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■' j « ■ _ Hie Global Newspaper r i 

jr ; Edited in Pans - ; 1 • ' 

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PARIS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


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The Associated Press 

'I BOGOTA — A volcano erupted 
western Colombia overnight 

- ' -•. 'ednesday, burying a town and 
• /■^Iree villages in torrents, of mud 

? ‘.\d melted snow as residents slept 
....'< officials said Thursday tbey feared 
. * -t.'.'at 15JOOO to 20,000 peoplehad 
J 1 :,, Sen killed. . 

- Armero, a coffee fanning town 

i\ . : 50,000 people, “doesn’t exist 

jiymore," a Red Cross worker, 
V’-’s-i scoando Doque, said in a radio. 
.[ ’■* p urview from the town. Officials 
. 1GMXX> people had been res- 

. . ;... ; ^Ted there. . 

■ " Amero is about 105 miles (168 
; 'telemeters), northwest erf Bogota 
> r .id 30 mifes fr<Hn the Andean voi- 
: ri/.’inoNevado del Rniz. - 
fL ; Eduardo Alzale, governor of To- 
/ ’.C Tia state, said in an interview with 

..- ., e Bogoti radio cham Caracd 

- •:.:ir.'flt U S5 percent of : the town is 
. ^ jstroyed, and we estimate there 

• - • i-,fe 15,000 deaths.” 

- ."[ Colombia's . Red Cross director, 
rtemo " Franco, said: “Rescue 
1 r bikers are talking about 20,000 
iacL It isan immense tragedy." 

- The Loll would be the worst vd- 
„ no disaster smee Mount Petek 

- “ " aimed nearly 30,000 lives in 1902 
r c ''t the French Caribbean island of 
." f ~ j-aitinique. 

, spokesman for the national 

’-"-rvfl Defense, Major Hugo Ardila, 
■' '- id that the toll of wounded - was 
^ K known. . "... 

- [Gustavo Esguerra, governor of 
r iff-,, jndinamarca state, where the 

^option occurred, said in a tele- 


: v Caribbean 

. - ..va 




) VENEZUELA 


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•' — pacific 3 : ' 

Bogota 

. T • J-!’ COLOMBIA'- f 


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'^ECUADOR ' 

”:C? /^PEHU 


-300 miles 


■phone interview; “There could be 

20.000 to 25,000 dead bu we hope 
that many of ,the missing people 
saved themselves by climbing near- 
by mountains,” United Press Inter- 
national reported from BogotiL 

[Hie United Nations Disaster 
■and Relief Organization said 
Thursday that rescue workers had 

- recovered 4.000 bodies from the 
ruins of Armero, and thar 15,000 
may have died in that town alone. 
UH reported from New York- The 
organization based its information 
on reports from the Colombian 
Red Cross. 

[Several hundred houses were 
destroyed in the town -of Chin- 
china, near Amera, the UN agency 

- said, and the situation was critical 
in the towns of Honda and Mari- 
quita, which were in danger of be- 
ing washed dot if a local dam burst 
because of flood waters. Up to 

60.000 survivors would be evacuat- 
ed from the 'region, the agency 
said.] 

Temando Rivera, the pilot of a 
crop-dusting plane that flew over 
the area, said an avalanche of mod 
had destroyed the villages of San- 
tnarib, Carmelo and Pindalito, 
which had a total population of 
about 20,000. 

Mr. Rivera, said he had seen sur- 
vwms “dinging to. trees they had 
climbed, some were on roofs that 
•weren’t reached by the thud, and 
even some in a cemetery that had a 
cement wall around iti” 

He saM in an interview with Car- 
acal that mad had buried farm- 
houses along a nearby river for 25 
miles. - 

“They have to send in helicop- 
ters to save these people,” Mr. Ri- 
vera said, “because everything is 
shnomded by mnd and there is no 
other way to get to them.” 

Ambulances and rescue workers 
were having difficulty.reaching Ar- 
mero because the mud destroyed 
the highway and five bridges lead- 
ing into the town, the Caracd radio 
quoted rivildef erne workers as say- 

^Drefirst jcnimah^tsto arrive in 
Armero. described the scene as 
“apocalyptic” and “Dante-esque.” 
One reported that he could “only 



U.S., Soviet Reach Agr 


HMm/un (Continued on Page 2, CoL IQ 



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IheANoaotsd Praa 


' :c.‘ Terry Waite during a news conference in West Beirut 


On Hostages in Lebanon 


:" "J By Nora Boustany 

. WotHngrcm Pan Service 

BEIRUT — Terry Waite, the 
-* .rchbishop of Canterbury’s special 
./Dvqy, said T hursday Ms nns- 
to free four Americans held 
.vostage in L ebanon was m akin g 


jj e ^ 1 ^^^ with journalists 
f padowing him to stay away rather 
w-^ fian risk the lives of people in- 
^ dved at a critical point 
.. Mr. Waite, a special adviser to 
le Most Reverend Robert Runde, 
f Arrived in the Lebanese; capital 
/ednesday after establishing cqn- 
ict through an intermediary; with 

vie group holding the Americans. 
t e It. Waite said he had not yet met 
ice-to-face with the group- 
“We are in touch, in several 
■ays,” he said at a news conference 
_ l the Commodore Hotel in West 
.. ; -eiruL “Progress is bring m a de 
’. .nd we are moving foiwaid.” 

Mr. Waite hrid the impromptu 
anference to urge jonmabsts s%- 
,• !ig there not to tail him and endan- 
. er his safety, the lives of .the Amer- 
,ans or thrir kidnappers. . 

1 j J “I would like to make a plea that 

f* not to be followed by anybody 
,»j because if that happens then it 


might jeopardize my own safety 
ana the safety ctf other people,” he 
said: . • 

“It is ex tr e m ely important be- 
canse of the great, great sensitivity 
of the situation that I am left totally 

alone,” Mr. Waite said, “because 
anything 1 have to do beyond this 
point would have to be entirety by 
mysdf." 

Mr. Waite’s mission to secure the 
freedom of four Americans, who 
appealed to President Ronald Rea- 
gan and tire archbishop last week to 
act in their interest, has aroused the 
interest erf the foreign press in -Bei- 
rut. - 

American television correspon- 
dents flew to Borat on Wednesday 
with camera crews to trail the Brit- 
ish emissary, who is also an envoy 
of Pope John Paul II.- . - 

Mr. Waite called on journalists 
to let him get on. with his task 
without imdne publicity after he 
sot camriumen and photographer 
outside an apartment where he Is 


BeuuL 

He left a West Beirut hotel late- 
Wednesdayaxid drove to an undis- 
closed location escorted by Shiite 
(Cootinued on Page 7, CoL i) 


Th* A mori rti H An 

Prime Minister Shimon Peres telling Labor Party mem- 
bers in Tel Aviv of his disagreements with Ariel Sharon. 

Peres Insists Sharon 
Apologize for Criticism 


By William Qai borne 

Washington Past Service 

JERUSALEM — Supporters of 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres and 
Trade Minister Ariel Sharon, who 
is under threat of dismissal, negoti- 
ated Thursday to avert a collapse of 
the 14-month national unity gov- 
ernment. 

Mr. Sharon, whose removal 
would almost certainly bring down 
the . government, was reported to 
have approved a new letter of “clar- 
ification” of criti cism of the moves 
by Mr. Poes toward Middle East 
peace negotiations. 

After a meeting late Thursday 
with Mr. Peres, Yitzhak Peretz, a 
minister without portfolio and 
member of the four-member Se- 
phardic Guardians religious party 
in the Knesset, said that he had 
gained Mr. Peres's approval in 
principal of a letter of apology in 
winch Mr. Sharon explained six al- 
legations that he made against the. 
prime minister. 

• Mr. Peretz has been (he principal 
mediator in the cabinet crisis, 
which began Monday when Mr. 
Sharon accused Mr. Peres of “base 
craftiness” and “un equaled cyni- 


Ulster Pact 
Is Approved 
By Dublin 

The Associated Press 

DUBLIN — The Irish cabinet 
approved on Thursday an agree- 
ment negotiated with Britain that is 
aimed at ending conflict in North- 
ern Ireland. 

A brief statement after a five- 
hour cabinet meeting said, “The 
government has considered the An- 
glo-Irish agreement and approved 
it.” No details were given. 

Earlier, the British cabinet dis- 
cussed (he final draft of the accord 
but did not say whether it had been 
approved. 

The agreement is expected to 
give Ireland a “consultative role” in 
Northern Ireland's affairs, in ex- 
change for Ireland recognizing 
long-term British sovereignly over 
the province. 

Such an arrangement has been 
tried before, in 1974, but collapsed 
after a two-week general strike or- 
ganized by Northern Ireland’s 
Protestant majority, which saw it as 
weakening their union with Britain. 
. Leaders of the Protestant major- 
ity have vowed to resist the agree- 
ment, and two rightist lawmakers 
accused Prune Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of betraying the province. 

Irish and British newspapers said 
the agreement would be signed Fri- 
day by Mrs. Thatcher and Prime 
Minis ter Garret FitzGerald of Ire- 
land. The papers said it was not 
known whether the prime ministers 
would meet in England, Ireland or 
Northern Ireland. 

Mrs. Thatcher refused to say 
whether the agreement had beat 
approved or whether a summit 
meeting would take place. 

Press Association, the British do- 
mestic news agency, said without 
attribution that the cabinet was be- 
lieved to have endorsed the agree- 
ment 

British and Irish newspapers said 
that Dublin had won a last-nrinnte 

concession when London agreed 

that the secretariat through which 
Ireland is to exercise its consulta- 
tive role would be based in -Belfast 

Two Protestant leaders, the Rev- 
erend Ian Paisley and James Mo- 
lyneaux, have said they would con- 

the courts! anX if neceslaiy^would 
resign from elected office to force 
elections on die issue. 

Mr. Paisley, leader of the Demo- 
cratic Unionist Party, and Mr. Mo- 
lyneaux, leader of the Official 
Unionist Party, issued a statement 
asserting that the British govem- 

(Co&tmued on Page 7, CoL 1) 


asm” in conducting secret negotia- 
tions with Jordan. 

Mr. Sharon said they would re- 
sult in Israeli withdrawal from ter- 
ritories captured in the 1967 June 
war. 

A senior official dose to Mr. 
Peres said that the prime minister 
was studying the draft and thought 
that he could accept it “with a few 
minor changes.” 

Mr. Peres had said Wednesday 
that he was going to dis miss Mr. 
Sharon, a former general and de- 
fense minis ter, who was the archi- 
tect of Israel's 19S2 invasion of 
Lebanon. 

A meeting was scheduled Friday 
between Mr. Peres and the leader 
of the rightist Likud faction in the 
coalition. Foreign Minister Yitz- 
hak Shamir, to refine the language 
of the letter, gove rnment sources 
said. 

Mr. Sharon expressed regret 
Wednesday for any remarks that he 
said may have been “construed" as 
an insult to Mr. Peres. But be said 
his opinions on “subsiantive politi- 
cal issues'* Were unchanged 

Mr. Peres rejected the statement 
as inadequate and said that Mr. 

(Continued on Page 7, CoL 2) 


U.S. Rejects 
Soviet Offer 
On Missiles 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The White 
House rejected on Thursday a 
Kremlin proposal that the two 
countries should reduce their land- 
based long-range missiles before 
Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev meet in Geneva next 
week. 

Administration officials said the 
plan called on the Soviet Union 
and the United States to reduce 
their nuclear arsenals by 200 to 300 
missil es each as a sign of good faith 
in arms control negotiations. 

Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, said that the latest So- 
viet proposal on missiles “would 
not meet our criteria of stability, 
balance and equity.” 

The proposal Mr. Speakes said, 
would entail relatively fewer war- 
head reductions by the Soviet 
Union. The ratio of warheads to 
targets would move further to Mos- 
cow’s advantage, and its first-strike 
capability would be enhanced. 

The Soviet Union's main 
strength is in land-based missiles. 
The U.S. relies more on submarine- 
based missiles and bombers. 

U.S. officials said the plan would 
enable Moscow to eliminate 200 or 
300 of its oldest and least effective 
missiles. But the United States 
would have to cut its Minuieman 
missile force, the backbone of its 
land-based nuclear deterrent. 

■ Offer Made Last Month 

Earlier, Don Oberdorfer and Da- 
vid Hoffman of the Washington Post 
reported: 

The Soviet proposal that each 
nuclear superpower quickly reduce 
its land-based intercontinental 
missil es was first made in the Gene- 
va nuclear and space arms negotia- 
tions in early October. 

It was repealed last week in Mos- 
cow to George P. Shuitz, the U.S. 
secretary of state, U.S. administra- 
tion officials said Wednesday. 

There is speculation that the So- 
viet proposal could be officially un- 


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Swiss troops taking an oath to provide security for officials 
in Geneva for the LLS.-Soviet summit meeting next week. 


veiled next week as a propaganda 
ploy when Mr. Reagan meets with 
Mr. Gorbachev. 

The Soviet Union is believed to 
have about 1,459 land-based inter- 
continental ballistic miss ile launch- 
ers. or missiles, while the United 
States has about 1.032 comparable 
weapons. The Soviet proposal is for 
the reduction to be made in launch- 
ers rather than in warheads. 

In another arms control develop- 
ment Wednesday, U.S. officials re- 
vealed that the Reagan administra- 
tion, in a previously unreported 
section of its recent Geneva arms 
proposal was willing to eliminate 
most of the Pershing-2 intermedi- 


ate-range missiles being deployed 
in Western Europe. 

The U.S. proposal calls for a lim- 
it on European-based intermedi- 
ate-range ballistic missiles of 140 
launchers on each side, with a war- 
head limit of about 420 to 450 on 
each side. 

The Soviet side would be expect- 
ed to deploy all its 140 launchers in 
SS-20 missiles with three warheads 
each, tor a total of 420 warheads. 

The U.S. side, officials said, con- 
templates 36 single-warhead Per- 
shing-2 missiles, plus 104 ground- 
launched cruise missile launchers 
with four single-warhead missiles 
on each launcher. 


Defying Reagan, Senate Votes Asian Textile Quotas 


By Steven V. Roberts 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON —The Senate, 
defying threats of a presidential 
veto, has approved legislation that 
would place stringent quotas on 
textile imports from 12 countries, 
most of them in Asia. 

The vote Wednesday was 60 to 

A task farce has urged the US. 
to file trade actions against Ja- 
pan and Taiwan. Page 2. 

39. A similar version was passed 
last mouth by the House, and a 
conference most now reconcile the 
two measures. 

The bill would cut textile im- 
ports by 30 percent from the two 
largest sources. South Korea and 
Taiwan. Products from Hong Kong 
would be cut 14 percent Imports 
from nine other countries, China. 
Japan, Pakistan, Indonesia, India, 
the Philippines, Thailand, Brazil 
and Singapore, would be frozen at 
1984 levels. 

Senator Daniel J. Evans, the 
Washington Republican who led 
the fight against the bib, said he 
was convinced that President Ron- 
ald Reagan would veto whatever 
bill came out of the conference and 
that Congress would sustain the 
veto. A two-thirds vote is needed to 



Daniel J. Evans 

override a veto, and the bill’s sup- 
porters failed to get as much in 
either chamber. 

Sponsors of the measure main- 
tain, however, that Mr. Reagan will 
ultimately decide to sign the legis- 
lation because a veto would hurt 
Republicans in key Southeastern 
states in next year’s elections. 

“The textile industry in this 
country is in crisis,” argued Senator 


Strom Thurmond 

Strom Thurmond, Republican of 
South Carolina. “Unless something 
is done to stop these massive im- 
ports, we won’t have a textile in- 
dustry in a few years.” 

The textile bill is the first trade 
measure to pass Congress since its 
summer recess. It has become the 
focus of a protectionist movement 
in Congress prompted by the U.S. 
trade deficit, which has approached 


a record S150 billion this year and 
cost hundreds of thousands of jobs. 

Many other bills are working 
their way through the legislative 
process, partly because Democrats 
believe they can use the trade issue 
against the Republicans in congres- 
sional elections a year from now. 

Under pressure from the State 
Department, the Senate altered its 
original bill to be less restrictive 
toward China. The administration 
is concerned that a sharp cut in 
Chinese imports would harm rela- 
tions between the two countries 
and provoke retaliation ag ai n st 
American manufacturers. 

The House bill is harsher toward 
C hina than the Senate version. 

Other industries are also looking 
for help against imports. The bill 
passed Thursday, unlike the House 
bill includes a clause protecting 
the domestic shoe industry from 
foreign competition by limiting im- 
ports to 60 percent of the U.S. 
market. 

Senators from copper-producing 
states added an amendment Thurs- 
day that would direct the adminis- 
tration to initiate trade talks with 
copper-exporting countries in an 
attempt to limit their share of the 
American market. That amend- 
ment won Lhe votes of lwo Republi- 
can representatives. Pete V. Dome- 
nici of New Mexico and Jake Gam 
of Utah, for the final bill. 


Botha Wants Blacks on Pretoria Advisory Body 


The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — Presi- 
dent Pieter W. Botha asked the 
President’s Council a parliamenta- 
ry advisory body, on Thursday to 
draft plans to add blacks to its 
membership for the first time. 

The 60-member council includes 
41 whites, 13 people of mixed racial 

background and six Asians, and is 
empowered to resolve disputes 
among the separate chambers of 
Parliament that represent those 
three racial groups. 

Meanwhile, the police arrested 
718 blade strikers at the Baragwan- 
ath Hospital in the black township 
of Soweto, near Johannesburg. Vir- 
tually all the strikers voluntarily 
offered themselves for arrest after 
leaders of the walkout were de- 
tained two days after the strike 
starred. 

[In another development. South 
Africa has suspended minting gold 
Krugerrand coins, the first tangible 
sign Thai anti-apartheid sanctions 
by Western governments are begin- 
ning to hurt. Renters reported,] 

. The President’s Council was re- 


vised in September 1984, when a 
pew constitution took effect creat- 
ing the new houses of Par liam ent 
for the Asian and mixed-race mi- 
norities alongside the existing 
while chamber. The black majority 
was excluded from representation 
in the Parliament or the council. 

“Reform means new adapta- 
tions," Mr. Botha rold a special 
meeting of the council Thursday. 
“It means that new circumstances 
call for a new approach.” 

Mr. Botha Has said in recent 
months that he is commuted to 
devising some form of power-shar- 
ing with blacks in a system that 
protects the rights of whites and 
other minorities. He has not of- 
fered any detailed plans apart from 
ruling out a one-man. one* vote sys- 
tem, saying it would mean white 
abdication. 

The president did not advise the 
council on how many blacks should 

be included or whal powers they 
should have, saying It was up to the 
council members to propose the 
revisions. 

In Soweto, Lhe striking Barag- 


wanath Hospital workers were ar- 
rested after refusing to heed police 
orders to break up a protest dem- 
onstration on the hospital grounds. 

A police spokesman said 144 
men and 574 women were being 
char ged at a Soweto police station 
with attending an illegal gathering. 
The spokesman said they probably 

would be released and void 10 ap- 
pear in court Monday. 

In Cape Town, Heather Peter- 
son, the wife of a detained anti- 
apanheid activist, Robert Peter- 
son, said about 300 jailed activists 
began a three-day hunger strike 
Wednesday. 

II Sanctions Take Toll 

The organization dealing with 
exports of gold Krugerrand coins. 
International Gold Corporation, 
said Wednesday night that produc- 
tion had been suspended several 
weeks ago bat refused to say exact- 
ly when, Reuters reported Thurs- 

The coin, launchedm 1970, has 
helped South Africa export about 
43 million ounces of gold on top of 


its bullion exports. At its peak in 
sales, lhe Krugerrand accounted 
for up to 12 percent or total gold 
sales by South Africa, according to 
economists. 

Don Mackay-CoghilJ, the com- 
pany’s chief executive said that de- 
mand for the Krugerrand had been 
affected by recent import bans im- 
posed by ibe United States and 
Japan, both major markets. 

■ Namibia Releases Prisoners 

Namibia’s Soutfa-African spon- 
sored administration freed Thurs- 
day 22 long-term political prison- 
ers, all members of the South-West 
Africa People’s Organization. Reu- 
ters reported from Windhoek, 
South-West Africa. 

Faciei Kozonguize, justice min- 
ister in the interim administration 
set up by South Africa which con- 
UroU the territory, said their release 
was a gesture of “peace and reeon- 
cfliation." 

The most prominent of the 22 
freed was Ebaser Thudadeienl a 
veteran nationalist and trade 


reetnent 

Arms 


Accord Due 
For Geneva 
Signature 

By Leslie H. Gelb 

.Vfw York Times Service 
WASHINGTON — The United 
Stales and the Soviet Union are 
poised to announce at the Geneva 
summit meeting that they have 
agreed to combine efforts to halt 
the spread of chemical weapons, 
according to Reagan administra- 
tion officials. 

The U.S. officials said Moscow 

ON PAGE 2 

■ Reagan hopes talks will mod- 
ify Gorbachev’s view of U.S. 

B U.S. and Soviet drafted a new 
cultural accord. 

fl An air of calm prevails as Ge- 
neva gets ready Tor visitors. 

had agreed to the accord on chemi- 
cal weapons and that the adminis- 
tration had agreed in principle, al- 
though they said the Pentagon was 
continuing, to resist giving its final 
approval Details on how to put the 
accord into effect have not been 
worked out, they said. 

Officials said the agreement on 
chemical weapons was one of sev- 
eral arms-contro! statements the 
two sides have prepared for an- 
nouncement at the end or the meet- 
ings next week between President 
Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader. 

But administration officials ac- 
knowledged that unless there was a 
major breakthrough on arms con- 
trol these measures would not be 
sufficient by themselves for Mr. 
Reagan to be able to portray the 
meeting as a major success. 

Because of what they said were 
continuing uncertainties about 
reaching an agreement on offensive 
and defensive nuclear forces, most 
administration officials continued 
to play down prospects for break- 
throughs in Geneva. 

Administration officials familiar 
with summit meetings noted that 
statements tilling back and forth 
from optimism to pessimism were 
not unusual before high-level meet- 
ings. Presidents and their advisers 
use statements about expectations 
as part of the bargaining process 
and as a way of shaping opinion 
about the results. 

The disclosure of an agreement 
on chemical weapons comes when 
the United States and the Soviet 
Union have been negotiating in 
Geneva to destroy existing stock- 
piles and cease further production, 
as distinguished from preventing 
their spread to other countries. The 
two sides have been unable to reach 
such an accord. 

The administration has said So- 
viet troops have used chemical 
weapons in Afghanistan, and both 
sides have expressed concerns 
about Iraq’s use of chemical weap- 
ons against Iran. 

The use of chemical weapons in 
warfare is banned by the Geneva 
Protocol of 1925. but there are no 
restrictions on production and 
stockpiling. 

Mr. Gorbachev, in a visit to Paris 
last month, advanced what he 
called the “thought" that the two 
sides could work on an agreement 
on halting the spread of chemical 
weapons as they had developed a 
treat) to prevent the spread of nu- 
clear weapons. 

The officials said the other arms- 
control matters, either already set- 
tled in principle or on the verge of 
agreement, included a new and 
broader understanding on ways to 
prevent the spread of nuclear 
weapons: a pledge against using 
(Continued on Page 7, Col. 2) 


INSIDE 

B The House voted a new U.S. 
debt ceiling, averting a federal 
financial crisis. Page 4. 

■ In Manila, many questions 

surround the upcoming presi- 
dential election. Page 5. 

B UJS. congressional panels ap- 
proved a pact on shanng nucle- 
ar technology with China but 
blocking sales for now. Page 4. 

B Chile's bishops accused the 
military government of carrying 
out state terrorism. Page 7. 

WEEKEND 

■ Peter Zadek, at 59 still an 

enfant terrible of German the- 
ater. has taken over the Ham- 
burg Schauspielhaus. Page 9. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

B Beatrice Cos-, the U.S. con- 
sumer-products concern, ac- 
cepted a buyout offer valued at 
S5J billion. Page 13. 

ILLS, retail sales plunged a 
record 3.3 percent in October, 
the government said. Page 13. 



v v ■ '*• * t S3 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


Reagan Hoping Dialogue Will Modify Gorbachev’s View of U,S , WORLD br iefs 


By Bernard Wdnraub 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan believes he will 
have a significant effect on Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev's views of the United 
States through his “personal dia- 
logue" with the Soviet leader at the 
summit meeting next week, a U.S. 
official has disclosed. 

The official said Wednesday that 
Mr. Reagan and White House aides 
believed that results in arms con- 
trol and reducing regional tensions 
between the superpowers would be 
seen in the months after the meet- 
ing and not at the meeting itself 
Tuesday and Wednesday. 

“The president very much wants 
to get at, or to establish, a basic 
understanding in the min d of the 
general secretary of what our con- 
cerns are." the official said. “Why 
do we worry about the Soviet pro- 
gram, which of their systems pose 


the biggest problems, our concept 
of deterrence and how it can be 


of deterrence and how it can be 
made more stable." 

The official also said Mr. Reagan 
would seek to discuss the adminis- 
tration's space-based shield against 
missiles and to convince the Soviet 
leader "why it is clearly not a vi- 
sionary whun or a political stunt." 

The research program has 
emerged as a central issue on the 
summit meeting's agenda. In Mos- 
cow. Mr. Gorbachev reaffirmed 
that the Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive would be his main concern at 
the summit meeting. 

In a statement to a delegation of 
Nobel laureates Wednesday, the 
Soviet leader made no mention or 
regional conflicts, human rights or 
other issues Mr. Reagan intends to 



missile defense would be his main 
concern at the Geneva talks to 
mean dm he would not retreat 


Greece Disrupted by 24-Hom- Steike 


^ Soviet Union h. — 'Te^J. - !S W , P 2 ? JS 

a formidable publicity campaign 
against the space-baled defense 


ZSSSJEEZ AH flight by Olympic ^ 
shown willingness to curtail re- and ship sailings were canceled, trams and 
search on tlw program. 


ptadfr amnofthtf mpandSy St Th^labor minister. Evai^osYaimopojJ^id a 
mat rests on the leadeisofall coun- “misemHcfa^ 

tries but primarily those of the mid 60 percent of his members, 70 percent :of d«*ncity wooers and 90 
XJSSJL and the United States.” percent of telecommunications workers had gone out. 

Mr. Gorbachev said. “We are going . T 

EC Body Votes Spending Inodes ,, 

hands not enmty. STRASBOURG (Reuters) — The European Parliament voted Thi-.si 

“The Soviet Union,” Mr. Gorba- day for increases in 

chev said, “wants the meeting to cover the cost of promised benefits for its new members. Spam and 


S P *Wi$fnear unarumry .memb^s P ^Sfi° r 

hancma international Deace and se- reinstatement of about two billion ECUs (S » ) pending. 


Seeking bipartisan support before his summit meeting with 
Mikail S. Gorbachev, Mr. Reagan meets with congressio- 
nal leaders, from left, Robert H. Michel, Republican of 


Illinois; Jim Wright, Democrat of Texas; Robot J. Dole, 
Republican of Kansas; Robert C Byrd, Democrat of West 
Virginia; and Alan K. Simpson, Republican of Wyoming. 


handng international peace and se- reinstatement of about two oirnon r.v.us 

curity^ improving tKS £ Fmancc mtaister* o£ the present ^ % 

tween the USA IL and the United Executive Commission s anginal UKtadP* 

States, checking the arms race and presidency, currently held by ^embo^^w^ ^parhamat 
preventing its extension to outer that major new spending would niaJce it ™offl : for national govern- 
space;” meats to reach a compromise over the final sizeoFi the budget. 

It was on the last issue that Mr. Almost one-third of the amount was allocated by the parliament for 
Gorbachev focused his comments, honoring spending promises to Spain and Portugal that were made 
i — : « j rinn'ns Tiwntiiirinnc fnrthar entrv to the EG in January. lDe rest would 


The U.S. official said that at the 
talks lasting more than eight hours 
in Geneva, Mr. Reagan would seek 
to influence Mr. Gorbachev's fu- 


understandable basis For Tear of can influence in a constructive way 
aggression from outside." the U.S. by personal dialogue, by his pre- 


sues and human rights. It was un- 


“The Soviet people, having lived during negotiations for their "entry to the EC in Jan uary. T he rest would 
for 40 yean surrounded by Ameri- go to ward dealing a backlog of unfulfilled spending comxmtmenB for EC 
can ‘forward-based' weaponry, projects. 


ture behavior and dispel some of appeared to hold “a separate but 
his negative opinions about the real belief" that the Reagan admin- 


United States. 

The U-S. official said President 
Reagan would point out that the 
United States has no “animus" to- 


ward negotiating with the Soviet also conveyed the belief that a mili- 


Ffidal said. sentation of how be views our inter- 

He added that Mr. Gorbachev ests internationally, how he views 
ipeared to hold “a separate but their system, how he thinks we 
al belief" that the Reagan admin- should get along, and over the 
ration opposed “the very idea of course of 10 or 12 hours, to relieve 
ting business with the Soviet whatever concerns were based 
rioo." upon the other side's worry of his 

The official said Mr. Gorbachev fundamental convictions about 
rhfir a milt- East-West rCulIlOnS. 


dear if these proposals would ro iMrwMu-waeu weaponry, 

SC” on “ fromthead - Liberia Detains Opposition Officials 


umuauvu, _■ - — _ _ . • . 

Asked what the United States 

miaTit Mr above theu-.homes, hi 


istration opposed “the very idea of 
doing business with the Soviet 
Union." 

The official said Mr. Gorbachev 


raise. 

“The most pressing question," 


“The president has stated his 


wry- industrial complex dominated 
the United States and opposed an 


Mr. Gorbachev said, “is whether sense that there is a Soviet attitude improvement in U.S.-Soviet ties. 


strike weapons are to be or not to 
be in outer space." 


of mistrust of the United States, 
and as be reads their history some 


Of Mr. Reagan, the official said: 
‘Each of those thing s he believes he 


The official said Mr. Reagan in- 
tended to make proposals to Mr. 
Gorbachev in the four key areas on 
the meeting’s agenda: arms con- 
trol, bilateral relations, regional is- 


thought Mr. Gorbachev wanted to -p 
accomplish at the meeting, the offi- „ 
dal replied, “I expea that it is to t™! 
judge the leadership of the United 
States first, to determine the quali- snart 
ties or leadership that he faces." 

■ Gorbachev Persists on SDI . “i 


jitover- 

hesakL 


“How would ordinary Ameri- 


ABIDJAN. Ivory Coast (Com- 
bined Dispatches) — Leaders of 


cans, who are not accustomed to 

haying the weapons of others on rounded up m MonrcMf^and 


uav* WUILAJtU ui ULUUJ Ull * - • -I*. _J„. 

wders, either on earth or in hoitfes wre loo ted tbursd^tw 

fed in such a caser Mr. ^ to 

4jev asked. . ■ . K- Doe following Tuesdays abor- 


Gorbachev Persists on SDI . “I think that tension in relations tive according to reports 

Serge Schmememn of The New. between our countries would esca- reaching the Ivory Coast. 
irk Times reoorted from Mnxo/iw late to a nrwnr unnmwipniwi mim Residents of Monrovia said that 


U.S., Soviet Draft a Cultural Accord 


By Bernard Gwertzman during the s ummi t meeting in Ge- one-year exchanges of high school 

New York Times Service ncva next week and college Students and the expan- 

WASHINGTON- The United President Ronald Reagan has son of summer language students 
States and the Soviet Union have become interested in increasing the and postgraduate study exchanges, 
completed drafting a cultural ex- exchange of young people, particu- There also has been discussion of 
change agreement that the Reagan larfy y oang Soviet citizens coming having young people attend sum- 


neva next week 


and college students and U 
son of summer language 


RENCONTRE 

REAGAN - GORBATCHEV 


euange agreemcui uiai. uic xvcagan larfy young Soviet OUZenS mining 
administration hopes will open the t0 th e United States, in the belief 
way Lo a major exchange of young that such visits might help reduce 


Geneve 


people, government officials said, misunderstandings, the officials 
The officials said Wednesday said. 


80 nov. 19BS 


that the accord was to be signed The United States has proposed 


&uv ® 

Est. 1911 

Just cdl the taxi driver ''sank roo doe noo" 

• 5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

• Falkenturm Str. 9, MUNICH 


Nom . REAGAN 

Prenoin , R()NALD p, 

Affil., DI. AVDOV 


PLAYBOY 


Hcral»Sribu»« 


Opening for TJk‘ 
fcSrm in Witwow 

hW> »M»» CimMmW 

ViivT-v. 'FLT.CSZ 
*=Z s-. _r s; eJSa 


omit Leaden Vow to Push 
- an Economic Recovery 


1 ST r&rg ffTOg 




There also has been discussion of 
having young people attend sum- 
mer camps in the other country and 
of more athletic meets and other 
contacts. 

Through the years, many Ameri- 
can young people have visited the 
Soviet Union, but relatively few 
Soviet young people have come to 
the United States. Those who have 

come often have been in their 30s r « suwm , K r\ f - n | n m 

and would more accurately be de- CZCZC i\wlvMUU I • 

scribed as youth leaders. ‘ nCWWEm Affjl 

The derision by Mr. Reagan to - - n0ftA '* PLAYBOY 

press for admission of more Soviet o JX/U 

young people comes at a time of “ 

concern in Congress about the — ■ — 

□umber of Soviet agents in the 

United States. But a U.S. official . n»i 

said he did not believe the admis- Copy of a press card issued to Ronald Reagan's son, who Is assigned to rep< 
si on of more young people would Geneva summit meeting forFlayboy ma gazine . He is expected to write a featn 
cause alarm. 

This will be the first cultural ac- f -w-w • O • /^i 

Lalmness rrevails in bummiLCil 

cause of the Soviet intervention in 

Geneva Takes Planning, Security Measures in Stride 

performing arts groups and travel- ^ ^ 

. . By Thomas W. Nctxcr During a recent press confer- preparations has been 

Vif 1 1 - tr0UpeS ’ , New Yofk Times Service cnee, for example, at vdiich it was mg that resembles a 

as the Bolshoi Ballet, wctc regular GENEVA — When the Swiss announced that during the summit the United Nations h* 


and that officials had been .de- 
tained. Widespread chaos in Mon- 
rovia also' was reported. Radio 
ELWA, a private Liberian radio 
station, said that General Doe had 
dismissed Brigadier General Mau- 
rice Zeze and replaced him with 
_ Brigadier General Rudolf Kdaco. 

In Havana, the Foreign Ministry 
rebuffed on Wednesday Liberian 
assertions that Cubans had taken 
part in the cram attempt 

; (AFP, UPI) 



Samuel K. Doe 


U.S. Intelligence Panel Criticizes QA 


lha Aooocfad FV« 

Copy of a press card issued to Ronald Reagan's son, who is assigned to report on toe 
Geneva summit meeting for Playboy magazine. He is expected to write a feature article. 


Calmness Prevails in Summit Qty 


WASHINGTON (WP) — Senator David F_ Dorenbeiger, a Republi- 
can of Minnesota who is chairman. <rf the Select Committee on InteQi- 
rnnee, has criticized the Central Intdfigence Agency and its directs, 
W iUinm J. Casey, for lacking a “sense of direction" and particularly for 
faflure to understand the Soviet Union. ^ 

Mr. Durenberger said Wednesday his committee would consider 
recommending I^jriarion that would substantially downgrade the QA 
director’s role arid make the president’s national security affairs adviser 
responsible for evaluating mtdHaence in the policy-making process. 
Despite his crittasms, .Mr. Durenberger also defended Mr. Casey as a 
“professional” and “a damgood gnyin that job.” ! 

Mr. Durenberger adcoowledged, however, that a vote Thursday in his 
Rep obhean -dominated committee over whether to recommend Mr. Ca- 
sey’s dismissal after the CJA’s hamffing of die Soviet defector Vitaly i 
Yurchenko would be &T in shppor tefThe director, avote reflecting party 
lines. Mr. Yurchenko defected in Angnst, but three months later changed 
his mind and denounced the QA as IddmqipeES and torturers before 
returning to Moscow last week. 


U.S. Rejects AIDS Tests on Workers 


I^SSS 


PUS 5 ’ 


WmIt hIm I wi PmI. ° gfeaS 




ZSoacl 


mg exhibitions. 

Until 1979, Soviet troupes, such 
as the Bolshoi Ballet, were regular 
visitors to the United States. Amer- 
ican groups, including the Boston 
Symphony, the New York City 
Center Ballet and the American 
Balia Theater, have gone to the 
Soviet Union- 

Officials said they were not able 
to say at this time which artists or 
exhibitions would be exchanged. 
At least one traveling exhibition a 
year is to be oiganized by each side. 
The number of performing arts 
groups would depend to some ex- 
tent on financing. 


During a recent press confer- preparations has been on a buM- 


ence, for example, at which it was mg that resembles a bunker near individuals known to be infected. 


WASHINGTON (WP) — IheUA Department of Health and Hunan 
Services announced natianaUgnidetines Thursday cm AIDS in the work- 
place that generally recommend against routine screening to see who 
might be infected with the virus and against employment res triction s on 


Army announced that anyone try- Swiss troops had orders to shoot It is called the International -there is no evidence that acquired immune deficiency syndrome is spread 
ing to breach security during next anyone ignoring their order to halt. Conference Center, where anthori- by casual contact of the sort^ that occurs in most occupational settings^ 
week’s summit conference would there was laughter when an army ties issue accreditation, promise si- The gmddinescoartterproposals by legislators in several states and the 
be shot the statement caused little official added that the infantry multaneoos translation of speeches Congress to test certain groups of workers, oyh as food handlers, 
reaction. commander, Colonel Hans Meier, and statements in E ng l i s h, French teachers and heal th-care workers, and impose restrictions cm those found 

No one has been shot and killed is in civilian fife a director of the and Russian, and will operate a to be AIDS camera. But they also noteri that fortiher ^commendations 


announced that during the summit the United Nations headquarters. The guidefines say that sudi steps are medically unnecessary because 

Swk< fmons h*H nn)m t n thnnl Tt ic nllnt tho Tnlwnotinml - 1 — — — : J 1 - * < * - ' 1 ■» ■ > 


week’s summit conference would there was lau g hter when an army ties issue accreditation, promise si- The gukldiixs counter proposal 
be shot the statement caused little official added that the infantry mujtancous translation of speeches Congress to test ccrtam groups 


commander, Colonel Hans Meier, 


No one has been shot and killed is in civilian life a director of the 
by army guards in -40 years, and Swiss National Bank. 


lose restrictions an those found 
that further recommendations 


such “thorough” security, proven- In announcing that outdoor during the meeting. 


food and drinks bar 24 hours a day for sudi health-care workers as surgeons and dentists who perform 


tion and advance planning is sec- demonstrations could only be held Across town, te chnicians have 


“invasive procedures” were under review. 


ond nature to the Swiss. with a permit, the director of justice virtually taken over the Noga Hfl- 

With less than a week to go be- and police. Guy Fon tenet, said: ton Hold on the lake, turning it 

fore the meeting Tuesday and “We are determined that Geneva into a communications c enter for 


Air-India Baggage Wasn’t X-Rayed 


^ fore ^ nwetoig Tuesday and “We are determined that Geneva into a communications center for . NEW DELHI (AFP) — An X-ray machine that scans haevan. was not 

r.^irin ? 01 10 501116 K ' Wednesda y between Ronald Rea- is and will remain and island of several television networks with an- working when passengers checked m at Toronto for m AirTndia flfcbt 

InTh^TLericn £“ “ d & Gorbachev, peace and mrbBconter. And we are tennac on the roof, nearly two ih^wrfSSM 

In the past, AnKncan impresa- Swiss authorities are bracing for convmced that our atnens will un- miles (three kilometers) of power said in an affidavit received T hursday secum y 

10S nave undertax en tne cost ffl what officials in ilv rirv ctqi* derstand that sneh Mcrmrinnal rahl# mw hun miliw ■ ? «•?’ * • . . . . 


undenajeen me cost ot what officials in the city and state derstand that such exceptional cable, over two miles of telephone 
t “® Soviet stars and administrations say mil be the big- measures are not a breach of their cables and 200 telephones, 
the United states, while gesi event in Geneva's modem his- rights." nntd«i* m t>«. n«« 


Take advantage of our spedd rates for new subscribers and 
we ll give you an extra month of Tribs free with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand 
price in most European countries! 


bringing the Soviet stars and 
groups to the United States, while 
the United States has had to subsi- 
dize the costs of sending American 
groups. 

Despite the suspension of talks 
in 1979, exchanges of graduate stu- 
dents and scholars have continued, 
at a rate of about 75 a year. 


Outside, on the. quai, the Ji 


Geneva's main characteristic nese television network 


- Baggage was checked using a hand-held -explosives detector, the 
security officer, John D’Souza, said in a statement to an Indian commis- 
sion investigating the June 23 accident The cause of the crash has not 
bam determined, but Sikh extremists said they had set off a bomb aboard 


About 2,000 army infantrymen these days perhaps can be best ex- chartered a lake steamer called the plane. The crash killed no nwmL> 

Iff flrmnrwl tr/wnc vn^rw tKnn nlfliiuvf IK 99 »li> T • ***** 


and armored troops, and more than plained as a “can da" attitude. 
1_300 policemen will provide seen- A hotel official said, “Any oi 
rity. time, we couldn’t install a telex 

Geneva’s hotels have been com- telephone in less than a month. 


Hdvetii,” the Latin name for 


pietely booked for weeks, and tele- all that is suspended for the period 

nkMi. i • r. *» 


About 40,000 Americans on phone install ers and terimiei»n. of the sumnnL 


A hotel official said, “Any other Switzerland, complete with bar, FYir flip 
time, we couldn’t install a telex or a restaurants and a transmission ca- * w AlCCUru, y 

telephone in less than a month, bm ble back to the Hilton. A martial law court in Eizurnm. Tmkev n 

aU that is su^raded for the period Some Genevois are hostile to all terrorists w death on Tbuisday, 

of die sumnnL" these activities, caring more about accused of belonging to the mdoaound IZ D^VWl 

Besides seenritv. mill* of th* r,n arv Wav ^ uxiucigiouna group uev-y ol, or RevcdntKra- 


their own have visited the Soviet have been stringing miles erf lines Besides security, much of the restrictions on traffic and naritW ary Way. 

I Inion annnallv ic truincic m m. mkU 1 J. il.. .1 , ■ r “ » n. . 


Union annually as tounsis in re- and cables, and installing hundreds preparation for the s ummi t meet- places than w hat is going on. 


cent years, but only about a thou- of telephones. 


mg has centered on handling the A doctor who asked that 


To: Subscription Manager, International Herald Tribune, 

1 81 , avenue Cbaries-de-Gaule, 92521 NeuiBy Gedex, France. 
Please enter my subscription for: 


sand Soviet citizens have visited the But with typical efficiency that journalists who are expected. Only name not be used said: “What 


A R^anum seaman who Oedirom a ship in the port of Houston was 

^United States, Inm^Son and Natural- 
tis izauon Service officials, said. Paul FiricTSStbrS^d RaSS 


United Stare; each year. State De- this French-speaking region is not- the army and police will outturn- really going to come out of this sailor to be granted asylum in the United 
partment officials SaiO. ed for- CUV officials- armv nffieppe ber the media nartiemanf* vhn m mMMaO T™* t.n. d... n n ■ .. . _ • I- _ UmtCu States within a week. 


ed for, city officials, army officers, ber the media participants, who are meeting? Just more talk But fm 


The negotiations for the accord police, hoteliers, restaurateurs and expected to number about 3,000. 


□ 12morShs 
(+ 1 month free) 

□ 6morehs 
l+2weefafreej 

Q3mardhs 
{+ 1 Meek free) 


Biqi aril tfwnBAjctdntoaiPMn Ena a t wail . Ear nawnbterihertcriy 
Mcrdi31 ■ KB6J 


have been going on for more than a various other service personnel are 


year in Moscow, officials said. taking it ail in stride. 


In the weeks leading up to the 
conference, the focus of media 


trying to get out of this city on the 
19th, ana my main concern is 
whether I can get to the airport" 


a ? t * *?*“■ L****** ™ ap^ogy Thursday from 
0031 and called off its seizure if £10 
mlliOT f$14 mfflion) m assets of the NaticmaJ Union of. Mineworitert. 


The strike ended in March. 


(Reuters) 


□ My check 
is encl ose d 


Of 

SSS-. 


^sjjetfBrjKJL 

Greece 

(retard 


! U.S. Trade Action Urged France Apologizes Volcano Erupts in Colombia; 
J Against Japan, Taiwan At Least 15 >°00 Feared Dead 


Major Eruptions 

Since 79 AJD* 


By Qyck H. Farnsworth 

New York Tima Service 


onnnendatHMs. the tariffs on 256K 
RAM chips could rise substanti^- 


Reuters 

AMSTERDAM — France has 


■m u r — i 

•33 


Pteow charge my: 

□ Access 

□ American 


Sweden 

Swnharlond 


□ DnenOub 

□ Euroasrd 

□ Mastercard 

□ Visa 


1^ of &Fope,fkinh Africa frvrmrfrsKh 
Africa USA, French MpieaaMtfcfip Baa 

I i\ _saj 

fejiof Africa CflnodalfifciAnwm Gu# S» 

Aoa I *\ *«| 


Card expny date . 

G ydoc count| j 
number L, J 


. SgXtfUTB. 


15-11-85 


L Td n. rJ 


n — President dally beleaguered semicondi 

Ronald Reagans trade strike industry in ihe United States, 
force has recommended that he ;r . ,, D 

initiate unfair-trade complaints 

against Japan for selling semi coo- romJLI ™P^toi-howeve 
ductors below their fair value and h , , v 

visa Taiwan for faHorc lo pro- ! ? d “™,' 
iKicopnightsandiradeniarks.ac- o ul J 1 ^ ! h Jj* ^ 10 
cording lo administration officials. ISthc im™Sl^( 

Ii was unclear niursday whether mission stiD would have to 
Mr. Reagan would act on the rec- that the domestic industry has 
ommen da lions before he dqiarted injured by the imports. 
Saturday for his summit meeting in -rt.. fnrnt . ' 

Geneva Nov. .9 and 20. .^^ 7^1 Z 

Among the targets of such trade ate other dumping cases air 
complaints would be Japanese brought by some American 
companies that “dump" 256-kilo- companies, 
bit random access memory drips. Although the presidential 
one of the most powerful semiocm- rions would be dironed again! 
ductors avatbUe and a btnldmg djvidual annpani^ 
block m high-capanty conmuu^ govemment wbuld be very r 

tovolvedbecauseitwouldtec 

Sr ? u ”■ “P 00 ^ settleme 

called RAM chips. u>s _ agenciSfbund the Japa 

If the president accepts the rec- had dumped the chips. 


ly. and that could help the finan- apologized and offered compensa- 
dally beleaguered semiconductor non to the family of a crewman 


tes. who died when a Greenpeace ship, 
initiated the Rainbow Warrior, was sunk m 

ever the New Zealand’s Auckland harbor in 


Commerce Department still would ® i spokesman for the environ- 

have to determine officially that group said Thursday. 


Ihe chips are sdd in the United The leucr of apology and offer of 


— r - «rv4U U| uib WUJIM1 T , , _ 

States at below cost, or fair value, ^ agned by the 

and the International Trade Com- L rt ^ h def «Pl e . PfluI 


mission still would have to find 2 “^. °°. behalf J ot Preadem 
that the dcmtsUcmdiisir , 1 has been 


injured by the imports. Tuesday 

tt. * . , by Haxmdce Pereira, the widow of 

1 he strike force also recom- Fernando Pereir a, a Portuguese- 
mended that the president accder- bom Dutch citizen who was the 


(CoadDKd from Page 1) Ho votamo had. bem spewum 

see a sort of enormous beach of smoke, ashes and gases gin**» iogtf 

TlKre ■>« rqjom the vokano 
EddibertoNieio, a survivor, said started producing ash and smoke at 
m a radio mterview that many of 10:30 PM. Wednesday, and about 
his family members had been three hours later the mud and water 
«D«L _ hit Azmera • 

“I drink h was past 11 o'clock _ _ 
last night when we heard a fright- EJ-Darrdl Herd, deputy chief of 

erring noise,” he said, “and then a “J® U-S- Geological Survey’s Office 
blast of wind bit us and we saw fire Earthquakes, Volcanoes and En- 

fallmg from the sky.” ' peering in Reston, Virginia, said 

“It was horrible, so horrible,” volcano’s last ertqjtion of this 
Mr. Nieto said. “My wife was ™? mtade was in 1595. Since then 
killed. My mother was ldlled. My bem activeaTthinincH- enip- 
little gjzl who would have 4 years Qoa 5 » he said. . 


The Associated Press 

Here is a list of same of the 

major volcanic eruptions in hista- 

. . i i* 

• 79 AJD, Vesuvius, souih- y 
cm Italy, death toll unknown, 
Pompeii and two other towns 
buried. . 


.•1669, Etna, Sicily, about 
20,000 killed. . 


ate other dumping cases already ship’s photographer. 

501116 ****** C “P a Greenpeace spokesman . de- 


' _-5 e! ^ kano reawakened 


companies. scribed the compensation as ac- 

. Although the presidential ac- ceptaWe. He said the letter admit- 


lers was ItiDed aid one of my little 

nephews." J c ? tlK F*akea 

' . Colombian Gvfl Amtttttu- 


uons would be directed against in- icd that the attack on the converted 
dividual companies, ihe Tokyo trawler was uxnustiGaUe. France 

Or\Vi» l HiH awl mmiM ka ■■■■ ■ m.iaL _ _ j ■». J - t 


government would be very much has admitted its involvement in 
involved because it would be called gtricmg the vessel which was to 

IlfWI In n»n.vh,f, , Milieu., it l I , • ... . - 


upon to negotiate a settlement if have led a flotilla in protest cf 
US. agencies found the Japanese French nuclear tests in the South 


-w vvivuumu uvu rtaunau- 0 ~ r » 

Iks Adtmnistratiort prohibited all Krid. 

private and commS pSaa ™at« , 35 

’ j ' jm tlymg jbilo the area because of qMkaim0Qih - . , 
poor visibility from ash in the air. . An Aviaraa Boeing 777 ~ 
Mud and snow swept down to commercial- fli^tSim 

^ L ^S aR r er ™* hev<d - ^ v fcSElffiC 


• 1792, Unzen-dake, Japan, 
10,452 dead from eruption and 
mudriides. 

• 1815, Tambora in the East 
-Indies. 12,000 killed on the 
ntam island, 80,000 cm neigh' 
hOTing islands. 

. • 1883, Krakatoa, Indonesia. 

. 36/100 . IdDed by volcano and , 
“stdng tidal wbvcl. 

PHee, Martinique, 

38,000 lohfid, including 29,000 
in town of Sain t-Herre alone. 

. •1902, Kdnd, Java. 5,100 
killed from ensuing mudslides. 

• March 20, 1963. Agrrag, 
BaE, about 2^000 killed. ‘ 

• •May-18,- 1980, St. Hefcns, 


had dumped the chips. 


Pacific 




rooet roakte «« deeph.fr ~ Ute 21 Sled 




.. ■ -snr-m 






\ r * 


i! *li 

r 


i « t villi 

Ru-i: : ! 


un lii' 

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llltr-r 

fe:‘ i-'ft, 

iIHm 

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mb'rv. 


[ [ 

t. \ 

corn em 

ii'-rv. e. 

and h; 

i-i. -’Ifi 

link-. 


o r . 



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init-ri 

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lintf an 

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ti\vn 


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INTERNAT IONAL HERAUO TRIBIJNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 Page 3 




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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


Salvador Rebels Shift Tactics 

Guerrillas Turn to Abductions and Organizing Workers 


* By Robert J. McCartney 

Washington Pan Service 

■ EL ZAPOTE, EJ Salvador — 
Plans to merge El Salvador's five 
guerrilla forces signal a shift to- 
ward tougher tactics such as kid- 
nappings and increased efforts to 
build a mass base of workers and 
peasants, rebel leaden say. 

The country’s revolutionary 
movement has suffered since its 
earliest days from ideological divi- 
sions that sometimes have resulted 
in particularly brutal killings. 

Now on the defensive militarily 
and politically, the guerrillas are 
seeking to put aside past disputes 
and form a more united front. 

Leon el Gonzalez, the leader of 
one of the groups, said, “We’ve 
been able to cany out commando 
operations that Have had a great 
political importance," owing in 
pan to the unity agreements. 

The principal split within the 
Farabundo Marti National Libera- 
tion Front, the umbrella organiza- 
tion known by its Spanish initials 
FMLN, is both geographical and 
ideological. Described simply, it is 
between the military-oriented guer- 
rillas based in the eastern part of El 
Salvador and the rebels based here 
in the north who have shown great- 
er interest in political organizing. 

At a meeting of the FMLKs 
general command in Perquin in 
July, there appears to have been a 
trade-off. according to accounts 
given by top guerrilla leaders inter- 
viewed behind rebel lines at the end 
of October. 

The “militarists" won support 


for hard-line tactics such as kid- 
napping mayors, and they agreed 
in return to focus more on poGlical 
work designed to broaden tue guer- 
rillas' popular support 

It remains to be seen how much 
success the guerrillas will have in 
forging “one single aimy,” as the 
general command said it had 

Behind Rebel lines 

Under Siege in El Salvador 

Lai of nvo articles. 

agreed to do. Guerrillas of each of 
the five-forces still live in separate 
camps or in distinct areas in shared 
camps. 

In addition, the new emphasis on 
kidnappings and urban commando 
operations, such as the killing of 
four U.S. marines and eight Salva- 
doran civilians at a sidewalk res- 
taurant in June, is likely to strain 
further the guerrillas’ alliance with 
such exiled social democratic poli- 
ticians as Guillermo Ungo ana Ru- 
ben Zamora. 

The fundamental divirion in the 
FMLN is between its two largest 
groups, the Popular Liberation 
Forces, based here in Chalaten- 
ango 'province, and the People's 
Revolutionary Army, based in the 
northeastern province of Morazdn. 

The differences between the two 
are evident in their relations with 
civilians in their “zones of con trot" 
and in the concerns and personal- 
ities of their leadere. 


It has become possible only in 
the past four months for a U.S. 
journalist to make that assessment, 
because the guerrilla leaders did 
not begin to meet with U.S. report- 
ers until July. 

The Popular Liberation Forces, 
fonned in 1970 by a breakaway 
faction of the Salvadoran Commu- 
nist Party, has worked to build a 
mass base of civilian supporters. 
Peasants living near El Zapote en- 
thusiastically support the guerril- 
las. and liuie or no tension is ap- 
parent when armed rebels arrive at 
a village. 

In contrast, relations between 
the People’s Revolutionary Army 
and civilians living in areas that it 
dominates in the east appear to be 
uncomfortable. 

One reason for the difference in 
relations with civilians was the Peo- 
ple's Revolutionary Army’s at- 
tempt to force peasants to join its 
ranks last year. 

Mr. Goozdlez. the People's Lib- 
eration Forces commander, was 
soft-spoken and reserved when he 
spoke in El Zapote on OcL 29. He 
repeatedly emphasized the point 
that “this war is both political and 
military." 

The leader of the People's Revo- 
lutionary Army. Joaquin Villalo- 
bos, is widely considered to be the 
guerrillas' brightest military think- 
er. He talked almost exclusively 
aboui military strategy at a July 
news conference, as Lhe Commu- 
nist Party leader, Shafik Handal, 
answered questions on political 
topics. 



U.S. House Votes Temporary Ceiling 

On Debt limit, Averting < ishCrisis 



Ib« N«y* Yori 7Vn*l 


Joaquin ViDalobos, right, commander of the rebel People’s 
Liberation Army, talking with guerrillas in Perquin. 


Since the Perquin meeting, the 
FMLN’s five forces have cooperat- 
ed more closely in drawing up mili- 
tary and political plans, guerrilla 
leaders said. The most visible effect 
was that the Popular liberation 
Forces began on SepL 18 to kidnap 
mayors of towns in areas either 
inside or bordering its “zones of 
control'’ 

There have been other signs of a 
shift to tougher tactics. In particu- 
lar, a commando uni t kidnapped 
President Jos6 Napolebn Duarte's 
daughter on SepL 10. Also, guerril- 


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Nam. 


Atiditss. 


las seem to have become more will- 
ing than in the past to open fire on 
buses or trucks during nationwide 
transportation halts called by the 
guerrillas to disrupt the economy. 

The rebels freed Mr. Duarte's 
daughter and the mayors on Oct. 
24 as part of a major prisoner ex- 
change. The government released 
captured guerrillas and other polit- 
ical prisoners, and granted safe 
passage to wounded rebels who left 
the country to obtain medical treat- 
ment 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Hie House 
approved and . sent to President 
Ronald Reagan on Thursday a bill 
temporarily increasing the U.S. 
debt ceQing. The move averts a fed- 
eral financial crisis Friday, when 
the government would have run out 
of cash to pay its bills. 

The House, by voice vote and 
without debate, accepted the Sen- 
ate’s version of a short-term in- 
crease in the debt limit. 

The bill would avoid potential 
embarrassment for the president as 
he leaves Saturday for his meeting 

in Geneva next week with the Sovi- 
et leader, MikbaO S. Gorbachev. 
Mr. Reagan has indicated through 
a spokesman he will agn the legis- 
lation. 

On Wednesday, the Senate 
averted a separate flngnoal prob- 
lem by approving and sending to 
Mr. Reagan a resolution that per- 
mits the government to continue 
operating through Dec. 12. 

That measure, approved by the 
House on Tuesday, was needed be- 
cause only two of the 13 appropria- 
tions bills For fiscal I9So, which 
began Oct. 1, have been approved 
by Congress. Without that author- 
ity, government offices would have 
been farced to begin dosing at mid- 
night Thursday, regardless of how 
orach money was in the Treasury. 
Mr. Reagan is expected to sign the 
bOL 

On the debt ceiling, the White 
House warned Wednesday that un- 
less the Treasury has the power to 


borrow' more money, the go v *™ r 
ment would stop paying i® 
Friday. 

“We are not going to issue 
checks that will bounce,*’ said the 
presidential spokesman. Larry’ 
Speakes. 

The administration supports 
permanent legislation raising the 
national debt . ceiling to $2-078 tril- 
lion, more than twice the mdebted- 
ness when Mr. Reagan took office 
in I9S1 and enough to accommo- 
date another deficit year of 1200 
billion. 

Bm the president nevertheless 
was ready to sign a short-term debt 
increase. 

“The president accepts the obvi- 
ous sentiment of both houses of 
Congress,” a White House spokes- 
man, Edward P. Djercjian, said 
Wednesday night- “But he will con- 
tinue to urge Congress to deal with 
our federal deficit once and for 
all” • 

The Republican-led Senate, with 
White House support, has refused 
to raise the debt ceiling above the 
S2 trillion threshold without at- 
taching a plan to gradually end the 
annual deficits. 

To keep up the pressure for the 
balanced-budget plan, the Senate 
on Wednesday night approved ex- 
tending the debt ceiling only until 
Dec. 6, rejecting the Dec. 13 date 
passed earlier in the day by the 
House. Both houses approved $80 
billion in new borrowing, but by 
tatting off that authority earlier. 


the Senate bill would bring about 
• the next crisis sooner. 

The Senate majority leader, 
Robert J. Dole, Republican of 
Kansas, said Thursday that the 
Senate date would actually keep 
the government afloat until Dec. 
11 and the House version until 
Dec. 19. 

Senator Phil Gramm, Republi- 
can, of Texas and co-sponsor of the 
balanced-budget plan, said: “We 
believe that we can’t have a cloud 
of Coal collapse hanging over the 
president’s head as he goes to Ge- 
neva.” 

The Senate, by voice vote, sent 
the short-term debt bill back to the 

House in a package with other mea- 
sures also due to expire at midnight 
Thursday, including extending the 
federal tax of id cents a pack on 
cigarettes through Dec. 14. 

The House had approved the 
debt increase separately from the 
cigarette tax and some other extra- 
sons needed while permanent bills 
are pending. . 

The Senate’s balanced-budget 
plan would set gradually stricter 
l imits on annual deficits until a 
balanced budget is reached in fiscal 
1 99 1. If Congress and the president 
failed to meet the targets, the presi- 
dent would administer automatic 
spending cuts. 

The House has approved its own 
version of the Senate plan, si m ilar 
in concept but protecting some 
poverty programs from the fuD cut- 
backs and K nn t jyi g presidential au- 
thority. 


* 


¥ 



Panels Back Nuclear Pact With China, 
But Link U.S. Sales to Nonproliferation 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Senate and 
House committees have voted to 
approve President Ronald Rea- 
gan's long-delayed agreement to 
share nuclear-powcr technology 
with China bm at the same time 
block any U.S. sales until the presi- 
dent receives firmer assurances that 
China will not give other countries 
access to the material. 

In a strong rebuff to the adminis- 
tration's handling of the nuclear 
accord, the Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee voted Wednes- 
day, 11-3, to set the new conditions. 
The House Foreign Affairs Com- 
mittee agreed later to the same lan- 
guage, on a voice vote. The agree- 
ment still must be approved by the 
full House and Senate. 

The accord, which was reached 
during Mr. Reagan's visit to China 
in April last year, has been delayed 
by Congress for more than a year 
because of concern that China 


would provide the technology to 
countries trying to build nuclear 
weapons. 

Write House and State 
meat officials worked until 
day to soften the conditions, ac- 
cording to a source. The 
administration has argued consis- 
tently that the agreement met all 
legal requirements and concerns 
al)out nonproliferation. 

'After Wednesday’s -votes, ad- 
ministration spokesmen were care- 
ful to say they could live with the 
conditions. “We have looked at tins 
and concluded it mil not undercut 
the implementation of the agree- 
ment,” said James B. Devine, a 
deputy assistant secretary of state 
involved in the negotiations. 

The resolution requires a 30-day 
waiting period for issuing export 
licenses for U S. nuclear technol- 
ogy, after a corporation has won a 
contract from the Chinese During 
that time, the president must certi- 
fy to Congress that the admiitistr&- 


Airlines Cut Holiday Fares 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — United Airlines 
has broadened its three-day dis- 
count on air fares, offering reduc- 
tions of up to 85 percent on all 
domestic routes except Hawaii and 
extending the time limit by 12 
hours to midnight Nov. 30. 

Lower holiday fares are also be- 
ing offered by American. North- 
west, Eastern and Delta airlines. 

United said Wednesday that It 
took the step because of over- 
whelming respouse to the price re- 
duction. The original offer was 
good only on routes in which there 
was competition by American Air- 
lines, and the time limit was from 
Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 28, to 
noon Nov. 30. 

The new offer expands the fares 
to United’s routes to Alaska. Flori- 
da and the Midwest, as well as its 


routes between Denver and the 
West Coast, the airline said. 

Travelers on United must still 
buy round-trip, nonrefundable 
tickets within three days of the 
deadline for making a reservation, 
Nov. 26. and make the round trip 
within the three-day discount peri- 
od. 


Italian Giri, 17, Is Ransomed 

Reuters 

CATANZARO, Italy — Enza 
Rita StramandinoH, 17, a schoolgirl 
kidnapped 11 months ago, was 
freed Tuesday in the Calabrian 
mountains after her family paid a 
ransom of 800 million lire 
(5450,000), the Italian news agency 
ANSA reported. Schoolchildren 
bad collected an undisclosed sum 
to help her father, a doctor, pay the 
ransom. 


tkm.has clarified how the United 
States would prevent China from 
diverting that technology to third 
countries and that “China has pro- 
vided additional information con- 
cerning its midear nonprolifera- 
tion pofides.” 

The resolution does not give 
Congress veto power over pro- 
posed nudear shipments, bm ad- 
ministration officials nonetheless 
fought the restrictions because they 
set up a series of handles that could' 
make it mbre difficult for Ameri- 
can companies to compete for Chi- 
na’s nuclear business. 

lhe votes followed a classified 
briefing for senators last Friday in 
which officials of the Central Imd- 
Ugence Agency catalogued evi- 
dence showmg that China has dra- 
matically improved its 
nonproliferation record over the 
past two years. 

News reports in 1983- and 4984 
disclosed that China may have se- 
cretly shared nuclear warhead de- 
sign information with Pakistan and 
appeared to be assisting Pakistan’s 
attempts to prodnee highly en- 
riched Uranium for weapons. 

More recently, U^. intelligence 
agencies have gathered - evidence 
that China has continued this year 
to supply some nudear material to 
Argentina and South Africa. ' 

The CIA also learned through 
intelligence channels that Chinese 
officials in June discussed thepos-' 
sibflity of providing nuclear equip- 
ment to Iran, according to a report 
in September m the National Intel- 
ligence Daily, which circulates 
among senior U.S. officials. 

The discussions occurred 
a visit to Beijing by the speaker 
the Iranian parliament. Hashemi 
Rafsanjani, who also was arranging 
to purchase surface-to-surface mis- 
siles from China, awarding to a 
news report from the region. 

