV 

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a- 

IT. 

:d 

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in 

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af 

The International Investment Croup of 

J. P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. 
has moved its offices. 

5- 

jj J. R Morgan 

> Investment 

G 

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ai 

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Our new address is: 

83 Pall Mall 

London S1V1Y5ES 

m 

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Tel 01-930 9444 

4 

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□ 

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The International Investment Group 
specializes in managing single and 
multi-currency portfolios for 
institutions diversifying out of 

their domestic markets. 


November 19S5 





Cll 






*# 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 


>Ionda}5 



Godra? 


Tables include the notionwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


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1'4 

+ b 

650 60 

58+ 

39 

+1% 

268 24ft 

i'4% 

24'/- 

- % 

3 15% 

IS': 

15% + b 

1324 <4b 

4)4, 

Alb 

+ % 

2 68 

33 

fcl 

+i 


14% 

21 

1* 

12% 

13% 


35% 31 


43% 2B% PPlItCh 
34 23% PotmEI 

46% 37 PotElpf 
41% 33 PotEI Pi 
25% Iffb Preml 9 
42% 31V, prlmrk 
20% 14% PrlmeC 
37 16% PrlmMs 

47 50% ProcJG 

15 8 PfdRss 

45% 3596 P ruler 




257 12% 

12ft 

12ft 

+ ft 



212 17"» 

17b 

IT*,- 


00 

1.1 

16 309 15% 

15% 

ia%- 

- % 

.161 

10 

12 56 12 

It ft 

lift 

- ft 



72 833 7% 

;% 

7ft 

% 

-6-ie 

3.1 

U 16 20b 

20ft 

20b 

■ ft 

40 

iB 

60 146 12% 


12ft 

- V* 

3X0 

2-6 

5B 2500 39% 

J8% 

29ft 

- b 

00 

J 

34 294" irs 

14ft 

I5%— ft 

JO 

40 

87 04 19b 

ISb 

19ft 


XU 

X6 

147 16b 

16% 

T6t. 

- ft 

1.90 

B.9 

9 456 21ft 

21 

21% 


260 

I0X 

1 U 

24 

24 

- ^ 

<00 

IJJI 

« 34b 

33b 

33b- 

— In 

402 

128 

5 34 

All's 

33ft- 

- 

1-56 

19 

16 14703 42b 

39% 

39b — 2b 

2.16 

66 

9 430 32b 

32b 

32% 


4X0 

100 

350= 45ft 

44 

44 —lit 

4X4 

10.1 

1550: 41 

38% 

40 


06 

IJ 

19 152 25b 

24 ft 

25111 

- ft 

200 

5.1 

17 S2 42ft 

421: 

42ft 

L % 



17 2119 19% 

18 s 

19ft 

u L. 

.09 

0 

29 1247 37b 

35% 

36% 

-r 

2X0 

A 1 * 

17 2001 67ft 

65b 

67ft +lft 

08 

2X 

22 568 14b 

13b 

14V: 

■ b 

1.40 

16 

15 22 39 

38b 

38% 

4- ' '4 


12b 
«'» 
13', 
23 1 
SJ'k 
43 'b 
14 ' 3 
33 


148 

XO 

160 

1X4 


JSb 29’: Scl'Ae* 

19b 1S% SauIHE 
= b 17% SoeETP 
13b Sa.EA 
•Ob SavEPt 1X3 IS 
5 Savm 

9 Savin p* l.ifi 
fl'. SCAN A 216 
35', SshrPIo 
32% ScnlfnO 
9 SciAll 
fJA, Sccolnd 
65- s 53b ScotRer 
45% 31% ScoilP 
14% 12% Srouvs 
4£ 744. SeoCnr . _ _ 

13 10= 1 SeoCI P« 1 J6 11 J 

14' i 14 ScaC PIB210 13J 
14'* 134, SeoC me 210 T3L5 
~ 17% SeoLnd .48 23 II 

3-: SeoCe 
34% Swarm 
IS: Seogul 
S’, SeciAjr 


Mb 35b lei - 

fi% 36% 3T: * % 

IS-, 24"-; 25% + b 

2T 39 >: fcv. 

If I ID ID -16 

7% 7 75; + b 

M% Mb 32% +1% 
.4 k 25% 24=. + =s 
E% a: £% 

_ 11% IC'I IDb — • : 

vie 31% 3r 31% -% 

- 19 23b 23% 23b— b 

:x 14 p2j a , 32=. 33% + % 

XJ 13 922 Mb 47% 47-S 

53 34 A, 34b 34V, * % 

* 1S-6 19 : 18b 

31% 215k 21b + b 

22% r*k 22% 

12 12 12 

5b £ , Sh- 

ff: a% s% — 


4J IS 
J.l 47 
7.4 B 
5* 


33 

1 

1 

14S 

13 


SO 10 493 ab 7£* ab + b 


143 3X 15 1971 54% S3". ST, *1% 


1X4 

52 

J2 


23 II 
3X 11 
IJ 7 


Sb 


is 10 4969 Mb 34% 34b + 

.12 1.1 16 *06 11% 10% IT, + % 

,76e ZJ 13 1GE0 32% 32*, 32% 

.90e IJ 11 39 59% 5*-» S9b 

542 45 4416 45 + % 

81 13% 13b 13% + V* 

411 27b 27 27% + is 

2 12i: ir-6 lf6 + % 

44 15V, 15b 15b + >* 

4 15% IS’A 15=6 

BS9 31 li Ml* 21% + b 

37 4 3b 4 + b 

IX 13 2911 43b 42t» 43b + V. 
103 17b 17% 17b 
1«0 30 


JO 


30 
IJ 16 


32% 

22% SealPw 

1X0 3J» 

9 

98 75% 25b 

25ft + % 

591: 

39ft 

30 Sears 

1J4 <X 

1021975 36% 35^ 

36% + b 

1079, 


9X3e 85 


311 106's 106ft 106: + % 


31% 

1« 

24b SrcFoC 5 1 J4 45 
lib Sets LI 

7 

2514 29b 28b 

7 1ST: IS r : 

2*b + b 
18% 

171* 

30 

30b 

17ft SvcCpb 


21 

200 30ft 29% 

29b— ft 

24ft 

16ft 

Ilb Sbakiee 

02 46 

24 

338 16 15ft 

1S%- ft 

Ub 

26ft 

16b Shawln 

60 2.7 

B 

42 22ft 22 

22ft 

14 

«0ft 

29ft ShellT 

2.45« 6 A 

7 

T157 38ft 37b 

38ft- b 

38b 

30'. 

21 ShelGlo 

.90 36 

6 

156 26% 25b 

tab + b 

44% 

40 

25ft Shrwbi 

.92 14 

u 

ISB 38% 38% 

38b — ft 

19% 

9 

5V, 5hoetwn 


111 

»2 B% B 


n 

15ft 

12 SnowDt 

60 40 

li 

97 14% 13% 

14'', + % 

124V: 

19"» 

lrn SlerPac 

166 80 

11 

181 19 lBb 

19 + ft 

41b 

41 

26% Slnper 

.40 IX 

9 

370 38b 38b 

38b — ft 

64 b 

33ft 

28b Slnarpr 

3-50 10X 


5 37b 37ft 

32ft — b 

6ft 

171: 

12b Skvllne 

-48 16 

17 

4B0 13ft 13ft 

13ft + b 

19ft 

T6b 

20b Slattery 

.40e 16 

22 

15 2*ft 23b 

24ft + ft 

38 

Ub 

7b Smlftiln 

02 19 


482 8b 8 


•ta 

71 ft 

50% SmJtB 

3X0 40 

11 

2085 71b 69% 

71 +lft 

59% 

85 


100 IX 

20 

47 B6b 85ft 

B6b +lb 

34% 

41% 

31b SnaoOn 

1.16 30 

12 

722 35b 35 

35b — 'A 

72 

15b 

12ft Sirvder 

2X0 118 

18 

43 14% Hft 

14ft — ft 

32 

43ft 

31ft Sonat 

2X0 55 

11 

975 36% 35b 

36ft + ft 

20ft 

19ft 

13': SonvCc 

-160 .9 

15 

2575 18b 18 

lBli— b 

26% 

12% 

22b SooLin 

100 4X 


30 29% 29% 

29ft + b 


40b 

33% SourcC 

300 85 


13 38% 38% 

36% — % 

72 

23 b 

19b SrcCp Pf 2X0 104 


3 23 23 

23 

24 

30ft 

24ft SoJerln 

248 19 

12 

74 27% 27ft 

27ft + b 


Aft 

38 ft Soudwn 

1.00b 20 

12 

657 44ft 43% 

44ft + b 

TISVto 

35 

24% SoelBK 

100 18 

ID 

279 JlOt lift 

31ft— Va 


9 

r* SoeiP5 

2131355 

35 

109 6 5% 

6 

Sb 

777* 

21% SCal Ed 

116 86 

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1563 25 24% 

25 + b 


23ft 


2X4 90 

/ 

4937 21 20ft 

28ft + % 

18% 

26b 

20% SoInGss 1X0 70 

9 

85 25V. 24% 

24ft 

33% 

44 

31b SNETI 

272 6J 

11 

561 43b 42% 

43% + % 



18' 

5 

la'.: 

9' a 
41% 

23 , 

23 

14 . ... _ 

34b I6b TW4 p< 82X5 
33b 24% Tran sm 1X8 


It A. ToroCo 
1 Tosco 
r: Towle 
3% Towle Pf 
25% TovRUS 
16 Tract s 
Sb TWA 
13 TWAaf 


6 

29 13 
IX 14 


21 'a IS Trenlnc 228 10a 
14 11% TARltv 1.00 8X 88 

:!■■» is 1 , TmCdoni.12 65 7 
57% 44 Transco 6.99*127 SO 
*4 b S3 Tmseol 3X7 4X 
52V, 52 Trnscpf 47S «X 
24b 17b TronEx 2X4 11J 
13b S 7 * Tronscn 8 

as 1 *: 70 TrGPot 4A5 80 
97 85b TfGPPt BJ4 

25% St TrGPot 2J0 
13% 8% TmsOfi 
47.: 291: Tronwv 1X0 
43% 28% Tmwtd .48 
259.- 12% TwIdwtA 
M"k 27% Twld pf 200 
17b 15b Twldof 
49% 34% Trovler 
58b SQ'-k Trovol 
27% 22% Tricon 
32 7% Trlalns 

35b 23 TriaPc 
51*6 30V1 Trlbuna 
4 r » 4 Tncntr 
7V1 5% Trlco 
17% 1316 Trintv 
35% 14% TrltErtg 
19% 9% TrltE of 1.10 

43% 31% TucsEP 200 
17% 7 Vi Tune* JO 
20% 16 TwinOs .90 
41 30 TvccLb JO 

l7Vi 12% Tvlers JO 


13 29«6 29% 2916 + % 
2455 29% 38% 27% + V* 
139 3Vi 3% 3b— U 
1276 50 47% 50 A % 

3 53% 53% 53% — % 
45 9 8% SV. + „ 

238 20V. Mb 20% + % 

394 35V, 35 35% + % 

227 1B% 19% 1S% + % 

141 13% 13% 13% — % 

303 23% 22Vi 23% + % 

352 15% 15b 15% 

89? 7b 7V: 7% 

933 59% 58% 59% + 1: 

1S\ 21% 21 21 

1W4 <7% 46% 47% + b 

304 42 ilb 42 + Ik 

258 416 6% 1% + '■• 

a 10% 1£P, lCFVi + % 

15 2* 75 Af 29 

S3 17'k 17Vi 17b 

304 30% 20% 30b + b 

21 28=: 28b M% + V* 

11 25=, 23=6 29% 

22 27', 24b 27 1 , 

20 33 32*. 33 + % 

11 18b 18 18% — -m 

S 17% 17% 17% — 

24 2316 237* + % 

60 sa sa —v, 

22*4 22*4 

18 b 15H 18b + b 
4 Vi 416 «% 

8 Tli 7Vli *■ l, 

- Sb 4% Slk + % 

77 1429 3i 35% 36 

2X 11 582 16% 16 16% + b 

322 22V, 22% 22% + b 
2X5 14-5 88 15>6 15=k 15b 

6.7 82 33V, 33% 33% 

s.1 Id an 33 32b 33 + li 


640 

52 


5 

_ 16 __ 

2J 11 2731 

2.1 11 320 

734 
123 

a 5 20 


X2 


17 21% 21% 2116 + '.k 
31 12=k 12 lfk 
137 14% 14V6 14% + % 
751 Sib 50% 51 + % 

10 62V, 61% 62*. +lh 
382 52b 52% STi + Ik 
78 20b 20 201k + l 

59 8b 8% B%- A 
*31 1 83b 83h— Vs 
170* 96 94 96 

S 25% 25% 2S% + ’U 
12% 12% 12% + % 

S% Sh Sh-% 

IPk 171k 17ik 
4X 11 3414 47% 46% 47V. + V. 
1375 56 55V. 56 +1 

495 27Vi 271k 27*. + % 
380 3?b 31 Vi 31b + % 
77 35% 35 35% 

412 51V. 50 50%— Mr 

26 5 4% 4b— Vk 

87 6% 6V3 6% + Vk 

189 14 13b IB. 

267 29% 29 29% + % 

169 16'k 15b 14% + 5fc 
1B2 4114 41 41% + Va 

109 16b 16% 16% 

5 1B% 18% 15% — V* 
463 41% 40% 41% + 'A 
61 14 13% 14 + % 


.... 6X 

1.90 1T.1 

2.04 

4.14 7.4 
3J8C125 
■20 X 5 
1.00 2 X 10 
J4 1.7 17 
.516105 7 
JO 3X 13 
SB U 
,10b X 2J 
6X 

7 X 10 
2X 15 

4.9 14 

1.9 12 
19 12 


238 

1! 

6 

14 


u 


1X0 

140 


22% UDCn 


8 VI UNCRes 
10U URS 


IX 3370 51% 50% 50%— Vi 
7 A 786 31% 31% 31W— % 

lA 370 14 1316 14 + Mr 

4X0 15X 18 1189 27 26 26V. 

104 9J 12 IQS 22% 21% 21V. — Vk 
350 TOVl 10 10 — Vk 

JO 3X 13 28 ITVk 11 11% + b 

1X0 i6 2757 39b 37V, 39% +1V, 

1X8 4X63W40 39 =stt+% 

23S IX 13 3 15b 15b 15% + U 

112e 11 8 22 70 67% 68 —3 

1726 12 12 146 125 li 124 12S1A +1U 
1X4 44 15 1556 M 3515 35b 


140 5.6 


4% UnionC 
15% UnElec TX4 9X 
28 U UnElpf 4X0 11.1 
31% UnElpf 4J0 11X 
45 UnEIPt 6J0 11 J 


55% UElPfL 8X0 114 
21 3 i UnEI pf 2.9B I1X 
UnEl pf 2.13 10J 


52% UnEIPt 7J4 II J 
55 UEIpfH 0X0 MX 
22 JnExpn Jla IX 
UnPoc 1X0 
UnPcpf 7JS 64 
90 UnrYlPf 8X0 1TX 

2% UnltDr 

10b UnBmd X5» X 12 
9% UBrdpf 

18% UCbTVs .10 J 51 
24% UnEnro 2J8 5J 


3444 60% 59% 40% + % 

102 4% 6 6% 

1449 19b 19% 19b 
25jta 34 M 36 +1 

13QZ 38% 38% 38% +1% 
1000* 54 Vi 56 'A + % 

11 31% 31% 31% + % 
70* 70 78 70 — % 

M 27% a 26% 

7 19% 19% 19% + =4 
3 U% 26% 26% 

1M; 65% 45% 45% 

400* 68% 67%. 67% +1Vi 
104 22b 22% 22V4 
34 12 ail 49% 48% 49% + Vi 

8 110 109b 110 + % 

4540X74 70V. 71% — 1% 

1765 3% 3 3% + % 

19 23% 23 23% + % 

1 17% 17% 17% 

52 32% 32 3216 + <A 

212 44% 43% 43% + % 



Company 


Per Am! Pay Rec 


INCREASED 


Eraca Lid 
IAAS interna Ilona I 


.!« 1-JI 12-20 

.05 12-31 12-13 


Cabot Carp 
Coachmen Inds 
Economics Laos 
Elder Boorman 519 
Firs! Chicago Coro 


O X3 IX 12-3 

O .10 12-12 11-21 

a XO I-IS 12-2. 

0 0S% 12-10 11-11 

Q 33 1-1 12-4 


a -annual; m-monthly ; q-quorterly; semi- 
annual 


ComSities 


.\>r II 

HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U-SJ per ounce 

Clow PrevLoui 
High Low Bid Ask Bid Ask 
Nov _ N T. N.T. 323.00 325X0 IZLM 324X0 
Doe - N.T. N.T. 325X0 327.00 324X0 32tM 
Jon _ N.T. N.T. 327.00 329.00 324X0 320X0 
Fee _ 329X0 329X0 J2BX0 33000 328X0 330X0 
API _ N.T. N.T. 332.00 334X0 331X0 333X0 
Jun - N.T. N.T. 336 00 338X0 335.00 337.00 
Aua - N.T. N.T. 34100 3-13.00 339X0 341X0 
Ocl — 346.00 344.00 3*5X0 347.00 343.00 345X0 
v elurrw ; 2* 101 s el 10c oz. 

Source. Keufen. 


Source: UPI. 


London 

Conunodities 


\'ttr offrrinn 

CBOT 


BOND 


FUTURES 


FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures and 
Futures Options on 
COMEX-COLD & SIL\TR 
1MM -CURRENCIES 

ton' CkBtMinwn ftiUi 


S J5 


RttL'SHTlBK 
mV AND 
LIV ERNIklHT 


‘ Afifiiirt .w/v !'• mules 
cixetdinx -'9n commas per 
cilrmUir iMfHlh Fira .’*>/ 
inMnwr* 3JS round mm 


l nil one nl «>ur pnHrNiiiHh 

212-221-"15S 
Ttflrx. - llftn 


REPUBLIC CLEfiBXNG 
C05P0RSTI0N 


452 fifth .'A. ;.T UKKkS 
Aa Affitm-.H 


SipnbUc HaUoaal Buk el Sew Sul 

\ *12 Kdiitin 1 laimeniil If mk 


Previom 
Bid Ask 


-W. II 

Qese 

Utah Low Bid Ask 

SUGAR 
Sterling per metric len 
Dec 140X0 146X0 T 44.00 146X0 140X0 144X0 
15940 159X0 159.40 156-20 15660 

163.40 160.60 16X00 16X40 159.40 160X0 
164X0 167X0 16840 <69X0 165.40 16160 
174X0 171X0 174X0 174X0 170x0 171.00 
Volume. 1J2S innol SO Ions. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric htn 
Dec 1x62 1X42 1X45 

Mar U07 1X84 1X89 

1.717 
1J40 
1762 
1.761 
1.766 


Mar 

May 

Aug 

Oct 


May 

Jly 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 


1.732 IJI0 
i.ar 1.735 
1J70 1J60 

N.T. N.T. 

N.T. N.T. 

Volume. 1X58 lots of 10 ions. 
COFFEE 


1X48 

1X91 

1.718 

1.742 

1.763 

1.770 

1.776 


1X66 1x69 
1.707 J.708 
1.731 1.732 
1.753 1,754 
1 J75 1.777 
1.77S 1J78 
1JB4 1.788 


Sterling per melric fan 



Price Dec 

Mar 

Jen 

Dec 

Mar 

Jea 

Nov 

1X15 1.790 

1.795 

1.799 

1X30 1X36 

36 

130 

IB! 

133 

0X1 

0128 

053 

Jon 

1X65 1X18 

1X32 

1X35 

1X50 1X52 

37 

107 

112 

laS 

otto 

051 

OJB 

Mar 

1X70 7X21 

TX39 

1X42 

1X51 1X54 

38 

n a; 

1-50 

IE 

003 

050 

1.17 

May 

1X70 1X25 

IAJ0 

1X42 

1X40 1X45 

39 

020 

100 

160 

0.90 

109 

162 

Jly 

1X70 1X28 

1X43 

1X50 

1X50 1X55 

40 

0J16 

065 

1.18 

1.7S 

2X1 

201 

Scg 

1X78 1X45 

1X53 

1X55 

1X75 1X80 

41 

0X2 

0X2 

0X8 

— 

— 

2X9 


Ndv 1X40 1X*0 1X50 1X70 1X75 1X87 
Volume: 4X03 lorsol 5 ions. 

GASOIL 

u_S. dollars par metric ion 
Dec 269 JS 245.75 268X0 268J5 36L25 264-50 
asxO 262J5 264J5 76X00 Ml -50 Ml JS 
260X0 259.25 24M5 260X0 7S7J5 257X0 
252-00 251 00 251.75 253X0 24&JU 748.75 
245X0 244 JO 745X0 246X0 24250 743.00 
N.T. N.T. 237X0 238X0 23*50 235X0 
734 iM 211X0 733 JO 234.00 232X0 233.00 
733JO 73ZJ» 231 JO 233X0 731X0 23225 
N.T. N.T. 2M.00 752X0 New - 
volume: 1,9151015 01 100 tans. 

CRUDE OIL (BRENT) 

U £. doilors per Oorrtl 
□ec N.T. N.T. 29.17 3923 28X3 28.90 

Jan 38.40 28 25 28X5 28.40 7804 28.07 

NT. N.T. 27X0 27.90 2»X5 2?J9 

N.T. NT. 2720 27X5 27.10 5725 

27X0 77X0 26 90 27X0 76X0 26.7C 

N.T. N.T. 24X5 2fc60 26.11 26X0 

Volume; 212 loliof 1X00 barrels. 

Sources: Ret/lecs end London Fefnrfewn Eji- 
c*cnac latnail. crude oil). 


Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

API 

JUay 

Jun 

Jlv 

Ayg 


Feb 

Mar 

API 

May 



.%>! . II 

Previous 
BM Ask 


Close 

BM Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling par metric tan 

Snot 661XO 66100 670X0 672X0 

Forward 689X0 4*0.00 694X0 695X0 

COPPER CATHODES IHIgh Grads! 

Sterling per metric Ion 
Snot 953.00 958X0 960.00 961X0 

Farwrd 985X0 985X0 985X0 985X0 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling per metric Ion 
Spot 938X0 940X0 936X0 93800 

Forward 9(7X0 «68X0 *64.00 968X0 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ion 
Seal 278X0 279.00 275X0 375X0 

Forward 277.00 278X0 278X0 278X0 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric Ion 
Spat 2815.09 2820X0 2900X0 2805.00 

Forward 2865.00 2B7DXO 2850X0 2655X0 

SILVER 

pence per troy ounce 

5 pot 425X0 426.00 422X0 421X0 

Forward 438X0 438X0 <35X0 <36X0 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric ton 

Seal n.a. IUL 8548X0 B549X0 

Forworn njq. n.a. B456X0 8460X0 

ZINC 

Sterling per metric ton 

Seal 378.00 382X0 197X0 399X0 

Source; AP. 


Di\1 Futures 
Options 


W. German Mgrt-KUMO merhs. cent) nermari 


Callt-Seffle 


Aim. II 
PutfrSatlli 


ElKniated total vgL 3X86 
Cold: Frl.voLUuooen lot. 42.184 
Put* ; Frl. vaL 1252 open Int. 32X79 
Source: CME 


Japan to Issue Special Coins 

Reuters 

OSAKA, Japan — Japan will is- 
sue gold, silver and nickel coins 
neai autumn to commemorate the 
60th anniversary of the reign of 
Emperor Hirohiio in December, 
1986, the Finance Ministry said. 
Japan last issued a gold coin in 
1932. 




Commodity and Unit 
Cottee 4 Santos, Ib, 


A'or. II 

Ye 


Prlntclotft 64/30 38 %. yd _ 

Sleet bluets (PIH.), ion 

Iron 2 Fury. PnllcL. ran 

Steel scrap No I hvy Pitt. _ 
Lead Spot. Ib 


copper elect. 10 . 
Tin (Smuikl. ib. 


Zinc, E. St. |_ Basis. Ib 

Palladium, oz ... 

Sliver n.y _ oz — 
Sauce: AP. 


Mon 
1XS 
0X0 
473-00 
213X0 
73-74 
18-19 
67-70 
NJL 
0X5 
1 02-103 


Ago 

1J7 


<73X0 

213X0 


25-26 

67-69 


0J5 

149% 

NA 


. S&PIOO 

Index Options 


AKt.-. II 


«r*ki CoHvLod 
F ret Mm Dec Jan Fib 

165 - — - - 

in ii m. — law 

ITS 13H 147. Uto IT* 

U0 A *1 10*: t'k 

185 4li Pu 6to t 

190 13.I625/U3 Ta 

195 n »S Ik. 1% 


puts-um 

Nov Dec JOB Feb 
- 1/16 1/16 - 
int mi 


1/U li 
1/U 7/16 
la l*i 
»t 3‘, 
l/l» Fi 


V> * 

T » 15/16 
2I/16n 
44. 


11 M 


ToW ediwkme nun 
Total coll ooen H. 546.798 
Total Ml vakime 217.54* 
Toni out iwcn nt. nij» 
Infltt- 

Htafl 18987 Loa 186J3 
Source. CBOE. 


Oom 189X7*345 


Foreigners Sell Japan Stocks 


Reuters 


TOKYO — Foreign investors 
were net sellers of Japanese stocks 
in the week ended Nov. 2. for the 
16th successive week, the Tokyo 
Stock Exchange said Monday. 
Overseas investors sold stocks val- 
ued at 191 13 billion yen (S93J mil- 
lion) on the Tokyo. Osaka and Na- 
goya exchanges while they bought 
stocks valued at 17107 billion, the 
exchange said. 


To Our Readers 


The UJ5. Treasuries will not be 
available in this edition because 
most U.S. financial markets were 
closed for a holiday. 


Joint Investment Fond Planned 
For Foreign Capital in Taiwan 

Realm 

HONG KONG — Financial institutions 
from Asia and the United States are participat- 
ing in a Taiwan-based consortium that plans to 
establish an investment fund for the influx of 
overseas capital into the Taiwan stock market, a 
spokesman Merrill Lynch & Co~, one of the 
participants, said Monday. 

The j aim- venture company, China Securities 
Investment Trust Corp., will manage the fund 
and Merrill Lynch will handle sales and market- 
ing. Merrill Lynch. Fidelity International In- 
vestment Management (Hong Kong) Lid and 
Bangkok Bank Ltd. will jointly hold a 35-per- 
cent stake and the China Development Corp. of 
Taiwan will hold 65 percent. 

The spokesman declined to give a date for 
launching of the fund, one of three for which 
Taiwan issued licenses in March in a move to 
open the domestic stock market. 


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ZX 35 


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115 r 16% 37 4- -.h 

81 38 371 » JT% ♦ li 

73 39 38% »% -i- A 

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3969 Z2 S3 93 * % 

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N^teapanamAatheDcc. 


*%- 
' ■ii. -i 
'-y : 


■■ fiV 
- .. 


j US. Futures 


Coer. Hist: Lew Pane ChgL 


.W 11 


Scajon Season 
HI ob Law 


Open Hlgn Low Close coo. 


Grains 


WHfiATtCBTJ 

5X00 au mbi imum> aol tors per busnel 
1631: Z79% Dec 335* 3 39 12» 129 +X Tb 

174-,’j 2X7 Mar 1321 m 1V4 130% XM’L +JU 

AS3 284 MOV 1 >2 114% 11} 1UV, +.01% 

172% 2X3 Jul 191 192% 119% 192 +X1'A 

145 2X7 SeP 192% 194 197% Z93U +m 

MS’: 194'. Dec 105 +X1 

Esr. Safes Prev. Soles SJJ5T 

Prev.Oav Open Int. 30LS50 ott 194 


I CORN (C8T) 

5X00 bu ntiol mum- dallarsoer bushel 


195 

2.97 

nr. 

286 

273 

1151: 

174% 

EsLSale 


114% 

1241: 

231 

213 

Mil, 

220 ’- 

133 


Prev. Day Oaen int.KlJlS up 840 


Dec 138% 2J8V2 2J7>J. 137% +X0VS 

Mar 2 JS% 145% 2J< 244% 

May 24VVM Z UT*z UCTa —DOW 

JUl isaib 290% 148 148 —XIV. 

Sea 2351* 12SV: 133b lift -01% 

Dec 1291% 1291M 227b 7JBA —XI 

Mar 1371M 137V* 226V: 136VS —XIV* 

Prev. Seles 28.732 


SOYBEANS ICBT) 

5X00 bu mini mum- dollars per busbal 
6X8 4X7% Nov S2T.S 924 


6J9 
7.62 
729 
6-58 
6.74 

428 
622 
u: 

Est. Sales 


5.10 

SSKz 

131% 

136% 

135V: 

529% 

526 V: 

5L37VM 


Prev. Day Open int. 7ASH aft 73 


... 520U 521 +JXX2, 

Jon Ul% 132% 52TA 5J0% +X0% 

Mar 5X2 5.42 5L39VM 5.48% +XI 

May SJ9V: 5X9% 147 1X8 +XB% 

Jul 5.44% 154% 5J4Vs 552% +J0V* 

Aug 153 193 5J1 5J1 

Sep 136 5J6 533 533 —.02% 

Nov 532 132 528% 128% — X3U> 

Jan 141 — X2ft 

Prev. Soles. 4J.1S0 


SOYBEAN MEAL CC0T) 

100 tans- dollars per tea 

184X0 125X0 Dec 14820 148X0 147.10 M7J0 

Jan 147X0 148X0 14630 147X0 

Mar 148X0 14830 147X0 147 JO 

May 14820 14880 147X0 148X0 

Jul 14890 W8X0 148X0 148X0 

Aug 14850 149X0 147X0 14720 —1X0 

Sep 147X0 U7X0 145X0 145X0 —2X0 

Oct 143X0 143X0 141 JO 141.50 -250 

Dec 14390 14390 14290 14290 —280 

Jan 143X0)4250 14250 14290 —270 

Pr«v. Sales 12094 


163X0 
206X0 
16290 
167X0 
15270 
167X0 
14990 
150X0 
150X0 
Esf. Sates 


127X0 

130X0 

13253 

134X0 

13590 

13790 

148X0 

14200 

145X0 


■MI 

+30 

+20 

—20 

-90 


Prev. Day Oaen Ini. 45X44 ott 479 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 
60X00 ibs> dollars per 100 IBS. 


