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1 (j rte GIobal NeWspa 
ipv j ;• Edited in PSois: ■ 
wh Printed Simultaneous!' 

• *» Paris, London, 

H " 


INTER1VATIONAL 





31,9 58 


Pub lishe d With The New York Tunes and The Washington Post 



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_ . resale worker, caflingfor bdp, msbes a child, covered in 

- from a helicopter to a medical aid center in Armani 




-RfT 






■■ 


\reak Out in Colombia 


The Avsociaied Press 
BOGOTA — Colombian 


goyu 


■r .3t = f ^ Cauiwti W 5ar/nait officials said Monday that 
=»* boid fever and incidents of k>ot- 
had broken out in Armero. the 
. •^ it m muixlated by tons of mud 

T? . . jy.'ai a volcanic eruption last week- 

• ■ - )fficials backed off fr om $ 
r dechnation that, the hunt for 

'JjTVOrs would be en&cd fp A r- 


crr.Z 


•.*0rt 


mild who was bazdy aBut” He said 
be readied the boy by “swimming” 
through mud that nearly covered 
his heart 

He said that weak voices crying 
for help could be beard Monday in 
ouxtymg areas ol Armero, where 
- the ground is higher than the devas- 
tated center of town. = ' 

Geologists warned Monday that 




tJZ'-l 


ealedaff. 
escue authorities have put the 
SSaal toll of dead and missing 
fcf-U the eruption at about 25,000. 
^ictor Ricardo, president of the 
iwerinncm emergency committee, , 
Caracol radio that footers were- 
^wiing the Armero area. He said 
k*ond Rafael Horario Ririz had 
^■»n appointed mayor of the town 
A its outlying districts and told to 
^jorc order; 

wdayor Isaac Rodriguez of Lfcri^. 
■as four miles (6.5 kilometers) from 
^nero. said on Caracol that the 
■ay "has been given orders to 
;wot looters.™ 

These filthy looters arc stepping 
up the injured, who are agomzing 
w^he mud, to get objects mat were 
j£: covered by the avalanche," he 
w’d. “They’re even ripping chains 
rings from the cadavers." 
Otalora, a firefighter woik- 
, with a rescue team, told the 
%N radio station Monday: “We 

**ated a little boy buried in he 

# ■ ■ 


Nevado .dd Ruiz volcano might 
signal more activity. U.S. sdennsis 
set np the laser equipment on the 
volcano to detea movement. 

Meanwhile. British rescuers lis- 
tened for signs of life undo; the 
mud and rubble, despite Health 
Minister Rafael Znbiria Gdmez’s 
statement Sunday dial there was 
too one left to rescue." 

Mr. Znbiria called Monday for 
the fumigation of the area to pro- 
tect against typhoid fever after two 
injured survivors contaminated 
two operating rooms at Kennedy 
Hospital in Bogoti. He said the 


Of Liner 
Convicted 

5 Palestinians 
Sentenced on 
Arms Charges 

By John Tagliabue 

New York Times Service 
GENOA — An Italian court 
convicted five Palestinians on 
Monday on arms possession 
charges resulting from the hijack- 
ing of die cruise shm.AcfaiDe Laura 
and the murder of an American 
7 passenger. All five men were sen- 
tenced to prison terms ranging 
from four to nine years. - 
The prosecutor, Luigi Carii, is 
exp laining why he bad not sought 
the maximum penalty of 12 years in 
prison for the men, said that “even 
if adopting terrorist methods," the 
Palestinians had pursued a cause 
“that cannot be considered devoid 
of valid motivation." 

Four of the men were accused in 
the actual hijacking and the fifth 
was charged as an accomplice. 

Several Italian witnesses from 
among the ship’s crew members, 
called to identify the arms carried 
by the four hijackers, conceded 
that they had acted cruelly to some 
of the passengers but praised their 
patriotism. One crew member, who 
{fid not identify himself, raid they 
acted “with courage and firmness." 

The five Palestinians reacted to 
(he sentences by chanting, Tn our 
souls and in our blood we defend 
Palestine." 

In pretrial testimony that was 
largely confirmed Monday, the hi- 
jackers said the arms and explo- 
sives were smuggled into Italy on 
SepL 28 from T unis by close asso- 
ciates of Mohammed Abbas, a Pal- 
estinian leader whom the United 
States accuses of having organized 

the hi jacking 

. The court imposed the stiff est 
sentence, of nine years, on Moham- 
med Issa Abbas, a 25-year-old Pal- 
estinian who was not among the 
actual hijackers bur is described as 
a dose aide and a relative of Mo- 
hammed Abbas. 

In pretrial testimony, Moham- 
med lisa Abbas said he had carried 
a letter from Mohammed Abbas to 
Genoa that he thought contained 
instructions for the hijacking. But 
he said, he swallowed the letter 
when he was stopped by the Italian 
police. 

The trial, which lasted nearly 
right hours, enables Italian offi- 
cials to hold the Palestinians while 
they prepare the major case against 
them and other suspects for tire 
hijacking and the mnrder of Leon 
Klinghoffer, 69, an American tour- 
ist who witnesses say was slain by 
the hijackers. . 

Carlo Maria Napoli, the chief 



Soviet Leader, 
In Geneva, Says 
Arms Limit Is 
Summit Goal 


Mikhail S. Gorbachev, left, leader of the Soviet Communist Party, making a statement at 
the airport as he arrived in Geneva. At right is Switzerland's president, Kurt Furgler. 

Reagan Is Leaving His Options Open 
On Compliance With ’79 Arms Pact 


By Bernard Wtinraub 

New York Times Service 

GENEVA — It is unlikely that 
President Ronald Reagan will 
agree this week to a joint affirma- 
tion with Mikhail S. Gorbachev to 
extend compliance with the 1979 
strategic aims treaty, the White 
House national security adviser, 
Robert G Me Far lane, has dis- 
closed. 

A verbal ratification of the 1979 


agreement has been eagerly sought 
by the Western European allies 
who hope for gestures from the 
American and Soviet leaders at the 
summit meeting to indicate that the 
arms -control process is being sus- 
tained. 

But the disclosure of a letter by 
Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger urging Mr. Reagan to 
avoid making pledges on two arms 
issues appears to have forced the 


operating rooms had to be dosed. 

. Tt is necessary,” Mr. Znbiria judge of the three-member panel, 
said in an interview with the Cara- said the court found the men guilty 


col radio Awn, “to begin immedi- 
ately the fumigation to exterminate 
the donds of flies that are hovering 
over the decomposing bodies and 
ate the agents for transmitting the 
disease.” * 

- Government crifidab issued con- 

( C o otinn e d on Page 7, CM. 4) 


of smuggling and illegally possess- 
ing four automatic rifles, right 
hand grenades, nine detonators 
and 360 rounds of ammunition. He 
said the court accepted the prose- 
cution’s recommendation that (he 
five men be given (Efferent seo- 

(Coutmned on Page 7, CoL 4) 


Lon Nol, Ex-Ruler of Cambodia, Dies 


. . -- .in'* 


^ The Associated Press 

FULLERTON, California — : 
~£n Nol, 72, the American-backed 
^mboefian general who deposed 
. nee Norodom Sihanouk in 1970 
. , r, d was overthrown by Camnjn- 

-li ,t forces in 1975,diedhere Sun- 
. y. ■ ■ • 

, ' Mr. Lem Nol died in & hospital-in 
/fierton. where he had fiveasnee 
-■ - 79. He had been partly paralyzed 
flowing a stroke in 1971, and; 
- abably died of heart trouble, raid. 

. sot, Lon Rith. 

-'lactiveRoiemExile 

?" By Peter Kerr 

* ; New York Times Serrice . 

- In the years since his government 
: ■ a deposed, Mr. Lon ’NoL had 
-• . ed quietly in Hawaii and Calif or- 
; l UnKke a number of former 

i mbodoan leaders, he remained 

- ‘ ictive in the country's affairs or 
J > phe problems of Cambodian ref- . 
- : ees in the United States. 

In March 1970, Mr. Lot Ned and 
.. ter military leaders toppled the 



Ixwt Nol 


S' - 


AT 






sc- 


INSIDE 

; , a The House Ways and Means. . 
;• Committee will not propose a 
top tax rate of ‘35 percent for 
US. individuals. Page 8. 

' .1 The, Pfrifippifle oppositidn is 
back with the resignation of 
L the bead of the National Unifi- 
^ cation Committee. ' Page 8. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ j,M A U JL intetry gn»P urged 
' Prime Minister Margaret- 
Hiaichcr to set np a SI .4-Wlioo 
jobs fond. ftgelfi. 

% UA industry’s ope raftg jate 

^fdl in October, the fifth dedme 
•in ax months. ' ftgelt 


Khmer dynasty and placed it 
with arepubUc. Five years later he 
fled, leaving behindakgacy of cor- 
ruption and military defeat To 
. many Americans, Mr. Lon Nol was 
a symbol of the US. failure to find 
effective leaders with popular sup- 
port to fight Communism in Soatb- 

east Asia. 

But the failings; of his govmj- 
menl would pale by what was to 

come. - Mr. Lon Nol’s . departure 
soon was followed by &e amval of 
the Khmer Rouge guerrillas, trim 

initiated the methodical destruc- 
tion of Cambodia *mrt the 
kflfiog of three- miiKnii of their 
countrymen. : 

“Tf the other side took over" Mir. 
Lon Nol said two weeks before his 
departure, “they would kill all the 

educated people — the teachers, 
the artists, the intenw^imk — . and 
that would be a step towards bar- 
barism.” . 

Mr. Lon Nd was born on Nov. 
13,1913, tlw son and grandson of ' 
officials who worked for the 
. French, administration. From 1928 
to 1934 he;aKended die Lycfe 
Chasseloup-Laul»t in Saigon. 


On graduation, he became a civfl 
servant. By 1945 he was governor 
of Kratie province. By 1949, be was 
in Phnom Penh as (Erector of the 
administrative service. In 1952, he 
was commissioned fieotenant colo- 
nel and gjven command of an in- 
fantry battalion. The successful 
cam paign* he led against Commu- 
nist forces as the French retreated 
from Indochina helped to keep 
Cambodia independent 

In 1955. be became military chief 
of staff in Phnom Penh, ana soon 
he -became defense minister. In 
1961, he rose to the rank of lieuten- 
ant general. 

Mr. Lon Nci won Sihanouk’s 
trust and brid a broad success cm 
ol top ministries — foreign affairs, 
political coordination, mfonnation 
and tourism, as well as defense. 

In 1966, the prince appointed 
Mr. Lot Nol as prime minister for 
the first time. Traveling frequently 
in the countryside, Mr. Lon Nol 
began to build a following among 
local provincial chiefs, a loyalty 
xhai was said to worry the prince. 

Mr. Lon Nol resigned his post as 
prime minister in 1967 after a car 
accident, but was called back to 
office by the prince in Angosi 1969: 
Seven months later, with Sihanouk 
absent on a visit to Moscow, Mr. 
Lon NoFs government announced 

that the prince had been deposed. 
■ Other Deaths: 


The Issues in Geneva 

New York Tones Service 

NEW YORK — The following issues have been raised in the 
preparations for the Geneva meeting: 

' , ‘ “Aims Control 

The focal point ol Soviei-Amoxun dialogue has been the talks on 
strategic aims, medium-range weapons and space-based defenses. 

Both sides have offered cats in offensive missiles, but there are 
differences on the cuts. 

The Russians have seemed to rule out progress on aims cuts until 
Washington ends work on President Ronald Reagan’s plan to develop 
a space-based missile defe n se. Both sides have discussed drafting 
guidelines to give an impetus to the arms talks. 

Regional Conflicts 

Washington has sought to fink progress on aims control and other 
issues to arch problems as the war in Afghanistan, where Soviet and 
Afghan government troops are fighting Islamic rebels, and Cambo- 
dia, where the Soviet Union supports the Vietnamese occupation and 
the United States backs guerrillas fighting the government. 

Moscow says regional conflicts should not be tied to progress on 
arms controL 

In Africa, the two nations disagree over Ethiopia and Angola. In 
Central America, the Russians assert that the United States is plan- 
ning to invade Nicaragua, while the Americans accuse Nicaragua of 
trying to export Marxism. 

The Russians say the Americans, by trying to keep them out of 
Middle East diplomacy, have blocked a solution. Moscow seeks an 
international conference as a way to re-entei the diplomatic process. 

Soviet-Aroerican Accords ' ' 

These inchjaie a dozen or more programs, many of them established 
around 19?Mndudmg exchanges and economic relations. Most were 
suspended by Washington after Soviet troops moved into Afghani- 
stan in 1979 and martial law was imposed in Poland in 1981. 

The accords indude agreements on cultural exchanges; establishing 
consulates in Kiev and New York; direct air service between the 
countries; and procedures for air safety in the northern Pacific. 

Human Rights 

The United Slates regularly raises human rights issues in Soviet- 
American talks, riling the 1975 Helsinki accords on human rights. 

The main U.S. efforts are directed at gaining an increase in 
emigration of Soviet Jews, reuniting divided Soviet-American fam- 
ilies. and easing the lot of dissidents and rights activists who are 
imprisoned or harassed. 

Moscow regularly responds tiiat UK mention of such issues 
constitutes interference in Soviet internal affairs. 


administration to sharpen some of 
its public positions more than it 
might have liked before the talks 
begin. 

Mr. WeinbergCT. who is not a 
member of the American delega- 
tion. urged Mr. Reagan to ignore 
the Soviet Union’s “great pressure” 
and not make any agreements in 
Geneva involving two key elements 
of arms controL 

One of those dements involved 
the 197 9 arms limitation treaty, 
signed by Jimmy Carter and Leo- 
nid L Brezhnev but never ratified 
by Congress. The treaty, known as 
SALT-2, puts a ceiling oo intercon- 
tmeotal ballistic missile launchers 
and long-range bombers. 

A second portion of the letter 
urged Mr. Reagan to resist giving 
assurances that would limit re- 
search. development and testing of 
his space-based shield. 

The Russians have formally pro- 
posed extending for a year the com- 
mitment nol to undercut the 1979 
treaty, which expires Dec. 31. In 
doing so, the Russians have sought 
to announce what would amount to 
a joint extension of the agreement. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, said: “The presi- 
dent has not made a decision on 
whether we would extend H oc not, 
At the moment, it is open-ended. 
Our policy is to continue -to abide 
by it so long as the Soviets continue 
to follow the same criteria.” 

Mr. McFariane. at a news con- 
ference Sunday, said consideration 


By Henry Tanner 

baemauonai HeraU Tribune 

GENEVA — Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the Soviet leader, arrived 
Monday in Geneva and immedi- 
ately said that the overriding issue 
of the summit meeting with Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan would be 
arms limitation and tire US. Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative for a space- 
based missile defense shield. 

The negotiations, which will be 
conducted Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, must deal with ‘‘first and fore- 
most the question of what can be 
done to halt the unprecedented 
arms race and its extension to new 
spheres," Mr. Gorbachev declared 
on his arrival at the Geneva airport. 
He was welcomed by Kurt Furgler, 
(he president of Switzerland. 

Mr. Reagan, by contiast, has 
made it known that beyond arms 
limitation he wants the talks to in- 
clude regional conflicts such as Af- 
ghanistan. security issues, human 
rights, and bilateral relations, in- 
cluding cultural exchanges and in- 
formation programs. 

The weather was Moscow-like as 
the Soviet leader touched down in 
an Aeroflot Ilyushin -62. The sky 
was gray, and a bitterly cold north- 
ern wind swept the tarmac where 
be made his statement standing 
next to Mr. Furgler. 

Mr. Reagan's national security 
adviser, Robert C. McFarlane, said 
Monday at a press conference that 
Mr. Reagan was planning to make 
specific proposals during the two 
days of talks 

Other members of the U.S. dele- 
gation have said that agreement on 
cultural exchanges and some other 
bilateral issues have been virtually 
completed in negotiations by low- 
er-ranking officials during the last 
few days. 

Mr. McFarlane, describing Mr. 
Reagan's mood and intentions on 
the eve of eight hours of meetings 
over two days, said; “The president 
feds a deep sense of responsibility, 
challenge and opportunity. He will 
make a fundamental presentation 
on the strength, values and pur- 
poses and goals of the United 
States." 

He added that Mr. Reagan 
would forcefully express his con- 
cerns about basic Sonet policies 
and expects discussions to be very 
• frank. 

He also said that Mr. Reagan 
would “propose a framework for 
U.S.-Soviei relations" for many 
years to cony, on a wide range of 
issues that will include the nuclear 
balance, bilateral and security 


porters converged on Mrs. Gri- 
vivna, and Mr. Lomeiko's words 
were drowned out and he terminat- 
ed the conference. 

“Russia is above this; we are 
leaving," Mr. Lomeiko said angrily 
in English as he stomped out of the 
hall. 

Mrs. Grivivna, who was accred- 
ited to the conference as a journal- 
ist for a Dutch publication, heckled 
Mr. Gorbachev at the airport Mon- 
day morning. 

“If you are a peace activist, re- 
lease Sakharov!” she shouted, re- 
ferring to Andrei D. Sakharov, the 
dissident physicist. 

She said she had left the Soviet 
Union with her family three weeks 
ago after spending 13 months in a 
Moscow jail and 20 months in in- 
ternal exile in Central Asia. Mrs. 
Grivivna’s press credentials report- 
edly were withdrawn. 

■ Reagan Reaction 

Mr. Reagan stood by his propos- 
al for a space-based defense plan, 
The Associated Press reported 
from Geneva. 

“I ihink when that's explained to 
him, he’ll find it will help us end the 
arms race," Mr. Reagan said at a 
separate welcoming ceremony 
hosted by the Swiss government. ' 

Asked what he thought about 
Mr. Gorbachev's statement, Mr. 
Reagan said: “We both must have 
the same intentions. If he feels as 
strongly that way as 1 do. then w e’U 
end the arms race." 

■ Call to Mrs. Bonner Fails 

An attempt by the stepchildren 

of Mr. Sakharov to leant when Ye- 
lena G. Bonner, Mr. Sakharov’s 
wife, would leave the Soviet Union 
for medical treatment was frustrat- 
ed Monday when a Soviei tele- 
phone operator insisted that Mrs. 
Bonner -was “unavailable,” The 
New York Times reported from 
Newton, Massachusetts. 

Mrs. Bonner and her children, 
who are from a previous marriage, 
made an arrangement to talk Mon- 
day to discuss the details of her 
departure. But efforts to call Gorki, 
where the Sakarovs are in internal 
exile, were unavailing. 

Mrs. Bonner was granted per- 
mission last month to leave for 
medical treatment. 


of th^-1979 treaty “ought to benefit questions and bnnw* rights. 


from- the president's absorption of 
what does happen here,” as wefl as 
what takes place in the Geneva 
arms-reduction talks. Mr. McFar- 
lane also cited what he termed a 
Soviet arms buildup. » . 

“Until all of those things have 
been pondered by the president,” 
Mr. McFarlane said, “it's unlikely 
he' would make a decision on that 
issue." > • 

Mr. Speakes said the White 
House welcomed the Soviei deri- 
sion to issue exit visas to some 
spouses of Americans. 

The U.S. Embassy in Moscow 
was given the names of 10 persons 
Friday who were to be granted exit 
visas. Of the eight names of spouses 
on the list, seven were in the Soviet 
Union, and one already was in the 
United States. 


Mr. Gorfc;* hcv ’ underlined the 
historic inra^r'aftsv^iiiat his gov- 
ernment- alia: her- to the summit 
meeting in cr address Monday to 
Soviet (fiploiiL:L ai the Soviet Mis- 
sion to the Eisopean headquarters 
of the United Nations. 

“This conference will affect the 
very future of the Soviet Union,” 
he was quoted as haring told the 
diplomats. He added that the meet- 
ing was being followed closely and 
with great curiosity by Soviet citi- 
zens. 

A news conference by Vladimir 
B. Lomeiko. the chief press spokes- 
man of the Soviet delegation, broke 
op in noisy confusion when Irina 
Grivivna, a Soviet dissident, en- 
gaged a Swiss official in a loud 
altercation. 

Television cameramen and re- 


MORE SUMMIT NEWS 

M U.S. officials were divided 
over a Soviet proposal to con- 
struct a huge joint nuclear fu- 
sion facility. Page 4. 

■ A Weinberger ride called a 

letter on arms control sent to 
President Reagan a routine 
matter. Page 4. 

■ Mrs. Reagan and Mrs. Gor- 

bachev are to meet twice in Ge* 
neva. Page 5. 

■ Soviet bloc nations are 

watching the Geneva meeting 
for signals from Mr. Gorba- 
chev. Page 5. 

■ Pofitical pressure and intu- 
ition were factors on Mr. Rea- 
gan’s frequently bumpy road to 
the Geneva talks. Page 5. 

■ President Reagan has a 
chance to revive bipartisan for- 
eign policy, says John Temple 
Swing. Comment Page 6. 


No Trudy Nd Charge, but lOl Days in Soweto Prison 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

ALEXANDRA, South Africa — 
It was winter when she was taken 
and summer when she returned,' 
and not only the seasons had 
changed. 

For 101 days, Mathilda Gasda 
said, she was' held in Diepkloof 
prison without charge or trial or 
announced reason. No. 701 on the 
lengthening list of those detained 
under South Africa’s proclaimed 
stale of emergency. 

She was questioned, die said, for 
only 30 mi nates in that entire peri- . 
od, and then was left, like others, 
for 23 hours each day in a .single- 
personcdL 


Only toward the end,' she said, 
after mishearing a radio bro&dcart 

Roger Uroqne, 75, the Ganllist made her ltok «I_theofl«s 
the copM tf ^ ^ ^ 10 

So how had it altered her, the 26- 
year-old black high school teacher 
was asked in an interview. 

“When they pot us into prison, 

they thought it would stop our po- 
litical activity," Miss Gasda said of 
herself and colleagues from an anti- 
apartheid group. “But whai they 
did is to just make me fed even 
more that I'm not going to be 
stopped by them." 


mayor of Nornnha, 

New Caledonia, for 32 
staunch opponent of independence 
from France, Monday, of a heart 
attack, in Noumea. 

G. Robert Vincent, 87, who dur- 
ing his boyhood was an aide to (be 
inventor Thomas A. Edison and 
who went on to found Michigan 
State Uruveratty’s acclaimed Na- 
tional Yoke library, Wednesday, 
at his borne in East Lansing, Michi- 


In ihe chronicles of the stare of 
emergency, now in force in 38 dis- 
tricts around Johannesburg, Port 
Elizabeth and Cape Town, some 
among the more than 5,000 who 
have been detained teB of torture 
and beating. 

A civO rights activist displays the 
photograph of a 14-year-old whose 
thumbnail exploded, the activist 

South Africa is restricting print 
joumafists. Page 8. 

"says, when someone sprinkled wa- 
ter on the electrode that was at- 
tached to it to deliver shocks. 

According to the Detainees Par- 
ents Support Committee, a civil 
rights monitoring group, a sam- 
pling of 28 black teen-agers who 
lodged affidavits with the organiza- 
tion to complain about police activ- 
ity showed that 23 a them hart 
been detained and 16 had been 
assaulted — one to the point of 
acquiring double_ vision, another to 
the pant of senudeafness. 

Miss Gasela’s detention seems to 
illuminat e one insidious front of 
the authorities’ attack on perceived 
foes: a campaign of attrition ro 
wear down and demoralize those 
seen as adversaries by denying their 
humanity. 


A reporter had visited the Gasela 
household on a dirt road once be- 
fore. shortly after Miss Gasela’s 
detention, and had heard the story 
of her mother, Victims. 

As the wife of a black policeman 
and the mother of a black activist 
with the Alexandra Youth Con- 
gress, Mrs. Gasela was caught be- 
tween the wrath of the radicals 
against those, like her husband, 
who symbolize white authority, 
and the sudden, harsh visitations of 
those same authorities on those, 
like her daughter, considered to be 
foes. 

A mob had sought to burn down 
her house, because of her hus- 
band’s job, just a few days before 
her daughter was detained. 

So now, on a day of sunlight and 
wanmh, iu a cluttered yard in a 
bouse in the Hack township of 
Soweto, Miss Gasda, the daughter, 
h.-trt her own story to lelL 

The police came, she said, in 
three Land-Rovers on July 24 and 
went to the home of a friend, who 
'had already been detained, where 
Miss Gasela was checking on the 

children left behind. 

“Are you Tilly Gasda?” she re- 
calls them asking. “I said yes." And 
so the incarceration began. 

The oat day. the security police 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 



Th« Nm. >or4 Tn 


Mathilda Gasela was reunited with her mother, Victoria, 
after Mathilda spent 101 days in a Smith African prison. 


> 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 19&5 


: ADVERTISEMENT! 


APPEAL 
ON BEHALF 
OF SOVIET JEWRY 


Sharing the world's hope that the present summit 
conference between President Ronald Reagan and 
General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev will signify a 
turning point toward a relaxation of global tensions. 


W e, the members of the Executive Committee of the 
International Council of the World Conference on Soviet Jewry, 
representing the Jewish communities of five continents, have 
come to Geneva to draw attention to the tragic plight of Soviet 
Jewry. 

The rise to power of General Secretary Gorbachev has brought no 
improvement in the condition of Soviet Jewry, which continues to 
deteriorate. 

— Emigration has been virtually terminated. 

— Harassment, arrests and imprisonment of Jews seeking to be 
reunited with their people in their historic homeland, Israel, or to 
study Hebrew and their Jewish heritage, have become 
increasingly frequent. 

— There has been an ominous upsurge of anti-semitism in the 
Soviet Union. 

The world has, therefore, been left with no doubt that the U.S.S.R. 
is flagrantly violating the Helsinki Accords of 1975 and other 
international conventions which it has ratified and pledged to 
uphold, thereby casting grave doubt on Soviet credibility. 

While these violations continue, the fateful question confronting 
the world is whether the Soviet Union can be trusted to honor new 
agreements affecting the security and future of mankind. 

We demand that the Soviet government: 


1. Permit all Soviet Jews — who so wish — to leave the U.S.S.R. 
and join their people in Israel, their ancestral homeland; 

2. Immediately release the Prisoners of Zion; 

3. Enable all Soviet Jews to learn Hebrew and study their 
national heritage, free from discrimination and persecution. 


Arye L. Dulzin (Israel), Chairman of the World Zionist Organization, 
Chairman of the Executive Committee; 

Morris B. Abram (U.S.A.), Chairman of the National Conference on Soviet 

Jewry; 

Kenneth Bialkin (U.S.A.), President of the Conference of Presidents of 
major American Jewish organizations; 

Edgar M. Bronfman (U.S.A.), President of the World Jewish Congress; 
Gregorio Faigon (Argentina), Presidente del Congresso Judio Latino 
Americano; 

Arieh Handler (United Kingdom), Chairman of the National Council for 
Soviet Jewry; 

Avraham Harman (Israel), President of the Public Council for Soviet Jewry; 
Claude Kelman (France), President de la Commission Juifs d’U.R.S.S. du 
Conseil Representatif des Institutions Juives de France; 

Gerald Kraft (U.S.A.), President of Bnai Brith International; 

Isi J. Lexbler (Australia), President of the Executive Council of Australian 
Jewry; 

Akiva Lewinsky (Israel), Treasurer of the Jewish Agency; 

Barbara Stem (Canada), Chairperson of the Cana dian Committee for Soviet 
Jewry. 



Pact on Ulster Appears 
Both Risky and Fragile 

FitzGerald, Hume Are Seen to Face 
Most Political Danger From Accord 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Jo Thomas 

IVcw York Tima Service 

HILLSBOROUGH, Northern 
Ireland — The agreement between 
the British and Irish governments 
to give Dublin a voice in the affairs 
of Northern Ireland is both risky 
and fragile. 

Both governments see it as a 


efforts to stop the violence m 
Northern Ireland, where the blood- 
shed is at its lowest level in years, 
she also has risked a backlash and 
an increase in violence: 

Although Protestant Unionists, 
who say they are prepared to fight 
to stay" British, are accusing Mrs. 
ThatcheT of treachery and warning 


chance to break what Rime Mims-' of dire oonsequoices, the Prol- 
iant paramilitary groups who 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


old provide their urcpoww ami 

are undecided as to what, if any- 
thing, to do. 

For its part, the IRA seeitis » be 
operating as usual. On Friday it 
exploded a land mine that killed a 
policeman in Comity Armagh, near 
the border with the republic. 

Irish unity is a deeply felt, if 
sometimes latent, goal in Irish poli- 
tics, enshrined in the Irish Consti- 
tution, which claims sovereignty 
oyer the entire island. Mr. FitzGer- 
ald reminded Mrs. Thatcher on 
Friday that they had come to the 
table with “different land titles'’ to 
Northern Ireland. 

Nonetheless, in the accord 
signed Friday, the Irish govern- 
ment formally recognized that a 
united Ireland can come about only 
with the consent of the majority of 
the people of Northern Ireland, 
who now want no change. 

Mr. FitzGerald has gambled, in 
the face of odes of “sellout, " that he 
could defer the presently unattain- 
able goal of Irudi unity in exchange 
for an hrtmwtiate improvement m 
the lives of Northern nationalists. 

The last British prime minister to 
negotiate with the Irish, Edward 
Heath, had other difficulties on his 
mind at the timer Britain’s entry 
into the European Comnmnity and 
disastrous stokes in transport and 
industry. In 1973 Mr. Heath agreed 
with the Irish to set up a joint body 
known as a Council of Ireland, but 
the proposal died under the pres- 
sure of a vast Unionist strike: 

Mis. Thatcher, who has a huge 
majority in Parliament, has shown 
herself resolute so far under the 
Unionists’ verbal- onslaught. 


still 


ter Margaret Thatcher called on 
Friday the “cycle of violence” in a 
place that, since 1969, has known 
little else. 

The agreement is designed to 
help the Roman Catholics in 
Northern Ireland, who are over- 
whelmingly nationalist, to gain a 
measure of power and influence, to 
restore then- confidence in the 
province’s institutions and to erode 
their support for the outlawed Irish 
Republican Army. 

This would make Kfe safer for 
the members of the security forces 
who are the prune targets of the 
IRA and who are overwhelmingly 
drawn from the Protestant Union- 
ist majority. 

Most of the political risks have 
been taken by Prime Minister Gar- 
ret FitzGerald of the Irish Repub- 
lic, who is in a relatively weak posi- 
tion at home, and by John Hume, 
the Londonderry politician who 
represents Northern nationalists 
who say they can achieve their 
goals peacefully. 

If the agreement proves unwork- 
able, the government of Mr. Fitz- 
Gerald, already trailing in public 
opinion polls became of high taxes 
and unemployment, could falL 

If the lives of the Northern na- 
tionalists fail to improve, Mr. 
Hume could lose ground to Sinn 
Feta, the political arm of the IRA, 
which assets that justice for na- 
tionalists is possible only in a unit- 
ed Ireland and that this eventually 
will be won by force of arms. 

Mrs. Thatcher is in a strong po- 
litical position at home, bnt in her 


101 Days in Soweto Prison 


(Coa turned from Page 1) 

— a white woman and a black man 

— talked to her for 30 minutes. 
“They asked about my political ac- 
tivities," she said. 

“They asked what I do in Ayco,” 
she said, referring to the Alexandra 
Youth Congress, an affiliate of the 
United Democratic Front, the larg- 
est . nonparliamentary opposition 
movement in the country. 

“They tried to reenrit me to work 
with them,” she said. “They said if I 
don’t agree, I would stay the next 
year at the prison." 

On Aug. 8, she said, a policeman 
came and asked if she agreed to 
collaborate. By her account, she 
said no. “The Made policeman 
went away saying it means I don’t 
want to go.” 

Miss Gasda is a graduate of Fort 


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SCOTCH WHISKY 


Hare University and a teacher of 
English and science, but emergency 
rules do not permit books other 
than the Bible to people who axe 
detained So she read the Bible, 
three times, from cover to cover, 
once in Zulu, twice in En glish, 

For the first two months, she 
said, the female detainees' were not 
allowed to talk to (me another dur- 
ing the two, 30-nrinutc periods of 
exercise each day when they were 
released from their. cells. So they 
would whisper, when the guards 
were away, through the bats bn 
their doors or windows. 

On OcL X Miss Gasda said, 
things began to change when Helen 
Suzman, a longtime campaigner 
against apartheid, the country’s 
system of white-minority rule, 
came to visit. 

Mrs. Suzman said die had come 
to find out whether the women 
were being assanlted and had been, 
satisfied they were not; “but there 
were plenty of other complaints.” 

Detention, Mrs. Suzman said, 
was not so much designed for inter- 
rogation as a “father tough preven- 
tive detention" to keep political ao- 
tivists out of rircnlation, “a dear 
breach of due process." 

Conditions improved after Mrs: 
Suzman’s visit. Miss Gasda said, - 
but one impr ovement brought its 
own problems. Previously, there 
bad been no radio broadcasts, but 
then the radio was piped into the 
cells. 

On Oct 16, the women heard a 
broadcast that seemed to say all the 
other detainees had been released, 
and they thought they had been 
forgotten. 

After that. Miss Gasda said, “I 
used to cry every day and sleep a 
lot, but I didn’t want the others to 
see me crying because that would 
have made us all depressed.” 

Then, with the same suddenness 
as when she was detained, she was 
released. On Nov. 1, die was told to 
pack and given a voucher to cover 
her bus fare home. 

On that first night back home, 
die said, die could not deep be- 
cause she thought the police wcwld 
come again and say her release had 
been & mistake and she would have 
to return to prison. 

Her kgs are sometimes swollen, 
and her concentration lapses so 
that, fay her account, it takes her 
two days to read the evening news- 

* )a §/brst of afl, though, are the sus- 
picions of the mothers of those still . 
detained, who fall brio silence 


Itanher Assafled Over Ulster Accord 

tants < S? ^iS^iarsTae repeated assurances oven after the signing 
JS^lSanlreland’s status as part of the United. Kmgdom was 

SlissK^ssssHSs; 

of Northecn Irel an d. 



PresdentFrancofeMIttemuidaf^ 
ter MargareTSiatdier of Britain in London on Monday. 

U.K., France Agree on ChanneHink 

LONDON (Reuters) — Britain, and France said Monday they would 
sign « treaty in February committing both countries to buBd a permanent 
road-rad fait- across the English Channel ' 

Expats from the two governments are studying four privately financed 
schemes for imkmg the coasts of the two countries by tmmels, bridges or 
a combination of the two. . " • ; . 

President Framxas Mitterrand of France and Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Brito~foIlowing talks in London, said their governments 
would decide in January which of the four projects would be approved 
ami that a formal treaty would be signed the following month. 

Chairman ofDeak-Perera Is Slain J 

NEW YORK (AP) — A woman who said she had been cheated walked jr-f 


•rTjK 
v j”!'* 


.j:i 
.f - 


when she walks by, as if to say she 
bought her freedom by agreeing to 
collaborate while their dn] 
main in prison. 


re- 


metals trading concern an Monday and fatally shotNkholasF.L 

the Chairman of Deak A Ccl, and his receptionist, the autiiorities said. 

The police said the incident occurred shortly before noon. Taken into 
custody was Lois 40, according to Captain WIIHam Quigley. 
Another police officer, Vincent Jones, said that Ms. Lang, who apparent- 
ly was homeless and had ottered the company's offices frequently, 
contended that she was a partner of Mr. Peak’s and demanded to see 

him. • jjL 

Mr. Deak, a Hungarian immigran t, founded the company in 1939. last 
December, Deak & Co. and several subsidiaries filed for protection from 
cxeditoraunderCh^terllof^jPeiterdBanknjptCTCo^Thecon^ja- 
ny listed assets of $622 mfllioti and liabilities of $95 million. 

Protester Dies as Greeks Mark Revolt 

<le 


ATHENS (Combined Dispatches)- — More than • 100,000 
.marched Sunday toward the U&J&ibassyto mark a 1973 
againsr George Papadopoufos, the former dictator. The prime later shot 
and kille d a youth after protesters threw firebombs at officers, the 
. authorities said.- - 

Andreas Paparidreou'taEed the death “abominable.” But be said he 
would not .accept resignation .offers from. Agamemnon . Koutsogiorgas, 
the interior mimster. and the alternate minister. Athanasios Tsouras. 

In Sunday's march, protested carried banners and shouted anti- 
American slogans. The matchers included Socialist and Co mmu nist 
members of Parliament, as well as several hundred. Greek servicemen in 
unifo rm. Protesters were, unable to reach the U.S. Embassy in central 
Athens, which had beeir cordoned off by the police. The annual march 
marks the day that Greek soldiers bloodily repressed a student revolt 12 
years ago. 

' Hours after Sun day’smarch, a group of pro testers threw firebombs 
police van. After oneof them exploded in the vehicle, officers opened 
and killed Mihafis Kahezas, 15, a pohee spokesman said. (AP, Reutmj 

U.S. Cites Hazards of Toxic Chemicals 

: NEW YORK (NYT) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 
has concluded that 403 highly tone chemicals that are produced, sold and 
used throughout the United States pose potentially serious health dangers 
to the pribEc in the event of a chemical plant accident. 

At lost 577 companies at thousands of locations handle the chemicals, 
according to an analysis of chemical industry data. Some of the chaired 1 ; 
are produced and. stored near populated areas, w hile some are so toxic 
that small teaks could cause injuries, the agency said 
The agency’s list and its assodated documents are the first msgor step 
in a federal effort to measure the potential for chemical acri rier m The 
documents explain how municipalities can determine whether the chemi- 
cate are handled in their areas, and offer suggestions fca mininwring the 
prospects of major accidents. 

Seoul Protesters Bum Party Office f. 

SEOUL (Renters) — Protesting students set fire to an office of 
President Cbm Doo Hwan's ruling party Monday before being overpow- 
ered by hundreds of riot police, witnesses said. 

The 185 students occupied the two-story t raining center of the Demo- 
raaticJustice Party for six hems, keeping police at bay by splashing 
fl a mmab le bqrna m the bunding and setting it ali gh t 
The students; who also burial fire bombs and brandished wooden 
auDs ’ were de manding Mr. Orans resignation and an end to UK 
support forks government. Riot police fired tear gas before rushing in to 

For ihe Record 

Two rightist activists were killed Sunday night when a bomb they were 
transporting exploded as they were parked- in the Avenue Georges *V 
paridng garage m Paris, the priice said Monday . The men were identified 
as Pierre Bugny, 31, a Frenchman, and Carlos Marquez da Silva, 31, a 
Portuguese. (AP) 

Ejgw Franks, West Geraupy’s former minister for inter- German 
relations, went on tnal Monday charged with misappropriating 5i 
mfflion Deutsche marks ($2.1 million). Mr. FrankTc^alds themmey 
wasspent on secret deals to buy the freedom of political prisoners in r * 

14 ddcs tafia from Feb. 1-10, the 

(AP) 


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The A xtodaitd Pros 

SINGAPORE — A planned visit 
to Singapore on Sunday and Mon- 
day by the Czechoslovak foreign 
tflflflster.Bohuslav Chnonpek, has 
been canceled, the Ministry of For- 
qgn Affairs said Monday. 


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detailed resume 
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ENTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


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An abridged 
computing dictionaiy. 


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•! !.• . i. 


<f?> ‘Applications - All business 

*** e<J °n Qj^tasks, no matter how simple or so- 
sophisticated, can be divided into 
- ' several groups. There are specific 

. / : : ^7 programs available for many of 
"""^fcithe j 0 bs you want to do. These, 
logically enough, are called appli- 
; ■ Oration programs. Report writing 
’• ^is an example of.an application. 
^Before y ou visit an IBM. Author- 
i.-r^jised Dealer, you should have a 
.7 '-f i^clear idea of how you want the 
^ ^Personal Computer to help you. 
V. "J^That makes it easier to choose 
•^^from the many application pro- 
digrams written for the IBM Per- 
^ sonai Computer family. 

^.^jByte - The unit of measure used 
, .Jo describe a personal coinputer’s 
TrvrK ' ^nemoiy or storage capacity Qne 
'.-byte is ; approximately equal to 
Vw* ne The IBM Personal 

“ Computer AT can store 40 ihega- 
jjby tes of information (40 million 
- -^characters) which equals about 
; ::^o,0oo pages. ■ 

.. - U. ‘•%n 

-- - ' ^Compatible - Just because two 
--• -pieces of computer equipment 

are colour coordinated doesn’t 

...V'-imean they’ll hit it off. Compati- 
~ " bility means they work together - 
• **,-»{ Toxiftk® printer and a system unit, for 
-vs ^example, or application programs 
. - -^and an operating system. 


■ ^Configuration - Once you de- 
- i>: cide what you want your comput- 
,-: er to do, you configure your sys- 
tem. Your IBM Authorised Dealer 
7 “ can help you Here. A typical con - 
.figuration consists of a system 
psTt^unit, monitor and printer, along 
•: “ with an operating system and pro- 1 
'■ grams. 


the openings to your diskette 
drives. There are one or two, and 
they are responsible for reading 
and writing the information re- 
corded on diskettes. Sometimes 
they emit rather strange sounds, 
but that's nothing to be alarmed 
about. 

Dot matrix printer - This type 
of printer forms characters using 
tiny dot patterns. The result isn’t 
as sharp as letter quality printing, 
.but many businesses use dot 
matrix printers, like the IBM 
Propririter, for in-house work, 
because they are often quicker 
and less expensive than other 
printers. 

Emulation - With special in- 
structions, an IBM PC can imper- 
sonate other IBM equipment, 
allowing you to communicate 
with larger computer systems, 
which will think your PC is a 
simple computer terminal. That 
just goes to show that even the 
smartest machines can be fooled. 

Ergonomics — If you studied 
your Ancient Greek, you’d know 
that this word is a combination of 
two terms: work and natural laws. 
If you often slept during Ancient 
Greek, shame on you. Ergonom- 
ics often refers to a computer’s 
comfort and efficiency features. 
Or* how the machine is construct- 
ed to fit the person using it. 


Hu: 



Database - Large collections of 
■ ' ;■// information on specific : topics. 
.. Or, everything you always wanted 

to know about something, but 
never knew how to ask. For some 
databases you can connect your 
‘• Personal Computer, via the tele- 
phone. Financial information on. 
manufacturers in London is one 
' -^.example of a database. Another 
•v kind of database is that provided 
by your PC’s storages. ; 


Diskette - Using the same prin- 
ciple as cassette tapes* these thin 
pieces of magnetic plastic are ca- 
pable of storing large amounts of 
information. You can use them, 
again and again. Or,, they may 
hold permanent instructions for 
different applications. In this 
case, they’re called software ,or _ 
programs... 




Diskette drive - The slots found; 
on the front of every IBM PC are 


Function keys - Normally found 
grouped on the keyboard, these 
keys may be programmed to sim- 
plify tasks that usually require 
several keystrokes. This is one of 
the IBM PC’s ergonomic features. 

Hard file - An alternative to 
storing and exchanging diskettes, 
the hard file stays inside your 
machine. Hard files (or fixed disk 
drives) are becoming increasingly 
powerful and compact. For exam- 
ple, a PC AT with two 20-mega- 
byte hard files holds up to 20,000 
pages of information, yet each is 
about the size of your hand. 

Hardware - The equipment that 
makes up your computer system. 
(Printers, monitors- system units 
and keyboards). A very important 

difference between software and 

Hardware is that you can drop 
software on your foot without 
^suffering any long-term conse- 
quences. 

Integrated software - There are 
programs designed especially to 
work together: one program may 
help you write a report, while the 


other makes business graphics. If 
they’re integrated, you can easily 
pass information from one to the 
other. IBM’s Assistant Series is 
a good example. With programs 
for writing, reporting, creating 
graphs, filing and planning. All 
designed to work together. 

Kilobyte - One kilobyte is equal 
to 1,024 bytes. A computer’s Ran- 
dom Access Memory is usually 
described in kilobytes. Most PCs 
come with at least 256 Kilobytes 
of RAM. 

Letter quality printer - A print- 
er which turns out typewriter- 
style letters that you would be 
proud to send to your most im- 
portant client. Or even your 
mother. The IBM Wheelprinter 
and Quietwriter are examples. 

Local Area Network - The elimi- 
nation of the memo! Well, just 
about. LANs connect all the IBM 
PCs in one area, letting you 
exchange messages and files of 
information! LANs can help you 
share some hardware, too. such as 
printers and other devices. 

Menu - A list of information on 
your screen that lets you choose 
what you want your computer to 
do next. Computing “a la carte”, 
so to speak, it makes moving 
through tasks faster and easier. 

Microprocessor - The heart of 
the PC, these are largely respon- 
sible for the speed and power of 
your personal computer. You can 
think of them as the computer 
inside your computer. 

Modem - Hello, out there! A mo- 
dem lets you hook up your IBM 
PC, via telephone lines for exam- 
ple, to outside computers and 
databases, or other microcom- 
puters. 

Monitor — Your window to the 
world of personal computing. 
Also called displays or screens, 
they show information in either 
one or several colours. The IBM 
Monochrome Display is excellent 
for word processing, while the 
Colour Display is better for gen- 
eral business tasks. 

Numeric keypad - On the right 
side of your IBM PC’s keyboard, 
you’ll find 12 keys that make 
entering figures faster and easier. 

Operating system - This is a 
complex set of instructions that 
tells the computer how to carry 
out different tasks. Unless you 


become involved in writing pro- 
grams. you won’t have to worry 
about how it works. But when 
vou’re buying software for the 
IBM PC, make sure it is written 
for the PC Disk Operating Svstem 
(DOS). 

Personal computer - A comput- 
er that’s used by one person at a 
time, it is relatively small, and is 
not dependent on any outside 
sources, other than a mains sup- 
ply, for its processing power. The 
IBM PC is one of the most famous. 

Port - The sockets which are 
usually found in the back of the 
computer’s system unit and serve 
to link up other equipment, like 
monitors, printers, and commu- 
nications devices. 

Program - If computer hardware 
is the instrument, then programs 
are the music. Without programs, 
hardware is useless. Most people 
buy packaged programs choosing 
from a wide variety to fit a specific 
application, such as word pro- 
cessing or filing. But with experi- 
ence, you can write your own pro- 
grams for more specialised needs. 

RAM - It stands for Random 

Access Memory. Measured in 
* 

kilobytes, RAM describes your 
computer’s ability to temporarily 
store programming instructions. 
The more RAM. the more sophis- 
ticated tasks you can carry out. 
IBM’s PC is available with R4M 
from 128KB to 3MB. The amount 
of RAM von require depends 
on the sophistication of the 
programs you plan to use and 
the amount of data you need to 
process. 

ROM - Not to be confused with 
RAM, ROM stands for Read Only 
Memory. ROM chips in the IBM 
PC contain permanent programs 
and instructions (like the self- 
checking system) that cannot be 
erased or altered. 

Software - Often used to refer to 
computer programs. 

Spreadsheet - A program used 
for financial analysis or business 
planning. It- resembles a ledger 
sheet with many row’s and col- 
umns, which are filled with the 
numbers of a project or forecast. 
When one number is changed, all 
of the other numbers that the 
change affects are altered as well. 
This allows for very rapid and 
accurate refinements of a project, 
and a painless wray to carry’ out 
projections. 


System unit - The box-like ob- 
ject that sits under vour monitor. 
The system unit houses .the disk 
drives, microprocessor, memory 
and everything else involved in 
the computing process. IBM 
makes several different svstem 
units, with various decrees of 
power and speed. 

Thermal transfer printer - As 
opposed to impact printing 
(w'here the printhead strikes the 
page to form the character), in 
this advanced technology, ink is 
heated with electrodes and char- 
acters are formed electronically. 
This results in virtually silent, let- 
ter quality printing. The IBM 
Quietwriter uses this system. 

User friendly - Hardware or soft- 
ware winch has a number of fea- 
tures designed to make it easy 
to use, such as ‘"help” screens to 
get you through rough spots, and 
easy-to-read manuals. 

Word processing - One of the 
most important and popular uses 
of personal computers in small - 
businesses, word processing saves 
time by eliminating retyping, as 
all corrections can be made elec- 
tronically, on the monitor. Docu- 
ments are usually stored on dis- 
kettes or hard files and recalled 
when necessary. Word processing 
is very useful for mass mailings 
and form letters. The Display 
Write series and Writing Assistant 
are examples of word processing 
programs. 

Once you’ve mastered this list, 
you can amaze vour friends and 
impress your brother-in-law with 
your new-found expertise. 

Of course, if you want to learn 
exactly how an IBM Personal 
Computer could help you work as 
cleverly as you talk, visit an IBM 
Authorised Dealer or Retail 
Centre. For the rest of the story. 

For further information write to 
IBM United Kingdom Interna- 
tional Products Limited. West 
Cross House, 2 West Cross Way. 
Brentford, Middlesex TW8 9DY, 
England (Telex 27748). 




3190 ’i" Al'-I mu m ill «l i'V i in ii ii twim i .mini, i n mi 


'?age 4 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


XJ.S. Officials Divided 


Weinberger 


On Soviet Plan for Joint 
'Nuclear Fusion Facility 


. * By Bernard Gwerrzman 

; New York Times Service 
'* WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration was reported San* 
'day to be sharply divided over 
whether to accept a Soviet proposal 
Lo begin construction of a huge test 
.reactor for development of con- 
trolled thermonuclear fusion ener- 
gy- 

Administration officials sajd 
that the project, which envisions a 
major increase in cooperation be- 
tween the United Slates and the 
Soviet Union in efforts to harness 
'energy from fusion, would require 
an agreement to cover the nest 25 
to 35 years and could cost billions 

of dollars. 

But it would be a significant 
demonstration of Soviei-Amencan 
^cooperation in the peaceful uses of 
atomic energy. 

Scientists have tried for years to 
■build a fusion reactor that would be 
economically feasible at producing 
-power. 

■ Thermonuclear fusion is the pro- 
"Cess that fuels the sun and other 
Stars and gives the hydrogen bomb 
iits power. 

Unlike conventional fission reac- 
tors, which split uranium atoms 
;apart to release their energy, fusion 
factors would capture the energy 
jof neutrons released when atoms of 
-deuterium, derived from common 
$£a water,' and tritium, another ra- 
dioactive isotope of hydrogen, are 
fused together at extremely high 
.temperatures. 

In addition to using materials 
'■more easily obtainable than urani- 
um fusion reactors in theory would 
ebb “clean," or much less radioac- 
ytive and safer than conventional 
.-reactors. 

According to several officials, 
the Energy Department and the 
- State Department have recom- 
' mended to President Ronald Rea- 
■jjan that he agree to the fusion 
‘■‘project, first proposed to Washing- 
ton a few months ago, when he 
.meets Tuesday and Wednesday 
‘ with Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

"I The officials said the Defense 
Department had argued a g ainst the 
„plan. contending that it involves 
^hormous costs that could be better 
^spent elsewhere, and that it runs 
,.lhe risk of giving the Russians ac- 
"tbss to some of the most advanced 
American technology. 

U.S. authorities have grown 
l( mo re worried about slippage of ad- 
. yanced technology to the Soviet 
.Union, particularly the Pentagon, 
,, which wants to protect secrets gar- 
nered in research for a space-based 
jjuiti-missile shield. 

But thermonuclear fusion is one 


field in which American scientists 
do not regard Soviet scientists as 
lagging behind. 

The administration is looking for 
agreements to announce at the 
summit meeting, and although it 
publicly stales that it will not agree 
to anything just for the sake of 
agreement, the fusion accord may 
be announced in general terms, 
leaving the details to be worked 
out, a State Department ofGcial 
said 

Moscow's proposal was for the 
United States and the Soviet Union 
to begin the project together, and 
eventually invite other countries to 
take part 

The United States and the Soviet 
Union agreed in 1973 to cooperate 
in the peaceful uses of atomic ener- 
gy. one of 1 1 scientific accords con- 
cluded in the early 1970s, 

A special group was set up to 
conduct research in controlled 
thermonuclear fusion “to demon- 
strate the scientific and technical 
feasibility of fusion through the 
eventual development or prototype 
and demonstration-type thermonu- 
clear reactors," a government sum- 
mary said last year. 

In 1974, the two nations signed a 
10-year protocol on joint projects 
in controlled thermonuclear fusion 
and p lasma physics, setting up a 
committee to review the status of 
each other's programs. 

Scientists have been exchanged 
and equipment provided to help 
the other's projects. U.S. officials 
have insisted there was careful con- 
trol to ensure that Soviet scientists 
received no militarily significant 
technology. 

On another matter, U.S. officials 
said that they, Soviet and Japanese 
diplomats were putting the final 
touches in Washington on an 
agreement announced in the sum- 
mer to ensure air safety in the 
North Pacific. 

The accord seeks to prevent a 
repeat of the September 1983 inci- 
dent in which a Soviet fighter shot 
down a South Korean airliner that 
had crossed into Soviet airspace. 
killin g all 269 people on board. 

According to a Stale Depart- 
ment official, the final details in- 
clude “implementation proce- 
dures" to allow air traffic control 
centers in the three countries “to 
communicate quickly in emergency 
situations and provide for the in- 
stallation of the support facilities 
needed for such communications.” 

The official could not say how 
soon an agreement would be 
reached. 


Routine Matter toy Aiae 

'(^iAMefhSaMtoteinAcari 
With Administration Arms Positions 


r, n \V 7 Annie Tr He. disputed the notion. ex- . 

Bj R. w . Apple jt. pressed by some adnamstratsm of- 

Pew York Tuna Serve* fidab in Geneva that the letterwas 

GENEVA-2^- ttilfaL Mr. 

berger, the U.S. defense sare^; rwXtik neeiotianons, 

he ■ 



The delegation advising 
Mikhail Gorbachev in- 
dudes, top left. Colonel 
General Nikolai F. 
Chervov and, top right, 
Marshal Sergei F. Akh- 
romeyev. Ronald Rear 
gan's aides include Ro- 
zanne L Ridgway, far 
right, and Fred C Okie. 


Who’s Aiding Whom at Geneva Summit Meeting 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The following are profiles 
af the behind-the-scenes strategists accompa- 
nying President Ronald Reagan and Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev. 


FOR THE UNITED STATES: 

Fred C fide, undersecretary of defense. 
Longtime conservative aims strategist and 
director of Arms Control and Disarmament 
Agency under former President Gerald R. 
Ford. 

Robie MLR Palmer, deputy assistant sec- 
retary of state for European and Canadian 
affairs. State Department's senior Soviet spe- 
cialist and the State Department summit 
meeting coordinator. An ideas man, daring 
by diplomatic standards. Accomplished 
speech-writer. 

Richard N. Perie, assistant secretary of 
defense. Regarded as perhaps the most formi- 
dable opponent of arms control in the admin- 
istration. 

Kenneth L. Adehnan, director of Aims 
Control and Disarmament Agency. Youngest 


of senior members of the arms control mm. 
His appointment to the arms control agency, 
met opposition in Congress because of bis 
lack erf experience in the field. 

Roxanne L. Ridgway, assistant secretary of 
state for European and Canadian affairs. 
Career Foreign Service employee; former 
ambassador to Finland and East Germany. 

Jack F. Matlock Jr„ senior National Secu- 
rity Council staff member on East-West rela- 
tions. Former ambassador to Czechoslovakia 
and former No. 2 man at U.S. Embassy in 
Moscow. Cautious career Foreign Service 
employee. 

FOR THE SOVIET UNION 

Viktor G. Komplektov, a deputy foreign 
minister in charge of American affairs. 
Known for sardonic wiL A key Soviet strate- 
gist for policy matters on United States. Con- 
sidered a workaholic. Speaks impeccable En- 
glish. 

Andrei M. Alexandrov, a top foreign affairs 
adviser to Soviet leaders since Leonid I. 
Brezhnev. A constant figure at talks involving 
Soviet leaders, whispering in the ear of the 


Soviet leader, be it Brezhnev, Yuri V. Andro- 
pov or Konstantin U. Chernenko. 

Cotond General Nikolai F. Cberrov, top 


arms control expert in the Defense Ministry 
for many years. Accustomed to dealing with 


for many years. Accustomed to dealing with 
Westerners. Speaks adequate English. 

Alexander A. Bessmertnykh, chief of the . 
United States Department at the Foreign 
Ministry. Former aide to Andrei A. Gromy- 
ko, longtime foreign minister and now presi- 
dent, and to Anatoli F. Dobrynin, ambassa- 
dor to Washington. Known as good-natured 
and professional 

Vadim V. fust deputy chief of 

international department of party Central 
Committee. Does much of Central Commit- 
tee's foreign affairs work; in charge of inter- 
national propaganda. Has a doctorate in phi- 
losophy. 

Marshal Sergei F.Akhrotneyev, chief of the 
general staff of the armed forces. Considered 
a soldier's soldier. Straightforward, tough in 
his langnage; brought to prominence by his 
former boss, Marshal Nikolai V. Ogarkov. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


Page 5 



By Lou Gannon 


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WASHINGTON President Ronald Rea- 
^pdatong and frequentlybumpy 

{?“» “J*®* m r&etonc, to arrive at fte Tat* 
geneva chateau wfcercfce is panjematingf orthe 
nisttum m ast^power sranmhmaSng. 

u* a characterization that said as much, about 
toe distance lie bag traveled as it does abonihis 
Sowet ooraterpart, Mr. Reagan recently de- 
scnbcdMi khail S. Gorbachev as “a reasonable 
nian who understands “that if we both Trent 
peace, toereH be peace." 

words were far different from these 
Mr. Reagan used on Jan. 29, 1981. at Ms first* 
presidential news conference, wheahe sakHbe 
«nssians were bent on “the promotion of world . 
revouition and a ane-worid socialist ar commu- 
nist state." He added that “the - only morality 
toey recognize is what will further their 

nearing that they reserve unto, themselves the 

ngnt to commit any crime, to lie, to efrra t in 
order to that," 


‘•; T . Sioceihea, muchhas changed. Key members 
t of Mr.^ Reagan’s staff have been ffybtiyd, and 
he -Has waged a re-election gampnig n during, 
vindi pdita] strategists and U.S. allies pushed 
for a more con dilatory approach to the Rns- 
SXDS.. 

If Sothe advisers say Mr. Reagan, who cannot 
nm for re-election, also recognizes that time is 
r unning om cm his chance for progress in the 
superpower relationship. At the same rime, they 
say the Russians reafaethat Mr. Reagan has the 
standing to win Senate ratification of an arms’ 
control treaty. 


“Where he’s gong with Ms present approach 


ove Reagan Along the Bumpy Road to Geneva 



going anywhere or is likely to get anything. Bur 
what is dear is that the president has learned 
that dealing with the Russians takes more than 
denunciations.” 

■ The president’s discourse on Cornm nnis t rmv 


. rality al has initial news conference was vintage 
Reagan. It reflected a world view formed in toe 
early days of a political career that began with 
. accusatory battles against Communists in post- 
World War II Hollywood, then tempered in the 
1964 conservative crusade of toe Republican 
presidential candidate. Barry Goldwater, and 
finally sharpened in a 1976 primary election 
campaign in which Mr. Reagan accused the 
incumbent president, Gerald R. Ford, of weak- 
ening U.S. defenses in the face of a Soviet 
buildup. 

The challenge to Mr. Ford failed narrowly, 
but not before Mr. Reagan had demonstrated 
that even a conservative Republican president 
was vulnerable if accused of dealing too gently 
with the Soviet Union. 

Four years later, with U.S. suspicions height- 
ened by the Soviet intervention in Afghanistan, 
Mr. Reagan was elected president after a cam- 
paign in which he accused President Jimmy 
Carter of making a “shambles” of the nation's 


The Wives 9 Meetings: A Minisummit, or Just Tea? 


% Esther B. Fein ' . 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —It is apex- 
sonal meeting, said ; a Mend of , 
Nancy Reafcan, a dunce for two 
women to get together, talk and 
get to know each other. 

Th e meeting is xne^y standard 
protocol far two leaders' wives, 
said a member of Mrs. Reagan’s 
staff .'although It will be bathed in’ 
more than the usual public atten— - 
turn. 

It is “diplomatic pingpong 
gone femmine,” offered one Sovi- 
et expert, who added tha t- hr. was 
unsure nonetheless what infer- 
ences could be drawn from the 
meetings this wed: in Geneva be- 
tween Mrs. Reagan and Raisa M. 

' Gorbachev, the wife of toe Soviet 
leader. 

■Speculation about ’the n gmfi - 
canoe of the encounters began 
soon after the White House an- . 
noonced in September that Mrs. 
Reagan had imited Mrs. Gorba- 
chev to tea during the summit , 
meeting, and that-Mrv Gorba- 
chev had accepted and recipro- 
cated with an invitation of her 
own. V 

The first tea will be given by 
Mis. Reagan, on Tuesday at the . 
Maison de Saussure, where the 
Reagans will stay. The next day, 
Mrs. Gorbachev will be the host- 
ess at toe Soviet mimao n. 

T think Mrs^ Reagan is look- 
ing forward to tins as a woman- 
to-woman talk,” .said. Nancy 
Clark Reynolds, a lobbyist and a 
friend of Mrs. Reagan. “I don’t 
think she thinks of it as a mhu- 

s nmm ir ” 

Dmitri K. Sime^ a senior asso- 
ciate in Soviet affairs al the Car- 
negie Endowment for Interna-, . 



bun 


Nancy Reagan and Raisa M. Gorbachev with their husbands on arrival in Geneva. 


“People who are dealing with pre- 
snniimt arrangements on both 
sides fake this meeting very seri- 
ously.! bear reports from Eastern 
European diplomats who know, 
them wefl that Raisa has consid- 
erable influenceon ho- husband." 

'Much of the cariosity regard- 
- ing the teas centre on Mrs. Gor- 
. bachev, who has emaged as styl- 
ish and rdarivdy accessible, in 
contrast to toe wives of previous 
Soviet leaders; 

Still, little is known about her. 
She stndied philosophy at Mos- 
cow Univasny, wfaoe she is said 
to lecture on Mamst-Leninist 
theory. The Gorbachevs have 
one, possibly two children, and a 
4-year-old granddaughter. Mrs. 
Gorbachev speaks same English, 
and an her trips to London and ■ 
Paris she efirited such headlines 
as “The Bo Derek of the 


Steppes." and “Nancy Reagan's 
Greatest RivaL” 

Soviet diplomats are aware of 
Mrs. Reagan’s influenceon Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and of the 
turnaround in her public image 
from that of a socialite to that of 
the president's most trusted ad- 
viser. Recently, the Tass press 
agency began assigning a reporter 
to cover Mrs. Reagan full time, 
and diplomats at the Soviet Em- 
bassy in Washington say they 
have been assembling reports on 
Mrs.- Reagan for Mrs. Gorba- 
chev. 

Mis. Reagan's aides said she 
was preparing for the meetings by 
reading novels and history books 
about Russia, such as Suzanne 
Massie’s “Land of tbe Firebird: 
The Beauty of Old Russia” and 
Max Hayward's “Writers in Rus- 
sia: 1917-1978,” looking at news- 


papers and magazines and watch- 
ing videotapes of the 
Gorbachevs* visits to London 
and Paris. 

“One of tbe best-kept secrets is 
that she is an absolute media- 
phfle,” said Sheila Tate, Mrs. 
Reagan’s former press secretary. 
“She reads everything, she watch- 
es al least two news broadcasts a 
night, she looks at videotapes of 
the ones she mi«w, she watches 
all the Sunday interview shows. 
She will be very well versed for 
tins meeting simply by virtue of 
everything toe see&” 

A White House official said 
that Mrs. Reagan would be given 
“talking points" by tbe Slate De- 
partment, which are suggested 
topics of conversation, but that it 
was “difficult lo prepare for a 
meeting when you can't be cer- 
tain what will be discussed." 


defenses and being “totally oblivious” to the 
Soviet drive for world domination. 

Mr. Reagan came to office as the most out- 
spokenly anti-Soviet UJS. president of modern 
times. 

In public, Mr. R e a ga n successfully promoted 
huge increases in military sending. In private, 
he often shared anti-Soviet jokes with his inti- 
mates. He was so suspicious of his adversaries 
that he passed up three opportunities to go to 
Moscow after toe deaths of Soviet leaders. 

Mr. Reagan’s speeches reflected a dualistic 
view. On toe one band, be feared Soviet military 
prowess and considered the Soviet Union “toe 
focus of evil" and the “evil empire." as he told 
the National Association of Evangelicals on 
March 8. 1983. 

But he also asserted that Communism was a 
flawed system headed for toe “dustbin of histo- 
ry." the fate that Karl Marx predicted for capi- 
talism. In an address to Britain’s Parliament on 
June 8, 1982, Mr. Reagan said that denials of 


freedom and other restrictions had resulted in 
“toe decay of the Soviet experiment." 

In Mr. Reagan's view, expressed as early as 
1980 in an interview with The Washington Post, 
the arms race had a potentially beneficial conse- 
quence if the burden strained the Soviet econo- 
my and pushed Moscow io toe bargaining table. 
For him, therefore, the summit meeting seemed 
a natural consequence of toe U.S. buildup. 

“The president believes in toe success of what 
he has done lo restore America's defenses,” said 
a former senior adviser. “This logically leads 
him to toe conclusion that toe Soviets might be 
willing to strike a bargain." 

Political events, pressure from key advisers 

and diplomacy pushed Mr. Reagan in the same 
direction. The business of diplomats is diploma- 
cy. and Stale Department professionals were 
uncomfortable with toe absence or a U.S.-Soviet 
dialogue. 

By mid- 1983. White House officials were 
tal kin g openly about toe possibility of a summit 
meeting in toe re-election year of 1984. Political 


advisers, reportedly including Nancy Reagan, 
had concluded that toe president was potential- 
ly vulnerable on toe “peace issue" unless he 
muted his anti-Soviet rhetoric and began To 
bargain. 

Finally, in an unusually conciliatory speech 
on Jan. f6, 1984. Mr. Reagan said toe superpow- 
ers faced “a year of opportunities for peace." 
More than any other event, toe speech put Mr. 
Reagan firmly on toe road to Geneva. 

After the Soviet leader, Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko. died on March 10, 1985. Mr. Reagan 
agreed almost casually to invite Mr. Gorbachev, 
his successor, to a summit meeting. 

Some U.S. officials say that Mr. Reagan has 
traveled toe road io toe summit without altering 
bis fundamental views. 

One adviser said; “Reagan is not an intellec- 
tual in any sense, but he is powerfully influ- 
enced by his experiences and intuitively aware. 
Personal experience counts with him, and this 
could be the most important trip of his presiden- 
cy.” 


Soviet Bloc Watching for Signals From Gorbachev 


By Jackson Diehl 

Washington Post Service 

WARSAW — The preparatory rhetoric in- 
variably depicts a solid Communist alliance 
whose vision of superpower agreement hinges 
on good behavior by a stubborn U.S. president. 

But for Eastern Europe's summit-watchers in 
Geneva, it is likely to be Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
and not Ronald Reagan, who draws their most 
anxious attention. 

Moscow’s six Warsaw Pact allies have strong- 
ly backed Mr. Gorbachev’s drive to win conces- 
aons from Mr. Reagan on tbe Strategic Defense 
Initiative and other arms issues. 

Yet the most important outcome of toe sum- 
mit meeting for Poland. East Germany, Hunga- 
ry and other East European nations may be its 
impact oo toe developing relationship between 
Mr. Gorbachev and their own Communist lead- 
erships. 

For Eastern Europe, the Gorbachev era has 
already mean: brightened demands for econom- 
ic and technological contributions to the Soviet 
economy, at toe expense of internal living stan- 
dards and Western trade. 

The summit meeting. East European diplo- 
mats and foreign policy experts say, could shape 
toe lingering question of whether Moscow’s new 
requirements will spread from computers and 
shoes to military anti political affairs. 

“The Soviets are already demanding much 
more effective cooperation on tbe economic 
side,” said Marian Podowinski. a foreign affairs 
specialist on the Polish government’s official 
newspaper, RzeczpospoKta. “If nothing good 
happens in Geneva, there will be pressures for 
political uniformity as well." 

Many East European observers say they see 
little prospect that toe Geneva summit meeting 
will lead to immediate gains in their own rela- 
tions with toe United States and other Western 
countries, in part because a breakthrough in 
arms control is considered unlikely. 

