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WEATHBl DATA APPEAR ON PAGE. 16 



INTERNATIONAL 




No. 31,956 


.46/85 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post/ 

** PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY» NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 


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er after ggnfng an sgreement on Northern Ireland. 

Britain, Ireland Sign 


Say in Ulster’s Affairs 


pULEsHSA 

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By Joseph Ldyveld . . 

New York Tuna Service 

HILLSBOROUGH, Northern 
Ire land — Prime Minister Marga- 
ret Thatcher of Britain signed a 
treaty Friday gjvingthelnsb Re- 
public a formal consultative role 
and official presence in Northern 
Ireland for the first time since Ire- 
land’s partition 65 years ago. . 

Under the potentially far-reach- 
ing accord, Dnblnt 'was given ’a 
mechanism for pressing its views 
cm virtually afi matters touching 
the Roman Catholic minority in 



Arid Sharon 


Peres Averts 
Collapse of 
Government 


By W illiam ' Chibarne 

Washington Post Service 

JERUSALEM — Prime! Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres averted a collapse 
erf Israel’s coalition gove rnm e n t on 
Friday when he accepted a revised 
tetter <rf apology from the trade 
minister, Ariel Sharon, for critteiz- 
ing recent Middle East peace initia- 
tives. 

At a press conf erence eaiiy Fri- 
day morning. Mr. Sharon, who had 
threatened to bring the fragfle co- 
alitkm g o ve rn ment down over his 
feud with Mr.. Peres, said, “The 
erisifi is over.” 

After two days of id tease rhetori- 
cal battle with Mr. Feres, Mr. Shar- 
on pledged Ms support of the gov- 
ernment. 

His fetter was understood to 
have retracted the substance of the 
major points of criticism he leveled 

at Mr. fees eariy this week, includ- 
ing the asser tion that Mr. Peres was 
owning to negotiate with the Pales- 
tine Liberation. Organization and 
return the Israeli-occnpied Golan 
Heights to Syria. 

Later Friday, however, Mr. Peres 

and the leader of the rightist Likud 
faction. Foreign Minister Yi trhaV 
Shamir, met but Med to reach an 
agreement on how to avuid simil ar 
crises in the future. ' 

Mr. Peres said that if any minis- 
ter repeats Mr. Sharon's artadahe 
will be dismissed immediately 
without an opportunity to apolo- 
gize or r e tr act his statements. 

The prime minister said that his 
authority is a 1981 amffldroent to 

Israel's Basic Law erf Government 


Northern Ireland, including the sc- 
curity policies of the army and po- 
lice, the administration of justice 

secretariat of Irish and Brf&hoffi- 
dals to be set up* officials said, 
within a matter erf weeks to serve 
the Anglo-Irish finnfwwiw of cab- 
inet ministers that jj to sen- 

sitive issues and matters of policy. 
The secretarial is to be based in 
Belfast 

The primary aim of the arrange- 
- meat is to ease the Catholic minor- 
ity’s sense ci alienation- from the 
. local government without provok- 
ing a violent Protestant backlash. . 
r Garret FitzGerald, the Irish 
prime minister, whose , mere pres- 
ence in Northern Ireland was taken 
as a provocation by Protestants 
demonstrating outside the 18th- 
century castle where the signing 
took place, said he hoped that 
Catholic wiPingTiess to tolerate the 
guerrilla activities of the outlawed 
Irish Republican Army would be 
“eroded” once the accord takes ef- 
fect 

In the treaty as well as Ins state- 
ment at a news conference, Mr. 
.FitzGerald formally conceded that 
the Protestant majority in North- 
ern Ireland rejected the nationalist 
goal of Ireland’s ^unification. 

The agreement that he signed 
stipulated that Northern Ireland 
would remain British until a major- 
ity of its inhabitants fredy consent 
tO a change. - - - 

In present or foreseeable circum- 
stances, *h«t twwtnc indefinitely — 
a point tiiat Mrs. Thatcher was 
careful to stress. She said: *T want 
to offer hope to young people par- 
ticularly that the eyrie of violence 
and conflict can be broken. I be- 
lieve in the union -and that it wfl] 
last so long as the majority so 
wish.” 

She was referring to the union erf 
Britain with Northern Ireland and 
the Protestant mqority in the prov- 
ince. Lriob natio nalis ts argue that 
the majority that needs to be heard 
is the mqority of Ireland as a 
whole- - 

The British, prime minister re- 
peatedly described herself as 
“unionist” and “loyalist’’ — terms 
.that are the focus for the political 
identity of Protestants in the prov- 
ince — and insisted that the new 
arrangement would involve no sac- 
rifice of .British sovereignty. 

But Protestant leaders, who see 
any involvement by Dublin in the 

(Continued cm Page 5, CoL 2} 


INSIDE 

■ MaredBe, plagued by a re- 
cent spate, of gang warfare, is 
something of a poor relation on 
France’s tooth coast PSge2. 

■ The CEA itief said that critics 

in Congress compromised intd- 
tigence sources. Page 2. 


Lists Aims 
At Talks 

But Agreement 
On Chemical 
Arms Is Denied 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has proposed “the 
broadest people-to-people ex- 
changes in the historv of American- 
Soviet relations,” 

Mr. Reagan, who was to embark 
Saturday for Geneva, said Thurs- 
day that his meetings there Tues- 
day and Wednesday with Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev, the. Soviet leader, 
could be “a historic opportunity to 
set a steady, mere constructive 
course in the 21st century.” 

Meanwhile, Larry Speakes, the 
White House spokesman, said 
Thursday that there would be no 
agreement in Geneva on baiting the 
spread of chemical weapons, con- 
trary to reports Wednesday by ad- 
mmn tra tr on officials. 

The officials had said that the 
two countries were planning to 
combine efforts to stop the spread 
of chemical weapons, although de- 
tails on how to im plement the ac- 
cord had not been worked out. 
They said the issue was to be in- 
cluded in one erf several arms con- 
trol statements to be released at 
Geneva. 

George P. Shultz, the secretary 
of state, said in a news conference 
Thursday that no aims accord of 
any significance was expected to 
emerge from the meeting. 

Mr. Reagan, describing his view 
of the Geneva conference, said in a 
televised address: “My mission. 


ON PAGE 2 

■ Only 50% of Americans ex- 
pect the -Summit to yield better 
ties, a survey shows. 

■ A shift in Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev’s view of the United States 
is called unlikely. 


stated simply, is a mission. r for 
peace. 1 1 is to engage die new Soviet 
leader in what I hope will be a 
dialogue for peace that endures be- 
yond my presidency. 

“It is to sit down across from Mr. 
Gorbachev and try to map out, 
together, a basis for peaceful dis- 
course even though our disagree- 
ments on fundamentals will not 
change,” Mr. Reagan said. 

In proposing the broad ex- 
changes of Russians and Ameri- 
cans, Mr. Reagan was in effect call- 
ing for some fairly basic changes in 
the relatively isolated Soviet sys- 
tem. . 

Traditionally, Soviet borders 
have been closely guarded, publica- 
tions and first-hand information 
from theWest-have not been readi- 
ly available, and foreign travel, 
even to allied Communist coun- 
tries, has been restricted. 

Mr. Reagan said the two sides 
were dose to completing an agree- 
ment to expand educational and 
cultural exchange programs. The 
programs were suspended in 1979 
by President Jimmy Carta- alter 
the Soviet intervention in Afghani- 
stan. 

Administration officials said 
Wednesday that the new accord 
was ready for signing at the summit 
meeting. 

Officials said that Mr. Reagan’s 
televised speech Thursday could be 
construed as seeking to set a posi- 
tive tone for the Geneva meeting. 

Although Mr. Reagan accused 
the Soviet Union of having ngected 
efforts to limit nuclear weaponry, 
be said that “nuclear aims control 
is not of itself a final answer ” 

He then focused on the need for 
Soviet and American people to get 
to know one another directly. 

“Despite our deep and abiding 
differences, we can and must pre- 
vent our international competition 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) ' 



Death Toll 
Of 20,000 f 

Is Expected 
In Colombia 


Rescue workers in Armero, Colombia, lift an injured woman from the ruins of her home. 

Colombia: Miracle at Sunrise 

Survivor Tells of Desperate Race Against Mudslide 


BOGOTA — Swept away by a 
torrent of mud, with houses crum- 
bling about him, Joto Martinez was 
one of the lucky few from the dev- 
astated Colombian town of Ar- 
mero who lived to see the sunrise 
after the volcanic eruption. 

“It was a miracle,” said Mr. Mar- 
tinez, 49, a trade driver, from his 
hospital bed in BogotA on Friday. 
“For those of us who survived, me 
and my family, it was a miracle.” 

At least 20,000 people died when 
the Nevada de Rniz volcano erupt- 
ed in one of the worst volcanic 
disasters of this century, unleash- 
ing a river of mod, rocks and water 
that engulfed Armero. 

Relief workers said that perhaps 
only 2^00 1 Armero residents - had 
escaped- death. Twenty-five survi- 
vors; arrived in Bogoii bv bus on 
Friday and 50 more, all children, 
were expected. 

Mr. Martinez, his battered body 
bearing the marks of his ordeal, 
slowly moved his broken left arm 
to show how he reached for debris 
as the mud swept him away. 

“I saw houses crumble, cars and 
electric pylons carried away as if 
they were toys,” he said. “1 grabbed 
what I could and drifted for 
hours.” 

Mr. Martinez said that be, his 
wife and their five children had 
been trying to flee the torrent in a 
neighbor’s truck. He jumped from 
the vehicle when a wave of mud 11 
feet (3 meters) high swept down on 
them. 

“I guess it was fear, a desire for 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 2) 



Covered with mud and ash, parents in Armero, Colombia, 
comfort their daughter after being rescued from a sea of 
mud following the eruption of the Nevada del Ruiz volcano. 


The Assedatrd Pros 

ARMERO, Colombia — The 
Colombian Red Cross said Friday 
that it estimated the nation's volca- 
no death toll to be at least 20,000, 
as rescue workers dug nonstop to 
save people buried by the wave of 
mud that swept over Armero and 
three other Andean towns before 
dawn Thursday. 

A dark column of steam and ash 
rose above the Nevada de Ruiz 
volcano Friday as rescuers dug 
numbed survivors from a sea of 
mud and a fleet of helicopters shut- 
tled them away from Armero. 

Thousands of survivors spent a 
second night Thursday in the open 
without nourishment. 

Many of those rescued from the 
torrents of blazing ash and mud 
complained bitterly that local offi- 
cials had failed to warn them of the 
danger and had even discouraged 
them from evacuating when the 
volcano began spitting ash 
Wednesday afternoon. 

The volcano, after months of 
rumbling, erupted with a deafening 
roar shortly after 10 P.M. Wednes- 
day, residents said, and about three 
hours later the mud avalanche 
rushed through Armero and three 
other towns. There were reports of 
a second eruption as well. 

Simultaneous heaw rains en- 
gorged the Lagunilla River before 
dawn Thursday, turning it into a 
rushing wall of mud that destroyed 
at least 85 percent of Armero, a 
coffee-fanning town of 50,000 peo- 
ple situated 30 miles (48 kilome- 
ters) from the volcano and 105 
miles northwest of Bogota, the Co- 
lombian capital. 

Another 20,000 people lived in 
nearby Saniuario, Carmelo and 
Pindaliio, towns that also were bur- 
ied by the mud. 

The United Nations Disaster 
Relief Organization and the U.S. 
Embassy in BogotA said that 4,000 
bodies had been recovered by Fri- 
day morning, and death toll esti- 
mates by government officials 
ranged beyond 25.000. 

From the air on Friday, fewer 
than a hundred buildings could be 
seen jutting from a mflewide river 
of mud. Before the eruption, a cen- 
sus showed the town had 4,200 
buildmgs. 

A church, the tallest building in 
Armero, was leveled by the mud. 
But the local cemetery, protected 
by a high cement wall, was un- 
touched, saving residents who hud- 
dled there. Other survivors climbed 
trees and jumped onto roofs. 

Some inched on their stomachs 
across the mud to reach trapped 
neighbors. 

Television film showed one man 


di gging laboriously with a sauce 
pan to free a young girl half buried 
in the muck. 

“They have rescued very few 
people until now because almost 
everyone was buried in the mud,” 
said Argemixo Moreno, who was 
picked up by a helicopter after 
spending 30 hours on a board atop 

Devastating mud slides like 
those in Colombia are well- 
known to geologists. Page 5. 

the sea of mud covering the town. 

Colombia's president, Belisario 
Betancur, who put himself in 
charge of rescue operations, spent 
mosf of Thursday flying over the 
devastated area in a helicopter. In a 
television interview Thursday 
night, he described the ravages of 
the volcano as an “immeasurable 
tragedy.” 

“We have had one tragedy after 
another,” Mr. Beiancm- said. 

The disaster occurred one week 
after a 28-hour siege by leftist re- 
bels at the Justice Ministry in Bo- 
gotA. in which about 100 people, 
including 11 of the country’s 24 
Supreme Court justices, were 
kilted. Mr. Betancur had refused to 
negotiate with the rebels and broke 
the siege with repeated assaults by 
armored cars and troops with 
heavy weapons and explosives. 

Tremors were felt Friday near 
the volcano and steam still poured 
from (he crater, stirring fears erf 
new eruption. But the Colombian 
Geophysical Institute said it de- 
lected only light seismological ac- 
tivity. 

An air bridge was being estab- 
lished Friday to bring injured from 
Mariquita to Bogota, using four 
mflitarv and four private aircraft- 

The United States was sending 
i2 helicopters, tents, blankets and 
medical supplies from U.S military 
bases in Panama. Mexico sent 10 
tons of food, medicine and medical 
equipment. Japan announced it 
was sending an eight-member med- 
ical team. 

An estimated 2,000 people still 
were trapped on a ranch near 
GuayabaL four miles from Armero. 
Hundreds of bodies were being tak- 
en to a soccer stadium in Guavabal. 

[The eruption was the deadliest 
since New Guinea's Mount Lam- 
ington exploded in 1951, killing 
from 3,000 to 5,000 people. United 
Press Internationa] reported. 

[It was the Western Hemi- 
sphere’s deadliest eruption of this 
century. The worst before was in 
1968, when Mount Arena! in Costa 
Rica erupted and killed 80.] 


Liberian Coup Leader Killed; Doe Calls Situation 'Very Tense 9 


Corrpikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Sam- 
uel K. Doe, Uberia’s head of state, 
announced Friday that the fugitive 
leader of a bloody coup attempt, 
Thomas Qmwonkpa, had been shot 
to death by troops in the streets of 
Monrovia. 

In a nationwide broadcast moni- 
tored here, General Doe described 
the situation in Liberia as “very 
tense,” and said that anyone who 
violated a dusk-to-dawn curfew — 
even by one minute — would be 
executed on the spot. 

Residents of the Liberian capital 
reported many casualties, arrests 
and continued looting by soldiers 
following Tuesday's coup attempt. 

Witnesses contacted from ivory 
Coast said they had seen truck- 
loads of bodies being driven 


through the streets of Monrovia. 

They alto quoted reliable sources 
as saying that top opposition lead- 
ers had been detained, including 
Jackson Doe, who is not related to 
General Doe, and Edward Kessely. 
Both ran unsuccessfully against 
General Doe in last month’s presi- 
dential election. Opposition politi- 
cians had accused the president- 
elect of ballot rigging. 

Ellen Johnson-Sirieaf. a former 
finance minister, also was believed 
to be among prominent opposition 
leaders detained. Her arrest in Sep- 
tember for remarks against the gov- 
ernment. made in the United 
States, had led to a U.S. protest. 

[U.S. officials have received un- 
confirmed reports that some oppo- 
sition leaders, including Jackson 
Doe and Mrs. Johoson-Sirleaf, 


have been executed, Reuters re- 
ported from Washington. 

[Am official said, “We are mak- 
ing known to the Liberian govern- 
ment at the highest level our con- 
cern over reports of summary 
executions and arrests.” He said 
that U.S. Embassy officials in 
Monrovia were “urging modera- 
tion” on General Doe.] 

Congress has threatened to sus- 
pend $86 million in U.S. aid, about 
one-third of Liberia’s budget, if Li- 
beria’s elections are not deemed 
fair. 

General Mr. Doe said in his 
broadcast: “There are a lot of our 
people who have been (tilled inno- 
cently, a lot of property de- 
stroyed.” 

After the broadcast. General 
Doe was cheered wildly as be drove 


along Monrovia’s main thorough- 
fare, residents said. 

Mr. Quhvonkpa’s body was tak- 
en to an army barracks and pul on 
display, radio reports said. 
Residents said that General Doe 
went to see the body. 

General Doe, who seized power 
from President William Tolbert in 
a 1980 coup, said that one of his 
bodyguards had captured and 
killed Mr. Quiwonkpa. 

Mr. Qurwonkpa, an ally of Gen- 
eral Doe in 1980, had been in hid- 
ing since his band of rebels was 
crushed by General Doe’s loyalist 
troops in fierce fighting Tuesday 
and Wednesday. 

In a telex to The Associated 
Press in London. General Doe’s 
press secretary. Patrick Kugmeh, 
said, “Quiwonkpa was shot on 


sight because he was considered to 
be dangerous and armed.” 

General Doe said security forces 
were trying to flush out any rebels 
involved in the coup attempt, and 
said anyone harboring them would 
“face the full weight of the law.” 

“We want to once again appeal 
to members of the diplomatic corps 
to stay home after six o’clock,” he 
said. “We do not want to see any 
DC license plate after six o'clock. 

“If you are caught one minute 
after six o’clock, you will be dealt 
with and you will be treated as a 
rebel.” 

He added, however, that “we 
want to assure our foreign inves- 
tors, members of the diplomatic 
corps that their lives, their properly 
will be fully protected.” 

f AP. Rearers} 


After 76 Years, Halley’s Comet Stages Bright Comeback for Earth 


ARTS/LEISURE 

■ A museum cti alor dreams of 

making.. Xagnes-sur-Mer, 
- France, to Renoir what Giveray 
Is to Monet. Page* 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ U.& industrial ontpirf was un- 
changed last month, but prices 
at the wholesale tevd jumped a 
sharp 0.9 percent Pig e II. 

. MONDAY 

A Ml page of background on 
the Reagnu-Gorbachev summit 
■ . .. . a The 

The 



By John Noble Wilford 

New York Tima Service 
NEW YORK — Halley’s comet 
has emerged from the dim recesses 
of space and, displaying an unex- 
pected early brightness, is coming 

■into increasingly dear view in the 
night sky. 

The best opportunities so far to 
see the comet began Thursday and 
will continue through Sunday. The 

moon is new and thus not a source 
of much interfering light. 

The comet will be fairly high 
above the eastern horizon and near 
an easily recognizable feature in 
the sky, the duster erf stars astrono- 
mers call the Pleiades. 

The comet, which returns to the 
inner solar system roughly every 76 
years, should be viable' through the 
night. B eginning at about 9 P.M. 

local time, throughout most of the 

world, except in extreme southern 
latitudes such as South Africa and 
southern Australia. 


However, m March and April, 
on the comet's return swing, the 
Southern Hemisphere will get by 
far the best view of the comet in its 
most spectacular phase. 

Most comet expats recommend 
binoculars, rather than a telescope, 
for viewing the comet They suggest 
7x35 or, preferably, 7x50 binocu- 
lars. Binoculars provide a wider 
field of view than telescopes, which 

is an advantage especially in night* 
when the comet’s tail stretches 
across the sky. 

Visibility will depend on weather 
and proximity to dty lights. The 
sky must be clear and dark. People 
in cities and most suburbs will have 
little orno chance to see the comet. 

The comet will make its closest 
inbound approach to earth on Nov. 
27. It wfl] he 58 million miles 
(about 93 million kilometers) away 
and difficult to observe because of 
bright moonlighL The next two 


prime observing periods for the in- 
bound journey are Dec. 8-13 and 
Jan. 4-6. Backyard observers might 
want tony Dec. 5-15 and Jan. 1-14. 

la February the comet will dis- 
appear from sight as it passes be- 
hind the sun. 

Late that month, it will emerge 
from behind the sun more dazzling 
than ever. Solar heat will have 

stripped its core, which probably is 

no more than a few miles wide, of 
its outer layers of ice and other 
particles. This wiU result in a dens- 
er, more luminous cloud surround- 
ing the comet’s nucleus and twin 
tails extending perhaps 50 million 
miles across the sky. 

On April 11. the coma will come 
closest to earth, passing within 39 
million mQe$. But on the entire 
outbound teg, it will be a disap- 
pointment to observers in the 

Northern Hemisphere. It will al- 
ways be too close to the horizon. 








Page 2 


EYTERJVATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 



Shift in Gorbachev View 
Of U.S. Seen as Unlikely 

Stereotyped Marxist Images of America 


Will Be Difficult for Reagan to Dispel 


By Philip Taubmnn 

New York rimes Service 
MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- 


spends closely to usual Marxist- 
Leninisi views of the United States 
as a corrupt society controlled by 


chev’s America is a land controlled capiuluumwhidiavtogccitiKns 
by wealthy capiulUls and comer- ““P' 011 * 1 b - v ^ , da f s 


vaiive business interests. 

Rightist forces dictate govern- 


and government policy is made to 
protect the rich. 

“When Gorbachev talks about 


mem policy and would never per- . " D “ T.w a n 
mit a lasting improvement in reL- UniKd Stato, he : sound* like a 

dons with Sc Scwiel Union. ^vdi a ?Pl oni ? 1 ^ 

Although Mr. Gorbachev s views 


n nuliury -industrial complex , - . ... 

hungry to profits is the real force have cm ^. m ™™4 S 

behind the development of space- w “ h Americans, his 



Only 50% of Americans WORLD BRIEFS 


Expect Sunmntto i leld 

Better Ties, Poll Shows 

to a g0 lf n,?e iS^comhti<m he not be nanw^dteSorokidLdat 
By David K Shipler vdoping the spac^based Systran Sp^kmg m declaration last month tf m ecm^.aau^ 

NcYoHcTirnsJ" and giving it up and negottann^ S3 g^ ^j^S ninr measures spanning 15 fflnnltahgjl tamed the 

NEW YORK. — Only half the without die mtem. and ctegg toUury g oveomens of 

Sz; percent would /orgon^tv ^ to toll smuggling and ewre^.n^: 




.-a.-* 


1 'if ^ 


. - i *■**■:> 

' .1 


SffismS a Tehrai^BaghdadRgportAfrA^; 


^IveysbowedwMydiffer- <* urptXnmaimlhe.*^: 


Tha A tso cxrlwd ftm 


and. CBS News. eni laeas oi wmu. uk epm* mci™* utur. 

TWM-. infff . ^ TlRJ^’SSBtoW Rafauffl ai, yato ,cfWj , 
officials, whotunebeenanaioiis to 


ent ideas of what the space defense Onff. 


based weapons. ■ ^ ubt f ™. P™no«nced 

These are among the impressions wh f n j’ e m Moscow last we* 
of the United States that Mr. Got- S?5^ ecr ?^. 0 L. S o“»?? r f e P ' 


Mikhail S. Gorbachev and George P. Sfrahz in Moscow. 


• k "'••j* 

■f.r 

...... ,--r 7* 

■; _ f; •«!-- 

■ -i- 

_ \ ' vVV.. ; Bfqf** 


S^and Roben C. McFarian* 
tiom, with U S. officials and politi- ^ national security 


cians since becoming Soviet leader ad '?**f*. ,be s®^ 

in March, according to Western Officials traveling with Mr. 


diplomats who have been briefed in 
detail about the meetings. 

The diplomats said Mr. Gorba- 


Shultz and Mr. McFarlane said 
that Mr. Gorbachev’s view of the 
United States was as offensive to 


chev's vision of America would not £ e Reagan a dmini stration as Mr. 
be easily dispelled by President Reagans depiction of the Soviet 


Ronald Reagan when they meet in 
Geneva nett week. 

A top Reagan administration of- 


Union as an “evil empire” was to 
the Kremlin. 

Diplomats said that Mr. Gorba- 


Officials traveling with Shultz said 
Gorbachev’s view of the U.S. was as 
offensive to the Reagan administration as 
Reagan’s depiction of the Soviet Union as 
an ’evil empire 9 was to the Kremlin. 


avoid raisin g hopes that might 
ihwhwj jf the Geneva nw-tfng 
unproductive. 


tect less than 10 percent 


neaTtbe Strait of Hormuz on suspicion of i... 






Friday, showed that Americans ^ .aZZC 

were eager for an arms control trea- ? cbcmc w0 °ki s^^ed at AstRSV- 


tv even if it meant riviM un Mr “S ““****> ~ WASHINGTON (NYT) — President Rxmald Reagmr hMs^ncd two 

would give it op if domg so would stopgap bms » enable the wKnmgl to ■ «M to kgqp 
nScdrfSS^wstenL . bnD S “ 311113 agreement. running while the president-goes to Gam fey conference 


But few said thev thou^t Mr GWcn a list of five major issues next week. Congress hadTUri«d oraldagit 
™ of concern, more pendents them before the deadline of midmght^Thnxsda^ ^ ■ ■■ : 

named anas control than any other One of the two bills wifl teaipom ay inc rease the matintatiw .debt 
i«ae. ceffiBg by SSOMBon, Blowing ft to 


ficial said Wednesday in Washing- chev repeatedly cited a book pub- 
ton that Mr. Reagan believed he Usbed by the Hoover Institution, 


could have a significant effect on the research center in Palo Alto, 
Mr. Gorbachev's negative view of California, as the real blueprint for 


Joseph D. Douglass wrote. “The 
Soviet objective is to destroy capi- 
talism and replace it everywhere 
with their brand of socialism. “ 
“We have read this book and 


Lhe United States and persuade Reagan administration policy. with their brand of socialism, 
him that the administration had no The book, “The United States in “We have read this book and 
"animus" toward negotiating with the 1980s," was a compendium of watched all its programs become 
lhe Kremlin. articles and recommendations adopted by the Reagan admimslra- 


piction of the United Stales as a 
source of military hardware and 
other aid to the Soviet Union in 
World War IL 


Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev were OI wncern, more respouueui* 
readmit) make the compromises re- named arms control than any other 
quired. The respondents were also lssae * 


it's debt 


asssiaii* i^ds&’ss^sz laiswas 


tviltng Oy 53U DUUOD, allowing u w ovuow w.j/k? «a oils uirougir uec, - 
1 1 , a Treasury Department spi^cesman said Thursday. The cnneot debt 


dom of r aising human-righ ts jccngS bdlCVCd titt effect Of tfifi large U 5 . — —•* - ^ _ -n c. 

alasunSeting.anZieywere and Soviet nndear arsenakWas to th S?e^be^& 

overwhelmirigly^mvmced that no keq> the superpowers out of war 

f tv becanse thetvro countries feared *e 13 appropriations bills for the 1986 


“That's wishful thinking," a dip- about U.S. domestic and foreign 
lomar said Thursday. “He believes policy in the 1980s by prominent 


the United States is an implacable conservatives. The authors indud- 


articles and recommendations adopted by the Reagan admimstra- 
about U.S. domestic and foreign don," Mr. Gorbadiev told Mr. 
policy in the 1 980s by prominent Shultz, citing that as confirmation 


ed Milton Frie dman, the econo- 


“ Th ere may be an element of mist; Edward Teller, a key figure in 
pos ruring and calculated propa- the development of the hydrogen 


that “right-wing forces” control 
American policy, a diplomat said. 


The diplomats said that when 
Mr. Shultz recalled that s up po r t 
within Congress for the strategic 
arms limitation treaty of 1979 died 
after the Russians sent troops into 
Afghanistan that year, Mr. Gorba- 
chev responded, “It shows you 


pr o gress in that fiehi could be ma de because the two countries feared 


at Geneva. 


mutual destruction. Only 38 per- 


ThepotLin which 1,659 adults ** il ^ "** A 

_ T^_ .IiL-i.lI.. tune before the two cotmtnes db- 


French Aide toJVe^ 


-■ 


mbit hgendej 
xi only four <rf 
bt^antXx, l' _ 


were interviewed by telephone “5T 

from Nov. 6 to 10, showed Mr. saa ^ d “ other - 


Gorbachev with a mildly positive Blacks and whites showed snb- 
image among Americans, and it stantial differences on this 
gave Mr. Reagan a high approval tion, with 63 percent of the 
rating! expecting ultimate destmetk 


ganda," said a diplomat who has bomb and recently a leading pro 
Laiked with Mr. Gorbachev, “but ponent of a space-based missile de- 


The diplomats said Mr. Gorba- don't take us very seriously when 
chev, who was more combative and yon make a remark likw that " 


ultimate destruction and 


all the evidence suggests that the fense; and Fred C. Ode. currently 
man sincerely believes these undersecretary of defense for po- 


olings." 

Mr. Gorbachev's image of .Amer- 
ica. the diplomats said, corre- 


ln a chapter on Soviet nuclear They said, for example, that he been undermined by “right-wing of foreign policy, 
strategy. Amoretia M Hoeber and refused to accept Mr. SbuUz's de- forces.” ^wntv-'fcvc 'n 


argumentative than he had been in 
previous meetings with Americans, 
challenged almost every statement 
made by Mr. Shultz about the 
United States. 


Mr. Gorbachev then contended 
that long before the Russians went 
into Afghanistan, the treaty, which 
was signed by President Jimmy 
Carter and Leonid L Brezhnev, had 


expecting ultimate destn 
57 percent of the whites 


With a margin of sampling error «P 


^ITpcSIsSromt that war would be avoided 
urveyed endorsed Mr. While 65 percent believed it was 


of those surveyed endorsed Mr. While 65 percent believed it was 
Reagan’s overall performance and somewhat or very likely that nude- 
56 percent supported his handling ar weapons would be used in the 


PARIS (Reuters) — Edgard Pi- 
gani stepped down Friday as mitris- 
ter in charge of France's Paofk; 
territory of New Caledonia .in a 

mfnnr gov ernmen t shuffle. 

In additiem, a new secretary of ’ 
state for transport, Charies Josse- 
lin, was named Friday to fin a post 
left vacant smce Septenber. Louis 
Mexandean, junior mmister f 1ot. 
posts and tdecommmrications, 
gained full mmistqial-rimk^aiid 


foreign policy. next 15 years, only 29 percent gained full mmisterial-rank and 

Severity-five ’percent said they tkou^ht they would be used by the jomed the cabinet- • . / vr:— 
believed the president really want- United States or the Soviet Union; Mr. Pisani, dmsea last JJecemr 
*\ an rrmtmi oorwnwit- Ai 59 percent said they expected the 


Defector Tells of Escape From CIA 

Soviet Aides Call U.S. 'Hypocritical’ on H uman Rights 


AW- York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Vitaly Yurchenko, 
considered a valued defector by the 
United States until his recent re- 
turn to the Soviet Union, has ap- 
peared at a second news conference 
here to offer new details about his 
experiences. 

At the briefing at the Foreign 
Minis tiYs press center, Mr. Yur- 
chenko told Thursday how he 
made his "escape" from CIA super- 
vision by dashing from a French 
restaurant in Washington to the 
Soviet Embassy. 

Mr. Yurchenko. Vladimir B. Lo- 
raeiko, the Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, and other officials 
called the United States hypocriti- 
cal on human rights and accused 
American reporters of asking ques- 
tions planted by the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency. 

Western diplomats said the news 
conference added weight to the the- 
ory that Mr. Yurchenko’s defection 
in August and his return to the 


Soviet Union had been planned to evidence of having been drugged 
embarrass the Reagan administra- and continued to suffer from hallu- 


tion before the UiL-Soviet summit cmations and high blood pressure. 


meeting next week. 

Mr. Yurchenko denied that he 


Mr. Yurchenko said he was able 
to bdt from the QA on Nov. 2 


had ever been associated with the because of inadequate security. 
RGB, the Soviet intelligence agen- During a visit to a clothing store in 

TVa r*l A L I 1L! m r ° - 


cy. The CIA has described him as a Manassas, Virginia, near the safe- 
senior agent who rose to the mili - bouse where he said he was kept, he 


taiy rank of “general -designate" in said he was able to make a collect 


a 25-year career with the KGB. 
Mr. Yurchenko seemed nervous 


call to the Soviet Embassy. 
Unexpectedly, he said, the CIA 


and appeared at times to be reading escort offered to go to Washington 


from a prepared text 
Mr. Lomeiko, referring to Mr. 
Yurchenko's assertion that be had 
been kidnapped and drugged, said. 
“The United States makes it a mis- 
sion. to teach all mankind how to 
live, but the same authorities per- 
petrate barbarous acts on people.” 

The Reagan administration has 
denied that Mr.' Yurchenko was 
drugged or mistreated during the 
three months he was a defector. 

Dr. Nikolai Zharikov, a physi- 
cian, said Mr. Yurchenko showed 


for dinn er at a restaurant near the 
embassy. While the officer was in 
the washroom. Mr. Yurchenko 
said, he ran out of the restaurant. 



ed an anus control agreement; 47 59 percent said they expected l 
percent thought that Mr. Gorba- &» use by some other country, 
chev did. More of the pessimism about 1 


chev did. More of the pessimism about the 

But Mr. Reagan was seen as will- pnspwts for the summit meeting 
■ u, seemed to turn on assessments of 

the Soviet Union, its tostworthi- 


KIZlSS: ness and the attitudes of Mr. Gor- 
Gorbachev w^byonly 21 percent ba^ev than it did on assessments 
Am«*17r>erw»nl ww hnth fenders Of Mr. Reagan. 


A mere 17 percent saw both leaders _ _ 

as prepared to compromise. Those who expressed a faintly ment 1®^ month of a new.gr 

a aim aa \ positive and slightly hopeful view mg structure for the territory. 

AndMr.Rwgandidnotiqiprar GoriXv tended to be 


ber to defuse a worsening crisis m 
New Caledonia, spent several 
months in the territory As .ltigh 
commissioner and returned to Par- 
is in May with the new title- of 
minis ter. He is to join , the Staff of 
President Fran 9 ois Mitterrand as a . 
special asristanL His departure was 
expected foDowing thc estabifisb- 
merit last month at a oew gavem- 



Edgard Pisani 


to get solid support for all his posi- iThJXiX;, .TT 

I!-"!®"®' 


poDed said they Mm* accord and reduced Soviet- BUENOS AIRES (AP) — A man befieved to be Walter Kntschnmn^ a 

SSSSWSrs Po “ ^ 

i i . luZl vmtm has been arrested near here, authorities said Friday. 

pot disciigtt reduction^mnoctor p^So^^Oul^ tod Nfr! 

Kutohmra, ™ K^onabfc for (h. ttah. of 1400 to 2,000 lows lit 


Aj^entine Police HddM Alleged Nazi 


Vitaly Yurchenko at Ins 
Moscow press conference. 


Forty-seven percent regarded 


sincere when they said they would Mr. Gorbachev as different from 
not discuss a reduction in nodear previous Soviet leaders. Only 3 per- 


ceeded with work on a space-based peace with the United States less 


defense system. 


than did his predecessors, arid 35 


If forced to choose between de- percent believed be wantedit more. 


QA Chief Asserts Critics in Congress 
Compromised ’Sources and Methods’ 


Poland in 1942. . • • T- :• 

Argentine police said that thesu^pect, vd». used filename Pedro Olmo, 
offered no resistance when officers arrested him in the town of Florida, 
six miles (nine lrilameters) north of thecqiitaE 



By Stephen Engelberg 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Wiliam J. 
Casey, the director of central intel- 
ligence, has asserted that corn- 


had questioned the handling of the 
cases of Vitaly Yurchenko, a 


Soviet intelligence officer, and of 
Edward Lee Howard, a former CIA 


said in Ins letter, “the thrust of my 
remarks was positive." 


meats by members of Congress Soviet Union. 


Edward Lee Howard, a former CIA 
officer accused of spying for the 


have caused “the repeated compro- Mr. Durenberger has asserted 


raise of sensitive intelligence that be was misquoted in same ac- 


I sources and methods.” 


counts. But Mr. Casey’s letter was 


In a strongly worded letter to clearly aimed at the broader issue 
David F. Durenberger, a Minneso- of whether h was appropriate to 


ta Republican who is the chairman have public discussion of . certain 
of the Senate Select Committee on sensitive issues overseen by the in- 


Intdligcncc, Mr. Casey contended teiligence committees in the House 
that the congressional oversight of 2nd Senate. 


intelligence agencies “has gone se- 
riously awry." 

He said that some congressional 


Mr. Casey said his remarks were 
directed at a pattern of congressio- 
nal comments on the p er f orm ance 


attacks on the agency’s perfor- °f. the agency, some of which he 
mance had been “inaccurate,” “off said involved disclosure of Htings 


the cuff" or “unfounded." 


told to the committees in dosed 


A CIA spokesman would not session. 


elaborate on what specific breaches Mr. Durenberger, in a letter to 


■ . Durenberger Defended 

David Ottaway of The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Washington: 

Senator Patrick J. Leahy, the 
ranking Democratic member of the 
Intelligence Committee, accused 
the CIA on Friday of “yearning to 
go back to the good dd days" when 
Congress had no oversight respon- 
sibility for its operations and tbe 
United States made “some of the 
most colossal failures, intelligence 
failures, ever.” 

Craning to the defense of Mr. 
Durenberger, Mr. Leahy charged 
that Mr. Casey had “unfairly at- 
tacked" his colleague in the letter 
released Thursday. 

“I hear people yearning to be 



Marcos Begins Re-election Campaign 


CEBU CITY, Hnlqipines (AP) President Ferdinand E Marcos, 
wearing a bulletproof vest, began iris rejection campaign in opposition 
territory Friday: He said; he was willing to postpone the presidential 
dection for three weeks, until Feb. 7; as a compromise with opponents 
who said they had tboU tdetHne to organize. ^ He had originally proposed 
voting on Jan. 17. - - 

Mr. Marcos also announced that he plans a major reorganha tion of the 
armed forces. He said the reorganization would begin with tbe return oi 
General Fabian G Ver, a longtime Marcos ally, to the post of armed * 
forces commander if General Ver, who is on trial with 25 other men in the 
1983 murder of a popular Philippine opposition leader, Benigno S. 
Aquino Jr, is acquitted. 


For the Record 


Domestic flights in Italy were canceled Friday due tt> industrial' ^action 
by air controllers, o ffi cial sources said. International flights and. flights to 
Italian ulands operated normally. (Reuters) 

Greek-Cypriot officials wSmeet a UN team in Geneva on Nov. 30 and 
Dec. 1 amid new efforts to settle the 22-year problem of a divided Cyprus, 
an official statement said Friday. Tmkish-Cypriot and United Nations 
delegations are to meet Nov. 18-19. (Reuters) 


William J. Casey Cocreetio]! 


of security might have been caused Tbe Washington. Post, said the back to the good old days,” Mr. 


[by members of Congress. 


newspaper had “dene a great dis- 


Mr. Casey said his letter was service” in its reporting of a 1 un- 
prompted by an account in The cheon meeting he held with report- 


Washington Post of criticism of the He said his comments were and a lot of other failures." ^ht those were 

! rv — u — _ taken “entirely out of contexr and tagm, more were 


agency by Mr. Durenberger. 


Mr. Casey’s letter was released b® cslhxl jh® Post report “factually 
Thursday after several weeks of incorrect." 


mounting criticism of the Central “As 1 am certain other corre- 


back to tbegood old days,” Mr. . A Washington Postarticle in Thursday’s etfitions of thelntematkmal 

Leahy said. *WdL the good old W ?2 1080 10 Unbone conveyed ax rari e adu ig impression that the VS. Senate 

asgffla agg tis 

and a lot of other fafimes.” 

^ te *¥■ tbe Bay of Pigs." The QA report- toe held such a vote — which U ck^nrajlan the result ^Sdl* 

geaing that there was anyone m the edly was mvohned in overthrowing 8 to 7 in favor of retaining Mr. Casey Tbe article aiw mivSSLw 
QA “wanting to poll another Bay the leftist regime of Salvador Alia? described Mr. Duren^M^i consSi iSSTJ 
of Pigs, *e abratiye CIA-badced de in Chile and sought to loll Mr. position of director of central intelligence; h^dSnrst^^^w« 
invasion of Cuba by Cuban exiles Lumumba- who led tho Tfeiaian tallansr shout * that he was 


Intefligrace Agency by some mem- spon denis at the press luncheon invasion of Cuba by Cuban exiles Lumumba, who led the Belgian talking about a recommendarion^^^’ciT^ .i^^.P 1 ^ 
bers of -Congress. The congressmen would agree," Mr. Durenberger in 1961. Congo to independence as Zaint tor's role. leg^ianon. to danfy” the dirccr 


Gang Warfare Troubles Marseille, a Poor Relation in the South of France 

12.. D:^l p —» * — r- 1 1 * _ __ v 


By Richard Bernstein 

New York Times Service 


Table clock. “Ditomo” gold- and silver-plated 


BVLGAR I 


JO VIA DEI CONDOTTI ROMA 
HOTEL PIEP.RH NEW YORK 
3ft RUE DU RHONE 1204 GENEVE 
AVENUE DES BEAUX-ARTS MONTE CARLO 
HOTEL PLAZA-ATHENEE PARIS 


MARSEILLE — The two main 
newspapers of this bruised old pen 
city reported with a certain amuse- 
ment the other day on a gang that 
tried to coronal wbat might have 
been one of the robberies of the 
century, except they mistakenly 
stopped the wrong train as it 
crossed a railroad trestle, and while 
their getaway trucks waited below, 
they searched in vain for the sup- 
posed cargo of goods. 

If that botched crime ended up 
in Keystone Kops fashion, howev- 
er, it nonetheless seemed an apt 
j reflection of this city’s image as the 
center of organized crime in 
France. Lately, that reputation has 
been growing. 

This year. Marseille has experi- 
enced one of its worst spasms of 
mob violence ever. In 10 months, 
32 persons have died as big crimi- 
nals and little criminals alike have 
been gunned down in caffe, or 
while walking out of their homes, 
or wide caught at red lights in their 
cars. 

The press has been, pub- 

lishing pictures of than splayed out 
on sidewalks, their corpses covered 
with blankets. Marseille has been 


cast as a contem p orary French leg- 
end populated by gangland figures 
such as Barthdemy Regazzi and 
Paul Mondoloni, both of whom 
were gun ned down in recent weds. 

The people of Marseille see the 
situation in more complex term s. 
They are both embarrassed anrJ in- 
different. accustomed on the one 
hand to their repmaticoi and at the 
same time preoccupied with more 
orgeat concerns than what happens 
in the world of crime. 

“Yes, it is true," said a police 
official. Pierre Richard, confirming 
that the spate of recent slayings is 
.-dated to a power straggle. “But, to 
be blunt, tins city is used to that." 

"Besides." he 'added, “I have to 
say that the killers of guys lika 
Mondoloni have very good awn 
They kill with a certain ma ste ry so 
that bystanders don’t get hit, and 
that enables the public to be com- 
pletely indifferent." 

The killings compete with other 
concerns in a city that wars against 
more than its share of dilapidation 
and economic difficulty. The plain 
fact is that Marseille, a yellowing 
and, by French standards, charm- 
less place beside the sparkling sea. 
has always been a rough spot. 

It is only just along the coast 
from such exceedingly fashionable 


’Marseille is a great 
Mediterranean port 
and like other great 
Mediterranean 
ports, it is a tough 
town.’ 



Gaston Defferre 
Mayor 



places as Nice and Saint-Tropez, 
and it seems to have the same geo- 
graphical advantages. Yet there are 
no fibn festivals here, no grand old 
hotels p e ering south across the 
Mediterranean, no pretty prin- 
cesses appearing on the brach fol- 
lowed by eager photographers. 

“We could be the pearl of south- 


ern France;" a businessman said 
with ruefulness in Ins voice. “We 
have everything here; we have a 
good opera and an outstanding the- 
ater. We have the beach. And yet. 
we have always been a kind of poor 
cousin to our neighbors.” 

Asked recently why Marseille 
was the mccca of orgaiized crime, 


. Gaston Deffene, mayor since 1 953 

^todwth asperity, “And why fe 

Then, Mr. Defferre, who has 
six electi o ns far mayor by 
banging the political left and righ t 
mto a kind of undercover coalition, 
added, “Marseille is a great Metfi- 

to^tean port and like other great 
Mfefitoranean ports, Genoa for 
eaample, it is a tough town.” 

. 0°? of the major factors in the 
city’s identity is the simple fact that 
for hundreds of years most of the 
pera>le who came to France caww. 

to Marseille first This is where the 

boats landed. The dry is a French 
vczsicui of the melting pot. Mending 
together — but also keeping stm- 
rate-~ Armenians, Conkans, Ital- 
tons, Arabs. Jews and Africans. It 
re^mWes pro-civil war Beirut, an- 
otuer framer melting pot, more 
than -Monte Cario™ 8 
^In deed , the Beirut image is one 
that comes up in conversation these 
days and reflects a political storm 

tnore intense than aw generated bv 
thegm^d warfare. MaraeillelS 

Ua ^ si «*“«*«- 
hots of Arab immigrants, which 

to fed a powerful nativist senti- 
ment. 


political party, the National Front, 
™*ch, m legislative elections next 
M arch, . is widely expected to 
emerge as the region’s second most 

t e. * 


important political force, with al- 
most one-third of the popular vote. 

Showing a physical expression of 
this political storm. Manrin* ic 


Tbe dty b the most important 
enter of France’s enrem& ri^ 


vukd mto two distinct parts lying I 
on rather side of a main street 
caltod La Candsfee, formerly, the 
-grabdof the dt/s status- as a town 
m of saflao and caffe. . 

