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The Global Newspaper ■ 
Edited in Pins 
Printed Simultaneoudy 
in Pam, London , 

WEATWR DAIA APPEAR ONJPAGE IS 

No. : 31 ; 9S7V ' 47/85 



INTERNATIONAL 





Published With The New York limes and The Washington Post 

** PARIS, MONDAY,. NOVEMBER 187l985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 








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Reagan, in Geneva, Hopes for 'a Start’; 
Soviet Attacks Weinberger on Arms 


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ARMER.O, Colombia. — Heli- mnd 


i :-rr - .ri 


VT^Vi’ 


3 Key Issues 
OnAgendaof 
U.S. Leader 

By R.W. Apple Jr. 

New York Times Service 

GENEVA — President Ronald 
Reagan has arrived in Geneva far 
his meetrng with Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. the first encounter between 
the leaders of the world's two dom- 
inant powers in more than six 
years. 

Wrapped in a heavy coat and a 
scarf against the chill, Mr. Reagan 
was greeted at Cointrin Airport on 
Saturday by Kurt Furgler, the 
Swiss president 

Mr. Reagan said he bad come “in 
the fervent hope that on behalf of 
all the people of the world we can 
make a start towards lasting 

'ItoAmbakd Press peace. 

Red Cross voiiers kbor to free a survivor from the mod covering Annero, Colombia. " Mr. Reagan win spend about 

eight hoars. Tuesday and Wednes- 
. - day conferring with Mr. Gorba- 

n Town Abandoned : due to arrive Monday, arms control 

is the overriding issue of this con- 

17 71 - Ch f* /V/^/v ference, which is the 11th Soviet- 

foil brows to 2o,UUu ^r 1 ^ *" 

; For the president, that subject is 

'buried this town under a river of verting it into a vast cemetery, only one of three major items on 
t-' wind ; The Colombian, health minister, the aj ymda, along with human 

e Firefighters began burning bod- Rafael De Zubiria Gdmez, said rights and the resolution of region- 
s' ies Sunday and dumping others Saturday that at least 21 ,559 people al conflicts, 
g into mass graves to diminish the had died or were missing in Ar- Western European frM-rf have 
h threat of disease, and the Colombi- mere, giving the first official tofl of invested considerable political cap- 
d an government declared the area the disaster. Other officials said jtal in a success ful outcome to the 
d consecrated ground, thereby con- that more than 25,000 people, in- conference. 

■ eluding 8,000 children, had been 7^ fr-ench, the British and the 

. ’ . ; : " r ~T~. killed and 25,000 left homeless and Italians have all pressed the presi- 

••ji. 'm TIM*" JV that at least 2.453 had been injured. dent to push for an arms agreement 

l inn s OI MUd ' Six more survivors were pulled to prevent revived pacifism and 

from the sea of mud at Annero on anti-Americanism. 

: \\/ - 1 • . Sunday before rescuers gave up On Saturday afternoon, more 

jscue worKers hope of finding more. . than 10,000 demonstrators parad- 

On the first hdicopter-out Sun- ed in Geneva to call attention to 
ies Brooke day morning was Omayda Medina, their own agendas. Some wore 

'ibnm Service 20, who spent nearly three days masks, others carried placards 

aoSnR^stheadWflterobfbrSan subranged in mud up to her neck, bearing such legends as “Soviet 


, 1 000 



buried this town under a river of verting it into a vast cemetery. 


'. The Colombian health minis ter. 


* is,.- copters began evacuating rescue. Firefighters began burning bod- Rafael De Zubiria Gdmez, said 

. Hq. workers SuadayfromArmero/as ies Sunday and dumping, '.others' Saturday that at least 21 ^59 people 

a-.ji-jjj. hope was abandoned of finding into mass graves to mmmis h the had diwl or were misang in Ar- 

- ~ mote tnpped suryivois of thfr vd- . threat of direase, and the Colombi- inero, giving the first official toll of 

• ' ■ r canic eruption last week that killed an government declared the area the disaster. Other officials said 

311 estimated 25,000 people and consecrated ground, thereby con- that more than 25,000 people, in- 

. . eluding 8,000 children, had been 

M 1 _ • • _ • • killed and 25,000 left homeless and 

■-* ' ' 4 , ' y V ' rH 1 that at least 2,453 had been iiqured. 

f *c titebmtit - Armftrn fi f o inn s TIT IVilin • Six more survivon; were pulled 
’ from the sea of mud at Annero on 

^ ,3W ™ Frustrate Rescue Workers hopeof finding more. . ** ^ 

- ■ On the first heiicopter out Sun- 

• -s.T- •. By James Brooke day morning was Omayda Medina, 

■ - , ' i/ew YdiXZlmm-Senice -V 20, who spent nearly three days 

' • VJ ARMStOi iSblehA&^BemaraaRaiwsrimd.dn the ibof-of San submerged in mud up to her neck. 


Armero’s Tombs of Mud 
Frustrate Rescue Workers 


President Ronald Reagan strolling Sunday after a strategy session at his Geneva 
residence. From left are Secretary of State George P. Shultz; Mr. Reagan; Robert C. 
McFarlane, national security' adviser; and Donald T. Regan, White House chief of staff. 

Soviet Grants Exit Visas to Spouses 
Of 8 American Gtizens, 2 Others 


By James Brooke 

"7 V ’ • ‘.'.ifrw TnHiSSmA-Senie* ‘ • 

ARMHW^ stdod cm the ipof of San 

IxnwoA^o^aiaTMiastflicdo^ovci^'ejoMa^ c^^^'nmd. - v • 
“Thousands at peb pfc Sre buried uf£der'mei^*’^e said Saturday. 
Pointing, to a htnree-siaed boulder, he added:- “My family is under 
there.** - •• 

Mr. Rcgas was one of a lucky handful to scramble to high ground 
after the Nevado dd Ruiz vdcmip enpted Wednesday, setting off an 
avalanche of mud arid-rocks that roared through this town of 25,000. 

“This was Main Street,* 1 Fernando Ardoiegas said, pointing to the 
lopscrftwoman^o trees. “Theraiboad station, the Bank of Colombia, 
the Haza Principal — jfs all gone.”. The wall of mud and water 
(Continnedpn Page 3,CoL 3) 


^twined with the body of her dead -. XJniori out - af-. Afghanistan”, and 
husband, before rescuers . finally “USA out of Central America/* 


freed her late Saturday night. 

Helicopter rescue teams, Hying 
Sunday over the sea of mud that 
swamped the mountain valleys be- 
neath the Nevado del Ruiz volcano 
on Wednesday, concentrated on 


ground 

The government said the lives of 
227,000 residents in seven Andean 
valleys had been disrupted by one 
of the worst natural calamities in 
the Western Hemisphere. 

Scientists, concerned that a new 
eruption of Nevado del Ruiz might 
send more melted snow cascading 
down, have mounted a round-the- 


Mr. Reagan. 74, has three years 
left in office. Mr. Gorbachev, 54, 
can reasonably expect to rule for a 
decade or two. Yet there is a certain 
convergence in the present goals of 
these two max, one of whom began 
his political career as an anti-Com- 
munist crusader and another who 
worked his way through the Com- 
munist ranks. 

Mr. Reagan is eager to establish 
a reputation as a peacemaker. Mr. 
Gorbachev is eager to ease the bur- 
den of armaments on the Soviet 
economy so that he can press ahead 
with a broad program of change. 

In Washington, in Moscow and 
in other capitals, the meeting is 


New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
Union, apparently in a gesture in 
advance of the Geneva summit 
meeting, has told the United States 
that it would give exit visas to some 
U.S. citizens’ spouses who for years 
have been denied permission to 
leave, S',.v; -Deportment officials 
said. 

One official said the Foreign 
Ministry’s list of 10 names, handed 
to the U.S. Embassy in Moscow on 
Friday, included about a third at 
the long-separated spouses who re- 
main in the Soviet Union. 

The list indudes Dmitri B. Arga- 
kov of Leningrad, husband of 
Mary Lou Hulseman of Cleveland; 
Tatiana U. Bondarev of Moscow, 
wife of Tony Bartholomew of 
Fountain Valley, California; Helle 
Frejus of Tallinn, Estonia, wife of 
Kazimiaz Frejus of Pomona, Cali- 
fornia, and Mikhail lossel of Len- 



Leaked Letter 
Asks President 
For Vigilance 

By Henry Tanner 

Iniertuihotut Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — Spokesmen for the 
United States and the Soviet Union 
stated basically conflicting posi- 
tions on key disarmament ques- 
tions Sunday and pointedly re- 
frained from predicting that the 
summit conference Tuesday and 
Wednesday between Ronald Rea- 
gan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
would be successful. 

Soviet officials seized upon die 
printed version of a letter to the 
president by Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger as an indica- 
tion that the United States was not 
serious about reaching agreement 
on the limitation of nuclear arms. 

Georgi A. .Arbatov, a senior ad- 
viser to Mr. Gorbachev, accused 
Mr. Weinberger at a news confer- 
ence of making a “direct attempt to 
torpedo the whole arms negotia- 
tions process." 

In his letter. Mr. Weinberger said 
that Soviet violations of existing 
treaties “put us in a particularly 
vulnerable and dangerous position 
emm when these violations are com- 
tegy session at his Geneva pared with the sharp reductions in 
ritz; Mr. Reagan; Robert C. our for strategic defense 

, White House chief of staff. fu °< iin S- ... 

’ Copies of the letter were ob- 

tained by The New York Times 
and The Washington Post and pub- 

to hpouses Mr. Weinberger told Mr. Rea- 

_ gan: “You will almost certainly 

2 /||.L *-*-*» 0 conie UQC * er fire® 1 pressure to do 

* F I. li ters three things that would severely 

limit your options for responding 
The Russians have accepted the ^ Soviet violations, 
argument that the question of di- Ue listed the pressure points as: 
vided spouses is a legitimate one a demand to continue adherence to 
for the United States to raise. VS. die SALT-2 strategic arms limiia- 


offidals said However, they have 
argued that it was not the United 
States's business to raise questions 


(ion treaty; restriction of missile 
defense research; and a Soviet pro- 
posal for a statement “that ob- 


on the treatment of Soviet Jews and **•« of arms control 

i* ? 3 (fiAlotinne ku rafarrl rt/v 1 a ika ‘im 


of dissidents . violations by referring to the *im- 

v , ^ , .. . portance that both sides attach to 

Ydena G. Bonner U. wife of compliance.’” 

r. Sakarov, the Nobel pnze-wm- Mr. Arbatov said there could be 
tig physicist was given permis- n0 prog^ toward any kind of 
in to go abroad for medical treat- ^ Station unless both sides 


Mr. Sakarov, the Nobel prize-win- 
ning physicist was given permis- 
sion to go abroad for medical treat- 


- j . ■ j I ,<11 UUU 1 Jiuva 

ment and has said she would do so adhered to ^ treaties ihev had 
at the end of this month. already signed. 

Mr. Gorbachev, in his meeting 


Mr. Weinberger urged the presi- 


Karimierz Frd us i of Pom onal Call- Al>e Stolar that field as a result or the review, swering questions for more than an 

tafSlKtanS. j. stav ;n State Department officials said hour in the main auditorium of the 

ingrad, husband of Edith Luthi of Sf® 011 10 stay m ^ Umted that even though the number of >? tc ™ t,onal CCTter se ^“S 
ii .i States. : n .l the European bead Quarters of the 


with the U.S. secretary of state, dent in his letter not (o commit 
George P. Shultz, in Moscow last himself to a prolongation of SALT- 
week. said he had reviewed the list 2, which is due for a one-year ex- 
of separated spouses. Mr. Shultz tension next month, 
reportedly gained the impression Mr. Arbatov was one of four 
that something might happen in high-ranking Soviet officials an- 


Ibat field as a result or the review. 
State Department officials said 


By Nora Boustany ' 

Washin gt on Post Servkr 

BEIRUT — Terry Waite, a spe- 
dal envoy of the archbishop of 


jv 1 


- . - • J,<3 


. 9rv ~g M MT clock wateb on the volcano. ^ capitals, the meeting is 

... • , The Colombian government said seen not only as a dash of ideolo- 

through to the nght petyle, md it had installed new setsmological gtes but also as a contest between 
» OS*** " ^ eq^Pnifflt to replace measuring ^ fonnidab l e personalities, 

estabushea - devices destroyed by Lhe first erup- ... cau 

“I wffl not say at an where 1 met, don. Aide to Nfr. tanw rhe 

whh^wfaom I met or jjJiU paswi Eduardo Parra, a rttamaopn 


< V Canterbury, said Sunday- that he with whom I met or what passed Eduardo Fana, a volcano expert, 
had met with the kidnappers, of between us,” Mr: Waite said, said that the chances of anew erup- 
f&b four Americans in Lebanon. _ , “peculation about any; of those don or lava flows were receding but 

e*-;. He later left Lebanon to rqwrt points could cost lives.*’ That there stffl was a danger erf 

to the archbishop, who is the spin- It was the first known mating mudslides. 

' jn tnnl lead er of the Oraixh of En- between a Western representative However, Derrel Herd, a leading 
r gland, and to ccmsoli with U^. arid the abductors of the Amen- American volcano specialist, said 

officials. - , • cans. Islaimc Jihad, a Shiite funda- Saturday in BogoiA, before flying 

^ Mr. Waite, a lay represen tali ve _ roe n t a g st group.has claimed re- over the volcano, that “additional 
' , £•. of the archbishop, the Most Rever- SponaNlity fear the kidnappings. explosons can be expected.” 

end Robert Runde, said at a news . ^ Mr. Waitc safd he planned - to fly Mr. Herd, deputy chief of the 


end Robert Runde, said at a news • Mr. War te said he planned - to uy Mr. Herd, deputy chief of the 
conference before his departure for to Wa sh i n g to n or another location United Stales Geological Survey’s 
London that bis mission was not . Sunday night to confer with U.S. Office of Earthquakes, stud that 
comnlete vet. but that “positive officials. only about 20 percent of the volca- 


London that bis mission was not . Sunday night to confer with U.S. Office of . Earthquakes, stud that 
complete yet, bid that “positive officials. only about 20 percent of the volca- 

steps have been taken.** '.■■■■' . Larry Speakes, the White House no’s ice field had been removed by 

He anriourtoed Saturday in a spokesman, said Sunday that Rea- the eruption, and that the remain- 
brief statement that a face-to-face . gm admimstraticm officials would mg ice could “probably be the 
meeting, was bong ; arranged be- - be wiffing to meet Mr. Waite in source of more mud flow activity.” 
tween him and the kidnappers, mid London, Wa shingto n or Geneva, _ 

that he had estahEsfced they were where preparations are under way ■ Aid Arrives 
holding the' American hostages: for the talks Tuesday and Wednes- The dvil aviation authorities 

MrWaite emphiisized the deb- day between President Ronald said that more than 50 planes, in- 
cate nature of bis negotiations. with Reagan and MikhailS. Gorbachev, eluding . some from lhe United 
the abductors and refused to Pro- the Soviet leader. - States. Canada, Venezuela. Brazil 


officials. only about 20 percent of the volca- 

. Larry Speakes, the White House no’s ice field had been removed by 
spokesman, said Sunday that Rea- tire eruption, and that the remain- 
gan administrmiop affiaals would mg ice could “probably be the 
be wiffing to meet Mr. Waite in source of more mud flow activity.” 
London, Washington or Geneva, _ ’ 

where preparations are under way ■ Aid Arrives 
for the talks Tuesday and Wednes- The civil aviation authorities 


the abductors and refused to pro- 
vide details on -the penons with 
whom he had; met 
“There is absolutely no. doubt at 
att." 2fc. s^3£maft.A have got 


the Soviet leader. - States, Canada, Venezuela, Brazil, 

Mr. Waite said that he had had Britain, Spain and France, arrived 
“lengthy contacts” with the kid- in Colombia over the weekend with 
Dappers since arriving in Beirut on . emergency supplies. The Assodat- 


lesday night. 


ed Press reported from Bogota. 


two formidable personalities. 

Aides to Mr. Reagan say he 
hopes to persuade Mr. Gorbachev 
that the Kremlin view of the Unit- 
ed Stales is incorrect. Soviet offi- 
cials expea their man, who has 
established a reputation in public 
relations in his own right, to prove 
the more forceful and better-pre- 
pared of the two in their meetings. 

“You know how things were in 
lhe Karpov- Kasparov chess 
match,” said a Soviet official "The 
younger man won. It trill be the 
same thing in Geneva.” 

The mere fact that the two men 
are meeting signals a s ignifican t 
thaw in relations. 

After a period of detente in the 
1970s, the Soviet intervention in 
Afghanistan at the end of 1979 
chilled the atmosphere, and the im- 
position of martial law in Poland 
led to a near-freeze between the 
two governments. 

The deployment of American 
cruise missiles and Pershing-2s in 
Western Europe aroused as much 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


HoDiston, Massachusetts. Others nn th* n« ■ n se P araled spouses is small the ap- r? e .rTrf™ 11 ^aquauers oi me 

Marina F. Lepekhin, who is al- , ..i f w- h? e u_ n j^f^ ?• parent decision to allow some to N ^ uons - 

ready with heThStad, John Ko- J 5 ''j 0 *” thrir “ significant. werc M- 2»- 

pedl, in Justice, Illinois, was in- £“'’“1 given the problems itat hawaiisen niyalm, the Commutmt Party Cen- 

chided and is to receive Soviet ™ e in recent years on these cases. (Conliniied 00 Page 2. CoL 6) 


the European headquarters of the 
United Nations. 

The others were Leonid M. Za- 


MOBE SUMMIT NEWS 

■ The Soviet press criticized 
the U.S. on issues ranging from 
space weapons to alleged hu- 
man rights abuses. Page 2. 

■ The meeting in Geneva marks 
a new approach in the history of 
summit meetings. Page 4. 

■ The United States prepared 
to propose that it and the Soviet 
Union work to halt the war be- 
tween Iran and Iraq. Page 4. 

■ The superpowers have the po- 

tential to reach an aims accord 
in Geneva, but neither side ex- 
pects one. Page 4. 

■ Henry A. Kissinger argues 

that Ronald Reagan went to 
Geneva with a strong bargain- 
ing position. Page 5. 

■ William Safire and W illiam 
G. Hyland tell how to score the 
Geneva meeting. Paged 


of Woodford McClellan or Ivy, 
Virginia; Leonid M. Oblavsky of 
Leningrad, husband of Robin Ru- 
bendunst of Somerville, Massachu- 
setts. 

Ending the list were Abe Stolar, 
73, a native of Chicago who was 
■taken by his parents to the Soviet 
Union in 1931 and who has been 
trying for more than a decade to 
leave, and Mikhail Stukalin, 16, 
who will be allowed to join his 
mother in the United States. 

According to State Department 
officials, the question of reuniting 
divided spouses has been one of the 
principal human rights issues on 
the agenda for President Ronald 
Reagan’s meeting in Geneva with 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 


Weinberger Reassures 
White House on Budget 


By Gerald M. Boyd 

New York Tima Serviee 

WASHINGTON — Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Weinbeiger 
has assured White House officials 
that he has not sought to undercut 
President Ronald Reagan on legis- 
lation to balance the federal bud- 

The assurance came at a meeting 






INSIDE 

■The Philippine insurgents are 
home-grown, cautious and self- 
reliant. ----- Page 2. 

■ The United States expressed 
concern to Liberia over reports 
of executions after, the recent 
coop attempt •*. . Page 3. 

i B^BcHragitt wffl bre ak ties with 
Taiwan permit the Beijing 
government to open an embas- 
sy in Managua. BBge-5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ OECD membos disagreed 

openly about U.S. growth pros- 
pects.--- JPagell. 

■ Oil drfiling off the Sooth Ghir 

na coast has proven a disap- 
pointment to leading ofi com- 
panies. RefielL 

TOMORROW 

The British-Irish agreement on 
Northern Ireland .is risky and 
f ragil e for both countries. 


Irish Opposition Chief Assails Accord on Northern Ireland 


Mr. Reagan also intends to raise Friday with Donald T. Regan, the 
the question of the thousands of White House chief of staff. Some 
Soviet Jews who seek permission to senior aides have said there was 
emigrate to Israel as well as the growing resentment within the 
release of political prisoners such White House over Mr. Weinber- 
as Anatoli Sbchanmsky and the ger's public criticisms of the pro- 
amelioration of conditions for such posal a source of friction within 
activists as Andrei D. Sakharov, the administration. 

Mr. Sakharov is in exile in the city The defense secretary told a Sen- 
of Gorki. ate subcommittee Thursday that he 

would recommend that President 
Reagan veto the proposal on a bal- 
anced budget, suggesting that it 
_ T 1 _ 1 could endanger the nation's de- 
ll IrP.mlMl fenses. 




By Steve Lofir 

New York Times Service - 
. . DUBLIN — Ireland’s opposi- 
tion leader, Charles J.' Haughty, 
has attacked the agreement be- 
tween Britain and Ireland to give 
Dublin a finriwd^ voice in the affairs 

of Northern Ireland, and he vowed 

: to fight its ratification in the pariia- 
ment 

- By taking a consultative xole in 
the affairs of the North, Mr. 
Haughty said Saturday, Dublin 
would be assuming responsibilities 
for security maf lets without having 
any power, since Northern Ireland 
would remain ruled by Britain. 
This arrangement, Mr. Haughey 
said, would conflict with the Irish 
Constitution. . ‘ 

Mr. Haughey said he vigorously 
..opposed the agreement’s recogni- 
tion of Northern Ireland's status as. 
an integral part of the United 
Kingdom. This, in his view,* under- 
mines efforts* to eventually unify 
Northern IndaMf with Ireland. ' 



m 


The defense secretary told a Sen- Caspar YY. Weinberger 
ate subcommittee Thursday that he 

would recommend that President ... . . - - . . „ 

Reagan veto the proposal on a bal- rea f^ J^ es,den . 1 

anced budget, suggesting that it 

could endiger tS naUoTi's de- "f- 

fenses. XZT ? 10 nse to make up for 

Under the legislation, the presi- ‘ nfI;JI ‘ c,n “ 1986 “S to 3 

den. would bc'S.uired ,o cu". U. 


the agreement is important because election must be hdd within two tin’s largest daily, called the agree- ? ^ drasticail >K ah r tn 19S7 and 1988. 
his party, Fianna Fail, is the largest years, many political analysts said ment ‘reasonable, balanced, l “ In addition, the secretary hai 

single grouping in the Dafl, Ire- it was likely that the opposition restrained." adding, “It occupied Eluding tnemui^y. io_ reacna^r- ^ 3t remarks viewed u 
land’s parliament. In a recent pcfl, would come to power unless the the middle ground.” lam oenai ouing u ^eir emiretv would support hi 

Mr. led Gh™ Fifes’ Irid. uconomy picked up soou. The ImhTm.es suit “The Irish- She ^ “cuT« rS a cunmuriou ihs, he was non under 

P™ mm | sler ' by 19 per- g otherwise, the early reaction J»g«emeni is a reasonable balanced budget by the end of the CUt ^ I 1 J, 1 k C JF l J ad “ l - and lhal 

. . . here to tlwasreonm has been cau- ^ I* “ a solution; it is a S e . ^ “ be “. 


Charles -Haughey 

“This is a severe, blow for Irish 
unity and hish n a ti onalismT Mr. 
Haughey said. 

Mr. Haugfaey's attknde toward 


single grouping in (he Dafl, Ire- 
land’s parliament- In a recenr poll, 
Mr. Haughey led Garret FitzGer- 
ald, the prime minister, by 19 per- 
centage points. 

Mr. Haughey*s opposition to the 
agreement is a greater threat to its 
long-term survival than to its ratifi- 
cation. The two parties in the gov- 
erning coalition met Saturday and 
agreed to ratify the accord. 

Mr. FitzGerald’s Fine Gael Par- 
ty and the Labor Party together 
hold 86 seats in the parliament, 
compared with 75 seats for Mr. 
Haughey’s party. 

Mr. Haughey said his party 
would try to change the agreement 
if it came to power. 

“We wffl certainly not be pre- 
pared to accept h in its present 
form,” he said. 

Given Mr. Haughey’ s high rating 

in the polls and the fact that an 


hereto the agreement has been cau.- 


f ailed to provide an annual budget 

, contention that he was not under- 
wild Lot requisite cuts to r cs ui fl * j , . , j « % ■ 

balanced bSget by the end of the cut ^£, t ^, e P?**® 11 - and ,hat 

5 u i oosiuon had haM fmcrertivt:^ni#vt 


decade. 


tioosly favorable. Under the ac- begiiming. It has to be welcomed." Several officials,, who asked not SSmrat. 


position had been misrepresented 
through only partial reporting of 


cord, the Dublin government is giv- 
en a mechanism for pressing its 
views on virtually all matters 


I Threat From Protestants £ ^ b « lie V« i Asked if the secreiaiy’s cora- 

Northrm Ireland^ bard lin^ - playmg ments were counterproductive, a 

into the hands of cnucs of the pro- White House aide said. “You’re 


touching the Roman Catholic mi- Proie^m politicians threatened posal by raising legislative obsta- damned rishu" 

nority in predominantly Protestant Sa ttrniay to resign from the Bnosh c les to enactment of the proposal as r ui r si 

vr .! T PaniampriT Tn nrnr«l in* a.v'/trd r r r BUWWW»i).» 


Pariiament to protest the accord, f aTO red by President Reagan. 


Northern Ireland. Parliament to protest the accord. 

The Associated Press reported 
The agreement says that North- from Belfast, 
era Ireland win remain British until Tk- 


cita cuaumeni oi me proposal as But Robert B. Sims, chief Penta- 
tavored by President Reagan. go n ^jokesman. said it was “totally 

In addition, they said the defense ridiculous” to suggest that Mr. 
secretary was making it easier for Weinbeiger was attempting to un- 


E1U UCUUU W1U IHUdlii Olliuu umu TKaB«li»fl«ll IrinDuiulaii « . , . . . C. , , 7 r 

a majority of its inhabitants want a X? r j ■ i ® adeT Congress to pass a version of the dermine the legislation. 

of. the Democratic Unionist Party, bfll that the president would ulu- Meanwhile, the oresh 


**°i d said be and his 14 fellow Protestant 


also acopts the legmrnacv 0 r the wouW gi^ up ^eir par- 

nationalist provided those Senuiy seats unl«s BriSi 

sttkmg j unified Ireland press then ag^ „ Mi i , rrferen dum i 

S perS “ as ‘ 011 ratller Sum Ireland Mfcaccori. 


bQI that the president would ulti- 
mately have to veto. 


Meanwhile, the president vetoed 
a 513-billion appropriation bill Fri- 


Whiie House offidals said that day. saying it showed ihe “failure 
Mr. Weinberger bad told Mr. Re- of Uie budget process” and the “in- 
gan he was not seeking to under- grained capacity to tackle the large 
mine the president but was, in- budget deficit.” 
stead, trying 10 assure that militarv The bill included funds for the 


If Britain refused, Mr. Paisley stead, trying 10 assure that mili taiy The bill included funds for the 
In a front-page editorial Saiur- said, “then they are making the spending would increase in each of Treasury, the Postal Service and 
day, the Irish Independent, Dub- choice of anarchy, not us.” the next three years to levels al- the White House. 


H, As 










Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


U.S. Is Criticized on Broad Range of Issues by Russian Press 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Roam 

MOSCOW — The Soviet press 
criticized the United States on Son- 
day on issues ranging from space 
weapons and Asian security to al- 
leged U.S. human rights abuses. 

Articles in the Communist Party 
newspaper, Pravda. and by Tass, 
the press agency, expressed little 
hope that President Ronald Rea- 
gan's meetings with Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev would produce signifi- 
cant results. 

Pravda said people longed for 
arms accords and improved super- 
power relations, “but at the very 
same time not one observer and not 
one newspaper expresses confi- 
dence that the American side is 
ready to take real steps along this 
road" 

Pravda said the United States 
still counted on military superiority 
over the Soviet Union and warned 
that, if necessary, Moscow would 
match Mr. Reagan's space-defense 
program. 

Tass, commenting on a Reagan 
interview with Japanese reporters, 
said he bad tried to frighten Asian 
countries with a mythical Soviet 
threat. 

“He said, among other things, 
that Washington favors a discus- 
sion at Geneva of the issue of Sovi- 
et SS-20 missiles deployed in the 
Asian pan of the Soviet Union," 
the agency said. “Meanwhile, it is 
common knowledge that it is not 



Th* Aaodetad Pro 


Two Soviet officials, Leonid M. Zamyatin, left, and Georgi A. Arbatov, meeting the press. 


the Soviet Union but tbe United 
States which has recently intensi- 
fied its military preparations in the 
Asian-Pacific region,” it said. 

“As far as the missil es in the 
Asian port of the Soviet Union are 


concerned, they are deployed in 
precisely those numbers necessary 
to balance the U.S. potential in the 
region." 

In another article, Tass accused 
the FBI of framing a case against 


Leonard Peltier, an American Indi- 
an jailed for murder whom the So- 
viet press often calls a victim of 
U.S. human rights violations. Tass 
described him as “a courageous 
American Indian leader who has 


languished behind bars on 
trumped-up charges for eight years 
now. 

■ Soviet PnbOc Relations 

Serge Schmemann of The New 
York Times reported from Geneva: 

The Russians have maintained a 
hectic public relations schedule in 
Geneva since the first Soviet offi- 
cials arrived last Monday. 

At tbe Intercontinental Hold, 
where die American briefings were 
to be held, workers were busy lay- 
ing cable Friday for the press brief- 
ing room. At the International 
Conference Center, the Russians 
were busy giving briefings. 

Their subject Friday was space- 
based defense, and a team Of Soviet 
officials, led by Leonid M. Zamya- 
tin, the Communist Party spokes- 
man, and Georgi A. Arbatov, head 
of the Institute of tbe United States 
and Canada, preached, wise- 
cracked and tangled with about 300 
journalists in town for the opening 
Tuesday of the two-day summit 
meeting. 

On Wednesday, they defended 
the Soviet record on human rights; 
on Thursday they auended a lunch 
with 90 reporters; and on Saturday 
they were to hold a briefing on 
regional problems. Between those 
enga gements the Russians put out 
the word that officials were avail- 
able for interviews. 

In contrast, a small American 
office at the International Confer- 


ence Center was staffed only by 
press attaches brought over from 
Warsaw and Bono, and no brief- 
ings were scheduled until Sunday. 

American sources complained 
that the Soviet briefings were set- 
ting a combative tone on the eve of 
the summit meeting. 

Mr. Arbatov denied that the 
Russians were gening anv rinfair 
advantage. “Your people talk 
much more,” he said. 

. But in Geneva, the Russians 
seem to have a monopoly on talk- 
ing for now, and much of tbe time 


Soviet 


have displayed the kind of 


they hai 

sophistication that has put a' new 


Philippine Rebels Are Home-Grown, Cautious, Seli-Reliant 


By William Branigin 

Washington Pan Service 

MANILA — The long-naming 
Co mmunis t insurgency in the Phil- 
ippines has been billed lately as the 
“Reagan administration's Iran." 

U.S. observers, old Asia hands 
for the most part, draw compari- 
sons with Vietnam. 

But for Filipinos closely in- 
volved in the insurgency, either in 
waging it or fighting a gains t it, the 
closest comparison is with Nicara- 
gua. 

Except as a metaphor for a U.S. 
foreign policy crisis, Iran has little 
relevance here, and comparisons 
between tbe two countries have 
drawn reactions of surprise. 

Less surprising, but stOl perplex- 


ing, is word from the U.S. Congress 
that the Soviet Union is moving to 
exploit the turmoil in the 
pines by malting contacts with 
insurgents. 

The Communist Party of the 
Philippines and its armed wing, the 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


New People's Army, have been 
seeking foreign support for years in 
their battle against the government 
of President Ferdinand E Marcos. 
By all accounts, however, they have 
received little. 

Rebels and military sources say 
none has come from the Soviet 
Union, which has angered the Phil- 
ippine Communists by trying to 
curry favor with Mr. Marcos. 


to Communist publi- 
cations and interviews during tbe 
past several months with rebels and 
their supporters, the Communist 
rebellion is a home-grown move- 
ment that borrows concepts and 
doctrines from a variety of sources 
but tends to be cautious. It places 
great stock in its self-reliance. 

Comparisons between the Phil- 
ippines and Iran generate more dif- 
ferences than sumlarities. 


it faces a determined 
aimist insurgency, but the 
similarities seem to end there. 

The Vietnamese Communists 
benefited from large-scale foreign 
support from the Russians and 
Chinese, had supply lines through 
neighboring countries and recourse 
to a powerful conventional army, 
the North Vietnamese regulars. 

By contrast, the Philippines not 
only has an isolated insurgency. 


Among the Communists’ prima- 
aims now is the creation of a 
(road united front" of i 
forces to complement the 1 


: opposition 
leNewPeo- 


nair 


The Philippines is a predomi- but the country also eqoys a demo- pie’s Army guerrilla war with an 

mftv Unman Pathnlin arr4mv»1n- CTfllir traHihftn that nlthnnoh tut- 1 w.nl rtw.imln" rnmnilv in 


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rebels have been fighting the gov- 
ernment for 16 years. 

In Iran, it was a largely sponta- 
neous Islamic revolution that over- 
whelmed the monarchy. Opposi- 
tion to the shah, an aloof figure, 
was channeled by Ayatollah Ru- 
boDah Khomeini into a religious 
revolt that mobilized the majority 
of the people and paralyzed tbe 
country with strikes. 

This made Iran virtually impos- 
sible to govern, and there was noth- 
ing the shah or any outside power 
could do about it 

In the Philippines, the opposi- 
tion to Mr. Marcos is much more 
fragmented and by no means uni- 
versal While he is often described 
as out of touch with the country, 
Mr. Marcos always has been in- 
tensely political and has been cred- 
ited with knowing how to play on 
the sentiments of the Filipino peo- 
ple like a virtuoso. 

Never quite the dictator that his 
enemies have portrayed him to be, 
he has always seemed able to sense 
when to crack down and when to 
ease up on his opponents. 

As in Vietnam, a U.S. -backed 


tered under Mr. Marcos, stiH ap- 
pears salvageable and may yet 
provide an elected alternative. 

In fact, there are indications that 
this is what tbe Communists fear 
most . 

A former Spanish colony in 
which the Roman Catholic Chnroh 
wields great influence, the Philip- 
pines, on the face of things, would 
seem to have more in common with 
Nicaragua. 

The Communists' own literature 
raises the prospect that, as in Nica- 
ragua, the political struggle could 
outpace the armed insurgency if 
efforts to develop a "broad united 
front" against Mr. Marcos, includ- 
ing businessmen, professionals and 
political moderates, are successful 

It is a prospect that also is taken 
seriously by moderate opposition 
and even some military sources. 

Diosdado Macapagal, the for- 
mer president, has warned for years 
that the Philippines could go tbe 
way of Nicaragua if Mr. Marcos 
remained in power. 

“Unfortunately, there seems to 




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Reagan Hopes for 'a Start 9 


(Con tinned from Page 1) 
fury in Moscow as the Soviet ac- 
tions aroused in Washington. 

The period was epitomized by 
Mr. Reagan's description of tbe So- 
viet Union in 1983 as an “evil cm- 


He urged the Soviet Union to 
eUniti 


pire. 

Since arms talks were resumed 
earlier this year, progress has beat 
slow. Both sides have proposed 
cuts in their arsenals of strategic 
and medium-range missiles bnt 
major differences remain on how to 
count weapons and how to imple- 
ment the cuts. 


join the United States in solving the 
problems of Afghanistan. Cambo- 
dia, Ethiopia and Angola, all places 
where the United States wants So- 
viet or Soviet-backed troops to 
withdraw. 


In addition, the Russians have 
seemed to rule oat arms cuts until 
Washington agrees to halt work on 
Mr. Reagan's proposal for a missile 
defense based in space. 

Mr. Reagan has talked a lot 
about regional conflicts. In his 
speed to the United Nations this 
month he emphasized such issues 


For its part Moscow would like 
to curb American activities in Cen- 
tral America and tbe Middle East 
The administration ba^ implied 
that progress on aims control 
should be linked to regional con- 
flicts, a proposition resisted by the 
Russians. 


Mr. Reagan, like other recent 
presidents, hopes to use the summit 
meeting to press for an increase in 
emigration rights for Soviet Jews, 
for the reunion of Soviet- American 
couples and for less harassment of 
Soviet dissidents. 


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face on Soviet public relations 
since Mr. Gorbachev came to pow- 
er in March. 

Though they have made few new 
points, the Russians have often 
shown wit in assailing Washing- 
ton’s positions. 

Asked how Mr. Gorbachev was 
preparing for the meeting, Mr. Ar- 
batov referred sarcastically to re- 
ports that Mr. Reagan was study- 
ing videotapes. “Mr. Gorbachev 
doesn’t need KMnmule video dips 
to fill his attention, span,” he said. 

At another point, parrying ques- 
tions about shifting -Soviet posi- 
tions on Mr. Reagan's proposal for 
a space-based defense, an official 
pulled out a slip of paper to 
m Fnglish from Voltaire: T 
never made but one prayer: O God, 
make my enemies ridiculous." 


U-S.Says 

WASHINGTON (WP) — Soviet owv < w- , , 
up shipments toNjcaragua,mdudingatl^ ^ to officials 5 
that can be armed to protect .ground troops, aecoramg » 

officials outimed the latest spurt ^shqHMB to Ngu^ m 
ran of the Reagan a dminis tration's campaign on behalf of tbe cotmter- 
revolutionaries. or “contras,” who arefignting tire Sandinist government 
there. The ^minis tration maintains that the- Nicaraguan government 
supplied and backed by Soviet bloc conntnes. 







! oESS“‘S Winnie Mandela Defies Police Order 


be a merging effort of the Comma-, 
nist Party with tbe legitimate oppo- 
sition," Marine Colonel Rodolfo 
Rla-ynn $aid recently in Davao. “I 
litpn thin to the situation of Nicara- 
gua, where the nom-Communist 
anti-Somaza factions allied them- 
selves with the Sandinistas.” 


Weinberger 
Calls For 


Vigilance 


(Continued from Page 1) 


the cities. 

In fact, some observers believe 
that the guerrillas, whose weapons 
are almost entirely captured from 
the Philippine military, may have 
great difficulty expanding their op- 
erations from hit-and-run raids to 
the more conventional battles envi- 
sioned in a “strategic stalemate.'’ 

“I think the NPA has gone about 
as far as it can. unless it receives 
outside assistance,” said a parish 
priest working in a remote area of 
Mindanao. “The NPA is simply 
outgunned — M-16s and bolos are 
not enough." A bolo is a long 
heavy knife. 

It is dear that the insurgents 
would welcome support from the 
Russians, or anybody else, but they 
tend to doubt that it will be forth- 
coming. 

“The Russians have always 
looked at Marcos as a sincere na- 
tionalist who can be befriended," 
said a rebel supporter in Manila. 
“They lode at the NPA as an ad- 
venturist movement" 


tral Committee’s chief spokesman 
on international affairs; Colonel 
General Nikolai F. Chervov, a fre- 
quent spokesman on arms control; 
and Yevgeni P. Vefikhov, a nuclear 
physicist and vice president of the 
Academy of Sciences. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, earlier had pointed 
out that Mr. Weinberger's views on 
SALT-2 had been known publicly 
before Us letter to the president 
was leaked to the newspapers. 

The secretary’s remarks, he said, 
were contained in a cover letter 
accompanying a Pentagon review 
of the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile 
treaty requested by the president. 

Robert G McFariane, the presi- 
dent's national security adviser, 
said at Us own news conference 
tbat the leak of Mr. Weinberger's 
letter was “unfortunate” . 

He declined to predict what the 
president’s decision about SALT-2 
was going to be. 

Mr. McFariane stressed what he 
described as deep-seated differ-, 
ences that existed between tbe two 
sides. 


CAPE TOWN — Winnie Man- 
dela, tire black nationalist leader, 
continued to defy a police order to 
return to internal enk Sunday. 

She remained at a hotel in Cape 
Town near the hospital where her 
husband, Nelson, tbe loader of the 
outlawed African National Con- 
gress, is recovering from, prostate 
gland surgery- Her lawyer, Ismail 
Ayob, said . that Mrs. Mandela 
would stay in Cape Town until her 
husband returned to prisosL 

Mrs. Mandela refused to return 
to the remote Orange Free State 
township near Brandforf to which 
she was banished in 1977. 

In Johannesburg, police said (hat, 
two people were shot dead Sunday 
when blacks, attacked a police car 
and a private home. In overnight 
violence in black. townsUps three 
blacks died in clashes with police, 
they said. (Reuters, UP I) 



Winnie Mandela 


Rightist Wins Mayorabjm Brazil Vote 

RIO DE JANEIRO (NYT) — Eight montiis after Brazil returned to 
avffian government, a former president, Jamo Quadras, has been elected 




v- 



were the first free of 


the former military government. The 
military control in 21 years. 

Mr. Quadros’s victory in the country* s largest city was a setback for the 
Brazilian Democratic Movement Pasty, vrinch for two decades opposed 
miHt&iyruk and now is theTdomiuumt partita in the govennjag coalition p 
that supports President Jost Samey. His defeat of Fernando Henrique 
Cardoso, considered a potential preadentiaLcandidate for the Democrat- 
ic Movement, could have major impheatiocs for general ejections next 
year, the remoddSngof Mr, Smiley's cafimei and tire structure of political 
parties in BraziL - . ■ '[.,■ \.t " 

However, the Democratic. Movenretri tobJra majority of the 200 
mayoralties at stafa^ea ffimmi g^t se i F ag^ party. It 

won in. 1 1 of 23 state capitals andwas ahead-in six others. It also suffered 
one other key defeat 4aBdO-dcKT an e in vt hc -canrf idat erijackcd by the 
stale's Socialist governor, Leooel Brizda, won easily.. 


almost to the exclusion of arms 
control 


The president he said, viewed 
his meeting with Mr. Gorbachev as 
“an opportunity for an exchange 
on the full spectrum of the differ- 
ences between our two countries." 

He said that the Russians were 
attempting to force the United 
States to make “a dance between 
defending our friends and allies or 
maintaining a central balance in 
strategic systems between oursdves 
and the Soviet Union.” 

His remarks referred to the Sovi- 
et proposition that U.S. medium- 
range Pershing-2 and cruise mis- 
siles in Europe must be counted as' 
part of UJS. strategic weaponry, 
and- that the United States there- 
fore most choose between reducing 
either its cruise and Pershing mis- 
riles or its intercontinental land- 
and sea-based weapons. 

Mr. McFariane said that talks 
between Soviet and UJ5. experts 
during the last few days had nar- 
rowed the differences between the 
rides on “several of the bilateral 
issues." 

Mr. McFariane and the four So- 
viet officials who preceded him on 
the stage of the press center restat- 
ed in summary form the respective 
armament proposals made public 
by the two sides over the past 
months. 

Mr. Velikhov, asked about the 
U.S. Strategic Defense Initiative 
program for a space-based defense, 
answered tbat there were in effect 
two UJS. programs. 

Tbe first, he said, was Mr. Rea- 
gan's initial declaration callmg for 
an im p r e gnable shield that would 
make affmrive nuclear weapons 
obsolete. 

The Soviet Union regarded this 
as unattainable. But, he added, 
there was a second idea that called 
for a partially effective shield tbat 
would increase the United States’ 

first-strike capability and thus lead 

to further destabilization. - • 

The Soviet news conference was 
disrupted for several minutes when 
a Soviet dissident, Irina Grivmna, 
who left tire Soviet Union three 
weeks ago, engaged tbe Soviet offi- 
cials in a shouting matrh 

She asked for news about Ana- 
toli L Koryagm, a psychiatrist who, 
she said, was dying in a Soviet labor 
c amp after reocmtly starting his 
fourth hunger strike. 

Mr. Zamysuin said that there 
were “no political prisoners” in the 
Soviet Union. He said be was not 
familiar with Mr. Kotyagjn’s case. 


Cairo Tells 7 Nations of Alleged Plots 


CAIRO (Reuters) — Egypt has infimned seven Euro pe a n and African 
envoys of alleged Libyan terrorist plots in their countries, the Interim' 
hfiimtiysaidSunday... 

It arid Tnftri rtr’VffTMctar Ahmad Rnshdihari met with the ambassadors 

of Britain, West Gcnnany, France, Greece. Italy, Austria and Nigeria in 
tire past tew days and informed tbem-of details of tire^ alleged plots. ■ 
The ministry statement said tireinf carnation was obtained in confes- 
sions from four men, identified by tire authorities as Libyans, who were 
detained last week for questioning in what Cairo said was a plot to irifl 
Libyan exiles living in Egypt The statement described the confessions as : 
“highly important and serious” bat did not elaborate. 


£ " 




UN Sanctions on Pretoria Blocked 


UNITED NATIONS, New York (NYT) — Tbe United States and 
Britain have vetoed a resolution that would have imposed mandatory, 
econonncand trade sanctions against South Africa for its failure to carry! 
out a 1978 UN plan to establish an independent South-West Africa, or 
Namibia. 

France abstained in the vote Friday night, while 12 of tbe Security 
CoundTs IS members supported the measure. Despite attempts by 
Western members of the council to remove tbe references to mandatory i 
sanctions to which U.S. and British representatives objected, India and' 
Peru refused to compromise; according to diplomats. 

The resolution called for oil and arms embargoes and bans on all new- 
investment, new government and bank loans and credit guarantees. It; 
also would have prohibited all export credit guarantees for shipments to.' 
South Africa and Namibia; importation of South African and Namibian 
uranium, and the sale of Krugerrands. 


For the Record 




4 


Spanish «r traffic cootraflen decided Saturday to begin a 4S-bour! 
strike Monday after talks with the government failed to produce an- 
agreement on their demand far a pay raise, onion officials said-fReaww) ; 

The U.S. Food M4Dnig Aitahristratioo has reached an agreement in 
prmople wi th asptnn makers to require warnings linking the drug and 
Reye s Syndrome m children, congressional sources said Friday. The! 
disease, winch sometimes follows treatment of viral infections with' 

aspirin, can cause anms, brain damage and death. (LAI)' 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1983 


Page 3 


- ■ ' . ->!• 
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- - v'" 

■- '-^hX 

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AMERICAN TOPICS After Agony of Rescue, the Trapped Are Left to Die 


Summits and Politics: 




The smmniz -mfgtfng ' i^th 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev is unlike- 
! ly to strengthen or weakta Pres- 
ident _ Ronald Reagan's political 
position at home. This conda- 
sion comes from a Washington 
polling concern, William R_ 
Hamilton & Staff, which ana- 
lyaed Gallup Ron records of 
presidential approval ratings 
before and- after nine s n mn rri t 
meetings sinty 1955 . 

Twice there wasa measurable ■ 
gain: President Richard M. 
Nixon after the 1972 Moscow 
meeting (9 percent)' and Presi- 
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower af- 
ter the 1955 Geneva meeting (4 
percent). -■ • 

Two other limes, popularity 
declined: President Gerald R. 
Ford’s by 6 -pcrceot after the 
1974 meeting in the Soviet Far' 
East city of Vladivostok and 
President Lyndon B. Johnson’s 
by 5 percent after the 1967 
meeting in Gla&sboro, NewJer-. 
sey. After an five other U.S.- 
Soviet summit meetings, shifts 
in presidential approval ratines 
were so small as to be statisti- 
cally inagpificanL . - . 

_ A new pojl on Mr: Reagan 
inmsdf, taken' from Nov. 6 to 
Nov. 1.0 by -The NewYark 
Times and CBS New- found 
that. Mr.. Reagan's popularity 
rating remained high-Sroy^five 
percent of the people inler- 
. viewed from Nov. 6 to Nov. 10 
approved of his handfing of his 
job while 26 percent ’disap- 
proved. The approval, rate 
. matched that found in January 
and July. Mr,. Reagan has ex- 
ceeded that rate in Tnnes-CBS 
News polls only once, when 67 . 
percent approved of him in 
April- 1981. after he was shot 

Short Takes 

Hydrin*, the weed that 
chokes waterways, has been 
fought in the Ptitomac River 
around Washington with herbi- 
cides, underwater harvesters 
and even electric tights to kill ft 
by disrupting its normal light- . 
dark cycle. In California's Im- 
perial Valley, sterile caip,.which 
weigh up to SO pounds (about 
22 kilograms) and eat up to 
twice their weight in weeds each 
- day, are being put to work - 
against the weed in irrigation 
canals. The carp are sterilized to 
keep them from reproducing 
and crowding out game fish like 
catfish ap d friagg 

Bennington College in Ver- 
mont has the highest tuition in ’ 
the United Stales, $17,210 for 
the 1985-86 school year^ fait has u , 


been in debt for years. One rea- 
son is its student- teacher ratio, 
which - at eight to one is the 
lowest in the country. Another, - 
President Mi chad K. Hooker 
says, is that Bennington, con- 
ceived in 1925 but not opened 
until 19323 only 53:_“Happ2y. 
most -of . the - ahisuti are still 
alive. Since money for endow- 
ment usually conics from peo- 
ple?* wflb, that has made it hard 
for us. But we now know of 
several m£Qkm dollars in be- 
qocsts that will come to us, if we. 
hang on.” . “ 

Notes About People 

W fffiam Proxmire turned 70 
years old this month, and has 
merit half those years in the. 
UJS. Senate. The Wisconsin 
Democrat says that of the 
changes over 35 _years. “one in- 
teresting- difference is behav- 
ior,” adding: “The first night I 
was here, a number of senators 
were literally, intoxicated- I 
haven’t seen any senator, who 
has down the shghtesi sign of . 
being tnffaenoed by fiquor on 
the floor in the last six or seven 

years.”. 



W flfiam Proxmire 


MkbeOe PKBps. 41, is tell- 
ing the story of the sometimes 
less than harmonious offstage 
lives of the Mamas and the Pa- 
pas. the 196Gsxock group whose 


music was once described as 
“whipped cream and cham- 
pagne.” Written with Derek 
Taylor, the book is titled “Cab- 
forma Dr earnin’ — The Music, 
the Madness, the Magic That 
Was” and is due out in May; 

. Andy Wmbol, 57. the Pop Art 
pioneer, was signing copies of 
“America,” his hew book of 
photographs, when . a woman 
snatched his trademark plati- 
num wig and fled. The artist 
pulled up the hood of his parka 
and continued autographing. 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HfGBEE 


(Continued from Page 1) 

roared down an Andean canyon 
and exploded into Armero, on’the 
low land. On Friday, ages of the 
force of the avalanche could be 
seen everywhere. The torrent had 
flipped trucks like toys against 
houses, and a mod-filled blue Re- 
nault had smashed through a ce- 
ment supporting column at the 
hospital • . 

Near the hospital, time nurses 
who had tried to flee lay dead in an 
ambulance, crushed by a falling 
palm tree. /_. 

“There we dead under our feet,” 
a survivor, Oscar Ariza, said, point- 
ing to the first floor.of the hospital, 

where an estimated 30 doctors, 
nurses, and patients were en- 
tombed'by a mass of mud. 

Exhausted rescue workers were 
frustrated by their powerlessness to 
rescue the living. 

“There are many people trapped 
out there alive, but they are going 
to die,” said Leopoldo Guevara Se- 
pulveda, a civil defense worker, 
who by midday was directing res- 
cue operations from the hospital 
roof. “The mud is 12 and 16 feet 
out there and we can’t get to them." 

Close to noon, a group of 30 
survivors was sighted struggling to 
reach the safety of the hospital 

“Grab the wires,” men on the 
roof shouted. By hanging onto the 
dead telephone and electrical tines 
it was possible to avoid drowning 
in the quicksand of the mud. 

The haggard survivors carried 
children or sacks of possessions on 
ibeu- shoulders as they picked their 
way past ruined houses, trying to 
walk on fallen tree trunks and 
sheets of corrugated roofing iron. 
Parents tried to turn the gaze of 
their children away from two bod- 



Omayra Sanchez, 13, submerged to her neck in water in 
the rubble of her house in Armero, died Saturday before 
she could be dislodged, despite three days of rescue efforts. 


ies lying half-submerged near the 
hospital walls. 

After the group was pulled to 
safety, rescue workers were dis- 
tracted by a report of a man 
trapped alive on the first floor. The 
stairs to the first floor disappeared 


into a pool of black water, but a 
doctor, Gustavo Adolfo Ordonez, 
gathered workers on the second 
floor and asked them to listen. 
From below, a faint tapping could 
be heard. 

Within minutes, workers with 


pickaxes were sending up clouds of 
concrete dust and sparks as they 
dug a man-sized hole in the floor. 
Dr. Ordonez attempted to talk to 
the trapped man. 

“I can move, but there's water up 
to my neck," the man, who identi- 
fied himself only as Fernando, said 
weakly. 

By late afternoon, workers were 
still trying to free the man. who had 
been crapped- for 40 hours. 

On a hospital bed Saturday in 
nearby Manquita, volcanic sand 
still caked in her hair, Blanca Olivia 
Ochoa de Prada lay worrying how 
to feed her two sons without her 
husband's salary of S20 a week. 

“I don't know if he is alive or 
dead," Mrs. Ochoa de Prada said 
quietly. Her husband, .Alfonso 
Prada. worked in the rice fields of 
Armero. 

Mrs. Ochoa said she last saw him 
Wednesday when an avalanche of 
mud and rocks burst into their one- 
room cinder-block home in Ar- 
mero. Groping in the darkness, she 
grabbed her children and rode out 
the torrent — “that moving 
swamp.” she called it — clinging to 
an uprooted tree. 

The avalanche may have pushed , 
many people like her over the edge : 
of poverty into destitution. Across 
Latin America, cities are ringed 
with shantytowns built by the sur- 
vivors of similar ca las trophies: 
droughts in Brazil floods in Peru, 
civil war in Central America, and 
earthquakes up and down the An- 
dean chain. 

“We just had a bed, a gas stove 
and plastic plates; now we have 
nothing," Mrs. Ochoa de Prada 
said, lying under a cheaply woven 
blanket. “We only escaped with the 
dothes we have on our backs ” 

In Colombia, as in most of Latin 
America, government welfare is al- 


U.S. Warns Liberia Over Reports of Executions 


By Don Irwin 

Los Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The United 
States has expressed deep concern 
to Liberia about reports of summa- 
ry executions after the attempted 
coup b>« week has hinted that 
U.& aid mil depend on Liberia's 
observance of human rights. 

“We are deeply concerned by the 
bloodshed” said a State Depart- 
ment spokesman, Bruce Ammer- 
man. 

“There appears to have been 
substantial loss of life in the unsuc- 
cessful coup,” he said Saturday. 
‘There are widespread but uncon- 
firmed reports of summary execu- 
tions of soldiers involved in the 
coup. Opposition politicians have 
been taken into custody and there 
are unconfirmed reports that some 
of these politicians have been exe- 
cuted.” 


Mr. Ammerman added: “The 
US. government has conveyed to 
all levels of the Liberian govern- 
ment the importance we attach to 
ensuring that due process is afford- 
ed to all those taken into custody. 
We have not yet received a satisfac- 
tory reply." 

Reports reaching Washington 
Friday said that Jackson F. Doe, 
one of the chief challengers in last 
month’s presidential elections, had 
been executed- On Saturday, how- 
ever, his name topped a long list of 
politicians being urged by radio 
broadcasts in the Liberian capital 
of Monrovia to report to the gov- 
ernment for questioning. 

Jackson Doe, the candidate of 
the Liberian Action Party, and oth- 
er opposition leaders had accused 
Major General Samuel K_ Doe of 
rigging the Oct 15 presidential 


elections. Official returns gave 
General Doe the presidency with 
51 percent of the vote. The two men 
are not related. 

At the State Department Mr. 
Ammerman was asked whether the 
strong measures that the Liberian 
regime was reported to have used 
to put down the coup were likely to 
affect the flow of U.S. aid. which 
totaled an estimated S83.2 million 
in loans and grants in the fiscal 
year that ended SepL 30. Mr. Am- 
merman implied that they could. 

Mr. Amm er m an said that Presi- 
dent Ranald Reagan had sent a 
message Thursday to General Doe 
expressing relief that the Liberian 
president had escaped injury dur- 
ing Tuesday’s disorders. 

General Doe said that General 
Thomas Qiriwonkpa, the leader of 
the coup attempt who was shot to 


most nonexistent, and only family 
ties provide a safety net in limes of 
emergency. 

An only child. Mrs. Ochoa de 
Prada lost both her parents when 
she was 9 years old. Her parents, 
also farmworkers, were killed in 
political violence in the mid-1950s. 

Newspapers on Saturday started 
printing lists of names of the in- 
jured, with the hospitals where they 
were confined. But Mrs. Ochoa de 
Prada, 39, said no one would be 
looking in the newspaper for her 
name. She and her husband never 
learned to read or write. 

Any work she is likely to find in 
this region would generally pay less 
than the subsistence wage her hus- 
band earned in tire rice fields. 

Mrs. Ochoa de Prada's older son 
had been enrolled in elementary 
school. The school was swept away 
by the mud flow. 

Without money to pay for rice 
and bans, much less school books 
and materials. Mrs. Ochoa de 
Prada did not believe that she 
could afford to allow him to con- 
tinue studying 


You get many smiles 
al the Palace. 


palace hotel 
LiSTAAD 
SWITZERLAND 

I'IlMiC ‘..ill 

I l*h.»n- Min.’S il il Telex *J22 222 
»ir 

iflhtfcadisi/jfHoicls of theWbrldj 


death Friday, had promised to 
hand over power to the opposition 
Liberian Action Party if the coup 
had succeeded. 

This contradicted General 
Quiwonkpa's declared intention of 
holding elections. He promised 
elections when he briefly occupied 
a Monrovia radio station Tuesday 
and announced be bad taken pow- 
er. 

■ Sierra Leone Accused 

General Doe has accused Sierra 
Leone of direct involvement in the 
coup attempt. Reuters reported 
Sunday from Abidjan. Ivory Coast 

Genera] Doe, briefing diplomat^ 
on the coup attempt Saturday 
night said the rebels were trained 
and had acquired arms in Sierra 
Leone before crossing to Liberia. 
Sierra Leone has denied involve- 
ment 






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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


Reagan , Gorbachev Meeting: A New Approach inHistoryo 




Dwight D. Eisenhower met with Nikita S. 
Khrushchev in Geneva in 1955; Richard 
M. Nixon greeted Leonid I. Brezhnev in 
California in 1973; and John F. Kennedy 
and Khrushchev conferred in Vienna in 
1961. 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Pm Service 

WASHINGTON — The ses- 
sions between President Ronald 
Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
on the shores of Lake Geneva on 
Tuesday and Wednesday — the 
first meeting of the lop U-S. and 
Soviet leaders since 1979— -mark a 
significant break in the history of 
superpower summit meetings. 