However, they say a failure by Geneva to 
improve the atmosphere of East-West relations 
could place at risk their relative freedom in 
recent years to pursue national goals and culti- 
vate variations in Soviet-style Communism. 

In East Germany, the stake is closer inter- 
German relations; in Hungary it is free-market- 
oriented reforms of the economy; in Poland it is 


increased tolerance for debate and dissent in a 
politically divided society. 

Until now*, there has been no clear sign that 
Mr. Gorbachev intends to curb the relative 
heterodoxy among his allies. But neither is it 
dear to toe East Europeans that toe Russians' 
relative flexibility during tbe years of detente 
and frail Kremlin leaders will continue, rather 
than be replaced by a stiff dose of Mr. Gorba- 
chev's discipline. 

“There’s still a lot of visible nervousness and 
tension about what might be coming from toe 
East,” a veteran Western diplomat in Warsaw 
said. East European leaders, he said, “think a 
failure at the summit could lead to some old- 
time discipline by the Soviets for everyone and 
everything attributed to the era of detente.” 

This risk-conscious outlook means that many 
Communist leaders have focused on minimal 
summit results. Many say they see no real 
chance for major progress even on toe European 
arms control issues that most concern them. 

However, officials interviewed in several East 
European capitals were quick to point out that 
the very stagmg of the meeting was a welcome 
result. 

"The total importance of such a meeting may 
be that it happens," said Ivan Broz, an adviser to 
the Czechoslovak Foreign Ministry. “It will be 
like a patient with flu who gets his first aspirin. 
He'll still be ill, but at least toe doctors decided 
to treat him ” 

East European dissidents, including leaders 
of toe outlawed Solidarity movement in Poland, 
have a similar view. Many regard a new era of 
U.S.-Soviet cooperation as a condition for real- 
izing their goals of increased political pluralism. 

Any superpower dialogue, they say, gives 
their governments an interest in e asing internal 
repression. 

“I'm not that interested in concrete out- 
comes.” said Tin Dienstbier, a spokesman for 
the Czechoslovak dissident group Charter 77. “I 
simply think that any talk is better than noth- 
ing.” 

Outwardly, all of the Soviet bloc governments 
have enthusiastically echoed Mr. Gorbachev's 
emphasis mi arms control issues at Geneva. 

A summit meeting of toe Warsaw Pact in 
Sofia last month declared “full support" for Mr. 
Gorbachev's proposal for a 50-percent cut in 


nuclear arsenals and a ban on space-based 
weapons. 

“Now it is toe turn of toe U.S.A. to follow the 
positive example of the U.S.5JL," a joint com- 
munique said. 

But tensions lie just below the surface of such 
outward cohesion. East European resistance to 
an escalation in the arms race was evident in 
1983 when popular unrest over the deployment 
of new Soviet missiles in Czechoslovakia and 
East Germany surfaced publicly in those coun- 
tries. 

Last year, unsuccessful attempts by tbe East 
German leader, Erich Honecker, and the Bul- 
garian leader. Todor Zhivkov, to press ahead 
with planned visits to West Germany despite 
Soviet displeasure further underlined the reluc- 
tance of Moscow’s allies to follow a new hard 
line. 

Even while lining up behind Mr. Gorbachev 
in toe pre-summit propaganda blitz. East Euro- 
pean leaders have been careful to emphasize 
their own regional interests. 

“Other countries have to dr own place in this 
process," said a Bulgarian Foreign Ministry 
official who pointed to his country’s call for a 
nuclear-free zone in toe Balkans. 

The recent Warsaw Pact communique point- 
edly emphasized the possibility of “a separate 
agreement" on European missiles, and this lan- 
guage was later highlighted in accounts of the 
Sofia meeting by toe official press in Poland and 
Hungary. 

While relieved by the formal detachment of 
the SDI impasse from their own arms control 
interests, officials here remain pessimistic that 
toe summit meeting win lead to quick progress 
even on European missiles. 

“There is a chance to discuss toe problems 
separately," said a Polish Foreign Ministiy offi- 
cial who asked not to be named. “But another 
question is whether it’s realistic to expect radical 
solutions” on intermediate aims “without solv- 


ing toe problem of strategic and space weapons. 
I don’t think SO.” 

Similarly, most East European officials seem 
to have few expectations that even a successful 
s ummi t conference would lead to significant 
changes in their own relations with toe United 
States and the West. 

Jackson Diehl covers Eastern Europe for The 
Washington Post. 




.... - • 


Page 6 


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc. 


PubilxlvNi With The .V-w lark Tlinn. and The Wwhingkw Pert 


The Work of the Summit 


It is just as well that the sentimental vision 
of Soviet-Anierican relations that President 
Reagan offered is an address last week is not 
central to his actual policy. The vision of 
ordinary people going tack and forth nourish- 
ing one another’s understanding has little to 
do with reducing what the president otherwise 
plainly understands as the real conflicts of 
interest and outlook between the two powers. 

There is a question whether it is wise to 
invest much hope in building these citizen 
bridges — which usually are the first to crash 
when a political dispute erupts — before any 
of the disputes are treated. Some of the ex- 
changes Mr. Reagan now would resume were 
suspended after the Soviet invasion of Afghan- 
istan, and the Russians are still there. But the 
vision does reflect American good will. 

The president's sudden embrace of ex- 
changes is dismissed in skeptical quarters as an 
effort to ensure that he has something to bring 
back from a summit meeting that otherwise 
promises only limited tangible results. But it 
may make more sense to see the proposal as a 
broad-screen projection of his belief in the 
potential of the leader-to-leader exchange that 
he is conducting himself. 

Mr. Reagan seems to fed that by vigorous 
exposition he can break through some of the 
unfounded distrust to which he attributes So- 
viet pulley differences. Few would underesti- 
mate his talent for one-on-one engagement. 
Still, he would be breaking new ground if he 


were to alter his Sonet counterpart’s world 
view. The more realistic Geneva goal and one 
whose modesty and subjectivity require no 
apologies in a nuclear world, is simply to raise 
the level of mutual understanding. 

To get an impatient public off its bade, the 
administration has discouraged expectations 
of progress on arms control the one major 
area where accord is conceivably within reach. 
Yet it does not seem unreasonable to hope that 
Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev can come to 
broad terms. The first requirement is to halt 
the rotting of the existing arms control frame- 
work caused by Soviet noncompliance and 
American distancing, and the second require- 
ment is to move on from there. 

Thanks in pan to Ronald Reagan, the Unit- 
ed States has regained much of the general 
strategic momentum that it lost in the 1970s, 
and this should translate into bargaining con- 
fidence. The Russians will not pay exorbitant- 
ly for. but perhaps could use, something of a 
breather. Therein lies the possibility that Mos- 
cow mil put on the table the disproportionate 
offensive capacity thaL trouble the United 
States so deeply, and Washington wQ] put on 
the table the pursuit of early unilateral deploy- 
ment of a high-technology defense. That is 
what any serious arms control bargaining will 
be about. Whether or not it comes to anything, 
Mr. Reagan at least has created the conditions 
to make it possible. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Help for the Colombians 


Earthquake, mud slide, volcano — nature 
itself seems in insurrection in Latin America 
Again there are casualty numbers beyond 
comprehension. Again we read of communi- 
ties instantly entombed. Again on television 
we hear the cries ol the trapped, the sobs of the 
bereaved. At least for a few days, a remote 
land becomes close, its population resolves 
into real people and their suffering is entered 
in the common account of humanity. 

Of course, Colombia, like disaster-struck 
Mexico and Puerto Rico, has been there all 
along and will remain after the heartbreaking 
images fade. It is bigger than Cuba, Nicaragua 
and El Salvador combined. And more Colom- 
bians now live in the United States than do any 
other South Americans. 

So let this be the occasion for enlarging our 
vision. When virtually all South America fell 
under military dictatorships in the 1970s, Co- 
lombia proudly preserved its democratic insti- 
tutions. The current president, Belisario Be- 
iancur, has been an architect of the Contadora 


coalition for Central American peace and of 
attempts to coordinate a responsible Latin 
response to the debt problem. The story of 
Colombia before and after the volcano is 
about much more than just drug smugglers 
and the guerrillas of the M-l 9 group. 

The volcano tragedy of Nevado del Ruiz, of 
course, dwarfs even last week's man-made di- 
saster in Bogota’s Palace of Justice, which cost 
100 lives. Now Colombia urgently needs social 
solidarity and relief. 

The international response has been swift, 
but much more help is needed. Mexico, so 
recently afflicted by devastating earthquakes, 
immediately dispatched 10 tons of food, medi- 
cine and equipment. The United States has 
sent helicopters, tents, blankets, and technical 
assistance. Especially needed are power gener- 
ators, tents and orthopedic equipment 

Tragedies of this size teach only humility. 
They dramatize the fragility of life, the obliga- 
tions of neighbors, the solace of friendship. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Re-Regulating the Banks 


With yeflow lights flashing to signal g rear 
uncertainty ahead, the U.S. government is be- 
ginning to reverse the deregulation of banks 
and the financial industry. This change in 
policy is not coming from the top down: the 
White House has taken no part in it Instead it 
is coming from the bottom up, as the various 
regulatory agencies struggle with the increas- 
ingly urgent demands being made upon them. 

L. William Sddman, the new chairman of 
the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 
says he expects the number of bank failures 
this year to come to about 130. That would be 
5 1 more than last year, and there were more of 
them last year than at any time since the 
Depression. Robert Clarke, nominated to be 
comptroller of the currency, has appeared at a 
confirmation hearing and talked mostly about 
handling troubled banks. Further deregulation 
may be a good thing in theory, he suggested, 
but it is not going to be the main concern of the 
comptroller’s office for a while. 

When interest rates began to shoot upward 
six years ago, putting the banks and SJfcLs 
under great strain, regulators reacted first by 
relaxing some of the traditional rules and giv- 
ing the institutions more room to maneuver. 
The deregulation of interest meant that depos- 
itors were paid much higher rates on their 
savings, which in turn meant that holding 


deposits was a much less profitable business. 
For a time the prevailing idea among regular 
tors was to abandon longstanding limits and 
allow bankers to get into new businesses that 
would provide greater stability. As for the 
savings and loan associations, it seemed sensi- 
ble to encourage them to turn themselves as 
rapidly as possible into banks. To that pur- 
pose, many restrictions were eased or lifted 
entirely. Not all banks and S&Ls used these 
new liberties skillfully or wisely, and that is 
why the failure rates have been rising. 

Circumstances are pushing the authorities 
toward re-regulation here and there, bat the 
White House apparently finds it inconvenient 
to acknowledge this publicly. As for Congress, 
the two banting committees understand the 
need for a broad revision and tightening of the 
rules, but every senator and congressman 
dreads dealing with the banks. Divided among 
themselves, suspicious, anxious and influential 
in every congressional district, the banks can 
be counted on to fight any proposal that does 
sot immediately and directly benefit them. 

The regulatory agencies are generally mov- 
ing in the right direction. But in the absence of 
adequate political support they are moving 
more hesitantly and less powerfully than expe- 
rience is showing to be desirable. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Washington's Royal Nhwittery 

Washington was so agog about the visit of 
Britain’s fun couple, Charles and Diana, that 
some of its denizens seemed to be regretting 
the outcome of the Revolutionary War. Exam- 
ples of the nitwitteiy: extensive inquiries into 
such burning questions as the royal tourists’ 
sleeping arrangements and whether D iana 


shaves her legs. True, when engaged in such 
silliness, Washingtonians are distracted from 
raising taxes or otherwise harassing honest 
folk in the outside world. Nevertheless, there 
are times when the rest of us could wish that 
the citizens of our nation's capital would show 
some cool: This frenzy may’ not have been 
revolutionary, but it sure was revolting. 

— The Dallas Morning News. 


FROMOURNOV. 19 PAGES, 75 AMD 50 TEARS AGO 


1910: Plot Against Mexico Uncovered 
NEW YORK — U.S. Secret Service agents 
have learned details of a revolutionary plot 
against the Mexican government, which has 
recently ban brought to light on the American 
bonier. They say that a general rising on the 
border, from Nogales, Arizona, to Browns- 
ville, Texas, had been prepared [for Nov. 20]. 
The brains of the movement are in the United 
Slates and Europe. The revolutionists are 
abundantly supplied with money, with which 
they have purchased arms in the United States. 
The aim of the revolution was to release politi- 
cal prisoners, to enable exiles to return, to 
remove President Porfirio Diaz and establish a 
popular government. Consignments of arms in 
San Antonio and elsewhere are under surveil- 
lance, and will be seized if any attempt is made 
to carry them across the border. 


1935: More Nationalist Riots in Egypt 
CAIRO — British and Egyptian mounted po- 
lice charged with drawn sabers jn Cairo [on 
Nov. 18] to disperse a mob of students, many 
of them girls between 14 and 18 years old, 
intending to storm the Government Hospital. 
Using the flat of their sabers, the mounted ‘ 
police drove the mob down side streets, where 
the demonstrators remained chanting “Off 
with the British yoke — long live National- 
ism?” Police said nobody was injured in the 
m&l&e. Anti-British and Natio nalis t demon- 
strations were renewed in Cairo when two 
students were wounded trying to break 
through police cordons around Opera Square. 
It was in this square that the students had 
announced their intention of holding a “mock 
funeral” for their comrades kille d during the 
past few days of Nationalist rioting. 


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0 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. 



A Human 
Dimension 
At Geneva 

By Samuel Pisar 

P ARIS — The grim count of nu- 
clear missiles and warheads at 
Geneva must not obscure the fact 
that a whole oew generation has risen 
to power in Moscow, sweeping away 
an intractable gerontocracy. If we fad 
to test the motives and intentions of 
these men we may lose an opportuni- 
ty that will not return for many years. 

There is reason to believe that the 
new Soviet leaders are a different 
breed from their predecessors. But 
this younger generation, the most 
educated and pragmatic Russia has 
had, faces huge economic problems. 

I have met and dealt with several of 
these men. They know that their agri- 
cultural sector is bankrupt and their 
industry obsolescent and that they 
cannot endlessly extract from Moth- 
er Russia's soil the oil gas, gold and 
raw materials needed to buy wheat 
and technology from the West. They 
understand that in the midst of a 
technological revolution, the future 
depends on the human capacity to 
create. Yet today there can be no 
creation, no sustained economic pro- 
gress. unless minds are free. 

This opens a window of opportuni- 
ty for East-West accommodation on 
a host of urgent issues. 

Firmness is a constant requirement 
in dealing with the Russians: but it is 
only half a policy. To respond to the 
new situation in the Kremlin we mus t 
advance on two legs: firmness and 
openness. Ronald Reagan seems 
ready to add the missing component 
to his dialogue with the “evil empire.” 

The period of detente launched by 
Richard Nixon and Leonid Brezhnev 
was never given a chance. Each side 
had one foot on the accelerator and 
the other on the brake. Yet business- 
men, managers and tourists demon- 
strated that they could cross ideologi- 
cal borders much more effectively 
than could diplomats and soldiers. 

Hungary was able to institute eco- 
nomic reforms. Relations between 
the two Germanys developed with 
unexpected intensity. Ro mania often 
dared to go it alone in foreign affairs. 
Unprecedented social and religious 
effervescence shook Poland. Far 



A New Bi 

,r 




Bv John Temple Swing 


N 


from Russia dominating Western Eu- 
rope. it was Eastern Europe that be- 
gan to move closer to the West. 

The condition of Soviet minorities, 
and particularly Jew, was always a 
barometer of East-West relations. 
Lowered tensions and the prospect of 
increased trade with the United 
States enabled more than half a mil- 
lion Jews and ethnic Germans to 
leave the Communist empire. Now, 
both emigration and trade are at a 
virtual standstill dissidents are si- 
lenced, the arms race has resumed. 

Taxpayers blink at the bloated mil- 
itary budgets that eat up funds badly 
needed elsewhere, and pray that these 
billions will not be turned against 
them. Meanwhile, their leaders re- 
main unable to produce the fresh 
ideas and political courage needed 
for a real change of direction. 

History shows that the Soviet 


Union will not be destroyed militari- 
ly, nor strangled economically; it 
would be futile to engage the Rus- 
sians in a competitive accumulation 
of weapons in hopes they will exhaust 
themselves. At the same time, Russia 
must have a chance to exorcise its 
fears about security. 

The West’s most effective weapon 
in realm is not its arms, but its 
superior capacity for economic pro- 
gress and human freedoms. Only the 
bold development of economic, cul- 
tural and intellectual contacts can 
lessen mistrust and build the confi- 
dence needed for disarmament. A 
common interest in survival requires 
that tins process now begin. 

The writer, a lawyer, is author of "Co- 
Existence and Commerce” aid "Of 
Blood and Hope.” He contributed this to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


EW YORK —The convention- 
al wisdom is that a bipartisan 
U.S. foreignpobey is dead, the victim 
of Vietnam. Iran. A fg h a ni s tan ana an 
all-guns, no^butter president- Do not 
be too sure: There may be life in the 
old bipartisanship yet, and President 
' Reagan has a rare historic opportuni- 
ty starting at the summit ntfeting 

—to restore it to robust health.- 
The argument that bipartisanship 
in foreign policy is dead runs like 
this: Until Vietnam, consensus in for- 
eign policy held center stage, benefit- 
ing from an unwritten alliance be? 
tween the moderates in -both 
principal political parties and leaving 
the ideologies of left and the right on 
the fringes. Not until Bany Goldwa- 
ter name along in 1964 did a. fringe 
can didate capture a major party tick- 
et; and Mr. Gold water was emphati- 
cally rejected in the general election. 

Vietnam split both m^'or parties. 
Liberal Democrats, led by Eugene 
McCarthy and disgusted with ..what 
to them was an immoral and unnec- 
essary war, deserted the center and . 
contributed heavDy to the electorate’s 
repudiation of, Hubert H. Humphrey 
in 1968L Meanwhile, conservative Re- 
- publicans: furious at the moderates 
for selling out a war “could have 

been won,” captured their party and, 
by 198Q, the White House itself. The)' 
were aided in no small measure by . 
what many believed was a Kberal 
Democratic president’s failure of wifi 
in Iran, and the subsequent Soviet 
invasion of Afghanistan. 

It soon became dear that President 
Reagan’s militant foreign-policy 
views lay to the right even of Mr. 
Goldwater’s. His overwhelming Hrer 
election triumph in 1984 seemed, 
ihere/ore, to confirm that “biparti- 
sanship” was dead. 

While this analysis has validity, it 
overlooks an essential part of the sto- 
ry. William Schneider, an analyst of 
public cpimonj reminds ..us that most 
Americans have consistently fawned 
both str ength and peace; a' duality 
that lies at the heart of a bipartisan 
foreign pdjcy.Broughttobearonthe 
most critical relationship of our 
times, that between the super] 
this roughly translates into; “1 


strong so that the Russians can’ipush 

us around, but. when the opportunity 
arises, negotiate aims control agree- 
ments with them," 

To a large euent. their perceived 
success in achieving both these goals 
en hanc ed the popularity of two very 
different, presidents John F, Kenne- 
dy and Richard M. Nixon. Inhis first 
term, however, "Ronald Reagan gave 
os only half the equation: strength, 
but no progress on arms control 

Now, as the summit meeting be- 
gins, he has an opportunity to redress .< 
this imbalance. With the Soviet offer * 
to reduce nudeax warheads to 6,1300 
(and land-based intercontinental bal- 
listic missies to 3.600), coupled with 
the administration's cautious re- 
sponse (accepting, the general con- 
cept arid expressing a willingness to 
limit US. air-launched cruise missile 
. warheads, to 1 .500), the ingredients 
for -red progress may be at hand. 
Politically," protected on bis right 
. Hank, the president cm afford to 
move — mw* as Presdem Lyndon 
B. Johnson, a Sou therner , could af- 
ford to move oa civil rights. 

./ In. many ways, the real test for the 
president. will be whe&er his instincts 
will lead him to imite his administra- 
tion. and sustain it in the months 
ahead during what is boaad to be a 
lengthy, trying pursuit of a realistic 
arms -control agre ement. Then? are 
reasons for hope. As has been poioi- 
ed oui, :ihe president*^ staff has al- 
ways Included ideologues ,and prag- 
matists; hot wheti fcHcedito choose, 
Mr.'Riagmopel^ 

If, asj&w oppeaivto be the case, 
the opporfBti^/is .lbert^-ihe presi- 
dent mraiW^ab itTSc can count on 
haring tfcei American people solidly 
behind hnn^for he will have brought 
about a a^ mtiKsis ^ those two 
central idgfedKaits of a' -bipartisan 
foreign ^pdicyf; peace as wdl as 
stre^&T^iis.thc duly foreign po- 
licy mat c^ evor. woik .over the long 
hauI^EaFif is. the only one the major- 
ity ofjAsiriicans have shown they 
mllmg^^Jpfflt. 

The wrilef.raffir^ president of the 
Councilon Fdreiga Relations, contrib- 
uted, this /d'The^ew. Y6rly Tunes. 


Budget Balancing, Alas, 
Requires Doing Just That 




W ASHINGTON — The longer 
Congress wrestles with the def- 
icit problem, the clearer it becomes 
that the only way to balance the bud- 
get is to balance it. That is not a 
tautology; it means there are no 
shortcuts, no procedural gimmicks, 
no painless solutions available. 

It also means that nothing other 
than a balanced formula of spending 
cuts and revenue increases will pro- 
duce reductions of sufficient scale. 

Again last week, the Congress and 
President Reagan dodged the neces- 
sity for hard choices by extending the 
debt ceiling until after the Geneva 
summit meeting. Republicans and 
Democrats agreed to let Unde Sam 
go on borrowing a bit longer, rather 
than send Mr. Reagan into Mikhail 
Gorbachev's parlor as the head of a 
deadbeat nation. But such temporiz- 
ing does not stop the hemorrhage. 

There is much appeal in the sugges- 
tion bom Representative James R. 
Jones of Oklahoma, the former 
House Budget Committee chairman, 
that Mr. Reagan inrite the leaders of 
both parties in Congress, to a post- 
Geneva “domestic summit” to re- 
solve the year-long budget deadlock. 

Both the president and the Con- 
gress wdl have to face this issue be- 
fore the year is over. By then, there 
may be an added imperative in the 
form of the Gramm- Rudman biD — a 
measure that purports to set an 
“automatic” timetable for eliminat- 
ing the deficit by the end of the de- 
cade. Congress seems likely to pass it, 
not because very many people think 
it will work, but because they are 
politically frightened to oppose iL _ 
But the Gramm-Rudman biD is 
still a device for delaying the inevita- 
ble hard choices. The way out of the 
swamp lies in a proposal put forward 
last summer by Senator Slade Gor- 
ton. a Republican of Washington, 
and Senator Lawton Chiles, a Florida 
Democrat. Their plan, unlike the 
Gramm-Rudman bill did not just 
mandate future cuts sufficient to 
reach specified targets. It made those 
hard derisions, and in the only way 
that will ultimately prove acceptable 
— with everybody giving up some- 
thing important for the sake of real 
defied reduction. 

Military and domestic discretion- 
ary spending would be held down, 
but not cut as deeply and haphazard- 
ly as would be necessary under the 
Gramm-Rudman bOL By exempting 
Social Security, military procurement 
contracts and some domestic pro- 
grams From any cuts, the Senate and 
House versions of the Gramm-Rud- 
man bill put an intolerable burden on 
the rest of the budget. 


By David S. Broder 

Mr. Gorton and Mr. Chiles ask 
pensioners to help solve the deficit 
problem by forgoing cost-of-living 
increases for one year. Military 
spending would be frozen for a year, 
then increased at .the 3-percent yearly 
rate Mr. Reagan has requested. The 
two senators would ask taxpayers to 
stop shoveling their bills onto the 
next generation, by accepting a $59- 
billion tax rise over three years. 

In making their proposal the two 
senates took considerable political 
risks. Mr. Chiles, representing Flori- 
da with hs thousands of retirees, said 
be would deny them cost-of-living 
adjustments for a year. And Mr. Gor- 
ton, a freshman senator facing re- 
election next year, said openly that 
here was one Republican who was 
asking voters to pay more taxes. 

That kind of courage will have to ' 
become contagious if we are to see 
more than gimmi ck solutions 10 the 
deficit problem. When the Gorton- 
Chiles plan was presented last July, 
President Reagan and House Speaker 
Thomas O’Neill conspired to strangle 
the plan al birth. 

Mr. Reagan balked at the militazy 
freeze and the tax increase, and Mr. 
O’Neill was unhappy with the Social 
Security provisions. Both men pre- 
ferred rhetoric and politics to reality 
and responsibility. 

That was last July, and a discour- 
aged Mr. Gorton said, “We have lest 
the last best chance we had of seri- 
ously approaching a balanced budget 
in the foreseeable future.” 

No other way of reaching that goal 
has yet been found. But next month, 
Mr. Reagan and Mr. O'Neill may 
have a dunce to redeem themselves. 
The Washington Past. 





N 


EW YORK — While the 
world’s attention has been fo- 
cused on the summit meeting, 
storm clouds have darkened over. 
Nicaragua. And. though “regional 
disputes” are on the agenda at Ge- 
neva, it is unlikely that anything 
done or said there will much affect 


what may be the coming crisis in - them the final 


Central America. , ■■ 

Both the Nicaraguan govern-- 
meat and the U ^.-supported “am- • 
tras” are predicting ihata crisis is at 
hand. When the Sandinists an- 
nounced in October the suspension 
of certain civil liberties, the reason! 
Resident Daniel Ortega 
. was that the government 
was “on the verge” of routing the 
contras. The suspension of rights 
was necessary, he said; to help pre- 
vent the rebels from “regrouping.” 

From the other side of the fence, 
Arturo Jos6 Cruz, once a member 
of the government and perhaps the 
most respected contra leader, said . 
last week: “1986 id the year when 
the book will be dosed, u (the San? 
dinistsj are stfll in power by the end 
of 1986, that’s iL” 

If Mr. Ortega has judged the mil- 
itaiy situation correctly, die bad 
news is that it is highly unlikely the 
Reagan administration — in an 
election year — would be any less 
determined to overthrow the San- 
dinist leadership. Rather than let 
the contras be crushed. President 
Reagan might support them with 
U.S. air strikes or other U.S. forces. 

But if Mr. Cruz is correct that the 
contras might succeed next year in 
overthrowing the Sandinists, not 
only will the war intensify but so 
will the danger of. its spreading 
across tbs Honduran or Costa Ri- 
can borders, or both. That also 
would make it Gkdier that the Unit- 


By Tom Wicker 

ed States might be drawn: inc in 
“defense" of these, allies. iQr, if. 
Washington saw that the San$nist& 
were near defeat, the . temptation 
could be great to intervene mid give , 



l -Perhaps i 

the announcSment by : 

Ortega Saavedra, Nicaragua’s" : 
feme minister and the president's 



brother, that his country might 
soon acquire new fighter airplanes 
to counter what Ive said was a U.S. 
plan to equip Honduras with ad- 
vanced F-5s. A Stare Department 
official replied that there was no 
plan to provide F-5s_— - not until the 
French Super Mysthre fighters that 
already give Honduras the stron- 
gest air force in Central America 
could no longer be repaired. The 
official said the Myst&res probably 
could last a year or twomore. But in 


this age of deniabnity, that state- 
~ Tnentlcavespleray of rootrifor the 
United States to equip Honduras 
with F : 5s sooner rather than later. 
/ V Jf the United Stans did so, Nica- 
‘ ragunwohldb*' vrithfoiissovereign 
rignts^-^as ifritfooWbeeveittiow — 
. 1 , to seek advmioed.fi$rteFSof its 

^Sirriet MiGs or 

The -Reagan 
»*rfgwrtUdratir& ; has '-tffrmgff.felicara- 
,’s acquisitiou of such aircraft 
taqrepfal^”; and officials 
havcleftlhestrang impression that 
thejadnnnLstration might mount air 
..strikes id destiny the planes. 

TlmSrifthc Pentagon seat F-5s to 
Horicluras during the crucial com- 
ihgyeai, and if Nicaragua then ac- 

^^agan 'administration might 
have just -the excuse it would want 
- to eoier the war. It is even possible 
that the F-5s might be sent deliber- 
ately to trigger a Nicaraguan reac- 
tion that would give Washington an 
excuse to intervene. 

On tbe other hand, the Sandinists 
might acquire the aircraft even 
without the provocation of F-5s go- 
ing to Honduras. That, too, would 
raise tbe grim possibility of direct 
U.S. intervention in the war. 

.The consequences in Latin 
America, either from open U.S. 
military action or from the down- 
fall of the Sandinists under pressure 
from the contras, probably would 
be severe. To mention two possibili- 
ties: The trend toward democracy 
in several Latin countries could be 
reversed by an emboldened right; 
and debtor nations would find it 
mofe difficult to repay the gringo 
interventionists. Bat these are not 
things .the administration seems to 
fear, or even to contemplate. 

.The New York Tunes. 


Saving Those Magical (and Much-Needed) Forests 


B ELEM, Brazil — John Boor- 
man's film, “The Emerald For- 
est” so magjcal in its portrayal of the 
Amazon forest, says it alL The Ama- 
zon forest is rapidly disappearing. 
Still enormous, still overpowering, 
dense and in parts impenetrably 
deep, it is being eaten too fast by that 
great plunderer, man. Nowhere is tins 
clearer than from this city at the en- 
trance to the greatest river and the 
greatest forest m the world. 

Bel feu originally was a fortress 
guarding the entrance to the Ama- 
zon. Then it became a busy port, 
shipping rubber to distant parts. 
Wealth flowed into the city. One can 
stfll see the beautiful baroque The- 
atre of Peace, a fluffy pink building 
where Anna Pavlova once danced. 


By Jonathan Power . . 


On the main square, ornate with 
pavements of black and white quartz, 
is tbe Hotel Gr§o Para, where Xavier 
Curat and his orchestra would play 
and Zsa Zsa Gabor would stop by on 
her way to Rio. 

This is now history. The rubber- 
boom collapsed and BeUm's glory 
faded The forest has been milked of 
its wealth. It has been 30 years since 
Pierre _ Gouroo, in his book “Le . 
Monde Tropique,” warned that the 
tropical forest is not the nidi paradise 
it appears; it is a fragile eamrrament, 
and only the Indiaasj, with their shift- 
ing cultivation, have crane to terms 
with it Cutti n g down the forest and 
introducing modem intensive meth- 


ods of agricnlture will lead to its ruin, 
for without the protective canopy the 
sofl will tarn to rock or sand. . 

Yet the lesson is unlearned- A few 
hours from Bdfen along forest back- 
xoads one sees large-scale forest 
clearing projects as Settlers attempt 
to develop pasture for cattle grazing. 
Will the government never learnt? 

The Amazon contains perhaps a 
million forms of plant and ammni 
life, lOpercerxt of the Earth’s stock of 
speoes and, so it is said, produces 30 
percent of the wraicTs oxygen supply. 
A'.Sxngle hectare (pJS acres) of Ama- 
~zoman rain forest can contain 230 
1 to the lOto 


live Taiwanese culture. Its resistance 
to virus came from another wild spe- 
cies that , probably evolved in the Si- 
ted Valley, apart of India threatened 
^YJ***?-* ^disciplined exploration. 

Tte -Washington-based World Re- 
sources Institute has presented a re- 
port by nine experts, including Paulo 
Noguriro-Neto,. the Brazilian secre- 
tary of the environment. They argue 
that ff the destruction of the tropical 
ram forests continues unabated. 10 
percent to 20 percent of the Earth’s 


A World Summit 

As an Indian who also considers 
himself a citizen of the world, I have 
been astonished at the manner in 
which comment on the summit meet- 
ing in Geneva has sounded as if the 
world consisted of only the United 
States and the Soviet Union. Far 
more is at stake than the welfare of 
those two countries. A nuclear holo- 
caust will not respect international 
frontiers, and the current philosophy 
of mutual assured destruction wifi, if 
pal to the test assure the destruction 
of the rest of the world’s people. 

President Reagan and General 
Secretary Gorbachev, therefore, car- 
ry a grave responsibility not only for 
the welfare of their own countries but 


aperies normally found in a hect- 
'iaro pf temperate foresL The wbrid' 
cannot afford to see. the. destruction 
;-d this. Or of any of the 
forests imfe. threat in 

for all the peoples of the world. They put the terrorists in tbe hands of /.ocria, India and Grina. 
have become our proxy holders. We legitimate authority in Italy,, and at - ".Tr opica l forests produce essential 
will all be watching anxiously to see the same time let it be known that it .-riK, gunis, resins, waxes, spices and, 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


whether they have tbe courage and 
wisdom to ensure the survival and 
wdl- being not only of their own 
grandchildren but of ours. 

KARAN SINGH. 

New Delhi. 

Responding to Terror 

It is sad to see that Wlllet Weeks 
(in “An Erratic U.S. Hurts Its Allies,” 
Ocl 28) regards the action of the 
United States following the hijacking 
of the Achille Laura with such mal- 
ice. The American response demon- 
strated courage and caution, and it 
deserves praise. Tbe U.S. government 


would no longer tolerate terrorism. 

CHARLES O’CONNELL V 
Marly, Switzerland. . - ' 

Correction * ■ ' 

An editing error introduced antm- ■■ 
wanted “not” in Andiiana lerodii- 
conou’s Nov. 12 column, “Greek 

Fury Isn’t -What It Used to Bc^ lt- ivaanite Rctf*. 

should have said .that-'mid-WO '.'taace^s oftenmaiatained by 
would be “tiie outride deadline for a -* cross-breeding with wfld popula t i on s 
UJS. pullout, supposing Primehturis- . c&^hrsamespedes. Much depends 
ter Papandreou did termniate the ria' n ra ui t riiu q g/ttr untouched 
present five-year bases^ agreement at ^ ofgmcsiThe griae'for the sam-dwarf 
the fust available opportunity spec£ / j yanriy of ^ric e that has transformed 
Bed by the toms of the agreement-” - 'Asian rigfflaltrirecanaefrom. a primi. 


above all the raw materials formedi- 
ris& More than 50 percent of mod- 
ern medicines come from. the natural 
world. Two important anti-cancer 
compounds come from the periwin- 
kle plant in Madagascar’s forests. 

■ jlMany food plants originated in the 
tropical forest. The world's food sup- 
ply depends on maintaining plant ore- 


— year 2000. 

Butthey'also point to success sto- 
nes. One is. m Zambia, which 20 years 
ago began establishing industrial 
plantations. It hasmsSned a pro- 
P^tn of reforestation using pines and 
eucalyptus and now has a ready sop- 

rtLSnSf? to hi its copper 
mmes. CbiJehas created more thana 
million hectares of pme plantations 
Mce 1965. And worldwide, the num- 

'52 «** has doubled in the 
lasU5 years. 

^ ^ « bring lost 
developing countries 
ve declined by nearly abalf during 
Pony of® 

foresls ^ been 
or degraded. Most of 
hectares 

are in theAin»/m j /->. . • 


“ * in* Amazon and Congo basins, 

“to vastuesj^d remoteness. 

but the world is Dually 

fc” “““ “ SeKsWiUnd 

fmern St 25 s **td Tribune. 

. rights reserved 


it 






r-v. 






BVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


Page 7 







Envoy Will Return to Beirut, 
Plans to See Kidnappers Again 



r«L Pres-. Anderson. 38. chief Middle East Beirut, did not identify the hostage 

LONDON — Terry Waite, a correspondent of The Associated or specify his ailment’ 
special envoy of the archbishop of Press; the Reverend Lawrence Negotiations to secure the re- 
Canterbury. will return immediate- Martin Jenco. 50. a Roman Githo- lease of at least two of the captives, 

Jy to Lebanon to m«L again with lie relief official; David Jacobsen. Jean-Paul Kauffmann. 2 journalist,' <■ 
kidnappers of four Americans, the 54. director of the .American Uni- and Michel Seurat, a scientific re-./ 1 
Anglican Church said Monday af- versily Hospital in Beirut: and searcher, have apparently stalled. • . 
ter Mr. Waite met with U.S. admin- Thomas M. Sutherland. 53. dean of The typewritten statement said: • 


correspondent of The Associated or specify his ailment. 

Press; the Reverend Lawrence Negotiations to secure the re- 
Martin Jenco. 50. a Roman Catho- lease of at least two of the captives, 
lie relief official; David Jacobsen. Jean-Paul Kauffmann. 2 journalist,'.. 


fell? 


rP 


m 

V>. 


Anglican Church said Monday af- versily Hospital in Beirut: and searcher, havt 
ter Mr. Waite met with U.S. admin- Thomas M. Sutherland. 53. dean of The typewritten statement said: 
istration officials. agriculture at the American Uni- “We warn the French government 

Mr. Waite was to fly to Beirut versily in Beirut. against procrastination in current- , 

bier Monday. No other details The four wrote that they had negotiations and hold it fully re-.- 

were immediately available. been told by their captors that a sponsible for 1 

Mr. Waite. 46, had said he had fifth hostage’ William Buckley. 57, the hostages i 
made some progress in secret meet- a U.S. Embassy political officer, is The statem 
ir.gs with the kidnappers in Lebti- dead. This has not been verified, words Islamic 
non. and he urged the hostages' They made no mention of Peter did not elaboi 
families Lo keep their hope. Kilbum. 60. a university librarian In Alexand; 

Speaking aL London's Heathrow missing since Dec. 3. 1984. a daughter of 

.Airport on Sunday night after re- The four have been held for peri- min Weir, wh 
turning from Lebanon, he said: ods of from five to 10 months. after lb mon 
“The situation i<c still very difficult In Beirut, a statement purport- Lebanon, was 

and dangerous. I still regard that edly from the kidnappers of four thebusiowhii 

lives are at risk.” Frenchmen said that one of the hit bv a train 

“We have breathing room," he hostages was in “terrible physical said Monday, 
said. “We have some space.” condition that might endanger his A spokesw 

Mr. W'ai le reported on his return life." American wor 


been told by their captors that a sponsible for what might happen to , 
fifth hostage’ William Buckley. 57, the hostages in case of delay." 
a U.S. Embassy political officer, is The statement, signed with the. 
dead. This has not been verified, words Islamic Jihad Organization.-.. 
They made no mention of Peter did not elaborate. ' 


Kilbum. 60. a university librarian 
missing since Dec. 3. 1984. 


In Alexandria. Egypt. Ann Weir, 
a daughter of the Reverend Benja- 


The four have been held for peri- min Weir, who was freed Sept. 14 


ods of from five to 10 months. 

In Beirut, a statement purport- 


after lb months as a hostage in," 
Lebanon, was killed Sunday when ■ 


edly from the kidnappers of four the bus in which she was riding was 
Frenchmen said that one of the hit bv a train, the U.S. consulate. 






Palestinian defendants under guard in a Genoa courtroom 
during trial Monday are, from left, Ahmad Marrouf al- 
Assadi, Bassam al-Ashker and Ibrahim Fatayer Abdelatif. 

5 Sentenced on Arms Charges 
In AchiUe Lauro Hijacking 


(Continued from Page 1) 


magistrates, received the lightest 


fences according to their involve- sentence under an anti- terrorism 
mem and willingness to cooperate, statute favoring such cooperation. 

The court sentenced Youssef The stiffest sentence fell to Mr. 
Magid al-Mdqi. 23. the confessed Abbas, 25, who was accused of 
hijacking commander, to eight playing a key role in preparing the 


said. “We have some space.” 

Mr. Waite reported on his return 
to the archbishop, the Most Rever- 
end Robert Runcie. who is the spir- 
itual head of the Church of En- 
gland. 

Mr. Waite refused to say whether 
he had seen the hostages and would 
not talk about their condition. 

Islamic Jihad, an extremist Shiite 
Moslem group, has claimed that it 
is holding the Americans and has 
demanded the release of 17 persons 
convicted in Kuwait of bomb at- 
tacks on the U.S. and French em- 
bassies. 

Mr. Waite, a lay representative 
of the archbishop, went to Beirut 
after .Archbishop Runcie received a 
letter appealing for help from four 
of six Americans missing in Beirut. 

The letter was signed by Terry A. 


Salvador Rebels 


A spokeswoman said another 
American woman was also killed in 


The statement, delivered Mon- the crash, but would not identify 
day to a Western news agency in her. 


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years in prison. Mr. Molai is ex- 
pected to face charges la ter "of mur- 
dering Mr. Klingh offer. 


hijacking. He was arrested in Gen- Repeat Proposal 
oa on SepL 28, several days before * 

the hijacking, for hearing false * tlr * Times Service 


The three OLher hijackers re- identification documents while ap- 
ceived lighter sentences: Ibrahim patently in the act of helping smug- 
Fatayer Abdelatif, 20. was sen- gle the arms into Italy. He received 
tenced to seven years, three a SI. 700 fine as well as the nine- 
months, and a fine equivalent to year prison sentence. 

S570; Bassam al-Ashker. 19. to six The four hijackers were seized by 

years and six months; and Ahmad the Italian authorities on Oct. 11, 
Marrouf al-Assadi, 23, lo four after an Egyptian airliner carrying 
years and a $1,000 fine. them from Cairo to Tunis was 

Mr. Assadi. the first of the hi- forced down over the Mediterra- 
j ackers to cooperate with Italian nean by United Slates war planes. 


Disease Strikes in Colombia 


(Continued from Page 1) 


He said that people had been 


flicting statements Sunday on found alive Sunday in houses bur- 
whetber the search for sumvors “ ““*• “ d **“* ®a*>y houses 
would be resumed in Arraero, after < “iy rooftops protruding had 

saving earlier tn the day that the 1101 ‘■ >een checked yet. 
entire town, now a sea of mud. “ 

debris and bodies, would be sealed 
and consecrated as a mass grave. 

Caracol appealed to the govern- 
ment to continue rescue opera- 
tions, saying information from re- 
porters in the valley indicated that 
there were as many as 2J0Q survi- 
vors lying in the mud or trapped in 1 

inundated houses and under de- f 

bris. J 

Within an hour, Mr. Ricardo A 

told Caracol that rescue attempts /A TTlfjT| 

could continue. Later, the defense vy '*" L 

minister. General Miguel Vega, 
said, “I want to tell you that no one 
had thought, neither the army nor 
the government, of suspending the 
rescue operations.’' 

“We will not abandon the search 
until we are absolutely sure that no 
survivor is in the area," General 
Vega said in a broadcast interview. 

Officials said Monday that 
about 25,000 people, including 
8.000 children, had died after the 
volcano erupted Wednesday, melt- 
ing its snowcap and sending a gi- 
gantic wall of mud roaring down 
the Annero Valley. On Sunday, the 
government had officially estimat- 
ed that 22,000 were dead or miss- 
ing. 

Parts of 13 villages and almost 
aD of Armero and its surrounding 
rural area, with a population of 
50,000, were wiped out by the ava- 
lanche of mud, water and rubble 
that swept across the area about 
100 miles northwest of Bogota. 

The British rescue team, using 
sensitive listening devices, contin- 
ued trying Sunday night to detect 
signs of life beneath the mud. 

“Everything indicates that there 
are survivors to be found," said 
Patrick Stantou, head of the British 
team. “Everything pants to that 
conclusion. There just have to be 
pecole still alive out there." 


Chile Military Base Attacked 

Reuters 

SANTIAGO — Gnamen at- 
tacked a military air base Monday 
with bombs and machine guns, 
damaging a helicopter, the army 
said in a statement No one was 
injured. 


,V t n- Yorii Times Service 

EL ZAPOTAL. El Salvador — 
The top military leaders of the Sal- 
vadoran guerrilla movement have 
made public a proposal here that 
repeats past calls for a direct share 
of power in a transition govern- 
ment while promising a prolonged 
war if the government of President 
Jose Napoleon Duane refuses to 
negotiate. 

The 20-page document, given to 
reporters Saturday, contends that 
military, political and economic in- 
tervention hv the United States has 
kept the government from pursuing 
realistic talks ro end the six-year 
civil war. 

The proposal was signed by the 
commanders of the five groups that 
make up the Farabundo' Marti Na- 
tional Liberation Front 




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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL 


In Soweto, Other Areas 
Despite Official’s Claim 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Despile 
a published statement to the con- 
trary by South Africa’s leading in- 
formation official, print journalists 
continue to encounter severe diffi- 
culties in gaining permission to re- 
port on incidents of unrest in black 
townships. 

Louis Nel, deputy minister of 
foreign affairs, said in an article 
published Sunday that despite a 
ban on television reporting of dis- 
turbances in black townships, “ac- 
credited print journalists will still 
be able to report on any unrest 

incidents.” 

But that statement did not seem 
10 tally with the experience Friday 
of a reporter who sought police 
permission to report on two stories 
in Soweto, the nation's largest 
black community, outside Johan- 
nesburg. 

In other areas, all television and 
radio reporting of unrest is barred, 
while all print reporters must re- 
port to police and obey orders if 
disturbances break oui. The maxi- 
mum penalty for violating the rules 
is 10 years in prison or a fine equiv- 
alent to S8.000. 

In Soweto, which is home to up 
to two milli on people, the restric- 
tions are different. All nonresidents 
are barred, but the police have indi- 
cated in the past that reporters 
would be allowed to cover stories 
not related to the political violence 
that has taken more than 840 lives 
since September 1984. 

A reporter called the police 
headquarters Friday in Soweto to 
ask to* report on the aftermath of a 
strike by nurses and other staff at 
Barjgrvanalb Hospital. The police 
major in charge of press relations 
refused permission. 

The reporter then asked to inter- 
view the parents of children who 
had been prevented by the unrest 
from taking their final high school 


examinations. Again, the answer 
was no. 

The police contended that both 
stories related to unrest, or boy- 
cotts, or strikes — that is, to black 
protest of one form or another. 
Similarly, a week before, a reporter 
was required to get police permis- 
sion to cover the funeral of a black 
boxer in Soweto. 

Thus, contrary to Mr. Nel’s 
statement, under the regulations 
imposed Nov. 2 the police appear 
to have unlimi ted discretion to 
curb reporters' access to areas 
deemed to be controversial in 
Soweto and throughout the 58 dis- 
tricts covered by a state of emer- 
gency since July 21. 

In the past, police sought to hin- 
der news coverage by several meth- 
ods. For example, even before the 
state of emergency was extended to 
Cape Town in October, police or- 
dered reporters to leave that city’s 
mixed-race suburbs during clashes, 
and several journalists were de- 
tained. 

Black reporters who live in 
Soweto, and who thus cannot be 
barred as nonresidents, say they 
have another problem. 

“The regulations say that if there 
is unrest, we must remove our- 
selves," said a reporter from The 
Star, an evening newspaper. “But 
what do they mean by removing 
ourselves? If we go into a house 
nearby, is that removing ourselves? 
Or must we go away so that we 
can’t see anything?” 

■ 4 Killed in Queenstown 

Police said Monday that they 
killed four blacks and wounded 
eight in rioting in a black fanning 
center outside Queenstown, 340 
miles (548 kilometers) south of Jo- 
hannesburg. The Associated Press 
reported. 

Separately. South African news 
reports said Sunday that 186 U_S. 
companies doing business here 
were pressing President Pieter W. 


Germans Safe After Hijacking 


NAIROBI — Ftve West Ger- 
mans on a plane hijacked to rebel- 
held Ugandan territory last week 
have arrived in' Rwanda, the West 
German charge d'affaires, Helga 
Strachwitz, said Monday. 

Miss Strachwitz said the five 
reached the Rwandan capital, Ki- 
gali, by road on Sunday after a 
week in the southwest Ugandan 
town of Kasese, which is held by 
the National Resistance Army. 


Their Ugandan Airlines plane 
was on a scheduled flight Nov. 10 
from Uganda's main airport at En- 
tebbe to the northwestern town of 
Area when it was commandeered, 
apparently by an army lieutenant 
who had escaped from prison. 

The fate of 43 other passengers 
and crew members was not known. 
The rebels have said they are free to 
go, providing they do not cross into 
government-held territory. 



Doe Says Sierra Leone 
Abetted Coup Attempt; 
He Recalls Ambassador 


Loins Nel 

Botha for a compromise solution to 
boycotts of final exams at black 
and mixed-race schools, saying the 
boycotts are damaging students' 
lives. 

Thousands are refusing to lake 
the tests, which determine promo- 
tion and graduation, until soldiers 
are withdrawn from black town- 
ships and other demands are met. 

The South African Press Associ- 
ation called it “the first direct move 
in what is expected to be a greater 
involvement by U.S. corporations 
in pressures on Pretoria for re- 
form." 

■ Mrs. Mandela Defies Order 

Winnie Mandela, wife of Nelson 
Mandela, the imprisoned leader of 
the outlawed African National 
Congress, continued Monday to 
defy a 1977 order that restricts her 
to the isolated town of Brandfon in 
the Orange Free State and forbids 
her to meet more than one person 
at a time, Reuters reported from 
Johannesburg. 

However, she has returned to 
Soweto after visiting her husband 
in a Cape Town hospital, where he 
is recovering from prostate gland 
surgery'. Her lawyer. Ismail Ayob, 
had said Sunday that she would 
remain in Cape Town until Mr. 
Mandela returned to prison. 


Zia Sets a Visit to India 
Alter Talks With Gandhi 

United Press International 

MUSCAT. Oman — President 
Mohammed Zia ul-Haq of Paki- 
stan wfl] visit India on Dec. 16. 
signaling a further improvement io 
relations between the two coun- 
tries. Indian officials said Monday. 

Hie announcement was made af- 
ter General Zia and Prime Minister 
Rajiv Gandhi of India met in Mus- 
cat in their fourth set of talks since 
the Indian leader came to power 
last year. 

Ait Indian government spokes- 
man said the aim of the visit was to 
continue dialogue between the two 
neighbors who have fought three 
wars since independence from the 
British in 1947. 


Reuters 

ABIDJAN, Ivoiy Coast — Libe- 
ria has recalled its ambassador 
from Sierra Leone after securing 
that country of involvement in last 
week’s unsuccessful coup attempt. 

Radio Elwa, a private Liberian 
station monitored by the British 
Broadcasting Corporation, said 
Sunday that Major General Samuel 
K. Doe, the Liberian head of state, 
had announced the recall of the 
envoy and the closure of the Lib©- 
ria-Sierra Leone border. 

It is the worst crisis in relations 
between the two West African na- 
tions since General Doe sent troops 
to the border in 1983 after a Sierra 
Leone newspaper incorrectly ac- 
cused him of killing his wife. 

General Doe has accused Sierra 
Leone of direct involvement in 
Tuesday’s coup attempt, which was 
led by Brigadier General Thomas 
Quiwonkpa. According to General 

Guru Denounces 
U.S. 'Monster 9 on 
Return to India 

The Associated Press 

NEW DELHI — Bhagwan Shree 
Rajneesh, who was given a hero's 
welcome by his Indian followers 
after returning from arrest in Ore- 
gon, has denounced the United 
States and said the world must “put 
the monster America in its place:'’ 

In his first news conference since 
pleading guilty last week to immi- 
gration violations in Portland. Ore- 
gon, Mr. Rajneesh said Sunday, 
“Either America must be hushed 

up or America wfl] be the end of the 
world.” 

He pleaded guilty Thursday in 
Portland to two counts of a 35- 
count indictment charging that he 
bad participated in a scheme of 
<;Kam marriages to enable some of 
his followers to live in the United 
States. 

The U.S. government dropped 
the other immigration charges, as- 
sessed him $400,000 in fines and 
court costs, gave him a five-year 
suspended prison sentence and or- 
dered him to leave the country 
within five days. 

On Sunday. Mr. Rajneesh, 53. 
said be was tortured during 12 days 
in U.S. jails and that the authorities 
tried to “destroy our paradise com- 
mune of perfect co mmunis m” in 
Oregon. “The real enemy is no 
more the Soviet Union, it is Ameri- 
ca," he said. 


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Doe, General Quiwonkpa’s rebel 
troops were trained and armed in 
Sierra Leone before crossing to Li- 
beria, 

Sierra Leone has denied involve- 
ment and said last week that it 
dissociated itself from any step that 
could destabilize Liberia. 

General Quiwonkpa, who helped 
General Doe seize power in Libe- 
ria’s first military coup m April 
1980, was shot dead Friday by one 
of General Doe’s bodyguards. 

■ 12 in ‘Protective Custody' 

Joe Ritchie of The Washington 
Past reported from Washington: 

Liberia has declared that 10 

^usmesamm^Tajot^nalist are in 
“protective custody” and has sug- 
gested that many of them will be 
tried for complicity in the attempt- 
ed coup. 

A spokesman for the Liberian 
Embassy in Washington made the 
announcement Sunday. 

He repealed denials of persistent 
but unconfirmed reports that sev- 
eral of the opposition leaders had 
been summarily executed, includ- 
ing the Liberia Action Party presi- 
dential candidate, Jackson F. Doe, 
wbo is not related to General Doe, 
and another leading party figure, 
EDen Johnson -Sirleaf, a former fi- 
nance minister. 

General Doe accused Mrs. John- 
son-Sirieaf of financing the coup 
attempt, which came less than a 
month after a disputed presidential 
election. 

General Doe was declared the 
winner of the Oct 15 balloting, but 
there have been reports from ob- 
servers that Jackson Doe appeared 
to have won a clear majority. Three 
opposition parties, including the 
Liberia Action Party, rejected the 
announced outcome. 

J. Emmanuel Bowier, the U.S. 
Embassy's counselor for public af- 
fairs, said religious leaders and 
members of the diplomatic corps 
were summoned to a briefing by 
General Doc on Friday at which an 
alleged member of the group that 
tried to seize power revealed details 
of die coup attempt, including al- 
leged participation by mercenaries 
from Sierra Leone, Cuba and 
Guinea. 

Mr. Bowier also said Jackson 
Doe and two other opposition lead- 
ers were at the briefing. 

Besides Jackson Doe and Mrs. 
Johnson- Sirleaf, Mr. Bowier said 
that among those in custody were 
Edward Kessely and Gabriel Kpol- 
leh, both candidates for president 
in the recent election. 



CedHa Mufloz-Palma, center, attended church recently with Corazon Aquino, left 

Opposition Is Set Back in Philippines 
As Leader of Unity Committee Resigns 


By Abby Tan 

H'ashtngion Past Service 

' MANILA — Cecilia Mtmoz- 
Palmrt hac resigned as chairman of 

.. ■ __ • . ■ i 


uenenu vot accusea mts. jonn- Philippine opposition as the Na- 
son-Sirleaf of financing the coup hooS Assembly continues to de- 
attempt, which came less than a bate a bfll calling for a presidential 
month after a disputed presidential election early next year. • 
election. Mrs. Munoz-Palma, 72, resigned 

General Doe was declared the Sunday after a sharp exchange with 
winner of the OcL 15 balloting, but Salvador H. Laurel, leader of the 
there have been reports from ob- United Nationalist Democratic Or- 
servers that Jackson Doe appeared ganization, a confederation of the 
to have won a clear majority. Three main political groups and the larg- 
op position parties, including the est opposition, party in the Nation- 
Uberia Action Party, rejected the al Assembly. - 
announced outcome. The possibility now emerges that 

J. Emmanuel Bowier, the U.S. there could be two separate opposi- 
Embassy’s counselor for public af- don candidates to challenge Presi- 
fairs, said religious leaders and dent Ferdinand E. Marcos in the 
members of the diplomatic corps election, tentatively set for Febru- 
were summoned to a briefing by . ary. 

General Doe on Friday at which an The National Unification Corn- 
alleged member of the group that mittee was set up in March to unify 
tried to seize power revealed details jhe various opposition groups and 
of the coup attempt, including al- partes and to lay down a mecha- 
leged participation by mercenaries nism to select common presidential 
from Sierra Leone, Cuba and and vice presdential candidates for 
Guinea. the next election. It has been at- 

Mr. Bowier also said Jackson tempting to rally about a dozen 
Doe and two other opposition lead- potential presidential candidates 
era were at the briefing. behind one person. 

Besides Jackson Doe and Mrs. Mr. Marcos, meanwhile, pre- 
Johnson- Sirleaf, Mr. Bowier said pared Monday to reorganize the 
that among those in custody were Philippine armed forces. Such reor-’ 
Edward Kessely and Gabriel Kpol- ganization is one of the principal 
[eh, both candidates for president demands of the. United State in- 
in the recent election. ■ urging the Philippine aimed forces 


House Panel Won’t Set 5 : 
35% Limit on U.S. Tax 


to be more responsive to a.Commu- 
rrist insurgency. 

A government statement said 
tha t the president has set up a 
board of generals and colonels to 
carry out the reorganization, winch 
presumably will mean the retire-' 
ment of many senior officers. 

The board includes General Fa- ■ 
bian C. Ver. who has been on leave 
as military chief of staff to stand 
trial in the 1983 murder of Benigno 
S, Aquino Jr„ a popular opposition 
leader. A trial court is expected to 
hand down its verdict Wednesday, 
and General Ver is widely expected 
to be acquitted. 

The statement said that General 
Ver was asked if he would help in 
the reorganization of die military if 
he were not reinstated as chief, of 
staff after the triaL 

General Ver wasquotedas repjyf 
mg : *T am willing to put down in 
writing that I will, serve- even utja. 
consultant’s capacity in thereorga- 
□ization plan." V - - 

This was regarded as an indica- 
tion that General Ver might not be 
reinstated as chief of staff if he is 
aquitted. 

The Supreme Court heard argu- . 
meats Monday from lawyers repre^ 

seating several prominent Fflipmot 

asking the tribunal td delay any 
lower.court verdict until their pen- 
don to declare a mistrial is heard. : 

- Thepetitkmeb have accused the 
prosecution and The trial' court _Si- ; 
self of bias irefavoroftbe 26 ac - 
cused. They have rdsposgested that; 


all evidence has sot been present- 
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individuals to 35 percent 
Nonetheless, the chairman. Rep- 
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The Illinois Democrat said his 
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The top tax rate now paid by 
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Treasury’ Secretary James A. 
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is willing to compromise on many 
aspects of tax legislation, but that 
the 35-percent top rate is “a line 
drawn in the sand." 

Mr. Rostenkowski said the rate 
must be somewhat higher so that 
the bill could generate as much 
revenue as the current tax system. 

He said, “I wouldn't want, and 
T m sure the president and Jim Bak- 
er wouldn't want, us to lose the 
opportunity to write history in as 
large a document as this over one 
or two percentage points." 

Administration officials de- 
clined Sunday to respond to his 
remarks. 

Mr. Reagan has proposed that 
individuals be taxed at three rales: 
15 percent, 25 percent and 35 per- 

U.S. Court Allows 
Limit on Medical 
Malpractice Fees 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court allowed states on 
Monday to limit the fees that peo- 
ple who win medical malpractice 
lawsuits may pay their lawyers. 

The justices, citing the lack of “a 
substantia] federal question." let 
stand a 1975 California law that 
such fees may not exceed certain 
percentages. 

The law was challenged as an 
infringement of rights of free 
speech because it bars people who 
sue for medical malpractice from 
spending money as they wish for 
"constitutionally protected advo- 
cacy." 

California's Legislature ap- 
proved the law as a response to vay 
high insurance costs in the 197% 
arising from the growing number of 
malpractice suits. 


cent Each percentage point those 
three figures are raised would bring 
in an additional S15 billion to 520 
billion a year. 

The president also proposed a 
cut in the maximum corporate tax 
rate to 33 percent from 46 percent 
The committee is expected to ac- 
cept a rale higher than 33 percenL 

The Ways and Means Commit- 
tee met all weekend to settle com- 
plicated business tax issues. On 
Saturday, it approved measures 
that would limit the ability of 
American companies to shelter 
their overseas profits from U.S. 
taxation. 

The panel on Sunday rejected 
Mr. Reagan’s proposal to abolish 
tax incentives for commercial ship- 
ping lines and for businesses that 
employ poor or handicapped work- 
ers. 

Mr. Rostenkowski said he would 
push the committee toward com- 
pleting its work by Friday night 
After its decisions are translated 
into legislative language, the bfll 
could go to the House of Represen- 
tatives for debate and voting before 



todebate the election bifl. The op- 

batin^thc. date the 
vice presidency is tribe contested. 

The; opposition says the rating 
party*; indecision was . reflected 
when itfaikdto. take up discussion 
of .the hilL lest imk and instead 
debated the succession bilL which 
gxoudes.4qr succession wiwm there 
is no vice president. • , . . 

The Apolitical opposition has 
beeri^tecn' further by the unan- 
- notmced;--candidacy of . Corazon 
Aquino, the widow of Mr. Aquino. 

While die lias refused to an- 
flounce'-her candidacy, Mrs. 
r Aquinos recent statements have 
nndek p ro gr c ssi vely clear that she 
will rum lor president She has in- 
sisted, however, on the signatures 
of a mffion supporters before male - 
ring any formal announcement. 

Mrs. Muflaz-Pahna has openly 
endorsed Mrs. Aquino and thereby 
infuriated Mr. LaureL She said in a 
public' fririam that only Mrs. 
Aquzoricauld unify the opposition. 

M^ NhHtozrPalma, a former Su- 
preme Court justice and now an 
opposition member of the National 
Assembly, asserted that ' Mr. Lau- 
rel, 57, angrily demanded her resig- 
nation Friday ait a heated meeting 
of thejNational Unification Com- 

• ■mm'hm ' •• • 1 " 


- I I /wvln s-v 


Dan Rostenkowski 

the chamber adjourns in mid-De- 
cember. 

To meet that deadline, the panel 
must address this week such mat- 
ters as the deductibility of state and 
local taxes, the tax treatment of 
employee fringe benefits, depreda- 
tion schedules for business invest- 
ments and investment tax credits. 

Other areas include the applica- 
tion of minimum taxes on individ- 
uals and corporations, the tax 
treatment of business .entertain- 
ment and travel expenses, and tax 
rules for real estate investments. 


Overseas Income Benefit 
To Be Cut Under Tax Plan 


By Robert C Siner 

latenuacnal Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON —The House 
Ways and Means Committee has 
approved a measure to reduce the .. 
$80,000 earned income exclusion 
for Americans working abroad - to 
$75,000 and freeze it at that level 
indefinitely, according to commit- . 
lee aides. 

The proposed change, .which 
must be approved by the full House 
of Representatives and Senate, was 
made over the weekend as part of. 
the tax revision package bring 
drawn up by the committee. 

In addition, a proposal that 
would subject overseas taxpayers - 
using the exclusion to a minimum, 
tax is scheduled for action by the 
committee later this week. 

Under current law, Americans, 
living overseas may exclude 
580,000 of income earned abroad ' 
from U.S. taxes. The figure was due 
to rise to 585,000 for income earned 
in 1987, to 590,000 in 1988 and to 
$95,000 in 1989. 

Under the committee language 
adopted late Saturday,- the exclu- 
sion would remain at 575,000. 

However, 'Mien compared to the 
proposals drawn up by the commit- 
tee staff in September that would 
have cut the exclusion to 550,000, . 
the panets action represents “an 
important symbolic victory,” ac- 
cording the Jane Dudley of the Na- 
tional Constructors Association. 


The association supports the in- 
come exclusion tor U.S. citizens 
abroad, contending that it makes 
them more competitive with their 
foreign counterparts who generally 
pay no taxes in their home coun- 
tries. Most workers abroad must 
pay taxes in their countrics of em- 
ployment. 

" Ms. Dudley said that it probably 
would be much more difficult to 
win a similar modification, in the 
minimum tax proposal, a change in 
tax law that could be more painful 
to Americans abroad than die re- 
daction in the income exclusion. 

Under that proposal, they would 
be subject, to a tax of 25 percent of 
total salary, allowances, interest 
and* dividend income above 
540,000, or $30,000 for unmarried 
taxpayers. 

Egyptian Goes on Trial 
In Murder of 7 Israelis 

Renters • 

SUEZi Egypt — - An Egyptian 
policeman, Sofiman Khater, ac- 
cused of willful murder of seven 
Israelis at an Egyptian resort in 
Sinai on. Oct. 5^, has gone on trial 
before a military tribunal, his law- 
yers said Monday. 

The charges carrv the death sen- 
tence, they said. Mr. Khater also is 
accused of intent to kfll two Israe- 
lis. • 


Easier Local 
Aid Rules 


By Kenneth B. Noble 

Nets York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration h3s drafted a pro- 
posal calling m Congress to ex- 
empt state and local governments 
from many of the laws and rales 
that are a condition of receiving 
money from Washington. 

Die administration, in a draft 
bill that is undergoing revisions, 
proposes that Congress approve a 
procedure in which the Office of 
Management and Budget would re- 
view 68 U.S. statutes or administra- 
tive requirements and recommend 
to Congress which ones could be 
eliminated. 

Regulations that require local 
governments, no matter how small, 
to build expensive sewer systems 
might be eliminated, for instance, 
but the budget office said that in 
most instanc es it has no intention 
of removing requirements for com- 
pliance with civil rights regulations. 

The move, which would repre- 
sent a significant change in U.S. 
f>olicy, is part of die administra- 
tion’s longstanding effort to reduce 
what it said is interference in local 
government decisions." 

A variety of groups whose mem- 
bers see benefits in the regulations 
can be expected to oppose the bfll, 
including environmentalists, 
unions and advocates for the 
handicapped. 

State and local officials have 
co mplain ed with growing urgency 
i n rec ent years about the costs of 
complying with what they said are 
a proliferation of U.S. regulations. 

The New York Gty government, 
for ex ample, estimated that it in- 
curred $6.5 billion in additional di- 
rect costs in 1983 as a result of U.S. 
and state mamta^ 

James L. Martin, legislative 
Ohinsel of the National Governors 
Association; ' predicted that if 
adopted by Congress, the proposal 
would have “significant state im- 
pact 


Under the draft of proposed new 
ouL to be called the Crosscutting 
Requirements Restraint Act, the 
“tnumstratiou argued that it was 
wrong- to impose myriad require- 
ni ® ^ governments or nonprofit 
g°£P*s™ply because they receive 

As examples of U.S. mandates, 
mostof them enacted in the 1970s, 
£* ^dg«of5ce rites such laws as 
the Rehabilitation Act, whiefa or- 
uris state and local governments to 

equip public buildin gs and trans- 
pQrtajion for the handicapped: the 
Mean Water Act, which requires 
“jenstve construction of water and 
systems; and the National 
S?i Pre ? rvafioa is 

taSjlSy 0 ^ ^ 10 





Page 9 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 



“Thou shalt not leave the Soviet Union!’ 

For two and a half million Jews, it’s a command- 
ment sent down from the Soviet Government. 

But it’s not carved in stone. It can be changed. 

Because Mr. Gorbachev has the power to free 
the Jews. 

Mr. Gorbachev has the power to release those 
“prisoners of conscience” whose only real crime is 
wanting to live as Jews in Israel. 

Mr. Gorbachev has the power to reunite those 
families separated by Soviet emigration policy. 

And Mr. Gorbachev has the power to do it all at 
the Geneva summit meeting with President Reagan. 

Mr. Gorbachev has the power. 

If only he can imagine the glory. 


Sponsored by the Coalition to Free Soviet Jews* (212) 354-1316 

Representing concerned organizations in New York City, Long island, Westchester, Rockland and Bergen Counties. 

SUPPORTED BY UNITED JEWISH APPEAL OF GREATER NEW YORK & FEDERATION OF JEWISH PHILANTHROPIES. 


Alan Pesky Chairman, Zeesy Schnur Executive Director 

in cooperation with National Conference on Soviet Jewry, National Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council and Union of Councils for Soviet Jewry. 

' Formerly the Greater New York Conference on Soviet Jewry 


Alumni Association Teachers Inst, of Seminary 
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American Zionist Federation • 

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AMIT Women •. ■ .. J", 

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B'nai B'rith Youth Organization 
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Center for Russian Jewry 

Council of Jewish Organizations in Civil Service 

Economists for Ida Nude! 