. On the east ride of La Canebibe 
ra what is commonly called the 
Eunroean” part of town, spread 
°vra the MBs that run along t he 
gtorahng Mediterranean comkhe. 
1 ^™i West ' ^miing between the 
^hoad Station and the c orrmw - 
oal prat, is tbe center of a North 
Aeaam way of life, with a kind of 
Arab bazaar extending under 
sculpted Second Empire bunding 
modes; w oman iri. shawls arid griz- 

zledmeniaskuHcaps. 

a few weeks 
Jgo, said Tlteo Bidalas, a Socialist 
rarty ^uvist and restaurant own- 
«; and I was ttradeby. how Kvdy 
Marseille, 
o <iare go out in tows 
^ a ^ monL U Cane- 
tore u drad. There is a kind oT 
psyratoBis here.” 


'•'rtfiTT T-itr* 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 


Page 3 


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. .JN- 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


Brazilians Vote in First Elections Since Military Rule 


\nutii * 


,ffr# 


Royal Indifference 
ToaPrincefy Couple 

The recent U.S. visir of the 
prince and princess of Wales had 
Wa shingto n and Palm Beach so-' 
aety in a whirl, but despite a 
blizzard of magazine covers and 
television specials, the rest of the 
country took it in stride, accord- 
ing to a poD by The Washington 

Post and ABC -News. 

Of 1.506 people interviewed 
on the eve of die visit, 58 percent 
said they had: no opinion of Di- 
ana and 67 percent said they hoi 
□o opinion of Cha ri ot, re«ri^ 
got a favorable rating of 29 per- 
cent, to 4 percent unfavorable. 

' Diana rated higher, 38 to 4, but 
not as high as Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the Soviet leader, in the 
same pdL He got a favorable 
rating of 39 percent On the other 
hand, 35 percent of those inter- 
viewed had an unfavorable opin- 
ion of Mr. Gorbachev; 26 per- 
cent had no opinion. 

The Post also reported that 
just one couple was invited to all 
five of the major lunches arid 
dinners given for “the Waleses,” 
as some of the American media . 
took to catling the. prince and 
princess: J. Carter Brown and his 
wife, Pamela. Mr. Brown is the 
director of the National Gallery 
of Art. The gallery is. the site. of 
the current “Treasure Houses of 
Britain” show, of which Charles 
and Diana are patrons. 

Short Takes 

With the abandonment of 
Manhattan's 4.2-mik (6.8-kilo- 
meter) Westway, which at $2 bil- 
lion would have cost $475 nril- 



J. Carter Brawn 

lion a mOe, the most expensive 
highway project in the- united 
States is a proposed 10-mile 
stretch in Hawaii outride Hooo- 
. lulu. The highway would require 
two one-mile tunnels. It initially 
. was justified as a military neces- 
sity, but . the Defense Depart- 
ment says the project is not need- 
ed. Senator Daniel K. Inouye of 
Hawaii, a Democrat, is pushing 
it anyway. At $1 bOHon, it would 
cost $100 mzQiofi a mOe. 

As recently as two years ago 
the population of Texas was 
growing so rapidly that it was 
expected to overtake New York 
and become the second most 
populous state after California. 
But the deepening energy reces- 
sion has dramatically slowed the 


Lone Star state’s growth, from a 
net in-migration of 400,000 in 
the 12 months ending July 1, 
1982, to about 30,000 in the 12 
months ending July 1, 1984. Tex- 
as grew 4 percent a year in 1981 
and 1982, four times the national 
average, but only 1.3 percent last 
year, slightly above the national 
average of I percent. It had 16 
milium people at the end of 1 984. 


Rear What? Dewey 
Would Have laughed 

When the navy, in 1980, re- 
vived the one-star rank of com- 
modore, which had not been 
used since World War II, the 
rank was given the designation 
“commodore adnriraL" 

But Representative Ike Skel- 
ton. a Missouri Democrat, got 
ibe designation changed to plain 
“commodore.” As be said, “If it 
was good enough for such great 
men of theses as Perry, Decatur 
and Dewey, then I felt it was 
good enough for today.” 

The navy didn't, and a three- 
year fight ensued. One high- 
ranking officer said: “You’ve got 
officers who have been working 
all their professional lives to be- 
I come a dmir al and they get 
1 trailed a commodore. It became a 
very emotional issue." After all , 
brigadiers in the army, air force 
and marine corps are called brig- 
adier general. 

Mr. Skelton has now retired 
from the fray. A one-star admiral 
will henceforth be ranked “rear 
admiral lower half," but will be 
addressed amply as “admiral." 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


By Alan Riding 

New York Timet Ssrtcr 

SAO PAULO — His opponents 
variously portray Janio Quadras as 
unbalanced, alcoholic, senile and 
demagogic, and they blame him for 
the three years of instability and 21 
years of military rule that followed 
his abrupt resignation as president 
of Brazil in 1961. 

Yet Mr. Quadras — a candidate 
in elections Friday, when Brazil- 
ians went to the polls for the first 
time since civilian government re- 
turned here in March — has shown 
that his populist style and anti- 
communist mfftsagg have a huge 
following in Brazil. 

Mr. Quadras, 68. appeared to be 
neck, and neck with the govern- 
ment’s left-of-center candidate in 
the race for the mayoralty of Sao 
Paulo, oTteu a stepping stone to 
national office. 

If be wins, his victory will mark 
the re-emergence of the recently 
displaced conservative forces and 
send shod: waves through Brazil's 
eight-monlb-old democracy. 

“Janio is the one hope of stop- 
ping the PMDB from taking con- 
trol of this country," said Ant&nio 
Delfim Neito, planning miiMow in 
the last military government. He 
was referring to the Brazilian Dem- 
ocratic Movement Party, the long- 
time opposition movement that is 
the dominant partner in the gov- 
erning coalition. 

Although national attention is 
centered on Sao Paulo, Brazil's 
largest dty, elections for mayors in 
22 other state capitals on Friday 
also were bong treated as more 
than routine municipal polls: not 
so much as a referendum on the 
performance of President Jcs6 Sar- 
ney, as the first round in the battle 
to succeed him. 

Mr. Samey, who formally loci 


Indian Guru Without Fanfare, Political Prisoners 
Pleads Guilty Begin to Emerge From Polish Jails 

In U.S. Court By Jackson Diehl saw as of late Wednesday, most of The government’s formal an- 


_ ‘ New York Times Service 

* PORTLAND, Oregon — Bhag- 
$an Shree Rajneesh, leader of a 
commune established four years 
9go on a ranch in eastern Oregon, 
las pleaded guilty m federal dis- 
trict court here to violating U.S. 
immigration laws. . 

Mr. Rajneesh pleaded guilty to 
two counts of a 35-count indict- 
ment charging that he participated 
in a scheme of sham marriages to 
enable some of his followers to five 
in the United States: . 

Under a plea-bargain arrange- 
ment announced Thursday, Mr. 
Rajneesh received a five-year sus- 
pended prison sentence. He also 
agreed to pay a $400,000 fine and 
leave' the 1 United St a tes within five' 
days. . 

Mr. Rajneesh was reported to 
have left the country Friday, and 
his followers said they would dis- 
close his destination later. 

[In New Delhi, the Indian guru’s - 
pffice said Friday that he would 
return to India on Samrday.mom- 
ing, Agence France- Presse report- 
ed.] 

The fine, which included 
$140,000 in court costs, was paid 
from a $500,000 bail bond posted 
in his behalf by Rajneesh Friends 
International, the commune’s cor- 
porate arm. The future of the com- 
mune, where about 2,000 of Mr. 
Rajneesh’s followers live, was un- 
certain. 

The indictment, returned last 
month, charged Mr. Rqjneesb and 
seven of his followers with conspir- 
acy »««l fraud in immig ration mat- 
ters. The charges are stiH pending 
against the seven followers, all 
women. 

- Under the agreement, Mr. Rrq- 
ieesh is required to obtain the per- 
mission of the VS. attorney gener- 
al before he can return to the 
United States. In one of the few 
statements he made during Thurs- 
day's bearing, Mr. Rajneesh said. 
’T never want to return again.” 


.By Jackson Diehl 

Washington Past Service ‘ 

WARSAW — Last Monday af- 
ternoon, Jan Kn fman . 44, a histori- 
an and editor for the Polish under- 
ground magazine Krytyka, was 
suddenly hurtled from his cell at 
Rackowiecka prison. By way of ex- 
planation, a guard only pointed to 
a small, vague headline in the news- 
paper Zywe Warszawy: “The Im- 
plementation of the H umani tarian 

Initiative.” 

Hours later. Mr. Kofman was 
free to call his wife from a phone 
booth and surprise her with the 
news of his release under the mod- 
est clemency program that Po- 
land's Communist authorities have 
initiated for political prisoners. 

“It was very unexpected,” be 
said. “Even the families were not 
informed. The anthem ties are han- 
dling this in a very quiet way.** 

With little public notice and no 
official fanfare, political prisoners 
have begun to emerge in groups of 
two and three from Poland’s pris- 
ons this week. Officials have pro- 
vided no names or numbers of the 
released, though they say that most 
of the 368 officially recognized de- 
tainees will eventually be freed. 

Opposition sources said that 12 
persons had been released in War- 


Ardficial Heart Patient 
Dies in Pennsylvania 

New York Times Service 

HERS HEY, Pennsylvania — 
Anthony Mandia, 44, who was kept 
alive by a new type of artificial 
heart for 11 days before he received 
a transplanted human heart last 
month, died Thursday, officials at 
the Milton S. Hershey Medical 
Center here said. 

. The cause of the Philadelphia 
man’s death was listed as multiple 
organ failure “secondary to over- 
whelming infection," according to 
Cari Andrews of the medical cen- 
ter. 


saw as of late Wednesday, most of 
them persons who bad been 
charged but not yet tried or sen- 
tenced for such offenses as distrib- 
uting clandestine literature or en- 
gaging in demonstrations. 

While welcoming the clemency, 
both prisoners and opposition ac- 
tivists are c allin g the proceedings a 
disappointing retreat by the gov- 
ernment of President Wqjcdech Jar- 
urekfri from its seeming offer last 
month of a formal amnesty follow- 
ing the election and installation of 
a new parliament. 

“This measure will not help the 
si tuatio n much, because the prom- 
ises were much greater,” said Mr. 
K nfman, who was imprisoned five 
months and had been awaiting trial 
on charge of printing and distrib- 
upng Kry1yka. “This is not a real 
amnesty. Society expected much 
more.” 

Opposition leaders argue that 
even a broad amnesty program is 
unlikely to have a lasting political 
benefit in Poland. 

“What people are fighting for,” 
said Zbigniew Romaszewski, a Sol- 
idarity human rights activist, “is 
not amnesty but political rights like 
freedom of expression and freedom 
of trade unions. And as long as 
those rights don't exist, people wQ] 
be in prison. They can empty the 
jails but they*n be full again a year 
from now. It’s a vicious aide.” 

General Jaiuzelslti first men- 
tioned the possibility of an amnesty 
during a visit to the United Nations, 
in early October, saying it would 
depend on public support for the 
Oct 13 elections to the Sqm, Po- 
land’s parliament 

Government spokesmen later 
called the elections a success and 
said that an amnesty measure could 
be submitted to the Sqm, which is 
required to approve such measures. 

Subsequently, however, the com- 
munist-backed Patriotic Move- 
ment for National Rebirth called 
for the more modest step of clem- 
ency for prisoners on a case-by- 
case basis. 


The government’s formal an- 
nouncement of the program, re- 
leased on Nov. 9 in a brief report by 
the official PAP news agency, did 
not use the word amnesty. It condi- 
tioned the move by saying that the 
“compassionate mitigations” were 
“not expected to cover” persons 
who had been arrested previously 
or who benefited from amnesties in 
1983 and 1984. 

These guidelines nominally ex- 
clude the leading Solidarity trade 
union activists in prison, including 
Adam Mjchnik, Bogdan Lis and 
Wladyslaw Fiasymuk, whose trial 
and conviction last June drew pro- 
tests from several Western govern- 
ments. 

Those prisoners released so far 
have been told by prosecutors that 
the charges against them have been 
dropped, but that investigations of 
their cases will remain open, indi- 
cating that they could be rearrested 
at any time. 

Mr. Kofman said. “My prosecu- 
tor said that in connection with the 
change of the political situation 
and the increasing normalization of 
the country, my activity is no long- 
er so dangerous.” 

The apparent scaling back of the 
initiative has raised speculation in 
political and diplomatic circles that 
General JaruzeLski planned a full 
amnesty but ran into opposition 
from hard-line factions within the 
government and possibly from 


Other Poles say that the low-key 
approach to this year’s release re- 
flects the government’s embarrass- 
ment over emptying the prisons in 
1983 and 1984 with amnesties, only 
to qnickly fill them again. 

“The situation of the govern- 
ment is very uncomfortable,” said 
Mr. Romaszewski. “They are con- 
spiring against themselves by lock- 
ing people op and then letting them 
out again each year. On the other 
band, they can’t afford to keep 
these people in prison because of 
public pressure, pressure from the 
church and international opinion.” 


% Study Cites Guiltless Executed in U.S. 

343 Wrongly Convicted Since 1900, Rights Group Says 


By Lee May 

Los Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON— At least 343 
innocent people have been convict- 
ed of capital offenses in the United 
States since the turn of the century 
and 25 of them were executed, ac- 


CHURCH SERVICES 


PABtS 

CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH. 13 Him du. 
VOew-Gokxnbiw, 75006 Bsri^ AM* , 
SJpfc*. Sunday worship tn Engfish *45 , 
a.m.. Rev. A. Summerville. lei.s 
-Ad. 07.67-02- • ~ . 

PARIS SUBURBS 

EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH, 56 Rue des 
Bora-Raisins, Ruell-Malracbcn. English 
tpmeiono. evangelical, all denominatkim. 
S.S. 9:45; WonNps 10*45. Olhm acKvMe*. 
Call Dr. B.C. Thomas, Pastor. 
{1)47.49.15.29- 

STOCKHOLM 

IMMANUEL CHURCH near city an*r. 
Friendly Christian fidtowshin. Sunday 1 1:00. 

Tel.: (OS) 316 051, T31225. 

TOKYO 

OflOSTIAN CHAPEL NEW OTAN1 HOTH 
•GARDEN, open daily 8 30-10:30 o.m. Sun- 
day 8:30-9:30 and Refr e shments. CaU hotel 
26S-1 1 11. Don ModdM, Chapd Director. 


To place on adrertaemenz 
in this section 
pieame CtMl MK 
M- Ohilunh HERWOOD 
181 Ave. Qu-de-G*nlle. 
92521 NeaiDy Cede*, France. 
TeL: 747.I2.6S. 


cording to researches of the Amer- 
ican Civil Liberties Union. 

The three-year study was re- 
leased Wednesday by the organiza- 
tion's Capital Punishment Project 
at the national conference of the 
American Society of Criminology 
in San Diego. . 

The authors of the study noted 
that “the evidence that suffices to 
convince us, might not convince 
others." 

. However, Hemy SchwaizschDd, 
director of the project, called the 
findings “dramatic proof of the on- 
going fallibility of our death-sen- 
tencing laws:" . 

Professors Hugo Adam Bedau of 
Tufts University in Massachusetts 

and Michael L. Raddet of the Uni- 
versity of Florida compiled the 
cases from sources including law 
journals, court records, newspapers 
and interviews with lawyers. 

They called the 343 cases the 
I most extensive compilation to date 
of cases in which defendants were 
found to have been erroneously 
convicted. 

Analyzing data- accompanying 
accounts of the cases they studied, 
the researchers cited numerous rea- 
sons for which convictions were 
judged in error, inriuding confes- 
sions by others, valid alibis and 
prosecutor errors. 

Interviewed by telephone from 
New York, Mr. Schwafischzld said 
that it was a “loracal certainty" that 
innocent people will be put to 
death “in a system that executes 
people." 


But at the Justice Department, a 
spokesman said that the finding s 
did not mean that the death penalty 
should be outlawed. The spokes- 
man, John Russell, said that the 
Reagan administration advocated 
capital punishment for selected 
crimes that resulted in death, in- 
cluding treason, terrorism and kid- 
napping. 

Mr. Radelet said by telephone 
from Gainesville, Florida, that he 
was surprised to find so many 
wrongful convictions on the books. 
He called the cases a “re min der 
that the expression ‘beyond a rea- 
sonable doubt’ does not mean be- 
yond any doubt” 

The report said that 1,600 people 
now were on death rows. 

The researchers found that ef- 
forts of defense attorneys in appeal 

courts led the way in uncovering 
evidence lo.coirecl erroneous con- 
victions, with 147 such cases. The 
real culprit confessed in 39. and 
newspaper investigations resulted 
in 23 conviction corrections. The 
researchers attributed 10 correc- 
tions to “sheer luck.” 

The study excluded the numer- 
ous cases in which defendants 
rained reversals of their convic- 
Sons because of trial errors. 

Despite the fact that critics of the 
death penalty contend that minor- 
ities are disproportionately repre- 
sented on death rows, Mr. Radelet 
said that the study did not conclude 
that the justice system treated mi- 
nority groups unfairly. 


Study Links 70% 
Of Crib Deaths to 
Mothers 9 Smoking 

Washington. Port Service 

WASHINGTON — A study of 
800 babies who died from sudden 
infant death syndrome since 1979 
has found that 70 percent of their 
mothers smoked during pregnancy, 
according to an official of the Na- 
tional Institute of Child Health and 
Human Development, a. division of 
the National Institutes of Health. 

- Testifying before members of 
three House panels Thursday, 
Charlotte S. Catz also disclosed 
that black infants are nearly three 
times as Hcely as others to be vic- 
tims of the syndrome, that 32 per- 
cent of its victims were bom to 
teen-agers (compared with 19 per- 
cent of 1,600 other infants studied) 
and that nearly 60 percent of the 
deaths involved male infants. 

She also said that although about 
80 percent of the babies studied 
had adequate birth weight, low- 
binh- weight babies “are at espe- 
cial, dispro p ort i onate risk, and (he 
smaller the babv, the greater the 
risk.” 

Sudden infant death syndrome, 
the single greatest cause of infant 
deaths in the United States, claims 
about 7,000 lives annually in the 
countiy. 

Although the analysis of the in- 
terviews with the families of the 
800 victims and of some of the 
1,600 other' infants studied wiH not 
be completed until next year, pre- 
liminary results are helping physi- 
cians identify babies at risk, the 
official said. 


over on April 21. when the presi- 
dent-elect, Tascredo Neves, died 
without assuming office, has an- 
nounced that he expects to remain 
in office until March 1989. The 
exact length of his terra will be 
fixed by a combined Congress and 
Constituent Assembly to be elected 
late next year. 

But Mr. Samey, unable to hold 
together Mr. Neves's fragile alli- 
ance of former supporters and op- 
ponents of the military regime, is 
perceived as a weak president 

As a result, he exercised minimal 
influence over these elections, leav- 
ing the battlefield to old and new 
parties and personalities apparent- 
ly more interested in building a 
base for the future than in consoli- 
dating the current administration. 

In many cities, the governing co- 
alition partners — the Braalian 
Democratic Movement Party and 
the Liberal Front Party, formed by 
last-minute defectors from pro-mil- 
itary ranks — are caught in elector- 
al disputes. 

In other cities, there are bizarre 
marriages of convenience, such as 
mayoralty candidates jointly nomi- 
nated by the rightist Democratic 
Social Party, which was founded by 
the former military regime, and bv 
the Democratic Labor Party, a So- 
cialist group headed by Leonel Bri- 
zola. the governor of Rio de Janeiro 
state exiled by the military for 15 
years. 

The key issue appears to be who 
will emerge best placed for the next 
presidential elections. Yet any 
strong “pre-candidates” for the 
succession could hamper Mr. Sar- 
ney’s efforts to consolidate his 
power. 

Several opinion polls to identify 
favorites to succeed Mr. Samey 
have given first place to Amftnio 
Aurefiano Chaves, vice president in 
the last mihtaiy government, al- 
though bis Liberal From Party was 
not expected to do well in the dec- 
dons. 

It is in Sao Paulo that most is at 
stake. Fernando Henrique Car- 
doso, 54, the candidate of the Bra- 
zilian Democratic Movement Par- 
ty, is a sociologist who personifies a 
new social democratic current 
among middle-class urban profes- 
sionals. 

In contrast, Mr. Quadros, with 
his paternalistic, tabtethumping 
populism, symbolizes a more old- 
fashioned Brazil And by promis- 
ing to end street violence in S3o 
Pink) and “to fight the hammer 
and sickle to the death.” he has 
appealed to such different constitu- 
encies as urban slum-dwellers and 
entrenched conservatives. 

However, if the Brazilian Demo- 
cratic Movement wins in S5o Paulo 
and a majority of other state capi- 
tals, it should augur the emergence 
of a strong centrist party that could 
provide Mr. Samey with more reli- 
able congressional* support 



Janio Quadras pauses during a campaign stop in SSo Paulo, as his wife, Hoa. wipes his face. 


B'O' 

h ■ *•«!**** 



BiuteHtoas* __ 
CmuiAtc* ‘ZM*t**C*\jr**^ 


a— •Cvvr#**' yj'll 


Canadian Club. 

Lighter than Scotch, smoother 
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The smooth and distinctive taste of 
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the world. Enjoy Canadian Club. neat, 
on the rocks or mixed to your taste. 

Since 1S5S. 









IN BOND l! 
T **°f IMUmo IMtt ‘ J 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 


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II ' 1 rt.c. uni i •« • 

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lammit Leaders Vow to Posh 

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•i 







Continued Freeze Seen on Pretoria 



The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — A Swiss 
mediator said Friday that Sooth 
Africa would have io extend a 
freeze on repaying foreign loans 
into early next year because -of de- 
lays in rescheduling the debt pay- 
ments. 

Fritz Leutwiler, the former chief- 
of the Swiss central bank, said he 
has canceled a planned meeting 
Nov. 26 between the government 
and 28 creditor banks until at least 
January. He said the government is 
expected to announce soon an ex- 
tension of the four-month debt re- 
payment moratorium. 

South Africa froze nearly all for- 
eign loan repayments in late Au- 
gust when its currency, the rand, 
tumbled to record lows after for- 
eign banks called in loans rather 
than renew them routinely.. That 
meant about S14 billion of South 
Africa's $24 billion foreign debt 
was doe within a year, far beyond 
the country’s ability to repay the 
loans. 

The crisis resulted from foreign 
bankers’ doubts about South Afri- 
ca's long-term political stability in 
the face of sustained anti-apartheid 
violence that has left more than 800 
people dead inl5 months. 

Mr. Lentwiler’s statement was is- 



that the South African govern 
meat’s repressive actions were "the 
very 


1 


biggest bank, was quoied as saying 
Thursday that the banks were eager 
for genuine political rerfonn ut 
South Africa in return for an agree- 
ment an rescheduling the loans. 

In Soweto, the huge black town- 

ship near Johannesburg, offioas believed South 

diaxrissed hundreds oT smtaag ^g^XrruHfe ‘^stomshin*’’ 
workers at Baragwanath Hospital Africa 




heaccepted ihejbbof trymgJ 
to settle the country’s foreign debt 

crisis. . v * | 

He said in an interview on Swiss* 
at he 1 
made 


r: 

^# ,is 




when they refused to end a strike 
and return to wxk, said Heunie 
van Wyk, director of hospital ser- 
vices in Transvaal province. 

Dr. van Wyk refused to say how 
many strikers were dismissed, only 
saying it was “less than -1,000. 


des over the P** six. years, hut 

added, “I wonder how anyone can 
sdl his policies worse than the " 
South African government." 

Mr. Leutwiler also called aw* 
restrictions on the meSa “the most ^ 

lymgitwas-rewuum ,,^. - 

The hospital, with a total staff of i^ done? ■’ 

nearly 10,000 people, isthe primary 
provider of medical care in Soweto. 

In Cape Town, news rqjons said 

that Trevor Manuel, a senior mem- 
ber of the United Democratic 


Ceram fiai 


Fritz Leutwiler 

sued from his office in Switzerland 
through the government’s debt 
freeze committee in Pretoria. 

Max Kuhne, manag in g director 
of Swiss Bank Corp n Switzerland's 


Front, South Africa's biggest mul- 
tiracial anti-apartheid organiza- 
tion, was served with agovexnmou . 
order hairing him from attending 
- public gatherings for five years. 
Mr. Manuel is in detention without 
charge under security laws. 

■ Leutwiler’s Criticism 
; AHister Sparks of The Washing- 
ion Post reported earlier from Jo- 
hannesburg 

Mr. Leutwiler has complained 


The impact of those restnctkms, K 

which ban pictorial coverage of un- 
rest and severely limit print cover-: ■ 
age, were dearly fdt Thursdays 
when the police arrested 718 *rik-J* 
os at the Soweto hospital. A police* 
officer declared, the conflict an' • 
“unrest situation” and ordered afl 7 
reporters to leave the hospital- 
grounds. 

Print journalists had to cover the^ 1 
rfMh by telephone, while tdeviaon: : 
networks, whose crews arcanto-^ 
pmtically banned from unrest titn-- 1 
a turns, said that without action^ 
shots they had abandoned attempts’ 1 
to cover the indde&L. *• 


M 



Army’s Vocal Support for New Governor Raised Coup Fears 


By William Branigin • 

Washington Post Service 

BANGKOK — A political mav- 
erick with dose ties to Thailand’s 
mili tary has been elected governor 
of Bangkok after a heated election 
campaign that revived coop fears in 
the Thai capital. 

Chamlong Srimuang, who re- 
signed from the army last month in 
order to nin for office, won Thurs- 
day’s election by almost 240.000 
votes over Chana Rungsaeng of the 
Democratic Party, according to of- 
ficial results announced Friday. 

The Democratic Party is part of 
Prime Minister Prem Tinsul an on- 
da’s coalition government 

A vegetarian known for his aus- 
tere life-style, Mr. Chamlong 
waged a populist cam p ai gn against 
traditional politicians. But Mr. 
Chamlong. who has taken a vow of 
sexual abstinence, said during the 
campaign that he would not impose 
his life-style on Bangkok, nliicb 
has numerous nightclubs and mas- 
sage parlors. 

• His nonparty candidacy drew 
unusual attention because be has 
been identified with tbe miHiary’s 
“Young Turks," some of whom 
have been involved in two unsuc- 
cessful coup attempts in the last 
four years. 

Mr. Chamlong was also a mili- 


tary academy classmate of Manoon 
Roopkacbora, a cashiered army 
colonel who led the latest coop at- 
tempt Sept 9 and was allowed to 
leave Thmlahd after his troops sur- 
rendered 

In a recent interview, Mr. Cham- 
long denied any connection with 
the failed coup, which left five per- 
sons, dead and 59 wounded. 

He described the source of Ms 
support as a “silent majority” of 
Bangkok residents who were tired 
of political parties and tactics such 
as vote buying. 

Mr. Chamlong said his candida- 
cy was a “big change, since I have 
no money for elections at alLT 

While clearly demonstrating 
great populist appeal, Mr. Cham- 
long, 50, also seemed to get consid- 
erable help from the mili tary. 

The election campaign was 
peaceful, but a rash of army state- 
ments in its doting days showed 
tensions underlying the calm that 
has prevailed since the September 
coup attempt. 

Army statements im p u gning po- 
litical parties and the parliament 
were interpreted widely as an en- 
dorsement of Mr. Chamkmg's in- 
dependent candidacy, but they left 
some politicians wondering wheth- 
er another coup ought be in the 
works. 


On Monday, the army radio net- 
work broadcast a strong attack on 
political parties generally, accusing 
thim of corruption and insincerity. 

. The radio also accused one party 
of inviting Communist defectors 
into its ranks and selling itself to a 
foreign power that intended to sub- 
jugate Thailand. 

It did not name the party or 
provide any evidence of its charges. 

The Democratic Party, believing 
that it was the target of tire attack, 
reacted diaxpfy. 

The party’s deputy leader. Ham 
Leenanond, hims elf a retired gen- 
eral, declared that, “there is not a 
tingle party which is traitorous” 
and fawned that democracy de- 
pended on a strang party system. . 

“The army might nave forgotten 
the fact that democracy did not . 
prosper here because some army 
officers staged coups to saze power 
once every two and a half years,” 
Mr. Ham said. ' 

General Arthh Kamlang-ek, the 
supreme nriEtaxy commander, car- 
ried on the attack; critidzmg the. 
parliament as useless and accusing 
legislators of qaanefing among, 
themselves. • 

He ordered soldiers to vote in 
Thursday’s, election, but not for 
any party that “harbors ifl inton- 
tions toward -national stalpHty,. de- 



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thmi expressed for^q£ng. about i 
another coop. -.. J 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 


Page 5 


Addis Ababa 



Lahar: Volcano’s Devastating Mud Slide 



- *. v 



By John M Goshko ■ 

H&Afcigftm /»** S<rWfe 

WASHINGTON — The United - 
States has toed hard to improve 
relations with Ethiopia, brn the 
Maoist government of M eauastu - 
Haile Mariam has rejected \J.S. 
overtures, according to Chester A 
Crocker, assistant secretary of state 
for African affairs. 

Mr. .Crocker disclosed the U.S. 
campaign in a speech Wednesday 
night to the Washington Worid Af- 
fairs Council. He said the United : 
States hoped to improve relations 
so that Ethiopia could deal more 
effectively with, its drought and - 
f amine . 

Underlying the .tensions have 
been the Mengistu government's 
attempts to spread Marxism. 
through the Horn of Africa region, 
its coUaboratioo.with Libya and its 
dependence on Soviet and Cuban 


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aid to pursue war against Somalia 
and to incite civil war in Sudan. 


Mud -covered survivors walk down a road Id Colombia on Friday after the volcanic eruption. 


By Walter Sullivan 

Ne w York Time * Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — The mud 
slides during the volcanic eruption 
in northern Colombia appear to be 
a classic example of what geologists 
call a lahar, a devastating])' fast and 
huge avalanche of mud. 

Scientists said the slides proba- 
bly were touched off when heat 
§ from the eruption of the Nevada 
:y del Ruiz volcano melted the moun- 
tain's covering of accumulated 
snow and ice. 

Lahars have been known to race 
down mountainsides ai speeds as 

high as 60 mph (about 100 kpbj, 
sweeping away everything in their 
paths. 

In prehistoric times a lahar gen- 
erated by Mount Rainier in Wasb- 
ington state reached the Puget 
* Sound 65 miles away and covered 
„ an area of 125 square miles (320 
square kilometers), burying the 

- present-day sites of such towns as 
I Kent, Puyallup, Auburn and Sum- 
ner under many feet of mud. 

The mud slides are another ex- 
ample of a situation in which it was 
I known or suspected that a catastro- 
phe was imminent, but not known 
with sufficient precision to avoid 

- loss of life. The 1980 eruption of 


Mount Sl Helens in Washington, 
the Mexican earthquakes in Sep- 
tember and the volcano disaster in 
Colombia were results of the same 
process, the descent of the Pacific 
Ocean floor under the Americas. 

Nevada del Ruiz, which is Span- 
ish for “snow peak of Ruiz. " is the 
northernmost active volcano in the 
chain that lies along the crest of the 
Andes from Chile to Colombia. 
The chain rises where a section of 
the Pacific floor known as the 
Nazca Plate plunges under the con- 
tinent. In response to beat and 
pressure at a depth of about 60 

miles, molten nock, or magma, 
pushes upward to form volcanoes. 

The Mexican earthquake origi- 
nated where another, smaller sec- 
tion of the ocean floor, known as 
the Cocos Plate, descends and rup- 
tures under Mexico and Central 
America. Mount SL Helens stands 
where the Juan da Fuca Plate 
plunges under the Pacific North- 
west, forming the Cascade Range 
of volcanoes from California to 
British Columbia. 

In each case, scientists had evi- 
dence that a disaster might occur, 
but not enough was known to say 
when or in what manner. 

“We understand the situation 


better" with each such occurrence, 
said Dr. Richard P. Hoblitt of the 
U.S. Geological Survey’s volcanic 
hazards prediction project. Never- 
theless. he added in a telephone 
interview from his base in Denver, 
“volcanology is still a young sci- 
ence." 

Dr. Hoblitt and his colleagues 
fear that a new lahar will occur on 
Mount Rainier, overlooking Seat- 
tle. In prehistoric times the moun- 
tain repeatedly shed its covering of 
accumulated ice, snow and ash, 
sending huge mud slides down trib- 
utaries of the White River. 

There is no current evidence that 
Mount Rainier is reawakening, be 
said, but a careful watch is being 
kept. 

Since 1984, however, there were 
signs in Colombia that Nevada del 
Ruiz was coming to life and might 
be melting its accumulated crest of 
snow, ice and ash. A consortium 
had been formed by geologists in 
Ecuador, Costa Rica and the Unit- 
ed States to aid Colombia in estab- 
lishing “an integrated national rap- 
id response to the potential of a 
catastrophic eruption," according 
to the Geological Survey’s head- 
quarters in Reston, Virginia. 

Hazards maps were completed 


several weeks ago, and a small net- 
work of seismic stations was set up 
on the Colombian volcano to moni- 
tor tremors that might precede an 
eruption. 

According to Dr. Hobljtt, erup- 
tions similar to the one in Colom- 
bia, with lahar flows and great loss 
of life, have occurred along the 
eastern rim of the Pacific several 
times in recorded history. One was 
the 1902 eruption of Santa Maria in 
Guatemala. 

Another occurred when Coto- 
paxi, the volcano that towers 
19,344 feet (about 6,000 meters > in 
Ecuador, erupted in 1877. Lava 
flowed oyer its icy crown, melting it 
and causing a slide. The last major 
eruption of Nevada del Ruiz was in 
1595. 

While no two such eruptions are 
identical. Dr. Hoblitt said, “they 

are variations on a common 

theme." 

American Teaches in Tibet 

'Reuten 

BEIJING — An American lin- 
guist, Rod Morse, 62, has become 
the first foreign lecturer in Tibet in 
20 years. China's official Xinhua 
news agency said Thursday. 


Survivor Tells of His Escape 

pour Halle Selassie, turned to the ' . ■ . * 

United States refused*^} continue From Wave of Volcanic Mud 

arms sales to die militaxy govern- .. , . — ^ , . . , 

nwait While it own- c«_ (Coutmoed from Page 1) Colombian rescue workers re- 


arms sales to the nrilitaxy govern- ^ ^ _ ,, _ , , . 

meat while it was -at war wth So- (Contained from Page I) Colombian rescue workers re- 

malin self preservation, that made me ported Friday that hundreds of 

“Wesougfar disc*eet,«jious and jump ” he sakL “Iran to a house for children became orphans with the 
substantive fanre. on the issues refuge and watched the truck being volcano’s eruption., 
which divided ns,” Mr. Crocker carried away, tumbling in the mud. At a hospital in Mariquita, 


Ethiopia, issues of regional peace When Ok mud stowed he and A_M_ iirarsday, awakening many 
and security, issues affecting Ethio- sight others pulled themselves residents who had spent the eve- 
pia’s security and bilateral political P*®* 8 ° f <**» mtil they ning watching a soccer match on 

problems between our two coun- readied solid ground. n television. \ 
tries.” • •• Mr. Martinez said he walked six The nimble apparently followed 

Mr. Crocks’ said the Ethiopians “riles to the nearby village of a second eruption of Nevada del 
delayed responding to the U.S. GuayabaL where an emergency aid Ruiz after midnight, as the voka- 
overtures for months andthen said statkm bad been set up. There he no’s first eruption was reported 
preferred to establish an was reunited with his family. around 9:30 PM Wednesday. 

S first” Bat, he after ‘‘It Was a dark night but I lived to For those who woke up, “it was 

igton “developed as com- ** sunrise," he said from Ms panic,” said one survivor. “Eveiy- 
plete an agenda as one could ask bed in John F. Kennedy Hospital body was ru nnin g, people were 
and offered it to the government “ Bogoti, where doctors and trampling one another, 
we received nothing but obfusca- nurses called his survival astound- • Other survivors described hn- 
t j OIL ” ^ . mg. man ladders on the sturdiest trees, 

Last summer, Mr. Crocker con- Most families were not so lucky. _ and waits of several hours in the 


we received nothing but obfusca- nurses called his survival astound- • Other survivors described hn- 
t j fnL - . mg. man ladders on the sturdiest trees, 

Last summer, Mr. Crocker con- Most families were not so lucky, and waits of several hours in the 
tinned, after Congress threatened Radio stations in the capital broad- trees for the first rescue helicopters, 
to retaliate aaainst^ “Ethiopian go*- ^ tong baa of relatives missing “Fust we heard an incredible 
eminent brutality and intrank- and parents separated from their noise," said one. “When we left our 
gence in obstructing relief efforts,” children searched hospital wards, houses the landslide was already 
the Memdstn eovemment suddenly often in vain. upon us gone.” 


eminent brutafity and intraria- ™ parents separated from tnar noise,- said one. - wnen we war our 
gecce in obstructing relief efforts,” children searched hospital wards, houses the landslide was already 
the Mengism government suddenly often in vain. upon us gone." 

“started sending positive signals” . 

including a promise that its foreign 

U JL and Ireland Sign Accord 

dming the United Nations 40th an- U 

Giving Dublin a Say in Ulster 

the foreign- minister came, he had ” » 

no from his superiors to ’ (Continued from Page 1) Protestant Royal Ulster Constabu- 

engage on any of these issues,” Mr. - province's affairs as a retreat laiy was killed by a land mine. A 
Crocker said “Fearful of a trade threatening eventual. Catholic key advantage of the British-Irish 
embargo, the government mounted domination, were quick to promise accord from the British standpoint 


9 pidfe-ff3gtifro raTTTp ai gn iHVi»^--boycotts~aBd'reMs!mce! ! ■ -isthaiitcomnnls the authorities in. 

a desire farbetter relations: Bui the *-• . The Reverend Ian Paisley, a loy- Dublin to closer cooperation on a 
FthinpinTi appa rently - abst parliamentarian, denounced cross-border basis in incidents such 

fearful of its Soviet mentors, would Mrs. Thatcher as a “quishng” who as that 
not permit any real prb g res s in thin was conspiring with a “foreign gov- RaUnn-d against Dublin’s secu- 


is that itcommits the authorities in. 


direction.” 


was conspiring with a “foreign gov- Balanced against Dublin’s secu- 
emment that protects the murder- rity commitment is a British wiD- 


ers of oar people.” 


ingness to consider the possibility 


Reagan Lists 
Summit Aims 


Pram the balcony of the Hills- of mixed courts involving judges 
borough council chamber, a banner from the Irish Republic, as well as a 

iv. 1. uDa -*i i * tv _ 0 At. w — .i 


proclaimed the single word: “Be- 
tray aL” 


)le hill of nghts for Northern 
id, to respond to the sense of 


trayaL Ireland, to respond to the sense ot 

Even before Mr. Paisley spoke, vulnerability of Catholics, who 
the tricolor flag at the Irish Repub- mate up nearly 40 percent of the 
h'c was burned on the balcony. Loy- province's population of about 1.6 
afists brandished placards that millio n 

said, “Loyalists Awake? and “No minis ters nnder- 

® ere -” .■ . scored a feature of the agreement 


. , _ • . n ,, , niiaia uisuuuucu uuwuo uiai milli on. 

(Contwoed from Page 1) . said, “Loyalists Awake” and “No Both prime ministers nnder- 

from spiling over into violence,” Pope Here.” scored a feature of the agreement 

Mr. Reagan said. “I have hopes [The agreement also prompted a that is designed to lure recalcitrant 
that we can lessen the distrust be- British junior minister to resign m unionists into some form of power- 
tween ns, reduce the levels of secre- protest Renters reported from ^ “constitutional na- 

cy, aid bring forth a more open London. tionalists.” meaning those Catho 

worid.” • . [Ian Gow, a junior TVeasuiy mm- ^ ^ rqect violence as a means 

Mr. Reagan said that if young an “ * fonna member of the ^ achieving a united Iidand. 


Mr. Reagan said that if young “r . IumK r. OI of achieving a united Iidand. 

Russians could attend American ^ Under the accord, Dublin will 

schools and unwasities, they could j, Thaidier in alerter of reriana- have maximum scope for involve- 

SafaSEs ssssssS asasSfeiss 

“ anIL _ ' riem of the province, wiU prolong The last attempt by Catholic and 

If American youth could, do tike- and will not dimimsh Ulster's ago- Protestant parties to work together 
wise, the president said, tbejrcould “ 

talk about their interests, values 


ny.”J •••:■■ 

On Friday morning, near the vil- 


coDapscd 1 1 years ago as a result of 
protest strikes by loyalists that 


taut uuar auero a, vujuca On Friday morning near the vil- protest strikes by loyalists tnat 
and hopes for the future with their ]gge of Crossmaglen in Slouth Ar- brought the province to a halt, forc- 
Sovjet friends. ma c* a member of the mainl y ing Britain to impose direct rule. 


Peres Ends Cabinet Crisis , 
Accepts Sharon 9 s Apology 


“Imagin e if people in our nation n ; r 1 . 

could 'see the Bolshoi Ballet a gain , 

while Soviet citizens could see - IT 1 /"v ; 

American plays and hear groups MlGTCS HiTHtS Lfli 
like the Beadi Boys,” Mr. Reagan 

said. “And how about Soviet ciul- A QJ 

dren watdring Sesame Street’ T. ACCeUtS ohUTOi 

Mr. Reagan urged bold new . - 

steps to open the way for Ameri- (Coatmned from Page 1) 
cans and Rnsaans to participate in rieratrinn'i made by a majority of the 
the buflding of peace. cabinet 

“Why shouldn't I propose to Mr. For his pan, Mr. S hamir reiterai- 

Gorbachev at Geneva that we ex- ed his position that, under the Sep- 
rhatig e many more of our citizens tember 1984 coahtioq agreement 
front fraternal, regions, educa- that led to ihe national umty gov- 
ticmal and cultural groups?" Mr. ennnent, the prune minister can 
Reagan said- “Why not suggest the dxs nu s s a mm^ter from the oppo- 


graduates cadi year, ana wen 
younger students who would live 
with 3 host family and attend 
schools or summer camps?” ‘ 

Both Soviet ind American peo- 
ple love sports, Mr. Reagan contin- 
ued. “If .we most compete, let it be 
on theplaying fields and not on the 

battlefields,” he said. 

Turnin g to communications, Mr. 
Reagan said that since Soviet 
spokesmen were free to appear on 
American television, to be pub- 
lished and read in the American 
press, lhe Soviet people dioula 
have the same right to see, hear and 
read what Americans have to say. 

He also urged joint space and , 
medical research projects. 


3 Dutch Air Bases Damaged 

Roam 

THE HAGUE —Nuclear disar- 
mament activists cut cables and 
damaged landing lights at three 
Dutch air bases (taring the mgbt, 
the Defense Ministry said Friday. 


of tbe alternate prime minister. 

Despite the impasse on the ques- 
tion of the prime minister’s author- 
ity to dismiss cabinet members, the 
crisis pver the Feres-Sharon fend 
app e ar ed to have subsided, at least 
for the time being. . - 

But, although "both rides vowed 

pubUdy to try to maintain tbe co- 
alition government nntfl Mr. Feres 
and Mr. Shamir are scheduled to 
rotate positions next September, 
sources in both the Likud and La- 
bor factions expressed fears that 
another attack by Mr. Sharon 
against Mi. Peres's foreign policy 
would bring down the government, 
which took office 14 months ago. 


They said that any moves by Mr. 
Peres m the peace process that Mm 
of significant concessions would be 
likely to trigger a new outburst by 
Mr. Shamm, leading to Ms dismiss- 
al and a walkout by tbe Likud bloc. 

Predicting that the days of the 
coalition government are num- 
bered, the absorption minister, 

T™ «.r tka T n’Ksvv Dsrtu 


said, “After this, it wfll only be a 
timeout.” 

Tbe minis ter of economic plan- 
ning, Gad Yaacobi, said be hoped 
that “lessons had been studied” by 
Mr. Sharoa and other ministers. 
But, he warned, “If such phenome- 
non trill happen again in the fore- 
seeable future, the prime minister 
will fire any minis ter who acts the 
way Mr. Sharon acted, without any 
negotiations or any effort to ap- 
pease anybody." 

Mr. Sharon, who flew to New 
York for a fund-raising tour after 
his confrontation with Mr. Peres, 
appeared to be tbe principal loser 
in the brief cabinet crisis. 


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US. FEED (SANS COUNCIL 

International commodity organization is soaking o xporio n cod 
assertive professionals to assist in export expatsion program. 

TRADE SERVICING DIRECTOR 

Responsibilities indude managing international programs designed to increase exports of U.S. feed 
grains. Requires administrative and supervisory experience, background in agriculture, and 5-8 
years of experience. Relocation to Rome, Italy required. The individual we seek must have the 
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• Extensive experience in international grain trading and merchandising 

• Experience in management of an inter national staff 

• Overseas living experience 

• International travel wifl be required 

POULTRY SPECIALIST 

Responsibilities indude managing i n ternational programs designed to increase exports of U.S. feed 
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Responsible for directing international programs designed to increase exports of U.S. feed grains to 
the Peoples Republic of Chino. Requires administrative and supervisory experience, degree or 
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• U5. cirizen&hip preferred 

All responses will be held in strict confidence. Send resume and salary history to: 

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1400 K Street, N.W„ Suite 1200 
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The U5. Peed Grains Council is an equal opportunity employer 


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Page 6 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL 



eribtmc. 


PublLfhrd With Thr New Y«fk Times and TV Washington Post 


Come to Colombia’s Aid 


Weep for Colombia. A country still grieving 
over the dozens who died in Iasi week's siege at 
the Palace of Justice in Bogota, must now dig 
for thousands of bodies buried in mud. For 
months there have been warning puffs from 
Nevada del Ruiz, the northernmost Andean 
volcano. But life continued as before in Ar- 
mero and three other towns lying below with a 
total population of 70,000. "That was surely 
understandable; the volcano last erupted in 
1595, and its periodic huffing over the years 
provoked not terror but shrugs- 
Wednesday night, Nevado del Ruiz awoke. 
Heavy rains turned ash to mud. The flames in 
its cone could be seen from airliners trying to 
escape its smoke high over Bogota, 160 kilo* 
meters (100 miles) to the south. The outcome 
was summarized by a Red Cross worker “Ar- 
mero doesn’t exist anymore," he said of a city 


of 50.000 engulfed by mud. There may turn 
out to be 20,000 dead, in a country of 23 
million. Compare that with the toll of Mexico's 
killer earthquake, which may have killed as 
many as 7,000 in a country of 75 million. 