29-55 

19X5 

Dec 

21.10 

21.10 

2063 

20X7 


2907 

1902 


21.15 

21.15 

2002 

2006 

— JB 

28X0 

19X0 

Mar 

2105 

21X0 

ZTX8 

21.10 

+.11 

27X5 

stun 

Mav 

21X0 

2160 

21X0 

21X7 

+.17 

2505 

20X0 

Jul 

21X5 

21X8 

21X5 

21X8 

+.13 

2S.15 

20X7 


2106 

21X5 

2100 

2100 

+.10 

24X5 

20 JO 

Sep 

2L95 

2105 

21X0 

71X0 

+.10 

22X0 

20X5 

Oct 

2TXS 

22X0 

21X0 

21X0 

+.18 

21X0 2005 Dec 31X5 21X0 

21X0 2005 Jon. , 

Est. Salas Prev. Sales 23079 

Prev. Dav Oaen Int. 43014 off 719 

mxo 

21X0 

21X0 

+X2 

+X2 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40X00 lbs.- cents per Hl 


67X5 

5SJW 

Dee 

6600 

67X2 

6600 

66X7 

+JJ7 

67XS 

SOS 

Fed 

63.15 

63X0 

6207 

inw 

+03 

67X7 

5500 

Apt 

61X0 

61X7 

61X5 

61X5 

+03 

6605 

5605 

Jun 

61.40 

6105 

6105 

61X7 

+.15 

65X0 

Wsq 

Ang 

5900 

59X5 

S960 

59X0 

+00 

60X0 

6500 

57-53 

5930 

Oct 

Dec 

58X5 

5U0 

58X0 

5800 

60.10 

+.18 

Est. Sates 

Prev. Sates 20724 





Prev. Dav Open Inr. 69X98 up 1979 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME] 

44X00 uts.- cents per lb. _ , 

7320 58.10 NOV 6490 6&g 

79X0 «L5D Jan 68.15 6835 

7120 4B162 Mar 6820 63*2 

71X0 6060 Apr 6795 6720 

70.00 60.10 May 6625 6635 

6890 6525 Aug 6623 66X5 

EsI. Sales 935 Prev. Sales 1214 

Prev. Day Open Int. *268 up 96 


4420 

67X0 

67X2 

6730 

66.15 

6690 


65X5 

68.15 

68.12 

67X2 

6620 

6L» 


+25 

+.W 

+X5 

+.12 

—.15 

—25 


30X00 R».- cents per Ib. 
50X5 3605 Dec 

46X2 

47.10 

46X5 

47X5 

+5a 

50X7 

38.10 

Feb 

4600 

46X0 

46.10 

4655 

+04 

4705 

36.12 


41x0 

41X5 

41X5 

41X3 

+.10 

49X5 

39X0 


43X0 

43X0 

4057 

43X5 

— X5 

49X5 

40X5 

Jul 

43X0 

4400 

43X0 

44X5 

+.13 

51.90 

4005 


42X5 

42X5 

42X2 

<2X2 

— X8 

41.10 

38-07 

Oct 

39X0 

39X0 

39X5 

39X5 

+X5 

49X0 

3807 


40X5 

40X5 

40X5 

40X7 


40X0 40X5 

Est Sales 

Feb 

Prev. Sates 6077 


41X0 



Prev. Dav Open Int. 28954 up 680 
PORK BELL1E5(CME} 

38X00 lbs.- cents pot tb. 

7620 5525 Feb 6243 S272 

75X0 55X5 Mar 62X0 62X5 

75X0 £7X5 May 63X5 6175 

76X0 5730 JUI 6425 6425 

73.15 5550 Aug 61X5 61X5 

Est. Sales 2783 Prev. Sales, 4X88 
Prev. Day Open Int. EXX off 256 


6210 

6230 

6355 

6X95 

6120 


62X0 

6267 

6290 

6430 

6190 


—.10 
— X5 
— -20 
+.10 
+.10 


Food 


CDFFEE C (NY CSCE) 

3 lMX0 b * J "l2S& DW |fec 19191 15925 15325 158X0 

Mar WM 13B _7, 153J7 UBXJ 

May 155-25 160X0 15525 159.98 
Jul 15690 16130 15625 16130 
Sen 15825 16235 1582S 16335 


167X3 

167.10 

167.10 

167X8 


12890 

131X0 

13590 

13275 


+4X0 

+357 

40X0 

+128 

+122 



PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option A Strike 

Underlying Price Colls— Loot 

Nov Dec Mar Nov Dm Mar 
12900 Brtttsb Poands-ceats per anft. 

B Pound 125 S 10X5 r 

142X3 135 t r 8.10 

14283 I4S r 020 r 

14203 155 r r 0X0 

62908 West Oermon Marto-conlt per onlt. 

DMarfc 35 r 329 397 

38X9 36 r 220 r 

mw 33 t 134 r 

38X* 38 027 020 190 

38X9 3t 0X6 020 1X2 

raw 40 r 0X6 ojo 

6250X00 Japanese Yea-UOfM of a coat pgr onlt. 


Nor. 11 


0X5 

0.10 

0X1 

1X0 


0.17 


098 

a« 


JYen 

40 

5 

8X5 

r 

J 

r 


48X9 

42 

r 

6X5 

6X0 

r 

r 


4859 

46 

r 

r 

3X0 

r 

r 



46 


2X0 

2X6 

r 



48X9 

47 

1X2 

r 

2L.16 

0X2 

0.14 


48J? 

48 

0X6 

1X2 

1X7 

r 

0X0 


4859 

49 

0.09 

0X7 

s 

r 

085 


48X9 50 6 002 008 

62X00 Swiss FnsacKents per imII. 

i 

r 



34 


1200 

r 

• 

r 


4609 

39 

s 

7X3 

r 

> 

i" 


46.39 

43 

r 

r 

2X7 

r 

0.17 

007 

4609 

46 

r 

0X8 

2X3 

r 

0X5 

1.10 

4609 

47 

r 

0X0 

1X0 

r 

r 


4609 

48 


910 

1.16 

r 

r 


Total cad y#L 3048 


Call open tat, 2*5082 


Total pot VOL 


UK 


r— Nat traded, s— Na opKoo offered. 
Last is promlyn (purcneB* price). 
Source: A P. 


PM open l«t. 163247 


Season Season 

High Law 

14730 13100 C« U7JC 163X0 159X0 1622S 

1*7*5 T4U0 Ater UI5C 161 XC iilJXl 164(71 

eSwes Pnv 

Prev. D cy Coen tr.t. 11x15 sttSDO 
5U GAR WORLD 1] (NTCSCE1 

11 1000 lbs.- ceils per®- 

7.7S 25A .'cr. 53 595 

933 334 Mcr Afl2 6.15 

7.15 398 Men fta AJ3 

4.70 329 Jul 636 4.® 

6X2 424 SsP 693 69! 

6.96 o: Od ii? U1 

735 635 Jan 

793 49! Mar 736 731 

Est. Soles PrevjSaies SX25 

Prev. Dav Oeer. iaL 9139! usJ77 


+Z7B 

+200 


538 

599 

4U 

634 

IN 

665 


735 


595 

4.13 

63D 

6XS 

463 

623 

kK 

734 


+.N 

+.» 

+.18 

+X7 

+X6 

+XT 

*m 

+.10 


COCOA (NY CSCE) 


18 metric tors- 5 oer "oa 
2337 1945 Dec 

206C 

7367 

3050 2063 +1 

2292 

1955 

Mar 

2l(v 

2142 

2147 2159 —3 

2422 

I960 

Mat 

2228 

310 

7T9B 22» 

2429 

I960 

ju! 

22U 

345 

2238 E45 — * 

2430 

2323 

Seo 

37* 

2274 

374 2Z74 —4 

2425 

2055 

Dec 

380 

2280 

2K W — € 

2385 

EsI. Sates 

2039 

Mar 

Prev. Sates ZJ* 5 

Z2M —4. 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 2039* oE 535 
GRANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

15X00 IDs.- cents POT Ib. 

181X0 11220 Nov 11180 !1<>: 1UJB IM00 

JSn It4X0 114.90 11360 IK® 

Mar 1)435 It 5X0 1I4LM 11495 

Ma-/ 11490 115X0 1U50 T14.90 

JUI 114X0 

sea 11275 11275 11225 TT22S 
Jtev 11230 

J33 11275 

16135 ill 90 Mar 1)3X8 

Est Sales Prev. Sates SOB 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 5210 


180X0 

17790 

16290 

T5790 

18090 

11435 


11130 
11235 
111X5 
111.4 
I1IX0 
1 1193 


— J5 
+30 
+35 
+.15 


+30 

+38 

+39 

+30 


Metais* 


COPPER (COMEX) 
25X00 ac c e n t s per la. 


60X0 

8435 

8430 

80X0 

74X0 

74X0 

7DJ0 

7030 

7030 

67.90 

6730 

6430 

61-80 

Est. Sales 


6030 

5U0 

58.75 

5930 

60X0 

6035 

6020 

61X0 

6330 

6295 

6290 

633S 

6190 


6235 

6245 

6250 


Nov 
Dec 
Jan 
Mar 
Mav 
Jtrt 
Sep 
Dec 
Jan 
Mar 
May 
Jul 
Seo 

Prev.Satcs 


6055 


6230 

*265 

6250 


*1.70 

6215 

6285 


.— . —45 

61X0 6135 6035 6080 -30 

*1.10 —30 

*135 -30 

62.15 —45 

*255 —45 

6295 —40 

64.10 6630 64X0 6X65 — X0 

6285 —JO 

6430 6430 6430 MX® — M 

6435 -X0 

*530 —M 

45X0 — X0 


Prev. Day Open InT. 77x(0 


ALUMINUM (COMEX) 
40000 Un.- cents oer Rl 


Htafa 


n 

v. 


Does Ktab Lata Cleat Ota. 


EUftOOOLUUtSflMM! 


fl imlOaMtsal ISO pet. 

*2X7 

*7 U 

*2X6 *2.11 

- 

•217 

BUS Dec 




««3 


*1*1 *L9B 



MJ3 JOO 

9ua 

*TA* 

*1X2 *TXB 

•to 

e>05 

JIM Sea 

910* 

9104 

*U8 njs 

+01 / 

*1X5 

1708 Dec 

*0*t 

91X1 

nor *1X7 

+JT 

TCJB 

87*4 Mar 

MM 

9BP6 

Nil 98X9 
90S <009 

+01 - 

9*00 

nit jm 

*002 

9007 

+JJ1 — 

•axt 

8909 Sea 

twv 

9BLK 

9WH W-12 

+07 . - 

Cst- Sates . Prev .jctef 4640S 


*- 


Prw DarOtoea M.l»734 up) 

■RfTOH KMTBKIOMW ■ 

'?5Z~ilsrEtfST,*m 

1XJBS 1X400 MB r UM UBM LOU 1X045 
1X215 l.ltOS Am UM 13*00 13MB IJKS 
EseSataS 2X40 PTtoV Sons 1L517 
Prev. Day Opening. 30.19* #*437 


+u 

+» 

+« 




Spwtlfr lpcenfeaHtoil 

356* JDO* Dec 375# 3274 .73*9 

3504 4m «r JW -3230 VW 

n*0 Wt A *1 TW jmt 7BT 

3303 3178 Sew 3720 .TO2 3222 

Est. Sales 5fl Prev Safe* 24)* 
Prev.DavOwawhO. TOO tata 


3399 

32*6 

3232 

2718 


-1 


-3 

-a 




i per franc- 1 taotat 

.13690 XNJB Dec 
.nm .M*s5 mb r 
.1MS0 .12130 


J2S0Q 

.12423 

.12350 


M 


Prov.OmrOMawr. U3 


3*17 


JM4 JOI 


JC0 

JUI 

3892 

.3930 


8CR4UK4UUIUMI ; ' . 

s per man -iponteqoatsttXOOl __ 

3800 3971 Owe JU3 JBM 

J m 3040 MOOT 304* J877 
3935 3335 Juo 3804 

EOM4S 11X67 ftwTtelB W3B 
Prev. DayOptn lot. 49 JM oflW 

JAPANESE YCHU88M3 ' 

IwriwtwWwiiihMlWI 

X04924 JD03M5 Dec X04853 8BMB7 J04O3 JXM63 
JS4934 X04B2S Mar XBM55 X040B7 804055 004068 
004999 X0422D Jun JM7U0MB79 804B75JXM7T 

«;-i.TD XWfta 5*P X04V15 

004905 X04IS0 Dec 4M493S 

Esf. Seles 0989 Prev. Sale* 30307 
Prev. Derr Open Hit. 1*28 upl.MJ 
SWISS FRANC (nut) 

Seer franc- 1 PoMneaoDHSOXOOI 
X77B 3521 Dec Xtn X688 .4652 X612 

X77T 3KB Mar X*M X734 X695 X715 

XUO XWB Jun X2S2 XJJH XTS X759 

MOO Jim Sen AIM 

Esr.SataS 8X17 Prev. Safes (5333 
Pntv.Oav Open in* 273*7 aflUl 


-7 

—2 

+18 


1. 


-i: 

—14 

—t* 


+3 

+5 

+1 

+5 


7W60 

7690 

7X60 

6*35 

63X5 

52)0 

49.10 


41X0 

44.70 

<2-90 

4430 

+uo 

46 39 
48.95 


4390 

4430 

<5.15 


Dec 
Jan 
Mar 
May 
Jul 
Sen 
Dec 
Jon 
Mar 
May 
Jul 
Sep 

Est. Sates Prov. Sales 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1380 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5X00 troy ac- aenls per tray ox- 


4240 <278 42X0 


43X0 


4345 

4430 

45.15 


5335 

50130 


flXO 

50X0 


42X0 —.10 
4270 — 

43.10 —.10 

43X5 —.10 

*4J5 —.50 

4525 — .10 
45X5 —.10 

47XO —.10 
4735 —.10 

48X5 —.10 
48L75 —JO 
49X5 —.3® 

50.15 —.10 


620X 

T230JS 

1215X 

11910 

1048X 

945X 

WOO 

799X 

789X 

770X 

7520 

746JJ 

EsI. Sales 


6025 
59O-0 
595X 
607 JB 

61 ex 
6293 
621.0 
652X 
* * 6 ,0 
6700 
6820 
695JI 


609X 

6UL0 

4KX 

*nn 

6305 


6473 

6649 


609X 

6120 

6140 

6240 

6329 

6409 

6490 

6649 


.7000 


6073 -6070 —24 
6079 6105 —25 

6140 6143 —25 

*77 a *778 —29 

6305 631 X —29 

6400 639.6 —25 

6473 6489 —29 
66X0 ■ (W J’.b —29 
feS.® -25 
6770 —25 
6080 —29 

7000 46*0 —29 


+30 


+30 

+20 

+20 


Nov 
Dec 
Jan 
Mar 
Mav 
Jul 
Sep 
Dec 
Jon 
Mar 
May 

Jut 7000 
Prev. Sales 

Prev. Day Open Int. B6J75 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 troy aL-dol lots per trDvac 
357X0 331X0 Nov. . 325X0 

332X0 33000 Dec 98790 

37390 25790 Jan 329.10 33090 32800 32700 

357X0 26490 Aar 33190 332X0 33B20 33100 

363X0 273X0 Jul 33400 33400 33390 33400 

360X0 302S® Oct 337X0 337X0 337X0 33700 

Est- Sales 1,158 Prev.SoUts 
Prev. Dav Onen Int. 1X640 uo <22 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 trov oz- dollars per ez 

14190 71.00 Dec 9880 9935 98X0 9835 

12790 9130 Mar 97X0 9735 9825 9925 

1144511 9190 Jun 9935 10090 .9990 100X0 

115X0 9730 SOP 10035 1X190 10035 1D1X0 

10725 10400 Dec . __ 102X0 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 1277 

Prev. Day Open int. 6X38 
GOLD (COMEX) 
lOOtruv acr dollare per troy at 

32690 320X0 Nov 32110 —1.10 

Dec 334X0 324X0 323X0 X1450 —1.10 

Jan S690 —1.10 

Feb 333X0 32800 328.00 32890 — 1.10 

Apr 332X0 332X0 331X0 33200 —US 

Jun 33690 33690 33500 33800 —1.10 

Ana 340.10 340,10 340X0 3(090 —1.10 

Oct 345X0 l.ifi 

Dec 34830 349.10 3*830 349X0 —1.10 

Feb 35400 3S40O 35400 05460 —1.10 

Apr 35990 -1.10 

Jun 36490 —1.10 

Aug_ 370X0 —l.TO 


+90 

+35 

+103 

+190 

+190 


48990 30190 


306X0 

31430 

32090 

331X0 

335X0 

342X0 

31300 

35500 

36500 

372X0 


485.50 
494X0 

455 JB 
438X0 
3VS30 

39300 

358J® 

3SSU0 
39490 

1 385X0 ■ „ 

Ext. sates 8900 Prev. Safes 
Prev. Day Open 1 nU27j07 


Financial 


US T. BILLS 1 1 MM} 

SI mtlllen-pts at 100 pet. 

WX0 8527 Dec 

72X4 8460 Mar 

9168 8701 Jun 

ss ss gs 

91X6 0998 Mar 

9108 9060 Jun 

70.94 90X3 Sep 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 9042 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 40,922 


93X1 73X3 

92X2-92X6 
92X6 92X9 

9207 9208 

92X8 92X8 


92X9 

92X9 

92X4 

9205 

92X4 


9301 —.0? 

92X5 +01 

92X9 +01 

9209 +02 

92X7 : +03 
9100 +X2 

71X3 +X2 

9137 +X2 


10 YR. TREASURY (CST) 

5100X00 Pr In- Pli 8.32nd* of lBOoct 
87 75-13 Dec Bff-73 88-30 

B8 75-14 MOT 87-27 17-30 

87-1 74-30 Jun 87 » 

85X0 80-7 SeP - 

85-6 80-2 Dec 85-12 85-12 

Est Sales PrevXtales 10^568 


88-22 

87-26 

86-28 


85-11 


88-25 

87-26 

86-29 

86-3 

85-11 


-a 

—2 

—2 

—1 


Prev. Dev Open Int. 74331 upl, 

U5 TREASURY BOHDSfCBn 

79-15 

78-16 57-2 MOT 780 78-14 7M 

77-11 56-29 Jutl 77-4 77-11 770 

760 56-29 S*P 76-6 76-ID 7+6 

75-10 56-25 DOC 7W 75-li 754 

7+15 56-27 Mar 74.13 74-M 74-11 


Jun 


-70-34 

72-3 


73-34 

72-2? 


63-12 

634 se» 

62-24 DOC 

66-25 JwT JFM 

-SEtfSIW 


3 M. 

77-7 

76-6 

75-7 

24-11 


73-17 73-17 
72-26 72-28 
. 72-5 

_ . 71-18 

7M 71*2 


BM 

85-11 

84-22 


74-24 
72-28 
72-18 
71-6 . 

68-30 
Eat. Sales 

Prev.OoyQPeri inf 003^81 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT) _ 
S1OD0nIndex-pts&32n»9<lD0pet 
87-2 81-17 Dec 864, 

86-7 80-4 Mar SMI 8S-77 

85-12 7V Jun 84^2 84-23 

.84-20 79-10 Sep . ... 

Est. Soles- Prev. Saks XJW 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 5334 up 218 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) .. 

92S]^‘as5 100 6M 92X2 9Z& 913S 92X2 —XI 
7238 M« MOT 9239 -9229 9235 9229 —XI 

9104 66X3 jun.;' 91.7S 

»1X4 87X6 Sep -J1X5 +X1 

W57 8834 Dec -'- JJS. t5l 

opas 8820 MW ' _ 9099- t07 

Est Soles 39 Prav.Sateg ' 50 

Prev. Day Open Int' 1308 vpJ - 


868 

85H5 

84-22 

83-31 


rndostriais 


LUMBER (CME)- 
i3eX00bd.fl.-5pert0D0bd.lt 

186.10 126-50 NOV UIJ» USA 14100 UtB 

187X0 UOXO Jan UM0 14480 1404C U43D 

i«xo awn Mar i « jo i5oi» mmo iscxo 

n*X0 14500 Mar 144X0 15550 I53JO 15140 

18X00 W9JD Jul J57JD 15950 15HJO 15830 

176X0 152.90 Sea 142.10 14X10 162.10 162.10 

18100 15650 Nov 142X0 16200 M2X0 162X0 

Btt. Sates 637 Prev. Sates 1.123 
Prev. Dcy Open tat 7094 oH91 
COTTON I (NYCE) 


+J0 

+30 

+XD 

+XB 

—JO 

—JO 

—JO 


p 


50000 lbs,- emts per tb. 
71X0 57X1 Dec 

61.12 

6L65 

60.98 

61.17 

—02 

7605 

S8J7 

Mar 

62,10 

62X0 

61X0 

6280 

-07 

70X0 

58X0 

May 

6250 

6300 

42J0 

6263 

-02 

70X5 

JB0D 

Jul 

6105 

6200 

61X6 

61.73 

—08 

65XD 

52X0 

Oct 

5405 

UM 

5*05 

54X0 

+X5 

5905 

50X3 

Dec 

51X5 

5205 

51X5 

5233 

+08 

6605 

5200 

Mar 

53X0 

53X0 

53X0 

5265 

+.18 

Est. Sates 

Prev. sales 2X50 


Prev. Day Optra loL 22073 


HEATING OIL (NYMET 
*2000 oal- cents per oat 

SOTO 69.15 Dec 8704 

87.90 

87X0 


+01 

8*05 

69X0 

Jan 

87X9 

87X5 

87X5 


+X0 

8405 

70X0 

Feb 

0645 

8600 

8605 

WM 

-HX0 

81.95 

66X0 

Mar 

81X0 

8205 

81X0 


+X7 

77X0 

68X0 


7800 

7800 

77X0 


+J8. 

74X0 

68X0 

Mav 

13X0 

75X0 

74X0 

74X0 

+J0 


71X0 

Jun 

74X0 

74X0 

7US 

UXO 

+J0 



Jul 

7100 

73.10 




7305 

7230 

71X0 

72X0 

£**? 



• 

7115 

7140 

+X0 

+X0 

Est. Sales _ 

Prey. Sales 5X77 





CRUDE OIL (NYME) 
UM0 bW.- dollars per b&L 


3054 
1 2950 
[29X6 
27AS 
27-45 
27X4 
2687 
3453 
3605 
27X0 
25X5 
25X7 

1 25X0 H 

Est- Sale* 


2X70 

2408 

2*0S 

24.13 

23X3 

2X65 

2308 

24X5 

24.90 

34X0 

2S.IS 

2505 

24X0 


Dec 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 


3065 
29X5 
3X70 
2808 
2708 
27XC 
27X0 
2634 
Aug 26X5 

S«P 2405 

Oct 3*7< 2635 
NOV 36X9 24X9 

Dec 2600 26X0 

Prey.smes KU61 


3031 

29.77 

29X3 

2807 

27X8 

27X0 

27.WJ 

2634 

24X8 


30X1 

27X3 

28X0 


Si 3 

2702 

2634 

36X5 

264S 

26U0 

26X8 

26X9 

2600 


30X7 

2*35 

29X0 

2806 

27X5 

27 08 

27.10 

26X5 

2*50 

3609 

3641 

MAO. 

36X0 


+02 

+00 

+08 

+06 

+05 

+.17 

+01 

+.15 

+26 

+05 

+00 

+01 

+05 


it 


Prev. Day Oaen taL 68058 up 31 7 


Stock Indexes 


5P COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and centg 

??* ISJ* 5 ISS" 19750 

7V3JS wuo Mar 19S4E mxo mas w*jo 

Jun 1JWO 20080 176X5 301X0 

18700 Sep KXK) 19900 19805 20309 


20650 

19&4Q 

MAflPrSvTsrtes 61089" 

Prev. Day Open lot £6.135 up 1075 


+4X5 

+4.10 

+4X0 

+3X0 


V *LU«UNE TKCBT) 

points and cents 

Dec 2DUB 2X600 201X0 30610 -MX8 
^ 202LTO 208JI0 703M 2B.W MSS 
j&SD »0X5 iS »* W 


sate* Prev. sales «tw 

Prev. Day Open Int. KLMuplxes' 


jizia 


+4J0 

+4X5 


!HA IB 

«l 0 Iteto 


Dec 172.10 11405 mas 1 U 0 S +110 
Mar iixw nsas inS 11 S +iu 

114X0 iSjn >}MH mas IIU9 +2I5 

|x8i ns * nw* «■“ 

Prev. DovOptai Int. a^si up m 


,0 

T . 


™ !3» 


Ssr 


Prev. Day Open Int. im* 


2 £7% 
2£TVa 


3*40fe 

364*2 


267% 

267% 


+3U> 
+3111 . 


I Commodity Indeaeps 


Moody's, 

Routers 


D-l. Futures . 

Com. Researcfi Bureau^ 


Ctas» 

. 91800 f 
1j736JI0 
120-92 
226X0 . 


/wooov's : base 100 : nee. 31 i<», 

o - preiimiSa?5» “ tSSt" * ” * 

Dwj«iM?taJ2?iM ep ' 19 > 1W1 - 

JOOW • bQ Se : Dec 31. m*. 


Prev ions 

nuof 

1 334X0 • 
12063 
22AJOO- 


* tr-'-il 


jtorket GtUrto 


CBT: 

CME: 

IMM: 


£££“» Board at Trade 
ft* 60 * MercnnHie fS* 


t"C3CS: 

NYCE: • 

COMEX; 

NYME; 

KC8T: 

NYFE; 


i^wosa Mercantile rsdianai 

^?g^^.iWoiwtwYXto*et 


ot cotaw iuSEKJ 

^cSSSS^£SSSm 


Cone# Exchange' 


.1 


New y+to eagar. con 

arsg^gm gssfy-n . ■ ■ 



vsn^«‘. . 



t&S-Ad'S 









EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 


JvJ-i 


IK 







TaWea indude the notfoiiwW® Prices 

wtothBCiosli)9anWall5tnEet 
"* ^ ,ec * ***** etsewhere. 

