Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats



”8 doctor 


■ ’ l.a 


- Vu_ ^ 


-. •• > *«&? i«b 't ^7'—-^ 

■ . '!> V/V WAAffWONwail 

■ 4 ; -*/?*. vll W • • ••• :•••■ •• - : 


The Global Newspaper 
• Edited in Paris 
Primed 5imnltaneooglv 
in Paris, London, Tin-ir-h^ 


INTERNATIONAL 











-? Jf ^°’ 31,962 47/85 

" ■ ““Tl-V f ^"- ~ 


Published With Hie New York Times and The Washington Post 


SO S. 

Bot-im. — 0S»D*> 

Bdgan <S Eft. 

Canada C* IA 

Crpna Cl DJC 

Drnmuri — BODL'fi 

ton* l»Sf 

Wond ID 0 f JA 

Fimc* Am F 

Gviwpy ISO DM 

GreaiBnicvi .50P 

Gutet 100 IV. 

Iron-, IIS Bet 


mu ’oonjl. 

17M L»r OnOft__CJ00 Kah 

tod«_i_*»M Wbc 

feyC: S3*. »» J?* 7 , — 450 

Kr^S^lST-SI 

i**— .^f^sSrrJiS 

*«*m.22>s* 

Madwa 10} 6c rums Q150 Dw 

Mdla — 35 Caw rurUj T£ 406.00 

Moocco — uaE. — .ass.* 
N**wtonfll_2/S R Ui*W,(Sir.v_| 0 i; 
Higona 170ft Vogedmno HOD 


* * 


l - *,.- '■“Si.vs H. 
■ ■■■ ' ,*«? 


PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23 - 24 , 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 




‘A ^ 



Spies Get 


’rrfi 





•■• ."i •> j , L ■win- 


'-* <•£!?* 






For Early Release 
From Auckland 


, r _ By Michael Dobbs ■ 

'. ui'.'r °Hk Washington Pea Service _ ‘ . 

"ft.!, PAMS • Two French secret 

• *'■ agents were each sentenced Friday 

*- v vle ^ in Auckland, New Zealand, to 10 




* «*ZPft£ 






^'Jl _■ 


V ‘;N : . ; 


7*11:- *.- 


years in prisanior their roles in the 
July 10 bombing of the Greenpeace 
ship Rainbow Warrior. A mun died 
in the bombing. 

The agents. Major Akin Mafart 
and Captain Dominique Priettr, 
were eonvicted of manslaughter 
.... _ . : ~ livief. .-And criminal arson after planting 
• . !?. ' ' P£jtilty Not. 4 to involvement in the 

BriL«h.iA. ! ^ bombing in the Auckland port. 

The French government has ac- 
knowledged that- the agents acted 
under ontes as part of an effort to 
forestall /protests against French 
nuclear testing in the South Pacific. 

In passing sentence; New Zea- 
land’s chief justice. Sir Poland 
Davison, said the prison terms were 
intended “'to give a clear warning to 
persons such as the defendants and 
their masters that terrorist-style ac- 
tions will provoke stem reaction 
and severe punishment M 
“They should not be given a 
short holiday in Nerw Zealand and 
return to France to a hero’s wel- 
come,” he and 

The French government called 
for the early release of the agents, 
whose rde in the bombing is be- 
lieved to have been one of provid- 
ing logistical support Two other 
French agents, never.arrested, are 
believed to have planted limpet 
mines on tbe hnfl of the environ- 
mental group's flagship. 


■■ 

, ■— anawv 

• • '^aiFca 

"r k 
;• as 

Uuti 

‘ • ‘ftelio'lgjj; 

- .-esiab 

;; ; 

•• <1 ini.r^' 

1 * 'r-:' Jpais- 

~ ' ’-I i'slBSiij. 

• C-'CTSME; 

— w pskeaassr 



Reagan Asserts Summit Talks 

'Moved Arms Control Forward' 


Winnie Mandela was accompanied by her husband’s attorneys, George Bizos, center, and 
Ismael Ayob, as tibey visited Nelson Mandela at a hospital in Cape Town on Friday. 

Death Toll Rises to 13 in Clash 
In a Township Near Pretoria 


By Sheila Rule 

New York Tima Service 

JOHANNESBURG — The au- 
thorities reported Friday that 13 
persons were lo&ed Thursday in 
dashes with the police in the black 
township of MamdodL It was one 


kwed African National Congress, 
met with his lawyers for two-and-a- 
half hours in his hoqrital room in 
Cape Town, where he is recovering 
from surgery to remove his prostate 
gland. Following the meeting, the 
lawyers declined comment on 


of thoihighac i t olls m ft ftinglu. widespread specula ti on that Mr. 
day a state of emergency was Mandela’s release from prison was 


i *rse~r-*3Pi* ->s T r<«3r 


R£\IBMr 

iv.isnpf 

357 NH 9 

o'lim 


imposed on July 21 in parts of the 
country. . 

The deaths bring to at least 36 
ense Minister Paul Quilts of : the number of pecple killed in 
townshqw around the nation since 


'I f): :: ft: 


'-»• t ■ 


*ra 




»®a iem- 

■ '. XfJK fc 

; tirtt 

• ■■ 


-it, ^r*-3ST 

•• r . • r^T3’ 

■ r.fTT - 

v, - r - iTt^zr 


HI. 

; M\, 


/VCi « : 

u.si v: 

si.: . • ' » -• 


_ appeared to faint Friday at 
political n^otiations with New 
Zealand for the release of Major 
Mafart and Captain Prieur when he 
said the Greenpeace affair had en- 
tered a “new phase.” . 

“The French government will, do 
everythmgin its power sotimi the;. 
French ameers can^SfiBT.bsdt "to 
their country as rapidly as -posrir 
ble," he said iri a radio interview. 

The new^nuxi Le Monde, quot- - 
ing sources close to the EXefensc 
Ministry, said the two agents could 
expect-, to be deponed to France 
within three xnomhs. . 

After the vadict, Melame^han- 
nafaan, a Greenpaffie representa- 
tive, said; “We ted flie senteices 
. ... -^g.- aren’t long enough- The sentence* 
/; X+n won’t bring badr-Fdsmido or the 
-*■ .. Rainbow Wairi^, ,< 3 ; «cbando Pex- 

: : r *:7 ^eira, 33, waslfeJEKrtdr photogra- 
***;■.& ^pher who died m tfac bomhing. 

; Securing the idease of the tv^p 
agents is a politically inportani 
goal for the Frendi . government, 
which faces legislative elections in 
March. . 

* The prolonged detention of the 
agents would make the Socialist 
government vulneraUe to renewed 
attacks by the rightist opposition 
and to discontent within ute armed 
forces. '• • 

Pditical sources in Paris smd 
that France .was wilting to offer 
cooipensation both to .New Zea- 
land and Greenpeace if the agents 
were released. French officials ham 
held out the prospect of more fa- 
vorable conditions for the import 
of New Zealand lamb and butter 


Sunday. 

The potice initially reported that 
only two persons had died in the 
violence in Mamdodi but said Fri- 
day that they had found more bod- 
ies injhe township overnight. . 

saidabatpo- 
ti« patrols had been “confronted 
by particularly videni mobs” and 
were, “bombarded with petrol 
bomba, half-bricks and other ob- 
jects.” Residents, however, said the 
demonstration had been peaceful 
until the police opened fire; 

Meanwhile, Nelson Mandela, 
the imprisoned leader of the out- 


immm ent- 

The attorneys, George Bizos and 
Ismad Ayob, said that prison regu- 
lations prevented them from speak- 
ing about the conversation with 
their diem. They said they did not 
know when Mr. Mandela would be 
returned to prison, where he is serv- 
ing a life sentence for sabotage and 
treason, and would neither confirm 
nor deny that negotiations were go- 
ing, onfor Mr.Atandda's release. 

In gnotfeer development, soldiers 
and’ poticemen -were withdrawn 
from townships around Port Eliza- 
beth, amove that had the effect of 
m ee ti n g a major demand made by 
blacks to bring an end to a four- 
month boycott of white-owned 
businesses. The police, however, 
dismissed suggestions that they 


were bring influenced by the de- 
mands of “certain organizations.” 

The withdrawal of the troops 
Thursday night came after repre- 
sentatives of the Port Elizabeth 
Chamber of Commerce met with 
police officials about the boycott 
and other community problems. 

Leaders of the boycott, which 
has crippled many businesses, bad 
lifted it temporarily and said they 
would later decide whether to rrim- 
pose it. Another of their boycott 
demands — the release from deten- 
tion of boycott leaders — also has 
been met 

The police opened fire on resi- 
dents in Mamdodi when thousands 
of people, many of them rideriy 
women, gathered at a local admin- 
istration office to protest the con- 
tnmieg presence mtrospF in the 
township, the banning of weekend 
funerals and high rents. 

'Witnesses said seme of the dead 
were shot by police squads, while 
others were trampled when the 
crowd, estimated at 25,000 to 
50,000 people, fled the gunfire and 
tear gas. 


McFarlane 
Sees Gains for 
Both Sides 

The AssoraM Press 

GENEVA — Robert C. McFar- 
lane, President Ronald Reagan's 
national security adviser, said Fri- 
day that (his week's UiL-Soviei 
summit talks “succeeded beyond 
any reasonable measure” and bode 
wdl for more smbie East-West ties. 

“It succeeded in establishing a 
very thorough understanding on 
both sides of the other country's 
purposes, priorities, ambitions and 
willingness to compromise,'’ Mr. 
McFarlane said of the uJk* be- 
tween Mr. Reagan and Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev. 

“For the first time in many 
years,” Ik said, “it resulted in 
agreement by both sides (hat our 
agenda is broad, that it is not exclu- 
sively arms control, that arms con- 
trol wil] never succeed unless it is in 
a climate of political behavior that 
is acceptable io both sides ” 

Mr. McFarlane was addressing 
professors and students of the Ge- 
neva University Institute for High- 
er Studies, from which he graduat- 
ed in 1967. 

Reporting on the discussions on 
the Strategic Defense Initiative, 
Mr. Reagan's program to develop a 
space-based defense system, he 
quoted Mr. Gorbachev as saying: 

“Mr. President, I understand 
you, you are deeply committed to 
this, i disagree with you and I be- 
lieve we should engage on this is- 
sue." 

That response. Mr. McFarlane 
said, was “profoundly important.” 
For the first time, he'srid, the two 
leaders resolved to try to overcome 
thdr disagreements. * 

He said the discussions were 
“probably the richest, most thor- 
ough exchange between leaders of 
East and West that I have ever 
knowTj-of." 

“This meeting was terribly im- 
portant,” he sai«l “It succeeded be- 
yond any reasonable measure.” 

Mr. McFarlane said that previ- 
ous summit meetings failed be- 
cause “hidden weaknesses” on one 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5) 



Th> AnaoaM Prut 

Ronald Reagan at a joint session of Congress on his return 
from Europe. Behind Mr. Reagan are Vice President Bush, 
left, and the speaker of the House, Thomas P. O’Neill Jr. 


'We understand each other better. That’s 
the key to peace. I gained a better 
perspective. I feel he did, too. 9 

— Ronald Reagan 

Geneva’s Success: Process 
Wins Out Over Substance 


■ By Leslie H. Gelb 

New York Tima Service 

GENEVA — The U.S.-Soviet 
summit meeting was seen widely by 
officials on both sides as a victory 
for President Ronald Reagan, who 
wanted to emphasize process and 
play down substance, and a setback 
for Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who had 
staked so much personal prestige 
on an arms control breakthrough at 
the two-day encounter. 


— p* Y-, 

jr.—-.*** 

nig 


&***]!& 


U.S. Navy Analyst Held, 
Charged as Israeli Spy 

By Philip SI 

■ New York Tima 


Shenon 

t Service 

WASHINGTON r— A civilian 
who analyzed: counterintelligence 
for the UA Navy has been arrested 
on espionage charges, accused of 
selling rfassTfieri code information 
to Israel, federal officials said. 
Jonathan Jay Pollard, 31, was 

A UR: general said Yurchenko 
affirmed U5. appraisals of So- 
viet spy techniques. Page 2. 

arrested Thursday near the Israeli 
Embassy. Federal officials said he 
was trying to get the Israeli authori- 


ty the European Community. 

The speculation about a possible 
deal for the agents’ release followed ties to help him Dee, 
the decision by New Zealand au- An 
thorities to drop murder charges Rauhitschek, 
against than in return for- gouty 
pleas to the lesser crime of man^ 
slaughter. 

Interviewed by- telephone from 
her prison. Captain Prienr, 36, said 
she was not . a “terrorist” but “a 
captain in the French Army who 
did what I was told to do.” 

■ She also suggested that prema- 
ture public pressure horn France 
could have contributed to. tbe se- 
verity of her sentence: 



INSIDE 

■ The search for the remains of 

missing U.S. servicemen 
brought back a Vietnamese 
woman’s grief.- Page 2. 

■ A Japanese-born mother who 
killed her children in a suicide 

jt wa 
j'tion after a 

■ Canada is B 

ported- tinJchetwcen' . 
teUjg&nce agents and Sikh au- 



-p -'jyv 


■ Tory Waite. jti, Beinn j 
with- the kidi£atgpefsi,6f four 
Americans.' . v4 f Page A 

BUSINESS/FTNANO: 

■ U.S. consumer pices rose 0.3 
percent in October, the biggest 
rise since ApriL ' . Page 13. 

ITbe doBar fefl sharply in Eu- 
rope, losing 1 pfennig against 
. the Deutsche made and 1 cat 
against the pound. Page 17. 

SPECIAL REPORT 
J On tour in a land where the 
history is tiymuma ttal: Travel 
in Egypt, - Page 9. 


GaW 
owkdged that 
Mr. Pollard was^nisted outside 
the embassy on Thursdtry, but said: 
“We have no farther mfonnatioa” 

Mr. Pcdlard, one federal ofiGdal 
raid, was an employee of Ihe Naval 
Mteffigence Service in snhurban 
S wiftnTvl, Maiyttnifl. OvCT lhe last - 
‘ year and a half, an official said, he 
had. received payments of “less 
thanS10Q,00(r from the Israelis in 
exchange for code information. 
Hie nature of tbe rnfnrwwlinn and 
its value to the Israeli government 
ctaild not be detennmed. 

A UA NaVy source said that Mr. 
Ptrflard Was detected after he began 
requesting access to documents 
outside his area of expertise. 

: A federal law enforcement offi- 
cial said that Mr. Pollard was cpn- J 
fronted with the espionage evi- 
dence “one or two days ago,” and 
. agreed .to. cooperate and “possibly 
implicate more people.” Mr. Pol- 
laid, he raid, acknowledged seflmg 
riagdfied mformatiem to the IttfadT 
government and to - at least one 
.Asian nation. 

(Two U5. goreramoat sources 
said Friday that Mr. Pollard had 
also confessed turning over '.secrets 

to Pakistan, The Associated Press 
reported from Washington. One 
source said FBI agents woe still 
trying to verify Mr. Ponard’sdaim. 
A’ Spokesman was. not, immediately 
available ax the Pakistani Embassy 
for comment} . ' - 

[A State Department spoked 
man, Qnnles Redman, said Friday 
that the . United States was 
“shocked and .saddened at the no- ‘ 
tion that something Hke this might ', 
occur,” Renters' reported from 
Washington. ' 

[‘Tm'iew of the fact that he was 
arrested leaving die Israeli Embas- 
sy, the -cacanmamccs -ccaacenung 


his presence at that location are 
being actively investigated," he 
said. “We’ve been in touch with the 
Israelis to try and get to the bottom 
of this. We .don’t have all the 
facts.”! 

Mr. Pollard was placed under 
observation tyr the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation and was bring 
watched when he drove to tbe Is- 
raeli Embassy, where FBI agents 
arrested him , die official said 

Before the arrest, Mr. Pollard 
talked with Israeli officials and said 
that “The FBI is onto me, I need 
help,” according to tbe law en- 
forcement official. 

In papers filed Thursday in U.S. 
District Court here, the authorities 
said that Mr. Pollard had told fed- 
ora! agents that he had delivered 
documents and writings relating to 
national defense to an agent of a 
foreign government last Friday. • 

‘ A Reagan adminis tration official 
said that a recent search of Mr. 
Pollard's borne had turned im 50 or 
more efasafied documents, the of- 
ficial said that the' information he 
had obtained was sensitive but 
added, “I don’t have any reason to 

(Continued oa Page 4, CoL 7) 



PRESIDENTIAL WELCOME — Tbe Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, center, was 
greeted by President Andrei A. Gromyko, left, when he returned to Moscow on Friday 
amid signs of Kremlin satisfaction with" the results of the Geneva summit meeting. Page 2. 


Before the meeting that ended 
Thursday, Mr. Gorbachev gambled 
that by threatening a failure in Ge- 
neva, he could dirit concessions 
from Mr. Reagan on space-based 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

defenses. By all accounts, it did not 
work. Now, according to Soviet of- 
ficials, be will revert to a longer- 
term strategy of trying to turn U.S. 
and allied opinion against Mr. Rea- 
gan's Strategic Defense initiative. 

Mr. Reagan calculated that the 
Soviet leader also could not afford 
a failed summit meeting because of 
such domestic priorities as the 
weak Soviet economy and his need 
to buttress his power base. 

As it turned out, the two leaders 
took the meeting into thdr own 
hands in a remarkable display of 
personal diplomacy. From what is 
known, this was unplanned as of 
last week and apparently evolved 
more or less spontaneously. 

On the surface, there was good 
personal chemistry and optimistic 
talk about the future. 

On substance, the two leaders 
bucked up against the hard realities 
of their conflicts and made scant, if 
any, progress on nuclear arms con- 
trol and regional disputes. 

In practical terms, they agreed to 
establish what Mr. Reagan culled a 
process and what Mr. Gorbachev 
termed a mechanism to keep dis- 
putes from getting out of control 
and to try to resolve them through 
negotiations. 

The principal question the two 
delegations wrestled with into the 
early hours of the morning was how 
to portray what had been accom- 
plished — whether as minima] or 
modest progress or as more, and 
what in particular to say about nu- 
clear arms. 

To U.S. officials, it was critical to 
find a formula that spelled success 
without suggesting euphoria. 

Success would be good domestic 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 7) 


But He Cites 
Split on SDI 9 
Other Issues 

By David Hoffman 

Washington Peat Service 
WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan said that he had 
“moved arms control forward” at 
his summit meeting with Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev and that be had tried to 
convince the Soviet leader that mis- 
sile defenses could help the super- 

Moscow will allow planes to land 
in emergencies. Page 3. 

powers “escape the prison of mutu- 
al tenor.” 

The president’s nationally tele- 
vised address to a joint session of 
Congress on Thursday capped a 
20-hour day that took Mr. Reagan 
from a final appearance with Mr. 
Gorbachev in Geneva to a session 
with allied leaders in Brussels and 
then home to Washington, where 
he reported directly to Capitol Hill 
and was received with sustained 
applause. 

Mr. Reagan acknowledged that 
the United States and Lbe Soviet 
Union remained “far apart” on 
many issues. He said Mr. Gorba- 
chev, in a “very direct exchange of 
views," had rejected his appeal for 
“my dream" of missile defenses, 
“which could ultimately protea all 
nations against the danger of nucle- 
ar war.” 

The president offered a generally 
optimistic view of the prospects for 
better relations with the Soviet 
Union, but also cautioned that his 
two days of long, private talks with 
Mr. Gorbachev had not brought 
the superpowers closer on funda- 
mental issues or resolved specific 
differences on arms control. 

He expressed hope of ending the 
tensions and mistrust that charac- 
terized his first term. The president 
suggested tfcai in his second term 
be would seek to resolve differences 
by candid and direct talks with Mr. 
Gorbachev, who may lead the Sovi- 
et Union into the next century. 

Mr. Reagan, who puts great store 
in the value of personal relation- 
ships with other leaders, empha- 
sized the personal contact he had 
with Mr. Gorbachev. “That was the 
best part, our fireside summit,” he 
said in a reference to sitting beside 
fireplaces for more than five hours 
of one-on-one discussions. 

After reporting on thdr agree- 
ment to meet twice in the next two 
years, once in the United States 
and once in the Soviet Union, Mr. 
Reagan joked that “we arranged 
that out in the parking Icl” 

“We met, as we had to meet,” 
Mr. Reagan told Congress. “I had 
called for a fresh start — and we 
made that start. I can't claim we 
had a meeting of the minds on such 
fundamentals as ideology or na- 
tional purpose — but we under- 
stand each other better. Thai's the 
key to peace. I gained a better per- 
spective. I fed he did. too.” 

Mr. Reagan flew by helicopter 
from Andrews Air Force Base to 
the Capitol to deliver his address, 
following an eight-hour, 4.000- mile 
(6,400 kilometer) flight from Brus- 
sels, where he had reported io the 
allied leaders on his talks. It was a 
gesture identical to one used by 
President Richard Nixon when he 
flew to the Capitol to report on the 
signing of SALT I in Moscow in 
1972. 

“Maybe it's the old broadcaster 
in me,” Mr. Reagan said, “but I 
decided to file my own report di- 
rectly to you." 

The central part or Mr. Reagan's 
report was on his disagreement 
with Mr. Gorbacfaev on the Strate- 
gic Defense Initiative, a research 

(Continued on Page 4, Col. 6) 


Reagan Advised to Ease 
Trust Laws , Sources Say 


Wt 


Perer Behr 

Post Service 


WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan’s cabinet advisers 
have recommended that be seek a 
. fundamental revision erf U-S. anti- 
trust laws cm corporate mergers 
and price-fixing penalties to bnng 
these statutes in line whh “econom- 
ic realities, " administration sources 

said. 

A key proposal would ask Con- 
gress to change the 71 -year-old 
Clayton Act, one erf the two pillars 
of- antitrust enforcement, to lessen 
uncertainty about the legality of 
mergers. 

The language in Section 7 of the 
Clayton Ad prohibiting mergers 
that “may” lessen competition or 
“tend to create a monopoly” is so- 
vague ^thar it inhibits some merges 
that would ingwove competition 
ami strengthen industries, admfaris- 
tration officials Jiave su'd; 

■ .ThegotfwouM be to remove this 


barrier, the sources said Thursday. 
The proposed changes were 
to Wednesday at a joint 


meeting of the cabinet councils on 
domestic policy, headed by Attor- 
ney General Edwin Meese 3d, and 
economic policy, led by Treasury 
Secretary James A. Baker 3d, 
Another meeting was necessary 
to approve final language of the 
proposed ClaytoQ Act revisions, 
the sources said. 

If approved by the president, any 
antitrust proposals would be sent 
to Congress early next year. Justice 
Department officials had said be- 
fore the Thursday report. 

Despite strong support from 
business, the proposals were con- 
sidered likely to face an uphill 
struggle, particularly in the House 
of Representatives. 

Congress would also be asked to 
write into law the administrative 
revisions in merger guidelines and 
an tit rust -enforcement policies 



Hong Kong Is Cautioned by Beijing 
About Sweeping Politiccd Reforms 


Douglas HL Ginsburg, assis- 
tant attorney general, work- 
ing Co revise antitrust laws, 

adopted during the Reagan admin- 
istration, the sources said. 

These revisions constitute “a 
quiet revolution that is remaking 
the map of American indusny in 
(Costumed on Page 4. CoL 5) 


Acence France-Presse 

HONG KONG — China has in- 
dicated that it will not tolerate 
sweeping political changes in the 
British colony of Hong Kong be- 
fore it reverts to Chinese rule in 
1997. 

The apparent warning came in 
statements Thursday by Xu Jiatun, 
head or the Xinhua news agency in 

Hong Kong. The statements were 
reported Friday by a top Hong 
Kong official who said that Mr. Xu 
apparently was referring to a recent 
Legislative Council election. 

Mr. Xu, who is Beijing's de facto 
spokesman in Hong Kong, report- 
ally said that China did not want 
to see the colony undergoing “12 
years of tremendous changes” be- 
fore 1997 and then “50 years of no 
change** after that. 

Under an accord between Brit- 
ain and China. Hong Kong will be 
governed by an agreement called 
the Basic Law. which Beijing is to 


draft with the help of representa- 
tives from Hoag Koag. 

In the past, Mr. Xu has declined 
to comment on current political re- 
forms in Hong Kong, describing 
them as “British affairs.” On Fri- 
day. however, he reportedly cau- 
tioned that there should be no po- 
litical changes in the colony that 
might conflict with the Basic Law. 

Mr. Xu reportedly said, “Some- 
body has done something which 
deviates from the terms set down in 
the Joint Declaration.” 

[Hong Kong stock prices fell 
shaiply in heavy trading Friday, 
Reuters reported from Hong Kong. 
Stockbrokers blamed concerns 
sparked by Mr. Xu's remarks. 

[In London, the Foreign Office 
reacted calmly io Mr. Xu’s state- 
ment 

[A spokesman stressed that Brit- 
ain bad sovereignty over Hong 
Kong until 1997 and said that any 


criticisms of its policy would be 
aired inside a Chinese-British liai- 
son group overseeing ihe transi- 
tion.] 

Under a Chinese-British declara- 
tion signed Iasi December. China 
promised the capitalist enclave 
self-rale for 50 years after 1997. As 
a step in that direction, the colonial 
government in September held its 

First legislative council elections in 
more than 140 years. 

Tbe high Hong Kong official, 
who declined to be identified, said 
Friday: “The Chinese seemed to 
have become so suspicious of the 
British efforts in introducing a rep- 
resentative government in Hong 

Kong that they have decided to 
make public this unhappiness.” 

The elections were held indirect- 
ly, with only selected candidates in 
the running and only about 1 per- 
cent of the colony's 5.4 million resi- 
dents allowed to vote. 




s 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, SATUBPAY-5UNDAY, NOVEMBER 28-2^ 1985 


Even a Weighty Summit Meeting Has Its Lighter Moments 


By Joseph Ldyveld 

AVh Yu'k Tima Service 

GENEVA — When the U.S. and 
Soviet delations descended on 
Geneva tat week, they were both 
working overtime to shape the ex- 
pectations held at home and 
abroad for the first Soviet-Ameri- 
can summit meeting in the six years 
since Leonid I. Brezhnev planted a 
ceremonial kiss on Jimmy Carter. 

They left Thursday the way they 
came, working overtime now to 
shape the conclusions that by- 
standers would draw in the pale 
light of a joint statement that 
showed no movement on the major 
issues that separated the two sides. 

This lime there were no kisses or 
embraces, but die omission seemed 
more a question of style than poli- 
tics. Mikhail S. Gorbachev bad 
shown various sides of an expan- 
sive personality, but it still was 
bard to imagine him in a clinch 
with President Ronald Reagan. 

The two men looked relaxed and 
comfortable with each other after 
an intensive round of personal di- 
plomacy that had no equal in the 
annals of U.S.-Soviet summit meet- 
ings. but as they stood aide by side 
on a stage in a huge conference 
center here, both wore the abstract- 
ed looks of politicians focusing 
more cm their home audiences than 
on each other. 

□ 

Most of the journalists who 
would report on the meeting 
watched from a hail directly behind 
the one in which the ceremony ac- 
tually took place. There, trouble 
with the projector casting larger- 


than-life images of the leaders on a 
big screen caused them to go 
through some alarming changes in 
color while Mr. Reagan was speak- 
ing — from red. to orange, to green. 

Then the journalists divided into 
three packs. A sedentary pack re- 
mained in the hall with the big 
screen on which Mr. Gorbachev 
was due to appear in one or another 
hue. The others beaded for either 
the Soviet mission, where it was 
possible for those on an approved 
list to hear him in the flesh, or the 
Inter-Continental Hotel, where 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
and another American, a self- 
styled “senior American official,” 
were giving their versions. 

The Americans finished first be- 
cause Mr. Gorbachev wanted to 
talk at length about the menace of 
space-based weapons, and they did 
not. Nonetheless, modem technol- 
ogy — which proved to be neither 
American nor Soviet but Japanese 
— ensured that the Americans got 
the last word. 

Even after the Washington press 
pack bad decamped, Mr. Shultz 
still could be seen, over and over 
again, belong oul the American 
version on a video cassette that 
automatically rewound itself and 
started again whenever he seemed 
on the verge of stopping. 

□ 

One minor problem of some deli- 
cacy was at least eased by the lack 
of firm agreement on major issues. 
This was the institutional problem 
that occurs whenever leaders leave 
their principle aides behind and go 
into lengthy private sessions. 


Group Close to Marcos 
Said to Seek U.S. Lobby 


.Vov York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — A promi- 
nent Republican lobbyist has said 
thaL his firm would register as a 
Washington lobbyist for a Philip- 
pine business association closely 
tied to President Ferdinand E. 
Marcos. 

The lobbyist Paul Manafort, 
said Thursday that the firm of Paul 
Manafort Stone ft Kelly would reg- 
ister with the Justice Department 
as lobbyists for the Chamber of 
Philippines Manufacturers, Ex- 
porters and Tourist Associations 

Meanwhile, another Washington 
concern. Gray ft Co., is discussing 
possible representation of the Phil- 
ippine government, according to 
administration and Philippine offi- 
cials. 

Both concerns have principals 
with Strong ties to the Reagan ad- 
ministration, and Mr. Manafort 
and several of his business asso- 
ciates played important roles in 
President Ronald Reagan’s re-elec- 
tion campaign. 


China Plans Yangtze Project 

The Associated Press 

BELTING — - China plans to 
dredge the entire Yangtze River 
and its 33 tributaries to form a 
9,000-mile ( 14.500-kilometer) navi- 
gation waterway by the year 2000 , 
the China Daily reported Friday. 


These developments come at a 
time when the Reagan administra- 
tion and Congress have been in- 
creasing pressure on Mr. Marcos to 
make wide-reaching changes. 

Mr. Manafort said that the 
group he is representing has “ties to 
the government” He added: “We 
wQl advise them, and people of the 
government of the Philippines, in 
issues of bilateral interest” 

Subsequently. Mr. Manafort 
said that the word advise was inac- 
curate. “Communicating with them 
is the better word,” he said. 

In addition to being a principal 
in the lobbying firm based in north- 
ern Virginia, Mr. Manafort is also 
involved in the political consulting 
firm of Black Manafort Stone & 
Atwater. The two firms are legally 
separate but involve many of the 
same core personnel. 

H. Lee Atwater, a principal of 
the consulting firm, is a volunteer 
adviser to Vice President George 
Bush’s political action organiza- 
tion, while Roger J. Stone and 
Charles Black, the two other princi- 
pals, are advisers to Representative 
Jack Kemp, a Republican of New 
York. 

Spokesmen for Mr. Bush and for 
Mr. Kemp said that any private 
work undertaken by the firm was 
solely the firm's business. 






Qi«m; natch in IS-ct. gold, u ith date. 
Sliding stainless steel bracelet. 


B V LG A R I 

10 VIA PEI CONDOTTI ROMA 
HOTEL PIERRE NEW YORK 
»0 RLE DU RHONE 120-1 GENEVE 
AVENUE PES BEAUX. art & MONTE CARLO 
HOTEL PLAZA-ATHENEt PARIS 



Mi kha il S. Gorbachev, left, and Ronald Reagan shared a 
relaxed moment during their sramnit meeting in Geneva. 


The aides then are faced with the 
task of extracting an accurate re- 
cord of the discussion from a single 
fallible memory so negotiators who 
will cany on the talks may know 
what agreements were reached. 
What makes Hwlirat n is that a 
subordinate cannot order the lead- 
er to tefl more than he feels like 
telling. But if there were only re- 
statements of standard positions, 
the aides can afford to be less curi- 
ous. 

On the issue of a space-based 
defense — whit* produced discus- 


sions that Mr. Gorbachev de- 
scribed as “very, very lively" — Mr. 
Shultz was ready to assert that no 
new ground bad been broken. “If 
you had been sitting in the meet- 
ing,” he told a reporter from Wash- 
ington, “you would have recog- 
nized very clearly the things the 
president had said” 

Hearing them from Mr. Rea- 
gan’s own mouth appeared to leave 
Mr. Gorbachev somewhat mysti- 
fied. At least there was implicit, in 
the version of the talks that he 
chose to convey, a portrait of the 


American president as a good-na- 
tured. wefl-inientioned sort, with 
an incomprehensible faith in weird 
weapons. 

Tbe Soviet leader said he tried to 
be “unbiased" and “broad-mind- 
ed” so that he could catch a glimpse 
of the world the way it looks from 
Washington. That took a lot of 
work and effort, he said. 

□ 

There was no such record as yet 
of Mr. Reagan's reactions to Mr. 
Gorbachev after what was, by far, 
the most intensive round of person- 
al diplomacy of his presidency. 
Throughout the week his aides ei- 
ther sidestepped questions about 
whether they thought he might be 
at all affected by the encounter, or 
dismissed the suggestion with refer- 
ences to his settled views on the 
Soviet Union. 

□ 

Mr. Gorbachev left saying he 
hoped his arguments would prevail 
on the Americans. The Americans 
left saying they hoped Mr. Rea- 
gan's arguments would prevail on 
the Russians. If this wasn’t agree- 
ment, it was at least symmetrical. 

□ 

The American side took the ini- 
tiative in Ending a marketable 
brand name for tbe meeting. Mr. 
Reagan’s conclnding statement re- 
ferred to it as “the fireside sum- 
mit,” apparently after the Maze in 
front of winch the two leaden and 
their wives sat Wednesday night 
when the decision was taken to 
order up a joint statement of good 





Americans searching for traces of missing U5. servicemen at Yen Throng in Vietnam. 

Search Brings Back Vietnamese Grief 


YEN THUONG, Vietnam — 
Grief wells in the peasant woman’s 
eyes. Americans have come to this 
hamlet in Vietnam to look for their 
war dead, causing her to remember 
her husband and son killed at the 
same time 13 years ago. 

Vietnamese officials sav that un- 
der 60-year-old Nguyen Thi Teo’s 
garden are the remains of four U.S. 
airmen who died when their B-52 
bomba - crashed in the village. They 
invited the Americans to Yen 
Thuong, about six miles (10 kilo- 
meters) from Hanoi, to see for 
themselves. 

Already, the first excavations 
have turned up bones and aircraft 
fragments that are being sent to 
Hawaii for laboratory analysis. 

The huge B-52 demolished Mrs. 
Teo’s house and killed her hus- 
band, ho- 12 -year-old son and 1 1 
other villagers on Dec, 20, 1971 
The villagers filled in the crash cra- 


ter and Mrs. Teo put up a new 
house. The only evidence of the 
plane left above ground was a small 
pile of olive-drab wreckage 
stamped “Boeing Forging." 

The aircraft was shot down by 
two Soviet-made missiles before it 
dropped its bombs. Tons of explo- 
sives also may be buried up to 32 
•eel (10 meters) deep. 

The American team brought 
bomb disposal experts to help Viet- 
namese workers dig in Yen 
Thuong’s red clay as part of at- 
tempts to trace more than 1400 
U.S. servicemen miming in action 
in tbe war in Southeast Asia, about 
1,800 of them in Vietnam. 

Mrs. Teo cried as she recalled the 
day of the crash to reporters who 
accompanied the U.S. search team. 

She said she bore no grudges, 
adding: “But I’m Sony to this day 
that I lost my husband and son.” 

Mrs. Teo had regained her com- 
posure by tbe time a young Ameri- 


can in a green Hawaiian shirt drove 
an earth-mover into Yen Thuong. 

Some of Yen Thoong's 500 resi- 
dents pitched in to dismantle trick 
and tile buildings to allow the 
earth-mover, flown to Vietnam 
from the United States, to get at 
Mis. Teo’s garden. 

When the search for more bones 
and parts of the B-52 is over, Viet- 
nam will give the United States a 
bill for costs incurred. It also will 
give ibe U.S. team seven sets of 
human remains from other parts of 
the country that are believed to be 
those of missing Americans. 

Mrs. Teo’s new home may have 
to be dismantled brick-by-brick, 
tile-by-tile to let the American 
earth-mover do its job, according 
to the Vietnamese supervisors of 
the operation. She had no special 
requests far compensation. 

“I'd be grateful for anything,” 
Mrs. TeosakL 


General Says Yurchenko 
Affirmed U.S. Appraisals 


By Stephen Engelberg 

Se w York Tima Sorter 

WASHINGTON — The chair- 
man of a Pentagon commission on 
security said that he had discussed 
Soviet espionage techniques with 
Vhaly S. Yurchenko, a Soviet Intel- 
ligence officer who said be was de- 
fecting to the United States but 
later returned to Moscow. 

General Richard G. S til well, the 
commission chairman, said Thurs- 
day Mr. Yurchenko had confirmed 
several assessments made by U.S. 
intelligence officials. Sources fa- 
miliar with the discussion said that 


CHURCH SERVICES 


texts 

CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 13 Roe du 
! VwiColMibw, 75006 Paris. Metro 5t- 
Sulpice. Sunday wor s h i p in English W3 
I a.m_, Rev. A. Sommenrille. Tel.: 

! nH6.07-67.02- 

PARTS ci mi mix 

EMMANIB3. BAPTIST CHURCH, 56 few des 
Boris -Raisins, RueiUMolmelson. English 
speaking, evangefiad, all dsnorainaNons. 
S4. 9-.A5, Worship: 10)45. Other adivitin. 
Call Or. B.C. Thomas, Pastor. 
(1)47.49.1529. 

STOCKHOLM 

IMMANUEL CHURCH new dty center. 
Friendly d id P lan feBowdep. Sunday 1 1 4)0. 
Tel.: (08) 316051, 151225. 


7b place an advertisement 
in this section, 
please contacts 
Ms Elizabeth HER WOOD 
181 Are. Qi. -de-Gaulle. 
92521 Neniflj Cednc. France. 
TeL: 474-7. 12.65. 


Mr. Yurchenko told General S til- 
well that most Americans who 
spied for the Soviet Union were 
volunteers, not recruits. 

The commission announced 
Thursday its recommendations for 
a broad array of changes in the 
military's security procedures. 
General StihveU discussed ibe pro- 
posals with reporters, saying that 
the continuing uncertainty over 
whether Mr. Yurchenko was a So- 
viet plant or a defector who 
changed his mind would not affect 
the commission’s conclusions. 

Mr. Yurchenko defected to the 
United States in August but later 
asserted that be bad been drugged 
and kidnapped by tbe Central In- 
telligence Agency. The agency de- 
nied iL 

Some Reagan administration of- 
ficials have since said that Mr. Yur- 
chenko might have been a Soviet 
plant. General StHwefi, the former 
deputy under secretary of defense 
for policy, said he believed that Mr. 
Yurchenko's defection had been 
genuine. 

The report on security has been 
received by Defense Secretary - Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger, who is to de- 
cide which recommendations to 
adopt Several require congressio- 
nal action. Mr. Weinberger already 
has ordered all military command- 
ers to conduct a “top to bottom” 
inspection of security practices. 

The commission recommended 
that the three million people with 
clearances to handle “secret” mate- 
rial be subject to random poly- 
graph. or lie detector, tests. It 
railed for suffer penalties for secu- 
rity lapses by military contractors: 



intentions, as well as one in a pool 
house where they talked on the first 
day. 

□ 

Those who couldn't follow Rus- 
sian found more surprises in Mr. 
Gorbachev’s remarks than those 
who could. At one point the inter- 
preter quoted him as apologizing 
for putting so much “cottonwool* 
in his speech. He was actually apol- 
ogizing for sipping water. At an- 
other pant, she had him expressing 
satisfaction over his meeting with 
“the Reverend Jesse James.” In die 
original, he had said Jesse Jackson. 


The last of many demonstrators 
drawn to Geneva in the summit 
week to roll up his banner was a 
gay tights activist from Miami 
Beach, Florida, named Robert 
Kunst. He had come here with the 
proposal that each superpower 
scrap ten nassiks in order to re- 
lease funds for research into ac- 
quired immune deficiency syn- 
drome. 

“Everyone is talking abont disar- 
mament,” he said. “Nobody says 

ifia mamait for what, TSn flwwily 
one who’s focused." 

Finally, as the motorcades left 
for the airport, Mr. Kunst was seen 
standing with his banner in front of 
the conference center in a light 
snow. Whatever the conference 
promised, neither side bad commit- 
ted itself to scrapping a single mis- 
sile for any purpose. His proposal, 
like much else, seemed to be on 
bold. 


Pact Seems 
To Please 
Kremlin 


MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev returned borne Friday amid 
signs of Kremlin satisfaction with- 
the results of die U.S.-Soviet sum- 
mit meeting in Geneva. 

The Communist Party general 
secretary flew to Moscow from 
Prague, where he secured the en- 
dorsement of Moscow’s Warsaw 
Pact allies for the position he took 
in his talks with President Ronald 
Reagan on Tuesday and Wednes- 
day. 

A communique issued Thursday 
after Mr. Gorbachev briefed the six 
other Soviet Hoc leaders said they 
agreed that, on the whole, the sum- 
mit meeting had created an oppor- 
tunity for a return to ditto te. 

At a news conference in Geneva 
on Thursday. Mr. Gorbachev said 
he was optimistic about die future 
of U ^.-Soviet relations. 

But he voiced strong displeasure 
that Mr. Reagan had ignored his 
call to abandon the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative, Mr. Reagan’s plan 
for a space-based anti-missile sys- 
tem. 

The Soviet mss printed in fuD 
the (ext of the 90-minute news con- 
ference, the joint U^. -Soviet state- 
ment, the two leaders’ speeches at 
tbe dosing ceremony and the War-, 
saw Pact communique 

But none of the newspapers com- 
mented on the results of the sum- 
mit meeting, which has been por- 
trayed in recent weeks as vital for 
the maintenance of peace and the 
future of humanity. 

The government newspaper Iz- 
vestia displayed prominently re- 
ports of positive reaction from Eu- 
rope. It quoted Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher of Britain and 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West 
Germany under the headline “An 
Important Step at Geneva.” 

It also carried the reaction of 
Russians interviewed in Red 
Square in Moscow. All said they 
were satisfied with the summit 
meeting and stressed that the im- 
portant tiling was that a dialogue 
had begun. 

State television gave extensive 
coverage of Thursday's events in 
Geneva, showing Mr. Reagan live 
for what is believed to be the first 
time. 

The media kept up a strong anti- 
U.S. campaign in die period lead- 
ing up to the summit meeting but 
virtually suspended attacks while 
the leaders were meeting in Gene- 
va. No direct criticism of the U.S. 
government appeared Friday. 

Among Soviet leaders meeting 
Mr. Gorbachev at Moscow's Vnu- 
kovo Airport was President Andrei 
A. Gromyko. It was the first time 
since 1943 that the former foreign 
minister had missed a US. -Soviet 
summit meeting. 


WORLD BRIEFS 4 

Emergency Declared In Philadelphia^ 

PHILADELPHIA (Reuters) — A state of emergency ws tfsdareS 
Friday in a white, working-class section of Pbiladdphia after hunctods OT - 

whites harassed a black couple and an interracial couple who moved in 

(he area earlier this month. f f , linn . 

Under Mayor W. Wilson Goode’s order, «uherin£i of foot or amt 

persems are banned Tor up to two weeks. Mr. &Jode, tire aty s first bladK 

mayor, said be was acting to prevent violence. “It is time to the aty to «. . 
mgime absolute control over the streets there,” he said. 

The black and interracial couples moved into the Elmwood area, an . 
Itafianrlrish neighborhood of neat tenacod houses, earlier this month ana • 

their hnme$ were subjected to continuous acts of mmor vandalism, , ^ 

induding window breakings. On Wednesday night, the incidents escalat- t 

edwhen 400 people demonstrated outside die homes, shooting “We Wont^. 
YonOnL” Several hundred people demonstrated Thursday mght as wdL , 

ft • 

More Austerity Planned for Belgnini* ; y 

BRUSSELS (AF) —The new. Bdgian center-right coalition gewerrir 
matt agreed Friday on- a program that will include more anstenly^| j 
measures. «_ * 8 ) 

Members of the new government are expected to take the oath as office a* 
next week. The outgoing prime minister, WBfried Martens, who 
»«icwi to form a government after trading his majority to vtctoryin the K 
OcL 13 elections, has said he does not want to c hange his m ini ste rial W 
team. .jm 

Tbe Christian Democrats and Conservatives agreed to g overn for® 
another tom and puisne efforts to invigorate the sta gnatin g economy jgt 
and reduce the jobless rate, winch is one of tbe highest in Europe, and tofi 

nit till* narj o p al budget ildiffl t , B& 

Soviet Vessel, Japanese Boat Clash .1 

TOKYO (AT) — A Sennet minesweeper in the Tsushima Straits fired X 
three warning shots in front of a Japanese fishing boat that accidentally S 
brushed it, a Maritime Safety Agency spokesman said Friday. , 9 

None of tbe three fishermm were injured Thursday and the 8 -5-ton ■ 
fishing boat AikoMarn was notbit by theriaots, according to tire agency’s H 
spokesman, Kegi Tame He said the incident occ ur red m international 
waters about 12 miles (20 kilometers) northwest of the Japanese island of^ 
Bo, when the chain of tbe boat’s sea anchor became entangled with the Jf 
anchor chain of the 65fi-ton minesweeper, identified by the agency as the 
Vychegda. ’ Ti 

When Captain Aq j Qugnchi of the Aiko Maru and its two other crew S 
members tried to free the chains, the boat brushed the minesweeper, Mr. 81 
Tame said. Tbe shots were fired and Captain C Mg p d ri cut the chain and w 
moved away from the Soviet ship, hesakL ‘ ** 

Moscow Merges Agricultural Units ;:Jj 

MOSCOW (AP) — The Soviet Union annnnnftafl Friday that it had * 1 
merged five agricultural miiiistxies into a state agri-indostrialoouzmittoe, 4 
Weston analysts saw the move as an attempt to boost food production -j 
and streamline the g o v e rnm ent j 

The official news agency, Tass, said that a first deputy premier, i 
Vsevolod S. Mnrakhovsky, had beat appointed to bead fhe.co anmtlce; -) 
Tass said the new committee merg e d the Ministxy ctf Agriculture, the 
Ministry of Fruit and Vegetable Growing, the Ministry of Rnral'Con- -1 
sanction, the Ministry of Meat and Dairy Industry and the Ministry af'~ f 
the Food Industry. 

Kenya Reports 7 Deaths From AIDS’! 

NAIROBI (AP) —Seven people have died of AIDS in Kenya, Health . 1 
Minister Peter Nyalriamo trad tbe National Assembly, but he said tfad J 
disease was not among the nation’s major health threats. | 

It was the first time a government nfewl hud pnWidy acknowledgofe, 
the presence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Kenya. TlFj 
government reportedly has refused to acknowledge the presence of thSfl 
disease at least partly because of oobceni to the country’s tourist* 
industry, wfaicb is a major source of foreign exchange. 'm 

Mr. Nyakiamo said there had been a total of eight cases of AIDS in the £ 
country, with four of them from Kaiya, two from Uganda, one from « 
Rwanda and one from Tanzania, Mr. Nyakumo did not identify the I 
victims by name or say when they died. ■ ■ ~~§ 


• ... :•%* 




»pte watch; 
Id Florida." 


" 1 TT. . rocket 

From the third floor of a coodbndnfniri, two people watch;.- 
the waves rimming op on Panama CSfy- Beach in ^Florida." 

Hurricane Disrupts Power in Florida’ 

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, Socth Carolina (AP) — The h u rr i c a ne 
de signated Kate left more than 100,000 people without electricity as it 
headed north Friday and was downgraded to a tropical storm. Six 
persons have died in the stonn riuec Wednesday. 

Ninety percent of Tallahassee, Florida, a city of 89,500, was without 
power after the hurricane swept ashore Thursday and spun at least rigi# 
tornadoes across the Florida panhandle and southern Georgia. 

The high winds ripped the roofs off bmldiiJgs in-the areas of Panama 
Qty, Florida, and Mags, Georgia: They also toppled the water tower aji 
Ap alachicola , Florid* and tore down trees Imd power lines in the Florida* 
rides of Port Sl Joe, Mexico Beach and Tallahassee, 

For die Record 

Warsaw Pact defense n did s t e ra will meet in Beilin next month, the 
Czechoslovak News Agency CTK reported Friday. (AFP) 

A Spawh priest, Joan Fsriada Krofan, who attempted to:k31 Pope 
John Panl n in 1982 when he was visiting Portugal, was expelled from 
France on Friday just a few hours after being espriled from Portugal, 
where Ik was released from prison Wednesday. (Reuters) 

Northern AHnma was struck by an earthquake &zd a series of after- 
shocks on Thursday, the Yugoslav news agency Tanjug said Friday. 
There were no reports of injuries at damage, *_ (Ratters) 

Two Ch i nese a ai ahlH 'S stepped down Friday, the Xinhua news agency 
said. Rin Xingwen, who recently became Communist Party cmefin 
Shanghai, was replaced as minister of urban and mral oonst mct ioo by Ye 
Rntang, 45. Zhou Barman, 67, was relieved of his post as minister of 
machinebufiding industry. No successor was named. (Reuters) ~ 


Sherri Meyer 

travel restrictions on Eastern bloc 
diplomats assigned to the United 
Nations; and rewards for people 
who turn in spies. 

■ Romanian Goes Home 

A Romanian circus acrobat told 
U.S. immigration officials in New 
York on Thursday he did not want 
to defect. They said they believed 
be might be leaving the country 
against his will, Immigration and 
Naturalization Service officials 
said. 

The Washington Post said that 
officials stoppoi Audi Georgescu, 
24, at Kennedy International Air- 
port on Wednesday, hours after his 
American girlfriend. Sherri Meyer, 
21, of Mesa. Arizona, phoned the 
office of Senator Dennis DeConci- 
ni, a Democrat of Arizona. 

She is reported to have com- 
plained that Mr. Georgescu. who 
she said wanted to marry her. was 
leaving tbe United States against 
his wifi. According to tbe senate's 
staff members, the woman told 
them she was pregnant by Mr. 
Georgescu. 


Japanese Woman Gels Probation g 
la Drowning of Her Children in U.S. 


By Robert W. Stewart 

Las Angela Tuna Service 

LOS ANGELES — A Santa 
Monica Superior Court judge 
granted probation Thursday to Fu- 
miko Kunura, the Japanese-born 
mother whose two children died in 
January when she waded with them 
into Santa Monica Bay in an abort- 
ed suicide attempt. 

Judge Robert W. Thomas de- 
clared that Mrs. Kimura“vrifl Hke- 
ly experience punishment for as 
long as she lives.” His decision not 
to send Mrs. Kimura. 33, to prison 
was strongly supported not only by 
her lawyers but by tbe prosecutor, 
Lauren L. Weis. 

Mr. Weis said: “I really believe, 
as the probation report saw, that 
the pain and suffering Mis. Khnara 
has inside her is enough punish- 
ment." 

Despite a bailiff’s warnings. 


spectators applauded when the 
judge announced that he would 
place Mrs. Kimura on probation 
for five years. He said be had re- 
ceived petitions with 25,000 signa- 
tures supporting Mrs. Kimura, al- 
though he said the petitions played 
no part in his dedfloo. 

Mis. Kimura bowed sBeotiy to 
supporters as she was escorted 
from the courtroom. 

Her husband, Itsnroku. 40, 
whose infidelity reportedly 
prompted her suicide attempt, 
watched from tbe gallery. 

As a condition of probation, (he 
judge ordered Mrs. Kimura to 
serve a year in prison, but that 
requirement already has been met. 
She has been in custody for 297 
days and will receive credit for an- 
other 149 days for good conduct. 
Judge Thomas also oxdered her to 


Mis. Kimura and -her two young 


children were pulled from tire : 
ocean near Santa Monica. Pier by” 
two college students on Jan. 29. She£ 
suryived.bnt Kaartalra. her 4-year- 
old son, and Yuri, her 6 -moath-old" 
dmufate, died. 

She was charged with two counts 
of murder but was' allowed to plead 

no contest on Oct. 18 to voluntary- - 
m a nslaught er. She could have been ’ 
sentenced to as much as 13 years in ' 
prison.. i. . 

The decision by the district at- 
torney’s office to accept pleas an 
Ibe lesser charges was based krgdy ' 
on reports of seven, psy chiatrists. - 

According toMrs. Kj mura’s pro-' - 
batjou report, the psy chia trists • 
concluded that she was suffering . 
from psychotic depression amide-- 
fusions when she walked into the* 
sea. .... 

Parent-child suicide is not »m- 
beard of a Japan, although ilis not 
sanctioned by or custom. 




r 

i 


r 







** 


INTEBNAllONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24, 1985 


Page 3 


i. 


• ■ 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


- • ^ 


- v- " 

j 

••• 

■: •■ ■■ - :r~ 


' U ■ 

-v:r. 




r n "_ 






°r 






Ua 


"- ’ :.. P- ‘•’'W 

r, ^ ‘v* 

. -V" a SSe' h 

- - . ’’ A-rw. i^ 

•*>** 

- 

••• .-.S-fitf 

..... - -Ciil 

• " v 


^161^ 




t r -“ 'arirulturaHi 


• ^-SS£5*t 
- "****«£ 

_• ■_ 




^TheVoters’Mesgage; 
P erlormanceComits 

In one television commercial. 
Republican candidate for 
governor of Vi rginia, Wyatt B, 
Dorrette; was shown in stem 
profile against the American 
Dag, dedsivdy stabbing the air 
with his fin ger. In another, the 
Republican candidate fra- state 
attorney general, W. R_ O’Brien, 
led his happy, healthy family in a 
frolic through the smf straight 
into the eye of the camera. Both 
candidates lost in this month’s 
elections. 

*• The Washington Post, sug- 
’gesting that competence, rather 
than image or party,- is the main 
concern of today’s voter, quoted 
James E. Tierney, 38, who plans 
to run for governor of Maine 
after five years as state attorney 
general: “The old politics of the 
media consultants showing the 
guy walking down the beach in 
the surf with his family,; or roll- 
ing on die lawn with his kids »n/t 
his dog, doesn’t make it any- 
more.” 

Mr. Tierney is a Democrat, 
but be cited a Republican, Gov- 
ernor Thomas EL Kean of.New 
Jersey, whose decisive re-election 
pointed up the. ‘'nonpartisan 
politics today. Voters are looking 
for character, integrity,' princi- 
ples 7 - and efficiency. That's 
been happening all over the 
country.” 


Short Takes 

“ Work-related injuries and ill- 
nesses increased in 1984 for the 
first time in four years, by 11.7 
percent, the largest jump on re- 
cord, according to the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics. The AFL-GO 
labor organization Hamad “Rea- 
gan administration, policies of 
weak enforcement and deregula- 
tion.” Bui Karl Kronebushof the 
congressional Office of Technol- 
ogy Assessment said, “As plants 
pick up more activity and hire 



ap/wt 


NEW LOOK — California^ chief justice, Rose EL Bfrd, 
48, seat left at die tune of her appointment in 1977, has 
refashioned her image, right Controversial for voiding 
every death sentence she fits considered. Miss Bird is to 
run for a farther 12-year term in elections next year. 


new workers, the.mjory ratesgo 

op." . 

Only aaosmokerg need apply 
to join the 17-officer police force 
of Holden. Massachusetts. The 
requirement was ratified in a la- 
bor contract with current offi- 
cers; 16-1. The laa two smokers 
on the force have qydL Other 
American police and fire depart- 
ments have stopped fairing peo- 
ple who smoke, but Holden is 
believed to be the first to write a 
nonsmoking clause into a union 
contract. Patrolman Donald 


men’s union, said: *To ride in a 
police cruiser with a smoker for 
eight horns, in the wintertime 
with the windows rolled up is 
uncomfortable.” 

After 40 years of frustration al 
not bong allowed to- fold their 
government checks, Americans 
are about to. get some relief. 
Punch-card technology is bang 
phased anl in Tavor of checks 
made .of Bgbter, foldable paper. 
“ rndling and mutilating the 
ecks can still render them in- 
valid. Bui the Treasury Depart- 
ment, apparently reiving on peo- 
ple’s good sense, has retired that 
most famous of government, 
warnings, “Do not fold, spindle 
or mutilate.” 


- The Checker cab zoomed up 
Manhattan’s Madison Avenue, 
catching green and then ydkw 
lights and scattering pedestrians. 
The passenger, Leslie H. Ben- 
Zvi, told The New York Times 
that what a red light finally 
brought the taxi to a heart-stoo- 
ping halt he remarked to the 
driver that some of the pedestri- 
ans had barely leaped dear of the 
vehicle. The driver turned 
around, saying, “Yeah, it’s sorta 
like a video game.” 

Shorter Talus: A poll of U.S. 
college presidents rated Stanford 
first among major universities 
for academic excellence and Wil- 
liams first among small liberal 
arts schools. . . . With Ronald 
Reagan saying he wished people 
would stop referring to the Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative as Star 
Wars, his press spokesman, 
Larry Speak es, is pushing “Star 
Sh i eld” as a substitute phrase. 
. . . W. Ann Reynolds, the first 
woman chancellor of the Califor- 
nia State University system, has 
had its motto changed from the 
Latin for “Man, Truth, Voice” to 
“Voice, Truth, Life." 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 




3 From.® U.S. House Panel dears Tax on Rich 


iw fcj 

:• iak. 

lisfcjsa, 

' 'i: ar> 


• t. lash? 
' id E« £r 



By David E. Rosenbaum 

New York Times Service 

.WASHINGTON — The House 
^Tays and Means Committee has 
approved a stiff minim um tax on 
wealthy people and profitable cor- 
porations. 

The measure would prevent 
many individuals «ud companies 
from taking advantage of. tax 
breaks to trim their tax liability to 
littie or nothing. Ir also would raise 
billions of dollars more than Press- 
dent Ronald Reagan's minim um 
tax plan. 

After approving the measure 
Thursday night, the committee 
then began debating limits on de- 
ductions for biirihess. meals and 
entertainment^ one of the few 
thorny issues remaining, ; 

With the panel in the final stage 
of its ax-month effort to revise the 
UJS. federal income tax system, d»e 
chair man, Dan Rostenkowski, an 
A Illinois Democrat, called its^ padc- 
T age ‘ihe.biggest reform bill in his- 
tory” and a “massive improvement 
over present law.” 


Referring specifically to the tions — including American Tde- 
xmnmmm ux raks/he said. “The phone & Telegraph Ox, Boeing Co. 
annual embarrassment about me- and General Dynamics Coip. — 
gacorparatioos that pay nothing paid no taxes last year, 
wffl be a thing of the past” The measures adopted by the 

In the letter, Mr. Rostenkowski committee on Thursday night 
said that his committee would ap- would raise about $40 billion from 
prove a top tax rate far individuals individuals over the next five years 
“two or three points” higher than ^ shout $15 billion from corpo- 
the 35 percent rate that the presi- rations, according to the committee 


dent has insisted upon. Mr. Rea- 
ganls two fewer rates of 15 percent 
and 25 percent would be main- 
tained, Mr. Rostenkowski said. 

The- committee intends to com- 
plete action on the tax bill and scad 
it to die full House of Rquesenta- 
tives by the end of this week. A 
House vote is expected by the mid- 
dle of next month. 

According to data compiled by 
the Internal Revenue Service, more 
than 250 taxpayers with income of 
more than $200.000 legally paid no 
taxes at all and thousands more 
paid a negligible amount in 1982, 


staff. That is about 525 billion 
more than Mr. Reagan's minim um 
tax plan would, raise. 

Under the measure, taxpayers 
who take advantage of many tax 
preferences would have to calculate 
their taxes twice — once using the 
conventional method and the sec- 
ond time using the nrinfamim tax 
method. In the second calculation, 
some of the tax preferences would 
have to be counted as income and a 
25- percent tax rate would apply. 

The minimum tax would apply 
when it was higher t h an what the 


die last year for which statistics are taxpayer would owe under the reg- 
avaflable. ular method. As under current bw, 

1 Moreover, according to a private $40,000 would be exempted from 
study, 40 major profitable corpora- the minimum tax on a joint retnrn. 


i-v zsr. uiCii. w0 P?tu 
’s.-.i-t-a i:I> Best*®® 


J pi.» Pitwerifll 

' ' * . la-lkt* 

... - 

■ • ", 71 a & 


, ■ — 

‘V^C-iSV . 

::;5sS^ 


. 5.;.: !*<■ 

■ - ;i -rk 

* «e- 


.-rvF»* 





PROTEST IN CHILE — An estimated 400,000 people gathered in O'Higgins Park in 
Santiago on Thursday. The rally was called by the Democratic Affiance, a center-left 
coalition, to demand the end of 12 years of mihtary rule by General Augnsto Pinochet. 


Pact Allows 
Emergency 
Air Landing 
In Soviet 


By Richard Witkin 

New Yeek Timer Service 

NEW YORK — The Soviet- 
Ameri can- Japanese civil aviation 
pact announced in Geneva sets up 
the first procedures for foreign air- 
liners or other civil planes to make 
emergency landings in the Soviet 
Union, the chief U.S. negotiator of 
the agreement said. 

Until now, airplanes in iroable 
over the North Pacific in areas clos- 
er to Soviet territory than to Ameri- 
can or Japanese airfields have had 
no ready means for contacting the 
Soviet authorities far landing au- 
thorization. 

“We have broken through 
long-standing aviation barrier 
there,” said Donald R. Segner, an 
associate administrator of the Fed> 
eral Aviation Administration. 

Equally important, he said, was 
the creation of procedures to help 
cavil aircraft get bade on course 
after having gotten lost or having 
strayed into another nation’s air- 
space. 

The pact was signed in Washing- 
ton on Tuesday and was an- 
nounced Thursday in the commu- 
nique from the Geneva meeting 
The document said that President 
Ronald Reagan Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, 
viewed the development “with sat- 
isfaction.” 

The three-nation negotiations 
were undertaken after a Soviet jet 
fighter shot down a South Korean 
Boeing 747 airliner that had flown 
over the Soviet island of Sakhalin 


rt' 


Pro 


( hillin’" 


batin' 1 ,' 


Report Ties India to Unrest in Canada 


Mimsuy spokesman. Sean Brady, 
did not specifically deny the accu- 
racy of the report. . 


in 


l 


By Herbert Denton 

iVashingim Post Semite 

TORONTO — Canadian offi- 
cials have said they are inyestigat- “We have made it dear on previ- 
ing chary * that the Indian govern- ous occasions that any improper 
mtfnt has carried out illegal activity by foreign representatives 
intelligence operations in Canada from any country winch would in- 
that may be linked to a series of terferein the Kves of Canadian dri- 
violent incidents within the local zens and residents, if confirmed, is 
S&h community. inappropriate,” Mr. Brady said. 

The Toronto Globe and Mail re- 3' T*? 

Thursday that Canadian of- dosfi ?y tiuough the oou- 

iDwsuaj cemed agencies of the Canadian 


lice, disputed only one part of the 
extensively detailed article. 

The Moonti es said there was no 
substance or foundation to the 
newspaper’s assertion that Canadi- 
an investigators now believe that. 
Indian government agents may 
have been responsible for both the 
crash of an Air- India jet off the 
coast of Ireland last June and the 
explosion on the same day of a 
suitcase at Tokyo’s Narita airport. 
Two baggage handlers were 

udais believe Indian government kffled in Japan and all 329 passen- 

agenis have operated cS^rfly here ge* and crew died in the Air-hdia 

STmore than three years and appropriate actions as required. ^ ^ ^ , ugg3gc ^ 
seemed to be working to discredit Another official statement, by ploded in Japan and the Air-India 
Canadian-based groups pressing the Royal Canadian Mounted Po- uight had originated in Canad a 
for a separate Sikh homeland in 
In dia 

High Commissioner S.J.S- 
Chatwal. India’s diplomatic repre- 
sentative in Canada, vehemently 
denied the report saying, “The 
whole thing to our mrad is com- 
pletely baseless and goes to almost 
being nonsense.” 


on Sept. 1, 1983. All 269 people on 
the jumbo jet were killed. 

tne Soviet government contend- 
ed that the plane been an an 
espionage mission. An inquiry con- 
ducted by the Internati onal' Civil 
Aviation Organization found no 
evidence that the plane had been 
spying. 

Mr. Segner said that aD the tech- 
nical details of new direct phone 
links between Soviet and Japanese 
air traffic centers and other im- 
provements in communications 
had been worked out. He said the 
improved network was expected to 
go into operation in sx to eight 
months. 

Mr. Segner said that six to eight 
months would be required before 
implementation because time was 
needed for the installation of com- 
munications equipment and for the 
training of some Soviet larhnirians 
In accordance with worldwide 
practice, En glish will be the lan- 
guage for handling air-traffic prob- 
lems under the pad. 

A crucial element of the system 
will be a direct phone link between 
the air traffic control stations at 
Khabarovsk in the Soviet Union 
and in Tokyo. This will be backed 
up, Mr. Segner said, by telegraphic 
and radio links. 

Direct telephone links between 
the Japanese center and the Ameri- 
can traffic control center in An- 
chorage, Alaska already exist. 

It was from Anchorage that the 
South Korean plane, Korean Air 
Lines Right 007, took off on a trip 
to Seoul along a standard flight 
path, that passes near the Kamchat- 
ka Peninsula in the Soviet Union. 
Instead of f allowing the flight path, 
the plane began easing too far west 
soon after its takeoff, and it was 
hundreds of miles off course in So- 
viet airspace when it was destroyed 
by a Soviet jet. 

Under the system in effect at the 
time, there was no procedure for 
contacting the Soviet civil air au- 
thorities to try to rectify the situa- 
tion even if the crew, or the Ameri- 
can or Japanese authorities, had 
known what was happening 

Soviet air traffic stations were 
not involved because the flight’s 
intended course lay outside the air- 
space they control. 

With the new system, Mr. Segno 
explained, the Russians can be rap- 
idly notified of a navigation prob- 
lem and a stray plane can be direct- 
ed bade to its proper route. 

Similar assistance will be avail- 
able for planes threatened by a 
breakdown or fire in flight. 

■ Flights May Resume 

The United States and the Soviet 
Union have reached tentative 
agreement allowing resumption of 
direct commercial airline flights be- 
tween the two countries after a 
nearly four-year suspension, offi- 
cials said Friday, The Associated 
Press reported from Washington. 

The agreement, clearing & way 
for at least /oar commercial flights 
a week by Pan American World 
Airways and the Soviet airline 
Aeroflot, was initialed by negotia- 
tors in Moscow, according to 
Transportation Department offi- 
cials. 


But a carefully wordedstatemerit 
by*' a Canadian -External Affairs 


1 ... 2 4 ... 8 ... AND ... 10 

. Cashmere Plys of Course 


For ladies and men. 

Best prices/ Export discount. 

. Alexandre Savin’s 
- Cashmere coflection 
Exclusivity: Cashmere House. 


Cashmere House 

2, rue (TAguesseau 
angle 60, Faubourg St-Hooort 
• PARIS 8 e . 



Great for Curling 

On ihe open-air hold rinks 
and in the village curling hall. 


PALACE HOTEL 
GSTAAD 
SWITZERLAND 

Please call: 

Phone: 030/S 31 31 Telex 922222 
or 


W hen you first handle a Patek Philippe, you 

become aware that this watch has the presence 
of an object of rare perfection. 

We know the feeling well We experience it every time 
a Patek Philippe leaves the hands of our craftsmen. 
You can call it pride. For us it lasts a moment; for you, 
a lifetime. 

We made this watch for 
you - to be part of your 
life - simply because this 
is the way we've always 
made watches. 

And if we may draw a con- 
clusion from five genera- 
tions of experience, it will 
be this.- choose once but 
choose well 
A Patek Philippe - 
because it's for a lifetime. 



PATEK PHILIPPE 

GENEVE 

Patek Philippe SA 

41. rue du Rh6ne - 1211 Geneva 3 - Switzerland 



TRY A LITTLE HELP FROM A FRIEND 


A 


t Epson, we think a good personal computer is one 
that you can turn to even in the most unlikely 
situations. And you should be able to consult it not 
just for big, important decisions, but for something as 
playful as a fun game of chess. 

The difference is That we 
never lose sight of what is 
essential and what is not. Sure, 
we're as technologically 
competitive as everybody else. 

But we don’t stop there. 

Others may try to impress you with fancy 
frills. We strive for simplicity instead, and 
concentrate on creating products that 
respond and relate to you in a direct 
and dependable way. 



And while others may offer you sophisticated 
features and capabilities, we offer these same features 
in computers that you can lake anywhere. 

In other words. Epson products are designed to be 
big on features but small in size. Which is why you'll 
find just the right combination of performance, easy 
operation and cost efficiency in every personal 
computer, printer or any other product from Epson. 
Checkmate? Try a little help from your Epson. 
It may be all you need to win. 


N->. 




SSKO EPSON COttPORATDN' HeaoCMee 3 -S. CVb S onera S<*«a iW, Kiffino, Ja«r Tfci *£66 ) 62301 Telex. 33H-OS EP$0N AMERICA. INC- SSMOHBv^wBW.TwrtflM.CAiiCSCS.USA 
Tfij (2131 *7*.gS".<m2 Tewc EPSON DEUTSCHLAND QnkH Imp <Mr Smos b «OJO DuSMUen 11. FR Germany TaF JDS11J S6030 Tots* B5(M7Bb EPSON (UJL) LTD. CVUnd Htoie 

MB Men wiwy acoaatei MA9 Bum UX laMDii W68SZ Tem BS'riBS EPSON FRANCE SJL 5S. u Degu^gml BTO0. LowiKWPw-W. France W HI »». 6/. TO Wo. ei«Or 
MON AUSTRALIA PTY, LTD. Uim 3 17 Fkxsnmpi Rood Fiencna Forces NSW ;-jm lumu Try |QC) 4U.S2 £2 Trttr TOOK (EP3CHA) EPSON ELECTRONICS (SWOAPOflS PTE ~ LTD 
Me ■ Uanbrna -K> 19. Wfre Trad* Came, w Bang*, no Sr,**, 0*06 Toe aTO607i Tate*. 3963S EPSON ELECTRONICS TRADMO LTD. SfrP. f* E*r F™«w Cent’* wa>«^ 

bad. Central Hcrvj Kjnj V &HS555 Totem 65543 EPSON ELECTRONICS TRADING LTD. (TAIWAN BRANCH) 1-flF. K V Weteiht BK&. 206 NanUns E Road Sat 2. Tam Tan-*" *0'. 
fe tOS) 5364355 SSF624M Tevc £au4 9SON CANADA UTL 285 TOrttenc BK. fftanaw Owe M2J itt. Cera CB Tp (416) 4959955 fc*» 6S6&& B>SON LA 1 W 0 AMBUCA &A. 
Calte S con CM fi. 6a Miinrar Piso 2. La uioro. Asoo Ptwai 89? Caimemaa Caracas line Venezuela tw 35-OWte T«a_ 27680 EPSON DO BRASIL MDUSTR1A E COMEMW LIDA. 
** P*ero» at uytv «33 m. Sop Pto*. &a*i (tmi ?it>0509 late*. 3M72 EPSON SEOl &pJL Vo ■'enavo. 12. M124 M«n». iWy w ir, otovi* V*e.- 51 5,1 3D 







Harmfi I ni. I'art.-kr. llAtllll'lll. 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL EffiRALD TRIBUNE, SATORDAY^tftSP AY, NOVEMBER 23 - 24,-1985 


Envoy Confers in Beirut 
With Hostages 9 Captors 


Reuters 

BEIRUT — The archbishop of 
Canterbury's personal envoy. Ter- 
ry Waite, reported Friday a second 
face-to-face meeting with kidnap- 
pers holding four American hos- 


“li is cruel to further punish a 
sick man." Mr. Waite said. 

He made his statement on the 
fourth day of his second recent visit 
to Beirut, and said he planned to fly 
to London on Sunday and then 


■•'.cw *-V ' “ * 

•■■■ • 


«' - . ■ ■vw' ‘ * - i r S • 


r — iVUl ruuwiuui UUiT ~ WM me* *** n i t; — — — 

tages in Lebanon and “significant meet with U.S. church and gorern- 
steps" in his efforts to win their nwnt officials in New York. 


release. 

Mr. Waite said, however, that 
the hostages' situation remained 
very dangerous “and it really could 
end in disaster." 

The meeting originally was 
scheduled for Thursday, but Mr. 


Speaking as explosions from 
heavy street fighting rattled win- 
dow's in his hotel lobby. Mr. Waite 
said he had met the wife and broth- 
er of two of the French hostages in 
Beirut 

Asked later if he had achieved 
the “major move" toward freedom 


Waite, who was caught in heavy for the Ameri cans that he hoped 
street fighting between Druze and for when he returned to Beirut on 
Shiite Moslem militias in West Bei- Tuesday, Mr. Waite simply said: 


rut, was forced to postpone it 

He also made a plea for the kid- 
nappers of a Briton. Alec Collett 


“Yes." 

When asked if he now was taking 
a message from the kidnappers to 


□appere OI a onion. /vice VOUCH, “ Tr^vT^ 

63, a jour nalis t seized last March New York, he replied: I have steps 
while on assignment for a United that ^ to take now. I 

Nations relief agency, to contact believe it is possible that we ran 
him and “let me know about his ®*rti a out °f this deadlock, 
situation” The shadowy Islamic Jihad orga- 

nization bolding the Americans is 
Mr. Waite repeated a plea to demanding U.S. pressure on Ku- 

fhne# kiMnio Fruit- FnsnrhmAii m c n a 


those holding four Frenchmen to wait to free 17 Arabs imprisoned 
release one whom they have said is on bombing charges. Washington 


gravely ifl. He is believed to be has replied : 
Marcel Carton, a diplomat. ‘‘terrorists.'' 


at it will not deal with 



Have f Mov 


(Continued from Page 1) . House officials said the negoti*- 
program for a space-based shield tio ns would , M * res ““ 
against nuclear missiles. The Rus- 

sians have made SDI their chief Reagan offered no spedfira mo 
target. Mr. Reagan used one of his how tfae-negotranoiw ' wooldbeac- 
longest private meetings with Mr. celerated, as he and Mr. Gorbachev 


“Just as we must avoid iUnrioos 
on our side, so we must dispel iJWj 
on the Soviet side." hesafoadd^ 
“I have made it dear ro Mr. Gorba- 
chev that we must reduce theW. 

trust and suspkaoosbexweea mg 
we ate to do such things as redoefc 


longest private meetings with Mr. celerated, as he ana wir.uoroHaio »« 

— conuo. for- 

but the president said Thursday ward from where we were last Tan- ** . “ 

night that he ran into deep sfcepti- uaiy. ^“the So vwts returned to Wned rfi 

dsn by the Soviet leader. the table," he stud. . A new rraj^Sfa^ed the 

y - Mr Reagan emphasized that he <he aim™* - 


ristedthai we might use a strategic ¥* B ^H 5 SS P “iJS!? h wc go from Wr- i 

defense system to put offensive * C Y ^ 011 wap- t 

sSdJftrjsgfi 


exchange .of 
i said. ^Mr. ( 


l views," Mr. 

Gorbachev in- 


“This discussion produced a very Mr. RragM emphasrz«l ma 
irect cxchanee .<5 views." Mr. and Mr. Gorbachev had called for 


summit, the summit ilsdf was a 
good start, and «ow '-our byworfl 
must be, steady as We go," Mt 
Rea^^saidL ^ 

asked. “Well, otw derire for im. 


nuclear superiority. wanted to “turn the tancs rowaiu 

“1 made it clear that SDI has our chief goal, offensive reduc- 

SKSSSSCS . j&fftes S- 2 -; 


MIS. y 

Such a shtft in emphasis could be not just the a bsenc e of war. 
i indication that both nati ons are “We don t want a phonj 


GARRARD 

The Crown Jewellers 

112 REGENT STREET 
LONDON- W1 A 2 J J 


Th* Auoaolad ftwj 

Terry Waite, left, talking in Beirut with the brother of one of the French hostages. 

Druze Take Some Areas From Shiites 
In Battle for Control of West Beirut 


ODS, mat, msreau, we arc mvesu- { DC ii C ation that both nations are “We don’t want a phony pe** 
^SnSStS^SaSL j^dy to sidestep thedradlodc over 
offensive missiles,.noi people," he Mr. Reagans strategic defuse pro- 

added “If our research succeeds, it gram and seek agreements reducing musoty detentfc We cant besa h» 
will bring much ctoser^Ser, ■«» mtennediate-iange ffed ^ 

more stable world we seek. Nations . . . ... .test ef tma*. 

could defend themselves against Mr. Reagan, who has devoted bis * 

missile attack, and mank^at political cararto cnnasm^Com- .J 

long last, escape the prison o£ mu- munism, said that there will be “m- cum of Moscow .on hiarem^ngfats. 
lull terror -Ss is my dream." during competition between the yic^ot^M 
™ .. . . , , , , superpowers, but he called for an cussed it with Mr. Gorbachev as k 

end tTthc tension of recent years, “peaoeissw.” *./. “ 



The Associated Press tinmen -to fight the Shiite Amal 

BEIRUT — Druze fighters irregulars, 
drove Shiite Amal militiamen from For them it was revenge for a 
sections of West Beirut on Friday stinging defeat at the bands of the 
in an attack supported by tanks. It Shiites, who were aided by the 
was the third day of fi gh ti ng bo- Druze, in three days of street war- 
tween the two militias for control fare in April 
of the Moslem half of Beirut Mr . Jurat's fighters were 

Pobce and hospitals reported at locked in a fioor-to-floor combat to 

6351 P 60 ? 1 ® 311(1 209 dktodfi 6 Amal militiamen from 

wounded since the fighting started ^ unfinished 40-story Mutt Tow- 

W », r ^ er building, the Shiites' mosLstrate- 

The toU from the fighting on gj c stronghold in West Beirut, po- 
Friday. Lebanon s Independence gj* said. 