China covertly sells arms to Iran 
in its war with Iraq, according to 
intelligence officials. Chinese offi- 
cials have denied such sales and 

o fficiall y wiaintafp neutrality in the 

conflict 


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NOVEMBER 17 • THE HAGUE t CONGRESGEBOUW 
NOVEMBER 13 • ANTWERP • KONING1N ELISABETH ZAAL 
NOVEMBER 22 • LISBON • CASINO ESTORIL 
NOVEMBER 24 • MUNICH * DEUTSCHES THEATER * 
NOVEMBER 2S • FRANKFURT * JAHKHUNDERTHALLE HOECHST ' 
NOVEMBER 2T * BARCELONA • .MLACIODE LA MUSICA CATALANA 
NOVEMBER Z 8 • MADRID • PACHA CLUB iZ PERFORMANCES! 
NOVEMBER 30 • MILAN • CINEMA TEATROtUAK 

AJAZZMOBAEMC. AND PttiLffMflflRtS JAZZ SUUn’CD^RODUCTHni 


Police Head 
Resigns Over 
MOVE Raid 


By William K. Stevens 

New York "nines Service 

PHILADELPHIA — Police 
Commissioner Gregpre J. Sambor, 
who directed the aerial bombing 
against a radical group last May 
that led to 11 deaths and the de- 
struction of 61 homes by fire, has 
resigned, effective Nov. 30. 

The commissioner’s resignation 

- Wednesday was the latest political 
development to reverberate across u 
Philadelphia since the police at- T 
tempted on May 13 to evict armed 
members, of 'the radical group 
MOVE from the house they bad 
fortified m- West Philadelphia. It 
was ainong the worst fires in the 

- city’s history. 

- iMt Sambor was the second to 
xesigriamong four top dty officials 
. who played key roles in the MOVE 

affair 

The former, managing director, 
Leo A; Brooks, who was in overall 
comqumd of the MOVE operation, 
resigned afew days after the bomb- 
mg-and fire. . 

M^/or W. Wilson Goode and 
Hre„ Commissioner W illiam C. 
Richmond remain in office, and the 
future of both is widely seen as 
being in doubt 

The police commissioner’s resig- 
nation came less than a week after 
the end of the public hearings in 
which his actions were portrayed 
by members of lhe investigative 
commissioa as hasty and ill-consid- 
ered. He testified that he had been 
unaware of much that was going on 
in the assault on the house occu- 
pied by MOVE members. 

Mr. Goode is commonly thought 
in political dudes to have peritaps a 
year In which to repair Lhe political 
damage done to him and his two- 
year-old ■ administration by the 
MOVE operation, and especially 
by the 18 days, of public hearings 
on the incident that concluded last 
week. 

After a year, he will effectively 
be in the middle of his planned 
campaign for re-dection. ■ 

The mayor said at a press confer- 
ence Wednesday that on Monday 
he would elaborate on plans he had 
announced earlier to reform the po- 
lice department, the target of con- 
tinuing federal investigations of 
corruption. 

He also named Robert Ann- 
strong, 55, the deputy polk* com- 
nrisffloucr, as-acting commissioner. 

The investigative commissioa, 
appointed by the mayor, is expect- 
ed to Issue its report earfy next 
year. It has no poww to indict any- 
one or to farce dismissals. Both the 
district attorney and the federal 
Department of Justice are induct- 
ing investigations as welL 


I-'-- 


f 




Bellicose Smoker ^ 
Freed in London 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — . A court freed on 
bail Thursday an American sales- 
man who insisted on smoking a 
cigar in a no-smoking section of a 
jumbo jet.; 

TTie Trans World Airlines jet, en 
route .Saturday from Athens to 
New \ork, made an unschednled 
stop at - London’s Heathrow Air- 
port after police said a serious inci- 
dent flared up in the no-smoking 
urea. The plane continued its jour- 
ney after a fcrar-hour delay. 

Steven Vavaris. 52, of Jackson, 
MBsssppt, T«as charged with 1 as- 
sault occasioning actual bodily 
™ to a passenger aboard the 
Vavar is,looking dishev- , 
ded and unshaven, wept at Ux- 
ondgp Magistrates Court when lhe 
““SWrak adjourned his case until 
Nov. 28. The bafl sum ^was not 
rev *uled in court. 


i( Jnp 

ili- 



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- -.S' 


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Jutm, Foii^ 
nifion Resign Oj 
MOVEUj 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 



bus on Voting 

Seen in Marcos’s Tactics 


By Seth Mydsuis 

New Yotiir TIftKiiSerticc 
MANILA — ' After nearly two 
weeks of debate and political ma- 
neuvering, the nature and even the 
likelihood of early ejections called 
for by President Ferdinand E. Mar- 
cos have become fragmented into 
an array of political and procedural 
questions. 

One of 'the foremost of these 
questions is whether tills atmo- 
sphere of uncertainty and disarray 
proves the political mastery of Mr. 
Marcos or reflects the desperate 
maneuvers of a president under 
pressure from several directions. 

Some political analysts suggest 
that both explanations may be 
partly true. , • 

The deterioration of the politi- 
cal, economic and mxHtaiy situa- 
tion in the Philippines over the past 
two years, and a new level of con- 
certed-pressure from W ashington 
in recent weeks, may have brought 
a more precipitate reaction from 
Mr. Marcos than might have been 
seen in the past * 

Salvador H. Laurel, a former 
senator and one of Mr. Marcos's , 
chief potential opponents in an 
election, appears to be of this opin- 
ion. 

“It’s very clear that Marcos does 
not know what to do," Mr. Laurel 
said. “He doesn't know whether to 
move to the left or to the ri gh t. He 


doestftknow whether to stop or go. 
The old Marcos would ww-do 
this kind of wishy-washy thing. The. 
: old Marcos was deliberate.” 

But at the-same time, meet on- 
lookers appear to .remain im- 
pressed by tne president’s shrewd- 

^N^AmYSIS - 

ness in the days since he announced 
on Nov. 3 his intention, to call an 
election.. . . 

A businessman experienced in 
politics said: ‘‘There’s no other pol- 
jticiaa on the scene who is a match 
for him. He is the only one who 
knows wbatis goingon.” 

With Mr: Marcos’s proposed 
date for the start of an election 
campaign only two weeks away, the 
ithwi hflgic que stions MMifl unan - 
swered.. 

Mr. Marcos appears for the sec- 
ond time to be shifting ground on 
whether ihe pdst of vice president 
will be contested. 

. His supporters said Thursday 
that they would agree to move back 
the election from the Jan. 17 date 
that Mr. Marcos first mentioned, 
but the date of the vote is still 
unknown. 

Serious questions remain unre- 
solved about the constitutionality 
of the election as Mr. Marcos pro- 
posed it, and a Supreme COnrt rul- 
ing or: a nationwide .plebiscite still 
may be called for. 


Questions about a monitoring 
system to ensure fair elections re- 
main a sottrceof controversy. 

The questions . arc divisive ones 
between the president and his op- 
portion, and within the two camps 
themselves, and together they raise 
the question of whether elections 
w31 be hddat alL 
■' Some factions of the opposition, 
particularly the supporters of Mr. 
Laurel's chief rival for the nomina- 
tion, Corazon Aquino, say they will 
insist on a favorable resolution of 
some of these questions if they are 
to contest the election. Mrs. 
Aquino is the widow of the assassi- 
nated apposition leader Benigno S. 
Aquino Jr. ' 

Some politicians in Mr. Marcos’s 
drdc say they believe he has delib- 
erately constructed these paints of 
conflict to have the option of call- 
ing off the election and blaming his 
opponents’ intransigence. 

Opinion is divided among Phil- 



Ferdinand E. Marcos and Iris wife, Imelda. 


ippine commentators over whether 
the Americans pressured Mr. Mar- 
cos into holding early elections, or 
whether the announcement of an 
election was a ploy to blunt in- 
creasingly insistent U-S. demands 
for more wide-reaching reforms. 

Although U-S. diplomats in Ma- 
nila have said they did not favor 
early elections, a oil. for a demo- 
cratic election is something to 


which the United States cannot 
publicly object. 

With his sudden call for elec- 
tions. Mr. Marcos also caught his 


mzed, and may have precipitated a 
divisive battle for leadership. And 
by shifting the ground rules for the 
election almost every day, he has 
managed to keep them off balance. 


However be plays bis options, 
few Filipinos say they believe Mr. 
Marcos would enter into elections 
unless he is absolutdy certain he 
will win. 

Teodoro Valencia, a columnist 
who is a friend of the president, 
said, “When Marcos is in a corner 
with his hands up saving, ‘I surren- 
der,' ran, man.” 


Villagers, Recalling a Massacw, View Assam Election W arily 


‘•'tLrfjjj., 
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■ ti— fc;... 


By Rone Tempest .- . 

Las Angela Tana Service . 

NELLIE, India — The last' time 
the people of this village in the 
Brahmaputra River valley of As- 
sam dared to vote in a state elec- 
tion, raiding parties from neighbor- 
ing settlements attacked with 
machetes, knives and bows and ar- 
rows, IriQing more than 1,000. - 

Most of the dead were women 
and children not quick enough to 
escape into the teak forests. Known 
as the Nellie massacre, it is one of 
the worst incidents of election vio- 
lence in Indian history. 

That was in 1983, when the far 
northeastern state of Assam was in 
the grip of student-led agitation 
against illegal immigration into In- 
dia from Bangladesh 

Now elections are approaching 
again in Assam, the result of an 
August agreement between Prime 
Minister Rajiv Gandhi and the As- 
samese student leaders. Here in 
Nellie, there remains an under- 
standable wariness about the elec- 
toral process. - 

In 1983, the students, represent- 
ing indigenous Hindu Assamese 
•fearful of being ^taiatibered by 



Bengali-speaking Moslem immi- 
grants, called for a boycott of the 
elections, charging that many 
Bangladeshis had registered illegal- 
ly to vote. 

The long-settled Moslems of 
NeUie, mq6tly poor rice fanners 
and roadside merchants, were not 
illegal immigrants, and they ig- 
nored the boycott. They paid a 
gruesome price. 

fn ‘an, officials estimate more 
than 3,000 people were lolled in 
election -related violence. The 
worstof it was in Nellie, .-a- 


Hus time, Assam’s highly orga- 
nized and powerful students have 
decided to take part m the Dec. 16 
balloting for 14' members of the 
national Parliament and 126 state 
assemblymen. They have formed a 
party to challenge Mr. Gandhi's 
Congress (I) Party for control of 
the state. 

For Imdad Ali, 21, as for many 
of Nellie’s other survivors, the price 
of democracy weighs heavily. He 
lost a aster, who was pregnant, and 
a cousin. 

“We shall certainly vote again 
this time,” he said. “But the fear 
that came into our hearts is still 
there." 

Mohammed Akkas Ali, a villager 
who owns a tea stand, said: “As 
long as everyone votes, we have no 
fear. But if we are the only ones to 
vote, there is danger ” 

Adding to the villagers' fears is a 
provision of the agreement signed 
by Mr. Gandhi and the student 
leaders that says voters can be re- 
quired to prove their citizenship in 
a special court. 

The student groups have chal- 
lenged nearly everyone in the state 
who has an obviously Moslem or 


Bengali name. Moslem leaders say 
two tmOion voters have been chal- 
lenged. 

“The foreigners occupy the land 
of the local people,” said Bhrigu 
Kumar Phnkan. a student leader, 
when asked to explain the Assam- 
ese position to reporters from 
abroad “Ultimately, political pow- 
er would go to the foreigners.” 

All the usual causes of tension in 
India — caste, color and language 
— come to a head in Assam. 

For centuries it has been a melt- 
ing pot of cultures and religions, 
ran ging from Southeast Asians 
who speak a 13th-century Thai dia- 
lect to untouchable outcasts from 
central India, brought in by the 
British to work on tea estates. 

About 59 percent of the state's 
20 million people are Assamese- 
speaking and 25 percent are Ben- 
gali-speaking Modems. 

Here, however, the issues are 
complicated by the intense demo- 
graphic pressures from neighboring 
Bangladesh, where 100 million peo- 
ple live in an area only slightly 
larger than England. There is am- 
ply not enough land and Assam, 
which lies upstream on the Brah- 


maputra River, has become a kind 
of population release valve. 

It is unlikely that Bangladeshis 
could be prevented from immigrat- 
ing illegally to Assam. The border 
between India and Bangladesh is 
2,400 miles (3,900 kilometers) long, 
and easily crossed A plan support- 
ed by the Assamese students to 
send back Bangladeshi immigrants 
already in Assam is even less likely 
to succeed 

“What will you do,' 1 said A.F. 
Golan Osman i, a Moslem leader, 
“leave these people at the border?" 

Mr. Osmani, a former state min- 
ister who now heads an organiza- 
tion called the All-Assam Minority 
Front, is leading statewide nonvio- 
lent protests against the agreement 
between Mr. Gandhi and the stu- 
dents. 

Like other minority leaders, he is 
bitter about the prime minister’s 
attitude toward the students, which 
is more conciliatory than was his 
mother. Prime Minister Indira 
Gandhi, who was assassinated last 
year. 

“Had Mrs. Gandhi been here,” 
Mr. Osmani said “they would nev- 
er have concluded this accord” 


Voting Delay 
Is Approved 
By Parties in 
Philippines 

The AssoaaieJ Pros 

MANILA — Governing party 
and opposition politicians said 
Thursday they have agreed to delay 
by a few weeks a presidential elec- 
tion that President Ferdinand £ 
Marcos had proposed for Jan. 17. 

Mr. Marcos's political affairs ad- , 
riser, Leonardo B. Perez, said that 
an eight-hour bargaining session 
bad failed to produce agreement 
between the president's New Soci- 
ety Movement and opposition as- 
semblymen on a new election date. 

“We merely agreed to be flexible j 
on the date," Mr. Perez said, “but it ! 
should not be later than the first 
week of February.” He added that 
negotiations were continuing on 
whether the election should include 
the vacant post of vice president. 

In announcing the election last 
week, Mr. Marcos said be wanted 
only the presidency to be at stake 
but later agreed to include the vice 
presidency. 

Jaime Ferrer, an opposition as- 
semblyman who confirmed the 
postponement, said that the gov- 
ernment party had “asked us if we 
would agree not to include the rice 
presidency and we said ‘no.’ " 

Salvador HL Laurel, an opposi- 
tion leader and possible presiden- 
tial candidate, pledged that Mr. 
Marcos’s opponents would rally 
behind a single candidate. 

Mr. Laurel declined to indicate if 
be would be willing to yield his 
candidacy in favor of Corazon 
Aquino, widow of the assassinated 
opposition leader Benigno S. 
Aquino Jr. 

“I don’t think Cory and I will 
have a problem agreeing,” he said. 

Meanwhile, the National Assem- 
bly adopted an elections bill that 
would ease some restrictions, but it 
contains elements opposed by Mr. 
Marcos's critics. 

The bill allows district and vil- 
lage officials, whom the opposition 
says are loyal to Mr. Marcos, to 
serve as poll watchers. 

It also authorizes the Commis- 
sion on Elections to exclude the 
National Movement for Free Elec- 
tions, a group of businessmen and 
civic workers that claims to be free 
of government influence, from 
monitoring election results. 

■ Motion Approved in U.S. 

The UJS. House of Representa- 
tives on Thursday approved, 417-0, 
a resolution calling on Mr. Marcos 
to ensure that the presidential elec- 
tions are free and fair. The Associ- 
ated Press reported from Washing- 
ton. An identical measure is 
pending in the Senate. 


Page 5 


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INTERNATIONAL 


PubTmhrd Will The New loA Tune* and The Wanhinjrwn Potl 


Good Start for Guatemala 


! Guatemala's much awaited “democratic 
opening" turns out to be just that. Round one 
of its presidential elections was conducted 
fairly on Nov. 3, apparently without the gross 
abuses that had marred most recent contests. 
A runoff between two civilians will be held 
Dec. 8. With the army's indulgence, Guatema- 
la's first freely elected president in 15 years 
.will take office in January. 

• Guatemala has been dominated by a succes- 
sion of military and extreme right-wing re- 
gimes for 31 years — ever since a CIA-orga- 
nized coup that toppled the left-leaning 
elected government of Jacobo Arbenz. The 
army has waged a generally successful cam- 
paign against left-wing guerrillas, leaving 
.100,000 Guatemalans, mostly civilians, dead 
| Terror and countertenor against the coun- 
try’s Indian majority have uprooted villages 
and created tens of thousands of refugees. The 
battle has militarized the entire society, 
prompting the draft of all adult males below 
age 60 for the 900.000-man “civil patroL" 
Rightist death squads have wiped out or in- 
timidated most political centrists. Can a civil- 


Managing Exchange Rates 


! Do not blame imports, or the people who 
buy them, for the gigantic American trade 
deficits. The trouble lies in the currency ex- 
change rates, and a more useful approach is to 
ask why the exchange markets have been be- 
having so strangely in the past several years. 
This week a congressional conference on ex- 
change rates, convened at the initiative of 
Representative Jack Kemp of New York and 
Senator Bill Bradley of New Jersey, has been 
at work on that question. Most of Congress 
now has acknowledged, publicly or otherwise, 
'that protectionism — the attempt to restrict 
imports by law — is dangerous and costly in its 
effects. But if protectionism will not work, the 
politicians anxiously ask, what will? 

The kind of reform that is needed has less to 
do with c hang ing the exchange system than 
with changing the attitudes and political pre- 
conceptions that surround it. From World 
War II until the 1970s, Americans lived in a 
world in which exchange rates were something 
for other countries to worry about. The rest of 
■the world made little difference to the hugely 
powerful U.S. economy, most Americans 
thought, and they were right — for a while. But 
beginning in the early 1970s, America's foreign 
[trade expanded twice as fast as its economy, 
and the flows of foreign investment expanded 
'even faster. Although foreign trade and for- 
eign money became major determinants of 
American prosperity. American views of the 


world did not adjust immediately to that reali- 
ty. Until recently the Reagan administration 
brushed off the ’foreign connections with the 
argument that, with steady growth at home, 
the international accounts would lake care of 
themselves. Thai has not worked. 

As long as the United States runs large 
budget deficits requiring foreign financing, the 
dollar exchange rates will continue to be out of 
line. All of the trading countries draw great 
advantages from the enormous volumes of 
trade that tie their economies together. But 
because they are tied together their govern- 
ments enjoy less independence in economic 
policy than they once did. The Americans in 
particular are having trouble getting used to 
these constraints and the obligations to coop- 
eration that they impose. 

But responsibility for poor performance 
does not lie wholly with the United States. 
West Germany and Japan still are not entirely 
accustomed to then economic weight, and be- 
have as though their policies had little effect on 
anyone else. As Long as such strong countries 
accept so little responsibility for making the 
system work, it is not likely to work weEL 

No one country now dominates exchange 
rates, and managing them is a joint endeavor. 
That is the spirit in which the Kemp-Bradley 
conference is proceeding, and that is why it 
mav prove to be unusually usefuL 

— THF WA SHINGTON POST. 


Killed for Being an Arab 


• In the same week that Leon Klinghoffer was 
murdered in the Mediterranean for the crime 
of being Jewish. Alex Odeh was murdered in 
California for the crime of being an Arab. Mr. 
Odeh, a Palestinian by birth, was killed by a 
bomb on Ocl 1 1 when be opened his office 
door in Santa Ana, where he was West Coast 
director of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimi- 
nation Committee. On television the day be- 
fore, while condemning the Achille Lauro hi- 
jacking, he had defended Yasser Arafat. 

The Odeh murder was denounced immedi- 
ately by the Ami-Defamation League of B'nai 
B'rith as “domestic terrorism which cannot be 
tolerated.'’ A disturbingly different judgment 
was offered by Irv Rubin, chairman of the 
Jewish Defense League: “1 have no tears for 
Mr. Odeh. He got exactly what he deserved." 
Despite these words, the league denies any 
pan in the crime and indignantly rejects as 
slander the FBrs preliminary finding that it is 
“the possible responsible group." It will take a 
trial to determine who killed Mr. Odeh. 

No trial is needed to ascenain the character 
of ihe Jewish Defense League, a promoter oF 


blatant racism in America and Israel Mr. 
Rubin was named UJS. chairman by the 
league's founder. Rabbi Meir Kahane! who 
immigrated to Israel and now sils in its parlia- 
ment as the choice of 1.2 percent of the voters. 
Rabbi Kahane derides Arabs as “dogs" and 
“jackals" and says they must be driven from 
Israel with “their" luggage of abomination.” In 
a sordid, unintended parody of Nazi ideology, 
he advocates making Israel ethnically pure. 

To defend its democracy against racism. 
Israel is changing its laws to try to disqualify 
Mr. Kah one’s party. But the Jewish Defense 
League also poses a moral and political prob- 
lem for America. A life is a life, and there can 
be no distinction between the murder of a Jew 
by the Palestine Liberation Organization and 
the murder of an Arab to punish the PLO. 

When Mr. Rubin condones the killing of 
Mr. Odeh. he dishonors the memory of Mr. 
Klinghoffer. Anti-Semitism is odious whether 
practiced against Jew or Arab. The way to 
drive that message home is to bring Mr. Odeh’s 
killers to justice. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


A Soviet Setback on Afghanistan 


The Soviet Union has suffered a diplomatic 
setback with the adoption [Wednesday] of a 
UN resolution demanding "the immediate 
withdrawal of all foreign forces from Afghani- 
stan." For the Russians, the vote is all the more 
inopportune coming jusL before the Reagan- 
Gorbachev summit conference — and because 
the resolution recommends a solution based 
on the "political independence and nonaligned 


nature” of .Afghanistan, the self-determination 
of its people without foreign interference and 
the right of Afghan refugees to return home. 

Washington, while furnishing arms to the 
Afghan rebels, has not provided the missiles 
that would wreak havoc on Soviet aircraf L The 
U.S. aim seems to be to keep pressure on 
Moscow to negotiate. We will know after the 
Geneva meeting whether Mr. Gorbachev hears 
this language better than did his predecessors. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


FROM OUR NOV. 15 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: China Chafes at Opium Pact 
PEKING — The leaders of the National As- 
sembly have determined to induce Great Brit- 
ain to consent to an abrogation of the ten-year 
agreement under which China is not permitted 


to prohibit the importation or Indian opium. 
In view of the fact that China has already 


In view of the fact that China has already 
reduced home-grown opium to a small frac- 
tion, not exceeding ten percent of the former 
total the promoters of the movement believe 
that England should consent to an absolute 
prohibition of the importation from India. The 
Anti-Opium League cabled the British and 
American Societies [on Nov. 14] asking for 
active cooperation in securing a change of 
attitude on the pan of the British government. 
The present attitude, they contend, is the one 
obstacle to the success of China’s sincere ef- 
forts to stamp out the opium evil. 


1935: Europeans Investing in America 
WASHINGTON — Joseph P. Kennedy, retir- 
ing chairman of the Securities Exchange Com- 
mission. conferred [on Nov. 14] with President 
Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding the European 
nervous nes> that is causing a flow of capital to 
Wall Street. Kennedy foresaw a situation 
wherein the sudden withdrawal of this capital 
might cause a sharp break in ihe market. 
"That’s purely hypothetical," he said. “If they 
decide conditions abroad warrant brin ging 
back their gold you might have a situation 
where withdrawals would bring a severe 
break." Kennedy attributed much of the re- 
cent rise in foreign buying power to "England, 
while France and other nations on the Conti- 
nent are now beginning to swing toward 
America. The result* will be a terrific increase 
in the stock market business of this country." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman mx-M: 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pubiaher 

PHILIP M.FOISIE Eucuire Lht.* RENfeBONDY Dam Publisher 

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


Citt 


Too Much Arms Talk Can Spoil a Summit 


W ASHINGTON — The summit meeting be- 
tween Ronald Reaaan and Mikhail S. Gar- 


ion now bring peace to Central America's most 
developed country? Will the military submit to 
constitutional processes? 

Neither Marco Vinicio Cerezo, a Christian 
Democrat who polled 39 percent of the vote, 
nor Jorge Carpio Nicolie. his right-leaning 
challenger who polled 20 percent, has dared to 
talk about bringing the military under control. 
But a severe economic crisis has caused the 
country's business community to long for 
more honest and efficient civilian government 
It also wants a better reputation among for- 
eign lenders and aid givers. 

During the Carter years Guatemala was 
prosperous enough to refuse military aid rath- 
er than accept human rights lectures. It can no 
longer offend such bravado. The Reagan ad- 
ministration last year succeeded in persuading 
Congress to renew military aid, and it now 
seeks more aid as part of its regional counter- 
terrorism program. To that end it is pressing 
the Guatemalan military to curb its excesses 
and to let civilians really rule. That is likely to 
be a long, hard struggle, but it is well begun. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


w tween Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev provides an opportunity for both super- 
powers to begin to put their relations on a firmer 
footing. If they are to do this, however, they must 
digest the lessons of the past. 

It would be unrealistic to expect a breakthrough 
on arms control id Geneva: The time is too short 
and the two sides' positions are too far apart. In 
addition, the Reagan administration remains too 
divided and unsure of what it wants. The most the 


By F. Stephen Larrabee 


redes of political relations. When these relations 
deteriorated, support for aims control fell 
The fate of the second strategic arms limitation 
accord illustrates this; it was derailed more by 
Soviet behavior in the Third World than by any 
inherent weakness 'in the accord. In this sense. 


v m er*-n< wavs in wnicn torce 


At Geneva, 
Opportunity 
Still Knocks 


$ i* u 




•;.* Ttys.-* 


These discussions could be compi™>- ^ 

talks on confidence-building measures 
reduce the risk of war by acradcnt, misralcutanoa 


By Anthony Lewi* 


... 

. ^ ^ 


mnerent wearness m uie accora. in inis sense, romcc mcjun wi r,a *yj an n *he TjOSTON — The Reagan-Gorba-- 

President Jimmy Carter's national security adviser, and misperception. The United saw* ^j^ mh meeting comes at 

Zbigniew Bizennski, was right when he -quipped Soviet Union have been implementing the riaht time — a time when there is 

: : sons since ihe 1960 s — includin g the no ime ^ the best in years, to 

There is a danger inmakmg IlktfSear war audited agreement on the 


meeting can do is to help define the major areas on 
which me two sides should focus in tin next phase 
of aims control negotiations and thus give those 
talks new impetus. 

If the summit meeting is to serve more signifi- 
cant purpose, it must look beyond the immediate 
disagreements on arms control and focus on the 
broader problems of the political relationship. 
This is not to argue that arms control is not 
important. There is, however, a danger in making it 
the centerpiece of America’s relationship with the 
Soviet Union. This was one problem with the 
approach pursued by President Richard Nixon 
and Henry Kissinger in the early 1970s. 


There is a danger inmakmg 
arms controllhe centerpiece of 
the U£.-Soviet relationship. 


in*. uummu. «« — - superpowers, inat is u« « me 


focusing almost exclusively on arms control, it was 
made to bear the whole burden of the relationship. 
When arms control talks stalled, the political rela- 
tionship suffered. Second, the approach at times 
led the United States to make otherwise undesir- 
able compromises on anus control in order to 


maintain the momentum in political relations. 
Third, it tied arms control too cfosely to the vicissi- 


that the SALT-2 treaty lay "buried in the sands 
of the Ogaden." 

Two lessons flow from this. First, arms control 
cannot be pursued in a vacuum. It must be part of 
a larger political process designed to stabilize rela- 
tions between Washington and Moscow, Without 
a broader political accommodation, arms control 
is likely to stagnate —as the dismal record of the 
last six years underscores. 

Second, the arms control dialogue needs to be 
broadened beyond arms reductions to include oth- 
er subjects that can help stabilize nribiary relation- 
ships. One area worth exploring would be discus- 
sions between the military establishments in both 
countries on such issues as nuclear doctrine and 


' Such measures are, of course, no subsmuieror 
anus reduction. But they can help stabihzerm- 
tions in important ways. They also help to keep tne 
arms control dialogue going while bom sd« grap- 
ple with the lamer and harder strategic issues, thus- 


two leaders’ political interests. ' , 
Consider the central issue on the 
agenda, the attempt to limit nudear 
arms. The problem is complex, and, 
sharp differences remambetweeh the; 
Soviet and U.S. positions. But in rc-j 
cent weeks the two sides have made, 
what amounts to a dramatic, though 1 


pie with the larger and harder strategic issue*, mus 
preventing a deadlock. This is particularly impor- ■ 
tant because, as a result of changes in 
comprehensive arms control agreements tiKc uic 
first and second strategic anus limitation treaties 
are becoming increasingly hard to negotiate. . _ 
In short, the summit meeting must be the itrst 
step in a larger process of stabilizing relations 
across the board. Otherwise, the prospects for 
progress in arms control are likely to stay dim. 




*•/: . 


largely unacknowledged, break-* 
through on a fundamental principle,. 

The principle is that the vast ar- 
mories of offensive nudear weapons; 
should be cut by 50 percent. Massive 
reductions of that Kind have been 
President Reagan’s dream since he' 
Look office. The Soviet leads:, Mik- 
hail Gorbachev, made a 50-percent 
cut his proposal last month. 

Of course, the two sides differ on 


The writer, a member of the National Security 

Council staff fnm 1978 to 1981, is vice president of 

the Institute for East-West Security Studies. He 
contributed this comment to The New For* Times. 




Pushed Out 
Of the Land 
Of Promise 


HI 






I WAS SO J WSQQttKl 

-iStWe AMERICANS AND 
SA'tJ'SFN&MfilftX 
Moscow/;, 
andwerciam. 


By Charles Kranriiarnm ei* 



mmei^ 

So HERi F 

err--/ wlShutup/ 


how to count weapons, on exactly 
which ones should be cut A summit 




W ASHINGTON — The United 
Suites is of two minds about 



defectors. It appreciates the senti- 
ment, but not the hassle. Every defec- 
tor is confirmation that America is 
the promised land. Too many defec- 
tors — a world of tired, poor, hud- 
dled masses are yearning to be free — 
and the promised land gets crowded. 

Worse, too many defectors can be 
bad for business. Embassy business, 
for example. U.S. embassies in the 
Soviet bloc discourage locals from 
jumping their walls and seeking asy- 
lum. It means work and headaches. 
Seven Siberian Pentacostalists lived 
for five years in the basement of the 
U.S. Embassy in Moscow. Embassies 
do not like running hostels. 

What is hurt most of all is ihe 
business of business. If every Soviet 
trading vessel on the Mississippi Riv- 
er brings a ship^jumping incident, 
what happens to the grain trade? 

Accordingly, defection is tolerated, 
not encouraged. There are excep- 
tions, of course. For some defectors 
mundane considerations do not ap- 
ply. Rudolf Nureyev and Mikhail 
Baryshnikov bring glory, and you 
cannot buy that. Unfortunately for 
Miroslav Medvid, he does not dance. 

He does jump. Mr. Medvid is the 
Ukrainian sailor who twice jumped 
ship in New Orleans only to be twice 
returned by U.S. authorities. He is 
now on his way to an unhappy fate in 
the Soviet Union. 

More sophisticated defectors come 
better prepared. An acquaintance of 
mine, a psychiatrist, planned his es- 
cape from the Soviet Union for many 
years. He signed on as a ship’s doctor 
and made a break for it at a West 
African port. He bolted from his 


meeting cannot solve those details. 
But it can make explicit the agree- 
ment on principle — the 50-percent 
principle — and Instruct negotiator* 
to proceed on that basis. Such an' 
agreement should be attainable. It 
would be a significant achievement 
Not even the problem that seems: 
most forbidding, Mr. Reagan’s "star? 
wars" program, should stand in the: 
way of ah agreement on arms control 
principles at the Geneva meeting.! 
From some of the. statements made 
on both sides, wgotiatorsxould fash-, 
ion a solution sufficient for. the day: 


, ■*. 

_’-".j£53K 

if « 

Vi- i* 


-t» 


reaffi rming lhi» anti- baBis tic missile 
treaty while allowing "star wars" re- 


'Three rehabUilated defectors exchange notes. 


away, he could say be had gotten lost 
and no one would be the wiser. Had 
he been drinking? Did he have a fight 
with someone on board? Victor got 
the drift In reply, he pulled down his 
pants and produced his trump — his 
underwear, into which he had sewn 
his medical diploma. That seemed to 


pressed will, his 
It should not ha 


It should not have been. 

At least not immediately. That 
should be Ride Two: Not every wish 
deserves immediate honoring. Con- 
sider the analogy of the suicide 
jumper perched on a ledge who re- 
fuses rescue. Shall we tackle him and 


Medvid? Why not wait a few days to 
find out — at least long enough for 
the effects of the brutalization and 
the drugs to dissipate? 

If American officials erred on the 


treaty wirne allowing "star wars" re- 
search to proceed. 

The realistic reasons for hope iri- 
Geneva make one wonder about thel 
noises coming out of the Reagan ad- 
mink tration in advance of the meet-, 
rag. Various officials have been put- 
ting on longer and longer faces,- 
suggesting 'that not much will be,' 
achieved. lt is as if they were playing 
a game of lowered otpectations. ° 

Secretary of State George Shultz’ 
and the president’s national security 
adviser, Robert McFariane, met Mr. - 
Gorbachev last week to prepare for 
tiw summit talks. On that return to 
Washington, the word went out that 
Mr. Goibachev had been so “argu-‘ 


■ fe-JN 

v. 

Viihsjc 

-.Ji-iem V 


Pet 


wrong side, the error is correctable, mentative" that the chances 'for pro- 
Mr. Medvid can always walk back to gress in Geneva looked dim. 


a Soviet Embassy and go home. Spies ' A high-ranking official briefing the’ 


. n 

- -J*r £ 

* 

*. tA' 


do it After ah, as in suicide, only one press in Washington — my guess is- 


choice is irreverable. 


that it was Mr. McFariane — said 


Poor Medvid has a ticket to the 
U.S.S.R. When he turned up on 
shore, he was canying only a glass jar 
containing his watch ancLa piece of 
paper. The immigration agents were 
not impressed — just a sailor with no 
English. They sent him back. 

Now these agents are either very 
hard or very stupid men, and they are 
in for some punishment. But this is 
not just a case of human error. The 
rules are absurd. 

First, when a guy jumps 40 feet 
from a ship, that alone should be 
considered a request for asylum. And 
if he later offers his signature cm a 


single "will." If he really wanted to 
die, he would not be on the ledge; he 
would be lying on the sidewalk and 


And thitd, wity must a. defector that Mr. Gorbachev was disappoint- 
have Sovdet officials present daring mg because he "hasn’t yet absorbed 


his interviews? Lode at it ton Mr. 
Madrid's point of view. The first time 


the •t#rfww«il aspects of arms con- 
trol” That from an aide to a presi- 


•- ' ** 
-..T-r. at 

., .v.<t 


would be tying on tne sidewalk and . Medvid spomtot view, the nrst tune-’ trot i hat from an aide to a presi- 
tbe question would- be -moot. -And if hejumps,nemnterviewed by Ameri-- -dent souHfmtihE^with-hisown pro— 


he really wanted to live, he would not 
be on the ledge either; he would be 


group on shore leave and made it to 
the U.S. Embassy. 


piece of Riper, so much the better. 

After four days back aboard ship, 
Mr. Medvid was presented to Ameri- 
can officials for reinterriew. This 
time he said he wanted to go home. 
America being die land of freely ex- 


Had he acted on impulse? they 
asked. If be left the embassy right 


inride. He is on the ledge because he 
is of two minds. Society then derides 
to ally itself with the life-seeking 
mind, and often lodes him up for -a 
few weeks waiting for that mind to 
retake command of the other. 

By tiie time Mr. Medvid’ was 
brought back for a final interview by 
U.S. officials, he had no doubt been 
threatened (if not worse: his wrists 
had been cut) and, according to the 
psychiatrist’s report, -heavily 


cans only, be aria to stay, and they posals that he got "star wars" afl 
send him back kicking and screamf mixed up, and his press secretary had 
mg. He is then reinterriewed by to explain his howler away as "presi- 
Americans, this time with a Soviet • dentim imprecision"! 


embassy official present IsTie supr / Mr, Reagan’s strength is as an ar- 
posed to confess now his rgectibnof ticulator ;cf visions. And it is just 
' e motherland and his embrace of there that a summit conference can 
merica? He is not crazy. . ..wade, that it can make a difference. 

A few more Methods and the old . .'The message that a Soriet-Ameri- 
ke — defourion of a Soviet too: a can summit meeting sends out, if it 


America? He is not craty. . / 

- A few more Methods and the dd 


joke — definition , of a Soviet trio: a 


quartet returned from abroad —may works, is that two very different and 


drugged. He said: I want to go 
to the Soviet Union. Days b< 


to uie Soviet Union. Days before, 
another Medvid had said: I want to 
come to America. Which was the real 


lose some of its truth. America is 
putting an enormous effort into, that 
shiny new pamt job for the Statue of 
libaty. Perhaps a bit might be dir 
verted to preparing a better wdcome 
for those who believe its inscription. 

Washington Post: Writers Group: 


EuroparUament: New Teeth, or New Rubber Stahps? 


S TRASBOURG, France — At the 
stan of the 1980s the European 


J stan of the 1980s the European 
Parliament was going places. Its 
members included Willy Brandt, Bet- 
lino Craxi, Jacques Chirac and Pierre 
Mauroy: a former West German 


By Giles Merritt 


to new EC policy initiatives. Majority testing EC governments’ budgetary 
' would be: J , " -vl J * ‘ "-*■ — 


chancellor, a future Italian prime 
minister, and past and future French 


prime ministers, to name but a few. It 
looked like the stan of something big 
for the European Community's new- 
ly elected assembly. 

Today ihe Strasbourg-based par- 
liament is back in the news, but the 
question remains the same: Can the 
434-seat body grab enough power lo 
transform itself from a talking shop 
into a derisive political institution? 

The last few years have not been 
kind to the parliament. The heavy- 
weights have deserted, leaving sec- 
ond-rank politicians either on the 
way up or on the way down. Not a 
single important battle in the straggle 
for political authority has been won 
by the EC parliamentarians. The 
promise of a strong, supranational, 
democratic body remains unfulfilled. 

Bui all is not lost. The next few 
weeks will determine whether the as- 
sembly can grow some teeth. The 
prize that suddenly is almost within 
the pa riiammariaas * grasp is that of 
being a genuine part of the EC deci- 
sion-making process. 

If it is not quite make-or-break 
time far ihepaduunest. it certainly is 
make-or-molder time. 

This opportunity is offered by the 
European governments' efforts to re- 
write parts of the Treaty of Rome, the 
28-year-old legal charter of the Com- 
munity. The idea is that only by tin- 
kering with the treaty can the EC 
streamline itself for the future. 

For two months, Europe's foreign 
ministers have been locked in tortu- 
ous negotiations over an even closer 
integration of the Community, and a 
new system of voting that would 
open the possibility of the wishes of 
sovereign member states being over- 
ruled by the majority. 

What the ministers are talking 
about is a return to the original spirit 
of the treaty. But the motivation is no 
longer the idealism of the six found- 
ing nations; it is the fear that with the 
accession in January of Spain and 
Portugal to full membership, increas- 
ing the EC rolls to 12, unanimous 
decisions will be hard to come by. 

Under a revised treaty, the require- 
ment of unanimity would apply only 


voting would be reserved for the ad- 
ministrative issues that account for 
the bulk of Community decisions. 

The Europeans are not yet fully 
agreed on the details of tms tough 


A revised EC charter 
could turn the assembly 
from a talking shop into 
a decisive institution. 


new system. But most of the govern- 
ments' recognize instinctively that 
whatever the voting mechanism’s fi- 
nal shape, it needs to be dressed in 
the garb of parliamentary democracy 
— hence the chance being presented 
to the European Parliament to boost 
its political clout and influence. 

Up to now, the assembly has bad 
no more than nuisance value. It has 
engaged in the empty ritual of cc in- 


formal opinions on current issues. 

Refusing to wield the robber stamp 
seems an empty threat. Yet the Euro- 
pean Parliament should not be un- 
derrated. Thanks in part to regular 
television coverage of its debates, the 
parliament co mmands more public 
recognition and respect than its pow- 
er rally warrants. President Reagan 
has addressed it as if it were the 
European equivalent of the U.S. 
Congress. And perhaps because it is a 
window in die otherwise featureless 
wall of EC bureaucracy, it attracts 
protesters and lobbyists. 

There are a few fire br an ds in the 


naxtiament who press for change; 
They range from AtieroSpindli, the 
waits* budgetary veteran Italian Communist who 
decisions, knowing that each ume it champions pofttied and economic 
amends a draft budget (he Council of union for' Ettr6jfie,’ 'to the Yoinig 
Ministers will restore it to about its Turks on the right who are d^er- 
original size. But it has never resorted mined: to move' the parliament's 
to the Do-bolds-barred tactics that it monthly sessions to Brussels, where 
could have. The rules allow the par- the action is. " /;• 
liament to demonstrate its displca- Bat if.ctinrihg weeks bring a tod- 
sure by dismissing all the EC com- den i m prov e ment in the assembly’s 
missioners. and enable it to hamper fortunes, it wifi not be because tile 
the ECs works by refusing to vote its parliament has managed to take, but 
current issues. rather because the' EC governments 
the rubber stamp have derided to rive. Granting more 


When Europe’s heads of govern- 
ment meet in Luxembourg on Dec. 2 
they are due .to put the finishing 
touches to the ECs sheamliiuiig 
package. Its components are still be- 
ing wrangled over, but unless. H con- 
cedes more power to the European 
Parliament it probably wifi be vetoed 
by Italy's European-minded national 
parliament and possibly by those of 
some of the Benelux countries. 

International Herald Tribune 


antagonistic societies must have at 
least a. degree of mutual respect for 
the sake of survivaL To his credit, Mr. 
Reagan has understood thaL 
- As -a matter of history, Ronald 
Reagan has a great interest in a suc- 
cessful summit meeting, one that 
leads to real moderation of the arms 
race. It would give meaning to a pres- 
idency whose main achievement so 
far — changing domestic priori ties — 
is running aground on economic 
shoals. It would reassure European 
allies uneasy about a new arms race. 

Mr. Gorbachev also has a powerful 
motive to be flexible on arms issues. 
He has made improvement of die 
Soviet economy his lop priority, and 
that aim would be thwarted by an 
accelerating arms race. 

. The Soviet interest in better rela- 
tions with the United States should 
also make possible some gains on 
other issues in connection with the 
summit conference. If things go rea- 
sonably well, it would not be surpris- 
ing to see more Jews allowed lo leave 
the Soviet Union, and some dissi- 
dents released from their harsh im- 
prisonment. Mr. Gorbachev could, 
py a gesture here and there, greatly 
improve the chances of the peace pro- 
cess in the Middle East 

The stakes are high, ' and Ameri- 
cans should not be put off by the 
negative talk. President Reagan nnA 
Uftnool Secretary Gorbachev have a 
real chance to improve life and secu- 
rity in both their countries. If they 
miss that chance, if they explain it 
away, we should be outraged. 

The New York Times. 




INDC 
Import* 
a Poi 


• - n 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Dutch Dreams, Realities 


Regarding " The Netherlands: Uto- 
pian Dreams Are Being Interrupted by 
Reality” (Insists, Oct. 23): 

Why can an American writer not 
accept the premises of a modern wel- 
fare state as they are lived in the 
Netherlands without portraying 
them as "utopian"? Richard Reeves, 
with his capitalist bias, tries to imply 
{by a ridiculous 16th-century analo- 
gy) that the Dutch solutions to prob- 
lems such as drugs, crime, unemploy- 
ment and housing shortages ore 
somehow wronp or doomed. The gov- 
ernment gets involved and spends 
money — how can it be that simple? 

In America, neither government 
nor the average citizen wastes much 
thought, compassion or money on 
those who “don't make it," I applaud 
the simple notion by which the Dutch 
support every member of their soci- 
ety: "We must do iL because it would 
be wrong not to." . 

IRENE HEISENBERG. 

Durham, New Hampshire. 

I take umbrage at Richard Ree- 
ves’s editorializing. America’s 


dreams — instant and excesavema- especially in the media, toward inno- ment of a u s e ■ 

terialistic gain, philistine entertain- valive ideas launched by high-level date ax Ilnitij Swiss condi- 

ment 24 horns a day — have short- citizens and businesses. The Dutch misaoner for hVS 0115 
comings too. And is it less noble for consider themselves "pathfinders,” a Switzerland a ~ U8ees ^ 

the Dutch to subsidize housing, ait sort of "conscience of the world” Yet humanitarian fid? ^ ^ 

and health than to support multi- their reactions are conservative. tional r^ m ;.! e ( ^ S£ ? :e rr ie ,^ terna '' 
billion-dollar tobacco, dairy and de- Thegbost of Calvin has influenced exclusivrivw! tv S ^ S 0 ?* ^ 
fense industries? ’ even Roman Catholics andpditicany 

The article is an indictment of leftist groups. Theresult is that many ’on asvhim aSJ^S ltsbar S 1 P9 iiaes 
modem Western civilization on both scientists and busmessmenfed better after afl. nrmw/? 118665 ' PnviIe & es ’ 
rides of the Atlantic — not just in in the atmosphere outside the land of auues. 

the Netherlands. the dikes. And those who come back • JOHN de SAUS. 

JEFF J. BROWN. ■' after yean away face "return shock" Geneva. 

Fatgo, Oklahoma. d«! Cl ^^riands re rafuMhaS Restive Maoris 

Many foreigners join the Dun* in from when they left. Regarding the revert “New 

praising the tolerance of then society. . StiD, it does not hurt to remember foeness of Maoris Disturfu vJzf, 
But be aware that tolerance in- the Heinrich Heine’s advice that if ever J®** Whites” (Oa 301 ^ 

Netherlands has its limits. - the world faces annihilation. 'T Mv hBmrtar,^ J 

Immigrants through history - ti»j ■ wotdd like'to be in the. Netherlands, the BdaoSXln, 


V- s i -"J 5acto5d Swiss candi- 
oAte as Umted Nations High Cbm- t 
mjaoner for Refugees wmid give » 
Swttzerinnd a near monopoly in the 
humanitarian field, since the Interna- 
23“ Puttee of the Red Cross is 
aduavdy Swiss. This should lead 




rides of the Atlantic — not just in 
the Netherlands. 


JEFF J. BROWN. 
Fargo, Oklahoma. 




Many foreigners join the Dutch in 
praising the tolerance of their society. 
But be aware that tolerance in- the 
Netherlands has its limits. 




immigrants tnrougn History — would Hire to be in. the; Netherlands, the Maori* “ 

Huguenots are an example —found became everything there happroaSd mit^^SS It ’- OT . N f wZealand 
that they were welcome afrtongas the years later." • --- -injt rarisi 


cconomy was booming andthey.-^rHS: 
foreigners — contributed toxt. ' 
More recent immigrants, from 
Southern Europe and North Africa 
have to be protected by 
crimination" law. - - - • 

Dutch law and order is jement tp 
sauatters, demonstrator^ arkL drng. 
addicts. But there is much OTspicjOh,' 


years later." - 

JAN R. HAKEMULDER. 
- : Optinde, Netherlands. 


The Hnmanitarian Swiss 


However regrettable that a “UN 
Election Threatens Neutrality of Ref 
ugee PosT (forigte, Oa. 30), W 
maybe positive aspects. The appoint- 


““d-Kfctiwd suffer- 

rin^Sw 11011 b* bew m force 
JhJ if C ? atniy - ^ New Zea- 
Maons vote for their own 
^esentauves to the House of Rep- 
ttsentanves; the whStes.do the same! 
BRUCE J. PHILLIPS. 


■ * • . ti 


utag 




Budapest. 



- 


m 







At v 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


Page 7 


x (Co ntin ued fhwr.Page 1) 
Moslem militiamen of the Amal. 

■ Uy| movement. 

'u. ' Islamic Jihad, -a 'Shiite ftmda- 

mentaKst group loyal to Iran that 
has claimed responsibility for' the 
; \ : £V ; kidnapping of eight Americans 
."yi smce March 1984, allowed four 
host^to^di^lfittecslastFri- 
% 1^-7 day to Mr. Reagan, their families 
■ v '3' and the archbishop. 

: The group is demanding' the re- 

lease of 17 comrades convicted in 
' 5 < 4. Kuwait for bombing the UJS. and 

■ Freoch embassies there in 1983. . 

Last May, the samp group pro- 
' . *7^.1 posed to release four Americans, 

' induding WUHam Buckley, a U.S. 

- * Embassy political officer, if the L7 

.-/J-Sti prisoners held in Kuwait were 
.* treed. Islamic Jihad said they had 
r :» ; killed Mr. Buckley but this has not 

been verified, 

; . The only other U.S. hostage is 
Peter Kilburn, a librarian 
' .7 The letter to the archbishop was 

L' r ^' agned by Terry A. Anderson, 38, ■ 


es in Lebanon 


.chief Middle East correspondent 
forThe Associated Press; the Rev- 
erend taswtace Martin Jenoo, 50, 
a Roman Catholic priest; David 
Jacobsen, ^ director of the Amer- 
ican IWvosty Hospital in Beirut; 
and Thomas M. Sutherland,- 53, 
dean of agriculture at the universi- 
ty. . 

A Presbyterian minister, the 
Reverend Benjamin Weir, was 
freed Sept. 14 to show the captors 
“goodintentKm*’ ' 

There are no guarantees that Mr. 
Waite will succeed, but recent signs 
by the Americans' captors suggest 
that they may be ready to negotir 
ate. 

The U.S. administration has said 
it will not bend to wishes of “terror- 
ists” but left the door open for 
negotiations. - 

. Mr. Waite has successfully nego- 
riated the release of four Britons 
from Libya In September and three 
Anglican micsinnaries from Iran in 


d 






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. 

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Jean-Qaude Aim£ 

1981. He admitted that tins time he 
was up against a more diffuse and 
disorganized group, rather than a 
central government. 

Separately, Jean-Oande AimA, 
the UN's special Middle East en- 
voy, Dew to Beirut with instruc- 
tions from Javier PArez de Cu&lar, 
the UN secretary-general, to dis- 
cuss all the hostages with the gov- 
ernment. 


Agreement 

OnUlster 

(Continued from Paige 1) . 

meat had betrayed its responsibil- 
ity to the people of Northern Ire- 
land. 

The statement said British assur- 
ances that Northern Ireland's sta- 
tus would not be altered “is now 
contradicted by the concession to 
another government of a share in 
the framing and implementation of 
the law, and in die administration 
of the affaire of Northern Ireland.” 

The Times of London said the 
agreement consisted of: 

• An British-Irish ministerial 
commission to oversee contacts be- 
tween the two governments on 
Northern Ireland’s affairs. . 

• A secretariat of British and 
Irish officials in Belfast, to serve as 
a forum to which Roman Catholics 
could address grievances if they 
feel they are not being satisfactorily 
dealt with by the British, authori- 
ties. 

• A parliamentary tier up 
of British, Irish and Northern Irish 
lawmakers to work on improving 
relations among the three. 

• Reforms to give more expres- 
sion to Catholic culture in North- 
ern Ir eland, such as permitting 
Irish street names and the flying of 
the Irish flag, actions presently out- 
lawed. 

• A connnisfflon to improve Brit- 
ish-Irish cooperation in combating 
the Irish Republican Army and its 
offshoot; the Msb National libera- . 
lion Amy. 


Chemical Arms Accord Is Set 


(Continued from Page 1) 
force in- Europe combined with 
confidence-bull ding measures to 
reduce the risks of surprise attack; 
measures to prevent nuclear mis- 
calculations and nudear surprise 
attacks; and a cooperative research 
effort on nudear fusion for civil 
purposes. 

Officials said they were also hop- 
ing to gain Moscow's agreement to 
hold additional summit meetings- 
Meanwhile, Thomas P. Owl 
Jr., die speaker of the House, 
pledged “a bipartisan willingness” 
to support the summit results. 

“when President Reagan meets 
with Mr. Gorbachev next week,” 
Mr. ONeffl said, “he deserves the 
support of all Americans, regard- 
less of party or philosophy.” 

Later, Mr. O’Neill drew ap- 

f lanse from both sides of the 
louse when be denied a report in 
Wednesday's issue of The . New 


York Times that his remarks were 
part of a Democratic strategy to 
raise the summit stakes for Mr. 


Robert H. Michel of Illinois, the 
House Republican leader, said, “L 
for one, refuse to believe that the 
speaker of the House would use his 
high office for such a partisan pur- 
pose” 

Mr. O’Neil] responded that re- 
port in The Times was “absolutely 
and completely wrong,” and “the 
figment of somebody’s imagina- 
tion.” 

A source close to Mr. O’Neill, 
and one of several House Demo- 
crats to talk about the strategy, said 
that the speaker was denying his 
own partisanship in the matter “be- 
cause he was directly accused of 
being partisan” but that “the story 
about the strategy is a fact." 


State Terror 
Is Assailed 
By Bishops 
Id Chile 


SANTIAGO — ■ Chile’s Roman 
Catholic bishops have accused the 
military government of carrying 
out state terrorism and asserted 
that the sharpening of social con- 1 
fliers was due largely to the lade of ' 
political freedoms in Chile. i 

The charges were made Wednes- 1 
day in pastoral guidelines issued by 
the permanent committee of the 
country’s episcopal conference. 

' Relations between the Catholic 
hierarchy and the president. Gen- 
eral Augusto Pinochet have long 
been strained. 

Church officials called in August- 
for an investigation of kidnapping 
and torture cases they suspected 
were executed with the participa- 
tion of security fences, and seven 
policemen were arrested in Septem- 
ber an charges of involvement in 
the abduction and killing of three 
Communist aides of the president. 

Meanwhile, six opposition lead- 
ers jailed by the government for 
calling protests in September called 
off a hunger strike Wednesday af- 
ter two weeks, in response to ap- 
peals from their supporters and the 
Roman Catholic Church. 

In their document, the bishops 
said: “There is a political will be- 
hind this violence. There is violence 
in arbitrary detentions, internal 
and external exile, the practice of 
abduction of intimidation and even 
political murder.” 

The bishops distinguished be- 
tween “terrorism that comes from 
the state through its security orga- 
nizations” and ‘'terrorism that 
comes from those who resort to 
terrorist methods as an expression 
of frustration and discontent." 

But, they added: “State violence 
is more serious because the authori- 
ties, by definition, are supposed to 
repress crime using the weapons of 
truth and justice.” 


Peres Insists Sharon Retract Policy Attack 


(Continued from Page 1) 
Sharon was trying to break up the 
coalition to eh»Heng e Mr. Shamir 
for the Likud leadership. 

Mr. Sharon’s charges were the 
following: 

• Mr. Peres, in secret contacts 
with Jordan, sought to include Syr- 
ia in peare talks in an international 

conference in exchange for territo- 
rial concessions in the Golan 
Heights. • . 


• The Labor Party’s “cynicism" 
had “cost blood.” 

• Israel was being led down “a 
crooked path." 

• Mr. Peres employed “base 
craftiness” in refusing to rule out 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
participation in negotiations. 

• The peace treaty with Egypt 
was endangered by Mr. Peres’s 
“shaky and obsequious policy.” 

• When Mr. Sharon demanded 
that PLO bases be removed from 


Jordan he was “answered with cyn- 
icism." 

In a speech to the Labor Party 
centra] committee Thursday, Mr. 
Peres said that it would be impossi- 
ble to remain in the same cabinet 
with Mr. Sharon unless the trade 
minister specifically retracted all 
the allegations. 

MORE NEWS IN LBS TIME 

THE WORLD IN 16 PAGES 

' DAILY IN THE IHT I 


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INDONESIA: A Major 
Importer of Rice Becomes 
a Potential Exporter 


JAKARTA- An archipelago con- 
sists of 13.700 islands on the equa- 
tor, Indonesia has long been a net 
importer of food, especially rice the 
main staple of the majority of the 
country’s 167 million people. 

Rice imports amounted at 628 
tho usan d tonnes in 1968, incre- 
ased to 955 thousand tonnes- in 
1 970 and reached a peak in 1980 at 
about Z million tonnes. 

This does not mean that rice 
production stagnated.” But, just as 
Robert MaLthus predicted, the in- 
crease in production .could not 
match the increase in demand that 
came with population growth and 
higher income. About 12.2 million 
tonnes of milled rice were pro- 
duced in 1969. In 1984; after fif- 
teen year's hard work and determi- 
nation, the production of. milled 
rice reached 25.8 million tonn es. 

During the 20 year period, 
1963-1983, Indonesia received a- 
bout US$187 million worth of food 
aid — accepted worldwide as part 
of development aid. 

The New Order of the Indonesian 
government. under President 
Suharto’s leadership, was well 
aware of both its benefit^ and 
hazards for the recipient country. 
Food aid can prevent starvation 
and helps a country overcome 
short-term stock deficits. It can' 
also be used meaningfully in find- 
ing inn ovative ways to promote 
development and alleviate poverty 
and malnutrition. But, there is 

also the danger to become depend- 
ent on the donations. In order not 
to disturb the normal patterns of 
production and marketing, excess 
aid was channelled through a spe 1 
cial agency which stabilizes the 
prices of food produced domesti- 
cally. 

Food supply is naturally crucial 
in supporting national develop- 
ment and national security.. Since' 
the 1950’s Indonesia has striven to 
become self-sufficient in .food, pro- 
duction. 

But it was. not until. 1969, whert 
President Suharto decreed the im- 
plementation of Pelita T flndone- 



7 7ns is a sponsored article 

sia’s National Five-Year Develop- 
ment Plan), the development of 
agricultural sector was rightly 
placed ' on the highest rank of 
priorities. 

Four main programs were in- 
cluded in the drive towards self 
sufficiency: intensification, exten- 
sification, rehabilitation, and di- 
versification. Of these four pro- 
grams, intensification has played 
the leading Tole. The main reason 
for this is the confidence that peo- 
ple had that intensification was the 
cheapest and most effective 
approach. 

Most Indonesian fanners can be 
classified as low income small, far- 
mers. 

On the average, an Indonesian far- 
mer will own one hectare of land. 
On- Java, the most densely popu- 
lated island, the average is only 0. 6 
hectare per farmer. 

Moreover, most of the farms in 
Indonesia are managed by farm 
families.- This is the reason why 
agricultural modernization in In- 
donesia is actually a moderniza- 
tion of the family farm. Moderni- 
zation efforts are trying to maxi- 
mize productivity of each family 
member while using the natural 


resources available in the com- 
munity. 

Indonesian small farmers are 
willing to adapt to new innova- 
tions. For example, the use of rice 
hullers in rural areas was very low 
in 1968. There were only about 
8.000 units at that time, for most 
farmers still believe in the old 
traditional way of hulling rice. By 

1983, the number of hullers in use 
climbed to 64.000. Other examples 
can also be seen in the increases in 
use of fertilizer, high yielding 
varieties and modern equipments 
such as tractors, hand sprayers, 
thresher and the like. 

But. the most rewarding aspect 
of this intensification program 
must be attributed to the system 
called Mass Demonstration, which 
then turned to Mass Guidance 
Program. At first, the small far- 
mers were organized into groups, 
consists of up to 25 farmers. Oneis 
selected as the leader of the group, 
who is accountable to bring the 
problem of his members to the 
notice of the organizers. 
Demonstration plots of O.l ha are 
established on the farmer's land. 
This is then developed further into 
a demonstration farm between 5 
and 10 ha, utilizing modern tech- 
nology, managed by 10-15 far- 
mers in the group. Once these 
farms have shown significant pro- 
duction increases, the area is 
broadened out to 25-100 ha and 
organized cooperatively among 
several groups. 

In two years, 1966 - 1967, the 
area under this intensification 
program increased from 172.000 
ha to more than l.l million ha. 
These numbers have been con- 
tinually increasing. Last year, the 
program has covered 9.6 million 
ha. 

By the cooperation pattern, the 
small farmers are able to see that 
modem technology can operate 

effectively at the village level. It is 
this system that has worked so 
effectively in rice production, 
yielding 25.8 million tonnes in 

1984. 


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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15 , 1985 


S ^ , 


NYSE Most Actives 


Vtl 


Htah Low Last an. 


BeofC * 38713 4AM 
Foniwi mm sm 
at&t 223m &% 
PMIPts 31633 ljft 
BaxtTr 19T64 14 
CmyE 16624 30 
AldSonn 1*478 46ft 
IBM _ IBK 137 
WWBE 12280 43ft 
11837 33 
11383 11% 
I DSD 88% 
10212 16 
10147 «k 
10082 W% 


Mobil 
Aunx 
Am Exp 

fexOGs 

MW5U1 

MerLvn 


46 

OH 

21% 

121k 

> 3 % 

37% 

44% 

urn 

42% 

JIM 

11 % 

47ft 

15% 

9 

32ft 


46% 

51 

22ft 

13% 

14 

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45% 

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43% 

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33 


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+3 
+ % 
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+ ft 
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+ tt 


Dow Janes Averages 


Open 


HWl 


LOW 


Last an. 


Indus 142569 144X81 143064 1*3922 + 11.47 

Trans 68021 69121 67626 687.73 + 7.72 

UMI 16460 167.42 16367 16685 + US 

Comp 57627 5B4J2 57174 58229 + 553 


NYSE index 


f lomuasit* 
nflusirtcli 
Transn. 
Utllltnt 

Finance 


HM Lew Osh Cbteo 
11462 11167 11463 + 1J8 
13160 13029 13160 + 125 
10927 10862 10967 +128 
59 JJ 5923 59.73 +068 
13427 12327 13407 +0L65 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Utilities 

industrial* 


CIOM 

8157 

7967 

8368 


aim 
+ 0.14 
+ 0.14 
+ 0.15 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Low 
Volume up 
vel ume down 


Clan Prav. 


1133 

494 


2055 

107 

II 

90256680 

21,114210 


1023 

430 

3039 

94 

11 


[ Odd-Lot Trading in N,Y.~1 


NOv. 13. 
NOW. 13 . 
Nov. u . 
NOV. 8 _ 
NOV. 7 . 


Buy Sale* 

16663S 519.902 
254218 597206 
201298 415237 
15B285 4I9JS0 
156255 <37234 


•indudec-ln me me* figures 


-SWT 

7647 

7235 

30647 

6.180 

1,104 


Thursday s 

MSE 

dosing 


V0L0UPJM 

Pnv.4PjH.vaL. 


Prev consolidated dose 


12L93UW 
189690280 ! 
133499620 . 


Tables include the nationwide prim 
up to the closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 
Total Issues 
New h lofts 
Now Laws 
Vatu me up 

VoUime down 


313 

242 

257 

814 

33 

15 

S2*9,US 

3298.975 


2M 

297 


MASDAQ Index, 


camomile 

industrial* 

Finance 

Insurance 

urum** 

sank* 

Trans*. 


Week tsor 
Close CM* *•" 

30521 + 12* VTf. "HI 

ss.iiSS bs 


Standard & Poor’s index 


High Low Close diUe 
Industrials 32161 31861 220J9 +134 

Tronsp. 17966 174.10 17930 +192 

UtllTlle* 8829 8728 8820 + 023 

Finance 3427 3325 2426 + 0.11 

Composite 199.19 19628 19926 +128 



4 PM, volume 
P^APAft-raftmte 

Prev. con*. vtUutiw 


9,980200 

8^0200 

8690200 


amex Most Actives 


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14 


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173 106 
160 
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1.92elDJ 
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18% m AGS 

14 9% AMCA 

Sm 2»% AMR 
23% 18% AMR of 118 9J 
25% 23 AN Rdf 2*7 112 
33 19 ANRat 3.12 106 

13% 7% APL 

1SV. 9 ARX 
61% 32% ASA 
27 10% AVX 

28% 19% A2P 
62 38% AbTLOD 

25% 19% AcooWd 
24% 10 AcmoC 
1OV3 7 AcmeE 

19 15% AdaEx 

20 T3» AdmMl 

14% 8% AdvSn 
34% 22% AMD 
11% 10% Adoben 
15% 14% AdobprA 
16% 15V. AdObefB 
12% 6% Ad vest 

53 34% AefnLf 

57% 53% AetLPf 
39V. 221s Ahmrrj 

3% 3% Alteon 
57% 44% AirPrd 
24% 17% AtrbFrt 
7% 1% AIMOa 5 

29V. 23% AlaP pf 
33% 2914 AlaP PfA 3.92 111 
8% 6% AlaP dpi 27 10A 

83 66% AloPpI 920 112 

75 61% AlaP of 8.16 10.9 

76% 60 AlaP Ot 
26% 12% AlshAIr 
JOM 13% AIdtio s 
33 V. 26% Albtsns 
31 v. 22% Alcan 

38% 27% AlcoSId ... 

32% 21 AlexAlx 120 11 
30 20% Alexdr 25 

89% 72% AII9CD 1241 12 22 

28% 20V. Alglnl 1.40 53 

20% I6%Al9lnol 119 112 
98 85% Algl DJCI125 11.9 

34% 28% AllgPw 170 83 10 

24 lt'A AllenG 20b 16 12 

23% 15% AlldPd 9 

45 42 AldSonn 120 ... 