• rut The Associated Press 


6ft 

49ft 

Bft 

44 

Tft 

5ft 

3ft 

lft 

5ft 

4ft 

0 

5ft 

2ft 

ft 

&Ui 

3ft 

7ft 

5ft 

jft 

3ft 

4ft 

77k 

6ft 

lft 

9ft 



/Us 


men law Slack 



sit Ciav 

Dlv. YU PE lOto HIBtl LOW Qual. Ch t* 


1BV* Walbar AO 1.1 24 
IS WanoB .IS 2 
Wo WongC .11 A 
WrnCwt 

47k WshH % 5 

76 WihPit .96 A 14 
Uft WRIT t 1J8 7.1 13 
ftVk Wane a 20 13 4 
7% wmte a .is 1.9 S 
a witifru 

life Wthfdpf m 14.9 
BVk Woblnv n 
St Webtnwi 
ft WMW 
2ft wedco 

7 Wedgtn I.IOelU 7 
744 Wodlch SOB 2 IB 
fift Wekfirn 12 


JOB 2 IB 
12 
4 


4> W»ll« 4 

Hi WellAm 
2ft WefGrd 

19ft Weteo A2 IS 13 

»6 Women 

5ft WsfBrC 14 

Oft Wstbr g JO IS 
6*6 WDigltl 

7V. WIHIth It . 1* 

164k WIRET 1.58 77 14 
Aft WltSL s .16 t.l S 
lift WhrEns IS 

2ft Wichita 

3 Wlckes 5 

ft Wlckes wt 
30 Wlckes pfZSD 8.7 
1 WIIonB 

lft WiflE B 33 

13k |U]nE A 
ins Wlnlln 2J4elOJI 
2ft WoltHB 

B Wdstrm AD 46 34 
lift WkWeor £2 26 7 

2ft WwdeE 
12ft WWdopt ISO 12J 
9 Worthn 251 
16ft Wraffir £1 .1 43 


200 36ft 36V. 36ft- ft 
2248 19ft l«ft 19 4- ft 

5 19 19 19 + ft 

IS ft ft ft 

45 Hft 79k Bft -rift 

158 118ft »7ft 118 

236 IS 17ft IB 
f Aft 6ft 6ft + ft 

1 BUi SU. Bft 

43 3ft 3'4 3ft + ft 

11 15V. I5ft 15ft + ft 

20 Bft 8ft 8ft + ft 

iS £ 5 

2 7 ft 2 ft 2 ft 

3 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 

42 lift lift lift 

14 10ft 10ft TDft + ft 

3 14ft 14V. 14ft + ft 

22 % ft ft + K 

65 3V1 2ft 1ft 

17 40ft 39ft 40ft + ft 

22 lft 1 1ft 

179 7ft 7ft 7ft- ft 

SS 13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 
223 6 7ft a + ft 

38 1744 17ft 17ft + ft 
13 20ft 30 Vs 30ft— ft 

283 1 4ft 14ft 14V.— ft 
588 15ft 14ft ISft + 'A 


5 

1740 

4ft 

4Yn 

Bft 


67 

1*4 

lft 

lft 


*R 

29 

28ft 

TBft 





lft 

33 

40 

5 


5 


10 

4ft 

4ft 

«ft + ft 


53 

23 

22ft 

27ft + ft 


5 3 3 3 + ft 

8 9ft 9ft 9ft — ft 
12 199k 19*. 19ft + ft 

146 3V. 3ft 314 4- ft 

26 14ft 14ft 14ft + ft 

22 I Oft 10ft 10ft 

47 19 18ft 19 


Bft 5ft Yank Co 11 S3 7ft 7 7ft 


8ft 3ft timer JSI 81 4ft 4 4ft + ft 


AMEX Highs-Lons 



■816 FPA 44 

6 FaJrFln . 34 

lft FctirmC 
15ft Forty pf 67T 29 
3ft FMata 
114 FCopHd 

11 FWvtnB AO IS n 
9ft Faterps 7 

lift FlschP J8t 5JJ 21 
6ft FltcCE 5 

23ft FMGE p( 400 13.1 
616 vlFtanto 

28ft FfaRcJc Jt li I 

21 Fluke 15tt 58 10 
7ft Foodrm 5 

716 FoataM 
5ft FttlDIG 
89ft FordCnMOOe 
19ft ForetCA JO ua 
19ft ForstC B -.18 J 28 
12ft Fornsll. 30 

ft Fotomt 

3216 Frantz 7.00a Ut 12 
14 FnaEI 16 

5 FriosEn 17 

14ft FrtschB 23b UO 23 
10ft FmfHd. 9 

. 4ft FrtA art .171 19 
6ft FurVtt JO M 27 


4 TOft 
20 16ft 
1 1ft 

59 16ft 
A6 Aft 

60 4ft 
23 12ft 

1 lift 
48 13ft 
11 12ft 
6 30ft 
13 Aft 
89 39ft 
41 24 
I 12ft 
11 7 

83 A 
201)05 

8 23 

4 25 
102 37V5 

19 1ft 
1 31ft 
78 27ft 
38 9ft 

84 22ft 
63 23ft 

5 14ft 
44 14ft 


m 9ft— ft 
ft ft 

13ft 13ft — ft 
10 10ft 4- 16 
7ft 716 + ft 
7ft 7ft— ft 
16ft 16ft + ft 
lft 116— ft 
2flft 28ft — V. 
1016 10ft — ft 
9ft 7ft— ft 


10 10ft + ft 
16U 16ft— ft 
1ft 1ft 
16ft 16ft 
6ft Aft— ft 
4ft 4ft + ft 
12ft 1316 + ft 
lift lift + 16 
1316 13ft + ft 
12ft 12ft— ft 
Xft 30ft + ft 
6ft 6ft 
38 39ft + ft 
23ft 21 + ft 
12ft 12ft 
7 7 - ft 

5M » 

104 104 
25 25 

25 25 

27 27Vk 
lft 1ft 
38ft 38ft + ft 
21ft 22 —ft 
9ft Oft + ft 
22 ft 22ft + ft 
23ft 23ft + ft 
14ft 14ft 
14ft 14ft 


2 ft 

1ft LSB 




11 

2 

2 

2 — ft 

7 

3ft LaPnt 




4 

4Vl 

4 

4ft * ft 

20 ft 

lift LndBnn 

60 

35 

12 

69 

70 ft 

m. 

20 ft + ft 

20 ft 

13ft Lndmk 

60 

TO 

1 * 

31 

20 ft 

20 

20 — ft 

16ft 

Bft Laser 



33 

75 

10 

9ft 

9ft 

Oft 

2ft LoePh 



11 

66 

7 

6 ft 

6 ft— ft 

31ft 

1916 Lehigh s 

JO! 

J 

9 

2 

78ft 

28ft 

28ft + 14 

Oft 

4ft LaisurT 



8 

7 

6 ft 

6 ft 

6 ft— ft 

34ft 

9V» LbfPPh 

50 

1.9 

10 

39* 

27 

Uft 

27 —6ft 

3 

lft LlleRst 




27 

lft 

lft 

lft + ft 

4ft 

2ft Utlld 




*7 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft + ft 

2 ft 

lft Lodge 




22 

lft 

lft 

lft + ft 

33ft 

16ft LortCa 




19 

19ft 

19ft 

19ft 

39ft 

27ft Lorimr 



18 

281 

36 

35ft 

36 + ft 

19 

IDft LumejE 

SB 

A 

31 

94 

16ft 

16ft 

16ft 

14W 

lft LundvE 



IS 

ID* 

lift 

lift 

lift— ft 

13ft 

9)k Lurifa 



11 

167 

lift 

lift 

lift — ft 

Uft 

10 Lvdal 



9 

7 

13ft 

13ft 

13ft— ft 

26Vk 

Biv LvnCSs 

50 

16 

12 

205 

12 ft 

lift 

Uft 

I0U 

8 ft LynchC 

JO 

20 

19 

28 

10 ft 

9ft 

9ft— ft 


4ft H* GTI 
15ft 1016 Galax C 
2ft 116 GahcyO 
30ft 24ft Goran UO 44 
16ft 7ft Gotl.ll 
lift ?ft GeimS ' 

4ft 2ft Gomco 
18ft 12ft GDefm M 63 

5 '2ft GnEmp JO 67 
T7ft 13 GflMJcr. .TOfa J 

6 2ft Genlsco 

15ft 9ft GcnvDr JO 19 

14 716 G«oR» 

416 lft GaoR wt 

12ft 8ft GeoRspf 1JM 95 
24ft 12ft GtanFs 50 20 
28 8 GfltYTB 

35ft 20V, Glatflt J8 25 
37 2314 Glrarir IJXJb 13 

4ft 2K GlobMR 
6ft 3 GoIrtW 
1ft ft G Id Fid 
19ft 1514 GorRpS 76 39 
29ft 22ft GouldT iOOt 69 
16 6ft Graham 32 4 A 

11 5ft GrahMc XJ0tO9A 

24ft- 16ft GrndAu M 2.1 
12’ 7ft Granl 

15 Oft GrTech 

•44ft 27 GrlLkC 48 13 
36 17ft Gronm s 
lift 5ft Greiner 981 88 
13ft Bft GrdCh 50t> 43 
15ft 11 . GKCda 52 
36ft 34 Gltstr J m 1.1 
15ft 8 GuD JBSe 4 


14 2ft 2 

78 lift 10ft 
54 1ft 1ft 
37 28ft 27ft 
88 9ft 916 
52 13 12ft 
30 3ft 2ft 
32 14ft 13ft 
41 3 2ft 

1 15ft 15ft 

20 5 4ft 

26 10% I Oft 
48* lift 1116 
T3 314 3ft 
11 Uft 10'4 

526 25 24ft 
138 14ft 14ft 
37 35ft 35 

27 3»6 30 ft 

111 4 3ft 

105 3ft 3ft 

68 ft ft 

2 19ft 19ft 

5 29 29 

4 7ft 7ft 
57 5ft 5ft 

15 18ft 18ft 

•22 9 9 

219 lift" 10ft 

95 37ft 36ft 
75 24 23ft 
13 lift Tift 
15 11ft lift 
249 14ft 14ft 
36 35ft 35ft 
62 12ft 12 


2ft 

11 — ft 
lft 

27ft— lft 
9ft 

13 + ft 

2ft 

13ft— ft- 

3 + ft 
15ft 

4ft— ft 
10ft 
lift 

3ft + ft 

10% 

25 +ft 

14V, 

35 — ft 

38«j- ft 

4 

3ft 

19ft + ft 
^ + ft 

i£“ fc 

iU ♦ a 

37V. + ft 
m! + ft 

35ft + ft 
12ft + ft 


Wft 6ft 
2116 lift 
6ft 4ft 
8ft lft 
1ft 1 
29ft 21ft 
2716 13ft 
2ft ft 
39ft 21ft 
43 26ft 
41ft 2816 
9ft 8ft 
17Vi 1216 
10K. 5ft 
17ft 6ft 
15ft lift 
9ft Aft 
17ft 10 
3ft 2 

lft 3 K 

5ft 3ft 
3ft Tft 
17 816 

18ft 6ft 
24ft 15ft 
22ft 20 
22ft 1416 
12 6 
19ft 13ft 
Aft 2ft 
610 3ft 


HAL. .10e 1.1 
HUBC 50a 10 
Halifax 04* 7 
Hal mi 
Hatmlwt 
Hndmn J 5* J 
Hanfadt 50 19 
Harvey 

Hfflbrs .15 5 
Hatbrpf 100 5J 
Hasting 40a 1J 
Him 

HllhCrs J81 24 

HlthCh 

HlthEx 

HrtttlM 44 48 
HsfaWr JOe 24 
Htfalck ,M J 
Ho! dor . 

He) lent 
HoimR 

HershO 

Hlndrl 

HWroi 

HollyCp 74 1J 
HmeGn 

Hinlns Pf295 133 
Hormls 54 24 
HmHor 

HotlPfy 150 95 
HotIPwt 

HouOT J6416J 


916 916 
20V. 20'A 
6 6 
2ft 21k 
116 116 
24ft 24 
26ft 25ft 
lft 116 
3316 32ft 
38 38 

X 29ft 
8ft Bft 
15ft 15ft 
9 Bft 
9ft 9 
ISft 1314 
8ft 816 
14ft 13ft 
Tft 2ft 

* 3 £ 
5ft 5 
2 2 
15ft 15ft 
18ft 18ft 
24ft 23ft 
22ft 22ft 
2ZV4 ZT Vi 
7 6ft 
19ft 18ft 
6ft Aft 
«h 4ft 


916 + 16 
2016— 16 
6 

2V. 

116— ft 
24ft— ft 
26 + ft 

lft— ft 
33V. + ft 
38 + V6 

m 

Bft— 16 
IK 

9 + ft 
9ft— ft 
13ft 
8h 

14ft + ft 
2ft + ft 


5 

2 

15ft + ft 
18ft— ft 
24ft- ft 
22ft— ft 
2216+66 

IBft + ft 
Aft + ft 
Aft 


17 lift 
20ft 18ft 
9V> 5ft 
14ft 11*6 
21ft 12*6 
23ft 14ft 
17ft 12ft 
2616 13 
7ft 7ft 
4916 31ft 
6ft 3ft 
17ft lift 
14ft 11 16 
17ft 13ft 
7ft 5ft 
,13ft 6ft 
2ft lft 
3ft 2ft 
lift 9ft 


lift 4ft 
12ft 8ft 


KRMn 240 18.9 
NRUpt 240 138 
Nanfck IS 

NlGsO 40b 34 10 
NtPatnl .10 5 

NMxAr J9 -44 19 
NPInRt 185 68 15 
NPnoc 1 JOe 45 13 
NWidP n 

NYTImes 40 15 16 
NewbE JSr 54 6 
Newer 52 3J 
NewLsn 13 

NwpEI 150 88 11 
Nictiinn 19 

Nichols 8 

Noellnd 

Nolex 14 

NCdOgs 

NIPS pf 475 12J 

MoH/Z 9 

NudDt 10 

Numoc 


140 14 
20 1916 
42 8ft 
10 Tift 
333 TBft 
3 17ft 

71 15ft 
207 27 
211 Tft 
489 44ft 

9 Aft 
19 lift 
48 14ft 
41 17 
40 7 

35 9ft 
13 2ft 
1,1 2ft 
2 10ft 
802 34ft 

72 3ft 
40 5ft 

197 Oft 


18ft 18ft — ft 
8ft lift + ft 
lift Uft 
18 1816— ft 

17ft 17ft— ft 
ISft 15ft + ft 
26ft 26ft + ft 
7ft 7ft + ft 
44ft 44ft + ft 

lift lift + ft 
14 14ft + ft 
16ft 17 + ft 
Aft 7 + ft 
Oft Oft + ft 
2ft 2ft + ft 
2ft 2ft 
10*6 10ft— ft 
34ft 34ft + ft 
3 3ft— ft 
5ft 5ft + >6 
9ft Oft + ft 




17ft Bft Ultmhe 12 

13M 8ft Unlcorp 22 

15ft lift UntoPt 75 5.1 

lift 8ft Unlmar t.OSalBJ 

23ft ISft UAIrPd 54b 25 14 

23H 14ft UnCosFs J II 7 

216 116 U Food A .10 75 

2 116 U FoodB 

16*6 lift UtMed 12 

22ft 12ft USAG wt 


1117 15 Uft 14ft + ft 

341 lift lift lift — ft 

21 14ft 14ft 14*. 4- ft 

44 10*. 10V: 10ft 

32 23ft 23 23 — ft 

.1 23ft 23ft 23ft + ft 

It lft lft lft 
■ffi lft lft lft 
118 12ft 12ft 12ft- ft 

6 14ft Uft 14ft 


Bft 

516 UnltelV 


20 

23 

7ft 

6ft 

6ft— ft 

2216 

Uft Unltfin 

172 78 

7 

3 

7? 

21ft 

22 + ft 

Uft 

9ft UnvCm 


14 

15 

17ft 

12ft 

12ft + ft 

R»k 

6ft UnlvRs 


16 

144 

7ft 

7ft 


19ft 

15ft UnlvRu 

JOe 45 


38 

17ft 

17ft 

17ft + ft 

15ft 

10ft UnvPaf 



53 

12 

lift 

12 + ft 


10ft Oft VSTn 
27ft T7ft Valspr 
18 2ft Vertl 


Valspr s M 18 IA 
Vertl 


130 10 Oft 10 
18 27ft 2Aft 27ft + ft 
28 Tft TU 7 ft -V ft 


73ft 

15ft VtAmC 

60 

26 

12 

42 

16ft 

15ft 

16ft + ft 

6 ft 

ft 

3ft VtRsh 




41 

2 


13ft 

Bft Vemlt 

50 

2.1 

31 

41 

9ft 

9ft 

m 

6 ft 





10 

4ft 

4ft 

4 V, + ft 

U»ft 





5 

5ft 

tft 

5ft + ft 

4ft 

lft VinlDe 




4 

2 ft 

Tft 

2 ft + ft 

IBft 

12 Viral 

54 r 

J 

15 

2 

Uft 

14ft 

Uft + ft 

4flft 

54ft Valnll 




6 

lUlft 

68 ft 

68 ft 

12 ft 

7ft Vootox 

60 

40 

10 

2 

Bft 

Bft 

Bft 

19ft 

14ft VuIcCp 

JOa <5 

11 

3 

19 

19 

19 

Bft 

5 Vvausi 



8 

13 

6 ft 

Bft 

6 ft— ft 


Labor Costs Are Called 
Uncompetitive in U.K. 

Return 

LONDON — The cost-competitiveness of 
British labor against that of the country's main 
trading rivals fell by more than 10 percent inthe 
year to September, according to a study pub- 
lished Monday by the Confederation of British 
Industry. 

The employers association said the new fig- 
ures illustrated a need for smaller pay increases. 
The confederation is urging companies to cut 
pay increases by 2 percentage points from year- 
.-earlier levels. The study found British wages 
were- rising more than twice as fast as the 
average in major competing countries. Growth 
in British manufacturing wages was running at 
9-25 percent in August. 



If you are having 
difficult)' obtaining the 
International Herald Tribune on 
a timely basis, your newsagent 
should be able to help. 

Any newsagent in the 
British Isles can place a standing 
order for you, and most will 
deliver the paper early every 
morning if you order through 
them. 


HcralbSEribunc. 

63 Long Acre, London WC2E9JH. 
Tel.: (01)8364801 


24ft 16ft OEA 
22ft 15ft Oakwd 
12 4 OdetA n 


5 20ft 20 20 

37 20ft 19ft 20 


16ft 

5*6 OdetB 




21 

6ft 

Bft 

aft — ft 

27ft 

10ft Olsians 

54 

15 

19. 

250 

2516 

2*66 


7ft 

3ft OOkleo 




22 

4ft 

4ft 


!Vl 

3ft Oppenfl 

St 5« ijO 


41 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft— ft 

8 

4ft OrtOlHA 

.15 

27 

28 

1 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft— ft 

/4k 

4ft OrtolH B 

50 

38 

26 

12 

516 

616 

5ft— ft 

25ft 

16 OSulvn s 

62 

IJ 

IB 

4/ 

2W4 

25ft 

26ft + ft 

lift 

Bft OxtrdF 

J2t 3 l7 

II 

IJ6 

Uft 

14 

Uft— ft 

Uft 

■16 Ozark H 

50 

15 

31 

1250 

Uft 

14ft 

Uft 


15 1116 PGEpfA 150 105 

13ft 10ft PGEntB 157 11.1 

12ft 9ft PGEpfC 155 118 

12*6 9ft PGEpfD US 108 

12ft 9ft PGEpfC 1JS 108 

12ft Bft PGEpfG 150 108 

36 . 31ft PGEpfF 454 12.9 


23 14ft Uft 14ft 

11 12ft 12ft 12ft + ft 

5 lift lift lift— ft 

59 lift lift lift + ft 

171 lift lift lift 

62 lift lift lift— ft 

51 34 33ft 33ft- ft 


: : ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Nov. 8, 1985 

Net auef value quotations are cappfled by me Funds listed with the exception of some quotes based on issue price. 

The marginal symbols Indicate treauenev at avatanans soPPDed: (dl- daily; lw> -weekly; U»> -M-manthW; lr> - regularly : HI -irregularly. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
~(w> Al-Mal Trust, SA— . .. 
BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. Ltd. 

-id) Baertxmd 

-id) October 

-(d) Eaulbocr America 


I FAC MOMT. LTD. 

1. Laurence PouotY 
-tw) F&C Atlantic-. 


mm& 11 


irLi.r 


-rtWI LIOXCM 

NIMARBEN 

-fw) F&C Atlantic 8 1LU -( d 1 Class A 

SF 90555 (w) FAC Euroooan S 1553 -fw ) Class B ■ UJ5. 

SF 124380 -( w) FBC Oriental S 3L43 -1*1 Clora C-Japan — 

S 1163800 FIDELITY POB 471* Hamilton BernwdO OBLIFLEX LIMITED 
SF U04800 -<m> Amertcon Values Common— -s «27 -JwlAfcphlcurrwjcy 
5F 122380 -im) Amor Values CuaiPref — , — S 10*52 -iw) Dollar Medium Te 


k -td ) Eautboar Eurooe— — SF U04800 - ml American values common— 
■4 d 1 Equibaer Part FI c—— SF 122380 - m) Amer values CuoLPraF - 

!rid|Grabar Z_Zl. SF104LOO -Idl Fkfalltv Amer.Assrts^ 

' -I d I 5tockoar_— SF 143480 - dj Fldoj ly Aintralfa Fund 

BNP JNTER FUNDS - d D^COv^y Fund ; 

-lw) lirtmWHfa Fund _______ S 12883 - d .j 

-tw) jntaro irrency I MS .... ‘ 12-Ifi 5fi HE ^ ^st Fund : 

-twl fntmxurrucy DM.. .. DM 309 d I FWCllTV pH. nfflo 

nfercuTTency Stiwllny -c JtX24 - dj FletBlItV Ortent Fund , 

Hw! lESSKhFK^mc Otter— — S 1098 d Fjdrtlty FraaHer .Rind 

-Iwi Intereaulty N. Amor. OFfer— s 1050 - d ) Ffaejljy 


Amer values CWiLPraf-. s 10*52 -lw> Del lor Medium Term- 

Rdadty Amer. As*els- — 5 73.14 -fwl Dollar Long Term 

Fidelity Australia Fund S 1181 -1*1 Japanese Yen 

Fidelity Discovery Fund — s ias»- -<w) Pound Sterling ____ 
Fidelity Dir. Svgs.Tr S 12755 -Iw I Deulsdw Mart 


s 12755 -tw) DeuischeNiark ■ - ... 

I 2484 -(w I Dutch Florin 

I 7381 -Iwl Swtas Franc 

S 3384 ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
1 1456 PB8S578. The Hague (070) 469670 
S 155.03 A d ) Bewer Belegglngoit++ 


BARQUE INDOSUEZ 

-t d ) Aslan Growth Fun d * 1 

-Iwl Dtverbond SF 8 

.(w> FI F- America S 1 

-Iw) FiF-Euroee. ■ * J 

-<d) FIF-IntanxiUCTial... » 1 

-Iw) FIF- PodflC — - S 1 

-(d) Indosuez Multibonds A S 10 

•Id) Indosuez Multibonds B S £7 

-( d > Indosuez USD (NUAF1 S WJ 

BRITANNULPDB 27LSL HeMr, Jew 

-tw) Brit. Dollar income 8 0J 

-iwl Brit. I Manoo.Curr S 1 

.(dl Bril. intlJ Manavjxjrtt S 1 

•Id) Brit. InllX Monoo-Porif t 1 

-Iw) Brit. Am. Inc. A Fd Ltd * 1. 

-Iwl Bril. Gold Fund— S. (U 

-|w) Brmftanoo- Currency—- f U 

•I d I Brit Japan Dir Peri. Fd S 1 

.(w) BriLfersev Gilt Fund J f 

-( d I BrlL World Lete. Fund- S 1. 

-{ d I Brit. World Tectav Fund— S ft 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-(w) Capital inn Fund * f 

iwl rrmitnl Ifrr^loi Sft . * ■ ll 

CrriCORPINVESXMENT BANK(Li«J 
ROB 1373 Luxembourg TeL *77555] 

(dl Ot Invest Ecu ■ ECU 10a 


. -id) Fidelity 5PCL Growth Fd. S 1686 PAR ISBAS-G ROUP 

8 1181 -(d) Fidel Bv World Fund 8 3752* -< d > Cortexo international 

SF 8155 FORBES PO B«*7 GRAND CAYMAN -(d)ECUPAR 

. S 17.15 London Apont O1-839-30T3 -jw) OBLJ-IMA_^-_ 

S 1589 -Iwl Dollar Income i S 784 -Iw) OBLIGESTION 

S 1083 (w) Forbes High Inc. Gilt Fd c 94-40 -Iw) OBLi-DOLLAR_ — . 

S iSS -Iw Gold Income- S 858 -(w) OBL1-YEN— 

* 10788 -Iw) Gold Appreciation S *80 -Iw) OBLFGULDEN 

1^*5 5 

•rmr -tw) Eaatjmmstnwnl Fund t 1»M '-t d I PARiStIr BOND FUND. 


iwl 

S 9159 (W) 

5 10272 (d) 

S 9689 Iwl 

I r i 

S 1252 IW) 

S 1U4 Iwl 

S 1151 (w> 

— S 12.92 (w) 

C 1056 (dl 

-DM 1057 (dt 
— FL 1080 <d> 
-SF HUE (wl 
Iw) 

1 - IW) 

- S 3180 (ml 

ID 

_ S 93.40 (r) 
ECU 102989 (d) 
DM123283 Iwl 
5F 9180 d.) 

_ 8112355 r! 
Y 10385380 d) 
FL 105759 r 1 
_ S 9854 rl 
S 1157 wl 

- 5 12483 w 
81051 mi 


0893* -(wl Scottish World Fund C 13652 -Id) PARINTER BOND FUND 81041 Im) 

1053 -Iw) State St. American 8 16558 -(d ) PAR US Trees. Bond’d B', S 11459 (d) 
1.165 London:01-49M230, Geneva :4)-223S5530 ROYAL B.^CANAOAPpB MQGUBRNSEY Iw) 

1195 GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. -+Cw) RBC CorNtatatl iRind Lt4_ 8 1154* (w) 
1.125 PB 119,51 Pew Port, Guernsey. 0481-28715 -KWl RBC For Eaol&PoClfle Fd_ S \22ZT 


Q*70- -[wl FlltUrGAM SJL L 

1*56* -(wS GAM Arbltrape Inc 

1.182 -tw) CAMerica Inc 

DJ19 -iw) GAM Australia irw 

1J76 -Iw) GAM Boston Inc 

0530 -IW) GAM Ermltage 

-lw> GAM Frant^vul — _ — 
. *3.15 -iwl GAM Hong Kong Inc— 


— s .1851 A w). GAM international Inc.— — 8 138.18 

K (LuxJ w) GAM Japan Inc S 11751 

55) -<wl GAM North America Inc. „ s 10957 

ECU 1009A9 H w) GAM N. America Unit Trust- 103 80 p 




8 11433 -«wl RBC lnf*f Capital Fd 8 2649 (dl 

8 13755 -+IW) RBC inrt Income Fd. t li.u Iw) 

s 14530 -H d ) RBC MoivCurrencv Fd s 2789 id) 

8 103.15 -+l wl RBC North Amer. Fd— _ 8 1050 (wl 

8 10859 SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (46-8-234278) im) 

8 16.19 -(w)lncc Bid— S 4J40HoE 8 665 Id) 

SF 11455 -iw) ACC.: Bid 8 627 Offer— _S 668 lrl 

8 .98*3 SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. wl 

8 138.18 17 Devonshire S(LLondan-01n377-nM0 j d 1 

S 11751 -Tr)5HB Band Fund S 7S£J [wj 

S 10957 -(wi SHB intt Growth Fund 8 . 34.93 (ml 

. 10850 p SWISS BANK CO RP. (ISSUE PRICES) Iw) 

8 1301 -(d) America- Valor _SF 48655 fw) 


CREDIT SUISSE (I55UE PRICES) -(wl GAM rfM. & Otar. Woddw.p. lOMOp - 0 I D-flAarR Sana MWCraon. 

ArttlrisStaMS--— —— SF 46055 -iw) GAMPens. I Char. UJC Fd._ 11080 • ■ d ) Drttar Bond Sefad.on _ 

iS! If 10360 -(w)GAMrtnt 8 1M8Z - d Florin Bond Selection _ 

alrtlnSfaVnfarrEmnrtt DM 1K34 -Iw) GAM Singapore/ Mol DV IRC— S 9663 - d i Intervnj or 

a j B KdOlIarL- S 10751 ’( wl GAM Start 8. InH Unit Trusts 14850* p - d Jwan FWtfanOjj--— 

d Bond Valor Yen— ^Bfi 1002980 -(w) GAM Wor ld w i de Inc 8 18243 -(d) Starling Bond Selection 


:;3l£^^i5usiSoLL35l_:s 92066 «J-J. MANAGE#^ NT £WO Ltd. , 

•!3l^sr^x i IP *%£ : ?iSE553fe5M*te=- j 


:lgig^£S:SSt==r: 

I -id) CS Money Market Fund > 109950 -J01G.T. ArfaFund ■ ■ 5 452- 

:|S}^1KSMfSSzJ^ 1§S?S -■ , (d |T:|^ [ ^^fc= | H 

j! SS5== & %% SSS 

'3?g^£L.w,i — If 1U.75 -Id) G.T. Bond Fund. 8 1154 

-I d ! nww ^.SF 14CL50 -14 ) GT. 

DBEXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC -f^)G-T.HorahuPa4W^r S 2951 

Windietlef HOUS8 . 77 Lon don Wall A d) &T- F gjr-r- * 

london e a . im 92097*7) . 