Day. was expected to rise, since ~ .... 

many bodies could not be recev- Md Shule mditias 

ered from embattled areas, police ^ l “f aihe ^ n . 3avfl ^ 
saj^ y against Lebanese Christians, but 

Police said the Druze push gave ^ ch 

the Progressive Socialist Partf of other forcontroi of Wot Beirut 

Walid Jumblat, the Dnize leider. f nda ^ s W* 0 * h “Y , ? st 

control Of of r nm iA. between the two Moslem militias 


measures" 

nored. 


but the plea was ig- 


described to Mr. Gorbachev his 
idea of “open laboratories" to 
“permit Soviet experts to see first- 
hand that SDI does not involve 
offensive weapons." Under this 
idea, Americans would get a look at 
Soviet research programs on strate- 
gic defense that Mir. Reagan said 
have been going, on for “many 
years.” 

Mr. Reagan told Congress he 

“nMCCI.rwf” U. 1 ,L., Zt 


Prime Minister Rashid Karami “reassured" Mr. Gorbachev that if 
of Lebanon, a Sunni, and Grand the U.S. research demonstrates “a 
Mufti Sheikh Hassan Khaied, spin- defense against nuclear nwgdi<»c is 
tual head of the Sunni sect that possible,” then the United States 
makes up the majority of West Bei- would offer to diare- it with gflip<i 
rut’s population of 900,000. issued and Moscow in an attempt to “re- 

.. w- 4 I .n .. .. » - V* 


separate appeals to Mr. Assad for place all strategic missiles with 
personal intervention to stop the such a defense, which threatens no 
fighting. 1 * • • one." 

“Make them stop bringing Mr. Reagan said he told Mr. 


Geneva’s Success: Process. 

~ 

Wins Out Over Substance 

i 

(CoatuiDed from P»gel) spoke of .patting mutual' relations 

and alliance politics. But personal on a new footing; But neither adp 
diplomacy often breeds Tiighexpec- wanted this tevd'of optimism. • 
tations. That, Reagan advisers were With respect to space-based de- 
said to fear, coaid cause Americans fenses, the sides could have direct 
to lower their guard, and it also ed their negotiators in Geneva to 
could look as though the Russians focus where to draw the line bd- 
had duped the presadenL — - — - ’ 


tween permissible research awl- 


control of most of the Comiche 
Mazraa commercial thoroughfare, 
the seafront Raouche boulevard 
and the Hamra business district of 
West BeiraL 


since the Israeli invasion of Leba- 
non in 1982. 

In East Beirut, which is Chris- 
tian, the 42d anniversary of Leba- 


KUUL “"“J v* 

But pockets of Amal fighters non s mdqjendence from France 
held out in several buildings de- was celebrated with a parade 


spite, volleys of rocket-propelled 
grenades and -50-caliber anti-air- 
craft .ipachine-gun fire. . 


As the two Moslem factions 
fought on. Mr. Jumblat and the 
Amal leader, Nabih Bern, issued a 


Quartz movement - Water resistant 5-aun IB K. gold. 


Sunni Moslem fighters of the joint appeal with the Syrian gov- 
Mourabitoim — Arabic for am- eminent of President Hafez at- As- 


l wawiiliv J-dUTI IO TV JQVQ, « uw/iv LUI a m - Vk a iwmmui. aituw. UI ^ 

gold and steel, all steel. Natural rubber strap. Registered model. •_ bushers — were reported to have sad for a 10 AAL cease-fire. They 
— ___ joined forces with the Druze mili- wamgi wo latprs with “disciplinary 

Discover the world of interRent... 


r — o d — ^ * " 0" " * HUU uv iviu xvu« 

houses tumbling over the heads of Gorbachev “that we are a nation 
their tenants.” Mr. Karami said in that defends, rather than atta c k s , 
a radio statement. “I plead with that our alliances are defensive, not 
President Hafez al-Assad to do his offensive. We don’t seek nudear 
utmost to save the people of Leba- superiority. We do not seek a first 
ooti-" strike advantage over the Soviet 

Radios reported several gasoline Union. Indeed, one of my funda- 
stations and apartment buildings mental arms control objectives is to 
on fire, with people trapped in get rid of first strike weapons alto- 
basements. Palls of smoke hung gether." 
over many parts of die town. The president said he wanted to 

The fighting began Wednesday “give a push" to n qyitiatwnc in 
when Dnize gunmen tried to tear Geneva on nuclear and space 
Lebanese flags from government weapons, and that both lead er s trill 
buddings and raise their Progres- instruct the bargainers to “hasten 
sive Socialist Party banner. their vital work." However, White 

McFarlane Says Both Sides 
Gained From GenevaTalks 


As for Mr. Gorbachev; he banned development and testing, ft 
seemed to be searching for a way to coukl have tried to nnrow diffcaj- 
be upbeat, although he did not get ences about which faces on each 
what he most wanted from the ride were to be cat. Soma op enim* 


meeting: some limits on Mr. Rea- . could have been found on regional 
gan’s Strategic Defense Initiative, issues. Principles for resolving the 
Soviet o ffi cials said privately that Afghan conflict, for ' instance, 
they expected this bid gambled on might have been estabfi&ed. 
tbepresures of summitry anyway. Breakthrough gmdefines would 
Evjysgi panted to throndu- have^wken of deep-or SO^rercetU 

sEJS-feifSE jssaa- 4 i-.i?sa 


vince Mr. Goibadrev of tire virtues 
of space-based defenses, nor did 
Mr. Gorbachev persuade Mr. Rea- 


have left undefined which fared 
would have been .'counted. The 
sides dbuld have stated their desire 


■ ■ - * ... MUE»wuiuw>ciuKuiiKiruauE 

gan to abandon any of his pro- to ^ a nrompt and seoarate 
grams to devdop these defenses. 


grrnu to demop these defenses. aa^tdonmedx^angefor^sbirt 

1SSQe 1 -Wt'fcWk- Ahat wouM J^ do# 
J^^ymas^tfarsfmida^n^ ^ ^ British nud^ 

gap. It sard they would wort “to arms. • • v “ . 


** ®ey abo could have npeated 

cm (in«w . 'brift would scnspdoosfy observe 

A^Anfi-BaffistiSS Treaty c? 
l972,teaffinnod that die treaty re 
stricted the parties to “iesearch,r 
rbatkft undefined whether certain 

Son idmrm^^^^ aBoweS 


(Continued from Page 1) 
side or the other made commit- 
ments “untenable." 


»eneva lai&s an urter^n agreement op,r 
range forces m Europe: f 

ing, sufficient fa both to sustain Reagan ad minis tratioh \ 

their policies. made mhdr of these. points., But 


under this rubne. 


eirpdirics. nmde mhdr of these. pdrnts. v BtR . „ , .. .. Y; 

“The question is can they bridge Mr- Gorbadrevleftiiodoiibtinhis . ^ gmdjnra tnmed out to be 

e differences and hnw dn thrv news conference on Thursdav that-"?*?-®® 1 ^*^ oonoessrars enact 


UIVUL> UUKLUUIC. *UVV(UWUUUUVail LUVJ VllUgb - ■ ' . - |~ • — . 

“Today, you find on both sides the differences and how do they ncw ® conference on Thursday that- ? 

countries that"are able to make view strat^ic stability? The presi-' there would be no cats in offensive 

ihrKP -mmmilmpnfc ami In fiftnf Wlfprt (hie with mndfWnWr HUCJ CRT Hfil lS without R bflU On thfi lUMCRfl, _ IHC' IW< 


those -commitments and to keep 
them, - he added. .“We are going 
into a period where the strength of 
both sides is roughly correspond- 


: accessions eithdr 
twitornake._. 
two leaders seeded 


dent enters tins with consideraWe nudear anns without a bon on the 

optimism and enthusiasm and I. dc^dQnnent of space-based.de- They restar- 

tnink it bodes well for a more stable ... ;; 



East- West relationship.” The two sides were said to have 

■ Mmphy Briefs Israelis . 

William Claiborne of The Wash- . up either joint or separate gjiide- 
ington Past reported from Jerusa- lines for^negotiators. Some mem- 
ion: bers of the American team were 


Change Urged 
In Trust Laws 

(Cou tinned from Page l) 
the words oF Deputy Assistant At- 
torney General Charles F. Rule. 

- fa aspeech this month, Mr. Rule 
Said the administration's goal was 
to “deregulate” antitrust laws, not 
to eli m inate them, by encouraging 
beneficial mergers and joint re- 
search projects by businesses and 
by giving entrepreneurs more op- 
portunity to profit from inventions 
and other “intellectual’' property. 

The cabinet advisers acted 
Wednesday, on recommendations 


ed wboethey have been for tire last 
two months on nudear arms and 
brake no new ground, by all ac- 
counts, agreeing only “to accder- 


mormng to see if they could draw cora«^agreemgonly‘ioaccder- 
19 either joint or separate guide- the negotiations in Geneva. 

Hnpc fnr>iAA Afi __ Thev stressed a Drocednml franv- 


t stressed a procedural frara^- 
; hic h x B n g two more sranmit & 


’ru o ere oi me American team were wu mwc muu m. 

Richard W. Murphy, the Un said to be seeking at least rhetorical meetings and other highrlevd taBcl 

tistant secnerarv of KtnrA fnr Nnr common umfVnH m Aatmnmm c rw. >1.. t — j — _rr Ji 


assistant secretary of staie forNear common ground on defenses. . ' Once the two leaders set off dir 

Eastern and South Asian affairs, The leadera were bodon^ahnost feeir own, it was not dear whrd 
Wefed Israeli leaders Friday. on seven years of strained rdaticras. would evolve, only that the tone 
the Geneva summit meding but. The central issues were .tough, ones, and atmosphere would be upbeaU 
according to Israeli officials, of- little was accomplished btf ore the ' In one way, the positive person^ 
fered no evidence that tire meeting, meeting, and tirere was Kkle time chemistnroaareddoaa, at least for 
win have any impact on Middle ; during tlu talks to dealwhh coin- foose in the UJS. camp who wanted 


East peace negotianocs. . . . pficated, matters where ther^werc- to move toward.a better packaaft 

Folfawing a meeting with For- baric differences. But the personal dipl0ma«yBen5 

eign Minister Yitzhak Shamir, Mr. • From the outset, it was dear that ated uncertainty; One of the work 
Murphy said that Mr. Reagan and neither leader wanted a failure. But nightmares for professional, drpl* 
Mr. Gorbachev had restated their nerther seemed confident how to go mats is to see what they regard as 
respective positions on tire Middle beyond that and how to -measure their untutored bosses rennaoff oh 

EasL . • ■; ‘ their own; they are nevSqraie sure 

A senior Israeli official said that Tne final, bare-mnmnum pack- what was said and wbemer enri* 


EasL - : ' 

A senior Israeli official said that 


«V vuuwuflj uu 1 CWillUICI inauuns Mr.. Muiphy, who attended the age involved expressions of msap- 
from an administration working summit session, offered detailed re- pomtment by both leaders bat do 

crroim rm mrid.in nf anrihmet TVirts nn the IIS JMel fatlcc nastv .iliit em eiit« Tr alcA nu 4 hJ»t • 


their own; they are never qmic surp 
what was said and whether cod* 
promises were suggested thijt 
would run counter to policy or esr 
tabtishedinterests. •» 

•The personal touch also shifted *^ 
tire focus of disensrien away from . 


group on revision of antitrust regu- ports on 1 
lation beaded by Assistant Attor- “From 
ney General Douglas H. Ginsbuig, the offiri 

head of the Antitrust Division, and clear that — % am«wiicc ana toward 1 

Manuel H. Johnson, assistant m having a bigger role in the Mid- consulates. ' . seemed to be Mr Reas 

Treasury secretary for economic die East Of course, we knew that" The mostpaatrve package could to establish a sensed 
policy. - Mr. Muiphy was beginning a have harired back to the spirit of to convince his countei 

According to a.rqsoa this week two-week Middle East lour in what Geneva m 1955, where President admin istration's smeen 

in Legal Tunes, a trade publication *s said to be an effort to set the Dwight D. Eisenhower and Nikolai peace. Mr Gorbachev 

that covers legal and government- stage for (sradi-Jordanian negotia- A. Bulganin, the Soviet , leader, s' be wining io to alomr. 

agency matters, the waking group tions under some sort of interna- ; — _ - G -wag- 

supported legislative change to tional anspices. 

limit treble-damage penalties. . Isradi officials said that in sepa- T T 'CJ 1\F ' k '! i- .: 

These' penalties enable companies rate talks, Secretary of Slate U »J, lv( fl.W /\Tia IVat Al«V*Oa1 


ports on the U^.-Soviet talks. -. 
“From what Murphy told us," 


nasty statements. It also indhded a 

bundle of accords covering matters 


the official said, “it is definitely - such as scientific and 


— — - - . j 77 * wi- me iocus or arscussiai awav from 

char that the Soviets are interested changes and the opening of' new substance and toward mood That 

m having a bigger role m the Mid- consulates. seemed to he Mr 

die East Of course, we knew that" The moslpositive package could to establish a seLetfSousS 

Mr. Morohv was banntima a have harked bade to Cnirit rif -tn l;. JHnOUSnfiHy 


to caryince his counterpart of the 
a dmi nistration’s sincere desire f di- 


scerned to 


V 

supported legislative rfiangwe to 
limit treble-damage penalties. 
; These' pienal ties enable comp ani es 


Discover our world of professional, 
yet personal service. International travellers who 
come to irrterflent already know 
what to expect. They’ll find the comfort and 
reliable, friendly service they’re used to at home. 

So, the next time you rent a car, 
don't compromise - come to interRent. 
Our commitment to the highest standards makes 
all the difference in the world. 

interRent puts it all together. 


. ^Artiaiuw* UMUrv vuui|AOmca . IMLV ro i l UWIVUUJ Ul JU11C 

- and other private litigants to collect George P. Shultz and Foreign Min- 
big damage awards from other is ter Eduard A. Shevardnadze dis- 

- companies that lose antitrust suits, cussed the peace process in more. 

Treble-damage penalties should detail, but reached no agreements, 
be awarded only in price-fixing ■ U.S. Envoy to Visit Ghm* 

D ^ , j aaa r.° fS “£? Di 

couiiL ^ D. Wolfowitz was flying to Begmg 

The working group also pro- 011 Satimdjy to brief Chinese lead- 
posed to provide antitrust exemp- 618 the. results of the Geneva 
tions for mergers and acquisitions summit meeting, Reuters reported, 
in industries harmed by competi- ™- Wolfowitz also was briefing 
don from imports and to remove °“ er ^ an coraitiies md u ding Ja- 
some of the current restrictions on an ^ Swilh Korea, diplomats 


cusseo me peace process m more. XXIA>U 3 CU OI jjD 
detail, but reached no agreements. Jf , 

■ U.S. Envoy to VUCOiiia (Contimiea from Page 1) 

Assistant Sectwary of State Paul believe it’s in the Walker category ” 
D. Wolfowitz was flying to Beijing He was referring 1 to JoShn A_ 
on Saturday to brief Chinese lead- Walker Jr, a retired U.S. Navy 
ers on the results of the . Geneva chW warrant o^ier, who, with his 
summit meeting, Reuters reported, son, pleaded guilty this month to 
Mr. Wolfowitz also was briefing chaises of suunlvmp th« a-*;- 


U.S. Nayy Analyst Arrested^ § 
Accused of Spying for Israel * 


Walker Jr, a retired U.S. Navy sures. 

- L: - r — 1 — - - — ■ 1 .. . y ■ •_ 


®raaiple, usually are transferred 
without some sophisticated devices 
involving electronic countermen 


. T^cl^uehs also have been d®r 
Fp cwtain mOitaxy in idljgencc 


I^ioq with highly dassified docur ■ United States. *r 


interRent 


rent a car 


interlocking directorates. 

DEATH NOTICE 

ROGERS 

TOM ex Pepsi-Cda Inti Cairo, 
passed over peacefully on Nov. 4, 
1985 at his home in Hereford- 
shire, after a long illness borne 
with extraordinary courage and 
deienmnation. . 


- ~ DEATH NOTICE 

‘ • Mii JARMA BENSINGER 
film actress of Beverly Hfllji, California, 
h^sjnsi pasted away. Sic had been mar- 
ried to Mr, B£ 'Bfettsrager HI formerly 
of- Chicago.- cnrrenjly living ia London. 
Nire. Bewtutsa a survived by her three 
sons. John, Kerry and Tyler. 


4 .”tssffi»'i 5 s £aga 

ansissassi issi^slxs 

expressed a wflB n g nc is to improve A. Benner requested no bJrbZ said that officials have 

relations, but noted that the two cause, he said, Mr. Pollard had fuses to gc ? erally ^ 

countries had 'pointed om that tloy traveled outside the United States ^ 0n ? aticn po M 

stifi had serious differences. ^ - . twice in the recem past and “shows and that 

We hope that from now on the some intent to flee. 1 ? He also told of mJ? m ^ depl l °y me ok 
United States and the Soviet Union the magistrate tiiat Mr. Pdlard had coumri« Aja ^ 

will rea^r give up tiior contention *flarge amounts of money that he me been ■?? F™? f 0 ^ after ^ ' 
for military . superiority and.get received for his offenses.” Israelis 4 rcsu ^ ^ 

down to negotiation fa earnest," The United States already shares the ^ r 

the JCnhua news agency quoted a : many of its important mtiitaiy se- coun ^^ 531100 liasat ®40 ver Arai 
ministry spokesman assaying. . ■ crets with Israel, although the Is-. - — Wjtw '* 


“We hope that froro now on the some intent to flee. 1 ? He also told of arm«t iS 011 ^ d£ P 1 °y me at3 
United States and the Soviet Union the magistrate tiiat Mr. Potiard had countries Aja ^ 

will realbr gH% up tiior contention *flargc amounts of money that he ina been f m ^ aftcr haiv 

for military . superiority andget received for his offenses.” Israelis ^ rasuh, the. 

down to negotiation in earnest," The United States already shares iromnaiM*L!^- the ^ r 

the Xinhua news agency quoted a : many of its inqrortant mflitaiy se- countiSr 5 ™” 5 IXHsat ” a Qve r Arab 
ministry spokesman assaying. . • crets with Israel, although the Is- - ■ t ’’ 

- 7 — rn— — 1 . Jadi gow™em hasfabbied.quiet- J™ 1 ” Denie s InvoJveroent : l 

SikhPanyl^Ife^ 

of United AkaB Dal, a radkal Sikh more advance, than • the UniiS ’ ?es ?8ating it, United Press Intert 

SSSiliPi* Js^js SWf? Joranlly prwidB. ,„ d “H. W from Jamianl 


*,Tr 



r 



!r«l 

m 


v-meu uw metasonat wn,*,swiwffl political manen * u nappmed at aft « 

the party leader, Jogmfc^jwb; vermg brtween. the two countries. “<* totally oonoSd tl 

United News oflafiai^^- ~ aoti to find, for P ^ t3r . 93 far ■e-2eSSLa 

. .““^«tscoa^eched. , ’•■ w 




■ ,r " wa g ■' 








Page 5 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUKDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


■ - 
- Uri 

SrWSfe 

^ ' & 

. ... a«L 


vv 


i, .. C V I 


“VI I 


'jeadv 

■*U 




*c!J ftl; 






: 

V: 3^5$ 

%::^S 

. 

:£*■>* &* 

' ce **% 

' er S«% 

*:<!. w i&.. 

.. . _ V to Uni 

- --uni opnaj 
•; - - ^,v 

. :; ^‘Pir.foa: 
_'' u ;' -"n'l:cv !,v' 

= L, *2ttr.:.-.a(4 ^ 

.•••'■ 

■ ■ ’ ' : ■J-'ikfcai t 

* - - ■■-*« b=a 
• • rj-.c rja% 

" ,r ~ J pTOqiiJr 
'■TCiorajj 


* 



ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY 
ANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING VACANCIES 


PLANNING SUPERINTENDENT 

• Responsible for the work of the Planning Department in Exploration & Production, comprising studies on 
_ ADNOC Group strategies for the changing environment, and on optimisation/development of operations 
■j an d facilities in the ADNOC Group Oil Operating Companies, integration of ADNOC and Operating 
Companies' work programmes and. budgets, and monitoring and evaluation of plan implementation. 

The candidate. should -have a BjSc. in PetroIeum/MechanicalfChemical Engineering or equivalent, with 
« minimum 12 years relevant experience in the petroleum production industry including 5-6 years in a 
managerial or senior supervisory level--. 

SUPERVISOR - PLANS & PROGRAMMES COORDINATION 

- Responsible for the evaluation and consolidation of work programmes and annual plans of the ADNOC 

Grou'p Oil Operating Companies (OPCOs) and integration of ADNOC Sole Risk plans for exploration, 
condensate and gas; Directs the appraisal of budgets and expenditure phasing. Monitors OPCOs' 
performance, identifies and analyses major problems, and formulates recommendations on course of 
action. . - - ' 

The candidate should have a BSc. in Petfoleum/Mechanical/Chemical Engineering or equivalent, with 
minimum 10 years relevant experience in the petroieum production industry, including 4-5 years at a 
_ senior supervisory level. 

; SERVICE COMPANIES 9 COORDINATOR 

Responsible for the review, analysis and follow-up of work programmes, capital projects, 
budgets and operations of assigned oil industry Service Companies in the ADNOC Group. He is . 
r required to see that ADNOC objectives for the Service Companies, particularly in relation to the 
petroleum industry in Abu Dhabi, are optimally fulfilled, and prepare review reports and 
recommendations for submission to ADNOC management. 

-- The candidate should have a B.Sc. in Engineering with minimum 10 years experience in industry 
" (preferably petroleum related) including 4-5 years experience in a senior supervisory level. 

OPCQS’ OPERATIONS COORDINATOR 

Represents ADNOC and coordinates and monitors on its behalf all activities related to the 
operations and related services of the Oil Operating Companies in the ADNOC Group, so as to 
. conform to ADNOC’s policy, and guidelines. Represents ADNOC in the related Tender Boards 

- and prepares recommendations on ADNOC position on contract awards renewals, extensions 
. and purchases for submission to ADNOC management. 

The candidate should have a BSc. in Engineering, with minimum 10 years engineering 
experience in oil or allied industry with* 4-5 years in the drilling and production operations in a 
senior supervisory level. 


’•wT i Very good knowledge of English is essential for all these appointments. Knowledge of Arabic 

• •• r-r-r.adfcj; Y • will be an advantage. 


' if.. 

’• VsrsniMottc 

■ KTDjjkjfi'. 

* ci'iiwMisA' 

• liunfc 
r-ZS 1C- “} 

: ■ .uas wank 
' . ■ nszfal * 


. t» - KSSS 
: »:■ --ri'dli'CS 
amis: 

• . 

• . fitter. 

:az: 

• »: - rr* ESC '* 

. ■ li 

1 - "it*; 

. • , -zctn ns 3^ 
• mi 

- r r-o 
-• »“ 

■ - t*. S' 


advantage, 

Interested candidates are invited to forward their application together with photocopies of their edu- 
cation and experience certificates, within three weeks from the date hereof, to: 


■ .- I li-.,- 


•• j«* i 


PERSONNEL DIRECTORATE - EMPLOYMENT DIVISION 
ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY 
P.O. BOX 898 ABU DHABI - UJLE. 



ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL 
COMPANY 


★ 

★ 


HEAD, COMPUTER AUDIT 

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR (COMPUTER) 

INTERNAL AUDITOR (COMPUTER) 


The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOQ controls and coordinates 
the operations of both onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration and 
production and associated Petrochemical Industries in Abu Dhabi. 

We are seeking to appoint 3 experienced AUDITORS to join our recently re- 
organised Headquarters Finance Directorate based in Abu Dhabi City to 
contribute to the enhancement and development of the audit function within 
the ADNOC Group of Companies. 

The Computer Audit Department performs independent appraisals of data 
centre operations, individual applications and data security and control 
throughout the ADNOC Group of Companies; either independently or in 
conjunction with financial or management audits. 

All candidates should have a degree in Accounting, Computer Science or 
equivalent discipline, and preferably a recognised professional Accounting 
qualification. Proficiency in both written and spoken English and highly 
developed inter-personal skills are essential for this multinational working 
environment. Knowledge of Arabic is an advantage. 

Head, Computer Audit 

- requires 10 years relevant experience with 7 years in Computer Audit. 

Senior Internal Auditor 

- requires 8 years relevant experience with 5 years in Computer Audit. 

Internal Auditor 

- requires 6 years relevant experience with 3 years in Computer Audit. 

We offer competitive tax-free salaries plus a full range of expatriate 
benefits including free accommodation and utilities, subsidised school fees, 
air fares and generous paid annual leave. 

Jnterested candidates are invited to forward their detailed application ; 
together with photocopies of their education and experience certificates , 
within three weeks from the date hereof, to.- 

THE HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION MANAGER 
PBtSONNR DIRECTORATE 
ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY (ADNOC) 

P.O. BOX 898 
ABU DHABI -U.A.E. 



v.i.itre* 1 

iiusfaf* 


- • 

'■ . -C’ 




• : - ;r J* c 
- ■ * ■ 
.-;7 

- .1 


■3 
yr . 




- ' ' : ” 

. v - 

. . 

•• My 

yr-' 

,‘P y‘ 
- ' *• • f 



iSj us 

Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank 


SENIOR BANKING APPOINTMENTS 
with Abu Miabi Commercial Bank, 
Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. 

Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank is the largest capitalised bank in 
the U.A.E. with a paid up capital of U.S. $340 million. It has a 
network of 21 branches in the U.AE., a branch in Bombay 
and a representative office in London. 

Vacancies exist for the following positions at the bank’s head 
office in Abu Dhabi: 

POSITION SALARY RANGE PS ANNUM 

1 . TREASURER U.S. $81 ,600 - T 1 0,400 

2. CHIEF INTERNAL AUDITOR.......... r U.S. $48,000- 84,000 

3. CHI? CREDTT OFFICER. U.S. $48,000- 84,000 

4. CHI? DEALER — ....................... U.S. $42,000 - 60,000 

5. CHI? TRADER-MARKETABLE SECURITIES . U.S. $42,000- 60,000 

6. DEALERS : U S. $30,000 - 54,000 

Salaries will be commensurate with qualifications, background and 
experience. > 

Further information may be obtained from our representative office 

at the following address: 

..Attn: Mr. Philip D. Brewer 

Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank - Representative Office 
18th Floor - Sti Alphage House 

2 Fore Street, 

London EC2Y 5DA 

TeL: 588-1620 Tdex: 8814627 CITY SP 



ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL 
COMPANY 

* SENIOR SYSTEMS ANALYSTS 

The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) controls and coordinates the 
operations of both onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration and production and 
associated Petrochemical Industries in Abu Dhabi. 

We are seeking to appoint 2 SENIOR SYSTEMS ANALYSTS to join our recently re- 
organised Headquarters Finance Directorate, based in Abu Dhabi Gty, to implement 
new computerised Financial Accounting Systems. The posts offer unique and 
challenging opportunities for the right candidates to contribute directly to the 
development of one of the Gulfs leading Companies. 

The candidate should have at least 8 years experience in Accounting, Auditing and 
preferably analytical work related to systems and procedures, with 3 years experience 
in computer systems implementation. They should also have a first degree ■ or 
equivalent in an appropriate computer science or Accounting discipline. Proficiency in 
both written and spoken English and highly developed inter-personal skills are 
essential for this multinational working environment. Knowledge of Arabic is an 
advantage. 

We offer competitive tax-free salaries plus a full range of expatriate benefits including 
free accommodation and utilities, subsidised school fees, air fares and generous paid 
annual leave. 

Interested candidates are invited to forward their detailed application, together with 
photocopies of their education and experience certificates, within three weeks from 
Hie date hereof, to: 

THE HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION MANAGER 
PERSONNEL DIRECTORATE 
ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY (ADNOC) 

P.O. BOX 898 
ABU DHABI - U. A. E. 


INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY 
is seeking for Its office in Lngano 

COMMERCIAL ASSISTANT 

To worfc in doae coflabonaon wirib the managing director of the ekctromc aeaor. 

skills and experiatce m ifae ensiiimrTng/electranic sector. 

fluently Ft ^IwiK ggj Italian be willing to wnl in a small dynamic team. 

Preferred age mound 28-35 yean okL Swiss citizen or holder of C permit. 

For a highly motivated and numerate individual with creative commercial flair, 
tins is an outstanding opportunity offering attractive prospects and high-level 
contacts. 

Phase wrUe with penotvrf and carver detail* to: 

Gpher E24-900107 
PubBcBos, 6901 Lugcvio, Switzerland. 


INTERNATIONAL GROUP 
requires a WORKING ADVISOR 
to the chairman FOR THE SHIPPING DIVISION 

Candidate must have had experience as a chief executive of an 
international shipping company with strong commercial experience in all 
sectors of shipping with an area of concentration on bulk carriers, 
tankers, containership, operations and ship management. 

This post will entail that the candidate have the ability to sustain the 
pressures of the current shipping market and at the same time undertake 
to not only deal with the daily aspects of the business but also to propose 
and implement necessary changes. 

Please mile lo: Bax D-129 , Herald Tribune, 

92521 Neuilfy Cedex, France. 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


Arc 


t 1 Ay bcg N mH owm I g Pour PEmpM 

AGSNCE SPfclAIJSfe DE5 INGfrflEURS ET CADRES 
12 Rue Uonche. 75436 Pori* C&£X 09 
TeL i 280.61.46. Ex). 71 . . 285A4M. Ext. 42. 


"INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS” 

appears every Thursday & Saturday 
10 FIAGE AW APVBffgBHNT coated yoariwartrtbrtiiMficmdHMfttTilwM 

111 Atm. Otarim-de-Goufle. 92521 NewBy Cadex. Franca. Tab 47-47-12-45. Tele* 613 595. 


e ASSISTANT TO GENERAL MANAGE- 
MEWT, involved few 25 yean with the most 
i mp ort an t dediiom within Inte m otionoi 
c o n) pon ies , is looking far o UghW post 
sou eta ri al animation, structures, regulation, 
public relations activities. French citizen. 
Cambridge (Vohmeency. Knowledge of 
word praotuing system (Rank Kern 860). 
Ref.: 4y4-PMHS CADRES L 

• PROJECT INGINSBr 33, Unhenity De- 
gree Beetromes, 10 yean offshore experi- 
ence oversea*. In charge of specific* pra- 
|ects. Insiallation, servicing various 
In s trumettit. SEEKS new position. Ref..- 475- 
PAJffS CADRES L 

• FRBKH EXECUTIVE UUNGUAL SEC- 
RETARY, 50 years-old, 5 years in UK. TW- 
n/KK warli in Engllih. Experiecica in fU 
nondoi opetotions ond foreign exchange 
for trading petroleum products end ouatant 
to operation! manager. SEEKS permanent 
post, A m erican/ 1 British Company p referred. 
Rof.t 476+AKS CADRES /. 

• mtanahonal business mam- 

AGEMENT, French lady, 26, trlfegod 
French En^sh Chinese. Some German and 
SpoAnh. Ec o nomics and business adminis- 


tration graduate SEEKS challenging position 
in international trade (Marketing/ Finanee) 
in France US or For Eest. Free to travel or 
relocate. Ref.: 477 -PaJOS CADRES I. 

• 31 YEARS OLD, bOingwal French. Law- 
yer with experience of worldwide marine 
insurance sottietnemts and flfigarions and 
exceptional manageria l and orgardzinfl 
sldfli SEEKS international legal position in 
Paris. Kef.: 47BFAOS CADRES L 

• RQ4CH PHARMACIST, F. 34, fluent 
English, 6 years expertise m ul tinational 
Quaftry Control Registration Documentation 
Coordlnaior France /international 5EEKS 
pharmoceuttcal Ce France/ Abroad. Ref. i 
47V-PARfS CADRES I. 

• RUSSlANr MGUStir FRENCH, FtHN- 
ISM SPEAKING MAM, 32, experience in- 
temafional trade for cinema, translation, 
driving Ikemo SEEKS position in mtemcl i on- 
d compoty. ftf.i 4SDPAIRS CADRES 4 
*FRBKH-MBA DEGREE, 40 yean old, 
fluent in English German French LOOKS 
FOR a Gen er al Monoger position. Strong 
experience in management mark safes. 
Pi ov en record of succ es se s and efficiency. 
M., ASifARS CADRES 4 





Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24, 1985 

ARTS / LEISURE 


- # 


u lt to I? 


Building Spree Marks Golden Age lor Washington Museums 


By Mary Baraaca 

Washington Past Service 

W ASHINGTON — The new 
National Building Museum, 
housed in the century-old Pension 
Building in northwest Washington, 
is the only museum of its kind in 
the Unite*! States — perhaps the 
inevitable monument for the age of 
gentrification and giant cranes. 
Washington's 70th museum, it is 
dedicated to celebrating die United 
States’s building arts and design 
from architecture to the splendors 
of turn-of-the-century wrought 
iron. 

“Americans have been more apt 


to study the great palaces of Eu- 
rope than «ir own architecture,’’ 
said Bates Lowry, the museum’s 
director and architectural histori- 
an. “This museum will uy to see to 
it that at an early stage in their 
education, Americans know what 
our important buddings are, and 
what a record those buildings are of 
their own society." 

The opening of the Building Mu- 
seum is the latest milestone in a 
golden age for Washington’s muse- 
ums, part of a national mani a for 
labeling and exhibition. Due in 
Washington next are: 

The National Museum of Wom- 






-=~«£l8aC 


Noftond BUkfng Museum 

Design for a post office by Jeremiah O'Rourke. 
ADVERTISEMENT 


en in the Arts (expected to open by 
April 1987 at the renovated Mason- 
ic Temple building); the U. $. Ho- 
locaust Memorial Museum (under 
construction just off the Washing- 
ton Mall); a Museum of the Gty of 
Washington (expected to open next 
fall in an old school building); and 
the Smithsonian's Quadrangle pro- 
ject, to opai in May 1988, which 
will include the Sadder Gallery for 
Oriental An and a new, larger 
home for the Museum of African 
ArL The U. S. Army has an- 
nounced plans for its national mu- 
seum to be located near the Penta- 
gon, but the funding and 
construction date are still uncer- 
tain. 

There have been notable muse- 
um expansions as well during the 
past decade; The National Gallery 
of Art's East Wing was completed 
in 1979; the National Air and 
Space Museum, which moved into 
its present site in 1976, averages 10 
million visitors annually and 
claims to be the most visited muse- 
um in the world. The National Col- 
lection of Fine Aits was rechris- 
tened the National Museum of 
American An in 1 980 and has more 
than quadrupled the size of its col- 
lection since 1968. The National 
Geographic Society's Explorers 
Hall museum is being overhauled 
in honor of the society’s centennial 
in 1988. 

“Museums have been opening at 
an enormous rate." said Stephen E. 
WeiL the Hirshhom Museum's 


deputy director. California, for ex- 
ample, has beat opening mn«Bimx 
at a rate equal to one a month since 
1979. There is a computer museum 
in Boston, a broadcasting museum 
in New York and, in Lincoln. Ne- 
braska, the National Museum of 
Roller Skating. 

The National Building Museum 
puts Washington two behind Man- 
hattan in number of museums, ac- 
cording to die Official Museum Di- 
rectory of the American 
Association of Museums. That list- 
ing doesn't include Washington’s 
lesser-known collections, such as 
the Bethune Museum and Archives 


(the nation’s largest collection of 
artifacts of black women leaders), 
the Volta Bureau (antique hearing 
aids- ear trumpets and the library 
of Alexander Graham Bell) and the 
Sl Elizabeths Hospital Museum 
(relics of Ezra Pound and historical 
artifacts from the country’s Erst 
federal menial hospital). 

New .York, Reger and others 
said, is stiH far abwH of Washing- 
ton in “alternative spaces,” or gal- 
leries for avant-garde art, and it is 
still the capital for finance and the- 
ater, but Washington’s museum 
boom has helped transform the dty 
from a cultural backwater lo an 


landmark in the United 
States's cultural landscape. 

Experts attribute the museum 
boom to an assortment of factors, 
including a better-educated public 

with more leisure time, the in- 
creased showmanship of museum 
directors and the nation’s cultural 
coming of age. 

Lowry, the Building Museum di- 
rector, suggested that museums 
may be answering a deeper need. 
“They have become a plat* in our 
society where people go seeking 
something they don’t have — aes- 
thetic satisfaction or education,'' he 
said. 


New Glory for Old Pension Building 


By Henry Mitchell 

Washington Post Serf ice 

W ASHINGTON — Part of die 
charm of the National Build- 
ing Museum, which opened after 
years of restoration, is the Pension 
Buil ding, the great structure that 
houses the museum. 

The designer was General Mont- 
gomery C. Meigs, the only known 
architect in history to copy the Far- 
□ese Palace in Rome but double its 
size. His fourth Door is squeezed 
between the third floor and the 
three-story clerestory with no hint 
on the exterior that it is there, and 
he lapsed into virtual architectural 
insanity with his notion of 200-odd 


ADVERTISEMENT 


‘IV/ft'i; it nt, in i< tired iif Li'niloii he is (111*1/ ■>/ life, for there is iir London all that life can afford " * San&ja Jotiwon. JOn 5am*e. I7(/ % • ■ . 

The Yanks have Britain to thank 
for Thanksgiving 


T he fourth Thursday of November - which 
falls this year on November 28th, next 
Thursday - is a very special day to 
Americans. 


It is, as col umnis t Art 
Buchwaid writes in his tradi- 
tional column, reprinted in 
this newspaper every Thanks- 
giving, “the one day of the 
year Americans eat better 
than the French.’* 

All of which America can 
thank Britain for. Because the 
Thanksgiving tradition dates 
back to that tiny band of Bri- 
tish exiles who sailed from 
Plymouth early in the Seven- 
teenth Century and came 
ashore on the coast of what is 
now Massachusetts. After a 
hard winter, and a good har- 
vest, they chose to give their 
thanks to God for survival in 
the form of a British harvest 
dinner. Wild turkeys were 
shot, ears of corn husked and 
cooked - and America’s most 
enduring tradition was boro. 

International hoteliers 
quickly realized that traveling 
Yanks, and Americans based 
abroad, responded quite fav- 
orably to the idea of a special 
Thanksgiving menu. This ex- 
plains why a few of London’s 
more enterprising hotels and 
restaurants will be offering 
festive Thanksgiving specials 
next Thursday. 

Probably the most impress- 
ive menu is that being served 
in the heart of Knightsbridge 
at the Sheraton Park Tower 
which rises like a massive cir- 


cular col umn of windows over 
Hyde Park. Gerd Jacobmey- 
er, formerly of the Inter-Con- 
tinental, who is now Shera- 
ton’s Executive Chef, is en- 
thusiastic about the lavish 
feast his team has been pre- 
paring. "We start with 
home-made country pate,” he 
reports, “dder, a trio of duck, 
chicken and goose livers, bar- 
ley soup or a clam-and-mussel 
chowder. Then roast Tom 
Turkey, of course, with 
sprouts, creamed onions and 
an assortment of vegetables. 
And pumpkin or mincemeat 
pie for dessert, followed by 
coffee, some nuts and mints.” 
Reservations are recommend- 
ed for the hotel’s restaurant 
has just 110 covers, and the 
meal, costing £21.50 includ- 
ing VAT will be served 
Thursday evening only, be- 
tween 7.30 and midnight. 

Jay Campbell, the enthu- 
siastic New Yorker who runs 
the LA Cafe in Knights- 
bridge, also realizes his 
American friends and their 
British colleagues need a place 
to lay on a Thanksgiving 
feast, so will be offering tur- 
key dinners throughout the 
traditional Thanksgiving long- 
weekend from noon to mid- 
night, Thursday through 
Sunday. With James Dean 
posters looming over them on 


the cafe’s oaken-paneled 
walls, diners will tuck into 
prawn cocktail, the ever-pres- 
ent turkey, cranberry sauce, 
an assortment of cooked vege- 
tables, or crunchies from the 
salad bar, pumpkin or mince- 
meat pies and coffee. Price: 
£9.95. With 240 covers, and 
service non-stop from 12 to 
12, reservations shouldn’t be 
too hard to make. 

Ken Lo, the tennis fanatic 
who's still winning tourna- 
ments in his 70’s, won’t be 
serving anything American at 
his Memories of China restau- 
rant in Belgravia, for he never 
varies from his tradition of 
preparing only the best of 
China’s traditional meals. “If 
we have a festive harvest dish 
in China,” he suggests, “it’s 
probably a massive bowl of 
home-made noodles, made 
from freshly harvested wheat, 
topped with shredded chicken 
and bean sprouts. Also on the 
farmer’s harvest menu would 
probably be Peking Kou-tiek, 
dumplings steamed and fried 
in ginger and vinegar. We 
have them on our daily menu 
for anyone who wants to cele- 
brate Thanksgiving, Chinese 
style.” 

J.P. Dauvergne, the conti- 
nental who is Food and Bev- 
erage Manager at the 
Lowndes Thistle Hotel, also 
in Belgravia, explains that his 


intimate Adam Room Restau- 
rant will be serving two kinds 
of turkey on the 28th. “We’ll 
have the traditional roast tur- 
key of course, but if you like 
your bird with a bit of spice, 
we also have a Hun garian tur- 
key goulash that’s rather deli- 
cious.” With only 36 covers, 
early reservations are recom- 
mended. 

Pomegranate’s in Westmin- 
ster prides itself on being the 
most cosmopolitan restaurant 
in Britain, serving everything 
from Middle Eastern dishes to 
Mexican fere, so it draws back 
a bit from plain road Thanks- 
giving turkey. “But we'll defi- 
nitely be serving our tradi- 
tional holiday dish on Thurs- 
day,” enthuses Welshman 
Gwynn Jones who presides 
over the 60-seat establish- 
ment. “That’s filletted turkey 
with a peppercorn sauce. And 
pumpkin pie, of course.” Last 
orders 2:15 for lunch, 11:15 
in the evening. There’s one 
huge 12-seat table available 
for large parties - rare in Lon- 
don restaurants. 

For the British who started 
it all, the Americans who have 
elevated it into a major holi- 
day feast, and the curious 
from any land, there’s ob- 
viously going to be plenty of 
traditional Thanksgiving fare 
to go around. Bon appetit. 

Arturo Gonzalez 



VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 

— WORLD FAMOUS JEWELLERS — 




153 New Bond Street 
London W1 

Tel: 01-491 1405 
Tlx: 266265 VLC G 


Exclusive Jewellery 
Gift Items 
and 
Watches 


The perfect place to meet end greet 
-in the very heefft of London. 


WQWmtWl 

WlliAM SI KNIGHI5BROGE. IOHX3N. HLEPHONE (DO 235 8050. 
9'eaXn Wo«eS. inru & Oesorw wwdwos The *o5cn*3By oecote d TTT 


0 DINING OUT 0 


★ THE LA. CAFE ★ 

London's newest & most 
fashionable bar & restaurant 
featuring American and 
Mexican specialities (ribs, 
sl sales, burrttos, salad bar). 
Open dairy 1 2-1 2. Happy House, 
Christmas Parties, Sunday Buffet. 
163 Knightsbridge. 

TeL- 01 -589 7077 . 


04 Grosvenor OoacL Weslmrster. 
Cosmopolitan food from Far and 
Middle East Europe and the 
Americas. Rec by Micneiin. GaUt 
Mlou. Ronav and N Y Times Mon 
- Sat reservations. Tel: 828 6560. 


at The Lowndes Thistle 
Hotel, Lowndes Sheet 
SW1. TeL 01 -235 6020. 
International cuisine in the 
heart of Befgrdvia. 


KEN LO's MEMORIES 
OF CHINA 

Probably me most prestigious 
Chinese restaurant in Eubpe. 
Highly thought of by over 150 
Chinese and Far-Eastern delega- 
tions wno dine here. The onty 
restaurant featured by ‘New York 
Times’. ■GourtTier and ‘People's 
Daly’ of Bewng Cuuine features aO 
4 canary regions of Chara Res 
essential. 67-oQ Ebuiy St. Belgravia. 
SWl.Tet 01-730 773J 


TRASCO INTERNATIONAL 

LH.D. Mercedes Tax Free 
Limousines 36" & 44" 

Armoured cars and limousines 
Coach built cars 
Other makes * exotics 



Over 100 units in stock 
World wide delivery 
Direct from source. 
D.OI & E.RA. 



Tel: London (44) (1) 629 7779 
Telx: (’51) 8956022 TEAS G. 

Trasco London Lid. 

65-67 Park Lane, London W1 

Switzerland • United Kingdom ■ West Germany 


busts stuck in niches so far above Bates Lowry, the museum’s (li- 
the lobby floor that only a stray rector, plans to keep the exhibits in 
condor could see them. the rooms opening to the arcades, 

, . , . , , , rather than to detract from the stu- 

His brickwork should getjum pendous space of the lobby, 
into heaven, however. Nowhere ' “ . f ... . . 

else in Washington has brick ever „ Mags thought die cejhngs of of- 
been handled so lovingly, or with gees visited by the pnb lic sfa ould 
so satisfying a degree of skill. Javeai least moderate decoration. 

Lowry said same of this was uncov- 
There were 1.500 clerks working ered by rubbing with an unbeliev- 
on pensions in the building, and able amount of art gum. 
some of them hated Meigs’s notion As long ago as 1968 such lovers 
of a healthy work environment, ^ great space as the architect 
which included a steady flow (gale, Woodard Smith were 

some said) of fresh air: Below every suggesting that the Pension Build- 
window, three bricks were omitted, ingbe tamed into a museum of the 
(The Building Museum softies have budding arts. By 1974 a small corn- 
plugged up all the holes.) mittee was meeting. Lawyers, ar- 

Tbe building looks better dose chitcas ' c™** “d government of- 
up than atadistance. where the flciaIs pitched m, eventually 
fine craftsmanship is lost Its glory, wmnmg theff cause. The budding is 
however, is its interior. Meigs car- by die federal government. 





■ an**.'-* 


■ ■ ***** .. 


£• *£» -- - , • 

«• - -v • jU 


v a . 


**■•’:* 

lL * 1 - * 


' ” “'..i ’ ** 

;\.i • V*- 

*.’-"*5 s* 




■ t J T IM 




i HorttlM 




EX-REMBRANDT —After months of doubts and tests, 
brochure from the Kaiser-Friedrich Museum in West Bet-? 
fin concedes that the museum’s prize attraction, Mann 
With the Golden Helmet” (dettil), bnotbyltcMinriAhir 
by an “unknown artist ,* 4 perhaps one of Ms stedents^ 

’’Magic Christmas’ Beguiling 

p APSULE reviews of films re- Jade (Gary BasaHtbaX. las beef 

t • j * A. n «... I.M • I :_*S 


tied on about having a “park" in 
the lobby and noted wistfully that 
somebody had given him two fine 


- m which lends it to the museum 
Sly that board, a private group, 
two fine Before the museum opened, a 


palm trees. The fountain is his idea, small riwHr was received from two 
along with the tile floor (in poor retired dectrical workers in De- 
repair beneath a new carpet); the troit, marked “for our showplace,” 
pavin g under the arcades, now ter- and to the director tins was a gift of 


razzo, was ori ginally tile. 


major significance. 


C APSULE reviews of films re- 
leased in the United States: 
Paul Attanasio of The Washing- 
ton Post on “One Mage Christ- 
mas”: 

Vivid, beautifully produced and 
beguflmgjty perverse, Phillip Bor- 
sos’s film promises to become a 
holiday (name. . Girutie Grainger 
(Mary Steenburgen), a small-town 
housewife, could fit her Christmas 
spirit in an ejg cup:.Her husband. 


laid off and wanis tospluige away' 
their savings to open a bicycle re 
pair shop..- while her- boss at th$ 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 


ADVANCED DENTAL TECHNOLOGY 
AND MANAGEMENT 

American — CDT 
3 years full-time training 
next course will start in JANUARY 


foment AN 


A AM Academie cfArt Den tai re ' 

19 7. route du Mandemerrt - 1242 Satigty’Sw'itzeftanrf — TeL 022/53 1953 




UtwwrsHy preparatory cotmiei 
•■for Qfodes-9-13 *.•:'■■■ 



Education al & iKw u liwu l 
•xamions. •’ 

Superb sports opportunities. 
"Skflng at your doorstep” 
An Alpine Campus Aboy* 

’ LakeGarteva. 
Contact; Leysm American- School 
Oi-1854 (W) LEYSIN 
Telex: 456.312 - 
TeL: (41J 25/34 13 61 


pair sbop^wiSe her- boss at th* 
supermarket hounds her to woriT 

Christmas Eva Gkhje needs some- 
one to teach her the meaning of 


ChristmmL Ester Gideon (Harry 
Dean Stanton), a Qmstmas »ng»T 
With Ins hard face and blank-eyed 
. convkf5 stare SUntons a remark- 
able case a t casting-against type,’ 
cutting what’s syrupy in the a oi> 

Mm^CmbyofThbNewYo^ 
Times on “White 

, As rtar vehictes gp, Taylor Hadc- 
fonfs film k an EdseL The only 
- ieason.16 buy it ■ — a compefling 
one— is Mikhail Baxydjmkov. , 

«vstar is Gregwy Hines, 3 great 4 
lap- dancer but not in Bary&hnir 
boy’s kt^oe as a film personality 1 , 
especially not with this kind of hi-' 
dicrous znahsriaL Baryshnikrfv. 
plays a Russian baBet star who de : 
fected oght years earlier and 5nd^ 
faimsdf back in the Soviet Umon 
when jet accidentally crash- 
lan&m SSberia. Himes plays a Har- 
]em-bom dancer "who, tEsaichanl- 
ed over Vktxotm. has defected to 
the Soviet Union and, after initial 
c el e bri ty, fifkte himself in Siberia 
with what looks, to be apermanenf 
travefing tap company of “Paigy 
and Bess.” An escape melodrama 
eventually ensues, only tolerable 
when Baryshnikov is on the screen. 


/l: \ 


• , i i 

1 ■*" I 

. iut> t 






animir 


. . 'UT«a| 

. ' r. Tr*' 

. : til# 


MBA 


Tbe MBA for latemathmal Executives 

Fordham University, New York , with Irish 
Management Institute invite applications from 
experienced executives for their AACSB accredited 
MBA. It commences 24 April 1986 in Dublin. 
Duration two periods of five months in 1986 and 
1987. Concentration is on international business. 

Write to 

MBA Program Director 

IMI, Dublin 16, Ireland. 

Telephone 353-1-983911 ' Telex Ireland 30325 


SANT LOUIS UNIVERSITY'S 

Madmd Campus 


COMPLETE CURRICULUM 
IN ENGLISH, SPANISH 

Liberal Arts, Business 
Science, Hispanic Studies •* 

JULY SESSION INCLUDES: 
Graduate P ro gram in 
Hispanic Studies 

APPLY NOW FOR JANUARY 

INFORMATION: 

Cafte de la Wia, 3 
M adrid 23003 SPAIN. 

Td. (91) 233-2032/ 233-2313, 


LEAftN AND LIVE TM mKH LANOUAOC - 

m edm <rtd idySc svrrounings near Mor^e Caria. 
Caod’Aj.ahtcHimr.a^nawtdtargic/haAaKtp&veK. 
CBKIH MfiXTBSANtei trfiUDB HEANQABB oRas 33 

' i Jk yewtlli^»ilwW<ei»y»W)w^o{qiaaiiiiiwrj of. 
9 X fmvk lo tut yeur profanonci or eubrd needs. Sncf gmps. 4ltr 

I^^MakcauweatiogeaitiimritLCsBattatqMsaMlArary 
oreovaloMe »o gtiderti ajpavaed by a pe fca pr 
■not 1952 BroA u i wrth wr e ineri fe«. done a *di hood aid lodging 

CBITRE MfeTTBlRANto DTTUDES FRANCAI5B 
06320 Cap <f AH (Franco). 

Td.: 93T8.21 J59 - Telex; CEMH) 461 792 F 


YOU WANT 
TO SPEAK GOMAN? 
...SPEAK TO US FIRST 



Goethe-lnstitut 


Mart than 3 million ttudonh in 33 years 
146 irvtituttf in 66 cawntrief 
e. g. SMGAPORE, TeL 33751 1 1 
ATLANTA, Tel. 8922388 
IZMIR, Tel. 141636 

15 institutes in the Federal Republic of Germany 


For de t a R ed information; 

GOEne-wsmur 

Zentidvacwaltifnfl 
Lenbachfriatz 3 
D-8000 MOachea 2 
Td. JO) 89-5999-200 
Telex: 522940 



/ . / 


A//, 
/ / / 
/ / . / 
















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24, 1985 


ARTS / LEISURE 



j wgmm 


w^ff*"** 



EXpt^JSIVE BOUQUET ■ — This watercoJor of the Amaryllis Josephine is one of 468 
^faction pa intin gs in a 16-volume set of botanical fflnstraiions painted for Napoteon’s Empress 




*' rrtJt bTEjty Josfp imetiMtgas auctioned for $55 nriffion Wednesday atSotbeby ’sin New YortTbe 


« ii 


n-tnias* 


«r- ' 0 f watercoiors in “Les UEactes,” bought by W. Graham Arader, a New York dealer, were 

painted by the Belgian-born artist Pierre-Josepb Redootd, who was coart painter to Marie 
Antoinette before the French Revolution and worked for Josephine after die revolution. 
He recorded flowers from her gardens on veUumfrom 1&)2 to 1816. The price for the 320- 
r pound set was a record fora book sold in the United States, a Sotheby’s spokesman said. 

Dud Works 'Attributed’ to Gericault 
Clutter an Otherwise Singular Sale 



mv 


I* LAMS 




A* 

• w b;e Vfc 1 

■ • •• xliii 

■ ■ "u. :: Hi , 


International Herald-Tribune 

L ONDON — The thirst for 
/ wades of ait ham private cob 
lections that have long been hidden 
away found a spectacular expres- 
sion last week when a group of 
{huntings, drawings and litho- 
graphs by Thtodore Gericault was 
auctioned at Christie's. Some 
pieces reached phenomenal prices, 
such as £1.46 mflHon (including 
s^es charge) for (he painting called 
•*Bnst of a Negro.” 

Hus would nave been inconcehr- ' 
able had it not been for the prove- 
nance — a Swiss collection — and 


‘.I.S.'.C.Tjj 

fc,*;,SOUREN- MeT.TKIA N 

" w H V — — : — : 


« Mrestiefl 


•;.l 




•: va :ec 
fe 

'• 'M-T- 

~ n =ac: 
.iri r. 

— ’‘ vel 

- '•:::.V2i2£ 
: • ■■•-.aii 
:: i ass- 

■ • 

* : xj r 
•- Jwt 
r a 


1 jtM >NLSBCRT 


I t«*« 
OVE! 


A" 

* p* f 

Pi4*i 



for the surprise effect created by 
pictures last seen in 1953 at the 
Gericault exhibition in Winterthur. 
Vet Hans Eduard BOhler did not 
s(and out as a remarkable collector 
par the painting as a best seller. ■ 
_JBohler, who was bom in -1893 
3fld;died- in 1967, came from a. 
Yftnterthur family of textile pro- 
ducers. He developed two passions 
fjj.a boy: horseback-riding — as a 
^avaliy officer, he was a brilliant 
show-jumper and rode for Switzer- 
land at the 1924 Olympics — and 
drawing. He infuriated his father 
by spending 1916 in Bedin study- 
ing drawing and engrav ing mirier 
Lovis Corinth. 

~M the end of World War I, hav- 
ing married an heiress and joined 
his family’s company after all, 

dp a fev^G&icaufts — a horse 
painter if ever there was one. An 
auction in 1938 is said to have had 
a decisive effect on his collecting 
urge. Unfortunately, however, 
bfihler did not have a discriminat- 
ing eye for authenticity, 
i Even after son* weeding out by 
ie’s experts, the collection of- 
in London included a handful 
^remarkable works by the artist, a 
number uodisputably by him but 
not so remarkable, and several “at- 
tijbmctT-to Gericault - 
r-Il must be said in. fairness to 





w --- -:rN' 




f\- *■ 


ft***'* 



tbm the question of author- 
ip is by no means always a trans- 
parent one. Chris tie’s catalogs 
produced entries that are master- 
nieces of noncommittal diplomacy, 
^rm gfng is the multiple mad often 
contradictory opinions of dealers 
dnd scholars. Commenting on an 
[attributed^ portrait of a child, the 
Jataloger observed: “Dubaot and 
Nathan proposed this as an early 
york of Giricault, possibly a copy 
after van Dyck. The idea has been 
Questioned by Grunchec while 
Eitner also has reservations, but 
does not reject out of hand the 
posabOitv that it could be auto- 
graph." Whoever it may be by, the 
portrait is good. A bidder carried 
off the riddle for £5.940. 
tCMare disturbing were the copies 
in. the collection. The ‘•attributed” 
gain ting of an officer on a rearing 
rse, considered by Pierre Dubaut 
d Peter Nathan to be a sketch for 
picture in the Louvre that is one 

of G&icault’s most famous paim- 
igs, is rejected by PhOippe Gnm- 
. Lorenz Fi trier calls A “an old 
A buyer gambled to die tone 
8,640, quadrupling Christie's 
estimate. 

Such a context could have 
the better wades. One of 

__ s experts is said to . have 
offered the sale and to have 
'erlmeri ft, partly because of the 


Portrait of child, its origin 
disputed, sold for £5,940. 

huge reserve prices requested by 
the B Ohler famil y, but the.cumber- 
some presence of so many “attrib- 
uted" rinric must also have weighed 
in his decision. Thai' Christie’s 
overcame tins handicap was no 
mean feat. 

Most remarkable is the fact that 
£1.46 milli on should have been giv- 
en for a portrait that is admirably 
but uncommercial by all accepted 
standards. The “Bust of a Negro" 
represents a man identified by 
some experts as a model for G6ri- 
cault named Joseph. It is painted in 
a dark color scheme — the black 
face of the man, seen bead and 
shoulders, is faintly lighted on the 
left and set against a blackish- 
brown background. The expression 
is one of despair and helplessness 
— the bloodshot eyes appear to be 
those of aside man. Commercially, 
sadness is not a good point 

Worst of all. the condition is not 
as good as one might hope. Exam- 
ining the surface under blue light, 
one could see a small hole and an 
irregular crack in the paint surface 
that had been filled in. In the 
coarse of a relatively recent refin- 
ing, the paint surface has been 
slightly ground into the new can- 
vas. It now misses something of the 
original liveliness of the brush- 
work. This.is a masterpiece that 
will appeal only to a great connois- 
seur or, more fikety, some major 
museum in the muting — and, at 
that price, there are not many left. 
Eugene Thaw, the New York dealer 
who bid for it, is unlikely to have 
bought it for stock. 

The second highest price at the 
auction, £540,000, was paid for a 
small study on paper laid on can- 
vas, 20 by 29 centimeters (8 by 1 1 
inches). Proportionately, that price 
is phenomenal. The scene, showing 
meaiin the nude or half nude, strug- 
gling to control rearing horses, has 
all me qualities Giricauh — the 
movement, the tension conveyed 
by the effort of the bodies thrust 
backwards and by the threatening 


Collector's Guide 


A DAS BIBLIOPHILE 
S/ff EREIGNIS ZUM 

I flp 200. TODEStAG 

17. AUGUST 1786 

Friedrich der Grosse: 

Das Palladion 

Lirairiem nuineriene Lcdcrband- 
Sonderausgabe im Schuber 
(wclrwcir max. 999 Exemplars) 

Band I: 

Faksimiie des Exklunvhandes 
(1750) mir den 18 Knpfeisdcbco, 
die derKonig 

zum Teil selbst skizzien hat 
Band □: 

Deutsche Obenecung mir omfang- 
rdcbem Rommentar tmd Gtassar 
Zusammen im Schuber 
(Format 24 a 31 cm) 






Fordem Sie den ausfhhrlicben Farb- 
prospekt mit Bcstellkarce bdm 
Heausgeber an: 

Prof. Dr. Jurgen Ziechmann 
Pete r-H enlein-S tr. 72. 2800 Bremen 33 


antiques 


MHS-CHMVdaMAKS 

SALON DES 

ANTIQUAIRES 

22 NOV.-r DEC. 

. HJtWfe 

ICOl£ 
miutare 

TJ-J. : tl H/20 H 
: 10 H/20 H 



17 th PARIS 
ANTIQUE 


DECEMBER “7-1 B 1 985 


24-30 QUA1 D’AUSTERLITZ 
75013 PARIS 

From tl am to S pm 
Thursday until 11 pm 
Saturday-Sunday 10 are. co B pm 


FOR SALE 

cent coDecdon of 
ked Stamp Replicas 


in 


Hall Marked Stamp ilepucaa 

Solid Gold (91.66%), Solid SUver (95-84), 
Solid Sterling Silver (0.925). 

" Strictly limited i«ue of tbeae sets. Private sale. 
Owner wishes lo sell estize collection: 

ie; 25 yeare Crowning Glory, 

The Marriage of die Prince of Wales 
and Lady Diana Spencer, 29 July 1981, 

■ lSOlh Railway Anniversary and many more. 

As seen in die British National Postal Museum. 

. ’ Please write your interest tod. Box 03420 L, 

C8T, -$3 Long Acre, London WC2B 9JH, F . n ^a n d- 


Carnegie Show Stands Out Among Internationals 


By John 

Nr* York 71 


yellow light. But the price paid by 
the Loudon dealer Walter Goetz, 
also presumably on of a mil- 
lionaire collector or an institution, 
is unprecedented fra such a small 
study by a 19th-century painter. 

The greatest surprise, however, 
was the £356,000 given for “Le 
Giaour” (21 by 24 centimeters), 
making it the most expensive wa- 
tercolorever. It is an Illustration for 
Byron's poem (“giaour” is Turkish 
fra ‘Infidel") describing a Chris- 
tian rebel in Turkey. 

He wound dong but ere he pass'd. 
One glance he snatch'd, as if his last. 
A moment check’d fas wheeling 
steed, 

A moment breathed him from his 
speed. 

The rider, raising his clenched 
fist as he looks back restraining his 
horse, is dramatically lighted by a 
ray of moonlight from a cluster of 
heavy black clouds. The composi- 
tion, however wefldone, borders on 
kitsch. 

In the rirf iw rit u tnfw one may 
wonder why the superb painting of 
a rearing horse on paper laid on 
canvas made only £183,000. Com- 
pared with the previous prices, this 
is not a lot for a remarkable study 
of the subject in which Gfericault 
excelled most It was the first im- 
portant piece in the sale; perhaps 
buyers had not warmed up during 
the procession cf uninteresting or 
dubious works that opened the pro- 
ceedings — many of them selling 
extremely well for what they were: 
£85,000 fra an equestrian portrait 
of Marie de Medici, after Rubens, 
which had been estimated at 
£27,000 to £35,280. is simply crazy. 


Russell 

Nem Vtfflk Service 

P lITTSBURGH — The 49th 
Carnegie International Exhibi- 
tion has not been rivaled by any 
international exhibition of its kind 
in this visitor’s experience. 

Remembering the student dem- 
onstrations, the unauthorized re- 

hanging in the middle of the night, 
the open hostility between one 
country and another and the bitter- 
ly disputed prize givings that have 
been the mu* of this or that open- 
ing since the end of World War II, 
what was going on in Pittsburgh 
was hard to credit. In a troubled 
world, the Carnegie International 
of 1985 seemed to have been 
launched in an atmosphere of mul- 
tinational harmony. Fra this, credit 
is due to John R. Lane, director of 
the Carnegie Institute Museum of 
Art; to his curator fra contempo- 
rary art, John Caldwell; and to the 
international committee they in- 
voked. 

As to the prize winners — the 
West German painter Anselm 
Kiefer and the American sculptor 
Richard Sera — they could almost 
be said to have nominated them- 
selves. It would have been very dif- 
ficult, fra instance, fra any sculp- 
ture inside the Carnegie Institute 
Museum of Art to match the im- 
:i of Richard Sena's 40-fooi- 
( 12-meter) weathering steel 
aegie,” which stands just out- 
side the from door on . a middle 
ground between museum and 
street. 

Whereas the Sena sculpture 
stands tall, both figuratively and 
literally, the show’s painters, sculp- 
tors and solitary representative of 
video an have to face a tumultuous 
promiscuity. The Ham Galleries 
in the museum are neither few nor 
small, and every attempt was mart* 
to accommodate the 41 strongly 

rharartftriwttt and often mutually 
incompatible contributors with 
some semblance of fairness. But 
this was an exhibition in which art- 
ists gave not only their best but 
their biggest This sometimes led to 
trouble. 

Brice Marden, for instance, is a 
painter whose work has a plain 
grandeur and a fundamental stabil- 
ity that call for «thn and s tillness in 
its surroundings. When it is hung 
aslant of an tmaallatinn that has 
Georg Baselitz on one side and 
Francesco Gemeaie on the other, it 
might as well be back where it came 
from. No one ever called Julian 
Schnabel unassertive, but even one 
of his very large paintings had trou- 
ble beating bade the outsize and 
caricatural painted bronze beads of 
representative Florentines by Mar- 
kus Lflpertz that had been set out 
in front of it. 

Conceivably it was better to be in 
the think of things than to be 
tucked away, like Ellsworth Kdly, 
in comers no less disadvantageous. 
Even so, there were, quite justifi- 



*A Citizen of Florence,*' by Marfctts Lupertz. 


ably, some long faces among the 
contributors, even if they eame to 
realize that there was “nothing per- 
sonal" about it. Besides, much of 
the work is by its nature aggressive, 
and well able to fight for itself. It 
could also be argued that the 
chance to see SO much ambitio ns 
work in one place was more impor- 
tant than the search fra optimum 
conditions in which to see iL 

Perhaps it was Per Kirkeby. a 
Danish painter bom in 1938. who 
in his catalog essay c*me nearest lo 
defining the timely fascination of 
this show. ‘There are times when 
American qualities are indispens- 
able and others when the European 
dead-weight is suddenly worth that 
weight in gold. There were the ’60s 
and there is now. There are great 
fluctuations, and there is your own 
biology. Remarkably often, the two 
thjng s go well together. So, each 
thing to its own time." 

What we witness in Pittsburgh is 
a moment in art at which the old 
world and the new are for once in 
equilibrium. That equilibrium 


owed primarily to artists, bran be- 
tween 1932 and 1953, who are in 
the middle of something, not near 
the end of something. It is to this 
as much as to anything else, that 
this International owes both its ex- 


hilarating quality and the atmo- 
sphere of trust 'and harmony in 
which (he committee would seem 
to have worked. 

There were some welcome diver- 
gences from the standard interna- 
tional road show of contemporary 
an. If Lucian Freud, at 63 the old- 
est contributor to the show, has 
never quite been accepted in the 
United States, it may be because 
what be has to say both about hu- 
man nature and about the proper- 
ties of paint is loo intransigent, too 
naked and loo poignant. Be thai as 
it may, the group of his paintings in 
Pittsburgh is about as good as it 
could be, and it includes the (for 
him) very large painting called 
“Large Interior W 1 1 (after Wat- 
teau)," which is both an echo of a 
famous Watteau in the Thyssen 
collection and a portrait of five 
young people in the tumbledown 
part of London that Freud has 
made bis own. No less tenderly 
than Watteau does Freud portray 
the fugitive nature of first youth, 
the inevitability of oncoming hurts 
and the state of abstracted reverie 
in which very young people often 
huddle together. 

There are other surprises in the 
show, which can be seen through 
Jan. 5. 1 enjoyed especially die 
three-screen video installation by 
Dara Bimbaum, which goes on its 
quietly hypnotic way despite all the 
rackety images around iL There is 
also much to savor in the contribu- 
tions of Sol LeWiu, Neil Jenney, 
Jan Dibbets and Howard Hodghin, 
who are so completely themselves 
that we cannot imagine them get- 
ting into a competitive frame of 
mind 

Halfway through the exhibition, 
and after we have taken a great deal 
of chromatic buffeting, a large 
white room is given over to Kiefer 
and Robert Ryman. No pairing 
could be more mutually beneficiaL 
The white radiance of Ryman, so 
subtly inflected, ideally sets off the 
huge, densely worked images of 
Kiefer. (The prize-winning paint- 
ing, “Midgard," measures 12 feet 


by 20.) It is the achievement of 
Kiefer that when face to face with 
his work we are forced to rethink 
not only the history of punting but 
the history of humankind. Other 
living painters have addressed that 
possibility in a frantic, antic way. 
Kiefer's paintings look by compari- 
son as if the lapsed ages of the past 
had gone into their kneading. 


In the museum’s permanent col- 
lection, no more than a pace or two 
away from the International, there 
is a wall p ainting by Mel Bochner 
called “Syncline" (1981). Strong in 
color and festive in its deportment, 
it has a propulsive air, as if it were 
jumping a fence on its way to some- 
where imponanL Looking at it, we 
add Bodmer’s name to the list erf 
those who might well have been in 
the International. 

As it happens, Bochner. like 
Philip Pearlstein, Andy Warhol 
and Jonathan Borofsky. is an alum- 
nus of Pittsburgh's Carnegie-Mel- 
lon University. The university art 
gallery, directed by Elaine A King, 
has organized through Dec. 22 an 
exhibition of Bodmer’s work over 
the past 12 years. It begins with the 
gravity and austerity of the char- 
coal drawings of 1973, in which 
Bochner first tested the potential of 
plain black shapes that could be 
triangles, squares or pentagons. 
Without ever quite discarding that 
point of depanure, he went on to 
thicken the plot, consistently and 
year by year. Now acrobatic and 
aerial, now dense and imploded, 
ihe shapes were cried out in tex- 
tures of every kind, from the virtual 
transparency of man y of the “rico- 
chet drawings” of 1931 to the re- 
cent works done with oil and enam- 
el on paper. 

The Bochner retrospective is di- 
vided between the university an 
gallery and the Hewlett Gallery in 
the College of Fine Arts, a shore 
walk away. In the catalog. King 
and Charles Stuckey do a fine job 
of eluddation. 


AUCTION SALES 


HERVE CHAYEITE 

AUCTIONEER 
12, RUE ROSSINI, 75009 PARIS, TEL (I.) 47.70.5S.89 



Selection ofJeweUery 
Objets de vertu 

19th and 20th century European fine gold boxes (French, 

Swiss, Russian, etc.) with enamels, miniamres or precious stones. 
Works hv Faberge including animals, 
mmtamre furniture, frames, jewels, boxes, etc 

Antique silverware . 

PARIS NOUVEAU DROUOT 

ROOM 7- THURSDAY DECEMBER 57H AT 9 P.M 

EXPERT: M DE FOHMEHVALiLT. 

Private viewing: by appointment Public viewing: HOid Drouou room “. 
Wednesday December -uh. from 1 1 am. to b pjn. 
and at Jansen boutique 4, me Roy ale 7500 s Paris 
from Tuesday November 26ih 10 tusday December 3rd. 

Modem art 

Collection of Mr. and Ms. M_ 

Vases and furniture by GalK, 100 items. 

Ait deco 

Furniture by Pierre Ohareau. Partial property of Grand Hotel de Tours. 

Modem paintings 

Drawings and paintings by Bauchant, Derain. Max Ernst, Foujita, 
Hayden, Marcoussis. Picasso, Renoir, \'ej-ras5aL- 

PAR1S NOUVEAU DROUOT 

ROOM 7 -FRIDAY DECEMBER 13THAT 9P-M. 

EXPERT: Mr.JEANPlERRE CAMARD 

12. RLE DE LA GRANGE BATEUE2E, “5009 PARIS. TEL U 1 -i2.36.3j.74 
Prime viewing: bj appointment. Public viewing: H6tef Drouot. room i 
Friday December 13th from I! aan. to 6 pan. . = 


M® J.-J. MATHIAS 

Auc&onen 

19. Rue AmpArs. 75017 PARIS 
TL 46227025. TK: Drwol 642260. 


M e Y.-M. LE ROUX 

AuOtonwr 

18. Rue de la Grange«afei*e. 75009 PARIS 
Tl: 4770.e3.00. Tl*.: Drourt 642260. 


HOTEL DROUOT - PARIS 

Thursday, December 1 2, at 9 p.m. — Rooms 1 & 7 
COLLECTION OF M e Oaude-Henri LEVY and of various art lovers 

IMPORTANT MODERN PAINTINGS 

Mainly by- BONNARD, COMMERE, DUNOYER de SEGONZAC, PRJESZ, 
COERG. GROMA1RE, LEVY-OHURMER, MARCHAND. PASCtN, RENOIR. 
RODIN. ROUAULT. TOULOUSE-LAUTREC. VALADON. VUILLARD. 

Expert: 

M. J.-C. BELLI Eft, Expert of the Cour d'Appel of Paris 
32, Avenue PHfrre-l^-de-Sefteie, 75008 PARIS. Tel.= 47.20.19.13. 
ond 10/35 Madison Avenue. NEW YORK 1 0021 . TeLs (21 2) 249 03 33. 

Correspondent in Switzerland: Mrs. Isabelle MOSER. 

15, Cheftfn des Chevfehet, CH 1243 PRESfrtGE (Gen**). Tel.: (022^9.1525. 

PuUc viewing: Wednnda), December 11, 1965, from 1 1 sjn. to 6 pun. and from 9 
p-m. ro 11 pjn., Thursday, December 12, from 1 1 ojn. to 6 p.m. 

Previous exhibition at Mr. Better's fiouiei Tuesday, December 3, 1985, from 5 p.m. to 
8 pM. and firom Wednesday, December 4 M Monday, December P, from 10 wn. to 
1 2 ond from 2:30 p-m. to 6 p.m. (Closed Safurdoy ond Suidoy.) 

Catalog on rmCfuwrit SCO. 


INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 

I — Andre et Berthe NOUFFLARD 

DEUX PEINTRES itMOINS D'UNE EPOQUE 
1910 - 1970 

Documents sur Madame LANGWEIL et la famille HALEY Y 

8 NOVEMBRE - 8 DECEMBRE 1985 
MUSEE THIERS 27 Place Saint Georges Paris 9' 

Tous les jours I0h-12h / 14 h-18 h sauf Lundi matin 


MUSEE MARMOTTAN 

2, rue Louis Boilly PARIS 1 6th 

Andres de SANTA MARIA 

(1860-1945) 

November 20 1 985 - January 15 1 986 
1 0 a.m. - 6 p.m. closed on Monday 


GALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

_ 6, Roe Jean-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 43.59.82.44 , 


27 novexnbre - 8 janvier 


Amulf Rainer 


Galerie Maeghc Lelong 

13-14, rue de Teheran. Paris 8* 


BERNHSM JEUNE — 

83, Fbg. St.-Honore 
27, Avenue Motignon 8* 

Tel: 4266.6 031 and 4246.65.03 

Eleanor 

KING 


. urrtl December 4 . 


r = WA11Y FINDLAY =1 

Galleries International 

new yoric - Chicago - pdm beach 
beverly hiUs - pars 

2 Ave. Motignon - Paris 8lh 

T«L: 42J5J0.74. Malay dm. uihmSay 
10 tun. to 1 pjn. - 2 130 1* 7 pjn. 

EXHIBITION 

BOURNE 

Permanent exhibition of 
ADAMOfT, ARDtSSONE, AUGE, 
BOUDET, CANU, CASSIGNEUl, 
CHAURAY, DUCAIRE, EJTEL, FAB1EN, 
GALL, GANTNER, GAVEAU, 
GOftRm, HAMBOURG, HERBO, 
ROME, KLUGE. LE PHO, MA1K, 
MIQ1EL-HB4RY, MflJNKOV, NESSI, 
NEUOUHMAN, S3JRE, 5JMBARI, 
THO MAS, VIGNOLES, VO L1ET. 

A. VIDAW5UADRAS: Portraits 
BALAR1N: Sculptures 

Hofei George V - 47 J3.54.00 
31 Ave. George-V - Paris 8th 

Mlln.rr.lOjaiiA-1 (u>-UOI>«|ui 

Irak* and Mon** 7 hi 9 pjn 


XIII* EXPOSITION 

"MAITRES 
[IMPRESSIONNISTESl 
ET 

MODERNES" 



du 7 novembre 
au 14 decembre 

Beraud, Calder, Cesar. Chagall, 
Fautrier, Gauguin, Hfilion. Henner, 
Jongkind, Klee, Laurens, Liger, 
Lepine, Marquet. Matisse, Matta, 
Metzinger, Monlezin, Picasso. 
Stael, Utrillo, Vuillard. 

Catalogue upon request 10 j 

daniel 

malingue 

26, avenue Maiignon 
75008 PARIS 
Tel.: (1) 42.66.60.33 


AMSTERDAM 


ADTOGR DE BARBIZON 


Boudin 

Conn 

Courbet 

Daubigny 


Diaz 

Dupre 

Harplgniev 

Hervier 


Jacque 

Jongkind 

LCpine 

Michel 


Riche I 
Rousseau 
Tnivun 
Vtilhm 


Gebr. Douwes Fine Art 
1805-1985 
jubilee exhibition 
fromnavember!8thro^ 


Rokin 46. Amsterdam C. 
Opening hours: 
weekdays 10 am to 5 pm 
Sundays 1pm to 5 pm 


LONDON 

fr= MATTHIE5EN FINE ART « 
7-8 Moson's Yard, Duke Sr, 
Sr. fame's, London, S.W.l. 
01-930.2437. 