Fresh grief comes at a cruel time. President 
Bdisario Be tan cur has defended democracy by 
trying to negotiate fairly with guerrilla groups 
and standing against the corrupting traffic in 
cocaine. His hopes for social peace were frus- 
trated when M-19 guerrillas ended a truce and 
seized the Palace of Justice. Now human trage- 
dy is compounded by natural disaster. 

There is no doubt that the United States will 
open its bean and extend its hand to Colom- 
bia. as it did to Mexico after the earthquake. 
The only consolation in Colombia’s grief is 
that it can turn strangers into neighbors. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Tending Currency Rates 


There is little dispute that the U.S. dollar is 
too high and other currencies are too low, and 
it is common to blame the system of free- 
floating exchange rates. But nobody agrees on 
what, if anything, might work better. A confer- 
ence in Washington this week has helped pul 
things into focus. Perfection may be out of 
reach, but ways exist. to improve the system. 

The conference dealt in monetary abstrac- 
tions, but its roots were profoundly political. 
Currency values effect exports and imports 
and thus growth. Growth is how political lead- 
ers stay in office, and they are not good ai 
retarding it for some larger common interest 
The conference was convened by Senator Bill 
Bradley, Democrat of New Jersey, and Repre- 
sentative Jack Kemp, Republican of New 
York. They come at the problem From differ- 
ent directions but they agree there is a prob- 
lem. The Reagan administration did not agree 
until lately, but Treasury Secretary James Bak- 
er now shows a welcome new openness. 

The clearest evidence of trouble is the im- 
mense U.S. trade deficit and die huge increase 
in foreign investment in America. With Ameri- 
can goods now priced high and foreign goods 
low, imports have surged and exports lagged. 
This has cut economic growth at home, in- 
flamed pressure for trade barriers and put 
America deeply in debt to foreigners. On the 
positive side, the boom in imports stimulates 
other countries' economies, and foreign invest- 
ment helps finance the budget deficit. 

It is widely assumed that this situation will 
not last Countries cannot run large trade 
deficits indefinitely; one day. foreigners will 
decide that they do not want so many dollars. 


When they reduce their holdings the dollar's 
value will drop. If it drops too far or too fast, 
the world faces a whole new set of distortions. 
Everyone wants to avoid that; hence the explo- 
ration for a more disciplined system. 

Until 12 years ago currencies had a fixed 
relationship to the dollar, and Lhe dollar was 
pegged to a fixed price for gold. Fixed rates 
presume that governments adjust fiscal and 
monetary policies if their currencies get out of 
line. This system was finally overwhelmed by 
the growth of international trade and capital 
flows. In 1973. currencies were freed to float. 

Representative Kemp wants to return to 
some form of rate fixing. Senator Bradley 
leans toward more flexible controls. There is 
increased talk of setting "target zones.” in 
which Lhere would be an agreement on ex- 
change rates from which currencies would be 
allowed to vary by oo more than, say. 10 
percent. The big five Western nations agreed 
in September to seek belter alignment of their 
currencies. But they did not declare targets or 
reveal commitments to correct domestic poli- 
cies. The most notable distortion of currency 
values comes from the U.S. budget deficits, 
but other countries' policies are faulty, too. 

No sovereign government willingly alters 
domestic policy under foreign pressure. A per- 
fectly harmonious currency system is thus 
blocked by the political pressures felt by lead- 
ers of individual countries. But even sover- 
eigns can recognize a common good. The Sep- 
tember accord and this week's brainstorming 
move in the right direction. Harmony need not 
be perfect to avert a plunge. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Arms Stay on Sale to Debtors Scrambling for 'Aid* Projects 


Few belt-tightening proposals for debt-rid- 
den countries caD for reductions in military 
spending, yet heavy military spending is a 
major element in the economic distress of the 
developing world. Peruvian President Alan 
Garda Pfcrez caught the world's eye when he 
"capped” interest payments on his country's 
debt A similar cap on the purchase of fighter 
planes ordered by Peru attracted less atten- 
tion, illustrating one aspect of the current debt 
crisis that has been overlooked. 

Anns imports expand external debt, in- 
crease budget deficits and divert resources 
from investment in farming, manufacturing or 
health care. Until debtors and creditors recog- 
nize the link between military spending and 
mounting external debt, lasting solutions to 
chronic debt win prove elusive. From 1972 to 
1982, military spending by developing coun- 
tries rose to more than 5165 billion, doubling 
in real terms. Meanwhile, the external debt of 
these nations soared from less than $300 bil- 
lion to over $750 billion. High spenders on 
military goods — Sudan. Mauritania, Peru and 
Vietnam — have been among the first lo 
become delinquent in servicing their debts. 

Many countries now use more than 20 per- 
cent of export income just to pay interest on 
their debt Some use over 50 percent. Large 
arms outlays have helped push the debt-service 
ratio of some Third World countries to the 
point where outright default has become like- 
ly. Egypt and Argentina are prime examples. 

Because military spending diverts scarce re- 
sources from productive activities, economic 
growth is slowed. Cutting back on military 
spending in developing nations could do far 
more to enhance economic development than 
any other sacrifice now proposed. While a new 
jet fighter may provide the illusion of security 
to governments in an unstable world, it cannot 
quell- the instability of poverty. 

— Jodi Jacobson, wri ting in the United 
Nations publication Development Forum. 


When governments use public money to 
help their companies win big contracts in 
poorer countries, they not only undermine 
commercial discipline and budgetary pru- 
dence; they can pervert the very purpose of 
development aid. In recent months, commer- 
cial competition for scarce project work has 
become increasingly intense. So has the com- 
petition between governments, in effect, to 
buy export business with injections of “aid.” 
The U.S. administration has long campaigned 
against such subsidies — for subsidies they 
are. Now. in an apparent effort to expose the 
practice for what it is, the Export-Import Bank 
in Washington has named six overseas pro- 
jects. including a metro for Algiers, where it 
says it will maich and beat on behalf of Ameri- 
can companies anybody who tries to win or- 
ders by offering concessionary credit terms. 

The OECD countries already have an agree- 
ment which is supposed to prevent the most 
flagrant undercutting by rival governments. It 
stipulates that if soft finance is offered, at least 
a quarter of the total credit must be in the form 
of aid. The idea is to prevent governments 
from chipping in sweeteners here and there in 
order to win closely fought commercial con- 
tests. In the light of recent developments, that 
stipulation is clearly inadequate. 

— The Financial Tunes (London). 

A Diplomatic Role for Israel 

The Soviet Union has apparently derided it 
can increase its clout in the Middle East by 
improving relations with Israel. Other coun- 
tries. however, have more acceptable reasons 
for helping to end Israel’s isolation. The Unit- 
ed States will directly benefit as Israel plays a 
greater diplomatic role around the world. Isra- 
el and America share the same democratic 
values. As Israeli viewpoints gain respect, so, 
too, must those of the United States. 

— The Sacramento (California) Union. 


FROM OUR NOV. 16 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910:- How Many New Old Masters? 
NEW YORK — William M_ Chase, the artist, 
fears that the new tariff law regarding the 
admission of paintings without duty will in- 
crease the number of spurious old masters in 
America. “There is an increasing demand for 
old paintings in America," he says. “The flood 
of counterfeit pictures [from Europe] is amaz- 
ing. They are done so cleverly that even experts 
are not certain about their value. You would 
think that artists who could do such work 
would turn their talents into legitimate chan- 
nels. Few of them get more than a starvation 
wage for their labor. A considerable portion of 
their work goes unchallenged. Corot turned 
out not more than five thousand canvases in 
his lifetime. I suppose there are fully fifty 
thousand supposed Corots now in existence.” 


1935: Conservatives Lead ia Britain 
LONDON — The National Government, 
headed by Stanley Baldwin, is assured or a 
majority of at least 240 in the new House of 
Commons after the election [on Nov. 14J. 
Although the government's lead of 412 in the 
last Parliament has been much reduced. La- 
bor's gains have not been so large as expected 
and their relatively small net gain has sur- 
prised even their Conservative rivals. Said Mr. 
Baldwin; “The country has renewed its sup- 
port of the National Government It has ex- 
pressed confidence in our ability lo continue 
the work for national restoration." Labor’s 
defeat is attributed to the suddenness with 
which the election was held, and the thousands 
of votes which were lost to Labor candidates 
owing to the presence of Liberal candidates. 


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Stumbling Toward a Meeting of Opposites in Geneva 


W ASHINGTON — President Ronald Reagan and 
General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev have at 
least one thing in common on their way to Geneva: 
Together they nave demonstrated to the world how not 
to settle differences between sovereign nations. 

They have confused propaganda with diplomacy. 
Before they have even met in the first UJL-Sovier 


By James Heston 

broadcast to the Soviet peoples about Ms love of j 
as if that would make any difference even if they i 
him. Just before Geneva the Pentagon codes forward 
with a report on Soviet violations of past treaty commit- 
ments, as if it were trying to sabotage the Geneva talks- 
For years the president has been reluctant to talk 
about anything with the Russians. Then he derided he 


summit conference in six years, they nave turned the was eager to talk to Mr. Gorbachev about everything. 
* * * over to their ' Then, after Mr. Gorbachev agreed to talk only about 


lucfcsters and allowed the latter to concentrate on the 
things that divide Washington and Moscow. 

These two men have by accident inherited a world of 
apocalyptic weapons, one in which military spending 
exceeds $700 billion while people still go hungry. It is a 
world that includes six or seven nuclear weapons states 
and at least 20 more that are on the threshold, with 
bands of terrorists poised on the side. 

It was the hope of most nations that when the two 
leaders got together they would, in their mutual interest, 
be talking about the militajy and economic chats of the 
world. Those nations had good reason for hoping so. 

The United Stales and the Soviet Union are among 
the five paxnanent Security Council members of the 
United Nations that are treaty-bound to “settle their 
international disputes by peaceful means" and “to re- 
frain from the threat or use of force against the territori- 
al integrity or political independence of any state.” Both 
countries also agreed that if they were permitted to hold 
nuclear weapons, they would work together to prevent 
the spread of such weapons to other nations or factions. 

Mr. Reagan insisted, quite fairly, that these were 
proper issues for discussion with Mr. Gorbachev, but 
Mr. Gorbachev refused, insisting that the control of 
nuclear weapons must rest on the abolition of Mr. 
Reagan's “star wars” defense program. On this narrow 
issue, propaganda took over from diplomacy, forgetting 
all else. Mr. Gorbachev went to Paris to argue bis case 
in the hope of dividing the United States from its 
European allies; (he propaganda war was on. 

Mr. Reagan, who is better at propaganda than at 
policy, mounted his own publicity blitz. He made a 


Let the Record 
Be Scrutinised 

By Francis L. Loewenheim 

H OUSTON — For nearly 50 
years — since the days of Pres- 
ident F ranklin D. Roosevelt — sum- 
mitry has been an American fasci- 
nation. However, while much has 
been written about the history of 
summits from the 1950s to the pre- 
sent, remarkably little is known 
about what actually transpired. 

To be sure, we' have not been 
entirely in the dark. In his memoirs, 
Dwight Eisenhower wrote at some 
length about the July 1955 summit 
at Geneva and the aborted May 
1960 summit in Paris. The biogra- 
phers of President John Kennedy 
have written about his tensely un- 
productive meeting with Nikita 
Khrushchev in Vienna in June 1961. 
And we have the purported memoirs 
of Mr. Khrushchev himself. 

Richard Nixon’s memoirs and 
those of Henry Kissinger, his na- 
tional security adviser and secretary 
of state, contain highly selective ac- 
counts of the summitry of detente 
and of their extended meetings with 
Soviet leaders. But few who remem- 
ber Mr. Nixon's penchant for half- 
truths are likely to be satisfied with 
his self-serving account 
And Gerald Ford’s superficial 
autobiography adds little to public 
knowledge of what transpired at Ms 
summit meeting with Leonid Brezh- 
nev in November 1974. 

The 17 pages that President Car- 
ter's “Keeping Faith" devotes to his 
meeting with Mr. Brezhnev in Vien- 


scrubbing^Siar wars,” the word from the White House 
was that maybe they could not agree on anything. 


its folks together on the difference between researc h i n g 
and testing “star ware,” in the hope of leaving Geneva 
with at least some kind of c o mpr om ise. 

Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, who has 
climbed a few summits in Ms time, has come tip with a 
few sensible suggestions about this Genera meeting. His 
view is that the higher these clumsy giants climb, the 
bander they are Kkely to fall, unless they trust their aides - 
to prepare the way to the dizzy heights. 

Mr. Kissinger worries that Mr. Reagan and Mr. 
Gorbachev will try to negotiate seriously about the 
intricate and dangerous controls of nuclear weapons 
before they know what they are talking about He is also - 
concerned that the American media will turn the sum- . 
mit conference into a kind of superbowi sporting exer- 
cise, at the end of which the fancy guys of the press and 
television will analyze who won and who lost. 

“Whereas,” said Mr. Kissinger, “the real success of a 
summit can only bethat neither ride wins. Because, in a - 
world of sovereign states, you can’t have any permanent 
victories short of mihiaiy victory. There are no perma- 
nent victories in diplomacy without sane kind of comh 
promise of benefit to both rides.” 

That is not the known view of either President Rea- 
gan or General Secretary Gorbachev as they approach 
the summit tafia, but there is still a chance. They have 
been so dumsy and so stupid on the way that they can 
rally do better once they get down to the facts. 

The New York limes. 



Sfa&s 

A. vv 



1 SyBa,C ** 

A Chance to Dispel Mutual Ignorance 

-A k ANY Americans do not believe that their lexers on cranpoe 

■rtsssassstsss^^s- 

WhatcEmc* will poor Ronald Reagan have when the o& erfeflow is so 
smart he sneaks Russian? Observer become even more worried warn they 
reflect onMr Reagan’s legendary lack of interest m dmfl. Elaborate 
planning * takii^piace to tout the amount of time that he and Mikhail 
Gorbachev will be allowed to spend together alone. ^ . 

But it is very difficult for the leader of other side to give away the 
stored The Senate and the Politburo stand ready to ensure mat this cannot 
happen. And a valuable feature of summits can be to provide supgpower 
leaders with the education they should have received earlier. We can 
tolerate occasional missteps from U.S. or Soviet leaders at a summit. We 
cannot tolerate pervasive, continuing ignorance. 

— Charles WUEani Moynes, syne&catedcohmmist and editor of Foreign Polity. 

Blow the Whistle on Soviet Expansion 

O ONE with any knowledge of Russia would, expect. a new leader 
preparit& fra a party congress early nest year to reach any agreement 

- * “ lj.l .iT« »>• uim u tlitng tW cnnlrt Thit 


N 


stL'rr^ 

Drawtim by Cummlnu In It* wirmlpea Pro# Pr 


Cartoonists & Writers Syndicate. 


na in June 1979, which witnessed 
the highly publicized signing of the 
SALT-2 agreement, are largely self- 
serving and selective. This is not 
entirely surprising, for that summit 
was followed six months later by the 
Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. 

From a historical as well as a 
political point of view, we have had 
more than enough of unverifiable 
statements. We need the full docu- 
mentary record. The time is long 
overdue for the American people to 
be able to judge for themselves what 
their leaders say and do in their 
name at summit conferences. 

Aside from a small number of 
informed participants who have de- 
liberately chosen to keep silent, 
most of us do not have, and cannot 
have, any idea what classified re- 
cords contain. We have no way of 


knowing what light they may shed 
on the last 30 years of East-West 
relations. It is not too much to say 
that without access to such records 
it is virtually impossible to reach 
informed conclusions about the re- 
cent past and the troubled present. 

More than 30 years have passed 
since Mr. Eisenhower sat down with 
British Prime . Monster Anthony 
Eden, French Prime Minister Edgar 
Fame and Mr. Khrushchev in Ge- 
neva. Most of the records pertaining 
to that meeting remain tightly 
closed. Are we grang to have to wait 
until 2015 to obtain the records of 
the Reagan-Gorbachev summit? 

The writer, a professor of history at 
Rice University, is a former historian 
with the State Department He . con- 
tributed this comment to Newsday. 


iiniwac it wereTone in which the Soviets got everything they sought- This 
pessimistic view, however, should not blind Americans to the fact that the 
f»mCTM <!wviiinf«»r ftff«rs President Reagan an unusual opwaUinitv to raise 
with Mikhail Gorbachev the question of Russian utintary and political 
expansion. Mr. Gorbachev is deeply concerned with, the perilous state of 
the Soviet economy. But Ms concern has not affected the global spread of 
Soviet militar y operations. We are watching the new Russian empire move 
into positions on three continents in which its political influence is based 
on military power. President Reagan is the man to blow the whistle. 

— Syndicated cohmadst Drew Middleton. 

Think of Prisoners and Smashed Ribs 

I N 1977 Sergei Khodbrovicb. became manager of the Russian Social 
Fund, a Zurich-based charity founded in 197f by Alexander Solzhen- 
itsyn and funded by worldwide royalties from “The Gulag Archjpdago." 
The fund does nothing other than suppor t fnrmRen oT prisoners of con- 
science in the Soviet Union. Mr. Khoranovich was arrested in April 1983. 
In the years before his arrest he had been fired from Ms job, harassed in 

■ ’ * * ’ ‘ ■' — **•■*-- i disguised as thngs. In 

tno viable traces 
■was almost 

entirely blade aqd bine. Ribs were smashed. - 
He received a “tight” sentence of three years in a “strict regime” 
concentration camp-on the Arctic coast That term is due to raid next year. 
But in a transparent trick to confuse foreign critics, the Kremlin has 
amended tbe cmnmal code to permit arbitrary extenrion of “light” prison 
toms. Videos sentences are imposed piecemeal under a law concerning 
“malicious insubordination to the demands of tbe administration of a 
corrective labor institntiociPtY uri Andropov gave die Soviet Union two 
things — that law, and a jptot£g£ named Mikhail Gorbachev. 

Mr. Khodorovkh’s health is declining. His life may hang on Mr. 
Ragan’s willingness to express, in Geneva, a special interest in Mm. As he 
does so, Mr. Reagan should see, dnematically,.m Ms mind's eye, the 
methodical tareakm^of theprisonais pbs. 

U .F-dfyrid&ated coharadst George F.WUL 



Ulster: 



Waa. 


B ELFAST — For a country that 
takes a lead in dedaring “war on 
terrorism,” the United States is being 
inconsistently reticent on extradition 
of Irish terrorists. 

Authorities in Belfast will not be 
surprised if there is an upsurge of 
violence after tbe new Bn tish- Irish 
agreement, which for the first time 
will give Dublin the right to take up 
grievances of the Catholic minority in 
Northern Ireland. Tbe agreement 
does not go far. but both Catholic 
and Protestant militants are bitteriy 
opposed to any concessions. Both 
sides know how to blow things up. 

The United States and Britain have 
signed a supplement to their 1972 
treaty to dose the political defense 
loophole when extradition of mur- 
derers. bombers and hostage-takers is 
sought. There have been four hear- 
ings since the treaty was sent to the 
Senate for ratification last June. 

Tbe Reagan administration has 
not exerted itself to get it throngh. 
The treaty is now bogged down in 
fierce argument pressed by the Irish 
lobby. Opponents, with Senator Jesse 
Helms at the fore, want to reopen the 
loophole and let judges deny extradi- 
tion if they find “extraordinaiy cir- 
cumstances" behind the crime. 

There have been four recent cases 
in which American courts have re- 
fused on political grounds to send 
back charged Irish terrorists, includ- 
ing one man who was convicted but 
escaped from prison and marie it to 
America. The British want more as- 
surance that they will be able to pro- 
secute. When the shoe is on the other 
foot, as it was when Italy let Moham- 
med Abbas go after the Achflle Lanro 
hijacking, Washington has no doubt 
that politics is no excuse for crime. 

Danny Morrison, a leader of what 
he calls “Sinn Fein stroke IRA,” said 
the other day that his group planned 
“no special action beyond the c u rre n t 
level" of violence in" response to the 
London-Dublin agreement. “Our ad- 
vantage." he said, "is to let it founder 
and expose the weakness of constitu- 
tional republicanism*’ — that is. of 
those who argue for a political solu- 
tion instead of “armed straggle.” 

The Sinn Fein office, on Falls 
Road, is a shabby warren with an 
iron cage protecting its door. A post- 
er says “The IRA calls the shots” A 
sinister mural of men in camouflage 
with automatics extols “Guerrilla 
days in Ireland.” There are emblems 
of' AS ALA, tbe Armenian terrorists, 
and similar groups, and a card taped 
to the fireplace bringing “Lots of 
warm greetings from Damascus and 
all the Palestinian comrades here” 
Across town, in the Protestant sec- 


By Flora Lewis 


tion of Shankill Road, the offices of 
the Ulster Defense Association are a 
bit less tacky, but otherwise they have 
the same air of menace. “We're not 
angels," said Andy Tyne, who runs 
the UDA. The pictures of fighters are 
not different. W here lhe foreign 
posters favor the “contras” in Nica- 
ragua, the Cambodian rebels and the 
UNITA forces in Angola. 

These do not prove international 
connections for either group now, but 
both do look for foreign support 

If UDA murderers and bombera 
were prosecuted in Northern Ireland 
as energetically as the IRA, it would 
remove suspicion about partiality in 
pursuing terrorists there. U.S. rduo- 
tance to be as stem with suspected . 


IRA criminals as with Palestinians, 
for example, weakens Washington’s 
stand against terrorism anywhere. 

Treaties similar to the one with 
Britain are being negotiated with Is- 
rael, West Germany and soon with 
Sweden. If the British treaty does not 
get through the Senate now, it will 
probably be pot on tbe shelf until it 
can be offered next year alongside a 
treaty with Israel. That is cynical but 
probably effective politics. Senators 
wQl have to decide whether they are 
more against certain terrorists than, 
others, or against terrorism period. . 

The Irish Hines’s Washington cor- 
respondent called it “McCarthyism" 
to suggest that opposing tbe British ' 
treaty showed support for the IRA. 


LETTERS 

nj * ^Variants of Terrorism 

Moderate Cathode pobtaaflns m Bel- 
fast say that what really -matters for RegemSng Terrorism. A Case for 
the armed group now is not so ranch New Rida” (Nov. 9) by Raymond Price: 
the money it gets from fervid Irish- ' . The international “terrorist court" 
Americans as file pobtkal backing, . fet Mr. Price would like to see giving 
wmdi keeps 19 morale. t j automatic death sentences for com- 

There is speoalirouy m 'American - "pficity in acts of terrorism would 
right- wing ers supporting this leftist ^oon ran into serious trouble. How 
group, which says it wants a sodalitt 'would it deal with the French agents 
waiters’ republic for all of Ireland:., who sank the Rainbow Warrior, ldll- 
One spokesman said all would have ?idg an innocent photographed How 
been^h vain if the Brits just handed w&ld it respondtoSSs that 
c ? c r jyy y t ^. sh 5j& t ** wa -y J? -r Nicaraguan “contraS” be brought to 

ofthos&m the Free State [tbe Repub- justice for murdering civilians? How 
hc|, who would just move in and - .-would it deal withU.S. agents who 
become Bnts wearing the tricofon^ - - are active accompEces of the contras? 

^Tteiecan be no politically 'justifi- In a world in which only the state 

awe crane m a democracy. TJ.S. law has the “right" to kill people and 
needs to catch up with- UJS. talk wage war,lerrorism is Sy an 
aboBtprMKuo^g^Honsnrii < s delation suspended k a 

The New York Times. - ' 


This Extradition Treaty Is an Occasion 


W ASHINGTON — The UR. 

Senate has a tremendous op- 
portunity to strike a blow against 
international terrorism by ratifying 
the U ^.-British extradition treaty. 
Surprisingly, the Senate may refuse 
to do so. Yet the opportunities em- 
bodied in the accord, wMch is now 
before the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee, are dear. Above all it 
would deny fugitives accused or con- 
victed of certain serious crimes the 
ability to avoid extradition from the 
United States on the ground that 
their offenses were “political" 
Ratification is on hold because a 
small but vocal group of Irish- Ameri- 
cans has tried to tarn the debate into 
a refensidiim on support for the IRA. 
Without ratification, America will be 
a safe haven for IRA terrorists. Rati- 
fication would ensure extradition of 
those accused of the most serious 
offenses, mriudmg aircraft hijackings 
and sabotage, enme against diplo- 
mats, hostage- taking, murder and the 
use of firearms and explosives. 

In. 
rives 
caped 

States, and many more are likely to 
do so if this loophole remains open. 
All four cases involved members of 
the IRA who were convicted of or 
sought for murder or attempted mur- 
der. Three of those four cases in- 
vdved the death or injury of innocent 
Chilians. Yet under the present extra- 
dition treaty, U.S. courts classified 
each of these offenses as “potiticaT 
and refused extradition. 

Much of the current debate focuses 
on the “legitimacy” of IRA violence: 


By Larry Preseler 

The writer, a Republican senator 
from South Dakota, is chairman of 
the Foreign Relations Committee’s 
subcommittee on European affairs. 

This dangerous .diversion must be 
stopped. The real issue is terrorism. 

The treaty, signed last June by 
Prescient Reagan, is consistent with 


United States and Britain are siraflar 
to the proposed U.S. -British 


legal limbo. Motivated by past injus- 
tice, it can be legitimated only 
through as yet unrealized objectives. 
Terrorism can be stopped only by 
undenimiizig its raison d’etre, L&, by 
expanding the possibilities for com- 
bating injustice within the context of 
stable political order. 


, - - . — — h treafy^ • . .The opposite path of “war on ter- 

■ Trii rorism” leads directly to state tearor- 

. As Mr. Price si^gests, it means 

■£SH52a5SSSr^‘*^ y****-W* of law have 
allies take even, more 1 
. in terrorist situations ; _ 

**■ imoral vision and legitimacy, not imli- 


treaties with Mexico, Colombia and 
the Netherlands. None of those ratifi- 
cations provoked protest. Each treaty 
allows the executive branch, not the 
courts, to determine whether a politi- 
cal-offense exception is necessary. 

Such treaties offer three advan- 
tages: First, a political-offense excep- 
tion to extradition is reserved fra* un- 


substance of political power. 

PETER SCHUBELER. 

Stfifa, Switzerland. 


recent government policy. Since 1981 . said in August, ~3£ United States 
the United States has signed, and cannot condemn temmsm commit-, 'V 

■ - 

men provide shelter on these shores The Washington Post editorial 
^ atrocities / “Extradite the Terrorists" (Nov. 4) 
agunst citizens of other countries.” sounds like British propaganda. Car- 

0’.Gmn P OTKTYork 

not e2Si ArtS** A ' doS^' whs correct in stating that there are 
offeMsn/^r 31 ^^ octraditebte- many forms of terrorism and that not 
tbereq ^ re ‘‘ ^ “* Physical London has been 
»«Mtantive case agamst • perpetrating a police-stale form in 

pre- 


cooperation among Western because ofrehtnnns nr Si v*®?? 6 £“1? ^.alternative to violence for 
governments in the bS^ainst ter- fiefs. Shf 0 ?* “ “ democra S c " Northern 

ronsm is greatly increased. of nrovidint* a Ireland as a way to call attention to 

The proposed UA-Bdrish treaty is UgSwfflmn be aff la depart 15 years or so 
consistent with the European Con- ratification of the cSS?* ^ ^ ^ nnSau evidence of 

yention on the Suppression of Terror- But homicide tW'be ^ Catho ' 

ism adopted m 1916. It provides that with political the British government to war- 

the broadest range of ^ terrorist of- asylum Amnesty M- 

democratic states jointly, ar- 
{? enradite terrorists.. Stable 

cradalif We^^SSaSSf* 8 * W^sive role in that conti 

International Herald Tribune. • JAMES GALLAGHER. 

trwune - . - East Lyme, Connecticut 


fenses mil be grounds for .extradi- 
tion. The Europeans saw the need for 
a compatible, u n iversal approach to 
terrorism; so should Americans, 
Ironically, even Ireland's strong 
extradition treaties both with the 


tecnational and the World Court The 
proposed U.S.-British extradition 
treat y wra rid serve to legitimize Brit- 
ain's oppressive role in that contrived 


* 





An open letter to Mikhail S. Gorbachev, General Secretary of the 
CPSU Central Committee, publisher of Piavda, “Truth!’ 


rnr'/ 


I.KTTER! 


*/? 


The world awaits. 

As you and President 
Reagan begin your Geneva 
talks about nuclear arms 
reduction and a host of issues 
dividing the superpowers. 

This summit comes in a 
year of remembrances for us 
all. Earlier in 1985, we com- 
memorated the end of the 
costliest war this world has 
ever known. The greatest 
pain in both of our pasts. 

We recalled Auschwitz 
and Birkenau. Treblinka. 
Dachau. Six million Jews, 
millions of others dead. 

We have not forgotten 


enjoy such extensive political obligations assumed by the 
and other rights as they do in Soviet government, 
the USSRr Refusniks are outcasts 


theUSSRr 

Such a statement dims 
the light of hope flickering in 
Geneva this week. For any- 
one to distort the truth so 
brazenly about Soviet Jewry, 
makes any promise at the 
summit suspect. 


Refusniks are outcasts. 
Harassed. Persecuted. Jailed. 
We know this, Mr. Gorbachev, 
not from what we read in the 
press but because we were 
there. Because we spoke with 
Soviet Jews. Because we saw 
their condition with our own 


The truth is stark. Soviet eyes in Moscow, Kiev and 


Jews have no rights. Their 
culture has been suppressed. 
Hebrew teachers ana rabbis 
have been silenced. Syna- 
gogues shuttered up. Bibles 
aria Talmuds have been 
confiscated in raids on apart- 


the Nazi onslaught unleashed ments of Soviet Jews, 
upon your people. In Lenin- Jews asking to emigrate 

grad, Stalingrad, civilians, to Israel face the harshest 
military. 20 million dead. treatment. Tfens of thousands 

Our shared sense of suf- have been denied permission 
fering from Nazi madness to go to their religious home- 
only compounds our sadness land. Refusals in violation of 
aboutthe status of Jews in the the Helsinki Final Act and 


Soviet Union today. 

Duringyour recent visit 
to Paris you said, “Nowhere 
in the entire world do Jews 


many other international 


t visit i, howa 

here wkk on the 

ews 0 

Simon Wiesenthal Center 


Leningrad. 

Deprived of the right to 
cry out, they beseech the 
world, “Do not forsake usr 
These are humble, law abid- 
ing Soviet citizens. You know 
many of their names. Yet, 

Mr. Gorbachev, you say they 
have more freedom in Soviet 
Russia than in any other land 
in the world. 

As you sit down with 
President Reagan, people 
around the world wonder, if 
you misrepresent the status 
of human beings in the USSR, 
how can we trust your word 
on the status of nuclear arms? 

Or on anything? 


Headquarters, 9760 West Pico Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90035 

Offices in New York, Chicago Toronto, Washington 



Pape 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Kurt Schwitters: 

All the Parts Fit 

■ ^ax Wykcs-Jovcc of Modem Art by one of the artist's 

T — There can have fiends, Katherine S. Dreier, and 

^ own few artists more unfortu- ** kwr assemblages, large painted 
roSo**!? 11 Kurt Schwitters (18S7- collages and Mere sculptures. all 
J** 5 *- Bom to an affluent family in ver Y adequately represented, 
nf studied at the School Schwitters, listed as a “degener- 

rf™ I£,.T *er=, at the Dibs- ate” artist by the Nazis in 1937, fled 

of al die Academy to Norway, where he eked out a 

F ® er “ I H then established h'vdihood by painting landscapes 
“S nauve dty as a more and portraits. With the Nazi inva- 
iM**® painter. His ex- son of Norway in 1940 he went to 

oTT.?*? 5 01 War I caused England, where he was promptly 

S"* approaches to interned as an enemy alien. After 

from 1918 he became being released, he was somewhat 
cnjeriy on abstractionist with Sor- encouraged by the English avant- 
real undertones. garde, and returned to the produc- 

Too excessive in his Dadaist en- rioQof Metz coUa S es - 
deavors in dev eloping “Mere" art 
l from Kommerz, the German for 
commerce), he was expelled from 
the Dadaist group, but perfected 
tus Merz works in poetry (where he 

used the nom-de-plume .Anna r 

Blunts) and in drawing, painting Uef (now in the Hatton Gallery of 
and sculpture. “In the work erf art" the University of Newcastle). After 

a series of heart attacks he died Jan. 


His SI fortune pursued him; after 
moving to Ambleside in nonhero 
Eng land, he slipped and broke a 
thigh. He exhausted himself creat- 
ing a "Merzbarn." a very large 
sculpture that included a mural re- 



Impressionist Auctions Astonish Experts 

Jt 


he declared, “it is only important 
for all the parts to fit together, and 
to be evaluated for their inter-rela- 
tionships.*’ 

Examples of what he meant by 
this are to be seen through Ian. 5 at 
the Tate Gallery in what is proba- 
bly the most comprehensive exhibi- 
tion ever mounted of Schwitters’ 
work. Originally displayed at the 
Museum of Modern Art in New 
York, it will go from the Tate to the 
Sprengel Museum in Hannover 
next spring. 

Among more than 200 exhibits 
are examples of the early draw- 
ing/ coU ages such as “mit'roie 4" 
(with red 4), the ticket/ collages of 
the early 1920s, such as “Merz 
458,” bequeathed to the Museum 


8. 1 948, the day after receiving offi- 
cial acceptance of his application 
for British citizenship. 

“Kun Schwitters," Tate Gallery , 
Miffbank, SH 7, through Jan. 5. 


The American-born artist R. B. 
Kitaj has lived and worked in En- 
gland for many years but has not 
held a one-man show lure for five 
years nor shown an oil painting for 
eight. A 75-item exhibition at Marl- 
borough Fine Art Gallery gathers 
together his major works from that 
interval. Kitaj wrote bis catalog 
foreword, stating clearly his atti- 
tude to life and art in two epi- 
graphs: from Ralph Waldo Emer- 


Schwitters's “mit rote 4/ 


a 1919 collage and drawing. 


son. “That is always best which 
gives me to myself,’' and from Ar- 
nold Schoenberg, “I have long 
since resolved to be a Jew. I regard 
that as more important than my 
art." 

Autobiography and Jewishness 
therefore predominate. There are 
many self-portraits, ranging from 
the melancholy charcoal drawing 
“Cold in Paris" to the extraordi- 
nary, vast oil painting “Self Por- 
trait as Woman." and representa- 
tions of the Kitaj family from a 
drawing of “Grandmother Kitaj 
aged 102” through “Mother 
(weeping)" to his newborn son 
“Max, 10 minutes old” (1984). 


Celebrated Jews portrayed by 
Kitaj include the novelist Philip 
Roth, wtrile a shrewd critical appre- 
ciation of American mares is repre- 
sented by such large works as 
“Baseball” and “Amerika (John 
Ford on his Deathbed)," the latter 
loaned by the Metropolitan Muse- 
um of New York. 

“R. B. Kitaj, ” Marlborough Fine 
Art , 6 Albemarle Street , Wl, 
through Dec. 20\ Marlborough Gal- 
lery, 40 West 57 Street, New York, 
March 1986. 


Max Wykes -Joyce writes regular- 
ly in the IHT on London art exhibi- 


tions. 


Van Gogh , Japanese Ceramics Share Tokyo Spot 


Imamoxiamd Herald Tribune 

N EW YORK — Professionals 
who handle Impressionist and 
Modem Masters were in for a sur- 
prise here this week. 

Many have feared for some time 
that a crisis may be in the making. 
While there is a pressing demand 
for top-quality works, of which the 

SOUREN MEUKIAN 

supply is drying up, dealers have a 
hard n'm* with run-of-the mill 
paintings- No one expected Chris- 
tie's or Sotheby’s to make a killing. 

Most professionals believed 
Christie's small group of paintings 
with historical connotations from 
the collection of Hams Whine- 
more, who died in 1927, would do 
well, while a larger group bought 
by a businessman, Juan Alvarez de 
Toledo, within the last five years 
would not fare so well because of 
the huge reserves. Sotheby’s sale 
was seen as lacklustre and bound to 
run into difficulties. 

Bat events took a very different 
turn, with Sotheby's winning hands 
down. Its sale Wednesday totaled 
$25.22 million (not counting pre- 
miums), with only 5.5 percent un- 
sold, while Christie's session Tues- 
day netted $17.75 million (not 
inducting premiums), with a 33- 
pcrcent failure rate. 

The Whittemore collection, of 
which nine works were auctioned 
Tuesday night at Christie’s, was 
formed in the main between 1891 
and 1918, at a time when the 
French artistic establishment treat- 
ed Impressionism as a joke. 

For Hams Whinemore, as for 
many other American collectors, 
the dominating influence was the 
American painter Mary Cassatt a 
member of the Impressionist circle. 
A third-rate artist she had a first- 
class eye for the work of feflcrw 
painters. Modest and selfless, die 
was determined to promote Im- 
press onist art in the American in- 



Monet’s “Metric, Solefl dans la Brume” (detail). 


dustrial establishment, to which 
her family belonged. 

Harris Whittemore became in- 
terested in Impressionism when he 
was a student in Germany paying 
occasional visits to France, where 
he probably met Cassatt In May 
1891, his father, John Howard 
Whittemore, who was traveling in 
France, saw an exhibition of Mo- 
net’s work. Bade in the United 
States a few weeks later, he bought 
“Meule, Soldi dans la Brume" 
showing a haystack in the pinkish 
haze of an eany sunrise, winch had 
been in the exhibition. In Decem- 
ber 1892, Harris bought, an behalf 
of his father, a second landscape 
with two haystacks in the sun’s 
glare Both works were at Christie's 
on Tuesday. 

The yeatafter, Harris was in Par- 
is again, this time on his honey- 
moon. Cassatt invited the couple to 


By Christine Chapman 


ceramics exhibition; to its immediate right, at 


T OKYO — Vincent van Gogh is attracting Toyokan, the Eastern Antiquities Gulleiy, 
thou sa nds of Japanese to an exhibition at through Dec. 1, is “Envoys from Korea," a first- 
the National Museum of Western .Art in Ueno tinae collaboration between the Tokyo and 
Park. The show, featuring 101 van Gogh oils South Korean national museums, depicting the 
and drawings, comes from museums and private cultural embassies to Japan from Korea during 
collections in 11 countries, including the Her- the two centuries of Tokogawa isolation. 
milage in Leningrad and the Hiroshima Muse- 
um of Art. It runs through Dec. 8. 

The stunning oils are divided into sections 
presenting “types" and “elements." derived 
from research "in to the artist's life. One section, 

“Japanese Elements," refers to van Gogh's use 
of parasols and plum blossoms as well as to the 
techniques of perspective. It contains his bold 
rendition of “Flowering Plum Tree," by the 
ukiyo-e artist Hiroshige, and van Gogh's fam- 
ous bedroom at Arles. 

At the edectic Ueno Park complex in central 
Tokyo, with its museums, concert hall, 200, 

Shinobazu Pond and food stalls, there are sever- 
al good exhibitions. At the Tokyo National 
Museum, the nation’s largest museum, through 
Nov. 24, there is a comprehensive Japanese 


In the middle of the park at the modem red 
brick Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, 
through Dec. S. is “Forty Years erf Japanese 
P ainting ." 

While van Gogh is the showpiece, the ceram- 
ics exhibition is excellent, presenting 370 pieces 
of pottery from the early Joznon period to the 
sophisticated designs and glazes of Nabeshuna, 
Kutani and Imari ware produced in 17th- and 
18th-century Edo. This is a glorious show for 
lovers of Japanese ceramics, not only a survey of 
centuries of pottery but a course in Japanese 
civilization. 

An nniis n.il 6ih-cemury honiwa, the terra- 
cotta figure found at burial mounds, is in the 
exhibition. It is in the shape of a seated miko, a 
girl who serves a Shinto priest Contemporary 


with Sue pottery, originated by Koreans, the 
haniwa connects the ancient forms with the 
changing shapes of the foUowing centuries. De- 
scribed as lobed” or “wide- lipped" bowls and 
“waisted" water jars, they gleam as if just off the 
wheel or out of the kiln, the highly glazed jars 
incised with trees or fish, an Old Seto incense 
burner shaped like trouser legs and a 17th- 
century one shaped like a pheasant; wine bot- 
tles. a hanging lantern, a still-perfect celadon- 
covered jar from a 14th-century tomb, the 
strange distortions of tea-ceremony ceramics, 
like a Shino water jar in the potato4iead shape 
or a shoe-shaped Mino tea bowl; lotus leaf 
dishes and fanned cups, decorative platters with 
Chinese scenes and Japanese porcelain painted 
with herons or eg g plants or waterwheels. 

The exhibition is a visual and tactile triumph. 
Vincent, as the posters are dubbing him, would 
be proud to share the pad with these mostly 
unknown artists. 


4 Strads Find No Buyers 


Christine Chapman is a Tokyo-based journalist 
who specializes in the arts. 


Compiled by Owr Staff From Dispatches 

L ONDON — One of the world's 
• most perfectly preserved 
Scradivarius violins failed to sell 
Thursday at Sotheby's even though 
bidding topped the record price 
paid at auction for a musical instru- 
ment, a Sotheby’s spokeswoman 
said 

The “Lady Blunt” violin, made 
in 1721 and bought in 1S64 by 
Lady Anne Blunt, granddaughter 
of Lord Byron, did not reach the 
minimum reserve price. The violin 
had been estimated to fetch up to 
£1 million (51.4 million), the 
spokeswoman said 
Four Stradivari ns instruments 
were included in the auction — the 
first such occurrence in 99 years — 



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ADDRESS 


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Belgium Tel. QB7/77 39 IB. Telex 49650 


> 


GERMANY 


LEARN GERMAN 
IN HEIDELBERG 


A&oeGertAcide . 
and Hotel 
Collegium Polcffinum 
Heidelberg, 6900 W. Gen 
Hoetderfirwrag 8. TW.i (0) 5221 


TtmmatSpudUl 

EDUCATION 

DIRECTORY 

wan bu puMbbtd tm 

DECEMBER 7, 1585. 
Fur imp mm at Um, a l — i C Bw Met 
faa pteOfctaC 
baeruathwtat BwH TVRuara, 
oryaarmmxrm t IHT reprmmOUdue. 


tea and discussed an with them. A 
landscape by Sisley, “Le Barrage 

rin T itfng ft S^wnt. Mwmmea," also at 

Christie's, was bought on her sug- 
. along with two pictures by 
and Berthe Morisot. 


looking down was • 

Meyer sale, but. 

mjukf appeal tongy - 

than the van Gogh. f v s 

-ho- 

Tuesday and Wcdnesda. - ^ 

have no recoBecuon of 

up io SU million. ^ 

Quistic’s estimate. 

In many cases, however, the es- 

serves, tnroed off 

half of Alvarez's MJPJA:.. 

assays* sS; 

down at 5600.000 tep«e C ^ lS ?f, S 

5700,000 to 5900,000 

age’s painting of a n udew omm 

an anadEmossIy overeswaited . 

at 5450,000 to 

bought in at 5320,000 and ma> be 

sold privately at about that pnee in 

the next few days. . 

In the sate of nuxod 

that followed, there were no bids 

on the portrait of Madame Hcnnot 

by Renoir, one eye is so badly done _ 
that the woman" seems to have a . 
glass eye: Mondrian’s “Coraposi-. ■ 
tion cn Rouge, Bleu ei Jaunc. dat- 
ed 1930, is important, but ts tt 

worth more than S2 miffion? Those 

attending Tuesday, who maytaw ; 

rememboed its auction appear- 
ance in 1983, decided it was not> 

The contrast offered by Soth- 


■ w I91( !£- W S?™ ore a ^ > . d^r^Twrfiradv* cobld tut 

non was sufficiently niqxinaiii that JJJ* 4jhert J. 

a German sdioter journeyed to tiie have been neater. The Aioerx./ 

United States to see it at thrir 


but the two other violins and a cdk) 
also failed to reach the price asked 
by their vendors. 

The spokeswoman said bidding- 
for lbe Lady Blunt violin reached 
£820.000 in less than two minutes; 
the auction record erf £396,000 was 
for another Stradivari, “La Cathe- 
drale," a year ago. 

The Wilhelm violin, made in 
1725, drew a bid of £400,000, and 
the 1739 Ben Venoto cello won a 
bid of £290,000, each at least 
£100,000 less than they had been 
estimated to fetch. 

The last item in the sale was the 
Red Diamond violin, with an esti- 
mated value of more than £300,000. 
Bidding started at £150,000 and 
stopped at £160,000. (Reutds, AP) 


house in Naugatuck, Connecticut. 
The historical background proved 
irresistible Tuesday . AH but one of 
the pam ri ng ? sold brilliantly. 

A portrait by Manet, done in 
1865 in the manner of Velfisquez, 
would have been unsalable in any 
other context But Monet mentions 
the portrait ma letter. At $180,000, 
it sold at SO percent over the high 
estimate. 

A dtsoouragingly banal Monet 
landscape that Harris WiriUemore 
bought m Paris ini 892, “Pommiers 
pits de V&hcud," was knocked 
down at 5400,000. More astonish- 
ing is the 5650^000 paid for a Mo- 
net view of rocks from a efifftop, 
one erf the painting s seen by the 
German scholar who wait to the 
Whittemore estate; he discussed it 

jm an ur tirite in tiy» B urling ton mag- 

azineL It hardly qualifies as a mas- 
terpiece, however. 

