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Edited in Paris 
Printed 

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INTERNATIONAL 




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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 






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Oil Glut Forces Cuts in Payments, Incomes 





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enough when Saadi British Bank 
referred in its latest annual report 
to" the “downturn” in the Saudi- 
economy. The kingdom's central 
bank, however, found the phrase 
offensive, and it was duly removed 
from the final version. 

Here in the land of plenty, the 
economic slump — by whatever 
name — is a sensitive and painful 
subject. Foot years after a plunge 
in-oil production prices wirfqi 
a decade -ctf frantic growth that 
made the country a symbol of easy 
and almost endless wealth, some of 
Saudi Arabia's better-known busi- 
nessmen axe so' short on «<«h that 
they axe delaying debt payments. 
Property prices have fallen steeply, : 
masy new shopping centers mmd 
are being 
interest-free de- 
posits from the government. 

To save money, the government 
is delaying payments to contrac- 
tors, suspending some industrial 
projects and chopping- the lavish- 
subsidies that had helped a desert 
country grow far more wheat than 
h can consume GvO servants’ in- 
come^ while sriDgeoerous by West- 
ern standards, has been cut a third 
or more in many 
“It’s a pretty grim picture,” the 
foreign chief executive of a bia 


Reserves; enoi^b to last 2 16 years al 
the ctrrrentpredudion rate; malms 
Western leaders anxious about the 
Saudi situation. 

David Owen,, leader of Britain's 
opposition Sodal Democratic Par- 
ty, recently suggested that his coun- 
try should reduce its oil output to 


After the Boom 


First of five articles 


' ^fc^onpty. and several' 

- ?:r:i . propped up with i 


Hie worst pain has 
been felt by the 
foreign workers, 
who make np ranch 
of the work feorce; 
somehave been 
sent home, and 
many hare had their 
pay cot 
substantially. 


help relieve the strain on Saudi 
Arabia, which has cut back during 
bank said on a recent afternoon^ . the current ghn far mare than any 
staring at the carpeting in his vast other afl producer. 


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and near! 

filtered' the xmiffied chant of ‘the 
mn«7in ratting the Mamie faithful 
to prayer. 

'• However faithless some foreign 
bankers seem to have become, Star 1 
<fi Arabia is hardly goingbankpipL 
For most native Saadis Ufe remams 
Iictorious by world standards. 

' But Saudi Arabia’s role as a 
friend of the West and 
for about 169 billion barrels of 


The pam of recession is spread- 
ing far beyond the kingdom. The 
number of expatriate workers, 
mostly manual laborers from de- 
veloping nations, has fallen to 3J2 
mDBtm from 3 J nnlficsi at the peak 
of the constriction boom, diplo- 
mats estimate. 

The worst effects of austerity 
within Saudi Arabia fall iroon these 
manual workers, and it & a great 
convenience to -*fan<lic that these 


ile are Pakistanis, Fifipmos 
other Third World nationals 
who would make even less money 
at home. 

“The people wi» would be seeth- 
ing in another country" suffering 
from recession, observed a senior 
diplomat, “here, axe w py trials 
and expatriates are exportable." 

The new five-year plan rails for 
sending home 600,000 mare for- 
eigners, but many diplomats see 
that goal as overambitious, given 
the need far workers to operate and 
Tnajnmrri aU the new plants, roads 
and buddings. For those workers 
who remain, pay has been cut sub- 
stantially in many cases. 

Foreign suppliers also feel the 
squeeze, Saudi inpons fell 3 per- 
cent in 1983 and 12 percent in 1984, 
and construction companies have 
watched one of the world’s best 
markets rapidly deflate. 

Despite the slump, Saudi princes 
and government ministers serenely 
assure foreign visitors that the 
economy has hit the bottom and 
will begin to expand a gain within a 
year as so, this time at a rate mod- 
erate enough to be sustained. The 
recession, they say, has helped 
squeeze out waste and inept busi- 
nessmen. 

“Look to the fundamentals.” 
Sheikh Mohammed Ah A halkh.nl, 
the fiiMHinw minister, urged in an 
interview. Saudi Arabia has about a 
quarter of the world's oil reserves, 
huge financial resources, a small 
native population estimated inde- 
pendently and unofficially at five 
million to eight TmlTion business- 
men rued to dealing with the out- 
side weald, and a gleaming new 
base of roods, ports and telecom- 
munications equipment. 

“Why," he asked, “is there ah 
this gloomy picture about Saudi 
Arabia?" 

Sufiman S, Olayan, a former 

(Continued cm Page 2, Col. 2} 



Mubarak Asserts 
Libya Is at Fault 
Over Hijacking 


Egyptian commandos in Valletta try to identify hijackers just after the attack. 


Gorbachev, at Supreme Soviet, Calls 
For 'Dynamic Course’ on Economy 


By John Kifner 

New York Times Servin’ 

CAIRO — President Hosni Mu- 
barak openly accused Libya on 
Tuesday of being behind the hi- 
jacking of an Egyptian airliner, as 
tensions mounted between the two 
countries. 

“The connection is very clear," 
he said at a news conference. 

The hijacking of the airliner to 
Malta, during which one passenger 
was slain by the terrorists, ended in 
tragedy Sunday. 

Fifty-eight people died as Egyp- 
tian commandos stormed the plane 
to rescue the passengers. A passen- 
ger shot earlier by the hijackers also 
died. 

Mr. Mubarak charged that one 
of the ringleaders of the hijacking, 
whom he declined to name, was 
staying in room 401 of the Grand 
Hotel in Tripoli, Libya. 

As tension mounted between the 
countries, Libya called the 



Hosni Mubarak 


The Associated Frees 

MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev called Tuesday for a “more 
dynamic course” toward economic 
development at the fall session of 
the Supreme Soviet, the nominal 
parliament. 

The Soviet leader’s brief address 
at the opening session of the Su- 
preme Soviet was his first public 
appearance here since his summit 
meeting a week ago with President 
Ronald Reagan. He made no men- 
tion of the Geneva meeting. 

On Wednesday, the 1,500 depu- 
ties are expected to get a report on 
the summit talks. Toe speaker was 



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By WiffianL Claiborne 

WaAdngtofi Pont Spwx 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli 
government said Tuesday h would 
seek clarification of conflicting ac- 
counts of a purported offer by Mo- 
rocco’s- King Hassan IT to meet 
wth Prime Minister Shimon Peres 
to discuss peace in the Middle East. 

Apparently dashing hopes for a 
possible meeting, Hassan was 


A.l 


~ Mr. Perea has something ccm- 

^dblj^ -gete to put forward, he can nut his 
proposals in an axvek^e and ait 
dress ibemto the secretarygeneral 
of the UN" 

[The king. The Associated Press 
reported from Rabat, said that his 
comments should not have been 
4:5? a interpreted as an mvitatira to face- 

to-face discussions, but rather as a 
general offer intended only to dem- 
onstrate that the Arab side was 
.opoi todisciissionsj 


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.-:wa' e '-‘ -Hassan reportedly told Fraach 
television jouroafists Monday night 
_that he would agree to a meeting 
.with Mr. Peres as long as the Israeli 
leader had “something serious" to 
propose.. 

F ^rtip r Tuesday, Mr. Peres said 
that he would definitely meet with 
Hassan, - although faraeK officials 
jaid that no date been set for such 
“an encounter. They stud that apart 
from recent diplomatic exchanges 
concern in g a meeting, Israel had 
'received no official confirmation 
-from Rabat of Hassan’s intention 
to meet with Mr. Peres. 

Referring to Hassan's reversal, a 
■senior Israeli official said Tuesday 
night, “It came as a soprise, but so 
did the original statement. It looks 
■like he got badly bit by' his Arab 
colleagues." 

Hassan’s apparent shift Tuesday 
.contrasted with Mr. Peres’s confi- 
dent predictions that a meeting 

with Hassan would take place. It 
would have been the first open 
ariy* meeting b etwe en Israeli and Arab 

' leaders since the historic visit to 
Jerusalem by President Anwar Sa- 
-dat of EgypL 

-? S. .-■ ■ “We win meet. I’m prepared for 


ns. to. meet,"- Mr. . Peres said in a 
speech to high school students 
Tuesday before Hassan said that 
his r emarks Monday nig ht hyri 
been msintapreted. “He will say 
what he has to say and I will say 
what I have to sty.^ 

Mr. Peres said that he iiq^rded 
suchameetingas a’^psychc^ogiral 
and substantive advantage” in 
launching broader peace talks. 

Foreign Minister Yitzhak Sha- 
mir of Israel said in an interview 
before Hassan’s disavowal that he 
saw “positive" dements in the Mo- 
roccan’s leader’s offer. But Mr. 
Shamir said it was more important 
to begin peace negotiations with 
less distant Arab neighbors.' 

Mr. Shamir, who i$ leader of the 
coalition government’s Likud fac- 
tion and is scheduled to rotate into 
the prime mmister’s seat next Octo- 
ber, voiced reservations over .what 
appeared to be conditions set by 
the Moroccan monarch. 

Tho king said he would meet Mr. 
Peres if the Israeli leader brought 
“serious" proposals. He said that 
an Arab League proposal for Pales- 
tinian sovereignty over the West 
Bank and mutual -recognition of 
Israel and Arab states remained on 
thetabk. 





not announced, but Mr. Gorbachev 
and the foreign minister, Eduard A. 
Shevardnadze, were the only two 
members of the Politburo, the gov- 
erning body, who were in Geneva 
last week. 

On Monday night, Mr. Gorba- 
chev briefed the 12- member Polit- 
buro on the s ummi t meetings. A 
statement issued afterward noted 
"points of contact" in U.S. arms- 
contro! proposals. 

An account of the Politburo 
meeting was published on the from 
pages of national newspapers on 
Tuesday, and included an unusual- 
ly positive assessment of U.S. arms 
offers. In the past, the Kr emlin has 
portrayed U.S. arras proposals as 
one-sided and without merit. 

Mr. Gorbachev opened he Su- 
preme Soviet meeting with a live- 
minute address formally nominat- 
ing his ally, Nikolai I. Ryzhkov, as 
Soviet prime minister. Mr. Ryzh- 
kov was named to that Dost on 
Sept. ’Ll wiien Nikolai A. Tikhonov 
retired at age 80 for health reasons. 

Mr. Gorbachev praised Mr. 
Ryzhkov for his expertise in eco- 


nomic affairs, and said that intensi- 
fying industrial production was a 
primary task for the country. “We 
await from ihe Soviet government a 
more dynamic course for economic 
and social development," be said. 

After Mr. Ryzhkov's appoint- 
ment was endorsed with the usual 
unanimous vote. Nikolai V. Taly- 
zin. the chairman of Gosplan, the 
state planning commission, re- 
viewed economic growth in 1985. 
Ho said the 1985 plan “was bring 
effectively fulfilled,” hut added 
that some areas of production were 
lagging 

Mr. Talyzin also discussed the 
1 986 budget, and said it projected a 
3.8-percent increase in national in- 
come and 4.3-percent growth in in- 
dustrial production. The govern- 
ment plans to accomplish nearly ail 
of this through improved labor pro- 
ductivity. as opposed to increased 
capital outlays. 

Mr. Talyzin listed the military 
budget for 1986 as 19.063 billion 
rubles ($2422 billion), the same 
figure given for 1985. But the an- 

(Coutinned on Page 4, Col 7) 


Greece Calls 

iwu buuiuiicb, L.1UYH UlllCU LUC m -j — 

storming of the plane a “stupid and A oo/tj f /f /iw l/jf 
a foolish action that has resulted in £> 

Premature 


a horrific massacre." 

The official Libyan news agency, 
JANA, commented that Mr. Mu- 
barak bore full responsibility for 
“this frightening massacre." 

Relations have been strained for 
a decade between Egypt and the 
radical regime of Colonel Moamer 
Qadhafi. This month, Egyptian se- 
curity operatives arrested four men 
they charged with infiltrating to kill 
Libyan political exiles here. 

The western border region was 
put on a state of alert on Sunday, 
after the hijacking, and the mam 
desert roads in the area were closed 
to civilian traffic. The military alert 
continued Tuesday. 

Hie Libyan news agency said 
that Egypt was upgrading its mfli- 
tary equipment on the bolder and 
bringing in combat-ready troops. 

Officials here and Palestinian 
sources in Beirut say they believe 
the hijackers were followers of Abu 
NidaL a renegade Palestinian ter- 
rorist 

Abu Nidai, whose real name is 
Sabri d-Banna, broke with Yasser 
Arafat’s mainstream Palestinian 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5) 


Survivors Identify Alleged Hijacker 


Prime Minister Shimon Peres, arriving Tuesday at a sub- 
urban Td Aviv high school to deliver a speech. He told 
students be vodd meet with King Hassan n of Morocco. 


Begin Adviser Tied to U.S. Spy Case 





C7 

By John M Goshko 

Washington Fast Service 

WASHINGTON — Unofficial 
Israeli sources have named a man 
who .mice worked for Menachem 
TU^gm, the country’s former prime 
minis ter, as the Israeli intermediary 
who received secret U-S; docu- 
ments from Jonathan J. Pollard, a 
civilian U.S. Navy mtdHgence ana- 
lyst who was arrested by the FBI 
last week. ' 

The name of the man has dreu- 
lated in Israel since the weekend. 

[The Washington Post did not 
identity the man in its account 
Tuesday,--. because no reliable, 
source linked Mm directly with Mr. 


Pollard. However, Israeli radio and 
two Israeli newspapers, Ha'aretz 
and Yedioth Aharonoth, identified 
the intermediary as Rafael Blau, 
anti- terrorism advise to the gov- 
ernments of Mr. Begin and his suc- 
cessor, Yitzhak Shamir, The Asso- 
ciated Press reported Tuesday from 
Tel Aviv. 

[Mr. Eitan, 59, who has the same 
name as the Israeli general who led 
the invasion of Lebanon and re- 
tired in April 1983 as army chief, 
was not available for comment. 

[The newspapers said their re- 
ports were based on descriptions in 
The Washington Post report. 
Ha'aretz also said that the United 


States bad demanded from Israel 
detailed information on the Pollard 
affair and a commitment that Israel 
would not use spies in the United 
States.] 

U.S. officials involved in the in- 
vestigation into the Pollard case 
said Monday that the name of the 
Israeli allegedly involved was not 
familiar to them and indicated that 
an Israeli official whom Mr. Pol- 
lard reportedly telephoned last 
week was someone other than the 
man being named by Israeli 
sources. 

U.S. sources said Sunday that 
after Mr. Pollard learned last week 

(Continued cm Page 4, CoL 5) 


By Tony Austin 

knten 

VALLETTA, Malta — A Mal- 
tese official said Tuesday that sev- 
eral survivors of the EgyptAir hi- 
jacking had identified a T unisian 
recovering from wounds in a Val- 
letta hospital as the leader of the 
group that seized the plane. 

Paul Mifsud, the government 
spokesman, also corrected the 
death toll from 60 to 59. He said 
that the figure of 60 dead, which 
had been given Monday, included a 
Canadian baby who had been 
counted twioe. 

Mr. Mzfsud said that an Israeli 
woman passenger shot in the head 
by the hijackers, Nitzan Menders- 
son. was “clinically dead" but was 
still counted among the survivors. 

He said that several people had 
identified Omar Maizouki, 20, as 
the leader of the hijacking, but he 
withdrew without explanation an 
earlier statement that the pilot of 
the Boeing 737 also had named Mr. 
Maizouki. 

Mr. Mifsud added that a magis- 
trate had questioned Mr. Marzouki 
and that be would be charged un- 
der Maltese law if sufficient evi- 
dence were found. 

Maltese authorities said earlier 
that the alleged hijacker, who was 
wounded in the 22-hour seizure of 
the plane on a flight from Athens to 
Cairo oa Saturday, was out of dan- 
ger after surgery and was under 
police guard. 

The incident ended in a blood- 
bath Sunday night with the hijack- 
ers hurling grenades as Egyptian 
commandos stormed the plane. 

The government spokesman said 
that the magistrate had ruled that 
no passenger or crew member from 



tMn 


Officials inspect the EgyptAir 737 at Valletta airport 


the airliner should leave Malta be- 
fore giving evidence. 

The magistrate’s report will go to 
the attorney general who will de- 
cide whether to prosecute. Mr. Mif- 
sud said that he was not aware of 
any request from Egypt or other 
countries for the extradition of the 
man in custody. 

Autopsies were being conducted 
cm 59 bodies in an aircraft hangar 
aL the Valletta airport. 

■ Prime Minister Defends Raid 

Prime Minister Carmelo Mifsud 
Banniri said Monday night that he 
authorized the Egyptian raid on the 
plane because “we wanted to show 


we would not give in" to terrorism. 
The Associated Press reported. 

Mr. Bonnicd, speaking to the 
Maltese parliament, said that he 
told the terrorists he would not 
meet their one demand — to refuel 
the plane — because the aircraft 
might be intercepted “by other 
forces" and forced down from its 

ffiphL 

Mr. Mifsud, the government 
spokesman, lata- said the prime 
minister was “bluffing” and that he 
was trying to get the hijackers to 
surrender. 

“There was definitely no plan or 
any indication” of sudi an inter- 
vention. Mr. Mifsud said. 


Reuters 

ATHENS — Greece said Tues- 
day that the storming of a hijacked 
Egyptian aircraft was premature 
and accused the Maltese govern- 
ment of failing to consult Athens 
over the operation. Fifty-nine peo- 
ple, 12 of them Greeks, died in the 
hijacking and the assault. 

The Greek government, also at- 
tacked West Germany for criticiz- 
ing security at Athens airport, 
where the EgyptAir flight originat- 
ed Saturday, and for suggesting the 
airport be boycotted. 

Earlier T uesday, the governor of 
Athens airport, George Papadimi- 
tropoulos, said the U.S. Federal 
Aviation Administration bad 
warned airports last week that a 
hijacking might be imminent, prob- 
ably in toe Mediterranean area. 

Foreign Minister Karolos Pa- 
poulias, referring to toe operation 
by Egyptian commandos, said: 
“The possibilities for a different 
outcome, different from a blood- 
bath, had not been exhausted.” 

“The main responsibility lies 
with Malta,” he said. He added 
that he would write to Foreign 
Minister Alex Scebberas Trigona 
of Malta about toe matter. 

Greek newspapers on Tuesday 
termed toe commando raid a fiasco 
and a disgrace. Their correspon- 
dents in Malta said the hijackers 
were about to free 17 Greeks on 
board when the storming began 
Sunday night. 

Mr. Papoulias said “certain cir- 
cles" had tried to blame Greece for 
toe hijacking by suggesting that 
Athens airport sixurity was inade- 
quate. He said that toe airport’s 
security met toe highest interna- 
tional standards. 

Referring to criticism by Interior 
Minister Friedrich Zimmennann 
of West Germany, Mr. Papoulias 
added: “He should not be so hasty, 
coming from a country plagued 
daily by terrorism." 

Mr. Papadimi cropou! os, toe air- 
port governor, said that he had 
passed toe U.S. warning about a 
hijacking to all foreign airlines us- 
ing toe airport, and that they had 
tightened security. 

That was one reason why Greek 
officials did not believe that guns 
used to hijack toe Cairo-bound 
flight, to Malta on Saturday night 
were taken aboard in Athens. 

Mr. Papadimi tropoulos said he 
would press tor a joint investiga- 
tion of toe hijacking by all of toe 
countries concerned. 

He said that security had been 
increased at toe airport since June, 
when a dispute arose between 
Greece and toe United States over 
toe hijacking of a TWA plane fly- 
ing from Athens to Rome. 

A fence around toe airport has 
been rebuilt since then and toe 
number of security police has been 
increased from 250 to 750, Mr. Pa- 
padimi tropoulos said. 


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inside 

■ IniEa’s tribab are teaming 

drill s for economic survival 
with the help of volunteer 
groups- . Page! 

■East and West Gamany are 
poised to resume a dialogue on 
. closer relations. ... Page 2. 

■ California-based pacifists 

promote a new way of thinking 
about conflict Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE / "\ 

. ■ Bayer AG 
profits for IF 

TOMORROW 

Is Western Europe locked in 
ir rever si ble economic d edinfl? 

Tfa first article in a series a- 


♦ > -Sv 




Flea Morahte, the Iftrtfan 
novefist, died on Monday 
in Rome at 73. Page 5. 


South Africa’s Once-Reticent Businessmen Join Apartheid Fight 


By Allister 

Washington Post . 

JOHANNESBURG — South Africa's formerly 
apolitical business community has been transformed 
: into toe nation’s most vigorous political lobby by toe 
racial and economic crisis that has hit toe country 
during the past 16 months. 

Bnsinessmea who once thought it imprudent to 
venture into the controversy surrounding apartheid. 

and wham same suspected of secretly admiring a 
system that kept ~Madt radicalism in its place, have 
become what erne business leader recently called 
l *b<»n-agam Kberals." . 

Scarcely a day passes without some prominent busi- 
nessman j enning toe corporate chorus calling for toe 
dismantling of apartheid. A note that 186 UJS. compa- 
nies operating in South Africa sent to President Pieter 
W. Botha recently urging his government to lower 
tensions in black schools was part of an increasingly 
coordinated campaign by local and foreign businesses 
to pressure the government for reforms. 

- A national association of industrialists, toe South 
African Federated Chamber of Industries, has urged 


toe government to begin “true negotiations" with 
black leaders and offered itself as a “principled 
mediator.” 

Ninety-two of toe country’s biggest corporations 
recently placed full-page advertisements in local news- 
papers pledging themselves to work for toe abolition 
of legal race discrimination and for negotiations for 
power sharing with acknowledged black leaders. Soon 
afterward, 52 American corporations with interests 
here, calling themselves toe U.S. Corporate Council 
on South Africa, did the same. 

Business leaders also have played a major role in 
forming a new organization edited the National Con- 
vention Movement to pr om ote toe idea of an all-races 
convention to work out a new national constitution. 

A small group, led by the country’s most powerful 
businessman, Gavin Relly. head of the giant Anglo 
American Corpu has traveled to Zambia to sound out 
toe exilud leaders of toe underground African Nation- 
al Congress. 

Cumulatively, it amounts to unparalleled political 
pressure on toe government, and the question now is 
what effect it will have 


Observers in toe United States and other Western 

countries often view the growing pressure in toe con- 
text of their own societies, where business can exert 
great political influence. They see the new attitude of 
businesses in South Africa as the be ginnin g of a 
process of self-generated reform. 

But local observers are less sure, noting that toe 
relationship between business and government is dif- 
ferent in South Africa from most Western countries. 
Its potential political leverage is much less, they say, 
and its prodding may be ignored. Some think toe 
pressure may even be counterproductive, making the 
government more stubborn. 

This view was expressed Thursday by a pro-govern- 
ment newspaper, The Citizen. Warning UJS. compa- 
nies in particular that their pressure was bordering on 
“an unacceptable intrusion into the country’s deci- 
sion-making,” toe Johannesburg dafly warned local 
businessmen that they, too, might provoke a backlash. 

“Instead of having the ear of government, they risk 
an ear bashing from a government that cannot be 
browbeaten by businessmen," the editorial said. 

What limits toe businessmen's influence is toe his- 


torical ethnic cleavage between the Afrikaners, mostly 
of Dutch descent, who comprise 60 percent of toe 4 5 
million whites, and toe remaining whites, who are 
mostly of British descent. 

As a generalization, it may be said that toe Afrika- 
ners control toe government, while toe ethnic English 
control business. 

This is less true today than it was when Mr. Botha's 

National Party came to power in 1 948. Thirty-seven 
years of political control by people who were trace toe 
economic underdogs, and an industrial revolution that 
has made South Africa the most developed country on 
toe continent, have wrought major sociological 
chang es. 

Thousands of Afrikaners have moved from toe 
farms to the cities, and many are makmg their way 
into business. Two of toe country's six biggest mining 
and industrial conglomerates now are controlled by 
Afrikaners. 

A new class of young, urban, upwardly mobile 
(Continued on Pace 4. CoL 1) 


‘•■wn — 


-St 







1985 


Assembly 
In Philippines 
Sets Election 
For Feb. 7 


By John Burgess 

Washington Pan Service 

MANILA — The proposal by 
President Fer dinan d E. Marcos for 
an early presidential election in the 
Philippines passed another hurdle 
Tuesday when the National Assem- 
bly approved a bill setting the poll- 
ing for Feb. 7. 

Many analysts in Manila, how- 
ever, continued to suggest that the 
idea was only a political maneuver 
by Mr. Marcos and that the elec- 
tion might never take place. 

In Tuesday’s debate, opposition 
members of the assembly tried 
three times to move the polling date 
back to give their camp more time 
to organize. But the assembly, 
dominated by Mr. Marcos's New 
Society Party, passed the bill, 77 to 
41. 

Opposition members said they 
would go to the Supreme Court to 
challenge Lbe legality of the elec- 
tion. They contend it is unconstitu- 
tional because Mr. Marcos has said 
he will not leave office before the 
voting takes place. 

Facing increasing pressure from 
domestic opponents and the U.S. 
government. Mr. Marcos called 
earlier this month for the special 
election. His current term does not 
expire until 1 987. 

The Philippines' diverse opposi- 
tion parties have condemned the 
election as illegal while welcoming 
it as a chance to topple Mr. Mar- 
cos, who has been in power since 
1965. 

But they have been unable to 
decide on a single ticket to oppose 
him and avoid splitting the vote. 

The major contenders now are 
Salvador H. Laurel, head of the ■ 
country’s largest coalition of oppo- 
sition parties, and Corazon 
Aquino, wife of Benigno S. Aquino 
Jr., the assassinated opposition 
leader. 

Conflicting statements by Mr. 
Marcos on the mechanics and 
scope of the election have led many 
observers in Manila to question Ins 
in tendons. 

In a meeting with reporters Tues- 
day, Mr. Laurel suggested that if he 
and Mrs. Aquino were able to 
reach an agreement to run together, 
Mr. Marcos might feel threatened 
and allow the Supreme Court to 
nullify the election plan as uncon- 
stitutional 

Members of the National Unifi- 
cation Committee, an opposition 
umbrella group charged with assur- 
ing that there is a single opposition 
ticket, called Tuesday for a conven- 
tion to be held no later than Dec. 9 
if current negotiations to agree on 
the ticket faiL 

■ Marcos Would Meet Rebels 
Mr. Marcos has declared that he 
is willing to meet with Communist 
rebel leaders to ensure a peaceful 
election. The Associated Press 
quoted The Washington Times as 
reporting T uesday. 

The newspaper quoted President 
Marcos as saying in an interview 
Monday that he was trying to as- 
sure “honest, nonviolent elec- 
tions." 

Mr. Marcos also reportedly said 
that he had sent messages to rebel 
leaders through an underground 
intelligence network and that he 
would intensify such efforts in the 
next few weeks. 




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. - ‘ 

The Now York Timas 

Nursery school children sing songs in the village of Kavita. 

For India's Poorest , the Self-Help Way 

Volunteers Train Them to Plant, Seek Government Aid 


By Steven R. Weisman 

Sew York Times Service 

UDAIPUR, India — In front of a mud hut a 
dozen small children sat on the dusty ground and 
sang songs. From such innocent beginnings comes 
hope of progress for some of the poorest families in 
India. 

An illiterate woman with a golden hoop in her 
nose led everyone in a song about a man with a 
-mustache riding a horse cart into town. The chil- 
dren dapped their hands and giggled. 

The scene was a "nursery school” in Kavita, a 
village in the stubby mountains of Rajasthan in 
northern India. The teacher. Haiku Bail did not 
know her own age but was certain of one thing. 

"It's a good activity for these children," she said. 
“Before this school started, the kids would roam 
around in the dirt and get sick all the time. Here 
they can learn the importance of a good educa- 
tion." 

The nursery school is part of an experiment to 
improve the lives of descendants of aboriginal 
tribespeople in a land where maharajas once led 
glittering hunting parties in search of wild boar, 
deer, brans and tigers. 

In the old days, peasants were employed by 
maharajas to make a clatter- “ "■ » 1,1 

ing noise to flush out the 
game for the hunters. Today 
the bunting grounds have 
largely been stripped of trees 
by peasants in search of 
timber and firewood. 

The Indian authorities 
lately have given more atten- 
tion to the estimated 50 mil- 
lion “tribals" scattered across 
the country. But some say the 
most interesting woik is be- 
ing done by groups outside 
the government. 

There are thousands of such nongovernmental 1 
groups in India, but perhaps only a hundred that 
reach large numbers of people, according to ex- 
perts. 

Here in Udaipur, the voluntary work is ran by a 
group called Seva Mandir, which means Temple of 
Service. It was founded in 1966 by Dr. Mohan 
Sinha Mehta, an elder statesman who had served 
as a nmisier when the area was ran by Rajput 
princes. 

Dr. Mehta died this year, but ins concept of self- 
help thrives. His organization has 100 full-time 
employees and an annual budget of nearly 
$400,000. mostly derived from its endowment and 
voluntary contributions. 

“These people are at the bottom of the social 
and economic ladder," said Ajay Mehta, the 
founder’s 30-year-old grandson. “Giving people an 
education at this stage can provide just the incen- 
tive to persevere with their own problems." 

This fall life in this part of Rajasthan has been 


especially diffic ult- The monsoons started exit 
heavy last summer but then abruptly dried up, 
causing the loss of 90 percent of the harvest Hod it 
not been for a freak rainstorm two weeks ago, the 
people hoe would be without drinking water or 
fodder for their cattle. 

As it is, they have had to turn to hard labor. In 
blazing maroon and yellow saris, women work 
languidly in the sun, carrying gravel and rock to 
upgrade the roads. They earn less than a dollar a 
day. 

According to Mr. Mehta, the problem here is not 
necessarily a lack of government programs, but the 
inability of poor ana illiterate people to take ad- 
vantage of them. 

So Seva Mandir, the volunteer groap, has set up 
training workshops. In some workshops, women 
from remote hamlets were brought in to become 
nursery school teachers. In others, village people 
learned carpentry, weaving, crafts and blacksmi th- 
ing- 

The most striking effect was the way local resi- 
dents began to solve their problems and to plan for 
themselves.. 

In one example, the government launched a 
program to distribute healthy, purebred chickens 
to rural areas. The villagers discovered that al- 
■ ■ "■ « though the chickens pro- 

'Giving nponle an doccd more . eggs - * 

txivmg people an more expensive to feed and 


provide just the incentive 
to persevere with their 
own problems/ 


— Ajay Mehta , 

volunteer worker 


T 


education at this stage can 

dir, tiie villagers won govern- 
ment support for a program 
to breed local birds. 

There also have been hard- 
ships that demonstrate how 
close the villages live to the 
edge of disaster. A woman in 
the village of Kavita ex- 
plained bow an unscrupulous 
collector- underpaid her 

for her eggs. 

Because the woman is illiterate, she did not 
realize she was being cheated until it was too late. 
When her loan for the chickens fell due, she had to' 
sell her property and family jewelry. Today, she 
said, she lives under a tree. 

Seva Mandir’s philosophy is that training would 
prevent many such misfortunes. In addition to 
running the workshops, it prints a monthly “news- 
paper” which is actually a oig poster hung on mud 
structures in scores of villages and hamlets. 

Another effort undertaken in Udaipur and else- 
where is the planting of new forests in hills long 
since denuded by tribespeople. The people have 
•been driven farther and farther into remote areas 
by the process of development. 

Volunteers at Seva Mandir took satisfaction in a 
recent declaration by Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
that the drive to rescue the so-called wastelands 
most be "people-based." 


In Geneva’s Afterglow. 
The 2 Germanys Hope 

For a Rapprochement 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Pm i Service 

BONN — East and West Ger- 
many seem poised to explore a new 
rapprochement as one of the early 
repercussion* of President Ronald 
Reagan's “fresh start" in relations 
with Moscow achieved at the Gene- 
va summit meeting, according to 
diplomats and government offi- 
cials. . 

