Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


“‘•'-■‘.A 




TTie Global Newspaper 

Edited in Pans 

Printed Simultaneously 

^Pari^LrodoBi Zurich, 




•-c! 


‘ WEATHa MTA APPEAft.QN PAGE ) 8 

' feh'"' ' ••'•*• 



Published With The New 





31,961 

K ~ ] '■. — 


and The Washington Post 


LLl^QOOO NefW»_7«INlLl 

.JJBU. O'"® 5 - CTifl fcoa 

_^450Rfc — ■ — W6t 

hBHc ,_ aittOfl Cm >~ .o^ctas 
tWfc._C51SQ Zl hpolM-d-*]* 

C W «w_C tvo n. nr SouSA«sb«-eJ3K 

IW^fll 0JCr a k^-“*fc4£? Spa. 1'0 P«6 

!*rtx 175* • [ d ' x =y £?&£■«»■*■ — > g' S*. 

FWbnd 7U>ft\ gyg?* 

h«**_ _6J» F. H?"** — "W^Tmjio CJSO Dm 

Oencoey_250 DJA “*»■ ■ . T«fa>, — Tr tOOJQ 

&«M8r*m_MP. Moment — fcSODh. OAf. 45J trt 

Ona 100 Df. f**rV»Jj_r7SR Ui Ml ?b^BK 

tan list* Mgtna 170 it TujsabwB — MD. 


47/85 


PARIS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


1U 


•flV-. 


'“Wto' 




Reagan, Gorbachev En 
Talks by Pledging Peace 


Vflljj In- ^ 
to 

*-^r 

- -:^5? 


■ ■ - 55?** 

»C 

- ■ » ■«** 

:r r, fW 

. . ’.■ “'-nMe-st 

J- ‘>Sa i^' 

- ' ' ha,;- 

4 **t 
I'u^r, ChC 

■ ■ sr ^ By Don Oberdorfer 

'• " ‘ Washmgion Past Smite - 

.; • " GENEVA — A broad hint of 

4 )'i.. Wj (^..future Soviet accommodation on 
Tulhfc Afghanistan and a lade of roove- 
- rr-vVj Mfeijment on nudear and space arms 
. ifcih Geidof identified by UlS. offiri^lg 

- 4 : rr -vn^^^ursday as important substantive 
'■■ •••-?.;• «rjtt 'eatures of the first' UA-Soviet 
summit meeting in six years. 

The central accomplishments of 
between President 


The Soviet and U-S. leaden greeting each other at the oirnmit meeting’s concluding ceremony Thursday. 

u.s. Senses Soviet Openness on Afghan War 




*"""" whe meetings 

Sisis.iiee Ad QukkJy a* 


NEWS ANALYSIS: 


nrxsw.&i a; 


HERALD mum Donald Reagan am 
jorbacbev. from i 


*h;. :•« 




and Mjtha3 S. 
.all .indications 
: ' -available in Geneva, were. to restart 
■ r “»c:|ie process of useful dialogue be- 
, ... . ,. 0 ^. ween the two nudear superpow- 

■ r.- ■: -jiwirs, CO begin ajwwvrot ^btittadwp 

- - we ertweec the twoleaders and toem- 
' 5 ^ihasize positive aspects af-U-Si- 

Joviet ties for the first time since 
lATW/Ufihe 1970 s. ■ • 

»i,m, Am . » There was little disagreement 
* tmong U.S. experts ona^tatement 
icnoi o rhureday by Mr. Reagan at the 
"oint ceremony with 'Mr. Gorba- 
>«<pc- r :' :hev that “the real report card on 
taompe-.-.peneva will not come in for 
5 “ ^ ~ nonths or even years.” 

Generally, very littleshift in sub- 
tore.-.;ii .tan live positions was discernible 
i w -«f &« n the two days of meetings. The 
i.**”*.- wssions included intense ohc-on- 

tftPV 


What the Geneva Summit Achieved 

The Associated Pros 

GENEVA —FoOcrwuig are the highlights of the Reagan-Garbachev 
summit meeting 

ASMS CONTROL: The two leaders agreed to accelerate the arms 
control negoti ations, w hich are set to resume on Jan. 16 in Geneva. 

FUTURE MEETINGS: The leaders announced that they would 
meet at two additional summit sessions — one next year in the United 
Stales and another in 1987 in the Soviet Union, according to UiL 
officials. They agreed to the additional meetings on Wedtraday, the 
last day of the Geneva session, after a dinner at President Ronald 
Rngan’s readence. 

. . CULTURAL. ISSUES: The two sides reached a -solid accord to 
resume U-S.-Soviet cultural exchanges. The agreement was signed 
during the dosing ceremony by Secretaiy of State George P. Shultz 
. and Poreign Monster Eduard A. Shevardnadze. 

Exchanges of performers, students, teachers and scientists were 
shtopiyoortailed by. former President Jimmy Carter in retaliation for 
• .ibeSoUet mtdvehtkm in Afghanistan -mJL979.. -. .- 

AIR SAFETY: The United States and the Soviet Union also agreed 
to establish new communication Hn t s to improve, air saf ety in the 
North Pacific toavoid incidents such as the Soviet downing of a South 
Korean jetlin er two years ago. 

CONSULATES: A separate agreement cleared the way for a new 
US. consulate in Kiev and nSoviet consulate in New York. It also 
authorized the two governments to conclude negotiations to resume 
commercial air travel between the United States and the Soviet 
Union. 

RESEARCH: Another agreement aimed to foster research on the 
sunas energy through transfers of technology and “basic knowledge.” 


U-S- positioD toward Moscow and 
toe discussions between the two in the demise of 197Qj dfetente. 

R eaders with only interpreters pre- Secretary of Staiie George 

-*■ Zhilin coifl lllaf AFolianictan 


A?t: 


/.■l 


XUL 

Nevertheless, some members of 
b^,si ? 'j-. he U.S. diplomatic team were rat- 
Mortt«‘- l ng some of the more fascinating 
•"**£. Nf injects of the summit talks. 

r.. The most intriguing surprise for 
v*cw** r:.: ome officials was the change in the 
pjjg some degree, the sub- 
c ”° -lance of Mr. Gorbachev's discus- 
*iS^aon of the Soviet oca^Kition of 
^'Afghanistan. The Soviet move into 
<:,er "- i '.y hat country in late 1979 was a 
ZZw* J^otyor factor in the hardening erf the 


P. 

Shultz said that Afghanistan “was 
treated at some length” as part of 
“really a very good discussion on 
the regional ismes* dividing Mos- 
cow and Washington. 

Another senior official who sat 
in on the talks, but Who spoke' an 
the condition that he not be identi- 
fied, said.he believed that some 
progress might be made toward set- 
tling the issue. Ee saidthe question 
mi^bt be handled “more intensive- 
ly and less visibly” in the future. 


The most notable development, 
according to U.S. sources, was Mr. 
Gorbachev's unemotional tone in 
discussing the war in Afghanistan 
and the desire he expressed to work 
quietly to find a way out. 

The semor official said Mr. Gor- 
bachev did not mention UJ5. sup- 
port for the Afghan insurgents or 
Pakistan's involvement, which are 
persistent themes in Soviet public 
statements an the issue. 

The major impediment to arms 
control discussions, as expected, 
was the strong Soviet opposition to 
the Strategic Defense Initiative, 


Mr. Reagan’s plan to develop a 
space-based defense against nude- 
ar niiKflfC 

In a private talk Tuesday after- 
noon in the pool house of the villa 
where he was staying, Mr. Reagan 
reportedly handed Mr. Gorbachev 
a four-point proposal for joint 
“guidelines” that would be issued 
to give impetus to arms negotiators. 
The Soviet side may well have re- 
jected the proposal because of the 
third point, which dealt with the 
Strategic Defense Initiative. 

Pont Three, as proposed to Mr. 
Gorbachev, made it explidt that 
programs of strategic anti-missile 
defense could be pursued within 
the confines of the 1972 Anti-Bal- 
listic Missile Treaty. It also called 
for the two nations m work cooper- 
atively on the relationship fcervera 
strategic offense and strategic de- 
• fense. 

The Russians not only rejected 
that, according to U.S. sources, but 
sought to the very end to obtain 
agreement in the final joint state- 
ment that work on the Strategic 
Defense Initiative, including re- 
search,'wouId be halted. 

The U.S. delegation refused to 
agree to this, ami left open the 
possibility that there would be no 
joint statement — only separate 
statements by the two sides — if the 
Russians insisted. The argument 
was not settled until 4:15 A.M. 
Thursday. 

The Soviet team’s seeming anxi- 
ety to have the two leaders issue a 
joint statement and to make the 
summit appear a success was at- 
tributed by U.S. sources to Mr. 
Gorbachev’s desire to shore up his 
position on the eve of the Commu- 
nist Party Congress. 

It also seemed important to him, 
those officials raid, to begin on the 
right footing with the first Ameri- 
can president he has ever met. 


SDI Remains 
KeyPointof 
Disagreement 

By Henry Tanner 

International Heroid Tribune 

GENEVA — The leaders of the 
United States and the Soviet 
Union, in a joint appearance 
Thursday concluding the first su- 
perpower summit conference in six 
years, agreed to accelerate negotia- 
tions between the two nations “to 
prevent an arms race in space and 
to terminate jt on Earth.” 

In a joint statement. President 
Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, also “agreed that the 
nuclear war cannot be won and 
must never be fought.” They 
pledged that “they will not seek to 
achieve mOitaiy superiority.” 

The two leaders stated that, in 
recognition of the importance of a 
continuing dialogue between them, 
they will “meet again in the nearest 
future.” To this end, Mr. Gorba- 
chev is to go to the United States 
next year and Mr. Reagan is to visit 
the Soviet Union in 1987 

They declared that their discus- 
sions covering the full range of 
U.S.- Soviet questions were “frank 
and useful” but warned that “seri- 
ous differences remain on a num- 
ber of critical issues." 

Documents covering cultural 
agreements and other accords were 
signed by Secretary 1 of State George 
P. Shultz and Foreign Minister 
Eduard A. Shevardnadze, with Mr. 
Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev stand- 
ing behind them. Such documents 
are normally signed at the ministe- 
rial level. 

The Reagan-Garbachev appear- 
ance, which concluded the summit 
conference that was scheduled to 
end Wednesday, was held on the 
dais of the Geneva International 


Conference Center, across the 
street from the European head- 
quarters of the United Nations. It 
was attended by Kurt Fuigler. the 
president of Switzerland. 

Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev 
were sitting next to each other on 
the dak with their interpreters be- 
hind them. The two leaders were 
relaxed and smiling and conversed 
easily with each other. They ad- 
dressed an audience that included 
U.S. and Soviet diplomats and 
Swiss officials. 

“The president and I have done a 
huge amount of work; we have 
gone into great detail ; we have real- 
ly done it in depth, and we have 
done it totally openly and frankly 
said Mr. Gorbachev, according to 
the official Soviet translation. He 


was the first of the two men to 
speak. 

He stressed, as be has done many 
times, that for the Soviet Union, 
the central issue at stake in the 
conference was the nuclear arms 
race and the U.S. Strategic Defense 
Initiative, Mr. Reagan’s plan to de- 
velop a space-based missile shield. 

“We have decided,” he said, 
“that we must help to decrease the 
threat of nuclear war; we must not 
allow Lhe arms race to move off 
into space and we must cut it downs 
on Earth." 

He added that “there are impor- 
tant disagreements on matters of 
principle that remain between us.” 
In a long press conference later, he 
stated that the most important of 
these disagreements concerned 
SDK 





<0 

*1 am convinced 
that we are 
heading in the 
right direction.’ 

— Reagan 


\^\ 

f We must not 
allow the arms 

* 

' * V. ^ 

$ * 
i«a 

race to move 
off into space.’ 

— Gorbachev 

■■HI 

* 




Mr. Reagan said in a short ad- 
dress; “We have packed a lot into 
the last two days. I came to Geneva 
to seek a fresh start in relations 
between the United Stales and the 
Soviet Union and we have done 
this. I am convinced that we are 
heading in the right direction.” 

He added that the conference 
had brought "interim results” 2nd 
that “the real report card on Gene- 
va will not come in for iroqi1l> c: 
even years.” 

Saying that hard werk is still 
ahead, he concluded with an appeal 
to Mr. Gorbachev: “We ask you to 
join us in getting the job done, as I 
am sure you wiil.” 

After the ceremony the two men 
spent a final quarter of an hour 

(Continued on Page 6, Cel. 1) 


Soviet Resigned to SDI, 
Reagan Reportedly Says 


By Don Cook 

Lot Angeles Tunes Service 

BRUSSELS — President Ron- 
ald Reagan told leaders of North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization coun- 
tries Thursday that the Soviet 
Union appears to have passively 
accepted the U.S. research program 
on space defense, according to one 
of the participants. 

Mr. Reagan's statement did not 
in any sense signify that the Rus- 
sians have dropped their opposi- 
tion to the Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive, the source said, but merely 
that Mikhail S. Gorbachev, being a 
realist, now presumably accepts the 
reality that the program will move 
forward. 

The participant, who declined 10 
be identified, also quoted the U.S. 



ornts 


jf|5o Africa as AIDS Source 



-d 


By Lawrence K. Altman 

New York Times Service 

NAIROBI — Tantalizing but 


i*fcetchy dues pointing to Afnca as 
origin of AIDS have unleashed 
'l^.f^’l'one of the bitterest disputes in the 
i >^5* ^recent annals of medicine. 
■***?£* Thus far the search has led 
* ~Lf American researchers tc two Afri- 
: ; children who in 1963 lifted in 

•U** S*iXJpper Volta, now Burkina Faso. 

the basis of blood samples that 
% " '[iad been frozen and stored since 
^ iht time, lhe cbildrea are believed 
. ‘ have been infected with the 

<\H)S vims or one similar 10 it.lt is 
^^believed to be the earliest due to 
able infection by an AIDS vi- 
^ ^ closely related to it 






iI^This due and others have led to 
? E * fl^lihai now has emerged as the pns- 
■^i&^/vailing thesis in American and El'- 
1 ropean medical circles: that the 
■*- •'-worldwide spread of acquired 1m- 
/,*» 'mune deficiency syndrome began 
J tin Central Africa, the home o/ sev- 
J :* if . 'eral other recently recog niz ed dis- 
".eases. - _ 

v The Africans vigorously dis- 
* dag tot, and there is criticism of the 

validity of the studies an which the 
' "y theories are predicated. Indeed, 
^-^’’controversial new results point 

1 F:? 1 - / U _ . L. 4 — H J A TTVO nr U. fWl, ft 

41- 1 


.-originated in Africa. 

,-cCf ^ f The origin is regarded by many 
^ ri as a key factor in the overall search 


that they' ray they doubt it could 
have been introduced there recent- 
ly. General agreement does not ex- 
ist among scientists on either side 
of the Atlantic about whether it is 
new or merely newly recognized. 

Some' scientists believe that 
AIDS may be a result of a vires 
mn ration, or change, the first such 
mutation m medical history to have 
caused a virulent new disease. 

HAIDS is found to be an old but 
previously undetected disease, doc- 
tors need to determine why it sud- 
denly became a worldwide epidem- 
ic. Bui if a virus mutated to create a 
new disease, and if scientists identi- 
fy the precipitating factors, they 
might be able to stop another epi- 
demic Hke it or even other new ones 
from breaking out, . - • 

AIDS was first' recognized in 
1981 in the United States. But even 
if the disease had been detected 15 
or more years ago. it might not 
have beat posable for scientists to 
find the causative 1 vires because 
they, had not yet developed the 
tcclinology and expertise. 

There is widespread belief dm it 
will take at least one year, if not 

many years; for -viral historians to 
provide a firmer understanding of 
the origin of the disease. Some so- 



Hw Auaamd Ptofc 

Smoke billowing Thursday from burning tires in an anti-apartheid protest near Pretoria. 

South African Police Fire on Crowd 




;r 5**“ 

II- >J‘ 

-1 "T-J 


„*»• 




.. - -»v* 


artists insist that proof may never 

-2V. -**- “ —o -j 1 be found. Doctors still do not know 

p as a key factor m the overall search the origin of the overwh elming rrm 
P r - for die cause and core of AIDS and jo^ty of hmium diseases. 

. - e SVthe prevention of similar epidem- 
' Bui a strong stigma seems to 

' have bemme attached to the origin, 
v ' in part because of the deadly and 
insidious nature of the disease and 

. - ,in part because of the taboo&arao- omiv-ni ...„ 

.dated with practices often found to virw ^gbi be used to devd- 

**^4have caused its transmjsaon. a vaccine to protect humans. 

Some Amencan and European 3. ^ rat> when an animal 

? scientists also consider AIDS to be . k r*i a\ 

/so Wide^read in Central Africa (Continued on Pag* 5. Col. 4) 


If sriauists find that the AIDS 
virus mutated from an ancestor vi- 
res that caused Tittle harm in hu- 
mans, or is derived from a ofosdy 
related virus in animals, then a the- 
oretical chance exists that the an- 


£ 


By Aliister Sparks 

Washington Part Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Police 

opened fire Thursday on a large 

crowd of demonstrators, most of 
them women, in Pretoria's black 
township of Mamdodi, killing sey- 
w eral and causing a stampede in 
which hundreds were injured. 

Witnesses described scenes of 
panic and chaos in which some 
people were trampled to death as 
anu-government demonstrators, 
estimated at more than 25,000, 
tried to flee the police gunfire. One 
section of the stampeding crowd 
was said to have burst through a 
security feDce'sumxuufing a com* 





plot of official buildings. 

[The Johannesburg Star reported 


that at least six persons were killed, 
including three elderly women, and 
gave the names of four women vic- 
tims, The Associated Press report- 
ed The afternoon paper said that 
hundreds of people were hurt by 
police gunfire or in the stampede.] 
Police headquarters' in Pretoria 
said in a statement that two blacks 
ware killed when police dispersed 
groups who gathered illegally, but a 
spokesman had no immediate com- 
ment on the reports of widespread 
and injuries. 

prevented newspaper and 
television reporters from going to 
(he scene of the shooting under new 
press restrictions introduced three 
weeks ago. 

But some black reporters who 


live in the segregated township saw 
the violence and provided informa- 
tion, as did other witnesses in the 
township who were telephoned by 
reporters. 

Meanwhile, rumors swept South 
Africa on Thursday that the gov- 
ernment was considering releasing 
Nelson Mandela, the black nation- 
alist leader, who is in a Cape Town 
hospital recovering from surgery to 
remove his prostate gland. 

His wife, Winnie Mandela, fu- 
eled lhe speculation when she re- 
fused to say at a news conference in 
Cape Town whether either she or 
her husband had met with govern- 
ment officials in recent weds. 

She said she tod: seriously the 
(Continued on Page 6. GoL 7) 


president as saying that he had 
found Mr. Gorbachev to be much 
more flexible and open to compro- 
mise than he had expected. 

Mr. Reagan also reportedly told 
Mr. Gorbachev that he will keep 
the Russians informed about his 
program to develop a space-based 
defense against missiles as it pro- 
gresses, and that the United States 
will do nothing 10 exceed the limits 
of the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile 
Treaty. 

In a brief stopover at NATO 
headquarters on his way back to 
Washington from the Geneva sum- 
mit meeting, the president, found 
unanimous worm support for what 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West 
Germany later called “the opening 
of doors, a new basis for East-West 
relations 1 ’ achieved at the meeting. 

Heads of government of 13 of 
the 16 NATO members came to 
Brussels for the presidential brief- 
ing, which lasted an hour and 20 
minutes. Mr. Reagan then left for 
Washington, where he was to ad- 
dress Congress on the Geneva talks 
later Thursday night. 

The three allied leaders who 
stayed away were President Fran- 
cois Mitterrand of France, Prime 
Minister Andreas Papandreou of 
Greece and Prime Minister Felipe 
Gonzalez of Spain. Their foreign 
ministers, however, attended Mr. 
Reagan's briefing in Brussels. 

“It was very constructive,” said 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher 
of Britain, “and there is a new basis 
of confidence in the future. We are 
all well pleased.” 

Prime Minis ter Beitino Craxi of 
Italy said Mr. Reagan told his 
NATO colleagues that he had 
found Mr. Gorbachev “far more 
reasonable” than he had expected. 
Mr. Craxi said the president also 
said that the most important out- 
come of the Geneva meeting was 
the fact that he now had someone 
in the Soviet Union with whom he 
could develop a dialogue. 

Lord Carrington, the NATO sec- 
retary-general, said in a statement 
after the meeting that Mr. Reagan 
“was left in no doubt of his col- 
leagues' appreciation of his visit 

here in the middle of a quite excep- 
tionally long and busy day." 

He said that NATO members 

hoped the Geneva talks would “be 
the beginning of a new and more 
constructive stage as we work to- 
gether to keep the peace and im- 
prove East- West relations." 

■ Japan Praises Pledge 

In Tokyo, Prime Minister Yasu- 
hiro Nakasone said that the prom- 
ise to continue a U .5. -Soviet dia- 
logue was a “very good thing," The 
Associated Press reported. 

“They have decided to sum fresh 




£ r.' 5 '4 ; 


ft-r. t H •*£?*• ■ 

i •• •• 


Asoowri Pmi 

Two Moscow women read a front page from Pravda that 
contains news of the summit meeting and a rare picture 
of President Reagan. Soviet television also gave unusu- 
ally extensive coverage to the U.S. president Page 2. 

MORE SUMMIT NEWS 

■ U-S. allies express the hope that the summit meeting wiU lead to a 

new East-West dialogue. Page 2. 

■ The summit meeting’s success will depend on the follow-through by 

both sides, warns Philip Geydin. Comment Page 4. 


Gorbachev Says Talks 
Improved Ties With U.S . 


By Cel es tine Bohlen 
and Gary Lee 

Washington Post Service 

GENEVA — Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev said Thursday that his meet- 
ings with President Ronald Reagan 
were of “decisive importance" in 
improving U.S.-SovieL relations, 
but not in achieving progress in 
arms control. 

Although the meetings brought 
about no change in weapons stock- 
piles on either side, the Soviet lead- 
er said, “I would say that the world 
has become a safer place” with the 
opening of a personal dialogue be- 
tween the two leaders. 

Mr. Gorbachev, appearing at a 
news conference after the formal 
close of the summit meeting, con- 
firmed that his nine hours of talks 
with Mr. Reagan had done nothing 
to break the deadlock on the Strate- 
gic Defense Initiative — the U-S. 
space-based missile defense pro- 
gram that the Russians seem deter- 
mined to block and which they re- 
garded as the key issue here. 

In a prepared speech and in an- 
swers to questions, the Soviet lead- 
er made it clear that, in his view, the 
space weapons issue would contin- 
ue to dominate arms negotiations. 
Even though some headway had 
discussions on bilateral nod inter- W made m improving U^Sovi- 
national problems," Mr. Nakasone ; -dat-o ns generally, essenbal dtf- 

said. “They also have decided to fa^ rcmatneA be saKl. 

3 are prepared to engage m 

(Continued on Plage 2. CoL 1) radical reductions, provided the 


door to the arms race in space is 
closed and tightly shut.” Mr. Gor- 
bachev said. 

But he also gave a positive as- 
sessment of the summit meeting, 
which he said had accomplished 
“serious work" through “open and 
frank” exchanges that he described 
as “sometimes pointed, some limes 
very sharp, and at one poins very 
sharp indeed." 

In sum, he said, the meeting 

(Continued on Page 6. CoL 6) 


INSIDE 

■ The U.S, House has voted to 

increase the authority of the 
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff. Page 3. 

■ An Indian report said an ex- 

plosion apparently caused the 
crash or an Air-lhdia flight in 
June. Page 6. 

WEEKEND 

■ How hmer torment and anxi- 

ety feed the creative spirit of 
artists. Page 9. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 
* New York stocks surged 
23.05 points, to 1 .462-27, as vol- 
ume expanded to 150 million 
shares. Page & 







.Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 




. Western Europe Urged 
: By Mitterrand to Plan 
: ;Space-Arms Safeguards 


-* By Michael Dobbs 

” r Washington Post Service 

- ’ PARIS — President Francois 
' .Mitterrand of France, staying away 
“•from a post-summit briefing by 

- “President Ronald Reagan in Brus- 
~ .sels, called Thursday for coopera- 

Z “tion among West European coun- 

- * tries to counter a possible extension 

* .of the arms race into space. 

Mr. Mitterrand, addressing his 
■■ 'first formal press conference in IS 
'.months, described the outcome of 

- ‘the Geneva summit meeting as a 
•* ’"hopeful sign” for East-West nda- 
jj* lions. But he went on to distance 
» 'France from the arms negotiations 

* Z now under way between the United 
..•States and the Soviet Union and 
- 1 reasserted the importance of mam- 
^ . taining an independent nuclear de- 
d *terrenL 

■* \ French political analysts depict- 
j .ed the two-hour press conference as 
„■ 4 an opening shot by Mr. Mitterrand 

* *in what is likely to be a grueling 
’ -campaign for legislative elections 

'neat March. The latest polls show 

* Z the president's Socialist Party trafl- 
\ - ing badly behind the rightist oppo- 
i- ' si Lion. 

* . Mr. Mitterrand's decision not to 
'-attend the special session of the 

North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion in Brussels marked the second 
. time in less than a month that he 
has turned down an opportunity to 
meet with Mr. Reagan. Last month 
he declined an invitation to a pre- 
summit meeting of the seven lead- 
ing Western allies, in New York. 

Questioned about his failure to 
attend the New York meeting, Mr. 
Mitterrand said that he was op- 
posed to creation of a Western po- 
litical “directorate." 

A senior French official said lat- 
er that Mr. Mitterrand would have 
been happy to meet with Mr. Rea- 
gan for a substantive bilateral dis- 
cussion but saw little point in at- 
tending routine ‘jprotocol" 
meetings such as Thursday’s 
NATO session in Brussels. France 
was represented at the meeting by 
Roland Dumas, minister for exter- 
nal relations. 

At Thursday’s press conference, 
Mr. Mitterrand said that France 
should act to safeguard the credi- 


bility of its independent deterrent 

by taking measures to protect itself 
from an exrensiou of the arms race 
into outer space. He said that the 
development of space technology 
could only be effective if carried 
out in cooperation with other West 
European countries. 

“If the two superpowers have the 
imprudence to get involved in ‘star 
wars,* ** Mr. Mitterrand said, “any 
country that wants to maintain its 
independence will have to equip 
itself with the means to protect its 
territory.” 

France already has taken the 
lead in launching a civilian high- 
technology research program, 
known as Eureka, with its Europe- 
an partners. In a speech earlier this 
month. Defense Minister Paul 
Quil&s said that France should at- 
tempt to preserve the credibility of 
its nuclear strike force by develop- 
ing miniaturized nuclear warheads 
that would be invisible to defensive 
radars. 

Although Mr. Mitterrand called 
for greater cooperation between 
European countries in space re- 
search, he slopped well short of 
proposing a joint defense system 
for Western Europe. He noted that 
there were significant barriers to a 
joint European defense, including 
the present political taboo against 
allowing West Germany to have a 
finger on the nuclear button. 

Mr. Mitterrand refused to dis- 
cuss how he would react in the 
likely event of an opposition vic- 
tory in next year's legislative elec- 
tion. His seven-year term of office 
is not due to expire until 1988. 

A poll in the Paris daily, Le Fi- 
garo, predicted that the moderate 
rightist parties would gain a com- 
fortable overall majority in the Na- 
tional Assembly next March with- 
out having to rely on the extremist 
National Fioct- 

Computer projections gave the 
neo-GauDist Rally for the Republic 
and the center-right Union for 
“French Democracy 330 seats in a 
555-member assembly. The poll es- 
timated that the Socialists would 
win 146 seats, the Communists 44, 
and the National Front 32. 







W ORLD BRIEFS f f Qf 



New Affiance to Back Aquino’s Wi 

.ssr4a=KCS^S£?i- s . 

slain opposition, leader Benigno & Aqumo Jr- ™sed tf* 

w**- J* 

mrhidtng an organization of business ateeggves « 

calls itself Lakas ng Bayan, wjbu* in the TagdogA^Kt mams 

of the people.” Another opposition leader, the fotnwr senator Salvador - 
& LauSThas been ootSedby the 

Organization. Mr. Laurel also is trymg to P?nwg ce f dtot ws of ■ 
AtSnTwfao was asmwinatfld two years wftto^port hnn ® & 
election battle against President Ferdinand £ Ma*co& 


yi? , 

, lt l.u-fe 



twoUJS. 


Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev meeting' with dinner 
their aides Wednesday night for final discussions after a sofa is 


en by the president Leaning 'em the back of the 
* T. Regan, the White House chief of staff. 


Soviet Media Break a Taboo on Shewing Reagan 


; repeal of a const 
tondebydecrae. 

Duarte’s Daughter Recants Remarks 

. SAN SALVADOR (UPI) — late Guadalupe Duarte Dario, & 
daughter of Presufeht Jas£Napote6n Dnarte of r ~ 


the end of her 44 days in. captivity. 

In ^interview before her idem* on Oct 24, Mrs. .Duarte Dnrin had- . 
told Vectceremos, a rebel radio statical, that she. had formed a more ' ' 

But Mi^^SeDuriinSd^Wednesday that the guerrillas had gives - ; 
her “the -teds to read, sowhat I said would be favorable to them. 7 * In a& ' . 
interview on strne-nmtdevuucai.stesaid, “I cocidnotsay no at that tina - J 
because I knew I was only^a few boon away frombemg freed andifi 
refused I might not be xefeased.” 


VATICAN CL l V (UPI) —PppeJolmPad H told an international 

should not bc ccmsidered a 
He addressed about 120 


I . j*'**- 

‘flip. 

- ✓*:? rf: 

. i 
.... Zufar 




ru* bM' 




fa mass 
IteJSm '' 





: *u rdatf 




Ratters 

MOSCOW — Soviet television 
showed President Ronald Reagan 
live Thursday for what Western 
diplomats and Moscow residents 
believed was the first time. 

The television's main channel 
broke into its scheduled program to 
show the dosing ceremony of the 
Geneva summit meeting between 
Mr. Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. 

They were seen chatting together 
and then delivering statements 
about their talks . A simultaneous 
translation of Mr. Reagan's state- 
ment into Russian left Ins words in 
English dearly audible. 

■ Soviet Coverage of Reagan 

Earlier, Philip Taubmtm of The 


New York Times reported from 
Moscow: 

Mr. Reagan, normally vilified by 
the Soviet press, has been shown 
this week, wniltTig , lan ghrng and 
apparently enjoying the company 
ot Mr. Gorbachev. 

The main daily newspapers pub- 
lished Wednesday a huge front- 
page picture of Mr. Gorbachev and 
Mr. Reagan chatting amicably in 
the glow of a fire in the pod house 
of the Chfiteau Fleur d*Eau, where 
the two leaders held their first 
meetings Tuesday. It was the first 
front-page picture of a U.S. presi- 
dent that the Russians have seen in 
years. 

“It's got to be jarring to Rus- 
sians,** a diplomat said, “accus- 
tomed to all the anti- American pro- 
paganda, to suddenly see Ronald 


Reagan in their living rooms smil- 
ing pleasantly and talking easily 
with Gorbachev.” 

Since Mr. Gorbachev’s arrival in 
Geneva on Monday, Soviet media 
have devoted extensive, although 
carefully selected, coverage to the 
events. 

The coverage has not kept the 
press from being critical of UJ5. 
policies. Television showed an in- 
terview with West German legisla- 
tors who condemned the space- 
based missile defense program, the 
Strategic Defense Initiative. 

On Tuesday, the television news 
showed Mr. Reagan greeting Mr. 
Gorbachev and bantering about 
the fact that Mr. Reagan was not 
wearing an overcoat in the chilly 
weather. 


The dispatches in newspapers 
did not convey the same positive 
tone as the photographs or the tele- 
vision coverage. 

Pravda and Izvestia primed the 
same dispatch by Tass, the govern- 
ment press agency, under the head- 
line, “Gorbachev's Talks With 
Reagan.” The dispatch named the 
American and Soviet representa- 
tives attending the fonnal sessions. 

The papers also published on 
their front pages a Tass dispatch 
about the meeting between Mr. 
Gorbachev and the Reverend Jesse 
L. Jackson, the American civil 
rights activist The dispatch Ad not 
mention Mr. Jackson’s comment 
that “there is great anxiety among 
the American people about the 
plight of Soviet Jews.” 


three-d^ 

meeting to discuss the Vatican’s 1986 budget and the reorg anizati on of 
TbfcCfifift£the body of congregations' arid offices tinoagh whkh the pope 
rates the Roman Catholic ChnfthL John Hod said die meeting wtxud ■ 
serve as mi “an authoritative introd&ctionrto especial wnod crfbishopj ' 
that begins Sunday. The bi^ops aze j^ renew the effects of reforms 
. enacted by the Second Vstic^eSEoL winch concluded its wok IQ 
years ago- - 

John Panl said he welcomed ctiveuaty within the church, but en^ha- ' 
sized that die pope’s authority was supreme. He said he continually 
sought the advice erf the Curia so thafne conld correctly interpret the : 
views of his deputies. 


.Jm 

v 

■ 'Tfal & 




^ - 


ion 


->'y 


;>****; 
: - r 


Reagan Says Soviet h Resigned to SDI GimBatde 

In Beirut 
Traps Envoy 


(Continued from Page 1) 
visit each other in Washington and 
Moscow to continue the talks . 

"That promise is a very good 
thing. As long as the discussion 
continues, peace will continue and 
we might see further progress.” 

■ Congress Tempers Approval 
The decision of Mr. Reagan and 
Mr. Gorbachev to hold future sum- 
mit meetings won praise Thursday 
on Capitol Hill. But legislators said 
they were disappointed at the ap- 
parent lack of progress in Geneva 
toward limiting nuclear arsenals. 
Senator Richard G. Lugar, the 


•SDI 


2nd Annual Conforonco 
Sponsored by American Society 
of Mechanical Engineer* 
with the cooperation of the 
U.5. D.OJ3., SDI Org.,‘ 
Wash., D.C .... Dec 9-10 — $430. 
(202) 682-1549 or ide* 

Mr. Renfro, 89-242Z 



UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 

SACHfiOR’S • MASTBTS • DOCTORATE 

Far Work. Academic, I Mm Experience. 

Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 

PACIFIC WE5TEXN UFflVHtSHY 

600 N. Sepulveda BIvtL, 

Los Angeles. California 
90049, Dept. 23, U.5JL 


Indiana Republican who is chair- 
man of the Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee, said he saw a pos- 
itive sign of change in the 
atmosphere of hostility between 
the world's two superpowers. 

House Speaker Thomas P. 
O’Neill Jr., a Democrat of Massa- 
chusetts, said he was "more than 
delighted” that the two leaders had 
promised to meet again m the fu- 
ture. 

“As long as we’re sitting around 
the table, there is a possibility we 
can strike a point of agreement," 
Mr. O’Neill said- The mere fact 
that discussions were held, he said, 
indicated an “agreement that there 
is not going to be a war." 

Representative William B. Rich- 
ardson, a Democrat at New Mexi- 
.go, termed the meetings “a success, 
but not a great success; a hit, but 
not a home run.” 

Representative Edward J. Mar- 
key, a Democrat of Massachusetts, 
told the House of Rqpresentatives: 
“Overall, the world must regard the 
summit with polite applause; but 
not a standing ovation." 

Senator Patrick J. Leahy, a Dem- 
ocrat of Vermont and co-chairman 
of the Senate Select Committee on 
Intelligence, said the agreement for 
more summit meetin gs is a good 
one. 

Mr. Leahy said that if progress 
was made on arms control at the 
meetings but not announced pub- 
licly, it would be reflected in the 
actions of the U.S. and Soviet dele- 
gations at the next round of arms 
control talks. 

“If it continues to move at the 
pace erf dinosaur mutation," Mr. 
Leahy said, “as it has in the past, 
then the summit did not accom- 



JSwwp* JSwtyptk !&a n ® 

Est. 1911 

Just tell the taxi driver "sank roo doe noo” 

• 5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

• Falkenrunn Str. 9, MUNICH 



VALMONT 

WORLD RENOWNED MEDICAL CLINIC 

Glion-sur-Montreux, Lake Geneva, Switzerland 

Located at 2,000 feet altitude in a moderate and protect e d climate, the 
clinic has the finest accommodations available for your comfort. In o 
beautiful and calm setting overlooking the Lake of Geneva and the Mont- 
Blanc eholn the CLINIC VALMONT provides complete medical check-ups, 
outstanding medical care as well as rest, IntSviduat (fiet and rejuvenation. 
Centers are provided for cardiology, physiotherapy, electrotherapy, 
hydrotherapy, electrocardiogram, X-ray and laboratory analysis. 
Rooms with air conditioning. 

Please atk for our brochure and prices. 

Writs to Mr. H. Tuer - D i r e ctor 
OINK VALMONT, 1823 GUan-Mir-Monl>wx, Switzwknd 
Totophom: 021/63 48 51 (TO ngnas) -Tala» 453 1S7va!mt-ch 


phsh anything on arms control and. 
that would be a disappointment.” 

Jim Wright, Democrat of Texas 
and the House majority leader, said 
he was encouraged by “the fact that 
each apparently listened long 
enough to hear what the other was 
saying.” 

Representative Barbara A. Mj- 
knlski, a Maryland Democrat, said 
she was encouraged at the signs of 
“personal rapport” between Mr. 
Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev and 
said it reduced dangerous tension. 

But she added she felt “great 
disappointment” that Mr. Gorba- 
chev “absolutely denied that hu- 
man rights was a legitimate pan of 
the agenda." 

Paul C Warnke, a chief negotia- 
tor of the SALT-2 treaty signed 
during the Carter administration, 
said, the “indications” were that 
“the basic impasse still exists.” 

"I think that impasse comes 
about because of the president’s 
conviction that the strategy of the 
future has to be a strategic de- 
fense,” he added. 

Pursuit of the Strategic Defense 
Initiative is “a reckless gamble with 
the security of the United States 
and the world,” Mr. Warnke said. 

Iran Lets Soviet 
Examine U.S. Jets, 
Magazine Reports 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Jane's Defense 
Weekly has reported that Iran al- 
lows the Soviet Union to examine 
U.S.-made military planes as part 
of cooperation in military matters 
between the two countries. 

Yossef Bodansky, identified by 
Jane's as an American consultant 
to the U.S. Defense and State de- 
partments, wrote in the issue of the 
magazine published Tuesday that 
the Soviet- Iranian cooperation "Is 
one of the least known and most 
significant aspects of the balance of 
forces in the Middle East.” 

Moscow has a treaty of friend- 
ship with Iraq, which is engaged in 
a war with Iran, and supplies weap- 
ons directly to Baghdad. But the 
Soviet Union supplies tanks, mili- 
tary aircraft and other armaments 
to Iran through North Korea, Lib- 
ya and Syria, Mi. Bodansky wrote. 

Iran has given the Soviet Union 
access to U.S. weaponry supplied 
during the days of Shah Moham- 
med Reza Pahlavi, Mr. Bodansky 
wrote. F-14 Tomcats and F-4 
Phantoms have been flown to the 
Soviet Union for tests, and Soviet 
technicians have examined former 
CIA monitoring stations in north- 
ern Iran, he wrote. 


Irish Parliament Accepts 
Pact With U.K. on Ulster 


The Assodaud Press 

BEIRUT — Terry Waite, 


the 


special envoy of the archbishop of 
Canterbury who is seeking to free 
UjS. hostages abducted in Leba- 
non, was trapped Thursday in a 
Beirut office building as Dnize and 
Suite Moslem gunmen battled in 
the streets. 

The police said that at least two 
persons had been killed and 18 
wounded in die fighting, which be- 
gan Wednesday night. 

Mr. Waite remained in the Asso- 
ciated Press bureau in West Beirut 
as gunmen crouched on street cor- 
ners and fired automatic weapons 
and rocket-propelled grenades, 
chipping the walls and shredding 
curtains inside the office. 

The fighting forced him to delay 
a news conference he had sched- 
uled in the Commodore Hotel 
across the street. 

While he waited for the gunfire 
to subside, Mr. Waite took a show- 
er. He joked with reporters, saying, 
“If you can’t do anything else, you 
might as well make use of the 
time." 

• As he put on clean dotbes, a 
British television crew in the hotel 
across the street conducted an un- 
usual interview. 

“What do you plan to do now?" 
a reporter yelled from his window. 

“Take cover,” Mr. Waite yelled 
back. “This seems to be normal life 
in Beirut." 

The latest fighting was triggered 
Wednesday night when Druze mili- 
tiamen cried to tear down a Leba- 
nese flag from a government bond- 
ing. 

Shine troops of the Lebanese 
Army’s 6th Brigade moved against 
the Druze, their supposed allies in 
the civil war against the Christians. 
They were jomed by members of 
the Shiite Amal militia 

Druze and Shiite mili tia com- 
manders had met in the afternoon 
to call a trace, but the cease-fire 
collapsed an hour later and fighting 
spread to the mm commercial dis- 
trict of Hamra. 

The Dntze and Shiite militias are 
allied in a dvfl war against Leba- 
nese Christians, but they frequently 
have fought each other for control, 
of mostly Moslem West Beirut. 

The hostilities Thursday fol- 
lowed a two-hour bailie late 
Wednesday between Druze and 
Shiite troops around the state- 
owned television station in West 
Beirut. 


The Associated Press 

DUBLIN — The Irish parlia- 
ment approved on Thursday the 
British- Irish accord giving the Irish 
Republic a formal consultative role 
in running the troubled British 
province of Northern Ireland. 

The vote was 88-75, about equal 
to the margin predicted by aides of 
Prime Minister Garret FitzGerald. 

Foreign Minister Peter Barry, 
summing up the three-day debate, 
rejected the opposition. Fianna 
Fail’s criticism that the accord di- 
luted the Irish Constitution's claim 
to sovereignty over the entire . is- 
land, and he appealed to Protestant 
politicians in Northern Ireland to 
accept that Dublin “has no desire 
whatever to undermine their rights 
or their position.” 

“Tins agreement is not a take- 
over by Dublin,” he said. 

■ UJS. Aid Expected 

Earlier John M. Goshko of The 
Washington Post reported: 

The United States is expected to 
help bolster the agreement on 
Northern Ireland with an aid pro- 
gram that some U.S. congressional 
sources said could range in value 
from S250 million to SI bflhon. 

State Department officials and 
other congressional sources, noting 
that discussions between the Rea- 
gan adminis tration and Congress 
on such aid were just beginning, 
cautioned Tuesday that it was too 
early to make realistic predictions 
about its size and scope. 

But these sources agreed that 
there a ppeared to be a broad con- 
sensus that the United States 
should help to ensure successful 
implementation of the agreement 

The accord would give Dublin 
an official voice in governing 
Northern Ireland, which remained 
under British rule after the nation's 
partitioning 64 years ago. 

The aim is to end the latest, 16- 
year period erf political and sectari- 
an violence in the North by provid- 
ing better protection for Catholic 
rights and interests. 

The sources said the administra- 
tion and Congress seemed certain 
to agree by spring on aid aimed at 
stimulating Northern Ireland’s 


MOSCOW (AP) — -Three Soviet^ 
cosmonauts returned Thursday- to 
Earth after Soviet space officials 
aborted the mission when ibfcoifr 
mandeir tell 31 and needed hospital-' 
nation, Tass reported.-, ; 

The news agency said that the 
mission c omm ander? Vladimir Va- 
syiitin, had been fDCmd tp.be in 
s ati s f a c tory condition by: doctors 
who examined him at the ate of the 
SqyuzT-14 capsute's descegtfin the 
central Asian Republic of Kazakh- 
stan. Mr. Vasyutmwaslaterhospi- 
- taKzed, Tass reported^ aHhraigh it 
gave no mdkatitm trf the nature of 
the Alness. 

■ It was the first time the Spyiet. 

Union was known, to have entihort . 
a space mission becanse ^ healih 
problems among crfeWinedJbras. -' \ v *3- Vladimir Vasyutin 





.•Vj: - 


' -V 

-3£ 

r -Trfi 


Contra fin . 


assistance and incentives for UJS. 
companies to invest there. 

But first, they noted, the^ British ' *■" . -y^H, -«v •, *-• 

and Irish governments must devise 0 'tt w • • cs- % 

» plan tor cqmtabic dBmbotion some U.S. Diplomats Leaving Sudan - 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) ^-TheUmted States said Thursday that n - „ 
had started withdrawing scarie of its dqrfomats from Khartoum afta ’ZZ 
wanting Americans to stay out of the Sudanese capital because of the . . . 
presence of “known tmonsts^. I - . 

A State Department sprrfqesmaa^ Charies Redman, declined to say ho?r ._ 


and effective use of U.S. aid. 

Some sources, pointing to the 
voting strength of the Irish-Ameri- 
can community and its support of 
the Catholic nationalists in North- 

inclined to push formore ailfthan 
President Ronald Reagan deemed 
prudent. 

In baiting the agreement Friday, 




security reasbos. Be saul thattoe Sudanese authorities have evidence U 
icTISL aPegarioDs. \ 

announcing the wanting to A meric ans to stay away froo 



statement appeared to em phasi/g ' 
private investment, while other ex- 
pressions of support from key 
members of Congress spoke more 
explicitly of “financial and eco- 
nomic support.” 

Thesources said prdiminaiy talk 
on Capitol HDl has included dis- 
cussion of programs involving SI 
hilfion- But they acknowledged 
that Congress and the administra- 
tion were unlikely to agree on such 
sums. 


Storm Forces Evacuation in Florida 5’; ^ 

PENSACOLA, Florida (AP) r — With more than 87,000 readouts 0' : ' 
Florida’s. Pa n handle evacuated, the hnniama designated Kate headed c: -■ 
steadily northward through the Guff ofMcrico toward a landfall expect : . T~ 
ed Thursday evening. . i.- s .1, 

The storm, which caused , up to 10 in Cuba on Tuesday an-'i \ d 
blacked out wide areas of the 100-urite (I62-k3ometer) t* a in of tb-.-.-V • 
Florida Keys, would be the first Atlantic hurricane to reach land i'i , . • - 
November since 1935. 


an 

price 

proximate the lower range OF S250 
milli on or less. 

■ Man Stem in Londonderry 

Two Irish Republican Army 
guerrillas shot and killed Kurt 
Konig, 40, a West German-bom 
businessman outside his home in 
Lxmdonderry on Thursday, the po- 
lice said, according to The Associ- 
ated Press. The IRA accused the 
victim of woridng for the police, 
but police denied the allegation. 


For the Record 

Lech Walesa, leader of the bemed 

to appear before a prosecutor in Gdansk on Thursday to answer dtanj .,7 ' r 
mat he slandered the electoral authorities by giving false figures k" * 
Western reporters during voting Oct 13. (Reuter 

Fbur &mmkm bare recefml long jail terms after tribunals fc 

^ casc - m trial in New Ddhi < 

wah tbemurder of Prime Mimst v, 

Indira Gandhi, who was sherf JLrit year by her own gnards. (Sr !r V . 



PLD Again Rejects W Peace Resolutions 


■ 


Reuters 

' BAGHDAD — Leaders of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
have reaffirmed their raection of 
two United Nations resolutions on 


East 


d Middle East peace that assertlsra- 

economy thfr aigh direct financial n^it to erisL 

A PL0 spokesman said Wednes- 



Reutm 

CAIRO — Egyptian and Israeli 
officials mil reopen talks in Cairo 
on Dec. 3 on a long-standing dis- 
pute over the Red Sea enclave of 
Taba, the Egyptian foreign minis- 
ter, Esmat Abdel Megnid, said 
Thursday. 


day the organization agreed to 
stand fins on rejection of Security 
Council Resolutions 242 and 338 
after long meetings of the FLO ex- 
ecutive committee and the central 
committee of el-Fatah, the . main- 
stream organization ted by thePLO 
chairman, Yasser Arafat 

• Political oteerveraheresrid 
saw the renewed rqecticn as.a 


setback for ' Middle 
prospects. 

the resolutions 
they do not assert a Pales tinian 

right to srif-detWniiatkm, miring 
only for a 'Tun settlement of the 
refugee problem.” 

White stipulating Israel's with- 
drawal from territory it occupied 
be g in n i n g in 1967, the UN resolu- 
tions call for recognition of the sov- 
ereignty erf all nations in the area. 

fg main ally,' the XJmted 
States, .has made PLO accejrtam* 
of the two documents a precondi- 
tion for tasting to the Palestinian 


peace peace faltered last mouth after - 


• - 
*Cr... 



cruise liner A chiHe Laoro. : 

Arab diplomatic sources said b*^' ' '-V .. 
fore the meeting that King Husse^.^^ - : = *■ fruijH . 
of Jradan had pressed Mr. Aral 7'. 7 ' ' • - 

to lobby for anew PLO mjproa v. "■ br - 

to peace if Mr. Arafat wanted . 

continue his partnerrim with \j- 7 ■ * : "tc .5 ^-4 
dan in resolvmg the Palestinian : ? 

sue. Jordan accepts the UN resol 7 ‘ 
ttons. • 



Marriott Hotels in the MiddleEast 


AMMAN ■ CAIRO ■ JEDDAH • KUWAIT • 

For reservations: Amsterdam® (20) 435112- Frankfurt 8 ® 3 (0691 28 74 92 • London (01) 439 0281 • Milan® (2) 345 2009 • Munich® (89) 18 30 93 • Paris® 302 0979 rdteflimemational or )^ur Travel' Agent 















ORLD 




■ ; nr. ^ 

I> audurrH 


abd »«ihtA<i 


V:* 

■ '""Sfj 


'^unaUcl^Hj. 


: : r- 4cr - ■' , «v Be ^ 

- ‘ -" ”• . 


--■■ B-vaSL^ 

: ; 

‘ " ■ w ^«aad # ij'; 

. ; ■ !a - «s«fc # - 
• - 1 - »-<uk 5 c.-ht—l • 


Uh> 


paoeMhfa 


r: 


. .t 

J* 

t:3S 


% Eudimir Van 


*v I Ijeaving$ 

.rJTc 

- • • - t:u- ‘hct 

■ •. -’.wariiSs 

, ■■ v-ry.rsz: 

” ’ . ncsEff 


I ,■ ••■ |* J 

"tvcs^ss 1 -;' 


' ■" , ! l-i. - *| 

; _ _-.il" 

. - ■; :~X~- w 


h.r-. - 1 ^K-uationm^ 

* * 


j ■- — 






MV.»r8^ 




-: 7 -;:.y*> 

J " .{i •■ 
" .-• f 



U.S. House 
Approves 
Change for 
Joint Chiefs 


• By Richard Halloran . 

New York Timer- Swlee ■ 

WASHINGTON — -The House 
of Representatives has voted over- 
whelmingly, over the olgectians of 
the Reagan administration, to 
strengthen the authority of the' 
chairman of the Joint Ghids of 
Staff by gyving him greater gres* 
to the president and supervision of 
field commanders.. 

The bill, which was. passed by a 
•vote of 383-27, would make the- 
most far-reaching legal change in 
the organization of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff in more than 25 years. It 
now goes to the. Senate, where the 
Armed Services Committee is 
working on its own plan to reorga- 
oize the Joint Chiefs. . 

Both efforts reflect concern that - 
U.S. military, forces- lade the unity 
that, was mtended.wben the De- 
fense Department was eatatiHdwd 
in 1947 and instead have become 
fief dotns caught up in aiierce com- 
petition for missions and funding. 

The Joint Chiefs is currently 
made of a chairman, the chief of 
staff of the army, the chief of naval 
operations, the chief ctf staff of the 
air force and the commandant at 
the marine corps. The chairman is 
appointed by the president. . 

The bin approved by the House 

would make the chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs, rather than, all five 
members of the Joint Chiefs as a 
group, the principal mflitay advis- 
er to the president and the secretary 
of defease. Other members of the 
group would have the right to enter 
dissenting views with thriprerident 
or the secretary. ■ 

The bill would further authorize 
the president or the secretary of 
defense, the first and second in the 
chain of command, to place the' 

chairman as No. 3 and g^ve Mm the 
authority to supervise the' com- 
manders of combat forces in the 
field. That would make fo rmal 
what is an informal arrangement 
now. 1 ...... 

The legislation also provides for 
a deputy chairman of die Joint 
Chiefs who would be another four- 
star officer hut would crime from a 
service different from that of the 
chairman. ■ 

■ The bin would require the chair- 
man to submit recommendations 
on the annual mflftai y •‘b udge t to 
the secretary of defense, currently 
the province of die service chiefs erf 
staff - and the secretaries of the 
army, navy and air force: 

. . The intent of that proviaon 
would be to bring a wider, las 
parochial vjew tb budget derisions . 
and to reduce the dnpKcatiori of 
weapons and equipment that runs 
up military costs every year. 

Secretary of Defense Caspar W. 
Weinberger, who has testified sev- 
eral times on .questions , of reorga- 
nizing the Pentagon, has opposed 
changes on the ground that the pre- 
sent system is working sarisfactori- 
ly. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


or Supersonic Jet to Orient 


By Douglas B. Beaver 

Washington fort Servlet 

. WASHINGTON — The new Orient Express will be an 
airplane that can speed from the United Stales to the Far 
Fast in little more than an hour, U£. officials say. All that 
' is needed to make h happen is a political consensus to 
support the expenditure of a few o3H<m tax dollars for 
research. 

Dr. George A. Keyword* 2d, the White House science 
adviser, and officials from the DefenScDepartmeut ami 
the. National Aeronautics and Space Admmistr afi on are 
poshing to build that consensus. 

They carried ihdr message of redmokwcaJ possibility 
to a . meeting Wednesday of the Aviation Forum, an 
informal group of members ctf Congress. 

Recent developments in engine technology, light mate- 
rials, and computer controls have created tie option 
where “we’re an the -verge of technological revolutions, 

not evobriona," Mr. Kcywwtb said. 

He said research has made it possible to foresee an 
airplane that “can, take off- from a standard airport run- 
way. It can cruise at very high speeds — in the neighbor- 


hood of Mach 10 or about 7,410 mph (12,000 kilometers 
perheur), 10 rimes the rood of sound, or even m«e — at 
altitudes well above 100,000 feet. It can also climb into 
low Earth orbit.” 

He continued; “That means we're talking about an 
aircraft that can not only make posable virtually one-hour 
travel between here and the Far East, but one that can 
become a relatively inexpensive, flexible means for access 
to space.” 

Passenger fazes similar to those on a Boeing 747 today 
are conceivable, be added. 

The fastest growing commensal aviation market is 
across the Pacific, but flights from the United States to 
Tokyo and beyond now take 13 hours or more. 

This research effort, known as the Orient Express, is 
name d after the famous European pawng w train that ran 
from Paris to Istanbul. A restored version now is in 
sovice, 

A three-year, 5 50Q- milli on research program on the 
aircraft, starting next January, was outlined by Mr. 
Keywords; Dr. James A. Tegodia, deputy director of the 


Defense Department's Advanced Research Projects 
Agency, and Dr. Raymond S. CoUaday. associate admin- 
istrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Adminis- 
tration. 

If prospects look good after that, they would then want 
10 bold an experimental aircraft for S2 billion to S3 billion 
and have it flying by the early 1 990s. The Defense Depart- 
ment would pay 80 percent of the cost, and the space 
agency 20 percent. 

Mr. Keyworth said that “ihe president has not yet been 
briefed,” but added that there is “zero doubt in my mind 
there will no negative votes.” He expressed optimism that 
there wfll be “overwhelming public support.” 

The dream of an economically feasible high-speed 
transport that could drastically cat travel time over vast 
has long been shared by military planners and 
commercial airlines. 

Of the U.S. manufacturers. McDonnell Douglas Corp. 
has been most active in research on “hypersonic” aircraft. 
buL all major airframe and engine manufacturers have 
followed the developments closely. 


LEROY 


J&. 

by B*UME 1 ME0CSH 






Panel Urges 


r 


Spying in L .S. 

By Stephen Eogdberg 

New York Timer Service 

WASHINGTON — -A Pentagon 
commissi cm studying ways to deter 



L 

L ' 


abroad-array of securityrmeasures, 
including a significant^ expanded 
p rogr a m of random polygraph, or 
lie-detector, tests for mflitaxy per- 
sonnel and dyfljau contractors. 

The commission's r ep ort also 
calls for a program of financial re- 
wards for informers who torn in 
spies. It recommends substantial 
reductions in the storage of un- 
needed classified material, more 
limited use of secret dmnfiftninm 
and reductions in the number of 
people who have access to classi- 
fied material. 

Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger is to decide which rec- 
ommendations to adopt; some 

wpnld arrinn 

The commission was set up in 
July, after the arrest of John A. 
Wajker Jr., a retired navy chief 
warrant officer, on espionage 
charges. Mr: Walker and his son, 
Michael Walker,' pl eade d 

guilty last month to spying for the 
Soviet Union, The elder Walker’s 
brother, Arthur J. Walker, was con- 
victed of egrionage in August. ’ 

The report proposes stiff er pen- 
alties for defense contractors who 
violate security rules and calls for 
spot checks of mflitaxy personnel 
and ci vilian defense employees and 
their briefcases or satchels. It also 
would require some active-duty 
personnel to report all foreign trav- 
el and would forbid military per- 
sonnel and contractors to work 
with sensitive information in a 
room by themselves. 

A commission member said the 
group had urged Mr. Weinberger 
to order a complete review of secu- 
rity procedures by all mflitaty com- 
mands to assess whether they were 
following existing rules. 

Pentagon officials acknowledge 
that the problems addressed in the 


11» WaKn^on ft* 

A polygraph machine, or Ge detector, in use. 


commission's 63 recommendations 
have proved difficult to solve. They 
said some of the group’s proposals, 
such as reduction of the amount of 
dagrffwt information, had been 
tried unsuccessfully by previous 
administrations. But the officials 
believe the recent espionage cases 
have spurred new support far bet- 
ter security in Congress and in the 
miHtar y’s commands. 

“We’re redoubling our efforts," a 
Pentagon official said, referring to 
the push for tighter security 
brought on by the Walker case and 
other recent espionage cases. 

“This c ommissi on was carefully 
picked to include the people who 
will have to follow it up," the offi- 
cial said. “I wouldn't write this off 
as just another commission.” 

The panel, beaded by a retired 
army general, Richard G. Stilwell. 
included repre se ntatives from each 
of the Pentagon agencies covered” 
by its recommendations. 

The proposal for expanded use 
of the polygraph is likely to en- 
counter opposition on Capitol Hill, 
where critics have said that such 
examinations are unreliable and 
arc ofim used as a substitute for 
more time-consuming methods of 
investigation. 


The validity of polygraph tests is 
hotly disputed, with experts’ esti- 
mates of their accuracy r anging 
from 50 percent to 99 percent 

Congress has permitted the De- 
fense Department to establish a 
program over the next three years 
Under Which it would a dminis ter 
14,000 polygraph tests to certain 
officials with access to materials 
classified as “top secret” or higher. 

The commission member said the 
panel had urged that this program 
be expanded to include random 
polygraph tests for people who are 
permitted to see material classified 
only as “secret" 

Under the proposal, even such 
relatively low-ranking military per- 
sonnel as the Walkers might be 
subjected to random polygraph 
tests. 

' About 3.8 mini on people have 
access to classified information. 
About 2.6 million of them are mili- 
tary personnel or employees of the 
Defense Department and 12 mil- 
lion are employees of civilian con- 
tractors. 

The report calls for suffer penal- 
ties for contractors whose security 
procedures are found to be lax. 


Judge Finds N.Y. Suburb Maintained Bias in Schools 


By Howard Kurtz ■ 

Washington Peat Service ' 

WASHINGTON — A U.S. dis- 
trict judge in NewYorichasfound 
that city officials in Yonkers, New 
York, maintained a segregated 
school system far-more than three 
decades by refusing to build low- 
income housing <m the exclusive 
eastern ride of town. 

In a 600-page decision released 
Wednesday. Judge Leonard B. 
Sand said there was a causal rela- 
tionship between segregated neigh- 
borhoods and segregated sc hools 
He said that Yonkers officials are 
liable for the perpetuation of most- 
ly while and mostly black, schools . 
because they deliberately relegated 
all subsidized housing projects to 


the minority neighborhoods on the 


city’s west ride 
Judge Sand a 


Judge Sand also found that city 
and school officials had redrawn 
school boundaries, dosed schools, 
reassigned teachers on the basis of 
race and steered minority students 
into certain programs in a deliber- 
ate effort to maintain segregated 
schools. 

He scheduled bearings for next 
month to consider what remedies 
should be imposed on the New 
York Qty suburb of 200,000 peo- 
ple. 

“The ™wm 1 thing about this 
case.” said. Sarah Vanderwkken. a 
Justice Department attorney, “is 
we alleged that the city's boosing 
discrimination was a cause of 
school segregation, and the judge 


agreed whh us.” The dty had con- 
tended that the segregation result- 
ed from people moving. where they 
wanted. 

Cvil rights lawyers said the rul- 
ing would provide a potent legal 
weapon for private plaintiffs to 
challenge patterns of housing and 
school segregation in other cities, 
but that they do not expect the 
Reagan administration to bring 
such cases. 

The Justice Department, which 
sued Yonkers in the final days of 
the Carter administration, briefly 
considered dropping the case after 
President Ronald Reagan took of- 
fice, but pressed ahead with the 
National Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People as a 
joint plaintiff. . 


John Zairian, a spokesman for 
Mayor Angelo Martindli of Yon- 
kers, said the ruling was “no sur- 
prise" and that the dty hopes to 
settle the case in the coming weeks. 
He said that Mr. Martindli was re- 
elected this month after arguing 
that “we are going to have to put 
low-income housing in east Yon- 
kers," but that the mayor's at- 
tempts to settle the suit have been 
blocked by the dty council. 

Arthur J. Doran, the dty attor- 
ney, said it would be difficult for 
the dty, which is finandally 
strapped, to pursue an appeal. 
“Having spent 58 million to prove 
you were correct,” be said, “and 
finding out the court disagrees with 
you, is a disappointment.” 


Leif Stenberg, Recipient of Artificial Heart, Dies 


The Axsedated Press • 

STOCKHOLM — Leif. Sten- 
berg. 53, a Swedish businessman 
who was the fixstppsan outride the 
United States to receive a perma- 
nent artificial heart, died Thursday, 
doctors announced.-.- •• 

Mr. Stenberg had suffered at 
least one stroke since an American 
Jarvik-7 plastic and metal heart 
was implanted April 7 at Karo- 
linska Hospital in Stockbobn.- 

He was the world’s fourth redpi- 
ent of a permanent artificial heart 
and lived 229 days with the Jarvik- 
7- 

Before suffering a stroke in eariy 
September, Mr. Stenberg appeared 
to be making the fastest recovery of 
any of the recipients. 

“Stenberg suffered a stroke sane 
time ago” said Dr.' Bjame Semb, 


cular problems,” the doctor said, 
“and died at one o'clock Thursday 
morning.” 

Mr. Stenberg said that his new 
heart had taught him new thing s 
about life. “I have found out that 
quality of fife has a new dimension, 
that indeed the best tilings in life 
are free,” he said at the time. 

The first recipient of a perma- 
nent artificial heart was Dr. Barney 
B. Claik, who lived .112 days. At 
least eight other persons have had 
heart implantations. Three are 
dead . 


■ Other Deaths: 

Jarma Lewis, 54. an actress who 
appeared in many films including 
“Raintree County” and “The 
Tender Trap,” suddenly in Beverly 
Hills, California, on Nov. 12. 

Ronald J. Taggiasco, 52, the 
Rome bureau manager ctf Business 
Week magazine since 1978, Mon- 
day in Rome after a heart attack. 

Franco Mattel, 66,a leading fig- 


ure in Italian industry and finance, 
in a Milan dinic Wednesday after a 
long illness. 

Michael M. Mooney, 55, an au- 
thor and editor of Harper’s maga- 
zine, of cancer on Monday at his 
home in Washington. 

Ben Upshy, 75. who built Zale 
Corp- into the world's biggest jew- 
elry retailer, after a heart attack 
Wednesday in Dallas. 


¥ 


OUR KIND OF 
CHALLENGE 


the Norwegian surgeon who- per- 
formed, the implantation. “After- 
ward he showed signs of improve- 
ment, but later his condition 
gradually worsened.” 

“Late Wednesday sight, he suf- 

fered increasing breathing and vas- 
DEATH NOTICE . 


ROGERS 

TOM ex Pepsi-Cola Inti. Cairo, 
passed over peacefully on Nov. A, 
1985 at his home in Hereford- 
shire, after a long Alness borne 
with extraoirimury courage and 

dereiminaiioiL 


Gstaad . 

By night 

happens at the 


PALACE HOTEL 
GSTAAD 
SWITZERLAND 

Plca^ccill: 

Phone- OJO/X 31 31 Telex *12121 
nr 

*lhf[sada£HotdsoriheWidd 


University education, Ameri- 
can style, in the heart of Paris. 
A choice of international and 

traditional disciplines. An 
American Bachelor of Arcs or 
Bachelor of Science degree 


that opens doors anywhere in 

the world. The first step to 
your kind of future: graduate 
school in the United Staten 
and/lira flying stun to an inter- 
national career. Think about it. 


• all classes in English • 

• now accepting applications for Spring Semester » 

plan also for Summer Session: June 23 - July 31 


for the adult cumm hwV] ; fu rt-tiutr dtgrrt — ■ _ ■■ . _ ■ 

tuann, A mrrhau letfftege r/jiio. btui- A j-j j 


Contact: Mrsj. Pfeiffer 
Director of Admissions 
The American College in Paris 
B.P. 112, JI A ve. Bi>*quet 
75O07 Parii, France 
Telephone: (l) -t 5.5 5.91. 75 


MM 

waEigjsraK ) 

I }»I 




PA 


Army Reportedly Put Off 
Probe of Elite U.S. Unit 


Lady’s watch, 
ulira-ihm, 

quanz. water-resistant . 

Mat black treated steel 
end gold plated. 

Tax-free for export 


By Charles R. Babcock 
and Caiyle Murphy 

Washmpon Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The atmy 
agreed to suspend an investigation 
list month into alleged finan cial 
irr egulari ties by its elite Delta force 
counterterrorist team after the 
team's commander complained 
that the probe could impede a pos- 
sible rescue attempt erf passengers 
aboard the hijacked cruise ship 
AchiUe Laur o. according to in- 
formed sources. 

The sources said the warning was 
delivered in the Pentagon by the 
force commander. Colonel W illiam 
Garrison, to General Max R Thur- 
man. the army's vice chief of staff, 
after investigators arrived at the 
group's headquarters at Fort 
Bragg, North Carolina, to question 
members cf the unit. 

The investigation includes alle- 
gations of more than 5200.000 in 
double billings by members of the 
unit, the First Special Forces Oper- 
ational Detachment — Delta (Air- 
borne). The inquiry was suspended 
until the Delta force returned from 
the Middle East, the sources said. 

One source said that Colonel 
Garrison told General Thurman 
that if his men were tied down at 
Fort Bragg by the financial inquiry, 
“be wouldn’t have the operators he 
needed” for a posable rescue at- 
tempt. 

There were reports at the time of 
the Achille Lauro hijacking that 
about 50 members of the Delta 
force landed in Sicily behind the 
U.S. Navy jets that intercepted an 
Egyptian plane carrying the pirates 
early on Oct 1 1. 

Prime Minister Bettino Craxi ctf 
Italy said a week later that U.S. 
soldiers in combat dress who “were 
part of the Delta forces” poured 
from a C-14I military transport 
plane and surrounded 50 Italian 
soldiers guarding the Egyptian 
plane. 

An army spokesman said 
Wednesday that General Thurman 
had no comment. 

Army sources said that Colonel 
Garrison had disciplined more 
than 80 of his men by giving them 
noujudidal punishments. Several 
other men were facing courts-mar- 
tial the army said. 


The financial inquiry has fo- 
cused on expenses incurred during 
the last three years, while members 
of the Delta force were assigned 
temporarily overseas to protect 
UB. ambassadors and were quar- 
tered by the State Department. 
More than go members of the unit 
allegedly submitted vouchers to the 
army for living expenses that had 
been paid by the State Department. 









UMAMlia 
w»04* i So*a u** rlP _ 


Canadian Club. 

Lighter than Scotch, smoother 
than Bourbon.' 

The smooth ond distinctive taste of 
Canadian Club is appreciated oil over 
the world. Enjoy Canadian Club, neat 
on the rocks or mi>ed to vour taste 



va/iadum meter since issb. 









fc- S0TT LED (N BOND I 

jfc. . naobuM, ud uatc smt » 




Vs. 










“Cosi fan tutte.” r 5 ?, iiS 

Those wanting to get a foothold in ^ 

new markets should best find themselves a 
middleman, a specialist in matters related to y^ ./ 0 ' \ 

export - in short, a partner who is familiar '"S/? 
with the markets. “Cosi fan tutte’' - they all yr if ^ 

do it (that is, those who are successful). | ir 

Why don’t you turn to us as well? Zf 

We have representative offices in /J? t&r / 

Milan, London and Tokyo. And now in v J 

Frankfurt as well. 

Come to us if you need support or information for your export 
projects. We’ll gladly help you in such matters as; 

• Finding potential business partners 

• Obtaining up-to-date economic and market data 

• Deciding on suitable locations for setting up enterprises 

• Solving organizational and legal problems 

Needless to say, we’ll be happy to assist you in financial matters 
as well. 


Count on us. Talk to us. 


Frankfurt am Main Representative Office; 
Stein weg 8 

D-6000 Frankfurt am Main 

Telephone (069) 28 10 86 


BANK of VIENNA 

ZENTRAL5RARKASSE 
UND KOMMERZIALBANK- WIEN 




- Kilim VAIker A Son, Limiled 




FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


I 


Just a Start in Guatemala 


In Guatemala there is a keen appreciation of 
the power ihe military retains behind the civil- 
ians it has allowed to run for office. In the 
ranks of the Reagan administration, however, 
there is a marked tendency to see the elections 
there not only as fair in procedure but also as 
important (“the final step") in restoring civil- 
ian rule after three decades of dictatorship and 
repression. The elections are also being por- 
trayed in Washington as proof of a swing to 
democracy that the United States has been 
effectively encouraging almost everywhere in 
Latin America and the Caribbean except in 
Nicaragua and, of course. Cuba. 

Something can be said for reinforcing any 
rum for the better in a country that has seen as 
much grief as Guatemala. The valor of politi- 
cians such as Vinicio Cerezo and Jorge Carpio. 
who ran first and second in the election's first 
round on Nov. 3 (the second is on Dec. S) and 
are not the military 1 * pets, is exemplary. But 
Guatemala is not just the richest and most 
strategically important country in Central 
America. It is also the most feudal 

The generals did make a certain “democrat- 
ic opening," at least in part to attract more 
international aid and respectability. But the 
tolerated parties cover only the center and 
right, in a popular spectrum that contains a 
oowerful left. Great issues — land reform in a 


Still Fleeing Indochina 


Refugees are still fleeing Indochina, but 
concern for them and the rate of their resettle- 
ment has fallen sharply. Governments respond 
best when a calamity makes headlines, as when 
500,000 boat people fled Vietnam in 1979. 
Permanent homes were found at the rate of 
about 25.000 a month. But 160,000 still live in 
temporary camps, and only about 5.000 a 
month are now bang resettled. 

The world needs a lobby for yesterday’s 
riciims. What makes it harder for the most 
ecent refugees from Indochina is that they are 
ess likely than their predecessors to have rev- 
ives elsewhere or the skills that host countries 


want. So they may languish for years in Hong 
Kong or Thailand — which cannot absorb 
them — as wards of the Office of the United 
Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. 

But the totals are not indigestible. Since 
1979 the United States has admitted 580,000 
Indochinese refugees; by any fair reckoning, it 
has done its share. France. Canada and Aus- 
tralia have each absorbed more than 90,000. 
Meanwhile. West Germany has taken 23,000, 
Britain 1 9,000 and Japan 4,000. A world lobby 
for the victims could do worse than to ask' 
these other countries to do better. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Disreputable Verdict 


It is the biggest corporate breach of promise 
niit on record. Pennzoil claimed that it had a 
rinding agreement to buy Getty OiL The Get- 
y directors had voted, there had been a hand- 
shake and a press release. The engagement, so 
o speak, had been announced. But marriage? 
[hat, as a certain type of novel puts it. was not 
o be. Texaco made an offer that the Getty 
lirectors decided they liked better, and they 
-old their company to Texaco. Pennzoil sued 
a a Texas court. On Tuesday the jury awarded 
t S 10.5 billion in actual and punitive damag es. 

This is an absurd verdict — the kind that is 
‘ringing the whole American tort system and 
ts wide-open verdicts into disrepute. It is also 
: killer verdict, intended to pul the defendant 
<ut of business. The amount is a good deal 
arger than the total value of all of Texaco’s 
tock and comes to three-quarters of the coro- 
iany's net worth. The jury held that the actual 
lamages suffered by Pennzoil were S7.5 bil- 
ion. How that figure can be justified is un- 
lear, since the total price for which Texaco 
wight Getty was S10.1 billion. No doubt 
Texaco can be accused of having alienated the 
iffections of PennzoiTs betrothed, but it is 


hard to see any very substantial commercial 
damages in the usual meaning of the term. 

Addressing a Houston jury, PennzoiTs law- 
yer emphasized heavily that his client is a 
Houston company, while Texaco's headquar- 
ters are, notoriously, in suburban New York. 
Heartrending stuff. The unsuspecting local 
boy proceeds happily toward the wedding 
when along comes Mr. Moneybags from the 
city and snatches the girl from the altar. 

No doubt the verdict will be reduced on 
appeal. No doubt a smaller figure — perhaps 
much smaller — will eventually be negotiated. 
You can safely leave the rescue of Texaco to its 
well paid and highly motivated lawyers. But 
this case readies interests far broader than 
those of these oil companies. 

Has not something gone seriously wrong in 
a legal system when it develops the custom of 
spilling out, at random intervals, this kind of 
jackpot award unrelated to any real damages? 
Does not the rising threat of this kind of 
verdict put a severe burden on business in 
general and consequently on consumers? The 
answers are. respectively, yes and yes. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


K Summit for Breaking the Ice Spain a Decade Alter Franco 


The summit of silence became the summit of 
ope. Geneva will not go down in history as 
he meeting of great themes and great solu- 
ions but as a summit of two men who stamped 
: with their personalities. Ronald Reagan and 
'likhaH Gorbachev spoke privately with one 
nether for more time than the two delegations 
peat at the negotiating table. Thai means that 
nis summit went very much according to the 
fishes of the American president. 

He is not a man Tor stiff negotiating dia- 
?gue. He is a master of the infonnaL He did 
oi go to Geneva to solve the world's problems 
ut to develop a personal relationship with 
4r. Gorbachev and create a basis on which 
ley could negotiate on those problems in the 
.iture. All the signs are that he was successful 
!e was able to be Ronald Reagan — that is, 
ot to be overgen erous with tangible results, 
iui more important are the invisible and un- 
ocumenied results: The world's two most 
ewerful men understand each other better. 

— Die Web [Bom). 


Ten years after his death, the Spanish have 
learned to live with General Franco. Some still 
mourn, while others rejoice in his passing. But 
history has taken over from hagiography, and 
the unemotional way in which most Spaniards 
view his tomb, amid his Civil War comrades 
and the souvenir stalls in his own Valley of the 
Fallen, is a tribute to the heating powers of 
time. It is also a tribute to the good sense of 
those who have followed him, particularly 
King Juan Carlos, whose feeling for constitu- 
tional monarchy has been remarkable. 

The real significance of EC entry must sure- 
ly be that it confirms the country’s rising status 
in the West The government has a referendum 
on its membership of NATO to complicate its 
progress in the spring — and still has the 
terrorist threat from ETA. But ETA looks 
increasingly isolated, and as for the referen- 
dum — it is generally thought that Prime 
Minister Felipe Gonz&lez win win the affirma- 
tive vote he now wants. 


— The Times [London). 


FROM OUR NOV. 22 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


910: 100 Slain in Mexican Carnage 
JEW YORK — A telegram from El Paso, 
exas, slates that 100 more people have been 
tiled during rioting which occurred [on Nov. 
9] at Zacapecas, capital of the province of 
-lorales, Mexico. Soldiers fired into a body of 
oters. The American Consul at Zacapecas 
ated that the town was in a state of terror and 
lat no fewer than 100 people had lost their 
ves. Later reports announced that quiet has 
een restored, but the dead are still lying in the 
j-eets where they fell. The rioting resembles 
te carnage at Puebla [on Nov. 20] and bears 
ut the threat uttered by President Porfirio 
haz last week to an American tourist agency, 
hich asked whether it was safe to bring tour- 
ts to Mexico. He said that the disturbers of 
Ierico’s peace, whom he characterized as An- 
chists, would meet with swift punishment. 


1935: Inventor Describes Heat Ray* 
MELBOURNE — A claim to have invented a 
heat ray by which aircraft could be destroyed 
is made by L.G. Anderson of Melbourne. He 
says that he has been advised by the U.S. Navy 
Department that his invention has lived up to 
its claims, and that he has been offered a post 
in the department's experimental laboratory at 
Lakehurat, New Jersey. Anderson says that die 
Americans are more interested in his invention 
as a basis for wireless control of aircraft than 
as a weapon. It is stated that with the ray glass 
tumblers had been reduced to powda - from a 
distance of ten to twelve feet, electric bulbs 
destroyed, motor-car ignition systems made to 
fail, and wireless sets made inoperative by 
directing the ray at the aerial Anderson adds 
that, besides destroying aircraft, the ray could 
be used to make electric power lines useless. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

PHILIP M. FOISIE Executive Editor RENE BONDY Deputy Publisher 

WALTER WELLS Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

SAMUEL ABT Deputy Editor RIC HARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

ROBERT K. McCABE Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director OpauDom 

CARL GEWIRTZ Asujcune Editor FRANCOIS DESMAIfflNS Director a Gradation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Advertising Sola 
International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charles-de-GauDe, 92200 NeuiOy-sur-Sdne, 

France. TeL: (1) 47.47.1165. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cobles Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8051 
Diredeur de la pubbeadm: Walter N. Thayer. 

Managing Dir. Asst Malcolm Qem, 24-34 Honesty Rd, Hong Kang Td 5-2856! & Tdex 6! 170. 

Managing Dir. UJC: Robin MadGchan. 63 Lang Am* London WCZ Td 836-1801 Telex 262009 Ts£S] 
Gen Mgr. W. Goman 1 : W. Laaerhadt, FrieAidstr. 15, 6000Frankfirt/M Td (060)726755. Tbc. 416721. 

SJL au capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Nanlare B 732021126. Commission Paritaire No. 61337. 

U.S. subscription : 5322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Lang Island City, N.Y. 1I1Q1, 

C 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved 


In Ulster 
A Summit 


landlords' country, income distribution in a 
land of impoverished peasants, the account- 
ability and methods of a military with a record 
of savagery — were ruled out of bounds. 

“For more than a hundred years we have 
suffered from regimes that have been at the 
service of feudal oligarchies but have utilized 
the language of freedom," Octavio Paz wrote 
in “The Labyrinth of Solitude." And “the 
situation has continued to our own day." 

How the United States ought to engage with 
a rough place tike Guatemala is a fair question. 
Staying at arm’s length, as Washington has 
done for most of the last 10 years, averted taint 
from Guatemalan abuses but left the generals 
free to conduct a brutal internal policy. It also 
stoked Guatemalan pride and produced a dis- 
inclination — distressing to the Reagan ad- 
ministration — to cooperate with the United 
States on isolating Nicaragua. 

Moving closer risks some of that taint, even 
in what everyone hopes are improved circum- 
stances- But it also offers a chance for the 
Reagan adminis tration Congress, the human 
rights people and others to advise, press and 
nag in their respective fashions. The adminis- 
tration is ready to give it a try, but it needs to 
show it is not just winking at a farce in order to 
enlist Guatemala on the anti-Sandinist team. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 




% 




By Mary McGrory 


W ashington — T he news of 

3 successful summit in Ul st e r 


- Mrs- inaicnc 

A S ummit ’s Success Depends on Follow-Through 


W ASHINGTON — By the time 
you read this, there will have 


By Philip Geyelin 


been final summi t statements and a 
torrent of inside insights from the 
instant historians. Yet not even the 
principals will be able to say with 
certainty what their Geneva exertions 
hold for the future of East-West rela- 
tions or the chances for a safer world. 

This is not a put-down of what may 
have been g«»nad Quite possibly, 
Ronald Reagan may have charted 
with Mikhail Gorbachev the ‘'new 
course" that was his professed objec- 


tive. But ambiguities in official pro- 
nouncements are only the least of the 


nouncements are only the least of the 
reasoos for waiting and seeing. Sum- 
mit history is tittered with subsequent 
misreadings of what was said or mis- 
calculations of what was meant — 
compounded by unexpected events. 

Dwight Eisenhower’s “Spirit of 

rncc 1.1 1 i 


Geneva” in 1955 was blown away by 
the end of the year. Nikita Khru- 
shchev saw nothing in it to inhibit an 
arms sale to Egypt and a road show 
crusade through the Third World on 
behalf of international co mmunism. 

Much has been made of Mr. Khru- 
shchev’s underes timatio n of John 
Kennedy in 1961. But a case can also 
be marie that the Berlin wall and the 
shipment of missiles to Cuba may 
have owed at least as much to Mr. 
Khrushchev’s own insecurity. 

Conventional wisdom has it that 
the Soviet invasion of A fghanistan 


killed U.S. Senate ratification of the 
SALT-2 treaty. But the trouble start- 
ed, old Carter hands insist, with a still 
inexplicable dap over the “discov- 
ery" of a "Soviet brigade" in Cuba in 
late 1979 — a brigade that the United 
States knew about (and that the Sovi- 
ets knew it knew about) because the 
unit had been there for at least 17 
years. The consequent uproar in the 
United States peraua«ra&e Carter 

Senate ratification^ SAlsF-2 until 
the following year — by which time 
Afghanistan had intervened. 

Thus does the effect of untoward 
events on internal politics have a way 
of forcing the hand of American ana 
Soviet leaders, whatever commit- 
moits they make or whatever inten- 
tions they convey to each other face- 
to-face. Hus is aQ the more the case 
when you consider the current condi- 
tion of the still unsettled Gorbachev 
regime and the old but ast onishing ly 
unsettled Reagan administration. 

General Secretary Gorbachev has 
surprised Kremlin-watchers by how 
swiftly he has moved to take charge. 
But his capacity to carry through 
with bold chang ps is still threatened 
by a well entrenched old guard. A 
stem test of his performance awaits 
him at a party congress in February. 

President Reagan is sky-high with 


American public opinion. You would 
suppose him to be strong enough to 
work his will in whatever way he 
thinks would best advance the “fresh 
start” he was seeking at Geneva. Yet 
it is hard to ignore the real message of 
the “leak” last weekend of Defense 
Secretary Caspar Weinberger's letter 
to his old friend, the president. 

The contents, as Secretary of State 
George Shultz noted, were unexcep- 
tional* as he put it, “Cap’s" reserva- 
tions on arms control were well and 
widely known. But an anonymous 
White House official saw it instantly 
as an effort to “sabotage the sum- 
mit.” So the leaking of the letter says 
something about the law level of dis- 
cipline ana the high-level of disloyal- 
ty in the Reagan government. 

And the writing of it (not to men- 
tion its circulation with no security 
classification to State, the CIA, the 
Arms Control Agency and within the 
Pentagon) says even more. Mr. Wein- 
berger might as well have posted it on 
the newsroom bulletin board. 

The lesson for post-summit U.S. 
policy-making is (fear. Well into the 
administration 1 s second term, the 
struggle for the heart and mind of 
Ronald Reagan rages on. This is in 
larae part because the president him- 
self is not given to resmving contra- 


was swamped in the flood of bl athe r 
from the other summit, in G«teva. 

That was too bad for several rea- 
sons. Frm. the two prime Hamsters, 
Margaret Thatcher and Garrett Fitz- 
Gerald, brought out of a castk at 
HIDd»rouglL near Belfast, an agree - 
men! promising modest but signifi- 
cant progress in a 60-year-oki prob- 
lem tbit has been a synonym for 
ytft jiwnare Second, HHkbor ougn on 
Nov. I5wasakintl of model summit, 
illustrating the virtues of preparation, 
discretion and a dear agenda. - , 

Eig hteen months of intense work- 
went into it: In addition to two ftdt 
summits between the principals there , 
were fotir informal m e e tin g s Euro- 
pean Community, six ministerial 
meetings and 35 at lower fcvds. For a 
fun year the New Ireland Forum took 
volumes of testimony from all pbh*- 

tiffs, north and smith. 

Mrs. Thatcher and Mr. FitzGerald 
rjTI 1 have known each other far 10 years. 

1 hrougn j£3*-£fiSs£S£i 

• their joint news conference, “from, 
setting out to reshape ,UJS.- .wholly different historical perspeo- 
Soviet relations for the rest of the tives and title-deeds.^ 
century and beyond. But Mr. Wein- But they always got along, maybe 
berger knows the . president's mind because they have both been teachas 
too wdl to put into a letter so loosely and share intellectual cariosity, dlc- 
handled anything he thoug ht the sides, they were often thrown tt%etb-: 
president did not want to hear. er at European meetings, where Mi. 