Enurnah Women 
Free Sons of Israel 
Hadassah 
Hashachar 

Herat Zionists of America 
International League for the Repatriation of 

Russian Jews 

International Network of Children of Jewish 
Holocaust Survivors 
Jersey' Action for Soviet Jewry 
Jewish American JPblitical Affairs Committee 
Jewish Community’ House of Bensonhurst 
Jewish Community Council of Canarsie 
Jewish Labor Committee 
Jewish Teachers Association 


Jewish War Veterans 

Labor Zionists Alliance 

Long Island Committee for Soviet Jewry 

Manhattan Coalition for Sonet Jewry 

Masada/ZOA 

National Conference on Synagogue Youth 
National Council of Jewish Women 

National Council of Young Israel 
National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods 
National Federation of Temple Youth 
New York Board of Rabbis 
New York Federation of Reform Synagogues 
New York Legal Coalition for Soviet Jewry 
New York Legislators Coalition for Soviet Jewry 
Near Mizrachi 

Oceanfront Council for Soviet Jewry 
Pioneer Women 
Ftoale Agudath Israel 
Queens Council for Soviet Jewry 
Queens Jewish Community Council 


Rabbinical Assembly 

Rabbinical Council of America 

Religious Zionists of America 

Rockland County- Committee for Soviet Jewry 

Staten Island Committee for Soviet Jewry 

Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry 

Survivors of Nazi Camps and Resistance Fighters 

Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America 
United Jewish Community of Bergen County- 
United Synagogue oi America 
United Synagogue V)uth 
Warsaw Ghetto Resistance Organization 
Washington Heights-Inwood Council for Soviet Jewry 
Westchester Jewish Conference 

Women's American ORT 
Women's League for Conservative Judaism 
Women's League for Israel 
Workmen's Circle 

Young Israel Collegiates and Young Adults 
Zionists Organization of America 






Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


A Revival 
Of Rossini 
At Opera 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 


F t AR1S —An intensive course in 
Li 


the history of French grand op- 
era has been the cornerstone of 
Massimo Bogianddno's direction 
of the Paris Optra, and while Bo- 
gianckino has de facto moved on 
(to become the mayor of Florence), 
his program continues — most re- 
cently with a revival of Rossini's 
“Le Si&ge de Corinthe.” 

It was the first work that Rossini, 
newly installed in Paris, wrote for 
the Opeira, and his method was one 
he was to repeat. The Optra, bong 
a state organism, could not simply 
give the French-language premiere 
of an existing work and the com- 
poser was not prepared to write a 
new one. His solution was to take 
his u Maometto IF (Naples, 1820), 
refit it to a new (albeit similar) 
French libretto, suppressing large 
parts of the earlier work, and com- 
posing much new music — an over- 
ture, ballet and several major airs 
and scenes. In so doing, he showed 
an awareness of French style, at 
that point derived mainly from 
Gluck, Spontini and other foreign- 
ers, but also helped lay the ground- 
work for his later Pans operas and 
those of Meyerbeer and Verdi. 

After the 1826 premiere of 
■ 4 Si4gfi," it was exported to Italy in 
translation as “L'Assedio di Cor- 
into,” which completely displaced 
“Maometio IL" Now the Florence 
production of “L’Assedio” by Pier 
Luigi Pizza has been brought to 
Paris to serve for the first perfor- 
mance of “Sifcge” at the Optra in 
141 years. 

“Sifcge” won extravagant praise 
when it was first heard in Paris. 
Today it seems more an exemplar 
of Rossini's method than bis ge- 
nius, less vocally colorful than his 
Neapolitan version, less sure in 
adapting to French needs than in 
later works such as “Mofee.” Still, 
there are some splendid vocal op- 
portunities for the principals, and 
the second-act finale is a rousing, if 



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slightly mechanical, example of 
this particular Rossinian specialty. 

The authentic Frenchness of this 
revival was somewhat mitigated, 
from a scholarly point of view, by 
casting the tenor role of Nfcoclfe 
with a mezzo soprano (even though 
there is precedent in that this fol- 
lows the casting of the equivalent 
role in “MaometuTV This was jus- 
tified, however, by the superbly 
confident performance of Martine 
Dupuy, a young French singer 
making her Paris debut in a major 
role at the first performance Satur- 
day. Her bright-toned, accurate 
and expressive vocalism, convinc- 
ing appearance and fervent acting 
show that she has not been wasting 
her time in Italy, where she has 
spent the last few seasons. 

Katia RicciareDi. is the principal 
soprano role of Pamira — who re- 
nounces her love for Mahomet II in 
favor of patriotism and kills herself 
as Corinth falls — was in radiant 
voice and. less expectedly, coped 
cautiously but successfully with the 
coloratura difficulties of her big 
second-act air. The bass Ferruccio 
Furlanetto was a vigorous, some- 


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ARTS / LEISURE 



‘Hurleventf Turns Bronte’s Formula on Its Bead 


- By Mark Hunter 

P lARIS — If Emily Bronte's 
“Wotbering Heights 1 ' worked 
on a formula of denying passion 
until h exploded. Jacques Rivettc, 
the French film director best 
known for “L’Amour par were," 
has stood her concept on its head in 
“HuHerenL,” Rivette’s free adapta- 
tion of Bronte's novel retains her 


MOVIE MARQUEE 


what thick-voiced Mahomet, while 
the tenor Curtis Rayam sang agree- 
ably but with little character as the 
leader of the Corinthians and fa- 
ther of Pamira . Along with Dupuy, 
Jean-Phillipe Courtis saved the day 
for real French vocal style and ver- 
bal clarity in the relatively minor, 
priestlike role of Hi6ros. 

Ptzzi’s sets and costumes made 
much of the pale blue of Corinth 
and the warlike red of the Turks, 
and be populated the stage with a 
variety of architectural artifacts 
that would be at home in one of the 
gaudier Southern California ceme- 
teries, while his direction of the 
singers ran heavily to mass move- 
ment and swordplay. 

"The Swedish conductor Arnold 
Oestman. in his Paris debut, 
brought a contentious segment of 
the audience down on his head in 
the Erst act, which was uneven and 
at times raucous. Things settled 
down after that, but the orchestral 
contribution was never more than 
routine. 


tale of young lovers, separated by 
class and circumstance, whose de- 
sire ends in the death of one and 
the desolation of the other. But he 
has succeeded — as William 
Wyler’s film “Withering Heights 7 ’ 
did not — in cairyiiig the story 
through a visual poetry that con- 
tains a logic of its own. 

In “Hurlevem” the erotic field 
around Catherine (Fabimne Babe) 
is so enormous, her physical pres- 
ence so profound, that she seems 
capable of knocking down walls. 
As Roch (the Heatchdiff charac- 
ter), Lucas Belvaux is the burningly 
introverted, immovable object 
against which her irresistable force 
moves. The light around these two 
seems to have a churning density, 
as if the cinematographer, Renaio 
Berta, had made a vortex of light 
and darkness. The tension is evi- 
dent in the first shot of the young 
lovers embracing on a bed of black 
stone, and grows more intense 
throughout the film. 

The dialogues by Pascal Bonitzer 
(who did the scenario with Rivette 
and Suzanne Schiffman) are spare 
and effective; before Catherine 
says “I am Roch,’' we have seen 


their physical likeness, felt their 
shared energy. A gradual darken- 
ing of the film’s palette brings out 
the harsh side of Rivetle’s setting 
— rural France, circa 1931 — pre- 
saging the story’s gathering vio- 
lence. 

Yet the film loses momentum m 
its final third as Roch returns from 
exile to destroy Catherine's mar- 
riage to a rich local (Olivier Tor- 
res), her sister-in-law (Alice de 
Poncheville) and her life. Hoe the 
imagery becomes a bit facile. The 
brunet frailty of the rich siblings 
poses no convincing resistance to 
the blond ruthLsssocss of Roch and 
Catherine; why must they be 
crushed, when they seem ready to 
fall down? 

One could not ask, however, for 
a more lovely or rending medita- 
tion on the principle that character 
is fate. 


The director-scriptwriter Arthur 
Jqffe is dearly aware that feminists 

will hate his film “Harem" (open- 
ing Wednesday in Paris), which 
tells how a woman kidnapped for a 
sheikh's pleasure learns to love it. 
Explicit references to rape and por- 
nography dot the film man the first 
scene, and in one sequence a bum- 
bling feminist journalist confronts 
the sheikh (Ben Kingsley). Joffe is 
clever, but he has made a stupid, 
ghastly film 

Nastassja Kinski plays a New 
York futures broker leading a life 
so empty that,- once the shock of 
her abduction, has worn off, she can 
only barbie, “I didn't even know I 
had a family till 1 came here." Her 
new family indudes Kingsley’s gro- 



often work: offeri ng lro5 daytnps| 
Itanwbidr their wcnnis * 
appear. Joffe and everyone else 
volved in this mess of a 

should be ashamed. 

□ 

Most of the seven feattnw 

by the Soviet director NEuaMJ 
fcdkov srice 1974. Sadata** 
just-released (in the West) 

life" or ~Vbe Relatives!, toa K . 
the theme of an unexpecte^wj : 
[roniation with the past. A Mkhla- ‘ 
kov retrospective at.tiw 

Cm&natheqne stowed h&dtvasejr 

variations on that theme; “Soares 
Days From the life of OUoflarjV 
(1971) begins as a brofasHfowiy 
19ih-cennny bureaucrat is- 
in to a new, active fife by the arrival J 
of an old friend wbite M Unfmshe& 
Composition for Player Piano/’; 
(1979) throws the bomb of an tm-~ 
foreseen meeting of okHovos, now- • 
marri ed to others, into a gathering* 
of provincial aristocrats. 

“La Parcatete” (1981) presents . 
Maria (Nonna Mordiuiova), a[ 

sturdy peasant woman who sets omr 

to vial her daughter Nina ina deaa 
modem city, and in -the process: 
creates a confrontation, between . _ 
traditional and cootanpctaiy val- ' 
ues. Maria's enormous 'freight m* 
cludes not only her fcnge : suifcases; 
but a load of vrrsusxhal arewtedy: 
useless in Attemptin g tri r eso lv e her 
daughter's 


■ 

A scene from Jacques Rirette’s “Hurlevent.” 


tesquely sensitive sheikh, assisted 
by a caricature of a eumidi (“Mine 
is an honorable profession!” he de- 
clares in a Manhattan gay accent) 
and a crew of bedouin gunmen so 
inept that one kills his employer by 
migta fee at the end, after Kingsley 
and Kinski have exchanged vow as 
fatuous as they are incredible. 

The key scene, in which Kinski 
and her sheikh first make love — 
one uses the term grudgingly — is 


fi jpwri like a rape that Kinski pro- 
vokes. One can almost see Joff e m a 
comer, leering, “See —she likes it. 

Even more appalling is Jane * 
sheer social irresponribibty. Femi- 
nists axe not the only ones con- 
cerned about sexual slavery; it is an 
urgent problem, documented by 
numerous reports by . the United 
Nations, Interpol and citizens 
groups in the past decade. Jane 
renders this nightmare traffic as a 



Cta i» Conor 

0ile Final 


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.aft" 

I'lS' 


- TV 

::■*.! IS 


ation with 1 ... 

culture and her loog^tosr ex-Jras- 
bantfs alcoholism. “These people 
have evcrYthing, and tisey. don’t 




:*V0Z 

'-.jf 


Cooking Up Recipes for a How-to Videotape Hit 


“J> Siege de Corinthe , " Nov. 20. 
22, 24, 26, Dec. 2, 4, 7. 10 


By Marian Burros 

New York Timet Service 

N EW YORK — Take one at- 
tractive kitchen and $23,000 to 
$100,000. Add video cameras, hot 
studio lighting, sound equipment 
and a production crew. Mix with 
miles of videotape. 

Have a well-known cooking 
teacher or chef prepare dozens of 
recipes. If necessary, settle for an 
unknown actor with a good voice 
and another with {>hoto|enic 
hands. Stir together all ingredients. 

The result is a coolring video- 
tape, the newest addition to the 
“how- to” video market in the Unit- 
ed States, best known for Jane Fon- 
da's staggeringly successful exer- 
cise tapes. 

After only six months, the cook- 
ing videotape industry is, in a small 
way, booming. Last year, Video- 
takes of Bled Bank, New Jersey, a 
leading wholesale distributor of 
how-to videotapes, offered 12 
cooking tapes in its catalog. This 


year there are 40. (At least 10 more 
are being distributed by other 
wholesalers.) 

From Jacques Pepin’s “Guide to 
Good Cooking.” intended for be- 
ginners, to Julia Child's six one- 
hour tapes called “The New Way to 
Cook” and Madeleine Ka mm an’s 
two-volume “Madeleine Kara man 
Cooks,” there are videotapes cover- 
ing every type food and cuisine, 
appropriate for people at every lev- 
el of experience. 

Judith Olney has produced a 
tape devoted entirely to the subject 
of her cookbook, “The Joy of 
Chocolate." The well-known cook- 
ing teacher Ken Horn is featured on 
“A Guide to Chinese Cooking.” 
Craig Claiborne has taken 20 of his 
favorite recipes and used them to 
Illustrate specific cooking tech- 
niques for the intermediate cook. 

The increased production of 
cooking videotapes in the United 
Statess* parallels the increase in the 
number of households with VCRs 


to play them. When one of the first 
cooking videos — Madeleine Kam- 
man’s - — was marketed in 1983, h 
sold fewer than 1,000 copies. In the 
last 18 months, as VCR sales have 
risen, it has sold 10,000 copies. 

• Jennifer Peters of Videotakes 
said about 23 million VCRs were in 
use in the United States. Only four 
milli on had been sold in 1982. Pe- 
ters said that with the prices of the 

machines dropping, the number of 
households mthVCRs may reach 
31.5 million by the end of 1986. 

Hours of viewing confirm that 
the best video cooking tapes sup- 


Child’s, Kamman’s and Clai- 
borne's — were made specifically 
for the videotape medium; they did 
not originate as television features. 

The difference is important. The 
best of the made-for-video tapes 
are crammed with information — 
they are designed to - be watched 
and stopped and watched again, 
and a gfiin- But madft-for-TV cook- 
ing programs, intended more for 
entertainment than instruction, 
give cooking techniques a once-, 
over; there is same useful informa- 
tion but far less detail . • : 

Tapes that instruct without 


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ing media cannot: giving viewers 
an opportunity to learn in their 
homes, often from top profession- 
als they might otherwise not meet 
Moreover, a video can show what a 
cookbook can only describe: 

Videotapes are not, however, the 
perfect answer to a cooking stu- 
dent’s prayers. They cannot correct 
student errors. 

“People can think they are doing 
something right and they are screw- 
ing it up — you need a teacher to 
fix that” said Peter Kmnp, who 
nips a cooking school in New York 


actors, 

dious. Tapes that, Hke Bugjaffi’s, 
are not supplemented by written ^ 
recipes or cookbooks can bc^ ^diffi- 
cult to use: The home cook must- 
write down the recipes from 
screen. Some videos, such. 

Child’s and Kanaom\~ 
writtenTcapesanxfalislof 
exits superimposed over a still 
the finished dish. ... 

Written recipes are essential 
only because few people ' 

VCRs in thar kitchens but^alsoi 



two ari: drawn into 
at a 
Stanislav, 
peacd” 

>10 Mflthal- 
;«Wkix' by erotic, 
flicts- 


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tor’s evident oompas-. 


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because the printed wmd iraQr^ 

ff issrssrara 

aBd sside horn ^ 

Gene Gaudette, a novice cook 
and a buyer for Tbwer r Vae6, a 
lar^ videotape stare in Ne«rYoi3^- 
agreed that the future 
videos might lie with 


riS '-^-v 


placing a VCR in the kitchen there 
is no simple way to watch the tapes 
and work at the same time. 

In addition, consumers cannot 
make informed choices regarding 
the appropriate tapes to buy unless 



Depardon’s “Empty 
« femme en Afrique)” 
film with a vengeance. 
«pt is to show a relation- 
! ‘ only one partner ap- 


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J* 1 


l'.. ' 


they can rent them first Few tapes . generation “because youn^poople.^ 
indicate on their covers the degree 116 visually oriented.” - 


^camera while the other' 
observes from the 
of view. The ven- 
carrying tins vovenr-i 
to its logical en4 im- 
poteopwrad hostility, 

“ ' ' Ryders meet in a hotel by 


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FAITH W 
AMERICAN 
TEOmOG/! 



of culinary skill needed. 

In the broadest toms, all cook- 
ing videotapes follow the same for- 
mat. They are shot in kitchen set- 
tings. Each begins with music 
appropriate to the type of cooking 
that will be presented; GinHano 
BugiaUTs tape, for example, starts 
off with lively Italian melodies. 

Some videos, such as Kamman’s 
lessons on French foods, start with 
a history of a particular cuisine; ' 
others, such as that of Pepin, begin 
with a discussion of the equipment 
that win be used. Child moves right 
into a detailed discussion of how to 
buy the ingredients, how to store 
than and now to cook them. 

Introductions over, the video- 
tapes divide themselves into those 
that entertain, those that instruct 
and those that do both, . 

The best — the ones that enter- 
tain and 'instinct, which include 


Sea, begin sharing a room* 
e off across the desert to: 
People in the indostry what action there is; 

market for cooking videotapp *^OTaisrsts mamly of the naizator-' 

■ m i ght also improve xf die price^a^^c&iera’s . brooding close-ups of; 
the tapes fell The averaget^pcsdls^ -j jprancoise Prenant, a film editor in,' 
for $30 to $40 in the United Stetes.^ : her first acting role. 

Pate rs of Video takes ssmLjcThe 1 ; T ^Throughout the film Prenant re- 
price needs to . go down tojettider ■ mains a distant mystery, passively 
$30 for people to buy than instead;-, jnsisting the narrator’s misplaced 
of rotting t h e m . M anfi fa cm rent' - efforts toTove her. The film ’s fntw- 


’Si • - 

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have found that to be diecas^ipdi% 4Xt hes less in its narrative concept 


PARSAI CARPETS 


BASLE - SWITZERLAND 

ElisabethenstraBe 43. TeL (061) 23 30 30 


Offers 


Two collector’s items (both over 100 years old): 


2 . 


MESHED AMOGLI 
Measuring: 352 cm x 430 cm 
Almost 1,000,000 knots per square meter. 
FARAHAN 
Measuring: 340 cm x 440 cm 
Almost 1,000,000 knots per square meter. 

Price: both pieces together S.Fr. 1,000,000. 

Separate sale possible. Inspection at bank in Basle. 


Especially interesting for people knowledgeable in the 
Arabic arts and tastes. 


Many more valuable pieces of highest qualities . 
Persian carpets note on special sale /luptidation). 


other videotapes and are 
that direction.” . ' 

- .Success in tiiis industry, *!&fm 
cookbooks, is measured, by, Ithbn- 
satids,- not millions. Cookbook 
saleyare conaderedrespcctable at 
20,000. “More than 20,000 :Juiwrto 
tapes is a definite hit," Peters said. 
“About 5,000 .copies is generally 
the break-even pomt.” . 

“f see a nice small market for 
them, ■ selling maybe 20,000 to 
40,000 topes in their lifetime,” said 
Doug Garr; editor of Video, maga- 
zine. Stacked against the 850,000 
tapes Jane Fonda has sold, that 
seems small indeed. 


than in Prenant’s self-conscious or- 
dinariness: She does not deserve 
tins kind of attention, or even want 
it. What matters most to her, priva- 
cy, is exactly what the narrator 
wants most to violate. 

Regrettably, Depardon's static 
camera technique — he is ari 
award-winning photqjoumalist — 
and the absence of character devel- 
opment combine to *nalrg the film a . 
tiring experience, if an eerily true 
one. 




Pm 




Mark Huiuer is a joumabst'who 
writes about cultural affairs in Eu- 
rope. 









Technique 

oaiport 

Botonus 


leading medical center fon 
REVITALIZATION 

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rrunaes: 

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“•“■ML f 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


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Julius Caesar himself put Geneva on the map 
ih S8B.C. when he wrote of his passage through 
town in his /‘Commentaries. 99 It turned out 
to be a prophetic introduction, 
as .Geneva continues to occupy a role on the world stage 
out of all proportion to its modest size. 

The Eternal 
Meeting Place 


z -uous of the world 


Geneva has played host — sometimes reluc- 
tantly — to the likes of Goethe, Mozart, 
Liszt, L e n in, Lord Byron, Madame de ScaH, 
Napoleon and Bemie Comfdd, high-flying 
head of the Investors’ Overseas Services 
during the 1960s,. who wound up in jaiL 
Not to mention the scores of negotiators 
who regularly passthrough to discuss disar- 
mament or petroleum prices, or mediate 
the world’s most pressing conflicts. 

Author-philosopher . Voltaire', described 
Geneva as "proud, noble, wealthy, deep and 
sly” before leaving to cake up residence 
across the border in France, Jean-Jaajues 
Rousseau, likewise, was forced to flee when 
his writings, which were to have a lasting 
impact, on the. futures of France and the 
United States, met with local indignation 
and book burning . - 

Others have come to stay, casting a mote 
lasting influence over the dry.^ Certainly the 
most notable of these was French-bom 
John Calvin, who launched the Geneva 
Reformation, in 1556, laying down the rig- . 
orous laws of discipline and piety rhar 
shape the- pty’s reserve to this day. The 
-45.0th anniversary, of itii local ^activity will 
he 'commemorated, with - suitable Calvinist . 
restraint 'rfcxt'May. V.i ; v ' . • 

Jcan-Hdtri Dunant, an idealistic Gene- 
van, was the inspiration behind the estab- 
lishment in 1864 of die International Com- 
nriccw of they Red Cross, which l au nched 
Geneva’s involvement .. in . humanitarian 
causes. 

Geneva's role as an international arbitra- 
tion center dares back co 1872, when meet- 
ings were held in its historic Hotel dc VUlc . 
co settle the U.S. Cvil War dispute with 
Grear Britain over the warship Alabama. 

The League of Nations set up shop in 


1920 in the now-dilapidated Palais Wilson, 
named for Woodrow Wilson, whose vision 
led co its formation. The League relocated 
tp the Palais des Nations in 1937 and this 
palatial sprawl is now European headquar- 
ters for the United Nations. 

The UJM., with its 13 specialized agen- 
. des, is the current focus of international 
-activity.' Witness to the importance of its 
presence are the estimated 350 NGOs 
(nongovernmental organizations) rhar 
maintain .official representation here- Some 
meetings are perpetual in nature: die disar- 
mament calks, trade negotiations and gath- 
erings of die Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries are cases in point. 

Other meetings, such as the current 
Geneva summit talks between Ronald Rea- 
gan and Mikhail Gorbachev, are singular 
events char happen here because of the 
dry’s expertise in dealing with such things, 
as well as Swiss neutrality. 

Accustomed as it is to welcoming nego- 
tiators, refugees, business travelers and 
tourists, Geneva is at once gracious and 
chilly! Often criticized as being "unfriend- 
ly,” Genevans shield themselves with a 
nsyvicaf ^resetyt This is the result, in parr, of 
being a. minority in their own dty, accord- 
ing to Robert VIeux, chief of protocol. The 
canton of Geneva, with a population, of less 
than 360,000, is divided almost exactly into 
thirds: Genevans, foreigners and "other” 
Swiss. 

Visitors number approximately two mil- 
lion in the course of the year, making 
Geneva the top tourist draw in Switzerland 
in addition to its conference and business 
status. While tourist buses regularly dis- 
gorge budget-minded visitors, the hotel 
emphasis is on luxury, and Geneva boasts 



Clockwise from left: 
Julius Caesar, General 
Dufour, John Calvin , 
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, 
Voltaire, Jean - Henri 
Dunam. 


the highest concentration of deluxe hotels 
of any dty in the world. At last count there 
were 17 five-scar hotels, as compared to 
seven in Zu r i ch , a much larger dty. 

Geneva is one of the leading redpiencs 
of political refugees coming into Switzer- 


land On the ocher hand it welcomes the 
moneyed twice a year to the jewelry auc- 
tions that have become the most important 
in the world 

The welcome mar is always out. 

— Mary Krienke 


Geneva’s Working White House 


If Herbert A Schorr, general manager of 
rhe Inter-Continental Hotel Geneva, 
doesn’t seem particularly disappointed that 
the Reagans aren’t staying in . bis recently 
redecorated Presidential Suite this week, it’s 
. because his hotel - has nevertheless been 
turned .into the working White House for 
the duration of the Geneva summit. . 

That’s where White House Spokesman 
Larry Speakes will be conducting briefings 
foe the White House press corps, for exam- 
ple. (The rest of the world’s press, the 
turnout expected to top 3,000, will be 
working our : of the Geneva Conference 
Center, located a short distance dowrihilL) 
In all, the American contingent is occupy- 
ing 350 of the hotel’s 400 rooms, with 
another 10 rooms reserved for the. official 
Swiss delegation from Bern. 

Aside from the 600 extra telephone and 
. telex lines added to the 400 normally in 
place, an . entire new telephone system. 
Drought over from the United Stares, and 
10 dish antennas and 35 radio aerials crowd- ' 
ed onto the roof, the structure and routine , 
of che Inrer-Concincntalhaven'tbcen mate- 
rially altered for this historic event. 

Skhott has become accustomed to wel- 
coming beads of state (an average of four 
per year on official visits), sheikhs, ambas- 
sadors and business tycoons since the Inter- 
Continental made its dramatic turnaround, . 
beginning in 1968, from just another tour- 
isc hotel to Geneva’s top "private” meeting 
center. While official meetings may cake 
place at the United Nations -or . various 
missions around town, the real business is 
frequently conducted at che hotel As a." 
matter of fact, when two heads of scare 
happen to be on hand few independent 
reasons, Schott has been known tp puc 
them together fora spontaneous meeting 

apart bom press, protocol and Rearranged 
agendas. 

Working sessions of the 1973 Middle' 
Ease Conference, which broughr needier.; 
the foreign ministers of Israel, Syria, Jordan 
and Egypt, plus Henry Kissinger and Kurt 
Waldheim, were held at che InterConti- 
nental, as were talks between President' 
Jimmy Carter and President H Assad of 
Syria in 1977. Other key meetings dealt 
with theRhodesian conflict, tbeBbfra war, 
Cyprus negotiations, the Lebanese conflict, 



The Hotel Inter-Continental has long attracted VIPs as a special meeting place. 


the Palestinian conference, a Vietnamese 

refugee meeting involving 10 foreign min- 
isters, and negotiations between Spain and 
England over the independence of Gibraltar 
in 1984, Official meetings of the Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Exporting Countries 
have taken place ar the Geneva Inter- 
Continental for 17 years. 

! . Personnel have become so adept ar deal- 
ing with important viators that no dossier 
or special brief ing is necessary. "As soon as 
wc hear "someone’ is coming, everyone 
knows bow to act,” says one employee. 


Thar "someone" could mean Henry Kissin- 
ger, Cyrus Vance, Alexander Haig, George 
Shultz, Walter Mondale or George Bush — 
all repeat visitors. 

Aside from familiarity with the care and 
handling of VIPs, security is another Inter- 
Continental specialty, undoubtedly one of 
the reasons ir is chosen as the sice for 
sensitive meetings and visits. Situated on 
the highest point of Geneva’s Right Bank 
and less chan 10 minutes from Cointrin 
Airport, the hotel can be effectively sealed 
off without significantly affecting traffic 


parrems or disrupting life in che cicy. 

The hotel’s readiness to deal with emer- 
gencies has been thoroughly tested — 
though never actually pur into effect — 
most recently in 1983, when it was involved 
in riie Palestinian conference and che Leba- 
nese reeontiliarion conference, both poten- 
tially explosive encounters. It was then 
proved that the hotel's flat roof could 
accommodate military helicopter landings 
— alrhough rhar might prove difficult with 
die present forest of telecommunication 
dishes and ocher transmission devices. 


Rolex Rewards Enterprise 


Marline Fetrweis-Viemx is a Belgian ar- 
chaeologist preparing che first complete 
catalogue of Mayan murals in Mexico and 
Guatemala. 

Donald Perry is an American university 
biologisr uncovering the mysteries of rhe 
tropical rain forest through a unique web of 
ropes. 

Thean Soo Tee is a Malaysian agricultur- 
al adviser combatting soil erosion and poor 
living conditions through the cultivation of 
asparagus. 

' It is unconventional undertakings such 
as these for which individuals exhibiting a 
"spirit of enterprise’’ have been given the 
Rolex Award for Enterprise. Rolex, Gene- 
va’s largest industrial company, established 
the international awards in 1976 on the 
occasion of the 50th anniversary of the 
Rolex Oysrer. che first truly waterproof 
watch. The award carries with ir a sum of 
50,000 Swiss francs and a specially inscribed 
gold Rolex chronometer. 

While the award provides financial assis- 
tance co enable five selected individuals to 
cany out their projects, its broader objec- 
tive is ro encourage che "spirit of enter- 
prise” through its recognition, stimulation 
and acknowledgment as an essential human 
quality. A book called "Spirit of Enter- 
prise," published at rhe time or che award 
distribution in 1978, 1981 and 1984, not 
only describes the projects presented by the 
five laureates and winners of honorable 
mentions, but also summarizes projects 
submined by hundreds of other candidates 
rhar show particular promise. The books 
arc distributed to universities, scientific 
organizations and industry to encourage 
support. 

Andre J. Heiniger, managing director of 
Rolex, recently launched the 19S7 edition 
of the Rolex Awards for Enterprise bv 
remarking char the term "enterprise,” 
which seemed to have gone out of fashion 
when the awards were established almost a 
decade ago. has begun to experience a 
resurgence. "In spice of che pleasure I now 
experience at this new response, I cannot 
fail ro reflect how, under such inauspicious 
circumstances, Rolex demonstrated a pio- 
neering spirit that matches its constant 
vocation," Heiniger said. 

Projects for che Rolex Awards for Enter- 
prise may be submitted in one of three 



Donald Perry, 1984 award winner. 


categories: applied sciences and invention, 
exploration and discovery and rhe environ- 
ment. The eight members of rhe selection 
committee for the 1987 awards arc Dr. 
George VJ3. Cochran (^United Scares), pro- 
fessor of clinical orthopedics at Columbia 
University and past president of the Explor- 
ers Gub; Fleur Cowles (Great Britain), 
painrer, author and member of rhe World 
Wildlife Fund International Council; Dr. 
Xavier Fruccus (France 1 ), specialist in hy- 
perbaric physiology and scientific director 
of COMEX in Marseilles; Yoshimine Ikcda 
(Brazil), professor at the Oceanographic 
Institute of rhe University of Sao Paulo, 
specializing in antarctic research; Kisho 
Kurokawa (Japan), architccr and director 
of the Institute of Social Engineering. Inc., 
of Tokyo; Hans Joachim Panirz (Federal 

Republic of Germany), telecommunica- 
tions engineer and aerospace specialist ar 
die German Aerospace Establishment in 
Cologne; Carlo Rubbia (Italy), physicist at 
the European Organization for Nuclear 
Research and 1984 Nobel laureate; and 
Robert Stcnuit (Belgium), underwater ar- 
chaeologist and author. 

For information on tlx W 7 Rolex Awards for 
Enterprise contact; The Secretariat, The Rokv 
Awards for Enterprise, P.0. Box l?8. i?l] 
Genera 26. Switzerland. 




Page 12 


EVTERN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY^ NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 




Private Bankers Are a 
Special Breed 


Voltaire remarked, "When a private banker 
jumps into the lake, just jump after him. 
There is 10 percent to be made." In 1837. 
another famous traveler named Marie-Hen- 
ri Beyle, alias Stendhal, noted in his diary: 
“The foremost money men of the Conti- 
nent have the foremost of virtues, that of 
eating less each day than they cam. Even 
when they let themselves go, they only 
choose inexpensive pleasures like a walk in 
the mountains with a drink of milk.” 

This reputation for thrift is very much 
alive. For che Genevan citizen of 1985, a 
private bank still is rbe place where a pencil 
must be used down to its last inch before ir 
can be thrown away. A private banker still 
stutters or talks through his nose to lend 
that British air so fashionable 200 years ago. 
An invitation for tea in the austere and 
exclusive me des Granges still includes the 
delicate hint for restraint conveyed by che 
mistress of the house: "One lump of sugar 
or none?” 

Modem Geneva counts more private 
banks per capita rhan any other dey on 
earth, and the style and acumen displayed 
by the scions of Geneva's banking tradition 
make them impervious to most of the 


present-day banking dangers. So far they 
have enjoyed smooch sailing among the 
sharks and snags of financial hypertrophy: 
the takeover game, the debt problem, bad- 
risk inflation and even client famine. By 
sticking to their well-trained guns, the 
most sedusive families of neutral Switzer- 
land have preserved an unparalleled institu- 
tion for money making. 

A private bank in Geneva has nothing to 
do with che giant corporations chat arc 
currently prompted by che International 
Monetary Fund to step up their lending to 
developing countries. Private in this in- 
stance does not, moreover, carry the mean- 
ing of being simply the opposite of govern- 
mental. The crux of the matter lies in the 
personal liability of every true private bank- 
er in the Swiss tradition. A commercial 
banker runs his bank as he would any ocher 
commercial corporation. His personal li- 
ability concerns his professional compe- 
tence and integrity. The private banker, -as a 
co-owner of his firm, is bound both person- 
ally and finandally: his bank’s commit- 
ments are guaranteed by his personal for- 
tune. 

Foreign visitors discover with amaze- 


ment how most private banking houses 
blend into che classical urban environment 
of the Old Town. Their entrances do nor 
differ from those of the neighboring private 
town houses and, with the exception of 
some unassuming initials, there is no sign 
on the door revealing the nature of the 
business. It is because they are personally 
owned that private banks always take the 
name of a banker or a family of bankers. 

Few people are aware chat this unlimited 
liability also determines che kinds of opera- 
tions private bankers engage in. Unlike 
credit institutions, they do not seek depos- 
its from the public to finance commercial 
loans. They iimir themselves entirely to 
managing the assets of t heir clients and to 
providing related services such as currency 
protection, tax and estate matters, assis- 
tance in industrial participations or real- 
estate investments. On dose examination, 
such activities are in essence only a carefully 
organized extension of the administration 
of che banker’s own assets: che investments 
they recommend to their clients are often 
similar to chose they choose for themselves. 

Reception by a private banker has noth- 
ing co do with an inquiry at a idler's desk 


in an anonymous bank lobby.. The visitor 
will be shown into what looks more like a 
drawing room chan an office; he will be 
asked which common friend has recom- 
mended the name of the bank, arid also 
what his personal possibilities and- ambi- 
tions are. It is not quite as if the prospective 
client were asking for the hand of the 
banker's daughter, bur if he wants to be- 
come a part of che financial family -both 
patties lave to know exactly what they are 
talking about 

This privileged person- co-person rcla : 
rionship regularly produces above-average 
portfolio results. A man of means expects 
to be treated as an individual rather than an 
account number, and his direct contact' not 
only -with his specialised account manager 
(who, by die way, rarely changes), but with 
the owner of the bank itself, lends a reassur- 
ing dimension to the mutual confidence 
required. If security considerations still are 
the number-one reason for banking in Swit- 
zerland, for die more sophisticated clients 
of a private bank it is as important never to 
have been let down as it is to calk about 
some extraordinary performance. 

One tiling is sure: it would be out of 
character for a Geneva private banker ro 
boast about any of his achievements. But 
there must be something he does and 
knows that other people do not. Otherwise, 
how to explain his present-day importance 
in a pushy banking universe of thousands 
of brilliant newcomers? 

— Wolfgang Achierberg 


The Geneva bourse, which will open in the spring, 



LES BOUTIQUES 

Zurich Lucerne 




Geneva 


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Th e most fashionable place 
in Switzerland 


Geneva 

Place du Molard 


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Geneva & Zurich 
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ADVERTISING SECTION 



* « # 



m * 



A perfumer testing a new' fragrance. 


In Perfumes 
It’s Geneva First 


Chanel No. 5, Joy, Anais Anais, Paco Ra- 
banne, Eau Sauvage, Le Muse de Carrier and 
First by Van Oeef &. Arpeb are all Fine 
French fragrances with one thing in com- 
mon: key ingredients — in most cases che 
finished compound .itself — come from 
Geneva- 

Geneva’s billion-franc fragrance and fla- 
vor industry supplies not only the finest 
names in couture perfumery but also manu- 
facturers of cosmetics and toiletries, soaps 
and detergents, and an increasing array of 


the marketing momentum might come 
from New York or Paris, and natural ingre- 
dients originate in romantic places such as 
Grasse, it is safe to say that Geneva has 
become the scent center of the world. 

Two of the world’s cop three fragrance 
producers, Givaudan and Firmenich, plus a. 
cluster of smaller firms, have their homes 
here. 

While perfume dares back to the begin- 
ning of recorded history, and commercial 
French perfumery traces its development 
from the 18th century, 1895 was the key 
year as far as Geneva is concerned. That 
year Leon and Xavier Givaudan founded 
the firm that bears their family name with 
an investment of 300 francs, sharing pre- 
mises wich a bakery in Zurich. When the 
baker complained that his bread smelled of 
violets, they moved their facilities to Verni- 
er-Geneva, on the banks of the Rhone, 
which remains Givaudan's headquarters 
and major manufacturing center. A subsid- 
iary of Hoffmann-La Roche since 1968, 
Givaudan today ranks second in the indus- 
try behind International Flavors & Fra- 


grances, an American firm, and first in 
aroma chemicals. 

Firmenich, a family-owned company 
chat ranks third among flavor and fragrance 
producers, was also founded in 1895 by 
Philippe Chuic, a Swiss perfumer and 
chemist Fred Firmenich, gra n dfathe r of 
present Chairman Frcd-Hcnri Firmenich, 
joined che firm in 1900, contributing his 
name and his vision. "To do What others 
cannoc do" has been Fumenid^s credo 
since the beginning; resulting irircomrait- 


Nobel Prize, among ocher ewered awards. 

Geneva’s movement to the fboefrone of 
perfumery resulted, from ashifir'in ingredi- 
ents from purely natural combination 

of natural and sy ntheric that; rook , place 
following World War 
chemistry, rather than grit lies at 

the heart of Genevas fragrance industry. 
This does not die 

creativity of die pa fm^ ^ ^ ioses^y they 
are known, Whp a?(^i^a^ T X^^ as 700 
different ingrcS<3M3,tiikp^i -'Single . com- 
pound in nrtich cbmposirf 

writes a symphony. 

* . Reasons Why Geneva becarae an interna- 


tional pcrfun^idoMeriwae^.opcn mar- 
ket, eady fnredan^om >/ P>CQtt restric tio ns 


ity. To these v^^ferer -added Genevans 

S t? nir r vt y fipanrit^m dragiand communi- 
cations center, ipSay ns abflity to ..attract 
individuals coBHraacd mxeseardi and in-' 
novation. Jx evolved quite nacurally into a 
center . for -h »ycinA<ag< r- as? inti rmarionaT in 
scopeasperfumeiy: . 




*■ : 


> i* 



J O A I L LIE R S 
D E P U I S 
18 8 6 



GENEVA: 4l RUE DU RHONE 
19, PASSAGE MAtBUBSQN 
HOTEL HILTON - B.QUAI DUM0NT-BLANC 
LONDON: 13. NEW BOND STREET. 
ATHENS: B. VOUKOURESHQU . . : 
HONG-K0NG: PEMNSULA HOTEL *; 










v «> First 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


,f iv; j- ; 


topping 

< f a r a l : f K rP<* 9™ ■»“« lx- awsrLlv 
walking I*, rhc m( . Ju 
Wgu’. Cmu-va s 3nm . a n , t!x . m( . du 

-9*fTS ^-Honoa-. rhac this is in r „n. 

;s ’ tro *oW 

jewelers, and rep fashion names. 

Stouted mid*ay between Paris and Mi- 
kn as tar as fashion morality is concerned. 
Geneva s deluxe boutiques atmiec shoppers 
who, regularly frequent Paris or New York 
for the simple reason that shoppm* he rc ;< 
sp easy. In one hassle-free afternoon it is 
possible to visit Dior. Yves Saint Laurent 
Valennno. Ouncl. Lunrin. Armani and 
Versace, and still have time for a cup of 
coffee. r 

_ Anita Smaga pioneered rhe rue du 
Rhone as an ulcrachic shopping thorou gh " 
tare in 1961. when she wenr into business 
with her dressmaker to shake up the pcarls- 
wirh-basic-black conservatism of Geneva, 
and she has never looked back. Ensconced 
ip a string of bouriques at 5L rue du 
Rhone. Madame Smag3. a dimirmrive 
blonde from Casablanca, numbers- among 
.the. top fashion retailers of the world. Hen 
was the first Yves Saint Laurent Rive 
Gauche boutique outside Paris, and to it 
she has added Ungaro, Valennno, Nina 



J--J- Brunschwig of Bon Genie. 

Ricci and Karl Lagerfeld. She also runs a 
thriving couture operation and master- 
minds some of die most fan rustic weddings 
in dje world. 

Low, at SO, rue du Rhone. carries a 
strong representation of Italy's best-known 
names such as-Genny, Missoni, Bosile and 
Soprani, while Armani and Krizia are 
among rhe selections ar Anode, located at 
number 31*. Gianfranco F erre is at number 
15 and Versace has a shop of his own 
around chc corner at 3. me Ccard The 
French representation includes Chanel at 
35, rue du Rhone (with another location 
across the lake on the rue des Alpes), Dior 
and Lanvin almost across die street at 
numbers tjO and 68 respectively and Gi- 


VCikhy Jfltl Jcan-lawi* Stlumr :it Ar«»k\ 

Running parallel rt> du- rue du Rln'nic is 
a MRvt time changes its name mi frequently 
ft is commonly known, colkxtivdv js rhe 
"rues Basses" (low streets). Us retail esraK 
lirfimoits are generally larger and a hit 
more "department store.” Lix.it ul ar 3 1 , rue 
Ju Mardie is Bun Ikniv. one of the few 
rrue fashion .qxxidlry stores on rhe Conti- 
m*nr. which nut only spawned tin- Ixuriquc 
tWrnncnt in Geneva (some of its originals 
lave set up individual slu>|ts elsewhere) bur 
continues m innovate. Among its currenr 
top fashion makers are Sonia Rykiel. Dor- 
nfiiec Bis. Kenzo and a clurch of Japanese 
designers Bon Genie had rlic guts to intro- 
duce to a conservative Geneva fashion cli- 
entele with notable success. 

"We don'r carry too maw names, be- 
cause wc like ro represent every designer in 
depth." says Jean- Jacques Btunscliwig, gen- 
eral manager, who wirh brothers Michel 
and Francois run the store starred bv their 
grandfatiicr in 1891- Oilier stores in rhc 
Brunschwig galaxy arc located in Lausanne, 
Zurich and in Geneva at rhc airport, train 
stariun, Inter-Continental Hotel, Hixcl du 
Rlione and the Balcxen shopping center. 

One very smart move was ro spin off two 
of the most famous Bon Genic names, 
Gucci and Louis Vuirton, into freestanding 
shops riiar now flank the main score. Gucci 
operates as a Bon Genie frandiise, while 
die Brunschwigs are business partners with 
Vuitton in Switzerland. 

Since Geneva is the gateway to some of 
die best siding in Europe, it stands to 
reason that stores catering to rhe needs of 
skiers are a notch above the average. Hof- 
stetter Sports, located in a landmark build- 
ing at 12-14, rue de la Cornitcrie, has been 
called by insiders one of the best ail -around 


sports shops in die world for its selntuxi 
am! high level of professional servue 
MjYIm.1 Hi listener, w!io took over the 
store fmm his father, is a hmu fide Swiss 
ski iiLstriktor wlio personally tries our all 
the cups »f- rhc- line skis lie stic ks with his 
pal Jean- Claude Killy, and is on liand most 
wintry Saturdays ro gi-.e a firsthand report. 
In addition to an ura.qur.Ilei! ski selection. 
Hof stetter socks rlic top skiweor. switch- 
ing to tennis in the summer, plus nunsport- 
mg fxslimns from suth names as Valentino, 
Samr Lament, Bngncr for women. New 
Man and Faconnable for men. 

Michel Hofstetter's sporting fashion. 



Caran d’ Ache Has Built Prestige From Pencils 



Caran d’Ache lighters, models of elegance. 


A penal may not seem a likely starting point from which to build a mark of presage in 
pens, lighters and watches, but then pencils from Geneva’s Caran d’Ache are no ordinary 
pencils. 

First there is the name, taken from a French cartoonist of the Belle Epoque who signed 
his sometimes cynical works "Caran d’Acbe" after the Russian word for pencil, karandasch. 
Second, chat is the commitment to innovation char resulted in the world’s first mechanical 
"lead-grip” pencil (a best-seller since its introduction in 1927), water-solvent colored 
pencils and Neocolor wax crayons favored by Picasso as well as Swiss schoolchildren. 

Having cornered the Swiss writing market — an astonishing 50 percent of Caran d’Ache 
production goes to its tiny home market — chc firm undertook an ambitious diversification 
program in the 1970s, beginning with the Madison Collection of unabashedly elegant 
weiring instruments in a variety of materials, eventually expanded ro include diamond- 
studded models. 

Building further on its pride in precision, Caran d’Ache next branched out of chc 
writing to introduce a lighter nor only sleek and elegant in design but innovative in 
performance, with two independent gas reserves and a slanted flame of particular interest 
to the pipe smoker. It wasn’t long before Caran cf Ache yielded to its native Swiss 
temptation and introduced a small collection of watches compatible in design with its pens 
and lighters. Fine leather accessories and desk-top articles axe another successful line. 

"Even our throwaway ball-point pens have class," says Philippe Bolens, general 
manager, in commencing on the firm’s continuing high standards of design and undeniable 
Swiss quality. 


Page 13 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


Restaurants Offer 
Good Food and 
Good Times 


Ik ing so iIum: to France. «»m. might expect 
to car well in Geneva. Ami one docs. The 
ambience unril recently, however, has tend- 
ed toward the serious. 

Thar artiiutk- is changing, and now it is 
possible to enjoy a “power" lunch or .i 
sybaritic dinner much in the manner of 
New York i»r Paris. Four restaurants offer- 
ing an attractive combination of g>»xl fix id 
and fun con be found in a relatively unchit 
part of rhe Left Bank between the Old 
Town and Eaux-Vives (“living warm"), 
which lias been likened to Paris's Saint- 
Germain -dev Pres. 

It was here that Bernard Grobet, king of 
Geneva's nightlife, established the private 
Griffin's Club 20 years ago, and ro which he 
rcccndy added the restaurant Lc Business, 
with instanc success. It is crowded during 
lunch with lawyers, bankers and rhe like 
and comfortably relaxed in the evening, 
when the music and lighting conjure up a 
romantic mood. Youthful chef Bruno Bo- 
nin presides over the kitchen and chc em- 
phasis is on light, not necessarily nouvdle, 
cuisine. 

Just around rhc comer, Jo Panarinfo 
turned a hole-in-the-wall on an obscure 
street inro a very special place thanks to 
Gerard Bach, whose interior design bril- 
liance also influences Lc Business, and a 


rmwf-tlv.in-mmj’vtvm idtcf, Manuel Alfava. 
lake Parc categorizes irstlf as a deluxe 
hiMPi with tile emphasis on Liglv jualir. 
fmxl interest I ngl> prepared. The demr fea- 
tures mixed patterns, giant pi lms and a 
stairway leading to nowhere. A ruuih of 
fantasy in a very serious town 

Boulevard Hclvctiquc is turning into a 
restaurant strip of sorts. Up the street from 
Lc Business is Le Patio and. farrher on. la; 
Francis. both ro he rexommended fur !ura.h 
or dinner. Le Patio replaced a hourique in a 
vintage stone- walled building and quu.kk 
built a following among those lunging fi -i a 
pleasunr and not necessarily expensive place 
for lunch- Since its inauguration it has 
moved resolutely upmarket to the point 
that one must book days in advance, and 
acquired a lively evening crowd. The fr,*) 
is imaginative and varied, rhe ambience 
delightful the service friendly and personal. 

Farther up boulevard Hclvctiquc is Lc 
Francis, celebrating its second birthday this 
month. Owned by Francis Wehrcn. who 
runs another restaurant, L’Aubergc d'Her- 
mance, in one of the canton's most delighr- 
ful lakeside villages, the menu successful h- 
combines gourmet and bistro fare. The 
mood is eleganr yet not forbidding, and 
there’s live piano music in rhe evening, a 
good thing considering Geneva’s shortage 
of late-night attractions. 



Le Business, 35. boulevard Hdvetique. Le Patio, 19 boulevard Hehetique, hi 
teL 35.42.06. Businas lunch 46 SF, dinner 3666. ?5. Business lunch 26 SF. a la carte 
from 60 SF. not including urine. dinner 60-~0 SF, nor including uine. 

C6te Parc, 3, rue du Parc. teL 36 .91.98. Le Francis, 5, boulevard Hehetique. teL 
Plat du jour 19 SF. dinner 70-80 SF. includ- 46.32.22. Plat du jour IS SF at lunch, dinner 
mg ume. fixed-price menu +$ SF. no: including uwe. 




The Rolex Day-Date speaks 


s. 


In Geneva, this is often useful 











j ' Lb . i -*-.-'' 1 u 


Many of the world s most superb watches have been created 
in Geneva. And the great tradition of the watchmakers of Geneva is 
% represented notably today in the unique Rolex Oyster. 
f Ever since Rolex invented the worlds first reliable wrist-watch, 
the history of precision watch making has been particularly the 
history of the Rolex Clyster. 

It was the first watch to be sculpted from a solid block of metal 
in 162 separate, skilful, precision operations. The first watch to have a 
winding crowm, designed to screw down tightly onto the case, sealing 
the movement completely against water, dust and dirt. 

The Rolex Oyster was the worlds first automatic precision wrist- 
watch. The first to show' the date through a window cut into the dial. 
And the first, thirty years ago, to actually spell out the day of the week 
in full. 

Today, the Rolex Day- Date is available in 26 different languages. 
Throughout the world the Rolex name has become synonymous with 
the all-too-rare qualities of craftsmanship, care and attention to detail. 
Simply to own a Rolex watch is itself a mark of considerable 
achievement. But it is also to share in the rewards of over /0 years of 
invention, innovation and the pursuit ol excellence. 

Today, wherever a Rolex is worn, it is a sisen that its owner cannot 
be satisfied with anything less. 


t 


ROLEX 

of Geneva 


- 








Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


advertising SECTION 


“Young Turks” 
Turn 100 


It r iikcs courage for a jeweler co set up shop in Geneva, the world s 
jcwl-Ity capital, where you’re up against every big name in the 
business — Orticr. Harry Winston, Van deef & Arpels and 
Bulgari. to mention but i few. When Adler Bros, opened their 
doors in a passage just off the rue du Rhone in 19- however, they 
had two important things going for them: a rich family tradition in 
precious jewelrv daring back to ISSb. and an exotic Eastern rouch 
that appealed to the influx of oil-rich big spenders into Geneva. 



The Adler look, from Istanbul to Geneva. 

Since then much has changed, and not only have the Alder 
brothers Carlo and Franklin expanded to three chic Geneva 
locations, but rheir designs have been toned down. "Westernized” 
you might say. ro appeal co European tastes and changing Arab 
tastes as well. They also have expanded their business both East 
and West by opening shops in Hong Kong and London. 


jack Adler, founder of the Adler jewelry dynasty, arrived in 
Istanbul 100 years ago after completing his jewelry apprenticeship 
in Vienna. In Istanbul he encountered the sumptuous designs char 
marked the end of the Ottoman Empire, to which he introduced 
sophisticated European craftsmanship — with great success. In 
196-U lack Adler's son Edouard transported the East- West Adler 
look to Athens, where he set up a shop and workrooms. 

The decision to move the Adler Bros, headquarters to Geneva 
was prompted by the city’s pre-eminence in jewelry based on its 
central location, lenienr import and export regulations, long- 
standing tradition of anonymity and well-heeled visitors. The 
semiannual jewelry auctions added not only prestige but important 
customers as well 

Geneva also became the Adler creative center under the direc- 
tion of Franklin Adler, whose wife, Leyla, is also involved in 
design. Carlo Adler runs rhe business side bur, as in many family 
operations, commerce and creation go hand in hand. 

The Adler "look” might be a dean sweep of baguettes in a 
necklace centered with an important squire-cur diamond, or an 
intricate and sensuous melange of diamonds and emeralds hearken- 
ing back to the Ottoman Empire. "Our jewelry is meant co be 
worn, not kept in a safe." says Franklin Adler. ”Wc try to put 
warmth and nostalgia into every piece wc produce." 

Jewelry remains the mainstay of Adler Bros., but one cannot 
overlook the exquisite objects on display in the boutiques: a jasper 
basket trimmed with dusters of gold grapes, a carnelian bowl 
decorated with flowers studded with rubies and diamonds, or a 
gold-and-di amend- copped walking stick. "The sort of thing one 
head of stare presents to another,” Franklin Adler explains. Other 
objects reflect Adler collections of priceless coffee cups used by 
On oman sultans, rare Fabcrge pieces and tum-of-the-cenrury 
glassware from Galle and Datum. 

Customers run the gamut of well-heeled Geneva visitors and 
residents, among them Gulf-state royalry, wealthy Indian families, 
Greek shipping tycoons, French and Italians who prefer to shop in 
Geneva to avoid the steep value-added tax and the occasional 
American. 

The Adler Bros, have become members in good standing of the 
Geneva jewelry establishment, a solid point around which to build 
a 100th anniversary celebration. 


lane Leasing 

> Flying High 














- ’ •' ijSj 


i r i ,, 




Shdtie.diptomctcyatS5,0Q0 per hmr. 


- ;Vt* >* 

.v f : 


Private jetting takes off in Geneva. 


Proud, prosperous, Protestant Geneva is sm okcstack- free, its formi- 
dable cash flow fed by a service- sector economy that relies on 
30,000 conferences a year, a thriving banking establishment and 
upscale tourism. . . 

A fertile breeding ground, in other words, for general avianon, 
as evidenced by the scores of private jets and turboprops parked at 
all rimes on chc Jura side of Cointrin Airport's single runway. 

In addition to rhe Swiss-registered small fry, there are the 
regular movements of private planes from abroad — some of them 
the size of full-blown airliners — carrying oil sheikhs from the Gulf 
or Greek shipowners on business or pleasure or both. 

General aviation activities at Gointrin are all-encompassing: 
from helicopter rides over Lake Geneva to glacier outings in ski- 


The original private banking 


Erred Pilarus Porters,' from to weekend diar- 

ccrs to Sc Moritz, from Red GrOsS'mercy flights to Ethiopia ro air- 
taxi rides ro a new golf couryfflxfg fehamas. . . x 

One Greek tycoon even ihSdk i Falcon 30 jet to forw«p£ a 
planeload of Geneva-grownorS^s-xaapariy m AEhens. _ ■ 

The concencracion of home-bred arid foreign nest eggs has scat 
the' fortunes soaring of. lo^i^W ^pebfWi^ts.such ^-Egcctidvi ? 
Jet and, most notably, Aeroldisjtig (ALC^which wifi edebmre ves ' 
twentieth birthday next yeany- '• ‘ <’ ~ : ~ 

From a modest start _wrtlr& sijgfc jKpet Aawdfe ia __fe*66;''; 
Aeroleasing’s wings have gtb%r to-cncqmpass i^Cosicm fleer of" 
12 jets suid two rurboprogsi;^«lQng jx Europe's 'bi gges t private 
charter company. .• •: - ' ' • 1 y"'- . 

ALG's diene roster reads: like -fto- roretnaribnai vWho’s Who, 
from UJM. scaeraxy-gcncialr to Haflywood edebrife^ from For-..: 
mula One speed kings to ^ru^iony ciiicscEa conductors, nor' to 
mention the Gulf-state prih«: wlib dqh3nded ? spec&} Errib-covcr- 
ing uni forms for ALG's hostfcssfe’ ■ 

the Middle East, and got whis ht • 
Airliner-sized aerial taxis L^new' trend, 

espedally among the big mulanarioaals, a^ehar^oampames are 
responding. ALG has just whose 

oak-paneled interior, com pfiar • wi tk-a fnlf-siae ddoWe-bed state- 
room, resembles that of a Medireiiarftaai^^^^:^c6c ;' " ‘ • . 

With its extended range, the 2OT|^ere-board of’ 

directors around the world in-lf:Work'^^^^re crivironmait - 
hitherto undreamed of in per hoar, 

charterers daim,. a party of SO.woidfiw^^^^Il’ttettrmudi more - 
than they Wild for Concorde sejgSjriad ^a n^l^ nric desrinarion, ■- 
and with a charter the aisromcr cah 
schedule. /- . ’ ; ^ 

Swiss neutrality and eniregEenearial <dcj3£etidB arc majorassets 
in Genevtfs bpomir^ WMP^iWbHW^^I^oon’s Pn^fent . 
Amin Gemayd keqas a Swi^-icgisHaed^ Slct^5p c^Wr_jet: on,^ 
permanent apuidby on a hordWT Beirut- The . 

farmer ruler -of' Sierra Leone aKbd&feefied a.huWess-iet in-Geneva 


on a long : cenn bads for getawS^pt^pases-A / 1 -.i;. ' .’ 1 . 

Demand is not lacking dosef to hrime, 'other. Whatever the ■ 
summit holds in store for worid peite, chc Reagan-Gotbadiev 
show, withies' cast of .thouWds,^raf^et Gdw^skash registers 
clinking and keep the dry's aK^fk^. bc^»^hdand in the air. 

- • ■ • . i -~r-£ - ^ Robert Kroon - 


|U .jt ’ 


Geneva's private bankers: so discreet that most of 
them don't even have their names on their doors. 
Generation after generation, their clients' satisfaction 
is the best advertising... 

For centuries. Geneva's private bankers made their 
reputation in offering the best services and very 
personalized relations with their clients. 

Yet Geneva's private bankers well know that such 
a reputation can only be maintained through permanent 
innovation. Hence their great tradition of money 
management capability remains unequaled. 








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•:ivV>, Tuesday, November io:iofts 

r ‘ '“i • "•••'• 

■■■ ii>.g^te7i 

■ nniinE$AMDc»iTiQiis 

! = ^ Grain Contracts Lose Favor 

While Financials Hirive 

. . 

Tr * ? «£ 4 >‘ By JAMES STEBNGOLD 

• tV«9 York Times Service ._ ■ 

l HICAGO^.a decade ago, the go-go-palse-of Wall 

-- Jlt ‘■V I S tr eet had nothing op the commodity pits .fa rHw»an 

>w : \ > ™» mobs of shouting traders could be seen wheeling 
T ?. I! «: &N* , , “ahng in wheat, com, soybean and other agricol- 
! nituies. Bat tunes have changed. In the roMf i tf erf one of the 

" . i) ; ^oratfenmngcrisesfor the United States, many of those agricol- 
turat-futures pits have turned into the equivalent of dust Bowls. ■ 
.^*“' c aftk ; same time, .the financial-futures markets have blos- 

■f« r So ^ d “to the most vibrant commodity trading. ' ■ ■ ■ 

. . :" Pil V 1 ® 6 has been, in fact, a violent shift in the balance of tratfing. 

" ' :<T r ‘i? . ■ A S r “tutural futures have plummeted from 64 percent of total 
volume in 1980 to amere25 ~ -- 

^ peromi m the first 10 months , - 

: --r- ilr ;rof this year. Meanwhile, ac- 1 fading m Wheat, 
r ’«!?" cording to the Futures Indus- ^ i 

~ rj M.,."' 1 '. tty Association, financial fn- ®On^ Soybeans 

A ^? : tur ^ . “duding interest-rate, - * . hag bran hrt hv ' 

*•: equity and currency contracts, nH8 " een mi 

f* a ‘SriU®*"!® 4 *?“ ) 8 p ® 05111 U.S. farm crisis. ! 

:; r the total market in 1980 to - 

?*i 59 percent this year. Precious- "™ • ‘ 7 

n , metals and petroleum futures make up most of the remainder of 
k marker. 


li^^themaricet. . 

** jost one sign. of. how. the farm economy's difficulties 
reverberated in the commodity world. Speculators, who add 
uni- ‘'"■essential volume to the markets, have abandoned the grain pits. 
r\ Many commodity brokerages have dosed, merged, or cut back 

I— _ " CI i YVrv»f!»tirme 




operations. 


, F | iHE ONCE-FLOURISHING business of indepen den t 
I floor traders in grain futures has withered.- It has grown so 
- ba d for many floor traders on the Chicago Board of Trade, 
•’»’ ."^"Ss principal arena for trading and speculating in grain futures 

1 for more t h an a century, that they are switching to the finanriai 
:r Se r . futures. 

Recently, for insta-nr^ the ismaTi am phitheate r-sha ped pit 
•f-'.'eiiji.jj. where com options are traded was almost deserted. Nearby, true 
• for Treasury-bond futures looked h~V»» & packed football 

--I'baaj.j stadium during a dose game. 

^sa. . Some floor traders in grain had believed that economics was 
- permanently on their side. 

— t< it. “We thought we’d always have this business because of the 

need to feed the starving people in the wodd, like the Chinese," 
■ji; j'!*i said Robert S. Ixxnec, who holds a master's degree in business 
administration from the University of nriagn and worked for 10 
years in the com pit until July 1984, when he switched to trading 
otMf stock-index futures. “But look now, the Chinese are the ones 
' Ktib ij. exporting com.” 


Milisllj: Th e U.S. used to be the mqor exporter of gnmi We still are, but 
—vi -'.tints our share of the market has fallen to about 26 p e r ce n t in wheat 
% Mi*a if alone, from SO percent five years ago.” 

"irz At the Chicago Board of Trade; the average daily volume in 
-... V.. 'nrVr com is down 33 percent from last year, to 24,603 contracts; 

' h: >:- 2 ic soybean trading is off 42 percent, at 28,036 contracts a day, and 
-"'.as: c wheat has shimfwd 33 per ce nt^ to 8^60 contracts. Those levels 
■j--i t;r ^ represent a 60-percent drop from 1983, a be tier- than- average 
" •r". l> year for grain futures because of a drought that disrupted supply 

yi and raised prices. - . 

H’t.O The v<HiC?KLla^naQiQial futures, howevn^has been heading 
jsir skyward. A record 387,262 Treasury-bond futures changed hands 
':■£ rja5:’ cm Oct. 30 asd 'voteme in i tise Standard & Poor’s 50CPstock index 
. : r'- sac; contract, traded at lhe Chicago Mercantile Exc hange, hit a new 
high of 106231 last Tuesday. 

- , Many conxmeiciat interests — farmers, processors, and end- 

_ . .! users of grain products — continue to ireiy on futures to hedge 

• L vri”- : themselves against price uncertainty.- 

: :^x r C;_ “We will still go to futures.wfaea we need that protection, ” said 
r siinjc Alphonse DSDommids, manager of grain purchasing for CPC 
:■ International, a com nriUer. “But over all, the vohmie in the 
(Cootinoed on Page 21, CoL 1) 

Clmreneylfates ~ 

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interest; Rates 


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l.roor BMrXtk «-*».. UWHk 10»k-TOH 6Mr««.;8Hi 

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ISDR). Roles wUcotPa lo tatarbonk daptatta of SI milOon minimum (oratfulvalmttl. 


K*y Money Bate* Hfco 13 


.OftaHIdm 


7VS 7Yl 

7v« m.; 

916 ‘ *Vi 

m 9 ** 

7X5 UO 
7X1 7X3 

725 7JS 
7 JO 758 
750 7 JO 


SJO 550 
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— 430 

— 4X5 

— : *W 


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1 imttf - ; IW-BVE. . - 

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smoattit g^-au - 

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1Y0BT BlO.nt 

Savrco: Rautmrx 


VASbteyMvkkMs 

Hot. IB 

Merrill tvwdi naodv mm 
so n nwnW; - 7X5 

Ttternta Udoml Rote Index: 7X51 
Source: MarriU Lynch. TeteTMte. 


licralb^^fcribunc, 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 

Approval World Shipbuilding’s Doldrums 

fe Seen for Even Koreans 

SEAT Pact 


f ^ 

/Cl~> i 


Mm. 18 
U=. ■ van 

TDM’ UUOTf 
. 3169 . 2599- 
biiw * UBS* 
3X339 290,19 

93*66 axes 
11325 303J9 

3722 19173* 


1BCU 0X419 19919 22992 67323 1*91*9. 2X99 . 446226 3X999. 171797 

...Vi^l SDR 2X757] 073515 2X2132' HA NA 1173 57X002 2J0H 219X64 

, r .- r . Closings In London cndZurlcti Hxlnos in other Europaon caotars. New York rotas of d PM. 

' r ' * .-(a) Commardal franc (blAmountanaaded to bu* ana pound (c) Amounts naadad to buy ona 
jr---- donor r> UnllaofieaOt) Unltsot lM0(y> UntteofHUK0N.Q. : not quoted; NA.:notomllabUL 
- "i.‘ (f) To bur one pound: stULL427 

■-■^'Oteear Mhr VaIbm 


VW Takeover 
Expected Soon 

By Warren Getler 

Jnicnatkmal Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Vdkswagen 
AG's supetvisoty board is expected 
on Friday to- clear the company’s 
plan to take over SEAT, toe un- 
profitable S panish automaker, this 
year, board officials disclosed 
Monday. 

A representative of one of VWs 
worker-councils, who is also on the 
supervisory board, said VW’s man- 
agement board informed worker 
representatives Monday of its 
plans to acquire a S 1-percent inter- 
est in SEAT this year, reflecting in 
part the desire to benefit from cer- 
tain tax provisions. 

The representative said manage- 
ment would ask the supervisory 
board on Friday to approve an 
agreement to purchase a majority 
interest in SEAT from INI, the 
government-owned holding com- 
pany, if two main conditions are 
mar that the S panish gov ernmen t 
absorb SEATs accumulated debt, 
estimated to be more than S2 bil- 
lion, and that it agree to cut several 
thousand jobs at SEAT over the 
next five years. 

The source said VW manage- 
ment had said Spain was prepared 
to meet both conditions as a means 
of fadh taring VW’s takeover, al- 
lhough details have to be worked 
out, particularly concerning the 
valuation of the company. 

A VW executive c onfir med that 
talks between VW and INI have 
reached an advanced stage and that 
“the management board would not 
press further toward signing an 
agreement without a vote of gener- 
al approval from the supervisory 
board.” 

Officials of the state of Lower 
Saxony, which owns a 20-percent 
interest in VW and has two repre- 
sentatives on the supervisory 
board, said they expected the board 
to approve VW’s takeover plans, 
despue possible resistance from 
trade umon and worker representa- 
tives who make up half of the 
board’s 20 members. 

Supervisory board decisions, 
particularly concerning major is- 
sues such as takeovers, are usually 
based on a unanimous show of 
hands. There is some probability, 
VW supervisory board sources in- 
dicated, that worker representa- 
tives will not vote in favor of the 
takeover plans but wiQ abstain 
from voting — allowing the negoti- 
ations to be conduded. 

The worker-council representa- 
tive said he and other council rep- 
resentatives would meet Thursday 
to develop a common stand an the 
takeover proposal. VW workers are 
concerned that production and fi- 
nal assembly of VWs Passat and 
Polo models might be shifted to 
Spain, squeezing out about 1,000 
jobs in West Gomany. 

He said VW management had 
indicated that a shift in certain pro- 
duction to Spain could eventually 
be compensated for in West Ger- 
many, but that details of how any 
such program might be carried out 
were unclear. 


Long Slump 

By Jonathan P. Hicks 

S rw York Times Service 

NEW YORK — When South 
Korea's major shipbuilders an- 
nounced layoffs of thousands of 
workers last week, ihey sent an 
alarming message to the other 
players in this industry: Even the 
world's most efficient shipyards 
are struggling. 

Thai the shipbuilding busi- 
ness, from Hamburg to Kobe, 
Japan, is hurting is no surprise. 
The industry has been reding for 
years. What is new is that the 
problems have reached the South 
Koreans, whose low materials 
cost and inexpensive labor are 
the envy of the industry. 

“You know thing s are in bad 
shape when the picture gets pret- 
ty bad for Japan and Korea, who 
together have about 70 percent 
of the worldwide market and are 
the price setters," said M. Lee 
Rice, president of the Shipbuild- 
ers Council of America. 

Almost no one in (he industry 
foresees a quick rumaroundL 
Some say that the situation could 
get worse, unless the world trade 
m oil and cargo picks up or the 
huge overcapacity in tonnage is 
shrunken. 