The extended discussions in Ge- 
neva have produced a sense of keen 
anticipation here that the two Ger- 
manys may soon proceed with 
plans for closer cooperation that 
could not be sustained in a pro- 
tracted dimate of hostility between 
Moscow and Washington. 

Diplomats in Bonn and East 
Berlin have said that there are 
strong indications that Erich Hon- 
ecker may make the first visit to 
West Germany by an East German 
head of state. Under pressure from 
Moscow, Mr. Honedrer last year 
had to postpone along-awaited trip 
to Bonn and his birthplace in the 

The Kremlin ostensibly objected 
to the timing of the visit, which 
would have served as a touchstone 
of continuing d&tente between the 
two German states while U.S.-So- 
viet contacts were still frozen. 

But the renewal of superpower 
dialogue under a new, more vigor- 
ous Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev, has been perceived widely 
as a “green light" for Mr. Honecker 
to continue his pursuit of closer 
contacts with West Germany. 

Some commentators bave 
warned that Bonn’s intention to 
announce a decision by year's end 
on participation in Mr. Reagan's 
space-based defense system, the 
Strategic Defense Initiative, could 
be seized upon by hostile political 
forces in Moscow and East Berlin 
as a pretext to block the Honecker 
trip to West Germany. 

While Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
would like to show that Bonn can 
demonstrate full allegiance to 
Washington and the Western alli- 
ance without jeopardizing the pros- 
pect of improved ties with East 
Berlin, he may not be able to offer 
Mr. Honecker sufficient political 
or economic incentives to over- 
come lingering resistance in Mos- 
cow. 

Foreign Ministry officials in 
Boon said that if Mr. Honecker 
came to West Germany soon he 
coaid not expect much more than 
token agreements to promote envi- 
ronmental cooperation and cultur- 
al exchanges. 

Mr. Honecker’ s own expecta- 
tions of the impact of a trip to West 
Germany must /be mints: because 


he knows that the ruling coalition 
in Bonn is opposed to meeting East 
Germany's primary demand for the 
recognition of separate nationality, 
the officials said. 

But although no protocol ar- 
rangements have been finalized, 
Mr. Kohl said after the summit 
meeting that he assumed Mr. Hon- 
ecker's visit would take place "in 
the very near future.” 

In East Berlin, an unexpected 
reshuffle last weekend of the ruling 
Politburo appeared to strengthen 
Mr. Honecker's support for new 
initiatives with the West Konrad 
Naum arm, an outspoken hard-liner 
opposed to closer economic links 
with Bonn, was dropped from the 
19-man board, and three younger 
allies of the East Goman leader 
were promoted 

Diplomats in East Berlin said 
that Mr. Honecker, 73, wanted to 
establish greater political legitima- 
cy for his government, as well as 
economic benefits for his people, 
by broadening channels of cooper- 
ation with the West. 

He has often justified his policy 
of rapprochement with Bomi, at 
the nsk of some displeasure in 
Moscow, by stressing that the 
smaller states in Central Europe 
must contribute in their own ways 
to the reconstruction of East-West 

detente. 

- West Germany’s opposition So- 
cial Democrats have become in- 
creasingly attracted to a potential 
breakthrough in relations through 
the recognition of a separate East 
German nationality, in return for 
an earing of border restrictions and 
travel rights between the two Ger- 
manys. 

But Mr. Kohl while eager to 
improve relations with East Ger- 
many, has resisted this notion as a 
violation of the preamble to the. 
West German Constitution, which 
upholds the notion of a. ramifica- 
tion of the German people. 

In the past, Bonn has extracted 
concessions from East B erlin that 
relaxed travel restrictions for elder- 
ly East Germans by offering hun- 
dreds of milli ons of dollars in guar- 
anteed loans. East Germany’s 
credit needs have eased considera- 
bly in the past year, however, re- 
ducing Bonn’s leverage. 

■ Husak Visits East Germany 

Gustav Husak, Czechoslovakia’s 
Communist Party leader, arrived 
Tuesday in East Germany for a 
“friendly visit" and talks with Mr. 
Honecker, said the official news 
agency ADN. The agency, moni- 
tored by The Associated Press in 
Berlin, said the visit was part .of 
regular yearly contacts betvreen the 
two leaders. 


Ex-Liberian Commander Put on Trial 

LONDON (AF) 

esaS - 1 ^ 

Ktwodayjrfio 

Geaerai^^a, wmrao ___, tire army in 1983 by 

the fugitive who led tfc: coup 

Leaders of 2 Koreas Reportedly Met 

JSS « 

kS«s Of hforih and South Korea sace the peninsula was 

ButYmmgMo Ahn, senior press attach^ in S°urit KorranEmlray 
in Washington, said *hat officials in Seoul bad denied the report. “The 


Commons Opens Debate of Ulster Pact 


LONDON (Renters) — Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher urged 

Pariiament on Tuesday to ratify the 
British-Irish agreement an North- 
ern Ireland, telling Loyalists in the 
province it did not foreshadow 
eventual union with the Irish Re- 
public. 

Opening a two-day debate in the * 
Hocseof Commons on the pact shed* 
sighed with Prime Minster Garret 
FitzGerald on Nov. 15, Mrs. 
Thatcher said: ‘The agreement' 
does not affect the status of North- 
ern Ireland within the United 
ICtn ffkwn- It does not set us on 
some imagined slippery slope to 
Trish unity." 

The motion to ratify the accord, 
which for the first time gives Dub- 
lin a voice in the affairs of British-- 
rated No rthe rn Ireland, was certain 
to win an overwhelming majority 
among the 650 members of the 
Commons. 



Margaret Thatcher 


Ex-French Defense Minister Asserts 
He Did Not Order Attack on Ship 


Reuters 

PARIS — Charles Hernu, 
France's former defense minister, 
said that he had not ordered the 
attack on the Greenpeace ship 
Rainbow Warrior, and did not be- 
lieve hi$ secret service chief, Admi- 
ral Retie Lacoste, had given any 
such command. 

The interview Monday on 
French radio was his first public 
comment on the matter since he 
was forced to resign in September. 

Mr. Hernu said he had ordered 
surveillance of the Greenpeace ship 


Italian Unions Accept Pay Raise Plan 

ROME (Reuters) — Italy’s *n«n trade unions have agreed to a new 
method of- relenting wage increases for public workers but the plan 
seems unlikely to be accented by private employers. 

The formula, agreed to Monday night by the three confederations and 
Public Administration Minister Remo Gaspari, would replace the sliding 
scale system doe to end in January. That system gives cost of living 

adjustments quarterly. 

Unions estimate tint the formula would make about 740,000 lire ($427) 
a month of an average salary inflation proof compared with only 600,000 
lire under proposals put by the private employers’ association, Coafifr* 
dustria. The formula off era some cost-saving advantages, since wagrfT 
would be adjusted twice a year instead of quarterly. 

Report Warns Pentagon on Spending 

WASHINGTON (W?) — Dedinmg congressional support for arms 
spending wxD force the Defense Department to choose by 1990 between 

an unprepared military and a much onafler fort*, a pand cf retired U.S. 

military leaders has concluded aftcra yearlong study. 

Even if Congress grants *"""*! nubtaiy spending increases of _U5 
percent above inflation, the panel said, three army divisions, six tactical 

o^d^decade to maintain <wrtiwttf^^rM^ne«. Nosuuctear forces 
could shrink by as modi as one-third. 

"The more likely tendency, should defense spending be constrained, 
will be to retain farce structure and decrease readmess/’- the panel said in 
a report published Monday by Georgetown University’s Center fra 


to stop it dtsnqptingFrenchnuclear 
tests in the South Pacific. "The 
president was not informed,” he 

said, “nor was, the prime mmister.” < # o 11 n _ 

Prime Mmteter Lauran’ Fabius Wife OI SakhaTOV RetUIUS tO MOSCOW 
accused Mr. Hernu and Admiral 


to the levels of the tele 1970s. making the military “a hollow force,” die 
report warned. 


Lacoste, who was later dismissed, 
of concealing the truth about the 
ship's sinking by French secret 
agents in New Zetland in July. 

“I consider that measures . taken 
to safeguard the nuclear tests were 
normal and they had been taken 
by my predecessors for more than 
10 years," Mr. Hernu said. 


Long Oil Glut Forces Saudi Arabia Into Painful Retrenchment 


(Continued from Page 1) 
track dispatcher who rose to be- 
come one of the kingdom's most 
successful businessmen, expressed 
s imilar optimism. “From here on," 
he said, “I think we will see normal 
growth" in the economy, which he 
defined as an inflation-adjusted 
rate of 25 to 4 percent a year. From 
1975 through 1981, the economy 
raced ahead at an average of about 
10 percent a year, during the past 
four years, it has shrunk by a total 
of more than 10 percent. 

For all their calm confidence. 
Sheikh Abalkhail and other Saudi 



If 

HUBLOT 


officials have a delicate task in try- 
ing to wind the economy down to a 
sustainable level without bankrupt- 
ing too many businessmen and 
damaging the royal family’s credi- 
bility. The drop in oil revenue by 
about 75 percent during the past 
four years has left far less money 
for soothing over discontent, how- 
ever much the economic pain has 
been concentrated on foreign 
workers. 

At home, impatience for eco- 
nomic growth is growing among 
bankers and businessmen. “We 
can’t just sit down and say time wiD 
take care of it," warned Abdulaziz 
M. Al-Dukhefl, a leading Saudi 
banker and former deputy finance 
minister, who complained that 
some small companies were p .art- 
lessly being driven to ruin. 

Amid such anxiety, Saudi offi- 
cials are trying to balance their de- 


sire to end deficit spending against 
rails for higher expenditure on pro- 
jects that would help restore confi- 
dence among businessmen. The 
government could perhaps fulfill 
both goals by borrowing money, 
but that would jolt the kingdom's 
financial conservatism and its reli- 
gious aversion to paying interest, 
banned by Islam. 

Both Sheikh Abalkhail and Ha- 
mad al-Sayari, governor of the Sau- 
di Arabian Monetary Agency, or 
central bank, insisted that there 
was no need to borrow, in spite of 
belief among some bankers that it 
may be necessary eventually. 

Part of the Saudi confidence 
comes from the rise in oil produc- 
tion to around 4 million bands a 
day from a 20 -year-low of shghtiy 
more than 2 iwiTKo n las t summer, 
compared to a peak five years ago 
of about 10 million. Last summer’s 


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TRAVELLERS RE ASSURED 1 WATER 
IN BOMBA Y SAFE TO DRINK 1 . 


Based on his long and intimate acquaintance with 
Bombay our foreign correspondent writes: 

"Of all the things that people drink in Bombay, 
water has never figured prominently. 

Most prefer Tonic in Bombay, Mai 
tini in Bombay or Orange in Bombay 
Indeed, anything that one would 
usually mix in Bombay. 

But, let me assure you, 
is no need to stay clear 
of the water. 

Those rumours 
which infer that 
water does not mix 
with this most 
distinctive of Im- 
ported London Dry- 
Gins are well and 
trulv ill-founded.” 

tzr-. 



drop in sales cut revenue so low 
drat the Saudis finally decided to 
join other members of the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries in offering discounts 
from official OPEC prices to at- 
tract more buyers. 

Even so. the kingdom's goal of a 
government budget balanced at 
200 bOlioii riyals (S55 biffion) in the 
fiscal year ending next spring ap- 
pears out of reach. A leading inde- 
pendent economist in Riyadh esti- 
mated that, even with spending far 
below the planned level the budget 
would show a deficit of 30 billion to 
50 blllkm riyals because of the drop 
in oil revenues. 

Sheikh A ha Tk hail, the finance 
minister, said it was too early to 
predict the budgetary outcome but 
that spending priorities were being 
changed “dramatically.” He also 
said the current account, a broad 
measure of trade in goods and ser- 
vices plus certain transfer pay- 
ments, would show a smaller deficit 
than last year’s S23 billion, which 
was exceeded only by that of the 
United States. 

So far, the Saudis have coped 
with their deficits by cutting spend- 
ing and by drawing on foreign re- 
serves. Sheikh Abalkhail declined 
to talk about how much money the 
government -still has stowed away 
in foreign bank accounts and other 
investments, but dose observers 
roughly estimate that the total is 
S90 buHon, down from a peak of 
$150 billion in the early 1980s. 

At the current rate, the Saudis 


apparently would run out of easfly 
liquidated foreign reserves within a 
few years. Whether they can avoid 
that, bankers say, depends largely 
on oil prices and output in the years 
ahead. 

Even if there is no need to bor- 
row now, some businessmen and 
hankers here aigue that the govern- 
ment should do so to avoid further 
drawings on reserves and stop the 
decline in government spending. 
The government could borrow at 
home by selling some sort of bonds 
or other debt instruments, suggest- 
ed Mr. Al-Dukhefl, the. banker. 
Such borrowing, he said, would at- 
tract private Saudi funds now held 
overseas and help waahKgh the 
habit of investing at hom& 

Both Mr. ALD nHieil arid Mr. 
Olayan, the businessman, want- the 
government to foster a more effi- 
cient stock market to help Saudi 
companies raise money. Mr. 
Olayan also said the: government 
should end a ban on using mort- 
gages as coHatexaL ■. 

Perhaps more important, many 

bankers say, is the need to adapt 
the largely religious legal system so. 
that there are dear methods for 
resolving lending and other com- 
mercial disputes. At present, many 
bankers say the situation is so con- 
fused that they dare lend onhr to 
then very best customers, those, 
who generally do not need extra 
cash. 

TOMORROW: Beaks taken bat- 
tering under Saudi Arabia’s Islamic 
law. 


MOSCOW (AF) — Andrei D. Sakharov’s wife, Yelena G. Bonnet, 4 
returned to her Moscow home Tuesday from internal exile in the dosed* 
city of Goriri in prep ar ation for her planned visit to Italy for medical 
treatment. 

Guards barred foreign reporters from her apartment but confirmed 
that she was inride. Mrs. Bonner said that she expected to be in Italy on 
Monday. Her exact travel plans are not known. 

Earlier this mouth, Mrs. Bonner, 62, told relatives in the United States 
that she was being allowed to travel to Italy for treatment of eye and heart 
a ilm en t s. Her husband, the 1975 NobeL Peace Prize winner, has gone on 
hunger strike at least three times to try to win permission, for her to leave 
the countiy. 

For the Record 

Hk Pofiah government has released 15 political prisoners in recent 
days, raising the total freed this month undo 1 a “humanitarian initiative" 
to 125, the official newspaper Rzeczpospoliia said Tuesday. {Ratters) 

Nabte, the largest town lo the braettAxxopied territories, is to be the 
first major West Bank town to have a Palestinian mayor since direct 
Israeli military administration was setup there three and a half years ago, 
the Israeli administration announced Tuesday. (AFP)h 

- Prime Min i s t er Rajiv Gandhi left Tuesday on a one-day trip to 
Vietnam, the first by an Indian leader in more than 30 years, to discuss 
possible expansion of trade and economic ties. (UPI) 

Soviet and Chinese foreign mnistiy offkiais have si gned a consular 
agreemmi afta: two weeks of talks in Moscow, the official Soviet news 
agency Tasssaid Tuesday. (Reuters) 


WestGennmMamttyhScreenmg 
Third World Trainees for AIDS Virus 

The Associated Prta 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 



Japanese engineers 
working in Finland shouldn’t have 
to do planning in English. 


Just imagine if the success of your 
business depended on your mastery 
of Finnish. 

impossible? Perhaps. 

But that’s just the kind of problem 
facing many people who work for 
international companies. 

It’s difficult enough simply 
ordering lunch in a foreign language. 

But when they also have to use 
centralised software systems in a 
language other than their own, it can 
cause real problems. 

So naturally they’re not as efficient 
as they might be. 

And naturally your business 
suffers. 

IBM has a constructive suggestion. 

It’s called International Business 
Services (IBS). 

And it can help you build 
information bridges within your 
company from one country to 
another. • 

Or even across continents. 

CL Japanese engineer, for example, 
could use Application System - 
just one IBS product - to do project 
planning. 

Application System is so easy to 
use that he could learn it in a matter 
of days. 

And it works just as well in 15 

other lang uages as it does in English. 


Not only would it help him with 
planning. 

He could use it for word processing, 
graphics and statistics as well. 

With IBS, he has access to all the 
information in his company’s central 
database. 

So while he’s in Finland, he could 
check out the progress of a similar 
project in Italy. 

Or see if a partner in Denmark has 
experienced similar budget problems. 

, of course, keep your head- 
quarters well informed on all aspects 
of the building project. 

Whatever the industry, whatever 
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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27 , 1985 


Liverpool Backs Down, Balances Budget 


By Michael Wise expected multunillion-doDar loan Prime Minister Margaret Thatch- 

y Reun from foreign bankers and money er’s Conservative government to 

LONDON — After backing allocated for housing. The plan was has spent 5S2 i£ He irad* ftw'fiS 

•wn in a confrontation over raon- approved Friday by the local bon ($36 million) more in services K™*. f^Senitv * ^ 

with the national Conservative branch of the opposition Labor than it budgeted Hus year. ™ v._ 


down in a confrontation over mon- 
ey with the national Conservative 
government, leftist leaders of the 
northwestern port of Liverpool 
have begun trying to pull the city 
back from near-bankruptcy. 


branch of the oppoation Labor 
Party, to which the leftist council 
members belong. 

The dispute had threatened to 


Derek Hatton, the deputy coun- 
cil chairman and the most promi- 
nent local member of the Militant 


expulsion from the party. 

“The actions which are now be- 


lts. irora near-oarucniptcy. deprive Liverpool of most munici- Tendency, a Trotskyist faction of 
The city council's finance com- pal services and leave its 31,000 the Libor Party, bad hoped to 


mil tee agreed Monday to a plan to workers unpaid. 


balance the city budge l using an The council, defying efforts by 


force a government bailout. 

The government responded by 


ing put into effect will reconcile the 
council’s income and expenditure,’* 
said Tony Byrne, the finance com- 
mittee chairman, after approval of 
the budget plan Monday. 

Liverpool sought aid from for- 
eign banks after Britain's Public 
Works Loan Board, which ordi- 


South Africa Business Joins Apartheid Fight 


(Continued from Page I) 
Afrikaners is having a revisionist 
influence that is working its way 
slowly through the National Party. 

Hermann Giliomee, an Afrika- 
ner political scientist, calls them 
the “Boer yuppies.” Boer is the 
word for “farmer” by which the 
Afrikaners once described them- 
selves in their derivative of the 
Dutch language. 

But Mr. Giliomee says that de- 
spite the changes there is still a 
psychological gap. To the Afrika- 
ner nationalists who control the 
government, business is still seen as 


essentially the preserve of the En- 
glish establishment and thus part 
of the traditional political opposi- 
tion. 

Mr. Botha has gone out of his 
way to woo the business communi- 
ty and involve it in government in a 
way that his rightist opponents re- 
gard as heretical. But when it 
comes to pressure and influence, 
ihe English businessmen are still 
outsiders with limited leverage, 

Afrikaner businessmen have 
more political clout, but they are 
more reluctant to use it, especially 
when the government has its back 


to the wall as it does now. They are 
aware that there is an dement of 
ethnic disloyalty in joining in the 
public criticism. 

Michael Spicer, a political ana- 
lyst and public affairs adviser to 
Mr. Relly. thinks the gap is more 
than just ethnic. He also sees a 
cultural difference between govern- 
ment and business that is equally 
wide- 

The National Party is not only 
tribal, Mr. Spicer says, it is also 
populist, with its roots among 
fanners and small-town lawyers 
who felt exploited by big business. 


□ariiy lends to local authorities, de- 
nied further help to Liverpool be- 
cause of its refusal to balance its 
budget. The banks were not identi- 
fied. 

Phillips & Drew, a London bro- 
kerage, said it was crying to arrange 
for a consortium of foreign banks 
to take over £30 minion of liver- 
pool’s contractual obligations. 

Mr. Byrne said a major Swiss 
bank was involved but he refused 
to discuss terms or identify partici- 
pating institutions. 

He appealed to the Department 
of the Environment, in charge of 
local finance, to approve the for- 
eign aid The department has been 
considering parliamentary legisla- 
tion to remove the Militants. 



Keagan Urged by 101 Co°f e “ 

N„t t„ H«*ln Insurgents in Angola 


o u w the retired Chatman of Uu 

J r^DWTTmon Mr Reagan said Friday that the jet; Manhattan Bank- In the kt 
By Bernard Gwenaraan favored providing Chase said that U5 

. Savi^i forces « ebano 

WASHINGTON -A group of “V s " “L™-, Mis pending m nofilical settlement b 


WASHINGTON -'Agrajpcf bills pending m “^^fpoiitical settlement b 

101 congressmen have urged Pn»- ^ wa ^°^2twouM give dj™ ^mbero Africa, but that any aid ti 

“?,rrs 2 Sra-sH-fes 


deni Ronald Reagan not to proride 
covert aid to the rebels fighting 
against the Soviet-backed govern- 
ment in Angola. 

The . congressmen made the re- 
quest Monday in' a letter to the 
president. A copy of the letter was 

.J. lmr Dmrpcontbmw 


open aid worth S27 mflliou m hjj" tberebds before the talks had nn 
mani tarian assistance and S27 nnl “would promote . 

Hon in military aid. confrontational and more di 

Lany Speakes, the White House by the Unite, 

spokesman, «■*? if! sSes in the complex nexus o 

Ami /t hail been made on a. , * Mra " 


southern Africa.' 

made public by Representative 

Ho^Wo^aMd^nD^o. Etn*d to Mr. ^ pref 


era t, 1 who is chairman of the For- 
eign Affairs Subcommittee on Afri- 
ca. 


covm aid- Bonn Identifies Suspect 

tjijP Angolan rebels hflve rc* c o. 

coved most of their support from Jjj Blast at t - a- Store 
the Sooth African govanmeal. Toe jumen 

«£ .SSS.-Si- 5 ? 5 SSgsi't 


.Mr. Wolpe also rdeased copies 
of letters from the Organization of 
African Unity to Mr. Reagan and 
to leaders of Congress expressing 
concern about reports of imminent 
U.S. aid to the forces of Jonas Sa- 
vimbi, the leader of the group, 
which is known by its Portuguese 
acronym of UNITA. 

Mr. Wdpe has been in the fore- 
front of congressional efforts to 

j a * rLm nf m/4 tn T T"W_ 


UJC O f . . . 

Angolan government receives am 
Soi the Soviet Union, Cuba and 

other Soviet-bloc nations. 

The letter signed by the. con- 
gressmen said that any U.S. m- 

" t i— «La AnaAlan /vrnfHrT 


a car bomb explosion Sunday m 

..n .hnviluo renter 


“whether direct or indirect, covert park^iot that nyw=d 35 person. 

■ < * T - Afn^nPflUs 


which is taown by Its Portuguese » S^Anttirans. 

ssw-Sisa* 

front of congressional effort to ^i^^u^tibiectivcs in sooth- years rid, who used a Moiocca 
prevent the provision of aid to UN- passport whm buying a used car i 

ITA, either openly through coor er ^^ resentarivc also dismb- nearby Graveabroch the day be 
at gressorial or secretly through the Tbc KfE£rE JSttSSZ fore the car was used in the atiad 


— j — --- -pi,- rt-wesantarive also distnb- nearoy »«. 

af sessional or secretly through the Jbe vMRodkSE fore thecarwas used in the atiad 

Derek Hatton Central Intelligence Agency. med a letter from David Koclatet toreinc 


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(Continued from Page 1) 
Liberation Organization in 1973, 
has carried out a number of terror- 
ist operations, including assassina- 
tions Of moderate Palestinians. 

He is now reported to be operat- 
ing from Libya, although at earlier 
times in his career he has been 
sheltered by the rival regimes of 
both Syria and Iraq. 

Asked Tuesday if Abu Nidal was 
behind the operation, Mr. Mu- 
barak replied: “I know who was 
behind it, but I will not speak 
frankly on the subject. Everything 
in good time.” 

“They are Palestinians, but not 
from the PLO, he said. “They be- 
long to another faction that is 


asked eariier if Egypt had evidence Mubarak, but did not call bade. yoo . 

that Libya was responsible for the When the Egyptians med to phone, : dmo®^ at the eseapn$ pas 

hijacking, said: “Wehave some.” no one answered. ; sengera on the tarmac in th 

A commentary on stale radio, At one point, Mr. Mubarak said: confusron. 

reflecting offidal thou^it, directly “We wffl never let them get away But there questions dxw 
Mcus^Iibya of funding and insfr without being punished." Asked d the conduct of the raid and th 
gating the hijacking. be was prepared to go to war with munberaf cawatoesmtbeoppoa 

■The prime piece of evidence LAya, he replied, “We shall leave 

cited by ffiej^gmtians is a reported • S£JSASSliSSS. 


visiL to the hijacked plane on the are no wannongas, wear 

airport tarmac by the Libyan am- the opposite, _ he said. ^ If we adop 
bassador to Malta, uho was then war it will be for the sake of 


“W e are no warmongers, we are leader of the Socialist Labor Party 
the opposite,” he said. “If we adopt as raffing for a parliamentary in 


ordered to Tripoli Accormngtomeacoounisoi me 

Mr. Mubarat also said that after commando to gm by both Mr. 


ir it will be for the sake of peace.” vestigation into the responsibility 
Accordin g to the accounts of the for assanlt on the plane. 


Mbtarak and his defrase muiiAa; 
hyacking, Foreign Minisier Esmat ^ Egyptian troops fired only sev- 


■ US. Aided Commandos 

■ The United Slates provided se 
cm eq ui pment to Egyptian com 


was instructed to mandS^ring to^rm the hi 

call his counterpart in Tripoli, Ali *5™ ^ jadeedjetfiner Sunday, and offeree 

Auteui ™ a. another and two that went wild. TTTZZZl lL. 


Abdd- Salem TreUri, to say the 


1VUE w OliUlUfel lOKUWU UMli fc 4-J ■ - V — —V , . — . 1 T|_ f — r 

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(Continued from Page 1) 
that ihe Federal Bureau of Investi- 
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Israeli government knew about any 
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The man nam ed as Mr. PoDard’s 
contact in the stories circulating in 
Israel was not in Washington last 
week and never served in the Israeli 
Embassy there. 

The man identified as Mr. Pol- 
lard’s contact worked for Mr. Be- 
gin and Mr. Shamir on security 
matters. According to the story cir- 
culating in Israel, his alleged rela- 
tionship with Mr. Pollard began 
several years ago when the Ameri- 
can visited Israel 


In Jerusalem, senior Israeli offi- 
cials told a Washington Post corre- 
spondent,' William Claiborne, that 
the country’s political leadership 
bad no knowledge of a spying oper- 
ation. They said that if secret US. 
documents were accepted or pur- 
chased, h was done by persons act- 
ing contrary to longstanding, offi- 
cial Israeli government policy. 


UJS. officials stressed that it is 
unclear whether top officials of the 


These statements came against a 
background of growing concern 
that toe incident could have serious 
adverse consequences for U.S.-I5- 
radi relations. The sources here 
said the State Department had told 
the Peres government that the 
United States expects an explana- 
tion of what happened before the 
end of this week. 


■ Israel Investigating 

Aa unidentified senior govern- 
ment figure in Israd is conducting 
an intoisive secret investigation of 
the spying charges, and it is ffiedy 
that some officials win be ffis- 
missed soon, Israeli officials told 
The New York Tunes in Jerusalem 
on Monday.. 

The coalition cabinet does not 
want to commit itself to any expla- 
nation before it is certain that it 
wffl answer all the oatstanding 
questions, officials said. 

Ha’aretz newspaper repotted 
that several high- and middle-level 
figures in mteffigence were eject- 
ed to tow tint jobs, both to punish 
(hem and to persuade the Reagan 
adrmmstratkm that the political 
leadership of Israel had not been 
involved. - 


“inchmeal support,” including por 
table listening gear, that aQowec 
the commandos to determine 
where the terrorists were locatec 
inside the Boeing 737. 

The Coral Sea was ordered n 
have F-AJ8 fighter bombers and E 
2G oontnd planes prepared for ac 
tide if the Egyptian gqvemmen 
requested help in protecting the C 
L3U transport planes carrying tbt 
commrados* Pentagon, offidal: 
said. The Egyptians did not ask foi 


A UJS. offidal said the quick 
offer of UJS. military assistance 
was part of a “get tough” policy on 
terrorist attacks, with the United 
States- prepared - to help friendl) 
governmen ts requesting aid against 
terrorists. 

Pentagon officials added, how- 
ever, that the offer of assistance did 
not extend to bombing missions 
against Libyan forces if any mili- 
tary action had been taken against 
Egypt during the hijacking crisis. 


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The Politburo on Monday de- 
scribed -the summit meeting as a 
“major political event in interna- 
tional life” that could improve the 
“political and psychological cli- 
mate.’ 1 

But it also affirmed the Soviet 
position that reductions in offen- 
sive nuclear weapons were depen- 
dent on a ban on “space strike 
weapons,” a formula that would 
indude any U.S. space-based mis- 
sile defenses. 

The statement echoed Mr. Gor- 
bachev’s effort at a news confer- 
ence last Thursday to describe the 
meeting in an optimistic tone, de- 
spite its failure to resolve central 
issues of arms cootroL 
• The Politburo said the summit 
meetings ^marked the beginning of 
a dialogue with a view to achieving 
changes for the better in Soviet 
American , relations and -in the 
world as a whole.”- > 

Drawing on the joint statement 
issued after the meetings, the Polit- 
buro said that the * 


I 


m 


Kn^' 


r 




r 






¥ 


-***a»^ 





• *****£ 


<thaah quoted Ibrahim Shukry 



“pdnts of cantacL 11 But it added 
that “the fact of continuing negoti- 
ations in itself should not serve as a 
justification or a cover-up for the 
arms race. r 

In an apparent allusion to re- 
gional conflicts, the Politburo 
statement said that, in its foreign 
policy t the Communist Party would 
“continue to proceed unswervingly 
from the fact that each people has a 
sovereign right to follow its own 
path and to choose its friends and 
itsalliesT 

The Soviet press has hugely fol- 
lowed the lines of Mr. Gorbachev’s 
news conference and the joint 
statement But there were some ap- 
parently discordant notes, notably 
from the military daily Krasnaya 
Zvezda. 

In a commentary on Sunday, 
Krasnaya Zvezda discussed a letter 
from the U.S. defense secretary, 
Caspar W. Weinberger, urging Mr. 
Reagnn not to give in on arms is-^» 
■ ^ 1C letter bad not been offi- 

cially released, but accounts of it 
had appeared in The New York 
Times and in The Washington 1 
Post ^ 

“One should keep in mind ihat fe 
the dangerous demands of the Pen- M 
togon chief are not a 'voice crying 
m the wilderness,’ ” the paper said, 
ifehrnd him stand the influential 
forces of the military-industrial i 
complex. They have also not been I 
stienUhey, too, have hied to block \ 




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01 Co 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


Page 5 


11 U S. Pacifists Try 'New Way of Thinkin g* 






By Jay Mathews . standoff, is carried front one Gving-roorn jneei- 

AT ^° s ^ a Z lon Pa31 Stmet . ; tog to the next, producing puzzlement, conster- 

$ {Jil “ALO ALTO. California — It was' late 1983, -nation and skeptiasm. 
i ‘ 311(1 [he small band of affluent, wefi-edocated But- the message-bearers, including several 


couples From the Silicon Valley area of this state who were millionaires before their 40s, are often 
thought they had found a way tp end war. SO personally impressive, and their pitch so free 
nret, it needed a road test. How about Iowa? erf the slogans of partisan politics and the main- 
n T^-dazea of them, including some of the stream anti-war movement, that converts are 

Vallejrs fiaest. minds,. piled into a van headed 


,n ‘CK 




^ anti-nuclear 
movement: the MX missile, 

some foreign capitals than at home. Last year it the Strategic Defense 
established a San Franctsoo-to-Moscow “space T “ 

bridge" satellite hnk to give its Beyond War Initiative, the SS-20 missile* • 
i Award to the International Physicians fa- the ' 

Prevention of Nuclear War, which also won the steadily pouring in, each willing to spread the 
1 985 Nobel Peace Prize. . a Hole' farther. 