VARUN in BRITAIN 

1955-57 

L November 14 - December 20. 
s Monday - Friday 10-6 p.m. =Jj 


AGNEW GALLERY 

43 Old Bond St, London, W1 . 
01-629 6176 

OLD MASTER DRAWINGS 
AND SCULPTURE 

Until 20 December 
Mon-Fri 9:30-5:30; Thura. unfU 6:30. 


PARIS /NEW YORK 


ZABRISKIE 

WILLIAM 

ZORACH 

724 Fifth Ave, New York 

PHOTOS 

SURREALISTES 

37 rue Quincampoix, Paris 








Page 8 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



After 22 Wasted Years, Testing Continues 


Published With The New York Times and IV Wuhlngtoa Poet 


Something to Build On 


A Spirit of Geneva 

Not a bad two days’ work in Geneva. After 
years of bitter nam e-c alling and sterile com- 
bat, the leaders of the Soviet Union and the 
United States decided that they really needed 
a more respectful relationship. After hoars of 
spirited debate. President Reagan and Mikhail 
Gorbachev attest that, much as they deplore 
each other’s military buildups, they share an 
interest in controlling the arms race and re- 
straining their other rivalries. Nothing start- 
ling there; these conclusions merely ratify the 
altitudes of their predecessors. Yet both men 
judged this to be progress, which makes it so. 

On the central issue of arms control they 
did little more than reiterate sharp disagree- 
ments about space-based defeases. Yet the 
decision to meet again next year and in 1987 
offers at least a chance to “accelerate” the 
negotiations. Many more high-level contacts 
will be needed to break through to significant 
arms reductions. But the atmospheric gains in 
Geneva look to be more than momentary. 

Mr. Gorbachev, who is likely to lead the 
Soviet Union for the foreseeable future, certi- 
fies that the president whom Moscow so often 
vilifies as a mortal enemy is actually a rational 
competitor interested in rules of restraint. And 
Mr. Reagan, the most stridently anti-Commu- 
nist president since World War IT testifies that 
no amount of evil in the Soviet system should 
discoura ge Americans from pursuing their in- 
terests in negotiation and compromise. Marga- 
ret Thatcher was right: Conservatives can do 
business with Mr. Gorbachev. 

Thai toms back the dock, at least to 1980. 
The hostilities uncorked by Soviet actions in 
Afghanistan and Poland and by Ronald Rea- 
gan’s rqection of the SALT-2 arms treaty have 
Dot been forgotten, but they are dedared to be 
history. American and Soviet society both 
stand to gain from this diplomatic revival. 

Mr. Gorbachev commits a new generation 
of Soviet leaders to coexistence and better 
relations with America. Thai puts a premium 
on defusing crises abroad, if only to focus on 
domestic development Mr. Reagan invests his 
peat popularity in a course that could liberate 
Amec can politics from his initial unrelenting 
psychological and economic warfare against 
the Soviet Union. Both governments have in- 
deed made a “fresh start.” And both leaders 
are likely to stick to that track, because it 
promises them political profit. 

The Soviet leader, only eight months in 
office, has quickly made hims elf the equal of 
an American leader who prizes national 
strength. As the man who matched wits with 
Mr. Reagan and wQl do so again in America 
□ext June, Mr. Gorbachev acquires new au- 
thority in the Kremlin. And as Mr. Reagan 
recognized in his rush to report to Congress 
Thursday night, the president has robbed the 
Democrats of the peace issue and wQl look for 
dividends in his struggles over legislation and 
for control of the Senate next year. 

None of this guarantees early progress on 
arms control A fghanistan or Nicaragua. The 
institutionalized suspicions that drive Soviei- 
American rivalries will not yield to fireside 
civility or clever arguments. But conflicting 
views of national interest can be redefined 
over time, if the heads of government press 
their bureaucracies toward that end. 

The chances are great that if Mr. Reagan 


awakes this morning to an alarming report 
about a new Soviet missile, he will resist de- 
nouncing Mr. Gorbachev as a cheat and in- 
stead make a personal plea for a satisfactory 
exp lanatio n. The chances are, too, that if a 
U.S. bomber strays over Soviet territory. Mr. 
Gorbachev will fire off a private complaint 
instead of a missile. That is the spirit of Gene- 
va. and it is something to build on. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A New Civility 

It was at the least a civil summit Whatever 
differences were expressed in their long ses- 
sions alone, in public President Reagan and 
General Secretary Gorbachev were at pains to 
display restraint and amiability. A hint of 
frustration seemed to touch Mr. Gorbachev’s 
remarks at bis press conference on Thursday. 
And Mr. Reagan acknowledged to Congress 
Thursday night that he had paid Mr. Gorba- 
chev "the tribute of candor.*” Yet, mi the 
surface, cordiality and forbearance reigned. 

There is always the risk, in these summit 
extravaganzas, that the chemistry will go sour 
or that differences will widen into misunder- 
standing or worse. By this standard it would 
have been enough Tor the president to come 
home cloaked in an aura of relief that re lati ons 
had not worsened, in fact, both leaders said 
that something more positive was achieved in 
the way of mutual understanding and that a 
political impulse was given to arms control 
That two more s ummi ts are in the offing is 
reassuring. Much can be said for a subdued 
and steady approach to Soviet-American rela- 
tions. especially when the gap in formal posi- 
tions and in leaders' perspectives is so broad. 

Still a thinness of tangible results is notable. 
The e xchang es and humanitarian relief and 
other items were something, but the summit 
did not produce agreement even on the full list 
of lesser bilateral accords that had earlier been 
described as fit for Geneva sanction. Nor was 
there public sign of any decision on the large 
arms control issues or on the regional disputes 
that lie at the heart of Soviet-American rivalry. 

For Mr. Gorbachev, one can guess that his 
failure to stop the Strategic Defense Initiative, 
which the Kr emlin had characterized as his 
chief summit concern, had something to do 
with his readiness to paint as successes the less 
tangible, atmospheric modifications. At his 
press conference he insisted that damming the 
door on the SDI was the continuing Soviet 
condition for “radical** cutbacks in offensive 
arms. Still the final joint statement recorded 
his agreement to seek “early progress” in “ar- 
eas where there is common ground.” The “ar- 
eas” named exclude (he Soviet priority of 
space arms but include the American priorities 
of deep cuts in offensive strategic arms and an 
interim accord on missiles in Europe. 

Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger 
and some others had urged Mr. Reagan not to 
trade away the SDI or to extend the controls of 
SALT-2. Mr. Reagan evidently did not. But it 
seems premature to conclude that “Weinber- 
ger won" on arms control or that the perfunc- 
tory language in the joint statement on region- 
al issues means there are no chances for 
restraint there either. The deepening of consul- 
tation could turn out to be important. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


N EW YORK — Perhaps the first significant 
nuclear arms control achievement was the 
Limited Test Ban Treaty, negotiated in July 1963, 
ratified by the U.S. Senate in September and 
taking effect on Oct. 10 of that year. 

President Kennedy signed the treaty on Oct. 7 
and set out later that month on a tour of the 
American West Ostensibly he was visiting conser- 
vation projects; in fact, as any assiduous reporter 
could learn, the trip was designed as a sort of pre- 
campaign swing before the election year 1964. 

He was in a period of declining popularity and 
his trip was not at first a great success. Crowds 
always turn out to see a president, but experienced 
campaigners noted a lack of enthusiasm and a low- 
key response to his “conservation” speeches. 

In Great Falls. Montana. Mr. Kennedy partly 
dropped the guise of touring conservation projects 
ana talked about what the test ban would do — 
stop testing in outer space, under water and. most 
important, in the atmosphere. It would drastically 
luce the threat of nuclear fallout. The Great 
Falls audience responded with roars of approval 
At every remaining appearance, mostly in Re- 
publican and conservative states, Mr. Kennedy 
repeated and expanded his r emar ks about the test 
ban. Everywhere the response was enthusiastic. As 
he moved west, his trip began to take on something 
of the atmosphere of a campaign swing. 

for The New York Times. 


I covered that trip for 

Remember 
The Afghan 
Nightmare 

By Orrin G. Hatch 


By Tom Wicker 


When it was over 1 asked Pierre Salinger, the press 
secretary, and Kenneth O’Donnell one of Mr. 
Kennedy’s top political advisers, if the audience 
response to the treaty would cause the president to 
emphasize it in his re-election campaign. No doubt 
about it, both replied; the treaty would provide the 
cornerstone for a “peace issue” in 1964. 

Years later, Jerome Wiesner. who was Mr. Ken- 
nedy’s science adviser, told a Washington audience 
that the president had returned from his tour of 
conservation projects deeply impressed with the 
public enthusiasm for the limited test ban. Had he 
realized how popular such a treaty would be, Mr. 
Kennedy suggested, he ought have been able to 
mobilize the necessary public support for a com- 
prehensive test ban, stopping all-nuclear tests. 

Looking back, it seems tragic that he did not do 
so. Useful though it was, the limited test ban 
merely moved nuclear testing underground, where 
the two superpowers have staged hundreds of 
nuclear tests in the intervening years, as their 
arsenals have grown in numbers and destructive 
power. In. fact, the treaty, by ending the most 
obvious threat of fallout may even have reduced 
public demand for an end to testing. 

Yet in 1963, after negotiations that had begun in 
the ’50s, the two sides seem, to have beentantaliz- 


ingly dose to a M mprehra^= 
era nations were dennndmgscwm mui 
inspections within Soviet banlM accept 
compliance; the Soviet Umon^sw^g Kg’ 
no more than three such view of 

ence no doubt seemed vast then; t has 

an arms race that has grown out of ■" "gj ^ 
cost each of the sopepewejs rmtold an 

has degraded rather than «*aiwd £ 

eacCthe risks of compromise in 1963 appear to 


The Leaders 
TalkedPmt 
Each Other 

By Flora Lewis . 


G ENEVA — There were qo evi- ; !{« 
dent hitches at the Reagan- '' 
Gorbachev summit, and nobody ga p 



mg conunuea wwwioi . • 

of whatever new determination far as cotdd be told. 

bom in John Kennedy by those Western Despitea remarkable five hcurs'of j | i 

enthusiasm for the Limited Test Ban treaty. private taHs in ihepresoice only dJ -! J 3 II** 1 

weeks later T .ou another Weston jour* h Interpreters, each leads' said he vtes i*ir 



dead in Dallas. 22 years . .. 

Now President faagiahas : copduded 

withMkhaflGorbadwvmwiirchihar^pr^^d 

differences" on the control of nuclear weapons 
apparently were not overcome. 

Once again, as has been the case for moa of - 
years, no progress was made toward a “ssatjoaj" 
nuclear testing. It is not clear that the subject ws 
even discussed, although the Russians are m tM 
midst of a six-month test moratorium teal mt. 
Reagan has refused to enter. Testing will go on - 
The arsenals will continue to grow. 

The New York Times. 


sriH sure duct the other would 
around after thfnking over the : 
ble ideas he had offered So much for 
charm and persuatioo. 

That was no surprise. Summitry i& 


\um 


-M- "i 


The writer is a Republic 
senator from Utah. 


icon 


W ASHINGTON — A popular 
analogy applied to the Soviet 
war against the Afghan people is that 
A fghanistan is “Moscow’s Vietnam." 
That is superficially true. According 
to recent reports, the war has not won 
the wholehearted support of the Sovi- 
et people or even, as the high deser- 
tion rate suggests, from the soldiers 
sent to Afghanistan. In the sense that 
it is an unpopular war, Afghanistan 
can be said to be a “Vietnam.” But 
there the analogy ends. 

The Kremlin does not as a rule pay 
close attention to domestic public 
opinion. And. unlik e the war in Viet- 
nam. the one in Afghanistan is laige- 
iy hidden from the eyes of the world. 
These two factors make it possible for 
Babrak Kannal’s puppet regime to 
pursue its campaign to “Sovietize" 
Afghan society and to destroy the 
freedom fighters, the mujahidin. 

The mujahidin have two funda- 
mental strengths: the support of the 
majority of their counuymen and 
their own determination and raw 
courage. Poorly equipped and dis- 
organized at the outset, they have 
become increasingly effective. They 
control large areas of the countryside. 
The Soviet “limited contingent” has 
not been able to crush them. 

Moscow's strategy is not aimed at 
winning a military victory per se but 
at cutting off the mujahidin from 
their base of support by terrorizing 
the Afghan people. The systematic 
bombardment of villages drives thou- 



sands into the cities, where, presum- 
ably. Soviet forces can exercise great- 
er control The secret police is con- 
ducting a broad campaign to arrest, 
interrogate and torture people sus-. 
peeled of apposing the regime. 

A former officer of the security 
police has described the following 
types of torture: giving electric 
shocks, tearing out fingernails, pluck- 
ing out the beards of some prisoners, 
pressing mi the throats of prisoners to 
force them to open their mouths 
while the guards urinate into them, 
setting police dogs on detainees, rap- 
ing women in front of family mem- 
bers, and other vile acts. 

These axe more than “human 
rights violations.” What is happening 
is not only torture but genocide. 

Of the approximately 16 milli on 
Afghans in me country in 1980, an 
estimated one milli on have been exe- 
cuted or have starved to death since 
the Soviet invasion. According to a 
report by Afghan Aid, a charitable 


organization, about half a million Af- 
ghans are in danger of starvation. 
Some four million refugees — more 
than a quarter of the population — 
have fled to Pakistan and Iran. 

But the Afghan honor story has 
not penetrated Western conscious- 
ness, it has not entered our lives. This 
is one key difference between Af- 
ghanistan and Vietnam. As a recent 
study put it: “Vietnam was a high- 
tech television war; Afghanistan is 
one of those old-fashioned encoun- 
ters that take place in the dark." Tele- 
vision cameras are not allowed inside 
Afghanistan to film the children 
whose hands bave been blown off, or 
tbe tens of thousands of other muti- 
lated victims of tbe Kaimal regime: 

But this is no excuse for the 
de facto blackout by much of the 
world’s media. Some three milli on 
Afghan refugees have fled to Paki- 
stan. Each one has a stray to teQ. - 

Meanwhile, a far greater effort 
must be made to assist the freedom 


fighters hi their public information 
campaign. The $500,000 grant that 
the Uil Congress has approved for 
an Afghan media project, sponsored 
by the U.S. Information Agency, is a 
strain the right direction. 

This worthwhile initiative needs to 
be augmented by cither efforts. The 
newly established Radio Free Af- 
ghanistan, which broadcasts into Af- 
ghanistan far half an hour a day, 
should be upgraded and expanded. 
Mujahidin liaison offices should be 
established in cities' sad) as New 
York, Paris and Tqyfco to help raise 
money for the resistance fighters and 
to teD their story to the wood. 

Vietnam was foqg£r in Western 
Bring rooms ra the evening /news.:. 
Afghanistan is largely rat of sight, - 
out of mind. Sovietotgectives in the 
region have not changed. Arrests, tor- 
ture and executions continue unabat- 
ed. To ignore all this is to do a grave 
injustice to theAfghan people. 

The New York Times. 


Other Opinion 


They Didn't Avert Hieir Eyes 

President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader 
Mikhail Gorbachev did not avert their eyes 
from each other in their meeting at Geneva. 
The future of relations between the United 
States and the Soviet Union is bidden in the 
undisclosed contents of their private talks. In 
any case, we value the fan that the s ummi t was 
held and that they promised to continue their 
dialogue. It is a “fresh start." 

The joint statement says that both countries 
have set a goal of a 50-percent reduction in 
nuclear arms, but the two sides could not agree 
on the Strategic Defense Initiative. The world 
can only expect that the two leaders will make 
more efforts toward this goal as promised in 
their statement at the end of the summit. Each 
of the two countries is shouldering difficult 
domestic problems, and they have come under 
pressure from their allies to promote dialogue. 

— Asahi Shimbun f Tokyo). 

• 

Mr. Gorbachev is a realist; the main lesson 
of this summit is precisely that he has decided 
to accept differences and resume not only 
sustained dialogue but also much more active 


bilateral relations. The list of agreements made 
in conjunction with tbe summit gives the im- 
pression that the “grand detente" of the Brezh- 
nev-Nixon years is back again. 

The Soviet leader undoubtedly has tbe long 
term in mind. He can hope that the SDI, at 
least in its present conception, will not survive 
when the man who initiated it leaves the White 
House in three years. Meanwhile, though. Mr. 
Gorbachev took the risk of encouraging tbe 
hard-liners of tbe Reagan administration to 
think that their toughness paid off. 

For his part, although he made no substan- 
tial concessions. President Reagan bad to 
change his language, forget tbe “evil empire” 
and give credence to the sincerity of Mr. Gor- 
bachev’s desire for peace. 

— Le Mancie (Paris). 

It is hoped that the Middle East will figure 
prominently in exchanges in the near future in 
view or the urgent need to promote the peace 
process, the valuable contribution that both 
superpowers can undoubtedly make and the 
fact that the Middle East remains a possible 
area of U.S .-Soviet confrontation. 

— The Egyptian Gazette (Cairo). 


U Detente Is Back, Europeans Have Talking to Do 


FROM OUR NOV. 23 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: A Herculean Task in Panama 

PARIS — Hercules, says the mythological 
story, tore asunder two mountains and opened 
a passage between the Atlantic and the Medi- 
terranean. Thai was a good day’s work even 
for the greatest of Greek heroes, but there is a 
man on the Isthmus of Panama who is doing a 
work that may be redroned of even greater 
importance. Colonel George W. Goethals’ re- 
port on the progress of the P anama Canal is as 
impressive as the splendid Homeric line. The 
whole world watches the digging of this pas- 
sage between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, 
for it will mean the remaking, of the map of 
trade routes. The revelation that the opening 
of the canal may occur two or three years 
sooner [than the original target date of 1915] 
has given the world a kind of shock of pleasure 
— or of pain, according to the point of view. 


1935: Complaints From Old Soldiers 

PARIS — Another bonus march on Washing- 
ton was urged by Senator W illiam Gibbs Mc- 
Adoo at a meeting of 1.500 veterans in Los 
Angeles [on Nov. 22}. Senator McAdoo ex- 
horted the former soldiers to “stay with Con- 
gress until it passes a satisfactory bonus bOL 
You are soldiers and you must use military 
tactics to fight for adequate compensation. Go 
to Washington, by hundreds and thousands.” 
Meanwhile, a letter to the editor signed “Old 
Solgier,” from Riga, U-S.S.R., says: “I am 39 
years of ege, Wen serving 3 years in the Rus- 
sian army in this great war. 2 times woundei on 
Astrian from. Now I return to the home land 
Latvia and I have to serve on year moore in 
Latvian army and run along whit the younger 
and stronger ones. It's real misery as old 
wounds stfl trobel me. Life is no worth living.” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M.FOTSIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWLRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Puhiahtr 

Exeeuite Editor RENE BONDY Denny Pvbhiher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor RIC HARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISON5 Director cf Circulation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Dbeaor of Advertising Sale: 
International Herald Tribune, 1S1 Avenue Qarks-de-Ganlle. 92200 Nemfly-sor-Sdix; 

France. TeL: (I) 47.47.1165. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8051 
Dincteur de la publication: Writer N. Timer. 

Mttoagng Dir. Asia: Mriabn Gem, 24-34 Homes? Rd. Hate Katz TeL 5-285618 Tela 61170. 

Mooring Dir. UJi: Rctm MacKkfm. 63 Lang Acre. Lauhn WCL TeL 8364801 Tekx 262009. 

Gen. Mff. W. Germany; W. Imerbxh FfietMmr. 15. (fftoFrmkfrtihL TeL 1069)726755. Tbe. 416721. 

SA. au capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Nanterre B 732021126. Commission Peritaire No. 61337. 

U.S. subscription: $322 yearly. Stcond-ckm postage paid at Long Island City, N.Y. Ill 01. 

© 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. 



B ONN — The Geneva summit 
achieved the optimum of wfaai 
‘ possible within two days: 
basic relationship between the 
two superpowers is to be improved, a 
new phase of detente is to begin. 

Both sides have agreed that a nu- 
clear war cannot be won and most 
never be fought And they win not 
seek military superiority. 

This means the superpowers recog- 
nize that they are forced to cooperate, 
to move from a situation of mutual 
assured destruction to a stale rtf mu- 
tual assured security. Partnership in 
questions of security has become the 
unavoidable consequence of the 
deadly capabilities of both sides. 

Ronald Reagan arid Mikhail Gor- 
bachev nwiTit^ n their differing fun- 
damental positions; this was to be 
expected. But they are partners none- 
theless, and indispensable to each 
other when it comes to malting World 
Wax in impossible. 

Understandably enough, tbe com- 
plicated issues of arms control could 
not be resolved. And it remains to be 
seen how soon success-oriented nego- 
tiations can result from new instruc- 
tions to the negotiators. 

It is important, all the same, that 
negotiations on nuclear and space 
arms are to be accelerated with a view 
to accomplishing the tasks set down 
in the joint U.S.-Soriet agreement of 
Jan. 8, 1985. That package remains : 
tbe prevention of an arms race in 
outer space and its termination on 
Earth; limiting and reducing nuclear 
arms; enhancing strategic stebiHty. 

The idea of an interim solution for 
intermediate-range weapons — of 
particular importance and interest to 
us in Europe — is being considered 
by die United States. 

The complexity of the issues stem- 
ming from new technologies in weap- 
ons systems is unchanged. But if the 
good will expressed in Geneva can be 
preserved, there are better chances 
tor finding solutions in this area, too. 

The commitment to reach a gener- 
al and complete prohibition of chem- 
ical weapons and an eventual de- 
struction of existing stockpiles of 
such weapons is to be welcomed. Ef- 
forts to prevent the proliferation of 
chemical weapons to third countries 
have been reaffirmed. Equally wd-^ 
come is toe commitment to observe 
the nuclear nonproliferation treaty. 

But a question of great importance 
is going to be whether both sides can 
manage to renounce further deploy- 
ment cf nuclear weapons and space 
weapons, particularly anti-satellite 
weapons that will soon be ready for 
deployment. Otherwise, toe continu- 
ing arms race would rapidly endanger 
any results readied in Geneva. 

The talks at Geneva also dealt with 
Other issues of interest to third coun- 
tries. While one cannot but welcome 
toe agreement to exchange views on a 


By Willy Brandt 

The writer was chancellor of West Germany from 1969 to 1974. 
He is chairman of the Social Democratic Party. 


regular basis on regional issues, I am 
afraid that there has been very mod- 
est progress in this respect — maybe 
none at aJL This is a pity, far rapid 
progress an such issues would be in 
the interest of all concerned. 

We must continue to insist that 
world security is not just a military 
problem, but also economic and so- 
daL One can only hope that expert 
talks an regional issues will be held 
in a general spirit of cooperation 
and co-responsibility. 

Along similar lines, I would hope 


but the momentum must be used and 
some visible signals given now. Per- 
haps we in Europe have a str onger 
feeling for the urgency of a new wave 
of detente and cooperation because 
we are at the front line — in East and 
West — and fear that there is pre- 
cious little time left for removing toe 
threat from our territories. 

I hope we are not over-optimistic 
when we assume that without explicit 
reference to toe Anti-Ballistic Missfle 
Treaty and to the SALT-2 agreement 
in toe joint declaration, the two su- 


Perhapswein Europe have a stronger feeting for 
the urgency of a nmctmveof detente becausewe 
are at the front line — in East and West. 


that at an early stage others will be 
able to participate in specific pro- 
grams for environmental protection 
— a global task, as the joint state- 
ment correctly puts it 

In Europe we know from firsthand 
experience how important a regular 
and intensified dialogue at various 
levels can be. Agreements on cultur- 
al educational and scientific- techni- 
cal exchanges, as well as on specifics 
such as air traffic, can substantially 
contribute to reducing tensions and 
building confidmce between East 
and West And this would make a 

breakthrough cm disarmamen t easier . 

We need substantial progress soon. 
The fiill meaning of the Geneva sum- 
mit may not be revealed immediately, 


perpowers nonetheless agreed to con- 
tinue observing both. 

Even if there is good will on both 
sides to reach a verifiable disarma- 
ment agreement, new threats could 
undermine negotiating prospects. 
That is why I agree with those who 
prefer a freeze of nuclear and space 
weapons during negotiations. And 
that is why we insist on including 
those nuclear weapons deployed on 
or targeted against- European territo- 
ry from the very beginning. 

On toe basis of toei positive signals 
in Geneva, we must intensify tbe 
East-West dialogue among the small- 
er countries. They should not leave 
their fate to toe superpowers. 

The world does not belong to the 


superpowers alone. One important 
implication of the result of toe Gene- 
va meeting, is -not explicitly,' men- 
tioned in the joint statement: the tre- 
mendous impact that cooperation 
and dfeteate could have in economic 
toms, not onty for the superpowers 
butalso for die rest erf the.woim. lIie 
Third World should share in these 
benefits at least to some extent Mir- 
acle? could be achieved if only a few 
percentage points of the vastly exces- 
sive outlays for military 
could be used for worid 
• It also seems that toe 
to the. importance of resolving hu- 
manitarian cases m (be spirit of co- 
operation — brief as it is — may be 
an encouraging sign. 

Both leaders have gained a better 
understanding of each other. They 
have also decided to meet again m toe 
near future. This should give hope: 

In due course we may perhaps even 
see an agreement on deep cuts. That 
would be a revolutionary decision. 
However, I do not see how reactions 
could be deqp enough if both tides 
get involved in the deployment cf 
strategic defense systems. 

A great deal of work now needs to 
be done. Agreement on practical 
steps will not always be easy. But it. 
lodes as if the Geneva meeting has 
established a sound basis for further 
progress. Europe will have to make a 
considerable effort in supporting the 
initiatives that we are now expected 
to follow. This is a task for Europeans 
cm both tides -r- East and West . - 
- A bright future ties ahead if only, 
some moderate expectations can be 
fulfilled. The 198> Geneva summit 
may wdl have been the be ginning of 
success for generations to come. 

Los Angeles Times. . _ 


not a matter cf affection. For all toe 
White House talk about “personal - 
chemistry." it makes hole difference ' 
short of such an abrasive approach v 
that it leads to temper tantrums. And 

both Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev 

were determined lo be civil so they ' 
could announce that they had got - 
along very nicely, thank you, and 
looked forward to meeting again. 

They talked past each other, re- 
peating afl toe things that each has 
been saying for months now without 
any hmi of being ready to budge and . 
reach further for compromise. Amer- . 
ican officials say Mr. Reagan’s “star 
wars” program has put toe .United ’•■ 
States m a strong bargaining. po$i- - 
lion. But there is still no sign that the ( ,- 
president has any interest in bargain- • 

ing away even a period of restraint on 1 
his ebensbed project, and toe Soviet 
leader is adamant tom everything else * 
hinges an its remmoaxicHL 
At bis doting press conference, 
which he handled with smooth sdf- 
confideucc, Mr. Gorbachev gave a 
foretaste of toe theme Moscow win 
sound. Arms control is the center- 
piece of the. whole Soviet-American _ 
relationship, he said, and the issue is 
“survival or mutnri destruction.” 

If the United Stales goes aheid 
with the Strategic Defense Initiative, 
he insi$fed,./il w3T mean putting 
“weapons in space” and that would 
“stop. any. constraints on the arms 
race.” He said Mr. Reagan repeated 

again and a g ain that fit p lan was ' 
purely defensive, but Mr. Gorbachev 
replied.. “Are you going to tell your 
propfe dial you refuse to cut back on ■’ 
offensive wrapons? We are ready for - 
.a radical redaction In toe mountain 
of weapons if toe space door is shut.” 

Tins is a very strong argument, : 
particularly since Mr. Gorbachev 
suggested ht would go even beyond^ r 
his recent proposals to wind down 
toe arins-race if he fdt secure abom • 
space. Otherwise, he warned dryly. • 
without a tone of threat but with 
dctermnmtioii, “Soviet scientists add 
agencies” would act on instructions 
tiiey have received to build a counter- 
forcc (hat ' would be effective, less 
costly add more rapidly achievable 

thaw AimLam cmw ili fenM^ 

So the idea dt a fresh start and a *" 
new warmth in Soviet-American rela- 
tions, the pofitihility-of a safer and ~~ 
mare relaxed world less frenetically 
focused on churning out arms, re- 
mams UghtyconditioEiaL 
It was much better to have a sun^ 
mit servings to comcentrate minds od 
these issues than to have Moscow and 
Washington cun tiuuing to shnn 
denounce each other. But (be direc; 
tkm for toe future has not been seu 
The extent of accommodation be- 
tween die two leaders did not go 
beyond -Mr. Reagan's willingness to 
issue a fairly anodyne joint statement 
and « brief joint <*pp«» ra nce for 
toe finale,and Mr. Goroachev’s wiU- 
ingocss to arrange more meetings at 
‘ practically all levels despite the re- 
buff be received on substance. 

The Soviet leader really does seerd 
eager for stable, improved relations 
. in many fields. But his price is “stra- 
tegic parity” as seen through Mos^ 

’ cow’s eyes. He called it “the natural 
state of Soviet-American relations.” 1 

Now tbe question is the purpose of 
'further meetings and negotiations. 

The leaders have got “acquainted" 
and exchanged assurances of good 
wflL They cannot keep repeating that 
• performance without the risk of turn^ 
mg it dangerously sour and of nnder- 
mm ing their domestic positions. 

Mr. Reagan still does -not seem to 
have made the basic decision on 
whose advice to take in bis divided 
ad m i nis tration. That showed not 
only in the leaked letter from Secre- 
tary of D efeas e Caspar Weinberger 
s e eking to stiffen him up on the eve of 
the summit, but also in the all -nigh i 
_ infighting among Americans over the 
text of the joint statement It resulted 
in diluting what might have been a 
whit more encouraging diplomacy. 

The summit was called a “first 
step" and it worked in terms of clii 
trat e. The next steps cannot be so 
equivocal. There is still a fundamen- 
tal need to decide what the United 
. gates wants and expects from the 
Soviets. There will always be dis^ 
putes. They can be sharpened or 
nwiteged. The United States cannot 
resolve them alone. 

The New York Times. 










4; 


A*.. 


I 


S. 


■* 

f “• 


& 




if i 




’W 


Blame the Soviet Union 

Regarding the opinion column u The 
Russians Could Live in Fence If They 
Warned” (Nov. 4) by William Pfaff: 

For the first time in many years, 
I have finally seen a column by one of 
the regular contributors to your edi- 
torial page which unequivocally purs 
the reaxmsMityfor superpower ten- 
sion where it belongs: on toe Soviet 
Union. Usually toe page is dominat- 
ed by articles that place toe blame on 
the United States for most of toe 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed ‘'Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er’s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. haters should be brief and 
are subject to editing We cannot 
be responsible jar the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


world’s ills, equating U.S. actions and 
attitudes as morally equivalent to 
those of toe U.S.S.FL, or advocating 
further steps by the United States to 
reassure (read: appease) toe Soviets 
— for example, the column on toe 
same page by George Kerman. 

' JAMES WHITAKER. 

M anama L Rahram, 

Roosevelt Wasn’t There 

Daniel Schorr writes in “Summit 
Syndrome: Reagan Most Beware" 
(Nov. 6): “What Mr. Khnjsbcfrev did 
not know was that in deriding to go 
to Geneva. Mr. Eisenhower had over- 
ridden Secretary Dulles and toe Re- 
publican old guard, who feared be 
might ‘give away toe store,' &s they 
believed President Roosevelt had 
done ar Yalta and Potsdam.” When 
toe Potsdam conference began on 
July 17, 1945. Roosevelt had been 
dead since April 12. Harry Truman’s 


Fcswce at Potsdam as presdent of Herald Tribune be giving equal space 

theUmted States n afact&own to — and thus respectSyL 
most high school graduates. recsntly sentenced American spies^. 


JONATHAN P. DYER. 
. . ' Berlin. 


I have noted your recent reportmg 
erf toe trials of American dozens who 
have received severe sentences for 


CLP. SORENSEN. 

■ Copenhagen. 

ivy IxagaeAhuanae 

^Regardingtherepcn "Boon: India's 
Hartffw by the Himalayas? (Nov. 16): 
There i$ a major difference 



It seems dear that in toe betwwen the wives of Doon gradu- 
nited States spying against one’s ate and those of men attending nJ 

umtas at Yale and IWd 



own country is considered one of the 
worst crimes possible. 

I was therefore a little surprised to 
End a lengthy column about “defec- 
tors” CThe Three Affairs Seem Un- 
related to the Summit” Not. 12) by 
Arkady N. Shevchenko, .a. Soviet spy 
who for several years, according to 
his best-sefling book, worked » gn"« 


^.ta«:-*5«T3rtrtE 

SsSgsssag 

*S«8 to wSw fo? 

5S Li t ■ dtcade - a fact thai 
, . _ should not have escaped an Arrw^i 

as& own country under cover of his ■ reporter’s notice/ 

setuorpotition at theXIruted Nations MAPinvi nvrvT- 

in New YoriL WHl toe frndflaiiopal . MARION HUNT.— 

..* Paris. 












lies 


1 . v . 


'iv ,-i- . 


* **•»?. T 

L 4- • 


g^:> 

■V.!i:'^MSSsk -l 

: 

■■ ■. 
- V“ «4>s ; 


IlcraUQO-ribunc 

■ • ■ - -— - — 1 — — 

TRAVEL m EGYPT 


A SPECIAL REPORT 

SATUKDA Y-SUNDA Y, NOVEMBER 23-24, 1933 


Page 9 


By Spiffen Mefikian 


" =f^ ,! 5' ”T7 EW ARAB c apitals of the Middle East have 

~ . sui^ved the turmoil of 20th-century events with 
: ^arraosqws, their palaces, the maze of thdreentury- 

•■ -r<- n . , *o h» u,/* ‘ old streets, the gates that lead through ranroarts, 

•• .-rr. ‘.'Vis & ' fantastic necropolis sprawling beyond its 

s ‘- Lia?' ■anuts. 

Cairo has. Despite the quickening pace of destruo- 
' • ■tion that threatens many mans i o n s and winnc^in^ it 

- . '.75 «s the artistic Rome of the Arab worid. Whole areas 

still stand almost as they did 500 or 600 years aga The 
■ Anaent Egypt of the pyramids is some miles away, not 
‘ 7? ,;,T ^2' m “>® aty that was founded by the admits cf Warn 
■•5; : ®ore than 1,000 years ago. Several of its monuments 

■ ... ^ inirq? 1 are as unique to Islamic archilecture as Saint Peter's is 

- %, ront itjvJ .'to baroque art in C hristian E ur ope. 

^ “~c " " T here is no other mosque liVe the powerful square 

: -a an; 'Structure erected by Ahmad ibn Tulun in 879. Low 

" l'' r ' cr, ~Pa<u i?‘ u ' ' wallsendose an outer courtyard beyond winch emerge 
higher -walls of the mosqueitsdt Pierced by one 
ji **V long horizontal line of arched windows pimr* 1 hi gh 
rraur-,* ^ above mound level, it looks Hire a fortress. 

• ■” Sknafi rect angu l ar doors lead at wide intervals into 

••' *■? 3 i its inner space, a huge courtyard surrounded by ar- 

odes, three aisles deep on one side, five cat the other 
: r • ' :hr sides. Enormous piers with *n g ag^-t columns in each 

' ■- \rr_" ];J? **v ; ^gle support barrel vaults with ogee profile, a re- 
’ *■'•? hfuK 1 t; Gothic Europe borrowed not a Ettle from 

■ t * f . *Si-. the Islamic East, including the pointed arch. Stucco 

r. ... , P ane i s exquisitely carved .with geometrical patterns 

■ -m ej l***’ Once covered all the soffits, or underside, of the arches. . 

•: ; Several can still be seen, masterpieces of Islamic 

• f m *®tset 'abstract design at its highest, strongly. marked by the 

...... /'*■; ' a jjJ sat- influence of bran, as KA.G, Creswefi, the author of 

,7 t ' ait ^Eariy Muslim Architecture,” has pointed oul They 
j I’,' . ■; i L ^ S; • do not lessen the impression of ascetic restraint nor 
”• .^5': did, probably, the panels of Kufic calligraphy carved 

“r-an lisa m teakwood, some of which remain. 

fa: St j ; ' • Progmsmg through the archways from one massive 
. .. . ?? •" pier to another, one is reminded of the Tslamie thane 

' : u Tilecj,- that the worid is but a passage leading to Tight, lig ht, 

- indeed, glares intensdy in the courtyard. Damaged 

- -ria.’j-wiEj,. more tluui 100 jprs ago and resttwed, the MoKjueof 

vat- Ibn Tulun retains its austere grandeur and invites 
; meditation. 

-.ys Jt £ The later periods have left here and there a gem or 
: r - : v.,Ti(! , two of abstract carving in wood and stucco. One of the 

" r wit * most accosrqdished stucco ndhrabs (a shallow rdchr 

■ r-t:fa*yss .mdicatrng tas direction of Meoca which Modems face 

--a : st b; rr. when saying prayers) was completed in 1094 AD. In 

t the 13th century, a mimbar, or preacher's chair -that 
“Si. W£ > looks Hke a staircase leading to a domed platfOTm, was 

r ‘ ■-.iLjj.T-- carved with intricate geometrical patterns. 

- -;zm- ■; ' ra v, At the center of the courtyard, a domed monument 

. _.:j builL in 1296 ova the ajhhttkm wdl looks Eke an 

.. ’exaxasein ^‘d'g«jnietry of surprising modernity. It 

(Continued on Next Page) 



On Tour in a Land of Monumental History 


c: r* 

■■ d aa: 

’ ■ “ “S’-Kltt 

r' 

r-.T.vijKJB. 
- ’ • -’. : i v tt's 


o I)( 


: ..'1 ; L'cil 

r sva^sc 
su 

■* is. t 

Jjf 


iwacE 
. '■'UCZSit 

•vV-ssfc 

■ .vrscsssa 
: c>. k: 

■ 'uiiTs Bit': 
r: vksS^ 
-... 

1 ?.aSS»* 

2Z. 

_- v - ic£' 
art's 

r-.ziJ *r\ 

.. v-‘ 

j. 

.. I?” 




nesr* 


Major 
mosques 
of Cairo: 
Ibn 

Toniotm, 

above, 

A1 Azhar, 
below. 


By Scott MacLeod 

C AIRO — Herodotus, that intrepid tourist from 
Halicarnassus, visited Egypt awl loved it. Among 
other thinp , be marveled at how Egyptians snared 
crocodiles from the Mile by using pigs as bail. 

At one point, Herodotus commented: *1 shall hare 
a great deal to say because of the number of remark- 
able things which the country contains and because of 
the fact that more monuments w hich beggar descrip- 
tion are to be found there than anywhere else in the 
world.” This was 1,500 years ago. 

To his credit, the Greek traveler-historian did not 

succumb to the pyramids. He explored the entire land, 
from the Nile to its outer deserts, as might a traveler 
today who is curious about Egypt’s 5,000 years of 
cmhizaiion. from Meaes, who united Lower and Up- 
per Egypt, to the modem Arab nation of Nasser, Sadat 
and Mubarak. 

Those who follow this route, particularly Ameri- 
| cans, should, of course, be sensitive to the political 


Herodotus did not succumb 
to the pyramids. He 
explored the entire land, 
from the Nile to its outer 
deserts. 


tensions in the Middle East. During recent demonstra- 
tions in Cairo following the commandeering of the 
A chOl e Lauro, Americans were warned to stay away 
from universities, where anti-American sentiment was 
high. The State Department cautioned Americans 
then in Egypt to mamtairi a low profile, but it is not 
now advising against travel to the country. 

Cairo fascinates as a 20th-century city. A quarter of 
the Arab people are found in Egypt, and a quarter of 
Egyptians are found in Cairo. Thousands are so poor 
that they make their home is a cemetery called the 
City of the Dead. Across town, some of the wealthiest 
men in the world gamble at ritzy casinos. 

The quickest orientation to modem Cairo is the 
bazaar, Khan d-Khahli. Feshawfs coffeehouse at the 
gateway serves thick Turkish brew or mint tea. 

Inside the marketplace, traders haggle in four or 
more languages over goods ranging from fine Eg>p- 
tian cotton to cheap glassware imported from Taiwan. 

Most people come to Cairo for its past. The Egyp- 
tian Museum near Tahrir Square houses the greatest 
collection of Egyptian antiquities. 

On the second floor of the mnsenm, in understated 
displays, are the treasures from the tomb of King 
Tutankhamen. 

The pyramids of Giza and nearby Saqqara can be 
seen in the distance. Built 4.500 years ago, their size 
and geometrical perfection make them strangely pow- 
erful monuments. The half-man, half-lion Sphinx is 
there, too. 


Often overlooked by visitors are Coptic and Islamic 
Cairo. Copts are Egyptian Christians and make up 
about 10 percent to 1 5 percent of the population. They 
are regarded as descendants of the pharaohs. 

Egypt was one of the earliest lands to embrace 
Christianity, so the Copts had an important role in 
early Christian dora. 

Coptic churches are scattered around the country, 
and Coptic art. viewed at a special museum in old 
Cairo, represents a major contribution to Egyptian 
culture. 

The Copts faded into the background with the 
emergence of Islam in the 7th century. 

Cairo has a splendid Islamic museum, but Islam Is 
clearly a living religion here and the minarets of 
hundreds of mosques pierce the skyline. 

To probe deeper into pharaonic Egypt, a 400-mile 
(648-kilometer) cruise up the Nile takes one to Luxor 
and the Valley of the Kings, where Tutankhamen's 
burial chamber can be viewed. 

The area, known in ancient times as Thebes, was the 
capital of Egypt during the Middle and New King- 
doms. 

All types of steamers transit the Nile, catering to a 
variety of tourists, from backpackers to the cocktails- 
- before-dinner scl 

Alexandria, more Mediterranean than Egyptian, is 
another world altogether. 

This once- great city founded by Alexander — it has 
a fine Greco-Roman museum — looks and smells 
more like the seedy prewar metropolis of Lawrence 
Durr ell’s “Alexandria Quartet.” Westward on the sea 
is El Ala-mein, where Montgomery won the battle that 
turned the tide of the North African campaign in favor 
of the Allies. 

Further along is Marsa Matrub, an expanding resort 
city with some of the finest beaches in Egypt, attract- 
ing vacationers from all over the country. 

From here, with special police permission, true 
adventurers can organize convoys across the desert 10 
hours away to the oasis of Siwa. near the Libyan 
border, whose 10,000 inhabitants live in a bygone 
century and still speak Berber. . 

.Alternatively, explorers can camp in the Sinai pen- 
insula. a rugged triangle of territory cut off from the 
rest of Egypt by the Suez CanaL Sinai constitutes the 
joint between Africa and Asia; In the midst of the 
mountainous desert is Sc. Catherine's monastery, 
which is ran by Greek Orthodox monks. 

It was built in 527 on the spoL where God is believed 
to have revealed himself to Moses in the burning bush. 

There are a variety of resorts an the Red Sea. 
notably at Hurghada on the Gulf of Suez and Sharm el 
Sheikh and Dahab on the eastern coast of the Sinai. 

These are considered among the finest waters in the 
world for scuba diving; the b rillian t, coral formations 
and tropical fish are visible through the glasslike 
waters at 100 feet (31 meters). 

For longer visits to Egypt, self -designed tours are 
recommended, although these can be planned in con- 
sultation with a travel agent. 

On the other hand, far brirf stays of a week or so, a 
group tour is the best value. 





JCMpfa Ncnu'THr Imagt Btani 



Hie columns of 
Luxor, above. A 
burial town at Mini a, 
left 


Fted fcft/Th* fanga Bant 


At Luxor, Preservation Gains 
Time for Legacy ofPharoahs 








Detail of a wall at Luxor.. 


By Jane Friedman 

L UXOR — The dippe(y-clop of wobbly horse- 
j -drawn carnages along the Nile road gives this 
town in Upper Egypt a sleepy feeling. But nearby, 
Egyptian. European and Amen can archaeologists are 
working hard to save its ancient remains. 

From roughly 2000 B.G to 500 B.C., Luxor was the 
religious and political capita] of an empire that 
stretched from the Upper Nile to the Euphrates. The 
pharaohs buih huge monuments here to themselves 
and to thdr god Amon. from whom they claimed their 
light to rule. 

The bulk of the excavations in Luxor were carried 
out from the- mid- 19th to mid-20tb centuries. They 
bared the magnificent temple of Luxor, the power 
base of the Egyptian kings, and die temple of Karoak, 
which was the residence of Amon. Both temples were 
bnilt more than 3.000 years ago. 

They also uncovered the huge tombs of the Valley 
of the Kings and the Valley of the Queens and the 
smaller tombs of nobles and workmen in which daily 
Hfe and religious beliefs were recounted in detail. 

The ruins of Luxor are the largest concentration of 
antiquities in the world and many have been preserved 
in original form and color so that they give a striking 
picture of the pharaohs. ’ 

The excavations show a highly , ordered society in 
which kingship was regularly reconfirmed in elaborate 
rituals. 

The magnificent frescos and reliefs also show the 
human side of. the pharaohs: Queen Hatshepsut, who 
dressed in men’s clothes, pharaohs who scratched out 
the images of the kings who came before them and 
King Akhenaton, who threw out the cult of the gods 
and installed (me god, Aton, although his monotheis- 
tic policy was reversed after his death. 

Nevertheless, the s c o r es of tombs and temples that 
have been, excavated are in danger of extinction. The 
opening of the monuments has made them vulnerable 
to dust, sand, air and the abuse of the many tourists 
who visit them each year. Several tombs have already 
been dosed to the public. 

In addition, the Aswan High Dam. which became 
operational in 1968, has raised the underground water 
table, exposing the monuments to the erosive effect of 
salt in the water. Some of the water evaporates, but the 
salt crystallizes inside the monuments, causing pieces 
of rock to break off. - 

Dr. Lanny BeB, director of the University of Chica- 
go’s archaeological team in Luxor, said the monu- 
ments are deteriorating so fast that 75 percent of the 
objects in photographs taken of Luxor temple in 1888 
ho longer exist. 

The tomb' of Nefertni, a wife of Ramses IL has 
become “one big salt bubble,” he said, and it may 
never be opened again. 

Hundreds of tombs and temples have not yet been 
excavated. They include the palaces of pharaohs and 

the tomb of Ramses n, which has not been touched 
because of its precarious construction and the danger 
it could pose to excavators. 

Archaeologists today, however, are focusing on 
small excavations and on restoring and preserving the 
excavated legacy of the pharaohs. 

At an area called Abu el Got, an Egyptian team is 
excavating- the homes of ordinary people from the time 
of Ramses II and earlier. The rise in the water table 
has made these ruins vulnerable. The Avenue of the 
Sphinxes, winch ran from Karaak to Luxor temples, is 
also being excavated. 

. Onthewesrside of die NDe, which was a huge burial 
ground probably because the sun sots in the west, the 
Egyptians are uncovering a laige tomb that contained 
the mummies of Mumo Emhau a mayor of ancient 


Luxor, and bis wife. The tomb will be open to the 
public in two years. 

A Franco- Egyptian team is responsible for restora- 
tions in the temple complex in Kamak. to which 
virtually every pharaoh of the New Kingdom added 
his offering to Amon and lesser gods. 

The French discovered 14,000 stones that were pan 
of a relief built during the time of Akhenaton and 
subsequently destroyed. They are now studying the 
stones for dues about Akhenaton’s monotheistic cull. 

They are also assembling a mass of stones originally 
built as a temple by Queen Hatshepsut and later 
destroyed by her brother. The stones will constitute 
pan of an open-air museum that is scheduled to open 
m the spring 

Included in this museum will be the chapel of 
Sesostris I, the oldest standing object at Karnak. The 
temple contains reliefs of Amon and of Amon Min, or 
Amon as fertility god, and shows how the god was 
transported tty boat each year to Luxor temple for the 
king's reinvest! lure. j 

The American team, led by Dr. Bed, from the i 
University of Chicago’s epigraphic survey, is continu- 
ing the work it began in Luxor more than 60 years ago. ' 
The group is seeking to record the ancient monuments 
in drawings so that if some disappear, they will stifl be 
documented. At the moment, the team is working in 
Luxor temple to document and restore the wall built 
by King Tutankhamen around the massive colonnade. 

‘'Luxor temple is the largest standing monument of 
the reign of Tutankhamen after the heresy of Akhena- 
ton and the destruction of Amon.” Dr. Bell said. “It’s 
crucial to the understanding of ancient Egyptian 
religion." 

Although tourists may not have access to the exca- 
vations, they should see the following: 

• The temples of Karnak and Luxor. Karnak tem- 
ple, built as a homage to Amon, has been described as 
the Vatican of Ancient Egypt. 

Luxor temple, as a seat of temporal and religious 
power, continued to attract attention even after the 
pharaohs. The half brother of Alexander the Great 
drew himself at Luxor in the garb of a pharaoh after 
Alexander's invasion of Egypt. The early Christians 
built churches inside the temple and the early Mos- 
lems buill a mosque inside its walls. These monuments 
survive. 

• A large selection of tombs on the west side of the 
Nile. The most interesting in the Valley of the Kings 
are those of Tutankhamen, Ramses VI and Amenho- 
tep m. 

The tomb of Tutankhamen, discovered in 192Z was 
the only pharaoh's tomb found intact. It contained the 
mummy and was full of gold-laden objects chosen by 
the king for his journey to the hereafter. Tutankhamen 
died young so that there was no time to build a huge 
tomb. But the paintings are very well preserved. 

• Of 440 nobles’ tombs that have been numbered, 
12 are open to tourists. The tomb of Senniifcr, the 
chief gardener of King Amenhotep n, is in almost 
perfect condition. 

• In Ddrel Medina, also cm the west bank, archae- 
ologists have excavated a village where pharaonic 
tomb builders lived. They found shards and papyras- 
es, documenting in detail the workmen’s lives. 

The workmen’s tombs are nearby. Only two are 
open to the public and they are worth seeing. The 
tomb of Sennudjem, who lived during the Rammes- 
side period, around 1200 B.G, is probably the more 
beautiful. In it, Sennudjem imagines a paradise in 
which he and his wife are plowing the land. The tomb 
shows how pharaonic denizens looked and dressed at 
thdr best. 

• The Museum of Luxor, well-lighted and pkasant- 

(Coutimied oo Next. Page) 





* » • .'••'v- • -v-;. 



RO 


m 


a-* k 


mm 


. .Nr-'.-'*' •• V • 

■mid 


gig, m 




k'.-V / >; 


p-'i 






THE PRIZE 
DESTINATION 


EGYPTIAN GENERAL AUTHORITY fOR 
THE PROMOTION OF TOURISM 













Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, NOVEMBER 23-24. 1985 

A SPECIAL REPORT ON EGYPT 


a mm* 






Night lighting of the monuments at Luxor. 


Mmal b>«Sch»»ni/The Iraoge Bori 


In Stone at Luxor: Legacy' ofPharoahs 


{Continued From Previous Page) 

|y arr ange d, contains reliefs and statues of King 
Akhenaton. with his long raann eristic face, an- 
gular jaw and intense eyes. 

Despite years of excavation, the pharaohs are 
still largely a mystery. Their legacy, however, is 
powerful. According to Dr. Bell, at the end of 
the 19th century, when many mummies were 
sent by boat down the Nile io Cairo, peasant 
women lined the banks and wailed. 

The late President Anwar Sadat closed the 
Cairo Museum's mummy room, because. Egyp- 
tologists say, he wanted to preserve the dignity 
of the pharaohs. 

The best time of year to visit Luxor is from 


October through April. Luxor is located 400 
miles (648 kflometers) south of Cairo and is hot 
in the summer. The visitor should initially take a 
standard tour of Luxor temple. Kamafc and the 
Valley of the Kings. 

More adventurous visitors can get a good 
guidebook and do the rest alone. It costs 20 
piasters to take a ferryboat across the Nile to the 
west bank, where one can rent either a bicycle, 
donkey or taxi 

On the west hank, tourists must buy tickets to 
the monuments at dockside. To avoid the 
crowds, visit Karnak and Luxor temples in the 
morning and the west bank in the afternoon. 

There are several specialized tours led by 
Egyptologists. In the United States, the Brook- 


lyn Museum, the University of Chicago and the 
University of Pennsylvania organize such locus. 

For accomodation, the recently built Moveo- 
pick Jolieviile Hotel located on an island in the 
Nile, is a quiet haven away from the hubub of 
ihe monuments. It has a pod overlooking the 
Nile, dean cottage-type rooms, a jogging track 
and concerts. A room with bed and breakfast 
costs about 50 Egyptian pounds ($40) a day. 
Other hotels in Luxor are the Winter Palace and 
the Etap. There is also a Club MMiterranee. 

The most efficient way to travd is by plane 
from Cairo. The flight? which costs about 125 
pounds roundtrip, takes an hour. The taxi ride 
to Luxor from the airport should not cost any 
more than 5 pounds. 



Temple at Luxor. 



YOUR GUIDE IN EGYPT 


MISR TRAVEL is the largest tourist company in Egypt 
The owner/operator of 350 luxury tour buses & limousines for 
travel to all parts of Egypt MISR maintains offices 
with staffs of expert tour guides in all tourist centers 
of Egypt For complete group tour and F.l.T. arrangements 

Call the One Who Knows ALL Egypt: 

MISR TRAVEL 


Heed Office: 

1. Talaat Hart Street P.O. Box 1000, CAIRO EGYPT, Tel: 750010. 
750032, 750201, Telex: 92035/920771 MRSHIP UN 


BRANCHES: New Yoik, London. Parts. 

Stockholm. Frankfurt, 

Sydney, Tokyo, Jeddah, Kuwait Sudan. 

In Travel 
since 1934 




HILTON INTERNATIONAL. 
LIFE ON THE NILE. 

Not since die davs of die Pharaohs lias life 
on die Nife been so majestic. 

The tallest building in Cairo, The Bacoses 
Hilton is literally the height of luxury with 
900 sumptuous guesn\ x>ms with private 
halo mies, Qne restaurants and a nightdub. 
Just a stone' s throw away stands the 
Nile HHton with its view of the mw; the city 
and the Pyramids. 

Here you can chance vour luck in the casino, 
dine under the palms and dance under the stars. 
And whar better way ro lhe it up on the Nile 
than to cruise up it in style on Hilton 
I ntemadonal’s MS Isis or MS Osiris. They'D 
transport you to another world, to the ancient 
City of Kamak and the spectacular tombs and 
temples of ancient Egypt 


For resen atkms. caHyair 
nwefagerU. anyHiuon 
International Hold or 
Hilton ResenationSenice — 
m Copenhagen. Frankfurt, 
London, Madrid, Milan. 
CUo Paris or Stockholm. 


HILTON INTERNATIONAL EGYPT 

WHERE THE WORLD IS AT HOME’** 






Arab Art Museum Holds 
Pageant of the Centuries 

.iw. hiebest form trf arL There were 


}fp m ; 



. nnnar with the highest form of art. inert were no . 

By Souren Melildan __ ; 

AS THEY leave Cairo after a tom ;dowi or inlaid in sO vet and ^ , >■ 

A few visitors are aware that they have just nnssed iMk nth- and earfv I2ih-ceuuiy bowisand 

.v iv,. Rtitish Museum is to reproduce derism- 


S THEY leave Cairo after a tour 


*.-*** sa 






Above, a brass incense 
burner inlaid with silver; 
MamalOk period, 8th cen- 
tury. Below, detail from a 
painted dish of the Fatimid 
period, 11th century. 


rS iB 1*«r. cfariy tepmdax designs- ' 

Sddwn by the 

engaged in the work. A beautrfd lareJWwOTtary 
w <trP. . • ■ «Tth art ri enl ia nt shnwa'n 


the equivalent of what the British Museum is 
W ^ShSeum of Islamic Art originally set up by the 

French, is the treasure house of flU that is greatest in 

the artof Arab Egypt, with an additional sprinkling of spredacross the dimte bottom. -3 

I ranian objets cTart that would send any curator mto pan of the rising sides fay an artist **© wag.! 

ecstasy. . ohvjously used to working in the horizontal formarx 

Treasure house is perhaps an exaggeration. At nr ^ m ji flmainiS criptpamti!^Theartttthass^iicd'' 
times, the museum looks like a dumping house, not K OT ^ undoride: "Ibrahim m Cairo.” 
with respect to the objects, which provide an tmrnter- Farther proof of the inescapable fink between the* 
rupted pageant from the 8th to the 18th centuries, but and the art of the objects is provided 

as a result of the installation. bvsome frescoes on fine white plaster or gesso— tbq.; 

Hus is hardly surprising in a country with meagn T ^. qn fonn ^ Antic joss, m turn bontwed tom tix, • 


Be 


‘-U& 




. — — -—j — r a 1 : . iianan ionu ui ---w- _ 

resources, where curators are paid salaries tnat just p — w jridh were recovered m a. Cairo street., 

about allow them to keep their h eads above water. , . *n<. «r a f * wU r nHAhMknm 


during road work. The face of a rcveta, wine beaker hj 




mz 







The easy way is to go straight to the architectural 
panels of carved marble or wood tom countless 
mi-typi^c yt yvil p and ppiant-c Some were remo ved to 
die museum for safekeeping, others just recovered 
under a pavement or inside a wall in the course of 
restoration, sometimes even during roadworks. 

The wooden mlhrab from die mausoleum of Sayyda 
RuqaTyya, completed in the mid- 12th century, is one 
of the greatest exercises in geometrical des ig n and 
Kufic calligraphy to be seen in Arab ait. It is famous 
and is Qhistrated in many books dealing with Modem 
architecture in Egypt. 

Others come close to it in perfection. A single leaf 
from a wooden door that once led into a section of the 
mosque of Malik R»l«h Talai, bmlt in 1 160, is no less 
impressive for its geometrical abstraction. 

Hav ing t rained hfo eye on the monumental works of 
the 12th century, the viator is prepared to work Ms 
way bade to the smaller fragments surviving from the 
F atimi d period, mainly the 10th and 11th centuries, 
arguably the greatest age of Islamic art in Egypt 

A small panel carved with two affronted birds, 
highly stylized mid yet instantly identifiable, ranks 
among the museum's masterpieces. Another panel 
carved with forma] foliage is surmounted by the pow- 


Tl f ir T ilBi vi J " 

iSHN 

mm 


-shaped heads that is typical of the 9th and early 10th 
centuries. Such fragments help form an idea of whar 
the iH emanated manuscripts of the period must have 
looked like (none have survived). 

Architecture on a miniat ure scale is provided by 
some of the furniture removed tom mosques. A tall 
hexagonal table, decorated rat its flat vertical sides 
with arcades mid geometrical n*ttwn< inlaid with 
ebony and bone, once stood in the mosque of Sultan 
Sha’ban n, which was completed in 1369. There must 
have been many of these in 14th-century Cairo, but 
only this (me remains almost intact. 

Museum^Twanjic Art most excels — spoony, glass 
and metalwork, which, in Mami e countries, were not 
mere decorative pieces of a minor order but were put 


from Egypt. 

The connection between painting andotjets d’ari 
continues in metalwork, of which the Cairo museum 
has one of the most imp ressive coBectio&s in 
world. It is particularly striking in a IJth-cencuiy^ 
group of brass vessels inlaid with silver and gold. On rf ^ 


Muzaffar Yusuf, a frieze Of dancers arid toUskaan^/; 
illustrates the seems of the Middle Eastern ceremonial^ & 
reception in which a banquet was green, followed hf- , 
wine drinking, musm playing, daricag and poetry 7 " 
redtations. 

The faces have the idealized type.cf Benian hterarji | 

origm — round as the full moon with ahnoud-shmed - 
eyes and tiny mouths ■ — cnltivated by eaiy 13tb- 
centmy. manuscript painters in fran^tw xnnnerouu 
artists who came to Egypt tom the etotempart ^ th3 ■ 
Tdamic world via Moral Baghdad sed Damascus, 
introduced it to the Egyptian capstd. Evidencectfsodiy . 
a route is found among others. in. tirar.very sigiatnresf 
— a hexagonal table inb&vi&iSi&jtaaid g/M thaf' L 
carries the name of Sohau Mt&m&Bad ibB Q^a’un is— ' 
signed by an artist caSed h fahaaunl ^ son of Sanqur 
(/Baghdad. ■ •— ‘ 

By that time, 1327, the forogd loens had be^ 
largely assnmlsted into a mfBbcf j^rotmi Minm But 
the Eastern attraction neverxc»&&~ The national' 
library in Cairo, dbach took artistic hddings 

of the former royal Eteaiyj ErtatBs die oMy maBx^'- 
script with several nmnattires-My si^ed by fee tnost' < - 


I 




■■veHMSt- 


.[lie Bead 

3 e >an<L J 

nAnieni 


31 ^ 





ed the six pamtings Htnr aboet l488 ra die dw of 
Herat ^ - . i'- 

The story of its pe re g rinatio ns tonL presait-day , 
Afghanistan to Cairo has yet to be written, but its ' . !.. 

presence in the former Egyptian rqyaf Sirary proves - ~ xg.,7. 
that, until recem rimes^ artistic iniapou^fe^was as. 
active among die diffrr mr parts of theldaimc wodd ' 
as it was among die diffl e mi t'cnrinfcigrrf rhnglian ^ ~' 

Europe. . =■.- f. 


r 




Discovering Cairo ’s Islamic He 




F : *c 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
is almost devoid of ornament, as if the austere atmo* 
sphere and perhaps the appearance of the Mdiir 
structure that it replaced had innnmned its builder. 

The mosque of AI Azhar, built a century later, may 
have been just as impressive, but it became the victim 
of its celebrity for the teaching dispensed by its derics, 
which became as famous as that of die Sorbonne in 
West European Christianity. 

‘‘Improvements’’ were carried out over the centu- 
ries, and within the last hundred years these have 
proved fatal to the integrity of the monument Only 
fragments of the original survive, but as an institution, 

! Al Azhar may well be the oldest university in the 
world. Teaching has gone oil uninterrupted there for 
the last 1,000 years or so, easily beating Oxford and 
Paris. 

Anyone hicky enough to have Egyptian friends in a 
i position to give a private tour should seize the chance 
to see tins monument The general layout and atmo- 
sphere have not been drastically altered, and the 10th- 
century carved stucco, just under the cupola over the 
entrance door, still comes alive with its beautiful 
formal design typical of the early Fa timid age. 

The third mo6t famous mosque in chronological 
order, the mosque of Al Hakim, who built it between 
990 and 1012-1013, has greatly suffered. It should be 
visited for its details of monumental calligraphy, pref- 
erably using binoculars. 

No such precaution is needed in the mosque of Al 
Guynsbi (1085), with a domed chamber that ranks 
among the great works of Egyptian architecture. 

After that date, one of the most abrupt chants took 
place in the history of Egyptian architecture. Exactly 
40 years later, the mosque of Al Aqmar, dated 1125, 
illustrates the metamorphosis undergone by Egyptian 
art as Iranian influence gave way to the Syrian archi- 
tectural tradition. The inner courtyard with taD, nar- 
row, almost angular arches supported by strong pillars 
conveys an utterly different sense of space, oriented 
vertically rather than horizontally. 

Most striking is the sculp rural effect of the carved 
masonry, now a major factor. It is from there that the 
most truly Egyptian style started develo ping, culmi- 
nating in the mosque founded by Sultan as Zahir 
Baybars in 1267-1270, followed in 1284-1285 by the 
complex duster of mosque, university ( madrasa ) and 
mausoleum of Sultan Qala’un. 

The scale scons gigantic even when die actual 
dimensions are far from exaggerated, as in the mam 
entrance to the mosque of Sultan as Zahir. Deeply 
recessed niches flank an archway that seems decep- 
tively big ; 

In the case of QalaWs monument, however, the 
size truly becomes enormous. Inside, the vaults three 
stories high, the tall pillars, the numerous engaged 
cohunns, the use of polychrome marWe gives arunipe* 
rial feel The windows, with their twin arches topped 
by rosettes, are strikingly evocative of Gothic architec- 
ture. Nor is this a coincidence, since the Modems 
discovered h cm expetimg the European invaders tom 
Palestine. 

By the arid- 14th century, Egyptian architects man- 
aged the rare feat of combining stark smpheity and 
baroque in the same monuments. The barrd-yaultcd 
entrance gate to the mosque of al-Maridani, built tom 
1338 to 1340, has enormous stone piers on either side 
with tiny engaged columns at the bottom. It conveys 
extraordinary strength and austerity. And yet, a flqnr- 



ish of marble pdyefaromy over the opening at the end 
of an archway introduces an almost mcqngroonsitote. 

This is, perhaps, theforerunnetof thetrcnd towwrd 
uncontrolled baroque that set in within tije next two 
decades. The mosque of Sultan H&san,' which took, 
seven years to complete betweea.1356 and-1363, has 
one of tiie most beautiful rimer courtyards in the 

on to iL But, crovniixig^restrai^it faerit^rooj&ig, . 
extravagant catenations designed fike ^fleur-de-lis 
lode like a prtrietoc feature,- rather out at context. 


M-i iH IM, U1W UUU llAw |AAJV4UVMUJ "J 

the time cfQaitBay, in the kler ,15 th century, all sense 


the 16th century that balance was rectored.. :-'.’ -.^ 

Private ’.dwellings were laig£y. immune! tom the 
touches of baroque. VirtnaHyunknownbat ton hand- 
ful of specialists, they rank among the arcfartactnral 
treasures of Cairo. They are threatened by durqpan-, 
which then becomes an excuse for speculator to teat 
than down. •, ; - 

A French team from the National OeniljK for Scien- 
tific Research has focused attention dir some admira- 
ble dwdtings in a series of four votomes thled “Palais 
et Maisons daCaire” (Palaces and Housn of Cairo). 
What remains of the Bayt al-Molla, 'a 17th-century 
manaan. particnlariy the reception quarter^ or' ma- 
q’ad in Arabic, is admirable even in iri derdict stale. 
Behind that, a. fidd of ruins tdls a disanf rale. . . 

A walk through, some streets tells more about an 
Arab metropolis than vohnnes of art histosy. One 
should amble by the. Ottoman rnanskm cafled Mhnzil 
as-Sohaynri, on theDarb al-Asfhr.togel’aferiiiigd 
vdiat a patrician street was like in 17th-centmy Cairo. 

Few tourists seem to find their way there. The 
Manzfl as-SuhaynH may not be a pyrannd,Tmt as an 
insight into another culture, impoverished yet dive, it 
ismcomparahie . Wandering in cti ^MdirWagd 

light, in the midst of the seething Cairo crowds after 


zfs description of Cairo markets and urban- fife in the 
lSthcentnry, is a great deal more than plain to urism 
It is like travdin^ backward through time, with the 
stone docnmentabonall around and a human cast fhat 
does not seem to have greatly chang ed once about 
1500. '. ; : ' 

Then, for a Surrealistic shock, go and see the 14th-, 
15th- and 16th-century mausoleums that stud the 
desert in a huge necropolis outside the city. The 
beauty, the isolation, the weirdness of some of the 
baroque memorials erected ova the tombs of the 
Mamin It sultans, where the'homeless camp out, are 
worth skipping a pyramid or two. 




vfc.- 

a 


* dfHt 

I II I 

v rs 



Hv trjih mss $ 

'' r v*** 

•'5^.". ^*»r £ 


yi&ry. 


1 J -' i " _ 


Nmoi.]-,, . 

•-n - • ‘ 1 • * • j 




Above left,' ceramic frag- 
meot of the Fatimid period. \\ 

Above right, detail of a 
carved wooden panel, Fati- 
-mid period. The photo- 

OTatlhc oM AAi.l ■ 


■» cuuuiQOD in 

Cairo, Islamic Art in Eevot 
969-1517. 


Marriott Hotels in the Middle East 

AMMAN ■ CAIRO ■ JEDDAH • KUWAIT • RIYADH 



For reservations: Amsterdam ^5? (20)43 51 13 • Frankfurt^ 3 (069) 28 74 92 • London (01)439 0281 • Milan*® 1 (2)345 2009 • Munich 1 ® 3 (89) 18 20 93 - Paris*®? (06) 079 II ?7 - Zurich ‘lUF lOli 302 0979 * UteHIntemationai 


HOTELS*RESQ RTS 


or your Travel AgenL 












* nl «rL' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATCRDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24., 1985 



in Cairo: Beyond the Bazaar, Artisans Are at Work 


' S' *!.>, 

V: 


By Jane Friedman j 

^SSSSfegi 

»5^^ d, ^^ dafflbes «'f«iBcolor , 

&hS EMvi i 


■-'ill 

mdhi0,iaI “ 

Kfr. Ratoya ^ joined by a handful of other sho- 
^ ptwrafire who believe that Egyptians must stop deco- 
-:: -,.... ^ derivations of Ewopean styles a£l start 

;r* Mr.RaWya and others are trying u> bring bade the 

i !.tu : E^spnan style that flourished from the 14th to the 
T n i f aia : ““ centmy, a manner apparently influenced by the 
1 “ 6 aTaonic ’ Roman, Coptic and Ottoman cultures. In 

Si*.' “P* centuries, Egyptians lived in domed houses 
..."'■ whose cente r was an inner courtyard. Windows were 

V ^ R>. pdte^pd by beaded wooden screens and mash-abrya 

'* ^ allowed families to peer outside without being 


•gwMfirsssssa 


seen. Furniture was dose to the floor, with cushions. 
Brass lamps, offered mated light. 

M through, the to half of the 20(h century, Mr. 
Rabiyasaid, the upper classes erf Cairo furnished tbdr 
homes as if they were Qving in Paris. Then came two 
infltieno^ihc work of HassanFaiM, an architect who 
sought to revive traditional Arabic style, and, in the 
mid-1970s, the influx of Western tourists eager lo find 
Islamic artifacts. 

' The new shopkeepers woe dduged by foreign con- 
noisseurs. “The Egyptians began to know our work 
through, the foreignas,” Mr. Rabiya said. - 

Tourists will be disappointed toleam that, today, it 
is difficult to find real Egyptian and Islamic antiques, 
such as carved damascene chairs, antique mashrabiya 

screens, with wooden beads pieced together in geomet- 
ric forma, and brass. Most woe bought long ago by 
coDecton and sent overseas. It is now illegal to trade in 
and export Egyptian handicrafts more than 100 years 
old. 

So the boutique owners are trying to revive antique 
styles by commissioning local artisans to copy earlier 


!<T- . . '■'tV.'-'Z.J 


-- — 



r-- '■2c;.*/ 

■ sV:'^ 
"— ■ .hr J 1 *: 


influenced by the thinking of Mr. Fathi, Mr. Rabiya 
decided to redesign his villa at the pyramids. Hebttili 
the domes but could not find carpenters to construct 
tiie elaborate wooden screens for the windows. So he 
began to prodnee them himself. 

Mr. Rabiya incorporates the screens into chairs, 
settees and mirro r frames, and uses geometric Nubian 
motifs in cabinets. He manufactures large wooden 
tableaux etched with Arabic script from the Koran 
and much smaller tableaux, for about $30 a piece, as 
mementos. 

Shehira Mehrez, who operates two boutiques, is 
reviving traditional arts and crafts such as brasswork, 
wooden chests with mother-of-pearl inlay, cushions 


In the AJ Azhar market. 

and fabrics. A vial to her boutique in the neighbor- 
hood of Doklti is interesting partly because the bou- 
tique is across the hah from Mrs. Melina’s apartment, 
which was designed by Mr. Fathi. The apartment is a 
maze of connected rooms separated by wooden-bead 
screens 

Leila Fadd, with her boutique in central Cairo, is 
the mother of the traditional movement Her shop, 
called Sinouhi, opened 30 yean ago. It is crammed 
with objects, ranging from day coasters etched with 
pharaonic designs, to bedouin jewelry, wooden 
screens, carved chests, lithographs and wall bangings- 


“All our things are made by artists," she said. ‘1 try j 
to have what is beautiful.” 

Mrs. Fadd acknowledges that the current populari- 1 
ty of traditional Arabic objects reflects the search to 
reassert a national identity. But she also sells a rela- 
tively new Egyptian handicraft, the rug work done by 
peasants from the Wissa Wassef school, situated near 
the pyramids of Giza. 

Today, the work oT that school which is widely 
copied, is ackiHwledgpd lobe on a high level The rugs 
can sell for up to 51 .000 apiece. 

Ramses Wissa Wassef, who was an architect, select- 
ed a few peasants in the village of Harraniya and 
taught them bow to weave. For inspiration, he re- 
counted pharaonic myths and other tales. Today, a 
dozen master weavers are producing tableaux, some of 
which hang in the Metropolitan Museum of An in 
New York. 

To see the Wissa Wassef carpets, which mostly 
depict village life and pharaonic tales in primitive 
style, a visit to the school in Harraniya is possible. 
Sophie Wissa Wassef, the architect's widow, has creat- 
ed a museum of the best carpets nearby. Carpets 
ranging from 50 Egyptian pounds (about S37) to 
several thousand can be bought there. 

Other boutiques of interest in Cairo are El Ain, 
which sells large brass and glass lamps, and Noshka, 
opened recently by Nadia Tewfik, a journalist whose 
bobby is Arabic decor. Aida Ayoub specializes in 
modem Egyptian art at her gallery near the pyramids. 

A trip to any of these boutiques offers a combina- 
tion of shopping and discussions on the Egyptian 
identity. These talks add what the tour guide can never 
offer a feeling for Egypt today and what its educated 
elite feel about where the country is going. 

“1 want to talk to the tourists,” Mr. Rabiya said. “I 
don’t care if 1 sell to them or not, but I want to show 
them what we’re doing here and why.” 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON EGYPT 


The FRENCH ART 
OF FINE LIVING IN CAIRO. 


s! i 3s 

N s - _fer - - 


rrj^Sts? At the Beach: 


■ ■ 

-■WrrtirV 

-ilvrVi- 


Fine Sand, but 
Few Amenities 

By Fabienne MouIIot 


: !a» s - 

" Tb*. 

•crshrais)!^ 

aeabiC 
" z: 


: ; ' K 


Basie 





rj *•; HP HE SAHARA has endowed Egypt with at 
-t least one asset — fine sand which, as it falls 
■.c&xSp into the sea, forms miles of magnificent beaches. 

[jj Ji Along the northern Mediterranean coast, on 
f»;i; At® shoreline erf- the Sinai peoinsnla and along 

V—V . ■' thp Arabian desert, there are about 2,000 milit 
(3,200 kilometers) of beaches. 

“*■ Temperatures are high in spring and fafl, and 
stifling in summer, and there is a total absence 
‘ as of rain in these seasons. Far the moment, how- 
; ' 't -TZi! ever, few af the beadies have any fag Ti tirs. 
*• ^r. ; , although there are nmoerons projects. 

•- Those that have been carried through to oom- 

"• ■. ' ‘x lac pletion are often of foreign coocqition: Soviet 
•.-T.'.aadi: tn the north, Israeli in. the Srnai and French on 
the Red Sea. 

The Egyptians themselves have tended to 
concentrate on the area around Alexandria. 
Among the Alexandrian resorts, the most fam- 
yi J ousts Agami, 1^ miles from Alexandria, and 120 

miles from Cairo. The beach thereis'frequented 
by inhabitants of both cities taking refuge from 

- — the torrid summer heal 

u . . ! Bnt AgamTs only assets are its ease of access, 

* by the Desert Road from Cairo, and a relatively 
'^rJ^SS t&q)erate dimate. Othenrise, the resort lacks 
w '9 * v '\ charm. Bortoed by a few hotels and a multi- 
- J. tdde of villas, the beach is dirty and crowded, 
fra whik the seaisbftcnroughto the point of being 
dangerous. 

W| T’oescape oiowds and pollution, tiie vacation- 

m" mb erineeds to go further wesL And a first stop is 
if' wH Sdi Abdel Rahman, about 80 miles along the 




A deserted beach west of Alexandria. 


Egypoao NaMnef Taurini Offia 


In addition, the food is pom-. But that does 
not seem to trouble the customers, often Gulf 
Arabs happy to find that the bar is well stocked 
with whisty as they leave their Moslem lifestyles 


temporarily behind. 
For famiHen, the h 



jThe resort consists of a single hotel the Ala- 
mgin, situated on a tnfldnng crescent of beach. 
Iws an ideal spot for rest, solitude and swim- 
mmg, and the sea is turquoise, limpid and warm. 
[However, the hotel winch dates from the 
pgssenoe of the Russians under Nasser, is of an 
unmistakably Sriviet style. Its reception desk is 



djiiing room lugubrious, with not even a glimpse 
of the sea. 


t CONTRIBUTORS 

JANE FRIEDMAN, a Cairo-based jour- 
roahst, is a regular contributor to TheGhris- 
-fem Science Monitor and The Observer. 

) SCOTT MACLEOD is a journalist based 
Cairo specializing in the Middle East He 
%£ is a regular contributor to The Guardian, 
'The New Statesman and The Christian Sci- 
ence Monitor. 

& ■ • . 
t SOUKEN MEUKIAN, a specialist m Is- 
[bmiic art, covers the art 'markets for the 
(International Herald Tribune. 

i * 

FABIENNE MOULLOT, a fredancejour- 
■hahst based in Paris, has lived in Cairo and 
[traveled extensively in Egypt. i 


Far famHiftt, die hotel has a number of bun- 
galows, equipped with outdoor barbecues, 
which provide a more agreeable vacation solu- 
tion. 