“Most people don't think 
there win be any significant im- 
provement in the world markets 
until 19% or so,” said Ken Pot- 
tmger, a spokesman for British 
Shipyards Ltd. in London. AD 
shipbuilders can do in the mean- 
time, most agree, is to streamline 
operations and to diversify, to 
become less dependent on the oil 
tankers and dry bulk carriers 
they have traditionally relied 
upon. 

Shipbuilders are paying the 
price for responding hurriedly to 
forecasts in the early 1970s of a 
dr ama tic need for vessels to 
transport Middle East oil, ac- 
cording to shipping experts. 
While they were speeding tanker 
construction, they also stepped 
up their budding of dry bulk ves- 
sels in expectation of a coal bo- 
nanza that did not occur. 

All this brought about overca- 
pacity of 35 percent to 40 percent 
and ship values that have 



The Hyundai shipyards in Ulsan, South Korea. 


plunged 15 percent just in the 
last year. 

In the last three years. South 
Korean shipbuilders have priced 
their output far below their cost 
of materials, Mr. Rice said. He 
added that the price competition 
had farther depressed U.S. and 
European yards. 

“We now have essentially zero 
in the area of commercial orders 
in the United States,” Mr. Rice 
said. ‘There are now maybe five 
commercial ships being built, 
whereas there were 66 being built 
in 1980. It's not a very positive 
scene." 

In the last four years, 25 ofl 10 
U.S. shipyards were closed, in- 
cluding General Dynamics 
Corp.'s shipyard in Quincy, 
Massachusetts, last July. Anoth- 
er 35 American yards may close 
within the next four years. 

The situation is as grim else- 
where. “Tbe shipyards in most 
European countries are suffering 
from a lack of work,” said Wer- 
ner Fame, director of the Ham- 
burg-based German Shipbuild- 
ing Industry Association and 
also director of the Western Eu- 
ropean Shipbuilders Associa- 
tion. 

Employment in West German 


shipyards has declined to 45,000, 
from 57,000 in 1982. In Britain, 
four major shipyards have been 
dosed in the last five years. “Al- 
though they have work to keep 
them busy until sometime next 
year, they're not profitable,” said 
John M. Pullen, another spokes- 
man for British Shipbuilders. 
“And I don't think there is a 
single shipyard in the world that 
is operating profitably." 

Perhaps the most notable evi- 
dence of the industry’s decline 
came in August, when Japan's 
Sanko Steamship Co„ one of the 
world's largest operators of oil 
tankers, applied for court protec- 
tion from creditors, reporting 
outstanding debts equivalent to 
about S22 billion. Also in Japan, 
winch is tbe world's leading ship- 
builder, Hitachi Zosen Corp. 
said it would reduce its work 
force by almost 30 percent, to 
12,000. in 1987. 

The South Koreans, led by 
Hyundai Heavy Industries Ltd., 
Daewoo Shipbuilding & Heavy 
Machinery Ltd., a unit of 
Daewoo Industrial Co., and 
Samsung Heavy Industries Co., 
remain optimistic. Still their or- 
(Conthmed on Page 20, CoL 1) 


Japan Rebuffs EC on Import Targets 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — The Japanese gov- 
ernment Monday officially rejected 
a request from the European Com- 
munity that Japan announce spe- 
cific, quantifiable targets for in- 
creased imports to offset its trade 
surplus. 

European officials had called the 
impart targets tbe most important 
issue in daylong minisiexial-levd 
talks Monday between the Europe- 
an. economic bloc and Japan. 

Foreign Minister Shin taro Abe 
of Japan said after the meetings: 
“Since Japan bases itself funda- 
mentally on a free-market system, 
we cannot indicate any planned 
numbers for exports or imports." 

But he said the Japanese tide 
“had ma de dear that Japan itself is 


concerned about the huge trade 
surplus." 

European officials have criti- 
cized continuing Japanese trade 
surpluses with the EC and have 
called for quantifiable ways to 
measure the success of Japanese 
efforts to reduce the trade imbal- 
ance. 

According to European figures, 
Japan’s trade surplus with the EC 
in 1984 exceeded S12 billion and is 
expected to rise further this year. 

Willy de Clercq, head of the Eu- 
ropean delegation, said after the 
meeting: “We are interested in con- 
crete results and so far these con- 
crete results have not been forth- 
coming. We think further action is 
necessaty.” 

He said the response to the Euro- 


Bonn, London Resist EC Monetary Move 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 16 

Page 15 


U.K. Employers 
Call on Thatcher 
To Alter Policy 


HARROGATE, England — The 
head of Britain's employers' orga- 
nization called on the government 
Monday to cut interest rates and 
stop using the exchange rate of the 
pound to control inflation. 

Sir Terence Beckett, director- 
general of the Confederation of 
British Industry, said British com- 
panies were having to shoulder in- 
creased costs to pay the price for 
problems in the economy as a 
whole. 

The approach adopted by Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher’s gov- 
ernment “concentrates the trans- 
mission of policy directly onto ex- 
porting companies and those 
competing with imports,'’ he said 
at the CBI’s annual conference, at- 
tended by 800 business leaders. 

Sir Terence said wage restraint 
offered a better solution. He called 
on British industry to do away with 
automatic annual pay rises and in- 
creases unrelated to higher output. 

“We are paying ourselves in- 
creases that are completely out of 
line with those paid in Germany, 
Japan and America,” be said. “If 
we go on this way more exports will 
be barred to us." 

Sir Terence urged the govern- 
ment to give lower priority to tax 
cuts it is considering in the 1986 
budget and use the money to ease 
unemployment, currently 13.5 per- 
cent of the work force. 

On Sunday, the CBI published a 
report calling on the government to 
spend £1 billion ($1.42 billion) to 
fight unemployment. The docu- 
ment mainiain< that building im- 
provements, inner-city develop- 
ment and training programs could 
provide work to 350.000 of Brit- 
ain's 3.25 million unemployed 
within a few years. 

During her six years in office, 
Mrs. Thatcher has consistently 
viewed special pleading from the 
CBI with skepticism. 

At the conference, leaders of the 
confederation said that wage rises, 
now averaging 5 percent to 7 per- 
cent annually, must be cut by two 
percentage points to stem the dete- 
rioration of Britain's competitive 
position. They said exchange-rate 


fluctuations damaged the country's 
cost competitiveness by 10 percent 
in the second quarter of 1985. 

But industry sources said many 
businessmen were not overly 
alarmed by the CBI's arguments, in 
the face of predictions that profits 
of British industry were likely to 
rise by an average of 10 percent in 
1986 — 15 percent in some sectors. 

Industries with the best pros- 
pects for profit growth in 1986 in- 
clude building materials, mechani- 
cal engineering, brewing, health 
and household products, leisure, 
newspapers and publishing. 


U.S. Factories 5 
Operating Rate 
Fell in October 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — The op- 
erating rate at U.S. factories 
edged down again in October, 
the fifth month in the last six in 
which the measure has 
dropped, the Federal Reserve 
Board reported Monday. 

It said that U-S. plants, mines 
and utilities operated at 80.2 
percent of capacity last month, 
down almost 1 percentage point 
from the level of a year ago. 

For October, the operating 
rate at manufacturing plants 
edged down to 80.1 percent of 
capacity from a September level 
of 803 percent, partly because 
of a strike at Chrysler Corp. 

Meanwhile, in New York, the 
Conference Board forecast that 
U.S. gross national product 
would grow 33 percent in 1986, 
up from an estimated 2.1 per- 
cent in 1985. 

The business group's eco- 
nomic forum predicted that in- 
flation would rise to 4.2 percent 
from 3.6 percent but that unem- 
ployment would drop to 6.8 
percent by the end of 1 986 from 
7 percent at the end of 1985. 

(AP. Reuters) 


Trade futures 


pean request that Japan set targets 
for manufactured goods and pro- 
cessed agricultural products “was a 
negative one, and we have to reflect ; 
on that. It was a very dear re - 1 
sponse." 

Mr. Abe said the Japanese side 
had responded to the European re- 
quest by saying the “action pro- ; 
gram" of domestic market-opening 
measures announced by Japan in 
July “contains numerous elements 
not easily quantifiable in terms of 
effects, and therefore Japan would 1 
not be able To comply with the 
request of the European Communi- 
ty.” 

Mr. de Gercq, the EC commis- 
sioner for external relations qnd 
trade policy, said the EC would not 
abandon the idea of an import goal 
because the community considered 
it worthwhile. 


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Reuters 

BRUSSELS — The British and 
West German finance ministers 
tried Monday to torpedo plans to. 
enshrine monetary cooperation in a 
rewritten treaty for the European 
Community, diplomats said. 

They said the British and West 
German representatives at a meet- 
ing of EC finance ministers were 
openly hostile to a plan by Jacques 
Ddors, president of the executive 
Commission, to add a chapter on 
monetaty integration to the treaty. 

The British and West German 
delegates reportedly feared the 
move could lead to a loss of nation- 
al authority. 

Bat Mr. Ddors*s ideas gained 


support from France, Italy and 
smaller member countries includ- 
ing Belgium and Luxembourg. 

A senior delegate said Britain's 
chancellor of the Exchequer, Nigel 
Lawson, tried to block further dis- 
cussion erf the proposals by invok- 
ing tbe “supremacy” erf finance 
ministers in monetary affairs. 

The West German finance min- 
ister, Gerhard Stoltenberg, was 
also critical of tbe Delons plan, re- 
flecting a stance outlined to him 
last week by Kari-Otto Pfihl, head 
of the Bundesbank, diplomats said. 

Diplomats said EC foreign min- 
isters could look into the monetary 
plans Tuesday when they hold a 
special meeting on revamping the 


community treaty ahead of a sum- 
mit in Luxembourg on Dec. 2 and 

Proposals on monetaty coopera- 
tion, together with plans to stream- 
line community decision-making, 
to eliminate internal trade barriers 
by 1992 and to encourage joint for- 
eign policies, are due for decision at 
the Luxembourg summit. 

Mr. Ddors last month suggested 
that the long-stated endeavor to 
strengthen the European Monetary 
System and to create a European 
Monetary Fund taking the role of a 
joint central bank, be written into a 
revised treaty replacing the ECs 
o riginal 1957 constitution. 





We are pleased to announce that 

EMIL GLUDOVACZ 

Vice President 


GUNTER GER AUER 

have joined our corporation 


dMIJilHI* 

nil 


,L 

ZURICH OFFICE at 
Bahnhofstrasse 67 

As one of Japan’s ojdest and largest securities 
companies, we provide you with our comprehensive 
services as broker, dealer, underwriter and distributor. 

(JSAKAYA 

sSSSStSSm ZURICH OFFICE 
Bahnhofstrasse 67, 8001 Zurich, Switzerland 
Telephone; (01) 211-2222, 2246, 2269 
Telex: 614282 OSA CH 
Chief Representative: Mr. Kazuma Yasuda 










** 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


AT&T 

VOL 

74903 

High Low 

22% Hft 

Lost 

22% 

On, 

+ % 

FardM 

19204 

54ft 

53 ft 

54 ft 

+ w 

AMSenn 

17412 

14936 

13ft 

47% 

12% 

45% 

13ft 

47V, 

+i% 

AMDtO 

15769 

31% 

31% 

31% 

+9% 

AGnl wt 

13796 

13tt 

12% 

13 

- ft 

EastAlr 

13173 

6% 

6 

6ft 

— % 

GMat 

12799 

n% 

70% 

71% 

+■1% 

IBM 

11003 138% 

136% 

138% 

+lft 

BeatCo 

10465 

46% 

46ft 

46% 

- ft 

Kmart 

Saar, 

GcnEI 


34% 

37tt 

65% 

33% 

36ft 

64 

34% 

I7V< 

65% 

+ ft 
+1 

+1V* 

AmEtf 

8225 

40% 

47ft 

4% 

+ ft 

BoxtTr 

8158 

14V* 

14 

14ft 

- ft 


Dow Jones Averoges 


I ndus 

Trans 

Util 

Cornu 


Open Hlgti Low Close cang 

143X36 1447J2S 142235 1440X3 + 4.93 

*03X7 607.30 676X3 MlXO —MS 

1*5X* 1*6X3 163X3 IOSJ4 — 0LS2 

579.17 58179 S7A15 580X1 +0.19 


NYSE index 


Comoosi ip 
I ndus Trials 
Trams. 
Utilities 

Finance 


HM Low Close cmoe 
UAH ll-UK 11453 +0.1* 
TOTS 130J7 13135 +0JT 
109.22 lOLdl IWXS — 0.58 
»3S 39,1a S9J3 — 0X2 
12163 12120 12163 +021 


Dow Jones Bond Averoges 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Close 

61.20 

79X8 

szn 


Cbtt* 
+ 0X8 
+ 03 
— 022 


NYSE Diaries 


Close 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
Volume un 
Volume dawn 


W 

897 

3*0 

HH9 

100 

U 


739 

848 

469 

3046 

120 

18 


55X24X20 

40X19X30 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


NOV. IS . 
Nov. 14 . 
Nov. 13 . 
Nov. 12. 
Nov. 11 . 


'Included In the salea Bourns 


Bay Sates 
2M529 511117 
301099 4*9254 
166405 519.901 
25*218 597XOA 
2010*8 411337 


•SJlYt 


1JB5 

1447 

7X25 

31667 


iVlonda^ 

NISE 

dosing 


Vd.at4P.M- 


101340X06 
WHAM* I 


Prw.4PJH.raL~ 

Pre* consolidated dose 155,461440 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Won street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


One Pre*. 


sssw : 

¥3 « 

Naw+flatH 
New Lows. 
VohntrwwP 

Volume dawn 


275 

309 

244 

1 

1824X90 

1529.1*4 


2*9 

270 

8Z7 

24 

11 



commit* 
litdirfrioli 
P (nance 
Insurance 

Utilities 

Bonn 

TranfiP. 


C*** CBW 2«S 

HiSffiS 

+ fS SaS sw-72 

piiSigi 

+0JD2.3S7J5 329 JO 


Standard & Poor's tndex 


industrials 

Tramp. 

UtlllHag 

Finance 

Cammslle 


High LOW OeM Ciw 
WIG t 219X9 220X4 +U8 
T^TS 17744 178^ 

B7J9 8i» 87X» — D3D 
2US 33JB 2199 4-5.16 
19B71 197J1 19871 +0X0 


Astro fc 

DomeP. 

BAT IB 

tt qyWV 

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98 85ft A/ol PfCl I 75 12.1 
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720 15ft 15ft 15ft + ft 
311 17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 
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150 15 144* 144*— ft 

315 2* Hi 244 b 25 — ft 
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493 40ft 39ft 40 —ft 
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181 37ft 36ft 364,— ft 
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Dow Rises to Another Record 


United Press International 

NEW YORK. — The stock market dosed 


the fixed-income m ar k«, the stock market 
should continue to hold up,” be said. 

George Pirrone of Dreyfus Corp. cited 


mixed on contracting volume Monday but the strength in the auto issues and in IBM as 
Dow Jones industrial average advanced to a positive factors. 

new high. The Dow rose 4.9 3 to 1 ,440.02, edging AT&T was the most active NYSE-listed is- 
past its previous high of 1,439.22 set Thursday, sue, adding 34 to 22H. 

The blue-chip index moved higher in the last Ford followed, rising % to 54%. Last week 
hour of trading, after vacillating from plus to Ford's beard authorized the purchase of up to 
minus territory through most of the session. 20 million additional shares of its common 
Traders said several buy and sell programs stock. General Motors rose IK to 72% and 
related to stock index futures contracts contrib- Chrysler added 4 to 4434. 
uted to the Dow's seesaw pattern. Phillips Petroleum was third, unchanged at 

Broader market indicators also advanced, but 13ft. 
not enough to surpass the records set last Thurs- Among other actively traded bine chips. Al- 

day. The New York Slock Exchange index rose iied-Signai advanced 1% to 46%, Sears jumped 
0.19 to 1 14.55 and the price of an average share % to 37Va, General Electric added 1% to 65%, 
rose 6 cents. American Express edged np 14 to 48 and Wes- 

Dec lines outpaced advances ? 23-727 among ringhouse Electric rose % to 4414. 
the 2,029 issues traded at 4 P.M. and Big Board In technology issues, IBM advanced 1% to 
volume totaled 1 08.36 million shares, down 138%, Digital Equipment rose 2Vk to 119 and 
from 130.24 million Friday. Cray Research added l l A to 6546. In the semi- 

“The market is just experiencing some more conductor sector, Texas Instruments rose % to 
consolidation after its rather meteoric rise," 99ft. 

said William Raftery of Smith Barney, Harris In media and entertainment issues. Capital 
Uphara. "It’s probably overextended and ripe Gties Communications, which jumped 1546 last 
for some profit-taking,'' he said. week partly on the strength of several analysts' 

Mr. Raftery said despite strength in the bond recommendations, fell 1% to 214. Viacom rose 
market, the equity investor appears more pre- 246 to 56V£. 

pared to take profits than to take new positions. Claire's Stores dropped 2ft to 8ft. It reported 
He said thinner volume indicates that the mar- lower third-quarter earnings, 
ket may be drifting lower because of a lack of Gap Inc. moved up ft to 55ft. It reported 
buyers rather than any dramatic rise in selling third-quarter earnings of $1 .54 a share versus 51 
pressure. cents. 

Thomas Ryan Jr. of Kidder Peabody said the Dana Corp. jumped 2 to 26ft. The company 
fixed-income market's strong performance said it wfl] repurchase as many as six milli on of 
helped curb aggressive selling. He said the mar- its shares. 

keL's tone and psychology remained construe- Manhattan National fell 146 to 9ft. An invest-' 

ment advisor issued a negative report on the 


nve. 


"Until we get some pronounced weakness in company. 


5b. 

IQSt HJoh Low 


□me 
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1X8 

X0 

2X0 

Z10 

.10 

X0 


11 
20 
IX 9 


3X 9 
15 11 
9.1 7 

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IX 11 
25 ia 
47 18 
17 13 
7X 8 


32 19ft Calnxrt 
15ft 12 Comm I 

26 15ft CRLkg 
Sft 3ft CmpRa 

46ft 30ft CotnSpi ITS 
15ft lift CdPocs 
22ft 17ft CanPEO 
228ft 151 CapCIt, 

27ft 19ft CapHdl 
12ft 9 Caring g 
40ft 27 1 * Carlisle 

277, lift Co no Ft 

30ft 24 CorPw 

48 29ft CarTec 

lift 6ft Carrol 
26ft 17ft CarPIrs .. . 

31 22ft CartHw 172 
46ft 24ft CartWI Xfl 
18ft 12ft CascNG 170 
162, 9V* CastICk 
ffift 15ft CstiCpf lX8k 
15ft 12 CitICpF .90 &1 

39ft 28H CotmT 50 IJ 

29 19ft Coca SO 2.9 11 

133ft 74ft Celanse 4X0 36 11 

44ft 36 Cekin pf 450 1117 

lift, 7ft Cenov mu 5 23 
451, 341* Cenlel 278 57 10 

261, 20ft Con rex 75 IX 10 

27 20ft CenSaW 2X2 7X 7 

31ft 23 ConHud 2 St, 10* 6 

4* 37 C/I I LI pf 450 10X 

21ft 14', CnllPS 1X4 85 11 

29ft 20ft CnLaEI U» 7 

37 3141 CLaE lot 4.18 12X 

13ft 9ft CeMPw lx» 10X108 

21ft 16ft CVIPS 1.90 95 6 

lift 2ft Control 

12ft g>* CfitryTl 

23 17ft Cenvlll 

28ft 19ft Crt-teed 

30ft left CessAIr 

25ft 19 Oirnoln 

27ft 22 Chmlpf 170 49 

54ft 4*ft Cbm I pf 4X0 SX 

9ft 7ft ChomSp X0 46 15 
4ft I vlOtrtC 
Ift ft vICht wl 

4ft 1ft viChrtpf 

637, 41ft Chase 3X0 67 5 

SO Chase pf 575 106 

56ft 51ft Chase pf 655011X 
56ft Sift Chase pf BX3o149 


230 19ft 19 19ft— ft 

817 11914 118ft 118ft— ft 
32 S 4ft 5 
995 61ft *1 61ft + ft 
37 3241 32ft 32ft— ft 
170 54ft 54ft 54ft— ft 
23 7 1ft 1ft 
209 63ft 61ft 
10 lift lift 
305 17ft 17ft 
652 51ft 50ft 
113 26ft 26 

58 20ft 20' _ 

21 15ft Mft 

4.1 10 *0*7 28ft 27ft _ 

42 2 166 165 166 +1 

37 11 43 30ft 30ft 30ft + ft 

222 425 8ft 8’A Sft— ft 
35 107 26ft 26 26 — ft 

14 1954 15ft 14% IS 
2X 4 2352 24ft 23ft 24 +1 

242 53ft 52ft 53V, + % 

59 19ft 19 19ft— ft 

99 32ft 31ft 32% +lft 
18 13% 1 3ft 13ft— ft 

257 231* 22% 23ft— ft 
2B7 2ft 2% 2ft + ft 
2S 14 503 45ft 44ft 45ft + ft 
831 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
8 20ft 20ft 20ft— ft 
155 215 212ft 214 —1ft 
482 25ft 24% 25V* 

23 9ft 9ft 9ft— V* 

88 30ft 29ft 30% + ft 
159 Z7V* 26ft 26ft— ft 

1311 28ft 2Bft 28ft— Vt 

100 31ft 31 31 — Vi 

161 7% 6% 7 

50 24ft 24k, 24ft— ft 
70 28% 28ft 28ft— ft 

126 46ft 46 4£ft + ft 
339 16ft 16ft 16ft— ft 
907 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
2*6 27% 26% 26ft— Vt 
463 14% 14ft Mft 
2393 38ft 37ft 38ft— ft 
3 28 28 28 - ft 

289 132ft 131ft 132ft + ft 
3 44ft 44ft 44ft 
239 8ft 8ft 8ft— ft 
763 45ft 44ft 45% + ft 
348 35 24 24 —1% 

63« 24ft 25ft 25% — ft 
164 28% 27% 27% — ft 
2Mta 43 42ft 42ft— % 
289 19% 19% 19ft— ft 
441 26% 26% 26% 

2* 35ft 34ft 34% — ft 
85 13 12% 13 

3s 2D mu -m 
510 4% 4% 4ft 

129 12% 12% 12% + ft 

101 17% 17ft 17ft— % 

89 25 24ft 24% 

7 30% 29% 29% — ft 

1234 23% 22% 22% 

45 24% 24ft 24ft— ft 

22 52% 5! 52ft— % 

250 m 8% 8% — ft 

XO 2% 2ft 2ft 

21 % S ft 

97 2% 2% 2% + % 

1256 60% *0% 60ft + % 
1*3 49ft 49% 49%— ft 

24 55% 55ft 55% — % 
7 52ft 52ft 52ft— ft 
1? 23% 23ft 23% 


X0 *7 9 
2X0 117 a 
.1 U 9 
jor 28 
52 27 


24 16% Che line .72 3X 10 

32ft 2«ft Chemed 152 5.1 13 1148x3m, 29% 30 + ft 

44% 31 QimNY 2X8 67 5 2183 40V, 39ft 40ft + ft 

44ft 30ft OlNYpf 1X7 A7 8 40 39ft 39ft + ft 

Soft 51% OlNYpf 4X8e 7X 30 55ft 55 35ft— ft 

55ft 49ft ChNY Pf 4X7e 7X 120 55 54% 55 + % 

39% 33 Chewk 17* XX 13 66 36ft 36 36ft + ft 

£5 H 13 *2ft 41% 42% + % 

2X0 67 10 2204 38% 381* 38ft + % 
^ ^ 70 _22 140% U0 . 140ft + % 

741 10 263 


14 


44V* 31 CheiPn 
40ft 29ft Chevm 
200 124 ChlMlw 

29ft 16% ChIPnT 
lift 7ft ChkFull 
58ft 31 ChrlsCr 

13% 7ft Chrlstn 

17% 9ft Chroma 

79 44ft Chrm of 10X0k 

45 25ft Chrvsir 1X0 22 

54ft 30% Chubb S 

67% 50ft Chubb pf 423 6X 

20% 13ft Church S X4 2J 15 2844 

lift 5% Chvron .10 IX 25 122 

27ft 21 Cikorp 

51 40 CinBell 

19% 13% ClnGE 
34% 27% CWGPf 
75% 60 CinGPl 
75% 61ft CinGPl 
77 60% ClnG Pt 

26% 15% ClnMJI 
24% 19ft Ch-dKs 
31 18% ClrCIlv 

30% 15 Circus 
5134 34ft CIHcrp 276 5X 

84% 70 alien pf 77S» 97 

Sft AM ClnWr 72 <X 

19ft 6% CJalrS, 

32ft 23% Clark 6 

14 8% CtavHs 

22V- l*% civCII 


272 BX 10 
3.120 67 8 
2.16 117 7 
4X0 HX 
970 127 
978 127 
952 1ZX 
72 19 


.10 


.10 

1.10 


1X0 


XO 

X0 

2.96 


170 


45 

11 

5.7 11 

21ft 19ft avcipf 2X0 95 
23% 18ft CievEI 2X4 117 7 
64!* 54% Civ El pf 756 127 
14% 8 CJW* JW 
17ft 10 Clvpk Of 1.11 
18ft 9 Uvpkpf .921 
46ft 27% aorok ' 

26% 14ft CJubMd 
39'* 25'/i Clue ttP 
24ft l&ft CluatPf 

2ift 9% coachm 
36ft 16% Coasti » 

80% 59V, CocaCI 
21% 10', Coleeo 

32% 2 S’* Colemn 

33% 22% ColsPal 176 
49% «ft ColoP Pf A2S 
17% 16% CalAlk S X0 
16% 9 Co IF 05 .12 

37, 35% col Pen 1X0 
65ft 50 Coltlnd 250 
« 26ft CalGas 3.18 
50 45ft Cold pf 5.12 10X 
a 1 * 25 CSOpf 3X5 
21ft 17ft CSOpf 2X2 11.1 

in in csopIouts 140 

114 102% CSOpf nl575 14X 

soft 34% Camnin 216 47 
pvi 23ft CmbEn 1« 35 
74kf 8 Comoll JD .9 II 
19ft 15V, Com Mil J4 
gft 8ft Comdr* 

MJk 26. CmwE 
32ft 26% CnE of 

JK? C “ E 

18% IS'* CvuEdI 

107% 89% CwEpf 11,70 1QX 
7*V« 62ft CwE Dl 178 113 
24% »% CwE pf 277 9X 


319 23% 23% 23ft— ft 
a Vt 7ft 7% 

21 54 53% 53% — % 

39 10% 10% 10% 

649 17 16ft 17 + % 

539 76% 76 76% 

7789 45ft 44% 44% + ft 

432 53% 52% 52ft— % 

285 67 66% 66% — % 

‘ 18% 17% 17ft— % 

7% 7% 7ft 

Bto25% 25 25% — % 

54 SR, 50% 50% — % 

868 19% 18% 19% — % 

1I0B 34 34 34 +1 

12W 75% 74% 75% +11* 

33ta 75% 75% 75% + % 

2«»t 76% 76% 76% 

306* 18% 17% 18ft + % 

2340 19ft 191* 19% + % 

270 22% 22 22% + % 

491 15% 25 25% + % 

4160 45ft 44% 45% + % 
7 77ft 77ft 77ft- ft 
694 8ft 7% 8 +1 

1.1 IB 5819 10% 8% Bft— £Vi 
1236 25% 34% 24% — ft 

102 13% 12% 13 +ft 
95 17% 17% 17% — ft 
90 20% 20ft 20V#- ft 
1044 23% 23% 23% - % 
1350163% 61ft 62 —ft 
93 8% 7% 7%— % 
1 lift lift 11% -ft 

22 9% 9ft 9ft- % 
176 Z9 14 602 46ft 45% 46% 

70b IX 18 20% 20% 20ft 
IJ® 25 » 2469 39ft 39ft 39ft +. ft 

1X0 41 12 26% 24% 24% — ft 

‘ 15 14 200 11% 11% 11%— ft 

17 12 1963 36% 33% 34ft— % 

3.7 16 5494 79% 79% 79% + % 

1363 19% 19 19ft— ft 

47 19 151 SW* 28% 28% + ft 

45 4$ 2095 33% 30 30% + ft 

9X 1002 47 47 47 — % 

3X 9 347 27% 26ft 27 -ft 

9 1672 13% 13% 13% — ft 

4.1 10 217 33% 33% 33% — % 

153 63% 63ft 63ft- % 

483 37ft 36% 37% — ft 

300 49% 49% 49% + ft 

12 27% 27% 27% — % 

6 21% 21% 21% + ft 

1 tel 09 109 109 —1 

407109 109 109 + % 
283 50% 47ft 50ft + % 
350 29ft 28% 28% 

764 24% 23ft 23ft— % 
151 19% 18% 19 — % 
3034 10ft 9% 10% + % 
6856 28% 28% 28% + % 
1 28% 28% 2B%— ft 
49 >7% 17% 17ft + % 
S IB 17% 18 
2500x108% 108% 108% +1% 
Iflr 74 74 74 + % 

142 24% 24% 24% + ft 


4X 

ax 


3X0 104 
1X2 4.9 
1X0 UX 
2X0 11.1 


l.» 13 
7 


12 Month 
HUiUM Stock 


wv. no. pe 


lb. 

1 06# High Low 


CteM 

OuotChe# 


26ft 23ft CwE pf 2X7 11X 

3M% 22ft ComES 252 U 7 

38ft 23 Comsat 170 

35% 23ft CP JVC 78 

XO 



15 


1X0 
1X0 

2X0 

15% 12ft Conroe X0 
38 27ft ConsEd 2X0 
47ft 36ft ConEpf 4X5 
50 41ft ConEpf 5X0 10J 
37% 26ft CniFri 1.10 II 12 
47% 38% CraNG 232 5.1 10 
8% 4ft ConsPw 
31% 19 CnPpfA 4.16 13X 
34% 20ft CnP pfB 450 13.1 
54% 33% CnP PfD 7X5 135 
56 32% CnP pfE 772 14X 

31% 15% CnPprV 4X0 147 
25% 14 CnP PTU 3X0 14J 
28% 14% CnPprT 378 145 
S5ft 34% CnPpfH 7X8 137 
28ft 14ft CnPprR 4X0 147 
28!* 14% CnP prP 3X8 145 
28ft 14% CnPwN 3X5 145 
lift 10% CnPprM250 145 

17 9ft CnPprL 223 13X 

29 15% CnPprS 4X2 14.1 

18 10ft CnP prK 2X3 14X 

47ft 31% CnHCp 2X0 5X 40 
10ft 41, Conll II 

4ft % Con II I rt 

53% 33% Cnllllpf 

2 % CtllHkl 

14ft 4 Cntlnfo 

24% 20% Control 
38ft 15ft CtDala 
40% 32 CnDtpf 
1% % vlCoakU 

39% Z7ft Conor 152 3X 16 1 
41ft 31ft Coop i pf 2X0 77 
20% 14% CoprTr X0 27 9 

27ft 15 Coopvls .40 15 17 

15ft 8% Copwld 721 

23ft 17 Cpwldpf 2X8 138 
27% 17V, Cor dura X4 3X 15 

15ft 11 Comm 56 47 11 

56% 32ft CamGs 12B 27 24 I 
58ft 27ft CorBIk 1.00 17 78 
10ft 5ft CntCrd 74r ZX 15 

11 6 Craig 13 

37% 32 Crone 1X06 43 11 _ 

66V* 23 CravR* 32 2 

19% 17ft CrcfcN pf 2.18 115 
53ft 49% CrckN Pf 189e 7 X 
24 18% CrmpK 170 57 12 

79% 43ft CrwnCk 
44% 28% CrwZel 1X0 
S3 44 CrZelpf 4X3 

65ft 50% CrZel PfC450 
20% 18ft CrvsBn 
35% 22% Culbro X0 23 16 
33% 13 Cullnels 

88% 58ft CumEn 270 ... 

11 9% Currlnc l.lDdlai 

37% Tsm CurtW 170 17 18 

52ft 33% Cyclops 1.10 23 B 


5 26% 26ft 26ft 

12 28% Mft M%— ft 

4X 9 113 30% 29ft 2%*— 1 

1.1 17 1894 25 24ft 24ft— ft 

27 9 10 27 26% 26ft— ft 

13 215 29 28% 28% — ft 

1351 11% 11 11% + % 

436 40% 39ft 40% + % 

22 18% 18% 1B% — ft 

27 32% 32ft 32%— ft 

96x 14% 14ft 14% + ft 

1062 35ft 35% 35% 

1 001.x 47% 46 47% +lft 

» 48% 48 48% 4 % 

262 36ft 35 3S%— Ift 

283 45% 44% 45% + % 

3SJ8 8 7ft 8 + ft 

df«SJ% 30% 30% 

I2te 34% 34 34% 

500i 55 54 55 +1 

2001 55 55 55 


25 15 
KX 13 
BX 10 
2X IB 
67 8 
9X 


+ % 


102 30 29ft 38 . _ 

214 Sft 24% 25ft + % 

149 26ft 25ft 26ft + % 

20502 56 55ft 56 +1 

87 27% 26% 27ft + ft 

24 27% 27 27% 


+ ft 
! + ft 


26ft 26ft 26% . _ 
17% 17ft 17ft— % 

16 15ft 16 

28% 27 aft+lft 

17 ,6%,*% 


46% 46% 
7ft 7% 


7%— 


1X0 77 
-701 

450 127 


25 

BX 

77 


13 


3X 9 


h 

i% 

53 

ft 

5 

+ 

l 

I 

13ft 

73% 

13% 

+ 

ft 

■tv 

I/ft 

lBMi 

+ 

% 



“ft 


% 


av, 

av* 


+ 

tt 

18V, 

18 

IB 

— 

ft 

j.' 1 '1 

26ft 

26% 

+ 

Mi 

ITJU 

9+4 

10 



KtJB 

18 

18 

+ 

Mi 

pj L . T 

24% 

24% 


tt 

pva 

11% 

54ft 

&. 


% 

tt 

58ft 

57% 

57% 



% 

9ft 

9 

9V, 

— 

tt 

9% 

9% 

9V, 

+ 

V, 


30% 

38% 



X- 

64ft 

65% 

+1% 

ic 

18% 

18% 

+ 

% 


52ft 

52% 




22ft 

av* 

+ 

% 

■*> 

79% 

82% 

+3% 


40% 

40ft 

— 

V t 

■71,. 

Bft 

52ft 

— 

tt 

Hr 

61 tt 

61% 

+ 

% 

,.,VT 

20ft 

20ft 

— 

ft 

35 

35 

35 



17% 

16% 

17% 

+11* 


71% 

72% 

+ 

% 

|R_| 

10% 

IlMh 

— 

Mi 

frjVl 

36ft 

37% 

+ 

% 

Lltil 

48ft 

48% 

+ 

% 


Oft 15ft Dallas M 4X 30 102 16% 16% Ttf%— % 

14% 9ft DaRxmC 70 15 85 14 13% 13ft — ft 

30% 22ft DanaCp 178 47 I 6501 27 24ft 27 +2% 

9% 5% Danohr 7 113 7% 7% 7% + ft 

6ft Daniel .18b 25 73 7ft 7% 7ft 

27ft DarlKrs 156 3X 13 2315 40 39% 39ft + ft 


15 

42 

7* 

5% 

lift 

a 


74 

74 

X2 


31 DotaGn 

4 Datptn 

6% DlaDso 

45k. 29% DaytHd 

20% 15 DavtPL 2X0 107 

66% 55ft DPLpf 770 11X 

40% 24% DecmFd 56 IX 18 

33% 24ft Deere 1X0 37 40 

26% 20% DelirtP 1.92 7X 10 

52ft 36ft DellaAr 1X0 25 7 

10 4ft Deltona 
44ft 24% D IxCIIS 

28% 20ft DensMI 

37% 31ft DeSolo 

17% 14 Dei Ed 

SO 64 DelEpf 9J2 I1X 

*8% 54% OWE pf 7X8 11.1 

66% 31% OetEpf 7X5 J7J 


1X4 2X 19 
170 57 13 
1X0 41 11 
1XS 10X 7 


77* 117 

275 105 

374 11X 

3.13 12X 

112 I IX 
775 107 
140 I2X 


33% 24% 
21 14% 

38% 34ft 
22% 19% 
II 6ft 


170 

1X0 


.12 

2X4 

X6 

1.16 

170 


7 A 14 
3 


66 52 De IE 

24% 23 DE pfF 

28% 23, DEprR 

27ft 21ft DE ptQ 

27% 221* DEnfP 

25% 22ft DE pfB 

29ft 24 DEPtO 

29% 241* DEPfM 142 11X 

33% a DEprL 400 12X 

34% 29 DE PtK 412 125 

'M%107 DE otJ 15*8 117 
a% 16% DelEpr 278 UX 

24 18% Dexter X0 35 13 

IW* lift DiGtcr M Un 

27% 21ft DiGioof X8 3J 

IGJoot 275 7X 
lams 157T10X 
laShpf 4X0 11J 
iaSOf nlXOe &X 
7kmaCP 30 If t 
31% Diebids 1X0 
125% 85ft Digital 

Btthrr 

10% S? Dome'g 

3»issgsa 

61% Donley 

25 5 orsev 

42% 32% Dover 

3»% 27 DcnvCh 

s. 

24% 17% Dresr 

21% 16ft DrexB 

73% 35 drevtu, 

63% 46% duPart 

s MV. duPntPf 350 97 

Pt «0 ?X 

S% DukeP 2X0 7X 

85% 70% Dukepf 8J0 10X 

55% 65 Dukepf STD 10X 

2 SIS DufcPOf 7X0 105 

M% 30ft Dukepf 3X5 105 

83ft 60 Durfird 270 -- 

17% 14ft DuaLI Ui 125 

13 Ouapf 1X7 11X 
TV# 3ft Duapf 2X0 12.1 
18 14% DuqprK 2.10 11X 

20ft 15ft Duqpr 271 12X 

2K, H 1 * Duqpr 175 10J 

*2% 51 DiMRt 770 111 

27% 20ft OvnAm jo J 12 


45 20B5 43V, 41% 41ft— 1 
487 5% 5ft 5ft— % 

1* 9 40 6% Oft -6ft 

IX 9 1*2 18 17% 17ft— % 

IX 18 2293 43ft 42ft 42ft— ft 
- - 8 1357 19% 19% 19% + % 
350z 66 65 65 —1 

1M 39% 39ft 39% — ft 
887 27% 26% 27 — % 
113 26 25% 26 + % 

1588 38% 38% 38% 

72 8% 8 8V, — % 

220 43ft 42% 43 — I* 
64 23ft 23 23% + % 

64 33% 33% 33% + % 
1701 15% 15ft 15% + % 
i3oib 78 a a +ift 
56501 69ft 67% 69ft +lft 
1Mb U 66 66 + % 

17207*6 *5 66, +1% 

27 26fc 26% 26% 

45 27% 27ft 27% + % 
17 27% a 26 — % 

16 26% 26% 26% + V, 

17 25% 25ft 25ft 
24 28% 28% 28ft— % 
66 28% 28% 28% 

19 31% 31% 31ft— % 
24 32% 32% ,32% + 4t 

114% 114% 114% +1 
24 30 19ft M + ft 
263 23% 22% 22%— % 
98 16% 16% 16% — ft 
17DZ 27 27 27 

10 29% 29% 29% —Ift 

2953 15ft 15 15% 

24 35ft 35% 35% — % 
142 20% 19% 20% + ft 

. 32 10% 10% 16% 

2X 14 532 39 a 38 — ft 
19 6045 119% 116ft Ilf +2% 
17 52 573 97 95% »6%— 1 

226 19ft 18% 18%— % 
44 5% 5% 5% 

1371 9V, 9 9 

1339 33% 32% SJ, + % 
101 2S% 25% «ft— ft 
541 59ft 50 aft-T 1 ? 1 

68 37ft 36% 37 f ft 

287 37ft 37% 37ft + % 
47 16 3265 38% 38 Mft + % 
IX 20 555 42% 41% 41%—% 

xoe 1.1 4 181 35% 34% 25ft— V, 

50 3X 144 15 14% 14%—% 

.80 43 16 1103 19 18%. + % 

SMS OS 42 20ft 20% 28%—% 
X0o X U 552 75% 73ft TO* +2% 
100 4X 16 3073 63% 61ft 62 — ft 

25 » 37Vr 37ft + ft 

11 48 47 47 —1 

1061 34% 34ft 34ft— ft 
333QZ 83 Mr Blft »» flft 

5te 78% 78% 78% +Wk 
4701b 74ft 73ft 74% + ft 
1 26ft 26ft 3' ft— ft 
_ 16 35ft 34ft Mft + % 

2J 21 1126 79% 78ft 79% + ft 

' 8 1303 16% lift 16ft + S 1 

2D0Z 16ft 15% 15% f ft 
20ta 16% 16ft 16% + ft 
23 17% 17% 17ft— ft 
50z 19ft 19ft 19ft 
22402 25% 25ft 25% 

200z 59ft 59% 59% — % 
57 m 26% 27V, + % 


UK) 

a 


8X 9 
26 12 
2X 16 
12 74 
27 14 


xa 

17* 

50 

W 

721 


*3 29 EGG 

17% 15ft EQKn 
32ft 23% ESYSt 
aft ao EogieP 
20% 12ft Eoseo 
12% 3% EaalAJr 
1% EALwtO 
ft EALwtA 
7ft EsAIr pf 3x3k 
9% Sir pfB 470k 
33ft 11% e Air etc 
»% 21% EastGF 170 57 
23ft 15% EostUll 2X6 85 


1J 79 
7X 

17 15 
40 10 


5 

2% 

22% 

251* 


427 38% 37% 38% + % 

26 17% 17 13% + S? 

687 30 29% 29%— % 

61x26ft 35% »“*+?• 
17 18ft 18ft + ft 
613171 6% 6 i%— % 

401 2% 2 2 -% 

428 1% T% 1ft— ft 

169 16% 15% 1S*-1% 
90* 19% 17% 1^-3% 
2S 24 22% 22* —1% 

518 24% M% 3ft + % 
252 J4ft 22 24ft +1 


SO 41ft EsKods 270a 4B 14 4616 46 ' 45% 45%— ft 
6?ft Eaton 1X0 2X «7TO58%5BftSB% + % 

‘ 35 11 1413 12ft 12 12ft + ft 

35 14 363* aft 29% 30ft + ft 

48 IS a Sft a 331 

lfl 13 - 

15 16 
V 14 
9J 
X 11 


15% 11% EetilMs 
32% 20 Eckerd 

II 8 BdCmp 
34% 22ft Edward 
25ft 21% EPGdtrt 205 
19ft 9 grroro Me 


X4 

1X4 

1X0 

78 

. 1 * 

X0 


12 nt Eloor 
5% 2ft EHCA& 
24V, 15ft Elems 


06 


3.7 

15 
X 25 


94 14% 14ft 14%—% 

33 25% 25% 25% 

77 10% 10 10% 

23 10% 9ft S~JS 

17 21% 21 21% + % 


12 Month 
H hill Low Stock 


Six. 

IMiHWiLcw 


Qnet.OiYR 


>6 lit, ttgm 
9% 2 Ehelnt 
73ft 66 EmrsEI 276 


13% 6% Em Rod .941111 9 

20% 15% Entry A 50 3X 14 
33% 26ft emharf 1Mb SM 70 
3 17% F.mBOs 1X8 87 9 

Sft 4 Emnpf -47 107 

5% 4ft Emppf 50 MU> 

9ft 7% Emppf 51 10X 

16% 12% Entrant 1X4 77 10 
Vi EnEjrc 

32ft 21ft EnelCp 72 37 12 
3a lift EnisBus 06 IX 14 
29% 17% Enserch 1.40b 7J 139 
104ft 98k EnsdipfWJS 107 
106ft 96ft Enseft pfiS DelOX , 
21% m* EnsExft 17DB 5.9 9 
2% 1% Cnsrce 25 

13% 9% Elllera 

19ft Uft EntexE 250el87 
21% 17% Enttxin 176 67 13 
35ft 21ft Eaufxx 174 35 21 
»Vj 2% E admit 
22ft 14ft Earn* pt 271 127 
50ft Sft Eat Res 172 3.9 10 
17 8% EaviteC ' 

is lav Erbmnt 
24% 14% EesBus 
24% 15 EsexC s 
28 15 Etirtne- 

26% 14% Ethyl a 
6 1 vIEvanP 

43% 33% ExCeto 102 3 S 11 
17% 15 Excetar 1X6elOX 
55% 42% Exxon 110 U 1 


17" 13% 13ft 13ft— % 
203 3% 3ft 3% , 

18 13 2059x73% 72% 72ft + % 


7% VA— % 


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^ Mm turned on Page 18) 
























Considers Rise . 1 Data General Introduces 

Lung Announces 

for Aliied^Lyons Reorganization, New Super-Minicomputer 


.... .... Raiun . . r 

fcpNDON ~ Elders DCL Ltd, 
UU-Austialiim brewing, fa rming 
£3L paance ‘group, said Monday 

Hr • increase its £!.S-bd- 

w2-6 billion) cadi offer for 
aed-LyonsPLC. 

Es .** j$* ^'.gwup director for stratezv 

||r *' ew Gummas, said aiTaeS 

Si § • -S Elders might hare 

W'ei rating last ninth's 

^Bwd-Lyous publishes its 
... eose document. AlhedLyons, a 
■-5V. ^don- based food and Hriny 
the bid as 

.“•^walysts have generally agreed 
'i- Elders's initial offer, of 255 

’ ice. a share, although it is Bnt- 
. * biggest in total value, would 

'<l%L V ^ to ** iaisod 10 wni contra of 
^recanpany. Most see 350 peace a 
*re as a more realistic price for 
/* . ied-Lyons, winch is about four 

I ( *s die size of Elders, 

i f'Hpdr. Cummins’s remarks were 
*-* ute after the company's chief ex- 
* sin rw &iye,John D. uliott; said that 


■" Vs 


• if. i-UlUO, MU1 UUlL 

[j)v bid, which closes Dec. S.'had so 
Mt (failed to attract a high level of 

Stances bv Allied-Lvnnc cfcnr*. 


: Elders on Monday issued the 
• . . . Al inal offer document giving de- 
• ^ *e bid,althcnigh Mr: Cum. 

. -8* said the company had until 

•'■r UJy . 


Ody JamiarytoTmseits offer. AI- 
hed-Lyons is expected to publish 
. .defense next month*- ■ ■•... 

a AUjcd-Lyons -shares dosed Mon- 
day at 285 pence on the London 
Stock Exchange, down 1 pence 
from Friday’sclosing of 286. 

The Bdas document disclosed 
that it was offering £1.8 Union of 
four-year secured loan notes as an . 
alternative to the rng h hid. 

Interest on the notes would be at 
% percentage points below the av- 
erage Citibank three-month depos- 
it rate. That deposit rate was 11W 
percent ou Friday. ' 

-The notes; redee ma ble after 12 
mouths, would yield 10ft percent ai 
Friday 1 s Citibank deposit rate. 

Murray to Become 
Chairman of Mobil 

Untied Press Itaawaional 

• NEW YORK — Mobil Corp. 
announced Monday that its board 
had' elected Allen. 'Murray chair- 
man and chief executive officer to 
s uc ce e d Kawieigh Warner Jr., who 
will retire. Feb. I. 

Mr. Murray, 56, joined Mobil in 
1952 as an accountant He. will re- 
tain his positions as president and 
chief operating officer. 


Interest Payment 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — One of 
Hong Kong's biggest shipping 
groups announced Monday 
thatit had devised exeoiganiza- 
tios plan to keep its troubled 
operations going. 

The Tung nonp, owned by 
the Tung family of Hong JKong, 
said it would be able to pay 
'interest on debt estimated by 
some bankers at about SI bil- 
lion. The group , stopped debt 
payments in September. 

An associated company, Uw 
publicly traded -Orient Overseas 
Holdings Ltd, will set up a sep- 
arate business for its profitable 
container operations. Trading 

in the shares of Orient Overseas . 

was suspended on Hong Kong's ' 
four stock exchanges on Sept. 3 
as the company tried to work 
out a settlement with creditors. 

The family side ofTung has a 
fleet of 55 shops, including con- 
tainer ships and oQ tankers. It 
borrowed to finance an expan- 
sion of its fleet but was hurt by 
ihededmein the shipping mar- 
ket Bankers have said its prob- 
lems have dragged down the 
publicly owned company. 


Compiled hy Our S&ff Frt^> Dupatcha 

NEW YORK — Data General 
Corp. on Monday introduced its 
most powerful super-mini comput- 
er line to try to regain a competilit e 
edge against its main rival. Digital 
Equipment Corp. 

Data General officials said at a 
news conference that the compa- 
ny's new Eclipse MV/20000 super- 
minicomputer, designed to com- 
pete with Digital Equipment's 
VAX S600, can process S.S million 
instructions per second, the stan- 
dard measure for (he speed of a 
large computer. It costs about 
542,000 per MIPS. 

Officials said it was twice as fast 
as Data General’s previous top 
computer, the MV/10000. 

A super- minicomputer is a very- 
fast computer that is almost as 
powerful as large, muhimillion- 
dollar mainframes, but much 
cheaper. It is typically used as the 
hub of a departmental or small 
company computer network. 

Data General and Digital Equip- 
ment, both ..with headquarters m 
Massachusetts, built their success 
on the minicomputer, a sector that 
International Business Machines 
Corp. ignored for a number of 
years. 

IBM has a minicomputer, the 
System 36, that it promotes as a 
departmental computer, but it is 


not considered a super-minicom- 
puter and has a far higher price per 
MIPS than the MV/20000 or the 
VAX 8600. 

Both Data General and Digital 
Equipment, which have long domi- 
nated the market for factory and 
engineering applications, are" eager 
to mow into the much larger office 
market by offering departmental 
computers. Demand for depart- 
mental office equipment is growing 
by about 30 percent a year, more 
than twice the rate of the computer 
industry as a whole. 

Monday's announcement by 
Data General may help the compa- 
ny's flagging order rates, company 
officials said, because many of its 
customers have been wailing to buy 
in anticipation of the new foe. 

Data General recently an- 
nounced a drop in earnings for the ; 
year ended Sept. 28 to Si4 million 
from S83 million a year ago. 

Data General also introduced a 
slower, cheaper minicomputer, the 
Eclipse MV-20G0 DC. Analysts 
said it machine was targeted at 
Digital's MicroVAX II. 

Bolstering the super-minis, Data 
General announced a new operat- 
ing system, AOS- D VS, that n said 
allows for distributed data process- 
ing through a local-area network. 

I Reuters, AP) 


COMPANY NOTES 


British Petroleum Co.’s Forties 
nil field has been found to have 54 
million mom barrels of recoverable 
oil, worth about £1.5 billion (52 
bfllion), than estimated. The esti- 
mate of total recoverable oil has 
been raised to 2.072 billion barrels 
from 2.01S billion. 

General Motors Carp, said its 55- 
billion acquisition of Hughes Air- 
craft Co. should be completed by 
year end. Glvfs executive vice-pre- 
sident said Hughes’ technical re- 
sources would be a major factor in 
maintaining GW’s competitiveness. 

Hongkong Industrial and Com- 
mercial Bank LuL, a 62-percent 
held subsidiary of Overseas Trust 
Bank LuL has resumed share trad- 
ing. It was suspended on local stock 
exchanges in June, when the Hong 


natHHiMiiM 



Kong government took control of 
it and Overseas Trust Bank. 

IialteL a member of Italy’s state- 
owned In’-Stet Group, has signed a 
30-billion-lire (SI 7-million) con- 
tract to bu3d a telephone equip- 
ment factory in Chongqing. China. 

MIM Holdings Ltd. workers at 
the Hilton mine at Mount Isa in 
northwest Queensland will pursue 
their indefinite strike. The 2^00 
base-metal miners are protesting 
facilities in an underground staff 
room at the Hilton base-metal de- 
posit being developed bv MIM. 

Royal Dutch /Shell Group said 
its subsidiary. Norsk e Shell A/S. 
has bom ordered by the Norwegian 
government to halt winter drilling 
at an Arctic well as the rig is unfit 
for Arctic conditions. 


Sinte Darby Bhd said its whol- 
ly-owned subsidiary. SD Holdings 
Bhd. has agreed to acquire from 
Pern as Si m e Darby Holdings Sdn 
53.35 milli on new oO-cent shares in 
Dunlop Malaysian Industries Bhd. 

Suzuki Motor Co. and the Bed- 
ford commercial vehicle division of 
General Motors Overseas Com- 
mercial Vehicle Corp. have signed 
an agreement to make Suzuki-de- 
rigned commercial vehicles in Lu- 
ton, England. 

Union Mintere SA, a subsidiary 
grouping non-ferrous metal inter- 
ests of SorieiC Genfrrale de Bel- 
gique SA. said it will offer share- 
holders of Socifiifi GeneraJe des 
Minerais a unit price of 10.700 Bel- 
gian francs (S202) for their shares. 


IT S NOT JUST OUR 
REPUTATION THAT'S GROWING 
AROUND THE WORLD 


ford Says It’s Setting New Golden Rale: f Quality Comes First 9 


• Vu- J tL7 JL.W 

■■■ ^ 

- : k , By Warren Brown 

- : *«#» V , Washington Post Service. 

v DEARBORN, Michigan — The 
- ------ h,; ..jate card is making the rounds at 

'* •---r: ' id Motor Co. 


ing principles is: “Quality conies' to grow as automakers in China, based in Calif ornia His company 
first It is appropriate for a com- South Korea and Yugoslavia gear has sometimes been scathing in its 
- -i-'c v'lpEARBORN, Michigan — The that, by its own a dmi ssion, up for U.S. sales. criticism of Ford managem ent and 

*3 svRte card is m altin g the rounds at uwj had some problems with quail- Japanese car companies are pul- products. But, Mr. Hemphill said, 
•-■'-r: rd Motor Co. ty rnthe recent past . - ting more assembly plants in the -“I don’t have the impression of: 

Top executives cany it in their ® ave world the fust United States. According to most ‘Ahh, here we go again.* " 

•"M V 't'st pockets. Engineers tuck it in . e , a5Sen r , tyJj? c domestic industry estimates, the Ford recognizes that it has to do 

',j .^pockets of their shirts. Assent- tne-Modru T m the early 1 900s. Japanese will have the capacity to a better job erf attracting a segment 

v of v- ^Koe workers tape h to machine- Urutcd S ^ aics “ e ' produce at least 900.000 cars a year of the “baby-boom" generation, 

' 'ntrol panels. - • m the United States by 1990. Many people in ihrir mid -30s and early 

slssS ^ “ d , 

Visitors to Ford/s worid gero us /because some Pintos succ H ssf ? “ Vfmmn Z lhe 

- .j •L-'fdquarters in Dearborn are un- exploded when they were struck ' 'J? Al ^ ncan aat< ?" Roomers, whose tastes are deter- 

rely to go home without iL fiomSbrear • makers hare been workmg on qud- rnmmg the shape of future automo- 

r- [«r i . • r , tj1 itv and cost-contrtrf, Mr. Healy tire desiens and services. Ford and 

“ Forf « bnfldtot on its donSc rivals, on die other 
c £ f^ re ^ u ?, on ’Z^. I i ord avcra 8 c - a car than Us do- hand, mostly have been successful 

Vrei-.c.^ 15 b ? p ^ wH thetr com- mestic competitors. But the comp a- with people of an average age of 48 

t a ^, m i OT ?' 1W i p0 “ t ^ 0n 88 ^ ny stfll can’t bold a candle to the yearsjS?. HemphiliraS 

. ... .. --rid s leader m automotive quah- saymg^t the car was Ford Motor Japanese" in terms of quality, he Ford is goingafter the boomers. 

“The Pinto was a terrible tbine . the is tiyi^ to get 


'ilifci ' 


ntrol panels. 


:tx,« . LL . l -l-I .....i .v ^ . — j uufts ucw japanoe cars mu oc 

'isaiij., 2 wners ’ “HP 8 *** “5“^ “»■ • aimed at the power center of U.S. 

‘ iysts, was a sloppy car. Many auto- car producersVthe mid-size and 

■* 11 : • 811(1 P ™: exports said it was also dan- luxury-car segment 

"'rvJs:; V®: Visitore to Fords worid gerous. because some Pintos as a result *11 Amvimt anto. 

- - .i"'fdquarters m Dearborn are un- exploded when they were struck ' "i? Al ^ ncaD aat 9" 

-r-. e v lo go home without it ; ^era hare been workm* on qud- 

• . ' rr^the card s^ibdiz^a corporate Sd^Ford tS^buflding, on 

! borage, a better car tiian Us do- 


^" '-Ford’s quality drive is running in . • JJH John A. Manoogian, a 30-year rid of a habit it developed in 1931 : 

with its cost-cutting cam- Ford veteran who is now the com- following GM. 

- i . ^ Auto-industry analysts say JJJj: ■ a™ -SL pan/s executive director of quafity Ford had been the world leader 

'* "■ ' i iv «’ the two movements areinsepa- assurance, disputes that He ac- in automotive sales almost since its 

Without quality, Ford loses ioowledged that some Japanese founding in 1903, until it relin- 

.. ”k?tfomers. Without competitive J companies still have a quality edge quished the lead to GM in 1930. 

. iia:.«duction costs, Ford loses cus- woriang lor “* over Ford, but he said the advan- The problem? Ford held on to the 

* Risers, because higher manufac- ^ tage is shall and is disappearing, basic, reiiaWe. economical Model T 

tng costs oft®; appear as higher, : J:™ “We’re pretty proud of the rate too long. .GM, meanwhile, was out 

ces in the sbowroogu [. of improvement were made since 

?o, since 1980,'.wfouFoid its ioon» “rv- 


1980," Mr. Manoogian said. “Our designs. 


baric, reliable, economical Model T 
too long. .GM, meanwhile, was out 
there wowing customers with new 


> , . S-bDEon-Ios^ the company has customers tell us that we’ve gpt 50 

on a cosvcuttingspree, ehrni- ? ^ percent fewer things going wrong 

* CtXflllgng what now. anmunia.m vrith our cars than whadin 1980. 


lion in annmd .operating costs.-' . 
Much of that reduction is reflect- 
ion smaller worldwide and U.S. 


• .1 - -■_« a wiui vui wuv mnu nw upv m i^uu. 

Svid Healy. a 


^luuvuui uuunjuuvuuuuiuiwr r\. a T .T - Tlr.. ... • t C»C1 SU1W, IRU.LU1E lu C»C1 Y 

(Jm smaller worldwide and U.S. “Th^ 1 are dead serious about raoveGM made, until 19S3. 

grails. Ford’s woiHr^de average this,” said John HemphtU, vice That year Ford shocked Lhe de- 

ployment dropped 214 percent, JSfiLTSn* P reside o ;t d J -°- Power & Asso- mestic auto industry by introduc- 
1 ^tly ctates, a market-researeh company- ing radically different cars - the 

td's U.S. ranployment define ■ imvktmemts — u.s.a. . 


• Ford M to third place behind 
GM and Chrysler from 1936 to 
1949. It moved back into second 
place in 1950 and has been there 
ever since, reacting to almost every 
move GM made, until 19S3. 

That year Ford shocked the do- 
mestic auto industry by introduc- 


• i- V- 4^3 IT - Ford apd its domestic rivals, 

to n3,6SS *™ g "* “ 

'..'^'SnnMuaodMandK- 

. l-rtis are needed — about 25 per- tou * h ? on ^ etltlon . 

- -I . i , . - . automakers, especially from the 

- a T 8 ^ _ SnK^ir.^^Sid. 

. .. . rtd and at other domestic auto .^7™* 17Q 

.... cpufacturers, according to Peter ^ P®? 8 fi 8 uies ^ us - 
n Hujananto-industty analyst 

' :. Arthur Andersen &CoT^ Japanese miports cap- 

. . / - Japanese automakers now have a SSSt hi 

• :, r6duction-cost advantage of fjSi!? 

- to Sl.MOpg umt OW!, 'hm ul 

C0m P etlt0rS ’ • ifc Van market, and that figure is expected 

■ however, semae Ford employees — 7 . “ " 

"016 cost-cutting as running con- 
xy to Ford’s plan to adiieye 

;t-aier product quality through 

• ibellence in hiuhan rdations.” a 
”. jor tenet of the companys nris- 
. n statement and guiding prind- 

. , oord’s president, Harold A. Pol- 
said he disagreed with the no- 
; nlhat excellence in human rda- 
ns r and excellence in business 

- : ~l hagement are mutually exdu- 

y* 

-■ ' "?Lnytime. you have to reduce 
- : ir work force, it’s a problem," he 
d, ( “The question is: “How do we 
about implementing the actions 
- " lit Lave to be taken to ensure that 
sr corporation, has a long-tom 
'■ ore?’ The mission statement is 
approadL" 

Die first of Ford’s six new guid- 

fetal Box Pretax 
if 1.6% in Half; 
et Shows Loss 

p International Herald Tribune 

' " 33NDON — Metal Box PLC, a 
.- :kagmg and en^neering com pa- 

■'./ reported Monday that its pre- 
"profit in the fiscal first half 
led SepL 30 slqiped lii.peroerit, 

- £312 milli on ($442 milhon) 

> m £31.7 million a year earlier. 

VRer taxes and extraordinary 
r 'ips, however; the company 
... . 'wed a loss of £700,000, com- 
. ’ ed with a net profit of £ 17.6. 

.Bon a year before. An extraordi- 

■ ; ’ y ioss’of £23 5 million reflected 
oostsofsbaiplywduciiighead- 

• triers staff. . 
tales rose to £569.3 milhon from 

... «Q.7 milli nn, and the directors 
-hred an interim dividend of 6.1 
; -ice a share, unchanged from a 
x earlier. . . " 

' ■ .,-The latest figures, unlike those of . 

’’ ear earlier, do. not include tiie 
; .• npany’s Nigerian _ subciifiarics 

• t a consolidated basis. 

Tie company predicted ^further 

■ \ Trail? t rading conditions" daring . 

rest of the fiscal year.-- ‘ . 


INVESTMENTS — U SJk. 

INCOME PRODUCING REAL ESTATE 

ideal for Pension Fundi and other large Groups 
T. Safe and Secured 
2- Below Market Acquisition 

3. Total Management 

4. High Yearly Returns 

5. Excejient Appreciation. 

Properties $3,000,000 and up 
Principals only please reply te 

e ■ ■ - a • Uoyd J. WHGams, Realtor 

111 I I 5629 FM 1960 W. f Suite 210 

I || I I Houston, Texas 77069. 

Vw/ \Ay TeL; (713) 586-9399. Tbu: 387356. 


The Royal Oak 


A- UiTJ' — ' '. 



Tempo, Mercury Topaz and Lin- 
coln Mark VII," and a redesigned j 
Thunderbird and Cougar. 

The styling of the new Ford cars 
were a major departure from the 
U.S. boxy look, and the cars were 
equipped with small, but spirited 
engines. 

Ford is accelerating its boomer 
push in the 1986 model year with 
the introduction of the Taurus and 
Mercury Sable, regarded by many 
auto critics as the only two substan- 
tially new domestic cars of the sea- 
son. But the Taurus and Sable are 
coming in three months late, with a 
rescheduled introduction date in 
late December, mainly because of 
production problems at the Tau- 
rus-Sable assembly plant in Atlan- 
ta, Mr. Kordick said. 

“We weren't able to come up 
with the quality we expected to 
have" for the scheduled fall intro- 
duction date. “So, we just delayed 
it," he said. 

“No longer are we going to put 
out crap bttause we have to rim a 
plant, and because we've got to get 
so many units out an hour at all 
costs. That's not going to happen 
any more," Mr. Kordick said. 







Find out how the increased financial 
strength of our asset base, economies of scale, and 
commitment to continuing international growth 
are all contributing to AEGON's outstanding 
turnover and profit performance. 



EGON 


w Insurance Group 


^ W To. AEGON 
^ ^ Insurance Group. PQ Sox 202. 

^ 7 Churchillpletn 2501 CE The Hague. 

W The Netherlands. 

Please send me more information about AEGON 


n 


Address 


AEGON insurance Group. International growth from Dutch roots 



"V \ 

T ; : 


% 






Tlie world’s 
fastest growing 
international brand. 

It s a whole new w orld. 






I’age IK 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


iMontiays 


(losing 


Tables include tne naliotiwlde prices 
vp to the closing an Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


7114 17% PSCOlDt 2.10 I0J 

10% 6'e PSlnd I* 1 J‘ • 

9 1* PSIn Pi 1X4 12J 

B'n 7 PSIn pi 103 131 

S3 41 PSIn M 7.15 11* 

»l m. PMn PI *44 I4X 

Hu. Jij PSvHH 
16' » 8% PSMH pl 

17 a la 8% PNHPIB 

13 PNHpIC 

22 11 ‘a PNHpID 

IIV. PNHPIE 
19/1 II PNHpIF 

2i i* iok pnhpig 

19V1 Tiva PSwflM 7.73 104 


S*s- CiOM 

mb mwi low Qua. Cnw 

13 MPV 20% 2Wb - Mi 

«9$ 8% 8 Mi 8 % — % 

50j iv, gvj an 

700z B% 8ft Bft 

100c 51ft Sift sift +-ift 

100/ L7ft 47ft 47V, +|Vj 
244 8 7ft 74V ~ 11 

7004 15ft |5V, ISft — «■ 

4 15*5 IS* 15ft *■ ft 
51 23ft 23ft 27ft t ft 
IB 20V, 20% 20ft— ’A 

14 21ft 21ft 21ft — ■ ft 
83 18ft 18ft 18ft + ft 
1 1 Mft 20ft 20% — ft 

438 38ft 3/ft 78ft— ft 


24 Jb PSkEC 3 84 93 B 7225 lift 30ft 31 — ft 


DWnm 
Hfttilq* Slot: 


Uk Ck»* 

Dh. TO. PE HOsHtgtiLO* OiwLOrt? 


(ConiiniKd front 1*5451* 


20 Orient 3b 74 

23 Oi lonC pi 1 12 74 
R'ii Or.wiP 

7J Orion Dl 7 75 10 0 
left OulHM .64 74 

24 OvmTr SO 7 1 
13 OuSilip 50 U 
30' . OwenC 1 40 4 0 
38ft Owmlll 140 14 
75 dwnllol 4.00 53 
ID' ? O. lore 44 ’* 


33 29% 
J73 23'.; 
4Q7 lO'i 
31 77ft 

14 811 74ft 

15 94 39% 

17 179 15ft 

9 375 35ft 

10 IB35 53ft 

2> 75 

U 60 15' • 


29 ft — ft 

78% + ft 
9ft — % 
27ft- % 
34ft + ft 
38ft— % 
15ft - ft 
35ft 

53ft +lft 
75 

IS'* — ft 


I, 13 PSEGor 140 10.1 

29 JO". PSECpI 408 10 7 

49ft » PS EG 6! 5.78 100 

31ft 14'': P&EOpI 717 1D5 

Mil 18ft PSE&pl 2.4J I0S 

IB9 94ft PS ec. 011 2 25 IIJ 

73ft 58 PSEGol 700 10-* 

73 59 PSEGpl 8X6 11.1 

4ft 2ft Public* 

16 9ft Pueblo .10 10 
a PRCem 

12 llta PuaelP 1.76 116 

m 6ft PulPen 
zl* 10% PulieHm .17 ; 

31 ft 16ft PuroWI .641 35 

10ft 5ft Pv'0 


.1 5 M 13ft lift — ft 

7 MO: X 38 38 — ft 

8 1702 49 49 49 + Vi 

5 U 20*4 20ft 20ft + ft 

5 113 23ft 22ft 23ft v ft 

x TObiMft ior.v in — ft 
.9 IBODz 71ft 71ft 71ft— ft 
.1 2Dr 72ft Tt-fi 72ft +1 

7J 2ft 2ft 2ft — ft ' 
.0 13 20 15% 15ft 15ft 

b 5 7ft 7ft 7ft 

6 7 64B 15ft 14ft ISft 

437 7ft 7 7ft + ", 
v 15 791 13ft 13ft lift 

5 5*8 18ft 1 7ft 18ft + ft 

7 664 6 5ft Sft— ft 


37’-: 73' ; PHH 1X0 ?.• 14 136 35ft Mft M% — ft 

50": !!■; PPG 1.7a 3S II 1*87 SO 3 * ££ 522 + ft 

31' : 17'- PSA 60 13 17 109 25ft 25ft 75ft— A 

?Jft 14% PSA oof 1.90 8.9 25 lift 21ft M ft + J* 

|44» 12 POCA5 154 1 0.7 80 14V: 14ft }«% — ,* 

Wft 15ft P«CE 154 95 7 2915 l*ft 19% ]*»T ,% 

46ft J7% PocLIg JJB 7.7 13 25V 4S 1 , 44ft 45ft + 3 

41ft 74' 3 Pc Cum 1.70 3 7 74 IW J7-8 37* 37% 

iO'b s ft PocPes OS* 5 10 135 M‘* TO 10* + A i 


63 33 Qua* Or 140 2A IS 7S2 57ft 57 57ft + ft 

25 1 7 QuakSQ .800 3.4 19 J* 24ft 22ft 23ft — ft 

1 nv. 5 Quanev 20 238 6ft 6ft 655 

Mft 77 Gumtar IjO S4 ft 1570* 29*. 29ft 79* I 

76’<« 14ft QKRell -4a .9 16 2*0 25ft 25 25ft * ft! 