•fmj ^ -1 al g!t jSS?SS* f 5-=: 1 So? 

ml FLnaiKiOlLtdnl. 8 699 KILL SAMUEL INVEST. MOMT. INTI- SJL 

• fS! eSSSu ? L — S 10220 Jersey, PA Bax 63, Tel 05J4 7602 9 

fwl Wlnrtirirtn HnHTtrff* Borne, PX). BOX 3622, Tel 4131 234051 

-(w) Wfacttesier Hoiainas rr ^ -(d) Crossbow (Far East) SF 1066 


-fw) G.T. Japan-Small CaJ=u»t« * 4&05|-(d) 


inn 9209797) tslll? 1 tfir’'-rSSll!S^cSS!t 

^Stwifled- * l iuf Iridl fuiw 


L50 o ■ d j Dollar Bond Selection — 8 1M54 (dl 

11452 - d ) Florin Band Selection FL 1276* iw) 

9663 - d i imen/ator— SF K55 i r I 

70* P - d) jgpcn Portfolio — . SF 90755 in 

_ J8243 -id ) Sterling Band Selection —— _C IW59 lrl 
S 11866 - d ) Swim Foreign Bond Set — SF 11043 w) 

- d ) Swtasvalor New Series SF 373.S0 w) 

1142 - dl Untwereal Band Select.—. . SF KL5D dj 

8 1366 - d I Universal Fund SF 12061 r) 

- 13.11 -i d j Yen Bond Selection y 1043150 wi 

452* UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND d) 

25.95 - d 1 Anna LL5. Sh.. 5F 3455 d) 

1151 -<d) Bend-1 nveet - - SF 67.75 d) 

1554 -fd) Fonso Swiss SlL SF 17050 w] 

<41 - g ) Japan- Invest ■ — — SF 94260 wl 

1154 - disaflt South Air SUL SF 315D d) 

1256 - d) Sima (stock price) .. SF 222 , 5 0 w) 

■2951 UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt wl 

2052 -fd) Unlrenfa. DM 4190 w) 


•-fm) Wlndwrter Frontier- 
-(w) Winchester HoWJnos- 


-fw) worldwide SacMfitlee 
-tw) Warldwtaa Special — 
DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
-+l a 1 Concentre 


!i t rt 1 mnarnirinhii -* ' DM 92» -Idl-ITF Fd fTeehnolOOV) 8 14.12 w) Trurtcsr Inti FtL (A 

ul^HTLtarifGeorae, tnme8 -(d O'Seas Fd (N. AMERICA) — I 2193 w) Bomfaelcjt- nuePf. 
* H.ontin 6 Lwra worac, prawn. ia Bn iuE et luitu). MR nCM lla Va , ml Canada GM-Mnrtaa 


'!"{ 9” riP-Bl ■** -t r ) J J» CurrencvfcBond S 7364 (dl Capital Preser>..Fd. inti., 

"Jm! Wta^ute ‘ 4WYJ — -I r t J.F Hang Kang Tnat,— „ 8 375* ( wl Citadel Fun d ■ ■ 

’[Si TmmBynnrl FiitP^ S8U61 *** -l r ) J.F PadBe income Trott — Y 2551 jmlCImMlondpftBhorBFd— 

eiewiKrcojjeiiWHTTB, ■( r ) J J Joocn Trust ... Y <726 iw) Crtumbla Seairlile»_— 

1 -{ r f J.F Japan Teamoiogy v U59S Jdcomete 

TB6DFncuRRENCYFUN^ 4 r ILF Pacific 5ecS.lAoc) S 7 50 fw) convert. Fd. inn A Certs 

afd?lnt- < w2 S iWI-oSer *10845- LLOYDS BAMK INTLPOB 4S0 Geneva 11 (w lOomsrl. RL MTB Certs, 

efdlC»'-BkLZl!s lMJoSC— S1Z401 *Hw) Lfavds InPI Dollar- * 11860 ( w j Doi wo JO Wt Fund 

Sttp oSa t 1 ONALI NCOmEFU ND^ -+tw) Lloyds Inrt Europe SF 12660 fw) OG.C — — 

InTE8IIAIION*t letOPB rum, ^.,-1 ■ Oi—h. .. *P mm Jdlfiolbir-BaArbaidPd — 


-Hw) Lktyds mri Europe 


-(w) Long Term, 


, 8 4555 -id) UnHotKta DM 31.10 Idl 

, S 23J7 -1 d I Unirflfc DM 83.15 («> 

. 8 1557 -id) UN I— I NS DM 11665 (d) 

intlsa. other Funds |» 

51 (w) Aetibendf Investments Fund. S 2466 id) 

SF 1066 (w) Artl vest inti S 11M tw) 

SF 944* (m) Allied Ltd — * L7S fw) 

DMI1J6 (w) Afluifa Internatienm Fund—. 8 11757 fw) 

, 5 1069 frl Arab Finance 1 J= — 8,92853 (wl 

, 8 .2658 friArtOM — ...— — S1880J6 id) 

, s 1AI2 fw) Truetcar inti Fd. JAEIF) 8 1053 fwj 

. S 2193 iw) Bomfcelex-lsiuc Pr. 5F 137.15 Iw) 

OHS KB (ml Conoda Gtd-MertBOB8 FB — * *64 Iml 

S 1364 ( d ) Capital Preserv. Fa Intt S 1J67 Id) 

, s 3764 f w) Citadel Fund ■ 8 I.-35 (d) 

Y 2501 iml Cleveland Offshore Fd.- 8210168 I r I 

Y 4726 fw) Columbia Seatrltlei—— FL 10055 (d) 

Y 18595 (DCOMETE * BJ069 Id) 

$ 750 f w) Convert. Fd. inn A Certs— $ 11^ (w) 

eaevall (w) Convert. Fd. Inti BCertS— 8 32-63 (d) 

8 11860 (w) Doiwo J0W1 Fund V 10591 

SF 12650 (w)DjG-C- — — — » M55 

SF 17M0 -<d ) Dollar-Battr bond Fd ^SSJS 

SF 31750 -IdlD-mark-BaerBond Fd — DM 11^50 
8 10555 fdl D. Witter Wld Wide ivt TiL— J ttj 
SF .13260 ( r > DroMcar InveslJund N.V.— 8 119150 
. . Idl Ore vtusAmcrloD Fund— — * IMi 



Forbes 
The most efficient way 
of reaching America's 
most influential 
executives 


A glance at the graph will tell you what a 
study by a leading independent researcher, 
Market Facts, Inc., told us: That Forbes is 
preferred reading by more corporate officers in 
1 ,000 of America's largest service and industrial 
companies. In comparison with Fortune and 

Magazines read regularly by corporate officers 
In 1,000 of America's largest companies. 0 

Forbes 

68.3% , , 


FORTUNE 

48.4% 


61 . 8 % 


’Market Facts, Inc. 1984 


Cost per Thousand Circulation 


Forbes 

4C Page 5*489 


BusfnassMfoafc 

4C Page $5279 


BW Page $3X85 j BW Page 534.72 


FORTUNE 

4CPageS56.39 

BWPa^ S3485 


Business Week, Forbes was judged to be overall 
favorite by 44%, versus 29% for Business Week 
and 19% for Fortune. 

When regular readers were asked which of the 
three reflects best the excitement of business, 
Forbes had rwice the scores of the other two. 
And when asked which of the three stands for 
"free enterprise,” 71% named Forbes, compared 
with 13% for Fortune and 7% for Business Week. 

These results confirm surveys done over the 
past fifteen years showing that more officers in 
big business read Forbes regularly than either 
Fortune or Business Week. 

As the graphs so eloquently show, Forbes is 
the most cost-elf cctive business magazine for 
reaching America's most 
effective executives. If you 
want to reach this elite, 
not only is it good busb 
ness for you to put your 

advertising in Forbes, 
it's bound to be good 
for your business. 


For further inf ormadon, please contact Peter M. Schoff , Di rector of 
Interna bona 1 Advertising, Forbes Magazine. 50 Pall Mall. London 
SW1Y 51Q, England, Tel (01 ) 9300J61 /2. 


Forbes^ 

Forties Magazine— BO Fifth Ave'.. N.Y., NY 10O11 


‘ . M—i. . mp . BMium Francs: FL - Dutch Florin; u= .Luwnftourg Francs; ECU - Euroooan Currency Unit; SF -5wl». Francs; a-ag)ad;+- Offer Pria«,-t) - bid Cha nge 

SJv«ioSs?2^55tt : 5 JL- )S AwnSof N.C - tfatcomwo^^ r 0^ Smv; S -inMndM; S/S -Start* Spurs - - E*-pvlaePC; - - En-Rts; - Gross imtarnm moex WtaMw 
Redeawi” PrK'E"-«iSbn!“* nrmrt* wanmvlita Fima LW; » -Oftar Price lnci.3ft proUm.rtmrge.- ++-dallv rtocfc wloo n on Amsftrown SlvcK Enchamw 













































Page 14 


business roundup 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 


Major Changes Planned 
At Omega Watch Unit 


Airline Created 
By Abu Dhabi 


Disney Posts Record Results 
For 4th Quarter, Fiscal Year 


Black Men’s Magazine Makes 




BIENNE. Switzerland — Ome- 
pu the troubled division of Switzer- 
land s leading watchmaker, is to be 
restructured after a string of losses 
uns decade, its owners announced 
Monday. 

The product range is to be re- 
duced. the wort; force cut by more 
than half and new marketing strat- 
egies introduced in a bid to put 
Omega back into profit by 19S7. 

Ernst Thomke. sice president of 
Sodete Suisse de Microelec troni- 
que et d'Horlogerie. whose other 
brands include Swatch. Tissot. 
ETA and Loneines. said at a news 
conference that Omega had suf- 
fered from rising costkoverexiend- 


BA Expecting 
Fall in Annual 
Operating Profit 


S.Ti.VfX 

HONG KONG — British 
Airways PLC expects operating 
profit for 19S5-S6 to be slightly 
below- last year's £303 million 
(5431 million) as a result or for- 
eign-exchange translations and 
the grounding of aircraft for in- 
spection. its chief executive said 
Monday in Hong Kong. 

The executive, Cohn Mar- 
shall. said net profit in the fiscal 
year ending next March 31 
would be about equal to the 
£202 million of 19S4-S5. which 
excluded extraordinary items. 
Net profit will be aided by for- 
eign-exchange translations on 
the company's loans and assets. 

Operating profit is earnings 
before tax and interest charges. 

Other airline officials said re- 
sults were hurt by the strength 
of the pound, the temporary- 
grounding of BA's fleet of 


ed product line and lack of new 
ideas. 

He called Omega's plight a “clas- 
sic picture of the Swiss watch in- 
dustry with all the consequences." 

The division's operating losses 
were around 30.7 million Swiss 
francs (S143 million) last year. 

Pierre Arnold, chief executive of 
SMH. said the Swiss industry had 
made great strides since competi- 
tion from Japanese producers 
forced a 660-million-franc takeover 
by Swiss banks in I9S3. 

Now back in private bands, the 
SMH group could expect to more 
than double its profit to 86.5 mil- 
lion francs in 1955, he said. 

The low-priced, fashionable 
Swatch had been a success, but the 
mediujn-to- higher-priced watches 
were still losing market share to the 
Japanese. Mr. Thomke said. 

He said Omega could no longer 
let other companies, especially U.S. 
manufacturers, put their names on 
Omega watches. He added that 
Omega was looking at an integrat- 
ed mechanism and case, adoption 
of which could halve output costs. ‘ 


Reuters 

ABU DHABI — A new com- 
mercial airline. Abu Dhabi Air- 


line Co_ has been created to fly 
helicopters and fixed-wing craft 


The Auotialed Press 
BURBANK. California — Wall 
Disney Productions said Monday 


Lecord Kesults 

ues. Furthermore, chenewpublica- 
1 ~i» -a -mj- tiort comes at a time when advenis- 

*P_ b lfiPPl Y ART ing revenue from Jet. a pockei- 
r sized weekly news magazine, has 

_ .. . _ . remained flak and follows the dos- 

Disnc)- said its filmed entertain- ing ^ Ebony Jr., ihe 

pent divjaon. which .ncludes mov- ] 2-year-old magazine 


which it had languished at about 
12 million. 


:«' -‘t - 1 


. 4- Vs**'- ’< 

succeed. » -.r:::. ■ ^ 

publwi \ t 


ies. the Disnev Channel, television for because of declining 


helicopters and fixed-wing craft 
on routes inside and outside the 
United -Arab Emirates, the offi- 
cial UAE news agency. WAM. 
said Monday. 

Abu Dhabi created the air- 
line from the publicly held Abu 
Dhabi Helicopter Co., with 
capital of 200 million dirhams 
tS54.5 million), of which 90 mil- 
lion dirhams will be paid up. 
WAM said. Sheikh Khalifa bin 
Zaid al-Nahayan decreed the 
name change and boosted the 
capita] from 60 million dir- 
hams. it said. 

Abu Dhabi Helicopters, 
formed in 1976. operates a fleet 
of 33 Bell Textron helicopters, 
mainly on charier to oil compa- 
nies. It has no scheduled pas- 
senger service. Abu Dhabi is a 
shareholder in the regional air- 
line Gulf Air, also owned by the 
governments of Bahrain. Oman 
and Qatar. 


that its revenues and net income for home video, was hurt by a circulation. 


the fiscal fourth quarter and year disappointing siring of summer Mr _ Johnson believes Ebony 


ended SepL 30 were the highest in 5J““ $* ywe ? an operating loss Man ^ succeed despite the fail- 
of S9.4 million for the latest auar- r _-_:i u.. 


its corporate history. 

The entertainment and land-de- 


of S9.4 million for the latest quar- 
ter. compared with a deficit of 


vetopmeni concern said its earn- S429.000 a year earlier. 


ures of similar magazines. He said 
those publications lacked the deep 


for the fourth quarter totaled 


$53.7 million, or SI. 60 per share, on 


For the year, that division earned 
533.6 million, compared with a 


pockets necessary to publish long 
enough to become a fixture on the 


revenues of $590.5 million, versus a S22 million a year earlier. 


loss of $60 million on revenues of P* com P a f X ? Anida land-de- “You try to bring a quality and 

$463.2 a year earlier. velopment division increased stv le to a new venture. bat manv oF 

For the year, earnings rose 77.4 fourth-quarter operating profit to ^ others were good, too.” Mr. 
percent from a year earlier, to SI 4.8 million from SI 1.8 mslbou a j ohnson ^ difference is 

$173.5 minion, or $5.15 per share. a S°. *““* fuU-year income ^ you ^ve to stay ou[ there long 
frr>m XQ7 b mtHinn <v R7 71 <» rose to 5o2.6 million from 542.2 ■inATioh f.TT rvnnio ta fhot 


enough to become a fixture on the 
newsstands, develop wide circula- 
tion and attract advertisers. 

“You uy to bring a quality and 
style to a new venture, bat many of 
the others were good, too.” Mr. 


from $97.8 million, or S2.73 a rree to *x:.o muiior 
share. Revenues rose lo 52 billion imU,on m riscal ,984 - 
from S1.66 billion. 

“■ «***» &->« os i- 2 * 

ue of some of Disney's movies and Return 

other properties, as well as a S76.1- LONDON — U.K. retail sales 


million onetime gain from tax cred- fell a seasonally adjusted and pro- 


its and an accounting change. 


Before those items. Disney ter a 1. 4-percent fall in September, 
showed g?ins of 522.1 million, or the Department of Trade and In- 


65 cents per share, in its 1984 dustry said Monday. Many ana- 
fourth quarter and $107.8 million lysts had expected a rise of between 


for the full year. 


Lucas to Raise 
£89.4 Million 


COMPANY NOTES 


Boeing 757s after a fire aboard 
a 737 in August in which 55 


passengers died, and a mechan- 
ical problem with a Lockheed 
L-1011 TriStar. 

Mr. Marshall said BA expect- 
ed a fuel-price increase soon. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Lucas Industries 
PLC said Monday that it plans to 
raise about £89.4 million (5127.2 
million) through an underwritten 
rights issue. Lucas also reported 
pretax profit of £57.8 million for 
the financial year ended July 31. up 
77 percent from the previous year. 

The increase in profit was greater 
than forecast — brokers had been 
expecting pretax profit of about 
£53 million — and Lucas Indus- 
tries shares were last quoted Mon- 
day at 463 pence, up 15 pence since 
Friday. 

.The rights issue will be on the 
basis of one new ordinary share for 
every four existing ordinary shares 
and three new ordinary shares for 
every eight redeemable preference 
shares at 365 pence per new ordi- 
nary share. The new shares will not 
receive the final dividend or 8.4 
pence per share for 1984-85. Lucas 
said. 


Allied Mills Ltd.'s shares were 
traded again Monday on the Aus- 
tralian stock exchanges. Trading 
was suspended last week by the 
National Companies and Securities 
Commission, which instructed the 
concern to see k independent advice 
on Fielder Gillespie Davis Ltd/s 
proposed bid for Allied and Good- 
man Group Ltd. 

Amoco Corp. said it will sign a 
contract Tuesday with China Na- 
tional Offshore Oil Corp. to look 
for oil off China's southeast coast, 
its first operation in China. 

Australia & New Zealand Bank- 
ing Group Ltd. said it has received 
approval from Japan’s Ministry of 
Finance to convert the Tokyo 
branch of its subsidiary. Grindlays 
Bank PLC. to a full ANZ branch. 

British Caledonian, said it plans 
to launch nonstop services between 
London’s Gatwick airport and To- 
kyo and Seoul in the summer of 
1987. The airline said it take a li- 
cense application Wednesday to a 


public bearing of the Civil Aviation 
Authority. 

Deutsche Bank AG plans to open 
a Japanese unit of one of its securi- 
ties business subsidiaries. Japanese 
Finance Ministry officials said. 
The ministry recently agreed to al- 
low foreign banks with branches in 
Japan to begin securities opera- 
tions through subsidiary compa- 
nies in which they have less than 
haL r ownership. 

Ford Aerospace Communication 
Corp. of California has signed a 
$70-million contract to provide In- 
dia with an Insat-ID satellite for 
telecommunications and, weather 
forecasting, government officials in 
New Delhi said. 

Jaguar PLC said its world sales 
reached a record 3.976 in October, 
a 40-percent increase from October 

1984. During the first 10 months of 

1985, Jaguar said it sold 30,974 
cars, a 13-percent gain from the like 
1984 period. 


New Products Jam Commodities Markets 


(Continued from Page 9) 
promising at first, but there was no 
homogenous unit to trade, since 
electricity rates vary so much be- 
tween peak and non-peak hours. 

Nonetheless, many new con- 
tracts ore awaiting approval from 
the regulators, or are in the plan- 
ning stages. For the Chicago Board 
of Trade, these indude futures on 
Treasury security repurchase 
agreements, a kind’ of short-term 
loan; futures on zero-coupon notes 
and bonds: a sub-index on over- 
the-counter stocks; a yen bond 
contract, and a London Stock Ex- 
change index. At the Merc, a zero- 
coupon contract is also planned, as 
well as a future on the European 
Currency Unit and other curren- 
cies, and an index on Tokyo’s stock 
exchange. 

“It’s hard to imagine where you 
go from here.” Mr. Burghardt said. 

There was one sign here last 
week that, even as competition 
mounts, cooperation between ri- 
vals migbi still be possible. 

At a meeting Nov. 4, the CBOT 
and the Chicago Board Options 
Exchange derided to finally begin 
work on a long-stalled footbridge 
between their two adjacent build- 
ings, officials from both exchanges 
said. , 


The exchanges bad planned the 
covered walkway since the two new 
buddings were constructed several 
years ago. The idea was a natural, 
since the CBOT bad created the 
CBOE over a decade ago and 
housed it for a number of years. 
And many traders hold a dual 
membership that allows them to 
trade on both floors. 

Relations between the two grew 
frosty, however, when the youthful 


offspring of the venerable Board of 
Trade began to show its indepen- 
dence and compete. This grew to a 
bead when the footbridge appar- 
ently was put on ice about a year 
ago. 

Ray Carmichael, a spokesman 
for the CBOT, said that Iasi week’s 
meeting involved staff members of 
the two exchanges, and it was de- 
cided to get moving soon on the 
symbolic and physical link. 


Chief Resigns 
AtBeecham 


Company Results 


Revenue and profits or losses. In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


BriUia 


Beectiam Group 
1st Half 1985 1984 

Revenue.. — MM. MSB. 
Pretax Profit MU .MU 
Per SMre 0.1084 0.1137 


Lucas Industries 
Year 1985 1984 


Oner Net WO 210 

Oner Shore— d2l 1J4 
o: loss. IMS Quarter and • 
months net et eludes one- 
time ertanre tor writedown of 
surplus assets, w riteoff of f or- 
mation reserves and costs as- 
saddled with plant consoli- 
dations. 


Net Inc *40 o S> 

Per Snare OJS tun 

Year 1985 1984 

Revenue «LQ 499.1 

Net Inc I3X 112 

Per Share — Ut 141 


Revenue 1.500. 1.400. 

Pretax Profit 574 334 

Per Share — 0AM 0.118 


United States 


Clark Equipment 
3rd Qwar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 2X4 2224 

Oner Nef <0)7.2 47 

Oper Share- — 0J0 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 7880 4518 


Columbia Gas Sys. 
3rd Ouar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 560-1 9?4 

Nef Inc <al124 7.9 

Per Share — 0.11 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 2.910. *430. 

Net me lamas 12SJ) 

Per Share — 292 

a: loss. 


Walt Disney Prod. 

4>h Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 590J 4412 

Net Inc SXB (a)440 

Per snare — ISO — 

Year 1985 1984 

Revenue 2010. lssa 

Net me 1715 974 

Per Share — 5.15 273 


Sbaklee 

4th Oder. 1985 1984 

Revenue 94.9 1092 


a: loss. IMS net both periods 
Includes p r et ax charges ot 
SIM million. iMf ne i includes 
ton credits of USA million In 
Quarter and SS million In 


(Continued from Page 9) 
and a half years erf stagnant earn- 
ings. 

Beecham’s pharmaceutical busi- 
ness. heavily dependent on penicil- 
lin, provides about 40 permit of 
profit, down from two-thirds in the 
late 1970s, and analysts say the 
company has failed to find profit- 
able new drugs. 

Further trouble has arisen in 
marketing of consumer products, 
long considered a strong point. 
Beecham said, for example, that 
West German wholesalers had be- 
come overstocked op Odol mouth- 
wash. partly because of marketing 
errors. In addition, Beecham has 
had weak performances from cos- 
metics and home-improvement 
products. 

Despite the recent spate of take- 
overs of companies with brand- 
name products, analysts said they 
believed a bid for Beecham was 
only a remote possibility. Based on 
the current share price, the compa- 
ny is valued at about £2.1 billion. 

Lord Keith said full-year pretax 
profit appeared likely to be about 
even with last year’s £306. 1 million. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


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(Continued from Back Page) 


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rae iow .0 trnmon tram for t0 reaUze that 

million m fiscal 1 984. you’re out there and lor advertisers 

to recognize that vou’re out there to 

UJk. Retail Sales Off 1.2% 

R HSs own company, he said, has 

i /"YM 7 -\r-\vr , i •, . the resources to back tbe magazine 

LONDON — U.k. retail sales for ^ extended period and imend- 
FeU a seasonally adjusted and pro- ^ l0 ^ » for al leasL five yeais. 
visional 1.2 percent in October af- ^ ^ nol ^ cheap. haven’t 
ter a U-pereem fall m September, satdowntocalcutatelt.butif Ihad 
the Department of Trade and In- t0 gu^ i would say we’re talking 
dusuy said Monday. Many ana- ab ^7 million debars to get it 
lysts had expected a nse of between svuteAr ^ Johnson said. Asso- 
0.5 percent and 1 percent. dates contend that the company 

has madea$5-nulbcB commitment 
to the new magazine 
According to Black Enterprise 
magazine, Johnson Publishing, one 
Pakistan International Airlines of the three largest black-owned 
Corp. said it had purchased a sec- U.S. businesses for more chan two 


tion. "*“* 

Perhaps its most profitable com- , - j rac 

pooenL associates of Mr. Johnson d.^rtfa- 

say. is the Fashion Fair line of lauon x.a l-- . _ ^ ^ .. 

higher-priced cosmetics, whose rev- Koff. 

enues are said to have recently out- ,_ s ..i UK i ir Cmcj* 

paced Ebony’s. ^ ^ 

Forbes magazine placed the J9S4 go. ^ 

net worth cif Mr. Johnson, who now there are ^ >&■.« 

began his publishing empire in to putting *■ ut ^ 

1942 with a $500 loan, ai S160 kimL 

million, making him the only black a definable wrg ■ , xherc^re 

on its list of the 400 largest person- advertising re- 
al fortunes in ihe United States- “jJSSs. Hack tor.- 


0.5 percent and l percent. 


ond-hand Airbus from a Hapag decades, had revenues of S138.9 
Lloyd AG. a European charier ser- million in 1984. 


vice. The PI A spokesman did not Although the privately held com- 


disdose a price, but aircraft dealers pany declined to comment on its 
estimated the price at around $25 profits# several of its major proper- 


enues are said to have recently out- 
paced Ebony's. 

Forbes magazine placed the J9S4 
net worth of Mr. Johnson, who 
began his publishing empire in 
1942 with a $500 loan, at S160 
million, making him tbe only black 
on its list of the 400 largest person- 
al fortunes in the United States. 

Despite its four decades of suc- 
cess. however. Johnson Publishing 
now faces challenges on a number 
of fronts. In Louisville, Kentucky. 
WLOU, tbe AM station the com- 
pany bought three years ago for 
S16 million, has new competition 
that pushed it from fust place to 
sixth in the market in the last two 
years, causing some impact on tev- 
enue. 

Tbe plateau in revenues for Jet, 
the 34-year-old weekly, has also 
hurt Johnson, since it has been a 
mainstay of the company. The 
magazine has been affected by de- 
clining liquor advertising. 

This year the company reintro- 
duced its Ebony- Jet Showcase, a 
television program it produces that 
runs on 65 stations. The program, 
which features interviews with ce- 
lebrities. had been withdrawn two 


wrved for advertising w Wacs R ‘ 

rr. Johnson Publishing sinners. Bureau Fa- 

halknges on a number In addition. Census Bureau S 

aLouitvflk, Kentucky, ures indieye tiui full 

: AM station the com- come for black nutoeopk 
it three years ago for time, a P nm L^ k f 1 ^ 
l has new competition nne such as Ebon. . tm- 
1 it from fust pSe to than doubled in the last JL yvj. 
market in the last two SI9J16.. from S9.14t>. 
ngsome impact on rev- 

au in revenues for Jet, whose lawn sund 
-old weekly, has also Btek Men. TTw magazine, abo 
m. since it has been a aimed at an upscale reader, is pub- 
4 the companv. The fished by a partnership tat ■ £ 
as been affected by de- George C. Pryce. a New \ ork pub- 
ca- advertising. lie relations man-turned-entrcprc- 

; the company rrimro- nenr. Mr. Pry ce said the market for 
Ebony-Jet Showcase, a publications aimed at black men 
rogram it produces that was large enough for all to floun>tt ( r 
stations. The program. “I’m not in competition w/ 
ires interviews with ce- Johnstm." Mr. Pryce said. His 
d been withdrawn two magazine is aimed at a vounger 


million. ties have been faring welL Ebony. 

its 40-year-oid fla^hip monthly 
Union Bank of Switzerland will ma gazine of breezy feature artides 
be listed in the foreign section of for a general blade readership, has 


IbUUUW, UOU niulWBnu >nv cr — — . - — 

years ago- Mr. Johnson said the group and mine is aimed at an 
show larfcari “the quality we want- older, more upwardly mobile 
ed it to have” and that its “costs group." , . 


the Tokyo Suxrk Exchange in late enjoyed recent increases in adver- 
December. the exchange said Mon- tiring pages. Its circulation rose last 


year to 1.7 milli on after a decade in 


went completely out of control*" So 
far, he said, the revamped program 
has not paid for its cost “You have 
to pul a lot into it for the show to 
work," he added, “bat it will 
work." 


Mr. Johnson is convinced that 
tbe market for a product like Ebo- 
ny Man has developed in the last 
few years. “L wouldn’t have cried 
this 10 years ago or even five years 
ago." he said. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 


\t Geneva, Gorbachev’s Burdens 


.7 . (Continued from Page l) 

>. ondefensc sector. Thai 
:-. r ; 7«zmg the arms-race." ■ . • 
y -This may also provide a way of 
Moscow on Jewish cox* 
Jation and other human limits is- 
, . jes, Mr. Cohen said, if the iihpres- 
\. on is given that liberalization on . 
V ? tch issues would make iheAmeri- 
• ••7': an political dimate more condor 
vive loan arms accord.. ' • - 

: u ’ Other experts doubt that cutting 
■jdear arms can save modi mon- 
i, /• y. “Strategic weapons are not very 
oportant in spending, 7 ” said a 
•.;*£ate Department specialist. ^Con- 
: rational arms get very expensive.” 

{ -ferry F. Houghs a professor ai 
‘ ake Univereity, said the greatest 
' tallenge to Mr. Gorbachev's 
: ’i -- ^ n^rging foreign policy -appears to 
* from Andrei A Gromyko, 
Mr. Gorbachev has had 


shifted from his post as tbe long- 
time foreign minister to president. . 

Mr. Gromyko remains on the 
Politburo as the most experienced 
voice in foreign policy and, Mr. 
Hough speculated, anadvocateof a 
Soviet-American approach to- 
world affairs, a view of the woridas 
bring' divided essentially into fac- 
tions led by tbe two superpowers. 

“Gorbachev wants to be far 
more pro-Europe and pro-Japan,” 
Mr. Hough said, dung as evidence 
tbe Soviet leader’s outgoing perfor- 
mances on visits to London and 
Paris. But because of Mr.. Gromy- 
io, “He just can’t mm that policy 
on a dimr " .... 

MNitze Sees SfimHope 

Bernard Gwertzmtm of The Hew 
York Tima reported from Washing- • 

ton: ‘ 

A Reagan administration official 


says there is an outside- possibility 
that the summit meeting might pro- 
duce an agreement on guidelines to 
provide impetus to arms control 
negotiations. But be stressed there 
was only a slim chance of »hfc 

Paul H. Nitre, the. senior arms 
control adviser, has been virtually 
alone in recent days u saying there 
was a chance for an agreed state- 
ment of guidelines for the arms 
control talks, which have just re- 
cessed in Geneva and are to resume 
in January. Mr. Nice’s view runs 
counter to remarks made by Mr. 
Shultz, and the national security 
adviser, Robert C McFadane, that 
there -was liule chance of stub ah 
accord at the meeting. 

Mr. Nice, appearing before a 
Washington press dub, said the 
possibility of agreed guidelines was 
still alive and was bang worked on 




Mr. Gorbachev's 


'authority is solid; 


his power is 

1 

relatively limited/ 


Zbigniew Brzezimki 

a. 


CURRENCY MARKET 



by Sonet and U.S. officials. “Our 
hopes are we can work something 
out," he said. But be added, ’There 
is a big gap between our proposal 
and their proposal” 


in US., Smoking Becomes Women’s Greatest Threat 


(Continued from Page 1) 

• ;f;- il al quitting than men, are mat- 
- ns of speculation. The theories 
V "delude nicotine's ability to sup- 
press hunger and relieve depres- 
on, the growth of adver tisin g 
... : -.imed at women, and the symbol - 
m of cigarettes as abadge of liber- 
Tyrian. 

7 n Smoking by women was illegal in 
. -\iany public places until the 1920s, 
^ ixcording to Virginia L Emster, an 
• : pidenadogisi at the University of 
-- i.'. California at San Francisco who 
. , ' -graced changing attitude towards 
‘ : ^./(omen's smoking in a July article 
- '< : i the New York State Journal of 
» .ledicine. 

Alice Longworth, President 
heodore Roosevelt's daughter, 
.-•'as forbidden to smoke in the 
/hite House in 1910, and threat- 
-rj-.ned to smoke on the rocf instead, 
. , ,' fiss Emster said. Women students 

rusaded in the 1920s for the right 

') smoke on campus as a symbol of 
quality. 