For thosein search of animation, the lonely 
coastal road, which is dotted with the rusted 
remains of World War IT armor and is often 
prey to sandstorms, leads to Mersa Matruh, the 
last town before the Libyan frontier. 

On tile beach just to the west of Mersa Ma- 
truh, UwJToid Bean Site is the most piquant in 
the area and perhaps in att Egypt 
.Owned by. a couple of Greek origin, it is 
reminiscent of a good family pension in Europe 
and contrasts favorably with the impersonal 
hotels of the major chains that are to be found 
elsewhere in-Egypt 

The staff, smiling and efficient like then- 
bosses, are mainly students who arrive for the 
vacation season. 

light and cheerful with bright green shutters, 
most of the rooms have a small terrace giving 
onto the sea. hi the dining roam, large bay 
windows open out on the Mediterranean and 
good-quality buffets are available at every meal 

- The beach is dean and well equipped with 
deckchairs, parasols, pedal boats and wind-surf- 
ing boards, as wdl as an instructor. 

The Bean Site is fall throughout the season, 
particularly during the Moslem fasting month 
of Ramadan when many Alexandrians and Cai- 
renes, presumably Christians, descend to escape 
the rigors of Islamic tradition. 

- A few miles further west are the most beauti- 
ful beaches of Egypt’s Mediterranean coast. 
They are almost always deserted. 

- Right at the other end of the Mediterranean 
coast*, at AtAzish, the capital of North Sinai, is 

Sample restaurants are wd?H!ituawd by the 
beach and serve Arab mezzeh, orhorsd’oeuvres, 
kebabs and grilled fish, but no alcohoL A Marri- 
ott hold is being bull 

Sinai’s other mam beach resents, to the south, 
are Shann d Sheikh and Nuwdba. 

The road that liriks the two must be among 
the most picturesque in the world. It passes 
through the Sinai desert, past rocks that slip 
through all imaginable shades of ochre and red. 
Every twist in the road brings a scenic surprise. 

The Israelis started developing the area short- 
ly after. the 1967 Middle East war, when they 
occupied the area. 

Nuweiba, an oasis, has retained the appropri- 
ate characteristics. Its single hotel comprised of 
very simple bungalows on the beach, is set 
among a garden that rises out of the sand. 


The standard erf comfort is not high, the food 
uninteresting and served indoors m a baleful 
dining room. Bat these are minor consider- 
ations. The scenery is so grandiose that it demol- 
ishes any worries about creature comforts. 

Behind Nuweiba stretch the rust-colored 
mountains of Sinai which rise to 8,500 feet 
(2,600 meters) at Mount Saint Catherine. Across 
the sea, an equally spectacular landscape, the 
mountains of Saudi Arabia, is dearly viable. 

But the main treasure is below sea level The 
Gulf of Aqaba possesses one of the most varied 
collections of corals, brightly colored fish and 
other marine life in the world. 

Sharm d Sheikh has the same assets, but it 
has been spoilt by axi ugly modem' infrastruc- 
ture. Far the Israelis, it was above all a military 
base, and they made few efforts for tourists. 

The Egyptians plan to develop the area but 
have done tittle since they recovered all of Sinai 
in 1982 under the Gamp David peace accords. 

In the earfy 1970s, Sharm d Sheikh was desert 
and little more. Protected by the Israeli Army, 
the rare v acationers were lodged in tents and 
served frugal plastic- wrapped meals. 

Later, concrete took over and rarefy with 
taste; detracting from an otherwise superb 
beach and hinterland. 

Still on the Red Sea, but across the Gulf of 
Suez, lies Ain Snkhna. About 50 miles from the 
dty of Suez, it is a 90-minute drive from the 
capital and a favorite with Cairenes. 

The beaches have no hotels, there are no 
nearby towns and only campers can stay over- 
night 

But visiting Ain Sukhna can be perilous. 
Since the 1973 war, the area has not been 
completely deared of mines and it is essential to 
check for danger notices and to avoid beaches 
cordoned by barbed wire. Earfy this year, four 
British children were killed when they triggered 
a mine while playing in the sand. 

Further south, 240 miles from Suez, Hurgh- 
ada is an established vacation resort with a 
Sheraton and Club Med. With its own airport 
and highway linking it to Upper Egypt, it is a 
favorite with foreign tourists seeking a few days 
of sea and sun after trekking round pharaonic 
tombs aud ruins. 

The coast on both rides of Hu^hada is unde- 
veloped and set against spectacular mountains. 
The beaches stretch as far as the eye can see but, 
here again, it is advisable to watch far danger 
signs because of mines. 

Hurgbada is a major skin-diving resort and 
the town has a marine mumm and aquarium 
showing most of the varieties of fish to be 
encountered in the wold. Several small islands 
just a short trip away by Sheraton or Qub Med 
boats harbor the area’s best corals, inhabited by 
fish of all shapes, sizes and colors. 


At Sonesta, service begms 





Let tis know when you're arriving. Our per 
sonneiwill meet you at the airport and assist 
i with customs, visa and passport controls, 
’ll then chauffeur you by complimentary air- 
conditioned limousine to the luxurious 5 Star 
Sonesta Hotel, only 7 kilometers away am 
kilometers from downtown Cairo. At Sone 
5 star service begins at the airport and never 
seemstoend. 

For reservations call 

Sonesta Instant Reservations in: 

Amsterdam 02025-65*42 
Frankfurt 069 284-388 
London .01 628-3451 
'Paris 06079-1717 
Zurich 01302-08-57 

r£^~}800 dlmct connection 
ti-HT for the cost of a local can 

Member of Golden T utip Hotels 

SooestaHotel Cairo 

4 El Tayaran Street Nasr City. Cairo. Egypt 
Telephone (025 609 444 or (02) 604611 Telex (S27)2l9iS 


■Uetviefl In Boston (Cambridge)- Ksy Bweayno pfisir^.CMando and 
NawOffMM. Portand (MalnoL Amsterdam. Bermuda, EgypL tarart. 





FOR RESERVATIONS AND INFORMATION USE ■ 

ME (APOLLO ) AF (PARS) RO (SABRE) SVSTEMS OR 
THE NEAREST AIR FRANCE TICKET OFFICE OR 
TRAVEL AGENT . 

RESERVATION IN THE USA CAN ALSO BE MADE 
BY CALLING Mfll (1) 800 223 69 tB. NY STATE 
(1) 800 442 59 17, CANADA - ONTARIO : 

(1) 800 361 82 34 OR 

MERIDIEN CAIRO ; 

CORNICHE EL NIL. GARDEN CITY - CAIRO ■ 

P.O.BOX 2288 TEL : 845444 

TLX : 22325 HOMER UN 


J/Jk HOTEL 
WWW LECAKE 


MERIDIEN THE INTERNATIONAL HOTEL 
WITH A FRENCH TOUCH 
TRAVEL COMPANION OF AIR FRANCE 


A crafts shop in Cairo. 


*>• . 

> • K ' 


fewir-Vw.i • ■" 




















7000 Years of Civilization 


More than 50 Years of Experience 

Ebvpt/Jir 

AMERICA - EUROPE - AFRICA - ASIA 

BOEING 767 - AIRBUS 300 - BOEING 737 

- BOEING 707 - BOEING 747 EnvpTflm 

AT YOUR SERVICE 







Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, NOVEMBER 23-24, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 


Vut HIM Law Last CDs. 


SKI? 14 
73469 JS'M 
22004 444. 
30143 41% 
103B1 49 
18177 44% 
I602S Am 
14793 3318 
14390 355*1 
13114 61% 
12811 

14693 43% 
13128 41% 
12104 *46 

11376 38V* 


14 + » 

34% — % 
44H + tt 

39 +3% 

47% -1% 
44% — % 
49% + % 
23% — % 
25% +1% 
40% — % 
39% -62% 
6 l% +1V4 
40% - ft 
4% + VS 
38% + % 


oaui Hion Law Oom! arm 

vss ’as'SfflwaB-S 

mu"* S 164.91 145.16 164.14 + D.11 
Coma 58 *S 5m* *253 58480-179 


Composite 
Indus mo la 
Tronsp. 
uinmes 
Finanoa 


HIM LOW Cine CtTae 
1164$ 114JJ7 11i24 +0.12 
13358 13X09 13X29 +022 
11040 IIOjOI 11X01 — 0J9 
,40-05 5957 SUH— ftM 
rcua 12S34 12540 +005 


fridays 

mse 

Ckmstg 


1 


AMEX Diaries 


masdaQ index 


Advanced 
Declined 
unowned 
Total Issues 
New Htota 

NOW LOWS 
Vdlumt un 
Volume down 


340 

221 ;g* 

157 233 

818 ®* 

43 W 

12 * 


Co mpotn*. 

industrial# 

Flnonco 

insurance 

UtllltlM 

Bank* 

Trwim 


WMK V«» 
AM ** 
304.17 34545 

Swt 2f2? 

40*49 29141 

29X37 2523 
32547 22340 
&& 33X32 


NYSE Diaries 


[•MflWfcffPHgtnKlB 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bondi 

utilities 

Industrials 


Clast Ch’M 

8144 -117 

79.90 —X21 

82.98 -'O.M 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 
Total issues 
New Higtis 
New Lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


947 1253 

444 £23 

444 381 

2057 2047 

198 ,92 

5G£ 



Boy soles 

•Shrt 

Now, 21 

- - - 208450 55SJHS7 

3,)55 

Nov. 20 

1*8417 481409 

vr 14 

NOV. 19 

Nov. IB 

180,107 307452 

I7UB saajvn 

HUM 

■Included In me sales flown 

■4.8W 


Vd. at 4 pm — 

i > n l m l MiA 

Prsv.4 PJ6.V0L 

icn r m^ip 

Prev coosoiktated dose 

107431380 



Standard & Poo fs index 


AMEX Sales 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
op to the dosinb on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


Via The Associated Press 


Industrial! 

Trane. 

U HIM Kg 
Finanoa 
Composite 


HIM LOW CP** am 

224.90 22146 22*2* +M1 
18148 179.91 18003 — 12S 
BUM 87 JV 87J6—9-5* 

3*31 34.18 24J2B + Q.05 

9(r? ni 201 JS 20152 +XH 


tafaTSyg- 

prev. cons, voluma 


105HUMB 

iwjwoo 

li^aaooo 


amex Stock index, 


m. h law Ckw ®t* 

.3042 24 X 0 2414 T + *** 




Dow Average Hits Another Hig h 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Stock prices finished higher 
Friday in active trading with the Dow Jones 
industrial average breaking a record for the 
third lime this week. 

The Dow Jones averages of 30 industrials 
rose 106 to an all-iime high of 1,46433, sur- 
passing the previous high set the day before. For 
the week the Dow jumped 29.24 points. 

Broader market indicators rose modestly. 
The New York Stock Exchange index rose 0.12 
to 1 1634, establishing a new high. Standard & 
Poor’s 500-siock index also moved higher, 
climbing 0.11 to a new record of 20132. The 
price of an average share rose three cents. 

Advances outnumbered declines 950-622 
among the 2,024 issues traded at 4 P.M. 

Big Board volume totaled 133.75 million 
shares compared with 15032 million shares 
traded Thursday. 

"The market seems to be defying the law or 
gravity,” said Charles Comer of Oppenheimer 
& Co. He said that while there was not a lot of 
follow-through buying on Thursday’s dramatic 
23-point advance, that could be a healthy sign. 

Many market participants expect stocks to 
retreat moderately after the recent succession of 
sizable gains, Mr. Comer noted. “The difficulty 
is that you don't want to get out too early,*’ he 
said. 

“The market is still quite strong,” said John 
Burnett of Donaldson Lufkin Sc Jenrette. “De- 
spite a somewhat easier bond market, stocks are 
continuing to chug along.” 

Mr. Burnett and other analysts said they 
believe that some correction is in store, but the 
extent and nature of a move down is open to 


T-Bond Yield Off Sharply 


United Pros International 

WASHINGTON — The Treasury Depart- 
ment sold S6.76 bQlion of 30-year bonds Friday 
at an average yield of 9.93 percent, down from 
10.66 percent at the last auction on Aug. IS. It 
was the lowest interest rate for 30-year bonds 
since Aug. 15, 1979. when the rates averaged 
8.91 percent. 

The department said that it received bids 
totalling S 14.8 billion for the bonds, which were 
sold at 99.460 percent of par, or face value, with 
a coupon rate of 97s percent. 


question. It could just involve some selling in 
the transportation sector or in stocks, such as 
financial issues, that have enjoyed especially 
strong moves up, Mr. Burnett said. 

Baxter Travenol Laboratories was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue, up J* to 14. Its share- 
holders approved the S3 -8-billion merger of 
American Hospital into Baxter Travenol 

Texaco followed, losing K to 34W. Westing- 
house was (bird, adding % to 4 614. 

Pennzoil jumped 3H to 62 in heavy trading. 

Sterling Drug climbed VA to 39% on rumors 
Pfizer might acquire it or that the company 
might be interested in a leveraged buyout, ster- 
ling had no comment. Pfizer fell 1% to 50V4. 

Among actively traded blue chips, AT&T lost 
% to 23tt, Union Carbide advanced 1% to 62, 
Sears climbed % to 3856, Celancsc (ex-dividend) 
jumped 1% to 13654 and American Express rose 
16 to 4916. 



240 

u 

245 

24 

14* 

7J 

48 

24 

40 

20 

160 

123 

.18 

U 



40 

34 




A 


% 


DH.YH.PE MhWMUW tt*Lgg 


\M 27 
Mbit 

3401120 
1371109 
052 27 
26 . 14 
tU S 3 
40 U 
144 44 
48 33 


II 

29 Vl 
3 * 
wo 
M 

nib 

30 
2T8i 

38ft 



ins 


35 24 

2314 IB 
37* 28 Vi 
40 31 Vb 

13% 9* 
40* 

54K 




v4n 




19 . 19 V. + 16 
taw Mft + H 



27V. 2186 JOVMta T40 64 2* 103 2396 2JK 2*4 


516 5 * . 

S 3 53 *, + 16 
996 OTi + Mi 

vm !?_ .+ * 






64 
40 
50 
AS 
9.0 
94 

BJ 

34 7 4109 
200 
192 
326 
391 


ills 

3 !» + V 6 



54 M 

22 

34 7 

21 ® 

12 

629 


302 

SOS 

23 13 

352 * 

U 

1218 

74 . 9 

16 


22 * 

14 2 B 

3*19 

44 .13 

1057 

- 9 

87 

34 21 

354 

U 23 

940 

. ® 

652 

74 7 

84 

94 

5 

8 

3201 


214 

5 

494 


43 

29 1 

EG 

IW 

1516 ! 

EQ 

3216 

23 V! 1 

ES 

2814 

20 ! 

Eai 

2 ft 

12 V, 

Eft 

1216 

346 

Co 

5 

146 : 

EA 

296 

16 

EA 

2296 

796 

ES. 

25 V. 

916 

EA 

3316 

1146 , 

EA 

2816 

21 Vj : 

Ea 

2416 

1516 

EB 

» 

41 V 6 . 

Esi 

6116 

49 U 

eo 

1516 

1116 

Ed 

32 % 

20 

Ed 

MV. 

2616 

Ed 

1886 

1 * 

ED 

11 

8 

Ed 

3416 

2246 

Ed 

25 b 

2146 

EP 

1916 

f 

Ell 

12 

746 

EM 

5 Vj 

2 U 

EM 

MV 6 

IS* 

El< 

16 

lit* 

EM 

916 

2 

EM 

786 . 

44 

Err 

12 & 

6 V. 

En 

20 V, 

1 SV 6 

Err 

3316 

26 V. 

En 

2 M 

1746 

En 


48 

12 

20 

243 

1.26 

72 


JO 

JO 

1.7 

15 

MO 

UH 

IV 

i 5 

226 

221 



22 



* 

3943 




100 




214 

323 k 



31 

420 k 



191 




291 

120 

52 


1530 k 

226 

82 

9 

95 

72 Da 

<5 

TS 1 S -13 

140 

22 

B 

446 

44 

33 

12 

1141 

124 

.15 

M 

30/4 

160 

42 

15 

i a 

20 

1.9 

14 

112 

.16 

12 

M 

48 

JW 

26 

14 

61.1 

2.15 

W 


20 

Me 

4 

11 

434 X 

2 * 

32 


77 



15 

72 

J 0 

4 

25 

344 

20 

6.1 

15 

nl 


17 

14 

1991 

.MtlU 

9 

1311 

JO 

3.1 

14 

*86 

L 40 B 

46 

10 

1401 

128 

B 2 

9 

44 x 




2814 27 

as 27 Vi 
116 116 
996 m 
35 3417 

15 1416 

2 M 4 2196 
27 2596 

18 1716 

TMi 191 a 
45 63 

304 3 SV, 
IOVj 1 QV 6 
2416 2416 
20 27VJ 
25 V 5 2 » 
3416 3516 
1 » 1616 
3216 3116 
34 V* 3 S 4 
17»6 1716 
229 ! 2214 
10 996 

2316 23 


w 'Tit 

am 2016 

49V. 4916 
1716 1716 
3316 3216 
4296 4216 
X 1916 
2816 2» 
296 296 
43 42 

IS 

1396 

4SM 
74 
33 





IB t$96 

irau 8116 


A 1 
7.1 
34 
U 
34 
?0 
92 
104 
J44 
114 
ITS 

U 

« 

ObEdrf 340 124 
WBd or 252 \ 2 j 
' ' 1L8 

124 

34 




















































































Statistics Index 

K*'®’ *M«xiwk« PJ* BraoKmui »_ ' 

,: ' *. ^■'' $SS SSr fl ilui. »u Sort Hw rluti p.13 

.1 MXS6™*™*"*P-M Inter**} rn H p „ 

1' & $ »« ^”.” ™ WWY Pl» 

■;« 55; « calmer row*. P.ia OnNons 

> I <.*; CBpww«ta P.14 OTCaoot pi? 

«i 0^*"* PM O^nwrKBti pin 

p 1 h, 23-24. ms 


CV Q r* 1 - . 


Keraih^^Sribunc. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Slocks 
Report, Page 12. 

Page 13 


c, Qi ?. 
i; <•* : .' 


ECONOMIC SCBtf 


- ; ~£; : 


- 


**• \ 
*c s 


— iin® '■ 

• * 

:■* ■&,'■ 


®-e-4, 


* .... 

How Should China Avoid 
Perils of Modernization? 

1. .. .. . B y AlttHURN. VALDR0N 

International Herald Tribune " 

P ^hX^?t> N ’ N ^* Jersc y — Now that the sensitive 

<* S^tcmber and the hoti- 
*5 ^ ^ Chinese leadership in 
to prevent some tw£ges 
' F aui ^9™ devdoptng into a fullmterame. Foxinthe 

J^the thcre 316 some dfctSKng problems 

w^the foreign connections, the key to China’s rademzation 

CMn ?P le °* "hat can go wrong is Hainan inland, 
which m 1983 was given money and axnromicprivaeges to boild 

up export industries. But in- p 

vestment was neglected and T 

the money used instead to buy It raiaftg tho. hnab* 

fonagh goods for profitable 

resale inland. question 01 WUtf 

modernization really 

RJSCk , d»3£ faforcw 

ton -describe a commercial 

toom town aborted: new shops and hotels dosed, port facilities 
deserted, and the industrious Hainan people now ringing fn the 
tropical sun. 

To di smis s the Hainan case as “ corrupti on" is too simple. 
• Haitia n is a disturbing example of the perils of what one is 
tempted to call “import-led growth.” And it raises the basic 
question of what modernization is for China 
. A s emblance of modernity can be created simply by spending 
.reserves and borrowing money to bring in “modem” goods from 
.abroad not just consumption goods, but factories and comput- 
ers. Such an ulti m a te ly seif -defeating policy of facade-buffeting is 
.not, of course, what China or any other developing country 
'Wants. But to a certain extent, it is what many of get. 

_ Many Western observers do not grasp thi« pnlmraTiy explosive 
-dilemma. China’s modem hotels and restaurants do not-eqnal 
modernity. The real question is whether the modem foreign 
invested sector is paying for itself. If it is not, China is in trouble. 

T HE evidence is troubling. Some joint-venture hotels are in 
fin a n c i a l trouble and the Special Economic Zones, such as 
Sh e nzh e n on the Hong Kong border, are not the successes 
■once hoped. Shenzhen's billion-dollar infrastructure is not re- 
motely paying for itself. And this week’s fall in the Hang Krmg 
Stock Market shows potential weakness in that colony, a key 
■jsource of China's foreign exchange. Now China's balance of 
payments and foreign reserves are suffering. 

*” If the problems just described were simply economic, they 
probably would be manageable. The mlr today is that, as has 
repeatedly happened in the past, economic problems wfll have 
social and political ripple effects. It is important to remember 
that manyof the manifestations that Western reporters angle out 
i, as signs of change — - like skirts slit to the thigh — and the 


Furthermore, became those manifestations ar e repellent to many 
Chinese, they may undermine economic growth by creating a 

'ha dflnish agamet change 

Traditionally China has sought to be self-sufficient For most 
of its almost 40 years, the People's Republic of China, has proudly 
.forbidden a meaningful Western role in its economy fear reasons 
that arebosicatty political. 

Inl9S2,accoftin^to’NodEtaiber’six)ok“FaIlofShhnghai, T, a 
'Communist official told an imprisoned Shanghai-bom Ameri- 
can, “The people's government has industrialized the whole of 
.’China and is entirely self-sufficient: Qiina needs nothing-” 

Of course that was not tree, but it was an illusion that built 
prideL The hard lesson of the decades that followed, however, was 
that boot-strapping China's economy was going to be impossible. 
By the 1970s, some in the Communist leadership had, hke every 
; regime since the 19th century, recognized the indispensable role 
of trade, foreign capital and technology. The problem, then as 
"now, was how to accommodate than. In this connection it is 
(Conthmed an Page 15, CoL 2) 

| Cu rrency R ates 

CraMRatM - Noe. 22 

S I DM. FJ=- IU- OUr. *J». SJ=. Ym 

hnuttroail 2*11 42T 1T256S* 36*2* 8L1647* 5JU m 07,42 ’ 14427* 

tirVCMB(a) 32275 - 7541 202248 US 2S9SB* 1734 2 US 2522* 

Frankfort 23B52 £737 3UB* IMI x BUS* 4W4- T2L12* 1281* 

London (M USB 37475 1U185 23SU0 43195 7583 UH 2JX173 

MHan 174520 252221 47X05 27U9 mm 3 1387 824.17 U53 

ttawYorlrlC} 04824* 2345 7J15 U33J» 210 52H UM 280*5 

Pori* 74785 312945 3JH84 U1SJC 2208 1X07 ‘ 17212 1987* ■ 

Tofcyo 201.15 291.18 7727 2U5 1120 * 4920 28571* 95J9 — 

ZortCft 21183 1062 8128* 2X875 • 0J2U* 72745* 4*571 * 10493* 

16CU 02544 0291 22092 47343 129129 24849 444741 1209 T72459 

J SDR 128308 DM902 NJX 85243* HO. 11529 5*411 22723 217*07 

Closings In London and Zurich, fixings hi other European cmtmrs. New York rutpsatt PM. 
la} Commardot franc tb) Amounts needed to buy one pound (ci Amounts needed tv buy one 
do /tar Cl Units of >00 (x) Units of IMO (Yi Units of 10000 NXD not wrtitf; NA: nriavaUattfa. 
(*) To bar one poood: M/JL12455 

<M tor PaHarV«lawi 

(kmcr Mr U38 Cmtcocv Ptr 1*52 currency mr ixs* Currency perUJJ 

Anxn. antral 0*0 Rl markka £55 M*x-M« 30X00 Soviet rafale 0J771 

AuctroL* 12443 Creek droc. 15220 Narw.knHW 724* SWM.P**eia 15935 

Abftr.KM. 1822 Haas Km S 72075 PDB.8M0 1720 SWMLkrm 7 m 

Be9g.fln.fr. 3274 Indian rupee 122773 PorteKUtD 14220 TaliimiS. 3928 

Bran cm. 920520 . Inda-ranh* 1,12320 Sawflrfycrt 1*»5 TkoJtMM 2*245 

CawcBaaC 127*3 frbkc 02184 5&M.B 2294 TartlctiRra SK2S 

CWHnym 32015 kraMM. 127120 S.Afr.rand 22*47 UAenkfwm 32725 

Donb* krone 934 KnwaWcBnor 02907 5. Knr.ira 88928 Vm&btfv. 14« 

EOypL pound 135 . MokTT.rtoo. 22M5 
CSterflag: 12M3 litdi e 

Sources: Banmio do Benelux (BnnssH); Banco Commercials itaUono (Ml tan); Mw M> 
Canale Oe Paris (Parts); Bonk of Tokyo (Totcra); IMF (SDR>: BAD frftoar, rfvoL tnmam); 
Gosbenk (mMeJ. Other data from Routers anOAP. 


U.S. Prices 
Rose 0.3% 
In October 

Rate Is Highest 
Since April 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Consumer 
prices rose QJ percent in October, 
led by higher food and automobile 
costs, the Labor Department said 
Friday. The increase was the high- 
est since a 0.4-percem rise in April, 
and ended a five-month suing of 
0L2-percent increases. 

So far in 1985, retail prices have 
risen at an *Trnm >1 rate of 3 3 per- 
cent, according to the Labor De- 
partment's Consumer Price Index. 

The annual rate of 3.3 percent 
for the first 10 months of 198S was 
the slowest pace of increase since 
1967, when consumer prices rose 3 
percent. In 1984, consumer infla- 
tion rose 4 percent fa- the year. 

Food prices, including restau- 
rantmeals and alcoholic beverages, 
rose 0.4 percent in October, from a 
03-percent increase in September. 

A department analyst, Patrick 
Jackman, said the bulk of that in- 
crease was attributable to a higher 
federal excise tax on alcoholic bev- 
erages that look effect on Oct. 1. 
Higher prices for automobiles and 
auto financing pushed transporta- 
tion prices up 03 percent after five 
straight months of declines, the de- 
partment said. That increase result- 
ed mostly from higher automobile 
finance charges and insurance 
costs, along with price increases for 
1986 models. 

But offsetting these increases 
were declines in the costs of used 
can, the seventh monthly drop, 
and of motor fuel, which fell for the 
fourth straight month. 

Housing costs rose 0J percent in 
October, following a 0.2-percent 
rise in Sq>t ember. Fuel and utilities 
dropped 0.6 percent, with natural 
gas costs down 13 percent and 
electricity prices off 1.4 percent. 
Fuel oQ prices jumped 2.4 percent, 
rising for the second month in a 
row, but the costs remained below 
their level a year ago. 

The increase brought inflation 
for the first 10 months of the year 
to 3 3 percent on an annual basis.. If 
that rate holds for the rest of the 
year, the rate of inflation this year 
could be the lowest since the 3 
percent of 1967, Mr. Jackman said. 

But other economists said they 
expected consumer prices to rise 
more in the coming months, fol- 
lowing a 03-percent rise in whole- 
sale prices for October. 

- Donald Ratajczak, head of the 
economic forecasting project at 
Georgia State University and a 
leading U3. price analyst, said his 
most recent survey of November 
prices a t the wholesale level showed 
more of an upturn in prices, partic- 
ularly meats. (UPI, AP) 



LME Extends 
Tin Suspension 
2 More Weeks 


b Th. Me~ Ycfk Tuna 

Woodworkers in Kafr el-Battikh, Egypt, vrhere carpentry is a major source of income. 

Economics of a Small Egyptian City 

A Village Praised by Nasser Builds Its Hopes of Wood 


By Judich Miller 

Nck York Tima Service 

KAFR EL-BATT1KH. Egypt — Almost every- 
thing has changed here in tins village except its 
name. 

Kafr el-BauBch, which means “village of the 
watermelons,” is no longer a village. With a popu- 
lation of 60,000, it is about to be declared a city. 

Nor do farmers grow watermelons here any- 
more. in fact, agriculture is no longer the town's 
major source of income. Its prosperity has come 
from a new local carpentry industry and workers’ 
remittances — money that villagers have sent or 
brought home from lucrative jobs in the Gulf- 

Yet despite the changes, the village continues to 
reflect, as President Gamal Abdel Nasser put it 25 
years ago, the “true face of Egypt.” 

The year before Nasser endowed Kafr el-Battikh 
with a moment of national prominence, the village 
on the Nile had 17,800 residents. Four miles (6.4 
kilometers) from the provincial capital of Damiet- 
ta, Egypt's carpentry center, and 1 16 miles north- 


east of Cairo, it had no piped water, no electricity 
and no paved roads. 

Nor were there movie theaters or television sets. 
The fortunate had transistor radios; the rest ex- 
changed news and gossip over glasses of hot tea or 
thick coffee in the local coffee house. 

There was one kindergarten and two primary 
schools. Only a handful of adults could read or 
write. 

The village, as its name implies, supplied water- 
melons. a favorite Egyptian dessert, to much of 
Egypt. Most of the villagers were poor, numbed by 
drudgery and disease, living in homes made of 
fired brick or mud brick. They still wore the dotbes 
of biblical times and fanned with implements 
pictured on the walls of Pharaonic tombs. 

Within six years, much had changed. Five new 
schools were built, including the first junior high 
schooL With money from Cairo, the village built a 
police station, a social center and a medical clinic 
with a resident doctor and a staff of five. New 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 1) 


Return 

LONDON — The London Met- 
al Exchange decided Friday to 
m a in tai n its suspension of tin trad- 
ing until at least Dec. 9 to give the 
International Tin Council more 
time to resolve its financial crisis. 

The LMFs chief executive, Mi- 
chael Brown, gave no date for the 
resumption of trading. 

On Wednesday, the ITC ad- 
journed an emergency meeting un- 
til Dec. 2 after its members failed to 
end the global tin crisis by refusing 
to accept a rescue package from a . 
group of 16 creditors. 

The council, which groups 22 tin 
producing and consuming coun- 
tries, has pledged to stay in session 
until it has readied a decision on 
honoring its estimated £1 billion 
(S1.44 billion) in debts to the banks 
and LME members. 

The LME the world's largest 
metals trading forum, suspended 
tin transactions on Oct 24 when 
the ITC said it no longer had mon- 
ey to support prices. Trading also 
remains suspended on the second- 
largest tin market, in Kuala Lum- 
pur. 

The ITC owes £352 million to 
the 16 financial institutions, which 
offered to lend the council £900 
million to meet its present debt 
obligations. But a majority of the 
ITC member governments have re- 
fused to underwrite the rescue 
package. 

The creditors “noted with con- 
cern that the ITC had met for the 
third week running without reach- 
ing any substantive conclusions." 

The crisis also has badly affected 
trading in copper and other metals. 

Mr. Brown said that the LME 
the ITCs creditor banks and the 
Bank of England will bold discus- 
sions on how to resume trading 


Mega-Mergers Worry Bonn’s Antitrust Officials 


By Warren Geder 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Mega-merg- 
ers are beginning to shake up the 
traditionally immovable terrain 
among West Germany’s top 50 cor- 
porations and Bonn’s antitrust 
watchers are reacting quickly to the 
rumblings. 

In two recent examples, Daim- 
ler-Benz AG has stated its inten- 
tion to acquire the electronics com- 
pany AEG AG and Bayerischc 
Moioren Werke is negotiating for 
control of the aerospace group, 
Messerschmi it-Bfllkow-Blohm. 

In response, officials at the Eco- 
nomics Ministry and the Cartel Of- 
fice said this week that large com- 
pany consolida ti ons, or “elephant 
weddings” as they are called here. 


could force Bonn to consider tight- 
ening merger controls once the 
1987 legislative period begins. 

Otto Schlecbt, senior state-secre- 
tary in the Economics Ministry, 
said be would not favor legislation 
seeking to ban mergers simply on 
the principle of size. 

Such a ban. which would shift 
the focus of West German antitrust 
law from a company’s acquisition 
of a dominant market share to its 
obtaining dominance as an eco- 
nomic and political power, has 
been urged in recent weeks by vari- 
ous members of tbe opposition So- 
cial Democrats. 

In an interview in Friday's edi- 
tions of Frankfurt Allgem cine Zd- 
tung. Mr. Schlecht said debate 
within the ministry is focused on 


amending antitrust laws to prevent 
companies with minority stokes in 
another concern from pooling 
those shares as a means of exercis- 
ing de facto controL 

Under current West German 
antitrust law. acquisition of stakes 
below 25 percent do not require 
Cartel Office approval. 

Mr. Schlecht expressed concern 
about a number of West German 
companies that had acquired stakes 
below 25 percent and then — 
through supportive votes of other 
shareholders, especially from 
friendly commercial h anks widely 
represented on corporate supervi- 
sory boards — obtained manage- 
ment control of a firm without ever 
having to meet Cartel Office ap- 
proval 


The Canel Office president, 
Wolfgang Kartte, expressed similar 
concern earlier this week. 

Mr. Schlecht said he is consider- 
ing calling for a replacement of the 
25-percent rule with more general 
criteria that would oblige compa- 
nies to obtain Cartel Office approv- 
al if their proposed acquisition was 
seen as affording de facto controL 

Herbert Wolf, chief ecoaomisi at 
Commerzbank, said that he doubts 
West Germany will pass stringent 
laws preventing large mergers. He 
said that Bonn instead will seek 
new guidelines that would give 
more flexibility to antitrust offi- 
cials and West German courts in 
determining whether a merger 
should be allowed. 


After the Texaco Case , Wall Street Is Taking Stock ofPennzoil 


Interest Bales 


Ban oetureMy Nm .22 

Swlct Fraud! 

iww p Mortt Fru*c Sturflra Rue BCU SDR 

Hnootb 4 tW-4 U. !Hr4Hi uvwnt BMrtSH 8Hrfl«W Ttt 

2 months ft4M 4IW% 1HM18I »t<-9!fc 8R-BW 7* 

ImnflU MV5 flMk 3 8w4h 11W-T1H ’M*. 7* 

4 months 84tt 4 4Hr**> 11 *-n * 9 tv-io H. BHhM 7 V. 

l y msir 8*4* 4 *-4 ■* 44H 11 Sir- 11 * 9 *10 * BVh44* 7* 

Siurces: Morgan Guaranty IdoOur. DM. SF. Pound. PPI ; Uords Bank tECV)i Routers 
(SDR). Rates appttaMa to interbank deposits of SI million minimum (or eauhralent). 


By Thomas C Hayes 

New York Tima Service 

HOUSTON — In the wake of 
Penny-nil Co.’s record damages 
award against Texaco Loo, Wall 
Street analysts are trying to handi- 
cap the value of PeunacnTs shares. 

A quick sampling, token two 
days after Pennzofl’s $10.53-biHion 
jury award in its case against Tex- 
aco Inc, indicated that the analysts 
were betting that Pemtzoil would 
take home at least $500 million 
before taxes. 

“It’s really very, very subjective 
at this point, but almost everyone 
among tire lawyers we’ve talked to 
dose to the case thinks Texaco is in 
a box," said Thomas E Hasseo, an 
oil analyst with Morgan Stanley & 
Co. He estimated that Texaco 
would have to pay at least SI bO- 
Hon. 

Before the jury announced the 
award on Tuesday in Houston, 
Marc D. Cohen, an energy analyst 
at Kidder, Peabody & Co, project- 
ed that Pranzoil would earn SA25 a 
share this year, and about $4.65 a 
share in 1986. 

That reasoning put Pennzoil’s 


market value at about $46 a share. 
The stock closed Friday at $62 on 
the New York Stock Exchange, up 
$3,625, its fifth consecutive jump. 
On Tuesday, the day tbe award was 
announced, the stock jumped by 
S7J75 in heavy trading, to $57215. 

J. Hugh Liedtke, Pennzoil's 
chairman and chief executive, said 
in an interview Thursday that he 
thought Wall Street analysts would 
realize that the $10.53 billion 
award was not as fanciful as it had 
seemed at first blush. 

PennzoB argued that it deserved 
a S7J3-bDIiou damage award be- 
cause that was the difference be- 
tween the 510 billion it would have 
had to spend to find and develop 
the one billion, barrels of oil re- 
serves it would have gained 
through Getty for S22> billion. 

It asked for another S7.53 billion 
in punitive damages. The jury 
awarded the full $7.53 billion for 
actual damages, but cm the puni- 
tive damages to S3 billion. Under 
Texas law, Texaco is also obligated 
to pay interest at a rate of S1.2 
billion a year, dating from Jan. 4, 
1984, the date on which Getty 


agreed to sell a 43-percent stake to 
Pennzoil. 

Judge Solomon Casseb of Texas 
District Court has set Dec. 5 and 6 
to enter a final judgment on the 
jury award. He can overturn the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

decision, uphold it and modify the 
award or let it stand 

“I doubt the judge will overturn 
the verdict completely, and I doubt 
he’ll give Texaco a new trial." said 
Mr. Cohen of Kidder, Peabody. 
“Will he reduce the damages? Td 
say probably.” 

Texaco has said it would appeal 
any judgment against It, and some 
triad lawyers said it could take at 
least two years for appeals to be 
heard 

Alan L. Edgar, an analyst with 
Schneider, Bemet & Hickman in 
Dallas, said the award was likely to 
be pared because Pennzoil’s S7.53- 
billioo damage request was flawed. 
Pennzoil would not -have invested 
$10 billion to find 1 billion barrels 
from new exploration after losing 
Getty, he said It would have 


looked to buy the same total of 
reserves from other oil companies 
at much less cost. 

Not true, Mr. Liedtke said. 
“There was only one Getty," he 
said, meaning that it would not 
have been possible to buy the re- 
serves so quickly and inexpensively 
elsewhere. “And those damages 
were based on our finding costs for 
the previous five years, not for 
what it will take in the future." 

Mr. Liedtke said be did not 
doubt Texaco's ability to pay the 
damages. Although Texaco’s mar- 
ket value is about $8.1 billion, he 
put its liquidation value at closer to 
$22 billion. 

He said Pennzoil expected to re- 
ceive about S6 billion, after taxes, 
from Texaco, or the equivalent of 
5120 a share. He said the company 
would put the money into high- 
grade corporate securities “and just 
sit until a series of things come 
along.” 

That would probably include a 


mix of major acquisitions, oil-] eas- 
ing investments, debt reduction, 
and special dividends to sharehold- 
ers. be said. “We want to build a 
company that would be a major 
factor in the oil business," he add- 
ed. 

Mr. Cohen calculated that a 53- 
billion award, after taxes, would 
give Pennzoil a “war chest" equal 
to about S7 billion. 

Mr. Hassen of Morgan. Stanley, 
said: “! think the stock should 
move higher. I expect ihe ultimate 
outcome wfll be an out-of-court 
settlement of aL least 51 billion. 
That’s S25 a share before taxes." 

Mr. Edgar of Schneider. Bemet 
cautioned that Texaco had a wealth 
of resources to fight the Pennzoil 
award. “We don’t know what will 
happen," he said. “We do think 
Texaco will have to write a big 
check to Pennzoil at some point. 
Bui, despite the euphoria that still 
exists in Houston, we can't believe 
it will be for 510 billion.” 


•Key M o n e y Bntew Nos- aa 

mated State* Ota Pm. 

hacmt Rot* 7» 7ft 

FMMFOt *v> 8 

PrUMRMi 9ft 9ft 

Broker loan Rota 9 9 

Com Paw 99-179 dor* 725 720 

3*nMli Trwaorv BflK 7J1 722 

Vtataaft Timur* BUts 730 729 

CniHfUrt MB 7*8 

CM 48890091 7JD 7SO 


WwtaormooY 
luted Roll 
WatefRofi 

QuaMMti hriertMak 


hriHDonfc 


lo te nw wii fl Bow 

.Coo turner 

O ne ta o nJ Bi I nte rfcae* 

■HmmfciMcruM . 
latertafc 

Wte8 

talk Bow Raft 
telMany 
N-tfcYTiBosenr BJH 
StaBftMHtak 


taeamfUte 
tWMter 
Ahfanr lattrta* 


5JU 530 
NA. 435 
- 4*5 


« M 

825/32 » 

M 8* 
R> M 
813/16 8U/16 


im lift 

it* n 
11 3/16 113/K 
1t‘ IT/44 II 11/44 


5 * 

7ft 7W 

Bft 


Arian PeOar Pepod te 

Nas.3S 

1 month 8-SH 

2 month* 8-8ft 

Iboob M ui 8 -8ft 

IIMOMs B-Srt 

i roar B*-8* . 

Source: Reuters. 


UJS. Money Marker Finds 

Merrill LYMURtaev ashk 
3D day avnm Yield: 736 

ToleroSe InMMft Rafo Iadov? 7J7BS 
Source; Merritt Lynch, Telerote. 


GATT to Debate New Trade Talks 



Manes; Akmtx cemmemxak. Cndtl 
Cramh. boo or Tonya 


Nov. 22 

AM PA OToc 
IKM Koto 32*28 32*40 +8JB 

LmMMOT . — Uneh 

Pori* (lXSfclW 32631 XUM -HUB 

Zurich 32435 32*33 +030 

mourn 32*00 32*5D 4-820 

MMYork ■— 324*0 Uw*. 

taxembaara. Paris and London ctftdol fto- 
ings: Hoag K oag aw Zurich opening and 
dasfnv prices; New York Comex current 

contract An prices In US, Seer ounce. 
Source; Reuiert. 


By David Tinnin 

International Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — The General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 
wifl confront a crucial question 
next week at its annual assembly 

here — whether its members, com- 
prising the major trading nations of 
the non-Communist world, can 
agree to posh ahead with a new 
round of talks to redefine tbe terms 
of global trade. 

More than 400 delegates from 
the 90 member states will gather 
Monday for a conference expected 
to last tour or five days. 

The question of new global trade 
negotiations, much like the so- 
called Tokyo Round of talks that 
ended in 1979, is sure to dominate 
(he discussions. 

The U.S. trade representative, 
Clayton K, Yeuiter, has created a 
highly charged atmosphere for the 

conference by warning that if 
GATT fails to move decisively to- 
ward a new round, the United 


U.S . , Canada , Japan 
Cut Computer Tariffs 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The 
United States, Canada and Ja- 
pan have agreed to eliminate 
■ most tariffs on imported com- 
puter parts, the UJL trade rep- 
resentative, Clayton K. Yeutter, 
announced Friday. 

The US. tariff is 4 J percent 

on foreign-made computer 
parts and Japan's ranges from 
3 2 percent to 6 percent. Cana- 
da’s tariff is 3.9 percent for 
most computer parts and 6.8 
percent for semiconductors. 


States will seek to solve its trade 
disputes outride the organization’s 
framework. 

An American abandonment of 

GATT would represent a severe. 


perhaps deadly, blow to the organi- 
zation, which was founded in 1947 
as a vehicle for promoting more 

liberal trading conditions. 

The main reason for American 
impatience is alarm at the burgeon- 
ing U.S. trade deficit, which is ex- 
pected to reach $150 billion this 
year. Some UA officials believe 
the imbalance is due mainly to 
unde barriers in foreign markets. 

In inly, the United States took 
the initiative for convening a new 
trade round by calling for a special 
meeting of trade officials from 
GATT member nations. The ses- 
sion, in September, set up a high- 

level working group in Geneva to 

seek agreement on a joint approach 
for a new trade round. 

Tbe full GATT membership now 
must decide whether to establish a 
formal committee to prepare an 
agenda and procedures for the start 
of a new global round. 


K The Value Line provides 

OBJECTIVE 
EVALUATIONS of 
AMERICAN STOCKS 

The Value Line Investment Survey continually reports on 
more than 1700 American stocks. It provides a vast amount 
of statistical history and forecasts, all of which are reduced 
by Value Line's computer-based programs to two simple, 
easy-to- apply indices; (1) The rank for Timeliness (Relative 
Price Pertormande of the stock in the Next 12 Months) and 
12) the rating for Safety (Price Stability of the stock plus 
financial strength of the company). 

An introductory subscription to The Value Line investment 
Survey brings you as a BONUS Value Line’s 2000-page Inves- 
tors Reference Service, with the latest reports, rankings, and 

ratings on over 1700 stocks, together witn the 72-page guide, 
“A Subscriber's Guide." Then, every week for 12 weeks you 
will receive new reports on about 130 stocks, which update 


and replace the corresponding reports in your Reference 
Service — for just S75, about half thus regular rate, providing 
you have not had a subscription in the past two years. Send 


you have not had a subscription in the past two years. Send 
payment along with name and address together with this ad 
tO Dept 513G04 

THE VALUE LINE 

711 Third Avenue, New York. NY 10017. ‘JS-A. 

Paymant In local cuiranctoa IBrJtfctfi £84. Fraact»tr73& Swlu IrMS, DM2421 
and hmhmM 4 tar information 9ftauWb«d<ractadts.-VafBaLina,Att.;Al«jL- 
andra da Salnt-PhaHa. 2 Ava. da VHmi 75007 Park. fTaL S51.63.5fi). 

Distributed Dv KLM floral Dutch Airimn Publication Distribution Service 
^ HottanC Aflow 4 to 5 waeks for delivery. . 


without risking a sleep fall in the 
price of the commodity. 

Analysts predict that when the 
market reopens, the price of tin 
could Tall by as much as half of its 
pre-suspension level or £3,140 per 
metric ton (1.1 short tons). 

Id New York, Malaysia’s prima- 
ry industries minister warned that 
such a drop could force his coun- 
try’s production to 10,000 or 1 1,000 
metric tons a year from the approx- 
imately 39,000 metric tons allowed 
under ITC controls. Malaysia is the 
world's largest producer of tin. 

“If tin prices fall to £4,000 from 
ihe £8, 000-level before the London 
Metal Exchange suspended tin 
trading, we project only 22 tin min- 
ing companies out of 480 in Malay- 
sia could survive,” the minister, 
Paul Leong Khee Seong. said 
Thursday. 


Japan Aide Sees 
Yen Stabilizing 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — The eco- 
nomic adviser to the president 
of the Bank of Tokyo, Koei 
Narusawa, said Friday that he 
believed the rise in tbe yen’s 
value had largely ended. 

Speaking at a conference on 
Japanese capital outflows. Mr. 
Narusawa said that once trad- 
ers concluded that the dollar 
would decline no further, *ii 
will spark a new outflow of cap- 
ital from Japan," probably to- 
ward the United States. 

Since central banks agreed 
on Sept. 22 to work to reduce 
the dollar's value, the dollar has 
dropped to 201.60 yen from 
241.70, a decline of 17 percent. 

Brazil Weighs 
Paying Debts 
Of 3 Banks 

Untied Press International 

BRASILIA — The Brazilian 
government will reconsider paying 
as much as $415 million owed to 
UJS. and European banks as a re- 
sult of a triple banking failure this 
week, according to the head of the 
central bank. 

The president of the Bank of 
Brazil, Femao Bracher, bad said a 
day earlier that the government 
would not accept responsibility for 
private bank-uvbank loans. But 
Thursday, he said be would discuss 
repaymen tin December with bank- 
ers in New York. 

“We are studying the real legal 
situation to see if the loans can be 
paid by the central bank,” Mr. 
Bracher said. 

The debts stem from Tuesday's 
failure of the Comind, Auxiliar and 
Maisonnave private banks, which 
have uncovered loans of $764 mil- 
lion. The banks jointly owe U.S. 
and other foreign banks about $415 
million, Mr. Bracher said. 

International bankers said gov- 
ernment refusal to take responsibil- 
ity for the loans could seriously 
jeopardize Brazil's negotiating po- 
sition with respect to its S 1 03-biJ- 
lion foreign debt. 

Central bank aides earlier said 
that foreign and Brazilian creditors 
should be treated equally in the 
liquidations, being paid after se- 
cured creditors like small savers are 
paid. 

Asked why the central bank 
might consider placing foreign 
creditors in a privileged position, 
Mr. Bracher said: “It is a criteria of 
greater or lesser national interest.” 


RES IN DEP 

An Account for Ihe Cautious Investor 
lo Protect and Increase Capital 

U.S. Dollar Denominated 
Insured by Ui Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute CoflfidenfiaDfy 

CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 

RESIN DEP 

Case Postale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospectus and 
account application to; 


I** <mkU* ndm #* USA. 









Fridays 


12 Atari* 

HE* Low Stgdc 


Dlv. YM.PE WOsHtahLOW OuoLOita 


■kVfl 91 


a t UV, Russ Or 13 Ut 31ft 2114 31% + % 

M 1339 RusTog M 30 11 3*3 22ft 2Vfe 39ft + ft 

31ft 21 RyanH 1* 40 9 1«7 + ft 

33 23 Rvders -60 19 U 1BU 32% 31ft 31ft— JJ 

29 lBVt Ryland M 25 13 30 2fl* 36ft 26ft— ft 

MW Oft Rvm«r 5 74 16ft 16ft 16ft 

Uft IB* SrrrSr Ofl.17 90 113 12 lift 12 +ft 


3W. 31 + * 


Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up ra tbe dosing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 



63 

33 

QwakOt 

1+0 

74 

15 

4K 

W% 

38 

58ft 

+ ft 



OufiXSO 

00c 

3+ 

19 

306 

nvj 

23% 

23% 

+ ft 

10Vj 

5 

Quann 



19 

146 

6% 

4 

4 

— ft 

34% 

27 


l+A 

52 

11 

46 

MVj 

3014 

30% 



14W QkRell 

6*0 

S 

17 

1059 

27 ft 

25% 

2/ 

-Hid 


110 13001 7Jft 

117 12002 61ft 

10 1301 59ft 

4.1 13 22 21ft 

SJ 8 6273 77 
14 13 1190 23ft 

11 4479 13«< 
1971 24 

14 27 29 

B 1107 33ft 

12 23 34ft 

14 111 lift 

13 win. caift 

T2 



LLSl Futures 


Open High Low Close Cha. 


Via The Associated Press 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37 JDO lbs.' cents per lb. 

I4O40 0.25 Dec 159.00 15940 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open High Low Close Cha 


WHEAT CCBT1 

5-000 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
343ft 179ft Dec 367ft 138 

174ft 237 Mar 136U 136ft 

442 284 May 113ft 114ft 

172ft 143 Jul 281 185ft 

187 Seo 285ft 286ft 

3flSft 194ft Dec 197 287 

Es). Sales Prev. Soles 7811 

Prev. Dav Open int 29804 up 212 


133ft 134ft —,02ft 
130ft 331ft -04ft 
3.10ft II 1ft -JJ3 

Hlh XBIL-. 111 


183ft 284ft —81 

284ft 284ft — -00ft 
196 196ft —80ft 


MOO bumbffmum- dollars per bushel 
IK 114ft Dec 23Bft 13* 

197 124W Mar 140ft 141 

1.91ft 231 May 142ft 203V 

£86 133 Jul 241ft 243 


237ft — 81ft 
240ft —81ft 


260 
235ft 
174ft 
Ext. Sales 


Mav 242ft 143ft 141ft 143 —80ft 
JUl 241ft 143 141ft 143 


2J0ft 233ft 
224ft 127 


133ft +81 ft 
126ft +81 ft 


Prev. Day Open mt.147850 up 2894 


M or 134ft 234ft 134ft 134ft +81 ft 
Prev. Sales 40834 


SOYBEANS (CBTJ 
MBObu minimum- dollars per bushel 
439 4.78 Jan 480 4.91ft 


.4.78 Jan 4 JO 4.91ft 
485ft Mar 496ft 580 


739 489 May 5.03 587 

688 4.97 Jul 589ft 5.13ft 

S3T~ 4.98ft AuB 589ft 5.12ft 

620 496 Sep 5-06 588ft 

432 +90 Nav 587 J.1D 

543 589 Jon 5.19 520ft 

637Vi 5.19ft M or 530 531ft 

Est. Sales Prev. Seles 49,199 

Prev. Day Open Int. 75336 OH37I 


485ft 48834 +83ft 
483ft 4.97ft +8+U 
581ft 58614 +8&ft 
588 5-12*4 +86L4 

58« 5.12ft +86ft 

584 587 +84 

586ft 5J09V, +84*4 
518ft 530ft +JMft 
538ft 531ft +84ft 


16783 12650 Mar 143.00 16425 

16750 131.00 May 16585 1*7.00 

169+5 13550 Jul 1688?i 169J5 

171.00 13275 Sep 170.25 17125 

171.00 13880 Dec 17180 17250 

17125 14350 Mar 17075 17380 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 3288 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 11,670 up301 
SUGARWORLD 11 (NYC5CE) 

113800 Its.- cents per lb. 

7.73 380 Jan 552 552 

933 334 Mar 630 634 

7.15 3JB May 639 655 

570 179 Jul 563 570 

682 424 S«P 676 6.76 

596 482 OCt 590 594 

7JS 625 Jan 

753 461 Mar 745 7.48 

Est. Sales Prev. sales 21,925 

Prev. Day Onen Int. 93663 up 2038 
COCOA (NYC5CE) 

10 metric Ions- S per Ion 

3337 1945 Dec 2125 2150 

2392 1955 Mar 2220 2225 

2422 1960 May 2273 2280 

2429 1960 Jul 3297 2307 

2430 2023 S« 2324 2325 

2425 2055 Dec 2330 2330 

2385 2029 Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. sales 1264 

Prev. Day Open Int. 18.972 offl37 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE1 
15800 lbs.- cents per lb. 

18080 11170 Jan 11380 11335 


15780 15988 
16260 164.18 
16535 1 6595 
16680 16934 
17035 17135 
17180 171.00 
17035 17130 


552 567 

512 518 

632 537 

667 551 

576 567 

573 574 

587 
736 736 


3125 2136 

2212 2223 
2244 2279 

2297 2303 

2323 2329 

2330 2337 

2347 


Mar 11360 11470 
Mav 11360 11435 
Jul 11460 114J0 
sea 111.90 111.90 
Nov 111.90 111.90 
Jan 
Mar 


11280 11335 
113-50 11390 
11290 11465 
11460 11480 
11190 11180 


Esi. Soles Prev. Sales 

Prev. Day Open mt. 6840 off 570 


111,90 11190 
112.10 
11230 



Est. Sales 99 Prev. Sales 
Prev.Day Open Int. 171 








r ivrt 


jej 

Eg 











LyH 

pi 



1 





tj 3 


















Jr 

si 






Pl'i 



Tm 







-.f 

'•|r 1 

r’lJ 

w. 


i 7 W 

V* aP 


hjrn 

“rM 


■t'i: 





P 

H 

r/v T 


[:-i 2 

rjij 






rH 








1 .-I 

[rlH 

'.'id 








32 .26 31 
60 15 13 






K 

31 

& 








u,-. 


Irf 





ii'I 

+,* 1 



U? 

■"■r 






■pi 

frl 

m 











IS 




37X4 HM xerox 350 58 20 4263 57* 54ft 57ft + ft 

56 48ft Xerwcjrf 54S W 325 54ft 541V 54ft + ft 

29 1946 XTRA 66 25 » 200 254k 2S5b 25ft + ft 

30Vi Mb ZaleCp Ut-dU flSftWtWJ 

17ft . 7ft Zaaata 32 U U 483 9ft 9ft 915 

61ft 3246 Zayres - 68 - 4 17 1463 97% 561k 57th— ft 

25 Uft SESk «3BW»ft»hW»+ftl 

21ft 15ft Zero* J216T7 

4TV, 2CH'Zumh> 132 36. 15 'MS 39ft 39 39ft + ft 


NYSE Hghs-Lcms 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 Ians- dollars per Ion 
1B480 12560 Dec 13980 14080 


5&3JM 12780 Jan 13960 140.00 

30660 13080 Mar 1396D 1407 0 

16250 13250 May UflJ» 14130 

147J10 13+00 Jul 14080 141.50 

15270 11550 Aufl 14180 14180 

16780 13580 S#P 14180 14180 

14950 13680 O a 13980 14180 

15080 13680 Dec 14300 14380 

150JH 13680 Jan 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 15.991 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 43605 up 344 


13070 139.90 
13860 13990 
13980 MOID 
13980 141.10 
14080 14150 
14Q80 14180 
14080 14180 
13980 14080 
14280 14380 
14350 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBT! 

60800 Uw- dollars per 100 lbs. 

2955 1884 Dec 19.10 1960 


79SS1 18.92 Jan 19.10 1935 

28+0 1988 Altar 1970 1950 

77+5 1935 Mav 1950 1973 

2575 1950 Jul I960 2000 

25.15 1950 Aim 1980 20JB 

2485 1055 Sep 19.75 2085 

£00 1950 Oct 1985 2085 

21.90 1950 Doc 1983 2085 

21+0 1960 Jon 20.10 20.10 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 22955 

Prev. Day Open Ml. 41677 up 130* 


1898 1932 
1981 1931 
1931 1968 

1950 1970 
1970 2080 
1975 1995 

1975 1998 
1985 1998 
1980 2080 
2080 2D80 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CM El 
40000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

6785 55 JM Dec 6770 6775 

67.45 5485 Feb 42.90 42.90 

4757 5580 Apr 4UM 6180 

6685 5675 Jun 6185 4170 

65.40 5570 Aim 59.40 5960 

6060 5750 Od 5687 5665 

6580 59.10 Dec 5990 5900 

Est. Sales 11606 Prev. Stains 1*647 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 65950 off 1895 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMEI 
44800 lbs.- cents per lb. 

7960 4050 Jem 6770 6770 

71.70 *062 Mar 6750 6750 

7180 6060 Apr 6*90 6690 

7080 40.10 May 6575 6500 

41150 45.10 AUB 66.15 66.15 

Est. Sales 550 Prev. Sales 770 

Prev. Day Open Int. 9042 up 42 
HOGS(CMB) 

30800 1 bi- cents per lb. 

5085 3685 Dec 4700 4787 

5067 30.10 Feb 4670 4662 

4785 34.12 Apr 4180 4185 

4985 3900 Jun 4360 43+0 

4905 40+5 Jul 4350 4350 

51.90 4075 Aim 42.40 4272 

41.10 3887 Oct 3960 3*80 

4950 3887 DoC 4075 40.75 

4180 40.40 Feb 

Est. Sales 5760 Prev. Sales 9970 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 28785 up 427 


PORK BELLIES ICMEJ 
30800 lbs- cents per lb. 

7680 5575 Feb 6290 6290 

75+0 5565 Mar 6275 6275 

7560 53.85 May 6300 64.00 

7680 5780 Jul 6390 6480 

73.1 S 5550 AUO 61.12 61.12 

ESI. Sales 3640 Prev. Sates 3854 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 8602 off 713 


Currency' Options 


Sot. 22 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

Ogffena strike 

Underlying Price Calls— Lost Put*— Last 

Dec Jan Mar Cm Jan Mar 
I2JM British Peomh-onrts per unit. 

BPouiM 10S *8.30 s r r s r 

14692 no 3585 s r r s r 

14692 115 3100 S r r J r 

16693 120 26J» I 2580 r s r 

16693 125 2180 l 2000 r s r 

14693 130 r r 1660 r r 0+3 

14692 135 1000 r 1095 085 r 1.05 

14092 740 S95 r r ai5 070 2J0 

14693 145 289 380 480 165 r 485 

14092 ISO 075 095 280 r r r 

AMO Canadian Doltore-cente per unit 
CDolir 70 r s r r s 0.13 

7269 72 r r r 087 r r 

7269 74 r r r 1+8 r r 

62900 West German AAorks-cents per unit. m 

□Mark 32 r s r r s 002 

38.97 33 585 s r r s r 

38.97 34 400 S 570 r s r 

3097 35 304 r r r r 0.10 

3097 36 208 r r t r 0.18 

3897 37 281 r r r 087 082 

3897 38 1.10 172 70? 087 088 099 

3897 39 089 0.70 180 r 009 r 

3897 40 0.11 079 007 r r r 

12SM0 French Francs-lBitiseta cent per unit. 

FFrgne HO 1770 r r r r 085 

12700 130 r r 295 r r * 

425O0M Japanese Ven-imtns at a cent per unit. 

JYSfl 41 8.70 s r r s r 

47.78 42 705 r r r r r 

47.78 45 r r 469 r r r 

49.78 46 392 r W r r r 

49 JB 47 296 r 204 r r r 


S Metals 1 

COPPER ICO A6EX) 






25000 lbs.- cen Is per lb. 






60+0 

6060 

Nov 

6060 

6060 

60J0 

61.10 

+1+0 

8465 

5850 

Dec 

60) 

6165 

6000 

61+0 

+165 

8460 

5875 

Jan 




61+0 

+165 


S9J0 

Mar 

&!? 

6115 

6890 

6110 

+160 

7400 

6800 

May 

6165 

6165 

6160 

6135 

+1+5 

74+0 

6065 

Jul 

6160 

62+0 

61+5 

616C 

+1+5 

70.90 

68*0 

Sep 

41JM 

69 *n 

61+0 

6190 

+1+0 

7060 

6105 

Dee 

6260 

6135 

<260 

6135 

+160 

7060 

6360 





63+5 

+165 

6700 

6255 

Mar 

6360 

6170 

6170 

6305 

+165 

6760 

62.90 





64.15 

+165 

6660 

6305 

Jul 




6445 

+165 

66+0 

61+0 





6465 

+165 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 





Prev.Day Open Int. 77658 UP 179 




ALUMINUM (COMEX) 






*0000 lbs.- 

^ntsparlb. 








NOV 




44+5 

+J0 

70+0 

4100 

Doc 

*600 

4600 

44+5 

4495 

++5 

76J0 

44.70 

Jan 




4565 

+■65 

73+0 

*190 

Mar 


*6.40 

4595 

46.15 

+60 

6*65 

*400 

May 

*7.10 

47.10 

47.10 

.46.90 

+60 

63+5 

44+0 

Jul 

4705 

47.95 

4705 

47+5 

+60 

52.10 

4660 

Sep 




48+0 

+60 

*9.10 

4895 

Dee 




49+0 

+60 



Jon 




4905 

+60 



Mar 




50+0 

+60 

5365 

4«+0 

May 




5165 

+60 

5060 

50.00 

Jul 




5110 

+60 

51 JO 

51+0 

Sea 




52+5 

+60 

Est Sales 


Prev.saies 





Prev. Dav Open Int 1,917 up 116 




SILVER (COMEX) 






5*000 troy az.- rants per Irov az. 





6200 

602+ 

Nov 

6220 

6220 

6166 

621+ 

+40 

12300 

5900 

Dec 

6170 

62*0 

616+ 

622+ 

+36 

12150 

5950 

Jan 


6270 

tint\ 

6270 

+36 

11930 

6070 

Mar 

6310 

6390 

6100 

635+ 

+30 

10480 

*190 

May 

6390 

647+ 



+30 

9450 

6290 

Jul 

649+ 

6S5J 

645+ 

6511 

+30 

1*00 

6210 

s*p 

6580 

6460 

6566 

661.1 

+30 

7990 

AV7Q 

Doc 

6710 

6000 

6710 

674+ 

+36 

7890 

6660 

Jan 

6750 

6750 

6750 

679+ 

+36 

7700 

6700 

AAor 

684+ 

686+ 

6B4+ 

6890 

+13 

7520 

6820 

Mav 

6946 

6946 

6946 

6989 

+13 

7*60 

6950 

Jul 

72SJ 

715+ 

7046 

7096 

+36 

721 J 

4*9+ 

Sep 

7270 

7270 

715+ 

720+ 

+36 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 15000 




Prev. Dav Ooen Int. 87+84 off 287 




PLATINUM (NYME) 






50 troy oL-do.an por trov to. 





357+0 

33100 

Nov 




34760 +1140 

33400 

33000 

Dec 




351+0 

+T20O 

373J0 

257+0 

Jon 

33800 

352+0 




35700 

2*4+0 

Apr 

342+0 35700 

342+0 

355.10 

+1360 

36300 

27300 

Jul 

3*6+0 

355+0 

346+0 

35860 +13+0 

3*000 

303+0 

Oct 

318+0 

36000 

348+0 

36110 

+1300 

35300 

34700 

Jan 

36500 

363+0 

35600 

367.10 

+1300 

Ell. Sale: 


Prev.saies 1137 




Prew. Day Open int. 14*6*3 w»slj 




PALLADIUM (NYAAE) 












9100 

Dec 

10100 

10175 

10000 

10160 

+60 



Jan 




90 



9160 

AAar 

10165 

104+0 

10105 

10180 

+1+0 


91+0 

Jun 

103+0 

10500 

103+5 

10405 

+165 

11500 

9760 

Seo 

106+0 

106+0 

106+5 

10560 

+105 

10705 

10400 

0<ec 


10600 

1D60O 

106+5 

+105 

ESt. Sal« 


Prev.saies 





Prev. Dav Ooen Int. 7039 up 50 




Est Sates 


Prev. Sales 

644 




Prev. Day Open int 7039 up 50 




GOLD (COMEX) 











326JD 

32800 

Nav 

32660 

327.00 

32660 

32690 


■fflOJO 

301+0 

Dec 

327+0 

329+0 

326.10 

327+0 




Jon 

32880 

32800 

32880 

329+0 


48500 

30600 

Feb 

330+0 333+9 

32860 

331+0 


49600 

31460 


334+0 337+0 

334+0 

335+0 


43560 

320+0 

Jun 

339+0 

341+0 

33800 

33960 

+.10 

428+0 

33100 


342+0 

34500 

34200 

343+0 


39SJ0 


Oct 

347+0 

349.10 

34700 

34760 


39300 

34100 


351 JD 

354+0 

35100 


+.10 

358+0 

31360 

Feb 

35700 

351+0 356.10 356+0 

+.W 




360+0 

3*0.90 

36890 



374+0 

lAtm 


36*00 

36600 

3*600 

36660 

+.10 

38500 

371+6 

Aug 

37150 

371+0 

371+0 

37120 

+.10 



Prev, Salas 20*000 




Prev. Dav Open lnUZA713 off 1094 




I Financial f 


GERMAN MARK(IMM) 
s per mark- 1 point eauals (08001 
8893 7971 Doc 8878 8908 J872 8903 

8915 8040 Mar 8913 8941 8»05 8936 

8947 8335 Jun 8940 8968 8939 8970 

8975 8762 Sep 6007 

Est- Sales 25.940 Prev. Sates 21951 
Prev. Day Onen Ini. 52998 up 3.147 


JAPANESE TEN (I MM) 

S per vep 1 point equal3SQJn0001 
004965 003905 Dec 004958 J0O497B 004951 004975 

004970 004035 Mar 0O4M2 004985 004957 004901 

004968 004220 Jun 004971 004795004971 004992 

004920 .004690 Sap 0O5OSS 

004985 004158 Dec 005024 

Est. Sales 1*787 Prev. Sales 12812 
Prev. Day Open Int. 39777 up 884 





SWISS FRANC (tMMl 
Spot fra no- 1 point eaua Is 100001 
6754 8531 Dec 6738 6781 6733 6772 

6794 8835 Mar 6786 6830 .4780 6820 

6833 6190 Jun 6835 6875 6835 6872 

6860 6770 Sep 6720 

Est. Sales 23.187 Prev. Sates 23957 
Prev. Day Open Int. 32963 up 2032 









51 24ft 
14ft 6 
25ft 14 
3ft 2ft 
28ft 19 
5ft 216 
42ft 22*2 
14ft 9ft 
25ft 13 
12 3ft 
lift 9ft 
13ft lift 
61ft 299k 
73ft » 
8316 66 
93ft 74% 
70ft 55 


S 12 598 5116 
144 1349 13 
} ' 17 2<ft 

. : 79 3 

I 7 MS 25ft 
. 54 5ft 
I 23 699 27ft 

> 37 284 14ft 

I 13 84 17Vk 

17 .78 10ft 

► - 36 lift 
14 743 13ft 

I 23 MB 60 

I I60y 71ft 
SSfiOy 83% 
10750V 94 
257009 «U 


58ft 51 + ft 
12ft 13 +ft 
24ft 24% + ft 
2ft 2ft— .ft 
24ft Z4ft 
4ft 5 —ft 
24% 27ft— ft 
13ft 13ft— ft 
lift 16% — ft 
10 1016 + ft 

1116 Tift + ft 
12% 12ft 
58ft 58% + ft 
7D16 71% +1% 
81 83% +M6 

92 92 +lft 

57ft 6K6 +2 


jjtcjjirnird.' 


• 'iIXM'ifv r,- s ■ “ ■ w.v 

' ' SSs&s 


Cornmwiities 


Commoclities 






Noe.22 




Close 



High 

LOW 

BM 

ASK 

CITge 

SUGAR 






Fftnchfronaparrafliilc ton 



Mar 

1045 

1020 

1029 

1030 

■MB 

May 

1050 

1035 

1047 

1051 

+ 2* 

Aua 

1080 

1080 

1080 

1087 

+ 15 

Oct 

1020 

1-520 

1910 

1920 

+ 22 

Dec 

1,550 

1.5*9 

1925 

1950 

+ 26 

Altar 

1003 

1999 

1987 

1000 

+ 27 

Est. voL: 1100 lots of 50 tons. Prev. actual 

sates: 3632 tote. Open Merest: 25+32 


COCOA 






Fraacb fraacs per HM Kg 



Dec 

1900 

1090 

1985 

1900 

+9 

Mcr 

1930 

1,925 

1,910 

T92T 

+ 4 

May 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1930 


— 4 

JfY 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1940 

— m 

— 5 

Sep 

ALT. 

N.T. 

1950 

— 

— S 

Dec 

N.T. 

ALT. 

1,950 


— S 

Mar 

N.T. 

N-T. 

1960 

— m 

—s 

Est vgi-. 

4 tote ef 10 tons. Prev. actual sates: 

13 late. Open Interest: 437 



COFFER 






French francs per He Ka 



Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

— 

1100 

Unch. 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 


1130 

— 10 

Mar 

1155 

1130 

1140 

1145 

— 18 

Mav 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1150 

— < 

— 20 

Jhr 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1185 

1215 

Unch. 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1220 


+ 15 

Nov 

N.T. 

ALT. 

1JW 


+ 10 

Est you 23 loti of 5 fans. Pr«v. octuar soUnz 

45 lots. Open Interest: 319 



Source: Bourse Ou Commerce. 




USilreasuries 


SP COMP. INDEX ICME) 
pa hits and cents 

25130 1 75.7*! Dec 70185 20390 20185 

20490 18280 Mar 30395 3)5.10 20155 

20+50 183.90 Jun 20560 206+0 20503 

20780 18700 Sen 20605 3D7J0 20670 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 33+77 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 74,735 


VALUE UNE (KCftT) 
paints and cents 

21705 1B&60 Dec 20705 20905 20705 

2110# TO3 Mar 210+S 21 US Z1Q.10 

21100 197.00 Jim _ 

713.00 20005 Sea 21675 71475 21473 

Est. Sates Prev. Sales 5074 

Prev. Day Open Int. 11935 up4l0 


US T. BILLS {(MM) 

11 mlllkm-ptsof eCDpd. 

K3J8 8577 Dec 92.96 9301 

9306 86+0 Mar 73.97 7301 

7208 8701 Jun 9ZJ7 «J8 

7256 B80O Seo 9265 9290 

92J6 89.05 Dec 9114 92.18 

91.98 8998 Mar 9105 9105 

9109 9058 Jun 91JB 91J8 

9167 9003 Sen 9160 «160 

EH. Sales 6+67 Prev. Sales 8033 
Prev.Day Open Int. 40762 off 366 


9296 9298 
7204 92.97 

9274 9277 
9265 9268 
9214 9219 
9105 91.91 
9108 9103 
9138 9138 


NTSC COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
points and eon Is 

11700 10100 Dee 11430 117.13 11675 

118J5 105JD AAor 11765 11860 11755 

12000 10600 Jun 119.10 119.10 11860 

11960 5ep 12000 12000 12000 

Esi. Sales 10341 Prev. Sales 12133 
Prev. Dev Open mt 8692 off 182 



Nov. 22 

DtMXMOt 


Pryy. 

Offer Bid 

Yield 

Yield 

3«HMtb WB 7+1 7.19 

704 

707 

6*naath Mil 7 as 7+7 

707 

706 

IWMC 7+0 7+8 

701 

701 

Prev. 

Bid Offer 

YMd 

Yield 

Jt-yr.tmed 10529/32 I05X/32 

Source: Sotomee Brothers, 

999 

992 

Merm Lyaa Treasury Index: 1IL29 
Chong* ter the dav: —007 

Average yield: f+3 ft 

Source: MerrUiLmctL 



Nop. 22 

Clue Prey tow 

SUGAR ™ A* « ** 

Sterling per metric h» 

Dec 15000 14600 14300 15300 14760 — 

Mar 16300 15900 16000 16070 16370 16360 

May 16700 1640S 16400 16420 167 JM 16760 

AW 17400 1722D 16960 171100 17260 17300 
Oct 17700 17300 17360 17400 17760 17700 
Volume: 2600 lots of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric tag 
Dec 1680 1657 1+58 1660 1+58 1659 

Mar 1022 1003 1,705 1,707 1,704 1605 

ftter 1M1 1376 TJ27 1,HS 1,776 1.773 

Jty 1061 1346 1346 1349 1344 1J45 

sen TJB0 1J6B 1665 1670 1664 1666 

Dec 1673 1643 1663 1665 1657 1659 

MOT N.T. N.T. 1668 1680 1666 1674 

Volume: 3627 lots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Sterling pw metric too 
Nov 1073 1030 1025 1035 1064 1+eS 

.tan 1,913 L861 10*2 1065 1.900 l5S 

MW ,«0 1099 1,900 1030 1634 

May 1.970 1030 1.936 1040 1058 1060 

Jhr 1094 1055 1.9*0 1065 1081 1005 

5*0 2013 1083 1005 1090 1095 2008 

NOV 2030 2030 2020 2025 2021 2025 

Volume: 4177 lots of 5 torts. 

GASOIL 

U0. do llan per metric tea 
Dec 28100 27765 28000 28063 278^ 27900 
JOB 2766S 27250 27565 27600 Z7A2S 37450 
Feb 27000 26600 26* JO 26865 26700 247J0 
MOT 23900 25600 25765 25800 25700 25705 
Apt 24865 2*705 24705 2*7 JO 2*765 S+OO 
MOV 2*800 23&2S 23800 23CJ0 23SJD 23R50 
Jun 23*05 23300 23300 23305 233J0 23365 
JIV 23450 23200 232J0 23300 23305 ^Jo 
Aug ALT. N.T. 23000 34000 21300 238 nn 
Volume: 3017 lots at 100 tons. 

CRUDE OIL (BRENT) 

IU. dollan per barrel 

Dec Exp. — — — 3000 so la 

Jaa 3000 3000 2900 2905 2905 S« 4 ' 

Feb 2905 2905 »05 2900 2600 2905 

MW N.T. ALT. 2805 2U9 2700 2BJ0 

API N.T. N.T. 27+0 2B+0 2766 2800 

MBV fCT. ALT. 2760 2H6B 2660 2765 

Jim N.T. N.T. 2700 2800 New - 

Volume: 2 lets of 1000 barrels 
Sources; Reuters and LonOon Petroleum Ex- 
crime (oasoU, erode oil). 


HOMCMCONGGOLD FUTURES 
HAS per nance 

H U low .fi-A* sms, 

BY - N.T. N.T. 32600 398 nn 3250032700 
ec - 32700 32700 32600 32800 X260O32MO 
...HI— N.T. N.T. 32800 33000 32UH 33000 
Feb. ALT. N.T. 33100 33300 33000 3H0O 
API — N.T. N.T. 33400 33600 33400 33*00 


CeauneAlv and Unit - 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb — 

Prtntdtotfi 64/3038 HtrVd- 
Steel bU lota fPttU, ton — 
Iren 2 Fdnc. PhUa- ton __ 
Steel scrap Nol hvy PML . 

Lead Spot. Rr . — — 

Copper etaet. lb. 

Tin (Sir-alts), to 

Zinc, E. SL l_ BaStV lb 

Palladium, OZ ... - 

Silver N-Y^IH — „ 

SoorcelAp:- 


Nav.22 X? 

Year 
Frl A9R 
• US \M" 

■ t** 80M 

47200 4730O V1 

Wft-W 36-28) 
67-68 67-70 m 

' HA. 6.11879 
*63 0+3 S 

99-180 1478 

6015 7+8.« 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJJ per ounce 


Prev. - l- -i.. '• 

Volume: 60 toS'J' loo » '• 331 - W .*.*?■* 


KUALA L UMPU R RUBBER 
Matankm amts per kna . 

cim Prevtow . 

roS iM. 