The group is spending $750,000 on an eight- “I wake-up every, day thinking it is in some 
satellite hookup Dec. 14. to present this year’s wavs a very iracfle process." Richard Rathbon. 


standoff, is carried from one firing-roam meet- In every presentation. Beyond War members i 
tog to the next, producing puzzlement, const er- lean htavfly on a notion of social rH.-wig f devel- 
nation and skeptiasm. oped by a former Stanford University comma- ' 

But- the message-bearers, including several mcations professor, Everett M. Rogers. “When , 
who were millionaires before their 40s, are often approximately 5 percent of a population adopts I 
so personally impressive, and their pitch so free a new idea it becomes ‘embedded.* ” says on; of ' 
erf the slogans of partisan politics and the main- the group’s pamphlets. “When the new idea is 
aTO^mti^armo^^^^ha^^wrt^re accepted hv 20 percent of the people, it is said to j 

Members decline to attack Beyond War attempts to demonstrate ihc| 

.1 . . r -T overwhelming need for change with its trade- 1 

the usual targets of the anti- mark “BB drop.” A speaker drops one BB pellet ; 

war anti-mini Aar —used in a compressed-air gun — intoameul; 

war, anu-nuciear canister to represent an the firepower used in I 

movement: the MX missile. 5* P® 1 ? reprEsent , ^ ^ ntre ’ i 

• power in todays nuclear ar senals, be dropsj 
the Strategic Defense 6,000 BBs “ lo ^ canister. The long, deafening 

r * • ■ i ocj _ _ ■ . rattle often leaves listeners shaken. 

Initiative, the 5S-20 missile. ' Since 1983, Beyond War has grown from 60 

to 400 full-time volunteers, many of them cou- 
iteadify pouring in, each willing to spread the pies in mid-career who have taken leaves of 
nessagp a Ettle farther. .... absence a sold stock to support themselves. 

wake-up every day thinking it is in some Several of the California couples have moved to 
ways a very fragile process,'] Rkhairi Raihbun, other states. The group estimates that it has at 
Lhe groap ’5 president, said of its growth- least 8,000 active supporters and many more cm 


■■ ■•■w.w 


« for Hi; 


Ta nzania for spearheading the Five Continent early to tdT* whether it will wi pffnn^ 

Peace Ini tia t i v e, a Third World plea fa super- Attacking thought processes, rather th an gov- 
power conciliation. eminent policies, avoids the frustration of the 

M Biroup’s organizing techniques protester “who demonstrates fa months to stop 
and philosophy, rather than its love of electronic the placement of Pershings in Europe and then 
extravaganza, that are be hind its rapid spread, finds they are placed there anyway.” said Craig 
Beyond War members decline to attack the Ritchey, an attorney and former White House 
usual taigets of the anti-war, anti-nudear move- fellow who coordinates the movement in San 
menu In tbrir view, changing the way people Francisco. 

think about international conflict is the crucial He said Beyond War’s apolitical approach 
issue, not the MX missile, the Strategic Defense allowed him and other members to visit Grand 
Initiative, or the SS-20 missBe. =_ -» « 


Forks Air Base in North Dakota and discuss 






Anns-control talks and the recent Geneva tbrir views with officers there, 
summit talks are fine, members argue, but they An officer Mr. Ritchey knew from his Wash- 
believe that the nature of such tools of destroc- ingtan days arranged the session. Mr. Ritchey 
tion should be decided by international tribo- said the Air Force officers “fell the}’ were after 
nals rather than by hostile governments jockey- the same thing we were. They felt the way to 


ing fa position. 


keep these weapons from bring used was to 


. ii 

js; 

, . L * 'so*. 

. J- ■*“ 

* 5 s 


The doctrine of peaceful resolution of con- make sure ours were well-maintained and ready 
flicts, from marital spats to thermonuclear to go.” 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


( last* 


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• • 


Justice Brennan’s 
Defense of Dissent 

Potter Stewart, a retired Su- 
preme Court justice, called dis- 
senting opinions issued by the 
court “subversive literature.** 
The late Chief Justice Oliver 
Wendell Holmes, himself nick- 
named “The Great Dissenter" 
called them “useless and unde- 
sirable." 

These comments reflect a 
widely held view that dissents 
lessen 'the Court's prestige: But 
Justice William J. Brennan Jr. 
dissents about 

In recent years. Justice Bren- 
nan, 79. who recently called the 
Reagan administration's view of 
the constitution “little more than 
arrogance cloaked as humility,” 
has been issuing dissenting opin- 
ions more than 50 times a year. 
He says dissents can limit die 
sweep of majority' opinions and 
giv^“practicaf- guidance” to 
those who want to circumvent 
them. 

Justice Brennan calls some 
dissents “prophetic,” such as 
Justice John- Marshall Harlan’s 
lone dissent in Plessy vs. Fergu- 
son in 1896, a ruling that upheld 
“separate but equal" facilities fa 
whites and blacks. That dissent 
became the majority view nearly 
60 years later, in Brown vs. 
Board of Education, when the 
court held that segregation in the 
public schools is unconstitution- 
al. • 

Short Takes 

Despite recent proMems with 
defectors, the Reagan adminis- 
tration has. concluded that its 
predecessors placed too much 
emphasis on the gathering of in- 
telligence by satellites, electronic 
listening posts and high-flying 
airplanes. Accordingly, the Cen- 
tral Intelligence Agency is now 
expanding traditional espionage, 
or “human intelligence” as the 
professionals call it. David F. 
Durenberger, the Minnesota Re- 
publican who is chairman of the 
Senate Intelligence Committee; 
said, “We can listen ah we want 
to the Nicaraguan traffic, but we 
don't know what’s going on in 
the heads of the Sancfinistes be- 
cause we don't have anyone” in 
the Nicaraguan government. 




'•/.tv;';? .■ 


BEACON OF LIBERTY — The 23-ton gilded lamp of 
the Statne of Liberty has been reassembled and hoisted 
above New York Harbor. The torch, removed for reno- 
vation, will be lighted for the statue's centennial in July. 


The 27-year effort to boDd a 
nationwide interstate highway 
system is nearing completion, 
with most of the 42^00-miIe 

10 traffic and most erftheremaiti? 
ing gaps under construction or in. 
the design stage. But the demand 
fa funds — fa bridges, tunnels, 
connecting roads — persists. 
Most revenue for the work conies 
from the federal gasoline 1 tax. 
Tins was raised in 1982 from 4 
cents to 9 cents a gallon (3.78 
liters). Projects eligible for feder- 
al aid aver the next 10 years 
would require $212 billion, but 
current highway taxes will raise 
only $124 billion during that 
time. 

Eighteen states now have lot- 
teries. Such lotteries brought in a 
lotal of $52 billion in 1983. Rep- 
resentative Mario Biaggi, a Dem- 
ocrat from New Yak City, says j 
a national lottery could raise up 
to $18 billion a year. 

. I 

Nebraska’s Kerrey • i 
Decides Not to Run 

Nebraska’s Robert Kerrey is a 


Democratic governor in a tradi- 
tionally Republican state. At 47, 
a winner of the Congressional 
Medal of Honor who became a 
distance runner despite having 
lost a leg in Vietnam, he has 
acquired extra glamour through 
his dose friendship with Debra 
Winger, the film actress. But he 
has derided not to run again 
when his term expires in two 
years. 

Mr. Kerrey's private explana- 
tion is the same as the public 
one: “It is time for me to move 
on to a future different from be- 
ing a career politician,” he said. 
“In my heart there is lacking the 
necessary call fa ‘four more 
years.* ” 

The governor did not ay what 
his future might hold. John Cav- 
anaugh, a former Democratic 
congressman, said: “This takes a 
lot of the fun out of the political 
scene. Bob Kerrey was going to 
be a national figure, and Nebras- 
ka Democrats in general don’t 
play on the national stage, at 
least not since William Jennings 
Bryan was last nominated for 
president, back in 1908." 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


PiageT 


The group's creed was developed when its 
core members were pan of a “human potential” 
organization called Creative Initiative. 

“I will resolve conflict," it say 5 . “I will not use 
violence. 1 wifi not preoccupy myself with an 
enemy. I will maintain a spirit of good wifi. I will 
work together with others to build a world 
beyond war." 

Some veterans of the anti-war movement ex- 
press doubt about Beyond War, particularly its 
upper-income leadership and its disdain for 
confrontation politics. “I'm suspicious of any 
group that takes a non confrontational posi- 
tion,” said David McReynolds of War Resisters 
League, which is based in New York. 

Don Wurtz, Beyond War’s treasurer, said the 
group raised S2.1 minion to support its activities 
in the last fiscal year. He estimates that it will 
raise more than S3 million this year. 


E. Morante, 
Author, 73, 
Dies in Italy 

By Herbert Mitgang 

.VfH 1 York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — Elsa Morante, 
73, the Italian author whose novels 
won two of her country's highest 
awards, the Viareggio and Strega 
prizes, died of a heart attack Mon- 
day in a clinic in Rome. 

Miss Morante, a Roman of Sicil- 
ian descent, showed compassion 
through her characters fa people 
living in the underground culture 
of Rome. 

In one of her most ambitious 
works, “History: A Novel,’' pub- 
lished in the United States in 1 977. 
Miss Morante created a nightmare 
landscape of Rome between 1941 
and 1947 that resembled the neor- 
ealistic films of the postwar years. 

Among Miss Moraine's best- 
known novels were “House of Li- 
ars" ( 1951), set in a city like Paler- 
mo; “Arturo's Island" (1956). and. 
most recently, “Aracoeli" (1985), 
about a homosexual, his family and 
his memories. 

Miss Morante led a life of soli- 
tude in Rome in recent years. She 
suffered from hydrocephalus, an 
abnormal increase of fluid in the 
cranium. 

She was married 10 Alberto Mo- 
ravia, the novelist and playwright, 
in 1941. They separated 22 years 
later and had no children. 

Walter W. Jenkins, 

Aide to President Johnson 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — 
Walter W. Jenkins, 67. a longtime 1 
aide and dose friend of President 
Lyndon B. Johnson, died Saturday 
in Austin, Texas. He suffered a 
stroke June 17. 

Mr. Jenkins resigned his job of 
special assistant to the president in 
the fan of 1964 after his arrest on a 
morals charge. He was arrested ata 
Washington YMCA, accused of 
homosexual behavior. The incident 
created a brief scandal about secu- 
rity in the final weeks of the John- 
son-Gold water presidential cam- 
paign. 

Mr. Jenkins forfeited bond in- 
stead of appearing in court 10 fight 
the charge, but the action was not 
legally considered an admission of 
guilt and did not bring a convic- 
tion. After a period in a hospital, he 
returned to private life. 








Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


Spate of Espionage Arrests in U.S. 

Is Largely Coincidence, Officials Say 


By Stephen Engel berg 

•Von r.wfc Timet Service 


WASHINGTON — Reagan ad- 
ministration officials say the recent 
spate of espionage arrests, includ- 
ing four persons in four days, is 
largely coincidence and reflects in- 
creased awareness of security prob- 
lems, not a sudden decision to 
round up all Americans known to 
be spying for foreign powers. 

Stephen S. Trou, the head of the 
Justice Department's criminal divi- 
sion, said in an interview this week 
that the timin g was dictated by 
circumstances. 

“These things just kind of all 

emerged,** be said. “People are just 
sort of stunned by the number of 
cases going on and they're looking 
for more than is there. We move 
when we’re ready to move." 


There have been at least 10 per- 
sons arrested on espionage charges 
in the United States this year, a 
total that has exceeded any other 
year in history, according to Justice 
Department records. 

An intelligence source famili ar 
with the four arrests said “there is 
no thread that ties them together." 

Mr. Trott said that this year’s 
succession of arrests arose from a 
change in policy by the administra- 
tion of President Jimmy Carter, 
which decided to prosecute spy sus- 
pects instead of dropping the 
charges or using suspects as double 
agents. 

Coupled with this, he said, were 
increased resources for the counter- 
intelligence program at the FBI 
and the passage of legislation that 


U.S. Brought Spy Charges 
Agcanst4 Witldn Last Week 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Within the last week. U.S. authorities have 
arrested four persons on espionage-related charges: 

• Ronald William Pelton. 44. a former communications specialist 
for the National Security Agency, was arrested early Monday and 
charged with espionage. 

Mr. Pelton. who worked for the agency from 1965 to 1979. is 
accused of selling information to the Soviet Union. Documents filed 
Monday contend that Mr. Pelton provided Soviet agents with details 
of "a United States intelligence-collection project targeted at the 
Soviet Union." 

The FBI said Mr. Pelton became a spy after he lefL the the agency in 
1979. Officials indicated that they believe Mr. Pelton’s motivation 
was financial. 

White at the agency, Mr. Pelton had a top-secret security clearance 
with special access to signal intelligence, according to the FBI. 

9 Jo nathan Jay Pollard, 31. is suspected of spying for Israel while 
working as a counterintelligence analyst for the navy. 

He was arrested and charged with espionage last Thursday after 
allegedly dying to seek asylum at the Israeli Embassy. 

Mr. Pollard was hired by the Naval Operational Intelligence Center 
.in 1979. In the fall of 1983, he was assigned to a newly formed, anti- 
terrorism unit of the Naval Investigative Service. 

Mr. Pollard. the son of a professor of microbiology at the Universi- 
ty of Notre Dame, is a graduate of Stanford University' in California, 
where he studied international relations. He also attended the Fletch- 
er School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University in Massachu- 
setts. 

o Anne L. Henderson-Podard, 25, wife of Mr. Pollard, was charged 
Monday with unauthorized possession of national defease informa- 
tion. 

The U.S. government says Mrs. Pollard was told by her husband to 
remove “certain articles" from their apartment on Nov. IS, while her 
husband was being questioned by agents of the FBI. 

• Larry Wu-Tai Chin. 63, is one of a handful of employees of the 
CIA ever aiTested on espionage charges. 

Mr. Chin, retired From the Central Intelligence Agency since 1981. 
was accused Saturday of spying for China for more than 30 years. 

The government contends that Mr. Chin, a native of C hina who 
became an American citizen, provided a variety of information to the 
Chinese from the time he went to work for the CLA in 1952 until his 
arrest, including the location of Chinese prisoners of war in Korea. He 
is accused of receiving more than S 140.000 for the information he 
provided. 


gave the Justice Department added 
authority for wiretapping. 

According to the Justice Depart- 
ment the number of wiretapping 
applications approved by the For- 
eign Intelligence Surveillance 
Court has more than doubled, from 
319 in 1980 to 635 in 19S5. Taps 
authorized by the court were used 
against John" A. Walker Jr., a re- 
tired U.S. Navy enlisted man, and 
similar taps may have played a role 
in the arrest of Larry Wu-Tai Chin, 
a retired employee of the CIA 
whose telephone conversations ore 
described^ an FBI affidavit 

Mr. Trott said another recent 
laws helping prosecutors deal with 
secret material behind closed doors 
had also made it easier to bring 
espionage charges. 

One factor that may have en- 
couraged the FBI to move quickly 
in the cases was the criticism the 
bureau received for f ailin g to de- 
tain Edward Lee Howard, a former 
Central Intelligence Agency officer 
who is believed to have fled the 
country. According to law enforce- 
ment officials, the FBI did not have 
sufficient evidence to arrest Mr. 
Howard. 

According to court documents. 
Mr. Chin had been under suspicion 
since 1983. Ronald W. Pelton. the 
National Security Agency employ- 
ee arrested early Monday, had ad- 
mitted espionage to FBI agents in 
an interview on Sunday. Jonathan 
Jay Pollard and his wife were taken 
in shortly after Mr. Pollard, under 
surveillance by the FBI. drove onto 
the grounds of the Israeli Embassy 
here on Thursday. 

.An administration official, asked 
about the large number of espio- 
nage arrests, replied: ’is it because 
we’re looking harder or because 
there are more? I would say it’s 
both." 



Catholic Church Is Urged 

To Widen Bishops’ Bale 


i) t >V 


The AaooGMd Pim 


HONDURANS PROTEST RESULTS — In Tegucigalpa, Honduras, backers of 
Rafael Leonardo Caflejas took to the streets to protest the outcome of the presidential 
election. The government candidate, Jos£ Azcona Hoyo of the Liberal Party, was 
expected to be declared the winner over Mr. CaHejas, candidate of tbe National Party. 


77rf Associated 

Sjtssaffiss 

w £«« e mbly caned tc .**»«£ 
S- 0 f the reforms of the Sec- 
SJdvltican Council. Wshgpsf»» 
the Third World also called for 

increased support 

dunch for embattled churriimra 

working for the poor and op- 

pI Bishop James W. Malone of 

Bishops, said he behoved there 

can II reforms to justify so me ex- 
tension of coUegiahty to the direc-. 

tion of bishops." 

Before commg to Rome, Bishop 
Malone repeatedly called for clar- 
ifications" of the Vatican II pro- 
nouncements on coUegiahty. 


Coflegjality, in church parlance^ £ 

refers to the collaborative relation- 
ship of the pope and bishops in 

* - .. J 


Shuttle to Test System to Build Space Stations 


New York Tims Service 

CAPE CANAVERAL. Honda 
— Preparations for T uesday night's 
launc hing of the U.S. space shuttle 
Atlantis were going well Tuesday, 
and space agency officials said they 
expected no difficulty in meeting 
the unusually stringent lime sched- 
ule dictated by the mission. 

A central part of the seven-day 
flight will be a test of a construc- 
tion system by which large space 
stations could be built rapidly and 
easily by astronauts working out- 
side the shuttle. 


Another major purpose of the 
mission will be to launch three 
communications satellites, one 
each for the United States, Mexico 
and Canada. 

Flight 6 IB, the 23d since shuttle 
flights were inaugurated in 1981. 
will begin at night for only the 
second time in tbe program's histo- 
ry. Controllers must launch the At- 
lantis within one of two brief peri- 
ods, or “windows." Failure would 
mean postponing the fli gh t for a 
full day. 

The liftoff was scheduled for 


7:29 P.M. local time and could be 
delayed for only nine minutes. A 
second window, only four minutes 

. " -fit " < C./V7 


long, was available starting at S:07 
PJM. 


U.S. Parties to Sponsor Presidential Debates 


United Press International 


. WASHINGTON — On the rec- 
ommendation of a bipartisan com- 
mission. the Democratic and Re- 
publican national committee 
chairmen agreed Tuesday that their 
parties sponsor presidential cam- 
paign debates starting in 1988. 

Paul G. Kirk Jr., for the Demo- 
crats. and Frank j. Fahrcnkopf Jr.. 
for the Republicans, stressed that 
they could not commit future can- 
didates to debates, but agreed that 
an v joint appearances like those in 
196U. 1976! 1980 and 1984 should 
be run by the parties themselves 
rather than by the League of Wom- 
en Voters, as" in the past. 


Other proposals by the biparti- 
san Commission on National Elec- 
tions. which is sponsored by 
Georgetown University’s Center 
for Strategic and International 
Studies, were that: 

• Congress make Election Day 
in 1988 a one-time national holiday 
as an experiment to see if it in- 
creases voter turnout. 


• Jowa. New Hampshire and 
Michigan begin national conven- 
tion selection in the same week and 
a Southern and a Western state join 
them in the first week. 


Officials of the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration 
said that Mexico did not intend to 
use its new Morelos-B satellite dur- 
ing its first three years in orbit. The 
satellite will be launched into what 
is known as an inclined parking 
orbit, the inclination of wmch will 
drift gradually toward the orbit the 
satellite will occupy when it be- 
comes active. 

Mexico’s needs for a telecom- 
munication satellite are currently 
met by the Morelos-A, launched 
June 17, which enabled Mexico to 
maintain co mmuni cations during 


part of the Atlantis’s seven-person 
crew, will conduct several biologi- 
cal experiments and test a variation 
of Chinese acupuncture therapy as 
a possible remedy for space sick- 


Mexican officials said that Dr. 
Neri would use “electropuncture" 
during the flight, applying direct- 
current electric shocks to the parts 
of his own body supposed by acu- 
puncturists to be associated with 
motion sickness. 


the September earthquakes. 
NASA sources said that J 


• A National Registration Day 
be held to increase participation. . 


• Individual contribution limits 
to presidential candidates be in- 
creased from SI, 000 to $2,500. but 
limits on contributions to political 
action committees remain un- 
changed. 

• States consider a single closing 
time for polls across the country. 


Trackers' Strike Blocks Rio 


Unual Press International 


RIO DE JANEIRO — Hun- 
dreds of striking truck drivers 
jammed the main highway into Rio 
on Tuesday. The}- are demanding 
unified national rates for freight 
transport. 


NASA sources said that Mexico 
was able to acquire the second sat- 
ellite, -a Hughes 376, and have it 
launched at a cost far below what it 
expects to have to pay three years 
from now. Mexico therefore decid- 
ed to buy the sateBiie and, in effect, 
put it in orbiting storage- 
The Mexican and Australian sat- 
ellites are expected to bring tele- 
phone service and television to 
hundreds of remote communities 
that could not be served economi- 
cally using conventional micro- 
wave communications links 
Dr. Rodolfo Neri Vela, a Mexi- 
can mission specialist who will be 


High points of the flight wjD in- 
dude two excursions outside the 
shuttle by crew members who will 
test two space station assembly 
methods. In one method, called Ex- 
perimental Assembly of Structures 
in Extravehicular Activity, or 
EASE, astronauts will assemble a 
four-sided structural unit from 12- 
foot (3.6-meter) aluminum beams. 

In the other test, of a system 
called Assembly Concept for Con- 
struction of Execrable Space Struc- 
tures, or ACCESS, the astronauts 
will assemble a 45-foot truss that 
could serve as a key building unit in 
a space station. 

Insurance costs have risen so 
high that for the first time, a com- 
mercial satellite is being launched 
without outride mwnc» RCA 
Corp.’s 4,144-pound (l^SO-kdo- 
gram) Satcom K-2 satellite rail go 
aloft insured only by RCA ksetf. 


' bEp that 

oressious of coflegjality" by U.S. 
bishops were not just reflection* 
"of those gimmicks and pragmatic 
contrivances for which American! 

axe thought to have a penchant." ^ . 

**We see celiegjaliiy as embodied; 
in our conference as an important 
service to evangelization." he said,’ 
in bis speech. 

Hie issue of shared responsible . 
itv between the pope and bishops is 
considered a rn^jor issue before th^ 

synod of 165 bishops from arotuu^ 
the world. 

Bishop John W. Gran of Oslo-, 
representing the Scandinavian 
bishops’ conference, went a step, 
further, asserting that the Vatican. 

II goals on coflegjality “hardly have 
been realized according to expecta- 
tions." 

“If anything, a tendency is felt , 
toward the return to the idea of 
diocesan bishops as representatives' 

of Rome rather than aflmlniarai 
tors in thdr own right,** he said. • 

Bishop Gras saki. the Scandium, 
vian bishops also have noted signs 
of a “return to centralization." 

He said that Pope John Pad II 
and the Vatican should allow local, 
bishops to seek their own identity 
“without rgffqng damage to church 
unity" <V 

He also called for a greater local. ^ 
say m the appointment -of bishops, , * 

The pope -'sat through all 21 
speeches Tuesday morning, taking, 
notes aid reading texts,' said the 
Reverend Diannmd Martin, a syn- 
od spokesman. 

The synod meetings are dosed to 
the public. Excerpts of the speeches; 
are made available by spokesmen- 
and in new releases issued by the 
Vatican. . 


Suriname to Withdraw 


BanoaPoiiskal Parties 


The Associated Press ‘ 

.PARAMARIBO, Suriname — ' 
Surname’s military-controlled, 
government has lifted a five-yeari 
.San-on political parties and an : 
noanced the creation of a new con-, 
sti ta tke and legislature beginning 

Jaaj- 

: Thfcrc was no mention of elec* 
tions. The ahnouncement by the 
government of lieutenant Colonel' 


a l980coup, was read at a rally ofT 
30,000 people marking the lOiti an- 
mveoary of this South American 
country's independence from the 
Neihetlands. 




. •WTORJ-WYHOtlB TOBACCO CO. 




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”7 '1'.'^ *> 


*• 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


INSIGHTS 



Page 7 


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Bj Barbara Grossette 

jVew York Timet Service 


ent Falters, Burma Warily Seeks Help From 



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young woman setting pineapples at the 
.bosy feny slip in Mazuklay. Arran g in g 
her wares on aboard, she dips into her basket 
for a handful of white flower bods. With email 
puffs of breath, she blows each one into, a 
blossom and decorates every frail. The list 
flower she tucks onsdf-consdously into her’ 

blade hair. ■■■' 

The inherent beauty and grace of the Burmese 
Aave been remarked upon f or as long as f oragn- 
wts have visited the country. At the tom of the 
centmy, R.G. Talbot Kelly, a British painter 
and travel writer, observed: “These people have 
so much that is innately pretty in their compos*- 
don that nature itself seems to be beautified by 
their presence. Even the poorest have a peculiar 
faculty for arranging and wearing their simple 
garments to advantage.'’ 

In Burma, appearance testifies to a sense of 
decorum mid dignity, explained a Western-edu- 
cated Burmese woman. When the Burmese are 
persuaded to talk about themselves as a nation, 
their larger preoccupation with self-esteem also 
becomes evident “We are careful not to dis- 
grace the family, 7 * the woman said. 

• When independence was won from Britain in 
1948, the Burmese had varying political virions 
for their country. But most of them agreed that 
after the psychological, social and economic 
dislocations of British rule, they wanted no 
more foreign domination, and certainly no more 
Westernization. They wanted to develop the 
abundant resources of Banna’s beautiful fa-nrirn 
their own way. ' 

Today, nearly 38 years later, they are still 
writing for the chance to create a nation in their 
own image. Burma is ruled by an authoritarian 
and often xenophobic militar y bureaucracy un- 
der General Ne Win, who took power m 1962 
and isolated the country from almost all foreign 
assistance and infliwwu** The proud Burmese 
nevertheless are haunted by the world outside. 

The dilemma is played out in small tragicom- 
ic moments. Two recent graduates of Rangoon 
University, trying to sdl their services as lour 
guides, stnmble with diminishing confidence 
through an explanation of Buddmsi Lent and 
the holy day of Watso. Finally, one blurts oat: “I 
am so sorry. We don’t know the festival days. 
We only know what days the foreign flights 
come in." 

" Burma has been on increasingly mwiiai terms 
with the United States, West Germany, Austra- 
lia and Japan for slightly more titan a decade. 
More recently, Rangoon improved its links with 
China, a country whose economic policy 
changes are watched closely by the Burmese. 

Despite the government’s loosely defined so- 
cialist philosophy, inte rnational communism 
has always been seen as a danger, at least by the 



Tha New Ynt Tone* 

The capital, Rangoon, a city of young people and of 19th-centnry buildings constructed during British rule. 

As in many poor countries, the people responded to scarcity and 
oppression with an unofficial, sympathetic system of their own. 



have grown chilli er. 

Living under a state-imposed philosophy 
called The Burmese Way to Socialism, tins na- 
tion of 36 million people leels acutely its grow- 
ing dependence on Asian neighbors who chose 
the paths of industrialization and a frcc-maiket 
economy. The Burmese, poor and caught in a 


net of surveillance, find daily life a test of their 
resourcefulness. Matty prepare for jobs and 
graduate with skills only to find (hax they are 
imemployableL 

Like many people in poor countries, they 
seem to have responded by collectively aban- 
doning the official Way and creating an unoffi- 
cial system of thor own. It is a sympathetic, 
symbiotic method of survival. A Hide “‘pocket 
money" to low-paid civil servants smooths nec- 
essary transactions; “moonlighting" in legal or 
not-so-legal private businesses makes life as a 
bureaucrat viable. The black market has become 
a way of life. 

AT precisely 8; 15 every weekday morning in 

/\ Rangoon, traffic comes to a halt along a 
-L JLwdl-deFmed route through the capital 
city’s busy thoroughfares. There are no flashing 
fights or sirens, just silence as a sleek black car 
rolls past, its white-curtained windows hiding 
thepassengcr from view. 

“The president,” a taxi driver explains. “We 
have to be quiet and not move, or 7 will lose my 
license." 

President San Yu’s daily motorcade may be a 
hint of things to come. Until recently, it was 
thought that Mr. San Yu, a former general and 
army drid of staff, lacked the real authority that 
would bolster such displays of self-importance. 
Although he assumed the ceremonial duties of. 
the presidency four yeans ago, all power rested 


with Mr. Ne Win. who was the chairman and 
sole derision-maker of the Burma Socialist Pro- 
gram Party. It is the country’s only legal poeti- 
cal organization. 

Last summer, Mr. San Yu’s fortunes changed 
suddenly when the organization held its Fifth 
Party Congress. Mr. Ne Win, 74, surprised 
many in the diplomatic corps by naming Mr. 
San Yu. 67, to the newly created post of deputy 
party chairman. The move placed him in the 
direct fine of succession. 

Diplomats in Rangoon describe Mr. San Yu 
as a man who may onoe have been influenced by 
Soviet-style socialism, but who now seems to be 
of an unknown ideology. One calls him “a loyal 
and colorless character," adding: “But this may 
be just what Ne Win wants. The chairman wants 
no jockeying for position in the hierarchy after 
his death. He wants to leave behind the Burma 
he has created — and he believes it is his 
Burma." 

Mr. Ne Win, though universally feared, is a 
member in good standing of the generation of 
Burmese liberators who campaigned for inde- 
pendence in the 1930s and ’40s. It is an image 
that be fosters. 

The general, who had taken over the new 
Burmese national armed forces before indepen- 
dence, distinguished himself as head of a care- 
taker military government from 1958 to 1960. 
He put the badly divided country bade on trade 
economically and strategically after the drift 


C-- 


Government vs. the 'Sanctuary Movement 9 : 
U.S. Clerics on Trial for Sheltering Aliens 




■4-*; 


a 





By Laurie Becklund 

Los Angela Times Service 

UCSON, Arizona — On Oct. 1, 1984, 
Salomon Graham, federal informant and 
veteran smuggler of illegal aliens, 
strapped a recording device to his chest anti 
drove to meet a group of suspected smugglers of 
illegal aliens under investigation by, the UJS. 
T in m i g ratio n and Naturalization Service. 

“This is C-1 92,” or confidential informant 92, 
Mr. Graham said into the hidden microphone as 
he drove into a parking lot “1 am at the Camel- 
bad: Presbyterian Church." 

He walked inside the church. The next thing 
he heard, according to a transcript of his tape, 
was “evoybody reciting a prayer," and then a 
Salvadoran man describing to the congregation 
(he violence he said had forced bis family to flee 
their native country. 

Mr. Graham’s recording may have been the 
first time that the U.S. government has bugged 
an open church service. 

“To ray knowledge, the U-S. government nev- 
er had to before,” raid Don Reno, special assis- 
tant U.S. attorney, in an interview. “But this 
group was conspiring to smuggle illegal aliens 
into the United States, and they were using the 
national media to publicly recruit more co- 
conspirators.” - 

Thus, the federal government secretly investi- 
gated what was probably the most public alien- 
smuggling ring in -U& history: the so-called 
sanctuary movement that has openly professed 
to sheltering about 2,000 illegal aliens. 

Tim investigation ended last January when a 
federal grand jury indicted 16 members of the 
chiurih-based movement oh felony conspiracy 
charges, including 7! counts of smuggling, har- 
boring and transporting illegal aliens. 

Three defendants later pleaded guilty to less- 
er charges. Charges against two others have 
been dropped. 

The trial of fberemaming 11 — an ecumeni- 
cal mix that includes two Roman Cathohc 
priests, a Presbyterian minister, two Quakers, 
two Methodists, a Unitarian, two Catholic lay 
^workers and. a Catholic nun — started this 
' mouth after a summer of pretrial motions. It is 
expected to last into January. 