46% 43 AldS PfA 4.12 62 

61 58% AM5pfC L74 112 

111 103% AldS PfDlTJM IU 

103% 101% AldSofF 
43% 47% AltdSfr 220 32 8 
9% 3% AJIlsOl 

34% 24 AlisCpi 

30% 22% ALLTL 

39% 29% Alcoa 

19% 10% Amax 


Si 14 IS 3S 23 >u 23 23 — % 

98 18 17V 18 + % 

31 10% 10% 10% + % 

sm 42% 42 42% 

423 23% 23% 23% 

1 Wt, 24U 24% — % 

405 20 30 20 

4 9% 9% 9%— % 

63 14% 14% 14% 

481 35U. 34% 35U. + % 

313 11% 11% 11% 

_ . 1157 24 25% 25% 

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22 18 210 24% 24% — U 

120 MU. 11% 1 1V. + % 

24 7 7 7 

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37 13% 13U 13% + % 

38 4513 25% 25 25% + % 

767 11 10% II + % 

384 15% 14% 15 + % 

231 16% 16% 16% 

.12 1.1 IS 485 10% 10% 10% + % 

264 52 17 4500 53% 51% 53 + % 

5410 96 110 56% 56 56% 

120 32 A *066 30% 37'- 37% — 1 

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60 18 12 779 21% 20% 21b + % 

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78 32% 31% 32% + % 

55 8% 8% 8% + V* 

StJi 82 81% 81% — % 

5100, 75 75 75 

1001 74 74 74 

1172 20% 19% 2D% + % 
89 29% 29 29% + % 

818 32% 31% 31% — 4k 
955 25% 25% 25% + % 
291 36% 36% 36% 

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19 1014467 46% 44% 45% +1% 

29 67 65% 66% +1% 

198 61% 597* 41% +1% 

6 105% 105 105% +1 

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501 63% 62% 63% 

272 3% 3% 3% 

IT 29 29 29 

1.96 46 9 45 29% 29% 2*% + U 

1.7!! 3-5 32 1548 34% 33% 34 + % 


N. Y. Slocks Set Another Record 


.tee 62 
lo3e 91 


828 112 
.18 6 8 
J8 U 22 
Jt 14 13 
68 11 49 
1J0 3J 13 


.101 11383 11% 11% 11% + VS 

37% 29 Amm.pt 100 103 17 29% 29 29% + % 

34 22% AmHes M0 16 25 2845 30% 29% 30% + % 

140% 98% AHesnf 150 17 1 130% 130% 130% +1% 

2% 1% AmAar 133 1% 1% 1% 

27 16 ABakr 10 51 27% 26% 27 + % 

70 53% A Brand 3J0L5 8 1643 59%S9 59% + % 

30% 25% ABrd at ITS 92 3 30 30 30 

70% 54% ABrd pi 267 44 4 68% 60 60% + % 

119% 56% ABdcst 160 1J 20 3758 119% 119 119% + % 

30% 20% ABIdM 66 36 14 18 34 23% 24 + % 

30% 20% ABusPr 64 11 15 

63% 47% Am Can 190 46 13 


25% 22% AConpr 260 116 

55% *2 ACanpf 100 56 

22% 18 ACaoBd 220 102 

30% 25% ACOPCv 1516 95 

II 5% ACenIC 
57% 44% AC van 

29% 19% ADT 

24% 19% AElPw 

49% 34% Am Exp 

29% 14% AFaml t 

36% 23% AGnCP 

16 8 AGnl wt 

56% 52 AGnl PfA 564*10.1 4 

47% AGnofD 264 46 


B1 30% 30 30% + % 

393 61% 60% 61 + M 

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United Press International 

NEW YORK — Stocks smashed records 

Thursday for ihe third time this week. 

Analysts said investors were acting on the 
belief that U.S. interest rates will come down 
and corporate profits will rise. 

The Dow climbed 11.47 points to M39.22, 
offering an encore to its 27.52-pomi leap Mon- 
day. 

The New York Stock Exchange index rose 
1.03 to an afl-rima high of 1 14.S2 and Standard 
& Poor’s 500-stock index increased 1.96 to an 
unprecedented 199.06. The price of an average 
share jumped 32 cents. 

Advances outpaced declines by 2 to 1. Vol- 
ume totaled 124.9 million shares, up from 
109.69 million Wednesday. 

Composite volume of NYSE-listed issues on 
all U.S. exchanges and over the counter totaled 
141.9 million shares, compared with 129.6 mil- 
lion traded Wednesday. 

“The sleeping giant is beginning to roar,'' 
said Marvin Katz of Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. 

Tm enjoying this market very much,” said 
Trude Latimer of Evans & Co. She said the rally 
has begun to spread to the secondary, tower 
priced issues. 

“The w illingness of institutions and the pub- 
lic to buy the lower priced issues shows there is 
increasing confidence in the market ,* 1 Ms. Lati- 
mer said. 

Alfred Harris of Josephthal & Co. in Sl 
L ouis said that more investors are converting to 
the beliefs that interest rates will trend lower 
over the near term, that disinflation will contin- 
ue for a significant period of time and that the 
overall outlook for corporate earnings is reason- 
ably good. 

“The stock market will remain at high levels 
from now until year-end," Mr. Harris said. 

Ricky Harrington of Interstate Securities in 


M-l Rises $ 200 Million 

The .Unxmcd Press 

NEW YORK — The narrowest measure of 
the U.S. money supply, known as M-l. rose 
$200 milli on in early November, the Federal 
Reserve Board reported Thursday. 

The Fed said M-l increased to a seasonally 


adjusted $61 1.6 billion in the week ended Nov. 
4, from S61 1.4 billion the previous week. 

M-l includes cash in circulation, deposits in 
checking accounts and nonbank travelers 
checks. 


Charlotte, North Carolina, said that a close 
above 1,440 on the Dow will be very bullish and 
will trigger substantially more public partic 
lion in the market He said that the Dow is 
likely to finis h above that level within the next 
few sessions. 

After the market dosed, the Federal Reserve 
reported the nation's basic money supply rose 
S200 million in the week ended Nov. 4. 

On the trading floor, Beatrice was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue, climbing 54 to 46M 
The company agreed to be acquired by Kohl- 
berg, Kravis, Roberts & Co. 

High-technology and semiconductor issues 
were among the market’s leaders. IBM climbed 
134 to 136%. Cray Research was the session's 
biggest winner, jumping 4 to 6534. Motorola 
added 1 V4 to 347a, National Semiconductor rose 
3 A to 1214. Advanced Micro Devices added ft to 
25ft and Texas Instruments climbed 2ft to 9814. 

Among other actively traded blue chips, Al- 
lied-Signal climbed 1ft to 46, Westingbouse 
rose ft to 43ft, American Express added ft to 
48ft. General Motors tacked on ft to 69ft, Sears 
edged up ft to 36ft and Exxon spurted ft to 54. 


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20 1146 11% 11%— % 
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271 20% 20 20% — % 

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136 44 49 4137 305, »% 30% + % 

XI 9 334 26% 25% 26% + % 

822 14% M 14 — % 

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21Z5 37% 36% 37% + % 

500 4916 49% 49>A — % 

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90x109 109 109 + % 

420 50 40% 49% +1% 

645 2916 28% 2854— % 

537 2414 23% 24 + U 

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136 38 14 
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17 Month 
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180 

180 

280 

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18% 14% CwEof 150 105 
18% 15% CwE pf 280 11.1 
76% 62 ’6 CwE pf 838 113 
24% 19% CwE pf 237 9J 
26% 23% CwE pt 287 108 
76% 60 CwE Pf 880 113 
65% 53 CwE Pf 734 113 
30% 22% CamES 252 87 
3B% 23 Comsat 
35% 23% CPsyc 
35% 23% Com par 
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47% 36% ConE Pf 485 103 

50 41% ConE pi 580 103 
37% 26% CnsFri 1.10 X0 12 
47% 38% CnsNG 232 51 10 

8% 4% ConsPw 

33% 20 CnPpfB 450 138 
39% 27% CnPpfC 452 113 
54% 33% CnPPfD 785 141 

51 32% CnPpfE 772 148 

56 33% CnP pIG 776 143 

31% 15% CnP prV 480 147 
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28% 14% ChPprT 178 148 
55% 33% CAPpfH 788 140 
28% 14% CnPprR 400 148 
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28% 14% CnPprN 385 148 
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27% 17% Cardura JW 34 16 
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10V. 5% CnlCrd 

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53% 49% CrckN Pt243e 58 
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20 1172 15% 15% 15% + % 

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37% 30% CurtW M03J 17 14 36% 36% 36% + % 

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30% 22V. DanaCp 138 53 8 

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34 

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264 5% 5% 5% 

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20% 15 Day! PL 200 103 8 351 W6 19% 19% + % 

65 52 DPLpt 748 118 46ta 63% 63% 63% +1 

64% 55V. DPLpt 770 117 100X66 65% 66 — % 

W* 34% DeanFd 56 14 18 70 39% 39% 39% + % 

33% 24V. Deem TOO X6 41 1601 27H 27% 27% + % 

26% 20% DelmP 172 75 9 536 25% 25% 25% + % 

52% 36% DeltaAr 100 25 7 — — 

10 4% Deltona 

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25% 22 OE pfB 275 107 
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24 18% Dexter 80 34 14 

18% 11% DKJJcr 8* 35 94 

33% 34 DIGIopf 275 7J 

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38% 34% DlaShPt 400 113 

22% 20% DlaSOf n 140e 68 

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85% 70% Duke Pf 870 107 
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77 61% Duke of 780 108 

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19% 1 M. Dua pfA X10 115 
16% 13 Duapr 187 117 
17% 13U Duqpt ZOO 122 
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10 14ft Dot PriC Z10 11.9 
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25% 23% Duqpr 27S 108 
62% 51 Duapf 770 120 
27% m OynAm 70 8 11 


2910 39% 38*. 371A— Ml 

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678 44% 43V, 437k— % 
106 22M. 22% 2ZM 

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3160 1516 1516 151* + % 

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20x67% 67% 67% 

40ata 66 66 66 +1% 

132 27% 27% 27% + % 

26 26% 26% 26ft— % 

11 SS SJ* »% + % 

27 259k 25^6 2594 
167 Mk 28V. 28% + V. 
200 2816 279k 28% + V. 

20 32 '4 31U 3TU — % 
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12 Month 
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Die. YW. PE 


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12 7% Elcor 86 15 41 10V. T% 10U + % 

5% 2% EIccAl 14 10 4% 4% 4%— % 

24% 15% ElCtfPS 88 A 25 115 21% ZU6 Zl% + % 

16 11% ElBln 80 58 15 1W lg6 13% WL 

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22% 17% EtnpDs 188 8J 8 24 22% 22% 22% 

516 4 Emppf JO 98 life 5 5 5 +% 

5% 4% Emppf 50 HUJ Mta 5% 5 5 

16% 12% Energen 184 7.1 10 139 14% M 14% + % 

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20 11% ISSsis 36 18 14 157 19% 19% 19% + % 

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106% 95% ElttCh&]a«el08 SO 104% 1 04% 104% + % 

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1^5 l5S 250.173 K Ik ]iS 13S + W 

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26% M% Ethyls 50 23 IS 1043 26% JflJ 26% + % 

6 1 viEvonP 73 116 1% 1%— % 

1% 1% vjlvSlpt 22 1% 1% 1% 

12% 2% vIEvnpfB 1 2% 2% 2%— 16 

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17% IS ExcetST 186*108 28 17% 17% 1716 — % 

55% 42% Exxon X60 6 7 9 8324 54V. 53 54 +% 


n Month 
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34% 18 HetmP 
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20% 1116 HaritCS 841 
35 21% HerltC pf 150 

31 16 Hirmn n 

50% 35 He rtftY 
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13% 9 Hestnpf 

38% 28% HoWlPk 
33% 24 Hex cal 
23% 15U HIShaar 
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26% 19% Hllrftrd 
73% 54 Hilton 
36V. 26% Hltodhl 
57% 39 Holiday T80 
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20% 10% HameD 
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3* 30% FdMog 130 43 11 

24% 14 FedNM .16 J 

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16 30% 281% 30% 

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443 21% 21% 21% + % 

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19% 12% HouFob 88 
41% 28% Houslnt 181 
90% 72 Holntpf 237 
61 48 Holntpf 250 ... 

81% 68 Holntpf 635 78 
29% 20% Haulnd 164 fj 7 
13% 8 HauOR 

19% 14% HowtCP 
27% 23% Hubbrd 
13% 9% Huffy 

15% 12 HutfiTI 
24% 1716 HughSP 
3666 21% Human 
31% 21% HuntMf 
41% 26% HuttEF 
32 21% Hydral 


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717 mS 12% 13% +1J6 

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180 10% 10% 10%—% 

596 12% 12% 12% + % 

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12 Month 
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52 39% LILOfK 

23% 16% LILPOC 
22% 16% LILPW 
23% 16% LILPfV 
27% 19% LILPfU 
21% 15% LILpfT 
16% 11% LILPfF 
19% 12% ULPTO 


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international 


November 15, 1985 


WEEKEND 


Page 9 


Photographers in the World of Dress: 
A Question of Fashion or Style 


L ONDON —Tlie cUcibi has it that fash- 
ion pbotographers would rather be 
so methin g else. In his preface to 
_ the catalog to the exhibition of . 
jfashionphouigraphsabwmtbeVictoriaaiid ' 
' Albert Museum, the museum’s director. Sir ; 

. Roy Strongs speaks of the photographers’ 

. love-hate relationship to their craft and 
claims they “fed- guilt-ridden from rime to 
, tune." 

“ Even the fashion butterfly Cedi Beaton in - 
~ 1938 wrote an article called ^1 Am- Gorged 
* With Glamour Photography” and staled bis 
true aim: “I want to malt**- photographs of 

Mary Blume 

very degant women taking the grit out of 
their eyes, or blotring their noses, or mirin g 
jthe lipstick off theiy teeth.” Beaton was of 
course far too wise to do such a thing. 

'i Edward Steicheri, whose: 1927 photograph 
. of Marion Morehouse in. a Cberuit dress has 
»• been called “the key to modem fashion pho- 
* 'tography." said .what he liked especially 
about Morehouse (who became Mrs. e. e. 
en mming s) was that “she was no more inter- 
ested in fashion than I was.” 

David Bailey, on the other hand, isn't 
•* convinced by all this self-loathing. “Steichen 
_ couldn’t have been that embarrassed about 
fashion photography -—he spent thirty years 
doing it. It’s like Tolstoy becoming a vege- 
’ tarian at eighty.” 

Bailey chose the 175 photographs in the 
V&A show, wind) is the first major exhfbi- 
j don of fashion photography ever held in 
Britain. He reckons that he spends only 
about 10 percent of his time on fashion 
pictures, bid he is not about to put down the 
craft: “My fashion pictures are documents 
"just as much as my boat people or my pic- 
. hires for Bandaid of Sudan.” 

The work of some of the best fashion 
photographers, Bailey says, could quaUfy-for 
categories other than fashion. “Irving Penn, 

' still life. Richard Avedon, portraits. And Bin 
Klein has had enormous influence on report - 
‘age." 

Bailey himself has had an influen ce not 
. only on fashion pictures but on pop sociolo- 
gy. He brought cockney cheek and hustle to 
* the. gented purlieus of Harper’s Bazaar and 
Vogue and helped create the swinging -60s 
although he was too canny to be taken in 
entirely by the myth. ‘The rixties was 3,000 
- people in London. I don’t think the coal 
miner in Yo rkshire had much fun in tile 
* sixties.” 

In his own preface for the V&A show 
(which lasts through mid-January) Bailey 
quotes the line, '"When I die I want to go to 
Vogue.” This still and glossy paradise is 
‘ represented by 39 photograp hers- who range 
- alphabetically from Diane Arbus, who pho- 
tographed children’s fashions in.a style eerily 



. :• 

. ; ' 




Martin Mtmkacsi (1938). 

like her more famous work, to Brace Weber, 
bom in 1946 and the hottest photographer 
these days. “With Weber and Helmut New- 
ton we're talking more about style than fash- 
ion." Bailey says. “Fashion is here six 
months and gone. You can recognize a 
style.” 

In addition to such expected grandees as 
Baron Adolphe de Meyer, whom Beaton 
called the Debussy of photographers, there 
are many now-obscure nam es such as the 
Fren chman Jean Moral, the Czech Francois 
Kollar, the Swiss Hans Feurer, the American 
Melvin Sokolsky, and above aU the very 
influential Martin Munkacsi, a Hungarian 
who died in 1963 and whom Henri Cartier- 


I German Theater’s Bad Boy 


Bresson called one of photography's most 
important pioneers who “made me suddenly 
realize that photography could reach eterni- 
ty through the moment.” 

A former sports photographer, Munkasd 
brought movement to fashion photography 
and actually had a model ran toward the 
camera. Richard Avedon had said that Mtm- 
kasd’s pictures in Harper's Bazaar were his 
first lesson in photography. 

In Avedon's own pictures, the running 
models seem frozen in mid-air. Both Ave- 
don's elaborate set-ups and the monumental 
photgraphs of Irving Penn (so intense, com- 
plained one Vogue editor, that they burned 
the pages and could not be used) date from 
the days of great dresses, which raises the 
question of how much the fading of haute 
couture hastened the disappearance of the 
grandiose fashion photograph. . 

Bailey points out that haute couture died 
in the ’60s at just about the time that the 
motorized camera came in. Everything 
changed. “The dress was a sculptured thing 
before,” he says. As for fashion photogra- 
phy, “Almost anyone can do it now.” 

Bailey’s own favorite fashion photogra- 
pher is Cecil Beaton. “He had a way of 
making people happy in their own space. He 
had a way of malting people natural." 

Yet no photographs were more posed and 
unnatural than Beaton's. “All pictures are 
unnatural,” Bailey replies. “All pictures are 
sad because they’re about dead people. 
Paintings you don't think of in a special time 
or with a specific event With photos I al- 
ways think I’m looking at something dead.” 


by John Curtin 

H AMBURG — Catcalis, boos and 
whistling reach a crescendo and 
threaten to drown out the ap- 
plause as Peter Zadek walks on 
stage to join his “bloodstained” actors. They 
are standing in a sea of stage carnage left in 
the wake of the West German director’s new 
production of “The Duchess of Malfi," the 
Jacobean horror classic by John Webster. 

During the three- hour- long premiere, the 
audience of the rich, chic and prominent in 
the Deutsches Schauspielhaus has witnessed 
the theatrical equivalent of “The Texas 
Chain Saw Massacre,” spiced with sex, nudi- 
ty and a bizarre siring of anachronisms. 
Squash, tuxedoes and telephones in a 17th- 
cenduy play? 

It is all par for the course in a Peter Zadek 
production and Hamburg audiences can ex- 
pect more of the same. At 59, the West 
German theater’s most enduring enfant ter- 
rible has signed on as the new In ten dam. or 
general manager, of the prestigious Schau- 
spielhaus and shows no indication of want- 
ing to mellow into a grand old man. 

Sitting in his spacious, light-filled office in 
the newly renovated tum-of-the-ceniury the- 
ater opposite die main railroad station, the 
director seems to relish his role as Skandal- 
madier. It is one he has enjoyed since 1957, 
at the latest, when Jean Genet called him “an 
idiot” for an unconventional London pro- 
duction of his play “The Balcony.” Things 
have not changed much since, after a stint as 
In ten dam at the Bochum Schauspielhaus in 
the 1970s, Zadek went on to provoke shock, 
titillate and delight audiences in the coun- 
try’s leading theaters. 

A completely nude Desdemona in a 1976 
Hamburg production of “Othello” was an 
attention-getter, as was a 1981 musical re- 
view’ version of “Jeder Stirbt fur Sich Allern" 
(Everyone Dies for Himself). The light- 
hearted treatment of Hans Failada's serious 
novel about the resistance prompted one 
critic to call the staging politically “ob- 
scene.” 

“I suppose I am interested in the place 
where the taboo sits,” says the director, who 
insists that he doesn't “care a damn” wheth- 
er the crowd boos or applauds as long as it 
reacts. Bad reviews bother him even less. 


"Every son of vicious attack that you can 
possibly imagine has been made,” he says, 
almost gleefully. 

Many a broadside greeted Zadek's uncon- 
ventional Shakespeare productions of the 
1960s and ’70s. The American historian Gor- 
don A. Craig, author of “The Germans.” in 
support of his thesis that the playwright had 
been “exposed to every outrage* in Germa- 
ny in recent years, cited Zadek's “Measure 
for Measure” in Bremen as “an attempt, on 
the basis of a prose translation of the play 
that retained nothing of Shakespeare's lan- 
guage, to tell the audience what the director 
thought the poet should have said.” 

“I think the theater is free to treat any- 
thing in any way whatsoever,” declares the 
director, who defines himself as “neither 
German, nor English, nor Jewish. Or all 
three.” in 1933. at age 7, he fled with his 
parents from Berlin to London, where he 
remained for 25 years. “I'm a son of gypsy. 1 
don't feel that I belong here or there or 
anywhere. That gives me a certain freedom 
of action which is perhaps unusuaL particu- 
larly in Germany.” 

Zadek's interest in theater dates from his 
student days at Jesus College. Oxford, where 
he was enrolled in modem languages but 
spent most of his time playing the violin, 
acting and directing. Like his contemporar- 
ies Kenneth Tynan and Peter Brook, he 
came under ihe influence of the literature 
and drama scholar Nevill Coghill. “There 
was an altitude to Shakespeare which was so 
free and so full of enthusiasm which we all 
learned from this man that I think it influ- 
enced the theater in England and ail over the 
world much, much more than anybody 
knows about.” 

After time at the Old Vic school he worked 
his way through numerous small theaters in 
England, produced drama for the BBC and 
finally returned to West Germany in 1959. 

Now, as the newly hired head man of the 
Hamburg Schauspielhaus, one of the Ger- 
man-language theater's leading houses, and 
recently acclaimed “director of the season” 
(according to the magazine Theater Heute, 
which polled 33 West German theater crit- 
ics) Zadek is at the summit of his career. 

Four of his own productions are showing 
in Hamburg this season including Federico 
Garcia Lorca’s “Yenna,” John Hopkins's 




“Losing Time" and an enormously success- 
ful version of “Ghetto” by the Israeli author 
Joshua Sobol. The musical, which portrays a 
cabaret group struggling to survive in the 
Nazi-controlled ghetto in Vilna, Lithuania, 
poses some delicate questions about the eth- 
ics of collaboration, it was firsL given at the 
Freie VolksbUhne in West Berlin, and was 
chosen in the same critics' poll as one of the 
high points of the last season. 

T HE work appealed to Zadek because 
*il was n.ot about Jews as victims. It's 
about Jews the way they behave today 
as Israelis. The main character, who is pre- 
pared to make compromises with the Ger- 
mans to save lives, but who is also prepared 
to behave in a manner which his more liberal 
or more humanistic friends would describe 
as cynical. I would compare to the behavior 
of the Israelis for instance in the raid on 
Tunis, which I would defend and find abso- 
lutely in order.” 

Contrary to what one might expect from a 
director whose name is associated with scan- 
dal and provocation, Zadek is a shy. retiring 
man who confesses — in the self-deprecating 
manner of a perfect Oxonian — that he 
hasn't “the faintest idea” why he is cut out 
for his job. All he knows is that he is “quite 
good at listening, and watching people doing 
things. 1 spend most of ray time watching 
what an actor does and how his imagination 
works. I’m fascinated by the idea of people 
being able to think themselves into other 
people or into other worlds.” 

Although he has made films, Zadek does 
not Feel at home in the cinema. What dis- 
turbs him is a shooting schedule with no 
logical sequence. “If I have to start on page 
19 of a script, and then on page 1 the next 
day, and then do the death scene and after 
that the birth, 1 get very confused.” he says. 

Nor does yearn for the English stage or 
Broadway. “What should I do on Broadway? 
Another bad musical? The theater in En- 
gland and America is so diabolically bad at 
the moment, what should I want to do 
there?” 

“1 like to work in a country like Germa- 
ny,” he added, “where the theater is impor- 
tant and really central to people's lives.” ■ 

John Curtin is a journalist based in West 
Berlin. 







t I Peter Zadek: “Interested in the place where the taboo sits. 




Bruce Weber (1984). 


B AILEY just contributed 35 photo- 
graphs to a Live Aid auction that 
raised £20,070 (about 528,000) last 
week at Sotheby’s. He also made a commer- 
cial for Greenpeace. “It’s a girl dragging a 
fur coat with blood oozing out of it and it 
says, ’It takes 40 dumb animals to make a fur 
coat and one to wear it.’ " It is, he says, the 
first X-rated commercial and can only be 
shown with X-rated films. 

He did a stately portrait of Margaret 
Thatcher for the current issue of English 
Vogue and is experimenting with different 
cameras, having noted some years back that 
they have different effects cm sitters. 

People will, he says, react differently to a 
Rolleiflex or a huge 14x11 camera. “It im- 
poses something on the sitters. It takes the 

S ctures — you can’t move it, you can’t lie.” 

e did not use this camera with Mrs. 
Thatcher. 

“1 cheated that like a normal Vogue sit- 


ting,” he says, laughing 
He may do little fashi< 


He may do little fashion work these days, 
but still when he dies David Bailey would 
like to go to Vogue. 

“1 wouldn't mind if all the girls were there. 
Not the editors," he says. "The models." ■ 


Australia’s Boom in Writing 


by Kate Singleton 

">4 YDNEY — Most people think of 
Australians as yachters,. surfers, 
beer-drinkers, more - than writers. 
J Yet probably there is more good 
Lion being written in Australia today than 
any other pan of the English-speaking 
rid. Not just one or two promising an-, 
ws, but' an. avalanche of talent. 

[o recent years the paperback publishing 
use Penguin Australia has proved to be 
> re successful than any other Penguin 
inch worldwide, so it’s easy to deduce that 
ctr aiianB are not only -prolific writers, but 
o avid readers. 

[f you travel around the country today you 
longer get the impression of being in 
ne distant and faintly ridiculous outpost 
the British Commonwealth. On the con- 
rv: Anti-Pom sentiments are ‘expressed ■ 
ite frequently, and the Italians and Greeks 
■ held up as exemplary New Australians, 
migrants from Southeast Asia may still be 


regarded with some reserve by older Austra- 
lians, but this is bound to change in time as . 
well The New Australia is a unique ethnical 
hybrid in a unique geographical position. 

. But the expression of Australian! ty in fic- 
tion needed a catalyst, which it found in the 
Literature Board of the Australia CounciL 
The council deals with public funding for the 
arts, and the Literature Board was set up in 
1973. “Seventy-percent of our subsidies go 
to living writers, ranging from the young to 
the established, to buy tune,” explains the 
director of the board, Thomas Shapcott, 

. himself a respected poet and novelist. “This 
has always been a controversial decision. But 
we believe that it has allowed writers to do 
that final revision, that extra polish that 
- makes all the difference.” 

The yield has been a wide range of writing 
and poetry. Notably, there has been a sud- 
den increase in the number of women fiction 
writers writing with great stylistic authority. 
And the short , story has proved to be a 
particularly successful genre. Australian 
writers mostly choose to explore the finer 


by older Austro- details of the small event; they ran express 
hange in time as . with extraordinary verbal economy the more 
i unique ethnical elusive feelings involved in episodes that do 
hical position. not elahn to change the course of history’, or 
stzaliamty in fie- even to leave a mark on it. There are excep- 
h it found in the dons, of course, bur for the most part Aus- 
istralia CounciL tralian fiction is not interested in Heroes and 
c funding for the Heroines and Stories that have a beginning, 
ind was set up In a middle and an end. It focuses rather on 
our subsidies go chunks of a continuum: like being more 
Dm the young to drawn by those exquisite minia ture land- 
ic,” explains the scapes that act as a background in Renais- 
lomas Shapcott, sauce portraits than by the figure portrayed, 

ti novelist. “This The Australian fiction writers have not 
dal decision. But only been encouraged by the far-sighted 
ed writers to do funding policy of the Literature Board. They 

rtra polish that have also been backed by some courageous 
publishing ventures: The earliest on the 
range of writing scene was the University of Queensland 
has been a sud- Press. Until the mid-’60s its best seller was 


a young American called Frank Thompson 
was appointed general rnana^w and things 

Continued on page 11 


U. S. Accent on the Paris Stage 


by Rosette C. Lamont 

P ARIS — The Paris season, which 
promises to be rich and varied, start- 
ed out with a marked American in- 
filtration of the cultural scene. First 
came Christo's irreverent and witty wrap- 
ping of the Pont Neuf. Then there was the 
dedication of two public sculptures by Rich- 
ard Serra, including his 35-foot-tali, i 00-ton 
assemblage. “Slat,” at the edge of the high- 
rise business suburb of La Defense. 

Now America is a presence on the Paris 
stage. The dialectic between strength and 
precariousness which characterizes Serra's 
elegant steel cube can be detected in the 
tilted urban landscape that provides the dis- 
quieting setting for Woody Allen's “Dieu, 
Shakespeare et Moi," the reigning boulevard 
success of the early season. Though these 
early Allen sketches may not be the author- 
dramatist’s best effort, he can do no wrong 
in Paris. The French admire him, as a fringe 
character, an anti-hero who has made an 
establishment success out of resolutely going 
against the grain of his society. 

The other sold-oui triumph in which 
America looms large is the avant-garde pro- 
duction of Ariane Mnouchkine's Th&ltre du 
Soleil, lengthily titled “L'Histoire terrible 
mais inachevge de Norodom Sihanouk. Roi 
du Cambodge" ("The Terrible but Unfin- 
ished Story .of Norodom Sihanouk, King of 
Cambodia"). H&l&ne Clxous’s modern 
chronicle play, in the tradition of Shake- 
spearean historical drama, has been accord- 
ed the bold Oriental treatment that charac- 
terized Mnouchkine’s productions of 
“Twelth Night," “Richard II” and “Henry 
IV” 

The eight-hour play, in two parts given 
over two evenings, is a highly evocative, 
poetic caricature of a gentle yet wily ruler 
enmeshed in the power games of the super- 
powers. Although CIxous, one of the leaders 
of the feminist movement in France, is well 
known for her radical politics, she proves to 

be both moderate and wise in this complex, 
ambitious satire. Its broad humor may not 
spare the American giant but it is no less 
devastating in its exposure of the schemes of 
the Russians and the Chinese. If there is any 
message, it is, “Leave this fragile, ancient 
culture alone.” 


“Ariane and I wanted to create a modem 
history’ play, the story of a whole people's 
misfortune, of a genocide,” Cixous ex- 
plained after the play's opening. “Ariane 
traveled widely in the East some 10 years ago 
and she was immensely impressed by the 
varied cultures she observed. When we final- 
ly decided to create a spectacle about Siha- 
nouk, a character who has entered history 
but who’s still alive, we realized that no one 
in France was interested in Cambodia. Per- 
haps because of France’s war in Indochina, 
followed by America's involvement in Viet- 
nam. young people here had become imques- 
tioningly pro- Vietnam and anti-Cambodia. 
In faci there was a good deal of hostility in 


regard to Cambodians. It was our intention 
to alter this perception.’' 

As the play begins, four black-dad men 
and a woman stand on the edge of the vast.* 
square beechwood stage of the Cartoucherie 
de Vincennes. They have reached the bank of 
the Mekong River" Phnom Penh, the capital, 
lies on the other side, unprotected by the 
dispirited, corrupt forces of Lon Nol’s army. 
Led by Pol Pot. the Khmer Rouge are dose 
to final victory- However, the victors now- 
face the problem of administering “a croco-^ 
dile that will tear them to pieces.” a citC 
peopled by an urban middle class and the 

Continued on page 11 
















V I - 


^ _ . . . . Mwime fumci.Wagnwrp 

Ueorges Bigot , right, as hinanouk. 



Page 10 


ENTERNATIOISAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


TRAVEL 



INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


AUSTRIA 


ENGLAND 


vrENNA, Basendorfer Hall (lei: 
65.66.5 1). 

RECITALS — Nov. 18: Russel Ryan 
piano. Alfred Krawagna contrabass 
(Berg. Scarlatti}. 

Nov. 22: Frederick Marvin piano 
(Chopin. Du&sek). 

•Konzcrthausltel: 7146.86). 
CONCERTS — Nov. 17: Hokelus En- 
semble (Enuncr. Mossolovl. 

Nov. 18 : Cara era ta Accademica des 
Salzburger Mozart cu ms. Sandor Vcgh 
conductor ( Mozart, Ravel). 

Nov. 23 and 24: The Chamber Orches- 
tra of Europe, Yehudi Menuhin con- 
ductor/ violin, Douglas Boyd oboe 
(Bach, Haydn}. 

•Musikve"rein(te1: 65.81.90). 
CONCERTS — Nov. 16: Bart ok 
Quartet ( Brahms. Mozan;. 

Nov. 18: New Vienna Vocal Ensemble, 
Peter Altmann conductor (Schubert). 
Nov. 20 and 2 1 : Vienna Philharmonic 
Orchestra. Sir Charles Mackerras con- 
ductor. New Vienna Vocal Ensemble. 
Peter Altmann conductor (Schubert). 
RECITAL — Nov. 20: Julie Bees pi- 
ano (Beethoven. Ravel). 

•Sian iso per ( tel: 53240). 

BALLET — Nov. 21 : “ Raymonds" 
(Petipa, Glazunov). 

OPERA — Nov. 16: "Andrea Che- 
nier" (Giordano). 

Nov. 17: “Fidelio” (Beethoven). 

Nov. 18: ~Dic Entfuhrung aus dem 
Serail" (Mozart). 

Nov. 20: “Tosca” ( Puccini >. 

BELGIUM 


BRUSSELS. Palais des Beaux Arts 
(tel: 5I2.50.4S). 

EXHIBITION —To Dec. 22: "Span- 
ish Splenders and Belgian Villages. 
1500-1700“ 

•Musics Royaux des Beaux- Arts de 
Belgique (tel: 51355.46). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: 
“Goya." 

•Musics Rovaux d'Art et d'Histoire 
(tel: 733.96.10). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: "Los 
JlSeros." 


BRAZIL 


SAO PAULO, 1-Sth Biennial Celebra- 
tion (tel: 572.77.22). 
EXHIBITIONS— To Dec. 15: “Con- 
temporary An" ( Borofsky, Dokoupil, 
EckeU, Duane. Seoise). 

To Dec. 15 “Modern Gassics"(Portin- 
ari.SegaHMalfaui). 

To Dec. l5:“TheApprenticeTourist: 
Photos of the Amazon Region by Mau- 
reen Bisilliai and Mario de Andrade." 


DENMARK 


HUMLEBAEK, Louisiana Museum 
of Modern An (tel: 19.07.19). 
EXHIBITION— To Dec. 1 : “Russian 
Avant-Garde: 1910- 1930" (Male- 
vitch, Kandensky. Gontjarova). 


BIRMINGHAM. Town Hall (tel: 
236.1535). 

CONCERTS — City of Birmingham 
Symphony Orchestra — Nov. 16: 
Christopher Robinson conductor, 
City of Birmingham Choir (Verdi). 
Nov. 19 and 20: Simon Rattle conduc- 
tor. Alfred Brendrl piano (Debussy. 
Mozart). 

LONDON. Barbican Centre (tel: 
638.41.41). 

CONCERTS — London Symphony 
Orchestra— Nov. 17: Geoffrey Simon 
conductor. Michael Davies violin 
(Mozart. Paganini). 

Nov. 21: Yuri Simonov conductor. 
Ann Murray soprano ( Berlioz). 

Nov. 16: London Concert Orchestra, 
Nicholas G cobury conductor. Wil- 
liam Cleobury conductor, William Ste- 
phenson piano (Rachmaninov, Tchai- 
kovsky). 

Nov. 17: London Concert Orchestra. 
BramwellTovey conductor, Clive Brit- 
ton piano (Humperdinck, Liszt). 

Nov. 18: Royal Philharmonic Orches- 
tra. Andrew Litton conductor, Jean- 
Bernard Fommier piano (Chopin. 
Tchaikovsky). 

Nov. 20: Bournemouth Symphony Or- 
chestra, Rudolf Barshai conductor 
(Brahms. Dvorak). 

. Nov. 22: Vienna Boys' Choir, Andreas 
LeitoerconducioriHandel. Schubert). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 24: “John 
Lidzev." 

RECITAL — Nov. 19: Andrei Gavri- 
lov piano (Chopin. Rachmaninov). 
THEATER — Nov. 16, 18-23: “Les 
Miserables” (musical based on novel 
by Victor Hugo). 

•British Museum (tel: 636.1S.55). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 1986: “Bud- 
dhism: Art and Faith." 

•Hayward Gallery (tel: 928-57.08). 
EXHIB ITION — Ti o Feb. 1 6 : “Torres- 
Garrio: Grid-Pattern-Sign," “Hom- 
age to Barcelona" 

•London Coliseum (tel: 836.0 1 . 1 U 
OPERA —Nov. 16. 20. 22: “Orpheus 
in the Underworld” (Offenbach). 
•National Theatre (tel: 633.08.80). 
THEATER — Nov. 16: “Pravda" 
(Bren ton. Hare). “Mrs. Warren's Pro- 
fession” (Shaw). 

Nov. 18-20: “The Real Inspector 
Hound" (Stoppard). “The Critic” 
(Sheridan). 

Nov. 18-21: “Love for Love" (Con- 
greve). 

Nov. 22 and 23: “The Duchess of 
Malfi” (Webster). 

•Roval Academy of Arts (tel: 
734.90.52). 

EXIBTTION —To Dec. 22: “German 
Art in the Twentieth Century." 

•Roval Opera House (tel: 240.10.66). 
BALLET — Nov. 18: “The Sleeping 
Beauty" (Petipa. Tchaikovsky). 

Nov. 20: “The Two Pigeons" (Ashton. 
Messager). “Divertissements." 
OPERA —Nov. 16 and 21 : “Semeie" 
(Handel). 

•Tate Gallery (tel: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Dec. 1 : “How- 


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aid Hodgkin: Prints from 1977- 1983." 
To Dec. S: “Scott Burton.” 

To Jan. 10: “Kurt Schwitters." 
•Victoria and Albert Museum (tel: 
589.63,71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 17: 
“Browne Muggs: English Brown Sail- 
Glazed Stoneware." 

To December ‘The Japanese Folk- 
craft Movement: 1 9ih St 20th Century 
Textiles and Ceramics. 1 ' 

To Jan. 19: “Shots of Style: Great 
Fashion Photographs Chosen by Da- 
vid Bailey." 

To Jan. 26: “Hals from India.” 

To May 25: “British Watercolours," 




PARIS. A.D.A.C. Gallerie (tel: 
42.77.96.26). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 28: “Sculp- 
ture. Engraved Glass. Paintings. Pho- 
tography." 

•American Center (tel: 43.35.21 JO). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 30: “Wil- 
liam T. Wiley: California I." 

•AncurialCel: 42.99.16.16). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 23: “Zao 
Wou-Ki." 

•Centre Culture) Cbaflioi-Galliera 
(tel: 4730.71 30). 

DANCE — Nov. 16and 17: Nina Wie- 
ner and Dancers. 

•Centre Col turd de Boulogne (tel: 
46.84.77.95). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: “Pall- 
tana: The Sacred Village of Jainism," 
photographs and works by Nicole Tif- 
fen. 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
42.77.1233). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. )6: 
“Malta." 

To Jan. I : “Klee et ia Mosique." 
•Egltse St.-Julien-le-Pauvre (tel: 
42_25.67.07). 

CONCERTS — Nov. 16: La Sinfon- 
etta. Francois Nature! conductor, La- 
bros Caravassilis flute (Mcaart). 

Nov. 18: Mon teclair Chamber Orches- 
tra. Philippe Htn conductor (Haydn. 
Vivaldi). 

•Espace Kiron ( tel: 43.73.5035). 
THEATER — To Dec. 1: “Mario- 
nettes in Paris." 

•Galerie Guigni (id: 4166.66.88). 
EXHIBITION —To Nov. 23: “Com- 
mire." 

•HOtel Mdidien (tel: 47.58.1130). 
JAZZ — Nov. 16: Wild Bill Davis. 
•Maison dela Radio(te): 4534. 15.16). 
CONCERT— Nov. 16: Orcheslre Na- 
tional de France, Lukas Vis conductor 
(Mozart). 

•Maison de Victor Hugo (tel: 
417116.65). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 3 1 : “Victor 
Hugo's Drawings." 

• Musfre d'Art Moderne (Lei: 
47.23.6U7). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: “Vera 
Szekely." “Modem Masters from the 
Thyssen-Bomemisza Collection." 
•Muste Carna valet (iel:42.72.2 1.13). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Nov. 24: “Les 
Grands Boulevards.” 

To Jan. 5: “Eugfrne BejoL" 

RECITAL — Nov. 17: Yannick Le 
Gaillaid harpsichord ( Scarlatti). 
•Musee du Grand Palais (tel: 
42.6154.10). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: “Sir 
Joshua Reynolds: 1723-1791" 

To Jan. 6: “La Gloirede Victor Hugo.” 
•Musee du Louvre ( id: 4160.3936). 
EXHIBITION— To Jan. 6: “LeBrun 
a Versailles.” 

• Musfee du Petit Palais (tel: 
42.65.1173). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan_5: “Soldi 
D’encre," Victor Hugo's manuscripts 
and drawings. 

•Salle Gaveau (tei: 45.6330.30). 
RECITAL — Nov. 19: Amelia Berto- 
linj piano (Chopin). 

•Salle Fleyd ( id: 45.63.07.96). 
CONCERTS — Orchestra de Paris — 
Nov. 16: Daniel Barenboim conduc- 
tor/ piano. Isaac Stem violin, Luben 
Yordanoff violin (Bach, Bruch). 

Nov. 20 and 21: Daniel Barenboim 
conductor. Andrads Schiff piano 
(Bach. Strauss). 

Nov. 22: Daniel Barenboim conduc- 
tor. Itzhak Perlman violin (Mendels- 
soh n. W ebern). 

RECITAL — Nov. 1 9: 1 tzhad Perlman 
violin. Danid Barenboim piano. 
•Tbfcatfe des Champs-Elysies (tel: 
4733.47.77). 

DANCE — Dance Theater of Harlem 
— Nov. 16 and 17: "Caravanserai" 
(Beatty, Santana), “Voluntaries" (Tet- 
ley, Poulenc). “Dougla” (Holder, 
Leon). 

•Theatre du Rond-Point (tel: 
4256.60.70). 

CONCERTS— Nov. 17; Alban Berg 
Quartet (Mozan, Schubert). 

Nov. 18: Ensemble Imereoniempor- 
ain, G&rard Schwarz, conductor, Paul 
Sperry tenor (Hartmann, Thome). 
•ThiStre Musical de Paris (lei: 
42.61.19.83). 

CONCERT — Nov. 18: Cologne Or- 
chestra, Pierre Dervaux conductor 
(Dukas. Strauss). 

JAZZ MUSICAL — To Dec. 19: 
“Black and Blue" (Segpvia/Orezzoli). 
•Tour Montparnasse (tel: 
42.72.93.41). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “Four 
Centuries of Ballet in Paris." 


GERMANY 

BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

OPERA — Nov. 17: “Fidelio” (Bee- 
thoven). 

Nov. 2 1 : “La Bohdne" (Puccini). 
•Phflharmooie(id: 25488-0). 
CONCERTS— Nov. 15and 16: Berlin 
Philharmonic Orchestra. Seji Ozawa 
conductor (Britten). 

Nov. 17: Bolin Concert Choir. Berlin 
Symphony Orchestra, Fritz Weisse 
conductor (V erdi). 

Nov. 22: Berlin Symphony Orchestra, 
Nicolaj Bojadschiew conductor. Fu- 
mihiko Ob told piano (Tchaikovsky). 
RECITAL — Nov. 21 : Bruno Leonar- 
do Gdber (Beethoven). 

COLOGNE. Oper der Stadt (teL- 
2135.81). 

OPERA — Nov. 16 and 19: “URitsrno 
dTJlisse in ft tria" (MomeverdiV 
Nov. 17and2Q:“Hektra”(R.Strauss). 
FRANKFURT. Alte Oper (tel: 13400). 
BALLET — Nov. 20-22: “Carmen." 
with Antonio Gades. 

CONCERTS— Nov. 17: Mdos Quar- 
tet (Havdn). 

Nov. 19: bollar d Quartet (Beethoven! 
RECfTAL— Nov. 20: Christoph Pop- 
pen violin. Maria Graf barpfPergolea. 
Taninj), 

HAMBURG. Siaatsoper ( lei: 

35.1555). 

MUSICAL — Nov. 16: “My Fair 

Lady" (Leraer/Lowe). 

OPERA — Nov. 21: “Kalya Kaban- 
ova** (Janacek). 

Nov. 22: “Fidelio" (Beethoven). 
LUDWIGSHAFEN, Theater im 
Pfalzbau(tel: 5043558). 

OPERA — Nov. 22: “Carmen" (Bi- 
zet). 




DUBLIN, Abbey Theatre 
( Ml : 74.45.05 }. 

THEATER — Through November 
“The Sanctuary Lamp” (Tom Mur- 

•(jallcry of Photography (tel: 
71.4654). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 23: “Cbar- 

geshrimer.” 

•Grafton Gallery (tel: 79.1834). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 23: “Ste- 
phen Rotschild and Anne O' Regan." 
•National Concert Hall (tel: 
71.15.33). 

RECITALS— Nov. 17: Frances Lacy 
soprano, Jcnnnie Red din piano. 

Nov. 21: Aisling Heneghan harpsi- 
chord/piano. 

•National Museum (td: 76.7731). 
EXHIBITION — Through Novem- 
ber: “Aphrodite's Scatter 
•Peacock Theatre ( td : 74.45.05). 
EXHIBITION — Through Novem- 
ber: “J ean M arc VidaL" 

THEATER — Through November: 
“The Execution” (Ulkk O'Connor). 


ITALY 


BOLOGNA, Galleria d'Arte Mo- 
derns, (td: 5038.59). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 30: “Luigi 
BerteUi." 

FLORENCE, Teatro Comunaie (tel: 
277.9236k 

OPERA —Nov. 16: “UnBaDoin Ma- 
diera" (Verdi). 

Nov. 17 and 20: “La FiUe du Regi- 
men t" (Donizetti). 

MILAN. Teatro alia Scala (tel: 
887.92.11). 

BALLET — Nov. 16 and 20: “La bis- 
belica domata" (Cranko, Scarlatti). 
Nov. 22: “Jeu decartes” (Cranko, Stra- 
vinsky). “The Lady and the Fool” 
(Cranko, Verdi). 

ROME. Accademia Nazionale di San- 
ta Cecilia (td: 679.03.891 
CONCERTS — Orches tra e Coro dell’ 
Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia 
— Nov. 17-19: Yehudi Menuhin con- 
ductor. FH*-ih«uH Connell soprano 
(Mozart). 

•Is titled one Universilaiia dei Concer- 
tiftd: 361.0051). 

RECITAL — Nov. 16: Mark Kaplan 
violin. Risto Lauriala piano (Prokof- 
iev. Mozan). 

•Museo delie Arti e Tradizioni Pcpo- 
lari(ld: 59161.48). 

EXHIBITION — Through Novem- 
ber “Bja Glazunov.” 

•Museo Nazionale di Castel S. Angelo 
(td: 6550.36). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 20: “Salva- 
tore Hume." 

•Palazzo Braschi (tel: 6558.80.). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec 31: *Te- 
vere-Senna." 

TRIESTE Teatro Comunale Giu- 
seppe Verdi (tel : 63. 19.48). 

OPERA — Nov. 16, 19. 21 “Simon 
Boccanegra” (Verdi). 

TURIN. Teatro Regio (td: 54.80.00). 
OPERA— Nov. 17, 19.22: “Elisabeth, 
Queen of England" (Rossini). 
VENICE Ca' Vendramm Calergi 
(td:70.99.09). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 24: “Felice 
Carena.” 

•Museo dd Settecento (Id: 70.99.09). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 20 ^War- 
saw 1764-1830: BeDoto to Chopin.” 
•Scuola di San Giovanni Evangelista 
(td: 70.6852). 

EXHIBITION —To Dec 8: “Mario 
Botta: 1960-1985.” 


JAPAN 


TOKYO, Azabu Museum of Ait (td: 
58114.10). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec 27: “Beau- 
tiful Women in Ukiyo-E" 

•National Museum of Western An 
(tel: 8285131). 

EXHIBITION— To Dec 8: “Vincent 
Van Gogh." 

•Ohta Memorial Mnseum (tel: 

403.08.80) . 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 24: “Paint- 
ings by Hokusai.” 

•Okura Shukokan Museum (tel: 

583.07.81) . 

EXHIBITION —To Dec 19: “Early 
Modern Japanese Painting Styles.” 
•Tobacco and Salt Museum (id: 
47630.41). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec 22: “An- 
cient Mexico: History and Civilization 
in Michoacao." 


MONACO 

MONTE-CARLO, Opera de Monte- 
Carlo (td: 50.7654). 

OPERA — Nov. 20: “Cibouletle" 
(Reynaldo Hahn). 


NETHERLANDS 

AMSTERDAM. Concertgebouw (td: 
71.83.45). 

CONCERTS —No%-. 16: Radio Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Henry Lewis con- 
ductor (Shostakovich ). 

Nov. 18: Cologne Chamber Ensemble 
(Bach. Vivaldi). 

Nov. 21 and 22: Concertgebouw Or- 
chestra, Hans Vonk conductor 
( Eschcr. Scfaal). 

RECITALS — Nov. 16: Vera Beths 
violin, George Pieterson clarinet. 
Reinbert de Leeuw piano (Liszt. Stra- 


Nov. 17 : Sergio DaniH Tiempo piano, 
Karin Lechner piano (Mozart. Ravel). 
Nov. 19: Theo Olof violin (Bach). 


PORTUGAL 


LISBON, Calouste Gulbenkian 

Foundation (tel: 735131). 

RECITAL — Nov. 22: Tan g Vim vio- 
lin. Joao Paulo Santos piano (Beetho- 
ven. Tartini). 

•S Carlos Theater ( td: 36.84.08). 
BALLET — Nov. 20-22: “Hero” 
(V asoWdtenkremp). “Ghost Dances” 
(Christopher Bruce). 

OPERA — Nov. 19 and 21“Der Ro 
seokavaiier" (R. Strauss). 


UNITED STATES 


NEW YORK. Metropolitan Museum 
of Art((d: 535.77.10). 

EXHIBITION —Jim. 5: “India!" 

• Museum of Modern Art 
(ld:708.WJ»). 

EXHIBITONS — To Dec. 3: “New 
Photography” (Berman. Mendoza, 
Ross, span ca 

To Jan. 7: “Contrasts of Form: Geo- 
metric Abstract An 1910-1980." 
WASHINGTON D C, National Por- 
trait GaDeiy (id: 35737.00), 
EXHIBITIONS —To Feb. 8: “Wom- 
en an Time.” 

To April 13: “Private Lives of Public 
Figures: The Nineteenth Century 
Family Print” 


Los Angeles the Flamboyant 

^ M. IW. J 

: m Z.* 

¥■ 


^ frea ft 


by Charles Lockwood 

I OS ANGELES — Of the half dozen 
distinct areas in central Los Ange- 
les. the most historic — and un- 
questionably the most vibrant — is 
the old downtown just east of Pershing 
Square. Spring Street, the former Wall Street 
of the West, is an open-air museum of early 
20th-century commercial architecture. One 
i block west, Broadway is a bustling shopping 
; and theatergoing street for the dry’s vast 
Mexican community, and between Third 
Street and Olympic Boulevard it offers the 
largest single concentration of pre-World 
War n movie palaces in America. Farts of 
both Spring Street and Broadway are listed 
as historic districts on the National Register 
of Historic Places. 

To explore downtown Los Angeles on 
foot, start at Broadway and 11th Street, 
where the flamboyant Mission-style Los An- 
geles Herald-Examiner Building (1912) rises 
phoenix-like out of nearby pairing lots and 
drab one-story commercial buildings. Built 
by William Randolph Hearst, the block- 
long. white stucco buidling is a catalog of 
virtually every Mission-style conceit; blind 
arches along the sidewalks, Spanish iron- 
work at the second-door windows, low- 
pitched red tile roofs, bell towers at its four 
comers and a loggia topped by a large dome. 

To continue your tour, head a block west 
on 11th Street and turn right on EQU Street 
The Belasco Theater (now the Metropolitan 
Community Church) also embodies the. 
Spanish style. Next door, the Mayan Theater 
reflects a 1920s vision of pre-Columbian 
architecture with stylized animals and hu- 
man heads, a row of priests near the roofline 
and elaborately carved stone blocks, actually 
poured concrete. Like many downtown Los 
Angeles theaters, the Mayan's lobby and 
auditorium have not been modernized. 

Many of the theaters let visitors look at 
their lobbies without charge, and a few allow 
them to wander around, even into roped-off 
balconies where the views are best If you are 
interested in a particular theater, drop in 
between shows when the lights are op. 

Back on Broadway between Ninth Street 
and Olympic Boulevard, you can't hms the 
half-Spanish, half -Gothic former Texaco 
Theater, whose entrance was recently mod- 
ernized. Walk past the new ticket booth and 
the hideous butterscotch tiled walls beneath 
the marquee. Hie unaltered lobby resembles 
the nave of a Spanish church. The auditori- 
um drips with Hispanic-Gothic ornament 
Its pifece de resistance is the ceiling’s central 
sunburst surrounded by more ornament and 
a series of mirrors, which could be spotlight- 
ed to cast patterns into the audience. 

Why this free-for-all of different architec- 
tural styles? The theater owners, like their 
counterparts across America, hoped that 
grandiose architecture would attract ticket 
buyers. Another reason was the prosperity of 
the motion picture studios that owned many 
of the theaters before World War IL By 1926 
the movies were America’s fifth largest in- 
dustry, producing 90 percent of the world’s 
films . What better way to flaunt the still 
youthful industry's incredible prosperity? 


B UT theater owners weren't the only 
ones to emb ellish Broadway, which in 
the 705 and *30s was Southern Cali- 
fornia’s busiest shopping street At the 
northwest comer of Ninth Street, the East- 
ern Columbia Budding rises 13 stories to a 
1 tower with clocks on each of its four sides. 
Aside from the dramatic massing and orna- 
ment. what makes this the finest remaining 
Art Deco building in Los Angeles is the 
exciting use of color. The facade is almost 
entirely covered with blue-green terra cotta 
tiles, accented with gold bands. 

The astonishing parade of movie palaces 
continues along Broadway, offering the visi- 
tor almost too many architectural riches to 
absorb at one time. At 842 South Broadway 
is the Orpheum, where six brass double 
doors open into a lobby where the only 
recent additions are cigarette machines ana 
video games. A few steps north the Tower 
Theater’s virtually unchanged auditorium 
evokes the lobby of the Paris Opera, scaled 
down to the theater’s 50-by-l 50-foot lot 
Hie Tower was the first Los Angeles the- 
ater designed by S. Charles Lee, later the 
architect of several dozen movie houses. 
“When the Tower was in the planning stages 
in the early 1920s, the owner insisted that 
income-producing stores be included in the 
Broadway and Eight Street facades," Lee 
said recently. ‘Two architects said that it 
couldn't be done, given the cramped site and 
(he need for a 900-seat auditorium. I was 26 
at the time, and I told the owner, TH make 
the plans, and I'll get a budding permit, or 
you will owe me nothing.’ Just preparing the 


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plans took every , cent I had. But the city 


The Tower was the first Los Angeles the- 
ater designed for sound, Lee said. Tt opened 
with the premiere of The Jam Singer.’ For 
months lures stretched around the block be- 
cause everyone bad to experience the talk- 
ies.”* he said. 

A block beyond die Tower Theater, Sev- 
enth Street marks the start of Broadway’s 
busiest blocks. From there to Third, the 
street is a nonstop fiesta, particularly on 
weekends when famili es of Mexican descent 
shop for clothes, see Spanish-language films 
at the movie palaces or simply stidL No 
other part of Los Angeles shows such vital* 1 
ty; it is Manhattan’s 14th Street and limes 
Square rolled into one. and imbued with 
Latin spirit that goes deeper than the Span- 
ish ornamentation on many of the buOdmgs. 

Few places in downtown. Los Angeles 
more successfully mix the Anglo and the 
Mexican, past and present, than Clifton’s 
Brookdale Cafeteria at 648 South Broadway. . 
Opened in 1935, Clifton’s is the largest pub- 
lic cafeteria in the world measured by sales 
volume, and it offers a wide-ranging selec- 
tion of American home-style food from 6 
AM. to 8 or 8:30 PJK The breakfasts, in 
particular, are an institution for many down- 
town shoppers and office workers. • • 

Like so many other Broadway buildings. 
Clifton’s retains its exuberant original archi- 
tecture. Outside, the temizzo sidewalk de- 
picts classic Southern California semes. The 
dining room represents a redwood forest 
complete with waterfall, rocks and columns, 
that look like trees. 


A CROSS the street, the Lbs Anseles^ The- - unadorned 850-seat auditorium. 

\ ater was once the finest movie palace < To understand tow quickly the fledgling 

-TjLin town. The lobby resembles the Jnqfatm;picture industry came ofage,a>m- 
HaH of Minors at Versailles; Near the mez- ' P?*?. with the opulent 

zanine is a fountain where strings of crystal . Theater erased ax years later 

simulate splashing water. The auditorium . ff B ro adway. Taking its name 

offers more of the same with- Corinthian ^ »ts routed oonstructiwi budget, the 
columns, crystal chandeliers. heavy drapery. Mmion Dollar was one of Americas first 
elaborate putter work andlotso^old lS. ttuemovie pdfce^Jgt by Sid Grauman, 
The basement of the Los Angeles Theater who laxer created the. Egyp timi and the Chi- 
is equally remarkable. There Lee built a' -" theaters on Hollywood Boulevard, 

restaurant, a ballroom, a 35-by-65-foot oval Next door to the MaKoa DdUart baroque 
smoking room, a marble-walled men’s room fantasies the Grai^ Market is very 

and a ladies’ room with 16 toilet stalls, each real, much like the Reading Market mFMa- 

decoratcd in a different color of marble, delphia or the ParkAv^nue Market m Har- 
With the help of ah engineer, the architect y 

even a p erisc ope-lute system of .. Across the stand fremi tiie Grand Central 

mirrors projected the movie into the Market stands a .drab-looking brown brick 
ballroom where theatergoers waited for the building. Once paisf 'the unremarkable 
next show to start. arched entrance, however^ you immediately 

Tt,- a n ..i H lac , recogoize the soaring interior court of the 

WjW ZZ “s frequentty appeared m movies and 

tdevision. stows, but y«o^ways fed a thrill 

rasesa? bas 2 l S ? SS 

^ross^^S? ^f'startS 1 hoo^T^d. 

booine.” The vear was. 1931 west, you see the monumentJike Music Cen- 

F^n the Broadway erdwds, sidewalk ^ f ^ 

clothing and food vendors, murals and mu- £j*? tde 4S , li P5* r 

sic. it is only a block to Spring Street’s - Bro ? d 1 w ay spMtcd, 

dignified, early ^century office build- ^L^ a ^- doWn ? ght ^-S U 
ings. Just step through the block-long Broad. 20tlnxaitmy 

way-Spring Street Arcade betweenFifth and wh?a a overgrown 

Sixth. It’s leaving a Mexican fiesta and of/unenca’s hng- 

entering a room of Wall Street bankers. nttled cities. And today Broadway 

On Spring Street, imagine the pride that t° far tmxc Angdenos than, say, the 

Angelenos must have felt looking at this of Air or the beaches 

masonry canyon, which stood riot far from 01 MaUDu * ■ 

SSJfJM ffiC n0t *??»■■' Charles Lockwood is the author of seven 
grant oO fidds and the boisterous movie lots books about U. S. cities and ardatecture. He 
that provided Southern California with so wrote this article fnr Th* m - 


rmir-h of its wealth. From these neoclassical 
8-to-12-siory buildings, which cotid easily 
fit into lower Manhattan or the Chicago 
Loop, businessmen, batikers and lawyers di- 
rected the boom that-crested between 1920 
and 1930, when Los Angeles’s population, 
soared from 576,673 to 1^3&,048. 

During the ’50s, banks* corporations and 
professional concerns moved from Spring 
Street to high-rises on Figueroa and Flower 
Streets. By the ’60s and TOs, many Spring 
Street office buddings were nearly enqrty. 
Al though two buildings have been converted 
to condominiums and a perfonning arts cen- 
to* known as the Los Angries Actor's The- 
ater, has opened at No. 514, Spring Street 
still wears the subdued, almost melancholy 
air of a place that rdishes past glories rather 
than present accomplisiimenfs. 

- But Spring Street's, decline has proved a 
Messing in disgrrisc- Except for. occasional' 
ground-floor alterations, most buQdingsttie- 
virtually ^ti^iangeH Look at the elaborate 
roofline cornices. Step into lobbies. One of 
the best is in the former Hermann W. Her- 
man Building (now the Banco Popular 
Budding) at 354 South Spring Sheet, com- 
pleted in 1903. The lobby boasts a curving 
white marble double stairway, white marble 
walls and trim and stained glass, mduding a 
dome adorned with the initials H. W. H. . 


B ACK on Broadway, the Cameo The- 
ater (19H).just north of the Arcade, is 
the oldest continuously operated the- 
ater in Los Angeles and the city’s best surviv- 
ing example of a mckdodecm, according to 
Marc Wanamaker.afibn and theater histori- 
an. Other than the refrcshment stand, the 
now grimy lobby is tmdranged, as is the 
unademoed 850-scat aaditorinm. 

To understand how quickly the fledgling 
motion picture industry came of age, com- 
pare the moderf Cameo with the opulent 
NfiDion Dollar Theater erected sixyears later 
at 307 South Broadway. Taking its name 
from its reputed construction budget, the 
Million Dollar, was one of America's first, 
true , movie palaces,Tntih by SSd Grauman, 
who later created the Egyptian and the Chi- 
nese theaters bn Hollywood Boulevard. 

Next door to the Million Dollar’s baroque 
fantasies the Grand .Cental Market is very 
real, much like the BJrading Mariret in Phila- 
delphia or the Park Ayetrae Market in Har- 
lan. . 

Across thestandfrcmitiieGrandCentiul 
Market stands a drab-looking brown brick 
building. Once paist 'the unremarkable 
arched entrance, however* you immediately 
recognize the soaring interior court of the 
Bradbury Building "(1893): Hns Sve-stoty 
court Iras frequently appeared in movies and 
tetevision shows, but you always feel a thrill 
seeing its sunlight-washed spaces, the lacy - 
wrought-irpn railings at every floor and the 
noiseless wroughi-iraaopcri-cage devators. 

Leaving the Bradbury Budding, you are - 
back on . teeming Broadway. Gazing at Bun- 
ker Hill, which rises seWal blocks to the 
west, yon see the moimmeat-tike Music Cen- 
ter and the sleek. glass office towers of the 
atys prosperous and orderly new down- 


a remarkable glimpse into early 20th-ceaitmy 
Los Angeles, an era when a dusty overgrown 
town quidtty became one of Amer ica’s larg- 
est, most fabled cities. And today Broadway 
isreahty to far more Ang rienm than ; tay ihp 
better-known hills of Bd Air or the beaches 
of Malibu. g 

Charles Lockwood is the author of seven 
books about U. S. cities and architecture. He 
wrote this article for The New York Times. 


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EVrERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


Page 11 


for fun and profit 


TRAVEL 


* .-ijjjfv ; .i lie Spouse Along: Historic Leon and a Palatial Hotel 


ea 


p A . bv Rover PnlUe V The same is true in Sweden, a country of 

E * : UUaiS exceptionally high taxes. “This is very 

X FARMED him for better or worse' 

I but not for lunch.*’ ‘TdruLSr tnp; the tax an then ties- arc vay 

KSSy I of taking a man with strong hert T think we’d better have a dis- 

Whatwould he cuss5on amongouraelves and call-you back,” 
’ \ nying my husband to confereneJu^nf (toqrawwdidfc said a spokesman forSAF, 

, the joys of my life.” “Whv 15 - OT r , tbc Swedish Employers' Federation. 

Tax is teT& single - inKbitor of 

I ating; you’re not treated ^ aast tntvd, affecting both the : company 

in yoor own right” uman being and the individual. “If it is declared, and 

Tj™_ 0 ^ r . teal’s a big if,’ then unless *it is wholly and 

wkT™! random responses to what exdimvely reqmred for busmess reasons' the 

SZSSSZST - 5 * ** * rompi^ on the basis of cost to the 

rv ■ e spouses (sor- company of tranpordng and accomodating 

ty, par^re) on business trips and to confer- the spouse,". Lincoln says. Bul how do you 
“2*2 fJ™? ““ °C ««Poraie practice atet up the respective costs? “That’s the 
— seldom articulated m formal policies. The 
answer, of course, depends on the executive, 

his or her partner, what kind of trip, who ” — : 

picks up the tab, and ultimately the tax rfi . 1 f 

authorities. But it is an issue that can have a IaX0S aXLCL UIOTBIG 
decisive effect on the morale and effective- 
ness of the long-distance manager. • • „ . f* 

A partner who is politically aware can be a UXEDDFlflllt IftCtOrS 
huge asset during indoct rinatio n trips to the -IT 

corporate Kremlin, or in breaking the ice ■ , * 1 • 

with potential customers, especially in coun- XU SfiL Linff pOilCY 
tries where socializing is inseparable from C? T J 

business. “This is the case inChina and in 
Japa n , where they’re be ginning to recognize 
the benefits of having the spouse along,” 

says an airline executive. Chi the other, hand, flaky area; you get evaything from outright 
an executive can easily lose conumtment and lying to telling less than the truth. For exam- 
cutting edge by taking a partner on a hard- : pie, you might ask for a letter from the U. S. 
nosed tour of the markets, which is why- parent company inviting an executive over, 
many companies require executives to ask indicating a genuine business reason for bav- 
permission, even if they pay themselves. mg his wife along, say for meeting custom- 
Abseace may or may not maV<* the heart ears- Bui the Inland Revenue’s very wary of 
grow fonder. But many a relati onship has these purely social functions. Another way is 
survived in spite of or because of prolonged to get a friendly travel agent to word the 
or frequent trips by one of the partners, invoice in a very careful way, so that it’s just 
There’s the “honeymoon effect” when, lie . not picked up.” 

traveler gets home to balance the risk of rival According :o Dfltman, the U. S. Internal 

relationships developing. Revenue Service has no dear up-front rule. 