— — zzirsz - i/ua 

&= as as as.- as 
^011^2 lnj0 " «" 




HWCAP O RE RUBBER 
Singapore eetos per me 

chne P revio us- - 

jg§l Dee_ jaS) i£S mS ' ikS 

15115 1SSJS 15500 l acS 

J4865 14965 14900- l«« 

5?5 j 14665 14765 14700 • uuo 

StSiS**— la JS 14463 14300.. 14600 

RS5 S Dec_ 13765 13965 13800 14000 , 


PALM OIL 
ualayslaa rtoggm per 2S ton 






18 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 
Sloaoooprln-ptsAJTndsotlOOPCt 
90-16 75-13 Dec 89-27 90-1 

*9-18 75-14 Mar SWT 89-1 

88-18 74-30 Jun BW 88-6 

97-24 BO-7 Sep 

„B7-1 80-2 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 

Prev.DavOaeninl. 74090 up 71 6 


89-17 SMB 
88-21 88-21 
87-25 87-25 

84-31 

86-8 


MAJOR MKT INDEX (CBT) 
points and eights 

275ft 249ft Dec 275 277 276% 

276% 77DU Jan 276 277% 775ft 

277ft 271 Mar 278ft 278ft 277ft 

Est. Sales Prev. Solos .289 

Prev. Day Onen Int. 1697 off *8 


DM fortunes 
Options 


rr. GemaaMari-BSMmarkLaalipur nark 


I 




London Mefo& 




Commodity Indexes 


us TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 DO-stoaan-ot5 & 32ndsaf ltD pqj 
82 578 Dec 81-10 81-15 

80-25 57-2 Mar 808 8W 

79-25 56-29 Jun 79-6 798 

78-27 56-29 Sep 73-5 78-10 

78-7 54-25 Dec 77-9 77-16 

770 56-27 AAor 76-21 76-23 

76-20 63-12 Jun 75-30 74-3 

768 63-* Sea 76-13 7619 

75-24 62-24 Dec 758 75-5 

74-24 67 Mar 74-18 74-21 

73-22 44-25 Jun 748 74-4 

^StTPenl^SJ?^ 

69-30 81-17 DeC 89-10 99-13 

59-1 804 AAor 8fr9 te-io 

87^22 79 JO" 874 

84-20 79-10 S4F 

Est- Sales ? rB X^S l S.« 

Prev. Dav Open In*. 907S gttoi 


49.78 45 r r 4+9 r r r 

49.78 44 307 r 364 r r r 

49 JB 47 266 r 204 r t r 

49.78 48 165 1.77 2.13 (UP r 0+1 

4968 49 0.91 10J 1+5 0.18 0+8 06D 

49.78 50 030 0J2 0.98 DJB r 1.16 

62000 Swiss FroncKMfS Per unit. 

SFrane 42 5+0 s r r s r 

47+4 43 4J0 r S.io r r r 

47+4 44 129 r 3.92 r r r 


47+4 43 4J0 r 5.10 r 

47+4 44 129 r 3.92 r 

47+4 45 2+9 r r 002 r 

47+4 46 1 63 r 151 006 060 

47+4 47 192 r LOO 123 

47+4 48 0J7 0.71 1+2 060 

Total call vol. 15J7B Call open 

Tela! put veL Mfl Putgpee 

r— Not traded- *— Ala option offeree. 

Last Is premium (purchase price). 

Source: ap. 


Cali open Int. 20106* 
Put open Int. 167090 


80-24 BO-27 
79-18 79-19 
78-18 78-19 
77-22 77-23 
76-28 74-29 
76+ 760 

75- 1 5 7S-20 
7*-29 75-3 

76- 13 74-19 
73-31 748 
73-19 73-27 


Close 

/Moody's 92100 f 

Reuters 1,723.30 

DJ. Futures 121+0 

Com. Research Bureau. 227.00 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary! t - final 
Reuters : base 100 : 5eo. 18.1W1- 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Prevtons 
291 +0f 
162250 
12TJJ5 
22+20 


SMke Callt-Sellte PutvS*ttt* 

Met Dk Mar Jm Dec IWr Jun 

37 204 359 LT3 UR 02B 1S4 

38 107 101 2+6 104 IS ID 

39 131 Hi 137 131 071 10 

40 007 181 1+0 104 1+2 1+9 

41 101 051 UH 1.98 — 130 


Strike CMteJ+d Pub-La* 

Prig* DKMMIbrDKJMPiito 
W - - — - - 1/14 — — 

DO » 2« - -- iff* l/W Hr - 

ns mvu.M - j/16 in* % — 

IBB lAlh HA tt ll»# t/U V 

»5 IB m lift lift ft ft 13/1617/14 
m 5ft 6ft 7ft- K 11/161% » }ft 

1*5 33/MM *ft 5ft 3 4 4ft 4% 

» ft 1ft 7 3/16311 • 6ft 7 7ft — 

as ft wu ii/wift iM - mi hr 


EsttnwtcritanivsLBJU 
Colts: Tbtt voL LBS op«n taL <2638 
Pats : Ttao. nL 3437 opon ML3U04 
Source: CME. 


Vdd col wftm ail* 

Tdri«lpHU.4WI3 
TWaipBt tem 01670 
Tetri rtwaloi. Stiff - 
Indue 

MuB 19557 LnrlMSf OW1NJT-U9 
Source; coos. 


88-26 88-27 
87-27 87-28 
84-28 84-28 
at 


Market Guide 






g kago Board of Trade 
tango M ercant i le Exchange 
intomaHona! AAcnetorv AAanwt 
Of Chicago MarcantUv Ex c h an pv 
New Yortt Cocoa. Sugar. CoH— Ex c ftc n gp 
Atew York Cotton Exchange 
Commodity Exchange, New York 
New Ygrfc Marcontlli Exchange 
Kamos a tv Board of Trade 
New York Futuna Exchange 


WSIiiTSSWiTil 





i c- "5 *m 









‘a3k£&& 















































- 1 


t ^ •*.* **: 


• • *« 
'55 - 1 ** 

■&K k - 



BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERN ATIONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24, 1985 







!,; , . 


• ,• 4*tS I 

• ^ 10 ’ ‘ S ^ ^ ^ 

v France's state-owned automaker 

’ - ' k * ; * ; <§ > b; agawmced Friday fiat it was end- 
'* : [ 3 &!5f s*** 8 W*Abb* in South Africa 
■ , J ■% Wctnsetf *e ^severe' deteriora- 

' '* *. 1 i-ikjv tkm of the economic cavir ftnmr-n f* 

.! i. ■ •■ ■ mt 1 lii- ; 1 there. 

. « ; «!s ^ decision foBowed the an- 

nouncement Wednesday by Pen, 
geol SA, the privately owned- 
Ffcncb car company, that it 

ptenned to cease its South AKctm 


of South Africa 


Fojgeot, which also died eco- 
nomic reasons for its «ten${np ^ had 
a similar agreement with Sygma 
Motor Corp, for assembling cars. 


winch was trading at a little more 
than 37 cents Friday against 58.4 
cents 14 months ago, has been 
widdy attributed to a loss of bust- 


* S.iSi. 

■; > !M:i 

■ ■*;? Tlmi’ 

: r ■ 

■ 5 i*, 
% 1 “ 


i b state ment, Renault’s unit 
here; Ehromotois Ltd_, cai d it was 


,i i'll; trminating its manufacturing 
zhreemenl with the Associated Ve- 


. ^SqHember, Alfa Romeo SpA, ness confidence because of the ra- 
ine Italian group, became the first dal violence in South Africa. More 
automaker to pul! out of Sooth Af- than 800 pe»ple have been kilkd in 
rua. It alto cued thepoorecononic the past 14 months, 
as the main reason for its 

decision. The drop in the rand’s value has 

Sooth African amomakos and also brought soaring prices for cars 
distributors have reported a 30-oer- andgasobne, and a huge increase m 
cent drop in sales this year Tiny mteKSl rates for k® 1 *- 



This, in turn has led to a collapse in 
sales. 

The South African industry asso- 

mtiffll h»<tWE timnr«<l that fttf ewin . 


: 3 V, 


=3^! 

/r 2 ?l 

%bf\ 


■: ■ t 


s f 



1 lidM;* 


VWBoardMeets 

OnSEATBid 

L latemaHmud Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Volks- 
.wagen AG's supervisory board 
Took, no vote Fn day cm ihe com- 
pany's stated interest in acquir- 
ing SEAT, the state-owned 
Spanish automaker, according 
Jo. sources at the meeting. ■ 

M a n a gem ent reportedly in- 
formed supervisory board 
members of the company’s ne- 
gotiating aims in seeking a ma- 
jority stake in SEAT and said 
' that ‘industrial and financial 
preconditions” require darifi- 
'cation. 

A The sources said that if an 
Agreement can be reached with 
SEATs current owner, Insti- 
tnto National de Industria, a 
.formal vote of approval could 
be taken at' the supervisory 
board’s neat meeting. 


have attributed the. decline to die 
general deterioration in the econo- 
my and to the high cost of import- 
ing foreign parts because ofthe 

-Jirrm riT^.TuT- 1/1 , aanonnasesmnaieamaiinectmn- 

country’s uv*s automakers would sdl about 
cuneacy, the rand. 2(50.000 vehicles this year, about 

The fall in the value of the rand, half the number sold in 1984. 

Laura Ashley Stock Off ering Is Priced 


Reisers - - 

LONDON — Laura Ashley, the 
fashion and furnishings group, said 
Friday that it would offer 23 J per- 
cent of its stock for sale to the 
public neat month at a price .of 135 
pence (51.96) per share. The offer- 
ing, which win raise some £270 mil- 
lion, wifi be floated on the London 
Stock Exchange. 

The offering would thn< to 


28. Trading is due to start on Dec. 
. 5. The sale wifi raise money for a 
major expansion, the company 
said. 

The Laura Ashley group sells 
more than 2200 mflhoQ in clothes 
and soft furnishings, a year in 180 
shops. It has announced plans for 
50 new shops in Europe and the 
United States. 

On Friday, the board forecast 


market some three months after the pretax profits of about £17 minion 
death of Laura Ashley, the designer for the year to January 1986. This 
who started the company. Mrs. would anxrant to a 17-percent in- 
Ashley did not recover from a fall orease from the £14.1 million for 
at her daughter 's house near Coy- - the previous year, 
entry, central Fn gjanri 


Turner Rejects NBC Offer 
For 50% of Cable Network 


Her husband, Bernard, with 
whom she set up the company 30 
years ago, said after the accident 
that the group's expansion and its 


Qievroa Completes GoK Sale 

. The Associated Press 

SAN FRANCISCO — Chevron 
Corp. announced Friday the corn- 


stock market launching would go pletton of its SZl-bifiion sale of a 
ahead in line with her wishes. 60.2-percent interest in Gulf Cana- 

The applications list, for 465 da Ltd. to Olympia & York Devd- 
miUion stares, wifi open on. Nov. opments of Toronto. 


The Associated Prtsf 

ATLANTA — Ted Turner, 
the cable television entrepre- 
neur, has rejected an NBC offer 
to buy 50 percent of his Cable 
News Network. 

Shortly before a 5 P.M. 
Thursday deadline imposed by 
NBC Mr. Tamer timiwri down 
the offer. A Cable News vice 
president. Ed Turner, who is 
not related to Mr. Turner, said 
that his boss broke off talks 
with NBC because it had de- 
manded editorial contra) of the 
network, which broadcasts 
news 24 hours a day. 

“It's Ted’s call, and Tm de- 
lighted," said Ed Turner. 

Art San do, a spokesman for 
Tomer Broadcasting System 
Inc., which controls Cable 
News Network, said that 
NBCs offer was worth 5200 
million to 5250 mMon 

In a statement released in 
New York, Lawrence K. Gross- 
man, president of NBC News, 
defended the network’s insis- 
tence on editorial control “You 
□ever get into the editorial busi- 
ness, NBC or anybody else, 
without journalistic oversight,” 
he said. 

Mr. Turner’s rejection of the 
bid caused concern among 
some industry analysts about 
his ability to raise the SI5 bil- 
lion needed for his purchase of 
MGM-UA Entertainment Co. 

The sale of CNN had been 
considered a prune source of 
funding for the MGM-UA pur- 
chase. 

*^lf Turner is unwilling to give 
op editorial control in CNN, 



Ted Turner 

then no one is going to tray ii." 
said Anthony Hoffman, a New 
York-based financial consul- 
tant who specializes in the 
broadcast industry. 

“He really is up against the 
wall in terms of raising money 
for the acquisition.” 

But Mr. Sando said that the 
MGM-UA acquisition was on 
schedule and should be com- 
pleted next month as planned. 

‘That transaction has never 
been dependent on our selling a 
stake in CNN,” be said. 

Mr. Sando said iatv< with 
other parties interested in Cable 
News Network would continue. 

Turner Broadcasting System 
has been trying to find a buyer 
for a minority interest in Cable 
News Network for nearly two 
months. Tamer’s investment 
banker, Drexd Burnham Lam- 
bert Inc, has talked with Time 
Inc., Gannett Co., CBS Inc. and 
Viacom Internationa] Tne , as 
well as NBC. 


Grand Met Announces Plans to Sell 
Leisure, Other Units for £9 5 Million 


Reulen 

LONDON — Grand Metropoli- 
tan PLC said Friday that it was 
selling its leisure and other interests 
for £95 million (S136.S million). 

The management of Mecca Lei- 
sure Ltd., a Insure subsidiary of 
Grand Metropolitan, said that its 
senior management and staff 
would be able to participate in the 
company being formed to make the 
acquisition. 

Completion of the offering is ex- 
pected on Dec. 16, Grand Metro- 
politan said. Samuel Montagu & 
Co., the merchant banking group, 
has underwritten the equity financ- 
ing and will be inviting institution- 


al participation. W. Green weD is 
acting as broker. 

Grand Met first announced 
plans to sdl its Insure interests last 
month. It then said that talks were 
being held with the directors of the 
companies concerned. 

The companies being, sold have 
annual volume of about £120 Bul- 
lion. a Grand Met spokesman said. 
Further financial details were not 
immediately available. 

Grand Mel shares closed at 396 
pence, up 3 pence from Thursday. 
Traders said the stock leveled off 
late in the day, after a buoyant 
response to the sale plan sent the 
the stock as high as 405 pence. 


Channel Group 
To Buy 3 Ferries 

Agence France-Prone 

LONDON — Townsend- 
Tboresen, the English Channel 
ferry operator, has announced 
plans for three new femes. 

The company, pan of the 
Flextiink Group fighting the 
plans for a channel tunnel said 
it would put the 20,000-ton fer- 
ries into service in 19S7, 

The femes will cost £35 mil- 
lion (about $50 million) each, 
and will have a capacity of 
2,400 passengers and 700 cars, 
company officials said. The 
ships are likely to be built by 
Schichan Umerweser AG. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Allied Eneabba Ltd. shareholders 
have cleared the way for Renison 
Goldfields Consolidated Ltd.’s 
takeover bid by approving RGCs 
purchase of 50 percent of Allied 
from Du Pont Co. RGC will pay 65 
Australian cents (44 U.S. cents) 
each for Du Pom’s 12 millio n 
shares in Allied, which min^s min- 
eral sands. 

CRA Ltd., an Australian metals 
producer, said it wQI farm out 
about one-third of its interest in 
two gold prospecting areas in Indo- 
nesia to Claremont Petroleum NL 
and New Zealand Goldfields Ltd. 
The agreement is subject to ap- 
proval by the Indonesian govern- 
ment and partner consent. 

Deutsche Bank AG plans to es- 
tablish a securities trading branch 
in Tokyo through its Hong Kong- 
based subsidiary DB Capital Mar- 
ket (Asia) Ltd., according to a man- 
aging board spokesman, F. 
Wilhelm Christians. Deutsche 
Bank wifi bold half of the branch 


and will ask Siemens AG and Bayer 
AG each to take up 25 percent. 

Ford Motor Co.'s British subsid- 
iary said it had offered pay in- 
creases of 135 percent to 15.7 per- 
cent over the next two years, 
pending union agreement on radi- 
cal productivity changes. Talks be- 
tween Ford and the 38,000- mem- 
ber Transport and General 
Workers Union resume Dec. 4. 

Honda Motor Co. said it is study- 
ing the possibility of building a 
second car assembly plant in the 
United States to boost annual pro- 
duction there to 400,000 cars by 
1990. Honda is expanding capacity 
at its plant in Marysville, Ohio. 

Linde AG, the Wiesbaden-based 
engineering company, said group 
sales in the first 10 months of 1985 
rose 55 percent, to 2.17 billion 
Deutsche marks (S838 million), 
while orders rose 205 percent, to 
2.41 billion DM. It gave no specific 
profit figures. 


Marriott Corp^ the Maryland- 
based hotel and restaurant chain, 
said it plans to spend more than S2 
billion in the next few years to 
build up to 80 new scaled-down, 
full-service hotels in smaller dries 
around the United States. Marriott 
operates 147 hotels and resorts 
around the world. 

Meredith Corp., an Iowa-based 
publishing, broadcast and real es- 
tate company, has agreed to buy 
two magazines from New York- 
based F amil y Media Inc. lor 596 
million. Meredith, publisher of 
Better Homes and Gardens maga- 
zine, is buying the Ladies’ Home 
Journal and Health magazine. 

Petronas, Malaysia's national oil 
company, said it has sold a 5-per- 
cent stake in Malaysia LNG SDN 
BhD to the Sarawak state govern- 
ment for an undisclosed price. The 
sale reduces Petronas* stake to 60 
percent while Shell Gas BV and 
Mitsubishi Corp. share the rest. 


' n 

; 

ck: ; 
: r, -an' V. 

' v-n V 


’-ft 


Booming Egyptian Town Looks Warily Ahead 


. (Confined from Page 13) 
stares appeared. A new midriv 
dass of civil servants, merchants 
and fanners slowly emerged. 


they’ve discovered that living here 
is cheaper and job opportunities 
good.” 

Social attitudes, traditions and 
The paternalistic land-owning expectations also have shifted 
family was supplanted by g o v e rn - markedly. Twenty years ago; as 
meat furnwwg cooperatives, and Nasser’s vision unfolded here, the 
1,000 acres - (400 hectares) of land villagers had new, largely unful- 
was distributed among 200 landless filled ambitions. Today, their sons area in 
■peasa n ts. . . and daughtera have high expects- to 31,000 acres. 

Today, Kafr d-Battikh is pros- tions — perhaps too high- Mayor Ahmed Rakha, whose 

npering. The town has doubled in Young mm dress in Egyptian 120-acre farm is the largest in the 


Egypt now imports 50percent of its 
food: the gap between consump- 
tion and production is growing. 

The trend is evident here. In 
1966, the village had one tractor 
and 28,000 acres under cultivation. 
Today, it has 200 traaors and 1,000 
mechanical water pumps, but the 


Government officials say they 
foresee other problems. Damietta’s 
carpentry industry has fallen on 
hard times, partly because of the 
decline in workers’ remittances 
The end of the Gulf ofi boom and 
the permanent return of many 
workers to Egypt is exj»emed to 
make the recession worse. 


■-VC-1 » 

v 

VCTS-JJC 

.-Alf I 


grown only 

This village — indeed, most of 
Egypt — faces massive structural 

_ . problems,” said John Waterbury, a 

land size and tripled in population dty style — blue jeans, sandals and village, said that the rising cost of Princeton University professor and 
since 1966. Row upon row of new partly open shirts — and harbor fertilizer and farm labor it one of the leading experts on 


houses and concrete apartment 
buddings are fining 
A sewerage system is under con- 
struction. Most homes in the main 
rare of fie town have electricity. 
Only, fapn roads, remain unpaved. : 
There is still no movie bouse, but 
young people travel to Damietta in 
their private cars or buses and taxis 
to take in the excitement of the 
provincial capital. Televisions 
abound, as do video recorders. 

One at the more striking aroects 
of village life — hs new social mo- 
bility — stems from Nasser’s em- 
phasis on education. 

“Ten years ago, we only had five 
agricultural engineers here,” said 
Hamid Abdel Raheem, 


wfaat Moukhatar Saad d-Sadamy, 
an employee at the government 
bank, called a “modem” outlook. 

Hae> as elsewhere, agricultural 
production has not kepr pace with 
fieincrease in population or with 
the gro w th of other economic sec- 
tors. Once a net food exporter, 


difficult to break even. Although 
farm workers are paid 54 a day, 
more than twice what dvil servants 
earn, fie exodus of farm laborers to 
Iraq and fie Gulf the disdain 
fiat young people have for farming 
haw produced a severe labor short- 
age in agriculture. 


one hand, r emittances and 
the carpentry business have 
prompted im plannad and unantici- 
pated prosperity here. On the oth- 
er, the town's boom has been based 
not on industry or agriculture, but 
on luxury goods. 


China Faces the Perils of Modernization 


(Confiraed from Page 13) 
worth remembering that in fie 
1940s, the Conummists strongly 
and effectively attacked the Na- 
tionalists’ foreign connections. 

Even so, by 1978 Beging had 


___ ,, — Cinm« rtuucl xianua adoci- futueeni, even ay, vy is jo Dty mg imo 

The- Jjauy owlw 1 mmager of the^ village farm cooper- derided that fie risk was worth 
♦ r*m a friftTtal ^ creation under Nas- taking. Trade and foreign capital 

-l ^ -Today, there are 70.” were fie only possible sources of 


* sr 


About 60 percent of the adults 
here are now Hterate. Some 300 
villagers have g raduated from uni- 
versities and returned to live here. 
Most of them work for fie govemr 
meat, Mr. Abdel Raheem said, but 
many supplement their salaries — 


fie wherewithal to keep China’s 
economy running timing an ambi- 
tious reform program. 

Die dilemmas of such reorgani- 
zation are excruciating. No more 
money can be squeezed out of the 


nese exports and an accelerating 
pace of foreign investment can pro- 
vide the critical financial leeway. 

But the Hainan example, thenm 
on foreign exchange and fie trem- 
ors in Hong Kong show vividly the 
risks fiat fie present Chinese lead- 
ers face as they try to walk a tight- 
rope of foreign economic assistance 
over fie gulf between the stagnant 
economy inherited from the Mao 
days to a balanced and productive 
one. 

The People’s Republic of China 
is a stale whose legitimacy rests on 


many people are dearly arguing 
fiat not simply adjustment, but a 
return to a different strategy for 
economic growth is necessary. 

Rumblings of such opinions 
were clearly audible at fie national 
conference of the Chinese Commu- 
nist Party this last September. 
Rather than push even more to- 
ward fie free-wheeling, free-enter- 
prise models that have worked in 
successful Pacific Basin countries, 
dissenters at the conference appar- 
ently want to build something in 
China fiat is closer to the orderly, 
inward-facing systems of Eastem- 


$rr » * i' 


countryside. The People’sDaflyre- 

a Hi? which average about $40 a month ported Ang. 17 that most Chinese an ideology opposed to the system |°wara-iacm; 

I iNH 1 ^ — with Dart-time iobs in £atmm£ or peasants are “barely warn and that made the new industrializes Dloc naQt>ns - 

fed.” But industry is unproductive strong. It is a state that in 1949 shut Arthur N. Waldron is .Assistant 

as weQ. Neither can supply the down free-wheeling Shanghai just Professor of History and of East 

money to reform cither itsdf or the as effectively as it now nas shut Asian Studies at Princeton Unhvrsi- 
other. Only a rapid increase in On- down free-wheeling Hainan. Now ty. 


; with part-time jobs in farming or 
commerce. 

'“In the old days, young people 
who left for the cities stayed there,” 
Mjr. Abdel Raheem said. “But 


j[ 


Abo. 22 



Dollar 


Antt BtaKHvTVM 
AtfintcFtaM/M 
ABtobtMtS 
BcaComnlMH 

Bcp Ns moron 

Brow Roma H/91 
tounrnn 
gafaiwSBn 


BkWUHMrl 

ttCMWvl 


Ban cm*.. . 

gssssysr 

iKCfMcan/n 

■KHMMdffMMr 

S jfSSon ' 

gas is 

BWtaYprtK • 
BkNan&caOaW/fS 
U Now scuta M 


M 


n 

IK 



RTabSl 
BkTttrBFiMB/VI 

- nkrakyoDadi/n 
BataMricaQ/SM 

■MnTwlR 
- BaatKtTnasTM 

SK5 

as a ss, 

gar*” 

• HF" 

gUDfcRXZttiCOPl 

■ gar 

: S** ' 

- Boston . 
gram B**ron»« 

SWBHOTg 
' iO/Spko 

S O/S 84 



*MA< 

Us***" 

gtKgSWftW 
agjjtwwn 
imnm 

tffZJVS 

SSmSSSS 

tefcP 

KMflnMVI 


CMPM Nut BM AM 
tv. u-umnuus . 

E SSSSiSS 7 

£ SS3S&& 

r smss 

IN 2HMM03WOJS 
7*. W-122JMUUt 
tasssa-M *w3 ssji 

n. 2MIW*22 

0WJ* Wjo 99 JO 
SI 1144 97.7S 9BJS 

ST 09-H 9US99JS 

1243 99 M U0J4 

1B4I9L23 9&C 

O4Z9U0 9MB 

IB42 99J0 99J5 

29-T1 9JJ0 MOM 

j7-oi 99 js mso 

2941 MBJBWU* 
M4I0UBNM 
ihi iswnmu 

R 

& “mJ!SS25 

•8i£SS 

Bfc n-uvnumfM 
a* 30-nw^ 99*1 

Bh IVU 99 JJ 10BJ3 
K 2M5W 

n. 

■BB3SW 

B 1744 99 J4 90* 
k jwsojw 

n 2 vn waooTotxxs 
|U 2241 f9J7 WXI7 
m UW*9Wi 1 9MB 
run 9?jjjMi. 

n iuntgug*-™ 

SVi SUJW^UnUt 
SW JMtWWW 

r g«*SgS5 
ol£ jounma 

0443 UUITOBSS 

9-u 9M2 nx 
1741 Wi 5 WJS 

mimshs 

lvmtauflSH! 


» 


3M1 

jaa^ssi 




*i4n WLZJaia) 

8 » Wl tMj gg. 

iw tMS9fJB no* 

_»owgfl«g* 

29-11 99JB 99J0 


omunv 

OwnvleoiOcJ97 

CKrtcltaotaBtn 

CfcrttHorloBkM 

Cwvrtf-92 

cmoBfPBS - 

cmcorpAu«9«vWv) 

aitcorosw** 

attenro PtSBW 

attocpw 

attorpM 

OftaUPPMP 

aitaniPwn 

OttcurpOTS 
Cocnortco 97 _ 
C — tlMg 

QaronuWIc.H 1 *** 
CarRBi uro A4ontnni9i 
QHasFtaOenuWb) 

CWKfl Ol Europe 93 
Cr»tft)P93 . 

Cd«« 

CrflWTS 

Cd9* 

Ccf97(M»M 

S3S .. rm 

orDoNoron^ 

Cr Fonder 0097 
CrForBouPira 
OrLvsMMbWW 
Cr Urwnwh 90/97 
cr CiiiiBji ggj 
Cr Lyt*noM91/» 
Cl-LYMOOMW 
Cr LtopoM Jeett/H 

CrCvawjSglCMl ■ 
Cr Lyonnofa W 
Gr Lvennaie JunK/M 

□mfltanWiON 

DuMorrteDMSB . 

Oe5TOtJan»" 

DuMOrtWlW 
DenmWkJOT* „ 

DM Bate Outfit* 
DreeAwr ftbW 
DroednerFjnW 
DnmmrFHR 

EMaradeNi** 

BH99 _ 
EdfWtMnsn _ 
Em>RWtB{MBhr) 
EndOe 

EO093 __ 

Evrwn Banwrp92 
Eat 90 

BtoVlsI Wg . 

FnTBViBfSIMttlhrt 

FluJ Boston n« 

First BkSySj* 

fwbx»«2h, 

FMHtnim 

FlretcSSS* 

First tutor 95 

psa«t« 

pUlln»*V»_ 

5SSBT 

G»»2 

SibPtro. 


nt 

m 


IN 


IN 

BV. 




MAwtryigSPI if 1 
Great W 


iMwj Md Adu 

IM M42 99 JB 99 JO 
K 1941 99 Jl 9971 

in tMBWJo ness 
n oMoraameoj* 

9N 1943 99.10 t9M 
B.M2S- • 99X2 99J2 

Ok ]>42 93SI 9145 
VA W-U99J3 99J3 
w . 3i4i louesioan 
71k M9MI99J3 
Mh IS-12 10U0WJ0 
ISfll 99JB TOOiO 

sMi naonwiif 

U-n99JS9U5 
27-T2 99.14 99JB 
2142 9M9 100J9 
2MS 10B.t71«a27 
1140 99J0 loaas 
■O45 99JI99J0 
jv« 19 si ma 
M19UB99W 
2*43 M004T0114 
•944 MUU0O21 
2742 999* TOfljS* 
Ilk 274J9M19JJ1 
M3 W44 K&14W124 
BV. n-12 iDflJneaj* 
M 2441 TSUB10B.n 
He 0944WU1100.il 
nt 041 Moonouo 

U 1V44 toUOIOUl 
MB 0944 lORlIMUB' 
sv. oMinunoato 
W -29-11 M0J714M7 
M 27-TI MOJTNMJ 
«4 2Wn MflWWit 
m ®02 59XS99J! 
79k 1*41 uumotu? 
•n ton lauaieue 
Hu 2 hi wanus 

M U4310034HU4 
BXtSXHR tOOljnui 
BN 1341 HMBNU0 
M zwtoUiioaji 

Wk 5S-12 9»W T0«J2 
0543 99 JO 99 Jl . 
IMS TeBJinMO 
0P4i Hunogiu 
19-12 99 ji U45B 
WflWJS XB2B 
1S44VM10M0 
1942 M*IUt71 
2941 WU4HIU4 
2V*4 M1.WBL2J 
39 -it 9*99 leaer 

2742 1BMQHM0 

11* JS429UI wtun 
BN 2742 1009*10100 
7% W4599» TIM 

unra-n 

M 0343 T0BJBUXL15 

m 2 MJ nuomuo 

m 0M19US99^ 
m 2»2totUMiau4 
BN WJMW7 
2342 10U410QU 
IMS 99jA 99 JB 
. 99J4 99JS 

3MJ 9TJW RUM 

2M11W8WJ4 
IM2WJ1WS3 
29-11 9TJ0 B9J5 
3*42 99 J* 99 JB 

— 0742W3WJ5 
1US1B42 99 JO 

- 2WJ 99 J5 99* 
3HT9UeWI) 
K-Qftama 
1MSWJ34M 
3*41 nX 99 JZ 
1541 HNinons 
31-13 HOWNIt 
2341 WU7K0.I7 
lMHUfflUi 
U-J2MM4MW* 
U4S9UBWX 

29*11 W1J0WU0 

Bto 27-a.MBjDULO* 

m 1744 9U3 55 . 

0*43 9R0S99JD 


Ito 

r* 

■9k 

Bk 

In 

jm 


n* 


Btk 

IN 

ft* 

H 


1ft 

M 

Dk 

IN 

BN 

en 

BN 

PA 

Bn 

M 

no 


CMPM Nut BM AIM 


Gt WHtEfn 72/9S 
Sr1ndtav*92 
CrindtmM 
GtWBSiern 19/9* 

Hill Soman f* 

Kill Samoa! P«ro 
Hlepono 91/95 
Homejtmd SH.9SCM 
Hona KsmPptv 
K kShanmieisPtrp 
Hydro 02 (MDBvl 
Hydro 41 WUrtyl 
id 91 

Iceland 9MB 
Indonesia BS/92 

iw Novel 

irekndwm 
inland 97 
inland 94 


twulmer92 

Italy 99 

KMyMiN 

twos 

cin*S7 

Jp Morgan 97 

KaeFttm 

KemiraOyfS 
KMawort Buff 
KMnportBanN 
KletowortBenPero 
Korea Dew Bk 14/19 
Korea Ext* 

Lincoln &H. 99 
Ltnfln Corp 95 
UavdSBkPatv 
UeMPBMfcPerp 

Uaudtn 

Uoydse 

LtoyuM 

LWJ92 

Mafemki 94/09 
Malaysia 00/15 (Mm) 
MalavdaAprtf/92 

Malania OtcP/n 

Malaysia BU93 

mrnmxam 

Man hum 

Man Haa 97 
Man HaaMlWktr) 
Mar Mid 94 

Mar Mid M 
Mar Mid to 
MCSTP97 [MH*) 
MSIIen BKH 
Midland SB Pen 
MkUandBk PtTPKew 
Midland intR 

Midland lid 49 

iMdlaid lot 92 

Midkaid Iran 

Midland IM 99 
MIOul Fhl 97 ICOP) 
Mitsui Fin 9* 

MuGreottm 
MM Bk Din 92 
Nab 97 (Coal • 

NOtBk D49TOU9* 

Nat Comm Bk 19/94 
mrwaiPiipW 

NotWBJ PtroiBI 

NnJWistRnn 
Not Wot Rn 15 
Not woo Faro (a 
Hat WWW 
Nat MM m 92 
Nat WW Fin Pan 
HWbOy94 

Nenteotandi? 

Nz Steel Dev 92 

Neraieinm 

OHlS* 

01094 

OOJ9S/99 

afmroMinMfi 
Otttore Mining <* 
PWBn» 

PnC57 

Pk Banter 18/91 . 
Qu i W a n dlBallft 
BWN91 
MO' 94 

Rea Bk Dallas 97 

RepKyOJ 


14- 12 9tB9&75 
2743 IBQJB10B4O 

0342 UB531KUS 

2*43 99X3 99 J3 
Z742 HCJnWOJB 
2M1 94JS 97J5 
2*44 99J9 1HA9 
2442 9900 99.» 

1442 99 ji loom 

0543 99 J5 99J5 

21-41 <9J0 9«M 

O14S99J0 MOM 

1541 99J5 19US 

U4199JIMJa 

0944 lauomis 

2045 10B4J0100J5 

1743 TXbIBIBQJt 

2M2MOJB1MO 

1441 100.1010320 

045 99.53 loan 

1142 99J4 99J4 

0*43 loawisau 

1245 mortflU* 

29-n T9JB WJ0 

2*43 Haistsae 
2M>raas5inJ5 
0342 lHUims* 
2«3 10B2SiaUS 
2042 100.WWUB 

2743 WGJ7TB8.T7 

29-11 99X5 9«JB 

15- 12 9950 10040 


RcdNyU 

RaNseMHB 

KbcftS ■ 

^253 


am 


n 

Bn 

to 

M 

IV. 


n-12 99 JB 99 JO 
1*42 99 JB 99J8 

09- 12 wawisuo 

2142 99ji loan 

3*44 I9UBWT.13 

BS.URHXBlOaa 

Mk IB44 1 01. 1X1 0024 

bn 29-n wan mob 
TV. M-n 99 JO 9990 
B 1544 9UB9BJB 
0944 lOBMlOOlS 

os-12 numoo.15 

2S42 99 ji lean 
834*9920 99 JB 
3NI1 99.97 W8JJ7 
3*42 99 J5 99x4 

1942 90X0 9SJ5 
0*4i 10US1DQ.12 
W-13 99J* 5BO0B 
1912 9955 10U5 
1*45 99.1S 9925 

2911 nmu 

1912 99 JS 100J5 
. . tofflioamam 

BN 2901100.1210022 

on 24-12 mawai 

a 4912100*810078 
9 390* IB0J41 00X4 

BM3 Mft04100.ll 

2841 99 JS 99JS 
0*43 RJOJUOOJ1 
1301 ftSS HOA 
19129930 10025 

81k 3*41 99JH 99.12 
M 3912 99X4 «9J2 
Tk. 23-T2 99J3 99n 

0*41 uomoou 

10- 82 HQJ2H022 

2HH I0BJBM0J0 

1844 MU*H0JH 
2342 99 U 99J* 
1844 100.1710027 
S-9 10UIW1JS 
W45 tobtotflJO 

2742 1000010.10 

owwtnwis 

jm 2 lannuz 

124S 9935 WOZS 

2MS10OWMCto 
2911 IOOJ5W1JB 

1144 nouims 

8*-12 >88,1410024 

2341 TOBJO 

2342 97J3B 10038 
U-12 99J4 99J4 
19U 9995 mu 

1345 110.1710027 

3743 MUBOOIB 
1142 99X3 99 JJ 

2842 99 JB 99 Jl 

W-12 YtM n JB 
rniwjswjo 
■wneuofUe 

0912 99flO I0QJO 


II* 

p. 

IN 


Pa 

I> k 
.(to 

M- 

BN 

BN 

Bk 

IN 

IW 


IW 


US 

IN 

IN 

n 


K 

to 

ON 

«k 

to 

s» 

IN 

BK 

n 

u 

to 


4K 1841 










i * ' vV 7 



rj . V 1 V 




■'.^T | j' y 





ii f T '-f i/;. 




’■1 . 



* ‘h _ r 2 , 


’» e i 1 4/^1 



■ 1 ^ Ki ’ir 









Z • -'j jii 









ii 












*T*' ‘ iK-"*' 



■ < . TTl .f. J 












;r 






ill jjLira 












,{ • i ,-V 


- 

















m'M.™ :« 




















zi ixtiz 








UDNonmyfl 
Ub Norway 99 _ 
Utd KJnodom 90/92 

MettsFareaSaptw 

Woils Fargo 91 

Walls Forgo BO 
torts Foroa Feb 97 

:97 (COPI 


World BkPerp 

World Bk»/W 
YokUemo 91/94 , 

Yokohama *7 (Coe) 
Zurrataphastl 


SN 7143 9175 9025 
BN 0741 99J7 9990 

BW 27-12 99X9 99 J9 

0257539-11 99 JS 99 Jl 

8M2 99X7 99S 

BN D43 90J3 99J2 
IN 1142 99JB 90M 
BN U43 H0.1B1W2I 
7JSOU-12 99X0 99 JB 
US 29-11 <1*5 <*B 

n* 0344 W24W0J4 

BN 1842 99.13 94JS 

r* 1541 1D0X51KU5 


Non Dollar 


Emar/MaL 

ABfary MMtonai 93/W 

AIUak»HjMcSoC91 

AorMp97 

BKMantmilW 

BkNosa Scotia 00 

BkTeknH/n 

Baiada«H>9i 

Beteufcnw 
BriBW+wsun 
Britannia 93 
□neons 89/91 
Caotaeto 
Cr Fonder JO 
Q- National 9im. 

Defwnart, 93/ye 

HgW«BA92 
III 94 

inland 93 
iraiandN 
LkmtoEuraH 
MtottCcn967tf 
MM 10 

Na WuuMW etoS.95 
Nm Zee lend 97 
HZeatond97 
RW05 
Snd 10/93 ' 

Stand Chart StBPcro 
Ywihire I nt 91/94 


Ceopoo Next W Askd 
ltoe 1544 99X7 9059 

n*k sms 9992 MB SB 
. 11*1 1442 IflBJOWOXO 

IP* 27-12 1IU9U0J9 

1U2S3WJ1 9»A 10UK 

m* 2HT W.12H&S 

llto 2V4B 100.UHU* 

rw» imi miTniu 

n*k 3M4 994! 99* 

Tito B844 99JS99J3 

11W 1742 99 JB 19X0 

it*. 21-12 tounea* 

in 8941 1002910029 

11% 15-12 KBZ9UU9 
ink - looxnoux 
11% 0744 99X1 9*51 
UN 1841 KC.1S1003S 

11% 1442 1191551 MAS 

11% 08-12 1001410024 

11% 28-11 1001410024 

■ mojo was 
n S743 uaiBia*a 

mt Ml 19X1 «Mt 
1 IN U4QMJ0 99JB 

11% U42WJ7 99J7 

U% 0*429922 9922 

11% 3*01 rnusuon 

11% 18-12 9M90J0 

iiv zMinamMUO 


TCmB/Stnm rjerr ooeron JM. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


MSCH36S SPECIALISTS 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 

far 20 y e a r. 

19t5 Modal* at bkemmi 
2M a. 2*0 SB. 500 
SOO SI. 500 SK 
1986 Models from Sladu 
23C6,3O0C, 30051, 260 SE, 300 St 
300 SB, 500 500 SB. 500 SEC 
Shipment & dstwe r y worldwide. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MAMZB IAN35TS. 191 
0-6000 RANKRKT/M 
TH.- (01 69-73 30 61 
TlX: 414018 


VMS. S*. 

OmaAL ROUS eOYCE 
DEALS? FOB BaGlUM 

TAX FRS CARS 
ROUS ROYCE BBfTIEY 
RANGE raid LANDROVH 
SAAB 

Also Usod Cars 
lixe MDDB50USG 7J-82 
1170 BrwseJj 
THj 2-673 33 92 
TlX 20377 


ROM STOOC 

Mereod ei 500 SB. ifawan j blue, 
'85 new ear, DMS6.000 
Fondia 928 S. autamdic, btae L . 

■55 ne- tar. DM89JM0. 
other mobs aid modBb upon roqumt. 
Same day rogakawn possit. 

K 2 KOVITS 

OoideiBtrosse 36, CK8027 Zixidt 
Tel: 01/20 76 10. TpIu: 815915. 


DAWAJl TRADE 

WTLDBJVBIY 

We keep o lar pedadc of 
noff cot branch 
Tel: 02/6<8 55 13 
Tete 65658 
42 rue lens, 

1050 BrussMs 


Mercedes/ BMW/ Porsche 


On AM Now 19*5/86 Modal* 

Gdl or Mu Mmifcfc, W. Garmary 
(089) 46 50 41 or 2. Tit 52385) 

American Owned and Operated 
The European Cm GonnacSaB* 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE FROM STOCK 


RUTEINC 

TAUNUSSTL 52, 6000 RANKRIKT 
W Germ, tel (009-232351, H* 411559 


/ PORSCHE 
New/med. Immedam deSvery. Fb AVI 
Tefc Gemuy (0)62364092. tfao 460986 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


EUROPORT TAX 
FRS CARS 

Gdl or write lor (roe cnfcdoa 
Baa 12011 

Rotterdam Airport, Mtend 

Td/a 10623077 
Tefc* 23)71 B’CAJi NL 


. EUROPEAN * USA SPECS. 

Al makes lor worldwide defray from 
Pock. Send far a TAX-FREE arfaioa 
BMW - MEKCBX5 - PORSCHE 
VW - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 

Btnpa Ajrio Broken tne 
POB 214, 3C0 AS Neuwaaem Holland 
Tefc CT 34Q24134&. Tte7&e EAS NL 


JAGUAR, ROVER. MERQSE5 
BMW. SAAB. VOLVO. PORSCHE 
Set) prices. Call Holland 

VAN LAARHOVEN B.V. 

PO Box 2178, 5600 CD Endhmrm 
40-424055, Tlx: 51213 tOA NL 


RG TEAM 

Otters tax free con . axatia and 
dcisda. dl makes. New & used. 
PO Bo* 2050. 4800 CB. BREDA / 
Holland. Tel (0) 76651550 Tbu 74282 


30 YEARS ALTTO-GSANER 
POB 2022, 7900 Ubn. W. Grnsmy 
Refcable German ax dealer offers rmw 
Mercedes, BMW. Porsche. Ferrari Tel: 
(PI 73160033. tU 712861 AUTEX 


MA. 300 SI, 500 SI, 500 SEC new 
Roll Royae S3ra Spirit "85, 7/000 faiv, 
lamhoraln Counadi new. Ferrari 
308 GTB new. P.CT. Belgium Tefc 
03/231 .WHO. 


NEW PEUGEOT, land fewer, fexige 
Bora, Toyota 4*4, iropicd specs. 
Britos, Zemrtaan 18, Maarom- 
txoefc. Hoflcnd (1^30445492. 6 47062 


TAX Free eurs, al makes ft models. 
ATX, NV. Ankemir 22. 2000 Antwerp, 
Setfixn. Td 03/231 16 53 Tit 3153? 


BOATS & 
RECREATIONAL 
VEHICLES 


200 FT. STS. MOTOR YACHT for 

rale, accommodation (or 31 guests 8. 
23 crew, speed 15 IQs. This yacht was 
rebu3t m 1976 at a aw of US$4 
nsBaru The lower deck needs refur- 

bfiteng. Owner fatrsd to sell cd US$1 

mifton. Telex Singapore RS 34845 
(MANSECJ. 


HEALTH SERVICES 


HEART DISEASE AND STROKES - 
^end 2 mmki m prev en tion and re- 
corny program. Segue mowm 
Trcxigut Surrey countryside Highly 
guafined profesionals. biton Hail, Erv 
ton, near Gadolmeig, Surrey, GU8 5 
AL Tefc (042 879J 22 23. 


HEALTH SERVICES 


AMHBCAH WOWflO BT m Ita ly- 
burg ofters ptordtotheropy 390W26. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US IMMIGRATION vim, Any*. 5mSes 
ft Rodney 1925 BridasB Av. Mmmi R. 
33129. Tefc (305) 609600, to 441469. 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


trgekxxem 
LAST MINUTE FARE 
reservation outhorizod within 
3 days prior to departure 

UNIQUE PRICE 

To 

NEW YORK, WASHINGTON (BWII 
CHICAGO or DETROIT 
(root Luxembourg 

On* way - rdraat US$ 199 
(DM 499. BR 9990) 

(S7R 449, FR 1590| 

Bound Trfa 17-21 daul 
etaoe* US$ 410 (DM 999) 
(BR 19,98a SR 899. fR 3290) 

ORLANDO arte way aboot USS 275 
round trip (faoat US$485 

For further nrfurm o tion and reservation 
ml KBAUABt 
Frankfurt fW) 29 99 7B 

Brussels {0^ 218 0880 

Unmmbwg ^98 2470 

Zurich Dl) 363 0000 

Paris (1) 47 42 52 76 


USA 1 WAT 05$ from Amsterdam: 

Miami 293. Atlanta 282. Texas 317, 
Seattle Hu, Coftfamia 320 vxi Alfan- 
lic, 868 vki Orient. MaEbu, Dtxnrcdr 
30. Amsterdom, 20-274041. Tfc. 1463$ 


TO LAX/SFO dtJy depenure from 
Europe return $4®. Ako 1 way ft 
other US dertnrflioni. PrxdC25 9290 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


HB1AS YACHTING- Yachl Owten. 
Aatdemka 28. Athens 10671. Greece. 


GWOLMAN YACHTS. HeAnon 7, 
Athens. 3230330. ths 216034 Groeca. 


HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


GB4EVA 

RBIDB4CE DE FRANCE 

4 Ave. de France. 0+1202 Geneva 
Tefc 0041 22/31 1479 
Seadrful, first dots. Cxr-ecncfctioneJ, 
reudenftal Furrrahed e parmwi m and 
ttucSas. Fu6y equipped kitchen, 
dciy maid service. 

Weekly and monthly rales. 
Err sli n t location. 


FOR SALE & WANTED 


«fiOVmG.G£&FTenchkiidieni»C- 
ances, fumitive, etc. Paris 47 23 6054. 


ARTS 


SA1£ OF RENCH MA511SS. loriou. 
Lauvray. BopeBe. etc. Thu Monfresso, 
td 514ftOS46 Canada, Mr brad 


COLLECTORS 


NUL G. TIBHE, Ktxd DoanWraat 
109. 1055 VD Amsterdam, Haland. 
tefc 020847133 requests to maka the 
highest bd far 100 picture pod cards 
aTBerfin before the bombing*. 


BOOKS 


BRITISH BOOKSHOP. FRANKFURT 
offers a wide selection of British / 
Ameriaxt boob (afao chicken's), Brrt- 
ish tourist pufaGadians. Ma3 order ser- 
vaOtnaw only. Td 069-280492. 
Boenerafr 17. 6000FTadriuR/Ml 


EDUCATION 


AMBBCAN STUDENT EXCHANGE 

program seeb teachers, schools &/ or 

o r a ani zt xio nS who wish la place stu- 
dents m die USA for quaby 1986 
sxnmer homestays. Abo wel> to con- 

tact equally caring organaaioro to 

& American students abroad. 

World Exchange, While Birch 
fei, Bax 377, Putnam Vdfcy, NY 
10579 USA. 


TRAIN TO TEACH BIGLI5H as a for- 

eign language. Private school in Cen- 
tra ftxe runs A week in t en s i ve 
courses fcedmg to Bnmh Royal Soci- 
ety of Arts Preparatory Calicnte in 
TffL Tefc 43 254) 55. 


PROFESSIONAL PILOT TRAMNG m 
the 1ISA Far xi fm mution: Kou, 16 
bis Rue Porker, 78150 Le Otetnay, 
France. Tefc (1) 3954 1957. 


PENPALS 


GIRLS AND GUYS dl contxie ntt not 

K pab. Deeds free Hermes Veriag, 
110660/M. D-1000 Berlin rf) 
West Germany. 


ANIMALS 


SSL FRBttH PUPPIB ft cots, af dl 
races, with or whhout pedimee. Inti 
defcray. Tefc Paris 39 (S0T97 


Place Your Ckssified Ad Quickly and Easily 

In ite 

INTBUIATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Phone: Cal yaw bed IHT representative with your ted. You 
vriS be informed of the cost munedneely, and once prepayment a 
made your ad wiB appear within 48 hours. 

Cart The base reXe is $9.80 pnr line per day 4 loed taxes. There are 
25 letters, signs and spaces m rhe first Ene and 36 in the foSowing incs. 
Minimuri space a 2 Snes. No ofabrewiations acce p ted. 

Credit Cards: Amerioan Express, Oner's Oub. Eoroaxd, Master 
Card, Access and Visa. 


HEAP OFFICE 

Rrnrb: (For daaified only): 
(1J4747A6JM. 

HIROPE 

AmstenW 2636-15. 
Adverts: 361-8397/360-2421. 
Btveselt: 343-1899. 
C np e n h n gw i: pi) 32 944a 
Frankfurt: (069) 72-67-55. 
Lausanne: 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
London: pi) 836-4802. 
Madrid; 455-2891/4553306 
Milan: (02) 7531445. 
Norway! (02) 41 2953. 
Rome-. 679-3437. 

Sweden: (08) 756922 9. 

Tel Aviv: 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Comaa Frankfurt. 

UNITED STATES 

New York: (212) 752-3890. 
Wait Coash (415) 362-8339. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

Bryamstoni 421599. 


LATIN AMBUCA 
Buenos Aires: 41 40 31 

(Dept. 312) 

Canon: 33 14 54 
Guayaquil: 51 45 05 
lima 417852 
Panama: 6905 1 1 
Soitiugo: 6961 555 
Soo Pouio: 8521893 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bahrain: 246303. 

KawaMi 5614485. 

Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar 416535 
Squcf Arcfaia: 

Jeddah: 667-1500. 

UAL: Dubai 224161. 

FAR EAST 

Bangkok: 39006-57. 

Hong Kong: 5-213671. 
Jakarta: 510092. 

ManBa: B17 07 49. 

Seoul: 735 37 73. 

Singapore: 222-2725. 
Totem: 752 44 25/9. 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Melbourne: 690 8233. 
Sydney: 929 56 39. 957 43 2a 
Portia 3289833. 

Paddington, Q ue en si c x iefc 
369 34 53. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SStVKE 

USA A WORLDWIDE 

Head office m New York 
330 W. 56* St, N.YJ1 10019 USA 

2 T 2 - 765-7896 
212 - 765-7754 

MAJOR CRHNT CARDS AND 
QffCXS ACCtr’IkD 
Pmrote Meudierrhipi AwAdde 


This 


RWOffl mIAHCIQ PVfYtCf hat 
featured as the top ft most 

by 


USA ft fartemaltofscd 


★ USA A TRANSWORID 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCOKT SBtVKE. 
EVSYVWCS YOU ABE OR GGL. 

1-813-921-7946 

CaH free from US.- l-8£» 237^892 
Cal free from Honda: 1-800-2824692. 
Lowrf badern welcomes you badd 


LONDON 
ISLINGTON 

ETOORT SBMCE 
lO KEhSNGYON CHURCH ST. WB 

TBs 9379186 « 9379133 

AD mafor cm5t axdi acaptad. 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


LOWON 

Poriman Escort Agency 

67 Ortoem street 
London WJ 

Tefc 486 3724 or 486 1158 

A B major credit cards u e c e | 4od 




* LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
402 7600 or 499 2225 


AW5TOCATS 

Ifrskw Eufirt 5amitt 
128 VAgnoro Sl, London W.l. 

AB Bxqar OedrT Ccrdi Aceepred 
Tefc 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - midmgte 


LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK ESCOKT SBMCE 
212 - 886-1666 


CAPRICE-NY 

ESCORT SBMCE M NEW YORK 
TB: 312-73 7 3291. 


ZURICH-GENEVA 

GtNGEn ESCORT SBMCE. 
T2L 01/363 08 64 -022/ 34 41 86 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


* LONDON OfiSEA * 

ESCORT SBtVtCE. 

51 Beauharp Place, SW1. 

Tot 01 584 6513/2749 (4-12 pm] 


ZURICH 

A1CX1S ESCORT SBMCE 
TEL 01/47 55 82 


INDRANI 

ESCORT SBMtS 
ZURICH. 01/730 89 13 


ZURICH 

JACQUELINE ESCORT L GURX 
SERVICE. TBU 01/ 69 SS 04 


ROME OJJB EUROPE ESCORT 
ft Guide ServieeTefc 06/589 260*- 589 
1146 (ten 4 pm to 10 cm) 


** GENEVA-FIRST ** 

Escort Service + weekend 32 34 18 


GENEVA ESCORT 

SBMCE. Tel: 46 11 58 


******GB4EVA BBT 
ESCORT SOVKX. 022 / 86 15 95 


* JASMINE * 

AMSTERDAM ESCORT SBMCE 
020-366655 


MADRID SHADOWS 

Tel: 2309603 

escort sekvkx. atsn cards 


LONDON BEST ESCORT SBtVKE 
Heathrow. Gwfct canto. 352 B343 


HIAMCRJRT ft SURROUMWGS 

Oxofata'i Etaort & Travel Service. 
EngUi French, Gmen,Sponihipo- 
bm. Tefc |069| 43 57 63. 


AMSTERDAM JEAW Boon Swviee 
Tefc P20) 325420 or 340110. 


ANAMSA GUDEA ESCORT Service. 
Telephone; LA. 213-273380: N.Y. 
212-744^107: Chicago 313-472-2022. 
MuhSnfyiaL 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


L-4rrL-4-rj 




PendKHjae Ejosit 5emca. Tefc 
0211/4997 84, 





mmMm 


ir i 1 , 







thl . J 

LOfOON PARK LANE Escort Servica. 
Tel: 01-821 0283 

Ik iV‘'i' , 

L ’ ' liiEiMl 

1 

c| 


LONDON DtSCSNlNO OCOKT Ser. 
vn (DIJ 961 0154. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


MUNICH -BAVARIAN ESCORT Ser- 

vice. Tefc 089/35 98 914. 


V1B4NA YOUNG ESCCWT Service. 
Tefc S3 33 71 














BRUSSHS, CHANT Ai ESCORT Ser- 
vian: Tat 02/530 23 65 . 









dan. Tefc 01338 8459. 


WASH. DjC. esCOBT SBtVKZ. Tefc 
301 JSe/mSL Crorit Cento. 


rS 























































** 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATliRDAY^SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24, 1985 



Fridays 



Closing 


Tables include the naf fonwfde prices 
vp to the closing on wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I’m The Associat'd Press 


l5M4rt nt 
HtohLow Slock 


Dlv. YW. PE 


Sts. Clave 

into High Low Jmn. COb* 


6% 

3% ADI fl 



53 

124 

4Ui 

4 

18 

Sft ALLabs 

.16 

1.0 

19 

107 

loft 

15% 

14% 

8 AMCl 



16 

29 

H'.k 

10'« 

S% 

2% AM loti 



10 

2157 

5 

4% 

4 

3ft AOI n 




73 

3*. 

3% 

88% 

68% ATT Fd 

552e 4J 


59 

87% 

IP'4 

6 

2ft AcmePr 




74 

34 

3 

11% 

9ft AcmeU 

22 

10 

30 

X 

10% 

IO'.j 

18ft 

9ft Action 



15 

145 

12 

11% 

5% 

lft Acton 




113 

1UJ 

1% 

% 

ft Actn wl 




1 

ft 

V* 

4% 

1% AdmRs 



E 

4 

3ft 

2-i 

30ft 

22ft AdRirsI 

.16 

5 

18 

J7 

27% 

26 ft 


3% Aeronc 




54 

J'« 

3ft 

Sift 

29% AniPbs 

50 

12 

22 

70 

Eft 

51ft 

B% 

5Va AlrEm 




n 

Tlj 

7* , 

12 

6 Airtai 



10 

46 

8% 

8ft 

13ft 

9ft ArCol Pl 

120 

112 


IX 

io:„ 

10% 

3% 

Vk Akim co 




u? 

■k 

% 

117% 

63% Almllon 



11 

71 117"! 

17 

9% 

5ft AIMW 




46 

V* 

t 

9% 

S% Aloha 




K 

9 'do 

9ft 

14ft 

8 Aloha In 

.05 

J 


57 

10 

9't 

S 

Vk Alias n 




56 


? 

ft 

S All ex wt 




SO 

l 'a 

o#i«_ 



Jte - te 


5 

3*u 


3\d + 'i 

10 »* + '? 


lft + 
VO 


a:* 

s? + ft 
rt + W. 
S’®— te 




£ - V« 


OB 

20 

OB 


200 i* 14 

24b 12 JO 


14 31 Alcoa of 3.75 10.7 

32V, I7U AIiqCp 
4 J'A AmBrlt 
18te 10% Amdahl 
11% SYg AmrdCO 
Bte 4 AmCOP 
59 37% AConrrl 

4m 21 AEigol 
9 4ft AFrucA 
9 4% AFruC B 

10% 3H AHIHiM 
Bft 4% A Israel 
17V, n% AMzcA 
14% 13% AUuB 
51% % AMBId 

4% 3 AmOil 
42% 47V. APeff 
15% I21A APrec 
8% 41A AmRiiy 

Uft 11% ARavl n l.Mel<U 
4 3 ASciE 

54% 49% A »enun 
48% 44 Axanpr 
7% 51% A -on sc 

lft Ampal 
4% Andol 
1% AndJcb 
9 Andrea 
5% Anoeles 
% viAnglO' 

3 ArooPI 
5% ArWy 
3% Armim 
. _ 4% Armel s 

20% 141b Arundl 
9% 4% Asmrg 

9% Aslnv 
% Astrotc 

7’% Astral pf I 80 14.4 
% A Us CM 
2% Atlas wl 

2 Audlolr 

12% 11% Ausiml n 
19'* IP! Avondl 


5S 

10 

479 

176 

13 


3% 

4% 

5% 

15% 

9% 

7% 

4% 

7% 

8Ki 

111 * 


45 7861 32' a 2«% 3tte — ’» 
12 23 28 Sft 2'* 2ft + '** 

15 19 2248 1J19 17% 13 + ’7 

1.1 58 7% 7W 7% + ft 

12 9 4% 6% 4'% 

150a 1.7 14 14 59 5Tft 58 — '•'* 

1983 43-s 41-» J3ft +lft 
44 7500s S’ 7 5% S': 

J9 23007 4% 4% 4% 

8 135 4% 4% 4%— % 

4 9 7 7 7 

u i3 T < ir* — 

IF. 13% Uft 

i-t 4* : 4'j + -% 

4'.* 4 4ft + ft 

51% 50% 51 s * ■‘■HI 
14 I3'J 14 

7~n 7ft n 

14% Uft 14% — ft 

4% 41: 4ft — % 

53% 53% 53% 

471a 47'* 47ft — % 

6’i i% 6 Is 

2% 2% 2'« + % 

6 ': 

2 % 

10 
fcft 
1% 

3'* 

5% 

4 

5% 


.flOe 1.7 
.■*0e 1.5 


70 


3 

734 


SiL 21 


.77 


7.4 19 

U 


52 

241 

47 

17 

14 

70 

SI 

479 

8 


2% 

4'* 

7% 

9% 

6% 

1 % 

3 

Vi 


6 ft — 
T-, — 'b 
9ft — 

4% + ft 

I’.* 

3'4 + ’a 

5% 


JO 


13% 

2 % 

17% 

1% 

4'A 

5% 


13 
11 S'7 
12 


21 

4 

98 

204 

44“ 


S’ 3 5% 


£0 45 15 


124 

10 

13 

T23 

20 


18 r 4 Ifift 18ft + % 

9'; 9% »ft 

13% 13% 13% ■+■ vs 
1% I'd lft 
12% 12!: 17'-: 

% \ ft + S 

3'b lft 3ft 
2% 2% 2% + '■* 
12% 12% 17% 
ir.S 17% 17% 


8% 4ib CaatoA 
14% 10% Cal RE 
18% 1 1% Cameo 
3 11% Camonl 

I7Vi III* CMorcB 
52% 27% CWino 


28 IB 


13 

3 

15TB 

15% 

8% 

8% 


4% Cardiff 
1% Card! I 
S'* CoreB 


sc* CaraA 


.10 


_ _ CantE B 

4% CareEA IS 

481a 38 CarqP of iOO 102 
51% 2 Cast) on j5t23J> 
23% 14% Cast LA 20b 50 11 

32% 25% CsaPd 220oi4 
3% % CasFdrt 

9% 4% Cun ran I 

14% I Oft ContSe 1.57*123 
9% S% Catae 20 28 IS 

4 lft ChmoH 27 

18% 12% ChmpP J2 W 17 

29% 14% ChtMA S .16 .9 13 

39 17% ChtMflS .16 .9 13 

21% 16% ChlRv UOo 6.1 12 

10% 9% CMDvo 

38'm 17% Chi I hi 5 
33'% 14 Citadel 
35 19% CflFsl 

33% 20% C hr Gas 
44% 35* CknYrlt 
12% 6% ClarfcC 
45 24% Clarosr 

77'% 11% Clopavs 
«% 3 Vi Coanitr 

6% Cohu 
1% CalF arts 
9% Comfod 
7% Com Inc 
6% ComoD 
4 W CmpCn 
5Vi CmpFct 


29 4% 4 4U. 4- U> 

74 11% 114% 11% + te 

34 16 15% 15% 

9 1% 1% 1% + % 

15% 15% 15% — % 
54 S2te 53% +1% 
10 % 10 % 10 % 

2% m 2% + te 

13% 13% 13% + % 

14% M 14V* + % 

4% 6% 4% 

6% 4% 4% 

200x 46% 46% 46% +1% 
6 2% 2% 3% 

36 16% 16% 16% + % 
34 26% 25% 26V* + Mi 
108 1 % 1 + % 
64 9 8% 9 

9 12% 12% 12% + % 
H 7% 7% 7% + » 

308 2 1% 1%- % 

73 18% 18% 18% + % 


.17 


1D% 

5% 

24 

11% 

12ft 

irb 

10 '* 


J X 

5 

1.00b 10 9 

158 34 10 
1,93a 44 
380 19 10 
.850 2.4 9 

2.1 9 


1 18% 1BH 

2 19% 19% 

86 9ft 9% 
148 k 34 33% 

151 31% 30% 

7 33% 33 
4 31% 31% 
2 44ft 44 
6 9 % 


20 


5* 13% 13 
19 4ft 4 
2 9ft 9% 
112 5ft 4% 


.16 


59 7% 7% 


70% 16% Cndim M 


IB 

25ft 

9% 

5% 

1B % 

14% 

15”* 

20 


16 
2.1 U 
9 


26 


6% Connlv 
Uft ConrCo 
5ft Conost 
1% Conawt 
4ft ConsOG 
ConOGwt 
14V‘ CnStorn 

B'm CnStr wl 
7% vIContA 
„ 9% vICnIA at 

2£<.b 171® ContMil 

14% 10% Convst n 1 JO 136 

19% 17% Copley n 3Bc 14 

3'b 7% CosCrn 

1 % CosCr wt 

10 9ft CntrM n 

12% 7% CrstFo .15e U 10 

35 25% Cross M4 44 16 

48% 28% CrowIM lJMo U 9 

17ft 9% CmCP __ 9 

23ft 17ft CnCP of 1.92 &J 

7ft 4ft CrownC 

2 % CrulcR 1 

4ft '* CrvsIO 

25 13% Cubic 

}1>m 23 l k Curtice 

3 % CuslEn 


1356 

68 

S 

1 


6 % 

7ft 

19 


6 % 

7ft 


892 

36 

117 

6 


8 % 

4ft 

5 


21 


11 

51 

29 

108 

75 

5 

48 

13 

ta 


9ft 


2 % 

% 

9H 


J9 

32 


38 ... .. 

30 17ft 17ft 17ft 
14 23ft 23ft 23ft 

,? TB *8 *=» 

1101 % % % + ft 

80 22% 22% 22% + % 
43 ZH* 23% 23ft + g 


X 


% 




.15* 16 


3CM 

4ft 

•i'.D 

4-k 




75 

lei 

Vile 

24 ft 

Vfft— % 




7 

11 








14 

12 

lift 

lift + ft 



J2o 14 


13 







5 

ro 


3ft— ft 

77% 

23U BonFd 

2.78fIOJ 


H 

26*4 

26% 

751: 


4% Bdic.tr 0 




• 

/ 


9% 

6% BnkBId 

-40 43 






4% 




5 

3>r. 

3% 

3% 




78 

17 

3 


J 





ira 

.■A* 

5 

3% + ft 

13% 


J7t 15 

19 

10 

10 ft 

10': 

10': 





73 


”1 

■f%— ft 

15% 


150 160 


18« lift 

11 

11*4 + % 

4ft 

ft Bel Iron 


2 

17 

% 

!« 

!k 


32% 20ft BeraBr 32 
40% 21ft BicCP .72 
14ft 10 Bftv .40 
27% 21% BlnkMf 1JM 
19ft ?U> BIORBS 
19 9ft BloRAs 
14% Blasng s 


JO 


1.1 14 
1J 27 
2 J 17 
1.7 12 
15 
15 

1A II 


50 79ft 
75 4tRr 
50 16% 
35 27% 
10 17% 
14 17% 
29 36T-1 


1 % 

% BlocAE 




22 

Ik 

19ft 

11 BlounIA 

45 

.12 

15 

.18 

14% 

19% 

11% Blount B 

M 

2 J 

IS 

7 

14 

23 

lift BotarP S 



2 J 

234 

16 

14 ft 

9% BowVol 

.70 



2 J1 

11 ’T 

10 % 

9% Bowl A s 

A* 

42 

10 

21 

10 ’. j 

5ft 

2% Bowmr 



15 

HO 

4ft 

1914 

12% Bowne 

.44 

22 

16 

91 

19ft 

76ft 

19ft Brscnfi 

1/4) 



76 

25ft 

38 ft 

27 BrnFA 

7.00 

76 

10 

III 

38*'* 

41% 

» BrnFB 

150 

2.4 

11 

AI 

41% 

5 

2 % Buckhn 




7 

3% 

Sft 

Sft Budch pl 

.50 

102 


T4 

-•■"k 

34% 

24ft Buell 

JO 

25 

6 

3 

»l% 

13ft 

6 % Bushn 



7 

18 

8 


25 U. 
39% 
14’s 
27’.* 
17% 
17* > 
35% 
% 
1 J"o 
13% 
15% 
11% 
10ft 
4’r 
19 

25% 


40% 

3ft 

■4% 

rr. 


40- j— % 
I aft 
27% 

17% + % 
17% + % 

36ft +1. 

3k + l 4 

14*1— >B 
14 + % 

15% — •* 

lift 

10ft + % 
4ft — >i 
19V. — ft 
25ft 

38* + % 
41% + % 
3% 

4%— ft 
30ft + ft 
7ft— ft 


22ft 

12% 

3ft 

9ft 

14% 


8% CDI 




1ft CMXI 


7% CSSn 


esNJ 



10 % .. . 

lft 1% 

7ft 7% 7% — % 
13% 12% 12% + ft 


i 





D 




I 




58t 

4.9 


IX 

1% 

1% 

1% + % 



ZOO 25j0 





8 + % 



2J0 312 


235 

7% 

7 

7% + ft 





6 

2887 

4% 












Darns of 175 1-L5 


43 

2S% 








580 





3% Dolorm 



6 

IAS 

Sft 










3% 








6 

3% 


3Vk 

38^: 

25% Del Lab 

S2 

15 

11 

9 

1574 

38% 

lft 

** 




23t 

6.1 

ID 

42 

3% 







13 

1 

Aft 

Sft 

8ft 





350 

21 

13% 

13% 

13% + % 




135 


6 

9ft 

9 

9ft + ft 





86 

211 

4% 

6% 

6% + % 





72 

45 

5ft 

5% 

Sft + % 






17 

74 

77 

74% 

26ft + ft 






18 

1ft 

1% 

1% 




20 

2 

17 

IX 

71ft 

71ft 

71% + ft 






1 

35% 

354 

359k 





11 

5 

3% 

3% 

3% — Vk 





13 

5 

5% 

& 

5% — % 






7581 

2% 

2*j> 






917 

% 


VS + 


,2 1k 


58 



193 

14% 

Mft 

14% 






123 

19k 

1% 

lft + Vk 




50 

25 

36 

156 

29% 

28ft 

28ft— ft 



M 

15 

11 

163 

18% 

in 

18ft + ft 




jm is 

16 

87 

14% 

Ute 




27e 15 

12 

1405 

15 

14% 

14% + % 

X*i 

18% Dmoer 

50 

19 

11 

5 

27% 

27% 

27% — % 

r~ 





E 




1 




50 

45 

42 

49 

9 

8% 

8% + ft 

14% 

13% 

EECO 

22 

25 

78 

JO 

15ft 

15% 

15ft 






IS 

199 

Bft 

79k 

Bte + % 




271 

42 

T3 

125 

Aft 

8% 

Bft + % 


7% 

EagICi 



14 

04 

Th 

3% 

2% + % 

71% 

17% 


150 

SJ 

9 

19i 

18ft 

18 

18 — % 




6.96*214 

7 

36 

31% 

31 

31% — % 



rrarl 

.12 



9T7J 

13ft 

1.1% 

T3% + ft 



ElAudD 




5 

% 

% 

% 



ElcAm 

150 

62 

9 

21 

77% 

Xft 

Xft — ft 


2ft 

ElecSd 



41 

37 

4% 

4% 

6% 







1058 

7% 

7% 

2% + % 

13% 

10% 

EmMdn 

53e 

J 


6 

12 

12 

12 + % 


?!<t 




5 

10 

6 

5% 

6 

14% 

13% 

EDvl un 

320*2X4 


15 

14ft 

14 

14% — te 

10% 

4% 

EiigOil 



7 

130 

8 

f If 

M? 

17V, 

10ft 

E5D n 

50 

25 

9 

26 

14ft 

14% 

14% — % 




.480132 


10 

3% 

3% 

a% — % 


Ate 




9 

16 

10% 

in ft 

10ft + % 

9% 

4% 

Elkev 




A 

7 ft 

7ft 

7ft + % 

R% 

Vi 

Eskev rt 150 129 


15 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

75ft 

15% 


50 

22 

8 

57 

IR 

17% 

IB + % 

4% 

te 





6 

1% 

lft 

1% + % 

14% 

22% 


.11* 

5 

29 

37 

74% 

X 

23 —1% 

10ft 


Evrj A 

20 

25 

25 

7 

99k 

9ft 

9% 

9% 

6% 

Excel 

50b 4J 

12 

40 

9% 

9% 

fft— Vo 

» »= 1 


U m FilcGE 

10% 4ft vlFtentg 

43% 28% PlaRck JO U I 
30% 21 Fhike 1JH U 14 
14% 7ft Faadrm 5 

10 7 FooteM 

34ft 29ft Foote of J0I 

9% 5ft FthtllG 

imi 89ft FordCnd4J»t . 

25ft 19% ForstC A JO 1J 27 
2S 199k F OTOtC B .18 3 2B 

32ft 12ft ForestL 32 

2 % Fotomt 

43ft 32ft Front* UOa 24 12 
7% 4ft FrdHIV 

U FrtaEI 
7H Frladm 
5 FrtasEn 
14ft Frhchs 
6% ForVIt 


26 

10Vb 

12 % 

24 

14% 


17 

38b M M 

17 

J2b J 36 
jo U 29 


25 12ft ^1% 11%— % 
25 5% 5ft 5% + % 

JOfl 44 4(2% 43 — Ml 

19S 26ft 26ft 24% + ft 

23 12ft 12% Wft „ 
6 8 7ft 8 fft 
2 X X X + % 

1(4x1 lift 1 lift 1 lift —2 

2 24% 24% 24% 

B 25ft 24% 25ft + ft 
393 23% 28ft 38ft— ft 
IX 1ft 1ft 1ft- ft 
2 38% 38% 38% — ft 
2 5ft 5ft 5ft— ft 
48 23% 23% 23% + % 
8 8% 8% 8% + ft 

48 9ft 9% 9% + % 
SO* 23ft 23ft Dft + ft 

24 15% 15ft 15% 


13% — te 

Sft 

ft GNCv 




5 

% 

19ft— ft 

6% 

4 GRI 




16 

4ft 

9%— ft 

4ft 

lft GTI 




2 

2 

34 +1 

15% 

10ft GolaxC 



11 

15 

12% 

31% + % 

2% 

lft GalxyO 



21 

66 

1% 

33ft 

90ft 

24% Goran 

120 

4.4 

16 

88 

27% 

31ft— ft 

W% 

7% Gal Ut 




142 

fft 

44% 

13ft 

9% GelmS 



43 

20 

12% 

9% 

4ft 

1ft Gemot 




49 

1% 

35% - ft 

18ft 

12% GDefns 

J8 

62 

8 

58 

13% 

13 

5 

2% GnEmp 

20 

70 

ll 

2 

2% 

4 — % 

17ft 

13 GnMicr 

.in 

J 

12 

13 

14ft 

9ft 

6 

2% GenlKO 




57 

2% 

5% + ft 

15ft 

9% GenvDr 

20 

12 

10 

63 

11% 

2l*k — ft 

M 

7ft Geo Res 



4 

* 

11% 

7% 

4ft 

1% GeoRwt 




41 

3% 

lift 


8% CeoRspMJIO 

92 


10 

10% 

t%— ft 

B. I 

12ft QianF s 

20 

12 

15 

IX 

26% 

7% + ft 1 

20 

B GfltYIB 




300 

14V. 

18%— % ] 

38% 

20% GRrMf 

& 

23 

13 

44 

38% 

16ft 1 

37 


i2nb 

14 

20 

113 

30 

18% — % i 

4% 





21 

3% 

8ft + ft | 

ift 

■H^rivU 




75 

4 

4ft + ft | 

lft 

% G Id Fid 




874 

Vt 

5% + ft ! 

19% 

15ft GarRps 

26 

32 

8 

5 

19ft 


U 

6ft Graham 

22 

43 


3 

7 

26ft— ft 

11 

5ft GrehMc 

120*302 

8 

66 

Sft 

14 + ft 

24% 

16% GmdAu 

AO 

2.1 

12 

20 

19 

12ft + ft 

12 

7ft Grunt 



u 

24 

8% 

15ft— ft 

7ft 

Vk Grant wt 




45 

» 

75% — % 

15 

9% GrTedj 



16 

42 

11% 

13ft + % 

44ft 

71 GrtLKC 

M 

1J 

17 

141 

37ft 

18% — ft 

36 

12% Groom ■ 



14 

172 

24% 

2% 

lift 

5% Greiner 

281 

84 

12 

16 

11% 

ft 

13% 

V GrdCh 

20b 19 

11 

70 

12% 

fft— ft 

15ft 

11 GMCdO 

22 



Z71X 

14% 

10% + ft 

36ft 

24 Glfetr 

M 

1.1 

12 

■ 1 

35% 

34% — ft 

15% 

8 Gull 

S 60 

J 

11 

El 

13ft 


H 

f* 


ft- ft 

4ft + ft 

.L. + ft 


lft lft— ft 


8ft 9ft + ft 


1ft 1ft 


2% .2%— ft 


5% 


5% +ft 
»1 - % 


3ft 


3% + ft 
10% + ft 


X 38% + ft 

■a ^ 


7 7 

S% 5% 

« » -14 


22V: 16% Fablnd 
18% 6 FalrFIn 
19 15% Forty pf 

10 % 3% FkJata 
5% 1ft FCaoHd 
15ft 11 FWymB 
13V|» 9% Fitcrp* 

15ft 11% FlsdiP 


40 U I 
13 

671 19 


22 22ft 22% 32ft + ft 

84 17% 17% 17ft + ft 

69 14% 16ft 16% + ft 

28 4% 6ft 6% 

3278 5% 5ft 5ft + ft 

M 66 12 13 12ft 12ft 12ft— % 

252 12% 12ft 12% ■*■ % 

25 14ft 13% 14ft— ft 


48! 48 21 


c 




H 




I 



.10* 12 


5 

0 

mu 

8 

13% 

I0U HMG 

j60 

52 


9 

10% 

Fhrl 

10% 



ASa 32 

13 


20% 

e: 



4% Halifax 

itk Hal ml 


3 


8 

Sft 

5ft 

Sft 

3% 




252 

2% 

7% 

2% 

10% 

6% HorrxJtl 

.93911 A 

A 

4 

Ate 

7% 

8% + % 

29% 


m 

2 

9 

3 

7Sft 

MV 

25% + % 

27% 


50 

12 

16 

11 

77% 

F’l. 