Nor does “Metrics au Sderi, Ef- 
fet de Matin" which fetched.' SI J9 
mritioa (not counting premmm), 
nor even the more attractive 
“Meuic, Soled dans U Brume,” 
which Christie’s gave a 51-naDxn 
high estimate; no one expected it to 
gD up to $2 mflHoEL 

The28totsfivKntlrecoHectiOT(rf 
I n an Alvarez dc Toledo, wbich fol- 
lowed, provided a storing antidi- 
max- Tire works were bought by the 
Argentinian .shipping magnate as 
an investment, starting in 1980. 
Collectors consider with suspicion 
works that come back to the market 
so soot, particularly with a mark- 
up reflected in tire “estimates.” The 
most important lot, a beautiful still 
life painted by van Gogh a month 
before his death and estimated at 
S2.5 million to 52.75 mDHon, re- 
mained unsold. Christopher Barge, 
Christie's president, who conduct- 
ed the sale, said the four or five 
people is the wodd who weir po- 
tential buyers of such a pointing 
probably remembered the 512 nrit- 
Hon it made at the Andri Meyer 
sale in 1980; then, the van Gogh 
tripled its estimate and the price 
was thought wildly exaggerated. 

On the other hand, Renoir’s por- 
trait of a wistful woman dzeamQy 


Ramses Exhibition in Utah 


United Pros International 

F I ROVO, Utah — Artifacts dat- 
ing from tire era of Ramses II 
(reigned c. 1292-25 B. C), befieved 
by many to have beat the pbaroah 
at the time of the biblical Exodus, 
are on display here in that first 
U. S. exhibition. 

On loan from the Egyptian Mu- 
seum in Cairo, the JlOO-ntiffioa 
show, “Ramses U: The Fhaipoh 
and His Time,'’ contains 72 . arti- 
facts. 

C. Wilfred Griggs, Brigham 
Young University professor of an- 
deat scripture, who arranged the 
Utah showing at the university’s 
Monte L. Bean Museum, called it 


“across the board, probably a bet- 
ter odribft than the Tm exinbit” — 
tire 1978-79 exhibition of artifacts 
from the tomb of Tutankhamen. 

- Although the show is named for 
Ramses, modi of the cofleotion re- 
flects the archaeological legacy of 
others from the period. Many of 
the artifacts come from the tan* of 
SeoHoedjcm, a nobleman-crafts- 
man in the employ of Ramses IL 
_ The exhibit win ranazn in Provo 
through the first week in April 
them wfll go to Vancouver, British 
Colum bia, for Expo '86 before re- 
mnm$ to the United States lor 
in Memphis, Tennessee, and 
Florida. 


DOONESBURY 


lARK/ r POyOUTMNK 

vei womsm 

GBNmmcm 

ENOUGH TW£ FUR 

PEAmmcowucr 
SBOQUSARMSm- 
ecmnaNs* 




\*&LA5'MU KNOW, THE. 

FFBswBtFsmeamnoN 
TDSSm/G TAtKStSMBO 
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have been 

Dteitzer ooL— . , 

Unction, «« it off to a remarkable _ 
start. John Marion’s skill as an auc- 
tioneer helped, but the enthusiasm . 
generator! by any painting that had 
tire appearance of an Iropressonist 
picture postcard left little doubt of 
the degree of intervention by a new " 
ctienzoc with coly lire merest ac- 
quaintance with art. ' r- 

Renal's portrait of a woman' 
Rtamiing is a field with trees 
around behind her is a border- 

fine case at S950.00G, well over 
Sotheby’s Irigh estimate of 
$750J)00. But Pusarro’s painting of 
a young peasant woman lying in ” 
the grass with a hole giri is not. Ther 

price — 5650,000, more than twice ';. 
the high estimate of 5300,000 — ’• 

beaus no rdationrinp to the modest 

quality of the work. 

The sale of mixed properties that 1 
followed may ^conre to be remenj- 
bered as a succession erf world re- *■ 
cords for the artists’ worn. For. 
Renoir, one heatxtes between the 
5320,000 offered for a painting of 
tire printer’s son Claude and two 
works in neo-lSth-ocaitmy style 
that look Hke a Resdr pastiche for 
a chocolate box. The pair was. 
knocked down «t a mmd-baggting 
$450jm Otre of the artist’s best 
pacttneshi tire sale, the portrait of j 
young woman wi^g her feet, was ■ 
sold for SL5 nmficn, caaqjarod- ' 
with Soflsriby’s law estimate d " 
51.75 nriDkm. . 

The sesaoa speAx for Sotbeby*»l t. 
sa te s manshi^ oat hardly for the 
buyer’s fe erinun a ticn . Itteft wae» 
famous deafcrarimost speechless.^ ^ 
“Inoonqjrehensfirfe," Kims Peris,,. j 
of New Yak mutt ered as he left' r. 
tire room. i" - 

■ £L46 Mffioo fora Gexicaeiti- 

A portrait bust by tire Ftmdi - ... 
Romantic artist Theodore Geri-_. 
emit fetched £1A6 mffioD (52LJ- 1 
mflEcm) at wirtion Friday, Rentas \ 
trowted from London. Bought by . 
a New York dealer, Eugene Shaw,'— ■ 
tire best of a black model named” , 
Josqrft was tire star piece of a Ctarik 
cault collection put together by ; 
Hans Buhler, a Swiss coGectar who 
<fied in 1957. 


> 


(“rfy 




at 


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■»«/» £, 


INTERNATIONAL HERAUD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 


Page 9 


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Karate Annitage and Joseph Lenaon in “The Watteau Duets.* 


Marc EnguartMl 


Karole Annitage: 'Uncouth’ Ballet 


’tr-zar.-. 

•v . 


By Mark Hunter 

F l ARIS — The New York choreographer Karole 
Annitage has developed a sizable following here 
since 1982, through performances of her works “GV 
10," “Paradise,” “The Last Gone Dance" and hex 
warmly re m e mb ered On local dance aides) An*t with 
Michael Clark, “Drastic Classicism.” But opening 
night for her latest piece, “The Watteau Ducts” at the 
ThMire .de la Bastille left the sellout crowd with a 
sense of dissatisfaction, 

Annitage, a veteran of the companies of George 
Balanchine and Merce Gmnfaighflm, described her 
c horeo graphy as “an uncouth rhythmic and scriptural 
approach to what ballet has always been.” She ex- 
plained, “Ballet is even and lyrical, its intention is 
decorative. In my pieces the rhythm is truncated and 
gneopated; the shapes are angular andasymmetricaL 
There’s a precarionsness, a feeling of not knowing how 
the movements will be completed, or if they’ll crack.” 

In “The Watteau Duets,” the composer, David 
Linton, applied a frankly violent approach to the 
classical tradition Annitage sees herself as wrtending 
His composition was constructed of electronically 
s a mpl e d and altered extracts of works by Beethoven 
and Mozart, on which a rock rhythm was im post*!, 
overlaid with improvised live d ra m m in g "part of my 
joy. in the piece was to take ‘high' sources «nd bring 
them down to the most basic levd,” said Linton, a self - 
described outrider to the classical field. 

Taken together, the music and dance— a variation 
on the pas die deux — - suggested a desperate romance 
against the backdrop of a guerrilla war. As it turned 
out, the guerrillas won:. At the end Tintnn and his 
partner, Conrad Krnard, left their podium to stage a 
gladiator combat with amplified sted pipes, a develop- 
ment that did not noticeably amtw. die audience , 
though it was plainly intended to do so. _ 

As in Linton’s solo concert at the same theater last 
fall, there was a strong dement of punk hnmnr in the 
“Duets.” Annitage, not coincidentally, is an a d m ir er 
erf the now-disbanded Sex Pistok punk rock group. “It 
was incredible to see something that single and pow- 
erful, that fafling-off-the-edge incertitude,” she said, 
recalling the Sex Pistols. . '■ 

. ; ) — I ...... i*i. ii i 

" “ • ‘ I 'jli" “ 

Rnmann Stage Jsaz Fest in Leningrad 

Agates France-PmK 

MOSCOW — - A festival of Soviet jazz,- “Autumn 
1985 Rhythm,” is taking place in Leningrad, featuring 
bands from across the country, Tass reported here. - 
The news agency quoted the festival organizer, Vladi- 
mir Feyertag, as saying that all styles of jazz, from 
traditional to avant-garde, were represented at the 
festivaL Official figures indicate there are 50 jazz 
groups in 23 Soviet cities. 


; Punks’ anger also surfaces in the “Duets,” which 
portray the ambiguous erotic interactions, as often 
hostile as tender, of a man (danced by Joseph Lennon) 
and a woman. Annitage’s intention, she said, was to 
bypass the “coquetry, flirting, and mnVrng oneself 
cute” Of! the classical pas de deux m favor of “varia- 
tions on the theme of a contest of wills.” 

_ But on this evening, rt was a contest without resolu- 
tion. Even within sequences, the most explicitly erotic 
of Annitage’s gestures (such as a suggestive Hft or 
placement of a hand) were isolated from her partner’s 
response. Annitage said mrinrirmi problems before the 
opening had made the performers so tense that “there 
was no humor in the piece, only stress.” One frit that 
stress, as a heaviness between Annitage and ipnnm 
even in comic quotations from swing dance styles in 
the later movements. 

At moments something powerful nevertheless 
emerged from the dialogue of Linton’s tribal percus- 
sion and Annitage’s idiosyncratic, stylized move- 
ments; drawn — or rather fused — from ballet, jazz 
and rock dance. Her furion technique creates memora- 
ble images by playing on the^ viewer’s expectations and 
against Linton’s propulsive rhythms. A Michael Jack- 
son-like hip thrust, for example, took on a strikingly 
different line and tension when Annitage performed it 
on her toes. Charie* Atlas’s eostiimwt — in particular 
an oddly Battering leather skirt worn by Lennon in 
one passage, and the nriVe rainbow-colored costumes 
at the end — kept some humor in the dance, even on a 
bad night 

“Pop and high culture are equally valuable and 
beautiful when pm to use on stage,” Annitage raid. 
“Image can be used from all our life and culture. 
Thai’s not even an issue, it’s a given.” She acknowl- 
edged, however, that this stance was indeed an issue in 
New York in die late 1970s when she performed in 
punk rock dubs. “At Gist people were suspicious,' she 
said, “and then it became a style.” 

In Europe the integration of ballet and rode has 
come not from the bottom but from the top. Roland 
Petit and Maurice Briart have choreographed to art- 
rock groups (End of Data and Tnxedomoon respec- 
tively). Pina Bausch, Jean-Gande GaHottaand Rigine 
Chopmotdeal in fusion choreography that demands 
that (“the. viewer grapple with .the images, get in- 
volved,” as Annitage said of her work. The reaction, in 
Paris to Aimhagris “Duets,” then, seemed to reflea 
less incomprehension than appreciation of one of their 
key themes , an at- times unnervingly cold aggressive- 
ness, and her audience's desire to see it carried further. 

“The Watteau Duets ” continue at the ThUttrt de la 
Bastille through Nov. 16, and at Riverside Studios, 
London, Nor. 22-23. 

Mark Hunter is a journalist who writes about cultural 
affairs in Europe. 


AUCTION SALES 

S.C.P. 

M es B. CHAMBELLAND et D. GIAFFERI 

Associated Auctioneers 

117. rue Saint-Lazarc - 7)008 Paris - TcL: (1) 42$4jK26 

and M c GODEAU 

Auctioneer 

52, rue Drouoc - 75009 Pans - TcL: (1) 47.70.76A8 

PUBLIC AUCTION SALE BY COURT ORDER 

Friday 22nd November 1985 at 2 p.m. 

HOTEL DROUOT - Room 14, 9 rue Drouot, 75009 Paris. 

IMPORTANT COLLECTION OF OLD DRAWINGS 

1 - GIOVANNI DOMENICO TIEPOLO: “Etude de paonS.” Pen and Indian ink wash. Trace 

of signature at bottom right. 24 x 1&2 cm. Antique frame.. 

2 - FEDERICO ZUCCARO: “Personnage assis vade dos.” Seal of the RICHARDSON 

collection. 25.7 x 1 83 cm. Antique gilt frame in carved wood. 

3 - MICHEL DORIGNY: “Hercule terrassant THydre de FHerne." Blade crayon. 213 x 19 cm. 

Carved gilt wooden frame. 

4- SIMON VOUET: “Etude de femme.” Verso: study of a man. From the collection of the 
Mm-qnic de Cbennevjferes. Black stone. Carved gilt wooden frame. 

- 5 - JACQUES STELLA: “L’Aotonme.” Indian ink wash on sanguine, etched for engraving. 

23 x 31.2 cm. Carved gdt wooden frame. 

6 - CLAUDE GILLOT: “Les Funfcnrilles de Pan.” Pen and Indian ink. Verso: light decorative 

ricetch. 213 x 33 cm. 

7 - JACQUES BIGAUD: “Personnages devant nn chflteau" (SL Cloud?). Pen and Indian ink 

wash. 19.8 x413 cm. 

8 - JACQUES RK3AUD: “Personnages devant une cascade” (SL Cloud?). Pen and Indian ink 

wash. 20 x 44 cm. 

9 - JACQUES DE LAJOUE: “Le Roi David devant un palais.” Black crayon on blue paper. 

Signed on bottom left. Upper part arched. 37 x 26 cm. 

10 - JEAN BAPTISTE OUDRY: “Etude d’oisean." Black and white crayon on blue paper. 

303 x323 cm. 

11 - JEAN BAPTISTE OUDRY: “Etude d’fchassser." Blade and white crayon on blue paper. 

303 x323 cm. - , 

12 -■ pfflUPPE MERGER: “Femme assise vue de face.” Blade state, white chalk and sa ng ui ne. 

Bears seal of RO BINSO N collectijon on bottom right. 31x243 cm. 

• i3 _ PHILIP PE MERCDER: “Femine assise accoudte.” Blade stone, white chalk and sa n gui n e. 

Bears seal of ROBINSON collection on bottom left. 28 x 243 cm. 

14 - EDME BOUCHARDON: “Etude d’un Jupiter.” Sanguine. “BOUCHARDON” marked on 

bottom right Gflt wooden frame. 45 x 313 cm. 

15 - LAURENT DE LA HYREi “Trois monies mtcrc6dent auprts de la VieTHC.'’ Black stone. 

(ptoer «*»!«<= and tears). “LA HYRE IN” noted on bottom right Carved gilt wooden frame. 

16 - PIERRE SUBLEYRAS: “Etude cPhomme agaiotiillfe.” Black crayon on blue paper. Marked 

on bottom right with seal of LEMFEREUR collection. 35 x24cm. 

17 - GIOVANNI BATTISTA GAUIii, caBed DE BACKXIO: “Adam et Eve chassis du 

Paradis.” Pen and bistre wash- 2 03 x 283 cm. Carved gflt wooden frame. 

18 - Attributed to LORENZO TIEPOLO: “Seine dTristoireandfimie.’’ Brown pen and Indian 

ink wash. Carved gflt wooden frame. 253 x 4t cm. 

19 - JACQUES LOUIS DAVBCfc “Etude de personnages.” Recto and verso black crayon. . 

20.2 x16 cm. _ . 

20 - Attributed to FRANCESCO SARBIERI caBed GUERONO: “Etude d’enfanL” Sanguine. 

Carved wooden frame. 

Viewing: Thursday 21st November, from 1 1 am to 6 p jn. 
and Friday 22nd November from 1 1 m to noon. 

Prnert- Mr. Bruno de BAYSER 69. rue Sain te- Anne, 75002 PARIS. 

TeL: (1)47.03.49.87. 


Renoir Museum: A Curator’s Dream in the Making 


By Mavis Guinard 

C AGNES-SUR-MER, France 
— Children' still play under 
the olive trees in Renoir’s garde c, 
but not for long, perhaps. 

“Cagnes must come to mean Re- 
noir, as Giverny now means Mo- 
net,” said Georges Dussaule, who 
wants to revive die house Pierre- 
Auguste Renoir built here. 

Dussaule, curator of the house 
and of Cagnes's two museums, has 
many plans. He has alreadypui the 
ancient fortrss of the Cndteau- 
Musie on the cultural map with a 
painting festival that attracts 
30,000 visitors a year. His new pro- 
ject is to refurbish Renoir’s farm- 
house and recapture the atmo- 
sphere of the days when Renoir 
and his friends lived there. 

First comes security. The hillside 
properly that Renoir bought to 
save thousand-year-old olive trees 
From builders must be enclosed. 
Sophisticated devices must be in- 
stalled. 

Then, Dussaule hopes, it wiD be 
possible to show six or seven major 
paintings of Renoir's Cagnes peri- 
od. The Musde Chfcret in nearby 
Nice has three. “La Fcrmc des Col- 
lettes,” acquired with government 
and mumapal funds for 900,000 
francs (about SI 10,000), is at the 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts until 
Jan. 5 as pan of this year’s major 
Renoir exhibition. 

Around the gardens, now a park, 
are scenes straight out of the land- 
scapes Renoir painted there, 
framed by twisted olive trees. A 
chil d in a white bonnet plays with a 
ball, a visitor in a red blouse moves 
through the trees. 

“We are lucky that Renoir never 
cared for a formal French garden.” 
said Dussaule. “He wanted it as 
natural as possible, forbidding gar- 
deners to weed the paths. He and 
his friends painted ‘Les Collettes’ 
from all «ngicg I just «m»» across a 
sketch Bonnard did.” Sunday 
painters still set up their easels on 
the grounds. Dussaule hopes to of- 
fer scholarships to attract young 
painters, about three a year. The 
old farm could be turned into stu- 
dios and a showroom. “The place 
needs to live again,” Dussaule said. 

The municipality of Cagnes and 
other well-wishers are supportive. 
“People keep stopping by to offer 
mementos or p ainting s done by Re- 
noir’s friends. They seem happy to 
have somewhere to bring them, and 
I am eager to have them,” D ussaule 
said. “We will need ah the help we 
can get” 

Stricken with arthritis at the age 
of 54, Renoir was advised to go to 
the south of France in 1895. It may 
not have been the best prescription. 
“In winter the Mediterranean fogs 
roE in at night to make every bone 
ache,” Dussaule said. “During the 
10 winters Renoir spent in the 
house be had bah tin 190$, he must 
have suffered agonizing pain. Still, 
he was fortunate to take such joy in 
painting that it gave him a reason 
to live.” 

An immense canvas, “The Bath- 
ers,” was rolled up on cylinders so 
that the invalid could reach it more 


easily from his wheelchair. “I won’t 
die until I finish it,” Renoir said, 
feding it summed up all he wanted 
to say. 

Dussaule believes Renoir did his 
best paintings in this later period: 
“ Influenced by the light, the sea, 
the vegetation, they are charming 
and sensuous. I admit that at times 
his paintings of children can be a 
bit cloying. But here he worked 
faster — maybe because of the 
pain. H ere be used pure, fluid col- 
or, applied from a scrupulously 
dean palate, as he had beat taught 
as a young porcelain painter in Li- 
moges-" 

Once the paintbrush had been 
wedged between the deformed 
knuckles and the bandaged palms. 

f Cagnes must come 
to mean Renoir, 
as Giverny now 
means Monet' 

Renoir would start daubing a small 
scene in a comer of the canvas “as a 
pianist would begin with scales.” 
Later, these “miniatures" were cut 
out and framed. Renoir added his 
signature, fra, despite his fame, he 
was a thrifty workman not averse 
to earning a few extra francs for his 
family. 

When his hands felt more supple, 
he would dash off a few garden 
scenes in a day, or linger to brush 
the vibrant, healthy flesh tones of 
the Cagnmt postman’s daughter or 
other villagers. 

His wife, Aline Charigot — once 
the model for the plump country 
girl in “La Danse a la Campagne" 
and the voluptuous “Blond Bath- 
er,” done on a trip to Italy, bustled 
about. 

He never painted the two-story 
Italianate building. It was divided 
into many small cubicles, since 
there had to be rooms for the three 
boys, Pierre, Jean and Claude; for a 
cousin, Gabrielle Renard, who 
came to look after the youngest and 
stayed to sit for 300 paintings; and 
for friends who came to visit: the 

K ter Albert Andrfc, the collector 
rice Caagnat, or dealers like 
Paul Durand-Ruel and Ambrotse 
Vollard. Photos show them dining 
on bent-wood chairs around the 
dining table: 

As Renoir became emaciated, his 
wife grew immense, a regular earth 
goddess. She loved food and was a 
lavish provider. The stepped ter- 
races were planted with amis trees, 
grapes for wine, vegetables. The 
pink and red roses Renoir loved to 
paint clambered all over; a small 
Matisse landscape shows them in- 
vading the base of the Victorious 
Venus on the terrace. 

In this lush atmosphere, Vollard 
suggested that Renoir try sculp- 
ture. Although he first “sent him to 
the devil," the painter tried a bust, 
then a medallion of Claude, which 
is set into the dining-room fire- 
place. 


AUCTION SALES 

GALEME DES ARTS AATIE.NS 

2022 BEVAIX 

IMPORTANT AUCTION SALE 
Hotel des Bergnes - Geneva 
From the 20 to 28 November 1985 

Sale of collections from the following estates: 
Dr. Wetzlar collection, Amsterdam 
old painting, "Haute Epoque”, furniture 
General Leclerr 

Breughel The Younger "Kennesse au Village" 
Qnistophe Bernoulli, Bale 
Renoir drawings, furniture, silverware 
Josef Muller, Soleure 
pai ntin gs of Lapiade, Friesz, Ghaboud etc. 

Collection A from Geneva 

Herixn, Alma Tadexna, Pfiakoff, Reth, Valmier, Hdioo, Ernst, etc. 
Galerie des Granges, Geneva 
A Friboura castle 

silverware from the XVI and XVII centuries (Zurich) 

Old palace. Saint Petersburg; 

PLUS 800 OLD AND MODERN PAINTINGS 

Utrillo, VaDotton, Balia , Vlaminck, Poliakoff 
old drawings from the estate of Charles Counrmlt 
(friend and executor of Delacroix's will) 

(Expert, Bruno de Bayser, Paris) 

Books (expert, Christian Galantaris. Paris) 

Asiatica (expert Michel Beurdeley and Guv Raindre) 
Modern prints (300 sets) 

"Haute Epoque” 

(Mai mes virgins, Not tingham alabaster, gothic sculpture) 
Huissier judidaire Maitre Charles Henri Piguet 
Catalogue on request: SF. 30.- 

Galerie Des Arts Ancxens 
Pierre- Yves Gabos S-A. 

2022 Bevaix 
Tel.: 038/46 16 09 


M“ deforme M“ binoche-godeau 

Auctioneer Auctioneers 

1 4. ov. de Messme, 75006 PAHS 5. rue Lo fioitie. 75008 PARIS 

TeL P) 4S.62J1.I9 Tel. pj 42.65-79-50 

HOTEL DROUOT PARIS 

Thursday, November 28 1 985 at 9 p.m. - Rooms 1 and 7 


OLD MASTER, 

XIXth century and 
MODERN PAINTINGS 

by 

ROYBET, PE PENNE, RENOIR. 
O. Friesz, Utriilo, Picabia, 
Lebourg, Fouioa 

XVHIfh cent. FURNITURE 

Pubic vwMng Thmdey. November 28 
from 11 OJTI. to & pun. 

Expert* MM. PodHl. He« Jiebuut, 1 1 ifcnJtu 


Bui his hands soon betrayed 
him, and trained sculptors, Richard 
Giuna. Marcel Gimond, or Louis 
Morel, carried out the 24 works 
Renoir prepared in sketches or 
clay, supervising and prodding the 
work along with his cane. 

Besides some casts of these stat- 
ues. the unfinished museum now 
shows only reproductions of Re- 
noir paintings. They are tacked to 
wooden frames; Renoir used to file 
his away. “I touched up the sides 
myself with some dabs of color to 
make them seem less new,” the cu- 
rator said. 

The property was saved a second 
time from the builders when the 
city of Cagnes bought it from 
Claude Renoir in I960. “Other- 
wise, we might have some ‘Resi- 
dences Rendu’ instead of the olive 
groves today,” Dussaule said. 

There are still relics of Renoir. 
“Hardly anything had been moved 
since Ahne died in 1915, Renoir in 
1919. We even came across some 
gold coins tucked in the bade of the 
desk.” There was the gray tweed 
jacket Renoir wore, a ball-and-peg 
to exercise his hands, some favorite 
props, a battered straw hat with 
artificial flowers, GoClo's faded 
down costume. 

The studio has been recreated: 
In front of the easd is the cane- 
back wheelchair, a folding stool 
with palette and brushes, a wooden 
paintbox and some crushed tubes 
of oD paint 

Most often, Renoir was carried 
on a portable chair, padded with 
many cushions, to whatever spot he 
fancied in the glorious morning 
light. 

Another daytime haunt was his 
glassed-in garden “atelier” — now 
disappeared — where be sheltered 
from the misiral while his models 
posed in the sun. 

From Madame Renoir’s balco- 
ny, the view stretches from sea to 



Renoir in his studio in 1914. 


mountains, with the medieval sil- 
houette of hilltop Cagnes in the 
center, and now the high-rise build- 
ings, some hideous, some hand- 
some like the pyramids along tbe 
Bale des Anges. 

“We can recapture the fore- 
ground: stilled planting must be 
eliminated, other plants brought 
back,” Dussaule said. “I want to 
see the five bittersweet orange trees 
on the terrace again, lots of flowers 
and some vegetable beds. The pav- 
ing must be ripped up and the rosy 
earth paths restored. The olive trees 
had to be severely cut back because 


of the freeze but their crowns will 
grow back all the better." 

Outside, an eavesdropping gar- 
dener shrugged tolerantly: 
“Around, tbe village, they say the 
way Maitre Renoir liked this gar- 
den was in spring when wild flow- 
ers burst out under the olive trees.” 

La Maison de Renoir, Cagnes- 
sur-Mer, will reopen Monday. It is 
open every day except Tuesday from 
2 to 5 PM. ' 

Mavis Guinard is a journalist 
based in Switzerland who specializes 
in cultural affairs. 


INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 

PARIS 

■Andre et Berthe NOUFFLARD ■ 

DEUX PEINTRES TEMOINS D’UNE EPOQUE 

1910 - 1970 

Documents sur Madame LANCWE1L et la famille HALEVY 
8 NOVEMBRE - 8 DECEMBRE 1985 
MIJSEE THIERS 27 Place Saint Georges Paris 9 e 
Tous les jours 10 h-!2 h / 14 h-18 h sauf Lundi matin 


fienofa. The dr Jenna rSe*. 12 x 28 1 


U reasons Vi 

| to visit J 

r LE LOUVRE 1 

r des 1 

ANTIQUAIRES I 

250 ART DEALERS OPEN 
FROM TUESDAY 
THRU SUNDAY 
11a.m. to 7 p.m. 

2. PLACE DU PALAIS-ROYAL 
75001 PARIS-TEL (1)42.97.27.00 

PraMnt Exhibition: 
"MARIONNETTES 
ET OMBRES D’ASIE" 

j= WALLY FINDLAY — 

Galleries International 

new yofk - Chicago - pcHm beach 
beverly hills - paris 

2 Ave. Mcrtignon - Paris 8*h 

T«U 4X25.70.74. toMby tbv. vHurdoy 
10 ajn. la 1 pjn. - 200 la 7 pj*. 

EXHIBITION 


Permanent exhibition of 
ADAMOFF, AKfXSSONE, AUGE, 
BOUDET, BOURME, CANU, 
CASSIGNEUL, chauray, DUCAIRE, 
B1H, FABJEN, GALL, GANTNSt, 
GAVEAU, GORRfTl, HAMBOURG, 
KERBO, KBME, KLUGE, LE PHO, 
MAJJC, MHJNKOV, NESSI, 
NEUQUELMAN, SBMRE, SiMBAH, 
THO MAS, V1GNOLES, VO ILET- 

A. V1DAL-QUADRAS: Portraits 
BALARW: Sculptures 

Hotel George V - 47.23.54.00 
31 Ave. Georg e-V - Peris 8th 

Ihl Un. ■atlUOaja.-l pA-UObfpja. 
Sunday and Mcndar7 la 9 pjL 


LONDON 

CRANE KALMAN GAIX£RY" 

178 Brampton Road. London SW3 
01-584 7566 

FROM MONET 
TO 

BEN NICHOLSON 
THRU NOVEMBER 

MtP-FrilO<ua-Ppja,5atlO«up.-4pja. 


= FISCHER FINE ART = 

X King St.. St. James's. London SW1 

01-8393942 

Prom Expressionism to Dado 
and Neue Sachlichkeit 
GERMAN ART 1909-25 
Unta 20 December 
=i7i Mon.-Fri. 1 0-5:30. =_«- 


"ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES” 
"AUCTION SALES” 
appear on Saturday 


===== GALERIE FRAMOND = 

ROGER DE CONINCK 

Peintures recentes 

= 3, rue des Saints-Pfires, Vl« - (1) 42.60.74.78 = 

GALERIE MERMOZ 

| PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

6, Rue Jeon-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel..- 43.59.82.44 _ 


& 


GALERIE FEUX VERCEL 

9, avenue Matignon - Paris 8® 
Tel. 42 56 25 19 


TTi 


ssou 


* de Paris a Nogent » 

november 20 - december 20 


GALERIE ELDtE 

105 Rag. Saint-Honort, 75008 PARIS. 
TeL 42 87 09 51. 

ROGER BLAQUIERE 

PAINTING 

Until December 7, 1985 

Tuesday lo Friday 1230 ■ 7 pjn. 

■ ■ Saturday 11-7 pjn. 


MAREVNA 

ET LES MONTPARNOS 

at MUSE BOURDELLE 

16, rue Antoine Bourdelle 
M° Montparnasse 

Daily except Monday 
from 10 a.m. to 5:40 p.m. 

mm Extended until December 7 — 


AMSTERDAM 


M TOi n DE BAHBIZON 


Cicbr. Douwes Fine Art j 

i <j>, . - [oqc . Rokin 46, Amsterdam 0. 

, , I Opening hours: 

Junilce exhibition • ^■eekasyslOamtbSpm 
from november 18 through december 12 i Sundays 1 pm to 5 pm " 


LONDON 

= MATTHIESEN FINE ART = 

7-3 Mason's Yard, Duke St, 
St. Jame's, London. S.W.l . 


01-629 6176 

OLD MASTER DRAWINGS 
A HD SCULPTURE 

Until 20 December 
MorvFrt 9:30-5:30; Thurs. unM 530 


1 01-930.2437. 

VARLUV in BRITAIN 

1955-57 

November 14 - December 20. 

■ — Monday - Friday 10-6 p.m. = 


EXHIBITION 

DECTMBHR iO .v U. 1985. 

IIoiida\ Inn M..yiuir. L<.::'.our.. 

ANCIENT C HINESE GOLD. 

SILVER AND GILT BROW. I 

Warring Sr ;iio up to riir 'funii Dynasty 

r.Ilj v 

( .'hrisru;-. llrvitr:. . ^ S:-.- f. I \\ ! 



Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Fridays 


1i 




ill 


Omo Utah low One Cfa'ns 

Indus UK -78 145057 1435*9 143509 — 4.13 

Trans 68730 691-44 48040 6 S 4.+3 —180 

Util 144.93 1 * 7.14 1 * 4 JS MSJ 8 — 1 07 

Corns 341 AS 58*077 57*01 SSOZ 2 — 2.17 


Cmroxwlt* 

Industrials 

Trenss. 

utilities 

Finanee 


Mtah Low Ckae Wro 
1 VL 97 1 U 33 11434 —044 
131 JK 133 .W 130,94 —046 
1 UL 0 B 10943 109 A 3 —024 
5*53 99.19 59 JS— 037 
12 X 99 12 X 32 12 X 42 — 0*9 


1MSE 


Closing 


- 

daft 

FreY. | 

Achinnead 

.287 

315 i 

O ecUned 

278 

241 

Unchomd 

270 

' 258 • * ' 

Total mm 

827 

.814 • 

Hm* Hiatn 

24 

J3 . 

New Lowe 

11 

•is 

Volume up 

4.18&300 


Volume down 

2J91J00 



Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 



1 gr^iSnriiA'* il 


'Included In ttx sain lloum 


Buy Sales *ShVt 
3uMt* 49 M 56 I 3 K 
144435 919,902 7 -W 

2543 J 8 597JNA 7023 
201398 415337 90447 

15 U 8 S 419,558 4.180 


VOtoMPJlf ■ — 

nvtwm 

Prev.4P7A.vot 

13M3MB0 

Prav corsoUdited do» 




Standard & Poor's index 


rabtef include the nattonwiOc prises 
up to the closing on Wall Street and 
do not refloat late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


industrials 

TraitJD. 

UtlFllle* 

Finance 

Composite 


HMi uw daw eras 
22177 21*98 220-06 —Din 
179.88 17834 17 X 71 — 0-52 
BUO W.n 1779 -DAI. 
2404 2 X 77 2 X 89 —071 
199-48 197.98 19 B .11 —MS 



r~ 

AMFX Stock index 

1 

. Htaft Une Close 

TX1J1 23677 23 X 76 

cm* 

+ 0 S 3 


24% 

IMS 
14 

504* 

m* 

259b 

22 

W% 

15 ft 
*IVb 
71 
284 b 
42 

2 5% 

24% 

104 

19 154 b 

2 D 131 b 
147 , BV» 
J6% 22ft 
0% 
«b 
5ft 
6 % 


Prices of 3V.Y. Stocks Decline 


13 Month 

Hid low Kw* 


Dl». Yta. PE 100» Hhrti I 


, 12 Month . .. 

Qoot.arirf I H Ul LOW stock 


United Press International 

. NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange retreated Friday as investors, 
armed with gains from three record-setting ses- 
sions this week, took profits. 

The market maintain ed a mixed pattern 
through early afternoon with blue chips sup- 
ported by strong buying in International Busi- 
ness Machines Corp. and the auto sector. As 
bellwether IBM weakened, the Dow Jones in- 
dustrial average fell back. 

The Dow finished at 1.435.09, which was 4.13 
below the record it set Thursday at 1,439.21 
For the week the Dow jumped 30.73 points. 

Broader market indicators fdL The New 
York Stock Exchange index lost 0.47 to 114.35. 
Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index decreased 
0.94 to 198.12. The price of an average share 
dropped 14 cents. 

Declines outnumbered advances by a ratio of 
2-1. Volume totaled 1302 million shares, up 
from 124.9 millio n on Thursday. 

“This was an opportunity to take profits,” 
said Wayne Nordberg of Prescott Ball & Tur- 
ben. Mr. Nordberg said that if interest rales did 
not decline further, the market would have 
nothing to propel it higher. 

Investment bouses are expecting stronger 
corporate profits in the first pan of 1986. but 
Mr. Nordberg said he saw neither the economy 
□or corporate profits strengthening during that 
period. 

The Labor Department repented that US. 
wholesale prices rose 0.9 percent in October and 
the Commerce Department said business inven- 
tories rose 02 percent in September. The Feder- 
al Reserve Board said industrial production was 
unchanged in October. 


Michael Metz of Oppenhdmer & Co. main- 
tained that the market would move still higher. 
He said, “You have a lot of excess money in the 
system that is not being used either for capital 
spending or to build inventories, so it’s moving 

into the stock and bond markets instead.” 

Ford Motor Co. was the mast active NYSE- 
listed issue, adding 2% to 53£. On Thursday, 
Ford's board authorized the purchase of up to 
20 wiininn additional shares of its common 
stock. 

The other major auto companies attracted 
strong buying. General Motors Corp. moved up 
Ito to 70 Vi. Chrysler Crap, added 1% to 44%. 

Beatrice Cos. was the second-most active 
issue, edging up % to 46%. Beatrice has agreed 
to be acquired by Kohiberg, Kravis, Roberts & 
Co. 

Middle South Utilities was third, rising % to 
I0V6. Among other actively traded utilities, Ni- 
agara Mohawk earned % to 20%, Common- 
wealth Edison fell % to 28% and Washington 
Water Power Co. rose % to 23%. 

IBM, which traded just below its 52-week 
high of 138% early in the session on strong 
buying, finished the day up only % to 136%. 
Cray Research, Thursday's biggest gainer, lost 
1% to 64% as investors took profits. 

Semiconductor issues, strong Thursday, con- 
tinued firm. Though Motorola eased % to 34%, 
Advanced Micro Devices added % to 26 and 
Texas Instruments rose 1V4 to 99%. 

Among other blue chips, American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co. lost % to 22, AQied- 
Signal eased % to 45%, Sears added % to 36%, 
American Express retreated % to 47%, General 
Electric Co. rose % to 64% and Exxon Corp. fell 
% to 53%. 


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ITeralbS^ribunc. 


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BUSINESS / FINANCE 


SATURPAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17. 1985 


*♦ 



U.S, Stocks 
Report, Page 10 

Page 11 




economic sow 


Trade Issue Undermiiiing 


if*- 

"MS- 



8 


can 

ByIEONURDSDLK\ 



3l0 


% 


New' York Tima Service • . 

EW YORK — lie biggest ernn/rmie. fh n pw f to tllC 
Republicans in the 1986 congressional elections is 
ipely to come from th&hugc U.S. trade defidi and the 
damage ft is doing to many farms, factories and mines. 
ThiS -J ,CeiC - ^*1 deling threats of a presidential veto, 

passed legislation that would impose stringent quotas on the 
import of textiles and shoes. 

: The House had passed similar legislation eariier. But since the 
Joto in both chamb ers fell short of the two-thirds majority 
required to override a veto, the odds arc strong that President 
HonaldReagan will be able to hlnrif protectionist legislation. - 
Nevertheless, this will not solve the n dffti o w l.pTohl*™ faring his 
party. Most Democrats are ' - 


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To some, tbe Plaza 
cnrrency pact looked 
like an exercise 
in "ad-hocery.” 


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determined to exploit the 
-trade issue, and the Republi- 
can administration can only 
.parry their threat by dealing 
-with the trade deficit. The 
.need to do that accounts for 
-the sharp turn it hag made in 

its policy on exchange rates 

.and the dollar. Until mid-Sep- 

tember, the administration had haii<*i the strong dollar as evi- 
dence that the world recognized the strength and stability of the 
U.S. economy, and it welcomed the hnog capital inflow that had 
held the dollar so high. 

But, cm Sept. 22, the administration, with Treasury Secretary 
■James A. Baker 3d as point man, strongly supported by Paul A. 
Volcker, chairman erf the Federal Reserve Board, did an about- 
face and accepted the view that an overvalued dollar was a major 
r cause of the huge UJS.' trade deficit, and that the dollar’s value 
jjjhad to be brought down, especially against the yen. 
f. The U-turn was marked by the agreement reached among the 
■ Group-of-Frve major industrial countries at the Plaza Hotel in 
^New York that the United States, Japan, West Germany, France 
rand Britain should work together to achieve "some further 
-..orderly appreciation of the mum non-dollar currencies against 
~ tiie dollar," as the commimiqu 6 on Sept. 22 stated. 

However, the communique did not specify what the objectives 
. of currency realignment should be or what rules for intervention 
" should apply. To some, the agreement ax the Plaza looked Him an 
ex ercisc in “ad-hocery,” Hwagnaril oily to meet the immediate 
■* protectionist threat. Skeptics doubted that there had been any 
= lasting change from the policy of letting exchange rales float, 
.- which allows currency markets to Anjnmmn the dollar’s value. 

Jr ■ 1 HIS WEEK, at a monetary conference in Washington, 

| Richard A. Darman, deputy secretary of the Treasury, 
r , indicated that, as far as Secretary Balrpr and he were 
- concenjcd, there would be a continuing effort to build on the 
monetary agreement readied by the Group of Hve in New York. 
»• Mr. Damian indicated support for pubHdy announced “target 
r zones” for exchange rates among the major currencies. Specifical- 
ly, he expressed interest in the proposal made by . John WflHam - 
^ son, a senior fellow of the Washragtcax-based Institute of Intema- 
; tional Economics, for target zones of perhaps plus-or-mimis 10 
^percent, with "soft margins,” rather than an absohne commit- 
'ment to prevail rates from straying outride target zones. 

He suggested it was necessary to "abstract from history" in 
moving to a new monetary regime. Currency intervention alone 
could not bring about exchange-rate stability, he said,. adding 
_ that “no monetary system could be expected to be stable if the 
fundamentals were out of line.” 

Those fundamentals include the ^wmwnuinn of monetary 
and fiscal policies, along with the structure of national tax 
systems, winch can affect savings, investment and the flow of 
capital between nations. In its current negotiations with Japan, 
.the United States is pressing for tax changes that would lessen 
capital outflows to this country. 

But changes in fundamental national economic policies that 
affect the world monetary system, Mr. Darman said, would 
i rfumgpg m the in ternatio nal ‘^political mechanism.” 
le closest thing we have to such a political mechanism is the 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 


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France Cuts Rate 

ButlightemUp 

OnBankCredit 

Rtuim 

PARIS .— The Bank of 
France cut its key interest rate 
Friday to its lowest level since 
July 1979, but moved to head 
off a credit boom by raising 
backs' minimum reserve re- 
quirements. 

The central bank acted after 
the inflation rate for October 
was reported below 5 percent 

The ’ cut of % percentage 
point in the central bank’s monr 
ey-market intervention rate, to 
8 % percent, signaled the gov- 
ernment's intention to bring 
down the cost of money, offi- 
cials of the Bank of France said. 

The intervention rate sets the 
cost to commercial banks of 
borrowing money from the cen- 
tral bank. 

Its reduction opened up the 
of lower loan rates for 


customers, but the simul- 
taneous tightening of compul- 
sory reserve requirements en- 
sured that the banks would view 
cautiously any increased de* 
mand for loans. 


Creditors, LME 
To Be Contacted 

Ratten 

LONDON — Members of the 
Internationa] Tin Council ad- 
journed their emergency meeting 
Friday after spending two days try- 
ing to solve the cash crisis that has 
reduced global tin trading to a 
trickle. 

Delegates said an eight-nation 
TFC waking party would contact 
the council’s creditors and the Lon- 
don Metal Exchange on Monday in 
a bid to dear hurdles blocking an 
overall solution before the full 
council meets ag ain Wednesday. 

neria, Thailand and Australia rep- 
resenting the producers and Japan, 
Finland, France and West Germa- 
ny for the consumers. 

The delegates have been ponder- 
ing terms of a £900-million (SIJ23- 
bifiion) refinancing package pro- 
posed by the body’s 16 creators. 

The LME, the largest tin market, 
baited tin dealings Oo. 24 when the 
ITC said it had run out of cash to 
continue propping up prices in the 
glutted market Trading remains 
suspended, as it does on the Kuala 
Lumpur market. 

The creditors, which are owed 
£352 million, have mad<» the cash 
offer conditional on guarantees 
from the central hanks of the 22 
producer and consumer countries 
that make up (he ITC. 

One of the creditors, Standard 
Chartered Bank, has offered a sep- 
arate £552 -miHi rai loan to help the 
ITC meet existing tin-purchase 
debts. 

Peter Graham, senior vice chair- 
man of Standard Charter, said Fri- 
day that as of Ocl 23, the ITC 
buffer stock had pledged 53,000 
metric tons (5,300 short tons) of tin 
as security for loans from the credi- 
tors. 

Delegates said that the Indone- 
sian cabinet had not endorsed a 
rescue plan similar to one agreed to 
by Thailand and Malaysia and be- 
lieved to involve some form of 
cushion against a sharp price de- 
cline. 

And Britain has tried without 
success to convince Mow mem- 
bers of the European Community 
t ha t they are legally responsible for 
their share oD any. existing ITC 
debts, delegates said. AD 10 EC 
members are consumer members of 
the tin council. 

The delegates said that a strong 
view among the EC nations is that 
they are liable only for contribu- 
tions already made and that credi- 
tors are unable to claim more than 
any assets remaining after liquida- 
tion of the ITC 


Subaru Faces New Challenges in U.S. 


Imports, 4-Wheel Drives 
Threaten Market Share 

By David Diamond 

New York Times Service 

PENNSAUKEN, New Jersey — For nearly 20 
years, Subaru of America has thrived by doing 
things its way. 

First, when Japanese cars were still a novelty in 
the United States, it brought in the Subaru, a car so 
much like a covered motorcycle in engine size and 
weight that it was exempted from federal amo 
safety and emission, standards. Thai, when Japa- 
nese cats began streaming into the United States, 
Subaru of America carved out a niche for itself in 
front- wheel and four-wheel drive. Subaru did all 
this while violating a basic tenet of the Japanese: 
Unlike every other organization set up here for the 
sole purpose of importing cars, Subaru is U.S.- 
owned. It is the sole importer into the United 
States of cars made by Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. 

Now, however, Subaru is faring a variety of 
challenges. Perhaps most pressing is the influx of 
small cars from South Korea and Yugoslavia that 
will compete with Subaru. Ironically, it is Sahara's 
co-founder, Malcolm Bricklin — inventor of the 
ill-fated gull-winged Bricklin sports car in 1974 — 
who is spearheading the invasion. Mr. Bricklin, 
who sold his Subaru stock daring the early 1970s, 
is bringing $4,000 Yugos, front-wheel drive mim- 
cazs, into the United States this year; he antici- 
pates importing 200,000 annually by 1987. 

South Korea’s $5,000 Hyundai, which was a hit 
in Canada last year, is due in the United States 
next year. Sahara is vulnerable to both, analysts 
say. “Generally, Subaru’s prices are at the lower 
end of the spectrum of Japanese cars,” said Lloyd 
Kanev, an automotive analyst with Smith Barney. 

Subaru "s market niche in front-wheel and four- 
wheel drive vehicles is also threatened. The front- 
wheel drive car, winch Subaru introduced to the 
United States in 1970, has been widely adopted by 
other car makers. Last year Subaru sold half of the 
101 ,542 four-wheel-drive passenger vehicles in the 
United States — a formidable share, but of a 
market that it once owned. 