ID'. S’ t PacPes 05e S 10 135 |0ft 10 {Oft J 

19^k IJ'-: PoiPjoI 23* 10J 31 J*ft 1 «'m 19": + 

17ft l?ft PdcSCI 40 7.7 13 791 is 14ft 'f** - J? 

M<- 65ft PacTelc 5,72 75 9 1662 TJv 76ft Taft- JJ 

15 PacT.n 40 JJ 7 I '2ft 12ft 12ft— 

315* 74ft PacilCP 140 B2 0 901 S9’- 29ft 29ft + ft 

36 JOft Pacil oi 4,07 120 4 34'u 34 34 


Vb, 5ft ftBInd JMI .7 
49ft ]4 RCA 104 2d 
112 80 RCA Pi *00 17 

39ft 37ft RCA Pi 165 9.J 
9ft 6U RLC 30 2.9 

4ft at« rpc 

19ft 14ft RTE M 29 

18'- 8ft RCKltce 


JMI .7 37 Sft St 

1JU JJ 25 3433 48ft 47ft 47ft 

4.00 17 2 HO 109 "5 109VS i- n 

165 9.3 55 39ft 39ft 39ft + ft 

JO 2.9 21 1E2 7ft 7 7 - ft 

M 3ft 3ft 3ft 
Jt H 10 20 194* 18ft 19 

11 218 15ft 14ft 15ft + ft 


341* 2Sft PainlV pi 125 75 
3* jt'b Palm Be ,90i 40 

41-r Pan*B* ..TI 1.7 9 

B/- 4 P«nAm 

4 I ft PanA wl 

21 13ft Pandckn .20 IJ II 


40 JJ 7 I 12ft 12ft 17ft— ft 

Iffl 8; 5 951 29'.- 291. 29ft + ft 

4.07 120 4 J4'u 34 34 

M 1J 1* 817 32' : 31ft 32 vj + ft 


1155 EolsPui I J30 2.1 IS .600 47ft 46ft 47ft -e ft 


336 JOft * 30 — ft 

28 35ft 35ft 35"J— ft 

66 41ft 41', 41ft + ft 
3799 8 7ft 7ft — ft 

212 2ft 7ft ?ft— ft 

77 17ft 1ft ft 17 +■ '* 


9ft S 1 -* Panrod 
21 'A 16ft Ran CD 
Sft 2ft RanqrO 
OD'V 51ft Ray Cm 
l6'< 9ft Ravmk 
2055 19ft Ravnrn 


20 1644 7ft 7ft TVS — ft 
34 4.7 9 20 18ft 17?B 17**— ft 

446 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 

.44 i 26 246 80V: 78*. 80ft 4-lft 

4« 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 

783 20ft 20ft 30'u + ft 


S3ft 36ft Pa*Mm 1.60 33 II 29*4 SOft 491V 50ft 4- ft, 


41": 32 ft PanhEC 130 U 12 2219* 38ft 36^ W* 


74', 12', Panvph 
B' i 3'; PanIPr 
18": 6' : Pardvn 

17ft lift PorkEI 


73 24ft 2*' . 24ft + ft 

3S40 8t: B<- 8W 

470 TV, 75v 7ft 

27 U'i 12ft IJ5V + ft 

317 4ft 4ft 4V: — 


17ft lift PorhEI Olo 3 II 77 13'* «2^ 13‘V + ft 
7t ; 4 ParkPrl .08 1 8 317 4ft 4ft «•': — ft 

J9", 78'. ParfcH 1.12 3J II 145 33ft 33ft 33ft 

33ft 14ft Pari.Pl> Jill H 32 776 22ft 21ft 22ft— ft 

5 3 PolPtri 2 97 4 3ft 3ft 

I5H. lift Pu> HP .64 S.I 14 257 lji, }2ft 

23^ 1J PdvC^ !<• 10 U dS3 15?* 15JY— » 

I 1 a % Pcn-jc 1 5* ik ^ 

58ft 44ft PonCnn 14 742 51ft SI": Sift + ft 

57'ii 44ft Penney 2J6 4S 10 1674 Sift SlPa Sift +1 

J'-V M’-: POPL 256 « J 10 1J93 27ft 27V- 27ft + ft 

40>- 32 PoPLOl 4 JO llj 130r £’■: 2 J 2 4 ,>h 

*0’: 33 PoPLPl 4J0 llj 2M:39 aft 39 

78'. 67 PaPLol 116 150: 74 72ft 74 +Ift 


10ft Sft ReodBr 40 
31ft 13 RdBal nl 2.12 1S.7 
2316 laft RdBaipl U2el7A 
16ft lift RIIRei i.40o 9i n 
17V. Sft Recnga IB 

17ft 7 Redmn 30 14 It 

12ft Oft Reec» 36 

1'. ft Peaa I 

43 v. 27ft Roicnc JO U is 
10ft 4ft RepAir 5 

3 1ft Pro A wl 


17ft 6ft RpGvds JO 17 10 254 Sft 


103! 6 Sft Sft — ft 

44 14 !3ft 139: + ft 

10 17ft 17ft 17ft 

1 J7 16ft 14H 14ft + ft 
8 123 lift lift lift- ft 

6 61 9ft 8ft 8ft— '« 

16 30 12V. 12ft 17ft — ft 

98 ft + 

S 47 33ft 32ft 32ft— ft 

5 1181 10 9ft 9ft — ft 

793 2ft 1ft 1ft— ft 


Jflft 32 PaPLOf 4 JO 115 

«>': 33 PaF'Lpr 4J0 113 

»ft 2 SPj PaPLdprl42 Vjg 'S' SS' 1 £ 

74-, 60'. PaPLOf 840 118 1702 77 71ft 71ft— ft 

31'. 27t, PaPLdBrt.75 112 8 31 30ft »ft 

98 77 PaPL Ol ».74 » j 3D: 97 97 »7 — 1 

lOJ': 88’. PaPLprM.00 10J iOOrlOSVs IMft IM;-: 

109 99 PoPLorl3J0 123 !50:10J’V 105": lOS'V -rift 

Tfrft S7', PoPLprSJO 11.9 100: 67 67 67 

75'.- b? PaPL PI 8 70 119 lte 73 73 73 —1 

41 : 34 Pfinwir 120 5.7 154 3B»* Mft Mft + ft 

2Sft 20 Pen* el IjO 68 M 33'-: 23ft 73 'V — ft 

50 34 Pennidl 1211 4J 22 1»7A 50 47ft 49ft +lft 

18'j 14': PreoEn I JO BJ 8 bli 18ft 17ft 18 — ft 

24ft 14ft PepBv S .20 a 21 165 26ft 24 26ft— ft 

67*. ji-i PepyCa 1.78 17 12 W9S 6*7* 66 66ft + ft 

.30'* 22ft Perk El 3t ZD It 2434 28ft 27ft 23ft + '2 

9' ; 7ft Prmlan 1.12el4.7 6 2B9 7ft 7ft 7ft — ft 

18 ft 10ft PervDs 42J 18ft 17** 18V, — ft 

4Bft 31 Pclrie 1 40 30 17 S84 48ft 45": 47«A — ft 

28ft 24ft PelRS 372e13J 4S 271* 26ft 271* 

17' . 14', PelRsol 157 9J 66 171. 16ft 16ft 

ift pirlnr .90927.7 149 Jv. 3% J 1 . — ft 

SJft JTft Ph:er 7.48 29 15 5681 JDft 4«’t 50'* + ft 

24 |”> PnelpD 1011 20ft 20'* 20ft — 1. 

SS 34 Pnela or 54)0 9.9 60 Sift 50ft 50ft — ft 

46>. W Phibr5 J4 IJ 21 6S46 42ft 41ft 42 + ft 

ISft -.3'. pm WEI 2-20 14.1 6 2461 15~s 15ft 15ft 


51ft 36 RepN y 1J4 3J 
37>. 23ft RI1V Die 3.12 M-2 
57ft 55 'V RNYpI A *24411.3 
34V: 24ft RepBk. 1 j4 5.1 

30 23ft RecBk p1112 7.1 

25ft 1SW RRiCal J3 IJ 

79V, 22V: Revco JO 10 

1 7ft 10ft Revere 


44 U I 111 49ft 49ft 49ft 

1.12 112 12 28 27ft 38 + ft 

l 2 4611.2 20 55ft 5Sft 5 Sft— ft 

M 5.1 7 318 32 31ft 32 

L17 7.1 S 28ft 78ft 28ft + ft 

JS IJ .135 24ft 24ft 24ft— ft I 

JO 3j 0 30 1184 26ft 26ft 26ft + ft 

7 184 13 12ft 13 6ft 


||JJ': 88’. PaPL pr 1 1.00 10-7 
lt» 99 PaPL or 13410 123 
TOft S7'. PoPLpr 8J0 11.9 
75'.- 0? PaPL or 8 70 119 
41 : 34 Pemvir 220 5.7 
2Sft 70 Pcnv> ol IjO 6 8 
50 34 Pennifl 270 4J 


26' .' 21ft Revlnpt 
100t> 93 Rvln MB 9.00 91 
75'-. 17ft Re<dim JO 28 17 


1.84 13 18 161 57V, 57ft 57ft 


3 26ft 26 26ft 

50 99 99 99 

35 24ft 24ft 24ft— W 


15ft lift Remrd J4 3J 9 303 13ft 13^ 13ft— ft 

37ft 24ft Reyn In s 1 48 5J t 7110 28!* 27ft 27ft— ft 

50 47ft Revln ol 4.10 a_2 5 49ft 49ft 49ft 

31 123ft Rev/non296 10 0 793 130'A 129ft 130 —ft 

41 30 PerMII 1.00 3J 61 32"* 32ft 32ft + ft 

87 65 RerMof *50 6J 7 72ft 72ft 72ft 42ft 

76ft 24 RevM ol 230 8.9 66 26 2Sft 25ft— Jl 

33ft 21ft RlleAld JO 11 IS 486 74 23'L 24—18 

7ft 2V, RvrOkn 52 357 3". 3 3ft 

S3 34ft 33ft 33*1— ft 
518 23>'. 22'* 22ft 41 

271} lift lift 11*1 

507 23ft 22ft 22ft 

493 35=6 35ft 35ft 4 ft 

120a 18ft 18ft IBft — ft 


87 65 RcrMof *50 6J 

76ft 24 RevMpI 2J0 8.9 

33ft 21ft Rift Aid JO 2.1 

7ft 2V> RvrOkn 
36ft Taft Robshw 1.70 3J 

4lft 19ft Poblui 1-301 

24ft 5ft vj Rodins 
74'* 18 P.octiG 120 VA 


42ft j| RodiTI 2J4 aJ 9 493 3S 

70ft la P.ckClr n 1.76 9j 120a 18’. . 

41ft 29 Rockvvl 1.12 12 9 7039 35 34 34ft— ft 

73 SSft RotimH 2J0 3J II 762 68 67ft 67V: 4 ft 

70 40 Ronrln 10 418 60ft 5BA1 59 —1ft 

77ft ISft RafnCm JO lj 31 I4r 26ft 26 26ft — Vi 

18ft 6ft RolmE i J8 S 26 663 15 14ft Mft 4 ft 

13 8ft Rollins 44 It IB 67 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 

3ft 1ft R arson S4 2ft 2ft 2ft 

19 11 Roper M *3 59* 14ft Mft 14*. 4 ft 

47 24 Rarer 1.12 3X1 IB 1538 37*6 37 37ft— ft 

11 7ft Rowan .12 15 66 62S2 8 7ft 7ft— ft 

64'* 47ft ROvID 129* 51 9 3705 63ft 63 63ft 4 ft 

17’, 11 Roylnls 70 117 16ft Mft 16ft— ft 

32ft 20ft Rubmds JS lj 21 505 32 21ft 31ft 


34',- 30 PhllE Pi 4.40 116 
J7'. : 30* : PhilEpI 4 a8 118 
6* 57 PhllE PI 9J5 118 

IK; 9’, PhllE Pf lj] 11S 
la'tt 87. PhllE pl 1J3 I IB 
t: si pmiE ci 7 as no 


iOOz 35 34'. 35 

100: 36ft 36'i 36ft 4 ft 

180: 68ft 68 68ft 4 ft 

28 lift II 11 — ft 

101 10ft 10ft 10ft 

700; 6? 60": 60 ft— '.1 

9p M‘a 9ft 10ft 4 ft 


44V, 364 

1 21 ISft 

WA 22W 
! 37th 22ft 

! 39ft 30 
10746 *716 

31ft WL 

19 1 111 

304* 17ft 
Mft lift 
26ft 1 7ft 
40ft 29ft 
30ft 71 

36 73ft 
toy. 25ft 

9 S'*. 

15ft IS 
19th 15ft 
41 76ft 
rjft 2Bft 
17ft HI* 

76V. TOW 
MU 7ft 
77 50ft 
88ft 48ft 
42ft 24ft 
41ft 31U 
15ft 17ft 
43'h 31ft 
19ft 13V: 
32ft 73ft 
40ft 33ft 
7JU 19ft 
»t* 24ft 
49ft 38ft 
35 24% 

9 SH 
27ft 31ft 
23ft 17* 
36ft 30ft 
44 314, 

39ft 32ft 
77ft 22ft 
»ft 24 'A 
43ft 74 W 
57ft 49ft 

18 lift 
Bft 5ft 

51 46 

31 IB* 
16ft 9ft 

19 IT 

B8ft 64ft 
79 19 1 * 

26ft 20 
17ft 17ft 
27ft ISft 
59 36ft 
43ft 35ft 
76ft 49ft 
34ft ISW 
73ft ISft 
17ft 10ft 
55ft 39ft 
76 71ft 
23ft 10ft 
Mft 12ft 
31ft 33ft 

37 Va 79 
JIS6 9ft 

3ft 2W 

13 9ft 
37ft 26U 
27ft 16 
32ft 2SW 

14 10 
48ft 38ft 
33ft 24 
51 W 34'6 
21ft Mft 
Jft IW 

91ft 40 
21ft 17 
21 W 1414. 
6’k 3* 
39 38ft 
lift 6ft 
56% 43ft 
110ft 90ft 
49W 40 
10ft SW 
7ft 7 
38ft 31 
22ft Mft 
48ft 29ft 
17ft 12 
22ft 16W 
39ft 30ft 
MW 10ft 
74ft 45ft 


36ft 27th TECO 
12ft 7 TGIF 
21ft 13ft TNP 
28ft 19ft TRE 
83W 68 TRW 


SIS' . ClOM 

E*T. /w. Pc 169% High L«— QmqI. C 

BO IJ 13 1 III a 43ft 43 '6 43*1 4- '■* 

26 47 191* Mft ISft— W 

44 1 3 18 98 32ft 37ft 37ft * W 

1X0 4 J 9 TOarZSft 74ft 25W 
1.76 48 M 841] 37ft 36% 36ft 4- ft 
908# IS ISO 107W 10PA IOPj + Vh 
t134 4 5 7 1433 30 29ft 3J ♦ ft 
1 ?*ft 19 Irt* + 't 
Jl 125 SOU 29ft -9ft — ft 
J? 4 J M 161 MVS law 16U— Vh 
60 U 8 lrt 23ft 22-1% 23ft 

2 45e 6J 7 317 3Sft 39 39 

.W 3.4 £ 703 26ft 26W 26% — ft 

I JO SX 2 78 78 2B — ft 

.92 13 13 443* 41 !■ 40ft 41 + ft 

17 352 8W 8U BW + ft 

.60 *2 15 8 14W 14* M* 

1A6 8.9 II 145 IB* 18% 18* 

40 1.1 9 500 31 37 }7>f3 - ft 

3 JO 10i 18 31ft 33 33* ♦ ft 

J8 35 17 172 le 13ft 13* - * 

40# 1 J 73 3 25» 2SW 25W - * 

J2 3 9 1511 8ft 8 8.4 

3 00 43 I! KM 73W 71* 72* + W 

1J0 1 4 20 29 88ft 87* 88W f ft 

n J 44* 44» 44* 

1.M 12 12 656 37 36V* 36ft + V* 

2.00 14J 17 117 13ft 13W 13W— ft 

200 SJ II 1327 I7W 36ft 36*— ft 

■ 16e .9 15 7895 IBft 18'-i IBW + * 

120 3.9 74 30W 30* TOW— ft 

J 3D B 3 93.40% 399* 40% + * 

2JQ 10 J 2x23% 27ft 22% 

2J8 8J 13 50 29ft 27ft 29% + W 

100b2J 12 417 43* 43'/* 43ft- ft 
IJO 17 10 IBB 32ft 31ft 32ft + ft 

2.13134 A 16 30 6ft 6W 6W — * 

2.16 88 B 6834 74% 24% 24W 

284 9J> J 7950 ?)ft 21 W 21ft 

180 13 9 874x25ft 24 * 74* — ft 
2J2 4.7 11 33? 41 40ft «* 

IK M 1 3BW 38ft 38* 

260 9.7 1 26* 26* 26* -*■ ft 

1.72 43 364 28 27W 27VJ # ft 

1X» 2J lo 7255 «* 41* 41*— * 

LOO 7.0 49 57VJ 56* 57 >U 

.12 3 23 1205 17* 16* Mft — ft 

■24b 2? 5 695 8* BW B* + * 

452eJ3L? 1 87 47 47 +1 

.13 j IS ITBS 26ft 25ft 25*- ft 

650 Mft 9ft ID 

1.24 6.9 8 316 18* 17* 17ft — ft 

WOO 7J | 1J28 79* 79ft 79ft— ft 

S3 2.1 9 16 24% 24 24 'i 

2.07 42 9 651 24ft 24% 54ft + * 

51 16359 92 MW MW Mft + ft 

43 21* 21ft 71ft— % 
1.92 19 82 1969 48* 4Sft 48ft 


trMixtft 
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23 a* TWA 784 97ft 22ft 22ft 

1* 13'/, TWA Pl 2.25 14.9 76 15ft 15ft lift - * 

34 24V Tronsm 141 5J1 18 1138 aft 33ft MW— J? 

21* 18 T ranine 2JS I0J 1 3 22V, 21* = + “ 

M 11% TAPHv 100 8.1 88 II I2'.h IZft 12* — % 

21* 15% TrnCflo nl.12 48 7 5B law 16ft Mft 

57% 44 Tronsco 6.978119 M 641 gw 52, ^-7 * 

S3 S3 TrnSC Pl 4.75 9.0 1 5?* g* SS + ^ 

74* lfft TronEr 2J6 11.7 96 20% 50 20* - * 

13ft 5% Trarr sen 8 68 Bft 8 ft 8ft + % 

97 U’ft TrGP O' LM 9 Si 50* 96 M 96 

2Sft 22 TrGP Pf 2 50 9.8 20 25* 25H Z»h + * 

IJ* BM Trmon 5 772 lift lift II* 

47ft W ft Tronwr 1B0 19 13 916 46% *6* + n 

43% SflVi TmwIO J8 U M 1870 40% 3W* J® - « 

25ft 12% TwldwlA 3 22** 22* 22Vi — * 

34* 77ft TwWpf 2JM 6.1. 6 3S% 33 33 

17ft 15ft TwkJpl 1.90 10.9 58 17* 17ft 17ft 

49% 3i% Trovler 2.04 aj II 1518 46% 45ft 46% + ft 

J8ft 50* Travel 4.16 7j 13 55* 55* 55ft 

28ft 72* TrICon 3J8#12j 108 28 27* T7*t— * 

32ft 7ft Trioin s .20 6 5 1B3 31 30ft 

15* 23 TrioPe 100 23 10 31 3SW 35* 35W * * 


73.4 19 UlPLol 2 Ji 100 


1 23ft 23ft ZJft 

10 20', TO.t 28* ” * 


-7, ■ ;; 2.9 iv M ith 384) ail 

f' 1 Sr 7/ 3* 50 , « »u ll’l lilZ 


26'4 19 tfonDrn 
5* 3!, VarcO ' 
15* 6% vsreofil 
47* 22''» Va/ian 
13* 9* varo 

TiVh 13 veaco 
17 3ft Vendo 


SO* 24* vFCotd 128 2 A 12 g M ^ 17* - % 

14* 6 uaMTO • 12 fJ iiS 23* — % 

■ 2Sft 14 Vale* Pl 344 14.7 M JV— 

3ft .MSS* ,00 4J 7 45 23* 23* 73*-,: 

rn *.wi •-* ... cv. S". 5* •« 


116 S ’* SW- ;» 
20 M’ft M W, — *» 
26 IJ 23 365 77 26W 26?* 

*9* uoro"" 5 -j n '» MV 6ft MW — "• 

Mft 13 9WM J0 2J 13 » {JS 19 10 

lift wSvevse lJoaio.T « {{5 12“-* 

49ft 39ft VaEPpI 5X0 108 S’* n 72 — ’« 

JT SwvSfSSiiSgj 

S If' vSepSi 720 loi % 71 ^ 

mi 58 VcEPcI 7J5 10i ^ + 

277h 13ft Visitor 6 || 2v | 66ft +lft 

SS 88 3! A SS uS * 


ioit w.fcLfc S yj! w 12, lift 
15-; A.BSS -6 U '6^. li-, lift*" 


sr- 15. /Cera* rn £J 19 2100' 47 Saw 5*%^ 

U ' Af t *rr M t'.W « • .2;2 HH 5^^, 

1 29 19*-: HTPA .6* 27 17 :j 7i 24 j* j 


Slit 30* TrlSine '£ 17 17 1172 51* 49* Mft - W gg 39ft VaEPpI 5X0 

.3 5JI!“ 2K n 3 ,K ,ST~ * nZ m 


17* 12ft Trlnlr jD 36 
J5W |4* TrtlEW .10b J 
19ft 9ft TfllE Ol 1.10 6J 


JO 36 65 >3* 13ft 13* 

10b J 7* *76 32* JI> 37ft + ft 

.10 4J 316 17% 17% 17ft + W 


JOU 24-* Zo'eCO 
23 : 19 : JnleoTA 
17 x 7 - Iwtt’B 
si, llftternrh 
25 It u JemMiE 
21ft 15 : 4 Zersv 
41* 2 4**U««'» 


r W!£& ‘-£ i? n ■’? Si Si ’O'W 

Cnleo/A Vr_ 16 2 75ft 22H 77% _ 

2*0310 .12 ‘4 «3 4*5 B'V.pJ.i 

iZerrev 4fi 8 17 S24 «. 58 ; 

. ZenUhE «W 510 1 7ft 17ft !jis~ 

: Zeros jj .6 17 SB JO is* » % 
1 Zu#i!i*> 133 25 lx’ IBS 3 *W B, 

MSt Hi^iis-limvi vi 


30 

JX0 32 13 


NEW HIGHS 104 


59ft 3VW UAL 1-00 2X 

36ft M'l UAL of ZA 7£ 

17Vs 10ft UCCEL 
30 JJftUDCn 4X0 163 

24ft 18% UGI 104 VJ 

25ft 20* UGI pl 2.75 11X 

11% 8* UNCRei 


104 9 J 12 356 


3IW 26 WICOR 2 M BX B 61 27V 77 J 

i8ft Taft Wcchov 1X0 V> 738 3. -J- g,. _ . 

2S* 16W Wockht 60 2J ^ 

B" iis ssEu ... j =. “’i'-ra-.n/' 1 

u u wlMrtoI 4 125 Ifi. 'sir- Tl ^ 


14 10% UPS 

Mft 23ft uSFG 
44ft 26* USG 5 
19ft Uft UnIFrst 


.40 3 j 13 U 
120 SJ 1122 
1X8 4.1 7 2176 


Tl ttV. .U j 27 MM 38% 28ft 2f* u W 

a ^ Kiai 9, a « 1 £ f ^ 

TOU 2*’h WollJm 1.40 .17 7 9SL ^ ^ t •. 


J *} J3 ,393 « ££ »2- ?? m »* ulrtSv Jjoe 33 IJ 393 


110 A6 
IJ8 5.9 90 

1.00 ax 
ix u 1 


1.74 2J 18 1405 74W 77* 73ft— ft 

ao 14 lj* 510 23* 23% 23ft + ft 

54 14 12 1073 22ft 21ft 21*— ft 

32 18 M 159 lift lift lift- * 

1X0 13 9 1522 53 52W 52* + W 

175 53 40:71* 71* 71* 

JO II 8 56 19ft 19 19% — W 

5) 37 10 35 13ft 13ft 13% + ft 

1X4 3J II 114 30% TO 30% 

1X8 3D 10 90 34 35ft 36 ■*■ ft 

?_J0oi0J 33 lift 11 lift 

.12 4X 45 7ft 7* 2ft 

.76 5.7 10 327 13W 13ft 13ft + ft 

120 15 14 1495 34* 34 W 34*— % 

130 it 845 26 25% 96 + * 

1JS 5.9 90 S3 28* 28W 28ft— W 

1.00 ax 100:12V: I2W 12W— % 

1 A0 14 9 24 48 47ft 47ft— ft 

AC lj 39 244 31ft 31ft 31ft + ft 

1.10 11 11 588 36% 35ft 34 - ft 

1.92 10X 14 140 19% ISft Mft + ft 

546 1ft 1ft 1ft 

JO J 393 92 91* 92 + % 

1 JOe 7.1 109 18* 18ft 18% — ft 

XO 3X 38 100 21ft 21 21 — % 

39 5* Sft 5ft— ft 

J8 IJ IS 12 34% 36 36 — ft 

83 10ft 10ft 10* 

2J0 4j 23 987 51 50ft 50ft— % 

125 12 4 105 104ft 104W— 3 

1X0 IB 12 Ml 47ft 47ft 47* + % 

629 6% 6 Aft — W 

1.19 15.9 1SS 7ft 7ft 7ft 

1J0 3.1 11 885 38* 37* 38* +1 

J8 ID 17 494 21ft 21 21ft— % 

JS 1.0 13 615 44% 45* 46% + 4 

JB U 21 B 13% 13 13 — % 

1X8 S3 646 21ft 20ft 20*8— ft 

140 7.1 10 34% 33* 33*— ft 

IS 39 12ft 12 12ft 

1.92 17 15 1616 72ft 71 71*— lft 

2 36ft 36Va 36ft 

.44 IX IS 1237 47ft 42ft 42% + ft 


41* 33% UComp 1A4 U 16 1400 


Jl 3J 21 
1X8 S3 
140 7.1 

IS 


136 7J * 
II 

125 6.7 f 
1X0 16 77 


343 33 32* 33 

S3 7* 7ft 7* 
41*18* ISft 1848 + % 
52 27ft 27ft 27ft — ft 


44* 32* UnCm-Q 3 JO 5 7 7405 

4ft 4ft UnlonC 229 

Mft ISft UnElec 124 9.1 7 960 

32Vi 15 UnEl of 150 112 1101 

“ “• UnEl Pi 4X0 IDA 20tU 38 

UnEl pf 6J0 UJ l? 154 ?* 

UeElPlWAXO 117 52 31% 

UE'PlL 8X0 llj Ml SO* 73ft 

UnEl pf 198 llj 194 27 

UnElpl 2.13 TDD 258 IP* 

UnEl ot 2.72 10J 1 26ft 

UnEl Pf 7.44 1 IX 102204 67H 
UEIplH 8X0 11.9 570: 6BW 

unE.nn Jle 1.9 102 22ft 

UnPac 1X0 34 11 3438 TO 

UnPc pl 7.25 6A 9 ' I0*ft 

unrvi of 8.00 11.1 1230: 

UnirDr 70 

UnBmfi X5e 3 12 38 

U8rd of 19v 

UCbTV 6 .10 J 57 71 

iJnEnra 148 5A 58 

U Ilium 2.00 7.9 5 310 

UllluDt 3.97 13A IS 

Ullluor 120 llj llOOr 

Ulllu ol 4.00 13J 25 

UlllUPt 1.90 13X - 15 

Unilind A0 15 9 83 

unmnn 33 j 38 6 

UJerBS l.M 13 11 88 

UlOMM 71 

UPkMn 1 192 

UscirG .12 J 7 B95 

USHom 767 

US Leas X0 12 10 501 

USXhoe .92 11 15 1348 

U 551 eel 1X0 A3 25 2649 

USStlpf SDlelOj 600 

USSIIPf 125 7.9 157 

USTab 1X2 5.7 10 564 

USWeSt S.72 7.1 B 780 

UnSKk 13 ID 

UnTech 1 JO 3J 10 J779 x 

UTetiPf 155 71 139* 

UniTel 1.72 flj 9 1956 

UfliTI pl 150 4j 

UI1IT2BI 150 55 1 


2548 1 7ft wrnn^g I SO . I.lirri»» •»>» 

39ft 79ft woiCSv JO 1.3 IB 3] M* X . M* Eosin Utn 

39V, 2*’h WollJm 1.40 3J 7 301 38ft 3| Mj* * | piowerinO 

9?h 8 WOIU « 1X0 103 3TO: 9* 9 j 9* * , ^rj^rPma 

32 W T7% Womoo D8 1* M » *J J Sft - ft Hr/n£ i,^, 

34ft 19ft WrnCm Ills 34- 33,1 2 Inait" 70ea( 

46W 313b WornrL 1X4 4X 12 2587 40, » •« 5*?* W lfvflB ai, odt 

— .k 17U IAMUiR, IU II 1 AS 21* 21ft 2Tft . I , 


AdooePacn 

AlWSflOPlA 

8ollrtPr>PI 

BrownGro 
Centei 
Camdiacn 
CnPn 74Sof 

Curtlii Wft 
Eaain urn 
PlovrerlnO 
GtroerProa 


AddxRhOfA AdOCeRSdB AlliHSOn,: 

AmCOT !3?5o AmHenlLf Anwffin ! ' 
Bell Inuusl 

CNA Pml Ctfrnar^ 

C.nG928pf 

ConAora Con Ed tr^ 

ConKl adi a Cnnm c 

Dopw Cfl Dreyfiis 

ExCelto For wm. 

GenElec GoPocirf 

Guttotcma 
HerjfMr 


28* 20% Workjn . Ja IJ JI 797 2Sft 25ft 2|W SelW Lot: 

II 8* WorOoi X0 10 10 3 10 9 4 97* * SrorerBrdi 

23 19'AWPvGpMAO 7.7 1 W- 20* 20* » Tronsm Inc 

13ft 3H WeanU | ** 4- U5Shoe 

23ft 16 - Weatjp 50 IX 10 1M 9U IB* 1»U + ft vaEF730(rf 

20ft 17 WemRn J9i 13 1 i»* iP*— J WesronEi 

35* 23 WeisM * JO 14 II ]TO 35-. 35 35* — ft 

« Well? F_ 2J0. AX 8 23J 40ft 40 J £ ’ 


Lenvoi wi 
Met£ fl»2pf 
Noi&«ciml 
Oec.P212of 
PoriG 340d 
Seift Loll 
SnrerBrdi 

Tronsm Inc 
USShoc 


WetF 01 A50e 89 


40 50ft 50ft 50ft + ft 


29% 20ft WelFM 2X0 117 10 2»0 22ft 2}*» 22 — * 
19ft 12 Wendv 4 X4 lj 16 1B68 16%. lPh 16 + ft 


AlaPw 1548a 

EntcrEng 

Narlin 


BoirSEs 

BrnmoFer 

CbrrSler 

CmE tlfflof 

CnPw76tof 

34IE 763of 

EauHcmS 

EordlMor 

GHW 5750f 

Heiencw 

MdiV 7l5d 

JerCe8l2of 

Lehi/olptA 

MKEdpii 

W/vEnaEl 

OMtns'll 

Raychem 
SherMtnwm 
SunTrstBirn 
UnEl WL 
. UntvFds 
varaadoinc 
WisPubSv 


AmCenrCo 
ForsOruo 
Norlnd PS- 


Ke*carp 
LoneSla I red 
MerEOPlH 
HTS880PI 
Oxloralrw 
Ravooiern 
Smimfieck 
Teltdyo# 
Unit Ilium 
UtPLWtof 


HunlMia 
jnlrstBwif. 
LePOMOsoi 
AAeivmr™ 
NslEOoc . 
NwtPio23i 

Pl»El78toS 
RWNY3J2S 
SieniftBhct 
‘ Texas mu 
UiBilwn 
VoEP 84_ 


WOlMortpfA WastUM 
wooiworin Wooiwrnjjc 


BonVAmRtv 
Inrtoy 150a 
PlomsWrn 


vlTocomBcar Te.AmBnch TnomMKte 


Cieveoak ' 
Mornantai 
Savin isopt 
Wfl/Kokr j 


26ft 11 WAIrpf 2X0 84 24 24 23ft M*— % 

8W 1ft WCNA 511 5ft 2'h 2ft u % 

51 M* WCNA 01715 363 41 20, IT.. ST + W 

133 99* WPocI 11 13 130* 129* 130- +1 

15ft 5* WUruon 1382 13H I2*b I3U. ♦%. 

4Tft 24% Wnun pl _ 13 39W 39 39. • ■" « 

7W 2% WnUpfS 107 7 6ft 6T« 

13* Jft WnU PtE SI 13ft 12ft JJft — ft . 

Mft fti WUTI erf A la U'li 14% 14% I 

44 34 WstaE 1X0 27 13 6414 44.. 43ft 44%. + ft 

41* Mft Westvc 1X2 3J 10 316 39 38 39 - % • 

34 24* wevern IXO 4J 28 10a Mft 78ft 28ft *■ h 

44ft 36ft Werrp* 2D0 4X 87 41% 41 41% + % 

Sift 45* Werror 450 92 70 49% eft .48*— ft 


AMEY ili^is4xn^ 


87 41% 41 41% + 'i 
70 49% eft 48*— ft 
13 Bft 8* B* 


3Tft 

Lft vlWPllpIB 



200c 20% 

20L. 

20ft + ft 


10% viWhPlrcrf 



410: 15*4 

15V. 

ISft - 


40% Whtrlpl 2X0 

<4 

10 

712 

45ft 

45% 

45ft— % 


2S% Wn.tC 150 

47 


2M 

37% 31* 

32% — -ft 


46ft WtalC pf 73X0 

6J 


1 

47% 

47% 

47% 

34% 

19% Whllehl 


9 

55 

23% 

23ft 

23ft— % 

76ft 

17% Whitiak M 

13 

9 

4340 

18% 

17ft 

18% +1 

12% 

6% witbiat 

17 


135 

lift 




Alarm lore 

ChaTTToPrd 
ESI Ind 
Glattllr 
LandRikSnc- 
Pro "Lam * 
SCE 85tfof . 


Ailratecn 
Oetmed - 
GRI Carp 
Seton s 


- AmCant Rid 
Ctaremont 
FerdCan a 
HoUrCorp 
Larimer 
smvlree Tr 
VnCo&Fina 


BowneCo 

CroumCrl 

Forestcty a 

Kormel 6 

AAcrkIVs 

Sborrbii 

WescoPin 


Con doomS 

EPcintv 

GlontFoo* 

HubelB^S 

PeinTiT 

Smith AQ it 


CoscMm Camroco 
OevonResln n Elsinore 


TumerEoi n WrenerErf n 


HMC pro prv MSR Exota 


Phil pl 17.12 14 0 

1001122 

122 

177 

+1 


407112 

112 

117 


FhilE ul 9 50 132 

1400: 72 

71 

77 

+ '.I 


940: 62% 

61 

61 

+1 

PnrfE of 7.75 I3J 

10c 58 

58 

58 



23’. 15": PMISub U2 4.1 13 B 71ft 21ft 21ft 

95 h ;? PhilWlr 4X0 53 B 3031 75 ?b 75ft 75ft— ft 

76* lft, Philpln a 0 28 12 135 22 21ft 21*— % 

bi's 39ft Philinpl 1.00 1.9 2 53ft 53ft 53ft— % 

18* lift PhllPts 1.00 75 II 174)2 1J>n 12ft 13ft 

25': 23% PhIPI P* 'Xte 43 171 24', 24 24 ft 

30ft 20ft PhilVH 40 lj 14 49 29ft 29* + ft 

• IT-3 25 0 PiedAs JS .9 8 309 32ft 31* 31ft— ft 

34 28ft FicNG 237 7.1 11 87 33* 32** 32*— W 

25ft Lft Pier l 14 32 25M Mft 25 — ft 


» 14* RuSSBr 14 7V 71% 20V 21 + % 

24 15ft RusTog 76 37 10 2 6 21ft 20ft 70ft— ft 

31% 21 RvanH 1J0 4D 8 407 74ft 24ft 24* + ft 

30ft 22 Ryders A0 20 12 1415" TOft 30 30% + ft 

V 18ft Ryiand A6 25 13 111 26* 26 76% — * 

70 ft Bft Rymer 4 27 IS M* Mft 

13ft 10ft Rymer pfl.17 I0X 43 11* II* II* + % 


S’* lft viTocSf 
57% S2>7 Tat 3rd 1.16 IJ 16 


3X0 35 36 3M 76ft 76ft 76* 


97 lft 1 1 — ft 

62 81ft 81 W 81% — ft 


21ft 12ft Tollev JOe 1.1 13 328 18 17* IB + ft 

23ft 15 Tolley Pi 1X0 5X 2 19ft 19* 19ft 

87 54ft Tombrd 3J0 4X 15 354 85ft Mft 85 — ft 

38ft 23* Tandy 18 2437 37ft 37W 37ft + % 

15* 12ft TndvcH 15 3 15* 15ft 15% 

48% 47ft Tekrrnx 1X0 1.9 14 508 52* S3 52ft— ft 


ADVERTISEMENT 1 — 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Nov/18, 1985 


Net-osu! value quota! Ians are supplied by the Fundi listed wild the exception of soma quote* tesad an Issue price. 

The marginal symbols indicate frequency of quotations supplied: (d) -daily; (w) - weekly; (b) -bl-monthiv; (r) - regularly; (i) - irregufariv. 


34 Mft FioNG 2.32 7.1 12 87 33% 32ft 32* — ft 

Lft Pier i 14 32 25M Mft 25 — ft 

' 43': 38V Pllsbrr 1.72 3X 13 874 57": 57V« 57 Vs 

34 21': Pioneer IJ4 5J 12 474 21* 23ft 23ft— W 

To* lift PianrEl X8e 5 3 15* 15ft 15* -t ft 

45ft 33ft Pitnyfl l.M 27 15 1352 45'. 44W Mft + ft 

91 44 PllnBol 112 2J 1 Wn B9ft B9ft— I 


«l 44 PllnBol 112 2J 

Mft 94, pitta In 
II 1o* PlonPtn .07 j 

17 9ft FlonRs JD 1.1 

13 7 Plonlm .)6b IJ 

13ft ?% Plavbov 


.07 A 199 16 

JD 1.1 M 40 18 

■l4b IJ 13 193 13 

75 28 B 


19ft lift P 000 Pd .60 4j 60 


794 12ft 12ft 12ft— % 

199 16* 16ft 16ft — ft 

40 18ft 10ft ISft — ft 

1C4 13 12ft lift— ft 

28 8% B 8% 

73 12ft 12ft 12ft — ft 


J»% 14% Poiarld 1X0 17 54 1094 37ft 3a* 37 — ft 


. 16>. 10ft Pondra jo ... _ __ . . 

'‘21ft 15% PcioTal XO A4 82 479 18ft 17ft 18 +ft 

22* LV, Porlec A0 75 96 17ft 17% 17*— ft 

Mft 73 Parfrpf 550 7.1 life 7H 78 78 + ft I 

, 21 M’ a PortG E 1.90 9X 9 409 21ft 20* 21 W + ft 
104 9J' : PaGof 1150 10.9 10:105* 105V 105* + % 

•24.-0 19* PorGpl 2.60 10J 13 2S Mft 24ft— ft 

35ft 31 PorG pt 4J0 12X. - 57 34ft 34Va 34% + ft 

Mft 30ft PorG pf 4J2 VLB 16 34 33ft 33*— ft 

«ft 28ft PotlfCll 156 4J 15 227 38% 36ft 1 7W -1 

M Mft PotmEI 116 6.7 9 1159 32ft 32* 32% - ft 

46' s 38 PolElDf 450 9.9 51ft 45ft 45ft 45ft +1 ft 

41* 33 PotEI pl 4X4 10 1 800: 40 40 40 +ft 

25ft 18'* Preml 5 -34 U 19 73 251. 25 2SW 

Ilk, IS Prim! s IS 332 20% 19* 20 - * 

20ft 14ft FrimeC 17 2147 19ft 19* 19ft + ft 

J7* 16'* PrimMs .09 J 27 1301 37 36* 37 

67ft 50ft ProctG 250 AO 17 1B5B 65ft 451* 65* + % 

IS B PrdRss JB 1.9 23 157 14* 14ft 14ft 

45* 35’ : Proler 1.40 3J M Ml 43ft 42 42* — 1 

2ft 3 PruRCn IBS 2ft 2 2 

Sft 8 PruRi n 81 8ft 8 8 

24% 18 PSvGol 100 9.9 9 1557 20ft 30% 20% — % 


J 34 37B 15ft ISft 15ft 


155? 20ft 70ft 20% - % 



5% 7ft Telcom 10 26 S 2ft 3 

279ft 227 Teldvn 11 308 281 277VJ 280ft +?ft 

24 12ft Tetrafe J2 2.1 20 185 15* 15 15% — U 

51 W 30* Telex 12 1148 50% JSft 50% 4-1 

40ft Jl* Tempfn 4/ 14 II 226 3*ft 39ft 39% + ft 

45* 33% Tennco 3X4 75 14 2298 39% 38% 39 + ft 

105% 94 W Tencpr 11X0 108 MldOIft 101 W 101ft +lft 

84* 72% Tencpr 7J0 8.9 264x 84 83W 13ft +■ ft 

32% 17V. Tordvn 14 9S3 20* 20 20W + ft 

15 8% Tesoru JO 4X 411 10% 10 10W— % 

27V: 20ft Tesor pl 116 93 . 108 22ft 22 22ft— W 

40T, 32ft Texaco 3X0 7J 27 3374 39% 39% 39% — W 

37V, 26% T>ABc 152 5X 8 258 Z7W 25* 26 — 1 

44 25ft TexCm 156 55 7 4444 Z7* 26ft 26ft— W 

39 26ft Tex Est 2J0 Al 9 701 36ft 361k 36ft— ft 

34% 25 Texlnd XOb 2X 11 159 30% 39% X* 

131* 86% Teklnst 2X0 IX >85 1448 100 99 99ft + ft 

5* I Texlnt 5319 5ft 5% Sft + 

21ft 14% TexOGs .18 1.1 12 5769 16 15* 15ft 

34* 28* TxPac JO IJ 22 85 29ft 29% 29ft— ft 

31ft 25ft Texlitll 252 8.7 7 2062 29ft 29 29— ft 

4ft 2 Texfiln 46 3% 3ft 3ft— W 

59* 31 Textron 1X0 3 5 9 608 50% 50ft 50ft — ft 

. 66 Mft Tertrpf 2X8 JX 2 54* 54* 54* 

53 28* Textrpf 1J0 11 5 44* 44ft 44* + ft 

lift 4% Thadc 292 5 8* 8* S%- ft 

23 10 ThrmEs 23 136 Mft 20 20%—% 


32% 17v. Tordvn 
15 8% Tesoro JO 4X 

37V: 20% Tosor pl 116 97 


4ft 2 Texfiln 46 3% 3ft 3ft— W 

59* 31 Textron 1X0 3 5 9 608 50% 50ft 50ft — % 

66 Mft Tertrpf 2X8 18 2 54* 54* 54* 

53 28* Textrpf I JO 11 5 44* 44ft 44* + ft 

11V: 6% Thadc 292 5 8* 8* ff%- ft 

23 10 ThrmEs 23 136 20ft 20 20%—% 

43% Mft ThmBet 131 36 It 329 37* 37% 37% u ft 

19% 15% Thom In A8b 35 10 13 18ft 18* ISft 

11% lift ThmMcd JO 14 10 150 12ft 11* II*— % 

MW lBft Thrifty 50 25 IS 150 23* 23% 23%—% 

ii. 'E? I Mwrtr M 62 357 11 ■■7 H 14% - % 

10ft 5% Tiger In 566 lft 7ft 7ft — % 

41* 40, Time 1X0 IJ IB 376 59% 59% 59%- % 

2% 14* TjmuK IB 125 Mft 20 20%—% 

58ft 38 TlmeM 1J6 17 13 765X49* 48ft 49* +1% 
55* 41% Timken IXOa 4X 57 TO 45% 43 44* +2% 

9% 4% Titan 2M 7 6* **— % 

39% 26% TodShp 152 45 IS 119 28* 28ft Mft— % 

21% IBiTokhms J8 25 11 108 18% 18% 18% 

21% 16 Vi TolEdl* 152 110 5 730 21 20* 21 

»% =4% To! Ed Of 172 13X 106 2PM 28% 23% + % 

30% 25 TclEdpI 3JS 110 25 29% 28* 28* 

Mft 23% To I Ed Pf 3J7 12.7 8 2 Tft 27’i 27%—% 

33ft 2W4 TolEdof4J8 110 7 33 33 33 + % 


720 21 20* 21 

106 28ft 28ft 23* 
25 29% 28* 2^. 
8 27% 27* 27V 
7 33 33 33 




Id! Dreyfus Fund Inn S «Jt! 

fwl Dreyfus IntBrcaafbwu.. S 3021 

tw) The Establishment Trust S Kffl 

( d; Eurtme OBHsatioTC Ecu 6351 

(«J Fir wEcHle Fund *117.42* . 

! r J Fifty Stars Ltd S 90x2 

Iwl Fixed income Trans S 10J9 

(wl Ponedex issue Pr. SF 20155 . 

[wl Forextvno : 1 73* 

(w) Formula Selection Fd. SF a5J6 

Id 1 Fondltallo S JAM 

[ d 1 Gove nun. Sec Fund* S VSAf 

{d> Frankf-Trun imenirn DM 41 55' 

(wl Haussmann Hides. N.V S 132X21 

fw) Hestio Funds s lMJd . 

Ivy) Horizon Fund - S 13X IS 

(mi IBEX Holdings Ltd 5F TTi* 

I r) ILA-1GB: 1 « 

( r 1 ILA-IGS S lOiT 

IdJInterhmdSA s 1851 

Cw tafermarket Fund. i I86J6 

Id HntermlnfnuMul. Fd.a.’B’_ * mojQ 

( r Inti Securities Fund t 111] 

Id investa DWS DM sbaj 

I r Mnvwt Alton houes 8 9J7 

ir I ml tort on* imt Fund SA S 1810 

<w Japan SefecTton Punts, X 13114 

'«ir) 3dPPn Padflc Fund * 116X8 

i-Jeffer Ptns. intL Ltd sumtihs 

, «. Xle*n*vqfT BOpson inftFD. — X 21 M 

(wl Klelnwort Bens. Jat>. Fd S 86.4. 

wl Korea Grovrm Trust f.w 8 a7259 

% 9.70 

(d > L»! com Fund — X 139451 

1 wl Leverage Can HokL — X 184J1 

f d TUaulboer. 5136800'; 

tw Luxftjnd.— -1 X 7SJ7 

(m AVaonofUnd N.V. X 15*22 

Id AAedtalaiuim Sel. Fd X 2JL49; ' 

:fr- Meteor* Y 103J63XO • 

fw NAAT_ X 11.15 

(d Nlklca Growth Package Fa— 5 8982X9 

{w Nippon Fund 5 35X81-. 

m NOSTECPorrtoflo— — 55138X6:. 

w Novolec Investment Fund 5 95X9' 

w NAM.F 5 171X6 

m NSP F.l.T—. X 17AJJ 

d I Pacific Horizon invt. Fd 5 121920,'.- 

Wl PANCURRt Inc 5 21J6 

r ) Porfon Sw. R Est Geneva „ 5F 1TO7X0 . 


,y ( 


( r I Permai value N.v 

f r j Pfeiodes— 

(wl PSCO Fund N.V 

(wl PSCO Intt. N.V 

1 a 1 Putnam Inn Fund _ 

t r j Prl-Tecn 

Cwi Quantum Fund N.V.. 

f d } Renta Fund 

Id) Renthivest 


5132851 
5 112466 
5 13250 
5 105J6 
5 7255 
5 BBOJAi 
5 5315* 
LFM12^ 


( d 1 Reserve Insured Deposits 5111858“' 

t w ) Rudolf WolH Fuf Fd Ltd X 125300' ' 

(wl Samurai PorMnim SF n7J5 

(d ) SCI/Tech.SA Luxembourg _ 5 11^ 

Iw) Seven Arrows Fund N.V X 9j*Xl 

(wl State St. Sank Equity HdgsNV_siaH 

(wl Strolesy Investment Fund S 2425 

(d 1 Syntax Lta.TCiass AV 5 115# 

Iwl Tectmo Gronrrn Fund SF 40** 

l d ) Thornton Australia Fd Lid * 948 - 

(diThorntonHKa.Ch.no 5 10JI 

l d Thornton JOPan Fund Ltd 5 1252 - 

id] Thornton Orient. Inc Fa Lid— _ 5. 

twl Tokyo Pac Haw. (Seal S 10749 

iwl Takee Pac Hold, n.v x 14751 - 

(wl Transpacific Funa 5 97J3 

jwj Trans Europe Fund Fi 

7X6 ( d 1 Turquoise Fund J 11441 

0X2 lw> Tweedv. Browne n.v.Oas*A_ B23GUr. ' 
»•?? <w> Tweedv3i-awne n.y.CloMB— X 1686X1 . 
7} 7.?!?5S. v J? rovme <O.K.) n.v._ $101954,' 

159 (d ) UN ICO Fund DM Ta.M*’ . 

1X2 Id) UNI Bond Fund— i $117199'. 

lv? i; 1 UNI CoottoJ Funo X 121756 

4Jt A Uf Federal Securitas 5 103* 

( d J US Treasury Income hmd 5 %. 

I wl VBnaerMit Assets — _ 5 I25i 

(dl Wend Funds a , ^ 


Nntli 


DM - DeutScB* Mark; BF.-Betolum Francs; FL- Dutch Florin; LF ■ Luxembourg Francs; ECU 'European Currency Unit; SF - Swiss Francs; 0- asked; N. 

P/V S10 M 11 per uni! ; N JL - Nol Available; N.C. - NcrCommimlco tedro ■ New; S - suspended ; 5/J - Stack Split; - - E < -Dividend: -Ej-Rts: • Gro^PeTto rriTari« 1 S? ^Y- • ;■ 

Reuempl- Price- Ex-Cpupoo; •• - Formerfy worldwide Fund Lidr 9 - Offer Price Ind. 3% prelim, charge; ++ -doJly slock price as on Amaferdom StackEkchmKie * 5,p,e,T ’ ,> *^ 


You can tell successful business 
travellers by the way they fiy to the USA 
They fly TWA first Class and use the 
American Express Card. 

For successful business travellers 
expect the luxurious comfort of 
TWAs Sleeper-seats. A superb 
choice of meals. Vintage wines 
The highest level of personal 
attention and service 

And when you fake the 






-C7*L^ r T 


American Express Card along, you have 
the idea] travelling companion. Because 
it's known and welcomed all over the USA 
You can use the Card to pay for your 
hotels, rental cars, meals and, of course, 
your TWA first Class tickets 
So next time you're 
planning a trip to tine USA, 
fly TWA first Class and 
charge it with the American 
Express Card. 



Void *ro^. kW .11 . 1 Of* 


R^BE&3KE|]EiEI]E3 





To; Subscription Manager, Intemtfional Heraid Tribune, 

1 81 , avenue Oxirles<Je-Gciulle < 92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. TeL : 47 47 07 29. Telex- 61 283'’ 

Please enter my subsc ription for: ‘ •’ :J 

□ 12 months- [ + ^] Q 6n^ ( + ?^) ‘ Q ( + W) j 

_LJ ^ cHecks enclosed Q] Please charge my credit cord nr^.^ . ' .’j 


-•**•+&** ■ 
■«."*«» ft ~ 




CD MG e Q^H 

Acob * ^^^Americon __ ™ .JSL, Ewo- 

c^dE^ess BS S&M-O* ^“rd *5* 


□ j;-' 


, i 15 

ligsggnnaMSBBg?3 



me American Expre® card. Leading the way to the USA 

Don’t leave home without it" ° 7 





Car doccouri number 
SgXtfbre 


Ccrdwprydotp 


en 4 - 


Tar • 

. ke » n Jf ‘ ■' 
' S ;-A , 

'■ ‘ b'L-i,., 

■* ** 

























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'/*■* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1983 


IISl futures 


js«i Smboh 
, tot) LOW 


OOM Hfeft 


L«W : QOM OWL 


it. 


Groins 


’ •'5^ um ^'JWf r i - ch3ila r s{»f Bcahe) 
‘Wa MW* Dec u?Vyxg 




■ n 

TTfa 

.« 

W* 


(.Sain 


247 

iM 

za 

us 

2.W.6 


Mar 138K UW 
«tov .J.WJ 117V. 

249Vfi 291 
Sea mu 291 Vi 
DtC.lOT iff! 

— - — _ . Prev.Sain ijm , 

icv.Oay Onanlni. 30935 up 860 
.-RN(CBT) 

Jut 205 2xs* 
5 bp £33 U, 2J3Vj 
D ec 295 W 777 
Mar 233 SjS 
Prov.Sotes 3592) 


■IS 
% 27 

:*v\ . 

• a 

; 7th 

■w,- ■ 

• HVa. 

. I. Sates 


204V5 
131 
133 
£24 Vk 

im 

233 


:w.DayOitenlM.l442ffl up LJOS 
Y BEAMS (CBT) 




t j J tl V IDUUI91LSIJ 

J 5 "Udw 'S^n^isJlnsr.^tjg 1 



uw 

Mar 5.17 I5S3 
May 227 
Jul 503te 50314 
Aua 539 539 

Sen 114 214 

NOV 5.12V, 2ms 
Jan 53D . iso 

— Pm, Sain 55.944 

. ~ev. Dav Open Int. 74453 off2563 
4 ' V BEAM MEAL tCBTJ 
■ Hons- dollars per ftp 

.'400 12540 Me 13990 13940 


UH' -JQ 

236 3J7 jan 

114* -42£ 
29* 187 —OK. 
2X7 ■ 2X7 — 

19Bfc 2»9- 


2%* SL3W +j0W 

UW, ZtTVl —-40K 

2X3* 2Am — 4114 

243V,. 244- — 43 
2JlVi 2JTV, — 41V6 
ilRfc 23454 — J n 

132»* 132V, —41 


448 490 -T-.12V, 

A91M 4J72K -vMUt 
500 541W — >UW, 

50 m, 549 -.rav, 
m. £ni4 — ja* 
513 £13 —.18V. 

£02 £02 ■ — .t2 

SM SM —.12* 
513 513 ■— .13 


S3JJ0 

• ' 1*00 

> . .7JM 

• ajo 

.740 

iuo 
. : iido 
HUB 


. •*■ LSntas 


*7.07 
1300 
?7XS 
■ J525 
-*5.15' 
16.05 
iiro 
11,90 
>140 
I. Sol 


137.00 Jon 
13000 Mar 
132158 
13400 
13550 
13756 
13900 
14100 
14 TOO 


[3900 13900 
s-sttao usnoa 
Alov 1423D 1 4790 
|MS5l 143401 
43J3D 14250 


Jul 

Aug 


Sep 14050 14050 
Oct 137.00 137.00 
Dec 14000 14000 
JonMOJJO 14000 
Prav. Sales 21.772 ■ 
ev. Day Open Int. 61077 off £134 ' 

YBEAN OIL {CBTJ 
-oOOtta-doHarentrlOOUK. 

?90S 1745 -Dec 2050 2006 

1932 Jan . 20.65 mJs 
TWO Mar 2053 
M. Me 21.22 2102 
»X0 Jul 2145 203 

M47 AUS 200 200 

3P® gep 200 2120 
2045 OCJ 

20^ Dec 2110 21.10 
2035 Jan 

Prey. Sales 15.959 


13490 >3540 
T2JL4G T2S.9Q 
13AD0 T3730 

3S3 1S3 
3S33 

134m mm 
13800 13400 
136JM 13800 


— 100 
— 34W 
—3.10 
-3X0 
—390 


-S58 

-aoa 


—100 


2505 2500 —48 

20.12 2514 —50 

2032 2043 —57 

2060 M. ^51 
.70 to- - — 55 
2045 20.75 '^02 
2070 20J0 : —.45 

3048 • 47 

2000 2020 -v4I 
2058 —47 


cv. Dav Open Int. 39078 off6B7 - 



Livestock 


WTLK (CMEJ 
IP?0 Fto.. cents per 16. 

SMS 33.00- Dec 6450 6557 6433 

745 5435 Feb 60 JC: 6145-6055 

‘1-2 ABr SfM sfM 

■ 5^ i 1 " S® «^5 59.90 

• 3^0 5£20 Aug 5570 5945 511*5 

*40 5750 Del S7J5 XU5 57OT 

- AJO 59.10 Dec 5935 593S 5946 

> '-Sates 1SJ68 Prev.Sales 19JM • - 
. . ev.DovOaenlM. 67J53 off£l09 . 

i'EDER CATTLE (CMB) 

; a»lbs.-cenUperto. 

• 129 " 58.10 NOV 6100 63.10 MVS 

•»50 .S«50' Jan 65.95 6415 6570 

• I'ffi l tar M40 6480 6655 

• 1J» 60jjO Apr 6405 6630 6535 

O.BD 60.10 May 6440 6505 6453 

050 65.10 AIM . 6535 6550 6120 

.• ). Sales 1059 Prou.Sate* 1388 
7 - ev.Day Open Int. 9560 up 53 


cents par to. 

3435 Dec 4557 4465 

Feb 4440 4487 4430 

Aar 39.75 <030 3935 

Jun 4122 4275 4122 
Jul 43LEU 43.18 4255 
Aim 4150 4150 4150 
Oct 3930 3940 3930 

Dec 4050 4050 4050 
Feb 


6545 
41 JO 
6030 
6060. 
59 J5 
5750 
».T0 


6442 

66.15 

6457 

6550 



3810 
36.12 
3950 
4045 
4035 
3807 
3837 

4040 

. . - ^1. Soles £220 Prev.Salas 6321 
Dar Open Int 28022 oH7 
■7 :•• ' TtK BELLIES (CME) 

• 'lOQlbs.- cents oer lb. 

—630 • 55.75 Feb 5890 5950 

• - ;. 540 5565 Mar 59.15 5980 

. - — 5J>0 57.05 May 6050 £890 

^600 5730 Jul 6132 

.• Jr- 3.15 5550 Aim 5845 58J8 

‘-'.Sales 3440 Prav, Sales 3528 

• • -~"tv. Dav Open Int. L5T3 0H86 


4535 4640 
-44J5 
' 4815. 
4252 
4230 
41 JO 
3930 
4872 
4065 


5850 

5830 

60.15 

6030 

5845 


5935 

99J5 

6087 

6132 

5857 


+33 

+68 

+48 

+35 

+55 

+.W 


— >05 
+02 
+38 
+32 
+05 


t! 

+37 

+.13 

9 

+JB 


+68 

+30 

+47 

+30 

+35 




Food 


/EE C(NYCSCE)- 

0T. lbs.- centsporfb. 

— >50 12935 Doc 15750 15858 15435 15556 —138 

.-■— 7J3 12850 Mar 16130 16170 15030 1593a —30 

■; -Me UUffl. May 16250 163.19 16075 16150 —M 

.: ! M0 .12550 Jul 164JD 16435 16235 16359 +48 


Currency Options 


4^- 


•Saangn Season 

High ..utw 


Open HUM Low Ctow Cbo. 


16706 U23S SOP 16500 1655D 

- 16730 13808 DEC U430 16800 

16735 14250 - Mar - 

Est. sates . - P rev. Sain 3744 

Prev^ovOpaalnL 12,153 wV2 
SUOARWOftLD 11 CNYCSCE) 

i b low to o- bmW per to, 

77$-.-: 300. Jon - £19. £19 

933 . 134 Mar 537 187 

■MS 351 May 60S 60S 

-878- 179 Jut £20 631 

432 43C StP' 636 637 

.496 -am . Oct -653 £53 

.735 425 Jon 

753 . 451 MOT 701 703 

E si. Sales Prev. Sates 8946 

Prev. DdrOPM hrt. 91,124 off 1004 
COCOA [NY CSCE) 

18 metrfewns- *Ptr tan 

2327 . 1945 Dec 2072 2089 

2392 -.» •• 1955 Mar 2160 3107 

2422 . I960 Mov 2225 2138 

2429 .. I960 JUT 2260 2260 

2430 2823 Sea 2294 2296 

2425 2855 Dec 2281 22M 

2385 2029 Mar 

EttSatos 1049 Prev. Solas Ml ■ 
Prev. Day OsonJnt. 19J98 off W 
ORA NCE JUICE fHYCE) . 

15008 tos^'ce wti P T IP. 

18000 111 JO Jan 11360 V. 

17750 11258 MOT 11305 11, 

16250 111JS. - 

15950 .11148 

18060 11100 


163JS 16430 
16X75 16450 
16550 


£02 £11 
533 533 

550 £91 

60S 809 

636 634 

838 639 

652 

637 899 


SOM 2063 

2150 2152 

2205 2205. 
2251 2238 

2280 2262 
3281 2280 
2294 


+45 

+52 

+50 


—.14 
.—.15 
— ,M 

—31 
—25 
—22 
—.16 
— >.13 


■ -1 
—10 
.—42 
— 12 

=# 


MOV T1440 11 
jul 11430. T 


— . 11128 1. 

JBn 11300 11 

14125 111 JO Mar 11300 11300 

En.Sotea 400 Prev, Safes 499 
Prev. DavOnen inf. .8350 off 91 



Metals 


COPPER (C0ME3O 
25000 OK- cants per tow 
6060 6030 MOV 


805 

5800 

Ok 

8430 

SOJS 

Jan 

8040 

5930 

Mar 

. 34-00. 
74X0 

ss 

May 

Jut 

-7o.ro 


Sw 

7O0O 

6135 

Dec 

7020 

6330 

Jon 

&tjro ■ 

mv. 

Mar 

<700 

62.ro 

May 

6630 

633S 

Jul 

U.W 

4100 

5«a 


4230 6230 62.33 62J0 


■ 6430 

6485 6485 6405 0608 

<iju 9BP 6520 £U0 4530 MJOO 

^ Sates Prey. Sates 6380 

Prev. Day. Open tot. 77447 off 5)0 
ALUMINUM (COME3Q 
40000 toe.- cents per to. 

Now 4200' 

7040 4100 Dec : '4250 42.95 4250 4295 

KS0 •- 4*30 Jan <335 

73^ . 42.90 Mgr 4338 4810 4330 4810 

6635 400 May 4485 

; Jul 4530 4&5T 4530 4500 

52.10 4490 Sep 4435 

49.10 4895 Dec 4745 

Jan 4700 

Mar 4855 

SOS 4940 MaV 4930 

5MB SUM ' Jul am* 

Sea aim 

Est. Sates Prev. Sales 197 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1341 op 1* 

SILVER [COMEX1 
'AOODtroyaz.- cents per frov ax. 

•200 '6815 Nov SOM 6080 6000 6087 

map 5900 Dec . 6185 eiao 6090 

12150 5W0 Jon 6185 <165 6160 6189 

119310 OS?0 Mar 6240 *35 9 4320 ffltt 

6190 MOV 6320 634J 6300 6315 

6290 JI4 6390 6425 6390 6403 

6210 Sep 6510 6520 649.6 4493 

4520 Dec 6425 6680 6625 6633 

6660 Jon 6681 

£700 Mar 6773 

<820 Mar eT20 6920 <910 6B&B 

jui 7030 mo 7010 ms 

7094 


— MS 
—45 

—45 

—45 

—45 

-45 

—45 

—45 


+35 

+30 

+30 

+30 

+3Q 

+30 

+30 


10480 

9450 

9400 . 6210 

79*0 
7890 
7700 

7520 

7440 6918 

6570 . 6493 Sea 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 11307 

Prev. Day Open Int. 88239 up 052 
PLATINUM CNYME1 
so irenr oz.-dnHars per trey or. 

35740 33100 Nov 

37350 
35700 
36300 
36000 


„„ 331.10 

257 JO Jon 33850 33800 33330 33430 
26650 Aar. 33700 33830 3355D 33700 
27300 Jul 34050 34100 33900 34030 

M -°e* 3*150 34350 343.90 

3S30O 36900 Jan 35050 35050 34700 34800 

Ext. solos " Prev. Saits 1011 
Prev. Dav Open InL 18171 oHSM 
PALLADIUM I NYME) 

1K8 irov a*. Ooflars per « 

vn sa njx Dec loaoo 10025 9950 raaio 

12750 91.70 . Mor .10135 10140 10100 101.10 

11600 .. 9150 Jun 10250 10100 10240 10260 

11500 9730 Sea . 10455 

10735- 10400 Dec' 10810 

Esl. Salts Prev. Sates 229 

Prev. Dav Open int. 7322 up 90 
BOLD (CQME30 
i w irovaz.- dollars per troy az. 

32A5D 2KL0Q iim/ w m 

48950 30150 Dec 32*80 32530 32400 3243B 

Jan 3263® 

30800 Fab 32930 32930 32830 32880 


48550 . 

*9608 31870 Apr 333.10 333J0 332.10 33240 

*3530- 32050 Jun 33A7D 33700 33600 33640 

33100 Au fl 34100 34100 34030 34080 

oa 14 57 0 

34200 Dec 35820 35020 34970 349.70 

31330 Feb 35431 

35940 
36890 
37040 


42840 
39570 
39300 

35850 . __ 

38840 . 35500 Apr. 

3W.SB 36500 Jun 
385.08 37150 AUB - 

Est. Soles Prev. Sates 17353 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. 128930 off 368 


+7 

+5 

+5 

+4 

+5 

+4 

+3 

+.t 


+00 

+00 

+00 

+00 

+00 

+00 


+00 

+30 

+30 

+30 

+30 


—.10 

—.IB 

— vW 
—3D 

-3 

—30 

—30 


Financial 


US T. KILLS [I MM3 


Pete— Last 


Nov. 18 

ILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
toa & Strike 

Itertylne Price Cans— Last 

Tec Jan Mor Dec Jan Mar 
oo Brftiia NflDtfKHiti per unit 
“mind 135 r r r 0J5 ‘(US 

wo 300 r r 045 

145 040 1-S0 r r 

- -1245 ISO 810 030 130 

W Canadian Dathus-caats per miL 
.-roUr 72 r r r 

•-I68 73 030 r r 

• -1M 74 r r r 

.- ■00 West German MortiKaat* per ualL 
-wit 33 536 e r . 