The more enlightened firm* recognize “You can usually negotiate a pro-rata 
what is often a problem by offering the amount, part of the air travel and so on. Yon 
spouse an occasional trip as a lrinri of re- discuss it with your accountant, make a 
ward. “It’s sometimes important to convince dunce, put in your return — subject to an 
a wife that traveling on business isn’t a audit which may or not hold water.” 
vacation, it’s a lot of pain and grief. Enroll- In spite of the tax hassles, business travel 
ing the wife — that’s an American model with a partner seems to be on an upswing, 

• • :V r "> we’re learning from,” says a British execo- especially for conferences. “Typical of this is 
. 7 7'V tive. “It makes the guy’s life a bit easier at the annual sales or management shindig in 
' home and costs peanuts; most hf>M rooms the Bahamas, which is dressed up as a plan- 
- : •. ", m J^ are doubles anyway and there are all sorts of uing exercise,” Lincoln says. 

. "‘f deals, like the QE2, where you can tain* Not all women appreciate joining their 
another person free,” says Arthur LyddaD, men at emporate events. A British journalist, 
^ travel manager at Chevron in London. Liz Hodgianson, says: “I think it’s dreadful; 

.. Py- According to Charles- Dufault, manager, the whole thing’s got out of hand. I think it’s 
. l\ management development and training, for humfliating, you’re just treated like an ap- 
: r Philip Morris Europe in Lausanne7“we*d pendage. I refuse to be treated as an ‘accom- 
y- •’ allow a wife to travel for a portion of time if panying spouse' and not as a person in my 
■ 1 - we have someone away for longw than six own righL No wonder the women’s move- 

yjp”' weeks, or when social activities are fore- ment never got anywhere.” 

■ r - -*“ 2 . seal. ... If an executive is traveling a lot. The women’s movement has at least 
- * ■ /■' we could agree to taking his spouse along at (mostly) won the right for female executives 
- his own expense.” ' to bring their men along to company func- 

' ■ Few companies are as forthcoming as tions, though not all seem to want to do so. 

~-‘t Philip Montis about their policies. According Says Annie Redmile, a London-based con- 
~ to David Lincohi, a London-based partner sultanl, “Taking somebody along on a busi- 
\ rr of Towers, Perrin, Forster & Crosby Inc , ness trip is always a problem unless they’re 
'■ ‘ ■ >:a. international consultants in pay «nd bene- actually involved in your own business. I*d 
tits, -chet whole issue of , spouse travel is ratherenjoy myself with the man in my life. 

J.J • . ' UT.i _ f , , , " ' . A- knw.. »- 


him for better or. worse. 
£f fOT luack ” “ rd never dream ' 
Mona business 


apH the individual “If it is declared, and 
that’s a big if,’ then unless it is wholly and 
exclusively required for business reasons' the 
tax is computed on the basis of cost to the 
company of tranporting and accomodating 
the spouse,*" Lincoln says. Bui bow do you 
split up the respective costs? “That’s the 


Taxes and morale 
important factors 
insetting policy 


. . Zi's shrouded in reticence. “Ifs informal, brown 
envelope stuff. Early this year we did a 
' — s. survey of 48 big companies in the U. K.; 
■ > only four of them declared any formal po- 

— licy. But in fact out rf 850 executives, just 
- under 20 parent hadactualty had tins benc- 

. fit in the last 12 mouths — this rose to 35 
. 7J percent at chief executive leveL I think this is 
. „ ;• an understaiemeat; it’s Hot something they 
want to broa dcast" Says Jim Dillman, man- 
ager of TPF&C in Frankfurt: “In Gennany 
don’t get a lot of hard data to tMs 
77- question, people don’t like to talk about it 
y Companies are looking at spouse travel as a 
. .. ',77 way to increase benefits, but the tax authrai- 
_"7 tics here are so structured that they would 
7.7-7 find it an unjustified business expense.” 


when Fm on relaxed time at home.”" 

And does it matter whether a couple is 
married? Not really, according to most com- 
panies, although “we still make a distinction 
between a legal spouse and concubines, or 
friends” at annual managers’ meetings at 
Philip Moms, Dufault says. 

There are no such inhibitions in France, 
according to Marcel Dumont, assistant to 
the secretary-general at the prestigious CPA 
business school in Paris. “French executives 
rarely travel with their wives and when they 
do take someone it’s often the mistress. 
Companies dose their eyes.” And what 
about the tax angle? An almost palpable 
Gallic shrug at the other -end of the phonfe. 
“In France, most people cheat a little bit” ■ 


by Mary Peirson Kennedy 

I EON, Spain — “Can you imagine Han- 
del’s “Messiah” emanating here 
from this patio and flooding the 
— whole hold? It sent shivers down 
my back last July when I stood here and 
listened.” 

Miguel Garcia, a member of the front desk 
staff of the San Marcos Hotel here is stand- 
ing on the loggja of a huge patio trying to 
explain why this hotel, where he has worked 
for 15 years, is not like any other. 

The magnificent building, completed in its 
present form in 1549, was once a refuge for 
pilgrims on their way to Santiago de Com- 
postela in northwestern Spain. Today its 
ornate and delicately carved facade rises 
above brfllantly colored flower beds at the 
end of a broad avenue. It that this 
cannot possibly be just a hold, and actually 
it is uol 

This 27, 000- square-meter building, de- 
signed in large part — in particular the 
facade — by the architect Juan de Badajoz 
(who (fid El Escorial outside of Madrid) is 
not only big enough to contain an orchestra 
and chorus, but it also contains a museum, a 
church and a magnificent choir stall done by 
Juan de Juni, a pupil of Michel angdo. The 
hotel itself has four dining rooms, two kitch- 
ens, immense salons and 260 rooms. The 
rooms are divided between two sections — a 
modem wing where the rooms are more or 
less the same except for different furnish- 
ings, and the old original section where no 
two rooms are identical. There is a baronial 
suite that includes canopied beds and a mar- 
ble dining table that seats 12, a tower room 
tucked away at the top of the hold, a cozy 
retreat with a sitting room at one end of the 
bedroom and of course various single and 
double rooms, all with private baths. Includ- 
ed in the antique and modem furnishings are 
more than 1,300 paintings by not only old 
masters but contemporary Spanish artists as 
well 

It is run by ENTURSA, a state organiza- 
tion that operates 12 luxury hotels, three of 
them historic monuments, including this 
one. After its religious function ceased in the 
last century, it was for years a horse breeding 
and veterinary center for the Spanish Army, 
In the 1960s the wade began to convert it 
into a hotel “It is slow because eveiyone is 
always leaning over our shoulders to be sure 
we do not destroy anything of historical 
value, ” explained Don Osar Alvarez, the 
hotel director. “Can you imagine whatit is to 
repair plumbing in a 436-year-old building? 
The biggest part of our operating budget is 
spent on restoring antiques and our heating 
lias to be very carefully filtered to prevent 
damage to the paintings.” 

The museum at the other end of the hotel 
is housed behind the church' altar and if you 
go there on weekends you can observe, dis- 
creetly hidden behind the great stone arches, 
a procession of local bridal parties who have 
opted to many in the church and then 
traipse across the worn stone passageways to 
the San Marcos for their receptions. In the | 
warm weather these affairs are held on the 
loggia of the patio and the guests sit in j 
quaint hooded wicker or straight-backed, 
carved antique chairs typical of the country 
homes in the province of Le6n. These chairs, 
according to Miguel Garcia, are similar to 
the Ledneses, — “stiff and hard.” 


T HE museum in the hotel has Roman 
and medieval religious objects. Per- 
haps the most interesting piece is an 
ivory midfix from the 12th century, called 
the “Christ of Carrizo,” with a regal almost 
disdainful, figure of Christ with no trace of 
suffering in his face. A young man in charge 
said, pointing to this crucifix, “No one here 
paid much attention to this piece untD an 
American museum offered us S450.000 for 
it, and then we put it under glass and agreed 


V,/" ^ i / 


Australian Books 


Continued from page 9 


began to change. Poets Rodney Hall and 
Shapoott edited “New Impulses in Austra- 
lian Poetry”. in 1968. Andin'1970 the UQP 
“Paperback Poets” series began. These inex- 
pensive volumes were hugely successful Da- 
vid Malouf, now one of Australia’s foremost 
fiction writers, published a book Of poems 
that went into three printings of about 2,000 
copies each. Average print runs everywhere 
for first editions of poems tend to be be- 
tween 500 and 1,500 copies. 


took over there six years ago it was only 
doing 20 to 30 books a year, mostly in 
current affaira. It now publishes around 120 
paperbacks: 40 percent nonfiction, 30 per- 
cent children’s books and 30 percent fiction. 

“We were having a revival of Australian 
theater and film in the late seventies. So it 
inst seemed kudcal to me that people would 


publishing prose in 1973. Feta Carey’s first 
collection of rather surreal short stories, 
“The Fal Man in Histoiy,” drew immediate 
critical acclaim for technical bravura and a 
touch of oddness that seemed to have no 
precedent. Since then the UQP has discov- 
ered and nurtured an impressive array of 
excellent writers. 

As word spread upward from down under 
about the harvest of good authors, houses 
such as the UQP found some of their discov- 
eries being lured away by British publishers 
in search of new names. This problem was 
less felt at Penguin because of its interna- 
tional stains. Nevertheless when Brian Johns 


fishing -policy. We used paperbacks for ex- 
panding the market, and hardbacks for con- 
solidating it” 

One of Penguin’s early titles was a remark- 
able novd by Jessica Anderson entitled 
“Tirra Lirra by the River." This is a quietly 
lyrical and humorous depiction of youth in 
Queensland in the early 1900s, young adult- 
hood in Sydney and maturity in London, 
seen through the eyes of a woman, who, in 
old age, returns to her birthplace and reflects 
upon the way she grew up by escaping. The 
fust print run was of 3,000 copies, but sales 
now stand at 60,000. 

“Sometimes print runs may seem small, 
but they’re relatively strong when seen 
against the size of the population,” Johns 


says. “In the UJSA, for the not-super best 
sellers, 20 or 30 thousand is considered a 
very good figure. Well, we’re achieving that 
regularly. But it’s not only a matter of cap- 
turing our own markets. We won’t have a 
proper publishing industry until we start 
exporting. Fm pushing us overseas, but it’s 
not easy. America's quite an insular country, 
actually, and the UK. is even worse.” 

Things are beginning to move, however, 
and this may be connected with the negotiat- 
ing of an increasing number of film rights of 
books by Australian authors. A Sydney- 
based literary agent. Rose Cresweh, has re- 
cently handled the rights for “Cocacola 
Kid,” based on Frank Moorhouse’s book, 
Peter Conis’s “The Empty Beach,” Jean 
Bedford’s “Kate” and Blanche d’Alpuget's 
"Turtle Beach." 

So this is the happy moment for Austra- 
lian writing. People are all still helping each 
other, major feuds and backbiting have not 
yet broken out, and good manuscripts keep 
rolling in. ■ 

Kate Singleton, a journalist based in Milan, 
writes frequently on cultural affairs. 


Four Women Writers 


F OUR very different women writers 
«in give some idea of die range of 
contemporary Australian fiction, 
and some of its salient characteris- 
tics as wdL Tbev are Olga Masters, Helen 
Gamer, Beverly Farmer and Blanche d’Al- 
pngel 

Blanche d’AIpuget is the exception that 

c onfirm* the local rule, which is a good 
reason for talkin g about her first. Unlike 
most of her fellow writers, male or female, 
she chooses to tell a tale with fairly tradition- 
al narrative structure. What is new in her 
work is the reality recounted: the problems 
of contrasting interests and cultures in Indo- 
nesia (“Monkeys in the Dark,” 1980) and m 
Malaysia (“Turtle Beach,” 1981). In b oth 
these books an ambitious young Australian 
woman working in Southeast Asia finds her- 
sdf involved in local issues with widespread 
national and international political npmica- 
tions. She ends up disillusioned, but perhaps 
wiser. She controls the telling of these stones 
with such a firm hand that her books make 
compulsive reading, without ever supping 
into the banality of the easy read. 

Beverly Farmer is the master ot the sow i ■ 
story. “M2k” (1983) is a collection that cen- . 
ters around village life in Greece, or ureeit 


' - s 9 - 


community fife in Australia. They are epi- 
sodes rather than events, described with ex- 
traordinary poetic delicacy. In just a few 
pages Farmer can draw out the essence of 
conflicting or overlapping feeling and per- 
ceptions between people of different ages, 
generations, cultural and geographical back- 
rounds. Old age and illness that grasp after 
elusive dignity are. two difficult subjects she 
deals with remarkably. Children feature a lot 
in her stories too: the hopeful ride of the 
natural cycle. 

Helen Gamer handles the long short sto- 
ry. Or the short novel, particularly weH Her 
characters are ordinary, recognizable young 
people living in cities like Melbourne; single- 
parent families, artificial families that buOd 
up in large households where the adults need 
as much support as the children. Her forte 
has always been her dialogues and the way 
she describes thought processes. Since 
“Honour and Other People's Children” 
(1980), her prose has tightened up. “The 
Children’s Bach” (1984) is a fine, terse study 
of relationships. Perhaps too dose to the 
bone for some; but impressive nevertheless. 


the home, making successes of their own 
lives. “The Home Girls" (1982) won the 
National Book Council Award in 1983 and 
imm e diate ly established its author as one Of 
the most powerful and original new Austra- 
lian writers. These are stories of a rural 
Australia of a few decades ago. The depic- 
tion of characters and places is effortless and 
often funny. Stylistically she is a natural 
innovator. Her sentences are often startling- 
ly devoid of punctuation (just like many of 
our thought processes). She effectively con- 
trasts short sharp phrases, strung one below 
the other rather than together in paragraphs, 
with softer, more flowing descriptive pas- 


Blanche cTAlpuget: “ Monkeys in the Dark, ” 
Penguin Books Australia; “Turtle Beach , ” 
Penguin Books Australia. 

Beverly Farmer : “Milk," McPhee Cribble l 
Penguin Books Australia. 

Helen Gamer: “The Children's Bach.” 
McPhee Gribble/ Penguin Books Austra- 
w 'lfr on ° ur and Other People's Children , " 

McPhee Gribble/ Penguin Books Australia. 
Olga Masters : “ The Home Girls." Universi- 
ty of Queensland Press. ■ 


. .. . [tt'KiC:-;.' «S» 










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Facade of the San Marcos Hotel in Leon. 


with one another that it was indeed rare and 
valuable.” 

Founded by the Seventh Roman Legion of 
Augustus in the first century, this city on the 
banks of the Bernesga River was later cap- 
tured by Moslems, who were in turn driven 
out in the eighth century. Leon, the people 
will tell you. bad eight kings before Spain 
was even a united country. 

A Gothic cathedral inspired by the one in 
Reims, dominates the rity. On weekends it is 
especially impressive at nigbt when flood- 
lights illuminate it from every angle. Inside 
the church there is a lovely cloister strewn 
with huge Ro man artifacts and a museum of 
religious art including a curious painting of 
the Sl Paul looking very cross. For 150 
pesetas you can buy a ticket and a guide will 
take you around to the five salons that house 
the collections. 

History and art critics often speak of the 
Romanesque basilica of San Isidore in Le6n 
as being more in keeping with the Spanish 
character than Gothic architecture. It is cer- 
tainly beautifuL Completed in 1067 it has the 
funerary chapel of the kings of Leon and the 
bones of San Isidore, a popular Spanish 
saint of the sixth century whose remains 
were credited with helping to drive the 
Moors from Spain. The re mains are said to 
have been brought from Seville in 1063 and 
put in an ornate silver reliquary covered with 
bas relief figures. The main one is of God, 
Adam, Eve and the Serpent in a fine example 
of buck-passing — God is pointing to Adam. 
Adam to Eve, and Eve to the Seipem! 


Not far from the cathedral, down a neat 
winding street where religious objects are for 
sale next door to judo parlors and sauna 
baths, is the central market, a huge plaza 
offering a wealth of -meats, vegetables, fruit 
and fish. With such raw materials it is no 
wonder that eating in Leon is an adventure. 
There are several good restaurants, at the top 
of the list the elegant dining room erf the San 
Marcos. Trout is often on the menu (stuffed 
with salty ham. in one combination). They 
wifi proudly tell you that their paella took 
first prize in a nationwide contest, or you can 
have smoked salmon, caviar and French 
wines. The selection here is large. 


A LTHOUGH the Bodega R«gia may not 
be as elegant, it has brought fame to 
-L7A_Lhe rity with its national culinary 
awards. This rustic restaurant with beamed 
ceilings in the oldest part of Le6n, the Barrio 
Humedo (so-called because the walls of the 
houses are always damp), has three floors of 
large and small dining rooms and specializes 
in cocido, a heavy bean, vegetable and meat 
stew, a large choice of homemade sausages 
(try cecina). smoked bull meat, roasted green 
peppers, roast meats and fish, these last two 
done in woodbuming ovens. They have a 
wine cellar that boasts of some of the best of 
the Spanish wines (Riojas from ’43, *57 and 
74 and some local Leonesa wines from three 
excellent years, ’48, ’67 and ’81). And for 
dessert there is natiUas con nueces a mouth- 
watering cream custard served with walnuts. 

Another local specialty is patatas bravo, a 
highly spiced cooked potato that can be 


eaten hot or cold and is found in all the tapa 
bars, which in Le6n also offer tiny plates of 
cocido, a variety of sausages, morcilla (a pork 
dish), pulpas (octopus) and many trout dish- 
es. 

The countryside around Le6n is rich in 
medieval Roman, Mudejar (Moslems living 
under Christian rule) and Mozarabic (Span- 
ish Christians living under Moslem rule) an 
and history. 

The biggest suite at the San Marcos is 
18,500 pesetas in the high season (Easter 
week and July through September) and 
1 7,300 pesetas the rest of the year. A double 
room is 9 ,350 pesetas in season and 8 ,350 off 
season and a angle is 5.900 and 5,500 pesetas 
respectively. For full pension add 3,600 pe- 
setas a person year round. A lunch or dinner, 
if you order the menu, is about 1 ,800 pesetas. 
Breakfast, not included, is 500 pesetas. Fig- 
ure about 160 pesetas to the U. S. dollar. 
These prices do not include a 5 percent tax 
that is added onto most tourist items in the 
country. These prices are good until April 
1986, and after lint there will be a 1 2 percent 
increase. 

At the Bodega Regia you can eat well with 
wine and three plates for around 1 .200 pese- 
tas. If make the round of tapa bars, count on 
around 500 pesetas a person. 

Le6n is 327 kilometers (202 miles) north- 
west of Madrid by superhighway and good 
primary roads. There is no airport, but there 
is good train service from both Madrid and 
the French border at Irun-Hendaye. ■ 

Mary Peirson Kennedy is a journalist who 
writes on Spanish cultural affairs. 


A Lament for the Ocean Voyage 


by Hans Koning 

1 AST month I crossed the Atlantic on 
the Queen Elizabeth II from En- 
gland to the United Stales. Apart 
^ from the vast amount of entertain- 
ment the ship provided for an age that has 
forgotten how to amuse itself unaided, the 
voyage was much like those I made 30-odd 
years ago, when sea travel was the normal 
way to go and when passenger ships linked 
New York with Southampton, Cherbourg, 
Rotterdam, Hamburg, Naples. 

Walking the deck of the QE2, thinking 
back to the glass-enclosed decks of the old 
Queen Elizabeth, it seemed amazing how 
fast the transition from ship to plane has 
been, how quickly that tradition of the sea, 
so solidly anchored in Western culture and 
folklore, has vanished When trains started 
to push out mail coaches, it took the best 
part ol the 19th century before the change- 
over was complete, and my 1914 Baedekers 
still list all sorts of alternatives, such as river 
steamers, horsedrawn tramways, and indeed 
coaches, for many routes. 

It is now 27 years since the first nonstop 
jet services began in the autumn of 1958 
from New York to London and to Paris and 
that was when the curtain really started to 
desce n d on the ocean liners, first on the 
Atlantic and then on the Pacific. Now the 
QE2 is the last ship to run a regular Atlantic 
run, though from April to November only 
(to which may be added the summer cross- 
ings of the Polish Stephan Baton, formerly 
the Dutch Ryndam, which docks in Halifax 
rather than New York). The northern seas 
are once more as empty of passenger ships as 
in the days of Amerigo Vespucd and it’s 
only cruises that have kept some of the finest 
liners, built as recently as the 1960s, afloat, 
while on the Mediterranean and the North 
Sea the new vogue of car ferries keeps some 
flags flying. Apart from convenience, train 
travel around 1900 was about eight times 
faster than coaches; the jet plane is 15 times 
faster than the great liners. 

Until around I960, flying was still more 
expensive than going by boat. Hying was the 
luxiny way of travel sailing the common 
one, although of course Cunard, the French 


Paris Stage 

uprooted peasantry who fled their murder- 
ous advance through the countryside. 

Pol Pol and his high command arrive at a 
ruthless solution: “To empty out the trash 
can, evacuate two and a half million inhabit- 
ants. Everybody out, into the fields, the rice 
patches.” 

Despite a cool critical reception, “Siha- 
nouk” is selling out. The largely young audi- 
ence squeezes tightly onto the upholstered 
benches and even sits on the steps. Above the 
spectators’ heads, propped up donga gallery 

that runs around the theater space, a crowd 
of dolls dressed in a variety of Eastern and 
Western garb conveys the sense that the 
whole world is watching in awed silence and 
in judgment of the proceedings on the stage. 

Cixous caricatures all parties involved in 
the death of a great culture: the Cambodians 
themselves, their Vietnamese neighbors, the 
Americans, the Chinese, the Russians and 
the Khmer Rouge. Sihanouk, played by 
Georges Bigot, is depicted not only as a 
sensitive artist but as a c unning diplomat 
caught in the web spun by the major powers. 
Bigot shuffles, dances, leaps, as though nim- 
ble footwork could get him off the tightrope. 

The other success of the new season is Lhe 
world premiere at the Th45ire de la Porte 


Une, the Hblland-America Line, and others, 
competed in trying for the best service and 
the best food for their pampered first class. 
Those were class-coma ous days on ships. 
On my first crossing, as a student in tim'd 
class on the old Queen Mary, I shared a four- 
bunk cabin with three other men; the stew- 
ard would open our door at 7 AM sharp, 
turn on the light, and call us out of bed like 
an army sergeant. When we docked in 
Southampton, we were escorted in little 
groups to the British immigration officers 
sitting in a room in cabin (second) class: 
even at the end of the voyage we weren’t 
allowed to set foot across the class boundary 
line by ourselves. One of my cabin mates 
wanted to take a picture of the cabin class 
swimming pool but he was refused. 

Fust class, on the other hand, was like life 
as a guest of a milli onaire or a viscount, with 
an unending stream of eating and drinking 
delights from breakfast in bed to the mid- 
night buffet, a “boots” to do your shoes, and 
bathtubs with four gold taps (or maybe gild- 
ed), hot and cold fresh water, hot and cold 
filtered sea water. The People's Expresses 
and Freddie Lakers of those days were most- 
ly student sailings in converted World War 
II Liberty and Victory ships, and they took 
you to Europe in 10 days for a $100 or so. 

As planes became cheaper, relatively and 
even absolutely, ships became more expen- 
sive. Two main reasons: one, wages (in the 
old days, crews could be found willing to 
ship out for not much more than room, Le. a 
bunk, and board), and two, oil When in the 
early 70s we in the West stopped getting our 
oil at bargain basement prices, the cost of 
ru nn ing a ship's engine shot up and almost 
overnight motorships with their heavy die- 
sels or turbines such as the Queen Elizabeth 
and the Queen Mary became economically 
impossible. New ships with much greater 
fuel efficiency were then built — the QE2 is 
one — but that did not sum the price spiraL 
A crossing now on the QE2 is value for 
money, in my estimation, if you have the 
money. It is still like a long weekend in a 
posh country bouse. But seen as travel rather 
than a cruise, it is doubtless an indulgence, 
with even the simple cabins on the lower 
decks costing several times the price of a 
plane ticket. 


Continued from page 9 

Saint-Martin of two Woody Allen sketches 
written some 20 years ago. “Death” and 
“God” combined into an awkward diptych 
under the grand title, “Dieu, Shakespeare et 
Moi.” are attracting a substantial middle- 
class, middlebrow audience. 

“Death” features the typically hangdog 
Woody Allen hero. As played by Pierre 
Richard, a favorite with French movie buffs, 
the hero, named Kidman, is a lurid coward. 
Despite his sound survival instinct, he allows 
himself to be inveigled into joining a group 

of scary and scared vigilantes who are track- 
ing down an elusive mad strangler. Alone in 
the empty canyons of a deserted metropolis, 
this latter-day Candide wonders why he left 
his warm bed only to face rival bands of 
vigilantes and other potential victims. 

When Kleiman finally runs into a puny- 
looking killer, played by the actor Rufus, he 
attempts to reason with him, even after the 
madman points out that this approach is 
wasted on the insane. Kidman’s obsession 
bas caught up with him. 

In “God," which makes up the second half 
of the evening, a limp rag doll is lowered 
onto the stage by means of a red halter 
attached to a cable. As the bearded, toga- 
clad puppet flops down, a familiar Nietzr 


This development w'as not inherent in the 
nature of the beast. Through the ’60s and 
70s we heard regularly of plans to build 
simple ships, sort of floating YMCA’s, with 
cafeterias, and with trans-Atlantic fares of a 
$100 to $150. At one point a West German 
concern announced itself ready to go ahead 
with this. Nothing came of it: the develop- 
ment has been in tee opposite direction, with 
planes also providing for teat basic no- trim- 
mings market, and with Cunard. as the last 
passenger line, definitely opting for tee old- 
er, richer, cruise- type traveler. 


M Y regretting this is barking up a no 
longer existing tree. Cunard and 
others must have done their sums; 
there is no floating Y in our future. A pity. 
Not only are there people of all ages and 
classes who hate flying, but more positively, 
whole generations do not know the ocean 
anymore except as seen from a beach. The 
love for tee sea, inbred for so long in tee 
English, tee Scandinavians, tee French, tee 
Dutch, and their American descendants, the 
mystery of that great and separate element, 
they remain a closed book. That alone might 
be a reason to bold out for tee sea voyage, if 
only once. 

And you would not travel by sea in spite 
of, but because of tee fact that it takes four 
or five days. Days without telephone calls, 
television, tee lastest bad news, and jet lag. 
Peihaps it is as fast as we can handle. Per- 
haps tee human mind cannot absorb tee 
transition from Europe to America or vice 
versa much quicker, and when you ship your 
body by plane, your mind arrives five days 
later. When our ship docked one Friday 
evening in October, it felt fantastic to me 
teat only five days earlier I had walked 
English streets, ridden a London cab. eaten 
chips with vinegar flavor. Looked at from 
12te Avenue in tee rain, with cops waving. 
Yellow Cabs honking, that wary excitement 
in tee air of Manhattan, tee lights of tee tall 
buildings coloring the foggy nighi, Europe 
was years if not light years away. R 

Hans Koning's new navel, “ Acts of Faith." 
will be published this winter by Gollancz. 


schean pronouncement is delivered: “God is 
dead!” Then tee play goes on to indulge in 
tee mock-Pirandellian device of questioning 
tee relations between public and performers. 

The plays’ extraordinary success owes 
much to Woody Allen's tausmanic reputa- 
tion in Europe, and especially in France. 
Together with Jerry Lewis, Allen has become 
a cult figure. He is viewed as a metaphysical 
comic, the uncommonly common man who 
lets it all hang out. The French have always 
taken pride in understanding certain aspects 
of America better than tee Americans them- 
selves: Edgar Allan Poe made his mark in 
France thanks to the superb translations of 
Baudelaire. WQliam Faulkner’s mythical 
South was probed by tee generation of Le 
Nouveau Roman. 

The myth of Hollywood is still powerful in 
France. “Dieu Shakespeare et Moi” is anoth- 
er sign of this fascination with America, and 
tee disintemmem of these buried early 
sketches has proved to be a commercial 
bonanza. B 

Rosette C Lamont is a visiting professor of 
the Institute of Theater Studies of the Sor- 
bonne Nouvelle. This article was written for 
The Hew Y'ork Times. 


Page 12 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


Thursdays 


N1SE 


Closing 


Tobias include ttw nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Won Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


17 wum 
Hlflh Lew Start 


8tt- 

WOlHIOhJ-Bw 


Owe 

aw>t.oi\ 


(Continued from Page 8) 


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12 21% 21% 71%-% 

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21% 21% PrfmKwl 
30% 14% PrlmeC 
37*. 16% PrfmMi m 
67’<S SOV- Procto 260 
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17% PSCol pf 210 106 
6% PSind 160 116 
ft* PSln pf ' 

41 PSln pf 

48 PSln pi 

56 PSlnpf 

51 PSln P# 

3% PSvNH 
8% PSNHef 
B% PNH PfB 
24lh 13 PNHpfC 

22 11% PNH pm 

22* 11V PNHpfE 
19% 9V PNH pIF 
20* 10% PNH pro 
29% 32% P59NM 7S7 [02 
37V, 25 PSvEG 184 9.1 
19 X* PSEGOf 4 08 102 
39% 31* PS EG pf 4,16 106 
48 37* PSEG P* SJ5 106 

49* 39 PSEG Pf S28 10.9 
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S* 18* PSEG pi 143 106 
109 m% pseg onus 116 
73% 58 PSEG Pi 720 106 
71 55% PSEGpf 7S2 102 

69% 54% PSEG of 760 107 
4% 2* Public* 

15% 9* Pueblo .16 10 13 
7% 6 PRCcm 6 

17 11V PuoelP 176 116 7 

7% 6% PulPen 399 

"IV 10% PulleHm .12 9 16 3157 

31% 16* Purofat M U IB 

ID* 5% Pvro 7 74» 


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136 a a 2 

84 8% 8 8-4 

1617 30V 20% ^8 + % 
12 20% 20* 2D* + % 
1994 8% B% 8% + % 

lOOOz 8% B% 8% + % 

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50x 59* 59* 59* 

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200z 61V 61V 61V 
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43 21% 21* 21* 

44 18* 18 IB - * 
51 21% 20% 21% +1* 

412 3*4 27% 28% + % 
4245 31% 30V 31% + % 
320Qx 38* 38* 38* + V 
950z 39V4 39* 39% + % 
15502 47% 46 47% + % 

510Qz48vt 48% 48% 

23 20% 2D% 20V + % 

2BS 23 22% 23 + % 

7CBHT7 107 107 —1 

5880x 737i 73% 73% + V 

1*4102 70 68 70 — V 

21780X 69% 67% 69% +1% 
2W 2% 2Vi 2H+ * 

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A 7% 7% 7%— % 

15% IS 15V + % 

7* 7 7 

14 13% 13V + % 

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6 5% 6 + % 


610 


63 33 QtMkOI 

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10% 5 Quanta 
34V 27 Ouratw 
2ft% 14% QtcRell 


160 26 IS 
600 13 19 
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268 24% a* 24% + % 
153 6% 6% 6* 

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SS! 


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27% 17% SeaLnd M 23 U 572 20% 20% 20%— % 
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21 15% Socaul 25 12D 1B% 17% 16 + % 

34* 23* SMlAlr At 74 17 49 32* 30% 32% + % 

S% 2Z% SealPw 160 3-9 10 76 25V 25* 2S%— * 

39% X Soars 1-74 4.9 10 9085 34% 35% 36% + % 


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31% 24V SeCPoCS 164 46 
J9 JIV SelpLT 
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lftV llV ShokV* 

26% 16V Show In 
40% 2 vh ShefIT 
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a 25% Shnrin 
9 5* Sttoetwn 

15% 12 5nowt» __ 

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41 36% Sinpar M lJ 10 1092 39%38%39% + % 

37% 20* Sinorof U0 106 22 33% 32V 33% + * 

17% 12V Skyline 68 34 18 162 14* U 14* 

26V 20V Slattery am it a 18 25 % 25 ZSMj— % 

14* 7* Smiftiln 31 3.9 341 8% 7% + v« 

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88% 48% 5muckr 1 60 lA 2D 19 88 1 * 87% 88* + * 

41% 31* SnopOn 1.16 36 12 480 36% 3SV 36% + % 

15V 12% Snvdor 2J0 14J 17 55 14% 14 U% — % 

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1309 30* 29% 30% 

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682 ' 30 29% 30 + % 

241 16% VS 14% + % 
57 23% 23 73% + % 

1470 3* 36% 39 + % 

m 26% 25% 26% + % 
470 40 39% 40 

223 B% 8% 8* 

69 1498 14% 14% — V 
178 TB% 18% IS* 


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3J0 U 


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49% 34 RCA 
112 80 RCA pi 

39% 32% RCA Of 
7% ft* RLC 
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19V lt% RTE J6 
18* 8% Rod Ice 

49 31% Ral'-Pur 1.00 

9% 5% Ramad 

21% 16% Ran CD D4 

5% 2t5 RanarO 

BO* 51% Rovcm M 
16* 9% Raymk 

19% 19% Ravnrn 
53% 3ft* Rovttm 
10* 5% ReodBt . _ _ 

21% 13 RdBaf pf 2,13 li7 
23V 16% RdBal pf X12e17A 
16V flV RIIRef U3e 9 A 11 
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12% 7 Redmn 

12% 8* Reece 

1% * Reoal 

43% 37% RetchC 
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3 1* RcpAwf 

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27V 23V RNYpfC3L12 11J 
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25% 15% RsttCot J2 
29% 22% RevCO DO 
17V 10% Revere 
58 32% Revlon 1D4 

100% 93 RvInpfB 9-X 
25* 17V Rtxhm .70 
15V )1V Retard AA 
32% 24V Roynln s 1D8 
50 47% Rev In Pf 4.10 

112% 103% Rev in pn 150 1DJ 
131 123V Rev in Pfil96 9.9 

41* X RevMti 1D0 
26** 24 RevMPf 130 
33% 21% RiteAld DO 
7% 2% RvrOk n 

34% 28% Robshw I JO 

41V 19% Rowan IJOi 

24% 5% vl Robins 

24% 17% RodlG 120 
42% 31 RcCflTI 144 
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41V 29 Rockwl 1.12 
73 55V RohmH 2-30 

7V 40 Rohrln 
27* 15% RoInCm M 
IS* 4% RollnEs Da 

12% 8% Rollins M 

3% 1% Ronson 

IV 11 Roper D4 
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44% 47% Roy ID 129e 52 9 

J7* 30% RorlnfS 20 

31 X% Rutmd s M ID 20 

26 14V RussBr 14 

24 15% RusToB J6 3D 11 

31* 21 RvcnH 1D0 4.1 8 

30% 22 Ryders 
29 18% Rvland 

20% 8% Rymer 

13% 10% Rymer pf 1.1 7 10D 


40 6 5% SV— * 

3562 48* 47* 48% + % 
6 110 109V 110 +% 

4 39* 39 39 

7* 7 7* + * 

3V 3% 3% 

19% 19% 19% — % 
17 16% 17 

47V 47 47% + % 

7% 7% 7% — % 

17% 17V 17% + % 
4% 4* 4* + % 

79 78* 7BV + * 

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50 49% 50 + % 

6 % 5 % 6 — % 

13% 13* 13% 

17V 17V 17V 

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11% 11% 11% + % 

9% 8% 9% 

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500 10 9V 9% — % 
139 7% 7 2 

155 8% 7% 8 
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22 27% 27% 27V 

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V 28 279k 23 

87 25% 24% 24% — % 

aSJ 27% 26% 77% + % 

5 13 12V 13 + % 

109 57% 57* 57% 

64 99 «9 99 

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403 13V 13% 13% — * 

7054 27V 27% 77% + % 

5 50 50 50 +% 

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1743 130% 1309*130% + % 
356 33% 33% 33% + * 

173 26% 26 26 

913 24% 24* 24% 

316 3% 3* 3* — % 
117 35 34V 35 

330 21* 19% 21* + % 
375 11% 11% 11% + % 

174 22% 22% 22V -jr % 
121 35% 35% 35%—% 
754 18% IS* 18% — * 

2020 36V 36* 36% + * 
810 68* 67V 67V 
149 6ZV 61% 61V— % 
56 26% 26 »% + % 

&3Qx 14% 13* 14* +1 
176 129k 12% 12% + * 
113 2V 2* 2*— % 
507 14% 14* 14% + * 
581 39% 38% 38V— % 
980 8* S% 8* + % 

2672 63% 62% 63% +1% 
43 16% 16% 16% — % 
451 31 30* 31 + % 

392 21V 19% 21% + % 
16 21% 21% 21% + * 
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172 £ 7 


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34 19% SPSTec DO 2D 16 

19 15 Sabine D4 2 40 

19% 16 SabnRy 2-38el5J 

20% )2%5«vdBs JO ID 17 

12V 5% 5 led Sc 

2% 1* SfedSwt 

38% 23* SafKIns 
37% 25* Safewv 
34* 20V Saga 
23 18% SlJoLP 

11% TV 5 Paul 
8% 39k viSolonl 
38% 24% SoffieM 
28% 21% SDieGs 
9V ft* SJuanB 
12% 89k SJuanR 

43% 29% Sondr 
25% 20 SAnltRI 1.94 
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49* 31% SaraLae 1D0 
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19% 15V Saul RE JO 
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23% 18% SavEA 134 
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13* 8 Savin pf 1.121 

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57 35* SchrPIo IDS Z9 16 

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300 16 15% 15% — % 

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9% 9% 9% 

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19ft 37 35% 36V +1 

712 36% 35% 36* + * 
295 24% 24% 24% + % 
19 21% 20% 21% + * 
94 10% 10* IQ* 

86 8 7* 8 + * 

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349 26% 26% 26% + * 
717 8% 8% 8% 

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14 7547 35% 33% 34% +1% 
>88 SO 48% 49V +1* 
36 36 35V 34 + % 

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22V 22V 22V + % 

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8 % 8 % 8 % 

27% 26% 27 + % 

57V 56 57% +1% 


43% 31V, Sonet 
19% 13% SdWCP 
32% 22V SooLln 
40* 33% SourcC _ 

23* 19V SrcCppf 240 104 
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26V 20% SoInGss IDO 
44 31V SNET1 272 

52 41% SoNEfrf 4D2 

27* 22% SoRyof 2D0 
31 24% SoUnCd 172 

42% 24V Soutlnd IDO 
56% 49% Sound pf 4D0 
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47 5a mk pf 6D9el4 J 
18V SwAJrl .13 D 
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29 19% SwEnr 

26% a SwtPS 
17% 12% Spartcn 
27% 15% ScectP 
59 36V Sparry 

38% 31* Sorinos 
43% 35% SouorD 
76% 49V ScufbtJ 
24% 18% S to lev 
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23% 10% StPecC 3 
16V 12% Standex 
31% 23% StanWk 
37V, 29 StarraH 
II* 9V StoMSe 
3% 2% Sleeeo 

20* 15% SterctU 
12% 9% SfrIBCP 

37% 26* SiertDo 
27% 16 SfevnJ __ 

33% 25% StwWm IDS 
14 10 StkVCpflDO 

48V 38% StoneW 1D0 
34 34 SfOneC DO 

51% 34* SMPShp 1.10 


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97 40 39V 40 + * 



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21% 17 SfrIMIn lJOe 7.1 

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39 28% SunCh 

»% ft% SunEI 
56* 43% SunCo 
110% w* SunCpf 
49V, 40 Surds Ir 
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7* 7 SunMPf 1.19 16.1 

38% 31 SunTrsI 1J0 3J 11 

22% 14% SupVal 1 J 17 18 
48% 29* SupMkf 48 
17* 12 Sv-ank .48 
22V 16% Sybron 1D8 
39* 30 tk Svtwri pf 240 
16% Iff* SvmsCp 
74% 45* Synlex 1.92 
42% 30V Sysco 44 


IDO 


23 23 23 — * 

62 28% 28* 28V + % 
312 44% 43V 44 + * 

213 319k 31% 31% + % 
65 6* 6 6% 

7008 24% 24% 34V + V* 
2*97 21% 21% 21% + % 
121 25% 25* 25% + % 
118 43 42* 42VZ— * 

MOOi 50% 50% 50% + * 
1 26% 26% 26% — % 
74 26% 2d* 24% — % 
43% 42% 42*- % 
.. 259 56* 56% 56V + * 

3 23 6389 17* 17 17% 

S 571 x 8% 1% 8% + % 

4x46 « V — % 

356 26% 26* 21* 

1099 10% 10% 10H 
198 18% 17% 18% + % 
(M2 B(tt BOV Si 
69 24* 23% 23 fk — V 
914 24V 24V 24% + Vk 
126 14% 13% 14% + % 
238 22% 21 22% +1% 

3075 49* 48% 49% + % 
177 38% 38* 38% + * 
175 40 39V 40 

702 74% 73V 74% + Vk 
948 23% 23 23% + % 

79 21% 21% 21% + * 
48? 12 11% 12 — % 

3244 53V 51% 53% +1% 
171 19% 19% 19% + VS 
57 13V 13% 13% 

272 30% 29% 30% + % 
17 35% 35 35% + % 

60 11% 11 II — % 

S 2V 2% 2* + % 
19V 19% 19* + % 
71 12% 12% 12V + % 
925 35* 34V 35 + Vk 

4346 25% 25% 25% — 1* 
50 3d 29% 30 + % 

100% 13% 12V 12V — V 
94 48% 48 48*— % 

*3 39V 29* 2*V + % 
379 36V 36% 36*—% 
217 19 18V 19 

5Z7 1% 1* IV 

1570 91% 91% 91V + % 
82 18% 1B% lff%— % 
12S TOV 20* 20V 
115 6 5% 6 + % 

IBS 36% 36 36% 

766 ))* 1D% 10%— % 
589 52 51 51% + % 

9 W7%104V107VS +1% 
207 47 46% 47 + % 

416 6* 6 6% 

509 7% 7% 7% — * 

294 37% 37 37% — Vi 

374 22 2TV 21% — % 
266 46% 46 46% + * 

224 13 72V 13 + * 

4938 21 20 2QV + % 

29 34 33% 33%—% 

134 11% 11% 11% + % 
“ 73 71% 73 + % 

42% 42% 42V- V 


3D 10 
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ID IB 112 


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16% 12% Scotfvs 
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13 10% SeaQpf 1D6 11 J 

16% 14 SeoCpfBZIO 133 


+ % 

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560 2B 25* 27% +2* 
14 12% 12% 12V 
27 15% 15% 15% — % 


SO* 30% TDK 

364k 27% TECO 

12% 7 TG1F 

21% 13% TNP 

28% 19* TRE 

83% 68 TRW 

178% 151* TRW of 
5% 1% vlTocBI 

87* 52% TaflBrd 1.16 ID 16 

21% 12% Talley ,15e D 13 

23% 15 TaffevpMDO 5.1 

87 56% Tarnbrd 3D0 

38% 23* Tandy 

15* 12% Tndvcft 

60* 47% Tektmx 1D0 

5* 2* Telcom 
275% 227 Teldyn 
2« 12% Tel rale J2 

51% 30V Telex 
40% 31V Temoln 
45* 33% Termo 
84* 72* Tencpr 7D0 
32% 17% Terdvn 
IS 8% Tesoro DO 
40* 32% Texaco 3DC 
37V! 26* TxA Sc 1-52 
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39 26% TexEst 220 _ 

58* 52 TxETpf SJOelOD 
34% 25 Tflxlnd DOb 2D 17 

131V 86* TexIlKf 
SV 1 Texlnt 
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31% 25% TexUfll 
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65 34% Toxtrpf 2D0 18 

28* Textrpf lDd 11 
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10% 5% Tlfferln 
61* 40 Time 
23* 14V T imply. 

58% 38 TimeM 
56% 41% Timken 
9* 4% Titan 

11V B% Titan pf IDO 
39% 26% TodShp l2 _ 

21* 15V Tokhm S D8 17 11 

21* 16% TolEdll 252 110 5 
29% 34% TolEdpI 172 111 
30* 25 TolEdpf 175 13J 
28% 23* TolEdpf 147 127 
33% 28V TolEdpf 428 111 
20% 16% TolEdpf 236 125 
18% 15% TolEdpf 221 123 
30 9% Tonkas .10 D 

61V 26 TootRol DSb D 

26% 14* Trchms DO 

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5 1 Tosco 

lft% SVi Towle 


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252 


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2W 33% 33% 33%— % 
136 7% 7% 7% — % 

56 18V 18% 15* 

181 27% 27 27% — % 

914 78 76* 77V +1* 

1 169V 169* 169V -4% 
45 IV 1% 1% 

114 81V ajv 81% + % 
90 17V 17% 17V + % 
32 19V 19% 19% + * 
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15 36 15% 15% 15V + % 
785 53V, 52% 53%— % 

21 3% 3 3 

247 274* 273% 274 +% 

192 15% 15% 15%—% 

661 50% 49% 49% + % 

. 109 38% 37* 38% + % 

7.7 11 6744 39V 39 39% + % 

8.9 8 8J% 83 M — 1 

16 663 20% 20V 20% + % 

3.9 420 10% 10% 10V 

7D 27 4463 39% 38% 39V + V 
27 27* 27% 27% 

777 Z7* 26% 27V + % 
589 36% 35% 36% + % 
100 55% 55% 55% 

64 30V 30V 30V + V 

20182 1268 98% 9SV 98V +2% 
2961 5V 41k 5% + % 
1.1 1210212 16 15V 16 + % 

17 30 29% 30 + % 

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IJ 23 
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23 

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18% 


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50 


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656 28% 28 23% - % 

9S II 17V IS 
1081 21 20% 21 + % 
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17 29 28% 28%—% 

16 27V 27V Z7% 

6 33 32V 32V— K 

5 1B% 1B% 18V— % 

7 18 17V 18 +% 

830 26% 24% 36% +1% 

28 57* 56* 57V + V 
813 25 24 24% + % 

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2140 4% 3% 4%— Vk 

104 8% 7% 8% + V 




Mac. 14 

Prevfoui 
Bid AH 


CtaM 

Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Starling per metric ton 
Soot 657 DO 659.00 65SDD 65850 

Forward 683D0 684D0 683D0 68350 

COPPER CATHODES (Htaft Grade] 

Sterling per metric ton 
Seal 97150 97450 97650 977D0 

Forwrd 990J0 991 DO 994D0 995* 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard} 
sterling per mtrrfc ton 
Spot 952.00 956* 950* 953* 

Forward 970* 974* 973* 974* 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ton 
Soot 273* 279* 284* 285* 

Forward 381* 283* 283* 28350 

NICKEL 

S fen hm per metric ton 
Seal 2875* 2885* 2830* 2850* 

Forward 2895* 29** 2860* 2880* 

SILVER 

Peace per tray ounce 

Spar 430* 431* 431* 432* 

Forward 442* 443* 44450 446* 

TIN ( Standard] 

sterling per memc ton 

Soar Sum- Susc, — — 

Forward Susp. Saxo — — 

ZINC 

sterling pgr metric ton 

spar 397* 399* 402* 404* 

Source: ap. 


To the Holden of 

FORD MOTOR CREDIT COMPANY 
Rusting Rsu Notes 
due Novsmber 1991 


Pursuant to tho Focal Agency ApMenont 
Dated as of Novamtar 1, 1986 (the 'Agras- 
wanOhBB w a n Fl M dMow&atftCdnigwiy 
and The Chaw Manhattan Bank [National 
AssocaScnJl as fiscal Ag «n nonce s 
hereby given hat the R» of bdarast apuSc- 
able to the above Notes tor tfw Mares 
Period November IS- 1985mMBy 15.1S06.M 
dawirawd in acconlanco vwh *b provi- 
sums of the AguMwl is Mtk par annum. 
11a amount of ntaresf payable in rasped of 
sacti US36QJ00 principal amount of Naasis 
USS2Q5925, payable May 15.1986. 


THE CHASE MANHATTAN BAfflC 
(NatioMl Assodathnli 
ttHacalAgnt 

Baud: November 15, 1985 CHASE 




London 

Commodities 


Nov. 14 


Provfous 
BM ASfc 


ClPM 

HWi LOW BM fl 

SUGAR 
Sterling per mehic ttw 
Dec 142* >40* 1J9* Ml* 739* M3D0 
158D0 154* 154* 15530 156J0 156D0 
162* 159 AO 159* 17* 160* 160* 
147* 167* 164D0 164D0 165* 165* 
173* 171* 169* 170* 171* 171* 


Mar 

May 

Aim 

Oct 


Volume: 1540 lots at 50 tons. 


COCOA 

Sternpoi 


• metric tea 


Mf*V 

Jiy 


Dec 

Mar 


1D19 1D10 1D17 1D1B 1D3) 1D32 

1D68 1D57 1D65 lDftft 1D79 ID* 

1D93 1*1 1D9I ID92 1706 I,}* 

1*719 1.708 1J15 1,717 1*7» 1J33 

1J*4 1J» 1J39 1J43 1*750 1JS7 

US0 1J42 1,745 1JS1 

1*765 1.765 1.765 1J71 


Volume*. 2J47 lots of 10 tons. 


1.757 1*763 
1JA5 1*3 


COFFEE 

Sterling per metric ton 
7*09 1DW 1510 1432 1540 1535 1537 
■£» 1*0 1582 1*5 7572 1573 
1545 1585 15*0 1578 1580 


Jan 

Mar 

May 

Jhr 

Sep 

Nov 


1,920 1545 1590 1595 

1.918 IDS 1,900 1*7 

>520 1*330 7.9QJ 1.970 >4 

N.T. N.T. 1,9* 15* 1595 


Volume: 4D47 tats of 5 tan*. 


GASOIL 

U5. doftar* per metrle ton 
Dec 275* 272* 273* 273J5 2*9* 269.75 
271* 26*25 269.75 Z70* 266J5 247* 
266* 265* 24529 269* 262* 26Z25 
256J5 255-50 256* 256J5 25ZZS 253* 
248* 246* 246* 2*7* JAi* 245J5 
237* 237* 237* 238* 23 6* 238* 
235* 235* 234* 236* 233* 234* 
23325 23325 23325 23X50 231 25 73775 
N.T. N.T. 228* 239* 22S* 242* 


Jan 

Feo 

Mar 

API 

May 

Jon 

Jhr 

Ai>« 


Volume: 3211 fats of 1* tens. 


For the tale&t information on 
De Voe- Holbein International rr? 
and Gtv-Gock Imemationai nv 
please call collect 31-20^27762. 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and die weekly' 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be seat free and without 
Obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Center 
StrauinsAjlaan 857 
1077 XX Amsterdam. 

The Netherlands 
Telex: 1450" finco nl 


CRUDE OIL (BRENT! 

U5 doitan pot txPTrl 

D«C 3Q.1D 30* 29.95 30* 2»D8 29* 
29D5 29 JO 29.15 2«J2 2825 2851 
3X40 38* 2845 38J5 28.10 2822 
N.T. N.T. 27 50 2BJ0 Z7D1 3* 
N.T. N.T. 27D2 27* 2?D» 27* 
N.T. N.T. 2A70 38.10 3635 24-70 


JCA 

Fob 

Mar 

Apt 

May 


Volumot 71 tats M 1*0 barrels. 

Sourcn: Reuters ana mnaon Petroleum Ex- 
change (aatett. enn/e oil). 


Gommmiities 


Aar. 14 


a * pe 


£Iom 

High Low BM ASK 

SUGAR 
French franco per metric tan 
Dec 1D01 >591 1*395 IJ99 +17 

Mar LCS 1510 1D1S 1D19 +20 

May ID* 1D49 1442 1448 +21 

Aug NT. NT. 1485 1490 +12 

OCf W* 1*510 1JW +2D 

Dec 1535 1525 1*5 1*5 +13 

Eat wo).: 2D* lots of * tons. Pray, actual 
sola: 2*097 tats. Opott Inforest; 24*088 


COCOA 

French fra ncs per in kg 


Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1026 

1040 

Mor 

N.T. 

N.T. 

IMS 

>075 

May 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1*0 


Jiy 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.900 

_ 

See 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1,910 


Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1,910 

— 

Mar 

M.T. 

N.T. 

>.920 

— 


_Est. vo).: 0 lots of 10 tons. Prev. octuol sales: 
7 tats. Open Interest: 486 


COFFEE 

French francs per 109 ka 
Nov N_T. N.T. 25* 

JOn 2D7D 

Mar 2.120 

MOV N.T. 

Jlr N.T. 

sea N.T. 

Nov N.T* 


2565 
25* 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. _ 

EjT.vol.: 4ft tafset 5 tons. Prey.oaual sales: 
3 lots. Oann imprest: 3* 

Source: Bourse tfu Commerce. 


zm 

2.113 

2595 

2D% 

2,100 

2,110 


2.1* Unett. 
1114 —2 

2>14 + 13 

2.118 + 10 
2.125 +10 

2,1* +10 
2.140 +15 


Asiiin 

Gommodities 


Nov. 14 

HONG- KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U3.S per obdcx 

„ . . Close Previous 

High Low Bid Ask BM Ask 
NOV _ N.T. N.T. 324* 326* -933 * 3X1X1 
Dec _ N.T. N.T. 325* 327* 32S* 327* 


Jtm_ N.T. N.T. 327* 329* 32750 329* 
f “? - 5°-22 S*- 00 331 - 00 329* 331* 

API _ 334* 334* 3J3D0 335* 333D0 335* 
Jun _ N.T. NT. 337* 339* 337* 339* 
Auo _ NT. N.T. 341* 341* 341* 343* 
C* 1 - N.T. NT. 116* 348* 345* 3*7* 
Volume: 2J lots of 100 az. 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 


Cash Prices 


Commodity and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santas. Ib_ 


Not. 14 

Year 


frirlcJom 64/30 38 %.yd __ 

Steel bfiiefs fPtttJ, ton 

iron 2 Fdrv. PWto.hxi 

Steel scrap No > ttw Pitt. _ 
Load spot. m. 


Ttw 

15S 


Copper elect, fb 
Tin f Strolls). B> 


473* 

TO* 

73-74 

18-19 

<7-70 


473* 

21U8 


Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb 

Poficdlum.oz 

Silver N.Y. az 

Source: AP. 


CDS 

160-10 

6.15 


47% 

AMS 


147 

741 


Dec 
Feb , 


Wan 


NT. 


Low 

32640 

N.T. 


Volume: 60 kits of 1* ox. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mstoystaa esafe per kilo 

dosi 

_ Bid Ask 

Dee 180* 181-Si 

Jan 181* 182* 

Feb 182* 183* 

Mar 183* 184* 


Settle 

32640 

330.40 


Settle 

32340 

329D0 


Volume: 0 lots. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 

Sinaapore cents per kite 
Close 


Previous 
BM Ask 
181* 182* 
182* 181* 
181* 184* 

184* 185* 



Volume: 6 lots of 25 tons. 
Source: Routers. 


ll&lreasuries 


Nov. 14 


Dliceuwl 
Offer Bid 


Prev. 

Yield 


3-mwmbUI 

6-aant&biu 

1-mrblll 


757 

7J8 

7DB 


755 

7J6 

7a 


7D0 

TJS 

7J2 


Bid Offer 
M+eorbond 10414/3310416/32 


Yield 

10.14 


7D9 

7D8 

751 

Prev. 

YWd 

10D6 


Sowior: Salomon Brothers. 


Merrill Ltd* Treoxory lodes: 132* 
Ctamvt for Tke day: — 0D6 
Average yield: 9J6 % 


Source: AAerrOt Lyncn 


DM fiitures 
Options 


tr. Gm mn Mert-nsuDmartt am tv atcn 


Sr»« 


Not. 14 
Pub- Sente 


Dec 

Mr 

Jw 

Dec 

Mer 

Job 

NJL 

209 

338 

aoi 

026 

052 

103 

ID 

X70 

aw 

007 

080 

059 

108 

NA 

0* 

0* 

1.0 

0.17 

in 

LS« 

078 

126 

10$ 

024 

062 

1.16 

145 

1* 

XM 

(LSI 

1141 

as 

142 


276 


Estimated total veLS*S 
Caks: wed. rat 2.122 oora M. 41578 
Pals : Wed. *vL NA open hrt.32574 
STO.GHE 



Nor 14 


Fee 


Srtkt 

Prk* Nov Dec An 

14S - - 

ra 21H nv. J2 — 

ns 17% vk i7% m* 

n a 12% 12% 13 

S 2 7% m f* 

198 21/164 4L SH 

1/16 I V Vo 3% 


1/14 


Key Dec An F* 
— 1/14 VU - 

1/1* 1/U % w 
1/16 1/U )/14 7/M 
1/U 3/14 1/16 1 
1/14 % IW 1ft 
Vk 23/U2V 2% 
3*9 5 5% 4ft 


IVli - W - - 


TMcaaveioDe 33451 
TUN CoO SMP WL 5BCL33D 
Tefal xut vataoe U4J53 
TFuteot apes tot tun 


Htakinr uevn 
Source: CBOE. 



EXTRA 


Advvsf Group Inc 

Martas Co 


> 51 1-15 12-4 

> 55-13*14 12-1 

INCREASED 

AddlsattrWesiev q * 12-14 T2-2 

Q 59 1-HJ T2-20 

a 55 12-14 12-1 

Q 57 % 2-1 MS 

Q * 1-6 12-23 

INITIAL 

Peootas Bank 


Morton Lobs 
MavtooCo 
Raaawcy Services 
Safety Kleen Corp 


. .Iff 12* 

SPECIAL 


72-1 


La rig lev Core 


JS 1-24 7-10 


STOCK SPLIT 


Amer Medical Services — s-fer-4 
Fur Vault — 3-far-2 
Safety ■ Kleen -3-fw-2 


USUAL 


Advest Gratia 
6 mi Products 
Cetanes* Canode 
Colaata-Patmoilve 
Coir industries 
Eldon Industries 
Frozen Food Exp 
Gent instrument 
Gifford Hilt & Co 
Kav Cora 
LLAECo 
MOPcainc 
Mertdion Bcncoro 
North Amer, Cool 
Sdfertcd MOrtdrhrtt 

saence Mananoit 
Sen au i i ixi tic Eiectr. 
TrooersGrodPct A 
Tronswov inti 
Untflrst Corp 
USGCorp 


O 53 1-15 12-6 
Q 56 12-13 11.59 
Q D5 12-31 12-4 
O 54 2-15 1-24 
QD2% 12-31 12-13 
B D4 M 12- JJ 
O D7 12-11 11.2S 
O D6 V 14 134 
Q .13 12-9 11-22 
Q DS 12-14 K-7 
Q J5 12-13 11*29 
Q 55 12-10 11-26 
Q D5 M IMS 
Q 57 % 12-13 124 
Q it 2% 12-13 12-2 
Q D2 % 12-13 11-27 

s*% ire 12 + 

O -10 1-1 12+ 

Q D5 13-9 net 
Q DS 1-2 n+ 
Q D2 12-15 11-26 


su. 

wtaHtahLee 


Claw 

Guot.Ch 1 *. 


9% 3% Towle at 
41% 25% TpyftUs 
a 1 /- 16 Troers 
23 8% TWA 

16 13 TWApf 

34% 18% TWA PlB 
34 
21% 


At M 

27 

-32 1.7 12 


7 5% 4% S 

851 36 33£ + V 

875 19 179k 15% +1 
771 22V 22% 22% 

1B7 15% 15% l»k + V 
92 »% »% 33% — % 


16 



21% 

57V. 44 Transo ftJJeiaf 50 
66% 53 Tnucpl 3-S7 62 
52% 52 Tnweof 4J5 9D 
24% 19% TronEk 136 1 ID . 
13% 5% Transen _ a 

25% 22 TrGPpf 2* 9 S 
13% 8% TmsOtt . ft 

(P-3 29% Tranwv IDO 35 13 
43V a% TmwW DS 
25% 12% TwIdwfA 


34% 27% Twkt pf 
17% 15% TwMpf 
49% 34% Trovter 
58% 50% Trov pf 
22% TrlCon 

X 22% TrICnpf 250 
32% 7% Triolns . JO 
35% a TrltrPc 
51% 30ft. Tribune 
6% 4 Trioitr 

7% 5% Trice 

17% 12% Trtnhr 
35V? 14% TrltEno . .. 

19% 9% TriTE Pf 1.10 6D 
43% 31% TucsEP XOO 7.1 10 
17% 9V Tyllex D8 2D 15 
20'- 16 TwfnOs .90 U 15 

44% 30 Tyco Lb DO ID 13 

17% 12% TyWS * 28 13 


459 51% 50% 50% 

It 62% 42ta 62V + <& 
7 52% 52% B% 

134 20% » 20% + % 

68 S% 8Vk 8% + % 
12 2SH 25% 25% — % 
139 12% 12 12%— % 

_ .. 710 46V 46 46V + % 

U 14 2454 D0% 40% 48% — V* 
32 ZM 22% 2T — % 


2D06D 13 33% 33 33% + V. 

1* 109 5 17% 17% 17% + Vk 

2.04 O 11 1766 47 4SV 47 +T 


4,16 7D 
3D8«115 

3 S 

1* 2D 10 
D4 IJ 17 
,51*105 7 

JB 

. 10 b 3 3t 


173 S5% 55% 55% 

389 73 27% 27% 

1 Z7% 27% 27% + V. 
337 31% 38% 30%-% 
1* 35% 35% 3S% + % 
353 *% 49% * 

23 4% 4% 4% + % 

718 6% 6ftk 6% + % 

11V 13% 13% 13% + U* 
314 31% 30% 31% + % 

a 17% 16% 17%-% 
42% 41% 4JV1 + % 
Z23 16% 16% I6%— % 

3 1H T8% IffU + 'A 

623 44% 43% 44% + % 

53 14% W 14% 


u 


IDO 2D 
2D0 73 

16 

4* 15J 18 
£04 9D 12 


591k 39% UAL 

36% a UAL Ot 

17% iMk UCCEL 
X 22% UDCn 
24% 18% UGl 
11% B% UNCRtrs 
>4 10% UR5 

39% 23% USFG 
44% 26% USGS 
77V* 48V, USGpf 
19% 12% Uni Fret 
77 48 Unifvr 

126 B4% UPINV 

4176 33% UCfflTtD 

64L. 32% UnCorb 3Dd 
6% 4% UnlonC 
»% 15% UnElec TD4 9J 
38 28% UnEI pf 4* 10D 

99% 45 UnEI Pf 6D0 11D 
34% 27% UnElpfNW* 1Z7 
n 55% UElDfL BD0 114 
a 21% UnEIPf 2J8 1L1 
76% 21% UnEIPf 2J3 103 
61 52% UnEI Pf 7D4 UJ 

77 55 UEIPfH 8* 11.9 

24 22 UnExpn Die ID 


1617 50% 49% 50 




DO 15 13 
Z20 SD 
ID U 7 
1* 2D 
JD U U 
2J2e 11 8 
V2B 2J 12 


_ . 14% 13% 14% + re 

2J4 a% 25% 26% + + 

115 21% 21V4 21% + Vk 

92 10% 10 10 

109 11% 11% 11% + % 

2537 39 * 39 + % 

774 42% 41% 42% +1 

3 75 75 75 +1% 

11 16% 16 16 — % 

64 69 67% 69 

77)62436 122% 124% +1% 


144 AS 16 3641 36% 35% 36V. + Vi 


SJ 


339S 60% 59V. S9%— % 
1W 6% 63fc 6% 

1169 are 19% a 
SXtt 37 36 37 +1% 

140z S6Uc 56 VS 56 V. 