“Everyone is coming at their segment, and 
they’re going to have to find ways to protect it,” 
said Edward T-apham, marketing editor of Auto- 
motive News. 

Subaru has begun to counterattack. It is plan- 
ning to bring over its own minicar, the Justy, in 
1987. The Justy wQ] probably be priced between 
$4,000 and $5,000. 



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lha Nw York Ta ms 

At present, to get around import quotas, Toyota 
Motor Corp M Nissan Motor Co. and Honda Motor 
Co. are making cars in the United States that, 
industry analysts suggest, could satiate the U.S. 
craving for Japanese cars. Fuji is tempted in the 
same direction. That could mean a sizable increase 
in the number of Subaras for sale here — and that, 
says Harvey F-anwii, Subaru of America's 50-year- 
old chief executive, could be regrettable. 

Subaru is comfortable with being small It has 
been selling about 150.000 cars a year, and expects 
sales of 200,000 next year. By contrast, Toyota 
expects to seD 650,000 cars in the United States in 
1986. 

“By growing at 15 percent a year, we are really 
targeting the market,” said Robert L Reich, Saha- 
ra's executive vice president for finance. “When 
Toyota or Nissan have to sell 750,000 cars and 
there's a downturn, they've got a problem. In our 
case; we don't get into trouble." Subaru, with its 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 7) 


Industry Output 
Was Flat in U.S. 
During October 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — U.S. indus- 
trial output showed no change in 
October following a small Septem- 
ber decline, the Federal Reserve 
Board reported Friday. The report 
disappointed economists who bad 
expected a sharp rise based on a 
gain in manufacturing jobs last 
month. 

In other U.S. economic data re- 
leased Friday, the Labor Depart- 
ment said prices at the wholesale 
level jumped 0.9 percent last 
month, the biggest rise in more 
than four years, and the Commerce 
Department reported that business 
sales fell 0.5 percent in September 
as inventories rose 0.2 percent 

The Fed, meanwhile, said that its 
index for industrial production re- 
mained frozen at 124.9 last month, 
up 1.8 percent from a year earlier. 

Industrial production had de- 
clined a slight 0.1 percent in Sep- 
tember following a big 0 . 8 -percent 
increase in August, which had been 
the largest gain in more than a year. 

The report showed that produc- 
tion at manufacturing plants was 
unchanged in October following a 
02-percent September decline and 
a 1-percent August increase. 

By sector, manufacturing plants 
producing durable goods, items ex- 
pected to last three or more years, 
suffered a OT-percem drop in out- 
put while plants producing nondu- 
rable goods recorded a slight 0 . 1 - 
percent rise. 

Much of the decline stemmed 
from a 6 -percent drop in output on 
auto assembly lines. The animal 
rate of production fell to 7.6 mil- 
lion units, largely as the result of a 
brief strike al Chrysler Corp. 

Production of military and space 
equipment was down 03 percent. 


U,S. Warns That It May Hold Talks Outside GATT 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
trade representative, Clayton K. 
Yen tier, has said that a group of 
developing countries was objecting 
to a new round of trade liberaliza- 
tion talks, thns "blocking the will” 
of most of the global trading com- 
munity. 

At a Senate Finance Committee 
hearing on Thursday, Mr. Yenttcr 
named India, Brazil, Yugoslavia, 
Egypt, Nigeria and Argentina, but 
he added that this list was not com- 
plete. 

He said that if these countries 
persisted, the United States would 
proceed anyway with talks outside 
the framework of the General 


Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 
with nations that “share our objec- 
tives.” 

He warned that the United 
States might penalize the countries 
that are blocking agreement by 
striking them from the list of bene- 
ficiaries of the Generalized System 
of Preferences. Under that system, 
raw materials and simple manufac- 
tured products of nurd World 
countries enter the United States 
duty-free. 

The six nations that Mr. Yeutter 
named are middle-income coun- 
tries. Some, such as Brazil, Yugo- 
slavia and Nigeria, are heavily bur- 
dened with debts. All depend on 
markets in industrialized countries. 

Their principal condition for a 


new round of trade talks is a roll- 
back of industrialized countries' 
protectionist measures, according 
to Third World representatives and 
analysts. 

But the industrial nations say it 
is all they can do to prevent new 
protectionism. In the United States 
both the Senate and Honse of Rep- 
resentatives have approved a brD to 
cut imports of textiles from devel- 
oping countries, although Reagan 
administration officials say they 
expea the president to veto iL 

“We can’t tolerate it when a 
handful of countries predude de- 
bate.” Mr. Yeutter said after the 
hearing. He said that 65 of the 90 
GATT members actively support 
the new round, but “at the moment 


we are feeling a lot of intransigence 
from our developing-counny part- 
ners.” 

His warnings came just ahead of 
a meeting of GATT members, 
known as contracting parties, 
which starts Nov. 25. in Geneva. 
The United States had hop^d that 
this meeting would lead to estab- 
lishment of a preparatory commit- 
tee to begin work on a negotiating 
agenda for the new round. 

The developing countries also 
object to a negotiating agenda that 
the United States is pushing for the 
new round. It indudes liberaliza- 
tion of trade in services and new 
rules covering investment and in- 
tellectual property rights such as 
patent and copyrights. 


with output being held back by a 
labor dispute in that industry as 
well, the report said. 

The sharp 0.9-percent jump in 
the Producer Price Index reflected 
the rad of cut-rate automobile fi- 
nancing and a big gain in food 
prices, and came despite continued 
declines in gasoline prices, the La- 
bor Department said. 

However, despite the October 
gain — the largest since a 1 -percent 
rise in April 1981 — the index for 
finished goods was still rising at a 
moderate 0.9-perceni rate for the 
first 10 months of 1985. 

Wholesale goods overall had fall- 
en 0.6 percent in September and 0.3 
percent in August, with modest 
rises through the rest of the year. 

The department said food costs 
overall swelled 1.4 percent in Octo- 
ber, after falling 0.9 percent in Sep- 
tember and 0.7 percent in August. 

The bulk of the increase in 
wholesale prices was the result of 
sharply higher prices for the newly 
introduced 19S6 model passenger 
cars, which climbed 5.1 percent, 
after Tailing in September and Au- 
gust 

Factory and business equipment, 
which makes up 21 percent of the 
index, rose 1 percent, after falling 
0.6 percent in September. That in- 
crease also was the result of the rise 
in motor-vehicle costs. 

Dorothea One, a Georgia State 
University economist, said the in- 
crease was “not unexpected.” 

She said the overall price figures 
should drop back next month as 
car prices are figured lower in the 
index with seasonal adjustments. 
She also noted, however, that if car 
manufacturers continue to see slug- 
gish sales on their new models “we 
may start to see another round of 
incentives, then well see prices 
drop again." 

Meanwhile, the Commerce De- 
partment said that the big drop in 
sales in September — the biggest 
since a 23-percent decline in June 
— came from a 1 . 6 -percent fall at 
the wholesale level and a 13-per- 
cent decline in manufacturing 
sales. Sales had risen 1.9 percent in 
August 

With sales off, businesses were 
caught with unwanted inventories. 
Stockpiles on shelves and harklots 
rose by 03 percent in September. 

With the decline in sales, the 
closely watched inventories- to- 
sales ratio rose to 135 in Septem- 
ber from 1.34 in August That 
means it would take 135 months to 
deplete inventories at the Septem- 
ber sales pace. (.4 P, (JPJ ) 


Philips Executives Are Skeptical About Eureka 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

EINDHOVEN, Netherlands — 
Officials of Philips NV, Western 
Europe’s largest electronics compa- 
ny, believe that if the Eureka pro- 
gram is to succeed, it will need far 
greater support than it has gotten 
so far from West European govern- 
ments. One executive, Nico 
Hazewindns, characterized the pro- 
gram as “vague.” 

Philips executives said Thursday 
that European governments com- 
mitted to participating in Eureka 
should act quickly to establish Eu- 
ropean-wide standards in new tech- 
nologies; provide new government 
financing for Eureka projects, no- 
tably subsidies, and assign a more 
active role to the European Com- 
mission in defining projects. 

Eureka was proposed last April 
by France to stimulate European 
cooperation in high technology, 
primarily in the civilian sector. The 
program has drawn political sup- 
port of 18 governments — the cur- 
rent 10 EC members and Austria, 
Finland, Norway, Portugal, Swe- 
den, Switzerland, Spain and Tur- 
key — nnd the EG Commission. 
Many participants described Eure- 
ka as a response to President Ron- 


ald Reagan's Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative. 

Philips is among more than 100 
manufacturing companies in West- 
ern Europe exploring or planning 
to establish projects under the Eu- 
reka program. 

In interviews in Eindhoven, Phil- 
ips executives expressed skepticism 
about the way that the program 
was evolving, despite its endorse- 
ment by the second meeting in 
Hannover, West Germany, Nov. 3 
6 . At that meeting, Britain, West 
Germany and the Netherlands an- 
nounced that they would allocate 
funds from current government re- 
search budgets. At the first Eureka 
conference, held in Paris July 17, 
France said it would provide gov- 
ernment financing totaling 1 bil- 
lion francs (S125 million). 

The Hannover meeting also es- 
tablished 10 research projects in 14 
countries, costing the equivalent of 
an estimated S3 12 million and in- 
volving dozens of companies and 
research institutes in sura fields as 
microcomputers, lasers, water fil- 
tration, research, diagnosis of sexu- 


ally transmitted diseases and optic 
dec ironies. 

“Despite some of these encour- 
aging signs, and our con tinuing in- 
terest, Eureka still strikes us as 
vague," said Mr. Hazewindns, who 
directs coordination of Philips co- 
operative research programs m Eu- 
rope, including those under EC 
sponsorship. “To change that im- 
pression, we believe European gov- 
ernments should act, and make far 
stronger commitments than they 
made until now.” 

As a first step, Mr. Hazewindus 
said. Western European govern- 
ments should establish European- 
wide standards for new-generation 
technologies in such key sectors as 
television and Tg 1 «y> nnniinjcarinn!; _ 
Mr. Hazewindus and other senior 
Philips executives cited an EC 
Commission task force on informa- 
tion technologies and telecom- 
munications. 

The group is studying ways of 
establishing common standards 
with European-based electronics 
companies, industry associations 
and various government telecom- 


munications and postal agencies. 

“This kind of expertise in Brus- 
sels is an example of what we re- 
gard as highly important and it 
should be tapped, not attacked un- 
fairly as it has been,” Mr. Hazewin- 
dus said. He was referring to state- 
ments made repeatedly in private 
by senior British. West German 
and French government officials 
that they were determined to have 
the commission play only a modest 
role in the directing the Eureka 
program, fearful that a strong com- 
mission role would only create 
more bureaucracy in Brussels. 

“It is true that Eureka is not 
comparable to anything we have 
previously seen in European tech- 
nological cooperation, but much of 
what is gong on in Brussels is very 
important, and for that reason, the 
EC commission needs more sup- 
port than it is getting from govern- 
ments,” Mr. Hazewindus said. Al- 
though the commission will be 
represented on the policy-making 
body, the Eureka Conference of 
Ministers, its role will be as one of 
the government participants. 


fill RESERVE 

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to Protect and Increase Ccpilal 


U.S. Dollar Denominated 
Insured by U-5. Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute Confidentiality 


CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 


RES IN DEP 

Cose Postale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospectus and 
account application to: 


Name . 


Address . 


Nor m o tofa h wtifon tfa USA. 


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THE VALUE LINE INVESTMENT SURVEY continually reviews more 
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and requests lor Information should be directed to: Value Una. Att: Alexandra 
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Distributed By KIM Royal Duicn Airlines pubucauon Distribution Servwa 
Holland. Allow 4 to 0 weeks for deBvery. 



REPUBLIC OF TUNISIA 

MINISTRY FOR THE NATIONAL ECONOMY 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 
INTERNATIONAL INVITATION TO TENDER 
N P 3766 

The Cafsa Phosphates Company hereby launches an International Invitation 
lo Tender with a view to purchasing the following machinery, for exploita- 
tion of the phosphate quarries in the basin or Gai&u 

1. eight (8) tyre-wheeled loaders, 375 H P. 10 tonnes 

2. s be (6) dumper tracks, 32 metric tonne* 

3 L ten ( 10 ) drillmg nuehbif^ 

4- ten (10) adapted compreseors 
The compote* interested in the above may obtain a copy of the Schedule of 
Conditions against payment of 50 DT (fifty Dinar) from the "Service 
General. 9 rue du Royauine. <f Arabic Seoodite. 1035 Tunisia''. 

Tenders in the French Language must reach "Monsieur le Direct eur des 
Achats de la C.P.G. 2130 Meilaoui (T uniaia) - before 10.00 hours on the 5lh 
December 1965. 

Hie outer envelope must be marked as follows: 

"Appal <T ottre N P 3766 
Engine tie Garricre* 

Ne p oflmr avant le 6/12/85.” 

Hie envelopes will be opened at 10-00 hours on the 6th December 1985 at 
the "Direction dcs Achate a Metlsoui”. 

Any tender received by telex, or alter the above mentioned dale will not be 
ooiwidcimL 



REPUBLIK TUNESIEN 

MINISTERIUM FUR VOLKSWIRT5CHAFT 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 
INTERNATIIHfALE AUSSCHBEBUHE H J. 37GG 

Die Cafsa Phosphates Company funJen mil der AhstchL, Beigbaunuschinerie IDr 
du- llnii'rt^wcblkssunR der Plvfcpluigniben im Caka zu kauien. zu interna- 
Ikmokn Lirttsangeboien Kir naehsreheni: Ausiffctung auf: 

1 . achi { 8 ) hthberohe Lader, 375 H P, 10 TonxMsn 

2. sects (6l Autoohutter, 32 metrische Tonnen 

3 . aehn ( 10 ) Bohnnnwhinen 

4 > zehn (lO) adapderte Kompreeeoren 

An dieser Ausschreibung inLeressierte Gesdfachafim KSnnen gegpn Zahlung der 
Summe von 50 Knar (funfag Dinar) vom Service CcneraL 9 rue do Royaume de 
I'Anbie Srtwdite, 1035 Tuncucn. 

Anethole, in fraiwaichw Spiache riGmcH “.Motwicur 1c Dirwieur d* Achats de 
D CP.C. 2130 Metboui (Tumsien)" sffliesensam 5. Dezonber vor 10-00 
llhr vorliegen. Der Siesere I'm&chlag is! wie folgl zu besduiften: 

“Appel tTrrffre N P 3766 

Engxnx de Carrierea 

Ne pas ouvrir avant le 6.12.1985”, 

Lhc L'mschlage werdefl am tx Dewmber um 10.00 Uhr in der "Direction dcs 
Achate a MetiwoT gjtfffiwt. 

Nach diowm Dunam eingehendc renwchrihliche Angeboie kdnnen nicht beriiflc- 
uditigl wendm. 









INTERNATIONAL 




Fridays 


Iran 


(losing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


£% 3 L l<# it 17 636 4f% 47% 4BW + ft 

2&* 34F*» PWRl JJ3elA7 37 27V. 1M, 27ft + ft 

17V" w? gMWSPt 1-57 fj 7) 17W !«V 169» 

Sft 2% PtrliTV JOeasj Si 3h » » 

®« *25 SP*?* ixb u is «wxso 4?% 4»j* 

34 12% PhelpO 1046 HHk 20 20% -Mm 

S5 34 Phetanr 5X0 OX S7 51 50% 51 + % 

46% 29 PnprS 54 1J 21 4585 42% 41% 41%-% 
16ft 13% Ph Id El. ZM 14.1 * 4271 15% 15V) !«*— ft 


33 25% PftilEpf 3X0 H7 

JflW 79 PhllEpf 440 12a 
*o 57 PhllEpf 8XS 12# 
11 A 9% PilUEDf 14! 127 
10% Mi PtlllEat U3 1X7 
« 51 PNlErt 7X5 IIP 

low Mi PhllEpf 1JB 1X8 
124 HOVj Rill of 17.12 lax 
iu ioo pniie pfisxs lxa 

74 *2 Rill E Pi 9-50 113 

*i Site PhllEpf 780 110 
60 50tt PhllE Pf 7X5 114 


UhX » 30 

lOQz 33 35 3S + K 

50* 61 68 M 

58 1U* 10% 11W + U 
175 10W TDV> 10W 

m&em 40* «%— 1% 

BS 10ft 10 10 

J4M22W 121 121 -9 

101112 112 112 +2W 

I70x 73 71*4 71V* — 1W 

8001 60 60 60 
17DZ5V 51 58 — ft 


anti 54% PSEGst 7 M 108 
41* S% PubUek 
is* 9% PoetNo .16 18 13 

7a a PR Cem 6 

17 llli pugatp 1X6 11X 7 

7% m* Pul Pan 
2}% 10% PulteHm .12 3 15 

31% 1414 PurtJot jUI 16 

1014 5% Pvt* 7 


(Continued from Page 10) 


3* 32% 

12% 7ft 
31 20 

n 23 
12% 8% 
9% 6% 
33% 24 
31J* 17% 
40% 24 
19 13 

37 30V, 

53% 38% 
15% 10ft 


OronRN 114 
Orange J3t 
Or.wiC Jt 
OrlonC 011.12 
OrtonP 
Orion pi £0 
Orion pf X75 
OutMAA M 
OvrnTr 80 
OvShlP 80 
OwenC 180 
Ovwnill 180 

Oxford m 


84 27% 24% 
45 8 7% 

134 3DW 29% 
94 28% 27% 
1085 10% 10ft 

12 7% 7U> 

13 28 77% 

342 24% 24 
354 38% 38% 
74 15% IS% 

748 35% 34% 
801 S3 52 
581 1 5% 14% 


26ft— % 
8 + ft 
2Pft — 1% 
28 — Ji 
ltVi-% 
7ft- % 
27% — % 
34 + % 

38% + % 
15% + % 
35V*— ft 
52 - % 
15% — V* 


SSW 15% PhllSub 1X2 6.1 13 153 21% 20% 21% + ft 

95% 73 PhllMr 480 SJ 8 4066 76% 75ft 7Sft— lft 

36% 1» PfiHpIn 80 X7 12 1749 22% 20 22 — % 

44% 39% Phlllnpt 180 1.9 3 53% 53ft Sift— 1% 

18% 11% PhllPtS 180 78 II 13548 15% 13 13% — % 

25% 22% PhIPtpl 184e 48 1046 24 23ft 23ft— ft 

30% 30% PhnVH 80 18 14 342 29% 28% 29V. + ft 

15% TSftPledAS 88 .9 8 305 32% 32 33% 

34 27% PieNG 2X2 78 12 19 33% 33 + % 

25% 14% Pier 1 14 74 25% 241* ffift + ft 

*2ft 38% Pllsbrv 1.72 38 13 784 58ft 57% -57%— 1 

34 21ft Pioneer 184 58 13 470 24% 23ft 23ft— ft 

26% 13ft PtenrEI 88a 8 54 15% 15% 15ft + ft 

45ft 33% PlfnvB 1X0 27 15 473 45ft 44ft 44% — ft 


37 ft 23ft PHH 180 28 U 244 

50 31ft PPG 1X6 15 11 1596 

31ft lift PSA 80 2J 13 334 

23% 14ft PSA dpf 1J0 98 IS 

14% 12 PocCS 184 IDS 7 

a ’.4 15% PocGE 184 9 A 7 ssai 

46% 37% Poet- to 388 78 13 31 

41% 24ft PcLum 1X0 3X 24 470 

101* 574 PacPes X5e J 10 63 

19% lift PocRSPliOO 108 20 

17ft 12% PoeSd .48 2J 13 76 

82% 65 PocTele 5X2 74 9 2351 

15 V’fc PacTin 80 3J 7 2 

31% 24% Padfcs 280 12 8 1416 

36 30% PoctfPf 487 HO B 

43% 25% Palnwb .M 1.9 19 1883 

34% 25% PalnWaf 2X5 78 9S 

J> 32% Palm Be .901 60 75 
41 20ft PanABk JO 1.7 • 46 
3% 4 PHnAm 4588 

4 1% PoflAwI 364 

21 13% Pandek n 3D U II 77 


244 35% 35 3S% + % 

1596 50% 49% 49ft + W 
334 2M4 25Vj 25% + % 
1$ 21 21 21 + % 

7 14% 14ft 14% + % 
5581 19ft 19'i 19ft — ft 

231 45ft 44ft 44ft — % 
47® J8 37ft 37% 

63 10% 10 10-ft 

20 19ft 19ft 19ft 

76 15 14% 15 -ft 

2351 78% 76ft 77 —1% 

2 12ft 12ft 12ft + ft 
1416 2*% 79% 29i«, — ft 

8 34ft 34 34 — ft 

1883 33% 311* 31% — 1% 

95 30ft 30% 30% - % 
75 35% 35ft 35% — ft 
46 41ft 41 41ft + ft 
4588 B% 7ft 8 — ft 
364 2% 2% 2% — V* 

77 17% 16ft 16ft— ft 


14ft 7% PIHitn 256 13 12% 12%— % 

21 16% P ten PI n 34 16ft 16% l«u— ft 

19 91* PkntRs XO I.) 16 £50 18ft 18W 18ft- ft 

12% 7 piontm .lib IX m am 13 12% ia + ft 

13% 7ft Piavbov 75 65 Bft 8% Bft — 1* 

28ft 19ft Plcsev 84a X9 14 23 22 21ft 21% — ft 

19ft 11% PMWPd 80 48 60 143 12ft 12% 12% 9- ft 

39ft 24ft Poland 180 27 55 1287 38ft 37ft 37ft— % 


lift 10ft Pondrs 80 J 
2ift 15ft PeuTal JO 45 
72* 14% Portec 80 38 
21% 16ft PortGE 1.90 98 
24ft 19% Parcel 280 106 
35% 31 PtirGPf 480 1X9 
34% 30% RrGpf 4X2 128 


80 X 34 023 15% 15 15% + ft 

80 45 BO 171 17% 17% 17%— ft 

80 38 150 17% 17 17% + H 

.90 98 9 432 21ft 20% 21 + ft 

-60 108 I 24ft 24V* 24ft 

80 IX® 10 34ft 34% 34%—% 

X2 128 19 33ft 33% 33ft + ft 


43% 28% Poll left 1X6 41 IS 1364 39ft 38ft 38ft- ft 
34 23% PotmEI lit 4 ; 1 M 33. 32ft |2%— ft 

4144 33 PolEInf 404 113 250r 39% 39% Sfl* - % 

25ft 1B% Prtrtls X6 18 19 417 25ft 25 25% 

ait 31% Primrtc 2X0 58 16 304 41% 40% 40ft— 1 

21% 21ft Prlrnkwl 19 21% W’ta 20% — % 

20% 14ft PrlmcC 17 1067 19ft 19ft 10% 

37% lift PrlmM 3 89 8 27 81 37% 36% 37 — % 

67V: 50% ProctG 2fi» 4.0 17 401B 66 65% 65ft— ft 

IS 0 PrdFtss 39 18 TS 132 14% 14% 14%— ft 

45% 35ft Prefer 180 3L2 16 153 43% 41% 43% +2% 

2% 2 PruRC n 49 2 2 2 


41ft 33% PanhEC 2-30 6 X 13 1092 37% 37 37%— % 


24ft 11% Pansoh 16 168 

8% 3ft PontPr 5246 

lBft 6ft Pardvn 1127 

17% lift ParkEI do 2 H 66 

7Va 4 ParkDrl 88 1J M 
3r-s 28% PorfcH 1.12 3J 11 583 

23ft 14% PorkPn 82t 28 32 2ffi 

5 3 PatPtrs 2 153 

15% lift PovNP 84 40 14 291 

23% 13ft PavCsh .16 1.0 14 560 

1% ft Penoa 119 

SDft 44ft Pen On 14 410 

63% 44% Pennev 136 48 10 1284 

27% 23ft PoPL 286 94 10 B40 

40ft 33 PoPLpt 480 118 200: 

29% 25% PaPLdnrl.43 11 J I 

27ft 22% PaPLdprlW 108 5 

74ft 60% PaPL pr B80 11.7 IOOj 

58% 24% PaPL dPfOXS 118 3 

31% 27ft PaPL dPf3.75 112 4 

7Sft 62 PaPLPr BJ0 118 50i 

41ft 34 Penwlf 2X0 5.7 226 

25% 20 Penwpf 180 6.7 K 

50 34 PenniDi 2X0 48 21 1BW 

lBft 13% PeopEn 1X0 48 8 187 

26% 14% PePB/5 XO J 21 36 

67% 39% PepsiCo 1.78 17 12 2964 

301* 22ft PerkEI Jt 22) 16 5243 

9ft 7ft Prmion l.iai4J t M 

1B% 10% PervD s 324 


16 168 24ft 24ft 24ft + ft 

5246 8W 8 81* + 4* 

1127 7% 7% 7% + % 

JOo 2 II 66 13'6 12% 13 — % 

nfl IX 235 4% 4ft 4% 

1.12 JJ 11 583 33ft 33ft 33ft + % 

X2t 28 32 2B5 22ft 22 72 — ft 

2 153 4 3ft 3ft 

44 5.0 14 291 13 12% 12ft— ft 

.16 1.0 14 560 15% TSV« I5ft t ft 

119 ft 

14 410 51ft 51ft SI%— ft 
136 48 >0 1284 51 50ft 50ft 
156 9.4 10 840 27ft 27% 27% 4- ft 

4J0 lU 2001 39 39 39 

■342 IIJ 1 29ft 29ft 29ft + 'A 

1W 108 5 27 26% 26% — % 

8.40 11.7 1001 72 72 72 +1 

3XS 118 3 28ft 2Bft 28ft — ft 

3X5 12X 4 30% 30% 30% 

BJ0 118 50z 74 74 74 

120 5.7 226 38% 30% 38% + ft 

180 6.7 32 23ft 23 23% + % 

130 48 21 1897 491* 47% 48 — 'J 
1X0 68 8 187 IBft 17% 18ft + ft 

XU 8 21 36 26% 26% 26% + ft 

1.78 17 12 2964 67% 66% t6%— 1ft 
Jt 20 16 5243 M% 27ft 27% — % 
l.lZeHX b 381 7% 7ft 7% 

324 18% 17% 18% + % 


8% 8 PruRi n 
34% 18 PSvCol 100 9J 

70 Si PSCOI Pf 7.15 118 

21% 17ft P5Colpf 110 10X 
10% i% PSInd IJ9 118 
9 6% PSInpf 104 1X2 

b% 7 psmoi loe in 

53 41 PSlnpl 7.15 14J 

71 52ft PSInpf 984 I4J 

63 48 PSInpf 182 148 

63 4«ft PSInpf 888 143 

64 51 PSIfl Pi &96 14X 

8% 3ft PSvNH 

16% 8% PSNH pf 

17% 8% PMH pfB 

24% 13 PNH pfC 

72 11% PNHpfO 
22% 11% PNH pfE 
19% 9% PNHpfF 
21% 10ft PNHpfG 

29ft 22% P5VNM 192 10J 
32ft 25 PSwEG X84 9.1 
39 30% PSEGPl 488 10X 

39ft 31% PSEGpf 4.18 108 
40% 31% PSEGpf 4X0 TIL7 
49% 39 PSEGpf 538 109 
115 TD2V1 PSEGPfl384 118 
20% 16ft PSEGpf 117 108 
23% 18% PSEGpf 283 108 
109 96% P5EG PTI2X5 11 J 

73% 50 PSEGpf 780 108 

73 59 PSEGpf BJ» 11J 

71 55V* PSEG Pf 782 104 


49 2 2 2 

44 Bft S 8 
• 507 20% 20% 20ft— % 

2001 65 65 65 

9 2Bft 3S% + % 

» 752 Mi 8% 6ft 
lOSfe 8ft 8 8% + % 

200z 8% BU 8% + % 
1001 50 50 50 —1 

210z 66ft £6 66 + % 

mz 51 59 59 — % 

150z 58% 58% 5fl%— % 
lOOr 43 63 63 +1% 

680 8% 7% 8 — ft 
1250* 15% 15% 15% + ft 
1 15% 15% 15% 

3 23% 23% 23% — ft 
S 20% 20% 20%— % 
215 21% 21ft 21** + ft 
10 18 18 18 
27 20 Li 20% 20% — ft 

307 aw aw a% — % 

5306 31% 31 31% — ft 

400* 38% 38% 38% 
lOQz 39% 39% 39% — % 
1450*40% 40% 40%—% 
400* 48ft 48ft 48ft 
580 114%114 114% + ft 
21 21ft aw aft — % 
87 23% 22ft a 
320zU3ft 106 163ft +lft 

502 72 72 72 —1ft 

100* 71ft 71ft 71ft— ft 
25fttz 70ft 70ft 70ft + ft 



US. Futures 



Grains 


WHEAT (CBTJ 

5.0)0 bu minimum- donors per bushel 
383ft 2X9ft Dac 136, 141 

174ft 287 Mar 3J6ft 140 

452 284 May 116% 117 

172ft 263 Jul 290 2-91 

385 287 Sep 192 , 192ft 

105ft 254% Doc 103% jJB% 

Esr. Sales Prov. Soles. 5X74 


Prev. Day Open Int. 30M3 oH 772 
CORN (CBT) 

SilOOBu minimum- doUars per bushel 

195 114ft Dec 2J9% 139ft 

197 124ft Mar 144% 144% 

191% 131 May 146% 146ft 

186 2X3 Jul K7ft 147ft 

170 124% Sep 134 2-34% 

2X5ft 2X0% Dec 127ft 2XH 

174ft 133 Mar 134ft 135ft 

Est. Sales Prey. Sales 34618 


Est. Sales Prev. Sales 34618 

Prev. Day Open lnf.l44X52 up 1,999 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

S000 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
688 497ft Now 5.12ft S-!3 


135 140 ft +.02% 

3X4 ft 3X9 ft +J)lft 

115 117 — J»% 

289% 190% —XI 
190ft 190 ft —81ft 

102 102 - m 


137 138 — X2 

142% 243 —82 

144ft 145% -51% 
245% 246 — 82% 

132ft 2X3 —XI ft 
225ft 125ft —82 

133V* 133ft —81% 


SOYBEANS tCHTI 
5800 bu minimum- dollars per t 
6-68 497ft Now 5.12ft „ 

6X9 5.10 Jan 5.18ft 5X0 

7tl 5X2 ft Mar 5X7 SXOft 

7.n 5X1% May 5X7 5X9 

£J8 5X6% Jul 540 543% 

6X4 5X5ft Auo SXBft 541 

6X8 5X3 Sep 5X2ft 5X5ft 

432 519V: Nov 510ft 5X3 

563 5X3 Jan 5X6 _5X6 


EsI. Salas Prav. Sulci 31014 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 77826 Off 853 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 hms-dollarsper ton 
18480 12540 Dec M2.10 1424 

16380 12780 Jan 14240 1425 

206-50 13080 Mar 14380 1415 


16380 12780 Jan 14240 14150 

206 JO 13080 Mar 14380 143J0 

16150 13150 May 14450 14450 

16780 13480 Jul 14100 145JSJ 

152X0 135J0 Aug 14580 14680 

16780 137 JO Sap 141S0 1413) 

149 JO 13980 Oct 140-5i 14080 

15080 14180 Dec 14180 14150 


582ft 582ft —.lift 
586ft 587% —.13% 
516 516ft —.14% 

526ft 5X7% ^11% 
5X2 532ft —09ft 

SX1 5X1% -87ft 
5.14 5.14 -89 

512ft 512ft —87 

5X6 5X6 —87 









High 

Low 

Open 

High 

Low 

Close 

Chg. 

167-25 

142J0 

Mar 



165X0 

+55 

i Est.Sata 

Prev. Soles 

1.931 




Prey. Day Open Ini. 11003 aft 39 




| SUOARWORLO 11 (NYC5CE) 





1 1 1000 Ibs.- cents per lb. 





7X5 

3X0 

Jan 5X2 

5X2 

5X3 

5X5 


9X3 

3X4 

Mar 556 

+01 

5X5 

SXB 

— iH 

7.15 

3X8 

MOV +11 

+20 

+05 

6X7 

— X5 

+7D 

179 

Jul +25 

+35 


6X3 

— X7 

+83 

4X4 

Sod +*2 

+42 

642 

642 

— X7 

+96 

4X3 

Oct 638 

+64 

+52 

654 

— X7 

7X5 

6X5 

Jan 



6JS 

—X7 

7.53 

4X1 

Mar 7.10 

7X1 

7JB 

727 

— At 


Prev. Sales 8X92 




Pray. Day Ooen Int. 72.132 upSd 




| COCOA (NYC5CE) 










2337 

1945 

Dec 2051 

2080 

2050 

2065 

+37 

2392 

1V5S 

Mar 7155 

2175 

3150 

2162 

+31 

2422 

1S&3 

May 2207 


2205 

2217 

+31 

7429 

JM0 

Jul 2290 

2253 

2245 

2250 

+25 

2430 

2023 

Sep 2275 


3770 

2200 

-K9 

2425 

2055 

Dec 2293 

2293 

2285 

2290 

421 

2385 

2029 

Mar 



2304 

431 

Est Sales 


=■ rev. Sales 4X05 




Prev. Dav Open Int. 21097 off 336 




ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 





15X00 lbs.-can Is per lb. 





181X0 

112X0 

Now 113X0 

114X5 

II3X0 

114X0 

+X0 

180X0 

112X5 

Jan 112X0 

11160 

111X0 

112X0 

+40 

177 JO 

11230 

Mar 113X5 

113X0 

112X5 

113X0 

+X5 

16150 

111.95 

Mav 113X0 

11440 

moo 

11330 

+X5 

157 JO 

111.40 

jui Him 

114X5 

113X5 

113X0 

+40 

1 00 JO 

111X0 

Sen 111X0 

112X0 

111 JD 

112X0 

+.10 

114X5 

11 1X0 

Nov 



112X0 

—.10 



Jan 



11230 

—.10 

167X5 

1T1XD 

Mnr 



112X0 

— xo 

Est. Sales 


559 




Prev. Day Open Inf. 6X41 up 97 






15080 14180 

15080 14180 

Esi. Sales 


jan 14180 14180 
Prw.Sale* 16806 


Prev. Dav Open Ini. 4241 1 oH 1859 
SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 

60800 lbs- da liars per 100 lbs. 


ajs 

2987 

2840 

2745 

25X5 

25.15 

2405 

2180 

21.90 

2140 

Est. Sales 


!S£ 5S %% as 

1940 Mar 2180 21X0 
»82 May 21X5 21 JO 
2040 Jul 2T40 2140 

2047 Auo 21X0 21-50 
20-50 Sep 21XS 21 JO 
2045 Oct 21 JO 21 JO 
20 35 Dec 21X0 21X0 
20X5 Jan 

Prev. Sales 10,178 


Prev. Dav Open Inf. 40X85 oft 1X75 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40800 lbs.- cent* per lb. 

6785 5580 Dec 6545 6165 

6745 54X5 Feb 61X0 6140 

67J7 55X0 Apr 6040 6042 

66X5 S6XS Jun 6060 6&0O 

65.40 55.78 Aug 59X5 59J5 

6040 57 JO OCI 58-10 58X5 

tSXB 59 JO Dec 5940 5940 

Est. Sains lnJO* Prev.SaleS 1*445 
Prev. Dav Open lot. 698*2 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

4480a ibs.- cents per lb. 

73X0 58.10 Nov 64X0 64X0 

7940 60 JO Jan 66J5 6685 

71X0 6042 Mar 6780 67.15 

7180 60.60 APT 66 JO 66J5 

7080 60.10 May 65X5 6540 

68-50 6540 Aug 65J0 65J0 

ESI. sales Prev. Sales 1J79 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 9J07 
HOGS (CME) 
lO.Ooc ibs.- cents per lb. 

50X5 36X5 Dec 45X0 46X5 

50-47 JB.I0 Feb 44 JO 4587 

47X5 36.12 Apr 40X5 40X0 

498 5 3980 Jun <245 4380 

<98f 4045 Jul 43X5 43X5 

51.90 40X5 Aug 4130 <2X5 

41.10 38J? Del 39X0 3945 

49J0 38X7 Dec 40J5 4055 

40.90 40.45 Feb 4180 4180 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 

Prev. Day Oosn Int. 28029 off 417 
PORK BELLI E5 (CME) 

38800 Ibi- cents per lb. 

74X0 55X5 Feb 59.10 59 JO 

75.r0 5545 Mar 5940 59J2 

7540 5785 MOV 60J5 60.95 

76.00 57X0 Jul 6095 61X5 

7115 55JO Aug 58-50 58X0 

Ed. Sales 4.132 Prev. Soles 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 0599 


13840 —4.10 
138.W —190 
140X0 —150 
14100 —180 
saw — 140 
143X0 —1X0 
141JQ — ' 1J0 
13880 —180 
13980 —100 
13980 —180 


a 26 20J6 —.11 

30-40 M44 —15 

20.75 2095 —.13 

2185 21X1 —.16 

21X5 21X5 —89 

21X2 21X7 —84 

21.15 21.15 —.10 
21.15 21.15 —.13 

2180 21.15 —33 


6448 6442 

6040 6042 
39XB 59-72 
59.97 60X5 
SBJ0 3840 
57X0 57X0 
59.10 59.10 


4180 6380 
6685 6687 

64X5 6640 

6405 tJ rn 

6445 6445 
65.10 65.15 


43J0 4345 
<4X5 44X7 
3980 39.90 

42X0 42X3 
4245 42X5 

4 1 JO 41J2 
39.15 39.15 
40.10 40X0 
4040 4047 


SPS 55.75 
SB.TO 5985 
6080 6040 
60J2 OJ.02 

58.10 58X2 



COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37JD0 lbs.- cents oer lb. 

16040 129X5 DSC 15980 I5»J0 15680 156.94 

lt703 12850 Mar 160X5 16110 159X0 160.18 

167.10 13180 MOV 16150 16345 161.10 1A1JI4 

1*7.10 135 M Jul 163X5 T64J5 16100 163X1 

16788 132X5 Sen 1*4X5 IteJH 16480 164X5 

167X0 13880 Dec 16580 165.10 16580 164X8 


Currency' Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option A Strike 

Underlying Price CnHs— Last i 

Nov pec Mar not Dec Mar 
12X00 British Pounds-ceats per unit. 

B Pound 105 1 37.10 3745 s 

142X0 11D S r 3245 s 

162X0 130 s 12X5 2X0 s 

142X0 135 r r r r 

142X0 140 280 r 48 r 

142X0 MS r 0X5 r 150 

50400 Canadian Doftara-cents per unit. 

CDollr 72 r r 18S r 

6141 73 r 0X0 r r 

62J00 west German Mam-cents Mr unit. 
DMork 31 s r r S 

38.U 34 s 4X2 r s 

38.14 35 r 3X0 347 r 






i&intm 




■m 4« -p.akjdgiqgi 

:■ ■■■ 

Nfe 


test#* 


30% 24% ZaleCn 
174* 7% Zapata • 
61% 32M Zcrrres . 
23 - UK ZnuBhe 
219* 15% Zaras . 


44 U 44 39 ZBft 29 
IX 6+ !B2 . f Bft 9 . +1* 
J 17 180 599* 5Bft 59 —ft 
"IN. Si n 174* 17ft 
U 17 41 20 Wft 19ft— I* 




,|f ’.I’.KFl 1 *7 


jrjimnr 

:-I 




COTTON 3 (NYCE) 

50800 lbs.- cants per lb: 

7380 57-51 Dec 6045 

76X5 58X7 Mar 6IJ0 

7080 58X0 May 62X7 

70.CS 58X0 Jul 61 JO 

65J0 52.40 Oct 55X0 

59X5 5085 Dec 52X7 

66.75 52X0 Mar 

Mav 

Esi. Salas Prev. Sales 4 

Prev. Day Open Int. 23X11 


4048 60.17 60.19 
61X0 61X5 61X7 
62X7 6287 6288 
61 JO 61.10 61.10 

5530 5580 5585 

5381 5X50 5240 
5122 
5340 








39V* UAL 180 28 
a UALpt 240 78 
10% UCCEL 
22ft UDCn. 480-16.1 
IBft UGI 284 9X 
2D% UGlpf 2X5 11X 
8ft UNCRas • 

10% URS 40 34 
234* USFG 220 57 
26ft USDs 148 4.1 
T2ft UnIFrst X0 IX 
48 Unllvr 212a 21 
84ft UnINV 2X2e 22 
5% UCcmp 144 4X 
32ft UnCarft 340 5X 
49* UnionC 
15V* UnElec 14< 9.1 
28% UnEJ pf 4J» 10J 
311* UnElPf 4JSO 118 
45 UnElPf 640 114 
27U UnElof M4JB 127 
55V* UElufL -880 114 
21ft UnEJ pf 298 11X 


1020 499* 491* 491*— V* 

537 31V* 30V* 30ft — J* 

16 530 MV* m* 14 —9* 

17 4« 26% 24% Mfk — It* 
12. 93 22 21ft 22 + ft 

6501 25 24% 24V* + ft 

. 183 TO 9ft 9ft— % 
13 5D lift: 11% 11%- V* 
981 39 3811 389* — V* 

6 2503 4Zft «®ft 40ft— 1ft 

13 7 14 18ft 15ft— %• 

8 4 49ft 68V* 69% + V* 

12 145 124ft 1221* 123ft r-1% 

16 4621 38 36% 37ft +Tft 

3073 60V* 59ft S9ft— ft 
310 6ft 6ft 6ft + ft 

7 . 2422 20% 19ft 20V* + ft 

14Sfe 38 1 37 38 +1 

• IOOe.38 . 38 88 ;— ft 

740x56% 56% 36ft 
43 31ft 31ft 31ft • 
100^70 70 7G 

68 27ft an 26ft— % 


.41ft Mft Zumlb ■ 1X2 34 U . 107 38ft 38% . 38ft + % 


Layoffs Increase in Sooth Korea 

United Press International 

... SEOUL — Because of a contimimg economic 
slowdown, more dun. S2;000 people were laid 
off dming lhe firsf nine mondis of this year, up 
J7.8 perceu.over the like period last year, 
government statistics showed Friday. The star 
tisrif^pompiled by the Ministry of Labor said 
the number bf conqianies shut down during the 
period also increased to 1,913, up 91.1 percent 


*- r-4N NWK 


Gxnmmlities 


London Metals 



Cash ft-ices 




















1 . 











Noe. IS 




Close 


SUGAR 

High 

Low 

Bid 

ASk 

Cktea 

French francs per metric tan 



D>c 

UV5 

2<?S5 

1X65 

1400 

— 27 

Mar 

1415 

1400 

1402 

1405 

— 14 

May 

1444 

1440 

1428 

1435 

— 14 

Auo 

1470 

1470 

1440 

1470 

— aa 

Oct 

1500 

1500 

14*5 

1J0S . 

— 16 

Dec 

1526 

was 

1515 

1525 

-10 


Stock Indexes 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

Si million- pt? erf 100 pc». 

9188 85X7 Dec 92X7 9285 

9382 B660 Mar 92JB 9280 

WTO 8781 Jun 9243 9254 

9250 8880 Sea 92.15 92X4 

92X0 89JB Dm 9145 71X1 

91.96 89 JB Mar 9141 9146 

9149 jgjo Jun 91X6 91X6 

9147 6043 San 9181 9141 

ESI. Solas Prav. Salas 9.123 


r 0X0 2.10 
r (US 3.90 


38.14 34 

38.14 35 

38.14 3* 

38.14 37 

38.14 38 

38.14 39 

38.14 40 


36 111 r r r 082 0X7 

37 r r r r 0X7 DJ4 

38 0.11 0J4 142 081 r r 

39 101 119 0.9J r r 140 

40 r 0X5 020 t r f 


125X00 French Fruncvliths of a cent per unit. 
FFronc 125 0J0 r r r 

445UM» Japanese Yen- UOtu of a omi per an n. 


46 r 2X2 3.10 r r 0X3. 

47 1.97 280 2X2 r 007 042 

48 194 1X0 1X6 r 123 r 

49 0X6 048 1.18 0X8 04* 1.19 

50 * 0X4 179 s r r 

ann-ccnts per anlt. 


JYen 40 s r 

4&99 41 s r 

4199 42 r r 

48X9 43 r r 601 

48LW 45 r r 1*8 

48.99 46 r 292 110 

48.99 47 1.97 280 2X2 

4849 48 194 1X0 \£ 

4199 49 0X6 058 1.1 

48X9 50 S 0X4 OJ 

62400 Swiss Francs-ccnf* per anff. 
SFrartC 39 5 7X0 

4646 40 5 648 

4646 41 5 5J0 

4646 42 s 4X0 

4646 43 f 3-70 

4646 <5 r 1-78 _ 

4646 46 040 0-94 U 

4646 47 0X2 142 14 

4646 *8 r 0X0 IX 

Total call nl 9473 < 

Total put vat 8.107 
r— Not traded, s — no option o f fered. 
Lost Ie premium (purchase price). 
Source! AP. 


s 0X1 0X1 

s 0X1 0X1 

t r 0X2 


r 3X0 r 

r 1X8 r 

040 0-94 2X0 


0X2 142 145 152 

r 0X0 1X8 r 


r 0X5 0.94 


Call open Int. 306472 
Pal open hit. 168X12 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 43.132 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

5100X00 prbv pts & 32nds Ol 100 Pet 
89-17 75-13 Dec 88-16 88-27 

88-18 7S-14 Mar 87-13 87-27 

87-18 74-30 Jun B6-16 86-28 

84-23 80-7 Sep 

86-2 BO-2 Dec 

Est. Soles Prev. Soles 1MB1 

Prev. Dav Open ini. 70X60 pH 1X89 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

( B Pct-Sl OOXOOrfHs & 32nds all OOpct) 

BO-22 57-8 Dec 79-6 7*21 

79-19 57-2 Mar 78-2 78-16 

78-19 56-39 Jun 77-5 77-15 

77-18 56-29 SOD 7 M 76-17 

76-23 56-25 Dec 75-11 73-21 

75-24 56-27 Mar 7+18 74-2B 

73- 2 43-12 Jun 73-25 7+6 

74- 12 63-4 See 73-15 73-19 

73-20 62-24 Dec 72-21 73 

72-28 47 Mur 

72-18 66-25 Jun 

Est. Soles Prev. Se1esl82X37 

Prev. Day Oaen int J30X0B un 24,947 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT] 
si 000* inder-Ptt & 32ndsof 100 pc! 