The trial pits the federal government against a 
growing movement endorsed by nearly 300 
churches and synagogues, 10 universities, and 
half a dozen city councils that contend they have 
a moral duty.-eveo a legal right, to help people 
who claim they are fleeing for their Dves, 

“The most fundamental issue,” Mr. Repo 
said, “is whether persons in disagreement with 
their government can take the law into their own 

hands and interpret that law in a way whksh is in 

dear violation of its purpose.* 
in his opening statement to the jury on Nov. 
IS, Mr. Reno was careful to keep religion oat of 
the courtroom; even ioihe extent of referring to 

Sister Dariene Nicgarski, a Phoenix nun, as 
Miss Nicgorslri- He then described in detail how 
defendants had carried out a “cri minal enter- 
prise” by guiding aliens, through a hole in the 
border fence, . or - by . giving them American 
school uniforms or fraudulent documents to 
bring them to the United States. 

In . a aeries of lengthy pretrial rulings, U.S. 
District Judge Eari H. Carroll made « dear that 
be considered the proceedings to be an “aliens 
smuggling case," and would not allow evidence 
tha t dealt with international law,- conditions in , 



The Reverend John ML Fife 


NYT 


foreign countries, or defendants’ motives or 
religions beliefs. ' 

He al$o rejected a defense motion to dismiss 
the charges on the ground that the federal gov- 
ernment was guilty of misconduct in its use of 
Mr. Graham and another informer. Both re- 
ceived immimity from prosecution on charges of 
smug glin g aliens, and were paid 514,000 for 
their work. ' 

T HE motion charged that recordings vio- 
lated First Amendment rights of dozens 
of worshipers not involved in the investi- 
gation and caused a “chitting effect" in many 
congregations. 

The second informant, Jesus Cruz, was de- 
scribed by sanctuary volunteers as a genial fel- 
low in Ins late 50s who had been an “uncle” to 
Latin American children he had helped trans- 
port in his undercover role as volunteer. Mr. 
Cruz even volunteered to send Christmas cards 
to children as part of a ruse to secure their 
addresses for subsequent arrest, sanctuary 
workers said. 

* 'God Mess you, father.’ be would say to me, 
and give me a hug," said Tony Clark, a defen- 
dant who is an associate priest at Sand Heart 
Church in ’Nogales,' Mexico. 

Judge Carroll has yet to rule on one remain- 
ing motion charging that the Justice 

Department "selectively prosecuted” movement 
members for political reasons while all but ig- 
noring ranchers who induce workers to cross the 
border to work in their .fields. 

Documents submitted in support of that mo- 
tion draw on investigators’ files from the day the 

i file 


immigration service opened its sanctuary file on 
March 26, 1982, to Jan. 14, 1985, when the 
defendants were indicted. 

The first memo was written by a Border 
Patrol agent who attended a news conference 
Staged in 1982 by a defendant, the Reverend 
John Fife, to announce that his Southride Pres- 
byterian Church in Tucson was deckring itself a 
sanctuary for Guatemalan and Salvadoran refu- 


Tbe agent described the event as the begin- 
ning of a ploy to demonstrate to the public that 
the U.S. government, via “jack-booted Gestapo 
Border Rurol agents, [thinks] nothing of break- 
ing down the doors of their churches to drag 
Jesus Christ out to be tortured and murdered.” 

An immigration service intelligence agent in 
Yuma noted in 1983 that a story about the 
movement appeared in a Catholic-Episcopal 
magazine with what he described as a “left-wing 
format of stories about nuclear disarmament, 
UJS. foreign policy [and] blade and poor peo- 
ples’ movements." 

In September 1984, an immigration agent 
based in Los Angeles attended two sanctuary 
events there, including one on Sept. 30 in which 
the Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, who bad sought 
the Democratic presidential nomination, sup- 
ported the movement and “expressed the usual 
anti-Reagan sentiment," the agent said. 

D ENYING that the case had been prose- 
cuted for political reasons, Mr. Reno 
said that “everyone knew this would be 
a controversial case because priests and nuns 
were being indicted” 

He added, “They singled themselves out for 
prosecution.” 

Since 1982, leaders of the movement have 
welcomed interviews by reporters and allowed 
television cameras to follow them occasionally 
as they transported refugees across the country. 

They have distributed thousands of bro- 
chures^ conducted public caravans of aliens 
through downtown streets and established a 
toll-free telephone number to widen their net- 
work. Mr. Fife even posted a billboard-sized 
sign in front of his church announcing in Span- 
ish that tin; church was a “sanctuary for the 
oppressed of Central America." 

But such activities did not constitute the sort 
of evidence that he needed for trial, Mr. Reno 
said. “It was necessary to make the recordings to 
corroborate informants’ reports." he said. The 
informants will testily at die trial, bat the tapes 
will not be introduced because they are unneces- 
sary and “difficult to work with,” Mr. Reno 
said. 

Defense attorneys said they suspected that 
Mr. Reno would not introduce the tapes be- 
cause they could reveal the defendants’ motiva- 
tions. 

The defendants have said they were following 
ancient traditions of sanctuary. Moreover, they 
said, they were acting in accordance with inter- 
national treaties and the 1980 U.S. Refugee Act, 
both of which require countries to grant asylum 
to anyone who has legitimate fear of persecution 
in Ms homdand- 

The defendants contend that, unlike some 
nonviolent movements of the past, they are not 
practicing civil disobedience. 

"It is the INS who is violating the law, not 
ns.” asserted Jim Corbett. 52. a Quaker and 
retired rancher. With Mr. Fife, he is considered 
a co-founder of the movement. 

Judge Carroll has ruled that the defendants 
have the right to mount an unusual but legiti- 
mate “advice of counsel” defense that contends 
they were innocent because they had not intend- 
ed to break the law, had consulted attorneys, 
and had been advised that what they were doing 
was legal 

Defense attorneys declined to outline any 
strategics in interviews. But they appeared con- 
fident, almost lighthearted, as they prepared 

their opening statements. 


and dissension it had known under Prime Min- 
ister Nu, an indecisive visionary. There have 
been no democratic elections since 1963, when 
Mr. Nn was overthrown by Mr. Ne Win. 

The years of battle with the Karen. Shan, 
Ka ehin Arakanese and other ethnic armies who 
are opposed to rule by Barmans, the country’s 
ethnic majority, have brought the Burmese mili- 
tary establishment into direct confrontation 
with Communist insurgents. The insurgency is 
now more or less confined to the guerrillas of 
the Burma Communist Party, who have been 
pushed into the northeast along the Chinese 
border. 

In the past, China, which supported the insur- 
gent Communists, posed a greater problem than 
the Soviet Union for Mr. Ne Win. But Chinese 
backing for the rebels recently has appeared to 
stop, and Burmese leaders, including Mr. Ne 
Win, have visited China His visit was a signifi- 
cant step in gating Chinese recognition of his 
legitimacy as party chairman, for Beijing tradi- 
tionally values party-to-party ties and had long 
maintained links only with the Burma Commu- 
nist Party-. President Li Xiaimian of C hina paid 
a state visit to Burma last March. 

Experts say that Rangoon may use the Chi- 
nese leadership’s new stance to deal a double 
blow to the rebellious northeast, attacking both 
military targets and the opium fields that now 
finance the guerrillas. According to reports in 
Rangoon, Burmese pilots are already being 


trained in the United States for crop-eradication 

missions. 

Some Burmese, as well as foreign students of 
the country’s politics and insurgencies, specu- 
late that Vietnam —with or without the Soviet 
Union — might step into China's role os backer 
of the Burma Communist Party. No evidence 
supports this as yet. 

The philosophical base of Burma's economy, 
which badly needs new direction, remains 
vaguely socialist. It was formed by the Marxist 
and Fabian thinking prevalent among the ami- 
colonial movements of the 1930s, when Burma’s 
first generation of leaders was coming of politi- 
cal age. To them, the theories matched realities: 
Capitalism in prewar Burma meant exploitation 
by European banks, eviction by foreign land- 
lords and indebtedness to Chinese merchants 
and Indian money lenders. 

\\ T HEN the Ne Win government came 

%3l/ to power, these ideas were codified. 

IT often contradictorily, in two docu- 
ments, The Burmese Way to Socialism and The 
System of Con-elation of Man and His Environ- 
ment. “Man matters most” was the noble motto 
enunciated by the Burma Socialist Program Par- 
ty. 

But practice overtook theory. Military offi- 
cers with little education and no experience rose 
to the helms of vital institutions, and the stale's 
intrusion in every area of the economy, includ- 
ing wholesale nationalizations, soon took its 
toIL 

As recently as last August, at the Fifth Party 
Congress of the Burma Socialist Program Party, 
the government publicly stated it would cooper- 
ate more with foreigners, if only temporarily, in 
Burma's development. 

Diplomats and development experts working 
in Burma say that cooperation has been very 
slow. The success of projects involving industry, 
agriculture, public services or the building of an 
infrastructure hinge on personal contacts with 
suspicious and unprofessional!}’ uneven minis- 
try officials, and on a decision-making process 
that is almost clandestine. 

Central to Burma's unofficial economy is the 
importation, legally or otherwise, of foreign 
goods. Burma has shortages in almost every 
commodity and produces virtually no luxury 
items. Smuggling, either as a wholesale distribu- 
tor or Tor oneself, is the more common way of 
breaking into the import trade. 

The country's precious stones and metals, 
teak, tin and even cattle cross an uncontrolled 
border riddled by insurgency and corruption. 
Insurgents in some sections engage in smuggling 
and levy taxes on other smugglers. Opium and 
refined heroin flow out, and hard currency, 
goods and even such services as Thai dentistry- 
are sought in return. 

The Burmese Army is trying to close some, if 
not all, of the smuggling routes in areas domi- 
nated by the Karen ethnic minority. But new 
routes continue to open, and more goods are 
arriving from Singapore and Malaysia's Penang 
Island to take the place of Thai products. 

Although permission to go abroad is granted 
rarely. Burmese in certain jobs may now legally 
bring back a limited amount of foreign goods if 
appropriate duties are paid. This system has 
catapulted the merchant seaman to a level of 
prestige in Burmese society. 


Saaaing is now- the home of more than 5.000 
monks and nuns. The men in red and rail robes 
and women in orange and pale peach reflects 
the pervasive role of Buddhism in the daily life 
of central Burma. 

In contrast to Southeast Asia's other major 
Theravada Buddhist nations. Sri Lanka and 
Thailand, where monasiickm has been politi- 
cized and religious practice has been ritualized 
to 2 greater degree. Burma’s Buddhism appears 
refreshingly down-to-earth. 

A Sagaini monk talks freely, like most Bur- 
mese. of the' military dictatorship. "The govern- 
ment knows it cannot challenge the Buddhist 
church. The monks would fighL 

“But it controls the freedom of monks as it 
controls the freedom of other citizens." he said. 
“It is hard for us to travel. 1 had requested to go 
to Sn Lanka to learn the Sinhalese language so 
that I could study their Buddhist books. It was 
refused. I can't go to India, where every Bud- 
dhist wants to make a pilgrimage." 

Burmese are scandalized by the presence of 
scantily clad Thai prostitutes u-ho. they say, are 
imported by West German and other contrac- 
tors working on government projects. Some of 
these women can be seen lounging in the lobby 
of the Inya Lake Hotel, a Soviet-built cement 
monolith’ that is incongruous in the tropical 
atmosphere of Rangoon. 

Fraternizing with foreigners is not encour- 
aged by the Ne Win government, and tourists 
are allowed to come for only seven days, (in the 
past they were allowed to visit only for 24 hours, 
and later for three days.) The Burmese will seize 
any opportunity for conversation with tourists 
on substantive topics such as Chinese economic 
policies, world terrorism or the quality of life 
elsewhere. 

T HE use of English, inherited from the 
British, is still widespread in Burma. Be- 
ginning this year in the ninth grade I there 
are 10 grades in the pre-uni versiLy system). 
English is being reintroduced as the language of 
instruction. Each year another grade will be 
added, down to kindergarten, until all children 
will be taught in English in every subject except 
Burmese language and literature. 

Diplomats caution against reading too much 
significance into the revival of English. Rumor 
has it that Mr. Ne Win made the decision after 
his daughter went to Britain for graduate medi- 
cal work and failed a language -qualifying exam. 

Although there have teen violent incidents in 
modern Burmese history, violence has not been 
a hallmark of political life. “We are a forgiving 
and forgetting people,” a man in his 60s tells a 
guest in his home. “It *s easy for any government 
to rule here." 

Protests are launched occasionally, particu- 
larly by students, and they are quickly and 
decisively suppressed. But no one speaks of 
tenure. There is no atmosphere of a police state 
on Rangoon's run-down streets and broken 
sidewalks, where gaping holes expose the sewers 
below. 

There is. however, a sense of sad resignation. 
In a small cafe in Mandalay, a middle-aged man 
remarked on how little he sees of his family as he 
goes from job to job. "We don't care about who 
is the government," he said. “We just want 
something done about the economy. We Bur- 
mese work so hard and have nothing." 


INIMITABLE,,,. 


*. not 're acisnaary s:cr.e Us! n^rks V :e 
er.c o' " c ccursi or :::o c=y - 5c' r-e 
oo.v.-'oj.'y s,'o~e .'"ar rr.sr^ s "he sra/? o' 
eier-.e' i:o , ’ C^ea^bnand 



Dedicated to Re, the Sun, the 
pyramids have fascinated 
humanity for over fourty* 
centuries! But is this not the 
same for all outstanding 
achievements! That would 
explain why, for 230 years 
our master watchmakers, 
combining art with skill, 
and applying the latest 
technology, have put all 
their love of their craft 
into producing crea- 
tions - precious, rare 
and almost as ini- 
mitable - bearing 
the name. 



VACHERON 

CONSTANTIN 

Geneve 
A 





La plus antienne manufacture d'horiogerie du monde, En file, a Geneve, depuis 1755 
VACHERON CONSTANTIN -1, rue des Moufins, 1204 Geneve 


V:- 






f 

) 




I 


Page 8 


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


Tieralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



§£rtbuttC Why U.S. Must Distance Itself From Marco s 


PublWW WJih Tlie New York That* nd Tbe WaUn^im Piwt 


No Fixed Rules on Terror 


It does no good to Fault Egypt or Malta or 
.Greece for ihe death of 60 passengers in the 
storming of EgypiAir Flight 648. The respon- 
sibility for the carnage falls squarely on the 
terrorists. But to recognize that brings us no 
closer to understanding the mystery behind 
this chilling episode: Why did they do it? 

Once in Malta, they made no specific de- 
mands except for fuel. Then they began trilling, 
first passengers one at a time and then, un- 
imaginably vicious, heaving grenades when 
commandos stormed the plane. In these cir- 
cumstances, there can be no argument about 
the need for tbe Egyptian rescue operation, 
only about its management 
The presumed motive of the terrorists was to 
humiliate President Mubarak of Egypt and 
Yasser Arafat, leader of the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization. For pledging to renounce 
violence outside Israel. There is talk of the 
terrorists' links to Libya's Colonel QadhafL 
What can be said m the wake oF this butch- 
ery is that airport security is still insufficient 
and that all civilized nations, not just Egypt, 
need more effective countermeasures against 


aerial piracy. Greece insists that all bags and 
passengers were rigorously checked under a 
new procedure instituted at the Athens air- 
port. It may well be that the weapons were 
already hidden on the aircraft, which came 
from Cairo. The obvious need is to check the 
planes before passengers board them. 

There is a natural tendency at limes of such 
cruelty to seek comfort in generalizations. 
Never negotiate, some say, forgetting that eyen 
Israel has in some circumstances found it wise 
to negotiate. Simplism plays into tbe hands of 
terrorism. All terrorist acts axe unique, and few 
fixed rules can guide governments. 

When in last resort governments use vio- 
lence against terrorists, all need to improve 
their techniques to minimize casualties. De- 
bating whether Egypt’s commandos had to be 
called in is a matter of hindsight: evaluating 
their performance is preparation for the next 

time. Such operations should transcend con- 
cerns of national sovereignty. Foresight argues 
for a pooling of skills to provide the best help 
when terrorists strike with such hatred. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Barking at the Watchdog 


A lot of people at the Central Intelligence 
Agency have never been reconciled to the 
increased burden of accountability that Con- 
gress imposed on it in the mid-1970s. They see 
leaks and loss of effectiveness as the price of 
having to tell legislators about covert action, 
and they do not like being open to a new and, 
to them, suspect host of kibitzers. Liberating 
the CIA from such procedures stood high 
among the security goals proclaimed by Ron- 
ald Reagan in 1980. He has since, wisely, 
found more pressing tasks, but distaste for 
oversight lingers. It has been evident in recent 
outbursts by CLA Director William Casey. 

Tbe reformers had hoped that a nonpolitical 
intelligence professional would run the CIA — 
someone like W illiam Webster, the nonparti- 
san judge who took over the FBI. or Bobby 
Inman, for a while Mr. Casey’s deputy. But 
President Reagan chose his campaign director, 
who has since made himself known, in part by 
public statements, as both an advocate and an 
operator of expanded CIA covert actions. 

Several instances, have come to light in 
which Mr. Casey had to be reminded of his 
statutory obligation to brief Congress in a full 
and timely fashion. Recently the CIA's compe- 
tence was called into doubL in the fiasco of 
Vitaly Yurchenko's ‘’defection." It was not 
simply that the agency rather publicly exulted 
in an intelligence coup that turned to dust. 
Centra] to the conservative indictment of the 


1970s was the charge that human intelligence 
bad been downgraded in favor of technical 
intelligence, the collection of information by 
spy satellites and the like. Here the conserva- 
tives' man blew the case of a live agent 

Tbe chairman of the Senate’s Sdect Com- 
mittee on Intelligence. Dave Durenberger, 
goes on to question the quality of the CIA's 
intelligence product Outsiders cannot really 
tell whether analyses are sufficiently farsighted 
and free of political bias, but although it 
ruffles Mr. Casey, there can be no harm in 
keeping the analysts on their toes. Before the 
current flap, Mr. Durenberger said that Mr. 
Casey had indicated support for a committee 
plan to check on the CIA's system of looking 
ahead. Presumably that support still holds. 

Does all this make a case for Mr. Durenber- 
ger's inclination to restrict the CIA director to 
an intelligence role? In the original 1947 Na- 
tional Security Act, intelligence was given a 
place behind, not at. the policy table, perform- 
ing a service function as a supplier of informa- 
tion. In this tradition. Mr. Durenberger sees 
intelligence as a “service organization’' and 
advises the director to “welcome constructive 
comments designed to improve that service." 
The administration has another view. 

This is an explosive issue, and it is unlikely 
to yield to the requisite consensus while dis- 
putes on oversight rage. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


By Dave Dorenberger 

W ASHINGTON — Time is run- 
ning out in the Philippines for 
the regime of President Ferdinand E. 
Marcos and for the United States. 

A Communist-led insurgency has 
grown from a minor presence in the 
1970$ to more than 30,000 armed 
regular and irregular guerrillas. They 
control or are contesting control of at 
least 10 million people, or nearly 20 
percent a the entire population. 
Tbey are now active in nearly every 
province, including the outskirts of 
Lhc capital. More important, their 
numbers have been growing rapidly, 
particularly in the last two years. 

Like all insurgencies, this one is as 
much a political and social phenome- 
non as it is a military one. Itfeeds off 
the anger and despair of a population 
victimized by economic decline, po- 
litical corruption, maldistribution of 
wealth and abuse of power. While 
Mr. Marcos, his wife and a few fa- 
vored cronies and military command- 
ers have amass ed huge fortunes, the 
economy has become a shambles of 
mismanagement and corruption. 

Politically, tbe Philippines is run 
by presidential decree with power 
concentrated in tbe small oligarchy 
around Mr. Marcos. The 1983 assas- 
sination of Mr. Marcos’ strongest po- 
litical opponent, Benigno S. Aquino 
Jr- almost certainly tbe work of Phil- 
ippine military personnel, greatly ac- 
celerated tbe decline in popular sup- 
port for the regime while stimulating 
reenritment for the insurgency. One 
result of deteriorating conditions has 
been a growing effort by Filipinos to 
leave for America; they soon win be 
the largest Asian minority there. 

It is an all- loo- familiar problem. A 
corrupt, increasingly ineffective but 
pro-U.S, dictator faces a popular, 
radical revolution. Washington is 
faced with the dilemma of trying to 
prop up a disintegrating regime or 
abandoning it and accepting an anti- 
U.S. successor. The pattern has re- 
peated itself, with local variations, in 
postwar China, Cuba, Vietnam, Iran 
and Nicaragua. In each case the 
United States waited too long and 
allowed itself to become too closely 
identified with the established re- 
gime. When the revolution tri- 
umphed, America was left without 
ties or credit with a new, often viru- 
lently hostile government — whether 
led by Mao Zedong, Fidel Castro, the 
Viet Cong, Ayatollah Ruhollah Kho- 
meini or tbe Sandinists. These have 
been a series of costly lessons: We 
cannot afford another. 

No one can know for certain 
whether there is still time in the Phil- 
ippines. Certainly the hour is late. 


Sis O&i CLNMS 

BOTWua gfotiubtl 



But 1 believe that there is still time, 
and that it is dear what we must do. 

The U.S. administration has tried 
to use quiet pressure and argument to 
persuade Mr. Marcos of the serious- 
ness of the situation and the necessity 
for reforms. The policy has not 
worked, because Mr. Marcos sees re- 
forms as undermining his personal 
and political position. 

It is time for the United States to 
distance itself publicly from the Mar- 
cos regime in the eyes of the Philip- 
pine populace. References to the 
“U.S.-Marcos dictatorship’’ have 
been a staple of propaganda by leftist 
groups for years. 

In recent weeks some important 
steps have been taken. In a highly 
visible mission. Senator Paul Laxalt, 
a Republican of Nevada, brought a 
personal letter from President Rea- 
gan urging reforms. The U.S. ambas- 
sador in Manila has condemned the 
government's response to the deaths 
of four Americans in that country at 
the hands of Philippine security 
forces. Senators and congressmen 
have spoken out in blunt terms con- 
cerning the need for change. 


By Ohtnoo 


to 


Mr. Marcos has responded 
these, as well as domestic pressures 
by catling for early presidential elec- 
tions — a kind of national referen- 
dum on his leadership which is due to 
be held early next year. 

That may or may not be a welcome 
development. If Mr. Marcos uses tbe 
means available to him to rig the 
outcome, as his record indicates that 
he might, the resnlt will he worse than 
no election at aL It will be the final 
death knell for democracy in the Phil- 
ippines, and many of those who have 
pinned their hopes on democratic 
processes will eve up and throw in 
their lot with the insurgents. 

Nevertheless, the democratic op- 
position appears to believe that it has 
no choice bit to pick up the gauntlet 
that Marcos has thrown down. Elec- 
tions are the only hope. 

It is up to the United States to do 
whatever it can to ensure that these 
elections are hoaest, whether Mr. 
Marcos intends them to be or not 
The Senate and the House have 
passed resolutions that set forth the 
conditions that Congress considers 
essential for fair elections. 


In Tha Oip qo nlop (Porflontf). CoPvrMrt 1 W 


They indude an insistence that 
Marcos observe the provision of his 
own Constitution requiring a presi- 
dent to resign before balding a spe- 
cial election; that tbe opposition be 
provided adequate access to radio , 
television and the print media during 
the campaign; that the election com- 
mission charged with overseeing the 
process be staffed with ge nuinely 
nonpartisan members; that official 
accreditation be extended to tbe Na- 
tional Movement forFree Sections, 
an independent citizens' election- 
monitoring organization; that the 
military serve a nonpartisan, profes- 
sional function as protectors of tbe 


tbe outcome; nnd that Mr. 
no minate a vice presidential ro m ac g 
mate as the constitu tion requires. 
thny mnA'ri ftns t-an hemetjtmd. 

if the oppastion cm present a not-; 
fied ticket, avery ill patient will have 
taken the first step toward recovery. 

The miter, a Republican of Minne- 
sota, is chairman of the Senate LetdBr. 
gence Committee. Be contrihute&dius 
comment to the Las Angeles TirUeti 


Danger in the Dollar’s Fall America Should Act to Equalise Trade Competition 

-W Or 4 viori re A t v, v, •» « n n v - TL. . , 1 J m * 


The Japanese yen has risen in the foreign 
exchange markets to about 200 to the dollar. 
That’s a dramatic increase since Sept 22, when 
the five largest industrial democracies an- 
nounced a campaign of intervention in the 
markets to bring the dollar down. The yen is 
now getting up close to the exchange rate that 
reflects its actual value in trade. The dollar was 
overvalued against the yen by roughly 30 per- 
cent when the intervention began two months 
ago. Now the overvaluation has been brought 
into the range of 5 to 10 percenL 
Amidst the applause and congratulations, 
the governments of the trading countries now 
run two kinds of danger. On the American side 
there is a great temptation to say that interven- 
tion works and the exchange rates can safely 
be left to intervention alone. That is a very 
comfortable idea, for it means that there is no 
need to take up difficult and unpleasant re- 
sponsibilities such as reducing the size of the 
federal budget deficit But like many comfort- 
able ideas, it is wrong. 

Intervention only means using government 
money to buy and seQ currencies and move 
rates by changing supply and demand in tbe 


market Historically, intervention ruled the 
exchange markets only as long as govern- 
ments’ resources were massively larger than 
those of private traders and speculators. But 
the former system of fixed exchange rates 
coDapsed in the early 1970s precisely because 
Of the growth of currency and investment 
flows beyond levels that governments could 
outweigh. Trading in the dollar alone now is in 
the range of $200 billion a day; total U.S. 
government revenues are a little under $800 
billion a year. If the major trading countries 
want stable rates, they are going to have to 
bring their basic economic policies into better 
harmony. For the Americans, that begins with 
getting the budget deficits under controL 
But there is another danger ahead as the 
exchange rates swing, and this one mainl y 
threatens the Japanese and the Europeans. As 
the American dollar drops, U.S. demand for 
Japanese and European imports is going to 
drop with it Japan and particularly West Ger- 
many. which sets the pace for Europe, are 
reacting very slowly to this reality. The ri ght 
response is to step up domestic demand. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


L OS ANGELES — A few years 
i ago, the president of one of the 
leading semiconductor companies in 
the United States complained to me 
about the unwillingness of the Japa- 
nese to open their markets to his 


By Edmund G. Brown Jr. 


'many’s products. 


Takeo Fukuda, the prime 
minister at the time, visited Califor- 
nia a few months later, I asked the 
business executive to j( 



Other Opinion 


Defending Anglo-Irish Accord 

In defense of the Anglo-Irish agreement the 
British government now has nowhere to go but 
forward Its merits need the most vigorous 
“hard sdT which a united cabinet can mount 
Unionists need reminding that the Anglo-Irish 
intergovernmental conference offers die pros- 
pect of improving cross-border security coor- 
dination. If improved security should be the 


content of the government’s promotional 
drive, its form also needs careful attention. 
There is a balance to be drawn between asser- 
tions or pronouncements which raise the tem- 
perature still higher and those that are best 
designed to persuade any nonaligned members 
of the majority community to give the deal a 
chance. The best approach to this would be the 
broadest government front 

— The Times (London). 


FROM OUR NOV. 27 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Suffragist Accosts Qmrchill 
LONDON — On arrival at King’s Cross sta- 
tion from Bradford [on Nov. 26], where be had 
been addressing a Radical meeting, says the 
“People," Mr. Winston Churchill was attacked 
by a woman suffragist Hardly had the Home 
Secretary alighted from the train when a wom- 
an rushed toward him and, after hissing a few 
words into his ear, made an attempt to strike 
Mr. Churchill in the face. The Minister ducked 
his head to avoid the blow, which in conse- 
quence fell on his bat and knocked it off. A 
crowd gathered, and the woman was seized. 
She was about to be given into custody by one 
of the railway officials when Mr. Churchill 
directed that she should be allowed to go, and 
the Home Secretary made his way to an auto- 
mobile and drove off to his residence in Eocles- 
lon Square without further molestation. 


1935: Old Inflation in die New Deal 
NEW YORK — Lewis Douglas, who resigned 
his directorship of the budget because be was 
unable to accept the New Deal's fiscal policies, 
told a New York economic dinner [on Nov. 25] 
that inflation was now here and that tbe public 
must choose between a small boom and a small 
collapse, or a big boom and a "greater bust" 
Mr. Douglas insisted that in its inflation the 
New Deal was simply the old order in a new 
guise. He said that whereas the banks were 
blamed for tbe inflation that led to the 1929 
collapse, the government was now creating it. 
He found four parallels between the old order 
and the New Deal: “Rising stock martlets; 
shares selling at abnormal levels in relation to 
yields and earnings; public statements that 
everything is fine; reluctance of tbe authorities 
to undo damage done by cheap money." 


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Co-Chairmen 


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Depm Publisher 
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Director 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 
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© 1985. International Herald Tribune AU rigftxi reserved. 



and biuntness that the rest of us in 
the room became uncomfortable. 

Mr. Fukuda listened politely, and 
then rallied that Japan had opened 
its markets, and very much welcomed 
his company’s competition. 

Now, five years later, the com- 
plaints have not gone away. They 
have been repeated with growing in- 
tensity by almost every executive in 
the industry. What is happening in 
semiconductors may foreshadow 
what is in store for America itself. 

These are the facts. The Japanese 
have virtually routed U.S. semicon- 
ductor companies from the largest 
segment erf the memory drip market 
and stand poised to capture other 
sectors of the industry still dominat- 
ed by American concerns. Despite a 
deep recession in the industry, Ja- 
pan's semiconductor investment is 
soaring, exceeding that of U.S. com- 
panies for tbe first time. The goal of 
the Japanese is to position themselves 
to control the market of tile future. 

The Japanese are doing well in 
semiconductors because they have 
committed themselves to a national 
strategy. In pursuing this, the govern- 
ment creates a selectively closed 
home market from which Japanese 
companies launch export forays to 
the rest of the world. Huge sums of 
cheap capital, made available by the 
national emphasis on savings, and 
the ability to accept low rates of re- 
turn on investment, enable compa- 
nies to drive down prices while ex- 
panding capacity and marntaining 
high levels oT research. 

I mention the semiconductor in- 
dustry in some detail, not only be- 
cause semiconductors provide tbe 
brains for the devices that are trans- 
forming the world economy, or even 
because the programmable intelli- 
gence they make possible are at the 
heart of economic leadership and 
rmlitaiy strength, but also because 
the problems of the semiconductor 
industry illustrate the U.S. dil emma. 

This is no smokestack industry. Its 
level of capital spending, research 
and development, productivity, com- 
mitment to long-term investment and 
a skilled management and wortc force 
are the envy of the world. Yet U.S. 
companies in this field are losing. 

If the United Stales cannot com- 
pete in industries where we are the 
most productive, our standard of liv- 
ing will deteriorate. But while no- 
body wants that there is not yet the 
political will to take derisive action. 

The President’s Commission on 
Industrial Competitiveness is ig- 
nored. The debate on tax reform 
barely mentions the words “trade" or 
“competitiveness.” And efforts to re- 
duce tite budget deficit, which in turn 
would bring down interest rates, low- 
er the dollar and make U.S. exports 
more attractive, are going nowhere. 

Washington remains committed to 
incompatible objectives: raising de- 
fense spending, supporting the elder- 
ly, protecting farmers, maintaining 
tire social safety net — and all with- 


out l egislating additional taxes. In- 
' stead of biting budget and tax ballets, 
the president and his adversaries are 
gumming rhetorical marshmallows. 

One doesn’t have to h&rir back to 
Benjamin's Franklin's sense of thrift 
to know that Americans have been 
creating an economy where the sound 
order of things is perpetually com- 
promised. Assuming that govern- 
ment can fix any fiscal excess, we 
have lurched from one indulgence to 
another, embracing tire promiscuous 
creation of credit. But for how long? 
We are but 5 percent of tbe world, 
and oceans no longer insulate ns from 
other nations determined to master 
the techniques of economic strength: 
strategy, savings, sacrifice. 