Mr. Reagan is taking a Afferent 
tack than his recent predecessors. 
Presidents Richard M. Nixon, Ger- 
ald R. Ford and Jimmy Carter used 

s ummi t meetings to negotiate spe- 
cific arms control agreements, re- 
sulting in the SALT-1 and SALT-2 
accords of the 1970s. Mr. Reagan 
says he does not want to dicker in 
Geneva in this way but seeks to 
“■ elimina te the distrust” character- 
izing relations between the United 
States and the Soviet Union during 
his presidency. 

While some earlier summit meet- 
ings ended with major agreements 
on nuclear weapons, this one is 
expected to conclude with Mr. Rea-, 
gan signing minor accords and 
leaving negotiations on arms to the 
U.S. and Soviet teams that have 
been meeting in Geneva. 

A former adviser to Mr. Nixon, 
Helmut Sonnenfeldt of the Brook- 
ings Institution, said, “This is the 
first s ummi t in six years, so it 
should not be compared to the kind 
of summit we had in the 1970s.” 
Those meetings, he said, “came at 
the end of extremely intensive peri- 
ods of negotiation.* 

Mr. Reagan is starting a new 
chapter in another sense — the 
Gorbachev era, which could stretch 
to the end of the century, has just 
begun. While six U.S. presidents 
have preceded Mr. Reagan to the 
summit during the last 30 years, 
only two Soviet leaders have domi- 
nated those meetings: Leonid L 
Brezhnev, who attended five, and 


Nilrit* S. Khrushchev, who held 

four. 

This meeting also could mark the 
beginning of a new phase in super- 
power summitry if Mr. Reagan and 
Mr. Gorbachev agree to hold a sec- 
ond meetin g, or regular mee tings , 
as Mr. Brezhnev once proposed- 
The 10 summit m eetings since 
World War II were generally held 


the allies have been left on. the 
sidelines in 1985 and are to be 
briefed by Mr. Reagan in Brussels 
afterward. 

The shif t to emphasizing strate- 
sic aims control oo theagenda was 
highlighted at the 1967 meeting 
tha t was hastily convened at Glass- 
boro State College in- New Jer 
between President Lyndon 


Reagan is taking a different tack from his 
recent predecessors by saying he does not 
want to use the meetings to negotiate arms 
control agreements, seeking instead to 
eliminate distrust between governments. 


at haphazard intervals, except for 
three consecutive meetings in the 
Nixon era. 

S ummi t sessions have produced 
varied results, ranging from the 
Paris meeting that collapsed in 
1960 after the Soviet Union shot 
down an American U-2 spy plane 
to the major accords on strategic 
arms signea in the Nixcm, Ford and 
Carter years. 

The .em phasis has changed, too. 
Meetings involving Presidents 
Dwight O. Eisenhower and John F. 
Kennedy stressed reducing interna- 
tional tensi on caused by such con- 
troversies as the reunification of 
Germany and the Bedin blockade. 
By the 1970s, arms control was the 
prime topic. 

Paralleling growth in the super- 


been a shift from the emphasis 
in Eisenhower’s presidency on mul- 
tilateral summit meetings. 

In contrast with the Geneva 
meeting of 1955, when Eisenhower 
stood shoulder- to-shoulder with 
the leaders of Britain and France, 


Johnson and the Soviet prune min- 
ister, Alexei N. Kosygm- 

Tfaere, Robert G McNamara, 
riign secretary of defense, tried to' 
persuade Kosygin that Moscow’s 
system of anti-ballistic missiles 
threatened to widen the arms race. 
The disenssion eventually led to the 
Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty of 
1972. 

Mr. Nixon met with Brezhnev 
three tiiftes, arid summit meetings 
became more ambitious undertak- 
ings, producing major agreements 
on strategic arms. Mr. Nixon also 
tried to use summit meetings to 
extricate the United States from 
Vi etnam and pressure the Russians 
with his diplomatic opening to Chi- 
na, but the strategy was under- 
mined by the Watergate scandal 
and Mr. Nixon's resignation in Ao- 
gust 1974. 

Later that year, it fell to Mr. 
Ford in Vladivostok to reach a ten- 
tative agreement with Brezhnev 
that laid the groundwork for 
SALT-1 

The Reagan administration has 


■ played down the value of a “get 
acquainted” meeting, but h&ay 
shows numerous examples # infor-"*^ 
mal summit contacts between lead- ^ 
ers that proved sgnificarit. <- 

Gordon JR. WeflmuHet; in V'-T 
ftHthconring study of U.S.3ovfet \ 
summit meetings for Georgetown - ' 
Univereriy’s Institutefor the Study . 
of Diplomacy, concludes that these • 
moments have been favorably ..' 
noted by every president involved 

. in the postwar summit e x p eri emy -' . 

with the Soviets." 

For example, in Geneva n. July" , 
1955, Eisenhower nungkriwith the ' 
Soviet delegation while walking to r * 
a cocktail' lounge. Although the So - ■: 
virt prime minister, Nikolai A. Bui- UE 
grain, bad shown interest in Earn- 
hower’s“open skies” plan for arm* •„ 
inspections, KhrushchevtokI the. 
president as they strolled that lie* 1 ' 
disagreed with the prime mi raster. 

“Tbere was no smite in 1 
voice,” Eisenhower later recalled. 

“I saw dearly that, for the fim . 
time, the identic the real boss of ' 
the Soviet delegation.” - 

Nearly two decades later, Mr. ^ 
Nixon reoeived an unexpected nM- v 
night “tirade” on the Middle Fast 
by Brezhnev when tbs two met in ' 
California in 1973. ■ ■ 

Mr. Sqnnenfddt stud that Mr. 
Reagan must convince Mr. Gorba- , • 
chey that he is stiD a strong presi- 
dent. Mr. Reagan needs todeman- 
strate “that he does have authority, 
he does have the capacity to act” . 


Thehazard of a 


imp res- ■ * 


son often is cited in the June 1961 ' 
meeting between ICennedy and - 
Khrushdieviri Vienna, perhaps the - " 
low point in the summit meetings ’. 
since Worid War IL It followed the 
Bajy.iof Pigs debacle in Cuba. -• 

Khrushchev concluded that he . 
could snca^fiilty djallenge the 
new US. president, with an audac- 
ity tint led to the Cuban missile " 
crisis a year later/ - ‘ 


Allies Are Cautiously Optimistic About Outcome at Geneva 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Peal Service 

BRUSSELS — The first summit meeting between 
American and Soviet leaders in six years has awakened 
fresh hopes among U.S. allies that Washington and 
Moscow may be groping toward tangible improve- 
ments in the East-West climate after the collapse of 
d&lente bred a phase of dangerous tendons. 

The rapid consolidation of power by Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev within eight months of assuming the Sovi- 
et leadership has buoyed hopes that the Kremlin is 
now controlled by a man driven by the need to 
modernize his nation and to do so by nurturing a more 
stable relationship with its chief foreign rival 

The coincidence of Ronald Reagan's second presi- 
dential term, following four years of rebuilding Ameri- 
can power and prestige, has convinced many allies 
that he will focus the rest of his tenure on bnnrishing 
his credentials as a peacemaker. 

Now that Mr. Reagan finally has a vigorous coun- 
terpart in Moscow who shares his concern about 
public image, the allies fed both leaders may be 
motivated to act in ways more keenly attuned to a 
global yearning for civil dialogue between the 
superpowers. 

The Reagan administration’s awareness that it faces 
a more formidable contest for hearts and minds in tbe 
Gorbachev era has been reflected in frequent consul- 
tations with the allies before the summit meeting 
Tuesday and Wednesday in Geneva. 

Besides Mr. Reagan's meeting with five leaders of 
industrialized democracies in New York last month, 
foreign and defense ministers from the North. Atlantic 
Treaty Organization have held separate sessions in 
Brussels to ensure that Mr. Reagan goes to Geneva 
with the full support and solidarity of the allies. 

Mr. Reagan’s response to the Soviet proposal Sept. 
30 that would cut strategic nuclear weapons by 50 


percent was greeted with approval and relief in Euro- 
pean capitals. 

Mr. Reagan immediately held intensive talks with 
NATO allies on how to respond to the proposal, 
although these talks resulted in contradictory respons- 
es from the Reagan administration. 

In New York. Western leaders had warned Mr. 
Reagan about letting Mr. Gorbachev set the pace for 
the summit conference with his wide-ranging offer, 
and they were reassured that the United States had 
seized the upper hand on arms control by diverting 
attention from Moscow's proposal 

This was done during October, when tbe U.S. presi- 
dent said constructive relations with the Soviet Union 
depended on earing U.S.-Soviet rivalries in the Third 
World. He also proposed giving assurances to the 
Soviet Union that it would negotiate any proposed 
deployment of new defensive strategic weapons and 
give five to seven years' notice before deploying such 
arms unilaterally.’ 

The common desire among Western nations and 
Japan to see the summit talks instill more predictabili- 
ty and understanding in the Soviet- American dialogue 
has inspired them to submerge apprehensions about 
Mr. Reagan's virion of a space-based missile defense 
and the influence of Pentagon hawks who doubt the 
worth of arms control. 

Instead, the allies have displayed a striking consen- 
sus, at least publicly, behind the US. administration’s 
tactics in its approach to the Geneva meeting. 

Concerned about the political risks of a disappoint- 
ing outcome, the allies have joined the United States in 
seeking to lower public expectations that the meeting 
might lead to a conceptual breakthrough that could set 
guidelines for an early accord at the Geneva negotia- 
tions on nuclear and space weapons. 

“1 am being prudent about what I expect,” Prime 
Minister Bettino Craxi of Italy told pa rliame nt, ex- 


pressing sentiments of other leading Europeans. “1 do 
not wholly discount an agreement and I would consid- 
er a breakdown injurious. 

“I think it would already be a great result,” Mr. 
Craxi continued, “if the s ummit effectively opened up 
a period of dialogue, if it created a different atmo- 
sphere of greater mutual trust,” 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West Germany has 
acclaimed the fact that the summit conference was 
taking place as a vindication of his repeated pleas for 
more intensive East-West contacts. Although Mr. 
Kohl, too. has sought to minimize the stakes at Gene- 
va, his advisers say he is acutely aware that Bonn’s 
hopes for closer relations with East Germany depend 
to a large extent on the evolution of U.S.-Soviet ties. 

Like Prime Minis ter Margaret Thatcher of Britain, 
Mr. Kohl is eager to show that his friendly rapport 
with his fellow conservative, Mr. Reagan, can have an 
impact on US. policy and bring to bear Europe's 
desire for further relaxation of tensions with Moscow. 

Britain and West Germany also share a particular 
interest in promoting an East-West agreement to re- 
duce chemical weapons stocks in Europe. Officials in 
both countries believe that Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gor- 
bachev might be able to make more substantial head- 
way in that area rather than in forging an agreement 
on nuclear weapons. 

“They are not going to get a settlement” on nuclear 
arms, predicted a British official who closely reflects 
Mrs. Thatcher’s thinking. What Britain seeks, he add- 
ed, is “a real impetus to the arms control process; the 
object is to break the logjam." 

If nothing else. Britain and other allies would ap- 
plaud a bilateral accord on consular or cultural ex- 
changes, or a joint agreement for regular high-level 
meetings between the superpowers. “If that’s all h 
does, it would be a slightly disappointing but worth- 
while end,” said a Foreign Office diplomat in London. 


U.S. government officials reported Thursday that 
the United States and the Soviet Union have complet- 
ed drafting such a cultural-exchange agreement. 

France, which last month hosted Mr. Gorbachev’s 
first visit to the West as Soviet leader, has kept hs 
distance before the summit meeting to underscore its 
independent foreign policy. President Francois Mit- 
terrand rebuffed Mr. Reagan's invitation to meet with 
him and other allied leaders in New York 1** * nwmfii 

“We have already had our own summit with Gorbar 
chev,” said Dominique Moisi, associate director of die 
French Institute for International Relations. 

“There is general indifference among public opin- 
ion abontwhat is seen as another media event,” 
said. *TVe fear little and hope for Httle.” 

Political analysts cited another reason for French 
aloofness as that government’s dete rmination not to 
' give Moscow an excuse to roelnde French nuclear 
arms in the overall Western nudear arsenal at- the 
Geneva negotiations. Paris has countered this long- 
standing Soviet demand by insisting its mtdear force 
remains truly autonomous. 

While the allies acknowledge public interest is so 
great that arms control is bound to dominate the 
agenda, they have supported U-S. intentions to raise 
other issues such, as human rights and regional 
conflicts. 

An exchange of views on regional conflicts, such as 
Af ghan istan, the Middle East or southern Africa, is 
unlikely to yield much progress, according to officials 
in various European capitals. 

The probable result, a British diplomat said, is “a 
pretty unproductive discussion in which the two sides 
are talking over each other's shoulders.” 

William Drozdiak is The Post’s correspondent in 
Bonn. Other correspondents, including Karen DeYoung 
in London, Mi cha el Dobbs in Paris, Loren Jenkins in 
Rome and John Burgess in Tokyo, contributed to Ms 
article. 


Reagan to Seek Soviet Help 
In Ending Conflict in Gulf 


Afar York Times Service . 

WASHINGTON — The 
Reagan udmims t ra t-irm hag de- 
cided to propose to the Soviet 
Union at the Geneva summit 
meetmg that die two nations 
use their influence to .try to 
bring an end to the Iran-Iraq 
war, administration 
said. 

The officials said Saturday 
they thought that Moscow and 
Washington had a connnon in- 
terest in soring the fighting 
stopped in toe Gulf. wa£ whim 
has been going onfOrmOre than 
five yens. 

But there was a recognition, a 
senior official said, , that any So- 
viet-Americaa' cooperation on 
the issue probably would have 
to be in parallel and not in con- 
cert, given tbe sharp differences 
between the two sides on almost 
all regional world mattera. They 
said they were hoping for some 
statements the end of the sum- 
mit meeting by the two leaders 
ca llin g for a negotiated end to 
the conflict.' 

One official said there had 
been pressure from Arab na- 
tions on both the United States 
and tbe Soviet Union to seek an . 
end to the war. 

Some Arab countries urged 
that Washington and Moscow 


jom as -co-sponsors of a UN 
Security Council resolution to 
end the fighting. But the United 
Stales rejected the idea, officials 
said, because it felt this would 
•' have no impact on Iran, which 
regards the United Nations as 
. dominafedby those hostile to it. 
Richard W. Morphy, the as- 
sistant secretary erf state for 
Near Eastern and South Asian 
affairs, will hem Geneva during 
die summit meeting, in case his 
expertise is needed in the nego- 
tiations He then wiD go to lie 
• region to brief key leaders on 
die talks. " ■ - . . .. , j 

Regional issues are due to be 
discussed on Wednesday morn- 
ing by Mr. Reagan and ML 
Gorbachev, although they 
. could come up earlier. 

Given the refusal to date of 
Iran to consider any negotiated 
accord that does notindude the 
res i gnation of tbe Iraqi presi- 
dent, Saddam Hussein, there 
was no optimism that any Sovi- 
et-Amencan approach might 
work. 

But one official said those in 
Iran who want an end to tbe 
war' might sdze upon the fact 
that Moscow and Washington 
have agreed on the need for a 
cessation of fi ghting to argue 
their point of view. 


■■ jflflfiK 






if Mi 




Despite New Proposals, Standby Drafts, Neither Side Expects Arms Accord in Geneva 


The Arms Proposals: A Balance Sheet 


Figures compiled by the House Committee on Foreign Affairs 


Current Batonco 


Soviet Proposal, Oct. '85 


US. Proposal, Nov, ’SS 


Intercontinental 
ballistic missiles 
(ICBM’s) and 
submarine- 
launched ballistic 
missiles (SLUM'S) 


ICSM and SLUM 
warheads 


Heavy bombers 


Air-launched 

cruise missiles 


U-S. 

1,030 

(l.toOtCBM's) 
(600 SLUMS) 


7.506 

12/1 3CHCBM S) 
(5.376 SLUM'S) 


263 


1.176 


Soviet 

2.352 

0.398 (CBM 3> 
(654 SLUM’S) 


6.630 

(6.420 CBM 9) 
(?.4i0 SLUM'S) 


480 

Includes 300 Sac*, 
area Sowerutuon 
saysifttsisnof a 
strategic bomber. 


200 


U.S. 


Soviet 


tLS- 


SovJet 


815 1.176 

Applies 50 percent cut across the board 
using U S. figures Soviet Union counts all 
U S strategic and medium-range systems 
at 3.360 and Soviet ones at 2.500 (not in- 
cluding SS-20 si Us>ng Some) figures. 50 
percent cut would result in l .680 systems 
lor U.S and 1 .250 for Soviet Union 


6.000 


6.000 


Only 3.600 ot any one type. 6.000 limit also 
applies to gravity bombs and short-range 
att.-icX missiles (US reiects this inclusion ) 


1,250-5.450 1.250-1,450 

Freedomtomn between ICBM and SLBM 
launchers 


4.500 4.500 

No move then 3.000 on fC&Ws. 


131 


90 

Bac Mires not 
mcluded 


350 


1,500. . 


350 

includes 300 
Secktees, 


1.500 


Missile throw 
weight* 


New systems 


4.4 roiJhon pounds ?!.9mtflion 
sounds 


Partol larger lulnl 
ban on long-range 
cruise missiles 


’Nol included 


Not inclubed 


Not to exceed 6 Not to exceed 6 
mason pounds 


Medium-range 

launchers 


Medium-range 

bombers 


134 Pershing 2 s 2 70 SS-20- sin 
and ground- Europe ptus 1 7 j 

launched cruise ■ to Asia tor total of 
tmssdesfone 44l (3 warheads 

warhead each) each) 


264 

(198 F-rn sand 
66FB-71V4) 


553 

(tocluJea Backfires) 


Ban on new types o» ICBM's. SLBM's 
and heavy bombers. Soviet Union has 
not defined what it considers to be new 
types 


No Pershing 2 's. 243SS-2Q‘sm 

1 00 ground- Europe phis a 

launched cruise freeze On SS-20's 

missiles in Asia, currently 

atl 71 


127 276 

Derived Irani applying 50 percent cut to 
U S figures 


Ban ooaanew heavy teswe and motsto 

taiasSes, metodng Soviet SS> 1 & 
ggg;”*°-S. Wdgetmmi mobfe 


1 40 SS-20- C in 

Spends* in 

Broun d-touoc hed Asia. totaling 229 
wwsemfeaifeo. • 


WilSngftesstodaciiss restraints 


* Weight thatcaatoe tffled off and conled amo target 

Th« N*»‘ Ywfc In 


By Leslie R Gelb 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — With new proposals ad- 
vanced on both sides, the United States and the 
Soviet Union are in a position for a general 
aooord on limiting offensive and defensive nu- 
clear arms. But the assessment remains on both 
sides that an agreement will not be reached 
Nonetheless, key Reagan administration ex- 
perts have prepared standby drafts that call for 
50-percent cuts in strategic and medium-range 
forces and for restricting space defenses to “re- 
search” consistent with exis ting treaty obliga- 
tions. 

But it is doubtful whether President Ronald 
Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev will use these 
drafts and agree on general principles or guide- 
lines for arms control negotiators. 

_ It depends on whether they are prep ar ed 
either to make significant mutual concessions, 
which officials on both sides say they doubt, or 
to downplay their differences on critical 
by m a king rhetorical c om promises, the vahie of 
which is debated by officials on both sides. 

Basically, prospects for agreement at the sum- 
mit meetmg in Geneva turn on the two leaders 
themselves — on their overall goals and strate- 
gies, on their sense of history, on their personal- 
ities; on their domestic pressures and on how 
each man wjU react on the spot to the d ramatic. 
moment of the talks.' 

The two leaders' predecessors, faced with 
similar opportunities and dangers, generally 
shied away from bold strokes/Tne major trea- 
ties on limiting offensive arms, reached in 1972 
and 1979, were modest and tempo rizing 
The briefing book for Mr. Reagan contains 
sections on the aims control proposals, on rela- 
tive barga inin g daps and positions, and on 
strategies. His advisers also have ideas on tenns 
of agreement. 

Moscow advanced a new proposal in Octo- 
ber, and Washington countered with one in 
early November. The proposals established the 
idea of 50-percent reductions in strategic or 
in tercon linen tal-range missiles and bombers, as 
well as a separate agreement on medium-range 
forces in Ear ope with cuts in the 50-percent 


range. 

There 


was no discernible movement toward 

tent on space-based defenses against nu- 

lear missiles, which Mr. Reagan sees as the 
moral and necessary path to the future. Mr. 
Gorbachev contends that it will lead to a new 
and more dangerous arms race. 

Thus, the kernel of the bargaining deadlock 
remains. According to Moscow, there can be no 
deep reductions in offensive strategic forces 


until the United States abandons all efforts to 
develop “space strike weapons.” Washington 
main la ins that deep cots should be made in 
offensive forces now, even as the two sides try to 
figure out how to phase in defenses as offenses 
are phased out. 

Officials on both sides neither anticipate nor 
want (heir leaders to address the details. A dmin. 
istration officials differ on whether Mr. Reagan 
should even tiy to compromise on generalities. 
Defense Secretary C^pai W. Weinberger and 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

his aides say that to agree only on gene-su 
principles or guidelines would seriously preju- 
dice subsequent negotiations on the all-impor- 
tant details. 

To (hem, it would be buying a moment of 
glory in Geneva at a high cost Thor idea .of 
talking with Soviet officials while to 

nothing has been more or less adapted publicly 
by the Reagan administration. J 

The secretary of state, George P. Shultz; Paul 
H. Naze; the senior arms control adviser; and 
Robert G McFariane, the national security ad- 
viser, are said to be privately pondering posable 

j^ement on guidelines for the arms negotia- 

Those o f fi c ia l s are said to believe that Mr 
Reagan could secure agreement on some key 
pnuaples for cuts in offensive weapons. To 
achieve that, he would have to lower hS lhetori- 
cal sights on anti-missile defenses, talk only 

about research and agree to negotiate on what 

constitutes acceptable research. 

Such negotiations would be long and drawn 
out, and toe Ru ssians could be pressed during 
that time for separate agreements on offense. 

The guidelines on cuts in offensive weapons, 
which e ss enti ally would state areas erf broad 
agreement, are said to look Kke this: 

• Cut all strategic missiles and bombers by 50 
percent Jost what is “strategic” would be left 
vague. Washington could say that the guideline 
referred only to interoontmeutal forces, and 
Moscow could say it included US. forces in and 
around Europe that could launch a nuclear 
strike against the Soviet Union. 

Moscow is expected to concede this point 
eventually, but to ask far something in return. 

• Set a common ceffing of 6$D0 nuclear 
weapons. Washington could continue to main- 
tain that ihurinautied only nrimflf warheads 
and long-range air-launched cruise 
Moscow could say it included bombs rad air- 
borne short-range attack missiles as weD. - 

• Establish a common limit of 3,000 larid- 


based mi ssile warheads. Moscow is proposing 
3,600. Even an intermediate figure would re- 
qume Moscow to make deep cuts in its SS-18 
ik mis ^ cs - Cuts in those heavy missiles . 

has been the Reagan administration’s overrid- 
ing goal and would be Moscow’s most impor- 
tant concession so far. 

• Apee to pursue a separate pact on medium- 
rrage forces envisioning 50-percent cuts cat both 
? < "t s ' 1 ™ MC0W k prepared to do this, al though it 
unnally took the position that that the issue had ’ 
to be settled along with cuts in strategic offenses 
rad defenses. The key Soviet demand that ' 
French and British forces be included in the ' 
count would be left open for the time being. 

***** sfaould strictly adhere 
to the AntibaUistic Missile Treaty of 1972, reaf- ’ 
firm toat the treaty permits research, and then ■ 
negotiate on where and how to draw toe line ‘ 
between penmssiWe research and banned devel- 
opment and testing. 

would “be conducted in accordance with a re- 
ana™ miopretatim of the traty^liga- 

an ^ P ros P cct5 f <* ' 

foIlow flagon 

defenses and 011 ^ ace ^ asod ' 
guidelines wodd A* JK5i or 30 acC0rd 00 

or less quwtly? TTk ^wS a ? CT iS >a !? 08in0re • 

to officials involvei^ ^ 


?rarh 

Wi. 


SsaetSssrSW 

demand. .^ united Stales, and than face 


Effagw to aig^^ “i^offidals 

be wiHing to mghl 

a faflurtThS ^ ““F* 
wa strengthen hishand at nngfat 





** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


Page 5 






By Henry A. Kissinger 


Reagan’s Chances of Negotiating an Accord at Geneva: IfNotNow, When? 

P 


' i:- 


RESIDENT Ronald Rea- 
gan has goneitj Genevam a _ 

' u l. st f ong -position, .ing stroctSre.even thotgdi central 

T 6 °PP ortuI “ t )' to lam an planning provides too few inceo- 


son’s choice. He can seek to im- 
prove the petfomiaitbe of the erist- 




in history into a break- 


»* w .. 


He is the beneficiary of an uo_ 
\- r '> 5 ^ matched degree of public canfi- 
- A’i,'*- deuce; his Strategic Defease Initia- 
■■ live has unlocked the arms control 
r, r ^ 'j-» talks; be finds the Soviet situation 
highly fltrid and potentially maDea- 
'.’V' 1 - bk- is not because GeteraJ 
- . vv,' ■? Secretary Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
- smiles more easily, or because his.- 
~Te wears Gucci. shoes, but be-. 
“““ “'recti ve conditions’ in the 
hion would seem to re- 


aves, am! allows too little sponta- 
neity to be compatible with high 
technology, innovation or superior 
quality. 

On the other hand, more funda- 
mental ref orm* int rorinang mcen- 


has simultaneously pursued three 
approaches; 

(a) He has cultivated the appear- 
ance of a new type of Soviet leader 
— appealing to Western predilec- 
tions to reduce historical conflicts 
to a dash of personalities. 

00 He has downplayed political 
tensions as the cause of conflict. 

(c) He has focused the Soviet 


bodied in the Brezhnev doctrine 
that proclaims all Soviet posses- 
sions as sacrosanct and everything 
else as subject to pressure or Sub- 
version. The attempts to eliminate 
from the diplomatic agenda Af- 
ghanistan, Caban troops in Nicara- 
gua and Africa, and Soviet support 
for gueniDa movements and terror- 
ists, have the practical consequence 



There will never be a better time for a fundamental change than with 
a new Soviet leadership far less encumbered than it will be over time 
by existing policies and facing considerable domestic pressures. 


quuea relaxation of tensions... 
V.1 . After 70 years of rule by “scien- 
tific socialism" the Soviet form of 


vy. ■ 


government r emains more »i™ to 


fives and mark ets would surely diplomatic offensive cm aims con- 
geneme a titanic domestic struggle iroi, especially on dhninating the 
. .. . requiring allof Mr. Gorbachev’s U.S. Strategic Defense Initiative in 

the trading personal relationships authority and attention. Faced return far a 50-percent cut in offen- 
■ *•. found m med ieval fmitiicm tt,an- jyjth the dioice between potential **"» r 


tng 


• As-. 


found in medieval feudalism than 1 
to the cons titutionalism found even 
’ in a modem corporation. ’ • 

The Soviet economy is threaten.- 
• ing to spin out of control, as the’ 

- . t jjv pronouncements of Soviet leaders. 

- ' t ^ iemse ^ ves m «kc dear. The real 
s cost of manufactured goods is un- 
known, all prices are fixed by the 
state, and goods move by central 
allocation rather than markets, 

Corruption, sloth and inefficiency 
emerge not as aberrations, bin as 
inevitable attributes of the system. 

And soon the growing informa- 
tion technology will confront , the 
Soviet system with new dilemmas. 
Where the control of information is 




‘“•H 

- - .. 


stagnation and potential turmoil, 
Mr. Gorbachev has way incentive 
to seek-a relaxation of international 
tension. 

But he must achieve this' relax- 
ation in a. rmtrmer that dees not 

magnify his domestic tmmp lerrties. 

The forces in the Soviet Union that 

favor economic reform do not nec- 
essarily favor flexibility in forego, 
policy. To overcome' party resis- 
tance Mr. Gorbachev w31 have to 
gain support from institutions that 
put efficiency above prerogatives 
amt have access to more or less 
reliable information from abroad: 
the military, as shown in an article 




■< t>,** 


m io Stvl; Sorie 

1 in flict in Q| 


considered the key to political paw- by the former chief of staff, Nikolai 
er, cassettes, video machme* and V. Ogarkov, may support economic 
computers become threats fbpoKti-. efficiency as a prerequisite of nrili- 
cal control, rather than tcchnologi- tary strength; the secret police, the 
cal opportunities. . KGB, mayseein reform a means to 

Mr. Gorbachev requires no sen- control sdaal unrest But these very 
rimen tal c ommi tment to Western 
notions of peace to conclude that 
bis country cannot simultaneously 
sustain fundamental reform and 
heightened international tensions. 

But for him reform poses a Hob- 


institutions are also the most reluc- 
tant- to constrain Soviet geopoliti- 
cal and strategic options. 

T HESE conflicting require- 
mentsdictate the thrust of cur- 
rent Soviet policy. Mr. Gorbachev 


rive forces. 

Mr. Gorbachev has been ex- 
traordinarily successful in impos- 
ing these themes. Western media 
and the pronouncements of West- 
ern leaden reflect a rapt fascina- 
tion with the new Soviet personal- 
ity, coupled with suggestions that 
be is entitled to some unilateral 
concessions to reassure him. Mr. 
Reagan’s major speech at the Unit- 
ed Nations calling for a settlement 
of political conflicts has been treat- 
ed by most of our allies — and 
many U.S. commentators — as 
“widening*’ the summit agenda and 
therefore a diversion from the goal 
of arms control. And the «me 
combination of allied governments 
and American intellectuals wedded 
to the outdated anns control con- 
cepts of the 1960s has sought to 
present the president's Strategic 
Defense Initiative as an obstacle 

and tn redmy it tn insignifican ce hy 
confining it to research. 
/'COMMON sense suggests that 
the principal M|| ” < of ten- 
sions- are political Chief among 
them is the Soviet proposition em- 


tion of renew- 
jressnres when Soviet domestic 
i are o v erc o me. 

The Soviet attitude toward arms 
control reflects the same attempt to 
maintain all existing options. The 
most revolutionary new concept in 
that field, the defense initiative, has 
been bartered by an unrelenting 
assault whose intensity has ob- 
scured the one major breakthrough 
SDI has already achieved: the Sovi- 
et readiness to discuss arms reduc- 
tions on a heretofore unprecedent- 
ed scale. 

The Soviet offer to cut offensive 
forces by SO percent is nevertheless 
one-sided, and not primarily be- 
cause its provisions are loaded in 
the Soviet favor, a problem that 
could be remedied by negotiation, 
ft is one-sided above all because it 
one mins nothing to ameliorate the 
elements threatening nnclcar catas- 
trophe. It does not reduce the dan- 
ger of surprise attack because so 
long as each mireflg carries several 
warheads there will always be more 
warheads than launchers, and as 
numbers decrease a first strike will 
grow even more tempting because 
fewer targets need to be attacked. 
This danger been magnified by 
the incomprehensible American 


counterproposal to ban mobile 
missiles. The 50- percent reduction 
would still leave more than enough 
warheads to assure civilian devas- 
tation and thereby guarantee the 
continued growth of nuclear paci- 
fism in the West. The principal sig- 
nificance of the Soviet offer is to 
demonstrate that the nuclear di- 
lemma cannot be solved by a re- 
duction of offensive forces alone; 
for that a defensive component is 
essential 

C RITICS have confirmed u> 
urge a “compromise** that al- 
lows strategic defense research but 
prohibits any deployment of defen- 
rive forces. If this should be the 
outcome it will mark the end of 
SDI even as a bargaining chip. 
Congress would be deeply divided 
about whether to appropriate 
funds to a controversial program: 
the military services would be am- 
bivalent about diverting expendi- 
tures to what cannot be deployed; 
the allies would oppose any ap- 
proach toward deployment The 
Soviets would refuse to negotiate 
about it once tbe offensive limita- 
tions are in place. A formal distinc- 
tion between research and deploy- 
ment abandons the defensive 
option; particularly since it will be 
Mr. Reagan's successor rather than 
the author of the SDI who will have 
to nuke the decision to deploy. 
Having, in effect, committed itself 
to permanent vulnerability, how 
does tbe West then maintain public 
support for a strategy of mass ex- 
termination? And what does it tell 
tbe Soviets about our resolve if they 
can outmaneuver us at the time of 
their greatest uncertainty? 

The West would be hardly doing 
even the Soviets a favor were it to 
quynmh to the current Soviet 
agenda. If experience is a guide, we 
have not heard the last Soviet word. 
Given his necessities, Mr. Gorba- 
chev might in linn* agree to a real, 
even historic change of political 


and strategic relationships and to a 
serious discussion of the relation- 
ship between offense and defense. 
Bui he niH have no incentive io do 
so while the West is mesmerized by 
the most transparent Soviet pro- 
posals and arranges periodic re- 
spites while the Soviets son out 
their domestic problems. The Sovi- 
et leadership has no motive for a 
radical change unless it can prove 
io itself that the existing course is 
not working. And there will never 
be a better time for a fundamental 
change — or at least for producing 
conditions conducive to change — 
than with a new Soviet leadership 
far less encumbered than it will be 
over time by existing policies and 
facing considerable domestic pres- 
sures. In other words, if not now, 
when? 

T HE risk Mr. Reagan runs at 
Geneva is not failure but irrele- 
vance. He has a good prospect to 
achieve some progress; the ques- 
tion is whether future generations 
will think it commensurate with the 
opportunity. There are in fact three 
fundamental issues for the summit : 

How to prevent or contain re- 
gional conflicts. 


How the superpowers can con- 
duct their relations so as to respect 
and not impinge on each other's 
vital interests. 

How in the field of anns control 
to relate offense to defense while 
reducing the level of both and di- 
minishing the incentive for nuclear 
war. 

These issues cannot be resolved 
at one summit. But they cry out for 
a definition of their nature and a 
work program for their resolution. 
Both leaders should state their dis- 
agreements and how they propose 
to resolve them. Each would there- 
by maintain bis principles while 
charting a road to the future. What 
followed would determine whether 
the summit was an episode or a 
breakthrough. 

Will Mr. Gorbachev accept such 
an approach? Mr. Reagan can in- 
sist. And if Mr. Gorbachev has a 
historical perspective, he should be 
tempted by the only responsible 
way to reduce the risk of a confla- 
gration into which both rides could 
slide because they lacked the wit to 
step off the treadmill — a confla- 
gration that, in the end. would so 
exhaust tbe combatants that world 



leadership would pass into new 
hands. If Mr. Gorbachev refuses, 
we will know that his personality 
and Soviet domestic structures con- 
demn us to a continuation of exist- 
ing patterns, if at a temporarily 
lower level of tension. Then w’e 
must take care to bold aloft the 
torch of peace but also make sure 
that the desire for peace cannot be 
used to blackmail the free into 
abandoning their sense of justice. 

So what lies before Mr. Reagan 
is tbe choice between a tempting 
but largely irrelevant outcome or a 
new departure that points the way 
to a better future. 

<&Los Angeles Times Syndicate 


linn 


, -<c: 


Nicaragua V.K. Wellington Koo, Taiwan Diplomat, Dies at 97 
ToBreakTies 
With Taiwan 


By Stephen Kinzer . 

New York Times Service 
MANAGUA — Nicaragua wQl 


> 'TZ'. ^ 

break relations with Taiwan soon 
: -r-’ ct and allow the Beijing government 
’• fflr to open an embassy here, senior 
wtfc foreign diplomats said last week. 

■' --"i: The Nicaraguan government's 
decision, which has not been an- 
nounced officially, would-be the 
most significant remit ctf-a dipi>. 


• : >r. niatic campaign undertaken by : >ktem of Taiwan. 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Dr. VX Wel- 
lington Koo, 97, a Nationalist Chi- 
nese diplomat, a former fMnesg 
prime minis ter and a signer of the 
United Nations Charter, died 
Thursday at his borne. 

In 40 years of dipknoaric service, 
Mr. Koo was ambassador to 
France from 1936 to 1941 and to 
Britain from 1941 to 1946. He then 
served as ambassador to the United 
States until 1956. when he became 
a member or the International 
Court of Justice in Hie Hague. Af- 
ter leaving the court in 1967, he 
became a senior adviser to the pres- 


1 •: »r 


tn 


Jin 


Beijing in Latin America in recent 
monthL 

Prime Minister ^ "Zhao ’ Eying is 
touring the region arid already has 
signed a commercial agreement 
with Venezuela, pledged to in- 
crease trade with Argentina and 
expressed interest in buying mili- 
tary equipment from Brazfl. . a 

A Chinese delegation visited 
Mexico last week to pursue plans 
for a S200-million mining project 
there. . 

In tite last four months, China 
has succeeded through diplomatic 
efforts in persuading two other na- 
tions in the Western Hemisphere to 
break ties with Taiwan and recog- 
nize Beijing. Bolivia did so in July, 
and Grraada followed at the end of 
September. Nicaragua would be 
the first country in Central Ameri- 
ca to take such a step. 

The region has been regarded as 
one of Taiwan’s last bastions of 
diplomatic support Taiwan has 
fully accredijsri embassies in Gua- 
temala, El Salvador, Honduras, 
Costa Rica and Panama. 

Although strongly anti-Commo- 
nist, Taiwan has bom providing aid 
to (he leftist Nicaraguan govern- 
ment since soon after the Sandin- 
ists came to power in 1979. It previ- 
ously aided the rightist regime of 
Anastasio Somoza. 

Much of the aid sent from Tai- 
wan to Nicaragua since 1979 has 
beenusedtonmalargeeiqieriinen- 
tal farm in tbe northern province of 
Matagalpa. Diplomats said Nicara- 
gua probably would seek aid from 
Beijmg to compensate for the loss 
of assistance from Taiwan. 

Ruling Party Posts 
A Large Victory 
In Taiwan Voting < 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — The ruling Kuomm- 
tang, or Nationalist Party, appar- 
ently unaffected by two major 
yandpla this year, has scored an 
overwhelming victory, in Taiwan’s 
local elections. 

The Kuomintang, which has 
ruled Taiwan since 1949, led oppo- 
sition candidates by wide margins 
in Saturday’s elections/or a provin- 
cial assembly, city councils, mayors 
and comity magistrates posts. It 
won nearly 80 percent of the. 200 
offices contested, a party spokes- 
man mid 

The opposition Tangwai groups 
won only l 7 seats, or a loss of three, 
in (he 77-member assembly 

The Kuomintang spokesman de- 
scribed the victory as an indication 
of continued confidence in the rul- 
ing party by Taiwan’s 19 million 
people. 

The Knamintang won despite 
two scandals. Three of Taiwan’s 
top intelligence officials were in- 
volved in the murder of a dissident 
writer, Henry. Liu, in California . 

A dditionally , a banking scandal 
brought down the Cathay, business 
empire in February and forced the 
resignation of the economics minis- 
ter, Hsu li-teb, and his successor, 
Loh Jen-kong. 


Fluent in English. French and 
German. Mr. Koo became English 
secretary’ tri tbe president of the 
newly established Republic of Chi- 
na in 1912, after he received his 
master’s degree from Columbia 
University. He specialized in inter- 
national law. 

He served briefly as prime minis- 
ter, foreign minister and finance 
minister of China in the 1920s and 
*30s. • 

John J. Sparkman, 85, 
Vice-Presidential Nominee 
. HUNTSVIELE, Alabama 
(NYT) — John J. Spademan, 85, 
the Democratic vice-presidential 
nominee in 1952, died Saturday of 
a heart attack. 

Mr. Sparkman, an Alabama 
Democrat, served 42 years in Con- 
gress before retiring in January 
1979. The son of a tenant farmer, 
he was first elected to the Senate in 
1946 after serving for 10 years in 
the House of Representatives, 

He was one of the early populist 
liberals to come out of the South 
and made bis greatest legislative 
mark as an advocate of public 
housing while serving as chairman 





VX Wellington Koo 


sciences, seman tics and a range of 
other subjects. He was part of a 
small group of advisers who helped 
Mr. Roosevelt shape the New Deal. 

During the Depression, his main 
thesis was the inevitability of a 
planned economy. He used “A 
New DeaT as the title for a book he 
published in 1932. 

■ Other deaths 

Marshal Alexander L Pokrysb- 
km, 72, a Soviet fighter pilot who 
'was credited with having shot 
down 59 German planes in World 
War H. and was a former govern- 
ment official, it was announced 
Friday in Moscow. 

Wffian L Pereira, 76, as archi- 
tect whose California landmarks 
include the Transamerica Corp. 
pyramid in San Francisco and the 
planned community of Irvine, 
Wednesday of cancer in Los Ange- 
les. 


2 Syrians to Join 


Armistead L Sdden X 64, a 
former cong ressman, defeny de- 
partment official and ambassador, 
Thursday of brain cancer in Bir- 
mingham. Alabama. 

Meret Oppeuheim, 72, a noted 
Swiss sculptor and surrealist artist, 
Friday in a Basel hospital. 

Dicky WeDs, 78, a trombonist 
who starred with Count Basie's or- 
chestra from 1938 to 1950, Tuesday 
of cancer in New York. 

Vtsifi F. Garbuzov, 74, the Soviet 
finance minister since 1960. Tues- 
day after a long illness, the Tass 
news agency reported in Moscow. 



Anatoly Shcharansky 

a Russian Jew, has been held hostage 
8 years, 8 months, 4 days 
by the Soviet government. 
Enough! His time for freedom has come. 


American Friends of the Association to Release Anatoly Shcharansky 
Rabbi Avraham Weiss, Mr. Joseph Mermelstein, Co-ordinators 
3700 Henry Hudson Parkway 
Bronx (Riverdale). New York 10463 (212) 796-4730 
During Summit, call in Geneva: 41-22-322100 
Contributions are most welcome and will be used to 
publish this ad throughout the world. 


of the Senate Committee on Bank- 
ing, Housing and Urban Affaire 0 • n m • 

from 1967 to 1974. soviet space 1 rip 

The high paint of Mr. Spark- * a 

man’s political life came in 1952, 


when he was chosen as Adlai E 
Stevenson’s running mate: In the 
general election, Stevenson was de- 
feated by Dwight D. Eisenhower. 

Stnart Chase, 97, Economist 
Coined Phrase *a New Deal’ 

REDDING, Connecticut (NYT) 
— Stuart Chase, 97, an economist 
and a member of President Frank- 
lin D. Roosevelt's “brain trust*’ 
who coined the phrase “a New 
Deal,” died Saturday after a brief 
illness. 

Mr. Chase, an outspoken advo- 
cate of government planning and 
intervention in the economy, was a 
prolific writer on economics, social 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Two Syrians have 
begun training for a space mission 
with Soviet cosmonauts, the offi- 
cial press agency Tass has reported. 

A Tass report from Damascus 
quoted Mohammed Zuhair Ma- 
sfaarqa, Syria’s vice president for 
in tonal affairs, as saying that the 
two unidentified men will travel 
into space very soon. 

Neither report gave details about 
the mission. 

Cosmonauts from the six East 
European countries in the Soviet 
bloc, and from Vietnam, Cuba, 
Mongolia, India and France have 
conducted joint missions with the 
Russians. 



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Page 6 


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international 


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Sribune. 


Publkiml Willi Tlw New York Timm add The Waahiiigtoa Poet 


Agreeing to Keep Trying 


A Soviet-American summit is not a dueL If 
Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev ex- 
pect to wound each other in Geneva this week 
by force of argument or personality, they are 
wasting their time. Both are riding high politi- 
cally and can easily survive a propaganda 
battle about human rights or Third World 
revolutions. And both are shielded by bureau- 
cracies that will protect them against making 
any damaging concessions. 

Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev meet not as 
gladiators but as captains of formidable mili- 
tary teams. The summit meeting will be a 
success only if they can envision new rules to 
restrain their rivalry. If they cannot, both lose. 

The summit meetings of the past 30 years 
show that it is difficult but not impossible to 
spell out restr aining rules. Rules written to 
manage the mili tary confrontation in Europe 
have been largely successful, even in “normal- 
izing'' the awkward divisions of Germany and 
Berlin. The rules to limit the stockpiling of 
nuclear weapons have constrained the arms 
race — but now are being overrun by technol- 
ogy and suspicion. The quest for rules to 
demilitarize competition in the Third World 
has failed Attempts to promote Soviet-Ameri- 
can collaboration in commerce, science and 
culture have been fitful and sterile. 

The Reagan -Gorbachev summit meeting 
thus amounts to a confession that the rule- 
making process has ground to a halt. Both 
sides have been angrily disappointed, and the 
reasons for this are instructive. 

As Mr. Reagan emphasized on the way to 
Geneva. Americans expect better relations 
with Moscow to blossom into expanding ex- 
changes of ideas and peoples, advances for 
human rights and tolerance for international 
diversity. But to the Soviet rulers, these aims 
sound subversive. They prefer a controlled 
detente that advances the Soviet economy and 
ratifies their standing as an equal world power. 
Yet to Americans, that in mm sounds like 
insistence that they acquiesce in totalitarian- 
ism and betray freedom. 

With every impulse toward agreement, 
therefore, have come new fears and hostilities. 
And the disappointments of tire last decade 
have shown that only progress in arms control 
can to some extent relieve the tension. For the 
arms race so institutionalizes mistrust that 


Toward Peace in Ulster 


The Irish-British accord announced Friday 
is the result of painstaking, high-level negotia- 
tions over Northern Ireland. The bloodshed in 
Ulster, the current phase of which began in 
1 969. has exhausted all sides: the British peo- 
ple. most of whom are tired of paying the 
financial, emotional and casualty costs of sup- 
porting an army in the province; the people of 
the Irish Republic who want unification but 
know that continued violence in the north 

E revents it; and the people of Northern be-' 
ind. Protestant and Roman Catholic, who 
yearn for an end to the shootings and the 
bombings that have caused more than 2,500 
deaths in the six counties. 

The agreement does not change the status of 
Northern Ireland as a part of the United 
Kingdom. It does, however, create a perma- 
nent Anglo-Irish Intergovernmental Confer- 
ence with representatives from Britain and the 
Irish Republic, which wDl serve as a forum to 
deal with political, legal and security matters 
and encourage cross-border cooperation. Ini- 
tial meetings will concentrate on relations be- 
tween the armed forces and the minority com- 
munity and on strengthening public 
confidence in the administration of justice. 
Eventually, the conference will consider the 
long-range political future of the province, 
though both governments agree that there will 
be no reunification of Ireland without major- 


ity consent in the north. The forum wQl have 
no actual governing power and does not super- 
sede the government in place. But as a first 
step toward settlement of the very questions 
that have engendered what amounts to an 
insurrection, it is more than a symbol 

Hard-liners on both sides in Ulster will 
complain. Intransigent Protestants will object 
to any role for the Republican government, 
and Catholic extremists want nothing less than 
full reunification. But parliaments in West- 
minster and Dublin are expected to give quick 
approval and both governments are pledged 
to be steadfast against internal resistance. 

Ironically, the framers of the pact are espe- 
cially concerned about the reaction to the 
agreement in the United States, for without 
strong U.S. support for this peaceful step, they 
fear, money and arms will continue to be 
funneled from America to the most violent 
factions in Ulster. It is difficult to understand 
why any American would prefer to finance the 
continuation of armed conflict when an im- 
portant step toward peace is a reality. Strong 
statements supporting the agreement have al- 
ready come from President Reagan. House 
Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill and scores of con- 
gressional friends of Ireland. This support 
should reassure these longtime allies that the 
Americans applaud their step toward peace. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


A Condition lor Survival 


Both superpowers have to learn that parity 
is not a breathing space on the way to one or 
the other’s victory. It is the condition of the 
world’s survival A two-day meeting between 
two men [who are] already scarcely well-dis- 
posed toward each other, is not the occasion to 
address this fundamental problem. But poten- 
tially it is a step toward such a discussion, 
which nil! be neither easy nor quick but can- 
not be indefinitely postponed. 

— The Observer (London). 

President Reagan wonld be right to reject an 
offer from [Mikhail] Gorbachev to cut nuclear 
forces in return for dropping the Strategic 
Defease Initiative. Mr. Reagan’s desire to 


make the world less vulnerable to nuclear 
holocaust deserves rather more serious consid- 
eration than most Western commentators have 
been prepared to give iL And the Russians are 
already working hard on an SDI erf their own. 

— The Sunday Times (London). 


Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev lead coun- 
tries with profoundly different views of poli- 
tics, economics, history and the future. For as 
long as anyone can foresee, they will be in 
competition for the hearts and minds of the 
rest of the world. The best that anyone could 
hope for from Geneva would be the faint 
glimmerings of ways to compete without blow- 
ing one another up. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 


FROM OUK NOV. 18 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: r Alien Gold 1 Cor Irish Home Role 
LONDON — The Standard says: “If it were 
not for the subsidizing of the Nationalists from 
the United States, there would not at this 
moment be a Constitutional crisis in the Unit- 
ed Kingdom. When John Redmond [the Irish 
Nationalist Party leader] undertook his West- 
ern trip, he was told that it was useless for him 
ever to come to America again and ask for 
subscriptions until he had made Home Rule an 
accomplished fact. He has been made to un- 
derstand that he has been given his last chance 
of enlisting American support. These two hun- 
dred thousand dollars are not to be melted 
away with nothing to show for them. Their 
subscribers want value for their money. Home 
Rule is bad enough, but Home Rule bought 
with alien gold is a degradation which ought to 
be a Utile much for the spirit of Englishmen.” 


1935: A U.S.-Canadian Trade Treaty 
WASHINGTON — The reciprocal trade trea- 
ty between the United States and Canada was 
made public [on Nov. 17]. The treaty establish- 
es a lower tariff for 767 American exports to 
Canada, in return for which the United States 
accords Canada a lower tariff on S3 major 
products, which will probably aggregate more 
than 100 separate tariff classifications, and 
places several Canadian products on the duty- 
free list. President Franklin D. Roosevelt sum- 
marized the pact at the White House. He 
hailed it as a “revolution in the trade relations 
between the two countries.” He stressed that 
the larger part of American export trade with 
Canada is covered by the treaty, while conces- 
sions made by the United States affect com- 
modities which accounted for about two- 
thirds of imports from Canada in 1929. 


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


A Checklist 
For Judging 
Summit XIV 



J YOU AiM'T \ 
SEEM i 

NOTHIN]' 


Success at f 


The Summit^ 


:«**** 


other issues become mmegotiable. If there is to 
be progress in Geneva at all, it must begin with 
progress toward a stand-down in aims. 

With the aims race now reac hing toward 
outer space, is a stand-down stOl possible? 
Most assuredly yes. Is it likely to be pro- 
claimed this wed; from Geneva? Probably no L 

The possibility lies in the symmetry of griev- 
ances. Mr. Reagan accuses the Russians of 
destroying the detente of the Nixon years by 
building ever more threatening missiles and 
pursuing a military advantage with which to 
divide and weaken the democracies. Ml Gor- 
bachev accuses Mr. Reagan of abandoning 
arms control and speeding the pace of military 
spending to bankrupt the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Reagan's great fear has been that Amer- 
ica's land-based missiles are becoming vulner- 
able to a first strike by the much larger force of 
Soviet land-based missiles. Unable to match 
this Soviet force even with a triDion-dollar 
defense buildup, the president finally coun- 
tered in 1983 with the threat to build a “star 
wars” missile defense. Mr. Reagan says it is 
only research for a futuristic shield protecting 
all nations, but the Pentagon's undisguised 
objective, at least for this century, is a missile 
defense to neutralize most R ussian missiles. 

Surely this threat explains Mr. Gorbachev’s 
new offer. He win greatly reduce his offensive 
weapons if the United States guarantees not to 
deploy missile defenses. If he cannot get such 
an accord, the Soviet leader will certainly vow 
this week to match Mr. Reagan weapon for 
weapon. But he also will proclaim a preference 
for an agreement that lets him shift scarce 
resources to rebuilding his economy. 

In its present form, the Soviet offer is unac- 
ceptably unbalanced. But it implies a bargain 
that should interest the president: to trade off 
a costly and dangerous quest for defensive 
weapons for the significant and stabilizing 
arms reductions that Americans have long 
advocated. If Mr. Reagan agrees, at least in 
principle, thus to cash in his “star wars” chips, 
the two leaders might be able to shake hands 
on an effort to negotiate in earnest until they 
meet again next year. 

They will get no awards for accomplishment 
until that second meeting. But they will be 
judged harshly if they fail even to try. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


By William S afire 


By William G.Hyiand ;j 


G ENEVA — How do you judge a 
summit meeting? What criteria 


VI summit meeting? What criteria 
do you use before saying, “They got 
more out of this in world opinion 
than we did,” or, “We sure avoided 
another Yalta”? ■ 

Here in this neutral city, where 
parading protesters are already heav- 
ing firecrackers for peace, it ls dear 
what the standards would not be: 

1. Did the leaders get along well? 
They will and they won’t It is in the 


N EW YORK. — If past 

meetings are any guide, jadgmgj 
. what constitutes success may not be! 
so easy tins week. It is notoriously! 
difficult to score a summit. The samel 
two questions always arise: Did the 
]n»Arr%. get along?' Who won theprtH 
paganda battle? But the answers dd 
not necessarily tell much about the 
meeting's substance or, lasting effects.; 
Presidents t^ttttiie^ifeige tfae'foj 

cus on pgsqnaB^y;«^> r opaganda^ 
- tfrflir rareerajihvc’becpooiit on tneaW 
personalities and powers of Parana- j 
hoil Roosevelt pndedirimsdf on his| 


interest of both to say publicly that 
the other was tough and businesslike, 
while saying privately that the other 
is burdened by hard-line ideological 
hangups. To the extent that hand- 
shake photos conceal deep ening dif- 
ferences, the personal touch can hurt. 

2. Did this summit the 

14th between the two countries, re- 
duce tensions? Another phony crite- 
rion; America's purpose is not merely 
to reduce tension, but to get at the 
cause of tension. For example, the 
Soviet invasion of Afghanistan 
caused President Carter to impose a 
grain embargo and suspend cultural 
ties; President Reagan lifted the em- 
bargo and now proposes to resume 
people- to-people visits — but the 
rape of the Afghan people goes on. In 
this case, “redaction of tension” is 
not a success, but an admission of the 
impotence of impatience. 

3. Was a breakthrough achieved in 
arms control? That was already 
achieved when the Russians seized 
“star wars” as an excuse to drop their 
insistence that America not respond 
to their deployment of new missiles 
aimed at Europe. The Russians are 
pressing to make this a pure anns- 
control summit meeting, seeking a 
major concession to perpetuate their 
offensive advantage. 

4. Did we break the ice by gating 
into the agreement-signing habh7 
Agreements lie in diplomatic drawers 
to be dragged out for ceremonial 
signings. They range from high- 
sounding statements of principle to 
agreements to open consular offices 
— as if one needed a solemn occasion 
to learn to bake chicken Kiev. 

5. Did we agree, at least, to meet 

again , on a regular basis? This sounds 
normal and sensible and is a mistake. 
A s ummi t meeting should be an ac- 
knowledgment of progress in hum- 
drum diplomacy, and a political stim- 
ulus to bureaucrats, not an 
circus to celebrate stalemate. 

Having averted false criteria, what 
standards can we set for success? 

1. Was a connection made and ac- 
cepted that behavior in one field can- 
not be separated from all others — in 
other words, did linkage triumph 
over arms control isolation? America 
cannot expect the Soviet Union to 
change dramatically on suppression 
of dissidents, expansion of espionage 
or export of subversion. But it can 
keep up the pressure at all points, 
rewarding progress with trade good- 
ies and dollops of d&tente. 

2. Was the first glimmering of real- 
ism shown on arms reduction? Mr. 
Gorbachev’s protracted denuncia- 
tion of space- based defenses has pro- 
vided him with the fig leaf he needed 
to return to the bargaining table with- 
out the removal of American Per- 
shing-2 missiles from Europe. If he 
chooses to freeze on the “star wars" 
issue, that wQl demonstrate his inter- 
nal political weakness: but if he faces 
reality, the long process can resume. 
The measure of America’s success is 
in its perseverance. 

3. Was any damage done? Secret 
agreements that invited later dis- 
putes, dangerous misreadings of the 
will of the opposition ana simple 
blundering have marked several par- 
leys. The would-be healers of the 
world's wounds should mind the 
Hippocratic oath: “Do no harm." 

4. Did it provide the cover for real 
movement? Summit meetings give 
leaders the chance to pretend to less- 
en their distrust of each other. That is 





am? 


ability to convince; even the ruthless* 
Stalin could beconverted into Uncle] 




PA N C.H0 


Geneva: A Grand Deal to Be Made 


W ASHINGTON — A grand deal 
lies there waiting to be made at 
the summit meeting, a deal that 
would make everything else look a bit 
easier. It involves keeping work on 
strategic defense withm bounds of 
treaty and reason and planning deep 
cuts in strategic offense. It glimmers 
on the horizon at Geneva. 

It may still be glimmering after 
Geneva. The Russians are going into 
the summit meeting in the kind of 
hard, hysterical bar gaining mode that 
cost them dearly on the missiles in 
Europe, where- everyone later could 
see how ov erwrou ght and artificial 
their hysteria had been. And it seems 
that the value of such a grand deal is 
still in contention in President Rea- 
gan’s mind and among his aides. 

So there is real drama over what 
will come out of the summit talks. 

Attention inevitably has fixed 
upon the two leaders' personalities 
and public skills. Mr. Gorbachev has 
been playing good cop, bad oop: first 
earnest and peace-seeking, then 
pushy and “Russian." Mr. Reagan is. 
being scrutinized for his alertness and 
command of his brief; critics also 


Bjr Stephen S. Roeenfeld 


question his capacity to stand up to 
the suspected battering he mav ra- 


the suspected battering he may re- 
ceive from the vigorous and perhaps 
somewhat mean new Kremlin leader. 