58 31% 31% 31V*, 

1702 70 70 70 

14S 27 26% 36% — Vt 

8 26% 35% 26% 

4170* 67% 66% 66% + % 
10Qz 47% 57% 47% +1 
157 22% 22% 22% — Vk 


52 U 37% UnPoe 1* 34 12 4147 50% 49% *9% + % 


115V, 87T6 UnPCPf 7J5 65 

74 50 Unrript 8JK >>D 

5fti rw UnltOr 

23*. 10W UnBriid DSC J 13 
18% 9*k UBropf 
33% 18% UCbTVs .10 J 51 

AAV, 24% UnEnrg 2D8 54 

75 13U Ulllum 2DQ 8D 5 

30% 24 Ulllupf 197 135 

If 14Vk UilluPT 220 114 

24U UllluPt 4* J3D 

14% 11% Uinupf 1.70 13.1 

25 15% Unltlnd * 25 9 

43% 3Sfti Uniting J2 5 37 

37V. 20% UJerBs 1.16 12 11 

1846 11% JWMM 

3% 2 UPtcMn 1 

38% 27VS UsolrG 
8% 5 US Horn 
42% 31% U5LOOS 
40% 24% US Shoe 
a 23% ussteel 

56% 4936 USSttpt 541 el 05 

33 25 USStfpf 2J5 73 


.12 


53 lUMTOBMlKM +1 
2O40x 73 71 73 + % 

167 ] 28k 2ft— % 

81 23ft 23 23% 

2 17% 17% 17%— Vk 

281 32% 32 32% — % 

115 44% 44 44% + % 

337 25% 2436 25 + % 

31 30% 29% — 

20Qi lBft 18ft 

4 2W6 29% 

14 14ft 14% 

269 34% 22ft 

14 43% 43% 

207 36% 35% _ 

470 18% 18% II 

3 3% 3% 3% 

777 30% 30 “ 

842 6% 5% 6 

TO 34 35% 3S%— ft 



30 .— % 


JD 23 It ... _ 

.92 2J 15 1879 42ft 40% 42% +2% 
1J0 4D 26 3810 77 26ft 27 + ft 
464 55% 55 55% + ft 

_ 248 28ft ML. 28% 

39ft 29% USTOb US 54 10 492 30ft 30% 30ft— % 

84ft 65ft U5West 5J2 63 8 764 82% 82ft 82ft— % 


Dh>- Tld. PE 



u 12 a 8% 8% ■»— w 

Ji Ido 3D 1 1 s* 

wv. 31 % urrtTPf 2SS + * 

’l 3 ? IIs-ists 

20% 16% Unh^OT D ™ TS% 3V6 ^ + ft 

is 3 s .« M §3 ^3 





s jrBKicS'pfiS’i^ 


35% 31ft UtMCo pf 432 120 


10 28 — Siir 

Jfi a% 22ft 

46 SlUi 19ft 20%— ft 

41 23ft zm + ft 

19 lr% 21* 21% „ 

3 34™ 34% 34ft + ft 


58% 24ft VFCorP ID* 25 K 

S,rwif 1 


3% 216 vatavln _ 

- — VanOm IDO 4.1 / 


1 2i6 Varca 

42ft 22% VoriO" 

13% 9ft Vara 

12 3ft Vengp 
mb 9ft v «*0» 

0% lift veteran 
61% 29% ViMgm 
73Vk 59 VBEP Pf 7, 

Sft U VdEP pf &D4 W 

« n% yoiLpL IS ,M 


ijouioj 


ID 23 
3D 37 

23 « 


7 % io5 


19 

23 

1 

78 

37 


JS% 49ft 50ft + ft 

\T lift “ 

23ft w 

3 2ft 2ft— % 
24% 24ft 24% — % 
5ft 5ft 5% + % 
27 26ft 27 + % 

13ft lift lMfc + ft 
17ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
« Vft ,«k + V* 
11ft n* !15*> 


994 12ft lift 1» + ft 
975 54% 53ft 54 — 4* 
3320* 72 72 72 — % 

i ¥mm lllli 

Ssl.^5!““aTlPS 7,! 

Si 2B«SSS> w uS 


w 


31% » WICOR 2D2 S3 B 
38% 26 Waetwv 1D0 25 10 
14% WoddJf -60 2D 
Hfli. 4% walngc 
29 IBftWtMrtS 
30ft 20 Wa tarns * 

25ft 17ft WkHmaUB 
39% 294k WdJCSv JB 
39ft 29% waitim 1* - 
9% 7ft WoltJpf IDO 10.5 
52 39ft WaltJPt 1D0 
39% 17ft Women 08 
36% 19ft WrnCm 
44% 3i*k womri- 106 


18 


27% 27% 27ft + % 
35% 34ft 35% + ft 
24ft 23% 24 — % 

37 2228 28% 2«S aft + ft 

15 18 ’lSSft^Sft + % 

n'l bb& 8^ 


130z 9% 9ft 9% + 
il 4 51ft. 51% Sift + % 

23 M 171 3ff% 3BH 30% + 14 

§2 KUiai a I JSM8K IklBW 


a» S1 


JO 

2S 

S-i 

J4 


24% 17ft 
49 405k Waste 

ffi'ara mou 

i?wl M SSeOTPt lJ6k 
23ft 14% WebbO 
35ft 23 WeteMS 
62ft 44 WeltsF 
5! 42 WelFpf 

29% 23% WelFM 
iwe 12 Wendrs 
27V* 17 Westco M 
AS 35 WstPtP 2-20 
14% 10ft WStctTg 1D4 
9ft 3ft WnAirL 
3% ft WTAir wt 
26% 11 WAlrpf 2* 

8% 1% WCNA 

ST 16ft WCNA pf7J5 37 A 
133 Wft WRacI 
15% 5ft WUntan 
46% 24% WnUnpf 
50% 26 WoUpfC 
8% 2ft WnUptS 
14 4ft WnU PtE 
46ft * WUTI Pf 


f 49 49 49 +5% 

2D810D 8 160 23% 2316 2316 + % 
J4 ID 21 2637 68ft 67% 68V, + % 

■» 1 * - 1 - 1 ^ ^ 5 


11 4% 4ft 



2 

Nft 

10ft 

10ft 



ID 

TIB 

183k 

18% 

18% 

+ 

% 

20 

n 

35% 

35 - 

35% 

+ 

% 

7 

160 

59ft 

59% 

»% 




541 

50% 

50 

50ft 



10 

960 

23% 

20% 

23% 


% 

14 

1811 

16 

15ft 

16 

+ 

% 

» 

B7 

23% 

23% 

23% 

+ 

% 

13 

737 

41% 

41% 

41ft 

+ 

% 

29 

no 

12% 

12ft 

12% 



6 

1634 

s% 

7% 

8 




8J 


109 3ft 2% 2ft 
13 24% 24% 24% 4- ft 
417 2ft .2% 2%— % 
40 19% 19 19% + % 

3 129% 129 129%-+! 

2573 13% T2ft 13% + ft 

2 39 39 39 —ft 

8 42 41 42 +1 

99 7 7 7 

96 12ft 12ft 12ft— % 

4 38% 38 38% - 


PhfcYM-PE 


mti tahkPW- 


aon 

QuotQrt* 


17% 


41ft 

34 

44ft 

5Tft 

18% 

37% 

J2W 


jy» wuti ntA 
24 WffiE 
34% Woslvc 1* 
24ft Wevert UO 

3tf% WiWPf 2* 
45% Weyroc 4* 
6ft VfWftPtl 


' » ifiP 1SS IS ^ 

■2JT312W tfft 4^ 43ft + W 


1% 39% + ft 
— + % 


1SS&"? 


«m 40% wnirini 

wS SS wwte • 

34% 19ft WWtaW 
»% TBftWWtek 
12ft 6% We-btm 

Stt'lltoSB 


7ft 59k.w|bnri3 ..M JD u 


USJS38 fsy 

40QX 16 15ft 15ft „ 
Si 46ft «ft 46% — ft 
™ 31ft 3Z% + % 

204 23% 2J%.23% 

293 WW 17 ft 18 -TS 

a « IS” * 

35 12 Tift 11ft 

5 * 15 12 % 12 % 

1SB 30 - 29ft 29%— ft 

W 5 4 % 4 %_% 

141 6% » 6% + ft 

393 36 41 ? 36 * * 


MiWKiiJ 


45 TO 
* A6 ? 

» dJ 

47 22 



%£ .iS.fi wi m 

iu " 7ft S 7%+% 

.48% W6 2D8 w » 

03% 72% WtaEPf DM 90 - 20te 91 91 % 

40ft 2ff% W+CRL S» 7J 9 IE MX Mft + % 

39 % 29 % WtacPS 206 70 9 «, 3 » 2 *“ 

*W 30 % WI 1 C 0 100 30 IB 124 37 % Jo* tin +A 7 
,4 mu, WotvrW J 4 20 ’ 378 12 ft 11 ■ - 12 ft +n% 

2 - S3 'BiSiKiS** 


. ,; a ' 




91% 54% WrteJV 
4% 2ft Wurllzr 
16 . lOftWtoUi 
23ft 15W Wynns 




4646 Uft xerox 300 -53 19 2464 50% '52% 96% + % 

g“ SfcxSSpfSs « „ W* »k »% + % 

» 19ft XTRA 44 U U 80x23Vr 22% 


+ ft 


M 


30% 24% ZoleCF 
17% 7ft Zapata 
61ft 32% Zovros 
25 Hftzanmie 
21ft 15% Zeros 
41% 24% Zumln 


ta 40 is 
j* 10 a 

08 DM 
J2 

102 .30 14 


» 29% 28% 29 —ft 

38a 9 M «t0 

214 59% 59% 59% +'% 

731 17ft 17ft 17* + % 

17* 20Vk lM TWk— % 

486 38% 3714 38ft -H 3* 




. 5 f 

"r r- ^ 


NVSEi%hs4xws 


NEW HI OHS 107 


Aetna Lfe 
Am Baker. 
AmWatrpfC 
AVEMCO 

BrownGrp 

CNAIncShr 

cnramalpf 
Comdisco 
Cray Rich s 

ethyl* 

PtowGent 

GorbarPrad 

HanJnninv 

Johnoipf 
Lonestalnd 
Meted pfl 
Newell 
ObEd 864pf 
PanABnk 
PefrieStr 
P5NH 34SpfG. 
RoIttTS 
SterinsBncp 
Unit Ilium 
WhttuGoni . 


AJrProd 

AmSdcsf 

AisKiOay ■ 

BdfysPrkPt 

BrwnaPer 

Coco lad . 

Chrysler 

ConnNG 

CrwnZatcvp 

FerBCo 

FordAAot 

GokfWstRn 

HviniS 

'J233&. 

Lmptott . 

Lonestln 53 


NIMa _ _ . 
Ortmdnd 
PaPL 92401 

PhEtnfpf 

P5EGZ17pf 
5am Lee 
StoneWeb 
USSboe 
W oolwcirth 


AJUadSmln 

AmiwM 

AadnnGm 

SatfGEt - 

Burtnst tnd - 

axnMnhies 

ClnG 92801 - 

CnPw45taf 

Curr Incom 

FedExoress 

FbxPtwto 

Greyhound 

H er Buu Cm* 

JeffPnot 

JotmUF _ 

LfbertyCp 

Liicfcystr 

NBDBcPS . 

NwstSHW 

OxfonHad: 

. P«atco 
Pier line 
PSEG 78001 
Sara Wei Sd 
StarerBrds 
UtPLJRpr 

. Wootwtb pf 


. ABdSgnofA 
AnNuFfr 
Arm Win 1 
BemhCo -i 
. BurlNth 
CbosMntiflt 
-CocoCota , . 
CorroonB - 
Dorsey Co -. 
FWwrFds: 


X' . 


- -Xfr 


GffSUi__ 

- 




Po cWcH ek: 

^rryoruai 

Pru iu Moti 

Rayouern 

sawyptoh 

Unton Carp 

VFCorp 






MEW LOWS n 


fEvanP 


BankAmRty 

Le ar Petri 

vlStorapeTch WeUParMI. 


FePotaapf 

SoumrXadlP 

WWrtofcr 


MntForctti 


US. Futures 


No*. 14 


Season 

High 


Season 

Law 


Ooen Hiatt Low Close Ore. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBT1 

SOTO bu m tnfrmj m- donors per 0 ushet 
3+3% 2.79% Dec 337% 339ft 137 138ft —00% 

Mar 138% 339% 337ft 138 —.02 

/May 116% 3.18 116% 117% 

Jul 202 2.93 191 251ft —01 

Sep 194% 254% 252 252 — J0% 

Dec 304 

Prey. Sates 16000 • 


174% 

402 

172% 

3DS 

3.05% 


Esi. Sales 


2D7 

204 

163 

207 

254ft 


Prev. Dor Onen Ini. 30787 up 95 


CORN (CBT} 

5*0 bu mm! mu nv dollars per bushd 


195 
257 
191ft 
2J6 
270 
235% 
174% 
Est. Sales 


114% 

134% 

131 

233 

134ft 

230ft 

133 


Prev.DayOpen lnLUl3S3 up 984 


Dec 139ft 140% 138ft 140 +0Oft 

Mar 144% 205ft 143% 145 +0Oft 

MOV 208ft 208ft 2D7 147% 

Jul 141% 209ft 148 208ft 

Sea 134 134% 233% 234% +01% 

Dec 227% 128ft 226ft 227ft +0Oft 

Mar 235 135% 134ft 234ft -00ft 

Prev.5ctes BD00 


SOYBEANS (CBT1 
5000 bu mini mum- dollars per bushel 
497% Nov 5.17% 5.19 


6J9 
702 
7.79 
6l 5B 
6J4 
628 
632 
543 
Est. Sates 


5.10 

522% 

531ft 

536ft 

535% 

526% 

123 

536 


Prev.DayOpen Int. 77079 up 1549 


5.14 5.14ft —03% 

Jan 523ft 526ft 520ft 520% -04ft 
Mar 524 536 530% 530ft -04ft 

Mav 501% 502ft 538% 538% —03% 
Jul 5D5 506 502 502 —04ft 

Aug 503 504% 539 539 —05 

Sea 526% 527 523 523 —03% 

Nov 522ft 521 . 5.19% il9ft' —04 
Jan 534% 534% 533 533 —03 

Pnu.Soles 42541- 


50 Y BEAN MEAL (CBT) 

1 00 tons- dollars per Ion 

184* 125.40 Dec 14520 1 4620 142* 14220 —190 

Jon 14530 1460Q 142.00 14200 —220 

Mar 14600 14600 143* 143* —160 

May 746-50 747-50 144* 14400 —160 

Jut 148* 14820 145* 145* — i50 

Aug 148* 14850 145* 14500 —170 

Sep 14520 14550 143* 143* —250 

14120 14120 139* 139* —100 

14100 14100 .141* 141* — 150 

141* Ul* 141* 141* —1*. 


163* 
20650 
14190 
167* 
15170 
167* 
14950 
150* 
ISO* 
ESI. Sales 


127* 

130* 

73250 

134* 

13550 

13750 

140* 

14100 

14150 


Oct 

Dec 

Jan 


Prev.Sales 153* 


Prev. Day Open Int. 43070 off 1176 


SOYBEAN Of L (CBT} 


60*0 lbs- dollars per 100 lbs. 
29-55 1935 Dec »Jt 

2001 

2002 2X67 

+.10 

29J37 

192 

Jan 

2072 

ms 

2X56 2039 

+JD9 

2800 

1900 

Mor 

30.92 

2000 21* 

+.13 

2705 

Mfl? 


2133 

2135 

2U3 2137 

+.14 

P 

2040 

Jul 

2100 

2105 

21* 2104 

+04 

3U7 

Aug 

2130 

2104 

21* 2131 


2425 

20* 


2135 

2136 

2135 2133 

—SD 


2005 

Oct 

21* 

2105 

21* 21* 

tB 

2035 


2100 

2100 

2135 2102 

2100 

2035 




2102 

+.17 

Est. Sales 

Prey. Sales 15JH2 




Prev. Dav Open Int. 41060 aft 17 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMC!) „ 

40000 lbs.- cenfeperlb. 

67* 55* D»c 

4705 SLS Feb 

6707 55* Apr 

6625 JWl 

6540 SS* Aug 

&£ 59* 6005 60 

RsdSm? 


6550 

47* 

60* 

60J2 

5925 


65* 

5130 

s$ 

5925 


ff yi 
41* 

MIT? 

6055 

5905 

5720 

59* 


6547 

612? 

6037 

60* 

5905 

5720 

59* 


+02 

—33 


— DS 
+.10 


FEEDER CATTLB (CMS) 

HJOT lb*.- cento Per lb. 

73J0 51.70 Nov 6420 

79* 4050 Jan 67* 

7170 6062 Mar 

71* 40* Apr 6605 

70* 60-10 Mav 65* 

68* 4525 _ Aug 65* 


4420 

67* 

67.10 

6605 

65* 

4570 


Est. Safes 1J79 Prev . Safes 7095 
pSvTdw 0p« int, 9007 off 30 


6320 

66* 

6655 

6620 

6420 

65* 


64* 

6605 

6605 

6605 

6505 

6500 


—DO 

—52 

+20 

+D8 


-D5 


Season Season 
Htafl Low 


Open High Low Close are. 


Food 


167* 
167.18 
167.10 
167* 
167* 
1672S 
Est. Salas 


128* 

131* 

13550 

13225 


141* 


COFFEE C (NY CSCE) 

i5M I5U0 ^ 
Mar 159* 159* 157.10 159* 

MdY 16025 161.10 158* 161.10 
Jjl 161^ 16251 160* 1620] 
Sep 163DS 16305 16125 16306 
Dec 162* 161* 162* 163* 
Mor 1623S 16235 16X35 16405 

Prev.SofBS 3049 

Prev.DayOpen Int. 1ZD42 upZX 
SUGARWORLD lUNYCSCei 
n^^-c^per^ - 

7J5 3* Ntoy 6^ 638 6J? IS 

6J0 179 Jul 60O 602 6J8 430 

602 424 SeP 658 6* • £3- 809 

63t 402 Od 671 674 .Ut ..ADI 

7js 625 Jan - 671 - 

753 401 Mar 728 728 7.18 7.11 

Est Sotos Prev. Soles 11033 

Prev.DayOpen Int. 92046 off 649 
COCOA (NY CSCE) 
in metric tons- SPOT ton - 

2337 7945 Dec 2033 2039 2023 - M28 

2392 1955 Mar 2137 2)37 2123 2131 

2422 1960 May 2186 2190 2178 BB4 

242 9 I960 Jul 2223 2226 2215 : 2225 

2430 2023 Sep 2252 

2425 2055 Dec 2258 2168 2258 2269 

2385 . 2029 Atar 2283 

Est. Sates Prev.Sales 4361 
Prev.DayOpen Int. 20033 off 87 
ORANGE JUICE acres} 

15000 lbs.-centsp«r lb. _ 

161* 11230 Nov 113* 113* IT3* 113* 

Jan 11120 11335 11225 11230 

Mar 113* 1TO60 112* 11295 

May in* 113* in* ns* 

Jot 1)330 113* 11X15 11X40 

Sep 11230 11230 >1230-. HL90-- 

Nov • * 11200' 

Jan ■ . npD. 

Mar '• 112* 

Prev.Sales 6* 


+339 

+4* 

+4* 

+390 

+356 

+3* 

+395 


Hiatt 


■+fcr- 

r- 

, . ’ , r . 

L- 


Low 


Open Hiatt Low Oase. ore ' . 




—%05 


—03 
— 04 


— 04 
— lTI 


—06 


+7 

+7 

+7 

+11 


ISO* 

177* 

162* 

157* 

110* 

11425 


112* 

11175 

11195 

111 * 

111 * 

111 * 


— * 
—35 
—JO 
— .10 
+05 


16105 
Est Sail 


111 * 


—05 


Prev.DayOpen Int 6.1*4 


Me fats 


6330 

6305 

6300 

6190 

6400 


6205 

6200 

62* 

6X60 

6405 


6495 6495 


4355 


HOGS(CME) 

30000 ltd.- cents per lb. 

5085 3635 Dec 

5007 38. W Feb 

4735 36.12 Apr 

OXt5 3980 Jun 

4905 4005 JU1 

51.90 40JS Aug 

41.10 3807 OcF 

1832 


4530 

4432 

J90S 

4202 

4125 

42* 

39* 

4100 


4S.W 

£3 

Sio 0 

42J2 

39* 

410Q 


4527 

4420 

3975 

42* 

4287 

non 

39.10 

40* 


4575 • +08 


4032 

4155 

4X00 

4222 

39.10 

40.97 

4100 


+. . 
+J8 
+37 


+.15 

+07 


Prev. Day Open I id. : 


PORK BBLUSSICMEI 
38000 ibsr Cjntjper no. 

76J0 SS75 Feb 5805 

7500 SS* Mar CT05 

75* S7JB May 6005 

74* ■i ul S-S 

7X15 SS* _Auo_ S&* 


59* 

59* 

6095 

6105 

3870 


Est. Sales Prev.Sales 5844 
Prev. Dav Open lot 8099 off 100 


58* 

59.15 

60* 

60.95. 

58* 


5905 

5930 

60* 

6130 

5X55 


+* 

+23 

+05 

+33 

+03 


Currency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
opt toe A Strike 

LJn itarty tog price CelU-Lort 
Nov Dec Mar Nev Dec Me 
12080 Brittok Peaed+cents per entt 
B Pound 13S r r r 
140 . UO 200 r 

147 r 073 XW 

1* r r 105 

155 r ■ r 0J0 


Nov. 14 


Pats— L«t 


100 


100 

IBS 


5B0M GotreAM OffRononts per wdt. 

CDglh- 73 r r Oji 

74 r r OJ! 

75 s * Ml 


1* 


62*0 West OeiTMOh Mem-cant* pw oert 

DMortc 36 ■ r r r 

37 r • r r 

38 f 005 l* 

39 0D2 025 1JJ2 

40 r 008 007 


002 


0L» 

0J1 


fMmnuat; BMPonltilr; q-qearteriyj s+emL 
omreal 


Source: UPL 


t3S0n Fraacb Fraac+Mtbe at a cant per uett. 
FFranc 110 r • r r r 

4 05M 88 Saeee m e remwems of a centner unit. 
JYen * r 6.U 4.W r 

45 ■ r r 4J0 r 

46 r 320 3J0 r 

47 r 1H U! r 

41 1.10 102 186 0JJ1 

46 001 070 138 030 

SO S 001 004 6 


XU 

006 


020 

0* 


0088 Swtsi Freac+CMB mt wdL 
(Franc 40 • s r 709 s 

43 r 190 r r 

45 r 190 r r 

At . r r r r 

47 008 r t t 

Total caHveL .MB Cell open tat. 

Total put ML 1 2438 _ Put osen tot 

r »— wot traded a ha option ottereO. 

Last Is premium (purchase oricel. 

Source: ap. 


008 


888*7 

167071 


Hcmlb^fetoSribtiuc 


Readin^MoreThan a Third of a Million Rfiaders 
in 164 Countries Around theV\^d • 


COPPBR(COMEX) 

25000 1 to.- cents P«r lb. 

60* 6030 -Nov ■ 

8425 58* Dee 61* <225 61.18 

84J0 .5X75 Jon 

8000 8920 Mar SIS 

. 7AM 4000 May SUB 

74* 6005 Jul 6X55 

7020 6090 Sep 6390 

7030 6125 Dec 64* 

7828 . <330 Jan 

6790 62* Mar 6495 

<700 6290 May 

6620 4225 Jul 

66* 61* Sep . . 

Eat. Sales Prev.Sales 9J08 

Prev.DayOpen Int. 78,177 up373 
ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

40000 ibsr ceidsper to. 

_ Nov 

4100 Dec <255 4245 
4420 Jan 

•£290 (War 43* 4320 
4420 May ' 

44* Jul 4X10 4X10 
4690 Sep 
4895 Dec 
Jan 
Mar 
4900 May 
5000 Jul 

Est Soles Prev.Sales 251 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 1.722 up 7 
SILVER CCOMEX) 

5000 fray accents per trov ax. 

62X0 6Q2J Nov 

IBOD 5900 Dec 6190 6214 

1TL5D 5950 Jan 62X5 62X5 

17930 4070 Mor 432J 4345 

1M80 6190 MOV 6405 6415 

9450 6290 Jul 6490 6515 

9400 6210 Sea 6590 6593 

7790 6520 Dec <740 <745 

7890 6b60 Jan 

7700 6700 Mar <845 <845 

^ JSS 5 r 7005 7005 

E«. Sales Prev. Safes 21521 

Prev. Day Open Int. 87087 up 719 


<1.15 

6135 .-00 
6155 —.W 

6X30 —.10 

4740 —JO 
6295 — 2B 
6325 — * 

6X85 —35 
6405 .-35 
6405 —35 

6405 —.40 

6525 —05 

6505 —05 


TO* 

76* 

7X60 

6625 

63* 

5X10 

49.10 


4X15 

4X40 

42* 

4X55 


4X10 


5X35 

so* 


45* 

4X70 

4425 

47.10 

47* 

48* 

4920 

49* 


+.15 

+.18 

+.10 

+.10 

+.15 

+.15 

+.15 

+.15 

+.15 

+.15 

+.15 

+.1J 


<1X5 

<19J 

<2X5 

6360 


65X5 

6673 


68X0 

7003 


61X4 

<143 

6189 

S271 

6353 

6442 

65X3 

6672 

Sft 

69X2 

70X6 


—50 
-X0 
—5M 
— SJ 
—52 
—43 


—53 

—45 

—53 

—47 


PLATINUM (NYME) 

*lrov az.-doflarsoertrDyoe. 

35700 331* NOV TOP 

03 * 2S7* Jan. 337* 33990 33450 337.10 

3g* 264* Apr 339* 34X10 337* 3J90O 

30* 273* Jul 34X50 34X50 34X50 

J*U» 30X50 347* 3*737 34731 J47.W 

Jan 35X00 353* OS* hi i n 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales X 1 M 

Prev.DavOnen Int. 14062 UP422 


+120 

+120 

+120 

+120 

+120 


PAUADIUMCNYMSl 

lOOfrav ez- dpi to re Per az 


141-50 

127* 

11400 

\£& 


Est. Sales 


91* 

9120 

91* 

9720 

104* 


Prev.DayOpen lot. 7,109 


Dec 100* 101* 100* 10020 

Mar 10125 10X25 10125 101* 

Jim 10X50 10X75 KQ25 10130 

Sep WS2S 1M0O 10425 10505 

Doc 107* 107* 107* 10X80 

Prev.Sales 


+20 

+20 

+20 

+20 

+20 


£3 SS 

9X20 9238 
9192 9192 — D7 

E-& --** 

. 9128 — 0Z 
. • 9098 —SD, 


9X87 

nr 

91 JB 


CART. DEPOSIT (DUM) 

SI mUHon- pts oflOOPCt ■ - - - • 

92* *524 Dec 9X32 KJ 

9X22 . 8X56 Mar 9X22 771 

9X05 8603 Jin . 9195 913 

9104 87* Sep 1 

9009 880*. -Dec -'., 

9025 8828 Mar 

Esf. Safes • Previa let B2 

Prav.Oav Open ink .1046 off 34 
EURODOLLARS OAUio 
SI mnihpvptsofJOOPCL : 

9X17 84* Dec 9X03 

9203 8X78 -.-Mar - VM9 

9128 8X73 Jun 9109 

9107 87* • ~Skp ■ 9t27 . 

9U4 87* .Dec- 9105 . .. 

90JQ 870*. JMar 9X73 9023. 

9056 . 8884 --Jim ■ 9000 9000 
9029 8829 Sep 90.13 9X13 

Est. Sales ' • Prev,5o(M 3/20S 

Priv.Dcr Open ttw* upIbT 
BRmSIfPOUHfHUlMO - 
S per pound- 1 paintequotssa0Hl . 

10425 TJZ200 Dec 10225 102SS 102* 10345 +65 

L4310 10680 Mar 10J1O 10150 10095 1009 465 

1.4215 1.1905 Jim 10018 -10060 T0O1O 100*8 +70 

Est- Sales 40»Prev.5atas M25 

Prev.DayOpen Ink XUR9 m»X933 ' ■ v 

CANADIAN DOLLAR /IMMJ 
s per dir- 1 point equals SQJKDI' 

9566 2OT6 (taC-4J3<3 m Jfgrjg 


r f-s' 


i-+f 
. ‘‘+: 




9199 9201 —03 

FU7 91* —JJf 
.9101 9102 —07 

9129 91*. —07 
.9097. 9828.— 07 
9002 9006 -ID. 
9025 9036 —.07 

9005 9009. — * 




flCb- ‘ 

Vn'. 




' ' 

•3: " 


— - C K 


•J-r' - 

'.'■'IP •" 

' ^ 1 


2504 0981 Mar ; 2347 


2228 

2213 


+H 


.12525 

.124* 

.12375 


T- 


2869 *74 *60 *70 


2360 ’ -2070 
2M 2i7< Sop 

Est. Sates 553 Prev: Sales 1258 

Prev.DayOpen Int. 8018 up 933 

FRENCH FRANC flMMl' . 

S per franc- 1 paint eauais 5800001 
:i2i» 09670 Dec 

' .13440 “ '28985 Mar • 

.12450 .121* Jim .... 

Eat. Sates Prev.Stom ’ 

Prev. Day Open mf . J7D up 33 

GERMAN- MAJlll(rfllM> " 

I per mark- 1 BwwWMUMWI. 

2880 2971 Dec 3840 

3912 3040 • Mar . . . 

3935 3335 Jun - 3893 3901 

2975 3762 Sep ’ . . - - • - 

Est. Soles 18009 Prev.Sales 2X879 
Prev. Day Open Int. S+OM op <178 ■ . 

JAPANESE YEN flMMl ' 

Spar yen- 1 point equofs SO.MOOOI 

004924 003905. Dec 004716 004938 0ON87 004992 +40 

004934 004031 Mqr 004920 004999 004909004931 -MI 

■K939 004220 ' Jun 004907004938*4906004936 +34 

004920 *4690 Sep 004916 

004985 004158 Dec - 004990 

Est. Sates 2X568 Prev.SoleS 1X874 * 

Prev. Dav Onen Int 4Q013 up» • - 

SWISS FRANC (IMMJ • 

5 per tronc- ) polrd equ al s 5 0J001 ■ . . ._ 

0728 3531 Dec 0689 0710 0473 0686 +11. 

0771 3835 Mor 0731 0756 0717 0729 +11. 

0800 .0198 Jun 0773 0780 0770 0777 

0790 1 Sen ' • 081* 


• ' . off. 

.L4 


*.11 


,v. 

; 1 - - 


ir.:- ’ f • 


+8 

3 




■■■■ W 


.£■ t: . . . v- 

, - .• v 


a .« .-‘ijjtr f 


Ext Safes 162*8 Prev.SptfB^ligO 


Prey-.OavOpeo int. 28099 up 


-i a Cumiici 




3 


LUMBER (CME> . • 

130000 bd_ft.-Sperl0OObdlR. • ' 

18X10 13X50 Nov 145 JO 14800 145* M7J0 

JOn 148* I5L50 148* 148* 

Mar 15X50 15600 >5120 153* 

May 15X10 16856 15X90 15900 

Jut 142* 1OL70 142* 16X70 

Sen MS* MX20 1<S*.K6* 

Nov 16520 16620 16570 16X00 

Prev.Sale* L223 


'taw 


187* 

1*5* 

17X40 


13300 
>3*20 
145* 

14138 
176* 15X90 

1BM0 156* 

EsL Sates 
Prev. Day Open Int. X90B off 106 
O3TT0N 2 . 

58*0 ttre-ceats per lb. 

73-00 5731 . Dec 

7£S 9177 Mar 

70* 5X90 May 

7005 a* . Jut . 

65* 5200 Oct 

89-25 5085 Dec 

6X75 . 5230 Mar 

May 

E*t- Sales _ . Prev.Sales .2281 


+MJL- 


Prev. Day Open Int. 


UP0V 

HEATING OIL (NYME) > . 

4X00Qoa+ cents per aal . 

8820 49.15 Dec 88* 

8803 »* Jan 8835 88 * 

8625 7060 Feb 87* mo 

SLAB 6X80 Mar' 8X75 8336 

7020 4MB . Apr 782J 29.10 

75* 68 * May 7535 75* 

7435 7L80 Jun 7335 7305 

7X10 TIJV Jul 7X35 7335 

7235 7100 Aug 7425 . 7425 


489* 301* 


GOLO(COME2U 
' <a -l?? t - i 9 r5 PW tt®!! 97- 

326* 320* Nov 325* 32180 32110 324* 

Dec 32X50 32730 Tt v n are* 

Jon 3Z7* 

Feb m * »10O 329* 329* 
Apr 33400 334* 333* 33320 
JW ™.T0 339* 337* 33720 
Aug 34X50 34X50 34X50 341* 
Oct 346* 34650 34630 
Dec 35130 35X00 35050 351.18 
FBI? 357* 357* »* 355* 
Apr 340* 

Jun 34830 1 

Aug 37X70 37X70 37150 371* 


—1 00 


48550 

sd 

42800 

2P° 

27X00 
35850 
38800 
»<sa 

385* ■ 

EskSalee^^Vi 
Prev. Oav Onen Int.i: 


304* 
31420 
370 50 
331* 
335* 
342* 
31330 
355* 
365* 
372* 


— JB 


w* 


UP 1.196 


Financial 


US T, BILLS (IMMJ 
HMTMIan-^rt’OO 

9302 14* 

p- SS 

p? 

2* 9850 

9107 9X83 

Est. Solas 




Jun 

S*p 


9187 

9X68 


9251 

9X89 


RZ07 

«* 

9104 

91.15 


& 

tl, 

91.13 


Prey. Sales 9*4 


9X85 

92* 

9200 

9101 

9UJ 


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9285 
9X81 

%2r. 

9139 
9109 
9101 —07 

9L1F" -07 


—07 


Prev.DayOpen Int. 43,132 up 1,002 

»T R. TREASURY (CBY) 

80.7 sen 8X1 8X11 

■W Dec _ 55-n 85-19 

Prtv.Satae 


Pt-17 

ns 

s? 

Bst. Sales 

Prev.DayOpen lirt. 7X157 
US TREASURY BONDS ( 


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87-24 S8-T- 1 
86-29 87J 

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78-19 
77-11 
7X23 
7506 
75-2 
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73-20 
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66-25 Jun 

Est Salea _ Prev.Sotes290*Q 
Prev. Day Open ln«3OS041^^ 
MUNlQPAL BONDS (CBT) 


57-7 

56*29 

54-29 

54-25 

56-27 

0-12 

4X4 

62-34 

17 

66-25 


Mor 

Jun 

» 

Dec 


78-3 

77-21 

7X26 

?4-10 

ST 


79 

77-31 

7X31 

7X1 

7J-7 

7X15 

^■26 

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79-70 

77-80 

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7X9 

73-78 

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{=®L Sotos , Prev.Sales M^» — 
Prev.DayOpen int 340X7 up 1341 

I*Ot^daUartpertAf. 

ST* 23* Dec 
30* - 2438 Jan 

2904 2435 - % 

2905 ' 24.13 Mar 

2905 2393 Apr 

27* 2306 May 

27.12 2X7* Jun 

2605 3405 Jut 

2 140 U 30 Aug 
27* .. 34* Sep ■ 

2624 25.15 Oct 2630 

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SS }%£ S 285 

Saw p ? 0 2DB -9B 3*50 20050 rasre 4-1*1 

20X75 187* S|p ZJl* 201 JO 20130 20430 +175. 


Bt 4otOfr 84781 Frew. Sales 57051 
Prev.DayOpen Int 7X408 uexus 
Y A LU8 LINE (KCBT) 


Dec 208.10 20715 

isi. m5t S S-S 


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VM 


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Reuters 


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Index'. 

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ils SJ £ tf* hWaflom M2 intmtf rain . p.u 
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£ /> 5 faoDAY, NOVEMBER IS, 1985 


Hcralb^.£ribunc, 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


Jyd-j /Cu> 1 U}£ J 

1 ^TjSstocks 

Report, M-l, Page 8 

Page 13 


,*t *• 

'••' '-"l 




technology 


.-*• X 


>■ ByJOHNHOLCSHA 

A.-'s^_ . New York Tana Service 

"T - EW YORK.— Computers are veay good at processing 
'% 5f F^l “formation once it has been. entered into their memo- 
t $^l ._| ^1 ■ nea. The jproblem is getting it there. This is a particular 
•$£■._ problem in industrial applications, where timely re- 

^i'lPortmg on inventory levels and quality control is often slowed by 
[delays in entering data. 

c a typical inspection situation, you have a person with a 

£ £ clipboard making notes on defects and problems as production, 
j ?iomes off the line,” said Daniel F. Fink, an executive with the 
j ^Intel Coip/s Integrated Systems Operation. “Then it goes to 


I 3 


* J. 


i * •: i keypunch at ni gh t a nd the re- 1 ~ 

. . i^ponabfe executive gets a xe- mi 

>" t ■. ; 3 ort in the morning. Mean- iDfirC Sfe tWO 

i b-^lyhile, a whole- day’s •■ - _ • 

1 •. ii vbroduction has gone out' with "WHCOCntTy Systems 

T wbereb y p** 16 more are to follow. 

r^-^xaac cnrectly to a computer — ' 

' li ^ \ pave been viewed for at least a 

* j - 1 decade as a potentially attractive means of getting information 

• v ^ '■ nt0 a computer system quickly. Then it would be available for 
> •; =i I mm ediate analysis and could t>e used to fine-tune production. In 

; “ ' \ 3 Addition, a worker wearing a microphone apac-hcd to * he adset 
S 1 ;ias eyes and hands free and can. concentrate on reporting events 
r V^ithout having to look away to write or use a keyboard. 

■■ ^ That vision seems much closer to reality today, with two-new 
" t! « ^bice-control systems introduced recently and with mare report- 
; S^ixily to follow soon. 

i t; In spite of its potential advantages, voice entry has been slow 
r £ j-‘:o come to the factory Boor. Maty attempts at practical apphea- 

- * t.pons required usees to develop expensive custom softwear for 
^ i.'iach application: With some it was difficult to sort out- spoken 

c 5 gjornmands from the noisy background of many shops. Others 
i h'Ncrc so complicated that workers balked atusing them. 

; ’ t t ■ • . • 

• p. <~IVT OW several companies, including Westinghouse and Ln- 

- •* a- j \ have developed voice-entry systems that they say have 

" l solved these problems and are ready far industrial use. 

£ i.'ioth demonstrated their products this month at the Autofact 85 
i & factory automation conference in Detroit. Each' system is in 
“ -’imbed commercial application now, including one used for 
; c Quality control in an auto factory. 

' ^ i Speech-recognition systems operate by attempting to match 
1 | «;he frequency partem of each incoming word with ones already 
^ u Stored in the memory. The difficulty is that the computer memory 
■*-. = !‘eqniredmcreaseswith the size of the vocabulary. And people say 
- 4 , he same words in such dkrimilnr ways that no- pattern ^can be 
: g j!ised for a given word. 

'! T £‘ J Both the Westinghouse and Intel systems overcome these 

- ,* i 'iifficulties by having earii use - “train” the machme to recognize a 
J limited number of words in the user’s speech pattern. Each 

. ‘1 > Person speaks the words he or she will.be using several times to 

• Establish an individual ‘ “voice template.” 

• z ?';i With the Intd system, users have a bubble memory cartridge 

• if’jontainmg their template that is inserted at the vrark station 
: 4 1 iefore operations begin. Westinghousestores all the templates on 

z >’ central hard disk, and users identify themselves by entering a 
■; i'.umeric code on, a keyboard. 

The number of words the fysteans ^fH recognize is li mited '^. 
^‘;60 for Westinghouse, 200. rar Intel — but since each word 
represents a code, a substantial amount of inf tarnation can be. 
Centered using a small vocabulary. 

7 ^ * ' Both com paniefi have gone to some length to make their 
... systems user-friendly, so they win be accqited by workers. By 
u s-.imply saying “relax,” workers can make the fystems pause, so 
. j : ; hey can talk to a fellow worker without putting in false data. 

■ l '. (Continued chl Page t7, CoL 4) 


LONDON — Paul Keating returned to his hotel 
after an afternoon's browting recently in three or 
four of the better known antique shops in Lon- 
don’s West End. As well as being Australia’s trea- 
surer — and the second most powerful politician 
after the prime minister; Bob Hawke — he is a 
collector. But this time he had no treasures to take 
back home. 

“A lot of it is junk," he said, “and some of the 
people in those places are so condescending, yet 
they are probably on only about £60 [about S85] a 
week.” 

Mr. Keating, 41. feds the same way about many 
of Europe's economic policies, particularly in 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s Britain. He 
puts h simply. ‘They’re stuffed,” he said. 

Australia's treasurer believes that he has good 
reason to be confident that his government’s poli- 
cies, rather than Mrs. Thatcher's basically mone- 
tarist ones, are the right ones, at least for Australia. 
When Mr. Hawke’s Labor Party government won 
office in March 1983, the economy was contract- 
ing; inflation and unemployment were both in 
double digits, and the country was bogged down 
with labor unrest g-nH a highly protected financial 
and manufacturing sector. 

Within 12 months, thanks partly to the end of a 
crippling drought ami, perhaps, a modest world 
economic recovery, growth had sped up, and, as a 
result of a wage-restraint accord with organized 
labor, both inflation awt unemployment shrank- 
The Australian government’s policy is usually 
called an incomes policy, abroad phrase covering 
the various dwiart forms of inflation unem- 
ployment control by government, including freezes 
or less severe curbs on increases in prices, wages, 
rents and dividends. This is dramatically different 
from the monetarism of Mrs. Thatcher, which 
advocates strict control of the money supply as its 
major economic weapon. 



U.K. B ank Offers 
Loan to FTC of 
$783 Million 


U.S. Sales KeatmgSeesHawhePknWorldttg U.K. Bai 

f Cli uiD /€ Australian Treasurer Ties 
In October to Incomes Policy 

By Colin Chapman 

_ " ‘ ’ International Herald Tribune 

Record Decline LONDON — Paul Keating rammed to his hotel 

after an afternoon’s browsing recently in three or 
A nfne four of the better known antique shops in Lon- 

XUMSU, UJ JM.U W8 don’s West End. As wdl as being Australia’s trea- 

The Associated Press surer — and the second most powerful pditidan 

SaF™ 6 -^^ 

S TwL * 6 goveraxilcnI report ‘ “A lot of Ufa junk," he said, “and some of the 

tww L . people in those places are so condescending, yet 
reS thc^jjre probably on only about £60 [alwut S85] a 

Mto fdl $3.9 Mr. Keating, 41, feds the same way about many _ , __ . . nc emergency session m London, 

$n 5 ? bfllioT M of . E nrope's economic pdkaes, paiticulariy in Treasurer Paid Keating of Australia. was S^Sed by a letter from 

The drop maum sales followed a Mimstcr Margaret Thaldier’s Bntam. He ihe bank’s senior vice chairman, 

buying spree in. August and Sep- ^AiM^^tr^^ra'bdie^’that he has aood This year, Australian officials think that the new Gr ^™- M*- Gl ? 1 ?^ ra rr p 

tember. when TJJS. automakers of- reason to he confident that his oovernment’s nrili- policies really began to pay off. Economic growth, chair ma n erf the group of 1 6 ITC 

fered cut-rate financing. Auto sales rather than ThstrJvJs”hadr^v i excluding agricultnre, in the fiscal year to June 30 creators, which had made an earli- 

fdl a record 14.6 Sroent last was 5 pJSToonsideniblv faster tiian the previ- er offer of a financmg package that 

mouth after increases of 6.1 per- 0115 ^ 34 P »»«■ And Mr. Keating projected evolve a large loan faality 

cent in August and 8 percent in office w nrr i. jom nonagncultural growth at 55 percent for the cur- m winch more banks would partici- 

SeptembeT renT&cal year. As recently as & 1983, the gross P^- . , 

Without the decline in demand amble dieits. and the^nntrv^; hooved down domestic product, which measures the total value In the accompanying letter, Mr. 

for autos, retail satewadd have SfalSfiSr^a^a h^proteS&tmS of a nation’s goods and seryioes, excluding income 2 ?^ iSf i? uSSdSS 1 ™ 

nsea 05 percent m October. a-j rrMnmfjM-tnrincr p from foreign urrestments. fell 1 1 percenL cheaper and its procedures were 

^Coxnmera D^art^t also wS^^StSks partly to the end of a The current jobless rate is 79 percent; whai the madC €atim 

revised downward Sqitember’s m- crirmKnff w«rM P 21 ^ came to office n was 115 percent Mean- by the group 16 - 

crease in retail sale^ro 2.1 percent S a while, inflation has fallen to 7.6 percent from 12 Standard Changed is prepared 

from 2.7 percent, percent to put up ihe whole facility, selling 

Economists _tove been warning bLth Corporate profits as a sh^e of national income Ucl^iT—ThVn ^he^Sl 

thatconsumer buymg may be slow- ^ A n^H 3 n govanm^TpotiCTfa usually are now at an .histoncany high 15 paxwit and esta iSS he saii 

mg because of wrak growth m per- railed unemployment is falling, despite a rapid growth m amount is established, he said. 

sonal income and a record level of the Pilous directfi’ uS? J* force ' ( J owin S ^ government reclaim 

C °ne^cmuge of disposable in- 

^ mmSSSLoSSSSBUS If f «= fruits of an incomes policy S5T. LBrf illTrSB 

^JESi £rom ^ monctarism of Mrs. Thatcher, which d}^ » were other changes introduced by hto. OTer years ^ aSual 

MS’fSTen^i^M ^ vomits and recured by stale gim 1 - 

1.9 percent as consumers dipped dmccs. 

into savings to finance auto par- 
chases in August and September. 

Beatrice Accepts $ 5 . 45 -Billion Kohlberg Buyout 

commg months would not match X O J 

gains in the first half of 1985. Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches Beatrice said the buyout should of Beatrice’s existing management $5 to buy the giant food and con- 

Stxong gains in h ousehold CHICAGO — Beatrice Cos. said be completed by next March. But speculation has been wide- sumer products firm, 

spendmgsmee the beginning of the Thursday that it agreed to be ao- The company also said that it spread recently that Donald P. Kd- Two weeks after the Beatrice 

year cut the saving rare to histon- quired KoMberg, Kravis, Rob- granted options, exercisable under fy. the former chairman of Esmark, board rqected the offer, Kohlberg, 

caJJy low levels while debt relative eats & Go. through a leveraged certain cncunutances, to Kohl- a corporation that Beatrice ac- Kravis increased its offer to $40 in 

to income has nsen to new peaks, buyout at $50 a share, or 55.45 berg, Kravis to buy either Be- quired last year, would be named cash and securities with a market 

he said. As a result, we should see bmioii. atrice’s grocery group and Tropi- chairman and would bring along value of 57. 

temporarily slower growth in The pant food and consumer- rana units for S2J9 billion, or the some of his associates. At that time, Beatrice agreed to 

household spending. products concern accepted the pro- Tropicana, meat, soft drink and Kohlberg, Kravis has confirmed discuss the offer, but told its in vest- 

The big surge m auto sales was posal after Kohlbent. Kravis, a on- honied water businesses for S2.41 that Mr. Kelly is involved in the ment advisers to entertain other 


Yha Now York Tima 

Treasurer Paid Keating of Australia. 

Ibis year, Australian officials think that the new 
policies really began to pay off. Economic growth, 
excluding agriculture, in the fiscal year to June 30 
was 5 percent, considerably faster than the previ- 
ous year’s 3.4 percent. And' Mr. Keating projected 
nonagricnltural growth ai 55 percent tor the cur- 
rent fiscal year. As recently as fiscal 1983, the gross 
domestic product, which measures the total value 
of a nation’s goods and services, excluding income 
from foreign investments, fell 1 1 percent 

The current jobless rate is 7.9 percent; when the 
party came to office it was 115 percent Mean- 
while, inflation has fallen to 7.6 percent from 12 
percent 

Coiporare profits as a share of national income 
are now at an historically high 15 percent and 
unemployment fa faUmg, despite a rapid growth m 
the work force, allowing the government to claim 
that it has created proportionately more jobs than 
any other country in the Western World. 

If these fruits of an incomes policy were unpre- 
dicted, so were other changes introduced by Mr. 
Keating, especially major deregulation of the fi- 
(Contmned on Page 15, CoL 1) 


Reuters 

LONDON — Standard Char- 
tered Bank PLC, in a revised pro- 
posal to the International Tin 
Council, offered on Thursday a di- 
rect loan of up to £552 million 
(S783 million) to enable the council 
to meet existing tin-purchase obli- 
gations until Jan. 23, an official 
document shows. 

The document, circulated at an 
ITC emergency session in London, 
was accompanied by a letter from 
the bank's senior vice chairman, 
Peter Graham. Mr. Graham is 
chairman of ihe group of 16 ITC 
creditors, which had made an earli- 
er offer of a financing package that 
would involve a large loan facility 
in which more banks would partici- 
pate. 

In the accompanying letter, Mr. 


Earlier Thursday, the chairman 
of the London Metals Exchange 
said the LME would allow the ITC 
to trade only in cash after die sus- 
pended trade in tin resumes. Jac- 
ques Lion, the chairman, said the 
restriction would be accompanied 
by a cut in production and a reduc- 
tion of existing tin stockpiles. 

Mr. Lion made his remarks as 
the ITC began consideration of the 
earlier refinancing package of £900 
million from the group of 1 6 credi- 
tors. 

The LME suspended tin trading 
on OcL 24 after the ITC, a group of 
22 tin producing and consuming 
countries, said it had run oui of 
funds. A planned resumption of 
trading next Monday was post- 
poned Wednesday for at least an- 
other week, apparently because 


Graham said the new offer was creditors feared that the lack of an 


cheaper and its procedures were 
simpler than the offer made earlier 
by the group of 16. 

Standard Chartered is prepared 
to put up the whole facility, selling 
it down — offering it to other par- 
ticipants — when the actual 
amount is established, he said. 


overall solution to the tin crisis 
would send prices plunging. 

No date has yet been sei for the 
resumption of tin trading. 

The creditor banks, which are 
owed £352 million, made their fi- 
nancing package conditional on 
guarantees from the central banks 


The document shows that after of the ITCs member nations. 


Jan. 23 the loan would be available 
to Lhe ITC for working capital pur- 
poses. It would be diawn down 
over a period of one year, repaid 
over three years in equal annual 


The stumbling block so far has 
been unwillingness by the ITC 
member governments to under- 
write the ITCs obligations to credi- 
tors and traders, estimated at al- 


amo unis and secured by stale guar- most £1 billion. 


Beatrice Accepts $ 5 . 45 -Billion Kohlberg Buyout 

Compiled by Our Stiff From Dispatches Beatrice said the buyout should of Beatrice’s existing management $5 to buy the giant food and con- 


year cut the saving rare to histori- 
cally low levels while debt relative 
to income has risen to new peaks,” 
he said. “As a result we should see 
temporarily slower growth in 
household spending.” 

The big surge in auto sales was 
one of the main factors boosting 
overall economic growth to a 33- 
percent annual rate in the Jtdy- 
September quarter. 

While the Reagan admmistra- 
tiem is predicting that economic 
growth, tins quarter will be higher 
man that of the third quarter, many 
analysts are forecasting a decline 
because auto sales are expected to 
be much weaker. Car sales during 


ion has been wide- sumer products firm. 


erts & Co. through a leveraged certain circumstances, to Kohl- 
buyout at 550 a share, or S5.4S berg, Kravis to buy either Be- 
bmion. atrice’s grocery group and Tropi- 

The pant food and consumer- «ina units for 5239 billion, or the 
products concern accepted the pro- Tropicana, meat, soft drink and 
posal after Kohlberg, Kravis, a pri- bottled water businesses for S2.41 
vately held investment banking billion. 
firm in New York, raised its bid Such options are known as 
from $47 a share. “Wlr-wn” mtiravs sine* ibmr at* 


that Mr. Kelly is involved in the ment advisers to entertain other 
buyout. offers. 

The agreement resulted from a The offer accepted by Beatrice 


“lock-up” options since they are marathon directors' meeting that topped a reported last-minute bid 


the first 10 days of November, far UA corporate history, would 
example, were down 12.4 percent oaike Beatrice a private company. 


• Beatrice said it will recommend designed to discourage rival offers began Wednesday afternoon, 
that its stockholders tender their and therefore “lock up” an existing In mid-October, Kohlberg, Kra 

shares to Kohlbog, Kravis, which meager proposal vis offered 540 in cash and pre 

Is offering 543 in cash and 57 in There was no mention of the fate ferried stock with a market value oi 

preferred stock for each of the com — — 

pany*s 109 million common shares. . — — ..., ... . 

The leveraged buyout, the largest 


began Wednesday afternoon. from a group led by Dart Group 
In mid-October, KoMberg, Kra- Carp- a retailer based in Landover, 
vis offered $40 in cash and pre- Maryland, and RF. Hutton & Co. 


was no mention of lhe fate ferried stock with a market value of 


(AP. UPI) 


At a news conference Thursday. 
Mr. Lion said the LME was confi- 
dent of an early settlement after 
receiving pledges of support from 
central banks. 

“There is every prospect of a 
satisfactory solution in the not too 
distant future ” he said. 

Industry sources said the ITCs 
meeting, expected to last for two 
days, was unlikely to come up with 
a quick solution. 

Both producers and buyers bad 
so far refused to give the creditors a 
collective financial commitment to 
get the industry back on its feet. 
Except for Thailand, none of Lhe 
main ITC producing countries was 
prepared to give such guarantees. 
Britain, one of the major buyers, 
had no success in persuading fellow 
members of the European Commu- 
nity to honor their share of existing 
debts, the delegates said. 


GutrexMy Rales 


1 -• • 

^v«m KKato* 


from a year earlier. In a leveraged buyout the purchase : 

The October decline in retail k with mostly borrowed 

sales was a ram-month record, sat- frtods that are repaid with proceeds j 
ssing the previous record of a fro™ large* company’s qpera- 
-percent drop in March 1975, dons or the sale of its assets. 

□ng the trough of a recession. Beatrice’s products include Airis 
Sales of durable goods, items ex- car rental, Hunt-Wesson Foods, 
:ted to last three or more years, Swift meals, Tropicana fruit juices, 
re off 8 percent, reflecting anto Samsonite luggage. La Choy Chi - 1 
es. Sales of nondurable goods nese foods, Playtex women’s wear , 
re off 03 percent and Max Factor cosmetics. 




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during die trough of a recession. 

Sales of durable goods, items ex- 
pected to last three or more years, 
were off 8 percent, reflecting anto 
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were off 03 percent 


Sweden Cuts Bank Rate, 
Showing Faith in Krona 




I* * 


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: \pttr.KiA 1M0 HOMIOMI 7J0TS PttLpaaa T7J5 SmatLkrmm 7JS 

rato.flft.tr. an umioanionn 1J-T35V rortuaMo IMSO Tatums 3WS 

VgczIIotb. S79&M ■ Unto. rvpfcA 1.13X00 SomB rtyoi U5U . .TMMrt 26JK 

i .pnamaat U77I Irish t MM2 BUS nil TnrUABra SSldS 

*■ : mmw ytaqi iwk Sirat8st»fc. 1477.00 S. Aft-, road J.T12S UAH tSkHam uns 

krooa M4J Kmraltf dtaor IL2921 S.KW.OM Wtt30 VM«x.baflv. l£30 

I : a 'BTPt natmd 1.25 jWttv.riM. 2AUS 

^Stortfaa: 1 JOi irieb £ 

u Taxes : Banaua du Barrn/u* (BmssmHI; Banco Cammorckde ttatiana (MHonJ; Banmm Na- 
yn ate do Ports {Paris); nook of Tokyo {Tokyo); IMF t SDH t; BA If (dinar, rtyaLdhtiaitO: 
r ’ ptiJCtr* (ruble). Other data from Router* orttfAP. 


Reuters tutting 1985 highs co four of the 

STOCKHOLM — Sweden on last six trading days. 

Thursday lowered the cost of bank A central bank statement said 
borrowing, signaling that its cur- that the move was made posable 






sn |r 




rency was now strong enough to by a significant net currency inflow 
withstand a reduction in the gap into Sweden. The flow of private 


between domestic and foreign in- 
terest rates. 


funds in and out of Sweden is the 
main indicator the bank watches to 






The Bank of Sweden cut its pen- act in defense of the currency, 
ally rate, which sets the cost of Rumors of an imminen t devalua- , 

marginal funds for the banking sys- tion sent $230 million flowing out 
tem, to 13 percent from 14 percent, of Sweden on Oct. 17, highlightin g 


The man with exceptional goals 
needs an exceptional bank. 


The rate, which governs the domes- the krona's potential vulnerability 
tic money market, last was lowered, and the need for high domestic in- 


by 1 percent, on OcL 24. 


terest rates to keep investment in 


The new cut had been widely Sweden attractive: 


H s 


briefest Rales 


anticipated by the mariais. Share Thursday’s decision follows 
prices have been nsmg sharply on strong critwaom from industry and 
Lhe long-dormant Bourse, wrth the trade unions of high Swedish inter- 
Veckans Affarer all-share index cst levds, which still are 5 percent 

above equivalent rates on Eurodol- 
; lar deposits. 

Sweden’s powerful LO trade 

Spot Oil Prices 
Rise on News of ^ 

vt q n i a would lower inflation and make it 

UoiJa neauenons easier to negotiate moderate wage 

_ rises next year. 

Ktmen All parties involved say that the 

AMSTERDAM - North forthcJ^jtxmd rf^enegoS 
Sea spot oil prices rose Thurs- ations holds the key to inflation 
day by as much as 80 cents and the closely related issue of 
following the American Petro- whetba Swedish exports can re- 
leum Institute Weekly’s report main competitive, 

showing heavy, unexpected re- Meanwfcfle, the Central Bureau 
duttions in Uncommercial in- of Statistics reported that the rise in 

ventories in most categories of the cost of living in the past 10 

cal products, traders said. months was 45 percent, the slowest 

Offers of spot Brent crude for since 1972. But the report said that 
December loading rose to costs still had risen twice as fast as 
53035 a barrel after rumors dr- the average among Sweden’s main 
dilated of an transaction at trading partners. 

53036. The buy-sell range at The government fa hoping for 
Wednesday night's dose in Eu- inflation to be hdd at 5 percent this 
n»e was 529.50 to 52955 a bar- year, having earlier abandoned its 
ret Brent erode is the most original target of 3 percent. In 
widely traded North Sea vari- 1 ( - 4, Swedish consumer prices rose 

: efy._ & 2 percent 

Traders said the increases In a s eparate report, the statistics 
lyffegjufn ariHwi mn mm him « bureau said industrial production 
traders who had been wary of in September was down a seasonal- 
recent strong gams derided to ty 8 djusisd 23 percent from Au- 
oater the market as buyers. gust’s level, but op 13 percent from 

The API report showed a September 1984. 
one-million-barrel fall in distil- . The agency said the dedae m 
late stocks , in the latest week mdnstnal production from August 
and a 13 -milBoo-barrd decline resulted from lower output in the 
in erode stocks, base metal c h e m ic als and engi- 

nearing industries. 


Dollar 

> moato 7Wr«M. 
moothx 7 IvS 5V 
month* 7<(v4H. 
■ matin IW* 


Pwieri f Km. 14 

Swiss - Fma 

O-Mark Franc Storllno Franc ECU SDR 

3 A -3 h lltt-ITYfa I OWV H. IWM 7 V, 

4M-CM *-* Hi mb-llto WVW tww 7A 

4MA ms-nvi narni iuu«m 7<u. 

IMK CASH, 11 Ml A, TDto-10 ¥. IMA 


' vaar IW4U> (M 11*b-ITtk 10VMOH MW 7a, 

! '\aurensi Maroon Guaranty (dollar. DM, SF. Pound, Wt Lloyds Bank (ECU); Beaten 
“ SOW. Ratos mtileable to tatertwnk deposits of *T motion mthknom {or eaohntienfi. 


yo.Y ■ 


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775 

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744 

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740 

740 


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vu 

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— 

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Casaaths «-PV 

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Source: fteutsn. 


PAMiwfy Market Faads 

N*L14 

Morrflt LvkH Roodv Aetata 
MdavmrtntvIaM: ' 7SS 

Tatarntn I i Wiii I Rata IMtr 7Jas 

Sauna: Merritt Lynn, Teterata. 


Gold 


V«wnOB.' meuters. Cotammrxoone. Credit 
•T ’ .manats. Book of Tokyo. ■ 


Km J4, 

AJVL PJA. cat* 

HunKOM 375.14 22535 . +02D 

Laxamboum mas — 40.75 

Porta mskfla) 32122 32537 +131 

arm au sates- + loo 

Lti*U7 3ULN MH +0JO 

. HawYsric — jmjso —a* 

Luxembourg. Paris and Loodon offldof dx- 
hosi Hone Kang and Zotkit opening odd 
cAtj/w priest,- no*r York Comas current 
BnfrretA/lwicwhmil ifwnitin 
Source: Bevtars. 


Spot Oil Prices 
Rise on News of 
U.Se Reductions 

Reuters 

AMSTERDAM — North 
Sea spot oQ prices rose Thurs- 
day by as much as 80 cents 
following the American Petro- 
leum Institute Weekly’s report 
showing heavy, unexpected re- 
ductions in U 3. commercial in- 
ventories in most categories of 
oil products, traders said. 

Offers of spot Brent erode for 
December loading rose to 
53035 a barrel after rumors cir- 
culated of an transaction at 

53036. The buy-sefl range at 
Wednesday night's dose in Eu- 
rope was 529.50 to 52955 a bar- 
ret Brent erode is the most 
widely traded North Sea vari- 

:efy- T 

Traders said the increases 
were given added momentum as 
traders who had been wary of 
recent strong gains derided to 
enter the market as buyers. 

The API report showed _ a 
one-million-baire) fall in distil- 
late stocks , in the latest week 

and a 13-milBoo-barrd decline 
m erode stocks. 


What makes TDB exceptional? 

Our service in Switzerland, for example. 


As the 6th largest commercial 
ii bank in Switzerland, TDB can 
give you a complete range of 
sophisticated banking services. We 
also give you the personal atten- 
tion that can be so important to 
your business. 

At TDB we serve our custom- 
ers exceptionally well - and we 
do that in a number of ways. To 
begin with, we concentrate on the 
things we do best, such as trade 
financing, foreign exchange, pri- 
vate banking and precious metals. 

Moreover, now that we are 
part of American Express Bank 

Ltd., we are even better placed to 
serve your individual banking 
needs. Through this global link. 


we provide access to the broad 
choice of investment opportuni- 
ties and asset management services 
offered by the American Express 
family of companies. In addition, 
for certain clients, we also provide 
such unique “ extras ” as Gold 
Card® privileges and the exclusive 
Premier Services, s “ for round-the- 
clock personal and travel assis- 
tance. 

While we move with the times, 
our basic policies do not change. 
At the heart of our business is the 
maintenance of a strong and 
diversified deposit base. Our port- 
folio of assets is also well-diversi- 
fied, and it is a point of principle 
with us to keep a conservative 


ratio of capital to deposits and a 
high degree of liquidity - sensible 
strategies in these uncertain rimes. 

If you would like more infor- 
mation about any of our services, 
stop in on your next trip to Switz- 
erland. Or telephone: in Geneva, 
022/37 21 II; in Chiasso, 001/44 W 91- 

TDB offices in Gaicva, London. Paris. 
Luxembourg. Chiasso, Monte Carlo. 
Nassau. Zurich. Buenos Air t s. Sau 
Paulo. 

TDB, the 6th largest ivmmrciai bank 

it; Switzerland, is a member of the 

American Express Company, which 
has assets of US$69.3 billion and 
shareholders' (if nit) of US$4.9 billion. 


ISM 


Tiade Development Ban k 

The Trade Development Bank building in Geneva, 
at 90-98, rue du Phone. 

An American Express company 









• „ fr 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER IS, 1985 


s® 


Th ursdays 

AMEX 

Closing 


1? Month 
High Lom Slock 


9l Oa» 

Oht.na.PE wa High Low OmLOi’ot 


13 Month 
HtatiUwr Stock 


She dost 

Dhr. YM. PE IBS High Low Onct-Orta 


12 Month 

Wonuw Stock 


Stt. ran ' 

Phr.YW.Pg WhHMtUw ftwt.Qi’gB 


r^vvLPg whmw Sjgpgs 


Dfa.1HI.Pg 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 
I'ia The Associated Press 


3th ADI n 

5*. ALLrtS .16 1.0 
6 AMCS 
2*6 AM Inti 
Jft aoi n 

68ft ATT Pd 5J2e 6 A 
21’. AcrrwPr 
9 'm AcmeU 32 3.1 
9* Action 
1 Hi Acton 
1% AdmRs 

221m AdPusI ,|» A 

3H 

29 ’A 

n 

6 

n. 


ft 
30 

in 
2% 
tow 

SI* 

*v* 

4 

3r» 

TSPu 
4% 

4U 

m 

4ft 
nit 
131* 
h 
3 

47W 

12V. 

6V. 

110s 

3 

49ft A xon un 
44 a vonor 

!"i a .on sc 
lft AmooP 
lft AnOJcb 
S'* Annin 
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31s ArooPI 
SI* Arlev 
3** Armim 
«* Artnel s 
6% Asmrg 
7ft Astray 
1 Ait role 
7% Asirotpt 1 
•* AtlsCM 
3 Audlcrtr 
12 Auslmtn 
13% Avondl 


66 m 5V. 

IB <2 IS*. 
15 111 1092 
19 1033 5 

384 ru 
140 &7 
3 2ft 
28 20 10*4 

14 51 11 

11 11* 
8 16 2% 
18 «4 27Ta 

13 4 

21 5 49V 

108 6% 
10 54 P-3 

34 lift 
638 v* 

10 44 107 

10 M* 

5 14s 

10 9 
273 0ft 
322 Is 
1700: 34 
41 396 291* 
S 10 21* 
17 BOS 111* 
737 6ft 
$ 31 Ills 

13 56 7 

14 4x55** 
SM 41«* 

40 132001 4ft 
38 23001 4** 
9 140 5*4 

4 13 ft'* 

67 41 141* 

67 4 14V* 

1249 5% 

21 37 4*. 

15 7 48 

21 IS 14** 

4 9 8 

399 15 
!« 16 44* 

32 54 
2 474* 
57 7 

9 132 24* 

15 29* 

12 61* 
12 IV* 
21 31* 

8 10 ft 

X 4 

I IK » 

59 291 74* 

11 15 131* 

1410 l'A 

4 134k 
87 9k 


SVf 5b + 
154* 15ft- 
10V* 10% t 
» 5 
3A. 3ft — 
86% 84% + 
2% 2b — 
10V* 10'* 
ID®* 11 + 
1% II* 

24* 2ft — 
?7ft 274. + ' 
3% 4 
CIVz 491 * 

6% 4% + ; 

81* 8% 

1TM lift + 


Vs Vi. — U 
1051* 106V* + V 
6 61* + V* 

J* **-% 
a 5 «« 

33'* 34 + % 

281* 28ft — % 
2*3 24*— 9i 

101* 11>* + I* 

ft A*. + V 

ir in* + ft 

6ft 7 

55 55% +1 

401* 41V* + 49 
4V* 446 

4>* 4'.*— ft 

4ft 4% — Vs 

6% 64*— <* 
13V 14V* + V4 
14 14 

41* 5V* + 9* 

41a 419 

48 48 — Vs 

14 144k + U 


324* 25% 
244 *k 
74* 2. 