27% 

2% 

ft Harvey 




98 

1ft 

mti 

1% 

39% 


.IS 

4 

10 

428 

36% 

Fs 

35ft— ft 

43 


49 


2 

40% 

40% 

48% + ft 

41% 

Sft Hasting 

.40a 12 

10 

16x30ft 

30 

30 —ft 






222 

m 

8% 


17% 

12ft HlthCr x 

281 

U 

s 

127 

14% 

13ft 

14ft + ft 

10ft 

5% Hit hOh 




48 

A% 

8% 

8% + % 

17% 

4% HHhEx 



19 

50 

9ft 

9% 

9%— % 

15% 


34 

42 

If# 

183 

lift 

14% 

14ft + ft 

9% 

6% HeinWr 

200 2 S 

B 

5 

8% 

A% 

8% 

17% 


.10 

J 

9 

104 

14ft 

14ft 

14ft + % 

3% 

lft HokJor 



50 

25 

2 

2 

2 

9 





71 

3% 

15 


1% 

% HeimR 




741 

% 

5% 

3% HerxhO 



71 

87 

5 

4ft 

s + % 

3% 

1% Hlndrl 




22 

2ft 

2ft 

2% 

17 

fft Hlpfron 



16 

M 

15 

14% 

15 + ft 

4% 





11 

2 

1% 

2 

20% 

t% HallfCP 

24 

12 

7 

219 

70% 

19ft 

20% + ft 

25% 





3647 

77% 

74ft 

25% + % 

22ft 

20 Hmlns pf2.95 1X0 


307 

22ft 

22% 

22% + ft 

24% 

14% Hormls 

JS4 

22 

14 

77 

74ft 

74 

24% 

12 

3% 

6 HraHar 
% HmHwt 




238 

134 

% 

% 

TL + i 

19ft 

13ft HoHPtv 

120 

93 

16 

70 

1A% 

lftte 

18ft— ft 

6% 

2% HattPwi 




i 

6% 

6ft 

6ft 

6% 

3% HouOT 

J6el&4 


371 

4ft 

4 

4% 

18% 

11% HovnE 



11 

7 

14ft 

14% 

16ft 

13ft 

8% Howl In 

25* 2.1 

7 

5 

12 

12 

12 + % 

23ft 

16% HubeiAs 

Jo 

XI 

13 

ID 

24% 

73% 

24 + ft 

25ft 

15% HubeiB s 

24 

3.1 

14 

189 

714% 

74ft 

24ft + % 

21% 

17% HudGn 

AO 

12 

17 

10 

21ft 

71% 

21ft + % 

9% 

6% Husky a 

26 

5.1 


890 

7% 

7% 

m— % 

| 








1 

a 

3% ICEE n 



11 

1.18 

A 

5 

5 

55W 

32% ICH 1 



8 

775 

53 

57ft 

52% — % 

7% 

1 ICO 


138 

21 

T% 

1ft 

1% + % 

3% 

2% IPM 




77 

3ft 

3% 

3ft + % 






m 

Aft 

8% 

8ft 


4ft 155 
l*rw imnGp 

.12 

22 


2 

5% 

Ste 

5% 

3Vk 

,12e 34 


546 

15 

sK 

3JJ + *. 

2ft 





76 

% 

40ft 

30ft Impong 

M 



IX 

79 

38% 

79 

13ft 

5 Inftaht 



7 

;w 

6% 

Aft 

6% + ft 

23% 

lift Instras 

20 

3 

21 

74 

21% 

70% 

21% + % 

2ft 

1% InstSv 



8 

365 

1ft 

1% 

1%— te 

3 

2% InsSypf 

jstian 


n 

7% 

7% 

2% 

13 

6% IntCtvg 

40 



86 

17% 

17% 

12% — ft 

15 

10% Intmk 

,12b 

2 


15 

14ft 

14% 

14ft + ft 

4ft 

2ft InhBknt 




316 

It 

3% 

3% 

1% 

% IntBkwt 




170 

% 

%— Ik 

12% 

5% IntHvd 



21 

49 

7% 

7% 

7% + % 

lift 

9ft IIP 

36 

92 


70 

10% 

10% 

10% 

9ft 

A mtSeow 




3 

1% 

8% 

s%— % 

10ft 

Z% intThr n 




AHA 

3% 

3% 

3% + % 

10ft 





47 

3% 

3% 

3% 

23% 

13% Ion less 



21 

143 

7.1% 

21% 

21% + ft 

41 

25 IroqBrd 



33 

33 

39% 

34% 

34%— % 


I Aft 

11 Jaelyn 

.51® 44 

11 

6 

11% 

11% 

11%— ft 

7ft 

5% Jacobs 


12 

30 

5% 

5% 

5% 

4% 

2ft Jet Am 


7 

96 

3% 

3% 

3%— ft 

1% 

% Jet A wt 



268 

% 

% 

ft- ft 

9% 

5% Jetron 

Jit 9J 

12 

19 

7ft 

7% 

7ft 

6% 

2% John Pd 



72 

4 

Sft 

3% 

11% 

5 JoimAm 

20 55 

8 

134 

5% 

5% 

5ft 

11% 

6 Jahnlnd 


3 

56 

8% ' 

8ft 

8% + ft 

Aft 

2% JumpJk 


17 

XI 

3% 

2% 

3ft + ft 


Our exdusiveR-desoied 
leather pocket diary 
is thin, flat and elefflint. 





nb »Ulr 


No sooner was it introduced than 
everybody wanted one! 

The International Herald Tribune diary, 
started as a distinctive Christmas present for a 
few of our f riends, was such a huge success that 
now we make it available to all our readers. 

This ingeniously designed diary is flat as 
can be — neat and luxurious — including a built- 
in note pad. Slips into your pocket without a 
bulge and is ready with instant “jotting” paper 
the second you need it. Personalized with your 
initials (up to 3) at no extra cost The perfect 
Christmas gift for almost anyone... including 
yourself. 

— Note paper sheets are fitted on the back of the 
diary — a simple pull removes top sheet 
— No curled up edges. No tom pages. 

— Comes with note paper refills. 

PLUS: Pages of useful information. 

Conversion tables of 
weights, measures and 
Y . . . » distances, a list of 

national holidays by 
countiy, vintage chart 



t fJ 


and other facts... all in 
this incredibly flat 
little book. 


— Gold metal comers 
— Plenty of space for appointments 

— Tabbed address section — Format 8x13 X 3 in.) 

— Rich dark leather — Gold initials included 
— Note that quantity discounts are available. ^ 

Return Order Form to: Paul Baker, Program Coordinator, International Herald Tribune 
c/o Dataday House, 8 Alexandra Road, London SWJ 9 7JZ, England 



please check method of payment: 

Enclosed is my check or money order for S_ 


□ 


□ 


made to the order of International Herald Tribune. 

(Payroeni can be node in any convertible European currency ai current 
oednange rales. 1 

Please charge to □ Access nVisa nAmex 
nay credit card: □ Eurocard a Diners □ Mastercard 


Please send me 1986 IHT Pocket Diaries. 

Price includes initials, packing and postage in Europe. 


.14 

diaries 

S-? 

dunes 

J0-19 

diaries 

U-S.S20each 

US. 5!9cadi 

UiSIScach- 


Additional postage 
ootsfcfeEiBcpe 
US. S3 each 


INITIALS 

cpio3perdiary 


Name. 


Fwqnanmvonfcn. 
pkaseusesqaBie sheet. 


AN BLOCK LETTERS) 


Card No.. 


Address. 


Exp. Date. 


City/Code. 


Signature. 


Country. 


23-11-85 






— 




3% 

3%- ft 

uu. 

10 KOvCb 





13% 

Ute 

nft . .. 

13% 

ID% Kovjn 

JM U 

11 

9 

IW 

13ft 

Uft + % 

15% 

9ft KearNI 

40 

26 

15 

33 

10% 


23% 

U Ketchm 


19 

5 

11% 

18% 

10%.— ft 

4ft 

2% KevCofi 

.151 

42 

22 

19 

3% 

3% 

3ft + ft 

4 

2ft KevCAA 

.15* 42 21 

II 

3% 

2 1 *- 


12ft 

7% K«yPh 


22 


6075 

10 



7% 

2ft KevCa 



9 

6 

2% 







AB 

% 








M 

3ft 

3ft. 

3ft 

4% 

3ft Kllern 



30 

12 

M 

3% 

3% + ft 






71 

:w< 

3% 

3ft + ft 

4% 

7% Klrbr 




a» 

2% 

m 

£ 

$ft 

3% KIIMip 



15 

1 

Aft 




m 

3 


17 

2% 


2ft— % 

16ft 



16 

56 

15% 



30% 

22ft KoaerC 

222 

84 

97 

lit 

27% 

27 

27ft + % 

f 




m 


■H 


MB 

R1 

lft USB 




63 

1% 

1% 

1% + % 






5 








10 

2 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft — ft 

22 

11% LndBnc 

30 

72 

12 

37 

21% 





40 

20 

8 

33 








If 

408 

11 

10% 

11 + % 

13 




18 

12 

8% 

Sft 

8ft- ft 

TOff'-l 

16ft LkorPP 

320 

16.1 


11 

18% 

um 

16% — ft 

■ci 




13 

481 

Sft 

7% 

7ft 


19% Uhlohs 

40 

12 

11 


33 

33% + % 





8 

42 






JO 

12 

10 

40 

ni 


28%— te 

3 

1% LiteRst 




38 

1% 

1% 


4ft 

2% Utfld 




74 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft 






5 

1% 

1% 

1%- ft 

33ft 

16% LmTCp 




57 

21% 

20% 

21% + ft 





21 

89 






J» 

2 

34 

143 

17% 

17% 

17% + ft 


, 'lilfri I J :• ^ 


16 

159 

19ft 



13% 




11 

120 

11% 



14% 

10 Lvoal 



9 

18 

U 

14 

14 

26ft 


30 

19 

11 

140 

10% 

10ft 

IDft 

10ft 

8% LyncftC 

JO 

21 

18 

2 

v% 

y% 

fft 

| 




M 




1 





14 

50 

13% 

Uft 

Uft 

2% 





55 

1% 

1% 

1ft + ft 

9% 

7% MSA 

J8« 9.9 


2£x 9 

8% 

8% + ft 

lft 





49 

1ft 

1% 

1% + ft 






69 

8% 

Bft 

8% + ft 






3* 

2% 

2ft 

2% 

I5ft 

7% MaeGro 




765 

9% 


9te + ft 



.16 

J 

68 

39x19% 

19% 

19ft 






75 


W 

1 + ft 





6 

93 

11% 

11% 

Uft + ft 

71% 

10% MaPS 

251 

12 

3 

234 

»ft 

19% 

19ft— ft 

15% 

8% Matarto 



33 

I? 

11% 

12 + % 

24% 

10% Manpd 




11 

41 

12% 

4% 

12% 

4% 

12%— % 
4ft— te 

17% 

4% MricIVs 



15 

?7 

17ft 

17% 

17U + » 


21ft Marmpf 225 107 


3 

71% 

21% 

2T% 





24 

31 

19V. 


19% 





19 

18 

57 

569k 

56% — M 



20a 12 

6 

68x 20% 

19ft 

20% +1M 




12 

11 

114 

12% 

12% 

12% — ft 





7 

88 

15% 

14ft 

15 + % 

E3 

Ifft Matrix s 



22 

276 

71ft 

20% 

21% + te 

I bt^I 

Bft May Ena 1JJJ 154 


250 

9% 

9% 

9% — % 


14% Mavflw 

20 

34 

10 

138 

22% 

27% 

22ft 

6% 

4ft McDow 


22 


28 

4% 

4ft 

4ft— % 


1% McRae t 

20* 55 

12 

11 

3% 

3ft 

3% 

7ft 




11 

2 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft— % 

Ixl 

60ft Madia 

1.16 

14 

78 

9 

85% 

85 

85% + % 



24 


18 



21% 

21% 

10 

5% MercSL 

2Dr 22 

6 

54 

8% 

8% 

Bft + % 


8% MetPro 

.15 

2 

24 

SO 

20 

19% 

20 + % 


11 Metexm 



9 

36 

15% 

14% 

14ft — ft 


3% NichGn 



7 

147 

3% 

3% 

3%— % 


8% Mid Am 

20 

22 

12 

14 

9% 

8% 

9 

K x 

I7te Mkflnd 

40 

12 

9 

IS 

29% 

By; - 1 

29ft 

18 

12% MtchlE 

24 

12 

71 

459 

13ft 

t r I' j 

15te + ft 

16% 

9% MotlMg 

40 

16 

10 

63 

16% 

a T". n 

16%— te 

Uft 


20 

1,1 

16 

16 

17V. 

17% 

T7ft + ft 

18% 

10% AAoaaA 

28 

14 

15 

35 

17 

14% 

17 + % 

22% 

15% SAMedn 



14 

108 

20ft 

20 

20 

4% 

1% MiuRiwt 



22 

1% 

1% 

lft 

19% 

16% AAlgGttl 

156 

82 

7 

107 

1ft 

17% 

17ft 

10 

8 MlaPIn 

20* 22 


56 

fft 

9 

9te + te 

2ft 

1 Mortm 




114 

lft 

lft 

lte— % 

13W 

7% Matts 

20 

24 


7 

Hlu 

8 

Bte + % 

6% 

2% Ml Med 



13 

300 

5% 

4% 

5ft + te 

4% 





37 

1% 

1% 

lft— % 

Uft 

9ft Myerln 

28b 24 

10 

40 

11% 

lift 

UKl + % 

■ N | 

17 


240 192 


210 

13% 

13 

13ft + te 

20% 

18% NRM of 

240 14.1 


14 

lBft 

18% 

18ft — te 

9% 

5% Nanlek 



14 

s 

8% 

Aft 

B% + % 

14ft 

lift NtGsO 

40b 34 

It 

65 

11% 

11 

lift— % 

21% 

12% NtPatnt 

.10 

3 


198 

18 

77% 

17% — % 

23% 

14% NAAxAr 

.79 

4S 

19 

T7 

17ft 

17% 

17ft 

17% 

13% NPInRt 

125 

62 

15 

K4 

15% 

15% 

15ft 

27 

13 NProc 

I20e 48 

12 

147 

26 

25ft 

25ft— ft 

10 

7% NWIdPn 



51 

374 

10ft 

10% 

10% + ft 

49ft 

31% NYTirma 40 

12 

17 

1005 

48 

47ft 

47ft— % 

17ft 

lift Newcor 

22 

22 


a 

11% 

lift 

11% 

16% 

lift NtwLsn 



15 

794 

16% 

14ft 

16ft . 

17ft 

13% NmpEI 

120 

84 

13 

26 

17ft 

17% 

17ft— U 

7ft 




18 

4 

6% 

6% 

4ft— % 

13ft 

6% N knots 



7 

278 

9% 

9 

9 — te 

3ft 

1% Norllnd 




155 

4% 

3% 

4% + ft 

3ft 

2ft Nokx 



IS 

175 

3 

2% 

3 +% 

11% 

9% NCdOg s 




37 

10% 

10% 

10% + % 

71 

29% NIPS pf 

125 126 


620*33% 

33ft 

33ft— % 

4% 

2% NuHrz 



IT 

40 

4 

3% 

4 + ft 

lft 

Ik NuHrwt 




8 

% 

% 

te 

11% 

4% NuClDt 



11 

53 

5% 

5% 

5% 

12% 

8% Nomac 




233 

9% 

9ft 

fft + te 

I 




0 




| 

24ft 

% 

O 

m 

> 



14 

111 

TO 

19% 

19%—% 

22% 

is% Oakwd 

28 

4 

14 

28 

21 

20% 

71 + te 

12 

4 OdetAn 




116 

7% 

5% 

7% +lft 

16ft 

5ft OdetB 




23 

8 

7 

a +iu 

21% 

13% OhArt 

24 

1.1321 

9 

22ft 

21% 

22ft + % 

27% 

10% Olsten] 

24 

3 

20 

56 

26 

25% 

26 

7ft 

3% OOkJeo 




4 

3% 

3% 

3ft— % 

7% 


25e 1.1 


15 

4% 

4% 

4% 

8 

4% OriolHA 

IS 

72 

28 

5 

5% 

5% 

S%— ft 

7% 

4% OrtolH B 

JO 

16 

28 

50 

.5% 

5% 

5% 

2% 

1 Ormond 




32 

1% 

1 

1% + % 

26ft 


42 

1J 

17 

A 

25% 

25ft 

25% 

17ft 

6% OxfrdF 

-82t 4J 

13 

477 

17% 

17 

17% + % 

14% 

Sft OzarkH 

20 

12 29 

777 

U% 

13ft 

13ft- % 

1 E 1 


ft PatLwt 

6ft Pettrnf 1.45 212 
7% PattAlM 228 214 


fft PMIU) .^S*U9 

" PiooPU 


1 ft 

7 2ft Pier lwt 

7% 2% PtonrSY 

5% 4% PltWVo 56 104 10 

77 «sft ptHwev ijc 2 A n 

10ft 6% Pftnin J» IX 

20ft 15% PlcrOo M m 

16ft 12ft PIvGfll* -U 1J W 

4% 3 PomEv . 

13ft m Parttva . 36 

17ft .12% PwtlPr JO U 13 

7% 5ft ProlrOs 

24ft W- ProftL* Tl 

8 % 6% Pratt Rd OH 
7ft 6ft Protppf M MX 
1 % ft PremRs 

12% 1% PraRB 1J00 93 4 

6 % 3ft PraM 15 

22 % 19ft PrpCT 5 1 JO U 13 

X% 15ft PrvEnk U4 73 9 

40 32% PSCol pf 425 TM 

22 va 16% P«t pic 234 115 
34% 30% PatlrtC 437 134 ' 

94ft 18 Potpfp 2J4 9* 

8 ft. 2% PuotaG 


58 h h 

i a 9^ K + ft 

I 1J% IJg— w 

£- S g 

^ 3ffi.]£S>SS + » 
A % 9 9^* 

M 13 lift 12 + •“ 

'J 'S « 'ft 

79 23ft 23ft 23% 

3k a % % 

“ 10ft 10% lgfc- ft 
24 . 3ft 3ft 3%—ft 
41x19% 19ft +3? 
6 -23ft Xft 23ft + ft. 
SOzXft Xft OTb+1 
ID 20% Xft W* 

37 12ft 33% 32% + % 
4 24 34 34 — ft 

II 4% 4ft 4ft— ft 


Bft 5ft PLM .13 14 
15 lift PGEpfA 1-50 105 
13% 10% PGEpfB 1 J7 1U> 
12% 9ft PGEpfC 125 104 
12ft 9% PGEpfD 1J5 114 
12ft 9% PGEpfE 1J5 102 
12ft 8% PGEpfG 120 107 


72 PGEofF 434 128 
29% PGEPfZ 406 128 


Xft 

29% 24% PGEpfY 320 114 
24% 1«ft PGEpfW2J7 107 
22ft 17ft PGEpfV 232 108 
34ft 18% FGEdFT 2-54 108 
24% 19ft PGEpfS 262 107 
11 8ft PGEpfH 1.12 105 
23 17% PGEpfR 237 105 

19% 15ft PGEpfP 205 105 
20% 14ft PGEpfO 200 107 
19% Mft PGEjrfM L« 107 
21 16ft PGEpfL 225 11.1 
WA 15ft PGEpHC 2 M 105 
21ft 17% PGEpfJ 232 T15 
lift Eft PGEpfl 109 104 
V 16*6 PGTm 124 43 11 
41ft 33% PacUpf *M 105 
41ft 32% PacUpf 440 11.1 
43% 34% PacUpf 4J0 107 
73*6 58% PacUpl 744 105 
ft % poms 

42ft 32% PaflCp 40 1.1 22 
m 5ft Panfast 
35ft 17% ParkOl UOa 21 12 


87 8% 8 8ft + ft 

15 I4ft I3V I4V6 +■% 

1 12ft 12*6 12ft . 

6 12 11% 12 -fft 

X 12 11% 11% 

TO 12ft lift 12ft + % 
22 lift lift lift 
M 3t 33% 34 + ft 

32 31% 31% 31% — ft 

59 29 28% 29 + ft 

17 24 23% 24 

4 21ft 21%' 21ft— ft 
15 23% 23ft 23ft +% 
19 34% 23% 24% + % 
57 10% 10ft IKS 

5 22ft 22% 22ft + ft 
777 20% 19ft 19V4 

6 18ft 18% 18% 

33 15% 15% 15% 

5 20ft * 20ft 

X 19% 19ft 19% + ft 

3 21 21 21 +ft 

6 10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 


c 



- 

9 




1 

10% 

5% Ouobot 


02 


35- 

(Tte 

8ft 

8ft -F % 

r~ 



- 

ft 




■ 1 

7ft 

Sft RAI 

J3t S3 

20 

6X 

6% 

6% 

A%+ tt 

20% 


1? 

3 

48 

8 

20% 

20% 

20%+ te 

20 

2% 

turn **.' j 

72 

Of 

29 

137 

IS 

m 

\ 

"Kit 

17% 

14 RHSon 
lte RffSowt 




14% 

16ft 

Uft— % 

2ft 




26 

lft 

1% 

lft 

20% 

16% RffSoun 1220 63 


13 

17ft 

17ft 

17ft 

4ft 

1% Redtaw 




43 

3ft 

7ft 

2%— % 

15% 

10ft Regal B 

60b 19 

14 

31 

Uft 

15te 15% + % I 

50ft 

35% Rssrt A 




13* 

45ft 

45 

45 — % 







49 

SOte +lft 


3ft RstAsB 



11 

31 

6% 

6% 

6%— % 

6 

3% RsiAaA 



18 

9 

5ft 

5ft 

Sft— %• 

4ft 

3te Rex Nor 

.10# 13 

12 

29 

4ft 

4% 

4% — % 

Uft 

9ft RibtotP 

20 

1.9 

15 

10 

10ft 

10ft 

10ft— % 

18% 

14% RiaAlg 

M 

35 


50. 

14% 

15% 

15% + ft- 

19% 

•te Rckwvs 

20 

13 

34 

107 

17ft 

16ft 

17V. 

30ft 

17te Ropar* 

.12 

3 

19 

29 19% 

19% 

19ft— te 

5ft 

1% RoanvP 




166 

1% 

lft 

1% 

34 

22ft Rudtck 

J6a2.1 10 

W 

26% 

26te 

26U 

33% 

22ft Rudckp 

36 

22 


15 

25% 

25% 

25% + % 

Bft 

4% RBW 



B 

20 

m 

B% 

8% + % 

20 

11% Russell 

JO 

U 

14 

68 

18% 

10% 

18ft— % 

29% 

14 RykofI 

40 

27 n 

274 21% 

21% 21% + % | 

1 




S 




1 

9 El 

3ft SFM . 



10 

3. 

4ft' 

4% 

4% + % 

NK] 






8- 

7% 

8 

IKi 

21% SJWs 

L45 

3 J 

u 

' 4 

39% 

39% 

39ft + ft 

5 

2% SMD 



10- 

67 

7ft 

3% 

3ft- + % 

10ft 

6% Saps 




2 

7% 

7% 

-7ft 

lft 

% SCarto 




4 

1 

-1 

1 • 

9 

6% SDaont 

40 104 


5 

Bft 

Oft 

8ft + % 

9% 

Aft SDoopf 

40 10J 


4 

8% 

Aft 

8ft + % 

10 

7% SDgort 

1JU 10J 


7 

m 

99h 

Jg* + % 

23V* — % 

24% 

19% SDoopf 

247-104 


3 

73W 

23te 

soft 

34ft 5Deapf 

435 124 


14 

38% 

38 V. 

38%+ V. 

26 

20ft SDgopf 
21V. Sandate 

248 106 


0 

25% 

25te 

2S% + % 

30 

40 

33 


1 

26% 

26% 26% 






186 

14% 

13% 

MW + ft 


3% Sanmrk 

431 

84 

11 

69 

5 

4% 

5 + te 

11 

9% Sdund pf 120 IV 


14 10ft 

10% 

10% + % 

Vft 


120 132 


U 

9 

Aft 

9 + % 

17 

11% Sbarron 



20 

86 

17% 

16% 

ttfk + % 

5 





44 

3% 

3V. 

3V. 

30ft 

17% Schelb 

46 

14 

14 

23 

29% 

29% 29% + % 

2ft 

1% School P 



38 

1 

1% 

1% 

>% 

7% 

3ft 5dMst 

.10 

14 


4 

5% 

5% 

S% 

34 

lift SdLsn 



fl 

15 

Uft 

13% 13% + te 

40U 


A3 

U 

lit 

5 

33 

33 

33 + % 

20 

12te ScurRn 




42 

19 

lute 

18% + % 

69ft 

42ft SbdCto 

30 

.7 

7 

16 

70 

69% 

69%—% 

2ft 





27 

lte 

1% 

lte + % 

4% 

4ft Scant of 

1 



150: 

4% 

4% 

4% 

15% 

fft Sec Cop 

.14 

14 

9 

71 

rat* 

10 

low + % 

4ft 

2 SetsPro 
% SetsDH 




T 

10* 






24 

44 

4ft 

4 

4 - 

4ft 





7 

7% 

2% 

2H + % 



461 

72 

IB 

73 

13% 

12 

12 — % - 

IK41 


49 

4 

11 

48 

10% 

10% 

10% + ft 

lit! 

Bft ShaerS 

140e 73 

8 

31 

482 

13V. 

ft 


15ft 

9 SMopwIs 

.16 

12 


19 

12 

11% 

11% - 

16% 

4te SlB-HSn 



30 

607 

Sft 

5te 

5% + % 

15% 

fft SlerSPO 

271 22 

29 

43 

12 

11% 

U + ft 



■20 



2 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft +. ft 

7% 

4 SlfCD 

.10 


18 

16 

5% 

5 

5 

15V. 

8% SlkesA 

20 

24 

12 

26 

10ft 

TOV. 

raw.— % 

5% 





26 

3% 

3ft 

3% 

4% 





20 

3ft 

3% 

3 ft + te 


10% SmthA 

40 

05 


282 

23 

29 

22% + % 

IHtfj 

10 SmtbB 

40 

34 


39 


21ft 

22% + » 


34te SmfiiPf 

Z12 

72 


730 


38ft 

29% + % 

-J HlZj 

Sft Sofftron 



22 

169 


7% 

I 

IEJ 

7 SargPrn 
% SoTex 


292 

20 

12 


lft 

% 

Bft 

% 

iote 

Bft SCEdPf 

142 102 


■ 

■Hid 


10 

11% 

8% SCEdPf 

UK 102 


3 

Irlrl 


TO%— ft 

11% 

Bft SCEdPf 

140 

94 


6 

11 

tc 

11 + ft 

14ft 

lift SCEdPf 

145 104 


13 

MM 

14ft + te 

IEZ£j 

18 SCEdPf 

2J0 

9.9 


12 

f ;ij 


23V. 


17ft SCEdPf 

221 

too 


9 

t-trl 

TE 

22% 

75% 

60 SCEdPf 

748 KM 


2 

73 

73 

73 

84 

61 SCEdPf 870 -92 


- 1 

88ft 

m 

B8ft HKtft 

TO 

70 SCEdPf 

826 U2 


7 

TO 

1 'ii 

A7ft— % 

3% 




ID 

15 

3% 

3U 

3% + te 

7te 

4% SpedOP 




U 

7 

6% 

7 

12ft 

Sft Speocer 

461 



10 

Aft 

Aft 

6% 

11% 

3ft Spndthn. 

188 

18 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft— % 

8% 

4% StHavn 

48 

13 

25 

9 

5- 

5 

5 — % 

7ft 

% StHavwt 



■ 5 

m 

1% 

1% 

Wte 

7ft Stanwd 



66 

19 

9% 

9% 

9% 

Xlte 

14ft SlarrfH 



21 

28 


17% 

17%+ % 

Wte 

6ft S latex 




16 

■ c! 

8% 

8% — % 

23te 

15ft Stepan 

72 

32 

12 

7X22% 22% 22%— % , 

5% 

4te strtCop 




3 

598 

5% 

5% 

Tte 

lft Stone 




43 

1ft 

1% 

lft + % 

73 

13ft StrtExt 

25 

U 

TO 

57 

19ft 

19% 

19te 

n% 

5% StertSft 

.18# 14 

26 

179 

9% 

9% 

fft + % 

2% 

lft StrvtW 




U 

1% 

-lft 

1% 

7 

3% SumltE 




1 

Ate 

5te 

5U— % 

11 

7 SunCtv 




41 

t 

7% 

7ft- ft 

8 

2% SunSL 




74 

4% 

4te 

4ft— % 

24% 

11% SunJr 

48 

11 

U 

6 


22ft 

22ft — ft 

1 1' 

ZIte SuprFd 

A4t 

15 

49 

- J 

11% + te 



20 

14 

8 

15 

190 

58 

■MV 

rite 

1 

T1\4 SuttST 

26 

Ol 

11 

73 

IfiLl 

17% 

17ft + % 

1 

. 



8 

37 

4% 

4% 

4%—te 

' 



TO 

2 

1% 

1% 

1% 

HT JJ 

19% Swtffln 

120 

44 

36 

31 

25 

24ft 

24ft 



.10 

14 

9 

14 
. 78 

2ft 

6ft 

3% 

iff* 

2ft- -. ' 
4%—te 

11 T 


a 28% 28% 28% 

4f " 


40ft 40ft 40ft— ft 
100*39% 39ft 39ft— ft 
1290* 4216 42ft 4216 + ft 


7 ‘$? +TW 


13*6 4ft PotTdl 
13ft 6% PouJPt 
5% 2% PayFon 
1T% 0*6 PwrTu 
45ft 23ft Poll EM 
2Sft 15ft PwTr 
2ft % PECO 
26ft 19ft Pen RE s 150 
13% 7ft Pcnril 20 
1% ft PeotreiT 
X 24ft Refill 1C 20 
13% 11 PBrtnll 40 
12% 9ft PerhU pf 1.10 
4ft 2ft PetLw 


X 
32 
52 

40b 40 14 
40 24 11 
120 47 11 
25rS7.1 
7J 9 
07375 


30 

3J 19 
92 


345 42*6 41% 42 + ft 

83 7ft 716 7ft + ft 
5 32ft 31% 31% — ft 
46 5 4ft 4% 

25 lift 1®% 10%— ft 
4 3% 3% 3% 

152 noa la loft + ft 

2 25ft X 25 — ft 

1 

S3 26ft 24 24ft + ft 
49 7% 7ft 7ft— ft 

97 2ft 1% 2ft + ft 

49 26% 26% 26ft + ft 
35 12ft 12ft 12ft + ft 
79 12 11% 11%— ft 

534 2ft 2% 2ft 


9ft 4ft T Bar 
13ft fft TEC 
Vm 4ft TIE 
12ft 5% Til 
21ft Wft TabPnl 
9ft 6ft TtandBr 
17ft 9% Taffy . 
4% lft Team ' 
3% 1% TchAm 

22% 9ft TdiSvm 


202 53 40 
.16 22 21 


20 


22 ' 
U 13 

3J 13 


5ft 

7ft 

5% 




5% + 
7ft 
5% 
7ft 


:=l 


171$ 4- ft 
+ ft 


12 


77% 46% TochOp 759*114 19 


10 
Z1 9 
.1455 


30 


U 16 
35 15 

46 


17 


6 • 3ft TechTp 
20ft 10ft TecWrl 
238 97 TeionR 

4ft lft Teleam 
Xft 24ft T*Hlax 
11% 0ft TelDto 
lift 6ft Tetsd 
5ft 2ft Teftwh 
6% 4 Tenney 
Wft 4% Tenear 
29 21% TexCd a 120 

20 7% TexAJr 2 

8ft TexAE 241 5.1 
20ft 14% TexAE PfZ57 145 

3% % ThorEn 20 

5ft 3% ThrDA .10 25 15 

13% lift Tolu > 72 

9*6 2% Tortel 297110 
16ft m TotIPfp 24 
2ft ft TatPtwt 
2 9ft Xft TotPtpf 258 95 
14 8% TmsLx 201 1.7 12 

19% 11% TrrnTOC 54 35 10 


' 69 5% 

4 7ft 
948 5% 

.56 7% 

.72 17ft .... . 

. .52 8ft .8% 8ft .. 

8 M% MU WH + » 
•41 3% . 3%' 3J6— ft 

12 3 ' 8k 1 + % 

45 12% 12ft T2% + M 
12 69ft 69% 69% 

TO4 4ft 4 4ft— Vk 
. V 14% 14% 14ft + % 
900*522*4 218 222ft -f 3ft 
22 1% -1% JL% + % 

05 38% 38% 38% +■ % 
43 11% KS%- 11 
92 8 7% 7ft— % 

115 4ft 4 4 —ft 

11 5% - 5% 5% . 

IB 7% 7% 7H , 
28 22% 22% 22% + ft 
490 15% 14% » .— ft. 
24 4% 4ft 4ft 

& 17% 17% T7%— % 
2 1 T T 
54 44+% 

IX 12 lift 12 - % 
24 3 2% 3 

» + “ 
3x29ft Xft Xft +% 
.34 12 11% 1T% 

46 14ft 16% 16ft + ft 



3ft 2% TiibjVft* X 

22ft 10ft 130 IS W 

ff* Sf* » u 

3% 1% TylrwH 


14% M% 

5 13 IB 19 ^ 

4 § k ftiS 

^ sg 
s ™ 


iiigMl 




l%— % 


J5 « 


35k 2 USRIntl 
10ft B% Uirmle 

«% oKunkora 

2ft lft UFo^g - ,D 6,7 
2 lft UFoadB 
lift 11% IfflBOjl 
2Z% 12% USAGft 
BVo 5*6 UnltelV 
14% 9% UnyCm 

8% 6% UmvRs 
M% 15% t?*!"" 

15% io% unvPal 


12 


50c 45 


4LL 21+ 2ft 

9 *\ » % J s 

sH-53-sH 

60 I7«i 17% tfS 
71 12 “ 



11% lift- % 


«W* OlbVSTn 
x T7% VahPTS 
10 2% Verll 

23% IWiVtAmC 
6% 3% VTRfh 

% verna 
8% Verrtit 
2« VertPtP 
3ft vicon 
... lft VlntBC 
10% 12 Vi/CO 
Fft M VttuaiG 
12% 7ft vortex 
20% 14ft VolcCP 
0% S VYOUSt 


JU 15 17 


xo 23 n 


ta 
13% 
6 ft 
9 . 
4th 


20 25 32 


du 2 17 
50b3J 9 
Mi 43 II 
Sa35 1| 


» ’» % US 

io% fn n — 

iu. lft r 9 Jd 

oft 9VR v r i6 

20% X% 2DH + ft 

S6 6% 6ft— % 


1! 

449 

11 

52 

*2 

10 

9 

9 

7 


W 


7% 3ft W7TC 
Xft 15 WanaB 
X Uft WadoC 

1 % S WmCrt 

11% 4% WshHi 
UO 74 WshPfrt 
20% 14% WRITS 
10% 6HW01KA 
11% TftWatscB 
3 vyiMrt 
Bto Webinvn 
% WBbinwt 
% Webcor 
2 % weden 
7% wedaln 
7ft Wcdtch 
4% WWajan 
7 VHMTb 
8% weutra 


7 

36 3 n 

128 7.1 13 
20 35 13 
J6 15 14 


5% 

9ft 

k 

10 

12 

6 % 

1^ 

W 


tU S 4% 5 + *J 

T7M M 18% I«%— ft 

“j 1M 19% 19% + ft 

<C fk #• 

4? uft rift lift + ft 

wiis iijs i» -ft 

3 S ft ft t s 

144 » 3 'A 


•St % 

7? % iC U + ft 


.4^ Weilco 


52* J , 
1-32 145 ^6 

.16 35 5 
4 


6 

102 

1 » 


52 15 15 


18% 

13%. 

15% 


21% 

15% 

24% 

4% 

% 

Sf 

2 % 


20 


WeffAm 
2% VtWGnt 
41% 20% Wesca 
2W *6 Wmpcp 
5% WelBrC 
5% Wftbra 

4% WDIoffl 

7% WtHrtbn 
16% WIRET 1JB 
6% WktSLs 20 
11% WhrEits 
2% Wichita 
3 widen 
% Widen wt 
TO -Wicknpf2J0 85 
9% Wiener n M 45 
1 WfljnB 
1% WtnEB 
3% UflnE A 


20 


200 

47 

13 

25 

92 


7% 


% 3S 

^iS5ift + M ' 

U% 13% 13% 

£ $> 

40% 39% 39%-% 

9% 9 9 — % 

IS 10K 13% U iw + % 
23 3297 9 8 8% + % 

14 67 14% 14% 14% — ft 

b u s ^ Kjaa=s 

« ^ ^ v* 

S 1ft 1% ft 

7 «« 2£ ^ 

6* 1% 1% lft + ft 

25 4% 4% 4% 

n «* 4% 4% + ft 


mk 19% Wlotlo 224*125 

46% 36% WlkPpF 4J9 -92 __ 22flz 46% 45 46% +1% 

70% 8 W as t re l .404433 3 V ^ « 

21 11% WkWaor 52 24 7 42 30% 19% 20 — % 

mWinkF 25 Jfc 3% 33k + Yi 

ini rat WWtiWpf 150 HI H Mft lgh 
22% * Worttm 251 „ “ “ + 2 

21% 1CU WraWir 52 J 27 477 17% 17% 17%— % 


8% 5% YonkCo 


11 86 7% 7ft 7% + ft 


8% 3% Biflar 5St 


225 5% 5 5ft + ft 


j AMEXH^is4jOv\s 


.: & 


HEWHiStfS 41 



Iritl T* - 


SoodyCpn 
smmiAOBl 
Vulcan Carp 


MEW LOWS XX 




a-yrtoKM 

Murpbylnd 

SYstEnss 


Hafmlnd 
NRMEnOV 0 


LaunaCop 

NatGalO 

WtaaarEota 


UKtaaSMe r 
prazTRcvpf <r 
Wlnmropln 


tl 2. - .’ 




Bank of N.Y. Borrows 
Large Sum From Fed 


’Room 


Friday that itboneweda “large sum” Thursday 
Irani the Federal Reserve’s discount window 
because of a computer breakdown at the bank 
dial left ft-short of funds to meet its clearing- 
house oWigations. 


Rumois.in the credit markets put the size of 
die bank’s loan from the Fed at 524 billion. A 
spokeswoman for tbe bank declined to specify 
the size of the loan. 


-The bank specializes in clearing securities 
transactions for a host of banks. According to 
tte-market sources, the bank was unable to 
transfer between 520 billion and $30 billion in 
•credh market ins tnnnenis Thursday. One 
source put -the figure as high as S60 billion. 




The wire problem and the reserves inj ected 
into the banking system by the discount win- 
dow borrowings has left the Fed funds market 
awash with liquidity, economists noted. After 
dosing Thursday at 7 percent, funds fell to 6 
-percent Friday afternoon. 


ADVERTISEMENT: 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed). Nov.22, 1985 


Hot a«8rt wIh a* cfotlow or* iup p H *d by to* Fund* titfpif wttb tt>* exception of coin* quotas bread o* Icm* pHc*l 

Th* marrtwal symbols lodtart * f r mu iwcy «f quotat ion* «nppB*d;W -deHy i (w)-*nMv; (U-Uemititir; Crt— rsontarlyf Ol - Ur ea irtu t l y . 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
■lw) A I -Mai Trust SA. 


BANK JULIUS BAER 5 CO. Ltd. 
-td> Baortxmd- 
-td) Conbar. 


-id> Eortbasr Am*rto 


-Id ) Equlbaer Europe 
-I d ) Eartboar Pacific 
-Id 1 Grabar 



■Itf ) StOCMor 


BNP UTTER FUNDS 
-|w) inMrtwnd Fund 


■ jw) [nlnrajrrencv USJ 


-Iw) Iniercurrencv DM. 


■Jwi Intercarrencv Slerllng 


-|w) intsrsqultv Pacific Offer _ 


w) Intersaullv N. Amor. Offer 
BANQUE IN DO SUEZ . 
d ) Asian Growth Fund—— .... 
w) Dhtrtnnd 


w) FIF-Am*rl«. 


wl FIF-Eurap«- 


dl FiF-internatlanal 

wl FiF-Padflc . 

d] IndoktMz MuRlbands A 
d i indosuez Muiffbamts B 
d ) imtoMsz USD (Mjn.Fi 



BRITANHIAJ'OB 271. SL H*H«r. Jersey 
wl BriLDaiiar Income. .... ■■ S 0.901 

w) Brlti Mooao-Curr S 10 a0 

S3 ) Brit IntljS McnKWjwtl S 1.183 

d) Brit. Infix ManasJ>ortf E 1XZ 

w j Brit. Am. Inc. 8. Fd Ltd S 1.142 

,wi BrltGatd Fund S 0211' 

wl BrHJiMmao-Curnency— t VL74 

d> Brit. Japan Dir pert. Fd S 1.1S7 

wl BrKJeney Gilt Fund E 0219 

d ) Brtr. World Lett. Fund S 1228 

dlBiH.WarMTedin.Fund S 0-755 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
-Iw] CartlcJ Infl Fund . 

-Iwl Cartlal llalla T" 


CITICORP INVESTMENT BANK (Laxj 
POB 1373 Luxemoaunf T*L 4775571 
( d » q (invest Ecu————. ECU 101 J24 
( d I ClHnwjt UouMlty $101279 


CREDIT SUISSE {ISSUE PRICES! 

-1 d 1 adloraSulim SF C4Z 

-(d) Bond Voter Swf—, — SF 10455 

-(d) Bond Valor D-merlc DM NaSi 

M d 1 Bond Valor U 3- DOLLAR 5 109*4 

.( d ) Band Valor t Sterling 110021 

■(d) Bond Valor Yen Yen 1006350 

-id) Convert Valor Swf SF 12120 

•(d) Convert Volar US-DOLLAR. S W4J5 

-td) Canacc SF 68803 

-(d| W Fonds-Bonds SF 7950 

-(d) C5 Fonds-mn SF 12150 

-( d )C5 Money Mortiot Fund — _ 8110250 
-(dies Money Monwr Fund— dmkm2J» 

-Id ICS Money Market Fund E 104550 

-( d > CS Manev Market Fd Ten^ YIOOOlLOO 

-(dl Enerrte-Volar SF 14175 

-Id.) Ussec SF 82350 

A d ) Euroco-Vator SF 10825 

■Id) Pacific -Valor,. SF 16050 


DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
winchaEter House. 7 7 Lond on wall 
LONDON EC2 (01 9209797 ) 

-Iw) FinWuA> Group Ud. — $ 12859 

-(in) Winchester Diversified S 1953* 

-(ml Winchester Financial Lid. S 859 

-(nU Winchester Frontier $ 10220 

-(wl Winchester Hoidtnas— FF 10659 

— S 1250 

-twl Worldwide Securities $ 50.14 

-(wl Worldwide Special S 179950 


D1T INVESTMENT PPM 
-H d 1 CMKontro. 


DM 

DM 


34.99 

9258 


-+(d> inn Renienfoad. 

Mnn 4 Harrttt 6 untfGeoroe, Bnmeli 

-(ml D&HCammMIIV P«el *36254 — 

•(ml Currency 5 Gold Peel $ 15751 

-(m) winch. LHe Fut. Pool S 5S9J4 — 

-{ml TnmsWorMFul.pDgl_ S 81641 *■• 
EBC TRUST COXJERSEY) LTD. 

M Seale SL5t. HeH*rj0534-36331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND, 
etdllnc: BM — S_ 1058* otter — S10518 


ogy.- - .$12483 


... fER NATIONAL income; fund 

■Id) Short Term 'A* (Accum) s 

Kd) Shortterm %' (Dtstr)___ s 

-(d ) Short Term *8' (Aeeum) t 

-(dl Short Term ‘B*(Drstrj. s 


15062 

15063 
12909 
09411 


2K.TH 


-fw) Lone Term— — - 8 

FAC MSMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Laurence Paunty Hill, EC4. 01-623-46M 

Aw} F4C Atlantic-, S 1112 

-(w) F&C European S ISJf 

-Iw] F&C Oriental S 3178 


FIDELITY POB 09. Hamfltan Bermuda 
-(ml American Values Common— s 9527 

-(m) Amer Values Cum-Pr*l_ S 10422 

-(dj FidemyAmer. Assets i 7557 

-id Fidelity Australia Fand— ... 9 1159 

-( d FkWlty Discovery Fund s 1059 

-(d) Fidelity Dtr. Sv9s.Tr S 128-10 

-(d) Fidelity Far East Fund S 2472 

-(d) Fidel ty I ntx Fund ... S 75X3 

-(dl Fidelity oclenl Fund S 3353 

-(d) Fidelity Frontier Fund s 14JB 

-Id) Fidelity POdfiC Fund 915452 

-(d) Fidelity 5 pcL Growth Fd S KUO 

A d ) Fidelity World Fund ■ 


FORBES PO BIST GRAND CAYMAN 
London AOent 01-094013 ■ - 

(w) Dollar Income. .. ... S 


-fw) Forbes High Inc. GIH 
A wl Gold income. 


wt Gold Appreciation . 
mi Stroteoic Trading _ 

■FINOR FUNDS. ■ 


fi 


6.92 

9520 


451 

150 


Aw) East Investment Fund. 
-( w j Scottish world P«i ' 


Aw) Stalest. American . 


5 39955 
C 13155 
S 17257 


London :0 1-4 9 1 423 0. G*n*va:4V2Z3555n 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT COR P. 
PB 1 19, St Peter Port. Guenwy, 0481-88715 

-(w) FuturGAM SA 1.12221 

lwt GAM Arbitrage Inc i 13841 

w] G AMarlca lnc_ S 15429 

wl GAM Auffralla Inc S n.18 

w GAM Boston me S 11354 

gam Errairoge : ; s 1658 


w) SAM Fftmovrt 

wj GAM Homo Kang Inc 

w ) GAM International Inc-- 
w) GAM Japan It 


SF 11152 
$ 18854 

S 13820 

... * 11051 

w) GAM North America Inc » 1M57 


GAM N. America Unit Trust- nuop 

w) GAM Paefllc lac s 13328 

w) CAM Pens. 8. Char. Wortdw._ 10X70 p 
w) GAM Pena & Char. U.K.Fd._ IOSJOp 

wIGAMrtfit 9 11521 

' GAM SingaparerMakiy lnc__ 1 9757 


w) GAMS ten «. loti Unit Trust— 151.45* p 

.w) GAMWortdwid* Inc 9 18751 

-(w) GAM Tvche &A. Class A S 12954 


G.T. MANAGEMENT ( UK) Ltd. 
■d) Berry Poc. Fd. 


r 1 G.T. Aaaffed Science S 

. , 6.T. Asean HJK. GwthuFd % 

d) G.T.AN0 Fund .... 1 


G.T. Australia Fund 
d)G.T. Europe Fund 


1122 

1351 

1254 

.424* 


w) G.T. Eurob Small Cos. Fund . 

r) G.T. Dollar Fund 

d ) G.T. Bond Fund- 


U56 
1554 
15511 
1X01 
051 1 
3056 
20JM 
4726 
3425 
15501 


d)O.T. Global TedntoyFd 1 

d ) O.T. HotiNiu Potwinder— s 

d i G.T. Investment Fund 9 

w) G.T. Japan Small CaFund — S 

r) G.T. TsduwMy Fund. S 

d) G.T.£ouiti CBlna Fund S 

..ILL SAMUE L INVEST. MGMT.INTL. SJL 
Jersey. P.& Box 6^T*I 0934 WB9 
Beret. P.a BOS 3Ca.tel.4131 23*091, 

HO) CrossbowlForM East)— _ SF W5J 

CSF (Balanced) — . — . S3 2659 

European EaultY Fund DM 11^ 

irunl Bond Fu nd .. . J 1058 

-(dl l nt- Currency U5— S off 

A d I ITF Fd (TedmalOEV). S 1550. 

-<Sl OfSeac Fd (N.'AMERICA) — . S 3022 


JAROINE FLdMUWir POB 7IGPO H* R* 

■4 r ) J J CurronqrOJp n d-j.. 

-fr»J.F Hong Rono Tru»_-j * 37^ 

-( r } Pacific Income TrusT — Y 2*35 

-tr jj.FJopOTTfUg—-— Y CTO 

-( r) J.F Jaaan Teehnrtoay Y-1W45 

l rj J.F Poc M t c SecAtAoc) — * • 7JB 
-XOYD3 BANicngx. POB W gen era l 1 _ 
-Ffw) Uoyds jrdl Dollar — — — - * 

-+(w) Uavds InH Europe— |F 12658 

-Her) Liard* inn Growth SF 171* 

-Kw> Ltords mn Income-. SF 3UX 

-+(w) Uavds mn tL/mwrlca — s Wl 5 


-Hit) Uovdt u*n Pact* 


-+lw) LJoyds mn. Smaller Cas_ 1 1M4 


NiMARBEH 
■d) Class A. 


(w ) Class C-Japtm- 


IBLIFLEX LIMITED 


— t 9463 
— < 1065’: 
2 10021 


Deutsche Mark. 
-Iw) Dutch Florin — 
Swtse Franc. 


■RANGE NASSAU GROUP. 

PB 85571. The Hague (0701 469670 


d 

-Id 

4Si 


Mufficurnencv. 


Dodor IMgdlum Term. 

Dollar Long Term 

Japanese Yre. 


Pound Starttno. 


-DM 


1220 

1150 

1150 

1257 

1154 

102 * 

1059 

KL12 


A0) Sever B We q Btnp en 1 1 _ 


PARISBAS-GROl^^H 

-(d) Corteoea Urtomatlonol 

MIECUparmhmi 


S 3120 


(w) OdUEEBTOB 

Iw) OBUGESTIO 



W) OBLI-GUU3EN 


PAROIL-FUNO 


PAR EUROPE GRO WTH. 
PARINTER FUND.^H 


PARINTER BOND FUND— 

PAR US Treas. Band 'CL B'_ . 

ROYAL B. CANADAJ'OB S4LCUBRNIEY 
rHw) RBC Canadian Fund Ltd— ' S 1121 
-Hwl RBC For Cos tG P odflc Fd. 1 w.es 

-Kw) RBC Inn capital Fd 1 2623 

-JJwj RBC Inti Income FtL__ 9; 1T.16* 


RBC Mon^urrency 1 


S Z7J19 


_ . _ .. JJIFOND IMTL FUND (4*MM270) 

-(w)lncjBM 9 4J3 Offer ... jt 4 

-I w)Aoc.: B M 9 &2S Otter * t 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

T7 Devonshire S<LLoodDn-01-377504lt 

-CDSHB Band Fund -S 2524 

-(w)SHB I nil Growth Fund t 2027 


SWISS BANK CO«P. (ISSUE PRICES) 

AnHKjBftYrtgr.. LJ . — -_SF 4992S 


I D-Mdrft Band Selection ' 


-(d) Donor- Bend S election. 
A 0 1 Florin Band Selection . 


4d) Intorvalsr- 


-(d) Japan Portfolio 

-(d) sreriing Bond Setccnan, 

-id) Swiss Foreign Bond Sei 

-(d) S wbxva lor New Series 

-(fit Universal Bond Select 

d j Unlwrirt Fund. 


I Yen Bond SMectfen. 


UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 



(d) ArocaU-S-StL 


-tdlBond-iartstJ 
-(d I Fanse Swtse si 
H a ) Jopon-l nvest- 

MSafllSoM* 


31 


South Afr.Sh.. 


1 Sbtto (stock 

TOM INVESTMENT Frnakfart 


173 1 Unlreata 

-jdjunflooTO. 


SF 3S2S 

J* 15 

SP wot 
SF-953M 
SF 31250 
SF 22150 


■(d) DNIZINS- 


Other Funds 


DM .*4050 
DM tfM 
DM 8425 
DM 10750 


WJ Acttbcndt Investments Fund . 
Acttkoatlntl. —— ■*. 


(mi AUted LKL 


IS 


Aoulla l u terw a Banaf-Fona 

tmMBW.Tr - 

Arlana- 


S 2455 
1 1X10 
* 475 

S T72JB 
9 94658 

Tnatcor mrrFtttAElF)— *”10^ 
Bandsefex-issue Pr.v . _ SP. .13755 
Canada GM-MortoageFd s 954 

CaolhH Preuery. Fd. lnO.___ 3 hjd 

Sl tedl Putyt_,_ s {£. 

Omrtanit OlUon Fd «210lS 

Co^MaSecurttltt, FL IOaH 

tYiMFT^--- - ; — s I7S5S 

CenvecLALJntXA Carts— , ri58 
Convert. Fd. Ml B Cem__ 7 -r»er 
.DrtwO KMXM Pm ut , Y lgiu 

nnc. - r- • s .um 

Dollmvanerbnnd-M-. . S 104650 


1 CWnacfcGoer Bond Fd— DM102850 
CL Wttier wid wue hrt T*t._ t hS 
Drakkar InvaaLFond N.V— . 11717a 
Drevtue Am*rt» Fin>c___ . c 1024 


SF 13240ffd) Drevtus Punfl Inn. 


(wl DTOYtuSiAtorBOTHnent. 


4053 

3628 


®!S8SiS8S£^±r-., 


Fifty Star* Lid_ 


Fixed income Trans. 
-Fonwtlejtlskue Pr._ 
Forex fund. 

Forrmffa selecilon Fd.. 

FOnNStOllO. 


Governm. sec Fund* ^_l_ 

Fronicf-T rust Intvrzlns— 
H«SOTJBnn HldOS. N.V- 
He*tta Funds. 


fc J» ,123 

First East* Fund si gim w 

* 94159 
S 1055 

SF 20155 

* 729 
SF acsb 

- S 3523 

- S 9049 

DM 4150 

* 13723 

* 10424 
9133455 

SF 11595 
S 924 
*. 10^2 

littermorhet Fun d " « -“- 12 

'"te'J^ftO.Mht. Fd. CL-B-r I 80059 
mn Securities Funtt _ s lira 

DM 6072 
S 1053 

* 1855 

* 13)53 
9 11*59 


jntertimdSA 



HflrtBnn Fundi 
IBEX Holdings 
ILA-IGB^m 

■ LA-IGSI 


Investa dws. 


Korea Growth Trust. 


(d 


I tol fortune Inn Fund 
Jtman Sdectlan F 
JQPpn Ppdflc Ft 

JefterPtnk.lnff.L jg s iatHbc 

FM 

KW 954753 

- * 950 

- *139451 

: SiSSS 

SB SS^=E I'M 

r 10225950 


Lklcom Fo nd 
LuxfteML 


NOSTECPorttoiln — ~~ — SeSfi* 
Wovoteg investment F und_ 1“^ 
* 17U8 


WSPF Xf _ 

Poirfflc HiKtton Invt. 


PANCURRIinc . 


PlekstSe, 

PscofundN.v.. 


PSCO IntLN.V 

Frtn™h|inn Fimd. 


1132891 
*114651 
I 13250 

* 10556 

* 7429 


; ftehHnvtgt — ^W65o 

Sumunil PorttoUo ^ ^ * I2S350 

* In'” 

Idl Sb^ 5 ga 

Id I Tbornhm Japan Pm i.m — ! MJ4 


*! z yyop ocHoidtLv — ■ * 10654 
•Tl TranspactficJiM * 14824 


Irani Europe 


_reno Europe Fu nd * IQO 57 

, . Turquoise Fu nd — - — FI 5137 

g iSSS jgSjflgg: isllg 
5 S,B “ 

<* 1 UN( Bond F 

Fund. 

a) Wdrld Fund 



DM -Deutsche Mark; BF- Belgium Francs; FL • Dutch Florin, 
P/V *10 to *1 per until 1 N A.- Not Available; M.C- NetCommurt 


RedennN Price- Ex>Cowxm; •• - Foreieriy worldwide Fund Ltd; 


2d;i.OH*rP»l«iocl^rt!Blte*i^oiv»'H--S^.t^.prtcdd»wA nBlw ^gy55tegtMigj|y^|J^idgano* 


V .'Tl 
'!? A 


*f* 


**t 


t*v 

F*«l 


■“ -A 

‘fc. 


TJ1 

. *% 

'*% 

** ■ 
*% 

p6 


t* 




S ’ft 
■*. *'0 


■’ 8 %. 




; 31' 

■> 3S% 


( 

rtb 

jm 





















^ ■ ■'“.35!. > 

T *: • 

: 

1 s.. * v 


business profile 


CNTElteUTIQ-NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPA Y-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-^ 1985 

/Rent-A-Car Patriarch /W arren E. Avis CURRENCY J 


Mi 






MARKETS 


4. 
r a 

• is* 
[ *?$: 


. s r >> 

i til 


^ HidKii 


j? a. ■ , By N.R. Kltfhfield 

• Wav Varfr Times Service 

< NEW YORK — “Whai’s the 
barpitit tf getting op in the mora- 
. mg unless there’s OKatemem," asks 
Warren Avis, sipping a soft drink 
jp Jris luxurious fifth Avenue 
.apartment overlooking Central 
faA. 

■-.It.is mentioned that them are 
plenty of ways to find excitement. 
*Tve done, them alt w 
Not quite all; which is why the 
investor and entrepreneur has 
latched onto an idea that he thinks 
_ jmD furnish him with a new reason 
ttoget up in the morning. He is 
F determined to boy back the compa- 
ny that he sold more than 30 years 
uago, the empire that made his name 

famous throughout the world: Avis 
‘Rent-a-Car. 

Late last mouth, Wanra Avis 
stqjped orn of the past and de- 
xJaiod that he and a group of inves- 
tors wished to acquire the second 
.Suggest US. rental-car agency from 
-Beatrice Cos, which has put it up 
for sale Beatrice itself, meanwhile, 
% about to be bought by the New 
'York investment firm of Kohlberg, 

: Kravis, Roberts & Co. The attitude 

of Beatrice and its future owners 
.toward a formal bid from Mr. 
^Avis’s group is unclear. And other 
-^potential bidders for the car-rental 
agency have been mentioned in 
press reports. 

*■ ML Avis said his bid for the car- 
rental agency would not be just 
some sentimental fling- Frustration 
is also involved. Mr. Avis has 
■ watched his “baby” for years 
-always thought that it ought to be 
•No. 1, not Hertz, owned by UAL 
■Inc. So if no one else is going to get 
it there, then he win The deal could 

- cost him and his backers $200 md- 
,-lion to $400 million He says they 
-'can afford it. 

' f It can be tricky trying to taiv to 
/Warren Avis. He has done man y 

- things, and he can tell you all about 
them, but details get fuzzy. “I can't 


ryingtttBuyR 


foiS?t & T 1 he bought .au interest in a Ford 

thifVh! ^ * ltmch with dealership in Detroit. And he start- 
Jkf \ bncfc “c “d, .sure ed thinking “In 1945," he says, “if 


^forgotiL- — ^ 

^ „ a v ' stor ’ ^ raust ca, you took a taxi. If you landed in 
hunsdf seemingly every New York and wanted to go to 
^tranutes. The phone beckons. It Westchester, you took a taxi and 
seems like 20 or 30 business pro- ien to get bad: you had to some* 
Pt«ais is a hghi day for him. how find a iaxi .1 have probably 
wir. Avis has moved deep into his madeUTebetterforminionsofpeo- 
7 s - H® win not say exactly bow pie with the idea I had." 
oeep. because his second wife, The idea was to set up car-rental 
i anna, who is about half his age, is agendes at airports. Rental agm- 
An avid equestrian, Mr. oes, including Hertz, then. 

Avis remans trim and looks like he but they were downtown exclusive 
ODUid still take a me d i an e ball in jy f often in garages. “Nobody 
tne stomach. His Saits are cutin the thought it would work. There was 
tonn-fittag fashion favored by incredible trouble. You had to get 
xj ~ all the arHin^ to cooperate. Where 

v v ^ rBCCDl iy been investing in efid you pm the cars? There were no 
nigh-technology electronics com- rrwtif ratrrte T jjilr yv j^r wj thff 
Panics- Over the years be has card for car-renting." 
benight and sold dozens erf enter- ' Mr. Avis had $10,000. He bor- 
pnses — factories, hods, condo- rowed $75,000 more, and in 1947 
m i norm s. He says that his deal- he started what was th ** 1 called 
raffing has transformed the S3 Avis Airlines Rent-A-Car at the 
nri 'll on he collected . from selling Detroit and Miami airports. At 


Avis Rent-a-Car to a substantially first, all the cans were 
larger fortune. Whatever takes his outside the termina 
fancy. hc tries. _ counter person who rented you the 

He is always moving, jetting be- car would escort you out arid show 


ked right 
and the 


- — 1 "CP J -~- o ** uu WVIMU UMUli JVUUUfc BUU MMin 

tween his apartment, a fann in Ann you where it w as* Business began 
Arbor, Michigan, and a mammoth ■ “very damn skw, H he s»M_ 
house bnfli into the cliffs in balmy ^ £ofmd ou , and, wirh the 
Acapulco, Mexico. “The way I femdex working feverishly, the 
“£* if know Avis network spread to other air- 

tof rm doing..- - ports and then to the downtown 

Mr. Avis was bomm Bay Oty scctjons. Within seven years. Avis 
Michigan, about 100 miles north of ^ bdiad „ die second- • 
Detroit, where his faiher was m the c ^ HOltt i network in the 

lumber bosmess. His working iife worid. Fretful that he couldn't ex- 
begsn m the Michigan Department pand it fast enough, Mr. Avis sold 
of Investigation, where be was an thecompany in 1954 for S3 million 
investigator specializing in auto to Rid^rf s. Robie. a Boston fi- 

, • _ nanrier. Since then, it has been 

He did that for a couple of years, duittled to ITT Corp_ to Norton 
But the money was paltry. Already Simon Inc, to Esmark Ina, to Be- 
ne was coming to believe one of his aU jceL 

pet credos: *Tha:e is notiiixigworse Warren Avis was not yet 40 when 

fhan dying broke." So he found a he sold his baby. He was rich. And 
J 1 * “WSL so, as he puts it, “I didn’t break my 
slogged through Indiana, Hinas ncc fc u anything for a few years." 
and Missoun hawking pais. He did He adds. “TveMver been interest- 

fnaf fnr n Ammla Af ii^qiv motrno « . . . ^ « « 


IWOM. I/IU UVUUD IJCl lliuj. 1 UUl L “ 

remember a telephone number better money. . 

from here to there," he says. Then he went into the Air Forces 


.‘'Names? Dates? Forget it 1 could 
never be a politician. You give me 


-- -or — neduuh. X vc iicru uccu uiwicai- 

Jat for a couple of years, making ^ - m making a fortune and having 
better money. . ■ a heart attack, as some people do. 

Then he went into the Air Force, If you don't enjoy the money, then 

u«j u., .vl j Hi i •• 


■- ft 
fit . 




y 2X 

X 


Hu Naw Yoti Tor 

Warren E. Avis at his Michigan farm. 


and had risen to mqor by the end the money doesn't have any value.' 
of World War n. When he got out, How did he HD the time? 


“Easy," he says. “Three months 
in Mexico for the -winter. Three 
mouths in France for the summer. 
That took care of six mon ths. I 
went to parties and so forth. I did 
some real estate deals. Then I got 
enthralled with the idea of fac- 
tories.” He bought and sold a few 
dozen factories m Michigan, in- 
cluding me that made bread, one 

that Tru^ gli-ri, ftrwThftl 

trical products. 

After 15 years of bachelorhood, 
in early 1981 Mr. Avis married 
Yanna’Elbim, an actress who had 
appeared in plays and on television 
in France. He has three ehildng p 
from a previous maniage. These 
days, his dander rises if it is sug- 
gested that he was perhaps a play- 
boy. “You know what playboy 
means in the business world ? 1 he 
asks. “It means you can't borrow 
money." 

In the late 1960s, a time of soda! 
unrest and confusion, Warren Avis 
figured out precisely what he want- 
ed to do next He wanted to save 
the world. u My interest was culture 
change in society. That’s imilfmg a 
better worid. 1 was interested in 
making America a problem-solving 
society rather than a conflict soci- 
ety." 

He labeled the concept Shared 
Participation. The idea was that 
most problems spring from faulty 
communications. By assembling 


Dollar Off in U.S.; Pound Stronger 


groups of strangers and nudging 
ihem to converse frankly about 
personal ch«ngngps and problems, 
new understanding would emerge. 

To test his concept, he created 
the American Behavioral Science 
Training Laboratories in Ann Ar- 
bor in 1967. Subjects would arrive 
at the lab for week-long sensitivity 
training sessions. Each person 
wonkl be given a roommate. Mr. 
Avis liked to make the matches as 
bizarre as passible: a policeman 
bunked with a beatnik was a favor- 
ite. 

After almost a decade of this, 
Mr. Avis dosed down the center. 
He wasn’t getting the top business 
executives he wanted. He wasn't 
getting political leaders. He wanted 
United Stales senators to check in. 
“If we could have gotten the sena- 
tors," he says. “If they could have 
forgotien about their ego and self- 
serving interests, what a change we 
could have made." 

But the senators bad other com- 
mitments, and so Mr. Avis scaled 
bade his ambitions. 

The company that oversees his 
wide-flung holdings nowadays is 
called Avis Enterprises. Its bead- 
quartos is in Ann Arbor. Mr. Avis 
is not much of a day-to-day manag- 
er. His staff lakes care of that. “Pm 
not an operational man," he says. 
To a strategic planner.” 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW' YORK — Die dollar end- 
ed lower against other major cur- 
rencies Friday, as the British pound 
closed at its highest level since early 
1984. 

Die dollar hit a five-year low 
against the Swiss franc, a 19-tnoDth 
low against the Deutsche mark and 
remained at its lowest is almost 
five years against the Japanese yen 
before stabilizing later in the day. 

Traders in New York noted that 
a forecast by Henry Kaufman, 
chief economist at Salomon Bros. 
Inc., that the UK discount rate 
would be cut by January helped 
push the dollar lower. The discount 
rate is the interest rale charged by 
the Federal Reserve Bank cm loans 
to commercial banks. 

“We have broken through some 
significant chan perms,” a New 
York bank trader said, “that, com- 


bined with Kaufman’s prediction 
of a lower discount rate, oould put 
additional pressure on the dollar 
nett week." 

Traders said most of the volume 
was in the pound, which was up 2 
cents cm the day to its highest level 
since March 1984. Oil prices were 
among the explanations. 

“There is speculation that op 
prices frill be firmer and indeed oil 
futures prices were up today," the 
bank trader said. Oil is the major 
British export. 

Britain's decision not to join the 
European Monetary System also 
contributed to the rise, traders said, 
since the government would have 
to weaken the value of the pound if 
it joined the system. 

In New York, the pound ended 
the day at SI. 4655, up from 


S1.4465. Die dollar also' feU to 
1565 DM from 15835; to 7.815 
French francs from 7.S74; to 1887 
Dutch guilders from 1920, and to 
200.85 yen from 201.60. 

Earlier in Europe, the dollar 
closed nearly a pfennig lower 
against the Deutsche mark after a 
lau bum of trading. Traders cited 
late selling following she Kaufman 
forecast. 

In London, the British pound 
rose to SM555 from S1.4465. 

In Frankfurt, the dollar was 
fixed at 15852 DM, down from 
15888. In Zurich, the dollar closed 
at 11 133 Swiss francs, down from 
2.1233. 

Earlier, in Tokyo, the dollar 
dosed at 201.15 yen, down from 
Thursday's close of 2fl2 yea. 

(UP I. Reiners. API 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Secondary Issues End Week on Subdued Note 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — - The secondary 
Eurobond market ended an active 
week on a subdued note Friday as 
operators concentrated on squar- 
ing their positions ahead of the 
weekend, dealers said. 

The primary market was also rel- 
atively quiet, although during the 
day the 5350-million foreign-tar- 
geted pan of the SI. 04- billion of- 
fering of collateralized mongage 
obligations, or CM Os, for the Fed- 
eral Home Loan Mortgage Corp. 
was issued by Salomon Brothers 
International. This was the first 
launch of foreign-targeted CMOs. 
The respective trendies had been 
largely pre-placed. 

The first tranche was a S 100- 
million issue due 1995 that pays a 
semi-annual coupon of 10 percent 
and was priced at 101.46. 

Die second was a $250- million. 


13-year offering that market 
sources said was largely aimed at 
Japanese investors. This tranche 
pays a semiannual coupon of 10 M 
percent a year and was priced ai 
102. As a result of the pre-place- 
menu neither issue traded actively 
on the market. 

In addition to the foreign-target- 
ed offering, Freddie Mac is selling 
a further S69I.2 million of the 
CMOs on the U.S. domestic mar- 
ket. 

General Electric Credit Corp. of- 
fered a 5 250-million bond issue us- 
ing the “harmless warrants" formu- 
la. The seven-year bost bond is 
callable after four years, pays 915 
percent and was priced at par. 

The 250,000 warrants attached 
to the issue were priced at $1550 
each and are exercisable into a non- 
callabk but otherwise identical 
bond. If the warrants are exercised 
in the first four years, the host bond 


must be surrendered, thereafter ex- 
ercise is for cash. 

The issue was lead-managed by 
Union Bank of Switzerland (Secu- 
rities) Ltd. and the package was 
quoted on the market at 99 V* bid. 

Hewlett Packard Finance Co. is- 
sued a five-year zero-coupon bond 
with a final redemption amount of 
$150 milli on. The issue was priced 
at 644i and was lead-managed by 
Credit Suisse First Boston Ltd. It 
was quoted on the market within 
the % percent selling concession at 
a discount of Vi. 

On the secondary market, prices 
tended to slip a little during the day 
to end Vi or VJ point lower, dealers 
said. However, on the week, sea- 
soned bonds showed gains of Vi to 
IV. One trader at a European bank 
said: “The market got a bit over- 
heated during the week, and now 
it's taking time out to cool off." ' 


‘ "KT*. 

* -J«l 5 


■ Ri.ih N* W.Bon* 


. Iriday’s 

arc 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices as of 
3 pjn. New York tune. 

Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
HUUm SM 


23M UVi A 

-j .i '<5 'M 7* AS 


:* 

•1 P » 

17* ia»s AflEMi" 
TlHi 7* AI 


2M* I7W AI 
S 11* Altnet 
. Hi 4te AlpMfc 
MU. MkAltoa 
• 22 T1W Amass! 
1 * k AWAIri 
I*. AmAdv 
,14% IM ABnfcr 

■fc'KSMT 

TgL'mESk 

3SW UHAFIdCS 

MVS. 10% AMS S 
36* Z7Mj ANIInS 
7H 2VV APhvG 
MU. AmSec 
,15^ 7jS AmSfll 

44V& 2714 Amrtrs 
24 17 ArarwsT 

liu. 7* Amgen 
-34* IMAmU 

-s r as 


. Soles In IM 

Dtv. vtd mil Hkh LM 1PJU.CMK 


M U U7 
426 


*9 

M t* V 

A » 9 & 

AM 14 IM 


674. Apooee 

. ~~ 9VS. APOtoC 

■8 

!-* ?Sf 

AsdHst 
. _ ^ Asirosv 

» I3U. Atcor 

rU» BUAKAme 

• MW . m AHflFd 
, M m AIIFtn 
*» lMfaAHReas 
'5n 3% AliSeAr 

'» MHAtwdOc 
. 1216 4 AutTrT 

, TO Ttk Auimtx 
7n 414 Auxton 
•1W6 3W Avocre 
>21 5Va AvrtGr 
. 2S» T7n Avntefc 
W4 Avatar 
‘2 » 1JVS AvkrfGC 
! 516 . 3ta ArtcM 


4 m BBDO 
«4 BHConr 
14H Boncokl 
2314 BcpHw 
514 Bcndrc 
«tr BonoH 
3in BKMEs 
Mb BkMAm 
. vn Bonkv! 
12H Santas 
6* BaronD 
sfe B arris s 
6 SsTaA 
1 ■ BasAm 
3ni BsrtF 
41* BmBfcs 
flb Bavly 
5 n BochCf 
Mb Benhan 
3016 Betz Lb 
10W BtgB 
nt B la Bear 
VA Bind tvs 

34b BfoHtS 

414 Bloom 
1 Btasrc 
6* BMcR 
6V. Bird Inc 
26H Baal Bn 
15% BabEv 
616 BollTc 

IIVj Bast Be 
4 BstaDle 
W* BstnFC 
8V. BroeCp 
Brenca 
W BrwTom 
8n Brunos 
1211 BulMTs 
131* Bmfcm 
IS BifsrBr 
23n BMAs 
3 Busin Id 


.15* A 924 
40 U 331 
JM 4 A 3665 
64 
IB 
747 

.44 14 .84 

1458 
t 315 

JO 4.1 71 

55 
2*4 

-50 44 48 

t 17 

JO 24 371 
M 22 4556 
M 18 180 

1 

m 14 n 

57 

lilt 35 13 

160 
515 
152 

L50 43 2S3 

2 

118 

LOO 28 103 

M 2.1 41 

1558 
11 
235 

.14 U 197 
1437 
2185 

g 

89 

1 

91 

75 

JObU 1197 
50 

.12 1J 28 

98 

M 17 35 

M 1 J 230 

83 
152 
43V 

ion 

84 

t 37 

241 
52 
207 
10 

•3 

1079 

JD 55 92 


h 

a 27H 

23 2214 


1V>»— v% 


A’ .KH 

“ : *h 
' ’13H 

Oft 
K Vi 
11 

unit 

33V, 


4W C COR 
3%b CPRM 
7 CML 
M- CPI 
414 CPT 

6 C5P 
2Ht CAD 
iTh CbrvSc 

7JS CalAMc 

«b CtaShra 

7 CoUanP 
.Hh Cslny 

l CanenS 
% CanCtlj 
12, CrdnlD 
316 CoreeTC 

55b Carsmk 
4M>.Cartarl 
9J4 Casey* s 
.fib Cencer* 
a cntrBc 
* Cerrtcor 
% CHrftc 

aiO'CinpBn 


I 

508 

1 

551 

. 71 
112 

.16 1.1 *» 
29B 
384 

JB 5 43 

JW 2.1 231 
4574 
I 657 
100 
4 

1JO 53 143 
135 

125 U n 
283 

“ fi 

702 

n 


514 511 
12W 1114 
lau 13 
m mb 
214 214 
12M 12 
1314 1214 
PM 814 
15 U* 
716 716 
' 3314 33V% 

. 30 2Wi 
Wth 10 
23% 231ft 
3516 3514 
4 31b 

29Hi 2V 
1116 104ft 

* ^ 
3716 371ft 
24M 24W 
IT Va 1114 
331b 3314 
1916 19 
1316 12a 
1316 1316 
1916 19 
121* 1214 
1214 1216 
1914 18% 
39Vo 29 
1514 15 
2214 221ft 
81ft 816 
51b 6*. 

2114 21 
4016 3914 
TV, 7V, 
1216 T2V4 
616 5H 
2516 a 
13% 13 
1214 1214 
10* 10*4 
261ft 261ft 
1214 1214 
1414 1416 
4 4 

m 4j6 

516 *14 

914 914 
516 6 
2114 
■■ 1714 

22*. 2216 
314 314 


Sit 

1916 + 14 

12—16 
13—16 
9 +16 

iSS— 14 

iS^T 14 
716— 16 
3314 — 14 
2914— 14 
1014 + Va 
2316 

3514 + 16. 

2914+14 

11 

2 V4- <h 
3714 + 1ft 

8“ 
19—14 
1316 + 16 
T3I4 

19 — 16 
1214 + 14 
1216 
19 
29V4 

1516 + 16 
2216 
81ft 

514 + 14 
2114 + 16 
40% + Vb 
716 

1214— 14 
61ft 

2SU. + 14 
IP* + 14 
12M 
iim 
2614 

121 b + 1 ft 
1414 + 14 
4 

414 + 14 
516 
914 
5*4 
22 
1714 
2246. 

314 


» 4814 

7V, 716 
17*. 1716 
35*. 35U 
aw BW 
.0 VW 

50 19W 
M* 9 

1516 1714 
1714 1714 
11VS 11 
1816 1714 
1016 1016 
814 814 
JO 361ft 
6244 5116 
4*h 416 
91ft 914 
1116 10W. 
34V, 33* 
I MV 13U 

•as -a 

1214 1U4 
21b JV4 
714 7 
914 814 
34V. M 

51 20 Vs 

7W 7*. 

2714 25» 
416 4 

30 3914 

W> 10 J 6 

as re 
SSSt 

15 MI4 
1715. 17 
2916 28*. 
-r+ 7V. 


4816— 1ft 
714 + 16 
17*.— 14 
351ft— 16 

^£ + w 
T-v, 

17*. 

1714 

1114 + 14 
1B1* + 14 
IKS.— 14 
814— 16 
391ft +3 
*»4 + 5* 
414—14 
916 + 16 
1114 + 14 
3416 + 14 
131ft 

BW— 16 
6A. + 14 

914 + 14 
3416 + 1ft 
20Vb 

7*b + * 
2714 + J* 
41ft + !ft 
79*- Vi 
1016 

314— 1* 

llS + J4 

2316 + Va 

17-16 
29 +16 

744 + 1b 


& L. 

jSiR 

1116 UW 

JS& 

MU. 131* 

t 

35 OT 
TVfl 23 
SRI, 3816 

S 2216 

S 

3 2 *. 

lie in* 

5S si* 


w + vt 

414 

,,a .. 
%=5 
"* + K 

1114—14 
314 + 1" 

1414— *4 
3P*- 16 
1 

1714 

T3§+ 14 

R$2 

14—16 

33* 

TSta + Jf 
S» + V4. 
23 + H 
2514— « 
1 *. 
in* 

34* 


12 Montti 
Wall Law Stock 

251* 1515 
2114 1116 
11 i* 

3116 VS* 

1016 416 
15 914 

1414 814 
31 24 

1814 514 
25U 1216 
4416 2514 
3414 1016 
1214 5 
716 4 
231* 1Mb 
37 24 

.4716 -271ft 
4116 2716 
14ft 916 


4814 ant 
2516 13. 


4316 3314 

T R 

3416 231ft 

3&15& 

12* 71* 

21 1316 

1214 4 
2514 141ft 
416 216 
1516 5V6 
30 1514 

1314 716 
BVft 31ft 
M9b 614 
9ft 5ft 
8ft 5ft 
5ft 2 
low £14 
2116 9ft 
nl4 41* 
8 1 ft 
1216 6 
9ft 5 
27 13*. 