Still, on the American side; there 
are some surprises. It is not news that 
American liberals are troubled by the 
familiar rigidities of the president's 
political style. Even in that quarter, 
however, there is an expectation of — 
certainly a hanger for — honest dia- 
logue between Mr. Reagan and Mr. 
Gorbachev. This is based on appreci- 
ation of the president’s honesty and 


gutielessness, and of the clarity that 
comes from bong older and beyond 
petty ambition. It is as if these posi- 
tive personal traits might offset what 
are seen as the negative features of 
the president’s ideology. 

Even more intriguing is the trace of 
anxiety among administration loyal- 
ists. Some conservatives seem genu- 
inely alarmed by the thought that 
Nancy Reagan and Mike Deaver may 
induce the president to make crowd- 
pleasing concessions in order to come 
out of Geneva as a “peace president." 
Mr. Reagan himself has seen fit these 
last few days to r emin d people that he 
had much negotiating experience as 
president ot the Screen Actors Gnfld. 

The president had hoped to go to 
Geneva riding the crest of a wave of 
confidence created by his restoration 
of American pride and power over 
the last five years. Instead, he is 
caught in a wave of frustration creat- 
ed by his decimation cf the integrity 
of the nation’s budget 

Moscow was supposed to be feel- 
ing a cauticmaiy economic squeeze cm 
its military spending and, beyond 
that, a systemic squeeze on its fitness 
for technological competition. Per- 
haps h is feeling a squeeze; quietly. 
But the budget crisis that has over- 
taken Mr. Reagan, conspicuously, 
just as he heads to Geneva threatens 
to take a big bite out of his own 
military plans. 

An optimist might say that there 
has beat established precisely the 
condition of mutual and somewhat 
balanced vulnerability that , is most 


conducive to a broad political under- 
standing, if the two leaders can fift 
their sights and take a long view. 

A pessimist would pomt to the 
newness in office_and the evid ent 
inexperience of Mikhail Gorbachev, 
to * 1 ** seemingly boundless frith 
that Ronald Reagan shows in the 
correctness erf his own economic po- 
licy and in the aut omati c advantage 
of tlm American system TTk conclu- 
sion would have to be that it doesnot 
much matter that each is in a bind. 

An optimist would take a re- 
strained cheer in the condition of 
hard-earned stalemate • wwHru 
most of the regional disputes where 
the two countries are wi g»g *H Theo- 
retically, stalemate could translate 
into a tacit, gradual damnation of the 
scale of exertion an both sides. 

Practically, however, to de-escalate 
is inconsisten t with, a policy of win- 
ning and seating a favored regime, as 
Moscow seems intent on doing in 

Af ghaninfam, arid W mdtmg tnn om <tn- 

ing in Nicaragua. The different pro- 
posals in circulation to twin treat- 
ment of these places have a formal 
symmetiy and not muchdse. 

Forty years of experience have in- 
stilled the twitwai habit of wHtig 
sure that Soviet-American competi- 
tion does not get near a midear 
threshold. Bat the notion of substan- 
tially djmtnkhfng or. ending competi- 
tion of these two evangelistic global 
systans seems beyond read!. The 
habit of cooperating below thenude- 
ar threshold, to reduce the costs and 
perils of competition all mound, is 

work (rfTb^tjeneva talka/*^ 


Joe. In this narrow sense, the Yalta 
Co nference in 1945- succeeded: Roo4 
aevdl and Stalin seemed to get along} 
if largely at Chorchiirs expense. > 
So when Stalin djedjt was natural 
that President Eisenhower woulc] 
warn to sit down whhJSBkita Khro, 
shchev. the Genfcva meeting in 1955 

was hailed as a “fresh starL It wasj 
in effect, & propaganda triumph, i 
But the meeting did not provide a 




r.,’r 

— « 


grand strategy . pt’^ feten ewqric 
super pow er retafloMPTfei “spirii 
Geneva" was bom in 1955, hot 
beB broke loose ■■thereafter 


in l958, Mr. KhrnShcfifcV’s demand! 
that the West get out of Berlin. {j 
The 1955 meeting did: lead. to Mru 
Khrushchev’s U.S. visit in 1959, boil 
by. the following spring he was be^J 
lowing threats. Mr. Eisenhower was! 
roundly attacked when he declined) 
one last meeting witit the Soviet lead^* 
er. Yet 25 years later. Hie Eisenhower 
reputation grows and Mr. Khru-i 
shchev ir a nonperson. Sopropaganj 
da victories iue not quite enough, t 
Much the same thing happened hi 
1961 when President Kennedy me{ 
Mr. Khrushchev in Vienna. The pres* 
ident and Mrs. Kennedy easily wod 
t he popu larity contest. But' Mr i 
Khrushchev dinrfiahly /refused to 


leavy Gu | 

attic He! 


* 

v ^ 

•••- «l 


The Washington Post 


Wall and pot mfosfas in Cuba. Hej 
had badly minudgiod the man he had* 
argued with in Vienna^ and so hdi 
almost produced a war. ' |f 

President Johnson never had a full- j 
fledged summit conference. He met! 
with -die second team, beaded bjfj 
Prime Minis ter Alexei Kosygin, in' 

. New Jersey. Yet this meeting inangnja 
rated the strategic arms talks that? 

. have been the centerpiece' of aQ sub-| 
sequent summit: meetings. So it is a* tl 
mistake to jndgesummit talks by the? ~ 
pomp and circumstance. : -jj 

Nor do personal rdations prevent \ 
nations from .acting in their: own in-!j| 

and; 

1 teoti&'Bi^^CT’.^f^months afjf 
. ter Me' Carter met Mr? r Brezhnev inf 


.5 


> fi T )7 Af-‘S 


No Relief From the 'Logic’ of Deterceiiee 


ghamstan. Mr. Carta withdrew thel 
treaty belted sgned~witffMr. Breads' 


O SLO — Around the world, there 
is hone that somehow. Ronald 


is hope that somehow Ronald 
Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev can 
find a way to ease people's fears of 
nuclear weapons. Yet even if the Ge- 
neva meeting were to lead to a drastic 
reduction of nuclear stockpiles, the 
basic situation would be the same. 


By John Ansland 


Smaller nuclear stockpiles might 
tost less. There would be less danger 
of accidents or unauthorized firing 
But the nuclear powers would contin- 
ue their preparations for nuclear war. 

Officers at the headquarters of the 
U.S. Strategic Air C omman d, near 
Omaha, Nebraska, do the key Ameri- 
can nuclear planning A group called 
the Joint Strategic Target Planning 
■Staff has at its disposal for planmne 


SIOP, the Single Integ r ated Opera- 
tion Han. This is the plan of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff for the possible use of 
America's strategic forces: the air 
farce's ballistic missiles and heavy 
bombers, and tire navy’s ballistic inis- 
s£Le submarines. 

SIOP planning begins with a direc- 
tive from the preodent via tire secre- 
tary of defense to the joint chief?:, 
who then prepare a somewhat more 
detailed directive to the planners in 
Nebraska. Taking into account the 
nuclear weapons available to them, 
they revise the existing SIOP and 


purposes, about 10,000 
Field commanders j 


why Mr. Reagan talks naively of reas- 
suring the Russians that. America 


soring the Russians that America 
means them DO {R se eming to a ccep t 
tire notion that Soviet expansion is 
rooted in fear of the United Stales 
rather than in their own desire to 
dominate. In the past, this has bred 
conteumt; it is now hoped that the 
psychological concession will provide 
an opening for Mr. Gorbachev to use 
inside the Kremlin, if he wishes to 
reduce the Red Army’s influence. 

Using those criteria, this summit of 
sinking expectations might produce a 
modest gain for both sides. As I kept 
tiying to explain to Talleyrand: Even 
in a world of linkage, not every plus 
has to be somebody rise’s minus. 

The New York Times. 


Field commanders also prepare 
plans for the nuclear weapons for 
which they are responsible. In Eu- 
rope there is Genoal Bernard Rog- 
ers, the supreme commander of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
forces there. When the reductions in 
the NATO stockpile now under way 
are complete, he will have about 
4,600 U.S. wa rh eads in his inventory. 
Various U.S. naval commanders 
share about 3,000 nuclear warheads. 

At his headquarters in Florida, 
General Robert G Kingston is re- 


report bade to top officials. 

To test the procedures for execut- 
ing the SIOP, the joint chiefs conduct 
periodic exercises. Some of these in- 
volve senior officials. But these offi- 
cials should participate more than 
they do. Briefings are useful but only 
when one has lived through a test of 
the SIOP can rare fully understand 
the terrible decisions a president 
would have to 

Anrencan leaders have used vari- 
ous terms to describe their nuclear 
strategy. Dwight Eisenhower had 
massive retaliation. John Kennedy 
spoke of flexible response. Defense 
Secretary Robert McNamara’s 
phrase was mutual assured destruc- 
tion. What would really matter in a 
crisis, however, would be tire options 
available to the president. These have 
varied little ova the years. 

Today the president would have 
four main SIOP options: to attack 
Soviet nodear forces, about 2,000 
targets; to attack the Soviet leader- 


sponsible for military planning for 
the Gulf area of the Middle East. You 


the Gulf area of the Middle East. You 
can assume that his contingency 
plans include a nuclear dimension. 

It used to be impossible for the 
public to know much about nucl«*y 
planning. But in recent years, a num- 
ber of researchers have published 
books and pamphlets on the subject. 
Mostly they have written about the 


ship, about 700 targets; to attack 
about 3,000 other miHtaiy targets; 
and to attack 200 to 400 key factories. 

There are several, observations 
worth making h ere : The fimis that it 
is unfikefy that the president -would' 
order any retaliatory nuclear attack 
without, seeking to . destroy the re-' 
main mg Soviet nndear forces. This 
would involve the use oMhbnsands of 
warheads. Even if the Russians cut 
the number of their strategic war- 
heads by half, a UH coonterforce 
attack would be catastrophic. 

Tire second poiht concerns attack- 
ing the leadership. The president has 
the optiaii to attack the Soviet leaders 
— or not to. This gets into a complex 
question of command and control If 
there is to be any hope of terminating 
a nudear war before both sides ex- 
haust their warheads, American lead- 
ers would need someonerto talk to. 

The SIOP also includes an option 
on whether to attack countries allied 
with the Soviet Union. Their fate in a 
nndear war would dependon whetfc- 


• Moscow Olymnjj 

pjcSjJl^didqo|st<^Mr. Brezhnevs 
from proposing another sunurntj? 
ineeting, witli Ronald Reagan. < * 

■X So what should we expea to hap-*} 
jren; this week re Geneva? Neither 
side is hkefy io score a propaganda^ 
'famckoai. Mr. Reagan and MuchaiU 
^Gorbachev probably will get along| 
faiily wdL But m a year it wiD notf 


matter mudLTf Soviet leaders do nof5 
trust their- Own 'comrades, imagin g) 
how they regard foreign leaders. i| 
■ Jadgmgthe private discussions irfi 
difficult. There is little to be gained^ 
by ideological debates: Soviet leaders* 


' “ — “ w un. IMV UL 1 

Soviet politics only to be converted,? 
by an American president. Debating) 
Soviet misconduct is necessary, but* 
in general there is no way to bndgejj 



in general mere is no way to onageij 
the perceptions gap in just two days.*! 
Some progress is possible an can-;* 


a they bad dissociated themselves 
from the Russians. 

In the absence of a Soviet nndear 
attack on the United States, no sane 
UiL president would anthpri Tf the 
use of any of the SIOP options. The 
question that remains is whether he 
w ould be any more prepared to au- 
thorize US. odd commandos to use 
their nudear weapons. 

If you believe in deterrence, nude- 
ar plans have a logic cf their own. ‘ 
They also represent a form of mad- 
ness. The fact remains that 
Irfans exist. We do not malr* our- 
selves more secure by. ignoring them. 

International Henald Tribune. 


crete issuo. Soviet leaders are not! 
totally free agents, but they can make's 
de c i s i on s. Ajoznt statement of prind-'9 
pies on future aims control negotia-. 
tioas would be a welcome step. 4 
The final score wfl] be posted in]! 
about a year. President Reagan isj] 
probably right in calling this meetingjl 
a chance for a fresh start. But a freshjj 
start has to be followed by more than'g 
just a pleasant atmosphae. ‘s 

Summit' meetings have their ad-S! 
van tages-JJie^ force the pace of dcd-i J 
sion-maldfie 'm' Moscow, and they^ 


create apolitical mom 
not easy to reverse — < 
This makes the second 
mg as important as the l 
more so. So, next year 


i that 
mt side.; 
lit meet-; 


-w ■ 

Tkewrder, etbtoE^Oe Journal Por\\ 
amAffaiis, contributed this commenn 
to The New- York Times. ‘ 1* 

.. - ^ 


Of Aristotle, Dertg and Ouna’i Productive Peasants iwvJ^Tsaa, ' 



B EIJING — Aristotle got it right 

When it came to farming, he observed of 
ancient Greece, yon needed the stimulus of gain 
for hard work and the stimulus erf private owner- 
ship for husbandry and care. 

Deng Xiaoping’s China is demonstrating these 
universal truths. China's grain harvest of 407 
million tons last year was the world's all-rime 
record. The Soviet Union, still saddled with col- 
lective farms, produced just over half that much. 
America, the runner-op, had a 1984 harvest of 
312 million tons, one of its biggest, creating 
surpluses and falling prices. Mr. Deng’s reform- 
ers also found themselves with more grain than 
they could handle. Since 1979 thw had offered 
the peasants incentive prices for au above-quota 
grain surpluses and cash crops. But the money 
went to China's 50,000 communes — relics of 
Maoism and collectivized farming. 

China’s agricultural miracle has come since the 
Dengists introduced the “responsibility system” 
in 19Sl.lt broke up communes as economic units 
and. meant a return to family-sized farms for 
entrepreneurs who in effect rent their land- 
Between 1981 and 1984. production went up 
so fast the government had m pull money away 
frombadly needed energy projects to pay for it 
all This year, peasants are getting guaranteed 
prices for just about 40 percent of what they 
grow. With a grain glut, farm incomes are down. 


By Richard Critchfield 


— higb-yidri wheat, rice and other sdentif- 


Somc drop in the 1985 harvest is certain, partly 
because wheat-growing northeastern China had 
an unusually wet spring and dry fafl. Even so, 
production may reach 400 million tons. 

Chen Yun, 81, a Politburo economist, has 
warned that “tens of milli ons" of peasants are 
leaving the land. Is this a Ind thing? 

If Japan, South Korea and Taiwan axe taken as 
models for intensive family fanning in East Asia, 
the ideal land holding would be about 15 acres, a 
hectare. Too many Chinese land allotments are a 
fraction of this, often just a half acre. As fanning 
has become modernized, Japan's rural popula- 
tion has dropped from 60 percent to 25 percent, 
South Korea's from 80 percent to 29 percent. 

Chen Yun has also said that “grain shortages 
can lead to social disorder." With the maigjn 
between, scarcity and surplus so narrow in a 
country of more than a billion people, Western 
experts worry about shortages as soon as 1987. 

One thing is certain. The 1981-1984 grain, 
boom has proved that, given wise politics and 
scientific fanning, China can feed itself. Most of 
the record 1984 harvest was grown the age'-old 
way. with hoes and sickles, often without a plow, 
chemical fertilizers or pesticides'. 

The huge production gains came, from the 


because it had to cross Modem- and Philippme- 
bred wheat and rice wiih its own strains/^ 

These sdentifk advances were one reason Chi- 
na reemened its dbras and its ears to the West and 

its technology. Already, average yields are up to 
American standards — 15 tons of wheat per 
hectare (o America’s 21 terns, 4.8 tons of rice to5 
tons In America. China’s annual wheat produc- 
tion has more than doubled in the past seven 
years, from 41 milEon to $7 million tons. 

Future fanning miracles wfll depend an how 
fast China can expand scientific training, peas- 
ant literacy, electric power, credit andtran£nt. 
Some trends seen earner in Japan, Sbuth&orea 
and Taiwan are now appearing in rhma- < 3 ^ 
rtvenSficatioa (soybeans, cotton) and ishift m 
met from gram to more meat and nrilkYneariv 
10,000 daily cows were flown in this year)/* 

Deng Xiaoping aims to raise the average peat 

ant $ per capita raceme to S80O a yearwrtinal 5 

S^^^^^Koiiansdidita a 

angte decade, 1970 to 1980. 


Upon my return from Sofia, whert? 
I attended from beginning to end the 
General Assembly of theUnited Nal 
fcqns Educational, Scientific and CuW 
taralOremiration, ti* report 

™ W«t Against UNESCO 

Head” (Noe. 9) was brought trif 
my attention. 


of ^iHages” 

lAout peasant Ofein the Third World, contributed 
this comment to The New Yale Times. 


myattention. , 

Ifind therein a grave deformation 
that prevailed dming 

Paul Lswii oi 
. TheNew York Times, says that min* 
of the tune was takoi up by “strident 
of the U5. ^tSrawal by* 

tte'iovietUmonandhs'nmxiWorid* 

att^coupled with attearots topun-J 
ish die Umted StatrafoTeavin^* 1* 
But my reading was that the Soviet* 

Umon and its “Third World 

SfVararji 

... ^MAR CEL ROCHE: 1 

of Venezuela at UN^^ i 

TfoaSr J 




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\femenia 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY,- NOVEMBER IS, 19S5 


rr¥r% 

Alia: 

The Roval Jordanian Airline 


Page 7 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


Mticomeso our wodd. 


*^f^/t}fehA££yS 
SrtlSAN ARAB AJRUWEf 



KUWAIT AIRWAYS 


4Hpfln«3BhiXl3JI 
Iraqi almBiis 


u/gtkaJJfuaB 

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GULF AIR" 




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Arab carriers now form an increasingly influential bloc 


an overall profit last year for the first time since 1978. European and 


rvnii 


-rtwfc 


Heavy Gulf and International Air 
Traffic Helps Boost Profits 


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While air traffic co and from the Middle Ease continues to prosper 
at higher levels in general than in die rest of the world, the Arab 
airlines have their difficulties. Chief among these is the erosion of 
their profits by what are ken is cbe predatory actions of non-Arab 
airlines operating in what has been the traditional stop-over on 
routes between Europe’ and the Far. East. Some of these airlines use 
these stop-overs to fill their empty seats and cargo holds by 
discounring fares arid rates well below those agreed on by the 
airline industry, its representative bodies and the overseeing 
governments. . • ‘ . 

This problem dominated the discussion ar the most recent 
meeting of the Arab Air Carriers’ Organization (AACO), and the 
organization’s director. General Amer Sharif, estimated losses from 
discounting ar 10 percent of rhe Arab airlines’ revenues. As these 
total around $3 billion in an average year, the leakage, according to 
Sharif's calculations, could be as high as $300 million. The meeting 
called for more stringent pofidng by the Arab governments of their 
airlines' interests, and a subsequent meeting of the AACO- Arab 
Civil Aviation Council reinforced that view. 

The Arab airlines now carry some 30 million passengers each 
year, and their productivity is gradually improving. Around half 
their total traffic Is tamed within the Gulf area, and there is 
concern that , as shown by die latest International Air Transport 
Association (LATA) figures, business within rhe Middle East 
showed a fall in 1984. Passenger kilometers flown were down 1.6 
percent, and freight and mail ron/kilometers fell by 2.3 percent. 

On the routes between the Middle East and Europe passenger 
business was up .6 percent and freight by 10.3 percent, and between 
the Middle East and the Far East by 10.6 percent and l6.5 percent 
respectively- B et we en the Middle East and Africa, passenger 
business was down by 5.6 percent, but freight showed an increase of 
4.5 percent • ‘A 

. LATA member- airlines, of .which the Arab carriers now form an 

■'•.if; TrfrtO ' .\fA s&r&fis 


A Vital Market 




increasingly influential bloc, generally did well during 1984, 
achieving positive resides for the first rime since 1978, according to 
the director-general of the association, Gunter Eser. On revenues 
approaching $40 billion, the operating result of the members 
before interest charges was S2J> billion. After net interest charges 
of $1.7 billion, die net result was $500 million, or 1.3 percent of 
revenues. 

Eser pointed our thax although these were the best results for 
several years, they were well below the levels required co finance 
die industry in die future. Jc is estimated that the LATA airlines in 
general, and the Arab carriers in particular, will need to acquire a 
grand total of -4,000 aircraft by 1993. about 1,800 of them to replace 
existing units. With spares and other fixed assets, the investment 
should total between $150 billion and $200 billion, including some 
$100 billion for international scheduled services. 

The need co increase revenues, which are under constant and 
increasing pressure from discounting, rising costs for materials and 
labor and rails from passengers and freight shippers for Iowa fares 
and rates are further major worries for the carriers. 

Arab airlines are also concerned by the recent starting up of 
Emirates airline, based in Dubai, with scheduled flights co Kuwait, 
Karachi and New Delhi, and with plans for further services to, 
among others, Colombo, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain. Qatar and Oman. 
Pakistan International, New Zealand Airways and the British 
airline Britannia are among those prepared to offer the new airline 
technical and managerial assistance. Several established airlines in 
the Gulf area derive considerable revenue from operating through 
Dubai, and the advent of a newcomer that could compete strongly 
for such income must be bad news for them. 

In general, though, the Arab carriers continue to cooperate 
through the AACO, IATA or ICAO, the United Nations aviation 
body. The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) has recently promot- 
ed a greater level of accord between Gulf Air. Kuwait Airways and 




A Saudi Airbus A300 takes to the skies. 

The airline is taking delivery of JJ of these aircraft 

which are manufactured by the European 
Airbus Industrie The A 300 seats 250 and is 
one of a family of airbuses whose range and capacity 
varies according to the seating configuration and 
powerplants. Below, another version of the 
airbus, the A320, which is for short to medium 
range and will carry J 50 passengers. It is due 
to come into service in 1987. 


r* v.-T 



UT • • V • 


for Aerospace 
Industry 


Saudi a, forming an executive committee of senior governmental 
and airline people and increasing flights between the capital dries 
of the GCC councries. A common ticket cover and a unified GCC 
timetable have also been established to facilitate the exchange of 
airline documents within the GCC countries. 

The Arab airlines are estimated to handle about 7 percent of 
total international traffic today, compared with 2 percent two 
decades ago. and the region has its share of high fliers. Saudia is the 
class ic example. This airline began with one DC-5 at the end of 
World War II and now has ova 23,000 employees and a sizable 
flea of the most modem airliners, in the introduction of which it 
has become renowned as a world leader. 

Saudia was selected for spedal commendation by Gunter Eser, as 
was Yemcnia, which he congratulated on its finanrial turnaround. 
Other carriers in the region that continue to do well are Kuwait 
Airways, which Eser commended for its sophisticated training 
facilities, and Gulf Air, now preparing to become 49 percent 
privately owned within che next six months. Privatization is 
becoming a trend in the airline industry, and die rest of che airlines 
in the Middle East will be warebing Gulf Air’s experience with 
keen interest. 


According to the Boeing Co., 
there are 21 airlines in che Mid- 
dle East that opera re rheir jer 
airliners. The other major air- 
craft manufacturers in both the 

United States and Europe have 
an equally buoyant sales story 
to relL Taking into consider- 
ation the large number of exec- 
utive aircraft based there, rang- 
ing in size from the eight-seat 
British Aerospace 125 ro the 
Boeing 747 jumbo, it is appar- 
ent that the region is an ex- 
trcmclv important market for 
the world aerospace industry. 

The aircraft makers have nor 
been slow to exploit this poren-' 
rial, and they have found will- 


ing purchasers among rhe Mid- 
dle Eastern airlines who early 
on saw the advantages of wide- 
bodied airliners, the high tech- 
nology they contain and che 
economical and quiet engines 
powering them. 

As a result, there are no Few- 
er rhan 38 Boeing 747s owned 
by the region’s airlines. The 
very advanced Boeing 767 has 
also begun to enter service 
there, and Saudia was rhe firsr 
airline in the world to introduce 
the European Airbus Industrie 
A300-600 wich its futuristic dig- 
italized cockpit operated by a 
crew of only two. 

Continued on next page. 


Most of the airlines in the area admit, however, that even with 
the Gulf Cooperation Council cco many of their flights fail co 
connect with each other, with che result that valuable traffic and 
income is lost co the non-Arab airlines saving the region. The 
AACO scheduling committee has been inquiring into these 
disparities, and is to make recommendations to the member airlines 
on how their flights might be better meshed 

But the Arab airlines have to accept that they will always 
compere with outsiders because the region is one of the grear 
aviation crossroads of che world, because its building program of 
the 1970s produced some of rhe world's best and mosr advanced 
airports, and because of the rich commercial pickings it offas. 
Although the earlier petrochemical and construction booms have 
now* subsided, the Middle East remains one of the great interna- 
tional targets for exporters of all nations, while its regular 
migrations of foreign workers, teachers and pilgrims fill hundreds 
of thousands of airline seats that would otherwise fly empry. 
Writer Arthur Reed is European Editor of Air Transport World 


... ’■!' ?i. 

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Hot, aromatic cardamom coffee - 
the traditional Arabian welcome to 
an honoured visitor. And taie to all 
the traditions of Arabian hospitality, 
when you fly Gulf Air you fly not as 
a mere passenger, but as an 
esteemed guest. 


i ! 





When you fly Gulf Air 
you’ll find it’s Golden Falcon 
service second to none from 
the moment you checkun 
until vou arrive at your 
destination. Once on-board, 
no effort is spared to make you 
feel at home. 

Luscious Omani dates, rose 
petal water, hot scented towels, 
free newspapers and luxury 7 
sleeper-seats — that’s Golden 
Falcon 1st Class service. 

But whether you choose 
1st Class, Falcon Business Class 
or Golden Economy 7 , you’ll find 
the Golden Falcon service is 
unbeatable. 

And that’s the Arabian promise. 





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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


advertising section 



Hatta Fort Hotel at the foot of the Haijar Mountains in the United Arab Emirates. 

Hotels Now Offer 
Updated Welcome 


The rigors oF travel in the Arab 
world may have eased for chc 
business person, bur the region 
still has rhe habit of dir owing 
chc unexpected in the pach of 
even the most seasoned visitor. 

Michael McFadyen, general 
manager of chc Gulf Horel in 
Muscat. Oman, who has been 
in the Gulf since 1968 recalls: 
"In Kuwait in those days, all 
you wanted was a bed. You had 
to accept that you went into a 
room with two beds, and in the 
middle of the nighr a stranger 
would arrive to share it." 

The 1960s were a hotelier's 
dream as far as occupancy rates 
were concerned — usually more 
chan 100 percent — although 
char could also rum into a 
nightmare if the government 
suddenly decided to comman- 
deer a hotel for a state function. 


putting guests out onto the 
screecs. 

In ccnrrasr with even five 
years ago. chc business traveler 
is now totally spoiled for choice 
in most of the Gulf states and 
in the Arab world in general. 
This is the result of the arrival 
since the mid-1970s of nearly all 
the major international hotel 
franchise operators: Sheraton. 
Marioct. Inter-GonrinentaL. Hil- 
ton. Hyatt, Holiday Inn, Ra- 
ni ad a. Mcridien and ocher 
smaller groups often with only 
one or rwo hotels. 

The independents are not to 
be overlooked, since they often 
offer better value for che travel- 
er on a tight budger. In Bah- 
rain, considered the holiday 
center of chc Gulf, che smaller 
hotels in Manama are doing a 
roaring trade with Saudi holi- 
daymakers and also with visit- 


ing salesmen who don’t care 
about king-sized beds or private 
minibars, but prefer no- frills 
service. Haggling over which 
room discount applies is still 
the order of chc day. No one 
walks into a hotel and pays the 
full nice. Corporate rates, com- 
pany discounts or just plain dis- 
counts arc the rule, but they 
should be negotiated in ad- 
vance, preferably by a local 
agent or sponsor who will usu- 
ally want to direct a guest to a 
property where he has influ- 
ence. 

Earing in one’s hotel has be- 
come more interesting, with 
many Gulf hotels trying for 
originality in theme restau- 
rants. The Japanese restaurant 
at the Bahrain Hilton, the Ital- 
ian trattoria and coffee bar at 
the Hyatt Regency in Riyadh 
and the pool-side facilities at 


rhejebel Ali Hotel outside Du- 
bai are all worth trying as an 
alternative to room service, 
since staying in reach of the 
telephone is often a priority in 
Arab countries where business 
does not follow stria office 
hours. Outside catering con- 
tracts help the hotels make 
money from cbeir kitchens and 
bakeries, but genuinely high 
levels of cuisine are available. 

F acilities at hotels have also 
changed out of all recognition 
during the last five years. In 
addition to in-house video, 
swimming pools and he a lth 
dubs there arc now bowling 
alleys and a variety of beach 
sports, from undersea diving to 
windsurfing and dinghy sailing. 

Unless the visitor has local 
contacts in Saudi Arabia, Qatar 
and Kuwait he is likely to 
spend a lot of rime in his own 
company in the hotel, usually 
meaning a limited diet of in- 
house video movies on televi- 
sion and trips to the pool or 
health dub. 

McFadyen is a keen racquets 
player and has introduced ten- 
nis and squash fadliries ar the 
Gulf Hold in Qunim, an inno- 
vation that is typical of the 
older generation of properties 
now updating their fadliries. 
At che Regency Inter-Con tin en- 
rol in Bahrain, chc most central- 
ly located of Manama’s top four 
hotels, new investment is going 
into a rawer block to put more 
accent on leisure attractions, al- 
though the hotel itself is only 
five years old. But improve- 
ments in terms of upgrading 
rooms are also going on at och- 
er hotels in the region, largely 
because of the influence of fran- 
chise operators on their owners. 

The method of getting to 
business appointments is also 
changing. It is still possible to 
walk a few hundred meters 
from the main hotels and hail a 



Airbus solves the 
Middle East cargo puzzle, 

When all the pieces fit, you no longer have 
a puzzle. 

The Airbus A300 and A3 1 0 take full-size pallets 
straight from long-range wide-body aircraft. They're 
standard aboard the Airbus. 

Furthermore, the Airbus A300-600 takes 22 
standard LD-3 containers. 

So there are no prizes for guessing which 
aircraft has been ordered by the major airlines of the 
Middle East. 

® Airbus Industrie 

YOUR BEST RETURN ON INVESTMENT 


passing battered cab. The 
chances arc chc driver will 
speak only Arabic or, if he 
knows English, will be unlikely 
to recognize street names in 
English. But these days in Saudi 
Arabia, Qatar and Kuwait it is 
the practice for the principal 
hotels to offer a limousine ser- 
vice, usually in connection with 
a leading car rental company 
such as Avis, complete with 
drivers who know the dries 
backward and foreward Some 
hotels, like the Marriott chain, 
offer free Hertz car rentals and 

ocher services if guests book a 
certain number of nights. 

A stay at che Inter-Continen- 
tal Hotel in Muscat is likely to 
cost $105 a night, depending on 
what discount can be negotiat- 
ed, bur a more modest hotel in 
the same city would be die 
Ruwi at $75 a night for a single. 
At the Holiday Inn in Bahrain a. 
single room would cost about 
che same as at the Ruwi, while 
the Diplomat Hotel, pan of 
Tnxstbouse Forte’s Middle East 
chain, would cost just over $1(X) 
a night. Hotel charges are still 
high in che Middle East because 
of high overhead and staff coses 
and the cyclical nature of busi- 
ness. 

Most travelers visir chc Gulf 
in the autumn or spring, avoid- 
ing che hoc summer months 
when Gulf nationals travel and 
religious events of significance, 
including Ramadan and che 
Haj pilgrimage, cake place. 
These are now moving up earli- 
er in che year, but still fall in the 
hoc weather season from April 
to September. 

A recent change in che Mid- 
dle East hotel trade has been che 
emphasis placed on attracting 
the Arab traveler. Visitors from 
the industrialized countries are 
still welcome — and are che 
bread and butter of the busi- 
ness — but che marketing drive 


of many top hotels in che Mid- 
dle East, including Egypt, Jor- 
dan and Syria, is to attract the 
Saudi or Golf traveler. This is 
because Arabs often travel as a 
family and rarely quibble about 
chc rate 

"It's quite simple,” says a 
spokesman for the Jeddah Holi- 
day Inn, "the Arab traveler 
spends more rime aod money in 
chc hotel, and although we 
don’t favor any one group we 
must cater to his needs.” 

Holiday Inn is established 
in Saudi Arabia, where it was 
the first hotel group in Jeddah 

-as well as in the industrial dries 
of Jubail and Ycnbo. Another 
hotel group with a strong pres- 
ence throughout the region, is 
Mcridien, of France, which, still 
has its eye on Beirut as a center 
for regional tourism if a peace- 
ful solution could be found to 
the country’s problems- 

Visa delays often frustrate 
the business traveler visiting 
che Middle East, and such com- 
plications deter him from stay- 
ing on to see die sights. In die 
Gulf, visas for Oman have be- 
come tight because of the 1985 . 
15th anniversary of Sultan Qa- 
boos’s accession celebrations 
and the summit conference of 
die Gulf Cooperation Council. 
Getting access to Saudi Ara- 
bia — che most important busi- 
ness market — has become easi- 
er. 

The business of arranging 
appointments has always been a 
subtle procedure in the Middle 
East, but now it. is even more 
so. An appointment made by 
telex to meet a minister is often 
regarded as an in vi cation for a 
meeting rather than an actual 
rime and place for an interview. 
Top people in the Gulf are well 
protected by screening proce- 
dures, although the system usu- 
ally works in favor of the persis- 


A Vital Market 


Airline Fleets 


The following is an inventory of the aircraft operated by the 
major airlines of the Arab World. 

Alia-ihe Royal Jordanian Airline - with 4^00 employees, 
operates a fleet consisting of three Boring 747-200B "combi” 
passenger/ freight aircraft, three B707-320Cs, six B727-200s and 
nine TriScar 500s. 

Egyptair - has 9,600 employees. Its fleet consists of one 
B747-2Q0, seven B707-320G, eight Airbus A300B4s, three B767- 
200ERs (extended range) and some light aircraft. 

Golf Air - has 3,300 employees. It was formed in 1950, and 
equal shareholders since 1971 arc the Gulf states of Bahrain, Oman, 
Qatar and che United Arab Emirates. Its fleet consists of one B747, 
11 TriStars and eight B737-200S. 

Iraqi Airways - formed in January 1946, has 4£00 employ- 
ees and a fleet that includes three B747-200G, one B747SP (special 
performance), two B707-320Cs, six B727-200s, three B737-200s, 20 
Soviet Ilyushin II-76T/M3, six Antonov An- 12s, three An- 24s, six 
JctSrar 11s, four Falcon 50s, two Falcon 20Fs and four Piaggio 
P.166S. 

Jamahiriya Air Transport - formed in 1982 with its base 
in Tripoli, Libya, has 250 employees, but ope ra tes a fleer consisting 
of eight B707-32OCs, 11 Ilyushin Il-76T/TDs, a Lockheed L-10O- 
30, two Lockheed LT 0020s, one Fokker F-27-500, one F-27-400 and 
six Twin Ott er s. 

Kuwait Airways - formed in 1954, but adopting its present 
ride in 1957, employs 6,500 and has a fleet consisting of four B747- 
200Bs. rhree Airbus A300-C4-600S, five Airbus A3 10s, three B707- 
320Cs, four B727-200S, two British Aerospace 125-700s and three 
B767-200ERs- Three of the Kuwait A3 10s were in the process of 
being sold as this list was prepared. They had been stored by 
Boeing in Hannover, West Germany, and were being modified in 
that country before delivery to Pan American. 

Libyan Arab Airlines - with a staff of 4,800, flics two B707- 
320Bs, two B707-320Cs, ten 727-200S, three Fokker F-28-4000S, two 
F-27-400S, one F-27-500, 14 F-27-600s and has on order four Airbus 
A3O0B4s and four A3 10s. 

Middle East Airlines - whose operations have been badly 
disrupted recently as a result of the conflict in Lebanon, has 5,200 
employees. Ics fleet consists of three B747-20QB com bis, eight 
B707-320Cs and ten B720Bs, although some of these aircraft have 
been leased to other airlines. 

Oman Aviation Services - formed in 1981, has 1,000 
employees and a flea of four F-Z7-500S, one F-27-600, a Gcarion 11 
and two Twin Otters. 

Royal Air Maroc - with 3,900 workers, has in its flea one 
B747-200B combi, two B707-320O, eight B727-200*, four B737- 
200s and two B737-200CS. 

S&odia - can trace its history back to 1945. Now the biggest 
airline in the Arab world with 23,500 employees, its growing fleet 
includes two B747-20QFs, eight 747-lOOs, two B747SPS, 11 Airbus 
A300-600S, Eve 707-320CS, 17 B737-200S, two B737-200G. 17 
TriScar 200s and various smaller types. Among its orders are 10 
B747-300S. 

Syrian Arab Airlines - formed in 1961, has a staff of 3300 
and operates two B747SPs, three B727-200S, four Ilyushin H-76s, 
five Tupolev Tu-1 34s, four Antonov An-26s and seven Yakolev 
Yak-4Qs. 

Trans-Mediterranean Airways (IMA) - the Lebanese 
cargo airline, has 1300 employees and flies eight B707-320G. 

Tunis Air - goes back to 1948. It has a staff of 4,700 and its 
fleet consists of an Airbus A300B4, eight B727-20Qs, a B727-100 
and five B737-200S, one a cargo aircraft. 

Yemen Airways (Yemenia) - fanned originally in 1963, 
and given its present title in 1978, has 1,100 employees. Its fleet " 
consists of five B727-20QS, a B7 37-200 and two DHC Dash 7s. 


Continued from previous page. 

However, the Arab airlines' 
cn'tl have a considerable num- 
ber of decisions about fleet re- 
newal to make before the end of 
this decade despite-cheir spend- 
ing spree in the past For in- 
stance, there arc still 64 Boeing 
707s flying with Middle Eastern 
airlines. This aircraft .first came 
into service in I960 and is now 
out of production, nor do its 
engines satisfy die stringent 
new noise, regulations now be- 
ing introduced irii the United 
States, Britain and in Europe 

Operating such aircraft to 
areas outside chose mentioned 
above presents no immediate 
problem, bur the pressure to 
consider replacements is on. 
One option is to refit die air- 
craft with the new, environ- 
mentally acceptable U.S./ 
French CEM-56 engine at a cost 
of around $6 million, compared 

with, at least $30 million for a 
brand-new. narrow-bodied air- 
liner. 

Rc-cqurpmcnc decisions are 
also facing nlriinffg operating 
wide-bodied aircraft such as the 


Lockheed TriStar, die McDon- 
nell Douglas DC-10 and rhe 
earlier versions of the Boring 
747. As these aircraft age they 
arc becoming more ccsdy ro 
service and maintain as well as 
outmoded by newer technol- 
ogy, including advances in com- 
purerizarion and materials, par* . 
ri ciliary composites in airframe 
manufacture. 

Lockheed has now dosed its 
civil aircraft production line, 
but chree 1% companies: Air- 
bus, McDonnell Douglas and 
Boeing, arc in competition for j 
■what will be a rich crop of 
orders from, the region in che 
□ear future: 

The Arab Air Carriers’ Orga- 
nization’s figures indicate this 
need. The association forecasts 
chat during the next decade che 
annual growth in. die number 
of Middle Ease passengers will 
average 7.3 parent, which is 
0.8 percent greater than world 
airline growth, while that for. 
cargo will be 62 parent. The 
figures were calculated on all 
routes within the region and on 
all international routes ro and 
from che Middle East. 


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Athens 


■ • There arc lew regions of- rhe 

■ world char offer as specracuiar a 
heritage as the Middle Ease. 
From the splendors of classical 
Ijgypt, with che -unforgettable 
sight of the grear temple of 
Abu Simbd in the 'glow of an 
early morning sunrise, to the 
crumbling relics, of whar ■might 
have been the Queen of Sheba’s 

■ main ejqxjrr harbor for mynh 
-in southern Omari, rht< area, is- 
rich in both -past and 'present' 
glories. : 

"Wars may come and go, 
■but tourism goes on for ever” 
was the firm conviction of one 
director of tourism in Egypt, 
the country which has perhaps 
mere chan others in- the Arab 
world made a real industry out 
of tourism. . • 

From the Pyramids to Luxor 
to floating palaces on the Nile 
to the ruins rit. Aswan, there is 
indeed nothing (price Kite Egypt 
for viewing' and reliving the 
past. “ ’ '■ 

But. there are plenty of other . 
archaeological treasures to. be- 
found in the Arab world, which 
as a whole is booming more 
conscious of its past. Although 
some of the countries, notably 
Syria and Oman, are not always 
easy to otter because of visa 
restrictions, they both offer a 
wealthy heritage to the discem- 
, ing visitor. Joidan,widj its ede- 
t braced "Rose-red” Petra carved . 
[ our of the rock, has few bang- 
\ ups about letting the world see 
< a little of its history. Jusr'out- 
i side Amman, the capital, great 
efforts are being maoe lco reveal - 
the true splendor ofjetash. 

Unfortunately the same can- 
• not be said for the great dassi- 
, cal sights of Syria, which un- - 
1 doubtcdly has one of the richest 
. patrimonies in the Arab world, .. 
ranging from the almost Holly- 
wood- style Ktakdes Cheva- - 
Uers, one' of die most magxufi-/ 
dent of Crusader Castles, to che 
ruins at Palmyra. - 

During the next two years a 
touring exhibition of Syrian' 
culture is visiting . museums 
throughout the United States. 

It has just opened in Baltimore 
and indudes items from muse- 
ums in Aleppo, Danytyus,^ 
Ddr ez Zor and Palmyra. Most*. ’ 
of the objects hav^SJcwdikSv* • 


ered in -che last 50 years and 
trace the rodAng of Roman, 
■Hdlexusenf, Aramaean - and 
Arab cultures. 

Across the Gulf from Syria 
the past is coming' more and 
more into view as many of the 
Gulf countries' realize die natu- 
ral potential ‘they have on their 
hands. 

Ten years ago, anything that 
might be described as a muse- 
um would often consist of a few 
' fading- photographs, a box of 
- crumbling pearls and a decay- 
ing fishing boat or two. Now . 
all char has changed. 

: Kuwait, as might be expect- 
ed, has one of die finest muse- 
ums of Idaroic pieces anywhere 
in che world. No expense has 
been spared to gather together 
some of the richest objets (fair, 
ranging from intricately carved 
door frames and screens to. mag- 
nificent carpets and illuminated 
manuscripts. Th e displays and 
lighting march anything to be 
found in North America or Eu- 
rope. 

On a much smaller scale is 
the museum 'in Dubai, where a 
former fort has been opened as 
an informative cultural center. 
Here the tradi dons of the Gulf 
can be sedi, from a typical reed 
house to early marine relics. 

There are similiar but more 
modem museums in Bahrain, 
Qatar and Oman, where in- 
creasing efforts are being made 
do. preserve something of the 
past. 

Syria is not the only country 
with a wealth of forts. Many of 
a later period mack the trail of 
some of the original European 
trail blazers to the Arab 
world — the Portuguese. After 
.virtually circumnavigating Af- 
rica they ventured around the 
-Strait of Hormuz and into the 
Gulf. Everywhere they stopped 
.they left behind elaborate cas- 
tles guarding sheltered creeks 
and harbors. Two of the most 
spectacular, now restored, are 
the twin fares at Muscat. There 
are also several smaller ones 
inland where Portuguese troops 
and traders ventured into un- 
known Arabia. 

One of; the newest tourist 
destinations Is without a doubt 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


Page 9 


advertising section 


ADVERTISING SECTION 



One of the old Portuguese forts, now restored, guarding the harbor at Muscat. On the right is the Sultan’s Palace. 





Kuwait’s museum houses a fine collection of Islamic art. 


The splendid Roman theater as J crash in Jordan. 


North Yemen, where che feel- 
ing of the true Arabia is per- 
haps at its best. So far modem 
tourism has not really come to 
this area although the govern- 
ment, through its airline, Ye- 
meni*, and the" Yemen Arab 
Tourism Agency, is now hop- 
ing to attract more visitors. 
North Yemen, with its ancient 
buildings and dramatic views, is 
like a rime capsule where it is 
still possible to experience the 
sights and sounds of a bygone 
era. 

Mud-brick buildings stand 
upon' each ocher in raggle-tag- 
gfc fashion, each house giving. 


support to its neighbor or form- 
ing the foundation for a smaller 
dwelling on top. There are 
highly ornate fortresses built 
almost impossibly on top of 
pinnacles of rock and plenty of 
relics from past invaders who 
have left footprints in history 
throughout the land as well as 
much evidence of pre-lslamic 
times. 

All this can be seen from the 
comparative comfort of several 
new Western-style hotels, in- 
cluding the Sheraton, the Ra- 
maria, the Taj Sheba (one of che 
India Taj Group's finest ho- 
tels), the Al-Hamad Palace 


(once che home of the Imam) 
and many others. 

Sadly, much of the splendor 
that was Arabia is bring, or in 
most cases has already been, 
swept away in che course of 
progress. The once ubiquitous 
wind towers of cities like Dubai 
and Muscat are nearly all gone. 
These were a primitive form of 
air conditioning which had 
great practical value. Efforts are 
bring made to preserve the few 
of chem that still remain. 

In Saudi Arabia's Red Sea 
port of Jeddah, the mayor has 
made a valiant effort to preserve 
parr of rhe old city with its tiled 


alleyways and carved overhang- 
ing balconies. 

Ironically, now that the great 
tide of modernization in the 
Arabian Peninsula and Gulf 
countries has all but eliminated 
relics of the pasr, there has been 
a rewakening of interest in the 
Arabic cultural tradition. Much 
of this pan of che world was the 
leading center of civilization in 
early medieval times, a fact of- 
ten overlooked by the casual 
visitor who. if given time and 
encouragement, can learn much 
from the many new museums 
displaying treasures from che 
past. 



arabair 


olio] 


MIDDLE EAST AIR TRANSPORT, 
AIRPORT EQUIPMENT & 
CARGO HANDLING EXHIBITION 
AND CONFERENCE 

Dubai International Trade Centre 
United Arab Emirates 

16-20 February 1986 

Arab Air ’86 ibe first event ofits kind to be held in Dubai will provide 
the international aviation industry with a unique opportunity to 
present its products and services directly to buyers and specifiers in 
one of the most rewarding markets in the world. 

The Exhibition profile will indude a comprehensive range of 
equipment and services, inriT K lfri g airport planning, construction 
and operation, aircraft, navigational aids, passenger service 
equipment, cargo handling and safety and security. Arab Air '86 is 
certain loartraa a large and specialist audience from tfaraughoin the 
Gulf and neighbouring states. 

The Conference will be presented by MEED - Middle East 
Economic Digest with the theme “Civi] Aviation in the Middle East - 
The Challenge of Change' and will feature many of the leading 
experts in the international aviation industry. 

Arab Air '86 will be held under the auspices of the Department 
of Civil Aviation of the Government of Dubai & Dubai International 
Airport. 

All enquiries to: 

Fair* and Exhibitions i imitwi 
(Member of the Rem Organisation Limited) 

51 Doughty Street, London WC1N 2 LB, United Kingdom. 
Telephone: 01-831 8981. Telex: 299708 EfaneeG. 



Complete and return to the organisers, j 
Fairs and Exhibitions Limited t| 

Please forward full information on Arab Air ’86. 
Company Name 


## 


Address 


Telephone Telex 


Name of Contact 


1 A Multi-Million Dollar Sales Opportunity ’ 


Aqaba 


Amman 


Kuwait 


Lagos 

Saialah 


Jeddah 


tana 


Abu Dhabi 
fi, ■* Q.r Fa Kfcan 
Snarjah ^ 
C^sabishca 




Valletta 

M-JSC3? 


If you haw been to the Acropolis, 


If you have visited the tomb of KingTutankhamun, 

If you have watched the sunrise from a Maya Temple... 

Shouldn’t You Discover Yemen, The home of The Queen of Sheba? 



Legend has it that Sana’a, the capital of North 
Yemen, was founded by Shem the son of Noah. 
It is indeed tbeworlcfs oldest living city. 

In Yemen, history does not stop in Sana'a. 
Nearby lies Mareb, the capital of the andent 
Sabean Kingdom, whose Queen’s fame is a 
legend in itself. 


Call on 


The temples, the 3,000 year old Mareb dam 
and other historic relics have survived the 
centuries as have Sana’a’s andent wall and 
magnificent oriental souk. 

Yemenia, the national airiine of the Yemen 
Arab Republic, invites you to pay a visit to a 
culture as old as history itself and discover 
Yemen. 








well showyou the way. 


Yemenia, London Office 5 Cork Street London W1X1PB Tel: 01-434 3926/7 
ABU DHABI ADDIS ABABA ADEN AMMAN AMSTERDAM ATHENS BAHRAIN BOMBAY CAIRO DAMASCUS DHAHRAN 
DJIBOUTI DOHA FRANKFURT JEDDAH KHARTOUM KUWAIT LARNACA LONDON MUSCAT PARIS ROME RIYADH r 
.. . - SHARJAH SANAA ^ 






tiBR 4 








-» ■; m z " 7 * . -* ■ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


The Airport Building 
Boom Continues 


Gulf Air Partial Privatization Move 



Lr. spite oi 1 downturn in oil 
prices and .1 ccnsrrucrion-lcd in- 
dustrial recession in the Middle 

£asr, airporr devdopmenr in 
the region continues apace. Pas- 
senger and cargo traffic are 
growing, governments contin- 
ue ro see air transport as one of 
rhe most efficient ways of uni- 
fying the often far-flung comers 
of their countries, and a nation- 
al air carrier with an expanding 
network remains an essential 
mark at progress. 

Consequently, according to 
the annual publication Arab 
Transport and Shipping, some 
40 percent of world airport 
building and improvement in 
the second half of this decade is 
expected to take place in che 
Arab world. 

Admittedly, airport develop 
ment is a little more subdued 
rhan in the late 19 T 0s. Time 
was when you could scarcely 
open a newspaper in the Arab 
world wirheur reading of some 
vast new airport project. At the 
rurn of the decade a rash of 
stunning new international air- 
ports bec.in with Kuwait in 
1 -HS, the Abu Dhabi Interna- 
tional Airport < Nadia) in 1982. 
the Queen .Alia Airporr in Jor- 
dan in 1985 and die SSOO-mil- 
lion Saddam Hussein Intema- 
cion.il Airport in Baghdad, also 
in 1083. Topping them all ware 
the S^-bil'ion King Abdel Aziz 
International Airport in Jeddah 
in May 1981 and its sisrer facili- 
ty. the King Khaled Interna- 
tional Airport, in Riyadh in 
December 1983. 

The Jeddah and Riyadh air- 
ports are two of rhe rhree air- 
porrs conceived under Saudi 
Arabia's International Airports 
Project. The ocher is a $2.18- 
billion replacement for the ex- 
isting Dhahrun airport original- 
ly built as a military base in the 
mid-WOs. Ir was upgraded to 
accommodate increasing pas- 
senger and cargo traffic in 1980. 

Completion of the first 
phase of rhe King Fahd Eastern 
Province Airporr remains one 
of rhe main objectives of Saudi 
Arabia's recently elaborated 
Fourth Five-Year Development 
Plan 1985-90. 

With rwo 4,000-meter run- 
ways, the new airport is expect- 
ed ro serve seven million pas- 


sengers 2 year by 1992, rising ro 
12 million by the year 2000, 
when Riyadh should be coping 
with I? million and Jeddah 
with 17 million. 

These compare with 1983 
figures of 4.3 million it Dhah- 
ran, 6.(5 million at Riyadh and 
8.1 million at Jeddah. Total do- 
mestic and international pas- 
senger traffic at the tliree was 
up 6.4 percent in 1983 over the 
previous year, and cargo traffic 
was up 26.9 percent. 

Already, over the past year, 
contracts have been awarded to 
a dutch of local firms to up- 
grade 10 regional airports. Al- 
Namal Trading and Contract- 
ing is to cany out runway 
improvements valued ac $7 mil- 
lion at Qurayyar, while Tamimi 
& Fouad have a $8.7-million 
contract to extend the runway 
at Rafha in order to accommo- 
date Boeing 757s. 

Meanwhile, general airport 
facilities in Saudi Arabia are 
likely to be improved as a result 
of joint ventures ser up along- 
side Boeing's $ 1.2-billion Peace 
Shield air and ground defense 
program. For example, che larg- 
est of four projects antidpaced 
by the Boeing International In- 
dustrial Technology Group in- 
volves a ?500-miliion aircraft 
modification center to be built 
with partners including Saudia, 
the national airline. 

In neighboring Bahrain, a 
consortium of U-K. consultants 
led by Scott Wilson Kirkpat- 
rick and Partners this year won 
the design and supervision con- 
tract for a $50-miliion plan to 
expand the island's internation- 
al airport. Work has already 
started on resurf ad ng the main 
runway and on a new freight 
terminal. Contracts to refurbish 
the existing passenger terminal 
and to construct an additional 
one will be bid on over the next 
12 months. The two terminals 
will allow one to be used for 
arrivals and another for depar- 
tures, thus redudng the security 
risk posed by transit travelers. 

Further down the Gulf, Scott 
Wilson Kirkpatrick is also the 
consulting engineer on che 
United Arab Emirates' largest 
ongoing airport development at 
A1 Ain. where che construction 
of earthworks is almost com- 


plete and where Joannou & Par- 

askevaidcs won a $60- million 
contract in Ju3y for the main 
civil works. 

In neighboring Dubai, the 
local contractor Du too. in part- 
nership with Balfour Beany of 
the United Kingdom, is build- 
ing a new 530- million Arrivals 
terminal which will comple- 
ment the new 4,000-meter sec- 
ond runway opened in April 
1984. 

In Qatar, plans for a new 
airport have been shelved, but 
Scott Wilson Kirkpatrick has 
been designing and supervising 
a series of improvements (now 
worth around 530 million) to 
the facilities since 1978. 

The same British engineers 
are completing che design of a 
new $200-million civil and mili- 
tary airport ac Erbii in Iraq, 
where, in spite of che war with 
Iran, the new Saddam Hussein 
International Airport was com- 
pleted in 1983 by French con- 
tractors Fougerolle and Spie- 
Bacignolles under the 
supervision of British consul- 
tants Maun sell and Partners, 
and where new airports at Basra 
and Mosul are planned. 

Jordan has completed its 
$23S-million Queen Alia Inter- 
national Airport, 40 kilometers 
(25 miles) south of Amman, 
but has little prospect of much 
development in che near future 

Rehabilitation of the Beirut 
airport, as envisaged by Acro- 
port de Paris in 1983, remains a 
pipe dream as long as political 
instability persists. 


Airporr development in 
North Ainca is more sporadic 
Libya’s ambitious program in 
this sector hats been held buck 
by financial difficulties, chough 
the International Airports Au- 
thority of India still claims to 
have much work in prospect 
there and in Algeria. 


Tunisia is set to build a new 
515-million airport to serve its 
tourist industry in Tabaika on 
che northern coast near Algeria. 
The project is being financed 
by 5audi Arabia and designed 
by British Airports Internation- 
al which, with Aeroport de Par- 
is, Naco (of the Netherlands) 
and FI ug haven Frankfurt, arc 
the main European airport 
managers and consultants 
working in the area. 


In general, says Bill Sterling, 
che partner responsible for the 
Middle East at Scott Wilson 
Kirkpatrick: "Although it 
won’t be up to the levels of five 
to 10 years ago, there is still 
going to be a reasonable 
amount of work on airport de- 
velopment, especially in che 
Gulf scares. 


"Governments are realizing 
che airlines will go co airports 
which offer the best service in 
terms of cost of fuel, efficiency 
of turnaround and passenger fa- 
cilities. 


Formed in March 1950. with 
equal shareholding by Bahrain, 
Oman, Qatar ana the United 
Arab Emirates since April 1974, 
Gulf Air is now che second- 
biggest airline in the Arab 
world Ir is also the most profit- 
able, according to its chairman, 
Salim bin Nassir al-Busaidi. 

The airline has an all-jet fleer 
consisting of Boeing 747, 
Boeing 737 and Lockheed 
TriSrar aircraft and operates a 
wide network of scheduled ser- 
vices both within the region 
and as far afield as London and 
Hong Kong. 

Two major events are on its 
corporate horizon. First there is 
the need co consider new equip- 
ment, including the eventual 
replacement of its TriSear air- 
liner flea with a type incorpo- 
rating che latest technology. 
Prospects indicate that a total 
of 17 new aircraft will be re- 
quired, involving an invest- 
ment as high as 5850 million. 

Second, there is the shift co- 
ward partial private ownership 
of the airline which, up to now, 
has been government-owned. 
Privatization is a strong trend at 
present within the world airline 
industry — British Airways, Sin- 
gapore Airlines and Malaysian 
Airlines System are among che 
industry leaders moving in this 
direction — and the program 
for Gulf Air involves 49 percent 
of the shares being offered. 


probably within the next six 
months. It is expected that only 
Gulf nationals will be allowed 
co buy che shares, which will be 
split into denominations small 
enough to encourage wide dis- 
tribution. Gulf Air’s board is 
being advised on this move by 
the Chase Manhattan Bank of 
New York and die Gulf Inter- 
national Bank of. Manama; 
where the airline has its main 

operating base. 

Recent profits make Gulf 
Air a reasonably attractive- 
proposition for potential pri- 
vate investors. It is a "lean" 
airline, with staff productivity 
high by the standards of some 
of the other Arab airlines and 
increasing ac the rate of around 
9 percent a year. Figures show 
that 1984 was its sixth consecu- 
tive year in the black, with 1 
profit of $47.5 million on reve- 
nues of $624.8 million (com- 
pared with $50.9 ■ million and 
$574.7 million in 19S3). The 
airline served 29 cities in 1984, 
carried three million passengers 
(16 percent up), and handled 
record volumes of freight. 