To compete and win requires a 


The comp an ies could form strategic 
affiances with European and . AsanL 
f undamental change of mind The t companies. Indeed, joint . verihnraf- 
mdispensable first step is to make ’even among American co mp e ti t or s 

may be necessary to mainiam-U.& 
production of memory chips^;3ui . 
sooner rather than later, the US-gpik. 


competition in international markets 
a national goal, and redesign UJS. 
tax, spending and trade-polities to 


overcome the nation's handicaps. ' eminent must intervene. . .. .f . 


A New Era ] 
Of Mistrust ! 
Is Created f 

By William Safire « 

Ty ARIS — My ulterior motive in { 
XT lo aimnu tsis to uaeetSovi- ■» 

etcotmterparts where they uefree to ,, 

talk and have been told to be commas • 
motive. Jousting is encouraged. At * 
such. a rime, summit groupies ask: 

Are tVy rVwmaunkts for teal? Are i 
they frfUng us what they sincerely, ■} 
ibraig h mfaak enly. before, or are .J 
they s po uti ng a- line that they, as '• 
iri trfKj yni people, know to he false? jf 
In die same way, Prefcdeof Reagaa ja . 
tmref wmder whether the. views of T 
General Secretary Gorbachev daring f* 
their ax hours of tito-a-fiEte reflected ■{ 
the Soviet leader's grasp a£ reality or ;t 

were xnerdy official posffioos set ij 
forth to justify Martian. , 

If the presidegt cmchiriesthat Ins • 
Soviet counterpart can be persaaded \ . 
by reason and By peiwnaF assurance •;« 
to modrfy a ctoki-war parana^ mind- > 
set. then Mr. Reagan would Hunk it \\ 
possible to aS ay Soviet fears of < 
America, thereby opening the way to '■*. 
arms rriiuction. Such a coodution ( 
presupposes that mtscrosv-ind not i 
desire for world doarioalaaq.lmotiT i 
vales tire Soviet leaders. . ; 

Centra! to that Zantihopeis this '• 
notion: Behind the facade of truth- j 
twisting and rfisirfbnitttion is a man 1 
in touch with reafity aswetoww it, * , 

whose political conclusions may dif- :* 
fer but whose.htttoikaZ premises are rjjm . 
in tire ballpark of our woridl ~ -f 
I explored that m a four-hour sub- '* 
aimmrt dinner with ComradeToogh- 
guy and CooicBde Nicegny. ;• ■*. 

Com ra d e "Ifrn g h g ri y, a Moscow’' 
media . b goti e -arid successful play- it 
“ '■ ‘-It, rs o^^^ted Sffi mc nlafly • . 
hn/Twroui and cocksure — in ig 
WOT^ -a‘i&kcd spirit. Conb :i 

guy and fwnt at a hammer-end-. ; j 
siddemd^gs. Not much drinking; *« 
we woeeigri'to explore each others j 
heads; ao ^fift ateht history, national | 
motives^ xU& xegkmal issues. T can' \ 
report, imdtfie would agree, that we ,i 
do dot tjn the same planet. J 

This vra»jo mere dash of tdeok>- ? 
gy; we^reffefotfSafeayeerpeat on « 
anytME^g^idhappened m oor adult ,* 
5vea. jQor did not touch. . ; 

CpianS^Sb^gy agreed with 4 
bhrin jSBmffiSfmt n was important ' 
t imdosfoKf fhat Moscow would 1 
nere^Pit^war. Be was rad that 

. Otir^foodfeft . 

Seed thbtq^-provolting. Per-! 
haps Tanf tftnriag naive rft the senti- j 
mem of ^moment, butl^ have come 
totiraxoriefos^on: i hep realty bcBeve - 
off. ijKt r== j“*t as fiocely as : 

Ibe ti CTO ^ faaihfcpow to be the truth. •? 

- Git ffipheavy matters-^ on values 
K fc cfieedoptJtod justice and ethics — i: 
ire 4er not geu enough -traction on '• 
mntattBy accepted facts evenio con- 
I tirink they suffer not 
a tirnge^caasrieoce about abuse of j 




If 


i¥ 






r,-: 


.. -■ i 






iv. 

p- v 




President Reagan shr»nM are t fo 
legal and political levers at his com- 
mand to open markets abroad dr 
block the onslaught of foreign prod- 
ucts in industries vital to our national 
welfare. Markets once lost win be 
much harder to regain, and he must 
understand this as he weighs his 
moves. In cases where trade deficits 
with certain countries remain abnor- 
mally large, it may even be necessary 
to negotiate an agreed balance. 

As for the United States’ semicon- 
ductor industry, the options are few. 


The ghost of Adam-Stintit qqntBtr 
nes to harntt us. But despite oca: com-^ 


^ ^^^mritooamder my , ■ 
'democracy absurd. • 

'jrifi fiewwilPkni now willing to ;» 


‘f 


Hazards Facing the Enyironmenlalists 


W 


ASHINGTON —None of us 
environmentalists has seen a 
handy Hst of reasons for not pro- 
tecting the environment. But if one 
did exist for opponents of environ- 
mental protection, it would proba- 
bly look something like this: 

• We need more study. This is the 
all-time granddaddy of reasons for 
not taking action now. The acid- 
rain argument is just its latest incar- 
nation. Warning: Do not be drawn 
into a discussion of what should be 
done about the problem in the 
meantime. The idea is that nothing 
should be done but if you say so, 
someone might think of something. 

• It would hurt the economy. Tbe 
polls keep showing public s u pport 
for environmental issues, yet envi- 
ronment-bashing has consistently 
been part of President Reagan’s 
popular appeal, because of the 
strong impression that environmen- 
tal protection and economic growth 
axe at opposite ends of a seesaw. 
Raise one and yon automatically 
lower the other. 

Warning: The seesaw relation- 
ship is not necessarily true so avoid 
calling for more study on tins one. 
Remember what happened when 
the Environmental Protection 
Agency caDed for more study of 
cutting down on lead in gasoline 
and found ec on omic benefits. 

• It would cost jobs. Don't hesi- 
tate to use this argument even when 
the environmental action you're 
trying to stop would create more 
jobs than it would dinrinate. Back 
when the late Representative Phil 
Burton, Democrat of California, 
was trying to buy up forest to ex- 
pand Redwood National Park, 
timber companies were successful 
with the jobs issue, even though 
there were a lot more new rangers 
than laid-off lumberjacks. 

Note: Keeping the issue general 
rather than focusing on the jobs of 
Specific workers, also avoids em- 
barrassment when the environmen- 
tal action would benefit those same 
workers (for example, pesticide re- 
strictions and farm workers). 

• The risk is exaggerated. Lots of 
environmental issues involve swab 
risks of a big disaster, like people 
getting cancer oradam breaking or 
a nudear plant mdting down. Until 
it happens, which it probably 


B j David Roe 

won’t, you can always argue that 
the other side is being alarmist. 

_ Note: This arguments works par- 
ticularly well with untie chemicals, 
where die evidence comes in funny 
numbers that the public doesn’t un- 
derstand, and where the toxicol- 
ogists can’t keep im with the de- 
mands for analyas. throw the word - 
“chemqphobia” around: It im plies 


rules. This is'a simple appeal to 
fairness. The rmdear intiustxy has 
□sod it most, butitturiusupin every 
context- whcrc'eaVnbsumental . and 
. health, protection, are. delegated to 
technical regulations: The bureau- 
crats who wrote tbe rnles are hardly 
; eager to start oyer." 

- ~ • Trust tis ; . tor handle it ourselves. 
-Inanutshdl deregulation. Thereg- 
jdators are against you on this one, 
space if tbe system tnisted you in- 
stead erf them ori .technical issues, 
they’d be out of. a. job. But they 
. know tire secret that, at bottom, 
yu' ~ even the tougfieft regulatory prp- 
grams have to trust tiie industry for 

• something — and that most of the 
’ . time they’re tnistiog you across the 

- .board because they can’t keep up. . 
, Do not bq intimidated when 
something goes wrong. After the 
Bhopal catastrophe in India, and 
evoi after a tone-gas release or two 
in Institute, West Virginia, Union 
Carbide was stfil being trusted to 
prevent future leaks at its plants 
since no one dse knew bow, and no 
onehad the new to shut them: - 

• We can't afford to accept liabil- 
i/y.JYou simply can’t stay in bua- 
nessif yqu “accept" such* burden. 

. .-Jocfludcar industry led the way on 
tins argument with the Price-An- 
tosoa Act, winch protected them 
from l i ab il it y above 5560 million 
-.(very useful at Three Mile Island). 

9 If yadve seen one tree, you've 
son ’em aH Don't be fooled. ! 

- TBSre’s a brilliant argument l urking 
behind this discredited old one-lm- 
er: The mpdetirvecsion is powerful. 

Die point of the old version was 

Ihe damage is trivial. The flip -that trees shouldn't be saved for 
side of “exaggerated risk," this is_. their own sake^ but used, 
usually referred' to as tire SnriT . 'The modem version w & fo 
Darter theme, after its most famous' -~ tJ - - - 

incarnation in the case of the Ten-,, 
nessee Valley Authority’s Teffico 
Dam. The builder argued in, the 
1970s: “What's a three-inch fish, 
compared to a giant dam?" 

In fact, fish seem to nudeeanatu- 
ral target for this araumenL Dave 
Stockman's Office of M a na ge ment 
and Budget came up wirh a . winner 
when it announced that tor cost of 


im tmgnt to - laissez-faire mid free co nc ede i-tiaMr ®°t b® self- 

trade, the time hasxbme for the fed- J - decewingfiatsiSdJ^poailra but are >• 
cral government jo use its power g flqfag rtjtea upside- 'j 

equabzeriiecompetitkm.; -down iroddjccqc&de thar my logK^ 

; ' ' ’-' audpeisuasiveaessarenot going to‘| 

The vrriter, CaDfomufs governor A^te wafid riew aMtota. j 
from 1975 to 1983, is chairman of die ' Ftt*!* ti* same thought has OC- 
National Conrndaum on Industrial . cgnc d ttrMr. R eagm afterins per- j 
Innovation, a nonpartisan orgpniza- roBafcuCOcnterwitfi.Kfr. Gorbachev; 
tionihm seeks to improve XJS. compel vstonConiradeTOT^y arri Com-|f 
itnenas- He contributed this view to . raderweegny roued mlo one. 

What rf Mr. Reagm concludes, as t 
I have, that bis counterpart really < 
befieves in Ins heart of hearts most <s 1 
what he says, and is not jost puttmg ; 
up a rhetorical Potemkin vHlage? In 
that case, miKuided nnstrust of the 
West is^ -not the basic. problem and ij 
c ommun ication is not the core. . 

Dialogue can lessen hostility and is 
necessary to avert mitiakulatiom but ;j 
at the core of supcsoower conflict is ’ 


(In*' 


J*.: 


The New York Tunes. 







V#j 


mis- : 




that concerns about chemicals are 
both exaggerated and irrationaL 


with pollutkm loading and the 
point b the same. One of the great 
resource values erf the air, water 

and land is their ability to soak im 
poButicm to a certemievd.vmhout : 
cansnig much -harm ~~That value is 
there to fo~,«»i' Anyone who. 
thinksotiiermseis'binng a puna, or 
trerihugger-tejSng to piotect-natnre 
for as own sakd; ^ ' ... 


cb m .. .. 

to S 6tfj0 a fish -^-a WDiant com-.. , the EnrirrmufOtMDifetae FwuLa 
bining of the SnaB- Daritx" t h e m e honprofhgoap^Mvyersand scien- 
with ff hvnting the economy* - ; tat^HetxnMl^jAisEommait to' 

. • You Can’t k^':Biaigrig. the. TktWecdan^iuE^yr- • 



trust It is their certitude that theff/f 
historical mission is to extend then’ll 
item's dominance to the corners of f 
the Earth — - countered by America's ; 
re^prihsflnlity to .inutnie freedom evr ! 
erywhere. Mutual understanding vriRT 
widen, not narrow, tbat gulf. - iL r 
You can talk to lhem. You can Eke W x . 

many of them as hxfmdaals. But, 1 * 
txyamny does not become tolerable.} 
because a tyrant or tnsagents sincere- “! 
ty think h is right. It just becomes 'I 
more dangerous. S iimirnit meeting s^ 
shooid teach us that comnuruication ' 
is sot.alL especially when.it reveals] 
the dqpdi of our differences. 

“Our goals are the same," gushes j 
the president. Not so. We . can hi 
that both rides* means are peace 
bar we are certain that both .sides' J 
ends are-antithetical • ~ jj 

Let us, on all levels of summits,!! 
dink oar glasses to a candid riewreal 
of mutual mistrust, because that wffly 
mean, that we pnrfoundty.undcrriandi 
each other’s ultimate aims: ' . ; S 

. The New York Hmex 


UTTER 

The Perils ol Smoking 

' The International Herald^ 
Tribune is to be.cmnmended .for ihy 
up-to-the-minute reporting oifr 
the serious dangers to nislth whi 
me posed by smolrfnq dgaietl 
rSmoking Enduring Among 1 /jSJj 

Threat to The^l . 

Heath," Nov. 11 ) . . | K 

As Ear as women’s health is conn} 
it is sad to learn that the£ 

■ Organization for Women* 

• claims , to represent the inter-- 

«sts women and vdiat interest is*! 
mcae basictiian health? — isimwiD-!, 

.mg to recQgmze that smoking is now^ 
me “wont threat” ^ ; > 

NOW shoifld be working do&ety { 
theU^. suigeon-gpneraltb per- ^ 
ybung' wonidi not: to take up; 
snoksig nwi ea d <rf aocepcmg advdS 

ti^g from tobacco crwYi p am^s , ; 

Lung ^ccr can brmg to an end 1 
evcn ffob^gest ofcareeri'. ^ 


’W. 











1 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD-TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


TR AVEL IN 



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Volumes have been written 
abour India, yet she remains 
little known. Many, when chev 
think of this, vast subcontinent, 
conjure up a picture that begins 
and ends with the Taj MabaL 
Others imagine that all there is 
ro see is ■concentrated within 
the golden triangle that is Del- 
hi, Agra .and Jaipur. 

• It is a false picture. The gov- 
ernment of India's Department 
- of Tourism, under the - leader- 
ship of Dr. NJC. Sengupta. has 
launched an international cam- 
paign aimed at encouraging vis- 
itors, to discover, the rest or this 
attractive and stimulating coun- 
ty- • - : 

- Recently he led a top-level 
delegation of India's tourist-in- 
dustry professionals to the Mid- 
dle Ease. A series of "Friendship 
Through Tourism’ - visits is be- 
ing made to a dozen other coun- 
tries, while Bombay played host 
recently to several major Euro- 
pean tour operators under the 
sponsorship of Air-India. A few 
weeks ago another party of 
leading US. travel agents was 
entertained by the Obcroi- 
group of hotels. 

All were shown at least some 
of the unending attractions that 
; India has to offer today’s travel- 
er. In addition, plans have been 
prepared to .promote confer- 
ences and conventions, incen- 
tive ;and -business navel; trade 
: faira"ind 'exhibrrioris.. ‘ -• -• 

■ Dr. Sengupta says: ’Tourism 


has now emerged as India's 
largest source of invisible over- 
seas earnings. The latest fig- 
ures, according to the Reserve 
Bank of .India, show foreign 
exchange earnings from tour- 
ism increasing by more chan 6 
percent a year. This has led ro 
large increases in chose em- 
ployed in travel and related sec- 
tors of the economy such as 
hotels, restaurants, handicrafts 
and cultural activities. . 

"The record budget of ap- 
proximately £2 million {$2.80 
million] for the seventh five- 
year plairfor tourism is ro be 
spent exclusively on advertising 
and promoting India as a tour- 
ist destination. The Depart- 
ment of Tourism is looking at a 
budget chat is five rimes more 
than last year. An international 
campaign now beginning says, 
'In India, die festival never 
ends."’ 

He adds: "In India there is 
no off-season." 

What quickly becomes clear 
on arrival in India is that the 
choice of destinations no longer 
stops at the Taj Mahal, al- 
though nobody should miss 
seeing this magnificent monu- 
ment to eternal love at Agra. 
The delights of Kashmir, the 
serenity of Goa and the scirnula' 
tion of treks into the foothills 
of the Himalayas also wait to be 
enjoyed, 

: Says Dr. Sengupta; "Nobody 
can ever hope to see all of 


. *■* 


7 


i - - A fry’ 

7--‘. " K sf:t --?> - - rift: . ; • 

* * • 
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On Kashmir's Lake Dal. a shikara, or local gondola, makes its way along the luxurious houseboats lining the share. 



India's cultural reminders of a 
past that stretches back into 
furthest anriquiry. Wherever 
you go there are temples and 
palaces chat are dose ro perfec- 
tion. But that is only one part 
of the picture. Everywhere 
throughout the country there 
arc resorts, some in the cool of 
the mountains, others by warm, 
golden beaches. As a holiday 
destination India has become 
incomparable." 

Every firsc-rime traveler to 
India can be assured that the 


modem hotels are not only up 
to the highest international 
standards, bur are among the 
finest in the world. The old hill 
stations at Simla and Darjeeling 
Still welcome today's tourists, 
nor to Fan-cooled bungalows, 
but to modern international ho- 
tels. 

There is so much to see. 
How’ many modem explorers 
have gazed at the voluptuous 
, temple carvings ac Khajraho? 
Or taken in Le Corbusier’s ul- 
tramodern Chandigarh, or in- 


spected the edicts of the emper- 
or Ashoka carved in rock at 
Dhauli, which 23 centuries of 
sun and rain have failed to 
obliterate? How many have vis- 
ited Poona, that legendary habi- 
tat of thousands of real and 
fictional British colonels and 
colonials? 

The finest collection of 
South Indian bronzes is in Ma- 
dras, and Kerala has some of 
the oldest Christian churches in 
the world Ac Cochin, the so- 
called Queen of the Arabian 


Sea, there ore Jewish syna- 
gogues, Portuguese churches 
and Dutch architecture. 

The country also abounds in 
wildlife, thanks to a successful 
conservation and prorectionisr 
policy which has assured the 
survival of many once-cndan- 
gered species. At the Corbett 
National Park in the foothills 
of the Himalayas, an eight-hour 
drive from Delhi, the elusive 
tiger can now be seen in its 
natural environment. 

Lons continue to roam and 


hunt beneath the sun of Gir 
Forest in Gujarat state, and the 
Periyar wildlife sanctuary in 
Kcrab protects herds of ele- 
phants and other big game, 
which can daily be seen drink- 
ing and barhing in the quiet 
waters of the lakes. Two hours 
by car from Agra, bird lovers 
can watch more than 303 spe- 
cies of warcr birds in the Keola- 
deo Ghana sanctuary. 

And what of the Indians 
themselves? Then’ are a friendly 
amalgam of races and religions 


who, although dissimilar in i 
hundred ways, have become a 
single nation. \X’hac makes this 
unity all rhe more impressive is 
the increase in population at a 
rate of one million every four 
weeks. By rhe end of the centu- 
ry there may be one billion 
Indians. 

For derails on tourism and 
travel in India contact: The 
Government of India Tourist 
Office. 7 Cork Street, London 
W1X 2AB. TeL 01-43"-3o77. 

— Moss Murrw 






INDIA. 

I DISCOVER IT WITH THE TAJ. 

L S&SSi 


si.* - :.; : 




:-yt r rt-otr *• •»>•*•« • -JK4 


KPNWiltlitillll • j 

rie v mt v 

m M ono amuwr 

^ Mli *■"**« i 




Bombay. Tit Tjj Mahal Howl* & Bombay. Herd Prtsidmi 

The Taj Mahal liner Conrineiual 








Jh 


\ y 

fc s 




New Delhi. The Tjj Mahal Howl * New Delhi. Taj bba- Hard * 





Madras. Taj Coromandel Huiti * Madias. Cnrnicnun Hmcl 


Madras. The Fisherman V Cove Jaipur. The Ranibajdi PjIjiV 






V ri -1“ 

\ \ V ; 








1 - ■ „ 



y, 'Ojl 






xan woimagwai^ 

aasagjagsaLy. 

^fir if 




Udaipur. The Lake Palace 


Bangalore. Tjj ResidctiLV 


Bangalore. Vest End Hold Benares. Hmcl T jj Ganecs 




VO. © o 






India is right on top! 


• "" *. • * 

' . •■‘■■7 >y\ ■ 

■ ; 


m \ 


-: V 9 c ! 

■ v:/ 

• vr 


Up there 30,000 ft. high. up in the 
sky you’ll find the very essence of India. 

Air-India. A country quite different 
from any other. You sense the mystique 
even as you enter the 747.. 

The hospitality, the graciousness, 
the exotica— all. designed to make you 
feel right on top. 

Smiling, sari-clad hostesses welcome 
you with folded hands — the namaskaar — 


4k 


a gesture which means, “my guest is 
as my god.” 

The menu superb, Indian or 
Continental, the uplifting strains of an 
Indian raga... Air-India. It's your 
foretaste of India before you actually 
get there. A country you’ll want to come 
back to again and again. 

Come up to Air-India. 


I . | Goa. Trw Ai.'indi HcnnilKy Goa. Thr Fon Apud.i Beach Kcmhi Goa. The Tjj Huhdav VilLcv Ooty. '^■■v Hold 


For enquiries and reservations contact; 

• The Taj Group of Hotels • Utell International iwoHdwidei 

cfo. Inter- Continenial Hotels, For all the hotels in the Taj Group 
1120, Avenue of the Americas, Tel: Now York (212) 3"7 1 3ni 

R ?T r ' L 1/m . • 'ThifJeadingHotels of thfWorld** 

New- York, N\ 1003ft TcJ; Ntfw Yll|fc ( i !:) x ; lS M 

Tel: (212) 81 9 7939 Ullwt 


WT ■= M* 








THE TAJ Cl 


.INDIA 


The airline that treats you like a Maharajah 


^ ^v?;~ ■ y --- ---.t -r.-y .-■■■■ :• _ 






Page 10 


INTERNATIONA! 




The Dynamism of Bombay 


Bombay is where East meets 
West. To see the dry in the wo 
days most visitors allow, you 
need a guide with the knowl- 
edge, enthusiasm and stamina 
of Homai (pronounced, she in- 
sists, "Oh, my”) Mehta, the 
doyenne of Bombay’s travel 
guides. 

With Homai you discover 
that, despite the growth of 


many new commercial enter- 
prises, Bombay’s textile mills 
still produce nearly a rhird of all 
the fabrics made in India and 
that, although the Bombayices 
account for Little more chan 
1 percent of the country's 700 
million people, they pay one 
third of the nation’s income 


tax. 

Not 


surprisingly, Bombay 


has spawned several super-de- 
luxe hotels, of which the 75- 
y ear-old Taj Mahal Inter-Conri- 
nental, already given the 
accolade of being one of the 12 
best hotels in the world, is for 
many the finest. The luxurious 
Oberoi Towers, claimed ro be 
the highest building in India 
with 35 stories, offers immacu- 
late 24-hour service. 


The Teg Mahal 
Inter-Continental 
deluxe hoteL 


By day the wide sweep of the 
bay shows skyscrapers bristling 
like a mini -Manhattan; ar night 
the long curve of' the harbor 
outshines Nice in a display of 
light char has justly earned the 
ride "the queen’s necklace” 

Only a couple of blocks away 
are the Dhobi Ghats, an entire 

area given over ro the job of 
washing Bombay’s clothes. Ho- 
mai Mehta confides, "You 
don’t hire your dhobi. You in- 
herit him. Mine comes regular- 
ly each Monday. Sometimes 1 
give him as many as 50 items. 
He never marks them . . . and 
never makes any mistakes. Ev- 
erything comes bade spotless, 
with my husband’s shirts 
starched and ironed. How he 
docs it, I don’t know." 

Bombay's rise to modem 
fame and fortune began with 


Goa Offers 
Beaches and a 
Touch of Europe 


Sitting beneath a swaying palm 
with nothing to disturb the 
stillness except the sound of the 
Arabian Sea lapping the sand is 
an experience in tranquility. 
Today there are not many re- 
sorts where you can be by your- 
self, alone with tropical nature. 
Goa is one of them. 

The atmosphere— distinct 
yet indefinable — makes Goa a 
place apart. It is Europe in the 
tropics. The influence of the 
Portuguese, who ruled here for 
more chan 450 years, is every- 
where. Nearly 40 percent of the 
population is Christian. 

When the Portuguese con- 
quered the area ir quickly 
earned for itself the name Goa 
Duorada — Golden Goa. But 
the Europeans had not arrived 
solely for trade. They were de- 
termined to spread the Catholic 
faith. When persuasion failed 
they issued decrees that made it 
virtually impossible for a Hin- 
du to practice his religion even 
in the privacy of his own home. 
They built churches and de- 
stroyed temples. And in 1560 
chc Inquisition arrived. Many 
families fled the terror. Trade 


languished and Portugal’s pow- 
er in Europe began to weaken. 
By che 18th century much of 
the glory of Goa had faded. 

Yet a touch of Europe re- 
mains in the churches and in 
the piazzas where the grandees 
of old rook their evening prom- 
enades. 

It is the churches that com- 
mand che attention of the visi- 
tors and make the region differ- 
ent from che rest of India. The 
church of Our Lady of the Ro- 
sary, built in 1543, is one of che 
best surviving examples of Re- 
naissance architecture. From 
che same period (1527) is the 
two-story facade of the Church 
of Sc. Francis of Assisi, crowned 
with two octagonal towers. 

Equally fine is the Cathedral 
of Goa. begun in 1562 but not 
completed until 1652. It is a 
grand example of a Renaissance 
cathedral, with the ceiling in 
the form of a barrel vault and 
che ribs on arches. The wooden 
alraipiece, painted in gold leaf, 
is the finest in India. 

The Basilica of Bom Jesus, 
the most celebrated sanctuary 



in Goa, is a one-nave shrine. 
One of che highlights of any 
visit is the mausoleum of St. 
Francis Xavier. 

During the coming months 
more visirors will visit Goa 
chan ever before. The First inau- 
gural flight from Germany is 
due to touch down at the local 
airporr early next month with 
200 holidaymakers. They will 
be Followed by regular charters 
each week via Condor, the char- 
ter subsidiary of Lufthansa, un- 
til the end of ApriL 

There are hotels to suit every 
pockct. Ar chc top of the list is 
che Taj Group’s Fort Aguada 
Beach Resort. Nestling bv Ca- 
bin guce Beach, it offers individ- 
ual luxury villas, some with 
lounge, dining room and bed- 
room plus cwo bathrooms, oth- 


ers with cwo bedrooms, and 
rambling tropical Mediterra- 
nean-style cottages. There are 
also 88 air-conditioned rooms in 
che main block. 

Much nearer, and more con- 
venient to the airport, are two 
more first-class tropical hotels. 
The Oberoi Bogmalo Beach is 
just five minutes from Dabolim 
Airport, and only a few more 
minutes away is the Major da 
Beach resort, which cools you 
the moment you enter. It al- 
most seems to be a hotel with- 
out walls. Wherever you stand, 
sea breezes waft in. 

Goa is as near idyllic as any 
holiday location can be. Nature 
has been prolific and land. The 
people are gentle and w arm. 
Hospitality and friendliness 
reign. 


Oniy one airline 
gives you the wonder 
that is India. 


AT jet speeds - and in the best 
of comfort — Indian Airlines helps 
you discover India's many fabled 
holiday resorts. 

64 Wonder 
Spots 

Temple cities in 
South India, or 
wildlife sanctuaries 
in different parts 
of the country. 

Golden beaches on a 6,000- 
kilometre coastline, or bridle paths 
in shadows of snow-capped peaks. 

Or forts, palaces, monuments, 
museums .. 

Wherever you want to go, there 
ore 250 flights every day. 

Connecting 64 stations in India 
and 9 in neighbouring countries. 

10 Airbuses, 

25 Boeings 

And you thought India had only 
snake charmers and the Taj. 

Yes. India also has a domestic 
airline that is one of the biggest and 
the most modem in the world. 

Our fleet of Airbuses* Boeings and 
other aircraft flies more than 83,000 


unduplicated route kilometres every 
day. 

Supported by advanced operational 
and communication systems. 

With ticketing facilities through 
otfices of more than 120 IATA 
airlines. 

And with inflight service that 
makes your trip so memorable. 


Indian Airlines 
offers... 

Come, see India with Indian 
Airlines. 

At fares that can make a holiday 
budget go a long, long way. 

With special travel schemes, on 
some sectors, that bring down the 
cost even further. 



Taj Mahal Agra. Monumentto an 
emperor's law© for his queen and crowning 
glory of traditional Indian architecture. 

A 30-mlnute jet-hop from Delhi, with 
same-day return. 


Like the 21 -day Discover India 
scheme which lets you travel as 
you like, on all domestic sectors 
for US $ 375. 

Or the South India excursion 
with a 30% cut on US $ fares, 
on some South Indian flights. 

And a 25% cut on US $ fares for 
those between 12 and 30 years. 

Plus a 50% cut on US $ fares 
for all IATA/ Airline employees 


Far luTTher information, contact : 

Indian Amines Central Space Control 
Computer Centre Paten Airport 
New Dein- no a io (INDIA) 

■«T DEUBWC031-2131 031-2576 

CaWe CWTRESERVE Member Sta Communications 


MT I Sidled (JdHc 6 l£«r 4 f 

Mr I Indian Airlines 

Jets you to the wonders of India 


chc Portuguese Vasco da Gama 
was in che area in 1498, arid 
early in the l6ch century the 
Sultan of Gujarat ceded the bay 
of Bom Bahia co Portugal. The 
British acquired Bombay 
through Charles U’s marriage 
co a Portuguese princess, Cach-. 
erinc of Braganza. Ic was pair of 
her dowry. 

Despite congestion and 
chronic overcrowding, Bombay 
today boasts parks, a cricket 
stadium, beaches, an aquarium, 
libraries and museums. 

There are some fascinating 
sights in the old Crawford Mar- 
ket. All around is a cacophony 
of cries and calls, shouts, grunts 
and bursts of laughter. 

There is also the Chor Ba- 
zaar, or Thieves Market, where 
according to a local anecdote 
you can be sold spare parts from 
your own car. Here Gucci and 
Dior fakes are passed off as the 
real thing Nearby, each day 
hundreds of customers can be 
seen choosing jewelry from 
proffered trays, much as they 
would select hors cf oeuvres at a 
cocktail party. The jewelry is 
mostly chunky, sometimes os- 
tentatious, but always pure 
gold. 

Everywhere in Bombay you 
find industrious Sikhs, religious 
Jains, orthodox Jews, hard- 
working Hindus and Arabs giv- 
ing rips to hotel staff and beg- 
gars rhar are more than many of 
them normally earn in a month. 
There are also Parris. In Bom- 
bay their influence has been out 
of all proportion to their num- 
bers. Some insist the Parris 
have made Bombay what it is. 
Three of their many famous 
names stand our: Tata, whose 
empire includes hotels, steel 
mills, trucks and chemicals; 
Wadia, owner of textile mills; 
and Godrej, maker of typewrit- 
ers and electrical equipment. 
Their philanthropy has built 
hospitals, schools, rest homes, 
museums and the Tata Institute 
of Fundamental Research. 

One of the most important 
buildings in Bombay is at 19 
Laburnum Road. This is chc 
house where Gandhi lived. It is 
now a museum with 28 superb- 
ly produced dioramas depicting 
in great detail highlights from 
the Mahatma’s life. The room 
where the founder of modem 
India lived has been preserved, 
including his spinning wheel. 

One excursion every visitor 
makes while in Bombay is ro 
chc Elephanta Island. Ap- 
ching the small green is- 
after an hour’s boat ride, 
the traveler has little idea what 
to expect All is quickly re- 
vealed at che end of a climb up a 
hundred gently sloping steps. 

The massive cave carvings at 
Elephanta are among the un- 
sung wonders of the world. 
Each 25-foot-high (7.5-meter) 
frieze is a fantasy of intricate 
figurative derail which, despite 
being nearly 1,500 years old and 
having been used by Portu- 
guese troops as targets far rifle 
practice, remain bewilderingly 
lovely. 