-827 34 . 827 s r 

35 r r r 




f 


155 370 

r 85$ 

■ r -r 

' r 054 

r. r 

132 r 


36 

Z1S 

r 

. r 

042 

045 

37 

1X0 

r 

r 

045 

815 

38 

007 

r 

1X6 

023 

0X2 

39 

0.15 

0X0 

006 

893 

044 


40 804 813 

l French Frtmci-limis of a can! per unit 
125 155 110 MB 105 

130 r 001 170 r 

mete Yen-mtteaf a cent per antL 

: « -cn 

. -9.18 

-.9.18 
-. -9.10 
^•■-9-18 
- - - 9.18 

-SW ... 

-. MO Swiss Francs-ccnts per ualt. 


» 

aw 

* 

r 

r 

• 

r 

43 

r 

818 

r 


_r 

r 

45. 

r 

r 

430 

041 


810 

46 

£16 

r 

339 


r 

819 

47 

£15 

£15 

2X7 

r 

r 

835 

48 

138 

1X7 

US 

0.13 

030 

r 

49 • 

003 

0.75 

134 

000 

004 

147 

50 

035 

0X4 

0J9 

r 

r 

r 


rone 

37 

903 


r 




684 

38 

871 

ft 

r 


& 

r 

644 

42 

405 


r 

r 


r 

644 

<3 

348 

r 

r 

r 


r 

644 

45 

100 

r 

r 


r 

059 

644 

46 

140 

r 


OJW 

IU4 - 


884- 

47 

0X5 

DJ0 ' 

r 

ass 

041 

r 

884 ' 

48 

817 

. f 

r 

r 

r 

r 


- lal caO vsL 
•_ laiintt val. 


6498 

5497 


i— ^lol Iroded.*— No option ottered. 
" st b premium (purchase orfoe). 
arse: AP. 


Call open laL . 193330 
Put open InL - 162464 


ci oilman- pts of 160 pet. 






9340 

B£77 

Dec 

9£80 

9254 



+.13 

9342 

0608 

Mar 





+.16 

■■9278 -- 

87JW 

Jun 

9204 

9276- 

9204 

9256 

at 

9250 

8840 

5tp 

92X3 

9248 

92X1 

72X8 

9230- 

B8BS 

Dec 

9118 

9£18 

92.13 

7£17 

+32 

9156 

8908 

Mar 

9143 

9143 

9143 



9109 

9000 

Jun 

9107 

7108 

9157 

9100 

+31 

91X7 

9043 

Sep 




9L34 

+31 


Season Season 

High Law 



1 


fage 19 


Open Hteti Law Close Cts. 


EURODOLLARS { (MM) 

Slmlttlon-ptsof IOObcI. 

9117 8400 Dee 9199 9207 9103 9206 +.12 

3^jD 88U MOT 9106 9205 9105 *204 +38 

2‘2 SK2 ”52 9102 9142 9101 +J3 

9147 8703 SOD 91 JS 9151 9135 9150 +3* 

S-iS S-? 9 ^ ?, 05 tl.19 9105 9U9 +31 

9M2 3744 MOT 9880 9007 WJ7 9307 r34 

985* M0J Jun 90S *05* 9043 9857 +34 

JS? *’■?? 983 9038 9030 9830 +34 

Est. SOWS 42758 prev. Sates 47068 
Prev, Dav OPMIirt.155467 un974 
BRITISH' POUND (IMM) 
suer oawnO- 1 pomt aawalssuuoi 
)4JJS UDOO Dec 14185 14235 14180 14225 +05 

J-SIS J-KS9 ( l* or ’■*” J0«D 14065 14U5 +#5 

J43Ji UTO Jun 14015 14015 14000 14015 +6S 

Est. Sates 8130 Prev. sales 18713 
Prev. Dav Owen Inf. 33564 ua2A46 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Spot dir- 1 Mint equals S&0001 
X66 7006 Dec 723 7205 7250 7201 -I 

-7504 4*81 Mar 7243 7251 73S 7248 —1 

7360 .7070 Jun 7234 7231 7234 7233 — 1 

7303 17176 See .7290 — 1 

EsLSafes «» Prev. Sates 1007 
Prev. Day Oaen inf. 7,979 off 475 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

9 aer franc- 1 point equals SUHOOI 

0JSS D*e .12540 .125*0 .12548 .12540 -HQ 

■124* 30»5 Mor .12*60 .72*60 .13*60 .12660 +20 

.0450 .12130 Jun .12408 +20 

Est.Sates 4 Prev. Sales 
Prev. Dav Open Int. T7D 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

Sper mark-1 point equals UM0! 

»» 0*2 DOC 3822 J84I J820 J83? +15 

7913 ;%« MOT 3356 J873 J8S2 5*71 +« 

79® -43?* J 1 * 1 -39Q2 3905 3902 3905 +16 

392S 3762 Sep JKI +IS 

Est. Sal«.J3;W5 Prav. Sates 17026 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 47000 offU75 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Sperven- 1 po in t equals MlOOOOM 

004933 083905 Dec 004898 004933 004099 0849T* +21 

22*2! -J51S5 Mor 00*98) 0O49ZJ 004900 00*921 +20 

2H2£ SfSS i vn 00491 2 004929 0O49U J»*9S8 +20 

00*930 004*90 Sep 00*938 +1* 

HM9S5 004158 Dec 004952 +16 

EeL Saha 11534 Prev. Sales 17756 
Prev. Day Open int. 38486 up 38516 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

S per franc- 1 point eaua Is 100801 
•4728 -3531 Dec 4672 4700 4669 4690 +23 

4771 -3835 Mar 4716 4745 4712 4742 +Z3 

4800 4190 Jim 4780 4792 4780 4792 +22 

4100 4790 Sea 48» +1* 

Eel. Sales Prev. Sales T3327 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 29.112 oH19l 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130000 bd. Helper 1 0OObcL!t. 

18818 12850 Nov 14130 14L7D 14IJD 14138 

18700 13340 Jan 14750 14350 14700 143.10 

19500 139.78 Mar 15250 153*0 15240 15340 

17848 MSJ0 Mov 15750 15108 1 57 JO 158.50 

183 00 1*950 Jul 16150 I6CL70 16SJ0 IfiMB 

17800 15090 S*P 16530 16650 16*30 16860 

U1J0 - 15850 Nov lfi&JO 16530 16*30 16AJ0 

Jan 168*0 16860 16640 16950 

EsL5ales 1045 Prev. Soles 1048 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 8775 off 175 
COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

5&B08 IBS.- cents per to. 


—.10 

+100 

+1.40 

+1J0 

+100 

+100 

+1.90 


7340 

5701 


6817 

6037 

6006 

6877 

+0B 

7635 

5877 


6135 

6109 

6145 

6104 

+37 

7040 

5850 

MOV 

6150 

6205 

6135 

6154 

—.14 

7805 

5830 

Jul 

6894 

6100 


6121 

+.11 

6500 

52X0 

Oct 

ton 

«» 

5440 

5440 

—35 

5935 

SOJS 

Dec 

«?JM 

5250 

£2X0 

5247 

— .23 

6875 

reap 

Mor 

May 

5308 

5150 

5149 

5255 

5305 

—37 


Est. Sales *250 Prev. Sates 3052 
Prev. Dav Open Int 2*072 up 15* 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 


<2400 not- cents per gal 
8870 69.1] Dec 

8810 


8540 

8600 


8845 

69 JO 

Jan 

8630 

8650 

fMIK 

8645 

+.15 

8700 

7040 

Feb 

8545 

8815 

8545 

8815 

+X5 

8336 


Mar 

8L15 

8140 

81.10 

8140 

+09 

79.10 

6800 


7735 

7700 

7890 

7700 

+42 

7508 

6800 

May 

TIN 

7445 

7380 

7-L85 

—33 

7435 

7100 


Tiro 

7340 

7135 

7240 

— 00 

713S 

71 3D 

Jul 

7240 

7115 

7100 

7155 

—35 

74.15 

71X0 

Aog 

Oct 

7140 

7100 

7870 

7140 

00 

—50 

EsLSate* 


Prev.Safes 13041 





Prev. Dav Open Int. 38648 oH42 
CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

1000 bWw dal tors oer bW. 


3100 

2350 

Dec 

3888 

3L02 

3875 

3893 

—44 

3848 

2408 


2932 

2950 

2906 

2949 

+44 

2908 

2435 

Feb 

2816 

2941 

2833 

2940 


29X5 

24.13 

Mar 

2847 


27.98 

2818 

-45 

29X5 

2193 

Apt 

27 JO 

2703 

2708 

2701 

—44 

27.96 

•ntn 


27035 

2705 

2744 

2705 

+45 

2737 

237B 

Jun 

2605 

-XL *7 

■M M 

9A m 

+44 

2647 

24X5 

Jul 

2605 

2602 

3635 

2651 

+57 

2740 

2440 

5«p 

2£85 

2£85 



—49 

SB. Sold 


Prev. Sol 05 20395 





Prev. Dav Open Hit. 71414 OH604 


Stock Indexes 


Est.Sates 103*9 Prev.Salas 9277 
Prev- Dav Often Int 41270 oft 1062 
18 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 
SlOlUWOprlh- Bts 8 Stotdsaf 100 pet 
89-17 75-13 Dec 88-29 89-26 

85- 18 75-14 Mar 88 88-28 

87-18 7+30 Jun 87-6 88 

86- 23 1-7 Sep 

86- 2 80-2 Dec 

Est. Soles Prev. So lei 13002 

Prev. Day Optn inf. 78554 u>286 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
[BPCt-SlOO0HHrts&32ndsanWpcT) 
80-22 57-8 Dec 79-29 8030 

79-19 57-2 Mar 78-22 79-24 

78-19 5<r29 Jun 77-26 7S-26 

77-18 56-29 Sep 7+28 77-26 

7+23 5+25 Dec 7+2 7+31 

7+26 5+27 Mar 7+14 7+7 

75-2 63-12 Jon 75 75-17 

7+12 63-4 Sep 7+8 7+29 

73-20 62-34 Dec 7+2 7+11 

72-28 67 MOT 

72-18 . 6+25 Jun - 

Eat -Sales Prev. SaleslBl 326 

Prev. Day Open lnL323096 off 7312 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT) 

JiMKbt index -pts &32nds eMDO od 
»B-3 81-17 Dec *7-29 193 

87- 8 80-4 Mar 87-3 68-6 

8+10- 79 Jan B6-15 B7-4 

0+20 79-10 Sep . 

Est.Sates - Prev. Safes 1153 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 9079 of(147 
CERT. DEPOSIT OMM) 

SI million- plsaf 100 pet . 

9250 H534 Dec 9205 9232 

9232 E6-56 Mar 9223 9234 

9205 8643 Jun 9209 9209 

9144 8706 Sep 9139 9139 

9059 8834 DOC 

9025 8820 Mar 

EsL Sates 283 Prev. Sates 33 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 1031 off 15 


8+29 89-26 
88 88-27 

87-6 87-31 

87-5 
8+14 


79-27 80-29 
78-22 79-24 
77-24 70-26 
7+28 77-25 
7+2 7+29 

75-14 76 
7+31 75-10 
740 7+22 

73-29 7+2 
73-27 
73-13 


87-26 BM 
87-2 8+5 

1+15 87 
8+2 


9235 9232 
9233 9234 
9209 92.10 
9139 9139 
9148 
91.16 


+16 

+16 

+16 

+16 

+16 


+114 

+113 

+115 

+111 

+19 

+14 

+14 

+14 

+12 

+111 

+ 11 ! 


+117 

+117 

+110 

+16 


+.10 

+.19 

+32 

+32 

+33 

+33 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cent* 

38005 I75J0 Dec 199.10 19930 19800 19930 +00 

20335 18230 Mar 201.15 20105 20005 20145 +00 

20650 18190 Jun 20Z9S 20105 20205 +05 

20530 18700 Sea 20300 20300 20205 20*25 +05 

Est. Sates 69414 Prev.Salas 70.979 
Prev. Day Open Int. 72315 off 1365 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points an d cants 

21705 18860 Dec 20600 20635 

20940 19000 Mar 20870 20900 

21100 19700 Jun 21000 71000 

211BQ 20005 Sep 

EsL Sates Prev. Sales 6JB7 

Prev. Dav Open int. 12459 up 568 . ... 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE1 
points and cents 

11730 1DL2D Dec 11490 11530 11430 11495 +35 

11835 105-50 Mar 11805 T1835 11035 11810 +30 

12000 106.90 Jun 11700 11709 1I6J0 117.15 +35 

11810 10810 Sep 11735 11735 11735 11735 —45 

Est.Sates 9037 Prev. Sates 11396 
Prev. Dav Ooen Int. 8680 offlASS 
MAJOR MKT INDEX (CBT) 
paints and eights 

273to 2493k Dec 27TVk 271M 269VS 27TFW. 

„ . Jan 27166 272 27046 2714ft 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 582 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 3023 oH 160 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's. 
Reuters. 

D_i. Futures. 


Clone Previous 

91730 f 92X30 f 

1335.00 132400 

„ - - 120.10 12033 

Com. Research Bureau. 22X90 22300 

Moody's: base 100: Dec. 31. 1931. - 
p - preliminary; f- final 
Reuters : base 100 : 5 cp. IX 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1978 


Market Guide 


CBT: Chicago Board at Trade 

cme: cnieaeo Mercantile Exchange 

IMM: International Monetary Market 

Of Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
NYCSCE: New York Cocoa. Sugar, Coffee Exchange 

NYCE: New York Cation Exctxmge 

COM EX: Commodity Exchange. New York 

NYME: New York Mercantile Exchange 

KCBT: Kansas aty Board of Trade 

NYFE: New York Futures Exchange 


Floating-Rate Notes 


Nov. 18 


Dollar 



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8M 2M1 1010210032 
7> M 990* 9946 

4 1604 1845 9905 

Mb €94* VM05IBO2O 
IW 05-12 9945 Wit 
BM 3M2 974f HB06 
BM IJHH 7900 9900 

ik 2Mi Toaimoaio 

22429905 9945 
BM 1942 98J0 9845 
Sh 0941 100.03108.13 
mi (8-1310800100.10 
Bb 19-12 « 07 10009 
BK 1+05 9907 9937 
BK 29-11 10005100.15 
BV* 19-129946 HBM 
H* MNUimto 
to* 2941 T8M6MW6 
IM 2+12 1M2TOOJ* 

• 07-12 toojmoejo 

33411004010000 
... D543in0BlBO.il 
BK 28-01 9948 9908 
Bib 0643 KB.1SUH2B 
BM 1341 994B 10003 
Mb 19-139940 18825 
K 39019907 99.17 
to 30-129940 19605 
» 2J-H99J3 9905 
IK 0741 WUtnOQ.15 
M MftlM 

BM 3M1 10U510045 

B* iso* lnusioas 

3743 990*9946 
BM 1+0* 1004010030 
BW 1506 Ml J010140 
« b U05 10046BUH 
BM 2742 UUV10D.10 
8Vl 894<UB.T71DG27 

IN 3+U 1000710817 
1245 9975 MU5 

. 10002100.12 
39-11 10O75HU0 

U44 nOOBHB.ll 

0+15 UO-UMUS 
BV* 3341 19081. 

SM sm 7700 HUB 
n* tT-IJ 7*02 9941 
BW. W-1999.9S10L1S 
BM m6 100J81B0JB 
BM 3HDWLWHB2D 
2142 9906 9906 
BM - 9948 9900 

toh 1M299JS99J0 
■M 1*019908 11603 


9 

SM 


R 


Uwer/MaL 
RottadilkhaiM 
RbcOS 
RbsPerp 
RbsB6/96 
Scltomo 91/93 
Sanaa Int Fta IB 
Saowto Int FtnH/81 
Sanwa Utl Finn 
Scored FbtAw93 
5condl FlnDecW 
Scotland int *3 
SocPodBcn 
5ec PodBc92 
Snowmut Cera77 
5ndB 
Seal M/93 
Stelntto 
Seim *1 
Soc Gen 90/95 
5ocGenMarM 
5ocGenMov9* 

Soc (ten 97 
SncbTI 
Saaln 92/97 
SPOln 05 (Mfttyl 
SoeAittm 
Saab 99 
Stand Chari 9* 

Stand Chan fl 
Stand Chart MortO 
Sand Chart Mismatch 
SM + CWPorp 
State Bk India B7 
Samftcmo Tp 72/9* 
moan 


tob 

a 


Coooae Next Bid Askd 
Mb 09-01 MJO 9500 
SM 08-129946 HUH 
1H6 7706 9946 
1+01 UOJBTOOLia 

05-12 lnuaittua 
aw 2Hniau» 

IM 2WB 1000510045 
BM 19-02 9793 10003 
BM U-W T9 J5 HSJD 
n* 21-12 9902 9742 
8 M 3HD HO0O1OB0O 
to* 3M1 9901 99 J» 
BM 0201 79JS 7945 
IW 07-62 9300 97.12 
IK 3041 HKLlSmto 
81* 24-12 100JM1M.H 

»m as-unnawoun 
BM 19-n 79J5 10035 
BW 6*83 1000010025 
15* t+63 100J3H023 
IK 0785 UOS5IKU5 
■M W*» 100151002] 


Sweden 92/05 (Mlhlv) 
Sweden 17/99 
S w ed e n W) 


Tolvo Kobe 77 ICool 
TteyoTK/M 
Takugfai 72/9* 
Tokuotn Cap T7 
Te*a« Commerce 97 
Tokal Asia 76/97 
Toraom92 
TOW rw 72/79 
TvcW/O* 
UtNmMvn 
LftNorvtaVW 
U Id Kbtodom 70/92 
Wafla Forgo Seal 97 

WNIs Fargo 71 
Wel Is Fargo 00 
Wells Forgo Feb 97 
Westpac97(Coe) 
wntsGlvn9l 
World Bk Pcrp 
World 8k 17/9* 
Yokohama wa* 
Yokohama 77 (Cop) 
ZadiuluAassTl 


BM 2762 <00.1250022 
CM 2M3 9907 79J7 
to* 2+02 10007198.17 
IW 27-11 1000110011 

im D+ai wuniout 
6M ■ 11012101132 

to n-o mono 
B* 0)41 79 JS 9700 
»* 0745 10007TOJ7 
BM 29-11 9707 H037 
8M 1382100181003 
to* WO 7900 79 JS 
79* 05-17 1001610071 
79* 1041 9943 97X1 
71* 1846 99 JB 97X1 
OK 2+119741 7703 


BM 0742 99 JS 77JB 


Mb 1843 1003*1004* 
8M 07-86 9746 10004 
2+429058 TUI 
BM 13-n 10022)0632 


b HfflT 

BK 31427U57U5 

8M 0741 7707 7901 

I K 27 -11 79X6 99 J* 
1287527-11 77X1 99J1 
IK 09-13 79X0 9920 
•M 1*42 9948 9928 
to* 1*4J 9942 9703 
to* 1B43HU8HU0 
JB63U-H 99.78 9940 
U! 29-11 98309140 
BM 0246 10830)800 
OK - 7920(741 

BK 1541 N0XSW6A5 


Non [>oliar 


Abbey National 92/BO 

ANkwee+LeJcSocB 
AnzOkeTt 
S>.Momreai96 
5k Nova Scotia OB 
Dk Tokyo SMB 
Dqlnd05uez91 
Sstaufawk* 
Brtstm+WeB73 
Brlluinkite 
ONcero 17/9! 
GMMM96 
& Fonder » 

Cr Nat kxul Tins 
Denmark 93/91 
HjdHto B/S92 

Iretarem 
Iretandte 
LkwKEurate 
W9Bk Dee «W9 
MM 18 

Natiqnwld*fcS.7S 
Hew Zeeland 97 
HlMtontti 

Stand Chart 3taPorp 


life 154*774*9706 
llj* X* rut TWO 
JJM 1*42 10025)0035 
11M 27-13 100J3100J3 
11323141 9946 MUM 
life U-n HKLT7KXU2 
IIS SHI 1BL14H036 

J2* W01 KO01IOO01 

119* 224* 7748 Mt 

IIS: SHi»-8o»94o 
11* 174299X1 toil 
IJfc S-D HB2!10U2 
11M 0941 HXBDMUI 

K K43 180321 8833 

2M1 10B40UOLSB 
11* 074677X4 770* 
lire. 1541 100. *00031 
n* U43 1185110003 

II* 06-12 1000310822 

IW* 36-11 1081310023 
- 3OBJDOWL50 
12 0742 lDOJCmsi 

111* 0844 77^5 W0S 
in* 1+42 TTXS 97JS 
IW* 164549X8 9»35 
II* 86429830 77131 
11* 3641 I0MS1PU5 
If* U-129BXD 9BX0 

IM 27-13 10UOW29 


Yorkshire tetfl/M 

Sou rce ; Cnrtl Sako+ttf*/ Boota* lm. 
Lonaan 


Commmiities 


/W. 18 

Otf# 

KM low Bid Ask Ctroe 

SUGAR 

Frauen fraM pot metric tea 
Dee N.T. N.T. 1 JO UBS — 19 

MOT 1405 1481 M14 1415 — 

May 1425 1410 1467 1460 —17 

AUD N.T. N.T. 1472 1485 —12 

Oct U« 1495 1491 1495 -21 

DOC 1019 149* 1032 1050 —77 

Est woL: NJL tats at 50 ions. Prev. OCToal 
sales: NAtotvOuen Inter***: 2LZB 
COCOA 

Fnodi fraeci per iuo kg 


Coi^wllides 


DM 

L8J5 

1470 

1468 

;ik 

+u 

Mar 

1507 

1.905 

1,983 

i<«5 

— i 

May 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1530 

— 

-5 

Jlv 

NT. 

N.T. 

1540 

*■ 

Uncn. 

SCR 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1550 

— 

Unch. 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.960 

— 

— 3 

Mor 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.970 

— 

— 3 


Est. vol.: 15 lets of 10 tans- Prev. actuel 
sales: * lots. Open btterast: *83 
COFFEE 


NOV 
J«n 
Mar 
May 
JIV 

sep 

NOV 

EsL vaL: U lots of S tons Prev. actual sales: 
US lots. Open Merest: W7 
Sea/rcm: Bourse On Co mme rce. 


Mbcb per 180 kg 

N.T. N.T. 2420 

1105 

—5 

N.T. 

N.T. 

a— 

2.15C 

— s 

Z)45 

11)5 

£125 

£130 

+ 3 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1UD 


+ 5 




re- 


8LT. 

N.T. 

1140 

£160 

+ 15 

N.T. 

N.T. 

iwn 

— 

+ 5 


li&Tneasuries 


Nod. 18 



Dtscoent 


Prev. 


Oder 

BM 

Yield 

Yield 

MMOtBBiB 

703 

701 

7X3 

7JB 

6-mentDBiD 

706 

733 

703 

73] 

Vyeorom 

74* 

70S 

737 

7.90 

Prey. 


Bid 

Offer 

view 

YUM 

iB-yeerbena 

>8521/3210536/32 

1041 

10.15 


Source: Sa l omon Brothers. 

Merrill Lynch Treasury Index: na 
CWD ee for Ihe dor: — 

Avenge yield: — 

Source: Merritt Lrncti 


Texaco Makes Discovery 
Of 03, Gas in North Sea 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK —Texaco Inc. re- 
ported Monday a new discovery of 
ofl and natural gas in an explora- 
tion block in the British sector of 
the North Sea. 

Tests of the discovery showed 
light oil at a combined rate of 
14,033 bands a day from two 
zones of the well and natural gas at 
a rate of 16.6 million cubic feet, 
Texaco said. The well was the first 
drilled by Britoil PLC, which 
bought a 163-percent interest in 
the Texaco lease in June 


Nor. 18 

HONC-KONO COLD FUTURES 
U00 Mr ounce 

Close Previous 
Hleh LOW BM ASM Bid Ask 
Ncv_ N.T. N.T. mM 3JS0O 32<J» 32600 
Doc _ N.T. N.T. 32400 32800 32540 327.00 
Jan _ N.T. N.T. 32800 32£00 32740 329.00 
Feb - 379.00 32900 32840 33040 32940 331.00 
API _ N.T. N.T. 33140 33340 33340 33540 
Jun _ 33740 33740 33*40 33B40 3374033940 
Aus .. N.T. N.T. 3C4D 36440 3*140 34340 
Del _ N.T. N.T. 36640 36640 34540 34740 
Volume : 25 lots of 100 ol 
SINGAPORE COLD FUTURES 
UAS per ounce 


Prey. 

High Low Softie Settle 

N T. N.T. 32600 32540 

N.T. N.T. 33810 29140 


DOC . 

Feb 

Volume: 60 lots of 100 ol 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malar* tan coats per kite 
CIOW 


Pravhws 



BM 

Aik 

BM 

Aik 








1KU» 



war 

_ 18240 

18340 

18158 

18300 


Volume: 0 lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kilo 

Close Previous 

Bid Ask BW Ask 

RS5 1 Dec _ 153.75 1542 154.75 15540 

RSS 1 Jon_ 156J5 105-25 1SSJS 15440 

RSS2DK- 14740 15040 14940 1940 

RSS 3 Dec- 147-Oif M840 14740 14848 

RSS X Dec— 14340 14540 14300 14540 

RSS 5 Dec_ 13840 14040 13840 14040 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 


Dec . 
Jan _ 
Feb . 
Mar 
Art . 


Mar . 
Jlv _ 
Sea _ 


Nov 

volume: 16 lots of 2S ions. 
Source: R e u t ers. 


"‘ESS 

25 lone 

Prevteua 

Bid 

Ask 

Bid 

Ask 

685 

700 

682 

690 

709 

714 

710 

715 

721 

729 

715 

723 

730 

737 

725 

730 

730 

743 

720 

746 

730 

745 

720 

740 

720 

740 

715 

735 

no 

740 

705 

735 

70S 

735 

New 

— 


To Our Readers 

The Deutsche mark futures op- 
tions were not available in this eai- 
ton because of transmission delays. 


Swiss Wholesale Prices Rise 

The Associated Press 

BERNE — Swiss wholesale 
prices rose 0.1 percent in October 
after a 0.4-percent increase in Sep- 
tember, the federal government 
said Monday. The year-on-year in- 
crease, however, narrowed to 0.9 
percent from 1 percent in the previ- 
ous month and compared with 3.6 
(percent in October 1984. 


East Asian Growth 
Slowed in 1985 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The economies 
of East Asia grew more slowly in 
1985 and are likely to remain slow 
for another year, aixording to Time 
magazine. 

The magazine's Asian Board of 
Economists said they expected a 
slight acceleration of growth rates 
in South Korea, Taiwan and Singa- 
pore, but further declines in Japan, 
Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand 
and New Zealan d. Only China is 
expected to expand rapidly. 

Japan's growth rate is expected 
to decline from 4-5 percent this 
year to 3 J or 4 percent; China 's 
growth in 1986 is predicted at 9 
percent; Hong Kong's growth is 
expected to remain at 4.5 percent; 
Taiwan’s growth may rise from 42 
percent this year to 5 percent next 
year, and Singapore will only see 
growth of 0.5 percent this year and 
2 percent next year, the economists 
said. 


Hrrolhcx&eSnbunc 


Readu^McreTlianaThird of a Million Rfiados 
in 164 Countries Around IheWfodd. 


Commodities 


Nor 18 

Clou Previous 
High Low BW Art BM ask 

SUGAR 

Sterling per metric ton 
DOC 14340 135x4 13*40 13*40 13840 14048 
Mar 15400 150X8 150X8 15000 15640 15440 
May 158J0 15£00 15440 15540 15840 158-40 
AM 16449 HUM MA0O H148 H3x0 164-20 
DO 16860 16640 16800 16640 16740 169x0 
volume: 2X31 lots of 50 nra. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric »n 
Dec 1X55 1X45 1X4+ 1X47 1X46 1X50 

M«r 1700 1X86 1X17 lXBfl 1X87 1X88 

May 1.724 1711 1710 1714 1713 1714 

17*4 1.736 173* 1.737 1735 1736 
1768 1753 1754 1755 1757 17*0 


1765 1759 1759 1.7 *0 1763 1770 
Ti?M 


N.T. N.T. 1770 1780 1774 
Volume: 1428 lot* of 10 Ion*. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric ton 

1A7V 1X45 1X35 1X45 1X40 1X64 

1.725 1X85 1X86 UFO 1097 1.900 

1.928 1X88 1X88 1X87 1,704 1.705 

1.930 1,904 1X9S 1,904 1X95 1.906 

1X40 1.715 1.710 1.9)5 1710 1,720 

1,958 1,935 1,935 1,950 1,720 1.735 

leov 1.765 1,950 1.950 1,710 1.920 1/940 

Volume: 2xxi loisof 5 ions. 

GASOIL 

UJS. dollars per metric tan 
Dec 26875 26600 26775 7»S40 2o775 26840 
265JM 26345 26625 264JO 20425 24450 
26075 25925 2*850 2*075 26040 2*025 
25240 25040 2SD7S 25140 25025 25075 
26140 240 JO 24175 J42J0 240 JO 24140 
232JO 23140 23225 23200 23040 23140 
22700 22700 23800 33140 22700 23075 
23108 22900 22740 2292S 22740 22840 
N.T. N.T. 23640 23240 22040 24D40 
volume: 1047 tot* rt IDO ions. 

CRUDE OIL (BRENT) 

U4. dollar* per Barrel 

Dec 2900 2700 2900 2770 39X5 29XO 

Joe 3806 28X5 2801 2805 2873 3879 

Feb N.T. N.T. 2775 2840 2040 2820 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2740 2740 27JB 28.00 

API N.T. N.T. 26X0 27XO 2640 2740 

May N.T. N.T. 2*40 27X0 26.13 2700 

Volume: 57 lota of 1400 barrel*. 

Source s: Reuters ona London Petroleum Ee- 
ctianoe tgeaou. crude oil). 


tom 

Mar 

MOV 

Jlv 

sw 


tom 

FM 

Mar 

Art 

May 

JUH 
$1 
A OB 


^^Dhidenc^^J 


■lor. 18 

Company Per Amt Pay Rec 

INCREASED 


Lancaster Colony Q 

.18 

1-3 

Nordson Coro Q 

.17 

1-2 

Stepan Co O 

.18 

13-13 

INITIAL 



Manufacturer* Nan O 

01 

12-20 

Pewdes Bk Cotawba 

.10 

12-20 

SPECIAL 



Imperial oil Ltd 

43 

t-1 

STOCK 



U0. Heottti Care Svs. 

UPC 

11-23 


STOCK SPLIT 
Dillard Dept. Stores — 2-tor-l 
USUAL 



Q .17 V> 


12-6 

U.I ii 1 7-II,lT- 

Q 

.18 

12-13 11-29 

Clablr Corp 

Q 




Clark EaiXpmenf 




» ' ’ ^ jtT'&vTA 





• '< i ;('*ifi- .PPRJB 

O 

XI 

12-16 

11-27 

- W TTr“ 





-T, * 'TT^rlM 






a 

.16 



Ir lllili 1 1 1 1 1 1 





ul:? ' ■ , * i jelfl 1 * 






Q 




i\ r. . “*■ | J f , j l 

O 




MAPCO Inc 

0 

.35 

12-10 

11-2* 

Nobiico Brands Ltd 

Q 

00 

1-6 

12-6 


Q 

.25 

17-70 

11-29 

1 in M 

O 

03 

1-2 

12-2 

a-annuali m-montbly; 

q-quarltriy; nemi- 


Source : UPI. 


S&PKX) 
Index Options 


Can-Las! 

Noe. 

Feb-Led 

18 

Dec Jrai 

Ft* 

Mar 

Dec Jet 

F*B 

Mar 

— — 

— 

■re 

— l/M 

__ 

re- 

Site 22 





I/M l/M 

3/1+ 

_ 

I7K T7 

17 



1/16 3/1* 

7/16 

_ 

12K UK 

1ZW 

13 

Vlt ft 

ft 

m 

7K 8K 

IK 

W 

7/16 IK 

1ft 

21/li 

3K 4U 

SK 

tM 

73/16) 

IK 

n 

17/1*216 

IK 

A 

S 5K 

7 

7 

7/16 1 

1 7/1*214 

fft 7ft 



l/M K 

1/16 

15/1*1 


MK 

— 


165 
171 
17] 

UO 

as 

NO 
19] 

380 

» 

TokrioaBwknee 141X7] 
TofcdaflaMBMLItUM 
Taw m «Ane HIM) 

TNol pet metoLMLiai 
Mae 

Kwmu leuMOJI Ctate W2R61.lt 
Source: CbOE. 


Commodity end uelt 
Cortee 4 Samoa. ID. 


Prlntctofh 64/38 » Vk, vd _ 

Steel Billet* (Pitu.tan 

iron 7 Fdrv. Phlki- ton 
Steel aerga No 1 hvy Pitt. - 

Lend Soot, lb - 

Copper tied, lb , ... 
Tin I5iralts>.ib. 


Zinc. E.&t.L.B«h,lb . 

Palladium, an 

Silver N Y. or . .. 
Source: AP. 



Nor. 

18 


Year 

Mon 

Ago 

103 

708 

008 

040 

47340 

<7180 

31340 

21340 

73-74 

18-89 

UK- 19 

26-28 

<789-78 

<7-70 

NLA. 

81353 

835 

003 

166-102 

147 

6483 

7013 




Mr. 18 
□mc Prevleui 

I BM Aik Bid ASH 

ALUMINUM 
sterling per metric toe 
spot 66040 6+140 66740 66800 

Forward 66600 68540 68*40 69040 

COPPER CATHODE 5 (HiSh Grade) 

Storting per metric Ion 

Spot 95840 7M40 96940 77040 

Farwro 77700 77840 786.00 98600 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling Per metric ton 
sort 73740 93940 94340 94640 

Forward 95740. 9*140 76*40 76840 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ten 
Saar 27440 37540 27640 27740 

Forward 27740 27040 27800 28040 

NICKflL 

Sterling per metric ton 
SPOT 2S4D40 285040 2H040 289040 

Forward 288040 288540 271040 273040 

5ILVER 

Pence per troy ounce 

Spat 42«0ffl 425J0 <2700 42800 

Forward *3740 439X0 43900 44000 

TIN (Standard) 

Storting per metric ton 

Scot Suw. Susp. — — 

Forward 5uw>. SuSP. — — 

ZINC 

Sterling per metric ton 

Spot 39840 40040 37940 40040 

Source: AP. 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

PRICES AT 12.1 1X5: 
A j US DOLLAR CASH SI 055 

B : MUnCURRENCY CASH $1156 

Ci DOLLAR BOM3S 511.83 

D -. MULTICURRENCY BONP5 $1255 

E : SIBLING ASSET £11.16 

FOREIGN &GOLOMAL 
MANAGEMENT (JERSEY) UMlTH) 

14 MULCASTER STREET^TJfiBUBSEY/CI 
TH: 053427351 TREX: 4172363 

FOX OTHER FiC FUNDS, SB 
INTERNATIONAL FUNDS LIST 


SDi 


2nd Annual Conference 
Sponsored by Amerkon Society 
of MechraikaJ Engineer] 
with the cooperation of the 
U.5. D.OJ3., SOI Org., 
Wash., D.C — Dee. 9-10 — $430. 
(202) 682-1549 or tdex: 

Mr. Renfro, 89-2422. 


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De Voe- Holbein International itv 
and City-Clock Intcnuiionai nv 
please nil collect 31-20627762. 


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markets can simply write us a 
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Capital? Foreign exchange? Call LTCB, the 
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long term, so we can help you plan for 
long-term success. And our experienced 
staff knows international finance through 
and through. If you have questions, LTCB 
can find the answers. 



International experience yuu can hank on. 

The Long-Term Credit Bank of Japan* Ltd. 

Hood Offie* & IntqrnaUoraBl Booking Group: Oiwnactn. Ibkyo. Japan Tel- 2lt-5m Tefee Ji-l 308 London 
Branch: 18 King Willem Street. London EC4N 7BR. U K. Tet- 623-9511 'feta* 685305 Now York Branch: 140 
Broadway. New Ybrv, M < 10005. USA V |2l 2l 246-2000 few: 425722 Lot Angola* Agency: 444 Soutn 
Flower Slrert. Suite 3700. Los Angeles. California 90071, USA Tet- i2i3i 029-5777 Hong Kong Branch: 
X5ih Root, For Cart Finance Centre ib Haicoufi Goad. Hong itong Tel 5-26S67D HMejc 76W5 Singapore 
Branch; 66 Chulia SlteeL tSS-Oi/CK. 0C5C Cennr. Singaso'C 0104. Smgapoie TW 019033 Telex. 23613 
Frankfurt, Paria, Bahrain, Toronto, Chicago, Dallas, Mexico City, Panama, 3*o Paulo, Mo da Xanalra, 

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(Zurich), LTCB Trent Go. (New York), LTCB Asia Ltd- (Hone Kong) 




Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


Shipbuilding Worldwide Runs Into the Doldrums 


(Continued from Page 15) 
drrs have dropped 60 percent in a 
year, and, like most shipbuilder* 
elsewhere, they will have virtually 
no ships to deliver after early 1987. 

Shipowners are clearly reluctant 
to replace their vessels. So far this 
year. 29 million gross tons of oil 
tankers have been scrapped, while 
less than 4 million gross tons are 
scheduled for delivery, according 
to industry analysts. They added 
that 20 percent to 25 percent of the 
world's dry bulk vessels are idle. 
Indeed, worldwide orders for ves- 
sels have dropped nearly in half 
since 1974. to 15.5 million gross 
tons last year, according to Lloyd’s 
Register of Shipping. 

Iq the United Slates, new orders 
Fell from 5 14.000 gross tons in 1 980 
to 155.000 gross tons last year. 
Even in Japan, which accounts For 
about 50 percent of the world's new 
vessels, new orders declined from 
9.9 million gross tons in 1980 to 8.3 
million last year. A gross ton equals 
2,240 pounds (1.015 kilograms). 

Although some experts predict 
that the shipping market will pick 
up next year because oF the recent 
strengthening of foreign currencies 
against the dollar, they contend 
that the recovery will take a while. 

’Tbe shipbuilding industry is 
still in a period where there is some 


The Worid's Leading SMpbu&ders 

Naw vessel orders Disced to rndhriflual countries. « mdltons 01 gross tons 

1983 . 19&! 

Japan 

11.0 8.8 

South Korea 

3.7 2.3 

Taiwan 

0.2 0.6 

West Germany 

0.5 0.5 

United Status 

0.2 0.3 

Denmark 

0 

A 

O 

6 

Britain 

0.1 0.1 


work to perform, some ships to 
deliver," a British analyst said. 
“But that period is slowly coming 
to an end. It takes about I S months 
to build the average ship. Very Tew 
orders were placed last year and 
there were Fewer this year. That will 
have a harsher impact on the 
world’s shipyards in the next year 
or two.” 

While most may not be profit- 
able. shipbuilders say it is crucial 
for them to keep working. 

Along with extensive layoffs, the 
shipyards" strategy for suvival in- 
volves diversifying For example, 
the South Korean shipbuilders are 
looking into the construction of 
floating plants, offshore platforms 
and partly submergeable rigs. The 
British and West Germans are 
seeking to carve a niche in the pro- 


generally been more favorable. 
•Ten years ago oil tankers and bulk 
carriers made up 50 percent of all 
the ships built in Germany," he 
said “Today, that number is down 
to about a third- The specialized 
ships are not as tied to the interna- 
tional price market" 

Industry experts question wheth- 
er these strategies will be enough to 
offset the effect of the slowdown in 
the shipbuilders’ traditional busi- 
ness. Analysts say that South Kore- 
an shipbuilders are doing less than 
12 percent of their business in non- 
traditional building. They add that 


duction of technologically sophisti- 
cated vessels to be used for diving — - - - . . , w-ct 

support and scientific exploration ■ eyen orders to the 
in the North Sex 


“Some of the Korean prices on 
tankers and bulk carriers are below 
their materials cost, sometimes 30 
percent below,” said Mr. Pullen of 
British Shipbuilders. “We simply 
can’t compete against that. We 
have to go for a different sort of 
competition- We have to go into the 
hi-tech area and. at the same time, 
use our geographical advantages. 
After all. we are closer to the North 


Germans for advanced-technology 
vessels are coming in at a trickle. 

“The specialized market has pro- 
vided us with useful business," said 
Mr. Pottinger of British Shipbuild- 
ers. “But there is only a limited 
demand for crane ships. Tbe orders 
come only infrequently, but we’re 
certainly glad to get them, of 
course.” 

Industry officials say that recov- 
ery will come only when oil and 


Sea than the South Koreans or the cargo shipments pick up. “There’s 


Japanese. 

Mr. Fame of the Western Euro- 
pean association said Lhe market 
for such specialized items as vessels 
for scientific research, cruise liners 
and offshore support ships had 


only one thing that’s certain: Sea 
water is corrosive, and the ships 
that are out there now will not last 
forever.” Mr. Pottinger said. 
“Eventually some of them will have 
to be replaced.” 


OBLI -DOLLAR 

10 A, Boulevard Royal - Luxembourg 

NOTICE OF ISSUE OF FREE SHARES 


Till- Bojrd of Directors of Oration Obli-Polbr S.A. have decided to 
distribute the income received durum tbe financial year to 30th September 
[935 bv Aligning to sliareholder? one free new share for every 10 shares 
held on the flh of November. 1985. 

Thw new shire? will be assigned, without charge, on the 21st Novem- 
ber. 1985 again st delivery of the coupon No. 4 to Basque Paribas 
(Luxembourg) S.A.. I0A Boulevard RoyiL Luxembourg. 

Tbe shareholders hive the option of rounding up or down the number of 
new shares Lint will be assigned to them. 

TTw instructions from shareholders must arrive at Banque Paribas 
(Luxembourg) S.A. on the 20th November. 1985 at the latest, the balance 
resulting from the rounding up or down will be settled on the 29th 
November. 1985 on the basis of the net asset value calculated on lhe 21e! 
November. 1935. 

Free -hares not allocated bv the 21st November. 1985 will be sold at tbe 
net asset value on this same date. The proceeds of sale will be delivered to 
the holders of No. 4 coupons presenting themselves after that date in 
proportion to their rights. 

The proceeds of the sale not claimed within 5 years of the predted dale 
will lapse and revert to the Fund. 


Geetion OB LI -DOLLAR S-A. 


Luxembourg. October 28th. 1985. 


OBLI-GULDEN 

10A, Boulevard Royal - Luxembourg 


NOTICE OF ISSUE OF FREE SHARES 


Tbe Board of Directors of Geation Obli -Gulden S-A. have decided to 
distribute tbe income received during the Financial year to September 30th, 
1985 bv assigning to shareholders one free new share for every 17 shares 
held on tbe fih ot November, 1965. 

These new shares will be assigned, without charge, on the 21st November, 
1985 aobist delivery of the coupon No. 2 to Banque Paribas (Luxembourg) 
S.A. 10A Boulevard RoyaL Luxembourg. 

The shareholders have the option of rounding up or down tbe number of new 
shares that will be assigned to them. 

Tbe instructions from shareholders must arrive at Basque Paribas (Luxem- 
bourg) SlA. on the 20th November, 1985 at tbe latest. The balance resulting 
from the rounding up or down will be settled on the 28th November, 1985 
on the basis of the net asset value calculated on the 21st November. 1965. 
Free shares not allocated by the 21st November, 1965 will be sold at tbe net 
asset value on this same date. Tbe proceeds of sale will be delivered to the 
holders of No. 2 coupons presenting themselves after that date in proportion 
to their rights. 

The proceeds of the sale not claimed within 5 years of tbe precited date will 
lapse and revert to the Fund. 

Gentian OBU-GULDEN S-A. 


Luxembourg. October 28th, 1985. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


HOUSEMAN/ CHAUFFEUR. Cordon 
Heir Onrtificafe in coc/dng, To years' 
with previous employers, very reliable 
capable gentleman, good referenda, 
free now. Fnr Staff Coosubants. 7 
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025231S369. IA teamed 


HEALTH SERVICES 


ARTHRITIS AND CHRONIC PAIN - 
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AUTOMOBILES 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


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MASSATt QUATTROPORTE 1983 


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Rolls toyce Silver Spirit 85. 7.000 lun 
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Other makes & enotics 


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CANNS/WCE 
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STUTTGART 
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NEW YORK 
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Drdlas F3430 F3660 

Montreal F I 890 F3000 

end more destinaticre — 

15% dbcount on In dam 

PARS ML (1142 21 46 94 

(Cor. lie 1503 


TO LAX/SFO dafy departure From 
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athre US destinations. Pare 4225 9290 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


PORTUGAL 


7 DAYS NOUStVE TOURS 

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ESTORti/ CASCAIS SF1037 

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ALGARVE SF1040 

MADBRA SF1090 


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EDUCATION 


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des 


<h praflranb Apply PAX, 9 rue 
UnuEres, PcrifSh. 43 25 35 09. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 

330 W. 56th St, MY.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS AND 
CHEQC5 ACCEPTED 

Private Menibreihlpt AvaBaUa 


* LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SBIVKE 

402 7600 or 499 2225 


ARISTOCATS 

London Escort Servtaa 

128 Wi^nora St.. London W.l. 

All major Credit Cards Accetrted 
frt 437 47 41 / 4742 

12 noan - rwduglit 


bm> featured re tha top X mart 
ndniv* Ewart 5arv>ce by 

USA A international new* madia 
indnCng radio and TV. 

CAPRICE-NY 

ESCORT SERVICE IN NEW YORK 
TEL 212-737 3291. 

* USA ft TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT SBtVICE. 
EVERYWHERE YOU ARE OR OOL.. 

1-813-921-7946 

Call Free From Ui. l-«0-ZJ7^892 
Call free from Rorida l-800-<S7-0892. 
Lowe3 Eoslern welcomes you bodtf 

MAYFAIR CLUB 

GUIDE SERVICE from 5pm 
ROTTERDAM (0) 10-254155 

THE HAGUE 10) 70-60 79 96 

ZURICH 

Srantorttwi escort + guide service 
TeL- 01/57 75 96 

LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SHtVKI 

10 XBtiINGTON CHURCH ST. W8 
THa 9379136 M 9379133 

AM major credit card* aceaptod. 

ZUR1CH-GENEVA 

GINGSTS ESCTMtT SERVICE. 

TEL- 01/363 08 64 -022/34 41 86 

* JASMINE * 

AMSTERDAM ESCORT SERVICE 
020-366655 

LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Eia* Service. 

Tel: 736 5877- 

★ LONDON CHELSEA * 

ESCORT SERVICE. 

51 PeuuJiaiy PteC*. SW1. 

Tel; 01 504 6513/2749 H3 P»l 

LONDON 

Porhmsi Escort Agency 

67 CMtarn Sfreaf, 

London tfl 

T*U 436 3724 or 486 115B j 
AR major credit card* accapted 

MADRID SHADOWS 
BCoS CRHMT CARDS 

ROXANNE 

Geneva Emit Service. 
022/36 64 82 (12 naen to 6pm) 

ZURICH 

AlfXiS ESCORT SBIV1CE 

IS: 01/47 5S 82 



ESCORTS & GUIDES 

* Madrid Taste * 

ESCORT SERVICE. Tel: 4117257. 

SWITZERLAND 

ESCORT SERVICE 

TEL D-077S1/5510 

ROME CLUB EUROPE ESCORT 
& Guide Servica.T«l: 06/589 2604- 589 
1144 {from 4 pm to 10 pmj 

** GBSEVA-HRST 

Escort Service + weekend 32 34 18 

GENEVA ESCORT 

SKWCE. Tek 46 11 S8 

* AMSTBiDAM SHF # 

ESCORT A GUIDES. 020-227137 

******GENEVA BEST 

ESCORT SBtVKZ. 022 / 86 15 93 

VtBMA ESCORT - AG&tCY 

TH: 37 52 39 

LONDON BEST BCORT SHfVICE 
Heathrow. Credit cards. 352 8343 

AMSTERDAM JEANET Escort Serw* 
Tel: (TOO) 326420 or 340110 



VIENNA STUDENT ESCORT Jerries, 
Contact; 83 63 04. Craft cards ac- 
cepted 

AMSTBIDAM BERNADETTE MALE 
and Female Escort Service. (0) 20- 
329716 

DUSSSDORF - COLOGNE - BONN- 
Essen Pam's Escort & Varel seivier. 
AB credit cards. 0211-39 50 66 

MADRID IMPACT esasrt and gride 
tervKB. MuhfinguaL 261 4142 

LONDON UBJCRE ESCORT SarvKT. 
Tel: 01373 B849. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

LONDON ESCORT SBtVICE. 7eh 937 
6S74. 

ATTO45 ESCORT AND GUIDE Ser- 
vice. Tet 8086194. 

NEW Y0RK-IO5 ANGBES. Ranee s 

Escort Senrice. 212-31 5^99. 



IOM30N ntBKH SPEAKING Escort 
Service. Teh 589 4900. 1 - 10 pm. 

OUEB4SWAY ESCORT ORVKE lon- 
don let Ot-2430785 

HEATVfltOW LONDON ESCORT Ser- 
we. TeL 994 6682. 

LONDON BAY5WATat ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 01 229 0776 

BStUN WEST - Escort & Troval Ser- 
vos. Tel 030/8815174 or 7534510. 

NEW YORK. MIA & Renee Escort 
Service. 212-2230870 CredH cords. 

MUNCH -BLOODY ATANJA Escort 
Service. Tel: 311 79 00 or 311 79 36 

LONDON ONLY JAPANESE BCORT 
Service. Tet: 01 821 0627. 

SAMANTHA BCORT SERVICE Lon- 
don. TeL 01-328 8459. 






VI0WA OESiraE BCORT 5BZV1CE 
Teh 52-29-16. 

LONDON ARABIC ESCORT Service. 
Tel. 727 1127 or 221 8458 

LONDON GENE SCOKT Servo 
Tet 370 7151. 

LOMION PARK LANE Eseert Serviea. 
Tet 01-BZ1 0283 

CLEO ESCORT SHtVKE. Heathrow, 
Garwiek, London 01-727 7886. 

DOWROQUE ESCORT SSYICE. 
London 402 1963 or 289 7972 

LONDON ORIENTAL GUIDE Service. 
Teh 01-243 1442 

MUNICH SUPREME BCORT Service. 
Tet 089/4486033 

BRUSSELS. CHANT AL BCORT Ser- 
vice: Tet 02/5 20 23 65. 

VIENNA - XANADU BCORT Ser- 
•Ke. Tel 75 57 20. 


LONDON ESCORT 

Tel: 935 5339. 


AGBICY. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

LONDON DtSCERMNG ESCORT Ser. 
«i»WW 0154. 

E=5i--M----dl.re- 


- wr 

HAV-'a.I-lTmliff 



J£ 

izsihpi 

AMSTERDAM MOOBtN ESCORT 

Service. (01 20327469. 

DOMINA JADEG8CVA Escort Ser- 
vice. Tfa 022/ 31 2671 

DU55BDOIDF BACCARA ESCORT & 
Travel service. Tel 0211/356905. 

FRANKFURT “TOP TEN" Eicort Ser- 
vie*. 069/59-6052. 

CLEOPATRA HEW YORK Escort Ser. 
vice pi 2} 48+9887. 

HAMBURG- MADBAOBBiE Eteart 
Agency. 040/55 32 914. 

MUNICH - PJSYATE ESCORT + 
Gude Service. Tet 91 2314 

AMSTBIDAM FOUL ROSES Escort 
Service (0) 20-964376 

AMSTBIDAM KIM SUE Euart Service 
Tet 020-953892 

aaSTA. LONDON SCANDMAVUN 

Escort Service. 834 0891. 

COMMA AMSTERDAM ESCORT 
Guide Senrae. Tet (0201 762842 

FRANKFURT, 5USANW5 ESCORT 
»nnca.Tet069/84 4?75. 

LOWON CTJAUTY Gwdri Service. 
Tel 01-262 3108. 

MADRID 5BECTION5. ESCORT Sar- 
<nce. 40)1507. Credit Cards. 

MUNCH - M5RB ESCORT Service. 
Tet 91 84 59 

G8CVA-AMA Fetreto A Male wart 
senrice. Mtfraxrf. 022/342955. 

CHARLWE GBCVA OUKC Sen**. 
Tet 283-397 

WASHMGTOK D.Ci Sandy Escort 
Service, (7035 >49-1255. 

HtAMOURT-ANFCS €nxt ATraft 
d Service. 069/55 88 2A 

FSAMCFURT POLAFD BCORT Sv- 
wto Tet 069/63 41 59. 

HAMBURG - SABRMA Escort Ser- 
vice. Tefc 040/58 65 35. '• 


RAMGURT- EVA'S ESCTXT& trav- 
el semas. Teh 069/44 77 75 


M onday^ 

MX 

Closing 


TaMBs include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


ftgmm 

met Low Stock 


Dtv. YfcLPE 


WtaHbhLee 


Ooet-Oiwe 


SVt 

u 

5* 

4 


MS ADI n 

S3* AL LObS .14 

8 AMC 1 

26k AM Ml 

33k AOIn 


44 

,J> I! 

to 


M a 


.16 4 


40 li 21 


viet Tet 01-727 2201 


884k tm ATT Fd i52e 44 
4 2Vi Acme Pr 
iivy W. Aemeu 
ink 93k Action 
51% Acton 

8k M Actn wt 

4*4 1/3 AdmRs 

sow 22 y. AdRior 

8 3H Aarone 

5141 2Wa AfilPbt 

m frt AtrEno 

12 4 AirCOl 

1314 93* ArCol pi 1.20 11A 

33* 1% Alomco 

WHk 45 Vj AlfflltOtl 

9V* 53k ARJOW 

M 11% Ain T re 

♦Ik 5H Ataha „ 

u% e AJPtoin SB J 

fa 1% Attexn 

36 31 Alcoa of 3.75 114 

293* 17U. AtzaCo ^ 

4 3V* AmBrlt R Jj ® 

lBfa 103% Amdahl 2Q U 17 

11V* 5Y* Amedeo J8 U 

13V* £3* AmBItt .15 14 5 

SVk 4 AmCnp I? 


105 

7 

9 

SB 

sa 

n 

4 

11 

45 

» 

17 

82 


5b 5 5Vfc + W 

84 SW 84 +3^ 

JH 214 2 fa+fa 
10’- lOVi toik 

'm 1 ?S” 

234 21U 234*— Vb 
273* ZA* 27V*— ft 

89 51 50* SI* +1W 

162 BV* 8b 

!« 11^ 10£ I*- fa 

208117 1U 117 +W« 

2 134 13k 134 + V% 

120 91% 85k 9 — fa 

1379 9^ W 9g +1fa 

AfiTTOi 34 33 33 — lfa 

« aS^Sfa Sfa 2?fa + >6 


11 


11 


57 2fa 2'4 214 
744 11U, 109k Ufa + fa 
30 634 64k 6fa— fa 

*4 'u ^ ^=3 

sS^SgEr 1 " 01,7 ,s ™ 4iw«fa”faJfa 

9 4 fa AFWA <1 27001 * S 

9 43* AFrtK B 39 ^ 5} SZ IS 

109* 33* AHlthM » 1^ ^ V* 

*14 43* AltrtMl mm A J iS_ 2 

31 ““ i§ Z 

*33* 47V4 APrif* 7M 4.1 fs 22 43V4 fa 

l» 1214 APrsc* V 2*b L7 20 M 141% 14V* 141*- fa 

lS5 llfa MtSJlf, IJfalOJ 26| 1«k 15^ 

a 9 acne 22 5 *6 4« q*i » *» 

5«* 49fa S^r un J I S3* 533* s»- % 

489* 44 Axonpr SOe \3 ,? ^ v* 

3V* Ifa aSJ? 0 » Uti SSI p* f* 2fa + fa 

“ iS s h k k + v* 

^SStov 13 lfa tfa Ifa 

O^Ara^Pt Ml » M 334- fa 

„ IB 4 4 4 

43* Armtli „ „ * 90 f* S 5A + fa 

7A AmwA 90 13 I Of 8«l w — M 
lfa aST? M 11 59 lO fa w v* 

934 Astro* U * TfA Ufa ,7V * J? 

1 A s troTc 4699 TWi fk 1 “ *■ 

TV* AtotoPflJO 118 U ,3 £ ,3 j ’V-jf 

V* AtHCM 64 fa fa fa— fa 

2 Audiotr 5 23% 2V6 2 fa— fa 

2 Auawrr ^ ^ u * — 


53* 

VIA 
Tfa 
6b 
SVC. 
llfa 
103% 

934 
Ufa 
23k 
173* 
lfa 

SI* _ 

191* 13?* Awendi 


17fa I7V4 173% 


B 


4fa 

27 

33% 

3b 

153* 

13** 

1716 

4V% 

27fa 

Tfa 

9fa 

43* 

4 

S3* 

63* 

135k 

12 

153* 

434 

323* 

4$ 

15fa 

27V4 

19 

38 

lfa 

1934 

19fa 

23 

1414 

’a 

183% 

2634 

373* 

413* 

5 

53* 
143* 
13 V* 


.15* 34 


M 4J> 


278*102 


.40 4J 


30 M 


33* BAT In 
13b BDMl 
134 BRT 

3 BSD n 
9fa BSN 
BVk Bonner 
Bfa Baker 
2 BrrivMwt 

22 Ui Ban pp 
43* Bansire 
43* BnkBkl 
Baraj 

2fa BomEn 
6fa Bamwl 

4 BaryRG 
IO'm Baruch 

434 Beard 
103* BeEdBIk 1-B0 ISO 
•A Beltran 
20fa BerpBr 
2fa BeFtiCA 
713* BICCP 

10 BhlV 
213* BinkMf 

93* BtoRAs 
14b Blesnai 
fa BlocdcE 

11 Blount A 
llfa BlountS 
Ufa BolarP* 

93* BowVat 
93* Bowl A s 
lfa Ekwmr 
173* Bowne 
1914 Breois 
27 BrnFA 
29 BmFB 
Tfa Buckhn 
334 Buckhpf JO 105 
24b Buell M 28 
6fa Bushn 


2580 
27 68 


23 
1 
4 

12 20 

16 51 


67 

9 

9 

n 93 


16 


1 

l 

J7t 15 17 4 

28 

23 

2 6 

14 1231 


33 1.1 
J3IT23 
31 U 
.40 26 
180 18 


80 16 


AS 12 
A0 29 


30 

M 4 2 


23 124 

1 


.44 24 15 
1.60 

1.00 27 10 
180 2J 11 


10 

15 49 


4ft 4Vh 
255* 25>i 
2fa 2fa 
3 3 

Ufa llfa 
101* 10V* 
133k 1314 
3 23% 

2714 Z79% 
73k 7fa 
9fa 8b 
3b 3b 
3fa 3 
61% 61% 
5fa 5fa 
lob im 
9fa 9fa 
1114 lift 

30fa 30 rt 
Jfa 316 
39fa 39fa 
151* 15fa 
27 26fa 
173* 17fa 

135k 139k 
13b 13b 
163* 155k 
115* Ufa 

lofa in* 

4fa 44* 
lBfa 181% 
25 25 

37fa 373% 
403* 409* 
33% 31% 
4b 4fa 
30fa 30V* 
79* 73* 


4V* — ft 
25fa— 1% 
2Hr 
3 

Ufa 

101* 

133* + fa 
3 -I- fa 

7% + * 

9fa + fa 
3b + fa 
31% + 1% 
61% — b 
5fa— V4 
109*— 1% 
VIA 

'"b-t 

^ + v% 

393% 

153*— 1% 
K%— b 
1714 




ft 

135*— fa 
nb— b 
1614 + 14 

Ufa 

103*+ 1% 
69*— »fe 
ISto + 14 
25 —14 
373*— 1% 
403k— fa 
33* 

4b 
30Vk— 1% 
73* — 14 


221 % 

129* 

314 

9V* 

1414 

Bfa 

143* 

185% 

17fa 


8b CD I 
5b CAM Ca 
11% CAAXCp 
I CSSn 
♦ CM8NJ 


191% 193* — fa 

iob iob 

11* 114 — 3% 

81% 814 + 14 


lOfa 10faj+ 1J 


48fa 

13 

3 

ISO* 

15fa 

8b 

814 

53% 

223% 

32fa 

2b 

S' 1 

ft 

91% 


.10 


17 

295% 

29 

10b 

3814 

331* 

35 

33b 


103* CalRE 
llfa Cameo 
13’A CMarco 
183% CdnOcc 
27fa Cwfoe 
49% Cardiff 
lfa CanJII 
•14 CoriB 
Bb CaraA 

A CareE B 15 

6 u. Care E A 15 

214 Coswon 641279 
UfaCMtLA 800 58 11 
259% CtrvFd 2200 SJ 
fa CasFdrt 
> Caatlnd 
4fa Carttanl 
10b CentSa 1.57el24 
5b Cetec 30 2S 17 
lfa QimoH 30 

123% CtimcP 32 48 17 
1«fe CtltMA 8 .16 9 13 

1714 CMMB S .16 8 15 

6fa CMDVO 
171% Chimt 


... 59% 

12 121% + Vh 

153* 155% 

16 H — 34 

191% 199* __ 

4614 51fa +3H 
109* 10fa + fa 
lfa 2 + fa 

131% 13b— fa 


1514 1~- 


1 


.17 


2* 

22fa 


r» 


30 11 9 




.16 


10b 

10b 

18 

2SV% 

95% 

5H 

s* 

211 % 


19b 

33% 

10 

35 


171* 

13fa 

P 

4b 

25 

31b 

3 


14 Citadel 
199k OtFst 
20fa CtvGas 
35b Cfarmt 
4fa OarlcC - 
24fa aorost 
lib Ctopavs 
31% CosrWtr 
6b Coho 
lb CotFwts 
♦fa Comtod 
8V* Cam Inc 
6b CemoD 
4fa OnpCn 

53% CmoFd U 

65* CfHKriF 246 

6b Corel ly 9 

131% CnnrCD 7 

5b Conqst 10* 

lft Com wt 
49% ConsOG 

CnnOGwt „ 

I6fa Cnstorn 27 

8b Cn Strati 
TV. vlCorttA 4 

Vb viCntApf 
171% CorrtAAtl __ • 

10b Corr»*t r> 180 1S8 
17b Coptorn 28a 1J „ 
2b CraCrn 21 

9fa CntrMn 

25b Craa 184 48 16 
28b CrowtM 1800 24 9 
Tfa Cm CP 9 

73* CrCPB 4 

* CrownC 

CnticJR 1 

CrvsrO 

13b Cubic 2 1 18 11 
Cortk* 82 38 9 
CustEn 


6b 6b 
6fa 61% 

2 2b— fa 

16 16 
26fa 26b 
lb H*— 14 
21% 2fa— fa 
Bft 9 

12fa 12b— fa 
6faT+fa 
2 23k 

1714 18 +1. 
179k ISfa— fa 
20 20 
>9* 9b— fa 
373% 33b+5fc 
29 2914 + 14 

329* 331% + 14 
3114 3114— fa 
44 44b + fa 

♦fa 9b— fa 

37 37 — fa 

13V* 131% 

414 414—9% 
914 9ft + fa 
49* 49% + fa 
Zifa Ztfa— fa 
7* 8 — fa 
iifa nfa— 1% 
6fa 6V%— fa 
7b 7b— fa 
714 79% 

163% 14ft— fa 
181% 18b 
814 8M + VA 
4K 414 
5 51% 






271% 27b + fa 
14 141% + fa 

13 13 —fa 

169% 16fa 
25V* 25ft + fa 
llfa 12 + fa 

1896 im + fa 
29* 294 + 14 
♦fa n%— fa 
349* 34fa + fa 
38V* 38V* + 14 
17V* 171% + 14 
123% 12b + 14 
7fa 7fa „ 

S 

22 22 —fa 

ZS4 24 — 14 
fa b + fa 


3 

15b 

15b 

594 

Ufa 

30b 

Bfa 


371% 

169* 


ISb 

% 

2M% 
3b 
76b 

169* 


lfa DWG 8Bt 48 
79* DomEA 280 248 
61% DamEB 280 30J 
3b Damson 
17b Da [TO of 250 If} 
19fa Damspt X75 168 
10b DotoPd .16 1.1 
3V% Datorm 
2 D* Rose 
25b Da! Lob 82 M 11 
12b CXKVol 1J4 10J ♦ 
I Dafmed 

3b Dso njm J3t S3 11 
7b Dawn! 13 

10ft DovfCp „ 343 

9b DvnRin 180 T18 
5b DtagA 88 

5*OlM0 75 

6 DtaBtttS 16 

lb Dig Icon 

36*4 Dlllrd 80 8 17 

29* D loots M 

” DlrActn 12 

Po me P 
DirwPwt _ 
Domtrs 



lfa lb 
8fa 814— 14 
714 71% — ft 
31% Jfa 
17b 17b— 14 
22b 22b— >A 
13b 14 — 14 
7b 7b— fa 
" 3fa + b 
37 +* 


\ "SI* 


_ fa 

3b 3fa 

n* >fa 

13ft 139* + fa 
9 ♦ —fa 

6fa 7 + fa 
6 6 
2414 25VS +1 
lfa lb 
78b 721% +3 
3b 3V% +fa 
5 5b + 14 
lfa 214— fa 


281% + fa 


2fa 


Driller 




42 

1 

ft 

3*fa 



30 

2J 

36 

23 

28* 

28 

80* 


M 

16 

11 

its 

18 

IB 

16* 



JOB 13 

16 

99 

14 

Ub 

10* 

9fa 

Dynta 

379 20 

11 

296 

I3fa 

Ufa 

29ft 

18b 

Dyneer 

JO 

19 

12 

2 

2/fa 

27fa 


iM 

7b 

31a 

239* 

40 

15V. 

r* 


M 43 40 
8! 28 21 
17 

8f7t 46 12 
14 

188 58 18 
6.96C21.1 7 
.12 


180 


814 

131% 




lb 

’2S 

3ft 

12ft 


89* 

2594 

fl* 

rv. 

34b 

10W 


6b EAC 
133% EECO 
43% ERC 
21* ESI 
2i% Eooia 
179k EstnCo 
3tTA EstBO 
7b EcboBg 
ft ElAudD 
15b ElcAm 
2b ElecSd 
Zb Elsinor 
19fa EmMdn 
BwrDvwf 
E&vton 
fa EnoMol 
4b ErtoOli 
ft EnrStv 
10b ESDn 
21% Enstrpf 
Bfa Erelnd 
4fa Esuv 
5fa Eskev Of 180 113 


42 * 
40 


34 ffa 
18 16ft 
108 7b 
1® 814 

382 21% 

2 n 

Z3 


JJ3* 5 


lil 


Bb 81% 

15b 15b— fa 
7fa 7b +b 
S 13* + fa 
214 21% + fa 
19 TV 
329* 33 + 14 

124% 17ft— fa 
•k 9k— 




JO IS 9 


. . 28 
480)28 


153% Eny 
ft Esortt 
3314 EsaRd 
221% EtiLOV 
6ft Ear J B 
6 CvrJ A 
4ft Excel 


M 28 8 


,72e 28307 
.lie A 35 
.10 18 26 
80 28 23 
.40b 48 12 


12 
fa 

\- 
99% 
ft 

n in* 

1 71% 

22 7ft 

8 17ft 

8 1ft. 
T 36ft 
SB 27ft 
Tl 1(H4 
7 99% 

37 99* 


6ft 

214 2b— ft 
lift lift— fa 
ft ft 

9b 9b— 14 
ft ft 
139k M + 14 
3b » + fa 
101% 10ft ■ 
7ft 7fa 
7ft 7ft + fa 
1794 171* + fa 

lfa 1ft— fa 
Tfa 36ft 
27ft 27ft— J41 
18 IgA + ft 
Wl Wi 
91% 9» — fa 


12ft 

El% 

Mb 

19 

’S 

12ft 


13fa 

15b 

U 

30b 

iob 

43ft 

3094 


Ift 

FPA 



48 

Ufa 

Foeind 

JO 

w 

1 

6 

MrFirt 



U 

ISfa 

3fa 

Forty « 
FMoto 

JOX 2J 


1% 

FCanHd 




9fa 

FtConn 

IdOOo BJ 

8 

Tl 

FWvmB 

30 

u 

11 

Ffa 

Fsfawi 



7 

Ufa 

FtschP 

AH si 

21 

4fa 

RteCE 




23* 

RrSE pi 430 133 


S 

vl Fiants 




28* 

FtaBck 

30 

13 

8 

21 

Fhike 

1381 55 

13 


J !L 

31 21ft 
25 II 
301 161% 
195 Tfa 
1400 4ft 

j im. 