But, as the chairman pointed 
out in his annual report for 
1984, die additional passengers 
carded during the year did not 
result in any gready increased! 
revenue, largely because of a 
drop in yield that was attribut- 
ed to fare competition and cur- 
rency devaluation in the air- 


line’s most important markets.- 

Three factors char could have 
a serious impact c*n future prof- 
itability are a long-running dis- 
pute with Pakistan Internation- 
al. Airlines over traffic rights 
between Karachi and the Gulf, 
die setting up of a new air 
company in Dubai, Emirates 
airline, with a possible impact 
on Gulf Aifs traditional high- 
revenue business service ro Pa- 
kistan and India, and the price 
war chat rumbles on among all 
the airlines in the area and 
which dilutes the yield from 
their, operations. 

Gulf Airis Bahrain budga 
includes a sum of $52.7 million 
for 1986/87 for. a new airport 
terminal; while workbegan lose 
February on .a. $6.6 million 
freight cemainaL When, the 

enormous investment .in. new 
aircraft and new buildings : is 
taken into account, it can be 
seen rhar the airline's finances 
will come under severe strain in 
the years to come, with, the 
result that earnings could suf-. 
far. 


turing of the company’s man- 
agement, which enables senior 
executives co concentrate mote 
’ on planning for the longer term 
while leaving divisional execu- 
tives, to run the airline on a day- 
to-day bads. 

The program also estab- 
lished an additional three divi- 
sions covering aidine services. 


planning, the whole devised 
with a view toward -making 
Gulf Air even leaner chan it is 
today. At die same time the 


company is pursuing its policy 
of Gulf-izatioh of its staff, with 


. In the meantime, Gulf Air 
safeguards its reputation as one 
of the most innovative of die 
Arab airlines with the introduc- 
tion of modem management 
technologies and computeriza- 
tion. Ics chief executive; Ali 
Ibrahim at-Malld, has recently. 
ranrifri out a significant restruc- 


tbe result that 100 percent of its 
leading management poses are 
now filled by Gulf nationals 
and 53 -percent of headquarters 
■workers are also locals. Staff 
recruitment has been kept to. a 

minimum in an effort ro keep 
rising costs as a manageable 
level During 1964 there was 
only a 9-Sjxaxerir increase In 
the work force even though 
traffic went up by 2418 percent. 

Gulf Air is working more 
closely, through the- Gulf Coop- 
eration Council, with fdknv 
council members Saudia arid 
Kuwait Airways, bur is report- 
edly Having difficulty convinc- 
ing them of the advantages that 
might flow from a , spread of 
privatization in cbfe Gulf and 
particularly from -the. -establish- 
ment of a number of small re- 
gional airKnes. AJL 


"As this sort of message Hi- 
rers through, Arab airports may 
well be better planned and a 
better value for money in the 
future." 


Dubai’s Duty-Free Shop 


Arab Air ’86 


This air show is che first event 
of its kind ro be held in Du- 
bai. It is being staged with the 
support of the Department of 
Gvil Aviation at the Dubai 
International Trade Center 
between February 16-20 next 
year. Already more chan 200 
companies from 20 countries 
have booked space in the new 
exhibition hall ac the Trade 
Center. The exhibition is co- 
inciding with a two-day con- 
ference organized by the Mid- 
dle East Economic Digest of 
London. 


The organizers of the exhi- 
bition, Fairs and Exhibitions 
of London, have arranged for 
special aircraft displays to be 
shown on the apron at Dubai 
International Airport. 


There are not many duty-free 
shops in the world where you 
can buy almost anything from a 
deluxe combat jacket ro a bar of 
gold But that’s part of the 
choice offere d at the duty-free 
shopping complex at Dubai In- 
ternational Airport. The duty- 
free shops there are now among 
che fastest growing at any air- 
port in the world 


For further information 
contact: Fairs and Exhibitions 
Ltd, 51 Doughty Street, Lon- 
don, WON 2LB, telex 
299708 EFANEE G.; or 
MEED, 21 John Street, Lon- 
don WClN 2BP, telex 
266872 MEEDAR. 


This year, according to 
Mohi-din Abdul Kader Bin- 
hendi, the young director-gen- 
eral of che Dubai Department 
of Civil Aviation, sales are ex- 
pected to exceed $22 million. 
Situated ar the crossroads of 
international air traffic between 
Europe and che Far Ease, Dubai 
is ideally placed to take advao=. 


cage of both departing and tran- 
sit passengers. 

Last year the total number of 
passengers pissing through the 
airport was just over 3.6 million 
— an average of nearly 10,000 a 
day, making Dubai one of the 
busiest airports in the Gulf. 
Binhendi expects the airport to 
be handling up to 5 -million 
passengers annually by the 
1990s, and plans for further ex- 
tensions to the airport are in the 
works. 

More than 45 airlines use the 
airport, and there are well over 
100 daily traffic movements.. 
Just over a year ago work start- 
ed on a new Arrivals terminal, 
expected to open in che Earc 
spring of next year. . . 

There will also be-a speciaL.. 


duty-free shopping center for 
arriving passengers, who will 
be able to make selected , pur- 
chases of duty-free goods. There 
are only one or two other air : 
pons in the world with a simi- 
lar system. 


eras, cotnpuccES^'icweiry. of all 
kinds,- leaiher - and sportswear, 
confectionery arid a delicates- 
sen One special feature is a 
shop called Gifts from Dubai 
which, as die name implies, 
coticentiareC bn local handi- 


It is hoped that soopping. off crafts: fc 


arideaxv- 


for duty-free shopping at Du- . uigs. „- r ^. j 


bai, whose slogan is "% -buy ,: ' .Dufearis^ny-free shop is un- 
Dubai," will become a must for rivaled- 'iro the Middle Ease* 
the business traveler arid roar- where at most airports sophisti- 
ist- The center comprises 24 aired duty-free shops ar ^airport 


individual shops, cOvcciqg an; shops; of ilihost any kixkl ~are 
area of 22,000 square'ftxt: (1^8Q conspicuous by their absence. 


square meters); .Goods.ori sale 


have made de- 


coder an e xtr e m ely wide range, rammol: efforts to make their 
of merchandise and come frqhi departure lounges more com- 


ali over, the world- • fonable and attractive — Bah- 

• There is & profusion hfa«iiO' ,r ' rain^s ^r’gbod'exariible — and 
and video capex ' fcfcSKSf - i1 l^w.4lfo^?ftS*«!d'*yispla3rs of 
wardjes, elecjrc^f - 



airline that’s been 



to be among 
the world’s best. 








•• .V 


: ■. - ■ . J. ' • . U.v ; 


k* V : ; • : : 


■■■■ 






*• j ar*— - 




* t ■ MiK'i ■; 





No, we haven’t made a mistake. We have a different 
calendar to you. 

Ours starts from the year 622 AD,whenthe Prophet 
Mohammed travelled from Makkah to Medinah. 

Our airline, however; started exactly 40 years aga 
111 a country' as large as Saudi Arabia, air travel soon 


cook off. Now weVe expanding so last, statistics are 
rapidly out of date. 

But here are a few you may like to bear in mindL 
Saudia carry over II million passengers a yeai; flying 
between 23 domestic and 44 international destinations. 
We have a 92-strong fleet that includes Boeing 747% 


U)ckheedTHStarsandtbe first 11 Airbus A300 t 600% Our in-flight cuisine wouldrft lvi 

14 new aircraft will wear our livery dusyea^ indbd- ^ but of place ^ a 

iiig 10 of die latesuaetettsop 747& . . So isrft itaboat time — , 

And write determined to improve a93% puncttality world? Because it looks - y 011 “Ho our 

record. (Just about any airline would be proud ofib) like 1406 is going to be SQL! tlin 

If the figures mean nothing to you, the food will! another very good year. - 




Jflfk- 6* 


=»***»£• 


j M»»-w 




■m 















H cral Srib un c, 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


" bNDAT, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 



’ i . V 


Page 11 


■> - 



P 


hop 


By CARL GEWHtTZ 

IiaemBimat BtntdTHbme : 

ARIS — Hopes of an imminent Cat frt TJ.S interest rarpg 
were pm into, temporary deep freeze last week- The 
reassessment was provoked by news late Thursday dux, 
with its debt-limit ceiling temp o raril y lifted by Gn ng regCj . 
'■ Treasury intended to i wng $61 billion in wwniti * T thiowh 
- ^^Sov-27. ; ... 

/ ; • It was no surprise that there was a big backlog of financings as 
V the Treasury had been. prevented from ht p pTt )g the marlrt* Airing 
j .'the long Congressional impasse over increasing the debt ceiling. 
r > But the size of die funding pro gram, winch started last Friday, 
s. tfas larger than expected. ^ ■ . ■ 

:■ r Analysts also said that the 
'. ^recent strong rally, in bond 
^prices was due for a correc- 
, . ' lion and testtxxtg of levels. Bat 
'-.the combination, of events 
“■ ... was enough to frr uvfc bond 
* prices down — more sharply 
vlin New- York than on the 
* , . %l Eurobond mark et That also 
was no surprise, as the New 
. . York rally had been much 
”, ^’-.stronger. 

_ L -~ . ; Most analysts contmue-to 
‘-.-^believe that the stream , of 
: economic data indicating fat- 
•• > tering U.&. economic growth 

' ~ ^ *• points to an inevitable cut in 
.^vthe discount rate. Bat that 
1 now is seen happening later 
rather than sooner. 

As the Federal Reserve 


Eurobond Yields 

For WmIc Endod Nor. 13 

U SJt tg term, InH Inst. _ 
UAS long term, Ind. • 
U44 medium term, tad. _ 
QbvS medium term .. ■" 

. French Fr. short term 

Sterling medium term — 
Yen medium term* Inn Inst. 

Yen lg term, Inti Inst 

. ECU short term ; 

ECU medium terra 

ecu long term 

EllA long term 


1037 %. 
1041 % 

uua % 
lOSS % 
11.73 % 
IOlM % 
AM % 
7JO % 
US % 
935% 
90S % 
E 93 % 
9sa % 
9M% 


LuxF mod term hrfl Inst 

LuxF medium term 

- . Cate ok dad by me Luxmmttourv stock Ex- 
Cham*. ■ 

Market Turnover 

Far Week Ended Nov. IS . 

(Mlllons of US. oonars) 


Cedtl .. 
Eurodeor 


Tetal 

VJU902S329J0 


500020 

343540 


• traditionally steers an even-keel policy during magor gover nm ent 
financing operations, a cut is railed out until at least the final week 
of this month and probably, many say, until December. 

All this did nothing to facilitate the sale of the fixed-coapon 
Eurodollar issues launched last week. Inf act, they all sank to 
discounts well exceeding the commissions paid to underwriters: 
■t~ . less 3 percent far Betowest Properties (a dooble-A rated mat of V 
S Westing, which was part of American Telephone & Telegraph 
V Go. before the courtrordered divestiture), Scandinavian Axrimes 
System and BanqueNationale de Paris. 


B 



NP OFFERED S100 nnQian of five-year bonds at 100% 
bearing a coupon of 9ft percent. These are callable after 
three years at par. The bank also sold warrants to buy Alike 
. amount of noncallable bonds. For the first three, years, the 
warrants can be exercised rally by surrendering the callable 
; bonds; thereafter, against carii. 

]y t '. Market operators referred to these as phantom warrants be- 
^ ■ cause no one had any to trade. The entire amount, priced at $10 
; ■> each, was preplaced through Salomon Brothers. They were 
: quoted at the end of the week ax $14 to $16. 

■* c There is a considerable amount of skepticism in the maricet 
. :r about these “wedded wainmts'* — so called because they need to 
. ^ be married to the original callable band during the first years. At 
issue is the premium — which many consider to be exocnfam — 
at which these warrants apparently trade in the secondary mar- 
ket. 

; Coca-Cola, fra example, issued seven-year warrants early this 
--- month at -$&25 each: They were quoted as high as $35 before 
settling down- to a rangeof $25-$30. The question being asked is 
•z who is buying. these warrapte M that price, nnd why? ...... 

: Willy Dimi4a_director at Soci&fc G&n&rale StiuussTmnbuIl in 

London, one of the major mar ket makos. in warrants, says he sees 
no .way ofjnsttfyrflg the -high pr emium the market puts on the 
long fife of these wedded wtuxants. . 

| By way of example, he uses the recent 10%-percent issue from 
Electricity de France: If interest were to drop one percentage 
point during the next year; the EDF noncallable braid (which 
then would have a life of nine years left) would logically be 
expected to be trading at a price of 106. That 6-pereeat premium 
would push down tteyidd on the nine-year bonds to 9ft percent 
• Assuming the difference^ between four- and nine-year maturi- 
ties remains constant at % percent, Mr. Dunn assumes the 
callable bands would then trade at a price of 104, to reduce the 
yield to 9% percept ' 

•; The difference of $20 between 104 — the price that would have 
to be paid. to buy the callable bond in order to exercise the 
tfanante ~ arid the 106 value on the noncallable bond is die 
value of the warrant if rates drop 1 percent within a year. 

■ In fact, the EDF wammts,which were originally offexedat $16 
each, endedihe week at $20-$24 -—reasonable compared with the 
premiums at which some of the other warrants are tra d in g . 

1 The high premiums would seem to reflect expect ations that 
rates will drop much more sharply, either in the first year or 
rfirring the relatively long life of these warrants. But so long as the 
' - (Continued oa Page l3, CoL fy 


Last Week’s Markets 

All figures are as of dose of trading Friday 



! Stock Indexes 

UiAed States 

— J “Twiwv- hwift. atf 

DJ Indus T43U2 M043S>*-3a)%. 

DJ UAL ' 1*542 +21*% 

DjTrems— *8*34 .. 678.14 +.041% 
SiPTOO— 19142 18*37+250% 
5*P5D0_ 19ZM 1 9390 +219% 

NYSEGP • T1430 ’ HIM +211% 

Saarcr.MtireLndiParft .. 


FtSElOO— : 140320 * 1W540 +131% 

FTar 100+40 107740 +0*4% 

Hoag Kang 

Hong Seng- 173647 172238 +079% 

Japan 

NtWcrtDJ— 1363740 1205145 —144% 

WestCemany 

Cemrrwrxbk 169440 17»40 —348% 

Satira:J(mtCcbtl&Ca.L0*ion. 


Money Rates 

United Sfatta 

Discount ruts. 

Fcdortf funds rots— 
Prims ruts.—,. ... — 

*ss 

Discount — — 

Con money 

6+duv intertxjnfc — . 
WestCennany 

OvtmMit ... 

Vmontti Interbank— 

*- -■ --- 

ofimn 

Sank boss rate— 
Call monsv —— 

DoBar lmm. 

Bk Bnal index— 12930 

Gold 

London wru fix* 32540 


V 


LatfWk. 

PnrvJWL 

7Va 

Th 

m ■ 

713/1* 

1 V 2 

9VS 

s 

5 

»- 

746 

715/16 

713/16 

SLS0 

&» 

*35 

ASS 

+7D 

. 470 

llVi 

111* 

12 

HA 

113/1* 

— 


PrevWk. CVm 

12 940 —023% 


33IJS +1479% 


Currency Rales 


Bnombta) 

FiWridort 


s 

2944 

5282 

26157 


Nov. 15 

c DM. 

on low* 

752*5 232* 

1727 

qWH 1UQ 7J1X3Q fcflW r<W9 . WWW | 

SSST® 1 uS ^ — ware Am' wm ua 

Mmr YVrMc) MBIT- 2tf 

PtfaH 7 SI 11J» KM” 

Tokyo 2D34S 29BJ85 77i* 

Tvrtcfa 2 VMS 10571 8M*5« 

' .SS oSS **« ,40+36 ^ 


FF. 

itj- 

OMr. 

■A : 

5 J=. 

36S25* 

8.14*5- 

— - 

5574* 

DM0* 

64256 

159* 

17 9* 

— “ • 

244*5 

31795* 

146 X 

KB15* 

495 * 

12135* 

11361 

251250 

42066 

7534 

34433 

22L56 

— — 

SCO. 78 

32426 

mss 

7J*» 

wn» 

29* 

5WJ 

' AM* 


*513 x 

27179 

15*4* 

17195 

25 49 

1UI* 

058 

36443* 

9479 • 

2*58* 

(L105- 

128K* 

40102 * 


UM 

149646 

2*651 

44409 

TJ115 

urns 

MV&M 

NA 

TUX 

2JB97 


aofurf 

tiff TdOoyvMWbO; «UU4T, 

l^rlMIarVataeo 


—■ cwmew pw U5LS WTWW nr US* 

Orneev eer VSS CHn *CfJ * *»«tpe» 50540 SeotetnWe 07771 

A* n . aa *lml OJO WBJ2** 0 ^ Mor.kT^m 746. SpU. MUtD 16QJ0 
AMro+B 1489 - CceefcW*C_ *** Lmmto 1745 swakrewe 745 


AMro+B .. — __ __ 

AWIr.CcML 1+38 HbMlCmt 74WS 1<nqi 1MB,, 

NlO, fle.fr. 5346 tarta n r ?!* sutftW 3451 IMHl 2+195 

ledon. 842550 tad+rwW lr!22« 2.1163 mux 5025 

Cow 131W s. Atr.rad 246*7 UAE«%m» 2673 

SSSTS “S? “• 

Caret pooru 125 fMM.tnm. +«• 

i^wfleg; UOS Rttl Qwwrwrfelr ItvHav (MOW; Banvm fto- 

Sovrcn: sanauedvemrtar fsDRJ . Ml , tdtoar./MAmamfj 

&pa» de Paris tPtaWr gabkbrTak w f rom/- 
°9rton» omaroato Ax>m Gmu/trs crxj at. 


16070 

745 

394* 


S £lUC»‘ 



Disappointing Drilling Off South China Coast 


After Much Costly Exploration, 
Oil Strikes Are Only Moderate 


By Jim Mann 

Las Angeles Tima Serria 

CANTON, China — Many of 
the world's leading oil compa- 
nies have spent a great deal of 
money here during the past few 
years, among other things paying 
rents as high as those in. Hoag 
Konger New YoikCSW, in order 
to dnH for oD off the South Chi- 
na coast. 

Chinese authorities have 
charged the dl companies Hoos- 
ton-kvel salaries for the services 
of o3 workers, who may acmaDy 
be paid no more than $75 a 
mnnth The companies have 
shuttled foreign oil workers in 
and oat of China, at a cost of 
about $250,000 per man per 
year. 

Bui despite expenses of more 
than SI .5 When so far, the com- 
panies have not come op with the 
major a3 di sco v eri es that bad 
been expected. 

At a couple of drilling sites, 
moderate +mrmntc of <m have 
been found, the commercial val- 
ue of which is not yet certain. 
And most of the foreign compa- 
nies are continuing to bid for 
exploration contracts, saying 
that having started here they do 
not want to give op yet. 

The stakes are huge. Chinese 
authorities have been coanting 
on offshore oil to hdp ease the 
nation’s energy problems. And 
they have been expecting exports 
of offshore dl to help produce 
the foreign wAtiiy Ti rfd ^d for 


China' s modernization program. 

but the early hopes that Chi- 
na’s offshore o3 reserves might 
be as large as those in the North 
Sea or in Pnidboe Bay off Alaska 
have been dashed. Ofl company 
executives now admit that they 
were far too optimistic about the 
prospects, and the Chinese gov- 
ernment recently has begun to 
em phgrim the possibilities for 
future drilling on the mainland 
in an effort to dampen the 
gloom. 

“Fundamentally, the first 
round has been disappointing 
and unsuccessful,” said George 
V. Wood, general manager of 
British Petroleum's China opera- 
tion, which has drilled 14 wells 
and has 14 dry hides. “The big- 
gies that were possible are almost 
cer tainl y not there. Rather than 
Prodhoe Bay-size discoveries, 
we’re talking about 50 to 100 
million bands of recoverable cal 
at best" 

Prudhoe Bay’s reserves are 
about 10 billion bands. 

Robert O. Anderson, chair- 
man of the board of Atlantic 
Richfield Co„ said during a trip 
here in September that “some 
discoveries have been made, bat 
the problem has been size.” 

A spokesman for China Na- 
tional Offshore CXI Corp„ the 
government-owned ou company, 
turned down a request for an 
interview, saying that all the 
available information about off- 


A Chinese 
oilfield 
worker and 
map of the 
exploration 
areas. 


SOVXT UNION 


L---C £ 




DAQ1NG 


0a«an 




Tan, "*<^, *»J 

&MENQLI 3J 



shore oil prospects already has 
been published. 

niwn is in the midst of a sec- 
ond round of negotiations for the 
sale of offshore dl tracts and its 
official viewpoint continues to 
be upbeat Qin Wencai, presi- 
dent of CNOOC, recently tdd 
the government-controlled news- 
paper China Daily that the for- 
eign dl companies’ disappoint- 
ment “is premature.” 

The official Xinhua News 
Agency said early this month 
that “considerable progress has 
been made over the past six years 
since China began seeking for- 
eign help to develop offshore dl 
fields.” 

China already is one of the 
world's 10 leading oil producers. 
Its onshore wells, particularly 


IfeNpwYo+Tn 


the large fields at Daqing in 
Manchuria and at SHangli near 
Bohai Bay, turned out about US 
million tons, or 730 million bar- 
rels, of crude dl last year. Most 
of this dl is used in China, but a 
portion of it is exported, particu- 
larly to Japan. 

Although China has operated 
the wells on the mainland on its 
own, it invited foreign dl compa- 
nies to help in offshore oil pro- 
duction, hoping to obtain the lat- 
est offshore drilling technology 
and to develop the offshore 
fields more quickly. 

Throughout the late 1970s and 
early 1980s, Chinese authorities 
and Western dl experts alilm 
tended to view China as the most 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


OECD Members 
Disagree on 
U.S. Growth 


CBS Sells Stake in Tri-Star lor About $50 Million 


CotyHed trp Ov Staff From Dupmdta 

NEW YORK — CBS Inc. has 
sold its one-fourth interest in Tri- 
Star Pictures Inc. for at least $48 
nriHion in its drive to pay bade debt 
it incurred fighting off Ted 
Turners takeover bid. The sale 
could be worth as much as $53 
millinn. 

Tri-Stax’s general counsel, Leslie 
Jacobson, said Friday that Colum- 
bia Pictures Industries Inc., one of 
three partners that formed Tri-Star 
in 1983, was negotiating to buy half 
of the one-fourth interest hdd by 
Home Box Office, a Time Inc. sub- 
sidiary that is the other partner. 


Columbia, a unit of Coca-Cola 
Co„ also owns one-fourth of Tri- 
Star, which produces and distrib- 
utes theatrical filnvi The purchase 
of the HBO shares would give it 
effective control now that CBS has 
sold out. 

With Friday’s sale to purchasers 
that Ms. Jacobson described as 
“ primaril y" institutional investors, 
the public holds about 49 percent 
of Tri-Star shares. 

CBS received $7.75 a share from 
the sale of its 6.25 millinn shares 
and expects a supplemental pay- 
ment of $1 a share from an affiliate 
of Columbia Pictures, Ms. Jacob- 


son said. She described the SI -per- 
share payment, which is subject to 
approval from Coca-Cola's board, 
as an “inducement for CBS to selL” 

CBS should make about $53 mil. 
lion from the sale after accounting 
for the money from Columbia and 
paying 25 cents a share as a selling 
fee to Alien & Co n she said. 

Tri-Star distributed such popu- 
lar films as “Rambo First mood: 
Pan IT and “The Moppets Take 
Manhattan,” but was never a fi- 
nancial success for CBS. 

CBS sold its interest in Tri-Star 
as pan of a drive to trim operations 
and raise $300 million after taxes. 


The company needs to pay off debt 
it incurred by buying bark nearly 
$1 billion of its stock to fight off the 
takeover attempt this year by Mr. 
Turner, the cable-television entre- 
preneur. 

On Wednesday, CBS took a 
521. 1-million after-tax loss on its 
movie operation, including both 
Tri-Star and its in-house movie di- 
vision, in posting a third-quarter 
corporate loss of $1 14.1 million. 

Columbia Pictures, CBS and 
Home Box Office invested about 
5100 miffi nn in Tri-Star after its 
founding in February 1983. 

(AP.LAT) 


By Brian Childs 

Return 

PARIS — Two days of economic 
policy talks between senior officials 
from major industrial countries 
have ended in open disagreement 
over U.S. growth prospects. 

Beryl W. Sprinkel, chairman of 
President Ronald Reagan's council 
of economic advisers, said he told 
the officials that U.S. gross nation- 
al product would increase 4 percent 
next year, after an estimated 3.5- 
percent growth for the last quarter 
of 1985. 

But Kjell Andersen, country 
studies director of the Organization 
for Economic Cooperation and De- 
velopment, said that he and most 
offi cial* of the 24 nations attending 
the talks saw a UJS. growth rate for 
1986 of no more than 3 percent. 

The OECD itself, in its last half- 
yearly report in May, forecast a 
decline in U.S. growth below 3 per- 
cent a year in the 18 months to the 
end of 1986, from 6.8 percent in 
1984. 

Mr. Sprinkel, defending his 4- 
percent figure, said the economy 
would be boosted by declining in- 
terest rates, a current low level of 
inventories compared with sales, 
and action to curb federal govern- 
ment spending. 

“All the background is in place 
for an economic pick-up,” he said 
after the meeting ended Friday. 
“Reports coming in mostly shew 
it's already happening. We will be 
coming into 1986 at a good dip.” 

But Mr. Andersen said a likely 
slowdown in U.S. business invest- 
ment and a probable rise in person- 
al savings from low third-quarter 
levels made a 1986 growth rate of 
more than 3 percent unlikely. 

Other officials attending the 
half-yearly session of the OECD’s 
economic policy committee, also 
said that they were unconvinced by 
Mr. SprinkeTs forecast. 

“Off the record, it's difficult to 
see much ground for his opti- 
mism.” said one economist who 
asked not to be identified. 

Aside from the wrangle over the 
U.S. outlook, officials mid that the 
meeting broadly reconfirmed pre- 
vious growth forecasts for the rest 
of the OECD nations. 


Overall OECD growth is likely 
to run at 3 percent next year, with 
Western Europe slightly slower at 
about 2.5 permit and Japan rather 
faster at almost 4J percent, they 
said. 

There was general agreement 
that inflation was likely to stay low 
in 1986, but that no rapid recovery 
was expected in the U.S. balance of 
payments deficit, one of the major 
problems faring the world econo- 
my. 

Mr. Sprinkel said that an OECD 
forecast indicating a 5145-billion 
current account deficit next year 
was “very realistic.” 

He said the dollar’s recent depre- 
ciation would take time to have an 
impact on trade. “We are not pro- 
jecting a quick turnaround in the 
U.S. current account deficit,” he 
said. 


Mexico Plans 
SpendingBoost 
Of 50% in 1986 

Reitieri 

MEXICO CITY — Mexico 
plans to boost domestic spend- 
ing by nearly 50 percent next 
year, but will retain austerity 
policies adopted after the 1982 
economic crash as its baric eco- 
nomic strategy. 

President Miguel de la Ma- 
drid’s 1986 budget outline con- 
tains no dramatic r+awgwe, but 
earmarks 500 billion pesos 
($990 million) for rebuilding af- 
ter the September earthquake 
that killed an estimated 7,000 
people. 

In the Friday outline, he also 
indicated he might be willing to 
enter the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade, the world 
trade framework that Mexico 
has long mistrusted. 

The budget plan calls for a 
43.1-percent increase in public 
spending, to 15,400 billion pe- 
sos. It also calls for a 1986 bud- 
get deficit of 4.9 percent com- 
pared with 9.6 percent this year. 


A Captain of Industry 
In Norway Sells Stake 
In OilrRig Manufacturer 


By Simon Haydon 

Reuters 

OSLO — Fred Olsen, the reclu- 
sive corporate financier, has 
strained Norway’s business com- 
munity by rctinqmAing the corner- 
stone of his worldwide commercial 
empire. 

Mr. Olsen, whose companies em- 
ploy 40,000 people in more than 20 
countries, announced last week 
that he would sdl all Ms shares in 
Akers Mek Verksted A/S, the 
group that is Norway’s largest 
manufacturer of North Sea oQ rigs. 

Corporate analysts in Oslo said 
the sale by Mr. Olsen, believed to 
be Norway's richest man, signaled 
a change in policy away from the 
offshore Ml business that had beat 
at the heart of Ms activities. 

Mr. Olsen, 56, said the sale of his 
29.8-percent stake in Aker to Nar- 
cem A/S of Norway would net his 
gronp about 650 million kroner 
($82.7 mfihon). This sum repre- 
sents virtually pure profit, as the 
original investment was made 
when the company was framed 75 
years ago. 

The analysts said that were also 
signs that Mr. Olsen, who has head- 
ed the family concern for more 
than 20 years, was preparing to 
hand over some power to another 
member of Ms family. 

His 29-year-old daughter Anette 
has emerged as an influence in the 
many holding companies that 
make up the cSsea empire. 

Mr. Olsen’s international busi- 
ness connections have their roots in 
tbe shipping fleet developed by Ms 
grandramerin the last centtny. 


But business associates in Oslo 
say Mr. Olsen showed unrivaled 
acumen in selling off most of the 
60-strong fleet of ships buDt op 
before the oil crisis ra the 1970s 
wreaked havoc on tbe world tanker 
market 

They said he was now concen- 
trating on the microelectronic and 
computer industry, and Ms sale of 
Aker could be seen as a warning 
that Norway's offshore ofl boom 
was under threat Aker has been 
involved in dozens of contracts far 
North Sea operations. 

Norway’s crude ofl production is 
increasing rapidly at the moment 
however, with expected production 
of more than 1 million barrels per 
day 1 next year. 

To run Ms business empire, 
winch includes Timex Corp„ the 
watchmaker, Mr. Olsen has devel- 
oped a complex financial structure 
under an Oslo-based bolding com- 
pany called A/S Quatro. 

Aker, one of Norway's largest 
industrial concerns, had been an 
increasing drain on the Olsen 
group until it was restructured last 
year. Mr. Olsen then more than 
halved Ms stake in it from the 76 
percent tbe family had owned for 
75 years. 

Analysts said the sale of the re- 
maining stake to Norcem had been 
possible because Aker is once again 
profitable after the restructuring. 

In a statement, Mr. Olsen said he 
had no plans for the profits from 
the Aker sale, “other than to pro- 
tea ourselves in the turbulent eco- 
nomic period of change we are go- 
ing through.” 


Bally Manofactoirog Agrees to Bay 
MGM Grand for Up to $560 Million 

Reuters 

CHICAGO — Bally Manufacturing Crap, has agreed to acquire 
MGM Grand Holds Inc. and its casino-hotels in Las Vegas and 
Reno, Nevada, in a transaction valued at up to $560 raillinn. 

Both of the MGM Grand casino-holds axe huger than Bally’s Park 
Place casino-hotel in Atlantic Gty, New Jersey. 

Under an agreement announced Saturday, MGM Grand's public 
stockholders will receive S18 for each of their common shares and S14 
for each preferred share, the company's majority stockholder, the 
financMT Kirk Kokorian, wfll receive $1225 for each common share 
and $14 for each p r e ferred share. Mr. Kerkorian and his Tradnda 
Corp. own about 70 percent of MGM Grand’s common and preferred 
stock 

Bally will pay about S44G million fra all the MGM Grand stock. 
Including some MGM Grand debts that Bally will assume, the 
transaction is valued at $550 million to $560 milli on, Bally said. Mr. 
Kerkorian will receive more than $270 million for Ms stock. 

Mr. Kerkorian earlier this year agreed to sell his MGM-UA 
Ente rtainmen t Co. to tbe broadcasting magnate Ted Turner fra about 
$1 5 billion. In turn, Mr. Turner is to sdl MGM-UA’s United Artists 
subsidiary to Mr. Kerkorian for $480 mfllkm. 


trade 


International 
financing makes us 
tick. 



At BFCE we specialize in one major field-international 
trade financing-and it gives us an edge. 

For example, when you need a fast answer on a loan- 
be it a short, medium or long-term requirement-in one of 
the world’s dozen or so major currencies, you can bank on 
our getting back to you with a fast proposal. The same is 
true in other complex areas such as countertrade operations. 

And it’s even more true for interest rate swaps, 
currency swaps or foreign exchange options. For the 
excellent reason that our treasury' teams are active in the 
interbank and foreign exchange markets-in 
New York, London, Paris and Singapore- 
right round the clock. 

Several thousand companies, 
including commodity traders, are 
successfully operating with France and 
worldwide with credit-and know: how- 
supplied by BFCE. 

Because, their international 
competitors can be relied upon to keep 
them on the hop. these clients have 
to be ready to move fast. 

So do we. 


That’s why we can 
beat the clock. 



BANtxre FiMiCAisEOuCOMHUCt Exterieur London l Akcsi Coujlt EC2R 7 HU - New York (Howton-S/in FmwckcoJ 045 Fifth Avan* N.Y 10022 - Miun 5. m Mougi 
201ZJ- SwcAKHte JSOISmu Tovra 50 Raw lls Place QIW - HEJtBOmceS, soulevaadHaimmann 7H27 PaiusCedEXO?- Branches: 26lochioksin FRANTi-R£J’tt5£Nr«n'£ 
Offices- Abidjan. Bv.gkc*. Cairo. Cakacas. Hon&aoj.-c, Mu bourne, Mexico City. New York. Rome. S*o Paulo .Overseas Agehts: Bogota, Bombat. Jew annesburg. 

Pewnc. Tajiu. 




aagaaga g&sgaa — - — 1 





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provided & Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel.; 01 - 023 - 1277 . 
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p 6 72 OW 88* IT46 1130 ML 

l 12* 72 Jan Ml* 1248 1248 

\ 6*72 Nov 102* 9.15 

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1 4* 19 Apr 113 ILK M82 

15* « Jan 107 1184 1477 

17* 1* Dec 106 1125 1451 

12*71 NOV 187* HR 1L7I 

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HIGHEST YIELDS 

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1134 1 200 


9* 16 MOV 98* 12.94 1284 680 I ad 9 


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175 Austrian Control Bonk 
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108 Genessen zwnrqlDOf* M 71 Jim 110* 11R 

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1 30 TauernauSSm Ag IMVMer 97* 1027 MR 844 ecu 75 Denmark 

! 5 TraraSStoGiailni ^IJJM «* JW llfl 7JJ * ™ SSJSj 

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Ins MvShSciiv 13* 74 Jul 1U* 1185 UR S in Denmark 

r* SI ZentrolsoarwriCommen 11*70 Feb 1® 1033 11.15 * -JSS 

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S 100 Geokrunoe UlaTOJeet 1D1* 1044 1184 nkr 250 Denmark 

cnS 75 iCreWlbunkinmg ’LSfi" ’ffi? ’13 * , J22 

B 125 5otvav 6* TP Apr 67* 1144 937 y 15H0 Denmark 

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12X4 S 1D0 Denmark JUet U*VAua lWTk 9£ J2R 

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1127 S H» Denmark UluWMmr 1W4 JR MR 

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9V. 72 Jun V 1121 HI* t 

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n TlJul HI 11 Jl 11301 
11* 75 Dec 102* 1123 HR 1 

11 74 MOV » 1032 IDR 1 

6 72 Feb 90 M57U77 


HE iris is — highest current yields 


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15*71 Dec 112 IIJJ 
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7R S HO Denmark 
UR 5 W0 Denmark 
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11.15 t IU Denmark 
1122 V 20H0 Denmark 
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S 2» Denmark 
JJ-5S nkr 250 Denmark 
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DENMARK 

7* 175a> 97* 984 959 789 

UArVAug 109* 657 1253 

ID* 19 Apr 99* 1L93 1083 

11* if May ram »JB 10R 

U VOW in* 1835 1282 

7*70 Jan 95 138 9R 789 

ID* 70 Mar Ml M54 MJ7 

11*70 APT ID4* 1043 ILM 

11* 70 May 105W 939 KL64 

II* 70 Jun 104* 1028 1123 

10*71 Mar 107& 835 1082 

12 71 Mor M7W KL17 1130 

13 71 May 111* H23 1130 

14 TlJul 110 1146 1233 

13V. 71 See 111* 1045 11R 

4* 71 Jan 99 *95 ,A«J 
U 73 Jan 1D1* 1252 1236 

II* 7* Feb 181* HU 1255 

6* 72 Mar Ml 93* 941 

11* 72 Apr IDS WR 1035 

I* 72 May 182* 7 JO Hi» 

12* 73 Dec 1B7* HUB 1142 

11*74 Sea in* 1124 114? 


nsmwee ib*77JuI in rus 

7S Pemex PetroimMiadc mjljj; jm* 15R 

S Mcdorall Daugka Fin 17 WFeb m KB 
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75 OcWdental Hid Flnan U* 17 Mar 102* M26 


10R f 60 Gulf Stotts O/iFlnan 1 7* WOW 187* 1421 

1282 s 38 saanaro Breweries n* V Jul 

7J9 s 75 Ohio Edison Finance 17* WOW jnjk U-W 

M77 i 75 Genstar 17* ROW 108* 1441 

ILM ad R Nocianoi FMondara 17* VMar Ml M59 

KL94 od 68 Hudsons Bov 18 VNav 105 MBS 

1123 od 40 cORsofldoted-Boltuind 17* 17 Feb 101*1548 

1082 od a Qutaec Province II VOW UBS UM 


s 1H MltsubisM CarnW/w 

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1 75 Denmark 11* 74 Sea 103* 1124 1149 

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1 12 Mangaw Bank Denmark W 14 Jon 

s 25 Mnrtgone Brnik Denmark 7* 71 job JfVS 134 9R 786 


I m Bonk Ot Montreal 
ad 75 Bark Ot Montreal 
5 150 Bank Ol Montreal 

5 2S Bank at Nava Scat* 
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S 200 Brit Columbia Hydro 
S 150 Bril Colgmblu Hydro 
S in BrB Columbia Hydro 
S 208 Bril Columbia Hydro 
S 150 Brit Columbia Hvdro 
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ID* 14 MOV 99*1051 1038 

13 19 Nov 107 1133 12.15 ion Flnkmd 

lO’-VMay 95 1283 103? J „ £^£5 

14* -UMov 103* 4X5 1350 * .5 ™™ 

14* 17 MOV 104* 953 U41 * 'S f£E 2 

I4*WMW 110*1122 15.14 J2 £1^5 


. 71 Jm 94* 134 9J4 736 

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ecu 40 Privaibotaett n*7iow 9® MR 

ecu 75 Privutbcitten W 72/Way 103* 931 930 


1 

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14* 14 Mov 103* 4X5 
14* 17 MdY 104* 953 
14* W Mar 110* 1122 
16* V Dec 111*1335 
15*14 Jun 104 738 

13*17 JW IK 948 
12* WSeo Ml* 1134 
I* TO Jul 96* 642 
10* WOW 100* 1484 
7* 17 May 97* 939 
16 VJun HI 1237 
a* VMar HI* 1033 
Kft.’HMor 182 921 

13* WJ? 109* 9R 
14* WOW 107* 1232 
14* 19 Mav 113* 931 
15*72 Jul 121* IDR 
11*7JQW 107* MJ1 


p 1 HD Finland 

jm I 7$ Finland 

itS S in Finland 

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So nkr 200 Finland 

{iS y 15000 Finland 

V 15000 Flnkmd 


FINLAND 

i5*VAer lS* 631 14.15 * 100 M0»< F bonce Asia 

iiSwjSJ HSi yil ILK * in AAftaul Fhemca Asia 

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ft*™ irol m 7jv 684 5 106 Mitsui Trust Fin (hk) 

g*S?S£ one uo 439 * HO Mitsui Troet Flo (hkl 

ne wow 6J*» ran «3i «S f" ® ISlEiUTSSitlamt 1 1 

stir 74 Nov 109* 10R 11.19 * I® JJjPPOn Credit B*k 


S 100 Mitsubishi Corn 

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f 50 MJtlubbnl Estate ~ 

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S TOO Mtfsufatohl Metal X/w 

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50 Mitsui Enstneerln XA* 

50 Mttsul Finance Ada 


101* 1548 

1655 

14X0 

104* 1027 

14X7 

124* 20 
90* 9X7 



12X9 

10214 9R 

1822 

118ft 9X5 

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99* 1059 
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H plnkmd 8* 72 Oct Wi ion 

75 Finland C*74*a, rot* law 

a eiwvGunm^_ iv*70Mor to 1035 

15 Finnish EsPortCrmJtt 13*16 Apr WJW 584 

50 Rimish Espori Credit M* 14 Dec 06 849 

75 FkuiWl Ekport Crodtt 12*® Nov UM J.H 
104 Ffctnbh Eimorl Cr 71A* 72* W Nov W* ?R 


20 Ind Mlpe Bor* Finland 


849 1X92 

9.H 12X0 

9J9 1158 

954 1037 825 


od 24 Brit Columbia MunidP WUVMov .97 WJr 

ad 1H Brit Columbia Pravlnc 12 WApt ib* jig 

ad in Bril Cofumo/a Provtnc IMV Jul IH 103? 

ad in Bril Columbia Pravlnc 12* 71 Nov 108* ILM 

cnS 125 Bril Caiwnela Pravlnc 12 TO Dee JK OR 

cnl 50 Bril CehmUUa Tektao 17* W Sen 109* 12.92 

art to Bril Columbia Trieaha 11* V Feb IK* 1L50 

S 175 CaraOdr 0*J9Nw 109 ¥.48 

S 73 CancChm ImoerlCd Bk 15*16 Jul Ml LM 

1 in Canctuon Imperial Bk It WMor 127* 952 


{££ I 15 Msmage Bank Finland 11*19 Nov 182 1111 1092 1IJB 

HR FRANCE 

MM « 500 Banmie Franc Com Est M* 14 Mar 101 11R 

JL57 | 299 Bantu* Franc Cam Ex! IS 1* Nov 107* 7X0 

11® I 30 BomM Franc Com EM U*®Jun 104* 1L® 1333 

1237 I 50 Baimie Franc Cam Ext llftWMay 100* 11X1 11^ 

1132 s 21 Brmaue Prone Cam Ext f 19 Mor 94 1044 1130 9JI 

mi ecu HO Boom Franc Com Ext 6*72 Jon ira* 983 

1535 oai UO Banaue Franc Cam Ext e* TO Oct «7* 985 


1101 S 80 Nippon Credit Bank 

{vS s in Nippon CradR Bata 

tid 7 1 in Nipeon Credit Bn* 

1ZM S 100 Nippon Credit Bata 

ii« ecu 50 Nippon Credit Bata 

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1LB 5 in Ntaxm Cro« Beta 

1, - K s iso Nippon Crocit Bonk 

S 150 Mlopon Credit Bonk 


11 70 May 99* ILM 

17* 79 Jun 182* 1052 

4WWMOT HZ* .11 

4* 19 Mar 90* M47 

7W VNav IBS* 531 

7* W Nov 90* HJ7 
7* WOW UB — 

7* WOW 91 

II* V Dec 1M* U.14 

lJWTOAoo 105* M44 

12* 72 Feb 101* IUI 

KfcTSPW 97* 937 
lZWVNav 109 1081 

lm-WJun 102* MR 

12 71 Feb 107* M03 1135 

8* 73 Nov 67* 931 
13* V Jul 111 1088 IUO 

15* If Aug IMV 1034 1X29 

11 70 May H3* 9X9 

12 70 Aug 104* 1021 1138 

11* TO Nov XM1A 1022 U.M 

11 71 Mav 104* 931 931 1029 

12* TO Jan Ml* 1239 1254 

11* TO Feb 103*10X7 

10*75 Jul 99* HUD 

10*75 Nev 99* 1048 


100 Nta>an Kofcan Kabushlk 13* 71 Sep MS* 1038 


1 50 filpoon SUnoan 

s m NI 

s 50 NIPPoaTategra TeiePh 


art 50 Canadian Imperial Bk ltWVJotl IBgk 1131 

art « Conoakm imperial Bk 12* 79 Mav 1UW M33 

S 75 Canadian imperial Bl 11 TO Mav 181 M47 

1 KM Canadian mtoeWat Bk VBi 71 OW 114 1232 

S 15 Canadian Nad Rullew B*WNov ?9W .892 

ad 40 Canadian Hatl Rollvnyy I* 77 Mar 9S 1052 

1 IW Canadian hart Railway MW TO Dec 11?* 1W4 

cnS WO Canadian Nail Ralhnav ll*TOJim US 

Od WO CmaScm Hull Rdlvov WWTS Apr in* 1038 

art 40 CanadkrOaMPrtral n* 79 Mar IB 1150 

od 40 Canodkxi Padflc 17* W Nov 187 1LH 


lira s in Bamwelnaosuer 

UX7 s ea Banqueindasun 

MR ad 75 Banaueindaeuez 

14X8 1 in Bancuelndasup: 

1549 t 158 Banaue National PmHs 13WVOW 1JW* Jf-M 

12J9 s 250 Banaue National Ports M* 70 May 107*11X3 

ion i is boiwm National Porte uwTijan ion* 12x1 

1444 ad U Banaue National Parts 12 TO Jun 105* 1034 

842 5 100 Ca tee Cimtr Coca Eco 15* TO Jun 124 10*1 

.984 1 75 Cota* CemrCooa Een W* 75 Sep 109* ION MR IJR 

!«1 s in Cause CemrCoeo Era 11* 77 Dee ibb* MJ7 lots 11.11 


15 VMOT 112* KL49 
15*79 AUS 113ft MR 
U 71 Aug 111* 11.14 
UWTOSCb IIS* 1131 
13* VOW 110* 1L13 
14*70 May 187* 1133 


12V890W W7 MR 
HWTOFnb 99* 1059 

50 Nippon TelegraTnMMn IftWMor 98 937 

50 Nkmon Trttgni Tetmh 19*70 Jan HOW 1004 MW W.U 

in Nippon TelagraTeMi 11 * to Feb MS* 934 MJ? 

188 Nippon Tekram Telroli 12*71 Aug HI* 1001 11X3 

100 Nippon TWcgraTWeta 1IM72FM Ml* 1035 

50 Nippon YtaonKObuPU 13* W Aug 187 not 

... 6* W Feb 184* 439 

6* 79 Feb 89* 1042 
1 2V, TO Dec Ml* 1U4 


70 NbshalMl Carp W/w 
rn 70 N taw ImI Carp X/w 

S in Hamura Eprupe .... .. — ..... 

5 1H Nomura Securities WA» tUWNov 154* 895 

s 1D0 Aomorn Securities XA* tiAWNev B* 1081 

- 50 Otibcr/n*FGuml WAr 

50 OhbaytnhWBumJ Xjw 


7* V Aar 172* 921 
7* V Apr 93* M49 


cM 50 Canagiao PaciFc 
S 58 Canqdion Podflc 
ad 75 Canodkai Pacific 
I 71 Canadian Podflc 
5 75 Canadian Poe HI c 

S 100 Carnation Padlle 
Od 35 Canadian uillUlea 
art 50 Canadian U turtles 


12-91 s m CatsseCentrCoooEcs 11* 77 Dee l8MkMR1QRI1.il 

H34 1 in Calsse Franc Mofieres WJSTtNov IBM* UR UR 

UR s 75 Caine Not Autnrwigs e 74 Mav too* BR 89* 

U36 1 50 Cause Not Autarouies 9«,yiSeP 66* w.12 1041 9R 

MR t 85 Cefne Net Aatloroiim H* TO Mav 1D4V* 1IR Ml 

li» s 75 Cause Nat Auterouies 15* 74 Jun 113*075 1139 

1930 j 75 Cote* Nat Autoroutes 15* 77 Mar 114* 1296 1111341 


30 Ornran TaWSl Ele W/w 6*WAsr 188* 4X4 
38 OmrenTaieUI EleX/w 4*79 Apr 0*1049 


s 50 Dame Petroleum 

J 58 Dome Petroleum 

J 25 Domtnan Bridge 

S 16 Du Pont Canada 

ad 50 Edmonton City 

S 58 Eldorado Nuclear 
S 150 Ejtocn Drvctoo Corn 

S 108 Export Develop Coro 

S im Export Devotee Coro 

S in Export DeveKxj Carp 

S 125 Ekoori Develop Coro 

S 150 Export Develop Coro 

S too Export DevWoa Coro 

art IK Exoort Develop Coro 

S TOO e roorr Dovotoo Coro 

crrt 75 Farm Credit Caro 
art 50 Farm Credit Caro 
5 73 Form Credii Coro 


17* 77 Nov 187 13X3 MR s 85 Cstme NWAutaroutn 

14*79 Apr 107 13R 1538 S 75 Cable Nat AuteroUMS 

9* 79 MOV 98* MR 1027 930 I 75 Cotae Not Aytoroutei 

11* TO Mav 105 1Q29 IUI s 50 Cabse Nal Automates 9*77 Mor U 1258 

12*TOOW in 1033 11X7 * 125 Calue NalCredAaric 11* TO Jon 184* *50 

14* TO Jun 111* 1230 13.15 1 125 CahM Nat Cnid AgriC W TOOW 100* 934 

ID* TO Jun 103 1014 1044 1 1DD Calsse Net Crvd AprtC 13* 71 May IW 1027 

17 "87 Auo 108* IUI. ig * 1Z5 Calsse Nat Crod Agrtc 11*72 APT IB* 1031 

17 76 Dec 117 130 13.17 UR ad H Calsw Not Enerote 

l SO Canctamwiwat Board II* TO Dec HI* J0W ILM S 125 Cause No Enerpie 

ad 58 Chrvslcr Credit Con 14 710W 188*6 1139 120 S MO CMN Not TeWWitm 

ad 6D Chrysler Credit Ccei 12*72May 105* 1127 UR I 20 CtBsse KOI TnleC u mm 

art 40 CcnsonantetFBaltmrsl 17* ’87 Feb 181* 1540 14.95 J in Catae Nat Teleenmm 

s «0 Consoirdated-Baitium t7V,WNov 189* IJX5 1270 1538 ecu 71 Calsse Mat Telecomm 

ad 33 Credit Fane Franc-Can 17* VAor 115. I1R U» J 75 CalMe Nat Telecomm 


30 Onodo Cement CO WAv 
H Onodo Cetmnd.ca 3t/w 

48 Renown Inc 7C/w 
H Soltoma lull Ihk) 


7*79 Apr 131* L74 
7* 79 Apr 19* 11X0 
6 79 F6b HU AM 
6 79 Feb ®*6 10X1 
11* TO Mor 103 1056 


I* 77 Mar 88 1250 1436 11X1 


13* TO May 101* 11X3 


ID 74 Jut 8*» 1139 12X1 1U7 
9 7* Jim IH >33 <X0 

13 * to Feb 102* mi 1114 
m. -89 Aug 109* 1047 
W* 76 Mar 101* LI8 
** 74 Jan HJOVj 7.16 
13* 77 Oct W7 9JM 
11* 77 Nov 114* 9.U 
10*71 JOT 183* 90 
ID WMOT 101* 921 
11*79 Feb 184* 631 
12 TV Nov 107* 9R 
ll*TO Dec HA him 
19 TO JW in 969 
W* TO Sen 107 KU3 
12* TO Mar 107* 1045 
lift TOOW 107* 1020 


1127 teg H Calsse Nat Telecomm 


W TOOW 100* 934 
13* 71 MOV 112 102? 

11* TO APT 105* 1021 
13 TOFea W8 1128 
11* 75 Fib IP* HUS 
9* 74 Jun IBM 1R 
12* WOW 184 11.17 

13* TO Jun 114* TU7 
9*72 Apr 101* 9R 
9 TO May 92 1057 

9* TO Aar 103* 930 
11* 75 Jun I0J* 1123 
13*79540 M7* 1122 
8* WOW 99* 9X1 


58 Senvn Hrtl Finance Hk 11* 89 Dec 101 1048 

fi Santa Mt Fkumce Hk HftTOSep M4 1071 1147 

150 SanwalntiRnanraHk 11*72 Jan HH* HU7 1039 TLR 

10B Sanwa Inti Flntxice Wt 11V. 72 Jun 104* 1044 

jo 3cpaara Briwerlei U*WJui 83 2U7 

50 5clna TnatsaarM W/w 6* 89 Mor m 135 
50 5etno Transporta! X/W 


4* 76 Mar B7* 1U3 
U*TO Jan 99* 11X7 
7*70 Apr IDO* 5X7 
7k. TO Apr 90* HR 


Od in Feder Busmen Dev Bit 17M740W 106* 1827 

ad 58 Feaer Bmtnasa Dev Bk tZhTT-See Me* 94J 

art a Fora Motor CrodH Can 8*T7Mav 97 1U4 90 I IH Elwdriciie Franc * 

ad 2D GciMefraeaMtain J7^ TO Oct U* 110 list 1 m Eiearidte France 

art 40 GazMetrowHItaln 1 £' l »2 , 9¥ I!E? 13-13 • WO Eloctridte France 

Od 50 Gc* MetraBOIItOtn 'K^TOOW IIP* 11R 12R v 2D0M Eiedrlclte France 

ad » General Motors Accept ?*7»Feb 0 ura 1A.B 9x0 $ 12s Eieefrtwie France 

ad H General MatarsAtrcpf 15* 76 Jun 103 ma 1541 ecu in EteWrid* Frtnee 

od 75 General Motors Acceot M WJan 10114 KID lira 1 150 etAouttiine 

ad X General Molars Accept JMTSQci 91* 10R HU3 9.TO j n GazDe France 
art 50 Gcnerai Motors Aoeeot W*WFeo lOJ IW 15® nkr WB GazDe Franca 

s 50 Censtcr 18 WJun 0* 1023 10X5 I 175 Got Do France 

I 75 Genstar 17WWOW 101* 1441 16.13 H HO GazDe France 

ad 75 GenWar Financial CO 11* 75 Jun Ml* 1JR UR s 75 MidtoHn 

S too Gull Canada U*72A0r 11 IU. 12X8 TOR 1 58 MlcMiln 

I JSHWrniWWkerHoMliwS 14M76APT 10116 W44 Ut7 s T2S MleNHln 

I 30 Hiram *iwker Hotdtngs 16 74 Jun JM* 129 Wg s u MkMUnO/s 

I n Hiram walker HnMlnas 14 T9Mgr 112* 11.1? IjB I 22 Peuaeet 

s 25 Home on ewujut rao T23 tra JJ® tt in Peugew-cmo-n 

ad 6Q HufiansSav 18 77 Hov MS UM lr-J* B MO Panl-frMauaon 

art 4D Hudsons Bov JOWWAar *6 ILM 1245 1094 1 48 Port ALOW tries 


'rll 015 <8 Owroonra 

*X0 I I0O C* Fin De 

lira j 35 Cle Not Du Rhone 
1253 H IH amenta Luluu e 

1JXS ecu 50 Gub Medlterrrmee f 78 Dcr in 
.!■£ ad 50 Credit Eouhmi P«Ht M WVl 70 Fee 104*11.19 

]?» S 200 Credit FonWerFrXA* H*7iMov W3 W.11 

I'M 1 200 OedN Fender France WV>72Jul UO IIJ3 

'WT ecu in CredH Fender France 11* TO Feb WT* 1017 

9X5 ecu 70 CradU Fender France lift TO Aug 108* *29 

1047 1 n Credit LvenMta ~ 

11.14 I 58 CrodH Nottanat 

110 9 UD Credit National 

jjo ea, SO Creait Noilenai 

J'-fi S IM EieWridte France 

]L3J S 50 EleWrlcI* Frteice 

wxi 3 150 EJcaricita France 

* 12S EleWrlcKe Franc* 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD. TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


; New Eim)b«id Issues 

Compiled by Nicole Baruch front information supplied by European bond traders. 


-£ Issuer Amourt 

(millions) 

»i*> — 

3AT1WG RATE NOTES 

. ‘ ‘ 


Price .end 

_ , . . - . 

■ 4«Rn 


nuonsfce 
■■ ivimborJt 

\ f i i _ _ 

’.ipire of America 
' * :ferd Savings 

7 undo Engineering 
Construction 

> ppon Crecfit Bank 

t -~K \ 

t. ’daysa 

j-?! \ 

' s«w Zealand 

C* ! 

;V_ rtBs-coupQH 

>■!; t.mque Nationaie de 

k- :•«! 


: - rtawest Properties ' 

; J <owtf ba Finance ~ 

; 'j- ;53ndinavian Ai rimes 
\j*» /stem 

\\ ’ wWfaa 

• r ustrdki 

i plgiuni ■ 

■ Iksndi Finance 

■ . . 

■ O - Icrindl Finance 
Ujj t jlV. Amev . . 

**'«£ ^ brink. Nederland 
I ’apierf ab rieken 

; :> Renry-Martin 

' ‘inance far Danish 
■■ £ xlustry 

futebat* 


r : Win* 

I:* i‘ 

& 

' : ) 5az Metropofitain 

l'£ * NARRANTS 

\ : fiibro-Sriomori 

L 51 - * • 

■H ? 3QU1TY-UNKED 

:®C finance . 


(.iurratoma Realty 


1997. W-% 


Dm! ,200 -2DQ5\. 0.10 


99 55 Owr 6-nwsti Umaen. CoBable at par irftar 1991 ml 
njt m rtlt at par in 1997. Foe* £L7tBL - ‘ 

• 9975 OwtaibrthL&or. CefabbarporeAaH98AL0adBd1>)' 
hcm+merigagi torn end US. flwmwirt weurrfiaa. ten* 

• tMP^DononmboatSlDQJOQ. - . 

98.12 Over 6-moah Libor. K point far 4 yean. 5/16 far4 yam, 
miH pofctf far iyaon. CafaW* at par in 1999 and 1993. 
Fm TWL Dcnesninofaons jStfXA. 

9930 Owr 1-monlh liar. Maxinun coupon 12*. NoflCofcWa. 
ftasOgaLDanam i nafa nt SjgflOO and $250J00. 

9932 OwrSaarfiiMiiiiibtf.CdUlteparahrHmwi 
040%. Danoaiwiom DMIOflOO. . 


1997 W6 


9935 Ovar 3-rnonifi Ubar. Callable at per in 1990. Em 035%. 
Dmxwxxwm £50,000. 


1990 9% 1Q0VS 9737 Crfcita t* par after 1988. Aho 100,000 vwnxrt, priced c* 

. $10 nodi o wtfrmn Wo at par into another 9NX band 
naneaflabfa, duo 199a Latter bond can bn bought with 
warrant! phs hod bond during it* first 3 yam, than with . 
worront* aid carfi Warrant* ended the wu at $ld 

1992: TOM 100% 9735 NoecdUUo. ' . ~ 

1995 11 100 97-50 NonedfaMa 

1995 : 10% TOO 96 . 87 NaneaHafaie, 

.1995 10% 101% 9935 Noneaiable. ” ” 


1990. 6% 
1992 6% 

1997 7 


1990 '7 


100 9950 Nanadetia privata plocmnrd. 