B8-3 ei-17 Dec 87-12 87-30 

B7-8 KM Mar 86-14 86-34 

04-10 79 Jun 

8+70 79-10 Sec 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 4X94 

Prev. Day Open int. 10X34 off 289 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM1 
summon - pis of ioopci 
92J0 8U4 Dec 92.15 9227 

92X2 B646 Mar 92.13 92.13 

92X5 8643 Jun 91X5 91X5 

9144 B7X6 Sep 

9059 88X4 Dec 

9025 BSXO Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 82 

Prev. Dav Open int. 1X44 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

Si mltiloiMdsof too pci. 

92.17 84X0 Dec 91X9 91X7 


92X5 92X1 

9244 92XB 
9241 9156 
92.13 92X7 

9]X4 *1X7 

9145 91X7 

91X7 71J9 
91X1 91.13 


88-10 88-20 
87-13 87-20 
86-16 06-24 
85-31 
858 


79% 79-15 

78-2 78-12 

77-2 77-12 

7+5 7+U 

75-11 75-17 
7+18 7+23 
73-25 74-5 
73-10 73-10 
73-31 72-24 
72-16 
72-2 


87-8 87-18 

5+14 8+20 
*5-22 
8+28 


92.15 92X2 
9213 92.15 
91X5 91X8 
91X7 
91X5 
90.93 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
pain fs and cents 

rooxs 175170 Dec ifua min ihw 

H tbrawSS 
S™ B Un 20135 X2 ''° *L90 

t?”?? 5 .— lBIM 20530 705X0 203J0 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 74,«i 

Prev. Day Oaen Int. 73A0wi <72 

VALUE LINE CKCBTJ 
pofnrs and cents 

S™ 5 1|°60 Dec 20540 2Q5L95 205J0 

2?IxS 197X0 JSr-M »* 208.10 

213X0 200XS Sep 

S3SI£SS NDBXt,VY,!H 

3H-® 101 JO Dec 1 15X5 i um iuwi 

]IH5 J 0550 Mar 11+10 11+95 lfjJO 

^ un 117JB U+TO 

SteSpMW 

Prev. Day Open Int. 9X35 un 297 
major MKT INDEX (CBT) 
polnrs and eights 

mt. H 0 * D ' ,% Z74 271 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 1*83 off 58 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody's 92X30 f 

Reuters 1J24X0 

D J. Futures 120XJ3 

Com. Research Bureau- NA, 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 ; Sep. IS, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 ; Dec. 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 


Chicago Board of Trade 
Chicago .Mercantile Exchange 
infemplionqj Monetary Mental 
Of Oilcooa Mercantile Exchange 

Yore £55 5VW« Ceffee Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Com modi ry Exchanga. New York 
N*w York Mercantile Exchange 
Kansas a iv Board of Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


Est. wotj, 2X00 tots of 50 tons. Prev. actual 
sates: 2X09 lots. Open Interest: 21652 ■ 
COCOA 

French francs per HO kg 
Dec 1X55 1X53 1X52 1X75 +17 

Mar 1.900 TXW 1,900 1,910. +35 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1,925 — +40 

JIV N.T. N.T. 1X40 — . +40 

Sep N.T. N.T. — 4-40 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1.960 — +50 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1470 — +50 

Esi.vol.; 4 lots of W tons. Prev. adual sales: 
0 lots, open bitertst: 486 
COFFEE 

French froocs par 1*0 kg 
Nov n.T. N.T. — 2,110 Unch. 

Jon 1125 2.123 1108 1120 +5 

A tor 1141 1125 1123 1923 +17 

May N.T. N-T. 1110 — +14 

Jty N.T. N.T. 1115 — +15 

S«P N.T. N.T. 1120 — +10 

NOV N.T. N.T. 1130 — +15 

Est. voL: ioo lots of 5 Tons. Prev. actual 
soles: 52 lots. Coen Interest: 320 
Source: Bourse OU Commerce. . . 


m S&PIOP 
Index Options 





rt'T^'lL ,V, 

¥| 

I'y >1 J.-^r -T L.'j X h 

dfc[L? 




commodity and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santo+lh. 

Prlntdom 6406 38 ft, yd _ 

Steel billets ( PI It J, ton 

Irm2 Fdry.Ptrila.tan 
Steel scrap Net hvy Pftt. _ 

Land Soot, lb 

Copeer atect. lb 

TO (Strolls), H> ■ 

ZtaoE.SLI_Boah.ib 

PaUadlunuu _______ 

Sliver N.Y.ar _________ 

Source: At*. 


Abu IS 
Year 
Frt Ago. 

1X5 -144 

168 BJ0 

£180 47100 

mn 2TiM 

»74 8M9 

lf-1* 36-28 

*7-71 &7H 

MA. +M9 

+35 045 

1 90-112 147 

<■125 740 


prirTr.-tT^Y,-,*.; +r,-*rmr^ 


CofmwJdKties 





. i 




Ua] 


T/*'| 




Dividends 




^3 






"XI- 










NA'-'l • 


AlTl - 




lrA*V. . 

,.X,' 




■ ►r. ’.B 





■TX7, 






Abe. IS 

strike 

CiUXxd 

1 PaMnt 


Prtca Nn 

OK *s » 

nn an 

Jm 

M 

165 — 

_ 1 — 

_ _ 

lift 

__ . 

I7B - 

22 W1I- 

- 1/14 

1/M 

« . 


U* M w* 

1/lt 1/M 



» n 

lift 12 33 

1/M ft 

ft 

l 


6+ 7ft M 

1/14 ft 



M A 5ft , 
tft M *ft_ 




W 1/M 

* S* 

4ft 

M 


ft ivu it ni 

- t« 

9ft 

» 

Tawadlwrum* XE4U 




Tefal aril a 

WflAMA 




TmoDur vabro RlXfl) 
tors nm onminttWAM 




Man; 

NW* 192J5 





Low 19897 ChwOU. 

ua 


Source: CBOC. 











Previous 
918X0 f 
1,742.40 
120.90 
225.10 


LLS-Treasuries 




NY CSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 



DUcoaat 

Prav. 


Q«tr 

ik> 

YleW VMM 

3-flMath bill 

73* 

7X2 

7J8 7X8 

6+nooth bill 

7J7 

7X5 

US 73S 




Pin 


B a 

Offer 

Yield. VWd 

30-year hood 

18412/3210*14/32 

10.15 NL14 

Source: Salomon Bratsers. 


Mcrrfli Lvnc* Trea«*Y ' 

Change tar tee dev.— 



Average VMM; 




Sourer.- MorM Luteft 






DMfidures 

Options 

. KGenmtiafrmmmrticKtoMrntri 


. 181-90 


vahmSTotoff 1 " 0 » 

esSBBse 

CkHM 

gMJJan- 1=X5 iSxo 

149X0 lam 
14BXQ 

SS a 

■sanscs 


,8 wo lEa 


frevteg, 

BU jub 

] MJ0 

IS 5 J 0 15+00 
149 X 0 150 X 0 

147X0 148X0 
3 S* 145 JH 1 
13M0 140X5 






v. L * • . 

'• -* 1 ' ' ••• ^ 















































BUSINESS ROUNDUP 

Turner Discussing Sale 
•0f CNN to Gannett Co. 


CVTEBNATIO^AL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEJtfBER 16-17, 1985 


Jv-ij 






Page 13 


* sale of CNN io RCa Coto, parent 

•iUJs; W YORK “7 Turner Broad- of , the NBC network. Industry ru- 
tashng System disdosed Friday mas last week had indicated that 
Jtot it is discussing the sale of its an agreement with RCA was dose 
; News Network to Gannett at hand. . 

' < Gann^>mS' { ned * a con< ? m * A Turner spokesman said Friday 

that the company was' sdD talking 
^fnSL^S?^ f * CO ™ 1 V , with RCAandtLt no agreement 
’that it P re yi® us ly disdtMd had beat struck with anyone 
-■ 11 *** ae 80Mting a possible a spokesman for NBC said ne- 

T> i_ m u gotiaftons with Turner were con- 

-oeecnaui IRIKS turning, but that “nothing new has 

— _ t developed** 

-A O Panfr y Pndt hi a related development, Gan* 

J nett said that it had agreed to sell 

‘ _____ Reuters ■ three television stations in Oklaho- 

a LONDON — Beecham Group ma, Alabama and Arizona to 
PLC said Friday that it is holding Knight-Ridder Newspapers Inc. 
'talks with Pantry Pride -Inc. over fortlfiO mfltkin. 

The possible acquisition of the Nor- . The Federal - Communications 
£liff Thayer m edic in e and health Commission had ordered Gannett 
^product business of Pantry Pride^s to sell the stations as a. pan of 
recently acquired subsidiary. Rev- Gannett’s acquisition of- the De- 
Inc. treat Evening News Association, 

Beecham gave no financial de- publisher of 'die Detroit News. The 


The possible acquisition of the Nor- . The Federal - Communications 
£liff Thayer m edic in e and health Commission, had ordered Gannett 
product business of Pantry Pride^s to sell the stations as a. pan of 
recently acquired subsidiary. Rev- G anne tt'* acquisition of- the De- 
Jon Ioc. trait Evening News Association, 

Beecham gave no financial de- publisher of lhe Detroit News. The 
.tails, but industry sources estimat- sale to KRN still requires FCC 
ed that Nordiff Thayer's value at a pproval, 
about 5400 million. Before Revlon The stations are KTVY-TV. an 
.yielded to the Pantry Pride take- NBC affiliate in Oklahoma City; 
wer bid, it had agreed to sell Nor- WALA-TV, another NBC affifiate 
cuff Thayer and other divisions to a in Mobile: and KOLD-TV, a CBS 
New York investment house mak- affiliate in Tuscon. 
ing a competing Sad. Allen Neuharth, Gannett’s 

Beecham said Tt W(Wld make an- chflfrinanj ths>i more than 

<rther statement after discussions 40 offers w ere recei ved for the three 
ended. Rumors of the talks- arcu- . television stations. A buyer for two 
iated London markets Friday, driv- radio stations in Detroit, also part 
tog the price of Beecham shares up of the Evening News acquisition, is 
'IQ pence from Thursday’s dose of expected to be announced soon, 
273 pence (about $4). Gannett said. (Reuters, UPI) 


Fujitsu Planning 
NewComputer for 
1987 Shipment 

. Reuters 

TOKYO— Fujitsu Ltd. said 
Friday that it will begin ship- 
ments in 1987 of a new series of 
powerful,, large-scale, general- 
purpose computers, including a 
model the company called fast- 
er than others of its type. 

The new Facom M-7S0 series 
is to include six models with 
one to four central-processing 
units. The series’ top model Fa- 
com M-780/40 will be able to 
process information twice as 
fast as in ternatio nal Business 
Machines Corp.’s mainframe 
model. Sierra. 400, a Fujitsu 
spokesman said. 

IBM introduced the Sierra 
series last February, and NEC 
Corp. and Hitachi Ltd. already 
have announced models that 
they say have faster operating 
speeds, computer industry ana- 
lysts noted. 

Fujitsu said it will begin mar- 
keting the series between March 
and September 1987 at monthly 
rental prices from 44 milli on 
yen (S215JOOO) to 181 million 
yen, depending on the modeL 

“Fujitsu wanted to bring out 
the Facom series now to con- 
vince its user base (hat they still 
have a good product and still 
mean to do business," said Ka- 
ren Mavek, an industry analyst 
with Jaxdine Fleming (Seam- 
ties) Ltd. in Tokyo. . 


Fed Warns About Excess Bank Dividends 


By Nathaniel C Nash 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Federal 
Reserve Board has issued a policy 
statement warning U.S. banks and 


a similar directive to 4,900 national 
banks it supervises. The Fed's 
statement was directed to 6,000 
bank holding companies and to 
1,200 state-chartered banks be- 


have eroded capital, and exposure 
to losses from defaults on third- 


W MPPf UW ... I J.F.I — JH-Ui 

Subaru Faces New Threats 
To Its Share of U.S. Market 


(Continued from Page II) 51 , 290 . it was S300 cheaper than 
low overhead and only 850 dealers, Lhe Volkswagen beetle, and it 
benefits from a lower break-even weighed less than 1,000 pounds 
point. (4516 kilograms) — a statistic that 

It is unclear what role Subaru meant it was exempt from federal 
would play if Fuji wanted to safety standards and had to meet 
change its strategy. only the less-stringent standards of 

There are other problems Subaru the individual states. Nor did its 
could face. A move toward protec- 22-horsepower engine have to satis* 
ri nnisrn could burden the company fy federal emission standards. Su- 
with everything from new trade re- baru sold 7.000 cars before Con- 
strictions to import surtaxes and sumer Reports, rating automotive 
local content requirements. And if safety, called them “unacceptable.” 
the yen continues to rise, the com- Dealers demanded a new model, 
pany would likely have to charge and in 1970 Subaru developed the 


world debt could greatly erode cap- low overhe ad and onhi 850 dealers. 


ital levels. 


benefits from a lower break-even 


bank holding companies that are longing to the Federal Reserve Sys- 
experiendng financial trouble that ,raL 


they should reduce their dividends 
or not pay them at alL 


The Fed voiced particular con- 
cern about bank holding compa- 


Conceroed about the strength of that are paying out more divi- 
capital in the banking industry and dends then their major banking 
the pressure from Wall Street on uni * 5 ^ pass on. 


banks to keep dividends at ever- '‘A bank holding company the holding company?" 
growing levels, the Fed suggested should not maintain a level of cash " 

in its statement Thursday that pro- dividends to iis shareholders that 
dent banking practices include places undue pressure on the capi- 
wiihholdiog dividends to protect tal of bank subsidiaries,” the Fed 
the finanrifti soundness of Hantrc said. 

and their holding companies. The levels of capital in the bank- 


“Our concern is really for bank po^ 
holding companies,” said J. {t £s unclear what role Subaru 
Charles Partee, a Fed governor. w0u jd p iay if Fuji wanted to 
“What .happens if the component ,>h ? n y strategy, 
oarts of the bank holding company -phereare other problems Subaru 

tail to produce enough earnings, or could face. A move toward protec- 
the comptroller restricts the pay- Monism could burden the company 
ment of dividends from the bank to everything from new trade re* 


The Fed s policy statement, to- local content requirements. And if 
gethcr with Lhe comptroller's state- ven continues to rise, the com- 


and their holding com pani es The levels of capital in the bank- their dividend levels. 

The central bank’s action ram* ing industry have been of particular All U.S. banking rcguL 
one week after the office of the concern to regulators. Losses in ag- ties have authority to 1 
Comptroller of the Currency issued ri culture, energy and real estate dend payment by banks. 

COMPANY NOTES 


mem last week, is a warning to pan y wou ]j Ukd 
banks that regulators will be taking more for its cars, 
a more active role in monitoring p or Q0W , ho*> 
their dividend levels. America is riding 

All U.S. banking regulator agen- nv w t,j c h was 


s motions to import surtaxes and 


ries have authority to limit divi- S75.000 in 1967 and went public in 


are for its cars. bigger FF 1 — the first front-wheel 

For now. however. Subaru of drive passenger car to hit the Unit- 
America is riding high. The compa- ed States. The FF 1, handy for 
ny. which was founded with driving in mountains and snow’, set 
"5.000 in 1967 and went public in Subaru in a new direction. In 1975 
68 , has set sales and earnings the company introduced station 
lords in each of the last nine wagons with four-wheel drive, 
ars, despite the fact that its unit In 1981. Japan agreed to Limii 
les volume was Frozen in 1981 by the number of cars it sent to the 
e Japanese. U.S. market; the quotas were re- 


1968, has set sales and earnings 
records in each of the last nine 
years, despite the fact that its unit 
sales volume was Frozen in 1981 by 
the Japanese. 


Brad Corp. Holdings Ltd. ex- Illinois, for 42 production days in 
pects to triple group revenue and January and February, 
double group profit in 1985-86, Esso Norge A/S. Exxon Corp.’s 
mainly as a result of the acquisition Norwegian subsidiary, has been or- 
of Castiemainc Toobeys Ltd, ac- dered to stop drilling at the Zapata 
cording to Alan Bond, the chair- Uglaod rig on a well off northern 
man. The company reported a Norway, the Norwegian Petroleum 
profit of 20.47 million Australian Directorate said. It said Esso had 
dollars (S13.6 million) in the year failed to document the rig's ability 
ended June 30, up from 9.35 mil- to withstand winter conditions, 
lion in 1983-84. Mr. Bond said Genera] fesmnnenr Cotp. said it 
group revrenne was likegr lo nse to woold ^ a 
1.7 billion dollars u 1985-86. about $80 million in its third quar- 
Deere & Co. said it would lay off ter. It said Lhe biggest item was a 
about 350 employees, most of them provision of about $40 milli on be- 
at Waterloo, Iowa, and shut down 

its combine factory in East Moline, __ , 


fore taxes for consolidation of Lhe 
microelec ironies division. 

Hyundai Auto Canaria Inc^ sub- 
sidiary of Hyundai Motor Co„ will 
build a $300-million automobile 
assembly plant at Bromont, Que- 
bec, the provincial premier. Pierre- 
Marc Johnson, announced. 

Royal Dutch/SheO group and 
Exxon Corp. have signed a contract 
with C hina National Offshore Oil 
Corp. to explore for oil in the Pearl 
River basin off southern China, 
Shell announced in Beijing. 


Results for its fiscal year ended taxed only Iasi April when Japan's 
Ocl 31 are not yet available, but Ministry of International Trade 
Mr. Kancv estimates that Subaru and Industry permitted the export 
earned S75 million on sales of SI J of an additional 40.000 Subarus. In 
billion, up from S60 milli on on Si those four years, Subaru turned ad- 
billion. versity to advantage. By adding 

The company was the inspire- such features as turbo traction — a 
don of Mr. Bricklin, who went to combination of turbo-charging, 
Japan in 1967 to persuade Fuji ex- electronic fuel injection and four- 
ecu lives to let him import their car. wheel drive that increases power. 


It was a time when fewer than 10 
percent of autos on U.S. highways 


erformance, safety and traction — 
ubaru increased the average price 


were buili overseas, and the Japa- of its cars to S8.000 this year, from 
nese were readier to yield control. S6.025 in 1981. According to Mr. 

The first Subaru' reached the Kanev’s projections, Subaru will 
United States in May 1968. At earn 54f>0 a car after taxes. 


Time Seeks Trims, Takeover Defenses Trade Plagues 

r By David A. Vise Stock F j chung e. Time Inc. has a Television & Communications sub- flCflfitt/l ifljffV 

n Washington Post Serrice . mark et value of about S3.8 1 billion, si diary is the second-lamest UR l? */ 

w NEW YORK — The president But Dennis H. Ldbowhz, an ana- 

'nf -r: t t n:_ i 3 hm T o. r 


Stock Ex c hange . Time Inc. has a Television & Communications sub- 
market value of about S3.81 billion. si diary is the second-largest UR 


'of Time Inc., J. Richard Mtmro, tyst with Donaldson, Lufkin & Jen- 
sent a two-page memo last month rette,and others believe the compa- 
■to all 20,000 employees. His mes- n Y probably would be worth more 
jsagie was simple; Trim the fat • than $95 a share, or above the $6 


Mr. Munro wants to eHmmate billion, in a takeover. It is this dis- 
$75 million from the corporation's parity between the share price and 
'^operating costs by the end of next ttos potential takeover price that 
.year — a deep cut that Time says makes Tone an intriguing target of 
.signals abiding ffhany in the cor- takeover speculation. 


-poralion's attitude toward costs. A similar situation evicted earlier 

.Wall Street analysts say that this year at CBS Inc, which had to 
Time’s decision to focus on costs is defend itself against a hostile take- 
^^a response to softening mag- over bid from Ted Turner, who 
•azine and cable profits. Days after operates Cable News Network. 

Mr. Munjo’s memo went out, the “Anybody who is in- that situa- 


irt De nni s H. Lobowhz, an ana- cable television company, serving 
st with Do naldso n. Lufkin & Jen- 75 bps fc piiwr ihwK 
tie, and others believe the compa- The company also owns the largest 
J probably would be worth more and third-largest pay-television 
than $95 a share, or above the $6 program services, Home Box Of- 
IHra, in a takeover. It is this dis- fice and Cinemax. 
irity between the share price and Timi* is iK<* lang ret Hirw*t mar ketr 

e potential takeover price that er of books in the United States, 
akes Time an intriguing target of Time-life Books will sell about 20 
keover specu l ation. millio n books by niaii this year. 

A similar situation existed earlier Time's book publishing also in- 


(Continued from Page 11) 

annual economic summit, and that 
is useful mainl y for personal rela- 
tions and symbolism,” be said. 
“The summit's principal purpose is 
to reproduce die previous year’s 
communique with the date 
changed.” 


■corporation reported third-quarter tion has got to be concerned,” Mr. 
.pet income Of $44.16 mOHpn. This Mimrn oawt ~ ftm h<> “1 think 


.was down 4.1 percent from $46.03 
^million in the 1984 period, al- 
though revenue increased to $846.9 


defend itsdf against a hostile take- which has more >han 2^00 titles in 
over bid from Ted Turner, who prim. Time’s Book-Of-Th e- Mo nth 
operates Cable News NettrorL Dub has more than 2 million mcm- 
“Anybody who is in- that situa- bers who buy bodes and records 
tion has got to be concerned,” Mr. through the mail, and the compa- 
Munro smd. Bui he added, “1 think ay's Selling Areas- Marketing Inc. 
there is & real Hanger of getting is second only to Nielsen in the 


Time's book p ublishin g also in- 1° the absence of solid agree- 
cludes Little, Brown and Co_ ment within the Reagan a dmin is - 


preoccufried with it” 

Mr. Munro' says his attention 


.milli on from $751 million in the these days is focused on cutting 
‘year-before period expenses, as witness his Oct 11 


field of marketing research. 

Despite the wakening in maga- 
zine advertising revenue, and the 

slow-growth envir onment that has 


nation or among other members of 
the Group of Five on the nature of 
a new monetary-cum-political sys- 
tem, the Baker- Darman approach 
adds up to an evolutionary process 
for reaching a new and more stable' 
monetary system. “I hope we don’t 
require a crisis to get there,” he 
said. He urged “incremental 
change,” not something “excessive- 
ly ambitious.” 

“If we try to move it too fast," he 


‘year-before period expenses, as witness his Oct 11 slow-growth envi ronment that has Iy ambitious.” 

• But the analysts say the cost- memo. He says his goal is to alter reduced expectations in cable dra- “If we try to move it 

cutting decision also was driven by Time’s corporate culture by chang- maticaHy, it is diffic ult to deny the said, “it won’t work.” 

lhe fear that unless aggressive ing the way tanployces think about fundamental strength at Time’s 

steps are taken to tiy to keep its spending money. balance sheet and of the profitable But coping with the 

■Share price trp. Time could become 


-the target of aTiosoJetakeover bid. " Fve watched the faTbuud around' 
c Mr. Munro said in an interview the belly, ” said the lime president, 
earlier this month that if Time be- who is also chief executive officer, 
came the target of such a bid, Gan- “It’s time we started jogging.” 


“Fve been hoe for 20 years, and Time enterprises that produced 
ve watched the fafbuud around' S3.T billion m revenue and $216.4 


balance sheet and of the profitable But coping with the trade deficit 


inett Com publisher of 85 . daily 
newspapers, induding USA Today, 


“Deep down in our souls, we at 
lane Inc. know that costs have 


million in net income last year. 
That, according to Mr. Munro. is 
one of the key reasons why it will 
be difficult to persuade employees 
that reductions in staff and cuts in 


,would be an attractive partner for a Dever been on the forefront of any- spending are needed. 


■friendly merger. bod/s minds in this company,” he 

1 Time and Gannett “both have said. “We have a reputation for 
wonderful franchises, and they are bang a little bit erf a spendthrift" 
both in businesses die other is not Since die company was founded 


£. Thayer Bigelow, Time’s chief 
financial officer, said the cost-cut- 
ting program, which aims at reduc- 


and staving off the political threat 
of protectionism will require that 
action not be too slow, either. 


CanaiHan Inflati ng 

Rises to in October 

The Associated Pros 

OTTAWA — Canada's annual 



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both in businesses titc other is not Since die company was founded ing estimated expenses by 15 per- rate of inflation edged up in Octo- 
jto,” Mr. Munro said. “There is very in 1922 to publish Time magazine, cent, was "unprecedented in that ber to 4.2 percent from 4. 1 percent 
-tittle conflict there. They have Tune Inc. has become one of the what wr are really looking for here in September, the government said 


newspapers and broadcasting. We most powerful 


have magazines and cable.” 

“We have a great deal of respect 
for Gannett,” the Tune executive 
said. “There are probably a couple 
6 f other companies that could also 


rations in the is not a big one-tune fait, but a kind Friday. It was the third consecutive 
operations in of permanent cost reduction and a month that the inflation rate, based 


United States, with operations in of permanent cost reduction an 
magazine publishing, cable televi- little bit of an attitude change.” 
si on and book publishing. It is the Mr. Bigelow said Time, ebuflu 
world’s largest- magazine publisher, over its $480-million acquisiti 
with such titles as Time, Sports this year of Southern Progr 


make sense. It is public inform a- Illustrated, People, Fortune and 


non that we talked to CBS.” 

Alien H. Neuharth, the Gannett 
chairman, said that if Time were 
interested in a merger, he would 
welcome the chance to talk. 

- Based on its closing price of 
559.C75 Friday on the New York 


Money. Its magazines capture 
about 22 percent of U-S. magazine 
advertising dollars, more than 2 16 
times it3.d06est competitor, Hearst 
Carp^ according to Phflrp G. How- 
leu, lime vice president. 

Time’s profitable American 


little bit of an attitude change.” on the change in consumer prices 
Mr. Bigdow said Time, ebullient over the previous 12 months, has 
over its $480-million acquisition increased, 
this year of Southern Progress Figures released by the govem- 
Corp^ publisher of Southern Uv- meat indicated that housing, trans- 
ing magazine, was eager to make porta tion. recreation, clothing, to- 
additional acquisitions. The com- bacco, alcohol and health and 
pany is dying to make a large cable beauty products all increased ini 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 5ATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 


Fridays 

dosing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Hi. Ctae 

Phi, m pe 1 opinion m» ouN.cmo 


gts, amt 

Otv. YM. P£ 18k HMi Law QUA Or’tw | 


Sbi Ooftc 

TteHttLan Q um-arui 


S'* ADI n A3 109 SVi 5 5 — £ 

5k. AL LOOS .16 IjO IB 10 15% IS* ]5% + ^ 

B AMCs 15 2 10% 10% 10% 

7% AAA Inll 10 1021 5 4% W 


10 1021 S 4% 4W - w 

68% ATTFd JL52e 6J *7? 86% 85% SS%— 1% 

KlT J? 3.1 M 5 low. lo£ joi 

VL Action 14 56 tl 105* 11 

IW Aclon 23 1% tW lit 

IW Admfts 8 23 2% 2% J% . ,, 

22% AdRwl .14 A IB 7t 28 28 2fl + * 

j% Aerone 44 4 Jt 37s— W 

29V* AflIPBS .40 U 21 3 49* 4712 «% 

5V* AlrExp IBS JW £. 71* + Jj 

6 AlrCol 10 U h SV. IW — W 

7J. ArCal of 1J0 10.9 79 HJ* H ll_ - « 

65% Almltafl 10 77 107 106 it 104% + £ 

S* AlboW 23 *W * * — {? 

nu AlntM 11 9W 9 9V* + v« 

! Aloha in H5 A HI! BJ* 8 8% + W 

% Alton >7? ff ? £? 

30^* AJncoT 175 10.9 I2W2 + Vi 

%££& .08 uS 

10W Amdahl JO lA 16 Bl« 11 W 10% IMS — V. 


Si* Amedeo JIB 1 2 
4 AmCas 12 

J7W AConlrl 1.00a \J 14 
20k. AEkd wt 
A'H AFrucA 41 

4' •: AFruc a 38 

3% AHIthM 9 

4** Alsroel 4 

t14* AMioA J2 17 66 

4* AMBIfJ 

3 AmOll 21 

<r« a Pen ioo 4.1 is 

4* AmPIn v 

12% APrec J4b 1 3 21 
6'- AmRItv 4 

117* ARovin 134(103 
3 ASdE _ 21 

49% A ran un .«0e 1.7 
44 A /on or .90e 1.9 
SW A xon sc 

IV. Atnpal JM 17 9 
4*. Ando I 75 

14* AndJcb 
5*. Angles 
’■» vlAngiv 
31* ArswPt 

SV* Ariev 5 

4 >* Armais 8 

7% A) row A JO U 1 


185 TV* 4*i 641 

12 1 67* 6* 6% — % 

14 10 58‘a 54 SUM +2% 

863 4111 40% 40k.— 44 

41 55001 47a 4k. 4% + V* 

38 73101 4% 4** 4 Vs 

" 96 4k. 4'* 4%— W 

4 S7 47* 6% 4% + V. 

64 33 13% 13% 13% - ■* 

343 5V* 4% 5 — '* 

2| 3 4% 4'A 4% 

15 31 45k. 48 48% + VS 

10 % % % 

21 6 14% 14V1 14% + V* 

4 19 8% 8 B 

317 IS 14% 14 + U 

21 42 4% 4% 4% + 4* 

I 54 54 54 

5 47k. 47k* 47% + 4* 

J2 44* 6% 6%— W 

9 123 34* 5V. 2'i 

75 104 4V* 4 4 

22 2ki 24* 2k. + '* 

IS 64* 64* 6% + W 

108 iva 1 iv* 

“ 35 £? 15 

8 ID 5% S’* 54*— % 


B4t 4W CmtaA 5 

144* 104* Cal RE 1JB IDA B 

9V* 64* Colpr on JMtlOO 21 

184* 114* Cameo Jl U 1 
3 IV* Camonl 

ITVj 13V. CMorca JO l J 

23*. 184* CdnOcc JM 

474* 77V* tWInC 10 

13 47* CardlH 20 

3 14* CarOI I 

159* B'i CoreB 16 

15% Bil C«r«A .10 J 16 

BK 4k* CoroE B U 

B'a 4V< CareEA 15 

48!* 38 CaraP at SJH 11J) 

Sv* 2 U. CasiHan Ml 25.1 

22V* 744* CS3tlA JOB SJD II 
J37* 254* On Fa 220a 82 
2k. 4* CosFdrt 

7** 2 Castlnd 
9% 4>* centeni 

14V* 10V Can IS* 1.57a 112 

nv* sv Celec JO 2.9 17 

4 1'* ChmpH 30 

17 13’* OimpP 22 A2 16 

394* 16% Oil AAA 5 .16 .9 13 

29 17’- ChIMBs .16 A is 

2)Vi 14V* ChiRv lJOo 6.1 17 

10k. 64* ChFOvg 

38- 171* Churns .17 £ 39 

33V. 1U* ClfBdel S 

35 19V* CltFst IJttbJJl 9 

54Vv 33% CltFst pl 2J0 46 

33 k. 20 Vi C hr Gas IJO IB 10 

634a 35V4 Claim I 1.73c 44 

124* 644 Ctar+C JBs 2.9 10 

45 544* Clara-.’ 35a U 9 

521. IK- Clooay s .14 1J 

6% }t* Cagmtr 

104* 6k. Cohn JO U t 

54k lk.ColFmrts 

24 7T* Comiod 6 

11k. 8 Vs tormina .16 

12Vs 6k. ComoD 

13% 4's CmnCn 

I0V1 5Vr CrnpFO 16 

204. 144* Cnchm M 2.1 W 

Ilk* 6% Coned F ^4 

18 64* Cannly 9 

25 v* 13Vs CanrCu ■ 

9 % 5H Canto! 103 

5% ir* Conawt 

10 44* ConsOG _ 

28 16VI Cnstarn 77 

74'/* 8V. Cnstrwl 

15% 714, vIConlA 4 

20 9V. V 1 0*1 A of 

26V* 171* ContWII 9 

14V* 104. Conus* n IJO 2SJ 

19k. 1741 Coaler n JS« IJ 

3% 54* CrnCrn 19 

1 H CosCr wt 

10 9's CntrMn 

rn ik* court id Me 2J> 

35 25*i. Cross 1J4 4J 16 

T7V» 9V» CmCP 9 

13% 74* CrCPB 4 

Z3k* ir^* CwCP Pi 1.92 BJ 

7Vs 44* CrownC 

2 VS m CrutCR I 

4% '* CrysrO 

25 IJk. Cubic J9 1J 15 

II 'A 231* Curtice J2 X8 9 

3 1* CudEn 


JBfl 2.9 10 
JSa 2J 9 


16 

m n 16 
216 


J9 lj 75 
J2 3J 9 


7 IV* 
79 6% 

7 7% 

13 19 

12 74* 

13 171* 
36 ttU 

119 B [ 4 
IB 4’- 
63 5 1 - 

453 28 
1 14 
117 13'.k 
25 164* 
52 25 
94 11% 
16 10% 

51 9% 

31 24* 

100 3446 
15 17 
S 12V* 
3 23V. 
27 T s 
73 *= 

2549 is 
50 22 Vi 
38 244. 
62 k. 


546 6 
11% 11% 

84* 84*— IV 
154* 154*— V* 
It* 1% 

16 16V.— V* 
19V. 19t* + V* 
46k* «Rk +19* 
595* 1041, + V* 

1% 1%— W 

13% 13% 

1346 1346—4* 
646 *%— V* 

64* 6V> — % 
45W 454* + V* 
2% 24* 

154- It + *1 
26% 264*— k* 
l'A m + l* 
2% 246 + 1* 

8% 9 + Vi 

124* 15k. + Vo 
64a 69* + V* 

2 2V* + V* 

164-17 + 16 

1746 18 Vi— l* 
191* 20 -1 
194* 194V 
9% 99» 

32% 32%— <A 
29 29 

324* 32% 

564* Ml* 

314* 31% + T — 
4346 U + % 
9 vs 9 Vs— W 
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tUSIWESS PROFILE / Frank Chao, Shipping Magnate CURRENCY MARKETS 



Negotiating the Shipping Slump 


: By Dinah Lee 

■; - Intemeaona} Herald Tribune 

; HONG KONG - It is one Of 

■ . he ironies of Hong Kong, the 
/odd’s second-largest container 
' ; X>rt after New York and home for- 
: ; 3» vessels, or almost 10 percent 
H the world’s total tonna ge that its 
brae top shipowning families are 
: ’ 'al natives erf Hong Kong. They' 
- -£, e post-1949 arrivistes from 
j^bo, a Chinese port city in Zhe- 

-■ .““S province near Shanghai. 

f ' : .“TheCY.TungsaieNmgfao,tbe 
1 Pans are NIngbo, and we 
. 2haos are NIngbo,” said frank 
. Thao, president of Wah Kwong 
/ dipping & Investment Co. (Hong 

■ <ong), a competitor to the Tong 
. amily’s Overseas Orient Holdings, 

die Pao family’s Worldwide 
■ N »hippmg Group. Wah Kwong itself 
. >' : 5 one of the sturdier o£ the shi- 
' ; xiwnmg empires that has appeared 
; n the British colony in the three 
• lecades since the Communist vict- 
ory OQ the Chinese mgwitan/t .. 

■ While his competitor, Sr Y.K. ! 
; ^ao, chairman of the Worldwide 

■ * 3roop, hobnobs with prime minis-. 
. ■ frs, presidents and other in terna, 
\ lonal notables, the Chaos manage 
" heir own fleet of 56 vessels free of 
■' ntemational publicity or. pomp. 
7-^Most of the. fleet, totaling nearly 
‘our minion deadweight ions, is 

- vegistered in Liberia. 

■I Al 51, Frank Chao acts as Hong 
I -bong’s ambassador- at- large for the 
r : rar East for the Republic of lib©- 
; 1 tia, promoting Liberia’s role in the 

- -. dupping world in the course of his 
- ;■ work. Nevertheless, shipping mag- 
i. ..izmes rather than diplomatic insig- 

litter his office. 

.i ; Mr. Chao boasts a strong train- 
: • hg in the nuts and bolts of ships 
: ' hat began in Britain in 1952 at 
- Sunderland Technical Co ll ege in 
; Britain, moved to the University of 
; - Durham from 1954 to 1957 and 
. : -tontxnues with his dose involve- 
~ • meat in the University of Hong 
: r.Kong and Hong Kong Potytecb- 
. ? ‘.tie's engineering departments. He 
. - - prides himself on bong "probably 

- * 'linn* terhmrnTly q nwfiftwt than arty 


other shipowner in HongKoog.” 

A nrint-freshcxercise bicycle, a 
gift years ago frtanJris wife, stands 
unused near ins office window 
overlooking Hong Kong’s dramatic . 
harbor. Mr. Qian seems to get ex- 
ercise simply dashing from, one of- . 
fice to another. Even sitting for a 
conversation, he is constantly in 
motion, and'al one point— -'feet in 
the air and head rolled down deep 
into his leather chair — he appears 
about to take off into midair. 

He intmupted his conversation 
‘many times to lake telephone calls 
— speaking either in F.nglish or 
voluble Chinese thickened with the 
aiscntof eastern Zhqiang. Ope call 

was to Britain to sell a racehorse, 
loving him with two horses tun- 
ning on courses in Singapore and. 
Malaysia and a third in Australia. 

Many erf Mr. Chao's - critics in 
Asia’s shipping circles, in fact, con- 
sider him a bit of a gambler off the . 
track. 

In the face erf the international 
chipp i n g dump , some rival regional 
shipowners have collapsed, such as 
the Japanese.. company Santo. 
Steamship Ca .or Hong Kong- 
-bascdwheelock Maritime Inter- 
national Ltd. 

The Tung family's Overseas 'Ori- 
ent Holdings now is undergoing its 
second emergency financial re- 
structuring in three years, this one 
involving 70 major creditors. Other 
competitors, soch as Jatdine Math- 
eson Holdings, are divesting some 


leninvest AB of Sweden, hit the 
company hard in 1984. 


their attention to property or trad- 
ing. Sr YJL, for example, has de- 
voted more time to a sew airline, 
Hong Koog Dragon Airline Co. 

Wah Kwong has not escaped un- 
scathed. Reversing a longstanding 
positive trend, it reported a 17- 
percent drop in profits in 1984 to 
125 minio n Hong Kmig dollars 
.($16 mUEon) and another 11-per- 
ceat decline on interim results of 1 1 
percent, to 71:1 million dollars. 

Defaulting on charter contracts 
by ailing shipping companies, in- 
cluding Irish Shipping Ltd. and Sa- 


in dudes a listed properly subsid- 
iary that outsiders have offered to 
buy al least three. times, Frank 
Chao said that be has not put h on 
the market to support the shipping 
side. Nor has he significantly 
hedged the family’s exposure to the 
vicissitudes of the international 
shipping slump and he denied re- 
ports that such offers were to be 

taken seriously. 

“Everything has its price, but if 
we were seriously negotiating, the 
[stock market] listing would be sus- 
pended,” Mr. Qiao said. 

At the moment, he now has un- 
der construction 10 vessels totaling 
just under 1.S mUhon deadweight 
tons, four for the public company 
and six in the family’s private hold- 
ing. Most of these ships are bang 
built in Japan and Taiwan. 

He agreed that in the present 
worldwide shipping slnmp, he 
would not like to see many new 
ships wwv into the market, but 
denies he is betting a long shot on a 
recovery in shipping, demand. 
“You. never gamble in love or busi- 
ness," be said. 

“Since I .assumed control of the 
company in 1963, we haven’t lost a 
single ship,” he continued. “I avoid 
financial difficulty, almost all my 
loans are secured, and when the 
market goes down, . I always take 
delivery of the vessels T order. 
When the *"»*** goes up, I don’t 
ask my charterers for more money. 

“I have a unique rep utatio n, 
there are very few shipowners fit- 
ting these specifications, that’s why 
even when the market is weak, I can 
still get cargo before it even goes on 
the market,” Mr. Chan said. 

“People likeme, who have every- 
thing in life, needn't take unneces- 
sary risks,” he said. “I am absolute- 
ly no gambler.” 

Mr. Chao has consistently re- 
mained an optimist «mmig the 
doomsayers. In the summer of 
1983, he said that the world tanker 
market had bottomed out and that 



Dollar Strengthens on Rate Outlook 


Frank Chao in his office. 


it would c limb out of its deep de- 
pression by late this year. The mis- 
timing of tins prediction does not 
faze ntm 

“I think one of the reasons recov- 
ery has not had happened so fast is 
because in late 1984, there was 
some optimism and a lot of ships 
came out of lay-up, fewer vessels 
were being scrapped and a lot of 
people even ordered ships,” he 
said. “Anticipation slowed the re- 
covery but a recovery is definitely 
coming. Even the Japanese Mari- 
time Research Association says the 
tanker market win be much better 
next year than this year.” 

Bankers are “too nervous,” he 
said, arguing that bankers’ pressure 
for repayment of outstanding loans 
were largely to blame for Overseas 
Orient Holdings' current restruc- 
turing. “Their debts will be met, 
and OOH will survive,” Mr. Chao 
predicted. “Their ships are running 
smoothly and their assets are great- 
er than their liabilities.” 

The son of a mainland refugee, 
Chao Tsoog-Yea, who arrived in 
1949 “with half a ship,” Frank 
Chao works with his brothers, 
George and Cedi, and leaves open 
the possibility that his two sons, 
now studying in Britain, may join 
the family b usiness “ODCethCY haw 
established their own careers and 
contacts” 

During the course of the inter- 
view, the elder Chao passes 


through the large office, a dignified 
silent figure. “Although he tells ev- 
erybody I'm in charge, he’s very 
much the big boss,” Frank Chao 
said. . 

For a family that arrived as refu- 
gees and built a fortune on the 
uncertain shores of Hong Kong, 
the question of 1997, when sover- 
eignty over the British colony re- 
verts to Beijing, is naturally a sensi- 
tive one. 

Mr. Chao is closely involved 
with the introduction of an interna- 
tionally acceptable autonomous 

» register for Hong Kong 
re 1997. As a British colo- 
ny, Hong Kong operates a shipping 
register that is effectively an exten- 
sion of the British registry. As 
rhairman of committee in charge of 
the technical aspects of the change, 
Mr. Chao’s aim is to have the new 
register m operation by 1990. 

On the personal side, Mr. Chao 
holds British dependent territory 
citizenship, a form erf British na- 
tionality that will expire in 199?. 

“I think the British would like to 
see some of the Hong Kong busi- 
nessmen become British,” be said, 
“but unfortunately, to be fair, they 
cannot distinguish the entrepre- 
neurs from the ordinary people on 
the street. Anyway, for a person 
with good business know-how, 
technical knowledge, and some 
small amount of money, you can 
survive anywhere in the world.” 


Couqtiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dolbr end- 
ed higher Friday in Europe and the 
United States, buoyed on all mar- 
kets by the U.S. Treasury’s an- 
nouncement late Thursday that it 
would sell S6I billion in securities 
during the next two weeks. 

U.S. economic indicators re- 
leased Friday, including a 0.9-per- 
cent rise in October producer 
prices and flat industrial output for 
the same month, had linle impact 
mi markets, which were dominated 
almost exdusivdy by rate consider- 
ations, dealers said. 

“The dollar advanced on the 
prospect of interest rates moving 
higher because of the huge supply 
coming to market,” a New York 
dealer said. 

The federal funds rate moved to 
9 percent early Friday morning, 


lending some support to the inter- 
est-rate projections, but the Feder- 
al Reserve added liquidity at that 
point in an attempt to bring the 
rate back down. 

The first trf the issues — S18 
billion in 14-day cash management 
bills and $4 billion of 69-day bills 
— sold Friday at S25 percent and 
7.48 percent, respectively. 

Dealers said the dollar’s advance 
was later dampened by rumors that 
the Bank of Japan would raise its 
discount rate over the weekend. 
The report was dismissed by a trad- 
er for a Japanese bank 

In New York, the dollar rose to 
2.6200 Deutsche marks from 
2.6105 on Thursday’, to 204.04 yen 
from 202.65; to 7.9890 French 
francs from 7.9600, and to 2.1460 
Swiss francs from 2.1410. 


The British pound slipped to 
Si. 4210 from S1.4295. 

In earlier trading in Europe, the 
U.S. currency closed in London at 
2.6220 DM, up from 16190 there 
on Thursday, and at 204.20 yen,' up 
from 203.70 on Thursday. 

The British pound ended at 
SI. 4225, down from S1.4275 Thurs- 
day and little changed from 
SI. 4170 a week earlier. But it rose 
slightly against continental curren- 
cies, closing at 3.7293 DM versus 
3.7240 on Thursday. 

In other European markets Fri- 
day, the dollar was fixed in Frank- 
furt at 2.6157 DM, up from 2.6122 
at Thursday’s fixing; at 7.9700 
French francs in Paris, up from 
7.9600, and at 2.9440 Dutch guil- 
ders in Amsterdam, up from 
2.9415. In Zurich, the dollar ended 
at 2.1465 Swiss francs, up from 
2J4J3 Thursday. (UP I, Reuters) 


THE 




U.S. Borrowing Calendar Depresses Prices 


By David Rees 

Reuters 

LONDON — Eurobonds ended 
the day and week lower Friday, as a 
heavy calendar of new domestic 
borrowings by the US. Treasury 
depressed prices and helped lead ax 
least two borrowers to delay 
launching new issues that had been 
due Friday, dealers said. 