Inride this cave temple is art 
of the highest quality, which 
deserves to rank with the finest 
and sculptures in 

India, is fdf^F surprises. 


carvings 


The Delights of Delhi 



Horse Show, Red Fort, Delhi. 


Delhi, India’s capital city, is a 
double delight. It Is two dries 
in one. The first presen cs itself 
as you drive in from the airport: 
a forest of green interspersed 
with che homes of industrial- 
ists, the enclaves of embassies, 
and nine or 10 modem hotels. 
The second is a sea of people 
constantly being jostled and 
harri ed, yet never quite losing 

their inher ent cheerfulness. 

New Delhi remains distinct- 
ly British. Old Delhi could only 
be in India. In the .former che 
old imperiousness remains; in 
the latter the feel of 5,000 years 
of turbulent history is every- 
where in the narrow, over- 
crowded streets and alleyways. 

Ic was in 1911 that the Brit- 
ish laid die foundations of New 
Delhi to glorify che empire. 
This, imperial complex, de- 
signed largely by Sir Edwin Lu- 
tyens, became the headquarters 
of the British Raj in Aria. It is 
now die capital of the new 
Republic of India. 

Parliament House, a vast cir- 
cular building rimmed by an 


open colonnade, the massive 
secretarial Mocks and tire Vice- 
regal Lodge crown the impres- 
sive, arrow-straight Rajpadi, an 
avenue as magnificent in its 
majesty as the Champs-Elysces 
in Paris or London's Mall 

One end of the Rajpath is 
the India Gate, a memorial ro 
che Indian army dead of World 
War L and modeled on the 
Mcnim Gate in Belgium; at the 
other end is the home of che 
head of the world’s largest de- 
mocracy. 

The best shopping is around 
Connaught Place, bur do nor 
expect Bond Street, Fifth Ave- 
nue or the Via Gondorri. India 
is not part of the West, but a 
gateway to Asia. The shops in 
Connaught Place are not de- 
partment stores, but small fam- 
ily-owned businesses selling ev- 
erything from expensive 
jewelry to cheap souvenirs. 

Minutes away, you arc trans- 
ported back co the Mogul mag- 
nificence of the Jama Masjid, 
India's largest mosque, wel- 
coming you to Old Delhi. Its 
doisrered courtyard can hold as 


many as 20J300 of the faithful^- 
when they come to p*ay. 

Buc most visitors are first 

nken to the Quib Mirer, a 254- 

foot (70- merer) 15th-century 
mi rarer which is a unkrae and 
ocar-perfeer exaropfeot rower 
architecture. Its builder must 
ha** been. ^ mathematical ge- 
nius; ic has stood for eight cen- 
turies. Its sides are afrrc with 
intricately canned /quotations 
from the Koran which get larg- 
er as the tower grows higher, so 
char from the ground k is as 
easy to read the words a: die 
cop as those at the bottom. 

Cose co chc minaret is an- 
other of Delhi's curiosities. 
This is the famous iron, pillar 
that stands in whac was once 
the courtyard of > mosque It 
has been (bee since the fifth 
century. Whar makes it an ob- 
ject of interest is that through- 
out 1.500 years it has remained 
msr-frcc . . . and nobody knows 
how or why. 

Humsyuri’s t om b is another 
must for every traveler to Del- 
hi. Built in rite 16 th century, it 
marks she beginning of a great 
period in Mogul architecture 
which culminated in the glori- 
ous Taj Mahal Both are memo- 
rials co lore. The comb m Delhi 
was buOt by a wife far bet 
e m pecoc hus ba nd; the one at 
Agra is l husband’s everlasting 
tribute ro Iris wife. 

Before- leaving Delhi most 
visitors make a pilgrimage co 
the hfack-triftbie simplicity of 
GancflaVromfct Ic is . a place of 


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jlatial 


Nbw/sadijr, there is another 
Arme rbbe visited. The house 
where Prime Minister Indira 
Gancfiri Bred, worked and was 

bar hnrn aimed 
ihco_* p£ree of r emembrance. 
Here people crane in the hun- 
drafeto pay there respects. 

N6bo<jf- cm think of this 
scene aut delight. Yet it is part 
of, dre. ;peyer<n£xg story of 
Defid and India, a tale equally 
divided b etw e en turbulence and 


Kashmir: 

The World’s Roof Garden 


Kashmir can only be described 
as one of nature’s wonderlands. 
As you drive in from the airport .. 
at Srinagar you are welcomed co 
"Happy Valley.” Already the 
enchantment has begun. And 
che weather, except in mid- win- 
ter, will almost always be good, 
mostly glorious. The. air. is a 
relaxing sedative; the scenery 
an exciting stimulant. ' 

Srinagar, che state capital, is 
dusty and overcrowded like cv- . 
cry ocher Indian city — and 
chat is all you can say against it. - . 
The streets bustle with activity' 
from before dawn until past 
midnight. The small family-run ' 
shops stay open late selling the, 
famous Kashmir carpets, 
shawls and exquisite papier-ma- 
che boxes, bowls and coasters, 
all richly decorated in a rainbow 


of colors and exotic designs, at 
prices half what one would pay 
in London, New York or Fun* - 

.The city is x treasure: houses 
of crafts and craftsmen. The- 
carpets are woven in both wool 
and silk as wdi as the lovdy 
nam dabs and rhain srinrfa 
The most popular buy 
women visitors are the rare and 
fine Pashinina and Sbahtoosh 
shawls in an array -erf delicate 
colors. And there is walnur 
wood carvod into imricare 
terns, each piece a legacy 
ancient tradition. 

Srinagar stands astride two 
lakes whose waters reflect the 
town and the surrounding 
mountains. Lake Dal, with its 
boulevard of shops lining one 
bank, is best seen at dawn as the 
rim rises from behind the foot- 



the Palace on Wheels. 


W' 


HAT more romantic train circuitous route through majestic 

can there be. and what and colourful Rajasthan, visitinig 

more splendid away of seeing the Delhi Jaipur, Udaipui; Jaisafiher, 

glories of Rajasthan? A dozen or Jodhpur and the Ihj Mahal / 
more tum-of-the-century a . - at Agra, 

carriages originally built for No wonder so many 

Maharajahs, thoroughly refor-/^^^. v people are 
bished in the original making tracks 

grand manner \ to India, 

providing a supremely 
comfortable mobile 
hotel. 

The train, hauled, 
by veteran steam 
locomotives for some 
of the journey takes 
a week’s marvellously 


The Government of India Tburist 02ke,7, Cork Street, Lpndon W1X 2AB. 
Telephone 01 -437 3677/8. Prestel: 3442500. 






Address 

• • % 










3p~ : 

hills of the Himalayas. Nearby 
Lakc Nagin is less soph isti c ated 
but, perfaros. more .elegant^ 
/‘ Both fakes aoecrowdcd v^ 
■houseboats that vary from S&f 
. com&rable co the luxurious, 
-wtritejhe waters are alive with 
stdharxs, the gondolas of Kash- 
mir, which serve as taxis, float- 
ing shops and sorer deafters. 

. The houseboats came ro Sri- 
nagar by dunce. The British, 
who had already fallen under 
che spell of the area’s delights, 
took co the warer co circumvent 
an edict from the Maharajah of 
Kashmir prohibiting owner- 
ship 'of land by non-Kashmiris: 
A tradition of gracious living 
was established, which . has 
since become one of the attrac- 
tions of the region. 

. So are the Shalimar Gardens, 
or Gardens of Love, which were 
laid out neatly four centuries 
ago by Jahangir for bis queen. 
Nor Jchan. Here is a feast of 
flowers and fountains and to- 
day, as yesterday, it is a place 
where lovers walk hand in. 
hand. ThcNishar Bagh, or Gar- 
den of Pleasure, which rises 
from Lake Dal in terraces of 
color, has the mountains for a 
background. Although differ- 
ent from S halim ar, ir has. die 
same effect of making the visi- 
tor feel calm and serene. J ' 
Gulmarg, or Meadow of 
Flowers, is 55 miles (56 kilome- 
ters) from Srinagar. In spring 
(he colors of die wild Bowers 
are astonishing, while in au- 
tumn there are still enough of 
them to cause wonderment- at 
what has been missed.. A pop- 
lar;lined road leads to a climb 
through pine forests to the high 
■rafley- Stretching ahead are car : 
pets of meadows where, it is 
said, che emperor Jahangir col- 
lected 21 varieties ; of flowers 
during a angle visit 

Pahalgam is different, and 
one of die best takeoff points 
for treks into the surrounding 
mountains. Ponies, porters and 
equipment, are available- in 
abundance for treks to the.Ko: 
fohoi gladcr via the lovely 
high-altitude lake at Dudsar. . 

For the really fit; Sqnsraarg 
JS the starting point fora trek 
towards the roof of thr wodd 
near Ladakh, India’s remote and 
mystcnous frontier province..-; 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27 , 1985 


Page 11 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 



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y . New Delhts Ashoka Had cffm 

Palatial First-Class Hotels 


I A journey through India is no 
L longer a hardship, although it 
can still be an adventure. Ac rhe 
end of every day’s sightseeing, 
the traveler can come home to a 
I ' room tastefully done up in 
modem furnishings or a mod' 
ern interpretation of older Indi- 
an styles, toilets chat flush, 
baths that always provide hoc 
and cold water, and maid and 
room service chat very few ho- 
ods in Europe or America can 
equaL 

Among 'chose who -have 
helped make India a luxury des- 
tination is the Taj Group. Stay- . 
ing at the Taj Mahal Hotel in 
Ban bay is an unforgettable ex- 
perience. 

Put simply, this is one of the 
grand hotels. Designed by an 
Englishman, the hotel’s sea-fac- 
ing rooms overlook the harbor, 
and those facing the city have 
views over the gardens and 
pooL Nobody who has stayed 
here is surprised- to. learn dwr 
Fortune magazine listed the Taj 
in Bombay as one of the 12 best 
hotels in the world. And its 
new Inrer-Contlnencal tower 
block has few rivals. Neverthe- 
less, tty, if possible, to stay in 
the original building. This is' a 
hotel as it should be. 

-The Taj Group, whose par- 
ent company, Indian Hotels, 
had a turnover of $45.58 mil- 
lion last year, now has a second 
hocel in Bombay, the President, 
as well as two in New Delhi, 
two in Madras and another two 
in Bangalore. And that oily 
covers die main dries. There 


are three more in Goa, the mag- 
nificent Rambagh Palace in Jai- 
pur and the Lake Palace in 
Udaipur, as well as others in 
Benares, Madurai and the hill 
station Oocacamund. 

The Rambagh Palace in Jai- 
pur deserves special mention. 
Once the palace of the mahara- 
jahs of Jaipur, it is today a 
deluxe hotel with three servants 
to look after every guest. 

Udaipur’s Lake Palace, as its 
name implies, has a water}' sa- 
ting. This white-marble, 85- 
Toom fantasy stands in the mid- 
dle of Lake Picbola and was 
originally the summer home of 
the Maharani of Mewar. Many 
people have seen it. lr was one 
of the spectacular settings for 
James Bond and his film girl- 
friend, Octopussy. 

Another palace that offers 
maharajah service is the Oberoi 
Palace at Srinagar, Kashmir. In 
this haven of tranquil gardens, 
where in the afternoon guests 
sip Kashmiri tea flavored with 
dnnam on and cardamom and 
copped with chopped almonds, 
the rooms are aU emperor-size 
and furnished to near perfec- 
tion. 

But the largest chain of ho- 
tels in India is the Ashoka 
Group with 44 firsr-class hotels 
and motels. Run by the India 
Tourism Development Corpo- 
ration, its flagship is the luxuri- 
ous, yet friendly, Ashoka in 
New . Delhi which has 500 
rooms, a shopping center, ten- 
nis icourts ana a swimming pool 
and combines every comfort 


with a standard of service and 
food that is seldom bettered 
anywhere in the country. An- 
other top-class hotel run by this 
. group is the Lalicha Palace in 
Mysore, once rhe private palace 
of the maharajahs of Mysore. 

A newcomer to the hotel 
scene, the Welcomgroup. 
which has links with the Shera- 
ton organization, has developed 
no fewer than 2 L luxury proper- 
ties in 10 years, largely by con- 
centrating upon the needs of 
the international business com- 
munity. 

Nobody understands this 
better than the Hyatt group, 
whose Hyatt Regency in New 
Delhi, built in a palatial style 
that many a maharajah might 
envy, is especially geared for rhe 
comfort and convenience of 
business. 

Asa hoed it is both dramatic 
and comfortable. The lobby is a 
study in spaciousness and cool- 
ness. There is probably more 
marble ar the Hyatt than in the 
Taj Mahal. Yer it remains 
warm and welcoming, with 
four excellent restaurants and a 
fifth, with an Italian theme, to 
be opened shorrly. 

The two Taj hotels in New 
Delhi offer equal magnificence. 
The Taj Mahal has 350 luxury 
rooms plus four banquet rooms, 
a swimming pool and a disco- 
theque. Its newer sister, which 
is closer to the airport, is the 
Taj Palace, with 504 rooms and 
whar many consider the most 
glamorous entrance lobby in 
Asii. 


Traveling Like a Maharajah 


Many dispute wlur vonstitured 
Britain's greatest contribution 
to India. Sranc say rhe English 
language, or her % (he art of ad- 
ministration. Still more believe 
ir was. die railways, winch 
street h to rhe remotest parrs of 
(he country and provide Indian 
Railways with rhe largest sys- 
tem in Asia. 

There arc nearly 40,000 miles 
(6-1,000 kilometers} of broad-, 
meter- and narrow-gauge track. 
Daily, more than 8 million peo- 
ple travel on nearly 10.000 
trains connecting 7,085 stations 
scattered throughout the 
sprawling subcontinent. 

Anyone who has traveled by 
train in India has his own tale 
to tell of compartments packed 
with people all managing to 
smile and give the impression 
of some kind of comforr — 
even of men and women sleep- 
ing contentedly, to the envy of 
their fellow travelers, on lug- 
gage racks. 

But tourists are unlikely to 
suffer ary of these experiences. 
For them rhe India Tourist De- 
velopment Corporation has 
some pleasant surprises. 

The luxury express named 
che Great Indian Rover has 


double-decker bedrooms and in- 
stant room service as well as a 
deluxe dining car serving Indi- 
an, European and Chinese iui- 
sinc. lr rakes its passengers on a 
four-day, riircc-nighr tour 
through pans of the Golden 
Triangle. 

Afrer a lunchtime briefing at 
the Hotel Ashoka in New Del- 
ta' there is a journey through 
rhe night to Agra and a visit the 
following morning to the Taj 
Mahai. 

"Dinner mat evening,” ex- 
plains R.K. Puri, the corpora- 
rion's vice president, "is taken 
on rlie rrain. and eariv the fol- 


lowing day the traveler is in 
Ktaijraho to sec rise thousands 
of erotically bc-autiful statues on 
the outside of rhe rhuu.sand- 
year-old temples." 

The final journey is an early 
moming boar ride on the holy 
River Ganges ar Varanasi. 

Almost every rail trip in In- 
dia is J leisurely experience. 
Away from the main superfast 

expresses, there arc always fre- 
quent stops for engine dung- 
ing. watering and making con- 
nections. But the unchanging 
picture of Mother India is being 
painted before your eves at 
every stop. 



One rail journey should nor 
be missed. This is the journey 
aboard the famous Palace on 
Wheels run by ihc Rajasthan 
Tourist Development Corpora- 
tion. There are departures from 
Delhi from early October until 
the end of March. Tins 12- 
co-ach rrain journey is a trip 
back in rime to the opulenr, 
luxurious days of maharajahs, 
kings, emperors and viceroys. 
Some of rhe carriages were built 
specially for the viceregal rout 
of ISOS; others were sumptu- 
ously furnished by rhe fabu- 
lously wealthy Indian princes 
and princesses. All have been 
faithfully and lovingly restored. 

Each saloon his a lounge and 
sleeping berths, plus a bar and 
intercom for tour announce- 
ments. Luggage is stored away 
by impeccable stewards whose 
uniforms and elegant scarlet 
turbans recall what India must 
have been like in the davs of the 
Raj. 

And the meals match the 
mood. Most passengers decide 
that while in India they should 
eat what the Indians eat. and 
dine on curried meats, rice, 
spiced vegetables, dal and cha- 
fatis. followed by a selection of 


delicious sweetmeats. The 
choice nf drinks includes wine 
and beer as well as the popular 
favorite, fresh lime and 

Day One begins wirii ri n_ 
first of a long series high 
points. At the pink >andsr« .r.e 
city of Jjipur travelers are greet- 
ed bv caparisoned deph.ir.rs. a 
foretaste of a precarious ride 
later in (lie day aboard - im-*-- 

dah. high atop an elephant iba 
stems bored with the show and 
ponderously walks up die creep 
slope leading to the mounr.ur' 
fortress at Amber, former -.ap: 
cal of Raj urban. 

Days later che majestic steam 
locomotive hauls its carnage-, 
deep into the deserr. In the 
disrancc, silhouetted in tr.v 
morning sunrise, is the cu_d-.: 
of Qiitorgarh. scene of .! h-c- 
rendous sacrifice in the i-ich 
centurv when che queen yr.d ai; 
her handmaids killed them- 
selves rather than be taken pris- 
oner by invaders. 

Via the Palace on Wheels 
these and more wonders of 
north India, including L ; daipur. 
Jodhpur and Agra, can all he 
seen in comforr in a single 
week. Prices srarr at l,2>j R> 
(S108) per person per night 


Flying High Above Asia and the World 


Air-lndia is one of che world's 
most successful airlines. Not 
only is iu in-flight service by 
sari-dad hostesses calm and 
courteous, but its latest annual 
report discloses that during 
1983/1984 passenger traffic rose 
7.9 percent and freighr jumped 
18.4 percent. 

The passenger load between 
India and the United Scares in- 
creased from 70 percent ro 73.S 
percent and traffic with Japan 
was up by 5 percent, while the 
numba- of passengers carried 
on the Singapore route soared 
45 percent. During che year, 
revenue rose 10.1 percent. 

These are impressive figures. 
Seeking to rake advantage of 
che increased interest in India 
generated by films like "Gan- 
dhi" and "A Passage to India," 
a four-passenger group fare 
from the United Scares and 
Canada was established as an 
attractive package. 

The airline is to acquire six 
Airbus A3 10-300 aircraft next 
year as part of a fleet-replace- 
ment program. The planes are 


scheduled for the India/ Africa 
and India/Gulf routes, and later 
will be used for runs ro Austra- 
lia and Japan. 

As parr of a realistic ap- 
proach ro accommodating the 
business traveler, Air- India has 
reduced the total carrying ca- 
pacity of its Boeing 74"?s from 
394 to 3~7 but increased the 
number of Business Class seats 
from 20 to 40. Another way of 
increasing capacity has been the 
introduction of the Airbus on 
flights ro Singapore. 

On all long-distance routes 
passengers are pampered with 
excellent food and above-aver- 
age sen-ice. and in Business and 
First Gass they enjoy good 
French wines and champagne. 
Business fliers also get a travel- 
ing pack including a sleeping 
mask, slippers, a headset for 
music or che sound track of a 
film and toiletries for freshen- 
ing up before landing. 

With Delhi now less than 
nine hours away from London, 
Air-lndia is also becoming a 
major force in che country’s 


growing number of First-class 
and deluxe hotels. The first link 
in this sparkling chain was the 
Centaur in Bombay, a complex 
built by the Horcl Corporation 
of India, which is a wholly- 
owned subsidiary of Air-lndia. 
Opened a decade ago, it has 300 
rooms. 

Ir has since been followed by 
a second hotel ac the Delhi 
Airport with 416 rooms and a 
third at Srinagar, overlooking 
Lake Dal, which has 254 rooms 
and one of che finest conference 
complexes in India. 

Air-lndia has come a long 
way since 1932, when it began 
operating w-ich a single Puss 
Moth aircraft. Today its planes 
are named after Indian rivers, 
emperors and Himalayan peaks. 
The entire network totals more 
than 35,000 miles (55,500 kilo- 
meters). 

While Air-lndia rules the in- 
ternational airways, inside the 
Indian subcontinent most of 
the air traffic is handled by 
Indian Airlines. Their network 
covers the entire country with 


daily flights. Many leave in the 
early hours of the moming in 
order to deliver their passengers 
to their destinations before the 
sun gets too high in the sky. It 
seems inconvenient at che time, 
bur one appreciates che good 
sense of a dawn start long be- 
fore sightseeing or business 
meetings arc over. 

One of the best deals in the 
air is Indian Airlines’ 53"5 
"Discover India" fare. This 
ticket allows you ro fly any- 
where inside the country for 21 
days, but does not allow rhe 
flier to backtrack to any city 
excepc to make a connection. 

Because Indians love to fly. 
and also because of the growth 
in tourism, Indian Airlines are 
now using international planes, 
including Airbuses, rather than 
the smaller 200-plus seaters chat 
were adequate until a couple of 
years ago. 

Since 1981 a third airline has 
taken to the skies above India. 
Vayudoot has begun to link by 
air several of the more remote, 
out of the way, centers. It now 


flics 21 routes connecting y 
stations in 15 states and two 
union territories. No fewer 
than 20 of the stations were 
added in 1985. 

During the first year of it.-, 
operation the airline carried 

19.000 passengers. By 1984-85 
this had increased to KAOOO 
and is expected to top the 

350.000 mark this year. Profits 
have grown at an annual rare of 
more chin 60 Dercent. and in 
1985 should increase by 100 
percent, making Vayudoot one 
of the best managed airlines in 
the world. Its market is the 
lower-middle income group 
Some of its package tours cost 
as lirde as £40 t556i including 
air travel, sightseeing and good- 
class accommodation The du- 
ration of the tours is between 
four and six days. 

Travel in India war 
compiled by MOSS 
MURRA Y,a free-lance 
travel writer formerly 
with the Daily Express 
and Dmh' Mirror. 


lOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOeOOOOOQi 


4 


WHICH INDIA WILLYOU 
R\LL IN LOVE WITH? 










Tijil'i-'UJl.NIi 


" India is a thousand temples and palaces. A thousand different colours 
and sensations. A thousand different moods. 

Travel there and you travel back in time. But with all the comforts 
of today. 

Bathe from one of thousands of palm-fringed beaches. Stay in first-class 
hotels to rival the palaces of the maharajas. (In fact, some of them were the 
palaces of maharajas.) 

Vender at the white beauty of the Taj Mahal. And the love that inspired it. 

But then India has always inspired the most powerful emotions. 

Choose India. Then choose the India you love. 




% 





ENTERINATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Maggie Smith Breathes Life Into Pale 'Interpreters’ 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 

L ON DON — If, one of these cold 
/ autumn nights, yon wish to see 
some irons being pulled spectacu- 
larly from a dramatist's fire, hasten 
to the Queen's Theatre. Seldom, in 
the 20 years or so since we moved 
away from an actors' theater, and 

ceased to call upon Celia Johnson 
to turn the minor comedies of Wfl- 

THE LONDON STAGE 

liam Douglas Home into some 
semblance of triumph, has an ac- 
tress have been called upon to per- 
form the artificial respiration job 
that Maggie Smith is currently giv- 
ing Ronald Harwood's new play. 
“Interpreters.” 

Topically enough, the scene is set 
in and around the Foreign Office 
during a multinational conference. 
Smith portrays a British interpreter 
and a wildly miscast Edward Fox 
plays her Russian counterpart at a 
debate to arrange the catering and 
political plans for a forthcoming 
state visit to Britain by the Russian 
leader. 

But it rapidly becomes clear that 
Harwood's interests are anything 
but political. Instead he wishes to 
tell an old-fashioned kind of multi- 
lingua] love story, precisely the 
land that used to oosess Peter Us- 
tinov in the long-lost days of his 


Beatles Museum Sold, 
To Be Moved to London 

The Associated Press 

LIVERPOOL, England — A 
museum containing more than 
1.000 pieces of Beatles memorabil- 
ia has been sold and will be moved 
to London early' Qext year after 
failing to make a profit in the 
group's hometown of LiverpooL 
the museum’s owner said this week. 

Since it opened in April 1984. the 
S2.9 million exhibition called “Bea- 
ile City" has drawn fewer than 
200.00(5 visitors, according to its 
owner, an independent radio sta- 
tion. 


“Romanoff and Juliet” and “Love 
of Four Colonels.” 

Thus we have Fox abandoning 
all the clenched and stiff-upper- 
lipped English reserve that he pre- 
sents better than most and giving 
us instead on uneasy impression of 
a manic Soviet lover who only has 
to hear the sound of running water 
to be off in pursuit of every female 
interpreter buried within the Unit- 
ed Nations. 

A decade before the play opens, 
he and Smith have had a brief and 
tempestuous romance. Brought to- 
gether again by the impending state 
visit, they are left to rekindle an 
affair which may have lo email his 
defection. 

like Tom Stoppard in an infi- 
nitely stronger play. Harwood 
intent on making us under- 
stand that love is the real thing, and 
lhaL it is very often impossible. The 
idea of a doomed love affair be- 
tween interpreters ought perhaps to 
have offered us whole linguistic 
and geographic and national areas 
of romantic and sexual explora- 
tion. Instead, it becomes all too 
clear by the intermission that this 
play has nothing much to tell us 
beyond the fact that a man can 
behave badly in more than one lan- 
guage. 

We do in all fairness meet one or 
two other interesting characters, in- 
cluding an old Russian grandmoth- 
er. played by Doreen Mantle, who 
lives oil her memories of the Ballets 
Russes. Two other characters from 
East and West ministries, por- 
trayed by Jeffry Wickham and 
John Moffatt, are so perfectly type- 
cast Lhat they seem to have stepped 
straight from a British comedy film 
of the early 1950s. 

But because Harwood has so lit- 
tle for them to do except reinforce 
national prejudice and prove that 
the art of character-acting is still 
alive, it is left to SmiLh to rescue a 
remarkably shaky evening. She 
does it with a vengeance — whether 
realizing in mid conference that her 
stockinged foot is halfway up the 
leg not of her faithless Soviet lover 
but his appalling boss, or turning 
the last scene into a haunting ay of 


loneliness and rejection. Hers is 
one of the roost moving perfor- 
mances in town. 

This is a play about the l an gu age 
of love and about the moment in a 
relationship when the lies become 
more important than the truth. It 
remains a desperately fragile and 
stilled script, however, and nothing 
that the director. Peter Yates, can 
do to move his characters around 
an unusually cumbersome, set by 
Farrab is inclined to persuade me 
that without Smith there would be 
anything at ail here. With her and 
because of her. there is in fact 
something very special: few plays 
of recent times have started so un- 
steadily or proved at the last so 
undeniably touching in the accep- 
tance of loneliness as a way of life. 

□ 

In a good week for starry female 
turns, the enterprising Greenwich 
Theatre is offering the British pre- 
miere of Maxim Gorky's “Vassa" 
with Janet Suzman in the title role. 
She portrays a formidable ship- 
owner who runs her business and 
her family as if in rehearsal for 
some pre-Russian Revolution epi- 
sode of “Dynasty." 

“Vassa" has been recently and 
marvelously filmed in the Soviet 
Union, but seeing it now for the 
first time on stage, in director Hele- 
na Kaut-Howson's omnibus edi- 
tion of the 1910 and 1936 Gorky 
rewrites, one realizes that here es- 
sentially is the play that gets us 
from Chekhov to Strindberg. 

Vassa’s abominable family, her 
child-molesting husband and her 
drunken brother and even her 
light-fingered secretary, are dearly 
seen by Gorky as some sort of met- 
aphor for the bourgeoisie in termi- 
nal decay. Against them he sets up 
a revolutionary daughter-in-law, 
played by Amanda Boxer, who is 
prepared to sacrifice even her child 
for the cause of a better world. 

Bui in a theater, unlike a political 
tracL the star gets all the best lines 
and there is no real contest here. 
We stay with Vassa just as we stay 
with Hedda Gabler. hoping that 
she will win in the end because 
however murderous she may be of 


people or ideas or revolutions, she 
is still a hell of a lot more interest- 
ing than anything or anyone 
around her. 

“Vassa” thus becomes a play not 
about the collapse of one social 
order or the birth of another, but 
instead about a matriarch desper- 
ately intent on survival whatever 
the order. Prowling around the 
cage that is her office and her 
home. Suzman has found one of the 
great unplayed roles for an actress 
on her way from Hedda to a dowa- 
ger Borgia. 

□ 

The National Theatre, in dis- 
tinctly nostalgic mood with one of 
its earliest Olivier hits from 20 
years ago, "Mrs. Warren’s Profes- 
sion,” already in the repertoire has 
come up with another: Peter 
Wood’s production of “Love for 
Love.” 

The play was first seen on the 
theater’s stage in 1965 with a cast 


headed by Sir Laurence and Geral- 
dine McEwan. Now it is back, in 
the same Iil» de Nob Hi sets re- 
created by Bruce Snyder, but with a 
very different cast and as oddly 
different emphasis. 

In 1965 it seemed to me that 
Wood was intent on establishing 
William Congreve as an infinitely 
tougher and edgier writer than the 
fashion allowed. Today, that prin- 
ciple well-established, he seems 
more content to lean back into the 
play and let it stand as a celebra- 
tion of Congreve’s language rather 
than an exploration of Ids social 
standing as a commentator. 

Tim Curry is in superlative form 
as a tattletale, bearing more than a 
passing resemblance to Congreve, 
while Michael Bryant, Stephen 
Moore, Basil Henson and Amanda 
Redman achieve a company style 
and confidence that is rarely found 
in National premieres these nights. 
All in all it is an early, not- to-be- 
missed Christmas treat 









r 


Vampirologist Nibbles on New Angle for 


By Steve Brewer 

The Associated Press 

S AN FRANCISCO — The 
problem with most books 
about vampires, says Anne Rice, is 
they have the wrong outlook. “Ev- 
erything I had ever seen focused on 
the victim, not the vampire, and he 
was the interesting one,” said the 
author whose latest book is “The 
Vampire Lestat" (Alfred A Knopf, 
$17.95). 

“I had never read a vampire 
book or seen a vampire movie that 
satisfied me,” she said. “The sur- 
face hadn't been scratched.” 

In “The Vampire Lestat” and 
her 1976 best seller “Interview 
With the Vampire." Rice lets the 
reader look through lbe vampire's 
glowing eyes at a world populated 
with tasty humans and his fellow 
creatures of the night. The tales 
explore the personalities of vam- 
pires. depicting them as immortals 
with a good deal of mortal emotion. 


Rice discards much or the old 
vampire myth in her books. A stake 
through the heart won’t kill a sleep- 
ing bloodsucker and crosses or gar- 
lic draw scorn, not fear, from her 
protagonists. 

“I wanted to write a new mythol- 
ogy ” Rice said. “Bram Stoker 
wrote his own when he wrote ‘Dra- 
cula.' He researched the old leg- 
ends in Eastern Europe and that 
chose what portions of that he 
would use in his book. I did the 
same thin g.'* 

In her books, Rice said, she tries 
to envision an immortal mind. In 
other works, the concept of immor- 
tals “is really boring," she said. 
“They’re usually looking for a lost 
love. I think that if these creatures 
really could live forever, or even for 
a couple of centuries, they would 
have to have something on their 
minds other than a lost love.” 

For Rice's vampires, the search 
is for a meaning to existence. “If a 
person was immortal, then sooner 



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


EMPRESA NACIONAL DE ELECTRICIDAD S.A. 

ENDESA 
REPUBLIC OF CHILE 
CANUTILLAR PROJECT 

INVITATION TO INTERNATIONAL PREQUALIFICATION OF PARTICIPANTS 

CONTRACT CC-51 

SUPPLY AND ERECTION OF ELECTROMECHANIC EQUIPMENT 
FOR THE CANUTILLAR POWER PLANT. 