17 “The decision by a woman to 
''*'-‘moke was. in part, a rejection of a 
» ouble standard.”' she said. 

k Not until tbe late 1 920s did man- 
7 facturers dare to advertise to 


women, but once- they, did, they 
portrayed the cigaret te as a torch of 
freedom and a tool' of beauty. In 
1928, the makers of the Lucky 
Strike brand launched a campaign 
with the slogan, “Reach for a 
Lucky Instead of a .Sweet,” intro- 
ducing the linkage of cigarettes 
with slender figures. ‘ 

World War n made smoking by 
women -acceptable, - Miss Emster 
found. Female workers appeared in 
magazines puffing cigarettes while . 
they riveted battleships, and tbe 
free cigarettes distributed to sol- 
diers swelled the ranks of smokers. 

By the end of the war, & third of 
American women smoked; a figure 
that remained almost constant 
through the mid-1960s, when tbe 
UJS. surgeon general asserted that 
a link existed between cancer and 
smoking. Tbe figure, had dropped 
only 3 percent by 1983. 

fia sharp contrast, smoking 
among rn«< ham been declining 
steadily, from 52 percent in tbe 
mid-1950s, when reports linking 
cigarettes with lung cancer began 
appealing in the press, to 35 per- 
cent in 1983. 

Meanwhile, statisticians have re- 


corded a steeply rising rate of lung 
cancer in women since the 1960s. 
Tbe American Cancer Society, pre- 
dicts that in 1985, mere women 
(38,600) wiD die of lung cancer than 
of breast cancer (38,400). Lung 
cancer deaths in women already 
have surpassed breast cancer 
deaths in a dozen states, according 
to preliminary data. According to 
data, 75 to 90 percent of lung can- 
cer cases are caused by smoking. 

. Lung cancer long has been the 
most common fatal cancer in men; 
this year, 87,000 American men are 
expected to die of it, government 
researchers say. Smoking also is be- 
lieved to cause a third of all deaths 
from heart disease annually. 
Counting its toll from cancer, otter 
lung disorders, heart disease and 
strokes, smoking is estimated to kill 
320,000 Americans each year, more 
than the total U.S. death toll from 
all wars fought in this century. 

So enormous is the impact that a 
1983 study in Public Health Re- 
ports, a joumal of the U.S, Depart- 
ment of Health and Human Ser- 
vices, predicts that the difference in 
men’s and women’s life expectancy 
— eight years in women’s favor. 


according to 1979 census data — 
soon will vanish because of wom- 
en's smoking patterns. 

The researchers found that life 
expectancies of nonsmoking men 
and women are almost identical 
Women in the population at large 
have had a higher life expectancy, 
the researchers concluded, because 
fewer of them have been smokers. 

When “women who have 
smoked as much as men reach the 
later decades of life," the 1983 re- 
port said, “the present differences 
in longevity between men and 
women will disappear." 

A key factor preventing women 
from quitting once they strut — 
and possibly a motive for some to 
Stan — is nicotine's ability to sup- 
press hunger, said Ellen Gritz, as- 
sociate director for research in can- 
cer control at the University of 
California al Los Angeles.. 

Turkish Leader in Aba Dhabi 

The Associated Press 
ABU DHABI — President 
Kenan Evren of Turkey arrived 
here Monday on a three-day state 
visit to the United Arab Emirates. 


When asked why he thought 
such a statement was possible out 
of the svmmii, he replied that both 
sides wanted the Geneva meeting 
“to be a success." 


Cigar Smoker, 
Taken Off Jet, 
Held in London 

United Press Inienutional 

LONDON — A court or- 
dered an American business- 
man held without baD Monday 
on an assault charge stemming 
from a dispute over his refusal 
to put out a dgar on a trans- 
Atlantic airliner flight. The 
plane made an unscheduled 
landing in London to discharge 
the passenger. 

Tbe court refused a request 
for bail by Steven Varvaris, 52, 
of Jackson, Mississippi after 
police said they wanted to 
charge him with violating' the 
Aviation Security Act. 

Most airlines prohibit smok- 
ing of cigars and pipes on board 
their jets. 

The court adjourned the 
bearing until Thursday. Mr. 
Varvaris initially had appeared 
in court on a charge of causing 
bodily harm to a fellow passen- 
ger on a Trans World Airlines 
flight from Athens to New 
York. 


Dollar Ends Firmer in Europe, U.S. 


Reuters 

LONDON — The dollar closed 
slightly firmer in Europe and the 
United States Monday in thin holi- 
day trading. Dealers said the cur- 
rency continued to be underpinned 
by short-covering and corporate 
demand, but that most operators 
expected to see a weaker trend in 
the weeks ahead. 

Markets were closed Monday in 
Brussels and Paris for Remem- 
brance Day, and trading was ab- 
breviated in the United States for 
the Veterans' Day holiday. 

In London, the dollar closed at 
2.6270 Deutsche marks, up from its 
opening 16190 and previous close 
or 16223 on Friday. Earlier, the 
U.S. currency rose at the midafter- 
noon fixing in Frankfurt to 2.6270 
DM from 16240 on Friday. 

In New York, where some banks 
traded during the morning session. 


the dollar closed Monday at 16250 
DM, up slightly from Friday's fin- 
ish of 2.6210. 

The dollar also ended marginally 
higher against the Japanese yen. U 
finished in London at 205.78 yen, 
up from Friday’s close of 205.50, 
and in New York at 205.85, up 
from 205.10. In earlier trading in 
Tokyo, the dollar slipped to 205.15 
from 20535 at Friday’s close. 

The British pound, meanwhile, 
fumed in London to SI. 4200 from 
SI. 4170 on Friday, and to 3.7298 
DM from 3.7 158 DM. In later New 
York trading, the pound ended at 
SI. 4200. down slightly from 
S1.4220 there on Friday. 

Dealers noted Lhat while the dol- 
lar is finding support from corpo- 
rate demand, markets were mixed 
about its midterm prospects. “Af- 
ter the dollar rose above 2.60 marks 
last week, people became a bit cau- 


tious about going short,”' one Lon- 
don dealer said. 

"But the market is split at the 
moment," he added. ‘‘Some people 
think that the dollar is a good buy 
at these levels, and othere feel it will 
drop further." 

Dealers said they did not see 
markets finding a clear direction 
until the release of key U.S. eco- 
nomic figures later this week. Octo- 
ber retail sales, due out Thursday, 
and the producer-price index and 
industrial production, due Fridav, 
are expected to show a sluggish 
U.S. Economy, they said. 

In other trading Monday, the 
dollar dosed in Zurich at 2.1545 
Swiss francs, down from 2.1600 on 
Friday. It closed later in New York 
at 2,1560 Swiss francs, up from 
2.1520. In London, the dollar 
closed at 8.0250 French francs, up 
from 7.9850 there on Fridav. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


2 Dollar-Straight Issues Emerge on Quiet Day 


By Chrisropher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — Secondary' areas 
of the Eurobond market ended 
Monday showing liule change 
from Friday's closing as trading 
remained quiet because of holidays 
in the United States and pans of 
Europe, dealers said. 

Despite the inactivity on the sec- 
ondary market, two new dollar- 
siraighi issues emerged during the 
day while Sweden became the first 
borrower in the “bulldog" bond 
market to launch an issue that will 
be sold by tender with a minimum 
tender price. 

Sweden's £100-million issue was 
lead-managed by Morgan Grenfell 
& Co. A minimum tender price will 
be set on Wednesday. 

It will be set at a level of not less 
than 86 to yield 75 basis points over 
the gross redemption yield of the 
Treasury 13 '^-percent government 
bond due 2004/08. That issue fin- 
ished on the market Monday at 


around 125^. which gives a GRY 
of some I0J3 percent. 

The allotment price and basis of 
allotment should be known on 
Thursday while dealings in Lhe is- 
sue wflj start op Friday. 

Also in the sterling market. 
Amev NV issued a £50-million 
straight paying 1 1 percent over sev- 
en years and priced at 100*4. The 
issue was lead-managed by Morgan 
Guaranty Ltd. but was launched 
too late to trade widely on the 
when-issued market. 

In the dollar-siraight sector, two 
new issues were launched, the larg- 
er being a S200-million bond for 
Beiawesl Properties Inc. The issue 
was guaranteed by U.S. West In- 
vestments. a subsidiary of the tele- 
phone company. U.S. West Inc. 

It pays I0W percent over seven 
years and was priced at 100Vs. 
Lead -managed by Salomon Broth- 
ers International', it ended on the 
when-issued market around the to- 
tal Ift-percem fees. 


Mount Isa Finance NV issued a 
SI 00-million straight guaranteed 
by M.I.M Holdings Ltd. The bond 
pays II percent over 10 years and 
was priced at par. Ji was quoted nn 
the when-issued market just inside 
the total fees of 2 percent. Lead 
manager was Credit Suisse First 
Boston Ltd. 

Secondary market activity was 
subdued and one dollar-siraight 
trader at a European bank said, 
“it”s really been a very dull day. 
There's been no incentive to do 
anything at all.”” But, he added Lhat 
there was still a little retail interest 
in Lhe market that prompted select- 
ed issues to dose showing gains of 
'/a. or occasionally. Vi point. 

Floating-rate note issues ended 
little changed, although some peri- 
od Eurodollar deposit rates closed 
showing an easier bias, dealers said. 

The Japanese-convertible mar- 
ket ended easier on the back of 
lower underlying share prices in 
Tokyo ovemighu they added. 


Monday^ 

ore 


(Vices 


NASDAQ prices OS Of 
3 pott. New York time. 

Via The Associated Press 




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lift— ft 

I 8 *-* 
24*— ft 
19 
13* 


9ft 

10 * 

3* 

22ft 

im 

23ft 

714 

17* 

32 

38* 

8* 

9. 

18* 

33 
32ft 
27ft 


5* FOP 
Sft FMI 
1* PamRsaf. 
10ft FarmF 
47* FrmG 1J4 
12 FtdGPS 
3* Feroflu 
-7* FRxvns 
21* FfMcTB -1JB 
35ft RBhTu liS 
21ft Fippls AS 
3* Flnatco 30 
4* Fbignut 
I FWbop - 
21ft FAIoBK l.tt 

33* FtAFtn A0 
16U FTATHS .94 


. 45 

4SZ 

88 

17 

U IBM 
126 
277 
145 
80 46 

M 11? 

13 

384 

14 

34 417 
2* l 
33 83 


S3 


8* 7* 
10ft Wft 
ift iS 

12 II* 
87* 

18* 18ft 
«* 4ft 
14* 14ft 
3Z* 32* 
58* 57n 
38* 37 
Aft 3* 

-4 5 * 

15* 15* 
33 3Zft 

30* 30* 
25ft 25 


w-* 

11 * 

87 +1H 
18ft + ft 
flb+ ft 
14ft 

32ft + * 
57ft 
38* +1 
3ft 

4 +ft 
15ft + ft 
32ft— Im 
30* 

2Sft + * 


lZMontfl 
HtohUm Stock 


Sole* in 

Db. via iQCi moh 


Met 

Low 2 PJM. Ctfo* 


19 

11% FtColF 



82 

18% 

17ft 

18% + % 

79* 

20% FComr 

120 

40 

138 

24% 

74* 

24% + % 

9* 

6% FIConI 

lJMel83 

50 

7 

6% 

7 + ft 

16% 

10% FExec 



3702 

17ft 

16% 

16% + * 

23* 

Oft FFCnts 



6 

22ft 

77ft 

22ft 

29* 

13 FIFnCP 

JB0 

S3 

114 

16ft 

15ft 

16 + ft 

Tflft 

10ft FIFnM: 



48 

Wft 

T9 

19 - * 

30ft 

20% FIFIBk 

.44 

1 S 

15 

30 

30 

30 

3flft 

28% FJerW 

1A0 

43 

169 

38% 

38ft 

38% + % 

66 

28% FMdB 

1.60 

33 

38 

54 

5Sft 

53ft— * 

47% 

23ft FMfdnilAO 

.IS 

22 

J9ft 

39ft 

37ft + * 

45ft 

26 FRBGa 

14W 

3 A 

221 

45 


44% — * 

31 

19% FtSvFla 

HO 

78 

12 

28% 

78% 

38% 

78 

1B% FSecC 

1.10 

47 

200 

23% 

73ft 

23ft + % 

47% 

29 FTeno 

140 

19 

Si 

41* 

40ft 

41* + % 

44% 

31ft FstUnC 

L24 

34 

40% 

40ft 

40% + * 

8ft 

V* F taker 



430 

lft 

1% 

1% 

14ft 

10ft Flexstl 

.48 

40 

40 

13% 

12 

12 — ft 

77ft 

15 FlaFdl 

30 

11 

39 

IP 

18% 

18% — ft 

41% 

27ft RaNFl 

A0 

24 

447 

40% 

40* 

40% — ft 

19% 

7% FlowS B 



107 

12 

11% 

11%— ft 


11% Fluracb 

30 

14 

no 

15% 

14% 

15% + % 

6* 




380 

4 

.1% 

3%— ft 

18% 

12* F Lion A 

09 

S 

11 

18% 

18* 

18% + * 

19* 

13* FLton B 

07 


95 

19 

18ft 

19 + ft 

34ft 

25% For Am 

96 

79 

21 

33ft 

33* 

33ft + % 

24% 

13* ForeafO 

1JX) 

64 

35 

15% 

15* 

15ft 

23* 

3ft 

12ft FortnF 
Ift FortnS 



1% 

19% 

lft 

19ft 

1ft 

19ft „ 
lft- ft 

10% 


08t 

A 

3551 

10ft 

ID* 

10% + % 

7% 

4ft Faster 

10 

X4 

128 

4% 

4ft 

4U— ft 

»% 

14% Fremnt 

M 

u 

548 

28ft 

35% 

26% +1 

13* 

4% Fudrck 

213 

5* 

5 

5 — * 

18% 

11% FulrHB 

32 

24 

83 

15ft 

16ft 

16* + ft 


r~ 




O 



1 

18* 




t 

n% 

11% 

n%— % 

lift 


.10 

12 

50 

4% 

4* 

5*— % 

58ft 

29* Gcaetch 



882 

49 

48 

48% + % 

9% 

5 Genets 



1341 

vn 

9% 

9% 

9 

1% Gene* 



304 

2 

1% 

2 + ft 

25* 

9ft GaFBk 



£2 

25 

24<4 

24ft . 

Bft 

3% GerlMs 



22 

7* 

6ft 

_«k— ft 

24% 


34 

12 

3411 

am 

19* 

20ft + % 

20ft 

14 GlaaTr 

573 

14% 

14 

14 — * 

17ft 

Uft Gataas 



179 

17* 

Uft 

16*,— % 

23 

10* Gaft 



8 

22V: 

22 tt 

22ft- ft 

18ft 

14ft GouIdP 

36 

A3 

197 

16* 

16 

Uft 

U* 


M 

24 

236 

18* 

17% 

10 + * 

9% 




14 

BH 

8V: 

8% 

13% 

5* Grpflls 



9 

14 

14 

14 + % 

7% 

A GrphSc 



«J2 

7% 

m 

7*— ft 

22ft 

13% GWSav 

Mr U 

21 

22* 

211ft 

22* + * 

12ft 

B GtSoFd 



104 

9H 

9H 

9ft— ft 





24 

15Vt 

Uft 

15ft + ft 

19 

13* GulHrd 

OSm -4 

A 

14* 

14* 

14*— % 

15% 


1580c 

12 

ft 

ft 

8V 

1 




H 



1 

24ft 

15ft HBO 

30 

1.1 

1000 

18ft 

T7ft 

18 + ft 

11% 

7 HCC 

M 

3 

2 

8% 

Uft 

Bft 

17 




31 

16% 

Uft 

U% 

7* 

3* Had co 



20 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft + * 

3* 




31 

3ft 

3 

3ft 

18% 

13% HamOll 

.10 

3 

82 

18% 

18* 

18% + Ik 

25% 

15% HarpGs 

34 

IA 

53 

lift 

16* 

16*— * 

34* 

25ft HrtfNt 

\33 

5.1 

1006 

34* 

32% 

33ft +lft 

10ft 

6 Hothwa 

30 

23 

138 

9* 

Bfti 

9* + % 

lift 

4* HowkB 

.141 


ira 

6% 

6* 

Aft— * 

10ft 

1% Htthln 


49 

2 

1% 

2 + ft 

4ft 

1% HHhdvn 



601 

2% 

2ft 

2ft— ft 

33% 

15 HctsAs 

.16 

9 

317 

18* 

17% 

18* + ft 

24ft 

15 HchaBa 

JIB 

A 

93 

20* 

19% 


8% 

3% HefenT 



39 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft— ft 

37% 

15 Helix 



4 

IS* 

18 

18* + * 

38% 

31ft HenrdF 

Mb ZB 

74 

32ft 

32 

32ft + * 

24% 

17 HiberCp IJHb 44 

54 

22% 

22ft 

22ft 

13% 




18 

11% 

11* 

11% + ft 

12 




58 

6% 

6ft 

dft 

31 

13% NosiFAl 



43 

30% 

33* 

30ft + ft 

10ft 

2* Hmecfl 



136 

2ft 

3* 

3ft— * 

33 

15* Honlnd 

84 

1A 

44 

27 

26ft 

27 + % 

44% 

24% Hoover 

130 

73 

l J l 

43ft 

42ft 

43ft 

6* 

3ft Honlnd 



1 

4% 

4% 

4% 

33ft 

Uft HwSNJ 



290 

31* 

31 

31 

30* 

19ft HudUB 

20 1 

3 

M 

24ft 

24 

24ft + ft 

14ft 

7% Hit tgln 



12 

12% 

12* 

12* 

24% 

16% HntoB 3 

M 

32 

76 

22ft 

22* 

22*— ft 

27% 

14 Hvbrltc 



102 

28ft 

28 

28 

14* 

4% Hvponx 




Uft 

U* 

13* 

r~ 







1 

rn 

7* ILC 



2 


ri 

9ft — * 

IK . 1 

18% IMS l 






33ft— ft 

14* 

7ft ISC 





14 

7ft 

3% leal 






7ft + ft 

BT-lTI 







8 + ft 


3* Inocmp 






3ft 

lEJ 

32% IndlN 

1A0 

3.1 

Kin 


W-'V-M 

52*— * 

liH 

20 IntaRK 


l>-iS 


25 

25* 


12ft Inftm 



214 

■ t vJ 

17% 

17% — * 

IB.-zl 

17 InstNIw 




Mrul 

22 

22*— * 

lift 




735 

5* 

5 

5* + Ik 

15 

a* IntgDv 



2/| 

12* 

12 

13* 

4%- 

3 IntgGen 
to* ISSCO 



584 

4ft 

3ft 

4ft + ft 

23ft 



154 

14ft 

14* 

14ft 





4112 

27 

26 

26% + ft 

9% 

3 InttSv 



139 

3% 

Sft 

3ft— ft 

3% 

1* IntrTel 



19 

2% 

2ft 

2ft— * 





77 


lift 

lift— ft 

16ft 

7 IntrfFIr 

20 

12 

30 

12% 

12* 

12% 

35* 

21 Intgphs 



2875 

29* 

28ft 

29 + % 

»* 




1177 

7ft 

6% 

7ft + * 

22* 




258 

13% 

12* 

13ft— ft 

13ft 





6ft 

6 

6ft + ft 

17 

a Intel in 



72 

10ft 

10 

10ft 





33 


haj 


35ft 




133 

K£l 


w — * 

16 

7% IntLsas 



123 

15% 

inrl 

15ft 

12 

4% inMobll 
ft IRIS 



93 

7ft 

6a 

7 — ft 

3* 



193 

2 

ift 

lft— ft 

25% 

9* IT Cos 



2910 

22% 

22 

22% + % 

14ft 

<% inmna 



593 

10% 

10 

10 

13% 

9* Inmdx 



7 

12ft 

11% 

11*— % 

10 

5ft Itet 



287 

91k 

9% 

9ft— ft 

II ek 



IEF 


HUH 

HI 

HR II 

15% 

9ft JBRsta 


12 

149 

10% 

10% 

18% + * 

Oft 

3% Jodcpof 


216 

6* 

6 

Aft + ft 





103 

37% 

37ft 


34ft 




215 

24* 

23* 

23% — * 

8% 

4% Jriftf ort 



31 

ift 

4ft 

5ft— ft 

23% 

14* Jertco 

.U 

3 

468 

23* 

23 

23* + ft 






eft 



10% 




2> 












20ft 

13% Justin 

A0 

32 

137 

15ft 

15ft 

15ft 

II K 11 

24ft 

13ft KLAs 



* 

» 

18% 

18% — * 

25* 

13% kg mot- x 



25% 

34* 

25% 

19* 

13ft Kerch r 




17% 

17% 

17%— * 


10* Kosier 

25| 


UP 

lift 

11* 

Uta— * 

HRS 

<% Kovdtm 


343 

9% 

9* 

9% + ft 

41* 

KM Kemp 

120 

3.9 

392 

62ft 

10 

11% +1% 

4Bft 

30* KyCnU 

20 

u 

101 

49 

48* 

aft + % 

Sft 

4ft Kevin 


6 

6 

Sft 

5ft— ft 

11 

6% KevTm 



40 

9 

Bft 

Bft— ft 













'IS 




13% 

4% Krw 

M 

Ji 

7ft 

7% 

7ft 

18% 

11 Kruger 

J8 

33 

314 

15ft 

14% 

15ft + ft 

29ft 

Bft Kulcke 

-Til 

U 

431 

1! 

ink 

10ft 

II HH 



■ ' 


■H 


— J 


11* 

5* LDBmk 



56 

Aft 

6 

6 

18% 

9% LSI Log 




19 

18 

18% + ft 

23ft 

9* LTX 



114 

11% 

10% 

lift + ft 

19ft 

9% La Petes 



334 

18ft 

18ft 

189k + ft 

50ft 

33 LaZQy 

1A0 

20 

58* 

SO 

SO* 

32ft 

13% LadFm 

,U 

3 

n 

22 

21% 

22 

18ft 

11 Lfltdlw 

2D 

U 

qj 

14* 

13% 

14* + ft 

17 

lift LamoT 

A0 

5.1 

■f 

15% 

15% 

15% 

17 . 

14* Loneost 

AI 

Al 

12 

17 

16% 

16* — In 

59% 

36 LwaCe 

32 

1J 

44 

54 

53ft 

54 

32 

23* Lowsns 

32 

U 

315 

26ft 

25% 

26ft + * 

79k 

4% Leo Din 


5ft 

Sft 

5ft— ft 

15ft 

8* LcJner 



ff 

10* 

9% 

10* + ft 

9ft 

£% LewtiP 
2ft Lexicon 

■286 3U 

B 

7% 

7ft + * 

'4 



■145 

1* 

2ft 

2ft— Hi 

3% 

1% Lexlflfo 



W 

2 

2 + ft 

E33 


AT 

J 

140 

21% 

21 

21% + ft 


LSllUiES 

M 

s 

3 

47* 

47* 

47* 

7ft 

4% LfeCom 



% 

6% 

6ft 

6% + ft 

20% 

11% UIvTat 

M 

1 3 

Uft 

15ft 

15% — * 

Mft 

ink UnBrd 

27* UncTel 



347 

35 

34% 

34% + ft 

36* 

230 

63 

20 

35* 

35 

35% + % 


12Monfll 
High Low Slock 


SotOS In 

Div. VIA IPOs Utah 


Aft 

49ft 

25* 

33* 

19* 


4ft LlndBra 
21% UzCId a 
20* LongF 
15% Lotus 
5* LypftOS 


.16 27 44 

JS Jt 1490 
178 5.1 28 

<72 
876 


6 

42* 

25 

18ft 

17 


5ft 6 


24* 25 
18 181- . _ 
18ft 16ft— * 


M 


14% 

8% MBI 



1 

7ft 

7ft 

11% 

7* MCI 



14624 

10% 

10ft 

BU 

4% Ml W 



231 

8% 

Bft 

26 

15 MTS l 

3i 

1J 

12 

18% 

IB* 

32% 

17* 

15 MTV 

9% MocfcTr 



992 

1816 



27% 

21% MadGE 

228 

86 

IB 


26* 

9% 

7% MaIRt 



217 

8% 

E 

14ft 

7% Molrtts 


15 


16* 

7ft MgtSci 



365 



74ft 

72* 

18ft Manltw 
31% MfrsN s 

A0 

3A 

182 

107 


rfTb 

9 

3* Morgux 



913 



13% 

8* Marq&i 



91 


37* 

20% MrldNs 

1J» 

11 

158 


'^Sr' 

Uft 

7% Mscols 
ift Massror 



310 

Kjj'’ 

6% 



480 


i* 

34ft 

24* MatrkS 

.10 

2 

83 

3!ft 

31 

24% 

13 Manors 



3820 

19% 

19% 

Uft 

tt 

38ft 

0% Maxwei 
3% MavPt 



665 

% 

'ft 

3ft MaynOI 
30ft McCrm 

to 

Z5 

1 

192 

4ft 

1 

4ft 

35ft 

14ft 

10%. Me Far I 


41 

12 

lift 

6 Medex 

as 

4 

2 

Bft 

9 

4 A6edCra 



51 

5% 

5* 

20ft 

30ft 




214 

I7B 

14% 

14% 

14% 

39% 

30ft MercBc 

1.92 

s 

42 

142 


65% 

38* 

41ft MercBk IAS 
24% AArdBcs 1JU 

11 

211 

m 


22ft 

12ft 66erlBs 

36 

36 

36 

21 


21* 

20% 

11* MeryG 
B% MetrFn 

AOb 11 

SB 

14* 

14 

19% 

35% 

11% Mlcam 



322 

15%: 

15* 

5% 

1% MIcrD 



43 

2% 

ru 

11% 

5% MlerMk 



49 

6% 

6 

7* 

4% Micrdv 

J)A 

1A 

42 

6 

5% 

29% 

3% MIcrTc 



574 

6* 

4 

9 

4 Ml crap 



251 

7% 

7% 

8% 

3ft AAicSffl S 



73 

6 


6% 

2ft AAdPcA 



32 

3 

24 

T7ft MdSIFd 

AO 

1.9 

9 

21* 

21* 

41* 

25* MidlBk 

124 

11 

415 

40* 


8ft 

3 AAdwAIr 



379 

8% 


27% 

18ft MIlIHrs 

-44 

1.9 

925 

23 


5% 

2ft Mllllcm 



105 

3% 


44 

31* Mtlllpr 

M 

12 

217 



Sft 

1% Mi n Isa- 



1915 


2ft 

27% 

17 Minstar 



455 


23* 

left 

7* MGosk 

Ale 

.1 

22 

8 

7% 

12% 

6 MobICB 



B9 

11 

10% 

20% 

14 Madinas 

68 

36 

18 

19 

18% 

10% 

6 Moled r 



162 

7% 

7ft 

39ft 

* 

i 

ir 

-03 


199 


33* 

25% 

U Mania 

ASe 12 

IB 


23 

17ft 

7% ManAnt 



55 

Uft 

U 

17% 

9% Manaflt 



610 

13% 

13ft 

34% 

24% MonuC 

1-40 

4A 

141 

34% 

34ft 

20* 

14ft MorFlo 

Al 


13 

15 

14% 

22ft 

15ft Moran 

At 

23 

103 


19 

7% 

2 Moaetey 



31D 


2% 

18* 

12ft Mote lb 

30 

1J 

63 


17* 

28* 

11% Mvtans 

.10 

6 

2548 


Uft 


Bft- ft 

IB* 

32ft + * 
10* + ft 
26ft + * 
8*6+ ft 
lift— ft 
9% + ft 
21* 

35* + ft 
3 — ft 

&=£ 
21 + ft 

I* 

31ft + ft 


1 ttMcntn 
] High low Slock 

□ IV 

fia 

Salas m 
100* 

Net 

Htan LOW 3 PAL Ottoe 

I 

ll__ Q 1 

15ft 

6 QMS 



640 

«* 

Bft 

8% + % 

9% 

3% Quodrx 



349 

9* 

Oft 

9 — % 

13% 

9 Quok.Cs 

JB 

3A 

56 

12* 

11% 

11%— ft 

32* 

16% Quantm 



709 

22* 

21 ft 

22% + ft 

5% 

2% QuestM 



133 

Ift 

4% 

4% 

U* 

8* Quixote 



102 

Uft 

15% 

16% + * 

U* 

7* Quairn 



3591 

12* 

11% 

11% — * 





R 



1 

12* 

5 RAX 

Air 

3 

155 

6* 

6 

6* 

18% 

13 RPMs 

62 

4A 

320 

15% 

15ft 

15% 

16U 




192 

12% 

17% 

12% 

14% 

i% Rad In T 



13 

9ft 

9 

9 — ft 

10ft 

5% Rodion 



2 

Bft 

Bft 

Sft 

7% 

2% Rosen 



55 

3% 

3ft 

3ft— ft 

33* 

22% Ralnrs 

1 A0 

11 

360 

32 

31ft 

32 + * 

20* 

12ft RovEn 

2A 

12 

1B6 

19% 

19ft 

Wft 

7* 

1ft RedlCr 



524 

2 

1% 

2 + % 

23% 

17* Reodng 



64 

20% 

20ft 

20% + % 

10* 

5ft Recotn 



17 

Oft 

8% 

8% — ft 

35% 

25% RrdknL 

64 

2J 

40 

29ft 

29 

29ft 

12% 

4% Reeves 



97 

10% 

10% 

10% 

7% 

4% RgcyEI 

A0 

36 

488 

6* 

5% 

5%— % 

18* 


.12 

A 

43 

16 

15ft 

U + % 

12ft 

3ft Reilab 



28 

4ft 

«ft 

4ft 

10ft 

7% RpAufO 

.16 

15 

29 

8% 

8% 

8*— ft 

90* 

9% RpHIth 



230 

10* 

10 

10ft— ft 

IB* 

11% RcsIrSy 




17% 

17% 

17% — ft 

16% 


.15e 2.1 

B9 

7ft 

7* 

7* 

30ft 

19% ReutrH 

J6r 

.9 

50 

30 

29% 

30 + ft 

43% 

29 ReyRev 

1J4 

28 

74 

44 

43* 

44 + ft 

17ft 

9% Rhodes 

J2 

1.9 

26 

16% 

16% 

16% 

10 

3% RiWIm s 



040 

6% 

6% 

6% + ft 

17ft 

11% Rival 

A0 

4A 

19 

16% 

Uft 

16% 

33% 

24% RoadSv 

1.00 

3 A 

922 

29* 

29 

29* 

16ft 

11 RabNua 

A4 

3 

505 

12% 

12% 

12% 

13* 

8ft RabVsn 



113 

8% 

8* 

8% 

28 

16% Rouses 

34 

2A 

224 

26% 

26 

26% — * 

13 




106 

11% 

11* 

lift + * 

9* 




361 

t 

3% 

4 

18% 

10% RustPel 



04 

11% 

11% 

lift- % 

24* 

11* RvanFs 



309 

2J 

22* 

22*— % 

1 







1 



19 + * 

7* + * 


23ft + ft 
16ft + ft 


19 

Sft 


9 

2ft NCACp 



10 

n 

n 

3 + ft 

9% 

Sft Semlcn 



27 


2* NMS 



J8 

Hli 


5 

10ft 

6 Sensor 

.05 

6 

Z746 

■Il J 




317 



10* + * 

16% 

10% SvcMer 

m 

6 

6J6 


Uft N Bn Tex 

30 

36 

70 



21ft + ft 

25ft 

17ft Svmsf s 

A0 

4.0 

8M 

t;i3l 

33% NllCtV 

2AU 

4.1 

135 



48ft + % 

24% 

13% Service 

1 


J44 

20* 

12* NtCptrs 

AO 

1.1 

223 

HJ 


10ft + * 

7ft 

4* SvcFrct 



B 

14% 

6% NDota 

M 

27 

1117 



Uft + % 

IB 

12ft SevOak 

.16 

3 

» 

36 

12 NHitC s 

iWI 

3 

116 

■S3 


15* + ft 

37% 

23ft ShrMed 

68 

15 

1984 

7% 

4ft MtLumb 



71 

5ft 

5 

5 — ft 



168 

46 

228 

5% 

2 NMJcm 



34 

2% 

2% 

2%— ft 


12% Shelby s 

.16 

A 

171 

8% 

1% Naugte 



2653 

4ft 

3ft 

4ft + % 


7% Sheldl s 



•36 

Bft 

6ft NetenT 

.151 


84 

'6% 

6ft 

Aft— * 

31% 

21ft Shonev 5 

.15 

6 

347 

11* 

4% Nelson 



91 

6 

Sft 

5ft— ft 

lift 

10 ShonSas 



210 

9* 

4% NwkSeC 



133 

6 

Mk 

6 

10* 

3% Silicon 



374 

27% 

14% NlwkSs 



1199 


21% 

22 — * 

17ft 

9ft SIHconS 



TVS 

36ft 

20% N outre s 



49 


fl -Of 

33ft +1* 

20ft 

11% SlllcVal 



117 

12ft 

7ft NBnmS 



B2 



9* 


11% Slllcnx 



as 

34 

23ft NEBus 

32 

20 

4 



25ft — * 

11% 

4ft Sllfec 



79 

32* 

19% NHmpB 

ta 

26 

382 

31ft 


30%— ft 

17% 

11* Simpln 

A0 

55 

37 

32% 

20* NJNtl 

1.12b 36 

19 

33% 

32% 

32% + * 

15* 

10ft Siepln S 




17% 

9ft NwldBk 

.10c 

4 

695 

18ft 

17% 

18ft + % 

18* 

9ft Staler s 




30* 

IB Howol 

.06 

3 

236 

19% 

19* 

19ft . 