100 — - Nbnc nfaU a privotn plocn renn tL 

100 9737 SnfcmB fund to Sort in 1996 vdprodoosoillM-yromoge 

Mm. 

36% ■ 35.12 Nancnflabla. • ■ - 

10014 . 9755 NaacoBabin. 

99% — Nuncn B uU a priwtn ptacemaid. 


1990 10?% 100% 9975 Noncrffabln, 
1992- 9% 100 9&00 MmodUda. 


1993 ? 100% 9937 Noncoldsla 5Mirig fund to dart in 1989 wiprodueB a Syr 

awenagn tin. “acronym for Bropnan TaJaaxnaunicationt 
• . Sote&ta OrpjtbxAon- ' 

1990 Si . 100 99.00 Noneai ab ln. “ acr onym for Victorian PnfaSc AiAhoritiu R 

nm» Agancy. . 

1995 10% 100% 9875 Hnnmfablo. 


1988 — $16 


— Each warrant k un re k abti at 101% brio a lljOOO note of 
US Treatwys 9Mi of 1990. 


1992 5% 100 104 NoncaBabh. Bidi $5^00 bond with 23 tmrants each 

. . eea c M e imo ora of company* bearer p ertopation 

certificalu at a price to be set Nov. 1 8. 

1990 Open 100 101 Ompoa indicated erf 5%%. Noncalabti. Each $5^000 note 

with one mnat werdsabti into company's thorn* at an 
expected 2M% premium. Terms lobs set Now. 19. 


: • i; K (Continued from Page 11) 
Warrants remain wedded. to the 
" ^ :.jn callable iwtiH* die men«»f ft in 
"■! ' pie value of the warrant w31.be 
-imtedl^ the increase in the vilue 
. > ; " the cal^ble bend. ‘ : 

’• ■' This leads to'fe shsgndon that' 1 ; 
r «coIalors these ^rar^, 

• - 'nls, hoping fc^-> ianiastic capi? 

: 'j I’ l-gains increase ff interest rates 

i’sdne. are confosing them with 
-1- f:e trigh-flying das^c warrants 
.‘i ; au once were the vogue Those 
^ W arrants simply req u ired hedders 
pa tup cash to boy at para fixed- 
h : >q)on bemd. 

’ ? ?■ But the current wave of warrant 
: ; sues, requiring in the early years 
,h : M payment be. effected flnoo^i 

- : : it surrender of the callable pape^. 
’’t rite Afferent The warrant holder 
?•' •* jinst either pay the premium to 

- 1 - °y the callable bond or, if he al- 
« ;ai3y holds the host bond, lose the 
,'r^ premium at idnch it is traAng by 
I 14 1 irrendcring the paper at face val- 
' T'! T e. 

; r • j Not until later years, when these 
Redded warrants get divorced from 
. ■’ ‘ 'T ie callaWe bond and can be exer- 
; ised for cash, wifi, these warrants 

- : iecotne unenoimbered options. 

* - l,i So why is the c urr e nt premium 

? -' aid for these warrants so high? No 
»i dc can er plain that The answer 
"• mply is that the market knows 
£[ esv, it’s the price someone is wffl- 


paper for Malaysia — paying 10 
baas points, or 0.10 percent, over 
the three-month interbank rale. 
Tins was deemed too big an issue 
fora developing country at too low 
a margin. ! ", 

Th^ tone iff the fixed-rate market 
i^weak^reC^ctiagthe continuing 
heaty supply of~ new issues' and- 
uncertainty -about the exchange 
rate. . 

The only real bright spot in the 
nondollar sector remained the 


high-coapoo French franc market 
R£my Martin offered 250 million 
francs of five-year, 1014-percent 
notes at 100% and ended the week 
at a modest discount of % percent 
A drop in domestic short-term 
rates, tslmn as an indication that 
coupon rates will be declining, gave 
die market an added fillip. ~ 
Umleverwill be the next borrow- 
er to tap this market, offering 250 
Trail ion francs of seven-year notes 
late this week. 


ominate 


International Market 


ig to pay. 

So who me these peculators? 

■ ■ itional investors are buyers of the 
'' arrants at thee hritial offering and 
; i-z lQers rather rhan takers at the 
. ’aces quoted in the secondary 
lariret. Still unanswered is tins 
jesticsr Who is paying the high 
•emi ntns quoted in the sec o n d a r y 
gm arket to Imy the paper, and why? 
Mv A v ariation on the wedded-op- 
| m theme was introduced last 


mrn rn ffi m 


>10* 

stofi 


y r nts. 7bese have a life of five 
■ C ars, but can be exercised onl y in 
e final two years to buy, at a price 
; 101%, the' 9%-percent Treasury 
ires maturing on Nov. 15, 1990. A 
lomon spokesman said that the 
jtrided exercise period makes the 

irion less valuable than an mure- 
iicted one and that it was sumo- 
red to appeal to its clients who 
ire willing to pay $16 for each 

In the Coating- rate market, the 
fame of new business has slowed 
/h reduced demand. The tenyo- 
cy problem here is that the yield 

rve, which normally sets a steady 
bg reaao a upward from the shor- 
a maturities tothe longer maturi- 
s, is now flat, The cost erf mcmey 
m one to six znemths is identical 
th the London interbank offered 
feat 8 3/16 percent ■' 

This nwms there is no profit for 
nits, the biggest takers of FRNs, 
lo normally borrow coe-monih 
to buy papfif priced at the 
iee- or six-month rate and po^ef 
-difference. There may even be a 
/ k of inversion, with one-month 
Ees highw than - tiie longer -dated 

nods. 

That is because the U-Sr govem- 
bn*s sale of cash-management 
is is putting upward pressure on. 
emight money while the three- or 
rmonth rates, reflecting the an- 
ipmed cot in the discount rare, 
s unde pressure to decline. 

The Deutsche mark floater mar- 
t saw its second-laisest issue last 
ids — 13 biBion DM of 15-year 


By Gar! Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Refinancings, where- 
by borrowers prepay outstanding 
. debt and replace it with lower-cost 
new debt, were die main feature of 
the international credit market last 
week: 

Chrysler, which recently ob- 
tained a S2.6-b£tlion credit to pay 
for its purchase of FmanceAmer- 

SYNDICATEP LOANS 

ica, a co rrm company, 

from Bank America Corp, taxied 
the Euromarket for a lower-cost Sl- 
bilHon, three-year facility. 

If Chrysler draws on the banks 
underwriting this facility, it will 
pay a margin of 15 basis points, or 
0.15 percent, over the London in- 
terbank offered rate tor xxp to half 
the amount and 30 basis points 
over Libor for more than that By 
contrast, it -paid 373 baas points 
over Libor for the original $2.6- 
bffliou. 

The annual underwriting fee on 


~ 10 and 15 basis points, depending 
on how Chrysler uses the facility . If 
it asks underwriters to tender bids 
for short-term Euronotes, the lower 
fee wiH pertain. But if it does not 
use the facility or if it draws direct- 
ly on the books, it wtQ pay the 
higher fee. 

Sotheby’s is also refinancing ex- 
isting debt by arranging a 5100- 
raillkm, seven-year facility. Of this, 
S60 milli on is earmarked as a re- 
volving credit on which the private- 
ly owned auction bouse wiH pay a 
coimmtme&i fee of % percent on 
the amniint tha t is not drawn and 
S40 million is a- term loan that wfl] 
be drawn immediately. Sotheby's 
will pay % point over Libor on its 
drawings. 

Port ugal is refinancing two sev- 
en-year loans totaling $650 million 
taken oat two years ago on which it 
■ was paying % point and % point 
over Libor. Interest on the new 

Eve-year loan is set at % point over 
Libor. Portugal is . also paying a.%- 
- percent renegotiation fee and 
front-end commissions ranging up 
to 75 basis paints: 

Italy’s electricity agency ENEL, 
winch had been paying % point 
over the prime rate or the adjusted 
rate for certificates of deposit, 
whichever was higher, has renegoti- 
ated the late On the remaining 
$247.5 million of its loan to 45 basis 
points over the adjusted CD rate. 

Ttarkcy’s Ziraat Bankasi is tm- 
jrag the syndicated loan market for 
aSlOO-mffion, one-year pre-export 

financing It will pay-% point over 


T-Bonds Rise 





In Spile of Antitrust Reform Aims to Boost Joint Ventures 

T^VrfV A HAllATI By Steven J. Dryden distribution, and the 15-percem Relations between thecommuni- only 10 percent of those j 

* -t* Ut/UUU international Herald Tribune threshold is not seen as a strict tv and Turkey were already poor, heard of the ECU. 

t>d t TCCITT C TVi*. mmiiw limit Mr SnthtrianH tndir»mri Tli^ Pf mcnpnHpd Rnsrirnal a.aric- OveralL 32 DOCCnt 


By HJ. Maidcnberg 

Tfew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Despite a severe 
tightemng of credit caused by 
heavy government borro w i n gs Fri- 
day, prices of Treasury securities 
rebounded in late trading to dose 
moderately higher. The best gain* 
were in the intermediate maturities. 

With the interbank overnight 
lending rates at 9 percent at (he 
opening and the Treasury poised to 

anrtipn bfl BoO of manage . 

US. CREDIT MARKETS 

meat bills, the Federal Reserve 
took the uncommon presale acti on 
of announcing that it would ease 
credit with repurchase agreements. 

Friday’s sale, in units of S10 mil- 
lion, was heavily oversubscribed 
and consisted of $18 When of 14- 
day and $4 biBion of 69-day bills. 

The amount of the Fed’s repur- 
chase agreements was believed to 
be small because dealers are short 
of collateral Treasury paper. 

The Fed’s move, which allowed 
dealers to pawn government securi- 
ties over the weekend, only served 
to shave the interbank lending rate 
by % point. Bm with the Treasury 
asking same-day payment for the 
$22 billion of cash management 
bills, the Fed’s action prevented a 
much tighter credit situation. 

Closing discount rates cm 90-day 
bills in the secondary market were 
bid basically wnehawg^d -&t 735 
percent; so were the six-mouth is- 
sue at 738 percent The one-year 
bills lost 5 basis points at 738. 

At the long end erf the Treasury 
market the 10.75s of 2005 climbed 
9/32, to 103 24/32, for a yidd of 
1030 percent The benchmark 
10%s erf 2115 gained 8/32, or a 
quarter point, to dose at 204 27/32, 
to yidd 10.14 percent. 

U.S. Consumer Rates 

for W—fc Endad Nov. IS 

PoMfaook Savings - 5LS0 % 

Tax Exempt Bonds 

Bcna Bayer 20-Bonfl lnd«x. : g^O % 

Money Martcat Funds 

Ponogtw* 7-Day Avtrog* 745 % 

Bank Money Martwt Accounts 

Bank Rai* Monitor Index _____ 6JJ8 % 


By Steven J. Dryden 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The executive 
Commission of the European Com- 
munity is planning new antitrust 
guidelines to encourage joint ven- 
tures. 

Peter Sutherland, the EC oom- 
mga oner for competition policy, 
said last week that while restraints 
were st£Q necessary, the Commis- 
sion would take a pragmatic ap- 
proach because joint ventures were 
important for the growth and glob- 
al co m petitiveness of European 
businesses. 

The new guidelines Mr. Suther- 
land is planning, which are to be 
published within the next few 
months, were outlined in a speech 
he made in Bru s sels. 

Mr. Sutherland said the ECs 
com p e ti tion roles would apply to 
joint ventures only if the partners* 
combined market share exceeded 5 
percent, regardless of their aggre- 
gate turnover. In general, he added, 
partners with combined market 
share of up to 1 5 percent would not 
be considered to be distorting the 
competitive structure of the mar- 
ket. 

The latter guidelines will also ap- 
ply to joint ventures that include 


distribution, and the 15-percent 
threshold is not seen as a strict 
limi t, Mr. Sutherland 

EC Envoy Returning 
To Turkey After Flap 

Gwyn Morgan, the EC represen- 
tative ’to Turkey, is to return to 
Ankara this week after a controver- 
sy there over the unplanned publi- 
cation of a private report be sub- 
mitted criticizing the government’s 
human rights record. 

Mr. Morgan had sent the report, 
which contained the assessments of 
EC ambassadors in Ankara, to 
John Taylor, the European Parlia- 
ment’s adviser on human rights. It 
was delivered, evidently by mis- 
take, to a European Parliament 
member from Northern Ireland 
who is also named John Taylor. 

The parliamentarian, who in the 
past hi criticized Mr. Morgan for 
harming EC-Turkish relations, 
gave the report to Turkish diplo- 
mats. 

Its contents ended up in the 
hands of the Turkish press, which 
accused Mr. Morgan of slandering 
the government He left Ankara 
several weeks ago after the furor 
began. 


Relations between the communi- 
ty and Turkey were already poor. 
The EC suspended financial assis- 
tance to Turkey after the military 
seized power in 1980. 

In September, the EC unilateral- 
ly restricted imports of Turkish- 
made clothing after talks to limi t 
the imports failed. The issue of 
Turkish immigration into the com- 
munity is also sensitive, with West 
Germany pressing for continued 
controls. 

ECU Unknown to Many 

In Europe, Survey Shows 

Despite its increasing popularity 
among bankers and traders, the 
European currency unit is still rela- 
tively unknown to the general pub- 
lic, according to a recent survey. 

A Gallup poll sponsored by 
three European banks asked a total 
of 6J552 people in seven EC coun- 
tries about the ECU, winch was 
created almost seven years ago. 

In Belgium, Franoe and Luxem- 
bourg, about 60 percent of those 
questioned knew of the ECU. In 
West Germany, Italy and the Neth- 
erlands, (he rate was about 30 per- 
cent 

In Britain, which unlike the other 
nations polled does not participate 
in the European Monetary System. 


China’s Disappointing Oil Strikes 


(Continued from Page 11) 
important untapped source of pe- 
troleum in the world. 

“Even the most conservative es- 
timates are staggering," the weekly 
U.S. magazine Newsweek said in 
1975. “Some Western oilmen and 
intelligence experts even equate 
Chinese reserves with those of the 
entire Middle East." 

Now, oil company executives 
look hack ruefully on those days erf 
rosy expectations. 

"Everyone was so optimistic at 
the outset, particularly the Chi- 
nese," said Murray C. Hudson, 
president of Esso China Ltd. “They 
thought all we had to do was sink 
one well and come up with major 
finds." 

So far, Esso has drilled nine wells 
off the /Tiina coast and brought in 
"only one that has given us any 
encouragement," Mr. Hudson said. 
As a result, he said, "we think any 
discoveries are likely to be small; 
we don’t think there are any major 


discoveries of Middle Eastern lev- 
els." 

In the first round of bidding for 
offshore oil exploration that began 
in 1982, China signed 19 contracts 
with 28 companies representing 
nine different countries. The final 
contract in this first round was 
signed Nov. 12 between the 
CNOOC and Amoco Orient Petro- 
leum Co., a subsidiary of the U.S. 
company. 

According to figures published 
by the Xinhua news agency, these 
contracts have resulted in the drill- 
ing of 49 wells. Of these, seven have 
shown o3 and gas flow. 

Why have the results been so 
much poorer than expected? A 
number of explanations have been 
offered in recent years. Some o3 
executives say the main problem is 
the nature of the oQ being found off 
the China coast 

"Chinese ofl, as far as I can see, is 
very high in wax content and so it’s 
hard to flow." said Mr. Wood of 


British Petroleum. "You’re going 
to have to produce a lot of wells to 
get any reasonable accumulation.” 

Another executive, who asked 
not to be identified by name, said 
that Chinese officials forced the oil 
companies to bid against one an- 
other in the dark, without letting 
the companies see the available 
geological data. 

"We didn’t have access to the 
Ministry of Geology’s logs." this 
offirial said. “We all made huge 
commitments, which we regret 
now.” 

For their part, Chinese officials 
tend to put some of the blame on 
the oil companies, suggesting that 
they have been less than skillf ul in 
then drilling techniques. 

“The location of the first wells 
was not very accurate,” Ma Qifu, 
deputy general manager of Nanbai 
East Oil Corp., a Canton-based 
subsidiary of CNOOC, said in an 
interview last year. 


only 10 percent of those asked had 
heard of the ECU. 

Overall, 32 percent of those 
questioned were in favor of a Euro- 
pean currency replacing national 
ones, while 38 percent were ada- 
mantly against the suggestion. The 
percentages against were highest in 
the Netherlands, West Germany 
and Britain. 

Almost 60 percent of those 
polled were in favor of a European 
currency existing side-by-side with 
national currencies. 

Freeze on VAT Rates 

Sought by Commission 

The Commission has asked the 
Council of Ministers lo approve a 
freeze on changes in value-added- 
tax rates in member states. 

The proposal, which is to be fol- 
lowed by efforts to harmonize tax 
rates, is considered a key pan of the 
Commission’s efforts to complete 
tbe creation of the ECs common 
market 

The uneven rates, which vary as 
much as 1! percent are seen as 
creating barriers to trade inside the 
community. 

In a related move, the Commis- 
sion has also signaled its intentions 
re garding standards for the trade 
and marketing of foodstuffs. 

The Commission plans to pro- 
pose that communitywide rules be 
adopted guaranteeing health, safe- 
ty and fair competition, but that 
otherwise there be no restraints. 


2 WAYS TO MAKE 
SILICON VALLEY 
BUSINESS CONNECTIONS: 

1. Go There, 

2. Cafl Arnold Comez. 
Established business law office for the 
electronics community since 1972. 
Now you can haw an immediate 
presence in the high-tech capital 
of the world. 

InsIdLtwMz 

A PmlesaloealLtitCotponlion 
333 Vfea Maude Awmic. Suite 101 
Sunnyvale. CaUbrau 94U& ISA 
Phone 14081 73837(1) 

Fax M0Q 7384343 Iclat 6Z90KU 


SDI 

2nd Annual Conference 
Sponsored by American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers 
with Are cooperation of the 
U.S. DX>JD., SDI Org., 

Wash., D.C Dec. 9-10 ,_$430. 

(202] 682-1549 or telex: 

Mr. Renfro. 89-2422. 


This announcement appears as a matter ot recorct only 

REPUBLIQUE FRANQAISE 

U.S. $ 3,600,000,000 

AMENDMENT TO THE FACILITY AGREEMENT 

dated 27 October, 1982 
co-ordinated by 

SOCIETE GENE* RALE 

ARAB BANKING CORPORATION (ABC) BANK OF TOKYO INTERNATIONAL LIMITED 


August. 1985 


CAPITAL MARKETS GROUP. 


BANQUE NATiONALE DE PARIS 


managed by 

CREDIT AGRICOLE 


CREDIT LYONNAIS 


Libor and front-end commissions 
of up to 40 basis points. 

Hyundai Engineering & Con- 
struction of Korea rated $100 mil- 
lion through the of 12-year 
floating-rate notes. But the pricing 
on this paper clearly reflected that 
it was a syndicated credit dressed 
up as a capital market transaction. 
The margin, which starts at V* point 
over Libor, rises every four years by 
1/16 percent. Holders can request 
redemption at cadi four-year mar- 

gin rfiimgft . 

Algeria's rural development 
hank, recently crested to finance 
agnail tore, is planning its first en- 
try into tbe market and is seeking 
terms for a loan of up to $500 

IpilHnn. 

National & Provincial Building 
Society is raising £75 million 
through a seven-year transferable 
loan faeflfry. It wiB pay % point 
owr the domestic rate for three- or 
six-month sterling draosits and 
guarantees that this will never be 
lower than 5 percent 

An affiliate of the Bank of Scot- 


nanrial Services, is seeking 
million in either bankers’ accep- 
tances or cash advances. This wm 
be a three-year “evergr e en" giving 
the borrower the right to ask lend- 
ers to annually add another year to 
the maturity. Lenders will be paid a 
margin of % percent. 


NBC to Move Oat 
Of RCA Building 
In Mid-Manhattan 

Here York Times Service 

NEW YORK — National 
Broadcasting Co. is planning to 
move its headquarters from the 
Rockefeller Center site in New 
York City that it has ooaip i ed since 
1932, company and city officials 
said. 

The officials said Friday that the 

network was reviewing several pro- 
posals in Manhattan and at least 
one in northern New Jersey to meet 
its need for more space and more- 
modern studios. The network, 
whose leases at Rockefeller Center 
expire between 1989 and 1997, is 
expected w decade on a new site by 
February. 

Refurbishing the current head- 
qnarters at 30 Rockefeller Plaza, in 
tiie 70-story RCA Budding, would 
cost "hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars," an NBC spokesman said. He 

added that tbe network's space has 
become “very prime real estate and 
not economic for studios." 


BANK AMERICA CAPITAL MARKETS GROUP 
CHASE MANHATTAN CAPITAL MARKETS GROUP 
CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE 

GENERALE BANK/BANQUE BELGE LIMITED 
NATIONAL WESTMINSTER BANK GROUP 


BANKERS TRUST INTERNATIONAL LIMITED 
EOUP CHEMICAL BANK INTERNATIONAL GROUP CITICORP INVESTMENT BANK 

THE DAI-ICHI KANGYO BANK, LIMITED THE FUJI BANK, LIMITED 

Paris Branch 

GULF INTERNATIONAL BANK B.S.C. THE INDUSTRIAL BANK OF JAPAN, LIMITED 
SANWA INTERNATIONAL LIMITED SAUDI INTERNATIONAL BANK 

A L -BANK A L- SAUDI AL-ALAMI LIMITED 

WESTDEUTSCHE LANDESBANK GIROZENTRALE 


CAiSSE CENTRA UE DES BANQUES POPULATES ALGEMENE BANK NEDERLAND N.VJBANQUE DE NEVFUZE, SCHLUMBERGER, MALLET 

AMSTERDAM-ROTTERDAM BANK N.V. BANCA COMMERCIALS ITAUANA BANCO EXTERIOR DE ESPANA THE BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA GROUP 

Pari* Branch 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ BANQUE PARIBAS COMMERZBANK CREDIT INDUSTRIEL ET COMMERCIAL DE PARIS 

AktrengeMlIschaft 

DEUTSHE BANK _ THE LONG-TERM CREDIT BANK OF JAPAN. LIMITED MANUFACTURERS HANOVER LIMITED 


DEUTSHE BANK ^ 

COMPAGNIE FTNANCI&tE LUXEMBOURG 
MIDLAND BANK INTERNATIONAL 
THE MITSUI BANK, LIMITED 
THE NIPPON CREDIT BANK, LTD. 
THE TOKAI BANK, LIMITED 


CONTINENTAL ILLINOIS CAPITAL MARKETS GROUPS 


THE MITSUBISHI BANK. LIMITED THE MITSUBISHI TRUST AND BANKING CORPORATION 

THE MITSUI TRUST AND BANKING COMPANY, LIMITED MORGAN GUARANTY TRUST COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

ORION ROYAL BANK LIMITED THE SUMITOMO BANK, LTD. THE SUMTOMO TRUST & BANKING CO., LTD. 

TORONTO DOMINION INTERNATIONAL LIMITED THE YASUDA TRUST AND BANKING COMPANY, LIMITED 


ARAB BANK LIMITED 


L'EUROPEENNE DE BANQUE 


ALLIED IRISH BANKS PLC. THE BANK OF YOKOHAMA. LTD. BANQUE INTERCONTINENT ALE ARABE THE CHUO TRUST AND BANKING COMPANY, LIMITED 

CREDIT DU NORO THE DATWA BANK, LIMITED THE HOKKAIDO TAKUSHOKU BANK, LIMITED THE KYOWA BANK, LTD. RABOBANK NEDERLAND 

THE SAITAMA BANK. LTD. THE TAIYO KOBE BANK, LIMITED THE TOYO TRUST AND BANKING COMPANY, LIMITED ASLK-CGER BANK 

BANCO Dl NAPOLI INTERNATIONAL S.A. BANK OF IRELAND (JERSEY) LTD. DRESDNER BANK 

AkiiengesaliGchalt 


GIROZENTRALE UND BANK DER OSTERREICHISCHEN SPARKASSEN AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT AL UBAF BANKING GROUP BANCO DE BILBAO 

Pans Branch 

BANQUE COMMERCIALE POUR L'EUROPE DU NORD (EUROBANK) PARIS . BANQUE DE L'UNION EUROPEENNE BANOUE WORMS 

THE HOKURIKU BANK, LTD. POSTIPANKKI SOCIETE GENERALE ALSACIENNE DE BANOUE BANOUE EUROPEENNE DE TOKYO 

New York Branch 

BANOUE INTERNATIONALE A LUXEMBOURG S.A. ZENTRALSPARKASSE UND KOMMERZIALBANK, WIEN 

GENOSSENSCHAFTLICHE ZENTRALBANK AG. VIENNA KANSALLIS ■ OSAKE ■ PANKKI 


AL UBAF BANKING GROUP 


provided by 


THE - BANK OF TOKYO. LTD 
BANOUE NATIONALE DE PARIS 

BANK OF AMERICA NT S SA BANKER! 

CITICORP INVESTMENT BANK LIMITED CREDIT ( 

THE INDUSTRIAL BANK OF JAPAN. LIMITED 
TH E DA MCH I KANGYO BAN K . L IM ITED C A ISSE 

THE BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA CHANNEL ISLANDS LIMITED 
CREDIT IHDUSTR1EL ET COMMERCIAL OE PARIS 


BANKERS TRUST COMPANY 
CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE THE FUJI 

INTERNATIONAL WESTMINSTER BANK PLC 
CAISSE CENTRA L£ DES BANOUES PG PULA I RES 
LIMITED BANOUE INDOSUEZ 


SOCIETE GENERALE 

CREDIT AGRICOLE 

THE CHASE MANHATTAN BANK. N A 
:E the FUJI BANK. LIMITED GENERALE BANK 

P»l'l 

TMINSTER BANK PLC THE SANWA SANK. LIMITED 


AMSTERDAM-ROTTERDAM BANK N V 

Pf-4 Pawn 

BANOUE PARIBAS 


CREDIT IHDUSTRIEL ET COMMERCIAL OE PARIS DEUTSCHE BANK 

Cofayfl'Kr *••*•**•:•*■* LMa«*nDCMt 

THE MITSUBISHI BANK. LIMITED THE MITSUBISHI TRUST AND BANKING CORPORATION 

THE NIPPON CREDIT BANK. LTD R B C FINANCE B.V THE SUMITOMO BANK. LTD. 

b •nun B'an:» 

TORONTO DOMINION (CURAQAOl N.V. 


THE LONG-TERM CREDIT BANK OF JAPAN. LIMITED MIDLAND BANK 

THE MITSUI BANK LIMITED THE MITSUI TRUST AND BANKING COMPANY. LIMITED 

THE SUMITOMO TRUST A BANKING CO . LTD THE TOKAI BANK. LIMITED 

THE YASUDA TRUST AND BANKING COMPANY. LIMITED 

Lonjo* biaian 

TRUST COMPANY OF CHICAGO ARAB BANK LIMITED OBU BAHRAIN 


ARAB Banking corporation iabc? 
„ „ CREDIT LYONNAIS 

CHEMICAL BANK (GUERNSEY! LIMITED 
GULF INTERNATIONAL BANK BSC 

SAUDI INTERNATIONAL BANK 

«1 BAht AL 2AUt I Al AL AW1 LIMITED 

BANCA COMMERCIALE ITALIANA 

B-na-cn 

COMMERZBANK INTERNATIONAL 

Sofn.nv Anfrfa.nn- 


BANOUE FRANCO- ALLE MAN DE S A CONTINENTAL ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY OF CHICAGO ARAB BANK LIMITED OBU BAHRAIN 

tVv\l<J! Crawe 

BANCO EXTERIOR DE ESPANA S A MORGAN GUARANTY TRUST COMPANY OF NEW YORK L EUROPEENNE DE BANOUE 

ALLIED IRISH BANKS PLC. THE BANK OF YOKOHAMA LTD BANOUE INTERCONTINENT ALE ARABE THE CHUO TRUST AND BANKING COMPANY LIMITED 

CREDIT DU NORD THE DAIWA BANK. LIMITED THE HOKKAIDO TAKUSHOKU BANK LIMITED THE KYOWA BANK. LTD THE SAITAMA BANK. LTD 

IbAflufl Bijirfi) 

THE TAIYO KOBE BANK. LIMITED THE TOYO TRUST AND BANKING COMPANY. LIMITED MANUFACTURERS HANOVER Bank iGUERNSEVi LIMITED 

ASLK - CGER BANK BANCO Dl NAPOLI INTERNATIONAL S A BANK OF IRELAND (JERSEYl LTD DRESDNER BANK AG 

L 0*100*1 BianrK 

GIROZENTRALE UND BANK DER OSTERREICHISCHEN SPARKASSEN AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT WESTLB INTERNATIONAL S A BANOUE DE NEUFLIZE 5CHLUMBERGER MALLET 

BANCO DE BILBAO BANOUE COMMERCIALE POUR L'EUROPE DU NORD (EUROBANK! PARIS BANOUE DE L'UNlON EUROPEENNE BANOUE WORMS 

P»ai B-anta 

THE HOKURIKU BANK, LTD MANUFACTURERS HANOVER BANOUE NOROQUE POSTIPANKKI RAB08ANH NEDERLAND 

BANQUE EUROP§=NNE DE TOKYO ALGEMENE BANK NEDERLAND N V BANOUE INTERNATIONALE A LUXEMBOURG S.A. ZENTRALSPARKASSE UNO KOMMERZIALBANK 


ALLIED IRISH BANKS PLC. 
CREDIT DU NORD 


L EUROPEENNE DE BANOUE 
THE CHUO TRUST AND BANKING COMPANY LIMITED 
THE KYOWA BANK. LTD THE SAITAMA BANK. LTD 


MANUFACTURERS HANOVER BANOUE NOROIOUE 


POSTIPANKKI 


RABOBANK NEDERLAND 


GENOSSENSCHAFTLICHE ZENTRALBANK AG. VIENNA _ KANSALLIS OSAKE PANKK' 

F. VAN LAMSCHOT (JERSEY) LTD SOCIETE GENERALE DE BANOUE EN ESPAGnE DAI ICHI KANGYO BANK NEDERLAND N V. 

UNION DE BANOUES ARABES ET FRANCISES UBAF 

BANOUE -FEDERATIVE DU CREDIT MUTUEL BANOUE PETROF.GA2 


ZENTRALSPARKASSE UNO KOMMERZIALBANK 

BANCA NAZIONALE DEL IAVORO 
MORGAN GUARANTY FINANCE LIMITED 


■ INTERNATIONALE DE MONACO ASSOCIATED JAPANESE BANK lINTgRMATIONALl LIMITED BA COB SC 

OR S.A BANCO PINTO & SOTTO MAYOR BANCO Dl ROMA iFRANCEi BANK FUR ARBElT UND VUIRTSCHAF 


BANQUE DE LA SOCIETE FINANCIERS EUROPEENNE 
SIEMOur 

COUNTY BANK LIMITED CREDITO ITALIAN© 

LmWI Bwefl 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO 
ISTTTUTO BANGARIO SAN PAOLO Dl TORINO 


BANQUE SUDAMERIS CA5&A Dl RISPARMIO DELLE PROVINCIE LOMBARDE COMP 

L™oa> 8-anil- 

CREDIT LYONNAIS BANK NEDERLAND iCURAQAO) N.V DAIWA EUROPE NV. AMSTERDAM 


alGEmene bank nederland n v 

■a*-%0y B—aca- 

SC BANCO EaTERIOR FRANCE S A 

HAFT AG. VIENNA BANK OF HELSINKI LTD 


COMPAGNIE MONEGASGUE DE BANOUE 
ROAM ELSAE5SISCHE BANK AG 


GULF RiYAD BANK EC 
JAPAN INTERNATIONAL BANK LIMITED 


HANDELSBANK N.W (OVERSEAS) LIMITED 
NATIONAL BANK OF BAHRAIN BSC. 


PKBANKEN INTERNATIONAL (LUXEMBOURG) S.A. RABOBANK CURACAO N.V SOCIETE CENTRALE DC BAN) 

UBAF ARAB AMERICAN BANK / UNION BANK OF FINLAND LTD. 

BANOUE REGION* LE □ ESCOMPTE ET DE DEPOTS AL SAUDI BANOUE BANCO Dl SANTO SPIRITO 

BANOUE BRUXELLES LAMBERT. SA BANOUE GENERALE DU LUXEMBOURG SA Cr'IehT s’uSse 

STATE BANK OF NEW SOUTH WALES SWISS BANK CORPORATION 

AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN BANKING CORPORATION 


BANOUE BRUXELLES LAMBERT. SA 


SOCIETE GENERALE 


OVERSEAS) LIMITED IRVING TRUST COMPANY 

: OF BAHRAIN BSC. NIPPON EUROPEAN BANK S A 

iTCBCAQUP 

SOCIETE LUJ EMBOURGEOlSE DE BANOUE - LU'B*NOUE 
YAMAICHi INTERNATIONAL iNEDERLANDf N V 
BANCO 0) SICiUA BANCO DE VI7CAYA. S A. 

I (AUiO B'JHiZri 

LLOYDS MERCHANT BANK LIMITED SPARKASSEN SOS 

^jrfiajT i i'a'vr. 

union bank of Switzerland 
BANOUE VERNES ET COMMERCIALE OE PARIS 



Page 14 


-HW- 


Weekly International Bond JViees 


Provided b* Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel.: 01-623-1277. 
Prices may vary according to market conditions and other factors. 


Security 


-new 

Midale As* 

Mot Britt uol UisCurr 


(Continued from Page 12 ) 


S 110 NarttiAmtrPlUIHH 

1 25 North Amy Rocr-taf 

* SO Normal O/aCePiMI 

1 75 Occkantoi imt Firm 

5 40 Occidental On Fine 

S 75 Ohio EOhon Flnofict 

1 7S Ohla Eotaon Finance 
5 IDO FodHcBdl 
I 80 POcHlcGci Electric 

* 45 PqcMcGoj Electric 

5 60 PocUlcGm eironc 

* nPucHkCaElectnc 

5 75 Pacific G« Electric 

v am PadfieCesEletartc 

i TS PntafieLrttlfineOrt 

5 45 Pacific Lloffllna loti 

S HO Pembroke CaoitQl 

5 200 Pembroke Casual 

v 26880 Penney jc Ca Inc 
5 100 Penney Jc Finnic Caro 

5 HB Peiw Jc O/s Finance 
S IS PesmmH Oft Fm&Kt 
I » PMtti Morris cm Co 

5 U Ptilllo Moms inllCa 

* 300 PhnilBS itatrDleum 

1 M Phoenix Mutual Mat 
5 101 PllhburvCo 

5 ISO Procter £ Gamma 
i 25000 Procter Si Gamm 

* 1JB Procter fGamtue 

S 158 Prudential OfiFundm 

* 100 Pfutentlal On Furdln 

5 158 Prudential O/l F X/w 

5 386 Prudential Rnflfy Sec 

5 545 Prudential Really Sec 

5 25 flaBHr Purine 

5 100 RaWon Purina 

S U0 Ralston Purina 
S 14 Retme Trtmscontlne 
3 100 Reaver! on Finance 

s 125 Revtan inti Finance 
5 <0 Remolds Metals Elina 

ecu 135 Perno ld a Rl inavsirw 
S wo Reynolds Rl On 
5 125 RienanssaH/icuon 
s H» Rockefeller Drown 
1 20 Santa Fe Imt 

I 20 Sard Paner O'S 
i TOO SaanO/i R nance rye 
S 129 Soars a/s Finance 
i JO jnrsO/l Finance 
S 150 Scars O/s Finance 

S ISO Seers O/s Finance 

S 151 Sears O/s Finance 

v 12S» Sears Poe&uck Co 

5 K» SecurJtv Poet i No! Bk 
S TOO Security Pod! Not Bk 
S >00 Security Pod! on FI 
5 700 Security Poeff O/i FI 

S 100 Snearsen Aroertc E»ore 
s 125 Stool Companies 
S 75 Society For Serines 
S ISO SotoI Finance 
S 75 Scuta CaHtom Edison 
S 25 South end tom Eaton 

S 75 Santa Cotltom Edton 

s in South Contem Edison 
S 50 Soutti CaHtom Gas 
1 00 Soutti Content Gas 

S so Soutti Ccrotlna El Gas 
% 1D0 Saerr* Ciroeno 

5 75 51 Paul on Finance 

! 20 standard on Indiana 

i 35 Standard OH Indiana 

S ISO Standard Oil OMo 

I 30 5lerl!noDrugCaBlrnl 

5 100 Sun Coottal Cera 

S 25 Sandstrand Finance In 
I 125 Sumter OH Finance 
I 1(0 SanertorOfi Finance 
3 IS SvtmmO/iCooUal 
3 150 TennecoCom 

5 MO TemecoCorp 
5 191 TonnKoCorp 

S 100 Tennecoinc 
S 100 Tenoem Inti May 
l X Tereiecn Inti 
s 38 TcmeoiittiNav 
s 700 Tawed Irffl 
S 301 Texaco Capital 
i 200 Texaco Capital 
3 150 Texaco Capital 

t 250 Texaco Capital 
3 3* Texaen Capital 

5 250 Texaco Capital 

( 30 a Texaco Capital 

i 75 Texas Eastern R nance 
t 40 Texas Eastern Finance 
3 150 Texas Instruments liH 

i X Textron Inti 
3 MO Tlme-Lite 0/3 Finance 
1 4) Trailer Train Rnance 

3 75 TTanamorfco Ruanda 

3 JD TranMmertcaO/sRna 
3 TnxtscD inH 
3 SI Trtmsa Inti 
3 30 Tnansaccen Gull 0(1 

3 40 Traraocrcn CultOII 

f 15000 Try* Inc 


me -nod 

OVVMav 
1214 VI Fen 
ire. Umar 
HI 17 Feb 
ink -a? jut 
170s won 
lift 17 May 
1 5% W Jon 
Ublller 
Mix 10 Am 
13 TIOet 
12 VI Jan 
7 V*5» 
I IB Apr 
ISVWJiil 
Vftte?JUl 
134. 12 Sen 
JS4 V3 Fee 

174. TL oa 
lift VO Ota 
1 »/«W 
HATS Aar 
BftteiJufi 
u HO May 
10% 96 Sec 
1011 93 Sen 
10% V7 Dec 
«yV2Feb 

10 vsjm 

IT%te70et 
UP* VI Apr 
10% V3DK 
11*5 T2 Jan 
I TVS V3 Jan 

TV: 37 Fee 
IKWOd 
lFteTSMar 
(ViteAFeb 
lm-njui 

11 TOJul 
lift VMar 
Ota vi Sep 
mvod 
imV3Jwi 

UV.WJjn 
9ft 14 Jul 
Ski « Jut 
13ft tS Mar 
ItfetetNav 
1114 V Jan 
lift vi F*b 

10 A VI Aua 
liftvsod 
ift VI Nov 
lOtaWFab 
lltaTSOcC 
I OUSTS Jim 

12 V2Mar 

171k T4 Mar 
115.7! Feb 
llta 70 Feb 

llftvzjun 
15 *89 MOV 
10*2 VO Mav 

I IVj Vfl No* 

11 77 Jun 
1(5. 79 Sap 
nv, vi Od 
15V»79 Apr 
15 79 SOP 
111% 77 M» 
IV] 78 Alta 
859 78 Dec 
101579 Jon 
IffftVBAer 

10 vOOa 
85. 77 Jun 

14 79 Jut 

II V! Nov 
B 77M*r 

lift 19 Jan 
» 79 NO* 

USkVSJim 

11 VSNav 
75. 77 MOV 
14U77AU0 

7k. 77 NOV 
n wod 
127% 77 Sob 
131% 79 Poe 
WTO Ma- 
tO VO Sen 
UJftVONav 
lmTSMay 
18 VI Aug 
155% 71 Dec 
15k. 79 Jun 

lift VI Mar 
75k 77 Oct 
1 CH4 VO Jan 
I3UT2N9V 
7 76 Sep 
8>% 76 Dec 
15 , 4 77Aar 
16%. 78 Dec 
B 76 Mar 
71% 77 Jan 
7 VI Dec 


HWk T1J4 12X4 
.98V3 9J2 ?J6 LX 


IBS 11X5 
mm i«29 
«7vs law 
1099) 1047 
107H I4.M 
105 1049 

1021% 1444 
107 1274 

1069* 1277 
1045% HL83 
104VJ W.M 
100% 4X4 
975k 9X4 941 LIS 
IB UB ISM 

IBM 948 
1111% 1122 
995% 4X7 
ItB 10X2 
1*4% TOM 
98 946 *X2 AM 

IflOXfc 1097 71J4 

9954 8X1 U2 LS 

W35. 1289 1143 

in iaj4 1 tn hjs 


1146 

16X4 

8.9* 

1573 

U26 

11X7 

1137 

1449 

13X5 

1144 

1148 

4X7 


941 

1233 

4W 

11X1 

lljt 


nui 

KL77 

445 

9XS 

1203 

1023 

1034 


«8V% 1053 
101 1029 

995% 489 
1009% 9X0 
106 9.16 

10« 9X2 

97k. 1054 
1055k 1034 9XS 11X3 
108%. 1(44 1083 020 
98*1 B43 LSI 799 
180ft 10X1 117! 

1051% 1077 11.14 

87% 1111 1131 7.16 
93 U01 1237 

100%. 10X9 1057 

104 1121 1157 

«Sft 193 875 

tot ijj* im 

IB 1049 19X5 

Vto 11X8 129 

100 9JS 975 950 
995. 9X3 9X3 177 


aim 


Security 
S SB TrerOreFtoonee 

S 9 Uer OH Finance 

5 10 Union Cams On Fbtaac 

1 19 Union Cartatt 0/3 

5 30 Unkxt Oil Inti FhKXtc 

6 108 Union PodllC Carp 

I SS unfled Tedinategtas 
S IM United TadutatogteS 
v SOOB united Teetmotootos 
3 uo united Tecnnatogns 
100 United Taamotoates 
20 Utah intt Finance 
in wad Dhnev PIMKIM 
75 twiroisney Producllo 
is ward Foods on Capita 

100 wnmer-Lcmbert Intt 

100 WelliFtnoCB 

101 Weill Fares Co 
75 wefli Fipgo Inn Finn 
g wn tre ocmar Cta»tai 
U Weverhoauser Capital 
150 wwemotuser Co 
19 Mftw Credit Coro 


VfcM 

MMda Ave 
Mat Prtca Mat LH% Cuff 
99V. 971 9J1 079 
101 1U4 1291 1337 

unv. as: uji 

104 13.15 14 18 

95 97710.15 745 


ta 

SkiTOOd 

IMTBOct 
115419 Nov 
1454 79 MO* 
71% 77 Feb 
IIV%"92 Apr 
1154«SfP 
1^7900 
4*%-92Jon 
lltavjjah 
19*% V5 Aua 
S 77 Mar 
ljv%770et 
129% 79 Mar 
FlkTBNo. 
10i vo Feb 
155% VIS* 
12*% VI Dec 
15 77 Mar 
10V% vqMcy 
UtaTONOv 
ir* 77 od 
105. 79 Jun 
BONDS 


nxB 

ILffl 

1173 

6X5 

10X2 

(057 


tan* 1083 
lgiu 1173 
m» 1U3 
995% XX 
104 1032 

T0ft% (051 

97 104S11H 875 

ms 944 am 

«35t 11X4 1205 

71 1951 28X3 LM 

W2 7X3 
MOW UJB 
101 1236 

112 n« 
m Hus 
M2 TOXi 
M4 9X4 
HE* 9J7 

OF THE 


FOREIGHTARGETED wr- .... 

TREASURY AND OF ITS AGENCIES 

3 low U« Treasury 1154 78 Sen M7 LSI 

1 IM Ut Treasury 7 ' 2?° ’i 4 

I 1000 U3 Treastr* .f^TOAus in Ml 

1 TOO Fed Honte Lean Bonn 11 79 Dec 132*, ra.il 

3 MFSKSSilSmlAta >« *5 

1 50000 Fed National Mori Ass 4JWF* «W 7X4 
y 2SW Shidait Loan Mark Ass 6*%T2Jon fits 6X2 


nos 

1233 

1251 

1471 

■041 

rxt 

1U8 

H46 

US 


1061 

MX? 

941 

U71 

11X4 

*94 

X73 


Amt 


Security 


Yieta— 

Middle Ave 
Mb) Price Mat Lite Cur* 


1055k 11X4 
IdSta oxt 
M3*. 9.98 
107 ua 
103 6J7 

1075k 1L15 
101*3 448 
1015k BJ3 
10SV 941 
102 954 

10SW 1051 
1045. 1119 
lOIVi 1874 
102 1073 

101 uua 

ioau U47 
99 1075 

102 13X3 
181 MTS 
104%. 1253 
1055. 1135 

103 1423 

10514 1211 
in*. 1025 
97V! 951 975 172 
W% 97SIL15 LU 
1013% 9X0 M34 

99H 1095 1092 

loo loxa iaoo 

98 10.13 1014 8X3 

104 1246 1346 

104%. 13.12 1055 

91 985 1054 016 


13.12 

taxi 

HXO 

1054 

1019 
1039 
ATS 

1020 
11.16 
1029 
1127 
1158 
1127 
11.15 
11X1 
1453 
13X1 
1127 
1089 


12X6 

18X5 

1425 

1154 


DM STRAIGHT BONDS 


dm MO Canon kn imnerka Bk 
dm HO EnwtOoreiopCsn 
dm in Monittfiq HwkwBaor 
dm 280 MarintagPminep 
dm 200 Mooltabe Prpetaee 
dm 2*6 6 *ml t idM Pr u ¥ be* 
dm too Modraaiotr 
dm UP Moatraoiatr 
dm MO Moedreaiatr 
m inMcnMoloty 
dm in Montreal Otr 
An B NeerBrntneKk P r a u ln e 
tan 10 NeedtamWgnd Pruetwe 
dm NO wae rfBwxnuii d Preetacp 
dm HO Nova Scotia Power 
dm 180 Mmi Sarto Prcvtace 
dm 1» Ontario Hydro- Etedr 
dm 180 Ontario Hydraitodr 
dm IW Ontario Hedre- Ete cfr 
dm 100 Ontario Province 
dm HO Q u ebec H ydro 
dm ISO Qu ebec Hyd-B 
dm 280 Ouebechvdre 
<*n us AteMc Hydro 
dm SO OvpbKttrdre 
fin no outatee hydro- Beetle 
dm 200 Quebec HytttkEledilc 
dm 150 Quebec Hydro-EleCtrie 

dm 100 QoettC Hydro- Electric 
dm 150 QimOk Province 
dm ISO Quebec Pro vi n ce 
dm IBB Quebec Prtrrifice 
fin 151 Atobec Province 
dm HO Quebec Province 
dm uo Ouetcc Province 
An 150 Quebec Ptavbtee 
dm 790 Qv 


AUSTRALIA 


dm 106 Australia 

dm 29D Australia Pp 

dm UO Australia Pu 

dm 230 Australia 

dm 250 Australia 

am 750 Australia 

dm 2D0 AiSffttBB 

dm 300 Austretta 

dm 200 Australia 

dm 200 Australia 

dm 468 Australia 

dm so Australian lira Oev Co 

dm 100 Hnus s nm Iran Fin 

dm 100 Mount Isa Finance 
dm ISO Mount Isa Finance 
dm 50 Popup Ne* Guinea 


7 77F« 
3'4 77 0d 

8 77 Dk 


Ski 79 Nov 
INTO Mar 
W»vi Frb 
9J*VI Dec 
7ta V2 Nov 
60% VI Jan 

714 V6 Nov 
4k. 77 Nov 
6*k 77 Jul 
7*%V0Mor 
7*fc VI Apr 
6k. 78 Jul 
AUSTRIA 


KXFk 

HSU. 

HI 

loau. 


183 

110 

1D9*. 

105*4 

101k. 

1821% 


ns 


ram. 

w 

10314 

991k 


07* 483 4X8 
691 8X7 
7J3 7.7! 
S19 5.99 
383 LB* 574 
777 7J9 
7X2 852 
723 854 
089 723 
054 076 
OX2 7JB 
473 071 iX 
422 0X2 470 
OS 723 
7J9 751 
0X3 OH 477 


104%% 975 
991% ILIA 
101 M56 

991. 11.13 
98 9.17 

104*1 1127 


11X0 

10X5 


11X0 

7X1 

1004 


1X0 9X1 7X1 


107V. 1029 
1151* 920 
10* 1141 

99 18X2 
[« IM 
10IU KL17 
IBM 1007 
95 10X4 

102 10X3 

10414 1X87 
104V 1883 
9614 M SI 1004 005 
101 1042 1044 

105 1114 11X0 1282 

« 90* 7.1* 

99 953 9X0 35* 

101 1203 70X1 

102 1&36 15.93 

991% 951 955 8X4 
97%. 1816 1087 771 
10IR* 0M OX7 


dm in Austria 
dm 100 Austria 
dm 100 Austno 
dm 100 Aim r >a Pc 
Dm 150 Austria 
dm IDO AurtrUPa 

tan 300 Austria 
dm 100 Austria 
om IS Austria 
dm IM Austria 
tan 300 Austria 

dm 300 Ash nor 

tan ISO Auslrttai Control 8 Pp 
tan IS Austrital Control 8 PP 
tan IM Austrian Control tak 
dm IS Auslrttai Control 8 Pp 
dm IS Ausnitat Control Ota* 
dm 100 Austrian Control Bank 
dm IM Austrian Control Baik 
dm 100 Audriao Control Bonk 
tan 100 Austrian Control B Pp 
tan in Austrian Control BPp 
an IS Austrian Control Ban* 
dm IS Austrian Control Bank 
dm is Austrian Control Bank 
dm IS Austrian Control Bari 
dm uo Austrian Central Bonk 
dm S Austrian Elecirtclh- 
dm IS Austria) industry 
dm SO DacKtufcrnftwerke *8 
dm IH PonoutcratTwerSe As 
dm H( GenassM ZentTPlbank 
dm 90 GlrstBmASitwi'assen 

dm H Kotos Koemtner Elekt 
dm IH Oast El 8, wirtscmfl 
fin X Pvta-H Autobahn 
tan 7B Touentoutabotm Ap 
dm 50 Touernoutobtom An 
tan 100 VtacenClN 
dm IM voest-Aleme 
dm 100 Vgest-AWne 

BELGIUM 

tan 100 Beioelecrrlc Ftaonee 10ta79Jun 
tan 100 Belgetoctrtc Finance II -91 Oct 

CANADA 


7A.7SM ev 
11% -87 Mur 
7*%79Jut 
7k. VS Aua 
51k V0 Nov 
7%S-91Mnr 

7 V! Feb 
«|V7Jun 
av. v20ct 

8 VJJal 
rte-WMa- 

4k> V5NOV 
11 76 OCt 
9k. 76 Dec 

6 77 Feb 

9 77M av 
81% 78 Nov 

6*%78Dk 
■<%79Scp 
7»i70Oet 
71% vo Feb 
7W vOMor 
7>% VI Feb 
tele VI Nov 
O'.VJAsr 
8tkT2 Jul 
6S4T7A4W 

7 77 Feb 
7 VS Jul 
ilk 78 Mar 
■ V* Jul 
6 77 Dec 

10k. vi jul 
61k 78 Mar 
61% VS Oct 
*14 79 Sen 

S% VJ Apr 
91% V4Mar 
91k V2 Aug 
BWTSOcJ 
61479 Jun 


101 

10M 

10*14 

UWta 

99k. 

uau. 

101k. 

MSto 

10* 

10*14 

ion. 

97Vi 

lfl 

104 

101k. 

183V% 

104k. 

1011% 

106 

nms. 

1025% 

»ii* 

104M 

109k. 

104k. 

185 


141 531 743 
571 ATS 17* 
436 721 
480 7X2 
593 4X1 579 
4X8 723 


in 

M0V% 

W5V% 

took, 

11514 

180%% 

971% 

MP*% 


115k. 
MTV) 
1021% 
HI Ik 


7JJ9 7J6 
7.11 4X1 771 
4X1 7 53 
7X1 725 
7.11 4X2 
731 Mxl 
5X3 928 
42S 7X 
4X3 Ub 
4X6 LU 
595 480 
7X1 837 
489 721 
4X1 7X4 
477 7.13 
483 721 
111 837 
7X8 pi 
724 714 
1X7 6X2 
69* 4X1 7X0 
4X9 7X0 
489 4J3 472 
7.13 758 
586 5* 5X9 
722 *29 
AS 624 472 
415 4X7 
4J» 5X9 472 
5J9 599 580 
727 153 
7X8 781 572 
7X4 723 827 
433 4X8 487 


106* 820 
1U%% 5X3 


dm 200 Canada 
dm 100 Air Canada 
dm KM AbOuda 
dm 103 Amen Intt 
dm in Brecon tall 


51% 79 Apr 
9 V2AUB 
714 S3 Jun 
814V1 Dec 
8V% *88 Oel 


106k. 825 7X4 

lHPi 7X3 L16 

707* 439 7.13 

103 721 UJI 

104 491 421 517 


7 78 MOV 
MV0M 
£34 77 Jun 
Tte V3 May 
79% Vi Ota 
6*% V3NOV 

81% 74 jul 
7 77 Jul 

7 79 Apr 

8 9JW 
4=4 V3 Jun 
4*4 77 Nov 
I 76 Aug 
61% 78 Apr 

7 77 Dec 
7V, 76 Dae 
TV! 74 DCC 
61% 77 Jun 
11%78 Mtt 
4 77 Sep 
71%198*oy 
MkiVlBec 

8 V3F«b 
» WMoy 
7V% VSJun 
61% 77 Apr 
<1% 77 Aua 
*>417 0«c 
41% 78 Mar 
7Y% 77 Pah 
714 77 Jun 
4V%77Jul 
4 VOMoy 
71% VI Apr 
IIHk vi Sep 
Ht%V2F*b 

7V% -*3Feb 
71176 Am 


nz 

WJU 

MOV, 

1021 % 

10*Vk 

MM 

W1M 

»1 

103*4 

9914 

HIM 

11 * 1 % 

MOM 


ni 


dm HO Royal 6onk Of Comb 

CHINA 

dm UO BonkOfOdna 7 72 Jon 

tan Iff OUne Inn Truet Irw AMtelOd 
DENMARK 


IBM 

M2 

HH 

ICPV 
I0M 
106k. 
10M 
im 
1Q5V, 
104 1% 
IBM 

101k. 

101 

I0B4 

101 

1001 % 

loot! 

101*4 

991% 

M)*k. 

116%. 

IM 

1031% 

102 


6J9 6X4 
6X9 686 
4.19 4X3 U0 
628 7.D 
4.9* 751 
6X7 4X1 
5X1 557 127 
42S 6.M 4X3 
SJJ 435 473 
50 622 AB 
681 423 4A5 
421 351 4*6 
7.17 7JT 7X* 
6JB 58* 44* 
459 430 498 
1T2 357 780 
723 589 781 
412 598 487 
6.12 5X5 485 
J51 15* SJ| 
441 723 
72* %a 
7JM 780 
7JB 78! 
439 *57 
5S 4X9 682 
536 68* 
611 623 
4X0 54* 44* 
7X3 781 
4X4 721 
523 AW 439 
4T2 421 40 
4X3 


721 
725 

7J* 

722 


7.16 

928 


727 

7X0 


9M 723 
97 726 


7X9 

620 


dm 100 Denmark 
tan 10) Denmark 
tan IB Denmark 
dm IS Denmcik 
tan HO Denmark 
dm IH Denmark 
tan M9 Denmark 
dm HO Denmark 
dm 19 Denmark 
dm IS* Denmark 
tan Hi Denmark Pc 
tan 100 Denmark 
dm MB Denmark 
tan M0 Denmark 
am LS Denmark 
tan 150 Denmark 
dm TOO Cooenttnen CBy 
tan 73 Cnnrr h n p ei i CTry 
dm 7J Coo et fi mnn Oty 
tan 100 CooentnoenOtv 
tan VS C u nenboao n Otr 
fin Mi 

tan 7*i 

dm US Copenhagen Tc 
dm 100 _ 

dm 70 DenOateeBe* 
tan US Etetan 
tan A Juttoad Telephone 
tan A Juttsd Teteohono 
dm 9 Jutland TetePhatw 
dm 125 Jultofl Teteohene 
dm 100 Mortgage Bank Denmark 


71% 74 Feb 
7V, 77 MOV 
flk-SJDtc 
4 78 Feb 


n 


7*4 78 May 
ft* 79 Feb 


9W1 


7%% 79 Aar 
H* 79 Noe 
99% VOMoy 
•M-9IFA 

tekyVJMor 

I 73 May 
71% Vi Aar 
7MV4NO. 
7*476 Aar 
71% 16 Dec 

6 "Wttoy 

IMVijm 

71* VS Feb 
tv% 77 Jen 

7 77MOV 
f%%78 Apr 
8*4-93 Jed 
Ik. 76 Nov 
6*4 73 Nov 
6*4 77 Mar 
714 71 Fob 
iW vo Feb 
6*4 75 NO* 

78 jal 


tan 19 MomoMBta* Danmark 8%%70Ji8 
tan 100 /Martova Bank DenaiPp 7747100 
dm IS MerlBCtee Bank Denmark MV% 71 Nov 
dm 100 Atertpoae Bunk Denrncek H*73Feb 
tan lfl Moriaeae Bank Dmnork 7*%75Mav 


ion 

103 

ion% 

10014 

107V% 

106 

H0*4 

H>*k 

1S» 

1031% 

10414 

10 * 

114 

7*51% 

H4tt 

733t% 

102 

101 

999% 

H9% 

>001% 

Mb 

H0t% 

7009% 

IfiSk. 

W 

•£%. 

too 

1011 % 

int% 

M14 

HI 

H<V% 

M2%% 

um 


415 7X2 

5.11 72* 

WJ 427 U! 