Some say it does not matter be- FitzGerald, a mo^obl^nig and avi- - 
cause Mx. Wemberger’s influence is hzed man, sometimes served as. her - 


on the wane. He did not go to Gen©- interpreter, since Mrs* Thatcher 
va. But his key man for arms control, knows oaty.Erigfisfrland he speaks 


Assistant Secretary of Defense Rich- 
ard Perle, was on hand and will pre- 
sumably be back at his old Pentagon 
stand, acting with consummate skill 
in the spirit he outlined eaiiy this year 
to The Washington Post 
“The sense mat we and the Rus- 
sians could compose our differences,, 
rednee them to treaty restraints, enter 
into agreements, treaties ... »nd 
that rely on [Soviet] compliance to 
produce a safer world — I don’t agree 
with any of that,” Mr. Perle said- And 
the Wemberger letter is vintage Pbde. 

‘ The point here it that position- 
taking m preparation for getting-to- 
know-you summits, at which public 
perceptions count for as mnch as sub- 
stantive give ami take, is not the same 
as pohcy-makmg. That is why sum- 
mit undertakings are fragile, subject 


mOSt of the language ofEuTOpe. 

“Thecbeoaistiy-Was good, even 
when the- meetings didn’t turn put so 
wefl,” said' Sean. Donlan, a. framer 
Irish ambassador to the United 
States and n ow The seni or civil ser- 
vant M ihe Department of Foreign 
Affairs. He was reflating to.tfae dark 
moment when, after the November 
1984 conference^ Mrs. Thatcher 
brusquely dismissed cadi possibility 
for better rriatioes as “not on.” 

Mrs. Tbatdicr andMr. FitzGerald 
had to . pot aside a great deal more 
than Ronald Reagan and 
Gorbachev. Despite a lnstoty of al- 
most hysterical hostility between the 
United Stales arid the Soviet Union, 
the Soviets, mid the Americans have 
never gone to war. To talk rationally 
about Ireland and England, each rep- 


to stress cracks and metal fatigue, resenfative most put aside thememo- 
Their enduring value depends entire- riveraof blood. • 


dictions. He would he the man of 


fy oh the care that goes into their 
maintenance -— by both sides. - 
Washington Post Writers Grogs. 


•*' Ifat Mis. Thaldai mid Mr. Fitz- 
Gerald managed it Her personal ex- 
perience of the. Irish problem had 


P ARIS — In a recent poll by Business Inter- 
national, the New York-based analysts, 106 


IT national, the New York-bared analysts, 106 
senior financial executives of major multination- 
al corporations judged Italy and France to be 
high-nsk countries for investment Britain was 
held to be low in risk, and the United States even 
lower. A quarter of these executives said that 
they were consolidating their companies’ invest- 
ments into the United States, and cutting or 
eliminating overseas commitments. Another 20 
percent said that they planned to do so. 

It would be interesting to know the reasoning 
behind these judgments, although they reflect a 
certain conventional wisdom. But even in terms 
of the conventional wisdom it seems odd to say 
that France is a risky place, when the conserva- 
tive parties are about to return to power. It might 
have seemed risky in 1981, when the Socialists 
took over — although it was not: The French 
markets prospered after 1981. 

Why is Britain considered a better risk than 
Italy, when, as Lord Stockton, the former Sir 
Harold Macmillan, b3s recently reminded his 
countrymen, without its North Sea oil income 
Britain national bankruptcy? 

Why is Italy a risky place? For 40 years the 
country has been dominated by the same party, 
the Christian Democrats, either alone ot as the 
principal force in moderate coalitions, following 
essentially the same conservative, buriness-on- 
ented, growth-directed economic policies. 

One crisis after another has been mastered in 
Italy: the oil shock, industrial reada p tation, 
union accommodation to the decline of heavy 
industry, restoration of competitiveness through 
innovation and design leadership, successful re- 
sistance to terrorism. The Italian economy has 
proved to be one of the most flexible and produc- 


By William Pfaff 


tive instruments in the modern world. None of 
this, however, does much to shake the inveterate 
un<»a<infts<: of the E n g lis h-speaking businessman 
about economics and politics in Italy. 

Reverse the lens and consider how a European 
(ot Martian) investment manager might assess 
the United States today. This water happened to 
be wa idling television in Paris when Preskkni 
Ronald Reagan was shot in 1981. The French 
broadcasters picked up a sateffile relay of NBC’s 
coverage, and newsmen in Paris were trying to 
make sense of what we were watching live from 
Washington. When Secretary of State Alexander 
Haig — ex-General Haig — made his dramatic 
“I am in charge” statement, one became aware 
that, hesitantly but seriously, the commentators 
in Paris were beginning to wonder whether this 
might be a military coup d*6tat 

A generals' coop in me United States? To an 
American the idea is preposterous. But an Amer- 
ican must consider how America can be seen 
from abroad. Here is a country where assassina- 
tion attempts have been made against four of the 
last seven presidents — one successfully, another 
nearly so. A recent president was driven from 
office by demonstrations in the streets against an 
unpopular war, and another for malf ea sa n c e and 
the use of police power against his political 
opponents. There has been terrorism and racial 
violence. The level of insecurity in the nation’s 
cities has no parallel in the Western world. 

The country has been at war for 12 of the last 
35 years. It has invaded four Latin American or 
Caribbean countries since 1950, and it now 
seems close to invading another. It is mare than 


$2 trillion dollars in debt, and yet its Senate, in 
what to the foreigner m i ght seem a surrealist 
gesture, has just acted to mandate a balanced 
budget President Reagan, whose own adminis- 
tration has been running S200-billioa dofiar an- 
nual deficits, welcomes this initiative. 

The economy relies on milrtaiy ^mending. Real 
wages have been falling since 1973, family in- 
come diminishing, living standards declining. 
Industrial profit rates arc half what they were TD 
years ago, and interest rales are at histooc highs. 
Tlie currency, because it is the corrency in which 
international debts are settled, no longer reflects 
the realities of the eamomy. 

Trade, except for aircraft and ^ limited num- 
ber of other high-technologyproducts, resembles 


peneacc at tbe. man problem bad 
been hmtaL In March 1979 her friend 
Airey Neavewas murdered; in Octo- 
ber 1984 she escaped the bombing of 
a Brighton hotel She showed great 

- /Ygrtn yTrd-m o gnttwfmify tn goin g to 

Ireland for the signing 
Mrs. Thatcher’s motivation is simi- 
lar to that ascribed to Mr. Reagan: 
the desire to go down in history as a 
peacemaker. A solution to the Irish 


and raw materials and i mpar t in g a much larger 
value ctf consumer and military electronics, autch 
mobiles of a. sophistication unavailable from 
Ameri can nwn^if^»pne«. machine tools W d IO- 
bots, luxury goods. Protectionism is on the rise. 

What sensible investor should want bis money 
in a country with so unsound an economy, gov- 
erned so izresponably, so given to violence, polit- 
ical assassination and crime, its future so com- 
promised by public and private debt? 

But of course they do. They do because what 
I have said is only part of tbe stray. 

It is, nonetheless, for both Italy and theUnitcd 
States, a neglected piut of the stray. The United 
States is rich and stable. Its riches, though, are 
compromised, and its stability is relative. The 
unstable governments in Italy regularly fall. The 
consistency of Italian political and economic 
policy over the 40 postwar years nonetheless 
rivals that of Switzerland. 

0 1985 William Pfaff. 


This Peres-Sharon Show Is a Duet With Encores 


J ERUSALEM — Last week’s cabi- 
net crisis is over — for the time 


J net crisis is over — for the time 
being. On the surface it can look like 
a four-day wonder. On Monday the 
minister of commerce and industry. 
Arid Sharon, made a bitter personal 
attack on Prime Minister Shimon 
Peres and his policies. By Wednesday 
the normally conciliatory Mr. Peres 
was demanding an apology or Mr. 
Sharon’s resignation. By late Thurs- 
day the prime minister had received a 

letter of “clarification’’ that satisfied 
him and allowed Mr. Sharon to re- 
main in the government 
Thai is the simple verson. But in 
the current maneuvering, a lat mere 
than a year after formation of the 
national unity government, things are 
seldom what they seem. Indeed, there 
is reason to wonder if the confronta- 
tion was not a well staged dress re- 
hearsal by two seasoned political 
showmen who share a common goal 
Mr. Peres is dearly intent on 
breaking up the national unity gov- 
ernment before next fall, when Li-> 
kud’s Yitzhak Shamir is scheduled to 


By Zev Chalets 


a sure thing. Mr. Sharon has made a has changed parties four times in the 
career of attacking adversaries and past decade, leaving behind an im- 


colleagues in the most intemperate 
l a n g u age. But such attacks are far 
from spontaneous. They are calculat- 
ed to further his objectives — in this 
case, to gain control of Likud. 

Were the government rotation to 
take place on schedule, Mr. Sharon 
would have to wait through two years 
of a Shamir government, until 1988, 


pressive array of anemiw: His han- 
dling of the war in Lebanon cost him 
his job as defense minister and, aigo- 


ably, cost his party the 1984 election. 
He is a man of rare insensitivity. 


before seeking the party 
If the -government falls , all bets will 
be off and Mr. Sharon will almost 
certainly chaDenge Mr. Staanur. So 
the Peres ultimatum has effectively 
given Mr. Share® the initiative. It 
aEows him to bring down the govern- 
ment when it suits him 
* Probably nothing would delight 
Mir. Peres more than a Uknd led by 
Mr. Sharon. No former general has 
ever been denied prime minister 


He is a man of rare insensitivity, 
and he continues to plow ahead, 
tank-like, through a field of contro- 
versy. Bui his armor is not made of 
Teflon, and mud has stuck. He has 
his supporters — some attracted by 
his voy real expertise in security mat- 
ters, outers by ms danagpgic rabble- 
rousing — but they are a distinct 
minority. One recent poQ showed 
him with the lowest public a pp roval 
rating of any senior cabinet minister. 

Mr. Sharon is a man of consider- 


able competence. Successive prime 
ministers have reached out for him as 
an instrument to cany out difficult 
policies. But the war in Lebanon ex- 
pcsed him as a brilliant officer hope- 
lessly beyond his level of competence 
in the role of poHcy-maker. 

Mr. Suron's hard-core supporters 
will not desert him;, anyone, "too s till 
admires; him after Lebanon can hard- 
ly be expected to abandon him now. 
They are not numerous enough to 
elect him as prime minister, but they 
could conceivably, .win him Likud’s 
nomination: That is what Ml Sharon 
hopes far. And so does Mr. Peres. - 


5ors. lt Is an achievement she covets. 

' Ml FitzGerald was bom wanting 
. recondhation: His mother was a 
northern Protestant, fas father a 
southern Cadioticr 
. . Their agenda was neither crowded 
•' ^nor in dispute. They had no spurions 
photo opportunities, no spouses’ 
;teas.Tbeywanted to gjye the Repub- 
lic a say in Ulster's affairs, to inqjTOve 
relations between the Ulster security 
forces and the northern Catholic mi- 
nority. They did not talk about ex- 
changing Erne scholars. They estab- 
Eshed-a joint conference to ensure 
cooperation on political, security and 
.'legal matters. They promised that 
there would be no change in North- 
em lndand’s status without majority 
consent They rehearsed their post- 
summit statements so that no unnec- 
essary offense would be given. 

. The reaction was as expected. Ian 
Paisley, the Protestant demagogue, 
howled betrayal; the Northern Ire- 
land Assembly denounced the ao- 
COTd; the Thatcier government's sec- 
retary for Northern Ireland, Tran 
King, was roughed up by anti-Dublin 
demonstrators when he visited Bel- 
fast City Hall. Mr. Paisley promised 
to keep resistance within constitu- 
tional Emits. He proposed that Tri«fr 
members of the British Parliament 
rcsgn, forcing a referendum of sorts. 
If rejected, they would resign again. 

Tbs leader of Mr. FitzGeralcTs oiv 
paation, Charles Haughey, has com- 
plained that the agreement “recog- 
nizes the legitimacy erf unionism.” 

U.S. support was instantly assured. 
Presideat Reagan and the speaker of 
the House, T5p O’Neill, jointly prom- 
ised aid to a peaceful Ulster. 

It was all in admirable contrast to 
the hypo-activism in Geneva, where 
two total strangers met amid a mob - 
of reporters at the superpower Ofym- 
P 1 *® — us against them.” ■ 

Washington Pari Writers Group. 


The writer, abhor of a forthcoming 
book an Land, "Heroes cad H ustkis, 
Hard Hats and Hdy Men” contributed 
this comment to the LMAngdes Times. 


ir ^f ndai for publication 

^tevUr^'ieumuiihe 

Odutor and must contain the hw- 
ers signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Leaers should be brief and 
are subject to editing We humor 


i -Li r — ** * 

for the retam ef 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


imSBSTOTHEEDrrOR 


replace him as prime minister. But 
Mr. Peres, who for years has suffered 


Gdda Meir by a Labor Party conven- 
tion), and Israeli voters have tradi- 


Back to Resolution 242 


Mr. Peres, who for years has suffered 
from a “Tricky Shimon" image, need- 
ed a good reason — and now be has 
rate in store. In accepting Mr. Shar- 
on’s halfhearted apology, he went on 
record to the effect that any repeti- 
tion of last week's verbal assault win 
lead to Mr. Sharon’s immediate dis- 
missal Such a dismissal, Mr. Peres 
well knows, would force Likud to 
leave the government. 

Mr. Sharon knows it, too, which is 
why Mr. Peres seems to be betting on 


non), and Israel: voters have train- The guide to “Re gional Trouble 
tionallY spurned flamboyant milUaiy Spots” m your Nov. 20 editions re- 
types uke Moshe Dayan, Ezer Wriz- gardmg the differences between the 


types uke Moshe Dayan, Ezer Wriz- 
man and Mr. Sharon himself, who 
received less than 2 percent of the 
vote when he ran at the head of fas 
own ticket in 1977. Given Mr. Shar- 
on's controversial record, abrasive 
personality and overbearing style, he 
wouMmake an inviting target for Mr. 
Peres in any future election. 

It is arruryfnp that Mr. ShSTDA IS 

stQl in public life. IBs army c ar ee r 
was checkered with accusations of 
insubordination. As a politician he 


two sides at the Geneva summit was 
m i sle a d i ng as far as the Middle East 
is concerned. Itinqjlies thatthe Sovi- 
et Union is alone in demanding “that 
Israel, inretuni for peace, give up the 
land it seized from Arab nations in 


United States included. Moreover, as 
successive U.S. a dm ini st rations have 
made dear since then, the United 
States regards Resolution 242 as the 

baas its poiky in the Middle East. 

ROBERT HOLLOWAY. 

Paris. 


1967," and It suggests that the United . 
States regards the demand as insin- 
cere. In fact, the demand is the bore 
of Security Council Resolution 242, 
passed on Nov. 22. 1967, with the 
approval of all council memh ert, the 


Donald Regan’s comments : about errvSLJ?® ? ttat ^- was P 


women (Uli, Nov. u ) are lgnoram __ 

predictabfe and depressing. As an W 
Americaa-womair I wok forward- to 
fas letteraf resignation \ 

_ , ANN-QTE^^O^MAk ; 

•• ' <r -SmrSTVYrt- ‘ 


Lobeck Wasn’t Spared 

j* to State that Lfibeck 
bomb ®8 in Wodd 

flew thrirfi™ JZr vAF bombers 

. ROGER ANTHOINe, , 
Genieva. • - 



V a*** 






v ml 

v- • 




¥ l ^ 






14 




M 


- * 

* TPa‘ 

J V 


; i ft 








iwfen .m. 


> *AF bombers - 

harm incendiary *' 

jas planned asari *“ 2 - 




LJ s: 




% 

7 










/U^ 


vSfi 



** Mrr 

•• “'-' Fj -. h r ie, 

■ ■■.'C : > : • ^ 

, ... . s-Jf »Gk* 
’ ‘ - ’ . ■“ • « 


• - •-? • „ ‘W ■•/ , 

:;• . . v - -^5^5 

-..r^rj 54 ? 

-- 

- “ : - >,j-, 

. *hj jj J* 


1963 African Case May Be Early Clue to AIDS 9 Origin 


(Cornui Bed from Page t) 
disease, cowpox, was used 10 eradi- 
cate smallpox. 


by the Kenyan government be- 
cause of on article by this author on 
AIDS that mentioned the existence 


One theory bolds that AIDS had disease there, 
long existed as an undetected dis- Nevertheless, leading AIDS re- 
ease in a remote area of Africa aid searches such as Dr. Robert Gallo 
then spread as thousands of people of the National Cancer Institute in 
began moving from rural to urban Betbesda, Mary i and. and Dr. WH- 
areas after countries gained their liam A. Hztdline of Harvard Med- 


n 


independence. 


ical School argue strongly that 


.*• - rsj. 

ojt 

•: for if, r*- 


. - • .'l—' 


The AneoaMd Pf«s 


Colombians e xam i nin g a list of survivors of 'die volcano disaster posted on a wall in Lerida. 

Colombia Rescue Effort Tapering Off 

Mock Evacuation Is Ordered as Vokxnu) Remains Active 


.Another theory is that the AIDS AIDS began at Aries, 
virus’s natural home is in an am- The idea that AiDS began in 
mal. possihhv the African green Africa, although now predominant 
monkey, and Lh3t somehow the ii- among Americas and European re- 
rus jumped species. searchers, is by no means universal 

Knowing Lbc precis*! location of imong them, 
origin may help determine whether Dr. G. Himsraanr, and three oih- 
such anmial-to-homan transmis- er doctors who work in West Ger- 
sion occurred. many and Zambia reported last 

Dearly, no country wants to month in & British medical journal, 
learn that it is the orisin j] source of Lancet, on tests of 4.000 .Africans 


Kinshasa^ 


African countries have 
been playing a game 
of buck-passing on 
AIDS, with one nation 
citing another as the 




source. 


AIDS. 

Health officials in the United 


in seven count nes. 

‘it would seem that the epidemic 


:> ... * 

’ ■ ^ t ^ 
■ - 

■-•••• *£;**f*l 
- 

.... '.;:- L -^-Eu.v> 
.^.Wee 

... ,T : * 

. - .. ; ^ 

. . . 

... - r- 

. • ■ : v !bN " 5 j 

• •;••• « sad pmsJ 

a- "Set a‘ 

• Mr Fist* 

•• - ■■■icaiBls 

*. - •; . and 

teirsti 

' •• - >T.al.^ 

■’ " r^n-WCB f 

-■■■ J.'-uiiam* 
- • - • • • L'isiac* 

•• a- jifji-as 

. ;• Jii M» *■ 

' :*? ?sria: 

.•••> waist 

*' i snh: 

T.-'jrred.nih 
*• ' ' PJ3E 

: v-vup 

. -.r..:' :s 


■t 

„ V.r ?au 
..r ■*! fc: ‘v: 
>.:i v tier 

• r j* hjnij 

^ dri* 

^ sj; 

r.'iX'? c 
- i:: te 


- -.- trX- 
c-.tarfc: 

j;v- :zr 

- 1. ii'i. 

: yJt’ 
iW -. “S'® 

cSS^ m 


By Joseph B. Treascer 

New York Times Service 

ARMERO, Colombia — Offi- 
cially, the search for survivors of 
the eruption of the Nevado del 


Wednesday, and policemen armed 
with carbines were shooting stray 
dogs. A squad of a. dozen police- 
men roamed the hi gft ground erf the 
town Tuesday. They were not help- 


Ruiz volcano here is still under mg with the rescue operation, they 
way. But except for intensified ef- said, but were looking for looters. 


foils by two small teams of French 
and British rescue workers, the op- 
eration, which from the beginning 
had been fragmented, small and 


With hundreds of tho usan ds of 
people in the vicinity o( the volcano 
still worried about another erup- 
tion, Augusto Ramirez Ocampo, 


poorly equipped, had all the signs the minister of foreign affairs, said 


of being over. 


after a meeting of the the National 


Guillermo Rueda. the director of Emergency Committee cm the vol- 
Colombia’s Red Cross, said after cano Wednesday that “the volcano 
flying over Armero on Wednesday continues to be active,'' 
that the rescue operation “can be “There’s potential 1 danger," he 
considered finished.” said, “and there can be new erup- 

The dty was destroyed by a mud- dons" - 
slide triggered when the volcano 

erupted Nov. . 13.' killing about ■ Mock Evacuation Held 
25,000 people. • - The authorities began evacuat- . 

Rescue workers continued to re- ing residents near the volcano 
port hearing and 'seeing people Wednesday night as part of a sur- 
alrve in the buried town, but a Co- . prise civil defense exercise; United 
lombian Army officer in a nearby Press International reported from 
community said H was probable L&rida, Col ombi a , 

that the government would begin . Radio announcers did not hnme - 1 


■ Mock Evacuation Held 
'. The authorities began evacuat- 
ing residents near tbe volcano 
Wednesday night as part of a sur- 
prise dvil defense exercise; United 
Press International reported from 
L&rida, Colombia. 

. Radio announcers did not i mm e- 


sp raying Armero with disinfectant diately announce ibar the orders to 
chemicals on Thursday. That evacuate thousands of people was a 


would formally dose the search. 
Some decomposed bodies in Ar- 


mock exercise. 

The announcers said the authori- 


Umied Press Inicmational 

MIAMI — General Jos& Bueso 
Rosa, a former member of the 
Hondnran joint chiefs of staff, has.' 
been urrestedin connection withal 
plot to assassinate President Ro- 
berto Suazo C&rdova. 

Genera] Bueso, 48, left Santiago 
on Tuesday to face U.S. charges 
against him in Miami. At a hearing 
Wednesday before U.S. Magistrate 
Samuel Smargon, he was ordered 
held on $50,000 bond. If convicted, 
he faces a maximum of 15 years in 
prison and a 520,000 fine. 

On Nov. 1, 1984, agents of tbe 
Federal Bureau of Investigation ar- 
rested eight individuals, three of 
whom were charged with plotting 
to assassinate Mr. Suazo. The plot 
allegedly was to be financed by the 
sale of cocaine that had been 
shipped to the United States. 

The U.S. government requested 
General Bueso's extradition from 
Chile last December. Chile’s Su- 
preme Court rejected the extradi- 
tion request, but the Chilean gov- 
ernment refused to extend General 
Bueso’s visa, which expired Tues- 


Sb 

017 

CARWEL 

HOTEL 


When in Athens (Greece) you can stay in a 
1 00% fireproof, 420 room and 72 suite Hotel, 
with facilities such as Mini Bar, color T.V., free 
indoor-outdoor.swmming pool, 24 hour Room 
Service, as welj as the best food 
in Athens. 

CARAVEL HOTEL 

For the most exciting island vacation, 
there is also 

CARAVEL No. 2 in the Ionian Sea. 

Pollution free holidays in a rural setting. 


Reservations: 

Athens: (01)7290721 (60 lines); 

Zante: (0695)25261,2,3. 

Telex: 214401 - 218714 CH GR. 

Head Office: 

CARAVEL HOTEL, 

2 Vas. Alexandrov Ave., Athens. 

Postal Address,: 

P.O. Box: 18106 - GR 116.10, - 
Athens, GREECE. 


Guayabal and Mariquila, both 
within 10 miles (16 kilometers) of 
.Armero. 

Within 20 minutes of the first 
nationwide announcement at 9:20 
PAL. announcers on two national 
radio networks said the evacuation 
was practice for a real emergency. 
■ Guerrilla Leader Killed 

Oswaldo Calve, a leader of the 
Popular Liberation Army guerrilla 
group, was shot and killed Wednes- 
day in Bogota. The Assoc iaied 
Press reported. 

Tbe Popular Liberation Army 
recently had joined forces weth an- 
other leftist guerrilla group, tbe 
April 19 Movement, or M-19. the 
U.S. ambassador. Charles Giiies- 
pie, said Tuesday. 


States, for example, are reluctant to of AIDS in Africa started at about 
acknowledge that exports of Amer- the same lime &s. cr even bier than, 
icon blood products may have the epidemics in America and Eu- 
spread the disease elsewhere. rope” they said. “Our results do 
Africans are particularly sensi- suppori the hypothesis" that 
live about the question'. Their AIDS originated in Africa, 
countries have been playing a game And Dr. Peter PioL professor of 
of geographic buck-passing, "with microbiology a; the Institute of 
one citing another as the source. In Tropical Medicine in Antwerp. 
Rwanda and Zambia, many people Belgium, says that it is not certain 
insist that AIDS spread from where die disease started and that 
neighboring Zaire. In Uganda, sci- proring .Africa as ’he piaee of ori- 
ent! sis suggest that .AIDS came gin would be difficult. 


from Tanzania. 


Finding the orisrin now is a bit 


More generally. Africans con- like trying :c do a jigsaw puzzle 
lend that AIDS "originated some- with only s. few pieces" in the box. 
where else, that it was probably no knowledge of its dimensions 
.Americans and Europeans who and no picture cn the cover. As new 
brought it to them. clues are found in the bush, or in a 

They express bitterness about desert or laboratory, scientists may 
being blamed for a disease they have to change the basic design of 
associate with homosexual prac- iheir research. Existing techniques 
tices in the United Stales and Eu- and tools are limited, 
rope, practices that generally are Researchers often have difficulty 
agreed to be uncommon in Africa, pinpointing the introduction of a 
The Nov. 9 issue of the Interna- new microorganism into a popula- 
tional Herald Tribune was banned ticn because their methods are. of 


necessity, retrospective and indi- 
rect. In’ the case of AIDS, they 
concentrate chiefly on blood tests 
done on humans for other purposes 
in years past and frozen for ihe day 
they might yield valuable informa- 
tion. 

Some scientists believe it may 
never be possible to determine 
where AiDS began. Others are cau- 
tiously optimistic. Dr. Donald ?. 
Francis of the Centers for Disease 
Control in Atlanta said. "W; will 
localize it to areas, though I don't 
think we will be able to say it began 
in ibis village in that specific year." 

Blood tests done since 19S4. 
when the;, were developed, on sam- 
ples that had been stored for yean, 
indicate that the AIDS virus, or one 
similar to it. was present in Central 
Africa in the early 1970s and possi- 
bly in West Africa in the 1960s. 

Tests of stored blood from .Afri- 
ca showing evidence of the AIDS 
virus in years past have been re- 
ported from four countries: Kenya 
and Uganda in East Africa. Zaire 


in Central .Africa and Burkina Faso 
in West Africa. Additional samples 
from Tanzania are under study. 

The earliest dues to possible in- 
fection with the AIDS virus, or a 
closely related one. come from tests 
of samples collected in 1963 from 
144 children in Upper Volta by Dr. 
Harry M. Meyer. Dr. Meyer's 
team, from the U.S. Food and 
Drug Administration, reports find- 
ing evidence of the AIDS virus or a 
closely related one in two children. 

A team of American. French and 
Danish scientists headed by Dr. W. 
Cari Saxinger of the National Can- 
cer Institute has published in Sci- 
ence. the professional journal, the 
finding of evidence o? the AIDS 
virus in 50 of 75 blood samples 
collected chiefly from healthy peo- 
ple in the West Nile district of 
Uganda between August 1972 and 
jui\ i*?73. 

Another study of blood samples 
from a remote population of east- 
ern Zaire found evidence of the 
AIDS virus in about 15 percent of 


250 outpatients in a local hospital 
The study was reported in the Bri: 
ish Medical Journal by a team 
American, Belgian, banish 
Zairian scientists headed by Dt 
Robert J. Biggar of the Nation 2 
Cancer Institute. 

Dr. Biggar headed another teas 
of American and Kenyan scientist 
who reported finding evidence 0 
the AIDS virus In widely -.ar-in: 
percentages among six distinct?; 
different regions of Kenya. The fre 
quency was highest, at 50 percen 
of 99 samples, among the Turczn. 
people living in the remote areas o 
northern Kenya where little if . 
AIDS has bees reported. Tbe .‘"re 
quency was lowest, a; < percent 0 
99 samples, among trie Mouc 
Overall. 22 percent .:'f ti.e 5-2 '.cm 
pies showed evioertes A!Ci 
virus. 

Regardless of 'JthsOie: AIDS be- 
gan in .Africa, dcten-uiir.i en accu- 
rate prevalence of rzact 20.-.5 to Lh-. 
AIDS virus in African pcpulauoz: 
is important. 

If half the Turk an a pop ui alien 
has been walking around with curt 
symptoms but with evidence 01 in- 
fection from the AIDS virus, fo: 
instance, then it is unperati-. e 
learn whether such individuals had 
the infection fer a ions time mi 
survived because they froJ s-.vm.u- 
how developed immtmirv to the 
disease, or whether they are infect- 
ed with a different but closeiy relat- 
ed and iess dangerous vL’Js.’ 

Greek Spokesman Resigns 

tofr 

ATHENS — The Greek 30 -. err - 
mem spokesman. Kostz* Lalir.ts. 
34, said Tnursday be had subm;!- 
ting his resignation to the Social - 1 
prime minister. Andrea* F^rar- 
dreou. and intended to leave ?:-h- 
tic*. 


Avery exalted brand of Swiss chocolate, generally found at an altitude of 

12,000 meters. 


raero were set afire Tuesday and ties had ushered residents out of 

Honduran Faces Charge 
In Assassination Plot 


at 4 li 





L 




day, forcing him to leave the coun- 

try- 

Hondurans vote for a new presi- 
dent Sunday, but a legal controver- 
sy could leave_tiiem without a lead^ 
‘ er when Mr. Suazffs term expires 
Jan. 27, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Tegucigalpa, Hondu- 
ras. 

Mr. Suazo is barred by the Hon- 
duran Constitution from seeking 
re-election. 

It is undear which of two elec- 
tion laws will take precedence in 
deciding his successor, and the two 
laws are likdy to lead to opposite 
results. 

The constitution says the presi- 
dent will be dected by a simple 
majority, but an electoral law en- 
acted in September says the top 
candidate within the political parly 
that captures the most votes will be 
president. 

The Liberal Party is expected to 
win the most votes Sunday. Jose 
Azcona Hoyo is viewed as the lead- 
ing Libera] Party candidate. 

But a National Party candidate, 
Rafael Leonardo Callejas, is con- 
sidered likely to be the leading indi- 
vidual vote-getter. 


Black and White Cognac 
Trulfe-Igeli 


r 


Jamaica Mint-Gelee 



Rigispitzli 


m 


TrufTe clair 


Truffe au lait TrufTe V'unille Florentiner- TrufTe Croquunt Swissair-Mignon Sire usel-Tru lie Raspberry- 

Carre dark Gelee 




Gold-Braun Caramd-TrufTe Bourbon-Carre Confiscur- 

Kiibeii 


Caramel- Rum-Roseiie Himbcerspiuli 
Stengeli 


n 







11 



n 


Orange-Truffe Swissair-Mignon Honignuss Raspbeny-Fjord Doris Marzipan-Augli Espresso- Orangen- 

bght _ TrufTe Marzipan 


Sianniol-Gianduja Tea-TrulTe 


Curafao- 

Halbmond 




Williams- 

Schnecke 



r 







Non-Pareilles Almond- Mocca- Honey-Caramel Almendras Colfee-Trufie 

Gianduja light Halbmond _ 





Bon Pere Orange-Gelee 
Williamine 


[ Hf/ ' 


Caramel-Carre Grand Mamier-Truffe Abricot-Fjord 


Montelimar 


Numoe 


Caramel-Stanee Boule au Kirsch Prinz Albert 



Schaum-Trulle Trulle ;tu 

Kirsch dark 



Cointreau 


Amarenen- Carre maximal Whisky-Trufle Arm.ignac- Lemon-Gelcc Pineapple 
Kubeii Brugcli 


F - - ^ .J _■ M 

F. . 1 ' 1 1 '■ W\ XT 

L> - >' 1 ‘ 1 ^ 


Rocher dark Nuimee-Trulle 


rm 


Violcne Strawberry- Ferdinand TrufTe while Finesse de Paris Gianduja WaJTel -Praline .Ananas-Spitzli Nuugai-Raute Baum»tammli 

Fjord Hodler special 


m 1 











^-"1^ ■ ^ 


Riora Carre au lait King of Ceylon Chemin defer Quaire Freres Pyramide Clair de June Sehniit-Praline De^ir Hazelnut- 

lighl Gianduja 





r r ^ 



G 



Caramel-Kiibeli Amand^laire Armailii Sri Lanka Mont-Blanc Stcm-Trufle Brandy-TrufTe Biindner Kirsch- Fondant Rocher light 

tOHL Nusspniline 













P*.vrlo Branchli Nougat-TrulTe Marillen-Gelee Sulianette Coruba-TrulTe Schniu-Praline Caramel- Champagne- Pistache- 

white Gianduja TrulLr Mar/ipan 

We’re not exaggerating: our ehocolatiers make a hundred different chocolates for our First Class passengers 
- even if you think that’s overdoing things and if there’s unlikely to be anyone who’ll try them all at 
one go. But there is one conclusion you can draw from this: an airline which takes so much trouble does 
a little bit more for all its guests than it needs to. At an altitude of 12,000 meters as well as on the ground. 
From inflight service to aircraft maintenance. Something which even those people who don’t like chocolate 
won’t regard as an exaggeration. Swissair jCT 













■S 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


Reagan, Gorbachev End Talks by Pledging Peace 


(Continued from Page 1) 

alone for a farewell with only their 
interpreters present, according to 
the chief White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes. 

In all, the two leaders have spent 
an unprecedented six hours in pri- 
vate informal meetings including 
much of Wednesday night’s dinner, 
Mr. Speak es said, 

■Mr. Shultz, at a separate news 
conference, called these private 
meetings “the most important 
thing that has happened here." 

. “The two leaders took over the 
conference completely," he said, 
“The length of time, intensity, 
frankness and scope of these pri- 
vate meetings went beyond any- 
thing I could have expected.” 

Mr. Shultz emphasized that nei- 


ther side had compromised in any Shevardnadze as well as lower- Mr. Reagan flew to Brussels in 
way on SDI. The issue was dis- ranking specialists such as disar- the early afternoon to report on the 
cussed at great length, he said, and mam em negotiators. conference to leaders of North Al- 


he added: "The 
strongly as ever 


Mr. Reagan flew to Brussels in order to draw attention to existing 

e early afternoon lo report on the dangers.” 

nference to leaders of North At- He said that Mr. R e agan spoke 


India Calls 
Explosion 


idem feels as The meetings between himself Ian tic Treaty Organization mem- Of a defensive shield while in fact 
at this is essen- and his Soviet counterpart will be bers. what was under discussion was a 

. There is no “regularized" to the point where Mr. Gorbachev held a press con- space weapon that would carry the 
e Soviet posi- contact is so frequent lha: they will ference at which he delivered a arms race into outer space and was 


rial. He insists on it. There is no “regularized" to the 
give on this at alL The Soviet posi- contact is so frequent 
tign also has not changed." be able to get away I 


point wi 

that they 


t where 


Mr. Gorbachev held a press con- 
ference at which he delivered a 





be able to get away from general- statement of about an hour and therefore “unacceptable. 


He underlined the Reagan ad- ities and can concentrate on one or answered questions for another 


ministration's belief that the Gene- 
va conference was an important 
step in a continuing “process" that 
started with bis own meeting with 


two issues at any one encounter, 
Mr. Shultz said. 


half hour. 

He, too, stressed emphatically 


Mr. Gorbachev's exchanges with 
Mr. Reagan had sometimes been 
“tough” and even “very tough,” he 


Regional issues — particularly the fact that there has been no said, but they had great importance 
the Soviet intervention in Afghani- narrowing of the gap between the because each side had gained a bet- 



Andrei A Gromyko, who at the stan and conflicting policies and two conflicting positions on SDI. 
time was foreign minister, in Gene- perceptions in Nicaragua — were He made this the central issue of 
va last January. discussed frankly and at length in his presentation. 


va last January. discussed frankly and at length in 

The process, Mr. Shultz said, will the private meetings of the two 
include not only summit confer- leaders and at the sessions of the 


:o conflicting positions on SDI. ter appreciation, 
e made this the central of In addition to the key' issues of 
s presentation. security and nuclear and space 

The two powers had a “choice talks, the joint statement reported 


ences at the top but an intensifica- 
tion of negotiations at different lev- 


leaders and at the sessions of the between survival and mutual de- agreement on the opening of con- 
full delegations, according to U.S. sanction.” he said, and added: “I sulates in Kiev and New York, on 


els including himself and Mr. was reported on these issues. 


and Soviet officials. No progress deliberately use the word ‘survival,’ 


not to in order to frighten but in 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 


For Those 
Who Have 
Everything: 

One, two and three bedroom luxury apartments 
overlooking the Mediterranean. World-class Health 
& Beauty Spa featuring authentic Dead Sea mineral 
baths. International Business Center, Shopping, 
Dining and Entertainment, on the premises. 

Plus 5-star hotel services 24 hours a day. Ail at 
The Daniel — the most distinctive resort in Israel. 

Prices start at two-hundred, seventy thousand 
U.S. dollars: financing available. 

. i 

00 

THE DANIEL 

Residence & Spa 

HerzIia-on-Sea, Israel 46769 
Tel: (052) 544 444 TLX: 341812 IL 
London Office: 

14-16 Cockspur St., London SW1, England 3 
Tel: 839-7194 TLX 8950055 5 


ONE OF THE FINEST OF CALIFORNIA’S 
VINEYARDS FOR SALE 

RARELY IN THE NAPA VALLEY DOES THERE BECOME AVAILABLE 
For sole, such high quolrty vinqyardi, to well located in this large of on 
acreage. The tale of these properties, brought on by the death of a 
shareholder, presents a unique opportunity far the qualified buyer. 

Excellent, long term, winery contracts, strong return history. 

The properties eve composed of three separate, contiguous, tracts 
containing approximately 500 acres. Purchase price US $1 6.8 mBBon. 
Year cash return appr. 10%. Available as a single unit or as separate 
properties. 

Our complete brvchurv u necessary to fully appreciate this special 
opportunity . 

Please contact: 

HUBER FARM SBIVICE OF CAi'FORNIA INC. 

2517 West Shaw Avenue, Suite lOl 
Fresno, California 9371 1 USA 
Telephone (USA) (209) 225-5715. Telex (USA) 176 847 

or our office in Switzerland; 

HUBER TREUHAND AG 
Lavaterstrasse 76, 8027 Zurich 
Telephone (01 ) 202 91 77. Totac.56421 


ERESBY HOUSE 

Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge 

A very well appointed South/ West faring second floor flat in superb 
block by garden square close Hyde Park. Two double beds, bcrth/WC, 
extra WC, good kitchen, reception 17” x 17" into bay. Central Heating, 
lift, 24br porter. 1 20 years, £205,000, sole agents. 

PORTMAiS'S: London (01) 589 0337 (24 hr*) 


FRANCE - Offices of d* SCP VAJULON, TRAXELLE, ROCHAT, 
Lawyers of the Bar of Grasse - Offices or Maine MOUREY; Receiver- 
Administrator Le Rweknd-Avenue Gallieni. CANNES - SALE BY 
PUBLIC AUCTION, after seizure of real property in one lot. THURS- 
DAY DECEMBER 5. 1985 at 8u8Q a.rru in the Courts of Justice in 
GRASSE 

VILLA colled “LA VKHE” - in MOUGINS (Aipes-Maritimes] 

Chemin du Belvedere, with garage, cellar, boiler-room, swimming-pool, 
pergola and garden of 2,265 sq.m. - An aerial photo of the villa is at the 
disposal of interested parties at tf>? Offices of the SCP VALLON, 
TRAXELLE. ROCHAT. 

STARTING PRICE: 800.000 FRENCH FRANCS 

(with possibility to reduce by one quarter, and then by roe half duriq* the auction) 
For further information contact: 

SCP VALLON, TRAXELLE, ROCHAT, ovoccrts, 

19, rue d« Sertxa, 06400 CANNES - TeL 93.39.19.54 


Own land in the great ☆ 
American West i 

I this land can 

Here's an outstanding oppor- I be yours, 
tunity to acquire a sizable I Easy credit 
piece of America's rancbland H terms 
at a very' modest cost. " available 

Sangre de Cnsto Ranches Inc., the land de- 
velopment subsidiary’ of Forbes Magazine, 
the American financial publication, js now 
offering for sale scenic ranchland in Colorado's 
Rocky Mountains. Spectacular land for a 
homesite and a lifetime of appreciation. 

Minimum 5-acre ranch sites starting ai $4,500 

Send today for fact kit and full color brochure 


FORBES EUROPE 

SANGRE DE CRtSTO RANCHES INC. 

P.O. BOX 08, DapL IKT 
LONDON SW11 3UT 
ENGLAND 




W7DDDS®[jQ 

Let your SU5 buy more in Toronto. Canada. 

1 70 Apartment Complex 

• A very well maintained complex 

• Price: $3,310,000.00 

• Excellent k>w long-term financing 

• 1 2% return. 

Office Balding 

First-class buiding located in central Toronto with 
government as tenant. $1,800,000.00. 

Financing available. 

In addition WINZEN has other quality commercial and 
rental apartment buildings.. 

WINZEN REAL ESTATE LIMITED WINZEN CORPORATION: 
Attn. Mci-ketlrra Manager A Leading Development 

67 Yonge street. Suite 700 Sales. Property Management 

Toronto. Ontario. Canada M5E 1J8 and Marketing 
Tel.: ( 416 ) 843-0071 - Telex: 04524301 Organization. 


"“monte carlo 

are sold through 

AGED 

u. de Charts 

Te , g3- 50.66.00 

^SSSSk 1 ^ 1 


SWITZERLAND 







*irrar:fj 


VOJLARS-sur-OLLON SLu 

LUXURY APARTMENTS 

1 to 4 bedrooms. EBO.OOO- 

L200.000. Available for purchase 

by foreign residents. Mortgages up to 60*5. 

6.5%-20 years. ^ 

All south facing - Breathtaking views — 

Superb fully fitted accommodation, kitchens 
and bathrooms — Carpeting. 

FULLY SERVICED 

Take this opportunity, free of UK exchange control, and with full Swiss 
government permissions, to invest in the security of the Swiss franc. 
Enquiries dealt with in total confidence. Legal and technical advice 
available. Professional enquiries welcome, ro: 

Mr. T. F. HORN. Solicitor. HAXBY. JARVIS AND MALCOLM BROWN. 
4 The Quadrant COVENTRY CV1 2EL Private calls: 0203-2S498 

Villars — 4750’ m gkwkx» mountain scenery. 20 minuies from lake. 90 minutes 
Geneva. Skiing, walks, waier sports. golf. tennis. riding. 

Active alpine village wriih dl facilities, quiet residential atmosphere. 

Excellent cuisine. ^ 


CORPORATE RETREAT 
San Diegc County, CA 

This metfwfirOy designed end becutifUiy 
appointed 37 -acre residarOal compound 
with 2 sMety homes provides grocJ Secu- 
rity. privacy, elegance and scenic charm. 
On the westerly slopes of the Laguna 
Mtr., rf is easily accessible to San Dwgo. 
The origmd home, designed by Frank 
Uoyd Wright contains 5000 sq. ft.; the 
second newly buiH home of 7,000 sq. ft. m 
the New Orleans style offers 70 rooms. 4 
quest cottages ore duPered mound the 
lake with ns own island, beach and dock. 
A operating ferns wheel and carousel 
provide unique entotantnent. Tho re- 
markable endave a an ideal setting for a 
corporate retreat. Brochure IHT-7155A1 
S5.400.000. 


Sun M'S. 'ruiSaiRK Ihr w..,iU -fiv-i l-.Jlr 

1231 State St„ Sta. 206A 
Srmta Barbcra, CA 93101 
(SOS) 963-95/7 or 1-800 
pv2-2222 (Outride GoTodaro) 


JAVEA 

Costa Blanca Spain 

Delightful, south facing villa 
with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. 
Newly landscaped garden of 
1 ,200 sq.m., garage & mosaic 
tiled pool. Large open ter- 
races. Located above Javea 
Golf dub. 

A BARGAIN AT £76,000 

Please call: 

Mr. A THfRSK 
in England, Leamington Spa 
0926 832220 

or write to 

ST. THOMAS HOUSE, 

23 Leans Terrace, Leamington 
Spa CV31 IBB. England. j 
Telex 312605 PREST-G. 


FIRST CLASS U.S.A. INVESTMENTS 

Real Estate Investment in Syndication 

Missouri Income Properties Limbed I, a Florida Limited Partner- 
ship, offers participations of U.S. $26,000.- (or multiple) in the 
ownership of an office building rented as a distribution center to: 
FEDERAL EXPRESS CORPORATION 

a New York Stock Exchange company, nation leader in the 
courrier service {1984 turnover: 1 .4 billion dollars). 

Triple Net Long Term Lease. 

Guaranteed Triple Net Yield: 7.5% average. 

For more information and a free brochure, please call or write to; 

ORION INVESTMENTS & TRUST LTD. 

15 rue du Cendrier, 1201 Geneva 
Tel.: (22) 32.48.05/ telex: 23676 Orion ch, fax: (22) 31.44.91. 

This offer is net avaSebie to UJ>. citizens or residents. 

THE ORION GROUP 

MIAMI (Headquarter), GENEVA, MONTREAL, 
FRANKFURT, MUNCH EN, ES$EN, LONDON, LUGANO. 


sulates in Kiev and New York, on 
cooperation in measures to protect 
the environment, and on a set of 
safety measures concerning air 
routes in the north Pacific. 

In addition, the two govern- 
ments expressed the desire to reach 
an early agreement for the resump- 
tion of commercial air service be- 
tween the United States and the 
Soviet Union. They also reached an 
agreement to resume some cultural 
exchanges. 


British Commons 
Rejects Han to 
Televise Debates 

United Press International 

LONDON — The House of 
Commons has turned down a 
chance to match the House of 
Lords and gain a television au- 
dience for its blend of high- 
brow debate and raucous name- 
calling. 

By "a vote of 275-263. the 
camera-shy Commons decided 
Wednesday to reject experi- 
mental televising of its sessions. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher was among those who 
voted to keep the cameras out. 
An official close to Mrs. 
Thatcher said she would like 
“great occasions" televised bnt 
not the regular sessions. 

Many lawmakers said they 
feared there could be pictures 
of members caught napping or 
of other members posturing to 
the cameras. Enoch Powell, a 
veteran member of Commons, 
said televised broadcasts might 
give the electorate a “misrepre- 
sentation, a caricature, a false- 
hood about this place." 

Since January, the House of 
Lords has been televised on an 
experimental basis, but no final 
decision has been reached on 
regular coverage. Both houses 
are broadcast on radio. 





The iNooccwd Prw» 


Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher smile before the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization meeting in Brussels. 

Gorbachev Says Talks 
Improved Ties to U.S. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

"lays die groundwork to mutual 
understanding and a dial ogue.” 
And that, he added, “is conducive 
to enhanced security." 

Mr. Gorbachev compared the 
summit conference to a rescue op- 
eration. an emergency effort to free 
up a “logjam” in U.S.-Soviet rela- 
tions. 

“We believe an improvement in 
Soviet-American relations is quite 
possible,” be said. “Problems have 
accumulated, there are mountains 
that have to be eliminated. 

“When logjams and pQeups hap- 
pen, rescue teams aze sent in,” Mr. 
Gorbachev said, adding that in 
U.S.-Soviel relations, “the rescue 


charges of Soviet interference in 
regional disputes. So it was decided 
from the outset not to engage in 
such “banalities," be said. 

Mr. Reagan, in a speech last 
month, said that Soviet or Soviet- 
backed military involvement in five 
Third World conflicts, including 
Afghanistan, would be his main 
priority in the summit meeting. 

■ Warsaw Pact Endorsement 

Leaders of the Soviet Union’s six 
Warsaw Pact allies have endorsed 
the stand taken by Mr. Gorbachev 
at the summit meeting Reuters re-, 
ported from Moscow.. 

The official Tass press agency 


work should be done together and said that Mr. Gorbachev, who met 
we are prepared to do that” the Communist Party leaders of the 

He said it would be a “grave six countries in Prague after leaving 
mistake” to miss the “chance avail- Geneva, gave “a detailed ao- 
able to us now to rum the situation count 0 f proceedings and re- 

fi-vr (he ** d.. /— . . V .. 


for the better.” 

Mr. Gorbachev gave a detailed. 


suits” of die Geneva meetings ■ 
“The leaders of the fraternal par- 


animated account of his discussion 

with Mr. Reagan on space arms. . port for the constructive stand pre- 
He said that Mr. Reagan had seatedbv Mikhail Gorbachev atitis 


sentation, a caricature, a false- with Mr. Reagan on space arms. . 
hood about this place." „ e ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

Srnce January, UkHouk of Elista 

Lords has been televised on an defensive rather than an offensive 
ojmmtnai baas, but no Goal m ^ ^ ^ K 

^ ™ “ lie way it hi at ail" Mr. Gorbachov 

^oaS^-£ h< ^ said wo won". 

“So I asked,” he continued, “why 
• are you taking the arms race into 

Seoul Dissidents Placed flinhcr s P ticres? You dod;t believe 


talks with President Reagan," Tass 
said. 


Of Jet Crash 


NEW DELHI — An explosion 
was the apparent cause of the crash 
of an Air-India jet in June off the 
coast of Ireland, according to a 
government report. _ 

The report by KS. Khola, In- 
dia's inspector of accidents, . was 
presented at an inquiry that began 
here Wednesday, The crash tilled 
afl 329 people on the plane, which 
•was bound from Toronto to Bom- 
bay. 

“From the sounds recorded on 
the cockpit voice recorder” and air 
traffic control tapes at Shannon 
airport in Ireland, the report said. 

“it a^ears that ah explosion had 
occuotJ on board,” 

Previously, exports investigating 
the June 23 crash of the Boeing 747 
had said flai a stady cf the tapes 
had failed to determine the cause. 

Lalit Bhasm. Air- India's coun- 
sel. said that winfc experts were 
almost certain the Crash was caused 
by ah explosion, the explosion did 
notiKcessarifyre^iltframa bomb. 

“The inquiry aims to find what 
caused the explosion,” he said. 
“That should be much dearer once 
we know about the wreckage which 
was recently recovered and is now 
bang examined." 

The report said that debris found 
in the beginning of the plane's 
“wreckage traiT consisted mainly 
of suitcases and panels from the aft 
cargo compartment, -^indicating 
that scant; rupture had Occurred in 
the aft cargo compartment in the 
ah'.” - . ■ : .y ■ 

He sud that Air-India would not 
accept Canada’s ejaim that airport 
sccmhy was primarily the carrier’s 
rcgxwsDjSity. ' 

Last week, an Air-India. security 
officer reported that the X-ray ma- 
chine .aranc - baggage W3S IlOt 

working when passengers checked 
in azToronta 

The report includes a transcript 
of the last words of crew members, 
who were checking progress with 
Shann on ateportand talking about 
customs requirements at London 
until a sound described in the re- 
port as a “bang’; at 7:14 A.M. 

Two Sikh groups have claimed 
responsibility ibjr planting a bomb 
on the plane, mid Canadian offi- 
cials have arrested two Sikh sus- 
pects. / ' 


Under House Arrest 


us. Why should we believe you 
when you say these weapons are 
defensive? 


Thousands of Protesters Clash 
WithBoUce Oifidde Pretoria 


_ defensive? (Contained from Page I) 

The Associated Press . . , , . , , _ 

SFOUl — ^ The nnlira. h °pe U's not the United spcculautm about her husband’s 

States’s lartword," Mr. Gorbadiev release, but denied local press re- 


dissidents under house arrest and ’zSzZZa Mr -' Joroacaev 
barred 59 student activists from r ^ 5eated tWKe - . _ • 

attending an anti-government stu- If the . Reagan administration 
deni rally on Thursday, dissident continued with its space arms 
sources reported. plans, Mr. Gorbachev warned. 

The police also were reported to Moscow would respond, and the 
have mobilized 1,000 officers at the response “will be effective." 
gates of Seoul National University, According to Mr. Gorbachev, 
site or the. protest, billed as a “something of a fight” broke out 
grand national forum for consti- when the U.S. side pressed its 
rational changes.” 


all funerals in Mamelodi from Fri-. 
day evening to Sunday evening. 
Police and journalists said that 

i , j , - , youths had mobilized before dawn 

ports *hat he had agreed toaeeept p, aop rnidentj from going 10 

T ^ a , : a ,,?°Ty worif and to jaui a protest march to 
independent blade homeland. Mr. [he town conndL 
Mandela ms asneoced lo pnson A ^ tc „ thc 

fot We m 1964 for sabotage and ^noo thathenot beideniffied. 


WORLDWIDE 

mKHTAEVMEXT 


Get the 
right feeling 
about 

Amsterdam 

YabVum 


Jet's Forced Landing 
Injures 16 in Azores 

Reuters 

LAJES, Azores — Sixteen pas- 


plotting revdution. 

The fact th^ Mr. Mandela is still 
in the hospital 19 days after his 
operation has added to the specula- 
tion. So did an official announce- 
ment Thursday night that a request 
by him for pennission to meet with 
his lawyers Friday had~been grant- 
ed. 

But a statement Thursday by 
President Pieter W. Botha at a Pre- 
toria news conference that “no de- 
rision has been taken" on Mr. 


sengers were injured Thursday af- w . j 

Boeing 747 made an emergency #hh t . xi« 

Landing in the nnd-AtianticAzrmes 

Islands after reporting a fire m the - , 


hold, the Portuguese Air -Force 
said. A British Airways spokes- 
woman in Lisbon said the fire 


■ Unrest in Mamelodi 
The unrest in Mamdodi was one 
of the bi^est confrontations in 15 


Singe! 295. Amsterdam 
AM major credit cards accepted. 


warning was a false alarm probably months of anti-apartheid violence 
caused by a faulty indicator light that has left more than 800 people 
A Portuguese Air Force spokes- dead, The Associated Press report- 
man said three of the 354 passen- ed from Johannesburg. The Mamc- 
gers on the flight from Barbados to lodi protesters were demanding 
London were hospitalized and 13 lower rents, an end to restrictions 
were treated for minor injuries and on funerals, and the departure of 
dischaiged. The spokesman said he soldiers and extra police from the 
believed the injuries occurred dur- township, 
ing evacuation by emergency exits Several hoars after the dash, 
after the jet landed at Lajes. . Magistrate PAJ; Burger banned 


said, “There was no sign that the 
police were in- any danger, and 
there was no wanting from the po- 
lice that they were gang to shoot." 

The Johannesburg Star said, “El- 
derly people and children were seen 
falling as the crowd stampeded af- 
ter voDeys of tear gas from the 
police. Ai least eight of the people 
on the ground 'appeared seriously 
wounded. They lay on the ground 
motionless.” , 

In. another development, police 
said chat an official report issued 
Monday on unrest in Queenstown, 
in eastern Cape province, mistak- 
enly omitted the deaths of five 
blacks shot by riot patrols. 

(The newly ; reported deaths 
brought the toll in Queenstown to 
14,. the. highest number since the 
state" of emergency went into effect, 
United Press International report- 
ed. from Johannesburg. 

_ {“The officer compiling the po- 
lice report on the morning of Nov. 
18 overlooked j the fact that five 
bullet-ridden bodies resulting from 
police action were found in 
Queenstown ori the previous day,” 
a police spokesman said.) 


2 PORI 

Take advantage of our speaal rates for new subscribers and 
well give you an extra month of Tribs fee with a oneryear • 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand price, 
in most European countries! 

To-. Subscription Manager, International Herald Tribune 

181 , avB^Charl&cfe<3ai)lfe, 92521 NeuillyCedex,Fronos.Teli 47470729 Tefe* 612832 
Please enter my subscription for:. 40JZ. 

[~[ 12rtWTths njirrwnths [ +2 ^\ j~j3n»nlhs . 

__J_J MychedckaKW Q FWdwgemya^mrdocoou^ ~ 

E3D!Sp (ojnrfinmnpsr 



|l>. 











Cardocoo ro tnurAer 


C'rtflJtpirydcte 


SfcfcidliJLiVtiiJ 





Trad 


Incr 














LPK 

ijkeK- (V, 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


Page 7 


ADVERTISEMENT 


ADVERTISEMENT 



V.fftrr 
?j<7£.:s v-.. 


• ‘ '' 

;■ r - 
.'I 

! W,T-. •■ 




■Jw:rv'jV- 


■ •: ;k. . '••J- 
•J 1 .. "‘ : ^c. 

- . - ’ittbi-: 

fc Ct- 

. .; ■■■'-■ =***'. 

r.r^v : 

• -lit -,.l '• 

... • ■•H;-,. 


•• 


>’ £J 

1. ‘•■•'■‘•W}:- 
in*; 

- -iB ^ 
■ - ■ 5r asnai3 ; 

••-'• -ya2a. 
^'wiav.fc^ 

" :: X- 

'•“• • nj£22b*.‘ 


"'-■Mai* 

\iie» K 

- • i-jr^ pj-'igv, 

■ ■ "• 

•’m, * 2 
■ -■:~h;z= 

'• ■>?'- kti 
:• :jq;i 
J v.ai£ 


ul< nf f l rof t-slersCk 
i t;ri (hii ifh PretM 


j -.i-J 1 

n^'. 


f? S^==T -v • 

: ' ^hen a . man is tired. of London he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford." Dr. Samuel Johnson. 20th September. 1777 

. .*.......... 'V.^ 1 \-i. -,V* < ‘'s' V'Y 'V \ • > [/j?.' .V- ‘ ’ — ; ■ ■;••■■■ . 


Auction Houses go into End of 
Season High Gear 


T he London auction season has two 
peaks: one in the first weeks of July 
and the . second in the first weeks of 
December. The four big salerooms based in 
London are now gearing themselves up for 
the end of season flourish. 


At Christie’s in Xing Street . 
on 25th and 26th November, 
Islamic works of art will be 
sold. One of the highlights is a 
rare 12th century Khmer . 
sandstone, panel depicting 
Vishnu as Naravana. It Ins . 
been on loan to the Victoria & 
Albert Museum for the last 
six years and is now being 


sold in aid . of the - charity 
Young Enterprise; Christie's 
expect it to realise £50,000- 
£60,000: 

Also at Christie V a wine 
sale with a difference is sched- 
uled for 5th December when a 
bottle of Bordeaux from 
Thomas Jefferson’s cellar will 
be sold. Jefferson visited 





*/i & 





* s 


u TheEntperorMaxxnaUttni ” by Lucas van Leyden 
(1494-1533) engraving and etching, 1520 

To be sold ai CHRISTIE’ Sin London, Decembers , 1985 
(Old Master Prints from Chatstoorih) 


SOTHEBYS 

FOUNDED 1744 

Important Sale 



20th-22nd FEBRUARY 1986 

Jewellery and Precious 

OKierfc 



A piiifc sapphire and diamond, 
bow-knoi brooch, sold in Sl Moriii in 
February 1985 for S.Fr. 27.500 

Sotheby’s -jewel, experts will be visiting the 
following towns to value items for the sale. 

Brussels Monday 25ih and Tuesday 26th November 
Cologne Monday 25lh November . 

Frankfurt Tuesday 26ih November 
Hamburg Wednesday 27 ih November 
Lausanne Friday 6th December 
Lugano Monday 2nd December 
Madrid Thiirsdav 28ih. November 
Milan Tuesday Sid December 

Monte Carlo Monday 25th and Tuesday 26th November 

Munich Friday 29rh 'November 

Paris Tuesday 17 tk-Thursdav 19th December 

Rome Wednesday. 4th December 

Vienna Thursday 28th .November. 

If you wish to make an appointment, please 

telephone or write, to:. • .- • 

32 five dr I'Abbayr, Brussels 1050 Tel: 343 5007 
St. Ap*-rn-Stras«* 17-29. ifCrri^liauv Galt-rid, 5000, Cologne I 
Tel: 221 219 930 . . . - 

.Strinlr*rav.c- 7. 6000 Frankfun/M. 70 TeL 62 20 27 - 
‘24 Rue tie la Gild CH-1Q21 Genu Tel: 21.33 87784 
AL-iierkamp 13, 2000 Hamburg Tel. 4 10 60 28 

Plaza de la I ndrpendeneia 8. 2ROOJ Madrid Tel: 232 6488 

Via Pieiru Maxaim 15/2, 2012.1. Milan W: 783911 
U- Sporting d'Hiver. Plate du-Casino, Monte Carlo Tel: 30 S3 80 
OdrumplaiK 16. 8000 Munich 22 Tel:; 22 23 75/6 
3 Rue de dromes nil; 75008 Paris Trf: 266 4060 
SinKrt.-dfsu&e 16. 1010 Viennj Tel: 524772/s. . . 


Bordeaux in 1787 and wrote 
an extensive <md enthusiastic 
report of the area. He bought 
a large quantity of wine to 
take back to the United 
States, and the bottle to be 
sold is engraved “1787 Lafitie 
Th J”. It is expected to sell in 
excess of £5,000 and should 
be in perfect drinking con- 
dition. 

That same day Christie's 
are offering a selection of 
some 300 Old Master prints 
from die Chazswonh collec- 
tion. The high point will be a 
group of seven prints by Rem- 
brandt including a superb im- 
pression of Christ Presented 
to the People- Works from 
Italy and Germany will also be 
included in the auction. The 
following day, 6th December, 
Christie's continue selling 
prints, both Old Master and 
modem, with examples by 
Rembrandt, Goya, and Pira- 
nesi in the Old Master section 
and Kir chn cr , Beckmann, 
Kandinsky and Hockney re- 
presenting modern artists. 

Finally, Christie’s are in- 
augurating their Monaco sale- 
room with an auction on 6th 
December of magnificent 
French furniture as well as 
Vincennes and S&vres porce- 
lain from the collections of the 
late Sir Charles Clore. 

Over at Sotheby’s in Bond 
Street they are getting literally 
into the Christmas spirit on 
27th November with a sale of 
finest and rarest wines, spirits 
and vintage port. A section of 
the sale is devoted to rare 
vintage Armagnac, made in 
the country of the Three Mus- 
keteers, which includes vint- 
ages from 1893 to 1975. They 
are being sold in aid of the 
charitable Knights of Malta, 
and one of the vendors is a 
descendant of the original 
d'Artagnan. 

The previous day a sale of 
19th century pictures includes 
drawings by Dante Gabriel 
Rossetti, including one of the 
model who was later to 
become his wife; a biblical 

MARLBOROUGH 

6Albermarie Sheet. 

London VVTX 4 BY 

R.B. KITAJ 

November 8 - December 20 

Astota/cotafcguecMifabfe 
Mon. -hi, 10-5:30; Sots. 10-12:30. 

01-6295161 


painting by Sir Lawrence 
Alma-Tadema of Joseph, 
overseer of Pharaoh's gran- 
aries; a very fine portrait of a 
man by Jacques Louis David; 
and an oil study of a Greek 
girl's head by Frederic, Lord 
Leighton. 

Sotheby’s were originally 
booksellers ami this heritage 
is noticable in two manuscript 
sales. The first on 26th Nov- 
ember contains a complete 
9th century Carohngian gos- 
pel book with 20 full-page ill- 
uminations; it is expected to 
realise around £M million. On 
28th and 29th November a 
sale of music manuscripts and 
letters includes compositions 
by both Wolfgang Mozart and 
his sister Nannerl, pan of a 
Haydn string quartet, and 
letters by Verdi, Mahler, 
Tchaikovsky and Haydn, who 
wrote to Dr Burney about his 
London visit. 

Next month Sotheby’s are 
also selling some possessions 
of the late Sir Charles Clore, 
and on 3rd December his Im- 
pressionist works of an go 
under the hammer. An early 
painting by Paul Signac is ex- 
pected to realise over 
£400,000 and works by Pic- 
asso, Kandinsky and Pissarro 
are included. 

Lastly the two smaller auc- 
tioneers also have sales of in- 
terest. On 26th November 
Phillips sells a Roman marble 
statue of Hercules, dating 
from the second century AD, 
which was found in an orna- 
mental lake in Berkshire. It is 
rumoured that there was a fe- 
male companion, but she has 
yet to be found. 

At Bonhams, on 4th Dec- 
ember, their fifth annual 
Southfield sale will be held, 
including pictures, ceramics 
and bronzes. Perhaps the 
most amusing item is a paint- 
ing by Frederick Valter en- 
titled The Art Critic. It shows 
a triumphant bull in a field 
amidst a disorder of aban- 
doned brushes and paint- 
boxes! Linda Wagner 

AGNEW GALLERY 

43 Old Bond St. 

London W1 
01-6296176 

OLD MASTER 
DRAWI NGS AN D 
SCULPTURE 
UntB 20 December 
Mon-Fri 9-30-5.30: 

Thun until 6 JO. 


Period panelled rooms in pine and oak. 

Anbque chimney pieces in marble, stone and wood. 
Life-size classical bronze and marble statues. 

Superb wrought iron entrance gates. Garden « 
temples, vases, seats, fountains, statues etc M 





JON I ‘ON 


inniirrHMiiiiL.in'Lmirti Buu* iiimrf Also visit our Gallery at 
MdAv, iw»'Bn tjqdnj Old Bond Street House, 

7rM>MH?r*7N IH^WUnn 

SHuanl taiMTO ImU' R m IaI A l HMIlim, Aii|wil O Ulu DOIlU 3unl< 
MMninudvndAiun 4.n>jim wiayiair, ujnuun. 


U. 


in Miinchen seit 1864 • in London since 1985 


Antique Furniture, Sculpture 
and Works of Art, Chinese Art, 
Carpets, Tapestries and Textiles. 


BERNHEIMER FINE ARTS LTD 
32 ST. GEORGE STREET 
LONDON W1R9FA 
TEL: 01 -499 0293 
TELEX: 268091 


L BERNHEIMER KG 
LENBaCHPLaTZ 3 
8000 M0NCHEN 2 
TEL: 089-59 66 43 
TELEX: 5 212 724 


London Galleries have 
Something for all Tastes 
and Purses 


L ondon is the centre of the international 
art market not just for auctions but also 
ffor art galleries. They cover the full 
spectrum of works of art and prices. 


Bcmheimer of Munich 
opens its London branch next 
week. This is a family firm 
which has been in business 
since 1864. The present Mr 
Bc mheim er is an enthusiast 
for famille verte porcelain, 
and this will have pride of 
place in the new London 
showroom. 

The London branch offers 
the same range of works as the 
German. In addition to the 
famill e verte there are other 
Chinese works of an, sculp- 
tures, European works of an, 
and furniture. One major de- 
partment is devoted to car- 
pets, textiles and tapestries. A 
complete interior design ser- 
vice is available. 

Because Bcmheimer is a 
family business it prides itself 
on the personal attention it 
can give clients who return 
year after year, generation 
after generation. 

The first British exhibition 
of the prims of Junsuke 
Watarai will be held at the 
Milne Henderson gallery for 
the next three weeks. Watarai 
was born in 1936 in northern 
Japan. His work combines the 
inner searchings of a very pri- 
vate artist with the experience 
of international travel and 
study. 

He is attracted by musical 
and theatrical subjects, and 
his work is peopled with the 
warmth of the world of crea- 
tivity. He is also renowned as 
a book illustrator and has 
published many albums of 
prints in the traditional 
Japanese manner. 

Growth er of Syon Lodge is 
a family-run business, begun 
nearly 100 years ago when 
Tmn Growth er, a stone- 
mason, sold his marble 
mantles and tombstones from 
a barrow in Chelsea. Now the 
company is renowned as a 
so nice of architectural an- 
tiques and sculptures. 

Conveniently located in an 
Adam-designed house not far 
from Heathrow Airport, 


Crowtber has a wide range of 
statues for both interior and 
exterior use, wrought iron 
gates, chimneypieces and 
urns and vases. The antique 
garden statuary section is now 
housed in a gallery in Bond 
Street. 

The China Restore Studio 
offers a two-week introduc- 
tory course in restoring china. 
As antique porcelain becomes 
more valuable restorers are in 
great demand and the course 
gives a good grounding in the 
subject. Tuition is combined 
with visits to outstanding por- 
celain collections in London 
and outside. 

From 9th -1 1th December 
Oriental Bronzes are holding 
an exhibition of 41 outstand- 
ing gold, silver and gilt 
bronze pieces at the Mayfair 
Holiday Inn. The exhibition 
includes works which date 
from the warring states period 
to the T’ang dynasty. Bowls 
and other vessels, scissors, 
jewellery, mirrors and belr 
hooks will be on show. 

William Drummond's 
Christmas exhibition features 
over 200 items all modestly 
priced, beautifully mounted 
and framed. There are water- 
colours, drawings and a few 
oils, all aimed at the collector 
with modest means, with 
most prices in the £65-£150 
range. 

At Agnews there is an exhi- 
bition of German Impression- 
ism and Expressionism which 
ties in well with the German 
art exhibition at the Royal 
Academy. This exhibition 
comes from the Leicestershire 
Museum and An Gallery. 

The works of R B Kitaj are 
on show at the Marlborough 


REMBRANDT 
ETCHINGS 

Exhibited for Sale at • 
46 East 65th Street 
New York NY 10021 
Artemi* Fine Arts; 

N G Stogdon Inc 
Ring 212 772 8890 
for Appointment 


Etchings by the important 
contemporary Japanese artist 

JUNSUKE WATARAI 

* 26th NOV- 

13th DEC 




96 MOUNT STREET ■ LONDON W1 Y SHF ■ 01-499 2507 

Every Piece Of Jewellery 
Has a Story Tb Tell 

Was l^alaounis presents his collections 
ol gold jewellery and silver objels'. 
inspired by history, nature and technology 
at his new I/ondon Gallery. 

©ilias LALAoUNIS @ 

174 New Bond Sired London \M 

OT-491 0719 and 01-491 0673 

rwtK uvm maul wniiu iuuxn.ui* • mill Huviura. 


EXHIBITION DECEMBER 10 & 

11, 1985 

Holiday Inn Mayfair, London 

ANCIENT Cl IINESE GOLD, SILVER AND| 
GILT BRONZE 

Waning States up to the Tang Dynasty 

fully illustrated catalogue available: 
Christian Deydier, 

1 Z Charles Street, London W1 



Gallery. There are a number 
of self-portraits and many of 
the pictures are directly or in- 
directly on Jewish themes; 
theatrical subjects are includ- 
ed as well. 

On 4th December an exhi- 
bition opens at the Rafael 
Vails gallery of 17tb and 18th 
century pictures. There are a 
number of French and Italian 


WILLIAM 

DRUMMOND'S 

Annua] exhibition of 200 
watercolours for the collector 
with modest means. Open 
Tuesday 3rd December until 
the 14th. 

1 1 Bury St. SL James’s 
London SW1 
930 2902 & 9696 
DON’T MISS IT! 


LEFEVRE 

Specialists in 
FINE XLX AND XX 
CENTURY PAINTINGS. 
DRAWINGS AND 
BRONZES 

ALEX REID & LEFEVRE LTD 
30 BRUTON STREET. 
LONDON. WI 

Tel: 01-493 2107 Telex: 298226 
Cables: Drawings. London, Wl 


CHRISTIES 

LONDON 

Who obtains the 
glittering prices? 


.... " if~ '-'intarfiTt'i i ■ ' iT^i - i 


A tmmpc I'oeil of letter, comb, quill, key, watch and other items 
in a letter rack by Evert Collier. Oil on Canvas. 


trorape I’oeil drawings which 
are calculated to amuse. 

Artemis Fine Arts 
specialises in prints and draw- 
ings, and always has a fine 
display of Old Master and 
19th cenruiy works in the gal- 
lery. The New York premises 
are showing etchings by Rem- 
brandt. 

Linda Wagner 


CHINA /gZfc 
RESTORATION 
COURSES r-srZ 


WVuHci ancici'ingapportunii) few 
vnion lempira nly tuseil in UK Our 
)«#<i»hesjnncr«i - uhki ifach ample 
bonding lumJvanreil crdim-ral 
leuwisiruciiun nwuldinp. pruning cic. 
combined wilh culiuraJ visiii m femnus 
cotlectioiK. lecture. Wnueitcr 
factory. Christie.. 

Wnie brufhurr 

25 Acfold Road, 
London SW63SP. 


RAFAEL VALLS GALLERY 
6 RYDER STREET 
LONDON SW1 
DECEMBER 4!h-24th 1 985 
AN EXHIBITION OF 
TROMPE L'OBL 
PAINTINGS AND DRAWINGS 


Ur i Fi Finely made 
1 Kfc® Edward, an 

jEi jjr. flexible 

^ Sold at Christie's 

Christie’s do, regularly. 

Last Season, Christie’s sold over £40,000.000 of 
Jewellery in our Salerooms worldwide. Entries are 
now being accepted for our sales in the New- Year. 
We are happy to provide valuations for all purposes 
and advice on forthcoming auctions worldwide. 


8 King Street, St. James’s, London SW1Y 6QT. 
Tel: (01) 839 9060. Telex: 916429 
17 rue de Lille, 75007 Paris. 

Tel: (331) 4261 1247. Telex: 213468 










** 




Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


1 NYSE Most Actives" 


AT&T 

Texaco 

BoxtTr 

Aiasenn 

AMR 

ESKotf 5 

IBM 

BeatCo 

SeoLnd 

UAL 

TntOGs 

DeltoAr 

Wkt B £ 

FoniM 

Am Exp 


13303 


1UM 


Utah lAtm 

lAl 

Che. 

23ft 

23 

23ft 

+ * 

35% 

14* 

35 

4- U 

13% 

45% 

13* 

44ft 

10* 

45* 

+ ft 

42* 

■** 

38* 
47 Vi 

41ft 

48ft 

-rift 

140U, 

139 

14Q 

+1 

ff 1 

46* 

24U 

44 li 
24ft 

+ % 

50'A 

46ft 

ifiVk 

-1% 

15* 

15ft 

15% 

— VI 

38* 

36% 

37ft 

-1% 

45* 

446, 

45* 

+IU 

54* 

53ft 

54* 

ta ft 

48* 

47* 

48* 

+ ft 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Nigh Low Last COB. 


Indus 1445J0 1466J6 1439.79 146227 + 2105 

Trans ASA. TO 6*732 674.16 46847 + 2.63 

uni 7 aasb ■ jmjs iaxtb imjh + t.n 

Como S62J1 S9M6 577 JO $87.58 + 688 


NYSE Index 


Composite 

Industrials 

Trans. 

uiliines 

Finance 


High low ani CJrge 

UAH HSJO 114.12 + IJ3 

13X07 133-07 13X07 1- MB 
11)26 HOJU lion + 0-77 
60.10 S9J6 60.10 +D-6T 
135.35 12427 12X25 + 1.49 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages] 


Gok 

SUl 


NYSE Diaries 


Close Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unch an ged 
Total Issues 
New HlDhs 
New Lows 


1265 

423 

379 

2067 

192 

11 


750 

BOS 

472 

2033 

10B 

12 


Volume up 
V olume down 


I Odd-Lot Trading in N.yTI 


NOV. 30 . 
NOV. 19 . 
NOV. IB . 
Nov. IS. 
NOV. 14 . 


Buy Salat 
1684)17 481.209 
100,107 507,452 
17X322 5D8J003 
224J29 513,117 
mow 499^254 


•Stm 

1236 

10314 

6034 


'Included In me sales figures 


1.7B5 


Hmrsda^s 



Vol.flMPAL. 


PTBV.4PJ4.VOl 

Prev coo sollclated doss 


wjzxoso 

ifiSrinno 

ummjtv 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
tip to the closing on Wall Street raid 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


CtMS 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New High* 
New Laws 


345 Z72 

m w 

•03 266 

B34 IBS 

34 24 

5 U 


Volume up 
volume down 


444A02D 
1 <684.125 


NASDAQ Index 


Composite 

Industrial* 

Fin ance 

insurance 

uilllli«« 

Bonta 

Tiunn 


WSJ 

311.16 

40651 

37X94 

29*50 

327J19 

Z7X70 


.Week- Year 

are* ah* a*o 

+ 126 MUl • — 
+153 30X31 — 

+xo mss — 

+ X12 37X61 Cbd. 
+286 2918* — ' 

+ 036 32187. — 

+£5 27X26 - 


Standard & Poor's Index 


industrials 
Tran s>. 
Utilities 
Finance 
Cotnpeslle 


High Law CMse ant 
22485 02134 224-05 +285 
18258 1B0.W 18186 + 1J9 
so ns 57.1 S BUS +087 

S nn J4fl +031 

201.43 198.99 20TA1 + 2A2 


AMEX Sales 


J 


4 pjm. valuins 
Prev. 4 PM. volume 

Prtv. ant. volume 


| AMEX Mrot Activts ‘ 


Men Lew best o®.' 


UatP 

hdnOk 

FCflpMd 

WnoflB 

Wicket 

TasAlr 

AleaCn 

AM inn 

viCWWA. 
Atnadti 
EchoS s 

Hfflinspf 

BAT In 
TIE . 
Ebfnar 


37X3 

3372 

3389 

3331 

2326 

2138 

33 

1704 

1693 

1642 

1545 

less 


2% A 

25V, 34% 

s* m 

i9 w* 
m ju 
1 Sk. H 

* if* 
im nn 

12V. !Z% 

IM 13% 


“ HL 


JVt 1+ % 

■is *§■ 

tM ... 

»% +w»" 

I, + * 

■ Oft . . ; . 

*%■ 
U* + ft 


4 Vi __ 
5* Sft 
2% 29k 


5H 

2V» 


+ fe 





\ 


AMEX Stock I octet — 1 


High 

24056 


Law 

23X73 


CVbt 

24057 '7**04 



(fHi"? 
*0* 


12 Monti) 

HlctiLayf 51x6 


Sis. CkM 

aw. YW. PE I mb high Low Qiiot OiV 


14 IS 
IS 


IMa 58 
-32 24 

172 108 


244s lfi AAR 
16% 916 AGS 
14 ?*» AMCA 

SO*. OTi AMR 

16% AMR of 2,16 « 
12% 7% A PL 
15% 9 ARX 
59 324. ASA 

27 1DV- AVX 
2394 20 AZP 
63 38% AhrLnb 

2576 IWt ACCOWd 

2-A. ID AcmeC 
10ft 7 AemeE 

19 15% AdC Ex 

20 13% AdmMI 

143m 0ft AdvSv* 

36% 22% AMD 
12% 10% Adooen 
15% 14% Aaob of A 
>7% 15% AdobpfB 
12% 6% Advest 
53% 34% AetnLf 
57% S3* AetLPf 
39% 22% Ahmns 

3% 2% Alison 

59% 44% AlrPrd 
24% 17% AlrtaFrt 
2% 1% AJMoa 5 

29'4 23% AlaP of - 

33% 28 AJaP PfA192 1X6 
8% 6% AiaPdpf 87 1IL4 

B7V, 66% AlaP Pi 980 105 
77 61% AlaP tf 

76% W AlaP of 
26% 12% AlskAir 
30% 12% Albrto 3 
33% 26% Alblsns 
31* 2211 Alcan 
38% 27% AtoStd 
32% 71 AlexAJv 180 
30 20% A led: 

89% 72* AllgCp 1541 18 21 
27% 24% AkgCPPt 286 10.7 
28% 20% Alglnf IM 5-5 
20% 16% A loin pf 119 111 
98 85* Algl pfCHJS 128 

34% 28% AltaPw 170 88 10 
24 16% AllenG 800 17 T2 


-10e 65 

1630 95 


23% 15% AlldPd 

48% 42 AkJ5gnn 180 *0 

70% 62 Aids PlA 4.12 8.1 

63 SS% AldS p*C 474 iav 

111 103% 1 '5 

l«i% 10’% AldS Pf F __ 

64% 47% AlldStr 120 14 
9% 3% AlllsOi 

34% 24 AlltCpt 

30% 22% ALLTL t.°6 67 

38% 30% ALLTpl 286 X4 

39% 29% Alcoa ~ ~ 

19 10% Amax 


101 23 t2*i 23 + & 

58 19 18% 1B% + % 

30 11% l!% 1 J% + 9. 

721394 42% W* 41% 

14 23% 23% 23% 

5 101 10% 10% 10% + % 

4 143 15% 15 f S 

366 37% 36% 37% + % 
244 13U, 12% 11% + % 
__ 7 2222 26Ui 25% 26% + % 
1.40 12 17 2117 43% 62 S?21 ft 

JO 11 17 570 23% 23% Z3% + £ 

M 16 446 11U> 11 '1% — % 

J2b 4J 11 93 7% 7 7% + % 

1.92=10.5 11C 1B% H’i- % 

8 10 I 48 20 19% 20 + % 

J3t 16 21 3SS 14% 14% 14% + % 

40 5584 27VS 26% 27 + % 

105 12V« 12 12 

309 15% 15% 1^ + % 

198 17% 17 17% 

.12a 1.1 15 323 10% 10% 10% 

284 58 17 2*67 52% 51% 53% +1% 
X41« 245 56% 55% M% + % 

1_20 m 7 604 ) 40% 38% 40% +1% 
159 2% 2% SB * + % 

1A8 25 13 1621 M% 59 59% +1 

80 19 12 64 21% 20% 21 — ^ 

1053 1% ^ 

ISO 28% 28% 28Vj— % 
139 28% 28% 28% 

248 B% 8% 8% + % 

170i 8S% B4% 85% +2% 
12701 76% 76% 76% 

$80. 76 75 76 +1% 

1956 19% 18% 18%— % 
42 29% 29 2W? , ^ 

MO 32% B* + % 

36% 37 

644 32% 31% 32% + % 
60 28% 28% 28% 

35 83% 83 83% + % 

11 26% 36% 14% 

339 2S% 25 S’* + 14 

29 18% 18 18% + % 

50 91% 89 89% —2% 

449 32% 32% 32% + % 

31 22% 22% Tgk 

. 54 19% 18% 19% 

723570 45% 44% 45% + % 

45 47 66% 47 —2% 

179 62'A 60% 61% + fh 

8 107% 107% 107%— % 
555 !0r.i 103% 

8 2601 64% 63% 64% +1 

279 3% 3% 3<4 — % 

16 29 27% 28% +1 

9 82 2B% 29% + V. 