12% 

8% Sklpner 

AS 



» 

1* NwuPfi 



515 

11% 

It* 

11%- £!t 

4 





5% 

% NiCoig 

t 


3241 

Ilk 

Ift 

1% + fc 

54 

33* Socie iv 

1A4 

37 

31 

14% 

6% Nike B 

60 

3.1 

652 

13* 

12% 

121b — * 

23ft 




54A 

21ft 

15 Nordsn 

66 

4A 

15 

Uft 

IS* 

Uft + ft 

10ft 

4% Softeeh 





28* Nordstr 

AA 


233 


50* 

51ft +1 

21% 

11% SoftwA 



115 


■ ^ £ | S [V * ' !■ 

321 

A 

65 

■ Zl 


53% + ft 

30ft 








20 

6% 











121 

7* 

BJH 

7 — % 

Aft 




158 





674 

17% 


17% — ft 

33 

\ 1 

32 

2.1 




152 

8.1 

57 

19 

18% 

18% — ft 

28% 

1 





I i : iisiv!^in 

Jill 

1J 

30 

30% 

30% 

30% — * 

9ft 


.10 

1J 

385 


a L ^ | . nlaB 

A0 

33 

302 

23ft 

22% 

23 — ft 

31ft 

22% Sovran & 158 



34 ft 

■ l_ TTiViTi 

230 

96 

n 

23* 

22% 

23 + ft 

19* 




90 

50 

40ft Noxell 

1A8 

28 

81 

55 

54% 

55 + * 

28* 




62S 

7 

4% NucIPh 



492 

Sft 

5* 

5* 

8% 

5% SoecCII 

A7 

.9 


9* 

4% Numrax 



57 

5 

4 ft 

4ft— ft 

16% 

13% Strtre 



337 

17% 

10% fJtsmrc* 

At 

11 

319 

18% 

17ft 

18* +1* 

1* 

3ft StorSur 



128 

10ft 

6% NutrIF 



4 

9% 

9% 

9% 

8 

5 StofBId 

A0 

26 

30 

13% 

4% NuMads 



IB 

7 

6% 

7 + * 

30 

19% Slandv 

IA0 

36 

100 









23* 

n* stdMic 

60 

1J 

39B 












1 







■ 

Aft 

3ft StoteG 

.150 36 

u 


4* 

17ft 

46* 

72ft 

32* 

41* 

22ft 

28* 

9* 

19* 

4B% 

19* 

Sft 

a 

34ft 

15 

14* 

4* 


lft OCMasr 
10 Ocflias 
33 OgiiGo 188 
40* ObloCa 280 
20 * OtaKnts 1 XO 
23 OldRP3 74 
19ft OWSptC 2x0 
14 OneBcp J2 
3* OnLine 
12ft OotlcC 
22 * OpIlcR 
17ft Orbanc 
5ft OrWt 
4* OrfaCp 
26* OHrTP 276 
OvrExa 

8 OwnM s 3 B 

* Oxoco 


53 

14 

27 694 
19 231 
13 44 

12 63 

117 7 

1J 198 
5 
713 
23b 
5 

877 
237 
BJ 36 
3 

17 23 

190 


2ft 

lift 

40 

77ft 
3on 
34 Vi 
23* 
29 
7* 
12ft 
33* 
14* 
8ft 
6ft 
32ft 
10 

14ft 

ft 


2* 2ft 
11* lift 
39ft 40 + * 

71ft 72ft + ft 
X* 30ft + * 
34* 34* ~ ft 
22* 22* 

28ft 28% + ft 

6ft 7* + * 
12ft 12ft + ft 
33 33* + * 

14 14* + * 

8ft Aft + ft 
6* 6ft + * 
321V 32ft + ft 
10 10 — ft 

“it. “sr* 




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lit! % ’< 



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H ' T 














II > .. ' ■ 




























32* 

53* 

15ft 
13 
16* 

Bft 
24ft 

17* 

6 

124k 

18ft 

T7* 

10* _ 

31* 20ft Pamirs J8 25 
15ft “ ‘ 

30ft 
13ft 
12* 

18* 

5* 

29ft 
24* 

37ft 

10 

15 

34% 

27* 

3ft 
15ft 
lift 
37ft 
Oft 
7* 

16* 

36* PrleoCo 


20ft 17 + V5 



rr^ 


l ' : ■ 

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19ft 

A 

42 

15ft 

19ft 

27ft 


0 Pfireru 
4ft ProdOB .10 18 
20ft ProgCs .12 3 
11* PraplTr 1.20 «u 
lift Preuin 
13ft PuftBfl AO U 


1057 

104 

35 

8 

6 

48 

A0 


60ft St'A 60ft + ft 
17* 19ft 13* + % 
4ft 41k 4*- ft 
40 40 40 
11% 11% ll%- ft 
19ft 19* 19* 

9 27ft 28 + ft 


16 7% SAY rod 

17ft 10ft SCI Sr 
20* 13 SE1 
11% 4 5FE 
23 16 SRI 

20ft 6ft Sotecds 
46* 29 Safeco 
IS* 7VJ Soft-Ill S 
18% 7* St Jude 
79ft 47ft StPaul 


.10r 1J 

-B0 4J 
TOO IX 
140 3 S 


532 

763 

23 

no 

93 

416 

473 

45 

98 


10ft 10ft 10% — ft 
13ft 13* 13ft 
SO* 20* 20* 

Aft 6 6ft— ft 
19 18ft 18*— ft 
19* 19ft 19ft 
48ft 45ft 45ft + % 
12* 12- 12* + * 
17ft 17% 17ft 


6% 

2% SalCpI 



56 

5% 

5% 

S%— ft 

10 

4ft SanBar 



32 

‘‘If 1 

5% 

6* + % 

8% 

5ft saieisv 

.12 

28 

18 

Aft 

6 

6 

31ft 

16% SavnFs 



143 

31* 

JO* 

30*— ft 

20ft 

11% SBkPSS 

AA 

23 

242 

20% 

20% 

20% — ft 

10% 

4* SamOp 



42 

B% 

8ft 

B% + ft 

1/ 

10% ScnnTr 



17 

15% 

15ft 

15%— ft 

13% 

B% Sdhersr 

32 

26 

91 

12% 

12ft 

12% 

251* 

14* SdhlmA 

Mb 16 

71 

25* 

24% 

24% — ft 

Aft 

3* SciMic 



43 

6ft 

4% 

4ft + * 

13ft 

7 SctSft 



5 

7* 

7* 

7* + ft 

20% 

7 Scitex 



135 

10 

9ft 

10 

9ft 

3% Sea Gal 



SB 

4% 

4% 

4% + * 

8% 

4 Seagate 



2160 

5% 

5% 

5% + * 


lft Sec TOO 



186 

2 

lft 

2 + * 

7ft 

1% SEEQ 



169 

1% 

1% 

1% + ft 


26* 16 Selbel 


7ft 4ft Steiger 
18ft 11* StswSN 
25 17* Shnlnf 


102 

17 

6 


6ft 6 
8ft B 
13* 13 
20% 19* 
27 25ft 
4ft «ft 
17ft 17ft 
33ft 32* 
3Bft 38ft 
20 19ft 
9% 9ft 
26ft 26ft 
10* 10ft 
4ft 4ft 
II 10ft 
15* 14* 
19ft 19 
4ft 4ft 
14% 14ft 
11* TOft 
15» 15* 
lift lift 
2ft 2* 
50 49ft 
24ft 23% 
9 B* 
14ft 14% 
29* 29* 
17 16* 

4ft 4* 

' 24* 23* 
IB* 10ft 

7ft 7ft 

27ft 26ft 
18ft 10* 
24 22% 

B 7% 
14ft 14ft 
9ft Sft 
7* 7ft 
20ft 28 
13% 13ft 
35* 35ft 
4* 4ft 
5 4ft 
14ft 14* 
23* 23* 


22* + % 

8% + * 
13ft— ft 
20* + ft 
26* +lft 
4ft 
17% 

32ft— ft 
38ft + ft 
19ft + ft 
9ft 

28ft + % 

10ft 

4ft + * 

10ft 

15* + * 
19ft + ft 
4ft— ft 
Wft— * 
11* + * 
15ft + * 
lift + ft 
2ft— ft 
50 + * 

24 + ft 

9 + * 

14ft + ft 
29* + ft 
16ft— ft 
4ft 

24* + ft 
18ft 

7ft + * 
27 + * 

18% 

23* + ft 
7% 

14ft 

9 

7% + ft 
28ft 
13% 

35ft — ft 
4ft — ft 
4% — ft 
14ft + * 
23*— % 


Sale* llgurei are unofficial. Yearly hlghi and laws reflect 

ine previous 57 weeks olus the current wee*, nut not me lores! 

trading da v. Where a soil! or itock dividend amounting to 25 

percent or more has been paid. Ihe year's high-low range ana 

dividend ore snown for me new stock eniv. Unless otherwise 

noted, rales of dividends ore annual disbursements based on 

me latest declaration, 
a— dividend also eriratsl^i 
b — mutual rale oi dividend plus stack alvMenH/1 
c — liquidating divWena/l 

dd — co I led/ 1 
d — new v early IcntJI 

e — dividend declared ar add In arecsding 12 month sVI 
g — dividend In Conod Ion funds, sublectio 15% nan-residence 
tax. 

I — dividend declared after sellt-up or sloe! dividend. 

I — dividend paid this vear. omitted- deterred, or no action 
token of lutes) dividend meeting. 

k — dividend declared or paid this rear, an oc cumulative 
Issue wim dividends In arrears. 

n— new Issue m the pas! S3 weeks. The high-low range begins 
wlln tne start of Irodlno. 

no — nevl Oav delivery. 

P/E — priee-eornlngs ratio. 

r— dividend declared ar paid In preceding 12 months. Plus 
Block dividend. 

s— flock split. Dividend begins wim dale of soiir. 
sis— sales. 

—dividend paid In nock In oracedina 12 months, estimated 
cosh value an an -dividend or ex-dlstrlbuihm dole. 

u— new veorly high. 

— Irodlng hailed. 

vl — In bankruptcy or rocelvershlp or txHno reorganized un- 

der tho Bankruptcy A<f. or securities assumed by such com- 
panies. 

wd — when distributed, 
wl— when Issued, 
ww — with warrants. 

<— ex-dtviaena or et-rumis. 
xdls— ex-distribution. 

xw— without warrants. 

y — ex-dlvidend and sales in Ml. 
rid— view, 
z— Sales In ML 


12 Month 
High Low Slock 


Soles In Net 

Cih>. YM. inns High Lo« 3 P66. Oi ge 


Bft Sft 
20* 8* 
38ft 29ft 
23ft 15 
171ft 112 
73* 39* 
4% 2ft 

*5 

10ft Sft 
10% 7* 

5ft 3 
14 Bft 
14ft 6% 
5ft 2ft 

as* aw 

7* Sft 
11 % 6 % 
25ft 14ft 


.10 


Stlfei 
Stratus 
SlrwCI s 34 
Strykrs 
Subaru Z28 
SubrB 1.92 
Summit 
Sum) HI 
■SunCst 
Sun Med 
SuPSky 
SuprtOh 
SvmBT 
Svnlech 
Svnlrex 
SvAsoc 
Systln 
Syilnlg 
Svslmt i>8 


25 

244 

2.1 14 

9 

U 68 

23 62 

135 

1.1 175 
151 

18 

2 

IB 

101 

137 

44 

292 

32 

12 

3 «82 


8% Aft 
20% 19* 
37* 37 
23* 22* 
166*166 
72* 72 
2* 2% 
8ft 
1 ft 
9 

Bft 
3ft 
Bft 


I?- 

9 

Bft 

3ft 

9ft 


10ft 10 
4 3% 

9* fl% 
6% Sft 
10ft 10* 
25ft 25* 


6* + * 
20 - % 
37 

23* + * 

lb6ft 

9 + * 

Bft 

3ft 

Bft— % 
10 

3* — % 
9* + ft 
6% + % 
10ft + * 
25ft + * 






T 



| 

14 

8 TBC 



110 

9% 

9ft 

9ft 

27* 

13* TCACfa 

.16 

6 

6 

25% 

75% 

25% + * 

7ft 

3% TacVivs 


52 

Jft 

3* 

3*- ft 

28% 

12% Tandem 



2988 

19 

1R% 

19 + ft 

8% 

2% Tendon 



1059 

3% 

3* 

3* — ft 

Uft 

5% TcCom 



11 

13% 

13% 

13% 

22 

9 Telco 



150 

10 

9% 

10 

34* 

20ft TIcmA 



405 

33 ft 

33 

33ft 

12% 

6% TelPlus 



318 

8% 

Bft 

Bft 

25* 

13ft Teleerd 

32 

IJ 

356 

26% 

25 

26* +1 

19ft 

8% TelPd s 



543 

17 

’tt 

17 + ft 

4* 

1% Tetvta 



234 

2ft 

3ft + ft 

20 

8ft Tefabs 



365 

10ft 

9ft 

Vft- * 

18 





18ft 

17% 

18* +1 ft 

10% 

3 TermOt 

1 


492 

tt 

3% 

3% + ft 

14* 

8ft TherPr 



19 

0% 

8ft 

13ft 

6* Thrmds 



259 

10ft 

9% 

10ft + ft 

20% 

Uft 

15% ThrdN s 

64 

26 

9 

33 

26% 

7% 

tt 

ttTS 

28ft 

5ft ThouTr 



442 

7% 

/% 

7ft 

15 

Aft TimeEn 



115 

6% 

6- 

6*— ft 

14 

9ft TmeFIb 



58 

13* 

13 

13 + ft 
ft + ft 

2% 

* Tfprarv 



341 

ft 

y. 

30 

Bft TotlSvs 



9 

27 

2/ 

27 + ft 

17% 

10 TrakAu 



257 

lift 

10% 

11* 

12ft 

6* TrladSv 



93 

9ft 

9* 

9ft 

30* 

20 TrusJo 

60 

16 

11 

24% 

24% 

2A%— ft 





u 



| 

25% 

18 USLICs 

A0 

11 

4 

25% 

25* 

25% 

24* 

13% UTL 



82 

17 

16ft 

17 + % 

20* 

5 Ultrsy 

Me 

3 

712 

8% 

Sft 

8% + ft 

23ft 

10% Ungmn 



427 

13% 

13 

13* 4- ft 

13% 

7% UniH 



539 

13* 

Uft 

13* + % 

29ft 

14* Unplnlr 

IA9t 

4.1 

33 

27* 

26% 

26% 

54 

23% UnTBcs 

160 

28 

74 


S3ft 

53ft + * 

26* 

11% UACmj 

A6 

J 

521 

24 

23* 

74 + y. 

11% 

B% UBAIsk 

-ISr 

15 

76 

10 

9% 

9% — * 

28ft 

21ft (JBCol 

IJU 

4.1 

123 

26% 

26% 

26% + * 

11 




26 

6% 

6% 

6% 

22* 

11% UFsfFd 

ASe A 

26 

16% 

14% 

16% 

14% 


1641236 

10 

7 

7 

7 


9* UPresd 



14 

12 

11% 

11% — !<» 

2 % USAnl 



36 

4* 

4% 

4*— ft 

32 

21% USBcp 

1A0 

36 

349 

29% 

28 

29ft -flft 

4% 

1% US Coo 



285 

4% 

4 

4ft + % 

33% 

11* USHCl 

M 

3 

1673 

32 

30% 

31ft + % 

Sft 

3* US Shell 

.12 

73 

80 

4% 

4% 

Jft— ft 

22ft 

14ft USSur 

60 e 2.1 

S! 

19% 

IVft 

Uft — ft 

37% 

25* USTrs 

1.20 

11 

742 

38% 

37ft 

38% +1 

25* 

17* llStatn 

A0. 

.9 

68 

22 

21ft 

22 + ft 

25 

15ft UnTetav 


589 

24% 

24% 

24% 

48* 

33% UVaBi 

164 

36 

IDS 

45* 

44% 

45* + % 

22 

14* unvFrn 



159 

19 

18ft 

19 + ft 

20ft 

9% UnvHII 



2043 

141* 

12% 

14 +lft 

13 

7ft UF3BV. 

07r 

3 

124 

10% 

10* 

10ft 

6* 

3* Uscaf 


SJ 

52 


4ft 









V 



1 

9% 

5* VLI 



370 

6* 

6 

6* + * 

Uft 

7* VLSI 



56 

12 

12 

12 

12 

3% VMX 



57 

4ft 

4% 

4ft + ft 

11% 

7ft VSE 

Ms 16 

5 

10 

Vft 

10 + ft 

20% 

& ValldLa 



2633 

7% 

7% 

7% + ft 

22% 

B* ValFSL 



147 

17* 

Uft 

17 

42* 

26ft ValNh 

120 

13 

432 

36ft 

36% 

36% + ft 

33% 

19% ValLn 

60 

2A 

15 

20* 

20 

20 

19% 

11* Van Dus 

60 

11 

358 

19% 

19% 

19ft 

IS* 

4* Vanzell 



7 

4ft 

4* 

4*— * 

6ft 

2% Ventre* 



1244 

5% 

5* 

5% + ft 

28% 

13* Vtarrp 

JJ9* 

3 

355 

1B% 

18* 

18% + ft 

13% 

6% ViedeFr 

.lie 16 

S3 

7 

6% 

6%— * 

Uft 

9ft Vlklns 



t 

14 

13ft 

Uft — ft 

20% 

13% Vlraiek 



12 

20ft 

20 

20 — ft 

12ft 

5% Vadavl 



228 

7ft 

7 

7 + ft 

22 

14* Volllnf 



18 

19* 

18% 

18% — ft 

d 



W 



1 


17% WO 40 

.9* 

5A 

323 

19ft 

urn 



10 WalSsC % 

-24 

16 

54 

13ft 


13ft + * 


5% WlkrTel 



142 

9ft 

BIS 

9% + ft 

E TOM 

17% WshE 

1J6 

78 

107 

22% 

t-vTl 

22% — ft 

28% 

IS WFSL5 

60 

10 

114 

29ft 

28% 

29ft +!ft 

16ft 

10% WMSB 



190 

IS 

14% 

IS + * 

9% 

* Wavetk 



54 

bft 

4% 

bft 

14* 

10ft Webb 

60 

13 

319 

12ft 

li% 

12* + * 

Iflft 

8* WostFn 



7 

16% 

14% 

16% 








14ft f * 

10% 

5% WMIcTC 



29 

7% 

7ft 

7ft— * 

14* 

5% WITlAs 



449 

15 

Uft 

Uft + % 

21% 


60 

11 

23 

19* 

18% 

19* 

17ft 

6% WltwCS 



34 

10% 

10ft 

10ft— U 

35 

34ft Wettra 

.98 

28 

211 

35ft 

34% 

351V + ft 

6% 

3 Wlcal 



493 

4ft 

3ft 

z 





105 

4% 

4* 


EJL9 


165 

38 

148 

43* 

42% 

43* + * 

15% 

7% W1IIAL 



139 

Uft 

13 

13 

10% 

4% WllsnF 



37 

5* 

5* 

5*— * 

7% 

3ft Windmr 

A3I 


355 

4% 

4ft 

4% + ft 

24* 

ifiaanaji 

p a 

17 

It 

16* 

16ft 

16* + ft 


IfP-m'.'iTry 

vTn 




13* 


19% 

14 Worthgs 



583 

19 

in* 

19 + ft 



AO 

36 

327 

22 

21ft 

22 + ft 





K 



| 

8% 

Ift Xebec 



250 

2ft 

2\ 

2ft — h* 

13% 

5% Xtajr 



398 

6% 


6% + * 

17% 

ID* Xlde* 



924 

12ft 

12% 

IZft 

HE 







mmt 

24 ft 

M* YlewFs 

64 

13 

626 

24ft 

23% 

24 

BHB 




SB! 



■i 

30ft 


.101 

6 

■513 

27% 

2t% 

27 + 

13% 

10ft Ziegler 

6Ba 32 

4 

12ft 

Uft 

Uft 

47% 

31 Zlaniii 

1 3b 

36 

207 

40ft 

40 

CO 


2* Zllel 



129 

2% 

2ft 

2ft — ft 









15* 

Aft 2ondvn 

ABI 

.7 

174 

Uft 

11% 

12 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 

















Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


2 

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PEANUTS 

I ( fourteen? 


TWENTY- TWO ? 
5IXIY-THREE? 


SORRY. MAAM. 


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30 

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BLOND IE 

PRICES ABE T 
SO HIGH < 
TVESE CAYS > 


I THINK MY MATH 
BOOK HA5 A 
CHILP-RE5I5TANTCAP! 


books 



ITAPPECTS 

EVERYONE 


VOU MEAN IT SVEN *-> 
AFFECTS VCXJ.COBA? 


% OH, YES, JULIUS AND -P WE'RE NOW USfNS *“ 
\ I ARE CUTTING I "FILET AWSNON HELPER" 


THE MASTER OF THE FORGE: 

A West African Odyssey 

By Harold C our lander. 224 pages. $16.95. 
Crown Publishers Inc, I Park Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. 10016. 

By Elizabeth Alexander 

H UNDREDS of years ago in the western 
Sudanese kingdom of Joliba, caretakers 


exist only to prccrea 
the river. 


te. - 


rhinoceros: 


SOLUTION TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE, page 15 M ' ,? as 


ACROSS 

1 Yearns 
6 Pall short 

10 Dramatis 
personae 

14 Perch 

15 Entice 

16 Kind of 
admiral 

17 Dogie catcher 

18 Algerian port 

19 Heraldic 
border 

20 J. D. Salinger 
work 

23 Owned 

24 Caravansary 

25 Use 

29 Northern 
European 

32 Perform 

35 Obstruct 

36 Curtin or 
Seymour 

37— — mater 

38 Humper- 
dinck's fairy 
opera 

41 Leave out 

42 Nelson or 
Mary Baker 

43 Upper crust 

44 Transgress 

45 Iran and Stone 

46 Faye and 
Ghostley 

47 Dunderhead 


49 Chemical 
suffix 

50 Film comedy 
team 

58 Christiania, 
today 

59 Footnote abbr. 

60 Lorelei, e.g. 

62 Thailand, 
formerly 

63 Grind grain 

64 Bring joy 

65 Scarlett's 
spread 

66 Mind 

67 Resign 

DOWN 

1 Timetable 
abbr. 

2 Arrange hair 

3 Grayish-white 

4 This, inTaxco 

5 Horse-drawn 
carriage 

6 Patterson of 
boxing fame 

7 Nimbus 

8 Persia, today 

9 Give 
temporarily 

10 Sing softly 

11 Concerning 
aircraft 

12 Garage or yard 
event 

13 Low card 

21 Voice vote 


22 Type of code 

25 Group 
character 

26*' Vice." 

TV program 

27 Like Malaya or 
I stria 

28 Keen desire 

29 Alights 

30 Griffith or 
Williams 

31 Cribbage piece 

33 Where Minos 
ruled 

34 Stories 

36 Greenstone 

37 Cold-cuts 
center 

39 Journey part 

40 Freed 

45 Simian 

46 Residue 

48 Fragrance 

49 In a strange 
way 

50 Misplaced 

51 Gobi's site 

52 V.t. P.'s car 

53 Ancient 
Hebrew month 

54 Green color 

55 Vex 

56 Apothecary's 
weight 

57 Abominable 
Snowman 

61 Bottom line, 
often 


n 




BEETLE BAILEY 

V/e'RE BACK ^ 
EARLY. I'LL BET 
WE CATCH SNA&E 
sleeping a&aiN y 


WE BETTER 

Mot/ he 

KNOWS HOW 
MAP I GET! 


it won't po him 
A BIT OF ©OOP 


rm 



ANDY CAPP 

I'LL NEVER SET 
> POOT IN THIS 
HOUSE AGAIN f ] 



‘ THAT SHOOK’ 
HER LIPA B»T‘ 


WHEN NOURASS 

RACING BAPS?? } 


in Bethssda, Maryland, a novelist and folklor- 
ist namrH Harold C our lander writes that he 
“became the djeli of Numnkeba of Naiadugp," 
the ancient folk-hero Courlander has created' 
in his latest novel. 

*The Master of the Forge" is a prose emc 
t hat follows the blacksmith Ntmuilceba an his 
1 1-year journey from his village in search of 
honor and truth. His purpose? “I do not know 
what i am looking for, only that I am living out . 
my story,” says Numnkeba, placing himself in 
a long line erf heroes questing spiritually, as 
well as physically. 

like England's Lancelot and Mali's Sun- 
diata before him. Numukeba’s venture be- 
comes an adventure, all in the name of honor 
and the faith that his “story" will guide him. 
He has cinematic encounters with evil, slays 
foes, does good deeds, and most importantly, 
augments the faith *h»t sent him oot in die first 
place. 

Numnkeba is a sober, straightfaced hero. 
His philosophy is strongly delineated and ap- 
pealing. Though Courlander lets him sound 
like a famine cookie at times, he also quietly 
prints to the larger lessons embedded in daily 
activities. Joliba is a world where ritual ana 
community are profoundly respected. This 
strong sense of wUianr»» and kinship makes 
Numnimba’s self-imposed odyssey afl the more 
poignant. 