1814 lift 
2*16. 1116 
8ft 61* 
54ft 32ft 
5ft 3ft 
Mb 114 
45ft 29 
18ft 816 

lift 4ft 

6 ft 2 ft 
2216 14ft 
1616 514 

9ft 6 
lift 546 
31ft 30 
5 1ft 
7ft 3ft 
1*16 1016 
1546 10ft 
2*14 20ft 
14 9 

34ft 1546 
29ft 1814 
3816 151+ 
27 1816 


Ados In 

Wv.m lGM HIM I 
20 J 1095 2516 

74 15ft 

4 (ft 

J8 1J 11465 2116 

214 816 

JB 12 29 10 

3836 181* 

94 24ft 

61 9ft 

Ml Li 190 2516 

.120 J *3 m 

731 16ft 

t 11 614 

387 m 

J8 45 7I2x 19V4 

L04 2.9 44 3Sft 

1 57 « 

L9t 41 27 4116 

.43 31 1741 10ft 

18b 21 15 32 

JB 35 23 2514 

2JB 115 1* 17ft 

3144 2314 

525 181* 


2J0 

5J 

452 

54 

UU 

24 

134 

56 

4 S 

lZlx 

L40 

48 

5 



31 


17ft 814 
15 5ft 
54* ft 
1146 5ft 
37ft 2416 
124* 716 
1* 1216 
111* 4ft 
LB* 6% 
]« 10 ft 
lift 4ft 

28ft 9ft 
19ft 7 
19ft 1246 
1516 * 214 
13ft 6 W. 
1414 04* 
14ft 51* 
7ft 2ft 
8 ft S* 
17ft 5ft 
3214 15ft 
21ft 71* 
1714 8 ft 
21ft tO- 
20 !* 4ft 
aw 59* 
35 23ft 
Wft 11 
15ft 714 


14 

32 

253 

6770 

1299 

337 

342 

.13 .1 13 

i JM 1J 190 
159 

•- IS 

95 

527 

JO LI 15* 
543 

n 2 J * 
10 
39 
937 
23 
2654 
182 
167 
228 
79 

JO .9 61 

132 34 82 

.200 1.4 14 

J8- 43 239 
. 3D* 19 17 

207 
849 

24 LD 491 

-56 45 33 

.15 lJ 151 
158 
417 


33 

.12 1 J 20 
212 
50 

LM 2J 13* 
159 

1-52 iolo rau 
429 

4* 

.16 LB 8 
224 
379 
615 
154 
115 
59 
76 
IM 
29 

58 

• 707 

164 
■49 

2D 1 J Bx 
209 
43* 

JO 18 238 
JHe U 1U3 
141 
797 


Net 

Hell Law 3 PAL ChVn 
251* 26 2614 + ft 

1546 1516 15*6 
Sft Bft 81* 

2116 20 2116 + 16 
846 8 ft 814— ft 
10 VI* 9ft— ft 
1BH 10ft 10ft + ft 

=B 

2516 24ft St* + ft 
at avft 40 + ft 
1646 15ft 16ft + 16 

% ft flSTiS 

HW 19 19ft + ft 
354* 3556 35ft— U 
45 44 16 4416— 4* 

41ft *1 4116+16 

101 * ID 10 ft + ft 
32 32 32 + U. 

25ft 2446 25, +16 
17ft Tfli 16ft— ft 
2314 2046 21ft— 1ft 
IBM 18ft 18ft 
2516 2416 24ft + ft 

16ft 16ft lift- ft 

in* i«* it* + ft 

lift*! 

20 H 20 ft 28ft— ft 

piS 

lift 11 IB*— ft 

29ft 28ft 29ft + ft 
9ft 916 9VS + ft 
18 T7ft 17ft + ft 
1216 1116 12 ft 

R'RR + ri 

fflft OT 6 3B16 + ft 
Bft Bft Bft + ft 
6 ft 6 ft 614 — ft 
144* 14ft 1416 + ft 
746 7ft ri* 

7ft 74* 71* + ft 
2ft » A + 4* 
74* 71* 7ft 
22 21 ft 2 TV> 

5 4ft 4*0 
14* I ft 1ft 
119* 17ft 114*— ft 
744 74* 7ft + ft 
15 1416 1446 

lift 10ft 10ft— 4* 
1214 12 H 121 * + ft 
6 ft Bft 59* 

4916 48ft 48ft — ft 
3«. a m . 
21* 216 24* + ft 
4416 44 44 + ft 

VI* 91* 91* 

41* 41* 41* 

946 916 94*— ft 

14V* 14ft 14ft 
lft Ift 14* 

4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 
18ft 18U> IBM. — ft 
151* 14ft 14ft + 14 
7ft 7ft 7ft 
10 » 10 10 ft + ft 

3ft P4 316 
LB* 13 13 

16*6 16ft 1516 + ft 
2K6 2416 25V* + 16 
1314 1316 1314 + 16 
19*. 19 191* + 14 

214* 21 2116 + ft 

201 * 20 201 * 

1914 19ft 19V + 16 


1546 + ft 
214 — ft 
1241+4* 
7ft + ft 
» 

TV* + ft 

105 +4* 

20 VV + ft 
lift + ft 
516 . 
2714 + 1* 
3 + ft 
516 — ft 
4ft— ft 
19 - ft 
lift 


Sniaabi 

Dtv. m Idta Wan 


“fc-X 

ft— n. 

946 + ft 

•SS + tk 

lift + ft 
44* 

3446 

3544 — ft 
22 ft + ft 
37 

M46 + ft 
2016 + ft 

2444 +Mb 

]^ + ft 


9ft 536 

too* SV*. 

m lu. 
22ft 10ft 
6M* 47ft 

aft n 

7i* m 
1744 716 
34ft 21ft 
43ft 3*4* 


FDP 1 

5 

Frfn£ F 17* 25 1097 
F*d0«l 633 

Feniflo 254 

Flbrons ^ 412 
ftflera L32 43 27 

PtHtiTs L40 25 35 

Float* J U 71 
FtBrtft M 3* 134 


Vft Bft 
*4* * 
14* 1W» 
9* 94* 
37ft 7716 
94 m 9ft 

in m* 

Vt* 9ft 
716 7ft 
15ft 15 
II HHk 
II 10 
19ft 184* 
17 16ft 
3ft 2ft 
Bft 7ft 
I5M 14ft 

in* ii 

3ft 3ft 
71* 74* 
74* 7ft 
1*« IIM 
21ft 21ft 
1346 13ft 
10ft 10ft 
Bft Bft 
716 7 

2Sft 244a 
-194* Wt 
lift 9ft 


7ft 7ft 
IIM 10ft 
m 14* 
124* 111* 
7016 69* 
2016 194* 

5ft -5ft 
15ft 14ft 
32ft 324* 

43V* 43V* 


& + » 
14*+ ft 
946 

37ft+ 46 
9ft + U. 
1516 

104* + ft 

716 

15ft + ft 
18%— ft 
10 ft— ft 
19 + ft 

^=6 

■ 

1416 

11—44 

.316 

71* — ft 

74* + ft 

3ft=S 

1344 + 46 

KM-.U 

Bft +4* 

7ft— ft 
244* + 4* 
1916 + V* 
11 + ft 


7ft 

T>=* 

194*— 4* 

516 

Uft — 1 

32ft + ft 

43*— ft 

Bft 


12 Mourn 
HWi Law Mode 

54* 316 

9 44* 

tm * 

3416 21ft 
33to 24 
27V* 154* 

20 114* 

2946 204* 

916 aft 
1746 104* 

23U, 8ft 
25ft 14ft 
2946 13 
20ft 10ft 
30ft 20ft 
4316 284* 

56 284* 

42ft 33ft 
50 25 

31 19ft 
25 18ft 
284* 1946 
4414 31ft 
Bft 1ft 
76ft 10ft 
22ft 15 
41ft 27ft 
194* 7ft 
17ft 114* 

* 3 

20 1246 

an* 1316 

34ft 254* 

24ft 1316 
2316 13ft 
3ft lft 
18ft 5 
7ft 4 
2946 144* 

1316 44* 

1*7* lift 


1516 94* 

lift 4ft 
59 2916 

10 5 

Bft 14* 

ns a 

344* 15 
20ft 13ft 
1746 12ft 
24V* mm 
18ft 14ft 

m* lout 
Vft 5ft 
14ft 516 
746 4 
224* 131* 
12 ft 8 
17ft I 
19 1216 


24ft 15ft 
lift 7 
17 116 

746 316 

316 2 
19ft 134* 
254* 15ft 
34ft 25ft 
10ft 5 
lift 546 
946 14* 

4ft 1ft 
234* 15 
24ft 15 
Sft 3ft 
37ft 15 
38ft 31ft 
24ft 17 
I3ft V 
12 3ft 
32ft 12ft 
10 ft lft 
2816 1516 
516 Sft 
33ft 14ft 
28ft 191* 
14ft 846 
2SVi 164* 
29ft 14 
14ft 4ft 
9 5ft 


1046 7ft 
351k 1546 
141b 7ft 
7ft 31* 
10ft 4 
746 31* 

524* 324* 
32 20 

24ft 12ft 
33ft IT 
lift 3ft 
IS Mb 
4ft 3 
23ft 1046 
32ft 2041. 
91* 3 

54* lft 
15ft 846 
lift 7ft 
35ft 21 
10 ft s 
23ft IM* 
Uft Sft 

ir a 
18ft Bft 
25ft 141* 
U 74* 

12 3ft IS 

25ft 91* 
14ft ai* 
13ft 9ft 
ID 5ft 


154k 9ft JBRtts .16 13 353 

Oft 34* Jockpol 231 

41ft is* Jock Lie 195 

2516 14ft JnmWtr 3» 

Sft 4ft JefMort 1803 

23ft 141* jerico .1* J 535 

746 34* JonSOH I 31 
104* 5 ft Jasrttan 44 

22ft 9*h Junes 27 

20ft 13ft Justin Ml US Si 


M 2 49 

.07 3 200 

.96 3J7 13 

LD0 M sa 
,524 
1133 

A* J 7D2 
.10 2J *3 
M 1.9 4*1 
491 

J2 28 5DB 


.,0 28 J 

714 

443 

10 

34 L3 2431X 

__ a 

2085 

B* 

J4 4A 174 
M U 190 
35 
27 
472 

JS 

425 

-05a J 33 


20 U 1755 
JM J 25 
59 
18* 
49 

.10 J SI 
24 14 1 

1.72 58 UBS 
ja 2J 27 
.141 301 

524 

.1* .9 3*2 

8* 4 3* 

zy 

138 

82a 28 08 
LM.4J 70 

77 

52 

124 

M 2J 25 

13$ 

» J « 
84 32 270 
957 
87 
7 


316 

20 4 399 

370 
£22 
280 
55 

140 3.1 52 

241 
84 
141 
489 
118 
425 
13 
72J* 
358 
91 
3 

JO >J « 
2751 
291 
354 
96 
45* 
W 


24ft 13ft KLAl 
9 4ft KVPhr 

2bft 131* Komar, i 

ltft 13ft Korcnr 
1716 Oft Raster 
10ft M* Kavdon 
Mto 40ft Kemp 
51ft 301* KvCnLi 
Bft 4ft Kevcr 

"** aasss 

21ft 13 Kinder 
Uft 4ft Krov 
lift 11 Knioer 
29ft 8 ft Wiae 


1551 

18 

20 * 

270 

35t 98 

36 

180 28 701 
180 IJ 332 


«Z 

84 J 2409 
84 8 343 
J 6 U 118 
.12] 1.1 353 


1116 516 

21ft Vft 
22ft 916 
2116 9ft 

51 to 33 
W 124* 
18ft 11 
17 12ft 
17ft MU. 
W* 36 
32 • 2316 
7ft 4ft 
Uft 116 

•ft 0S 


LDBrak 

LSI L00 
LTX 
Lo Petes 
LaZBy 140 : 
LadFrn .16 
Laid hr 30 
LtanoT 80 , 
t nn u ttl 22 ■ 
LaneCo Si 
Lowsns 22 ' 

LeaDta 

Lalnar 

LawteP 200 1 
L e xi con 


Nat 

Low 3 PA Qtba 

31* + l* 

6 

I5to + V* 
3416 
33U 
-25 

19ft + ft 
2416— 16 
*ft— ft , 
17 
23to 

2T6 + to 
lift + ft 
19ft— to 
31ft + 1 ft 
4316 

Sift + ft ! 
3816— 16 
4516—1 
29ft + ft 
2 <ft + 16 
27=1* 

13ft— ft 

18ft 

40ft— 16 

lift— ft . 

1 * +ft 
Sft +lft 
20 + ft 

201* + ft 

32 + ft 

15ft— 16 

Y + * 

is —to 
4—16 
24ft 
4 + ft 

lift— ft 


12Monta 
HWlLow Stop. 


Sides ia Met 

Dtv. YU. 10k Mon Low 3PJLOHM 


IZMonm 
HtotiLew Sttefc 


Soles hi Net nMenlt! 

DIv.VM. Wh High Law 1 PJto OiVe Hlaft Low Stack 


Soles In Net 

Div. rid. infls Won low l pm. Choe 


lift 11U. 
5ft 4ft 
58ft 57ft 
10 9ft 
lft lft 
25ft 25ft 
51* 5ft 
19ft lift 
14ft 14 
1716 lift 
24ft 24ft 
17ft 1716 
J9to lift 
Bft lft 
14ft Mto 
7 6ft 
23to 22ft 
9 8ft 
lift lit* 
IS 14ft 


lift lift 
It* 8 
17 lift 
51* 5ft 
2 ft 2 ft 
I9U. 19 
17ft 17ft 
34ft 34ft 
9 Bft 
Sft 4ft 
i* 216 
2 ft 2 U. 
1816 18 
5B*6 19ft 
4ft 4U» 
21ft 21 to 
35ft 35 
23 22ft 

lift in* 

4ft 4ft 
32ft 32ft 
lft II* 
27ft 2716 
4ft 4ft 
31ft 30ft 
2416 25ft 
1216 12 
26ft 2516 
28ft 2Sto 
13ft 1316 
7to 716 


9to 9 
3216 32 
M 134* 
7ft 716 
Bft Bto 
41* Sft 
Oft S3* 
23to 2216 
1716 15ft 
25 24V, 

54* Sft 
14ft 1416 
4 31* 

Uft lift 
2V 28ft 
4 3ft 
2 ft 2 ft 
12ft T2ft 
13to 12ft 
30ft 30 
7ft 716 
13ft 12ft 
7 6* 

10ft 10ft 
9 Mb 
21 2016 
151* 14ft 

ft Si 

24ft 36to 
lift lift 
111 * lift 
91* 9ft 


is* nv* 
4ft 4ft 
30V. 37ft 
2516 24ft 
4ft 4ft 
23ft m 
616 61* 
9 Bft 
73 22 ft 

lift K* 


21to 21 

Bft ■ 

74* 24ft 

15ft IM* 
11 10ft 
91* 9ft 
64ft 631* 
57 52 

4 SI* 
916 91* 
2 ft 2 ft 

19ft 18ft 

7ft 716 
15ft 151* 

in* ioft 


616 6 
71ft 31ft 
13ft 13 
2116 20 ft 

5316 SI 

a* aw. 

15ft IS 
M 14 
17ft 17V. 
58ft 57ft 
7716 36ft 
Sft ,5ft 
IQto » 


3* lft 
24* 17*6 
48 40* 

7ft 4ft 
20ft lift 
3816 18ft 
34ft 2716 
4ft 4ft 
49ft 21ft 

2aft 20*6 
33ft ISto 
24ft IV 
lVft Sft 


Lokidta 
Llabrt 8V 
Lflnvs J4 
UeCean 
LityTuI JO 
LinBrd 
UncTH 220 
Undbra .14 
LlrOas JS 
LongF 1J8 
Lotus 
Lvndon 
Lyphos 


2 lft 
22to 21ft 
4716 47to 
7ft 6ft 
lift lift 
38ft 38 
34ft 3a 
4ft 6 
4416 45V. 
2416 256. 
22 21 
22ft 22ft 
18ft IBM 


I9W 

23 

4716 

4ft— to 
lift— to 
38ft + ft 
34 

6 — 1 * 

44 +1 

24to + ft 
2116— ft 
22 ft— ft 
18ft + ft 


lift + 16 
5V* 

58ft +1 

via 

1 ft 

2 Sto + ft 
Ob + 16 
19-16 
Mft 

17ft + ft 
24ft + ft 
1716 

19+1* 

Bft 

Mto— to 
6 ft + ft 
2316 + ft 
9 — ft 
lift 
15 


15ft 

816 + ft 

17 + to 
5ft- 16 
2 ft— ft 

19ft + ft 
17ft— ft 
34ft- l* 
9 +16 

516 

216 + ft 

2 ft + ft 

18 +16 

«=* 

21ft 

35 — to 

23 + to 

lift— 1* 

ift + ft 

331* + ft 
lft— to 
2716— to 
4ft 

31ft + ft 
25 + ft 

1216 + to 
2516 + ft 
28ft + ft 
1316— to 
716 


9to + ft I 
32ft + ft 
13ft— ft 
7*— ft 
Sft + ft 
3ft 

5216 + ft 
2316 +116 
15ft— 2 
25 

516— ft 
Mto + to 

4 

15ft 


2ft— V* 
12 ft + ft 
1316 

»to + u. 

7ft— to 
Uft — ft 
Bft + to 
10 ft 

Sft + 1* 
21 +16 
14ft— 1* 
8 ft + to 
Ift 

25ft + to 
lift + ft 
lift 

Vft + ft 


12 ft + ft 
Bft + ft 
38 +16 

3516 + ft 
41*— ft 
23ft + ft 
4to 

Bft— ft 
23 

lito + ft 


21 

Sft— ft 

74*— * 

15ft— '.* 
16ft— 16 
9ft 

64ft + Vi 
5516 +4 
4 + ft 

9ft— l* 
2 ft 

19(6 + ft 
716— Ml 
151*— ft 
10 ft- ft 


t + ft 
21 ft + to 
lW + ft 
2116 +ft 

SJto +11* 
23ft— ft 
ISto 

14 — ft 
1716— ft 
58ft +1 
27+16 
5ft 

1 * — to 
7* — 16 
2 ft 


J4 1J • 
21 
125 

228 82 75 

£37 

J,I « ^ 
JM 14 144x 
124 32 221x 
JO 12 I 


UM 30 444 

157 

447 

.10 J 21 
2993 
453 
1482 
-88 24 1412 

24 

JB A 94 
171 
55 
1047 

122 42 131 
Til 24 35 

m 

120 45 727 
24 32 47 

48 
294 
121 

25 

JM 1.1 283 
2373 
183 
41 
39 

M 22 1 

124 22 744 
1159 

M 22 37&x 
28 

28 12 388 
121 
72 

21e .1 145 
138 

i il U 70 
193 

23 57 

-45e 12 4 

47 
2425 
JJ1 11 

.48 25 1385 
449 

JO 1J 27 
.10 A 830 



1016 
21 ft 
4VVt 
19ft 
lift 
17ft 
516 . 

2 ft 2 ft 
ift Sft 
ift ift 
4ft 
4ft 
23 
3416 
Sft 
28ft 
32ft 
32ft 
1BV* 
21 ft 

’is 

13ft 


lft Oceoner 

io ocma a 

33U. OollCo 128 
40ft ODIoCo 280 
30ft OldKnt s l.W 
23 OldRss 34 
19ft OMSpfC 260 
1416 One Boo S3 
3ft OnLlne 
1216 OMIeC 
22ft OollcR 
12ft Orbonc 
5Vi Orbit 
416 CMoCp 
13ft Oahmn 30 
25ft OtlrTP 224 
Sft OvrExa 
8 OwnMs 28 


142 
242 
26 448 
XI 321 
12 UOx 

XI 3S4 
11J 2x 
16 205 
139 
52 
494 


33ft 21ft 
33U 3946 
Uft 1 
15ft 11 
lift 10 ft 
8 V* 4 
1716 lift 

a 4 i* 

13ft 5ft 
If 8 to 
17ft *1* 
1016 516 
Sft 25ft 
3 Hi 20ft 

Uft 7ft 

30ft 23ft 
13ft Jft 
17V. 7to 
18ft 1416 
4ft 2 
30ft 17ft 
251* 16V] 
371* »J* 
ID 7 
15 Bft 
34ft 14ft 
77 ft 71 
39* lft 
IS* 9!A 
12ft 5ft 
37ft 20 
•ft ? 
7ft 1, 
1416 7V. 


PNC* 1J2 
Paccar UOa 
PaeM 
PacTal JO 
PoeoPti 
PoneMx .13 
PnrfcOh M 
PatatM 

Paul Hr t 
Pavctvx 
PaokHC 
PeeCId JM 
PenoEn 2J0 
Pantors M 
PewEx J5r 
Potnte 1.12 

Pbmx3 
PSFS .15a 
PtllKN JOt 
PftnxAta 
PlcSov 

PIcCulo M 

PlonHI 1 M 
PlonSt .12 
PoFMh 
PiCVMB 

Pore* 

Powell 
Powrtcs 
PwCoav 
PrecCsf .12 

KC 

PricCm * 


il 93U 
U 15 


21 * 1 ft 

13 17ft 
41ft 40ft 
72ft 7W* 
34ft 33ft 
31ft 331* 
271* 22ft 
32ft 31th 

7ft ift 
14ft Uft 
2Sft 27ft 

14 14 

7 Bft 
7 5ft 
Uft 13ft 
33ft 311* 
111* 11 

“ts’ie 


331* 331* 

411* 41 
IIK* «* 
15V* 1516 
lift 14 
BVb 7ft 

12 lift 
ito Sft 

19ft UU 

low. in* 

13 lift 
7t* ,7ft 

35 34V* 

28 28 
916 B»k 
24ft 241* 
716 7 

11 10ft 
18ft IBM 
2 h Sft 
30ft 30(6 
2S1* 24ft 
3316 32ft 
bk aft 

low 1BV* 
Tito 90ft 
22 to 23 
2 lft 
Uft 13V* 
Uft 12ft 
32V* 32 
Bft ■** 
S 4ft 
81* 79b 


8 to + to 
%♦* 
4ft -1 " 

33V* 

104S 

27ft 

32^ + M 
IIM + M 
22 M + to 

Wi'% 

316 — M 
8M + V* 

19ft— ft 
1 ft 

ft iz 

1316 + ft 

39* + ft 

sr* 

7ft— to 
5 + M 

IS! + >6 
Tig 

Mto + M, 

40 + ft 

71 

Uft 

16ft + 16 
216 
41* ' 

Sft + V* 
7V* + ft 
7ft 
5ft 

2 to— to 

SOM 

42V* *■ ft 
8 

219b— 1 
4ft— to 

rile 

22ft— M 
91* 

lift + 16 
19ft + M 
8M— M 
34ft + to 
2416— 16 
16M + M 
14ft + ft 
15ft— M 
If 
7M 

15ft- M 
I7M + 1* 


2 ft 

4ft + M 
10V* + to 
2116— to 
48ft 
19ft 

16ft— ft 
17ft +21* 
516— V* 
2 ft 

4ft + M 

ito— V* 

5 

4ft 

23W 

37 + ft 

Bto— M , 
28V* — to 
32ft + to I 
32ft + 16 
llto— M 
21 ft— ft 

Vfc " 14 

13ft + ft 

17 —1 
51M 
57V, +1 

4to— to 
Bft— to 
171* — M 
18ft— ft 
32ft + ft 
2aV* + M 
23to + M 
5BW + 2 ft 
5M + ft 
Sft 

18 


2 

13 

4ita + ft 
72ft +1 
J4W + 1* 
34ft +lft 
22 ft 

32—16 
716 + ft 
Mto — to i 
28to + ft 1 

14 

ift 

ift— to 

Uft 

3336 + 16 
TIM + ft 

“Sf 


33V* + ft 

4IM + ft 
KM + to 
1516 

lift + ft 
BV* + ft 
13 + to 
ito + M 
13V* + 1* 
1VU + M 
13 + ft 
7ft + to 
34M— to 

^to + 16 
34ft 

7 — to 
11 +16 
in* + 1 * 
a +i 6 
3016 

24ft— 1* 
33to + to 

8 ft 

low + to 
20ft — 1* 
23V*— ft 

IN- Vb 
!» + 1 * 
12ft 

32 —to 
Bft + l* 
* + ft 

7ft— to 


66 3416 PrtcaCH 1393 

IBM V Prlronx 70 

4 Sft ProdOp .14 19 -274 

4216 20ft ProsC * .12 J 107 

Uft I IV* ProolTr 1 JO 105 202 
lVft 13ft Provln 14 

29 17ft Purl Bn JO IJ 47 


15V, 4 QMS 182 

Vft 3ft Quodrc 221 

Uft 9 QuaKCS J8 XI 2 

3216 14ft Quanta! 957 

51% 7ft QuestM 48 

17W Ito Quixote 12* 

lift 716 Qualm 2149 


12>6 5 

IBft 13 
lito Bft 
14ft ift 
10M 59* 
7ft 2ft 
33V* 22T* 
20to I2W 
7to iw 
23ft 1716 
lift 5M 
35ft 25ft 
12ft 4ft 
7ft 4ft 
II II 
17M 3W 
iai* 7ft 
20 W. fft 
1* ltft 
lift ift 
jfe 19ft 
4516 29 
17ft Vft 
10 3ft 
22ft 12ft 
18ft lift 
33ft 24ft 
lift 11 
UU IM 
28 lift 
10 ft ift 
916 3M 
17to ia'4 
24ft llto 


14 7ft 
lift 10ft 
Zlto 13 
lift Sft 

23 14. 

27ft ift. 
44ft 49 
1516 71* 
18W 716 

62ft 47ft 
ift 2M 
10 4W 
Sft SW 

JIM 15ft 
70ft lift 
10ft ito 
17 10ft 
13ft Sft 
25ft MU. 
4M 3* 
13W 7 
20 ft 6 
9W Sft 
Bft 4 
4ft lft 

7W 1ft 
26>6 14 
9ft 4 
14ft 10ft 
25V* 17W 
27 13ft 
7ft 416 
18ft 12ft 
37ft 23V* 
41ft 29to 
21 ft 12ft 
Uft 7ft 
311* 711* 
15ft 18 
IDto 3ft 
17V* fft 
2DM lift 
24M lift 
lift Sft 
17ft lift 
isu. tow 
1816 9V* 

12ft Bft 
4 lft 
54 33U 

24ft lift 
10W ift 
Tift Tift 
30W 18ft 
27V* Mto 
ito Sft 
33 20ft 
38ft 141* 
ft* ift 
Jlto 22ft 
19ft 10 
28to Sft 
Bft Sft 
15ft 13W 
13W 3W 
8 5 

30 Uft 
Z3V6 1116 
27 19 

41to 71 
Bto 3ft 
7ft 4Vb 
1BW lift 
as i7ft 
at* 5ft 
7SW Bft 
« 29W 

24 15 
171W112 

76ft 7916 
ift 216 

10W 4W 
10ft 7ft 
4ft 3 
M Bft 
M9* ift 
Sft 2W 
19to 12ft 
2 AU> 8 
7ft 3W 
lift ift 
» Mto 


14 8 
2716 1316 

7M 3ft 
SOW 17ft 
Bft aft 
MW Sft 
22 9 

34ft MW 
lift ift 
SO* 13V* 
20 Sft 
416 lft 
20 BW 

19M 9ft 
10ft 3 
1416 4 

131* 416 
2ftft 15ft 
Ml* 5ft 
20ft 5V> 

15 38* 
IIM °M 

2 ft 16 
30 SM 

17ft 10 
T2M 416 

30 to 20 


22 il 25 

3 

1787 

26 1 S 50 
23 

138 1J 35 
1.93 IS 213 
42 

.10 1.1 209 

41 
35 

4 

5 

221 

23V 

884 

JO U 8 

sss 

30 

49 

JH J S8x 


5 

.1* A 18 
82 
2757 
2335 
233 
1170 
1 173 

1283 

J9 IJ U1 
484 
383 
998 
S39 

t 1 * 
53 
24 

M 15 254 
121 
335 
254 

4117 

70 

19 

4 

43 

JC M V 


45 44W MW— '6 

13W 124* 13W + ft 
ito 4 41* + ft 

42ft 42 42to 
lift lift lift 
19ft 19ft 19ft + to 
27to 24ft 27 + W 


vu. n* ift— to 
at* 7ft Ito + to 
ITto 12 to 12 to + ft 
22 21 W 21 ft— U. 

ito ift ift— to 
lift lift lift 
12ft 121* 12ft— to 


jn* .1 lKbc 
52 16 597 
422 
lOi 
11 
238 

1J» XI 255 
Jt 13 47 

35 
384 
245 

64 11 51 

444 

JO 15 132 
.17 J 28 
57 

.16 1.9 74 

838 
152 

-15e 27 53 

J6e .9 135 
MO XI 416 
J2 IJ 76 
1949 
16 

JO 44 782 
1.10 X5 494 
M A 4B 
129 

.54 10 449 
I . 252 

182 
S3 
154 


I 130 

MVS 

87 

■10r 1-6 38 

JO 4J 82 
.Mb 3 1712 
140 XS 87 
18 
271 

X00 XI 128 
44 
220 

.12 1J 311 
48 

I 44 U 24 

219 
522 

J2 14 429 
40b La 58 

ss 

10 

113 

89 

2144 

44 

155 

A IS 11 
JB A 2408 
.08 A 1170 
JO 16 1104 
t 179 
43 

.16 J £33 
AO 1J 1643 
MS 61 73 

I .la J 247 

&s 

.15 S 5325 
am 
143 
431 
17 
1141 
131 

80 XI 4x 

220 
177 

JB J 14 

143 

LB4 15 34 

154 
51 
195 

E ABa 22 217 
-40a 34 118 


7ft TV, 
17V* 17 
141* 13ft 
Vto 9 
Ito Ito 
3ft 3to 
33W 32ft 
18ft 11(6 
2 lft 
22ft 22ft 
111 * 10 ft 
30ft 30ft 
1216 12 
5ft 5W 
18 17W 


10ft UK* 
lfto IBft 
Bft ift 
2916 29 
45to 44ft 
17ft T7ft 
ift 4(6 
2IM 21 
1816 IIM 
32 31(6 

Uft 13ft 
Vft 9W 
2716 27 
9ft Bft 
Sft 316 
12V* lift 
22 22M 


7ft + V* 
17to 

13ft + ft 
fto 

IM + (6 
Sft— to 
32ft— ft 
16ft- to 
2 + to 
22 ft— to 
10ft 

3m— to 

12V* 

5ft 

IB + to 
5to „ 
BW — ft 

lou , 
19. +ft 
ito— 16 
29 
45 

17ft— V* 
ift + to 
21 — to 
IBft — to 
31ft 
13ft 

916 + to 
27ft— to 
9Vb + to 
3to— ft 
lift— to 
23 + W 


97 

ift 

4M 

49* 



175 

22VJ 

21 to 

22 



to 

IDS 

18M 

17ft 





443 






974X 

TBto 

28 




280 

19M 

19U 

19ft 

+ 

w 

207 

23 

aw 

22ft 

+ 

9* 

70 

BW 

BU 

BW 

+ 

(6 

152 

15 

lito 

15 


(6 

159 

9U 

9 

9U 







+ 


3D 

29 

jaw 




to 

Xft 

lift 

14ft 

Mfe 



58 



26ft 




309 

41 to 

40ft 

•soft 

mm 

9* 

43* 

4to 

4 

ito 







— 

(a 

13 

Uft 

Uft 

14ft 


(6 

25 

23(6 

23U 

23U 




7to 716 7(6— ft 

22to 21ft 22to + to 
39U 39<6 3Vto — ft 
74* 33ft 24(6 + 16 
161M140to 140ft — IM 

lft ’ft 


•ft 9(6 fft + to 

Ito BM IM 

3V* 3to 3to 

1(W* Vft 10 + w 

13to 12 12 — to 

4ft 4 4ft + M 

T9W 19 19W + M 

lift 11 U 111 * + ft 

B 7to B + to 

Vft 9W fft 

24 25to 25V, — ft 


10 Vft 
24 2Sto 
3U 3V» 
in* law 
3ft 3(6 

mw isto 
10 M 10 to 
34to 3a 
9** Vft 
21ft 2416 
19to 199* 
3 7ft 

law mu 
19 liu 
3ft 3ft 
7 ift 
10W 10U 
2Sft 25 
41* ift 
7ft 49* 
416 Jto 
14ft 14|* 

2814 27to 
11 U. 10 U 
•to ,9ft 
2S(U 24ft 


ID 

25V* 

3U 

10 ft + ft 

3to 

14 + % 

lOto + to 
34W + M 
VW + to 
2416 — (6 
194* — ft 
3 +16 

I 0 W + ft j 

IBft + to 
3ft-ft! 
ift + M , 
10 U— U 
25(6— ft 
ift— to 
5ft— ft 
3ft— ft 

tit 

m +iii 
11(6 + u 
•to + u 

24ft 


2 SU II 
34(6 13*6 
lift 5 
23V*, 10ft 
14 7ft 
29to 14'6 
5a vi 2 fl* 
24(6 lift 
lift 8ft 
29(6 Tito 
11 4 

2216 Uft 
lift 4 

’& a 

32 31ft 
59* Ito 
4 2W 
34 UU 
5Vb 3 U 
22W 14V* 
42W 25U 
25ft 17ft 
25to 15ft 
48ft 33ft 
23 MU 
TBVk Vft 
13 7V, 

ift 3(6 


1 U IS 
133 

Me 2 UP 

47V 

56* 

urn xv l 

1 J 0 26 2 S 
Mi 2 923 

.1ST M 38 
1J0 X7 48 
195 

J>5a J 389 
1641205 10 


LOO 13 473 

JM J KKO 
.12 2J 78 
.40c 33 470 
UO U 501 
J4 1.1 31 


99* Sft 
14W 7ft 
ltft Jto 
20 ft 4 
229* 8(6 

42ft Tito 
33W 19ft 
19ft Uft 
15ft 4(6 
it* 29* 
28ft 13(6 
139* ito 
15 fto 
20 ft ITU 
12M Sft 
22 14ft 


VLI 

VLSI 

VMX 

VoltdLa 

VOIFSL 

VOlNH MO 

VaILn AO 

Von Dus .40 

Vanzell 

Ventrex 

vkorp Me 

viedeFr J2e : 

Viklna 

Vlraiek 

Vodovf 

Vottlnf 


low I 0 U 18W + ft 
U9* U llto 
23to 23 23to + to 
ift 41* ift + to 
18ft lfift 18ft — ft 
22to Tito 23W + 9* 
45ft 45ft 45to + V 6 
Uto lift lift — ft 
19 llto 18ft + ft 
79 78ft 79 + ft 

5W Sft 5to + ft 
ito ito ito + ft 
5to 4 6M + M 
30 29ft 29ft— M 
20ft 2DW 20to 
9W Vft Vft— 1* 
lift 15ft lift + 4* 
13to TZVb 13U + to 
2Sft 2SU 35*— to 
4W 4W 4W — U 

7 7 7 

8 7ft 7ft 
49* ito 4to 

4ft 5ft Sft— to 
2U 2 3U 
2 lft 2 + lb 
23 22W 23 + (6 

Bft Sto BN + 1* 
13 129* 13 + ft 

22W 23 (6 22M + » 
24W 23ft 24 
49* 4Vb 4 to— to 
19to IBM 19 +9* 

34W 35ft 34ft + ft 
41U 41 41 

22ft 21ft 22ft +1 
9(6 V 9(6 + U 
27ft 27 779* + to 

10ft 10 10ft 
4ft 4(6 4(6 — to 

13ft 139* 139* + to 
14ft 14V, 14W 
22 U 20ft 22 +194 

5 4ft 5 + U 

in* 159* 15ft + ft 

UU 10 ft I 1 U + w 

lift 15V, 15V, 

10ft 109* 10ft— U 
3W 2ft 2ft 
51 50ft SOft— |6 
24M 21 Sto 
Bft 8ft Bft + 16 
14U 14 I4U + 16 
29 2BW 29 +16 

18 in* 17ft— U 


25U 179* 
17 10 

Uft 5ft 
25U 179* 
30V* ij 
lito 10ft 
9ft 6 
14U 10W 
19W 8U 
1796 5U 
10 ft Sft 
17U 6U 
21ft 15W 
17V* 4ft 
38ft 24W 
ito 3 
131* 3 
<au 3iw 

15ft 79* 
TDft 4(6 
7ft 3W 
24U 14ft 
19ft UU 
20 14 

SOM 20ft 


7to lft xebec 
13ft Sft xicar 
17ft lou Xklex 


.94 47 31 

N IJ W 
77 

L74 72 75 

60 11 45 

323 
2071 

JO M 8 
44 
29V 
289 
34 

A0 2D ^38 

J8 27 435 
104V 
593 

165 U 13V 


6331 ■ S58 

60 36 VI 
60 4J «J 
64 2J 177 
JM 18 444X 


2516 251* 
I6W li 
8ft Bft 
14W 13ft 
M 13ft 
27ft 27ft 
58 57ft 
2SY* 24ft 
Vft Vft 
29V. 29 
7 ift 
191* IBM 

‘Ife’k 

30ft 30 
4M 4U 
2 ft 3* 
30M 28ft 
4ft 4U 
18U 17ft 
42U 41ft 
21W 21 
24ft 24 
44W 44(6 
21U 20U 
13ft 13U 
11 10ft 
4ft ift 


416 4 

Mto 14(6 
4ft 4ft 
8 7ft 
I9W 18ft 
38ft 38 
25 24ft 
1VW 1914 
5 ift 
5V> 5 

19ft 19ft 
8 79* 

14 13ft 
19U IBft 
7ft 79* 
19W 19U 


20ft 3D* 
lito 14 
9ft fft 
22 22ft 
28ft 28(6 
15U 149b 
7V, r* 
I2W 12U 

19 1BW 
15ft 15ft 

7ft 7 (fa 
171* lift 

20 19ft 
1216 Uft 
37W 34W 

3ft 3ft 
4U 39* 
44ft 44W 
lift I3W 
4 59* 

ift 49* 
lift 14W 
17ft 17W 
18ft 18ft 
2IU 20ft 


25V* + M 

lift 

Bft + ft 
14 

13ft + <6 
27ft + to 
58 

24ft— to 

Q36 

79(6 + U 
4ft 

18ft + W 
8 — ft 

u A -u 

30U 

4W+ to 
29*— W 
30 — M 
4U 

18(6 + ft 
4216 + ft 
21U— to 
24ft + ft 
44U— (6 
21 + U 

139* + ft 
IBft— U 
ift— U 


4 — U 
lito 

4ft 

7ft + 1* 
IBft— to 
38U + to 
25 
19(6 

49* + M 

5 — M 
19ft 

7ft 

13ft— ft 
I9U + to 
7ft + U 
I9U- U 


20(6 — ft 
lito 
fft 

23 + ft 

28W 

15V* + (6 
7ft + U 
12 U 

IBM— ft 
159* + to 
7ft + U 
17 +1* 

19ft— U 
lift — U 

34W— IV* 
3ft— to 
4 — U 

44ft- 1* 
Mto + to 
Sft— u 
ift 

lift + u 

i 2 to 

IBft + to 
21 (6 


25 MU VlowFs J4 XI 3370 


2ft 29* 2ft- ft 
Bto 81* Bto — I* 
14W 14(6 14U— U 


SU 24ft 25V* + to 


30to 

Sto ZenLbs 

.101 

A 

455 

25Vi 

24ft 

Uft 

lOto Ziegler 

.430 36 

14 

13U 

13 

45 

31 ZlonUt 

1 J6 

XI 

44 

44U 

44 

Sft 

lft Zltei 



154 

3 

29* 

10ft 

Sft Zlvod 



83 

4W 

Sft 

1516 

aw Zondhm 

J08I 

J 

32 

lit* 

11 '6 


Sales figure* are unofflclaL Yearly highs and lows retted 
the previous 52 naeks phis I he current week, but not the latest 
trading dav. Where a ulir or stock dividend amounting to 25 
percent er more has bean boKL Hu vearVi high- low range and 
dividend are shown for Hu new static only. Unien otherwise 
noted, rates of dhridenae are annual dlsaursemenls based on 
the latest declaration, 
a — dividend also extra (sL /1 
b— annual rate of covMand plus sloe* dividend/! 
c— liquidating divloendJI 
eld — cnlleiL/l 
d — new yearly lawyi 

e — dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 mantnsyi 
g — dividend in Canadian lutids. subject to 15% non-residence 
tan. 

1— dividend decJored after spflt-up or stock dividend. 

I — dividend paid ( 1 , 1 c year, omitted, deterred, or no action 
taken at lafnet dividend meeting. 

k — dividend declared or paid this year, an aecurnutallve 
Issue with dividend* in arrears. 

n — new Issue In the past 52 weeks. The High-low range begins 
with me start of trading, 
nd — nest day delivery. 

P/E — price-earnings ratio. 

r — dividend doctored or paid In preadlng 12 months. Phis 
stack dividend. 

s —stack split. Dividend begins with date ol Milt, 
sis — soles. 

t — dividend paid In stack In preceding II mentns. estimated 
cash value on ox-dividend or es-dlstribution dote, 
u— new yearly high, 
y — trading halted. 

vt— In bankruptcy or receivership nr being reorganized un- 
der the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by »ucti com- 
panies. 

wd — when distributed, 
wl — when Issued, 
ww — wftti warrant*. 
jt — emflvldond or ex-rtgfih. 

Mils — m-dlstrlbullan. 
xw — without warrants, 
v— ex-dividend and sates In tail, 
yid— yield. 

I — Sale* In lull. 


Reaching More 

ThanaTmrd^a 

Million Readers 

in 164 Countries 

Around the World 

Hera I hSu Sribu nr 


*•- • 







** 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24; 1985 


ACROSS 

1 Oh] inOschaiz 
4 Nimble 
9 Expectant 
father, often 

14 Third Reich 
police 

21 Hind 

22 Salk target 

23 A poplar 

24 Hamlet or 
Romeo 

25 North; bids a 
minor suit 

2$ Pitcher and 
catcher 

29 Llama's 
relative 

3# Asian festival 

31 Matter-of-fact 

32 Kwa language 

33 Plow man 
John 


ACROSS 


34 Petitioned 

38 It precedes 
upsijon 

37 Cause 

42 Dullard, is 
spades 

43 East; 
challenges 
North's bid 


48 Abstract being 

49 Twelve or 
thirteen tricks 

50 Rinkorg. 

51 These run high 

52 Hoof sound 


53 Chimney 
sweep's target 

54 Junior runs 
these for Mom 

57 Increase the 
bid 

58 South: see 57 
Across 

64 Alan 

Alexander and 
family 

85 Half Of MVI 
88 Bristling 

87 Like same veal 
70 — the finish 
71 Utters 

74 Pack 

75 Bikini part 

78 West: bids a 
major suit 

85 Codex contents: 
Abbr. 

88 Real, as a 
diamond 

87 Dominion 

88 Latvia's 
capital 

89 Golden State 

N.B_A. player 
92 Sights in the 
Southwest 
95 Particular 
98 Mud volcanoes 
100 North: a jump 
bid 

104 Like a cliche 

105 City of 
Lebanon or 
Libya 


ACROSS 

107 Scold 

108 Newspaper 
sect. 

109 Summer mo, 

110 Grasshopper's 

critic 

112 Goad 

113 Knight from 
Conn. 

120 East: passes 

122 Porto , 

Benin's capital 

123 Merrill-Styne hit 

124 "Frae morn to 


Bidding With The Bard By can*ne& ntzgen*j 

E 


PEANUTS 



125 Dash 

128 Canary's 

cousin 

127 Bill 

129 Besides 

130 Org. for some 
drivers 

131 Burnt 

132 Virginia 

Woolf 

138 South: asks 
that the bid be 
recorded 

140 Some 
electricians 

141 More unfriendly 

142 Blake of 
"Shuffle Along” 

143 Kiki of rock 
fame 

144 Manage 

145 Color again 

146 Tap problems 

147 Kind of lot or job 


DOWN 


DOWN 


1 She saved 
Theseus 

2 Actress 
Dewhurst 

3 Auxiliaries 

4 Swiftly 

5 Poet Ridge 

6 Cubit 

7 Moroccan 
mountain 
range 

8 "A tutor who 
the flute 


9 Covenant 

10 Tennis term 

11 Like a tail 

12 Drench 

13 Promising 

14 Kaplan or Kotter 

15 Dodger 
18 Enhance 
17 WU brand’s 

discovery 


18 Generation 

19 Bv means of 

20 Kid Jazz 

trombonist 

28 Bridge 
essential 

27 French painter 
Odilon- 

34 Severe critic 

35 City SE of 
Stuttgart 

36 They pull 
skiers 

38 point 

(center of 
interest) 

39 Mrs. Irving 
Berlin 

40 Secretive 

41 Symbols 

43 "The Man 

1924 

song 

44 Addict 


DOWN 

45 Busybody 



WATCHING A FOOTBALL 
. 6AME,.J $HE.„ ■ 

UT 



UJMV DOGS SOMEONE 
I ALWAYS HANG A 5IGN 
tOVKTWE RAILING THAT f| 
SAYS. “JOHN 3-I6 w ? | 


Y rr*5 A VreAUY? 
scriptural ( THENI 

V UK0N6-- 



T ALU1AY5 THOUGHT IT 
HAD SOMETHING ID DO 
Jjffti JOHN ftWPBl 


m- 


t nrf 



BLONDIE 


see THiS‘?rrs 

M/ SALESMAN 

OP THE MONTH 
AWAPP i 






Mw® eaiy-naoPHY 

PCJR “TOUGHEST 

CUSTOMS? 

OF THE, 

DECADE'! 



I KNOW 


I'M 



t toil Hi 




BEETLE BAILEY 


X'll SNEAK OVER 
TO "8" COMPAQ 
TONIGHT ANP 
"BORROW'A TIRE„ 


© /Ve w York Times, edited by Eugene Maleaka. 


48 Like Father 
William 

47 Initials on a 
warship 

49 Canals 

53 Lawful forger 

55 Revives or 

recalls 

58 Display 

57 Midway 
attractions 

58 Characteristic 
style 

59 Comical 
blanket-lover 

60 Equivocators 

81 Previous to this 

82 Bk. sizes 

63 Western 
lizards 

64 Kind of 
physician 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


68 Under most 
favorable 
conditions 


69 Buck's mate 

72 Motor or meter 
leader 

73 Billing time: 
Abbr. 

75 A librettist for 
Verdi 


83 Three, to Hans 

84 Blacken 

90 English archi- 
tect Jones 

91 Alley 

pass, in basket- 


76 0-KJ 

77 "There Is 
Nothin' Like 


79 Needle case 

80 Macaws 

81 Capek classic 

82 Loilypop flavor 


93 "Take the 

Strayhom hit 

94 Rustic, to Milton 

96 Dismantle 

97 Originated 

98 Meteor or 
sphere leader 

99 Deign 

101 Novelist 
Fournier 

102 Sort 


103 Teammate of 
Jo-Jo Moore 

195 Little boy 

106 Lead all the 
diamonds, e.g. 

111 City NNW of 
Pusan 

112 Bleat 

113 Waterspout 

114 Manifested 

115 Gave 

117 Last syllable of 
a word 

118 Hobber, in quoits 

119 A-QorK-J 

120 Decrepit 

121 Looked fiercely' 

122 -do- well 


126 Scenes 
128 Yield 



■SET 'IT THROUeH-'jtf 

regular channels I 









129 Arabian chief 

130 Tiny opening 

131 Bit 


ANDYCAPP 


132 Exclamations 
of disgust 


133 Morse-code 
character 


134 Homophone 
for heir 


135 Actor Ayres 

137 Answer to a 
puzzle 

138 Mongrel 

139 Kimono sash 


I V7& 



WIZARD of ED 



* . 




■C-- “ v ‘ 


STORMY GENIUS: The life of Avia- 
tion's Maverick, BUI Lear 

By Richard Rashke. 401 pages. Illustrated. 
S19.95. 

Houghton Mifflin, 2 Park Street, Boston, Mass. 
02108. 

Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 


BOOKS 


colleague, he was impossible. As a husband, he 
could be counted on to cheat. As a father, he could 
be counted on for nothing. Irrati onal hysterical, 
sometimes suicidal he Hved at breakneck speed and 
died with a project on the boards that would eventu- 
ally lose $260 million. Yet because of the more than 
ISO designs and inventions this Ugh school dropout 


you an order now for your C-2 autopilot for our new 
jets.” Bill Lear says, **801 the auto-pilot won’t fly 
the jets. But if you give me a month, Fll redesign it 
soil wilL” 

A month goes by. Lear comes up with a new 
design. In the meantime, the Air Force decides to 
place the order elsewhere because it didn’t like the " 
fact that Lear’s servomechanism, or electronic con- 
trol deuce, used a triple servo instead of a single 
one. Lear gets wind of this and redesigns it over the 
weekend. On Monday they meet and the Air Force- 


you am? tb4in m&tnn 

ofez you pi£, oe eerstet'O*— 




T O most of us. Bill Lear was the developer of the 
Learjet, which seven years after his death is still 
the world’s best-selling executive airplane. But to 


patented, airplanes can make their way confidently 
he blackest night and set themselves down 


the industry that directly benefited from his restless, 
;knc 


inventive mind, he was known for having contribut- 
ed more to the safety of flying than any other man of 
his era. 

This is ironic, because, according to Richard 
Rashke’s breezy biography, “Stormy Genius,” the 
inventor was not in any other respect the sort of 
person to put safety first. 

As someone to work for, he was irascible. As a 


through the] 
gently on runways. 

Rashke, whose previous books include “The Kill- 
ing of Karen SELkwood,” describes dramatically the 
major achievements of Lear's life, including the 
development of car and airplane radios, the auto- 
matic direction finder, the autopilot system and the 
LearieL 

Within these acts, there are many scenes. In a 
typical one. Bill Lear barely makes the 1947 dead- 
line for an autopilot he promised the U.S. Air 
Force. The Air Force says, “We’re prepared to give 


tells him it has derided to go with a sin g fc servo. 

sar/Th 



1 C 


“We have a single servo now ” says Lear. *1 have it 

linlu nntk " l-XSUl 1 . .1 



voir 

flL&mWKiP-AWViS'iW&i 



JgOARB 




right with me." “Well, it probably won’t work in the 
“Then] 


REX MORGAN 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 




autopilot,” says the Air Force. “Then let's take it to 
the lab and book it up,” says Lear. It works perfectly 
and Lear wins a bflhan-dollar contract 
There is a fair amount of gossip. Lear’s fourth and 
last wife, Moya, whom he addressed as “Monuroe,” 
grew so exasperated with his womanizing that she 
once chased him around the house with a pair of 
scissors, threatening to castrate him. Later, resigned 
to his philandering, she kept a needlepoint on which 
she put the names of the girlfriends site knew about 
Lear had an overp ow eri n g mother who alternate- 
ly praised and damned him and always tried to keep 
him away from other women. “Away from her be 
fdt there wasn't a thing be couldn't do. Near her, he 
felt almost helpless.’' 


IT WAS YOUR i— | 
THIS IS 7 IDEA THAT WE BRING THE 
LOVELY, GROCERIES RATHER THAN 
GRANT — J STOP FDR LUNCH, YOUNG 
l^n LACY— so GET TO WORK.' 

l>ML s Wh»™r I'M HUNGRY. 7 


Y 


YES. SIR, SERGEANT' 
MESS'LL BE READY _ 
FIVE MINUTES 




Hi! 


He was, in short a kind of American archetype. 
The wonder of him doesn’t lie in and — 1 — 1 — 





P*-*: 


him, but rather in contemplating the force 
determination with which he got things done. The 
one moment of reflection that this fast-paced biog- 
raphy inspires is when a public relations firm pro- 
nounces Lear “not a good businessman ... an 
egomaniac . . . an eccentric scientific genius” who 
is just as wdl removed “from the day-to-day man- 
agement of the company." 

One feds a momentary fla sh of anger at the 
spectacle of the business establishment rejecting 
one of its most creative forces. But Lear thrived on 
that son of rejection. 


GARFIELD 


Christ 1 
Hew Yt 


er Lehmann-Haupt is on the staff of The 
Times. 


’ &EIN 6 SHORT ISMY SO 6 AD AS IONS 
AS YOU EONT LOOK UP 1 / 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Amsterdam 

Athens 


Berlin 
Brands 
Bucharest 
Budapest . 


Casta Del Sol 

DvNhl 

EdlnMrab 

Florence 

Frankfort 

Oewevd 
Hefeinfcl 
Manual 
Las patens 


London 


Milan 
Moscow 
Mu ok£ 


one 

Ports 
Prague 
RmrKfaviX 
Rome 
Stockholm 
Strasbourg 
Venice 
Vienna 
Warsaw 
Zorich 

middle east 

11 S2 


HIGH LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 

c 

F C 

F 



C 

F 

c 

F 

17 

63 8 

46 

fr 

Bangkok 

31 

88 

34 

73 

2 

36 1 

34 

*w 

Boiltao 

f 

48 

3 

37 

21 

70 13 

S 5 

tr 

Hoag Kong 

25 

77 

» 

73 

11 

52 1 

34 

fr 

WmiSSa 

31 

88 

23 

73 

a 

46 3 

37 

d 

irssw DgOtl 

Z 7 

01 

12 

54 

i 

34 .2 

21 

SW 

S#®«t 

13 

55 

7 

45 

3 

37 D 

32 


StKUSBSMl 

21 

70 

15 

59 

3 

37 1 

34 

r 

Slngoparg 

n 

91 

25 

77 

5 

41 3 

37 

0 

Talpd 

— 

— 

— 

— 

4 

39 1 

34 


Tokyo 

IS 

64 

9 

4 * 

17 

63 B 
43 2 

46 

36 

fr 

AFRICA 





4 

10 

at -a 

50 5 

30 

41 

ah 

O 

Algiers 

- 

- 

- 

~ 

1 

• 1 



0 

Cape Town 

34 

73 

1 # 

64 




CasoStaecs 

20 

68 

9 

48 









14 

S 3 11 

52 



29 


24 

75 

33 



d 









fP 




9 





0 






— 

— — 

— 

no 

LATIN AMERICA 











■ 7 

It ■ 12 

10 


Buenos Aires 

— 

— 



— 

■ 1 

a *3 

27 


Caracas 

21 

82 

18 

M 





Ltresn 

25 

77 

18 

64 


37 -i 



Mexico City 

24 

75 

6 

43 

3 

37 0 

32 

9 

Rio da Janeiro 

— 

— 

— 

— 

1 

34 0 
39 2 

32 

36 

SW 

NORTH AMERICA 


15 

59 11 

S 3 

ct 


■5 

23 ' 

■13 

9 




o 

Atlanta 

20 

60 

16 

61 




sw 

H it a 1 kite 

4 

39 

2 

36 

6 


JV 



6 

43 

-a 

at 




e 

Denver 

1 

34 

■M 

7 

— 

ta- — 



Detroit 

9 

48 

-1 

30 





HonoMu 

29 

B 4 

19 

66 


Ankara 

Beirut 

Damascus 

Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 
OCEANIA 


19 M 


1 34 Cl 

— — no 

— — » na 

— — no 
H 57 If 


Auckland — — — — no 

stater 17 a n ss ci 

Chctoutiv; fo-fooov; tr-tair; Mian; o-o w ca si ; pe-partiv cloudy; r-raln; 
ihslxwtni sw-snow; st -stormy. 


Houston 

Let Angeles 

Miami 

Mbtneepeib 

Montreal 

Nassao 

Mew York 

San Francisco 

Seattle 

Toronto 

wtutiiwton 


28 n 

9 48 
14 57 
-1 
1 

11 a 


tr 

55 a 


50 tr 
75 PC 


» d 
34 d 


72 IT 
41 r 


30 -5 
34 -3 


43 fr 
23 sw 
V fr 
43 


SATURDAY’S FORECAST - CHANNEL: Slight. FRANKFURT: Overcast. 
Temp. 7< — 3 C 3 »— Z 7 ). London: overcast. Temp. 3— 0 ( 36 — 33). Madrid: 
dowdy. Temp. 7 — 3 ( 4 S — 271 . NEW YORK: Portiv cfcxttfy. Temp. 14—7 
U 7 — 451 . PARIS: Overcast. Tempi T — I 134 — 30 ). ROME; Qoudv. Temp. 
12 — 9 (54 — 48 ). TEL AVIV: N A. ZURICH: Overcast. Temp. 1 — 3 (34 — 29 ). 
BANG KOK: Fair. Tame. 33 — 25 (91 — 771 . HONG KQKG: Cloudy. Temp. 27— 24 
111 — 75 ). MANILA: SHOWS. TernpJO — 34 (94 — 751 . SEOUL: Rahil Temp. 
12 — 7 ( 54 — 45 ). SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms, rente. 31—25 ( 99 — 77 ). 
TOKYO: Showers. Time. 17—9 ( 43 - 491 . 



n i 


W>rld Slock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Nov. 22 

Closing prices in local curmtdet unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

553 

550 

ACF Holding 



AEGON 

114*0 

I1A» 

AKZO 

139 JU 

13471 

Aho« 

7470 


AMEV 



ATtam Ruaeer 


9.1! 

Amro Bonk 



BVG 



Buehrmonn T 

117JD 

Ill 

Catena Hide 

2850 

28.9C 

ElMvtefiNOU 



Fakker 

77 JO 





Hrtnokra 

200 

20C 

Hoogavens 

7570 

77 JO 

KLM 

51 JO 

5161 

Noarden 

5780 

57 

NotNedder 

80J50 

81J0 

Nedllavd 

20050 


Oce VandarG 

378 

373J0 

PaktKMd 

78 

78Jt 

Philips 

5450 

557 

rroottg 

81 JO 

81 

Rodotnco 

13540 

13540 

Rollfsco 

73J0 

73J0 

Roronto 



Royal Dutch 
Unilever 

18&A0 

371 


VanOmmeran 

3030 

30X1 

VMF ShjfV 

255 

w 

VNU 

271 

266 

AHP.CBS Oeal Index : 23&70 

Previous : 23X00 




Arfaed 
Bekoert 
Cock erlll 
Cobepo 
EBE 3 

GB-lmw-BM 

GBL 

Govaort 

Hoboken 

Intercom 

Kredletbonh 

Petretino 

Soc Generate 

Safina 

Salvor 

Traction Elec 

UC 8 

Unera 

Vleille Momogno 


2750 2750 
9490 9490 
217 213 

4 SW 4525 
4(00 3990 
5160 £300 
2790 2740 
SU 0 5150 
5430 5700 
3000 3030 
12500 12300 
7160 7030 
2340 2 JH 
8390 8350 
4540 4200 
5**0 5500 
5490 sm 
2270 2250 
5900 5720 


Carnot Sleek lades ; 399134 
Previous : 2941.42 


Ifcankfart 


AEG-TeWunken 
Allianz vers 
Altana 

BASF 

Barer 

Bay Hypo B<Klk 

Bar Verelnstonk 

BHF-Bonk 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Cent Gwmml 
Daimler-Benz 


23750 23750 
1795 17 BS 
410 425 

270 257 JO 
241 JO 240 
450 451 
434 438 


uTsdie Babcock 
utscMBank 

Dresdnor Bank 

GHH 

Harpener 


434 415 

M0 60150 
27250 273 
159 AO 140 

1229V, 1231 
432 431 


ll c “>»* 

*TfY. 

Hochtlel 



Hoechst 

25150 29650 ! 

Hoesch 



Horten 

216 


Hush! 

419 

429 


323 

311 

Kall + Salz 


32950 

Kamam 

323 

321 


335 



323 

3 » 

Kloeckner Werke 

96 

96 

Krupp stahi 

Linde 

% 

178.10 

594 

Lufthansa 

22150 

224 




Mormsanom 

26150 267 JO 

AAuencti Ruock 
Nik dart 


2150 

PKI 

Porsche 

1 » 

703 

Prouwag 

24250 

239 







Rhetiunelall 



Sdierlng 

659 JO 

666 



Siemens 


673 

Thyssgn 

ITS 17150 

Veto 

240 <n 266jn 1 

Vol kswao«nw«att 



Welle 

663 

666 

1 CommerztRBrt Index : 177349 1 

Previous ; T 75 L 6 Q 



II II 

Bk East Asia 

zuo 


Cheung Kang 

2130 

2 L 10 

China Uant 

1470 

1840 

Green island 



Hang 5 m Bor* 

4675 

4775 

Henderson 

3 J 0 

1375 

China Gas 

1120 

mo 

HK Electric 

135 

ISO 

HK Realty A 

1110 

12 

HK Hotels 

3425 

33 

HK Land 

155 

150 

HKShong Bonk 

770 

7 JB 

HK Tshwhone 

9.65 

950 

HK YaumOiel 

AOS 

4 

HK Whort 

»A 5 

770 

Hutch Whompod 

36 J 0 

27 J 80 

Hvaon 

1*1 

043 

lull City 

am 

198 

Jam in* 

1280 



1 SJ 2 Q 

1140 

Kowloon Molar 



Miramar Hotel 

52 

54 _» 

New warn 

B 40 

BAS 

SHK Prow 

13 

1350 

Slehix 

NA 


5 wiro Podflc A 

29 


TaJ Cheum 

205 

110 

WflhKwm 

075 

077 

Wing On Co 

IM 

1 J 0 

Wiraar 

1 

£05 

world Infl 

250 

ZOO 

Hum Sent Index : 
Previous : 17 S 2 S 1 

1712 J 2 




21 M0 223 
tusi) 


712 
344J0 34150 
727 JO 227 

34450 345 


AECI 

Anoio American 

Anglo Am GeW 

Barlows 

Blrvoor 

Buftals 
De Beers 
Drletonrein 
Elgndt 


940 950 

3775 3800 

21000 31000 

1358 1350 
1825 1850 
KM 9491 
1550 1510 
5575 5600 
1800 1795 


GFSA 
Harmony 
HI void Steel 
Kloof 
Nedoank 
Pres Stern 
Rusolal 
SA Brews 
Si Helena 
Sasql 

West Holding 


3900 3900 
3375 3350 
605 605 
2500 2500 
975 990 
NA — 
2525 2550 
825 825 
4525 4650 
887 9W 
NA — 


Composite Stock Index : T309M 
Previous : NA 


London 


AA Carp 
Allled-Lvons 


StTVw SI 14k 
293 


Anglo Am Gold S65V, *63 V, 


Ass Brn 
Ass Dairies 
Barclavt 


BAT. 

Beedtam 

B1CC 

BL 


244 

142 

462 

417 


Blue Circle 
Group 


BOCI 
Boats 
Bowater Indus 

BP 

brn Home St 

Bril Telecom 

Bril; 

Brttall 

BTR 
Burmah 
Coble Wireless 
Codbtrfv Scltw 
Charter Can* 
Commercial U 
CoinGoM 
Courtaulds 


313 

S93 

324 

255 

313 

404 

373 

204 

46S 


264 

140 

45* 

482 

295 

303 

235 

30 

593 

312 

237 

315 

60S 

30 

205 


147 

273 

239 

514 


Paige tv 
Beers* 


De .. 
Distillers 
DrlefatUein 
FHons 
Free 3t Ged 
GEC 

GertMXMem 

GKN 

GfekOC 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Gwlnneia 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ter 

Imperial Group 


490 

495 

517* 

4S3 


743 
274 

1521/32)535/44 
3W 393 
758 
307 
9*. 




Land seeurMtes 


Lucas 


734 

218 

£ 

764 

512 

192 

<70 

190 


719 


Racal Elect 

Rtmdlgnteln 
Rank 
Reed mil 
Reuters 


792 

142 

S77V* 

474 

07 

334 


763 

305 

993 

221 

445 

719 

220 

334 

321 

749 

509 

1C 

470 

192 

520 

499 

714 

49 

304 

134 

794 

136 

576 

40 

492 

331 


Ravat Dutch C 44 19/44 44 5/32 
RTZ 5«f 549 

Saatchf 76Q 750 

Sahtsburv 384 378 

Sears HoWlnas i it <n 


Shell 

STC 

SM Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tate and Lvie 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
T.l.Graup 
TrmmgorHm 

Ultramar 
Unilever £ I 

United Biscuits 
Vickers 
Woo! worth 


F.T.88 index : him 
P revious : 11214a 
P.TAEJ80 index : 1451 Je 
Pravteus : 144U9 


mnaa 


Bonce Comm 
OgohoMs 
Crrd Hal 
Erktanla 
Form Walla 
Flat 

Cetera If 

Italeementt 

1 taigas 

Italmoblliarl 

MctBobanca 

Montedison 

NBA 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rinoscante 

SIP 

SME 

Sfda 

Stondo 

stet 


3180 

12500 12480 
15440 14470 
5009 4956 
49790 48700 
12990 13000 
50500 SONS 
2099 2099 
142850142000 
140900140000 
2490 2470 
3519 3525 
7900 7895 
3384 3410 
131000728400 
1010 102S 
2480 3m 
1300 T3W 
4940 4810 
15400 15410 
3647 3449 


MIB Correal Index : 1177 
Prevtwst uca 


AirUauM# 
Alsteom AH. 
Av Dassault 
Banealre 
BIC . 
Bongraia 
■aavwes 
BEN -GO 
Camriour 
Otorawm 
Club Mad 
Da/ty 
Dumcx 
EH-AouWalna 
Europe I 
Gm Eoux 


Lafarge Cop 

Learaad 

Lasbrar 

roreat 

Martcil 

Motra 

Merita 

Mlchofln 

Meet Hennessy - 

Moulinex 

Otddentale 
Pgrnod Ric 
Perrier 
Peuaaat 
Prttdemes . *• 
RadJatechn 
Redautc 
Roussel Uetcf 

Sanofl 

Skis Rosstpnoi 
Tetemecan - 
Thomson CSP 
Total 


03 ser 

410 400 

iin 1140 
027 Mo 
518 510 

1M3 1650 

■45 BIS 
2400 2410 

mo 2460 
701 742 

491 48U0 
im 1915 
852 849 

ZU 2 HU 0 
790 745 

772 778 

MM 1410 
,490 <70 

2380 2325 
755 750 

2754 2537 
1546 15*8 
^ WB 
Z3S0 2300 
1480 U55 
2145 2099 
6090 0 

775 703 

783 n* 
457 445 

460 4S2 

3d 339 JB 
.395 410 

IBM I860 
1430 1447 
480 <38 

M98 1430 
2920 2790 
675 ■ 437 

M3 3» 


cac index : was 
P revious; 23930 


1 

Close 

prev. 

[ | fnig^CiiMni ' | 

Cold Storage 

3.04 

308 

DBS 

550 

575 

Frasor utnw 

630 

645 

Haw Par 

107 

204 

lltchcapn 

111 

111 

Mai Banking 

5.15 

U5 

OCBC 

SJ0 

845 

OU8 

177 

275 

DUE 

129 

120 

ShangrWa 

2.18 

N-Q. 


149 

148 


247 

2JB 




S Steamship 

OB3 

0J4 

St Tradtna 

180 

181 

United Owsreeas 

143 

144 

UOB 

352 

350 

I JtraUi Times Ind Ipdex : 

rtMo 




11 fjfrtrhnlm | ! 

AGA 



AltaLovol 

. 245 

24) 

ASOO 

317 

310 

Astro 

fll 

514 


147 

143 

Botkfen 

175 

175 

Etectroluj, 

182 

178 


196 

193 

Eseolto 

415 

JU 

Pharmacia 

190 

181 

5aab-SC0nI« 

500 

500 

SondvHt 

600 

& 

Skanska 

105 

SKF 

253 

344 

SwedfshMatch 

224 

lPl 

Volvo 

252 

240 

I AffotmoflrMn Index : 42*39 1 

Prevkxa : cilia 



11 sy**y 11 

ACI 

ua 

-in 

ANZ 

672 

645 

BHP 

848 

8JB 

Bora! 

3.15 

113 


155 

M8 


8 

B 


4JS 

604 

Comal co 

U8 

1JB 

CRA 

546 

134 

CSR 

136 

133 

Dimiep 

140 

135 

Ciders Ixl 

280 

275 

ICI AuatroUo 

MB 

116 

Mage) Jan 

105 

2 

MIM- 

168 

242 

Mver 

155 

», 

NOT Aust Betlfe 

678 

News Carp 

876 

87* ■ 

n Broken Hill- . 

118 

113 

Pyoldoo 

QW Coal Trust 

355 

152 

•« 

Santos 

542 

SJ4 

Thomas Nation 

245 

245 

western Mining 
westpac BoniSw. 

.138 

-458 

iS 

woodiMe 

127 

tjs. 

AO Ordtparlos- Index : 99149 

PravHM : 9B4J9 



1 two» II 

Akai 

- 634 

-410* 

ASoWChom 

714 

m 

Asontctess 

877 

866 

Banket Tokyo 

725 . 


512 

53|! 

Canon 

Caste . 

1130 

1060 

1840 

CJtoh 

. » 

392 

Dal tMmKtn PrWt 

. 1250 

12 20 


BT2 

Ml 


772 

■ 366 

Fanuc 

Full Bonk 

TWO 

1440 

M30 


Full Photo 

Fulttsu 

Hitachi 

.Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Lines 
Kollma 
Kansel Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirk, Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Kids 
Mateu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi eiK 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
MlteuMshl COra 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsubishi 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK 1 mutators 
NlkkoSec 
Nippon Kooaku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Pioneer 
Rtaon 
Sharp 
Shlmani 

Shhwtsu Chemical' 
Sony 

Sumltoroa Bank 
Sumitomo Cham 
Sum Homo Marine 
Sum I tamo Moral 
Tataeicorp 
Talstio Marine 
TakcdaChem 
TDK 
Tell In 

Tokla Marine 
Tokyo Elec Power 

Tappan Printing 

Tarav ind 
TaNdba 
Toyota 
YamalcniSec 


Cmmkan-uoda via AP. 


the 32 \ 


I Sales Stock ' - 
245AMtPrco 
1700 AdOonds 
11935 AooicoE 




. 161001 

11500 Alta Nat . 

5332 At co | f 

11 HI BP Canada' 
70154 Bank BC 
88828 BanfcNS - 
43643 Barrtcfeo 
OBatonAI • 
2 Bonanza R 
OSralafiM 


ilL 




Nlkkei/CLJ- index : 
Previous : 114*702 
How Index: hblsi 
Previous : M 8 L 22 


12759JJ 


. 4SB00CCLB f . • 
12400 Cad FTV • 
6410 Campsau 1 . 

SKBSPf 

1319 Can Trust . 
, lOUCTuns . 
J97236 Cl Bk Can 
JT711BDCTlre At 
’ 400C UttI B 

2400 Cara 
-llUgcoianosg - 

. 5T00ContrtTT ■ 
. 32300 cinepisx ■ • 

N OTQO CptiH’Bf 

57837 CTL Bank 
arscoseka R.; .. 
ICOeCanranA - 
K330Crawnx 
. 192S0 Czar hs ' '• ' 
jineBPocviDev . 
MOOamA -- 

KSSSSft?: 

,7i00DlcknM B 


High . Law .dose Oa. 

■ SI 716 1716 . 171V- ^6 
IP 1816 . 1»A— ,Vk 

ow mn 'aDw-p’w 

WV% » .J9Uf.- . . 

■ JJTJfc TTVi 17frr.lt 

isVi .15%— V% 
SWH 196b 196b 
SUM 19Vb lfli— Vi 
Sion levs mb+ ib 
SXWi 3ZIA 22V.— V, 
■85 498 - . '5 1 +10 

314M- MVb 14 Vr— 16 
23. 18* .T44 -. — 5. 
Ml - 21' . . 2T. + « 
370 Ml. 310 —15 
385 379 - 385 +10 

S146b.1M:,l<)b— 16 
.8996- 9« 9M+.V6 
W; -201 MSB C . 
S26U 2516 2566— 16 
sill* 12M12W— 16. 

32lb - 3M6+ (6 
SI7M 166b 17. 
n»k 15V* ' 151*.- 

T4V4 .1466 +.« 
/g 716 .27. . -27 — l* 
S24« 346b 3466 > - 
tMJt 36 ■ 3666+1 H 

S43W.-4366 43W 

5M ltt . .10 V 

M2M 4166. «Tb— k 

■ 896b W -916 

81 lfW 196b + 16 
8T76b- 1716. TT%% 

*93b m 
saovt a) 


fMB Mertand E 
17212 Motson At 
. 901 Moison B 
IWMorahy 
9580 Nabisco L 
81930 Noranda 
24 Q 33 Noraen 
97234 Nva AltA t 
I 42400 NowscoW 
|M7409NuW*t5p A 

asssv, 

30100 Poe w AlTM 


Jggf 0 "^ 


.— -PonCsai P 
1425 Pemtkna 

«gP{wPpW 

19200 Placer 
44 00 QueSlurg o 
1700 Roy rack! 

7 W 5 Rodpoth 

IWtRwBtrSp 
3030 Rogers A 

2 ND Roman 






:n* + 6 b ■ 

3»9b 


.+.-»■ 


mva .... 

283 281 201 — 3 

- SICVb OTfc iWt-Yl 

s 2 » + lb 

80 330 +10 

JgW ' 51b M + %b 
MS *m- 440 -81 
SUV* MMi Wj+ H 
*TMi tnb. UMi + ta 
Sdlb .«fc .gJPjH 


8766 76hl 


l48BDOotacco ' 
3 Donohue 


Zarftek 


Adkt 

Alusuiue 

Awlophen 

Bank Lou 

Brown BoverL 

CibaGoigy 

Credit Sutfs* 

Eiectrowatt 

Irrterdbceuni 

Jacob Sucnanj 

Jeiman 

Landis Syr - 

Moevenpiek 

Nestle . 

OcrUken-fr 

RoeheGMjy 

Trai. f tt m 

aanaoz 


smear 

surveillance 

Swhsglr 


iaoi 

. 1182a Du Pont A 
195173 Dylex A • 
■SO Bdhamx 
ZO ErtKo .. 
20300 gquttvSvr 

. "faspSTinti ■■ 
, Z704q C Falcon C 
{-,24560 Pienbnige ■ 

f unto Fed miiA- 

W Fed Plan / 
xsOFCftvFin 
tOO OencflsA .; 

. ^SZOO Geoc Comp 
408633 Geocrude. 
2m Gibraltar ■ 
19423 OoWoorvf 
*30 Goodyear 
J r 5104 GL Forest, 

1 - 30 Gt Pacific 
lSbGrwiM'. 
1200 Hawker 
, 15959 HOVwD 
j 32400HeaslMt ' , 
250 HoUtawr i 
. 27»V4BoyCo - 
'-34683 tmasce ' 
20frindar 


«3e .7Vb.. ^ 6 J+ 66 


Union Bank 


-2400 2150 


MW 2416 

25% J7H 1766— 1% 

■ 36 V 0 + lb' 

- M- 14 + W- 

871b 61k ,. 01b— lb 

STVb • T 7W+ lb 
ra* 21 ano+ jb 

«4Jb -MU 14W 

1716 176b+ Vb 
ra*-Wk nub- ib 

■ 5?“ 381ft 2814+66 

s* .»•+* 

mi I :=# 

524 .324- M — lb 

SS ?»r. am . 
fig* 2 %'JSP*-* 

■i - « K-fK 

; SStS otr ■ ; ^ : 

;<ss vesssfe- s* ^ »r5» : 


iap — .... 

8332 7 Seers Con 
22735 Shell Can 
23506 Sherri tr 
5£400SouTtem 
38*5 Spar Aarof 
, T“|fBrodcit 
JgiSteicoA 

msteepR 
78* Tara -. 

2111 TedcCorA 
91818 TecfcB t 
MfJtaCan 

«B1 Thom N A 
g3g Tor Dm Bk 
'JjMTwWar ai 
,13 I rodB ^ A f 
WWTmsMt 

mss."- 

wSssr 1 " 

««y« 2 i Af 

»2 »J»wiwua 

fR Beor 
^0*01 tales 


• u, 


330 300 330 

*»Vk W6fc- 191b— \L 
O0 20 M 
0618 2S« 256b— ft 
OSU. 28V, 2016 
S14ft 1416 1446+ ft 
816M Uft 1516+16 
Mft 466 566+ft 

9181b 1816 1Kb+ lb 
44 40 40 

SR4 8ft 8ft 
270 242 242 — B 
83«6 3416 3416 + ft 
SUft 13ft 1316— ft 
Wft 9ft 9ft— ft 

»4ft 34ft 34ft 

JJ716 Oft 171* 
ramu 20V. Wft— ft 
Wft M 34 — ft 

«0 400 <508—5- 

.!» 7ft + vs 
54ft 14ft MVb— ft 
W4ft 44 44ft+ ft 

*12 IP* 12 + ft . 
S3* 13ft 13ft 
445 4SJ 440 
52a 2a 28 + ft - 
gift IP* lift 
13< 23ft 2346- 
.716 746 

- 1*0* w»fc+ V* 
3«b 2516— ft 

822 22. 22 
*2*6 22ft 22ft— ft 

«5 Z10 215+5 
260 260 260 — 5 ■ 

Sinb IBM ]8ft 
SMI* 1416 1416 

13ft 13ft— ft 
HJUt 31 31ft + ft 
TO 22ft 22ft • 
*5 24ft 24ft — ft 
« . “ft 32 + J 

WH 2gb 26ft + V, 

. 3K 2 95 305-5- 

37 27 — ft 

» WeMVi+ft, 
™ MO 325 +10 
21ft 21 ft- ft 

P J 1 - 

izft law, 

IX 1 3X ,+ V ' 

- 415 40S MS — s 

SS w 19ft 

r 

- 


*11 L' 






'V 


W 


+ 1* 


if . ^1,,. 