ENDESA invites Chilean and foreign manufacturers and suppliers of electromechanic equipment produced in 
member countries of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), as well as to firms specialized in engineering 
services and erection of electromechanic equipment from those same countries, to submit application to participate in 
the prequalification of participants for the Contract CC-51: Supply and Erection of Electromechanic Equipment for 
the Canutillar Power Plant, Canutillar Project. 


MAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PROJECT 

The Canutfllor Power Plant wiB be located some 1,000 km south of 
Santiago, Chile, near Puerto Montt dty and the works will be developed 
between the Chopo lake and the Rdoncavi estuary. 

The power plant will use the 240 m difference of elevation between the 
Chopo lake and the sea and a 60 cub'c meters per second mean annual 
flow, correspondng to the Chamiza river plus the diversion of the Blanco, 
Pangot and Lexica rivers flows. 

These resources will allow the installation of a 130 MW power plant with 
an average annual production of 960 million kWh. 

The works of the Canutiflar Power Plant will be executed through different 
contracts. The power plant commissioning is scheduled fer the first 
semester of 1991. 

SCOPE OF CONTRACT 

A summary of the major equipment to be supplied and erected under 
contract CC-51 is as follows: 

A. EQUIPMENT SPECIALLY DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED 
FOR ENDESA 

— Two (2) spherical vdvBS. Valve diameter 21 m, maximum service 
pressure 336 m water column, inducing operation and control 
equpment and accessories 

— Two P) Fronds turbines, 74 M.W. each, H = 213.5 m head, 375 r.pm 
and 38 mV sec, including governors and accessories. 

— Two (2) three-phase generators, 70 MVA each, 13.8 kV generating 
voltage, power factor 0.95, frequency 50 Hz, inducing static excitation, 
voltage regulation and accessories. 

— Two p) three-phase power transformers, 75 MVA each, 13.8/230 kV, 
FOW. YN dl and accessories. 

— Six (6) surge arresters to protect 245 kV equipment. 

— One (1) 245 kV, SF6 gas insulated substation. 

— Two P) 15 kV generator dreurt breakers. 

— Segregated-phcse bus. 

— Electric control equipment. 

— Protection equipments and fault recorders. 

— Erection of one (1) 150 ton overhead travelling crane (supplied by 
ENDESA). 

B. STANDARD AND MASS-PRODUCED EQUIPMENT 
— water and oil pumps; 

— fans; 

— air conditioning system; 

— diesel motor-generator set; 

— detection, alarm and fire fighting system; 

— diesel and electric motor -drrven compressors, 7 kp/sq.cm; 

— motor-driven compressor far braking and speed regulation systems; 
— dry-type insulation auxfltary service transformers, 15 kV class, 500 kVA 

through 2500 kVA- 

— generator field circuit breakers; 

— metal-enclosed equipment far ground rtg the generator neutral; 

— load ranter unit substation with dry-type transformer, 15 kV dass ; 

— ax. metd-endosed load distribution centers, 400 V ; 

— dx. metatendosed load distribution centers, 125 V; 

— lead-odd s ta tionary batteries, plants type, 110 V dx. and 48 V d.c; 

— battery chargers, 1 10 V dx. and 48 V dc,- 
— -inverters; 


— medium and law voltage ccbles; 

— dry- type insulation tremstarmers, 15 kV doss far the 70 MVA generators 
excitation; 

— dry-type insulation voltage transformers, 15 kV doss, for the 70 MVA 
generators protection. 

SALE OF DOCUMENTS 

Prequalification documents, only in Spanish language, may be o b ta in ed at 
ENDESAs man office, Santa Rosa 76 - 1st floor, Santiago, Chile, from 
November 15th, 1985, at the price of 113. $85.- (or Chilean pesos 
$15,000.-). 

Open: Monday to Thursday 9.00-113) and 1430-17.00 
Friday : 930 -1130 and 1430-1530 

They may oho be obtained by mail against payment to the order of 
ENDESA from: 

ENDESA 

Jefie del Departamento de Estudicu para la Construccttn 
Casilla 1392, Santiago, CHILE 

Air mail delivery wiB have an extra charge of US. $10-- per set of 
documents. 

CLOSING DATE 

The information requested in the prequafificatian documents must be 
submitted at ENDESA's main office, no later than 1130 a.m., Jcnucry 
14th, 1986. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PREQUAUFICATION 

ENDESA wiU preselect firms or joint venture participants on the bceas of 
their experience as wefl as technicd and fmandal opacities, aid at the 
sane time, will qualify Chilean and foreign manufacturers, suppliers, 
engneering firms, erection of eJedromechanical equipment firms, whose 
information wil be submitted by the pcrticipants. 

Chilean and foreign firms may constitute an association or joint venture. 
Any assodafion or jairtf venters not fagdfy fanned should exhibit a written 
comm itment binding the prospective member to legaBy materialize sad 
association m the case the contract be awarded to them. 

OTHER CONTRACTS OF CANUTILLAR PROJECT 

The CanutSar Poject considers two (2) other main contracts, the Contract 
CC-22: Construction of the intake surge shaft and penstocks, with its 
prequofifiedion procedure under way and the contract CC-23: Construc- 
tion of steel Ened tunnel, power house and discharge works with its 
prequafifioation procedure lo be initiated in a near future. 

FINANCING 

The financing scheme that has been envisaged comprehends the foBawing 
sources: 

— ENDESA's own funds; 

— A loan requested to the Inter-American Development Bank (DB) 

— And bans lied ta suppliers. 

Therefore, at the bW stage, prequafified podia pants wi have ta offer 
financing to cover at least eighty five per cent (85%J of the foreign 
currency portion of the contract vdue for the engineering services, 
equipment supply, shipping, erection card works of contract CC-51. The 
remaning vdue of this contract would be covered by funds from the looi 
has been requested ta the IDB. 


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or later that person would have to 
meet those questions,” she said. 

The vampires’ search will contin- 
ue. Rice already is planning a third 
book in what she caQs “The Chron- 
icles of the Vampires.” Some char- 
acters, such as the mournful master 
vampire, Armand, and the boy who 
conducted the interview in bar first 
book, will reappear. 

Rice's first vampire book grew 
from a short story she had written. 
The attraction to that subject was 
the idea of writing from the view- 
point of someone who was immor- 
ial Once she began writing about 
vampires, the subject kept present- 
ing new avenues for her. 

“1 want to take it as far as I can 
go with it,” she said. 

First, however, she has complet- 
ed the research and is writing a 
book on witchcraft. 

Rice said she no longer fears be- 
ing stereotyped as a horror writer 
because readers understand the 
deeper messages in her bodes. 

“There's no reason why a horror 
novel can't be as interesting and as 
deep and as unlimited as any other 
kind of novel,” she said. 

“Interview With the Vampire" 
sold particularly well in paperback. 
“The Vampire Lestai” recently ap- 
peared on The New York Times* 
hardcover best-seller list and soon 
trill be made into a movie. 


San Francisco Bay Plays 
On Underwater Organ 

United Press International ' r . 

SAN FRANCISCO — An un- 
derwatcr pipe organ will cany the. 
sounds of the waves of San Francis- 
co Bay to shore — at a cost of 
$63,000. 

The orpin’s designer, Peter Rich- 
ards, and his crew have sunk 25 
open-ended pipes of varying 
lengths through a terrace at theend 
of a jetty. The turbulence of water 
in the pipe activates harmonics for 
^almost a fugue-like effect,” said 
Richards, who hopes to open the 
xrgan to the public in January. 


- Rice wrote “The Feast of AH 
Saints" and “Cry to Heaven" under 

her own name and other works un- 
der two pseudonyms — Anne 
Rampling and A- N. RoqneJare. 
The Roqudare books are a trilogy 
of erotica Rice calls “very strong 
staff,” and the Rampling name re- 
cently appeared on a contemporary 
novel entitled “Exit to Eden." 

Using the pseudonyms is 
writing with different voices 
“They're like other persdnaKties of 
mine.” she said. 

Rice lived in New Orleans mm3 
she was 15, then attended, high 
school and college in Texas aSet 
her Family moved there. Sbe'-|*Mr' 

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years a variety <a 

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’0Jj jjl Statistaes Index 

• v nIJ) A*# 6 X (dot P .18 Eonrinos newt* KU ...-.■ 

71 /T, 1 «*fXM 8 y,P. w M*«, r SEr P £ . 

irflevj KYSB arioas P.l* Gold martartt P.U 
<W Int^rtfTrWw 

?««*««* fc» Mort*t mranafv. P.M 
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f V ” CwimwJHIw M* OTC sock - PM 

PMd * xH ftM Q*«f mnrteti P3> . 

M%| WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


lieralbS^Sribune, 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


,)vlL| ^ ^ a 


p. Stocks 
eport, Page 16 

Page 13 


Xssfe 


w wtmuimmw Bayer Sees 

B°unse^ and Itefa- Dangers, Record 
Are Taking Hold in Europe ..... ,, fi . 

BrSHERBY BUCHANAN O O L Itflilo 


Imported Steel 

As percentage of total supply 
in United States. 


: n-f 3 Sfe i ' By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

_ Jntenvttkmal BeraUf Tribune 

"•itr 1 ^ More European executives are getting cash 

£.1 * w^. .u nus f s wben t * ieir c wn p a mes dowdL and many of 
"■ui ■ £5°* l* 00 "** are getting bigger. But for the companies. 

: . bon ^ses are being revealed as less than miracle cures (or 

■r e - sagE 111 * Profits. 

i^Mording to some European compensation consulting firms, 

. j n w ™. cou P s « co mp anies an sa l a r ies , bemuses and other benefits. 

incr easing n umber of companies in Britain, France. Italy and 
West Germany are giving executives bonuses Bolted to group, 
. . ' Subsidiaiy or division perfor m a n ce. Some are HnMng bonuses to 

*•!- b *** 9^ m( i tvidua l performance. 

-.3: According to a worldwide survey on pay and bwwfjf s fry PA 

•L. Personnel Services, the Ion- — - ■ 

(pqj* don-based remuneration con- . , 

'Z * Sttjk J sultants, 67 percent of British As bonuses grow, 

SS m »X^ P ’SS shareholders wonder 

;S:C : ^— ^ 0^33 whether executives 

,u r fi ^5 e deserve them. 

.. c -a , .T3 Efr .-i- that of the United States, ; ; 

.. :e ^ 5 whe f e 95 percent of U.S. cozn- 
j ~ parties have such bonus plans. 

: . ' ^ Jfroj^ ^acconhng to Towers, Perrin, Forster & Crosby Inc., 
’.‘7^ 0; pi!rt^' r ji “ ^rotten branch of the UA remuneration consultants, 65 
, fife},, percent of all Fraith m a nag ers get some land of executive bonus 
i ’ ^ hnted; to performance. 

‘J-|?ad ; Knjj ■* Despite their increasing use <rf them, companies are finding 
... J ' r ■= E ?2s!jiL “tat executive cash bonuses alone are not likely to change 
l3 “ sc^. 1 ingrained practices. In addition, as the bonuses grow, sometimes 
. ^ ■ « to more than 50 percent of base salary, unions and shareho lders 

-jy : -»uj wonder whether the executives deserve them. 

Z ■ - , “Executive bonuses are highly overrated,** said Tom Peters, 

eaanIK U -S. ma n agement gum and oo-anthor of the best-selling book u In 
T '^QNe r.nj^; Search of E xcellence," winch analyzed 10 top U.S. performers. 

.*. ftsr ‘' ”• n w “Executive bonuses didn't appear as a major part of what good 

-• "£• companies did,” Mr. Peters said. “In a company that Is in 

7^" :: reasonably good shape, it isn’t a great motivator. In companies 

^ that are hopeless bureaucracies, you need s omething to wake 
^ them up. 

- - “Bttf it is no panacea,** Mr. Peters continued. “Putting a 
’ - J ’- « UjEg^ performance bonus on is not going to compensate for a hopeless 

“2 tan bureaucracy. Top executives will just start naming around with 

- fnc lirijjj. their heads cut off in ever-decreasing circles.’* 

T N addition, some European executives, especially in large 
' ■■ - c ^j.. I companies, who are accustomed to a relatively risk-free job 

M- may lose motivation once the bonus starts shanking. 

“Hie trouble in Britain is that many of the bonus schemes were 
iissgjj introduced at the bottom of the cycle," said Tony Vemon- 
»«c Harcomt, a remuneration adviser with Monks P ar t n ership and 

* *'•'■- -^djc .author of “Top Management Remuneration 1985-1986,” a survey 

i^^hat draws on annual reports of 1^00 companies and on salary 
r I'icae Mnd benefit surveys of 3,000 posts in 400 companies. 

' : “.'sexslac “There have been three good years of increasing profits, but 
--■‘.t. Tzvji what will happen when there is a downturn in profits?** Mr. 
- — jir-fc Veman-Haraxotsaid. “It could bean awful demotivator. Execu- 
: rives start living on their bonus, get used to the skiing holiday and 

■■ ■■ri‘ the extra car for the wife.” "" 

■ m iitjsc Average bonuses in Europe are still relatively low cocr^jared to 

• :: i those^in the United States, but (he. number of.^ companies paying 

-rr'i’iru.r. as much as 60 percent of base salary, or offering open-ended 

■' bonus plans, is increasing. , 

- ■ :..is.fi5- PA has estimated the average boniis to be 20 percent in Italy 
. . r-. r. rjrcz: and 9 to 13 percent in Britain. This compares with a U.S. average 

^axsafc (Contumed on Page 15, CoL 1) 


As bonuses grow, 
sbarebdldei's wonder 
whether executives 
deserve them. 




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■ GastwA (ru&ei. Other data from (tevtttnondAP. 


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MLNM 49000 
Harw. krona 774 
PAIL pass TU0 

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Nov. 26 

M er r lS Lydi goody Amti 
N day arorotM yield: 758 




Markets Oosed 

‘Financial mattas were dosed Toesday in iCalcntla, India, and Paki- . 

stan became of holidays. . 


Boom Is Cited 
In Foreign Sales 

Room 

LEVERKUSEN. West Germa- 
ny — Bayer AG, one of West Ger- 
many’s three biggest chemicals 
companies, expects record profits 
in 1985 for the second consecutive 
year because of a continued boom 
m worldwide sales, its chairman, 
Hermann Stranger, said Tuesday. 

Speaking at a press conference, 
Mr. Strenger also said that the 1985 
dividend would at least equal 
1984’s payout of 9 Deutsche marks 
(S3.51), but gave no details. 

Mr. Stronger said that sales had 
jumped nearly 10 percent to 35.5 
oilliou DM in the first nine months 
of 1985, up 9.5 percent from the 
32.43 bOHou DM in the 1984 peri- 
od. He said they should rise to 
more than 46 button DM by the 
end of the year, op from 43.03 bil- 
lion in 1984. 



LTV*sopef«tifigk»ses 
from Its steel division 

Quarterly figures, in mfJIkxisof doflars 




■s-<4:k.. ■■■ 


mm. 


Texaco Chief 
Sees Difficulty 
In Raising Bond 




'Oct. 1: President Reagan’s vohmtary 
quota agreement pdschigceifing 
of Imports st 20.5 percent 
Source : Iron end Steel institute 


Thi Now York Timoi 


LTV Upholding Steel Commitment 


it rose to 151 billion DM in the 
first nine months of 1985, up 14.1 
percent from the 220 billion DM 
of the 1984 period. 

Parent-company volume in the 
first nine months rose 9.4 percent 
to 13.56 billion DM, with foreign 
volume up 11 .2 percent and domes- 
tic volume up 5.9 percent. 

In 1984, Bayer, whose products 
range from industrial chemicals to 
phannaceu deals, reported record 
world-group pretax profit of 29 
billion DM, an increase of 34.3 
percent bom 1983, on sales of 43 
billion DM. 

Along with its major West Ger- 
man rivals, Hoecbst AG and BASF 
AG, Bayer continued to record in- 
creases in foreign sales, especially 
in North America, where volume 
rose 1 1.6 percent to 8.7 billion DM. 
North America is Bayer’s second 
largest market after Europe, where 
volume rose 15 percent to 17.9 
billion DM. 

Mr. Stronger declined to be spe- 
cific cm dividend payments, al- 
though he said that Bayer had a 
policy of paying a “good” dividend 


By Thomas C Hayes 

New York Tima Service 

DALLAS — Already under pressure from cheap 
steel imports, LTV Cofp. chose to double its bet on 
sled: In 1983, it agreed to acquire Republic Sted 
Corp„ reasoning that by using the best operations 
from Republic and its own Jones & Laughiin steel 
unit, it could fashion a more efficient operation to 
compete with foreign rivals. 

Its timing could not have been worse. The sec- 
ond-largest U.S. steelmaker, alter United States 
Steel Coro., has slashed production costs. But steel 
imports have actually risen since it struck the 
agreement with Republic, and prices are lower, 
keeping LTV Steel mired in red ink. 

Its losses over the last four years total SI 36 
billion. And with analysts forecasting little change 
in sled demand through 1986, LTV has bees 
pressed into selling some profitable assets and 
delaying some maturing debt in an effort to outlast 
its frustrating cash squeeze. 

“Instead of moving into a growing market, or at 
least a stagnant market with a growing share, we 
entered the market at a time it was plunging," said 
Raymond A Hay, LTV*s chairman and chief exec- 
utive. “Foreign steel has bombed the market” 


West German Trade Surplus Widens 


bank, or central bank, said that the 


100 The Associated Press 

DALLAS — Texaco Inc. may 
not be able to post the bond neces- 
,vS 3 £k£« icq 5aiy to appeal a juty judgment that 
is nearly 52 billion more than the 
company’s stock market value, 
^ -V. Texaco’s president was quoted as 
£Li&a|$200 saying in a published report 
VI gw Nevertheless, the company be- 

lieves the award may not withkand 
19W a pending judicial review, which 

would make the question moot a 
statement released Tuesday said. 

The statement came as Wall 

■■■■■■■■I Street in apparent reaction to the 
n. No. York Term remarks by Texaco's president Al- 
fred C DeCrane Jr_ went on a 
myfTVIDnf selling binge that forced a tempo- 

f f LiA/ia rary suspension of trading in Tex- 

aco stock. 

Last week, after a four-month 
ed the acquisition of Republic trial t Houston jurors decided Tex- 
ind said he and LTV believe aco should pay Pennzoil Co. a re- 
uld outlast its unrelenting cash cord SI 0.53 billion. They said that 

heir gamble would ultimately Texaco improperly enticed Getty 

. Oil Co. to back out of a merger last 

like to think that we made a year with PennzmL Texaco subse- 
Republic, Mr. Hay said. “Bnt quently acquired Getty for S102 
1 to be a better steel company billion. 

An appeal of that judgment 
adered getting out of the steel could require Texaco to post a S12- 

blic approached it with a pur- billion bond, a sum beyond the oil 

but elected instead to buy out company’s ability to pay, Mr. De- 

ittimi in new stock. The agree- Crane was quoted as saying Mon- 

eariong review before it was day by The Dallas Morning News. 
S. Justice Department, and it Texaco, which is based in White 
984. Plains, New York, and is the third 

imbi lions are realized, bowev- largest U.S. oil company based on 

’oviding timings f alls on the annual revenue, has a current slock 

I operations. Its fast-growing market value of 58.6 billion, 
se unit is a major subcon tree- Under stale law, a defendant 

d Stealth bombers and has must post a bond equal to an award 
>ed-up Pentagon spending on plus attorneys* fees and intere&L to 
sagan's Strategic Defense Ini- appeal a judgment, 
le unit — which Charles A. “If a $ 12-billion bond is required 
_ _ —Texaco doesn't have S12 billion 

on Page 19, CoL 5) and in my opinion, probably can't 

get it — then we'd have to look for 

some heroic measure, whether it's 
tb -A Chapter 1 1 or whatever." Mr. De- 

ll fi It m! Ifi^Tl fi Crane was quoted as saying. 

.UO YY lUCIia Under Chapter II of the US. 

bankruptcy code, a company re- 
The October result took the cu- care* court protection from credi- 


Stitt. Mr. Hay catted the acquisition of Republic 
“a good derision" and said he and LTV believe 
that the company could outlast its unrelenting cash 
problems and that their gamble would ultimately 
payoff. 

"A lot of people like to think that we made a 
mistake” in buying Republic, Mr. Hay said. “But 
we have the potential to be a better stori company 
with Republic.” 

LTV actually considered getting out of the steel 
business when Republic approached it with a pur- 
chase offer in 1983, but elected instead to buy out 
Republic for 5770 miHion in new stock. The agree- 
ment prompted a yearlong review before it was 
approved by the U.S. Justice Department, and it 
mok effect in June 1984. 

Until LTV*s steel ambitions are realized, howev- 
er, the burden of providing earnings falls on the 
company’s non-stcri operations. Its fast-growing 
aerospace and defense unit is a major subcontrac- 
tor for the B-l and Stealth bombers and has 
benefited from stepped-up Pentagon spending on 
President Ronald Reagan's Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative. Last year the unit — which Charles A. 

(Continued on Page 19, CoL 5) 


WIESBADEN, West Germany October current account surplus mulative current-account surplus tors while it works out a way to pay 


of 6J. biffion Deutsche marks (524 
of making adjustments when they ^ a 4.4.^. 


worsened. 

Separately, a Bayer report re- 
leased Tuesday said that foreign 
ownership in the group rose to 39.1 
percent in 1985, from 31 J percent 
is 1981. Increased British and U.S. 
interest accounted for most of the 
rise. 


Factory Orders 
FeB2.1%inU.S. 
During October 

TheAaoaatui Prat 

NEW YORK — Slack de- 
mand for military hardware 
caused U.S. factory orders for 
durable goods to fall 21 per- 
cent in October, the third de- 
cline in. the last four months 
and the biggest drop since July, 
die Commerce Department re- 
ported Tuesday. 

It said that orders totaled 
5104.4 button last month, a 
522-billion decline from Sep- 
tember. The drop followed a 
0. 9-percent decline in Septem- 
ber and was the largest setback 
since a 23-percent fall in July. 

The weakness was attributed 
to another big drop in demand 
for n&Htaiy equipment. Mili- 
tary orders fell 26.6 percent last 
month after dropping 21.1 per- 
cent in September. But analysts 
-cautioned that the defense cate- 
gory is volatile and future or- 
ders are likdy to rise because of 
the Reagan administration’s 
militar y buildup. 

In other economic news, a 
University of Michigan survey 
found that 25 percent of all 
families expected economic im- 
provement, down from 33 per- 
cent a year earlier and the all- 
time high of 52 perc e nt in tbe | 
second quarter of 1983. ; 


— West Germany’s current ac- was the highest on record. In Octo- to 27.4 billion DM this year corn- 
count showed a provisional surplus ber 1984, there was a surplus of 6.1 pared with 8 J billion DM in the 
of 62 bttfion Deutsche marks (524 billion DM in the current account, first 10 months of 1984. 
billion) in October after a 4.4-bil- the broadest measure of trade per- The cumulative merchandise- 
lion DM surplus in September, the formance.. trade surplus rose to 58.3 billion 


to 27.4 billion DM this year com- i* 5 debts. 

pared with 83 billion DM in the Mr. DeCrane's comment drew a 

first 10 months of 1984. heavy reaction on Wall Street. 


The cumulative merchandise- Trading in Texaco was halted on 


trade surplus rose to 58.3 billion the New York Stock Exchange for 


Federal Statistics Office said Tues- Last month’s surplus in mer- DM from 40.9 billion DM a year 59 minutes in the morning because 


day. chandise trade was the second-big- earlier. of an imbalance in buy and sell 

It also reported that the mer- gest ever recorded by West Germa- For all of 1984, there was a cu- orders after fatting 51.75 a share to 

chandise trade surplus widened to ny, behind the 8.82-billion-DM mulative current-account surplus $3230 on heavy volume. Trading 


8.7 bUtton DM in October from 7.4 surplus recorded in October 1984. of 17.7 button DM and a merchan- continued to be heavy and Texaco ship with 


billion in September. 

A spokesman for tbe Bundes- 


The current account figure was dise-trade surplus of 54 billion closed at $3225, down 52 


not seasonally adjusted. 


State District Judge Solomon 


Casseb Jr. of Houston has sched- 
uled a bearing for Dec. 5 to listen to 
attorneys* arguments on whether 
be should affirm the jury’s verdict 
and award. 

In a statement, the company not- 
ed that the district court may fully 
or partially gram Texaco's motion 
seeking reversal of the verdict. 

Later the company said: “Obvi- 
ously a Chapter 11 proceeding 
would be a very extreme step that 
would only arise as a possibility 
after all other legal remedies had 
been exhausted.” 

BHP Acquires 
Monsanto Oil 
For $7 45 MHKon 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MELBOURNE — Broken 
Hill Pty. took another step 
Tuesday toward becoming a 
major international oil concern 
with a 5745-million purchase of 
Monsanto Oil Co. from Mon- 
santo Co., the chemicals group 
based in Houston. 

The agreement involves all 
Monsanto's oil and gas interests 
except those in Britain, which 
Monsanto Co. plans to sell off 
separately. 

The purchase was the second 
by BHP of a U3. oil company 
in the past year, following its 
takeover earlier this year of En- 
ergy Reserves Group Inc. for 
S504 million. 

The acquisition of Monsanto 
Oil will pve BHP additional 
North American reserves or 
nearly 74 million barrels of oil, 
and 730 billion cubic feet (20.9 
billion cubic meters) of natural 
gas in the United States and 
Canada, BHP said. 

Monsanto also has large ex- 
ploration areas in both coun- 
tries, as well as properties that 
may be explored in Colombia. 

Stock analysts hailed the 
move 35 another example of 
BMP's strategy of budding up 
oil reserves, particularly in 
North America where they are 
cheap because of expectations 
of low oil prices. 

BHP is Australia's largest 
crude oil producer, in partner- 
ship with Exxon Corp. 

f Reuters, AFP) 


U.S. Banks lend to Soviet for First Time in 5 Years 


By Perer T. Kilbom 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — For reasons 
that analysts attribute partly to the 
spirit of the Reagan-Gorbachev 
talks but more to serious strains on 
the Soviet economy, U2S. banks 
have started lending to the Rus- 
sians again after a five-year hiatus. 

Without the ceremony that often 
accompanies such transactions, 
four of the biggest UJS. banks. First 
National of Chicago, Morgan 


“It means that American banks ing. On top of that, the Russians culties to persist for several years 
are beginning to get back in bus- have encountered severe produc- and that they will therefore have to 
ness with the Soviet Union,” said lion difficulties. continue borrowing substantial 

Ed A. Hewett, a specialist in Soviet Production has declined from amounts, 
affairs at the Brookings Institution, 123 million barrels a day to an Because of the Soviet debt-pay- 
a research orga n ization in Wash- estimated 11.8 million. Economists ment record, banks in the United 
ington. estimate that Soviet foreign ex- States and elsewhere are competing 

A senior officer of one of the change earnings this year have aggressively to share in the busi- 
American banks said, “My guess is dropped by 52 billion or S3 billion, ness. But eventually, some econo- 
that this kind of lending is going to to a point where for tbe first time mists warn, the Russians, like the 
get bigger." during the 1980s the country faces big Latin American debtors, could 

After tbe Soviet Union's 1979 a deficit in its hard currency trans- run into payment difficulties. 

: n . n c " urn- i .m « 



intervention in Afghanistan, UJS. actions. 


Their ad problem is a long-term' . 


Guaranty, Bankers Trust and Ir- lending to Moscow, which was new- The recent decline in world inter- problem," Mr. Hewett said. “It 
ving Trust, plus a London subsid- er very large, dried up. Even now, esi rates and favorable terms on the isn't a blip. A couple of years down 
iary of Royal Bank of Canada, the banks are treading carefully. new loan contributed to the Soviet tbe road the banks are going to get 
agreed early this mouth to lend the Jan Various, a specialist in Soviet decision to borrow, economists nervous 


Madison Avenue 
at 76 th Street 
New York 100*1 
Cable Tbe Carlyle New Vorli 
Interna portal Telex £20697 
■(telephone 212 - 744-1600 

A member at the Sharp Group 
since 1967 


iary of Royal Bank of Canada, the banks are treading carefully. new loan contributed to the Soviet tbe road 
agreed early this mouth to lend the Jan Various, a specialist in Soviet decision to borrow, economists nervous. 

Soviet Union up to S400 milli on at economics and a consultant in said 

unusually low interest rates to buy Washington, said that the loan was Tbe interest rate on the loan is _ 
American and Canadian grain. supporting grain sales at a time of onc-quaner of a percentage point If 

This week, those banks are invit- decline in the U.S. farm economy, above the London interbank of- I 


This week, those banks are invit- 


ing scores of others to share in the This loan is about as safe ajustifi- fercd rale, currently 8ft percent, 
loan. cation as you can get," he said. “It which is the basis for most interna- 1 

In relation ro the tens of billions can hardly be criticized.” tianal lending, 

of dollars that American banks Bankers involved in the loan said First National Bank of Chicago | 


of dollars that American banks Bankers involved in the loan said First National Bank of Chicago 

have lent to countries such as Mexi- the atmosphere of easier communi- has a long history of dealing with 
co and Argentina, it is a small cation leading up to the Geneva Eastern Europe through erain-ex- 
amounL But it is enormous in negotiations lubricated the banks’ ^ financing. j 

terms of U.S. lending to the Soviet deliberations with the borrower, Earlier this year First National 
Union, one of the worlds major the Soviet Foreign Trade Bank. Bank of Chicago, the group leader , 
debtor countries through borrow- For the Soviet Union, a more ]ed a^er group that made a 
tags from European and Japanese compelling consideration was the S200-mfllion loan to Moscow. Ex- 


negotiations lubricated the banks’ 
deliberations with the borrower, 
the Soviet Foreign Trade Bank. 


banks. 

This single transaction exceeds 
the total of the Soviet debt to 
American banks by 5125 milli on, 
and bankers and international 
economists suspect that much 
greater amounts are likely. 


state of its economy. 


cepi for the Chicago bank, none of 1 


To raise foreign exchange, it nor- banks were American, 
nutty relies on tbee^ort of ml of Mr. Vanous said he expected the , 
which it is the world’s No. I pro- Russians’ foreign-exchange diffi- 

ducer. I 

For several years, however, 

world oil prices have been plung- >■ - 


EUROPEAN GOAL AND STEEL COMMUNITY 

U.S. $60,000.000. — 9Vn% 1976-1986 

FINAL REDEMPTION 

The Commission of ihe European Communities informs the holders of 
above mentioned Bonds that the amount remaining outstanding Le. 
U.5. $37,500,000. — is redeemable at par on or after Janu- 
ary 15, 1986. 

Bonds should be presented for payment at the Offices of the paying 
agents bm. forth in the proepeenu and the conditions of the Bonds. 
Luxembourg, November 27. 1985. 


This announcewem appears as a matter of rec.:rj only. 


■it, . 

tv «*V 


NEW ISSUE 



250,000 Shares 

Ryan’s Family Steak Houses, Inc. 
Common Stock 

($1 Par Value) 


All of these shares have been placed privately 
by the undersigned. 


iS&mAcld aeulid. £&(eicft/wed&i,3M. 