Indeed, in ancient Johba, what goes around, 
comes around. A character is a slave one min- 
ute and a noble the next. At one print, Nunm- 
keba is changed into a dog by the wizard 
Elchuba. Courlander subtly and successfully 
challenges conventional social hierarchy 


mvisiDte, wu® 16 - j. . — i.i.ua--'- 

your heart? And **«!*“*£ tl^r 'luT.x -c 
n faim your heart, where .«- > r .- A .. the 

then? As Nunwkeba shea 

rhinoceros dropped » to - 

lay on the earth, watebrng ‘ ^ never 

Creating a world m wfccn ,,r r hc 

lived is no easy task, "Th*; . irrc> the- 
Force" is fiBed with dctai-s. £**;; k - ■ . • 

evocative of ‘'Africa 

words and a dipped, formal dicuo— *-* - • 
Mjefcsmith. forged 



C 3F 


he does not extend the challenge to the worm 
of women, who are scarcely mentioned and 


tempered it in millet water. When it w±s Jo*i- 
hefastmed it in place and hung die :vt> ‘ - 
his shoulders testing us fit. H* sla« 
him, ‘Master the armor becomes you. Nurmi 

kSi answered, ‘Iron does not turn away wtjp- 
ons because it -becomes*' but .because '- ^ 
tains the life force of the sun. And the 
answered. *Yes, Master, it is so.' 

Rw«iw the epic form is so familiar, the 
language between setting out and «-vmmg 
homemnst truly sparkle to dstir.guuJ: Jw 
^ “laS&sSSno L Bui it « steady 

and functional; while not JyncaL i* trot!, alona 
at an even gait. It can move large spaces of bine 
with a few gracefully tossed sentences. » nr. 
the effecting mae**! am Numokeba. lam here, 
Courlander places bis hero in a great tradition 
of literary cnesoTlere," of finding the central 
self through adversity. 

Men no longer venture forth on horse back uy 

search of troth. But they do wrestle with thdT 
own faith. This is neither a bona fide Afnutn 
epic nor a purely ristorical work. It is a gentle, 
quiet t«v». about a n*an “w ho understands the 
mysteries erf iron" his quest to understand 
his own Gate. 

Elizabeth Alexander leaches creative writing 
at Boston University. She wrote this review far 
The Washington Post 


WIZARD of ID 


& iVew York Times, edited by Eugene MaleskB. 

DENNIS THE MENACE "” = 





/ \w/& \ 

V&l&CtfSOAA 
A&&N TH4T 

< J 



REX MORGAN 


I'M TERRIBLY SORRY 
TD BE LATE, GRANT— 
BUT A WOMAN A 
CUSTOMER CALLED 
ME AT HOME . 
INSISTING THAT I 
DO HER HAIR THIS . 
MORNING BECAUSE 
SHE HAP A SPECIAL ] 
v LUNCHEON TO A 
ggATTEND/^^J 


LET ME HELP YOU WITH 
YOUR COAT. KAY l 
k YOU'RE OLTT OF 
BREATH ' 


I D1DNT EVEN TAKE TIME ’ 
TO GET OUT OF THIS SMOCK' 

I HAVE TO BE BACK AT THE 1 
-t SHOP IN 45 MINUTES f M 


YOU'RE NOT 
LEAVING HERE 
UNTIL YOU'VE 
7 HAP A GOOD 
I BREAKFAST.' 


fVE KAO iTUPTO/^^ WITH MAP6ARET GARFIELD 


D)^ THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
PlJWIAa by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


CAPTAIN/ CAPTAIN . 1 S 
THERE'S A BLACK HOLE 
PEAP AHEAP/ 


Unscramble these four Jumfctes, 
one tatter to each square, to form 
four ordinary wonte- 


YOMSS 




WE CANT TORN BACK/. 
THE GRAVITATIONAL PULL 
l IS TOO GREAT/ n 
\ARRRRRROHi^_/*->^ 


’axntAor - 1 


THEV JUST WENT 
WHERE NO MAN HAS 
. GONE BEFORE 


By Robert Byrne 

T > HE Nimzovich Memorial 
Tournament, hdd in Naes- 
teved. Denmark, to mark the 
50th anniwasary of the death 
of Aron Nimzovich, the great 
Latvian-Danish player, theore- 
tician and teacher, <*ndrd in a 
tie for first place anomg Walter 
Browne of Berkeley, Calif., 
Bent Larsen of Denmark and 
Rafael Vaganian of the Soviet 
Union. 

For some time now Browne's 
forte has been to mOc the 
Queen's Indian Defense of gal- 
lons of points, no matter 
whether he has Black or White. 
One can see him at it again in 
his encounter with Prering Nt- 
kriic of Yugoslavia. 

The popularity of 4 P-QR3 
against the Queen’s Indian has 
not let np. It is quite remaraka- 
ble that this prophylactic, 
which is directed against a pin 
with . . . B-N5 after N-B3, 
should give the defense such 
headaches. 

There is a tricky question 
whether the immediate ad- 
vance with 4 . . . P-Q4 has 
any more merit than the more 
usual 4 . . . B-N2; 5 N-B3, P- 
Q4. Of course, 4 . . . P-Q4 
gives the black QB greater flex- 
ibility, yet it is doubtful that 
any option other that fianchet- 
toing it would ever be exer- 
cised. 

Once Black plays 4 . . . P- 
Q4, he is committed, after 5 
PxP, to the recapture with 
5 . . . PxP, since 


CHESS 


5 . . . Nxp?; 6P-K4 gives 
Write a strong center with gam 
erf tempo. 

It would have been more 
usual for White to play 9 B-Q3, 
bat then 9 . . . JB-N2: IOO-O, 
N-B3; 11 N-K5 would let Black 
resolve the centre! tension by 
-11 . . . PkP; 12 NxN, BxN; 
13 PxP, with a very ""nimf 
advantage for 'White. Browne's 
alternative; 9 B-K2, exdnded 
<hrv possibility. 

It is not dear what Black’s 
best method for reduc ing the 
positional p re s s ur e wonM have 
been after 11 N-K5; 13 NxN, 
PxN converted the game into a 
battle tosee vriio gets tile vital 
open aueen file. 

Prooably Nikolic should 
have interpolated the exchange 
of queens with 14 . TTQxQ; 
ISKkxQ before playing IS B- 
QB3. Hien 16 P-Kfi, PxP; 17 
BxPch, K-Rl would not have 
made evident how Write could 
demonstrate any real superior- 
ity. 

Hie 14 ... B- 

QB3 let Browne gain tempos 
with 15 Q-N4 (threatening 16 
B-KR6XK-R1; 16 QR-QI. 

NtkoBc’s 19 . . . Q-RI en- 
visaged 20 . . . P-QN4, but 
after Browne's 20 B-R4L BxB; 
2i QxB to persist with 
21 , . . P-QN4? would have 
meant losing a pawn to 22 
BxBP! (22 . . . RxB?; 23 R- 
Q8ch). 

On 23 B-QS, it was of no nse. 
to play 23 . . . P-B4, since 24 
PxPe.p, RxP; 25 QxP?, QxQ; 
26 BxQ, BxB? would have in- 


vited 27 R-Q8ch. Moreover, 
23 . . . Q-Q2? would have 
proved a disaster after 24 P- 
K6! 

Thus, Nikbfic abandoned a 
pawn with 23 . . BxB; 24 
KxByQ-K2, 25 QxKP. 

After 26 . . . R-Kl. 
Browne forced the win of an- 
other pqwn by 27 Q-B2!. R- 
QBI; 28 Q-B5, R-B2 
(28 , . Q-K3; 29 QxQ.PxQ: 
30 R-Q6, R-Kl; 31 K-Bl cre- 
ates a winning rook-and-pawn 
codmg); 29 Q-Q3! 

Snoe a defense against 30 R- 
Q8dt yields WKie31 QxP with 
decisive advantage, Nikolic 
gave up. 

QMnra— tmcpiiw^ 
* «**« 'mwb iwr M . 

iaf.ffsa g 


'-'AN IMPATIENT 
DRIVER WHO 
HAS TO STOP FOR 
A TRAFFIC U&HT 
USUALLY DOES THIS 


Now arrange the clrded letters to 
form the surprise answer, aa sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer hero: 


Yesterday’s 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: RUSTY SWASH AVENUE LEDGER 
Answer, a political platform Is something a 

candidate needs when he hasn't this— 

A LEG TO STAND ON 


WEATHER 



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,'••• V . - - ; •• ■ \ 

INTERiVATIONAL HERALD TRIBIUVE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1985 


Page 17 

r: . : : 

SPORTS 





ono 




ffibo Chinese, Romanian , 
^■;<g East German Trike Tides 

. . By Anne'S. Crowley • . 

- _ ‘V 1 The Associated Press ’ 

: 1 • .‘. <; L r M°> 4 TREAi.— The Soviet Union’s monopoly on 
. .. , ■ gold medals at the World Gymnastics Ch^onsbdps 

A ; ws outed&nd^ with Tong Fa and Li htogS 
' - V; v -' Sihvas oE Romania tad Gibnrit 

• • -J‘* v 'v.rahnncb of East Germany winning tides on the dos- 

^ day of competition. 

But Soviet gymnasts continued their domination of 

- <i ( . die weeklong event, winning niw of the 30 ra*Hnir 
awaided Sunday in addition to the men’s and women’s 
r & m and'afl-around titles they already owned. 

i-.'.T A V *Tongwon for his floor exercise and on the high bar, 

' - while Silivas scored a perfect 10X) on the four-inch f 10^ 
t ' K- centimeter) balance beam. Li shared the men's ring 

• ; title with the Soviet Union’s Yuri Korolev and Fatah 

rich won easily on the uneven parallel bars. 

Korolev, the aH-around champion, ideo won -the 
. - - - > vault title and teammate Valentin MogOnyi took two 
golds. 

Elena Shonshounova and Oksana fWnrfiatHfWV 0 f . 
■ *. the Soviet Union, who tied for the women’s all-around 

-title Saturday night, each won one gold, Shoushoun- 

^ ova on the vault and Oradiantdiik, with the second 10 ' 

: ■ of the day, in the floor exercise. 

- Fahnrich scored 9.950 on the bars to beat out 

- - teammate Dagpar Kersten. The Soviet Union did not 

have a competitor in this event became of the contro- 
versa] decision Saturday to pull Irina Baraksanova 
■- .,?;?»• and Olga Mosiepanova out of the all- around fmqi m 
favor of OmdiamnhiV and Shooshounova. 

- - If withdrawn from one competition, a gymnast 

"V must withdraw from the rest of the meet, ana Barak- 

■ _ . " ^-^anova and Mostepanova were the only Soviet qoalifi- 

• on bars. 

. The only American to qualify for the apparatus 

.' , ^ final was Sabrina Mar of Monterey, California, who 
‘ ~ : % tied for axtb on the vaidL 

Ecatetina Szaho of Romania, who won four grJdc 
and a silver at (be Olympics, manag ed only two 

■ - - ... individual silvers at this competition. 

Tong, the sflva medalist on the high bar at the 1984 
' ■* Games, started the day's competition by winning the 
flow exercise, scoring a 9.9 of a possible 10.0. 

MogOnyi scored 9.9s on his pommel horse and 
rallel bar routines to win those events. On the bars, 
tied with East Germany’s. Syivio KroQ, who took 
bronze in the men's all-around, while the Olympic all- 
around champion, Kqji Gushikea of Japan, was third. 



yn 


Daniela SiDvas of Romania flipped up a 
perfect score of 10 and won the world 
championships’ title on die balance beam. 


SCOREBOARD 


Football 


Hockey 


.4 -i Selected TJ.S. College Conference Standings NHL Standings 


nranry 


Maryland 
Tech 
fmson 
itnJa 

UCarolTna 
- " r.''M.CaraSf. 

' lVs WLForast 
- .. Duke 


Nebraska 
3 Manama 
■ >WoJf. 
"toloroda 


ATLANTIC COAST ■ uiatl 

Contarance All Gamas Brig. Yjw 
W L T Pt« OP WIT PM OP "Hawaii 
400 125 40 6 3 0 224 122 QllO. St 
4 10 95 45 4 2 1 174 92 5aOlao St 

4 2 0 114 M £40 174151 -Mew Max. 
32 0 127 95 54 0 217142 Wyoming 
3 2 0 84107 S 4 0181174 Tx-EIPasa 

2 4 0 102151 3 7 0 147274 

1 5 0 89133 4 4 0 202208 
0 5 0 40134 270 139212 Ponn St. 
BIO EIGKT MtonlFta. 

Canfarance All Gamas Armv 
WLTPtsOPWLTPtsOP Fkxtdast. 

5 0 0 149 54 8 1 0 335101 SJWn 
400 199 32 410340 73 w. Virgin la 

3 1 0 90 58 7 1 0201107 NotmOama 
320 110 47 4 3 0 181123 Syracuse 


5 1 0 223189 82 0358284 
4 1 O W0 53 8 2 0 343121 
4 1 0 137 85 4 4 1 231199 
3 4 0 179230 4 40 227287 
1 4 0 115142 34 0 2432*1 
1 5 0 134247 2 7 0 228344 
1 50 105221 2 7 0 171309 
.ISO 102210 1 0 0 119 318 
MAJOR INDEPENDENTS 

W L T Pts OP 
9 0 0 198 122 


. WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T PU GF GA 


Montreal, 

Winnipeg 

WininCFL 

The Associated Pros 

MONTREAL — Quarterback 
Joe Barnes passed for almost 400 
yards Sunday and rookie Tony 
Johns scored touchdowns on runs 
of 3 and 1 yards as the Montreal 
Concordes beat die Ottawa Rough 
Riders, 30-20, in the Canadian 
Football League’s East Division 
semifinal playoff. 

In the West Division semifinal, 
the Winnipeg Blue Bombers sur- 
vived six turnovers to defeat the 
visiting Edmonton Eskimos, 22-15, 
as the wide receiver James Murphy 
scored twice. 

A crowd of 11,372 — well below 
expectations — shivered through 
freezing temperatures in Montreal, 
but Barnes and his teammates gave 
the spectators much to cheer in the 
last 17 minutes when the Con- 
cordes broke open a 16-13 game. 

They took a 23-13 lead just be- 
fore the third quarter ended, with 
Barnes throwing a 20-yard touch- 
down pass to Nick Ar.ikgi, his fa- 
vorite target in the game. Arakgi 
shook free from two would-be tack- 
las to score. 

Barnes then engineered a five- 
play, 63-yard touchdown drive [hat 
ended with Johns scoring from the 
one 3:56 into the fourth quarter. 
The Montreal quarterback, playing 
in his fifth since bong ac- 
quired chi Sept. 30 from the Calga- 
ry Stampeders, expertly used the 
screen pass — with one to Johns 
gaining 23 yards — .to move the 
Concordes down the field. 

In Winnipeg, Manitoba, the de- 
fending Grey Cup champion Blue 
Bombers scored their winning 
points after consecutive turnovers 
late in the third quarter, when they 
were trailing by 15-14. 

Winnipeg’s wide receiver Jeff 
Boyd fumbled the ball and Edmon- 
ton recovered near its goal line, but 
on the next play the Eskimos 1 run- 
ning bade Mil son Jones fumbled 
and Winnipeg recovered, then got a 
touchdown on the next play. 

With five minutes left in the 
game, Winnipeg's defense stopped 
ihe Eskimos on a third-and- three 
gamble at the Bombers' eight-yard 
Hne to ensure victory. 


Dolphins 9 Super-Duper Pass Tramps Jets; 
Cowboys Win by 6, Chargers in Overtime 



Sonn-UPI 

S 

lefeat- 


Tony Peters knocked down a pass intended for the Cowboys” Doug Cosbie, but at game’: 
end it was the Redskins who likely had been knocked out of the playoffs by a 13-7 defeat 

It May Be the U.S. f Orphan Academy,’ 
But They Still Play Football There 


By Charles Hi [linger 

Los Angeles Times Service 

NEW LONDON, Connecticut 
— High on a hill overlooking the 
west bank of the Thames River is 
Cadet Memorial Field, home of the 
U.S. Coast Guard Academy’s foot- 
ball team 

The Coast Guard Academy is 
one of the U.S. service academies. 
The best known of these. Army, 
Navy and Air Force, rank among 


score listed among the results news- 
papers publish. 

The major academies play such 
Division I-A teams as Notre Dame, 
Penn State and one another. CoasL 
Guard Academy, a Division III 
team, plays such New England 
teams as Norwich. Rensselaer 
Polytechnic, Union and Trinity. 

The Coast Guard Academy is 
the smallest of the service acade- 
mies. with an enrollment of 765 


317 150 
309 179 
304 187 
2TB 129 
153 138 
210 1W 
184 112 


PM lad# Mila 
NY Islanders 
Washington 
NY Rangars 
Nsw Jersey 
Pittsburgh 

Boston 
Buffalo 
Quebec 
Hartford 
Montroal 


12 
7 
7 
7 
4 
4 

Adams Division 
10 4 I 

9 5 1 

9 4 1 

7 7 0 

8 4 2 


- CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Nanis Division 


- (00901- 

148 78 MS 

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1- 

203? 354 

Sr.-lsubir 

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14 0 78144 

1 >0147287 

Vlr. Tech 

5 

5 

0 

236 

195 

Minnesota 

4 

7 

3 

11 

own St. 

1 4 0 *9197 

3 6 0 119294 

Cincinnati 

J 

5 

0 

189 

245 

Chicago 

4 

9 

1 

9 

Camas St. 

1 4 0.39173 

1 • 0 *7244 


4 

5 

0 

218 

235 

Detroll 

1 

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Tamp la 

4 

6 

0 

223 

200 

Toronto 

1 

11 

2 

4 


Conference 

All Games 

SW La. 


6 

0 

159 

292 


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5 1 0 197114 

8 1 0 291 144 


3 

7 

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153 

259 

Calgary 

8 

6 

1 

17 

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5 1 0 191 84 

8 1 0 354 109 

MaflWhJt, 

2 


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194 

Vancouver 

7 

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4 11 144 36 

7 1 1 240 51 


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6 

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4 30140104 

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Louisville 

3 

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178 

384 

Lax Angeles 3 

11 

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Purdue 

3 4 0 127192 

4 5 0 229258 












-Wisconsin 

1 5 8 107 158 

4 5 0 212215 











1 


The Bombers lost four of six ' the powerhouses of collegia le foot- cadets. Even the Merchant Marine 


fumbles during a game played m 
16-degree (minus 9 Celsius) tem- 
perature and quarterback Tom Cle- 
ments threw two interceptions. The 
Eskim os lost two of three fumbles 
and their rookie quarterback, Da- 
mon Allen, who had replaced the 
injured Matt Dtmigan, threw two 
interceptions. 

It was the third year in a row that 
Winnipeg had played host to Ed- 
monton in the West semifinal and 


ball from time to time. 

The Air Force team, for instance, 
is 10-0 this season, and ranked fifth 
in the nation. Army is 7-2. Navy is 
having a tough time at 3-6. 

The Coast Guard Academy’s 
team? Many do not even know the 
academy exists. 

There is no national radio or 
television coverage of the Coast 
Guard Academy team. There is not 
even local coverage. And one has to 
look hard to find a Coast Guard 


Academy at Kings Point, New 
York, has a four-figure enrollment 

No wonder they call it the or- 
phan academy. 

There certainly is do recruiting 
of football players here, and hardly 
a year passes when one of the stars 
turns out to be a cadet who never 
played in high school. 

This year’s top receiver, John 
Rendon, 19. a sophomore from 
Hudson, New Hampshire, had nev- 


Indlono 1 50 9T1B5 4 5 0 208245 

Nrltlwstm 150 <8174 3 4 0 150255 

BIG SKY 

Conference All Guam 


NFL Standings 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 




W L T PfaiOP W LT PtsOP 


W L T Pet; PF 

PA 


BwrRittl 

6 1 0 2S2108 

9 1 0 399148 

New England 

7 3 

0 

too j no 

171 

*•- 

u ’Idaho 

5 1 0 192 90 

8 3 0 359 178 

TLY. Jots' 

7 3 

0 

JW 22S 

150 


.jBolse St. 
^’wober St. 

5 10 173107 

4 3 0 319153 

Miami 

* 4 

o' 

JOO 241 

311 

*.M 

■ 

3 * 0 305177 

5 4 0 3*1 353 

Indlanapoiis 

3 7 

0 

JOO 1X7 

338 


Idaho SL 
p* Jj! Montana 
•£ :!, HArtenna 

3 3 0 180 155 

1 5 0 108231 

5 4 0 277213 

2 7 0 172344 

Buffalo 

2 8 
. Central 

0 

JOO 141 

214 

-%• 

1 5 0 63182 

34 0 128235 

Cincinnati 

5 5 

0 

JOO 287 

288 


Montana SL 

1 6 0 145298' 

2 8 0 282372 

Pittsburgh 

5 5 

0 

JOO 219 

181 

»«J 

** ;S 

IVY LEAGUE 

- 

Cleveland 

4 4 

0 

-400 140 

159 


£»■; 

Canfarance All Games 

W L T PIS OP WLT Ptl OP 

Houston 

4 4 
Wdt 

0 

ABO 143 

205 

'tXJ 

5 :Jttann 

5 0 0 127 42 

4 1 1 172 130 

Denver 

6 3 

0 

J47 219 

181 


r t J . Harvard 

4 1 0 117 49 

4 2 0 149113 

Startle 

4 4 

0 

J00 348 

205 


►**' Princeton 

3 2 0 73 57 

35 0 158173 

l_A. Raiders 

4 4 

0 

JOO 230 

227 

A-’* 1 

11 Dartmouth 

2 2 1 81 44 

2 5 1 13015B 

San Dlaoo 

5 5 

0 

JOO 240 

245 


.Yale 

2 2 1 74 81 

3 3 1 111 155 

Konsas City 

3 7 

0 

JOO 199 

340 


0-1 
0 — « 

Simmer (MI.Dariagoll); Breton (7). Shots 
oh goal: Minnesota (on Keans) A-3-11 — 30; 
Boston (on Beau ore) 12-5-10—27. 

Calgary 0 1 8—1 

Buffalo 2 2 1—4, 

vtrta (4), Hamel (4), FoUano 19). Dvksrra 
l a. Selling (3); McDonald (j). Shot* aa goal: 
Coloary (on Puapal 5-9-3—18; Buffalo (on 
D'Amaur) 15-14-10-41. 


Respirator Keeping Lindbergh Alive; 
Family Faces 'Very Hard Decision’ 


Basketball 


■ Brown 
Cornell 
i , Columbia 


BowL Gm 
. Miami O. 
CenLMldt. 
N.i lunate 
, MIA. 

SL 

'•/■Michigan 
. Kent Sf. 
owo u. 
Toledo 


ir 


230 7952 341 144129 
140 <0 84 2 6 0 109 137 

0 5 0 44188 DIO 47274 
MID-AMERICAN 

Conference All Samoa 
WLTPHOPWLTPteOP 
7 0 0 232107 9 0 0 289155 
4 1 1 209130 4 2 1 219183 

4 3 0 114103 8 3 0 141113 
.330 <3 98 3 6 a 116 222 

3 4 0 112 145 4 S 0 151 183 

3 5 0 147 TW 4.4 0 194240 
2 4 1 101 133 2 6 1 110188 
24 0 151151 3 4 0 202233 
250137 147 270 157212 
250 93 121 3 4 0 125 150 
PACI PIC-10 

Conference All Gome* 
WLTPtsOPWLTPtsOP 

5 1 0 177 103 7 1 1 244 149 

4 1 0 128 71 7 2 0 234120 
4 2 0 129 94 5 4 0-178170 
32013057 440 144124 
320 M 82 430 203112 
2 2 0 124113 4 4 0 225247 
2 4 0 110184 3 4 0 207270 
2« 0 74203 3 4 0 147287 
2 5 O 159156. 2 70 228240 

2 4 0 124188 .440211241 
SOUTHEASTERN 

Conference An Games 
W L T Pt* DP W L T PtS OP 
4 1 0 90 44 7 1 1 233 135 

3 1 1 132 94 4 2 1 245142 

3 1 1 T28 43 7 1 1 258114 
311 0741 511 127 57 

2 1 0 44 51 5 1 2 184119 
220 92 41 7 2 0 281 137 

1 3 1 78141 3 51 142240 
1 3 0 43 B4 5 4 0 1*1 154 

1 3 0 54 111 3 5 1 151 215 

0 4 0 78134 5 4 0 215224 
SOUTHERN 
Conference All Games 
WLTPtsOPWLTPtsOP 
400 121 48 8 I 0 314 140 

4 1 0 107 52 5 4 0 155120 
410 9948 630 200104 

3 2 1 92133 7 2 1 193157 

2 3 1. 84103 5 4 1 190194 
12 1 43 80 3 5 1 152244 

1 4 I 70104 3 S 1 130131 
040 95145 081 140205 
060 21T79 1 9 0 44321 

SOUTHWEST 
Conference All Games 
W L T Pts OP W L T Pfe OP 

5 1 0 191 7* 8 1 8 284110 
s 1 0 155 70 *7 SO 228118 

4 1 0 148 TOO 4 2 0 234 158 
4 1 0 141113 8 2 0 207 183 
4 2 0 208103 5 30 240154 

2 4 0 137211 3 6 0 203346 

1 5 0 145 ISO 4 5 0 324214 
150 127216 270 212303 

04 0 74245 3 4 0 144310 
SOUTHWESTERN ATHLETIC 

Conference All Games 
W LT PtoOP W LT PttOP 

5 1 0 172 89 8 1 0 271133 
S 1 0 153 94 7 2 0 254147 
4 1 0 1S9109 7 1 0 339153 

3 1 0 1W 70 5 2 0 188143 
3 3 0 100118 5 * 0 144194 

2 4 0 83145 2 7 0 102200 
1 8 0 HOW 1100 158359 
0 4 0 54154 2 8 0 Til 239 

WESTERN ATHLETIC 

Conference Alt Games 
WLTPWOPW-TflsOP 
Ah- Farce 4 0 0 Mf-.P to o o JWiiJ 


153 
170 
142 
1*1 

^00 184 232 

1.000 279 127 
J0Q 200 207 
J00 173 220 
.400 191 238 
.WO 200 272 

J00 210. 151 
-556 228 147 
JOO 176 242 
.WO 1*8 307 


UCLA 

Art st 

■ Wastmotn 
south. Cal 
Arizona 
Oregon 
.Stanford 
Oregon Si. 
WaNi. St. 
CailfanHa 


-Florida 
Alabama 
Georgia 
' LSU 
Tennessee 
. AuOum 
.Vanderbilt 
Kentucky 

Mississippi 
Mbs. SL 


Furman 

TrL-CTinga 

Anototilgn 

Mormon 

atodd 

VMI 

W-Caroltoa 
ETetuu Sk 
Davidson 


Arkansas- 

Baylor 

Texas ARM 

Texas 

5MU 

Rice 

Tasps Tech 
Houston 
TCU 


. Gcomoilng 
Jackson SL 
Mfes.V 0 l. 

- Alcorn St 
Southern U. 
. • Ala. ST. 
TexSoumn 
Pnrirle w*. 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
East 

Dallas 7 3 0 JOO 220 

N.Y. Giants 7 3 0 JOO 227 

PMtodelPMa 5 5 0 JOO 159 

Washington 5.5 0 JOO 145 

. St. Louis 4 4 0 

Central 

Chicago woo 

Minnesota 5 5 .0 

Detroit 5 5 0 

Green Bay . 4 6 0 

Tampa Bay 1*0 

. West 

LA. Rams 4 2 D 

San Francisco 5 4 0 

New Ortom 3 7 0 

Atlanta 1 9 0 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
PhUalelphta 23. Atlanta 17. OT 
Cincinnati 27, Cleveland 10 
Chicago 24, Detroit 3 . ■ 

Green Bov 27, Minnesota 17 
Buffalo 20, Houston 0 
New England 34. Indianapolis 15 
N.Y. Giants 24. LA. Roms if 
Pittsburgh 34. Kansas aty 2* 

Tampa Bay 16, SL Louis 0 
Seattle 27, New Orleans 3 ■ • - • 

San Diego 4Q, LA. Raiders 34, OT 
Mkrnii 21, N.Y. Jets 17 
Dallas IX Wash in gton 7 

MONDAY'S GAME 
San Francisco at Denver 

CFL Playoffs 

DIVISION SEMIFINALS 
- - NOV. If 

East 

Montreal 30, Ottawa 20 
WON 

Winnipeg 22, Edmonton 15. 

DIVISION CHAMPIONSHIPS 
Nev. 17 
East 

Montreal at HamlHon 

Weft ' 

Winnipeg at British Columbia 

GREY CUP 
NOV. 34 

Division champions, at Montreal 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 

W l_ Pet. GB 

Boston • 6, 1 JB7 — 

New Jersey 6 3 J67 1 

Philadelphia 4 4 J00 217 

Washington 2 5 J84 4 

New York 0 s .ooa 6h 

Central DMilea 

Detroit 4 3 647 — 

Milwaukee 6 4 A00 to 

Chicago 4 4 JOO 1 to 

Atlanta 4 5 am 2 

Indiana 2 4 333 2to 

Cleveland 3 A J33 3 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 

Denver 6 1 JS7 — 

Houston 4 2 J50 to 

San Antonio 4 4 JOO . 2to 

Utah . 4 4 JOO 2to 

Dallas 2 5 J84 4 

Sacramento 2 5 J84 4 

Pacific Division 

LA. Lakers 6 1 J57 — 

Portland 7 2 .778 — 

LA Clippers 5 2 JU 1 

Golden State 4 5 A** 3 

Seattle 2 6 J33 4to 

Phoenix 0 7 JXM 6 


By Cynthia Roberts 

The Associated Press 

STRATFORD, New Jersey — 
Pelle Lindbergh, the all-star goalie 
of the Philadelphia Flyers of the 
National Hockey League, who was 
critically injured in an automobile 
accident, still was being kepi alive 
Monday by a respirator and his 
family faces “a very hard derision” 
about the life-support system the 
team’s doctor said. 