, S 38 38 38 + % 

1.20 14 J3 &rn 359, H 35% +1% 

.101 549 11% 11% 11% 


8.16 1X7 
828 109 
.16 
J8 
J6 
,30 

1-24 „ 
XI 


5 7 
15 22 
2J 13 


10 51 1681 27 
3J 16 390 37 


26 


36% 27% Amaxpf 100 108 4 28 27% 27% —Hi 

34 22% AmNes 1.10 17 24 2884 29% 29% 39% + % 

2% 1% Am Apr 844 1% 1<« 1% 

27% 16 ABokr 10 235 34% 24% 2*% + % 

65 8 839 60% 59% 60 + % 

9.1 4329 30% 30% 30U + % 

44 2 60% 60% 60% + % 

U 30 1194 119% 119% 119% + % 
16 14 51 24 23% 24 + % 

21 16 213 31% 31 3T — % 

66 13 2238 63% 61% 63% +1% 

184 24% 24% 24% 

2 55% 55% 5514 + % 


70 5JX. ABrand 3.90 
30% 25% AHrdpf 2.75 
70% 54% ABrtPf 267 
119% 56% ABdCSt 1J0 
30% SOU ABIdM 86 
31% 20% ABusPr jbi 
63% 471. AmCcn 290 
25% 22U A Can pf 280 114 
55% 42 ACtmpf 380 54 


116 103 AConpM175 118 

72' (a IB ACOPBd 240 9 3 
30% 25% ACaoCv 251e 94 
11 5% ACantC 

58% 44% ACvun 
29% 19% ADT 
24% 19% AElPw 
49% 34% AmExf 
29% 14U AFomTs , 

36% 23% AGnCp 180 
16 8 AGnl wt 

56% 52 AGnl PiA584e1Xl 
71% 47% AGn pfD 284 48 
36% 29 AHerit 140 34 H 
13% 7% AHoiSt 
66% 48 AHome 
50 26U AHosp 


99% 73% Am rich 680 
101% 62 AlnGrp 44 
166 114 AIGppf 585 

2B% 16 AMI 42 
4% 2% AmMot 

29 13% A Frauds JO 

13% 5 ASLFta 
18% 12% mSLFI Pf 219 124 
15% 11% ASMP 80 64 


2 117 117 117 +1 

105 22V. 22% 22% 

33 27% 27 27% + % 

05 5% 5% 5% + % 

34 17 1740 58% 57% 58 + Vi 
34 26 314 28% 27% 27% + % 
98 9 2432 23% 23 23% 

28 1611424 48% 47% 48% + % 
18 17 1222 29% 27% 29% +1% 
38 9205933 32% 32% + % 

695 12% 12% 12% + % 
9 56 55% 56 + % 

!10 66% 66 46% + % 

12 36% 36% 34% + % 

120 9% 8% 9% + % 

190 4.9 12 4718 60% 59% 59% 

1.12 14 17 2734 50% 49% 50 


140 

.92 

246 

146 

M 


in™ 10o2 98% 99% +1% 

34 10 Ifs'wS^S^-lh 

77% ins 17V. + % 
“ 8% 8% + V, 


24 7 


2205 
1261 
309 
161 
9 161 


35% 26% AmSId 180 44 1! 2187 

68U 35% AmStor M 18 IT 336 

78 46% AStrpfA 448 54 6 

58% 51 AStrpfB 680 11 J 54 

AT&T 1-20 5.1 1729130 

AT&T Pf 344 8.9 
AT&T pf 344 8.9 
AWalrs 180 3J 
AmHotl 240 188 
£64 78 



24% 18 
41% 33 
42 IS 34 
30'A 17 
28% 12 


24 16 
10 

140 38 9 
140 15 17 


148 

132 

44 

-60 


24 

54 

28 33 
18 16 
24 14 


72% 61% ATror 
18 6% ATrsc 

89% 69% ATr un £64 
45% 26% Ameren 180 
25% 12% AmesD s .10 
29% 19% AnwhA 80 
28% 18% Amide 
16 1 vlAmfsC 

70 'A 50% Amoco 
37% 27% AMP 
21% 11% Ampco 
23% 12% Amrap 
38% 22% AmSth 
46% 32% Amslad 
4% 1% Anocmp 
24% 16% Ankro 
27% 19% Anchor 
48% 33% AnClav 
14% 9% AndrGr 
27'A 17 Angelic _ 

39% 23V, Anheuss 80 
73 52 Anheu oi 3^0 

19U 13% Anixtr 48 U IB 
16V. 10U An) hem 84 4 27 

15% 10% AnttVTv 84b X0 V 
12% 9% Aoacho 48 24 12 
2 % ApchPwt 

19% 15% ApdlP UH2.10 114 
34% 30-4 ApPwpl 4.18 128 
31% 28 ApPwpf 380 124 

39% 1S% AplDIa 

1W 8% ApdIMb 
24% 16% ArchDn 
102% 7B% ArlPpI 
31% 26% ArIPpf 
S8% 14 ArVBst 
24V. 16 Arklo 
% V. ArtnCp 
15% 11% Armada 
11% 61i Armco 
3% 15% Armc pf zio 108 
24% 13% ArmjRb M 38 9 
£2% 28% Arm win 1-30 10 11 
-5% 23% AroCp 140 14 12 
I8U 11U ArowE 40 ‘ * 

30 U 16 Artro 42 
78 17 Arvln s 80 

27V 15V Asa r co 
77 23V AshlOII 180 

44U 35 AshIO pf 3.96 
39% 24% AsdDG 3 180 
1WU 79 AsdDpf 4JS 
23% 16% Athlone 180 
29V 23V AlCvEI 2J8 &9 10 
67% 42 All Rich 480 68 
1609. 100% AlIRcpf 280 18 
17V 10% AHasCo 
29% 18V Aupat 80 14 28 
56V 35 1 * AuroDt 88 14 22 
yu 4V. Avalon n 050 1.1 
36% 17% AVEMC 80 18 16 
39% 28’m Avorv 88 “ " “ 
38’A 27 Avnel JO 
28 17% Avon 100 

28% 16% Avdln 


M% 74% 
^58% 

378 41V 
26 4214 
124 2914 _ 

330 12% 1 
9 72 71 


17 17% 

1% +1 



56 17 16% S 


6 B7V 87 |7V + % 

25 46% 45% 4614 +1% 


M 

38 _ _ 

A 24 2790 26% 24% 25% + _ 
12 16 280 25% 24% 2514 + % 
687 23% 23% 23% — % 
^ 3302 1% IV IV + % 

3Jffl> 48 9 2502 69 67V 68V +1 

3 X1 29 2782 34% 33% 34% + % 

28 16 420 13% 13% 13V 

15a 22 21% 21% — % 

420 37% 36% 36% — 14 

268 46% 46V «6% + % 

5 95 2% 2% 2% + % 

905 23V 22V 23% + V 

105 25% 25% 25% + % 

127 48% 47V 48 

479 14V 14% 14V + V 

229 26% 25% 26% + V 

12 13 8567 37% 36% 36V 

667 74 V 74 V 74 V + % 

184 17% 1714 17% — % 

383 IS 14% MV 

124 14% 13V M% + V 

477 12% 12 12 + % 

196 1% IV IV— % 

300 18% 18V 18V 

103 33% 32% 12% — % 

1.76f 58 55 2920 3?% 31% 3?% ^ 

32 166 14% 14% 14% + V 

■14b 8 13 4232 24 V 23% 24V + % 

2™*.!- 50z 99 99 99 —IV 

WIJ»„ W 30 29V 30 

H IS , 27V 27% 27V + % 

180 58 27 17B5 19 18V 18V + % 

128 % % + 

29 14 13% 13% + % 

1207 9% BV 9 +1* 

11 20% 19% 2CV 

409 14V 14% 14V. + % 

649 4J% 42% 47V 

ID 35 34% 35 

580 16 T4% 16 +1U 

27 22% 22% 22% + % 

2S0 28 27% 28 + % 

307 17% 17% 17% + % 

935 36% 35% 36 - V 

... „ 9 42V 42V 4214 — % 

3J 13 2114 40% 39 39% + % 

H 8 ’2. ’2*% W5% +1% 

78 60 16 20% 20% 20% + % 

,2ID 29 28V 28% 

1780 66V 65V 66% + % 

2 157% 157% 157%— % 
« 12% 12 12% + % 
52 24 21% 24 + % 

729 56% 55% 56% + V 
34 4% 4V «V— % 

,12 36% 36% 36% + V 
177 35% 35% 35% + V 

71 ii ^ 21 + % 

7J 14 2318 27% 27 27% 

»7 309 20% 19V 20% + % 


1J 

18 38 

19 ID 


48 ? 


98 


18 14 
IJ 33 


B 


.92 ... 

80 20 IS 


14V 6V BMC 
35% 21 W Baumco 

1B% 15 BkrlnH 

24V 18% Baldor 
2% % vIBoMU 

10 2% vIBIdUpf 

33 20% Balls J2 

18% H% BcllvMf JO 
14V 7% Bally PL 

24 18V BIIGEs 170 

48 38% Balt pIB 4J0 

25 16 BncOns 80 

5% IV BanTet 

62 48% Bandog 120 XI 12 

55% 39 BkBm 240 44 1 
54V 49% BkBpfB J9 e 18 
101 V 101% BkBpfC 87e J 
47% 31% BkNY 223 58 7 
33V 22% Banktfa 1.12 17 9 
22V 12% BnkAm 80 5J 
47 38% BkAmpf 487«12J) 

74% 60 BkAmpf 7 J5 b 12J 
16% 13% BkAm Pf 288 
32% 24V BkARtV 280 97 12 
75% 51% BankTr 170 28 7 

37 3H4 BkTrof ISO 93 

16V 9% Banner 830 J II 
41% 19 Bard J6 1 A IS 

25 19V BomGP 180 17 19 

41% 25V Barnet* 184 16 11 

20% 16% BarvWr M XI 15 

13% 6tt BA5IX 

35% 24V Bauscn 

16% 11V BoxtTr 

27% 20% Bay Fin 


.121 183 7% 7 1 — % 

M 14 11 536 25V 25 25% + % 

5J 13 1354 16% 16% 16V + % 

& 

13 ^ 7VU 2^4 + % 

“«S \f *iaa=s 

H 9 «« 2» 34% + % 

” ,, Ml 45% 45% 45% — 1 

“ 1J 58 ^ 24% + % 

427 2% 2 2 — * 

193 55% 55% 55% + % 

5» 55% H 55% + % 

99 54 53% 54 +1% 

an 101 v 101% tew 
436 45% 44% 45% - % 

727 30V 29% 39% - % 

3003 14% 14% 14% — V 

193 3« 39 39 

26 60% 59V 59%—% 

110 14V 14% 14 V- % 

123 26 25% 26 + % 

678 70V 69V 70% +! 

1 26V 26V W, 

156 16V 16 V 16% — V 

682 40 39% 40 — V 

289 26% 25 26% +3% 

760 39% 38% 39% + % 

176 19% 19 19V — % 

.12b 7J 12 213 9% 8% 9% + v 
-78 16 14 1944 30% 29V 30% + % 

J7 U 5726395 13% 13% 13%_ % 

JO 8 631 24% 24 24% + % 


34V 26 BoySIG 260 78 11 27 33V 32V 33V + Vi 


22% 19V BeorS! n 


... 4023 20V 19V 20 + % 

38V 31% Bearing 1.00 28 14 151 35% 35% 35% — % 

47 28 BeotCo 180 19 913836 46% 46% 46% 


138 19 

m mil 

10 15 


180 


A0 16 12 
Ml L9 11 


86V 52% Bectpf 
16% 12% Bear 
60% 39, BechiD 
7V fk vIBeker 

17% 12% BeldnH 

37% 22% BelHwl . 

37 22 BelHwpf 87 2.1 

98% 76% BellAtl 680 68 9 
33 25% BCE a 

28% 19% Bel II nd . .. 

44% 31% BellSau 280 63 9 
57 41% BefoAH 80 U 24 

43V 24% Semis 180 13 13 
47% 31% BenfCp .... 

40 32V Benefpf 4J0 108 

43% 33 Benefpf 4-50 10J 
206 I47U Benefpf £50 17 
23% IB Benefpf 2J0 10.4 
19% 16% Beneqtn 180 7.1 
6% 3% BenalB 871 

9 3% Berkey 


B37 86% 85% 85% + % 

271 UVa 14 14% + % 

533 61% 60% 61% +1 

180 1% 1% 1%-rft 

87 15V 15V 15% + V 
669 31% 31V 3«% + % 
1 31V 31V 31V 
892 «% 97% 98% +1% 
486 31% 31V 31% + % 
1.1 30 207 58% M 28 — % 
2906 44V 43% 44% +1 

211 48% 48% 48%—% 

180 23 19 36 43 43 43 + V 

280 46 12 1003 46V 45% 45% - V 

3 39% 39% 39% + % 

200* 43 43 43 — % 

90z205%205% 205%— % 
1000x 74 22V 24 +1% 

5 16% 16V 16% 

209 4 3% 3% 

105 7% 6% 7% + V 


80 


M 


15V M Beal Pd 84 18 61 2023 15% 15 15V + V 

71% 15% BethSfl J01 8371 15V 14% 15% + % 

49% 36U BelhSI Pf 580 12J IBS 40 3SV 39% +1 , 

24 V 18% BeHi5lpfl50 112 282 20% 20 20% + % 

40% 59 Beverly J2 .9 18 2045 37% 36% 37V + V 

“ 11 92 75S 2SV 24% 25% + V 

22 72 18% 18% 18% — V 

12 17 4069 20 19% 1?> + % 

M 35% 35 35% + % 

_ . . - . 908 22V 22 22% + % 

35 19V BlkHRs 1J6 48 15 1140 34% 33% 34 + % 

50% 34% Boeing ■ 188 13 14 7740 48% 47% 48 + V 

_ . c - " 4J 24 139S 44% 43% 44% +1 

88 10 57% 56% 57% + % 

... J 30 200 31% 31% 31% + % 

44% 28V Borden 5 1-52 3J 12 2105 45% 44V 45% +)% 

24% 19% BorgWo S6 4J 12 1363 S% 22% 22% 

- - 14 66 10V 10 10V + V 


26% 19% BlgThr 
24% 13% Blocfl n 

26% 17V BlockD 

36V 24% BIckHP 182 £4 10 
27% 14V Blair Jn JBI 


51 37 BalseC 1J0 

6) 50% BolseC pf580 

32% 18% BottBer -10 


10% 4% B+rmns 


Dow Index Soars 23.05 Points 


UmteJ Press International 

NEW YORK — Stock prices rocketed to new 
heights in heavy trading Thursday as the Dow 
Jones industrial average and other broad mar- 
ket indexes rocketed to record highs. 

The Dow Jones industrial average zoomed 
23.05 to 1 ,462.27, smashing through its previous 
record of 1,440.01 

The broader market indexes also broke re- 
cords. The New York Stock Exchange compos- 
ite index rose 133 to 116.12, passing its old 
record 114.82. Standard & Poor’s 500- stock 
index climbed 2.42 to an unprecedented 201.41. 
The price of an average share jumped 41 cents. 

Advancing stocks outnumbered dec liners 
1355-419 among the 2,058 issues traded. 

Volume on the Big Board expanded to 1 5032 
million shares traded from 105. 10 million 
Wednesday. Composite volume totaled 182.86 
milli on shares, up from 129.38 million in the 
previous session. 

Analysts expressed satisfaction with both the 
quality and breadth of the day’s move. Market 
bellwether IBM rose to finish at 140M, an 

all - time high. 

“Very high quality stocks are leading the 
market broadly higher,' " said Barry Berlin of 
Shearson Lehman Bros. “That indicates the 
move is real and not just a speculative, one-shot 
deal." 

Mr. Berlin said that the market was accumu- 
lating momentum because investors are afraid 
that if they do not get in, they will miss higher 
prices. 


M-l Jumps $ 1.5 BilUon 


The Associated Press 
NEW YORK — The narrowest measure of 
the U.5. money supply. M-l, rose $1.5 billion in 
the week ended Nov. II, the Federal Reserve 
Board reported Thursday. The increase was 
within expectations. 

The Fed said M-i, which indudes cash in 
circulation, deposits in checking accounts and 
nonbank travelers checks, increased to a sea- 
sonally adjusted S613.6 billion from a revised 
5612.1 billion the previous week. 


“A steady flow of money coming out of short- 
term money market deposits and into stocks is 
triggering the move," he said. “Interest rates 
have come down and people are realizing they 
can do considerably better with appreciation 
and dividends in the stock market than they can 
with the interest rates offered on short-term 
money market funds.” 

Mr. Berlin said that at some point, investors 
will take profits. But be said even taking that 
into account, the market's direction is “dearly 
higher." 

“The market’s strength is phenomenal" said 
Marvin Katz of Sanford C. Bernstein. He called 
buying frenzied. 

AT&T was the most active NYSE-lisied is- 
sue, rising Mi to 23H. Texaco followed, adding K 
to 35 to. Baxter-Travend was third, easing to to 
13to. 


12 Month 
H Mi Law Stock 


EH*. Ylft PE 


Sts. 

18b High Low 


Ctose 

Quota-go 


44% 33 
85 67% 

11% 9% 

14% 11% 
25% 19% 
31% 25% 
66% 47% 
4% 3% 

34% 21% 
29 22 

4 1 

29% 16% 
43% 34% 
37% 30% 
26% 16 
36% 25 
5«ki 32% 
41 28IA 
40% 29% 
19% 16 
20 16% 
20U. UYt 

32 24% 

611% 45 
7% 6% 

52 47% 

18% 9% 
68 52 

2 0 % 11 
5% % 

12 % 1 % 


BosEd 

BosEof 

BosEpr 

BosE pr 

Bmratr 

BrtgSI 

BrlSlM 

BrllLnd 

BrllPt 

8r>T2RP 

Brack 

Srekwy 

BkyUG 

BkUGPf 

BwnSh 

BrwnGp 

BcwnF 

Bmswk 

BrshWl 

Bundy 

BunkrH 

BurlnCt 

Burflnd 

BriNHi 

BriNopt 

BriNPf 

Burady 

Burrs!) 

Buflrln 

Buttes 

Bates of 


144 &2 8 

8-88 tax 

1.17 10-6 
1-46 1X4 
J2 32 9 
180 £8 13 
188 10 17 


281e £7 9 
-61e XI 14 


U2 &6 14 
111 7 S 8 
385 11.9 
JO .9 14 
186 4.1 22 
1JH 18 19 
IB 24 9 

52 U 15 
80 U 66 
2.16 1M 

12 

184 £3 70 
1.40 XI 9 
55 75 
£100105 
M 48 39 
160 44 12 
52 37 17 


145k 


669 41% 
240z 82 
32 11% 
74 14 
808 22% 
249 27% 
2836 6316 
63 4% 

1907 35 
147 29% 
1058 1% 

58 28% 
90 41% 
78 34% 
13 22'^ 
98 33% 
654 58% 
974 41% 
505 33% 
42 1B% 

62 19% 
24 16% 

484 31% 

M94 60 

63 7% 
710 49% 
205 11 

2166 59% 
600 14% 
160 1% 
34 2% 


41% 41% + % 
82 82 
10% 11 

13% 14 + % 

22% 22% + % 
27% 27% — % 
62% 63 +% 

4 4% + % 

34% 35 +1% 

28% 29'A + % 

1 1% + % 
28% 28% 

41% 41% + % 
33% 33% — 1% 
22 22 

33% 33% — % 
57% 58 + % 

40% 41% +1 
32 33% + % 

18% 10%.+ % 
19% 19% + % 
15% 16 
30% 31 — % 
67% 68% + % 
7% 7% 

49% 49% 

10% 10% 

59 59% + % 

13% 14 - % 

1 1% + % 

2 2% + % 


12 Month 
High Low Slock 


□os* 


29 18% CBI In 

T26% 68% CBS 



U4 108 


84 

1.16 

780 

150 


O 10 


.92 


.48 


18 
87 
-25b 17 
MB 15 15 
.9 43 


.12 

40 

.16! 


8% 4 CCX 
63% 38 CIGNA 
33% 26% CIGof 
54% 49 ClGpf 
6% 1% CLC 
63% 28% CNA Fn 
11% 9% CNA I 
28% 16% CMW 
52% 38% CPCInt Z20 
' 17% CP Nil 150 

_ - 19% CRIIMI 
19% 14% CRS 
28% 21% CSX 
168% 130 CSX pf 
40% 27% CTS 
12% 7HC3lnc 
33% 20% Cabo! 

17% 8% Caesar 
25% 13% Cal Fed . 

54% 38% CalFdpf 475 
21 13% Callhn 

32% 19% Cal mat 
15% 12 Comm I 
26 15% CRLkg 

5% 2% CmoRg 
46% 38% CamSPS ITS 
15% 11% CdPocs 48 
22% 17% CanPEg 50 
228% 151 CauCIts 70 
27% 19% CapHdS 77 
12% 9 Caring g 48 
40% Z7% Carlisle 158 
27% 1B% CaroFf 40 
30% 24 CarPw zao _ 
26% 21% CorPpt 247 105 
48 29% CarTge HO 6J 16 

11% 6% Carrol .10 
26% 17% CarPIrs 40 
31 22% CartHw 173 

46% 24% CartWl 40 
18% 12% CoscNG 170 
16% 9% CaslICk 

28% 15% CstIC pf 
15% 12 CstIC p! 

39% 28% CatrpT 
29 19% Coco 

133% 74% Colon se 450 
45% 36 Ofanpf 4JD 
10% 7% Cvngy 5* 

45% 34% Cental Z3B 
26% 20% Centex 35 
77 20% CetiSoW M2 

31% 23 CenHud 196 105 
% 37 CnlLfpf 4J0 107 

21% 16% CnllPS 144 85 11 
29% 20% CnLoEl X08 74 7 
37 31% C La El Pf 4.18 118 

13% 9% CeMPw 140 105108 

?3ft 'Si! £ V,PS 1-90 94 6 
11% 2% CentrOt 
12% 8% CrrtrvTl 
2 . <6 Cenvlll 
JW6 Crt-teed 
30% 16% CewAIr 

19 Chmoln 

27% 22 Chmlpf 170 
S«J 46% Chm! pf 440 


223 19% 19 19 — % 

15% 114 114%—% 


? ’foJ^4% 4% 4%— % 


1 .is 

. 11% 11% 11%— % 

950 17% 1714 17% + % 

A2 17 1501 52 51% 51% + % 

- -55 10 W 27% 27% 2714 

276*117 99 20% 20 20%— ta 




2 15% 15% _ 
4111X28% 27% 28% + % 
Al 1 170 170 170 -W 

37 11 180 3114 30% 30%- % 

213 279 8% 814 8% — '4 
15 246 26% 26 26 - % 

14 19B4 16 15% 15% + % 


54% +1^ 

13% + % 
‘ +■% 
— % 
+ 14 


35 10 
15 12 
95 7 


15 12 
24 9 
47 18 
15 14 
75 8 


158k 
.90 64 
JO 17 


50 


40 45 16 


9% 7% Cham So 
ift w IChrlC 
1% 'A vIChlwt 
1% WChrt pf 

HS 1 AS 2?°*® 180 64 5 

g* 54% Once pf A75 98 

® 40% Chare pf £25 106 

S2 5ft 9*9*9 Ff 655ell4 

56% 51% Diasepf 183016J 

ieii IS! Otelsea 82 34 10 

iift IL 9 m NY 248 64 5 

2% ChriYof 157 4J 

«% 51% ChNV pf 559C10-6 

2ft 2 I-W 35 13 

64J6 31 ClxttPn 
40% 29W Chevrn 
200 124 ChiMJw 

29% 16% ChIPnT 
11% ,7V. ChkFull 
5^4 31 ChrteCr 
J2% 7% Chrism 

9% Oinoma 
US S»fm gfllLOOk 

S£V. 30% Chubb* 14 

*7% SffH Chubb Of 425 64 


240 

240 


3563 25% 24% 

134 54% 54 

765 13% 13 

423 23% 23% 

480 2% 2% 

27 15 2659 46% 45% 

4518 13 12% 13 + % 

11 49 21% 20% 21% + H 

20 195 213% 212% 212% + % 
34 10 1085 25% 25% 25% + % 

33 9% 9% 9% + % 

228 31% 30% 30% + % 

237 27% 26% Z7% + % 

3476 28% 28% 28% + % 

10 25% 25% 25% + % 

211 33% 32% 33% + % 

353 7% 7 7% + % 

137 25% 24% 24%— % 

128 29% 28% 29% + % 

B8 46% 46 46% + % 

57 15% 15% 15% — % 

1923 12% 12% 12% + % 

3 27% 27% 27% + % 

262 15% 14% 15 + lx 

4151 39% 3SU. 38% + % 

43 28% 27% 28% + % 

420 136 133% 135% +2% 

9 46 4516 451b 

123 B% B% B% + % 

SOS 45 44% 45 

222 25% 24% 25% + % 

1318 2611 25% 261A + % 

152 28% 27% 28% + % 

100144 44 

180 19% 19% 19% + U 
110 27% 27% 27% + % 
9 35 34%. 35 + & 

232 13 12% 13 + % 

82 20% 20% 20’A + % 
166 4% 4% 4% 

89 12% 12% 1» 

274 16% 161A 16% 

619 26% 25% 26% +1% 

44 30% 30 30% + % 

2384 23% 23% 23% + % 

23 24% 23% 23%—% 
73 53% 53% 5314 + % 

653 B% 8% B% + 14 

=§? * T£ * 

126 3 2% 2% 

2468 63% 62% 6314 +114 

4 68% 67% 68% +1% 

11 49% 49% 49% + % 
38 55% 55% 55% 

24 52% 52% 52% 

36 23% 23% 23% + 14 

113 30% 27% 30% 

4034 4114 40% 41 + % 

II 41% 403* 41% +1% 

2 55% 55% 55% — 14 
, ..I 4 3SV * 35% — % 

4J 13 2104 42% 41% 42V* — % 
62 10 4342 38% 37% 38% + % 


28 11 
X5 11 
9J 
J 23 
£3 10 
Id) 11 
77 7 
6 


66% 53 
30% 22V* 
38% 23 
35% 23V- 
35% 23% 
29% 13 
44U> 9% 

41% 24% 
20 16 
33% 23 
15% 12U, 
38 ZTA 
47% 36% 
50 41% 

37% 26% 
47% 38% 
8% 4% 

34% 20 'A 

55 33% 

56 32% 

56 35 

31% 15% 
25% 14 
28% 14% 
56 34% 

28% U% 
28% 14% 
28% 14% 
18% 10% 

17 9'i 

29 15% 

18 10% 
47% 31% 
10% 4% 

414 % 

53% 33% 
2 % 
14>A 4 

34% 20% 
38% 15% 
1% % 
40% 27% 
41% 3114 
20% 14% 
27% 15 
15% 8% 
23% 17 
27% 17% 
15V. n 
56% 32% 
5814 27% 
10% 5% 

n 6 
39% 32 
66% 23 
19% 17% 
53% 49% 
24 18% 

83% 4314 
44% 28% 
53 44 

6514 50% 
21% 1814 
35% 22% 
33% 13 
88% 5814 
11 9% 

38 30% 

5214 33% 


CwEpf 

ComES 

Comsat 

CPSYC 

Co moor 

CompSc 

Cptvsn 

ConAor 

ComE 

CnnNG 

Conroe 


774 117 
X52 88 
U0 37 
J8 1.1 
M 27 


170 2 A 
170 SJ 
260 87 
AD 27 


ConsEd 240 67 
ConEpf 445 107 
CanE pf 570 107 
CitsFrf 1.10 37 
CnsNG 232 S7 
ComPw 

CnP PtB 4J0 136 
CnP pfO 765 1X5 
CnPplE 772 1X7 
CnPpfG 7.76 137 
CnPprV 4-40 146 
CnP prU 360 U7 
CnP arT 3J8 147 
CnPnfH 768 137 
CnPprR 470 147 
CnP nr P 298 147 
CnPprN 375 147 
CnPprMXSO 146 
CnPprL 273 136 
CnPprS 472 146 
CnPprK 263 146 
CntlCP 260 £5 
Conti 1 1 
Conti I rt 
Chilli Pf 

g tUHid 
nllnfo 

ConITel 170 
CIO ate 701 
vlCoakU 
Coopt 162 38 
CoopI Pf 290 77 
CoorTr 60 27 
Caopvfs 60 16 
Coowld 72j 
Cowld pf 268 147 
Corduro 74 36 
Corel n 66 46 
ComGs 178 27 
CarBIk 170 17 


. PE 

Utah tab Low 

QuoL art* 

1528QZ66 


66 

— % 

7 

174 28* 

i-ti 

78ft 

+ * 

10 

1570 31* 

la 

31% 

+7 

17 

2926 24* 

74* 

74* 

+ * 

9 

19 27* 

77 

77* 


13 

1420 29 

78 

29 

+1 


608 lift 

11% 

nu 

+ % 

15 

16S 41* 

41* 

41ft 

+ ft 

13 

127 18* 

18* 

18* 

+ % 

10 

38 32* 

37* 

32% 

- Vk 

18 

231 15 

Mft 

14ft 

- * 

8 

1240 36% 

35 

36* 

+ % 


100X 44% 

46% 

46% 

+ % 


4 48* 

48ft 

48* 

+ % 

12 

321 37ft 

£5% 

37 

+ % 

10 

428 46 

44* 

44 

+1* 

2885 8 

7* 

8 

+ % 


110x33 

33 

33 



1520x 55% 

54 

55% 

+1% 


1440x57 

M* 

56* 

+ * 


500x 56* 

56 

56* 

+ * 


76 30ft 

29* 

30ft 



69 25ft 

74* 

75ft 

+ % 


147 27 

76* 

74ft 

+ * 


40z 56 

56 

54 

+lft 


28 27% 

27 

77% 

+ ft 


38 27% 

/jTl 

77% 

— ft 


22 27 


76% 

+ % 


15 17% 


17ft 

+ ft 


10 16ft 

rlli 

Mft 

+ ft 


30 27ft 


77%. 

- % 


7 17 

Mft 

14ft ■ 

— ft 

41 

1652 47* 

44% 

47ft 

+1% 

14 

171 7ft 

7% 

/% 



76 


J. 


CnICrd 
Crate 
Crane 
CravR s 
CrckN Pf 218 116 
OcfiN pf 379g I A 
CrmpK 170 £1 
CrwnCk 

CrwZel 170 26 
CrZelpf 463 87 
CrZei pfC460 76 
CrvsB n 

Culbre SO 22 
Culbiets 

CumEn 270 XI 
Currlne 1.10al07 
CurtW 170 37 
Cyclop* 1.10 22 


234 
W 
291 

10 10S 14 

8 2870 24 
1688 18 
23 1 

16 1245 40% 
149 40534 

S 519 18% 
1490 20 
36 9% 
31 18 

15 270 24% 
11 86 12% 
25 2672 58% 
79 83 58% 

74T26 15 153 9% 

13 38 91A 

160b 47 11 220 38 V. 
33 2817 67% 
5 19% 


23 53 
86 23% 
60 81 
165 40% 
127 52% 
4 61 

1594 23% 
41 36% 
24 1678 17 
9 264 .71 
33 IOWi 
16 37% 
110 50% 


17 


18 


1% 1% 

53 V. 53%—% 
% 

13% 14 
23% 24 + % 

"ft "ST* 

40 40% 

401* 40% 

18 18% 

27% 28 +% 

9% 9% + % 
17% 17%—% 
23% 23% — % 
12% 12% + V. 
55 58% +3% 

57% 58% +% 
9 9%+ % 

9 9% — Vi 

37% 3816 +1 
66 67% +1% 

19% 19% + % 
52% 52%—% 
23 23% +% 

80% 80% — % 
40% 40%— 1A 
52% 52% 

61 61 
22 23% +|!tt 

35% 36% + % 
16% 16% + % 
70 70V* — % 

10 % 10 % — % 
37% 37% + % 
49% 50% +1% 


70 67 9 
200 121 7 

JO 26 9 
33i 28 

-H 27 
~ 57 
86 


71 

60e 17 12 
M 10267 
597 


3 141U.1J1 141% + % 

75 22% 22% 22% — % 
92 8 7% 8 + Vi 

35 54 53% 53% — % 

131 18 9U 914 — % 
195 16% 15% 16% + Vt 
1 73% 73% 73% 

7319 44% 43% 44% + % 
487 53% 53 53% +1% 

210 6b% 66% 66% + % 


'£! M.17 8944 19% 18% 19% 


27% 31 Cllcara 222 07 10 

fli*. vL. H"B«fl XI 2a 6.1 • 

Sft 2^ £! n § rt 400 117 

Sift ffft 1M 111 

'8% 61% ClnGpf 978 123 

60% CInGPf 9J2 12 3 

75 ClnGpf 1070 116 
J6H 15% CTnMIl J7 17 
19% arclK* " " 

31 18% Cliatv 

Wk IS Circus 

Sft £lMcara», 226 4? 
100% 02% C1tcppfA9.354 96 
,8% AW Clablr J2 87 
■9% 6% ClalrS s 
32% 23% Clark E 
14 8% ClavH a 

22V. 16% OvCIf 


JO 26 
.10 A 


.10 

1.10 


170 


IS JS? 21°?' w.1 

23% 18% CtovEI 264 117 


'& U , U 

170 &? 20 
60 3J H 
60 12 12 


... __ 1i7 

« » OvElpf 760 T1J 

14% 6% aevp* joi 

left L 1 - 11 > 

JSS *5: 8™* 01 

46% 27% Clerox 
26% 14% ClubMd 
27% 25% auelip 
24% HU duel pf 
21* 7f1 coachm 
36% 16% coastl * 

00% 59% Cocoa 

21% iowcSSS 

gg* Sft Cnlemn 170 
fflfc ?2% ColsPal 1J6 
27% 16% CcHAik * 70 37 
16% 9 ColFds 
34 »% Cal Pen 

65% 50 Coltlnd 
40 26*4 CoiGas 

28% 25 CSC of 

50% 34% Combi n 2.14 47 
37% 23% C mhE n 170 15 
24% 8 COtndl* 78 3 II 
19% 15% ConiMtl J6 17 14 
2514 8% Comdre 
32% 26 CmwE 370 107 
ShCvfFpf 1 JO. 4.9 
U% CwE of 1 jq 107 
18% 15% CwEpf 270 117 
76% 62% CwEPf |3| 117 
34% 20% CwEof 2» 9 A 
26% 23% CwEpf 287 107 

wS S CwEPl 860 112 


40 25% 24% 25% + % 
* » 5116 51 5114 + % 

7 10W 19% 17% 19% + % 
820z 34 32% 34 +1 

ISW 39 30 39 +1 

47te63 6114 6114 +1 

260lte 75% 75 75% +1 

3Mte7B 76% 78 +1% 

490Z 89V4 B9% 89% +3 
,420 19JA 18% 19% + % 
1233 19it 19% 19*4 + 14 
J3 1532 2M4 2ZVz Z3*4 +1% 
13 2 2SW 24% 25% + *4 

6 6487 46% 45% 46 + % 

„ a 97% 97% 97% + % 

,, ,5 J* 3 o% a aiA— u 

1.1 19 2111 0% 8% 9 + % 

43 „ 384 2S% 25% 25% + % 

ex I? ? W% 13 13% + % 

5J 11 435 1B14 18 1816 

, m an iv% 19% — % 

7 2406 24% 23% 24 + % 

, Mz 63 63 63 +1% 
2427 7% 6% 7%+lVk 

296 10 8% 9% + % 

113 8% 7% 8*4 +1 

754 464A 4514 44 + % 

222 21% 20*6 21% + % 
283 39V, 39% 3914 
6 Wt 24% .24% . . 
142 1214 11% 12 + % 

«3 35% 34% M»— % 


296 16 16 31A5 81% 79*4 81V4 +1% 


1087 «4 1«% M% + % 
4.1 19 117 29 28% 29 + % 
IA 49 1373 31 30* 3«S + % 


385 27% 26% 26% + W 
;i2 7 758 14% Ml* 14% + % 

170 A1 10 2834 34% m 34% + JA 
250 47 


218 07 
365 


7 249 63% 62% 63% + % 
1228 37% 36% 37% + % 
4 27% 27% 27% 

1517 50*4 5014 50% + % 

388 28% 28% 38% + % 

811 23% 23% + ?* 

44 19% io% 

. 1537 10% 9% 10 — % 

610708 W4 »% V. _ 

1 29% 29% »%— % 

60 17% 17% 17% + % 

15 1EF% 18% 181* + W- 

7Q80Z7S% 76 7614 +1U. 

15 24% 24% 24% 

17 26% 26% 26% + % 
600z 75% 75% 75% + % 


23% 15% 
14% 91A 

30% 22'A 
9% S% 
15 6*4 

42 27% 

76 31 
5% 4 

71*4 6% 

22 14% 

45V. 29% 
20% 15 

40% 24W 

33% 2414 

26% 20% 
52% 36% 

10 4>A 

44% 24% 
28% 20% 
37% 3114 
17% 14 
80 64 

6914 54% 
66% 51% 
66 52 

26% 23 
28% 23 
27% 21*4 
Z7Vk 2214 
26 221* 
29% 24 
29% 24 u, 
33% 28 
34% 29 

116% 107 
20% 16% 
24 18% 

18*4 11% 
33% 24% 
21 14% 

38% 34% 
22% 19% 

11 61A 
S7V» 31% 
125% US’* 

98V. 56% 

28% 17% 
614 4% 
10% 6% 
34% 26% 
261A 16% 
61% 43% 

3714 2314 

42% 32% 

39Vj» 27 
50 3614 

38 8% 

15% 11 
24 1A 17% 
21% 16% 
76*4 35 
63% 46% 
40 31V. 

50 40 

35% 27% 

80% *5 

77 61% 

27 23% 

35% 3JW4 
83V. 60 
17% 14% 

19% 15% 

17% 13% 

18 14% 

18 14% 

20'A 15% 
25% 23% 
62% 51 
27% 20% 


90 13% 13% 13% — % 


Dallas JA £9 30 87 16*4 16% 16% + VS 

□amwiC JO 1J ” 

DanaCp 1 JB 4J 
Danahr 

Daniel .lBb 24 
DartKr* 1 J6 19 
DalaGn 


Datpfn 

DioDsg 

Davco 

DaytHd 


JA 16 
J4 1 A 
X2 1.9 


DaytPL 2.00 102 
DeanFd JA L4 
Deere I -DO XA 
DeImP 1J2 7J 
DellaAr 14» 27 
Deltona 

DIxOi* 1JM 24 
DensMf 1J0 £1 
DeSato 140 4.1 
DeiEd 1-68 mfl 
DetEpf 9J2 11J 
DetEPf 7Jfl 11J) 
DetEpf 7A5 11J 
DetEpf 7X6 11J) 
DEpfF 175 10J 
DE»rR 3-24 11J 
DE PfQ 113 11J 
OE pfP 112 1U 
DEPfB 275 KLA 
DEofO 140 1U 
DEpIM 3X2 11-8 
DEprL ADD 126 
DEofK 4.12 12* 
DEplJ 15L68 1X6 
DatE or 228 11J 
Dexter SO 34 
DIGIar J4 3 J 
DIGIe Pf 225 72 
DlamS l_57rl0J 
EHaSh pf 4 jOO 11.1 
DIaSOf n 140e 7JJ 
DkmaCp 20 28 
Dlebfdl UD 25 
Digital 


Disney 

DEIS 

Dlvrgln 

Demeg 

DomRx 

Donald 

Don lev 

Dorsey 

Dover 

OawCh 

DowJn 

Downev 

Drava 

Drew 

DrexB 

DrevtaS 

duPont 


120 12 
l.*0 &9 


.12 

284 SLA 
86 25 
1.16 28 
120 13 
88 23 
180 4J 
JO 18 
AOe 1.1 
JO 34 
80 42 
200 9.9 
80a 8 
380 4.7 


duPrtfpf 150 95 
duPnl Pf 450 92 
DukeP £80 7J 
Dukepf UO 1(U 
Duke Of 780 104 
DultoPf 289 102 
Dukepf 185 118 
DuflBnd 220 27 
DuaLI 286 121 
Dm PfA 210 109 
Duo pf 200 121 
DuapfG 210 112 
Duq prK 210 118 
DW) or 131 JU 
Ouqpr 275 112 
Dun of 720 11 J 
DvnAm 20 J 


■ 5988 Z7% 27 27% 

7 165 7VA 6% 7%+% 

438 7% 714 7%— % 

13 1284 40% 39% 37*4 + 1* 
47 3736 43% 41% 43V* +2 
368 5% 5% 5V. + % 

« 84 6% 6% 4*4— % 

9 165 17V. 17 17 — 16 

17 7036 44% 43 43% +1% 

8 696 19% 19% 19% + % 

18 119 39% 39 37% + % 

43 1359 28% 27% 28% + % 

9 1905 26 25% 25% 

712295 38% 36% 37% —1% 

1D4 8% 7*4 8 + % 

19 323 43% 42% 43% — % 

13 140 23% 23% 23% + % 

II 54 34% 33% 34% + V* 

7 2809 15% 15% 15% 

690z 79 78 79 +1 

104701 70 AS’* 70 +1% 

530z66% 66% 66% ■ . 

3001 67 65 67 +1 

7 26% 26% 26% 

177 3% 27% 27% + 1A 

75 27% 26% 27% + % 

39 27 26% 27 +% 

3 26 25% 26 + % 

146 27 28% 28% + 14 

234 29 28% 29 + % 

29 31*4 31% 31*4 

50 32% 32% 32% 

2 115% 115 115% + % 

7 19*4 19% 19% — » 

14 150 23% 23% 28% + % 

95 117 17% 16% 17% + 14 

20 31 30 31 + 14 

3422 15% 15% 15% 

48 35% 35% 35% + V. 

214 19% 19% 19% 

4 234 10% HP* 10%—% 

15 572 39% 38% 37% +1V6 

1* 6253 119 117% 118% +1% 
52 1591 96% 95% 96*4 + *4 

15 185 20% 19% 20% + % 

3 163 5% 5% 5% 

1171 9% 9% 9% + % 

9 2821 33V* 32% 33% 

11 201x26 25VE. 26 +1 

16 510 OT% 58% 59% + % 

14 26 37% 36% 36% 

14 283 38% 37% 38% + V9 

16 7063 38% 38% 38% „ 

21 482 42% 41% 43% +114 

4 230 36% 34% 36 +1% 

146 15 14% M% 

16 1318 19 18% 18% 

Eft 38% 20 20% + % 

17 664 79% 77% 77% +UA 
17 3420 63% 62% 63% + % 

2 3814 38% 3SV. + 14 
344 48% 47% 48J6 + J* 
9 1324 34% 33% 3M4— V* 
SCI 71% 71 78% +1% 

224QZ 75 75 73 — % 

1 26 IA 2614 2614 
9 3514 35 35 

22 1575 01 80% 81 +% 

8 7*7 17 1AK 17 + % 

200x1914 m* 19% + % 
100x16% 16% 16% +14. 
350z 18 18 18 + % 

8 It 17*4 17*4—14 

3302 19% 19% 19*4 + 14 
39Qz 25% 25 25 - % 

400x 52% 61 ttta+1% 

12 56 27% 27% Z7% 


43 

17*4 

32% 

20 % 

12% 

5 

2ft 

22ft 

25% 

3314 

28% 

24% 

50 

6014 

15% 

32ft 

33% 

18% 

11 

34% 

2514 

191* 

12 

5% 

34% 

16 

9% 

78% 

13% 

20 % 

33% 

23% 


29 EGG A 8 1.2 
1514 EQK n 1JA 7 A 
23% i Sy*» X7 

20 EogleF 1JU 4 j 0 
12% Bara J21 
3% Ees! Air 
1% EALWtO 
% EALwtA 
7ft EsAirpf 353k 
9% EAfrpfB4J0k 
lift EAlrpfC ■ 

21% EastGF 1X0 £3 
15% Eastuil 206 U 
4114 EsKodJ 2300 fj 
49% Eaton MO 23 
11% Echlins 
20 Bckercl 
3614 EdKBT 
14 EDO 

8 EdCrtip 
22*r Edward __ __ 
21ft EPGdaf 235 M 

9 EITara Me A 
7ft Elcor JA 34 
2ft EfecAs 

15ft ElefSP 8 JB 4 
11% Elgin JO £0 
2 Else bit 

66 EmrsEt 276 27 
6% Em Rod JftllJ 
15% Entry A JO XI 
26<4 Emtian 140b <7 
17ft EmoDs 1J8 21 


44 U 
UM 35 
140 AS 
JB L9 
.16 15 
JO 26 


20 1179 
63 

IS 1716 
10 79 

111 
5 6675 
169 
245 
• 67 
. 18« 
124 
361 
9 234 
15 18552 
8 380 
12 3737 
W 3579 

15 40 
14 W 

16 283 
14 1326 

I 


11 


15 279 
341 
14 3195 
? 889 
14 751 
10 1108 
9 51 


38ft 37% 
17ft 17 
29ft 293* 
26% 26 
19 18ft 
6 5*4 

2% 2 
1 % 1 
Uft 13% 
16ft 16 
31% 30% 

24% 24 
24% 24 
48ft 471* 
61ft 59% 
13% 13% 
3014 70 
33 32ft 
14% 14ft 
10*4 10% 
30% 29% 
35ft 25ft 
10ft 10 
10ft 10ft 
5 4ft 
22 21ft 
13% 13ft 
3ft 5ft 
75 73ft 
8ft 7ft 
16(4 15% 
29*4 29 
23ft 23 


38 ft +m 
” - * 
29ft 

26J* + % 
Wft- % 
5% + % 
2 
1 

14%+ % 
16 

31 -ft 
24ft + ft 
24ft + ft 
48ft +1H 
6114 +1*4 
13% + ft 
70 

33 + % 
Mft +ft 
10ft + % 
30ft +1% 
25ft + ft 
T014 + ft 
10ft + *6 
5 + ft 
22 + % 
13ft 

3ft + % 
76 +1*6 
8% + ft 
16% — % 
29*4 + *4 

23ft + Hi 


12 Msrth 
High Low Stock 


5% 4 Emppf At 9 3 

5ft 4ft Efnp pf 50 103 

9% 7ft Emppf .91 105 

16% 12% E Bergen UM 72 10 
% EnExc 

32ft 21% EnglCp 71 U IS 
20 11*4 Enlsfius JA 15 14 

2 9ft 17*. Ensereh 150b 7.1 Ml 
56% S2V> Enseh pf £77e10J 


4ft 4ft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
Ift Bft + % 
14ft 14% 

17B 

281 22*4 22% 22*4 + % 

107 17ft 19H 19ft 

742 2Tk 22ft 32% 

270008 54% 54 54 + % 



71ft 17ft EnsExn IJOe 65 ! 156 2D 19*4 El 
2% 1% Enwc* 24 1743 _2% 2ft— % 


13ft 9% Entero 
1914 12ft ErdgxE 250OI&7 
Tift 17ft Entexin U6 6J 13 
35% 71 W Eaufas 1J4 35 21 
6% 2ft Eaulmk 
22U. 14% Eamk pf 231 120 

30% 321* EatRes 1J2 40 10 
17 8% Eewltoc .16 1J 6 

ISM. 10*4 Erbmnt JO 25 13 

24% 14% EmBuS M 1.9 14 

24ft 15 EsexCs TO 3J H 

JB 15 Estrlne 72 4.1 22 

26ft 14% Ethyl s M 72 15 

274 152 EIDVlpf 2M 3 

44ft 33% ExCefo 1J2 X8 12 

17ft 15 Excetsr IJAelOJ 

55ft 42% Exxon 350 65 9 


50 11% 11% 11% + 1* 
407 136 13ft 13% 

159 M 19% 20 +<A 

42 3514 34% 35% + ft 

419 4 3*4 4 + 14 

11 1914 18*4 1914 + IA 

253 43ft 43 43%— -ft 

254 8ft 8ft Bft 

441 14*4 14ft 14ft + ft 

173 23ft 22ft 231* + % 

69 ink 19% 19% + % 
371 17% 17 17**+ ft 

650 36ft 261* 26% — % 
2 272 272 271 —7 
103 44ft 44ft 44ft + ft 
31 17ft 17% 17%—% 
5158 53% 53 53ft + ft 


30ft 11% HortfCi JKI 
21 16 Herman 

521* 35 Hernhv 1-59 
10% Sft Htsstai 
13% 9 Kestnpf 
3*ft 38ft HewIPk 
33ft 24 Hexed 
23% 15U HJSherer 
13% 9ft HIVOU 
26% 19% Hnnbnf 
73%. 54 Hilton 
36ft 26% Hitachi 
57ft 39 Holiday 
93 65% HoIlyS 

20ft 10% HwneO 
27% 17% HmFSO „ „ , 

9ft 7 HmoG Pf 1.10 1X6 
28% 20% Hmstke 30 J 77 
18 10% HnwtFn JB IS 6 

63ft 46% Honda ASm J 9 
67ft 541* Honwell 2JOO 


J2 

M 

JO 

.17 

M 

1J0 

J4e 


UK 

1J» 


39ft 22% HrznBn US 34 12 
28ft 22% HrzBn pf 275e OS 
6% 3ft Horizon 
52ft 28% HCA MO U 9 
21% 17ft Hoff Ins 200 9J 16 
42ft 31ft HOudlM IjW ZB 13 
left 12ft HauFab >18 X3 12 


““ 'S ni ™ + 5 

"j 10% 10V, »-% 

A 18 6663 £% Mft s+S 

^ 16 

IM u% 11 ft 12 

42 23% 23ft 23% + 4k 

45S 66ft 65% 661* + % 

IM Sft “ft + ft 

506 56% 59ft 56 + % 

T3 91ft 9! ft JTft + J* 

787 lift 11% n%— % 
1W0 25% 24ft 2ft +1 
17 9% 9ft 9% — % 

593 24 23% 23ft— ft 

21 15ft 15ft 15* + 1* 

„ , *51 S9ft 50 ' 58ft +1% 
2J9 17 5189 68% A6*t Age -W% 


22 9 
L4 11 

23 13 
27 M 

J) 


1J 12 

u 8 

9 


925 69*4 68 69ft +2 

1639 26ft 26 26ft + ft 

4® 10ft 10% 10ft + ft 

71 lift 11% lift— % 
326 10% 9% 10 

122 29ft 29% 29ft— % 
437 lift 11% lift— ft 
1026 22 21% 21% 

27 15 14% 14% + ft 

7 46ft 46% 46ft + % 


132 21ft 211* 21ft + ft 


Bft 
180 5% 
77 46 


814 ■% '. ,, 
5% 51A— I* 

45ft 45%.+ % 


72 52 FMC 220 3J 35 

28 20% FPLGP LM 7J _ 

13% 9% FahOr J8 26 24 

13ft 9% Facet _ 28 

2D% Bft Falrcfld JO 2JJ 

3TO| 23% Faircnf XAO 121 

16% 11% Falrfd .ta IA « 

27 15% FomDIi JO .9 22 

18ft 13% FansteJ JO 40 15 

4614 23 FrWsfF 7 

22ft 15ft Farah J8 4.1 11 

13 8 FavDrg 30 ZA 26 

6% 4% Feders sue l.l 9 

4A% 32% FedlCa 1J4 4J 10 . _ 

52ft 31% Fed Exp 26 42S3 53% 51ft 53% +2% 

48% 31% FdHm pf 1 /Me 4.1 122 34% 34 34ft +1% 

39 30ft FdMog UO 4J 11 115 37 36ft 37 + % 

74ft 14 FedNM ..16 3 6709 24% 24 24% + ft 

“ 3J 18 268 181* 17% 181* + ft 

8J 24 28 27% 28 

AA 15 VI 1614 15% 161* + ft 

4J 14 84 19% 18% 19 — % , 

17 10 3429 68% 67'A 68% + ft 

4.1 16 296 29% 28*4 29% 

29 11 247 34 33V. 3* + ft 

3678 71* 6% 7 — % 

37% 29 FblCa pf 6J5e!74 32 36% 35ft 35%—% 

7% 2% FitSBar 9 327 7% 7 714 + 1* 

32% 25% FlrgFdn JO 3 3286 31ft 30ft 31ft +1% 

22% >6'A Firesfn JO 4J 15 2250 20 19*4 20 

28% 15ft FtAII S J8Q24 10 

58% 53% FIAtlpf 6JSelU 

43 25% FIBfcSv 1 -AO 40 7 

38ft 22 FBkFIS TOO TA 16 

47% 25% F Basts UM 23 IT 

26ft 19% FstCh Ic 1 J2 £1 V 


66 37% 37ft OT* + ft 

2 28 27ft 27ft 

96 Bft 5% 5ft + ft 
5553 34% 33ft 34ft + % 
82 21% 20% 21 — % 

58 38 37ft 37ft— % 

_ 74 16ft 14% Mft + % 

41ft 28ft HouxInT 1J1 45 10 1526 40% Wft 39ft + % 

61 40 Halntpf 250 42 3 60 60 60 

81% 68 Halntpf 6J5 13 38 81% « 5$ Fv 

29% 21% Houlnd 264 93 7 1«Q 2S% 2Wk 28% + % 

IJTelLl 72 9% 9% 91* 

XB 25 24 15 Wt 16% Wt- )* 

2J8&9 11 124 25ft 25ft ^F* + % 

AO X8 38 172 10% IOTA 10% 

M 33 2174 13% 12ft 12% — % 

32 IA 13 70 23% 23% 23ft— ft 

36 2J 13 1962 21% 27ft Z7ft 

-58 15 19 19 33ft 32% 33ft + ft 

08 IS 12 2226 361* 35ft 35% + % 

200 AS 10 59 31% 30ft 30ft— ft 


13% 8 HouOR 

19ft 14% HovrlCp 
27ft 23% Hubbrd 
13% 9% Huffy 

15% 12 HughTI 
24ft 171* HUOH5P 
36*4 21ft Human 
33 Zlft HuilfMf 
41ft 26ft HuttEF 
32 21% Hydra! 


IM 


23% 16ft FedIPB JO 
30% 25ft FPaDOf 231 
16ft 12ft FedRltS 1.04 
19% 14ft FdSanl JO 
68ft 49 FedOSt 254 
37 23ft Ferro U0 
35 25ft Eldest 1J» 
1114 5U FlnCsA -051 


3-9 15 2569 36% 3$% 36%— ft 
JHe 6.1 257 14% UK 14% + n 

70 m m W4 ia% + % 

270 95 12 28 27% 28 + K 

1J210J 36x17ft 17ft 17ft + % 

506 22% 22% 22% 

7 161 15% 15ft 15ft— % 

20 11 7883 34 33% 33% + % 


139 28% 27ft 28 + £ 

100 56% 56% 56*4 

844 40% 39 IA 39ft— ft 

357 38ft 38 38ft + 14 

861 45 44% 44% + % 

3153 25*4 25% 25*4 + ft 


17% lOft FtBTex M 48 U 1111 12ft 11% 12% + % 


38ft 26ft ICInd 
19ft 14% ICMn 
lift Bft 1CN 
30 23*4 iCNpf 

18V* 15ft IN Ain ___ , 

27ft 21% IP Tim n 1x2e 64 
17% 14% IRT Pr* 150 95 
36*4 25% ITTCp UX) 

65% 49 ITTpfK *M 
64% 49% ITT pfO £00 
48% 3314 ITTpfN 22S 
68 5115 ITT Ptl 450 

19% 11 lUInt AD 
24% 18% IdahaPs 1J2 
16% 4% ItfaalB 
27% ZT% IllPDwr 264 10J 

20 15ft UPowpf 2JJ4 IU 

21 16% UPowof 221 TU 
38ft 30ft HPowpf 412 UJ 

54% 47ft HPowpf £83 m» , 

36IA 26ft ITW J2 23 U 308 11% 31% 31% 

41% 31ft ImpOun 128* 54 6 1199 42 41% 42 + ft 
12 7% ImptCp . 101 1760 101* 9% 10% + ft 


D%. Wd. PE 


WtaHtoBLaw 


Chat 

GW arte i 


im lift LiLPfO 
31% 21% LongOt 
37V* 23% Loraf 
12ft 10ft LnGtnf 
38 28ft LaLsPd 
25% 17% LOPOC 
33% 24% LoPLpf X6M 12D 
25% T7ft LOPLPf J xm MS 


13 


J2 UUto toKAi'. 

im V IT 582 27- -Mfc' &lh* 3 
JOb 35 38 906 Z3to zn* 22ft- S 

36 30% 3B~ % 

18* S5 Bft g% +% 


Kft 25ft LoavGs 1SI 17 1 U 29% Bft- 

m uw .p m* SS'aT^S 

1.16 46 12 106* 25ft 24ft Sft + S 
M 34 15 323 U »ft M . 


■Sft 19ft Lutxil 
31 26% U»bys 

25% 16% LockvS 
16 10ft Lukens 


M 


23% 12% MACOM J4 
54ft 2Sft MCA 3 
24ft IB' MCorp 
UH KO MDC 
38 281* MDU 

42% 36% MEI _ 

18% 11% MGMGr , 

,13ft 10ft MGMGr pt44 34 
27 10 MGMUo J0e J 


1J 14 3975 g* rm rat 
33 Ten 53ft 5» 52ft '+ ft 
140 M t W _ w 

.32 ZJ? 9 4302 lift lftfi* lift + £ 

S iS A'StttK 

lW-«k 25ft- 25ft- 


11% 2% MGMwwt . • *» ‘ L, ~ V 

8% 6% MLCBfivASOe 27 4 fT 7K, _7<A. Jft . 

lift UM ML Inert ...... 3*3 W» 10ft_10ft — % 

J2VA UR* MB UP An TO ^.TO4 TP4 

jg*A 20IA Moemls 55 U »J5,WV«t l»+l 
651* 38% Moey 1J6 U IT limi AS* Sift. 61ft— ft 

54% 31% McglCf LIB 21 » 7» 54ft SXVST -ft 

27% 1% MBfASt I8JI»C • — 

17 10% Monhln 36, L* ■ 

11% 8ft MortWVr 33 13 _ 

H16 101* ManiC s .11 A 32 
OVt JOH MfrHan X30 7 A 5 


143. 3 ■ 


56% 44% MfrH of &.U01L4 
52% 41 MlrH of £43alLT 
Bft S% vtManvt ' 

25*t 15% vfMsvl pf ' . 

S* 24ft MAPCO 1J0 2S 
S 3 Marat* - - -- 

1% % Marcde 


_g=- MS + ft 

783 > fft + ft 

SI 2k: + ** 

.iS 


AC- 


6 2 
SO 
£1 
AJ 


84) 9 


£ 64% 64 64% 

12 63 62% 62% + « 

2 44% 44% 44% — % 

3 66 66 66 

908 13% Uft 13% + ft 

670 21% 21% 21%—.% 

• 180 5% 4ft . S 

7 3990 25K 24% 24% + ft 
104QzWb 18% 18%+lft 
lOQz 19% Wft 19ft 
1250*37% 37 37% +] 


90 53% 53% 53%— V£ 


7 

8 
9 
8 

75 

11 11 
8 


94 

73 13 
35 10 
35 9 


44% 32V> FIBTx pf &078145 

19% 61* Ftatv 

29V* 12% FFedAz 58b 25 

61% 43% FFB 112 53 

55% 39% Finish) 250 48 

34ft 25% FlnlstPf 237 

11% 6% FtMiss 34 

31% 16 Fdfatnn 
7% 5% FsfPq 

30*6 23ft FstPapf 262 

31% 25ft FlUnRI 200 

28% 18% FIVaBk .92 

37ft lfft FtWtec 130 __ 

55% 48% FWIscpf 635 114 

41 23% Ftachb J 51 

13% 8% FldiFd -05c A 184 

<3 36% FIIFtlGS 144 35 8 

28ft 17% Fleet En 44 

39ft 31% Flening 150 _ 

13% 11% FtacfpJ 151 128 

29ft 20 FlgMSf S .16 A 20 
35 ISft Float Pt 20 

45% 31% Fla EC .16a 4 13 

29ft 22% Fla Pro 216 7J 9 

191* 11% FloSII 52 28 15 

7% 3ft FhvGen 

21% 16% Flower 

20% 13% Fluor 

£9 47ft FooteC 

55ft 40% FortJM 

13% 11% FIDsor 

50% 28ft FtHaws 

15% 10% FasfWh 

1«% 7ft. FaxPhof 

30% 24M, Faxbro 

27 22 Foxmyr 16 1092 2S% 

22% 17ft FMEPn l.lOe 50 179 19ft 


24 35 34% 35 +% 

139 6% 6% 6% 

190 27% 26ft 27 + % 

183 62 61ft 62 +% 
1433 52 50ft 51ft +1% 
47 31% 30ft 31% +1% 
305 7% 7% 7ft 

21 31% 31% 31% 

594 6% 6% Aft — % 

84 28 Z7% 28 +% 

96 27% 27 271*— % 

319 26% 26 26% — % 

22 37% 37% 37% + % 

50* 55 55 55 

83 25% 28 28 — ft 

30 12% 12ft 12% 

137 38 37% 38 +% 

20 11 1505 22% 2216 22% + % 
25 14 47540 39% 39ft + % 

47 12% 12% 12% 

198 26% 25% 26% + ft 
2U 34ft 33% 34ft +11* 
28 40% 391* 40 +1 

670 29% 29% 29% 

641 19% 18ft 18% + % 
639 7% 7% 7% + % 

MS 21% 21% 21ft + ft 
1149 16 15% 15%—% 

250 52ft 51 S1%— % 

" +% 


46 21 19 
40 26 

220 4J 13 

280 £1 411998 54ft 53% 



13ft 13K 
1202 47ft ••• 
317 11% 


13ft 9% FMGCi 
10% 8% FMOG 
22% 15% FrpIMc 
32% 22 Frlotm 
28ft 2D1A Fruehf 
32% 26% Fruhfpf 
36% 28% Fuaua 



15% 10 INCO JO 15 
63% 50 lixflMpf 7 JO TU 
68% 55% IndlMpf 7J6 114 
19ft 15ft IndlMpf 215 105 
20% 16 IndlMpf 225 11J 
30% 26% IndIM pf 353 115 
28% 22 indIGis 2M 70 7 
7ft 41* inexco -jjTi 
54ft 40% IngerR 260 4J 17 
37% 30ft inoRpf 235 64 
16% 11 InarTec -54 13 26 
26 19K> ImdSII J8I 

48ft 38% InkOlpf 475 10L3 
21ft 16% Irallca 
6% 3% insoRs 
26% 11% IntgRsc 14 

28 ie IntgRpf 103 11J . 
361* 251A IntgRpf *35 1L7 
9% 7% Intsogn- ■ 

9% 9 Inttoopf 150 16J 
MU 8 inIRFn 
19% 17% ItcpSe 
73% 58% Inlerco 
12% 9 Intrfst 
53% 41% intrlk 
12% 8% Intmed 
24% 15% InlAlu 
139ft 116 IBM 
29ft 16% InlChi 
30ft 25 IntFtav 
lift 6% lofHary 
7% 3% IntHrwt 
3ft. 2 IntHwtB 
29% IntHpfC 


2167 !Z% 12% 13% + ft 
320r 631* 62% £2% 

U7Dz 69 67% 68% + % 

4 Wft 19% 19ft + ft 
155 20% 28ft 20% 

8 UK 30% 31ft + % 
51 26% 26 26ft— % 

SM -6ft 6 6% + % 

302 54% 53% 54% +1% 
7 36% 36 36% + % 

54 16% 16%. 16% — % 
463 23 22% 22% + to 

36 4<ft..46 461*.+ % 

180649 13 49*2 20% Wft 20% +1% 
1«i 4ft 4% 4ft + ft. 
321 25ft 24% 24% 

42 27% 27% 27%— ft 
35ft 35ft 361* + ft 
_ B%. 8% 8ft— ft 

160 9% 91*. 9% 

85 71% n lift + % 
83 19% W% 19% + ft 
234 69 6SK 69 +% 

• 674 10% UM MM— % 
+0 51- 50ft 5T + % 
_ 2673 9% 9ft Wi + ft 

n 40 9 48 18% 18 18% + % 

450 XI 1477034 1401*139 MOft +Ift 
50 15 10 in 36% 25%, 26!* + % 
L12 X2 1+ 586 35% 341* 35% +1 
10 5416 I ... 7% 8 + % 

m 4% '♦■•ft 
3% 2% + % 
30ft 51 ' 


IS 


210OML6 
XOB 45 13 
.50 SJ 31 ■ 
250 £1 10 



1J0 73 17 


XT6 

250 


280 7 A 
TAB 10.1 


JW 
56 X0 12 


20 % 

13% 

3% 

84 

65% 

9ft 


48 23% GAF JO 

37% 27ft GATX 130 
£1* 36ft GATX pf 250 
32% 4ft GCA 
80ft 54 GEICO 
6ft 3 GEO 
8 3ft GFCp 
44% 38% GTE 
39% 34% GTE pf 
26% 24ft GTE pf 
25 20% GTE Pf 

7% 3 GolHou 

66% 44% Gonneft 158 
56ft 20% Goelnc 50 
M 716 Gcortrt 
22% M% Gefco 
12ft 9% GemllC 
12% 10 Gem 1 1 | 

65 31% GnCorp 

19 14% GAInv 

62% 31% GnBcsh 
39% 22% GCinm 
38 22 GCkiPf 56 

7% GflDoto 
9% GnDgvn 
2ft GnDevwt 
63 GnDyn L00 
S3 GenEI 220 
4ft GnHme 
19ft lift GHosts 
17% B% GnHous 
22% 12ft Gainst __ _ 

68% 47ft GnM/IIS 224b 3J 
59% 52 GMIII wi 

85 64ft GMot £00r 7 J 

43ft 36 GMot pf X75 9.1 
58% 48ft GAVotpf £W 93 
46% 18% GMIr E .151 A 
50 41 GMfr H 

8% 4ft GNC .16 
16% 10% GPU 

100 58ft Gen Re 156 

1414 6 GnRefr 

53% 37 GnSlunl 1J0 

13ft 10ft GTFI pf 1JS 

13ft 10*6 GTFI pf 150 _ 

81% 64% GTFI pf 8.16 105 
. _ 2ft Goraco 
19ft 8 GnRod .10 .9 

26ft 19 GetulD 1 JO 5J 
26% 19% Gsfpf 158 &0 


A U 
AO 


+ % 




50c £2 
150b 23 37 
153e&8 
UM 15 12 
-50 1J « 
56 15 

14 

4 


JO 

JA 

35 


36 28% Genu PI 

27% 20% GaPac . 

26ft 23% GoPwpf X00 115 
30ft 25ft GcPwof X44 1L9 
31% 27 GaPwpf X76 123 
23% 19 GaPwpf 256 115 
23ft 1B% GaPwpf 252 11 JQ 
26*i 22 GoPwpf 235 lOT 
68% 57% GaPwpf 7J0 115 
67% 56 GaPwpf 732 1L7 
4TA 24 GertiPd 132 33.16 
21% 12% GerbSc .12 
31*6 14% Gettvs .16 
12% B% GIANT 
12% S’* GXbrFn 
27 16% GfffHIII 

70% 53% Gillette 
17% 11% GisasC 
14% 7V, GlenFd 
Ift.GKtfefM 
4ft GtohMpflJSI 
8ft GUNUfl 
1ft GldHwr 
40% 18% GldWF 
35 24% Gdricb 

30ft 24ft Goedyr 
Uft 14ft GondnJ 
37ft 19 Gould 
45 35% Grace 

36% 26% Grattars 


549 47% 

Tr .. 

ion 71* 6% 

135 80ft Uft 
186 3% 3** 3% + % 

«8$#i4S2ii* 

44 Bl* Bft S% + % 
72 24% 26% 

95 4ft 3% 4ft + % 
29 19 1964 58% 57*6 58% + % 
9 34 407 56% 55% 55%—% 
25 134 7ft 7% 7% 

" 316 18% tBft lift — I* 
329 lift 10% 11% + % 
299 11% 111* 11% + % 
932 64% 64% 64% — % 
112 18% 18% -18%— % 
46 62 61ft 62 + % 
998 41>A 38% 41 42% 

19 39% 38% 39% 42% 
270 10% 10% 10ft + % 
as lift 11% lift 
41 3% 3% 3% 

_ 1399 69ft 68% 68% + 1*- 

X3 13 8744 66% 65% 66% +1% 

18 B I 5ft 5% + % 
14 4 757 19% M% 19ft + % 
23 45 10% 181ft 10ft 

1997 16% 16% 16% + ft 
2072 68ft 67 68% +1 

156 59% 58ft 59% +% 
9289 71% 70% 7T +% 
W 41 40ft 41 + .% 

6 54 53ft 53ft 
1665 41% 40** 41% + ft 
6U 44 43% 43% + % 

160 SU 5 5K + ft 
3032 16% 15% 16% + ft 
900 100 99 100 + % 

176 9ft 9% 9ft + % 
740 43% 41% 43% 42 
120QZ 13% 13% 13% + ft 
400K 13% 13% 13% +1 
1180*781* 77 77 +1 

289 3% 3% 3% + % 

435 11 10ft 11 — % 

524 21% 21% Zlft 4 ft 
1.21 21 21 — % 





38% 25% MorMM IJ0 ,5X.J ■ ** 

451* 19 Marlons Ji X.41’ 5W**-a' 2% • 4'Tk -4 Ik 
Uft 8ft MarfcC M X9 10% 

17ft 13ft Marie of L20 J A J&. 14ft 4 ft 

103 70 Marrtat St S U 1 OfftTM 44% 

81 50% MrshM 270 -3A W ,»S7. -88% TMk 71% 

44% 26% MarlMl U» 23 0 2206 ISC.Sft 1W 41ft 
14% 8% MaryK JOtt,. j.15 VMS Mft Uft- Uft. . 

37ft 2Sft Masco J6T.1^ W ;P^ 37 . 3A16 37 4 ft 

3% 1% MatcyF Us -2ft 2% + % 

30% 23 MasCP* aw-nrv? +% 

12% 10% Moslnc Ullt t --. - lO tWh - PM. Wft - % 

65% 48% Mateo E - ' TO Sfe' 9K 51% +1% 

17% 9ft Mattel 320 ffifc W% l»- ft 

}31t 6% Main wf '. .^.3*. W 'ft M ft 

15% 11% Moxpar ' , 3 : TSK^n,.. 13% + ft 

6D% 37% JHIwMrUl” fiill. St Mfc 58® 4 % 
73% 43 Mntt -! BJiattdS&M M2 7T% TBft- 70ft + ft 
31% 21 MCOTPC ZajLffELfr .- 22 21% 23% 23% — ft 
30% Mft 270 Wft- Wft Wft +% 

9ft 2% Mrtlfll. ?. • 288 3ft .3% 3*6-4 ft 

Wft Aft McOW^ ■ -3*7*3 37 . 57 W 10% Wft + V. 

741* 50 NtaDME M 300 7SK 74% 75 4 *4 

87 « AVcOpO., fcJA^aA.rJ IM8 70* 89% 70% 41% 

52 37ft Mccm ?.Sa-%.r mottos 45% 44% «» + % 

39ft 25ft Mctnfo : - - 12 27 26U Z7 + % 

Sift 37, McKu^ TMpJUMlM-- 824- SM* 5tft 5fft + ft 
15 - 7ft Mldtoan-.V'1V V- -Xt r H>6 8% SH Bft + ft 

Aft JR8 McLeawt: . ... .• - TO 2 - |* 2 - 

29ft 22%r MCttff M8r3Jl-»9 i ® 26% 25ft 26% + % 
44** 33 Mead: -tax xo .u to 39% 35% 39% +1% 
25ft 15ft Mesriuc -Jt. r JV M,- 665 25% 241k 25% + ft 
43- 2£ft Medfm '® t9^M »*9 _ 4j S2 42ft- 1* 
5*%. -Cft MedQPT -l it 53 : 3 OB ■ 38% .49% J8% 41 
30ft 2*ft MeSdn &230riS5r ~ 13 28 ZTft 27ft— ft 

50ft -35ft AUMU 146E-2B -74. J11 50ft 50ft 50ft + ft 
70 53%’McrtSr.UOiU.Tl-lI7x4» J* 68ft +m 
723ft 85% Merck' 33B JJf 17 1813 n» UTft 134ft +0% 
80 50% MtnBft im -13 13 28 66*6 66% 4 ft 

36ft- 25% MerLvn JB .‘XT 17 .8531 3416 32* 33% 4 ft 
AVnoOf 7ft 2% 2%— ft 

22 -^riftMkioPf: rr; --.7 3*73 ttu.-ua 17 - u 

35ft 2tft MeaaR .LSffiai*. - 14 33. 32 32 

7ft 5%,Mego% .J9e»X -&-V0 5ft 5ft 5* + ft 
- 4% - 2% > : -- r T 3*6 7ft 3ft— % 

33 25ft MtEpfC 3J0-UJ - . 80x 37 22 32 

48ft_52 .MfEpflF-a.WnW'' MB At 68 60 

64 58; MIEpfG 748- TLF • 1030x45 64 64% 4 % 

49% .53 MtEpU 832 TlJi. >_ 380x211% 49% 78% +11* 
49ft SBi MflEpfl 7 ’*W 1®T - 758x68% 68% 68% + % 
49% S3 MIEpfH 8J2'nj 280x 70% 69 70 +% 

70ft SftMeh+ft.-.JOb-XZ- ‘ - » 19% W 
3 2 MwFU . - J3eM0' .139 2% 2 • 

Mft 45 MchER'c UK XX 42 ' «1 Wft W% 

7ft 4 MkfcAiy M L11M- U 5ft- 5ft 
-62ft :37ft. JAhtaop ..236. .44.10 789 53ft S3 
ISV^f MWSUt- ljal-^ v . ' 4 6145 78 - gft 


19 —ft 
2 


91 

43ft _ 

241* 14 
22*6 1 
22ft 1 
13ft . . 

Zlft 17ft li 
35 26 lawilG 


towillpf 231 105 


28% lOMRs XOB 9,1 10 


40 31% Ipotco 

13* 9* IpodCp __ 

40ft 30 frvBnk 156 4.9 
54% 44 . IrvBkpf 45Ie 02 


304 83 18 
-36 XD 9 


.39% an* 39% +16 
37% 37% —% 
4B -40 — Ji 
47ft, 48%' +1% 
8 ft r 0ft «%+ %' 
47% 4716.47ft 
92ft'92ft'9S4 +1% 
_ 40*6 -40 . ,40ft— ft 
42 23ft 231* 2316 + ft 
92 71ft Z1"*Z1 

10m zi ■ .21-21 

84 10% 10fti7 10%+ ft 
TOO 20ft 20ft.' 20ft. + ft 
77 33% 33ft 7 33ft + ft 
40r 22 22 f 22 — % 

110 33K 13ft 23ft- + ft 
400 36* 34ft 34% 




-in* 

A+* 


3% + 
4% ' 
Xlft + ft 


- so* + 

15Vt TOft* M8&IR ■ 23 -27+ lift 11 Hft + 

86 , -73ft MMJIA. 350*43 14 4183 82ft 80% 82!* . 

38ft 27ft MtaPL Sfcto. a 193 38 37ft 38 + 

.Wf 1ft IWMlns.^CfV. .2946 3ft. 2ft 

8 4% MNef - -T7rL 1 7TO 6* 6* 

34ft .25% Mobil . JJK 6S M 6557 -32 31 

tft-. ■%-vUMjJH 102 ft % 

tft.-nfcJModClrt-., 13 94 5% 5% 

33% 20% Mohasc . ' M. ,U 12 23 38% 30ft 

.U9»r -t MW® " f '■ 

53ft 40ft.MonCa 'MB' W 

58 •' s44V* ManCd pf308' 00 _ 

W9S. MftJWaprdr '-JB SO 24 40 16% 15* 16% + 

55ft: 40ft Moman 250 5S 12 8056 45% 44ft 45% + .. 

200. 65 12 166 30ft 30ft 30ft + W 

VJOaSJ * ' — ' 


+ % 


664 1ft 196 
34 52% 52% 52ft 
2 50V. 50ft Mft — 


12% 11* lift 


.7 3075. 40.; 39% 38*-^ % 


J8 9J W 
32 1 S 14 


51. -54* 54% 54* 


35* 23ft JWT s 
38 23* JRNer 


12 


L5 7 


28% 16 - Jamswy .12 i 
1» 10* JapnF 143e11J 
SB* 36 JeffPU L52 29 . 

69ft 521* JerCpf 8-00 11J 

66% 51 JerCpf 7M MA- 
TOS 91* JerCpf .1X50 129 - 

1W6 14ft JerCpf 2.18 11J . 

'A* 6* Jewlor 21 

5TO> 33* JahnJn 130 27 15 
47% 38ft JehnCn ZOO A3 II 
57* 50ft JhnCpf 4J5. 74 j- 
77* =* Jargen . U» 4.T 19 
OTA 20ft Jastons 88 X3 15 
27% .21* JayMfg 1A0 68 30 


1.12 17 17 416 30* 30ft 30*—; % 
J6 LS 12 H75 37% 36*6 37 + ft 


281 21ft 31%' 21%;+ ft 

282 12% 12*6 12*6 

1238 52% 51* 58k + ft 
340(69* 69* 69* +1% 
370X61 67% 68- +1* 

330X105 104% US 

U IM 1M1M 
28 15*15% 15*— M 


8KQ 5M6 49 42 

4S 47% 46% 47 


_ ..._ +ft 

76 57% 56* 57%+]*. 
-20 24% 24* 24% + % 
™ 71 36* 

275 23ft ZW.Z1* 


3096,16* MonPw 
Wft -15ft. MonST 
It*. 8% MONY 
Zlft j44* Moores 
» ' ,2Dft‘MoarM UM 4.1 13 
3T 724ft .MorM pf 3L50 8J 

1 i 56ft 36ft. Mam* 230 18 7 
f J8':-.TM /Horan pf&J6e 70 
• UM.WftjnorKa 13 

WttJW MarKnd.148 13 11 
23% Wft Morses JO 18 14 

S.--.16 ^MtBRty 

ft -25* Morton 
SPft'JOft Motoric 
ftft -15 Munfrd 
18* 8% Mums j 

32*6 23% MurpO 
286 MW MunvO 
14% 12 MutOm 
5%. 1% MverL 


]J0elO7 
AA 1 J 
At 
J* 


un 

M 

1AA 


92 20V. 19ft 20* + *6 
157 9 8* 9 + V. 

238 20* 20% 2B* + *6 
251 25* 25 S5VA + *6 
3 28* 28% 28% 

307 57% 56* 57* +1 
<02 B7* 87% S7% + % 
55 13* 13% 13* + ft 
221 45 44* 44% + ft 

47 21* 21% 21%—% 
273 17* 16*6 16*— * 
. . 525 36ft 36 36% + * 

18363868 35* 35* Kft + * 
w 11 40 ink 18% 18% — % 

„ 29 « Mft 18 1S% + % 

“ If 421 31* 31% 3Tft + % 

29 15 19 20ft 20ft 20ft + % 

9J 41 14* M% 14* + % 
185 2% 2* 2% + U 


^ (urn 


i^ 


10ft 7ft KOI 
20ft lift KLM 
46 34% KM! pf 

41% 30ft Kmart 


10 


8 

L4 103 
19 

4.1 12 
9JD 


9 A 


1.18 16 14 1346 33* 32* 33 + * 


* «"*8 


s* 

22* 

13% 

4 


SU 

23 29 ■ 28* 29 + * 

9 30* 30ft 30% — * 
32 23 22% 22%— ft 

7 22ft 22ft 22ft 
4 25* 25* 25* 
10ta68 68 68 +1 

670x 66 65 66 +1 

_ 843 40ft 40* «%— ft 

A 13 1751 19ft 18* 19ft +1% 
■6370 69 26 25* 25ft— Vk 

42 11% 11* lift + % 
4 . 720 9* 8% 9 

27642 198 WK 18ft 19* + ft 
17 14 1161 70% 69ft 70ft + ft 
in 36 16% 16ft 16ft + * 
IA 5 1720 14ft M% M* + % 
1245 7ft 1% 1% 

18 4* 4ft 4* 

25 1309 lift 11 11* + * 

342 2ft 2* 2* 

J4 A 6 1213 40 30* 39* +1 

L56 48 192 32* 32ft 32* + % 

140 £8 7 1496 27* 27* 27% + ft 
JZ 29 2510AU 18 .17 18 +% 

48 21 6805 33% 31ft 32V. —1% 

200 70 12 2079 Mft 39* 40% + * 


17 13% KN Enn 

18ft 12% Kotor Al .151 
67ft 53 Kal 57pf 4J5 7J 
66% 51 KolSVpf 475 7A 
66 49* KnJ AAPf -475 7 A 

19% 13ft KatoCe JO 14 
18% 15* KaiCpf JJ7 S3 
11* 7% Kato 40 £0 
24% 18 KCfyPL 236 103 
39ft 31 KCPLpf 4J5 11.8 
am* 15ft KCPLpf 220 114 
Zlft 17 KCPLpf 233 7LS 
KCSou UM U 

M% ii% Kcsopf .un Eo. 

19% 9ft KonGE 1.18 9J 
41% 32* KonPLt 296 7 A 
23% 18* KaPLpf 221 93 
45 12ft Katyln 
» 12ft KoufBr 
18ft 14 Kaufpf 
BB 73 Kaufpf 
72 37* Kellogg 


24 22 12 W4 10* lOT 10* + % 
21*22 18 5588 11% 17% 17*— % 
AM 10J ’-rio 44 -43 ,44 +2 . 

140 AO 11 4777 34ft 34* 34* + %- 


32 

1-52 

88 

JO 

232 


- 12 
34 13 
26 9 


10 


«% 23% KMlwf 
% Kenaf 


JO" AS .17 


99. 16ft 15*14*+* 
3164 16% 16% Mft + ft 
2 63 AS. .6 S'- +1% 
. 3 42ft 6Z% 62% +1% 
-1 62ft 42ft 62% +6* 
516 14ft 14% 14*—% 

¥'"*+* 
5218 21% 22% 23 ' + * 
WX»- J7 37 +1% 

13 Wft W . Wft + ft 
' 3 20* 20* SffiZ 
1169 53* 52 53* +1% 

- 60* 12ft_12ft ' T2ft < 
TOT 12ft 12% 12* + Vk 
707 39* 38ft 39 r +% 

r 22% 22% 22% + K 
216 16 IM 16 + * 
291 Wft. 16*16% + * 
f W» 1514 HU 
1 «0 80 • I0- + ft 

on 70% 48ft 70 +1 
400 45ft 45* 45ft + % 
124 * K + 

146 W* 19ft 19ft 

52- 2* w - «» + * 

280 28% 27% 28. 

81 12* lift 12 

XT 21ft 20* 21 — ft 


JO 


S3 

260 


JO 

.135 


1.9 U 321 


35% 35% + * 


21% 11 GtAFsf 48 25 71Z73 20 18ft 19ft + ft 

20 Mft GIAtPc 7 545 1» Wft Wft.+ ft 

19* is GNlm IJBBlOJ ^ t* 

41* 32* GINNk 1 J2 29 17 T»0 Wft M 3Wk +lft 

29* 22ft GIWFIn U00 24 7 5908 30ft 29 29ft +. % 

ZI 14% CMP 176 93 10 28 19ft 19% 19%- % 

30% 22* QreenT 7 171 30 29* 30 

31* 22 Grevh 182 +2 13 3Tft 3£6 31V, + % 

6ft 7* Gtwfer 9 202 5% 5* 5* 

13% OK'GrawG* JO 2J 14 .97-iefe 18ft 10ft + ft 

in 6ft GnAEI ■ M 1J 16 592 7* 7% 7ft + Ui 

Uf 1.1 12 IM » 31* 32ft +1% 

.16 23 41 103 7U 7 7 

At 26 U 56 26% 26% 28% 

SO 21) 14 4085 46* 45 45% — % 

1 48 68 68 - % 

93 15* 14% 15 — * 


40 24 6 
1.50 94 
875 WJ 
UM 26 .16 
13 * 3j0' I 

lft 96 Kefiij - . 

26 17% Kerwrrt 

18% 14% KPTqyn 
2Wk 23ft KvUtlf Z44 «7 
U% Wk KerrGI M- 73 
21ft lift KerGpf JJO XI 

Sft ^ SSS a ”; a S ^ S&.SD 

15* 17% Kpylnts 48 23 11 2S6M%14K14% + * 

r ^ the a-s-. 1 ? 

tt 44ft Klmba 2JZ X? 111613 66ft 65* tt .._ 
40* 26% KitghtRd 30 20 18 90S 38ft 37* 38% +1% 

19* 10* Knogo 37 .108- 17% 17ft 17% — * 

39. 24% Roger 2SB 94 48 394 26% 26% 26% + * 

SS SSSST | A4400 1M2 1BVA lWk If 'JS 

Si* ?!% !K rfM |. , g - 5 - ™ «- « 

48ft 36 Kroger zST 42 .12 
38* 25 Kubota 51c 15 40 
MS J* KoMm i AO 23 13 
C% 28% Kvucer 32. J 25 
23* 15% Kysor Jt A3 I 


US ££ KAE 00 V 00 “ 16 

37% 23% NBOs 148 17 7 
ms 10 %-nbi . 

.22% 17% NCH 

44ft 31% NCNB 

37* 24% NCR 

13ft 9% NLInd 
36ft 27 NUI 
1ft % NVF 
59% 35ft NWA 

28ft 22 NafCC 

29ft 23% Nashua 

18% 8% NHCflv J6 34 21 
35% 23ft NafDlst 230 67 23 

2Wk 17 NDIstpr 1J5 97 

23% 11* NatEdu 20 

30% ZBk NafFGS SJ» 75 7 

«% SJNFGpf 2J0 94 
41 22ft.NfGyps. 8 

W* 2% NtHom 
33ft 24 Nil 
65 52% Nil pf 

32ft 18ft NMedE 
11% 7% N Minas 
31 23ft NtPrcst UM 

J5% 30% NtSeml 
54% 47% NfSem pf4J0 
Mft 25* NISvcIn L10 

18 lift NSIand AO 27 24 

13 10% Ncrco At S3 7 

33% 26* NevPw 2J4 || IQ 

16 ' 12ft NevP pf 140 I nc 

^ ov E cf ^74 9J 
23 19ft Nov P of Z30 10J 

19 15% NevPpf 135 iaS 

12* 9% NevSvL S « . 
46ft 36% NEnaEI X40 73 
Sk'» NEnP.prUk 10.1 
29 Mft NJRsc 230 84 10 

39* 20% NYSEG 266 99 7 

OTt 16 NY5 Pf 2J2 104 7 

32* 27% NYS PfD 335 lit 
22* Mk Newell ^60 27 12 


-25 J 
£«» BO 


Ate 17% 16* 14ft —ft 

10J 20ft 20* 20ft + % 


A4* 33* Newhal 
W 12% Ncwhll 
10 7ft NwflIRg 
4«6 34* Nwrrrt 
3% ft Nwpark 

21ft 16* NIoMP , 

TOb 24% NtaMpf 340 1 
Wz Wi NtaMpf 3« 1 


35ft 27* NtaAtof ISO 1U 


36% 24% Grunin 
77k 4* Graetoi 
27ft 20 GuHfrd 

26ft GllWst „ _ 
68% 57 GlfWPf 575 85 

17ft 11% GulfRl 23 

23 16% GuHR Pf JJO .65 

14% lift GKSnn 144 121 6 
41% 31 GlfSURf 4^0 11 J 
32ft 26 SlfSU pr XB5 1X6 
351k 2Hk GH5UPT440 184 
23* 14 Guttaa 40 27 W 


2 20 2» 20 — ft 

2659 12% TOk 12% 

60z 40 40 40 - % 

31 31 30% 30%— % 

W 33% 32ft J2ft- v. 
103 22% 22% 22% — % , 


H 


32% 22* HallFB 1JXH 740 28* .27% 27% - % 

32* 24% Hatotn 1JB U 13 2218 26ft 25ft 26ft + ft ' 

lft KHallwd J» 64 13 371 Tft 1* 1* 

lift 7* Halwdpf 5A £8 54 9ft 9% 9ft 

43% 26ft HomPs 1J6 3J 12 1142 35% M 33 — % 

15% T2K HOUS 1.47a 94 ' 77 15 14ft IS 

ZTft 17ft HttfUl IJta LS 63 21ft 21% 21ft + % 

30 17ft Hondls J6 27 M 642 25% 23ft 35 + ft 

' 46 17 24 - — ' — 

40 21 24 
UM 14 15 
46 14 21 
23 


Zf% 2M LAC n JSe 
3lft 24ft LN He 2Me 94 10 
17 . II LLE Ry 232*20.0 
4%. 1 LLCCp - • 

13* 5* LTV 

19" BJA1.TVA . 43t 44. 