In fact, no new issues came Fri- 
day, as fixed-rate dollar-denomi- 
nated bonds fell as much as Vi point 
and floating-rate notes eased 3 to 4 
basis points. 

Dealers said that the market was 
pressured by news of a heavy U.S. 
Treasury calendar during the next 
two weeks, following the tempo- 
rary increase in the U.S, debt ceil- 
ing- 

“With that kind of calendar, it is 
obviously not the time to be talking 


about launching a new Eurobond,” 
said a dealer. 

Syndicate managers, meanwhile, 
said the 5350-million foreign-tar- 
geted part of the U.S. Federal 
Home Loan Mortgage Corp.’s Sl- 
billian offering of collateralized 
mortgage obligations, or CMOS, 
has been delayed. 

They said toe issue had been due 
for Friday, but with U.S. credit 
markets continuing the declines 
sparked by Thursday’s U.S. Trea- 
sury calendar announcement, for- 
mal launch has been put off until at 
least next week. 

The issue would be the first for- 
eign-targeted offering of CMOS. 

Syndicate managers said at least 
one floating-rate-note issue that 
had been due Friday afternoon was 
also postponed. 

As attention through the week 
focused on the U.S. debt ceiling, 


t rading was nervous and new-issue 
activity was modest, with just $550 
million of dollar straights and 52S5 
million of floating-rate notes 
launched. 

After the declines of Thursday 
and Friday, dollar straights and 
floating- rate notes ended the week 
slightly lower. 

Dealers said neither the report of 
an encouragingly modest 5200-mil- 
lion rise in the M-l measure of the 
U.S. money supply, nor news that 
U.S. October industrial production 
was unchanged, after having fallen 
0.1 percent in September, were 
enough to overcome supply pres- 
sures. 

They said that earlier buying by 
investors, looking to take advan- 
tage of more favorable yields in the 
Euromarket, dried up in response 
to Friday’s declines. 


High Law' Start 


Srtastai 

DW.YM. Ufa mall Low 3 PM. Oife 


n Month 
Utah Lew Start 


civ, via. iQ6i nigh La w a pm. cbm 


Srtcsin 

Ofv. YU tom Hteft 


Mel 

Low SRALOl-M 


1J Mount 
High Law Stack 


DW. YB. 1009 High Low 3 PM- Ol'et 


I? Month 
Hiatt Low Stock 


Mas In Net 

piv. via, nxa hw u» a pm. orae 


















































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SU3SPAY, NOVEMBER 16-17,1985 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


Rank-and-File Library ByJoyLWouk 


1 Thresher's 
husks of wheat 


8 Pie part 

11 Balaam's 
mount 

1*1 Snail's 
relatives 

!9 Jeopardy 

20 Dispatch 

21 Even if, to 
Tennyson 

22 Buddhist caves 
site 

25 Large: Comb. 


24 Whirling 

25 Mountain 
climber's 
action 

27 Film for which 
Odets wrote 
these reen- 
play: 1936 

30 Concorde, e.g. 

31 Wry face 

32 Pun ico 

33 On the Java 

36 Gilbert and 
Sullivan group 

44 Curacao city 

46 Masons’ needs 

47 Where to view 


49 Home of 
Kaihanna and 
Bianca 

51 Sin 

52 Field mouse 

53 Chou En 

54 Source of 
Samson's 
strength 

56 Coward opus 

66 Related 

61 Honshu port 

62 Wind into a 
ball 

63 Country singer 
Bandy 

64 C. S. Forester 
opus: 1945 

72 Edge 

73 Canonicalhour 

74 Exclamations 
of worry 

75 Filippias, 

Greek town 

77 Shaw opus 

82 Mendelssohn's 

"Lieder 

Worte" 

83 Windy City- 
time 


90 Race part 

91 Luzon lake 
93 Vivace 

95 Shirley 
Temple 
vehicle: 1935 
106 Wimbledon 
calls 


i 2 3 < \s 


7 

8 

S 

10 














lit 113 113 


[ 14 1 IS 16 17 18 


84 Spanish 
landladies 


a gnu 

43 Building wing 


85 British swell 

86 Slyly derisive 

88 Follower of D. 
C. Beard 


10! *■ Prince §j 34 35 

by R.L.S. 

102 Venom route 35 

103 Life, in Lyon 

165 5. E. Morisan 46 

opus on 

Columbus 53 

114 Smooth- go 

skinned peach 

115 Fifth -century Up 

Roman HBL_ 

general 

116 In the least 

118 Bit of land 

119 Bill's possible ** 

future 

120 Snow, in Sonora 90 

121 Conductor- §5 

teacher 

Boulanger m|n 

122 Ecole item \> ^ ^ ^ 

123 Bess Truman. 105 107 

Wallace . 

124 Some are 

Great ■ nr j 

125 Old auto ! 


137 1SB 13® 


lit t«a 143 


|77 78 79 


|97 198 199 





103 

104 



109 

110 

111 



TTT 





H 

TIT 

120" 

124" 



, 




121 

125 


Nor York Times, edited by Eugene Maiesha. 


DOWN 

1 Meas. of 
penodic rate 

2 Ardor 

3 Kind of bishop 
or duke 

4 Burnt 
offenng? 

5 E-eats 

6 7. N Page's 

“M-trse ” 

7 Steak order 

S Addict 

9 Irate 

10 W ear out 

11 “To Catch 


Hitchcock Him 
!2 Cnspin’s 
Droduct 


DOWN 

13 Underesti- 
mated 

14 Winter 
sportswear 

15 Former 
automobile 
style 

16 City renamed 
Ulan Bator in 
1924 

17 Kind of lamp 
or worm 

18 Fein. Irish 

society 

26 Gone with the 
trend 

28 Sci. of word 
origins 

29 Pair 


DOWN 

33 “ on the 

Wild Side”: 
Algren 

34 Of an Egyptian 
peninsula 

35 Ecuadorean 
inshore 
current 

37 Caught sight of 

38 Town near 
Alma-Ata 

39“ 

Wednesday. ” 
H. Lloyd film 

40 Crooked, in 
Caithness 

41 Black Sea arm 

42 Cameo, for one 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


43 Causes 

45 Ghoul, perhaps 

50 Toxophilites 

51 In any wav 

52 What a 
belvedere 
commands 

55 Aug. 1945 
weapon 

57 Worldwide 
workers' gp. 

58 Welsh writer- 
actor Williams 

59 Most free 

65 Units of elec, 
conductance 

66 Ham (deli 

order) 


67 L.B.J. son-in- 
law 

68 Bambi's aunt 


69 Puccini's “La 


89 Keyboard 
instruments 
91 Do a chemical 
measurement 


DOWN 

106 Amaz 


107 Year in the 
reign of Henry 
II 


70 Put into cipher 

71 Upshot 
76 D.A.'s 


77 Brewer’s need 

78 Oriental nurse 

79 Trick 

80 Native of Izmir 

81 Absence of 
sense of pain 

82 One-eyed god 

87 Wife of 
Athamas 


92 Famed 

Persian mystic 
poet 

94 PartofT-A.E. 

96 Spend time 
idly 

97 Spent and 
sterile 


108 Head of a tale 

109 Links event 


1 10 Spelunker’s 
milieu 


98 Margayor 
serval 


99 Present 


111“ Tu,” 1932 

song 

112 St. Louis 
bridge 

113 “1 cannot tell 


104 Jejune 

105 Indigo 


117 Negligent 


POLITICAL MURDER: 

From Tyrannicide to Terrorism 

Sy Franklin L Ford, 440 pages. Illustrated. 
SI* 50. 

Harvard University Press, 7 9 Garden Street, 
Canrf'ridge. Mass. 02I3S. 

Reviewed bv John Gross 


BOOKS 


ti 1 DOLl'nCAL murder” can mean many differ- 
em things — to a paciiisL war is a form of 


political murder — and in choosing the phrase for 
the utle of his nook. Franklin L. Ford has taken 
advantage of its flexibility. He is primarily con- 
cerned with assassinations, as the word is commonly 
understood, and with tyrannicide, the slaying of an 
unjust or illegitimate ruler, in particular. But where 
appropriate he also feds free to discuss judicial 
murder and those forms, of terrorism — bombings, 
hijackings and ihe like — that claim their victims 
more or less at random. 

The subject is a vast one. but in his willingness to 
range across centuries and continents Ford, who 


leaches history at Harvard, shows himself equal to 
the task. The assassins or would-be assassins he 
considers range from Jael in the Book of Judges to 
Squeaky Fromme. the victims or intended victims 
from Henry IV of France to Anwar Sadat. While he 
concentrates mainly on Europe and the West, he 
finds space to examine the role played by assassina- 
tion in non- Western cultures as well — there is an 
interesting account of attempts to kill the Buddha, 
for example. And while he tends to dwell longest on 
the most celebrated episodes, on such figures as 
Julius Caesar. Thomas a Becket and Abraham Lin- 
coln. he also explores less familiar territory. 

Taken primarily as a narrative. “Political Mur- 
der” makes rewarding reading. Individual incidents 
— Orsini’s attempt on Napoleon 111, for instance — 
are skillfully reconstructed; the motives of a variety 
of assassins and the effects of their actions are 


carefully weighed; there are succinct accounts of 
some of the more noteworthy movements that have 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle 



uncus □□□□□ □□□!□□ □□□□ 
□□□a Danina aanaa □□□□ 
□□□□□□□□□□ aQanQDauaa 
□□□□□odd □□nan edohe 
□H on □□□□□ □□□□ 
□□□□□u □□□□□ □□□□□□□ 
□□□no □□□□□□□□□□□ nmn 
□□an □□□□ □□□□ □□□□ 

□□a □□onaanaaan □□□□□ 
anaaaoaa □□□□□ aBaaan 
□□□□□ □dqqq annua 
□□□□an □□□□□ nanoanon 
nnano □□□aananono □□□ 
□bob □□□□ □□□□□□□□ 

□□□ □nDnaonaaaa odopo 
□ aaaaaa naaaa anaaao 
□□□a aanaa □□□□ 
□□ana □□□□□ aapoanna 

□□□□□□□□□a □□aaounianD 

□ana □□ddq □□□□□ □□□□ 

□aaa gdbbb □aaaa □□□□ 


been committed to killing their opponents, includ- 
ing the original assassins, the heretical Islamic sect 
of “Hashishiyyin.” 

The principal question the book poses is whether 
assassination is “good politics by either ethical or 
pragmatic standards.” At the end of the inquiry 
Ford comes out and says that with a few exceptions, 
the answer is “no,” but it is clear which way the 
wind is blowing as early as his chapter on the 
ancient Greeks, where he discusses the case of 
Harmodius and Aristogiton. 

These two friends were honored by the Greeks for 
slaying the tyrant (or purported tyrant) Hipparchus 
— they were reputedly the first mortals to have 
statues made of them, an honor previously reserved 
for gods. But both Thucydides and Aristotle took a 
cool view of the motives for the kilting, and while 
Aristotle conceded that there could be such a thing 
as justifiable tyrannicide, he warned against the 
dangers of what Ford calls “pseudo- tyrannicide.” 

Ford also tries to trace the ‘^peaks and valleys in 
the frequency curve for political murder." There 
have been several notable periods of remission, he 
argues, distinguished in their outlook by “a certain 
quality of balance, as between authority and fore- 
bearanee” — most recently, the later J7th century 
and the 18th century until its final decade. 

While it is possible to disagree about defining the 
boundaries of these periods and about their signifi- 
cance, what can hardly be disputed is that the list 30 
years have seen a brutal increase in the number of 
major assassinations and assassination attempts. 
There have also been developments for which the 
past offers little guidance, the use made by terrorists 
of highly sophisticated technology, for example, 
and the growth of a “terrorist international.” 

Ford acknowledges that when he oomes to deal 
with recent times he is also frequently dealing with 
unprecedented situations. But the same lessens ap- 
ply, and he brings the same balanced judgment to 
contemporary disorders that he does to those of 
earlier epochs. He has written a thoughtful book, 
one that deserves to be carefully pondered. 


WkW Stock Markets 


fia Agence France-Presse Nov. 15 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated 


tf D01 HAVE TO WALL 

THOSE UTILE P1ECES.T002' 


WEATHER 


Alger ve 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Belgrade 

Berlin 

Brauels 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Copenhagen 

Caste Del Sat 

Dublin 

Eeinauran 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneve 

HOI sink 1 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

Nice 

Oslo 

Pcrb 

Prague 

Reykjavik 

Rome 

Stockholm 

5 tr os Mure 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


MIDDLE EAST 


jSnkanj 

Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
TtH Aviv 


OCEANIA 


17 


13 

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3 

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Bangkok 
Beil lug 
Hong Kang 
Manila 
New Delhi 
Seoul 

Shanghai 

Singapo r e 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


30 06 24 
8 40 0 

25 n 22 

29 84 36 
24 75 13 

6 <3 1 

If H • 

30 04 34 
23 73 13 
15 59 B 


Close Prev. 
750 755 

243 J 0 242 J 0 
160 159 

582 263 

388 3*8 

321.50 312 

310 32450 

292 281 

311 311 

320 317 

93 91.20 
1 S 3 158 

574 503 

221 210 
198 19 X 50 
250 250 

2110 2140 
550 535 

092 NA 
1225 1225 
241 242 

15 X 50 155 XO 
198 19850 
489 405 

02480 029 

34380 341 JO 

AH AU 


GFSA 
Harmony 
HJvekl Stool 
Kloof 
Ncdtxmk 
Pres Stem 
Ruse tot 
5 A Dram 
St Helena 
Sasol 

West Holding 


AFRICA 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Cape Town 

Casablanca 

Harare 

Lagos 

Nairobi 

Tonis 


23 73 10 
23 73 10 
2) 03 11 
IS 04 11 
28 82 13 
28 BZ 23 
27 B 1 13 
21 70 14 


LATIN AMERICA 


Buenos Aim 25 77 20 

Corneal — — — 

Umg — — — 

Mexico city 26 79 4 

UodeJamHni — — — 


NORTH AMERICA 


Auckland 19 44 13 55 tr 

Sydney 21 70 19 oo o 

<i-cioudv: lo-toOTv." ir-folr: h-hali; 
'.n-stiw/eri. sw-snow; at -stormy. 


Anchorage -8 

Atlanta 25 

BOtfoo 7 

Chicago 10 

Denver 2 

Detroit 7 

Honolulu X 

Houston 2a 

Lai Angeles 22 

Miami 29 

Minneapolis 3 

Montreal 4 

Nassau 29 

Hew York 9 

San Frandsco 10 

Seattle 9 

Toronto > 

Washington 17 

04 vercast; oc-oartly 


SATURDAY’S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Slight. FRANKFURT: Cloudy. 
Terra. 3 — -2 137 — 281 . LONDON: Rain. Temp. 0—5 ( 40 — 41 ). MADRID: 
Cioud» Temp. 9-3 U 0 - 37 I. HEW ^ORK: P 0 JTty clwdy. Temp. 9-0 
(if — ; 21 . PARIS: Cloudv. Temp. 4 — 0 143 — 321 . ROME: Fair. Temp. 14 — 0 
141 — 43 .. TELAVIV: fJ A. ZURICH: ClOudV. Ternp.i - 0 ( 30 — 32 ). BANGKOK: 
F=ir Tcrr.p. 33-14 191 - 751 . HONG K 0 NC: fO.r.Tem^ 24-24 179 - 75 ). 
MANILA: Showers. Temp. 32 — 34 (90 — 751 . SEOUL: Cloudv. Temp. 7 — 0 
US - 13 ?. SINOAPOR E : Foggy. Temp. 33 - 24 (91 - 75 ). TOKYO: Folr. Temo. 
14—6 (M— 46 ’ 



3750 3000 
3200 3100 
010 010 
2425 2525 
085 890 

7050 4750 
2450 2400 
730 700 

4400 422 S 
850 855 

0550 0025 


MHaa 


Composite Stock index : 1251 JO 
Previous : I 2 U 90 


PEANUTS 


GOOD. MORNING, 
„ b/ervbopvj , 


is there Anything 1 

CAN PO AROUND THE 
HOUSE T0PAY TO 
JUSTIFY M/ EXISTENCE? 


( YOU C0ULP 
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THE MOUTH 15 QUICKER- 
imam the BRAIN* % 


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YEAR Ot=P TO ©GT HER 


[WHAT’S THE POOBL&h? L, 

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THEY^AMUJNGWIR. 
SHE'S AtAMnft f&VVBJ LtNS- 
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REX MORGAN 


r — — THANK YOU SO — 1 

MUCH FOR SEEING ME, OR. MORGAN !\ 
1 KNOW VOt me TAKIWG TIME ^ 

tm FROM youR LUNCH HOUR i a ■ 


DON'T LET THAT CONCERN YOU , 
MISS DENISON.' 1 UNDERSTAND 
YOU WISH TO TALK TO ME r—< 
em ABOUT YOUR FATHER ' 




VBS: L7r\Lf lb OJ- YBAKS l 
OLD ' MOTHER DIED IN AN J 
ACCIDENT THREE YEARS’ V 

a go! rr was a shock- to i 
ALL OF US— AND HE WAS J 
DEPRESSED FOR QUJTE'^ 
A WmtE v 

Isi Pfel- 


MY BROTHER AM> I 
HOPED THAT HE WOULD 
. J MEET A NICE LADY AND 
PERHAPS SET MARRIED— 
- BBT -fle^REFUSEDTO CKTE 
---LH^TWO.MOMTMC .« 


GARFIELD 


A WEALTHS 
PHILANTHROPIST 
J. WORTHINGTON HC 
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j/ORWA&rr: 

BECAUSE HE 

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S OUT OF . • 
L HIS WILL? ' 


John Gross is on the staff of The New York Times. |flTM BWf5 



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incftcaee 

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Shanarl-la 
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225 222 

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570 554 

338 324 

194 192 

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220 215 1 MIB Current Index : 1783 

375 375 | Previous : 1784 

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430 030 

144 144 

719 215 


347 244 

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428 423 

427 420 

475 473 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 


SPORTS 


\& raee17 




"Cl- 







By Michael Jano£sky 

York Tima Savior • 

NEW YORK — How aboot tins ror irony: 
In the thhd game of-ihe 1984 National 
: V~ -’■* s* 3 *., Football League season, the New Eadand 
Patriots were losing lothe Seattle Seahawks, 
i{. . 23-0, in thesecoml quarter wheaTony Eason 

Grogan at quarterfcack.Ea- 
^ son ran for one touchdown and jessed for 
^ two odwxs, leading the Patriots to the great- 

'•trC ' .;• est comdwdc in their history, a 38-23 victory 
^5^^: that established 'Eason as the starter and 
v t . moved Grogan to the sidcting for the rest of 
. .the year. ... - 

r ' Now, 24 regular-season games later, both 
r.-. t--' . ?'lhe Patriots (7-3) and the Seahawlcs (£4) are 

driving for divisional tides m the Amencaa 
• ^ ^onfermce. and guess who the Patriots ex- 
-}- to start at quarreibadc when they eu- 

„‘i gage the Seahawks Sunday in Seattle? It’s 
^■not Eason. 

- “That was just one of those things that you 
I can't necessarily explain because If yon did, 
J it would linger in the back of your inmd a d 
affect year performance,” said John Hams, 
^ r-.-Tr ^ -the Seahawk free safety, recalling last sea- 
Jason’s game. “1 wouldn't think a lot of guys 
T . '' J '^i,.'!have been thinking this week about what 
-V. . happened in (bat game, that if we go up on 
-.^t* l ^ eza would happen a gain, I don’t mink 
' . : “ that's °° anybody's mind 1 * 

■ ■ -Histoiy bears turn out, in that Seattle war 

\I0 games after its experience in New En- 
i . 1 gland to finish at 12-4. For this meeting, the 

~£. “xyJ? circumstances are somewhat d iff ere n t and, 
T because it conies much late in the season, far 

more critical for both teams. The Patriots are 
. n , tied with the New York Jets for the lead in 
the East; the Seahawks are tied wilh the Los 
- A Angeles Raidets, a game behind. Denver in 
the Wert. 

No player deserves more credit for New 


whole teas looks like it’s playing with muds 
more confidence." (Las Vegas oddsmakexs. 
favor the Seahawks by 3ft points.) 

Buffalo B3ls (2-8) at Oevefand Browns (4- 
6) — The Browns have lost their last four, 
each by a touchdown or less. The Bills beat 
Houston last week, but that doesn’t prove 
nmch. The offensive line enough mis- 

NFL PREVIEW 

takes that quarterback Bruce Mathison, in 
his first start, was sacked eight times, and 
two key Buffalo players, running bade Greg 
Bell and guard Jim Rhcher, were sEghtly 
hurt. Qevdand has a better defense, and 
Benue Kosar should Have enough experience 
to get his first victory asa starter. (Browns by 
8.) 

Ondimafi Beilis (5-5) at Los Angeles 
Raidas (MJ-ftis is an important 
for both, and that should make it a Raider 
victory. Off e&rtvdy, they are similar — both 
often throw deep — but the Raiders have the 
better, defense! (Raiders by 6.) 

Miami Dolphins (6-4) at InBanafioffs Colts 






current five-game winning streak. He has 
completed 67 of 125 passes (S3 percent) for 
1,068 yards and five touchdowns', just five ctf 
his passes have been intercepted. 

That’s enough to worry the Seahawks, 
whore drfense this season has not been espe- 
cially outstanding. 

• “If you know Grogan’s history, you know 
he’s a very good quarterback,” Hams said. 
“Phis; now they have speed everywhere, with 
Irving Ffyar playing wdL and Craig James is 
a much improved runner from last year. The 



Steve Grogan 

. . . Taking aim at the Seahawks. 


(3-7) —The Colts have not beaten the Dol- 
phins since early in the 1980 season, a streak 
that includes a 30-1 3 victory by the Dolphins 
in the second week of 1985. Don't expect a 
change. Indianapolis had problems on both 
sides of the ball in its last two games, giving 
up 13 sacks and all owing 71 points. Miami 
needs every victory it can get these days. 
(Dolphins by 7.) 

Ptasbtagh Steefers (5*5) at Houston Od- 
er* (4-6) — In beating three mediocre teams 
in the last four weeks, the Steders have 
shown an ability to do enough to win. Just 
. when it appeared the Oilers were making a 
move, they were shut out bv Buffalo, 20-0. 
(Steders by 3 A 

San Diego Chargers (5-5) at Denver £froo- 
cos (7-3) — The Chargers stunned the Bron- 
cos two weeks ago, 30-10, and with another 
victory (her can climh into playoff conten- 
tion. It aD depends on how Denver’s defense 
handles quarterback Dan Fonts and his mer- 
ry band of receivers. Last Monday night, 
that defense played remarkably well in a 17- 
16 victory over San Francisco, clamping 
down hard when the 49ers moved inside the 
10-yard fine. (Boncos by 4ft). 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

New York (Suns (7-3) at Washington 
Redskins (5-5) — The Giants beat the Red- 
skins, 17-3, four games ago, and it’s safe to 
assume they can win again Washington has 
not beaten a team that now has a winning 
record. With tackle Joe Jacoby injured, its 
fine is not doing Joe Thrismann justice, and 
teams with strong defensive lines (like the 
Giants') have had no trouble controlling 
John Riggins, George Rogers or any other 
Redskin runner. (Redskins by 1.) 

Chicago Bears (10-0) at Dallas Cowboys 
(7-3) — Jim McMahon has a bruised shoul- 
der, and if he can’t play or can play only with 
restricted use of his throwing aim, Chicago is 
in danger of losing its first game. Dallas is 
among the few teams that can handle an 
outstanding running flam* While both Wal- 
ler Payton and Matt Snhey ran for more than 
100 yards last Sunday against Detroit, the 
Cowboys have held opposing teams to under 
100 yards six times the: season. The Cowboys 
need a victory more than the Bears because 
they are tied wilh the Giants at the top of the 
division. (Even.) 

Los Angeles Rams (8-2) at Atlanta Falcons 
(1-9) — with or withoat Dieter Brock at 
quarterback (and although they have lost 
two of their last three games), the Rams wfll 


probably beat Atlanta for a second time this 
season. As if they don't have enough prob- 
lems, the Falcons mil play without right 
tackle Bren Miller, who severely sprained an 
ankle in Sunday’s overtime loss to Philadel- 
phia. (Rams by 6ft.) 

Minnesota Vikings (5-5) at Detroit lions 
(5-5) — Here are two teams about as exciting 
as their records. Both have been up and 
down all season, winning and losing in all 
sorts of ways. Hie Vikings won their previ- 
ous meeting. 16-13, on a field goal with no 
time left. (Lions by 3.) 

New Orleans Saints (3-7) vs. Green Bay 
Packers (4-6) at Milwaukee — In a tacit way. 
Coach Bum Phillips gave his win-one-for- 
the- Bummer speech earlier this week, saying 
that if the Saints didn't pick up five victories, 
be should be replaced. Well, they better plan 
on finishing with a five-game winning streak, 
because the Packers aren't likely to lose. 
Green Bay has shown itself the more re- 
sourceful of the two dubs, and Phillips has 
named Bobby Hebert, the former United 
States Football League quarterback, to make 
his first NFL start. (Packers by 7.) 

St. Louis Cirdbab (4-6) at Philadelphia 
Eagles (5-5) — The Cardinals were so 
pumped up over beating Dallas two weeks 
ago that they then went out and lost to 
Tampa Bay, 16-0. The Eagles, on the other 
band, won so rousingly Sunday over Atlanta 
— on a 99-yard pass play in overtime — that 
they're thinking about the playoffs. Thai's a 
lot of emotion, and with victories in four of 
their last five games (compared to the Cardi- 
nals' recent 1-5 record), the Eagles stand a 
better rhane* to win. (Cardinals by 1ft.) 

INTERCONFERENCE 

Kansas Gty Chiefs (3-7) at San Francisco 
49ers (5-5) — Minus the snowball thrown at 
the 49ers as they attempted a field goal 
Monday night. San Francisco might have 
beaten Denver. Tbe 49ers have slipped tins 
season, but not so much that they can't 
handle the Chiefs, who have lost their last six 
games. (49ers by 13.) 

Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1-9) at New York 
Jets (7-3) — If the injury-riddled Jets go into 
this gftma with a limited number of defensive 
backs, it's possible the Buccaneers could 
steal a victory. Tampa Bay, which beat the 
Jets last season. 41-21, has a fine offense, 
with Steve DeBetg throwing to two gifted 
receivers, J immi e Giles and Kevin House, 
and James Wilder is one of the best all- 
purpose backs in the league. (Jets by 9.) 


w 

| At Oxford, They’re Still Getting Serious Just for Fun 


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By Bill Shitlcy 

Lea Angeles Tima Service 

OXFORD, England — The 35 
i that make up Oxford Um- 
Jv ^ersfty are spreadxo far around tins 
? Vj^oTd town you need a taxi and a 
“ a : -couple of days to see them all -—if 
you can find them. Professors who 
-have taught here for years have 
' ^- ;r been khown to get lost trying to- 
:r ^ : find an unfamiliar rate. 

1 Natives can easily identify Christ 

Church, the most famous of the 
. rcoofieges, but when a reporter re^ ' 
-■ '“M'cently sought directions to (he Ath- 
letic Union he got no help until a 
young woman pointed to a lane 
that led frumlffley Road to a small 
( JUKE gymnasium. think it is over there 
”T somewhere,'’ die said. 

- She was ri^it The headquarters 
'•-r- ,T f(Sr all of sports at one of the 
'zts worlds most m^rtantumveraties 
' :r ’“ are two small offices in a gym that 
. ”P*T wouldn’t bold the athletic depart- 
ment of a major UJ5. college. 

•: ^ But what Oxford sports lack in 
- ’ * - -’.amenities, they make up for in lan- 

• > v; : *gevity and tradition. For bivtance, 
v ^ -ss the first rowing races were hdd in 

• - 1815, when the univonaly was 

about 650 years old. 

Scholarship doubtless has priori- 
ty at Oxford. Students control then- 
sports, the best athletes don't al- 
„ ways get into school; no such 
.: 1 ^ things as athletic sdbudarrizqrs, and 
. r" 1 * only a few coaches get expenses. 
The way sports are run at Oxford 
makes the Ivy League lode like the 
National Football League. 

“The rewards are very small 
here," said "Most coaches work for 
nothing We’re very amateurish 
compared to the United Stales." 
Oxford and Cambridge slam off 


-v- 


the top five percept of the nation's 
top scholars, leaving little room for 
ordinary jocks. 

“It is terribly hard for even the 
best athletes to get in here." said 
Jim Rafiton, secretary of Oxford’s 
sports committee (he is also the 
rowing consultant and correspon- 
dent for The Times of London). “If 
Cad Lewis came here with his four 
Olympic gold medals, he probably 
couldn't get mT 

London’s press virtually ignore 
Sports at Oxford and Cambridge. 
“Tbe boat race is the only event 

that meant anything" Said Adrian 
Brown, deputy sports editor of The 
Daily Mirror. The boat race, a visit- 
ing reporter was supprsed to know, 
is the me every spring between 
Oxford and Cambridge. 

Rail ton seemed amused about 
Oxford’s scant attention in the 
sports pages. “Sports are quite civi- 
lized here; we’re quite different 
from you Americans," he said. 

Kinp, princes, earis, lords and 
prime ministers and their sots have 
been playing games at Oxford for 
150 years. Teams have also fea- 
tured such Rhodes Scholars as Su- 
preme Court Justice Byron White, 
U.S. Senator Bill Bradley, Array 
General Pete. Dawkins and Los An- 
geles lawyer Pat Haden. 

On an otherwise undistinguishe d 
trade viable through a window be- 
hind Rail ton's desk, Roger Bannis- 
ter became the first human to run a 
mile in under four minutes. The 
dale was May 6, 1954. Sir Roger 
Bannister will soon become head of 
Oxford's Pembroke college. 

Hollywood, at least twice, has 
made films about sports at Oxford, 
first Robert Taylor in “A Yank at 


Oxford" and, more recently, the 
dreadful “Oxford Blue," a story 
about an obnoxious U.S. oarsman. 

Sports at Oxford are divided into 
“full blue,” tbe major gam**;, and 
“half blue,” the minor ones. 
Among the majors are soccer, trade 


'Sports are qnhe 
civilized here; we’re 
quite different from 
yon Americans. If Carl 
Lewis came here with 
his four Olympic gold 
medals, he probably 
couldn’t get in ... / 
Still, ’Sometimes ath- 
letes break down and 
cry when they lose. 

It’s the glare of 
television, 1 think.’ 


and field, basketball, boxing, golf, 
hockey,, tennis, rowing, rugby, 
swimming and yachting. 

Rowing is the sport. The boat 
race from Putney to Mortlake on 
the Thames River, a distance of 4 
miles 374 yards (6.77 iflometers), is 


televised by the BBC and attracts 
about 12 rnOhou viewers. London 
bookmakers give odds on tbe race. 

Nothing in U. S. college sports 
compares with rowing at Oxford. 
Oarsmen are members of tbe Boat 
Club, and hs president chooses his 
own coaches. “If he's sensible and 
has a good crew," Rail ton said, 
“heTI keep the same coaches." 

Neither university has dominat- 
ed the big race over" the years. “It's 
an intense rivalry, but it comes and 
goes," Raflton said. An American 
stroked the Oxford crew last sea- 
son. Oxford will row against 
UCLA in Los Angeles next April. 

Sprats here may be more civi- 
lized than at UJS. colleges, but Ox- 
ford’s rivalries can be intense. “The 
winning-is-eveiythmg philosophy 
does exist when Oxford plays Cam- 
bridge," RaDton said. “Sometimes 
athletes break down and cry when 
they lose. It’s the glare of television, 
1 think. I’ve seen athletes who 
would never speak to each other 
again after a race." 

Cricket and rugby are almost as 
popular as rowing, but soccer does 
not get the attention at Oxford that 
it does in the professional league. 
The university’s big match, with 
Cambridge, draws only about 7.000 
spectators at London's Wembley 
Stadium. Rugby, on the other 
band, draws about 35,000. 

Basketball has become a popular 
sport here, mainly because of Bill 
Bradley. It is hard to tell how well 
cricket draws because matches nm 
from 11 AM. until 8 PM., and 
students drift in and out Games 
can, in fact, last two days. 

Remarkably, Oxford has no bud- 
get for sports. It underwrites only 


the cost of the facilities. Each of the 
12,671 students — 4,630 of them 
women — pays a S3.50 fee to a 
central athletic fund. 

The major sports are financially 
independent thanks to cranmerrial 
sponsors. A bank sponsors the rug- 
by team, the soccer team gets a 
grant from the professional league, 
and a bookmaker, Ladbrokes, 
sponsors the rowing team. 

Politicians at Oxford join the 
Oxford Union and actors hope to 
get into the Drama Society: ath- 
letes, if they are lucky, join the 
Vincent's Club. Founded in 1863, 
the club once admitted only Ox- 
ford's finest 100 athletes, all males, 
through “elitism and careful selec- 
tions." 

Tbe old Blues still gather to 
drink and talk in their s mall quar- 
ters off High Street. Oxford's main 
thoroughfare. Photographs of ath- 
letic kings and prime ministers are 
on tbe walls. So is a rugby ball 
autographed, “with thanks,” by 
Fete Dawkins. 

But there is less exclusivity to- 
day. Membership, still all-male, has 
risen to 250, possibly because of 
less elitism and fewer careful selec- 
tions, and women are allowed in 
tbe clubhouse in the evening. 

Opinion on the Blues is divided. 
Rail ton said. “Sports to some stu- 
dents don't matter at aO. They say 
the Blues are out of date. To others, 
however, the Blues mean one hell 
of a lot” 

Oxford's approach to sports 
would never sell in the United 
States. Ahmrni would never go for 
it On the other hand, the idea of 
scholarship’s priority over games 
might just catch on some day. 


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SPORTS BRIEFS 

Bruins and Capitals Swap Goahenders 

BOSTON (AP) — The Boston Bruins traded Pete Peetera.who won the 
3983 Vezina Trophy as the National Hockey League’s top goalteoder, to 
the W ashing ton Capitals for goalie Pat Riggm, the Bruins announced 
Thursday night Both Peeteis, 28, and Rigging, 26, are in their fourth 
NHL seasons. 

Peelers came to the Bruins in June 1982 from Philadelphia in exchange 
for Brad McCrimmon. In eight games this season, he allowed 31goals f or 
a 3.84 goals-against average and a 3-4-1 record. 

Last season, Riggin set a team record with 28 victories, while recording 
the second-best goals-against average in tbe NHL, 298. In the 1982-83 
season he had a dub-record 13-game unbeaten streak, including 10 
straight victories. This year he has allowed 23 goals and has a 3.74 average 
an‘d is 2-3-1. 

Pavin Leads by Stroke in Kapalua Golf 


' KAPALUA, Hawafi (AP) — Corey Pavin had two 
66 that propelled him into a one-stroke lead after 


es in a round of 
,y*s second 



WHAT A DRAG — Training in Tnggfl, West Germany, speed skater Marie van Hekkm 
toughened up a recent driD with a braking parachute, forcing her to expend more energy. 


matching 68s. First- round 


"w* ■ 




Germany and Andy Bean were at 135 
leader Sandy Lyle shot a 70/136. 

For the Record 

Danyl Sutter, i 


Thursday on his separated right shoulder and will be out of action for at 
least two months. Sutter suffered the injury Wednesday night in a 6-4 

National Hockey League victory over Quebec, (AP) 

■ Refief pitcher Roffie Fingers, a former Cy Young Award winner, was 
released Thursday by the MBwaiikee Brewers, who this season finished 
next to last in the American League East Fingers, who holds thenugor- 
league record of 341 saves, had a 5.04 earned-nm average and 17 saves in 
47 appearances with the 1985 Brewers. (AP) 


Kings , Warriors Crank Up a Rivalry 


> **1. 

; 

re • . 


Quotable 


• Coach Marty Sdiottenhdmer, whose Qevdand Browns have lost 

four straight games: ""Some people say Fm dogmatic, bull-headed -and 
maybe Lank intelligence, but I don’t look at it that way.” (XYT) 

• DefensammMCve Richmond, whom tbe New^ York Rangere recently 

dem<rtcdtotheimnors:^ou’roprobal^aF^^ 1 ^ fi!Vc n w ^yP u 

play, but at least up there yoo*re prime rib. (iAT) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SACRAMENTO, California — 
The National Basketball Associa- 
tion and Northern California have 
a new rivalry, and judging from tbe 
Golden State Warriors’ fust visit to 
the Kings in their new hone here 
Thursday night, it’s a hot one. 

The Warriors had won their last 
four games, all since holdouts Pur- 
vis Short and Chris Mullin came to 
terms with the team, but the Kings 
were prepared to defend their home 
turf. Short finished with 32 points, 
but Marie Olberding. who held Mm 
to asingle point m the last quarter, 
sparked a scuffle in tbe waning 
seconds of Sacramento’s 112-103 
victory. 

• “My only problem was Purvis 
Short bong variously manhan- 
dled," said Warrior Coach- John 


NBA FOCUS 


Bach. “That has no place in the 
game. I look at it as manhandling; 
somebody else might see it as ag- 
gressive defense." 

The Warrior bench screamed at 
the officials over Olbcrding’s tac- 
tics, but to no avaiL Tbe tussle held 
up the game's conclusion for two 
minutes, but no injuries resulted 

**We woe talking to officials all 
the time, but how far do you take 
it?" said Bach in exasperaton. “Do 
you take it all the way to a technical 
foul? We were in a 2-to-3-point 
game, and it was going back and 
forth. We bad every reason to think 
the rough stuff wouldn't keep going 
on." 

Other NBA winners Thursday 


night were Cleveland, Houston, 
Denver and the Los Angeles Lak- 
ers. 

Eddie Johnson hit 11 straight 
points and scored 15 of his total of 
29 in tbe fourth quarter to help the 

Kings hold on. 

“We've always had an intense 
rivalry with Golden State,” said 
Johnson, who was playing with a 
sore elbow, "even before we got 
here. It’s always been physical. 
Both teams play the same type of 

basketball" 

When the Kings moved from 
Kansas City to Sacramento at 
the end of last season, it marked the 
first time two NBA franchises were 
based in Northern California. 
The two teams' home arenas are 
just 90 miles (144.8 kilometers) 
apart. (AP. UPI) 


Winging Farewell to a Goalie Gone 


Compiled by Our Staff FKrti Dispatches 

PHILADELPHIA — In the 
first rematch of last season's 
Stanley Cup finalists, the chal- 
lenge to the Philadelphia Flyers 
was not to avenge having lost to 
the Edmonton Oilers. It was sim- 
ply to play hockey — to get cm 
with living in their first game 
since the death of goalie Pelle 
Lindbergh. 

The Oilers bad offered to post- 
pone Thursday night's game, but 
Philadelphia chose to play. 

The contest at the Spectrum 
followed a memorial ceremony 

for Lindbergh, who died Tues- 
day as the result of a car crash. 
The Flyers won, 5-3 — a chib- 
record 11th straight victory — 
while wearing Lindbergh's 
No. 31 on their shoulders. The 
Oilers wore black armbands. 

Lindbergh had been left brain 
dead after his car crashed into a 
concrete wall in front of an ele- 
mentary school in Somerdale, 
New Jersey, early Sunday morn- 
ing. After his parents bad given 
permission to donate his organs 
for transplants, he was removed 
from life-support systems Tues- 
day. 

it had been a week of upheaval 
for the Flyers. Lindbergh was 
found to have a .24 alcohol count 
in his blood; a motorist with a 
measure of .10 is considered in- 
toxicated under New Jersey law. 
And that caused the Flyers to 
become introspective about the 
role of alcohol in their lives and 
the game they play. 

“This is not a drinking team," 
said Brad Marsh. “And Pelle was 
by no means a drinker. He liked 
to drive fast. He was a happy 
person. But be was not a drinker. 
But I think we’ve all done what 
he did. And now. I don't think 
We'D ever do it again." 

Outside the Spectrum Thurs- 
day night, the U.S. flag and that 
of Lindbergh's native Sweden 
were at half-mast. Inside the 
darken ed arena, a wreath of 
flowers was placed at center ice 
and the capacity crowd had 
stood silently. The Flyers, heads 
bowed, were on their blue line 
during a 23-minute service that 
included words from Benue Par- 
ent. Lindbergh’s childhood idol 
and goaltending coach. 

“A goalie stands on a very 
lonely island,” Parent said. 
“Pelle Lindbergh had become 
without question one of the 
greatest goalies. When death de- 
feats greatness, we aD mourn. 



Tha Auoaoisd Prcu 

Pelle Lindbergh, during tbe 1985 Stanley Cop finals. 


When death defeats youth, we 
mourn all the more." 

Lindbergh. 26 and an all-star, 
was the winner of the Vezina 
Trophy last season as the best 
goal tender in the league. 

“Tbe big question was how we 
would react." said the Flyer cap- 
tain. Dave Po ulin. 

“Nobody knew. But we knew 
we had to respond " 

When the opening was 
dropped, Philadelphia played 
hard. “These players have 
grieved all week," said the Flyer 
coach, Mike Keenan. “Winning 
or losing was not the factor. It 
was the way they played the 
game — their intensity.' 

The Flyers incurred the game's 
first penalty. They scored its first 
goal- Each time the higb-scoring 
Oilers challenged, they puDed 
away from the defending cham- 
pions. Rich Sutter scored the 
winning goal at 1 1 :04 of the final 
period. It was one of Philadel- 


phia's three third-period goals. 

The Flyers won with a goalie 
who had played in only one 
NHL game. When Bob Froese, 
Lindbergh's successor, was in- 
jured in a Wednesday practice, 
the club recalled Darren Jensen 
from its American Hockey 
League affiliate. Jensen turned 
back 29 of 32 shots. 

Said Sutter of the emotion- 
charged victory: “We art profes- 
sionals. We have to carry on. We 
couldn't let this game sUp away. 
Deep in everybody’s hearts was 
the will to win this one for Pelle 
and his family. Our job was to 
take pride in that." 

In the Flyer dressing room, the 
sadness of the last five days lin- 
gered. 

As the players peeled off their 
working clothes. Lindbergh's fa- 
ther, Sigge, slowly walked past 
the lockers, gently shaking hands 
with each of his son's teammates, 
thanking them. (UPI. AP. NYT) 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 


Hockey 


National Basketball Association Standings 


NHL Standings 


Boston 
Phllodelotilo 
New Jersey 
Washington 
New York 

Milwaukee 

Detroit 

Atlanta 

Qiknoo 

Cleveland 

Indiana 


A Mantle Division 

W I 
7 I 

5 4 

6 5 
2 t 
1 • 

Central OtvUen 
S 4 

7 4 

5 5 

4 6 

4 i 
2 6 


E 


UtWi 

4 

6 

.400 

4 



Dallas 

3 

6 

.333 

4ta 

Pet. 

GB 

Sacramento 

3 

6 

.333 

4W 

JS75 



Pod Be Dlvtolod 



556 

TVi 

LA. Lakers 

8 

1 

J89 

— 

545 

aw 

Portland 

8 

3 

-727 

1 

-2S0 

j 

LA. Clippers 

5 

4 

-556 

3 

.111 

6>4 

Golden Slate 

5 

6 

.455 

4 



Seattle 

4 

6 

.400 

4W 

.667 

— 

Phoenix 

0 

9 

-000 

B 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pts GF 6A 


-634 

-500 

.400 

.400 

-250 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 

Houston S 2 -BOO — 

Denver 7 2 77B 

San Antonia 5 5 -500 3 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

BOSTON— Released Jim Dorsey, piictw. 
Assigned Dove Sax. catcher, and LaScheite 
Tarver and Gus Burgess, outfielders, to Paw- 
tucket of the international League. Added 
Wes Gardner. Calvin SchlroWi and mike 
Rlchford, pitchers; Roy Quinonez, shortstop, 
and John Christensen. Todd Benzlnoer, Ellis 
Burks and Dana Williams, outfielders, to Hie 
40-man rosier. 

MILWAUKEE— Released Rick Walts, 
pitcher. Designated Pete Vuckovich, Pelt 
Ladd and Brad Lesley, Pitchers; Mark Brou- 
hard. outfielder, and Dave H upper?, catcher, 

lor assignment. 

NEW YORK— Named Joe Aitobelll bench 
coach. Signed Marty Bvstran, Pilcher. 

TEXAS— Aawlred Greg Ferfendo from To- 
ronto to comalete the trade for designated 
hitter aiff Johnson. 

National League 

5T. LOUIS— Waived Darrell Porter, catch- 
er; Bill Campeel l, pltdier, and Willie Lozada, 
tn fielder. Added Kevin Hagen, Rick Ownbev. 
Mike Shade, Rich Buonantony and Greg 
Dunn, pllcheri; Mike Lavalliere and Tom 
Paonazzl, catchers; Jim Underran and Jose 
Oquendo, faiflelders. and John Morris, out- 
fielder, to the 40-man roster. 

BASKETBALL 

WASHINGTON— Placed forward Toro Me- 
Mllien on the Inlarwillst. Signed George John- 
son, forward. 

FOOTBALL 

Natio na l Football League 

OETRO I T— Signed hoi Stephens, defensive 
end. Waived Jim Browne and William Dalton, 
running backs. 

N.Y. JETS— Signed Larry Flowers, defen- 
sive bock. Waived Jim Elloeulos. linebacker. 

SEATTLE— Signed Gordon Hudson, tight 
end, to a series of one-vear contracts. 

HOCKEY 

Notional Hockey League 

LEAGUE— Suspended Los Angeles goalie 
Bab Janecvk Five games lor a stlck-swlnalng 
Incident during o fight wlln Philadelphia's 
Fiver Peter ZLezel in a game Nov. a 

CHICAGO— Recalled Brace Boudreau, for- 
ward. from Nova Scolia at Itw American 
Hockey Leaoue. 