94* 4ft 
31 2» 

141* 1046 
17U. 14% 
9% Sft 
4 IV* I 
17 121* l 

294k 16% i 
29 1716 I 

21b 16V* l 
10*4 6% I 

38b 17% I 
33% 13% l 
35 19% I 

43% 35b I 
22% lib l 

6% 3% 

10% 6*a 

5% 1% 

34 m 

1146 8% 

1293 646 

12% 4W 
10b 5% 

X 44 144* 
IB 6% 
25% 13VJ 
9% 5% 
FI. 1% 

10 41k 

26% 16% 
13% Bb 
15% 7b 
70 9b 
Xi* 171* 
14% 10% 
1941 1746 

f» * 

10 9V* 

12b 7V* 

35 25% 

48b 284* 
171* 8Vk 
13% 7% 

23% 17V* 

TV* 4% 

z% n 

4% v* 
25 134* 

31b 23V* 


JO 10 W 

J2 4J 16 
.16 J> 14 
.16 J It 
lJta 41 13 


.17 S V 

ljjfflv 3 j0 9 
1.938 4-4 
.M 1J 


16 

JO 2.1 14 

7 

103 


3846 — V* 
l% — % 
2*4— Vk 
846— b 
29V* + % 
12% — Vk 
15%- % 
Mi 

2 — V* 
18% + V* 
184* — IV* 
21 — % 
1*46— % 
9% + b 
3244- % 
27 

329* + V* 

43% + V* 
13% + Vk 
44k -t- 4k 
9% + % 
4% 

22%—% 

ab 

tl%— % 
6b 

7ft + ft 
19b + % 
17% — % 
19b +1 
8b — % 
4b 

5b + Ik 

27V* tlb 
13% 

13% 

18% 

25 + % 
11* + b 
1846 
Zft 
% 

9% 

10% 

3846 

37% + % 
1S%— % 
12% 

23Vk + % 

7% u 

22b + b 
2446 — % 
% 


4% 2b 
18b 124* 

m* la* 
is% v% 

14 7b 
4b 1% 
12% 8% 
25ft 12V* 
» B 
3546 20V* 
37 2346 

44* HI 
8% 3 
lb % 

19% 1546 
29% 22% 


29* 2b 
13% 134k 
3 34k 

KVk IS 
Sb 9% 
1146 10% 
11% M% 
3% 3% 


10% jOK 

24% 23b 


24% 23b »ft + % 
14% 14% ftft— % 
35% 35 35% * ft 

Sfc 3 S V* 

19% 19** 19% — % 
29ft 22b 29Vk 
7 64k 7 + % 


24k 

139k — % 

15% — V* 
5b 

11 % +1 
11% 

3%— V* 
10% +% 
24V* + % 
Wft— Vk 
35% * ft 
29**— 1* 
3%- % 
3?*-% 


l« 

4ft Grohon 

J2 



111 

7 

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7 

11 


1J04309 


110 

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5ft 

5% 

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2.1 

12 

31 

19 

10% 

19 

12 

T*. Grant 



11 

15 

Mk 

8% 

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1 


1 

ft 

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9ft GrTect 



17 

2 

lift 

lift 

lift 

44 W. 

27 GrtLkC 

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M 

17 

87 

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37ft 

38 

36 




50 

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21% 

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lift 

SV* Gralnn 

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IT 


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13ft 

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JOt 

S3 

11 

3 

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12ft 


£2 795 

40 1.1 14 £0 
JHa A 18 98 


14% V(% 14% + % 
35b 35 3Sb + b 
13% 12% 13% +1 


134a 10% 
21b 11% 
8% 4% 
3% iff 
10 % 8 % 
2*9* 2146 
27b 13% 
7V* 4k 
39V* 21% 
43 26% 

41% Ub 
9% 8% 

17% 12b 
10b 5% 

17% 8% 
15% 11% 


HMG AO 10 
HUBC 46a 33 
HaUfoK Me 3 
Hal ml 

Homo! I .931113 


Hndymn J3s J 
Hanfrds JO 1J 
Harvey 

Hasbrs .15 A 

Hesbrpf 200 53 
Host! ms JQo U 


Him 

Hlmcrs 381 U 


HlttiCIi 

HlttlE* 

HetthM M 43 


14b 1446 — b 
4b 4b" + % 
539* 54 — 4* 

47% 47% — % 
6b 7 + b 

2b 2b 
2% 2%— % 
6% 6% + % 
1% 1%— % 
3% 3% 

5*k 6 + % 

4 4 — % 

41) 5% + % 

9b 94k 
12% 12% — b 
1% 1% 

13 £ Ttrff 

2% 2% — b 

12 % 12 % — » 
17V* 17% 


3 1% 

1546 7% 

1546 6% 

5% 3% 

24 Va 1746 
24% 19% 
20% 10% 
7% 3% 
0% 2 
6% 3% 

37V, 25% 
16% 1246 

4 1 

7 346 

9% 7% 

15% 10% 
114* 9% 

9% 5% 
«Vk 5% 
26% 6 

3 E ’B 

74b 36b 
6 2% 


1% IM 

B% 8% 

7% 7b 
346 3% 

18% 17% 
22% 22% 
14% 13% 
■% 7% 
lb 3% 
3% 34k 
36% 36% 
16 1» 
lb 1% 
4 3% 

B% 8% 
13% 13% 
94k 9b 
7 84* 

6 6 
24% 23% 
1U 1% 
b b 
89% 88b 
1% 3% 

k* 


1% + % 
8% 

7% + % 
3%— b 
17% — % 
22% 

14 + % 

8% + % 
3b + % 
3% 

38% 

15% — % 
lb 


9ft 

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3»U 1 

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la HalnhJc 

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so 

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114 

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185 

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41 

32 

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2 

17 

9% Hlptron 

15 

32 


16% 12 
2% 9* 

34% 23 
20 % 12 % 
16 % 12 
16% 9% 
29b 18% 


13^ 13% 


28% 27% 
18% 18% 
13% 13% 
1346 13 
27% 27% 


B% 4- V* 
13% 

9b— V* 
646— U 

2$ _% 
lb 
b 

68% — 1 
3% + % 

hkt* 

b + 

13% + % 

% 

28b + % 
18% — b 
1344— % 
1346 + % 
27% 


18% 8% 
34% 15% 
2244 70 
23b 14b 
12 6 
3% 9* 

1946 1344 
6% 2% 
6% 3% 

18% 11% 
23% 16% 
24% 15% 
63% 42% 
21 174* 

9% 6% 


HoIIvCp J4 tJ 
HmeGn 


Hrnlns PCL95 13J 


Hormls J4 2J 


HroHor SIB 

HmHwl X 

HotlPty 1.80 9J 16 38 

HottPwt 25 

KouOT -76s 17.9 387 

HovnE 11 70 

HubalAs M 3J 13 B 

Hubei B s 36 11 14 39 

HubM pt IM 12 1 


Husky d -36 5J0 


10% im* 
20 % 20 % 
546 5b 
2% 2% 
8b a 

24% 24b 
26b 26 
1% 1% 
3346 33% 
38% X 
314* 30b 
8% 84* 
14 134k 

9% 9 

99* 8% 
134* 13b 
8% 8% 
144k 144k 
2% 1% 

* SC 

5 4% 

2 2 
15% Mb 
1846 18% 
23% 23% 
22% 22% 
23 224k 

\ *% 
18% 18% 
646 6% 
44* 4b 
16% 16% 
23 22% 

25 23% 

64 64 

194* 18% 
7b 7% 


104*- (* 
20% + b 
5b 
2b 

Bb + 4* 
24% + b 
26b + % 
1% 

334* + % 

38(6—46 

31% + % 
Bb 

1346— b 
9 

9% + 46 
13% + Vi 
8b— % 

144k + Vk 
2 - % 


4%— Vk 
2 

14% — % 
1844 + % 
23% + V* 
22%— b 
23 + b 

18% 

6% — % 
4b — % 
1646 + % 
23 +* 

2496 +1 
64 +4 

19% +1 
7b 


35% 329k 
79k 1 

39k 2% 

£* i« 

246 % 

40b 3BI& 
13b S 
23% lib 
296 1% 

13 6% 

IS 10% 


ft ft 

13% 5% 
11% 9b 

4b 1% 
9b 6 
1046 2% 
1046 2% 

23% 13% 
41 25 


20 U 19 
8 

M 

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1754 4Va 
208 27 
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410 IP 72 
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47t 14 17 
1-80 lit) 


J2 1.1 14 
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32 1J 27 
40 2-5 17 
1-00 17 11 
14 
14 

60 16 12 


45 11 IS 
40 29 14 
22 


44 4.2 ID 
15 

44 24 15 
160 

160 24 11 


-50 106 
60 20 6 
7 


4% 4ft— ft 
25 26 +1 

2% 2% 

12 % 12 % — % 
10b im*— % 
9b 9b 
2% 29k— % 

27% 27% 

7b 7% 

8% Bb— b 
3% 3% 

3 3% + % 

6b 6b 
5% 5% + % 
10b 10b— % 
9b 99* 
lib lib „ 
% 46 + ft 

294a 30 . + 'A 
3% 3% 

39% 39% + % 
15% 15% + b 
26b 26% 6 46 
15?* 17 +1% 

16b 16% 4- % 

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3% lft 
22ft 9% 
77% 46% 
6 3% 

Xb 10b 
2ft 1 % 
230 97 

4b 1% 
30 Mb 
lift 8b 
11% 6b 
5ft 2b 
6ft 4 
29ft 21ft 
X 7ft 
8% 4% 
20% 16ft 
7b K 
3% ft 
13ft 11% 
34% 27ft 
9% 2ft 
16% Bft 
29ft 23b 
14 8ft 

m in* 




22 

JO u n 
JO 17 13 


11 

7J9el2J 17 
JO 2J 8 


JO 1J 16 
JO U 15 


J4t 5.1 23 
4257 T4J 


20 

34 

4JS T25 
J9tl2J 
J4 

288 9J 
JOT 1J 12 
64 U t 


212 5% 4ft 5 — V* 

1 7ft 7ft 7ft 
696 5 4% 4ft + V* 

32 7b 7% 7%— % 

30 16% 16% 16% - 

2D + *6 

70 16ft 16ft 16ft— V* 

6 3ft 3b 3b 
42 3 2ft 3 + % 

326 11% 11% lift . 

4 62ft 62% 62ft + V* 

9 4% 4% 4%. 

fl isft 13% n% : , 

39 lft lft lft + ft 

350X222% 717 222% +2 

14 lft 1% T%— V* 
25 37ft 37 37ft + ft 
19 lift 11% 11b 

31 7% 7% 7ft + K 
367 4 3ft 3ft+ % 

12 5% 5% 5% 

21 22% 2Zb 22% + % 
4770 15b Uft 15b— % 
82 4% 4% 4%—%; 

3 17ft 17% 17%— b 
» lb 1% lb 

10 I 1 1 

40 Uft 12ft' 12% +’ ft 

225X34 34 34 + % 

9 3% -3% 3%— % 
355 16b M 16b + V* 

6 29b 29b 29b 
45 12b 11% 12b + % 
' 64 16% 15% Mb + ft 



-MgMr HIGHS 33 


AmCoat lad 

Blenlnai *, 

Dataramvr; 

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Httcromta Hewor- . LaannCaii . 

TurnerEqtn Vlcon, WmrEnra 


AmFrudB 

HMGPraptv 

MottsSmkt 


5ft + V* 
3%— % 
5b 

15ft— % 
77 +1 

7ft 

16ft + % 
15% 

3b 

3M 

3ft— % 
11% + % 
14ft 

23% + % 

7 %-ft 
lift + ft 
10ft 
3% 

19% + ft 

23ft 

37% — % 
20ft + ft 
32% + % 
5ft + % 


Yen-Bond Yields Touch 
Record High in Tokyo' 


8% 5% 
4% l 
58Ri 15ft 
25 15 

2ft b 
14ft 10% 
17ft 16 
2% lb 
4% lft 
15ft 10% 
50% 35% 
6% 3% 
5b 3ft 


R 

J5t SJ 20 


Ragan :12 J 49 
Rambg 72 A0 78 
RatitH 

Ravin J2 3J 8 
RMlaw 

Regain AOb 4J 13 
R«rtA 34 

R«tAsB 10 

RstABA 9 


68 6% 
10 1 
30 20% 
115 lib 
13 % 

10 12 
<11 16% 
33 1% 
4 2ft 
7 14% 
185 45ft 
214 6ft 
210 5ft 


6b 6% 

1 1 
20 % 20 % 

W *\+* 

lift 12 + b 

16% 16% 

1% 1% 

2ft 2ft— % 
14ft 14ft 
44ft 45% 

5% 5ft + b 
5 5b +b 


/teuton 

TOKYO — Bond, yields touched a record 
high of 7.14 percent in the cash market Thurs- 
day as heavy selling emerged inieady broite-to- 
-broker trading, dealas said. 

The benchmark 6.8-percent, 10-year govern* , 
meet bond yield opened at 6.95 percent, then 
rose rapidly to the record. The last record was 
6.85 percent at Wednesday’s close. 

Earlier expectations that the Bank of Japan 
would be satisfied with a 6.8- or 65-percent 
yield on the benchmark bond are being proved 
wrong, sb bond prices looked set for further 
declines, dealers said. 

They said the Bank of Japan’s continuing 
firm credit stance suggests to most banks and 
securities houses that the policy to maintain a 
firm yen against the dollar will last until the end < 
of die year. This is causing substantial sefiing, 
because a tight money market is expected to- , 
ward December. 



in theTrrb. 


m;.L s 


<5et the tag picture on 
iwHd business trends in 




New Issue 
November 15, 1985 


'■ jvr. !,•" - — — 1 J 

Thfendiiertisement appears • 
ag a matter of recofri only. J ^ 


EUROPEAN INVESTMENT BANK 

Luxembourg 




m-: 


DM 300,000,000 

6%% Deutsche Mark Bearer Bonds of 1985/1995 


Offering Price: 100% 

Interest: 6%%pLa., payable annually on November 16 

Maturity: November IB. 1995 

Ustmg: Frankfurt am Main, Berlin, Dusseldorf, Hamburg and Munch en 


Deutsche Bank 

Aktiengeseilschaft 


Dresdner Bank 

Aktieng asol Ischaft .. 


Commerzbank 

Aktiengesedschaft 


Westdeutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Arab Banking Corporation - 
Daus&Co. GmbH 
Bank for Gememwirtseti aft 
Aktiongesetlschaft 
Bayerrsche Landesbank 
Glroan tra kv 
Berliner Bank 
Akticngesel I sefi aft 
Citibank Aktiengeaellschaft 

Deutsche Girozentrale 
- Deutsche Kommunalbank- 
Hamburgische Landesbank 
-Girozentrale - 

Induatriebank von Japan (Deutschland) 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Landesbank Saar Girozentrale 
Morgan Guaranty GmbH 


Badan-Warttembargbche Bank. 

AktiangaseiEschaft 

Bankers Tlrust GmbH 


Bsyariscba VSreJnsbank 
AktiengeseHschaft 

. Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 


Badische Ko mm unala Landesbank ' 5'- 

-Girozentrale- ;• 

BaywtecheHypMhaten- und Wechsef-Bank f 

Aktlengesellschaft l 

J°h. Berenberg, Gossler&Ca ; 


. lr 


Bankhaus Gebrfider Bethmann 


CSFB-Effectenbank AG - 
DG Bank 

Deutsche Genossensdiaftsbank 
Georg HauckASohn Bantders 
Kommandrtgestflschaft auf Aktien 
Bankhaus Hermann Lamps 
Kommandrtgesellschaft • 
Merd&FbickACo. 

Namura Europe GmbH - 


Sal. Oppimhehn Jr. Ado. 


Trinkaus&Burkhardt KGaA 


Simonbank 

Akttengesellschoft . 
Varelns- und Wastbank 
Aktiengasetteduft 
VftntMndMnk 
AktiangesdEschaft 


DelbrflckaCo. \ 

DSL Bank \ 

Deutsche Siedlungs- und Landesrentenbank . ! 

Hessische Landesbank • 

-Girozentrale - - 

Landesbank Rheinland-Pfalz 
-Girozentrale- ' 

B. Matzfer seel. Sohn &^Co. 

Norddeutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale . 

J.H. Stein 



M.M.Warb urgin' nckmann, WtrtzACo. 




_ 


rw.r.’yK 















* m ... J 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


Page 15 


His lawyers had Bgwd for the 
WASHJNGTON— The Federal waiver on foe grounds newspa- 

Comnmmcatioiis Commission bn pers are difficult to sdl 
rhuisday approved two mergers . .Hie Mo^och-Metnanedia ac 
V I S on ? , * t t r e Cl PcraliQg licenses cord still needs approval by the 
<m 32 or the most watched and holders of $ 1.4 billion in Metrome- 
Ustaica-to broadcast stations in dia bonds or a publie stock offer- ". 
tbeUaited States. tn&. Those options are awaiting ap- 

Tne cwxuniKJon. by.a 4^) vote, proval by the Securities and 
approved the S3J-bilhon merger of Exchange Commission. 

Tbc Capitai:Cmes-ABC.maxer 
mra mto Capital Cities Communj- can take place after the first of tiw 
rahons, which wiH become Capital vear imder terms of the contract 
. KtwecD tbetwocompmie. 

(r ? s^sarate 4-0 vote, the com- .. Capital Cities was given pernus- 


ta»aon aU^wsd Rupert Murdoch, son to keep its Pbikddphia TV 
tne publisher and broadcaster, to staikm, WPV^ as wdl as WABC- 
acqmre five major-market Metro- TV of New YorMfcidiit is acquit 
mpdia stations that could form the mg from ABC The signals of the 
baas of a new TV network. two stations overbm^.--' 


A sixth Metromedia station, 
WCVB-TV in Boson, will be.sold 


two stations overlap. 

. - The two stations already cany 
nearly duplicate network program- 
ming. To take advantage of a spe- 


t0 Heam Corp nrinfrTonS«l*mm 

■Mr. Murdoch also was granted . dal provision tithe 
the two years he had sought to sdl tiona Act, Capital O 
wo newspapers, the New York to offer specific sen 
Post and the Chicago Sun- Times , ware viewers and slal 
which are m the same markets. as that state, which has 


FordExponds 

StockBuybock 

Return 

DETROIT — Ford Motor 
CO. said Thursday that direc- 
tors had authorized the repur- 
chase of up to 20 million shares 
in addition, to the 10 milli on 
shares previously authorized 
for repurchase. 

Ford said the total buyback 
program, representing more 
than IS percent of its stock, 
would cost “in the range of $1 .5 
billion." Ford shares rose $2, to 
$51, in active trading on the 
New York Stock Exchange 
Thursday. 

“This expanded purchase 
program reflects our belief that 
Ford stock is substantially un- 
dervalued ami is an excellent 
investment for the company,” 
the automaker's chairman, 
Donald E Petersen, said. 


Beazer Bids for French Kier 
After Pact With Trafalgar 


Singaporean Purchases 24% ofExco Stock 


Revunt share without dividend. The pay- 

LONDON — C.H. Beazer mem to Trafalgar of £28.6 million 
Holdings PLC said Thursday that would be cowed by Bcazcr’s issu- 
it was making an offer for French ing 6.23 million ordinary shares. 
Kier Holdings PLC, valuing the which have been conditionally 
company at about £117.6 million placed on die market. 

(S167 million), after conditionally Under the separate cash offer to 
agreeing to bnv Trafalgar House other French Kier shareholders, 
PLCs25 .7-percen i stake in French County Bank would buy Beazer 
Kief, shares at 460 pence each. 

R^pt ^ holds no French Full acceptance of the share plus 
Kier shares. cash offer would involve Beazer is- 

The terms of the offer will be two suing a further 10.5 million ordi- 
Beazer ordinary shares and 655 Jjsry shares and paying £34.5 mil- 
pence for every seven French lion from its existing resources and 
Kier ordinary shares, valuing borrowing facffilics. 


: two years he had sought to sell tions Act, Capital Cities promised 

BP May Search for Oil in Argentina 


' v 'i\ndu 


: - «*sn 
-- V-f 


qatiir 

days 


Metromedia stations. 

Plessey Reports 
19,9% Decline 
In Pretax Profit 


? LONDON — Plessey Co. re- 
ported Thursday that pretax profits 
u for the second quarter, ended Sept. 

27, were £31 million ($44 million), 
> a 1951-percent decline from £38.7 
y million in last year's second quar- 
i. ter. 

-- Revenue for the quarter was 
;> £323.5 million, a 3-percent increase 
s from £314 million a year earlier, 
-s Per-share earnings fell to 240 pence 
,u frbm 317 pence. 

^ For the first half, Plessey pretax 
profit fell 14 percent to £70.2 mil- 
) lion from £80.7 milUon a year earii- 

er. Revenue rose 6 percent to 
* £656.7 million from £619.2 million 
a year earlier. Per-share earning* 
V for the half were 545 pence, down 
£ from 663 pence. 

£ The results were reduced by low- 
i er overseas earnings, affected by 
currency rates, and by lower inter- 
est income on declining cash de- 
_ posits, the company said. Hectron- 
x ics and telecommunications 
" ^omp antes in general have had 
_ earnings problems in the past year 
in Europe and the United States. 

Plessey’s directors declined de- 
tailed comment on the recent U.S. 
decision to place a multimOlion- ; 
dollar order for a French-designed 
baulefield-communjcadmis system 
rather than Pl^se/s Ptarmigan,* 
system. "■ 


no commer- 


cial VHF-TV station. 

ABC and Capital Cities also 


Roam Argentine state oil company, 

LONDON — British Petroleum rniemos Petrdiferos Fi scales. 
Co. said Thursday that it was coo- “We would look for oil any\ 


French Kier at about 237 pence a Beazer said its offer would ex- 
share. A cash alternative is 225 tend to the French Kier shares is- 
pence a share through arrange- sued to Abbey PLC shareholders if 
meats with the merchant bankers, French's Kieris current offer for 
County Bank Lid. Abbey is successful. 

Beazer said its conditional pur- Beazer said the enlarged group 
chase of French Kier shares from would be involved primarily in 
Trafalgar House is for 225 pence a hou « building, property develop- 
ment, contracting, engineering, 
, technology and mining 

Dll in Argentina Beazer had pretax profit of £15.8 

<5 millio n and per-share earnings of 

Argentine state oil company, Yari- 43.37 pence on revenue of £190.7 


were given 18 months to sdl off adding starting ofl exploration in 
other stations and' cable systems Argentina and in the sea between 


whose ownership by the new com- 
pany Would violate FCG rules. 
Washington Post Co. is buying 


that country and the Falkland Is- 
lands. 

Britain and Argentina went to 


53 of the 55 cable systems owned war over the Falkland Island* in 


by Capital Cities, but those agree- 1982. 
meats are awaiting approval by A BP spokesman said the corn- 
various franchising .authorities in pany was considering attending a 
the communities where they are lo- meeting in Buenos Aires in Decem- 
caied. Two other cable systems in her along with other foreign oil 
the Detroit area axe for sale. companies at the invitation of the 


Petronas Issues Rare Pro fit Report, 
Says Group Profit Bose in 1985 

Reuters 

KUALA LUMPUR — Petroliam National Bhd, Malaysia’s na- 
tional oil company, said Thursday that group net profit rose 27 
percent to 3.72 bsHion ringgit ($1.5 WHion)in the year ended March31 
from 2.92 bOlioti ringgit the previous year. 

Normally, Petronas does not rdease performance figures. But the 
company’s chairman, Raja Tan Sri M nhar Bin Raja Badiozaman, said 
1 the report was issued to ease local concern about its financial position 
after it spent 2.3 billion ringgit taking over BankBurcdputra Bhd. 

Parent company after-tax profit for the year was 3.51 Billion 
ringgit, Petronas said. Group pretax profit was 6.83 billion and parent 
pretax profit 6232 billion. 

Total revenue from crude oil and processed products in the year 
was 6.76 billion ringgit, it said, but gave no comparison. Malaysia's 
estimated crude oil reserves on Jan. I were 3.07 billion barrels, a four- 
percent increase from a year ago, the statement said. 

Liquefied natural gas exports rose to 3.86 million metric tons (424 
tons) from 1.85 million metric tons a year ago, earning 2.4 billion 
ringgit Petronas sold 140 billion cubic feet of natural gas worth 515 
million ringgit compared with 76 billion feet worth 267 million 
ringgit 

Two billion ringgit of this year’s group net profit went into reserves, 
raising them to 1 1 billion ringgit, the company said. 

Total associated and nonassociated natural gas reserves rose two 
pgeent and nine percentfropi J984 lgvds, to 93} trillion cubic feet 
and 42.83 trillion.- cubic feet, Petronas said, : • . ' 


“We would look for oil anywhere 
provided h was not unlawful,” be 
said. 

The Times of London reported 
Thursday that several other British 
oil companies, including London & 
Scottish Marine Od Co., would at- 
tend the meeting. 

Until the Argentines have a 
meeting “one doesn't know wbar 
they’re offering," the BP spokes- 
man said. “It really is very prelimi- 
nary at this stage.** 

COMPANY NOTES 


million Tor the year ended June 30. 
Computer Firm in Chapter 11 

Reuters 

BEDFORD, New Hampshire — 
Bedford Computer Corp. said it 
has filed for protection from its 
creditors under Chapter 11 of the 
UJL Bankruptcy Code. The com- 
pany reported Thursday a third 
quarter loss of S1.29 per share com- 
pared with a profit of $.02 for the 
like period last year. 


AffiedlVfiBs Ltd. has asked share- a total of S200 million, the China 
holders to wait on an independent Daily said. The Swiss company has 
adviser’s report before taking ac- orders to provide equipment and 
(ion on takeover offers from Field- technology for a power transmitt- 
er Gillespie Davis Ltd. and Minlor sion line, to help construct a power 
Holdings Pty. Fielder’s offer values station, to supply materials and 
Allied Mills’ shares at about 3.19 technology for another power sia- 
Australian dollars (£109 million) tion and to supply 150 diesel loco- 
while Minlor has countered, with an motives io cany coal, the newspa- 
offer of 3.50 dollars a share. per said in Beijing. 


offer of 330 dollars a share. 
Affis-Chabnere Carp, has sold its 


Caterpfflflr Tractor Co. has won a 


remaining 15-percent stake in Fia- 564-million order from the Soviet 


taltis Construction Machinery, a 
problem-plagued consiruction-ma- 


Union for more than 800 bulldoz- 
ers, the Tass news agency said 


chinny venture, to Fiat SpA. The Thursday. The machim* are to be 
sale price was not announced, but delivered between January and 


Allis-Chalmers’ investment in the March for use in eastern Siberia 
joint venture had been carried on and developing ofl sites in the north 
its books at $10.7 million. of Western Siberia, Tass added. 

company to be feted this yeS >n South Africa because of Mans 
bringing the number of foreign sales * 

firms on the exchange to 19. United Tedmotapes Corp. said 

BBC Bnmn, Bomi A Co. has it has completed sale of its Mostek 
won four contracts in China worth semiconductor subsidiary to 


Australia’s Treasurer Sees Government’s Policies Paying Off 


VM 


' . N> 


::,:onoi rue 

xene. 


(Continued from Page 13) 
□andal sector. This deregulation 
included ending foreign-exchange 
controls, floating the Australian 
dollar against other currencies, and 
licensing 16 foreign banks to set up 
- full-service operations in the coun- 
utry. 

Mr. Keating foUowed-this up in 
September this year by introducing 
important tax changes, including 
cuts in the income tax, the disal- 
lowance of excluding almost all ex- 
ecutive perquisites, including com- 
pany cars, from taxation, and other 
measures to encourage financial, 
rather than physical-property, in- 
vestments. 

The other week, in London, he 
- set out the details of another major 
■ change in policy — toward boost- 
ing foreign investment. Australia 
has decided to abandon the rule 
thgi foreign companies planning a 
takeover or the establishment of a 
qjajor business in Australia must 
first seek local participation, a ma- 
jor disincentive to investment, be- 
Vceuse then the foreign companies’ 

T attentions have to be advertised. 
Some other significant changes in- 
clude putting foreign insurance 
companies and other nonbank fi- . 
□anoal institutions on the same ba- 
ss as banks — able to compete 
freely with their Australian equiva- 
lents. 

Mr. Keating said that the transi- 
tion of Australia from a highly reg- 
ulated to a flexible, market-orient- 
ed economy would continue, but 
insisted that change was only possi- 
ble because of the accord with the 
major unions. The Australian 


Net Asset Value on 
November 7, 1985 

’adfic Selection Fund N.V. 
0.1*1.27 per U.S.*1 unit 

Pacific Selection 

Fund N.V. 


Council of Trade Unions recently 
agreed to a discount of 2 to 3 per- 
centage points under inflation in 
their contractual wage rises be- 
cause of the inflationary pressures 
of the 20 percent fall in the Austra- 
lian dollar against a basket of cur- 
rencies in the past year. 

“It’s quite simple," he said. X 011 
have no choice but to try an in- 
comes policy, because the only al- 
ternative is to go back to deflation- 
ary fiscal and monetary policies 
which can only have the effect T of 
reducing growth." 

But doesn't wage restraint mean 
that sooner or later the floodgates 
will open? 

“I could not say to you with any 
credibility that our policy will go 
on for ever, 1 ' said Mr. Keating, 
“but it does have the great possibil- 
ity of becoming the norm in Aus- 
tralia. We have had 2 Yi years now, 
more important we have just won 
an agreement (with the unions) for 
another two years, so a total of 4% 
to five years is quite a long period 
in a country’s economic history. 

“For Australia to have rattled 
along much longer with a rate of 
growth of under 2 percent, with low 
employment growth but high work- 
force growth, would have been so- 
cially unacceptable. So we were 
were bound to try it, and it is work- 
ing welL" 

Mr. Keating’s critics believe that 
the dollar devaluation will prove to 
be his Achilles Heel John Hewson, 
economic adviser to the previous 
liberal administration, argues that 
inflation will be back into double 


figures as devaluation effects hits 
the economy. • 

"We bad a problem with devalu- 
ation, which occurred because we 
were uncompetitive," Mr. Keating 
admits. “We had the economy 
growing strongly, but we were 
sucking in imports, and exports 
were not growing commensurately. 
A tower dollar means we are more 
competitive, and we are maintain- 
ing this by having wages discount- 
ed to keep inflation down.” 

Mr. Keating’s next major aim is 
to transform Australia’s sometimes 
image as a granary and mine for 
Japan and other Western nations 
into one of economic dynamism. 
He cites Rupert Murdoch, who has 
used his News Corp. to build a 
worldwide media empire, Robert 
Holmes a Court, the takeover spe- 
cialist who runs Bell Group, and 
John Elliott of Elders IXL, the con- 
glomerate, as Australians whose 
business skills are internationally 
recognized. 

“The notion that Australians 
could dig up another mound of 
rocks and sdl them to someone has 
gone on for too long," be said. 
“Herman Kahn (the late U.S. fu- 
turologist) said years ago that re- 
sour ces-rich countries end up being 
intelleciuaDy lazy, because they do 
not try hard enough to make their 
real resources wpik for them. 

“The real resources Australia has 
are its people, and in the recent 
past we have not been making our 
manufacturing and services sectors 
operate in the best interests of the 
country. Making our economy 


modem again is something that is 
long overdue. The agricultural -ex- 
port sector, and any improvement 
in markets that comes for particu- 
lar commodities ought to be the 
icing on the cake.” 

“We owe nothing to world eco- 
nomic recovery in picking the Aus- 
tralian economy back up to 5 per- 
cent nonfann growth; it’s all come 
from domestic policies. We have 
had 8 percent employment growth 
in the past 214 years, and 90 percent 
of that has been in the private sec- 
tor, in services and manufacturing. 
And that is where the growth will 
continue, for we are cutting bade 
the public sector now very rapid- 

Does this iwmh that Australia 
will now have to ease the con- 
straints on immigration, in order to 
gain growth through population? 
“That is always an option for us. 
We have kept migration flexible so 
that as shortages of certain skills 
and trades arise we can bring more 
people to Australia. But, on the 
more general question, it may well 
be appropriate to have a faster rate 
of migration growth than we have 
now." 

Mr. Keating rejects charges that 
the Australia is now overburdened 
with external debt. Australia’s for- 
eign debt has swelled to 52 billion 
Australian dollars (about $34 bil- 
lion at current exchange rates) as of 
last June 30 from 9.1 billion dollars 
four years before. 

But Mr. Keating responds: “For- 
ty percent of the foreign debt has 
come from the devaluation of the 
dollar. Most of the debt is private 




UNICO • 

V/ INVESTMENT FUND 

The annual report 1985 
mav be obtained from the 
Paying Agents or from the 
Amstarcfam Liaison Office 
NZ\toortXtf9wal 162-170, 
1012 SJ Amsterdam/ 

Holland. Tek 20-262383. 
Tlx. 15412. 

A dividend of DM 5,50 . 
is payable.asTrom 
15-11-1985. 


REPUBLIK TUNESIEN 

MINISTERIUM FUR VOLKSW1RTSCHAFT 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 
MTOMTIB1IUE MKS&fflBBUNfi HP. 3766 

Die Gafsi Phofeplulrs Company fordwl red! d?r Abeii'ht, Beigbaumasf+unme- fllr 
die ItortUprvnidhlinsunf; cter Pfx&phalnpibcn im Calsa zu iaafen. zu inleran. 
ikwalcn Lieferangcbonm fdr luufasxmncL- AiwrQftruqg oaf; 

1. acbi (8) lubbereifK Lttder, 375 HP, 10 Tonnen 

2. sechs (6) Autoflhfitter, 32 metrieche Tinmen. > 

3. win (10) Bahrmrachlnen 

4. who (10) adaptierte Kowp w wown 


Sumnw iwi .50 Dinar (fQntag Dinar] vom &.TWP (Vnend, 9 ruedu Rsyaumede 
T Arabic Senudite, 1035 Tunesiien. 

Anprlxdc. in frare^wslwrSprache nritaien “Monswur Ip Dbwteur Aehah de 
Li t.P.C. 2130 MetLotn (Tunaum)*' BpHlieolen* am 5. Deaanbcr 1965 vor lfXOO 
I'hr voriifpen. Der SiKenc Utmchlag La Hie folpt zu btschrifiea 

"Appd foffre N P 3766 

Engiw deCnriuM 

Me pu Oovrir want le 612.1985". 

Dir llmaddllpc wrnkn fi. December um 10.00 lAr in der “Direction dca 

Ai'hals a MetbouT pWImi. 

Nadi (fejem Datum ein^bnuL; InredirifllicU' Afljtetae kutmen nichi bfriick- 
■iiiiilifit Henlen. . ■ 


REPUBLIC OF TUNISIA 

MINISTRY FOR THE NATIONAL ECONOMY 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 
INTERNATIONAL INVITATION TO TENDER 
N P 3766 

TheCafsa Phosphate Compum hcrebv launches an Iniernaiional Imitation 
io Tender with a vie* to purcha-ifip die folioivinp nurhinery, for exploita- 
tion of the phfMphftie qturrte in the baitiii of Cafw: 

1. eight (8) ijTe- wheeled loaders, 375 H P, 10 tonnes 

2. six (6) dumper trucks, 32 metric tonne* 

3. ten (10) drilling: machines 

4. ten (10) adapted nimpreann 

The companies inlenvled in the abo» «• rrui obtain a copv ol the Schedule of 
Condition, again*! joink'iit of 30 DT (fifty Dinar) from the "Service 
General, 9 rue du Rovaunn;. d 1 Arabic Srnuditc. 1035 Tunisia" 

Tende» in the French latyuaye nnwi nueh "Mouieur le Directeur des 
Achats de la C.P.0. 2130 Merlaous (T uniaia|“ belore 10.00 hours on Ihe 5th 
Ctemnber 1985. 

The outer envelope must be marked a.- follows: 

^Appel d'offre N P 3766 

EaguM de Carrwrea 

Me pan ourrlr avant le 6/12/85." 

The envalopefi will be opened at JO.O0 Hour on ihe 6th December 1983 at 
the "Direction d«s Adult; a Metlaoui*". 

Any tender rocened by telex or aiirr iho above mentioned dale will not bo 
considered. 


By Bob Hagcrry 

International Herod Tribune 

LONDON — A spokesman for 
Khoo Teds Puat, a Singapore- 
based hotel and real-estate mag- 
nate, disclosed Thursday that he 
had bought 24 percent of Exco In- 
ternationa] PLC. 

The share purchases, which cost 
a total of about £128 minion 
(SI 82.3 million), prompted specu- 
lation that Mr. Khoo or another 
party would make an offer for the 
rest of the London-based financial- 

services company. On the London 
Stock Exchange, Exco shares 
dosed at 227 pence a share, up 10 
pence from Wednesday, giving the 
company a market value of £531 

millirm. 

James Capd & Co., a London 
stockbrokerage acting for Mr. 
Khoo, said he bought 53 milli on 
Exco shares Thursday For 224 
pence each from the Kuwait Invest- 
ment Office, an arm of the Kuwaiti 
government. The Kuwaitis had 
purchased the Exco shares only a 
day earlier for 215 pence each from 
British & Commonwealth Shipping 
Co. Before Thursday's purchase, 
Mr. Khoo had about 4 milli on 
Exco shares, Capel said. 

Exco is considered a prime take- 
over target because of its tempting 
hoard of cash and short-term secu- 
rities, estimated at £360 million. 
The company has been flush with 
cash since July, when it sold its 52- 
percent shareholding in Telerate 
Inc., a US. -based financial-infor- 
mation service, for £346 million. 

Exco retains interests in money, 
bullion and stock brokerage as wdl 
as financial futures and leasing. It 
has a substantial presence in Asia, 


Thomson SA, the French govern- 
ment electronics company. Most of 
Mostek’s industrial asses ts, inven- 
tories, products, technologies and 
associated rights were sold for ap- 
proximately $71 million. 

Rank Organisation PLC said its 
Rank Development Inc. unit is to 
build a vacation complex, includ- 
ing a 225-suite hold and 330 apart- 
ments, on an ocean-front site in 
South Carolina. The first phase of 
the seven-year project is scheduled 
for completion in mid- 1987 and 
indudes a hotel, residential tower 
and villas. 

Royal Insurance PLC said pretax 
profit rose 26 percent to £34.4 mil- 
lion ($49 million) in the third quar- 
ter from £9.4 ™iHnn in the like 
period last year. In the first nine 
months, profit was £16.6 milli on, 
compared with £7J million. 

Tandy Corp. has introduced a 
Model 3000 computer designed for 
experienced computer users at 
small to medium-sized companies. 


inducting its W.L Carr unit in 
Hong Kong. 

Mr. Khoo. who has interests in 
hotels, real estate and banking in 
Southeast Asia and Australia, last 
February made a takeover bid for 
Wherlock Warden & Co. of Hong 
Kong. In March, however, he sold 
his stake in Wheel ock to Hongkong 
& Kowloon Wharf & Godown Co. 

Financial sources in London 
said they believed Mr. Khoo still 
has holdings in National Bank of 
Brunei and two Singapore banks, 
Development Bank of Singapore 
and Oversea- Chinese Banking 
Corp. 


Meanwhile, British & Common- 
wealth and Exco moved to untan- 
gle their remaining ties. They an- 
nounced Thursday an agreement to 
exchange B&Cs 30-percent stake 
in London Forfaiting Co. for Ex- 
co’s 50-percent interest in Gan- 
more Investment Management 
Ltd. and Exco's 40-percent share of 
Fisdec BV. 

John G unn, a founder of Exco, 
resigned as chief executive of the 
company in September and recent- 
ly became a director of B&C, which 
helped finance the start-up of Exco 
in 1979. 


ENERGY SEARCH ONE N.V. 

NOTICE OF 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 


NOTICE IS HE REB Y GIVEN that the Annual General Meeting of 
Shareholders of ENERGY SEARCH ONE N.V., hereinafter called 
"the Company", will be held at the Company’s offices ai John B. 
Gore ira wee 6, Willemstad, Curasao, Netherlands Antilles, on 
Thursday December 12th. 1965 at 10.00 a.m. (Curasao time), for 
the following purposes: 


I a.m. (Curasao time), for 


1. To waive Article 10 sub-paragraph 2 of the Articles of Incorpora- 
tion of the Company regarding the period within which the 
Meeting should have been held. 

2. To report on the condition of the Company. 

3. To adopt the Consolidated Financial Statements of the Company 
and its subsidiaries for Ihe three years ended December 31, 
1964, together with Rebled Schedules. 

4. To change the Articles of Incorporation to reduce the required 
number of Supervisory Directors and to delete the requirement 
for an odd number of Supervisory Directors. 

5. To (re-) elect the Managing Director. 

6. To (re-) elect the Members of the Supervisory Board. 

7. To (re-j appoint Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. as the Company's 
auditors. 

8. Any other business which may properly come before the Meet- 
ing. 

In order to exercise their rights at this Meeting, holders of bearer 
shares must establish their ownership of such shares in a manner 
satisfactory to the Chairman of the Meeting. Such ownership may be 
established by depositing such shares at the office of the Company 
or at Pierson, Heldring & Pierson N.V., Herengracbt 214, Amster- 
dam. The Netherlands (or a certificate of deposit of these shares 
satisfactory to the Managing Director or to Pierson, Heldring & 
Pierson N.V.) not later than 6th December, 1965, and to produce 

[ i roof thereof at the Meeting. The Managing Director has estab- 
ished 2nd December 1965 as the record date for the purpose of 
determining Shareholders entitled to vote registered shares at this 
Annual General Meeting of Shareholders of the Company, and 
Shareholders as of the close of business on 2nd December’ 1985 
shall be entitled to vote at such Meeting in person or by proxy. 
Information related to items 3 and 4 of the Agenda are available at 
the offices of the Company and Pierson, Heldring & Pierson N.V. 

Willemstad, fiiiapfl 
15th November, 1985 

CARIBBEAN MANAGEMENT COMPANY N.V. 
Muugtng Director 


! of the Articles of Incorpom- 


debL Government debt is balanced 
by Australia’s international re- 
serves abroad, and the private debt 
is borrowed by sound companies 
on sound investments. Our export- 
to-debt ratio is about half that ctf 
debtor countries. If we revalue 
against the U.S. dollar in which 65 
percent of our debt is written, but 
maintain competitiveness against 
other countries we trade with, we 
will improve performance and re- 
duce our debt.” 


Consumer Prices 
Rise in OECD 

The Associated Press 

PARIS — Consumer prices in 
the 24 member countries of the 
Organization for Economic Coop- 
eration and Development rose by 
an average 0.4 percent in Septem- 
ber after bolding steady in August, 
the OECD reported Thursday. 

During the 12 months through 
September, consumer price growth 
was 43 percent, the lowest annual 
rate recorded since December 
1969. For the seven largest Western 
economies, consumer price growth : 
during the 12 mouths ended in Sep- 1 
leraber was 3.5 percent, the lowest 
annual rate since January 1968. 

Food prices dropped marginally, 
partly as a result of seasonal fac- 
tors, the secretariat said. Retail en- 
ergy prices also fell, it said, noting 
that those trends continued to re- i 
fleet depressed prices in the com- ; 
modity and energy markets. 


Worldwide Transport & Energy 

Nedlloyd Group, Houtlaan 21, 301 6 DA Rotterdam. The Netherlands 
Telephone number (01 0) 1 779 1 1 . T elex number: 27087 ndgr nl 


THE TOP FRENCH QUALITY 

'dkk 


F I R M 5 


Comit£ Colbert 

Hediand: A Vintage Investment 


Philippe Brurum, President 


Imagination, quality and taste: The 
ingredients drat have assured the 
success of Hcdiard, the renowned 
gourmet food shop on the Place de la 


Madeleine, by pleasing discriminat- 
ing P ari s i an palates tor 131 years, 
also ducaoetuK what Hcdiard presi- 
dent Philippe Brunon calls "che fin- 
est wine cellar in Paris." 

In just over 12 years with die help of 
sommelier Luden Babin, fotmerly of 
the Prc-Ocelan and Fouquecs, 

Brunon has assembled an exception- 
al collection of fine French wines and 
earned Hcdiard che increasing respect of che most 
knowledgeable oenophilcs. Today’. Hcdiard sells 
over 400,000 bottles of wine each jui ri nging from 
rare vintage Bordeaux dazing hack io 1Q28 to 
reasonably priced dinner wines and vins du pays 
sold under the Hcdiard label from 11 francs. 
"Selling wine is not complicated,” says Philippe 
Brunon. “What is essential in the wine business is 
buying." So when Brunon, already a passionate 
wine connoisseur, came into Hediard in 1973 and 
decided to expand the wine cellar, he went to 
Bordeaux. n l hod the luck to go there just as prices 
for the grear chateaux wines collapsed" he recalls. 
’Thanks to the contacts my father nad initiated, the 
fact that the marker was knocked flat and needed 
badly to sell combined with the elegant reputation 
of Hcdiard, from 1?74 on, we were able to buy 
directly from the greatest chateaux in Bordeaux, 
something others have spent their lives trying 
coda” 

Hcdiard buys cn primeur—or "in the wood"— from 
60 of the great name growers such as Lafite, Ducru 
Beaucaillou and Beane Gantenac, six months after 

’AN AS?OClAnON 01 Till MOST PPI STIOIOIS N AM/ S OF Till 


the harvest when the wine is soil 
maturing in casks. then sells some of 
these wines en prim cur to their di- 
enes. Hediard’s recent acquisition by 
the Guinness group has allowed 
Brunon co extend his wine develop- 
ment polity and with 1P85 promis- 
ing tojsc a memorable vintage year, 
he plans to offer 40 to 45 classified 
wines cn prim cur next spring at 
"super reasonable prices beouse no 
one buys cheaper in Bordeaux than 
1 do." 

Buying en primeur means a wait of 
two to three years before the wine is bottled and 
delivered, that a further five to 10 years before it 
is drinkable, so it can be, says Brunon. "like 
giving the grower a blank check." Hediard pro- 
vides the security, buying technique and quality 
selection that absorbs" most of the risk ana gives 
the private buyer a Chance to buy vintage wines at 
affordable prices. 

With annual price rises averaging 20 percent, 
investing in fine wines has become an international 
pastime and spotting trends can be financially as 
wdl as gastronomically rewarding. Brunon sees a 
comeback for red Burgundies. He tips Vosne- 
Romanec and Chambcrrin as good investments 
now along with the bourgeois Bordeaux growths of 
Chateau ViUcgootec and Chateau PotensaC. 

Even more marked is the new focus on Sautemes. 
Christie’s, who regularly auction wine in London, 
Amsterdam, Geneva and Chicago, recently devoted 
an entire sale to che legendary vintage Chateau 
cfYquem's and Brunon recommends buying Su- 
duiraut, Cimens and Sahuc-lcfrTour as well as j 
Yquern. I 

l-SI Mil -AKT III V |V HI ' ? HIS BUI III l » HAUMJ .7S1XW MRls] 


I AN ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE COMITE COLBERT I 






:r 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


advertisement 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Nov.14, 1985 

N<n nui Mria* amtaflane or* «™wll#<l &v (ft* Puncte toted with the exception of sotrw bvoTbs nosed on issue orts*. 

The rTwroiiKa^rr^J* -oototloai weolted; (d> -daily) M-mckty; ttJ-W-nwuttlhff (rJ-wWIK (D-IrrHolarlv. 


Hoating^tate Notes 


C uwU Hwa BM A** 


{.wmar/AWL 


AL Mal management 

-(wl Al-Md Trust, S.A t V 

BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. Lid. 

•I o i BorBona sf * 

• lOICflnJW™-. SF IS 

■10) Eoulboer America SUB 

•I fl ) Eoylboy Europe SF 130 

■I a ) Equlboor Pacific SF 13 

-I Q ) Crobar SP10 

-(dlSteckWr SF it; 

BNF INTERFUNDS 

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■|u») Inttrcurr^ncf V$S — . 1 

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CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

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HOE NASSAU OROUP 
072 The Hague (WO) 46*670 
Sever flelegBintwni I 


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t 136.70 -( a I Ameriaj-vaior sf 50420 iwi nam.f * na« 

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3 1220 -(d)UNIZINS — — — DM 11295 ( d I Thornton Australia Fd Ltd — * *56 

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EBC TRUaT CO.(JERSEY) LTD, 
1-3 Seale Sr*Si. Heller :053J-34331 


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Frendi RetaSPriceslIp 


Boom 

■ PARIS — Frepdi retail ptiew 
rose OJ to 0.4 peremi in October, 

y jroflrr fi fig -.try prrii ymrwir y fjgnryj 

frean the nadm^ statistics 'in^U; 
tnte, INSEE. T6e figures show the 
inflation raieover ih&year cudedw 
October eased to bertsecn 45 and. 5 
percent from 5j percent ai the end 
of September. . : 


/; d _ f> . 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


AUTOS TAX FREE J AUTOS TAX FREE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


CHEAT BRITAIN 


LUXURY EXECUTIVE APARTMENTS. 
Krughltbridge/Chelsea. Over 100 
fully serviced viudiav, 1 & 2 bedroom 
apanmenis. AI modei n conveniences. 
Mmeiwm stay 22 days. Prices from 
EU5 per weeA Please contact Lor- 
raine Young, f-lGH Apartments, Nefl 


GRfflC C ca Ewalent Setedion of 
Houses & FteB for rental m North, 
Northwest & Central London. T*L 01- 
625 8611. 


(Continued From Back Page) 


INTERNATIONAL EXECUTIVES / Vb- 


Gwynn House. Soane Ave. London 
SW3. TpL Q1-5S9 1 105. Tb. 295817 G. 
CENTRAL LONDON - Executive un- 


itors to London • for quality furnished 
oport m enh & houses cat HuntooJLon- 
don |01 W37 7365. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE EMPL O YMENT 

TO RENT/SHARE DO MES TI C 

PARIS AREA FURiVlSHED^ POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


vice apartment m new buJdrvn, 
comfo j to b tv hirruhad and fuUy 



had and fully 
id service (Mon. 
V. Phone for bro- 
x wnte Presidwv 
1 University 


don 101)337 7365. 

CB4TRAL LONDON CLOSE TO Oxir- 
cM Hotel. New 1 bedroom aporf- 
mert.MfWd Minimum tot 6 mcmlhj. 
£170 per week. Tat 01-935 47V7. 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


Carsof 
Copenhagen 
TAX IFRS 


■ saope a Isa sues. — - 

Aitmt&m for worldwide detvery from 
stock. Send far a DUM1KE cofafagn 
. .BMW --MERCEDES - PORSCHE \ 
VW -SAM - VOLVO - FRIGBOT, 


' - BlftOK AUTO imbk Inc. 

KXn&toM Ntol^n HS«r ' 

let n 34(041366. TK 760ffl EAfl NL* 


(lnir^fcO - 

Hit 


Brand New 


GENEVA FURNISHED SUBLET, 3fe 
rooms, view an Lake. SF2J0O/ month 
dxxoes induded. Tel 84 31 00. 


74 CHANUPS-B.YSSS 8th 


5TR Channina tiny Mty equipped i 
db. thru Sanaa. &0A 463368 ' 


CHARMING KNtGHTSBMDGE vi 
ktge house m quiet backwater dose to 
Hanock 2 bedrooms with erauite 
bath, simna room, lotchen, breakfast 
room, imcn garden. Mceiy attractive 
feature*. £400 per week. Available 
eoHy m New Year. 2-3 yerx lets posse 
He. London 01-Q49 0893 



THE EXCELSIOR 


Studio, 2 or 3-room upu i U ite nL 
One month or mom. 

LE CUUQDGE 4359 6797. 


TROCADBtO. Lcrvety AxSo. F4500 
ML Tet 47 20 94 95 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


A Ueque 


Brand New 


CENTRAL LONDON. 3 bedroom 
apartment. 6 month tot £400 per 
week. Tefc 01-286 1700 after 6 pm. 





Hotel Suite 
Residence 


HOLLAND 


THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 


AVE MONTAIGNE 

PIAZZA ATHB4EE 


115 nja, high dess. F35^00/manib 

SANTANDREA 47 04 75 60 


I6TH PORTE DAUPHINS 

Very lcrvety reception, 4 bedroomt, 1 BO 
iq.m. nijaa 45 63 68 3a 



TRASCO 

INTERNATIONAL 


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Gooch buff art 
Other mokes & exotia 


* knternatiand Sotos 

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■ •fO’XiwzM umvory 

* Eumpeon Price teodars 
w Tatntf45 1 3778 00 

* Tatax 1V932 DK 


EUROPORT TAX 
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IVki"- 


55 VaMtpm DK-1900- 
CPH YrDENMAIK' 


. Gaft or write for free catalog. 

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ittedsB f A tm a rt, Halos 

TaU0jJM23077 
TetatSTl SCAR NL. 


DOMESTIC 
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tMJLSA 

OFHOAL ROLLS ROYGE 
DEALS FOR BELGIUM 


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DUTCH HOU5MG CENTRE LV. 
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A Unique 
Hotel Suite 
Residence 


NEUlllY 

Double living, 3 bedroanv parting. 
F6.0KL 45 63 68 3K 



Tet London 
Tatar |51) B 


629 7779 
TRA5.G... 




MONACO 


pre-opemng savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 


IBCAL ADVANTAGES 


PRMQMUTY OP MONACO 
IN HEART OF MONTE CARLO 
Beautiful untuntohad oportmenf, mod- 
ern bwWmgi near beaches, hiah dan, 3 
roam, eqapped btehon, cefar, padk- 


UMQUE SETTMG 


Tat 93 SO 66 84 
Telex: 469477 


HTNB5 FACRJT2ES 


SWITZERLAND 


34 HOUR MEDICAL ASSISTANCE 


FOR FURNISHED LETTINGS IN S.W. 
London. Surrey & Berkshire. Cartad 
MAYS, Ochon (037 M4) 3811 UK. 
Tetew 8955H2 


LUGANO FOR RHVT, CHARMWG 
townhoiaa on mourtanside, 5 <nv 
utes from center. 3 bedrooms, 2 balhs, 
terraces, private garden, 2-ccr ga- 
raoe. fireplace indoor & omdoor. 


EXECUTIVE SBIVtCB AVAAABIE 


Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and dl with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


Executive Services Available 




dean. Errch S. Co. 01-499-8802. 


rage, fireplace mdoor & outdoor. 
Tastefully furnished with al umeriiiei 
spreod aver 3 Boors. Sopilice: 
SF2.4507niorth. Reason moving to 
U5. AvaAdito Jon ‘86 Canwei g»rv 
or. Private 091/54 36 B5 or Offer 
091/23 11 24 


sv/rrzsiAND gii 63-51-04 
HE BON TORT 


Model Suites 


HE BON TORT 
1820 MONTREUX 

Ca8 hr rypo kitm ent 


(212) 371-8866 



REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


WELL HXJCA1ED GIRL io oar* far 
your clikjn m in Errapp OA 201-334- 
7325 USA. 


Trasoo London bd. 

6567 fork Lane, Umdaa W.l. 


Sw to xtond-LRCW. Gerowiy 


TAX FRSCASS j 
ROLLS ROYCE B^fTLJEV 
RANGE and LANDROVBt 
SAAB " 


Tefc M 35X2-41346. Tki 7 


SECOND HOUSE/FRANCE- New 
York Ofy couple 8 6 0 1 11 (10 modernized 
fufly restored nxmar mute in Loiter 
River area within 2 hours of Paris. 
House to have 6 bedroona, 3 oom- 


ptete bathrooms with toitotv roabdly 
healed and cnrple land. Total price 
natio orated PF2J00DJX0. ASrepSa 


in fegGsh. Bax 2224, Herald Tribune, 
72SFfNeiiBy Cedex. France 





BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FRS AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 


AbaUnd Cm 

. rut MODOBOUEG 7442 
_T170 Brusieb - 
THc 2-673 33 92 ' 

. T1X: 20377 


JSWAGONS; LANDROVHl 


Range fever. Toyota, Suzuki, Nan 
4 WD. Tropnoi spec*. 041 Holond 

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AND SAVE 


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EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 



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Phro* p2J649906rtetau 63290 


LOS ANGELES 
LAW FIRM 


THECARSMPram 

SPEOAUST5 

(1)42 25 64 44 


ESCORTS & GUIDES ESCORTS & 


INTERNATIONAL 





toquires E y opeon r ap resenlabon to in. 
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ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES 


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BONN / COLOGNE £228 2129 
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1985 Madak -a) btecmmt prfaeei 



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Shipment & daCwery worldwide. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

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Fart turn-orauad tine. AS work dan 
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MIDDLE EAST 

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JWkwwno: 690 8233. ’. •' ‘ 



mmimsMm m 










































































BUSINESS people 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER IS, 1985 


TF77 _ _ 17 C* PC' 1/T. 5 CURRENCY MARKETS 




yffy By Brenda Erdmann . . . • 

III LaSmJZgSSTtoi- CCF Qiabmum Quia 

I; erations to L(md(m from itJi MmTwL / Roam 

i ^ headquarters. ; PARIS— StatwjwnedCrtd- . 

• *;+• With the .move, tbi computer it Commercial de France said 
[; 3'-; maker has named GJ). (GO) Wit Thursday that hs chairman, 
kams to the new post of viceprest Claude Jouven, resigned to pro- 
i. “ ent tor Europe. Mr. Williams w3I teat management- decisions 

h. . ^1 V 3 *ke president of Control "made by the finance minister, 
Data’s international division, T.C.. KerreBWgpvoy. 

Roberts, and wffl harc responsbfl- In a prepared statement, the 

: ; gilt vy far the company's operations in bank said mat Mr. Jouven’s res- 

1? cbimaies in the European re- ignadan arose from “a funda- 
i^jjVijaQn wtth total annual revenue of mental disagreement" over the 
'^ore tha n S700 million. - government’s handling of a 

. n . Mr. Williams joins Control Data plan to link CCF and two other 

from. Schl umb erger Ltd. After state-owned banks tinder a 
:> wori Mg w ith Scfalumbtagerin Brit- newly established holding com- 

ain, first in marketing andthen in pany, Ge. Financier du GIF. 

.M; general manag ement, he has man- I- ____ 

aged companies in.the electronics 

v 5 P 0 ® 10 ^ Peter Lougheed toils inter 
Entopeand Asia. Most recendv he national advisorv^ndL Uhti 
, j *A was a wee president at Fairchild, a recently, Mr. LW*ed was ore 


ignatian arose f rom “a funda- 
mental disagreement" over the 
government’s handling of a 
plan to link CCF and two other 
state-owned banks tinder a 
newly established holding com- 
pany, Ge. Ftnandfere du CCF. 


dal operations for Greece, Ireland 
and Northern Africa. In his new 
post, Mr. Nunez will continue to be 
responsible for Northern Africa 
while turning over has duties for 
Greece and Ireland to Bengt 
Braun. Mr. Braun will hold the tide 
of general manager <rf special oper- 
ations for Greece, Ireland and 
Scandinavia. He moves to Geneva 
from Stockholm, where he was 
manager for Scandinavia. 

■ Dow Chemical Europe said Ste- 
phen LTelegdy, its director of gov- 
ernment affaire, will mow is cm 
Zurich to Brussels, where be will set 


- — When YouSay ' Speak to Me 
;er ItMayBeHalWhoAnsiJoers 

(Continued from Page 13) The systems available commer- 

.W- Saying ‘‘speak to me" brings the dally are primitive compared with 
1115 Intel system back to attention with the ones being developed. “On a 


Dollar Eases Lower in Europe, U.S. 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dapaidia 


a cheerful Tm back." 

Another friendly feature is a self- 
adjusting mechanism, in case a pa- 


scale of 1 to 10, the onrem systems 
are at about 3," said Raj Reddy, a 
professor at Caraegi e-Mellon Uni- 


NEW YORK — The dollar many trad ere are speculators or 
aimed slightly lower Thursday in technicians who base their deri- 


etary Market in Chicago, where down from 2.1480. and at 7.9600 
many traders are speculators or French francs, down from 7.9725. 


son’s way of saying a word changes vereity. The goal, he said, is for 
over time. If unsure of a word, the people to be able to converse with 
systems will ask questions. “Did computers without “training" the 
you say 'speak to m €T If the an- machine. Mr. Goldsidn describes 
swer is "yes" the system adjusts the this as “talking to Hal," a reference 
template for that word to the new to the computer in the film “2001: 


ninniiQTj iot scanaujavia. pattern. A Space Odyssey 

Dow Chemical Europe add Ste- There are about twp dozen of But since such a system would 
phen L Telegdy, its director of gov- these systems in use in industrial require a machine to be able to 
eminent affaire, wDl move from facilities, according to Stanley recognize different speakers who 
Zurich to Brussels, where be will set Goldstein, publisher of Speech do not pause between each word, 
up Dow’s liaison office with the Technology magazine. But he said Mr. Reddy estimates dm fully con- 
European Commission and other the number should increase sharply versau'onal systems are at least 10 
European institutions and trade as- in the next few years because cif years off. 
sedations. advances in speech-recognition Meanwhile, he said, researchers 

- Deretoncnen* Com, the technology and because vendors are hoping that the limited speech- 

U.S. of computer software, are now offering complete pack- recognition products that are avail- 
has named Irfan Salim to the new ages that require very Kttieadapta- able will be accepted for industrial 
post of vice president of European by users. and commercial applications. 


wines m panted Peter Lougheed to its inter-: operations. He is succeeded as gen- 
JFJiJg, ne ' “atonal advisory council Until manag er of the international 
- a recentl y» Mr.. Lougheed- was pre- division by Quotes Digate^ who 
m SSif ** Canfldiail P rovill “ of was general manager of Lotus's 
rl ',- Albata. ■ business products division. The ap- 


Eoropean institutions and trade as- 
sociations. 


Europe and the United States, but 
dealers said there was some ner- 
vousness about pushing it lower. 

A U.S. Commerce Department 
report that U.S. retail sales fen a 
seasonally adjusted 33 percent in 
October had little impact on a quiet 
market. Dealers had anticipated a 
decline of 23 percent to 3 percent. 

A New York bank dealer said the 
market “is ambivalent; traders are 
wondering whether this is an op- 
portunity to buy cheap dollars. 
There has been no jawboning or 
intervention by central banks for a 
couple of days and the market is 


sions on chan movements. 

“it’s not a bank-dominated mar- 
ket." be said "Chicago traders 
have been calling the shots and 
they will keep pushing the dollar 
lower until it rinds support." 

He noted, however, that the dol- 
lar has been down against the yen 


The British pound rose to 
$1.4295 from SI. 4228. In earlier 
trading in Europe, the pound 
dosed at $14275, up from $1.4245 
Wednesday. 

In other European trading, the 
dollar was fixed at 2.6122 DM in 
Fr ankf urt, up slightly from 26107 


27,1. , T v, 7*^ I Wednesday at 7.9600 French 

at the close of the futures market f . frora 7.951 and at 

±ZL2S I.W4 lire in Milan. ,p from 


for three consecutive days and 
“this could mean a continuing 
higher level for the yen if it indeed 
represents diversification out of the 
dollar." 

After a mixed showing on for- 


getting nervous about short posi- dgn markets the dollar finished 


lions in the dollar. 


lower across the board in New 


Danid Holland, vice president at York. It finished there at 202.65 
Discount Corp. of New York, not- yen, down from 20433; at 2.6105 
ed that most volume in recent days Deutsche marks, down from 
has been on the International Mon- 26180; at 2.1410 Swiss francs. 


1.76220. 

In Zurich, the dollar closed at 
11413 Swiss francs, a slight drop 
from Wednesday's 21418. 

la Tokyo, the dollar closed at 
20425 yen. almost unchanged from 
Wednesday’s 204.65. Later, in Lon- 
don trading, the dollar closed at 
20320 yen, down from Wednes- 
day’s 204.10. (UPI. Reuters) 


1 ‘ MS ,«Tt eF&ummaZ— Kceuuy, Mr.. Lougheed was pro- 

m n “ er °f Canadian province of 
Mountain View, California. Alberta. - 

ix3.‘ Williams “joins Control HyogoSomBaeklidistoopen 
Data to Tocus and coordinate the a representative office in London 

• - 5 S HSgS &!L“ t SL* trtt88,eS °“ && 5. The office the Kobe- 
. throo^ioul Eun^e, tbe company based bank’s first overseas, will 

» c ■ ‘ _ , . cover all irf Europe and win be 

7: 5^ For - the ( ^ t r ?“ e months <rf this headed by SbumctoGomi, tdw win 


Hyogo Sogo Bank Lrd. is to open, prantments are part of a reorgani- 
representative office in London 70^0^ at the company. 