25ft r-Jto LTVpfB 22H 
68% 31 LTV PTC IM - • 

18% 8% LTV pfD 741 
15 -. 10% L Quint ; 22 

29ft 71% LadGs 170 64- 8. 

J% -6ft Lafarge JO 26381 
27 21% LflfniPf 244 1X2 - 

UH 7* Lemurs 24 24 15 
4% Vft LamSes , 219 

1J% Wft Ldwtlnt 46 4J 
2S* 9% LnrPI JO XI 

28* 19* Lea rP of 287 MO 
57ft 47 

31 „ , _ .... „ _ 

341k 25ft LswvTr ISO 47 IS 1333 37* aift yt>A +1 

46% 24ftLnint 1J4 24 If J7 42ft 42% 42ft + ft 


^ 31% + * 

J ! S -1% *15”^ 

"OS' «6 A .4% + Vk 
_ 2 9% 9* 9% + % 
258 Wft lift- 12* +ft 
. 36 35% 34% 35% 42% 
185 9ft V* 9* + M 
H* lift 72* +-ft 


*4 M NtaMpf 4 jB 5 i 
46% 37% NtaMpf SJ5 I 

B-WBHf W 

33% 26 NICOR X04 |M 
-12b 


69 17* 17% 17* +'* 
315 38% 37 37* +1 

191 12ft 12ft 12ft 
99 Zlft 20* 21 

« PS. H’ 1 ' 41V * 4,,fc + % 

X3 13 38% 36ft 38 +1 

J4 5» U 12ft I2» + Vk 
74 9 17 31 SBft 31 +ft 
94^ u u. 1 

, » W » 9675 gft 49* 52* -M* 

1J0 49 13 1473 25% 24% 24% — * 

9 319 28% 27ft 28* + * 
473 10* 10% 10ft— * 
839 33 32% 32%—% 

14 19 19 If 

594 OTC 22% 22% 

349 27% 27* 27ft + % 

, 4 24% 24% 24% 

1209 39% 39% 39ft -HK 

3 £ 2^2^+* 

*Oiiag»S-gg«'-- 

li 714 7 7V. — U 

^ M 30% 30ft 30ft— % 

33 8375 12* 12* 12ft + K 
7 A 321 54ft u jm + ft 

U 13 95 36* 36% 36%+% 

W.l£ft 14* 14ft + ft 
59 10% 1D% 10ft + % 
119 32 # 31ft 31% 

27Wz 15* 15. 15* + ft 
vm 17ft 17ft- * 
lOOzZT* 21* 21* + ft 
7 18. U II +% 
* 11% 11ft 11% + U 
122 46% 46ft 46ft + % 

1 27ft 27ft 27*— ft 

4 26ft 26* J6*— Ik 
1829 M 25ft 25% + U 

IM 20 20 

16 32% 32 32 — * 

172 22ft 2Z% 22ft + * 

39 60% 56* 60% +2 

« 3 8ft T Mk 
J £43^44*- ft 

1^_ Wft 19 19% + ft 

BtajSKj 29% 30% +2 
19» 31 30* 30* — ft 

%3<%.3«% 34% +1* 
«0z 43 - 42 42% — K> 


'■p ;■ , 


% 'i ; _ 


■ -U-. , , 




•7 


fc>-, **“' r ■ 

■* 


1-48C24 16 
AJXM2AJ j 
74*14 f 
LOO 13 35 


208 1X7 

“ 1.1 


IlUf'fi 


.IZIM 46% 46% 40% +2ft 


14 


W Wft NoMAf 
17% 10% NordRs 

54% NarfkSo 140 
2U jP 4 Merita 
«ft 33* Nondr 

W 1W Noriek 
65% 47% NACoal 
«* ?ift naphii 

stsss, 1^0 

Mft » NindPS* iS 
47* 41ft NIPSpf 4J4e «c 


66 10 


240 

1.10 

m 


AO 10 

2 ? n 


.. NSPw pf 3/j I,, « 


JOb U) 16 
” 1J .11 


m Wft 18* 19* + 1 


20ft 16 McndH 

21* 16% Hanna 

68ft 40 HarflrJ 

36ft 21* HarindS 

12* 7ft Kamhh 
28* 24% HampfBX40 115 

OTb 24* Horn pfC 213 73 

22% 15* HraRw* 40 24 17 

35 22* Karris J8 .. .. 

18* 10ft HorGrp 10 

31* 22 Horaoo 1J8 44 10 

39ft 24ft Hartnw TJ8 34 11 

17* 14* HaHSe 1 JO 104 12 

SSft If* HawEI 

Uft TA HovesA 
30% 20% HaUetn 
15% 9% HaxLab. 

8 10 HRhAta 

23% 19 HftOPn J38 24 

22* Bft HHU5A 
15* 10* HKkS 

18* 13* HedaM 

23% 14ft HeUmn 

33ft 16ft Hemp 

32ft 20% KelfUf 

22% 12* HttacC 

24ft 18 HetmP 


81 


IB* 17* 18 — * 
60S 19% 19* 19% 

1204 MU 60 63 +0% 1 

86 35% 35% 35* - 
703 10* 10 10* + tt I 

20 25% SH 25% + ft 
546 37% 27% 27% + ft 
_. .. 139 24ft 22* 24ft 42* 

X4 15 1110 26 25ft 26 + % 

76 16* Mft 16% — % 

9W 31% 31 31% + % 

221 36 35ft 35* 

14 17* 17* 17* 

.82 22% 32* 22% + U 

117 10% 9* 9ft- ft 
888 2» 22* 23 ■ — ft 
63 15% 15 15%—% 

385 Uft UK Uft- * 

14 ZI* 21% 21% — * 

405 -V 8% 81k— ft. 

150 H 12* 1396 — *1 

491 15* 15% 15ft 

226 18* 18ft 18* + ft 


3- A-A'ftz-B- sS „ 

&ISA-3f! IJfcrPiS- 



W ii” 27* S- T + 8- f “ S wokiftl 

sx m 2% 2*+% 

hS fB ts* 

477 45 44* u +1 ■ 

*2 33 8* 33 +* 


.18* nkUOMW 

28* T7Vi LcoPtat 

4 lftLahVol 
41 . 24% LVInpf 
15* 13% Latum IJBbKU 
15% 10% Lennar JO U 11 
24* 15% L8V0ftS 4 

SO* 42* LOF L32 29 8 
79% 68% LOF of 435 AS 
33 22% UbtyCp 32 22 13 


35 23 Mayo 

48* 28* Nucer 

J NuWS ^ 

NYU EX 640 


92% 72 


E 


11 

*S. ■* M 
■QH 93 

7JJ 9 


3«b53 52* 53 

2 27ft 27ft: 27ft 
« IS* 15* 15ft 

^ HI? + » 

« 14* 13* 14 +% 

594 74% 73* 74* + * 
95 5% 5% £*_ * 

gs- n 49 so +t* 
^ IlS 'Jffl B + * 

17 65ft Mft 65ft +1 
IM 36ft 36%. 36ft + U 
J « W% 17* 18%—% 

o UK ’Si. ^ “ + * 

9 7MJ W4 9 9% .+ * 

e J. £!* «% 43%— % 
9 iS. SS *% SO* + ft 
34% 34%- * 
39% 39% — S 
3W9 OT* 32% 33% +1 
. 378 TVfc 316 + to 

4 23ft '23% 23ft 

Uf ^ C 

?I< 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 
92 90* 91% +1% 



'■ “ft- 


r**>»ii* 




■ -v. 


2021 


■«?& , Ooklnd 


1J2 7 A V 
40e 4J 9 
40 . TJ 13 
J2 2,1 19 
24 


31ft 12ft UmAd» M J 30 1479 M 30 8016 + % 

5£0 36ft LIMfTt 2» X9 11 120 Slft Uft 51% +1% 

23* 19* LtncPt 2JAa 9S 1 23* zBS 23% ” 

*3% 62* Uttan LM 11 .2065 81% /P am— * 
23 20 LHtanpf JJ» 89. In 22% 22% 22% + * 

58 3Y% Locfchd JS* 1J 9 4017 49% 48* 40* +m 

37 27 Lad He JO 2X17 ^895 34* 33* 34* +1* 

54% znk Ue«a8 .UHffZO 9 2612 5016 49 50% +1% 

38* 23* Looleao J4 A 20 4« 39% 38% 39* + * 

37* Z7* LemFIn 140 17 Q 171 37* 37% OTk + ft 

28* 20% Lam Ml f244 19 D Ml 27ft 26* — ' 

4% 2 LemMwt 
M% W* LomaiMn ' •' 

33* 21* LnSta* 1JU 53 S 

to 45* LanoS pt £37 90 


aSS 2°**I»P IJ3 'cn i« 
32* 23% OedPef ta *4 

■J* oSpUi 2 * n 1 


'2Mk OcdPpf 2J0 «« 
2* 11 J2S 25?IEPf 212 9J 






issa&'if. 


l1 ^ 2* 2% 2* - 

, 2? 301* » . 30% + ft 

3581 35% 38* 35% + * 

< U 14* 15 + ft 

® »jr g% 25% 

76 22* 22* 22* + ft 

ra? VL MU + * 

W-ga g%J7ft + «- 
g WJ*W7ftW7% + % 
1*109 109 .109 . .. 

fg 19* W% 1M4 + * 


'1, 


JB 22 
JO 13 

48a 26 12 

40 1J M 72 39* 21* 31ft- % 
17 4910 34* 32* 33* + K 
21 181 23 22% 23 + VS 
36 1J 26 ' 531 19* W W • — U 


40* 31% HcFCuts 140 42 13 3408 37* 37* 37* + * ; 


**'. 5* ULCo 
34 24% ULp» 

29 21% LILpfE- 

51 39% ULpfJ 

27* 16% ULPfX 
2Z* UK'LlLpfW 
23% M% LILpfV 
27* 19% LILpfU . 
21*. Uft LILpfT. 

Mft lnk LILpq*.: 


Ml 27ft MI m+.a 
W £* a% £•.. * 

J KSiumtZ 

BfJ 7ft 7* 7* 

W 26% 26%—]% 

, Hb M% - MW 2S%— ft; 
108x 43* 41ft &I, +1* 
36W1A.W 1» — * 

A 148 17% -39* -W* -. 

5. 19ft Wft 19% — % 
,21* 71*— * 
18%' 18%—* 
Mr M. 


liit r, 5®*n 1JQ 5a V, 73 . S3? i«* + V* 

M6 » ffitaBd. TJB 1U 7 tSS 32* + * 

ic w SSEOnf 3JO 12.1 7 !£* 16 16U + % 

2L 440 15J J2^3?W 32U +1* 


36 






efts 





850z 36 35 35 — * 

58% M%+1 
61ft. 61 41 +% 

U 69% -MV. 

- I* 3T1A 30* 31V. + % 
16V, + u 

^lO%-93%.73% 
350X96 9416 94 +T 

« H Uft lift— % 
SSa# £2* *7% + % 

±S 21ft 70U *HA % 

(Cbotte^onPa^EJ ,w ,w 


OTk 26% 53 113 

ff-SRFJIS 
fipriS'-ajs* 

ni%ioa% oKSS,2g jg 


V 

V*-: 

■k 


. • . ■ • • \r!i -■ -■ .-J f 

• • " • •. • . --vF'r- 

















dri 



msm 





• -'S' ^ "‘" k 


*■=>» 


-!: Like a Song-Filled 
^ Rock of Gibraltar 

V. ?*!- JwtWqy & bring cetebnzud throu&out the 

’• -i'- ‘ world. Ned Harem, composer and flMii&t m vote this 

■?- f.i appreciation for TheMew York Thnes^ 


jS3W- 






How Inner Torment Feeds 
The Spirit of Creativity 


by Samuel G. Freedman 


• V ■[’■£• 


1 v.f«- 


byNedRorem -;. 

A S a ,^“\?8® r at Huladdphia’8 very proper Curtis Institute in 
/ % . 3 * wc^d occasionally bead tor. New York to get into 

/ \ n^chief. One weekend, before boarding tbe tram (I was 
W j . ™ to see Virgfl Thomson, whomTd never met, about 
o^onnng his copyist) a schoolmate, Shirley Gabis, said, “Why not 
on my old friend Lenny while you're np there.” I did. 
^ cc <»dmgly Benmem put me onto Copland — “Aaron KJces know- 
mg what young composes sue up to* — and I spent an afternoon 
weanng my tunes for the famous musician. Wcfl, I look the job with 
Virgil, became an instant fan. of Aaron a nd Lenny, and for the n ffri 
42 years with many an up and a down I’ve remained staunch 

with all three men. Some weekendl 

In the early postwar years, although Bernstein was yet to become 
i V ? s H_ er ““ wodd woold worship, Copland and Thomson wan 
already the Rome and Avignon of American musux Young compos- 
os jo ined one faction or the other, there was no third. Both were 
from France through Nadia Boulanger, bat Aaron’s camp was 
Stravinsky-French and contained a now-vanished breed of neo- 
classicist like Alexei H&icff and H arold Shapero. while Virgil's 
branch was Sane-French and contained a still vital breed Hk* 1 - John 
Cage and Lou Harrison. (The Germanisms of Wotoe-via-Schoen berg . 
were as yet quiescent.) The few lone wolves gnrh as myself were still 
socially partial to one or the other. If I saw a good deal less of Aaron 
than of Virgil it’s because tbe latter was' my employer. 

Meanwhile, there has built up around Copland bits of convention- 
al wisdom that bear inspection. On a recent TV h/wnng ft I found 

Fanfare for a Most 
Uncommon Man 

by Leonard Berostem 

On Aaron's 85th b htlalay : 

Awakener, 

Asker ofrid dies, 

Responder, 

Opmer of gales, 

. Namer of me ltimnwinh l^i 

Compasskm-healer, 

Organ of Cedha, 

! Prophet-friend. 

Load star and guide, 

Ancestor of us all. 

Noble father, 

Dedicator, Re-dedicator of our Art! 

myself stating, as fay rote, that Copland had invented out of whole 
doth what it means to-be American. Now, wasn't ii Thomson who 
first legitimized the use of homegrown fodder for 1 sophisticated 
palates, a use Copland borrowed intact fen his “second period” — 
the period of open, prairies and Appalachian springs? What's more, 
hadn’t Thomson, like Poulenc, invented Ms own folk marie (you 
won’t find his church- tune pastiches mid cowboy ditties in hymnals 
and songbags), while Copland, like Stravinsky, incorporated pre- 
existing lore into Ms scores? Certainly Copland was out to find the 
American Way, but whether the Brooklynite would have chosen just 
this way without the Missourian Thomson’s pioneering is specula- 
tive. 

As to the “periods,” they can now be viewed as mere textbook 
labels after the fact Copland’s oeuvre is history: Each work, from 
the once “problematic" Piano Variations through the “lean” “Ro- 
deo" to the thorny “Inscape,” can now be heard as flowing from the 
same economical jpen. IBs music, all of it, is accessible to the big 
public, with (this is Ms crucial inheritance from Boulanger) never a - 
note too many. 


N EW YORK — At Diane Arbus's 
funeral, the photographer Rich- 
ard Avedon turned to a friend and 
whispered, “Oh, 1 wish I could be 
an artist like Diane." The friend, Frederick 
Eberstadt, answered, “Oh, no, you don't." 
Their brief exchange — as recounted in Pa- 
tricia Boswonh’s biography of Arbus — 
raises the charged questions surrounding the 
tormented, even self-destructive, creative 
artisL Chief among them is where reality 
ends and mythology begins. 

Arbus personified the artist whose inner 
turmoil — depression, dislocation and a 
tasu for risk bordering on a death wish — 
fueled her creations, those moving and dis- 
turbing photographs of drag queens and 
hermaphrodites, celebrities and Siamese 
twins. But Arbus was also a woman defeated 
by depressions so debilitating she often 
could not work and, ultimately, chose not to 
live. Finally. Arbus represented an artist 
who gained more fame, who was indeed 
romanticized, more for living on the edge 
than for the artistry she brought back from 
that emotional frontier. 

It is no wonder, then, that Arbus — that 
the entire issue of the “mad artist," as the 
awful cliche has it — should both attract and 
repel, as it has for literally thousands of 
years. Aristotle spoke of “divine madness." 
the Renaissance scholar Marsilio Ficino of 
the “Saturnine temperament." The play- 
wright August Strindberg declared that few 
people were “lucky enough to be capable of 
madness," and the poet John Berryman 
opined, “The artist is extremely lucky who is 
presented with the worst possible ordeal 
which will not nearly kill him " 

For both creators' and scientists, (he sub- 
ject is an extraordinarily loaded one — even 
more so now, when popular culture so glori- 
fies violent and bizarre behavior. The Ameri- 
can artistic landscape is littered with the 
corpses of the brilliant, from painter Mark 
Rothko to poet Anne Sexton to musician 
Charlie Parker, and one must wonder if they 
died in part because sycophants with safer 
lives so celebrated their excesses. For con- 
temporary artists like the jazz musician Jack- 
ie McLean and the writer Raymond Carver 
true creativity began only after conquering 
their respective addictions to heroin and 
alcohol To them, and many other creators, 
tbe image of the self-destructive artist not 
only invites futility or death but denies the 
value of disciplined craft 

T HERE is no question that many cre- 
ative artists, perhaps the vast major- 
ity, are centered and sane. There may 
be just as many self-destructive bakers as 
painters, but psychiatrists and biographers 
do not analyze their cakes. It is the torment- 
ed artist and not the untroubled one — the 
Vincent van Gogh, not the Peter Paul Ru- 
bens — who provides the stuff of tabloid 
notoriety and romantic embeUishmenL 
But if that image is inflated, neither is it 
groundless. For many artists, creation is a 
constant act of balancing the dark side that 
allows introspection with the brighter one 
that turns raw material into finished prod- 
uct. One result of the process, “The Iceman 
Cometh” by Eugene O'Neill is now playing 




Nutfrounby Suva Mendofaon, TH» WtehnQMi flotf 

On the same TV program we learned, again through the iteration 
of received ideas, that Aaron is a saint. The broad acceptance of Ms 
sanctity stems less, I thinlt, from his sturdy need for self promotion 
(which all artists possess) than from his fanatic sense of the value of 
other people's work (which few artists possess). Even in private 
Aaron is a public person, enjoying gossip but not uttering it, witty 
and generous, yes, bat also stoic and immutable. Yet to be a saint one 
most have been a sinner, and it lessens the man to assume he is above 

twnp w g inatf, 

I have observed Aaron livid with impatience at the longueurs in a 
French pea’s sonata, heard him sigh from betrayed affection, 
submitted to his ire about what I'd written about a friend of Ms. 
known Mm to be more than tempted by the flesh. Bland sins, I admit 
But then, Aaron is more artist mam saint. Saints are a dime a dozen, 
but true art is scarce, and one could argue that Aaron Copland has 
changed the world for the better while Joan of Arc never changed it 
at aH 

Recently, I told tbe composer George Perie that Copland has 
branded us all in America, even those who repudiate him, since i 
repudiation is acknowledgement of Copland’s force. I’ve said this so ! 
often it’s dogma, so was disconcerted when George replied, “He j 
never influenced me: In fact, Fve influenced him. After ah, he finally 
cameoverto the serial technique, while 1 never went over to his side." 
Indeed, Copland did “come over" to the 12- tone system during Ms 
so-called “third” period. Retrospectively, this seems an act of hysie- j 
ria, of not wanting to be left behind. In the ’60s, Copland had the ; 
world at his feet except for that small portion older composers most j 
crave: young composers. The yoimg ai that moment were immersed j 
in Bculeziana, a mode quite foreign to Copland's very nature (as to 
the nature of Stravinsky, who also sold out to the system). 

The more things change the more they stay the same. Today I 
teach at Curtis. Lenny’s an esteemed poeL Virgfl thrives. And Aaron 
is again loved by the young, though less as model than as a fact of 
sonic geology, like a throbbing, song-filled rock of Gibraltar. ■ 


Brushing Up on Shakespeare in the Comics 


I ONDON — Those who find Shake- 
speare remote and redolent of 
schooiday suffering tend to refer to 
■/ him and Ms plays as “it” Anne 
Tautd, who now spends most of her working 
hours on the Baird, still uses the neutral 
pronoun. 

“Few teachers ever make it come to life for 
a class,” riie will say. “Most people so dread 

Mary Blume 

it thereafter that they don’t trouble to see it 
or to read the plays they never did at schooL” 
“It” became alive for her —and wtfl, she 
hopes for thousands of others — when she 
saw ' an artist working, while publishers 
jeered, on. a comic bode version of “Mac- 
beth.” She Has since published not only 
“Macbeth" but also “Othello,” “King Lear' 
and “Twelfth Night” in conic book form. 

Most people rectal at the thought. “When 
people at parties say what do you do an d I 
say publish Shakespeare in comic strips, I 
can see their faces freezing. And I think, gosh 
I wish I had a copy hoe so I could say no, it 
isn’t as you think it is. it isn’t “Desperate 
Dan.'" - . 

The art work and printing w* 
quality and imlilce the American comic strip 
Taute once saw in which Lady Macbeth said; 
“Hey Mac, have you killed tbe king yetT she 

mas the complete first folio version and with 
“Twelfth Night” provided a five-page glos- 
sary so readers would get the jokts. 

Admittedly, her Vida in “Twelfth Night" 
looks Eke David Bowie and her Lear Jhas 
been described as at times rese mbling Ray- 
mood Chandler’s Philip Marlowe and at 
other times a very cross poached egg. But 
stage directors are equally free in their inter- 
pretations and people rarely fuss. 

Anne Tautfi, on the other hand, has bees 
dressed down by booksellers and has found 
British schoolteachers perfect Peg-a-Ram- 
seys, or killjoys according to the' “Twelfth" 
Night” glossary. ' 

“I do understand that if the texts are 
available for one pound, they ca rmo t ask for 
funds tojustafy a copy at five pounds, which 
is what ours cost, but you would think they 
would pay for it out of their own pocket 
topiiw it would make the. lessons. Imag i ne : 
coming in and saying, look at this, you lot. 
You’re not going to be bored rigid any- 
more." ■ . 

She has had better acceptance at higher 
levels. The bookshops of both the N ationa l 
Theatre and the Royal Shakespeare Con^ar 
ny stock her comics and the BBC offers than . 


in a package with their cassettes of “OtheDb” 
and “King Lear,” starring Paul Scofield and 
Alec Guinness respectively. 

In France the comic book is an accepted 
art form, in the United States it is mostly for 
dimwits and kids. In England the long tradi- 
tion of excellent book illustration nukes a 
picture with one fane under it acceptable, but 
a page divided into nine frames with people 
speaking in balloons suspect 

Now in her ebullient mid-’ 30s, Anne 
Taute wdl remembers schooiday bouts with 
Shakespeare, Most people; she says, study 
only four plays out of the 36 during their 
school years. Despite her intense work cm the 
conricbooks— audit takes about two years 
to produce each one — she says, “Tactually 
rime out of a conversation that mentions it." 

Hie sophisticated cartooning techniques 


she uses are intended for adults who wish to 
brush up their Shakespeare, but she has been 
surprised by children's squeals of delight. 

“ “King Lear’ is the most favorite of chil- 
dren because it’s all distorted and I thwifc it 
reminds them of teddy bears (hat have one 
ear falling off and one eye popped ouL They 
love it, they want to cuddle it and go to bed 
with iL So when they go to school and 
someone says now we’re going to do Shake- 
speare, they have a perfectly open mind and 
aren’t scared.” 

Older children have also reacted weH 
“We’ve been doing tests in down-and-out 
areas of London where the kids are basically 
switched on only to pop music and glue. We 
took thirty copies in the other day of ‘Mac- 
beth' and when we came to collect them at 


the end of the class, half of them were 
mis s ing . I thought that was lovely." 

She got into comics when she saw draw- 
ings by a Brazilian-born artist named Von 
that everyone thought had no future. “I said 
to the other publishers all you do is regurgi- 
tate the same old material— the same books 
on flowers and cookery and sport and ro- 
mance. Why don’t you take on an exciting 
project like that? They said, why don’t you?” 
So she quit her own publishing job and 
founded Oval Projects Ltd. (the office is near 
the Oval cricket ground) with her father, who 
mortgaged the family house, as co-director. 

“He’s a designer and architect which 
means we think line and design and color 
and talk about artists all day long. And I 

Continued on page 11 





at the Lum-Fontanne. The play, set in a 
saloon ironically called Harry Hope's, close- 
ly parallels O'Neill's years of uncontrollable 
drinking in dives like Jimmy- the-Priest's and 
Lhe Hell Hole. It is impossible to imagine 
O’Neill having written the play without be- 
coming the virtual ascetic he did; yet it is 
equally impossible to imagine him writing as 
rendingly about self-destruction and self- 
delusion without having lived both. 

CNeDTs life and work raise some of the 
most frightening — and central — questions 
about creativity. Can the forces that mak e 
you creative also kill you? Can you live with 
control and yet create free of restraint? Can 
you live enough of tbe dark side to tell tbe 
tale without becoming a casualty? The equi- 
librium is precarious. As tbe playwright Ar- 
thur Miller wrote of Strindberg: “Strindberg 
not only suffered what by most definitions 
would be madness, but managed it like a 
conductor managing an orchestra. It makes 
his suffering no less real and painful to say 
that it was always being turned over and over 
by the bloody fingers of his mind.” 

In Sam Shepard's work that tension is 
frequently embodied by pairs of brothers — 
Lee and Austin in the play “True West,” 
Travis and Walt in the film “Paris, Texas." 
These characters represent the polarity in the 
playwright himself. “Somewhere there's a 
myth about the wolf and the sheep," Shep- 
ard said, “and man carries both inside him. 
And the process of keeping alive is trying to 
have these two cohabit, trying to cany on a 
balance between these two parts, because 
one's always trying to devour the other. And 
the one that wants to devour — the wolf — is 
the animalistic one, the one that operates on 
impulse and is pretty insane. 

[ 7^1 7 " 7 ^ 




“There's definitely a struggle going on. 
and it’s answered in different ways. Some 
people do it with drinking or drugs. The 
difficulty is trying to accept that this is the - 
condition you're living with, the condition of 
these two parts banging up against each 
other, and the constant Lnreai of being over- 
thrown by one." 

Like Shepard, the film director Martin 
Scorsese has consistently made an that de- 
rives from, and in turn reflects, his own 
turbulence. The emotional palette of Scor- 
sese’s surrogates ranges from the paranoia of 
Paul Hackett in his current “After Hours" to 
the volcanic violence of Travis Bickle in 
“Taxi Driver." Perhaps the most clearly 
autobiographical statement is Jimmy Doyle, 
the saxophonist portrayed by Robert DeN- 
iro in “New York, New York." Doyle is a 
singular musician and an impassioned lover; 
he also is a brutal predator, jealous of his 
wife's success as a singer, quick to damage 
those nearest him. 

“Timmy Doyle was very' much a picture of 
myself and DeNiro at that time.” Scorsese 
said. “We recognized that contrariness and 
difficulty, and we improvised on it. Because 
out of that does come the work, does come 
tbe art The trick is, how much does it get to 
you? “New York, New York' was not a 
complete success because the ‘wolf took 
over. ‘Raging Bull' was a beuer mix of vis- 
ceral stuff and form. 

“There's a creative urge that gets inside 
you, like ‘Alien.’ For me, it’s a constant; 
battle of deciding when not to explode, when 
to use that emotion to feed you creatively. 
There’s a constant fear, because you're push- 

Continued on page 11 


X 


Joanne Stronpn 


Robert 
Motherwell 
and his 
“ Samurai 
No. 1 (1974). 


Munich’s Gasteig Center: 
Getting the Culture, If Not 
The Cars, Under One Roof 


by .Albrecht Roeseler 


M UNICH — It is somewhat 
strange that Munich, though 
often praised as the focus of 
cultural activities in West Ger- 
many, has waited for ova 40 years since the 
last war to establish a new big concert hall 
Last week, with the official blessings of the 
federal president, who flew down to the 
Bavarian capital for the occasion, the new 
Gasteig Kuiturzentrum, a huge multipur- 
pose brick-and-concrete complex with sever- 
al concert and lecture halls, a public library, 
a music school and father educational facili- 
ties, opened its doors. Radio and television 
covered the opening ceremonies nationwide. 

The need to bouse the Munich Philhar- 
monic Orchestra in a new concert ball 
though evident for decades, had been ne- 
glected for a long time, and the provisional 
halls, the Herkulessaal in Lbe forma royal 
Reridenz complex as well as the ugly Con- 
gress Hall of the Technical Museum, proved 
to be more durable than expected. Thus, the 
Bavarian capital bad much time to consult 
other big cities on bow they had managed to 
reorganize their musical life after most 
buildings had been bombed during the war. 

Hamburg and Vienna, where luckily the 
concert halls had survived the end of the war, 

could carry on as before. Other cities started 
(rather late, in fact) remodeling the inside of 
partly destroyed buildings but took care to 
preserve their famous facades: Schinkel's 
forma Schauspielhaus (East Berlin) and the 
Alte Oper in Frankfurt were turned into 
concert halls. But there are also completely 
new buildings to be found: the Stuttgart 

Liederhalle (completed in the '50s) and the 
surprisingly modern Leipzig Gewandhaos, 
fine examples only surpassed by West Ba- 
lm’s spectacular Philharmonic, which is re- 
garded among international music connois- 
seurs as one of tbe finest concert halls of 
modern times. Built at (he edge of the Tier- 
gartea and since 1961 in close proximity to 
the infamous Berlin Wall it has nevotheless 
become the focus of music life in the divided 
city. 

The Munich people warned more than 
than This has been a problem closely con- 
nected with the idea of how German munici- 
palities decided to spend their taxpayers' 


A double . page from “ King Lear. '■ 


Ftjtscfcr. by Ian Po'bcl 


money on cultural activities. For a long time 
it was the dominating idea to spare no possi- 
ble effort to make even elite culture more 
easily accessible to the man in the street, that 
is, to offa visual and performing arts of 
diverse nature under one roof. There had 
been spectacular examples abroad; when 
Munich’s city fathers made up their minds to 
create a “grand multimedia cultural center 
plus facilities for adult education” New 
Yorkers had already experienced their brand 
new Lincoln Center — a large forum which 
assembled representative institutions for the 
performing arts, the famous Juilliard School 
and many other art buildings. Though nor 
strikingly modern but rather moderately 
classical it has proved to function properly 
ever since and was accepted by the public 
almost immediately. 

Whenever the architectural structure of 
new cultural centers became subject to criti- 
cism it seemed more understandable in other 
cities, such as in Paris when the merry, cubi- 
cal Centre Pompidou opened and. years later, 
in London, the Barbican Center. But despite 
all aesthetic grumblings the people gladly 
and swiftly accepted the new offerings, thus, 
justifying the general idea of assembling 
“culture under one roof." 

I N Munich, there were a lot of pros and 
cons when it came to raising enough 
money to finance the projected Kultur- 
Monstcr. And as soon as the decision was 
final to go ahead with this new Gasieig 
forum with numerous halls (seating capaci- 
ties from 150 up to 2,400 for the big Philhar- 
monic Hall) plus library and various educa- 
tional institutions, it suddenly became a 
popular political idea to promote subsidized 
culture in a more decentralized form; “dis- 
trict culture." street theater and so-called 
“sodo-cultural activities." 

While the monstrous Gasteig center grew- 
bigger and bigger (resulting in the city's 
decision to have lhe project bandied by a 
leasing company to whom they now will 
have to pay rates and interest for a total sum 
of over 330 milli on Deutsche marks, or 
about S126 million) the city administration, 
willy-nilly, had to fulfill promises made dur- 
ing the rule of the Christian Democrats; to 

instill] more and more “hardware" for cul- 
C on tinned on page 11 






Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


TRAVEL 


ENTERJNATIONAL DATEBOOK 




VIENNA, BSsendorfer Hall (tel: 
65.6631). k 

RECITALS — Nov. 26: Bssu Sozuar 

piano (Brahms, Dcbussyl 

•Konzerthaas(td: 72.46.86j. 
CONCERTS — Nov. 23 and 24: The 
Chamber Orchestra of Europe, Yehu- 
di Menuhin conductor/ vi olin. Doug- 
las Boyd obex (Bach, Haydn). 
•MusOcveron (tel: 65.8 1 .90). 
CONCERTS— Vienna PhQhannonic 
Orchestra — Nov. 23: Sir Charles 


•Musics Royaux des Beaux-Am dc 
Belgique (teL- 5 1355.46). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: 
“Ctaya." 

•Musses Royaux. d'Art et JHIstoire 


•British Museum (tel: 636.1535). 
EXHIBITION — To Jao. 1986: -Bud- 
dhism: Art and Faith.** 


45. 


(tel: 73336.10). 


•Hayward Gallery (td: 92837.08). 

16: “To 


ITION — To Dec. 22: "Los 


Iboros." 


BRAZIL 


EXHIBITIONS— To Feb. 16: “Tor- 
res-Garcia: Grid-Pattetn-Sign.” 

“Homage to Barcelona** 

• Lond on Cofisemn (tel: 836.01.11). 
OPERA — Nov. 27 and 30: “Orpheus 
in the Underworld" (Offenbach). 
•Nati onal T heatre (tel: 633.08.80). 
THEATER — Nov. 22 and 23; “The 
Duchess of Malfi” (Webster). 

Nov. 25-27: “Mrs. Warren's Profes- 
sion (Shaw). 


SAO PAULO, 18th Biennial Celebra- 
tion (id: 572.77.Z2)- 

WCBMa - Nov. 23: Sir dwfa Nov. 2^50: “Yomdab-lSluffa). 

Madcmasconductor, Hermann Prey ^S^Duarte. Senise). Nov. 28-31: “Love for Love" (Con- 

bamone, Omsaan Alicnburger violin x 0 D ec .|s«M 0 de ra Cla 5 sics"(Ponjn- &?*)■ 

ariSegaHMalfaui). 

To Da. 15: “He Apprentice Tourist: 

Photos of the Amazon Regionby Mau- 
reen BisQHal and Mario de Andrade,” 


(Schubert). 

Nov. 29 and 30: Christoph von Doh- 
nanyi conductor (Berg, Dvorak). 

Nov. 24: TonkOnstler Orchestra, Uwe 
Mund conductor, Heinrich Schiff con- 
ductor cello (Schubert, R. Strauss). 
Nov. 26: New Stockholm Chamber 
Orchestra, Franz Most conductor. Ulf 
Wallin violin (Mozart, Rossini). 

Nov. 28 and 30: Clemencic Consort, 
Reu6 acmendc conductor, Vienna 
Madrigal Choir, Xaver Meyer conduc- 
tor (Bach). 

RECITALS —Nov. 25: Robert Kflhl- 
mayer piano (Schubert). 

Nov 26 and 29: Walter Berry/ Erik 
Werba piano (Schubert, Wolf). 

Nov 27: Phillis Moss piano (Beetho- 
ven, Chopin). 

Nov. 30: Vladimir Ashkenazy piano 
(Beethoven, Schubert). 
•StaatsoDerfiel: 53240). 

BALLET— Nov. 26: “Raymonda" 




•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
73430.52). 

EXIBITTON —To Dec. 22: “Ge rman 
An in the Twentieth Century.” 
•Royal Opera House (td: 240.10.66). 
BALLET — -Nov. 23: “The Steeping 


7.66.82). 

CONCERT — Nov. 23: Quatucr Vo- 1 
cal William Byrd (Monteverdi, Pur- 
cell). 

•Espa ccKi ron (td: 43.73.50 25). 
THEATER — To Dec. 1: “Mario- : 
uettes in Paris.” 

•Maison de Victor Hugo (tel: 
417116.65). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 31: “Victor | 
Hugo's Drawings." 

•Mus£e d'An Moderns (tel: 
47.23.61.27). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: “Vera I 
Szdcdy." “Modem Masters from the | 
Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection-” 
•Mus6cCarnavalet(tr± 42.7121.13). 
CONCERT— Nov.24: Michel Pique- 
mal vocal Ensemble, Michel Kquemal j 
conductor (Rossini, Scarlatti). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 24: “Les | 

Grands Boulevards." 

To Jan. 5: “Engine BijoL" 


LONDON. Barbican Centre (tel: 
638.41.41). 

CONCERTS — London Symphony 
Orchestra — Nov. 26: Brian Wright 

conductor. Elizabeth Tremor vioun 
(Tchaikovsky). 

Nov. 28: Yuri Simonov conductor, Pe- 
ter Katin piano (Mussorgsky, Rach- 
maninov). 

Nov. 23:' New Symphony Orchestra, 
Clive Fairbaim conductor (Schubert, 
J. Strauss). 

Nov. 24: Philharmotria Orchestra. Jo- 
seph Giunta conductor, Matthias Zim- 


Bcauty” (Petipa, Tchaikovsky). •Musfce du Grand Palais (tel: 

OPERA — Nov. 26 and 29: “Semde" 42.6134.10). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: “Sir 


(Handel). 

•Tate GaBerv ( td: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Dec. 1: “How- 
ard Hodgkin: Prints from 1977-1983.” 
To Dec 8: “Scott Burton." 

To Jan. 10: "Kurt Schwitters.” 
•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To December: 

“The Japanese Folk craft Movement: 
19th & 20th Century Textiles and Ce- 
ramics." 

To Jan. 19: “Shots of Style: Great 
Fashion Photographs Chosen by Da- 

■ D«n_a M 


Joshua Reynolds: 1723-1792.' 
.6:“LaGloi 


Gloirede Victor Hugo.' 
nrvreftd: 42.60.39.26)- 
— ToJan. 6: "LeBiun I 


)PERA — Nov. 24: “Tristan und Isol- 
de" (Wagner). 

Nov. 28: “Die WalkOre" (Wagner). 
Nov. 29: “DieZaubexfl£>Le”(Mocart). 
Nov. 30: “Arabella" (Strauss). 
•Vcriksoper (id: 53240). 
OPERETTA— Nov. 29: “The Land of 
Smiles” (LehAr). 

Nov. 30: “Der BcUelstudent” (Mil- 
lOdcer). 


vid Bailey." 

Jan. 26: “Hats from India.” 


BELGIUM 


Nov. 25: Royal Liverpool 
monic Orchestra, Nicholas Oeobury 
conductor (Roscozwdg. Perrin). 

Nov. 27: English Chamber Or ch e str a, 
Andrew Litton conductor (Chopin, 
Mozart). 

Nov. 29: Orchestra of Sl John’s Smith 
Square, Alessio Vlad conductor, Rose- 
mary Fumiss violin (Vivaldi). 

Nov. 29: HaQ£ Orchestra, S tanisla w 
Skrowaczewslri conductor. John LiH 


ToJan.: 

To May 25: “British Watercolours.” 




(Beethoven). 


BRUSSELS, Palais des Beaux Arts 
(tel: 51230.45). 

Exhibition — To Dec. 22 : “ Span- 
ish Splenders and Belgian Villages, 
1500-1700." 


IIBITIONS — To Nov. 17: 
“JJLR. Tolkien," paintings by Ray- 
mond Gregory. 

To No v. 24: “John Lidzey." 
THEATER — Nov. 23: “Les Miserct- 
bles" ( musical based on novd by Vic- 
tor Hugo). 


PARIS, A.D.A.C. Gallerie (tel: 
42.77.96.26). 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 28: “Sculp- 
ture, Engraved Glass, Paintings, Pho- 
tography." 

•American Center (tel: 4335.2 1 .50V 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 30: “Wil- 
liam T. Wiley: California I.” 

JAZZ— Nov. 24: LesVoix. 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
42.77.12.33). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: 
“Marta." 

ToJan. 1 : “Klee et la Musiquc.” 


WEEKEND 


TRAVEL 



ToJan. 6: 

•Mus6e do Louvre i 
EXHIBITION 
a Versailles." 

•Mns£e du Petit Palais (tel: 
4Z65.12.73). 

EXHIBITION — To Jam5: “Soteil 
D'encre," Victor Hugo’s mannsciipu 
and drawings. 

•Opera (td: 47.42 j57.60). 

BALLET — Nov. 23: “Swan Lake" 
fBourmeister, Tchaikovsky). 

•Salle PJqyd (id: 45.63.07.96). 
CONCERTS — Ensemble Orchestral 
de Paris — Nov. 23: Jean-Pierre WaUez 
conductor, Beaux-Arts Trio (Beetho- 
ven). 

Nov. 30: Claudio Sctmone conductor, 
Daniel Arrignon oboe (Albinoni. Vi- 
valdi).Nov. 28: O r cfaes tr e de Paris, 
Daniel Barenboim conductor (Schu- 
bert). 

•Th&aire des Champs-Qys£es (id: 
4723.47.77V 

•Thfiltre du Rond-Point (tei: 
4Z56.60.70). 

RECITAL — Nov.24: Thomas Zehet- 
mair violin, Malcolm Fraser piano 
(Bach). 

•Thfeltre Musical de Paris (tel: 
4Z6 1.19.83). 

CONCERTS — Nov. 25: Toulouse 
Chamber Orchestra, Georges Armand 
conductor, Roberto Aussd guitar 
(Piazzob). 

JAZZ MUSICAL — To Dec. 19: 
“Black and Blue" ( Segovia/ Orezzoh). 
•Tour Montparnasse (tel: 
4Z7Z93.41V 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “Four 
Centuries of Ballet in Paris." 



Guanabara Bay and Sugar Loaf. 


Resurgence in Rio de Janeiro 




9*-‘ 


by Marlise Simons 


IO DE JANEIRO — On a Erst visit 
to Rio de Janeiro, you wonder how 
you could have missed out on it 
-until then. The next time, yon im- 
mediately remember why you swore to re- 
turn. It has ease and style and grandeur. 

BuQt against odds, on narrow struts of 
land, rolling over landfills and patched onto 
the mremtnrnsiriwi this hustlin g city IS a 
monument to human persistence. When a 
stretch of it is left alone, the vines and rubber 


GERMANY 


BERLIN. Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

OPERA — Nov. 24: “Dan Carlos" 




Jov. 25: “Salome" (R. Strauss). 

1 Nov. 27 and 30: “Tannhauser” (Wag- 1 
ner). 

•Philharmonic (tel: 25488-0). 

| CONCERTS — Berlin P hilhar monic I 
Orchestra — Nov. 23 and 24: Herbert | 
von Karajan conductor (Bruckner). 
Nov. 27: Reinhard Peters conductor j 
(FriedL Havenstein). 

Nov. 30: Zubin Mehta conductor. 


(tel: 


T 


ime In Europe is intended for the man and woman on 
the move. It is the only collected source of information on what is on 
in all the major centres of Europe — exhibitions, concerts and opera, 
sporting events and pop, trade fairs and congresses, and much more 
besides. Published monthly. Time hi Europe contains hundreds of 
events taking place each month. You may be in Birmingham for a 
trade fair, in Vienna for a congress, or in Frankfurt to see a client, but 
you will certainly be interested in what is on in town, even if you are 
only stopping over for one night 

If you are a regular traveller in Europe make use of the 
special introductory offer at 50% of the normal copy price and 
complete the form for more information. 


RECITAL — Nov. 28: , 

| low piano (Chopin). 

COLOGNE, Oper der Stadt 
,21.25.81V 
: CONCERT— Nov. 26: Cologne Uni- ( 
vereity Music Collegium, Dieter Gutk- 
necht conductor (Monteverdi). 
9PERA — Nov. 23: “H Ritomo d*U- 
tissein Panin" (Monteverdi). 

; Nov. 29: “Eektra" (R. Strauss). 

Nov. 30: “Madama Butterfly” (Pucci- 
ni>. 

FRANKFURT, AlteOper(td: 13400). 
CONCERTS — Nov. 23: London j 
P hilh a r monic Orchestra. Andrew Da- 
vis conductor (Beethoven. Writer) 
Nov. 28 and 29: Frankfurt Radio! 
phony Orchestra, Onus Peter 
conductor. Edgar Krapp organ (Bach, 

! Mozart). 

RECITALS— Nov. 25: Vladimir Spi - 1 
vakov violin, Sergq Bcsrodni piano 
I (Beethoven, Franck). 

HAMBURG, Staatsoper (tel: 
35.15.55). 

BALLET— Nov. 27 and 30: “Onegin" 
(Cranko, Tchaikovsky). 

Opera —N ov. 24: “Ki 
ova"(Janacek). 


y take it bade. The forces of gravity poll 
extra hard on weekends, when naif the dty 
seems to descend from the hillsides, travel 
down elevators and stairways and end up 
prostrate, prancing or playing down below, 
along miles of beach. 

Now that two decades of dour military 
role have ended, Brazil is experien cing a 
surge of cultural expression. Brazil's artists, 
writers and musicians have always been 
drawn by Rio’s merger of play, work and 
physical beauty, so their output is concen- 
trated here. The theater season has never 
been busier. There is a rush of new books, 
concerts and art shows. Caffa offer folk 
music and poetry readings. The last week of 
this month, Rio wfli be host to its second 
International Film Festival. In Sao Paulo, 
the Biannual Art Show will be open until 
Dec 15. It is a giant fair, exhibiting about 
2,400 pain tings, sculptures and photographs 
from 46 countries. 

There are places that ought to be ap- 
proached in the manner of the explorers of 
old, after along voyage at sea. Rio is one of 
them. In the distance, giant rocks rise from 
the shore and, like magnets, draw one in. The 
curving green and yellow coastline juts out 
toward the traveler, then bends away again. 

The French, showing a knack for presents 
that last, gave New York its Statue of liber- 
ty and Rio ils statue of ChrisL It has stnxuxed 
people ever since. To see it dose up, one 
makes the climb by car or funicular through 


binations for $200. Beach and leisure wear is 
inexpensive and saucy. 

B razilians are accomplished jeweliy mak- 
ers. Aside from the traditional gemstones, 
they produce piles of costume jewelry: some 
cautious, some imaginative and some outra- 
geous. A necklace might cost $15; an imita- 
tion ivory bracelet perhaps $10 to $15. - 

Interest on the part of foreigners seems to. 
have helped validate handcrafts again. Sev- 
eral new stores have opened, noth a great 
variety of pieces from all over the country. 
Offerings include tine lace, woodcarvings, 
pottery, hamm ocks, Indian artifacts, feather 
and basket work, fiber tapestry, pewter and 
leather goods. Representative stores include 
O Sol. 213 Corcovado Street, and M2os de 
Fada, 47 6 Visconde de Piraji Street Zu- 
hause, a bit pricier, has outlets in Ipanema’s 
Design Center and in Copacabana at 303 
and 458 Batata Ribetro Street 

For an authentic, popular market, see the 
Fair of the Northeast on Campo de S3o 
Crist6v5o, Sunday mornings. 

Beware of the woodenantique” saints. 
They are ubiquitous, often chanmn& usually 
carved just the other day and deserving of no 
more fhan the price of a contemporary piece. 

Rio's pickpockets are among the world’s 
nimblest. Passport, money, checks and jew- 
elry are best left in the hold safe (and never 
taken to the beach). Cash carried far shop- 
ping should lie kept to a bare ri wm mmn 
fans are cheap: There is no need or wisdom 


mousse of watercress, canracpiiiha (a small Z 
tasty lobster) and the tangy m&racuja (pas- . ' .. 
rion fruit tart) are now 'a pp e arin g! on more “ 


and more menus. Earing .bot .is it&tivdy -t 




cheap, and people See tostarf after 9 JP, 

Some of thebest-seafeodisservedin the 0 
Meditecribieo on Ipanana’s Pcudeate de ‘ 
Moras Street (]K5M696) : and ‘4c Grotta- . r j 
mare an Gomes Camriro Street in Copaca- ™ 
bana (227-3186). The. Albamar. on ce thc .^ 


(240^378). At hmch it offers a grand . n 
view of Gngnahara Bay. A ihrec-OHnse meal v 
fOT two without vnne.ai Grottamare, $25; :t 
MafiterrAneo, S30; ( : Albamar, $23. . j> 


- j - «f 


iR^oada and otiter BraziHan sperialrio ’*• 
are served at Cfralf on Matrix Street (286- 
0897) Also typically Rrayniitn are the ubiq- 
ifltous diUriascarias,' inf ormal, inexpensive 
halls wbere you often can' eat as mnrii meat n 
as you want for a fiat price. Waiters pick' 
giant qjfts from the open-pat barbecue and- “ 
carve the meat directly onto your plate. 
Good choices are Marin's an Atlantic Ave- "• 
hue . (542-2393) hi Copacahana a nd Plata- V* 
forma on Adalberto Ferreira Street (274- r 
4022). Marin’s, $25; Pbrtafomia, $21. 






tin 


?z:. 


in. riding’ abus. rstlr 


tit- Copacabana and Ipanema you. are in . 
the midst of things near beach, shops -and _ 
restaurants. Most of- Riots" fop hotris are 
akrag these famous shores, but it’s worth 
remosbering that these hotels are separated 
from die beach by broad avenues and tfaoe: 


The sigjit of this .vohqjtuous place and its ' 
people happily flaimfing their bodies, their 
glowing skm and their loud makeup, often 
scuds newcomers scrambling for a - quick 
body treatment themsrives. 

Massages, facials,^ hairstyling, manicures 
and pedicures for both sexes are so inexpen- 
sive you might as well do it all. Salons are. 
plentiful, in the hotels or the commercial 
streets behind them. 


..j ... TcaejmidsA^pceayt Do_askTor jt-.y.- .r.^. 


room at . jAbe- top. -Prices listed are for two, 
breakfast mciudedL 


ajropkal fprest to the top of Corcovado 
0 leet (703 meters) 


| HE choice of fine restaurants is rapid- 
ly growing in r’* 


(Hunchback) peak, 2^10 
above the city. There is nothing for an en- 
core, not even the cable car to P3o de Aqicar 


(Sugar Loaf) mountain. 
On tT 


“Katya Kahan- ! 


ITALY 


Name: 


Address: 
City: 


fo Nov. 30: “Luigi 


Country: 


Signature: 


Time In Europe (Subscriptions), P.O. Bax 134, A-1101 Henna, Austria. 


HOTELS 


™ p OR MEASURE in PARIS? 
ENJOY THE EXCEPTIONNAL SERVICES OF 


. f IWIK. 


HOTEL 
ClubMediterranee 


- RHIOTE CONTROLLED COLOR TELEVISION WITH U PROGRAMS 
™ Kn S n s h ' German, Italian, French_ through satellite's network. 

- CONFERENCE ROOMS AND OFFICES TO YOUR REQUIREMENTS. 

- RELAXING ATMOSPHERE WITH 40,000 sqJt of trees and fsardenn and 
yet only 5* FROM ARC-DE-TRIOMPHE 

- RENOWNED GOURMAND BUFFET AND A WARM WELCOME. 

FOB RESERVATIONS PLEASE CALL : (!) 4758ILOO. - Tlx. 610 971 

MAILING ADDRESS: 58, Bid. VICTOR-HUGO - NEUILLY-FRANCE 


ANTIQUE SHOW 


1 


M1US - CHAMP ds MARS 


1 SALON DES 

ANTIQUAIRES 

22 NOV.-r DEC. 


Hofldwufffe 


fcOLE 

MIUTAfRE 



books 


UNUSUAL GIFT 

Book of 

100 colour photos 10” x 8 ” 
‘Just Photos’ 

Price S 7 + $4 postage 
Allow four weeks for delivery: 

NEIL MORRIS 

Suite 289, 93 Hope St, 
Glasgow, Scotland. 

TeL 041.221.9105 


HOLIDAYS 


GO WEST and fly the best! U.S. Airtours 
Tel. 01-551 4451 ext 5 London 


restaurants 


HOT POTUHI BQRCHT. 

ptssjms 

SHOXED SALMON 



BOLOGNA, Galleria d’Ane Mo- j 
dernaUel: 5QJ2&S9). 

EXHIBITION— To 
BerteRL" 

FLORENCE, Teatro Comunale (tel: 
277.9236). 

OPERA —Nov. 23 and 26: “La FiRe 
du R^nncnt" (Donizetti). 

MILAN, Teatro alia Sea la (tel: 
887.92.11). 

BALLET —Nov. 23 and 27: “Labis- 
betica domata" (Cranko, Scarlatti). 
Nov. 24: “ Jeu de cartes" (Cranko, Stra- 
vinsky), “The Lady and the FooP 
(Cranko. Venii). 

RECITAL — Nov. 25: Salvatore Ac- 
cardo violin (Bach). 

ROME, Accademia Nazionale di San- 


ta Cecilia (tri: 679.03.89). 

RTS — Nov. 24-26: Orehes- 


CONCERT 
tra e Coro defl’ Accademia Nazionale 
di Santa Cecilia, Wrifgang SawaHsch 
conductor. Leon Bates piano, Julia 
Varfidy soprano (Bartok). 

VENICE, Ca’ Vendnunin Calagi I 


the ground, there are pockets of old 
Rio where narrow streets, churches, and 
monasteries have held out against the bull- 
dozers. Some are dose to the Fraqa 15. de 
Novembro. Here a fine 18th-century royal 
palace, used in modern times by the postal 
and telegraph department, has just been re- 
stored and reopened as a cultural center. 

The one museum not to miss is the Na- 
tional Museum in the Quinta da Boa Vista 
Park at 52o Crist6v3o (open Tuesday 
through Sunday, 10 to 5). A dmissi on is the 
equivalent of 10 U. S. cents. Its collection is 
fumbled but wondrous and includes me erf 
the world’s largest meteorites, an unusual 
Egyptian mummy with its arms not tucked 
in and a range of pre-Columbian pottery and 
Indian finery. (Brazilian museums do not 
have English labels.) 

The little-known Aerospace Museum, at 
the air force base, is open Tuesday to Friday 
9 to 4, Saturday and Sunday 10 to 5. Admis- 
sion is free, ana a guided tour m English can 
be arranged, free, for four or more, by calling 
359-8880 two days in advance. Among flying 
machines of many types and ages are the 
earliest planes, btmt by the Brazilian avia- 
tion pioneer Alberto Santos-DumonL His 
Demoiselle is here too, a graceful txeature 
with bicyde wheels, a bamboo frame _and 
silk wings. 


_ .swore 

by a heavy fare of codfish dishes and 
feyoada, the national stew.of. black beans, 
dried meat, sausages and pork. Such meals 
traditionally ended in deeply sweet desserts 
and deep. Now lighter concoctions are avail- 
able, based on the year-round abundance of 
fresh fruits, greens and fish. -Dishes like 


Modem hbtids indude the Meridien (275- ■ -i- 
992Z, $1 14)and die Othon Palace (235-7292, 

$1-19) in Copacabana mad the Caesar Park - : 
(287- 3122, $140) and Praia Ipanema (239- ' 

9932; $79) m Ipanbm&i -• * 

. For a less urban setting, the Sheraton, on . .v . 
its own little beach,- is half a mile from ~'. r 
LcbUm (274-1122, $125):, Old-timers often .. ." 
favDijone of the tiuee aging classics: the . 
Copacabana Palace (257-1818, $107), and©- if 

gant seafrtxit spa wrth high ceifings, small -4; FT 
bedsand akitchen with less appeal than the j\ “ : 
hold’s -architecture; the Goto Verde (542- ‘.j; f~ -- 

I887^88Xjustafewblocksaway, withafiue - ~ ' 
rfcstaiirant (about $35). Kked by business- 7 
meu, and the Hotel Gloria, overlooking ; 

Guanabara Bay (205-7272^54). ■ " ^ 


i<443 




- j. 






O IOSS The New York Tones 


tew 


ud:70J9D9). 
EXHIBI 


TRUSS 

Daily TRAITEUR until midnight 

Wagioni PARIS- IT*. TetflJ4l?7J4 74 CS. 


HTION —To Nov. 24: “Felice I 
Catena ** 

•Scuda di San Giovanni Evangelista I 
(tel: 70^52). 

EXHIBITION —To Dec. 8: “Mario I 

Botta: 1960-1985." 


| HIS is a dty of stylish cotton and 
linen clothes and leather shoes and 
handbags, all cheaper than you can 
get at home. Boutiques are scattered through 
two modem shopping malls, Rio Sul and S5o 
Conrado, and along Visconde de Pingi 
Street. Krishna and Chocolate have eyeaal- 
ly nice linen dresses, tops and suits. Krishna 
has suits for S1S0 and dress and blazer com- 


GIFTS 


□ 


NETHERLANDS 



<1,71 








.■.v., - 




1 at;- - 


M 


The Nw York W 



Looking for a Gift? 

THE FAMOUS 

BALLET 
DANCERS 
CLAY SCULPTURES 
(from F. 700) 
by 

Thirese Thoreux 

“U POTEHE QU HflBUH" 

in Montmartre 

Open 2;3Q p.m.‘7 pjn. 
except Sunday A Monday 
98 8. Laptc. 75018 fare. (1) £2SIAiSJ2. 


AMSTERDAM, Conrertgebouw (teL* 
71.83.4 5). 

CONCERTS — Nov. 23: Netherlands 
Chamber Orchestra, Emmanuel Ko- 
rin conductor. Sabine Meyer dan ne t | 
(Mozart, Wagner). 

Nov. 27-29: CcnKartgebonw Orcbcs- . 
■ era, Hans Vook conductor, Jaap van 
I Zwcdcn riolin, HarroRngsenaarscd- 
1 lo (Brahms, StravinsloA. 

iClTAL — Nov. 26: Kiystian Z- 
[ merman piano (Bach, Mozart). 


£ 


CHIVUS RI .GAI. 




. v 


UNITED STATES 


NEW YORK, Metropolitan Museum 
of Art (td: 535.77.10). 
EXHIBITION— Jan. 5: “India!' 

I •Museum of Modern Art) 


fteb708-94.0Cf). 
EXHIBITONS — ’ 


WEEKEND 

appears cverv Fridav 


-To De* 3: “New 
I Photography” (Berman, Mendoza, [ 
Sp&QO)- 

[ To Jan. 7: “Contrasts of Form: Geo- ) 
metric Abstract Art L910-1980." 




^JWm.NcutsHrDpnoovcrof 




:F 
































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


Page 11 i 


by Roger Colli s 

A S . < SL„ seas ^ ed lOOTV 

/V b J^P“ 1 8i . Or “involuntary 
forwhich 

l ****%+?*& 

SH/SfiS P^^^abcotit 


Awareness of 



ed by relatively stria rules in the United 
Bood *^ while those in ^ Africa 
and eastern Europe are mostly bad There's 

agrcwngawarciicasmEimwe: anfinesiikc 

British Airways and KLM are pioneering 
waysofaskmg for vohmtecrs toaccept cash 

slowly in Europe 

need to improve their approach. I 

The Stances of beme bumned hhvinndv 

vary according to the timeof the flight as 
as the airline. Overall, in the United 


aneiro 


the Bmqg earners was 639 per 10,000 in 
the first three months of 1985 compared with 
5-53 during the same periodlast year. British 
Airways has cited a figure of 7 per 10000 
(although “we’ve gone significantly below 
that now an our European and /farn*^ 

.. . V ^ ^sexvices,”a.qx)kesumsays).BritishCaledb- 

..." ’--.C; 'aj», nian’s ®jBo>*s for August work out to 8.12 

" ■'Tvsan^' 1 0|000. It could be 15 or mace forborne 
,. cT > carriers. This means that at .Heathrow in 
" * - s *v.^i-3 I-ondon, the world’s busiest inter national 
airport, an avoage of between 50 and 100 

" UL *‘i : passengprsmay be bunq>edbythe70airlma 
.’ ! 'St operating there. • 

_J ‘ Passeng e rs gq bumped becanse all afrtinftt 
ElJ .overbook to compensate for “no-shows,^ 
i. ?'?«». oi people who fail to turn op for a flight on 
• _ . L r iv. which they are booked. According to BA, 

• -'..’m: no-shows average about 15 percent, with 

• \ some services running as high as 30 poceut 
: -*ouaJ Sefik Juksd, general manager for c omm er- 
" l - r ■■ dal affairs for the Association of European 
u r Airlines, says: “A study we did over six 
, mont hs showed that in any specific year, our 

• - . h- ^ ^ hventy member airiines last one nriffion seats 

‘ . ®B; as a result of no-shows, representing a loss in 

- . ‘ ^ ^ revenue of $200 mflK nn, or around 15 per- 
’• '*"1" JT* 1 ® ^ cent of total p»«™gr T vofanne.” 

. ^ .‘‘is Some people try to shift the blame to the 

■ ^ r -3*t business traveler, who often makes mniti pV 

.. ,7 '■£; booltings or fails to caned. But it’s this' 

• *r. Ajs, flexflrifity (promoted, by the airlines) that 

■ r — si you pay for in the high cost of a business 
-T J zr .-‘ :i ^ class 01 ftdWaie ticket. 

“The arrtrnm; make a distinction in the 

.. v- price they charge in relation to load 

. / 'i k “' factor, that’s wity the business guy pays 
T, if mote! i the airlines have a moral obligation 
_ rj . *' when they talk about a firm booking,* says 
... . J ! 1 Geoffrey Iipman, executive director of the 
" c ^ "5 hitcmational Foundation of Airiine Passed- 
“i" 1 ? 2 -’ get* Associations in Geneva. Lipman ac- 
' ^ cepts that denied boarding is lmked with no- ^ 

' -- - — k '< shows, butfeds “it’snot ngHt to penalize an 
individual because he gets caught In the 
h. »,>ii system. The guy who gets turned off may 
, newer h»ve been a no-show in his life. When 

_ T it’s yon, it’s the end of the world.” 

m,'. 1 ™ To its credit, the AEA recognizes that the 
"• blame for no-shows and bumping lies as 
much, with the airlines and the travatiade as 
esfe: with the passenga. Last Juty h started a 
r.J : g campaign to increase public and trade 
Oi-rr awareness of the problem. Acccoxfing to Juk- 
„in: is seL many agents and booking staff either 
;•*.:? '■&» forget to caned bookings or improperly en- 



a ' ’7-.C confirmed tkket-Whatoften hrmpem is 

an airline faBs to caned alaterffight when a 


may risk having on ward and return fi whrc 
caneded, although Juksel admits that this is 
more of a scare than a threat 

. In the United States, the procedure is 
infinitely more enlightened than in other 
parts of the wold. Under Department of 
Transportation rules, an airHne must first 
ask tor volunteers to give up their seats in 
return for cash or vouchers. This is conduct- 
ed as a kind of auction, sometimes on the 
plane or at the boarding gate. If there are no 
volunteers, the airline. has to pay compensa- 
tion to those people who are involuntarily 
bumped. This amounts to the cost of a one- 
way lare, up to the maximum of S2Q0, if the 
airline can get the pa«eng*rq to their desti- 
nation within two hours on a domestic flight 
and four hours on an international fli ght If 
not, they are entitled to twice the vdne of the 
flight coupon, up to a maximum of S400 and 
overnight expenses. This system seems to 
work so well that there is a new bre e d of 
traveler emerging, die professional bumpee. 
AH you need to do is judge which flights are 
likely to be overbooked, make your plans 
and take the f»«h 

In Europe, no system is sanctioned by law. 
The AEA operates a voluntary plan whereby 
involuntarily bumped passengers are offere d 
50 percent of the value of the flight coupon 
for the single f are up to a maximum of $200, 
or the equivalent m other currency, for a 
delay of at least four hours within Europe 
and six hours for long hanL Several airimeq 
do not even apply these mimmal conditions 
and, worst erf all, off load passengers an an 
arbitrary basis. There is no provision for 
asking for volunteers. 

The oily European airlines that currently 
operate on the American pattern are BA at 
Heathrow and KLM at SdriphoL Neither 
conducts » U. S.-styie auction, but they do 
ask for volunteers and offer inducements in 
cash or vouchers. British rjriednnian says it 
will introduce a amilar plan at. Gazwick, 
probably in April 1986, whenit introduces a 
new computerized check-in system. 

BA does what it calls “queue combing, 
likely candidates are asked at the check-in 
counter if they would be prepared to stand 
down. If they are bumped, they are taken to 
a denied boarding lounge, treated to cham- 
pagne and other amenities. A BA spokesman 
says the airline has not only suc c eeded in 
reducing the number of people who are 
bumped, but half of those ^10 are are vdnn- 
teers. He cites the case of a honeymoon 
• couple who opted to be bumped from a flight 
to Cyprus and were delighted to spend the 
ni g ht in a first class hotel rather than arrive 
late at night. One problem, he says, is how to 
handle volunteers who are disappointed to 
get a seat at the last moment. 



Gasteig 


Continued from page 9 


/ 


ture purposes elsewhere, Le. buying, renovat- 
ing, reb uilding adequate housing; a medal 
Bavarian folk theater, a medal “playhouse 
■J-- factory*' for young people, a special chil- 
drens’ theater, another multipurpose music 
hah and a “Goman theater” to save toozing 
musical com pani es and ball festivities during 
the Fascfaing period. 

Naturally, most of these new establish- 
.j m«n its offered a lot' of trash during the first 
( months and people stayed away. The dty 
II had to drip in luge sums in order to keep 

_ doing how quickly "substantial “software,” 
attractive productions, new ideas and au- 
thors, could be found and hired. Mu nic ip al 
support has remained essential for all these 
k ■! newly founded establishments, and the dty 
1 a uthori ties must be glad that they do not 
have to subsidize the two state theaters and 
the expensive two opera houses in Munich, 
which are taken care of by the government of 
Bavaria. ... 

Meanwhile, the Gasteig complex has 
opened all its facilities. Offering a total seat- 
ing capacity of 3,500, it means Munich’s 
people can now choose every night between 
around 50 or more muac and theater pro-, 
grams offered to more than 25,000 specta- 
tors. The b uilding has been subject to vigor- 
ous criticism .from the very be ginnin g 
Though its nvrin attraction, the ampin theat- 


rical Philhar monic Hall (light brown wood- 
en ceiling and red seats), seems to have been 
more or less accepted by the experts, the 
vastness of the attire brick budding has been 
heavily criticized. “Culture Bunker” and 
“PhSharmomc Fortress” are two of the nicer 
nicknames. 

Nevertheless, artists and' agents have 
heavily booked the building many months 
ahead arid there is no doubt that the Gastdg 
will become the focus of the dry’s music 
activities. The two weeks following the open- 
ing festivities, apart from homemade con- 
certs, have offered a great number of inter- 
national elite artists and ensembles. 

This is, however, not the biggest problem. 
It is parking your car. There is hardly room 
enough to park those of the orchestra mem- 
bers and managers. People are expected to 
use the subway, winch offers special night 
connections, but acceptance of that idea is 
doubtful. The traffic chaos repeatedly pre- 
dicted by the load press was indescribable 
during the iy w ii i ^ ; tfa* Gasteig monster 
seemed almost inaccessible. The city of Mu- 
nich, a latecomer as far as its cultural cen t e r 
is concerned; has time enough to muse 
ova the problem. They brooded ova the 
culture but forgpt about the cars. 

Albrecht Roeseier is cultural editor of the 
Munich nevjspaper Sdddeuische Zaaotg. 



Munich’s new Gasteig cultural center. 


TRAVEL 


America at Table: A Nation Gone Food Crazy 


passenger has left earlier. Airlines often for- 
to notify other camera when there are 
■ys in connecting flights. 

_ J tbOUgh Mrlin w! ary al)rn»d , rm^i-r- 

mg rides of the Internationa! Air Transport 
Association, to impote a penalty fa honor- 
ing a ticket that shows an uncanceled reser- 
vation for a previous flight, it’s highly un- 
Ekdy that any would do so in today’s 
competitive climate. -That is why multiple 
booking, spread among several airlines, is 
hard to dete ct . More sensible is the AEA 
campaign, which mtfianeg that if. you are a 
no-show fa the outward leg of a trip,, you 


N EW YORK — What’s cooking in America todav? 
Plenty. The American palate erf the 1980s is unde 
mg changes that are at once exciting, bizarre, 
mmig and wildly confusing. 

I mag ine, even a year or two ago, waiting into a suburban 
Grand Union supermarket to buy fresh cactus leaf, tamarind, 
.purple peppers, fresh tuna and squid, fresh fava bouts, horse- 
raduhand jicama, and eight different varieties of winter squash. 
Even run-of-the-mill supermarkets all over the land sow offa 
half a dozen kinds of fresh gree n s, a dozen types of grind-your- 
own coffee beans, and, ih»nW to the Japanese s ushi w pjoq nn, 
fresh tuna is now just about as common as the canned One 
almost beHeves that if von can’t fmd a food in America todav, it 
doesn’t estisL 

During the last several yens, cottage industries have sprouted 

all ova, and oncc-exotic foods available almost exclusively 

Patricia Wells 

from France or Italy now proudly bear the stamp “Made in 
America.” Today, Bdon oysters, scallops with their coal, sun- 
dried tomatoes, slender haricots vats, black caviar, fresh foie 
as, big-breasted mallard docks and sea urchins are now being 
irvestcd in every comer of the land. Even one of the American 
food giants, the Campbell's Soup, has jumped on the bandwag- 
on and is mass-msketing fresh Oriental <bifnir* mn<hnvwn. 
.Until 1981, when a trio of ambitious young American entre- 
preneurs began a company called Flying Foods, such foods as 
white-fleshed St. Peter's fish and the bitter Italian chicory 
known as radiedno rarely found their way to the American 
table. Today, the company ships six tons of radicchio from Italy 
to the United States each week. 

Scotland, fresh 
France and 

Eaters never had it so good. Or have they? Americans have a 
way of equating quantity with quality. Tms astounding abun- 
dance does not necessarily make for a richer gastronomic life. 

There’s a lot of bizarre food being served out there. A nation 
of born-again eaters, the generation of palates weaned on JeH-0 
molds and fried fish sticks, meat loaf, canned green beans and 
lumpy mashed potatoes enriched with margarine, is now singing 
the praises of such unwholesome-sounding cnmh rnfltinn* as 
roast bed and Chateau <TY quern. They are serving tamales 
sprinkled with white Italian truffles, concocting cheesecake to 
serve with smoked salmon, and actually asking people to put 
down hard cash for deep-fried shrimp with strawberry sauce. In 



the beverage category, the hottest new gustatory challenge is the 
Cajun martini: marinate fiery bot peppers in vodka or gin. add a 
dose of bravery, and drink 

In New York, restaurant madness has reached dramatic 
heights. Diners with reservations risk being turned away at the 
door if Warren Beatty and friends walk in unannounced. 
Frantic diners send little bribes across town to secure the honest 
seats in town, and because the demand for tables far outweighs 
supply, people will eat at any hour just to say they’ve been. You 
eat not when you’re hungry, but when you can get a seat. Sane 
restaurants require reservations months in advance, and it’s not 
uncommon for a business lunch to begin at 11:45, and dinner 
may commence at the unfashionable hour of 6:30. 

The contradiction of the decade is the highly accepted state- 
ment that “Nobody in America cooks anymore.” Who, then, is 
buying all those funny things they seO in the supermarket? 

When the middle class can’t be found in restaurants, they're 
at home eating upscale carryout food or tossing pre-prepared, 
single portion meals into the microwave oven. 

America has always been keen on cany out food, but the 
pizzeria or Chinese hole-in-the-wall of the 1950s has been 
expanded to gourmet heights. In Detroit, the highly regarded 
London Chop House now offers a full take-out service that 
includes every item on its prestigious menu. Dinas can order a 
multi-course dinn er for 12 and the food will be delivered to the 
door in a stretch limousine, carefully packed in bright red-and- 
white insulated shopping bags. 

In Manhattan, a deKver-to-th e-door caterer called The West 
Side Express offers such duly items as 5- Alarm chili, Buffalo 
chicken wings, red-leaf lettuce salad, com bread and chocolate 
mousse, all charged painlessly on a credit card. 

L IKEWISE, the microwave phenomenon is affecting tradi- 
tional family dining patterns both in and outride the 
4 borne. It’s predicted that by the end of this year, 50 
per c ent of all American households will have microwave ovens. 
Thanks to the convenience and rapidity of microwave cooking 
and the increasing availability of prepared, single portion foods 
manufactured expressly for the microwave, the typical subur- 
ban dinner hour now stretches from 4 P.M. to midnight, and 
parents and children eat according to when they gel home from 
the office, from baseball practice, or the ballet class. 

In the “old days” the family dinner hour was fixed and 
everyone sat down to a shared meal Yon all ate the same food, 
and downed your spinach, Hke it or not. Now, not oily has the 
family dinner boor disappeared, bnt finicky palates are having a 
field day. Junior pops microwave Chicken Nuggets into the 


oven, diet-conscious morn may settle for baked potatoes and 
dad will opt for a couple of hot dogs. 

When that same family goes out to eat in a suburban chain 
restaurant, they continue this individualist eating pattern. The 
pizzeria — where every ope sits down at a shared meal — is no 
longer good enough- What the family wants, and what restau- 
rants offer, is an international smorgasbord, not one cuisine, but 
many, joined together as many courses in a single meaL 

So now. instead of the home cook mimicking the restaurant, 
the restaurant has to compete with the variety of foods bought 
in the supermarket and stored on pantry shelves. 


B 


UT there is danger in this individualistic, inner-directed 
approach to tuning - At the risk of over-romanticizing the 
importance of the famiiy meal there is something partic- 
ularly h uman and unifying about sitting around a table with 
famil y or friends, sharing food. Whether in a restaurant or in the 
home, sharing a planer of spaghetti, a pizza, a casserole, a leg of 
Iamb, a roast chicken, has a unifying effect. You don’t even have 
to be eating the same food, but it seems that it helps if you're ail 

at least a with vaguely common roots. 

Somehow, one's shared frame of reference goes haywire when 
a group of people is gathered around a table, and one person is 
drinking Micbdob light with nacbos and fried potato skins, 
another is sipping Mondavi red with a taco salad, and another 
combines Classic Coke and a hamburger. 

Likewise, it is impossible to cognitively or (physically) digest 
a meal that begins with goal cheese salad, followed by pizza with 
ricotta wrapped in grilled eggplant and sauced with chopped 
tomatoes, olive oil and fresh herbs, followed by wok-charred 
spicy blue-fin tuna with mango, tomato and green onion sauce, 
and, for dessert, an almond daquoise. One does not leave such a 
meal satisfied, simply confused. 

All, of course, is not bleak. The passion for freshness and the 
simple abundance of such a variety of foods is the most positive 
note, for if the base ingredients are of high quality, half the 
battle of good food has been won. Free-range chickens are 
multiplying like rabbits, restaurants and carryouts are making 
marvelously good bread, chefs all over are growing their own 
fruits and vegetables and cultivating sources for those they can’t 
grow on thor own. While sophistication and focus are still 
lacking, it seems that (he food phenomenon of the 1980s is 
positive. 

And who can tell, we may now be r aising a generation that 
win someday look back with fond memories, raving about 
grandma’s famous raclette gratin with radicchio, her red chili 
pasta, her chicken stir-fry with raisins and Sambuca mayon- 
naise and long for the old days. A 




Inner Torment and Creativity 


Continued from page 9 



ing something to the edge. And at the same 
time, there’s a fear you might become too 
civil, too sane." 


STUDY of 47 prominent contempo- 
rary British artists by Dr. Kay Ja- 
. a professor of psychiatry at 
the Umvrasity of California at Los Angeles, 
suggests there is a clinical model for the tug- 
of-war Shepard, Scorsese and so many other 
artists have described. Jamison found that 
more than half of the British artists had been 
diagnosed as manic-de p res si ve. mmpan».d to 
6 percent of the general population. A study 
writes by Professor Nancy Andreasan of 
the University of Iowa showed that 67 per- 



Diane Arbus . 


cent suffered from an emotional disorder, 
while only 13 percent of the control group 
did. Their findings by no means represent 
the definitive answer to whether creativity 
and madness are connected, but they at least 
indicate that it is more than an empty cbchfc. 

The question, then, is whether manic-de- 
pression and other emotional disorders serve 
the creative process, or actually impede it. 
“Most people who are manic-depressive are 
more reflective, introspective, can deal with 
more existential issues when they’re de- 
pressed,” Jamison said. “And if you think of 
a classic kind of manic wit, like Lenny Bruce, 
there’s a rapidity of association and an abili- 
ty to reach instantly back into the mind. It’s 
clear that if you give hypomania [the medical 
term for the manic state] to an already cre- 
ative person yon give them a big advantage.” 
As if to underscore the point, Jamison 
helped produce a Los Angeles concert last 
May entitled “Moods and Music.” It fea- 
tured compositions by Handel, Schumann, 
Wolf, Berlioz and Mahler — all of whom, 
she maintained, were manic-depressive. 

Dr. Barry M. Pan ter, an associate profes- 
sor of psychiatry at the University of South- 
ern California and the director of an annual 
conference on “Creativity and Madness," 
cites a timjlar chemistry between emotion 
and creativity. “The material artists use for 
their art,” Pinter said, “comes from the 
primitive levels of their inner lives — aggres- 
sion, sexual fantasy, polymorphous sexual- 
ity. What we know about the development of 
personality is that we all go through these 
stages and have these primitive drives within 
us. As we mature and are ‘civilized,’ we 
suppress them. But the artist stays in touch 
with and struggles to understand them. And 
to remain so in touch with that primitive self 
is to be at the fine line between sanity and 
madness.” 

Yet it remains largely an individual matter 
how an artist handles such powerful forces, 
or fails to. Fa a playwright Hke Athol Fu- 
gard, an alcoholic who stopped drinking in 
1983, one of the hardest parts of abstinence 
was giving up the liberating effect of liquor. 
Anyone who saw “’Master Harold* . . . 
and the boys,” a self-lacerating memory 
play, can well imagine bow an alcohol-fed 
melancholy helped Fugard touch the old 
wounds that underlie the work. “When I was 
writing a play,” Fugard recalls of Us old 
process, “I would start drinking after sunset 
and that fairly steadily into the night. And 
that last carafe of wine at night — that spell 
of wildness — was when I would set up the 
ideas (hat Fd work on soberly the next day.” 

By the time Fugard began work on the 
follow-up play to “Master Harold,” “The 
Road to Mecca.” he had stopped drinking. 



Carry GooiMm 


Athol Fugard: Alcohol helped the playwright reach into his “dark side, ' 
Above, a scene from a production of his “ Master Harold. ” 


The prospect of writing without alcohol was 
terrifying. “Mecca* was hard for me because 
I didn’t have that moment of madness at 
he said. “I had to ask myself, could I 
get into my dark side? Could I still put 
my dark side forward without the aid of a 
drag? And, obviously, alcohol was a power- 
ful drag for that. Nothing I could do could 
replace it I’ve found other things — run- 
ning, b iking , Buddhist man tras. And maybe 
my art now will be more about tigh t than 
dark.” 

F EW artists as a group so depended on 
tapping their subconscious urges and 
indulging their conscious desires, as 
the Abstract Expressionist painters, the dus- 
ter of New York artists who flourished in the 
1940s and ’50s. The results were ground- 
breaking work and tragic ends — suicides for 
Mark Rothko and Arshile Gorky, violent 
de aths for Franz Kline and Jackson Pollock. 

Robert Motherwell, one of the Abstract 
Expressionists still painting, has often spo- 
ken. of the psychological nature of his work; 
he has described iris process as free associa- 
tion — itself a term drawn from psychoanal- 
ysis — and “a state of anxiety that is oblique- 
ly recorded in the inner tension of the 
finished product." 

“One of my best friends is a psychiatrist,” 
Motherwell said in a recent interview, “and 
last summer I asked him, if be had to define 
psychoanalysis in a single sentence, how 
would he put it? And he said, ‘Chris Hard- 
man put it best — psychoanalysis is the 
study of self-deception.’ And it may be that 
the deep necessity of ait is the examination 


of self-deception. It’s not that the creative 
act and the critical act are simultaneous. It’s 
more like you blurt something out and then 
analyze it- After each brushstroke, you're 
analyzing iL Is this stroke an authentic ex- 
pression or not? Most painting in the Euro- 
pean tradition was painting the mask. Mod- 
em art rejected all that Our subject matter 
was the person behind the mask. And we all 
know genuine analysis like that is shattering 
to go through- There's a terrible price to be 
paid for the constant analysis, constant 
doubL" 

No other an form, perhaps, resembles 
Abstract Expressionism as closely as modern 
jazz. Both drew heavily on the psychology of 
the creator. Both were innovations that had 
to fight for legitimacy in the cultural world. 
Outer forces fed the inner fires of both, and 
that barely contained rage expressed itself in 
the raw and rending sounds of avant-garde 
jazz. 

“The music became a way to be both 
beautiful and angry at the same time,” said 
Jackie McLean, a saxophonist whose 40-year 
career spans bop, modal and free jazz. 

There is another parallel between modem 
jazz and Abstract Expressionism. Both be- 
came fixed in the public mind — correctly or 
not — with the stereotype of the dissolute 
artist. Some of the most brilliant jazz musi- 
cians literally went mad. The hero of the 
bebop era was Charlie (Bird) Parker, a fero- 
ciously inventive saxophonist and a heroin 
addict from his late teens until his death at 
35. The jazz wisdom once held, “To play like 
Bird, you got to be like Bird.” ■ 

C 1935 The New York Tunes 


1 


Shakespeare in the Comics 


spend a lot of time rushing out and seeing 
artists.” 

She has found that the best artists are 
those who have not done comics before. 
“They gpt terribly excited about how you can 
use illustration as a camera — pan into 
someone’s face, move back ova a shoulder, 
have a dose-up made a month.” 

Oscar Zarate, who illustrated “Othello,” 
was a lonely and embittered Argentinian, 
she says, who found himself drawing Othello 
in battie in Cyprus just when Argentina and 
Britain went to war ova the Falklands. “He 
lost two stone in weight doing the play, be 
was a shell when he finished, and I under- 
stand that because it’s suffering from begin- 
ning to end.” 

Ian Pollock, who illustrated “King Lear” 
is a well-known illustrator. “His wok is 
absolutely horrible, you have a distorted 
mind I said and he roared with laughter and 
said he would like to do ‘Lear.’ And of course 
it’s the only hysterical and distorted one of 
the whole lot.” 

Pollock makes the Fool get larger and 
smaller and changes Cordelia as the play 
goes on. “In the beginning she’s Just a blob, 
you have to imprint your own idea of what 
she rhmig hi and whether she’s got any char- 
acter or spunk. And by the end she’s grown 
herself a bosom and she’s grown up. 

“I don't know if any of this is allowable,” 
Taute adds, “but why not if it brings the text 
a£ve and makes people remember them?” 
"The Tempest” is next on the list, and 


maybe a “Merchant of Venice” set in Nazi 
Germany. She would also like to do Ibsen 
and Marlowe’s “Dr. Faustus,” and she 
would like to redo ha Shakespeares with 
other artists to offer other interpretations 
just as new stage productions give a different 
view. In large part, the point of the comic 
books is to bring the theater to people who 
do not have a chance to go — to biing the 
stage to the page, as Taut! put iL 
“1 mean 1 couldn't even read a line before. 
With the drawings you can almost squeak 
like the witches one minute and behave like 


Continued from page 9 

Lady Macbeth the next It brings out all the 
acting potential in a person.” 

Tauife says she is not the first to put 
Shakespeare in the comics and wifi not be 
the last. Probably, as the idea catches on, the 
plays will come out assembly-line fashion. 
“They’ll put six people on it with somebody 
drawing the legs and somebody coloring and 
the whole concept falls to pieces. The idea 
that one would chum them out like a Walt 
Disney studio is totally abhorrent to me” 
The books have been sold to Germany, the 
Scandinavian countries, Canada, Japan. If 


the United States is stuffy, Australia was so 
exerted that a TV interviewer asked Anne 
Taute if she would go out with old Bill 
Shakespeare were he alive. She would. 

Still, the comics are in the red and she has 
bought the title to another series that she 
hopes mil balance the books. It is called 
“Bluff Your Way," manuals on bluffing 
your way through philosophy, computers, 
golf, antiques, music and management 

There should surely be a “Bluff Your Way’ 
Through Shakespeare” as well. “Yes,” Tame 
said, “I suppose you’re quite right." ■ 


DOONESBURY 


I ASt&AffCHPPy 
fUHXnHS'‘SWRlMRS m 
STUFF 15 ALL ABOUT. 


HBswRmrmiueompRD-] 

7ECT OlKSeiyESFXOM NUQ£AR.UEfi-\ 
PONS, ANP 1HaftWrB£PREaPEM\ 

msiumPA f&Esmnv r 

SIUPfiV55H£S IN0U1ER.$RAC£..\ 


-SOTHEftmmWOUR. 
HDUS£. THEN NOBODY COULD UMN 
AHm. ANP/FNOBQWCOUU? 

TosimoNF. Mtmrfssmr. 








Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


Thursdays 


11 Month 
men Low in** 


SIl Q« 

Otv. VhLPE IMHWIUh Ouar.Ol’* 


inru 97* Soonpf mm« u 


300 107V. 107* 107V. 


31% M% 50CPOCGl34 U 7 mum 29% 29% — V» I 


n% sotqLi 


dosing 


Tonies include the nationwide prices 
up to the dooina on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


uj. gox _. 