Doctor Edward Viner said fur- 
ther examinations Monday had 
confirmed the original diagnosis 
that “he remains brain dead as we 
found him to be yesterday and a 
prognosis continues to be incom- 
patible with life.” 

Lindbergh, 26, the league's top 
goaltender last season, did not 
breathe for 10 to IS minutes after 
the accident early Sunday in near- 
by Somerdale, Viner said He also 
said Lindbergh had a blood alcohol 
level of 24 when bis Poracfae ran 
off the road A motorist is consid- 
ered legally drunk if he exceeds a 
.10 blood alcohol level 

“He had a fair amount to drink." 
said Viner. “Pelle Lindbergh was 
not a drunk. He did drink too 
much” Saturday night “Kids have 
done this after' games for years. I 
hope that sends a very strong mes- 
sage to student athletes." 



huttn-lin 

Pelle Lindbergh 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
MKvmsMe 24 20 31 22— 97 

' PMIoftlPtiia XI 23 23 2S— IBS 

Malone 12-17 1V14 35. Ervlng 9-21 24 20; 
Mancrlet 8-18 11-11 28. Prasnry 7-12 3-3 17. 
ROMuitds: Milwaukee 57 (Prensev j41;PWIa- 
delPhta 49 (Malone 1(1. Assists: Milwaukee 22 
IPrassev 71s Pirtiaaototiia 28 (Thrwtt, 
Cheeks 10). 

Sac ram ento » 24 28 29— ill 

OoWen Slate 33 24 34 24— 117 

Short 9-163421, 5m tth 7-97-107L Carroll 7-14 
34 17; Thorae 9-10 4-10 24. Drew 11-20 0-0 23. 
Rebounds: Sacramento 54 r Thomason 10); 
Golden Stale 45 l Corral I Ml. Assists: Sacra- 
mento 23 [Drew 8); Golden State 29 iFlovd 
101. 

Cleveland 27 33 24 21—187 

Portland 34 21 31 24—118 

Bowie 4-14 12-12 24. vandewege 9-17 34 21; 
Free 12-20 3-4 SkHInsor 6-11 6-8 1L Rebounds: 
Cleveland 51 tHiiHan 141; Portland e9 (Carr 
111. Asxttts: Cleveland 23 (Bagiev 101; Pori- 
land 22 (Drexler 6). 


Lindbergh's red turbocharged 
Porsche ran off a Camden County 
road before dawn Sunday and 
crashed into a concrete wail, caus- 
ing severe injuries to his spinal cord 
and brain stem, doctors at the hos- 
pital said. 

Two passengers in the car also 
were injured. Edward T. Parvin, 28, 
Viner said that no decision about of Mount Ephraim was listed in 
' system would be Critical condition with a skull frac- 
ture in Cooper Hospital-University 


smashed into a wall in from of an 
elementary school police said. 

Emergency personnel said he 
bad a pulse when they- arrived, but 
that be went into cardiac arrest 
moments later and cardiopulmo- 
nary resuscitation was used. 

The brain siem controls the 
body’s basic functions, such as 
breathing. 

“I want him to live, but I want 
him to be a person," Pietzsch said, 
crying. She and Lindbergh became 
engaged last fall and were planning 
to be married within a year. 

“He wasn't even going to go 
out," she said. “We went home to- 
gether after the game, hut he derid- 
ed he should go out to meet the 
guys. He left about 1 o'clock. 

“I always worried about a car 
accident, but he laughed at me. He 
told me not to worry, but I worried, 
you know, I worried. 

“And when there was the knock 
on the dqor this morning, 1 thought 
it was Pelle." 

It was the police, telling her of 
the accident. 


er played football in his life before 
entering the academy. 

There are no cheerleaders at the 
Coast Guard Academy. The fresh- 
man class, known collectively as 
the Swabs, is traditionally assigned 
by upper classmen to cheer loud 
and long. Every cadet is required to 
attend every home game. There is a 
reason: Not many others show up. 

Whenever Coast Guard scores, 
all the freshmen pour out of the 
stands and run behind a goal post, 
where each swab does as many 
pushups as the home team's score 
to that point. 

Coast Guard has two nicknames. 
Cadets and Bears. A real live bear 
was the team's mascot for 38 years 
— actually, there were 31 bears in 
that period — until last year, when 
Connecticut banned the ownership 
of dangerous wild animals except 
by zoos and laboratories. 

h was just as welL Objee, as the 
bear was always called — short for 
objectionable —was forever escap- 
ing and raising helL One year, stu- 
dents from arch rival Norwich Uni- 
versity in Northfield. Vermont, 
kidnapped Objee and began driv- 
ing north in a van toward Vermont. 
Objee took exception to that and 
destroyed the inside of the vehicle. 

Long before the students had 
reached the state line, they phoned 
the academy, admitted their crime 
and said they were returning Objee 
as quickly as possible. 

TTiis year, the mascot is a cadet 
dressed in a bear suit. 

Coast Guard finished its season 
Saturday with a 4-6 record after 
beating" the Marist College Red 
Foxes of Poughkeepsie, New Yort 
The score was 17-13. 

it was a typical season. The last 
winning year was 1977: in 62 sea- 
sons of football Coast Guard has 
had 18 winning teams, 36 losers 
and 8 that broke even. 

The coach these days is Bob 
(Campil Campiglia, 44. : *No way is 
this like football at the other acade- 
mies," he readily admitted. He 
ought to know, since he is in his 
fourth year as coach and was an 
assistant for 10 years before that. 

"They have their thing, we have 
ours." he said. “It's a matter of 
knowing the house you live in. En- 
vious? No. But it would be nice if 
we were mentioned when people 
talked about service academies.” 


By Gerald Eskenazi 

New York Tima Service 

MIAMI — Die New York Jets 
and the Miami Dolphins fought to 
the end Sunday, a classic struggle 
between a young team trying to 
establish itself and a dub that has 
been one of the best in the National 
Football League for several sea- 
sons. 

It seemed, with only 66 seconds 
re maining , that the Jets had ended 
the Dolphins’ dominance of the 
American Football Conference's 
Eastern Division. They took a 17- 
14 lead qq a 20-yard touchdown 
pass into the outstretched arms of 
Rocky Klever. 

Bui Dan Marino spotted Mark 
Duper. activated only Saturday, in 
a one-on-one matchup with the de- 
fensive back Bobby Jackson and 
hit him for a juggled, 50-yard 
touchdown pass with 41 seconds 
left that gave the Dolphins to a 21- 
17 victory. 

Duper, playing his first game 
since breaking a leg two contests 
into the season, bad caught a 60- 
yard pass for Miami's first touch- 
down, in the second quarter. He set 
a club record of 217 yards with 
right receptions, helping Miami 
avoid losing a third straight game 
for the first time in nine seasons. 

The Jets’ defense had to battle 
injuries as well as Marino and his 
receivers. Kirk Springs, the strong 
safety, was hurt early and replaced 
by the rookie Rich Miano. The reg- 
ular right cornerback. Russell Car- 
ter, was sidelined prior to the game 
with a back injury; another rookie, 
Kerry Glenn, stained. 

Pat Leahy, the Jets' kicker, had 
his problems, too, missing on field 
goal tries from 41, 37 and 42 yards. 

Cowboys 13, Redskins 7: Tony 
Dorset! tied a team record with his 
76th touchdown and Rafael Sep- 
tien kicked two field goals to keep 
Dallas tied for first place in the 
NFC East, United Press Interna- 
tional reported from Washington. 

Dorseti, a nine-year veteran, 
scored on a 48-yard pass from Dan- 
ny White with Dallas leading, 6-0. 
early in the third period. Dbrsett 
beat the linebacker Monte Cole- 
man, activated off the injured list 
only Saturday, on a delay play 
down the middle of the field and 
tied Bob Hayes’ team record. 

Joe Theismann, the Redskins' 
quarterback who threw five inter- 
ceptions during the defending 
NFC champions’ season-opening 
44-14 defeat in Dallas, was only l£ 
of-31 passing with three intercep- 
tions. He was sacked six times for 
losses of 52 yards, with the defen- 
sive end Jim Jeffroat getting five 
sacks to set a team record 

Dallas held ihe NFL’s No. 1 
ground game in check, limiting the 
Redskins to 124 yards rushing. 

John Riggins, with his second 
carry of the game, moved past O J. 
Simpson into fourth place on the 
all-time NFL rushing Hsti Riggins, 
who gained 34 yards on seven car- 
ries — and had only one in the 
second half — has 11,261 yards to 
Simpson's 11 .236. 

Chargers 40, Raiders 34: Lionel 
James scored on a 17-yard run 3:44 
into overtime to beat Los Angeles 
in a dramatic game in San Diego, 
The Associated Press reported. 

Dan Fouls, who passed for 436 
yards and four touchdowns, quar- 
terbacked the Chargers on an 80- 
yard drive to the winning touch- 
down after they got the kickoff to 
begin the overtime. 

In ending a four-year, seven- 
game loting streak at the hands of 
the Raiders, the Qiargers sent the 
game into overtime when Fours 
threw a 14-yard touchdown pass to 
the veteran wide receiver Charlie 
Joiner with 53 seconds left in regu- 
lation. That time, the Chargers 
went 71 yards in less than a minute. 

The Raiders had taken a 34-27 
lead with 1:49 left as Marc WQson 
threw his third touchdown pass, a 
24-yarder to Todd Christensen. 

Bui Los Angeles did not have an 
right-point lead because ihe Char- 
gers' linebacker Billy Ray Smith 
bad blocked Chris Bahrs point- 
after kick in the second period. 


rsupporl 
until Lie 


the life-, 

made until Lindbergh's father, 
Sigge, arrived from Sweden later 
Monday. 

Lindbergh’s fiancee, Kerstin 
Pietzsch; his mother, Anna Lisa 
Lindbergh; and a brother-in-law 
were at John F. Kennedy Memorial 
Hospital-Stralford Division. 

“I’ve warned" the family “that 
that decision might have to be 
made.” Viner said. “It may be that 
it won’t have to be made. 

“Bui because he is so strong and 

healthy otherwise," Lbe doctor said, 
“it may well be that it wfll be a very 
hard derision that will have to be 
made. But that won’t be an issue 
for at least 48 hours." 


Medical Center in Camden. Kathy- 
leen McNeal, 22, of Ridley Par k, 
Pennsylvania, was in stable condi- 
tion at the Stratford hospital with 
injuries to her liver and spleen. 

Pietzsch, who is Swedish, said 
Lindbergh had gone to The Colise- 
um, a restaurant and athletic com- 
plex in Voorhees, where the learn 
practices, to meet teammates about 
1 A.M. Sunday following a victory 
over the Boston Brains in Philadel- 
phia on Saturday nighL 

At about 5:40 A^L, Lindbergh's 
sports car, moving at a high rale of 
speed, failed to negotiave a sharp 
curve on Somerdale Road and 


Soccer _] .Record Prices Paid at Thoroughbred Sale 


- WORLD CUR QUALIFYING 
coomotwi znw 
Poraguov 1 Oil io 0 


SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Barofonei Z Reel Madrid 0 
Zaragoza I, Eanane) 0 
Atlettao Madrid S. Valencia 8 ■ 

Ososwna i. Bull* 0 
Sevilla 0, Gfkxi 0 
HercutoiCetta* 

Cadiz 1. Valladolid 8 . ; . 

MflfellC Bilbao 2, Real SoetoSad 0 
Lm Palmas l Somandw O 
Stand Mgs: Real Madrid 17; SUaa lw Am- 
lettc Bilbao is; AiteHco MaarU 13; Barcelo- 
na. voitodoiM. Sevilla. Zaragoza Cadiz 12 ; 
Rear Sodedad. Valencia 11; Bette. Las Pol- 
mos9i EspanoL Santandorj Horcutoo 8; Oeo-, 
mum A; Cotta 5. - 


The Associated Press 

LEXINGTON. Kentucky — 
Miss Oceana, in foal to Northern 
' Dancer, sold for a world-record $7 
roOliw* Sunday ai a dispersal sale 
held by Faag-Tipion Kentucky. 

The New York financier Cari 
lcahn purchased Miss Oceana, a 4- 
. year-old stakes winner of 
51,010,385. She was retired last 
jjear after an injury in the $1 mil- 


The previous high for a brood- ■ Estrapade Wins Last Race 
more was $6 million, paid ai Fasig- Estrapade, who is to be sold at 
Tipton’s Fall Mixed Sale last year the Keen eland auction on Tuesday, 
by the Maktonm brothers of Dubai won the 5400,000 Yellow Ribbon 
for Priceless Fame when she was in Stakes at Santa Anita on Sunday, 


foal to Seattle Slew. 

Also Sunday, the British Blood- 
Stock Agency bought a weanling 
filly by Seattle Slew out of Larida 
fora record S2i> milli on. The previ- 
ous high for a weanling of either 


The Associated Press reported 
from Arcadia, California. It was 
the jockey Bill Shoemaker's third 
triumph in the race. 

Estrapade, a 5 -year-old mare, 
won for the ninth time in 20 starts. 


ion Breeder's Cop Distaff, the only sex was the 5750,000 pud in 1983 She is owned by a syndicate headed 
race in which die failed to finish for a filly by Alydar oui of Irish by Brace McNaD of Beverly Hills, 


among the first three. 


Trip. 


California. 



NFL FOOTBALL 

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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


Haw to Lose a Defector Hollywood Nervously Confronts AIDS 


TVTASHINGTON —The spook 
* * community in Washington is 
talking of nothing but the turn- 
about of the Soviet spy Vitaly Yur- 
chenko. Only a few months ago he 
was the CIA's prize Soviet canary. 
Then, without warning, he turned 
up at the SovieL Embassy and an- 
nounced he was going home. 

Forget his story about being 
drugged and kidnapped. The truth 
is that Yurchenko was not tortured 
but was badly 


m 



handled by the 
CIA It was not 
Vitaly's love for 
the motherland 
that drove him 
back to Moscow 
but disenchant- 
ment with the 
American wav 
Of life. 

This is what p ..„. ■ 

happened. Yur- Bucb ' rald 

chenko. while in Rome, was per- 
suaded to defect by a CIA agent 
who offered the KGB officer wine, 
woman and song, not necessarily in 
that order. 

"Sing to us. dear Yurchenko," 
the CLA man said, "and we promise 
you riches beyond your dreams: a 
safe house. S’l million in cash, a 
gold American Express cord and a 
free trip to Hawaii for two. ground 
transportation and gratuities not 
included.” 

□ 

Yurchenko, who had always 
wanted to see Hawaii, accepted. He 
was immediately flown to Langley. 
Virginia, to be debriefed and tested 
for AIDS. As for his S 1 million, the 
CIA people said they would invest 
it for him in a good tax shelter. 

Then the counterespionage boys 
went to work. “Sing to us. Vitaly, 
sing to us the names of moles and 
double agents and spies who arc 
still out in the cold.” Yurchenko 
started to sing in the beautiful bari- 
tone that only great Soviet defec- 
tors possess. 

All went well until Yurchenko 
demanded the safe house he bad 
been promised. A CLA real estate 
agent took him to the Virginia 
countryside. They drove up to a 
dirty, gray, weather-beaten cabin 
with broken windows, rotting stairs 
and a large hole in the roof. 

"What's safe about this house?'' 
Yurchenko said. 

“The KGB would never think of 
looking for you here. We'll let you 
buv it for $500,000." 


"Why should I pay for a house?” 

“We always make our defectors 
pay for their safe houses. The CIA 
is not in business for its health,” 
replied the agent. “Look, we're not 
taking advantage of you because 
you’re a dirty commie traitor. Ev- 
ery house in Virginia sells for 
5500.000.” 


Yurchenko bought the shack 
from the CIA and received an ad- 
vance of SI 50.000 to Fix it up. 

Unfortunately just when he got 
the house the way he wanted it the 
KGB found out where he lived and 
burned it down on Halloween. 
Yurchenko escaped out the back 
window and three hours later ar- 
rived at CIA headquarters shaking. 
He demanded that his money be 
returned since the house wasn’t 
safe at all. The matter went as high 
as the director of die Coven Red 
Estate Division, who told him that 
the Central Intelligence Agency 
had a firm policy: As long as the 
house was safe when the CLA sold 
it to a defector, the agency was not 
responsible for the KGB burning it 
later. 

Yurchenko was bun and con- 
fused. 

The CLA put him up in a Holiday 
Inn and said. “Sing, Yurchenko, 
and you'll find a BMW in front of 
your door and a girl like the one in 
the Calvin Kirin ads." 

So Yurchenko sang some more. 
He would stfll be singing if the CIA 
had not made a tremendous blun- 
der. They had invested the rest of 
Vitaly's money in a Maryland sav- 
ings and loan association. When 
Yurchenko went to make a with- 
drawal the cashier told him they 
bad run out of money' and slammed 
the window in his face. 


Enraged, the spy returned to 
Langley and confronted William 
Casey. The director said there was 
nothing he could do. “The CIA has 
no intelligence as to which savings 
and loan banks are solvent and 
which ones aren't. If you had come 
to me earlier I would have tipped 
you off on some good stocks. 

That did it for Yurchenko. Since 
he was wiped out he decided to 
return to Moscow and face the mu- 
sic. His last words as he boarded 
the plane were. “I don’t want to live 
in a country where your savings 
aren't insured by the FDIC." 


By Aljean Harmetz 

A.’«V Yoel Times Service 

L OS ANGELES' — Until the announce- 
• meat in July that Rock Hudson had 
AIDS, the film industry had been under no 
special pressure to address the social conse- 
quences of the disease. 

But his illness and death, because it shar- 
pened Hollywood’s awareness of its vulnera- 
bility, has triggered a reaction that has creat- 
ed problems for the industry. Some now 
expect a rethinking of the way sex is depicted 
in movies while others fear severe discrimina- 
tion against homosexual actors. 

Reflecting these concerns, the Directors 
Guild of America trill discuss taking an offi- 
cial position on acquired immune deficiency 
syndrome at its national board meeting this 
month. The American Federation of Televi- 
sion and Radio Artists has informed its mem- 
bers in a letter that they “should and do have 
the right to refuse contact with anyone whom 
they believe may have any communicable 
disease." Since some institutions are testing 
for AIDS, the federation also told members 
that “no company Has the right to ask for 
blood tests as condition for employment.” 

The Screen Actors Guild added’ to the 
sense of alarm by calling open-mouthed kiss- 
ing a possible health hazard and requiring 
actors lo be told If they will be asked to play 
such scenes. 

“I think there could be a purge against 
homosexuals," said William Goldman, 
screenwriter on films such as “Butch Cassidy 
and the Sundance Kid.” “A gay actor friend 
of mine who has lost 1 1 friends to AIDS says 
he is already feeling a backlash.” 

Joseph Morge astern, a screenwriter and 
columnist, said: “Gay actors are absolutely 
terrified by this, in the depths of despair. It’s 
only my speculation, but I think a de facto 
blacklist may well emerge." 

The fear is that the spread of AIDS will 
lead to public identification of homosexuals. 
Few gay producers, directors, high-level stu- 
dio executives and writers have publicly an- 
nounced their homosexuality. Gay actors 
hide their sexual preference because they are 
under pressure to appear in real life to be the 
macho lovers they portray on screen. Lesser- 
known actors are unlikely to be chosen by 
casting directors if they admit their homosex- 
uality, said Michael Kearns, one of Holly- 
wood’s few openly gay actors. 

“Often, they’ll even wear wedding rings to 
auditions.” said Chris Uszler, president of the 
.Alliance of Gay and Lesbian Artists. 

Nationally, homosexuals have accounted 
for more than 70 percent of the more than 
14,000 known cases of AIDS. Federal au- 
thorities have identified homosexuals, intra- 
venous drug users and hemophiliacs as the 
groups at highest risk of carrying the AIDS 
virus, which is spread through intimate sexual 
contact or the blood. 

Hollywood’s historical insecurity and sen- 



I- / .- 










Hollywood in more chaste days: 
Dolores Del Rio, Charles Farrell in 
“The Red Dance," made in 1928. 

sitivity to political and sock) trends has fre- 
quently caused the industry to react with 
panic. The inability of the silent -film star 
Fatty Arbuckle to get a job after being ac- 
quitted of m anslaughter charges, the restric- 
tive production code of the 1930s and the 
political blacklist of the McCarthy era are 
obvious examples. In his book “Senator Joe 
McCarthy," Richard H. Revere wrote that 
Hollywood was vulnerable to the senator’s 
accusations precisely because “Hollywood 
has always been a hotbed of conformity.” 

The panic is because all of Hollywood is 
based on fantasy,” said Goldman. “It’s not 
just because an actor is hiding being gay. 
These gorgeous men and women are sup- 
posed to be perfect.” 

Gilbert Cates, president of the directors’ 
guild, said: “An actor who has AIDS or 
suspects he has AIDS has an obligation as an 
act of good citizenship not to do a kissing 
scene. No amount of legislation will deal with 
that problem." 

The actor Charlton Heston went further. “I 
think a member of that lovely euphemism ‘a 
high-risk group’ has an obligation to refuse to 
do kissing scenes." 

Although not willing to be quoted, several 
important industry figures expressed dismay 
that Hudson bad played love scenes with 
Linda Evans on the television series "Dynas- 
ty” after he knew he was ilL But because 
refusing might disclose that he was homosex- 
ual. "it might be vety difficult for a gay actor 


to refuse a pari that required open-mouth 
kissing -" said Uszler of the Gay Alliance. 

The Screen Actors Guild has a clause in its 
contract that prohibits discrimination be- 
cause of sexual preference. Some female 
members of the guild have expressed concern 
about playing love scenes opposite gay ac- 
tors, since the AIDS virus has been discov- 
ered in saliva. 

The new guild ruling attempted to prevent 
discrimination by not telling an actor or ac- 
tress whom he or she was expected to kiss. 
The response has been that this is unworkable 
and unenforceable. "It’s absurd," said Aaron 
Spelling, producer of “Dynasty.” When a 
show Is cast, he said, "first you get a star, and 
then you get a leading lady. It's absurd to 
think ypu could keep Paul Newman or Tom 
Selleck a secret.” 

Although there is no documented case of 
AIDS having been transmitted through toss- 
ing, experts are unwilling to say that the 
disease cannot be transmitted through the 
kind of passionate, open-mouthed kisses that 
love scenes often require. Federal experts 
from the Centers for Disease Control have 
cautioned against intimate sexual contact, 
includin g ki«ing that involves exchange of 
saliva, with members of high-risk groups. 

Even if open-mouthed kissing were banned 
— the industry considers this unlikely — * 
people feel that movies and television would 
simply show sex in other ways. 

Thomas Kersey, ABCs vice president of 
broadcast standards and practices on the 
West Coast said ABCs policies already for- 
bid open-mouthed kissing. “We advise our 
producers that the French kiss is unaccept- 
able,” he said. “If we see a tongue flashing , 
we will edit it out.” 

The policies at NBC and CBS are less 
restrictive. “We simply make a judgment 
when a romantic situation gets excessive,” 
said Ralph Daniels, vice president of broad- 
cast standards at NBC. "We decide case by 
case,” said George Schweitzer, vice president . 
of communications for the CBS Broadcast 
Group. 

“This whole thing is' a tough call,”, said 
Dawn Steel, president of production at Para- 
mount. "I think exciting sexuality is part of 
the fantasy, part of the entertainment of a 
love story. I would hope it won’t be with- 1 
drawn.” 

A Los Angeles program to test blood sam- 
ples for presence of AIDS virus antibodies, a 
sign of possible infection, is too new to have 
come up with definitive statistics, said Dr. 
Martin Finn, medical director for public 
health for Los Angeles County. He said, 
however, that in a men's study at UCLA in 
which homosexual participants were self-se- 1 
lected and thus worried about the possibility ; 
of AIDS, 54 percent tested positive for expo- j 
sure to the virus. 1 

Scientists presume that infected individ- 
uals, although healthy, can infect others. 


people 

Messiaen, Scientists Cited 


The French composer OErier 
Messiaen and wo U- S. scientists 
have been named in Japanas the 
first winners of the Kyoto Prize for 

contributions to modem science 
and technology. The awartk. each 
worth 45 million yen (about 
S220.000). went to Mes&an. 7b. 
noted for developing a new musical 
movement that influenced both 
psychology and Expressionist an: 
Professor Rudolph E. Kalman . 5- - 
University of Florida, for work in 
control theory; and Professor 
Claude E. Shannon, 69, Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, who 
established the information theory 
for basic science. . . . The astron- 
omer Cart Sagan, 51. of Cornell 
University, is to be awarded a 10- 
million-yen prize Saturday in To- 
kyo by die Honda Foundation for 
his contribution to “science in har- 
mony with civilization.” . . . The 
American sculptor Richard Serra 
and West German painter Anselm 
Kiefer have wot prizes of $10,000 
each, the top awards of the 19S5 

Carnegie International exhibition. 

Serra, whose “Tilted Arc” was or- 
dered removed from a New York 
plaza earlier this year, won the 
prize for an abstract steel structure 
titled “Carnegie.” Kiefer’s prize 
cpme far an apocalyptic panning, 
“Midgard.” 

D 

The brother of the U. S. Navy 
diver killed during the hijacking of 
a TWA jetliner in June was induct- 
ed into the navy in a special cere- 
mony conducted at halftime of 
-.Sunday's National Football 
League game between the Wash- 
ington Redskins and Dallas Cow- 
boys in Washington. Patrick 
Stetfaem, 20, brother of Robert 
Dean Stethem. joined 79 other re- 
cruits who were administered the 
oath by Navy Secretary John F. 
Lehman Jr. Another Stethem 
brother, Kenneth, is also in the 
nayy. 

□ 

Candice Bergen. 39. has given 
birth to her first child, a girl named 
nan*. The actress has been mar- 
ried to the director Loms Mafle for 
five years. 

O 

The Royal Opera House, Coveut 
Garden, has called off its long- 
awaited production of Verdi’s 
“OieBo” so that Pladdo Domingo, 
who was to star, can work to raise 
money for survivors of the Mexican 


earthquake. The Sunday Times «... 
ported. It said Domingo would sing; . _ 

ai Covent Garden January “m 3 ^ 
hastily assembled revival of anoih-/ 
a popular opera” that would not 4 , 

require the lengthy rehearsals,' ! A 
-OieUo" would. -;!{t * 

□ y 

A man who played skittles with 

frozen haggis has lost his appeal! Oi l** 
against dismissal from the frozen fcljK" 
foods factory' where he worked m j 

Tony Nkhofis, 19. was seen hurling i j 

frozen sausages into the air and- ,,i** ■ 
bowling haggis — the Scottish deli-. ■}.[«. *• 
caev made of sheep innards- and- 
oatmeal — down the aisles of the 1 
storeroom, managers told an indus- 
trial tribunal in Cardiff. Wales, 

□ ■ ■ 

As the American soprano Jessye 
Norman concluded a performance 
in Tokyo, the audience and orches- 
tra began a tumultuous - ovation 
that lasted 47 minutes. When the 
crowd refused to leave the hall the 
conductor, Seijt Ozawa, asked: 

“Shall we do it again?” “No way,” 
responded Norman who had bom 
ri ngi ng nonstop for an hour. The 
house lights were turned on, but: 
this traditional notice to audiences ■ 
that the evening is over was Tg- 

noted. Finally Noonan sang “He's - " 

Got the Whole World Vlfe .'iffi - 
Hands,” netting a further IS min- *. 
utes of applause. •! & 

ov | 

Captain Mark Phiffips, husband r 
of Princess Anne of -Britaih,-krf£ j? 
been fined £100 in aXdbdqn- mag? j , 
istraies' conn, after pleading gufliy |r; 
to careless driving, his thbtfcfrivmg £ 
conviction in etgiu yeais. Police * 
said Phillips drove hiscar mio the 
wrong lane July 2 and coHIdtfd [ with 
a motorcycle on a London street, ‘ 
slightly injuring the rafer. P hDlips. 

37. was convicted of speeding in' 

1977 and 1978. 

o- 

The American oil. magnate J. 

Pari Gettf kept a bevy of mistress- ^ 
es at his English mansion aid ap-! 
parently relished the spectacle of 
them squabbling, a writer says. 

Russell Miller, in an extract in The *>. 
Sunday Times from hs new book, ‘ 
“The House of Getty^said Getty's 
household staff refenred to the ? , , 
changing roster of female compan-' ^ - 
tons as “the harem.” Getty left $4 *“* 
billion when be died at 83 in 1976 ’ ‘ 

at Sutton Place, his Tudor home in ’Vr . 

Surrey. ■ : 






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For further details please contact- 

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PARIS & SUBURBS 


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OPHM4S 62 03 03 




REAL ESTATE 
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PARIS & SUBURBS 


FOR THE PAST 25 YEARS 

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Brvmeta: 343-1899. 
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I Mt o ar 67-Z7-93/66-25-44. 
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Wert Coart: (415) 362-8339. 

SOUTH AFRICA 


- . LATIN AMERICA 


Baenaa Mae; 41 40 31 
Pop*- 312) 
Caracae:33U54 
. Guayaquil 51 4505 
Urkk 417852 
Parana: 6? 05 1) 

Scm Jose: 22-1055 
Scetfiago: 6961 555 
Sue Paolo: 852 1893 

RUDDLE EAST 


Wvrairc 246301 . 
Kuwwk 5614485. 
Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar 416535. 


Jedckdc 667-1500. 
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FAR EAST 

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Hang Kang: 5-213671. 
Jakarta: 510092. 

Monte 817 07 49. 

Seoul: 735 87 73. . * 
Sin gap ore. 222-2725. 
Taiwan; 75244 25/9. ' 
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AUSTRALIA 
M e lbourne. 690 8233. 
Sydney: 929 56 39, 957 4320. 
Perth: 328 93 33. 



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