1 Dec. 5. The office, tbe Kobe- r, . . . , . « 


Company Results 

Revenue and profits or losses. In millions . are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


THE 




Drexd Bundnm Ijotot Seen* Auiralta 

rities Ltd. in London has named 

^ SohMnlKgan a director. Formerly 
jonn,whowfll du-r ^£- at Onadrer S«mriti« ***--. ™ 


year Sntrol Data reported a loss- hold the title of dtirfiwresenta- ^.trader at C^adret Securities 
■ 1 ®ahon on revenue of dve. He moves to LoSfrom Ltd. urLondc^Mr. Mulligan sne- 

53.69 Nfficm. - Kobe, where he was senior deputy 

Amer Groi* said its president genera! manager of the bank’s in- s * x ® siblc for Emt^ond 


Westpac Banking 
Ymt 1985 T9M 

Gross Rrw 6Jia Mia 

Pr ofi t s SOJS 305 M 

Per Shore 0729 a?47 


trading. 

Gmmess Peat Group PLC has 


Plessev 

ted Over. 1985 

Revenue 323 J 

Pretax Profit 31^ 


Sweden Campbell Soup 

RalifbHi mower. 1985 1984 

BOJttlen Revenue __ T/T70. 9 988 

f Mantes 1985 T984 Netlne. 51S *Lj, 

Revenue tMfi. 4^8& Per Share 080 073 

Ooer Profit. I8U 3SOO Per shore mutts adjusted 
fora f-tar-l stack s/dtt In Jutv 

Ericsson (UMJ 

'rSS 5?__ 71^ 1»!SS JoyWonufac^UiB 

P rwlfcs— rnt ss\A «h Qwar. 1985 1984 

Per Share &52 19.71 Seyemie — tibj 202-8 


Prices Soften Amid U.S. Treasury Concerns 


By David Ress 

Reuters 


to SO basis points over Treasuries 
to around 70 to 80, bat borrowers 


LONDON — Eurobond prices don’t want to pay that much for 
eased in lackluster trading domi- dollar Eurobonds," one dealer said. 


joy Momrfactoring nated by concerns that backlogged Thursday's issues included a 
'.9*T - igj U^. Treasmy borrowings would flOO-milliiM, 12-year floating rate- 

tous* w push domestic bond prices lower note for New Zealand, on the «nn» 


SSI 8 «Q«W. 

If .71 Rryenve — 

Net Inc. 

Per StKJTT— 
Year 


,?£ once tbe debt ceiling is increased, terms as a New Zealand issue 
silers said. launche d in July, paying 1/16 over 

They said that these worries have three-month London interbank of- 
fset the impact of buying by fered rate. Tbe two wiD be fully 
me investors looking to pick up interc han geable, 
dds as the spread between Euro- The note, lead managed by S.G. 


cm /ypni i. lot cjtstrom, woo cur- imoYuge,wiw formerly was in the appointed David Kelly and Bruce p c rshar._ amt cum? £££« iso iZZ 52TS?* — 

rentlyis executive vice. president of banFs Tokyo office as deputy gen- UreefltoitsboariLMr.KdlyisdDe »g »»g =£? pTra^Z ’am ^8 

Ramna Repola Oyand u responsi- eral manager of the international to retire at year-end from the board n* *j 

ble for the groups forestry mdus try business division. of PA International ftdtain’s Jarg- PerSte T w — aiJMS T h ai l a n d lo %J' tt"™' 

■'j; LT r,'' r businesses, will become Amer Brocter & cZtnMe. AG in Geneva est consultancy group. Mr. Llisdl is Canada Bangkok Bank /«« tor provision pSh- 

^ Vo. G I? U P. ,S °Q April 1. He has-appointed Rafad A. Nunez as a ma na gin g director and tbe chief MottwiCos. g 18 ^- 

wll jom the company on Feb. 17. general manager of speaal opera- <ygating officer of Gu inn es s Ma- 2ndo«or. i9ts m* parshorY — us il 2 s MacytRJO 

Amer Group is based in Helsinki tions for the Middle East, with the hon & Co, the merchant banking : ^5 ^ United Stares «« 

u ^ ^.mterests m the manufao- exception of SamEAraWa. He sue- arm of Gmmiess Peat opersi»«_ om tus AJex.a Alex. svc. iS Sw 

■ r; fpreof Cigarettes, pnnongandpub- ceeds Ronald G. Pearce, who, as Locaslmtetries PLC, the British i«o i!So «Qmr. ms i9« 

■--ua. hshmg, paperwholesalmg and am- previously reported, was named mate of aerospace and amomo- gSSSfc ^ & SSTz: ^ ^ WQ I^ iTu tm 

yertmg, sporting goods and the general manager of tbe British arm bfle parts, has named Jean-Oande » - — « ^ ^ 


_ 


verting, sporting goods and the general mmagpr of the British aim bile parts, has nawwd Jean-Qaude 
importation and marketing of can- erf Procter & Gamble, the Cindn- Martin managing director of Tjw-as 
g°°^- , nati-based soap, detergent and France SA. Mr. Martin, who previ- 

Morgan Grenfell & Ca, the Lon- food concern. Previously, Mr. oosiv was with Air France, sne- 


Molson Cos. 
tedOuar. 1985 

Revenue 53BJ> 

OpirNfi 1 U 

Oper Share— O M 

let KaW 1985 

Revenue itfO 

Offer Net 224 

Offer Share— 1.13 


Bangkok Bank 
3rd Qoor. 1985 1984 

Profits 241J 3919 

1984 Per Share SOS 1L2S 

w United States 

074 

|n4 Alex. A Alex. Svc 

7,030. ted door. 1985 1984 

aaa Revenue 234-2 20U5 

1^5 Met Inc. I M 8.90 

Per Shore OM oat 

9 MoatTK 1985 1984 

Revenue 673J 5837 


^nnuudeswritee tnft S3S offset the impact of buying by 
some investors looking to pick up 
yields as the spr^d between Eim>- 
foaaues. bond and U^. Treasury secimties 

Mflcy (Rjo yields remains wide. 

HtQuor. 1985 1984 _ . ,. 

Revenue — 1790. uno. The wide spreads are discoiing- 

p&shoreZI *£2 ait ing potential borrowers from 
lannrfiing doUar-deuominaled Eu- 
robonds, with Thursday’s issues 


2 crLi PerkJn-Elmer 

lstOuer. 1985 1984 

1134 Revenue 2915 2*5.9 

1984 Net Inc. 145 175 

qtL? Per Shore— 072 079 

MJ Prior year net includes ore- 
045 lax goto of sji mtuion from 


Warburg & Co., closed at 99.70 to 
99.75, down from the 99.75 to 99.85 


rope, lead manager Banque Paribas 
Capital Markets said. 

The issue was quoted at a dis- 
count of ^4, well inside the P.4- 
percent selling concession. 

In tbe Deutsche- mark sector, 
Haindl Finance BV launched a 
100-million DM, 7-percem bond 
due 1997 and priced at par in tan- 
dem with a 150- million- DM, zero- 
coupon issue due 2000, priced at 
36.25 for an effective yield of 7 
percent. Deutsche Bank AG was 
lead manager. 

The recent l_2-billion-DM float- 
ing-rate note for Malaysia held 


quoted for the July issue Thursday steady at 99.36 to 99.39, inside total 
morning, but inside total fees of 35 fees of 60 basis points, at which 


basis points. 

The Victorian Public Authorities 


£ ^ on ^ )ase ^ merchant bank, has ap- Nnnez was general manager of spe- ceeds Melvin Guest 

IMA . tsrn^ J ^ : 12 Month ' ScOesin N. 

* Thursday s °* '* L ^ JP •* an, 

^msebP — ^ — 


France SA. Mr. Martin, who previ- , SJSSSrJT & S SySfiSTfi 

AirFnmce, sue- KKL_ Jffi ^ SSST tSTSSSSS SU%C%9SS 

ceeds Mehin Guest. ot tn imtomrltlag ooom- mutton from restructuring a! 

P»r Share — 1979 2004 ttons. aeoratlons. 


co ming in the European currency Finance Agency’s 75-million-Euro- 
unit, British pound and Deutsche- pean-currency-unit, 8%-perccnt, 


mark sectors. 

“Investors are attracted when 


five-year, par-priced issue won 
strong demand, particularly from 


we’ve seen spreads widen from 40 retail investors in continental Eu- 


levels it was beginning to attracL 
some buying, dealers said. 

They said the world's tin crisis 
seemed to have liule impact oa this 
or earlier issues by Malaysia, the 
world's largest producer of the met- 
al. 


12Mentb 
HIMLm Slock 


Satosifi Ml 

PN. YU Mto ■ HWi Low 3 PM. am 


12 Month 
HtohLov Stock 


Sawsbii 

F2EUE 


on 


Prices 


NASDAQ Price* as of 
3 pjtt. New York time. - 

Via The Associated Press 


i9w m 
21rt life 
29* 4M 


fit S2 

19U 1M 
354b 354b 

41 Vi 4114 




Safes In NO 

Ofv. m IBOs Hlah Low 3 PAL OiVe 


31 +14 

25*.— Vb 
19V» +1 

2m— v> 

tv . i 

17Vb + M 
21V> 

21 % 

164k 

T9V» + 4b 


n Month 
HtohLow Stock 


Dht. YM. 160s Htoh Low 3 PM an* 



34b 14y Lexhtta 22 

24U I7W Uebrr 77 7 31 

47U 40«b Ulrws 74 5 17 

TVb 44b LtfCom 346 

2046 114b UlyTuI JO 1.9 530 

38W 18Tb UnBrd 1118 

36^ 27V. UncT«H 2J0 03 10 

*SVs 21% LizCJo s JS 5 1778 

2544 20U LorvsF 17* 55 200 

3344 I5W Lotus 2438 

263- 1? Lyndcn 2 

1914 544 LvphOS 1288 


2 1th 1th— fb 
2214 214. 714. — 14 I 
47'4 4714 47>4 I 
fib 644 644 
15% 154b 1544— lb 
3644 3S4b 36»b + 4t 
3514 3444 3446 
42 411 m 4m— V, 

16 25U. 2» + 41 

20 19'4 1942 + 44 

221b 22 Vt 22 Vi 

171b 1714 I7W + 14 


124fc 3 V. CTS 10 

1614 916 CoBlho 48 

IHb 544 GaraaB .10 IS 32 

5641 2914 Genetch M9B 


91b 5 GanalS 
9 14b Gantx 

2514 9Vb GaFBk 
Bib 344 GeOMs 
2444 M GflisG* 
JOVx 14 GtaaTr 
17Vi 124b Cofoas 
23 1044 Son 

ISVb MVb GouIdP 
1946 1044 Grace 
946 54b Grontrv 
UVa 546 Grphl s 
741 4 GrphSc 

22% 124b GW5av 
12Tb 8 Gttoftl 
154b 8 Gfeeh 
19 12V. GulKrd 


GanalS 1*77 

Gone* 194 

GaFBk 30 

GarlMs 9V 

GflnG* 74 17 2565 
GtaaTr 3 

Gctoas 823 

Gan 569 

GouIdP 76 47 207 
Graco M 2J 111 
Craato* 6* 

Grphl s 18 

GrphSc 233 

GW5cv Mr 13 41 

GtSoFd 59 

Gl«Jl 10W 

Gullfrd JBe J 9 


44 GHBdc KJOC 


34b 3H 34b 
12 lift 1144— lb 
54k 5V. 54b 
554b 5416 5446— Vb 
9Tb 94h 91b 
11b 14b 14b— 1b 
25 241b 241b— Vb 

7V» 7 7 — W 

284b 191* 1914— 14b 
1446 14 1446 

Wb Ifit 164b + V4 
234b 2244 234b + 4b 
UVk 16 161b + 1b 

19 181b If + Vb 

Mb SVb 84b — Vb 
14V9 14W 14«b + 4b 
74b 7 7Vb + lb 
2146 20Vb 211b + 4b 
9Vb 8*b 84b— 4b 
1646 141b 16Vb +14i 

14 % ^ 



9Vb 44! 
T0U. 34b 
Ulb Mb 
21V6 14 
Mb 44b 
6V6 21b 
211* 17% 
tl% 7% 
6 2N 

414 2 

UV6 814 

18% 12 
S 3M 
I3Vb S9t 
U46 614 

2146 916 

15 54b 

3SVb 26 
21 % 8 
St 34% 
3 m 12 

31 lb 178b 
1646 m 
6th 3tfe 

26 154b 


34 m 
2044 746 


« 1J J 

UM 28 94 

L52 100 WW 

22 
500 

.U U 20 


19 

1M7 

IQS 

58 

*. u s 

70 20 ™ 
7S8 33 2744 
143 
150 


» ft «+* 

1Mb 9Tb 91b 
37\k 37 37 — Vb 

91b 94b 94b— lb 
754b 15 1546 + 16 

91b 916 ' 9Vb— lb 
7Vb 7 7 — 14 

1446 1446 1446 + lb 
11% Ulb 11% + 16 

mb li in* + » 
l6Vb UK 16% + 16 
1546 151b 15% + K 
316 3 314— Vb 

8 7% 7fc— K 

14K im WK 

KW 1066 10% + Vb 
Mk 2% 24*— Vb 

7% 7VJ 7Vb 
8 7% 746— <4 

20 1946 1946- 16 

3W. 20 20K 
13to 12% 13to + % 
12 1146 1146 

p r* 

2046 2416 24»— lib 
1914 UK 15% — K 
12K 12K 12K + Vb 



9ft 

9% 

9ft 

+ 

to 

33ft 

31 

32% 

— 

to 

W 

Uto 

13ft 



7% 

716 

716 

— 

to 

R* 

8% 

Oto 

+ 

% 

3% 

3% 

3% 

+ 

% 

52% 

52 

52 



16 

25% 

24ft 

24ft 

— 

% 

1016 

17% 

18ft 

+ 

ft 

22% 

22 

22% 


% 

5ft 

5 

5to 

+ 

% 

13% 

12ft 

13 

— 

% 

3to 

3ft 

3% 



14% 

14% 

14% 



» 

26% 

27 

+ 

to 

4% 

4 

4% 

+ 

% 


2VS 216 216 — to 

1246 12» 12to — 16 
1246 17VS 125U 
29 28 2046 + to 

71b 7% 7*b 
1316 13 1316 + VS 

7 6% 7 +46 

W% 10 lOto—VS 
■% 8% 8% + to 
21 20to 2046 
1546 15% 15%— to 
7 *46 *46 — <6 

2 lib 1%— to 
234* 23to 23=6 
1046 1046 104* + V6 
1146 11% 1146 — to 
9to 9% 9% 


H Month sol»s 

HOhLOwt Stock Dtv. YU lap, 

ltto 7to PrlcCm s 104 

** 3*to PrlceCo 290 

19to 9 Prtronx m 

* 4V. ProdOp .1* 37 19 

42 20% ProoCs .12 7 19 

15% llto PropiTr 170 10B 718 

19to 1Mb Provln 1 

29 12% Puri Bn M U 151 


15to 6 QMS 
9% 3% Quodrx 

1346 9 QuokCs 78 01 

3216 16k, Quonhn 
Sto 3% QueslM 
17*6 8U Quixote 
1*16 7to Qualm 


Ole .1 *55 
A2 3,7 466 
** 
60 
2 
85 

170 11 193 


.12 J 59 
.1* 1J 3* 
240 
20 

.15*11 3»5 
Tie 9 599 

174 2J 500 
72 17 235 
140 
6 

jo u n 


Salesfai Nat 

Dht. YkL lflPi Hlot) Low 3 PJVL Cilba 


8% 8% 8% 

41 to 60S. 41 to + VS 
13 12% 1246 I 

4% 44b 44b 
41 40to 41 + to 

12 llto llVb— % 
19% 19% 19% 

28to 27% 28to— 16 


12 Month 
HtohLow Stock 


Phi. YM. jjjh Htoh Low 3 PJVL OtW 


1546 9Vb JBRstk .1* 1J 141 

etk »* Jockpot 21 

41 to 2546 JoCXUe J1 

24Vb 1446 JamWtr 34* 

8% 4% JeJMOTt 82 

23% 14V6 Jerks .1* 7 658 

7to 3% JonletH I • 39 
10% SVb JofBhsn 44 

22 u. 9% Junes 4 

20to 1346 JWHR M 2A 1t7 


1Mb 10% 10% + to 
6to A A — to 
371 m 3646 3716 + >6 
24% 23 to Z4V6 + Vj 
SVb 4% 5 —to 
23% 23 23% + % 

6Vb 64b *% + Jb 
7% 716 7% + to 

22 21% 21% — to 

15% ISto 15% — to 



846 8Vb 8Vb — % 
8% 8% S%— Vb 
12to 11% 12*6 + Vb 
23 U< 22% 22% — U 
4% 4% 4tb + to 

lift 16% l*ft + to 
11% 11% 11% + Vb 


8 7 7% + Vb 

1A% lift 1*46 + to 
12% 12% 17ft + to 
9Vb 9V6 9Vb + to 

8*b Bib SVb 

31b 3 to 3%- to 

37ft 32 32ft + to 
19*6 1916 1916 — to 
2 1ft 2 + to 

21ft 21ft 21ft + lb 
9to 9% 9Vb + lb 

30to 30 30 — »b 

llto 10% 11 
5% 5% 5ft 
17to 1*46 1*%— ft 
Bft 8% B%— to 
10% lOto 10% + to 
18ft IBVb llto 
7ft *ft 71b + to 
28% 281b 28% — to 
45 44Vb 4446 + to 
17ft 171b 17K 
6ft 6ft 6Vb 
20% 2046 20% 

16% l6*b 16% 

29to 29 29 — to 

13 12% 13 

8% 8ft 8ft + Vb 
27to 27 27 — to 

1116 11 llto + to 
3ft 3% 3%— to 
llto llto llto 
23 2216 23 + to 


21*b 846 Stratus 2*61 

38to 29to StrwCIS 76 27 25 

Z3to 15 Slrvkrs S3 

17ltoU2 Subaru 278 U 97 

73to 3916 SubrB 1.92 26 279 

4% 2ft Summo 48T 

14ft 716 SumtHI .10 1.1 62 

K ft SunCsl 317 

IOVj SunMad 0 

10% 7% SuoSfcV 7 

Sto 3 Suprtex 3 

14 8% SvniOT 4? 

141b 6% Svntecti 53 

5% 2Vb Svnrrex 170 

2616 8% SVA&OC 139 

7% 3% Systln 171 

lift 6% Svslnla 12 

25to 14tb Svslmt JB J 131 


221b 21 22 +1 

38 38 38 

21 to 23 23to + U 
162to 161 to 1621b +1 
73to 72% 73*6 + to 
2% 2% 2% 

8% 8% Bft 
lft 1ft 1ft 
« 9 9 — to 

8% Sto ato 
3ft 3to 3to 
8ft 8ft Bft 
9% 9% 9ft— 16 
3% 3to 3to— to 
9to Sto Sto — to 
6% 6ft Aft + to 
10 10 10 
2Sto 24% 25% + lb 


4% 1% Oceaner 58 

T7Vb 10 OdllOX 87 

46% 33 OallGe IJ8 27 T17 

73% 40% OWoCo 280 25 T22 

J3% 2(1% OWKWS 1J» 3.1 168 

41% 23 OtdRpS 74 U 353 

22% l*ft CHdSotC 260 11J 25 

31ft 14 OnaBeff 53 17 272 

3% OnLlna 13 

19% 12% OffllcC 425 

48% 2246 OffllcR 157 

Ifto 12ft Orbanc 125 

BV* 5ft OrWI 314 

8 416 GrtaCff *39 

34ft 26% OtrrTP 276 U 53 
16% ■ OwnM s J* 1.0 129 

4% to Oxoco 151 


2 1% lft— ft 

13 I3to 121b + % 
39% 39% 31% — ft 
71% 71to 71% — W. 

33 3246 3246— Vt 

33ft 33% 32ft— % 
22ft 22 to 2216 
31% 30% 31 + to 

716 6% 7to + lb 

13ft 13% 13ft 

34 33 to 33 to— % 
1416 14 Mto 

6% 6ft 6ft 
7ft 7 7 ft + ft 

33 32to 32ft 

14% 14% 14% + ft 
to % % 


0% 10ft 10% + Hi 
4ft 13% 13% — Vb 
20ft 20% 

6 6 — ft 

19 19 — ft 

20 20% + Vb 
45 45ft + ft 
17ft 17te + ft 
79ft 80 — ft 

5ft 5ft 
6% 6%— VS 

6 6ft + ft 
29ft 29ft— 1 V» 
20ft 20% 

8ft 9% + ft 
15% lift + lb 
12ft 12% + to 
24% 24% + to 
4ft 4ft + to 

7 7 — to 
8% 9ft— % 
4% 4ft 

5% 5% — to 
2 Sto 
1% 1%— ft 

22% 221b 
6 61b 

B 8 

13% 13% + ft 
20% 21ft + ft 
24ft 24ft— % 
41b 4% + to 
17% 17H— ft 
33% 34to + ft 
39ft 39ft 
19% 21 to +1 
* 9 — to 

27ft 28 + % 

10ft 10% + to 
Mb 3to— W 
12% 12% + ft 
14% 15 +16 

19ft 19to + ft 
Mb 3ft— Vb 
14% 14ft— ft 
II 11—16 
151b 15% 

II llto— Ml 
2ft 2%— to 
50% 50% + ft 
25ft 25% — ft 
8% 8% 

14ft 14ft + ft 
29ft 29% 

17 17 

4ft 4to 
22% 22% — to 
18ft 16ft 
7% 7ft + to 
27% 27% + ft 
19 19 

21% 22ft + ft 
Bto 8ft 
14% 14% — ft 
8ft 9 
7ft 7ft 
28% 29ft + ft 
14 14V6 + % 

24% 24ft— to 
15ft 35% + ft 
4ft 4ft — to 
5ft 5ft— ft 
14ft 14ft— to 
23ft 23ft— ft 
6% 7 


25 — % 
3% — to 
18% — to 
3ft— ft 

as-w 

35to 

Bft— !b 
35% + to 
17ft + % 
2ft + to 
10 - to 
18% — % 

P1Z 

10 % 

25ft- ft 
*% 

ft- to 
10% 

9% 

24% — ft 


70 

37 

18* 

25to 

ZSto 

25to 



704 

16% 

lift 

16ft 

Tie 

J 

15 

Sto 

Hto 

816 


1332 

13 

12% 

12%— ft 



129 

13% 

U% 

13% + to 

791 

4j0 

3 

27to 

27V. 

2716 

70 

27 

7V 

54% 

J3ft 

53ft— to 

76 

7 

284 

25% 

24ft 

24% + % 

.llr 

IJ 

59 

10 

9ft 

9% + % 

-08 

19 

5S9 

28 

27% 

27ft + % 


43 

6% 

6ft 

6ft 

JKa 



17% 

i/% 

17%— ft 

174121.9 

131 

71b 

6% 

7% +1 



24 

llto 

lift 

11% 





4to 

4% + lb 

LDO 

14 

223 

29to 

2»to 

29 - to 



637 

5to 

4% 

5% + to 



136 

3% 

3 

3 

.08 

7 

1161 

32ft 

31 

32% +1% 

.12 

28 

10 


4to 

4to— to 

70e 11 

251 

19% 

19% 

19% — % 

20 

37 

373 

39% 

JV 

39% 

70 

.9 

44 

22 

21ft 

21ft 



32 

24% 

24% 

24% — to 

M 

37 

144 

45% 

45 

45% - to 





19to 

19% + % 



648 


14 

14’6 

ma 

7 

60 

10% 

10% 

lOto + % 

78 

5J 

S3 

5 

4% 

4%— to 


9to 

5to VLI 



235 

Aft 

6% 

6% 

14% 

7to VLSI 



867 

12% 

12to 

1216 

12 

3% VMX 



98 

Aft 

4% 

4% 

11% 

7% VSE 

.16* 17 

B 

10 

9ft 

9ft 

20ft 

6 Valid Lo 



859 

a 

7% 

8 + % 

22% 

8'6 VOlFSL 



199 

17to 

17 

17% + to 

4216 

26% VoINfl 

170 

37 

2287 

37ft 

36% 

37% +1 

31ft 

19ft ValLil 

.40 

17 

395 

22ft 

22 

22ft + % 

19ft 

llto VanDus 

A0 

21 

53 

19% 

1916 

19% + % 

15V6 

416 vonzetl 



59 

5 

4ft 

5 + to 

6% 

2% Venire* 



121 

5% 

5% 

5% 

28ft 

13ft vicon 

Me 

S 

483 

19ft 

19 

I9’A — % 

13% 

6% VledeFr 

me 27 

482 

7% 

7% 

7ft 

14% 

9% Viking 



26 

13% 

13to 

IJto 

2Dft 

13ft VIratak 



47 

20to 

19ft 

20 + to 

12% 

5ft Vodovl 



274 

Aft 

6% 

6% 

22 

uft voitmi 



61 

I9to 

19 

19 — to 


TTMI 


.96 4.9 337 

74 17 40 

266 

17* 7.7 117 

JD 11 91 

515 
168 

M 13 34 

14 

6 

485 

-40 20 112 

14 

.98 27 597 

470 
176 

ITS 28 738 
505 
17 
28 

J03I 186 

TO 27 53 

M 47 B 
225 

■15e 17 28 

70 37 143 


19% 19% 19% + to 
14 13% 14 + to 

10 0% 9% — to 

23to 22ft 23 + to 

28ft 28ft 38% + to 
14% 14to 14ft— to 
6ft 6% 6 to — to 

12% 12 12 
IBtb 17% 17ft + to 
7% 716 7%— to 

15ft 15V6 15% + ft 
31 19% 20 + to 

11% llto 11% 

SSto 35 35 — to 

3ft 3ft 3% 

41m 4 to 416 

4416 43% 43ft— to 
14 13% 14 + ft 

18% 18<6 IBto + to 

S 4% 4% — to 

4ft 4% 4ft + % 

16% 16’6 16to 

12% 12% 17% + to 

19% 19to 19% 

8% 8% 8% 

23to 22% 22% 


8% lft xeaec 
13% 5% Xlcor 
17% 1016 Xidex 


24% 

13% KLAs 



477 

20 to 

90 

X 

9 

4to KVPtx 



37 


Bft 

8% + % 

26% 

13ft Komoni 















17% 

1016 Kaiter 

73 


2S7 

Iff* 

1(1% 

I0to- to 

urn 

6to Kavdon 



3 

9% 

9% 

9% 

72% 40% Kemp 

180 

2.9 

281 

63% 

67% 

63 + 16 

49% 3Sto KyOlLf 

170 

Z1 

62 

47% 

44 to 

47% +lto 

8% 

4% Kevw 



» 


5% 



6ft KayTm 





91b 


816 




1 



2%— to 

Zl% 

13 KlnOer 

416 

J 

692 

18 

17% 

I7to + to 

13ft 

4ft Kray 

M 

7 

100 

7ft 

/% 

7ft 

1Mb 

11 Kruger 

76 

27 

231 

16 

15ft 

16 + % 

29% 

BVb Kulcke 

.121 

17 

504 

1216 

llto 

llto 


IDA 51b FMJ ■ 2*57 

3ft - -1V6 Pom Rest 72 

27% 10% FarmF 271 

69H dm FrmG 178 U 313 

23% U FedOffS Ml 

7to 3ft Parofltf 2W 

17% 716 Hbraa* 65 

3446 2Hh HfCTB -172. 41 MZ 

59% ~ 35V, PIHhT* 170 77 57 

3m 21% FMl 78. IS 59 

18% 12% FNtflk 70 At 41 

6% , 316 Ffnate 70 A3 8 

9 4% Pin mv ' ■ IS 

Uft 8 Flmoan B 

Xtt bl% PAHBk 1.12 X4 249 


10ft 10% 10ft + % 
1% 1% 1%— K 
TZ lift 12 
68ft 68% 68% + % 
19% 19% 19% + ft 
4% 416 4% + to 

14to 14ft 141b 

am 3i» nib— ift 
*T% 50 61% 49ft 

3Sft 37ft 38ft + % 
15ft 14ft 14ft- ft 
Mi 3ft 3ft 

lb AiB=tt 

m* 320b 33 


170 U 13 
•If J 91 
as 1 A 7 

70 3L1 11 

78 09 107 

n 17 9 

72 17 101 


S*b Sto 5ft 

20% i9ft a 

13 1W 12 to 
19ft 19% 19% 
5116 50% 50% 
23% 23% 23% 
14% 14 .4 

Ifto 15% 15% 
17% 17ft 1716 
55% 55% g% 
27ft 28% 26% 
6% Sto 6% 
1016 to Oft 
8% TJb 5% 

2% 2*4 2$ 


172 

42 

637 

32 

31ft 

1706 27 

01 

-Sto 

41ft 



1*5 

19% 

19 

M 

54 

71 

14ft 

16% 



95 

14% 

16% 

.13 

17 

72 

7VS 

7ft 

40 

5.1 

49 

12ft 

lift 



151 

5% 

5 

t 


653 

1316 

12% 



165 

rsft 

18% 

7* 


Id 

ir% 

12% 

J 

434 


7ft 

220 

67 

14 

34 

33ft 

48 

27 

TOO 

27ft 

27 

Mr 

7 

421 

10 

9ft 

1.12 

47 

IU 

25ft 

34ft 



313 

7to 

61b 

-lie 14 

941 

10% 

9% 

JO* 17 

<720 

1 8ft 

18ft 



63 

2ft 

2ft 



160 

291* 

28ft 

40 

24 

147 

23% 

23 

.92 

27 

789 

33% 

» 

.12 

14 

2 

Bft 

Bft 



33 

10% 

9% 



42U 

20 

19 



23 

43 


23% 

lft 



21 

13ft 13ft 



125 

tm 

11 

.13 

4 

.84 

3216 

31ft 



164 

9 

Bft 



43* 

Aft 

4% 




mg 


24to 14to YlowPs 


30% 5% Zen Lbs .101 A 1364 

13ft 10% Ziegler 78a 19 is 

42% 31 Zioout 1J* 34 39 

llto 3ft Zivoa 21 

I5to 6% ZenOvn 781 3 110 


26% 25% Tito + ft 
17% 17ft 17ft 
41 to 40ft 40ft — ft 

6 Sto 6 
11% 11 11%— to 




Solution to Previous Puzzle 


mono acaaia naasa 

□non anas anano 
BEDiaanaaa manmn 

Hmaaaa raamiDaEi 
BdBnaci nnacita 
□ODD □□□□ □□□□ 
oBmoaoo] anaaoiDa 
□Bn naa acin ana 
□□□□aoa aoDDaoni 
qdsq EnmacD odds 
□ nmaa naaaaa 

□GQBQll QSlZIDClIu] 

□nsoa aaDQanDaa 

ocana iisbo nnom 

□□□□□ anas aaaa 














































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


again 

Him 


PEANUTS 


aaa an ■ 
Hiiama 


ASK VCUR PAD IF 
HE WANTS ME TO 
SHOVEL YOUR WALK.. 


HE SAID WHY SHOULD 
HE FAY YOU WHEN HE 
CAN 90 IT HIMSELF? 


HHHH 

MUM ■ 

aiaasa 




BECAUSE IF HE P0E5 IT 
HIMSELF, HE’S LIABLE 
TO HAVE A HEART 
ATTACK AND NEED 
BYPASS SUR6EKY._ 


BOOKS 


WHO WRITES YOUR 
COMMERCIALS? /3" 




UNCOMMON CLAY.- The Life and 

Work of Augustus Saint Gaudens 




BLONDIE 


By Burke Wilkinson. 428 pages. Photo- 
graphs by David Finn. S22.9S. 

A Helm and Kurt Wolff Book — Harcourt 
Brace Jovanovich, 1250 Sixth Avenue, San 
Diego, Calif. 92101. 


signed by White 

Gaudcns's gnioaui ■ 

ana — the bighe: **-;*. £ ; 

two feet nearer ^'^7. “^'', ' ' 

the Statue of Uix^S j " - '■ 
where to be Vis 1 ’'S'. 

famo us New icrK . -7 - !T" 
moved to Philadelphia 1 
was pulled down « W — f . 



!!■■■■ aamaaa 


THAT'S GREAT. 
ALEXANDER 1 


hUATS A 
CDU-ESE 


iTHATS A 


I pea o 

CONTRACT 


Solution to previous puzzle on page 17 
ACROSS 48 Neophyte 



Ithats back 


TO REALITY 


1 Animal's 
blister 

6 Autumnal cry 
9 G. I. 's therapy 
center 

14 Keep an 

the ground 

15 Lawyers’ erg. 

16 Sicilian 
seaport 

17 Meantime? 

19 Jeopardy 

20 Turkish title 

21 Heel 

22 "Strike not 


Shak. 

24 Shade of brown 

27 Gable role 

25 River to the 
North Sea 

29 Sound 
investment? 

31 Virgil's epic 
opener 

34 Latin’s lunch, 
perhaps 

36 Margins 

39 Lixivium 

40 Virgule 

42 A descendant 
of Aaron 

43 Herd of seals 

46 Lhasa 

(type of dog) 

47 African 
antelope 

•C Heir Font 


48 Neophyte 

50 Aust. state 

52 Whet 

54 Recondite 

59 Preserver’s 
activity 

61 On the" 

vive 

62“ pig’s 

eye!” 

63 Emulate 
Barrymore 

64 Old-timer? 

67 Versifier 

68 Storied age 

69 Sacred song 

70 Maudlin 

71 Flow’s 
counterpart 

72 Marble 


18 Sites of some 
front porches 

23 Skipper’s dir 

25 High time in 
Hampshire? 

26 Con on the run 

30 Buffet 

31 Peak 

32 Kind of rug 

33 Pacemaker? 

35 Jai 

37 English 
cathedral city 

38 Newscaster’s 
time 

41 What R. 


ScloJ»3 



Reviewed by John Gross 

A ugustus saint gaudens » the 

foremost American sculptor of his rime, 
but he has had to wait until now for a biogra- 
phy — in large measure, no doubt, a reflection 
of how rapidly he fell out of favor as artistic 
tastes changed in the generation following his 
death in 1907. 


the art world of the h» ■£ */-* 4C. 
who posed for Dianas oou>. 
moddedon Davida*- 1 ^ There ^ ^ 
tow* of Lordd Lee in the swa-; . . v 
quotes from an interview a- 

l ep on er. . „ , 


BEETLE BAILEY 


WHATlS W 


WITH YOU, 


soLPie/? 


X HAVE A 5 AD BACK I % 
FROM SLEEPING IN | f 


1 Sired 

2 Presto's 
opposite 

3 Behind 

4 Adam follower 
5Bilko, forone 

6 Plunders 

7 "Dr. Seuss’s 


8 Sunk fence 57 Gusset 

9 Ecstasy 58Vaisyai 

10 Turned inside 60 Indian 

out clarifie< 

1 1 Watchman? 65 Coronal 

12 Uniform prop 

13 Hay packer 66 Cord un 

Times, edited b? Eugene Maleska. 


Lovelace loved 

44 Opposed 

45 Stockings and 
socks 

47 Part of i.o.u. 
49 Japanese 
game of 
forfeits 

51 Brand 

52 Bitter 

53 Plant of the 
nettle family 

55 Newly hatched 

56 Laria't 

57 Gusset 

58 Vaisyaisone 
60 Indian 

clarified butter 

65 Coronation 
prop 

66 Cord unit 



ANDY CAPP 


I'M S£KAJI>T)RH>OFfT70Ur 

ATVMORKL ALL CvW. COVONQ -< 

HOME TO /WORE WORK IN THE 
EVENIN&.THE SAME OLD -< 
^ ** KXmNE-.' 1 1 


I CiWlDrtiimmNmwpm.1 
Onl bT Nm AmMea SfiMKJM . 


NOW L OOK M ERE, 
PET, WE’RE ALL 
> IN THES^ME -s 
( BOOT, VKNCTN- 


HOW ABOUT ME? 
TO TRUDGE 
> Down to the SA 

[ PUSBDRA PlE } 

) AND A PI NT— 4J 
'THEN STUCK 


-n-ERE 4 SALWXWS 
> SOMEONE _y 
r WORSE C3FF ^V 

L thannourselfT 


Nor did the two volumes of his memoirs that 
appeared in 1913 do much do keep interest in 
hurt from ebbing away. They were written, as 
Burke Wilkinson explains in “Uncommon 
Gay,” when he was already mortally 3i- with 
his wife and family standing over him. and they 
present a bland image that conveys little of his 
robust personality and almost nothing of his 
tangled private life: 

The most obvious concealments were those 
concerning his marriage. His wife came from 
an old New England family, and marrying her 
in 1877 represented a step up socially. (Saint 
Gaudens himself was the son of a French 
shoemaker who had settled in Dublin and then 
emigrated to the United States not long after 
his son was born.) But doe was also a difficult 
woman, notorious for her stinginess and her 
sharp tongue. 

By the early 1880s, Saint Gaudens had fallen 
in love with a Swedish-born model whom he 
called Davida (after Michdangelo’s David, 
Wilkinson surmises — her real name was Al- 
bertina). They had a son, and be continued to 
lead a secret life with her until a year or two 
before his death. 


altogether.”) 

The account of the Adams Moniimeawa 
Washington naturally strikes a more 
note. A powerful and mysterious pieceof » * - 
commissioned by Henry Adam* to 
bis wife Dover, h has cast its spdl on 
admirers. from Mart Twain to febn Gals ■ 
thy. (In “The Forsyte Saga « gjw» Smbw* 
Forsyte more pleasure than anything ids* tu. 
sees in America.) Wilkinson is at hi!* ocst 
HwrtKwwg the monument's origins, its rwxp- 
Arm Umk ArtanK's friendship With SdUtt 


Despite the undoubted hold that she had 
over Ins emotions. Davida remains a shadowy 


sees in America.) wiuaira-n » ■« --- 

discussing the monument's origins, its raxp- 
tion, and Henry Adams's friendship with Sunt 
Gaudens in generaL 

He also writes wefl about the Robert Gould jf 
Shaw Memorial on Boston Common — ■ Shaw 
was a young Massachusetts aristocrat who nau 
been killed leading his regiment of Hack sol* 
diersin theCivil War— ttough unaccountabl) 

he omits to mention that its presence pervades 

one of the most notable modem American 
poems, Robert Lowell's “For the Union 

i n 


ALL AFTERNOON. 
BVrt^EaWB/TTNS 
. BOR MY P INNER - 


figure, and there is little that WIBrinsoq can 
add to the bare outlines of the story. The most 
rewarding portions of “Uncommon Gay” are 
in fact these that dial with Saint Gandens’s 
professional experiences. 

Wilkinson (a former State Department offi- 
cial and the author of a number of previous 
biographies) writes in a somewhat florid man- 
ner. and he has a weakness for playing around 
with hackneyed quotations — he is not above 


WIZARD of ID 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



AWOi f&P- 
TH&Vlt » 

ftuutfea 




.-rtnrhidwig a chapter cm Saint Gaudens’s bas- 
reliefs wiui the a mmen t “For these reliefs, 
much thanks.” 


Bm to up for this be quotes a fine 
pasgag p- from Sant Gaudens in which the 
sculptor excases himself for hi s top g delav m 
compkiing the memorial (commissioned in 
1882, it was not onvdkd until 1897) by arguing 
rhar it would have been unforgivable for turn to 
have gi ven anything less than his best: 

“There is something extraordinarily irritat- 
ing, when it is not ludicrous, in a bad statue. A 
poor picture goes into the garret, books are 
forgotten, hut the bronze remains.” 


REX MORGAN 




S THAT THE J 
WOMAN ^ 
/HO WANTS 
D TALK WrTH 
ME ABOUT * 
IER FATHER*? 
S ^HE HERE 
. YET? yjrli 


SHE CAME IN ABOUT 
11530/ SHE'S QUITE 

concerned.thinks 

SOMETHING'S WRONG 
► WITH HIM— BUT 
DOESNT KNOW HOW. 
TO GET HIM TO A ^ 
DOCTOR/ *SHE SAYS HE'S 
HAD A PERSONALITY . 


DID YOU Tea HER I'M 
NOT QUALIFIED TO 
TRACTI CE PSYCHIATRY? 


But what he lacks in finesse he makes np for 
in honest enthusiasm — a prime requisite whm 
dealing with someone as full-blooded as Saint 
Gaudens — and in the diligence of his re- 
search. He has unearthed agrealdeaiof worth- 
while material, some of it highly entertaining, 
and his narrative is mhancwi by fiist-ratc 
photographs of Saint Gaudeas's work by Da- 
vid Finn. 

The sculpture that put the artist's name 
firmly on the map was the memorial to Admi- 


ral Farragut in Madison Square Park. New 
York. It also represented his first collaboration 


York. It also represented his fust collaboration 
with the architect Stanford While; who de- 
signed the base. The two men were to work 
together on some even more striking schemes, 
most notably Madison Square Garden, de- 


Among the oth e r episodes that enliven u Un- 
common Clay," there are chapters on the Sher- 
man statue in New York (which would have, 
been sited near Grant's Tomb rather than in 
Grand Array Plaza if there had not been bod 
feeling between the Grant family and the sur- 
viving Shermans), and on Saint Gaudens’s 
warm friendship with Robert Louis Stevenson 
Wilkinson also dean np a mystery that 
have bothered many people coming across 
Saint Gandens’s name (winch is generally hy- 
phenated in reference works). The sculptor 
p ro n oun ced it as though it were English (or 
American! --grf as in ‘gaudy/ a ens' as in 
‘enslave.’- . 


John Gross is an the staff of The New York 
Times. 



BRIDGE 


Aren't 'tou allowed td drive a car either ? J 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold end Bob Lee 


Unscramble these tour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to fonn 
four onlinary words. 


. 1 •- ufacLza 

| - 

I . ' *s*i 










































*»Ks 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


Page 19 


SPORTS 




- : r V 

■ f‘-4 

. C , 

• r v i-^ 

&*, 

- ~ !r 

■ L 

• :;A 

p "■ II ■ 

;'V: ; 


,7^ 

:«.-5S 



Northern Ireland, Denmark Gain World Cup Finals 


Compiled ip Our Staff F/um Dispacha (98 feet). The ball was cmiing to- mark top spot in Group 6. with the 
LONDON — Denmark and ward the top left corner of the net, Soviet Union in second place and 
Northern Ireland booked places in but Jennings dived to palm it already assured of a finals berth, 
the 1986 World Cup soccer f inals around the post. Romania posted an easy victory 

Wednesday night, bnt they did so Northern Ireland's closest over Turkey in Izmir. After racing 
in starkly contrasting styles. chance at scoring before halftime into a 3-0 lead by the 5 2d minute. 

Denmark, which needed only- to came when winger Ian Stewart the visitors retreated into a defen- 
avoid a heavy defeat in order to aimed a center toward striker Jim- sive shell 
qualify for the first time ever, ®y Quinn, who was allowed a free ^ ^ ajght’s other European 
cruised to a 4-1 Group 6 triumph header from 12 meters out- But qualifier, Switzerland and Norway 
over Ireland in Dublin. Bui with Qumn nuscued, and the bail new broughuheir unsuccessful Group 6 
Group 3 rival Romania winning, 3- well wide. campaigns to a close with a 1-1 

I. in Turkey, the Northern Irish At the other end Kerry Dixon, draw in Lucerne. 
haH io mount a stubborn rearguard substituting for injured center for- p 

action to hold England to a score- ward Mark Hatdey, missed a sim- ^ countries have quail- 

i j .w Li P- nlA Mfliw whra 9 ctnurf pmn fr/sm „ . _ — . _ 


I '*'•*••* .... - -J. -w 1 * ’• * ^ 

• • .’f 


Wednesday night, bnt they did so 
in starkly contrasting styles. 

Denmark, which needed only to 
avoid a heavy defeat in order to 
qualify for the first time ever, 
cruised to a 4-1 Group 6 triumph 
over Ireland in Dublin. But with 
Group 3 rival Romania winning, 3- 
I. in Turkey, the Northern Irish 
had to mount a stubborn rearguard 
action to hold England to a score- 
less draw at Wembley Stadium. En- 
gland had already qualified; 
Northern Ireland gained the one 


Northern Ireland's closest 
chance at scoring before halftime 
came what winger Ian Stewart 
aimed a center toward striker Jim- 
my Quinn, who was allowed a free 
header from 12 meters oul But 
Quinn miscued. and the ball flew 
well wide. 

At the other end Kerry Dixon, 
substituting for injured center for- 
ward Mark Hatdey, missed a sim- 


ple chance when a smart chip from - 

Wpr^hi^rhW S 


May and June; five places arc stiB 

Northern Ireland gained the one «■- Dixon ^d only Jennings io beax f yhe timetable for the 

point it needed to deny Romania from hnle more to five mem. £ 

and reach its second strait finals. fore the IraWin Mexico City: 

&SSSSS 

csss^»iSi: ^ *= «“ 

ham reserves. Jennings set a world constant Pressure into goals. -Jen- jg. France Yugoslavia and 

international appearance record umgs made a refin save with his r -f yman y, all chasing the final 

for a goalkeeper by winning his n ^ 1 le S f.™)' 300 50011 qualifying berth in European 

1 13th cap, one more than Italy's a dangerous Q r0U p ^ p^y nnal matches, 

Dino Zoff. He kept his country’s ^ Dump over the bar. France playing at home against 

hopes alive by making three superb ■ Despite pubudy expressed Ro- Yugoslavia and East Germany 
saves — deflecting two shots away maman fears that the two teams hnctitip already-qualified Bulgaria, 
with his hands and sticking a leg might c oUn de. Northern Ireland's Nov. 17: Chile hosts Paraguay in 
oiu to Mock another. m a n a g er, Billy Bingham, was insis- jgg of South Ameri- 

The saves proved decisive as En- “p l that England had not simply can playoffs to deride the final 
gland’s strikers failed to penetrate a allowed ms team the draw it needed CONM EBOL berth. Paraguay 
solid Irish defense. On the only 10 re ?™ Mexico. leads, 3-0, from the first leg. 

occasion Jennings was beaten, on a Said Bingham: “If anybody was Nov. 20: The Netherlands is at 
chipped cxoss-aon-shqt by Gary watching the game and thought it home to Belgium in the second leg 
Stevens, the ball was hooked awav was bribed I would say, 'What ^ ^ European playoffs (Belgium 
off the Irish lineL ' about the chances England had and holding a 1-0 first-leg lead) and 

A frosty playing surface made it the saves Jenmngs made?’ England Scotland playing Australia in Glas- 
diffieuli for players to keep their had three very good chances, and g 0W jp ^ first leg of the Europe- 
feet, and few chances were created each time Pal rose to the occasion." an-Oceania group playoff, 
in the opening quarto 1 of the game D enmar k, after falling behind to Nov. 29: Iraq vs. Syria second 
as movement continually broke a sixth-minute Frank Stapleton leg, Saudi Arabia, 
down in midfield. header, bounced back with two Dec. 4: Australia vs. Scotland, 

Glenn Hoddle almost broke the goals by Preben Elkjaer and a goal second leg, Melbourne, 
deadlock in the 29th minute with a apiece by Michael Laudrup and Dec. 15: Draw for cup finals, in 
beautiful left-footer from 30 meters Jan Sivebeck. The result saw Den- Mexico Citv. (AP. UPI) 


Dwight Gooden 


Gooden ofMets Is Unanimous Choice 
As Top Pitcher in the National league 


By Joseph Durso 

New York Tima Service 


tones, winning 24 games and losing made the Mets last year, and start- 
only 4. He led the majors in strike- ed setting records as “the youn- 


NEW YORK — After only ton outs, with 268. He led the majors in gest" to pass milestones, one after 
o>a«a-irv: Jq the- big leagues* Dwight ettned-nm average, allowing only another. 

Gooden mademare basebaH histo- 1-53 runs every mne innings- He is As a 19-year-old phenomenon. 


Th* rr7 n 3 " ‘ ‘“I fore the draw in Mexico City: 
pie viators forced two comm N(W . ^ hosts x ±e 

2% ^ of ihTfLd playoff for the 

SgliTtog but^g tQ 1 nun reraainin 8 *«■» from the ^ 

“BS 16: France, Yugoda^ia uid 

rigbneg to deny Dcton, and soon 

SSS ffinhSE ovct Ihl ta?. r0 “ S S roup 4 - fv th “ {“ maIch<2 - 

maucroj viw « “ uie oar. France playing at home against 

Despite pubhdy expressed Ro- Yugoslavia and East Germany 

maman feus that the two teams already-qualified Bulgaria. 

might edto. Northern Ireland's J7 . chile hosts ParagiSv in 

manager, BiUyBmg^ was insis- thesecondlegoftheSouihAnieri- 

tept that England had not singly ^ plavoffrlo deride the final 

aU ° We l^ le?mthedTaW,tneed ' :d CONMEBOL berth. Paraguay 


to reach Mexico. 

Said Bingham: “If anybody was 


leads, 3-0, from the first leg. 

Nov. 20: The Netherlands is at 


watching the game and thought it home to Belgium in the second leg 
was bribed I would say, ‘What of the European playoffs (Belgium 
about the chances England had and holding a 1-0 fim-leg lead) and 
the saves Jennings made?’ England Scotland playing Australia in Glas- 
had three very good chances, and g0 w in the first leg of the Europe- 
each lime Pal rose to the occasion." an-Oceania group playoff. 

Denmark, after falling behind to Nov. 29: Iraq vs. Syria second 
a sixth-minute Frank Stapleton leg, Saudi Arabia, 
header, bounced back with two Dec. 4: Australia vs. Scotland, 
goals by Preben Elkjaer and a goal second leg. Melbourne, 
apiece by Michael Laudrup and Dec. 15: Draw for cup finals, in 
Jan Svebeck. The result gave Den- Mexico City. (A P. UPI) 



Pat Jennings, making his first-Jiatf save on Hodtfle’s curving thrive. 


"3-atjs' Gooden mademore basebaH histo- 
‘-i-rs iy Wednesday when he became the 
. • youngest pitcher ever to win the Cy 

\T. .Young Award, And he did it in 


youngest ever named 


North Stars’ New Coach on a Downer 


dominating, dazding style — by Dodgers, the leading performer in the year. This reason, he became 


sweeping all 24 votes cast for first 1965 and again in 1966. the youngest pitcher in modem 
place. Gooden also won 14 straight de- baseball to start an op ening game. 

Only three days dual of his 21st dsioins in 20 starts after May 25, and the youngest to win 20 in a 
birthday but already the l and lost only one game in the last season, 
symbol of the strikeout, Gooden fonr months of the season. In his two seasons in the big 

became the second pitcher in the *Tm honored to have my name leagues, he has won 41 games and 
New York Met history to win the listed with the other Cy Young win- lost 13. struck out 544 batters; he 
award as the National League’s nos,” Gooden said Wednesday has allowed exactly two runs every 
best pitcher. Tom Seaver won three “S 1 * 1 “ Shea Stadium, where the nine innings. 
times: in 1969, 1973 and 1975. Mets had arranged a dinner for him He did all that while earning 
: Gooden also became the seventh m anticipation of his winning the 540,000 as a rookie in 1984, and 
nitrhev in 1 79-vntr hidnrv nf thi» award. “So much has happened to dose to half a miTR on dollars this 


■jrj — award as the National Leagnefs Oooden said 

• >^"(V best pitcher. Tom Seaver won three night at Sh» Stadirn 
vi „ t times: in 1969, 1973 and 1975. Mets had arranged ad 

r .^ Gooden also became the seventh m antumarion of 'Ins 
. ; . r-_f^itcher in the 29-year histray of the award. “So modi has 
t award to win nflahimously, getting. * sh^t pe 


The Associated Press 

HARTFORD. Connection — 
Lome Henning, who knows all 
about life at the top, is starting to 
find out bow the other half lives. 


when he was assessed a gross mis- “It took us a while to gei on I - 

conduct penalty at the end of the track," said the Whalers' captain, tvto a i- 
game for using abusive language on “We knew we didn't have a good ™ A a t a nnings 
referee Ron Wicks. first period, but then we showed eastern confei 




Basketball 


IARD 


Hockei 


about life at the top, is starting to referee Wicks. first period, but then we showed 

find out how the other half lives. “9“ of their guys went across what we're capable of." 

In his years as a player and assis- the ice and chargal one of our men The North Stars got goals from 
taut coach with the four-time Stan- 300 w e get the penalty," Henning Brian Lawton and Neal Broteo. 
lev Cm champion New York Is- ^ " Wicks n»«r HW *e charge. Rav NenM , ^ fl%r , ha 


NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DKritlan 

W L Pet. GB 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick DIvIclMl 

W L T Ptl OF CA 


ley Cup champion New' York Is- 
landers in the tough Patrick 
Division erf the National Hockey 

NHL FOCUS 


rSLTSS? N “fdd scored twice for the 

I wasn t plrased. Whalers, who also got tallies from 

OtoKiawinnereW^nesday jorgenPeuereson, £y Ferraro id 

SylSnTn^ y 


of time year. He aged last spring for a Lea ^ winning was habitual. 

•qp unrl ham wnr /vf CTT^ OHO nhic m vihiu w- x-o-aguv, o 


an the first-place votes cast by a Rookie of the year last year, and base pay of 5275,000 phis commer- 
panel of baseball writos. He far now t htS-” rial fees and bonuses — including 

outdistanced John Tudor of the SL “StiD," he added, repeating one one for winning the Cy Young 
Louis Cardinals, who got most of of his favorite themes, “I would Award. 

the second-place votes, and Orel gladly trade both of these awards Ballots for the award are cast by 

Hershiser of the Los Angeles for one World Series ring. That’s, a panel of baseball writers, two for 
Dodgers, who got earned erf ihe what I win be shooting tor next each, dry in the league. They vote 
third-place votes. yeat”. . for three pitchers, with five prints 

But no pitcher hasrwon it at so Dave Johnson, the manager of given for a first-place vote, three 
early an Fema&do Valenzuela the Mets, sainted his prodigy by for second place and one point for 
of the Dodgers was selected in telephone from his borne in Orian- third. Gooden swept the 24 top 


MS 


Buffalo, Chicago. Detroit and 
Pittsburgh; Calgary and Winnipeg 
tied. 


The Whalers got a strong game 
from goalie Mike Luit, who 


horrendous Norris Division, losing 
is contagious. 

“We're not playing and concen- 
trating for 60 minutes," Homing 
said Wednesday-night, after -the 
North Stars suffered a 5-2 loss to 
the Hartford Whalers. 

“We gave them their Gist goal 
and then they started to beat us 


UN, 


1981, just after his 21st birthday, do, Florida, and said: “AH the votes for 120 points. Tudor, who one-on-one,” Henning fumed. “It 
Gooden, rookie of the year in 1984 awards in the world won’t make pitched 10 shutouts as he won 21 ^ a btmch of blunders after 
when he was 19 and a superstar this Dwight complacent The most re- games and lost 8. got 21 votes for thus" 

year at 20, wffl turn 21on Saturday. markaWethii^abouthimistiiathe second place and 2 for third. Her- Should it have come as a sur- 
The Cy Young Award, named seems to come up with something shiser got one vote for second place Norris teams — aB five of 

for the legendary pitcher who won new every start Just when you and 14 for third. them losers — have a combined 18- 

511 games around the turn of the dunk you nright have seen it all, he It proved to be a dazzling year 44-13 record. The Adams Division, 
century, became Gooden’s latest a m a z e s you a gai n.” for youth. The American League which includes Hanford, has nary 

achievement after a season in - Gooden has been amazing peo- award, announced earlier in the a loser and is an impressive 44-29- 


achievement after a season in - Gooden has been amazing peo- award, announced earlier in the 
- which he scored one success after - pie since be started striking out week, went to Bret Sabotages of 
X another. batters in Hillsborough High the Kansas City Royals, who 

He led the major leagues in vio- School in Tampa, Florida. He turned 21 last ApriL 


Minnesota, which has lost five of stopped seven of eight North Star 
its last seven games, let a 2-1 lead power plays and made 13 of his 23 
vanish in the second period as saves fo rite first period. 

Hartford, sparked by Ron Francis, “Mike kept us in the game in the 
scored three goals to take a 4-2 first period," said Hartford Coach 
lead. Francis wound up with four Jack Evans. “It was his best game 
assists on the night. this year." 


Picking Up the Slack, Johnson 
Guns Cells to 118-114 Victory 

The Associated Press stretch in the fourth quarter," 

BOSTON — One reason the Johnson said. “If 1 could. I'd bottle 
Boston Celtics have been in the it and save it for the next game. 
National Basketball Association Those things just happen.” 
finals for two consecutive years is “He hurt us when we didn't sign 

that they can play well even when him as a free agent, and he hurt us 


Boston 

7 

1 

JDS 

— 

Philadelphia 

12 

3 

D 

24 

49 

39 

New Jeraov 

4 

4 

M0 

2 

WcutiHtgion 

8 

4 

2 

18 

45 

So 

Philadelphia 

5 

4 

556 

rt 

NY Islanders 7 

5 

2 

14 

53 

51 

Washington 

2 

4 

■2S0 

3 

NY Rangers 

8 

8 

0 

14 

61 

54 

New York 

1 

a 

-111 

4ta 

New Jersey 

4 

7 

1 

13 

50 

53 

Central Division 



Pittsburgh 

5 

8 

3 

13 

54 

44 

Milwaukee 

8 

4 

M7 

— 


Adams Division 




Del roll 7 

4 A36 



Vi 

Boston 

10 

5 

1 

21 

70 

50 

Atlanta 

5 

5 

M0 

2 

Buffalo 

10 

S 

1 

21 

44 

47 

Chicago 

4 

4 

M0 

3 

Quebec 

9 

5 

1 

19 

44 

54 

Cleveland 

3 

• 

J33 

3to 

Hartford 

8 

7 

0 

14 

58 

64 

India no 

2 

s 

.284 

Vfi 

Montreal 

7 

7 

2 

16 

45 

67 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 


Midwest Division 




Norris Division 




Houston 

7 

3 

.778 

— 

Chicago 

4 

9 

1 

13 

44 

74 

Denver 

4 

2 

JSD 

VS 

Si. Louis 

5 

0 

3 

13 

47 

55 

San Antonia 

5 

4 

554 

2 

Minnesota 

4 

B 

3 

11 

57 

41 

Utah 

4 

4 

.400 

3 Vs 

Detroit 

3 

9 

4 

ID 

49 

80 

Deltas 

3 

4 

333 

4 

Toronto 

1 

12 

2 

4 

45 

44 

Sacramento 

2 

4 

.250 

*ta 


Smyttie Division 





Pad fie Division 



Edmonton 

11 

3 

1 

23 

80 

52 

LA. Lakers 

7 

1 

-B75 

— 

Calgarv 

B 

4 

2 

18 

70 

60 

Portland 

8 

2 

.000 

— 

Vancouver 

8 

7 

2 

18 

49 

48 

LA. Clippers 

5 

4 

554 

2W 

Winnipeg 

4 

B 

2 

14 

65 

77 

Golden State 

5 

5 

500 

3 

Los Angelas 

3 

12 

1 

7 

53 

85 

Seattle 

4 

4 

-400 

4 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 


Phoenix 

0 

9 

JU0 

TVt 

Boston 

RrrilAbi 




2 

4 

2 

41 

0— f 

48 M 

WEDNESDAY’S RE5ULT5 


Perreault (4). Housiev (5), Hamel 2 (41. Cyr 

Detroit 

25 31 32 30-118 

(2). Tucker (5); NUmtaiis (7). Pederson (9), 


MUwnwkN H M 31 34—137 

Usier M3 4-4 22, Pierce 10-13 3-2 22. Cum- 


The Associated Press 

andI4f0rthmL them losers — have a combined 18- BOSTON — One reason the 

It proved to be a dazzling year 44-13 record. The Adams Division, Boston Celtics have been in the 
tor youth. The American League which includes Hanford, has nary National Basketball .Association 
award, announced earlier in the a loser and is an impressive 44-29- finals for two consecutive years is 
week, went to Bret Saberhagen of 5. that they can play well even when 

the Kansas City Royals, who Henning's frustration wound up Larry Bud isn’t. ' 
turned 21 last ApriL costing him an automatic $100 fine Bird, the NBA’s most valuable 


mines 1MD 1-4 21; Trioucfca 9*U 14-14 32, PMlon) 15-11-8— 3 l 


Kasper (41. Dor I cao (21. Strata on ooal: Boston 
ion Barrnssoi 5-13-15-33; BuHolo (on 


LoimMer 9-19 3-4 21. Rebounds: Detroit 52 
I Lalmtwer 17), Milwaukee o5 ( Lisler 121. As- 
sists: Detroll 24 (Tnomas 14], Milwaukee 35 
(Pre&gev 10). 

Dallas 30 34 34 25— 115 

Ulab II 25 27 30— IN 


At 49, the Stilt’s Still Taking His Shots 


By Tim Liotta 

The Associated Press ' 

LOS ANGELES — Wit Chamberlain, a 
youthful bounce in bis step, glides into a 
crowded restaurant and dips between the 
tables with a supple ease that belies his frame. 

His 7-fooVl (2. 15-meter) presence is still as 
imposing as the numbers be etched in the 
record books of professional basketball. . 

And at 49, he still looks much as he did 
when he patraDed tiu lanes m the 1960s and 
early 1 970s, when he was called W3t the Stilt, 
a ferocious center known for thundering 
4rmtr<: i crashing rebounds and incredible 
stats. 

But the game, he played, the game be still 
follows dosdy, is afar ay from the game be 
so dominated until his retirement 12 years 
ago. 

“It’s a run-rrp-and-down- Lhe-conrt-and- 
dtmk-the-baU game. These are speed mer- 
chants and ] limping fools. That’s why their 
shooting percentages are going way op be 
says of today's National Basketball Associa- 
tion playecs. 

“I led the league 11 times in field goal 
percentage and my lifetime average was 54 
percent. -There are five billion guys out there 
now shooting over 54 percent.’ 

Changed, too, are the playing conditions. 

“Can you imagine playing when ydnr 
hands are so cold and the ball is hard as a 
brick? 9 rhnmhariam. “I can remember 
going to Detroit and playing in the old De- 
troit Arena and there’s about 3,000 people in 
this big old huge thing. Eveiy time they 
opened the door, the wind blew through. 

can remember vividly Panl Aririn, who 
was one of the greatest players ever, going 
like this” — he Nows into he hands as if to 
warm them — ^ “and the smoke is blowing out 
of his nose. 

“Guys were shooting 37 percent, these 
were great shooters,” he said. ^People look at 
that today and say, Ts that a basketball 
player or was be on a blind team? 9 They don't 
know how to put that into perspective. It 

makes a big difference;” 

Another big difference is travel, 

' “We traveled and played on the same day," 
Chambexiam said. “How about fijnng.out at 

7 o’clock in the morning and playing m Los 


ey and the hype so much, and they trade 
players around .like yon can't believe.” 

The NBA two decades ago was a close-knit 
group, he says. “We had a closer and better 
tune as athletes doing our work than I think 
these guys do. That’s because these guys 
don’t know where they’re going to be tomor- 
row.” 

. In 1974, the year after he retired, Chamber- 
lain co-wrote a story in Sports Illustrated that 
said: “It may not sound humble to say it, but 
I think my impact on basketball wQl be ever- 
lasting.” 

He also rioted that he was the first athletic 
7-footer who could run the court and who 
was agile enough to become an offensive 
weapon. His statistics weren't bad either — 
he once scored 100 points in a game, averaged 
50.4 points per game one year and a 30.4 
career scoring average. 

- “I think we should put that in a time 
capsule and bury it,” said (he hall of faxner. 

“I dunk that I was a little bit before my 
time, so therefore I bad an influence," he 
said. “But I also think a great many people 
could never fully appreciate whal I was doing 
because there was nothing to compare it to.” 

Not that he Hires comparisons. “Here's 
something that bums WDt Chamberlain — 
when I listen to these various announcers 


the nemesis of Chamberlain-led teams, beat- 
ing them twice in the championship series 
and five times in the conference finals. Three 
times, a series was decided by a seventh game 
that Boston won by ether one or two points. 

Chamberiain was the NBA’s all-time lead- 
ing scorer until Kareem Abdul-Jabbar of the 
Lakers broke his mark of 31,419 last April 5 
in a game against Utah. “Kareem breaks my 
scoring record and he gets a brand new Mer- 
cedes, a 565,000 car," Chamberlain says with 
a laugh. “It's one or 103 records that I owned 
and nobody ever gave me a pop side." 

Nevertheless, he says he's grateful for all he 
did get “The only thing unfortunate was that 
it wasn’t 20 years later, so they could have it 
all down on videotape so people could see for 
themselves who blocked the most shots and 
how they did it. AH you have to go by now is 
hearsay.” 


that they can play well even when 
Lany Bird isn't 

Bird, the NBA’s most valuable 
player the last two seasons, led Bos- 
ton with 15 rebounds and seven 
assists Wednesday night, but shot a 
dismal 6-for-21 from the floor and 
finished with 18 points. 

Nevertheless, Dennis Johnson 
compensated for Bird’s compara- 
tively off night with 30 points — his 
high since joining the team in 1983 


Blackman 17-33 3-5 37. Parkins 4-12 3-4 15. 11-8— M. 