OW.YM.Pg Ufa High Law Owt.OiWt 


(Continued from Page 8) 

113 103 OtlPpfFM.00 117 
71% SB* OhPpfD 7J 6 11.1 
*ft 21% OWoSE 100 8.1 11 
** 7ft OktaG pt JO M 
37% 28% Olln 1X0 41 
io% 5% Dinner* 

I7ft 12 Oneida JO U 4 


0% 110% noth 4 % 
100Z 70 70 ID —1% 

1117 25 24W 24ft + % 

iooz M m n 

553 jj-i J514, 3414+1 

023 7% 6* 7 + % 

104 IS* 15* IS* + * 


33% 34% ONEOK 136 87 II 234 lift Jfift 3114 + * 


9 6 % 

8ft 7 
53 41 

71 53* 

63 48 

43 49% 

70 S6 

64 51 
s% 3* 

16* 8* 
17* Bft 
24* 13 
22 11* 
22U. 11% 
19* 9% 

31% 10* 
29* 23* 
32* 25* 
15 12 

39* Jl% 
40% 31* 
48 37V. 

21* 16* 
64 so* 
23 V* 18% 

72 S7 

73 5* 
69* 54* 
89* 70 

4* 2'4 

16* 9 * 
7* 6 
17 11* 

7* 6* 


.16 15 13 

6 

1.76 11.7 7 


29 22* OrenRk 2.14 7X ID 94 

12* 7* Orange X3t 4.7 23 171 

31 20 OrlonC .76 U SI 

29 23 OrignC Pfl.12 7J 34 

12* 8* Orton P 442 

9* 6* Orion of JO 65 
33* 24 Oribfiot 175 0X 

31* 19* OutbdM M 14 15 


26* 27* + * 2}¥ JRS 

7* 7* + * SJ* 

29% 29* — * M* 

28* 28* ■ 

10 10* + * I 
7% 7 %- * t: — ZT~ 
28 28 . + * “ S 


.12 5 16 

M 16 


814 7* 8V* 

8 7* 7*— Vi 

47* 46 46 —2* 

«% 59 59*-* 

55 53* 54 — 114 

54 53 54 +1 

47* £7% 47* +3* 
58* 56 56 —3 

7ft 7% 7ft + % 
16 15V* 16 

16% 16 16% 4- % 

24 23* 24 + * 

21 21 21 + * 
zi% 2i 'a am + » 

18* IB* 18* 

20* 20V. 20* — * 
39 2814 28* + ft 

31% 31V. 31% + * 
14* 13* 14% + % 
40* 39* 40* +1* 
40* 40* 40* + * 
47* 47 47*—* 

20* 20* 20* 

64* 63* 64* +1% 
23(4 23% 23% — % 
72V* 7214 72V* + V. 
72% 72* 7Z% — % 
70 69% 69V. + * 

89 88 89 + V. 

2* 2* 2%— M 

34 16 15* 16 + V. 

35 7* 7Vj 7% + * 
15% 14* 15 

7% 6* 7% 

13* 13 13* + * 

17% 17% 17* + % 
6 5* 6 + tt 


30* 17* SvcCpi 
18% II* ShaUee 


1 19* 19* 19* + * 

r _ 21 387 30* 39* 30* + V. 

18% 11% Slutiee 72 4,1 IB SC 17* 17* 17* + % 

26* IT* snow In A0 25 a 64 23* 23* 23* + V. 

40% 29% sneirr uae 61 a 1277 4d* 39* 40 + * 

30% 21 SftcICIo .90 W 1 589 27% MV* 27% +1* 

36 23* SheICnf 1« d 4 39% 28% 29V. +1* 

41* 25% Shrwtn S3 12 13 278 41* 41 41* + % 
9 5% Shaetwn 12 129 8* 8% B* 


2i* is* wcdiuiu j, ,s ass is» iffi 1 2 

57* 44 Trcnsco 4.99el3X 50 3)8 50* 49* Xn + w 

33 ft Trnacpf 475 95 205 30% 52% 52% + * 

24* 19% TrSfe? 136 1U „ 136 20* 19* 20 

13* S* -rranMl 8 II 14 Itt M-» 

fSX 70 TrGPp? 665 7.9 US 84* 36* 84*— * 

“ 85% TrGPpf §44 95 12*Z « SL. u. 

25* 23 TrOPpf 250 M 11 25% 25% 25%— * 

13* 8* TmsOh ... „ S 81 11% 1Mb 11% 


10* 9 Ig hW u 4« *** £& + Vk 

% ^.«* § sl 1! Si 

mu. jink utPLof 2J>« M H «. 5-js* 24 + * 

8 St,,. TtE. -nu 


36 23* SheIGBf 149 68 4 29% SS% 29% +1% AZ w* Trmwv 1J0 19 13 474 45* 45* 45*— % 

41% 25% Srirwln Si 12 13 M 41* 41 41* + % £2 2*2 Tmwkf 3 lSn30S34»V39%39* + * 

9 5% Sl*l*4l 12 139 8* 1(4 8* gcu .ju TwkS wtA 64 22% 22% 22% 4 % 

15% 12 Swwbt 60 4.1 IS 49 14* 14% 14* + * f|g }S T-rtdSf 1OT 108 3 17* 17* 17* 

19* 15% StarPoe 166 87 11 139 18* 18% 18*+ % US 1*2 Trawler 104 *2 11 1497 47* 46* 46* + 'A 

41 24* Sinner . .AS Jfl * 7689 38* 37* 3% + 48 ££ Jl6« SsK»S%S* + * 


20* 16* 
27 18* 

24* 20% 

35% 31* 


A SS5S3S + * 


33* 28V. Sliwrpf ISO 105 
17* 12* Skyline 48 15 17 
26* 20* Slattery Ate 15 23 
14% 7% ScnKhln 33 19 
73% SO* SmkB LOO 45 12 
91 48% Smuckr IX 1J 21 

46 24 Ui Smekrwl 


ISO WJ 3x33 32* 33 + V. 

M 15 17 152 13* 13* 13% 

Ate 15 23 12 26 25* 26 + * 

33 IP 710 8% 8 8% + % 

iOO 4J) 12 3327 74* 73% 74* +1* 

1.20 U 21 47 91 89* 91 + * 

19 46 45% 45%— % 


50% 50% Travef 6)6 JS 

28% TPM TriCnn 3A8C12A 

30 22 V. TrlCnof 150 14 

32% 7* Trtaln* Jffl A 


50% 34* VF Com 138 25 « g § 
lru a valern *■" T 3f X* 

2«S 14 VOller Pf 3A4 14.1 a 


671 m m 1% + *•} 3% zv. Volgin ■ ii6 3| 34* 3g« * « 

9 26% 26% 26% - J 38J& . VanOm 14H '254 5% * *»“ * 


,1 + n 


24* 24* + * 


211 32* 31* 32% + % 
34X 35* 35* 35* +.* 


41* 31* SnaoOn 1.16 3 j 0 13 226 39* 38% 39% +1% 
IS* 12* Snyder 100 14A 17 40 14 13* 17*- % 

43% 31% Sana! 100 5A 11 1184 37* 37 37* + * 

19* 13% SonyCn -lee 5 16 3473 19* 19% 19* + (A 
39* 22* SooUn U0 60 57 30* 30 30 — * 

40* 31* Source 350 85 41 40% 40 40 

23% 19* SrcCo of 2A0 117 1 22% 22% 22% + % 

25* 3J% SCrE of 250 106 1 23* 23* 23*— % 

30% 24% SoJerln 2M 8A 13 50 29* 29% 29* + % 

49% 38% Sour*wn 150b 2A 11 323 42* 41* 41*— ZU. 

35 24* Seati * 150 3A 11 3347 J4* 32* 34* +9* 

9 5* SoatPS Z13I33A 38 350 6* 6V, 6* 

27* 21* SColEd 2,16 09 B 5677 24V 24 24* + % 

m 17* Soumco 2JM 9A 7 2946 21* 21* 21* + (& 

26* 20* SoInGss 150 65 9 59 26* 25% 26% + % 

44 31* 5NETI 272 6A 11 149 42’A 41* 42V. + % 

27<4. 22% SnRy of 250 9J 25 26* 2£% 24* + V. 

30* 34% SoUnCo 1 71 63 203 27% 27% 27*— » 

42% 24* Souttnd 1 J» 2A 10 2246 42* 40% 42* +2U 

57% 49% SautldPf 4J0 7 j0 319 56* 55* 56* +1% 

18 HU 5oRoy .12 J 23 3702 17% 17 17% + % 


35% 23 TrlnPC 150 28 10 34x35% 35* 35* + % 

M* IS M M 17 531 Jl* JO 51* +1%. 

6% 4 Trientr 51 #105 7 20 4% 4* 4% 

7* 5* Trlea 30 3J 13- 65* 6* 6* 6* + % 

17% 12% Trlnfr X 1? „ 265 U* 13% 13* + * 


S* 2% Voroo . 

15* 6V. Vixxupf 

42* 22% Vartan 
14% 9* Vara 
25* 13 VMca 


20* . B% ' 
8* 5% ' 
. 8% 3*. 
40% »* 
-rt% TPM 
81 63* 

40* »% 

«% MM 1 

l 1% ; 
51% Jgv 
81* 50% 
S* 3* ' 
91% 54% 
4* 2% 1 

16 id*' 

23* K% I 


757 w% w% n + sT 

£ 5* £ + Mt - . 


SSitf f 


190 tftl 
755 9J 
17* 7.1 f 
2J6 73 9 

Ktt 3JI W 
ZAS 12 . 

J4 UB 
ZOO 35 11 
230 17 


n 7* 7* 7%. ■ 

mwra 3£b + % 

100x89 aw an — % 

aox»_ »o +1%. 
— * + *' 

2*. »*+% 


' ^ * ** r . '. 

• ... »*^8..r 

— Ti, 

' . 1 

• . ■ ‘ / 




MS 38% JTh M* « . 

1 315 215 3H +» 
8U I3M 12* 12 1 




1800 ZD 15 


,e % ££ SS : 

7 am 80* so* —1 -■ 

30 tn. IK. n* + ^ . 


52 Z4 31 

m u n 


UK . 3% J* 2% + 2 JL. 
152 13* 33 . Uh4h V 
27 17% l«k 17 ' — % 


m 17% 16% T7% 


25 13 328 17% 16* 
M M 16 « UW 10.. 


41 40% 40 40 

1 zz% a% 22% + % 

1 23* 23* 23*— % 

50 29* 29% 29* + % 


m» 1 »5 TritlS lllO 67 g 16* 16V. 1«%— * 

^ 3 £ OT ^ H 17 fm raS mv-% 

16 TwInDs 50 5J 14 a U* 18% 18% + W 

S% 30 TvcSS 50 15 13 72S .4S* 44* 45* +1% 

17* 12* TySro A0 28 13 239 14% 13* 14% + % 


,10b J 25 208 31% 30% 30* — * 


93 16* 16% 18*— * 


if* i5ooio7 ;; jaPBj* 

!■ !S a# 5 23 6^ 59 . 57% a% +,* 


57% ^6 Xejw. Jg H 11 
56 48% Xerpon MS w 
» 19* XTUA M Z5 W 


9* * + n 

157 25% 34% 25% + % 


UAL of IA0 85 


17 220 
680 15J 9 130 
254 U 12 83 


A0 35 13 
230 55 _ 


158 35 7 104? 


9% 5% Soumrk 34b 25 S 2078 9* 9% 9%- % 


40* 24 OvmTr 80 11 15 

19 13 OvShla 50 11 15 

17 30% OwenC IA0 60 9 

54% 38* Owen HI 150 3A 10 

15% 10% Oxford a4 11 31 


99 n + V> 63 33 OuakOt 

SAW 2aW + % 105% #1 OuoO pf 

Wi 2 25 17 QuakSO 

tT* i*2 4. * 10% 5 Ouanex 


16 16% + * 

35 35% + * 

52* 53* + * 
14% 14% - % 


QuafcOl 1A0 2A 15 749 SB* 57* 58* + * 
QuoOpf 954 95 36100x105*105*105*+% 

QliakSO 50a 3A 19 U19 24% 23 23V.— 1% 
Quanex 20 159 6k 6 6% + % 


5) 46 Somkpr 6^2*135 

31 18* SwAirl .13 5 

16* 9% SwtPar 

19 12 SwtGas 154 65 8 

88% 64% SwBeJI a 15 I 

29 19* SwEnr 52 13 9 

26% 20 SwtPS 202 8.1 9 

17* 12% Soarhin 52 35372 

27* 15* SoectP 


34* 27 Queslar 1A8 5J II 88 30* X 30* 
26% 14% QkReil 540 9 17 334 35* 24* 25* +7 


L5 1 48% 48* 48* + * 

5 16 3117 27* 26* 27* + * 

. 502 10* 10* 10* + * 

5 8 337 18V. 17% 18% + * 

5 8 1991 80 79* 79* + % 

J 9 105 23% 22* 23* — * 

LI 9 436 25 24* 24* + % 

15372 65 14* 14% 14* + % 

167 21* 20* 20*— * 


UnlFrst X U M 13 

Unlive. 2A0« 33 B 5 

UnJNV 63te 35 13 ZB 

UCamo U4 62 17 10 7S 

uncart) 3A0 55 ■ *773 
UnlonC _ CT6 


UnEWC 154 .85 7 1406 


37% 23% PHH 150 25 14 
51* 31% PPG 1J6 35 It 
31% 17* PSA A0 23 12 
23% 14% PSA daf 1.90 93 
14* 12 PocAS 154 105 
20* IS* PacGE 154 95 7 
46* 37% PacLto 3A8 75 13 
41% 24% PcLum 150 XX 25 
10* 5* PacRes OSe 5 11 

19* 13% PacRs Of 250 103 
17% 13* PacSd A0 V 13 
82* 65* PocTel* S72 73 9 
15 9* Poe Tin A0 35 7 

31* 24* Pccllco 2.40 8.1 B 
36 30* Pocltpf -107 115 

43% 25% PalnWb 50 15 19 
34% 25* PolnW pf 255 7A 
39 32* PolmBc .901 60 

42 20% PanABk JO 15 9 

B* 4 PanAfTi 
4 1* PanAwI 

21 13* Panddc n 50 15 IS 

41% 32* PanhEC 230 6A 12 


24* 12% Ponsoh 15 

9* 3% PonlPr 

18% 6% Pardvn 

17* 11% PorkEI JOe J 12 

7% 4 PorkDrl JB 1J 

39% 2fiV. PorkH 1.12 12 12 

23* 14* PorkPn 521 23 33 

5 3 P dtp fir 3 23 

15* 11% PovNP 54 68 15 


23* 13% PavCsh 36 18 15 
1% % Penao 

58* 44% PrnCen 14 

52* 44* Penney 236 64 10 
27* 23% Pa PL 256 95 10 
40% 33 PaPLot 4J0 118 
78 V. 62 PaPLpf 850 118 
29* 25* PoPLapi3A2 118 
27% 22* PaPL dpiiffl 19J 
74% 60% PaPLer SA0 115 
23* 24* PaPL dpr355 11A 
31% 27% PaPLdDl075 1Z1 
98% 77 PaPLpf 954 9A 
103% 88* PaPL prllJtS 10.7 
70* 57% PaPL or 6L00 115 
75% 62 PaPL or £.70 118 
41% 34 Penwlt 250 S8 
25* 20 Pen w Of '80 75 
60 14 Ptacol 2J0 3J 26 

18% 14% PeopEn O W I 
26* 14V. PodByS JO 8 21 
67* 39% PepsiCo 1 JH 2J 12 
30% 22% Perk 6 1 56 25 16 

9% 7V4 Prmlori l.UelS5 6 

IB* 10* PervOs 
48* 31 Petrie 1A0 25 17 
28* 24* PelRs 172el3L8 
17% 14 % PetRspf 157 9A 
5* 2K Ptrlnv .90e26.7 
53* 37* Pfizer 1A8 25 15 
24 12* PheluO 

55 34 Phelp or 550 93 

46* 29 PhlbrS 54 15 23 
16* 1316 PhliaEI 250 14.0 6 

32 25U PhllEef 180 123 

36% 29 PhllE Pf *M 12J 
37% »% PhllE pf 458 135 
69 57 PhllE pf 8J5 IZ9 

11% 9* PhllE pf 1A1 1Z8 
110 100 PhllE PM452 12J 

10* 8* PhllE Pf 133 1M 


9* S* RBInd 541 .7 
49* 34 RCA 154 25 
40 29* RCA pf 350 95 

112 SO RCA pt 450 35 
40 32* RCA Of 355 93 

9* 6* SLC 50 7J 
4* 3% RPC 

19* 14* RTE 56 28 
I8W 8* Racflce 


541 .7 226 5* 5* 9k — K 

154 25 25 3734 48% 47% 48—16 
350 95 230z 37 37 37 

450 35 1 110 no no — n 

185 95 16 39* 39* 39* 

50 23 22 911 7% 7% 7* 

51 3* 3* 3* 

56 28 10 126 19* 19% 19* + V 

11 176 16* 15* 16 + H 


59 36* Sperry 152 18 85 4039 30% 49* 50% + % 

38% SI* Sprinos 152 60 22 34 37% 37% 37*— % 

43* 35% SauarO 154 66 13 308 39* 38* 39* +1 

76* 49* Squibb 1-76 2A 18 3805 74% 71* 74 +1* 

80 13129 1232 24% 2316 24% +| 
56 25 13 346 22* 22* 22*— Yk 
52 28 15 151 11* II* 11* 


76* 49* Saulbb 
24% 18% Staley 
23* 18% StfiPnt 
17* 10% StMorr 


55* 39% SldOOh 280 SA 9 1968 52*. 51% SW. + % 


UaEI of 480 108 
UJlElOf 450 11 J 
UnEI pfM600 125 
UEIOfL 800 UA 
UnElof 298 118 
UnElPf Z13 105 
UnEI pf 253 105 
UnElPf 7A4 11.1 
UElPfH 880 118 
UnExpn Ala 18 



31% RaJsPur 180 21 15 560 46* 46 


9% 5% Ramad 
21 * 16% Ranco 
5* 2% RanarO 
81* 51* Sayan 
14% 9% Ravmk 

20* 19* Raynrn 


2211002 8% 7* 8% + 41 

84 67 9 33 17* 17* 17* + W 

915 4% 4% 4% 

A4 5 27 486 03* 82 83* +2 

47 10 9* 9* 

249 20* 30 20(6 + % 


76 71* SOOhpf 355 55 * 71* 71* 71* 

23* 19H SIPocCl A0 28 9 286 20% 19* 2016 + * 

U* 12% standex 52 38 10 168 13* 13% 13* + % 

31* 23* StanWk 184 U 11 269 3<W X XVk— * 

37% 29 Starratt 188 29 11 8 3Mh 36* 36* + * 

1KA 9* SraMSe 150a10J 41 11V. II 11(6 + % 

3* 2% stem .12 4A 41 3% 2* 2* 

20% 15* Starch! 56 38 10 24 20 

M 9* StrIBCP 56 55 10 288 14 


UnPac 180 35 12 6035 


20 Vi 15* Starch! 
H 9* StrIBCP 


8 36* 36* 36* + * 
41 11V. II 11(6 + % 
41 2% Z% 2* 

24 20 19* 20 + % 

288 14 13% 13* — (6 , 


UnPcpf 755 65 
Unryl pf 880 11.1 
umtDr 

UnBmd 85# 5 12 
UBrdPf 


53* 36* Ravfhn 150 U 11 2081 50'- 49* 49* — V. 


37* 26 1 - SteriDp 150 35 15 4054 36* 35* 35* + * 1 



10* 5* ReadBi AO 68 

21% 13 RdBat Pf Z12 168 
23* 16* RdBat pf 3.I2£I7J 
16* 11* RIIRet I Ate 9 a 10 
17* B% ReaiEa 19 

12* 7 Rttirnn JO 35 17 

12* B* Reece 37 _ ... 

1* * Reaal 360 * 

43* 27* HslchC 80 2A 14 2B4 31% 
10* 4* RepAIr 5 ’ ” "" 

3 1* ffepA wt 


AO 68 440 5% 5* 5*— % 

L12 168 72 14% 14 14*— % 

LI28I7J I 18 18 18 + * 

Ate 9 a 10 7 14* 14* 14* 

19 342 12% 11% 12% + % 

JO 35 17 251 9* 9% 9U + W 

37 38 12* 12* 12% 

-un -u 1*. * + % 

" ” 's 3ira To " — " 

205 2 


12* 6* RoGyps JO 38 10 490 0* 

51* 36 RepNY 1 54 13 9 807 490s 

23% 19 RNYpt 2.12 9J 3 23 

28* 23* RNY pfC 112 10.9 8 28* 

56 45* RNYpfB587e 95 400 55 

34% 24* ReoBk 184 5.1 7 543 32 

25* 15% RshCot 82 U 55 25V. 


1A0 29 17 
172013J 


98% 
103 
67 
75 75 

37 37* 

23 23 

58% SB* 
18 


25* 15% RshCot J2 1J 55 25V. 

29% 22% Revca 80 38 30 2353 27* 

17* 10* Revere 2 224 12* 

SB 32% Revlon 184 13 18 419 57* 

100% 93 Rvln pfB 980 9.0 9 99% 

25(6 17* Rexhffl JO 19 16 IS 24% 

15* II* Rexnrd A4 38 10 950 14* 

CV3 24* Revnln 8 1A8 5A & 5794 27* 

50 47* Rev In pf 610 8J 126 49* 

U1 123* Reylnpfl2J6 >08 1598 130* 

41* 38 RerMlf 180 38 409 33 

87 65 RevMpf 150 62 2 73 

26* 24 ReyMPf U0 89 29 25% 

33% 21% RltaAld 50 Zil 16 3019 2S* 

7* ZV> RvrOkn 52 141 3* 


126 49* 
1598 130* 
409 33 
2 73 
29 25% 


36* 28 Ve Rotnhw IJ0 3A 8 88 34* 

41* 19% Robtsn 1801 377 23 

24* 5% vl Robins 1003 11% 

24* 18 RochG 2J0 98 6 351 22% 

42% 31 RochTI 2A4 68 9 144 3716 

20* IB RckCfr n IJ6 9J 2514 18% 

41* 29 Rackwl 1.12 U 9 1600 33 

73 55* RohmH 2J0 12 11 600 68* 

70 40 Rohrln 10 Al2 59% 

27* 15* RofnCm A0 15 31 218 26* 

18(6 6* RollnEs JS 5 27 4508 15% 

13 8% Rollins A6 35 18 371 13% 

3% 1% Ramon 205 2* 

19 11 Roper 84 62 101 15* 

47 24 Rarer 1.12 18 18 4875 37* 

11 7% Rowan .12 15 65 239 7* 

64% 47* RovID 3J°e 51 9 3515 64% 


47 24 Rarer 

11 7% Rowan 

64% 47* RovID 


62 51 PhllE Df 785 12J 

10% 8* PhllE pf 128 12J 
126 110% Phil Pf 17.12 119 
116 102 PhllE Pfl5J5 13A 
74 62 PhllE pf 930 12J 

62% 51% PhllE Pf 780 1Z9 
60 50% PhllE Pf 7J5 119 

23* 15% PhllSub 1J2 62 13 
95% 72 PhUMr 600 5J 8 
26* 15* Phi lain 80 2J 12 
18* 11(6 PhllPtl 180 75 11 
25% 22* PhIPfpf 184e 64 
30* 20* PttllVH A0 1A 14 
35* 25* 

34 28* 

26 14* 

63% 38* 

34 21% 

36* 13% 

45% 33* 

14% 9* 

31 16% 

19 9% 

13 7 

13* 7(6 

26 19<6 

19* 11* 

39* 


88 9 8 

2J2 68 12 
14 

1.72 25 13 
184 55 12 


iTJm 


87 A 
.20 1.1 14 
-16b 18 13 

77 

44# 28 16 
80 68 fflJ 
180 28 56 
A0 J 34 
80 64 82 
80 3A 
1,90 85 9 
160 108 
4A0 117 
682 128 
156 61 15 
Z16 6J 9 
604 10.1 
623 88 
J6 U 19 
1.10 58 8 
17 

89 8 27 

288 19 17 

88 15 23 
1.40 38 16 


17* II Ftoylnts 19 217 16* 

32% 20% RubmdS AS 15 21 1S0O 32 

26 14* RussBr 13 Z76 21* 

24 IF* R us Too J6 3A 11 400 22% 

31* 21 RvarH 180 66 9 361 26* 

31% 22 Ryders 80 1.9 13 1298 32 

29 18% Ryland 86 Z5 13 47 24% 

20* 8% Rymer 5 191 16% 

13* 10* Rymer pfl.17 10J 201 II* 


191 16% 
201 II* 


49% 

23 

28* + * 
55 + % 

31* 

25* + * 
27 — * 
12 * — * 
57% + * 
99% + % 
24% + % 
14% + * 
27* 

49*— * 
130* 

32*— % 
73 + % 

25* — * 
24* + * 
3* + * 
34* + * 
22(6 — * 
10 % — * 
22* 

37 +1 

18* + M 
34* + * 
67* + * 
S8<6 + (6 
26% + % 
15% +1% 
13% + * 
3* 

15% + * 
37* — % 
7* + % 
64% +1* 
16% — % 
32 + % 

21(6 
22* +1 
26 + * 
32 +1 

26% 

16*— % 
11*— % 


27% 16 StevnJ 180 45 48426*26*26* + * 

32% 25% SfwWrn 188 58 21 62 29% 28* 29% + % 

14 10 SlftVC pf IjOO 78 30zl2U 12* 12* 

48% 38* StoneW 180 3J 9 100 48* 47* 48* + * 

33* 24 SlaneC 80 1.9 39 376 31* 30% 31* + * 

51% 34* StapShp 1.10 19 11 591 37* 36% 37* +1% 

21* 16* SlorEq 1.92 98 14 240 20 19* 20 + % 

3% 1% tfIStarT 1H23 1% 1* I* 

93% 40 Store r A0 A 990 93% 92% 93% + * 

21% 17 SiriMtn 1 Jte 78 126 19 18* 18%—% 

21% 14* StrkJRt 50 3J 38 320 21% 21% 21% + * 

6'6 J% SuavSh 
39 28% SunCh 

11% 6% Son El 

56* 43% SunCa _ . 

110* 90* SimCpf Z2S 11 3 105*105*105* + % 

49% 40 Sundstr 150 38 13 203x49% 48 49% +1* 

10* 5% SunMn 586 6* 6 6* + * 

7* 7 SunM pf 1.19 158 729 7% 7% 7* + % 

39 31 SunTrst 1J0 11 11 .176 38% 38% 38% + % 

22% 14% Supval I JE IJ 18 2057 27* 21* 22% + % 

48% 29* SupMfcf AS 15 14 186 47% 46 47% +1% 

17* 12 Swtxik A8 3J 21 342 13% 12% 13 


uruupf iso 1x3 
Unwind M 15 


1.92 98 14 240 20 19% 20 + % 

1823 1% 1% 1* 

A0 A 990 93% 92% 93% + % 

1 JOe 75 126 19 18* 18%—% 

50 17 38 320 21% 21% 21% + * 

82 5% 5% 5% + % 

AS IJ 15 16 36% 36* 36% + % 

170 10* 10% 10* + % 

130 45 24 456 51% 51% 51% + * . 

225 11 3 105* 105* 105* + % 

150 38 13 203X49% 48 49% +1% 

586 6* 6 6* + * 

1.19 158 729 7% 7% 7% + % 


UCbTVs -tO J 53 IW 

UnEnre ZA8 55 54 

UHlum 250 8.1 5 267 

UlllUPf 197 113 17 

UIIIupt 120 115 1 TCSta 

IWUupf 450 111 1 

uruupf LOT 1X3 25 

Unltlnd 80 25 9 198 

Untrtnn X 5-38 13* 

UJerBs 1.16 33 11 163 

UfdMM 91 

UPkMn 1 148 

UMlrG .12 A 7 7399 

USNonl 1260 

USLeta 50 12 10 337 

USShat 52 25 16 639 

USSfeel 1 JO 48 25 4371 

USSIlpf 5510185 153 

USSHPf 125 S3 275 

USTob 1J2 5J 10 471 

USWesI 5J2 75 8 1384 

UnSIck 13 116 

UnTech 1A0 3J 11 5504 

UTchPt IS 72 2101 

UnJTel 152 88 9 1514 


141ii 

25% + H 
22% 

9% 

11% + * 
38% + % 
4414 +% 
16 

77* +2 

111 44% 
38% + % 
60% + % 

7* 

7b 

27% 

19% 

26% + % 
«7% + ft 
'68 +1% 
22* + % 
51V*— % 

112 - 1 * 

72 —1 

2 % + % 
23% + % 
18 + % 
33* + % 
44% + % 
24*— % 
29* 

18% + % 
30% 

14* — % 
24%— % 

44 + % 

36 +% 

18* + % 

3% 

29% — % 
6% + % 
36% + % 

45 + % 
26% + % 
55% — U 
28* 

30* + % 
82 + * 
8% 

42% + % 
35% 

22* + * 


SESS&Bftjfld * 1 

70* S'* vSIpS ]{jj 

73% 58 VaEP Pf 7AJ 10.1 
87% 13% Vlshov s 15 

fH 33% Vomad “ 


WV, «% VUIWM 250 32 IS 53 87% 

I • W ' 

26 VYICOR 2X 85 8 JO g* 


IpQx 47% 47Vb OVl+1 
sS 72 72 72 

lOOx 93% W « 
flip 73 72% T3_ + % 

5 388 B Sit sr 

a 87% B®% 87% +4 


30* 14% ZfltaCP 45 n w va »% vn + 1£ 

17% 7* ZOHflO .12 U 66 tw- Rt Tm . T* 

61*32%Zavr»* A8 5 17 1M0 58 5? 57% + % 

^ wZiEms „ T m wp-m w* , 

21% 15* Zulu -<32 16 17 313 30 20 20 — h 
41% 24* Zurnltt U2 14 U 30 ; 391t-3l% 3t%+ * 


.(fill— 

1 V 


VoiiriP 


ii^-iru 


i ro 


347 23% 
98 6% 


iSSwiKf* -if 


18% WlfinTT S S -ii5 ju 

SO watoms J U H SS S* 

17% WkHRsel^ . IK 

298k WalCSv X U Ig g” 

29% WoHJm \M 35 8 9= 

39* VH OltJ Pf 1AO 11 3 S2 

JjSSK * ^ W 1016 m 

.56 19 13 2M 3W 
17% WashGs 156 M 9 » 

20% WshNot 15| 4J I S? 

CS8& saa |P 

S SSS5S 3 53 > J 

4# wellsF 2J2 4A B ® 

StaSSWi fifi ;o a J 

1? « s s 4 it 


36% WP«iPpK50 107 


35 WstPtP 230 S3 » 1M 
10% WStciT O 1JH 31 81 


3* WilAlrL 
11 SaWmO 8.7 13 

16* waJipf7J5 358 41 

97* WPacI 11 ’ 

5* W Union 2105 

24% WnUn Pf J, 

2* WnUPfS " 

4% WnUpfH 67 

20 WUTI pf 3 

mwuripfA^ X 

1SK g 

36% Wevrpf 250 &7 107 

45* Wayrpr 450 9J 65 

6% viWhPU E 

14% vlWPHpfB .2^ 

10% vlWhPItpf , 45Qr 

40% Whirl Dl 250 A3 10 694 

25% White 150 <J 315 

19* Whftehl # 151 


48% 29* SupMfcf AS IJ 

17* 12 Swaik .48 37 

22* 16% Svbron 158 52 

yi* 30% Svbm pf 2A0 7J 

16% 10* SvmsCp 

74% 45* Syntax 1.92 28 

3t% 36 Synfxwl 

42% 30* Svsco 


UnlT 2pf 150 55 


7 27* " 27* 27* + % . 
60 19* 19% 19* + Vh 


15B 52 557 20% 20% 20* + % 

2A0 7J 5 34% 34% 34% 

16 30 12* 12% 12* + * 

1.92 28 16 2517 73% 72% 73% +1% 

24 37 36% 37 + » 

A4 15 18 229 43 42% 43% + % 


32% 17* Unitrde JO .9 2J 156 22% 21* 22% + % 


25% White 
19* Whitehl 


23 21* 20* 21* + % 


17* WWttafc M XD 10 1632 


29% 22% UnivFd 1.12 35 11 158 29 28% 28*— * 


23% 18* UnLeof 150 47 8 425 21* 20* 21% + * 

S3 26% Unocal 170b 35 7 2369 2C% »% OT* + * 

131* 63* UpMtn 250 11 22 1165 132%T29* 132% +3* 

43 32% USUFE 1.12 25 11 1332 39% 38* 39* +1 


J4* 30% USLF pf 3J3 105 


1 33* 33* 33* + * 


6% Wlabktt 35 121 

8 Wilfred .12 J 14 64 

7% WIllcxG .10 8 j 123 

26* William 1A0 4J 22 1701 

2 WllraEI 891 

' 55 h WiishrO .10b 17 17 39 

30* WhtOlx 174 45 14 89 


IStg 

29% + % 
37% — % 

25 + » 

38% — * 
38*+ % 
52 +1 

30%— W 
34% + % 
39% + % 
21% +% 
24% + * 
22% + % 
am +% 

34* + * 
25% + % 

^Vk 
19* +% 
19% — 
35% + % 
61* + % 

&2 + S 

«-* 
42 —1 
41% +.% 

n*— * 
2% + * 
20% + % 

132% + %. 
14 — % 
40* + * 

40 + % 

S£+i3S 

41 +«■ 
29%+ % 
41% + % 
49 + % 

8 % + % 
22 +1 
.15* 

46 +8k 
32 +% 

22% + * 
20 — % 
13* 

13 

M*+ % 
29% — % 
5*+ % ■ 

• 5%— % ; 

35% - ! 


NYSEHgterixms 


. - 7JR* 


mm Kraus m . 


AGSCafr 
Adobe Re pfA 
AWStas . 
AittHaspR 
AndrsnGm 
BaUVsPrfcPl. 


Brit Pet 
CSXCppf 
Colon PfA 
ClnG744p* 
Coca Cola 
ConAara 
CnPw7Mpf 
CrwRadu 
D«re736pf 
ExCelta 
FstFUtatBcD 
FtowGeni 


AftXInc ■. Abbttjax-.AdoheRscnltr 
AtenonHF - AJrProd AlaPwdeoof- 

Amrcn ■ AmCenQBfk AmHKWU u 

AmStorwpnr Ameraa "AnwttJtBf* 
AnaWnt 7 
BatfGtU . 

BeneRJot-' 

BrBTtZpo. 

CaiP«Lpf ; - 


;-6.+ 


IHt 




GaPwXOOpf 
HarprRawi 
Honhev - 
imporCheni 
too Wand 
JeTfPUat 
Keycorp 



CmiBcdn 
Drevfus •- 
ForWestfta. 
F«fWl4C' 
ROataS 
GenMIHs ■ 
GfltattrCa r 
Haem - 

U6fl_a^r 

nnpan 

IndMTMpf 

IBM-. , 

LoBtaan .. - 
Mortons . . 
Merck. Ca • 


Hoooywetr 
WWM776PT 
IlnlKrmM 
JotaUn- I 




oeemnot 

OhEdlOHP* 

PoPLQpr 


iHonriorBcp. 

OedPzaaot 


Union Coro 
Unho-Cl 
VFCorp -- 
Wftf t* 


SMoeftc 
SoumrtcCo 

USG* : IftiBeUierPlc 
tMtan^tac . ttaEn 
UotatnCo + UtPL 

W o tel i W w* UMstabB 


Emof^Ef 

CTFtHB 
GUHW02 
HefcmCdr 
HUBMUB 
locHM3a3pf 

&SSS- 

WcDonoMs 
MetSdoCJ 
MonslQBt 
MatSvdnd 
NaAmCoal 
OMoEdbon 
PanABnfc 
PoPL S7Upr 
Premrfnds 
PSEG74Bpf 

RoMne .. .SB 

Smith Beck ■ 
teervaiui : 
TempielnW 
.Tuuex 
UnHevr NV 
Unftfnfti 


-a. Mud- I 

• i'.V.V-* 


Vornodolnc 

WTtcnCppf 


:.V" OKI 




AmAoro 

DettaAbl 

Permian 


BkBoMdlet BankAmatfb' 




Clevpk22Xi 

NfMkteSv 




50* 30% TDK Jle 7 
36% 27% TECO 256 7J 9 

12% 7 TGIP 12 

21% 13% TNP MS 46 9 

28% 19* TRE 150 35 28 

83% 68 TRW X0O X9 36 
5% 1 vlTacflt 

SPi 52% TaftBrd 1.16 15 16 

21% 12% ToiPoy J0e 1.1 13 

23% 15 Talley pf 150 45 
87 56% Tomhrd 140 45 15 

38% 23* Tandy 18 

IS* 12% Tndycft 15 


68* 47% Tektmx 150 25 13 


250 27 16 
J2b 15 10 
50 24 16 
54 J 39 
2J8el45 
JO 15 17 
34 


A0 1.1 25 
170 47 0 

52 Z1 12 
172 75 8 
158 107 


.16 A 16 
382e 67 
274 SA 9 
JWelQA 9 


50 15 19 
1.94 85 12 
150 25 15 
150 33 13 
1A8 45 16 
JO 1.1 48 
150 73 8 
134 19 


5* 3% Tolcom TO 

281 227 Teldyn 11 

24 12% Telrate 32 11 20 

52to 30* Tele, 12 

40% 31* Temnln 54 15 11 

45* 33% Tennco 354 77 14 

IQS* 94% Tencpr 1150 105 
84* 72* Tenc or 7 A0 87 
32% 17% Terdvn IB 

15 8% Tosoro A0 35 

27% 20% Tesorpf 116 93 

40* 32% Texaco 350 85 34 

37% 25% TxABc 152 55 8 

44 25% Tex Cm 156 19 7 

39 26% TexEst 230 63 9 

34% 25 Tex Hid 50b 16 12 

131* 86* Tex Inst 250 17192 

5% 1 Texlnt 

21% 14% ToxOGs .10 13 13 

34* 28* TxPoc A0 13 23 

31% 25% TexUlll 252 BA 7 

4% 2 Texfl In 

59* 31 Textron 150 35 9 

53 28* Textr pt 1A0 11 

11% 6* That* 304 

23 10 ThrmES 23 

43* 30% Thm Bet 136 35 18 

19% 15% Thornln 58b 15 10 

18% 11* ThmMed A0 25 12 

24% 18% Thrwtv 50 26 IS 

24 13% Thtwtr .90 67 

10% 5% Tlaerln 

61* 40 Time 150 17 18 

23* 14* Tlmotx 18 

58% 38 TlmeM 136 17 13 

55* 41% Timken 150a 45 58 

9* 4% Titan 
11* 8% Titan pf 150 9.1 


41% +1 

33 + * J— — — 

7* J _ 

1B%+* ■ i 

28* +1* ■ | 

76* + % ■ * 

%— % ■ 

79*- * ■ j 

18% | 

20% — % |H|H| 

38% + % 

J5JJ + J* Season Season 
5$% + % Hiflh Low 


LLSL Futures 


Season Season 
Hhjti Low 


Open High Low Ckne On. 
16850 16950 16750 1693S +A7 


Open Hiflh. LOW One* Cho. 


-t ?**"*&$ 


Via The Associated Press 


16950 13550 Jul 16850 16950 16750 16935 +A7 

170S lSfs SOP 16935 17150 1683S T7150 +150 

17005 13850 Dec 170.00 17150 MB35 17150 +1A5 

imS 14250 Mar 1TO75 171 35 170JS 17L38 +1.13 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 11 J69 crft 300 
5UGARWORLD 11 {NYC5CE) 


9133 .+55 
91 A1 +5S 
9159 +55; 


m 


A0 13 23 
252 BA 7 


LOO 17 IB 


Titan pf 1J0 9.) 


1.121 

116 BJJ 10 
158 35 IS 
130 35 9 
.12 l.l 16 
76e 23 13 
.9te 15 11 
134 17 11 
52 35 11 
M U 7 
1A6 117 
110 133 
110 UA 
AS 17 14 



39% 26% TodShp 132 45 15 
21* 15* Tokhms AS 16 11 


21* 16% TolEdfis 252 117 6 
29% 24% TolEdPf 172 127 
30* 25 TolEdpf 375 118 
M% 23* TolEdpf 247 126 
33% 28* To! Ed pf 438 118 
20% 16% TolEdpf 136 123 
18% 15% TolEdpf 231 125 
38 9% Tonkas .10 A 6 

61* 26 TaotRof -48b 3 15 
26% 14* Trehm 1 A0 13 12 
12 101 Trchpf 10380 9A 
18% 11% ToroCo A0 23 11 
5 1 Tosco 

16% 5% Towle 
9% 3% TowtoPf A4 03 
41* 25* ToyRU 1 28 

28* 16 Trocrs 32 17 12 
Trnmln 
TWA 
TWA pf 


50% + % 
3 + % 
278%— 1% 
15 — % 
53% +1% 
40*— % 
39% 

102 + * 
84* + % 
22% 

11% + * 
23* +% 
35 + * 
26% + % 
26% — % 
35% — * 
30% + % 
103% + * 
5% + % 
15% — % 
30 +% 

^J + % 
50% +1* 
44* + % 

20* + % 

19% + % 
14% +1% 

U%— * 


Open High Low Close Chg. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBTJ 

5J00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 


X63% 

374% 

452 

279% 

257 

2X4 

Doc 3X0 
Mar 3J6 
May X14 

3A1 

3J7% 

X15 

3J6 

3J4% 

112 

1X7% —56% 
1X6(6 —51% 
114% —52* 

372% 

3A5 

355% 

XS3 

2A7 

Z94* 

Jul 256 
Sep 2X6% 
Dec 2X9 

2X7 

2X6% 

2X9 

284 

284% 

2X7 

2X5* —53* 
285 —.S3 

2X7 —52% 


112500 Ibfc- cents par lb. 

sxo 

550 

530 

5X7 

+39 

933 

334 


5.95 

632 

5X7 

6X2 

+39 

7.15 

3X8 

May 

A12 

6X4 

*53 

' 6X3 

+A1 

670 

379 

Jul 

636 

658 

631 

658 

+A0 

6.82 

6X6 

434 

4X2 

Sep 

Oct 

6X5 

6X5 

6X0 

6X6 

6X4 

+A0 
■ +37 

735 

7X3 

63S 

451 

Jan 

Mor 

7.13 

7X3 

7J7. 

757 

7X2 

+37 

+37 

Est. Series 


Prev.5afes 






«JT- "B4J0 itac 9259 9259 9201 92 53 

92.14 0630 Mar 9259 9259 9271 9202 

n»: «6jjr -TJifc -7153 917s ton- 

TLA . XZ5B Sep R5B 9152. '9142 9L43 




9130 .' .«73l,_ ftaC.-.fUT^yOY 9LW 91.11 
ttaa> ; {JAA -SMr 9BAS 9Q55 . 907V 9079 
M6£. 8*84. J«fl» 1053 9059 9049 WAV 

+0^+. vK^^SSe-'ua*.'' vaaF 9037 fozi 

St Sales ~ Prev. Sain 50255 ■' 

Prev. Day.Qp*^Tn?^pw»a^pxa6^ 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 91325 off 376 


COCOA (NYCSCE) . 

10 metric tans- Spot Ion 




Prev. Sales 8769 


Prev. Day Onen !nL 29592 off si 


CORN(CBT) 

5500 bu minimum- donors per bushel 
275 114% Dec 240% 2A1* 238% 239% —53 

2.97 234% /War 241% 2A3* 141* 241% — 51* 

271* 231 May 143 244* 142% 243% —51% 

286 233 Jul 2A3U 244% 242% 2A3 —52 

270 234* Sep 231% 232% 231 231* —51% 

235% 220* Dec 235* 237 124% 234% -51% 

174% 232* Mar 233% 232% 132% 232% —48% 

Est. Safes Prev. Soles 41145 

Prev. Day Open lnt.145756 ue329 


2337 

1945 

Dec 

2 WO 

2124 

XH 

2124 

+53 

2392 

1955 

Mar 

2191 

2210 

2180 

2208 

+16 

2422 . 

I960 


2245. 

2260 

220 

3299. 

+43 

2429 

I960 

Jul 

2276 

2290 

2276 

2281 

+41. 

2430 

2023 

Sop 

2305 

2310 

2300 

ZH7 

-+4P 

2425 


Dec 

ora 


2307 

2324 

+44 

2385 

2D29 

Mar 




3328 

+34 

Est. Sates 


Prev. Safes 1329 





LB2QQ '■jDmc -JMOa 14*40 LOST 14425 
T5680' Mor L430Q1A340 UZM 1A310 


- ■’■r;3 


LM&Jlin- *4200-14214. 14165 1 4210 
. -63M Prev.sbtoe 8566 


SOYBEANS CCBT) 

5500 bu mini mum- «M kws per bushel 


Jan 455% 488 


476% Mar 457 


458 478 455* —57% 

475 455* 492% —57* 

552% 459 479%— 56* 


4M 

6X8 

557 

Jul 550 

557% 

4X7 

554% —52% 

674 - , 

557% 


556 




50ft +1* 

678 

551 

Sep 4X9 

553 

AM 

UC1 

—XI 

633 

550 

Nov 4X9 

555 

4X0 


+50* 

44ft + * 

553 

5.13 

Jan 559 

5.16 

559 


—51 

,1ft- ft 

637% 

575 

Mar 570 

577 

S.19% 

527 



Est Safes 






29% + % 

Prev. Dav Open int. 7SA27 otf*B 





Prev. Day D»en tnt. 19,109 affl49 
ORANOE JUICE MYCE) 

,5,«KT0 ibs.- centsper (b. 

18050 . HITS Jan 11X55 11450 USAS 11350 

17750 11250 Mar 114A0 11470 11X40 11435 

16250 HITS MOV 11470 11550 TUTS 11475 

15750 111 40 Jut m.10 115.10 11550 1147S 

18050 11150 Sep 11240 112A0 11140 11115 

11435 11150 Nov .11240 ni4fr T1240 11335 

11350 11350 J an 11225 

16135 11150 Mar - 11235 

Est. Sains ■ Prev.Satas 647 


Prev. Day Open f nt 46181 ie>293 


*314 Prw.sbtee 8566 * 

Pr^v- Day .Open, Intr 32412.0(9780 
CANADIAN DOdjUt OAtMO .1 
Sperdfr- 1 pqfat eaucisSaoooT 
75*4- 7086. P»C -7254 7267 7252 7266 

7304 . AMI. Mar- JM 7253 7239 725B 

7360 ; r , TWO. *Jo* “>7284 J28+- 7234 7237 

7383 . 7176 Star' ^214 7Z15 72M 7223 

EstSaleo T3M Prev.Satas 1707 .... ~ 
Prey. Day Open Hp. -7460 UP 462 
FRENCH PRAMC (IMM1 
S perfr ancJ pota»eoeotaW50Q0i " 

J1CT ‘ Dec ^ • .12660 

13450 .„JBl3:;jtiB". .12540 

Ept.Sales ' PnnrJSata*' 

Prev.Day OpenlnL- 171 


6--i 

.Jam* 


W T*Tf *■- 

Metals- ~ 


.;. , dERMMAMKlBHMlH^ 
^ f «peiv»tartPW i pl nten diB ta ,«08Plf 


j?* + * 

29* + Vk 
27% 

33% + % 
19% + * 
17% + Mi 
25% + % 

iim— ft 

4 


SOYBEAN MEAL ( CD T) 

100 tans- dollars per Ion 

18450 12SA0 Dec 13450 138X0 136 A0 13830 —.10 

16350 12750 Jan 13450 13830 U6J0 138.10 —JO 

20450 13050 Mar 13450 13850 13650 13850 —30 

14250 13250 May 13450 13950 13650 13930 +70 

16750 13450 Jul 13550 13950 13550 13950 +50 

15170 13550 Aug 13650 14050 13650 13950 +50 

16750 13750 Sep 13550 13950 13550 13950 

14950 13450 Oct 13750 13750 13750 13750 +50 

15050 13650 Dec 13750 14050 13750 14050 +1X0 

1595S 13450 Jan 13850 +150 

Est. Sales Prev.Satas 15500 


London Metals 


21 

Close Prev too* 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per metric ton 
SPol 66650 66750 65950 66050 

Forward 68950 6*050 68350 68450 


I 


London 

Commodities 


H 


Gx^ralihies 


Cash Prices 


Prev. Day Open Int 50A52 upB539 


COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Sterling per metric tan 

spat 94150 94250 94550 94450 

Forwra 96150 96250 96450 9*550 


Close 

SUGAR^ ^ B “ ** 
Sterling per metric too 
Dec 14150 140A0 147 A0 — 
Mir 16160 15450 16350 163A0 
May 16750 15X00 16730 16750 
Aug 17200 166JS0 17260 17350 
Oct 17750 16BL80 IT7A0 17750 


Previous 
BU Ask 


COPPER CATHODES (Standara) 

Sterling per metric too 

Seal 92150 92350 92450 92650 

Forward 94450 94650 94650 94800 


Volume: 4AV1 lots of 50 tons. 


1405014650 
15630 15480 
1603016150 
164A0 16440 
17X40 17150 


LEAD 

Sterling per metric tan 

Soot 27150 27250 27250 27350 

Forward 27750 27850 27750 Z7B50 


NICKEL 

Sterling per metric ten 

Spat 7770.00 278050 275050 276050 

Forward 281050 282050 279550 280050 


COCOA 

Sterling per metric ten 
DOC IA64 1AS3 IASS 1A59 

Mor 1707 1A73 1704 1705 

May 1728 Ijm 1726 1727 

Jly 1745 1726 1744 1745 

SW 1.766 1745 1764 1766 

Dec 1759 1747 1757 1739 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1766 1774 


Volume: 3.926 lots of to tank 


1533 1535 
1A7B 1A80 
1704 1705 
1724 1725 
17#3 1744 
1742 1744 
1739 1760 


HONO-KOHG GOLD FUTURES 
U5LS per ounce 

date Previous 
High Low EM Ask bu Ask 
NOV _ N.T. N.T. 32550 3Z750 32X00 32550 
Dec _ ILT. N.T. 32650 32850 32450 32650 
Jan _ H.T. KT. 32BJ30 33050 33650 32850 
Feb _ NT. N.T. 33050 31250 32850 33050 
API _ 33550 33550 33450 33650 33250 33450 
Jtm — N.T. N.T. 33850 34050 33650 33850 
Aug _ 34350 34350 34XJDQ 34450 34050 34250 
Oct _ N.T. N.T. 34400 34850 34450 34450 
Volume: 23 lata trflODaz. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U55 per ocace 



Nan. 21 

Commodify aad unit 

Tho 

TOOT 

Ago 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb 

L55 

1X8 

Piintdath 64/30 38 %. yd — 

074 

8X8 

Stool billets (Pitt J, ton. 

47350 

47350 

iron 2 Fdrv. Phna* ton 

11X50 

213X8 

Steel scrap No 1 hw PUL _ 

73-74 

88-89 


Uft-10 

2641 


tm -to 

*7-7* 

Tin (Straits!, lb 

NJL 

am. 

Zinc. E. St. L Basts. Ib 

035 

8A5 


110-1 DO 

147 

Sliver N.Y- az 

6.165 

Old. 

Source: AP. 





COPPER (COMEX) 

25500 lbs.- cents per lb. 

fiBjSO aaso Nov . 5970' -MS 

8435 5850 Dec 6050 6050 59 AO 5955 +.15' 

8430 5875 Jan 60.15 +.15 

BO50 .5970 Mor 6050 6095 6055 6050 +.15 

745s 6050 Mar 6130 6130 6150 61.18 +.10 

74A0 60JS Jul 61 A0 61A5 *138 61X5 . +55 . 

70S!} 6050 SOP 61A0 6L60 6TA0 '. . . 

70X0 . 6135 Dec 6250 6250 6255 6255 —.10 

7030 63X0 Jtw .. . • 6ZSf -_J5, 

6750 ... 4255 Mar . 4250 6250 6250 6150 — C25 

«MO . 6250 MOY 8280. '— J5 

6630 6X2S Jul ' 6X10 —AS 

«&Jta 6150 S«» . 6X40 —55 ' 

Est. Safes Prev.Satas 
Prev. Day Open Int. -77579 up 782 


>am: {Dec"-; X060 .jd jbsb . jsw 

3m , J840 Mar JWl 3915 J890 J912 
sm 1 JOSS^f -Juh-.-'JSM - • JJ47 . 5922 * X943 

3973 370 Sep . JMi 

EehSatas ZL530 PremSatac19JM2 
Prev. DayOpaninfc: 49551 ■ ooytu 
JAPANESE VeHOMMI 
S per ywT point eQuOfSS0508001 


504942 503985 Dec 5O42S4A04N5 504945 504963 

504942 V0004035 'M6r5»49S7 58^70 504949 504967 
504948 504220 Jan 504968504968504961504976 

00492B . 504680 Sep .. . 5049B8 

Dec . • ,505004 

Eet.SaialSm Pnv.Sales 14546 
-prey. Day. open tatTBX93 <XT469 
SWtSS-.FRAMC (IMM) 

Sperfraoo-lpototemx 

me • ^3331 -Dec A7Z7 A754 A7U A740 
A77L . J83S- Mar M 7S. A794 .ATM A792 
A82S-*7r~A19D. JWR+AB28 A833 ABU A840 
A830 _A790 Sep . ASM ABU A860 A860 

EsLSates-MJOr. Prev.Satas 23772 
PrwrOayOpen tnt. 30731 op 834 


851 — v93 

1855 — 57 
9.13 —55 

19X5 — 58 

9A2 —.78 

9JO —50 
9 AS — 57 
970 -J2 

9 AS —M 
9A5 l — A0 



4350 44J0 43A5 





CATTLE ICME1 
40500 Bis.- ce nts o ar lb 


67X5 

5550 

Dec 

6750 

6772 

66X0 

67.15 

+78 

67.4S 

5435 

Feb 

6273 

62X5 

62X0 

62X2 

+X0 

67X7 

55J0 


6055 

8150 

60A0 

60X2 

+J0 

6675 

5675 

Jun 

60X0 

6150 

6070 

60X2 

+77 

4540 

5530 


99 AO 

XXA0 

5955 

5077 

+.17 

6060 

57X0 

Oct 

5830 

5840 

37X0 

58.15 

+J3 

65X0 

59.10 

Dec 

5973 

5950 

5975 

59X0 

+75 

Est. Sales 


Prey. Sates. 14X1B 





Prev. Day Open Int. 67553 off 66 


SILVER 

Pence per troy ounce 

Soot 42450 42650 42650 42750 

Forward 43750 43950 43950 44150 


TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric ton 

Spot Sum. Susp. — — 

Forwara Sun. Sum. — — 


COFFEE 

Start lag per metric ran 
No* 1585 1563 1564 

Jan 1.930 1505 1500 

Mar 1,930 1.920 1.930 

May 1570 1548 1538 

JIT WBB 1566 1581 

SOP 2515 1595 1595 

Nov 3530 2515 2521 


High Low Settle Settle 

Dec 32750 327 JJ0 326.00 327 JM 

Feb N.T. N.T. 330.10 331.10 

Volume: 62 leu of 100 m. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 

Matavslan cents per Mle 

Close Previous 


■JS 


667S 67.10 
6730 6732 

6670 *673 

*5X0 6SJ0 

6550 66.15 


Options 


30500 lbs.- cents per lb. 


Volume; 4789 lets of 51 


1565 1573 1577 
1.903 1522 1.925 
1,934 1,938 1539 
1540 1.958 1,9*0 
1.985 1565 1571 
2500 2500 2510 
2525 2500 2570 



BU 

Ask 

BU 



177X0 

178X0 

17873 

1797S 

Jan— — 

17950 

18050 

18050 


Fob 

10050 

18150 

18150 

18250 


18150 

18250 

18250 

18350 


ZINC 

Sterling per metric ton 

5001 41050 41250 40250 40350 

Source: AP. 


U.S. Approves Airline Merger 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Department of Transportation said 
Thursday that it had approved the 
acquisition of Frontier Holdings 
Inc., parent of Frontier Airlines, by 
People Express Inc., after conclud- 
ing that the proposed S279 JZ-mil- 
iion merger would not lessen com- 
petition m any city where the two 
airlines complete. 


GASOIL 

U5. dollars per matrtc tan 
DOC 27950 273 JO 27875 27950 
Jan 274X0 270X0 27435 274X0 
Feb 26735 26533 26750 347X0 
Mar 25750 36.00 23750 S 735 
Alrt 24050 24750 347.75 24050 
May 24050 237X0 230X0 239X0 
Jun 23550 23350 23X50 23373 
JIV 23550 23350 23335 T E191 
Aug N.T. N.T. 23350 23850 


Volume: 3566 lots at 100 tons. 


27375 27450 
2*935 369X0 
26435 264X0 
mnn -tk*. •>* 
24535 349.73 
23650 23635 
231X0 23235 
23150 231X0 
23150 23350 


volume: 2 kits. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents oer kilo 

Close Previous 

BU Ask Bid Ask 

ESS 1 D#C_ 15335 15X50 15450 154X0 

RES 1 Jan_ 15550 155XO 155X5 15435 

RSSODeC- 14950 150 in 14935 15035 

RSSSDec. 14750 14850 14735 14X35 

RS5 4 Dec _ 14X00 14559 14X25 14X35 

RS5 5 Dec— 13850 14080 T38JS 14025 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian ringgit* per 23 ton* 

dose Prevtatn 


8rik> Cabim 

Price Dec to hi 

Mor 

J'Sw. 

PBtaLmt 
Dec M FB 

21 

Mor 

US 

_ 

_ 

— 

IAS 1A6 

— 

— 


V% - 




1A6 1A6 


— 

ITS 

a* 19* 

n 

... 

IAS 1/16 

* 

— 




15* 

1A6 * 

9A* 

« 

UK 



li* 

yu « 

I3A617AI 




I* 

1 I/Ml kk 

37/U3W 





3 3R 


5 

TOO 

n/i*i» 

2* 

JU 

V, 7Vfc 


— 

305 

- KA. 

ll/Ulta 

” 


“ 


50X5 

3635 

DOC 

<745 

47.95 

47.10 

47X2 

+75 

5047 

38.10 

Fob 

45X0 

4642 

45X5 

44X0- 

+73 

47 JS 

36.12 

Apr 

41.15 

41 38 

4073 

41.12 

+X0 

4X55 

39X0 

Jun 

43.17 

4JJ7 

42X0 

4375 

+30 

49XS 

4045 

Jut 

4127 

4340 

4350 

4132 

+.17 

51.90 

4075 

Aua 

42X5 

42X5 

4230 

4275 

+X5 

41.10 

3857 

Oct 

3975 

3073 

39X5 

39X0 

+.10 

49X0 

3837 

Doc 

4040 

4040 

4020 

4045 

—77 

41X0 

4040 

Feb 

4050 

40X0 

4047 

4047 

—32 


Est. Sates 7AS1 Prev. Sale* 6X25 
Prev. Day Open Int. Z735B off 341 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38500 I&L- cents per lb. 

7430 5X75 Feb 6145 62A5 

75X0 5X65 mot 61J0 62JM 

75A0 5755 Way 42X5 *3X0 

7650 37X0 Jul 63 50 6X72 

73.15 53XO Aug 60.10 6150 

Est. Sales 4X19 Prev.Satas 3339 
Prev. Dav Onen Int B815 up2» 


S2A5 +250 
6277 +152 
4355 +L63 
4372 +1X2 
6L10 +1J0 


PJUDEOIL (0 RENT) 

UX. dollars pgr bam 

SSf S5" “-‘o XM st’o 

2940 2945 29.94 2930 2935 

Feb 28.95 28.75 2flJW 3955 2BA1 2fl50 

2S?r K- £f-I- S50 tbS Sxi Sjo 

jSSL JS-T K-J- H- 74 M - 00 773) 2770 

Mm N.T. N.T. 2670 Z7.75 26X0 2779 

Volume: 73 Ion of IJOO barrels, 
joa rcas : Kev/ers ana London Patroh wm Ex- 
change (otaolL crude oil). 


COFFEE C OTYCSCE) 

37X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

168A0 13935 Dec 15976 16050 15876 15957 +J7 

16753 128X0 Mor 1*4X0 16SJ0 16X01 164.1* +37 

167X8 13150 MOV 1*750 1*7X0 1*550 14754 +A7 


Dividends 


Volume: 17 lota of 2S ions. 
Source: R outers. 


Currency Option 



■ . ■ 29Ay+_';Z3X3 ■ \:Apr-' 

*71 2863 28X4 28X5 

i +: 



*7X0 2856 2770 285B 

i .+: 





10 —60 \ 

- M : ' JiiP- .. 

17X5 = XTX 2755 2779 

; ■ +/ 



16X7 X632 26J0 2030 



C^OdtP-lMDCX rCMKl 


2 3 - 30 w«5i> 

v JS2?< “W 2gJS_ 204X0 202J3 
38d5Dc -;.;XBX90v Jim. 30X90 30575 301551 
20570, ia^f vjep 20675 mS.StW 


VAUIEUintKCBT) 

pofahraod cents 

225 ' fSS BS SSMS 206.10 

m^SSS: 5 ST 20870 

PrwX3ayOPf»Unf. nX25 off 231 


30150 +U5 
204.10 +2X5 
30 5 X5 +2X0 
20750 +2X5 


LLS.lreasiiries 


For the latest information on 
De Voe-Holbein Inlernational nv 
and Qtv-Qock Inlernational nv 
please call collect 31-20-627762. 


Investors seeking above average 
capita] gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us & 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Center 
Sirawinskylaan H57 
1077 XX Amsterdam. 

The Netherlands 
Telex: U507 firco nl 


Gommmlhles 



Non. 21 

Diseauai 


Prev. 

Offer BM 

YleM 

YtaU 

3mofittibai 73* 722 

747 

747 

LnoaNl WD 7 J0 778 

748 

747 

HwbU 7 JO 7X 

7X1 

7J1 

Pier. 

BU Offer 

YMd 

YleM 

n-yr.bmd 1W2202 WS2S/32 

Source: Sabmoa Brothers. 

9X2 

9X5 

MerrH Lynch Tritawy tades: 13166 
Change for Sh dov: + 0X0 

Average yield: 9.17% 

Source: Alarm Lmcti 



D\I Hilures 
Options 


W. G#rr 7 wp 6tor»-;2£OT niorti ants otr roctk 


Strike 

XUtatehta 


tataSettta 


ffior 


Dm 

Mar 


37 un 

240 

294 

am 

033 

040 

W 0X2 

148 

228 

{inn 

058 

088 

39 0X7 

L12 

ITS 

04/ 

U» 

U1 

40 (UU 

072 

176 

1X6 

1X7 

1X0 

4i cob 

045 

aw 

220 

— 

242 

Bt limited fetal veLSXU 




Cans: Wed. ML 2538 new 

taLAXN 


Puis : wea «oL1728spea W.3SS14 


Source: Cme. 






Company 

Par 

Mil 

Pay 

R*C 

EXTRA 




RX.N.B. Coro 

- 

.10 

12-12 

13-1 

INCREASED 




a 

XD 

1-2 12-U 

Valiev Natl Cora 

Q 

33 12-U 


INITIAL. 





Q 

.16 

1-3 

13-11 

Deposit Guaranty 

Q 71% 

1-2 12-U 

OMITTED 




New Canturv Bank Carp 




REDUCED 




Paradbe Fruit 

- 

XO 

1-3 

17-3 

STOCK 




Plan Comm. Bitot 

_ 

SPC 

12-16 

12-2 

USUAL 





American (nil Group 

Q 

31 

3-21 

3-7 

Betden & Blake Enrg 

Q 

45 

12-31 

11-29 

Be Id. Hemlswsay Co 

O 

.10 

1-2 

12-5 

Cornea ipc 

a 

.11 

1-14 

12-17 

Cincinnati Fnd 

a 

31 

1-15 

12-27 


u 

35 

1-2 12-U 


u 

XI 

13-13 

172 

Dallas Cora 

0.16% 

1-3 12-18 

FodScrowWrts 

Q 

.10 

1-2 

12-13 

Fsf Alabama Bncnra 

a 

78 

1-2 

12-17 


o 

75 12-31 

134 


0 

.74 

1-2. 

174 

Liquid Air Cara 

u 

40 

12-IV 




1-2 12-13 

National Stan. Ca 

0 

.10 

1-3 

1M 

Newport Carp 

s 

53 12-19 

12-4 


Q 

30 12>U 

1M 

Maxell Carp d-B 

Q 

77 12-31 

12-17 

nttswstw. rr 

a 

.14 12-30 

12-12 

Public Svc El & Gas 

o 

71 

1331 

124 

Savannah El ft Pwr 

Q 

40 

T-1S 17-31 

UfahP&L 

a 

X8 

1-3 

124 

a-aaoMli m-monthiy/ e-gaartmiy; weml- 

Source: UP 1. 






FiiWincinl 



207X5 +235 
210X0 «A0 
712X0 +2X0 
214J0 +240 


’*'**■* 


Coimnotflty indexes 


Market CuMp 


’srs-* 




j rsv-:v p '> v 






r v* 











































Statistics Index 


AMCx sriees . p.i* 
AMEX Msta/tomP.17 
MVSB prices . ' p. * 
NYSE Itighs/knn P .12 
CBBOSban stocks p.u 
Cunencv rata p.ij 
CofftmxWia p.ij 

Dtvktends .p.ij 


reoarH P.1S 
Fttno noe notec P .14 
GoWmartm*. p.ij 
i nttTort raios . P.ij 
summery p. 8 
Oattons p .4 

OYC stock • p,i7 
O^wmarkai P.U 


3fS> 


i" 1 mW, 


FRIDAY, NoyianiBER 22, 19&5 ~~~~ 

• 

TECHNOLOGY 

Getting Your PC To Be 
'An Electronic Secretary’ 


"Tt ivn»<nusu.«# *g 

iicralo^a^enbnnc. 

BUSINESS / FIN AN CE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report^ M-l, Page 8. 

Page 13 


By DAVID E. SANGER 1 

t:i *rs ^ ' Ncv Toirfc Timet Service 

fe e T"1 California — Nearly two years ago, Apple 

^ < ^ on ?P^ tcr Inc. introduced its Macintosh andbe*an to 

^4!L - Jyf '^.people look at computer 

•' sheens. It banished the cryptic “A” symbol .flint pr omp ts 
V-.'.* | jwmofmost personal computers to eater lfefet insSuaSo, 
p replacing it with a visn^; “tool ]□[/» . 

£*3* % * e Mac ™todr and other computers 

. .. ^ „ lhai have nmmdced its easy-to-use approach, users are accus- 
vf W^ topic^upafaiorthinpracST^rtjn^horaiidastic 
'■ & & ^ m ^ es on tire screen and to dispose of. old Sics 

s by simply dumping them into an electronic trashratiL 
S 1 ^^ Sificon Valley, b rillian t advances in software barely 

take hold before someone tries _ ' ; 

$• to go one better. Already there v 
r.,.^ is a move to leapfrog Apple, x on act as the general 

m dSj:“ building on its intuitive an-- , __ j 

2 ? p roach. . contractor, the 

:? : £v u £ ' Much of the action is cea- anftivnre wnrlra m tho 
•&£*} & tered m the artificial intdli- »°KWare WOrKS as me 

specialists. 


grace laboratory at Hewlett- 
Packard- Co., which xwa< 


,3, ;-rV 

'-■Vir-r- V. 


'i'l «l ' 

t: 


1 “w# >. Packard- Co., which was _£ ' ' - 

11 .'. ]*•''¥ £ caught snoozing in the early 
. ' ' ‘ ?' day® of die personal computer boom. Now Hewlett-Packard 

5: researchers are involved in a S30-nriltion to S50-mgBori project to 
Ir v/-: aA. design “software robots'’ that will perform many of the tasks — 

l\ phone message — 

• I-; ‘‘Today's PCs are good toolboxes, but they don’t cbine with a 
*: carpenter or a.plumber,” said Ira P. Goldstein, the jovial director 

» lo« of the Applications Technology Center at Hewlett-Packard Lab- 
oratories. Offering the first public glimpse .of the project, he 

• explain edthai “what we want to do is give you some intelligent 

- “ ’ assistance in how to use those tods — you act as the general 

contractor, they work as the specialists.” 

-■» T N THE tortured phraseology of the computer industry, what 
I appears on the screen is known as the “user interface.” It is 
. it best envi s io n ed as a translator: the human speaks one lan- 

guage, the computer processor another and the “interface” soft- 
ware mediates between the two. Ideally, it transforms the hu- 
' 7 j- v .. man’s general wishes into the exact commands d emanded by a 
rj; % j processor. 

' i A 5* Computers can be infuriating to work with, however, because 
7;r. y translations are rough at best. To accomplish a specific job, most 
"'f- ~I a r‘ \ computers still require excruciatingly detailed instructions. Tell a 
. 'r friend to meet you under the dock, at Grand Central Station, in 
New York and be probably needs no further guirinnr^ TfJl the 
• ^ same thing to a computer and you have to describe precisely how 

• - £ to get there, inch by inch — and then say which of dozras of 

- r : different docks you mean. 

v “ The idea at Hewlett-Packard, an idea that the artificial intefli- 

T ._ ^ gence community has toyed with far years, is to devdop what Mr. 

7 ->* i. 5 • Goldstein calls “agents” that dean up those details. 

' ?:■ < r* “It is sort of an electronic secretary or accountant,” he said, 

. ' displaying drawings of colorful cartoon characters who would 

appear on a computer screen sitting at a desk, bent over a file or 
scratching on a ledger. “Eadi one is programmed with a model of 
: your Hkes and dislikes, a model of tne tocds available to it and a 
* modd of its tadc.” 

Consider a base task for an office agent: setting up a meeting. 
The computer user would issue a general command, perhaps, “I 
■ p f want to see my topstaff at a zx^etmgm the'nextfew days.” Either 
- ■- ; through experience or preprogramming, the agent knows that its 
' lethargic human master rarely rises before 10 AJML, so a breakfast 
meeting is out Through electronic mail, it begins to poll the 
scheduling agents of other staff members. Eiths - a meeting is set 
r‘ for a mutually agreeable time or the boss’s agent reports back that 

■ it cannot be done; 

s S imilarl y, the accounting agent could begin to set iip.a spread- 
’..l~ sheet outlnnng next year’s office budget in the format its master 

prefers. And a message agent might sort phone messages accord- 
ing to a set of priorities, putting the chairman's call on top and 
/• • (Contmued oo Page 14, CoL 5) - 


. r j U2Z. 
• jr zrii 
4 



Currency Rates 


Volvo 
Seeks to 
Add Units 

Its Profit Rose 
6l£% in Period 


By Juris Kaza 

Imematumal Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — AB Volvo 
said Thursday that it was seeking to 
make acquisitions that would 
strengthen its position in food and 
biotechnology. At the same time, it 
reported pretax earnings for the 
third quarter had risen 61.8 percent 
over the period last year. 

Volvo said it was bidding to take 
foil control of AB Cardb, an invest- 
ment company that owns Sweden’s 
private sugar monopoly and con- 
cerns working in biotechnology 
and plant genetics, notably the 
breeding of trees. 

Volvo’s chairman and chief exec- 
utive officer, Pehr G. Gyflenham- 
mar, said that together with Vol- 
vo's current food operations, 
Cardo’s industrial companies 
would be consolidated in Proven- 
dor AB, a food group that would be 
Volvo’s third-laigest division in 
terms of sales and profits. 

In an interim report, Volvo said 
it earned 1.597 billion kronor 
($203.9 million) in the third quarter 
before tax, up from 987 million 
kronor a year ago, but off from 
2.046 billion in the second quarter. 

In die first uine mouths, earnings 
were 5.855 billion kronor, up from 
5.609 billion in the corresponding 
1984 period. Sales, at 6 23 3y billion 
kronor, were virtually unchanged 
tom a year earlier, reflecting the 
reduction of energy operations. 

Car sales rose 26 percent in the 
third quarter, to 7.052 billion kro- 
nor, and were up 18 percent in the 
first nine months, to 2553 billion 
kronor, Volvo said. 

Volvo’s third-quarter operating 
gamin g c , which exclude financial 
net and foreign-exchange effects, 
rase to 1^245 billion kronor in the 
third quarter from 1.065 billion 
kronor a year earlier. Volvo’s presi- 
dent, Haakan Fxisuger, said the 
increase was largely due to better 
profitability from car sales. 

Mr. Gyflenhammar said Volvo 
was. covered by forward contracts 
against dollar fluctuations, but 
cautioned that at some point, the 
lower dollar would affect Volvo’s 
margins in the United Stales and 
other dollar markets. 

However, Volvo officials said a 
lower dollar reduced Volvo’s dd- 
lar-denominated debt service. 

Third-quarter foreign exchange 
gftjps amounted to 3 10 millio n kro- 
nor, compared with a loss of 181 
million kronor a year earlier. 

In the offer to take over Caxdo, 
Volvo said it would pay 175 kronor 
cash and offer one rime in a new 
company built around Cardo’s 
share portfolio in a package valued 
at 280 kronor per existing Cardo 
share. 


America: A Nation of Truckers 

Pickups, Minivans, Jeeps j ^ raselllTnick Sates 
Attain Record Popularity TotaltrucksatesatthBand 


\ev* York Times Service 

DETROIT — When the domestic car makers 
dosed the books on the 1985 modd year recently 
and tallied their sales, they found «h-y the best- 
scIHng car in the United States was a track — 

Ford’s F- Series full-size pickup. The second best 
seller was also a pickup — Chevrolet's C-Series. 

“Tracks have captured the imagination of the 
American public,” said one new-car dealer. 

New models, sleeker styling, greater comfort 
more options, better fuel efficiency and lower 
prices man some compact cars have transformed 
the once useful but unglamor ous v ehicle into an 
attractive option for personal transportation. 

In addition, with more leisure rime and more 
disposable income, Americans in the 1980s are 
showing that they want a vehicle that offers not 
only comfort and styling but also versatility. And 
the new utifity trucks — which look good enough 
to be driven to the country dub and have power 
enough, with optional four-wheel drive, to tackle 
rough terrain on a fishing or hunting trip — fit that 
hill. 

While 1985 was not the first lime a truck was the 
best-selling vehicle, total track sales scored a re- 
cord high this last modd year, with U5. and 
import dealers delivering a total of 4.6 million 
units, surpassing the 1978 record of 4 2 million. 

“Trades are the major automotive growth mar- 
ket. Variety and car-like comfort are the reasons." 
said Louis E Lataif, vice president of sales opera- 
tions for Ford Motor Co. 

“Truck sales are up for a variety of reasons, but 
the main one is the new products introduced in the 
light-trade segment over the last few years,” said 
Michad Luckey. automotive analyst for Merrill 
Lynch Economics. 

Among the new products that have proven so 
popular. Ford’s F-series — the F-150, F-250 and 
F-350 — and Chevy’s C-series trucks are consid- 
ered the workhorses of tight commerce and agri- 
culture. Base-priced at under 59,000 — about the 


Total truck sales at the end of each 
model year, in millions of units. 

••O-U 



Economic Panel 
Sees 3% Growth 
For W. Germany 


*80 *81 ’82 *83 >84 ’88 u 

The five best- setting vehicles sold in 
the U.S. during the 1 985 model year. 
Vehicle Number of uitfts sold 


Ford F-series truck 
Chevrolet's C-series truck 
Chevrolet Cavalier 
Ford Escort 
Chevrolet Celebrity 


581,800 

477,100 

408,700 

394,000 

345,200 

Tha New Y«yt Times 


same as a mid-sized Chevrolet at 58,735 — a large 
portion of them now are also bought for combined 
business-personal use or for personal transporta- 
tion alone. These and others offer such luxuries as 
power windows, stereo equipment, air condition- 
ing and doth seals as optional features. Other 
popular new trucks, such as the Chevy S- 10 Blazer 
and the Ford Bronco U, the Jeep Wagoneer and 
Chrysler Corp.’s minivans, have even become pres- 
tige vehicles to some. 

The label “truck" covers much more than stan- 
dard delivery or work vehicles. Small pickups and 
large, utility vehicles such as Jeeps, lag v ane and 
the new minivans are all considered trucks. In the 
case or the minivans, which look and drive much 
more tike a car, the truck designation was given to 
take advantage of less stringent emission sum- 
(Con tinned on Page 17, CoL 5) 


By Warren Gerler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The West 
German government's Council of 
Economic Advisers, in an annual 
report that argues strongly against 
yielding to pressures for reflation, 
has provided some encouraging 
news to the center-right govern- 
ment of Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 
but with a caveat. 

While growth in gross national 
product was expected to rise to an 
inflation-adjusted 3 percent nett 
year, the report said, the moderate- 
ly faster pace would not be suffi- 
cient to spark a short-term reduc- 
tion in the country’s 
unemployment rate, which hovers 
around 9 percent. 

But the report supports the gov- 
ernment's position Of refr ainin g 
from any extraordinary efforts to 
bring unemployment down by cre- 
ating jobs. It urges Bonn to contin- 
ue to rely on market forces, chiefly 
rising capital investment, to ease a 
high jobless rale that largely re- 
flects a wave of young workers en- 
tering the labor force. 

The report, pans of which were 
disclosed to the International Her- 
ald Tribune on Thursday, is to be 
released Friday. 

The report criticized Bonn for 
having moved too slowly in dis- 
mantling subsidies to troubled 
steel, coal and shipbuilding indus- 


BP Net Grows 9% on Strong Refining, Marketing 


By Bob Hage rty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — A record perfor- 
mance from refining and market- 
ing helped push British Petroleum 
Co.'s net profit up 9 percent in the 
third quarter, the company report- 
ed Thursday. 

BP said net profit on a historical- 
cost basis was £416 million (5597 
million), up from £383 million in 
the year-earlier quarter. For 1985’s 
first nine months, net advanced 21 
percent to £128 billion from £1.05 
bfltion. 

On a replacement-cost basis, 
which excludes gains or losses onr 
inventory values and which BP 
considers more m eaningf ul, net 
profit soared 52 percent in the 
quarter to a record £477 million 
from £313 rafltionL For the nine 
months, replacement-cost net to- 
taled £134 billion, up 42 percent 
from £943 bfllk®. 

The results were wdl above most 
forecasts, and BP shares advanced 
15 pence to close at 605 pence on 
the London Stock Exchange. 

David Gray, oil analyst at James 
Capd & Co n predicted that BP 
would raise its dividend for the 


year to 36 pence from 30 pence in 
1984, and would report hutorical- 
cost net profit of £1.7 billion for 
full 1985, 21 percent above 1984’s 
£1.4 billion. 

Earnings per share on a histori- 
cal-cost basis climbed to 22.7 pence 
from 21 pence in the third quarter 
and to 69.7 pence from 57.6 pence 
in the nine months. 

Sales in the quarter edged up Q.7 
percent to £9.42 billion from £935 
billion. For the nine months, sales 
gained 14 percent to £30.87 billion. 

Operating profit from refining 
and marketing in the third quarter. 


at £153 million, was 10 times that 
of the year-earlier third quarter and 
weD above the £1 13 milli on record- 
ed for all of 1984. 

Since crude oil is priced in dol- 
lars, the decline of that currency 
reduced raw-material costs in local - 
currency terms for BP’S refineries 
in Europe and Asia. Michad Uns- 
worth. chief oil analyst at Scott, 
Goff, Layton & Co., estimated that 
this factor accounted for £30 mil- 
lion to £40 million of the rise. He 
said the company continued to 
benefit, as well, from its closure of 
excess refining capacity. 


The dollar’s fall cut ihe value of 
BFs oil output when expressed in 
pound terms. But the company 
boosted worldwide production in 
the quarter to 139 million barrels a 
day from 133 million. 

The contribution to operating 
profit from Standard Oil Co. 
(Ohio), owned 55 percent by BP, 
slipped to £556 milli on in the quar- 
ter from £571 million a year before. 

For the nine months, however, So- 
bio's contribution rose to £1.85 bil- 
lion, or 53 percent of the group’s 
total, from £1.73 billion. 


tries, thus inhibiting market forces 
and adding to government costs. 

It also suggested that the 
Bundesbank could raise its money 
supply growth targets a notch 
above the current 3- percent to 5- 
percent range — a move that the 
central bank is believed likely to 
resist. 

The council, a group of universi- 
ty economists that reports on the 
economy each November, predicts 
that the number of unemployed 
people will drop by 80.000 in 1 986, 
the first decline in years. The report 
also said that the number of new 
jobs is expected to climb to 300.000 
in 1986 after an anticipated in- 
crease to 200,000 this year. 

Recalling the period of steady, 
but moderate economic expansion 
from 1975 to 1980. the report said 
that West Germany's economy was 
set for stable, non-in flat ion ary 
growth through 1987 at its current 
3- percent rate. But that prediction, 
it said, binges on Lhe government 
maintaining a market-oriented ap- 
proach to the economy and West 
Germany's powerful trade unions 
not p ushin g for major wage hikes. 

Average consumer price infla- 
tion is expected to remain at this 
year’s 2 -percent level, depending 
largely on whether wage increases 
are “in the neighborhood'' of those 
of last year. Lhe report said. Econo- 
mists are concerned that labor 
unions will push for a marked wage 
increase rather than shorter work- 
ing hours. 

The council said that any at- 
tempts by Bonn to slash unemploy- 
ment or appease trading partners 
by pumping the economy would be 
ili-advisexL 

“An exaggerated widening of 
money-supply targets or a sharp 
increase in government spending as 
a means of expanding current do- 
mestic demand — and thus the de- 
mand for imports,” the advisers re- 
potted, “would not lead to greater 
balance in world trade, but rather 
would lead, with great probability, 
to the contrary.” 

Conspicuously absent from the 
report is a call for Bonn to move 
forward the second stage of a legis- 

(Con turned on Page 14, CoL 5) 



. . Cross Bates Nm. 21 

f C DJK. F.P. ILL. OUr. RJ=. - JJ. Th 

AimMrUm 7SU5 OW 112575- 35.MS- CLUM* — — 5J72- U7AS- ItlSIt 

BrvuatS(O) 5237 7S5B 307103 4429 ' 29915* 17.959 . 24J0M - 2S95- 

,; • Frankfort 25888 270 32805- UOTSk BUM- CM? • 122133- 1JBJ5* 

• London (b) LM 15 2738 1U985 ZSUOO 42W3 7S57 10595 29125 

Milan 125075 252050 <7275 22125 - — MU1 33452 82259 UB 

New Yorktcl 04915 - 15835 7J74 L7Hjg - -292 5244 2115 2H40 

Paris 7X995 TUM 3M2 4JM5X 2706 120855* 17222 29138- 

•• Tokyo 20200 29077 7744 2545 1157* 4924 38571* 9205 - — 

r •; Zurich 112*3 20453 -8L92S* 24JH* 87213* 72005- 48B8* 10577- 

1 ECU M5» 03908 22091 47331 V93J7 2487 444473 10089 172358 

M - 1 SDR 108283 074817 . 200321 NA 109541 XISU 547078 22951 218732 

’?• Clorinffs In London ana Zurich. Oxlnat In other European centers. New York rates at 4 PM. 

• lo I CammerxJal franc (Ol Amounts needed ro boy one pound (c) Amounts nmnrttd to tMr onm 

dollar t ’I Units of 100 OO Units of! 4X)0 (y} Units of 1<LOOO NXi^ not Quoted; not ovattaolo. 

(*j Tabor amr pound: SUJLIM&5 

Other BaDar VaJhnes 

Currency pur (LS3 Currency mt IMO Corruner pur U5J . Comer pur ILSO 

C '■ Aroen. austral 030 F1n.mar*fca 540 Mu*. peso 50500 SovWnrtHe 07771 

!- , AaxtnuL s 14742 Gruukdrac. 15200 Msrw.kroM . 777 Span. peseta 1ML35 

:? vAaar.scUL 1&25 Hoag Knap 8 70055 PMLpuso 1730 StHKLkraaa 7785 

j Beto.Bn.fr. S275 ladkm rupee 121455 PorLesoadu 14200 Totems • 39J9 

Brazil crux. 8.9*000 lada.rupMi 1.12300 Saedl rival 34509 TfertM* 24.175 

CnnotBao J 10772 Iris** 03435 Stts.8 21079 TerUsbUra SSUS 

Chines* yuan 32015 Israeli She*. 147100 S.**r.rand 24447 UAIdlrtam 34735 

Danish krone 9054 Kuwaiti dinar 029T2 S.KM*.wea 88949 VMei.tMfhr. 1490 

E BYT*. pound 125 Malay. rleo. 24355 

3; 8 sjerflna: 12085 Irish c 

Source*: Btotauo du Benelux (Brussels); Sonca Commerdole Uafkma (Milan): Boom* No- 
: • Henoto do Parts (Paris); Bonk of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMP (SOU); Bah (dinar, rtyot dMnmj; 

Oosoank (rvWe). Other data from Reuters and AP. 


B7-. - 

5P. 

TM 

5572-- 

73749* 

■MiSlT 

— . 

244898 

- 2545- 

4M9* 

12105- 

17835* 

7557 

3JH95 

291 JS 

3KH 

■2559 

8412 

STM 

2115 

2*140 

154855- 

17222 

34138- 

38571* 

9SJH 

-te — 

AFDi* 

— 

14577- 

«4473 

UN? 