SR 

II lift 
21 12ft 
■ 4 2L 
eft 
98 40b 
14 251%' 


10 10 —fa 
2Gb 2Tb + ft 
17 IB 


iift iii%- vj 


6ft 6ft 

«*k 4ft + fa 

im lift— fa 

12b 12b— b 
119% lift— fa 
Ufa 13ft- ft. 
T2b 17b 

2 8S a SU3 



TV. Faaartn 

_ 7 FooieM 

25 199* ForstC A JO 1J 

3»» gggn - 

2. ft Fotomi ,n 

alb 32ft Front* 180o 28 12 

7 fa 4b FrdHlv 

U 14 Fr*d El •• 

124* 5 FrbjEn U 

M 10ft FrnlHd , , 9 

14b 4ft FrtAwf -rt* -? — 
1534 69k PurVtt 80 1J 2? 



116ft 
25b + ft 
2Kb— b 

H6 + fa 
381%— fa 

^S— fa 

aft- fa 

1» + fa 


1-20 


534 fa GNCv 
6ft 41* GRI 
4ft IftGTI 
15b ISfa GfllaxC 
2b 114 GalxvO 
30b 24fa Goran 
1694 7ft GOHJt 
139* 9ft GaimS 
44% 2b GUMO 
Mb 12ft GDefns 

5 2ft GnCmP 
17ft 13 GnMicr 

6 2ft Gcntseo 
15* 9ft GenvDr 

14 7fa MRU 
4b 1ft G«3R wt 

129% 83% G*oR6FfT88 
2514 12b GlanFs JO 

20 8 GntYle _ 

3Sft 203% GkrHM » W 11 

37 33b Gtrenr 180b 13 20 

4ft 2ft GtoONR ■ 

61% 3 GoldW 

lb ft CWFW . 

1W* 1594 GorRps 86 48 8 

16 6ft Graham X. 48 

IT . 5b GrnhMC 1808308 8 

24ft 14b SraflAU JO 2.1 12 

12 79* Grmrt 

15 9ft GrTech. 

44b 27 GTTLkC 
36 Ufa Grerens 
lift 5V* Greiner 
13fa 9 oroch ; 

15b 11 otfCdg 

3AW 24 ■ Gtfstr 

151% 6 Gull . 



12ft 12ft + ft 
149k 14b 
15b 35b 
1394 13ft 


H 


881 28 8 


10ft 6ft HAL .108 18 
Tib 109* HMG M S3 ^ 
2114 lib HUBC JOaXS 13 
6b 4b HalKcnr -04a J 

31% lfa Hobnl 
19% 1 Hcdralwt 
10V* iV> HarnptL 8M1U 8 
294* 21ft Hntfvmn jl% 2 t 
27b 131% Hanfrds JD 18 IS 
2b ft Harvey 
39b 21b Hotel'.' .15 j 4 10 
43 269* Haabrpt 280 58 ^ 

41ft 28V. Host mo ^OO 18 10 
9ft 8ft Hlln 
17ft T2b HtthCr* 

T01A 5b HI Midi 
T7b 6ft HtttlEx 
15ft lift HelttiM 
9ft 69% HakiWr 
17b 10 He I nick 
3b ift Haidor 

9 3fa Hatkml 

lb S HeimR 

5ft 3ft HarsiiO 
3fa 19* Htodrt 
4b 2 Hotman 
189k 6b HoRVCp 
2494 ISfa HmeG n 
22ft 20 HmlTOPtiSS 138 
239* 149k HormlB M 22 IS 
12 6 HmHar 

3ft ft HftlH Wt _ 

19ft 13ft HallPty 180 »J 16 
«% 2ft HottPwt ' 

61% 3b HowOT 86*184 
18b lift HovnE ; 11 

23b 14ft HubatAS 86 02 13 

25 15b HobelB* 86' 30 14 

20ft 17ft HudGn 40 10 14 
♦ft 4fa Husky 8 36 5.1 


81% 8fa 
10b Mb— fa 
20ft 20b + b 
5ft 5ft— * 
Zb 29* 
lb lb 
Ift w— fa 

249* 25 +9% 

^^ft + b 

sssssiv 

^«* 3 m* + 9% 
129% 13b + fa 
r 894 89k . 

994 99b— 1% 

‘sa’K+g 


84 18 7 


2 2b + fa 
29* 2ft— V* 
1» 19ft + b 
J3Vi 23ft + 14 
2214 2294 + ft 
23ft 2«* +1 
7 7ft— fa 
ft ft 
Ufa IN 
6 ' 6 — ft 
4fa 4b— 14 
169% 17 +14 

23ft 231% + 3% 
•2*3* 25 +9% 

20b 20b 
7fa 7fa — fa 


I 


6 3ft ICEEn 
SSVi 323* ICHs 
7ft 1 ICQ 
3ft 3ft I PM 
9 3V4 IRTCPS 

3fa 19% ImpGo .12 e 48 
294 Vi imp lew 
40fa 30fa IrripOII O 160 
1314 5 InfteW 

22b 1114 Instms 
2ft Tfa IrertSv 
3 21* lossy pf 

69* IqtCtVe 
mb Intmk 


80 


13 

15 

4ft 

lfa 

12b 

lift 

71% 

4ft 

914 

KJft 

10ft 


2^4 intBknt 


7 

18 20 

8 

85t1B_5 

M 

.12b 3 


„ lotBkwt 
Sb inrHyd 
914 IIP 
3b IntPwr 
lb lntF*rnt 
6 IntSaaw 
2b intThrn 
29* irtThref 
23b 13b lorries S 
41 25 IroqBrd 


20 


3 49b 
850 51 
81 Tfa 
58 lb 
66 B% 

23 \ 
398 39 

42 6b 
25 19b 
ZU 1ft 
• 12 a% 

27 12b 
29 Ufa 
251 39* 

162 fa 
112 714 
72x W34 
6 4ft 
15 J 
60 89* 
444 3ft 

24 3% 
603 32b 

18 3514 


4ft 4ft— fa 
49b 50b + 14 
t ib + fa 

r#*a 

\% V-* 

.T* ^4 + ft 

191% 19b+b 
lb 1ft + fa 
. 2b 2fa— fa 
12ft 17ft — V* 
1314 13ft + 14 
3ft 3ft— b 
ft '« 

7 7b— fa 

10 18ft +TA 
4» 43% — ft 

m 3 

814 (fa— fa 
3b • 39%.; 

39% lfa. 

21b -219k— fa 
35b 3534— fa 


lift 11 
7ft 


joctyn 50b 44 11 


lb 

♦b 

6b 

Ufa 

Ub 

634 


Sfa Jacobs 


JetAm 

b JetAwt 
5fa Jetron 
21% John Pd 

5 JohnAm 80 

6 John Ind 
2b JumpJk 


JU1O0 12 


57 


3 11b lib 11b 

4 53% 53% 8fa- , 
111 3b »* 3ft — ft 
26 ft fa b 

49 7b 73% 71% +• fa- 

36 334 31% 334— ft 
181 5ft 5b 534— b 
68 • (ft 81% N + b 
6 3 29% 3 


39b 


lift 

139* 

153% 

23ft 

1296 

7b 

Zfa 

4b 


30 1-4 
80*22 
.40 38 
JSt 34 
JO 21 


39* 

16ft 

303% 


3114 KnGsPf 450 122 
2ft KopokC 
10 ICayCp 
IN KayJn 
996 KsarNt 
14 Ketcftm 
TV* KeyPti 
23% KdvCo 
b KvyCa wt 
2ft Kidd* Wf 
33* Klnork 
2ft Kirby 
39* tOI Mis 
2 KtaerV 
1014 Knoll 
22ft KouorC 


JQr J 


222 87 


lOQz 37 
206 4fa 
4 13b 
16 Ufa 
51 10ft 
39 Mb 
1124 9b 
12 Zfa 
62 b 
3T3 3ft 
22 3ft 
£55 a* 
♦ 5ft 
as 2ft 
19 15* 
103 3694 


37 37 —» 

3ft. Afa + 14 
13ft 139k 
139* 13ft— fa 
MIA Mb + 9% 
Mb lib— b 
914 ffa + fa 
294 2ft 


* S=i 


3b Jfa. ... 
3ft 3ft +fa 
8ft 2» '• 
53% 5ft 


N N + b 


15b. 15b 

26h am 


80 13 


319% 

7fa 


29k lfa LSB 

3V* 11% La Born 

6ft 3b LoPrrt 
20b Ufa LndBne 
Mb 8b Losar 
13 8ft Lauren 

5ft 4fa J-azKop 
27ft lift LeorPP 380 1X5 
Vb 2fa LaaPti 
1994 Latriphs 
4b LelsurT 
5 Lavltt 
9b LWPPh 
lb UMtft 
2b UMd 

33ft Uft Lo??Q> 

39ft 27ft Lorlmr 
19 10ft Lumax 
14b. 9 LurxtvE 
13b 9b Lurto 
149* 10 LVdni 
26b 8b LynCSs- 
1014 8b LrnchC 


2 lb 
194 lb 


3«ft 

3 

4ft 

2ft 


JO 13 18 

J 


58 18 


:« 

M 

12 4b 6b 
C 21 20ft 
85 in* 10ft 
S. 8ft Sb 

7 5 -J. 

12 199* Vb 
199 71 * 6% 

4. JO 30 
85 7b 7b 
2 6ft 6ft 


lfa— b 
ne.+ fa 
4b + b 
2B% +9% 
«B4— b 


-88 5 


JO 1J 
30 .2.1 


22 lfa N* 
7 33% 3ft 
•4 _n* jfa 

32 2C V% 20 
HD 46ft 39V* 
49 T7V* ISfa 
40 12 Ufa 

S llfa .18fa 

27 131* Ufa 

119 Ufa llfa 

4 19% n§ 


5—1% 
19b— ft 
«% + 14 
30 +fa 

Tfa— ■»% 

6ft + ft 
283% — fa 
lb 
3fa 
lfa 
20 — b 
40ft +11% 
16b— b 
IT* + fa 
11 —.14 
lift ;+ 14 
lift— fa 
9b— ft 


AJ 32b 

ub 4b PotTch x 

SS ibPomPt 
54* 2b PoyF« 

lib Bb 






19 „ 

42 7ft 7 7ft , 
19x339k 32ft 321*2 
56 4ft 4b tijlt 
1 9b 9ft 5' 
13 Jfa 3b Jfa_ 
29 10 W W 
19 am* 26b 2694 -. 
32 


im 

’*94 EeriSU I *® 

2V% P«1LW 
fa PriLwl 

Tssaar*** 

194 Pk»Pd 

2b PMrlwt 
29% Ptairfy 

4 b Piiwve 


2694 34b- 26*4 

m* m m: 


30 

32 30 
9.1 


4b 

fa 

93* 


Zfa 

6 

7fa 

5b 


36*119 1 


30 


36 
18. 13 


12 


93 


J4 33 
39t 52 


.H..JR 

32 48 28 


36W2 ia 

r 

lOVi fib Pizzaln 8« U 

58 SSKS.% S u. h 
* REBi 

6fa 3 POPJI* 

Ufa 7fa PortSYS 
17b 12b P«!iPr 
7fa ,5b £otr06 

jtraRui « 

SSnsa 5j 

SrZ 18 ppfofD 234 *• 

814 294 PuntsG 

Mb 5b OurtO* 

7ft 5fa RAI 
5V* 3b RM5D 

Taft Ufa Roaan 

^"bSssr 

lib FUtSoun 122* A9 
43% lb Remqw 
Ufa 10b RefloJB' 

Soft 35* RMtA 
57fa 40 ResrtB 
tv, 3ft RstAsB 
Ift 3fa RstAsA 
4ft 314 RaxNor 

72» 9b RBrietP 
Mb 14b RioAlB 
rn* S3* Rctcwys 
38ft 1714 Rooars 
5ft I* RoonvP 

7 33% RovPttn 

34 22ft Rodlck 
8ft Jfa RBW 
20 llfa RuSS*M 
291% 16 RYtofl 
8ft 3b SFM 
814 7 SFNB4A 

40ft 27ft SJVVJ 
5 29% SMD 

7016 49* Sooe 

1 5 Solera 

9 6b SDuOPf 
ffa «*SDeo*f 


421 

SO 

35 
41 
J 
T9 

36 
41 
17 
\ 


^ “i5 

132* 7 A 


250 
26 

1 1;* 

48*** 

J Kb ra* 12b4 

% * 

% i K: 
« if « 

139 76ft 753% 75ft _ 

20 714 Tfa 7fa_- 

491 17 Uft Uft- 
36 16 15b wi- • 

1 31% w ».:• 

3 3 . 3 - .3 .J • 
386 3b 314 3fa~ 

S « nb iH* riS'i - 
■ Mb Mb Mb4 . 
Sft 5ft Jftj ■ 
155 2«4 23b 24' 

3 «k m 
VI fa fa „ , 

4 WJJ Mb Mfai 

tr tm ffit 19ft *4 
4 275* 2314 23ft ■ 

■SWTS.*: 

w Bfa 8b> ■ 

J At ft 

n nb w 4 »% + . 








r* 


808CTW 

37 
;■ M 

• f 
.10*24 ' n 
2D. Lf IS 
JO u 

28 .13 23 
J2 .3 20 


Mfa— 

Wjfiinv' 


-56a 22 10 
- 8 
30 16-14 
40. 27 TZ 
H 


L4537 13 


88 M2 
SO 1U. 


IT. 


10 7fa SDaopt 180 MJ 
243% 19fa SDBOFf 3JO 


MR . 

39ft 34b SDBO:Ff~4jS5 128 . 
26 20ft SDaanf 248 M 7 

30 2ift Sandal. JO - 
Sfa 3fa SanmrtL A*.U Tl 
7 4b sounds . -S 2» 7 
6 fa 43% ScundA 30. 30 8 

31 9b Sound pfL» -12» - 
9ft 7 SaxnOa 128 158 __ 
Ub 113% Stxirraiy . 20 

30ft 17b \si 13 M 

I4ft 9blronS[- -47 23 
7b 3ft 5cUMr - JO 18 - 
34 Ufa settle.. - S 

40ft D, Sow. -83 L3 10 

S ft -» J * 

Hk 9ft sSa^ ' .« 18 9 
4ft 2 5*tsPra 
lfa . jfcSMsOtt 

u sas 11 

T4ft 9b Srvtsco 38 23 
rt 7b. Servo ^ M 

Mb ' 6fa Servotr 861 78 19 
-12* IfaSrtons 89 3 HI 
13b . 83% SbaarS 188a 73 8 
lfa- b Sboron ■ 

15b. 9 Shanwl* 8 U _ 
MM 4* SJarttS n 79 

15* 9b SVarSoB 377 23 29 
7* 4 Sttoi :. .1« 17 

15ft S3* SJk#»A 30 28 U 
5ft m SUvrcat . • ' 

21b Mb SmttiA. -• 30- 33 
21b 10 SortHB- 38 33 
28b 2414 Smtti at 232. 73 
9b 5ft SoMrmr i • • M 
1614 7 SoraPrn 279 

1 b SoTtX V- " 
iw% aftscErrot-u 
nfa DfaSCEdot U 
11* 83% SC&Jpf, U 
12ft 9ft scenat t: 

51* omsCEOAt ei 
14ft 11* 5CEd pt-1 


1 10% Ub 

2 17ft Uft 

n a ft at 

U Ufa Uft Mft— 

180 45* 44ft 

1501 49ft 48ft 

W M ft 
30- 5ft 5ft SU 
.73 414 « «*.+ 

12 MB* 10b 1«% ’^ U 

U 15b Ufa 15b+ ' 

» J* l* Ufa 

43 20ft 20 2D — - 

321 1ft 13% lfa_ 

16 6ft 6ft 6ft ■ 

S 25ft 2Sfa »%- 
196 Bfa 8ft 8ft I 

116 19b WV 1914- 
M7 22ft 21ft 22 — 

U A'« 414- 
40 8 ■ S . 

» 39b 39ft 39ft.*. " 

31 m 3ft 3fa* 

a r s rr 
■I- *-* SL. 

t 9ft 9ft 9ft.-- 
2 2Zft 22ft 22ft— . 

1 514 5ft 5ft 

1 5ft 5ft 5ft 
28 10 10 18 ■ - 
M4 8ft 7* 8 -y 
84 17 • 16 IT + - 
82 3ft 3ft 3ft.- 
16 29 28ft 29ft— -- 
4 -lfa lfa lft-^i - 
U 10ft Wfa Mb - * 

»■ Sfa 5b 5fa + 

88 Mb I Zfa Uft t 

23 Bit 33 33 - 

4 V lib I*' 1* - 

1 6834.68ft 68ft -t 

2 Jlk- 1* 

173 TOft 10ft 18ft 

10 2ft -214 2ft'’- 

57 fa b b+«^^ 

1 5ft 5ft «*'" — 

7 2b 2fa 2b - . 

36 12 12 12 — .-,{** - 

.1-Mfa iob lOb—Ulir" 

12 12ft 12ft 12ft- ^ 

117 10 9ft TV*—* 

U 12ft 12b 18k + 

583 b R fc— i 
■ST Ufa lib 111% - 
171 5ft 5 514 + 

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'Japanese Hav< 
Discounts < 

W DyBobHagcny 

iSsU Tn,Er *urionaJ Herald Tribune 

. i LONDON — Japancsfr icd! com- 
• Sjues hope io persuade Saudi Ara- 
t 'to offer- them discounts ax 
5 jade a£L sunilai to those recently 

'i ? anted in nnim rt <r c.. / 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOMEMBER 19, 1985 


— — — , ,, r, n CURRENCY MARKETS 


r.. t; |i * 

? . - i.'s. 

' V- 


V - y ... • f, re said Monday. 

£ V ;! j^The Saudis so far have resisted 
" - '■ P leas » “d Japanese buyers 

t £ v-.vc turned to Iraq and other smy- 
for cheaper crude. But some 
; \ panese sources in London said 
>• < * ^ LS’fS were rising and that a high- 
" i J 'rta delegation of Japanese com- 
£ v-ny officials was expected to visit 
t j soon for negotiations. 

- v: .. ■: ifcjSf^a^SodatioiBqipear urgent,' 
' .S -i “i:l?ces said, because kr®j term 

. - ,;?::niracts between the Saudis and 

■* £ Kiith KyodoOil Co. and Mitsubishi 
| :: • Tprp. expire at the end of thkywar 

' / s - £-.Tne discounts granted certain 

".. ^ t q . •,< pS. and European companies arc 

s |jJ,ised on a “netback”, system. In 
'■ i 1 Tat system, the crude is priced on 
> 'i '■ ~ £*e basis of current free-market 
» ;lues for ofl products, snch as gas- 

V| - ;; !■ infi and heating oil, allowing the 
'y ic^finer to show a small profit after 


taking into account refining and 
transport costs. 

In Japan, however, oil-product 
prices are set by the government. 
The Saudis have .said it. would be 
artificial to set crude pices based 
on Japanese product prices. 

. But Sheikh Ahmed 7-»Vj Yama- 
ni, the Saudi oQ minister, said in an 
interview this month that some al- 
terative form rediscount might be ' 
offered to the Japanese. 

Japan in recent years has been a 
big market for Saadi oil, bat Japa- 
nese buyers have cut their par- 
chases. In September, Japan’s nil 
imports from Saudi Arabia aver- 
aged 229,000 barrels a day, or 
about 7 percent of all oil imports. 
In September 1984, the figure was 
725,000 bands a day, or 30 per- 
cent For fan 1 984, Ibe imports ran 
at about, 1 mflli oQ barrels a day. 

Now, acc or ding to an industry 
source in London, Japanese com- 
panies; have agreed to buy 220,000 
bands a day of the crude Iraq is 
pumping into a recently opened 
pipeline through Saudi Arabia to 
the Red Sea. 


'rain Futures Are Overtaken 


Lee Predicts 2% Shrinkage 
Jn Economy of Singapore 

J Revim 

SINGAPORE — Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew has forecast that 
Singapore’s economy would decline by 2 percent this year, its weakest 
performance in the past two decades. 

Mr. Lee made the statement in an interview with Asahi Shimbun, 
the Japanese newspaper, on Saturday. The full teat was released 
Monday. 

Singapore's gross domestic product grew by 82 percent last year, 
but it has been declining since the be ginnin g of 1985. GDP is the baric 
measure of goods and services produced by a country's economy, 
minus interest payments from abroad. 

Mr. Lee said the outlook for 1986 was not bright and it could take at 
least three years fa Singapore to come out of the current recession. 
. “The figures up to October show a trend towards mi pus 2 percent 
growth for 1985,” Mr. Lee said. 

“It is difficult to see great improvement next year because even if 
there should be a pickup in the American economy, which may boost 
our manufacture, our construction is slowing down,” the Singapore 
leader said. 

“We have kept up a high rate of growth because we did major 
construction projects, countercyclical spending. They have come to 
an end,” he said. 

Singapore should increase productivity, hold wages down and find 
new growth industries to overcome its economic difficulties, Mr. Lee 
said. 


Company Results 

Revenue tmd profits or losses. In millions, ore in local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


- \ ! ! ’1 


'■ » .i 

-- o i- a 


j i. ■ (Continued from Page 15) 

; sfcinsis way down; I know traders 
Jiio now have second or third 

h*r 

; i What has drained volume has 
I -‘bat the desertion of speculators, 
j ' Patrick O’Connell, a grain ana- 
• nkt with Ref co Inc , explained that 
: Ranges in tax law had made agri- 
‘rilmral futures less attractive to 
j^isalthy individuals, and federal 
■ .ice-support programs had en- 
3 j - iuraged overproduction of grains. 

\ *Mr. Lerner said he was driven 
: . -tof com by a substantial loss 18 
i souths ago that he attributed di- 
\ ^ctly to the declining volume, 
i • He had developed a trading 
jufategy, called a butterfly, in 
,-iicb ire took a short or long posi- 
;£>n on some intermediate-term 
; -.td futures contract, say three 


months out Then, he would take 
an offsetting position. About half 
of tins opposite position would be 
at a longer term, about six months, 
and the rest would be at a shorter 
position,' say one month; the se 
were the “wings” of the strategy. 

Tbe jolt came when the market 
turned sharply against the wings of 
his butterfly, where ML Lerner had 
sold hnge amounts of corn short. 
Normally, he would have been able 
to trade out of tbe short position. 
But volume in tbe can-futures pit 
had grown so thin that he could not 
get out. “The liquidity just wasn’t 
there,” Mr. Lerner recalled. 

Not all agricultural-futures trad- 
ing is. so depressed. John J. Coc- 
heeoy, chairman of Merrill Lynch 
Futures, noted that cattle and cof- 
fee futures had been active; 


Britain 

Scot Newcastle Brew. 
W HON 1*85 HM 

Revenue 393J 3S4J 

Proto* Prom «L1 J7J 

Per Store 0-W 0087 


Ivoco 

3rd Quor. 1985 1984 

Revenue aoj) sot.i 

Oper Met 8S3 725 

oper Store— ft21 OJO 
f Mootbi 1985 1984 

Revenue UXO. pob .1 

oper Net— 2SJ 

Oner Stare— 183 1J3 

Voiced Stales 

Alee Stamford 
4HtQear. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1430. 3WJ 

■oper Met- 2SJ> 1U 

Oner Shore— 145 0 sa 

Year 1985 1984 

Revenue ojesl xm 

Oner Net 7<8 644 

Oper Store— 122 Z79 

JUS nets toed** pain of SiJ 
motion. 

Baker inn 

4m Oner. 1985 1984 

Revenue 5D39 481.7 

Net Inc. ' 2&D 244 

Per Store— OJ? 035 


Year - 1985 1984 

Revenue i^oo. 1330. 

Net Inc. tPJ TOo 

Per Stare— 125 1M 

• 

Fairchild Industries 
3rd floor. 1985 1984 

Revenue 22&s noo 

Net Me (0)774 7A7 

Per Store—. — 0 32 

TMonttu 1985 1984 

Revenue — 609.2 S7i2 

Net Inc. (0)1719 234 

Per Share — UN 

a: loss. 1 985 nets Include *rl- 
trail alSISSS mlllton. 

K-Mart 

3rd floor. 1985 1984 

Revenue SjM. 5^50. 

Net Inc 77 A 924 

Per Store— . 060 071 

9 Months 1*85 1984 

Revenue liaso 

Net Inc 2107 2948 

Per Store 144 027 


NVF 

3rd Quor. 1985 1984 

Revenue 3te.9 wt 

Net LOSS 207 1037 

9 Mon Hu 1985 1984 

Revenue *25.1 *77.9 

Net Loss 15JD 3248 

SOW 

1st Quor. 1984 1985 

Rovenue sxu szu 

Net Inc 1434 11J7 

Per Share L47 1.15 

(flto net lodvaes cnaruo of 2 ! 
cents oar share. 

Tesoro Petroleum 
(Hi Quor. 1985 1984 

Revenue 4609 11X4 

Oper Net 22 2.1 

Year 1985 1984 

Revenue 2J0a 3,12a 

Oner Net _ .19.0 17J 

Oper Share— (U1 os? 

Per share results oiler ore- 
femddMoanas. 


Mercantile Stares Wbeellnfl Pittsburgh 

floor. 1985 1984 SSSjSI’ ’ff? JJfS 

Revenue — 4495 4HU 2 S ( i? 

Net me 252 21.9 LOSS 13X1 9.91 

Per Shore 1.71 149 9Mont1u 1985 1984 

Revenue 58428 79X0 

9 Months 1*85 1984 Net Loss , — 208.M 9m 

Revenue — 1 j«a L130. 7985 nets Include charges of 

Net me iSJ 48J JJOH oar share to auanar 

a— ci— jjg 328 and of niSS to months. 


Yields Fall 
Below 10% 
On T-Bonds 

Racers 

NEW YORK — * The interest 
rate on new long-term U.S. Trea- 
sury bonds fell below 10 percent on 
Monday for the first time since 
June 1980. 

In when-issued trading, the 
30-year bond that tbe Treasury will 
auction on Friday was offered at 
9.98 percent, while the current long 
bond, the lOVperccnt issue due 
2015. rose over a point, to a high of 
105ii. for a yield of 10.01 percenL 

Dealers explained that with the 
current bond selling for nearly six 
points above par, investors are de- 
manding a premium in interest. 

The long bond rose nearly half a 
point just as futures markets closed 
for the day in Chicago, dealers said. 
The Dual push below 10 percent 
was sparked by heavy short-cover- 
ing from speculators who had ex- 
pected yields to back up this week 
given lie record volume of new 
treasury issues to be sold 

“Speculators went short ahead of 
the auction and got caught,” said 
one bond trader. 

Demand was aided by reports 
that Japanese investors are buying 
the new bonds, dealers said. Japa- 
nese demand for U.S. debt has 
been dulled by rising interest rates 
in Japan, which make yields on yen 
bonds nearly as attractive as on 
dollar securities. 

CFTC Studies Contracts 
Based on Dollar Index 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The Com- 
modity Futures Trading Commis- 
sion on Tuesday will consider an 
application by the New York Cot- 
ton Exchange to trade futures con- 
tracts on a U.S. dollar index, tbe 
agency said Monday. 

The index is a trade-weighted 
composite of the dollar's value 
against 10 major currencies — 
eight European, the yen and the 
Canadian dollar. 





Dollar Drifts in Quiet U.S. Trading 


CompikJ Ik Our S:j(i From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
drifted lower at the close in New 
York in extremely Lhin. technical 
trading, dealers said. 

Rank dealers said there was very 
little volume as the market waited 
for the reception of auction of the 
S61 -billion in Treasury offerings 
that began last Friday and wili con- 
tinue every day until Nov. 28. 

‘‘The Treasury's 10- and 30-vear 
bonds will be watched, especially 
for a clue to interest rates,” one 
dealer said. 

In Tokyo, dealers noted that a 
higher yield on the longer bonds 
could widen the interest-rale gap 

between Japan and the United 
States, and that would certainly 
push tbs dollar higher. But U.S. 
dealers said a lack of demand also 
could signal that foreign invest- 
ment was slackening and that 
would be negative for the dollar. 

Tne market also is awaiting for 


the revised third-quarter U.S. gross 
national product report, due 
Wednesday, looking for a clue to 
the U.S. economy and possible 
Federal Reserve policy, dealers 
said. 

A decline in the operating raic at 
U.S. factories to 80.2 percent in 
October from a revised 80.4 per- 
cent in September also fueled 
growing skepticism about forecasts 
of a solid rebound in the U.S. econ- 
omy in the near future, they said. 

In New York, the British pound 
closed at SI. 427. a slight gain from 
Friday’s close of S1.421. ~ 

Other closing dollar rates were; 
16 105 Deutsche marks, down from 
2.62 DM at Friday’s dose: 2.1325 
Swiss francs, down from 2.146: 
7.9555 French francs, from 7.9S9; 
1.763 Italian lire, from 1,771. and 
at 203.30 Japanese yen, from 
204.05. 

Earlier Monday in European 


trading, the dollar was mixed but 
little changed in very quiet and 
trendless trading . 

In Frankfurt, the U.S. currency 
was fixed at 2.6227 DM, up a bit 
from Friday’s 2.6157. In London, 
the pound ended slightly firmer at 
SI. 425 after $1.4225 at Friday's 
close. 

In Tokyo, the dollar closed at 
204.35 yen, up from 203.05 yen 
Friday. Later, in London, the dol- 
lar was quoted at 203.82 yen. 

Currency dealers said many mul- 
tinational corporations were slay- 
ing on the sidelines, seeing little 
need to hedge their currency posi- 
tions because of die steadiness of 

exchange rates in recent weeks. 

A U.S. bank trader in Frankfurt 
said he had listed only four small 
transactions on his trading sheet 
for the day, compared with 30 to 40 
transactions on a typical day. 

fVPI. Reuters, APl 


THE EUROMARKETS 


New-Issue Activity Centers on Sterling FRNs 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — New-issue activity 
in the Eurobond market centered 
on the sterling floating-rate-note 
sector Monday, with two issues to- 
taling £250 million being launched, 
dealers said. 

Elsewhere, prices in the dollar- 
straight and floating- rate-note sec- 
tors finished on a firm note on die 
back of afternoon gains in the U.S. 
credit markets, they added. But. 
operators remained nervous about 
the huge volume of this week’s U.S. 
Treasury auctions, which will total 
over $46 billion. 

Tbe larger of the sterling floaters 
was a £ 1 50-million note issue for 
the Woolwich Equitable Building 
Society. 

The 10-year issue was lead-man- 
aged by Hambros Bank Ltd. and 
will pay point over the three- 
month London interbank offered 


rate. It has a minimum coupon of 5 
percent a year. 

But. the first coupon has been 
fixed at 11 11/16 percent, which is 
*ii poini over five-month Libor. 
This is to allow for formal enact- 
ment of legislation allowing build- 
ing societies to pay interest gross. 

The issue was seen by some deal- 
ers as being rather tight but it was 
quoted within the total fees of 22.5 
basis points at 99.87. Building soci- 
eties are the major providers of 
housing finance in Britain. 

The British insurance company. 
Prudential Corp. PLC, issued a 
£ 100-million. 10-ycar note paying 
10 basis points over three-month 
Libor. The note was lead-managed 
by Credit Suisse First Boston Lid. 
and ended just inside the total fees 
of 40 basis points at 99.63 bid. 

In other new-issue activity. Finn- 
ish Export Credit issued a 20-bil- 
lion-yen dual-currency Eurobond, 


which will be redeemed in 1995 at 
an exchange rate of 182.5 yen to the 
U.S. dollar. It was priced at lOI’a 
and pays SU percent a year. 

No new dollar straights had been 
launched by the end of the usual 
Lrading day, despite an improve- 
ment in secondary-market prices of 
between U and point, dealers 
noted. 

A syndicate manager at a Euro- 
pean bank noted that it was still 
cheaper for U.S. borrowers to issue 
bonds on the domestic market rath- 
er than in Europe. “Until we get at 
least one poor ( LLS. Treasury) auc- 
tion. 1 imagine things are going to 
remain quiet here,” he added. 

The fioaung-rate-note sector fin- 
ished with gains of up to 5 basis 
points as period Eurodollar deposit 
rates closed 1 / 16 point lower, hav- 
ing shown gains of 1/16 point in- 
tiallv. 


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Page- 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER .19, 1985 



ROOKS 


PIAF 

By Margaret CrasJand 240 pages. Illustrat- 
ed $16.95. _ 

The Putnam Publishing Group Inc., 200 
Madison Avenue, New York, ; N. Y. 10016. 

Reviewed by John Gross 


SOLUTION TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE, page 21 
ACROSS 


I Gibraltar 
simians 
5 U.S. anthro- 
pologist: 
1901-78 
9 Father of 
Briinnhilde 

14 Kind of show 

15 King of the 
Huns 

16 "A Town Like 
Shute 

17 Unctuous 

IS Intimations 

19 Opposite or 
verso 

20 Football 
specialist 

23 River in China 

24 Put on years 

25 Markin 
bowling 

27 R.I. resort 

31 Hardens 

34 "The Greatest' 

35 Take care of 

38 Earl or duke 

39 Highly 
amusing 

41 Hideaways 

43 Appoint 

44 Smelting Fuels 

46 Barney Old- 
field, for one 

48 Eagle plus two 

49 Whence to 
watch wakes 

51 The firmament 

53 Crowd 
responses 

55 Genetic 
material 


56 Browbeat 

58 Urbanite in the 
sticks 

64 Conceal 

66 This: Sp. 

67 Of aircraft 

68 Crust 

69 Maui garlands 

70 Group pulling 
together 

71 Linked 
together 

72 Behaves 
humanly 

73 Otherwise 


DOWN 


1 Perched upon 

2 Burden for 
Jack and Jill 

3 Fitzgerald or 
Raines 

4 Airport 
luggage- 
carrier 

5 North Atlantic 
food fish 

6 Needle case 

7 "The Early 

Years of 

Waugh”: 1962 

8 Records 

9 Give one's 
word 

10 Corrida cheer 

11 Kind of parade 

12 Recorded 
proceedings 

13 Sign of our 
times 

21 Selves 

22 Outer: Prefix 


26 Ancient 
remains 

27 Drug enforce- 
ment agts. 

28 Author of "The 
Waste Land” 

29 Articles of 

woven twigs 

30 Spree 

32 Famed 
violinist 

33 Crystal gazers 

36 Spanish aunt 

37 N.Y. Philhar- 
monic, e.g. 

40 Leander's 
beloved 

42 Like some 
grapes 

45 Took a light 
meal 

47 Hindu queen 

50 Lanka 

(formerly 

Ceylon) 

52 Leave the 
premises 

54 Inscribed 
stone pillar 

56 Gotham inst. 

57 Ersatz butter 

59 North Sea 
feeder 

60 Ado 

61 Actor-singer 
Howard 

62 Distinctive 
time periods 

63 Rival of 
Carthage 

65 Gladiator's 
greeting 


Z ERO'S THE WNPOFGUY 
WHO CARRIES MATCHES TO 
LIGHT OTHER PEOPLE'S 

CIGARETTES 



HE ALSO LEAVES 

ms toothpaste 

OUT IN CASE 
you NEEP 
SOME 



BOY. 

IS H0 
STUP/P/ 



IkxX 

\)Aix£Z 


O N a house in a working-class district ' of 
Paris, a plaque (unveiled by Maurice u»\ 
vaJjer) states that Edith Piaf was bom oirthe 
steps outride “in utter destitution." Piaf 5 birth 
certificate makes it dear that she was, in fact, 
bom in a hospital On the apartment building 
in a more fashionable quarter where the singer 
lived during her final years, there is a plaque 
stating that she died there. That was what the 
.radio annou ncements said at the time, arid 
where else but in Paris could such a quintessen- 
tial Parisian have breathed her last? But in fact 
she died in a village in Provence. 

Anyone setting out to write the life of Piaf „ — - — - • - 

has to be ready to scrape away the fflemsts- ; . 4 ]gp jg die Tdur.de France 7 . 

dons of legend, yet in a sense the legends woe — 1 — 1 

die life. In this biography, however — the first 
to be written in Englis h —Margaret Crosland 
' manages to strike a reasonable balance bo-, 
tween setti n g down the bard facts (insofar as 
they ran be ascertained) and conveying some- 
thing of the speH Piaf cast. 

She was bom Edith Gasston in 1915. Her 
father had started work in a traveling arcus at 
the a®; of 10; her mother aba ndoned he r whe n 
she was a child — something sbe never forgave 


The most famous of her *£““““** 

the boxer Maxed Cerdan. It 

where Kaf ber ddmlml, 

(At first, American audiences didut kac 
Sat u make of her, Crosland Savsu to*, 
article by Vu&Tbousaino putteingk. . 
Ccnton was a glamorous 
a Star as she was. In 194$. hc_ won4l***i3 : 
-^hflewigbtdiainpionsbip. riew&tntojg'.- 
U Mona the following year, and was ; 
ready for * return match when he thed ^ 

pl Whatfcndof effect would it have had % L 

feelings if he bad lost to La Motia a «i\: 
jS^resland says that “one 
Ste/’ Piaf looked bat* at the aff nr as tfetfnj : . 
became convinced that she could rcHS^ . 
contact with Cerdan through spmo*!L£ f 
Meanwhile, something like a set patted, 
sumed in her private life; Fust came pe 
— add r^ffKnfcs and blue suits; then. 
quaSds, demands, recriminations A r 
sion of Monsieur Hafs found out what a 
die could be (according to one, a cyifiag 
plan, 48 boms with ba were 







Si- *1 

yhf' 

: •?* 


Xmi 

at- 


R 


— to pursue an v 
ultimately to die-of a 


ANDY CAPP 



; overdose. Piaf was 
^ — 0 -ier own daughter — 
„ v . j. when Piaf was 17 — when she went off to 
dng in the streets; sadly, the child was soon to 
die of meningitis. 

Piafs first big break came in 1935, when she 
was discovered by a dob owner called Louis 
Lepl6e (who gave her the name Piaf, Parisian 


press . — „ ^ . 

that Piaf had been, involved. Certainly m her 
private life she had kept company with some 
mucky characters. But she Eveddown the scant- • 
dal, «tvl in Raymond Asso, who had written 
songs for her, she found a mentor and resenar 
who taught her bow to dress, how to write, how 
to handle a knife and fork. 

Asso was succeeded by the singer Paul 
Memisse, whose affair with Piaf inspired Jean . 
Cocteau, one of her closest friends, to write a 
in which she appeared, about a woman.--^, 
t to stridde by her lover's apparent indif- , 


justification) as “abandof pitifufeyil cknatty'* 1 ’ 
Yet almost until the end — she wias 47;j ' 
she died — die kept rang by sheerr** 

Some of her greatestmts ( md adtn g . 

Ne R^rette fcen”) bdong to the. last rav 
year or two of ber life. 

It is harder to write — ... 

songs than about her kwe affairs, i 

times to quote them is enougk— the to* 
throb an the page. But Crosland has -sou . ■- 
intdfigent comnkaats to mg k < * about the vis '■ - 
in winch the Piaf. persona had its roctexv- 
French social conditions of the time. She j£' 
supplies a good^^^of usefid jnfpc^^' - 

such as the'^ra that the - 

inspired by a memory frttin Kafs early dayj| 
s tanding oatstefeibe Paris Opfciaa&er a p i .' - 
ft fld ra ' trfi i ng 'y gTrhj w of film star L«J " 
Howard wearing* long white scart The bof- ; ' 
. includes a discography and of sew^ ■ 

conned by.Ra!j* : Harvey. _ tT- ■ 


v-w 

a.-, fit 

. m 


%F« 

M4 

rt *1 

-v. 


rA-e-A ' 

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t 




Tones. 



'SesameSferee^ in 17tfa 

- rij Intarnatitmat ^ 
U1AYGLL 11/ atUVdUG WJ i/JGl u/fw limn-., NEWYGaat— “Sesame Street" began i 

fcrcocc. After Memisse, there were many oth- r J(?tir season in thq U nited States Monday, lb ” 
ers, mcludmg the young Yves Montand, wfao^^Pnl^ Bioaikas^ System trievisun pit. • 
career she encouraged; vriien she first got ^^/gram^riined at to 5-year-dhis for tiie trans ^ - 
know him, at the end of the war, hewassmgmgi^ vfionf-lzrai .fioificrto school, opened with 4 , 
pseudo- American songs in cowboy gear. - . ^ ^tdkh^owbbs^^UXjnahne as its guest st£ ; 



By Robert Byme 

remained a rirobtem and 

T N the game betwen Lev Pp- £3* ahnatf 

X lugayevsky, a Russian open fines am* the Him 
grandmaster, and Yasser 17p-KR4V^t 18 P-R5! 
Setrawan, a Seattle grandmas- - 
ter, in the Biel Interzonal Tour- 
nament in Switzerland, it was 
Pohigayeysky who had the last 
laugh. 

The sharpest weapon agaizut 

sgESte 

NxP; 8 Q-Q2. winch, after w al- 

10 . . . N-Q4, rannrits Writo ^^^^Lkfer^ 
to a gambit since wu ' 

11 . . . NxBP,whenl2RxN7 


53* Tv. . 


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notpennit I9:QxR?7 view^ - 

to 



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Unscramble these tow Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, 10 fonn 
four ordinal woitls. 


GIRRO 



rr 

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isoutof thequestionin viewof aimed for with 38 . . . S... 

12 . . . B-N5. ' •• • •-'< ; «^26NJ»^rplycramW: N8cb . Reafejng Uiai he M-V .-l 

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defense has been considered. 27yQ-Q6^^K4, 2 ff-y-jt 7 ai after 42 K-Q3, Sdrawan gm 
12 ... . B-K2. .. 

Maybe the best chance tor > JP. 

succesful defense after 14 N-: RkK^. .Sarffcan^hfld . readied 
K5, would, have been 27^-. L .-,; -^^N^-bui Poln- 
14 . . . OO, bat of coarse 

there would stfll be anqile op- ® Q" 

portuniry for White to create 

an attack on the king. • Tbti. “Russian s’ 32 R-KR11 . 

On 16 Q-B3!,- defense by <J-R7chl, KxN; 

16 . . . R-Bl? wonld havc al- 34 ll-R6ihate. After 
lowed I7 KR-B1, Q414; 18 &£ W- 33 QsP, the 

NxQBP! which wins. back the not be token be- 

gambit pawn with 'dear posL - RxN? permits 

YKR7aL 


nefts 

1 

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tix 

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5 ao 


i«uau 

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P-Q4 

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N/M3 

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22 K-N2 
22 P-B3 
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28 Jim 
27 RXR 
21 IMlTdl 


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RUSTYD 


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I A HANPY PE VICE FOR 

FINPINS FURNITURE 

IN THE PARK. 


Now arrange the circled loners to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer here: f J X I X I II-l 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: HIKER VIXEN BUTTON QUARTZ 
Answer Another name for that much talked about 
baby boom— THE "BinTHOUAKE" 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


HIGH LOW 


ASIA 


AKrurve 

Amsterdam 

Altwm 

Barcelona 

Belgrade 

Berlin 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Coven tween 

Costa Del Sal 

Dnt»!a 

Ediabureh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

MUan 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

Men 

otto 

writ 

Praam 

Rmndavik 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Sh-aabonre 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zorich 


Ankara 
Bel rot 
Damascus 

Jerusalem 


Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 


Auckland 

Sydney 


C 

F 

c 

F 


19 

66 

10 

50 

fr 

2 

36 

-i 

30 

fr 

17 

63 

ii 

52 

o 

13 

55 

6 

43 

d 

0 

32 

0 

32 

5W 

-2 

28 

-3 

27 

cl 

2 

36 

■2 

2H 

tr 

0 

32 

■2 

28 

SW 

0 

33 

-5 

23 

0 

0 

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0 

32 

w 

IB 

64 

9 

48 

a 

10 

50 

4 

43 

tr 

8 

46 

4 

39 

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43 

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41 

r 

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32 

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h- 

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3U 

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28 

0 

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28 

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2/ 

a 

mm 

mm 

p-p 

— 

no 

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7ft 

17 

63 

oh 

13 

55 

6 

43 

(r 

6 

43 

2 

36 

fr 

15 

59 

1 

34 

tr 

4 

39 

0 

32 

o 

-6 

21 

■8 

18 

sv» 

-4 

29 

■7 

19 

sn 

13 

55 

A 

43 

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30 

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3U 

Sw 

4 

39 

-2 

28 

fr 

-4 

79 

-7 

19 

0 

2 

36 

1 

34 

h 

12 

54 

9 

48 

r 

1 

34 

-3 

27 

o 

1 

34 

•3 

27 

fr 

3 

37 

2 

36 

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30 

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IB 

a 

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25 

■0 

21 

0 

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27 

-4 

25 

sw 

AST 




m. 

— 

— 

— 

no 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 




— 

— 

no 

23 

73 

12 

54 

fr 

29 

M 

IS 

J» 

lr 

31 

70 

14 

57 

el 

21 

70 

M 

57 

d 

DB0V 

; lr 

-Fair; n-hall.' 


Bangkok 

Beilina 

Hung Kona 

Manila 

Hew Delhi 

Seoul 

Stienohal 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


AFRICA 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Capo Town 

Casablanca 

Harare 

Lagos 

Nairobi 

Tallis 


HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

C 

F 


32 

90 

21 

73 

fr 

9 

48 

-4 

25 

n 

24 

75 

18 

64 

fr 

33 

91 

26 

79 


26 

7V 

10 

50 

fr 

6 

43 

0 

32 

fr 

13 

55 

2 

34 

tr 

34 

93 

24 

75 

r 

21 

70 

17 

63 

fr 

17 

63 

8 

46 

a 

19 

66 

12 

54 



W 

15 

39 

fr 

a 

73 

13 

55 

cl 

21 

70 

0 

46 

fr 

2B 

02 

14 

57 

el 

32 

9U 

S 

77 

a 

27 

SI 

14 

57 

a 

23 

73 

12 

54 

fr 

ERICA 



21 

70 

to 

50 

0 

23 

73 

13 

S5 

0 

21 

70 

B 

46 

fr 


Wwld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France- Presse Nov. 18 

Gating prices in Local currmdes unless otherwise indicated 


Amsterdam 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

ADom Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buehrmann T 

Cahmd Hldo 

El3e»*orJ*OU 

FoJcker 

Gist Brocades 

Heineken 

Hooaovens 

KLM 

Nuarden 

NatNodder 

Medisova 

Oce Vendor G 

PeLhaed 

Philips 

Rabaco 

Rodamco 

Rallnaa 

Rorenta 

Roval Dutch 

Unilever 

Von Ommeren 

VMF Stork 

VNU 


Close Pro*. 
S39 S37 

242 345J0 
10OB0 10838 
134 JO 134.60 

7ija n 

80-10 79 JO 

9JB SL» 

W.TO V7J0 

229 m 

IliSO 117 

28 27 JO 

158 155 

79 JO 79 

230 236-50 
191 JO 191 JO 

7M0 75 

51.30 51 

56.40 E6-S0 

30.90 81,10 

190 1B9JO 
371-50 37150 
80 77 JO 

55^0 54.90 

BO JO 8020 
135J0 13560 
72J0 72-50 

4720 47JD 
! 86-20 1B650 
3*9 366J0 

2950 2820 
2O_50 242.50 
257 256 


ANP.CB5 oem Index : zmjo 
P revlou : 23Ua 


B n w wb 


Buena Aim 
Caracas 
Limn 

Mexico City 
Rio da Janeiro — — — — no 


NORTH AMERICA 


Aochoraae 
Atlanta 
Boston 
Chicago 
Denver 
Detroit 
Honolulu 
Houston 
Los Angeles 
Miami 
Minneapolis 
Montreal 
Nassau 
New York 
Sai Francisco 
Seattle 
Toronto 
WasbUtgKd 
p-ouoreast: ne-nai 


-5 

23 

• 12 

10 

fr 

96 

79 

15 

59 

fr 

IS 

5» 

6 

63 

fr 

17 

63 

7 

4S 

*h 

6 

4 

-S 

23 

PC 

17 

63 

6 

43 

r 

» 

86 

20 

68 

fr 

28 

82 

X 

48 

PC 

19 

66 

9 

48 

fr 

2» 

S6 

24 

75 

fr 

4 

39 

1 

34 

r 

t 

43 

1 

34 

el 

39 

B4 

23 

73 

fr 

IB 

64 

7 

45 

fr 

14 

57 

8 

46 

Fr 

4 

39 

•2 

X 

K 

6 

43 

4 

39 

d 

24 

75 

17 

63 

fr 


irttv cloudy, 1 r-rain: 



Arbed 

Bokaert 

Cockerlll 

Catmaa 

EBES 

Ge-limo-BM 
GBL 
Govoert 
Hoboken 
Intercom 
Kredtaifiank 
Putraflna 
SocGnnerale 
Son no 


SdvBv 

Traction 


Elec 


Tram 
UCB 
Unerg 

Vlollie Mon leone 


2730 2850 
K00 6000 
204 30$ 

1AQ £4t)Q 

3770 39BO 
5180 S2S0 
2655 2690 
4900 4000 
5630 5*59 
2865 2870 
12000 12000 
6950 7000 
2365 2386 
8440 8300 
5950 5030 
507§ $040 
5500 5J50 
2145 IH5 
5680 5800 


Current Stock Index : 2911 JS 
Previous i 291BJ1 


Frankfnrl 


SINCASTtS^Ti^ r-25 (90 - 77). TOKYO: Fooav.Temn. 
17-7(63-45) 


AEG-TolefiaUan 

Allianz Vers 
AKona 
BASF 
Bavrr 

Bay HVPO Bonk 
Bay VereliKbank 
BBC 

BHF^ank 

BMW 

Commerrfwnk 
Cent Gumriti 
Daimler-Benz 
Deoussa 

Deuiadte Babcock 

DeuHOhe Bank 

Dresdner Bank 

GHH 

Haroener 

Hocntiet 

t-hwenst 


229 JO 226-30 
1714 1723 
419 417 

2S8 2S4J0 
146-50 24 1 JO 
43250 432 

426 426 
266 28*20 

427 421 
59050 58750 

250 25220 
J5U0 1 57 JO 
1190 1152 
421 431 

2IU02I4J0 
693 JO 688 
320 32150 
220 217 JO 
348 342 

752 760 

MAJ0 24UQ 



Close Prev. 

Hoesch 

162 


Horten 

205 


Husset 

386 


IWKA 

321 JD 37150 

Kafi + Satz 

32750 


Karstodt 

303 

272 

Kauftwrt 

315 


Kloeckner H-D 

31750 


Kloeduier Werkc 

9450 

93 

KruppStohi 

145 


Unde 

567 


Lufthansa 

223 

221 


19650 

198 

wumnesmann 

25650 

256 

Muench Rueck 



Nlxdorf 

55850 


PKI 

700 


Porsche 

1300 


Preussao 

241 

24) 



HWE 

197 

m 

RhQtnsrwton 

47050 

489 { 

Schertng 

646 63450 | 

SEL 

34934350 

Siemens 

65060 


TIi vs sen 

17B 

168 

Veba 


VoIksnoiioinfBrk 

401 




630 

Commenboftk Index : noue 

p rev no* : i69*J0 



II H**#K*»# I! 

Bk East Asia 

34 


Cheung Kona 


TtUQ 

China Light 

18 


Grew Island 

825 

L3S 

Hang Sang Bonk 



Henderson 

2225 


Chirm Gas 



hk Electric 



HK Realty A 

1210 

ii ro 

HK Haleb 

35.75 


HK Land 

6.95 

6BS 

HK Shang Bonk 

7 JO 

7JB 

HK Teleonone 

9J5 


HK Yeumate! 

350 



735 

7^ 

Hutcn Whampoa 

77 M 


Hyson 

053 


Inn City 

093 


Jar dine 

1350 


Jardkw See 

ISM 


Kowloon Motor 



Miramar Hotel 

5430 


New World 

855 


5HK Proas 

13JB 


Sfefox 

N.Q. 

2525 

Swire Pacific A 



Tal Cheung 

1125 



078 

D50 

Wlna On Co 

N.Q. 


Winsor 



world Inti 

1425 

140 


174430 


prevleus : 1736J7 




ft 

“J 



_J 


AECI 

Anglo Airier Icon 

ArtOfa Ara Gold 

Barlows 

Bfyveor 

Buffers 

De Beers 

Drieionreln 

ElamK 

GFSA 

Marm any 


775 750 

3710 3710 
20450 20425 
1275 1280 
'785 1775 
8100 8150 
1470 1460 

555 ss* 

ijro 1725 

53 ®so 

3200 J200 


Hlveld Steel 
Kloof 
Ned bank 

PresSteyn 
Rusolat 
3A Brows 
St Helena 
Sasol 

West Holding 


Close Pre» 
600 61' 


PrevteiB : 1251 jg 


AA Caro 

Alllod-Lvans 

Anglo Am Gold 

Ass Brit Foods 

ASS Dairies 

Barclays 

Bass 

BAT. 

Beediam 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Clrde 
BQCGrouo 
Boats 

Bawater Indus 
BP 

Bril Home St 
Bril Tetacom 
Brit 
Brltall 
BTR 
Bur man 

Cable Wireless 
Cadbury Sctiw 
Oiarier Cans 
Commercial U 

Cons Gold 
Caurtaulds 
DolcetY 
Da Beers* 
Distillers 
Drietametn 
f Isons 
Free 51 Ged 
GEC 

GenAcddenr 
GKN 
(Hosts E 
Grand Met 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hawker 
ICI 

imperial Gr oua 

Jaguar 

Lend Securities 
Lanai General 
UovdsBonk 
Lonrho 
Lucas 


2 M 
138 
452 
654 
293 
283 
235 
30 
580 
293 
224 
311 
585 
348 
193 


226 
376 
298 
635 
14* 

215 
243 347 

509 SISS 1 

163 167 

423 m 

430 m 

473 473 

$16Ui Styfc 
443 423 

ssm S2r«fe 
1!B 172 

745 753 

255 2S6 

1513021311/32 
378 380 

7SB 
315 
983 
ZI7 
429 

701 
217 



Ctaee 

FfWf. 

STC 



Std Chartered 

467 

467 

Sun Alliance 

565 

571 

Tata and Lyle 

535 

538 

Tesco 

293 

2M> 

Thorn. eMI 

397 

399 

T.I. Group 

415 

415 

Trafalaar Hee 

378 

378 


153 


Ultramar 

223 

215 

UnHevwt >213/64 123^2 

umtad Bfeaurcs 

209 

209 

Vickers 

308 

308 

Woolwortti 

5*1 

598 

f.t. 38 Index : 188U8 


i Previous : 1981.11 



l - F.T5JEJDB tndex 

: 150SJI 

Prav lows : 139131 



II il 

Banco Comm 





Cred Ital 

3240 

3100 


12100 117S0 

Farmltaila 

14799 14310 

Flat 

492S 


Generali 

64900 63790 

tFI 

12680 12120 

natcementl 


1 Taigas 

2143 


ihrimobiilarl 

139900136500 1 

Medtobanco 


Mooted! son 

2430 



3599 



7499 



3500 



120775119500 

Rlnaacente 

978 



2730 


SME 

1341 

mi 

Stdo 

4757 

46W 

Stonda 



3600 

3530 

MIB Current Index : 1829 


Previous : 178* 




tiooal advantage -for White, 

Seirawan had to .yrely on .C 
16 . . . O-O, although the de- seyenlh rank with 36 Q- 


II 043 

17 PJOM 


30 

5 - _ 

s am 

38 Qxp K« 

34 NxBdl K*#l - ■. . 

35 Br-RTdi - KJl r . 

38 ti**7 Jtm. 1 --- ■- 

37 QxP RMe . 

M Ml R-Nk- _ ■ - 

a icaa ana 

49 S4M R-NRf 

41 B82 I UIK- .. 

41 K-Q3 


■t^X 

T m- 

-• --iTr- 


- !* 
-v 




320 

752 

4W 

171 

446 

ISA 


Not West Bonk 
P and O 


Prudent HU 
Rocat Elect 
Randfontebi 
Rank 
Re« I nil 
Reuters 


482 

702 

430 

290 

12* 

772 

130 


750 

316 

960 

219 

433 

m 

215 

325 

322 

747 

499 

1M 

470 

187 

5« 

447 

702 

433 


126 

767 

130 


m m<h 

464 4*4 

671 *77 

330 330 


ROVOl DUKh t 44 1976444 11/32 
RTZ 529 522 

Soot chi 735 m 

Salmburv 370 310 

Sears Howtaas new 115ft 

Shea 683 678 


PWb 


Air Ltauftle 
AbfhomAfi. 
Av Dassault 
Bancalre 
BIC 

Bansraln 


BSN-OO 
Our* four 
CfWStvrs 
CHtbMed 

Darty 

Dutnez 

Elf-Aoultotn* 

Eurooel 

Gm Eaux 

Haebefte 

Lafarge Cod 

Logrand 

LesMur 

rorea) 

Martell 

Matro 

Merlin 

Mlch eljn 

Meet J iirmusv 

Mo u linex 

Ocddentale 

Pernod Rlc 

Perrier 

Pmiseol 

PrtolMtPS 

RadlotacnD 

Redout* 

Roussel Ucfof . 

5a noil 

SkfoRossfomrf 
T eiemeco n 
Thomson OF 
Total 


S79 573 

.32 “* 

l»o ran 
768 749 

490 490 

1630 15*5 
815 00 

2390 2390 
2620 2620 
731 732 

& « 

1843 1839 

BN 821 
200 201 
844 845 

718 720 

Uj3 1450 
621 60S 

2335 2280 

747 730 

2500 2518 
1471 1455 

1485 1528 
2265 2318 

152 

2105 2110 
» 5 

70S 

» 730 

450 449 

326 min 
381 379 

JS 1124 
1589 1572 

626 609 

W65 1374 
2SW 2595 
633 640 

268 263 


CoM Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Neave 
how Par 
In ch on oe 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

SnanorMa 
Slme Dorhv 
S>are Land 
S'»or« Press 
S Steamship 
St Trading 
Untied Overseas 
UOB 


X32 3J2 

6J5 6415 

6JS US 
Z15 2,16 
2.17 117 
545 540 
US 835 
2J4 7JU 
NA 237 
120 119 

141 144 

146 244 

645 6.7D 

0- 8* 0J6 
190 191 

1- 55 LS5 

348 172 


Straits Times Ind Index : 76238 
Previous : 38146 


S&L 


Laval 

Asea 

Astra 

Atlas Copco 
Bo! Men 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 
EsseHc 

Handtttbaaken 

Pharmado 

Eaob-Seanla 

Sandvfk 

Slumska 

SKF 

5w*dtahMaidi 

Vohrn 


160 .Ml 
236 239 

307 306 

515- 510 
140 139 

184 184 

181 107 

192 T9S 
400 405 

202 203 

178 183 

N42. — . 

3*5 590 

HIS HB 
254 257 

221 223 

245 250 


AffoenvaerMee Index : 41*40 


Preview tenee 


.gE*sr- 


CAC Index; 234.19 

Previeas : 232J0 


ACI - 

294 

3 

ANZ 

468 

482 

BHP 

BM 

830 

Barg! 

3.10 

3.12 

BauoalnuUle 

190 

197 

Castfemabte 

■ I 

8 


«5 

438 

Cetnaleo 

TJO 

1JD 

CRA 

156 

554 

CSR 

MS 

330 

Dunlop 

UM 

250 

E?-.irs ixi 

2J0 

2J0 

ICI Australia 

-.290 

235 

Masai Ion 

2.10 

UO 

MIM 

IM 

255 

Mrwf 

155 

335 

Not Auet Bank 

460 

4J0 

Newt Cera 

BJ6 

■JO 

SJ Broken HilT 

132 

734 

Poseidon 

in 

3J0 

Qid Cool Trust 

153 

1-54 

Santos . 

530 

£40 

Thomas Motion 

235 

237 

Western Min tog 

132 

338 

flfestPOC Bantdr® 

652 

453 

Woadstde 

UD 

130 


All onUnatlas ladek :9f5JDD 
Prev hue : HAM* . 


Tttfcyw 


AktH ' 

Asaht Chant 

AsoMfitosa 

BmkafTekyp 

Bridoestone 

Conon 

Cask) 

C-lkXi 

Oal Nippon Print 
Dalwa House 
Dahra Securities 


423 N.T. 
. 790 806 
- 860 863 

727 730 

532 536 

ION 1060 
IBM 1730 
411 .411 

1190 1U0 
ets 890 
765 768 


Fanuc 
Full Bank. 

Fufi PhalO 
•Funtsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

-kxxai Air Lines 
Kaflma 
Kansal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kvacera 
Matsu Elec Ind* 
Matsu Elec Works - 
Mitsubishi Bank . 
MRsuMshl Chem 
MltsuMsM Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
MltBotrfShf Cora 
Mllsoi and CO 
Mltsukoshl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators . 

NtukoSeC- • 

Nippon Kogoko . 

Nippon on 

Nippon Steel 

Nippon Yusen 

Nissan 

NotnuraSec 

OlvmOus 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

5hlmazu 

sntnetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Ctlom 
Sumitomo Marine 
Sumitomo M et al 
Tataol Corp 
Talsho Marine 
Talceda Cham 
TDK 
Tallin 

Toklo Marine 

Tokyo Elec Power 

Tbppoi Printing - 

Tonnrlnd 

Tostuba 

Toyota 

YumaichlSec 


7310 
14Sf 
ZWQ T971T 
994 . 981 

• to: -m 

675 . .661 
' TWO 1130 
640# 6290 
674- 477 
1*40 18» 
. MB • • 139 
'.:74» 760 

- Sir -5M' 

TO- TO 
•'4821 • 3940 
.USB 1130 
900 909 

T460 1410 
.css . m 
■TO TO 
350 347 

590 591 

47*. 477 

SJ 605 
773 720 

1T70 

WO B73 
2> 7S4 

893 
766 779 

154 152 

342 341 

574 572 

1010 1020 
1030 980 

!SS 

1130 -MW 
« -840 

“g US 
JES 775 

.3780 

1 590 1610 
2S2 
684 689 

is 

■ 333 331 

s s 

s? 955 

321 513 

360 363 

HI# 1120 
690 700 


MMM/pj, index : iiTNjr 
PrevMo* ; 1267944 
New Index : 99565 
Prevtaas : f*M5 


Zaridb 


AdiO 
Alusutsse 
AUtaohan 
Bank Lea 
Brawn Bavert 
CfoaGetBV 
Credit Subs* 

Electr o m al t 
Intcfxflacount 
JMASudnrt 
Jetmoll 
Landis Gvr 
Moevwplck 
Nestle ■ 

OerllkotfeB 
Roche Baby 
Sandox . 

Scfundfar 
Sober . 

EuraeUianeo 
Swfowlr 

SBC , aw 

Swfot Reinsurance 3410 2ds 

Swiss Voflcstxmk 2340 271# 

Union Bank 4875 nk 

Wnternwr 5900 56n 

TOO 3*50 


*as 4600 
702 705 
6100 6050 
4170 4I6D 
1TO 1148 
363D 3600 

£5 P 

3380 3B3 
3279 3420 
MW 7525 

3S 

2230 -.2218 

5S82 B2? 

ffoo 8890 
1370 142$ 
11500 11400 
m MSB 
4650 4625 
300 

4825 4000 
1565 1550 
518 50 


Zurfchlae 


SBC Index : S69J8 
Preview ! 56638. 


NX).: not quoted;- N jls not 
ovoltoMe; xd: taedlviame. 


7 i 6mn£tn Nub 1 


SMAUttPrce 


ISOOAsntco E. 
275B Asra-lad A 
289*4 Alt Energy 
12575 Atta Nat 
_i7s.AtpereaSt 
22DArgus C pr 
'1510 Alee 1 1 
2556BP OdOada 
226741 Book BC 
CT284 Bank NS . 
136#0 Barrlcfc e 
?.e.9 Bonanza R 
680 Brntame ' 
1830D BramaMa 
TOO Brenda M 
28656 BCFP 
| J42955BC Res 
11143 BC Phone - 
2200 Brunswk 
988 Sudd Can 
18300 CAC 
180CCLA 
5D55CCLBT. 
15800 Cod FrV . 

17300 Campeaut 

4358 C Nor West 
400CPackTt 
262 can Truer 

41051 C Tong 
17346 Cl Bk Com 
4*438 CTlreAf ■■ 
1210C Util B 
2179 Coro ' 

1301 C et a n e s* 
2550CantrtTr 
116X50 Ctneptex - 
-OnCDMbA 
2*Q0COfstbBf 
4850CTLBMk 
TOOCoowest A 
TOOCeeekBR. 
7*0 Cannon A 
3250QPWTW 
12400 Czar Res 
19128 Boon Dev 
2200 Denlswi A p 
19362 Dental B I 
42SB Devatean- 
9S52DkknsnAf 
822Dk*n*0B 
iWJDofoscn 
*40 Do Pont A- 
6onoDyf*xA 
400 EiCttlOcii X 
lSBO Etnco' 

T297S Esxrftr Ivr 
467SC FaMon C 

3 !J!2fES , K?? 

7000 Fed Ind A 
3WOFQty Fin 
651 GendteA 
2fi95BGeocCotno 
189833 Geocrude 
392BGeMoarpf 

700 Graft - 
TOGLfMWt 
25 Gt Pacific 

38»Gf«yiW. 

874 Hawker . 
aWHWND 
■898 Hew Inti 
2187 HolBneri 

489944 Boyce 

243V9 imaeco 

2»ladai .. 

2968 Inland Gw 
5] M0 mu-mem . 
MU9lrn*rPkie 


*771* 1716 7716 
tUM 18 18ft 
*W# 19Kr 19ft 
88ft 8ft 8ft + ft 
55k 1716 17ft 
55ft 15 15ft + ft 
*1916 1916 1916—16 
TWUi 19ft 19164-16 

22S IE* w*- ft 

2“ »» c»+ft 

to 4VQ 

n4ft 14 M — ft 
176 172 175 —1 

.S’ a a +,i 

W«6 1444 

J Sjp.fc* 

SS 

soft 1216 1216— ft 
*32 31ft 31ft— ft 
81 6ft -Wft Wft— ft 
5®ft 1M 15ft + ft 
8T516 15ft 15% 
tWk TJM, 13%+ ft 

S* J Sf + V * 

W5 206 34ft— ft 
834 34 . 34 + ft 

TO16 4316 4316 
*70% 10% 10ft 
TOft 40 ‘4014+16 

*914 9 9ft + ft 

JlWi W 1916+ ft 
*77 lift. 17 + ft 

« 1^6 lK 
Sft. 6* Jft + ^ 

»« «ft 6ft . 
TO . 996 9%— ft 
7Vt 7% 

214 280 284 +4 

Sfi t«4 15k+ ft- 

239 235 236 — 3 
460 445 455 —e 

Sfb JTO 13ft + ft 
TO. 13 + ft 
TO 5ft + ft 

Wft 6ft eft * 

ng6 « 24ft + ft 


mooivocoB . 
i n q o jcnpoc*. - 

■ aOBKjrr.AAt 

4485LatMtt.‘ 
.aB LauO ra: 
4600 Loaner: 
3971 LnbtayCB 

1U6MWHA 
I700MICC- ^ : 
[2W0 McfonJTTc . ' 
nuMarmnwi- 


«SKS35, 


3722 Murattv '.■* 

■wifcMKBq 
TT3837 NenmBft 


X3Sft 25% 2S% 

»Mft Ml* 14ft— -14 
P. 7 - 7 

TOft 32 % 22 ft— ft 

JH TO 7 + ft 
*14 13% 13*6— ft 

SJgk 17% -TTvt:^ 

5SS !2J WH-I5 

^ JSS 

&*?*?*-» 

& B-aLw 

AS g* Stt S 

5S* IS 6 ’TO+S 

a .-a 1 . 