536 599 

43* *21 

5X3 785 

6B 488 

7X9 7.13 591 
435 755 

455 7.13 

7-77 SM 

781 7X3 


dm 150 


7 75 Oct 

FINLAND 


7X1 751 
7.17 755 
721 7X9 
725 235 7X0 
4X7 JJ8 781 
612 417 483 
757 7X0 8X4 
729 728 72* 
6X7 UB 7J9 
459 481 497 
623 411 487 
721 127 
52* 523 4X3 
720 498 
471 430 475 
4X6 4X3 7.M 
4X5 537 
729 7X1 
6Z 434 6«3 
7 JO 513 
723 7X1 
735 921 
535 5AJ 
7.10 7J7 
725 721 7.12 


dm 150 Finland 

» 16 Feb 

TO 

382 

175 

dm 100 Plafond 

10ft 16 Nb* 

H4M 

5X7 

ms 

dm UO Finland 

7 tetAxr 

HU- 

489 118 471 

to IS Finland 

7ft « May 

IBM 

435 

7X2 

dm 150 Finland 

WtelAsr 

HN 

7JJ7 9A» 

dm IS Finland 

■ VC Nov 

U5% 

632 

7 XB 

dm IS Finland 

7ft VI Aer 

W% 

682 

7.16 

to OT PlnlorC 

7 -92JOI 

uo% 

4X4 6X5 

to IS Flnhjnd 

Aft VS Sap 

96ft 

780 

474 

fin SHrtsWflCJtv 

lft T2 Jun 

H5 

7X5 780 085 

dm 60 Ind Mhra to* Finland 

1 96 Ore 

Hlft 

*86 5X3 7X8 

dm 78 Ind Mine Bank Finland 

7 87 Jta 

in 

420 4X3 413 

to 19 Haste Oy 

6ft 12 Nov 

*6 

7X5 

477 

to S RtajicrutaddOr 

5% IB Aer 

99% 

AOS AJ0 S39 

to 100 Rauraraukkl Or 

1 VI Sep 

103ft 

7X3 

7X3 

dm X Tva Power Company 

4 tel Feb 

10O 

109 507 400 

dm S Union toik Of Ftatand ift tel Dk 

FRANCE 

380% 

640 432 UB 

to B Aereoart De Parte 

IUV2Dec 

Wft 

781 7.10 7X9 

dm 100 Banau* Franc Cam Eel 

7% 17 Jen 

100% 

7X3 

7X9 

to HO BawoeRnDicCgniEAl 

7 17 Feb 

101 

409 147 401 

to 19 Baaaee Franc Om Ext 

5% H Jan 

99% 

5X6 IM IM 

to TO Sonora FreocQm Ext 

9Ute9Ao« 

lant 

4X0 659 

dm 19 Bane Franc Cam Ext 

IftVBJul 

HSft 

Ul 

7X2 

dm TO Banque Franc Cam Ext 

Bft V4 Sep 

104 

7.11 

7X7 


Amt Staidly 


Mfrfdi 
mat Price 


dm HO Banoue FronC Com Ext 
dm » Sow FnmcCom Set 
am IH spam tndeemi 
tan in ■ annua National Paris 
tan TSCatSJoCeMrCaePECo 
am raa catBeCcntrcaapEce 
«n IH CoS** Ret Piitorautes 
tan in CdoeNatEflcrate 
dm IH Cohee Not Tdeeorani 
dm HO CoteHlMtTtaieomba 
dm 100 Ctassr Not Triecarntn 
an as cotaeNef Teteeam 
dm in cradH ebump pwm 
am 300 erMIt Eeutom Pern M 
am IS Credit Fonder Frooc* 
tan HD Credit Rneter Froocp 
on no Credit Fonder Pranaa 
dm 156 CradH National 
dm 200 credit Nattoeot 
tan M0 Eledridte Preetee 


dm M0 QaOe France 
tan 200 MleteSn Fbmcs 
dm UO Ranaull AO ttPtgK* 
dm 150 Ranaelt Acceptance 

dm 45 Sor Devrtoo Bcsfanol 

dm IH *dr Oevatsp fipgtattel 
OP IDO 4ncf ttol Chemlm Far 

tan M0 Snd«otOtemta»F*r 

tan MO Jnd Nat Otetnhil Fer 


BtbTSjta! IDA 

MIS Oct 9B% 

734 99 Mur 10* 
» 90*60- 10* 
81% 7* Jut 
7 79 Apr 10J1L 

I TtJan M** 
M 17 Mar in 

7H17DK MM 
tV%92Aul Mb 
7**V3«I (Bite 
■ 9!Mov HSk. 
7VV7 Pep HIM 
,8k. 90 Jul IKIk 

73k 93 APT MJte 
WWMoy ID 
6 77 Od 1009% 
8te 94 Feb 105*4 
n VI Sep IH 
Mb 91 Oct M6M 
96% 92 Aar urn 
7*e90Apr TOV% 
IRUJd w 
I vo jun ion 
7V% 74 APT MOV 
7L91JUI vta% 
19% 91 MOV Ufte 
78% 93 Mar rate 
M93DK lOIte 


773 72S 7X1 
60S. 447 

785 
788 
7.10 44* 
45* tX 4S 
7JB 759 
742 78* 

Ml 622 
786 7J2 




7X6 




787 
780 
781 7.U 

476 7X9 

7X1 789 

LU 
551 £97 

B ^ 

B 7.19 ft 
Ul 7 89 

725 15M 

446 7X7 

«3 523 78* 
7X2 7.M 7X1 
7X2 7.M LM 
723 720 7X1 
7J6 7.H 7X8 


GERMANY 


dm 150 Aodi raw** 
tan ISO BartvConttal Carafe 


am 400 Bayer Capital C« 
dm IH Odd* 11*5". 
dm SO wotecneB gpfc Fin ance 
dm BO anotaterRMnoey/w- 
am 250 Dreeaier FMenee xrw 
dm 250 Drtsdner FlnoociWTn 
an 250 Drasdner Finance Jlrte 
«n 70 HaM Finance 
«n IS KtaAof Flnonce W/w 
dm UO Kmdhta Fina nce Xite 
an IH KlaeeWtrJIMnbaldt 
dm 158 UndeWMWw 
dm IS 7793800 C ortMtetai Pe 

tan 2S ThvHPi CaribbPtai FA 
dm 300 VAO Intt Flnence wrar 
«n 300 vebeiefl Finance xra 
tan 700 Velkemscn MU Ffa 


7k4V* Feb ttfli 
7341* NOV 10M 

wvsFeb lCte 
»9SF*b 78k, 
79! 9* Fab 1019k 
6 91 Nov HW. 

* 10 Jun 166 

4 90 Jun 9296 
8 125*9 U7 
I 92 Sec ms 
8 VI Jut 

3k. 94 NOV 
»9*Nav 
MVMmP 
3MV4DK 
7Y:-»3fei 
4*4 9S Nov 

* NO Dee 
8 930PC 
7V. 93 Mar 


Wte 

us 

m* 


in 

im% 


ic 

HU 

M2M 


HUNGARY 


6X1 
6X0 

W 

536 

7X3 

514 
W3 
75* 

727 
SS 281 

427 65S 

471 47* 675 
111 2JN 

7 At 7J2 

7JO 4J9 

427 220 

62* 4X9 

6X0 7X7 


On 19 Not Bonk OtMunpary 7 V30ct 

ICELAND 


7*4 77 Aar 
99k V2 Jun 

IRELAND 


«n MB intend 
dm IH Ireland 
«n U0 1 retard Pp 

dm IS iretarei 
dm M0 tretortPp 

am Hi udM 
tan U0 Intend 

tan 200 I retend 
tan 200 Ireland 
tail 19 Ireland 


1M740K 
99%775*» 
0H90JA 
Ste-RStt 
Ik, VI Dec 
MbVlMbr 
8 Vk Od 
79k V5 Feb 
68% 98 NOV 
7*4 97 May 
ITALY 


10(9% 

IBM 


571 

IX 

720 

7.11 


Amt 


Security 


Mot 


-YUM—* 
____ *ve _ 
Me Mat UHCter 


Mtadie 


tan ISO Nor* Hydro 

tan IH NorUKvtaro 

dm MINanktfvdro 
am m wo ar> 
tan 7t Sfaatv 
an HOdeaty 
tan HQdeatv 
dm IH OBoatv 
dm 150 Stated DcnKonkP 
tan 150 SfatetlDen Norcke 
tan 15 TnntaebnCtty 


f|S is I If 

is lii 


78k 93 MOT 
6 78 Sen 


iftWMor 


5*6 70 APT 


jK ®S's 

now 671 433 ** 
M01% 520 £J* « 


dm lS Pnrti igta 
tan 2SB Portugal 




729 

72S 


dm Ml South Africa 
tan 200 SgufbAfrico 
tan 2» Sou lb Africa 
tan IH EnaBkOtSMlv 
dm M0 EpeamEiKtrSupair 
tan 1» EawnEte^rSupptv 
dm UO Emboi Electr Soppty 
dm is exBmetecfrSBppfr 
tan IM EscemEteetrSwfir 
tan is epcnmEtectrSiMly 
am IH Eecaai HectrSttatar 
tan 2oo tacom EtectrSitoPir 
tan MO lesar iron Steel 
dm in liar iron Steel 
tan 108 tear Iron Steel 
dn in tsenr Iran Steel 
an in ttarinnSlnfl 
dm SO JobanaaibBroCMv . 
tan S Jatemoestun) Qfv 
tan 100 J e tw rate Aura Oly 
tan UO Pna Tetecsm Pretoria 
tan MB PoaTetecsra Pretoria 
tan U0 Pan Tatedom Pretoria 
tan UO FOB Tetecum Pretoria 
tan in South AJricoRahvnw 
tan HO South AMcb Trantner 
tan UO Soum Africa 


PORTUGAL 

TteVjMoy 
7 vjsko 

SOUTH AFRICA 

7 77610V 10M S« XX0 4^ 

UbVlOec « £3 

78492DM 934* *-H KJ 

I -MMor lOOte WrtW 

496775m 971% 777 533 4*1 

9V. 77 Nav lev 5.W 

7 -RMOV *« 720 723 7X* 

Ste 9J Aar 
99% 90 Jan 
I 93 Apr 
buvtspp 

5tt9JApr 
7K76JUP 
7 77 APT 
7 71 MOT 
* 78 Mar 
M TO Nav 


TO 9X7 

5*9 kM 
.9*1% 57* JjJ 

S ft Ml ft 
•W WlUJ^ 
97 LM « » 
in txo 

MlMt 7J1 78* l£ 
no 721 •»* *2 
10116 182 *Xi 
-9116 7J0 7X9 436 
9*1% 9X3 55 

■imt 579 1» 

KS ft ft 

W4 7X0 725 7* 
*M 591- 
9116- 92* 


LU 


nov% 

97 

in 


ft 

ft 

755 


7X9 

7-71 

771 

72* 

7X9 

752 


dm WO AztenOB Mazton-Strorie 
gm MB CoroontoDtOetHtn 
tan in CregBP Create Opera 
an IS Ferrnele Della 8*He 
tan IDO FerravtoDelteSWn 
dm MO OOvetlt inti I tax) 


(16 78 Job 

(V%91 Jan 
8 VI Jon 
9*478 Mar 
I VI Apr 
ilk VI Jen 


M5 

M2 

UOte 


4X8 ' 7X6 

a 7X8 L33 
7X1 7X2 


10 * 1 % 

10tVk 


5X7 

699 

476 


JAPAN 


am a Bore Of Ttavo Cure pp 
tan in Bore ofTuttyo Coroeua 
tan IH Fun Electric Co WA» 
dm HI Full nai Finance Hk 
dm 2H Hondo Maw Co wri, 
dm 290 Hondo Motor Co X/w 

dm in l ndota Bonk Japan Pn 

dm TO JraonAWteei 

tan TO jaoon Devetap Bare 

tan 100 Japan Derate) Bar* 

tan 1D0 Japtn Finance MuddP 

tan Bi JiacaCoUdW/w 

tan in Karoo* Electric P outer 

tan 7 oo KatteOir 

tan in KobeOty 

tan in KebeOty 

tan in KaMarv 

dm IS Kobe Oty 

tan TO Kobe CBy 

tan 129 Kab* Cl tv 


dm TO Long-Term Credit Btpik 
an l» Mltwbtonl Heavy 
dm JU Mttsubrihi HaawWra 
dm 3Q0 MfnubhN Heavy X/w 
an IH MBgubtoM Metal w/w 
am 100 Nippon Credit Bank 
tan 209 Mapen Samoa mu- 
on 200 NtooenShtaotaiXA* 
tan IS Nippon Steel Cora 
tan IH Nippon Tetoara TaiMi 
am S Ftnytren rvoWi WAe . 
tan S RtirtnmWoWix/w 
dm HO SumttomoFInaiceAlla 
tan MO Sumtloroo Fkktoce Aria 
tan HD Yokoteunoaiy 


9H77JM 
71* 90 Feb 
31% 90 Apr 
7*4 92 Fab 
SteVOMor 
JteVOMar 
71% 79 Feb 
814 77 NOV 
7*%77 JeP 
71% 91 Jul 
79% VI Jul 
5*4 78 Feb 
7*4 76 May 
7*4 B6 F*b 
5*4 7* Jot 
6*4 77 Mov 
4»%77Jun 
71% 79 Od 
I VOJol 
7 vi Jen 
714 90 Apr 


101*4 

102 }% 

109 

1031% 

1031% 


7*%T7 Dec 
31% 79 APT 
3h 79 Apr 
31% 79 Dec 
714 VI Apr 
316 90 Jtat 
3*4 90Jtai 
fkiWCtee 
51% 77 Fib 
5% -sa Jul 
SUTiJlit 
7*6 -n Nov 
I vi Aua 
■ 76 Aua 


1011 % 

KEte 

1921% 

IB 

M3*6 

I5A% 

HM% 

107 

NO 

101 

Ml 

165 

TO 

Ml 

102*4 

TOM. 

MS 

IS* 

in 

10 * 

ItEte 

rjeh 

■9*6 
101 *» 
TO 
1171% 


7X9 

45* 

1X1 

7tn 

ui 

620 

6X5 

675 
439 
AM 
479 
eg in 


MB-) 

106 

miv% 


688 487 771 
290 232 7X7 
5A9 573 

SXt 574 4X0 
577 48* 

1 XS 479 
720 7J7 

4X2 493 

1*2 4X5 7.18 
7.15 77S 

65* ■ 780 

988 - 32 

150 150 

ISO -259 
471 1X9 

Iff 2D 
612 142 

4» - -443 

1*1 150 

3JB -431 
627 5JU 
7.U 430 7JI 
4X9 7JB 
573 173 7X1 


LUXEMBOURG 


MSD^QI^tionalList 

OTC consolidated trading for week ended Friday. 


Sain In Net 

iocs High Low Last cam 


AA Imp 

AWAS 

Adam&J 

Admac 

AdvRos 

AldCp 
AlaFdl 
AlamoS 
Ala ten 

A I dm 

AlexEn 

AllAmor 

AllSaa 

AloSChr 

Amrlbc 

AmAsrs 

ACetITI 

AConl of 

AFn PtD 


Me IX 


80 25J 
220 68 


AFn ptE 


AFn nfl 

ALndun 

AMdCtr 

AMIdlwt 

AMtdl Wt 

AMIP1 5 

AmPac 

ARocr 5 

AmShrd 

ATectiC 

Am rICr 

Ampalpt 

Amstrof 

Andryn 

AngSA 

AnaAGs 

Afillec 

ApIdClr 

Arden Go 

ASEA 

AsnoflR 

AspR un 

Ajirdv 

Aufadsk 

Auiodl« 

Avalnpf 


-99| 

SM 1S2 
1X0 118 
1X0 118 
TX0 1*8 


.14 IX 


25 AS 
88 10.9 


Me *8 
85* 72 


19 Sk. 
33 3*4 
*28 11 U 
9307 13U. 
177 494 
1010379% 
25* 3*% 
9051* 
2055151 m 
117 2«% 
«234<% 

548 17 
2083 2 
8 VU 
8717 
2419 
125 6W 
3822V) 
8*4 
89% 
12 *% 

a 4V. 

BV% 

B02 

1025 V» 
245 IV» 
19 2 
54 9 
172 3*4 
1434 B*k 
939 B¥> 
47 4*4 
95 01k 
124 2*4 
148411 
3318 6fc 
Z70017V% 
449 1*% 
425271% 
305 39V. 
434 2V. 
85 4*% 
222 1?% 
38891714 
3577151% 
I J*k 


5 5 — >4 

3ft 3ft 
109k 1114 + ft 
11*4 I 3ft 
«V% 4ft— *% 
34ft 36*% + *% 


3'i 3ft + ft 
13ft 13ft- 


V. 

14'% 15 
2ft 2ft- ft 
33ft 33ft— ft 
6*4 444 
2ft 2ft 
16ft lift— ft 
1 1ft— ft 
9ft 9ft 
l**k 17 + ft 

19 19 

6ft 4ft 
22 ft 22ft 
8ft 8ft 
Bft 8ft 
lift 12*% * ft 
*ft «ft 
8ft Bft— V. 


»— li 
+ ft 


ft 
ft 
lft 
9 

3 3 — ft 

I 8*4 + ft 
7ft Mb* ft 
6ft bft + ft 
6ft 4ft + ft 
2*% 2ft + ft 
9ft 10ft +1 
5*% 5 + 

15ft 17ft +1ft 
1ft 1ft— h 

25 27ft +21% 
37ft 39ft +lft 
lft 2ft 

4 4ft — ft 

1*4 1*4 

IS 1714 +2ft 
14*6 14ft 
4ft *ft— ft 


B 


2-9 


BKLAl 
BMJ Jl 
BMH Bnc 
br intec 

Bacardi 1X2a 38 
BncOp( £50 7JS 
Be Ok I pt 2X0 10 J 
Septwis 

Bncsrv Jle 1J 
BnTx cv 184 173 
Qk Leu 
BkNHs 
BkrNtP 

BkTrSC 180 2X 
BkMAm pLSO 13X 
BarDGr 


BsTnB 

Bmn 

BsukNo 

Beamni 

Beechm 

BenJer 

BlngSv 

SlnaKg 

BorWer 

Bteaiav 

BioTcC 

Blrdlpt 

Blod'D 

BlutdSD 

Blunsky 

Blwaor 

Bowair 

Branlr 

Braids 

Brolrnp 

BranH 

Brkwty 

BrancrC 

BrentB 

Brentwd 

Broad F 

SrokHII 

BrucuRb 

BCkOVF 

BuHele 

Buffel 

Burmh 


9 8ft 
139 29 
2S27 
141713ft 
11B30 
2873 
234ft 
3054 
10181% 
84 Oft 
19 

1125ft 
1305 S*k 
195 *8ft 
18ft 
548 aft 
2410ft 
65 3*4 
3 9ft 
18 8ft 
.17e 42 37243 4 
1772 Ztft 
145412ft 
633 5 
9313ft 


ixo tux 


Bft 

25 

25 

12ft 

30 

71ft 

24ft 

Sift 

10 

Bft 

19 

25ft 

7ft 

48 

18ft 

4ft 

9ft 

Jft 

9ft 


8ft 

25 -4 

26ft +!ft 
13 + ft 

30 

73 +1V» 

24ft + ft 
53ft +2 
18ft v ft 

25ft 

Bft +lft 
48ft + ft 
18ft 
Sft +1 
9ft— 1 
34% + ft 
9ft 


1X5 T 
lXQb 


1032 4^0 


414 
9915 
48 45 
3316 
S * 2J% 
S9el3J 2441 54% 
.140 XJ 76 4ft 


I7ft 

lift 

4ft 

12’J. 

5ft 

3% 

14ft 


1.9 


*4 


*Ve — 

raft— 2*% 
lift— %. 

12ft +W 

fft + ft 

I4*k 
45 +1 


IDe 18 
3A IS 


XI* 8 


1116ft 
2 Sft 
S3 2*6 
B3J 5ft 
10*0 *V* 
21 7 
12 9ft 
222 7%% 
87 2ft 


% 

lift 

» % 


Sft + ft 


Mr 3.1 312817ft 
85 7X 347 Sft 
25« 8ft 
3X7e13£ 1187241% 
55515 

.17a 4X 383 4ft 


4*6 

4ft 

7 

9ft 

7ft 

2ft 

lift 

Sft 

Bft 

21ft 

12 

4ft 


4ft + S 
Ibft 




4ft 
7 
Oft 
7ft 
2*4 

11*4 + ft 
Sft + ft 
81k + ft 

snr 

4ft— ft 


CLASS 

CNBS 1.12 3£ 
CNL Ftl ,14C 58 
CVDun 
Coctieun 
Colmar 
ConoG wl 
CbPaCod 1X0 
CaOIIFd 


2.1 


XOa 9 
80tl 25 


Carvers 
Ccntbnc 
QlBJtSv 
CtrfHia 
CnJerSv 
CriPocC 
CFocMn 
CSomk 
Centra! 

OrnibD 

chape pf ixo ids 
CT wflnt 


-20c 4.1 


1X4 10X 
800 4.1 
.12 1,1 


Oimetr 
C1M4SC0 
otidwid 
Cirobdrt 
CtrcEe 
Ore Inc 
CteSLn 
CoctH-F 
CalCm of 
ColSv wt 

CmooAm X0 IX 

CmwRI !X3el24 
CmpVifl 
Cmptek 
Cmnctim 
CmpOpt 
CmHzun 
CmpSvc 
Concern 
Coma 
ConiSv 
CnEbl 
CHHIfWt 
CtiHliun 
CoreS ni 3X7 118 
CrnrFn 
CouanH 
CrftHau 
CrwfdC 
Crosby 
CrusidSv 
CrwnA 

CusCuns 
Cutco 
Cvbertk 


224 3ft 3ft 
2735 35 

Kit 2ft 
224 6 6 

347 4 b 

Jle IX 22 

2994 5ft 4ft 
7 sm S7ft 
12500 V Sft 
1833 UU I Oft 
*422*4 22ft 
9716 16 

4 4 4 

3915 15 

471 8U. Sft 
2004 ft ft 
2321916 19U. 
31 4ft 4ft 
91710ft 9ft 
7811ft lift 
1371 ft ft 
67S 9ft 9 
7 3*4 31% 
102213ft 13 
1033 8ft Sft 
1833 9ft Sft 
4513% 13% 
2610 9ft 
2410ft 10ft 
322 . % 

10 7 6 

639 39 

12ft 12ft 
2205 7% 6% 
.129 1 3 141 70 9ft 
M 3 4% 6% 

331 2ft 2ft 

3 15ft 15 
520 Uft 
645 4 4 

Jfl IX 22612V* lift 
8710ft 10ft 
7 4ft 4ft 

105 4 3ft 

214 12ft 
7327 26% 

262 20ft 20ft 
855 4% 3% 

40 21% 2% 

28725 23ft 
141720 17 

1091812% 11 
.17# 15 50 6ft 6ft 

26 6ft 5ft 

.14 4 J 109 3k. 3 

729 4% ilk 


Xle 


.72 39 


3% + V% 
35 
Z% 

6 

6 

22 —ft 
5ft + % 
57ft — Ui 
9 

ia%— u. 
22ft— ft 
16 
4 

15 

8«i + ft 

ft 

19ft— ft 
4ft 

10ft 4- % 
Hft-ft 

9ft + ft 

13 

Bft — ft 
9ft + ft 
13% 

9%— ft 
10ft 
% 

7 +1 

39 
12ft 

7ft— ft 
9*4— ft 
6% + ft 
2ft— ft 
ISft + ft 
20 +1ft 
4 

12ft V ft 
10% 

4% 

3ft— % 
12ft -1ft 
27 4- ft 

20% + ft 
3ft- % 
2ft— ft 
24% +1 
20 +3 
11% * *. 
64% 

6 

3ft -4- ft 
49% + ft 


Softs In Nat 

100s High Low Lost ctiftp 


,15e 15 


DMI 

DNA P un 
DST X0 IX 

Del Ei .(Me X 

DoIrMA 
Del a PC 
DotoTr 
DBeer 
DnfnPr 
DmlMA 1X0 
DonlMB 1X0 
DostSv 
D«S» 

Dal am as 
DetCan 
Develop 
DIckenA 
DIckenB 
Dlstrib 
Dlvl un S 
DomMt 
Doskocl 
Dahlia 
DresBk 
DrlefCn 
Drugs s 
DualLfe 
Dyotm 
Dvnsac 


7ft 

4ra 

7% 


% 


SO 3 X 


.10e 10 


.12 2J 
2X0e 23 
I -22e 7 X 
X0 117 


185 4ft 4ft 
291 11 10ft 
25010% 10ft 
7 6ft 
204525ft 24ft 
39 Oft Oft 
284 Bft 
7538 4 
1182 8% 

178 9?% 

26 Vft 
18 24% 

316 Sft 3 
Ml 10ft «ft 
8213ft 13ft 
68 4 3% 

571 5 4% 

8 4ft 4% 
213 3ft 3% 
9110ft 10ft 
68 5ft 5ft 
2625 1ft 1% 

1 5ft 5% 
3831 123ft 1 
280516% 15ft 
86 4ft 4% 
459 4ft 5% 
496 4. 3ft 
1DI 2h 2 


EB Mar 

EogTwtC 

Ealing 

EoiVon 84 1.1 

Elctmas 

ElecTel 

ErnpCos 1JP 28 

EnanSu 

EnrVnt 

Eng Mao 

ErcfcGd 

Escokte 

EsaicCt 2J2 8X 

Eicar 

Expdl un 


152 9% 

2 

3 3 

18542 38ft 
39918ft 17*4 
309 7ft 7 
205X041 48ft 
1168 lift 10 
58 8 8 

425 7ft b*k 
246 2% 2% 
205 4% 4ft 
26% 26ft 
20513ft 11% 
74312% 71% 


9% 9% + % 


3 

39 —3 
18ft + ft 
7ft + ft 
50ft +2ft 
lift +lft 
8 

6ft— ft 
2% 

4ft— ft 
26ft 

11% —1ft 
72% + ft 


FMI wt 
FaicLts 
Faisiaff 
FedNII 


FldNFn 

Fbillnd 

FnNBcs 


FtBnSec 

FBncT* 


FtCorin 
FDtftftOt 
FExecpt 3X5S14X 
FFdAust 
FFdCOls 
FFIdBcpMXQ 68 
FFnel 176b A3 
FFncrp 

FtGlen 1J0 36 
FIJWpf LOO S3 
FJerpfS 2X8 6X 
FIPboNJ 

FPeopt 1X9 111 
Ftbnklll UO L2 
FltsHi 



F 

3875 2% 
1971224 
294 4% 
48 120 

48 

6052 

10 

4 20ft 
33 3ft 
9523*8 

42) 

237 

4% 

20 

IS 10 
29ft 

5.9 

3 4* 

12 

38 39 'a 

2L0 

1425% 


Oft 

1% 

50ft 


34ft 

Oft 

10 


6ft 


.99a A1 


Fteona 
Flock In 

FlnEim .I0e Z9 
FlaErp 

ForBetr .10 2X 
PtWvn S .90 2X 
Forum wt 
Farm wt85 
FndrFn 

FrtflFn 1X4 48 
FourSfr 

FmMd 280 5J 

FmkBc XOa 2.9 

FreeSG LSOellJ 150622 18ft 
FuilPh X4e X 388119ft 19 
Fulton 


, __ 25 

7831b 15% 

204 24ft 24ft 
14019ft 18% 
11410ft Mft 
1959 56ft 
1343 41 

4ft 4 Vj 
6133 S3 
1957ft 5* 
98 41% 3*ft 
13510% 10ft 
22116ft Ibft 
623 23 

641ft 41ft 
97424% 23ft 
4 3ft 3ft 
112 3ft 3% 
1783 Sft 7V% 
10 5 4% 

1134% 34% 
44721ft 20 
1722 Sft *V» 
>1 >% 1% 
3927 26% 

B1 5ft 4% 
445ft 45 
47028 26% 


2145 


2% + ft 
12% + ft 
Oft 
1% 

50%— ft 
20ft + ft 
3ft 

23% +lft 
37 
4ft 
10 

29ft 

6% 

39ft 

25 

15% — ft 
24ft 

18% — ft 
10ft 

59 +2ft 
41 
4ft 
33 

57 +3ft 
41% 42% 
10% + ft 
16ft 4 ft 
23 
41ft 

24ft 4- % 
Sft 

3ft 4 ft 
Sft 41 
5 4ft 
34% 4 ft 
20ft 4 ft 
4ft 4 % 
!% 

24% 

5ft 4 ft 
45ft 4 ft 
27% 41 
21% 43 
19V* 

45 


Nat 


(nr HRS 
IntLSPt 
InTtir un 
Intrwst 
InvtDS 
Irrvlra 
InvSLpt 
Irwin g 

Irwin nv 
I SCO 

Isrllnv 
ItoYokd 
I versn 


Sales In 
100s High Law Last Ch'gc 

284 2% 2% 2% — % 
232X7% 26% 24ft— % 
135 4% 4ft 4ft 
XQ A! 39614% 14% 14% + ft 
89 4ft 4% 4ft 4 ft 

10 3ft 2% n 

10611ft 10% lift 4 ft 
4 4ft 4ft 4ft 
3 3 3 

96114 12ft 14 41% 

5520 20 20 

24461 57% 57% —2ft 

59412% lift lift— % 


.09 11 


135 11X 
XBr 5 


JG Ind 
JMB 
Javelin 
JettBcp 
JeffBk 
JemReC 

Joslyn 180 AX 
Justtceln t 


1X4 103 
XSailX 


93 3% 3% 3%— ft 
141 Ibft 16 16 

143 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
lift 18ft 18ft 
13813% 13% 13% + ft 
132 4ft 4ft 4ft 
11929ft 28% 29 + ft 

27 5ft 4% 4%— ft 


KnCtvLs .94 38 
KVInvst XI 25 


Kina Ini 
KnasRd 
Kinney 
Klefnrf 
KloofGs 


12527 
I lift 
5 7ft 
289 4ft 
-10e IX 317 71b 
ST 7ft 
4734 7% 


24ft 24% + ft 
lift lift 
7ft 7ft 
6% «%- ft 
7ft 7ft + ft 

W 


ZD 


.16 IX 
XOe 33 
Me 3X 


LdITAs 
LndiPV 
Landsng 
Loser Cn 
LeadDv 
Lttlno 
LincRn 
UncLfe 

LineFIm 

LouGSpt 1X5 10X 
LauGPf 1X4 107 
Luskin 

LvdnPlt X*a Al 


1X0 

XII 


3X 


3111ft 
73 9 
810 

528 Sft 
785 Oft 
234 6ft 
654ft 
452Bft 
5226 Mlk 
3012ft 
II 17% 

i£& 


I Oft 11 
8% 9 
9ft 9ft 
8ft 8ft 
5 5 

6ft bft 
54ft 54ft 
27ft 28% 
17ft 17ft 
lift 12ft 
17ft 17% 
9% 9% 
5% 5% 


+ ft 

-ft 
+ U 
— 1 
-ft 


+1% 
— ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 


+ ft 


M 


MCI wt 

MCMCp X4 2.1 

MSI El 

McftVsn 

Model Pt 

Moa no i 88 

MorPet XXOelAZ 

MothAp 

Max co 

Maxtor 

MeehTc 

Medtrst 

Melrdg 

Mr ch Bn 1X0 AB 

Meh-Fdl 

MetroSv 

MsvrPk 

MlchJ X4a 30 
MIcrblo 

AUneSt s S3 IX 
MnrRs XOe 2X 
Mcacotn 

MuttnA XSe 70 
Mustu 
MutREI 
MutOlt 


3545 1 ft ft— ft 
10212ft lift lift 
20 2% 2ft 2% 

783 5% 4% 4%— % 

.242 TJa 3 2% + % 

206815% 1S% 15% + ft 
215ft 15ft 1 5ft 
153 2% 2 2 — % 

.237 2% 2% 2% 
146411% 11 11% + ft 

6% Oft 6% + % 


2SS19 

18% 

19 + 

19715 

IX* 

IS + 

33 

33 

33 

395517 

14ft 

17 

1416% 

14% 

14% 

919 

10 

19 

14 B 

8 

S 

13 » 

m 

2% 


12240 
4420 7% 
202 5 

27 S „ 
1573 Oft 
no io 
509 1% 


4%— ft 
5 

4 + % 

10 


I*. 


ift m + ft 


t 


NarreC 3X0a 78 
NtBusSv 
Nil FSI 
N (Coord 
NIHttcr 
Nil Sav 
New* Fd 
NwCntv 
NwCtvpf 
NY Mar 
NewmCm 
NwfdBun 
Nwpk wt 
Nissan 
NOIeOr 
Nooney 

NCorSL 7.1 

NestS pf 

No Trust 2.72 3J 
NwEna 

NwNGnf 2J7 7X 
Npwsce JO 23 


XOe 7 


34543ft 41 
11418ft 17% 
.56310% 10ft 
112613ft 12ft 
]373 9% 9ft 
2857 18% 17 
2415% 14% 
1224 3ft 2% 
153 3% 2% 

223 38 32ft 
,421 Bft 3ft 
142820 19ft 

& 

2331 3ft 3 
2319ft 19ft 
71 M I 
103528% 27% 
49781ft 78ft 
3ft Sft 
3531% 30% 
813% 13ft 


43% +2% 

18 

10% + ft 
12ft 

9ft + % 
18 +1 
15% + % 
z%— % 
2ft— ft 
35ft +3 
3ft 
19ft 

5*- ft 
3 — ft 
19ft 

Bft + ft 
27% — ft 
81ft +3 
3ft 

30ft— % 
13% — ft 


Ravrkg 

Reflctn 

RBflIna 

RetbLfr 

RSPtcA 

Run Ind 

RvrsdG 

RckwdN 

Rodim# 

RgrCbB 

Rosslnd 

RotoRtr 


Soles In Net 

100* Hign low Last Oiter 
271 5% 5ft 5% + ft 
I 1351*ft 15% 19 — % 
929210% 10ft 10% 

DO 48 940ft 40ft 40ft 

1354 9% 7 8ft +lft 


dm ISO BhLtaifc Fteona W/ef 7 V5Juf 
tan TO 5ocCe«rHaci60lra» I VI Jut 

dm MS Soc Ceatr Nuetealm 7 %V*Nm 

dm 150 SacCettrNuCtoetrea 7% Vi Jot 

MEXICO 


119 

105% 

101ft 

IOI* 


282 

ui 

7.17 

499 


JO* 6X 


3« ^ 


k 


6ft 




... 3% 

8% 8% — % 
408710% 10% 10% + ft 
90 5% 5 5 

.18 IX 55817ft 17% 17% 


X6 X 
32a IX 
1X9B1L1 


85r IX 


SK 

SKFAB 
SJNB 
SPI Phs 
SageAl 
StHIGd 
SaimNf 
SandRea 
Sanfrd 

St Mon B 
Santos 
Saso( 

SavrFd 
Sajctnin 
ScanOwt 
SamOun 
Sechwk 
SeomFr 
SeotleT 
Shan Iffy 

stwreSu 

SIvKJng 
SlmKar 
SbnnFt s 
5Irco 
ScAttn 
SestsvL 
50PCPI 
SlhHnte 

SwstNt 2X0 48 
SwstRtr 7J2 1ZX 
Spear In I 
Specs 
Spoarel 

StanWst 
Stan In# 

StarGla 
SkorTc 
Staler 
StwBcP 
StwBwt 


S3 AS 


XOr IX 
88 3.1 


I 


85 Sft 
18533% 
5 

32410ft 

520 

414 13% 
10 8 
844 8ft 
24321ft 
1926 
4Q5 3% 
394 2 
4011% 
593 2% 
120 3% 

71 5 j 
1930 21 U 

15ft 
4% 
118 4 


5ft 5ft 
32% 32% — % 
5 8 

IDft IDft 
19ft 20 + ft 

lift 1Z% +1% 
7% 8 + % 

Bft 8ft 
20ft 20ft— % 
26 +1 




^7 ft 


’J* frk 

2ft 3ft + ft 
18 21 +3 

1 1 

ZT 2144 + <A 
36ft 36V* 


* ,2 fc 


lift lift— % 
3ft 2ft 
12 12% 

15 15ft + ft 
4% 4% 

A 4 


«6-K 

14ft 

,. 344 
104 I1U 

.9 s 3 

1101 4 % 
22 7% 
403 3% 


XSe X 


StutGm 
StotGun 
SteeiTc 
StereVs 
Staketv 
Sulntrg 
SunEat 
SunWW 
Sunlit® 

Sun rat 
Sunrtwt 
Sunrtun 
Sutran 
Sven Cel 
Swedfw 
Srtvan 
Syntcpf 2X5 10X 
SyrSuPS XB 2X 


.IDe 20 

7 )S 4% 

% 

3021 3ft 

3ft 

2435 9ft 

8% 

1X0 4X 

9024 

25% 


37 4% 

4% 

220 7.1 

19 31% 

3! 

2X0 63 

1134% 

34% 


14ft 14ft 
44 64 

11 17 — 14 

3% 2ft— % 
6 4% + % 

3ft Pt+ K. 


% % + * 


26 + % 


31 — % 


XOe IX 
XS 9 


... ~ 3ft 4 — ft 
25 4% 4% 4ft + ft 
23611ft 11% 11% + ft 
408 7ft 4% 6ft— % 
259913% lift lift +lft 
20 1ft 1% l%— ft 
3ft 3ft 
« 7 + % 

3ft Sft- ft 
3% 3% 

% ft 
7ft 7% + ft 

W19ft 18% l»%7l% 
3829*4 296* 29ft + ft 
473 12 11% 11% + ft 

131 25ft 23ft 25ft +1% 


3% 
501 7ft 
54 3ft 
3% 
% 

392 7% 
363 4ft 


1880ft 10 10 — ft 


GACLa 275c 
Gambro X2e X 
GatwvBk 
G TW54P# .90 1UX 
GTet 5t>f 1X0 1DJ 
GenesB lXOa 2J 


Geodvn 

GlamlS 

GIO'H 

GoWCb 

GldFW 

Gotdale 

GtAMQ 

GrbERun 

GuarBn 


34 3ft 
152810% 
84523 
M2 Bft 
102 Oft 
7447 
40*13% 
. 441 6% 
Jle 18 2444022% 
961b 

XOe 17 42611% 
610 2% 
21715ft 
4817% 
5910ft 


3ft Sft 
7ft 10% 
22V* 22% 

av, jft 
9% 9ft 
4* 44 

13% 13% 
ift 6ft 
21% 22 
14ft 14ft 
9% 10% 
2ft 2ft 
15ft ISW 
14'4 77 
10% 10ft 


+ $ 
+ 14 
V ft 




— m 

+i% 
+ % 


+ % 


H 


HPSC 
Hoimlun 
HamOef 1.95 11X 
HarknO 


Harlvns 

Hartpns 

HowkC 

KawthF 

Heekln 

Hi-Pgrt 

HWivW 


X2I J 

J8r IX 
180 4J 


m 38 


HlmWL TOiOOC 
HlwdPk 1X0 7j 
HmFdGd 
HmFOMd XOe IX 
Kmecib 

HttATPi U0 TJX 
HorlzRs Xle J 
HstnOF 

HttnOpf 1J7 3&8 
HlrtctlTc 


721 10ft 
5% 
3317% 
403 1ft 
62 «% 
7 

11 5% 
230 

02616ft 

5 

2131 I 
682ft 
9623 
21814 
1 19% 
576212 
IK Vft 

41 3 u 

2096 1ft 
158 4% 
916 5% 


10 10ft + % 
5% 5% 

17% ink 
lft 1ft 
4% 4% + ft 
614 7 + ft 

Sit. 5% 

39ft 30 + ft 

15% 15% — 1 
5 5 

I 1% + 
42ft < 2ft 
22 22 -1 
13% 14 + % 

19% 19% 

10ft 12 +1ft 
Oft Oft 

4ft +1 
5ft— ft 


Sft 

Sft 


IDS s 

I PC 

IRE Fn 

IIIInMs 

(mark 

imtmun 

ImprBc 

imrea 

IncaRso 

indBkMi 

indSaS 

Indlnsr 

Ind Res 

InsllG un 

ICP^ 

InstCpS 

Into Bar 

intrSB s 

InlLte 

intAm 

in Dairy 


6X4 
11 11 
169 2ft 
493* 
40 3% 
149 5ft 
2055 IT 




1X4 UX 
180 48 


.12* U 


xai ix 

.IBa IX 


391 ... 
40 6% 
156X6 
28633% 
3376 2% 
10177% 
377 Vft 
263 9% 
238 Ift 
312ft 
16811% 
470 5ft 
1079 


44 84 

10% 11 + ft 

2% 2**— ft 
22ft 24 +lft 
3% 3% 

4ft Sft +lft 
10% 10ft + ft 

nv-* 

bft 4% + % 
15% 16 

31ft 31ft + ft 
1%) Ift- ft 
31% 34% — % 
9 9% + % 

9ft 9ft 
7ft lft— ft 
121* 12ft 
11% 11% + ft 
4ft 5 — ft 
76 79 +3 


OCMLta 

OKCun Xle SX 
OMICP 
OcWNeb 
OccuMd 

Oce-NY 88* IX 
OfLanfA 
Oft Log pf 
OIKntpf 1X2 5J 
OldNIB 

OtdRPDt 1X0 28 
OeenAr 
Got MSP 
Ovrslng 

Ovacppf 3X020QX 


2911 II 


,13ft 13g 


11 


2895 2ft 
159 7 6% 

f 3% 3 

25ft 24ft 
2% 1 

352 4ft 1% 

30135% 32% 
4415ft 15ft 
24242ft 40% 
1950 TOft 9% 
50 3% 3ft 
6 2 % 2 % 
18 lft lft 


^7* 


2ft . . 
7 + % 

2 — % 
25 + ft 

2% +1% 
4% +2ft 
35% +3 
15ft 

41% —1% 
10% + ft 
3% + ft 
2% 

lft — ft 


PCAint 

PNC pf 1X0 43 
PNC pro M0 A9 
PoclnlO 
PocifCr 
Pacowt 

PapCppf 2X0 98 

Patrkun 

PeanISh 

PeerCP 1X0 5X 

PeoGdwt 

PenlnFd 

PeapIBk 

PfetFIt 

PtHetvlB .14 IX 

Pttfein* .14 TX 

Ptirm un 

Pnotron 

Pierce 

Piero 

PltTBr t 
PtalnsR 

PinRspt U0 15J 

Plycotf 

P0394 

PretnFn X8 5 2 
PrsnICo 


16% 

3 

26 

Bft 

7Vb 

20 

% 


PraGM lXSelOX 
ProsStv Ul* 5 l9 


303 0% 6 

1526 25ft 
5526% 26% 
6% 6% 
24418 
138 3% 
14526ft 
4 Bft 
29 7% 

tT* 

IDft 10ft 
4517 16ft 
1012 12 
141 Bft 8% 
873 Sft Sft 
87 5% 5 

134 4% 3% 
6947 45 

2279 ft 
15017% 15ft 
106 lft 1 
6 8 % 8 % 
2 7 7 

30122ft 19ft 

13 12% 

433 7ft 6% 


6 — ft 
2SV* + ft 
M%— U 
a% 

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24ft + ft 

8ft 

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39 
% 

IflVi 

17 +ft 

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Sft 

5%— ft 
4% ♦ ft 
46 +1 


PresAIr 

Prism 

ProMed 

PrnvBc 

PulnTr 

PyfmO 


13WW6 15% 


J28 BX 


1XB 2X 


15831% 18% 
lgf 6 5ft 
373 7ft 7% 
32 3% 3% 
53 S3 
842 42 

78 3% 3 


17. +lto 
lft + ft 
Bft + % 

22ft +3 
12% + ft 
7ft + ft 
IS -tXft 

soft +1» 

Sft 

7%— % 
3% 

53 

42 

3% + % 


QuebcSJ 

Quincy 


31 2ft 29b 2ft + ft 
258916% 15% 15ft— ft 


RHNB X*9 J 31 20 19% 20 *■ ft 

RodaEJ 182 3% Site Sft— U 

Radaun 7110 9% 9%— % 

Radian 182 3% 3% 3% 

RalnrR 84e 5X 296 8ft Bft 8ft 


RankO ,17a 26 1070 6% 6 


6 — 


TELOH 

TRVB 

TSO 

TVX 

TocVlia 

TaroVt 

TavfrDv 

TCtktjD 

TeehOv 

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Tear co 

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Tar uto 

TmNLb 

TriSlar 

TrStrwt 

TrStrun 

TrlbSwb 

TricoPd 

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202 Dtp 


3X6B338 




2%- 


648 Oft 9% 

3W 2ft 2ft 
M83 8% Sft 
68312% 12 
114 3% 3ft 
402 3ft Zft 
215 2% 2% 

304 3ft 3ft 
*98 6% 5% 

37 lft iJk _ _ . . 
158317ft 15ft 17ft +2ft 
T 6634ft 32% 34ft 40% 

X2r 12X40215 

*0 57 4610ft 10ft 10ft 


n —v* 

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80*247 


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ift 


t 


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428 » 

253 «tt 
156 5ft 
51 10ft 


5 5ft + ft 
2 2ft— ft 
2ft 3% + IS 
7ft. 7% 

4ft 4ft— ft 
5ft 5ft 
9% 10 — % 

sS 3 ^ 22 ^* 

20 9 8% 8%— % 

998101% 10ft 10ft 
Ift Ift Ift 

7ft 8% + % 
2% 2ft + ft 
9% II +1% 
1% 1% 

50 SO 

. . 8% 9ft + % 
32X6% 3b% 36% 

143 8% 71* 8ft 
<8 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft 


1868 8% 
*W 2ft 
35611 
101 1 % 
11450ft 
797 9% 


Unifiwt 

U Count 1X0 AX 
UFdBk M V 
UnFnd I 
UFlreCs 1X0 4X 
UnHrng 

UttBkNJ lXOa 20 
unSvMo 80 2X 
USvAdpf 

us Beef 

US In tc 
USMee 
USFHav 
US PI wl 

US Saar . 

UVaBk pf 175 63 


9^ 5 


57 7 5% 

. 5745ft *5ft 
15W2«ft ZJ 
813 13 

~ 26 25 

. lft Ift 
361V] 61 
814% 14ft 
1571 2ft 1% 
35827% 27ft 
242815ft 14ft 
589 5 4ft 
2312% 12ft 
5 5 

550 SO 
43% 43ft 


7 +1% 

45ft 
ZT* +1 
13 

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lft 

61ft + ft 
14ft 

!%— ft 
27% + % 
M%— % 
41* 

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S 
50 

43ft- ft 


X3elLl 


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VM Sft 
VQOlRS 
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VdllAsc 
Vetera 
VTFedt 
Vtninxg 
vt com 
VlCtSwt 

VI cf Mist 80b 28 
view Ms 

VaFst XD* 17 
Vista Ra 80a 18 
VolunBn 93 17 


« 
1734ft 
9435 
38514ft 
1567 6% 
333 


7 SS-. 1 , 

8612% 

nS 


17% II + % 
5ft ift + ft 
7% 7% + ft 
34ft 34ft 
33% 34ft +% 
13% lift +1% 
5ft 

\ V-' 

16% 17 + % 
9% 111* +Tft 
lift lift— % 
29 29 

25 25 


W 



K% 17ft + % 
24% 29% +1% 
2ft 29* — ft 


Sft" 4* 

28 30 +4% 

7ft 7ft- % 
10 % 11 % +1 
71% 25ft +H» 
lift 12 +ft 
25 25 

BU 8% 

34ft 31ft +3 
T% 1% 

3% 3% 

4ft 4ft 


Zeta 

Zeus 


53 5% 
IT TO 


5 5% 

9% 9%— % 


tan MS Mexico 
tan TO Banco NedoooJ Obrae 
dm l» Comtoton Fed Electric 
tan 19 Nbdoaol FTncottero 
dm IH P*m*>P*lraleaiMtodc 
dm HB Pwnre P etratere Mw Jc 


7% 78 Jon 

I 16Ndv 
M kHAer 

II VOMIT 
7 7* Jan 

It V9P*b 


IH 

IDTCi 

97% 


7X1 7X1 7X5 
4Xt 430 T73 
7JT 089 691 
SH 16X3 
L74 703 
643 1L19 


MISCELLANEOUS 


tan IH Area BaoUng Cara 
dm TO lad Mtoin D*v Bk Irra 
tan TOXeradEjcrijangrBa* 
tan its Matovsto 
tan TO Motonla 
fin ISO M*90t Flnonc* 
dm 19 Mesoi Finance 
dm 19 MtsctFlnoricr 
dm IH Tram Enron HaturGoi 


I TISai 1CDVS 
79. VM 99% 
TWVONPr 100% 
1% V0 May 102% 
7ft VS Jun 100% 
iKVtJon 99% 
■VkV* Jon 105% 
714 V7 Any HOft 
I vi Now me 


446 7X4 
7X7 7-« 7J7 
7,19 7X3 
7 88 L03 
78S 781 
486 4X1 .4X0 
7X0 7X1 7X0 
7.H 7XV 
7 x* 471 7X6 


NETHERLANDS 


dm 398 Baxter Trowynot ltd) 7%V*Fyb 

tan TO Cammodera Ptaontt 7ftVlJan 

tan TO Erita IheestaKTtooeavl 7%HAue 

tan 19 Haoaovmi 7% VS Jun 

dm TO NaatriandttCanote ■ WDcC 

tan 75 PnNseGtaarbnnpFto N«Ok 

tan 29 PPWt»6( u *(lannWr>» SftVIDac 

dm TO PUBtosGtoeCtaateyn IftVJJua 

dm 2H ttabebankNedcritaid 7HV40d 

dm U0 Ml IMI FtataKI tfi-VAmr 

tan TO 9vll mil Finance M 79 Fab 

NEW ZEALAND 


TO 


92ft 

108ft 

101% 

101 % 

MM 

W 

MM 

104ft 

100% 

100ft 


7X0 7.H 

*j4 .an 

7X* 7J3 7X2 
tat 7.14 
671 5J9 7J0 
429 987 

12J 3X7 

4X4 713 

693 - 7 JO 

5X1 564 Aft 
662 651 673 


dm 29 New Zealand 
tan HO Me* Zealand 
tan TO NewZeoknt 
tan 2H Naw Zealand 
tan Ml New Zealand 
tan HO New Zealand 
tan 200 New Zealand 
tan 200 New Zealand 
tan 19 Now Zealand 
tan 90 NowZietand 
tan 250 N*w Zealand 
dm 29 imw Zealand 


5% 76 Mtt 
7ft it Mav 
7% 76 Nov 
MTT JOB 
7 Y7F«t> 
9% 77 Jul 
7ft 77 See 
7ft 76 Jul 
«%7» Oct 
9% 79 Dec 
• 7% VI Aar 
7% T1 Oct 
NORWAY 


TO 

181 

102 % 

T01 

100ft 


10t% 

IBM 

104ft 

110 % 

Wft 

HZ% 


LU 825 

LM SM 7X3 
<76 474 751 

U | ■ Alt 

633 619 697 
552 875 

407 700 

400 7 61 

6fi 7J9 

463 UO 

467 7X7 

4X7 7X6 


tan 9 ArtkdOoSuontadPn 10 77 Dec 

dm 73 ArttaOs3unndotVyr* 10% 79 Jut 

to 59 BeroenOty 7%79Fwb 

dm 30 OenNarskalndustrabk 6% 79 Jun 

tan 12S Den Naraka intaerfrtok * VOMoy 

dm S» Noise* HraBteWaranlt 7% VMur 
to 68 Nona Hypoteidomta 4 Vi Nov 

ad Z2S NaraesKommatatoank MV7Mtr 

dm 19 NaraaKemrounothank 6%VtJtai 

to TO Naraea KommamHftnk 7 7*Aar 

dm TO Noraee KnminwotOQh Pn 7ft 79 Acs 

tan zjo NaraeiiCdmiramotow* 6 l*Doc 

dm TO Nor— » to nrau nato unh * VC Aua 

dm 19 Norge* KemrounaBMk 7ft VI Jul 

to 150 Haroes komraonotoure 9%V4 Dk 

to TO Norpte* S H Jun 

tan 200 Norptpe 6 J»JJa* 

dm 19 NorSMBae 7ft 71 Due 

dm 1® HarseaCe* 7 7»Jul 


IBM 

10**k 

>09ft 

TOOft 


m 


139 *89 

9.0 1036 

7X6 696 7X1 
457 MS 472 
60 421 403 
649 4J9-7.U 


TO 

raft 

102ft 


HI 

107% 


786 4X2 U2 

3X9 389 6.17 
631 3X3 4X6 
7.13 699 7 JO 
408 3X6 406 
SXS 5X9 899 
7X9 7X2 788 
7X9 7X3 7X7 
4X9 4X9 7X2 
407 609 CB 
407 451 7J0 
AH 877 601 


dm 158 Argentine- - 

dm IN Brazil 

to 139 Brazil 

•n 19 Brazil 

dm MO Brazil 

an 150 »roii 

On 2S0 Venezuela 

tan ISO uaneenete 

to ISO Venezuela 

dm TO Bna (arinerttne) 

to TO Brtcnrorii) 

dm TO end# [brazil! . 

dot 19 Caran Enere Soo Paula 

tan TO Came Vote DeRioOoe* 

dm 150 Etttrotres _ 

to in Ektrabra 
dm 19 Etetntor re 
dm 19 Lhnn^ervfcae BreD 
tan 725 LtetthSerriCM Brazil * 
tan IB PWt u tt u* 
tan 125 Fe t udnui 


n 7* Oct 
MVMP 
7% V0 Jul 
1 VffOe* • 

Bft VI Jun 
8 VSJul 
7% 78 Joe 
7ft 2 Now 
.0 VJ Jun 
SOUTH AMERICA 

7ft 79 May -97ft JS ffi em 

■ 5%5SS- tSSS g on S 

*"*«« * ^ TXjg 

6ftV0Hay 95% iJ 

sse '8% ^ w g 

iftSS? *8* 

6% 7* Apr 99ft. lfl 
7 77 Feb 
7 77 Sap 
6% 1* Mmr 
0ft VOJoo 
7 78 Ota 
■ TP Od 
SPAIN 


. K S«3 

•fft 7J0 677 

UDft 03* 821 866 
raft 769 8X2 7J] 
IDO 7X9 7X7 800 


dm 2SS Sootn 
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dm 2H9Mn 
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dm 1H Automata 
on HD Autogtota 
to TO r 
tan HO i 

to TO 1 

tan « Renftlted Nackaat 
dm TO Rente Red NaCtonai 
tan TO Rente Red Motaonol 
dm TO TMetonteo Nactam 


Miss 

7ft VS May 
7ft 78 Feb 
I 7*00 
6% 77 Oct 
Bft 7* Feb 
8 77 Joe 
7lb 12 Jan 
XftHMev 
W V2MOV 
7ft VS May 
«% tel Jim 


HD 


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102 46* 3X1 

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103 Lit 3X7 7X7 


103 7X5 

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M3 7X9 
m 7X2 


786 

7X8 

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Amr Xerartri 


te, Mol Frier HOI UteCorr 


SI Sra euroomvmr Bare 

dm 2»g«nM? 

fin lffl msss, 

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dm H0&2S™ 

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tan lffl Eunrtlnte 

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to IH lntenA»wggPyS 

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SfeTBFW Wft 573 590 853 

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ift 79 Feb mt u in 


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. W% 577 TJX 

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105ft 464 7X0 

T0U4 093 7X1 

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SUPRANATIONAL 


dm TO African Develop Bo* 
tan HO African Develop Bonk 
dm HO African Dtuata Bank 
dm HO African Devotes Balk 
to IH Asian Derate Bank 
dm IB, 
tan to ; 
to 200, 

to in t 

to 200 Allan Devotes Bank 
am TO Alton Derate Beak 
to loo Arias DrvitoaBceikPn 
to 19 Arian Derate Bank 
to 19 Arian Derate Batel 
dm ISO Aston Derate Bank 
tan TO ANa> Derate Bata Pp 
to 200 Aalan Oewtto Sank 
dm zoo Aste Derate Bank 
tan 2H ASte Derate Bank 
to 200 Aetea Dewcte Bank 
tan 200 Ariaa Dewete Btaik 
to TO Council Of Europe 
to HO Council Of Eon** 

tan 60 Count® W Europe 
to 9 Council Of Europe 
to uo Conned Ot E u ra n s 
to TO council Of Europe 
tan 125 CoundlOtEurape 
to >00 Count* Of Europe 
to TO Council Ot Europe 
to TO Couidt Ot Europe 
dm UO Council OtEuopo 
tan HO CotsicUOt Europe 
to TO COuncTOI Europe 
tan 125 Coend l Of Eiaape . 
tan 160 Ceuadl Of Europe 
dm 150 CouncflOt Europe 
to 19 CoundlOtEseape. 
dm 19 Council Of europe-: . 
tan 300 CouadI Of Europe 
to 19 Caunoaotesrape. 
dm 15B CoundlOtEurape 
dm TO Ecs Eure Coat A Steel 
dm 75 Era Euro Coal ASM 
dm 125 Ecs Euro Ctad ASM 
tan IH Ecs Euro Coat ASM 
tan UO Era Coro Coal ASM 
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to 19 eaeura Cota ASM 
tan 19 EcsEuro Coal A Steel 
dm 151 Ecs Euro Cota ASM 
tan 7X Era Euro Goat A9M 
dm TO Ec* Euro Coal ASM 
dm IH Ecs Caro Cool 6 SM 
tan 159 Ecs Eero Coal ASM 
to IH EaEinCoaiAStPp 
to 19 Ecs Earn Cota AJM 
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to 19 Ea an Cota ASM ■ 
dm 2H Ecs Eure Cota A Steel ■ 
tan 9 Pa Euro Cool ASM 
dm IB Era Eva Cool A Bod 
tan 29 Ecs Eure am ASM 
to 2*0 CocEwapi 


7% 74 Jun 
1 . 77 Nov 
10 WOd 
* V] Apr 
Sft 78 May 
7% tel Aug 
Hft-BIOd 
10 VOMoy 
Sft VO Nov 
7ft VI Mar 
M VIAar 
7ftV10d 
9% VJAsr 
*ft V2AUP 
' 0ft V2 NOV 
8% VS Jun 


744 

20* 

9.71 

7X5 

-85* 

7Ji 

985 

981 

7JI 

■79 

9J2 

7J7 

19 

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7X1 

7X4 

7X1 

789 

7X0 

420 

783 


tan 29 EaeEurapEt 
to (00 EecEtUngpH 


101ft 4X7 
TO 4X7 
109ft 7.M 
103ft 7X6 
99ft 5X2 
m% 48* 

113% 46* 

706ft 834 
136 490 

103ft 699 
107ft US 
vnft 7.12 
1C8ft 787 
HOft ZX2 
in 7.0 

103 7JS 

Ift V3 Nov "107ft 7X3 
7% V* Apr l#3ft 7.77 

I V*Seo IQSft 7-17 

4ftV50d 97 493 

7ft V7 Apr >004 7.H _ _ 

6% *17 Nov. H0% 611 683 621 

ift tel MOV TO &J0 6X9 6T3 

7 H Jot 100ft 476 483 697 

Ift tel Jut 105 599 7JK 

6ft V8 Nov 308% 415 43 T 623 

7ft tel Mar 102ft 6« 5LB TB7 

7ft tel Od HOft 452 597 7X6 

7ft V0 Dec USft UO 756 *X2 

10 VI Apr 107% 03* 789 9X1 

IDft VI Ocf 108% 131 758 9X1 

10 V2 Feb HOft 7X0 7X4 945 

(ft -92 Jon 181% 7X2 6X9 _ 

8 V2Jta 103-780 - 737 

Bft V2 NOV HOft 783 78* 7X9 

7ft V3 Feb HSk 7J6 7X2 2X4 

5ft V3 Jul 105 781 7X5 7,__ 

Sft 73 NOV m 788 7J9 7X6 
Sft <W Feb 105% 733 7M 3X2 

7ft V* Dec 102% 7X1 7X1 7 JO 

7%-VSMay 103% 7X1 t98 7X6 

Mk 75 Ocf 971*. 698 671 

7ft te* May m% 4X2 4X8 781 

7ft 16 Od 183% 391 AH . 7X3 

9ft -87 Jan KXft S67 9J3 

6ft "57 Jut 101% 5X5 5X0 <4t 

7 tei Jan . 101ft 6U 8H 691 

ift tel Apr 100ft 625 418 487: 

4 tel New 101 ft LM v 59L- 

H( 794 60 939 

raft 407 7X1 

Bft 5X4 SB SB 

K5ft 653 • .75 

TO SO* 7.0. CM 

TOW 693 690 A* 

ten* 793 7X6 778 

VO* Z36 7Xt 7X4 

100ft 6J6 "491 

H2ft 7.H 7X2 U* 

TO 03 795 

199% LH 733 Lft 

Drift 7X2 73 TS! 