1723*3 

SODS 

22951 

2WL732 


Distillers, Expecting Bid, 
Says Profit Jumped 54% 


Interest Rates 


• - r r rrt£ 
5-i 


~fago em re n c y P e ydt* 

Swiss 

Dollar p M ar k Fnmtc smvim 
T month 331* 4VS-4 to 2 to-3 to I1VM1W 

2 months 84 Mi «M>to 3to-3to nVMlM 

1 months MVS 4VrOV> 33b-4 1IVS-119S 

4 months Wto 4¥MTk 3 to 11 **-TIto 

1 year 8 VMV. «H 5 4 to 4 to UlA-IHfc 


MM 

9to4to 

Wto-lOU 

10VJ-KW* 


ECU SPA 
OVeM 7V. 

8 tea to 7a 
Stwflto 7M 
1 toe to tm- • 
atetto 78k 


Sources: Maroon Suarmty (dollar, DM, SF, Pound, FP); Uoytn Bank (ECU/; Reuters 
(SDR). Rems aoplleobta lo Interbank deposits of SI million minimum rorwMrimft 


, Key M o wer Bale* i**. 21 

t Unites Status CWu Pruv. 

OUcooBt Ruts n» Th 

Fsdercll Funds 8 W 

i Printout* 9ik 9to 

.• -• toeker Loun Rate 9 9 

‘ Cum Paper M-179 days 778 7JO 

; S-aumft Traasonr BWs 722 721 

4-manlti Treasury Bins 729 728 

CTC3B-S9dpyi 740 748 

COY 4M9 days 740 748 

West Germany 

Lombard Bate 5JD 

.Uvwmpto Rets 445 445 

tuttreeuk <45 470 

_,■* .Heoutu tatartamk <35 <35 

, ->lf jfHnosM MtrhdMk 290 <J0 


Ari—BenarBe p e rt u 

Hot. 21 

imaam '3-Bto 

2 months B-BVt . 

3 month* B-Itt 

* months B-VMi. 

ivuar 81* - 8 W 

Source: R e uters. 


CAMtegy MaricetFmaU 

■ Now. 21 

Merrill Lynch Reody Assets 
WdaTovermyUM:. . 7J8 
THeratir Interest Rate Index: 7018 

Source: Merrill J-vnc tu Teierota. 




Proec* 

■Merveattn Rate B» 8to 

Can Money m 6M 

otteatcata hiiertnak 8=te W* 

iBtoroanit « « 

tauetB iBttrtunk 8 cm sn/it 


BrHnhi 

, Sett Base Bale 
CaflMaanr 
91-day Trewory BBI 
tnantt iQtunxsnk 


Gold 


<asa 

i*'* 4 •■■S. Huh 


Mseueutmte 
> Coll Money 

>' <Moy lotertCBik 


lift "to 
12 1M 

U3/14 tun* 

1111/44 113/14 


5 5 

7*i 73/14 

BY* ** 


V. Sources: Reuters, CommenbonK CrMR 
, Lrvmolx CM of TWtvo. 


LN. . pjl arttu 
Heap Kune.- 33440 mss ■ +148 

Lo ne mho uni BMD — +040 

Pam ( 125 ftfla )- 32749 32440 -UB 

Zurich 32440 32545 -045 

London ' 32575 32510 + 0 JJT 

Hew Yurt — XW 98 • +010 

LoMtnowfU Ports ontf London afUOal Bx. 
lags: Hong Kang and Zurich opening and 
dosing prices; New York Cornu currant 
c ont ra ct All nrtces In US. Spar ounce. 
Source: ftsvtam. 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Distillers Co., 
bracing itself against a takeover 
threat, shored up its defenses 
Thursday by reporting a 54-percent 
leap in pretax profit for the fiscal 
first half ended Sept 30. 

The company, by far the largest 
Scotch whisky producer, said pre- 
tax profit rose to £124.3 million 
(about S179 milli on) from £80 J 
million a year ea liter. Bui DistiDeis 
officials said extraordinary factors 
accounted for about 60 percent of 
the rise. 

Argyll Group PLC, a supermar- 


VeS. Spending 
Plunged 0,9% 
In October 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Ameri- 
cans’ personal c ppnrinig plum- 
meted 0.9 percent last month, 
the biggest decline in almost 25 
years, the government reported 
Thursday.- 

The Commerce Department 
attributed the plunge to a drop 
in car sales after an an to-buying 
binge in August and September. 

However, personal income 
rose 0.4 percent in October, the 
best gain since a 1 -percent rise 
in April Americans’ savings as 
a percentage of disposable in- 
come rose to 2S percent in Oc- 
tober from the record low of 1.8 
percent in September. 

A spending spurt had left 
consumer debt levels at a record 

high and the personal savings 
level at a record low. Given 
those two factors, analysts had 
predicted that spending would 
slow sharply in coming months 
as consumers take a breathing 
spdL 

This slowdown is expected to 
have adverse affects on the 
overall economy. Since con- 
sumer spending makes up al- 
most two-thirds of the gross na- 
tional product, many analysts 
arc predicting extremely weak 
growth in coming months. 


ket operator about a third as large 
as Distillers, was considered likely 
to make a takeover offer for the 
whiskey giant On Sept. 2, Argyll 
' confirmed its interest in Distillers 
but said it did not intend to bid “at 
the present tune.” Because of that 
statement, the Panel on Takeovers 
and Mergers ruled that Argyll 
could not bid before Dec. 2, unless 
a rival bidder emerged. 

On the London Stock Exchange, 
Distillers shares slipped 5 pence 
Thursday, to close at 493 pence. 
That compares with a low of 270 
pence earlier this year, before bid 
rumors arose, and gives the compa- 
ny a market value o! £1.79 billion. 

Some analysts said that the price 
might have risen beyond .Argyll’s 
reach, but Tom Curran of de Zoeie 
& Bevan. a London stockbroker- 
age, said chances of a bid remained 
“fairly high." 

The company, whose lop brands 
include Johnnie Walker and Dew- 
ar’s Scotch whisky as well as Gor- 
don’s gin, reported net profit of 
£74.4 million, up 82 percent from 
£40.8 nufikm, partly reflecting a 
lower average tax rate. Per-share 
earnings rose to 20.73 pence from 
12.45 pence, and the dividend was 
increased to 5.5 pence a share from 
4 J pence. 

Sales totaled £641 million, up 16 
percent from £554.5 million. 

The extraordinary factors that 
boosted profit consisted mainly of 
a rush to buy spirits in the United 
States in advance of a rise in the 
excise tax Oct. 1 and of strikes last 
year, which delayed sales into the 
current fiscal year. 

Even discounting those factors. 
Distillers described the results as 
“outstandingly good.” In the five 
years aided last March 31, by con- 
trast, per-share earnings showed al- 
most no growth despite a 22 -per- 
cent rise in sales. 

“I think we have pulled out of 
the pit of our recession.” David 
Connell, a director, said at a press 
briefing. He added that whiskey 
consumption was unlikely to return 
to die rapid growth of the 1960s 
and 1970s but that unit sales vol- 
ume appeared to be growing at an 
underling rate of 2 to 5 percent a 

l Continued on Page 14, CW. 5) 


For the man with exceptional goals, 
a new dimension in private banking. 


W 'hat makes TDB exceptional? 

To start with, there is our 
traditional policy of concentrating 
on things we do unusually well. 
For example, foreign exchange, 
precious metals - and, very im- 
portantly, private banking. 

Today, as part of American 
Express Bank Lrd., we offer you 
private banking with a totally new 
dimension. This includes access to 
the broad range of asset manage- 
ment services and global invest- 
ment opportunities provided by 
the American Express family of 
companies. And for certain clients. 




we also offer such valuable ‘■extras'’ 
as Gold Card® privileges and the 
exclusive Premier Services, 5 ** for 
round-the-dock personal and travel 
assistance. 

While we move with the rimes, 
our traditional policies do not 
change. Ar the heart of our business 
is the maintenance of a strong and 
diversified deposit base. Our portfo- 
lio of assets is also well-diversified, 
and it is a point of principle with us 
to keep a conservative ratio of capi- 
tal to deposits and a high degree of 
liquidity - sensible strategies in 
these uncertain times. 


If TDB sounds like the sort of 
bank that meets your requirements, 
visit us on your next crip to Switzer- 
land. Or telephone: in Geneva, 
022/37 21 11: in Chiasso, 091/44 1901. 

TDB offius in Gtvtui. Unit inn. Paris. 
Litxemhntirg. Chi./uu. Muale C./iio. 
Xusu.'/. Zurich, But nut Aires. Sun 
Pjlilb. 

TDB. tht 6th Ijrpt.ti o'wmtrdal fu/tl 
in SuilzirLmJ. is j mtmbtr o( tU 
Anhricju £.xpr(.\s Cmhjny. which 
hjs .cut it t’fl'Ss (5^.3 li/lici: ,mJ 
skmhtiUtrs' njnity ofCS$ 4.9 bfflkn. 


w»\ 


ggl 


Trade Development Bank 


The TraJc Development Bank bttiUin £ in GtihSJ. 
at 96-yS. rut du Rhone. 


An American Express company 













Page 14 


14 INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 

international classified Currency Squi 

restate I (Continued From Back Page) I AUT0STAXFREE - By Dinah Lee F 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN ' 


CENTRAL LONDON - Ettufav* ser- 
«e, Wortmeuis in new buMiras, 
comfortably fumeted end fifly 
equipped. My maid service (Moa 
through FriJGuor TV. Phone for bro- 
dwn (01 ) 388 1342 or writ* Prudon- 
U) biota (Motfuir) Ltd. I Urvwty 
5l, London WQEoJE. 


UJXURY SBWKB> RATS N Ken- 

sngfwi a tho dtemative to expensive 
beta occontmodaHon. Csntad Aw- 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

BOULOGNE. U~*<Y b* B* «“*>. 
floor, view, urn. F3J5QO + charges. 
Tot; 1 40 30 77 a 

T6TH MAJRJE. Doable living. 3 bed- 


EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 
fiM SALES RB> {29 yeon} a avaiable 


to help morfert voor products. Late 
evenings: Rons 45-32-1&74 


evenings: Pom 45-32-16-74 
GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


AUTOS TAX FREE 
MERCEDES SPECIALISTS 
FOR USA + MH3DLE EAST 

for 20 nn 

1985 Model* at Pbeewt ericn 


HJROPORT TAX HE CAB 

CoS fer free catdog. 

Box 12011 .Botle rdnn Airport. HalknL 
T«* 010423077. 7I»2SFT 3>CAJf FO- 


MA 300 5LSOO 51, 500 S 
Rafis Rayce SW Spin* ‘85, 7, 


Lamborghini Gountodt new. ferrori 
308 OT new. P.CT. Betg.ni Tel: 


rooms, 2 baths, equipped kfeho\ 100 
sqjfttel: 145 03 33 06. 


A Ounponr. 21/23 Wow Goto. 
London W85LS. T«L (01) 2956. 

Telex 418216 


Tel: 1-45 03 33 06 
SWITZERLAND 


LONDON MARBLE ARCH, near, «*- 
Cdtering luxury 2-bedroom flats, fu*y 
equipped, eafer TV, finen and lefe- 


G5TAAD / SWIRBOAND 

GeninA hntunaw, newly bidt, 

3 bedrooms + Iving room, fireptoa 
and doing area, nwdarfl vrcfl. 
Oose to da area. Per rent. 

for Further Defafle. Cefc 

030 /4 50 72. 


HECIROMC TECHNICIANS 

UJ5. Company needs 
sever at rechnidm m Germwiy/Europe 
Prefer, but not required, retired LLS. 


military, rearing m Europe. 
Send compete resume to: 


NEAR WINDSOR B4GLAND. FuOy 
equipped & Furnished hnury cqxirt- 
rmmr mprwhgrou* 1720 Mow 
House. £700/ month indudrg central 
heating A hot water, deanfna& louo- | 
dry senwee. Tth Ephom 36886 

KENSINGTON. NEWLY moderniz'd j 


AAl/ESi, 22. me de TEeu 
L-I44P LuMmbouig 

OVBtSCAS PORTIONS. Hundreds of 
top paying po si tions avdtoUe. Tax 
free maxim Attractive benefits. Op- 
portunities for dl occupations. Free 
detdfc. Overseas EmpJoyment Ser- 
vices. DepL HT. P.O. Bo* Town 
of Mount Rayd. Quebec. Canada 
H3P3C7 


380 SL 280 SH. 500 SB. 

500 S, 500 SEC 
1986 Models from Stock: 
WOE, 300E 300SL MML *»*: 
300 SS. 500 SL 500 SB, SOO SEC 
shpmcrt & defnwy werldwde. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MA1NZEK LANDS?#. 191 

D-6000 RANKHIRT/M 


AUTO CONVERSION 


TEL (05 69-73 30 61 

TLX: 414018 


• SUSCONVERT • 

The safest way to impart a 
Eviqem err Mo the U- S .A 
Worldwide American insurer 
provides al required HWxonte 


and guarantees your car *81 
pass aHLI-S. iju v cr nm ert standard s 
or your money bade induing 
conversion cost. 

Wnte or phone far free brochure. 


a furnshsd Rat. 4 bedrooms, 3 
ooms, separate dining loom. I 


bathrooms, separate drum room, 
study, reception roam. guO pet 
weei. Tel. Condon 01 937 8320. 


LOfOON HOUAND PARK area, 
dwnww 1 bcbo&fi Rat cxalabta 
Jmicxyror 612 months. £170/v>*efi 


or exc h ange tor sun 
las. Tali 01-243 0727 


for sindor m Los Ange- 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


Cars of 
Copenhagen 

TAX FREE 


GfSMANYfOl 69-7152425 < 
(0) 7091 / 223059 


amsbJSi 


(CAN MTL UNDERWRITERS 
Otorindav 7678 
D-dCQQ Frontfurt/Mom 


TWO 1ADIES, EARLY TWENTIES, 4 
end 5 languages (German, French, 
Ebgfch, Sp«to, Greek) wda eqteri 
enoB m hotel trade, soda any type of 
job anywhere. Any serious offers wiD 
bo ajefuSy duded. Call Anrefae or 
Domaque, Tel: 01 /725 -M 92 Zurich 
or It* 8249S9 Switzerland. 


* tm e rnonond Sdos 

* Worldwide Dclrvery 

* European Price Leaders 

* Tit mt 45 1 IB 73 00 

* Telex 19932 DK 


B»A / DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

• Custam brafeeroge/twrfng service 


• Pick-up & defvery a nywh er e in the 
Eastern U.5. & Ta»» 


55 Votkoffsvm DK-19Q0 

CPH V.OBMMARX. 


Eastern U6. & Tewi 
Professorial work usng orfy the 


freest qoatty comcone 
• Guor jne e d B>A / DOT apprawd 

CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS 05c, 
2294 North Pam Rd* KaHUd, 
PA T 9440, USA Tel: 215 8226852 
Tele* 4971917-CHAMP 


CENTRAL London. Luxury Furnished 
flats, American Ibfchert. £280/weef- 
dreps 4 or 075/ week ■ steeps Z Tel: 
064421 2204 or Q1 -4Q6 3415 ILIK1 
FOR fURMSKB) LETTINGS IN S.W. 
London, Surrey 6 Bcrttdxra. Contact 
MAYS, Oxshort 037 284) 3811 UK. 
Tetox: 8955112. 


A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 


BALLERSNA* Private Aerobe Instructor 
NYC seeks position. For further mfor- 

i; li *ll*i mi iMirt 


motion call: 213-734-9240. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


TRANSCO 


JOfM BIRCH has 20 years experience 
in Rentals. Long or short tenancies, . 
Central & suburban London & Aber- 
dnen. Birdi & Gx QI-499^80Z ! 

GRSfS 6 CO. ExceDenr Seiechon of , 
Hcxnea & Rois for rental in North. 1 
Northwest 6 Central London. Tefc 01- 

625 8611. 

WTaNATJONAL EXECUTIVES/ Vb- 
■ton to London - for quality furnished 
apartment; & houses call HurUenJjn- 

don (011-837 7365. 

CLAPHAM. EOUIPPS) house, 3 tod- 
rooms. utffity room, oentrat heating, 
near Tube 6 Common 6 months m» 
mum let ElSO/weok. Ring 01-627 0393 


BRENKAM ONER LUXURY HATS / 
houses to let / far sole m London. Tet 
01-431 3191. Telex 8952387 G 


pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 
fcafunnQ 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


MnumVE 5EELS for AMBUCAN 
mlNCKVt RRMS in PAEG 
Engfch, Bela an, Dutch or Germai 
secremrtes, SnowVdqe of French re- 
quired, Enqfah ihorthond BiBnguol 
IBlexisfi. Write or phone: 138 Avenue 
Vidor Hugo. 75116 Paris, France. Tel: 
(1) 47 27 61 69 


THE LARGEST SHOWROOM 
AND STOCK IN OKOFE 
Keeping a c ons tan t stock of mare than 
300 brand nev> ears of ol European + 


r/EPA CONVERSIONS 


Jopmese makes competively priced. 

Tax free sedes-thiapfog iww Bnca. 

e ■ Cm nuJUrnlnr £ f^iJnroto 

3 on a ror muriKOnx u vv lxkibovm. 

Transco 5A, 95 Noordeiaan, 
2030 Antwerp, Boftasm 
Tel 323/542 6240 T* 35207 Trtm 


Slipping, bonding, insurance. 
Door to door service Eirope 
to USA oc cep trxice mexanteed. 
Europear. Automotive Comptance, 
Govars Daynootwwg 126, 

2566 BP The Hogue.HoflaAd. 
Phone (0)70-559245 T6i 33230 EAC M. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


WE ARE LOOKING FOR an experi- 
enced rahwe female teacher of En- 
gfeh. part-time job. owSo-vitoal expe- 
rience essenhaL Ptecaa send resume 
+ photo to: Mr. KrscK 45 nre St. 
Souvau-. 75002 Paris. 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 


HEALTH SERVICES 


Since 1972, ex pen en ced cor rroda’ for 
Mercedes, Porsche, BMW, Joguar. Im- 
iredate dekvery. Import/axport, US. 


DOT & EPA sfxppmg for toixot and 
dealer. O awnwde Motors GmbH, 
Tanteegeratr. 8. 4 Duassetaorf. W. 
Germany (0) 211-434646. lb B5B7374. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


HOTEL KURHAU5 
SCHWHHSSH3BAD 
4 0 font Sooth of Beme 
SECRET HP for indvidud trea t ment or 
hotday in on unspoiled parodbe. The 
only Swiss mecidnd spa with the hoteTs 
awn noturd fango from its own source. 


CENTRAL LONDON. 3 bedroom 
aa citmant. 6 north let £400 per 
week. Tefe 01-286 1700 after 6 pm. 

MAYFAIR, 2 LUXURY FIATS: 1 fur- 
rushed, 1 unfurnished, avdtoble imme- 
dwtely- Tet 01 -491 2939 ml GSD/JW 

SHF CONTABiED sfudas central Lon- 
don from C18S/weeL 01-370 5241. 


MARBIE ARCH, 3 bedroom etc 
rushed. £180/ week. Tet 01-262 




Executive Services Available 
Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


ROTUND ENGLISH LADY, 56 with 
happy dapasrton, exceAent refer- 
ences, permrt C, at present working in 
Geneva, seeks housekeeper position 
in Geneva, Zurich, S*. Morit: or USA 
Own seff-conloned accxxmnodation 
with job appreaated. Free February 
1st. Write D 18-115487. PufaEdtas, 
CH-1211 Geneva 3 


Mercedes/ BMW/ Porsche 


Cdl thaw ttxordng to PROFESSOR 
NefAhOJtechxSng Thymus cells). 
Orignd Chinese acupuieure/neiird 


r_t fj> r_ PL *re Part, , , |I,. — - 

uuiuwimwi I' tvw AOGuunjnl 

On An New 1985/86 Models 


Oignd uenese □ajpunture/neurd 
therapy/ ozone therapy. Sfiraming 
axes. S04WBELB8K3BAD, ideal for 
restful and active hofidays or r»ec 4 mettf 


i for hewing in good hedth. Kurhout 
HoteL 0+171 1 SOriWffllBaGfiAD/ 
BBNE TBj 037/39 26 12 


Call or telex Munich, W. G er man y 
(089) 46 SO 41 or 2 The 522851 




American Owned and Operated 
The European Cv Cotm edio n * 


HEART DSEA5E AND STROKES - 
spend 2 weeks in prev e tuie n and re- 
program. 


By Dinah Lee 

Intenuammd Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — The repealed 
devaluation of the yuan is forcing 
gome of Lhe new foreign joint-veai- 

cure holds in China to start quot- 
ing room rates in UjS. dollars rath- 
er than in the Chinese currency. 

Foreign hotel managers based in 
China said that they look the deci- 
sion in order to maintain a steady 
revenue flow wiib which io repay 
syndicated hani-currency loans 
osed to build the hotels. 

In October. China devalued the 
yuan twice, leaving it at the current 
official rule of 3.2015 to the U.S. 
dollar, compared with 3.0008 at the 
start of October, and about US this 
time, last year. Hong Kong-based 
anal ysts see the devaluation as only 
one of many recent moves to re- 
duce China’s merchandise-trade 
deficit and diminish the impact of 
inflation. China reported a S7.8- 
bniion merchandise- trade deficit 
for die first seven months of this 
year. 

The failure of the Great Wall 
Hotel in Beijing to keep up with its 
loan repayments provides other ho- 
tel managers in C hina with a salu- 
tary lesson. Bankers in London 
(dose to the financing refused to 
disclose how far the hotel was be- 
hind in hs payments. 

The joint-venture owners of the 
Great Wall are n ego da ling with a 
syndication of 14 banks in London 
over the refinancing of the cost of 
the hold, which was originally S7S 
million, but rose to Jj81 nriDion be- 
cause of delays. A source dose to 
the talks said in a telephone inter- 
view that the hotd had paid all 
interest due so far, but he declined 
to give further details because of 
the political sensitivity of the talks, 
which involve Chinese government 
officials. 

The Great Wall Hotel is a joint 
venture between the Beijing branch 
of the state-owned China Interna- 
tional Travel Service, and a consor- 
tium led by E.S. Pacific Develop- 
ment Corp., based in California. 


- jB: - 


’ Ail 

*r 


i 

8 

n 









. United Pit— tow uuwwi 

Guards on duty outside the Great Wall Hotel in Beijing. 


Last March, Sheraton Corp. 
signed a tO-year management and 
marketing contract to run the hotel. 

I .ike the major joint-venture hq- 
n»i« in the southern provincial capi- 
tal of Guangzhou, near the border 
with Hong Kong, the Great Wall 
has quoted its room rates in U.S. 
dollars from its opening in late 
1983. It has been charging 
S89-S100 for its standard rooms 
this year, and will raise the price to 
S110-S120 next year. 

On Monday, one of the glossiest 
of the new foreign joint ventures in 
Guangzhou, the 1,000-room Gar- 
den Hotel issued travel agents with 
details of its new room rates, which 
will be quoted in U.S. dollars as of 
Dec. 1. All but about S10 milli on of 
the Garden Hotel's total cost of 700 
rmtii nn Hong Kang dollars ($90 
million) was borrowed in Hong 
Kong dollars, a currency that has 


been linked to the U.S. dollar ance 
October 1983. The money to bnOd 
the hotd was borrowed from 12 to 
14 foreign banks. The room posts, 
in dollars, for the hotel have re- 
mained relatively stable. 

NUdaus Leuenberger, general 
manag er of the Garden Hotd, said 
the Guangzhou municipal authori- 
ties had no objection to the change 
in hotd currency policy. 'The Chi- 
nese pf f fcfrk insisted, however, 
that at least two holds in Guangz- 
hou uhmilri go ahead al the same 
timg and that the U.S. dollar rates 
should not be published inside Chi- 
na. Some observers think this latter 
condition was imposed for reasons 
of “economic face.” 

The Chinese of ficials also insist- . 
ed that guests should still paytheir 
hotel bills in the- special Foreign 
Exchange Certificates issued m 
yuan rimnmfnarifins by the .Ghi- 


ncse government to foreigners trav* 
eUng inside China- Bills at major 
restaurants, holds and so-caned 

fncndshipstoreshavetobepaidm^ 

these “FECs,” which are traded at 
official exchange rates by all the 
banks in Chiaa for foreign curren- 
cy or travelers’ checks. 

People on the street in most ma- 
jor cities wiE offer double the Ctu- 
nese official ejtchange rare myuan 

for FECs, but forofftess and it 
difficult to use yuan in the ci* 1 *®* 
People trying JO spend yuan in the 
big holds are frequently charged 
up to SO 'patient more Tor meals 
and other consumer purchases. 

Mr. Lg ocab erger said that the 
otebange iaie between the U5. 
dollar and the yuan used to calcv*> 
late a gacst’s fcaH would be adjustof 
monthly, by. avexa^ng the tx~ 
changfr-rate fluctuations of the pre- 
vions month; • 

Standard rooms, at die Garden 
Hofd wfll now cost 545 to $50 a 
night, and snilcs S100 to SI 10, 

“i-heffld sotne rime ago that it 
was die g ov er nm ent’s intention to 
bring lbe yuan down to a rate of 
four to eme doBar," he said. 
“We hope tint we’ll be doing bna- 
ness in more stable conditions by 
the ead of this year or soon after.’" 

•The new. policy was negotiated 
with the Chinese authorities by the 
manager ol the i, 017-room China 
Hotel in Guangzhou, Joachim Bur- 
ger. Ml Binges says his hotel has 
xepaod $28 mSEort oat of its total 
lcfflnof^S^milfion scheduled dnr- j. 
□3£ tbe pext eigh t to nine years. The 
r^ayraents are composed of hoed 
profits, and radi. flaw from the ho- 
tels dffioti'.and residential tower 
nsedhy foeagp. ctm^ianies. 


Hacfirstcf the Guangzhou joint- 
veature 'hotels, the ' While Swan, 
may fo&ow snit, said die deputy 
general' mihiagcx, Jiang Zuogong. 
The White ^ran has so far repaid 
$ !7 : mtifion of. its $50 million in 
dm Bank of China, the 
ocattal h&ik for foreign exchange. 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CBilTRE B.V. 
Deluxe rentah. Voleriwtfr. 174, 
Airatentam. 020621234 or *23292 


MILAN RJHFRSHED APART MHUT to 
let $900 moniWy Lorxfon 870 0512. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


PEW YORK CITY 

CARLYLE HOTB. 

Live in luxury in ihs new fuly 
frmrfwd deagnar deoorai- 
ed 2 badrooni / 2 bath 
apartment. Fuly eqixpped 
kitc h en, maid & how ier- 
vi os. Owner leaving coun- 
try - wil sacrifice and rent 
below market for I year. 
S1UX10 / month. CantaQi 
J. Gakfing at Gty Properhei 
212-759^5252 


AUTOMOBILES 


74 CHAMPS-aYSBS 8th 


Stadia 2 or 3-room ui mft nent. 
One month or more. 

IE CLARIDGE 4359 6797. 


NYC LINCOLN CBITBt AREA. Luxu- 
ry 26 bedroom. 3 bath, top floor, 
pgy xu i nt views, IO month fleriUe 
around ion. 53000/mo. 212-581 -1475 



NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE FROM STOCK 

Bast service, shipping, inwrmMo, 

RUTE INC. 



ANIMALS 


TAUNUSSTR. 52. 6000 FRANKFURT iSHl HtBttH PUff® & ash, of cd 


W Germ., tel (0)64-232351. tL- 411599 


AUTO SHIPPING 



REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


TRANSCAR 


WANIH) - 2 BEDROOM furnished 
apartment in best location center oF 
Milan/ Ite/y. Contact Mn. R. GBson, 


THE CAR SHIPPING 
SFEdAUSTS 

(1) 42 25 64 44 


SHORT TBIM STAY. Advantages of a 
hotd without inconvenienc e s, fed at 
home in real stadias one bedroom 
and more in Ptxis SOfiEUM: 80 nie 
de r University Pm 7th. 4544 3*>40 


c/o Ainmort SA. Brvssels/Belgiixn. 
Telex 63916 - Tek fe) 759 9900. 
LARGE STUDKJ/2 ROOMS m centra l 
Pons or the Manxs with large luttiieiL 
Unfurnished, con do repdrs. CcR Mr. 

Mitrfvd 47 47 12 65 ext. 4561 



EMPLOYMENT 


CANNES /MCE 193} 39 43 

FRANKFURT (061 07) 80 

BONN / COLOGNE (0228) 2129 
STUTTGART S 703 I] 880. 

MUNICH (689) 93 10.45 

BKEMERHAVEN (0J71) 43063 

PEW YORK (212) 695 7061 

HOUSTON rl3 931 7605 

LOS ANGQES 213) 568 9288 

MONTREAL 514j 866 6681 

AGENTS WORLD WIDE 
leave it to us to brmg it to you 


INVAUDES. 3mamh sublet toobusi- 
neiBiKei from Dec \s. Began! stwfro, 
fufly rauffxd. with terrace facing 
Bffel Tower & gardens. No Fees. 
fTOQQ/manth Tel: 1 . 45 51 42 32 


EXECUTIVE 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 



Europe Shipping Broken bit 
Eixopoan ColleOKXi, worldwide sf 
ping. Tet 3402-4 1 21 5 Tlx: 76068EAB 




pick-up al over Europe ‘ro/ro-stew. 


AUTOS TAX 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FRH AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 


TROCADBtO. LUXURIOUS 2 rooms. 
Tel: 1-46475282 1 45534275 


ETOIUE. Studio, 40 iqjn, Kate, knehen. 
bath, security. F450S Tel: *3 5303 73 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 



PROOUCT D6VHO PMPIT: U S. Put» 
ksher oF crasner, hedthcore & red 
estate software, exponriiiaovssaas. 
Seeks industry {xofessfonaffor eefitori- 
ol development. Prefer generafist with 
sdes experience in multiple countries. 
Resumes: Pmparrt PubEdmg, Box 
13321 Oakland, Co. 94661. USA. Re- 
quired m USA (5on Fremtosen) 
03/17/86. 


wait FOR FREE CATALOG OR 
FREE BUY-BACK FOtDSt TO: 
SHPSUEB.V„ P.O. 8ai 7568. 111BZH 
Amsterdam Axpart, The Nethedcnds. 
Phone {020)152833. Telex: 12568 


SMPSIDE Inc.. 5 76 fifth Avenue, 
7th Floor. NewVcrfc. N.Y. 10036. USA. 
Phone (212) 869.4484. Telex: 427965 


SMPSHJE SA, OtausMe de Wavre 
465, 1040 Brussels, Belgkmc 
Phone: (02)64990Stetex: 63290 


races, with or without peri 
deivery. Tefc Paris 39 (Q01 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

hi the 


Pkf|JNi^>iKi/iUlT73;7:U*»rjini . 


By Phone: Cal your foed IHT representative with your text. You 
wk be informed of the cost immediroefy, and once prepayment is 
made your ad will appear within 48 hours. 

Cast: The bask rate b 59.80 per kne per day + local taxes. There are 
25 letters, egns <xid spaces in the First bw and 36 in the following Enes. 
Mmcnum space is 2 fines. No a bbr e viations accepted. 

Credit Cards: American Express, Diners Club. Eurocard, Master 
Card. Access and Visa. 


HEAD OFFICE 


tan: (For classified ortyfr 
(1) 47.47.46.00. 


LATIN AMBUCA 


moe Afros: 41 40 31 


(Dept. 312) 
Cwocae: 33 1454 
Guayaqafl: 51 4505 
Lena: 417 852 
Panama: 69 05 1 1 
Santiago: 6961 555 
5oo Pauio: 852 1993 


EUROPE 


Amstmkir: 26-36-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/36G-242I. 
Brussels: 343-1899. 
Copenhagen: (01) 32 9440. 
Frankfurt: (069) 72-67-55. 
Lausanne: 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-2544. 
London: (01) 836-4802. 
Madrid: 455-2891 /45S3306. 
Aldan: (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (02) 41 2? S3. 
Rome: 679-3437. 

Sweden: (08) 7569229. 

Tel Avhr 03-455 559. 
ViertraE Contact Frankfurt. 


MIDDLE EAST 


Bahrain: 246308. 
Kuwait: 5614485. 
tebroion: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatm 41&535. 

Saurfi Arabia: 

JeddoFu 667-1500. 
UAE: Dubai 224161. 


FAR EAST 


UNTTED STATES 


Bangkok; 390-06-57. 
Hong Kang: 5-213671. 
Jdnta: 510092. 
Mania: 8170749. 
Seoefc 735 87 73. 
Singapore: 222-2725. 
TaFwixr 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-192. 


New York: P12) 752-3890. 
West Coast: (415) 3628339. 


AUSTRALIA 


SOUTH AFRICA 

Bryronston: 421599. 


Melbourne: 690 8231 
Sydney: 929 56 39. 957 43 20. 
Perth: 328 98 33. 

Paddington, Queensland: 
3693453. 


(Continued from Page 13) 
lated two-phase income tax cut 
elated for 1986 and 1988 and total- 
ing 19.4 billion Deutsche marks 
(about S7.4? billion.) 

In a special report to the govern- 
ment last June, the council urged 
Bonn to consider brin g in g forward 
the second leg of the tax cut if the 


economy appeared to be slowing or 
if the U.S. economy, a major loco- 
motive to West Goman growth in 
recent years, appeared to be flag- 
ging. Neither of those possibilities 
seem to be on the horizon. . 

Because of the first ll-b3Eon 
DM phase of the tax cut private 
consumption is lUdy to pock op 


Putting 1'echnicums’ Into PCs 


(Continued from Page 13) 
not bothering lo pass on annoying 
reminders from bin collectors. 

“These make you the director of 
the show,' 1 Mr. Goldstein said. 
“The agents are your actors.” 

Hewlett-Packard, of course, is 
not alone in its work. Apple, while 
tight-lipped about Macintosh fol- 
low-ups. is working closely with 
artificial-intelligence specialists at 
the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. Allan Kay, is one of 
Apple’s top scientists and a former 
colleague of Mr. Goldstein's at 


Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center; 
where many of the early ideas for 
the Macintosh started. 

And there are doublers. “It’s 
pretty far-off stuff,” said Bill 
Gates, the chairman of Microsoft, 
which did mnch of the key pro- 
gramming for the Macintosh and 
die IBM PC “For many things — 
settingup meetings, drawing up the 
guest list for a picnic — I urink 
people want to do it quickly them- 
selves. Life is full of variety, and 
you can't have agents generalizing 
all the time about what to do.” 


Distillers Profit Surged 54% in Half 


(Continued from Page 13) 
year after more than five yeara of 
decline. 

Even so, the company remains 
enormously overstocked. 

John Connell, chairman , noted 
that the company had recently re- 
placed its much-criticized commit- 
tee-style management with a sys- 
tem under which the four division 
heads report directly to him. 


Distillejs, which draws nearly all 
of its profit from spirits, plans to 
diversify, but the chairman empha- 
sized that Scotch would remain 
“the backbone of this con^any.'* 
De Zoete’s Mr. Curran forecast 
that Distillers would show pretax 
profit of £265 million to £270 mil- 
lion for the fiscal year ending 
March 31, up from £236.2 millio n 
last year. r 


sharp ly nwi year, riHirihmg 3 per-- 
cent from a projected IJ^ercent 
rise this year. • . •] -• ~. 

Private consumption, which con-: 
tributes to about 55 percent of 
West Germany's GNP, has been 
sluggish since the early 1980s bin is- 
expected to replace erport'growth 
next year as the bey motor to eco-- 
nonric aquation. Growth, in <5NP 
— which measures the total value 
of a nation’s goods and., services, 
mdudmg-income from flcxeigi in- 
vestments - — has been estimated at 
25 percent for 1985. 

Capital investment, excluding 
a>nstructioa,is^xpcctedto-conf2n- 

ue at this year’s pace of 9 pemenVto 
10 percent, the report said. Investr 
ment in the depressed construction 
industry is set For a nugor tnro- 
around. booyed by a major rise in 
public outlays, to a 1 -percent in- 
crease after a projected 8-5-pauent 
drop this year. , i; • " 

West Germany’s merchandiser 
trade surplus; the report predicts, 
will widen to 83 trillion DM in 1986 
from this yeafs anticipated record 
high of 76 trillion DM. In l984^the 
bade surplus was 54 Wlkm^ I)M, a 
port-war record. Novpnfirtkms 
were made for the current account, 
the broadest measure ef trade per- 
formance. 

The Deutsche marie is likely to 
appreciate further next year against 
the dollar but even more so against 
non-doflar cmrendes, the council 

S ets. But it said that a. marked^ 
in the dollar’s value is utifikeJy 
□g as U.S. mterest -rates .~r 
propped qp by the UjS. budget def- 
lot — r emain several points above 
those in Europe and Japan. ; -. •• 


^4mJ0foKshedby 
Bankof Sweden 


■- Reuters 

STOCKHOLM— The B3nk 
of Swederiabdfi&ed credit cetl- 
mgs 31m«day as part of a reor- 
gamzation cf the domestic ared- 
ItmaidteL 

; lhe -central' ^ bank said the 
measure should be seen as a 
twrfimoil akeration and not as 
an earing of its restrictive mon- 
etary poficres. Credit growth 
was cut earlier this year to 2 
-percent from 4 percent 

lhe abofition-' will be com- 
pensated from Jan. 13, 1986, by 
increasing banks’ reserve re- 
quirements ,to 3 percent from 1 
percent 

-The centra! bank, also intro- 
duced a tiered sy&era of interest 
. rates aimed at replacing the 
penalty rate, at present 13 per- 
cent, as the main one at which 
commercial banks borrow mar- 
ginal funds. 

From Dec. 9, the rate 
- diaraed on loans above the lev- 
els imtaroabie at discount rate, 
' can«!n% 103 percent, will de-. 
, p^l OT;the propefftion of the 
. commercial banks’ share capi- 
tal - and reserves that the loans 
’;iq)rcsenL On loans of up to 25 
r percent of share cental and re- 
-iserve^ the rate chared wiD be 
1015 percent 

ft wifl go as high as 18^ per- 
cent cmloans representing more 
jhaii 175 percent of share capi- 

taTand reserves. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES j ESCORTS & GUIDES ! ESCORTS & 


INTERNATIONAL 


ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office m New York 
330 W. 56Ih SI , N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 


★ LONDON ★ ZURICH 


EXECUTIVE ESCORT SSTVICE 
402 7600 or 499 2225 


JACQUELB4E ESCORT A GUIDE 
SERVICE. TEL 01/ 69 55 04 


AR1STOCATS 


MADRID SHADOWS 


MAJOR CREDIT CARPS AND 
CHECKS ACCEPTED 
Private Mmnbanhips Available 


London Eicart Sarvk* 

128 Wiynoro St.. London W.l. 
Al mapof Credi Cards Accepted 
Td: 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - midnight 


Tab 2509603 ••**** 
ESCORT SERVICE. CREDIT CARDS 


Hw award-to ii wri ng sanriew has 
boon foahmd ailha lap i mast 
axdaihro Escort Swim by 
USA 5 kitemoHond nowi madia 
including radio atd TV. 


REGENCY NY 


* Madrid Taste * 

ESCORT SERVICE. Tol: 4T17257. 


WOR1DWDI ESCORT SERVICE 
212-838-8027 or 753-1864 


ROME CLUB EUROPE ESCORT 
& Guide ServicsJet 06/589 2604- 589 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pm) 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERfCAN 


aeon service. 
EVBYWHHE YOU ARE 08 GOL. 


CAPRICE-NY 

ESCORT SBCnCE W NEW YORK 
TEj 212-737 3291. 


** GBJEVA-HRST ** 

Escort Sorvira + wMfctnd 32 34 IS 


1-813-921-7946 


Col Itm from US: 1-900-237-0892 
Ccfl free from Ftoncfe 1-800-2820992 
Lswefl Eastern welcomes you boekl 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

ESCORT SERVICE from 5pm 
ROTTBIDAM (0) 1G-2S4155 
TFff HAGUE (0) 70-60 79 96 


GB4EVA ESCORT 

SGRVKE, Tel: 46 11 58 


NEW YORK CITY 

EXCURSIONS 


AMSTERDAM 

RJRO ESCORT SERVICE 

020 - 271001 


*****+grieva best 

ESCORT ram. 022 / 8615 95 


EsaxTssvia 

EXCLLSIVE & EXFH4SIVE 
7 DAYS - MAJOR OSDS 


** ZURICH 558720 ** 

Prorate Tavrian Gwdo Sank* 


(212) 517-7803 ZURICH-GENEVA 


LONDON B8ST EKORT SBtVKE 
Heodrow. Owfit eerdt. 352 8343 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 


^GJNGBPS ESCORT SERVICE 
7H.-01/S6308 64-022/34 41 86 


VTBB4A ESCORT - AGB4CY 
TH; 37 52 39 


ESCORT SERVICE 

10 KBtSINGTON CHURCH ST, WS 


* JASMINE * 


AS raafer amltk cardi w. * |i l e d. 


AMSTBIDAM ESCORT SBtVICE 
020-366655 



LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Senrica. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


* LONDON OaSEA * 

E5C0RT SatVKE. 

51 B-taxinta Ptaa. SW1. 

Tet 01 584 651S/2749 (4-12 pmj 


AMSTHIDAM JEATQT facert Service 
Tel: (020) 326i20« 3401 ltt 



ZURICH 


LONDON GGUXE BCORT SBtVKE 
Heothraw 01-328 97e3 


LONDON 

Portman Escort Agency 


A1EXB ES03RT raVlQ 
7S-- 01/47 55 82 


67 Qjfltem Street, 
London W1 

Tet 486 37J4 or 486 1158 
A0 imqor aedfr earek octepted 




Non Dolian 


baarfST 0 * • Suissc^Pirxt BastunUd. 


«*=■ 









































































. *,+. ~ - * 


l ii.. 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


HVTERNATTONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


■ 

luui 1 i nwr 

COMPANY NOTES 


Paw IS 


i. ■'« p..»* 

•%Vc lf> -to;*,, '■e 

v; ■' Us'i'&Si : 

• "lev" ‘W'V I 

^&:0j 

■■ ■■■■■<■«£&. . 
*•(.; *■ 

c 

• V l 


Japan’s Trading Houses 

ftV -bo V 


ow Growth 


■' •• ••■.er i '] *& • Reiuen 

i • Japaa ’ s foQ r major 

£ Uj *£ l ^ g Q h00SeS “ Mitsubishi 
■ : ^y. C«p., Sumitomo Corp, Nissho 

• l| - "*.* -PcjN. ? 0r ^' Mitsui & Co. — 
: business growth in. the 

'■ -.c: l "' ^^Jf 2March3t * 1986.com- 

. OR 

' : ‘‘ c 3 PP rea ^tion and slow domestic 



»rt .-- 


l5 e vIV S 011 ? 0 ^ are expected to 

.. J ~ •''*#?%{ business growth in 

1985-86. the four sad. 

"'•>?■ ;•% / Mi tsubishi predicted parent 
Company profit of about 52 billion 
■. — , • y^u (about $256 million), murh the 

" ' M 51.72 'bmiott in 1984-85, 

. ..' h,a - Hideo Mabuchi. vice presidem, 
' ‘ ‘“"ftShC;: He said he ejected sales of 

'-l',: ...... 'V 16-2 trillion, down from 16.4 tril- 

hon a year earlier. 


" >34. 

'■ , «38fc r f?- 
•tK? a > 
■ m :r I 

. ,i. ' 3 u'J>- ' 
• LI J: : 


, The company earlier 
29,17 billion yen profit in 


profit iose only 4.6 percent, to 
oajor 23.93 billion, because of a 47.8- 
>ishi percent- fail In dividend income 
issho from overseas affiliates. 

3- — Mitsui vice president, Ser-Ichi 
l the KitoV gave no definite figures but 
com- said it is provin g di ff icult tp iyhie wi 

ly. initially estimatedsales of lS.Stril- 

yen’s Hot yet. Profit is expected to in- 
estic . crease ma nuall y from 39.87 bil- 
d to lion in I9S4-85, helped by a 
ti is 29.1 -percent year-on-year rise’ in 
• first-half profit 

rent Mitsui's first-half profit rose29. 1 
Ilion percent from a yetfearher, to 20.57 
a the billion yen, 00 sales of 7.7Siril]ian, 
*-85, up 8.7 percent This was helped by 
lent a 26.9-percem increase in dividend 
a of income and a 10-5-percent fall in 
tr3- interest payments- * 

Nissho IwaTs vice president So- 
wed zaburo Tsuji, said 1985-86 profit 
first will rise mar ginall y from 19.13 bO- 


• . - J ■ 1. if -j 1 - ■ . £- — <rm iut iuuuuoui uuiu J7.1J uu- 

■ ‘r tiij! ban ended Sqit ^O, up 31 percent lion yen in 1984-85 on sales of 9 
■■ J . 1 * >■ a year earlier, on sales of 8J trillion, up 5.2 percent from SJ5 

■ ’ ii» ^‘V- trillion yen, up 4.1 percent helped trillion a year earlier. 

..... . ^ ? 3 1- ^percent increase in inter- &» 


-Ti 

^,1 . 


est income. 

Sumitomo expects its 1985-86 


.. -• ..1 . K us i^oj-oo u.i percent from a year earlier, cm 

•ilV- P5™ 1 “ be about even with the 4.35 trillion yen sales, up 6.1 per- 
45^0 WHion yen in 1984-85, the cent ^ 


«.wsr— sSnssaaa 


trillion a year earlier. 

Nissho Iwai eajber reported first 
half profit of 7-81 Wlion yen, up 
0.1 percent from a year earlier, cm 
4.35 trillion ven sales: un 6.1 uer- 


-Net profit in the first half fell 
21.1 percent from a year earlier, to 


The company reported that first anextraordmarylbssof 5.16biDioQ 
half Sales rose 12.1 percent from a yen, inrilirtrng » hyat fmm 1iqiTid?t- 
■ ■ T ' 1 - :e^ year earlier, to 7.12 trillion yen, but mg affiKated companies' shares.' 

■ . 


! Boots Reports 
6.2%Risein 
PretaxProfit 

Reuters 

LONDON — Boots Co., the 
British pharmaceutical con- 
cern, said pretax profit rose 62 
percent during the six months 
ending Sept. 30. 

Profit was £842) million 
(S121 mi Dio n) compared with 
£79.9 million in the like 1984 
period. Sales rose 6.6 percent 
to £980.9 million, from £920.1 
million. Boots said. 

Sales in the industrial divi- 
sion rose by 8. 1.. percent and 
profit by 10.1 percent. Boots 
said. Pharmaceutical sales in- 
. creased 8.8 percent. The Not- 
tingham-based concern . died 
good performances from Kan- 
dolt, its new West German unit, 
and operations in France, Italy, 
India and Pakistan. 

Consumer products sales in- 
creased 6.8 percent, it said. In 
the retail division, sales rose by 
6.8 percent and profit by 14.4 
percent. In Britain, sales of the 
Boots pharmacy chain in- 
creased 6.8 percent ■ 

The Canadian unit increased 
sales by 8 percent in local cur- 
rency and continued 10 trade 
profitably. In France, the ex- 
pansion of the Sep ho is chain 
proceeded as planned. 


Texaco Confident on Over turning Damages 


By Richard W, Stevenson 

V<r»‘ York Times Service 

NEW YORK —Texaco Inc. has 
strong grounds for overturning a 
Texas jury's decision that it has to 
pay a record S10.53 billion dam- 
ages to another oil company, Pem;- 
zoij Co., according to Texaco’s gen- 
era] counsel, WiQiam C. Weitzel Jr. 

He said Wednesday he was con- 
fident that the jury decision would 
be overturned, either by Judge Sol- 
omon Casseb of a Texas State Dis- 
trict Court in Houston- who beard 
the case, or on appeal. 

On Tuesday, a 12-member jury 
in the Houston court found unani- 
mously that Texaco, the third- larg- 
est U.S. chJ company based on an- 
nual revenue, had improperly 
enticed Getty Oil Co. to back out of 
3 merger last year with PennzoiL 
Texaco later acquired Getty. 

Speaking to securities analysts at 
Texaco headquarters in White 
Plains, New York, Mr. Weitzel 
took issue with the way Judge Cas- 
seb had instructed the j ary. 

He said of the verdict; **We feel 
very confident that this is just an 
outrageous travesty and that there 
is no way it can withstand review.” 

Bat investors took a waxy view. 
Texaco's shares, the most actively 
traded issue on the New York 
Slock Exchange Wednesday, fell 
SI .50, to S34.75, after dropping S3 
on Tuesday. They were recovering 
some ground in early trading 
Thursday. 

The next hearings in the case are 
scheduled for Dec. 5 and Dec. 6 in 


the same Houston conn. Judge 
Casseb could uphold the jury deci- 
sion, reverse it. grant a new- trial or 
decrease the size or the award- 
If Texaco does cot get a favor- 
able mtinc.il can appeal to a lexas 
intermediate appeals court and the 
Texas Supreme Court. “We don’t 
expect to have to follow that full 
chain,” Mr. Weitzel said. 

Mr. Weitzel detailed a number of 
points that Texaco feels could be 
used to get the decision reversed. 

For one. Judge Casseb “came 
into the trijl as a second judge in 


the middle of the trial and he was 
not familiar with the evidence.” he 
said. 

“He basically accepted the re- 
quested instructions put forth by 
Penn2oil, M Mr. W'eitzel said “The 
instructions to the jury were virtu- 
ally a directed verdict for Penn- 
zod” 

He also claimed some evidence 
had bera improperly excluded at 
the trial. 

Mr. McKinley also said there 
had been no settlement talks with 
Pennzoil during the Houston trial. 


Renault de Espana to Receive Subsidies 


v Stfe 

" "Hlji-i, 
' :i 


Company 

Results 

_ ’Pewnue ona profit* or tosun. In 
millions, arm in local currencies unless 
otherwise mUeataO. 


Making the New Bell Labs Competitive 

AT&T Breakup Brings Profound Change to 'Scientific Oz’ 


mi 


Lin\ fjwfoGeitS 
fowiA-o/Smi" 


Britain 

■v* 1 British Petroleum 

_ 3nJO «■■. ' 1985 1984 

Revenue — 9^20. 9J50. 

Met Profile 477.0 3UD 

j. „ 9 Months 1985 1984 

flit 1/nL RQV WUO- 30*70. Z7,110. 

Ill* L«llSf ■JatProflt 1440. 14X0 

? Boots 

> JhnfcL? 1985 1984 

-TlJOUfe Revenue^ 980.9 . Mai 

, Per Share 0072 .0465 

'it fit ^bJ Distillers 

J«9 , rtHolf . . !*» 1984 

Revenue ulj 55A5 

'•'a- PrehW Profit 1244 80J 

r ilVi-u - «*«■ Shore 03873 012*3 

Whitbread 

-Mbj*;: l«IHi* 1985 1984 

. . .... »«*-« "7234 6784 

Pretax Front 654 574 

■ ‘Sr i— Per Shore 01164 01064 

Canada 

,1 Hiram Walker Res. • 

ra-V^r 1985 1984 

• v.eovanue. .1770 Z6ao 

• '! - -Oper Net 2824 ■ 2294 

• • ;rrj~; ftngrghnr " Hi aiv 

— •: . Inf I Thomson org. 

... 7^,9 Month* 198S 1984 

J - - s. Revenue— 


-Oper Net. 

— - 'Oper Shore 

'~$iredn 

, • ; -.x » e • -• •> . 

■ ^ i . " 9 Month* 

- Revenue 

• J 


■ weverve— . 
xaJ’ronts: — 
.... — e Por shore. 


Aseo".- 

1985 

L 27450. 

1-770. 

2240 

Volvo 

1985 

624*a 

: 544a 

3490 


-.Thailand . 

' Slam Commercial Bk 

-^ItdCkw. 1985 1984 

... _. r -Profits 1282 161 3 

. — Per Snare 04422 . 04773 

'^'iivlted State* 

Uniroyal 

.. MOW. ■ 1985 1984 

’ ■ Revenue 5032) 5072) 

- .-.n-^PerNet (a)U 27j) 

, ; 4per Shore — 070 

-> Month* 1985 1984 

• 7g:?evenue 147a 7400. 

_.3perNei 380 B*2) 

)oer Shore 0.96 243 

... . 1 y: toss- 

■ * ' Winn Enterprises 


..)« Incotna (0)244 044 

iV'-’er Share — 02» 

1985 1984 

-■ Revenue 4624 2794 

tet Income (a)24S 141 

>er Share ... — — (125 

_ 1: 7: loss. 1985 quarter net Includes 
■ flume of $103. 


- By Peter Behr 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON— In the opin- 
ion of many experts, the foremost 
center of technology in the world, 
for most of this century, was Bell 
Telephone Laboratories. 

Before the court-ordered break- 
up of American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co^ its Bell Labs complex 
was a fabulous hothouse of discov- 
ery and invention, with 26,000 sci- 
entists, en g in eer s and other em- 
ployees, 20,000 patents to its credit 
and an annual budget of S2 billion. 

“Before divestiture, a young en- 
gineer driving up to Bell Laborato- 
ries for his first day of work might 
have spotted the vast, glittermg 
b idding across an immens e stretch 
of gras fields. and felt as if he were 
approaching a scientific Oz,” wrote 
Carol Fletcher, contributing editor 
of Spectrum, die magazine of the 
Institute of Electrical and Electron- 
ics Engmeezs^^-nsease, he would 
not have been wrong,” Ms. Fletch- 
er added.- 

The breakup of AT&T’s monop- 
oly in January 1984 and its trans- 
formation into a competitive high - 

Panby Pride Will Sell 
Revlon Unite to Beecham 

Renters ■ 

LONDON — Beecham Group 
PLC said Thursday that it had 
agreed 10 buy Norcliff Thayer and 
Reheis, the health-product and 
chemical divisions of Revlon hit, 
for $395 million from Revlon's par- 
ent. Pantry Pride Inc; 

Beecham said it would not retain 
Reheis. Pantry Pride took over 
Revlon Nov. 3, defeating Revlon’s 
plan to be acquired by Forstmann 
Little & Co., which would have 
sold the two -units to American 
Home Products for S355 million. 


technology manufacturer have 
meant profound changes for 
AT&T’s Bell Labs — the loss of 
8,000 employees and new marching 
orders for those who remain. 

The fear among some experts 
and onlookers alike is that AT &Ts 
unique commitment to research 
will be eroded by the change, weak- 
ening one of the United States' 
greatest technological outposts just 
as the tdecomrmmicatioiis industry 
is entering a new. crucial round of 
global competition. 

An impressive investigation of 
this issue, along with other reper- 
cussions from the breakup, is con- 
tained in this month’s issue of 
Spectrum. 

The partitioning of Bell Labs ac- 
tually occurred in two cuts. A 1980 
ruling by the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission permitted 
AT&T to enter the computer field 
— but required jt to create a sepa- 
rate subsidiary: for . this business. 
About 4,000' Bell Labs employees 
joined the new subsidiary. A rough- 
ly equal number transferred from 
Bell Labs in 1984 to a new, inde- 
pendent research organization 
serving the regional telephone com- 
panies- Some of AT&Ts scientific 
brainpower has defected, to start 
up new ventures. 

The 1 8.000 Bell Labs people who 
remain must cope with a new kind 
of research and development insti- 
tution. The commitment to re- 
search has not slackened, said Ian 
Ross, president of Beil Labs. But 
the goal of R&D has shifted, he 
added. 

“When the transistor was invent- 
ed in this company” in 1947, he 
said, “we had to wait 10 years be- 
fore we got it reliable enough to go 
into snitching and transmission 
equipment in the network, which 
were the only businesses we were 
allowed to be in. And in that peri- 


od, people like Texas Instruments 
came out with the transistor radio,” 
Mr. Ross added. “We weren’t al- 
lowed to sell transistor radios.” 

Now, the overriding mission at 
Bell Labs is to connect scientific 
work with products that AT&T can 
sett, as it swings into competition 
with International Business Ma- 
chines Corp. 

“Next time around, when we 
have a breakthrough invention, we 
can do the equivalent of a transis- 
tor radio ” Mr. Ross said. 

AT&T’s gain is Ekely to be its 
competitors' loss, however. As 
Spectrum noted, until the 1980 
FCC ruling and the breakup. Bell 
Labs had provided a rich lode of 
technology for other companies. 

“As pan of the resolution of an 
earlier antitrust case. Bell Tele- 
phone Laboratories published its 
work readily and let other compa- 
nies use its patents -— among them 
the transistor — for reasonable li- 
cense fees,” the magazine said. 

Mr. Ross denied that Bdl Labs is 
dosing its doors to outsiders. Its 
focus on the commercialization of 
its technology will bring more of its 
discoveries more quickly into the 
marketplace, he said. 

The concerns of the scientific 
community, however, are demon- 
strated by the case of an AT&T 
mathematician. Narendra Kannar- 
kar, who devised a radically new 
technique for solving complex 
equations that promises to speed 
up large computer-programming 
tasks. 

Spectrum noted that such equa- 
tions also could be used for airline 
scheduling or other such uses. 
While other rn-ubpmaHdqns praise 
Mr. Karmarkar's theoretical break- 
through, they have been unable to 
duplicate the results because de- 
tails of his work are not available. 
Spectrum said. 


: ; — ADVERTISEMENT 

I NTE RNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Nov.21, 1985 

Net asset value quotations or* supplied by UK Funds Hsled with the exception of some quotes based on Issue price. 

The marginal symbols Indicate frequency of qoottrttoas supplied: id) - daily; <w) -weekly; (t»~ bi-monthly; (r)-rcwnorfy; (I) - Irreou tarty . 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT FK MOMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS -+tw> Uovds KOI. Smelter Cos— 

-tw) AWVtal Trust, 5A— S 1822)9 1, Lau rcne* PountY Hilt, EC4. 01 -623-46B0 NIMARBEN 

BAHKJUUUS BAER & CO. Ud. -Iwl F&C Atlantic % UiJ) -fdJCUKSA 

> 57R SF 91145 4wi FAC European S 15*7 -lw ) Class B - 1)4. 

1 nSjSSJS 1 " SF 12882)0 -W FAC Oriental S 31J0 -(W ) Class C- Japan 

1 - Si Eoutooer America S12042M0 FIDELITY fob o», Haraftton Eermetfa OBU FLEX LIMITED 

■ -Id) Eaultroer Europe SF 74082M0 -Im) American Values Common—. S 9SJ7 -Iw) MufJfcurreacv 

- 3 Euurtxwr Pacific—-— — SF 121800 -fcnl AmerVoKf** CuntPref 1 10422 -tw) Dollar Medium T*rre 

. -id r" sf 10392)0 -Id ) Fidelity Anter. Assets 5 7*5* -iw> Dollar Lena Term— 

mzn SF165Z00 -tdi Fidelity Australia Fund 5 1144 rtw Japanese Yen 

1 BNP INTER FUNDS -4 d ) Fidelity Discovery Fund S 104? -Iwi Pound Sterllno 

"wl Inlerband Fund S 12640 -<dl Fidelity Dlr.Sws.rr-_ S 12806 -fw Deutsche Mane 

■ .-Hw - — — - * 1040 -Idl FVtel»y Far &at FumL X 2440 -Iwi Duich Florin 

-lw JnSrSrnmcv om!_— DM 30.48 Jd ) Rdolilv 'nfl. Fund. S 7443 -<w) Swiss Franc 

' - w rnwSmmS SttKHrafll— t 1040 3 d ) Fidelity Orient Fund % Z2Jj ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

-• w rtereaulhr PoctflcDHer 5 1043 -Id) Fidelity Fronltar Fund % 1443 PB 85578 The Mo«k 1070)469670 

.-IwilSlSR^er. Otter _ s 1843 -Id) g«g52g , £55?F5 «* ’52 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ , «* ■mwiiuMii. 

-( d ) AsJon Cfmrtt) * 11-63 -fo J Romiy wortfl fwq^ 

■-twl T^nrlmSl -1 ** BZ20 FORBES PO BS87 ORAlf D • 

Iiw) nrSSSfeg-.... — I . 

4" pi^MNnStidMi * y-ss sr? , ? s J^ r- lr ^ GlftF 

-■(wi FIF-Pacinc S 70-04 -ter) Gold i ncom e—. 

-I d InctosueiMulllbondsA S M ‘ 2 

i -Id) Indasuez Multlbonte B— . .* -IS5S «?ci 3 £??puilc^ n8 

■ dd) IndosuezUSO IM-M-F)__— 510*027 OBFUfOR FUN»_ 

;ffi£H J ,:SS3££^== l s 

-(d) Brit IntUManOgJWrtf C 1^3 CLOIWL AWET MANAQE 

:\Z\ B^lLGMd X* 

-iwi irt^raoa-Cur^pncv___- r M44* -jwl ISAM Arthraoe Jnc — 

IhI nSJi FdZIZ 5 1.135 -lw) GAMerlca Inc 

/:!«iSrSbSSSvolnRRili= I ?-S! 


-+(«■> Uovds Inn. Smelter Cos— S 1804 Id Dreyfus Fund ini' I 5 4047! 

NIMARBEN jw Dreyfus Interconllnenf S 3443 , 

5 mn lw The Esiabitshment Trust S 123 I 

S 105^9 Id Eurooo OW I Bartons Ecu 6349 

S 9841 <W Flrsl Eoole Fund S 192Q34B i 

I r Fifty Slors Ltd * 941.49 

S 12.10 lw Fixed Income Trans % 1045 i 

8 1140 |w Foraetex issue Pr. SF 20145 1 

S 1143 lw Forexfund * 749 . 

4 1244 <W Farmulo Selection Fd. SF 6548 

— C 1049 (d Fondlfalla * 35J1 

- Dm 1077 (d Governm. sec. Fund* 5 9049 I 

— FL 105S Id Frnnkf-TrusJ Interzlns DM 4147 

■SF mil lw Hounmonn hubs. N.V J 137.73 

(W Hestto Funds S 1WJ4 

I IW Horizon Fund I 133445 

- S 3140 (m) IBEX Holdings Ltd SF 11A95 

I r j ll-A-IGB S 944 

- * 9548 ( r } ILA-IGS S 1042 

ECU 103240 Id) IntorfundSA S 1907 

DM 123645 (w> Intermorket Fund S 28646 

SF 9S40 Id) liflermlnlng Wort. Fd. CL'B' _ 5 SOOM 

_ S 113840 ( r 1 Inrt Securities Fund— S 13.13 

Y 10361300 Id) Invests DWS DM 6048 

FL 105845 jr> Invest AtlonnqUM S 1063 

_ s 9847 1 r ) ItoHorlune inri Fund SA i 1845 

X 1148 CwJ Jopan Select Ion Fund S 13153 

_ X 1272)2 (w) Japan Pacific Fund S 11648 


■Id) Fidelity Soct Growth Fd. X 1649 parisbas-GROup 

. s 1143 -fd) FldgUlv World Fund.— S 2744 -f d) Carlexa lofematlana) 

SF 0240 FORBES PO BSS7 BRAND CAYMAN -(0 ) ECUPAR 

. s 1743 London APent 8I-83M013 -lw) OBLI-DM 


S 1543 1 -{ w 1 Poiw Income . — 
S 112UI-lwi Foro«sHlBhlnc.Gl)tFd 


N -<d) ECUPAR 

-Iwi OBLI-DM 

* 643 -iwi OBUGESTIOH 

C 9540 -lw) OBLI-DOLLAR 

5 82)6 -lw) OBLI-YEN— 

X 451 -lw) OBL I -GULDEN 

S 140 -Id ) PARDIL-FUND 

•Id) PAREU ROPE GROWTH. 
S 39945 - d) PARINTER FUMD 


C 1312B -Id PARINT6R BOND FUND, 
S 172471-1 d) PAR US TIBBS. Bond -CL B' 


j.901- -<w) Scottish World Fond C U12S5 -Id) PARINTCR BOND FUND 51057 (mJ Jefter Plus. IML Ltd s 1042345 1 

1054 -}yy) 5tote 5t. Ainertcon S 17247 -id i PAR USTroas. Bond CL B'. S 115.95 Id) Ktelnworl Benson Inn Fd._ 5 2151, 

un UWkwi;0!-49U230. Geneva U1-2235S5K ROYAL B-CANADA4*OB 24LGOERNSEY |w Klelnwon Bens. Jop. Fd S 8594 ! 

1203 GLOBAL ASSET MAKAOEMENT CORP. -+(W> RBC ComxUon Fund Ltd.- X 1148* (W) Korea Growth Trust KW 884743 


1283 (GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. RBC CoflOdlon Fund Ltd.- X 1148* 


X 0499- -lw 

r M44- l w; 

a s 1-U5 |-{w 


-id BrH World Lels. Fund- - X 1219 l-twi GAM oasronire 

. ijd 3 Brit world TecnrtPund — X aj53 ji*| iETSSf. 


^rr^r.L^ERNAT.ONAL , 4878 -Iwi GAM Hon® KmlK. X IBM SVEKSKA 1NTERKATIONAL LTD. wl NAAT X 1U4 

"i*l SfllS! !2!?.rKr < 1B39 -( w) GAM Internaitoaal Inc. X 138J0 17 Devonshire So-Lo n don-Oi -377-3040 d Nlkka Grawtn Pockooe Fd — $91401) 

riTirrwrM.lSrrrii r.m. fi(l.HK fl lnr* (w) GAM Japan lr»c. X .11831 -C r) 5HB Bond Fund X 2524 w NUyon Fund » J5J1- 

SHSS? ,H2I5SISB E Tel ^9541^^ -<w) GAM North America Inc. X 11447 -tw) 5H8 Inti Growth Fund ____S 2621 m NIMTEC Portfolio 5531836 

rSPJ,^y£££™? oure '■ sru 101242 -iw> GAM tLAmertto Unit TroN- IllJOp SWISS BANK CORF. (ISSUE PRICES) ..... w Nowtoc Investment Fund — X 9732 

l2f£HH?7£F,“.7=r: «iffl249 -lw) GAM Pocmc Inc S 13S2# -Id) Amerlco-Vo ter _SF <9945 w MAM.F, X 171.98 

rseniT «t¥l?*y?ri5*UE PRICES) -(wj GAM Pone.* Qior;WBrldw._ 10840 p -Id) OMork Bond Sefecflon— DM 12231 m NSPF.l.T — S J76^ 

™? I ?ITSU , SSe {ISSUE PRICES) j GAM Pens.* Cbor. u.K. Fd._ 10520 p -Id ) Dollar Band Selection X 140.10 d Pacific Horizon invt. Fd_ s 1215*6 

~{gl fiSriS.liiJSS- SF wsa -tw) QAWlnt— — - S rtSZB -<e) Florin Bond Selection FL 12037 w PANCURRl fnc S. 21Jk 

'{ ri ! Swf—' QU {£jm -( w) GAM Slnoapore/Makiy lnc_ X 9747 -Id I Intervalor 5F 0725 r Porfon Sw. R ED Geneva — SF 139730 

•jrti SSSSSSRf FnPSoLL?iR~ s iroS -IwiGAJW siert*lntr Unit TruD— 15145*0 -Id) JoPonPortiono 3F 69425 r Perow) Value N.V S 132091 

J 2 i r 10016 -IW) GAM Worldwide Inc X 18741 4dl Sterling Bond Selection 1 108.1S r Ptejodes X 114641 

1 d i Bn«d vSi T 1 y^n 1804008 -(wl GAM Tvche SJLOass A s 12836 -< d J^wlss Foreton Bond Sol — SF 11849 w I PSCO Fund N.V X 1M.90 

■Id) Bond vaor .Yen -q ittjS G.T. MANAGEMENT fUlO LW. rtd) Swlssvolor New Series SF 30140 wl PSCO Inf). M.V X 18544 

;f 3 1 £££Il iifrDO'LLAR 5 S ISiS ddl amftCi Fd. Ud.-Z — S n.ie -< a > untversol Bond seiea. SF nso dj Putnam Inn Fund, S 7Z3> 

>2 i ConwDrt Volor US-OOI llu»k- » .) r ) n T: APPUed Sdence l X 1432 -(d) Universal Fund SF 122.15 rlPrl-Tech S 08C-55 

~i j I r-" ip 7920 .Id ) G.T. AseonHJC.Gwm.FdL_ X 1241 -{ d > Yon Bond Solecfloa _Y 1034230 wj Qumdum Fund M.V. . XIS1545 

-Id) C3 Fonds-Bonds_ lS3 -<d) G-T.ADo Fund X 423- UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND IdlRentoFund — LF 211630 

1 rt y rr — s 110130 -< d ) G.T.MsrroUa Fund S 2597 -Id) Am Co US. Sh. SF 352S Id) Rwitlnvest LF 1Q555S 

'/SIS mKCiS cSS - ” - DM106130 -id) G.T.euraoe Fund—- — _ X 1348 -Id) Bcnd-InveSl - ... SF 6745 id 1 Reserve Insured Deposits — 1 111943 

‘J2lS!Kl!£'.!i2!S5c£5 - c loSSo rtw)G.T.fiurtL SmollCox. Fund __S 1544 -Id) Fonsa Swiss Sh. 5F 17530 { wl Rudolf WoJH Fut Fd Ltd 1125100 


' -I w) Copilot Inll Fund - 
' • I w) COoltal Italia SA_ 


■ld) Bond Valor Swf— 

-id) Bond valor D-mark ~— 
-I d 1 Bond Valor US-DOLLAR 
-Id) Band Valor c Sterlirw — 
-I d i Bond valor .Yen-- 

-f d ) Convert Valor Swf— ■ — ■ 


1.139 PB 119. SI PDer Port. Goerosev. 0481-28715 -H w) RBC Far EoDiPocMIe Fd- X 1225 , S 940 

0499* »■■■' r.J—r-au « A ■ •- s mm -+(w| RBC loTl Capltot Fd X 2643 Id) Lelcofn Fund— , S 139441 

1444* -jw> GAM Arthraoe Inc I 13841 -+(w) RBC Inti Income Fd X 11. IS" Jwj Leveroue Coo HokS ‘.IF- 22 

1.135 -lw) GAMeticalnc — , X 15439 -+( d ) RBC Mafl.Curr«ncv Fd X 2739 (d > UqulPoer *136230 

0219 -( w) GAM Austral lo Inc— — S 99.18 -Kw) RBC Norm Amer. Fd. — S 10J5 (wl Linrtund * 7827 

1219 -lw) GAM Boston Inc S 11334 SKANDIFOND 1NTL FUND (46-*23627D) (ml MOOnafund N.V—. * 15932 

' GAM Ermllooe— X 1648 •(wllnc.;Bld X 633 Offer. 5 623 (d) Mediolanum SeLFq — . __ * 2*67 

GAM Fronc-val SF 11843 -lw)Acc_-Bld X 625 Offer— S 646 ( r ) Meteors Y 1U2JS430 

GAM Hors ICono Inc. X IMIO* SVtKSKA INTERHATIONALLTQ. (wl NAAT X1U9 

GAM Jnfernotionol Inc.— X 13830 17 Devonshire SaJLandorH)l-377-a(M Idl NBskp Growm PoctCBoe Fa — $914811 

GAM Japan Inc.— X .11831 -( r ) SHE Bond Fund...... — — X 2524 (w) Nippon Fund » 3531* 

GAM North America Inc. X 1HH7 -lw) 5H0 Inti Growth Fvnd — .5 2621 lm) HOST EC Portfolio 5531S36 

GAM N. America Unit TruD- liuo p Swiss BANK CORF. (ISSUE PRICES) (w) Novotec Investment Fund — s 9732 
GAM Pacific inc X 13S2B -Id) Amerlea-Votar SF *9945 iwi NAM.F, X 171.98 


-lw) GAM Franc-vcl ... 

-iwt GAM Hang Km Inc.— 
-( w) GAM infer national me. 


l-(er) GAMlni 
l-rwl GAM Joi 
UwlGAMNa 
-|wl GAM N.) 


— S 9.90 
_ *139441 

— S 10722 

— *136230 

— S 7827 

— * 15922 

— S 3)47 
Y 1093S93O 

— * 1U9 

— *914031 , 

— > 3531* : 

— 5531106 I 


3F 69425 I r > Perma) Value N.V_ 

— t 108.1s ( r) Pleiades — 

SF 11048 (w) PSCO Fund tLV 

SF 30140 Iwi PSCO Inti. H.V 


~f 3 ! v°}°f ?,y noLLAff S 12136 -(df Berry PoC. Pd.Ud. S 11.18 - d Universal Bond Select. SF M40 (dj Pulnom Inn Fund- 

>2 i COWDrt Volor UK-OOI li_«k- » _r r ) S.T: Applied Sdence X 1432 - d Universal Fund SF 122.15 I r t Prl-Tocti — 

SF 7930 -id) G.T. Asean HX Gwth.Fd X 1241 - d Yen Bond Sotecl loo, .. .. ..— Y 1034230 (w| Quvdum Fund M.V. 

-Id) CS Foods- Bondi— -wion Jrt l re t_ Asia Fund X 4jn- UMtON BANKDF SWITZERLAND ( d i Renta Fund— 


-i Hi CS Fonds-mn — — — ~ 
' -I d) CS Mam Market Fund 
..*< d)CS Money Morket Fund 
■I d)CS Money Market Fund 


SF 7930 -l a l G.T. Aseon 
SF 12050 Hd) G-T.ADo Fund. 
.5 110130 HD! G.T. Ausrrolta f 


g.jj — s 110100 -{ d ) G.T. Australia Fund S 2SL97 - d ) Am Co Ui. Sh. 

‘Id I a Monev Market Fund - D “ 104500 rtw) %%’. lutuSmalicas. Fund — I TiS - d j FwasSSaiL SF 1K00 ( W) Rujfalt Ww "Fut Fd Ltd— x 12030 

^ l ns : Si^?«rsh== If ^ mg&WSbBST. y 3JS 

"JdlUwec — fp fa? rw 1} d I St. O toOoi F^U™ * . 12JS - d^8lmtr Utocdc prlc^Je- 5F 271-50 lw) S«ven Arrows Fund N.V S 9901 

n Kjr ?n e> Y.‘a 3r * SF I S ?< J d ) C-T Honshu Pathfinder s 2944 UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt (w) State St. Beak Eaufty HdgsNV— S 10.11 

iwrvri^^i km T ause bt INC -(d) G.T. investment Fund X 2045 ■ a) Un I rente DM «40 ivy) Strategy investment Fund — X 24^ 

S?J2S^w52?nLmdonWalf -i w) G.T. Jww Snwll CaFund- I 4Z.I6 - d ) UfiifaraJS DM 2940 d| Syntax Ltd.'lCkCsAJ' * JU9 

. -ir) G.T. Tecnnoloay Fund S 7*M ‘ 0) Unlrok- ■— ... . DM B345 Wl Techno Growth Fund SF 8104 

l v O, !®? N . E C3l01 W09797) rranq -idl G.T. South China Fund X .ISA) Hd I UNtZIMS DM 10740 (d.l Thornton Australia Fd Ltd — t .94? 

-I w) Finsbury C-rouP Ltd— ' . iSa- hILLSAMUEL IN VEST. MOMT. INTtlfiA. IVhar Cnnilc Id ) Thornton H K & China S 1023 

-<ml Winchester Plvrr»incd.. - * * ' (Srs Jer&e^p!o. Bo* 6X Tel QS34 7S029 OTtlfir FUIIOS ( d 1 Thamlon Japan Fund Lrd X 1332 

-jm> Wnctiestor pinorudai Ltd. — .*. 09110 B»n»% pxl Bo» 2622. Tet 4131 334051 ( w) Aciioonds Invostmcntx Fund. X 3445 I d j Thornton OrtenUnc. Fd LM J 

“S m ? SSllSSSSr FF iSly -id) CrpSxywtFor Eost)_ . ..... SF 10.91 fw) Active*! Inti f 1116 (wl TokvoPotHaW. fSea) 3 1M4 

-lw) Winchester Holdings ■=£ '¥?S JCSF (6 afcmced»u_— SF 2646 im) Allied Ltd S 425 l w) Tokyo Poc. Hold. N.V S 148.74 

% jau -f d j European EouJJv Fund DM 1152 lw) Aqulia inieroatlonal Fund — 5 17198 (w) Tronsocdftc Fwid * 

■ w Wortdwkfe Sswrit'M — — * 17 ^d -i d J InlnL Bond Fond X 1046 r) Arab Finaace i.F. X 04440 (w) Trans Eurooo Fund FI.SBJ7 

'(wl WortdwiOE Soedal. — — * .fd) int. Currepcv US.— _ S 2635 t r 1 s 191736 Id j Turquoise Fund 5 . 114 66 

p*T INYESTMCNT FFM xua -(d) ITF Fd (Tsmotoav) X . 1431 iwi Trostcor inn F«t <ae|F) _t W33 (W) Tw**dy,Browo« ivv-CIosia 

-+l d ) Cwumnlra— — — gjjj nSl -fd) OSeasFddL AMERICA)— X 2933 (w) Bonasatex-ISM Pr SF 1371s (w)TweMy£rowneti.v4JassB— *lf*S49 

-+Ld )Jrjf[ Renten fond . _ .°S,.iTr” JARDINE FLEMING. POB 78 OPO Ho Ka (m) Wtxtda Gtd-MOrtoovoFd S 946 (ml Tweedy Browne (U.K.) n.v— 5 1819J4 


'J2 SF 1$02S -l d ) G.T. rtonshu PatWlnder S 29.54 UNION It 

- rvo rv m i AMBE R T INC -( d ) G.T. in vestment Fund X 20J5 -la) UnJr 

2?J2SSto?w52?nLmdon Wall - "> S.T. J ww Small CilFum _ S 47.14 - j a I Unlft 

, *ir) G.T. Tecftnrtoay Fund 5 VM 'id) Unlr 


-lw) Wlncfnsnr Holdings- 


BIT INVESTMENT FFM 

-+l d ) Cancenlra— — - — 


_L! j : 1 u, . . — : V r«»» 9331 l-l a ) oaeasr a in. nmc kigai— » Oil wi oom«»j-PMwn — — — wu ivi 

t*Ld ) jnfl Rentcnfar)d^ r=r j JARDINE FLEMING. POB 78 OPO Hg K« (m) CCncda Gtd^MrNwFd— * ’-Wfirii 

ttnwa Hatyfft 6 Uofd own** B T57 ” ... |.( r | j.f currencvftBond.— - . * 1345 (dlCaoJtal Prtserv.Fd. Inll 5 UTDjld) 


1-3 Seale St^f. Helrtr;B^4-3«3 1 
TRADED CURRENCY 'FWW. 


YDS BANK INTLr POB 43L Geneva IT 


(mi Cleveland ONslwre Fd— 

iwi cotumbio securitlos. 

t r j C0METE 

(w) Convert. Fd Ini'l ACans 
(wl Convert. Fd. inti B Certs 
tw) D«iwa Japan Fund 


-Id) Short Term -B« (Dlstr) * D *Tj 

■(WJ Long Term - ■ * _ 

DM . Deutsche Mark: BF - MMjnl{Jn<WU 
, prvsiOTon perufm._NA-N«t*’Sj™SiJ 

Redempt- Prieo- Ex-Caunan. ee Former r 


Dgiwa Japan Fond — Y 10384 

DlGE S WjOO 

1 DoJ tor- Baer bond Fd SlMaoo 

iD^norv-BoerBandFa — OMi®« 
D. Wl«or Wkf Wide Ivl Tat. — * .JS-97 
DfOSekar imrHtJ=und N.V. — . X 121740 
Dreyfus America Fund s 1049 


5 1UD idl UN ICO Fund DM 7640 

S M2 Id) UNI Bond Fund *117199 

S 210141 ( r ) UNI Capital Fund. 5121746, 

FL 1D4.1B id) US Federal Sccuftic*. X 1044, 

, X 67545 (dl US Treasury Income fund — . x 

X 11.48 tw) Vanderuil Assets I 1237 

* 3337 (d) World Fund 5A. S 1340 


MADRID — The Spanish gov- 
ernment has agreed to provide Re- 
nault de Espaiia SA. Fabr Automo- 
viles, with 2 billion pesetas (SI2.4 
million) in subsidies 10 enable the 
French-controlled firm to update 
iu production line, a government 
spokesman said Thursday. 

The offer is part of a 50-billion 
peseta modernization program that 
Renauh has agreed 10 to gear up its 
Spanish plant for competition 
wi thin the European Co mmuni ty, 
which Spain joins in January. 

Spanish car industry sources said 
that the government was concerned 
about demands by French trade 
unionists for the closure of Re- 
nault’s factory in Spain to protea 
jobs in France. 

Spain approved a restructuring 
program for its car industry last 

Lenders Exposed 
In Collapse of 
3 Brazil Banks 


RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazil 
will not guarantee repayment of ah 
S4S0 million of medium-term loans 
extended by foreign creditors to 
three failed Brazilian banks. Diiscn 
Funaro. the finance minis ter, said 
Thursday. 

"The foreign banks will have to 
stand in line along with other credi- 
tors.” he said. 

The Brazilian central bank has 
said it will honor SI 60 million in 
interbank credit lines held by 
Banco Auxiliar. Maisonnave and 
Banco do Comercio e Industria de 
Sao Paulo, or Comind, the private 
banks whose liquidation was an- 
nounced Tuesday. 

Mr. F unar o said s mall savers 
with deposits in the three banks 
would be paid in full after Dec. 2, 
but other creditors would have to 
wait until the assets of Lhe banks 
had been sold to see what funds 
were available. 

Foreign banking sources said 
Wednesday night that the failure of 
the banks could hurt negotiations 
to reschedule Brazil’s S103-billion 
foreign debt, unless the govern- 
ment agreed to honor ah their com- 
mitments. The banks collapsed 
with liabilities exceeding assets by 
7 trillion cruzeiros (S785 million). 


month that calls for providing in- 
centives to stimulate an outlay by 
manufacturers of ISO billion pese- 
tas on plant modernization and the 
reduction of their work forces. 

The government is asking lead- 
ing commercial banks 10 help fund 
the modernization program. 

The industry sources said that 
the plan was aimed at helping the 
Spanish subsidiaries of French 
companies Renault and Peugeot to 
enhance their competitive position 
against more recent arrivals, Ford 
Espaha SA and General Motors 
Espana SA. 

The French producers and 
Spain's state-owned SEAT each 
employ about twice as many work- 
ers as Ford and GM. SEAT is nego- 
tiating a takeover by Volkswagen 
AG. 


AHied-Signal Inc., a technology 
company based in Morris Town- 
ship,' New Jersey, said its common 
sLock repurchase program, inter- 
rupted Nov. 9. will resume. It plans 
to spin off S5.2 billion in assets into 
a separate company and carry out 
an internal restructuring and cosi- 
cutting program. 

American Motors Corp. will of- 
fer rebates of up to S700 on its 
U.S.-nude Renault Alliance and 
Renault Encore subcompact cars. 
It is the first rebate from a U.S. 
automaker on 1936 models. 

ASEA AB. the Swedish electrical 
and electronics group, is planning 
to enter the insurance field by tak- 
ing over Sweden's Sirius Albs 
group. Terms were not disclosed. 

General Motors Corp. will lay off 
1,600 workers in Flint and Pontiac. 
Michigan, beginning Dec. 16. 
largely because of decreased de- 
mand for big cars. The by offs arc 
expected 10 last for six. months. 

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries said 
it and Kawasaki Heavy Industries 
and Fuji Heavy Industries will sup- 
ply parts worth about 5500 million 
for 300 aircraft to Boeing Co. of the 
United States. 

M1M Holdings of Brisbane. Aus- 
tralia. said a Queensland state in- 
dustrial commissioner ordered 
2.300 miners at its Mount Isa base 
metal mine to return to work by 
Friday. The workers walked out 
Nov. S to protest alleged safety 
problems. 

Nestle Capital Corp. has mandat- 
ed Swiss Bank Corp. International 
Ltd. as sole dealer for a Euro-com- 
mercial paper program for an 


open-ended amount, according so 
banking sources. 

Pohang Iron & Sled Co.'s plan 
to borrow S57 million to help fi- 
nance mill expansions has been ap- 
proved by South Korea's Finance 
Ministry. Lazard Brothers & Co. 
L;d_ the London merchant bank, 
will lend S44 million and Yoe&t- Al- 
pine AG of Austria S ! 5.2 million 

Schering AG. a West German 
pharmaceutical and chemical 
croup, expects record group and 
parent company net "profits in 

1985. accordins'to Klaus Pol tie. a 
board member. 

Schloemann-Siem^: AC. i Dm- 
seldorf plani-bailder that :> a sub- 
sidiary of Gutehoffnur.Cihu::-.- Ai.- 
tienvc’rein, expecis incomir.s : rdern 
to be near record levels ;hn c-jr. 
helped by strong demand item 
China, the chairman. Hem rick 
Weiss, said. 

STET, Italy's siait telecom- 
munications company, and che pri- 
vate group Montedison are r. 
up a joint subsidiary called Telsvas 
covering data communications. 

Tandy Corp. has introduced a 
computer compatible with inicrr.j- 
lional Business Machine Corp.'s 
most powerful persona! computer, 
the PC-AT. It said the machine uii 
much less expensive than the IBM 
model and 33 percent faster. 

United Canada Insurance Co. of 
Toronto has had its assets seized by 
the government, following an order 
by the Iowa state commissioner of 
insurance that the U.S. parent. 
Carriers Insurance Co., be placed 
under supervision. 