325ft, 25ft 2sft-u- 

P T ?£ + ft 

«4Sft 45 45 

SB5f vw3..is8 
S aift +16 
S* - % .16+% 
^tZ ft 

WJ 2K y*V Ua 

F.sf* 

"TO W. I9ft + ft 
-TOft 3TO.2Sft.+ ft : 

.Wft;+-i^. 
74 — ft 


78Z3 Moreen 
46973 MVDAttAf 
174KINawkc»W 
a«P NuWst SP A 

..gw gakwe od 

MOOOmnBxisD 

tttm pocwa CJ 1 

14000 PyS nP 
508 Pembina 


815ft 15% 15%—.. 

86% 6% 6%+ --, . 

*19 18% 79 +. ... 

38ft 37 38%+ -- ■ 

S8ft Bft eft- 
290 287 287 - 

83416 34 36 ■ £ ■ . 

873ft 1316 1314—. • “ - 

S9ft 9ft.. 9ft^r^- 
835 34ft 34% J - - - 

*171% 17ft I7%4| -<- 


Bi 




319 Oue 


asas,, 


.OjC Royro ckt 
IRedpoth 


1008 

979 RwdSt 1 Sp 
8292 RoueraA 
7280 Roman 
MO Rothman 

89300 scoffer 
1 M>9 Snarg can 
Sggwfl&n 
14097 5hemtt 
1440 Slater Bf ' 
3^gxm«m 

5 SS5SS5* 

5322Sotpm 
Steep R 
. SOD Tara 
TMOTe^corA 

74871 TexCter 
SjjW ThnmNA . 

SWjTraeJSt** 

w&p- 

7990Trtfon A 

sJll KSSt- 

lsmuiCeno^ 

™)MiAr 

SgWWIhWIA 
79Sd YkBear 
Total sal 


. 82*% 20% 20% 

523% 23% 23ft-' • 
*13% 13ft 73% j' - . 
410 400 400 ■4'' • 

57ft 7ft 

*14 13ft 13 %t.‘- : 

*43% 42% 43 ' 

*121% 11% im L _ - - 
*13% 12% 12H*+-'» '• . 
*31% 31% 31%t. ‘ 
475 46S 470 ,,-Z , 

*27% 27% 27%+ :,. 
SUM 11 lift*- « 

*24 23% 23%-. 

*7% 7ft • 7% .' . 

*1) 10% 11 .. . 
*14% 14% . 74%-r , - 

aasft 25% 25%?- ":- 
*22% 21% 2H+7 ; . 

183 M0 183 ■: 

265 255 265 - 

*18 - M 18 • *: •. 

*1416 7416 1416.---:', 
S1416 14 14 »-•'-■ 

131ft 31%. 01%+.-.. 
822ft 22% 22ft ... 6- 
*24% 2416. 24%+. V . 


•J-’ 




- «>-■#« j 
■' * ! 

. 




*24% 26 »% + 

810ft 10ft 10%+ 
285 285 285 + 
*27% 26ft ' 

*22% 22% _ 

330 325 sar 

*22% 22% “ 

*27 27 

59, SO 51 ■■+ 
*12% 12% 12% . 
*12 11% 12 



p%Ts 

z % ~ " 

liWTs, - :• , 


*8% 8% 8% 

325 315. 315 ^ 

410 400 “ 

XIV . 1816 
*16% 1616 ... 

*12% 72% 12% - o, _ 

809 97- 97%-T ^ ‘ 

*7% « 



*7% 7ft ‘7% + 
15X67,456 eharw. V 


tSEMMnc 


CfaM- 
1781 70 


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17475 


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*33 33ft 32ft- 
S13 13ft 13 " ' : i, *. 

*T3 12%-ra i 

*23% 23% 23%-r • 

«1 10% rt% :> * ':r 

*17% 17% 17% l.'Cj.-. 

*i3% 13% im +.-. .. ’ . . 

JHA-12% Oft- 

116% 16 16 . ,;-j . ' - . . . . 

*22% 21ft 22 +,<.'*'» * : • - if*,* 

*20% 19% 20%+,'i - *•' ^ 

*33% 33% WF*- c ~ -t . 

(22% 2T% 2T*f -i , < ; 

*31% 30ft 30ft -I 



'TO*W«* Index: 


Oese 

UMJ 


Ptwk, 

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- F.vao Qer a kioc out ofsoccbl " " ... • 

• READ ' ^ .. 4. „ •- 

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.•OK HUGHES 

w ttHBDAYS-W T)€ IHT 
























MJ *V$ 


. '-■■• '■.>S r sS» 

’■ ■■•*■:■ -r^-SSViSLS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 


./ : SPORTS 

on Seahawk Gamble to Win, 20-13 


c \ydJ 


/U-> 




ri*7„ a • ^y^aaeiitfeiAwB .; 

‘ — NonnaBy conser- 
J* v£%S««* Cluck Knox,' coach of the 
' ^^^ t ^cahawks,_gamWc d Sunday 

- '-In an uncharactcri^dedsioii 

_ >.* .. Nik Cnnriufi rni Q ^t.i.a r« v - ' 


dwice from' Miami, had lie key Tampa Bay took a JM lead in ccptions 
interception, all the way. *T saw the the first mauler, but by the time teid but 

f » .J n 1 ■ J Am*. . nr.n / - - 


Tampa Ray took a J4-€ lead in ceptions gave the Eagles a 14-0 Montana, put one foot onto Mcln- 
e first quarter, bnt by the time lead, but St. Louis tied the score on Qw’s back and vaulted into the end 


it as scon as it was -tipped," he said. O’Brien had hit Wesley Walker for a pair of short TD runs by Stamp z 00 ® for a 10-3 lead. 


“It'wasaaybody’sball— I reached one TD and Mickey Shuler for* MitchelL who gained 179 yards. " Lions 41, Vikings 21 : Id Pontiac, 

np. grabbed it and ran with it," three more, New Yodc fed, 38-21. *#era 31, CUds 3: fa San Fran- Michigan, Eric Hippie passed for 
Mario n reco rded his fifth and O’Brien’s last scoring pass was to cisco, Joe Montana threw for two 193 yards and three touchdowns, 
sixth interceptions of the season; rooltie Al Toon, oovering 78 yards touchdowns and ran for another 3S and Detroit took advantage of 
he also has three fumble recoveries early in the third quarter. the 49era sent Kansas Gty to a three turnovers to score 31 points 

andhasfwced two fumbles. “Mar- Eagles 24, CanSnals 14: fa Sl dub-record seventh straight loss, in the first half. 




he also has three fumble recoveries 
andhas farced two fumbles. “Mar* 
ion,” said Patriot Coach Raymond 
Berry,* t seems to be on a rofL” . 

Jcta tiZ, Bucdmeers 28: In East 


' -Or .L-«feZ*r ^ -ramm \-oaca jraynxraa lows, tamest JEdtson rat 

" NFL ROUNDUP ‘ Beny, “seems to be on a rou," . ' yards and one toochdo' 
iff ■ ", n ? “ — “ ~ - Wfi, Buccaneers 28: In East Paul McFsdden’s 20-ya 

I* 0 * *5 Rutherford, New -Jersey, Ken goal early in the fourih 
-^i-, seven-yaid O’Brien threw five touchdown broke a 14-14 tie and Phil 

. -i Tsr».^ -* .ine witntne score tied ait ..4 . „ , •_ 


early in the third quarter. 

Eagles 24, Cntimfe 14: fa Sl 
L ouis, Earnest Jackson ran for 162 
yards and one touchdown, and 
Paul McFadden’s 20-yard field 


;;.^r Pi score tied as 13. . passe 

pass was tipped at cords 
j j*-*- -: L n ; line of smminagebylnu’Wkrr point 

J - !fcr McGrew, and free safety of the 

- ‘ -• ?r> .'‘Cav™ Manon returned die ball 83 

yards njj theleftsiddiaeto setup a • 

' Z'- .C^ti same-wmmng, 13-yard touchdown TB 
' V v' fi^it^gass from Steve Grogan to Irving IB | 
' ; v u - c '^^t;^rYar -with 2:39 Ml -'•■■ 

New England, the hottest dub in fY 
- r " • :r ( - _ j the Ame ri can Football Conference, ^4 

-“i ~»on its sixth straight game, 20-131 
Kao*. whose preseason Super 
' r , . 'i^Bowl favorite Seahawks fell to 6-5, 

■■ ■: r,~ ; Honied he was gambHng by «»lHn g VA 
• 'Tor a pass instead of a ran. “CMwi- at ouo 

' we woen’t locating to get a down 

.. god there,” he said. “We point 


trBnen threw five touchdown broke a 14-14 tie and Philaddplna 
passes, and the Jtas Set leant re- went on to down St. Louis. Jackson. 


for 162 San Francisco broke a 3*3 tie when Minnesota lost two fumbles and 
in, and Roger Craig, usmg blocker Guy was intercepted once in its first 
d field McIntyre as a human stepladder, four possessions, and all three turn- 
quarter scored on a short phmge early in oven resulted in Detroit touch- 


Ihe second period. 

On the scoring play McIntyre, a 


downs. 

Two of Hippie’s touchdown 


at cords for first-half (41) and total scored his touchdown on a 51-yard 265-pound (120.2-fcD6grani) offen- passes were to David Lewis. 


points in the highest-sco ring gama . nm after the field gfl>TL 
of the NFL season. Mike Quick's two too 


n after the field goal sve guard, lined up in the back- Raiden IX 6: In Los 

Mike Quick’s two touchdown re- field; Craig took a handoff from Angeles, Marc Wilson threw a sev- 
en-yard touchdown pass to Marcus 

9 1 i ' 1 • *|~r *1 Allen with 2:50 to play, lifting the 

isn Columbia, Hamilton 

■ ia a row, drove 73 yards in 12 plays 

CFL’s Grey Cup Finale 

J Jf Denver, Loots Wnght returned a 


Set Stage for CFL’s Grey Cup Finale 


rrTT-J 7 *^ 130 ? 0 ^ Fn T - r, _ ■ t B* 11 * Bombore had scored early in the game for a TD 4;45nito ov^toncTl&tina 

VANCOUV tK, British Colu mbia — -Roy Dewaft • when Dewalt fumbled and defensive end Tony Nm - - the Bro ncos past San Diego. 
atraied for an cariy fumble by throwing three touchr man recovered in the end zone. Wide receiver James Denver actually blockdtwo 40- 
down passes asthe BntKhCcWjja Lions used a 22- Ma gAy tal lied a on a 16-yard pas fixm Clements, yard field-goal tries bv Bob Thom- 
oartc to crush the Wmmpeg BlueBomb- ^id iumnng back Willard Reaves crashed over from as. buton&e first one officials 
rc Sunday a^wm the Western Division the one late m the game. rnied a Branco olsver hadS 


blocked field-goal attempt 60 yards 
for a TD 4:45 into overtime, lifting 


L snta t ^ L didn*t think a Geld goal would hold era, 42-22, hen 
’^' 1 31 Cr^up. If we get a touchdown, it would channnonshqi 
- raat*;be a great call But we didn’t.” playoffs. 


the Broncos past San Diego. 
Denver actually blocked two 40- 


era, 42-22, here Sunday and win the Western Division 
championship in the Canadian Football League 


c one me m me game. ruled a Bronco player had 

Sunday’s victory ended British Columbia’s four- time out With a second chance. 


^ ^ The Patriots (8-3) scored two The Lions advanced to the Grey G 
of ' t ouchdowns in flie final quarter to time in three years and will meet the 


. . ~ , game Icmng streak against Winnipeg. Thomas again was blocked, by 

i or toe second m Hamil ton, Ontario, Ken Hobart Dennis Smith, and Wright picked 

new a playoff record- tyingfive touchdown passes, “P ^ loose ball and sp ri nted far 
nee to Sieve Slroler, as the Tlger-Cais crushed Mon- the touchdown. 
eaL Hobart hit Stapler on scoring plays of 14,38 and Denver forced overtime wuh five 

5 yards and also teamed with Rocky DiPietro and y c onds left when Rich Kariis hit a 
on Ingram for touchdowns. 34-yard field goal 


. — . 7 . | 


Marion ran the i 


- ?an, r^' the way* to the Seahawk 1'5 before champions by mtercepting qaarterback Tom C3e- 

: rf ^c'he was forced <rat of bounds by meats four times, one of them iranlting in a 57-yard 

' *- r ~ - l-.cr ^Curt Warner. After a 2-yard nm by return for a touchdown by camerback Keith Goodi 
. -V : : ^r> ^^Craig James, Grogan found the after the Lions had taken a 17-16 at halftime. 

!W.r,^>treakmg Fryar cutting over the Dewalt threw rooting passes of 38 and 35 yards. 


the inlcrcqjticm all British (Mumbia drotinated the defen efing CFL l 6 and , also 
Seahawk 15 before champions bv interceotina croarterisack Tom C3e- Ron Ingram f0r touthdowns. 



scoringplaysof 14,38and 
with Rocky DPictro and 


Raulw^UrMd Prau N nM*o"d 


Ron Ingram for touchdowns. 

Hobart and r unning back Johnny Shepherd both 
had one-yard scoring plunges. Berme Rnoff kicked 
seven extra points and a sin gl e for the winners. 
Montreal tight end Nick Arakgi caught a Joe Barnes 


iie-.ty < >trauaug Fryar cuumg over the Dewalt threw scoring puses of 38 and 3S yards, ' Montreal tigjit «td Nick Arakgi caught a Toe Barnes 
— middle at the S-yard^ne, in front respectively, to sidtbacks Ron Robinson and John pass for an 11-yard touchdown, Harry Skipper re- 
:*> -* j- rf comerback Teny Taylor. Fryar _ Pankratz sad of 27 yards to wide receiver Ned Ar- turned a Rnoff punt 91 yards for a score and Roy 
r went into the end zone standing tm. moor. Running back Freddie Sims scored the other Kurtz accounted for 13 points with an extra point and 
— — _ Marion, a fifth-round 1982 draft Lion TD on a 2-yard plimge. four field goals. 


Using blocker Guy McIntyre (lower right) as a stepladder, San Francisco r unning back 
Roger Chug vaulted into Kansas City’s end zone to snap a3-3 second-quarter tie on Sunday. 


•si?;** v 


hkss 


i,J Niwi'iniju 

-■-^^Flyers RaL 

- j -ut=d Stast J 

\ ^ ir Compiled fy Ow Staff Frvm THspauha 

UNIONDALE, N<* York - 

- a period of traoma and tar- 
"^‘^ence, the Philadelphia Flyers 

““ M^an't seem to do anything wrong. 

“Fm the first one to admit it was 
acky,” said Murray Craven,whose 

. tvertime goal gave the rirrimg Fly- 

rs a 5-4 National Hockey League 


ii i 


NHL FOCUS 


£ iterishm ovex the New YorkTsland- 
2 rs here Sunday night The Flyers’ 

E . 3th straight victory gave than a 
\ i.agne-best 15-2-0 record.. 

~Y Recent days have bem an ex- 
^.-aordmanr time for the Flyos — 
oalie Pdfe Lindbergh dymg fot - 
wing a car crash, backup goalie 
u o bFroese bemginjnrcd. And d» 

•. •jjjFtr ralr ■ • 

Pa!U * s!r: - “I dotft know how to explain it,” : 

■" •'nJ-fctf'aid Ctaven. “I can honestly tdl 
. .i c.l *alou that we’ve all been dqnessed. 

: tri :fs been tough to get excited about. 

■ aiything. But, somehow, when we 

- cs;et on the ice, we get ounchres 
- i\ i; jajgetiier.” • ■ ■ ■ • 

“We’re trying to snstam our Alth ough rookie goaltender 
^me at a very hi^i level,” said thrust, the New York center 
?i">«« n ^uladeiphia’s Dave Poulin, who steadied, andFUfad^hia ra 
n. « »pt credit for the tying goal at 16:35 

tS the third period. “Everybody has • 

51 ! ^ jjjeto expecting ns to let down, bnt - Roger Kortko wheeled around tie 
- r ’fas team doesn't want to let down, net an d a n g l ed the puck past rookie 
t. : 'We’re leaning on each raher and we goalie Dairen Jensen. 

. ;■■{•. liave a tot of confidence. . . Tim Kerr started the Flyer re- 

* J.f The Islanders, who in 1982 had a covery with two power-play goals, 
- c Record 15-game winning streak, sandwiched around a goal by Is- 
;• 'wouldn’t hold the Flyas as they lander Pat LaFontaine. Pdk Ek- 
5-wice fought back from .three-goal tand scored a powa-pky god in 
v i ilefidts. the third period to uanow the den- 

•i> >|i Phaaddphia sent the game into - citto4-3.. 

M v' '^wertiine at 16:35 of dm final peri- ' • • • ’ v . 

^ "'id when Brian foopp’s 40-foot - v-m- • 

— ■ — **vrist shot hit teammate Poulin in |-Cw-|^kl7'Q l-| QTIffl 
"'ront.cf die goal and: caromed in. • “MvdBo J, BK KI 11 1 
o^astgoafieBilly Smith to make it 4- 



UwAnacaMdPren 

Although roolrie goaltendef Darren Jensen stopped ftyan Trottier on this first-period 
thrust, the New Ymk center ended behind the net and scored seconds later. But Jensen 
steadied, andPHEadelpIiia rallied to its 13th consecutive victory, beating the Islanders, 5-4. 


at to 4-3. 


Jensen, who has played wdl any of their goals. They scored 
since Lindbergh’s death and from behind, the side, from any- 
Froese’s injury, thwarted a strong where on the ice. The score should 
bid with IS seconds r emaining by have stayed 3-0 for a long time.” 
blocking Mike Bossy’s 15-footer. “We fed very proud of our 15- 
Tsiander defenseman Denis Pot- game streak,” said Bossy. ‘'Thai 
vin called the loss “terribly frus- was an accomplishment we don’t 
Bating — we played a different want to see surpassed. We’ll have 
gamem the third period than in the another chance on Tuesday to stop 
first two. I don't know if Smith saw the Flyers.” (UPI^/LP) 


Bucks Hand Blazers Rare Home Loss 


£ , Craven put the game-winner 
i Isast Smith 68 seconds into over- 


Conpikd by OurSmff From Dhpatcha in a tow and against Portland have lead as Cummings and Alton List- 

PORTLAND Oregon Terry a better all-time record — 44-16 — er, each with 13 rebounds, started 

Cummings and’ Sidney Moncrief tbM any other NBA team. snatching away missed Acts, 

hammered awav from outride Sun- Cummings finished* with 27 


? jmbopiM to seth to someone m NBA FOCUS .•• 

£ nt,” said Craven, “but it just hit — — r~ 

j ; iis stick- and went in. It was not the Portland Coliseum since last 
t. Preconceived. It . was just a tadQr winter. 

V:joaL” Cummings and .Moncrief each 

c New York’s Bryan Trottier scared 16 secaod-half ptrintsio key 
r- opened scoring with his sixth goal a third period that spurred the MD- 
fpf the season at 4J2 of the first wankeeBockstoa 117-104 Nation- 
^ - jeriod, and Stefan Tersscn quickly al Basketball. Association victory, 
followed with his first oF.the year. Portland’s first home loss in 18 
i-Ihe Islanders went ahead 3-0 at games. 

the middle period when The Bucks (10-4) have won four 


The Bucks (10-4) have won four 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

i ■ 

Paraguay Becomes World Cup FmaKst 


once Cleveland, beat them last 
Man* 1. 

“If you give Cummings his 
game, ** said Blazer Coach Jack 
Ramsay, ‘lie’s hard to stop.” 

Cummings brought the Budcs to 
within 59-58 by scoring seven 
points to end the first half. Mon- 
Grief came out in the third period 
and hit two long jnmpers, including 
a three-pointer, to put Milwaukee 
ahead for good. The Bucks main- 
tamed a five-point lead through the 
period and then rode a 10-point 
lead the rest of the way. 

Milwaukee's rally got more fuel 
from Rkky Pierce and Paul Pres- 
sey, who finish fid with 16 and 15 
points, respectively. 

Don Nelson said he scrapped his 
defensive strategy at halftime. “We 
were pretty sloppy in the first half, 
but we really tightened up in the 
second half," said the Milwaukee 
Coach. 

. Clyde Drexler had led Portland 


The Bucks also loosened up the 
Blazer defense by hitting three of 
five three-point field goals, includ- 
ing two by Moncrief. Portland con- 
verted aaby one of seven from be- 
yond 25 feet. (A?, UP] j 



SANTIAGO (UPI)-P«agnay advanodm thcWaridCm socar 
,Ci a « amstCKiem ^ were prettysfoppy in the first half, 

•. A^Nov.lO.Ud.e 

l- fourth and last South American finalist for next years finals in Mexico. 

t Already qualified are Brazil, Urognay and Argentina. Clyde Drexler had led Portland 

£ - Flatterer Colonial Cap Winner Again. 

? CAhTOEN — wo^ Colonial Cup ^^nflh^bS 

aeepteduw here Sunday for a record thud straight year. SLrSrL ^ 

. Iftider Jmy Fishlack. Fkttcra overtook Salute at the finaifmcc and .. „ , 

^--^ontdnded the French entrant in the. quarter-nnle (400-meter) home- . The lead dwindled to only a 

rtretchtowin by twolcagths. The 6-year^c3d gelding, trained by Jonathan pomt at mte nmaa on as Milwanlcee 
Sheppard, dodted 5:14-1/5 over the 17-fence Springdale Course. Flatter* closed m on Drcder mid the game s 
. .. f tSS$ 36.000 and Sakle 512,000. u» who 

t. ; CoamletinE the cadg of finish were Gateshead, Chanmntiky, Kaiankoe, - lad 30. The Bodes held Dreria to 
^ ^ Local Kidaw Hansd Rag. just few pomtt— and four dmts 

Zf, s • — m the second hair. 

l AnnfaHp, "Whatever we. &d in the first 

jyuwwW® half “-the gan« plan— we tossed 

i. ’ V- • Safety Dave Duersm. on his Chiago Bens: ”We have all types — it and played the opposite way on 
Li- z f ,vi]d and crazies, straight and narrows, and sdrizos. A nice blend. (LAT) [Drexler] m the second.” Nelson 
• Basketball Coach Sonny Smith, on the £ffaence between coadung said. “We protected his man by 
' ~ .football and basketball at Aabum: "Last year they bought the football giving him a lot of help and we 
* **>« « * a far t4I9j)00. They bought me a mobile home and told me went to the double-team often. 

^ yj> knock off the wfceds-” ■ Wf Teamwise, we didn’t give- him a 

• nndMimi receiver Cris CdBnswonh, on die fange benefits of good look” at the ba&et 
playingm the NFL: Tve datedgixlywho were far better loddng than the . Control of the boards helped 
„i quality of girls who should be going our .with me.” ; ... (LAT) Milwaukee open up its second-half 



• Quotable 



Milwaukee open up its second-] 


Terry Cummings 

'If you give him his game. . . .* 


IARD 


Football 


Selected U.S. College Conference Standings 


in Overtime 


hwn 

McMflon 

OMo SL 

Illinois 

Midi. SL 

Minnesota 

Purdo* 

Wisconsin 

Indiana 

MiHiw s l m 


Artzooa 
South. Col 
Oreean 
Wash. SL 
Shmfora 
Oregon SL 
California 


Florida 

LSD 

Alabama 


Ala Tan Conference Ml 

Co n ference All Games 
WLTPtsOPWLTPrsOP 

1 1 o ue no o i o »i va Tuft o 
n 3 1 1 214 41 ■ I 1 2H a W. Tax. St. 

5 2 0 204136 B 20 2M178 Illinois St. 
4 2 1 167186 5 4 1 230 283 Indiana SI. 

4 3 0 174163 5 4 0 203195 Wichita St 
la 4 3 0 157152 6 4 0 264 1M S. Illinois 

2 S 0 151 7n 4 6 0 2S328S Drake 
In 2 30 119165 5 5 0 224222 Ml 

T 6 0 115226 4 60230306 
-a 1 6 0 68201 3 7 0 150287 
PncMc-W Conf erence Bowl. Grn 

Conference All Somes Miami, o. 
WLTPhOPWLTPSOP CenlJMkfl. 

6 1 0 2TB 103 8 1 1 305169 N.llllnoIs 

5 1 0 149 85 8 2 0 255134 WJlUcfilgai 

n 5 2 0 149113 6 4 0 198187 E. Mien. 

4 2 0 118 90 7 3 0 223 120 Ball St. 
gl 3 3 O 147 77 4 5 0 183 144 Kent Sf. 

2 3 0 132133 4 5 0 2332*7 Ohio U. 
i. 2 5 0 159156 3 7 0 92263 Toledo 

2 5 0 134 305 3 7 0 231 291 Wes 

SL 2 5 0 74344 3 7 0 14732S 

0 2 60 13*188 4 6 0 211241 

Se u t lmisle rn C onf erence Air Force 

Co nf ere n ce All Gamas Brig. Yno 
WLTPtiOPWLTPtsOP Hawaii 

5 1 0 105 79 111 241148 Utah 

4 1 1 104 56 6 I 1 144 72 Colo. SL 

1 3 1 1 132 M 7 2 1 269155 SaOleg SL 


Missouri- Valiev Confere nc e 

Conference All Gamas 


Bowl. Grn 
Miami, o. 
OnlJMich, 

M. Illinois 
WjMlcnigan 


Air Force 
Brig. Yno 
Hawaii 
Utah 


WLT Pfs OPWLT Pfs OP Army 

SOD 183102 6 S 0 27*308 FtorlUa SI. 
x. ST. 311 136 148 6 3 1 268245 W.Vlrglnlo 

I St. 3 1 1 89 74 6 3 2 2D6 156 Syracuse 

n St. 3 2 0 148125 4 6 0 237263 SAUss. 

a St. 2 3 0 106156 3 7 0 169270 Pittsburgh 

oh 1 3 0 99107 4 7 0 327256 NofreDama 

1 5 0 107130 4 7 0 206255 Vlr. TaOi 

Mid- American Conference S-Coroilna 

Conference All Gamas Cincinnati 

WLTPtiOPWLTPtsOP Temple 
Grn 8 0 Q 251 107 10 Q 0 310 155 SW La 

.a 7 1 1 24015* 72 1 250199 Now 

Wen. 5 3 0 137112 630 164122 Boston CoL 

Dls 4 3 0 98105 4 4 0 151229 MernPhSL 

Moan 34 1 135136 3 6 1 144191 RoWers 

A. 3 5 0 128176 4 4 0 167214 LOUlSvIlle 

I. 3 6 0 156219 4 70 20 283 E- Carolina 

if. 2 5 0 154185 3 7 0 205267 Tutone 

L 2 6 0 144202 2 8 0 164 267 

2 6 0 93142 3 7 0 T2S1B0 
western AthleiK Confereace 

Conference All Gomes 

W L T Pfs OP W L T Pis OP » ■■■- 
rce 6 1 0 Z70 97 10 1 0 419143 x ir fl Cm 


Motor Indapandaeft 

W L T Pts OP 
pom SI. 10 0 0 234 128 

MtamLFIa 8 1 0 317 150 

Army 8 2 D 358 186 


Basketball 

NBA Standings 


0 254 197 Boston 

1 T76 148 Philadelphia 
0 225 133 New Jersey 
0 £31 153 WOSttinetOJi 

t 202 156 New York 
0 216 1*6 

0 27* 219 Milwaukee 
0 2S2 266 Detroit 
0 189 245 Atlanta 
0 233 223 Cleveland 
0 162 30* Indiana 
0 236 232 Chicago 

0 184 300 WE51 

2 180 243 1 

1 135 235 Houston 
0 178 384 Denver 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 

W L Pet. GB 
t 2 £00 — 

, Inti la 5 5 JOT 3 

irsey 1 7 Jil 31, 

nfan 3 7 J00 5 

nr* 2 8 .230 * 

Central Division 

ikee 10 4 .714 — 

7 5 -583 2 

I * 6 J00 3 

na 5 6 .455 31? 

I 3 6 433 4V, 

B 4 B -333 5 

WE5TERN CONFERENCE 

Midwest Division 
n I 7 ill - 

8 2 .800 va 


146 246 son Antonia a 5 

Utah 6 4 

Dallas 4 7 

Sacramento 3 7 

Pacific Division 
l—A. Lakers 10 1 

Portland 8 5 

Golden Stale 6 6 

LA Clippers 5 6 

Seattle 4 8 

Phoenix 1 10 


Hocke> 


6 1 0 Z70 97 10 1 0 419143 lyTTT 
5 1 0 218 74 9 2 0 371 142 NULi 913000128 
4 1 0 137 85 4 4 1 233199 D 


5 2 0 252310 8 30377305 
4 4 0 200249 5 6 0 248306 
2 4 0 149168 4 4 0 Z77287 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pts GF GA 
Phlo 15 2 0 30 B4 48 

non 9 4 3 21 72 61 

nders 7 6 1 17 61 40 

sers 8 9 1 17 *5 59 

sav 6 9 1 13 55 65 

Oh 5 9 3 13 59 68 


SIB — 
300 <4 

J45 3 

-500 3VJ 
J44 5 

J00 511 

.909 — 
.615 3 
-500 4* 

-455 5 

J33 6W 
371 9 


TcnmsMP 

3 1 0 98 65 

6 1 2 218132 

New Max. 

2 5 0 197363 

3 7 0 2*9340 

Philadelphia 

IS 

2 

0 

30 

Ggorata 

3 2 1 138 87 

72 1 268138 

Wyoming 

1 6 0 121242 

2 8 0 187350 

Washington 

9 

4 

3 

21 

Auburn 

3 2 0 114 71 

6 2 0 305147 

Tx-ElPo» 

1 6 0 108344 

1 * 0 175 352 

NY Islanders 

7 

6 

3 

17 

VonderbRt 

1 3 1 78141 

3 6 1 146278 


Big Sky Confereace 

NY Rangers 

8 

9 

1 

17 

Kentucky 

1 4 P 76101 

5 5 0 194 169 


Conference 

All Games 

New Jersey 

4 

9 

1 

13 

Mississippi 

1 4 0 70 145 

3 6 1 165249 


WLT Pis OP W L T Pts OP 

Pittsburgh 

5 

9 

3 

13 

Miss. SL 

0 5 0 *2151 

5 5 0230243 

ai— - rs- — _ 
nw.'Ncng 

6 1 0 282108 10 1 0 447 155 

Adam* Division 


Snslbwi it Conferee 

ce 

Idaho 

5 1 0 192 90 

8 2 0 359178 

Boston 

10 

5 

3 

23 


Contorence 

All Games 

Boise st. 

5 1 0 173107 

7 3 0 261 167 

Buffalo 

10 

7 

1 

21 


WLT PtsOPWLT PtsOP 

Weber st. 

4 3 02S1 222 

6 4 0 377297 

Quebec 

10 

« 

1 

21 

Baylor 

6 1 0 189 10 

■ 2 0 242128 

Idaho St. 

3 4 0 225201 

5 5 0 222259 

Montreal 

7 

7 

3 

17 

TOXOS 

5 1 0 1*1 118 

72 0 227183 

Montano 

1 5 0 108231 

2 8 0 191 396 

Hartford 

8 

1 

0 

1* 


Texas A&M 5 1 0 151 114 7 2 0 244144 N-Arlmna 

SMU 5 2 0 217110 6 3 0 258161 Montano SL 

Arkansas 5 2 0 197 88 B20 290T20 _ 

RICO 2 5 0 1472*5 2 7 0 213380 

Houston 1 5 0 127216 2 7 0 212303 

Texas Tadi 1 6 0 153168 4 4 0 233223 ,. M 

TCU 0 7 0 76215 3 7 0 144330 Mos - 

Atlantic Coast Conference 

Conference All Gamas I 


Maryland 
Go. Tech 
Virginia 
Clemsan 
N .Carolina 
Nearest. 
Duke 
Wk. Forest 


Oklahoma 
Ofclast. 
Colorado 
Iowa SL 
Missouri 


0 7 0 76215 3 7 0 144330 
tootle Coast Conference 

Conlarence All Gamas Moin- 

W L T Pts OP WLT Pts OP rJZr 
5 0 0 15* 71 7 3 0 258 153 Mon 0 

5 1 0 134 55 7 2 1 215102 
4 2 0 HI 117 6 4 0 2*1 184 

4 3 0 167122 5 5 0 20718S 

i 1 3 0 108131 5 50 203200 h^v^, 

2 5 0 121189 3 8 0 186305 

1 5 0 71153 3 7 0 170231 
1 6 0 99174 4 70 212249 

Big EUM conference Ya j/ 

C onf erence ah Gamas i-, . ,, 

WLT Pis OPWLT Pis OP 

6 0 0 225 60 9 1 0 391 109 XiJmhm 

5 0 0 230 32 7 1 0 271 73 Colum * ,, ° 
4 1 0 HI 77 8 1 0 222126 

J 3 0 110 78 6 4 0 181 154 I 


1 SO 43163 3 7 0 136257 

1 6 O 1*5 295 2 9 0296436 
nkoa Confereace 

Conference All Games 
W LT PtsOP WLTPIsOP 
5 0 0 161 98 9 20367239 
410 8252 740 198 127 

2 3 0 114 lt7 44 0 268182 

2 3 0 108116 6 5 0 268211 
1 4 0 8*118 4 5 0 175181 

1 4 0 68114 3 7 0 135217 
Ivy League 

Conference All Gomes 
WLT Pis OP WLT Pts OP 
5 TD 134 75 720 184 119 
5 1 0 132 79 6 2 1 178147 
4 2 0 94 69 4 5 0 179 185 

3 3 0 101 52 44 1 166128 
2* 1 >8102 3 4 1 123176 

2 2 1 81 86 2 6 1 130180 
240 Sl 04 3 40 130 145 
0 6 0 54209 0 9 0 7529? 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



SI. Louis 

Nanis Division 

7 4 1 

17 

58 

63 

Chicago 

6 10 2 

14 

73 

85 

Detroit 

4 9 4 

12 

S3 

82 

Minnesota 

4 9 4 

12 

44 

70 

Toronto 

3 12 3 

9 

62 

79 

Edmonton 

Smvthe Division 
12 4 2 

2b 

*0 

63 

Calgary 

10 6 2 

22 

82 

66 

Vancouver 

8 9 7 

18 

77 

79 

Winnipeg 

7 9 2 

14 

74 

85 

Lo» Angeles 

4 12 1 

9 

57 

88 

Toronto 

SUNDAY'S GAMES 

1 

1 

3—5 

Buffalo 


2 

1 

0—3 


SUNDAY'S RESULT5 
Milwaukee » 31 25 34—117 

Portland 30 29 19 26-164 

Cummings lb-23 1-4 27. Moncrief 5-149-10 21 : 
Vandeweghe 9-21 13-13 3& Drexler 11-192-334 
Rebounds: Milwaukee 56 (Cummings, Uster 
13), Portland 47 (Carr 17). Assists: Milwaukee 
27 (Pressoy 9|. Portland 19 < Drexler 101. 
New Jersey 30 21 23 35—119 

l—A. Lakers 35 32 39 33-131 

McGee 11-21 2-3 26, EJohnson 9-15 3-3 71; 
Dawkins 7-0 5-7 19. Birdsong 8-10 GO 16. Re- 
bounds: New Jersey 46 1 WHltomsSj.LA. Lak- 
ers 49 (Lucas. Kuochak 8) . Assists; New Jer- 
sey 38 < Ran ley 7), LA. Lakers 38 < E John wn 
15). 


Soccer 


2 4 0 90211 4,6 0 140308 
T 5 0 97185 1 9 0 186308 
1 5 0 84144 5 4 0 260241 
15 0 S3 193 1 9 0 101 245 


Transition 


Clark (8). MStosrny {*). Ihnocak 2 ML 
Frvoer (5); Tucker 2 (7), Fottgno (10). Shot* 
hi goal: Toronto ion Pup oo) 7-5-10—22; Buf- 
fo w (on Edwards) 8-8-7—31 
N.Y. Islanders 2 2 8 0—1 

PMtadelpiiib 0 2 2 1—8 

Kerr 2 (18). Eklund (51. Poulin (4). Craven 
(5); Tiddler (6). Bourne (I), Kortko (1). Lo- 
FonMne (8). Shots on goal: N.Y. islanders 
Ian Jensen) 14-9-1041—33; Philadelphia (on 
Smith! 7-8-14-2 — 31. 

Edmonton 1 0 1 1—3 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
South America 

Chile! Paraguay 2 (Ploy off. second leg; on 
5-2 aggregate. Paraguay gains berth In me 
1*86 World Cup). 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Points; Real Mod rid 19; Gtion ib; Alleila 
Madrid, Athletic Bilbao 15; Barcelona. Valto- 
dolld-Zorogwa Real Socfsood 13; Sevlllo, Va- 
lencia. Cadiz 12; Bells 11: Los Palmas 9; 
Espanol. Son! under, Hercules 8; Osasuno 7; 
Celia S 


Golf 


Leading (taksbers and earnings In the Aus- 


NFL Standings 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
Eost 

. W L T Pet. PF PA 
New Endond 8 3 0 J27 227 184 

N.Y. Jets 8 3 0 J7Z7 287 184 

Miami 7 4 0 .636 275 231 

Indkmapons 3 S 0 273 20? 273 

Buffalo 2 9 0 .182 748 233 

Central 

Pittsburgh 6 5 0 .545 2*9 188 

Cincinnati 5 6 0 ASS 293 301 

Cleveland 5 6 0 ASS 177 166 

Houston 4 7 0 364 169 235 

west 

Denver 8 3 0 .727 266 221 

l—A. Raiders 7 4 0 .634 243 233 

Seattle 6 5 0 645 2*1 22S 

San Diego 5 6 0 A55 284 2*5 

Kansas aty 3 8 0 J73 202 271 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
East 

N.Y. Gloats 7 3 0 joa 227 170 

Dallas 7 4 0 .636 220 197 

Philadelphia 6 5 0 345 183 176 

Washington 5 5 0 500 145 181 

SL Louis 4 7 0 564 200 256 

Central 

X -Chicago 11 0 0 UKH 323 127 

Detroit 6 5 0 545 214 241 

Green Bov 5 4 0 a 55 225 2*7 

Minnesota 5 6 0 ASS 771 2*8 

To moo Bay 1 10 0 J)9t 228 334 

west 

LA Rams 8 3 0 -727 224 181 

San Francisco 6 5 0 -545 275 187 

New Orleans 3 8 0 772 190 300 

Alton to 2 « 0 .182 218 321 

(x-cltncfted division Uriel 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
develato 17. Buffalo 7 
Chicago 44. Deltas • 

Atlanta X. t— A. Rams 14 
Miami 3*. insomtootie 20 
Pittsburgh 3a Houston 7 
Green Bay 3a New Orleans 14 
H.Y. jets 62. Tampa Bay 28 
Philadelphia 2C5t Louis 14 
Denver SO, 5cm Diego 34. OT 
Detroit 41. Minnesota 21 
New England 2b Seattle 13 
LA. Raiders U dnclnitotf « 

Son Francisco 31. Kansas dry 3 
MONDAY'S Game 
N Y. Giants of Washington 


CFL Playoffs 

DIVISION SEMIFINALS 
Nov. 14 
Efitt 

Montreal 30L Ottawa 20 
West 

Winnipeg 22. Edmonton U. 

DIVISION FINALS 
NOV. 17 
East 

Hamilton 59. Montreal » 
west 

Bi-tttth Columbia <2, Winnipeg 22 

GREY CUP 
(A! Montreal, Nov. 24] 
Hamilton ve. Brnieh Cotomaio 


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Page 24 


ART BUCHWALD 

A Tribute to Overkill 

ASHINGTON — It's only that the superpowers were to 
W fair, with the simwirh in pro. they could kill each persoi 


m 




grass, thru we pay tribute to the 
world’s great stockpiles of atomic 
weapons. Without them there is a 
good chance that Ronald Reagan 
and Mikhail Gorbachev might not 
be meeting in Switzerland today. 

A recent survey revealed that be- 
ing blown up by a nuclear weapon 
is> not the biggest fear in the world 
today. It’s the 
fan that people 
can be muffed 
out more than 
once that has & 
most citizens on 
the globe slight- 
ly nervous. 

According to 
a report by Ruth 
Sward, a former 
official of the . mU 
U. S. Anns Con- BuchwaJd 
trol and Disarmament Agency, 
there are enough weapons on Earth 
to kill 58 billion h uman beings. The 
catch is, there aren’t 58 billion peo- 
ple in the world. 


Professor Sowa Bratten. who 
specializes in nuclear snuff statis- 
tics. says there is an answer to this, 
“Since we’re short on the living and 
long on the weapons, the scientific 
comm uni tv no longer counts how 
many people we can kill but rather 
how many limes we can kill them.” 
“How many times is that?" 

He Look out his pockei calcula- 
tor. “We can knock off everyone in 
the world 12 times — with" favor- 
able wind conditions, of course.** 
“That’s a big improvement,” I 
said. “I recall just a few years ago 


Early Beaujolais 
Starts on Its Way 

A genet France- Prase 

L YON — About 50 million boL- 
/ ties of new 1985 Beaujolais 
wine are on their way around the 
world to go on sale Thursday. 

Total 1985 production of Beau- 
jolais was 1J1 million hectoliters (30 
milli on gallons), with 450.000 hec- 
toliters set aside as Beaujolais Nou- 
veau. which is sold fust. 

Prices are expected to be lower 
this year, since the 1985 harvest 
was good and many dealers have 
large stocks left over from 1984. 


that the superpowers were lucky if 
they could kill each person five 
rimes. To what do you credit the 
breakthrough*?” 

“Better quality control In the 
old days building atomic weapons 
was little more than a mom-and- 
pop business. Mom stuffed the 
bombs with uranium, and pop 
screwed on the fuses. This was okay 
for Hiroshima and Nagasaki but it 
just wasn’t good enough for a glob- 
al arms race. No one was t h i nkin g 
big." 

□ 

“How did No. 1 and No. 2 move 
the arms buildup into the 20th cen- 
tury?” 

“Their military advisers warned 
them that the low post-World War 
II kill ratio would no longer keep 
pace. Without extra fallout they 
could not guarantee the safety of 
Lbeir citizens.” 

“Thank God For the military,” I 
said. 

He continued, “Crash programs 
were started, and larger bangs were 
developed, with the help of giant 
cost overruns. 

“It was obvious that, as the de- 
mand increased for third-genera- 
tion hardware, the nuclear powers 
would spend more and more of 
their gross national product on 
weapons. Edward Teller, the father 
of the H-bomb, said. The building 
up of larger and more powerful 
atomic weapons is the only way to 
stop the arms race.' ” 

“He didn’L say that.” I said. 

“Maybe not,” Bratten admitted, 
“but it sounds like something he 
would say. In any case we all know 
if you're going to make a nuclear 
omelet you first have to crack the 
plutonium.” 

□ 

“This still doesn’t explain how 
the superpowers managed to in- 
crease their stockpiles.” 

“The powers didn’t intead to 
make so many deadly weapons. 
They just got lucky. But it wasn’t 
the "size of the bombs that made 
everyone happy. A fool can make a 
nuclear bomb. The trick is to deliv- 
er it where you want it to go. That's 
where the real progress has been 
made. The breakthrough in the pre- 
sent delivery systems has given 
man new hope.” 

“Do you think we have now 
reached a plateau in overkill?” 

He laughed. “You ain't seen 
nothing yet.” 


nw raNATtOMAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1985 

Japanese Volunteers: A Rare Breed 

By Qyde Haberman agfij 
JVew York Times Service 

T OKYO — The last tiring To- 
shio Oeawa wanted out of life 


people 


T OKYO— The last tiring To- 
shio Ogawa wanted out of life 
was the great Japanese dream. 

For young men in this country, 
the dream usually menns gradu- 
ating from a good" college, joining 
a prestigious corporation, work- 
ing one’s way up the ladder and 
waiting for retirement. 

Not for Ogawa. He wanted to 
raise cattle after graduation, and 
perhaps travel For two years, un- 
til last spring, he combined both 
ambitions by living in Ghana, 
igar-fting techniques in animal 
husbandly' to farmers. 

“I just didn't want to be a sa- 
laryman.” be said, a hint of dis- 
missal in his voice as he used the 
common Japanese word for a 
company employee. 

En Kitagawa also found little 
that appealed in the Tokyo office 
where she worked. 

“I felt life in Tokyo was filled 
with falsehoods." she said. Tt 
was too luxurious; there were too 
many unnecessary things.” 

So in 198 1 she left for two years 
in T unis ia, where she had a small 
apartment and Laught school. 

Not many Japanese think like 
Ogawa and Kitagawa, who quali- 
fy as vaguely eccentric in a coun- 
try with a low threshold of toler- Ikuo TanlgllcM, right, wo 
ance for nonconformity. a member of Japan Overt 
Nevertheless, an increasing num- 
ber of young people are dropping by a government sensitive to criti- 
out of the corporate job ra&l at ntm that it does not do enough to 
least for short periods, to provide help less fortunate countries, has 
technical help to less developed rapidly grown to become the sec- 
countries. ond largest of its kind. 

They are members of the Japan In particular, it has assumed an 
Overseas Cooperation Volun- important role in supplying tech- 
teers, an agency patterned after ,^3] ^ “The requests from 
the U. S. Peace Corps. The agen- abroad for help are steadily in- 
cv, a surprising success, recently creasing," said Takanori Kazu- 


Jopsn Ownwi Coopgroban Val u m — n 

Ikuo Taniguchi, right, working in Mbeya, Tanzania, Is 
a member of Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteers. 


turned volunteers by as much as 3 
to 1. A few ccnporanons. includ- 
ing Nissan, Matsushita Electron- 
ics and Mitsubishi Heavy Indus- 
tries, give employees credit for 
rim e spent overseas as volunteers. 

But Japan's much-vaunted sys- 
tem of lifetime employment 
mak« it difficult for anyone to 
step off the corporate carrousel 
cavalierly. Nissan may be rela- 
tively flexible, bat most compa- 
nies do not invite defectors back. 
“I don’t think our work is val- 
. ued too much," said Hisashi 
Maeda, a soil-conservation spe- 
. dalist who. worked in Senegal “I 
think some people see ns as lazy, 
enjoying a few years abroad with- 
out any work." 

There is no adequate word for 
“volunteer” in rite Japanese lan- 
guage. Most people use the En- 
glish form: 

“Our society is so highly orga- 
nized that there is not much 
breathing room for young peo- 
ple,” Kazuhara said “When our 
people are abroad they feel free. 
They can test their own abilities.” 

Depending on where they are 
assigned, volunteers receive the 
equivalent of $240 to $440 a 
month. They tend to live alone, 
not with families, as many Peace 
jopm o«w. Gooporabon vqi u w^ Corps members do. They are 
ng in Mbeya, Tanzania, is supposed to stay strictly away 
s Cooperation Volunteers. from local politics. 

. Sometimes embarrassments 
zania. Under agency rules he - occur, however, such as the dis- 


cy, a surprising success, recently 
celebrated its 20th anniversary. 

In the last three years, the num- 
ber of new volunteers has don- 
bled, to 800, and the government 
hopes to double that figure again 
in the next few years. Interest 
among young people — the age 
limit is 35 — has risen to a point 
where officials reject seven appli- 
cants for every one they accept. 

Including re-enlistments, there 
are 1228 Japanese volunteers 
working in 30 countries, concen- 
trated heavily in .Africa and Asia. 
The total is small compared with 
the 6.000 Americans serving over- 
seas in the Peace Corps. But the 
Japanese program, encouraged 


creasing,” said Takanori Kazu- 
hara. the agency’s secretary- gen- 
eral 

Unlike the Peace Corps, whose 
early volunteers were occasional- 
ly known to be long on ideals but 
short on technical expertise, the 
Japanese version has little room 
for humanities majors. It asks 
host countries to specify the type 
of help they want, and then 
matches a young woman or. far 
more commonly, a young man to 
the need. 

That was how Hitoshi Higuchi, 
30, a potter, wound up struggling 
to learn Swahili as part of his 
recent three months’ preparation 
For a two-year assignment in Tan- 


must leave his wife at home in 
Mashiko , north of Tokyo. “I 
think my wife fully understands,” 
he said. 

Twenty years ago, host coun- 
tries tended to ask for health 
workers and agriculture special- 
ists, but interest gradually turned 
more to technical advisers such as 
electronics engineers and mathe- 
matics teachers. Computer ex- 
perts are in strong demand. 

Although leaving home may 
not be easy in any country, the 
consequences can be especially 
great in Japan. Kitagawa, for ex- 
ample, found that by going to 
Tunisia when she was 24 years 
old she missed the age when 
young Japanese women are ex- 
pected to many. 

Some volunteers discover that 
international experience looks 
good on their i&um&s. Each year, 
Kazuhara says, the number of job 
offers outpaces available re- 


covery in 1982 that four Japanese 
volunteers in Kenya were helping 
to build ammunition dumps and 
other military installations. 

People who complete two-year 
tmirs are given the equivalent of 
$10,000 each to tide them over 
while they look for jobs. Only one 
in five returns to his or her old 
company. 

“We detect symptoms of ‘re- 
entry shock,’ " raid Tokuhei Ha- 
shimoto of Nissan’s overseas per- 
sonnel department. He explained 
that the volunteers often worked 
in developing countries in a very 
independent situation, where 
they were leaders. Thus having to 
take orders can lead to conflicts 
after they return. 

Some volunteers — not many 
— fail to see any point in coming 
back. A few years ago, a man 
assigned to Ghana was made 
chief of the tribe he lived with. 
His wife in Japan went to Africa 
to fetch him home: 


The New York real estate mag- 
nate Donald Tramp is making an- 
other bid w eclipse the Sears Tower. . 
in Chicago as the world s tallest 
skyscraper. Trump. 38, and die ar- 
dutect Hdmat Jahn plan a tower 
as part of a comptot planned for 
the^ former Penn Central freight 
yard in Manhattan, a spokesman, 
Robert Rafsky, said Although 27 
of the world's tallest buildings have 
been constructed since 1980, it has 
been a decade since the 1,454-foot 
(443-meter), 1 10-stoiy Sears Tower 
replaced the twin towns of New 
York's World Trade Center as the ■ 
world’s tallest buflding. ; Rafsky de- 
clined to say how tall the building 
would be. Trump's dream surfaced 
in August 1984, when he-proposed 
a Sl-bfliion. 1,940-foot, 150-story 
tower near the New York finan cial 
district. The city has not yet ebesea 
a developer for the site. Eariier this 
year, TYump and another develop- 
er, Peter JKaDknw, lost out in Wil- 
ding when they proposed a D7- 
story tower. 

□ . 

When last they met in public — 
at a dinner party in . October 1977 

Norman MaBer threw his drink 

in Gore Vidal's face and-sbeked 
him in the mouth. “The Night of 
the Tiny Fist,” Vidal later dubbed 
iL Sunday night, they met again — 
on a Broadway stage, appropriate- 
ly. Their performance in the latest 
of a series of 51,000-^seat literary 
evenings may be remembered as 
“The Night of the Long Words,” 
Vidal 60, deHvard a speed* about 
what he called “the American Ent 
pire." Mailer, 62, gave a’ r ambling 
peroration that touched, qa qveiy- 
thing from President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s cancer ; surgery to modem ar- 
chitecture. The second half of the 
evening was devoted' in jtajt -to 
questions from the speciators* 
some of whom seemed frustrated 
that the two were so convivial. “If 
natherhasacritidsmofeachodi- 
er, does either have a criticism of 
himself?” one question -'read. 
“Whoever wrote that,". Mailer, re- 
plied, “I -can’t believe you. ask that . 
question of Gore Vidal” “Without 
knowing that Norman wfll. answer 
.h,” Vidal pot in.. ! /y 
' • ’ Q: 

Mayor Edward £ Koch of New 
York is in Japan onalQ-daytiip, 
returning the fanevisit ef 
• Suzuki die governor of T okyot To~ 

7 kyo officials declared^ Nov. 17-23 
“New York Wed^^schedolid 


festivities from video shows - 
New Y'otk artists to gourmet ga 
to mast 25 years of official “sist. 
hood” between two of the wad/ 
biggest cities- 

a .j)lU' 

A memorial plaque to D.t- * 
Lawrence has been unveiled in i f “ , 
floor of Poets’ Comer at Westm i 1} 
ster Abbey in London, adjoin^ l I 
those of Lord Byron and Lewis {> * 

roH Lawrence; whose 1928 neni f * km 
“Lady Chatterfe/s Lover” si I 
banned in Britain until I960, wp t * 
bom in 1885 and died in 1930. T 1 ' 
plaque had been sought by \ ; 

Lawrence Society. 


Joan Baez and Lech Walesa xv* ' ■ * ' 
given an ovation after mass Siind 
at Saint Brygida's church ■:"> 
Gdansk, Poland. Hie sin ger do' 
dated two songs, including “\ 
Shall Overcome,” to the tra 
union leader and to Father Henr 
Janbundti, priest at the churt 
which mdhdes in its parish t 
shipyard where Walesa works.- T. . 
day before, Baez and Walesa ai - 
Walesa’s wife, -Danuta, met £ 
about an hour at Walesa's apat ' 
rnent in Gdansk.Baez.onapnVa • 
visit u> Poland, also gave a concc 
for members of. the banned unk 
Solidarity, which Walesa found* - 
five years- ago. 


VtaKnfr Horowitz returned Str.. 
dayto La Scala after 50 years, wi 
rung oyations far a piano redt 
that included selections from Ch> 
pixy Liszt and Schubert. The lat 
afternoon perfarmaace was ones' 
two scheduled in Italy by the Ru 
siahrbam. virtuoso^ who last pe". 
fobned at the opera house on M? 
3, 1935. His second appearance wi. 

. be Nov. 24. P res id ent Frauds? 
CossEgaof Italy made. Horowitz 
Kpghr of thc Great Cross of dr 
Order of Merit at a ceremony r 
Milan’s city hall after die concert 


Yana QaeSdec, 36, author c.. 
“Les Nooes barbares” (Barbari' 
Wedding), a tale of a boy hated b;. 
bis mother, received the Prix Got . 
court, Ranee’s most prcstigim ! 
book; jfcrite; : on Monday. Anothe , 
covetodaward, the Prix Renaudo: _ 
Bffletrioux, V- 
hurts sent plus belle qti 
V 08 joiiK”;(My Ni^its Are Mor ’ 
. Beautiful Than Your Days). 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


TO PAMS 

Football Hobday Parties! 

Palais das Congrfci 

• live Tenant of Key NFL Ganes 

• HoCday Music & Decoration* 

■ Food & Refreshments of Your Ovsia) 

• Private Rooms For 6 to 600 PI in 

Avedabie Dates & Scheduler 

• Sun. Dec 15 7pm Giants v*. Dalas 

• Sua Dec 29 7pm Wild Cord Playoff 

• Sat. Jen. 4 7pm Divisional Wayaft 

• Son. Jan. 5 /pm Dtviuond Ptmnoff 

• Sun. Jan. 12 7pm Conference Rnob 

Reserve Nowl Limited Seating 
Far Infermatian Contact: 

Mme L Ardnet 

Max -Com Associates htc/PAT, SA 
25, Rue de* Long-Pres 
92100 Boulogne 
TeL 46 07 04 B2 
Telexi 270560 


DIVORCE IN 24 HOURS 

Mutud or contested actions, low cost. 
Haiti or Domncan Repubk. For infar- 
motion, send H75 fer 24-pooe bookJrt 
/handfcng to Dr. F. Gonzales, ODA. 
1835 ICS* H.W, Washington D.C 
20006. U-SA. let 202-452^331 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SI1BURBS 


GEORGE V 

lovely duplex, 80 eq-m. + maid's room 

FACING ILE ST. LOUIS 

Magn i ficent duplex, 150 squn. 
18th century burking 

EMBASSY 1-45 62 16 40 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


sa'CTinri 


EXCEPnONAL 
ON QUA! Of sate 
FACING HE 5T LOUIS 
Penthouse. Svmg, dming, 4 bedrooms. 3 
br*hs, office, mod's room, 1600 stun, 
terrace, fantasti c view over Para, high 
price. Visit: Gumfion every dav newt 
5c*urday afternoon aid Sundays, 16 
Qua des Cefestms, 75004 Paris 


NEAR SHNE 

RUE BONAPARTE 
Top floor, no lift 
CHARMING PtTOA-TBMffi 
Renovated, beckoom on mezeonne. 
^rn.^hee nOw. Fl, 000^00 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


5T GBtMAlN DCS PRB. 16th cent, 
penthouse, 110 squn. 43 29 02 94 


MALLORCA 

PENTHOUSE IN PALMA 

Hus penthouse a nhmlutrty outstand- 
ing overlooking the dty. the harbor 1 
the sea, rt is srtuated m the best & qixet 
dty area of Ptdma, only 2 minutes from 
the dty center ond the marina. Only 
finest materials have been used traci- 
uandly. 8*6 sqjn. iving area and 404 
sqjn. ponoranu c terrace -t- 74 sqjn 
bcdcony. Aoperty with 3400 squn. gar- 
den, ienttn, mdexir & outdoor pool, sau- 
na fi tn ess , private elevator, central 
heating, air condthonmg, doormen ier- 
vne- Price ui US$, ca 2J200JXXL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 

CRAN5-MONTANA 

RIGHT ON THE BEST EUROPEAN 
MOUNTAIN GOLF COURSE 
We sefl superb qxulments 2 to 6 rooms 
from SF285.000. 

NEAR FAMOUS CRANS PLATEAU 
AT T5ARAT HAMLET 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


SUNNY SOUTHERN SWITZERLAND 

LAKE LUGANO 

Lakesid e opalmems in a large 
beautiful park with 17JXJ0 Stye, p-ivatn 
wea, svrmwBng pool, private marimx 
private beach 1st qurnty cxxmwnts 
80sam.-190sajn. + terrem -B 


OOsqjiL - 190snjm. + terraces 24 - 47 
Pneet 5F463J900 - SF1,179,150 
Of: The Residenro Rvrdago in tfes Souds- 

era area of the Lake Lugano with opart- 
m«4j57 sq.m. - 130sqjn. + balconies. 
Abo overlooking lake ond mountoha. 
Bed barton an the lake in at old 


43 29 60 60 


Excelent opportunities fer foreigners. 
60% mortgage avcslable at 
6SftWe*t. 

Agence Remande hii w M Sw 5A 

Gd. Benjamin Constant 1 
1003 Lausanne - Switzerland 
Tel (021)20 70 II. Tbi 25873 ARIL CM 


ftw* SKlifaS) - SF 485A5a Mon- 

at tow Snss interest rates, lime 
for sale to foreigners. 

EMERALD - HOME LID. 

Wa G. Cottori 3. CH-6900 Lugano 
Tit CH-91-542913 ■ 

Tbc 73612 HOME Of 


ALCOHOLICS 

fans {da»y) 4634 5765. Rome 


ANONYMOUS m 


HAMEAU BOUJEAU 

16th. Charming 250 sqjtv house, 100 
sam. garden, calm, sunny. 

Kjmmo. ExauavnE 
FONOAL LEGASSE 42 66 32 35 


EIFFEL TOWER 

Sunny, fant a stic view, old 110 scum.. 
5 rooms, balconies. 43 80 26 0B 
AGENCE DE L’ETOILE 




REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 




bi the charming momt ub resort of 

IEYS1N: 

RK 1 D 0 KE l £5 FRH 4 ES 

Overiootfog a splendid Alpine panora- 
ma. 30 min. Erom Mortreux inf Ldbe 
Geneva by or. 

* you aon own quaSty 

with indoor ivrirmung pool aid 
finess foefities m on ideof 
env iron ment for leisure aid sports 
bki, golf, etc). 

- Frnanangaf lav SF. rates 
up to 8U% morlg uy at, 

Plerae Miteti 

Residence fes Prun es, 1854 Lmb 
SWITZKIAM) 

Teli |Q25] 34 1 1 55 The 456 120 OAI CH 


REAL ESTATE 
TO REYT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
.TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 



dm. £700/ week. Tat 01-569 


SHE CONTAINS) studfes central Lorv; 
don from £185/ week. 01-370 5241. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 



Paris 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
4562-7899 



SHORT IBM STAY, from 1 week. 
Fu8y equ i p p e d sludoe and 2 roans, 




Jor fatJy in London widt trove) ta USA 
Cooking mutt be Gordon Bleu standmf 
AppSajrt* aged 3545 yrs. Should be 
urge aid have oorakkiraUa praviou 
experience. Impeccable references es 
Mtrtd-Sdoty nego t iable with excefcn 
wanmodertan provided. » 

Phone UK 0753 885648 after 7 pax 


ISTANBUL - TURKEY 

lage private estate, festoric monument 
bull 1910. best location Asiatic coast 
Istanbul, offered for sale first lime ever. 
Pn nopals only please applyi 
PTO Box 4472; 8022 Zurich, 

**irlTef rf 
3" III* II III I 


CHATEAU D'OEX 

C hole t s r g ystmute rfffl ovaBafafe 
fer foraignen 
CONTACT: Agence Sfafcfag 
3780 Gtdaad (Tefc CH 030/44050) 


International Business Message Center 



VAN LINES WTL 

OVHt 1300 Offices 


USA AffledVoiUnes Inti Carp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 

Or cdl our Agency Eaopeai offices: 
PARIS Desbandee lotemafional 
(1) 43 43 23 64 

FRANKFURT ! 

(069) 250066 

DUSSaDORF/ RATINGS 

(021021 45023 UHLS. 

MUNICH UkL5. 

(089) 142244 


htl Met 
(01) 953 3636 
Co> fer Afietfs free ertimota 




ALPHA-TRANSIT, PPris Blfe 43892577 
Seo/or, co, boggoge. oV countries 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


rale is US. $9.80 or loeol 
equrtrafenf per tore. You must 
inetudo ooawloto and verifi- 
aUo biBata oddnotM. 


OPPORTUNITIES 


Af a cost in exceu of S2 milBan and 
Fofov«ng 4 yean of rasoarch and ds- 



BUSINESS 




GENEVA 

SWUZBtLANO 

Full Service 
is our Busness 

• Intemariond law end taws 

• Mabra. telephone and telex 
servica 

• TronskAon and seore t orid services 
1 Formation, donvokatiai ond 

adminotration of Swiss and foreign 
compares 

FiJ confidence and dboebon ossurtd 

BUSINESS ADVISORY 
SERVICES S.A. 

7 Rue Muzy, 1207 GENEVA. 

Tefc 36 05 4Q Telex: 23342 


FINANCIAL TIMES 

AT HOME OR AT WORK 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


TAX fifflE FOR EXPORT 
WHISKEY 
CHAMPAGNE 
LIQUORS 

RAA4PY SERVICES INC 
1290 Venoa/ Geneva Sw itz erland 
Phene; 0041/22/55 40 42 
Telex; 28279 CH 


OFFSHORE 8 UK COfWAMES 
Fiduciary and true services, dorodTo 
hon, company fermaiion, international 

lax, yochr regntremon, bad accounts 

established, accounting, mod end tden 
services etc. Whrttmgton Services LtiL, 
23 CaSege KB. Londat EGffi 2SD. 
Tefc 01^48 0602. Hu 334587 G 


BUSINESS SERVICES I OFFICE SERVICES 


International Secretarial Positions 


w n 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED INC 
LLSJL 8 WORLDWIDE 

A complete penond 8 business service 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 
IN ZURICH 

FULLY INTEGRATED 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


COTE D’AZUR 

SIR EXPORT AERONAUT1QUE 
Bedwche pour seconder son Dradeur 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE! 


promotional occotiore. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St., N.Y.C 10019 
Servus Bcpresenttrtvei 
Needed Woridvwdt. 




AVAILABLE 

Hr ew u e d 12 MBBon Sendee Bolrou 
ffigh BTU fejdwcxxi ar FOB Indonesia 


Wcraenaar. 




for sobsenphon detob. 
pltcM contad: 

FT Araterdr^i (t^23 94 30 a 
Europe’s Business Ne-apoper 


5L05 per 15 b . vacuum wrapped bun- 
06 1 rOf aafcMS conftoetr 
GSSMA TRADING SA. Lausanne. 
Switzerland. Tel (02)1 33 30 36, 

Tb 25298 GSMA Ot 


LONDON 

Madan/ & irwr serviom I Company 
formation & domi cle rion I fotemolion. 
al ta I Bank aocounts ratobkshed ! 
General business advice S assstonce j 


JPCR, 17 Wdegofe S/. London El 7HP 
Tefc 01 377 1474. Tb ; 893911 G 


GERMANY 


GREAT BRITAIN 




OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

Vwarperacion mid management n Lilt 
Me of Man. Turfs, AnguilQ, Charnel 
blonds. PancsiKL Lfeeria, Gbalta and 

Morart, 06000 | me* otherogme 

• tXKTTUWuO QQVTCB 

• bnmetSate ovdlafafiy 

• Nominee servtces 

• Beaer shares 

• Bod regs w rtora 

• Aceounono & odmiretrcjfion 

• Mail, »le?»i>e 8. telex 

SBfVICES LTD 
Head Office 

Mt J*® 1 

’tfisuraffs* 

London ReprmMWitafrira 
2-5 Old Bond 5Ll«*nWl 
Td 01493 4244, Tb 28247 SCSLDN G 





“WCTOIP5 ASSISTANT, tort , pub- 


motion A 


ACTE: 50 BUSINESS 
CENTERS IN EUROPE 

• FuOy eq u ip p ed offices to rent. 

• DonidwAan. mail, telex, fax. 

• Phone, trarafatioas. 


Tel (T) 43-59J7-55/n* 642187 F 

Tet (22) 469004, km 421818 CH 
RAMCRIRT 

11 (69)7100060 Ifac 176997263D 


SECRETARY PA 

FOR CHAilENGffJG POST 
tovoWng coraiderabto travel abroad. 
App&xrm shook! be 35-*0 years, sin. 
afe, possets first dose secretarial tkdb; 
Be ffoert in Arabic & French with corv 

wfcrable experience in a smflar capoc- 
Ny. Sdory negeMde virafh emriW 
n ecommo duti on provided abroad. in>- 
peocable references esserUiaL 
Tefc UK KW • 885648 after 7 pm. 


US HIGH TECH 
CORPORATION . 


0AADY 

Factory fatal of toeee ee* dnerndt 
Louse Herenialsasir 29 Antwerp 
Belgium. Tel 03/232J203, tfei 35243 


OFFICE SERVICES 



MMCDW 5SC5 fer AMffilCAN 

mmtxvt pfms aPahs: 

fagfidL/ Ud yonj Etotc h or German 
sb ct b tones, knowledge of find re- 
quired, Engfah shortaid. BiSt^od 


yexan. Write or cbont 138 Avenue 
Victor Hugcti 75116 Fora, Frame. Tefc 
(1)47 27 61 69. 


CCM. LTD 

Companies farmed UX & worldwide 
mdudmg Isle of Man, Tirts & Cocos, 
Angafla, Panama end Liberia 

For further infe r motion , please oontoct 
■M rt; - 5 Upper Qmrch SL Doudas, hie 
of Man, wa Great Britain, tefc Douglas 
(0624)23733, Itx: 627900 CCM o3& 





ZURJCH-ZURICH-ZURKH 

TW FINANQAL CB4T® 

e YOUR INTEGRA TH3 SUStf^S 
SBMCES COMPANY 
• YOUR OffiCE AWAY FROM HOME 
Bo rinew Sendee* Cewwft Cera. 
BafanhaCuram 52, CH8022 Zuridi. 
Tefc 01/211 92 07 n» 813 0W BSC 


HB|t 










A French subsidiary of an important muftfnofionaf 
company, leader in tfe field of renting plant moving 
equipment, seeks in South Paris 


■rijfpyypwjl 




YOUR OffiCE IN PAfitSi THJX 
ANSWB8NG SERVICE, 
omids. medbox. he 24H/doy. 
TeL FAL 46 07 95 95L 




. ■__TT1 



&W&h mrther tongue, she must have p higher level of Education 

^ He H *> n* 

Sherm^v^H organized, mHou i and dWe'to face all problems 

6 5 ter '' ^- ’and photo to our Persomel 
Advisory Agency: .SAhOSS, 3» nje RoVtoqwn 7S017 PARIS 

VVho is b charge- of asnftdei riiuly hording our recnitmertf 


TJtPwiVH'.Md 




■'SrTr:*.-:- 


ri-’ i * ^ 1 -^r v: v : i-YF '" 1 i 'i -