THURSDAY? RESULTS 
Cleveland 20 30 31 31—113 

Indiana 31 1» 24 27— 1M 

Hinson 1 0- li 3-5 23, Free 7-1 B 5-7 2D; St Ipano- 
vich 10-19 3-8 23, Fleming 9-15 2-2 20 l Re- 
bounds: Cleveland 52 (Turpin 12), Indlona 03 
(Stioanovich 14). Assists: Cleveland 29 (Bag- 
iev 12), Indiana 26 (Fleming 7). 

New Jersey 33 34421 29—107 

Houston 34 18 26 32—111 

McCray 11-13 3-6 25, OlaluwonS-IB Ml 25, 
Luoos 8-17 5-5 22; Richardson 10-22 1-1 21. 
Birdsong 10-18 0-3 20. Rebounds: New Jersey 
53 (Williams 171. Houston 55 (OJalowon 12). 
Assists: New Jersey 24 iRicnardson 11), 
Houston 23 (Lucas 41. 

San Altl onto 22 35 27 23—109 

Denver 25 34 31 23—112 

English 12-2* M0 33. Cooper 8-15 8-9 34; 
Mitchell 10-77 2-2 27. Robertson 5-10 5-4 15. 
Rebounds: San Antonio 45 (Robertson 10). 
Denver 57 (Cooper, Lever »>. Assists; San 
Antonia 28 I Moors, Robertson 9). Denver 23 
(Lever 7). 

Golden State 20 20 33 23-183 

Sacramento 22 24 32 S3— IT2 

Johnson 13-243-629, Thet»4-13 7-10 w; Short 
12-24 8-10 32. Carroll MB 2-4 IE Rebounds: 
Golden Slate 44 (Carroll I3t. Sacramento 54 
I Thorpe 14). Assists: Golden Slate 16 1 Floyd 
8). Sacramenlo 27 (Theus 8). 

Portland 25 3* 27 2*— 102 

LA. Lakers 31 31 27 21—114 

E .Johnson 11-10 5-7 3a Worthy 12-22 5-6 29; 
DrexleT 4-16 7 -8 19, Bowie 8-12 2-4 18. Re- 
bounds: Pori land 46 1 Bowie 8). LA. Lakers 59 
(ADdul'Jobbar. Rombis, E_laftRson 9). As- 
sists: Portland 25 (valentine 51, la. Lakers 
27 (EJohnson 17). 


Philadelphia 
Washington 
NY Islanders 
NY Rangers 
New Jersey 
Pittsburgh 

Boston 
Buffalo 
Quebec 
Hartford 
Montreal 


0 
2 
2 
0 
1 
3 

Adams Division 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 


St. Louis 

4 

6 

3 

15 

52 

5B 

Chicago 

6 

9 

1 

13 

44 

74 

Minnesota 

4 

B 

3 

11 

57 

61 

Detroit 

3 

9 

4 

10 

49 

B0 

Toronto 

1 

17 

3 

5 

51 

72 


S myttie Division 




Edmonton 

II 

4 

1 

23 

83 

57 

Calgary 

8 

6 

2 

18 

70 

60 

Vancouver 

8 

7 

2 

18 

49 

48 

Winnipeg 

6 

8 

2 

14 

65 

77 

Las Angeles 

3 

12 

1 

7 

53 

85 

THURSDAY'S RESULTS 



Boston 




2 2 

2 

0-6 

Toronto 




• 2 

4 

0—6 


Nieahufe 2 (»). R#M (2), Crowder <9), Unso- 
man 15). Kasoer 15); Dark (7), Stasmy 2 (5). 
Volvo 3 (11). Shots on goal: Boston ion Bern- 
hardt) 12-9-15-0—34; Taranto Ion Keans) 3-10- 
12-2—77. 

Quebec 2 1 6—3 

5L Louis 0 2 3—5 

NLHunter 2 (8). Mullen (B>. Gllmeur IB). 
Nattress (31 ; Eagles (4), Gouler (ill, Asntan 
(3). 5hots oo goal : Quebec ion warm lev] 22- 
12-11 — 45 :SL Louis Ion Gossel Ini 13-17-11—40. 
Edmonton 0 1 3—3 

Philadelphia 1 0 4—5 

Howe (5), Sintealo (81. Propp ( 13). Rich Sut- 
ter (7), McCrlmmon (1); Melnyk (2). Cottev 
17), Messier (9). Shots oo goaf: Edmonton 
(Jansen) 9-15-8—32; PniKKMipnia (on Moog) 
14-74—30. 


Pro Tennis 


WOMEN'S TOURNAMENT 
(At Brisbane. Australia) 
OuarterflnaU 

Martina Navratilova, (I ),uX,def. Sara Go- 
mer, Britain, e-3. 4-1 

Pam Shrlver, (2). U£~ def. LgrlSSO Sav- 
chenko, Soviet Union. 6-2. 44 
Helena Sokova. (4). Crecnaslovakia. dot. 
Elite Buraia. U5. 6-3. 4-1 

aovKGo Khodt-Kilscn. (3). West Germany, 
def. Wend v Turnbull, (5). Australia, 6-7. 6-1 6- 
1. 

MEN'S TOURNAMENT 
lAl Wemblev. England) 

Quarter finals 

David Pate. UJ»def. Joaklm Nvsfrom (8). 
Sweden. 4-2. 3-4. 7-5. 

Ivan Lendl (1 1. Czechoslovakia, def. Johan 
Kriefc 161. Ui 6-2, 4-1. 


World Clip Soccer 


ASIAN ZONE 

Syr la ft Iraq 0 (f irsr leg of puyatf for oerm in 
Hm 1986 cup finals; second leg Nov. 29 inTcrif, 
Saudi Arabia). 



A masterpiece ot Swiss, watchmaking 



GianmariaBikcellaii 

4 Race Vendotne, 75001- Paris - 










Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16-17, 1985 


POSTCARD 


PEOPLE 


Crying Need for Babies’ Doon:India’s Harrow by the Himalaya® Copland’s 85 th Feted 

•" * Q., Cmun S W/fli nrnin iMMBEliWBiLjw ^ . . JP* . 1 A /VrxJonH «i« aiunasesmil' 


By William E. Geisc 

New York Tima Semtr 


She picked up one of the seven 
flas hing phone lines. The caller 


N EW YORK — “There is a wanted an 8- or 9-year-old black 
crying need for babies." Sa- girl who looked 6 or 7 years old to 
bena Basch said wiih no trace of a play a regular part in a TV series, 
smile. The parents would have to move to 

She is co-owner of the Li’l Stars the West Coast. 

Talent and Modeling Management Orders for children are very spe- 
Agency. whose office was — cific. In the Li'l Stars computer, 
“Don’t step on the baby!" — filled blondes are broken down into dark, 
with black babies, white babies, light and medium, strawberry, 
Hispanic hahipx l lau ghing gurgling sandy and platinum. Calls have 
and screaming bloody murder. come for a child with two upper 
As Basch and her partner. Adelle front teeth missing, a child that 
Sharf. tried to do business, the ba- creeps on the stomach but does not 
tries tipped over containers of peas crawl, a new walker who falls 
and pushed buttons on the phones, down, a child resembling Dudley 
disconnecting callers. The people Moore, 
would caQ back and say, “Don't There are codes for such things 
push the button, honey, don't — M as looks and disposition: SG for 
The babies were — “Eric! Don’t super-gorgeous; NP for no person- 
pull her hair!" — getting into ev- ality. Fatal Flaws, such as a New 


erv rhing Marilyn is into residuals. York accent are noted. 

The 19-month-old, who sull re- "We interview the children," 
ceives checks for a Fisher-Price toy Sharf said. “We take them away 
advertisement was wearing a T- from their mothers to make sure 
shin reading “Kid for Rent." they aren’t too clingy." 

Manhattan's advertising, soap- 


A little girl about 3 years old 


opera and film industries can't with perfectly set blonde hair sat 
seem to get enough babies these practicing her lines — her word — 
days. ‘‘Babies are hot" said a com- for an audition: “Yummy. Yum- 


merdal producer. 

Basch said her babies were being 
used in all sorts of commercials, 
including those for tires, batteries 
and arthritis medicine. 

The office of Li'l Stars is at 
Basch’ s home in a housing develop- 
ment in Staten Island, where chil- 
dren abound. “The business is in 


my. Yummy!" 

Parents discussed where to get 
good “flippers," temporary plates 
with false teeth, for their kids. They 
talked of stage mothers who dyed 
their children’s hair, and one who. 
rumor had it was getting a nose job 
for her 7-year-old daughter. 

John Paul Learn created a stir 


Lbe city " said the parent of one Li’l when he ^ by office . The 
we P™ lh * 1 f d L 0Ut 6-year-old £s be^n on the soap 


here." There are car pools to Man- 
hattan auditions. 

Dan and Pat Taylor arrived with 


o-y ear-old has been on the soap 
opera “One Life To Live" for more 
than two years, and has done a long 
list of advertisements. Sharf dis- 


their daughters — Autumn, who covered him in a playground out- 
has done commercials, and Jenm- ade bcr she later found 

Fer. Dan Taylor was filling out the out ^ mother took him there to be 
forms for Jennifer, leaving blank discovered bv Sharf. 
the Social Security number. _ , . . . . . „ l.j 

“What’s the itier with you, One of the prism the room. had 
Jennifer?" someone asked. “Were nmde about SI 1000 for a dieese 
you bom yesterday?" advertisement. The chdds fattier 

“Nope, Saturday." said Pat Tay- confessed that his heart had sunk at 
lor. who still had" on her hospital a syrup audition - his daughter 
identification bracelet. was one of two finalists for the 

The couple brought Jennifer to 525-0“ part - when he watched 
Li’l Stars before they look her the other child "jusi literally dive 
home. “Cute baby!” one of the ml ° ““ pancakes, 
mothers said. “Who’s her agent?" The two agency owners work on 
Basch scares people. She chases a 15-perccnl commission and re- 
p regnant women in shopping cen- quire the purchase of their S 15.95 
ters to give them her card. “We get book on the child modeling busi- 
calls,’’ Sharf explained, “to book 3- ness. The book includes such prac- 
week-old babies a couple of deal advice as giving children can- 
months in the future — like we did dy or soft d rinks before an audition 
for the the movie 'Heartburn.' " to give them “sparkle." 


By Steven R_ Weisman 

,VfH< York Tima Service 

D EHRA DUN. India — The 
“old boys" will probably 
talk about it for years. 

Amid revelry, nostalgia and 
choruses of “Auld Lang Syne," 
the alumni of one of the country’s 
most exclusive boarding schools 
p ap w» back to their campus in the 
Himalayan foothills early in No- 
vember to toast themselves and 
their ascendancy in India. 

The Doon School their alma 
mater, had much to celebrate _S0 
years after its founding by British 
educators as an Indian version of 
Eton or Harrow. The “old boys” 
were proud, for instance, that 
among their number was Prime 
Minister Rajiv Gandhi, wearing 
his blue school blazer and tie, 
plus several fellow members of 
the “Doon School mafia" who 
joined his government- In abun- 
dance, too, were the executives of 
scores of India's leading busi- 
nesses and editors of its publica- 
tions. 

From Pakistan came 30 gradu- 
ates who bad risen to prominence 
in their country and who got a 
standing ovation when one of 
them pleaded for the barriers 
with India to “come down as 
soon as possible." 

In a speech before 3.000 guests 
at the jubilee, Gandhi class of 
1960, said returning to the ivy 
halls and playing fields of bis 
youth had “always been like com- 
ing back home." The Doon 
School he said, “has given us a 
certain strength to face the 
world.’’ 

That is hardly all it gave. 
Alumni and others say the “old 
boy” network flourishes and 
helps its members look after one 
another's interests. “It is unques- 
tionably India's leading school 
and a breeding ground for the 
movers and shakers (and reapers) 
of Indian society,” wrote Mala- 
vika Sanghvi, a chronicler of In- 
dian mores, in Imprint magazine. 

Doon School people are sensi- 
tive to criticism that they are 
sharpening the worst tendencies 
in a country long burdened by 
caste and social hierarchies. “We 
are not an elite in the conniving 
sense.” asserted Ajit Narain Hak- 
sar. a retired chairman of ITC 
Ltd., a conglomerate. “Merit is 
still the basic criterion." 

Haksar said the key to the 



Sew 8. Wefaran/The New York T* 

The “old boys” of Doon School at reunion to celebrate its 50th anniversary. 


school’s success was its commit- 
ment to equality among students. 
No matter what their back- 
ground, the boys wear identical 
uniforms, make their own beds, 
live by the rules and get the same 
amount of pocket money. “Re- 
member the day when the Nawab 
of Raxnpur brought his son to 
school in a cavalcade of cars," 
Haksar said. “The headmaster di- 
rected the boy to get out and 
carry bis own suitcase. Inside, 
class distinctions vanished." 

When the Doon School was 
founded in 1935. such a rule was 
considered revolutionary. Until 
then, the elite educational institu- 
tions established by the British 
had catered to the sons of the 
British raj and Indian royal fam- 
ilies. 

The Doon School became the 
first “public school" for the sons 
of the growing class of untitled 
public servants and merchants 
who would later assume positions 
of responsibility in independent 
India. 

It has come of age as the train- 
ing ground for India's entrepre- 
neurs. In fact, Gulab Ramchan- 
dani, the headmaster, told the 
alumni that “we should wean our 
boys away from the fixation of 
executive jobs in industry and 
commerce." 

Others wonder about the rele- 
vance of its traditions. English 
remains the medium of instruc- 
tion. Athletics and sportsman- 
ship are a must The boys go on 
treks in the mountains and do 


volnxtteo- work among the poor 
in a nearby village. 

Nearly a third of the students 
receive Financial aid, but few are 
on foil scholarship and the mix of 
students is generally upper class. 

A system of student prefects 
and captains enforces discipline, 
sometimes cruelly. “They’re still 
training people in 19th-century 
British values," said Dinesh Mo- 
han, a Haagmatp of Gandhi who 
is now a biology professor in New 
Delhi “They pride themselves on 
upper-class things, like quaint 
hobbies and politics based on 
class, but there have been no 
graduates of national stature in 
science, or literary achievement 
in Hindi" 

A more typical comment came 
from Bawa Amaijoyt Singh, a 29- 
year-old garment exporter. “You 
leave here with a feeling of self- 
confidence and determination. 
Whether we're actually brighter 
than the next fellow. I don’t 
know. But normally, we get what 
we want." 

Students and graduates gener- 
ally reject the charge that the 
Doon School is too Westernized. 
From its inception, they note, the 
school marie the -ringing of Hindi 
and Urdu songs a part of each 
day’s activities. Students are 
taught to appreciate clastic Indi- 
an theater and music. 

There were countless stories at 
the reunion of boyhood pranks, 
awful food, cold showers and get- 
ting lost on hikes, but little on the 


stimulation of the classroom. 
Grown men laughed and called 
each other Roly-Poly, Dinky and 
other old nicknames. Their wives 
looked forlorn and irrelevant, like 
their counterparts at reunions at 
Harvard or Yale. 

At a meeting of the “old boys’" 
in a school amphitheater, there 
were 9 i m f amili ar demands that 
the school give greater preference 
for admissions to the sons of 

al umni Politely but firmly, Ram- 
phandani. the headmaster, said 
□o. Then an older alumnus rose 
and proposed that the graduates 
get together and come up with “a 
Doon School plan for the nation" 
to help their classmate and prime 
minister. The place erupted with 
jeers, boos and laughter. 

But there was also a dramatic 
moment for Izzat Rai Dewan, 58, 
a tobacco company executive 
who in 1947, a few years after his 
graduation, was captured in 
Kashmir when war erupted, with 
Pakistan. Stripped of his clothes 
and shivering in his undershorts, 
Dewan was convinced that he 
and his brother and father were 
going to be executed by Pakistani 
soldiers. Then a Pakistani Army 
major, Barekara Mali Khan, rec- 
ognized him as a Doon School 
chum and freed them. ' 

Under a spreading neem tree in 
the pale afternoon sunshine, the 
two men were reunited for the 
first time in 38 years. They 
hugged each other in along sflent 
embrace. Then they bunt into 
tears. 


Aarou Copland was onstage smil- 
ing Thursday as the New York 
Philharmonic played “Happy 
Birthday*’ for his 85th, and the au- 
dience in Aveiy Fisher Hall in New 
York v*"g along. The composer of 
works such as “Appalachian 
Spring," “Lincoln Portrait” and 
. “kodeo" had said he would . like to 
lilfA to bear some of his relatively 
j fgfcniffri compositions for the cel- 
ebration. The program, except for 
the popular “Fanfare for the Com- 
mon Man." followed his wishes: 
Zubin Mehta conducted “Letter 
From Home," commissioned by 
the PhBco lUdio Hour in 1944; 
“John Henry,” commissioned by 
the Columbia Broadcasting Sym-. 
phony in 1940; and “Concerto for 

Piano ami Orchestra,” done for the 

Boston Symphony in 1925; and. 
“Proclamation For Orchestra,” ~' 
newly orchestrated by Pbffi^ Ra- 
' mey from a piano piece. At inter- 
nussion, Leonard Bernstein, who 
conducted the opening “Fanfare,” 
said, “Aaron Copland makes 
Americans fed American, whoever 
we are, whatever our roots 
are." . . . KingHosseni of Jordan 
celebrated Us 50th birthday Thurs- 
day at Raghadan Palace in Amman 
with a flight of 50 pigeons, a guard 
of honor and a laudatory address 
by Prime Minister Zrid A1 RifaL 
D; ■- 

A mother anil daughter who sur- 
vived histiny’s worst single-plane 



S - A 


4- * 

■%-lP 


mm $&&&„ 



The Aouettad ftiw 

RfflSS WORLD — Miss 
Iceland* Hohnfriour Kaifgi 
dottir, 22, a kindergarten 
school teacher, topped con- 
testants from 7 ' natkms in 
London Thursday to be- 
come the hew Miss World. 
Karlsdottir succeeds Astrid 
Herrera of Veaeznelaf 

unsuccessful at oiling your atten- 
tion on the plight of Fratch artiste 
banned from most private ra&o 
Stations. they receive Fewer and 


*4. 

-it *: ■ 


after they: lost three family mean- 
bees in the disaster, ffirofco YosU- 


becanse I have crane to believe that' 


zald, 34, held the hand of her M s langu a g e may have a better 
daughter MSfto, 8, as they w^fced .- chance to draw your attention. Af- 

- .l. i \r. i' i J Mr«n 5* w Pnriith that will cjrwvn 


out of the hospital Yosmzala lost 
her hnsband and two other chil- 
dren in theAng. 12 Jap^n Air Lines 
crash, which IriBedaff but four of 
the 524'persons aboard their jumbo 
jet The two other survivors remain 
hospitalized. 

□ 

Jack Lang, the Frenchcultural 
affairs minister, has written an -an- 
gry official letter — m English — to 
the president of the government-., 
broadcasting authority to complain 
about an “mvatioa” of American 
and British music on French radio 
and television- There are seven 
state-run radio and tdevition set- 


ter :all, it is English that wQl soon 
dominate all our media, due to the 
laissez-faire attitude of most deci- 
sion makers today.” Shortly after 
T-nng rook office In 1981, be at- 
tacked “American cultural imperi- 
ahsn," . primarily 1 m 1 enwna ami 
television, bt^he has not been able 
to curb showing of. American 
showsu- .-. ‘ 

■ = x.'*".cjr . . 

The American ringa' Diana Ross 
married" i;?Ndrwegian shipping 
magnate,Arae Naess.Oo. 23 in 
New Ypdt a spokeswoman for the 
New Ycai-.Gty dak’s office has 
disclosed- Marianne Faith- 


hno loll:'! 


works in France; and- aboot 200s*- fnl^a'&its rockstar in the 1960s, 
local private radio stations. rartffi e "■ has been granted a divorce in Lon- 
letter to Middle Gotta said, “For • doafrom her second husband, die 

the past, two years, I have beidf ponkgnitarist Ian Brwley. 

■ ■ 


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1984 OLYMPIC GAMES 


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Bjr Umbc Cal your local HT rapresentorive vrith your lad. You 
«4I be' informed of the cost immectarety, and pnde prejiayinenl is 
made yoir od wS appear within 48 home. 

Caet; Ihe bade rate is S9B0 per ineper doy + local taxes. There are 
25 leftw 5 ,iijyii andnaoH kt tb* first fine and 36 m the Maying Snes. 
Mmimum-spocn is 2 lues. No abbreviation s -accepted. 

Ostft Cards: Arnerjcan Express, Diner's Qob, Eurocord, Made 
Card, Accea and VSw. ■ . 


g?o n*ni 
£d\v Ht l Hl 


ARE YOU SBQNO a hanksariang 
soles cootd iuu tar ■ with mariceting S 
management CBmabSties. Young ex. 
-eadivA MBA Ffuent French; Engfith, 


jgt orgatj^oiTtotiB sriw dukng by 

friWtucnrraf pojecti. Seputablm ex- MDUCTUAI. SKOALiSr, SO, fluent 


Htepoma 

mh: (For dasrified only): 
NVATA&SXL : ... 

EUROM 


periencs cdxood. EnczBenl references 
available. Speaks perfectly Gemma 
English, French & ftdkm, Pleose con- 
tact: Mmkh, W. Germany. Tel 0049- 
89 95 85 98. 


Engfah, Bench, Sparish. Woricfwtde ] 
experience, sens joint vertme or 
dtJenginB posSon. Madrid arBi- 
rape. Write ffT Bax 228, PedroTex- 
eira a Mwkid 28020. Span. 


noedayl BokeL 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 


- you am own qualty nre drnc m 
with indoor swimming pool and 
fitness faeffities in on ideal 
enviio nmem fer toaure and iports 


(da. golf, ete}. 

I . Fmtmangar law SF. rotes 
up to 80% mertgages. 

Please contact: 

Residence le s Freoe *. 1854 Uysm 
SWITZBOAND 

Tel: (025) 34 1 1 S Thu 456 120 RLAI CH 


^■^^4634 5965.^ Qfiji fERRAT 

DOMINICAN DtVO«CE5. Box 20802, 


GREAT BRITAIN 

BH.GRAV1A SW1. Unfurnished mm- 
sonnetto, newly deooroted. rec e p t io n, 
latchen / brmddhst, 3 beckoanB, 
bathroom / 2 showers. £250/ week. 
Td 01-730 8117 Monday to Friday. 

CBUTRAl. LONDON CLOSi TO Chur- 
eh® HomL New 1 b ed r oo m aport- 
men!, serviced. Minimum let 6 months. 
£170 per wcefe Teh 01-935 4797. 


LONDON, MARBLE Ardi, £190 / I 


pre-opening savings on 
6 mo. f 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 


Shidio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and oD with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


74 CHAMFS-ELYSEES 8th krvel menrasment nooebahont S 


Stixfio, 2 or 3-roam a p annwi L 
One month or more. 

If OARDOE 4359 &97. 

SHORT TERM STAY. Advonlogei of □ 
hotel without moonverwnces, fed at 
home in dee shxEoc, am be d room 
and more in Paris. SORHJM: 80 rue 
de niriverdtfe Pmis 7th; 4544 3940 

NEAR FARC MONCEAU, 3 room, 
fi r cpface, deau F5J900, 5 months to 
one yew. Tek 42 62 34 la 


MARKETING Afl vdh banking bade- M *Trw*i«uj 
ground. Having shorn pemondBy. ’“£*£**? 
being very dynamic S raifcmf en ■ 

only a few ^tributes. Used to tap Jw?***n ^ 

level mmxrgannt nogoSafton*. Ho- A Watson 809 
ent SwmSsfi, Gorman, Engfah end 

S*xx«ih. some French * Norwegian. GENERAL 


BAIHOAIS M ANAOBL 10 + yewi 
nternaband - experience, degree, 
available for i mmedfata carignment 
A Watson 80*775-1510. ext. 3311. 


5panish. some French & Norwegian. 
5eeb new challenging iwymuont 
worldwide. Currart pofition: &rope- 
an Market + Promotion in paper mid 
rab ndustry. Please reply to Box 
Sri, LHT, Friedriefrstr. 15, 6000 

Frankfurt/Moin 


GENERAL POOTIWS 
AVAILABLE 


NOTRE MME; room in 4raom flat, od 
axnfijrts. Dec 15/ Jon 15. S400 + 
charges. 46 34 67 05. 


FAST TRACK ASSISTANT for teniw . , , 

mmerdve. Amrmrxm mr*. 31Jvy StaSi 

League degrees. 10 yean of rapid "Tj e aujntrttaw neogeot tixope, 
movement, with AT&T product man- tome e i ^arrfnwjn jo wnag n or [xto - 
ogemeri. morimfag, business deed- fatisna- WoHcgggw& or ^ swfiomed- 
gment, sdas ohd amtegfe dwming. 2d^fr^. TriUn *' 

Exo s lsnt reputation & pofished com- 9ZHI Nswy Ceaes^ mmee . 
f , 5fl^ arton LEADING REGIONAL PUBUSHMG 

L^GernwryAqty wdhrn the hph- houserequresworHwidesdmmpra- 
lech or mPoannve mcketneL C Hunt meaiiva-. to be bawd h Smaspcee. 

town. NJ 07960 USA 201-3269119. i nd ep andrrt 8~hqv» jucoeafd sales 
MT SALES MANAGBt 38, travel- £?«nfa- CortacJ Gro™W*her: 
Eng, mariy in Southern Europe from ^•**gf*J™® n 0 a P or ® 2659233 or tel- 

Bondux & Geraxxty) vAng to odd ex IB 25280. 


and B»GHT t B4BlGEnC researcher need- 
«d far Peris office of.-lrtT ntag uu' iie. 
Excelert Engfah, flwmt Fren3i and 

Gor man required. SuiK&xwiuii km- 

iia guoge deslndde. Mud have sokderki- 


A ms tor d se m 2636-15. 
ABsenes 361-8a97/36D242T. 
■liMMiK 343,1899. 
Cnp enhmiie n. ^71)329440; . 
' Frankfort: p&j 7^67-55. 
Lw w i i » >T 29JB^4t 
Udsrinr 67-^-93/665544. * - 
Iondens.{pii 8364802. 
Morbi d. 4553891/45S3M6. 
Miare (0q.753W45j 
Nerwwrpq4V2953. 

■mimi 67M43Z1 .- 
Swede n, m^sm 29. - . 
Td A*iv: 03fe S9. 

Vfaonsd 


lAHN AMERICA 

■wenexAbewdl 4031 

- (Dept. 313) 

-Ctoacaes 331454 .. 

Gu qyoqd L 51 4505 
lteE 417852 
. PmM»M:690511 
SanJowr: 22-1055 
Sostksgar 6961 555 
: SoeRoufac 852 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 

BabraiK 246303. 

' Kuwteh 5614485. 

- Leba n on: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar. 416535. 




Jedddu 667-1500. 
UAL: Dubai 224)61. 

FAR EAST 


Executive Services Available “P 87 ™ 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE FOR YOUR 
NEXT INTERNATIONAL MOVE 

FOR A FRS ESTIMATE CALL 



nn 

Companions 

uu 

DAKS 

LONDON 


rang pool wish pool house, caretaker's 
lodge, garage, pedangj, driveway aid 
an extrocninary very secluded gar- 
den. an a plot aver one one. 

john’ESylor sa 

1 avenue Albert ler 
F 06230 SAINT JEAN CAP FSOtAT 
Tek 93 01 24 24 

GERMANY 

RENTED APARTMENT FOR SALE 
Buyer wBI assume l«ae eF DM1 J080per 
mo-m 85 sqjn. living area, fuly n»- 
«hrd and equpped. DM mWO, ne- 
gotiahle. Tel: Frcpnkfurt {D) 69-BK29S3 

GREAT BRITAIN 

tNTHlNAnONAL TRAVB1BT7 Con- 
vwnent siwSot/ apartments, 1 min 
rrcxn Ketnmgton Station. Hemtvaw 
29 mins. Wen End 9 irinsi USM3DOO- 
116^00. London 603 6603, NY 718 
338 2576 

5- KENSINGTON, historic 4 bed 
house. £385/300. Trt 03-828 6555 


5HBU0N ISLAM). SMALL NOTH. & 
bar in 2 acres overlooking Bohmore 
Harbor on tosh South Coast. Sale 


nice house, 6 month lot rrinxnura. Tet 
262 9335. 

LAGO MAGGIORE mayfar. 2 luxury flats: 1 far- 

. nhhed, 1 unfumahed, availabie imm*- 

A5CONA tfc*dyTdr01-C9l 2959 ref G50/JW 

to this world famous resort we offer first - 

dkre opartmrt*^ houses. Right ITALY 

above the old vfloge of Ascona or on 

lake with indoor p ool, you wR find 
your home. Prices from SF333.000 up to When in Rome: 

SFl ,100,000. Mortgages at low Sww PALAZZO AL VBABRO 
interest rotes. These real estates are Luxury apartment hauee with funxshed 


Model Suites 


Free far sale to fareijyien. 

EMBtAlD HOME 13D. 
RBSENZA T1Z1AIJA 
VIA LOCARNO 27 A 
CH-6612 ASCONA 
TEL CH-93-352184 


SWTTZBUAND 


Bats, avafcbie For I week and more 

Phone: 679432S. 6793450. 
Write Wo del Vdabro 16. 
00186 tome. 


(212) 371-8866 


HOLLAND 

AMSIBtDAM: FOR RENT Luxurious 
furnished Gndhous»apartraent on 
toe Kaneragrochl, iwing room with 
sundedc & open fireploce, 3 bed- 
rooms, 2 bathrooms. Deluxe latchen, 
garden. Rent $2,000 per month. For 
more mfe rn xjliun , cc& 020-766022 
Peter Bnjm ritakefaorefe 


Tet 4329 3883. 


CHARMMG DUPLEX epartment 
beoutifuBy finrfahed. 46 06 Oi 37 

15TH. Short tern, 1 beckoom, bath, 
terrace, all oamfarts. 48 28 52 19 

EMPLOYMENT 

FOR THE FEATURE 
INTERNATIONAL j 
POSITIONS j 

TURN TO 


Successful c*>pfconrrr 
I nde p endent STwve 
reaortb. Gontoct G 

T, WSS!i in 9 apore 

ex IS 2526)1 


tmurf be dynamic, 
re successful sales 
Grou p Pub fcher: 
re 2659233 artel- 


olW activity. Betf references, know- j MTL MAGAZINE in fumitora indus- ] 


tog business mertaRties & kaiwagest 
English, Gernxn, French, Itafcxi, 
Spmmh. ETfiuent & pfeoiont T* 
Gennam 49/6206 69117 office 
hows. Bax 2284, Herald Tribune, 
92521 NeuBy Cedex, France 


FMANOAL CONSULTANT 37, UK 
Chartered AcBountcxi l ‘J-CA) moltiSn- 

(SatiSaaaagnt 


j fraekra writors/stringers | 
London, Cologne, Rome &| 


New Yodc(Zl2}'753-3890u 
WeetCo-fc|4T5t-362«J39 

SOOmAHUCA 

- .... 

* ^ :DQi^TC ' 
rosraor^AVAHLABLE 


Bangkok: 390-06-57. 

Hong Kang; 5-213671. 
Adnata; 510092. 

ManRre 8170749. 

SoobI; 7358773. 

Singmparee 222-2725. 

Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 

Tokyo; 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA *. 

Me R to ome. 6908233. 

Syrbtey. 929 56 39, 957 43 20. 
Perth: 32898 33. 


Mm;,y H 
iSeim; Kitb 


Paddfagtan, 

369 34 51 


employment 

DOMESTIC . . 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


WANTH) K HOUSBO0EPER/ AU ««- 

«5TP«^NYra»lS: N^FtLmxfentoU FW*. 9 d* 

j poaiJe ahuTrendj'sperAing, more 

GENERAL p** 1 . 5 y* «^^h e nflB. Wa tong q 

POSmONS WANTED • & 





International Business Message Center 


" - Sues ui ]ewelry, mwntxig, p 

— w rek£ora, aaoki portion, r«kxl/w 


REVACSA. 

52 MontbriBonr. CHI 202 GSYEVA. 
Tet 022/341 540. Telex: 22030 


wss- 


Raw Opportunity, For Stale Beoait 
DUPLEX APARTMENT 
of about 96 sqjn., elegantly furnished. 


EretondS)28l 20185 ’ Sm*^ baleonies. Hotel servjee if re- 

■nxeme pjxot xu.ra quued, Prrvcre swutmng pod ml fit- 

ITALY ness c en ter araJabfe at the buUng. 

■ — for p r i ce and other defcals: 

WreCA fTOLI O 14 mfa from plen^cne CH. MATT1, G5TAAD. 
dow n town Rome. Enchanting 4-bed- 030/4 26 25 

room vifa, dose to famous gdf 

wurw. WM G04EVA- VILLA FOR SALE Exdusrvt 


Exclusive DAKS 
clothes nnd 
accessories for 
men and women 
available from 
DAKS stockists 
around the world. 

OAKS Simpi-Of! Limited; 
34 jermyri bf'ttet,-- • 
Lcndort SvVl . 


bees. Cat! Rome 


PAIMA DE MALLORCA 

OUTSTANDING 

We o re sure we o ffer the read mrpen- 
rive apartments m fare de MaAorca. 


tesidenrialcrea Garden. 3JXXJ sqjn. 
CampieMiy renova te d and modern- 
ized WS sutt Diplomatic Services or 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES j 

Publish your batmen message 
in thw International Harold Tri- 
buna. wh e re mens than a thind 
of a m&fan notion tnrW- 
wUo, moot of whom two m 

btnirwn and Mushy, w ST 

road k. Jot! tohnt os (Perk 
613595J before 10 am., en- 
suring that wo can Tefax you 
back, and year menage wiK 
appear within 4 8 hour*. The 
rate is UJ. f 9.80 or toed 
equivalent per Una. Ye a asmf 
Indude com p lete and treraff- 
able bdSng addrea. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

TIC F&tANOAL TIMES 
EUROPE'S 8USMESS NEWSPAPER 


BUSINE SS BUSINESS : 

OPPORTUNITIES OPPORTUNITIES 

BROKERS / ADVISORS 

Your dmnu can mveW in one el Ameri- 
? s .’? ** !* e ® n S, Tedmolagiarf 
Breokflireaghs xi the nm infadry. 

Otosr 30.000 trees c beady Planted m 
1984. Preceded annual ineame Vrtriv 
cAy reaehen 52*. 

InvMters Enqurire htvitod: 

Mamrial avotabfe xi Engfah, French, 

92521 NeuRy Cxdex, Fronex 

BTABUSHB7 RRM WITH 5 

dp?*™ Ww, fa^y BUSINESS SERVICES 

— 

cenerol. Greece, Turkey. Phone W- (NTL 

fan. Itafy_ 0239-2-6595737. Th 315Q33 BEAUTIRIL PEOPLE 



DIAMONDS 

DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

Kna dxxiiunth in any price range 
a t lowest wholesale prion 
tired from Antwerp 
renter of Ihe dromond world. 
FtH guarantee. 

For free price far write 


tody, grd drfa Gemotogfa (GJA). 
Sdtt wi ]ewolry, mreketxtg, pufafe 
reWore, xeeb potafton, rakdAvhah- 
sofe, ar ifantxan/jewofar shop marv 
ogemxi#, Europe or USA. Fluent fav 
gHi. Spanah. Write Ruaud. T5 rue 
fort* Bretome, 03100 Mordfasorj, 
France. Tek 70^-1879. ? 

YOUNG INDIAN BAKER -mb trato- 


trisned ixexyiBtgWvar American, if 
_powMe . obg^eMyspe ala ng, mo re 

long4enti'^fao«han; pUawd, bdy, 

rwuinnbivreMaKnrT.bt-lMi^' *vJl^ 

M enreg.t« H xx« 5»» yof 3ymr old 
(prt A 3tafaef> old- baby girl Job 
avaScUMnmfioMhr. leCeraiKM & 
phatae,1re4iHtaiC . ^xan write to: 
CorirwrPSte WtAventte Morfeegsw, 
75008 ■- 

HOUSBC0B^s&ilh experience wax- 


Ft Louder dole, Florida 2 d* 
*en, pets, roroe ooolaig. Send photo 
Brebara Greenberg, 10411 N.W. 
3^0^^.33065.^ 


Estobfahod 1928 


nAaaretraat 62, B-2018. Antwerp 
Bd ritxn - Tet (32 31234 IV 51 
The 71/79 lyl b. At the DicroodOub. 
Heart of Artwerp Dromond Jndudry 


F1BRAM I or Sax 88. Herald Tribune, 
Torre 5, Milana S. FeSre, 20090 Se- 
grate. tody. 


Nil 

BEAUTRUL PEOPLE 

UNWHTH) MC 
UAA. « WORlDWa* 


kxge famly. 8 bedroom. 5 bath- nmx operates a morning of pubbeatioa Vde, lioty. UAA. * WfOAUWf** 

rooms, large rec ep tiarH. snooker- delivery service to sutoamen in the swo txic. sswruv ra^nw.., ■ . . , , , . 

/games room All amrmrifes. Turn felowtog arete Ararryly pwanol & bynneBiervm. 


FR ANCE 

iKreWbS 6a _ ^ ^Landan,waE-9JH ' . 

^ I^M^+ JDGANattoj. Sophia Antipa&s - Toutouw ■ Grenoble, 
reddannol oty area. BreoMalang wow ^ GSIMANY 


resdwMl dty area. BreotMatang vww vmoaa iwon, toramo, em 

on the tea, m« oty, toe hrxborTOnly con buy mogrifirem raw 

finest matenah hove beenjeed far the H^WOin 

14 apartments! I token marble; African 
waoS/Frerah ot* etc. Each opartrrant 

veto large taring, separate dirxng. fire- ‘ na ’ 1 '» iu 9 w 91 -WW 

place, large teraeo. eo mptew hM ww. USA RESIDENTIAL 

separate mmrf! area, 4 bedrooms with 

bathroom & web-fa dosei etc Total 

about 360 cqjn. property with 3,800 NEW YORK CITY ■ CONDO 
sqjn. gcxden, indoor & outdoor pod, European charm m big iroon apart- 
tenrx*, goroge, dr conrfitwning, door- mert. fid) atings, araMoys & beaub- 
nx*i service M detcB meke tois a very uriauei 

miclAtAt CAM Gxtdo residence m rad-tawn. Huge bv- 

HJSrSUU 5WI mg room with firepiaee. farmd Mng 

ARMADANS 

Jeee Soria 6. Word p\7i 6888700/5344318. 

Efl7D14 PUma de Mrdfatai fiflUlAM 8. MAY CO. 

Tek Spom71-38 99 00 555 Mcxfisan Ave, NY, NY 10022 


Foreigner) can buy magnificent raw r l . . . rr m . f ll . 

apornrarti/chdtM/v**. SfldtaK*. -VS? tteSrSid 
Swio residency ponfefe. H5SOLD kTtof dtatf HreSwT 

SA, Tour GraetCH 1007 Iwwnra »«»ir " oty at Hamburg. 

21/25261 1, Lugong office 91 -687648 f* tod, ami farther de**. 


ARMADANS 

Jeee Beria 6, 

&07014 Palma d* Mrdfaroo 
Tek Spom-71-38 99 00 


pktOH UJfUUi 

Ben Hugh*,, F.T. Paris 
Tel: (11 42 9T06 23, 42 97 06 X 
Telex 220044 

Send W. W«Wta, F.T. Frankfort 
Tdk Off? 7598-105 
Tdex 416193 

NO F.T. - No Comment. 


2ND MSSR3RT 35 courerietL GMQ 
36 Kteomenau. 10676 Athens Greece 


eo pradorean, grtrohie desfaq, ides 
p rama t on map raodquartered to 
Brmsds ond London far ody US51 2 

raSoa. Best woy to penet ra te lucra- 
tive European make! vnthaut costly 
Btttfcte Bax 2238, Herdd Tribune, 
92521 Netrily Cedex, Frtrce. 

SWISS QUARTZ WATOC5 

with your private logo 
1^ to 31X000 pfaere per worth 
RAMPT MVKBMC 
CH-1290 Venaix/ Geneva 
Tlx: 2S279Tefc 0041/22/55 4042 

SWItZBUAI® + ABROAD. We 
here care them 25 intending Carmo- 
nas (factories + barfing to rated to 
senrire) far sofa Turnover upta SF30 
mBEan. Swu readenre passfafa. Can- 
tods K SteCSD SA, WGfee 6, 
CH.10Q7 lomonne. Tet 21/25 26 llj 


prOvidng a saiqiia ealeetiM of 
tahded, wsdre A tndlfinguol 
xxfirid u ob far ofi sobd £ 
protsationd occaearts. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W, 5Mi Sfi N.Y.C 10019 
Service Rearesentabm 

Needed Worldwide. 


MAUFORWAJDiNG Offered For 

CuJJ teuuuf If-- 

vh*vihi rvnravwh Ymr niivuivv 

nW BSW.^CK 2060 CH803S Zurich 


D&ADY 

Factory eelm of Ioom art Amends 
_ Lange Herentahert r 29, Antwerp 
Bdffum. Td: MmTL&. in 35243 


OFFICE SERVICES 
Yow Office In Gecmany 

we are "A! Yore Santa” 

• Gsa^iefe office Servian at two 
pneage oddraaes. 

• My equipped offices far toe short 
tone or toe long term, 

• hdeniatiopgBy trained office and 

S afanonei staff at your depoiaL 
to be legaly used as yourcorprv 
rata dcrniale farGerrnony/Europe. 
• Ygw buiines operation can dart 



FINANC IAL 

INVESTMENTS 


Irtreo Bu ik im Serviaw OmfaH 

UwoJfare am HofehaiHeopark 
Justuvaretraue 22 
6000 FranUvri am Mato 1 


RNANQNG MOKTGAOTI fickaary EARN 25% SHORT IHIM-sn mawt 
sennets, mvesmwn rmd _aemmb. (tMned tov*s»n«enf guaranteed. AL- 


CaB mvesbnmt office DT Mr. Wym 
goarde, Belgium 3299/509733. 


jwik. j itMfled, Lnvesintonfguaranteect Al- 
Wym Bed Ud, FO Bar 432, Harrisonburg, 
| Vugiero 22801 USX 

73 rue de rEvantale, 75018 Paris. 


Tefe 6 ftW «61 
Telefax: 69.59 57 70 
Tefe* 414561 


308, Bahnea . ■ 

YOUNG ^ FRENCH LADY, model, PA. 
tnorivoTed, fxghfy emerienced. Seeks 
irtl totoretatog fab within rindar field. 
Free to tnavJ Paris: 42 89 50 91. 

MAN 32 1 SB CS POSn iCN os tra vel 
mnoarian between Wadiinoron, fa- 

rag^fart.Ca.GSgV 

NfflJ A WORLD CLASS COPY eefi- 
torB Steve Brown 801-466-3175 USA. 

SECRETARIAL ~ 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

pctec ropr s Aner r ANiL hxi pub- 

modoa & tap level ccrtaar drib, fia- 
guefa Iraral. perfod.EmfaA fluent 
French Open Markets, 37 qua d An- 
jau, TWOtofara. • ' 

SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 

LOOKING FOR TOP NUNGUALper 
joond? Gff the enerttGR INThM 
Mrafcnrerf4758feOPait 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

SffiC ENGLISH TiACH EB, mother 

DOMESTIC 

POSmCWS AVAILABLE . 

2 GRU REQUOra AS SOON AS 

iwrGdltodd Gty. Permonent pod- 
txx*. Must him pneriou do wlx. 
mverience. Driving Srense s essan- 
nct Own roam, color TV, use of cer 
etc. DuetoLK Goverrxnent'* restric- 
honfconiy toorowhoare IX residents 
re BC natfanoh can be axxadae d j 


ed forfefiiiyin taBtog Kta «■» exclu- 
sive Ux Angriw.Jufnirix No onofl 
dAherv-Yifirhtotoa dogs. The ohSly 
to exx* A.ilrive b o mat far ton 
potatioo-M^at , W# offen room with 
privrte bbfcStmdoyi » Mondays off. 



a. 

- .fe 
- <0 
-- • 


kssthreiXyenok 
a ux-yrar rATboy. ' 
edoaPing- d|r data k 
ricxd. AHolaa^cbur 
.1 montohetotaypor 


Tyraiold.to taka 

refboy. The jab i 
ihrdAd in Eurapee 


NAfMT.not 
d take core of 
■ job indudes 


Ail RAM FOR FLORIDA. Start soon, 
n««"ofcxr, eort for 1 info*. P* ' 

wtoi phcteMr.TeBer 7363KW 
St, lauderhB. FI USA 33319, 


toowtoYdfonan. Sdary USjffDOO 

per.rem^-pfasnbqous. tow rad 

ream cnTphato to Mr; Abu Sho- 


" Ew 25t-^5’ AU PAM SUtlY nORfflA. 2 d* 
N-W. 24 Terr^ Bom Boron. R. 33431 . 


domestic 

POSmONS WANTED 


AU MBR- 1 year old boy. Ef^t housn- 

. Engfah. - J «Rt 21 ! 

r^ 1 ? *P°?5- Pri?** room * •* < ***V: “PVW'Pto amfa 

' 1-S™k4tar. refer- "ren Jrexoy, ooror paotion in En- 

*? Ck--Nrefaa gfah frenJy m Loodor Jpsoking b kfie 
St, New Odeare, frendi, vnthvery ycxmg dridren., 

RAJ 

— _ W WbuW cottader faolSifloltf 


WitL Would condder lackmg offer 
bind or retired person to to- 
turn far fadangi and Mtarf. Teacfeng 
OT.iBB tfittfy p ra faMi an. t pcaefale. 
rranot general prartioaer seeki nqj- 

bhBdVotasre, 75Q11 PwtolWa.' 




•— if 


AU .PAIR JMAL£ to awe-far 4 yaw - ""H hfaLor rati 

■ ggftyjyaga.’hE 

Ream, (maxes, photo. Emfeh pm«*i general prat 

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