»» S **-&: 

H5I* .737 , 782 

90» 


to IH Sweden Pp 
to 75 Swfto 
, , dm OT Sweden 
H tan HI Swe d en P» 
dm 290 Stream 
tall 159 tn atae 


Vft tei Dec 
73b VO Jan 
M-VDXer 

■ Vo Aua 
M -91 Mar 

• 7 VI Apr 
Ift V2 Jon 
79k -RM 
7 V! Dec 
7ft tel Joe 
7ft tel May 
9ft V* Jan 

■ V* Noy 
7 *?s Jul 

• H Jon 


■^KecCwapEcuoamCtan 
to H0 Era Eerop Ecanwn Com 
to 2H E*c Eurpp Econera Coat 
to IH Eee Eureo Eagnam Cam - 
to 150 gee Cons ren n re n Cbm 
tan MB EAEuronlfwaMBrak 
to HO Etb Eursp Inrari Dcnfc 
tan TO EA EtaOP tnwdBrak 
to HO Bb Cot in rata Bonk 
tan HO EteEUrap loyal Btaik 
to I9D BA EtatePlavraf Btaik 
to Ui EA conp Inraet Bank 
to 2H EAEorep Invest Bonk 
to UB EA Eursp inra ri Bare 
tan IH EAEUrapImMAaak 
to SB EAEarap Inrari Bade 
to 300 e% Eton Inrari Bo* 
tan 3H EtbEurop Invest Bonk 
tan 2SB EA Estop inrari Bonk . 
dm 290 EAEwrap inrari Boto 
tan HI EA Estop tmneri Bank 
dm 3HEA Earap laveri Bank 
dm’JH EAEaroA Inrari Bank 
dm 29 QbEarap Inrari Batar 
dm TO EAEuraa Inrari Book 
tan TO EA Eton Invatf Bank 
dm, 200 EA Cu r u p Inrari Bata 


J ten Apr 
71b te* Nov 
I vt Nov 
7%te5Fbb 
7ft V6 Nov 
6ftte7lep 
7fttekMor 
TfttekCd 
4ft 17 Mar 


nm- .mi .. » 


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200 

Ri ta EA Estop Inrari D an k 
Ito 2H EA Eurap inrari Bank 
to -Hi EAEarae Inrari Bank 
M 2H EA Eerap Inrari Bata 
to HO EAEunv Inrari Bata 
tan 250 Eft Earap Invest Bank 
to 250 Eli Eurap Inrari Bank 
dm 210 EAEerap Inrari Bank 
dm HO Eft Ctota Inrari Bank 
tan HB Eft Euros invent Bata 


r 7.T7 629.3X7 
TJB . -7X1 

97% 41*. 468 

107% 1-51 IH 7J7 

in 5X4 334 7XB 

HOft 605 5J9 447 

TOft 59 531 .596 

HI 43t AH. 680 

7 tei Jut 191ft 42* 591. 6H 

» 19 Feb 199 477 9.17 

7ft te* Jim -Htft .4X7 7J2 

6 19 Aug UBft SH 561 194 

ift te* Nov TO* 7J1 . 017 

rx-HMa- 90% 571 4X8.536 
« VOOct 99 63* LM 

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6ft VI Jan N9H 6*4 - 4X| 

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8 VI Dec U5ft 6M 7 M 

H V2 Feb link 785 899 

MteZAtay ->86% 7XJ 7JK 

9%te2AUB IH 789 ' 0X0 

IHV20d HSft 7X9 7XJ 

S% V2 Dec MS 7.13 771 

7ft YJFeb «B% 7X9 - 7X0 

7% SOMta- 103% -7X5" 7X1 

■TVbVSMoy TO IN TH 

I VI Allt • ® ZU 782 

8% VJSep 706% 7.17 . 7X6 

0 A6Mar T05 7.17 782 

IV* Jen IBS 7.1* 782 

«%te*Auo 194% 737 . . J7J. 

7*te*Od Wft 7J7 7J* 

.TftKDec . Htft 698 - HI 


am tO Nordic Ui vestment Bk . 
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to 13) world gaek FP. . 

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dm 200 World 8«* P«> 
tan ** ftbriri Bare 

£2 2S2S22S* . 

dm 250 Wurld Bta* 

MSSSg.* . 

to 7H World Bta* 
to200 WHW* " 
dm TO world Bank Pp 
dm 2» WoridBank . 
to MB world Bonk PP 
to 400 vwnd Bnta ^ 
dm MO MWMStalfcPP- - 
tan HO WarMBtokFP 

to 250 World Bota 

tan HO WtfriBa* 
dm 2D0 World Bonk Pp 

to 200 vwrfd Bank 

to 3B wnrHBto 
to 2» world BOA 
to 3H world Bonk 
to HO world Book pp 
to ISO world Bta* Pp 
to 280 World Btof - 
to 2H WaridBnk 
to 360 woridBataj. . . . . 

dm 2H werMBatai - 
to SHIMrMBaak- 
to 400 WDridBta* 


7ft VO Jet 
IftVOOd 

7ft vt Mar 

Hft V3f*pv 
9 *97 Anr 
TAVZJta 
TftVtMor 
tft^Se* 

6%V2Na« 

7 teTJtal 
4% 17 Jim 
t%VHuv 
4% 98 Jon 

8 te* Feb 
B te*Jta 
f% tr Jut 
Sft VI Fib 

W -telbbr 

7% VI Aar 

bniVTMuv lUft 7.H 

9 V3AW HI 7X1 
«% VZ Jal 705ft 2.7* 

7ft V2 Nov Wft 7X1 
7ft VZ Nov MB 7.V 
8U.V3JOO Wft 781 

3 VI Mat .Ml LU 

7% VI AW W 7X3 
■% tel Aim «r ub 
S ft -91 Dec -H6 . 7X4 
7ft V* Dae Wft ZU 

TteVSJta Wft 7J7 

6%1t Jan MAC 41* _ 

.8 IbJfld HI 3X5 193 7M 

n 14 Mar JttH. «0J *71 

7ft 14 Jan HZ 1X1 0X3 7X5 

7nte*Dte H2 5*7 3X1 7S 

7 17 JOB - IN SM 6H 

4% -87 Mar- W% SH 442 6X3 

lft V MOT W« SXD * 63? 

MteBMDr MT% 5X0 LO 69 

■fttelJun HC% 439 ATT 

X HAM HU 571 - 597 

7% teR Aim m - 6*r 752 

4% tel Dec UBft AH 62! 

T%te9P*b: TO Ul 75! 

7ftH5e* Sri6 -681 751 

7ftVlJra H*ft, 4X9 7J* 

»V8Fri> 90% 6X9 635 502 
7ft 90 APT Wft UB 7.38 

tC VBMmr 112ft 445 1X9 

7ft VtJM H<% 63S IM 

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to TOtnflStandtadElKlrt . 7%-WMar 

to TOO rtrAnmn 9% VLAira 

to 200 UtAaBBa ■ 7- VI Jan 

to TO rtf Cmgmrikn . - - 7 HJaa 

tan HrMcdBamranamceco mtoou 

tan TO McdonaUi Finance Cn 7ft V! Dec 

■ __ Oo TftHJul 

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tan M0 PhUlp Morris lira Ch 8V. V0 May 

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to TO R*ynotdsRta% 7ft V* Jon 

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tan HB Stril lne wtidtireprira - 7KV4Mar 
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Wft 7X3 7X5 

107ft 751 617 

WSft 686 499 

Wft 690 7X7 

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CONVERTIBLE BONDS 


Anri Socerfly 


Price -Ctafr.P trt n a —Ceey. Price iririF- prauw, 


Akzn2980 H8JB 

AfinutmeCtadf DX6 6ft V3 Jan 
Ahtonelnfl 4% 27 MCJ- 

BanajSvtawa Hallo 6 VlOd 
Bbc Braeei Berarl 5X1 MVJDec 
Bbc Brarai BaverflOXO MkVSDec 
Bsn *ft 28 Jan 

Cadbury SChira rani I TJODec 
□bo-Gefty O/i 2JX) 4 V4Jul 
Crotai Sudtt BriatiB 4% tel Dec 
Croon Strew Brinmas Aft -93 Dec 
Eledrowutt Flnaott 3 VIJbi 
H coporare 3482 MHAlte 
Id FbmoeelXJ 9ft WOd 

Inttcupe Bermuf3X7 I VSAoa 
loterd»OroJXO SVSVOOct 
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Meet Have r? y 405 7 telJai 

Rta*OrwJnbOt**Xk fliVJFtb 
aRanStn 5 VSDec 
[5X0 *ftV70ec 
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.. .. . .. 4ft V* Jun 

Softs Bonk Co O/i 6% 91 Dec 
Ub» IhC ta abra ro l 1 XO iftteJMoy 
Ubt (panama) 15X0 5 VAtov 


EUROPE 


122 

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103 


l Sep 6i maturity M I2TX0- he *9X08 


14 Jan r mafurfty 

1 See 49 maturity 

1 DecS! maturity 

» 1JM3T mriaritv 

T3S IFebU maturity 

lOPft J Jon 16 2 Aer 

112ft 15 Jan M ID6C9 
28* 3 5eo7T maturity 

US U Joe 77 maturity 

119 t Oct 79 matoritv 

II* 17 Oct S3 29 Jun 90 

H I Jon 69 mat urit y 

H7VS U Oct 88 10CJ99 
■lft UFeMl "15 Jul 95 

135 2 Apr 79 maturity 

1J2 1 Oct S3 mofurttv 

jn T3 MoyBS S3 AprOO 

122ft 2 Jon 65 2APT99 
3* Feb 7* maturity 


001579 

S 12821330 

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12003/8 

iSd 

PlO-0t»X92 

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91250 

512*3 

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PU5-P757X7& 


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4X3 581 
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tU* 114 
4X2-L7Z 
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87X4 151 
2X4- 282 
1X2- 2JO 


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AilnemrieCa 
BrtdearianeTIreCo 
Canon lee 


CKzen yrardi Co 

FulibuLM 

KltndJt CrodB C6r* 
Jvc Victor CoawJcM 
Kotoo Corporation 
KooCorporatton 
KomboUSMCo 
KB*W rata Photo 
Marta Co Lht 
Maria Mofor Caro 
MtftubftMEftcfrCa 



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t Sop 18 m aturit y 
1 Jun 77 maturity 
1 Feb 88 maturity 
JAPAN 

124 38 Apr 84 22 Mar 99 
127ft 1 Mar 12 20 Dec H 
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117% 34 Jun 05 10 Mar® 

V 22 Apr 15 JOMar " 

Wft I ftfcjyW 23 MOT .._ 

*0ft 14 Jot II 23Sep*6 YMTZJ8- TO7J41 
taft lJJanB HMcrH Y2222 - 2B77870 


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S3 

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t£ft HUertS 3M»0B *eoi/7 

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D Ubfl73 maturity ■ S5ZI/4 

Kft UOan maturity 173 UB 

» 1 Dec 67 matoritv 0SX00 

ISSopK mtawfly . - UM/I 
1 Jut 71 mqtwBy 517172 

1 Mor 72 maturity 5227/1 

] Apr 73 maturity 138 

1 Aw 7« ‘mofurttv .5223/4 

20Od® mafurtry Slif/I 


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5% -DDK 

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5 Feb 16 BMftnUy 
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99ft UAey® maturity 
91 ISDkH maturity 
f«ft *5eo £5 maturity 
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99 1 Aor i* mat u rity 

JTVf 4MOTB1 metwtty 
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iMpy® moeurtty 
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l.Nw® 15 April 


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99ft Jl Oku motorttv 


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Caav.Ytds 

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Marine MtdkmdJSJO 5 teBMey 
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Mitta Co rnttJUS 7 97 Dec . 
Motwe g InH 2 882 _ 5 HI Jen' 

Moron Enemy OSS 8 V5Noy 
Moraao Jo 0/428X7 4ft 17 Jun 


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im ?iSSS K- 

171 IMavH M 
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HMovn maturity 
HAprft maturity 
30 Morn maturity. 
IfebJB maturity 
JAue 49 maturtr 
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% 2Aprj0 maturity 
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wft maturity 

m SSE? moturtty 

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Tricera OO Gas 2208 lft' 

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Vtacran Irffl locH.IL mtOJU 
Warper Lambert 2U3 4ft 17 Apr 
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mrper Lambert 36*8 8ft 98 Aug 
Xerae Cora 674 ■ J NDbc 


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42A5 7.13 
14X5 3X9 
1437 450 
209 205 
Lfl. 429 
7.16- 4X9 
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7U37 2X7 
57X1 2X7 
56X0 207 


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3U3 339 
11X3 383 
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31X1 
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55X2 471 
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251 JM 6X7 
251- 3X9 
2222 210 
30X3 
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2783 89 


13X4 410 
LS5- 157 
156 2X9 
39X7 7X7 
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9X8 7X7 
Ul- 


HIGHEST CURRENT YIELDS 

On convertibles having a conversion premium 
of les» than 10 %. : 


HX4 417 
UK J4 
153- ISO 
1485 XI 
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V. •- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


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MINISTRY FOR THE NATIONAL ECONOMY 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 
INTERNATIONAL INVITATION TO TENDER 
f. N P 3766 

,1' The Gafca Phosphates Company hereby launche s an International Invitation 
r lo Tender wiih a view to purchasing me following machinery, for exploits- 
■- lion of the phosphate quarries in the basin of Galas: 

1. eight (S) qre^wheded loaders, 375 H P, 10 tomm 
_ 2. six (6) damper trucks, 32 metric tonnes 

f 3. ten (10J. drilling; m a chines 
4. ten (10) adaplM compressor* 

'• The companies interested in the above may obtain a copy of the Schedule of 
1 Conditions against payment ol 50 DT (fifty Dinar) from the ’'Service 
General, 9 me dti Rovaume. d* Arable Sfoudile. 1035 Tunisia 
•* Tenders in the French language must reach "Monsieur le Direct eur des 
Achats de la C.P.G. 2130 Metlanui (Tunisia)" before 10.00 hours on the 5th 
. December 1985- 

;.i The -outer envelope must be marked as I allows: 

"Appeld’oHre N P 3766 

Ea^wide Csrrierw 

Ne paa ouvrir avaiil'le 6/12/85.” 

The envelopes will be opened at 10.00 hours on the 6th December 1985 at 
. the "Direction des Achats a MetiaouP . 

Any lender receive d by telex or after the above mentioned dale will not be 
considered- • • • 


REPUBftJK TUNE5IEN 

MINIStERIUM FUR VOLKSW1RTSCHAFT 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 

MIQNATHINA^ JHKSCfflHBffllG HP. 376G ’ 

Die Cofsa Rboapbaiea Companv feudal mil der Ahaicfat, Bexghaumascfainene fOr 
die Unierta^WhJieasanfi dcr Plwsphatenjhen bn Calsa zu kaiien, zu tntema- 
Lkmalen lieferanpeboten f6r rocfeJaiaide Aiteriatung aufc . 

* l.a^{B)hlW»«ndfteU^»3raHP, lOToimen . 

. 2,iwdw (6) AulMh5U*r. 32 metrisdbe Tom» 

V 3.ad»(10)Bohru»sehin«i 

4. zebu (lO) adaptierte Komprwswea 

m mm ■ I >1 ■ ^minlLnkaflan k’AmVT) WBP W 7lMltHlI (L ■ 


, Sumna- von 50 Dinar {fanf^Dom) vom Service Gesml, 9 niedu Rnyaumede 
rArahh? Swuditc, 1035 Tunesien. 

. AiMbote. in fransosicher Sprache rraiaen Monsieur te DbkIW to Adas de 

hi <TG ?1^> Mcflsnni (Timegqtr sfatestens am 5- Dtgendter 1965 vor 10.00 
Uhr voriMfsen- Der Siksmu Linschlag ist wieJofe m beediriftec: 

"Appel d’oSre IS P 3766 

F.noinn de Carracrcg 

Nenaj otmir.fn“t le 6J2.1985* . 

‘ bit UmjcW^ werdan am 6. Deaeniber um 1000 Uhr in der TSmaion des 

/ rtWirifliiehe Angehote konn» nick hertek- 

-ai-htipi wenlen. _ • • 


,-•* 


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TV- 


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Arab Bank Limited 

bringing our worlds together 


For over fifty five years now the Arab 
Bank has been working to bring our 
worlds together. A truly international 
network with more than 80 worldwide 
branches and affiliates, the Arab Bank 
works literally around the clock to 
perform services for its clients, to 
strengthen economic relations between 
the Arab countries and the outside 
world and to provide an insight into the 
complex and lucrative Arab markets. 
Our branches and affiliates span four 
continents: Asia; Africa; Europe and 
America with key offices in all of the 
world s major money centres.We offer 
a full range of international banking 
services. Demand and time deposit 
accounts. Trade and project finance. 
Medium and longterm credit. Foreign 


exchange services. Corporate and 
merchant banking. Correspondent 
banking and important advisory 
services. 

Quite naturally, our main business is 
Arab business. The majority of our 
offices are concentrated in the Middle 
Eastern markets and our branch man- 
agers are experts in all markets and their 
distinctive differences.We are amongst 



the largest financial institutions in 
our area with over $12 billion in assets, 
decades of growth and contactsthrough- 
out the Arab world. 

As the world gets smaller and markets 
more competitive, the Arab Bank is 
always there to give you that edge in 
Arab markets. 

If you are considering negotiating any 
business in the Middle East why not 
contact us first? - You will be pleased 
with our expertise and advice. 

London (01) 6067801 
Paris (01) 3593434 
Zurich (01) 2213035 
Athens (01)3255401 
New York (212) 7159700 
Singapore 5330055 


sttrssg ex xrxessses 























OTC Comakdored trading for week ended Friday. 


Stskain Net 

IKK High LOW Close ohm 

(Continued from Page 15) 



Sol** In Net 

100* High Low Close ChUe 

88 4Vs 3ft 4. 

33362BW 27ft 28 'm + ft 

340 4ft 4ft 416 

410 13K 13 IJ — ft 
218 TV, 711 7ft + ft 


HHOIIT 

H80 JO M 
HCC JJ4 .7 
HCW .10 1.9 
HEI T « 

HEIMn 

hm Am 

Hoch Co 24 .9 

Hobor s 

Boo co 

Hudson 

HomOII .10 J 

Homnd 

HonwCo 

Honvln M 1.1 
HorpG i 24 U 
MrHNt 1.72 5X 
HrtfSIs 2X0 15 
Harvln s 

Hoftiws JO 2J 
Hawser JO 12 
Hovrtv J6 Z4 
HnwkB .141 
Hlia-S s 
h tines s 
Himin 
Hffhdvn 

HctiuA S .14 .« 

HctiwB S JR J 

Heist C 

HetenT 

Helix 

Hemlec 

HtrirOF .920 14 

HerllEn 

HerltFd 

Herlen 

Hetro 

HlberCo 1 JXO 4J 

Hlckam 

HSftPIO 

HfttllSu 

HtghlNI 

Hogan 

KolmO 1X0 4X 
HmBOfl .02 27 
HmFAII t 
HmFFI 70e 17 
HmFRk 
HrnFAi 
Hmeclt 
HmaSL 

Honlnd M 13 
Hoooer M 3J 
Hoover 170 18 
HrznAIr 
Horzlnd 
HwBNJ 

HwrdB 1.13a 47 
HwngTg 

HuntJB TOO J 
Hnlgln 

HnlpB S .84 3^ 


144 4ft 3ft 
10035 18W 17ft 
75 Bft BU 
2037 5ft 4ft 
1103 4*6 4ft 
42 4 3ft 
2325 7ft 6ft 
127 27 

381 17 16ft 
336 4ft 4ft 
654 3lk 24 
195919ft 18ft 
10 4 4 

6813ft 11 
78051 484 

269 1746 16 ft 
3524 34ft 32 W 
11460 57ft 
1186 10ft SI*. 
330 9ft 816 
84 1564 15 
8024ft 2316 
2451 6ft 5ft 
2761 10% 94b 
3709 1418 12ft 
<S2 1ft 
253S Zft 2ft 
1387 18U 171ft 
106721 l*ft 
1 7ft 718 
1444 44k 3ft 
24821*4 18 
335 4th 3K, 
714 35 32 

550 4 3ft 
59211ft 21 '6 
94 Bth 7ft 
101 31ft 3*4 
984 231a 22ft 
1392 12 11 

309 6ft 4ft 
4919 248k 23 
78 34k 314 
830 7 4th 
50925 241<« 

3103V, 32W 
5018 17 

1482 1739 14th 
71 15 14th 
2224311b 301* 
2174 34k lift 
84033ft 30*% 
853*8*4. 241ft 
34141ft 13th 
434 43V* 4246 
213 4V. 4 
149 4ft 4ft 
1474311ft 31 
8627’A 23Vr 
404 4*ft 4ft 
31524th 24 
4441216 12 
222825 2316 


3ft— ft 
18ft + ft 
8ft — ft 
5ft 

4 Vs 

3ft 

7 — ft 

27 +1 

14ft— ft 

4th + ft 

2ft— ft 
19ft + ft 
4 — ft 

12 +>ft 
5Crth +1H 
17V +lft 
34 Ik +116 
S7Vh— IVh 
10'/. +1 
8ft— ft 
15ft + ft 
23ft— lft 
Oft — ft 
9ft + ft 
14ft +lth 
lft— ft 
2ft — ft 
18 + ft 

20ft + ft 
7ft + ft 
4ft + ft 
21 +3 

3ft— ft 
34ft +2 ft 

2& + 1S 

8 + ft 
3ft + ft 

23 + ft 

12 + ft 

5ft +1ft 
23ft + ft 
3ft— ft 
Jft + ft 

nft + ft 

ion + ft 

1446 + ft 

33 +2 
27ft +1 
14ft +1 
4244— ft 
4 — ft 
4ft + ft 
31ft + ft 


Ikla* 



iT-Mf ( 







ESSS^BKE3 h-l HKl 

I MBHBn M Mill 



Intrigued by espionage? Get twice as much coverage for your 
money. Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers 
and we'll give you an extra month of Tribs free with a one- 
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I mm MlItcralb^^Sribunc.iH 


To: Subscription Manager, International Herald Tribune, 

181, avenue Charie&<ie-Gciulle, 92521 NeuiTIyCedex.Fran^ 47 47 07 29. Tetexs61283Z 

Please enter my subsc ription for: 

| j 12 months rirt □snwfai+trt 

[ | My check is enclosed [ | Please charge my aeditcardoocount: 




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Cad account number 


l t!^LM1!gWEUiEg3 l 
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RKI5S35ESSJS* 


Card expiry date 




95 I Gy/Country 


UNmED STATES 
BANKRUPTCY COURT 
FOR THE SOUTHERN 
DISTRICT OF ALABAMA 

In re 

MARION CORPORATION 

Debtor CASE NO. 8MCB73 

ORDBt AND NOTICE 
OF HEARING ON 
DISCLOSURE STATEMENT 

TO THE DEBTOR, IT5 CREDITORS, 

AND OTHER PARTIES N INTEREST: 

A firsr Amended Chapter 11 Plan hew. 
ing been Bed on October 9. 1985, and a 
Dodaftre Statement onder Chapter Hof 
the Bankruptcy Code having been filed oa 
October 22, 1985. by Debtor, Gedlon. 
Shareholders and SkyTmk America, Inc., it 
is Ordered and notice is hereby given that: 

1. The hearing to ennsder the ap- 
proval of die Disclosure Stateroom shaft 
be held at Roam 306, United State* Court 
House, Mobile. Alabama, an December 5, 
1985 at 24)0 pan. The hearing may be 
adjourned from lime to time by oral an- 
nouncement made at Room 306 at the 
scheduled and o^ourned hearing bme*. 

2. November 21. 1985 a fixed as the 
last day for Fifing and serving in accor- 
dance with Rule 3017 (a) written abjec- 
tions to the Disclosure Statement. Objec- 
tion* to Ihe dadoHKs statement shall be 
Bed wah the Court and served an Ranald 
P. Stepto n , Attorney far DebtorevPasses- 
swn, P.O. Drawer 2025, MoUe. Alabama 
3065% Donald i. Stewart, Anarney for 
Bonk Credtors, P.0. Box 2904, Mobfe, 
Alabina 34652; Lawrence B. Voit, Attor- 
ney for Creditors' Committee, 43 17 -A 
Midmost Drive, Mobile, Alabama 36609; 
John taring. Attorney for Suborrfnafed 
Guar a n t yboUer Corarnttee, 700 West Ir- 
ving Peak, Suite A-l, Oieotfi, Kmed 
60613: and Joel B. nassick. Attorney tor 
Shareholder Committee, 2400 first Atlan- 
ta Tower, Atlanta, Georpa 30383. 

3. WHh a copy of (hi* order and 
notice. Manor Cerporeman. Chapter 11 
Debtor -in-Possesson, shafl transmit the 
ftsdosure Sotement and first Amended 
Chapter 11 Plan to toe Debtor, each 
uamm itte* appoi n ted pursuant to 51,102 
of toe Code, toe Securihei and Exchange 
CpnMMpen, and any party m interest who 
has requested or requests m writing a 
copy of Ihe Deetatute Statement an d first 
Amended Pton. 

4. Request* far copra of toe Dado- 
sure S tate mert and first Amended Oiap> 
for 11 Plan sha* be maried to the DehSw- 
iivPaBesstoa, c/o Ronald P. Stepian. 
Attorney for Debtor-irvPosseswort, P.O 
Drawer 2025, MobJe, Alabama 36652. 

Doted November 6, 1985. 

GORDON B. KAHN 

Dotted State* Bankruptcy Judge 








LastWfeefs 


UiATA 


ApdloComp. 
Mr Gasket 
Bitter Carp. 
ModuUre 
Rodime 


k wrm compuments of . 

1 CONTINENTAL AMS8CAN 


BASF to Regroup 
U.S . Operations 

Ratten 

■ LUDWIGSHAFEN, W6st Ger- 
many — BASF AG said it is 
structuring its (derations in the 
United Stales, bringing all activi- 
ties under one company to be 

called BASF Corp. ., 


that the restructuring, effective J*n 

I, was necessary because of its ra> 

id growth in the United Stales 
through acquisitions. North Ainer- 
ican sales in 1984 were $14 billion. 
.. The central company wffl ineor- 
porate chemical, fiber and -data 
techn o l o gy sectors phis the newly 
■acquired Inmant Cap. Oil and 
uannal gas e^tioraaion in North 
America will continne toberun by 
BASF Gnxqj’s 100-pttncnt owned 
jWintershall AG sobsidiaiy. BASF 
purchased Inmost from United 
Technologies Corp. te SI billieHi 
and has boogfet three Cdanese 




'American 






















































































A 


Bid Alt 
NE InTr 1 1st NL 

NE I nGt tOO NL 

N«m Star: 

Apollo 9A5 NL 

Bona iodi nl 

Rwrton IW NL 

Slock 11U NL 

NevsFd MJJ nl 

Nuvwn BJH NL 

OldDom 7211 24.9? i 

OlYMM IMS NL; 
OooMiiulinar Fd: ! 

aim lfsa 7 1 -38 | 

Direct 1943 SI A? 

Eoinc 7.84 AM 

OPPen 1M9 11.34 

Goto tan isn 

HI Ylfl W.U 1539 1 
NY Tax llJt 11.64 

Pretn 20.M ZL01 

Racy 1181 

Seed 1945 21 J26 
Target 1121 1937 
Tx Fr* 151 194 
Time 1446 1180 
Blue Ch 1191 11.92 

Ret Gov 1181 1141 
U5Gvt IDlIB 1043 
OTC Sec 17.71 IMS 
Pacific Harlan: 
Agresv 1957 NL 
Collt 1242 NL 
HI on Yd 1543 NL 
Paine Webber: 

Allas 12J8 1153 
Amor 1441 1175 
CalTox 943 1127 
GNMA 1049 1044 
HIYId 10.17 1062 
InvGd 10.10 1055 
Oivmp 940 1071 
TaxEx 10171042 
PaxWM 1258 NL 
Penn So 948 NL 
Penn Mu 7.11 NL 
PormPrl 1148 NL 
PMiO 940 944 

Phoenix Series: 

Bolen 1241 1345 
CtfFd 1647 1055 
Grwth 1022 1043 
HIYId 9.18 947 
Sleek 13.14 1446 
PC Co 1043 NL 
Pilgrim Grp: 

PAR 7341 2344 
GNMA 1547 1053 
PIIMan 858 945 
PllgHI 746 0,19 
Pieocer Fund: 

Bend 944 1042 
Fund 21.79 2341 
U Inc 1642 17.95 
III Inc 1448 1561 
Plltmd 1117 NL 
Price Fanes: 

Grwtti 1oJ1 NL 
Glhlnc 1343 NL 
HIYId 1046 NL 
incam 849 nl 

lull 1049 NL 


Pro Strikes: 

MedT 1049 NL 
Fund 1045 NL 
incom 043 NL 
Prudential Bocae: 
AdIPtd 2444 NL 
ColMu r 1048 ML 
Eatv r 1074 NL 






»Jd Aik 
ReeftT. 1804 10.97 
RoweTF unoval I 
Rove* OB NL 

SFT Eat unauaii 
Safeco Secur; u 
: Eauit 940 NL 
, Grwtti 1449 NL 
1 nice 13.17 NL 
I Mamie 1251 NL 
Scvddar Funds: 
CaiTx 1020 NL 
Devei 57.72 NL 
COPGt 1449 NL 
GvAlUC 1511 NL 
Grwln 1440 nl 
I ncam 1U7 NL 
imi Fa 2844 NL 
MMB 035 NL 
NYTO* 1041 NL 
TxFr87 1046 NL 
TxFfOO 1046 NL 
TxFr93 1043 NL 
Security FuaCx: 
Action 07« 

Bond 048 848 
Eautv £47 547 
invest OK 9.75 
ultra 941 tost 
Selected Funds: 

Am sns 1142 NL 
5H Shs 1945 NL 
Sells man Group: . 
COpFd 11.91 1X02 
CmStk 1X24 1027 
Cocnun 941 10 17 
Growth 542 527 

Inca 1X84 1X84 
McaVTx 746743 
MJCTlTx 749 Biff 

MilYlTx 744 741 

NallTx 749 744 
NY Tax 7J5 7JK 
OtilOTx 745 742 


CaTax 64$ 6J4 
CaTxQ 011 6 JO 
GovGM 744 EJJ21 
HIYId 741 7 m 
MleSec 734 T.9« 
Seminal Group: 

Balan 1142 1X04 
Bond 048 7.08 
Com 5 1949 2142 

Grwth 15J9 77.04 
Sequoia «X39 Mi- 
Sentry 1241 1349 
Shearsan Funds: 
ATIGt 81.U NL 
ATIKK ML» NL 
AgrGr 1144 1X36 


BI0 Ask 

Gwtti 11.74 Nl 

mco 10 14 NL 

OPOT 1119 NL 

USGVt 14.18 NL 

Tudr Fa 20.n nl 

TratFd 1041 NL 

Trust Portfolio: 
EqCth 1043 NL 

Eqine 11.91 nl 

28th Cent unr: 

Gift r 6.10 6.13 

Grwth 1544 NL 

Select 2748 NL 

Ultra r 745 740 

U5Gv 9944 NL 

Villa t 4.97 4.99 

USAA Gram: 

Corns! 1047 NL 

Gold 646 NL 

Grwin 1449 NL 

Inca H40 NL 

SOU TSJM NL 

TkEH 1247 NL 

TxElf HAS NL 

TsESh 104? NL 

Unified Mgmnt: 

Genrl 849 NL 

Gwtb 7030 ML 

inee 11.93 NL 

Indl 848 NL 

Mvtl 1526 NL 

United Funds: 

Accm 030 IJU 

Sana SJB oJa 

GvISeC 549 5.72 
JnlGin 036 o95 

Con Inc 1740 19.13 

Hi inc 1332 14.78 

Incom 1448 lft.26 

Muni 671 6.99 

NwCcpI 5375.7s 
Retire 006 642 

SC Eng 9.15 10.00 

Vans 592 647 


GldShr 
GOT 
Growth 
Inca 
La Cap 
Prspet 
VaiFro 


3J2 NL 

1*41 NL 
745 ML 
1048 NL 
722 NL 
46 NL 
10.94 NL 


Appre 2141 2246 
Cal Mu 14.70 1547 
FdVal 7.15 743 
Global 2521 2054 
HIYId 18.74 19.73 
SalGv r 11.U nl 
M gGvl 1X281198 
MMufl 1430 1A9S 
NYMu 1545 158a 
SuOBt r 1343 NL 
SpXmf r 1526 NL 
Sherm P 542 NL 
Sierra Gt 11.11 NL 
Slama Funds: 

Cos 1 1 746 849 

Inca 534 9.11 
invest 847 “A3 
Spci n 847 582 
Trust 1255 1X72 
Vent 1084 1145 
Smith Baraev: 

Eaut 1530 NL 
mcGro 947 1047 
U5Gvt 1347 1440 
So G«n in 1579 1649 
SthestG r 1071 NL 
Swlnlnc 458 NL 
Saver In 2249 2346 
Stole Bond Gtp: 

Com St 58? 644 
Divers 643 746 
Proofs 576 947 
SrFrm Gt unavoll 
SlFrm Bl unavoll 
StS trait Inv: 

Exch 9845 NL 
Grwtn r 6141 NL 
invst 76J1 7648 
Steadman Fuads: 

Am ind 279 NL 
ASSOC 49 NL 
Invest 140 NL 
Ocean 540 nl 
S tain Roe Fds: 

Band 945 NL 
Cap 00 2122 NL 
Dlscv 1517 NL 
HIYId 1504 NL 
Seed 17.14 nl 
S lock 1648 NL 
TaxEx 544 NL 
TotRel 2X51 2341 
Unlv 1747 NL 
Strategic Funds: 
Cool! 642 648 
Invst 449 447 
Silvr 4.75 519 
StratnDv Is44 NL 
Stral Gth 1591 NL 
Strong in 1941 19 JO 
5trngT 1529 1847 
TellnSh 14.91 NL 
Templeton Group: 
Fran 112? 1243 
Global I 3441 
Glob || 1144 1241 

Grwth 10J9 11.79 
World 1145 14J6 
Thomson McKVnaon: 


Value Une Fd: 

Bona 1175 NL 
Centuf 1040 nl 
C anv >0.48 NL 
Fund 1X40 NL 
incam 6.74 nl 
LO v Gt 19.77 NL 
MunBd 1047 NL 
SPl Sit 1X28 NL 
Van Katnpen: 

InTxF 1553 1620 
TxFrH 144*1529 
US Gvt 1541 1640 
Vance Exchange: 
Cape* 7015 NL 
OBM 4543 NL 
Diver 7925 NL 
ExFd 116J6 NL 
ExBoS 10129 NL 
FWE* 6120 NL 
Sec Fid 66.16 NL 
Vonounrd Group: 
Exptr 3117 NL 
Explll 19.95 NL 
Gemln 8046 NL 
Man 1249 NL 
NaesT 3743 NL 
Prmcp 3192 NL 
ODhr I 19.75 NL 
GDI* II 532 NL 
ODvIH 2345 NL 
STAR 10.99 NL 
TC Ini 3223 NL 
TCUSO MJB2 NL 
GNMA 9.79 NL 
HlYBd 847 NL 
IGBnd 527 NL 
ShrtTr 1041 NL 
I ltd Tr 2136 NL 
MuHY 921 NL 
Mulnl 1 125 NL 
MuLa 9.96 NL 
MlnLa 1044 NL 
MUSH) 1527 NL 
VSPGd 642 NL 
VSP HI 14.16 NL 
VSPSv 1515 NL 
VSPTC 1576 NL 
Wellsl 1511 NL 
Wellln 1172 NL 
Wndsr 1341 NL 
Wnds II 1036 NL 
widint 591 NL 
WIOUS 10.94 NL 
Venture Advisers: 
NYVen 541 9.19 
RPF aa 744 NL 
RPF EO 1744 NL 
IncPI 1141 12.01 
WPG 2246 NL 
WollSI 539 B48 
Woln Ea 1749 NL 
Wstard 9.95 1047 
Wood Strothers: 
deVea 1X75 NL 
Neuw 2022 NL 
Pine 1X33 NL 
WrldTr 929 1504 
YosFd 500 521 
NL —No load 
(sales charge) 
f — Previous day's 

quote. 

r- Reaemaiion charge 
mav Quo hr. 
x— Ex dividend 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED I escorts a guides 



LONDON OMENTAL GUIDE Service. 
ToL 01-243 1442 

MUNKH SUPREME BCORT Service. 
Tel: 089/4486038 

GB4EVA-AMA Female & Mole escort 
service. MuMrewd. 022/342055 


BRUSSELS. CHANTAt ESCORT Ser- 
vice: Tef- 02/520 23 SS. 


FRANKFURT - EVA'S ESCORT £ trow 
d service. Tel: 059/44 77 75 


GOLDfE ESCORT SERVICE. London 
I Heathrow 328 9763 


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Exlraardfaary Price Roriuc ti ons 
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garden tumiundng* oHv S mins, from 
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French). 5 co nra no on roam, 2 restau- 
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Get 

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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 



PEANUTS 



l save aw report 

IN SCHOOL TODAY... 



AT THE END I SAIR 
* 7 WI 5 REPORT UA 5 WRITTEN 
ON RECYCLED PAPER ..NO 
TREES WERE DESTKOVEP 
TO MAKE THIS REPORT" 




BOOKS 


ACROSS 

1 Highlands girl 
5 Lily's relative 

10 Thick slice 

14 Vow 

15 Mountain 
ridge 

16 Aureola 

17 Extent 

IS Erstwhile 

Turkish V. I. P. 

19 Assert 

20 The little 
troublemaker 

23 Superlative 
ending 

24 British stool 
pigeon 

25 Flying 
mammal 

28 Bonanza State 

31 Kind of pocket 

34 Diva's song 

36 Composer Ain 

37 Nonsense 

39 The hard- 
working girt 

43 Paris abducted 
her 

44 Crude metal 

45 Simple 

46 Overhead 
trains 

47 Nobelist in 
Medicine: 1907 

51 Occupied a 
chair 

52 *‘A of Two 

Cities” 


53 Sea gull 
55 The spinach 
eater 

63 Neighbor of 
Iraq 

64 Heat or meat 

65 Knob 

66 Put down 

67 Coat with an 
alloy of lead 
and tin 

68 Canadian 
Indian 

69 Concludes 

70 Fall flower 

71 Crowd 

DOWN 


1 Burden 

2 Rhine feeder 

3 Gun or actress 

4 Ladd film: 

1953 

5 Acme of 
achievement 

6 Smell (be 

suspicious) 

7 Entangle 

8 Greek goddess 
of wisdom 

9 Mariner 

10 Cut of beef 

11 Melted rock 

12 Pianist 
Templeton 

13 Drill 

21 Doctrine 

22 Muse of poetry 

.Vetr York Tones, edited bv Eugene Maleskn. 


25 Lave 

26 Prankster in 
“The 
Tempest” 

27 Cultivates 

29 “Tell it in 

Gath” 

30 Lake in the 
West 

31 Plumbers' 
tools 

32 “Carmen” is 
one 

33 Visorless cap 

35 Lager’s 

relative 

38 Border 

40 Buhlwork 

41 “To is 

human": Pope 

42 Truck driver 

48 Watchword for 
asoldado 

49 Prohibits 

50 A.F.T. rival 

52 Cares for 

54 Hoisting 
machine 

55 Nap 

56 Seaport in 
Algeria 

57 in full 

58 Stag 

59 Slave of yore 

60 Learning 

61 It joins the 
Neissenear 
Frankfurt 

62 Donna or Rex 


DENKIS THE MEN ACE 



‘G'mornins, Mr. Wilson! 1 promised Joey 
HW I'D SHARE YOU WITH HIM TODAY-* 

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
B by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 
/f i , 1 U ,U U\ 

Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one latter to each square, to fonn 
four ordinary words. 


KEHRI 


TZIC 

□ 

u 


EXVIN 


znz 




TOBUN 

IT 

XL 

C 



RAZTUQ 


TTX 

□ 

U 


ANOTHER NAME 
FOR THAT 
MUCH TALKED 
ABOUT BABY BOOM . 
k S 

Now arrange the dieted tetters to 
lorm the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 

■ ■^T . - M,* VI7— V/ 1 Mr*~ M ** 


(Answers tomorrow) 

, I Jumbles; FANCY REARM BODILY GEYSER 
Friday 5 I Answer How someone who sowed too many wild 
oats when he was young might end up 
looking— "SEEDY" 

WEATHER 


ROPE HIGH LOW 

C F C P 

mre 30 $8 11 52 fr 

tertfom U 39 3 37 cl 

ns 16 61 10 50 


rode 


wrest 


n Haven 
a Del Sol 


bomb 

ence 

Mart 


Palmes 


Bangkok 
MM 
Haag Kano 
12 54 5 *1 d Manila 

6 43 0 33 a NewDelM 

1 34 >1 30 e Seoul 

a 3? 1 34 d SMnehal 

3 37 a 32 sw Sing ap o re 

4 3? >7 2fl fr Taipei 

3 37 0 33 la Tamra 

10 66 10 50 O 

7 45 0 32 o ArRICA 

5 * -2 30 d Algiers 

7 45 4 39 d Cairo 

Cape Town 


HIGH 
C 


LOW 
_ . C F 

30 06 23 73 d 

9 48 -1 30 fr 

24 75 1* 66 fr 

29 84 25 77 o 

24 75 II 52 fr 

6 0 0 32 r 

14 57 6 43 fir 

32 50 34 7S a 

23 73 20 63 a 

18 64 7 *5 d 


20 68 14 57 
25 77 14 57 


Harare 

Lagos 

NafroM 

Tooll 


d 

29 84 16 61 Cf 

16 61 * 40 d 

30 86 15 5* tr 

30 <6 26 79 e 

27 <1 U 55 o 

23 73 17 63 o 


LATIN AMERICA 


|avfk 


3 37 -1 30 

2 36 0 32 a 

0 32 -1 30 sw 

12 54 8 46 fr 

23 » U 64 el 

15 S9 8 46 fr 

8 46 6 43 o 

13 55 0 32 fr 

6 43 -1 30 Cl 

■S 23 -7 19 d 

-1 30 -3 27 O 

14 57 5 41 d 

2 36 0 32 d 

5 41 2 36 a 

"2 S 1 » S NORTH AMERICA 

11 52 9 48 r 

7 34 -1 X sw 

1 34 -4 25 a 

5 41 0 32 d 

2 36 -1 30 fr 

1 34 4 31 fr 

0 32 -3 27 e 


Samos Aire* 26 79 M 57 r 

Caracas 28 82 18 64 d 

Urns 22 72 16 61 a 

MBWcaCNv a 73 10 50 fr 

Modejoaelra — — — — no 



CUTTING EDGES: 

Making Sense of the Eighties 

By Charles Krauthammer. 221 pages. 
SI7.95. 

Random House, 201 East 50th Street, New 
York, N. Y. 10022 . 

Reviewed by John Gross V 

I T is sad to live in present-day America, now 
that harvests have declined so precipitous- 
ly, food rationing has been introduced and 
“sreak has become a memory.” Je must be even 
sadder to live in “starvation-wracked Japan.” 
Or rather it would be sad, if these — 
prophecies of doom had 
were made by Paid Ehrlich 
“The Population Bomb’V they are died by 
Charles Krauthammer in “Catting Edges" in* 
passag e that exemplifies one of Krautham- 
mer's great strengths as a controversialist: his 
ability to seize on the giveaway quotation or 
the exquisitely revealing chink in his oppo- 
nent’s armor. 

This is only one of the skills that have made 
him someone to look out for ever since he 
beg3n pub lishing essays and npimrms in the 
late 1970s — initially in The New Republic 
(which is where most of the pieces reprinted in 
“Cutting Edges” first appeared), but latterly 
alsp in Time "Mgwine and The Washington 
Post, 

He is equally adept at summoning up a 
happy (and unhackneyed) quotation to re- 
inforce his position, as when be calls in aid the 


Bains rahhrm «* ? Vi Vf - - 

tough foreign pm#* lta 

Tspoto^n 

delivers a jab a* v ' 

rakes a smack * r.v - - ■ 

Sets 



go-it-alone right. But *«£ -r- 

wonh listening to. be.sa. w r . T; . , ... 

writes not so modi atw-« ” ■ , r. 

about political culture-- ... i; . tix 

assumption* — and. be>on j: 

contemporary social chronic • __ _ . j^.- 

In the introdnetioo to J-rr ^ fft 

— — __ niMiMi hnef aecou." a . . 



studying medicine, tire* I 

certainty that was“not found is the 

- .nmMhin* that attract** »■■■*» _ 


i if* :fpr 


REX MORGAN 


CONCERN ED ABOUT WHAT 
SHE DESCRIBES AS A PERSONALITY CHANGE 
IN HER 52-YEAR-OLP FATHER, LUCY 
PEN ISON ARRANGES TO SEE D*. REX' 
MORGAN ABOUT IT f p 

r YOU SAY 
YOUR 
MOTHER 
DIED IN AN 
ACCIDENT 


GARFIELD 



HE WAS TERRIBLY DEPRESSED BUI 
GRADUALLY CAME OUT OF IT BY HARP 
WORK AND TOTAL DEDICATION TO HIS 
BUSINESS/ 

• then TWO MONTHS 

AGO HE MET A 
WOMAN WHO IS 
YOUNGER THAN 1 AM/ 
SHE CAN'T BE MORE 
THAN TWENTY -THREE' 
SINCE THEN, NOTHING 
ELSE SEEMS 
IMPORTANT TO HIM/ 



alive revolutionaries — revolutionaries no* 
ing to describe the society they proposed to 
construct — as “mere speculators m anarchy." 

latioo. And he lcnowshow to gertlremost out 
of a comic analogy. Ph2 Donahue's television 
show, with its procession of deviants and odd 
men out, reminds him of P.T. Barrann — 
except that “m the old days, one merely 
gawked at these unfortunates. Donahue's ge- 
nius is to get them to taBc.” 

Satisfying Ins gifts are, Krautham- 
mer would not be the senous commentator he 
is if he did not put his talents at the service cf a 
fairly consistent view of the wodcL Politically, 
he tells us, he belongs to the Democratic tradi- 
tion “whose pedigree stretches from Hasty 
Truman through Henry Jadaon” — and zf 
nowadays that makes him something of a dis- 
placed person, in bis political essays hc.ro- 


Sobdioa to Friday's Pdzzie 


3onna □□□ □□□□□ 
3DEQ3 □□□ □□□□□ 
BEOBazzinan □□□on 
□eh ana aaaaaaa 
□EBoanaa aanaoa 
B^a aaaaaa 
nemo oaaa aaaoa 
lea sbqsb ana 

IDOGHJ aaOE 00DO. 

□aaana ciaa 
\umm aoBaaaaa 
iDEEaaa ma □□□ 
bCjEob asanaociaa 
Genoa aan nasoQ 
googq aaa asnaal 


found many satisfactions in 
thing be did not find was j. ^ 

amtrary, his ex p erience ns a dix L-r -- !U 
that there is no getting away from an:. 

Ambiguity, as he s^ys. is one of thtfrcju?’- * 
thrnnn^ q { his csskvs. Another, reutn* J 
die effort to sec tiwng s as they are. m - l - 
nn tidiness. He azgnes repeatedly asutat o^cr- 
sramtification, the blurring of disunciton.- 1 
tween course ami survival, for msUrco. ^att 

the gKb ra - evasve assumption of euniv* 

aleme” where real differences exist j * L ^m C 
seen at its sinslest in Dr. Seoss’s parable " f * 
Btmer Book." in which the u-enu * 

endang ered by a confrontation between tiiC- 
Yooks who like their bead butter-side up J 
tire Zooks who Hfce their bread but:er->i«h* 
down. 

He is equally on his guard against the nt^uw: 
of language, ffis objection to cri tics who 3‘. ihs 
time of Grenada kept complaining that we 
United «*»** had forfeited "the moral high 

ground” is not merely that thev were talking in 

SrbAt but that (he efidre in question was an 
- — ?r. u carried 

equivalence 


Inadions one: A militaiy metaphor, it carried 
amn of false i 


yet one more suggestion . 

(win a batik, lose a bank). 

Several essays — they are among the best m 
the book — *gan in authority from Krautham- 
mer's experience as a doctor, though he does 
not refer to it directly. There is a fine dtscuv 
sou of the tnie issue at stake in the Baby Fae 
heart-transpbal case (the dash between “rite • 
therapeutic an p aa tiv e" and “tire experimental' 
a npe i a l i ve"), and an essay on homelessnesi 
that defiealdy and humanely makes the poini - 
that tire pggbrof the homdess in (lie Uni lad 
States is to a large exrent the plight of people 
who have bees released from hospitals in tire- 
name of a Ebcrty they ate unable to enjoy. - 

For afl Ms vrghmee, even KrauttuumaH’. 
occaaonafly succumbs to the cdumnist’s i>jw- 
prioB} do ca se asd amplifies things for th^ 
ab of a de biting point But is general tht 
Haadnddf these pieces is exceptionally higfi, 

1 hey wese wefl worth colkcting. and they rc- 
nuBn as rfmalaang as they were when they 
first appeared. 

. ‘ JMr Gnmtttttt iheVBff tfTheN** York 

TWtBkA.-: W - 



BRIDGE 


HELLO. I'M RX-2. YOUR TALKING 
5CALE. IF YOU 6TEP ON ME, 
I'LL TELL YOU 
VDOR WEIGHT 



By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal. 
North and South ap- 
peared to be headed for six 
dubs after the opening one- 
club bid. 

The response of two dubs 
was “inverted,* 1 and therefore 
forcing. North was expe c t in g 
to reach six or seven dubs, but 
bad to change his His 
jump to four spades at his next 
turn was a form of Blackwood, 
by partnership agreement, ask- 
ing for key cards outride tire 
spade suit. 

The negative response of 


four no-trump nude # dear 
that both aces in tbe red suits 
were muring. North knew 
therefore that his partner held 
strength in spades and hems 
and made a briBunt deriaou 


was not a contract tiut 
would ordinarily suggest itsdf . ^ 
with the North hand after 
South has opened one dub, 
but it was absolutely rigbt. 
South won the opening spade 
lead and led a low heart to the 
jade, king and aba Soauer or 
later. East could make the dia- 
mond ace, but the declarer hsd 
11 tricks. . • 


NORTH . 

♦-r 

VKt 
-OKQ833 
JtAKJMMS 

EAST (D). • 

' 

QAim^ 
Qtk.J7§A*-. 
A— • - - 

SOUTH 
AAXTS 
OQMI3 
»1 

tm wd wear wera vuWmbt^ 


♦ Q 

«.4>f 

♦ass 


02 

J'-V*. 


TO 


Dbt 

. 4 N.T. 


2 a 


NorA 

a* 

« a 

Pass 


W^stlacL tbe spade qua mi. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Norman Australian Open Victor by 2 Shots 

MELBOURNE (AP) —Greg Norman, the U.S.-based Australian, scored a two- 
shot victory Sunday in tbe Australian Open golf tournament and became the fourth 
player to win both it and the Australian PGA in the same year. 

Others to accomplish tbe rare double were Ossie Pickworth, Norman Von Nida 
and Kel Nagle. Norman also won the 1980 open in Sydney. 

He shot a final-round 74 for a 4-under-par 212 in a tournament shortened by rain 
to 54 boles. Another Australian. Ossie Moore, shot 75 and finished at 214. Anders 
Forsbrand of Sweden was third at 76/215, while the defending champion. Tom 
Watson of the United States, tied for sixth at 77/218. 

Spinks, Cooney Reach Accord on Fight 

NEW YORK (AP) — Michael Spinks, tbe International Boxing Federation 
heavyweight champion, and Gerry Cooney have reached agreement for a fight set 
for March. 

The contracts, a source said Saturday, are expected to be signed after the 
promoter Butch Lewis, the champion's adviser, returns from Europe next week. No 
dale has been set for the fight, and five sites are being considered. 

The IBF president, Robert Lee, has said that Spinks will be stripped of his crown 
if he fights an unranked opponent Cooney is not ranked, and in August announced 
his retirement after having fought only twice since being stopped in the 13th round 
in a June 1 1, 1982, bid for Larry Holmes’s World Boxing Council title. 

O’Meara Beats Pavin in Hawaii Golf Playoff 


Pacers Snap Celtics 9 Winning Streak at 8 


Compikd by Our Staff Front Dupacka 

INDIANAPOLIS — Clark Kel- 
logg ended the Boston Celtics’ 
eight-game winning streak Satur- 
day night when his short jump shot 

NBA FOCUS 

at tbe final buzzer gave the Indiana 
Pacers a 111-109 National Basket- 
ball Association victory. 

Kellogg also shut down Larry 
Bird in the second half before a 
capacity crowd of 16,904, many of 
them lured by the presence of na- 


£ 


Atlanta 

Boston 

Chicago 


IDLE EAST 


Detroit 

Honolulu 

Hcnntoa 

LSI Angola* 

Miami 

MtaMOPOHO 


*tv 

EANIA 


11 52 4 39 d 

— — — — na 

— — — — no Montreal 

23 73 15 59 el Honan 

24 75 M 57 el Now York 


4 21 -13 9 pc 

» 75 M 61 PC 

13 55 2 36 PC 

13 55 0 32 pe 

ID 50 -3 27 PC 

U 55 I 34 PC 

X 8b 21 70 fr 

24 75 15 59 Cl 

20 68 II 52 PC 

35 «S 28 82 PC 

9 48 -3 27 PC 

0 32 -10 14 

27 81 22 72 fr 

16 61 7 45 tr 

SanFraadsco M 57 P 48 pc 

Seattle 5 41 2 3; sti 

_. 20 68 14 57 a Toroato 6 43 0 32 d 

Jr 27 81 2D 68 d Washington 17 63 7 45 pc 

kudv: to-taasvi ir-tei r.- fvh all: oovorcow: pc-partiy dmidv; r-ratn; 

taotn; nMiww; tt-stwnry. 

Quotable 

Al 77 77i Ho'mSOM: Fell 1 - Temp, 21 — 2D 170 — HI. MANILA: 

MB-WIVSBOOL: Snow. Temp. 6-1 {43 — 341. 

£i»oS* SW"*V?TJi£k31 -25 (88 - 771. TOKYO: OouOr. Tom* 17-3 
37). 


KAPALUA, Hawaii (UPi) — Mark O'Meara sank a 12-foot (3. 6- meter) birdie 
uti on the third extra hole Saturday to defeat Corey Pavin and win the Kapalua 
iternalioual golf tournament. 

O'Meara and Pavin, who was celebrating his 26th birthday, each finished 72 
holes at 13-under-par 275. Each parted the first two extra holes — the par-4, 397- 
yard 16th and the par-3, 178-yard 17th — before O'Meara won the playoff on the 
par-5, 557-yard 18th. 

Nick Faldo, who eagled No. 1 8 on Friday to tie Pavin for Lhe lead, a stroke ahead 
of O'Meara and Masters champion Bernhard Langer. made three consecutive 
bogeys on Saturday’s front nine and finished third with a 71/277. Langer (7 1/278) 
was fourth. 

McGuigan to Defend Against Sosa Feb. 15 

BELFAST (AFP) — Barry McGuigan. the World Boxing Association feather- 
weight champion, will make the second defense of his title Feb. IS against 
Fernando Sosa, the South American champion from Argentina, in either Belfast or 
Dublin. 

Sosa was selected by ABC. the U.S. network which is to televise the fight, after it 
was given a choice of five opponents by Barney Eastwood, McGuigan' s manager. 
Sosa, who is 43-3-3. is ranked fourth by the WBA and third by the World Boxing 
Council. 