PRIVATE BANKING 

IN LONDON I 

Forever i 50 years we have been providing •• I lL^ 

a professional and flexible service to those L Bff nl < A’ 'Jr 

losing for personal and confidential “y?. ! 

private banking. Ourwide range of deposit /Jy/* '/ \ j ;W| 

accounts enables customers worldwide to I n fill/ It | '•-'#! 

meet their exact requirements. rj Pv/j (i J v “ i j| 

* Attractive rates of interest paid on call P wAV j 

and fixed term deposit accounts. p{ My. * A®LJ !1 

Minimum US 55,000 or XI.OUO. P “3& 

* Interest paid without deduction of tax. , J p9 ak /mSt 

* Absolute confidentiality and securin’. W w 

^ Complete range of investment services. 

^ Rates quoted for all major convertible 

international currencies. 


£ sterling ( ^ wh 

10i%*S- 


LIS Dollars Jjjwuh 

6i%“ £sr| 


For information c>n opening an account 
please pest coupon lo Crindbys Bank pic. 
13 St James’s Square. London. SVVI or 
phone Cordon Coulthard on 1 >1-930 4611. 
‘Larger amounts cam mure m teres! Kate 
cttrai at Hmc nfaomu :o press D’tfcrcnt teres 
mag apply for I K resident s. 


| — . — J 

, Cordon Coult Liard. Crindlays Bank pic. J 

1 13 St James’s Snuare. Lmdon StV 1 Y 4LF England l 


j Address. 


Ill 


Grindlays 

Bank 

Group 


‘ Recisltrcd ,n England. Xo. "l*ii ; 

I Rifiisitred office- 36 Fenchuich Slrecl. t.undoo KC3P 3.i5 I 


6 3 A% Bearer Bonds of 1985 (1993) 

Kreditanstalt fur Wiederaufhau 

Offer for Sale 

Kreditanstalt fur Wiederaufbau, Frankfurt am Main, issues b J /s% Bearer Bonds of 1985 (1993) in a total amount of 

DM 600,000,000.- 

The net proceeds of this issue will be used for long-term investment loans. DM 550.000,000.- of this amount are offered 
for sale by the syndicate of banks listed below. 

Issue Price: 99 ’A % plus Stock Exchange Turnover Tax with adjustment of interest. 

Interest: 6 3 /4% p.a., payable annually in arrears on November 1 5 of each year. The first interest 

coupon will be due on November 15. 1986. 

Denomination: DM 100.- or a multiple thereof. 

Lrfetime/Redemption: 8 years. The Bonds will be redeemed on November 1 5. 1993 at par. Redemption prior 

to maturity is excluded. 


Voiiffliter IMS 


Denomination: 

Lrfetime/Redemption: 

Ranking as Trust Investments/ 
Eligibility for Investments by 
Insurance Companies: 

Listing: 


The Bonds rank as trust investments and are eligible for investments by insurance 
companies, according to the German laws. 


Listing: The Bonds will be admitted for trading and official quotation on all slock exchanges 

of the Federal Republic of Germany, including Berlin. 

Eligibility as Collateral for The Bonds are eligible as collateral for loans by Deutsche Bundesbank ("lombardfahig*’ 

Loans by Deutsche Bundesbank upon admittance for trading and official quotation. 

("lombardfahig") : 


Delivery: 

Sale: 

Stock Index Number: 


The Bondholder receives a Central Deposit Advice from the bank appointed by him. 
Definitive Bonds will not be available. The Bond issue will be evidenced bv one Global 
Certificate. 

The Bonds will be offered tor sale by the undersigned banks as from todav. 
276 031. 


The detailed Offer for Sale to be published in the Bundesanzeiger iGerman Federal Gazette) is available from the banks. 
Allotments of Bonds will be at the discretion of the selling banks. 


Sroct P^rtermone* Indox 
■dam Slade ExcMnao 


Frankfurt am Main, November 1985 


ADCA-Bj'Il AkiiengtsellYihjfi 
Allgjrrwiru? Deutsche Credit- Xnsidll 
■Vjb banking Corpora lion - 
Dauv i- Cc> GmbH 
Bankhau* H. Auihauser 
Saden-WuraemberRische Bank 
Aktiengesdlschari 
Badische Komnunale Londesbank 
— Girotemrale - 
8 anl.cn union Fiankt’un am Mam 
AUiengewllschafi 
Bankers Trust GmbH 
Bank rti' Gemeiiminschait 
Akl lengtrw llschjn 
Bank lur Handel u.nd indusinc 

hki •engesellsthafl 
BaveriKhe Hvpt4heken- ond 
Wechsel-Baiik ^ktiengrsellscbaft 
Bavwivche Landes bant Girruenlrat 
Baveritchc Veteiratunl Akiiengesellscturi 
Joh Berenberg. Couler & Co. 

Berliner Bank Aktiengesellyrhafi 
Berliner Commerzbank Aktiengeseltschan 
Berliner Handels- und Frankiurter Bank 
Bonkhaus Grixiider Beihmann 
Bremer Landesbank 
Kredianstah Oldenburg 
- Girozent rale - 

Commerzbank AktiengesellschaH 
Commerz-Crvdil-Bank AC furooanner 


Iffy / Kreditanstalt 
m\S Ww fur Wiederaufbau 


CSFB-EHectenbank AC 
□eibruck (. Co 

Deutsche Bank AkliengeseTlschah 
Deutsche Bank Berlin ALinmfiesellschan 
Deutsche Bank Saar Akiiengesvlly:hail 
Deutsche Gencasenschansb.ink 
und die genossenschafilichen 
Zenrralbanken 
Deutsche Giroremrate 
- Deutsche Karnmunalbank - 
Deutsche Landerbank Aktiengesellschan 
Deuiscbe Westminster Bank 
AkliengKetlschaR 
Ceesdner Bank Aknengeseilsrhan 
Bankhnus Ma» Fie»a & Co. 

Furs Fugger-Babenhausen Bank KG 
Furst Thum und Taxis Banl 
Albert Furet won Thurn und Ta»is 
Geettemiinder Bank AktiengeseJIs^hait 
Kamburgisrhc LandexbanL. 

-Cirozenirale- 
Handels- und Pnvalbank 
Al>1«ngesellsdwrt 
Georg Hauck & Sohn Bankiers 
kommandiisesell«ch.i(t aui Aki>en 
Hesusche Landesbank 
.- Girozentiale - 
Von der Heydt-Kerslen & Sohne 
Bankhaus Hermann kampe 
kommandirsewllschaii 


Landesbank Rheinland-Ptalz 
- Girosenuale - 

Landesbank Saar - Girozemrale - 

Landeshanl Schlesvvig.HulMe>n 
Girozeniralc 
Merck. Fincl A Co 
B. Metzlerseel. Sol in fi Co 
Nahonal-BanL Aknengn-«;llschjii 
BanLhaus Me*;lmever 
Aknengesellschaii 
Norddeutsche Landeshanl 
Girozcntraic 

Oldenburgische Landcshank *G 
Sal. Opperihcim ji 4 Cie. 

Reuschel A Co 
Kart Schmidi Bankgeschan 
Schroder, Munchmever. Huftiyt & Co. 
Schwab ' sche Bank Akiicngesellvhan 
Simonbank Akik-noncMschdii 
I. H. Slem 

Trinkaus & Burkhardi kG.ia 
V ereins- und VLeubank 
AknengewUschah 

M. M. Warburg- Bn nil kmann 
WirtE Ji Co. 

Wesideuische Landesbank 
CirufenlralL- 

Wesdalenbank AktiengfMjflxdun 
Wurtlembergische Komirurak: Landc-shai i 

Cirormlrslr 


p *s- }c?sf? fr- * 


11 





TdMes include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Hr The .-issotioteil fVsv j 


M* 

3% 

ADI n 



58 






18 

14% 

8 

AMC 5 



16 

5®* 

29] 

AAA lull 



10 

4 

3% 

AGI fi 




se% 

dflft 

ATT Fd 

5J2o 

8J 


6 

2Vi 

AcmcPr 





9% 

Aemoy 

JO 

30 

7« 

1B’M 





14 


1% 






1% 




0 

30% 

22% 

A-RUSI 

.16 

.6 

78 


s isn 15% 15% + ■< 

i iov iou io>i— « 

313 a s 4 V s * vj 

293 F - 3 1 * I 3% — fc 

140 87V 86% 87V +l'i 
20 Ti 2% 2 r -j + W 
27 10** 10% 10 l : — ' j 


S 3% Aerwrc 
51V VtVi AfilPbS M U 

8% 5*1 AlrExD 

12 A AirCol 

17V 9V ArCal dI I JO 10.9 

3% *1 A lames 

117% 6SVj Ajrnlton 
9’ j » AibaW 

9% 5% Aloha 

14*- B Alahaln £5 J 

lit tii Allen n 
34 31 Alcoa o! 3-7S 10.* 

30V iri AlaaCe 
4 2 'a AmBrll M 3a 


*38 1'* IV 1% 

m 2% rv; rv 
37 27 V 27 271* 

SB J-n 3 1 * 3% 
t Sl'~ SI'S 51 r 


10 1015 8V O'- B% — % 

JO 10.9 SSS UJ* W V 11 — ; 

90 * % % — • 

11 23 117 117 117 — ’ 

IB 4!1 4 Ml 

II 7% 9-* «'i— '• 

rtf S 77 TO 9V* 9'* — V 

140 IS V % + ^ 

L7S 10.* lHKftJi'tr 34% 34"; 

JO 2321 32% 30% 32 +1% 

jjg Ja 20 IS 21] 1'. 2V — % 


low Amdahl JO 1A 19 1970 12}r I3J« 


im 5W AmoOea .06 l.t 

13% 04b AmBIII .15 1J 

BU 4 Am Can 

434* 21 AEiOW) 

9 4*SAFrucA 
9 *4* AFruaB 

10W 3»*» AHIIhM 

3% 4% Alnraoi 

17% liv, AMroA Si JJ 

14* a 12% AM»B S’- 3.9 

5W % AMBId 

4V 3 AmOII 

429i 47 1 - APetl 2.00 AO 

154* 12V APre: J« 1.7 
8% a'. AinRI'v 

16i j 11% ARovIn IJtfiOJ 
5 3 ASclE ,, 

S6% 49% A -on on .®0e 1.7 
48% 44 A non or *00 1.9 
71* 59; A ror SC 

3*9 IV A mini 06 2J 

69g 4V Andol 

59* IV And JcO 

IS - * 9 Andrea .71 <2 

9<. sv Anaele* 

24* !* vi Anal j v 

6*k 3 Arpe D i 

Tij 5'-: Arlev 

B'< 3W Armlm 

ii'i 44* Armei 0 

lOW 71* Arrow A JO 10 

MW 15'* 4 rural 

9V 6'* Ajmr 3 JO 2.1 

13'.; 9V A Sire. 

?■'* ’* Astratc 


136 TV 79 j 

15 11 10V 

72 6** 5 


7W- V 
11 + 'v> 

6 >i + t* 


1076 42’- 40V 42 -*■!'* 

Ji 154001 5W 5 S'* + 


3* 12200] 4V* 4’: 4% 

S 3! l’n H) S'? + % 

4 6 7 6W 7 + 1* 

a - 4l 14 T3 ,, i 14 

*5 I I3V 13V 13 V— V 

226 J% 4% 4'* 

70 35 4'.» 4 ■!—'■* 

!e 26 50V J*'i 50V +1 V 

20 9« 149* 1J% 14 — 

4 6 7*o TV 7*e + «i 

434 1 5 14'* 147, + ..j 

21 3S 4V 4'* 4% * la 

12 53V S3W 53V * ' a 

2 471] 47't 47i* + V 
4 6’* 4V 6'* 

II 2»5 2V 25* 2W 


13 V— V 
4's 

4 — '* 

50 'a +m 

14 — 
T% + V 


25 136 6'.: 6' a 


14 70 10 9 

33 125 4V 4W 


1S1 4'a 3W 

20 5Vj 5W 
46 MS »’* 


13 43J 18V 17V 

5* 258 9' : 91* 


39 13' . 13 
722 I'.-a 1 


6 ': + *; 
IV 

10 + r B 

6** 

1*4 + '9 

3 — 9a 
52s- V* 

4 V; 

5*0 + 9* 
9:4 + W 
IBV + S* 
91; 

13V + 

I'-a + i» 


32% 

av cdi 



8 

23 

70‘i 

19.1, 

20 

12% 

5% CMI Ca 



12 

80 

10V 

10V] 

I 

+ 

3% 

iv* CMX Cp 




10 

1'jC. 

Hi 

11* 

9'* 

8 CS&n 




70 

a 

7V 

a 

1 14<4 

9 CaasMJ 



17 

lil 

12v* 

12 

12 v* + % 

B% 

4"* CsrleA 



S 

6 

6 

ST* 

6 + '« 

14% 

10% CaiRE 

ua 

1M) 

a 

101 

17 

11% 

11% — % 

9'* 

6% CaiprftP 

.861 10.0 

2> 

13 

8% 

8% 

8% — 'll 

19'* 

11% Camca 

.44 

ZB 

9 

34 

153* 

15% 

ISV 

3 

7% Carnenl 




29 

1% 

1% 

11*- % 

17% 

13% CMarcs 

JS 

13 


83 

18 

75% 

16 + Vi 

52% 

jt 1 '; CWme 



n 

88 

52V 

521* 

52'- + If* 

13 

4% carailt 



10 

38 

10V 

10% 

10V 

if 1 * 

8% CcrcB 



18 

33 

13% 

13% 

13% — '» 

ISA] 

8> Corf A 

.10 

.7 

16 

11 

14 

13% 

14 + 

BV 

•t\ CaroE B 



18 

34 

Mo 

61* 

6% -e % 

89. 

A' . CaroE A 



15 

8 

8% 

8VJ 

6>* 

489] 

Jfi CaroP pi 5^0 10.9 


350Z45V 

45V 

45V- V 

S'-O 

2 Cushion 

J5I2M 


74 

2Vt 

Wi 

2=!* + % 

22’.'; 

14% CastlA 

30b 5.0 

11 

1 

18 

16 

18 — % 

32% 

25% CosFd 

2J0a &5 


22 

28% 

28 

28 — % 

rv 

% CfliFd ft 




135 

1 

"a 

V — % 

7% 

2 Cajilnd 




9 

3% 

3 

3 — V 0 

7% 

4% Ccnlenl 




94 

9 

8% 

9 4- % 

14!* 

10% CeniS« 

1J7B114 


22 

12% 

12% 

12% 

99a 

5% Colec 

JO 

LB 

17 

47 

7% 

7% 

7%— ».*) 

j 

1% CtmipH 



89 

522 

3 

l’i 

4 

18% 

12% ChmpP 

J2 

43 

17 

20 

:a% 

13 

18 

76% 

I6’> ChlAAA s 

.16 

.9 

13 

994 

18% 

17% 

18% + "5 

29 

17% Chi MB 5 

.18 

.9 

14 

40 

18'* 

18 

181-4 + '* 

21% 

18") ChiRu 

7JOO 8J> 

12 

2 

20 

20 

20 

117V 

6% ChfDva 




51 

918 

9'* 

9V f % 

38% 

in: Chilfns 

.17 

J 

29 

107 

33V 

33% 

33':* - V 

S 1 * 

14 Ciiadol 



5 

1C99 

31% 

30 

30V +1 

35 

1Mb CirFsl 

1.000 14 

9 

a 

33% 

33 

33V + % 

33V 

MV, C tv Gas 

l JO 

33 

10 

23 

31 <* 

31% 

31% 4- % 

44% 

35% C lor mi 

1.936 tA 


14 

44% 

44% 

441*0— '* 

12% 

8V ClarkC 

J8a 

2.9 

10 

4 

P* 

9'* 

•*■* 4- 1* 

45 

24% Oortnl 

J5o 2J 

9 

7 

3W 

36% 

36% - % 

22'* 

11% Ckwavs 

.16 

IJ 


20 

13% 

13!* 

13%- % 

8% 

39s Cagnltr 



83 

9 

4% 

4 

4% 4- % 

10% 

6V Cohu 

JO 

21 

9 

16 

9V* 

9% 

0% 

5V 

IV ColFwts 




40 

5 

41b 

4* 

24 

W* Com fed 



6 

29 

22% 

31-’* 


MV 

7% Com Inc 

.16 



303 

7% 

7% 

*7V 

12'.* 

6U ComPD 




10 

11% 

11% 

11% 

13’o 

49* CmpCn 




1046 

7 b 

6% 

6V- V» 

10% 

Si* CmoFcl 



15 

38 

7% 

7% 

;i- 

20V 

14% Cnchm 

AO 

21 

14 

9 

19'* 

18% 

19% — Vb 

10% 

6% Caned F 


258 

1 

7V 

TV 

7V— l* 

18 

4% Connlv 



9 

I 

18V 

16V 

18V— % 

25": 

13% ConrCp 



7 

39 

19 

18% 

19 ♦ V* 

9% 

5% Cotw.1 


103 

397 

8% 

8 

B'.S f VS 

S’* 

!■■» Cora wt 




125 

4% 

3% 

4 + '* 

10 

4% ConsOG 




83 

5% 

5 

S’- + % 

% 

ConOG ml 



55 



— 

33 

la'* CnSIar n 



27 

330 

27V* 

26% 

27Vj + l* 

14% 

3'.-« CnSIrwi 




31 

13 V* 

13% 

13V j — % 

IS 7 * 

7% vIConfA 



8 

7063 

12’« 

12% 

1230 

M 

o% vlCntApI 




3 

>6 

16 

la 

28% 

IF ; Coni MU 



9 

4» 

26 

25 

TS’b + % 

UVc, 

10V Conv5t n 

1.W 

4.1 


203 

17V 

12V 

12V + V* 

16V 

17V Caalcv n 

Jfle 15 


53 

7£T« 

165* 

185* 

3''j 

2% CmCr n 



21 

8 

TV 

2% 

2% + V t 

10 

9'* CnlrAAn 




144 

O’* 

9% 

97* + V* 

IT 1 . 

7'.; CrslFo 

15r 

U 

9 

14 

10% 

10 

ID'- + U 

35 

25% Cross 

44 

4.1 

18 

56 

JJ'J 

34% 

34V + '.a 

171* 

f9* CmCP 



9 

JO 

IP-; 

17V* 

1?; + V 

1ST* 

7% CrCPB 



7 

33 

ir.4 

13 

13 1 . J- V 

7% 

4% CrownC 




5 

7% 

7% 

7% 


% CrutcR 



1 

473 

0 

» 

■■i -e '■« 

4% 

•* Cr/slO 




1090 

’* 

% 

% 

25 

11V Cubic 

J9 

1.3 

i: 

70 

22% 

22 

22 'm -t- 

Jl‘4 

23V] Curtice 

.92 

19 

3 

36 

23V 

23% 

23V + % 

J 

tv CuSlEn 




53 


V 

I*.— ta 





.11? A 

33 

1 

34% 

24% 

24% — 

% 




JO 2 O 


IS 



?*-r 


9'* 

4% 

E*cel 

.400 4 J 

12 

68 






UV. II jod/n ^n>4J 11 1 l»J 115 « W - 

7 V 51 * Jocots 12 gfc SVt 5 ^- 

4 tt 2 'a JelAm 7 213 3 V 3 JJ 

iv* '•* JetAwt ]0 » J* 


6*; 29; John PC 

117* 5 JohnAm JO S J 


114* A Johnlnd 
iU 2 V; JumoJk 


12 

S 

5% 

iVs. 

5'h 

7 

213 

3U 

3V* 

3% 


10 

% 

% 

% 

12 

84 

7% 

7 



124 

3% 

3% 

3% 

■ 

423 

5% 

5% 

5% 

3 

33 

8% 

8% 

8'A 

17 

54 

3% 

2% 

3 


V GNCv 




16 

4 SP1 




20 

l»i GTI 




I? 






r. GalyvO 



23 

123 


1J0 

4J 

16 

Mi 

7-b GalLII 




III 

9% GalmS 



43 

12 

r% Gamco 




96 

2 % GDcfns 

S& 

A A 

a 

185 

2% GnEmp 

JO 

6 J 

12 

21 

J GnMIcr 

.lot 

J 

12 

24 







JO 

IS 

10 

61 

7 1 — ChRos 



4 

15 

1 % GooR wt 




7 

3% GeoBSDflJO 

9.1 


? 

2 V GionF s 

J0 

1.9 

15 

257 







J8 

L3 

1 ? 

Rl 

3V Glnmr 

I nob 3 A 

20 

147 

2V GlObNR 




3A 

3 GaldW 




9 

% GlbFid 




50 

sv GorRus 

.76 

3.9 

8 

/ 

6 % Graham 

J2 

4J 



5'- GrahMc 

IJ0C30J 

A 

118 

6 % GrndAu 

>to 

Zl 

13 







9% GrTech 



17 

19 


^18 

IJ 

17 

581 




14 

476 


.981 

8.7 

11 

39 


JOb 3.9 




.5? 



1053 


.40 

1.1 

14 

3A 

8 Gull 

J55e 

A 

1 H 

43 


39'* Jl'tt 

<w 2 w 
16V 10 
\TM 10 % 
1 SVt 9V 
■ZP* U 
4V 2W 
4 2% 

12V 79* 
7% 2W 
2'.t I* 
4W 2V 
4% 3W 
4% 3% 
4% 2% 
5V J% 
3% 2 
14V 10W 
30V* 22V 


KltCSPf 4.50 I2J 
KopokC 2 

KovCp JO 15 V 
KovJn JOe 13 It 
KeorNt M 18 14 
Katdim 55! 34 18 
KcvCoB .19 4J 21 
KevCoA ,15e 44 20 
KerPn JO 2J> 25 
KevCo t# 


KevPn 

KevCa 

KarCa wt 

Klddewt 

Kilem 

KlnorH 

Kirbv 

Kit MlB 

KleerV 

Knoll 


KoaerC 232 U M 


: 37 37 

4 3% 

13ft 13% 
13W 131* 
10% 70% 
10% 19 
3% 3% 
3% 3% 

10% 9V 
2?* 2% 
% % 
3% 3% 
3% 3% 
3% 3% 
2% 2V 
57o S% 
2% 3 'A 
15% IS 
27 26V 


22% 15% 
12 

15% 5V 
70% 13% 
2 JU 18 % 
27% 10% 
7Vs 3% 
TV; 49* 

a 4% 
7% 4% 

:% i 
2SV 10 
10 6% 
14% 8W 


Oakwd 

OdttiAn 

OdOtB 
QhArt 
Otlalnd 
Olsten s 
OOklep 
Oopenh 
OriolH A 
OriOlH B 
Ormond 
OSulvn 5 
OxtrdF 
OsoriiH 


Ji LI 309 
40 1.9 W 
J4 J 20 


J)5e T.I 
.15 24 29 
JO U 28 


42 V W 
£IU ^ 
JS 14 30 


498 20% 
11 6% 

9 <5% 
8 21 % 
4 21% 

S3 28% 

10 3% 
190- fif* 

24 5% 

38 5% 

10 1 
31 25% 
18S 1 7V 
1297 I4'i 


19V 20% - 

A AVfc 
6% 8% - 
20% 2J% ' 
21 % 21 % 
25% 28 
3% 3%- 
4% 4V ' 
5% » 
5% 5% 

1 1 
25 % 25 % 
18 17 

13% 13% ■ 


131 * -I- : '4 

T% 

3% ^ 

10 ’'* + % 
2% + V 
.’* 

3% 

3% — % 
ZV— % 
S'-* — % 
25* „ 

15% + % 
27 i + W 


2% 19* 

3 % 1 % 

8 % 3 % 

22 11% 
20% 13U 
14% 8% 

27V 18% 
9% 2% 
J2'A 19V 
71* 4'* 

8'* 5 

34 % 9 % 
3 1 % 

«V 7* 
2V 19* 
33V IMS 
41V* Z7'A 
IT ID'A 
14'A 9 

IP* 9% 
14T* IO 

St’* 81* 


L5B 
La UarS 
LaPnt 

LndBnc 40 
Lndmk 40 
Laser 

LearPP LOO 
LeePh 

Lehigh a 40 

LelsurT 

Levitt 

LbtFPh JO 

L.fsRst 

Utfld 

Lodge 

LarlCo 

Lorlmr 

Lumen 48 

LuralvE 

Lurid 

Lvdal 

LvnCSs JO 


49 1% 

50 1% 

11 4% 

. 59 21% 
23 m 
293 11 
30 19'A. 
722 7% 

18 32% 
47 7% 

7 8% 
1 28% 
45 1% 

6 3% 

25 1% 

42 31 
1283 41% 
1B1 18 
28 11V 
239 11% 
21 14 
237 11% 


1% 1%- 
1 % 1 % 
4% 4% 

21V4 21% - 

19% 20% 
10% 10% 
18% 18% - 
7V* 7V 
32% 33% : 
7V 7V- 
8% 8V] 

28% 28% 
1% 1%- 
3% 3V* 

1«S 19] 

19V 21 - 

40% 40% - 
17% 17% - 
11V 11% 
11 % 11 % 
14 14 - 

10% 10% 


77% 

'1 HhllViU 

7V* Aslroipl 1JJ 14J 

8 

12V 

12'; 

m*- 

p\ 

1% 

l* AilsCA'. 

123 

*» 

'•3 



4V 

2': Allcswt 

6 

3'-s 

3': 

3"j — 

Vj 

y*» 

I Audiclr 

5 

2% 

2% 

2Ss — 


12V 

11 V Ausimtn 

221 

12' 4 

12 

12' 4 + 


19'a 

13”* Avondl £0 JA 15 

17 

12'* 

17% 

ir>*— 



6% HAL .10e 1J 
IOV HAAG AO 5L7 
11% HUBC Mq 3J 
4% Ha I Ha* JWfl .7 
!% Haimi 
1 Haimi wt 
*9; Hamall .93(114 
21% Hnovmn .05e J 
13'o HantrO S JO IJ 
v Haruev 

21% H astir & .15 4 

26% Hoshrsf 2J0 5.0 
28'* Hosting 40a tJ 
0% Him 

12' j HlthCr i J8I 2.7 
5% HlfhCft 
.;** HllhEv 
11% HetttiAA 44 44 
A’lj HeinWr JOe IS 
10 Holnlck .10 J 



50 

91 


1 



90 

4 

.iv 

■-* MOlmR 


220 

% 

?u 

3% HenhO 

70 

48 

5 

4% 




74ft 

2>* 

9% Hlptron 

19 

c 

14V 

14V 


e — % 
10 % + % 
20% + % 
5% 

2V* 

1% 

a 

25% 

27% +1% 
1% + ‘a 
34 A % 
<0'i + V 
30 W + % 

B%— % 
14 + V 

B%— % 
9'* 

14% + % 
SVa — % 
14% — ’.* 
2 — V 





3% 
SV* 
1% 
25% 
9% 
17% 
«* 
5% 
1% 
19% 
9% 91k 

1% 1% 
5% S% 
81* 8% 
4% 4% 

23% 

38% 
lVa 
10 % 

17% 


10V 5%Quet>gs .14 12 


32 8% 8% 8% — V* 


7 Hofman 
6’] Hally Ca J4 1J 
15% Hnrtn 

Hmlnsofl95 13.1 
14% Harml s 34 22 
6 HrnHar 
!>I HmHwl 
1JV HollPIv 1J0 9J 
:% hoiipwi 
3'* HduOT J6elB4 
I IV* HovnE 
8 't Howlln J5« 2.1 
18% Hubei A s Jo 3J 
1ST* Hubei B * .76 XI 
17% HudGn .40 1.9 
o% Husky O Ji SJ1 


% 

4% 

2 % + % 
14V + % 
2 

20 + % 
25% +1% 
22 '.* 

24% 

7% + % 
V 

18'*— % 
6’i — 

4% + % 
16V— % 
1 1% + V* 
23V + % 
24% + 9* 
21% f% 



7 

2J 

12 

1.3 

9 

I0J 


I0J 


1.6 

30 

3bft 

10 

IJ 

IS 

17 

15 



.W» 

5% 

5 Vi 

7% 

7% 

7% 

W. 

5V 

5% 

7% 

7 

71* 

16% 

18% 

18% 

8% 

SU 

B% 

16% 

Wik 

18V, 

3V 

3% 

3V 

2% 

2V 

7% 

12% 

17% 

12% 

70V* 

89 V 

691* 

4% 

4% 

4 '4 

l«k 

13% 

13% 

19* 

1% 

1% 

r«i 

1% 

T% 

38V 

37% 

38 

111* 

11 

11 

B% 

7% 

77* 

4U. 

4 


W; 

S'* 

5% 

7% 

7% 

7% 

22V 

72% 

27% 

1591 

15 

1W. 

A 

4% 

4V 


17% 

ti 

'X 

1 

3% 

1 

31* 

35* 

17% 

12% 

12% 

32% 

32% 

32% 



3% 2 U5R Ind 14 21* 2% 2'4 — % - 

17V 8% Ultinte ’ ■ 14 712 1«% 17% 17% -fc.%. 

13% 8% Onkorp 23 2^ 12 11% 12 + V* 

15% 11% UnJcppf J5 iO 38 15 14V* 15 + % 



•4 '• 



\ 




LIT. ...i, . 











\ 


\ 


V%; 


This Oaober, November and December, First Class passengers on our nonsrop flights from Tokyo to Los Angeles will enioy a menu including Pumpkin Bisque, Shrimp and Chicken Gurry, Four Seasons Lobster in Savoy. Cabba 
redpes created exclusively for Singapore Airlines by Four Seasons of New’ Yo A. Accompanied, as always, by such pleasant diversions as Doni Ferignon.Malossol Caviar and Hennessy X.O.,«xved by our gentle hostesses in their sarong 

















































« * -JL 

*** vy*--- i 
i •* » . 

r* ; «r. ' 

-'•* • - 7> «.*!< 

*■ Ir-s •’ '•. 




INTERNATIONAL HEHALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOMEMBER 22, 1985 

irnni CURRENCY MARKETS 


— __ INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVE 

w t SINESS PEOPLE 

n «iit ~ ■ — — ; — V.S. Saks 

Oj '■“"Nani®* Europeans to New Advisory Board Of Trucks 

Mrf' ^jiBrcnda Erdmann G^rale de Belgique SA; Sr Trc- Bank of Anaerk* has promoted buchi, who assumes the post of C - 

' emaxionai Herald Tribune . Holdsworth, chairman of JeremyG. Fair to senior vice presi- chairman. Muneiada Murata, ■who llcCOfU 

‘ -ryvfc. T l „ „ , Guest, Keen & Nettlefdds PLC; deoL Mr. Fair, who is based in was. c ha i rman , becomes a senior 




JijiBrenck Erdmann 

emafonal Herald Tribune 

TDON — The New York 
^change annoonced Thure- 


Bank of fhiragn (Continued from Page 13) 


„ . Ljqmde SA; Robert Stader* ettCb- *■>.<* '•64*8. and Abn. “ffi 


Mrf ' J^prenaa Erdmann Gfairale de Belgique SA; Sir Trc- . Bade of America has promoted ' kwii, «*»> assumes the post of O - ITf _ _ _ _ T 

" emaxionai Herald Tribune . Holdsworth, chairman of JeremyG. Fair to senior vice presi- chainnaa Munetada Murata, who jJ0f M\.GC0TtJ/ 

\ ■ -rvrvfc, — « _ x . ,, • Guest, Keen & Nettlefolds PLC; deni. Mr. Fair, who is based in was c ha i rman , becomes a senior 

..„k, *Vtnfc vfTL^ 01 * Andre Lcysen, vice chairman of London, continues as the bank's adviser. 

:&?S ShSSS Ei itaoralBnagertaMaiftlie. *922““' P*? “*»> (Condn " td,roB,Pl8 ' 131 

s=ht r? ^ Pfl w a> in European buS- ?**- land and the Nordic area; general h^LS, «!” dards - ^ lower standards allow 

S5¥»i=» sasssw jssr— - ta » — - 

« £* n said agjwaS Etatad von K*£ 2T 

J 3vifie the NYSE board on hrimi chairman of Bayeriache Mb- Middle East and Afnca. alrmo the snine of the Roekv 

> J - bu, ^ sas as international securi- toren Werice AG, and Sir David uJ*2SSfc1f Adafll Opd AG, the West Ger- Momiains, m the fannina areas of 

>fS?5 ** nndtinationfll securi- ELITuJSZ ^SoSw^dLpuLstaia. 

^ ■ : £T«» SWJS55SS* 

^ Hwadefabank A/S d^,and wffl takfS^responsi, SWFenylnt™Srtheea- SS £ 

f --JCi Jutch Airlines. Tbe otlw bns appointed Peter Schmahz-Joer- bffity for controlling the easting • ecotrve search finn. said Aimery de 

8TOSea ^ 1"®* P^oSo matoS Rochechouart^joinedKris ffiKhf wSitorfSS's 

^Ai Cario de general manager of its. branch in the bank’s services m Africa. He office. He was an executive search “ 7 “!*““ wealthiest of Detroits 

* '•lUM. > n nfvntftiw nfT«ii» r I A i - _ v* « : « * ■ _ . « . - - — . . . SUDUnK 


Dollar Tumbles in Europe and U.S. 


Compiled by Out Staff Front Dispatcher 

NEW YORK —The dollar tum- 
bled against major currencies 


upside momentum and dealers sold 
it down." 

Tbe dollar fell to a SS-month low 


Thursday as dealers had second against the Japanese yen, an 38- 
tb oughts about the strength of the month low against the Swiss franc, 
latest U.S. gross national product a 16-month low on the Ital i a n lira 
figures and on a belief that Con- dropped below the major sup- 


■ «**** 


- , — OVUUl" 

r>% rings and regulatoiy devel- 


ofinttee is headed by Scr- 

U TBt a i . president of KT M 
Jutch Airlines. Tbe othca- 


ish companies who was named a 
consultant to the NYSE last Febra- 

«y- . ,.; r . 

Copenhagen Handebbask A/S ■ 


Titiks have traditionally sold 
has been succeeded by Ian Hiu*. weU in certain parts of the United 

Middle Fan °^? I ^y*^ ur0 P c, * c States for their utilitarian value; 
M MeE y.mdAfnc^ along to spine of tlx Rocfcj- 

Opd AG.Lhe West Ger- Mm.,,-,;., In ,h^ farming STWK nf 

tgJT&SZ 

• * ®Pl But now they are popping up in less 

^^W^P^amemtoof JSSH^BTwcm b 


gress will pass a balanced budget 
amendmenL 

Dealers said the dollar also was 
affected by report in Nihon Keizai 
Sim bun, a leading Japanese eco 


___■ ,v„. ,u. nc m 5 LPiiug uuwu uutaca 

nomic ^newspaper, that . the MS. ralesai ,d that is bad for the dollar. 


pon price of 3.60 Deutsche marks. 

Mr. Johnson said the major fac- 
tor in the loss was an indication 
that “the balanced budget amend- 
ment may pass. The market is say- 
ing this win bring down interest 


firsa"-iKTCS 

1™*"°- Blodmfijdd Hills and we sold more 

um. He aKc ed . P. Mjdq d Era oncks man cm tel month." mar- 
-^ni/FefiybiteriiatiMttL theca- ve!ed william Hickey, general 
«aqve search firm,.said Auneiy de ^ AJan FnH RlrSirfrt 


Federal Reserve was seeking to sta- 
bilize the currency at 3 level be- 
tween 190 and 200 Japanese yen. 


Mr. Johnson said traders also 
had second thoughts about the 
GNP, which measures the total val- 


the Stockholm- 


"i*? ror: “ti 34 chair_ over ' fro® Mr. Sdunahz-Jbergen- Nomura Securities Ca of Tokyo tQ Eriksson chief operating officer, vneb^^m 

, * m ’ A Uml «w PLC; Jacques sen as head of the international has named Yoshihisa Tabuchi . He was president ofthegroup’s ais 

uman of Soa6t6 banking rdarions department presdent, succeeding Setsuya Ta- power dmsion. peoglcbuymg trucks for ten first 


UnOever PL 

ert, chairman 


mg machiTM- 

til Eriksson i 


suburbs. 

“It seems that no matter what 
happens to the economy, trucks sell 
wdl,” said Louis Stanford, owner 
of Varsiry Ford in Ann Arbor, 


J t *1 * >■■■■■■ II HI U VI tfUUCU i 

s^ = =- — — 

Th ursday 

mwm. 

•-*<35 

■■c : uia. Shies Include the nationwide prices 
: ci'an-T;* up to the dosing on wan Street 
r^®i»,ido not reflect late trades ebwwhere. 

j 

Jc2[A. 

' j! w k ^. itoefc Dhr.YM.PE WteHtoTlLow 


HMsBto . 

WBhLw Swdc 

to 4fe Vsma 
13H MVM) 
•to 2to Vertoto 
«to SH Vlolvan 


S View . 

Vtafoe 

«• 4M VtawilG 
T 2 to 7U 1 /OPtaK 
IMk Wto VirtcCo 
Sto 5 Vraud 


Div.YM.Pg XOi Klati U» OuatOiVt 

21 fc to to— to 
a u n « i» to lmt + b 

3 4to /to 4to + to 

i Sto Sto sto— to 

t 17 4 3to 4 + to 

11 }to 2to 2to + to 

jooxs f . i m nt m 
M 43 11 .U to to to 


B Month 
HWiUxr stoat 


Sto r?~T i 

DW.YM.PE ntoHtoaiiw ttmtonaol 


•to Tto WlnE B 
7to 3* WlnE A 
23to 1VM Wlnflrs Z34e1LT 
Uto ■ W UMun 41 US 
21 lift WkWwr J2 U 7 
Sto 2to WwxtoE 
T7to 12to WWMPMJO 12J 
22to 9 Wortftn ast 


Sto ' 
HXhHtan Low 


'* 1, ?j;ni .. 


(Continued from Page 16) 


. Unlmor 1.V3S17S- 
. ■“ u 

b 

— * v SiJj. Unltefv 21 

-M Unwin U2 7.9 1 

; ri ^ UnvOn 14 

•C.i.fiC tOSuv UnivHs It 

..^^ UnlvRu Mm AJk 
'■• “Ut .VurtUnvPof 

Tag y- 

: * jXCailVSTn Me M 

VoifvRol/a t3 11 
i I r 1 Volsprs M ts 17 
Sif FlrfV=y«rlt 

—v zFlKftHF -• « « 

“ ia] g^VlRJBfl 

^ siaai 

sJiw' tx Ttnnrsi 

:: 'ttsa t> 

m ■ | 

:-wir.i«aE; V V U 

^rijemscc- M 

v A- fti 

■•*:. •* r ‘ ~ NASDAQ pri 

• tier pr^ttf 3 pjn. New Yi 

r; r«<?a: J'j a The Assoc 
-r 1- >x!x . 
irK; 

l*is yes sot 

me® ^ J*-- “ 

r csz: a 


was - ,o w 


ai ii in it +to 

20 23to 23to 23to— to 
• 2SH 2» 2SU— H 
» ito ito Ito 
«3 ria lto m 
37 12to T2to l2to + to 
12 14to MM. 14V. — to 
7 7U 7 7to + M 
5 2] to Tito 21to + to 
VI 12 -llto 12 — to 
SO 7U Tto 7to 
2 17to T7to T7to — to 
20 Uto llto 12to + to 


in - 99 m ms vto + n 

4 2Dto 28to 20to + to 


7to 3to WTC M 4& 4to Sto 4»— to 

3Sto UU Woffljar 40 LI » SW » 34 — to 

»to U WonoB .14 J 3372 10 Uto If + M 

^to^WSt •” • - st ^ ^ 

llto 4to WshHi - 7 403 llto ID II -Hto 

00 76 WsbPit . M A 14 MS 115toll3to 11514 +ito 

MW I4H WRIT* 13i 7.113 91 n 17to 11 

llto TtoWotocB .14 IS M 5 M Sto Sto 4- to 

Sto 3 WIMrO U M w 3to— to 

Wto J3to WtMdpf 242 1S.1 IS 14to_14U 14to- to 
fto lto Wtblnvn 71 IW Sto Sto 

t toWMTlnwt M to % to— K 

10 7to Wtdfltn 1J2 U3 t 147 fto fto fto 

12 lto WMKh IS 47 llto n 11 

. u Sto Wdttrn 11 aa im ia% into 

l9Vk 4to wall CO 4 4 Uto Dto Uto 


aito i«to wrothr 


Sto Sto Yank Co 


Sto 3to Um*r 


.1 27 Me K 


97 4to 4to 4to— to 

3B Afe 4to 4W 

IS 22to 2lto 22U + to 
13 f » f — V» 

it 3Jto 20 20H+ to 

S3 Jto 3to Jto 

44 i4i« I4to llto— to 
S3 10 Vto fto— to 


7U 7H Tto 


5 Sto Sto Sto + to 
IS Sto Jto Jto— to 
IS 14%. UU 14 to — to 

2 % % TLi 

M7 9U »M fto 
47 71lh 11 11 

22 lOto ltf«s lOto 

/$ “8 

MB- Sto 3Vk 3to + to 
14 40V, yph 40W— to 


.. . 4to wall CO 
3M h WnOAni 
4 2to WaICnf 
41 U 20to Waco 41 U li 
2% % VMasoco 

Uto Sto WsiBcC 20 

at aasas * 2 ? 

23to 7U WIHlfh n ' 15 

21to IttoWIRET US 8.1 14 
15 V. 4to VWSLa a u s 

24to llto WhrEn* II 

-4to - 2U. Wichita 


AMEX Highs-Lows 


voj^-s 2JU 

Vt^oc S6 17U 1«J. rnk+to 


Thursday^ 

arc 

Prices 

NASDAQ ericas as of 
3 pjn. New York time. 

Via The Associated Press 


saiah 

Dfv. YM. IDOt Htf> -U» 3 PM l 


sto 3 WKSus 
m . to wk*Mw» 

32H 20 .WKtaspQJD U 
Uto ftoWtomrn M 4J 
2U 1 WllsnB 


IS 14 4^3^40^-^ 

U 3§ lilt 12to U* + to 
21 532 lto a SU 

is 451 uto Uto uto -Hto 

14 51 ins lfto ifto— u 

5 117 MVk Uto MVS + to 
II 10/6 llto 15* 14 + VO 

f 2to 2to 2to 

^as 

345 2fto 2ftt 29U- U 
7 3 fto fto fto— to 

2 Tto n* lto- to 


Inin in wet 

Dto. YM- Mh Won lw 3 PM. an* 


Mzacorp 
BrawnFar A 
ESI ind 
Hatty Cora 
NWUPIctn 
Oxford Fit 
SOto73(W 
SmlthAO B 

valtoyRacs 


CSS Ind f! 
Vlatten Inc 


12 Month ' 
Htoh Lew Stack 


Artdal 

CcndaaWlnc 
Giatfirr 
HameGpn 
NowprtEI 
PaJi Cora 
SaMYCan 
SMProd 
Vulcan Cora 


Guardodi 

Hudson Gen 

NooilMbft 

RfKtAicB 

SeahrdCP 

Trtoflox 


sinks Mb 

ERCUttJ 
Hama lr Os 
LatUoBPrt 
OhtaArt Co 

ROStASCA 

SmSttAOA 

UlUtnafc 


car. There is “a perceived image of 
the vehicle, especially by young 
people,” he con turned, “that it ele- 
vates them socially” 

Women, meanwhile, “are a fairly 
large portion of primary drivers of 
light utility vehicles, like the 
Bronco H," noted Roger C. Olsen, 
director of Ford’s Truck Sales Pro- 
motions. “They like the reliability 
and handling and perhaps some of 
them no longer want to be associat- 
ed with the suburban station-wag- 
on scl” Trucks, be added, have 
become socially acceptable. 

Pete Tam beau, a mechanic who 
lives in tbe small town of Algonac, 
Michigan, said he recently bought a 
Ford pickup as a second family car 
because he often has things to haul 
But that is not the only reason. "T 
like the security of riding in a 
truck,” he said. “My wife has a 
small car, a Chrysler Omni, bat 
when we took a vacation down 
South not long ago, we drove the 
truck," he explained. “I have a cab 


The U.S. Commerce Depart- ue of a nation’s goods and services, 
mem said third-quarter growth of “A kit of the increase was due to 
GNP was 4.3 percent. “The dollar inventory and government pur- 
ran up slightly on the GNP report rhays that won’t be repeated so the 
and we left it Wednesday at rela- fourth quarter will be weak." he 
lively firm levels,” said Earl John- said. 

son, vice president at Chicago's The U.S. currency ended in New 
Harris Bank. “But Asia decided York at 2JS835 DM, down from 
overnight that the dollar had no 2.61 JO on Wednesday. Earlier in 

THE EUROMARKETS 


Frankfurt, it was fixed at 2J8S8 
DM. Financial markets were closed 
in West Germany Wednesday. 

In Tokyo, the dollar dosed at 
202.00 yen, down from 20185. Lat- 
er in New York, it dropped to 
201.60 from 202.85. 

The pound closed at 51.4415 in 
London, up almost a cent on the 
previous European close of 
S1.433S, after briefly touching a 
high of $1.4485. In New Yort it 
dosed at $1.4465. up from $1.4355. 

Other late rates in New York, 
compared with late rates Wednes- 
day, included; 7.8740 French 
francs, down from 7.9575; 1,741.00 
Italian lire, down from 1.761.00. 
and 2.1 150 Swiss francs, down 
from 2.1425. 

Earlier Thursday in Europe, the 
dollar closed in Zurich at 2.1233 
Swiss francs, down from 2.1400. It 
was fixed in Paris at 7.899 French 
francs, down from 7.911. 

(UPI. Reuters! 


U.S. Rally lifts Primary, Secondary Markets 

By Christopher Pizzey Morgan Stanley lead-managed a graph & Telephone Corp., which 
Reuien $ 1 50-million bond issue for Procter issued a S 100-million bond paying 


By Christopher Pizzey Morgan Stanley lead-managed a graph & Telephone Corp., which 
Reuters $ 1 50-million bond issue for Procter issued a SlOO-mfilion bond paying 

LONDON — The dollar- & Gamble Inc. that had 150,000 916 percent a year over 10 years, 
straight sector of the secondary En- warrants attached. They were sold priced at 10034. 
robond market ended firmer t0 co-managers by auction. Tbe A/S Eksportfinans issued a 
Thursday, although below the host bond is callable after four S lOO-million bond paying 10 per- 
dav*s higher levels, after an active y ears - pays 9% percent a year and cent over 10 years, priced at 10014. 
session. In addition, the primary waspriced at 101%. In the floating- rale- note sector, 

market sprung back to life with a The warrants are exercisable into Merrill Lynch launched the antid- 
variety of new issues emerging, identical, non-caDable bonds. If the paled issue for Spain that emerged 
they added. warrants are exercised in the first as a S100- million note paying five 

Wednesday’s after-hours rally ^ our y ears « the host bond must be basis pants over the six-month 
on the U.S. credit markets sparked surrendered; thereafter, exercise is London interbank offered rate, 
a rush of buying at the start of i? cash. The warrants were auc- The 15-year issue was priced at 
trading and some longer-dated dol- tiooed at an average price of 100.05 and was quoted at about 
lar straights jumped to show gains S 1 8.89. 99.92, against the 15-basis-poini 

of % to I. Although prices later Bids were received for the war- total Tees, 
me back, the market still showed ran ^ s in 3 range of $12 to $25 and In other sectors, the Swedish 
ies of between V* and % at the lowest accepted price was $16. power company, Sydkraft AB, of- 
ase. At the end of the day, Morgan fered 300 million kroner of bonds 

The day’s most novel new issue Stanley quoted the warrants at $20 paying 9\ percent a year and 
is a development in the so-called l 9 S22. each and the host bond at a priced at 99%. The seven-year issue 
armless warrants” formula re- discount of about 1%. was jointly lead-managed by Ens- 

ntly developed by Morgan Stan- Another top-quality borrower to kilda Securities and Privatbanken 
f International, dealers said. enter tbe market was Nippon Tele- A/S . 


came back, the market still showed rants m 3 range of $12 to $25 and 
rises of between V* and % at the the lowest accepted price was $16. 
dose. At the end of the day, Morgan 


truck," he explained. “I have a cab The day’s most novel new issue Stanley quoted the warrants at $20 
on the back and my Hole boy can was a development in the so-called to $22 each and (he host bond at a 
play hark there and my wife and I “harmless warrants” formula re- discount of about 1%. 
can sit up from and listen to the cewly developed by Morgan Stan- Another top-quality borrower to 
stereo." Icy International, dealers said. enter tbe market was Nippon Tde- 


Satasbi Nat 

Dto. YM. Wta Htah Law IPALQrae 


12 Month 
KWiLo* Stock 


Sotos in Net 

Dto. YW. IOh Kkft LowSPJWjQllto 


12 Mount 
Htoh low Stock 


Dto. YkL *MB» ln Hloa Law 1 PM. Ota* 


K Month 
H Ion Low Stock 


10U Htoh Low 1 PJA. CJfoe 


27 llto BostBc 
10* 4 BstnDto 

an* 12 * BstnFc 
14 S* BrcwCP 
7to am Branco 
4t* . ft BntfTom 
Uto Sto Brunos 
24V. UU BulltfTs 
20to 72* Bruton 
zi is BurrBr 
29U 23U BMAl 
9to 3 Bu&Inhf 


1D0 X7 

15 

24ft 24* 26* 



. 3 

4* 

4 

4* + * 

Me U 

4X1 

30* 

» 

30 +1 



41 

10ft 

ID* 

lOto— * 

.12 

14 

30 

a 

3* 

3*— to 



257 . 

1* 

lto 

,1b 

12 

732 

' 14 

IX* 

13ft— * 



304 

23* 

22ft 

23* + * 

J24 

1J 

2M 

15 

14* 

14*— to 



37 

1716 

17 

17* + to 

U4 

34 

105 

29* 

28ft 

28ft- to 


1154 

7ft 

7* 

7*. + to 



31* 18to 
10* 4* 


3* 3«-U 
2 2 —to 

MU 15 + * 

gte 

12* 13U+U 
15* 1Sft + * 

i|-;g 

*§* 8* + to 
21 21 * + * 
BH 8*— * 
WS IB 

9* Vto + to 

24 24to — to 

2flk aKrft 

U* M* + U 
6to Gto 
ft* 4*— * 
19 lfto 
35V5 25* 

44* 44*— U 
41 41 — * 

in* is* 

31* 31*- * 
24* 24* 

17* 17* 

14* IS*— * 
22to 22*—' lto 
1IM IS* 

34 24* + Vi 

45to M + U 

'St 'St-* 

14 14* + * 

3* 3to + to 
M* l£ft 
3* 3U 
32to 32* +* 
If If* + to 

rr_* 

HV lfto 
llto HU— * 
2 2to 
41 to ilto + U 
43* 43* + * 

’IK '£ + * 

^to ^4 R + to 
17* 17 17V» — U 

Uto llto Uto 
18* IS 18 — to 
3* 3* 3* , 

6* 4* Sto + * 

28* 27* 2S + to 
Sto 8* 8* + to 
4* 4to 4* + * 
14* 14 I4U + * 
Tto Jto 7* 

7* 7* 7* + U 

.2* 2to 2* 

7U 7* 7* 

21* 21* 21* + * 

5 4U Jto 

lto lto lto 

T2M 11* lift- H 
7U 7 7* + U 

M* 14to 14* + .to 
UU llto llto— I , 
12* 12* 12* + to 
1 4* ffl— to 

49* 48* 48*— * 
3* 3* 3* — to 

2* 2U 2* 

44to 43* 44 
9* 9* 9* + to 
4* 4V; 4* 

,a r *+« 

St JS 

Uto IB 15* + to 
15 14to 14* + * 

iSS m u£ + to 

3* 3* 3* + to 

M 12* 13to- to 
14U 15* 14 + * 

24* 23* Mft +1V. 
13U 13* 13*— * 
19* If » — to 
30* 21 + * 

20* 20* 4- to 
lfto lfto— to 



15* fto JBRxt s .14 U 128 


Bto 3* Joe knot 
41* 25* JockLto 
25* M* JomWIr 
B* 4* JetMort 
23* 14* Jertco 
7* 3* J on (chi 
10* Sto JotBhsn 
22* f* Junes 
20to 13* Justin 


244 

29 

299 

35 

.M J 599 
t 14 
93 
331 

AO 15 108 


34to 13to KLAs 
9 4* KVPhr 

2ftto 13* Komans 
19* 13to Korchr 
17* 9* (Cosier 
10* 4* KovUen 
*4* 40to Kemp l 
SOto 30* KfCnU 1 
Sto 4to Krvtx 
IT ft* wvTra 
B* 2 * Klmhrk 
21to 13 Kinder 
13* 4* Krov 
16 * 11 Kraoer 
29to eto Kulcka 


M J 1794 
JM 4 57 

3ft 13 489 
.121 1.1 328 


llto 11* ITU 
ft* ft* ft* + * 
37* 37* 37V:— * 
24* 24 24* + * 

4* 4to 4to 
23to 23 23U 

4* 4* 4*— U 
8* 8* 8*-. * 
23* 21* 23 + * 

15* 15* 15* -f * 


21 * 21 21 
8* «* I*—* 
35* 24* 74* + * 
llto Uto it*- * 
11 Uto 13*— to 
9* fto fto_ to 
44 43* 63*— to 

f* fto 9* 

2* Tto 2* 

18* IS 18* 4- * 
7* 7to 7U 
15* 15* IS* 

10* Uto 10* + to 


22to 19* Old5ptC£40 11J 5 

33* M* OnaBCP 52 U 128 

V* 3* OflUne 47 

19* 12* OptlcC 320 

48* 22* OullcR 2303 


22* 22* 22* 

32* 32* 32* + to 
4* 4* 4* + to 

14* 14* 14* + * 

27* 25* 27V* +2* 


12* Orbonc 



10 

14 

M 

14 

«_ 

* 

5V, orbll 



If? 

TA 

4* 

ft* 

— 

ft 

•ft OrtaCP 



419 

7 

Aft 

4ft 



U 

12* Oshmn 

.20 

15 

934 

Mto 

1.1* 

13ft 

— 

to 

26ft OttrTP 

276 

82 

51 

33ft 

33ft 

33* 

+ 

U 

Bft OvtEkp 



3 

11 

1! 

11 

+ 

* 


OwnMS 48 1J 258 


12 * + * 

s*:s 


32* + * 
•3 — * 
38to 
J* 
ft 

15* +* 
34* + * 

32 

23 + >4 

2D +1 
24* + * 
4* 

17 + * 

33 

22 + to 

li 

If* + U 
29* + * 
4JU + * 
SfiU— to 
39 

47*— lto 
29 — to 
24*— to 
41* 

41* +1* 
I* 

13* 

19 

II* + U 

is*— to 
4to — U 
19* + to 
» + to 
15* + U 
19* + to 

1* + ft 

10 — U 
4 — to 
24* + U 
5* — to 
is* + * 


164 

5* 

5* 

S* 

+ to 

1405 

21ft 

21* 

21* 

+ * 

294 

13* 

12* 

13* 

+ * 

1350 

21* 

20* 

21 

+ *6 

34 

51* 

51 

51 

+ * 

187 

23* 

»* 

23* 

+ U 

112 

15ft 

15* 

15* 

- * 

12 

14 

14 

M 

- * 

286 

17ft 

17* 

17ft 

+ to 

71 

58* 

57* 

57* 

— 1 

104 

27 

24* 

24* 


•71 

5ft 

5* 

5*6 


7 

10* 

ID 

10* 


20 

287 

k 

k 


552 

5W 

2 

2 

+ u 

374 

22 

2tto 

22 

+ ft 

20 

48 

47* 

48 

+ * 

4434 

7* 

4ft 

7* 

+ to 

1031 

17* 

1446 

14ft 

— to 

831 

38* 

36*» 

38* 

+1* 

7 

34ft 

34 

34 

- * 

5 

•* 

6* 

6* 


2010 

45* 

44 

44ft 

+1* 

40 

26* 

25ft 

25ft 

+ * 

1038 

22* 

21* 

21ft 

— * 

109 

18* 

18* 

18* 

+ * 



1<* 15* 1ft* + * 
to * ft + V» 


33 +1to 

ts-to 

15* 

Ift + * 
7*— to 
It* 

5* 

15*- to 
19 + to 
IT* + to 
7* 

35 + to 
28 + to 

8*— * 
24* + to 
7* — to 
10* + * 
is*— to 
2* + to 
»* + to 

g* +* 
jgft— to 

a* 

10* + * 
a* + to 
a* + u 
2 «• 
la* — to 


25 

17ft Stwlnl 

.72 

11 

2 

23* 

23 to 

23* 

a* 

5ft Sltfel 


112 

7ft 

7* 

7ft 

22* 

8ft Stratum 



247 

22 

21* 

aft 

23ft 

15 Slrykr i 



37 

24 

23* 

23)6 + * 

171* 112 Subaru 

128 

W 

35 

142 

161* 161* — * 

76* 

39% SubrB 

1.92 

25 

137 

76* 

74 

74 — * 

4ft 

2* Summa 



191 

2ft 

2* 

2ft + * 

R 

7* SumtHI 

.10 

1.1 

742 

0* 

Oft 

lift + to 

ft SunCsl 



407 

lto 

1* 

Ilk 

ID* 

6* Sun Med 



81 

9* 

9* 

9* + * 

10ft 

7ft Sup5kr 



5 

0* 

8* 

8* 

4* 

3 Suprlen 



36 

3* 

3* 

3* + * 

li 

B* SvmbT 



170 

9* 

9 

9* + * 

14* 

•ft Srntech 



777 

12* 

lift 


5ft 

2* Svnirex 



B04 

4* 

3ft 

tfto 

12ft Svsam 

JO 

ID 

53 

19* 

10ft 

I? + * 

26to 

8 SfASOC 



1172 

lift 

n* + * 

7ft 

3* Svstln 



193 

7ft 

7* 

7ft -V * 

IS* 

14* Systmt 

DB 

J 

110 

25ft 

a* 

25* + * 


14 I TBC 2 

27ta Uto TCAC& .1ft * 51 

JVa aUTuCVivs 125 

28* 12* Tandem 1729 

8* 2* Tender. 2400 

14* s* TeCom 3 

22 9 Telco 755 

3ft* 20* TIcmA I 1337 
12* 4* TelPlui 1065 

2ft* Uto Tefocrd JB U 138 


4* i* relvW 
20 lto relate 
If* 9* Tehran s 
10* 3 TermDt 
Mto ft TherPr 
13* ft* Thrmd s 
28* 15* ThrdN s 
Mto 5* Thoiirc 
20* 5to ThouTr 
15 4* TtawEn 

Mto fto TmeFID 
2* to Tlprarv 
SB Bto TotlSv s 
17* 10 TrakAu 
12* ft* TrlodSv 
30 to 20 TrusJa 


si ZS 699 
174 
547 
•75 
173 
491 
3 
105 
42 

^0 Ijft 109 


15* 

b QMS 

267 

9* 

» 

fft— * 

9ft 

Sto Quodn. 

tt 

1 

7ft 

Tft + * 

13ft 

9 QuakC s 

-38 12 15 

lift 

lift 

lift 

32* 

left Quant m 

2934 

22* 

21* 

2116 + ft 

5to 

2* Quest M 

127 

4* 

4ft 

4ft— S 

17* 

8* Quixote 

176 

17 

16)6 

lift— U 

16* 

7* Qualm 

6672 

12ft 

lift 

12ft + ft 


ilutioii to Previous Puzde 


JDQ □□□ □□0fi3 

iaa atoHB acisn 

qh aaaoaQasQ 
aaacainQaaaaa 
j aaa aanani 
m\nm oda aaa 
jo aaaEaaniooa 

1C30QDI3S aaoci 
aaa saaacjn 
pa nan aaa 
jBanaaaainnaa^ 
aciHSS 
Jo □□□□ asaQs 
IB mnn qaasa 


11/2!? /OS 



229 
199 
• 65 

.10 4 144 

J4 ]J 4 
1J73 49 288 
JO 33 33 

.141 74 

5 
897 

.14 S 176 
JB A 33 


17* 14* 149k 
7* 7* 7to— to 

17 14* 14* 

5* 4to 5 + * 

2* 2* 2*— U 
If* 18* If +* 
18* 18* 18* + * 
34* 34* 34* + to 
9 8* 8* + to 

5* 5* 5* 

» ft 

18* 17* T8* + * 





19ft 

19ft 


140 

4 to 

4ft 

ift 


S 

21ft 

91* 

21ft + * 

U 

35 

34* 

34* 

4 J 

25 

23* 

22ft 

23* + * 


440 

lift 

11* 

DU 


197 

Aft 

6* 

a*— to 


212 

32ft 

32* 

32* 


139 

1ft 

1* 

Mb + * 

13 



27 

27* + ft 


495 

4ft 

4* 

416 + * 


361 

31 

30* 30*— * 


25* II 
34* 13* 
19* 5 
23to 10* 
M 7* 
29to 14* 
58 24* 

2ft* It* 
11 * 8 * 
28* J1U 
II ft 
22* 11* 
14* ft 

R » 

32 21* 

5* 1* 
ft 2to 
34 11* 

5* 3* 
22to Mto 
4lto 25* 
25* 17* 
25* 15* 
48to 33* 
22 14* 

SQto V* ! 
13 7to i 
•to 3* 


M 17 37 

29ft 

DM J 435 
1338 
284 

UW 4D 120 
150 2ft 224 
D6 2 112 
.15r U 83 
1JD 37 545 
8 

JBe J 30< 
1541 20J 48 

13 
34 

IDO U 2hS 


Dfl J 1442 
.12 U 7 
Mt 22 420 
1J0 29 1139 
2i 1.1 308 
143 

144 35 60 

379 
1334 

JUft .7 63 

28 6.1 116 


10 10 10 
2ft 25* 2S* + to 
3* lto 3* 
lfto 18* 18* 

3* 3* 3* + * 
13* 13* U* 

10* 10 10 — to 

3ftto 35* 34to + * 
fto 9 fto + to 
Oft* 2ft* 26*— * 
19* 19* 19* 

2ft 2* 2*— ft 
ID* 10* 10* 

10* 18 10* 

4 3* 3ft + to 

7* 4* 6*— ft 
10* 10* 10ft— to 
25* 24ft 25ft + ft 
6* 4ft 4* 

7ft 1 7* + ft 

4ft 4 4 — ft 

Mft 14 14* + * 

* ft ft— to 
37* 27* 27* 
lift 11 11 — to 

9ft 9 9ft- ft 
25 24 * 24* 


25ft 25ft 25to + to 
14* 14ft 16ft— ft 
Oft 8ft Bft 
14 13* 13ft 

13ft Uto 13* 

27* 27* 27* 

58* 57* 57to - * 
25* 24* 34*— to 
fft fft 9ft— * 
29* 28ft 29* + ft 
7 4ft 6ft 
18* 17* IS + to 
Bto 7* Bft + * 

% ’J* 'RiS 

30V* 29* 29ft + ft 
5ft 4ft 4*— * 
3 2* 3 + to 

30* 30* 30* + ft 
4* 4 to 4* 

18ft T7ft 17ft— ft 
a 41* 43 + * 

22 21* 21* 

24* 24* 24* — to 
46* 46to 44* 

20* Mto 20* + 4k 
U* 13 13* —lto 

11 10* 10* 

4ft 4ft 4ft— to 


9* 

5* VU 



207 

6* 

6to 

6*— to 

14* 

7* VLSI 



14S4 

14* 

14 

14* + ft 

lift 

3ft VMX 



109 

ift 

ift 

ift 

lift 

7* VSE 

.lie 1-4 

1 

10* 

10* 

10* 

20* 

• valid La 



762 

8 

7ft 

7ft 

22ft 

8* ValFSL 



110 

19* 

19 

19 + to 

42to 

26* ValNII 

120 

U 

765 

30 

37V* 

37ft + to 

33* 

19ft VaILn 

.40 

ID 

45 

25 

24* 

a + ft 

16ft 

11* VanOus 

M 

2.1 

30 

19* 

19* 

19* 

IS* 

4* Van cell 



4 

4* 

4* 

4*— * 

6to 

2ft Venire* 



349 

5* 

5 

5 + to 

28* 

13* vicara 

Dfe 

5 

•8B5 

30 

19ft 

19ft + to 

13»6 

6* viediFr 

_22e 2D 

44 

8to 

7ft 

0 + * 

15. 

9* Viking 



27 

14* 

14 

14 — * 

20* 

13ft vitaiek 



29 

19* 

TBft 

I Bft— * 

12* 

5ft vodovl 



210 

Tto 

6(6 

Tto + * 

72 

14* Volilnf 



61 

19* 

19* 

19ft— ft 


20k S 84 
73 

24 13 123 
174 
111 
10 


24* 25* 25* 

12* 12 12* + * 
25* 25 25* + to 

3 to _* 

r* t* 7*— ft 


10* 7* 
35H 14* 
14* 7* 

7ft 3ft 
10* 4 

7to 3to 
52* 32ft 
32 28 

24* 12* 
33* 17 
II* 3* 
15 8ft 
Aft 3 ■ 

23ft 1016 
32* 20* 
9* 3 

f lto 
Bto 

f 

27* Wft 
13* Sto 
17 8 

M* -B* 
25* 14ft 
14 7ft 

lto t 

24ft fft 
14ft 6U 
W* fto 
W 5to 


! 1 

96 

9* 

9 

9* 



to 

574 

32 

lift 

32 

+ 

to 

304 

13U 

Uto 

13U 

+ 

to 

760 

7* 

7ft 

7U 



323 

Sto 

0* 

8to 

+ 

to 

18 

4 

5ft 

4 

+ 

* 

5 

52* 

51ft 

51ft 



838 

22 

am 

22 



97 

18 

17* 

17* 

_ 

U 

616 

2Sto 

94* 

25 

+ 

ft 

964 

5* 

sto 

.5* 



883 

MU 

14 

14* 


to 

392 

4 

3*6 

3ft 

_ 

to 

5 

Uto 

15* 

uu 

+ 

* 

5478 

29 

28* 

28to 

+ 

* 

80 

41 

4 

2* 

ffl 

4 

2* 



69 

12* 

ttto 

12* 



311 

7419 

•5* 

13 . 
29* 

T3 

29ft 

+ 

* 

288 

7ft 

7S6 

7U 

— 

to 

an 

13* 

UU 

13* 

+ 

to 

14 

6* 

6* 

6* 

+ 

to 

384 

1(B* 

10* 

13* 

+ 

w 

149 

9 

Bft 

f 

+ 

* 

£ 

21 

15* 

ao* 

15 

20U 

15U 




255 

& 

7ft 

7ft 

— 

to 

160 

m 

1ft 

1ft 



636 

Mft 

26ft 

Mft 

+ 

to 

740 . 

lift 

11* 

11*' 

— 

u 

■2 

llto 

mb 

lift' 

— 

ft 

466 

9U 

9V> 

9ft 





2ft— to 
4ft 

fft— * 
ji* + * 
49* + * 
19* 

16ft ♦ ft 
15 
5* 

s+t 

6ft + ft 

Sto 

4ft — * 

32* + * 
36* + * 
9 — * 
29 - * 

32* — * 
32ft + to 
lfto— * 
2}*— tt 
llto- to 
tu 

13ft + * 
18 +1 
Sift + ft 
SVA + U 
•to — ft 

7 

18 +1 
I? + to 
32 +1 
24* + * 
23* + * 
£Rk + to 

18*- ft 

Si 


4ft 1* Qecancr 23 

17* 10 06 tto S 207 

46ft 3314 Oull&p US V 187 
73* 40ft OOteCe 240 4D 153 
3414 5M4 OMKirit 1.10 ID I« 
47ft 23 Old (tat 44 25 554 


2* 2 2 — W 

13 to 12ft 12* — u 
m 40* 55* + to 
TOft 69 70V. +1U 

34 33ft 34 
33to 32ft 33* + ft 




97 

10ft 

10* 

10* 



447 

13ft 

13 

13 — ft 



171 

a* 

22* 

a* +■ ft 

.for ID 

140 

6* 

6* 

4ft — * 


U 

1545 

19* 

lBft 

IB* — ft 

JU> .9 

786 


22 


IDO 

3D 

3 Z 

44)6 

44* 




12* 

12* 

12* 4- * 



295 

18* 

17* 

18 

3D0 

3D 

1005 

78* 

76ft 

77ft + * 



85 

5to 

Sft 

5ft— to 



31 

6* 

•* 

6* 









140 




M 

11 

8 


20* 




202 

9* 

9* 

9* + 16 



?7 

16* 

15ft 

16* 

32 

2D 

12* 

12* 

12* 

Mb ID 

IBS 

25U 

25* 

25* 6 * 




7Va 


7 



218 

8 

7* 

0 + * 



155 

4ft 

4* 




2495 



5ft- * 



68a 

2to 

2 



26f 

2 

1ft 

2 + * 

JO 

3D 

53 

22* 

22* 




18 

4U 

A 

6 

JOS 






M 

D 

W 

12ft 

12* 

12* + to 

JO 

3D 

22* 

21ft 

22* + Yi 

t 


118 

24* 

a* 

24 + ft 

.16 

.9 

A 

TSft 

18* 

18ft + * 

48 

1.4 

35ft 

35* 

35ft 

DU 

4.1 

& 

41* 

41 

41 — to 






.15 


1443 

9* 

9 

9% 

S 

1034 

2Jft 

27* 27ft— ft 



65 

ID* 

10* 

10* + to 



596 

ift 

4 

4* + ft 



840 

13ft 

13* 

13ft + * 



S3 

Mft 

Uto 

MU— * 






a* *■ n< 



100 

h 



JO 

S3 

86 

15* 

15V. 

15*- * 



41 

11 

10ft 

10* 



49 

15ft 

IS* 

IS*- to 

JB 

J 

3 S 

10)6 

urn 

10U + * 



2* 

2ft 

2ft— * 

W 




30ft 




S54 

25 

23* 

23*— lto 



M 

8)6 

Oft 

oft— to 



182 

14* 

15ft 

16* + to 

J8a2D 

81 

28* 28* 

28* 

D0c 13 

3 

10 

18 

10 + * 



ft 

4ft 

4* 

•ft i- * 

2 

13 

22* 

23 

22* + to 


22 

10* 



.10 

ID 

1343 

Aft 

Aft 

4ft— to 

IJ8 

41 

340 

38 


77ft— vs 



1111 

19ft 

19* + Hi 



81 

a 

22* 22* + * 

J7 

J 


a* 

0* 




VS 

Mft 

13* 

14*— * 



m 




30 

2.7 

B> 

7* 

7* 

7* 

LOO 

JJ 

59 

29 

28* 

2 B* + ft 



424 

IS 

Uto uto- * 

IJ0 

44 

28 

27 

26 

27 +1 

DO 

1J 

350 

41* 

39ft 

Alto +1* 

JH* 

ID 

256 

416 

4ft 





5ft 

5ft 




SI 

Mft 

M* 

lift + to 



20 

left 

sa 

S3 

++ 

* 

* 

fft 

fft — 

* 

22ft 

22ft- 

* 

a* 

20* 


Mft 

14)6 + 

* 

416 

7* + 

ft 

12 

« 


18ft 

If — 

* 

15* 

15ft + 

to 

7* 

TVs — 

* 

16* 

17 + 

ft 

Ifft 

20 


11 

11* 


37* 

37ft 


3* 

3ft + 

ta 

4* 

4* 


45ft 

46* + 

* 

13* 

13ft + 

to 

18* 

IB* 


5to 

5ft + 

ft 

4ft 

4ft 


loft 

lAft — 

ft 

12* 

12* — 

* 

18to 

IB* + 

ft 

20ft 

20ft — 

* 




254 

2* 

2ft 

2ft 

13ft 






17ft 

10* xidex 

1284 


13ft 


1 — v ■ 

24ft 

14* YIdwFs 

•54 12 1248 

a 

24* 

34(6 + * 
































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


l l l R 1 Mi m h hi 


PEANUTS 

GOOL? MORNING ! THJ: 
15 A CHRISTMAS 
WREATH. ANP... 


1*3 124 125 I ' I I I II 


139 130 131 133 





THANK YOU! 

I LOVE 
^SAMPLES' y 



I 6IVE up; I CANt 
imagine Anyone else 
HAVING A5 MUCH TROUBLE 
A5 I PO SELLING 
CHRI5TMAS WREATHS- 



BOOKS 




SI 

52 

53 

u 

u 


■ 

54 

□ 

u 


■ 

b" 




56 

F 



58 

» 

83~ 



64 

65 




66 

07 








B 

69 




■ 

To 


iTT" 





T2~ 





73" 


BLOND IE 

MJfr WHE RS'P VC3 U <5 
( SEX THE CAKE, 


S AT A SCHOOL. JU HOW 
1 EIRTHDAV /^OU? IS 
£ RMXTY FDR ( ’*CLP LADY ! 
I OLD LADY SIMS'? 

i SIMS ,71. /- 


OLD LADY SfMS J]l>' 
IS TWENTY-SIX 1 


’’III WHATSTHE 
.*»/ MATTER WITH 
L [ AARS.BLMSTEW; 


SOLUTION TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE, page 17 


ACROSS 

1 Small calk 
5S.A. capital 
9 Start of a 
quotation from 
Santayana 

13 Opulent 

14 Adored one 

15 Pried 

17 Quotation: 
Part II 

20 Wagon part 

21 Dine 

22 Edict 

23 Collections of 
anecdotes 

26 By mouLh 
29 Quotation: 

Part III 

34 Guinness 

35 Hades river 

36 and crafts 

39 Pedagogue 

41 Of a chamber 

44 Precinct 

45 Bonne , 

Nice 

sweetheart 
47 Lone 
45 Quotation: 

Part IV 
51 Small-sried 
fowl 

54 Descartes 

55 A Gardner 


56 Butter 
measure 

58 Swathed, as a 
judge 

63 Quotation: 
Part V 

68 Obliterate 

69 End of 
quotation 

70 Artifice 

71 Luge or 
monoski 

72 Nick Charles’s 
dog 

73 Item in a pit 

DOWN 

1 Bird's crop 

2 Atop Everest 

3 Farm measure 

4 Quaker's 
pronoun 

5 Illuminated 

6 Gem St. 

7 Decorum 

8 Menlo Park 
name 

9 Resting place 

10 Little one 

11 “The 
readiness 
Hamlet 

12 He wrote “The 
Class" 

16 Like morning 
grass 


18 Sad cry 

19 Fermi interest 

24 Wall St. letters 

25 Starry 

27 Spatlate 

28 Once more 

29 Adipose 

30 Olive genus 

31 Back 

32 Take in 

33 Type of rax 

37 Ilium 

38 Sodium 
chloride 

40 Laugh or fence 

42 Time period 

43 Tolstoy 
46 Plasters 

together 

49 Little devils 

50 Persian fairy 

51 Bunyan’sox 

52 Asseverates 

53 Twangy 

57- boy!” 

59 Gig rig 

60 Color of 51 
Down 

61 Other 

62 Tinted 

64 Employ 

65 Resting place 

66 Crackpot 

67 Oolong, e.g. 



BEETLE BAILEY 

HERE I AM, ) SURROUNPEP 
A DO© / SYHUMAMS 


how pip rr happem 
they got to be 

HUMANS WHILE X GOT 
TO BE A VO&\ 


f WHYSHOULP 
|2 X BE THF 


LUCKY 

-.ONE'? 




ANDY CAPP 


ARE SOU GOIf<T , 
- TO STIR V’SELF ' 
, -JOEW/OR " 
JUST LIE HERE..?* 


’ CVMONj NOW, AV4KE ’ 

> A PEOSION yA 

C FOR ONCE IN yj 
C YOUR LIFE.-- TI 


v Xetr York "lanes, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



I W-TL 

WIZARD of ID 


-mcwv&n 

...m mi 

k BUPN&Z. , 


Mfrj 

REX MORGAN 



* WHBY"1CU HWE TO 
’ AMKEA DE3SON AND ' 
s-YOUDONTAVMCErn - 
r THAT/S A DECISION J 


VVH ocm&r 3 


vw#rw 1 


4iiniaiu/m 




THIS ISA A 
LOVELY A3 

cottaoe, 

ORAWTf it’s 
REALLY A . 
T HOME { r£r 


V* ITS BEEN MORE 
THAN THAT FOR A\E.J 
. KAYf rrs BEEN A 4 
^ HAVEN { WAIT UNTIL 
. YOU SEE THE INSIDE 


ARE YOU COLOT 
I'LL GET THE FIRE- 
PLACE STARTED 
IN JUST A FEW A 
m MINUTES' eflf 


r DON'T M ADO YOU KNOW > 
WORRY *** SOMETHING, MISS ) 
ABOUT ME' e WEBS'? YOU'RE THE 
I'M FINE i f NICEST THING THATS 

r>rvr i happened to me in a 

W&CIgT; ? IT . long TIME ( J—^ 


St&OT^VI 

EDuMSW 


"Mind changing horses? 4 


lee W 

GARFIELD 


r 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lpe 


Unscramble these Four Jumbles, 
One letter lo each square, to torn 
lour ordinary words. 


YEASS 


RfNBY 


KAMBER 


PLOUCE 


ISSm 


EffftfJ# 


m 


iHpl 

iSm 


'YOU WEIGH » 
175 P0UNP5 
ANP YOU . 

iaregfeetA 

L TALL > 




I HOW DO 
f YOU KNOW 
1 MV HEIGHT? 


* M'M ' *1 

DIVERSIFYING 


ms 




WHAT A PERSON 
WHO BELIEVE© 

IN FORTUNE- 
TELLERS MIGHT BE. 

L — 

Now arrange Uw circled letters 10 
Form Ute surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


W)Hd Stock Markets 

<A 

Via Agence France- Presse Nov. 21 

dosing price* in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Answer a 


Yesterday's 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

AmitBfdam 

Attmu 

Barcelona 

Bela ratio 

Bertin 

BnnseU 

Bactiarest 

Bodasesl 

CoocntKKKfl 
Costa EM Sd 
Dublin 

Bomba rail 

Florence 

Frankfurt 


{Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: CHAMP ROUSE HITHER FUMBLE 
Answer Snacks meant to refresh often end up doing 
this— "HEFLESH" 

WEATHER 


HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 


c 

F 

C 

F 



C 

F 

C 

F 


17 

63 

9 

48 

fr 

Bangkok 

31 

88 

25 

77 

d 

1 

34 


a 


Bel Png 

13 

a 

-1 

30 


21 

70 

16 

61 

0 

Haag Kong 

23 

n 

23 

72 


9 

40 

0 

32 

It 

Manila 

29 

84 

24 

75 



45 

2 

36 

d 

NewDalbl 

27 

81 

11 

a 

tr 


X 


a 

yon 

Seoul 

12 

54 

5 

41 


0 

32 


a 

w 

SkaneM 

19 

66 

12 

54 


1 

34 

0 

a 

6W 

Singapore 

30 

86 

a 

79 



41 

2 

36 

r 

ToftWSJ 

29 

84 

19 

66 

fr 

1 

34 


32 

0 

Tokyo 

17 

63 

a 

46 

Ir 

16 

6 

61 

43 

10 

4 

50 

39 

fr 

r 

AFRICA 






5 

41 

2 

36 

sh 

Algiers 

13 

55 

7 

45 







Cairo 

25 

77 

13 

55 

Cl 


Geneva 

0 

32 

0 

32 

w 


-4 


•5 


tw 

Istanbul 

14 

51 

10 

a 

o 

Las Palm as 

23 

73 

17 

a 

d 

Ltobws 

12 

54 

7 

45 


London 

5 

41 

2 

36 

r 

Madrid 

6 

43 

-6 

21 

Ir 

Milan 

4 

39 

2 

36 

r 


** 6 


>8 


o 


■o 

a 

D 

32 

IW 

Mice 

10 

a 

5 

41 

0 

Oslo 

3 

37 

10 

14 

o 


1 

34 

>1 

a 

0 


1 

34 

0 

32 

aw 

Reyfclavllc 

B 

46 

3 

3/ 

r 


11 

52 

a 

46 

r 

Stockholm 

0 

32 

■i 

a 

o 

SfrasOoorg 

0 

32 

-i 

X 

Sw 

Vendee 

4 

39 

l 


r 

Vienna 

i 

3* 

0 

32 

w 


- | 

a 


27 

3W 

Zorich 0 S 

MIDDLE EAST 

-2 

a 

sw 

Ankara 

u 

55 

o 

32 

to 

Besnrt 

— 

— 

— 

—m 

no 

Damascus 

a 

73 

11 

a 

d 

Jfenusolein 

24 

75 

12 

54 


TeiAVIv 

27 

a 

14 

57 



Cape Town 23 73 is M d 

Casablanca 19 u 11 52 o 

Harare 24 73 13 55 cl 

Loam 29 u W 79 o 

Nairobi 25 77 14 57 st 

Tools 17 63 a 44 d 

LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Aims 22 72 19 66 si 

Caracas 2S B2 19 66 d 

Lima 21 m 18 64 o 

Mexico CUr 24 73 S 46 A) 

Blade Janeiro 26 79 18 64 o 

NORTH AMERICA 


AMcntla 

Boston 

Cblcoao 

Denver 

Detroit 

KanolulD 

Houston 

Las Aimeies 


ABN 

ACF Hokflao 
AEGON 
AKZO 
ANtUd 
AMEV 

axkoti Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

SuefmiKinn T 
Catand HWo 

ElBovtor-NDU 
Fokkor 
Gist Brocades 
Hetneken 
Hoaeavens 
KUW 
Naardon 
NatNerMer 
NMIIovd 
OcevanderG 
Pekhoed 
Philips 
Robeca 
Rodamco 

Rollnco 
Rorento 
Royal DulCti 
Unilever 
VanOmmeren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 

AHpjcbs Gwrt index : moa 
Prevtoas : 23LH 


Art*a 2750 2800 

Bekoerl 8490 8500 

Cockerlll 21 3 21 J 

Cobepa 4525 4500 

EBES 3990 3895 

GB-lmo-BM 5200 5220 

GBL 274B 2725 

Gevaert 5150 5000 

Hoboken 5700 571a 

Intercom 3030 2950 

KredMbank 12300 12000 

Pvlraflna 7030 7020 

Soc Generate 2350 2400 

Sollnn B3S0 B330 

Solvav 6300 6050 

Tracttan Elec 5500 5658 

UCO 5660 5610 

Unero 2250 2200 

VMiie Montaone 5720 5650 

Cat-rent Stack Index : 29614a 
PrevMds : 2947 J8 


Hochtief 

Hoeotsf 

Hoasch 

Horten 

Hussel 

IWKA 

Kail + Sab 

Karstarn 

Kouihof 

KJaeckner H-D 

Kloeckner werbe 

Krupp Stahl 

Unde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mannesmann 
Mwencn Rueck 
Nixdarf 
PKI 

Porsche 

Preussaa 

PWA 

RWE 

Rhelnmetall 

Schorl no 

SEL 

Siemens 

Thvssefi 

Veba 


Close Pra*. Owe Prav 

w J2 GFSA 3900 390 

25650 251 JO Harmony 7 750 330 

165 16450 Mtvetd Steel ads ah 

212 21050 Kloof 2500 Kf.- 

425 410 Ned bank 990 99 

_ 3 ” Z r S^JF rn N ’ A - 

33950 339 JO Rusolat 2550 257! 

321 31620 SA Brews B2S BO 

™ S 46H) 453! 

320 320 Sand g«0 BBl 

> 96 w West Hold Ino HA. 

170. ID 165 _ 

5 W 5 05 Conrposlta Stock Index : WJL 
224 223 Prerk ta S : 129520 


170.10 165 

JW 505 
224 223 

200 197 

267 JO 26280 
2150 2130 

fS 3 
5 ’B 

MO 19? Jo 
494 485 

066 661 JO 
34150 346 

673 677 

17250 I73L20 
26450 264 


1 Close Prey. | 

Shell 

681 

681 

STC 

M 

mi 

Sid Chartered 

462 

464 

Sun Alliance 

563 

558 

Tate and l_vle 

SIS 

530 

Tescn 

2 95 

295 



39/ 


417 

417 

Trafalgar Hse 

383 

382 

THF 

161 

162 

Ultramar 

226 

225 

Unilever t 1219/331211/32 

United Biscuits 

221 

217 

n Vickers 



S woatwoiiti 

590 

588 

> P.T. 38 lodes : 112140 


n Previous : iio&BB 



9 F.TJLE.1M Index 



“ Previous : W*U) 
1 

5 


“1 


AMERICAN NOTES: A Journal 

By Charles Dickens. 234 pages. Paper- 
back S3. 95. 

Fromm Iniemaiional Publishing Carp , 560 
Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 

I N the first week of January 1842, Charles 
Dickens and his wife. Kate, left Liverpool 
aboard the steamship Britannia en route to the 
United States by way of Nova Scoda. Dickens 
was then a month short of his 30th birthday 
and most of his best work lay before him, yet 
already he was famous for “The Pickwick Pa- 
pers.** “The Old Cariosity* Shop,” “Nicholas 
Nickleby” and “Oliver Twist-** A vast follow- 
ing awaited him in the United States, and 
throughout his tour would subject him to adu- 
lation as passionate ***& incessant as that now 
accorded such lesser figures as Bruce Spring- 
steen and Michael Jackson. 