• l". *‘6-. 




T5S 311 Index: 


Ctae PcMoib 


gowk M ont 

4 ®g®omtv«rB 
CB Pak 


Hoc. 22 | ' 


•H- 




mainOHs ■ 
' lllMMI 


; 41001. mm—**** 
HoUO+att Thom 

, 7456 rmw-flm 

A50IP8CO . 
JflMlVOCBB .-. 

wmi ymiiAaL 
iJItN JD 8 nn« 


.MOCH . 

■JHSBi.- 

ijigSr- 


5*g6 Provloo - 

5*wlOank 


li^tRovTrsico 

L5!2*«efnbraA| 


Tom* mSSjndg. « 
Indo gi rk us toatx: 


( 4 BW cteae a»a_ 

•wft 124 m 12 ft— u 
*U 12ft l2ft+ £ 
T23V. zjft 2316 
gm IN* n _ ft 

«1 31- 37 - ft 

IS 13V, 1SL Vb 

B-gss;? 

SS? 22ft 3266+ ft 


■n . -1 




\ft p -:_. 


P - 




Sx-yir -ViSf* Tr it. ... 5 -' ./AiAT-; ' 


! ^'T-?.^* i B 8 SEgkq ciMB 


v>- C, 

















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24, 1985 



Page 19 


SPORTS 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

% " 

,]Michigan Bowls Over the Big Ten 

SK.t 


'Leadl likely to Qint Davis Cup Team 

'.a CB »MWTfimm f rjn _ * 

i/\rl - 

entry] 


:S.i. 

yearns 


FRANKFURT (AP) — Ivan Lendl, the world’s 
(player, apparentfi ' - 

r.-J.eam, 


^yv^P^yhas'deaded to quit C3^x*odo3dSlSn^ 
sir ■ „ , «ennan sports news agency SID quoted his manager. 
^Gny Solomon, as sayin g . 

Scdomon, contacted in New York, denied reports Lendl bad applied 



Berra Finds Himself With a Hot Potato 

Little Joke in North Dakota Is Becoming 23 Tons of Fun in New Jersey 


A. Potato 


By Eileen Putman 

The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — As Yogi Bara is discov- 
ering, it ain’t over *tfl It’s all over your lawn: 23 
tons of iL 

The baseball Hall of Famer, who has man , 
aged the New York Yankees and the Mers. and 
now coaches the Houston Astros, made the 
mistake of telling North Dakota potato farmers 
that he was sfeg pKgii of their giaiw* to fam* 35 
one of the largest potato-growing areas in the 
United States. He also said he was a potato fan. 

Thai was all it loot 

Twenty-three tons of potatoes are being load- 
ed on a truck in East Grand Forks, Minnesota, 
bound for Berra's hame in Montclair, New 
Jersey. They are to arrive Tuesday. 

“Boy, I just asked for a bag!" Berra said by 


telephone. M I guess that's how it got started. I 
wonder bow long they last I didn't expect that 
much.” 

“Forget iL We can’t keep these potatoes,'* 
said Berra’s wife. Carmen. 

Berra's surplus began sprouting last June 
when he was pursuing one of his favorite pas- 
sions. golf, in the Roger Maris cancer benefit 
tournament in Fargo, North Dakota. 

“He saw all this farmland and (he first thing 
he said was, 'What do you grow here?* We said 
potatoes and he said he loved them, could we get 
him some,” said Vince Lmdsirom. executive 
director of the Fargo Convention and Visitors 
Bureau. 

“He said, ‘You don't have enough potatoes 
here to fill my front yard,'” added Lloyd 
Schmidt, executive director of the Red River 


Valley Potato Growers Association, which rep- 
resents 860 potato fanners in North Dakota and 
Minnesota. 

Then the growers suggested shipping Berra a 
few hundredpounds. But by the time they had 
finished their annual convention this month, 
they no longer were talking small potatoes. 

“We've got a whole truckload, " lindstrom 
said. “We'll just have a little fun there and then 
well turn around and bring them down to New 
York Gry and give them to people who can use 
them for T hanks giving.” 

The potatoes, which are being shipped in 50- 
pound boxes, are the norland variety, a popular 
red spud that has helped make the Rea River 
Valley region the third -largest potato-producing 
area in the country. 

Or so says the association. 



Y. Berra 






;*.• . ■ 


' .*V- 




f 1 

j r 


;,r.v — 

5 *t*«r *‘ 

S'* *«' * * 


i Q^Nihilator Is Beaten by Armbro Dallas 

CHERRY HILL, New Jersey (AP) — Armbro Dallas, a 34-1 shot. 
Njhflaiorin the final strides Thursday m^u and went the 5770,000 

highly favored NiMator, driven by Bill ODonnefl, had led all the 
=c acw- vay only ’to have his run of 14 straight victories ended. He was trying to 
standaidbied to earn $3 millifln. In recent weeks >3ro 
had lost twice to Nihflaior, by 4*4 and 3M lengths. 

ir die Record 

®*ny Faust’s future as coach at Notre Dame will be made in two 
■^tSi^veeks, after the Nov. 30 game with Miami of Florida, the athletic 
director, Gene Corrigan, said. (AP) 

John McEnroe definitely will play in next week’s Australian Open 
-jt- earns championship, said the tournament director, Cohn Stubs. McEn- 
01 LOg oe has had a shoulder injury. (AP) 

- nat Merv y n Fernandez, the game-breaking wide receiver for the British 
K®fliw u),umbia Lions * won Sdienley Award as the Canadian Football 
outstanding player for 1 985. (AP) 

«. Dorota and MatgoraabaThKa, the twin wodd dass skim who married 
brothers, may not be able to c om pe t e this because the 
^■^Stolish federation refuses to let than ski under French colors. (UPI) 
MBan fired manager Hario Castagner three days before playing 
lea « a f ]e ? d ^ Juwntus. Thejob went to the fanner international . 
^ £ teft wm ® er ' Mario Corso, manager of Inter’s youth team. (AP) 

Quotable 

rOm 11 * ^ Schroeder of die' Washington Redskins, on his minor-league 
t baseball careen “I helped put Dwight (Gooden) in. the majors, and he 
d>Eic;.idped put me in footbalL" (AP) 

fil , . 

nrici " 

'-"ttt'R- 
' ; &ps; 
era::' 



Ski Racing Called 
'Bonanza at Bank 9 


ThtAnoondfrni 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 



zypas. 
id Me 


"IV. ii-K « 


- v-n qi 


* t 'Wi 

r*s^**> : 
m :• ? 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AtMMNcaivMM 

' . . W I. Pet . CB 
Boston 9 2 ' an"— 

Philottelphta b 5 .545 3 - 

New Jeraov 7 r ao M 

Washington 4 • an 3*4 

New York J > JR 4U 

Central Division 

MUwookM 12 4 .750 — 

Dntroll 8 5 415 fflft 

ttonta J 6 J* 3 » 

J B JK M 
5 9 J57 t 

Indiana • ' 1 J jn ita 

WESTERN CONFERENCH 
MktMOSt DMthM 

18 2 M3 — 

lowston 10 1 M W . 


College Resnhs 

EAST 

MMuynaatJiira 7L Woof Ubertv J* 

Yabfva 10 X ME Bit*, 50 
SOUTH; 

Loubtiana CatL 43, ArV.-AAonMa»ito 5» 
Presttyfrlon 7X Eraklnt 66 
MIDWEST 

Baker; Kan. M, Bethany. Kan. n 
Banedlcttne, Kan. 7A McPtMraoa 45 
Bethel 75, Concordia, Minn. 44 
Cent Arkansas 54. Drary 5S 1 
Franklin BB> Huntington JB 
Kansas Wesievon 42. Bartteswffle WOsiyn 57 
McPherson 78. Baker 74 
Ma. Western 11 A Harris-Slow* 72 
Oklahoma City 107, Kansas Newman 80 
5T.- Francis, lnd.04. Indiana Tech 73 
St. Xavier 82, Olivet Nanrane 73 . 

TrWt *S, Defiance so 

SOUTHWEST 

John Brown 80. Hendrix 78. 2 OT 


Joe Kocar was beaten to the ptmch by the Los Angeles penalty box- The Red Wings also lost the game* 5-4, when 
Kings’ Jay Wells, although both players were sent to the Phil Sykes scored with 1:01 left in overtime in Detroit. 

Islanders Again Fit to Be Tied in Boston 



fean Antonio 

... 4 - 

7 

AU 

4V» 

Ok to. Baptist 81, Dallas Baptist 77. OT 

VJIali 

4 

7 

Mi 

<Vj 

TOURNAMENTS 

tarttoa 

5 

.7 

A17 

5 

Jo# Mood*, Memorial Ttooraamanf 

IsS^rartwnto 

4 

8 

J33 

* 

Sam mooli ■ 

la. Lakers 

Pacific DTvblOB 
..M 2 

A44 

_ 

Gtonvlllo 83. Union 72 

Salem. W. VO. 82. Concord 78 

via Aopto NIT 

Portland 

9 

6 

■60S 

. 3 

(AtHaastml 

IGoidon Stato 

7. 

7 

-5B0 

4V2 

- - lunwiNi 

1 LA. CHmra 

5 

8 

JBS 

4 

AJat-Birmlnphom 71, Texas a&m (8 . 

.Seattle 

4 

9 

JOB 

7 

Duke 66 , Lamar 42 

'Phoaabc 

2 

11 

.154 

9 


JV-. »-•. l.V 




THURSDAYS RESULTS 

' uam% »»**-** 
Dim 35 48 2) 21—121 

English 7431 2-5 3A Nott 8-15 54 23; AbcM- 

Jabtxsr 15-24 2-3 32. M. Coonsr 7-1* 5-5 28. So- 
i: Lot Anaales Lakara 42 luucas, AML 
uHlabbar 10); Dwnwr 4S (Natl 7). Assists; 
^Las Anacte Lauri 33 (Johnson 18) ; Oenwr 
'^23 I English 4). 

Portland 34 « 24 23— m 

rCUA. aippers M 25 27 25—188 

- • •” VandgwMho9-18S4 23. Canr 0-173-7 21 ;M. 

Johnson 11-20 5-7 27, Whit* 8-12 2-3 U. Ra- 
... -''T»ands; Portland 54 (Thomason 13); LasAn- 
2. ‘.galas dinners 45 (Can* 101. Assists: Porttana 
25 (PaxsanS); Los Anoeteatopers 29 (Etf- 
wants WJ. 

"... sj[jNd^E*aN5 M M «1 22-131 

' - '^ j T ^ra me n to 24 24 if it— 97 

:. -V ^ • ,n_ister 7-n 5-5 if, Bnwr Ms l-T 19, Com- 
... -jr^mtossB-ni-l 17; Johnson 12-1844 28. Draw 4- 

- ' 103-411. RttMoatfs: MHwouJica 41 (Monalaf 

“. 71 ; SacranMnto4i (Johnson 8). Assists: MU- 

waufcsa 37 (Prassor 14). Soodmento 24 
(Thous 7). 


Transition 


FOOTBALL 


ATLANTA— WMvad Ja« Jackson. Una- 
backer. 

GREEK BAY— Sionad Maurice Turner, 
naming bock. Ptocsd Horton Hocklabv, run- 
ning bock, on Inlnred reserve. - - 

HOUSTON— Signed Mtke Morasiei, mnirter- 


LJL RAIDS RS-Ptacad LvfeAlzodo, defen- 
sive end, on Mured reserve. Waived Ricky 
Williams, defensive bock. Added Don Bessll- 
Ueu,sately,andDavldPonasr,aeten*tvg line- 
man. to to* raster. 

■ NEW ORLEANS— Claimed Malcolm Bara- 
mll, wide recetver. Ptaiced David Rncklev, 
defensiv* Back, on Inlorad reserve. . 

HOCKEY 


Hockey 


5NHL S tanding s 


LOS ANGELES— Recalled Glenn Heoly, 
gaattender, to replace Boo JantcytoMio Js 
serving a five-day suspemian tor a stlck- 
swtnalna Mdden) on Nov. 3 against PhttcKM- 
ehta. 

PITTSBURGH— RecedHd Bab Error and 
Ted Nolen, left wings. 


The Associated Press 
BOSTON — The New York Is- 
landers are one of the better teams 
in the National ■Hockey T-engie 
power, but crazy things happen to 
them in Boston Garden. 

“I don’t know what it is, maybe a 
psychological barrier,” their coach, 
Al Arbour, said Thursday night af- 
ter the Boston Bruins battled back, 
from 3-1 and 4-2 deficits for a 44 
tie with his team. 

The Islanders, 0-5-3 since Nov. 
6, 1980, in Boston, received a cou- 
ple of breaks, such as goals by 
Brent Sutter and John Tondli on 
shots that went through the legs of 
goah'e Doug Keans. 

But the New York defenseman 
Stefan Persson accidentally put 
wo of Boston’s goals past his goal- 
ie, Billy Smith. Another goal was 
set up when the Bruins were in the 
attacking zone and the officials 
ruled that a New York player had 
kicked the puck back over the blue 
line, nullifying an offside calL 
Then, in the 5-minute sudden- 
death overtime; the Islanders out- 
shol the Bruins by 6-0 only to be 
frustrated by Keans' acrobatic 
goal ten ding. He stopped Mike 
Bossy three times and Ken Mor- 
row, Pat LaFontaine and Bryan 
Trottier each once. 

“It was a good hockey team and 
Tm not sure which team deserved 
to win,” said Butch Goring, a for- 
ma 1 star for the Islanders before 
being traded to the Bruins last Jan- 
uaiy, then winding up their rookie 
coach. *Tm very happy with the tie. 

“They came in herewith a lot of 
intensity for a particular game they 
wanted to win and we had our work 
cut out. We needed a big game 
from our guys and we got it 


NHL FOCUS 


- “We had some great opportuni- 
ties and we had some not so great 
opportunities.” 

Although that winless Streak 
was extended to five games (0-2-3), 
the lie enabled the Bruins to con- 
tinue as the NHL’s only team un- 
beaten at home (6-0-2) this season. 

Neither team could score for 31 
minutes. Then Ken Linseman was 
credited with his seventh goal of 
the season when Persson intercept- 
ed a goal-mouth pass and flipped 
the puck past Simth. 


. That Duke goal set off the Island- 
ers. Wiv i seven minutes they had 

retaliated with goals by Suuct, 
Tondli and Pat LaFontaine. 

“You just knew that when they 
were down 3-1 they were going to 
come at you," Arbour said. “They 
had nothing to lose.” 

Arbour was correct. The rookie 
Dave Pasin scored his sixth goal, on 
a pass from the rookie Kraig Nlen- 
huis. 44 seconds into the third peri- 
od despite protests by the Islanders 
that the Brains were offsides 

LaFontaine regained the two- 
goal advantage with his 11th goal 


on a breakaway a couple of min- 
utes later. But Lins eman scored 
again at 4:35, before breaking a 
bone in his right hand that wQl 
prevent him from playing for at 
least two weeks. 

The Bruins continued to press 
the attack and Nienbuis finally tied 
the score at 4 at 15:07 when he got 
his 10th goaL He dug the puck out 
along the boards and his 40-foot 
drive deflected off Persson’s stick 
and past Smith. 

“It was a fairly even game,” 
Morrow said. “We had some good 
chances at the end, but Keans came 
up with the saves.” 


By Janet Nelson 

Sew J'nrt Timer Service 

NEW YORK — The perception 
persists that ski racers do not make 
much money — that they are poor 
relatives in the world of athletes. 
Phil and Steve Mahre, the twins 
who won a mound of trophies be- 
fore retiring at the end of last sea- 
son, now’ are talking about the 
mounds of dollars they took home 
for their victories on skies. 

“It was bonanza at the bank,” 
said Phil Mahre. who spent IB 
years on the U.S. ski team. “No- 
body talks about the money in- 
volved in ski racing because it's 
supposed to be an amateur sport. 
But it's becoming more and more 
apparent that there is big money to 
be made by the top racers.” 

The Mahres discuss the business 
of skiing in their new book, “No 
Hill Too Fast," written with John 
Fry. Phil Mahre said be made 
5500,000 in his best season and 
Steve Mahre said he made close to 
S 300,000. They estimate that Inge- 
mar Steomark of Sweden makes 
almost SI million a year. 

The change in amateur-eligibil- 
ity rules began, the Mahres said in 
a recent interview, after an Austri- 
an racer, Karl Schranz, was sent 
home from the 1972 Winter Olym- 
pics in Sapporo, Japan, for suppos- 
edly accepting money from equip- 
ment manufacturers. "The next year 
the International Olympic Ctan- 
miltee liberalized the policies gov- 
erning payments to athletes. 

For ski racers, this meant they 
could take money from equipment 
manufacturers so long as.it was 
funnded through their national ski 
federations. 

“We signed a contract with K2 



Steve Mahre 

In 19SQ. the Mahres signed four- 
year contracts with a bindings 
manufacturer and a bootmaker, 
and changed their deal with K2 to 
straight base payments of S100.000 
a year plus victory awards. 

“In 1983 1 won the overall World 
Cup and the giant slalom and sla- 
lom titles." said Phil Mahre. “and I 
made a half a million dollars." 

In the 1984 Olympics in Saraje- 
vo. Yugoslavia,' in which Phil 
Mahre won the gold medal in the 
slalom and Steve the silver, each 
earned nearly $50,000, they said. 

While individuals on the U.S. 
team receive 100 percent of the 
money that equipment -manufac-.. 
turers pay them to use their prod- 
ucts, payments for clothing worn 
by all team members and from oth- 
skis in 1976 for a base payment of er sponsors go toward team ex- 
515, 000 a year,” said Phi Mahre. penses and administrative costs. 

"If I won a World Cup race, I “This year, skiers will also be 
would make an additional 55.000, able to sell space on their hats or 
or 53,000 for second and SI *500 for downhill helmets,” said Steve 
third, and so on down to fifth place. Mahre. “Of that money, 85 percent 
Winning a World Cup title would is to the skiers, which'should help 
be worth 520,000 and that was some of them get money support 
scaled down for second and third but the best skiers wiU still get the 
place,” most money." 


It Pays to Advertise When Down and Far Out at Upper Iowa 


By Hal Bock 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK— The idea, said 
tbe coach, Steve Fickert, came 
during a brainstorming session at 
winch the athletic department al 
Upper Iowa University was de- 
ciding just where it might find 
enough bodies to field a football 
team this fafl. 

Fickert had been hired in 
March, when most graduating 
high school players have made up 
their minds about winch college 
they want to attend So recruiting 
would not help. He was inheriting 
a program that had eight return- 
ing players from a 1-9 team. So 
the answer was not lettermen. . 

“Starring that late, I was faced 
with a numbers problem," Fickert 
said 

To solve it. Upper Iowa Uni- 
versity advertised 


“Wanted: College Football 
Players,” the ad in the Chicago 
Sun-Tunes began. “Make your 
dreams come true. Play football 
for a univeisity that is dedicated 
to excellence in education and has 
made a strong commitment to its 
athletic program.” 

The ad offered first-class uni- 
forms, “equal in quality to those 
worn by the Dallas Cowboys and 
si m il ar in design and color to the 
University of North Carolina Tar 
Heels." 

And it offered expen coaching. 
Fickerr’s credentials include slops 
at tbe University of Texas, where 
he spent last season as an assis- 
tant; Western New Mexico; 
Wayne Slate; Maryville, Tennes- 
see; Albion; Wabash and West- 
ern Michigan. 

“1 keep U-Haul in business," 
be said 


Why move from the high- 
powered Texas Longhorns, who 
play in the prestigious Division 
LA, lo the more understated ath- 
letic life of Division in? 

“The challenge," Ficken said 
“The opportunity to take a pro- 
gram that’s been down for a 
while.” 

Understandably, blue-chip 
players have found it tough to 
locate Fayette. Iowa, home of 
Upper Iowa and its 700 students. 
Nor are there scholarships al the 
Division III level, and media ex- 
posure in the Iowa Intercollegiate 
Conference is, well, limited So 
Ficken decided to shake some 
trees and see what would fall oul 
The responses, be said came in all 
shapes and sizes. 

“It’s been done before,” he 
said “I know Columbia does it in 


their student newspaper. Lots of 
times, schools will advertise for 
punters. We didn't limit it. 
though. We got about 34X1 inqui- 
ries. About 75 came and visited. 
Sixty applied 50 enrolled and 15 
stayed with the team the full sea- 
son. We got four or five starters 
out of iL" 

The’season was about what one 
would expect when the coach ar- 
rives in March and has to adver- 
tise for players. 

Upper Iowa opened with a 47- 
21 loss to Mid-America N azarene 
and dosed last Saturday with a 
62-8 loss to Sl Ambrose. In be- 
tween. the Peacocks surrendered 
45 points each to Buena Vista and 
the University of Dubuaue, and 
48 to William Penn — all losses, 
of course. They also lost to Tar- 
kio, Wanburg, Luther and Cen- 
tral 


“We were 1-9," Ficken pointed 
oul “We beat Simpson 22-20." 

Now he looks forward to next 
year. “With no scholarships. Divi- 
sion III recruiting can be tough 
sometimes," Ficken said. “Our 
goal is to be one of the five or so 
choices kids are thinking about 
when they make up their minds in 
January, February or March Las; 
year, we didn't have that opportu- 
nity." 

Was the advertising campaign 
worthwhile, then? 

“Well” the coach said "room, 
board tuition and fees is 57,700 a 
year here. The ad cost 51.500." 

That spelled a tidy profit as 
soon as it produced its first play- 
er. Tbe advertisement did much 
better than that, though, even if 
Upper Iowa's football team did 
noL 


V-* --e - W 


K ■ 


WALES CONFERENCE 
.r:-- Patrick Mvtaloa 

w l t hb gf ga 

V"? PWlOdatotlla 14 3 O 32 . 93 54 

Washington 11 4 3 . 25 79 45 


With^ Theismann’s Career Possibly Ended, Schroeder’s Begins in Earnest 



_ Edmonton 
'tolsarY 

. ,■ ' • „ yanoouvgr 
• .''.fflrmlpfa 
■ > v los Amatos 




-t-NY Jslondan « A 4 20 73 70 

:C' ’ NY Rangers 9 9 1 if 72 42 

1 t. New Jvsev 7 9 1 IS 41 48 

Pittsburgh S 11 3 13 43 74 

Adams Division 

10 a 4 24 84 48 

11 7 1 23 72 55 

10 7 . 1 21 74 42 

S g 3 19 77 77 

8 10 0 14 60 74 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 

Harris DtvWaa 

B . 7 3 19 43 48 

7 10 2 16 JB 05 

4 18 5 13' 49 77 

4- 11 -4 -.12 42 94 

3 13 3 9 45 84 

Smyttn OMstoa 

14 4 3 30 100 71 

10 4 . 3 23 85 a 

9 U 2 20 04 84 

8 9 2 18 77 86 

5 13 . 1 17 45 98 

THURSDAY'S RESULTS- 

a 3 I ■ — I 
CIS 4—4 
\ . Linseman 2 (8), posln (4), Ntonhuh (10); 

La Fontaine 2 jth, 0rcnt Salter (2), TmelH 
‘ .t-’to). Sltol* n ggah N*w York (slanders (on 

, ; • Keans) 8-15+4—37; Boston (on Smith) 1M-9- 

. -,'0—33. 

;*.• ■'■Haritart • 8 • 0-« 

..O raiMeMta 1 8 >-3 

. D. Smith (2). Howe (41 K«t (2 1). Stetson 
. "goal: Hartford (on From*) 7-8-9—24; PMto- 
' ■.'uolBnla ton (Jut) *15-9-32. 

' , t\.;Las asaetor 1 t 3 V— a 

sr Detroit i«ol-4 

Nichols (18), Lnkowlch (2), Ensfclom (2), 

- r roylur (BJ.Syket (3); Yow» (2), Gam (51. 
iY3grodnlck2 19). Shots cm gMC LMAngatos 
. L- .--Jen Stolon) 7-13-143—39: Datralt (an Eilat) a- 
.' 7-14-1—30. 

.SL Loots - 1 2 1—4 

• .r'wJtnwsoto l’l M 

. -f-'y P&stamkj (3),Lav&Ugg (4)<5utter (fliMiri- 
•“ .. - Ian (11); McCarthy (5). CtKaroai UU. SOM . 
.m Mali «. Louis -fed BMMOra)' 114 4 MJ 
vumvefohi (on Wonwtay) 11-13^—29. • 

tC ‘ j ' 


By Mii±ae£ janofsky 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — When Lawrence Taylor and 
Gary Reasons of the New York Giants sacked Joe 
Thraanann of the Washington Redskins on Mon- 
day night, breaking the quarterback’s right leg 
above the ankle, ending his season and possibly Iris 
career. Jay Schroedei's professional career began 
in earnest. 

Schroeder is si second-year National Football 
Lea gue player from UCLA, whose professional 
experience as a minor league baseball player in the 

Taranto organization had, before Monday night, 
outstripped anything he had done in football But, 

NFLPBEVIEW 

replacing Theismaxm, he completed 13 of 2D 
passes for 221 yards and a touchdown as the 

Redskins won, 23-21,' to rejoin the playoff race 
with a 6-5 record, just a game off the lead shared 
by the Giants and tbe Dallas Cowboys. 

More remarkable was that Schroeder managed 
all that against a defense ranked No. I in yards 
allowed. Now. the Giants are No. 3, and tbe Pitts- 
i Steeter? are No.1, 

who Schroeder and tbe Redskins play 
Sunday. ... 

It could be that Schroeder is too inexperienced 
to wony about starting his firstg 2 me.cn the toad, 
against a diviaori leader, in a- game both teams 

need to win to keep alive their playoff hopes. With 

the number of passes he had thrown prior to 
Monday night, eight, any defense with the posable 
exception ofTampa Bay's would appear threaten- 
ing. But tbe opposite also applies. 

“He came in and didn't nriss a beat,” said Mike 


Merriweaiher, the Steelers' left outride linebacker. 
“He scrambles a little bit like Tbeismann; it seems 
like he's from the same mold. The cranin’* pre- 
pared him welL I don’t think you can imdoresri- 
mate him, just because he's a young ball player. 
Yon still have to treat him as a guy trying to get a 
job done." 

The Steelers (6-5) have played well in recent 
weeks, winning their last three games and four of 
the last five. Brit for a month they have been 
without their regular quarterback, Mark Malone. 
In their last loss, 26-21, to Cincinnati, be had to 
leave the game with a disloca t ed big toe. He is due 
back before the playoffs. 

Hurrah's Reno Race & Sports Bode has made 
the Sieelers a 2&-point favorite in tbe game. 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 

New England (8-3) at New YoA (8-3): The Jets 
have become one of tbe best passing teams in the 

conference, but the Patriots have played very wdl 

against the pass all season, ana in big games 
defense almost always prevails. The Patriots have 
won their last six, with a 30-13 victory over the Jets 
five weeks ago. Tbe Jets then won three of then- 
next four, including last Sunday’s 62-28 roui of 
Tampa Bay. (The Jets are favored by 3ft.) 

Onchmatf (5-6) at Oevdand (5-6): Both 
have been erratic in recent weeks, but when in 
doubt go with the better defense. The Browns have 
iL Even though they had lost three games before 
beating Buffalo, most of their opponents this sea- 
son have had difficulty scoring more than two 
touchdowns. (Browns by 3.) 

Denver (8-3) at Los Angdes (7-4); The Broncos 
beat tbe Raiders twice last year, each a dose game, 
and they should win again, even though this time 
the Raiders are (he home team. Tbe Broncos have 



The Redskins’ 
new quarterback, 
Jay Schroeder, 
having; demoted 
one No. 1 defense 
in beating the 
Giants, now faces 

another tins 
Sunday in 
Pittsburgh. 


won six of their last seven, with four of the vic- 
tories decided by less than a touchdown. That 
shows character. The Raiders have a lot of charac- 
ter, too. They also have a lot of characters and a 
good defense, which means it should be another 
row scoring game. But Thursday they lost the 
defensive end Lyle Alzado, to a tom Achilles' 
tendon. (Raiders by 3 ft.) 

Miami (7-4) at Buffalo (2-9): Hus would appear 
to be an easy game for the Dolp hins . But their 
offensive line is in shambles, and if the Bills can 
mount a pass rush they might bother Dan Marino 
enough to force him into a few mktalrat (Dol- 
phins bv 914.) 

San Diego (54$) at Houston (4-7): Just when it 
appeared the Chargers would make a ran for the 
playoffs, they lost in overtime to Denver. As usual 
they ore scoring and passing with ease, but they 
only win when they play a little defense. Against 


tbeup-and-mostly-down Oilers, that should not be 
too hard. (Chargers by 4.) 

Ind ian apolis (3-8) at Kansas City (3-8): Tbe 
Chiefs have lost their last seven by anywhere from 
3 to 28 points. The Colts have lost tbor last three, 
with horrendous defensive play. If the Chiefs only 
bad a running game, they would have a chance to 
win. But they usually do not, so they probably wiU 
noL iChiefs by 4.) 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

Atlanta (2-9) at Chicago (11-0): Tbe Bears may 
have one of the best defensive units ever. In the 
last two months, opponents have scored 10, 19, 10. 
7, 9, 10, 3 and 0 points. If the Cowboys came up on 
the short end of a 444) drubbing, what hope have 
the Falcons? Not much, except that they just beat 
the Rams, 30-14, and sometimes upsets beget 
upsets. Sometimes. (Bears by 16.) 

Detroit (6-5) at Tampa Bay (1-10): The Bucca- 
neers' defense outdid itself last Sunday in tbe 62- 

28 loss to the Jets, but the Lions probably will not 
pose as mud) of a problem. When they beat the 
Buccaneers the fourth week of the season, the 
score was only 30-9. Since, the Lions have lost 
more games then they have won, but this one looks 
like another victory for them, even though the 
Buccaneers intend to give Steve Young his first 
start at quarterback. (Lions by I.) 

Green Bay (5-6) at Los Angeles (8-3): it would 
not be too shocking if tbe Packers steal this one. 
The Rams have lost three of their last four because 
their running game has failed them. And their 
defense, one of the best m the league earlier in the 
season, is cracking. The Packers have won their 
last two with the old and improved Lynn Dickey. 
A victory here would put them back in the wild- 
card chase. (Ram by 5.) 


New Orleans (3-8) at Minnesota (5-6): This is 
about the last game that could mean something to 
the Vikings. A loss virtually dashes any playoff 
hopes; a victory gives them a slim chance. They 
should get the victory, even though they lost their 
last two. The Saints have not scored more than two 
touchdowns in one game in a month and have a 
six-game losing streak. (Vikings by 7‘.i.) 

Philad elp h i a (6-5) at Dallas (7-4): The Cowboys 
were absolutdy awful last Sunday. Against the 
Bears the critical issue was their offensive line, 
which has periodically been their biggest headache 

in recent seasons. The Eagles won the previous 
game this year, 16-14, without much of a pass rush. 
If this time they can pressure Danny White, who is 
likely to play after having his neck jammed by the 
Bears, the Eagles should win again and continue 
their push for the playoffs. (Cowboys by 51) 
New York (7-4) at St Laras (4-7): This might 
have been a breather for the Giants; instead, they 
lost to the Redskins, thereby making this a critical 
game. The Cardinals do not score enough to worry 
many teams. The Giants brat Sl Louis the third 
week of the season, 27-17, but they hardly ran 
other defenses out of the stadium, which means 
this will be dose and, probably, a Giants' victory- 
(Giams by 24.) 

INTERCONFERENCE 
Seattle (6-5) at San Frandsco (6-5): The motiva- 1 
(ion for winning is tbe same for each club, the 
congestion among teams fighting for wildcard 
spots. These teams have played only twice, in the 
early 1970s, with each winning once. Each has won 
twice in the last three weeks, but the 49ers appear 
to have two advantages: they beat better teams 
and they are playing at home Monday night. 
(49ers by 6.) 









Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUBDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23-24, 1985 


POSTCARD 


Cajun Pride Pays Off 


By David McCormick 

The Associated Press 

T AFAYEITE Louisiana — Ii 
-L-* did not seem like a shrewd 
career move when Glen Pitre, fresh 
out of Harvard and dr eaming of 
becoming a filmmaker, returned 
borne to Bayou Lafourche to work 
on his father's shrimp boats. 

“People thought I was crazy,” 
recalled Pitre, a working-class Ca- 

C whose Ivy League scholarship 
made him the pride of the 
family. 

His parents and siblings had to 
wonder when he showed no interest 
in going to Hollywood but returned 
home and cast them in a series of 
documentaries about shrimpers 

and other ordinary Cajun folk, 
those Louisiana natives descended 
from the French immigrants called 
Acadians. 

Then the documentaries started 
winning awards in New York and 
Cannes, and before long Pitre had 
directors such as Robert Redford 
and Sydney Pollack coming to 
Louisiana to talk about making a 
full-length feature film. 

The result of their efforts is “Be- 
lizaire the Cajun,” a charming ad- 
venture-romance that premiered 
recently in Lafayette, where it was 
filmed last spring with financial 
backing from Redford's Sundance 
Institute. 


Pitre’s name was right up there 
on the screen as writer, director and 
producer. Starring with the Acade- 
my Award winner Robert Duvall 
and with Arm and Assante were his 
father, mother and sister. 


“It's a movie that came faead-to- 
head with what comes out of Holly- 
wood,” said Pitre, 29. 


After its run in Lafayette, he 
plans to take it to New York and 
Los Angeles to show it to distribu- 
tors such as Paramount Pictures for 
consideration for nationwide re- 
lease. 

“A lot of companies have ap- 


Spanish Art Fest a Winner 

The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — The biggest 
Spanish art festival ever presented 
out of Spain is on its way to break- 
ing a box-office record in Belgium, 
organizers reported Thursday after 
welcoming one million visitors with 
more than a month to go. 


proached us, wanting to see it," he 
said. “That's very flattering." 

Pitre said he expected the emerg- 
ing national popularity of Cajun 
food and music to pique interest in 
the RItti- 

“The timing is very good," he 
said. “If this had been released a 
couple of years ago, the title 
wouldn't have the word Cajun in iu 
It would have seemed detrimental 
Now we thmk it’s going to be an 
asset" 

The film is set in Louisiana's 
vigilante wars of the late 1850s, 
when wealthy ranchers set out to 
rid the state of “andesirables.” a 
broad category that included many 
Cajuns. 

"It’s a bit of a history lesson, but 
we play fast and loose with the 
facts,” Pitre said. “The bottom line 
is entertainment” 

He calk the movie a “gumbo 
western,” and it does serve up a 
generous helping of local color, in- 
cluding a lengthy scene at a fais-do- 
do, or Cajun dance party. 

Michael Doucet, a Cajun fiddler 
who recently performed at Carne- 
gie Hall with his band, BeausdeiL 
arranged and played the music for 
the fflra and made a cameo appear- 
ance at the party. 

Authentic Cajun waltzes and 
two-steps dominate the sound- 
track, but music had to be specially 
written for some scenes: “The Ca- 
jun music was fine for the romantic 
pans and the comic parts Pitre 
said, “but we could never make it 
sound very menacing.” 

The film's regional flavor was a 
key reason it attracted the interest 
of Redford. whose involvement 
should help it win national distri- 
bution, Pitre said. “That’s sort of 
like the Good Housekeeping seal of 
approval. ” 

Even if the film is never shown 
outside Louisiana, simply being 
able to get it made has propelled 
Pitre beyond most of his former 
classmates. 

.Although Cajun folklore has 
dominated his work to date, Pitre 
said he would like his next picture 
to be set in the present and outside 
Louisiana. T don't want to be hunt- 
ed to what I've already done, and in 
this business you get pigeonholed 
very fast.” 

Do his plans include a move to 
Hollywood? 

“Heaven forbid.” he said. “I love 
it here. I don’t ever want to leave.” 


5-Record Dylan Collection 
Establishes His Place in Art 


By John Rockwell 

New Ynrk Tunes Service 

N EW YORK — Remember 
Bob Dylan? He was that 
skinny, himt&i-lookmg folk-rock 


poet, the one some people 
“ Os. With 


thought defined the 1960s. 
his raspy voice, fiercely strum- 
ming guitar and wailing harmoni- 
ca. he sang songs, like “Blowin’ in 
the Wind” and “Mr. Tambourine 
Man,” that shaped a generation's 
understanding of itself. But in re- 
cent years. Dylan has hardly 
seemed so central, either to the 
pop-music business or to the cul- 
ture at large. That's what makes 
his new. five-LP album,. “Bio- 
graph,” so thought-provoking. 

Often, when aging rockers put 
out such retrospectives, it’s a way 
of reminding os of their lustrous 
pasts, and begging indulgence for 
their more prosaic presents. "Bio- 
graph” has something of that 
about it: Dylan’s recent work — 
indeed, his career for the past 15 
years or so — cannot be said to 
have been greeted with the same 
awestruck admiration that ac- 
companied his every utterance in 
the 1960s. But there is more here 
than forced nostalgia — a lot of 
remarkable poetry and masic, 
and not all of it 20 years old. 

Three years in the making , this 
set offers nothing after 1981. thus 
avoiding anything from Dylan's 
last two albums; gleeful chroni- 
clers of his decline will complain 
that the evidence has been there- 
by skewed. But on the whole, this 
is a thoughtfully, if occasionally 
eccentrically, assembled over- 
view. In conjunction with his re- 
cently published “Lyrics 1962- 
1985” (Alfred A. Knopf; a 
reprinting and expansion of his 
“Writings and Drawings” of 
1973), “Biograph” invites consid- 
eration not just of what it does 
and does not contain but, more 
broadly, of Dylan's lasting place 
in the history of American arts.' 

Tim song selection and juxta- 
positions, in which Dylan appar- 
ently had a big hand, are designed 
to thwart cliched expectations. As 
a rule, songs are grouped themati- 
cally, cutting across chronological 
and stylistic patterns. Thus the set 
opens with a side of love songs 


and side two is all political songs 
from 1963-64. 

Mostly, however, Dylan means 
to frustrate those who “dissect my 
songs like rabbits," as he puts it in 
Cameron Crowe's booklet essay; 
likewise those who make more 
ihan they should of his fdk-ver- 
sus-rock, rock-versus-country, 
political-versus-religious, roman- 
tic-versus-misogynisi and Jewish- 
versus-Ghristinn dichotomies. 

T’m ... not any seeker or 
searcher of God knows what," be 
grumbles in the notes to the indi- 
vidual songs. “There’s nothing in 
any of my songs to ever imply that 
Fra even halfway searching for 
some lost gold at the end of any 
great mysterious rainbow.” 

Dylan overstates his case; if his 
work was all that dispassionate, 
why call a song collection “Bio- 


graph”? Clearly this collection is 
lal i 


an intentional statement about 
his artistic life. 

According to the songs in “Bio- 
graph.” Dylan has always had a 
moral undopinning.'Tms is not 
to deny his sometimes quirky, 
raucous humor, but his songs 
about women, about political in- 
justice, about overt religious 
search, are all based on a sensibil- 
ity that cries out at the sadness of 
the world and seeks salvation not 
so much through the patient pro- 
cesses of the Anglo-American po- 
litical system or through the mili- 
tant anger of Lbe left as through 
prophetic, messianic intervention. 

But one can find that sensibil- 
ity among the cranks on every 
street comer. Presumably, Dylan 
has elevated his search into art, 
and if he has, presumably the 
proof is in this set 

On first glance, “Biograph” 
(Columbia; three cassettes; CDs 
forthcoming) ought not seem to 
make Dylan's best possible case. 
Any five-LP compilation is 
bound to leave out some of the 
best work of so protean a song- 
writer, bin this selection leaves 
out a lot. How, one might wonder, 
could any Dylan collection be 
without “A Hard Rain’s Gonna 
Fall,” “Don’t Look Twice, It’s All 
Right," “With God on Our Side,” 
“Desolation Row,” “Sad-Eyed 
Lady of the Lowlands,” “Shelter 


from the Storm," “Hurricane" 
and “One More Cup of Coffee," 
to name just a few? 

For every song missing, 
though, there are songs to 
compensate. In addition, there 
are 18 previously unreieased 
tracks (out of 53), plus a few that 
were previously available only in 
Britain or on earli er greatest-hits 
packages or as B-sides of singles. 
Sometimes songs most familiar in 
their studio-LP originals are of- 
fered in radically different ver- 
sions from live concerts. 

This new material will be famil- 
iar to assduous Dylan bootleg 
collectors, bat now it is here for 
the general public in as fine a 
sound as possible, and these are 
some gems. One thinks of “Up to 
Me,” a romantic, wistful confes- 
sional lift off the “Blood on the 
Tracks" album of 1974, for in- 
stance, or the fierce, incendiary 

Kve performance of “Isis” record- 
ed in Montreal duringthe Rolling 
Thunder Revue of 1975. 

Dylan’s plain and hoarse bari- 
tone offers very little as timbre or 
technique. While his guitar and 
harmonica playing are good 
enough, they are hardly virtu osic, 
and although he has come up with 
some haimtirig mdodies, he has 
never even tried to transcend the 
storehouse of received vernacular 
song-forms he has rummaged 
around in all his life. 

Bm the entire rise of vernacular 
influence* in American music has, 
in part, been a liberation from the 
ossified traditions, the compul- 
sive obsession with virtuosity in 
performance and composition, 
that have throttled most new clas- 
sical music and even some jazz. 
Dylan may not have much of a 
voice, bm his vocal performances 
can be overwhelming because be 
compensates with such visceral 
intensity. His best songs, their 
words and music and personal- 
ized performance inextricably 
merged, are remarkable works of 
art, miniatures in length but as 
deeply probing as anything pro- 
duced by the best American art- 
ists in any medium. 



■.<mc ' 

Frustrating those who “dissect my songs like rabbits.' 

he complains 


What, then, are we to make of 
his apparent decline? That there 
has been a fatting off in his cre- 


to hear. Does this 
inv alida te his aa*tier 

work? 

Of course it doesn'L It has : 
sometimes been rather brutally 
suggested that had Dylan been 
killed in his near-fatal 1966 mo- 
torcycle accident, he could have 
been promptly enshrmwH But 
Dylan survived. He ends this al- 
bum, almost inevitably, with 
“Forever Young” (song in a muf- 
fled demo recording on an only 
half-erased tape). He doesn't wish 
tO be rhiTHirii but tO he 
and even if that’s impossible, if s a 
sweet thought and a wistful meta- 
phor for an aging Romantic. 

What seems to have changed as 
much as Dylan are the times, just 
as he told us they would. T could 
make ‘Blonde on Blonde’ tomor- 
row and the same people would 


say it’s outdated,' 
bitterly here. 

Dylan headed the Greenwich 
V illage folk scene of the early 
’60s, gave us the anthems of the 
civil rights movement, taught the 
Beatles and the Rolling Stones 
that rock could be art, and pre- 
saged the country-rock of the 
"70s. . . _ • 


But historical significance is 
onlypartof his importance. Artis 
not history; it lives on, escaping 
tune, and the way that Dylan’s are* 
fives is through its recorded docu- 
mentation. “Biograph,” despite 
some omisaons and oddities, con- 
tains more striking songs, more 
stirring modem poetry and more 
mesmerizing musical perfor- 
mances than are likely to be en- . 
countered in any amuar seL 


PEOPLE 


Teddy RooseveltExpen 
To Do Reagan Chmnich 
President Ronald Reagan k* 
chosen the Kenyan-bom biogra. 
pfcer Ecbnnnd Morris. 45, who wdq- 
a Pulitzer Prize in 1980 for The 
Rise of Theodore Roosevelt," to 
chronicle his fife and presidency, 
g ranti n g Morris unlimited utter- 
views ami unprecedented access to 
White House meetings and events 
such as the Geneva summit. Bid- 
ding for Morris's biography of 
Reagan has reportedly risen past S2 
million, with no sign of stop- 
ping . . . J. Anthony Ldras,52,a 

Pulitzer-winning former corre- 
spondent for The New York Tuna, 
has received the American I tok 
Award for nonfiction for “CS&- 
mon Ground: A Turbulent Decade 
in the Lives of Three American 
Families," a study set amid the 
sc ho ol integration crises in Boston. 
d u ri n g the late 1960s and 1970s. 
The fiction award went to Don De- 
|.»Hn 49, for his eighth novel, 
“White Noise,” a story of a small- 
town college professor convinced 
t ftat the world is on die brink of 
disaster. The award for best first 
novel went to Bob Shacodm, 34, 
for “Easy in the Island.” about 
middle-class white people involv- 
ing themselves in Third-World 
c ommun ities in the West Indies; 
The prizes are 510,000 each. 


A Los Angeles County grand 
jury has decided not to open 
Investigation into the 1962 death pf 
Marilyn Monroe. The jury fore- 
man, Charles Richardson, said the 
grand jury bad sent a letter Thurs- 
day to the Los Angeles County 
Board of Supervisors saying it 
would not “pursue the Marilyn 
Monroe case any further.” The 
deliberations had been 

by a letter from Robot 
a Los Angeles writer who 
Haims to have been briefly married 
to the actress and who maintains 
that she was murdered. The Los 
Angeles district attorney’s office U- 

«1ca /vwufnrtwl a mimr rS tlu» race . < 


grand jury 
prompted b 





j®" 




also conducted a review <x the cass 
in 1982 and found that no invests 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


HAPPY THANKSGIVING, 1HU8S. 28 
AT THE KING OPBtA, 21 RUE 
DAUNOU, PARS 2 (Metro OPOA) 
Away from hone? You con stfl ode- 


bratt- Tharfagiving in a fnxitiand fam- 
ily atmosphere. Come 


! and enjoy a real 


American Thanksgiving day feast DeB- 
stuffed turtey wim 


oous slutted turkey with cranberry 
sauce, served with traditional Amenccxi 
side ashes and pumpkin and a p pfct pi e . 
Musical amhimen with American foot- 
ball video dpi from 6pm to 3 oil 
T or Renervatian Cafl: 42 6099 89 


CANADIAN GOTO 5TOCX5 and oth- 
er speculative stocks an the largest 
venture capital Shxk Market in Ihe 
world - the Vancouver Stock Ex- 
change. Recommended in upTREND, 
Canada luJy penny nrjfcd advisory 
letter. Tried offer - S55..6 issue* {every 
3 weeks) with subscription get free «r 
of 40 Vancouver Senior Grid Stock*. 
pTrend Investment Services Ud* PO 




. 49333, Benldl 4, Vancouver 6C 
CANADA V7X 1 L4 (604) 687-7990 
or Tefex 04-53231 


i Douqkn. 


YOUR FAVORITE US PRODUCTS wil 
be shipped to youl Send fat & wo wB 
impend with details. GREAT GOODS 
USA. 77 BJeedcer. NY, NY 10012 


AlCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS in 

&rju^Parh [defy) 4634 5961 Rome 


PAWS PSYCHOTHERAPY Indviduofc, 
Couples, Families. Paris 43 48 90 42 

DOMMCAN DIVORCES. Box 20S02, 
Scmo Dommeo, Dominican Repufatc. 


SUN. MY. TIMES - 
Write Keyset. POBZB1 


HAPPY BULTWAY CHANT AL Love 
Joe and Aeoyo 


MOVING 


ALLIED 


PERSONALS 


DESPERATELY SEKMG RANDA 
GHATTAS. Saw you shepprg af Lan- 
vin, Geneva, Nov. 8- Fine write let 
Box 2214, LH.T, Friedrichs*. 15. D- 
6000 Frankfurt/Mcrii 


VAN UNES INTL 

OVER 1300 OFTKZ 
WORLDWIDE 

USA AIEed Vcw> Lines Inti Corp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


Or caO our Agency Europecxi offices: 

PARIS Deft 

(1) 43 43 23 64 


FRANKFURT 


{06V) 250066 

DUSS&DORF/ RATINGS* 

(02102) 45023 LMS. 

MUNICH uas. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON MiMovio. 

(01) 9S3 3636 

BRUSSELS: z^s-A. 


(03) 425 66 14 
Gal far AEeds free ‘estimate 


CONTOEX. Smcd 6 medium moves, 
baggage, ears worldwide. Call Chaf- 
fiet raro 42 SI 18 81 (near OperoL 



Exclusive DAKS 
clothes and 
accessories for 
men and women 
avaiiablefrom 
DAKS stockists 
around the world. 


DAKS- Simpson Limits 
. . •3‘»J?mvn 5ir<?&!. 
condor. 5W1 . 


DA.SS 0! end Compc 

.trM.-Aobrtjrs-dfrcsytf 


PIEftftE: ALEX A JOAN are coming to 
Paris fas week in Dec. Owdc tor 
message at American Express. 

HAVE A MCE DAY1 BOKEL Hava a 
nice day! BokaL 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

CYPRUS 

OWN YOUR OWN HOME in the 
tavn & loaitian af your dioiee. Wide 
seferiion of vilo 1 uprxhueifc. kv 
medirai fGgfes rwafaUe. GD. Loidae 
SSora Ui P.O. Bee 1175, Unawal. 
Cyprus. Tefc 77V77, Tefex 5^36. 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

ST TROPEZ 

One of the most famous houses. 

Ewnpticnafly wel tacaSed 

Bgri on the sea, private hafaar. 
Very beautiful reception, numerous 
bedrooms & baths, swimming pool 
Magnificent view on St Trapes. 
RO, 106 bri ave do Viters, 

Paris >7. Tefc 46 22 78 2& 

Tefex CCAF 649603 F. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

NTOMABONAt TRAVBIBt? Con- 
venient sturSas/apanments. 1 nan 
from Kensington Station, Heathrow 
29 rains. Writ End 9 mini: US$43,000- 
116^00. London 603 6603, NY 718 
338 2S76 24 hour service. 

BELGRAVIA’S BEST MEWS, immacu- 
late; 3 bedrooms. 3 baths, 2 large 
receptions, roof terrace, garage, 60- 
yeor lease. £520.000; 01-235 9108. 

GREECE 

S-A. CO. OWNER of a red estate, 
near lerapetra S. Gate Gr. complete 
development far a dass hotel of 175 
rooms induded in offer. Infix inulioft 
Td: {00301| 7234091 - 10 cm - 3 pm. 

Telex 223076 Mara GR. 

SANTORINI, TRADITIONAL fenavaS- 
ed house. Fantastic view on sea & 
volcano. AB comforts, 140 sqm. plus 
tetraces 150 sqjn. Price US$40,000. 
Write: Mrs. Marat, Giasamion 8, P. 
PsychicD, 154 52 Athens, Greece. 

HOLLAND 

AMSTERDAM CB4TSL FOR SALE 

apartment, 100 sqm. Central healing, 
twig, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bcrti, bat 
comes & communal garden. Asking 
□fl.168.00a Cdl 31-20236562, Bafai 
Persoons. 

SPAIN 

MALLORCA 

PB4THOUSE IN PALMA 

This penthouse is absolutely outstand- 
ing: overlooknig the aty, the harbor & 
the sea, it is sfnfated in the best & guier 
dry area af Pdma, only 2 minutes from 
the dfy eerier aid the mtxina. Only 
finest moMnuh have been used tract 
ttooaDy- 846 sqm. king area and 404 
sqnt pestortxnic terrace -1- 74 sqm. 
balcony. Property with 3 JOB sqm gar. 
den, tennis, indoor & outdoor pool, sau- 
na fitness, private elevator, centres 
heating, dr condriarmg. dcontxxi ser- 
vice. Price in U5J. ea 2^00^00. 

HXFIQO SON AXMADAN5 
J05E80BA 6 

E-07014 PALMA DE MALLORCA 
Tel: E-7T-289900 

UMQUE opportunity. 6 bn Tarremo- 
^4^vaJ^e*pped,2 
pools, 5.000 sqm. lawn, 90 sqm. ga- 
rage, 100,000 sqm, lemon & avocado 
araxrcfa. Write Fmca d Cordobas, 
AJhaurin de fa Tone, Malaga 

SWITZERLAND 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


h the charm in g raeuriws resort af 

LEYSJN: 


RESIDENCE LES FRENE5 


Cfcerfaoldng a splemid Alpine pman> 
m 30 min. ran Mancreux end Lake 
Geneva by ear. 
you can own quaity residences 
with indoor swirnmng pod aid 
fitness footlies m an ideal 
enwronmerf for Idsure and sports 

Jstgo*f.«4 

nJCTatwot l ow SR ra mi 
up to SIX mortgagee. 


Rsridencs h e hu m 1854 teeth 
SWITZH11AP8J 

Teh (025) 34 1 1 55 Uk 456 1 20 HAl CH 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

SWITZERLAND 

SWITZERLAND 

GSTAAD VALLEY 

Attractive 2 to 5 room upuitiinh 
avtxlafale for fardgners in typied Swiss 
chalets in Outrou cTOex. Beautiful 
view, qutt end centrafty loaded. Priors 
from 9=290,000. Favorable mortgages 
ri 6H X interest. Ayietiiierii Afeo 
Avuddble in Mantraux on idee Gene- 
va & other moontain resorts. Contact: 
GLOBE PLAN SX 
_ Av Mon Repos 24, 

01-1005 Lausanne. Switzerland. 

Tek (21) 22 35 12 Tie 25185 MEUS 
Visits welcomed - Abe weekend. 

LAKE LUCERNE 

ks the world famous resort Bruman at 
the lake Lucerne, we id] fiat dass 
apartments & penthouses with ai unfior. 
actable view over the Ida. Prieto from 

5F1 B0/XX) up to 5F80OX0O. Mortgages 
at low Swim interest rates. , 

» 

Free for sde to foreigners. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 

Dorfatr. CH-8872 Weeran SG 

Tefc 04-58-431778. 

Tbc 876062 HOME Ol 

SWnZERLAND 

Forenxiers can buy STUD 105/ APART. 
M^fls / OIAIHS, LAKE GOIEVA - 
MONTREUX or in these world famous 
resorts: CSANS-MONTANA. LB 
DIABIHETS. VERSER. VtUARS, 
JURA & region of StAAD. From 

SR 10/XXL Mortgages 60* at 6M% _ 
HXerest. t 

REV AC SA. 

52 MonAriBrat, CH-1202 GBSVA. 

Td: 022/34(540. Tetou 22030 

G8CVA- VIUA FOR SAIEExdusive 
residentd cxea Garden - 3,000 sqm. 
Completely renavceed and madim- 
ized, Wil suit Diplomatic Services or 
large famiy. 8 bedrooms. 5 bath- ” 
rooms, large receptions, snooker- “ 
/gomes rooms. A| umei sties. Two 
garages, humedofely owdoble uriun- 
rxshed. Substortid price required. So- 
riews inquries write Bee 42013, IKT S 

63 Long Acre, London, WC2E 9JK 

LAKE GENEVA + LUGANO, Mon- 
treux, Gstaad region. Locarno, eat. _ 
Forei^iers con buy mognifieeri new 
aparbnenb/cfiofets/vllos. Big choice. | 
5 wb residency possible. HsBCLD 
SA, Tour Grise 6/01 1007 Lausmie 

21 /25261 1, Uigoro office 91-687648 | 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

AUSTRIA 

V8=NNA*S HOUSING AGENCY. 
0222-527964, Hodaw, Grabra 31. 
Rertafa dduxe flab & houses. 

CANADA 


VAL DTSBff. Luxury ft homes far 
rent. 8/12 pnons. AR deoning & 
Eneq sauna, TV, video, etc For bra- — 
chute, contact] Mumftin lodges. BP 

37. 73150 Vd (fWra. Tefc 79B» 77 
France. Tefex: VAUNV 980445F. E 

HOLLAND £ 

FOR HNT IN TW HAGUE. 

1 RETAIL LOCATION 

Prime upmcxkaJ budefing in sfigMy Ara- 
bie style <S Royd Peloee. idea! retail/ Sc 
oiriine bank etc. 3000 sqfL 2 partly 

17fh century flat with dl luxuries, 5 

2ft beds, Bvfru, dining, sfcriy, tenace. 

Tbt 3W60 Btcwe M- 
Tefc (31) 17177440 pT) 175179061 Fa 

Renthouse International 
020-448751 [4 lines) 

Nederhovon 19-21, Amsferdan 

DUTCH HOUSING CSfflS B.V. 

Dduxe rentals. Vdemiatr. 174. 
Amsterdam. 029621234 or 623222. _ 

BU 

mg WUW MAKEAABPU 
fafl Haudwa Set vice Btoitrii 
Amsterdam. Tefc O20-768O22. 

- 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


USA 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 


A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 

offering 


pre-opening savings on 
mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

fctfuring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
Afl magnificently 
furnished and ail with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


Executive Services Available 


Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


VAUCRESSON 


LARGE HOUSE + GAR0B4 
5 bedroom. FRS NOW 
FI 2000 month. 46 02 6060 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

74 CHAMPS-ELY5EES 8th 

Stufo, 2 or 3rtsam rqsuitinciU. 

One mortis or more. 

I£ CUUBDGE 4359 6797. 

9K3RT TBIM STAY. Advantages of a 
bate! without inconveniences, fed af 
home in nice stocias. one bedroom 
cad mare in frxk. SOfiSJM: 80 rue 
de rUnneratt, Paris 7th. 4544 3940 

NEAR MONTPARNASSE. Beautiful 
ateBer, deeps 3, garden, awdoble 
Dec IS / - 9 rxn. 

WORT RS4TAL M PARS. Stodos, ,2 
roexm & tnorc, cpjict, ovtrcd, neconlJy 
rodone. Week ar month. P) 91 6 32 It 

SHORT TB(M IN LA7M QUARTS 
No oger*. Tefc 4329 3883. 

OiARMRtiG DUPLEX cyxxlmert. 
beautifully famished. 46 06 04 37 

SUBLET 6 MONTHS. STUDIO, heart 
af 6rti STOO/mcnth. Tefc 45 48 52 39. 

ITALY 

When in Rome: 

PALAZZO AL VBABRO 

Luxury apartment bouse with Furnished 
flab, erasable far T week and more 

Phan* 6794325, 6793450. 

Write: Via dd Velobro 16, 

00186 tome. 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE [ 

HUgg 

EMPLOYMENT 

FOR TW FEATURE 

WTHNATIONAL 

posmoNs 

TURN TO PAGE 5 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


PRODUCT DEVBOPMBfT: Ui Pub- 
lisher of consumer, h ei t h e u re & rad 
estate software, expanrfna overseas. 
Seeks indudryprofeftonormraefitari- 
d development. Prefer genet ofist with 
soles experience in mumpie countries. 
Resumes: Pinpoint Pubfehina Bax 
13323, Ookkmd. Co. 94661 J USA. Re- 
quired in USA |San r r an cecol 
CB/17/86. 


RF ENGNBt with exteraira experi- 
ments ei high power ti unit letter ond 


orfenna to work an i s iemdi prefect 


in Alarita. P rc fera * A. Wang, I 
LA. CA 90024 213R2S-164Z 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


tered Ac c o un ta nt wi£1l5 years suc- 
cessful experience ei the prufrtdjfe 
of Hi tech conpade s , 


jncncwGfnertf 

once, pariradoriy in USA & Aostrdfia, 
seeks ^fwd man agement p o rtion 
with muhincitiamV ur grarad i o n where 
his pertidar daSties ei mtl manage- 
ment 0X1 property be Utfised Aval- 
die early 1 98i Emk 42149, LH.T, 63 
Long Acre, London, WC2E 


OfRCE MANAGER/ BOOKKEEPER. 


Experienced bOngual Frandl/fogfah. 

“brae write; PJC 


Avertable mid-Jan. fleam 
140-73 Borden Graced, Kew Gar- 
dens Wfc, NY 11435 USA. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


PHOTO-ME MTL PIC (PAM) has a 


voaxnr in their trtemd oudt depart- 
ment The successful candkkra wfll be 


bree d in Paris end wil carry out 


rtemd atxil pwed ui ra an 


com pc xras etunted m Europe. 

an estabfaed infl company end invites 
appficonis to subnet their Of aad 
stray requirement to Station Aranue, 
Wohcn an Thornes, Surrey, KTT2 TSB, 
UK. Tefax NaS28898. Tat Won on 
Thames B932L 220461, far the dten- 
tran Mr. iM. Chute, Managing Direc- 
tor or Mr. PP. Berridge, Group hoar, 
nd Audtor, 
confidential 


NTL MAGAZINE h furaitora indus- 


dps i 


Gutterurubel bel Mqgoa n » PO Bck 
6951, FDR Station, NYNY 10150 USA 


EMPLOYMENT 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


HJECnUMC 1EQMOAN5 
U.S. Company needs 

'/Europe 
rad US 


Prefer, but not required, retired 
mSfary, resdng in Emps. 

Send conxfcto resume 10 : 
AA1/ES. 22, rue de TEcer 
L-1449 L uxem bou r g 


private 

_ fT mm 
after 7 pm. 


& martgatge to 
cardderad. M Jones l 


OVBBEAS POSITIONS. Hundreds of 
tap paying pasrtiam avrddrle. Tax 
free m crxnn i. Attractive bene fi t s . Op- 
portunities far aB ocorpatians. Tree 
dekJIi. Overseas BnoJoymerf Ser- 
vices. Dept HT, P.Q. Bax 440. Town 
af Mount Royal, Quebec, Q xx xfa 
H3P3a. 


motion a* 712-734-9240. 


travel fW42B9 50 91. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


TAX ACCOWTANI5 to , . 

French & US tax retora in Pans on U1 . . n -.. ■ ■■ u ■ , , . 

line or part teae bade MWmura 2 I PMCTOTl . AWCTAW. In fl pub- 
years e xperien ce. Bax 2910, Herald 
Tribune, 92521 NeuBy Cede* frawe 


QNERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


mori o n & top 
guert travel 

nfiflul 


jaa. 


eh. Open 
7500*Pai 


perfect EnaBsh, 
Markets, 3/ qua 


Pant 


quai if An-. 


fOUt. INTERNATIONALLY Attuned 
jndrviduds with mud-talents ranging 
from design, cufinary ratenxt and 
industnd managranent, computer, 
jeadarid and the ixlv seek etferast- i 
ing and duukjla i u new vedura to 
eo mm eno i early 1984. Far deleft 
contact D.UPPS, 72 Brace Awe. West 
Worthing, Sussex, UK. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


UXNONO FOR TOP BRMGUALj 
KxmeB Cal the e xpert s GR INTSI 
Ms Renard 4758 8230 Paris 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


TWO L Mm, EARLY TWWT1B, 4 


Frendi ski okskAx, 28, 

■ far an American 


anywhere. Any leriqwof^awffl 


axefiAy sfcxftd. CaB Armefee or 
uamlnigua, Tefc 01/725 44 92 Zurich 
or the 826999 Swifierkxid. 


BT J7P5 Frtxice 


YOUNG SWISS, i 


id, verso- . 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


rife* cp taffied surve yor, presently do- ' 
mg a manmenl axra by corre- 
spondence. German, &igfch, French, 
seeks dxJengrng paftan. England or 
worldwide. Wiftnq to trove! or relo- 
cate. Write Baoc 2W8, Herald Triune, 
92521 NeuayCedex.Frdioe 


& new bora 


HBKH AVIATION mjBT, 23, 
frendi teener, P J, LFJL mdtien- 
pne, 1000 ftyng hours, Eng&di meek- 
mg. seeb position in Awafton field xi 
France or abroad. Box 2298, Herdd 
Triune. 92521 Nedly Cedex. France 


rel, 27 SMkm Street. 
Austraka 2W3 or a* (612J ‘ 
evening ond wedmnds. 


AU PA*. 
25 month 


MAN 32 SEEK5 POSTOON ai travel men. 


co mp el s o n between Woelenu t un , &*- 
CoB George 703- 


repe, Md dU East 
92-8091 


pool Send photo wflh refer- 
. c t merienc e . phone 
Cofleen Frarien, 1 


USA. 


fts. . .. 

llthSt. PhxeafagR.aam 


AU VAOMWBTaiN 


International Business Message Center 


. Marsh. No snxiiig. 
preferred. Send * 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


in the h-itm tKifitMHjI H mra/d Tri- 
bune, where mere titan a third 
af a mfl lf o w readers tvorfrf- 
w mie, meet of wham aw m 
butJnwss atd industry, wS 
nod d. Jad bit oe (Pais 


613595} before 10 uni. en- 
thatwmc 


muring that tea can telex you 
bade, and year manage wH 
v dpaca aneun 43 baas. The 
iota k US. $9.80 or local 
ep ra m f per Ena. You amt 
indude carnfJm t a atd vmrfft- 
abio b3foig address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


THE R4ANOAL TIMES 


in the 


Paris 


- Nos 


RANGE 

Hoots de Seme) - 
antes . Monaco - 
-Todagse- Grendgie. 
GERMANY 
IXwWorf . Frankfurt - 


Tefex 220044 


. F-T. Frarkfurt 
Teh 069 7598-105 
Telex 416193 


NO F.T. _ No Crxrxnent. 


PubSshers of the 
Michael Ran,' 



Poofs Street, 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BROKERS/ ADVISORS 

Your dba can invrat in one of Amer> 
Exchfag Tedraple rf e d 
rim in the nut industry, 



bees tA o o dy Wa i ted in 
tavtud mctxne eventu- 
52*. 


Mctfend mdkdto in Engfirit, French, 
German. Bat 2260, Herald Tribune, 
92521 Needy Cedex. Fran 


UiA COAL 

tons cf proven lour sdphnr 
reserves. 53X10 acres af scenic 
lend with minerd surface & vrater 
riahs. Abo cJ S gas potenl io l Must 
m Gann Energy 4 , 
ration, 11605 Dodge Street, 
Nebrask a 68T54, USA Tdex- 
FORSTE. Phone: 402-330 0555 



3 PROFTTAKE FAST FOOD Optra- 
tons far sde. Gran USS1 miSan.net 
U3260J300. located k> bar/ faring 
eerier in PhilodefaKa, PA. Adjra 
ae write to PO 
28393, PMadskhfa PA 19149, 
USA or cal 215 9S 57Q5Ja* for 
Mary) or leka 831639 PISCO MA. 
or write to Sad (fabein, Tudor 
"jautt flat 1, Wdton St, Waftotvxv 
th»4tf, Sixray, Unitod Kupdaii. 


SWITZERLAND + ABROAD. We 
h ave inure than 25 inter es ting cu rr ^ x ^ 
ruesjfodaries + trading + reft j_+ 
sarric^ far i ale. Turnover up to Sf30 
mffian. Swisa residency parade. Con- 
tad: H. SSOID SA. Yccr Grbe 6. 
CH-1007 UruKxme. Trik 21/25 26 11. 


COMPUT3S for buerien or parsdnd 
us e. Gaosut on l ser vic e s, soles, er pert. 
Custcnzed praorammoig. Mcjor 
brands • lowed pom Any quantity. 


Tlx 2U. 
4348 3000. 


Ue. Mr. Low rance, fan, 
Teb (1) 4563 29W / p} 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


gtooe & resume fcv P.Q. Box T, 


,PA 19020 USA. 


OmXTUMTY FOR YOU. and far 
us. Two en g ine er s with MBA degee 
seek to manage your buriness n or 
front Switzerland- Offers ta Com 
foods 57. 011 010 LousonnelO 


I DOU YOU WANT TO BUY or sel 
produds? We can rapresert your at- 
terest in the Benelux, ady, %tain and 
S w i t ze r in d. Contact LBJC. Xonirv- 
dnnegrachr 2514 AD The Home- 
/Holond. Tri 70/614751. Tbc 3E30 
BRHANL 


AMEBCAN FAMILY seeks experi- 
enced child core xi Pern far 3 year aid 


Good Engfah esstmticl Acoonmctk* 
twn pravaod. Send CV. to Bax 2913, 
Herdd Tribune, 92521 NedPyGedmi 
Trance 


FR4ANO W MORTG AGES fiduciary 
services, investments end ocraft. 
CsA iiweUmwt office DT Mr. Wytt- 
qaorde, Belgium 3259/d»/31 


AU PAntto tort for 7 month old girl 
Lauder- 


CAPITAL WANTED 


Room, board & salary. Fort 

dole. Must raeck EngfcK Send pic 
tore. r«ferwKB»& fetter to. 3834 NW 
98h AvOv Sunree, fl. 33321. 


BAMGNG AMD (rvestmert Advisors 
wanted - aalenraanaA. IR, 73 
New Bond Si, London W1. fatfend 


$200000 WANTED. Krtt mortgage 
ooBwft d 12% ' ' 


i interest. PX}. Box | 

23001. HonoUu. HI 96822. 


2W PASSPORT 35 oountrieL GMC, 
26 Klaanwtou, 106 76 Athens Greece 



$US 20 M&UON. secured tow need- 
td. Phope fcfaadi 64 47 50. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


WTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPIE 

IHWU1BMC 

UAA. i wouwn 


EARN 2S% SHORT IBM cm amount 
inves te d. Inveftee nt guorerteed. AL 
Bed Ir L PQ B est 42^1 Harrisonburg, 
Vrgmfa 22W1 OSA ' 


| AU MM-HOHRM. t driderv Mo- 
tura. *Ari peak. Good Engfafa'Nd 
■nolro $fwt toxtuKfa^,. K- Jcdo- 
^5. Box 34Q2«rBoS.faton. FL 


AUPAJH FLORIDA REnJB4TS. 2 diL 
drw age 4H & 2%. Mat raedr Erv 
Wrte Mr*. Gufa, 9M1 West 
33m & Bvd, Coral 5praigs, Pi 


DIAMONDS 


A csxnpfete persond & badness service 


prcniGaood oecason*. 
212-763-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 54th Si, MYjC. 10019 


Needed' 


Swice Raweseriorives 
edWoridwide. 


EXAMOhfl)$ ; 

Your best buy. 

fine dranonds in any price range 
. tf fewest wholesale price* 
cSrert front Antwerp 
eerier of the dkxnond world. . 

. hll guuuulM. 

Far free price Est write 


| AU IWH 3WMY aORBNL 2 d* 
dren, Bghf housekeeping. S75. Send 
fetter 5 photo tot Drcnxad. 4016 
N.W. 26 Terr- Bom Raton, IL33631. 


AU PAIR. T 
Must 




EMPLOYMENT . 

DOMESTIC 

_ posmoNs wanted 

MATURE B4GUSH LADY 

— seeks poOtion t» e companion in fee 
Amsterdam aria Ssehosdbnetife far 
onurdierofyegianJriscKfebweiAjul 

— experience, bopen'tasuggftions (xxf 
n, hos good references; Boot Z2B7. Herrid 
fa Tribune/92521 NeuRy Cedex, Brace 

nr SWB MALE STUDENT <21, rafaftfe 
weRbehoved would Bm. to spend 
. severri mortli rv Amoricco famiy to 

„ improve f» Engfi* « ralixn offea 
bAyshring.ficusewcxL French feoch- 
jpg. Driving fceneeJax 2297, Herdd 
T&me, 925Z1 NeuBy Cedex; frenoe 

* nntOTMrr, rr years old. Soda 
‘job in fcwMti ammmoda- 

— foi Omnfcir. fovoiv who 

1 don (xtMoB vfoHc pooif ora pwW 
□ to phone: (061) 38 $768 Swvtzsriand 

- ADMMBTRAIOR/TRAVB. Coordi- 

nator. Wfll towel veto work. Write to 

- 

NORTH LOMX3N NANMB aid 
Ntqeqtatdferi staff avaflobfe now: 

IfOWWOOWUEOTOpxiWfafl 

with exceJferi rimenoeK rafc tab 
after 6 pnfc 4723 41 13. 

PIOUW NAMBES > mothers' helps 

S£fetS&£Mlto 

3 SRI LANKANS H bayi pk) wdc 
.housework ar other Paris. Boy hra 
roskxrnxu experience. 42 40 89 5a. 

t 2S5;K?£3'K“ i ” , - 

HOUSEimMG DEC - JUNE. Ex- 
iMoni Box 85, NG907 OSLO 9. 

AUTOMOBILES 

_ MBKBRBfeDm EUROPE - 

WE FTOSAUZE CARS TO MSI OSl 
SAFETY STANDARDS T 

D.O.T. A LPJV. 

5YEARS EXPBD84CE 
. „ 1 RANK WC 

Tndonopcfc, fiefiona 317-2914108 

MBtCHS COUPE - 280 SIC 77. 
Aricmatit rarfern coreRian. 99JXX) 
fans. Fl40jre Tefc 4d 77 65 29 Para 

MEW9] ITfOBON Carrara T»ga ’ 

FBOIARI 1985 308 CIS NEW Red- 
/Bdgq Teb Switzerland. 22/52.37 41. 

AUTO RENTALS 

CHAHCjra^CAKftwiig. 

y^^g^jpurr SpiSTfaTOi. 

Fortrise, Mercedes, jaguar, BMW, 

AU5TI0A « EAST HJROFE USS15L00 

ener. 8. A-T020 Varra. Tel: 241694. 

auto shipping 

SHJP YOUR CAR TO A FROM USA 

Be^mc tot 231 42 39. 

raANKRJRr/MARqw. Germany. H. 5 

werp,Bel^wx. 03/231 1653 Tx 31^ 

- 

Artvmrp 233 9985 Corn 9339 At 

auto conversion 



Id* p&enzo’s “La 
daT (The. Official Stacy), m : 
gestine fltiw fife ond^tf' 

iitifitai3rtiictatortiq^captnre£($- 
boncrrs in tla feamrtflkQ category 
at the 21st Qucago IntematianT; 
Him Festival ‘ 

•• •---•• mk 





AUTO CONVERSION 


• SLBECONVBtT * 

The enferi my to toqxirtA 
Eurapeoi cw fata lbe IUA. 

Amwwwwi inaiiwf 

nonmvm aurriuii bitoiir 

pravidesdl raqdrad carmen 
and fluarantm yaw or vfli 


xj gums , __ 

. all US. g ove n imenf stamiui t k 

. or yaar money back induduig 
awwmn cost. 

Write or phone far free brochure 
GERMANY (0) 


697152425 or 


W7ttl?/ 2 23059 
AMB0GAN MTL UMXRWRRBB 

Oberfindau 7678 
D-6OQ0 Frankfurt /Main 


DOT 

suno 


Porsche- Start ah 
BMW- Start at SI 300 

M ercedes- Start ah $1300 
Mi 


EPA/DOT 

54000 




9WfS 


in USA. Write or 


Adkr Foreign Ors Ltd. 230 
r 99, Monsey, NY 10953 9U3S7- 


EPA / DOT 

GONVHS i qNS 
Coltaa B brakerege/boncSng stew® 
* PSdMp & defewiy anywhere in fee 
Eastern US. & Ti 


CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS 
2294 North tan ltd. 


Telex 4971917-CHAMP 


DOT-EPA 

UOMSED CBmnCATKJNS 


1 yearrepar ' 


ATLANTIC IMPORTED MOTORS 
_ . NEW -ISSEY. USA 
Tab 201-3227811; Tlx. 22607B 

Q wriRjr Coaveniaas Sfece 1978. 


MoraedesBenj; Ptandw BMW1 

EPA/DOT 

GONVBtSfONS 


al^kottcmotor'S* - . 

114 Anderson Sever 
Hgdnwaek NJ 07601 IBA^: 
«= 322234 201-488-060' 


DOT/B>ACONVBtSK)NS 


Sipping, bonefing, insurance. -. 
ttaar to tfeor service Europe ' 
to USA, Q O M p tac e axeatted. 
European AtAomafive Cui up fcxictr 
_ Gevwrs Deynoalwag 126, 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRANSCO 


THE IARGBT SHOWROOM 
.AND STOCK IN EUSOK 

edng a constant Mode af caora tha _ . 
I brand new cars of al European^, ... 


Trma SA, 95 NeartMawv ^ 
Td SW/MaM^x 35?wW . 


PAGE 15 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


UV^OB a.Upfxhcy rawortrZrM-l 

den. Need nmSoldy.Snd resume 


& photo: Herat 6740 SW Sbtd St, 
ttani, R. 3315^ 3056669663.- • 


YOLB TAILORS HUM 


' ' B R t b fe i 1928 
Pdkmlrari 62, B-20T8 Antwerp 


HONG KONG b 


Bristol - Tefc (32 33 234 07 51 
: 7i/79'syf b.At the namordOufaL 


[ SS0NG AU PAIR to arrive Mnh 
%VWte/ r dotophotorM n .8ur- 


nadetofltraure shirts, blouses atd 
ti t m i*.. For t aiBp l ei wnte Sictiwt 
taadbe Bck 71767 KCL Hangfeng 


Hecxt of Antwerp Diamond ixfustry 


SUNNY HAWAII AU PAIR needed . ! 



D&APY 

[ f eder y ude e d faeee cd din e n de 


DOMESTIC 
POSmONS WANTED 




Belyum. 


COOK FRK Zt D8CJ 3 JAN. ki 
between pedtone. Peris or Gtoeva 
pjWrtdHighesf referencM. Td IRC 




TEACH ABROAD! 

AMERICAS 


AFMCA - AMERICAS V ASIA 
Experienced Primary and Second- 
by International Schools W< 


■ Europe 4V:- 

Teachers . 

■ - — Ivride at the • : . • . 

. LONDON RECRUITMENT CENTRE ■ ; ’ ' 

Pdiruary 2S& Mani 1 1986 . 

Uni me P " aa ^4SOd postdinl only Id: 

, f™ LRC : Earooean fVwmr41 -f 1 — 

18 Lavant Sbeei. 1 


Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de VErangUe, 75018 Potul 






Tr-*.V‘