■ Jim Deveilano, general manager of the Detroit Red Wings, on the National 
Hockey League's perennially weak Norris Divirion: “ft’s like puppy love. No one 
takes it seriously, but it’s real for the puppies." \NYT) 


Football Fans 
Toot to Record 

The Associated Press 

NASHVILLE, Tennessee — 
A 35.000-piece kazoo orchestra 
led by the Oak Ridge Boys 
buzzed its way through the hit 
tune “Elvira" and into the 
Guinness Book of World Re- 
cords during halftime of the 
Virginia Tecb-Vanderbilt foot- 
ball game Saturday. 

The kazoos, which cost about 
18 cents each, were donated by 
two Nashville restaurants and 
passed out to spectators as they 
entered ibe sradiiim. 

After “Elvira," the kazoo- 
blowers were led in “Row, Row, 
Row Your Boat" by Amerigo 
Marino, the assistant conductor 
of the Nashville Symphony Or- 
chestra, and John Sawyer, the 
dean of Vanderbilt's Blair 
School of Music. A rousing ren- 
dition of John Philip Sousa's 
“Stars and Stripes Forever" 
dosed out tbe performance. 

Colin Smith, the assistant 
general editor of Guinness Su- 
perlatives in London, had ap- 
proved the establishment of ft 
new category for Saturday's ex- 
travaganza. 


tive son Bird. Ibe Celtic star, final- 
ly finding his shooting touch after 
some dismal performances, scored 
28 points in the first half but only 
five after in tenmssjon. 

It was a doubly sweet victory for 
Indiana’s coach, George Irvine. 
Last Wednesday, doling a shoot- 
around before that nighfs game 
with the Critics in Boston Garden, 
security people had lacked Irvine 
and his players off the floor 15 
minutes before their workoat time 
was op. The angry Pacers lost that 
one by four points. 

After Saturday's game, Boston 
Coach K-C Jones said that he 
thought tbe Pacers had improved 
but could use a boost in confi- 
dence. He added, however, “They 
got a good start on that tonight-" 

“I thought the key was that we 
never gave up,” said Irvine: “We 
managed to withstand Kid’s bar- 
rage somehow. When things broke 
down we still moved the ball and 
stiD got on the offensive boards." 

Ibe Critics fed by 100-93 with 
6:14 to play, but tire Pacers tied it 
at IQS with two and a half minutes 
lefL It became 107-105 Boston on 
Kevin McHaJe’s basket, but Steve 
Stipanovich grabbed a rebound 
and scared to make it 107-all with 
50 seconds to go. 

Boston's Dennis Johnson scored 
on a lay-up, but tire Pacers’ Terence 
Siansbury talli ed with 30 seconds 
remaining to make it 109-109. Fi- 
nally, Stansburg rebounded a miss 
by Bird and took tire ball down- 
court; be shot and missed, but Kri- . 
logg grabbed the ball and shot from 
eight feel as tbe ham sounded. The 
bail banked in for the victory. 

Kellogg led the winners with 21 
points. But Stipanovich, who is not 
a center one would compare with, 
other Parish or Bill Walton, scored 
20, ted all rebounders with -14 and 
led all pkymakers with 10 assists. 
It was a surpriang triple-double for 
tbe third-year pro. (LAT, UPI) 





Basketball 

harm! 




Wl'*-' 








“r.-'Mr 







''VS 


N 1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


;e 19 


& Jt :■ . 




SPORTS 






Penn State Tramples Notre Dame by 36-6 


By Malcolm Moran who gained 217 yards and scored four loucb- 

fcw York rime Seme* downs against Penn State Last year, was held to 

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania — 37 yards in the firsL half. 

Some said Pens State had no buaness atop the Steve Bcueridn, the junior quarterback who 
college football rankings, becftuy its ability to bad thrown for 524 yards against Penn State in 
come from behind for narrow victories was the last two years, was removed in the second 
hardly enough to rare bong voted the best team Quarter after an interception allowed the Nit- 
in the United States. tany Lions to raise their lead (o 13-0. 

But there was no to come from behind % the tuneBeoerlein returned for the start of 

Saturday. The Nittanv Lions scored on eight of the second half, the Irish season that had re- 


ed some hope had been reduced to more 
ittemess. And Beueririn’s reappearance did no 


COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROUNDUP 


picking off a third-period pass, Perm State defensive back Ray Isocn was splashed down by Notre Dame’s Tim Brown. 




dors 



■ •v. /-'; The Associated Press 

‘ING, Texas — The unbeat- 
- ■-'“’ago Bears won the National 
~ vcnce Central Division title 

■ V- record 44-0 root erf the Dak 
' -..^vbqys here Sunday. • 

• ; • •> ago's 1 1th straight National 
if League victory was its 
. k ; 1 er the Cowboys since 1971 


J: 


is the worst trouncing in 
.. ; : s 26-year histoiy. It was the 
: ne the Cowboys had been 

- i-, ;tanceSL Louis did it, 38-0, 

r ; :..^Tisrve end Richard Dent 
- 'V ; ^ his first professional tooch- 

- r .r -by interesting a Danny 
. ^'J ' pass and stepping into the 

; >efrom the 1-yard fine in the 
-■il“ riod. The Bears stretched 
- ‘id to 10-0 on Kevin Butler's 
+ .field goaL 

-. ‘ ■^Igo’s tougb defense twice 
quarterback White and 
Vlr* replacement Gary Hoge- 
.^-USt as rudely. Linehach-r 
' ■ ^’ Ilson knocked While cold 
ackle in the second quarter; 
^y^eturned in the third period 
again knocked out byWil- 
left for the day with a 
. ' ‘—-ineck. 


Hogeboom, pressured into an iB- 
’ advised throw by Wilson's second- 
quaner blitz, hit Chicago corner- 
hade Mike Richardson in.fuB stride 
and he ran 36-yards untouched for 
a score. Lesfie Frazier’s 33-yard in- 
terception return to the Dallas 48 
set up a five-play scoring drive 
capped by quarterback Steve 
Putter's 1-yard run, giving Chicago 
a 24-0 halftime lead. 

The Bears broke out some exotic 
plays in the second half, including 
Walter Payton’s 33-yard halfback 
pass lb .tight end Tim Wrigbtman, 
which positioned Chicago Butler 
for a career-best 46-yard field goaL 
Butler also had a 22-yarder in the 
fourth period after a 35-yard Pay- 
ton run. 

Payton gained 131 yards on 22 
carries, arid his 34-yard, fourth- 
quarter dash set up Calvin Thom- 
1 6-yard scoring run. Dennis 


picked up Payton and carried him 
Tar a yard in the third period. 

Falcons 30, Rams 14: In Atlanta, 
Gerald Riggs ran for 123 yards and 
three touchdowns as the Falcons 
downed the lethargic, mistake- 
prone Los Angeles Rams. Atlanta 
converted two of the Rams* five 
turnovers into 10 points within a 
65-second span of the opening 
quarter, and built a 23-0 lead after 
three periods. 

Browns 17, Bills 7: In Cleveland, 
rookie quarterback Benue Kosar 
Ml Ozzie Newsome on an 11-yard 
TD pass play with 2: 11 to play and 
Earnest Byner rushed for 109 yards 
and a score as the Browns beat 
Buffalo to break a four-game losing 
streak. 

Stedexs 30, Oilers 7: In Hous- 
ton, Gary Anderson kicked field 
goals of 52, 31 and 34 yards, ex- 
as’s 1 6-yard scoring run. Dennis tending Ms string to 10 in a row. 
Gentry's 16-yard touchdown run and Frank Pollard and David 
with 2:38 to play insured the Cow- Woodley each rushed for more 
boys' worst defeat since Minnesota than 100 yards and a touchdown to 
mauled them, 54-13, in 197GL lead Pittsburgh's rout of the Oilers. 

Chicago rookie Wflfiam Perry, a Green Bay 38, New Orleans 14: 


romped over sluggish New Orleans. 

Dotpfams 34, Cobs 20: In India- 
napolis. Dan Marino passed for 
330 yards and rookies Lorenzo 


Miami beat the Colts. 


305-pound (138.3-kilogram) defen- 
sive lineman who is used on short- 
yardage offense, carried once for a 
yard. He also drew a 10-yard penal- 
ty for illegal use of bands when he 


In Milwaukee, quarterback Lynn 
Dickey tossed two second-quarter 
touchdowns, one to Phillip Epps 
(whose 46-yard punt return set up 
another score), as Green Bay 



their first trine possessions, with Massimo 
Manca kicking five field goals, for a 36-6 victory 
over Notre Dame that was the worst defeat in 
Gerry Faust's troubled four years as coach of 

the Fighting Irish. “ “■ 

The Nittany Lions, 10-0 for the first time more to help than had his benching. He was 
since 1978, are one game away from taking an intercepted again, leading to Shaffer's one-yard 
unbeaten record into a bowl game. A victory at run and a 30-point defidL 
Pittsburgh next week will give them their choice But on the drive that followed the opening 

of the Orange, Sugar, Cotton or Fiesta bowls on kickoff Beueriein completed his first five passes 
New Year’s Day. The most alluring game would —with throws of 20 and 22 yards to (he tight 
be an Orange Bowl showdown against second- end Tom Rehder — and the Irish moved from 

their 17-yard fine to the Penn State 21. 

Then Beueriem’s third-down pass to Pinkett 
was two yards short of a first down, and John 
Carney, who had been successful on eight of 
nine field goal lacks inside the 40. lined up for a 
38-yard attempt. 

But Hal Von Wyi, the senior bolder, could not 
control the snap from center. In desperation. 
Von Wyl threw an incomplete pass, the Lions 
took the ball at their 21, and Notre Dame's best 
chance passed without a point. 

In other top games, United Press Internationa! 
reported: 

Nebraska 56, Kansas 6: In Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Tom Rathman rushed for 159 yards, scoring on 
a 44-yard ran. and wing back Von Sheppard 
caught two long touchdown passes during a 56-6 
romp that made the Cornbuskers 9-1 overall, 6- 
0 in the Big Eight. 

Oklahoma 31, Colorado 0: In Norman, Okla- 
during the shockingly one-sided first half they homa, Jamefie Holieway scored on runs of 2 and 
used Notre Dame turnovers to improve their 20 yards for the Sooners, now 7-1 overall and 5- 
1 ead to 23-0. 0 in the Big Eight. 

When Joe Paieroo, the Penn Stale coach, ran Wisconsin 12, Ohio State 7: In Columbus, 
off the mu dd y field at halftime, punching his Ohio. Marvin Artley plun ged one yard far a 
right fist into the air, many of the estimated touchdown and Todd Gregoire kicked two field 
84,000 spectators in the stadium were beading goals to give Wisconsin its fourth victory over 
for exits. the Buckeyes in five years. Ohio State, which 

Faust was not so fortunate. The two most was tied with Iowa for the Big Ten lead, fell to 8- 
important parts of his team’s offense bad been 2 overall 5-2 in the conference, 
taken away. Allen Pinkett, the senior tailback Iowa 27, Purdue 24: In West Lafayette, hub- 


ranked Nebraska or Oklahoma, winch meet 
next week to decide the Big Eight Conference 
title. 

The Irish (5-4). who did not score until 3 
minutes 33 seconds remained, saw the end of a 
four-game winning streak that had given a 

chance to be considered for a bowl game and 
had led to speculation that Faust might be back 
as coach. 

For Faust, who has two games to go in the 
final year of a five-year contract, there was an 
additional injury — Penn State was led by a 
I 00 * 0 ® Lorenzo product of the program he built at Moeller High 
Hampton and Ron Davenport School in Onamum. John Shaffer, the qnaner- 
scored two touchdowns apiece as back who has won all 53 g?m~ be has started 

since eighth grade, completed 7 of 16 passes for 
126 yards. 

The resourcefulness that had allowed the Nit- 
tany Lions to make all iheir narrow escapes this 
season remained an important factor. Twice 


ana, Rob Hough din kicked a 25-yard field goal 
with 68 seconds left that gave the Hawkeyes. 9-1 
overall 6-1 in the Big Ten, the inside track to (be 
Rose Bowl 

Brigham Young 28, Air Force 21: In Provo. 
Utah, Vai Sikahema returned a pum 72 yards 
for a third-quarter touchdown and caught a 69- 
yard pass from Robbie Bosco for another in the 
fourth quarter to rally Bri gham Young over 
previously unbeaten .Air Force. 

UCLA 4L Oregon State 0: In Pasadena. Cali- 
fornia. Gaston Green rushed for 108 yards and 
John Lee set a Pacific- 10 record with his 8 1st 
and S2d field goals. With a victory next week 
over crossiown-rivaJ Southern Cal, UCLA can 
gain its third Rose Bowl game in four years. 

Waslnngton 20. Southern Cal 17: In Seattle, 
Lhe sophomore Chris Chandler threw a 13-yard 
touchdown pass to Lonzeil Hill with 56 seconds 
to play following a fumble by the USC quarter- 
back Rodney Pee re at Washington's one with 
4:15 logo. 

Michigan 48. Minnesota 7: In Minneapolis. 
Jim Harbaugb passed for three touchdowns and 
Gerald White ran for two as Michigan retained 
the little Brown Jug trophy for the eighth 
straight year. 

Oklahoma Stale 21, Missouri 19: In Colum- 
bia, Missouri, Thurman Thomas rushed for 172 
yards and Oklahoma State escaped an upset 
when, with 68 seconds left, Missouri sophomore 
Tom Whelihan just missed on a 44-yard field 
goal try after kicking four during the game. 

Auburn 24, Georgia 10: In Athens. Georgia. 
Bo Jackson, slowed two weeks by a thigh bruise, 
rushed for 121 yards and scored on runs of 67 
and 6 yards for’Aubum. 

Baylor 34, Rice 10: In Waco, Texas, Tom 
Muccke passed for 310 yards and three touch- 
downs as Baylor moved within one victory of at 
(east a co-championship in the Southwest Con- 
ference. 

Tennessee 34, Mississippi 14: In Knoxville, 
Tennessee, Sam Henderson rushed for two 
touchdowns and Daryl Dickey passed for 203 
yards for Tennessee. ’ 

Bowfing Green 2L, Toledo 0: In Bowling 
Green, Ohio, Brian McClure passed for 143 
yards and a touchdown as his team won the 
Mid-American Conference title. McClure, who 
was ll-of-20, has thrown 1,378 career passes, 
breaking the Division I record of 1.375 set by 
Duke's Ben Bennett. 


SCOREBOARD 


Football 


Basketball 


Hockey 


Selected U.S. Results National Basketball Association Standings 


NHL Standings 


Walter Payton 

...131 yards on 22 comes. 


r 


• . • . 

Tinlan din g ham Wins D.C. International in Upset 


Andrew Beyer 

Washington Pea Service 


■■ Although McGaoghey wanted to 
prepare Vanlandmgbain for dirt 
DW . . . , _ . races in New York and Calif coma. 

REL, Maryland — Tram- he did see one bit of merit in An- 
ays grtmible when ownrp Sony's lidea. McGanghey had 
‘ come to learn a hamh truth about 

the 4-year-old. 

.He seems to be a one-dimension- 


and tdl them what to do 
one. When owner John Ed 
y told Sbug McGangbey 
wanted to enter VanUm- 




n in the Washington, D.C 
tional McGaoghey wasn’t 
rimed by the idea. 

— all, V Bnlanrirngham never 
red on the grass, be never 
jxi anything like the mushy 
i.’irse at Laurel Race Course, 


al runner who does his best only 
whm he can get die early lead. He 
hadn’t been able to win a race from 
off the pace all year. Otherwise, he 
bad been virtually unbeatable. 

“I figured lhal none of tire Euro- 
pean horses had his kind of speed. 


berry Road II toward the back of 
the 10-horse pack. 

- Vanlandingham loped the first 
quarter of'a mile in 26 seconds, the 
haff in 51-1/5 and three-quarters in 
1:17-1/5, and nobody behind him 
made, a move to chaitengr him. 
“When I went by the board and 
saw the 51, 1 was pretty happy,” 
MacBethsakL 

Second-guessers might criticize 
the other jockeys for permitting 
MacBeth to “steal” the race, bnt 
since nobody had raced over the 
Laurel turf course in a week, no- 
body could know what would con- 


Vaalandmgham. “He got to that 
horse’s flank, but that's all he could 
get,” said jockey Chris McCarron. 
Yashgan never threatened the win- 
ner, but managed to hold -off the 
late run of the En glish filly Jupiter 
Island to save second place by a 
nose. 

Vanlandmgbain covered the mile 
and a half in 2:35 35, and paid 
516-20 to bis hackers in the crowd 
of 19,806. 

Vanlandingham always had been 
highly regarded as a 3-year-old, but 
he was knocked out of action after 


- 1 1 bred to be agrass runner. McGaugbey said. “I figured he stitute a normal pace. Given die ^“rting hims e l f in the Kentucky 

■ nmnewl " cold 11 ■ -i . . X j-.- ... \ ... - TW«, 1 V. ui_L 


,• opposed,” McGaugbey said. 

Vanlandingham made his 
. look pretty smart Saturday, 
; all the way to score an cp- 
.ory in the 34th Inlemauon- 


* =th, be finished one length 
of Yashgan, with Jupiter Is- 

• ird. 

t *»wbeny Road II, the favorite, 
“ ,in, generally considered the 
* Jr’S best tarf horse, faded to 
> sot of the money (Win was 
' ind Strawberry Road U 
_ in the 10-horse field). ' 


could control the race somewhat. 

That is exactly what happened. 
Note of Vanlantfingham’s rivals 
had any intention of challenging 
him early . On a tmf coarse that had 
been saturated by daylong rain, all 
tbe jodreys wanted to conserve 
their mounts' energy. 

Moments after the gate opened, 
V anlandingham found 'hims elf 
three kngtfis ahead of the field. 
Richard Mighore, aboard Win, was 
content to sit just behind him. An- 
gel Cordero Jr. was keeping Straw- 


condition of the grass, the fractions 
were not absurdly slow. 

On the torn. Strawberry Road II 
tried to make a move, bet never 
lanndied a real challenge. He was 
probably enervated after a succes- 
sion of trans-Atlantic trips. Win 
weakened on the turn, too. He has 
never fared well on this kind of 
tmf, and trainer Sally Bailie had 
agonized all afternoon before de- 
ciding not to scratch him 

Yashgan just kept plodding 
along behind the leader, running 
tire same type of even-paced race as 


Derby. McGaoghey brought him 
back in peak form after a year’s 
layoff, and he was considered a 
strong contender for the horse-of- 
tiw-year title wha he went into five 
Breeders’ Cup Classic at Aqueduct 
two weeks ago. 

Challenged for the early lead, he 
tired badly, finished next to last 
and lost considerable prestige. Ou 
Saturday he regained a lot of it and, 
McGaugbey said, “I have to give 
Mr. Anthony all the credit.” Bui 
the tnuner and MacBeth deserve 
their share, too. 


van if 


Nrea 





‘ense Scores 2 Goals 
Forge Tie With Islanders 



TJu Associated Press , 

ONdXLE, New York' — 
mciutoiL Oilers got some of- 
an unexpected 

game National - Hockey 
losing streak with a 4-4 tie 
the New York Islanders. 
Jayed a hunch,” Oiler Coach 
Sather said, explaining why 

NHL FOCUS ^ 


rted defenseman Don Jacfc- 
rinst the Islanders, 
iisoo, who had been oot with 
lised right knee and had 
f l four games, responded with 
' goal in a wild third period to 
le.OQers pull even. - 
_ckson always -plays -well 
^t the Islanders,” said Sather, 
'iso got a goal Grom another. 
£man, Lee FogoHn, as the 
came back from two goals 
the third period, 
picked up our 'defense on 
' trip, even though we lost 
Jackson said. “We’ve 
back from bigger deficits 
hat, but the Islanders have a 
isdplmed team, so you’ve got 
2 our guys credit.” 
x Knuhdnyslri scored the 
goal for the Oilers in the 
•pen final period., 
lost happened to be watch- 
he Oiler forward said “I saw 
uck when it popped loose, 
one overskated it and . I just 


trapped at np-ice. It should never 
have happened. We played very 
well for the first 55 minutes.” 

Fogolin and Krushelnyski 
scored just 24 seconds apart during 
die last five minutes of the third 
period for the Odets, who had lost 
previous road games in Washing- 
ton and Philadelphia. 

The Wanders' held a 2-1 lead 
before the teams saved five goals 
in the third period, three by Ed- 
monton. 

Pkl LaFoutaine put New York in 
front at 11:55 of the first period as 
he banged in a loose pndc from a. 
scrambk in front of Edmonton 
goal tender Andy Moog. 

Wayne Gretzky tied die score 58 
seccmds lateron a power play noth ■ 
a 10-foot shot after a pass across 
the crease from Jari.KuczL .lt was 
Gretzky’s 13th goal of the season. 

Bryan Trottier put the Islanders 
in front, 2-1, al 2:20 of the second 
period as his shot trickled ^ under- 
neath Moog’s pads. 

Duane Sutter opened the third- 
period scoring, putting the Island- 
ers in front by >1 with a 20-foot 
shot just inside the far post. 

Bat Edmonton scored three of 
the next four goals to tie the game. 
Jackson got his first of the year at 
Kh07 as he put a rebound into the 
far comer of the net past Islander 
goaltender My Hrodey. 

. Just 45 seconds later, MflceBossy 
scored bis 10th gpatof the year to . 
restore the Handers* two-goal lead 
at 4>Z John TosdH set up Bossy’s 



id it upstairs. 

uder goalteoder Kdty Hra- 
,/as victimized by the Oiler ■ 40-footcr off Mopg’s gjove for his 
’^It’s tough to sit back against 500th career point. 

.tin like that,” he said. *Tbey " Edmonton thea came back on 
Xoratc the two defensemen the goals by Fogptin and Krusbel- 
attack. That gives them- nyski. Fogolin came behind the 1s- 
r-iayeraemningatyou.” lander net and shoved the puck 

'red Islander Coach Al Ar- past HrudCT at 15:26, and 24 sec- 
1 ”We got the goal to go up 4-2 oHds^ latex Kinshehxyski scored 
. air forwards starting getting a: 15-footer from tlK skit to tie it 



EAST 

Army 4 », AtamphJ» St. 7 
Brown 22, OorTmoutti 0 
Coni. CormoettaJt 30. Lontil II 
ComWI 21, Cotumbta ■ 

CW. Post 21. Poranom U 
Dekunaro St. Si. t w tftsa a twn I 
Marwont 17, Ponn i 
Hot/ Cron 30. Boston U. 9 
H oward U. 7. Moron St 3 
Uotoysne 23, Kutztown 7 
LohJoh W, BudoMlI 0 
Lock Hovan ZV Buffalo 31 
Atolno St Dotowars 7 
Massachusetts 21, Mow Hampshire 17 
Penn St. 3i Met r e Dam# i 
Pflncehm 7i. Vole W 
RPI 3X Hobart 2D 
Rbode blond Si Comecttait 42 
-ttutvmn 7S. Cotatf* U . 

Swtteiort 26. Georgetow n 6 
Syracuse 41. Boston Cal lone 21 
U minus li otekinson M 
W. Connecticut 17, Hotstra 12 
W. VTrgWo a Temote 10 
SOUTH 

Alabama 24. S. Mississippi M 
Alcorn «. 41, Prairie view 7 
Appalachian St. 40, Marshall 0 
Auburn a Georgia 10 
Oarti V. Morehouse 14 
Duke 31. M. Carol km St. 1* 

E. intfieis 14 W. Kentucky 13 
Florldo li Kentucky 13 
Florida St 50. W. Carolina 10 
Furman 4L The Otadel 0 
Georgia Tech 41, Wake Forest 10 
L5U 17. Mississippi St. 15 
Mar y lend 34 CTemsan 31 
S. CaroHaa 34 Navy 31 
Southern u. 34 Florldo ASM 27 
Tennessee 34 Mississippi 14 
Toxsiattonooaa 54 VMi 7 
Tulsa 21. E. Carolina 20 
Virginia 34 N. Co rat bio 22 
Virginia Tedi a vonderMH V 
Will tare 4 Mary a Richmond 17 
MIDWEST 
Bowlins Green 21, Toledo 0 
Cent. Mkhtgon a Boll 51. V 
Denison 44 Rochester 6 
Illinois 41. Indiana 34 
mmols St 24 Indiana 5t 71 
Iowa 77, Purdue 24 
Iowa St 31. Kansas St. U 
Miami (Ohio) 31, C. MkMaon U 
Michleon 44 Minnesota 7 
Michigan Sfc U Northwestern 0 
Nebraska 54 Kansas 6 
N. Dakota St. 49. N. Dakota ■ 

N. Illinois a Ohio U. 7 
Oklahoma St. 31, Missouri 1* 

S. Dakota a Nebrasko-Omaho 17 
W. Illinois 14 & Illinois 7 

W. Michigan a Kenl St. J 
Wisconsin 14 Ohio SL 7 

SOUTHWEST 

Ark.-Monticelta 42, Ariu-Ptae Bluff 3 
Arkonsos St 71, Lamar 0 
Baylor 34 Rice 10 
E. Texas SL 21, Howard Payne 0 
Louisiana Teen 79, Texas- Arlington 14 
Oklahoma 31. Colorado 0 
Panhandle SL A Se Oklahoma 35 
Sam Houston st. 51, VDoWAum 7 
Southern Meth. 7. Texas Tech 7 
S» Arkansas a Arkansas Teds 21 
Texas 24 Texas ChrtsrKra a 
Texas aim 14 Arkansas 4 
Texas AW 14 Abilene Cnrwion 3 
FAR WSST 
Arizona 24 Oreeon 8 
Arizona St. 21. Stanford 14 
Brigham Yeung 28. Air Ferae 71 
Colorado St. 2L Utah 17 
E. W as hington 52. Montano 17 
Fresno St. a Long Beech St. 31 
FuRerton St. a N. Artuno • 
Nevodo-Reno 44 Nev.-Los veoss 7 
New Mexico 41, Wyoming IS 
Soi Diego St. M Texas- El Paso S 
UCLA 4i, Oregon Si. a 
Washington 24 Southern Cal 17 
Washington SL M. Montana 5t. 14 
Weber st. 44 Idaho St. 4S 
W. Texas SI. 55. New Mexico St. 25 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


Boston 

1 

W 

2 

L Pet 
SCO 

GB 

New Jersey 

6 

6 

soo 

3 

Phltadrtpbio 

5 

5 

500 

3 

Washington 

3 

7 

JH 

5 

New York 

2 

8 

.200 

4 

Milwaukee 

Central Dhrliioe 

7 4 

492 

_ 

Detroit 

7 

5 

583 

Ite 

Atfagrto 

6 

4 

J00 

2 n 

Cleveiond 

5 

6 

.455 

3 

Indiana 

3 

6 

-233 

4 

Chicago 

4 

8 

J33 

41ft 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 


Houston 

7 

2 

AI8 

— 

Denver 

*. 

2 

too 

Vs 

San Antonio 

6 

5 

345 

3 

Utah 

6 

6 

300 

3to 

Dallas 

4 

7 

J64 

5 

Sacramento 

3 

Pacific Otvisioa 

7 

JOO 

5Vr 

LA. Lakers 

7 

! 

.900 

— 

Portland 

• 

4 

467 

2 

Gotaen State 

4 

6 

400 

4 

LA. Clipper* 

5 

4 

455 

41ft 

Seattle 

4 

8 

J33 

6 

Phoenix 

1 10 

-0091 

8VJ 


FRIDAY'S RESULTS 

Wachtaston » 17 » 44— 114 

Boston 37 25 21 33— lit 

Alnee 10-15 4-4 24 Bird 7-113-3 22; Rulandll- 
17MX. Matane 11-30 3-4 37. Rebounds: Wash- 
ington 57 (RiAand 17). Boston 57 (Bird 11). 
Assists: Washington 27 (G.WUltams 8). Bos- 
ton 34 (Ainge 7). 

Detroit 32 27 25 33—118 

Atlanta 37 27 34 22—122 

Wilkins 7-22 12-13 34 Lovlngston 8-13 5-8 21; 
Thomas*-207-724Trlpucka 8-1544 24 Lone 7- 


Soccer 


Worid Cup Qualifying 

EUROPEAN GROUP 4 
France Z Yugoslavia 4 
East Germany 2. Bulgaria 1. 

Final Points standings: France. Bulgaria 
IT; East Germany 10; Yugoslavia 8; Luxem- 
bourg 4 

France. Batgorta qualify lor 1W World Cup 
finals in Mexico. 

EUROPEAN GROUP 2 
Malta 1. Sweden 2 
Wen Germany 2. Czechoslovakia 3 

Final points standings: West Germany 12 
Portugal KLSewden 9. Czechoslovakia 4 Mal- 
ta I. 

West Germany, Port u gal Qualify for finals. 


European 


MAN OF THE MATCH — Mlchd Platini scored both 
goals Saturday in Paris as France beat Yugoslavia, 2-<L to 
earns slot in die 1986 World Cup soccer finals in Mexico. 


Pro Tennis 


ENOLI5H FIRST DIVISION 
Arsenal Z Oxford I 
Aston Villa 1, Sheffield Wednesday 1 
Ipswich Town 2 Even do 4 
Liverpool 4 West Bromwich 1 
Luton Town 4 Coventry ary 1 
Manchester Untied 4 Tottenham 0 
Newcastle 1. Chelsea 3 
Nottingham Forest 4 AAonchestor CHv 2 
Queens Park Rangers. 2 Leicester 0 
Southam p ton I, Birmingham 0 
West Ham 2 Watford 1 
Points: Manchester United 42; Liverpool 
37; Chelsea 33; West Horn. Sheffield Wednes- 
day 33; Evertoa Arsenal 30; Newcastle. 
Queens Pork Rangers 26; Nottingham Forest 
25; Luton 24; Watford 22; Tottenham. South- 
ampton 21 : Coventry 20; Aston VUlo Ms Bir- 
mingham 16; Manchester City. Oxford, 
Leicester 15; Ipswich 9; west Bromwich 4 
SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
voUodohd 4 Las Palmas 2 
Real AAodrtd 4 Cadiz 1 
Cefta 4 Barcelona 2 
Gllcxi 3. Hercules 1 
Reol Soetedad I, Sevilla 0 
hefis 2 Athletic de Bilbao 0 
Valencia 1. Osasuna 1 
Espanol 1. Atteflco de Madrid 2 
Santander 2 Zaragoza 3 


Mim TOURNAMENT 
fio London) 

QUarterflnoU 

David Pate. U.S. del. Joaklm Nystram |B1. 
Sweden, 6-2 34 7-5. 

Ivan Lendl (1) Czechoslovakia, Oaf. Johan 
Krtek (6), uj. ft- 2, ft-l. 

Afldftft Jorrvd (5). Sweden, oef. Ramesh 
KrUhnan, India ft-l, 7-5. 

Berts Backer (2). West Germany, def. Mike 
Leach. US- 6-4 5-3 tret.) 

SecnMeaH 

Becker del. Jdrrvd. 7-4 (11-71. 74 (7-4} 
Land) doL Pott, 6-4 6-7 (5-7), 4-1 
Final 

Lendl del. Becker, 6-7 tWH. 6-1*4 . 64 ft-A 


Transition 


BASEBALL 


143-224 Reboands; Detroit 47 1 Lolmbeer 14). 
Atlanta 40 (Lev Inaston 10j. Assists: Detroit 27 
(Thomas 14), Atlanta 22 ( Wlttmon, E Johnson 
6 ). 

New Jersey M 38 22 21— 98 

OaUas 27 27 2» 27—118 

Blackman 1321 5-4 31. Aguirre 8-14 2-3 18; 
Klno 11-)B3-3 24 Dawkins 7-74-4 14 Rebocmds: 
New Jersey 48 (Williams 12). Dallas 50 (Per- 
kins 16). Assists: Now Jersey 22 IRKhordson 
6). Dallas 34 [Aguirre 11). 

Chicago 32 21 25 25—183 

MOwaukM » M 29 37— lit 

Cummings 11-17 (HI a Pierce tr* 54 17; 
Woo! ridge 7-17 34 21, Green 7-11 44 IS. Re- 
bounds: Chicago 49 (Green 141. Milwaukee 5* 
(Mokeski 7). Assists; Ch largo 26 (Macv 7). 
Milwaukee 32 (Hodges ill. Total touts— Chi- 
cago a Milwaukee 34 
Seattle - 37 21 38 28— 77 

Phoenix 34 72 M 27—117 

Nance 10-14 54 25. Davis 8-1 3 6422; McDan- 
iel 11-17 0-2 a Young 7-13 0-0 IS. Rcbounds: 
Seattle 51 (McOanleL SI loner 81. Phoenix 64 
(Nance ill. Assists; Seattle 25 (Slkma e). 
Phoenix 33 (Davis 8). Total toulft— Seattle a 
Phoenix a 

Pen-Hand 38 U 25 31—118 

Utah 23 M 16 40— (33 

Dantlev 14-23 1316 41. Bailey 7-16 44 13 
Thomason 8-15 *4 a Drexier 8-17 1-3 17. Re- 
bounds: Portland 46 1 Drexier 91. U ion 60 (Ma- 
lone 10). Assist: Portland 25 (Drexier. Colter 
31. Utah 32 (Stockton 12). Total tauls— Port- 
land 31. Utah 22. 

LA. Lakers M 32 29 32—127 

LA. aipeen 20 35 3S 23— N 

McGee 8-15 24 17. Worthy 6-10 5-7 17. John- 
son 13Q 44 a White 8-14 1-2 17. Rebounds: 
LA. Lakers 66 ( Ejohnson 7), LA. Clippers S3 
(Case 10). Assists; LA. Lakers 40 ( EJohnson 
M). LA. Clippers a (Edwards B>. 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
Phoenix » 25 36 22—185 

Goidea State » 23 33 33-118 

Short 14-28 7-7 34 Carroll 64 39 19. Mulltn 6- 
14 7-7 17; Davis 10 27 7-7 a Adams 7-14 0-0 14 
Rebounds: pnoanlx Sft (Janes. Nance io». 
Golden State 54 (Short 10). Assists: Phoenix 24 
(Davis it. Golden Stale 22 (Fiova il). 

LA. Clippers IT 25 31 33—107 

0«W*r 34 25 29 25—113 

English 17-31 3-3 37. Cooper 12-21 *5 2B; 
Johnson 13-20 6-7 32. Cage 8-12 2-2 18. Re- 
bounds: LA. dippers 5» (Cage 12). Denver 51 
(Coooer ii). Assists: LA. Clloeers is (Thom- 
as, Edwards St. Denver 32 (Lever 16). 
Cleveland 29 37 M 29 13-132 

Chicago 29 a 31 27 7—128 

Free 6-18 16-19 a Hinson 10-174-7 24; Wool- 
rtdgg 12-22 u-u a Corztne 7-12 84 a Re- 
bounds: Cleveland 52 (Hinson B). Chicago 52 
(Corrine 12). Assists: Cleveland 19 (Free 5). 
Chicago 2? (Gervin, Corzlne 5). 

Seattle 23 23 17 27 3-TS 

San Aotoelo 29 18 S 20 7—97 

Milchell 15-30. 3-5 a Gilmore b- 15 *5 a 
Chombers 7-16 54 20, Slkma 513 9-7 19. Re- 
bounds: Seattle Sr (Slkma 18). Son Antonio 47 
(Gilmore 15). Assists: Seattle J9 (Henderson 
6), Son Antonio 75 (Moore 1«). 

Bowoo 33 28 28 28-107 

Indiana 31 75 28 so — 111 

Kellogg 8-12 54 21. Stlpanavfch 7 -ib 94 30; 
Bird 12*197-733, Parish 8-11 34 19. Rebounds: 
Boston 42 (Parish 10). India no £5 (Stlpanovlcn 
14). Assists: Boston 31 { Alnae 7). Indiana 32 
(Stlpanovlcn 10). 

Dallat 31 16 35 35—117 

Houston 29 a 35 25—122 

Otatavm8-M7-18a Lloyd 8-1524 1 a. Lucas 
6-115-518; vlncenn*. 22 1-3 29, Perk Ins 11 -186- 
7 a Rebounds: Dallas 37 (Perkins 10), Hous- 
ton 10 (Olaluwan 151. Assist*: Dallas 34 
(Blackmon 9). Houston 27 (Lucas 91. 
PhltodefPhio 23 a a* is- 97 

Washington 36 19 30 33—118 

JJMolone 11.20 10-10 32. Roundfleld 12-1* 0-2 
24; MJMolone 7-12 74 21. Ervlno 74 6-7 20. 
Rebounds: Philadelphia 36 (MJWalone 9). 
Washington <7 (Roundfleld 12). AsNsSs; PhlL 
odetohta 20 (Cheeks 01, Washington a (Wil- 
liams ])). 

Atlanta 25 20 a 31— 96 

New York 24 29 29 71 — 102 

Ewlno 9-21 10-12 a Soar-row 74 O-l 14; 
D.Wilkin* 7-18 S-5 19, Levingtoon 7-12 3-5 17. 
Neboands: Attentate l Rollins*), New York 4« 
(Ewing 30). Assists: Atlanta 19 (Johnson 7), 
New York 72 i Sparrow, walker 6). 

Utah 30 W 25 16—100 

Sacramento a 36 29 »- w 

Dontley li-ia 14-17 34 Bailey 7-12 3-* 17: 
Drew 9-17 64 34 Johnson 8-19 s-s 21. Re- 
bounds: Utah 42 (Malone »). Sacramento 45 
(Thompson 14). Assists: Utah 31 (Stockton 7). 
Sacramento 27 (Theum 8). 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pts GF GA 


Phliadeiphia 

14 

2 

0 

72 

79 

44 

Washington 

7 

A 

] 

21 

72 

ftl 

NY islanders 

7 

5 

3 

17 

57 

55 

NY Rangers 

8 

B 

1 

IT 

63 

56 

New Jersev 

6 

9 

1 

13 

55 

65 

Pittsburgh 

5 

9 

3 

13 

5* 

47 

Adams Division 




Boston 

10 

S 

3 

23 

78 

58 

Buffalo 

10 

6 

1 

21 

67 

50 

Quebec 

10 

4 

1 

21 

70 

60 

Montreal 

7 

7 

3 

17 

67 

69 

Hartford 

■ 

8 

0 

16 

60 

71 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Divblaa 


St. Louis 

7 

6 

3 

17 

58 

63 

Chicago 

4 

10 

1 

13 

68 

80 

Detroit 

4 

* 

4 

12 

S3 

83 

Minnesota 

’ 4 

' 9' 

3 

11 

59 

AS 

Taranto 

2 12 3 

Smyths Division 

7 

5» 

7ft 

Edmonton 

11 

4 

2 

24 

87 

61 

Calgary 

9 

6 

2 

20 

77 

62 

Vancouver 

8 

9 

2 

IB 

77 

7? 

Winnipeg 

7 

8 

2 

14 

70 

80 

Los Angeles 

4 

12 

1 

7 

57 

88 


FRIDAY'S RESULTS 

Vancouver 8 0 3—3 

Washington 1 2 2—5 

Adams (5). Christian (7|.G0uld (4). Andera- 
son (2) Djemen (l); Peterson m.Tantl 114) 
Skriko (10). Shots ou goal: Vancouver (on 
A_lansen) 9-11-10—30; Washington (an Bra- 
fluur) 7-11-7— 25. 

New Jersey 0 2 1—3 

Winnipeg 1 a 2—5 

Bosehmon (101. MdcLaan (11). Silk (21. Pi- 
card (2). Babvctj (4)j Mac Leon (5), McNab 

(6) . Johnson (4). Shots ou goal: New Jersey 
(on Hayward) +7-7—22: Winnipeg (on Reach) 
8-7-13—27. 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
Washington 011 8-3 

Boston 110 8—2 

Pasin 2 (5) ; Murphy (5). Lauohlln (4). Shots 
OP goal: Washington ion Keans) 3-7-180—20; 
Boston (on Jensen) 8-104-2-29. 

Edmonton 1 8 3 8-4 

N.Y. Islanders 112 8-4 

LaFontolne (7), Trottier (51. OSutter (4). 
Bossy (10); Gretzky (13), Jackson n). Fooo- 
Mn (2). Krusheinvskl (4). Shots on gdal: Ed- 
monton (on H ruder) 8-16-144— 40i New York 
(on Moog) 13-17-64-36. 

Philadelphia 1 1 3—5 

Hartford 0 1 1—2 

Prapp (141, Tocchet ! (5). Ektand (4). 
McCrlmmon (23: Lawless (21 Ferraro IS). 
Shots on goal: Pniladetohlo Ion Weeks) 6-9- 
13— W; Hartted (on Jensen) 7-174—33. 
Buffalo 0 I 8—1 

Quebec 8 1 3—3 

Hunter (5). Show (2). Gilds (61: McKenna 
111. Shots on goal: Buffalo (on Gosaelln) 9-3- 
7—24; Quebec (on Borras») 144-10—30. 
N.Y. Bangers I g 1 8—2 

Montreal 1 0 1 a— 2 

Ridley (6). Greschner (5); McPtiee (4). 
Gainey (5). Shota an goal: New York (on Soe- 
loert) 4-64-2—21; Montreal Ion vonblea- 
brouck) 6-13-10-2 — 31. 

New jersey 0 1 1—2 

Calgary 2 4 1—7 

Bmek (7), Beers [31, Be reran (31. McDon- 

ald (6). Mac I rolls (3), Bourgeois 14). Quinn 

(7) ; Verbeek?13).Sholsonooal: New jersey 
(on Lemehn) *-7-15—24; Calgary (on Chev- 
rler. Bllllnolon) 16-17-13— tt. 

COlcogo 8 4 8—4 

Toronto 3 3 t— 6 

Leernan 2 (3). Valvg (121. Terrion 2 (B). 
Fergus (7): Secord (51. Olcryk IS), Sovard 
(91. Fraser (11). Shots an <mm: Chicago (an 
Bern! xi rati 11-8-8 — 27; Toronto Ion Bdnner- 
mon) 17-17-6—41 

Detroit 2 1 1—4 

Minnesota 1 0 1—2 

Young (7), Duguav (4). Yzerman (3), 
Ogrodnlck (71; Biuastad (6). Giles (21. Shots 
on goal: Del roll (on Beauere) 9-124-49: Mln- 
nesota (on Sleton) 13-124—31. 

Vancouver 2 2 1 8—5 

St. Louis 2 2 I 1—6 

Romoae (21. Feaerke (5). Sutter 17), Gll- 
mour |«). Hunter 191 Mullen (9); Hod 15). 
Grodin (2). Lanz (51. Sundslrom (41. Tonrl 
|151.Shatieagodl: Vancouver tenWamstey) 
14-1744-39; Sf. Leu Is i on Caprice) B-U-70- 
2—34 

PHfshurgh ill 8-3 

Los Angeles 1 2 8 1—4 

Wilks (2). Tgytor (7), Hlcholls (8), Williams 
(6); Shedden (8), Lemleux (121. Ruskowskl 
(91. Sbete on goal: Pittsburgh (on Janecvk) 
114-9-1—39; Las Angeles 16ft Romano) 8-124- 
2—26. 


(In Brtsbenc, Asutralta) 
SemKlitolB 

Marttna Navratilova (1), UJL def. Claudia 
KohdteKilsdi (3), west Germany. 6-1 4-1. 

Pam Shrtuer (21. U5. dot. Ho<«n« lukevo 
(4). CzectnwIavakiaL. 74 (7J). t-A 6-Z 
Find 

Navratilova def. Shriver. 6-4, 7-5, 

(hi Osaka, Jaggs) 

Semifinals 

Chrit Evert Lloyd. U A. 041. Usa Bonder, 
US, 64,4-0 

Manuel Maleeva, Butoria, def. Carting 
Bassett, Canada, 64, 6-1 
Ftaal 

evert aeL Moweva. 7-s. 46L 


MILWAUKEE— Adoed Mike Blrkbcck, 
Mark aordL Brvan Clutlertwck. Bryan Du- 
nene, Dan Mureiiv. Juan Nieves, ana Dan 
Plesoc. ritdwn. Jim Adduct and Gtonn 
Braggs, outfielders, and Edgar Diaz, xhorl- 
staa. to me 40-mon raster. 

Naeioaai unw 

HOUSTO N- A dd ed Rafael Montalvo, Mike 
Frtaderid: and Jose Vargas.pltenrrs; Nelson 
Rood, xhorietop; Louie M eado w s gna Antn» 
nv wwker. gvffietotra and Ruaaie Wine and 
Troy Atonir, Catchers, to the 40-man rosier. 

N.Y. METS— Named 5am P e rium i mcrco- 
er ot Tidewater of the International League, 
Mike Cubboge monooer ut Jadcson at me 
Texas Leasite. ana Gtenn Attoon pttthtag coa- 
ch or Jackson. 

BASKETBALL 

Nattnal Baskettiafl Association 

MILWAUKEE— Extended the contract of 
Don Nelson, head coach, through the 1989-90 


FOOTBALL 

NaHaneJ Football League 
PITTSBURGH — Activated Dwayne Wood- 
raff, Otmertedc. tram me Inlursd reserve 
UN. Placed Edmund Nelson, nefenelve end, en 
lhe Injured reserve list. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1985 


A Salsa Star Crosses Over 
■ — Into International Law 


By Victoria Pope 

C AMBRIDGE, Massachu- 
setts —At the Mug V Muf- 
fin restaurant. Ruben Blades is 
ordering beans the only way they 
come in Harvard Square: baked, 
with brown bread — a far erv 
from frijoks in his native Panama. 
He is quick to teQ the waitress. 
"Do me a favor, hold Lhe brown 
bread.” 

It is typical of ike salsa star to 
try to cobble together a Hispanic 
breakfast in a Yankee coffee 
shop. He is unmistakably I-nin 
vet determined to live outside the 
usual confines of salsa musicians, 
who make their reputations in the 
barrios and stay there. At the 
Mug ’n’ Muffin. Blades. 37. was 
taking a break from writing his 
master's thesis for a degree in in- 
ternational law at Harvard Law 
School. He graduated in June. 

His music takes salsa’s Afro* 
Cuban sound and adds riffs and 
chords reminiscent of rock 'n' 
rolL Blades is perhaps most ex- 
ceptional. however, for his power- 
ful lyrics. His songs can both pack 
a dance floor and carry a political 
message about Latin America. 

As a star of "Crossover 
Dreams.” a film about the salsa 
circuit, he proved himself on actor 
of natural talent. The film opened 
in New York in August to excel- 
lent reviews that singled out Bla- 
des's performance for praise. Vin- 
cent Can by of The New York 
Times called him an actor “whose 
presence and intelligence register 
without apparent effort." 

Blades plays Rud\ Ydoz. a 
singer of salsa. Rudy signs a con- 
tract to record an album in En- 
glish. a bit of luck that he thinks 
will begin his crossover from the 
glitzy dance halls or Spanish Har- 
lem to mainstream popularity. He 
celebrates his big break by buying 
a yellow convertible and t akin g 
his girl to Coney Island — two of 
the Aim's many signposts of the 
American dream as seen from the 
barrio. 

Blades left Panama more than a 
decade ago to play salsa in New 
York. But instead of reflecting the 
world from Spanish Harlem, his 
viewpoint is Larin American, and 
his lyrics observe life and politics 


and their often brutal ming ling in 
Central and South America. 

In his songs, a woman looks for 
her husband, one of the “vanished 
ones" of Larin .America. ... a 
priest and altar boy are murder- 
ed. ... a secret policeman re- 
counts his dull morning before 
leaving for work. 

Such powerful subject matter is 
provocative by the standards of 
salsa, which often invites escape 
into dance. Blades says be does 
not want to use his music as an 
opiate, but rather to confront is- 
sues. 

This sense of advocacy and se- 
riousness of purpose has pro- 
voked criticism from Latins who 
portray him os a publicist for left- 
ist Latin American causes. That 
reputation has spawned many de- 
tractors. especially in the Cuban 
emigre community of Miami. 
Blades said. 

In 19S0, after he recorded “Ti- 
buron" ( Shark 1 . a song about for- 
eign meddling in Latin .America, 
the most popular Latin music sta- 
tion in Miami stopped playing his 
songs, and ran an editorial calling 
him a co mmunist . Blades recalls 
that he received death threats, 
and was told privately that it 
would be several years before his 
records would be' played in Mi- 
ami. 

The cause of the furor were 
these lyrics, translated from Bla- 
des's Spanish: 

The moon rests amid the silence 
Resting on the great Caribbean 
Only the shark is still awake 
Only the shark is on the prowl 
Only the shark is restless . . . 

"I used to get frustrated." 
Blades said of his critics, “but it’s 
like arguing with a drunk." He 
has avoided Miami since the inci- 
dent. 

Such pragmatism may reflect 
his training as a lawyer’ or per- 
haps it is street wisdom acquired 
in more than a decade as a rising 
star of salsa. 

He is critical of U. S. policy in 
Niraraguo. but also said: “When 1 
write about the colonializaiion of 
Latin America, it can as surely be 
a finger pointed at the Soviet 
Union as the United States. How- 
ever. historically, it's been the 


United States that has been in- 
volved in oor countries. 

“But terrorism is terrorism, and 
it’s always unacceptable. I write 
about freedom and the need to 
avoid dictators.” 

His interest in politics is not 
confined to songwriting. Many 
articles on Blades say he wanes to 
be president of Panama. Thai, be 
said, is an exaggeration; what he 
wants is to create a new political 
party. The presidency is a vague 
aspiration, far down the road. “I 
am not so foolish as to want to 
run before I can walk,” he said. 

Childhood friends in Panama 
say be was always eager to make a 
mark. His energetic family may 
have first set the pace. His father 
was a Panamanian basketball 
champion who joined the secret 
police when it was recruiting ath- 
letes for its basketball team. His 
mother was an actress on radio 
soap operas and television variety 
shows. At night, his pareots 
played music — his father on the 
bongos, his mother singing and 
playing the piano. Blades credits 
his paternal grandmother, Emma, 
with widening his horizons the 
most. She was a playwright, poet, 
spiritualist and vegetarian, and it 
was she who taught him to read. 

Upon graduating from Panama 
University with an undergraduate 
degree in jurisprudence. Blades 
was offered a plum job as a legal 
advisor in Panama’s embassy in 
Washington. He turned it down 
to play the marimbas with salsa 
groups in New York. Though 
based in New York for 1 1 years, 
he has kept dose links to Panama. 

When his song “Dedsiones” 
^ Decisions) was banned from the 
airwaves not long ago in Panama, 
the outcry was quick and insis- 
tent. “Deasiones” was interpret- 
ed as pro-abortion in some quar- 
ters because it describes a 
daydreaming girl in geography 
class worrying that she is preg- 
nant. A cabinet minister resigned 
in protest of the ban, and within 
weeks the song was back on the 
radio. 

Blades said official prudishness 
had less to do with the censorship 
than general uneasiness among 
Panamas ruling elite that his 
ideas hold too much sway. Well- 



LANGUAGE ? 

Summitry: Don’t Expect a Pe T€ °* ^ 


By William SaJGrc 

"ASHINGTON — “Definitions are critkaL" an 


What are our **&*¥££" r 
™fa r advantage. PJ . ^ 


be possible for the negotiators at Geneva to work out a ^uggpa; Det^^.^v • v J ■ rs?' r>7Vt_ 

specific agreement after the summit.” “That,” con- ma&ets are c,tK ' s: — » n 1 ;. .: a 

chided this skilled practitioner at nnmmtspeak. conuuKspcsis .i-- 

“would be a real breafihrough.” S? 5 £Sbvthe r k,W 

Ever since Winston Chnrchill cafled for “a parley at chariaerizatmas o. _ 

the summit" in 1950, face-to-faoe diplomacy at the j, . ^ gjjen-repotcd P r " *' *-***' 
highest level has been called summitry. For an esqria- natenih absurd, wading » - ‘ u -j ih.i: 

nation of the terms and phrases to be brought into .or; 

play at the Reagan-Gorbachev summit, I have turned not get off die grou-- , 

to a spokesman almost legendary in his ability to leave ' ffisdainful characwrjauo-” • ’» j ^ 

no footprints, V. Cumbrous Array. ^ senezz Se ‘ -.-**■ 

“You are correct," confirms Mr. Array, “in refer- . arin heavy. w=g.V.v -■■■* # 

ring to this as the Reagan-Gorbachev summit. It is not, ____ solemn.” In diplomacy ■ J ;/V. „>w 

repeat not, the Geneva summit, as some press agents ^ ^ jg which we ^ - mmi 


Ruben Blades: “The need to avoid dictators.” 


placed Panamanians, recalling 
the event, view it as an ill-con- 
ceived effort to annoy the singer, 
and a clumsy effort to protea the 
morals of Panamanian youth. 

What Blades writes and says 
has great doat with his audiences. 
He is not unlik e Brace Spring- 
steen in personal style and influ- 
ence on his fans. 

In a Boston concert recently he 
wore minimalist black, his pants 
slightly too short, his boots 
scoffed. Much Like a beat poet or 
chansonneur, he spoke seriously 
and frequently between songs. 

His concerts have drawn no- 
ticeably more non-Latins in re- 
cent months. He and his band, 
“Seis de Solar" — which trans- 
lates as “Six from the Vacant 
Lot” — were the first Latin act to 
play the Rockpalast in Essen. 
West Germany, in a concert aired 
to Western and Eastern Europe 
and the Soviet Union. In another 
rite of passage, he played Carne- 
gie Hall in October. 

Blades has a box of letters from 
fans in Latin America. He says he 
cannot throw them oat because 
the writers entrusted to him pri- 
vate thoughts and aspirations. 
His Latin fans often look up to 
him as one of their own who has 
made it to the top. A taxi driver, 
han g in g around the entrance to a 


Manhattan club to find out how 
Blades’s performance there went, 
said: “I like the fact he’s an edu- 
cated man. Did yon know he’s a 
lawyer?" 

In a bid to attract a wider audi- 
ence, the lyrics to his last two 
albums were translated into En- 
glish. He speaks of a record in 
FiigHsh in the near future. His 
newest album is in a personal 
rather than political vein, he said; 
it may be a sign of hb desire to 
broaden his musical arena that he 
cut one song on that album with 
L in d a RonstadL 

He is also working on a cyde of 
songs sex to short stories by Ga- 
briel Garcia MArquez. The Mexi- 
can author called Blades the 
“most popular unknown I have 
ever known,” a quip that Blades 
found right on the mark. 

With “Crossover Dreams” that 
description is almost obsolete. 
But even with greater exposure 
and popularity. Blades says suc- 
cess in the U. S. mainstream 
would not mean leaving his I -fltrn 
audiences behind. “Why would I 
do that? The subject of my marie 
would only be defeated." 

Victoria Pope is a Boston-based 
journalist who has covered news 
and cultural events in Europe and 
the United States. 


mtt We have agreed to thsagree on the bfflmg. but ^ of heaviness. ** .VliadM* 

agree on the hyphenation. ^ Henrv Kissinger zona* ~ , + 

Is that a breakthrough? time — is high approbation, and 1 

“No. It is evidence of progress, showing a certain w mean “static interfering with rau* A 
mutual flexibility, part of the ongoing process. Hard Ijot now means “mood ,’ 1 is considered J * 4 * IUj 
baigamfng lies ahead.” thm. ' 

Is such baling a good idea? short of a breakthrough — fine uwj 1 ^V B L l Vl S' 

“We do not use the word idea at summits, except in militar y context by London's Daily j". hr 
the denunciation, no new ideas. What you call an idea, ^ closest Russian equivalent iscrra -’*’? 1 __ . V * , v 
privately presented, is a walk in the woods, and when summit achieve? Here we have *e pr*:®-' ^7 * ' 
bruited about, h is labeled a proposal, which when 0 f the Conceptual Frame* orkers 


Short of a breakthrough - 

nlitaiy ccmiext by London s Dj~> c- . - 

Rn^ian eouivaleni npensom — *«• * 


proposal. Two formal proposals are an initiative. The 
only adjective permitted for initiative is bold." . 

v. Cumbrous expects a run on terms about the steps 
necessary to create a space defense: Four stages exist 
between the time an idea forms in the mmd of a 
president and a space shield makes its appearance, 
blinking and peeping, in the sky. 

First comes research — in Russian, issledataniye; no 
problem there, as Gorbachev already indicated to 
Time magazine’s editors in the presumxmt skirmish- 
ing; besides, research is not verifiable by rational 
teiautical means (spy satellites, seismographs), so no- 
body will try to stop that. 

Then comes resting or ispytamye; Reagan considers 
that to be part of research, but Gorbachev says that is 
a no-no, or nyet-nyet. Somewhere in the late stages of 
research, probably during resting; cranes development 
— in Rireaan, m-rnhntkn — a wide term, wfaidi will be 
the battleground of finutation. If agreement is readied 
on a definition of the word development, there wiQ be 
new hope fra- mankind, or as Reagan evenhands it, 
humankind. 

Finally conies deployment — meaning “to spread, 
out on a wider front,” from the French far “unfold, 




has already agreed to negotiate before undertaking. 
Therefore, a scrap is not expected on both ends of the 
spectrum — research and deployment — but much 
hassling may be anticipated on the words resting and 
development . 


framework for fiaui* discussion tc a 
principles; short of that, if the corner, l 

S5 T5,rir«n-*-. * 

signed; or if the conference falls spJA 
memorandum (^understanding, riWX '' n * ! *S® 

ture, may be put forward as a fig wo* 

. V. Cumbrous has sfipped me, on a wB'bc-flOMfi j 
bas is, this handy rundown of his true meaning it , 
Characterization of the talks. If MHce and ^s uw V 
thitwir® shoes across the room, and if the www 
strategic faces go oa red-white-and-biuc a-ert. tse 
discussion wiB be described as frank andseruXA • 

However, if they merely holler at one anas*. tttt 
some good end. the spokesman’s phrase wU oe ,*nd*t 
and productive. If the talks go wefl, we will best ana* 
and productive. Bf they really go well, beyond export* j 
lions, the talks wffl rate the snmmitspeak accolade. Jtt. 
im p ort a nt exchange. 

Now hold on to your hats. If that then escalates 
important and fruitful exchange — beyond sertout. 
beyond productive, with those well-nurtured scfcUL 
yielding real fruit — then we will have ourselves f 
regular perelom, a breakthrough j 

If tfarf happens, and the bells peal around the work^ 


WI 1 UC IUVCMIA 3 Uilliy WWW ouu r mn 

shares, what will be the hosanna from V. Curabr 
Array? 

“Hard bugaming lies ahead.” 

New York Tuna Service 


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