But su^jaim was not what Dickens went to 
the United States for. After reading accounts 
of the New World, he had convinced himself 
that it must be a more agreeable, less barbaric 
place ^han they had depicted, one to which he, 
with his ardent democratic sympathies, would 
respond more eruhusiastically-, he proposed to 
go to America and write a book, and his 
publisher eagerly embraced the scheme. The 
result, published the following year, was 
“American Notes.*” It caused ajnsocxablc up- 
roar at the lime but has since fallen into ne- 
glect; that it is available once again is a plea- 
sure, for it is, in every sense of the word, 
Dickensian — funny, picturesque, compas- 
sionate, exuberant, indignant at injustice. 

That is not to say that this is an especially 
useful edition of “American Notes." The 
sketch of Dickens on its cover is misleading; 
the Dickens who came to the United States m 
1842 was not the familiar bewhiskered gent of 
middle age but a dean-shaven young man with 
long hair. The text here is riddled with minor 
but annoying typographical errors. Most im- 
portant, no space hi been found for introduc- 
tory or explanatory material; the contempo- 
rary reader is left in the dark as to the 
cucutnsiances of Dickens's visit and the expla- 
nation for the sudden and rather startling 
change in his view of America as the trip 


rained of America as a fold of freedom.** Fa*& 
the rest of his tour Dickens was«o^m^h^ 

which turned ouTto^be^m ample supply, ifrf: 
was especially revolted by “the prevalence 
those two odious practices of dtewingam? 
expectorating," in which virtually all America*^ 
men seemed to engage. * 

Yet. Dickens bang Dickens, he coold po<j| 
help finding life and humor e' en in squalor. I*r 
New York, strolling along Broadway. “ImE 
meat promenade and thoroughfare.” be made 
me acquaintance of a pig, the description. off 
which must be recorded in full: f 

“Here is a solitary swine lounging homea.irr§ 
by himsdf . He has only one ear; having partoS 
with the other to vagrant dogs in the course off 

his city rambles. But be gets on very weM 
without it; and leads a roving. 
vagabond kind of life, somewhat answering td 
that of our dub mg" at home. He leaves; 
lodgings every morning at a certain hours 


Dickens found the United Slates not exactly 
what he had cracked it up to bs. At first all 
signs were favorable; ins reception in Boston 
was most friendly, and he admired both Har- 
vard College — be called it “the Univeraity of 
Cambridge — and the many “pubBc institu- 
tions and charities” that he visited. He was 
similarly impressed with the small towns erf 
New Englan d and the growing cities of Hart- 
ford and New Haven. £2 Hartford, though, he 
had an unpleasant experience that, although he 
does not mention it in “American Notes,” 
probably colored his view far the rest of the 
tour. At a dinn er in his honor (at which about 
70 dishes were served), he spoke out vigorously 
in favor of international copyright, a sore sub- 
ject in a country where book and newspaper 
publishers routinely violated the rights of au- 
thors; for this he was furiously attacked by the 
American press:. 

This did not deter Dickens from addressing 
himself to the subject on other occasions, but, 
as his biographer Edgar Johnson points , out, 
they “altered the visionary image he had enter- 


day in some maimer quite satisfactory to mm 
self, and regularly app ea ls at the door of hi 
own house «pn« at ni g ht , like the mysteziou 
master of Gil Bias. Hris a free ami easy 
careless, indifferent kind of pig. having a vdr 
large acquaintance aiming other pigs of tfe 
same character, whom he rather knows by siph 
tbim o o n ven w iticT!. ws hr troubles IM; 

self to stop and exchange civilities, but goe 
grunting down the kennel, turning up the new- 
and smaD-talk of rite city in the shape "0 
cabbagerstalks and offal, and bearing no tail 
but his own: winch is a very short one. for hi 
old enemies, the dogs, bare been at that too 
and have kft him hardly enough to swear by 
He is in every respect a republican pig- iP&g 
wherever he pkascs, and mingling, with flu 
best society, on an equal, if not supecuefost 
mg. for every one makes way when he Spears 
ana the haughtiest give: him the waiL if hi 
prefer iL He is a great jAilosopher. and sddoo 
moved, unless by the dogs before mentioned 
Sometimes, indeed, yon may see his small ejja 
twink&Dg on a slaughtered friend, whose car 
cass garnishes a botcher’s door-post, bur hi 
grants out, “Such is Hfe; all flesh is pork! 
buries his nose is the mire again, and waddles 
down the gutter; comforting himself with thi 
reflection that there is one room the less 1 ^ 
anticipate stray cabbage-stalks, at any rate.? 

Dickens was better as an observer erf tL 
American scene than as a delineator of tfa 
American character. He Hkcd Americans,/ 
“by nature, frank, brave, cordial, hospoa&k 
and affectionate,” though be imagmed therat 
be “of a doll and gloomy character.” He ws 
not taken by their distrust of strangers, the 
“love of 'smart* dealing” or their boctomha 


mxntioas Press,” which he considered 
“monster of de pravi t y " because of its abosei 
the freedoms it had peat accorded: wfaea.| 
returned a qnarter-cauury later be found j 
fike the nation, much matured and improve 
and was at pains to say so m a postscript! 
added to “American Notes” in 1868..,.. ' 


To be sure there is mare to be kanfad abou 
19tb-centmy America from TocqueviEe bu 
there is Ur more fun to be had fromIJidbfiri 
“American Notes” is as fresh and vigorous arfi 
it had been wrkten yeston%; its second chap 
ter, describing Dickens's storm-crossed Atian 
tic voyage, is as fimny as anything he cvp 
wrote. 


Jonathan Yardley is an thestaffafThe Wa 
ington Post 


By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal. 
West opened with two di- 
amonds, showing in his meth- 
ods 8-14 points with five 
spades and at least four hearts. 
Two spades by North showed 
a strong takeout in the major 
sorts, and North-South 
readied six diamonds, the only 
unbeatable dam. 

Six diamo nds, unlike six 
ebbs, is not exposed to a raff. 
North-South supporters left 
the room cheering, but had a 


BRIDGE 


shock when they returned: 
South had drawn tramps but 
misguessed in dubs. 

Making Che dubious as- 
sumption that West began 
with 5 -4-1-3 distribution. 
South lost a finesse to the 
queen. 

East-West reached five 
dubs, and North-South lost 10 

Neither s Wo m volaaretifaL like 


Voiklwooenwtr* 411 40650 

wolia &6S 650 

Com mordant Index : 176450 
Pravtaas : I7QJ0 


nrFANIA Son Francises » a 10 SO oc 

UCBAWIft Seattle 1 34 - 5 25 m 

Auddand 19 66 14 57 3*1 Toronto 19 66 10 50 sc 

Syanrr S 71 H 61 a W i i J U aota n 15 59 1 46 cl 

ct-etoudyi ta-loaav: lr-folr; Ivttall; navarcast; pc-aartlv cloudy; r-raln; 
sMMwerii w-waw; M^ior my. 

FRIDAY'S FORBCAST-- CHANNEL: SIlBhf. FRANKFURT: Snow. Tome. - 
I —-3 <30 — 271. LONDON: Overcasl. TiimJ-l (45 — 391, MADRID: Fair. 
T*mp. 8— - 4 146— 2SJ.NEW YORK: Rain. Ten*. 47 - 43 (117-1091. PARIS: 

Overcast- Temp. 7 2 (36 — 281. ROME: Overcast. Temp. 12 — 7 154 — 451. 

TEL AVIV: NA. ZURICH: Snow. Team. 0— -1 (32 — 301. BANOKOK: Clauav. 
Temp. 33 — 24 (91 — 75). HOMO KONG: Rain. Trmo. 24 — 21 (75 — 70). 
MANILA: Oav&i. Tmtip. 29 — 24 JB«— 73). SEOUL: Rain, Temp, 12—5 
(54 — 41). SINGAPORE: Showers- Temp. 31—3 (M— 77). TOKYO: Fobov. 
Temp. 17— 7(63— 4S). 


AEG-TeMuAen 
Allianz Vers 
Altana 
BASF 
Bayer 

Bov Hypo Bank 
Bov Vore Ms bcnfc 
BBC 

BHF-Banh 

BMW 

Commerztxpik 

CantGumml 

Daimler-Benz 

DetKASO 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Balk 
Drtndner Bank 
CHH 


23750 235 

1785 1748 
425 425 

26750 262 

260 25450 

IS 414 
4M 417 
288 287 

435 433 

60150 509 

273 267 

160 15850 
1231 1220 
431 434 

223 221 

71250 70650 
M5D3&5D 
227 237 

145 347 


BkEasI Asia 
Cheung Kong 
China Light 

Green Island 
Hang Sang Bank 
Henaerson 
Chinn Gas 
HK Electric 

HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK 5hang Bank 
HK Telephone 
HK Voumalel 
HK Wharf 
Hui eh Whampoa 
Hyson 
mri atv 
j online 
Jardlna Sec 
Kowloon Motor 
Mira mor Hotel 
New world 
SHK Proas 
Slehnc 

Swire Pacific A 
Tol Cheung 
wah Kwona 

Wing On Co 
Wtasor 
world inri 


24.10 24 

ZI.10 2120 
1840 1830 
N.Q. 030 
4735 47 

2275 2375 
1260 1290 
850 855 

12 1210 ! 
35 3525 
680 680 
785 785 

9.90 985 

, 4 1975 

2780 2780 

S£ & 

13JB 1170 
1540 1580 
1040 1040 
5450 B 
865 855 

1350 1350 
N.Q. 2075 
3050 MSS 
210 2125 
077 078 
180 174 

585 5 

260 2575 


Hong sens index ; 176251 
Pree hi e s : 175739 


AECI «0 930 

Anglo American 3800 3765 

Anglo Am Gold 21 000 20450 

Barlows 1350 1330 

Blwaar IBM 1850 

ButtelS 8450 KUO 

DcBeers 1510 t$to \ 

Drlefonleln 5600 5425 

E tanas 1785 1750 I 


AACara 
Ained-Lvons 
Anglo Am GaM 
ASS Brit Foods 
AS9 Dairies 
Bardavs 
Bass 
BAT. 
Beecham 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Bads 

Baxtaler Indus 
BP 

Brit Home 51 
Brit Telecom 
Brit Aennpace 
Brltoll 
BTR 
Burmtdt 
GoWo Wireless 
Cadbury Schw 

Charter Cons 
Commercial U 
Cons Gold 
Caurtaulds 
Dalgetv 
Do Beers i 
Distillers 
Driefbntein 
F Isons 
FroeStGed 
: GEC 

Gen Accident 

GKN 

Glaxo t 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Gulmecs 

GU5 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

imnarlal Group 
Jaguar 

Land Secu rates 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
Lanrtia 
Lucas 

Marks and Sp 

Meta) sax 

Midland Bank 

Nat West Bade 

P undo 

Pllklngtgn 

PMsaey 

Prudential 

Racai Elect 

Randlanteln 

Rank 

Reed Inti 

Reuters 

Royal Dutch t 

RTZ 

SoalcW 

5alnsburv 

Sears Holdings 


511ft 

510* 

288 

290 

163* 

560* 

266 

266 

140 

140 

459 

454 

682 

677 

295 

293 

302 

■go 

235 

215 

30 

30 

593 

585 

372 

305 

237 

222 

as 

315 

60S 

590 

369 

364 

205 

203 

455 

446 

238 

ZK 

393 

383 

301 

293 

650 

645 

145 

145 

213 

213 

213 

235 

509 

504 

ia 

IB4 

433 

425 

495 

433 

493 

498 

917 

916ft 

453 

450 

Susa. 


183 

172 

753 

743 

274 

271 

15 25/64 

15* 

393 

391 

763 

MB 

305 

3W 

993 

983 

221 

220 

445 

439 

719 

714 

220 

217 

334 

335 

321 

315 

769 

762 

509 

504 

182 

181 

470 

473 

192 

190 

520 

518 

459 

454 

714 

707 

428 

428 

306 

306 

134 

19 

794 

709 

U6 

130 

576 

459 

9 

693 

703 

331 

320 

44 5/3244 19/64 

549 

544 

758 

760 

378 

374 

120 

119 


Banco Comm 
Clgahalela 
Cred I tol 
Erl dan la 
Farm Italia 
Ral 

Generali 

1FI 

Italcememi 

I taigas 

Itainrabiiiarl 

Mediobunca 

Mon led ban 

NBA 

Ollvetil 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascente 

SIP 

SME 

Sola 

Slanda 

siet 


MIB Currant Index : 1862 
Pnerlocn : 1859 



Air Llaulde 
AHtham ail 
A v Dassault 
'Banco Ira 
■1C 

eonorain 

Bauvoues 

BSN-GD 

Carrafagr 

Clwgeun 

Chib Med 

Dartv 

Dumez 

EH-AaultuJne 

Europe 1 
Gen Eoux 
Hacnetie 
Lafarge Cop 
Leg rand 
Lesleur 

TO real 

Martell 

Matra 

Merlin 

Mlchelln 

Mart Hemtessy 

Moulinex 

Oceldentale 

Pernod Rlc 

Perrier 

Peuoeet 

Prlntemos 

Rodlolectin 

Redome 

Roussel uelaf 

Sanafl 

Skis Rasslanol 
Telemeoon 
Thomson CSF 
Total 

CAC Index : 23950 
Previous : 23478 




2410 2375 

2660 2622 
742 748 

480 
1915 1843 

«9 827 

21290 200 

745 803 

770 740 

1410 1460 

670 633 

2325 2315 
750 
2537 2530 

1548 1530 

1585 1540 

2300 2270 

14SS 1400 
2099 2110 

59 sans 


18*0 1039 

1647 1639 

634 
1430 1391 

2790 2640 
637 623 

293 279 


Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Hoove 
Haw Par 

India’-.? 

Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

Shanarl-lo 
Slme Dartjy 
S'pore Land 

S'porr press 

5 Steamship 
St Trading 
United Overseas 
UOB 

Strolls Times lad 
Prevlaas : 74785 


Alfa Laval 

Aseo 

Astro 

Allas Caoco 

Bolldan 

Electrolux 

Ertcsoan 

Esselle 

IkoxielatKMMn 

Pharmacia 

SaatFSoonla 

Saidvlk 

Skanska 

SKF 

SwetUdiMotcfi 

Votva 

Altaerivaertdm I 
Previous : 4197* 


ACI 
ANZ 
BHP 
Bora l 

Bougainville 

Casttemalno 

Coles 

Comalco 

CRA 

C5R 

Dunlop 

Elders Ixl 
ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 

Mver 

Not Aim Sank 
News Cara 
N Broken Hill 
Po seido n 
Old Co al Trust 
Santas 

Thame s Nation 

Western Mining 

westoae Benuna 
WoodsWe 

AdOrdtaartas I no 

Previous : n440 


Altai 

AsahiChem 

Asahi Glass 

Bejik a* Tgkvo 

Brfdoestane 

Canon 

Casio 

C-ltoh 

Del Nippon Print 
Dalwa House 
Dalwa SecurlTtes 
Fanuc 
Full Bank 


1W 35» 

585 6 

645 AM 
U4 286 
2.11 215 
5.15 5J0 

845 260 

175 283 

230 226 

N.a 230 
148 182 

250 259 
545 650 
054 056 

251 256 

144 146 ’ 

150 340 


169 163 

340 240 

310 3 09 
514 513 

143 143 

175 183 

171 ir 
193 191 

410 *05 

205 306 

181 179 

500 NA' 
600 590 

HR 103 


283 281 

445 442 

858 856 

213 212 

188 181 

8 0 

454 4 

148 170 

a 550 
134 
US 232 
275 2J4 
214 214 

2 210 
242 245 

255 3-56 

472 478 
276 880' 

213 225 

250 350 l 

S 152 
580 
288 ' 
217 | 
450 450 

ITS 1-26 


410 426 

770 770 

868 860 
726 734 

532 529 

1110 1120 
1840 1870 
392 405 

1220 1220 
891 BS9 . 
744 751 

7470 7360 
1430 1430 


Full Photo 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi 

-Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Lines 
Kalbna 

Kama! Power . 

Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
KVocora 
Matsu Elec lads 
Matsu Elec Warts 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi assn 
MitsubfaM Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mltsukoshl 
Mtsuml 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
HjkkoSfc 
Nippon Kogafcu 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon SUM 
Nippon Yusmi 
N issan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Pioneer 
Ricoh 
Sham 
Shimon _ 

Shlnetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bonk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo Marine 
Su mi tomo Metal 
Tolset Coro 
TaJsbo Marine 
TakedaOwm 
TDK 
Tellln 

Tofclo Marine 
Tokyo E lec. Power 
To ppon Krfntfno 
Turov Inti 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
YamalcMSec 

MMnVDJ. lades : nemn 
Pravtaus : 1364289 
New iMdex : H4I72 
Previous : 99688 


■M North East Sooth 

10 2 * 4 V 4 N.T. 

taw 59 Pan « 0 

taw Paw Paw 

West led the spade Ore. 


GmatEmstodu wa AP 


Sales Stock 
i32AWf Pnee 
igJTSAgnfcoE 
2)00 Agra indA 
1845B Alt Energy 
20930 Alta Not 
1473Algama St 
tWOAtcatt 
31910 BP Canada 
89393 Bank BC 
171216 Bank N S 
73900 Barrtdk o 
IQQ Baton At 
32852 Bonanza R 
8800 Bro tome 
5174 Brnmcdea 
440 Brenda M 
7963 BCFP 
30621 BC Res 
29952 BC Phone 
msSBraxMc 
16450 BuddCaa 
31500 CAE 
466CCL A 
26734 CCL B I 
19700 Cad Fry 
15095 campetMf 
5284 C Nor West 
SOOCPockrs 
800 Can Trust 
1 510 C Tuna 
34onciBiec«n 
93314 CTlre Af 
7480CUHIB 
_ 132 Cora 


Ad la 

Ahwrlsie 

Aut option 

Bank Leu 

Brawn Baverl 

CIba Gelgy 

Credit Suisse 

Electrawatt 

Inlerdlscount 

Jacob Suehard 

Jeimoil 

Landis Gvr 

MaevemicSc 

Nestle 

Oertlkon4 

Roche Body 

Sandoz 

ScMntfler 

Suteer 

Surveillance 

Swissair 

SBC 

Owlss Refnsurance 
Swiss. Vrtkabank 
Union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich Ins 

SBC Index : 57850 


47 SO 4740 
670 670 

fflyi 6400 
■*235 4250 
1920 1940 
37RJ 3780 
3440 3430 


2210 2250 

M iffi 

1710 1700 
4593 <n0 
505 510 

4900 403 
1560 1565 
ns 3W 
2390 ZIH 
2440 2420 

SK? i&£ 

5750 5750 


NjO.; not quoted; NA.: not 
avoUoDie.* xa: ex-dtvidencL 


25S0Centr1 Tr 
74200 Ctneplex 
23O0C Dljtt) A 
32900 COIStbBf 
20509 CTL Bonk 
__ ZOConwastA 

13056 CosetoR 
132S0 Conroo A 
115211 Cnranx 

13900 CSX- Res 
230743 Doon Dev 
4900 Doan A 
6883 Denim A p 
57515 Denison B f 
WW Pevrteon 
17300 DkSnBi Al 
1379 DkAnsq B 
3205 Dotoeat 
800 Donahue 
12670 Du Pont A 
37714 DVlex A 
1030 Ekdhorn X 
. 500Emco 
15050 Eauitv Svr 

25W C Fata*) C 
55226 Fknbrttae 
55940 Fed IrxJA 
3400 F atv Fin 
1900GOKUSA 
_3BDGeacOemp 
13630B Geocrode 

T700 Gibraltar 
16400 Golacorp f 
201 G oodyear 

125 Graft G 

75100 GL FOrait 
900 Gt Pacific 
2349 Greyhad . . 
900 H GrOUP A 
irn Hawker 
1955 Hayes □ 

8500 Hees Inti 
3U7HOHMOrt 

91 H Bov C O 

394715 imasoo 
24200 Indal - 
23180 Inland Gas 
217663 inti Thom 
3454 mtpr Ptoe 
lOOlpeco 
100 IvaaaB 
sotujcmaac- 
500 Kelsey h 
350 Kerr Add 
15690 Lobatt 
3150 LOnt Cam 
SMLacon 
SOOLMriawca 
4)77 Lansaala 
111HJWDSHA 
loam Mice 
21750 Melon HX- . 


HJoh Low Close Cha. 
S17H 1768 ITfa 
TX 19* +1% 

SOM SM 9M+M 
S17M 1716 17M+ W 
SUM 15* 15K 
520 19*+ M 

sim 7m* ro* 

SO* 32* 32*— Vi 
495 490 490 —5 

S14VS 14* 14* 

TO 171 171—2 

520* 2DM 30M 
375 360 375 +15 

380 • 375 375 

*16* »* 16*+ 16 
Wto tto 816— * 
*9* 9* 9M— to 

206 ’ 203 203 

SMta 26 26 

S12M J2» J2M+* 
say, 32 32M+ M 

£17 16* 17 + * 

51 W) 1516 1516— to 
*15* 15to 15M+* 
*14* 13* 14* + to ■ 
S27V6 27 2716 + to 

524* 24* 24* 

W5M 35M 3S»+ to 
54316 4316 4316 
SIM 1M MM+ M 
S«V4 41 to 42 +* 
91* fto 9*+ M 
rmt IP* If* 

817M 17M 17*+ to 
SHfc 9* 9*— to 

S1£6 14* 14M 
IW 9M 9*+ to 
5616 6to 616 
MM 4 6 

SUM TO . 10 — to . 
ST* 7* 7*— * 


517 16 

522* 22* 
249 240 

*516 485 
475 430 

S14W 13* 
*1216 13 
J5V. 5* 

S3* ■!* 

ST* 7 
526* 26* 
917* 17* 


international match point 
when the teamcoald have wfe 
II. • r 

■ t 4 ; 

. . NORTH ' . , i 

♦ AQJ9 

» 

OKtSl , 

H|||j|l to?? 1 si 

* 6 S * Q 3 r 

SOUTH ^ 

*7* 

VQ ’ . 

OQJ10S7 4 

*xio#34 . ■ i : 


WMLorC 
SJto 15* 
338 mo 
wo* w* 
S? 2® 

526 26 

WK6 2*to 
*14* 13to 
51611. 15* 
96* 6rto 
519* Wto 

« Si 

-382 . 270 
M4» 34 Hi 
914 13* 

non 9* 

535 34* 

23* 17 “ 

co* at* 
TO* 23* 

420 4tH 
7* 

TO* 14* 
J44V, «3* 
CT HK 

927* 27* 
511 > 11* 
TO 23* 
97VS 7* 

2!. >« 
TO* 14* 
C5W 2Sto 

ra 22 


92 M 2Zto 

9716 7 

14ft 
. 17 
913* 13* 
911 1046 

534* 34to 

jT* 398^ 

58* 8ft 
*6* 6* 
““ 38* 
toft 
1716 

TO* 23* 
57* 7* 

n 21* 
TOto 12* 
522* 22to 
520ft 20ft 
534* 24* 
24to 
18* 
__ in* 
99* I* 
944* -44ft 
OU* 13* 
SWto Wto 
STS* ten 
537* 17ft 
915* 15* 
531* 31* 
916* 15* 
SWU .10* 
•523ft 22ft 
9W -17ft 
fto • 15* 
400 400 . 

515to IS . 


348 —5 
5 +15 

475 +50 
I4ft+ ft 
13V6 + * 
5*— to 
7ft + * 

7 — ft 
wo+M 
17ft— * 
26 + ft 
13*— ft 
7ft + * 
22*+ to 
7 — * 
14* +16 , 
1716+ to i 
,»*+*: 
34*+* . 
7to . 
395 

**+ to 
Me— ft 
a*— to 
TM6 

n*+ to 
35 + to 
34*+ ft ■ 
7M+* 

«£+* 

ant 

2016+ u 

24*. . 
34ft 

T8ft+*. 
12 + ft 
9*— * 
44*-+* 

IX* 

Wto — to 
1011+ 16 
37to— to 
15ft 

3188+ * 

\tntZ 

TSto— * 


za aio to — 
365 260 365 +1 

TO* WV. 14* 

- TOft u V4ft + 

2!i5 31 31 -h 

*=£* 2B4 22ft- 
ft* 24* - 

a)* n -r 

«** 24* 26*-+ 

SS* io* id* _ 
3io .an aw + 

?O to 27* 77* . 
JJJft 22to 32* f- 
330 315 au - £ 

™* " 7*— 
913ft 13* 13ft+, 
H316 72* 19* 
58ft fto Oft.'. 
3« » sFU. 

410 410 418 +2 

Wto 19** 
SgM 12* 12*+" 

H ’Sto'wa 


72813 Bonk Meat 
2000 Bam&nfc-A 
TSaax HamnrerB 
780CB Pak 
1t337 Cascades 
Jg Cl 
3551 CenBadi - 
UPODamTxtA 
HM6BNMn 
-MOMiWTrat 
SOpsNatBkCda 

^eas. 6 ". 

too RaHandA 

t®35SSB&i, 


*U 11 U +:* 
to*. lTOiaw-L* 

•73ft Zlto 23ft \ 
ni* iv -ii*+^ 
Wl* 31* 31*-, 1 
8>n* 16ft 17* + R 
to in tsft+.q 
.51216 1186-12*1(9 
TO to MI*T6ftAjl 
•73ft ■a 22 

toto 21 to# 
9® If Uftiptor 1 
TOto 1>* .17* rr 

• KW 


S«»P04VWTOWO£pjlSS 

KKMcsBurr ■ 

. tMlYNUtiHY 




i 





Page 19 


By Ira Bcrkow 

~ -••own ' Neyv 7or{ ( Tints Strike 

:v,$$ &cJESeHS 5 S?*ssS 

• ^ ^ s tlKOldchr ^ 

■ i * nXPfe *■* vast °f times.” 

- - s ,**&■ 4^ •jsribfRff-^-’w- “ rm 

? ••' • 1 '?*$£:' “and rm sad.” 


basketball coach. 


1 *'l [; 


-«f». 

•;V : 

;‘ : s ' 

•y.x 


■*•■ •’ a ■ d * >l 


But at the moment college basketball was 
basking in its brightest spotlight, two events 
wne^^^ ^toce that wonld dentate the sor- 

Sbortly before thecfiLiipicinslrip game, John 
(Hot Reid) Williams and two other players at 
Tulaaewere arrested on charges of sport* brib- 
ery — pant-shaving, in this instance. 

At the ts tfiv ? tin^ virtually as the champion- 
ship game was being played at Rupp Arena, the 
^Tm happy that Patrick's gone — so we don’t b^^oftiatUmvciaty ofKentudcy, aninvesti- 

S i by the local newspaper, The Lexmgtoa 
d-Leadcr. was under way. The investiga- 
tion looked into possible violations involving 
Kentodty players from 1978 to perhaps the 
; -accepting money, op to thousands of 


;e Basketball: Amid Anticipation, Danger 


k- Ma ss iuii n o was responding to a Question 

sst*** i rc 

tenns, ts post-Patrick Ewing and post- 


. V' .. -a™* — ■vreuuai 

nave to play him anymore,” said Masrimbo, 
. . aiKi r m sad about the tragedy at Tulane—bm 

- -“Si J"® 1 “ Tulane. at the other places where 

’ - bearing about posable scandals and viala- 


to 


Jhe National Collegiate Athletic Association 
championship last April Fool's Day, in a 
■pi (i.^- *“* *{«*« d a tot of experts. Geor ge town, with 
f t- jbe winged Ewing, H 7-foot (2.13-meicx) shot- 


. 1 1 
ti: 


• ‘3- -... 




-m 

.. " ■ e •■; 

: • ... 

vs/**, 

-V ^ 


sc«jnd straight NCAA title.' Vnianova"uSnS 
finishe d in the top 20 in any postseason poll. 
Rlit MttaminA «-■ - — - , i ■ 


. for performing phony Jobs, for having 
played a good game or foe speaking engage- 
ments that paid well in excess of NCAA rales. 

Now, as a new season is about to commence, 
rite old season is still with ns. WiHianis, after a 
mistrial in the summer, is expected to be stand- 
ing trial again soon; the NCAA is investigating 
the Kentucky reports and, on the other hand, 

D — j.— D there is the legacyaf Patrick Ewing and what his 

■the tail of his tan suit jacket in constant flight ax four years of college hall meant to the game, 
the sideline, coached Vfflanova to a 66-64 vie- Massimino says Ewing was one of the four 
toiy ovw John Thompson’s Georgetown team most dominant college players in the last 30 
. The game was one of the finest eadnbitioiis of 
basketball by two cdtege teams in recent memo- 
ry, and one of the high points of college basket- 
ball at any tune. “The NCAA championship is 
■one of the premier sports events in the country 
now, like the Super Bowl and World Series and 


tournaments. 

: for John Salley, a 7-foot senior at Geor- 
gia Tech, to be one of die key players m the 
nation and possibly the first poac m the Nation- 
al Basketball Association draft Salley, along 
with the all-America guard. Mark Price, have 
elevated Tech to the top of preseason polls. Up 
near the top are Iffinois, withihe forward Efrem 

Winters; North Carolina, with the guard Kmny 
Smith and the freshman off-gnara Jeff Lebo; 
Michigan with all five starters returning; Syra- 
cuse; with the guard Pearl Washington; Ken- 
tucky, with the forward Kenny Walker, and, 
yes, Georgetown, with the forward Reggie Wfl- 

Wk. And ViUanova? Nowhere in the polk, but 
the Wildcats have recruited two freshman, the 
forward Barry and the center Tom- 


derk would remember him dearly: He signed 
the register with an assumed name and fished 
out a credit card with his real name to pav for 
the room. 

Eventually, be obtained the keys and met 
with the family. The man was a booster of a 
college with a’lofty sports reputation, and he 
was there to ay to persuade the family that his 
college offered the young mao the greatest edu- 
cational benefits. 

To prove h, he had the S5.00G, promises of 
more thousands plus a car, a stereo, a job for the 
father in the town of the college — it was out of 
state —and other assorted fruits of wndg mia. 

The family, which was poor and with the 
father oat of work, was persuaded. The whiz 
wound up at the booster's school, received 


aS^KSSSSBS’" 

On the Dip side, though, there is the door 
aspect of big-time college basketball seen as 
hypocritical arrinTwrrigiT^ as enmeshed in a 
“wtn-at-any-cost" syndrome. 


for money the first time.” said Bucky Waters, a 
television commentator who coached at Duke 
and West Virginia, “how much more money 
would it take to make a deal a second time — a 
deal to shave points or even throw a game?" 

The NCAA now is investigating allegations 
into some 30 to 40 rules violations — a normal 
complement, said BersL One of those cases is 
the strange affair erf Tito Horford, the 7-1 fresh- 
man from the Dominican Republic who en- 
rolled at the University of Houston, then was 
not allowed to attend because of recruiting 
violations, then transferred to Louisiana State 
University, then vanished from there. 

Sometimes, it is the player who takes the 
initial step toward special inducement. 

"One time,” said Massimino, “a fellow we 


able enter tainmen t business for the university. 

Thompson believes the experience involved in 
high-level competition can be positive for a 
college student, given the proper context. He is 
known to demand classroom performance from 
his athletes at Georgetown. "Bui it's also ridicu- 
lous for schools to assume a moralistic stance 
about athletes when they’re caught in violations 
of rules,” be said. "The schools We often used 
these athletes to raise funds or to bring attention 
to the university.” 

"The responsibility ultimately lies with the 
university president,” said Eamon ML Kelly, 
president of Tulane. After the point-shaving 
scandal hit his school be eliminated the men's 
intercoOegiaie basketball program. 

The presidents have banded together and 
decided to impose stricter penalties on rules 
violators, such as the so-called “death penalty" 
in which a school caught in a second serious 
violation within a given period will not be al- 
lowed to participate in postseason play and 
share in television money. 

That is tough stuff, especially when a team 
that goes to the final four of the NCAA basket- 
ball championship can earn as much as 


David Beret, director of enforcement for the 
NCAA, investigated an actual case in the not- 
too-distant past that began Eke tins: 


were interested in said to me, 'Wefl, Coach, you 
job. But the player soon grew unhappy, and be know it gets cold in the winter, and I'm going to 
and ins family toft town. need some extra money for hamburgers to keep 

Bcrst received confirmation from the family warm.’ I told him, ‘You’re going to have to keep 
about the recruiting violations. He also got the warm someplace else, because we don't pay $750,000, and a football team that goes to a 
goods on the booster, who was tripped up by his athletes.' ” major bowl as much as 52 million, 

bumbling of the phony name at the hotel Sometimes a higb-scboo! coach is looking for There also may be severe limits put on recruit- 

Tbe school was put on probation because the something special. Waters recalls a time at Duke ing and scholarships. This could hurt schools 
booster "was so intimately involved is the pro- when he was trying to recruit a high-school star such as Kentucky, where basketball is a quasi- 


Under an assum e d name and with 55,000 in gram, h was as though he were employed by the and asked (he player’s coach how his grades religion and where Rupp Arena traditionally 

«h oTrifW ir>tn Inc hriefnee o -nan IwhiIhI nfliii-rcin- ** ni>4 Dam O-i.lflu infill A*A ■ nu— unfa li.iu ia 1—a«> it -ia a.. U— «.a Tl . .r n nnn F«_ l 


.. .. : heavyweight cba_ 

-• Valvano, coach of 


ts,” said Jim 
State. - 


BQI Russdl, mil Chamberlain, and 
anAbdul-Jabbar were hts other choices — 
while Thompson says, "Patrick set a standard. 
Besides his natural talent, he was in the best 
tradition of college basketball He played hard 
all the time." 

.. But the departure of Ewing does not dimmish 
the anticipation for this season. There will be 


cash stuffed into his briefcase, a man boarded 
an airliner for a clandestine rendezvous. Upon 
arrival he headed for a hotel room where he was 
to meet with a high-sebool senior — a basketball 
whiz — and the whiz’s parents. 

He was not immensely clever as undercover 
characters go because, though he did not wear 
Groucho Marx eyebrows and mustache, be did 
make himself rather conspicuous. The hotel 


university" said Berst. Penalties included a re- 
duction in the number of athletic scholarships 
and a ban on television appearances, thus cut- 
ting off a handsome source of revenue. The 
gouty booster was banned altogether from asso- 
ciation with (he college's sports programs. 

This story illustrates one of the fears of some 
in the college ranks. 

“If a player can be bought in a recruiting deal 


were. "We have to know if we can get him into 
our school” said Waters. 

"Just tell me what be needs,” the coach re- 
plied. 

Above ah, the disgrace in big-time college 
sports is that in the past so many players have 
gone to college under the guise of being studem- 
athletes, but wound up as simply athletes — as 
Hessians of a son in a huge mid highly profit- 


draws sellout crowds of 23,000 for its home 
games — this year there will be 18 — and where 
the basketball revenue last year was S2J50.000. 

Thompson says that there is "a crisis in edu- 
cational institutions” today. Bui, he said, "You 
regroup, you monitor, you police," he said. 
"College basketball has gone through crises be- 
fore and has come through. It will do it again. 
It's not going to fall over a cliff.” 


SCOREBOARD 


r Jfc 

- 

' •’ : 'V Jr 


Basketball 


Hockey 


National Basketball Association Standings NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AKontfc DtvtUM ‘ 

W L Pet GB 



Boston 

9 2 

JIB 



FhltodetoMo 

6 5 

5*5 



V*v» Jersey 

7 7 

JOB 

m 


Washington- 

4 1 

J33 

SVi 


- New York 

3 * 

JSO 

6 Vi 

; - !r 
• 

'-••■'•■‘ifrrc? ■ 


Central DMstaa 



Milwaukee 

. 11 4 

JD 


Detroit 

Atlanta 

■ 8 5 

7 6 

415 

JOB 

2. 

. 3 ■ 

• • - 1 

’ t'i'jfi,. 

Cleveland 

5 ■ 

MS 

5 

Chicago 

5 9 

J57 

SVi 

India no 

3 a 

JOT 

6 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 



Midwest Dtvtsfoa 



Denver 

9 2 

J»fl 


* 1; 3 2Z 

Houston 

10 3 

.769 


••• ■ 

Son Antonio 

6 7 

j*62 

4 


Utah 

. 6 7 

462 

4 


□alias 

5 7 

417 

MV, 

•--..-.la.- [£• 

Sacramento 

4 7 

J64 

5 

• 


Pacific H vislen 



LA. LaJcert • 

li 1 

JT7 



Portland 

1 6 

471 

4 

2V 

Golden State 

7 7 

SOB 

5 


a topers 

. . 5 7 

41 7 

6 


until). AttbtK San Antonio » (Moors 10); 
Phoenix 30 tOavts »). 

nx9 a— w 

32 27 » 20—122 
E. Johnaen M2 *9 XL AbduUiAbar 1-14 :m 
19; M. Johnson KW4 0-10 34. Cnee 9-H M TL 
— b — m bs aimra ss (Caw 11); utters &\ 
(Locos 111. AssMr CHmra 2* ( Edwards*) ; 
Lakers 39 (E. Johnson 20). 

M Ww uk e e - 30 M M 30— ih 

*W»te 2f 31 23 20— IM' 

Cummins* 10-190-9 20, Moncrlef 0-124-5 Zl; 
Chambers B-T7 7-11 M, McCormick 0-9 *4 H. 
Stona 5-11 o-io U, wood HIM w. RMbumds: 
Mltwwtteo 51 (uster 13); Seattlo 30 (Sikma 
f). Assists: MRwnukee32 (Pmty 12); Seat- 
tle 20 (Hendsnon 9). 


Baseball 


Chronoleev of the American Leoeees moat 


• It *■ 

-• lie ' 

-• !:=:»• 

•: (BCKEt 
•‘..rs-: 

■ i c 


Utle 


JOB 

.IS* 


TV, 

Wt 




HIlXil 


WEMESDAVS RESULTS 
aevMond 2920 H2S— 90 

WOshlaeton U 29 20 11— 401 

wnnams W2I V3 19, Malone 0-17 2-2 10; E. 
tones Ml M t». Davis *9 m 10. Monads: 
Cleveland 33 (West, E. Jones 0); wesMneton 
51 ( RoWnsonlO). Assists: Cleveland 22 (Davis 
7); Washi n gton 23 (Wtmams 7i. 

NewYom 51 20 10 31— N 

Detroit 30 32 20 19—1*9 

Benson 6-9 9-9 SLTrlpucka 7-11 2-4 10, Leri m- 
beer 0-16 05 10; CammlnflsO-nMaLWndns 
5-93-4 13. Gnmteid 5-12 3-3 lluebounes: New 
York so (Cummins*!- si; Detroit 40 (Benson 
10). Assists: New York 20 (Cofle«4); Detroit 
a (Thomas fL 

SoUsn Slate 20 20 2227—113 

. PUhMMMta 22 24 29 22-417 

Malone 0-15 10-13 20. Bark ley 9-15 45 22; 
Floyd 0-1Q 10-10 Z7. Short U-25 1-1 24. Rs- 
boonds: Golden State 47 (SmWi 13); PhHadM- 
phla 50 (Malone T31. Assists: Golden note 27 

— 9); PMkKMphla 31 (Cheeks 8], 

Chicago 30 W M to— 101 

Attanla 15 25 U 29— 110 

•..■•j rj X W1 Debts 10-2D 0-10 20. WUUoims 9-10 M 20; 

- -> . 0olto 9 9-19 55 23. Garvin 10-10 25 22. Re- 

bounds: Chteago n (Oakley W>; AHantn SO 
^Levlnaston 17). Assists: Chfcogo 17 (McKIn- 
); Atlanta 25 (Johnson 71. 

20 XI 27 24 0—100 
29 29 19 XI 15— 1U 
Bird 10-25 66 27, ParWi MO 11-1525; Dont- 
lev 14-C8 45 33. BaOsy 7-14 4-4 11 I t shoeed s : 
Utah S3 (Eaton 13i; Boston 40 (Parish 171. 
Assists: Utah 27 (Stockton 0); Boston 24 
(Alnso 7). 

Indiana 1* 31 » 25— 97 

-Houston . 30 20 2V 23 — 124 

Olalinnn HH5 M 20. Sampson 12-102-3 36 j 
Tisdale 12X3 3-3 77, Williams 7-13 0-2 U. Re- 
bmtK Indiana 41 (Tisdale 10); Houston 40 
(Sampson 11). Asststsr Indiana 21 [Fleming 
10); Houston 39 (Lucas 14). 
son Antonio 2S M 24 21— ISO 

PhOMlX 20 M 35 30-121 

Nance 9-14 8-U 24, Adams 9-12 55 33 ; John- 
son 9-13 M2). Gilmore 7-W4-710. Mtomds: 
-Son Antonio 53 (Goman n> : Phoenix 52 (Ad- 


T.” 1 


nf 




1905 — Don M u tt tn o l y , Now York 
1904 — wane Hernandez. Detroit 
1903 — Cal Rtokert, Bc it lmore 
1902 — Robin Yount, MDunukee 
1901 — nolfle Fvwera, Milwaukee 
1900— Georoe Brett, Kansas aiv 
1979 — Don Baylor, California 

1970 — Jim Rice. Boston 
1977 — Rod Corew. Minnesota 

1976 — Thurman Munson, New York 
1975 — Fred Lynn, Boston 
1974 — Jett Burroughs, Texas 
1973 — Russia jockson, Oakland 
. 1972— Dtak Allen. Chicago 

1971 — VWa Blue. Oakland 7 

' IWO — Boos Pawod, B al t im o r e ' 

I960 — Hannon Kl Hebrew, Mbmssata 
I960 — Demy AACLohv Detroit 
1967 — Cart Y usi rasmekl, Boston 
1966 — Frank RoMnsarv Baltimore 
1945 — Zoilo Versa! les. Minamata 
1964 — Brooks RoMnson. Baltimore 
1M3 — Elston Howard. New York 
1962 — Mickey Mantle, New York 
W1 — Roger Marls; New York 

1940 — Roger Marts. New York 
1959 — Nellie Fox. Chicago 

1955 — Jackie Jansen. Boston 
1957 — Mickey Marta, New York 

1956 — Mickey Mantle. New York 
1955 — Yosl Berra. New York 
1954 — Yost Berra. Now York 
1953 — A1 Rosea, Cleveland 

1952 — Bobby Stwmtz. Philadelphia 
1951 — Yosl Berra, New York 
193D — phu Rizzuto. New York 
1949 — Tod Wllftoms; Boston 

1941 — Lou Boudreau. Cl eve l an d 
1947 — Joe DIMossia New York 
1946— Tod wnuams. Boston 

1945 — Hal NawtUMisar. Detroit 
1944 — Hal Nowhoussr, Detroit 
1943 — Spud Chandler, New York 

1942 — Joe Gordon, New York 
1941 — Joe DIMassto, Now York 

1946 — Hank Greenhorn, Detroit 
1939 — Joe DIMosalfe New York 
1938 — . Jimmy Foxx. Philadelphia . 
1937 — Charley Gehrtnser. Detroit 
1936 — Lou Gctuls, New York 

1935 — Had Oroenbero, Detroit 
1934 — Mickey Cochrane, Detroit 
1933 — Jimmy Fen. PhfkKhHpMa 
1932 — Jimmy Font; Philadelphia 
1931 — Leftv Grove. Philadelphia . 






SPORTS BRIEFS 

tj.S. to Participate in Soviet Games 

' ATIANTA(AP)— Tea <rf the 18 na^wnal^jortsgpvenring bodies in 
the United States have accepted invitations from the Soviet Union to 
participate in the Goodwill Games, officials said Wednesday. 

The games, to be held July 5-20, 1986, wSl be the first time since the 
1976 Olympics that US.' and Soviet athletes will compete against each 
other in summer world -class competition. Athletes from more than 40 
nations have been invited to participate in Moscow. 



Oemson Punishes Coach, Six Players 

WASHINGTON (WP) — Danny Ford, the Clemson football coach, 
was reprimanded and. placed on one-year probation by the South CaroB- 
na university Wednesday for screaming obscenities at officials during 
Saturday’s 34-31 loss to Maryland, and was tdd he cannot be cm the 
oideKnp for next year’s game agains t the Terrapins. 

In addition, four of his players wtxe suspended for this week’s game for 
artgririnp Maryland’s Lewis Askew, and two players were reprimanded 
apd placed on probation. Of the ax players involved, all three tmtietdas s- 
were suspended from wart years game at Maryland. ' - 
^ After (he final play at Ctemson, on imchAdcewmadeataddeon the 
Clemson sideline, replays indicated that at least six players attacked 
Askew while he was on the ground and beat him about the head and 
body. Several times Clemson players pulled bis face marie and tried to 
lake off his helmet At least cmi; Clemson player used his own helmet to 
Kit Askew. 

fliiffe’ Ball Indicted on Cocaine Charge 

-KANSAS CITY, Missouri (AP) — Mike Bdlof thi Kmsas City 
Chiefs, the second player selected in the NFL b 1979 draft, has become 
the latest sports figure indicied on federal coc^c charges. 


"If- waT^'^ 

Wednesday’s pracace.-He mid ins ^ 

: -■* persons indicted by a federal grand jury in Widnta^KaiBas; a brodw of 
F Tyler Lockett, a justice of the Kansas Supren* Court also was indicted, 

’> 28, were charged vnfh use of a triephone m cocaine 

b’ distribution Warteaipied possession tf fggf Each could recewe a 
• V - marimtnn of five yens inpnsoi and & S35,lxW nfle* 

C Quotable 

" • Don Shuia, of theNFL’s Miami Ddphms, onlns aitailidn to 

. y detail: "Someone once asked me if tiiere wasn’t benefil m 
/ . one wrroQ flaw, and I asked him, ‘What’s a small flaw?* 

> ' - 


HTAUK CONBERCNOi 
Patrick DMUae 

W L T P» GF GA 
PhllocMpMa 15 3 0 30 90 56 

Wtahbiatoa 11 6 3 25 79 65 

NY Ranaen 9 9 1 W 72 62 

MY litexteri S 6 3 19 69 66 

Now Jersey 7 9 1 If 61 46 

Pittsburgh 5 11 3 13 63 74 

Adorns DiyUton 

Boston 10 6 3 23 M 64 

Buffalo 11 7 1 23 72 35 

Quebec ID 7 1 21 74 43 

Montreal • I 3 19 77 77 

Hartford 3 9 0 16 60 73 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Harr is DMsten 

St Louis 7 7 3 17 59 46 

Chicago 7 10 2 16 75 65 

Minnesota 4 • 5 13 a 73 

Detroit 4 10 4 12 50 89 

Taranto 3 13 3 9 45 06 

Smyth* Dtvtstoa 

Edmonton 14 4 2 30 100 71 

Calgary 10 6 3 23 OS (9 

Vancouver 9 to 2 20 04 g» 

Wlnnlgea 1 9 2 It 77 U 

Las Amies 4 O 1 » 40 94 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Westringtoe 2 1 6-3 

Ftttshorah loo—i 

Laugttlln 2 (6), Andaman a); Undstrom 
(3). Stats m goal: Wasiffngtan [on Romano) 
11-7-7— JO; Pittsburgh (on Jansen) 4-9-6—23. 
Toronto I l V-j 

ILY. Rangers 3 3 1—7 

Brook* -3 (73, Ridley (71, Miner 15). Sw6. 

strom2(0);Stastny (71. Frycor |6),ciark (9). 
Shots an goat: Toronto (an Vteibiesbrouck. 
Scott) 6-13-4-05; New York ton Edwards) 34- 
-11-13— C. 

■d mooton 2 2 6 1—5 

Montreal 1 2 • g-4 

Knistidtiivskl (5), Smith (1). Nader (4), 
Gretzky (15), Messier Cll); Walter (5). 
.Trombley CD. Nauund (14), Niton (1). Shots 
an goal: Edmonton (on Poway) 69-13-1—21; 
Montrool (on Ktoag) 1612,7-6-^21 
Vtowwver . « o M 

CMcag* 0 2 6-t 

Savard (11), Yaromdiuk (3). Shots on goal: 
Vancouver (on Bannarman) 7 -4 4 1 7; C3i (co- 
go (on BTOdeur) 11-66-29. 

H- LOWS ■ • 6-1 

Winnipeg 1 1 

McBota C2), Hawerchuk (ln.wUm (1); 
Multan (10). Shots on goal: 5L Louis (an Hay- 
ward) 16615—36; Winnipeg (on Mlllenl 616 



Mattingly Easily Wins 
AL Award as MVP 


By Murray Chass 

Sm York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Don Mattingly, 
who did just about everything tins 
year except put the New York Yan- 
kees into the playoffs, achieved a 
runaway victory Wednesday in the 
voting for the American League's 
most valuable player award. 

He easily defeated George Brett, 
who led the Royals into the play- 
offs and then the World Series 
championship. Mattingly became 
the first player on a non-champion- 
ship team to win the award since 
Jim Rice of the Boston Red Sox 
won in 197S. 

In the voting, conducted before 
the playoffs by a panel of 28 mem- 
bers of the Baseball Writers Associ- 
ation of America, two from each 
league city, Mattingly received 23 
first-place votes and S second-place 
votes for a total of 367 points. 
Brett, whose September slump 
might have cost him votes, was 
named first on five ballots, second 


Don Mattingly was upstaged by his son, Tayler, at the presentation of the American 
League’s most valuable player award. His wife, Kim, declined any role in the proceedings. 

Australia Is Paying for Athletic Decline 


Transition 


TORONTO N a m ed RfekAma director of 
no Tuf lo oe wnl general monoow of 51. Cntno- 
rfnoa Inltie New York-Panaiyliranto League. 


PITTSBURGH— Named Jim Lev land mo n- 
tSO ' FOOTBALL 

Mrttoeal FeortaU Lea gu e 

DENVER— Placed Rick Panroe, running 
bade, on walvara. 

GREEN BAY— Placed Tim Huffman, 
guard, on hHured reeerv*. stoned Blake Win- 
nie, guard. 

PHILADELPHIA— Stoned Jeff Christen- 
sen. quarterback. 

ST. LOUIS— Placed Benny Perrin, lately, 
on Inhered mam. Stoned Tony Mumford, 
running back. Ckdmad Earnest Gray, wide 
receiver, from waivers. 

SAN DIEGO — Released Keith Ferguson, 
de f ensi v e end. Shined Scott Garnett, no** 

SEATTLE — am mod Rick Parras, running 
back, from waivers. 

WASHINGTON— ReBtaned Babe Laufen- 
berg, quarterback. Signed joe Phlntos, wide 
receiver. 

HOCKEY 

Notfonoi Hockey League 

MINNESOTA — Called up Jon Caiev, goal- 
tender. from Sartnoifiold of the American 


By Ian Pedley 

Agaice France-Presse 

SYDNEY — Australia, once one 
of the world’s superpowers of 
sport, is pouring millions of dollars 
into the search for new champions. 

After decades of global glory, 
Australians have been overtaken in 
all the glamour sports where suc- 
cess once was taken for granted. 

Nowhere is this more glaring 
than in the world of international 
tennis, where Australia no longer 
has a player ranked in the top 10 of 
either the men’s or women’s divi- 
rions. 

Australia’s sporting decline also 
has been sorely fdt in the Olym- 
pics, where her runners and swim- 
mas have rarely been among the 
medalists in recent 


In cricket, i 


even a prelect 
huge defeats 
West Indies, 


QUEBEC Ito c oi tod Gord DomwOv. de- 
fenseman, from Fredericton of the AHI_ 
WINNIPEG— Traded Dev* Babydv de- 
fenseman, to Hartford In exchange lor Ray 
Naufetd. rigid wing. 

COLLEGE 

VIRGINIA— Rei nstated Dan Molkowski, 
quarterback, to the football Mom offer a ono- 
wook suspension for violation of team rules. 


Soccer 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
Netherlands 2. Betolam l 
Scotland 2, Australia 0 


FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Monaco 1, Nantes 1 

Standings: PartaSG 23: Bordeaux 29: 
Mantes 27: L*n»23; Monaco Xb Metz, Nancy, 
Laval. Auxerre 71; Toulouse. N toe 30; Hemes 
17; Toulon. Marseille, La Havre, Brest 16; 
Lille, Socbaux, Basfto 15; Sfrasbwr? 14. 


lered this coun- 
, Australia is not 
to the throne after 
teams from the 
gland and New 
Zealand in the past two years. 

For a few weeks recently hopes 
of international success have been 
pinned on, for Australia, the un- 
likely sport of soccer. But Wednes- 
day night the Socceroos lost to 
Scotland, 2-0, in Glasgow in the 
first leg of their playoff for a place 
in next year’s World Cup finals. 

In an effort to regain lost 
the Australian government 
embarked on a costly program 
intended to encourage potential 
champions in many sports, al- 
though the investment so far has 
paid few dividends. 

Private enterprise also has taken 
up the challenge, pumping millions 
of dollars in to junior sports, partic- 
ularly tennis. 

Postwar Wimbledon saw a pro- 
cession of Australians occupying 
Centre Court, as if it were their 
right Lew Hoad, Ken RosewuU, 
Ashley Cooper, Roy Emerson, 
Tony Roche, Rod Laver and John 
Newcombe played out many of the 
finals among themselves. 

In the women's ranks, Margaret 
Smith Court and Evonne Goola- 
gong Cawley led the way. 

But for the men, at least, the 



land and Betty Cuthbert were the 
queens of the trade. In the pool 
Dawn Fraser — the fastest free- 
styler at three successive Olympics 
— headed an impressive array of 
swimmers that included Lorraine 
Crapp and Shane Gould. 

The men were pretty slick, too, 
with such track stars as Herb El- 
liott, unbeatable over 1.500 meters, 
and Ralph DoubelL Swimmers like 
Murray Rose, John Henricks, Jon 
Devin, Murray Wendeu and John 
Jonrads swept all before them. 

But the bubble burst and gold 
medals have been few and far be- 
tween at recent Games. When 
Glynnis Nunn won the heptathlon 
in Los Angeles last year — in the 
absence of the Eastern European 
stars — it was the first Olympic 
gold medal Australia had won on 
the track for 16 years. 

The government’s response was 
to set up the Australian Institute of 


on 20 and third on three for a total 
of 274 points. They were the only 
players named on all 28 ballots. 

The Yankees' Rickey Henderson 
was third with 174 points, followed 
by Wade Boggs of Boston with 159, 
Eddie Murray of Baltimore, 130; 
Donnie Moore of California, 96, 
and Jesse Barfield of Toronto, 88, 

Willie McGee won the National 
League award on Monday, giving 
the Yankees’ minor league system a 
sweep of most-valuable honors. 
Mattingly and McGee began their 
professional careers in the Yankee 
system and played together at 
Nashville of the Southern League 
in 1981. McGee (hen was traded to 
the St Loins Cardinals, but the 
Yankees kept Mattingly. 

In only Ms second full season in 
the majors, Mattingly. 24, led the 
majors with 145 runs batted in, 
batted .324 ( third in the AL) and 
hit 35 home runs (fourth in the 
AL). He led the majors in doubles 
(48) and the AL in total bases (370) 
and extra-base hits (86). Defensive- 
ly, be topped league first basemen 
with a .995 fielding average. 

“I never dreamed of putting 
those kinds of numbers up,” he said 
at a news conference Wednesday 
night. "There's no way you can say 
Tm going to get 140 or 150 RBI and 
over 30 boners.” 

Yet, last spring, on the night that 
the Yankees renewed his contract 
for the 1985 season, he angrily said 
his time would come. 'Til have the 
hammer next time,” he said 
He said Wednesday that he had 
made those remarks out of frustra- 
tion over his failure to achieve what 
he thought he was worth as 1984- 
batting champion. Bui reminded of 
the "hammer” comment, be said, "I 
guess I do have it now ” 

There will be one major differ- 
ence in negotiations this yean If 
there is no agreement on a one-year 
or multiyear contract, Mattingly 
can go to salary arbitration, where 
he can show that seven first base- 
men will be earning more than SI 
million next season, and his pro- 
duction this year exceeded theirs. 


Sport (A1S) in Canberra. 

,^BS“£ , £J!£ e S51S Leytend Becomes 
SSSS: Pirates’ Manager 

280 scholarship holders in reri- The foamed Press 

deuce, mostly teenage students PITTSBURGH -Jim Leyland, 
who continue their normal educa- a for the Chicago While Sox 


Australia’s Charlie Yankos wrapped up Frank McAvennie 
before Scottish teammate Kenny Dalgleish could arrive to 
help. But Scotland won the World Cup qualifier, 2-0. 


Wimbledon procession came to an 
end with Newcombe in 1971. Per- 
haps not coincidentally, the legend- 
ary national coach, Harry Hop- 
man, shifted his operations to the 
United States the following year. 

For a whQe it was understand- 
able that the Americans, tradition- 
ally the Australians' main rivals, 
should bold court. But the rise of 
Sweden, Czechoslovakia and West 
Germany left Australians in no 
doubt that they had been caught 
flatfooted at the baseline. 


Newcombe, now director of a 
major corporate-sponsored train- 
ing program, believes the country is 
back on ihe right track with such as 
Pat Cash and last year's top-ranked 
world junior, Mark Kracman. 

The Olympic sports have gone 
much the same way as tennis. 

The 1950s and 1 960s are recalled 
with nostalgia as the golden years 
when Australian girls really flew, 
whether on land or in water. 

Marjorie Jackson, Shirley Strick- 


tion outside the institute. 

Now in its fifth year of opera- 
tion, the AIS has an annual budget 
of 11 million Australian dollars 
(about S7.4 million). A large part of 
this money is used to send promis- 
ing athletes overseas for top inter- 
national experience. 

Track and field athletes com- 
prise the biggest contingent at the 
AIS. Other sports include swim- 
ming, squash, hockey, diving, bas- 
ketball gymnastics, rowing, water 
polo, weight lifting and tennis. 

Several AIS swimmers managed 
minor medals at the 1984 Olympics 
although, ironically, Jon SieDen, 
the only Australian to win a gold, 
was not from the AIS ranks. 

An AIS spokesman said it was 
still too early to gauge the project's 
success. "The East Germans gave 
themselves 30 years to get to the 
top.” this official said. “We've not 
boo going five years.” 


who calls his style “aggressive and 
unpredictable.” was hired Wednes- 
day as the Pittsburgh Pirates' new 
manager, completing the club's 
new ownership and management 

foam 

Leyland, 40, who spent 11 years 
as a min or league manager in the 
Detroit Tigers' organization, re- 
placed Chuck Tanner, who was 
fired Oct 7 after the Pirates’ sec- 
ond consecutive last-place finish in 
the National League East 

“I'm a hard worker but I'm not a 
miracle worker,” said Leyland, 
who got a one-year contract "We 
will have to have patience. We have 
a lot of good players, but they’re 
young players.” 

He coached third base for the 

White Sox for four years, and re- 
cently was a finalist for the Hous- 
ton Astros' job as manager that 
went to Hal Lanier. 


Fake Arrow Holes No Longer Will Fool West Virginia 9 s Game Wardens 


By Mannix Porterfield 
United Press Imcmawnal 

MACARTHUR, West Virginia — Time was, 
you could sneak into the woods and drop a big 
trad: with a buffalo-sized gun, then jam an arrow 
into the deer's wound, twist it a time or two, and 
head oa out to a checking station. 

The game warden would offer the obligatory 
congratulations, before sending you home with a 
himtr of venison, and no one was the wiser. 


. In West Virginia, the Department of Natural 

Resources now is resorting to Dkk Tracy-style 

(jinxstopping to keep up with the times. 

Introduced a coi$le of seasons ago to crack 
down on deer being shot in the bow season, a lead 
detection Jtit has put a big deni in illegal kills. 


"It’s a relatively common practice, shooting a 
deer with a gun, then sticking an arrow in the 
wound to make it look legal” said Sergeant Dan 
Farley. 

Inside the compact k> i, about the size of a fishing 
tackle box, are some disposable scalpels, gauze, 
nitric add and sodium rhodizoiiale. 

“When you suspect a deer has been lotted with a 
gun," said Farley, “you cut off a small portion of 
the hide where the wound is, shave the hair around 
it, then mix your chemicals and put them os the 
wound, liberally. 

“Then you wait for about one minute If the 
animal was shot with a gun, the wound will tom 
purple. That's the chemical reacting with the lead 
when it made the entry into the skm.” 

Often, the illegal hunter will not even wail for 


ihe examination, but confess. With much agony. 

And with good reason. Poachers can be fined from 
$20 to $300 and spend up to 100 days in jail That, 
cm top of four pomis being tacked on to a demerit 
list. Ten points results in the automatic suspension 
of a license . 

Already tins season, the DNR has bagged sever- 
al poachers, including a woman and her two sons 
who were fined 53,800. 

"Some will uy to argue their way out of it,” said 
Farley. “Bm unless you’re using an arrow with a 
lead tip — and there' aren't many of them around 
— you can look at the wound and tell if a broad- 
head arrow was the cause. 

“It’sjust hard to exp lam why a bow killed a deer 
with a round hole in it.” 

For those who remain unconvinced, Farley add- 


ed, “They could run an arrow all the way through 
but you would still have lead fragments oil the hide . 
and meat.” 

One loophole in the system is (he checking 
station itself. An honor system prerails, and Farley 
acknowledged there is little the DNR can do if the 
checker winks at the misdeeds of his peers. 

"But if we do have some suspicion, we can 
follow up on it," he said. “We can look through the 
checking tags and if there is a known violator 
among them we may want to look at his deer. 

"There are always certain families, or two or 
three habitual violators, who will go to any extreme 
to get game. Wiole families have been known to 
check in deer — every member, down to 6- and 7- 
year-old kids.” 










Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Conservative Madhouse 


By Russel] Baker 

N EW YORK — Triumphant 
conservatism is now splitting 

into so many sects that it's hard ro 

keep track of what they are and 
where they are goin g. Here are a 
few: 

Neo-conservatives. Thirty years 
ago these people were called “egg- 
heads” and admixed Adlai Steven- 
son. Misinterpreting Henry Kissin- 
ger’s career in Washington, they 
believe that what the United States 
needs is more professors with ac- 
cess to the atom bomb. 

New neo-conservatives. These are 
neo-conservatives who weren’t 
bom 30 years ago, so they don’t 
bear the stigma of having once 
been eggheads. Being beneficiaries 
of a modem college education, 
most have never heard of Adlai 
Stevenson. Those who have tHnlc 
Adlai Stevenson was a leftist col- 
lege that taught the arts and sci- 
ences of welfare cheating and went 
bankrupt 

Antique neo-conservatives. Now 
diminishin g in n umber s, antique 
neo-conservatives believe Chiang 
Kai-shek could have reconquered 
China and led it into the United 
States as the 5 1st state if highly 
placed Washington Reds hadn’t 
treated him badly. Some antique 
neo-conservatives believe Chiang is 
not dead but living in Mexico and 
writing popular music under the 
name Barry Manilow in hopes of 
winning the hearts »md minds of 
China's young people. 

Knee-jerk conservatives. These 
are the modem counterparts of the 
old knee-jerk liberals, who created 
such embarrassment for the Demo- 
cratic Party before its death. When 
their favorite issues arise, knee-jerk 
conservatives first salivate, then 
demonstrate, and finally accuse 
their leaders of double-crossing 
them. As the defunct knee-jerk lib- 
erals once did, the knee-jerk con- 
servatives smell heresy and betray- 
al on every side, insist that their 
issues are die only issues that mat- 
ter for the honor of conservatism, 
and threaten to blow up the party if 
they are not given satisfaction. Big 
issues at the moment: reworking 
the Constitution to allow school 
prayer, outlaw abortion. 

Let -Reagan -be -Reagan conserva- 
tives. An offshoot of the branch of 
the knee-jerk conservative bloc that 
believes President Reagan has dou- 


ble-crossed them, this sect believes 
that, to the contrary. President 
Reagan would die on the barri- 
cades if necessary for the big knee- 
jerk issues, if only he could regain 
control of himself. Unfortunately, 
the theory goes, control of the pres- 
ident has been seized by White 
House bureaucrats who refuse to 
let the president be himself. 

Scoop- Jackson- Democrat conser- 
vatives. This is one of the more 
important branches of the so-called 
“back to the Stone Age" conserva- 
tive military division. They believe 
that anything that threatens to slow 
the worldwide competition in 
weapons acquisition win be cata- 
strophic to all humanity. Their 
name invokes the calm spirit of 
Senator Henry (Scoop) Jackson, a 
Democrat whose progressive poli- 
tics did not preclude a strong dis- 
like of Soviet militarism. 

Bang-bang conservatives. Con- 
temptuous^ the pussyfooting they 
believe characterizes the Scoop- 
Jackson-Democrat conservatives, 
the bang-bang conservatives frank- 
ly dedare that they love everything 
that Irilk and want the Pentagon to 
go ahead and build it, no matter 
what it costs and whether it works 
or not. 

Voodoo conservatives. Their 
name comes from Vice President 
Bush's infamous description of the 
presidoit's economic policy. They 
believe the way to balance the bud- 
get is to cut taxes while spending 
more money than anyone has ever 
spent before and, if that doesn’t 
work, to pass a law saying they will 
have to balance the budget by 
spending less sometime in the com- 
fortably remote future. 

Seat-belt conservatives. These 
people believe government assaults 
human freedom when it passes laws 
requiring motorists to buckle their 
seat belts. They believe people 
should have the right to stay on- 
buckled if they want to. 

Does it seem a bit like a mad- 
house? Of course. When something 
as radical as what we now call con- 
servatism becomes the most suc- 
cessful political event in a genera- 
tion, the excitement it generates is 
likely to bring the nuts out in force. 
There is nothing the least bit crazy 
happening with the Democrats 
these days. Mausoleums are always 


New York Times Service 



PEOPLE 


Retired superwoman Carol Orebom now spends more time with her family. 


It* New Vortt T. 


'Enough Is Enough’ for Ex-Superwoman 


By Georgia Dullea 

New York Times Service 

A SELF-HELP group for women troubled 
.by Superwoman Syndrome has been 
formed in San Francisco. The group, said to 
be the first of its kind in the United States, 
will hold no meetings, elect no officers and 
raise no funds. “It’s the perfect organization 
for women who are already doing too much." 
said Carol Orsborn, founder of the 200-mem- 
ber Superwomen Anonymous. 

Orsbom, 37, is the president of a public- 
relations agency, a novelist, a brown belt in 
karate, a magazine columnist, the wife of a 
cotmtry-and-western and rock musician and 
the mother of Grant, 6, and Jody, 1, who are 
not being reared as SuperchUdren. 

“But I was starting down that path," Ore- 
born said, adding that Grant had “been ex- 
posed to everything” required to create the 
state-of-the-art child, including soccer, Sun- 
day school karate, the Suzuki method of 
music, gymnastics. Scouts and lessons in 
French, skiing, swimming and acting. 

Gram was also exposed to te chniques es- 
poused in the book “How to Teach Your 
Baby to Read" by Glenn Do man. “You label 
everything in the house — CHAIR, TABLE 
— until you’re Irving in alphabet soup," his 
mother said. 

Family life is more low-key these days. 
Three months ago. shortly before forming 
Superwomen Anonymous, Orebom detected 
in herself signs of Type E behavior, a term 
coined by a Los Angeles psychologist. Dr. 


Harriet Braiker, for “high-achieving women 
who are everything to everybody." 

At this point. Orebom decided to embrace 
“a lifestyle of downward mobility” to the 
delight of her husband, Daniel and the sur- 
prise of her Marin County neighbors. 

The first downward step was to move from 
a large house in San Rafael — with a view of 
San Francisco Bay, a hot tub, a sauna, three 
fireplaces and maid's quarters — to a more 
modest house in nearby Mill Valley. “We got 
rid of the live-in, cut our mortgage payments 
in half anil our commuting trmt» on the hi gh - 
way from 40 to 20 minutes," Orebom said. 
She and her husband then went from working 
SO to 30 hours a week at the Orebom Public 
Relations Group in San Francisco, giving 
him more time for and her more time 
with family and friends. *Td always judged 
good friends by how many times I could 
break a lunch date with them," she said. 

Other Superwoman feats no longer being 
performed by Orebom: volunteering for ev- 
ery community group, rhaiiffejiring chil dren 
to enriching activities, shopping for “success" 
suits, dieting and “going for the bum" in Jane 
Fonda workouts dad in turquoise tights and 
leotards. 

Nowadays, on balmy mornings she wears 
sweatpants as she drives to Sausalito and 
then rows a rented boat on the bay: “I row 
out to the middle and then I just sit there for 
about 45 minutes, doing nothing but bobbing 
in the water." 


While bobbing one morning, Orebom was 
inspired to create Superwomen's Anonymous 
as a forum for other recovered T^pe E per- 
sonalities. For S12 a year, members receive a 
quarterly newsletter — “ guar antee d not to 
teach you how to cope, juggle or manage," 
she said — phis a membership card »nd a 
poster, suitable for framing, proclaiming the 
group’s motto, "Enough Is Enough.” 

She acknowledged that she had been guilty 
of promoting Superwoman Syndrome in a 
column she writes for a magazine for 
California businesswomen. Her most recent 
column hinted that it might not be possible 
“to have it all" she said, adding. Tm not 
sure how long TO be around." 

Another irony is that Orebom, who con- 
tends that advertisers exploit women, may be 
leaving herself open to the mim charge by 
making money on the newsletter. “But I don't 
see it that way," she said. “1 already know 
how to raalfg money promoting products. 
Now Tm taking my talents to promote ideas I 
and other women believe in." 

The four-page newsletter carries the Super- 
women’s Anonymous logo — a big S m a 
circle with the last few letters of Anonymous 
falling off the page. Its first issue contains 
articles on Superwomen’s stress and the joys 
of doing nothing for a full five minutes. 
Future issues will cany letters from mem- 
bers: for example, the lawyer mid mother of 
two who wrote to say, “Tm living in a house 
we can bardy afford and writing this at 4 
AM" 


Paging Doctor landers 


Am Landera is being honored leader Nelson Jjg. 

for her contribution to medicine: sak. a mixed-race master « — 

The advice columnist and Lane Ad- Dutch Reformed Mission 
ams, chief executive officer of the who was charged last monti^idt Jfe 
American Cancer Society for 25 subvezson. war not ^owed to^- 
years, will receive Albeit Lasker leave South Africa. Naude^wboa^ 
public service awards today. Land- gave up hisposinon mine IXtjch 
ere and i-ane are in august compa- Refrained Church m tyoj to neaa Jig- 
ny — two 1985 Nobel Prize win- the Christian Institute, annoa at 
□ere. Dr. Michael & Brora and Dr. influencing white churrtraagmnsi ® 
Joseph L_ Goldstein of the Umver- apartheid, succeeded B feiwp y e»; p 
atyof Texas at Dallas, were named mood Tuta this year as secretary* jjfee 
winners of Albert Lasker awards general of the South African C oun- ggg 
for basic research, as was cQ of Churches. 

rw Bn mini ITtofi or rvf iHb Univrerei- D _ 


Dr. Bernard Files’ of the Universi- . D . 

ty of Pittsburgh. The winners re- _ Smgeut Shmer has announ v ^ 
ceive $15,000 each. Dr. Mkhaef m Beijing that he will help V" 
DeBakey, rhaWriian of the 25- expand sports programs rr- 
member jury that selected the win- mentally retarded. Shnyer, * 
ners, said Landere readied more married toOKfonnCT Emuc. 

• . • t ? J tkof KPTlTlWl I 


Ouistos Sarlzetakis cf Greece pre- sports competition first 
ynifii the Onassis Awards 1968. Ate the Special Olyi 

cm Thursday to Professor Sent Hong Kong last year, 
Dresden, representing the Erasmus framed a sports assocustKr 
Commission of the Royal Nether- retarded. . . . Jean fc 
inniit Academy of Arte and Sci- South, m Rome to help la, 
ences; K. K. nm* secretary-gen- ly*s first arts festival for 
eral of the India-based capped, announced that a| 
international Committee fra Irri- Italian rang e r would be* 
ration and Drainage; Hermann non-American invited t» 
Graeiner, founder and president of at Washington’s Kennera 
.SOS Children’s Villages, a fotxnda- under a new internals 
tion tbai cares for orphans in 85 rfiangr piogfam. 1 

countries; and L6opoUS6dar Sen- _ □ , ■ 

ghor, 79, president of Senegal from ftmeess Anne of Bn 
1960 to 198a The Erasmus Com- gues* of honor at a cog 
mission and Fnunji shared the Tniwauiia marking the ops 
Olympia prize for inter nati onal 192-mfle (310-k2ometer}8 
contributions in erhnlnrglHp and the biggest British- aided a 
the env i ro nm e n t; G memer won Africa. The Songea-Mak. 
Aristotebs Prize fra serial service Road links the southern agr 
and Senghor received the Athmai al region of Ruvuma with tl 
Prize fra contributions to iwmian tmMqriM Highway. Th 
rights. Each prize is worth cess is on a four-nan on Afn 
$100,000. . . . ‘My daddy would as presSdentof the Britisi 
Kirn to be with you this morning. Save die Children Fund, 
but he can’t because the govern- □ 

meat won’t give him his passport,” Pfaddo Domingo will sinj 

8-year-old Afian Boesak Jr. raid at Verdi opera “Simon Bocca 
Georgetown Umvemty in Wash- in January, the Royal Opt 
ington, accepting his father’s Rob- gnnn«m«*d in London. Tot 
eit F. Remedy Memorial Human had been scheduled to take t 
Rights Award. The three South Af- in Verdi’s “Oteflo" before d 
rican activists named to receive the to devote a year to Fund- 
awards, whom Senator Edward M. after the. Mexican earth 
twwwl j railed “the moral fcadwv rfamieri four of his relath 1 
of our entire planet," were the Rev- John Toofay, director of the 
eraad Alan Boesak, Winnie Man- said Domingo agreed to t 
dehand — the only winner able to “Simon Boocanegra" becai 
attend the ceremony — the Rever- role — that of Gabriele Adc 
end C. F. Bey os Naude, an Afrika- would be smaller and need 
ner clergyman. Mandela, the wife heareal The performances 
of the imprisoned black nationalist Jan. 14, 18, 22, 25 and 29. 


al region of Ruvuma with thefc 
7ania-7*mHig Highway. The pk 
cess is an a Four-nation Africa to. 
as pretideat'af the British-basA 
Save die Children Fund. \ 

□ ■:} 

Pfaddo Domingo will sing in the 1 
Verdi opera “Simon Boccanegra? = 
in January, the Royal Opera has : 
winruniwi in London. The tenor i 

had been scheduled to take the Lead { 

in Verdi’s “Oteflo" before deriding 
to devote a year to fund-raising . 
after the. Mexican earthquake 
claimed four of Ins relatives. Sr j 
John Tooky.directra of the operel j 
said Donmigo agreed to sing in 
“Simon Boocanegra" because his, 
role — that of Gabriele Adorno — 
would be small® and need less re- 
hearsal The performances will be. 
Jan. 14, 18,22, 25 and 29. I 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 




INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


m cH country home: new Grose, 
beoutifufly i m o m d IMi century 
"bestide on 7 a era of land, 7 bed- 
room, 3 reception rooms, firaploces, 
large pod, ate for Oiridine. 

OR IF YOU HEfBl SOMETHING 
roaBy modem; 4-bedroom villa of ex- 
ropbonddaign overlooking Itie Bay of 
Cannes, past home. 3 baAoams. 
house for personnel, kr^thtotod pod, 
csk for Bob ert- 

MIHtCULTURAL MARRIAGE - fty- ' 
dtolMSl ensnens tin roeod re»-|ihe Be#* Epoquei Comet CoSfornie, 
taonsfipin evening workshop. Ott & I s ^e ndid seouded property vndh SLpqrb 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D’AZUR. SAVE TIME A money. 
Sad denl Bs gfah red estate ngeni hx 
prei denary teu ches, prepu'Qliois of 
your visits, deeds trnlded at no 
extra eharne. John fSTCRT. 22 roe 
Benoit Burn, 06300 Non. 93800196. 


AUXBBE 160 KM PARIS, touristic 
area, redourart an rnerode. far 70 
people, and price. Write; Stt Le 
Maxxne, 1 Qua de fa Marine, 89000 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


HAMPSTEAD GARDBi SUBURB. In 

auiet eddneae, 5 mins walk load 
shops, ddrghrfyl temi 3 bedoom 
house in beautiful ren di tion. Recap- 
lion 19ft i 12ft fabulous lotchen / 
drier, r acel e n t Dathroam. 1 00ft gar- 
den, are centr'd healing. 019300 
freehold Tel 01-458 7309 


Woerfwjn Mrtmn workshop. Oa A sdendd seduded pr< 
Col WICE ^5 556*21 Pan. sea vie w. 900 

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in ^ magnSeont 
English. Paris (dcdyl 4634 5965. Rome Argen. 

678032a , 


property with superb 
fiL Ivina area, opOO 
• garden, osk for 


PERSONALS 


For cO your properly icq u ie m aih on 
the Cote ifAzw, cododt 
MBBDIA 9X43.19.19 




REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


mNOPAUTY OF MONACO 
MONTE CAU0 NEAR CBITBl 

Very nice 2 rooms, loggia, seaview, 
equi p ped bldien bathroom, WC cup- 
bonds, cel Im. in modern compter, high 
FI ,800,000. 

AGENCE INTEKMHBA Monte Carlo 
Tel: 93 50 66 M 
Telex: 469477 


MONTE CARLO 

Private mormon, near Monaco Prince 
Palace, p onoronxc mo view. 

Tet 93 30 46 54. 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


EXTRAORDINARY 


3 mdependert b e tkuun n each with its 
sumptuous bdhroam & wdk-in dasef, 
MBMAIIONAL TRAVH1BT7 Con- servcrt ntutfc, parking 

baton 47.04.55.55 

290^0^^19^11550^ Tefax BATON 630855 F 
1 1 6^500. London dB 6603. NY 718 
338 2576 24 hour servme. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SAI£ 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


GENEVA - VIUA FOR SAIE. Eedurive 
rosidertid na Garden - 3000 «pa 
Cbmdetety reno v ated end modem- 
fcrad. Wil wit Diploadic Serviree or 
kxge faniy. 8 bedroor m, 5 bdh- 
rooms, kxge receptions, mooicer- 
/gornn rooms. Al twn e nM e r . Two 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


NYC 43Story CONDO 

n n . ■ - i e * 

i/og i Mii muqoiu lower 

240 EAST 47th ST. 

I Bfodt To (AM NWiam 
^pectaojlar- 

!, 2. 3. & 4 Bedroom Apartments , 
kmotfade Ocajctmcv 
New fall ServiceBuicSnawMi 
Swkraing PoaL Hedth <Job and 
Hauseheeping Services Available 

®5tal APARTMe^re 

ABE ALSO AVAILABLE 
For Wo Gd 712759WU 
Sc*, Sin 10^ Mon to fri 96 







S-A. CO. OWNBB af a red estate, 
new lerapetra S. Crete Gr. camletn 
development far a dees face! of 175 
roor re md uded in offer. I nf ocmahoo: 
Tefc {00301} 7234091 - 10 am ■ 3 pm. 
Tele* 223076 Mar* GR. 


NEAR BEAUBOURG 

Lkeque toft. BO sgm. 
FIjOOQjOOa 42 67To 07 




1 

MONTPARNASSE Compcgne far, un- 
usual chaimiuu 100 egm., overlook- 

| ISRAEL | 

ing irecs. ten doi uniuanerv, ran 
Boor. Excellert condtion. 43 20 38 65 


LUXEMBOWG. 2/3 rooms, di ronv 
fam. 55 sqjn.. 4th Boor, Mt. stone 
buttng faOTg south. Tafc47356331_ 




i teaeity af jour 


PALMA DE MALLORCA 

OUI5TANDNG 

We mtm ww of fer Ihe must expert- 
sve □partrncrrti in Pdbn do MaBoito. 
We cue sure yoo cm*! find betof croi 
Situated in Ini most s fc yciR and cfumt 


residemid dty area BreaMoUnfl view 
on the jeOi'tne dty. the harbor. Ody 
finest ntfenoh have been ined for die 


Rdr Santa Raw, CA. 95404, OSA 


wood, French ook etc- Each oportmere 
wrfh krge fr mg. aq a creJe dra^ fine- 
fioOi lerge tBiuce, c ocn piete ktfdw, 
aeptrote makfs area, 4 bedrooms with 
bc^hroam & vwA- in dasef etc TotcJ 
about 360 x+m. property with 34*00 
vpil garden, mdoar & ou t door pad, 
tenra, garage, csr-oondtioiMg, door* 


ARMADANS 

Jam Berta 6, 

E-07014 Patou <fa Mdferca 

Tefc SprevTl-a 99 00 


mgs induded. $595^)00. 
A ftjuk it ma e s thru Arlene Holman 

MORU LYNCH READY 




LAKE LUGANO 

Lakeside a pertonent s in a kxge 
beoutiful park teeth 1 7 JXO tqjiu privtse 
area, swenming pool, pntmkB marine^ 


private beach. Iff 
B0 sqm- 190 rant + terraces 24 ■ 47 
sqm. Pncm 5*63,900 • SR ,179,1 50 
ott Die Redderan IBvafagoet the South- , 
era area of the Lck* Lugano with apart- 
mentsf7sgm.-130iqm. + b nknn i ei { 
Also ov er lo ok i n g fake and mounten. . 
Best location on the fake in ae old 
typed Wfags. 

ftiew SraiOA50 - SF 48^ 450. Mod - 1 
pnflfi of law Swiss interest retes Free 
for sde to fcteam. 


sgm. + terraces 24 -47 
51*63.90) . SFl.179,150 


m Pkiu Mayor. Ndond monunent 
butting Tek (91) 2314249. 


International Business Message Center 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES? 

LIFETIME SECURITY 

I nvest to one of America's meet ex- 
erting hdnologkd In sn Uirad a 

in the nor mdutt-y. Over X/X10 nut 
trees planted m 1984. Protected arinud 
i nc o me evertuaBy re adies 52%. 
BKOXBtS- moraSRS INVTTBD. 
Matend ovcdable m engfori, French. 
German. Bax 2207. Herdd Triune. 
92521 Nealy Cede*. France 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 




BUSINESS 


ran. 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 


U-5-A- « WORUlWfDE 

A complete penand & busfaess service 
p’OMdmg a unique co fle ction af 
tntenttt;wnc*fe X radltopud 
mdvfauob far al soad & 
prcxnorionol occosKn. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th Su N.YC. 10019 
Steviee l epi etei thri ves 
Needed Worldwide. 


EMERALD - HOME LTD. 

Vfcs G. CWteri 3, CH-6900 Ugmvo gry.nwy bedro om erfa ’ 

Tefc CH-91-6429T3 - Ceterd, Ftxk wews. Second 

Tbc 73612 HOME CH facet South, serwss as oaqr Itoaty. 

Maos roam cat be extra guest room. 
Btcelerf ooeAon throughout Very ee- 
led fuBy tarviad buttfag with nes tou- 
rant faoities. For detab c u t do th 
M5. BCWDfTCH 
212^927460 
to: 212-861-7764 
BK7WN HAMS STEVENS 



NEW YORK EXCLU SIVE 

rrfloffmngofftefanc bo nistsobtd 
room fifth Avenue a po r to eet living 
room with teoodfaming firepl ace pad 



VALAIS / SWITZERLAND 

CRANS - MONTANA 


The F.T. operates party marin a day of 
p u rifica t i o n defivery services far sub- 
scribers in die folowing dries: 

BASEL - GEFKVA - LUGANO - 
ZURICH * L AU S A NN E 

For detafe on these serves aid for 
fimher kifai 11 — iti. ji, oontncL 


Peter loiaater. F.T. Swetserkaid 
Tel: Geneyo^l ^^ 16 04 or 


FINANCIAL TIMES 
BIROPE’S BUSDB5 FEWSPAPBt 


U.SJL COAL 

190aOQjDOOkm cdpniven lawsUp4wr 
cod raenm. 50fl00 acres of sceac 
land with m i nerd surface & wafer 
ngVes. Also ad & gas potential Must 
selfc Gemeii Energy & Minerds Capo- 
je Streep Omaha, 


lA Gemeii Energy & Minerds Capo- 
ntiion, 11605 Dcrfgc Street, Omaha. 
Nebrasia 68154, l&A. Tettu 484591 
FORSTB. Phone: 403-330 0555 




HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS | IX>W COST FLIGHTS I HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 



«W YORK. WASFB4GTON (8WI) 
OflCAG O er pETRO CT 
from Lueembcorg 

One way - ctoeet USS 199 
(DM 499, BFR 99901 
5FR 449, WR 1590} 


New York 

wucogo 
Miren 
Ortoodo •• 
Dallas 


ACCESS USA 

On Way to 

k FI 500 


■ Way Retrod Trfo 

FI 500 F2990 

F2600 F4170 

FI 590 F3450 

F2980 F3450 

F2S90 F3450 

F3430 F3660 

FTCgO F3000 • 

i oavnten . 


end more dsviAcn M 
1556 tfan rt tm Id daM- 
MRS tefc {1} 42 21 46 94 

(Ger.Ue.1S02} 


dwBt 

(BHI 19,9 


Round THp (7-21 d»>l 
bon* USS 410 JDM999J 
19,980, SR 199. R=R 3290) 


ronad trfa drawt 

For further nbrntfai lid reeervedion 
rad KHANPAM 
Fr on kf u n (099] 29 99 7B 

Brusseh (02} 718 0680 

Luxemburg V!B 2470 

Zunefc £1) 363 0000 

Paris (1) 47 42 52 26 



fate USA Eat/West Coimt- 
- Cafabeai. TM London 74f 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 





TURN TO PAGE 10W