Montreal S 3 0—1 

N.Y. Ranvan 1 1 7—5 

Osoama Ul.S-Patrlck {2). Hoaers ( I), J J>a- 
Irlcfc (2).Gresd«tar (4): smith (3>.Momosso 
(5). Shota aa eoal - Montreal (an Vanaies- 
broudO 6-17-5— 28; New York (on Penney) 11- 


Vincent 2-411-13 15; DanNey +7 *-1217. Groan Mtaaewfa 2 0 0-2 

5-13 4-7 16. Redoundi; Dallas 04 ( Parkins 7). Hoi-Hard 1 3 1—5 

mu 1 E*TVrTTC Ulah 57 (Eaton, Bailey W. Asiiita: Dallas 23 Petfersvxi 14). Ferraro (4). Turnon (8), 

flllS A rULllS (Davis 7), Utah 19 I Stockton 71. Neufleld2 (5); Lawton 14), B rater (I). Shots 

Seattle 71 27 M 25—77 on wool: Minnesota lonUut) 15-7-3—25; Mart- 

» -J T, LA. Clippers a a 14 2a-W fort (on Beoupre) W-13-29. 

tonight, raid Coach George Ir- sniIWI 7 . 1S M 2 D, Henderson HZ l-l IP; Quebec 2 18-4 

vine, referring to the off-season of- smim 10-17 4-10 24 . Edwards io-is 0 - 1 20 . Re- auono 331—4 

fer sheet Johnson signed with Iodi- bounds: SeotUe50(5lkmal0I.LA.CIIw>ars47 TA*unray 2 ID, Paterson (3). Watson 12). 
ua ihti « k., SnriKn (Donaldson III. Awlsta: Seattle M (Hender- Fraser (111. Sovord (8); Goulet (10). 

ana that was matched by Boston. „n. Sober* 4 ). la. cmwersia (Edwards SI. P.5loshiv (6J, JJkwve IS], Pulemam (21. 

“He had a great game and did it Indiana m»b JJ— m Sbatsoa Boca: Quctaec (on Banner man) 17-18- 

basicallY against a tough defense." B °* |on 35 a a 35 — na 10 — 45 ,- Chicooo ton moj brown) is-»-v — 33 . 

T -T-jT — ." 1.1 i_ Johnson 13-21 4-4 30, Parish 8-147.8 23; H.WII- Winn I peo I o 34^-3 


“He had a great game and did it 
basically against a tough defense." 


^79-l2l7,Groen Minnesota 2 0 0—2 

44 (Perkins 7). Hartford 1 3 1—5 

silts: Dallas 23 Petfersvxi ( 4 ), Ferraro (4), Turaean (81, 
1 71. Neufleld 2 (5); Lawton 14). Bratvn (B). Shots 

21 37 » 35—93 on wool: Minnesota (an Uull 15-7-3—25; Hart- 
33 20 14 23—44 ford (on Beoupre] B-9-13-2V. 
ran 9-12 l-l 19; Quebec 2 2 8—4 

10-18 0-1 20. Re- Chicago 3 3 1—4 

l_A. Clippers 47 T .Murray 2 (9), Paterson (3). Watson (2). 


M,T> T _ J A _ . I 1 JHRDWII i#-4inn»p|,rwi iDiiipinfow, rknir 

DJ. made some real tough Moms , 12-24 w 77, Fleming 8-13 4-9 22 . ro- 
sbois.” said the Pacers' Terence boonds: mdiona54 (Kwiinoms 131. Boston a 


Shots 00 goal: Quebec (on Banner man) 17-18- 
10-45; Chicooo (on Matarowfc) 15-9-9—31. 
Winnipeg I g 2-8—3 

Calgary 0 2 1-8—3 

Turnbull (101. Amlel 2 (41 : Sheehv 111, Kon- 


J. J. „~.l, (k. ouvio, PttJW SUE laws iusum. « '•'■IWI. i in I,™ .ITS. 1 Jiranir iii. iw, 

—and made SIX steals as me Lei DCS Ctanshurv “We n Laved eood de- <Bl, ' d 151 *“lsta: lndtan ® « (Fleming 7). rovd (21. Wilson (8). (Sheehv. Peodnski). 
defeated Indiana, 1 18-1 14, for their f L„ l;_ Bo*tan aa (Bird 71. 15^7. Shota on goal: Winnipeg 1 (an Lcmelln) 

wvenlh mncrwiitivo vimrwv nfnw t ? DSe 00 0Ut fie 103(16 1(16 0l 8 Chicago 27 18 33 38-104 0-UMD-7-J7rCt»Kwrv (On Havword) 1M2-I0- 


say, ’Oh, Patrick Ewing 


that shot like 


Bill Russell used to block shots.* These people 
have never seen Wilt Chamberiain or Bill 
Russel] play basketball They’re just parrot- 
ing what they heard somebody else say.” 

During his years in the NBA, the Boston 
Celtics won 1 1 championships behind Rus- 
sell another intense center. But so much has 
been made of Boston's domination, Cham- 
berlain. said, that Russell's performance has 
been magnified. 

“You hear about aJQ those big confronta- 
tions between Bill Russell and Will Cham- 
berlain. ... There were no confrontations,'' 
he said. “I scored more points against die 
Celtics than anybody else, and there were 

three and four people playing me. not just Bin 

RusselL’ 

“Nobody really cares about that, it’s not 
important. But T care because it’s something 
that's personal to me. We aU want to get 


Angeles? You can’t fly all day long and play credit for what we’ve done.” 

at night. Despite ibe Celtics' success, Chamberlain's 

“And we flew coach. ... big 7-footere sit- reams were carving out a record that would 
ting up there like this [ knees to chest]. ‘Hi, have been lauded in any other era. In his 14 
WDiTei’s play some cards.’ Can you imagine years .in the NBA, Chamber! ain took his 
that?" -teams to the playoffs 13 times, twice winning 

Chamberlain, who these days plays a lot of , titles. The first came in 1966-67 with the 
beach volleyball, laughs deeply. “I wouldn’t Philadelphia 76ers, the second in 1971-72 
trade my time for this, no way, no bow," he with the Los Angeles Lakers. ' 
says, dismiss vriy. “They’ve built up the men- ... Butthe Celtics almost always seemed to be 



seventh consecutive victory after a 
season-opening loss to New Jersey. 

“Larry has been shooting bricks 
out there and D J. has been picking 
up the slack," said Coach K.C 
Jones. “Dennis is pumped up on 
both ends and is doing the job." 

Johnson scored 1 1 points in each 
of the final two periods as Boston 
broke away from a 58-58 halftime 
tie. 

His third quarter helped Boston 
move to an 88-81 lead; then, after 
sitting on the bench while Indiana 
rallied Tor a 91-91 tie early in the 
final period, Johnson scored nine 
points in a two-minute span as the 
Celtics pulled away again. 

“I can’t explain why I had lhaL 


-All Moione 7-23 7-721. Ervlng 0-143-719, Til root! 

All you can do when a player is B-122-2 19; wooindoo 12-179-1 1 34. oorvin 11-21 


32 30 M 24—110 3—37. 
-143-719, Thraatt PirhborgA 


Pirtatwrgli 3 1 a_4 

Vancouver 1 1 1—3 

Frawtov (21. Rwkowsk I 2 (8), Straddon (71, 


30 32 22 27—101 Vancouver (an Romano) 9-5-19—24. 

31 34 30 31—108 Detroit 2 2 3—7 

■kins 7-22 2-4 30; Los Amnios 2 0 8-4 

Ml 17. RotaraiHli: Gallant 2 (10). Clehockv (5), Duauav 131. 

.Atlanta 44 lUv Larsen (5>,Ogroanlck2 14): Quay 13), Sykes 
lx 17 (Footer 51, (21. Strata aa goal: Detroit (on Eilat) 14-12-4— 

34: Las Angeles (an Stefan) 15-10-11 — 34. 


going like that IS to keep plaving 2-22S. ReOBemls: Chicago 40 (Green 14). Full- Fnawtev (2). Ruskowsk 1 2 (8), Straddon (7), 
him tiahl and hooe he Twiccpc the 04,81 15,110 48 (Moione l»). Assists: Oilcogo 34 Lemieuk ill). Bullard (7). Tantl 3 (iSlShots 

IMocv 12), Philadelphia 24 (Checks 12). an goal: PlttsDurgh (on Brodeur) 7-12-7— 24; 
n »!?“?■ _ ... Phoenix 30 22 22 27—101 Vancouver (on Romano) 9-5-19-24. 

AU five Boston starters hit in Atlanta 31 34 so 21—100 Detroit 223—7 

double figures as the Celtics hand- Levmwion io-i*** 23 . wiikms 0023430 ; l» amoks 2 0 *-« 

— J ,L. , 0 , 1 , Monce 7-14 4-8 2tt Davis 7-20 QO 17, Rebeends: Gallant 2 (10). Clchackv (Si, Duauav (31. 

ea the Indiana Its loth consecutive Ph0«nlx44(J0nvs,Nonce12).A)lonta44 iLev Larsen (5>, Oarodnlek 2 (4); Guay (3). Sykes 

loss on the road since a victory in Inoston 111. Assists; Pnoenlx 17 (Foster 5), (2l.5h0taanMaJ: Detroit (on Eilall 14-12-4— 

Chicago last Feb. 15. Atlanta 2B (Johnson 101. 34; Las Angeles (on Stefan) 15-10-11— 36. 

“h’s just a matter of time for that — 

young a team," said Parish of the T 1 

Pacers. “They never give up and lKUISItlOH 

that's good. One day things are ’ ' " 

going to turn around So get them Ame^J^ui«we m ,h * ,nll,^w, reaervr lw - Activated Ramie 

while ihey’re young” BOSTON— Trodad Bab Oleda. Tom McCar. LMIer * BUOro ‘ 

Other NBA winnem Wednesday ,h '’- j0 ?" ' >u ' cne ," Qrxl Ctirts Bover, onetran, FOOTBALL 

nioht n»» \filiL-iiil- rr pu.i-j.i 10 the N.Y. Meta tar Colvin Schlraidlond Wes Nottoml Football League 

nradl were Milwaukee, Phlladei- Gardner, phehers. and John Christensen and ATLANTA— Placed Brett Miller, offensive 
pnia, Atlanta, Dallas and Seattle. Lo Schelle Tarver, amneldera. tackle, on I nlured reserve. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
Amertcoa League 

BOSTON— Traded Bad Oleda. Tom McCar. 
thy, John Mitchell and Chris Bover, oUehers, 
to the N.Y. Mets tar Colvin Schlroidl and Wes 
Gardner, pitchers, and John Christensen and 
La Schelle Tarver, ouinelaers. 

DETROIT— Traded Barbara Garbev, In- 


n elder, to Oakland tar Dove Collins, outfield- wide receiver. 


an the Inlured reserve lisi. Activated Ronnie 
Lester, ouara. 

FOOTBALL 

Notional Football League 
ATLANTA — Placed Brett Miller, offensive 
tackle, on Inlured reserve. 

CLEVELAND— Released John Jetten»n. 


DENVER— Shined Michael Oendenen, 


manage tne Bellingham Mariners of the class 
A Morthvmst League. 


MIAMI— Placed Robert Sowell, defensive 
bock, on inlured reserve. Signed Mike Smith. 


— — ' 1— 11 1. 1 n -- er - DENVER— Shined Michael Oendenen, 

^ I mm k I >C| 1C 1 Till I 8,' ijlQ SEATTLE— Announced sal Rende. will otaceklcktr. 

|~7 X \ J I n rt ll I Tjr ^ managettra Bellingham Marlnersof Ihe Class MIAMI— Placed Robert Sowed, defensive 

^ A northwest League. bock, do Iniured reserve. Signed Mike Smith. 

— — .. TEXAS— Waived Glenn Brum mer, catcher, defensive bock. 

_ __ _ . , _ _ __ _ ^ ^ TORONTO Added Olb Green and Glenal- ST. LOU 15— Waived Jess Atklnsoa place- 

Hagler-Mugabi Fight Set for March 10 

J 7 . , „ ...» Noltonal Leogoc nertxx*. Wolvnd Cart Howard, comeruock. 

NEW YORK (AP) — The utie fight between undisputed middleweight Atlanta— waived Randy Johnson, in- Washington— R esigned cnris Keating, 
champion Marvelous Marvin Hagler and John Mugabi of Uganda has jineb«i«r. n-ieosed Reggie Branch. running 

been rescheduled for March 10 at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, it was racier. 


TEXAS— Waived Glenn Bnmmer, catcher, defensive bock. 

TORONTO— Added Otis Green and Glenal- 5T. LOUI 5— Waived Jess Atklnsoa place- 

len HI1L outfielders, and Jett DaWlllls. culch- kicker. Signed Nova Bolovtc. place kicker. 


er, ta (tie 40men raster. 

Notional League 

ATLANTA— Waived Randy Johnson, in- 


T AMP A BAY— Stoned Rond v Easmon. ear- 
nertxx*. Waived Carl Howard, comeruock. 
WASHINGTON— Re-signed Chris Keating. 


announced Wednesday. Chicago — waived Dave Beard, Ditcher. 

Tire 12-round bout, originally set for Nov. 14. was postponed Ocl 29 SEKTJSt ZXZZS'Z 

after Hagler suffered a broken nose while spamng. Garv pormemer andean Ham nton. pi icncra, 

Hagler is 6 1 -2-2 lifetime with 51 knockouts, while Mugabi is 26-0, aD of rasrar. 

his victories canting an teadiouts. Mugabi, now tiving in Tampa, 

Florida, has won 16 of his 26 fights in under two rounds. l». first oa»irwi; Mike Konaeria «t Hugh 

Kema, Pilchers; Joe Oliver.catcher. and Tro- 

Snow lack Changes Site for Ski Series IT." SSt. 

BERN — Skiing’s world series, the prologue to the Alpine World Cup ST L ° uls-Naniw5 Rleh Hoek * r ** och - 


im 

W3t Chamberiam. nebonufii^ m 1967. 


Florida, has won 16 erf his 26 fights in under two rounds. 

Snow Lack Changes Site lor Ski Series 

BERN — Skiing’s world series, the prologue to the Alpine World Cup 
races, has been moved from Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, where there has been a 

scarcity of snow, to Sestriere, Italy, the International Skiing Federation 
announced Thursday. The series opens with a men's giant slalom on Nov. 
27 and ends with a women's slalom Nov. 30. 

The federation said snowfall in the Alps appears to have insured that 
the World Cup races will begin as scheduled on Dec. 1. 

Lyle leader in Hawaiian Golf Tourney 

KAPALUA, Hawaii (AP) — Sandy Lyle of Scotland shot a 6-under- 
par 66 that staked him to a one-shot lead in Wednesday’s uncompleted 
first round of the Kapalua International golf tournament. 

At 67 in the international field were Mark O’Meara, Bernhard Longer, 
Lanny Wadkins. Corey Favin, John Mahaffey, Andy Bean, David I«diii 
and Dan Halldorson. Two players. DA Weibring and Gary HaUberg, 
were stranded by darkness on the course; they were to complete first- 
round play on Thursday, but neither had a chance of overtaking Lyle. 

The rei gning British Open champion. Lyle won the recent Nissan Cup 
over the same par-72, 6,879-yani Kapalua. Golf Club course. 


World Cup Soccer 

European Qualifying 

GROUP 3 

Turk by 1, Romania 3 
England 0, Northorn imana 0 
Final Him Handing*: Enakmd 1Z iwut- 
ern irekmd 10, Romanln9.Flniond&Turkoyl. 

England, Narttrarn inland win berths in 
1784 finals in Mexico. 

CROUP 4 

Ireland I. Denmar k 4 
Switzerland 1, Norway 1 
Final pouts standings: Denmark tl. Soviet 
Union 10, Switzerland fl, Ireland 9# Norway S 
Danmark, the SoWM Union win Bering In 
final*. 


Baseball 
Cy Y oung Winners 

Annual wlmm of tn* Cy Young Award oi 
IM Notional Laaauel outstanding ptleber 
dram 1954-1944 ttwri warn am lamellae tram 
both leaguM): 

1985 Dwlghl Gooden, Now York 
1984 — Rick Sulcllfte. Chicago 
1983— John Danny, Phllaaelpttla 
1W9— Slava Carl ion. Ptilladrlanlo 

198 1 — T ama iO o Valenzuela. Los Angelos 
1780- St eve Canton, PhJkHtetahla 
1979 — Bruce Sutter, Chicago 
1978— Gaylord Perry. Son Diego 
1977— Stave Carlton. PnJtadeinnta 
1976 — Randy Janos. San Diego 
1975-Tom Seaver, Now York 
1974 — Mike Marshall, las Angeles 
1973— Tom Soever, New York 
1973— Sieve Carlton, Phliadeionia 
1971— Ferguson Jenkins Cnicaoo 
1970— dab Gibson, St. Louts 
1969— Tom Seaver, New York 
194^-Bob GRKon, S(. Louis 
1947— Mike McCormick, San Fmnetaeo 
1M4— Sandy Kaufeuc. Los Anonlei 
IMS-Sandy Koufnjt. Lot Angalna 
r*43— Sandy Koufax, Las Angem 
1942— Don Drvsoale, LOS Angeles 
I960— 1 Varnon Law, Pittiburgti 
IHT-Worrta Spatm, MINaoukVV BrovM 
1954 — Don Nmrcambc, BronJJvn 


i 








- ■" •‘'-a wff-W* 


Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER IS, 198S 


OBSERVER 


A Packer Packin 9 Hay Solzhenitsyn and Anti-Semitism: A New Debate 


By Russell Baker sturdiest of instruments, starting to 

N EW YORK — One Monday revise “The Road to Mandalay.” 
night while flicking a dial I suodauy » was swgwg: 

mused for the Green Bav Packers. By the old arcane Frank 0. Joe, 




what it is they pack in Green Bay. 

They were playing the Bears, the 
Chicago Bears, always called in the 
days of my childhood “the Mon* 
sters of the Midway." And now I 
wondered, as they played with 
Green Bay, where m fact was that 
Midway that the Bears were (be 
monsters of. “Where is that Mid- 
way?" I asked of the tube. “And 
what do they pack in Green Bay?" 

The men of Lhe tube — Frank, 
Joe and 0. J. — had pJenty to say, 
all of it utterly incomprehensible, 
though perfectly sensible, I sup* 
pose, to those with Ph. D. degrees 
in football, so why should we cavil 
carp and naysay if Frank, Joe and 
O.J. think it thoroughly O.K. to 
ignore our request for enlighten- 
ment: “Where is the Midway. 
Frank, Joe, or O. J., and what do 
they pack in Green Bay?" 

“Patience,” 1 counseled my fe- 
male co-viewer, yearning insistent- 
ly for a dial search that might, with 
luck, she said, produce some night- 
consuming nocturnal soap opera. 

□ 

“Patience” I counseled her. “We 
shall yield to your hunger for im- 
plausibility, but first let us pray 
lhal Frank, Joe or O. J. will sense 
my dismay.” 

“Hey, you TV guys, you!" 

I was crying out loud to the tube. 

“For crying out loud fellows, if 
you know' won't you say what or 
where's the Midway and what they 
pack in Green Bay?" 

No. they would not. My female 
co-viewer said “They are so im- 
plausibly Football-wise — Frank, 
Joe and O. J. — that they cannot 
imag ine not knowing the facts of 
the Midway and what gets packed 
in Green Bay, so let's dial away, 
dial away, dial away through chan- 
nels where we may End families of 
fantastic wealth so implausibly evil 
that they split the seams and stay in 
the pocket without the slightest 
trace of guilt." 

Splitting seams, staying in pock- 
ets. What did those terms betray if 
not the onset of an alarming condi- 
tion in this lovely woman? Her 
brain was being infested by the 
arcane professor-of-football jargon 
pouring out Lhe tube. 

I felt my own brain, normally the 


There’s a monster of the Midway, 
And a packer packin’ hay. 

“Pull yourself together.'' said the 
woman, pressing hot towels to my 
forehead “You know very well 
that, whatever they pack in Green 
Bay, it can't be hay. because if it 
was hay they wouldn’t be called the 
Green Bay Packers, they’d be 
called the Green Bay Hayseeds." 

□ 

We were both losing touch with 
real thin g s The pictures on the 
tube were the same pictures that 
bad been on the tube many years 
ago when 1 used to watch football 
five or six times a year. 

Incredible forward passes were 
being incredibly caught at the in- 
credible last instant Tons of heavi- 
ly armored flesh thrashed about in 
what looked like blind confusion 
but doubtless seemed purposeful to 
the authorities. 

Now and then someone writhed 
in pain or threw the pigskin to earth 
in violent exultation before leaping 
into the air to be bugged and kissed 
bv comrades. 

“We don't say ‘pigskin’ any- 
more," Frank. Joe and O.J. said. 
“That's as out of date as calling the 
team ‘the eleven,’ ” 

“Frank, Joe, O.J.! Remember 
when the Bears were ‘the monsters 
of the Midway*? Where or what is 
the Midway? Is that a field where 
they used to play? Back when 
teams were ‘elevens’ and the game 
was a ‘fray T* 

“Today" said Frank, Joe and 
O. J„ “we don't say 'monsters of 
the Midway.’ No way. OJv.?" 

Not entirely, my good but aging 
jocks so glib with split seams and 
little post patterns and busted 
pockets that you would probably 
Uke to meet my old calculus profes- 
sor who also enjoyed making me 
feel like a dunce. Not entirely O.K. 
till you say. with your learned au- 
thority in triple array, what it is. 
what it is that they pack in Green 
Bay. 

“Now back to the game," said 
Frank. Joe and 0. J„ leaving me at 
the merev of a woman in search of 
implausibly dull soap opera. 

Howard Cosell where are you? 

N«w York Times Service 


By Richard Grenier 

New York Tunes Service 

N EW YORK —The expanded version 
of Alexander 1 Solzhenitsyn’s “Au- 
gust 1934” — containing a new section on 
the assassination of a Russian prime minis- 
ter by an anarchis t Jew — has touched off a 
controversy as to whether the Nobel Prize 
winner and author of the “Gulag Archipel- 
ago" is anti-Semitic. The book is available 
in French »nri Russian and is to be pub- 
lished in English next year. 

As the man responsible for almost sin- 
gle-handedly informing Lhe West of the 
horrors of the Soviet Gulag, Solzhenitsyn 
has long been the object of Soviet efforts to 
destroy his reputation. But the accusations 
of anti-Semitism come from such anti- 
communist sources as Professor Richard 
Pipes of Harvard, a Soviet specialist and 
former director of Eastern European and 
Soviet Affairs on President Ronald Rea- 
gan's National Security Council 
At a Washington conference of the 
World Congress for Soviet and East Euro- 
pean Studies last week, Vladislav Krasnov, 
a former editor of Radio Moscow’s broad- 
casting division who is now a professor of 
Russian studies at the Monterey Institute 
of International Studies in California, 

called the charge “completely groundless^" 
Solzhenitsyn, who since his arrival in the 
United States has tended to remain aloof 
from such disputes, denounced anti-Semi- 
tism. calling the charges against him 
“base.” 

Not that Solzhenitsyn has lacked de- 
fenders. Hie Wiese 1, chronicler of the Ho- 
locaust and a professor of the humanities 
at Boston University, is one of his support- 
ers, asserting that Solzhenitsyn is an “au- 
thentic hero." 

Mstislav Rostropovich, conductor of the 
National Symphony Orchestra in Wash- 
ington, in whose home Solzhenitsyn lived 
for a time in the Soviet Unioa, said he 
would swears that the author was no anti- 
Semite. Professor Adam Ulam of Harvard, 
another Soviet specialist, said Pipes's char- 
acterization of Solzhenitsyn was “vety un- 
fair.” while Robert Conquest, author of 
“The Great Terror,” called the charge of 
anti-Semitism “ludicrous.” 

When Solzhenitsyn’s expanded version 
of “August 1914" appeared in French al- 
most two years ago, no charge of anti- 
Semitism was raised. The controversy 
broke into the U.S. press this year in 
connection with a separate dispute: wheth- 
er it was prudent to broadcast over the 
Russian-language service of the U. S. gov- 
ernment-financed Radio Liberty a talk by 
Lev Lossev, a Russian Jew; discussing the 
possibility of anti-Semitism in the works of 
Solzhenitsyn. In his broadcast, Lossev ex- 



Ucmd Pm bMmafionaf 

Alexander Solzhenitsyn 

pressed clearly his conviction that Solzhe- 
nitsyn was not anti-Semitic. But in present- 
ing the adversary view, as a land of devil’s 
advocate, he used such words as “snake” 
and “degenerate” to describe the Jewish 
assassin portrayed in “August 1914” 
(words not used by Solzhenitsyn in the 
book), and h was thought that such terms 
beamed in Russian into the Soviet Union 
might be misinterpreted. 

Charges of anti-Semitism against the au- 
thor are not new; they began appearing in 
the Russian tarigrt press and in specialized 
and Jewish journals as long ago as 1972. In 
1977, in Midstream, a publication of the' 
Theodor Heizl Foundation, a Jewish scuai- 
tist named Mark Perakh said be felt a 
disproportionately large number of unat- 
tractive Jews appeared in Solzhenitsyn's 
work. 

Another charge, which goes back more 
than a decade, is that Jews would be sec- 
ond-class citizens in Solzhenitsyn's ideal 
Russia, a charge that Solzhenitsyn’s friends 
have rebutted by quoting the work on 
which the charge is based, his “Letter to the 
Soviet Leaders," published in 1974, the 
year he was expelled from the Soviet 
Union. The author stated in this pamphlet 


that, although he saw Christianity as “the 
only living spiritual force capable of under- 
taking the spiritual healing of Russia,” he 
proposed no special privileges for Chris- 
tianity and called on the regime to “allow 
competition on an equal and honorable 
bjijp* . . . among all ideological and mor- 
al pairrent* in particular among all reli- 
gions." 

The expanded version of “August 1914,” 
containing the new section on the 1911 
assassination of Prime Minister Peter Sto- 
lypin of'Rnsaa by Dmitri Bogrov, has 
given new amplitude to the debate. This 
assassination ig considered a Cuming point 
in Russian history by Solzhenitsyn and 
other scholars. They believe that Stolypin 
was the last liberal, dynamic Russian lead- 
er (and benefactor of the Jews) who might 
have “saved” Russia from Bolshevism. 

Pipes said; “Solzhenitsyn looks into Bo- 
grov’s mind as he is preparing 'to assassi- 
nate Sudypin.' Stolypin is reviving Russia; 
therefore; it’s bad for the Jews. He assassi- 
nates him, acting entirely in. his capacity as 
a Jew. But the historical Bogrov was a 
Jewish renegade, not acting as a Jew at afl. 

“Every culture has hs own brand of anti- 
Semitism. In Solzhenitsyn’s case, it’s not 
racial. It has nothing to do with blood. He's 
certainly not a racist; the question is fun- 
damentally religious and cnlturaL He bears 
some resemblance to Dostoyevsky, who 
was a fervent -Christian and patriot and a 
rabid anti-Semite. Solzhenitsyn is unques- 
tionably in the grip of the Russian extreme 
right’s view of the revolution, which is that 
it was the doing of Jews.” 

In an article last summer in Midstream, 
Lev Navrazcfv, a scholar who emigrated 
from the Soviet Union in 1972 and who 
now writes for The Yale Literary Maga- 
zine!, went farther than Pipes. Navrozov 
condemns the Solzhenitsyn novel as “anew 
Protocols of the Elders' of Zion,” a refer- 
ence to the fraudulent document that be- 
came a pillar of anti-Semitic propaganda 
early in this century. 

Ulam takes sharp issue with the charges. 
He acknowledges that the assassination of 
Stolypin ‘lends itself” to an anti-Semitic 
interpretation, but he continues: “On bal- 
ance, over aU, taking into account all his 
work and his entire biography, I don’t 
think you can call Alexander Solzhenitsyn 
an anti-Semite. He has a vety sharp pen, I 
admit. He’s extremely passionate. He has 
some sharp things to say about Jews. But 
he has sharp things to say about Russians 
who are not Jews. The most you might say 
about Solzhenitsyn is that he resents the 
intrusion of foreign influences into Rus- 
sian life. But an anti-Semite? No. When 
you take his whole work and his whole life 
into account, you must say that he is not 


anti-Semitic and that he doesn t bale liber- 
alism. He is inconsistent, perhaps^but 
many great people are inconsistent- 
Professor Mikhail Agursky, a Soviet ex- 
pert at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, 

was one of several Jewish dissidents in the 

Soviet Union who defended Solzhenitsyn 
oooina Kbsrsres of anri&emitism. “He is a 


strong supporter of Israd and always has 
been," said Aguixky. “If yew support Israel 
the way Solzhenitsyn docs today, you are 
not an anti-Semite. And I don't think his 
idea of a Russian state founded - on the 
Russian Orthodox Church means that Jews 
would not have full rights. How about 
Israel? Let’s call a spade a spade. In Isaek 

religion is not separate man the state. 
Solzhenitsyn^ Russia would be bu2t on the 
same principle." 

writing in his own .defense,.. Sotzhem-- 
tsyn said that be was dedicated to the study 
of history ‘just as it was,” which be feels is 
necessary “in order not to repeat, the hen;- ; 
rors ibat humanity perpetrated on itself in 
the 20tb century — all types of 'rCTptatidhr 
ary and ethnic genocide." His critics, he 
indicated, have arbitrarily ascribed anti- 
Sflmi rism to him Because in pre-rcvofaition- 
ary Russia, a period dealt with in his most 

recent books, “a Jewish question odstof 
and was a burning issue. But at that time, 
hundreds of authors, including Jews, wrote 
about this; at that time, precisely tbc orms- 
son of mentioning the Jewish question was i. 
considered a manifestation of anti-Semi- 
tism — and it would be unworthy fee arr 
his tor ian of that era to pretend that that 
question did not exist" 

Referring to the cycle of historical novels 
of which “August 1914" is the first part, the 
author wrote: *T am developing The Red 
Wheel’ the tragic history — how Russians 
themselves in folly destroyed botbtheir 
past and their future — and in my facers, 
flung the base accusation of ‘anti-Semi- 
tism’ (cynically used as a dub by some),, 
and a string of false arguments is basely : 
ascribed to me. 

“Concerning the label ‘anti-Semitism,’ 
this word, just as other labels as well has 
lost its precise meaning from tboogbiless 
use, and different publicists in different 
decades understood il differently. If a bi- 
ased and unjustified attitude toward the 
Jewish nation is understood by this tenn— 
then I tdl you assuredly: not only is there 
no — nor could there be — ‘anti-Semitism’ 
in mv work, nor forthai matt er in anvboolf 


worthy of being called literature. To tqp? ; 
proach a literary weak with the measuring-; 
stick of ‘anti-Semitism’ is vulgar; an under- 
developed understanding of the nature of a , 
literary work." The expanded version of 
Solzhenitsyn’s “August 1914” is.to bepubr 
lisbed in 1986 by Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 


j people 


judgeBlocks Lucas Bid 

To Bar 'Star Wars’ Use 

• - a federal jwiS 6 has turned down 
a request by George Lucas a halt 
broadcasts of leteviaon commer- 
cials iifing the title of his hit film 
“Star Wars’* to refer to President 
Ronald Rdagan's proposal for a 
space-based missile defense -sy&- 
ton. Lucas clainiaithe;30-second 
co mmercials on behalf of the Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative infringed 
on his trademark- Lucas's lawyer*, 
wanted federal Jm%e‘Gedanf Ge> 
sen to order that theSDI lobbying 
group, the Coalition for the &rate- 
Sc Defense Initiative, be .repaired 
to change the 30-second commer- 
cials or bfc barred from showing - 
them. Gesdi refused to ^ i&j 
broadcasts, due to bejpn.tfrifyteap 
at about 30 U. S. stations, but said 
he would hold another hearing on 
the request Nov. 25. : ;.V. 

□ . . r -.V-- • 

Prince Charles, who fkw bade to 

Britain to mark his 37tb birthday 
Thursday, will return to the United 
States next autumn to &I|i ede- 
- brate Harvard Univeisity^ 350th 
anni v e rsary, thesdiool announced. 

. There was no immetfi^ lwoni . 
whether his wife; Diana. woOlff ac- 
company ft™ to the four-day'cde- 
brabon, sod a Harvard^spofas- 
man, David Rosen. Tbe.pimce.will 
address an assembly . 

Palm Beach is still aHwiua^afcnt 
Joah Coffins, who, wearifig^»rap. 
kiss black gown and * diamond 
necklace, wangled her -wayirtto a 
' reception for $25,OOO^plate t 
“benefactors" at Tuesday night's* 
charity ball and danced with Prince 
y-Oraries- The actress. toiftonly a 

■ 55,00Q-a-plate “patron” ticket for 
the ball, which did not mdiide the 
rcception widi the [royal couple. 

■ 

Maadanjs from Rjj&JDaofca of 
The Band tb Dare Stewart -of En- 


Bob Dyla» who- turned out 
Wedncsday mght at the Whitney 
Musema;m New Yorkai a party 
tKrowjtrby CotomhLa Record to 
honor- the anger-songwrittr. 

V. j- 'D • • ■ . • 

Wffiam B. Luera, tfe U. S. am- 
bassador to Czechoslovakia, has 
been elected president of the Met- 
ropoEtfln Mnseum of Art in New 
York^eis expected to assume, the 
pcwClat^ Bext ^mng, succeeding 
WSSsai B. Macomficr, who' an- 
homicect last January; that he 
planned jo retire. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 



LOU. 36 years of exp 
worldwide. Write: 
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YOUR FAVORITE US PRODUCTS wil 
be dipped to youl Send fat and we 
wil respond with deleft. Citariog 
avaiabte; GREATGOODS USA, 77 
B l nedwr NY. NY 10012. 

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
Engbh. Pant (doSy) 4434 5965. Roms 
678 0320. 

UNXRSTAND YOUR PCI WIGE eve- 
ning vwxtahop begirt: Nov. 21. Cal 
Font 45 558421 

SUN. N.Y. TIMES - Eurojet driven. 
Write Keyier, POB 2, B100Q Brvaek 


PORTUGAL SS 
HgSdays & Travel 

" PERSONALS 

BRUCE FROM SANIM BAU Phene 
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HAVE A NICE BAY1 BOKH- Have a 
nice day! BalceL 

MOVING 


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GENEVA cJJK. 


(022) 32 64 40 
CoS far Ai bed's free astanaw 

ALPHA-TRANSIT -Pam ft 42 ff>2S 77 
Sea/air. car, baggage, all countries 

REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENTS 

PUBLIC & PRIVATE 
U.S. SYNDICATIONS 

S2W.QQQ.00Q + In Various Amount? 

Oft* GAS 

IBinoo , Louvana, Texas. 
GiCT u niecd meome fundi, bonded 6- 
routed driBng, producti o n packages. 
REAL ESTATE 
Rondo, Coterodo, Anzom 
Eason property, hotels, casinos, opart, 
went comoteMS, hnioricct bwkfingi, ok 

Sen byuiUnm. 

COMMUNICATIONS 
N. Caraino. Colorado. CaEfama 
Cable TV, movies, TV syntSumora 

Bondi bade up every ivograii to nuns 
dw security of your inve s tment 

Interacted hi Serieoc Buyers Only 
(Minimum Investment of >100,000) 

We are a putAc US ad & gas neitoony 

(hat expanded * b<pe of product. 
Our operahom m Europe iv 
HHST TWANGLE ST. 

12, rue des Contfi e« 

P.Q. Box 521-121! 

Geneva 6, Switwtonp 

Ms fU) 22-B6 01 55 
Telex 27 153 TW CH 
Tele Fax HU 3^6 06 72 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CARIBBEAN 


SINT MAARTEN ISLAND. FLA. 

The Vilage at Oyster Pond 
Here is an opportunity to select a luxun- 
ous vocation home either on lhe white 
tardy beach or on the anc h orage at 
Oyster Pond. Now under construction. 
Price beghring at $290,000. Informa- 
tion: AJ. Bryon Jr., 2 Waterwew Rd. 

West Chester. PA 193S0. 

Teh 2IM92-1776 USA 

CORSICA 

PRESTKNOUS ADDRESS: Medterra- 
neon, Be de CavaOo. Land for con- 
structing 'Bergenes ‘ from F600JXM. 
land tar cuintiiicniw viks from 
FB00.000. "Bergenes' 70 gm. living 
space, free now, from FI .400,000. 
Moorings in manna. Promotion Mm 
mrl Xe Ruhr, 06000 Nice 06000. Tot 
93 88 37 37, He tmmocar 461235. 

CYPRUS 

LORDOS PRCmTY Exhibttion 9anv 
9pm. Brmmghcm 12-13 Nov, Ward- 
room Suite, Hofefay Inn Hotel, 643 
2766. London: 14-1 j Nov, Jrfm Ad- 
ams Suite, Mamar Hofei. 493 1232. 
Glasgow: 17-7B Nov, SfieBey Suite, 
Stabs Pond Hotel, 334 8161. Fbr op- 
porntmenti during exhibition. teL refo. 
vont ho rd surte; before exhibitions, 
pi ) 637 7704 [Mr Mavroudes) or G J3. 
Ifrtos & Sans Lid.. PO Bax 1175. 
Limassol, Cyprus, tel 77®77, At 5136 

FRENCH PROVINCES 


'NEAR CANNES’ 

PROVBJCAL STONE BURT HOUSE, 




WORTH M4XXJ.OOO, K» FAST 
SALE WOULD EXCEPT F3, 250, 000 

PLEASE CONTACT ON LONDON: 
01-729 0969 


COTE D'AZUR 

RIGHT ON A SANDY BEACH 

20 minutes from the West of Cannes, 
dose to a prwate pen. This is the Nme 
to buy seashore properties when the 
secnon is over. 

Property of greet! charm- 2 receptions, 
4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 3,000 nun 
garden, pool. Price asked F5JJWUJ0G. 
Offers invited. 

Ref: 1825. Apply 
JOHN TAYLOfiSA 
55 la Croisette 
06«00 Cannes 

Tit 93 38 00 66. Telex. 470921F 


CLOSE MONTE-CARLO i 

BEAUTIFUL MHMtOOM VILLA 
for sale, situated on rhe hb, overlook- 
ing the Medterramran and Cap Martin, 
only minims avwy frwn the famous 
Monte-Cx lo Cosmo. 

For further details please contact: 

A.G.E.D.1. 

26 bis, Bd Pnmessa Choriofte 
MC 98000 MONACO 
Tel: 93-5066.00 - Tl» 479417 MC ■ 
or Agence St. Roeh 

SAINT PAUL DE VH4CE Why settle 
for less? Beautiful Provenpi wla wWi 
sea view amf fiee-tonw pool an 3^00 
sqjn. lo*. Four-bedroom home with 
enormous «e« and todm. F3J M. 
For oH dstoes leCuilfinfi this and other 
Saint Paul dc veneo p roperties cat 
Mat or Bob at 93 38 1919. SSI, 47 La 
Gonetfe. 06400 Ca nnes. 

SAINT TROPE. Historic rewfenhd 
Provencal estate, right on sea, pool, 
terns. S rooms. Spierxid domed 
grounds. F3J00JXJ0. Promotion Mo 
ion 'Le RuW 06000 f*ce. Tefc 93 88 
37 37 lb 461235. 

COTE D'AZUR. NICE, *a wow. -ery 
beautiful vSa, 180 sqm Suing spaas. 
Coretatan 1 aport m ai h . 1400 jnm. 
land. Pool, realhouse. R^OOteO. 
Promotion Mazan 'Le Ruhr 04000 
hfce. TeL 93 88 y 37 dx 461235. 

T HOUR ROM MG AIRPORT, near 
proposed new lS-haie golf ajune. 
P rov en ; °l property with dkrocfw, 
punorertK views. Old mas modem. 

aed. enlarged 175 sam., 1^ ha. land. 
aTtve groves- FI .500 .000- 94 76 61 68 


YOUR CONTACT IN PROVBKL 
Houses with character. Charnww 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 



SELLING SMALL RSWVATffl form, 

dl camfarti. 35 ha woods cn Vafley 

* F Moyenne. Ided site. For conyiete LONDON HOTTING HUJL GATE ar- 
le 6 wfunmtiun. td 43 07 7D 25. diiteet designed stuefe house, 2/3 

CPtMANY 

C25DJ00. Tel 01-727 2969. 

REN l to APARTMENT FOR SALE GNTRAL LONDON. SMART 7-hed- 
BuyerwilosumeleaHofDMireOper - 

mpnth. 85 sq.m. Rvng area, fufiy fur. 
rushed and eqwpped. DM 20,000. ne- 
gotiable. TeL- Frankfurt {Oj 69492953 

GREAT BRITAIN 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


FRMOPAIITY OF MONACO 
MONTE CARLO NEAR CBflBt 

Very nice 2 rooms, loggia, sea view, 
equipped kitchen, bathroom, wc, cup- 
boards. cellci-, in modem complex, high 

etas. Fiaoafao. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


MARAIS. Ned Must* Peace, 5 
roomL 160 sul parting. 


rooms, 160 sqjiL, | 
. F2^DOjOOO. TeL 45 79 19 18 


TeL 93 50 66 84 
Tetoe 469477 


MONTE CARLO 


roam flat ^in Gmden Square with front I Private mansion, near Monaco Prince 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


s 


MALLORCA . 
PENTHOUSE BN PALMA 

Ties pentho u se is absolutely obtstand- 

3rd FACING HCASSO MUSEUM, finest motwiah have been used tract 
surety, Kma | bedroom. 81 «im_ by »onc«y. B46 sqjn. hying area and 
owner. FlpaMXXLTek 1-42 7B 1473 KLfR- panonmee torraoe_+ 74 sqm. 

SSsSffiirSSS: 

n [!?- R tne *?- .atovrtwi «w4rd 

roonl ‘ ” or - ^ M. Tel av 2D SB 70 hooting, cir condiiarwig, doorman ter- 
10TH NEAR RffUBUQUC- Superb du- vice. Wee m U5S, co-l&» l 00a 



mm 


& rear views of meeriwy. £125,000. 
Tel 370 4690 or K» 2191 Ext. 240. 


HOLLAND 


Palace, panoramic no view. 

TeL 93 30 46 54. 
PARIS & SUBURBS 


KENSINGTON. Top Boor mansion MUST 5HJL BEAUTIFUL living boat 
buldng,2JOOsqii with superb views aentrol on Aimtel river. DFL 70,000 
over Hollceid Fart 4 beckootra, 2 TeL Amsterdam 31-20-254288 
baths (roam for 3rd), 18ft x 18ft Wtdi- 
en. 2 reaejrions 23ft x 20ft & 29ft e v 

21 K large roof terrace 30ft x 15ft 

65 CALANDRE-MAR1E, NR. VentmigEa, 
095 ^0; Tri weridays hajy. Superb apartment m 
Pi B ' block ahnatf orithe border Sidy 

01-870 <703 and France (Cote CTAzurl, privately 

CENTRALLONDONPROnKTES.li>- owned for ym. exquaMv fuf- 
ternationd Company wil find fer so- fwfwd pnd fuly oqu^ped. 3 doubJe 
f*iishcdii>d dents lhe property of be*W3ms,\ smgle, very targe lounge 
ihor choice, speee fi sts m renavotian, [ opening onto terrace over- 
refurbishnient, art and ailiqum. B- toakmg sea. 3 bathroores/Aovwtrs. 
non avaiabie if empfieabie. Wntm lo tehee, ind ep endent heatup intem, 
BYANT1 5A. Postfech 6926. CH-B023 pr port, maid service a nvoifatfe, 
ZURICH. burglar atoms Keys can be left with 

■■^eneTAipc »tcvmty. S250,000. UX 0765 *405. 


FOR THE FEATURE 
INTERNATIONAL 
REAL ESTATE 

TURN TO PAGE 4 


properties, fetatei. Emile GABON, 
§> 55. 13S32 Sr-B&AY^-PKO- 
VB4CE Gcdex. Td 90.92,0138 + . 

CAMPING SITE •••for 100 cora 
vans ond moble homes, beouttful Vor 
country. 30 km. from sea Price ELSm. 
Bax WZ Herald Tribune. 92521 
NeuOy Cede*. France 


ST GERMAIN Bi LAYE 

RESTOWCT DU GRAND PARC 


apartment, 255 kuil + 2 maid's 
room, color. F3JM. Tel 69 20 88 70 
1 OTH PEAR RBUBUQUE. Superb du- 
piex. 3 rooms vrith-terroCn. Tel: 47 70 

Tl 21. 

MARAS, large stixfio, facing south, 
body Idtehenette. FSOODOOl 647 5282 


ST GERMAIN DES PRES. 16* amt 


fPl| 49*> 99 81, wee hinds/ evenings 

01-870 4703 

CENTRAL LONDON PRORKTES. In- 
ternahond Company wfll find far so- 
phiriastod dents the property of 
ihor choice, speeafisls m renovation, 
refurbishment, at and antfaues. R- 
rrra avaBabie if cmpficabie. Wmt 
8YANT1 5A. P0stfacn 6926. CH-B023 
ZURICH 


BROADSTAIRS, KENT. MODERN 

targe 2 bedroom apartm ent, part of CASTHfiANDOIKJ 14 miles horn 
18th century stone farmhouse. Wafc- downtown Rome. Enchanting Cbad- 
ing datance to 3 beaches. 2 m3ei room vila, dose to famous golf 
Ransgate/Ferry Immoculate. £39,500 came, beautiful garden with secular 
London: 01-455 4171 eveni n gs. trees. Col Home ^88447 

INIBNADONAL TRAVELLER? Con- MA GOOSE IAKBIDE tamshed 2- 
vemert sturios/ aau ti n e nH , 1 mm storey 400 sqm vRla, near PaBartao 


equipped kitchen, large balcony, 
oartne. P3JMCLOOO. 

Veit l5&ta NovTlpn to 5 pm 
8 bh roe DMmtri or 
Etude Banquet 47 05 06 76 


ON THE GOLF 

OF ST NOM LA 8REJECHE 
MAGMFKOfr HOUSE. 
ON 5fiOO SOM. LAND 

B.CB. 4 7 27 89 39 


BARBARA HIRING 

ETOOf 200 sqm Teh 42 96 95 52 


penthouse, 110 sqm 43 29 42 9* 

PORTUGAL ' 

I 

Wba is dbied of baidtog in lhe 

ALGARVE? 

Experienced, qucfty-artealed team of 
ordxteas and bufiaer weth offices in 
Zurich, Laban and Po rim ao can sue- 


EDflPiaO SON ARMADANS 
JOS BORIA 6 

. E-07014 PALMA DE MAL LORCA 
TebE-TI -289900 

BEAUtm JAVEA, AUCANIE-Spo- 
oous vflo, 4 beds, 2 baths, studo, 
pool, near beach, golf course, yacht 
dub. Dirod sat £ffl,00a Teh (34-65) 
770142 


SWITZERLAND 


HAWAB-KONA COAST. DimRes of 
ooeai frontage. 711 fee senple aoes 
with dl utfifiel Price $10/65fl00. 




ARIZONA RANCHES. From SA99£ 
913W Mahoney, Winslow. AZ 86047. 

USA RESIDENTIAL . 


NYC . 438tory CONDO 

DagHrenmarslqoldTow«r 

■ 240 EAST 4«h ST. 

1 Block To United -Natioro 
-SFECTAOJUUf 

1, 2, 3,2C 4:Bednxsn Apartments 
ImmedKta Occupancy 
. New FuB SmiaBJOrn With 
Swimrmng Pool, Hedtb Cjub and 
HaaselMpBigSsrvioes Avalafale 

v kenta£:apmmb*b~ 

AR£ ALSO AVAIA8IE 
For Wo Cc* 212-7598844' 

Sd. Sdtt .KMfe Mon Jo In 96 ' 




N^V tdMcaiY. Imiry coaperativa 








change. 3 




araxteas ana Oixiaer uem amces m ILR nranc 

Zurich, Laban end Fori m ao can sue- IJWC LUtEKrlt 

cnssfdly honcSe cmy land of size of pro- In the worid fdnoas resort Bnnvien at : 
jed. Portugal entarina Common Mortal the Ldm Lucerne, we sell first dan 
wil mean less fonnafeiai. Architect U. aporlmen&& penthouses wtti an ut*x^ 


venent slwfios/ apm ti n e n i i , > min 
from Kens in gton Station, M o ulin u w 
29 inns, West End 9 mvo. US$43,000- 
1I6J00 London £03 6603. NY 718 
338 2576 

LONDON, ST JOHN'S WOOD, peri- 
od freehold house for safe, quiet 
road, excrient condition^ 4 bed- 
rooms, 214 barbs. 2 large fining rooms, 
fined kitehen. fitted carpets. £249,000. 
Teh London 01-504 vfM9 anyiime. 

S. KB4S1NGTON, fostaric i bed 
house. £385.000. Tel: 01-828 6555 


den. AvdaM now. FuB view 
■stands. TeL 0323/52372. 


MEXICO 

ACAPULCO, fearful 3-bedroom via 
m wduswe Las Bnsas resort with ha» 
services, teerw. nvnd, room service, 
restaurants, available. Spectacukr 
mews of bay. Private pod. garage, 
meads' quarters. Sheehan, 77 bd. GaL 
Koenig, 92200 NeuBy, France. 



NEUH1Y, BD MAURICE BA 
htxunaus edm budefing, an 


Rufenacht, Gxm«ratr. 25, 8032 Zixieh. 
Tel: Of/251 81 66. 


MARBEUA. & ROSARIO, 1 war dd 
vila, 4 badhrams, 4 baths, 230 sqm , 
built, 1,350 sqm land. Pnraee swim- 
ming pad & garden. Putty furnished, 
telephone, near English sand, golf &■ 
taxes dubi U»MDOO. PamSbfiy of 
fin an cing up to 70s of mflpertjr m 16 
yean m pesetas. Cdl Alfirao (34-52) 
83 35 15. Writa 324, Urtx B Rosario, 
Marbefta. Spain. 


gehfala view over the Jdm. Prices from 
SFlWreO up to SfBOOreO. Mortgages 
at tow Stan irtawr rates. 

Free far sale to faroignenL 

EMBUUD-HOME LTD 

D erfrtr. CH-8872 Weeean SG 
Tel: 01-6 8-431778. 

Tbu 876062 HOME CH 


SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. 
NORTH OF WATOMAL 

ExquisitB & stunning qdept ut i un of post 
modem riyfing seF amBta lhe sedbded 
hBt of St uihunx tan tatfi expfosiM ; 
360* views over Groat Pecomc Hay 
from every 'roam of This SjOOO so. ft I 
borne. Sumphrous master suite; shm-'i 
mermg entat u ee n g rooms, 2-cor go- j 
ra^^jad, tennis court, pond & more. 


LANDVEST 


MA Q2109 
WT6 


MIAMI ESTATE 

6 bednoom,5 bath waterfront home of 



AAA LOCATION 
: DBiyGRB> VACANT 

6-stcxy 4- bcaennr. Be rotor bdUmg. 
25 x 100. 60’s off Madean Awl Prino- 

J, °MAafcl UKVA 0126937577- 

8ROWN HAMS SmSHS, MC 


NTC OMRAL PABC WEST- Rasiderv 
*d 3 bed room 4500 sq. ft. duplex 
■ apartment with terraor m taxunoro 
prow doorman txAfing. Rcnovc*- 
•d, awoTO gotta ordiitodurd dtdgri. 
^edaaitar wesvs of the profc. Brdav, 

Laurens 212-302-3388. exL 306. 


.-.USA' ■_ 

. r. . COMMERCIAL 
Vy ,- j IL INDUSTRIAL 

.’ TUDOR tfom 
- • • ... - F OR SAL E 

■: ’ ww york ary 
"480 Booms Close to United Nations 
John G. Strong 

43 Pantigo NY 11937 

SOfiOO FT. OfRCE SSSTs 
imSan. Hid Nassau County, Newi 
York State. Extelianr area. Must see. 

V Broker 516931-5241, P.O. flax 7021, 
-tfcfavBe, NYT1801. 


REAL ESTATE 
TOKENT/SHARE 

CANADA 

DOWNTOWN TORONTO LUXURY 
Apartment HoteL Designer Appointed 
T8.2BedrocmSui*oi.Fulrecrec4ion- 
d fadfitiesindmfing spa. Learn avtsB- 
able monthly or longer. From SI 650 / 
month. Cdl or wife Urn Harmon on 
Bay, 633 Bay Street, Toronto. Ontario 
Crowda M5G 2G4 (416) 593«47. 


Canada N&S 204(41 6) 593-S47. 
TORONTO, CANADA - LUXURY. 


SiX mcsunqNBACLT^^ 

fcxtay tana Iropiad afaiunv more. bedroom, IK baths, high Hoar. Mm 


^A , 0 5ui?i , ?JB 8EA^ o W«NlS»» FRWCH 


FI JQQJXX). No onents. 1-46 37 1488 
| CAN Hgp YOU to buy or to sell red 
estate in PWn mxl suburbs. No agen- 
cy. CoBSctm (3) 974 93 38. 


style via 8 hectares of garden and 
land. 15 trim. Jerez Airport 5 rim 
Puerto Sherry. Mon infix mafanc Ms. 
Sanchez P4-1 1 650 24 27. 



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in /he bif emath ni J Herald fri- 
buna. where mare Hxm a third 
of a nation reader s world- 
wide, mast of whom tee in 
business and industry, wS 
read it. Just Max us (Paris 
*13595) before 10 am. en- I 
turing that wo can Mu you 
back, and your message wtJ7 | 
app ear within 4S hows. The 
rate is US. $9.80 or had 
equ i va l e n t per lino. Yau must 
Made complete and verifi- 
obie bitting addre ss . 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

FINANCIAL T1MK 

SUBSCRIPTION DEUVBir 
tNSWnZBUAM] 

The F.T. operotet wjly momma day ef 
putfKonpn delivery semca tor sub- 
scribers in the fallowing atwh 

BASH. - GENEVA . LUGANO - 
ZURICH 6 LAUSANNE 

fa dn hft or Hyp e service s and for 
further mfanaatisq, conracL- 

Feta lanan tor, F.T . Switieriond 
Tel: Geneva (0 7R 31 16 04 or 
Tdcx 2239 

F94ANOAL TIMES 
EUROPE’S HfilNBS NEWSPAPSl 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


GUARANTS3 INCOME 

^ ANNUI TIES 

One of the foremost rourance compa- 
nies ii rhe world offers: 

* Guor cm tw d Return On liwestmem 

* Ui dalars, * Conmtoie fas iniiy 

* Tax Free. * World Wide bum 

* Complete Anonynxiy 

fioeEPlAN 1A. 

Av. Mon Repos 34, Q+1005 Lausanne, 
Switartaftl Td; mm 35 1Z 
Telex 25185 Me&CK 

farinn’ Enq u iri— brvtad 


BUSINESS SERVICES OFFICE SERVICES 


NTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMITHI INC 
U.SJL 8 WORU7WRX 

A complete persand & business service 
providng a unique coll eai o n c f 
idantod. vtrxme & mufaSngud 
mr&n ducts fa dl soda! £ 
promotional oocaeom. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56di St, N.Y.C 10819 
Service R e pro sem a tives 
Needed Worldwide. 


TAX Hta FOR EXPORT 
WW5J05T 
CHAMPAGNE 
UGUORS 

RAMFY 5SWK25 WC 
1290 Vertood Geneva Swi Uwkx id 
Phone: 0041/22/35 40 42 
Telex: 28279 CH 

ONLY 12 MBUON US$ wfl buy rhe 
fastest growing video production, 
graphic aesor ides promotion croup 


BUSINESS SERVICES LUXEMBOURG 
Accounting / Company Formations & 
Management / Se a -etottal / Telephone 
/ Tela / Med / Office space far rera. 
FVser, 12-14 Bd tTAvraedieL 1160 
limetabaung. Td 352/492153^ 1433 

ADVBTTKING M GERMANY? Ger- 


Your Offire in Genrmy 

,vro row “A* Yaw Service” 

• Campleto office services at two 

■i, ■■in, ■ i i 

presage aacrosses. 

• Fnfiy equipped office* far the short 
tarn or the tang term. 

• fata nutimwly trttaad office and 
pro fata ond staff at your depaed. 

• Cmi be fagd lv used as your corpo- 
rate dames® for Gonxxjay /Europe. 

8 Your burii vu operation con start 
i n smedtatoly . 

Icing B utan es Serv k ex GmbH 
LanssHan am Hohtmasnpai 
Justnonstran 22 
6000 FnaiLfiirt am Mata I 


i hmriy wing, tropied afaiunv more. 

SWITZERLAND ^ 

HOME OF “SCARFACF* 

15JJ00 sq. ft. estate saen frequently m 
Mam Vice & Saxfaoe, fomwriy par- 
lion of Nkon Winter While House 
Compo u nd. 5 bedrooms, 10 baihs, d- 
tra-contomparary iriJeveL S3y9vjm. i 
Johrtt Alen, Jr_ PTOv. ' i 
^ HVAC 5JL. Eves. 305561-6915. 

52 MonfarSant, CH-1202 GENEVA. I 

Teh 022/34154(1 Telex, 22030 Preferred Hames/Ciandon Realty 'Inc. 

260 Gwdon AM.. Key Bhoqyne, 

a 33149. Td 30536T.56I7L 

VALAIS l SWITZERLAND damn a nbw: Canaan Gomecfr 

CXANS - MONTANA cut. Executive type homes far. ror* & 

JHYONj 1E5 COOONS sata. Fkaemt TO. Cty suburb. 

ST LUC VAL D-ANMVIHK French spdwt. NotfantaJ, canneo- 

Flati and chaiets 25 to 150 iqA. tions. oSTbbetn R£ 2036557724. 

1 to 5 racxns. Cnxfil 60V Interest rate — . 


bedroom, 1)5 baths, high no 
ran t- Mary bu&rns, i 


Shorf/lana term restate M 
80 Front SI. East, Ste 22 
M5E 1T4 Canada. (416) 86 

GERMANY 





^AwrL' 


' KVACSJL. 

52 Mo^rBoet. CH-12D2 GENEVA; 
Tdi 022/341540. Telex. 22030 


SSSfagf"" 11 * 

CMRAL FLOnDA, FOR SALE 30 
OBW rf rtJSng coatayiide and 
Sfxinafad Urn. Beautfid famfly home 
one W north of DWffiYWORID 
S300U03. Or. Edward Carter, flax 
1361UwfnuB. Florida 327-tf. Tefc 
904787^111^ 

HJWA. ICAR TAMPA, Iran nv fa- 
nahed wwerfrent opertment, 7bed- 
roems, 2 bafas, fiving/dtom a bedoo- 
S&J»oLvfay. SlSflOO. Geneva; 

76 ay? or Box 23M, Herald 
Trfaunto 92S2T NeuBy Cede*, fiwee 


Br nicer. [BOIJIBt Spodous furnished houses. 


: ipooous tarnished houses, XT; A * 
eqmppcd. ip lo 6 penons. ” • I - 

"Overnr-.-'rtt 

wOlIN 0. Tet (0) 228-224345 i!i 


PAGE 16 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


GSTAAD 
tenty. For Serial 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


a\V.; . 

V ; - 

k f r : 
*y:.. : 

*%e:: - 


Tefi 69-59 00 61 
T«lifatofl9-59 5770 
. Telex; 414561 


rnuaadapsatioracfEngfah/Anrican BIRO BU9NESS 
upy Ear ads +■ droct mcS by pro to 62 Kmangrad*, 1015 
48 houre per fax. tnt'l roferanom, cofl Tefe 31 J0A5 57 49 


EURO BUSHBS CHna 
l e mwnmd*, 1015 C5 Ams fda t a 
31 JO* 57 49 Telex 16183. 

Wodd-Vfido Badness Centres 


graphic diiai xries promotion ffaup HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 
m Europe. Headquartered in Brouelt report - 12 countries orwly m i. be- , 
and London, this amp am insure ^ Lyndhurd Tenoce, 

your su ob m ei tfxs luaafaue martar. Suite 560, Central. Hong Kong. 

93331 EUROPBWKPRBMATIONaviril. 
NeuSy Cedes. France abfa.tatetati*ridand«inxiitomi 


LOW COST FUGHTS 

KBAMUUR • 

Several baton*. Hotel senna ri ro- 3 

qoired. Private swiaming pool end fa- UNIQUE PRICE 

ness center avtaUte in Dm baking. y c 

^ ™ y &A2STS8& « 8W ,] 

OL MATH, GSTAAD 030/4 26 M 

C8CVA-V01A FOR SAUL btaitave f>» m im' 

w, m ?So| 
oK - jsrtftBiiifsL 



HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL Ssi 


Iraneifictely cwaflcble unfar- 


63 LongAne, Iwdon. WC 2 £ 9M roandfrextesuf US$ 485 FROM LONDON TO; 

LAKE GENEVA ta lUGANOt Mon- For faThor riformatian ond r*sfaVgfton SwStt vV-,xi; - . J —C2M 

treux; Gstoad region, Lcamo,'^ ?* „ , 


mrs group 
n ths luaai 


P am mu te 
ativs market. 


w one way abort USS m 
rwtwl trip about us{ 485 


MONEY TREES? 

LIFETIME SECURITY SfflWSSj 1 

Invert ta Me of Amerkn'm meft ex- to2di. S &SSb , ' ***“ 

dttafl t e dsn o to gical breakthrough, ’jggJttgg 

m the nut induwy. Over 30000 nut mlwlK M tl , u , 


MUU7NATKXAL COMPANY itter- 
ested in harnig contacts h Rome wdh 

firms hawtig experience of bumes 
with an oraantflon [FAO, WH> eld. 
Write to i M IS- 115475, fU&ta, 
CH-121I G9>gKA3 J 

NEW UNIQUE SCORE raecrtfng 
punch baS sport unit far gymncmiBiiL 
Know-how, dtdgns, demonSratnw 
met and patent far outnaht sofa. 
£35,000. Slag«bct, Bfimta, Droytcn, 

tat L. UmJ 

r*prwicn. 


Liberia. Cor- 


atta, wide mduEnd ond rternchonal w ^_ — nEV 

sa y*" SW5 

niAMOIVnS TeL PAT- 46 09 95 95. 


HtHJDAYS St TRAVEL 

PORTUGAL 

7 DAYS WCUBIVE TOURS - 

FROM LONDON TO: 


(route Grioad region, Locarno, etc 
Foreigners can boy magri fi ce ni new 


DIAMONDS 

DIAMONDS 

Yaw bass buy. 

fine demands m any price range 
at toweri whotejqb prias 
. deed from Antwerp 

center or the cSaeond werid, 

fid guar trine. 

For free pra Est write 


FraAf u rt 

Bnmdb 

Luxemburg 


SA, tour Gcae 6.CH1DG7 LaascxvM Zurich 
il/2526U.Lugcno office 91-4876*8 font 


129 99 78 
218 0880 
4798 2470 


jn4742 t H°: 




. . * AUSTRIA'S 

LARGEST SKI CtRCUIT-t2 IBTS 
Spead padroge with oramiaed evc- 

nmg praam AoeammasUioa from a 

tow as ti,' -.-. eymp dhaoum. For free 

“rodwrerftaaw cantaeh 

■ wrejaiouits 

, Aurtrte 6K2 EBroae 90 l 

fP» THE FEATURE 

■: Wffica© 

TWW TO PAGE TOW 

«1£ YAOim&Y'teJ* Chariea. 

- Aa3 ^*nxs28,Alhonsl0671. Greece. 

OWUMNJfAOTS. FMumo 7. 
Athens, 3230330, t6q 216034 Greece. 

: hotels;. 

. FRANCE -• 


- 

r «i'. 

V: 


OFFICES FOR RENT 

For Rent in Geneva 

OFFICE 


TURKEY 




dd town {Mart It rdat de JusbcoT 
! FiiBy furnished and AMpped to high 
, dots (Trievr rt4, Compisi i i Otic office. 


meome eventua ll y reaches 52*. 
BROKERS' B40U8HES BWTHJ. 
Matenal ate Mbh i n Engfah, French, 
German. Bex 2207. Herdd Tribune, 
<72521 Neufly Cedex, Frenot 


G. fvio UKL 

BO MSSPORT 35 countnmL GmC, 
26Beomanc o . 106 76 Aihm Greece 


Estobtahsd <928 

rWtoong r oat 6£ B-201S Antwerp 
_ Bdaun ■ Tei : p2 3) 234 07 51 
Thu 71/79 syl fa. At the Omond Oub. 
Hemt ar -Amwpip Diamond "dvwy 


ISTANBU, - TURKEY Al 

Cricnia 


ACCESS USA 


«OM ZURICH TO: 


g«wde / Tiftott Grim 8i comfort- 
3 ro. MortTlwbQt. Pen 
j* Teh {l)42fifl 3280i Tfa, 213492 F. 


Of* ffiwnd Trip f aTrStb?i2^Tr— - — -SFitm *5** ” • w, 10 

R5M F2990 I aKr^5S^=r^~»l{»7 I &£'*- 1*3 -raom-flitebdh. 

77720IL 


3»S^iSSSa gl ffi ai f r WffiiAFwu C-ar 


work at dopos i fao if desired. 

Cal between LMme - SJSOpn 
21/29 4T 64 


Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de TEvangify 7S01S Paris. 


aw*- di. srat^ 


and more destin ati on s _ 
I5X dboaunt tm.lsr dau 
nuns tab m.42 ll 46 94 
. . (Cor. be.* 1502) . 


j£2*W“* «*oRioj.sn!8 
C ^^Ot£%09IW 

^AVRAgw 


uELf 

. Bteheq.hidflft Teh 


■ 1 Ptenerufnd9e.Trt t ni457772aL 
- • -CHEAT BR1TABV . 
«n,M« H018, LONDON*^ 

K«»^li*«liirtgn far buvros 

‘ J’ffi fl 11 * itaio-l. hair 

y *l«,cto hritmrtait/.bg/wteid/ 

ggaeukHui 

*ffiass.?ft{ar. s ?F 


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