STv3£- 

■ W ' 


Bneguet: 

Precision mastery since 1775 

Abraham Louis Breguel (1747-1823) 
was one of the most phenomenal watchmakers 
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His genius was an overriding influence 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


The biggest problem with per- 
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is the long delay. 






that’s why 


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business roundup 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 27. 1985 

THE EUROMARKETS ' 


JydJ i 


Page l i 


Commerzbank Reports 
<#§urge in Pretax Profit 


By Warren Geder 

International Herald .Tribunt 


— one-half of the full 1984 result. 
Group partial operating profit for 


Sperry , Hitachi 
Agree to Explore 
Technology Shifts 


Eurasbank Plans 
Loss Provision 
Against Profit 


FRANKFURT — Conuoeiz- fast 10 months was not dis- 
own* AG reported on Tuesday a closed. ' 


sharp increase in pretax partial op- Noting that earnings from the 


crating profit in the past four bank's trading business in both the 
months, raising expectations that securities and Foreign currency ex- 


group profit wifi exceed 1983’s re- ceeded last year’s levels. Mr. Sapp 

onrn mswma# k*. : j - ro«J — * f.I 


cord earnings by a wide margin said that he expects pretax group 

Market analysts said the jump in “““G to <*ceed by A 

operating results in recent monUK snnmud rate of 

refiecm both i: i tmnon DM. 


reflects both booming trading ac- : ^ ilOD 

tivitv amone the maim- t- Omnwrab a n ic, l< 


uvity among the major West Ger- ^- onirncrzp anx, jouowing a gen- 

man banks and a resurgent domes- S? J”? 10 ® amc £ g , Wcst 
Ejc economy that has spurred heavy ““J* S 065 001 ~ sd ? sc 
lending. ^ - profit figures. The bank said it 

... . . _ . ' posted record operating profit in 

Analysis said the announcemem, 1983, estimated to be 125 billion 


Analysis said tne announcement, 1983, estimated to be 125 bfflkm 
including Commerzbank’s plans to DM. 

*■ ““j 3 *: 5 s diwdeod from last “By the end of October, out op- 

yo^s ® Deutsche marks ($2.44), crating result already outstripped 
was discounted by financial mar- the 12-month total for our previous 
'■ ke ^ hwa Commerzbank's share record year, 1983,’* Mr. Seipp said. 

pncefeD 30 pfennigs, to 2742 DM, “We will, therefore,!* in a position 
.. Tuesday on the Frankfurt Stock not only to raise our dividend but 
“Change. also to add pwn TnrtTP cn Than 


Walter Seipp, Commerzbank's 
managing board oharrm^n, 
that parent company pretax partial 
operating profit in the first 10 
months diinbed 10 J percent to 
585.0 rniDion DM, from 5292 mil- 
lion DM for the like 1984 period. 
Partial operating profit exdudes 
the bank’s trading results on its 
own account. 


the 12-month total for our previous 
record year, 1983," Mr, Seipp said. 
“We wfll, theref ore, be in a position 
not only to raise our dividend but 
also to add — even more so than 
previously ; — to our loan reserves, 
particularly to foreign country 
risks.” 


,VfH- JYiri Timer Semcr 

NEW YORK — Sperry 
Corp. has announced agree- 
ment whh Hitachi Lid to eval- 
uate “technology exchanges,” 
leading industry expens to 
speculate that the Japanese 
dec Ironies giant will so on be 
making components of Sperry's 
mainframe computer systems. 

The agreement, announced 
Monday, appeared to be anoth- 
er Sperry move away from mak- 
ing much of its own hardware. 
Another Japanese company, 
Mitsubishi, already makes 
Sperry's personal computers. 

Sperry's statement, however, 
contained no specifics. 

But the statement did say 
that the two companies had 
“agreed to a joint development 
effort looking at the feasibility 
of integrating” Hitachi technol- 
ogy into Sperry's 1 100 system. 
The 1 100 is Sperry's big main- 
frame system. 


International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — European 
Asian Bank AG, the troubled 
Deutsche Bank AG subsidiary. :•* 
expeoed to make provision for 
possible loan losses against earn- 
ings this year without resort to loan 
guarantees from its owners, indus- 
try sources close to the Hamburg- 
based bask said Tuesday. 

The need to set aside more than 
400 million Deutsche marks (.5160 
million) in risk provisions for possi- 
ble bad debt from Far East custom- 
ers forced Eurasbank earlier this 
year to allocate all of 1984 operat- 
ing profit of 140 million DM to 
co\er posable 1984 loan losses. 

Eurasbank’s owners, Deutsche 
Bank with 60 percent, Creditan- 
stalt Bankvereio of Austria. 22 per- 
cent, Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank 
NV, 9 percent, and Sodeti Gener- 
ate de Banque of Belgium. 9 per- 
cent, had agreed in February to an 
estimated 300-million-DM guaran- 
tee, but the level of anticipated risk 
provision for 1985 loans is now 
expected to be down. 


COMPANY NOTES 


AEG AG said has it won a con- Continental Illinois Corp.’s New York Times Co. has an- 
tract worth 35 nriffion Deutsche board of directors have voted to nounced that a new electronic in- 
roads ($13.7 million) to equip 70 pay $45.8 milli on in arrears on pre- formation service drawing on the 
electrical tramways built by Com- fared dividends and oo the current contents erf The New York Tunes, 
monwealth Engineering of Austia- quarterly dividend on two classes news services and consumer publi- 
lia for a new network m suburban of preferred stock. The board de- cations would become available in 
Hong Kong, Hie contract has an rided to wait for further financial the New York area next spring, 
option for 40 more. improvement before acting on Pl _ a . _ L u , ' n . . 

Brthkb™ SKd CMT-plrns to co mmon sh are dividraJs. £d fifl! 

cut base paces of scrip mill plate by Kockums AB said it has signeo ,^ qr a ft nid h«- tHwwIv -f 
S56admn . r «ofJ^l,thc on ootim. agmomon. m build^S 

—hi. fi«d cosu end 


New York Times Co. has an-- 


..J That compares with 318.1 nril- 
'lkm DM partial operating profit 
reported in the first six months of 
1985, a ma r gin al 02-percem in- 
crease from the comparison figure 





Bonuses Come 
To Europeans 


option for 40 more. 

Bethlehem Steel. Corp. plans to 
cut base paces of strip smll plate by 


company said. It said the move, ferries for a new shipping service 
which will also also eliminate dis- between Sweden and West Germa- 


counts, “was intended to bring ny, at a total cost of 800 million 
published prices into Ene with kronor ($ 10 2 million). 


(Continued from Page 13) 
of 50 percent for chief executives, 
4b percent for senior executives 
and 35 percent for vice presidents. 

Towers, Perrin, Forster & Cros- 
by in Paris has es timate that the 
average size of bonuses in France 
has increased from 15 percent in 
1980 to 27 percent in 1985. 

In West Germany, where bonus- 
es for board members can be as 
high as 50 percent of base salary, 
some board members have guaran- 
tee douses written into their con- 


transaction levels.” 

CooBaodore International Ltd. 
has received a waiver through Jan. 


Koninkbjke Wesssnen NV said it 
planned to issue 231,000 Dew 
shares with a no minal value of 20 


31 of bank covenant agreem ent s guilders (S6.92) on the London 
from its lending banks, the compa- Stock Exchange. The issue was to 


ny said. The covenants, or terms of finance the group’s SI 5-million 
credit, were violated earlier this takeover of Tree of Life Distribu- 


year, when the company reported a 
loss of SI 13.9 million for the fiscal 
year ended in June. 


don Co. and American Natural 


Snacks Inc from Riverside Group shares with a nominal value of five 


Inc. of Jacksonville, Florida. 


guilders. 




Ex-Chase Banker to Head New Pfizer Unit 


Vs - V-. ? ^facts to soften the loss of bonuses 

i ‘£-J til] 7- Jt i^_: e._ 


'eryce 

rJiee 


Promjdcdming profits. 

“At board level, as much as 50 
general of base salary can behnked 
to profit,’' said Detlef Lehmann, 
yipe president responsible for hu- 


man resources and compensation - — ~ r-*-**^- ■ . 

practices at Towers, Perrin, Forster ceuficals company has appointed 


By Brenda Erdmann Juan, Puerto Rica will be conduct- products concern, said Louis P. 
international Herald Tribune ed p rimaril y in Europe. Asia and Privitere has become senior vice 
LONDON — Pfizer Inc. has re- Canada. It will provide loans and president, Europe and .Africa, at 
cruited a top banker from Chno* credit facilities to and accept, de- Merck Sharp & Dohme Interaa- 
Manhattan Bank to head its new posits from major multinati onals, tional Division. He also was named 
international banking subsidiary, sovereigns and supranationals with president of the division's MSD 
The New YoA-based pharma- *?. credk ratin S^ Wner Europe Inc. unit, succeeding Ber- 


nard J. Crowley, who was named 


•fcCrosty in Ffankfintrr r r rro Frahk-.fi. Salerno asgeneraumanag-- 
' -However,” he added, “there are a of P^Inlrimti^lBank.He 


guarantee clauses, where regardless 
of profit, total remuneration which 
i -r includes base salary phis a bonus 
HV if AtH not drop as much as a decline 
■ ‘ inprofit.” 


- Rata- AB-ha^-named Goran ‘Jauman of MSD Holdings Ltd., 
Hohnquist president of Gadelius ^ dt^ oas British arm. Mr. 
ABofSwedeoMd GadeUus KX of J r!^S: 


:iri d 


was president and chief ocecutire AB of Sweden and GadeUus KK of ^ J r !^’ 

officer of Chase Manhattan Bank Japan. Mr. Holmquist. currentlv 
of Canada, based in Toronto. executive vice president of the two 
Pfizer said that continued effee- companies snccecds Gunnar wifi^uc! 

TcoT at 5 ceeded by Jean Cbabre, Mr. 


- To improve motivation, some w=,b ,he A SEA AB- Qabre pr^c'usT, ^ ^MSDi 

conroanies are considering sovttcea, carresitiy invested in the /Ma group ajwommlermgspe. vice oirident and senior vice nresi- 


copies are co^denng new ckTu^a.' 

-can best be adnemd dnon *5 GadeUus ia a uni. of Hah. which Is de ?L? 'JSSSK 


cording to a second study by Mr. ^ achieved through a 

. Vernon-Harcourt <m cash benefit banlung entrty acting as a prma- 
Wans in Britain, which is soon to be 

iUv-UC 1 * released, “Cash Incentives for Se- The business -of the new bank, 
• nior Management”, a mqority of which wall be headquartered in San 

' Li Companies link performance to_ ' 

' ” ” ' gross profits or renan on assets. — 

- T* pip j Bin more innovative companies in- 
i' is ii* u cTiide urodnet innovation or other 


w f 1 s Dat-Ida Securities Co. of Tokvo 
!Lln a has opened a subsidiary_in_Geneva, 


2^ 5 ^a e SS e ?? S “ d Dai-Ichi (Switzerland) Ltd. Mune- 


• ■ (JoctrAnlor OV/Sim A CCA AD XvJWiU.Ci Uiiu; X.AU. IY1U1AV- 

The business of the new bank, e * ec * ronics AbhA AB. hiko Okubo is managing direaor of 


Merck & Gx. the U^. health the new unit 


cTude product innovation, or other 
OTleria in their measures of perfor- 
mance. 


moK? 

■ ffife 


„ » This is the first in a three-part 
Jferfes an executive compensation. 
■ The next two columns will examine 
j; perquisites and stock-option plans. 


CS MONEY MARKET FUND DM 
Restriction of the issue of units 


•'-Pelt 



. ' Allied- Lyons 
■luHrf 19*5 

— 1,710. 

Prefcur Profit T22J 

Per Share 0.112 


. i Rovenua. 


Rothmans Int7 


Pretax Profit. 
P,ar Sharo— 


Hong Keng 
i Hongkong Telephone 
•<.* T*Hrff 1?SS 

■i I Rrvor.ue l.Wtt 

*: ■ • Ptoflrs 309 J) 

. . ■ i PprShar* 0.W 


Japan 

Pioneer Electronic 

Vm 1985 

Rovenuo 341,080. 

j Pevtax Profit (o)W50 

.. PwShara — 

, - a : loss. 


United Stale* 

Albertson’s 

lit wa»; vm 

E.! WBvBnm lj™. 

E Mot Incoma _____ 1V.15 

3- per srw , OJo 

f SJWorihi - WU. 

Bmf*wenoe__; U4L 

9 sl*t incoow Stj» 

■ P*r Shari - W 

| ’. :■ Browu-Forman 

1 2nd On. 1985 


The management of CS MONEY MARKET FUND DM 
has restricted the issue of units of the Fund after 
21 November 1985. 


This means that, after this date: 


- units may be returned for redemption, as before, on a 
daily basis, 

- new subscriptions can, however, be considered only to 
the extent that units become available through 
redemption, 

- present unitholders may continue to switch between all 
CS MONEY MARKET FUNDS on a daily basis at no 
commission. 

The Board of Directors of the 
CS Money Market Fund DM 
Management Company, Luxembourg. 


Units of CREDIT SUlSSE’s other Luxembourg-based 
money market funds 


Per Shore , 

IrfHelf 


CS MONEY MARKET FUND US-DOLLAR 
CS MONEY MARKET FUND £ STERLING 


Mot income . 
Pm Share _ 
Tit Half 


Net income. 
Per Shorn - 


Medtronic 

1985 

10W 

UA 

Wl 

1985 

l«7 

- »J 

• TJ9 


CS MONEY MARKET FUND YEN 


25 Nw. 1*185 


will continue to be issued without restriction. 


1984 year net excludes loss of SSSSJJOO 
In Quarter and soszooo In halt tram 
discontinued operations. . 


W I ekes Cos. 


3rd Ora-. 
Bev«uie__ 
a oat Net __ 
oner Share, 
9 Month* 



Opcr Net _ 
Ojtfr Share. 


gow Cw nwwy • . 

• Bayer 

SMoette 1985 

RrvwH ut - ' -3&5D0. 

Pretax.Pnjfli z5ie. 


CREDIT SUISSE 

CS 



cations would become available in 
the New York area next spring. 

Phdipp Hohmaon AG, the West 
German building group, said full- 
year profits would be adversely af- 


severe competition. It made no de- 
tailed forecast. 


Royal Boskafis Westminster NV 
announced a net loss of 454 million 
guilders (S157.6 million) in 1984. 
an 866-percent increase from the 47 
million in 19S3, and said it planned 
to halve its share capital to 1 7 mil- 
lion guilders. Boskahs also pro- , 
posed to issue 19.1 million in new 1 


Texaco’s Issues Skid, Bucking Firm Trend in Rest of Market 


By David Rks 


LONDON — Texaco Inc.’s out- 
standing Eurobond issues slumped 
Tuesday, bucking the wed in the 
rest of raaritet. rln report* that the 
giant oil company frjgb: not be 
able to afford the btc.c zeeasssy 
w appeal a SlCo-biijor damage 
sward against it. dealer -^uid. 

One dealer said :hai s quote by 
Texaco's president. Alfred C. De- 
Crace Jr_ in a Dallas newspaper 
that he would not ryie aai a Chap- 
ter 1 1 filine if all outer oo.ssihi lilies 


failed “means Teuco issues are 
virtually un tradable." 

While quotes were being nude 
only on an indicaied basis. Tcxa- 
co'i fixed rare issues dropped one 
to two points, while convertibles 
fell two points. 

Texaco bonds dropped sharply 
Iasi week, leading many dealers to 
stop making markets in the issues, 
after a Texas jury ordered the com- 
pany to pay SI 0.5 billion in legal 
damages lo Peonzoil Co. 

On Tuesday, the Texaco 134- 
perceni bond due I9S9 fell two 


points to around 105 to 107, com- 
pared with quotes of 109! s to 1Q9N 
before the jury award. 


In contrast, the rest of the fixed- 
rate dollar Eurobond market 
firmed about h point Tuesday. 


Borrowers continued to feet:* at- 
tention on the floating- rate- note 
sector, which saw two SS&irjTiion 
issues, for J.P. Morgan & Co. and 
Marine Midland Banks Inc. 


They said fixed-rate dollar Euro- 
bonds were also supported by a 
relative lack, of new issues, with just 
one 5200-million 10H percent issue 
launched Tuesday for Olympia and 
York Maiden Lane Finance Corp.. 
lead managed by Salomon Bros. 
International. 


The Morgan issue, pneed a: 
100. 10 and paying five basis 
above the London interbank of- 
fered rate, ended bid at i 00.04. in- 
side total fees of 20 bxsis point*, 
while the Marine Midland :..:ue. 
paying 1/16 point over Libor, aj* 
offered at 99.52. compare J v.5:h 

total fees of 45 basis points. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

NTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 


Nov .26/ 1985 


Net nsa value auotallont are uipolied by the Fundi lined wltn the exceorkxi of tome quotes based an Issue price. 

Trie rrjralocl symbols Indicate frMueacv of quotations supplied: (dl -dally; (w) - weekly; (b) -Dl-monttilv; (r) -reoularly; (I) - Irregularly 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

■I v. | Al-Mal TrutT. 5^ 

BANK JULIUS BAEP £ CO. US. 


•fdi Boertuoa SF «liii 

-> d •. CertCT Sf 

-! a : Eouiacer A_~.e-.rc s 

-( fi ! EquifcOff Eurcse 5 b U35J09 

-id> Eaj.sarr Ptjcj'iC £F I213JI0 

-I C I Grctor. SF I'jaTO 

-la > Uocxxr SFIeeiK 1 

BNP INTERFUN35 

•Iwi inierbone =jr.s s irt* 

-I* i ieraitiK> s ic-i 

-i w » Inter currency tile DM 3Ci/= 

-(*>) ir.Teresnrencv £icr: :.s L ICi 

-(«» i imerecuir-i Par c*^» 5 

-l%») intereaui tv icer. Otter s ID*' 

BA KG LIE INOOSUEZ 

•Id i As-an CrowtR s ns 

-l«i Di.ertonc SB SZ2 

■twt FlFv&tceriSS 4 17.4. 

-Iw, FIF-Eirfcce S 1S7 

-Id . FIF-lr.terR£?::-»c S 11JV 

-IV, r FIB- Pact llr s 

-i a i meowej Mu^icosa e — — s ;c£a: 
-l e 1 indesuez ivci e s iTtBi 


. S irt45 
i 1520 
DM. 

. L KSL 

. S I6£3 


S 1103 

sb ezx 
S 17.43 
S 1S73 
s nut 
S 703: 
t :c£a: 
S 17U& 


-I d » lr*10?uez USD r F I S 10J(Lr7 

BEITANNIA^OB Jr;. s>. Keher. Jersey 

-ml BeitOe/ie- t-»e-.~< * 7.907* 

-lw) BrltAAMncs.C.T- S 10 Jf 


» d i Bril. !ntlA .'JfitgjjcrH S 1.1» 


-I tf I Br,l. IntU ■■."in ca. Pc ret C IIIJ 

-Iw I Bnl. Aa mz. S. BC US S 1.149 

-Iw) Brll.Gcld Bure S 072a- 

-Iwl BrtL*tar36.Cjr.-e«» C Ua f 

-Id» Bril. Jopcr> Sir p-rt. Ftf S l.:*T 

•tn.iBr!tJ{fyr;-n fyi. I. 0320 

-Id 1 Bm.VSo la LtiL B-.rtf S 1745 

-I a J Brit. V/C-5C “enr. Ftrvfl S 0777 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-iw) CCT^tai :rt ■ F-jnc s 45J2 

-t w i Ccpltct it=’ : SA ______ S 1722: 

CITICORP INVESTMENT BANK ILUX.) I 
FOB 1173 LL‘*erOc-jrj TrL *77.75.71 
I e l CiUnresj Se.- — E“ U tct3.97 1 

i a i CHinves - si.>si:r S1C13S5 

CREDIT 5UISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

-(Cl Actions So -iiej SF 47fl2S 

-( e ) Bond VB»» s».t SF 194 15 

-f a I Bead vrer D--nsrv DM 106.13 

•Id) Bone V 0.3 r US-DCillaR S )«73 

-Id) Bona vcisr : Sterii-n c 103.16 

•i a V Boro -.CIS- y«r. Ve« 1013323 

d I Cor yen .-cor Sw* — SF 1S1.*S| 


-Iw ' Lena Term 1 35. IB 

FAC MSMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1> LCurenCC Pounty Hill. £C4. 01-S2W68D 

-l« t Ft : Atlantic. S 13.13 

-iwl FAC European S IS 79 

-■••I FAC Oriental S 31.78 

FIDELITY POB OH Hamilton Bermuda 
-inv. American values Common— s 7527 

Amer values Cum.P rot » 10423 

-■ e > bkjbiIIv *mer. Assets..... 5 753* 

- 1 C ' Fidelity Austrello Funa 5 1 1 J3 

•l dl Fioelltv Dititayer. Fund S 1037 

-( a > Picet.tv Dir. Svps.Tr S 12S3I 

-lot Fidelity Far Eon Fund. s ?lm 

■id i Fieelllv inn. Fund. s 74 . 10 

-id) Fldeflt. Orient Fund J 3329 

■l e i Fidelity Frontier Fund ___ % 14.9* 

-IS) Fidelity PaclIIC Fund $ 155.76 

-i a ■ Fiseiiir Spei. Orowtn Fa s 1642 

-( 3 i Fidelity tVerld Fund S 38.48 

FORRES PO BUT GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 01-839-3013 

■t«l Ccilaf Income S 6-73 

-:»1 Forbes Hign me. Gin Fd c 95.70 

■ mi Gold income 5 ROe, 

In I Gold AtoreciCrtlcn S *-St 

■imi Stroieslc Trading S I JO. 

GEFINOR FUNDS. 

->wl Eeei investment Funa— s 4IB.9Q 

■Iwl 5cani9h World Fund t 13523 

■1*1 Stoic SI Amt. Icon—.. S 17428 

Lcnaon : 0M 9 1 4230 . Geneva:* 1-27355530 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 1 
PB liv. st Peter Port. Guernsey. Offli-2871 5 


NIMARBEN 

-id I Class a 

■iw i Class B- ui 

iw l CKns C • Japan 

OBL1FL.EX LIMITED 

■Iwi Muiileurrencv 

■Iwl Dollar Medium Term 

■Iw) Dollar Lons Term 

■Iw) Japanese Yen 

-iw) Pound Sterling,. 

•i w> Deutsche Mark 

-Iw) Dutch Florin .. 

•tw) Swiss Fmnc , . , 

ORANGE MA55AU GROUP 
PB 85578. Tne Hague (0701 4*9670 


_» 95.70 

5 10641 

..5 10021 


t 1120 

5 11.40 

i 11 A0 

t 1197 

( 11.04 

DM 10.76 
.FL 10J9 
SF 10.17 


iw) FuturC AM SA 

Iw) GAM Aroitrcge Inc 

Iwl SAMerica Inc 

[ wj gam Australia Inc. 

I w I GAM Boston Inr 

i w I GAM Ermcoge 

iw) GAM Franc-val _____ 
: » i GA.V. Hong Kong Inc — 
I *» l GAM i mer national lnc_ 
i w i gam Japan me. 


S 171.S0 

S 1J3L43 

S 155.14 

S 93.41 

S 115A2 

S I7J4 

.. SF 11925 

_ S 100.64 

S 14421 

_ s 1J0.74 


-IS) Convert -S.;r V5-DSLLAR_ S -,35.94 
'• 0 ) Ccnasee SF U829 


■( d i cs Fancc-Ssnst — _ 5r nso 

-!2.‘CSF3rdv>rr. SF 13; .75 

■i a : cs Mcr.ei v«n»i rurc — _ • i icias 
•< d ) CS Money ‘forte t Fund— DM 106320 

•< C 1 CS tte-.e» t.-di-we*. Fvns c 134,03 

-l a I CS Store. Msrfce* Fs >*n. v 100357 X 

-id i £ners!e-v=i3- sf us CO 

-( d 1 usiec SF 6-.£J>3 

-fd) Surcos V=:sr_ SF 1SJ.75 

-< a i Paci‘.c -vetor- SF ledoo 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Winchester wcusc.TT Lzr.ian Well 
london ec-. .t! new«) 

-iw) Piiaaur* Gtoac Lti s 12826 

-rmiWircjC'.ter Di«ers>' r ea s 1»£3- 

-dm Y7iRCr>es;er F:-ttr.;.-s.l Ltd. S S 99 

--(ml Wineftrs«er Frc-it.tr 5 10325 

• <w) A.r.chesier naia-ngc FF !0 aB9 

* 1Z50 

-IW. World w:ce 5ec.nt.rs S si.ij, 

-Iwl WorJdA.ae Sp*;]o:__— . 5 184328 
PIT INVESTMENT FFM 

-+l a J Ccnceitrrr DM 35.17 

-r(di Ini! Rententond DM 92*61 

Dunn A Meruit! 6 Lloyd George, Brussels 

-iml GAh C -m rr .SS itT Poci S 3*254 — 

-imi Currersv S G=ia Pod s 1572: — 

-(ml Wincn Lite Put Pool — S 55924 — I 

-In) Trotts World Fat. Pr—: — 5B'.6AI — 
EBC TRUST CO-(JERSEY) LTD. 

1-3 Seoie St_SI Metier .-3534-36331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 


did line: Bid — s iiAe-Cnfer — SUM)- 

C-( d 1G».: Bid S ’Z2t otter 51259* 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 


-id Shun Term ‘A - ifctoi'in, — S iSOtB 

-Id i Snert Te-m ’A - .D sir> S 12367 

-1 4 i Short Term ‘9‘ . A-currj S 12973 

-tdi Snort -erm ‘E :D:srrl 5 0.9674 


• Iwi GAM Nonn America Inc _ S IISA1 
■I w ) GAM N. America Unit Trust- 11225 p 

-Iwl GAM Pacific me S 137.17 

-Iwl GAM. Pens, s Char. Warl0w._ IfiSAOp 
•t w i GAM Pens B, Char. U K. Fd._ 1D6A0 a 
-ini C.AV.nm S 11621 

-1 w) GAM SlnoaoareM/.alov Inc S 94.90 

-( w I GAM Sten & i nil Unit Trust-. 153.15* a 
-i w i GAIA -Aoriaw.ee Inc _____ s wt .93 

-Iwl GAM TVCBb &A Clots A 3 177.13 

G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. 

-(Oi Berry Poe. Fd. Ltd. S 1128 

-(r i G.T. A pal >ed Science S 1420 

hcigt. A sean MV.. Gwtn.Fa_ S 1277 

-(01 G.T. Asia Fund S 425- 

■I d I G.T. Austrolro Fund S 7623 

-(d\G.T Europe Fund S 102 

-(w) G.T. Euro. Smell Cos. Fun: S 1623 

-i r i G T. Dollar Funa S 1523 

-tiif.T Rnryl Funn S 1224 

-f d I G.T. Global Teetmlgv Fd S 11119 

■ l a I G.T. Honshu Pet Winder 3 30.91 

l-r a J O.T. inwestmenl Fund s 2127 1 

l-( w) G.T. japan Small Co.Fund— 5 4&S9 
-I r 1 G.T. Tocttnclaev Fund—— S 245F 

■i d l G.T. South China F und S 1528 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. INTL.SJL 
Jersey, P.0. Bo- 63, Tel 053* ?602 9 
'Berne. PJO Box 2622. Tel 4131 224051 

-1 d i Crositww (Far EestJ SF 10A5 

-id i CSF (Balanced) 5F US] 

-id< European Eaulty Fund DM 11.91 

>-( d I inml. Band Fund — — S 1072. 

-i a > ini Currency s UX7 

-Id MTF Fa ITeuvunogy) S 1522 

-i a I O'Seos Fd IN. AMERICA)-. S 30.10 
JARDINE FLEMING, POB 78 GPO Hg K« 

-( r l J.FCurrencv&Bonfl S 13.97 

-i r i J.F hong Kong Trust S 37.79 

-( r I J.F Paelllc income Trusl Y 2525 

■l r 1 J.F Japan Trust, Y 4701 

-t r ) J.F Japan Tectinalco/ Y t«A05 

-i r i J.F Padtlc SedS.lAcci S 721 

LLOYDS BANK INTL. POB 43b Geneva 11 

-+■ w I Lloyds Inti Dollar S 118.40 

-+l»l LlcydS int'l Europe SF 12620 

H«i Llovdt Inn Growth SF 17350 

-*■ l w 1 Uovailat'l income __ SF 2(750 

-*■ Iwl Llovdt Int'l N. America S 10555 

-♦■Iw) LlovdS im'i Pacific— — SF 13*20 
-*r|w> Llards IrH'I. Smaller Cos—. S 1 SJU 


H 0 1 Bever Beleoglnperrt-r S 31 JO 

PARISH A5-G ROUP 

-I d ) Cone>a imernotional S 7757 

-i d I ECUPAR ECU 103625 

-iw) OBLI-DM DM 12125 

Iml GBLIGESTlON SF 96J0S 

-IwlOBLl-DOLLAR *113820 

-( w) OBLI-YEN Y 10361320 

-(w) OBLI-&ULDEN FL 14S8J5 

-Id) PAPOlL-FUND S 10120 

-fdl PAPEUROPE GROWTH 3 1123 

■I 0 1 PARINTER FUND S 12925 

-Id) PARINTER BOND FUND *1055 

-101 PAR 'JS Trees. Bona Cl. B'_ 1 115.93 
ROYAL B. CANADA. POB 24&GUERN5EY 
-vrw) RBC Canoalon Fund Lid. l H5B- 
-Hwl RBC Far EosfAPocilic FO_ S 12J1 

-H w * R BC i nil Casual Fd. 3 26.73 

-+(*•] RBC Inn Income Fd. S 1120- 

-*■( d 1 RBC Von. CurrertC* Fd S 2729 

-H«9| RBC Norm Amer. Fd S 1055 

SKAMOIFONO INTL FUND (464-236270) 

-(w line.; BIO -3 623 Otter— t 673 

-IwiAcc.: Bid S All Offer I A7a 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devonshire 5*L.Loni»n4>l -377-8040 

•( r ) SHB Band Funa l 2524 

•(wl SMB Inti Growth Fund * 2627 

SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

-< a I Amer lea- dolor SF 49875 

•( 0 ) D-Mark Bona seleolan DM 123.04 

-Id) Dollar Bona Selection s I40J6 

•Id) Florin Bond Selection ___ FL 12628 

-< d I Iniorvelor Sr 6725 

-I a ) Japan Portfolio SF 9OTJK 

-(d) Sierllno Bona Selection C i08j>e 

-id) Swiss Foreign Bond Sei SF MOJa 

;-(dtSw(33valar Neva Series SF 38125 

-{ d l Universal Bond Select sf 8325 

-id) Universal Funa SF 12229 

[-( d 1 Yer. Eand Selection Y 1046820 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

-(d) Amca U5. Sh. SF 1550 

-Id > Bond-lnvosl SF 67.75 

-( a i Fsnso Swiss Sn. SF 17550 

-( a ) jijajiv-liww SF 75350 

-( d ) Sotn South Air. Sh SF 33150 

-( a ) Sima (stock price) SF ZXLOO 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

-Id ) Unlrema DM 4020 

-Id ) Unltonds DM 29.90 

-( a 1 Unlrak DM B420 

-IdlUNlZINS DM 10755 

Other Funds 

(w) Actioonds Invostmenls Fund S 2455 

(wl Actlvest inti S ilia 

lm> Allied Ltd * 475 

I w) Aoullo International Fund S 179.74 

I r ) Aran Finance i.f s 944.eC 

I r 1 Arlan* S 191786 

Iwl TrusiCDT Inn Fd. (AEIF) S 1082 

l wl riandMex-iswie Pr SF )37.is 

im) Canada Gia-Morroooe Fd 5 986 

(d) Caoltal Preserv. Fd. mil. s 1121 

(wl Cnaael Fund S 182 

imi Cleveland Oftshor* Fd s 7101 as 

(w) Columbia Securities. FL KM.12 

I r I COMETE S 920.02 

(w) Convert. Fd. inM A Certs 3 1189 

(w) Canvdrt. Fa. Int'l B Certs s 3388 

Iw) Del wa Japan Fund Y 10*35 

Iwl D.GC S 97.95 

-{ d ) Dollar- Baer bond Fd i 10*5 00 

-I d ) D-mcrk-Boer Band Fa DM 102980 

I d ) D. Witter Wld Wide Ivf Tsl._ * 1112 

( r 1 OrakV-ar invesi.Fund N.V s 121788 

l d l Dreyfus America Fund S 105a 

(d 1 Dreyfus Fund Int'l S 4083 

iwl Dreyfus 1 nler continent S 3628 


(w) The Establishment True' 

1 a 1 Euraee Obligations . . . 

(wi First Eagle Fund 

I r I Flttv Stars Lid 

lull FUed income Trans 

iw) Fonsele* Issue Pr 

Iwi Furrncfung 

f nr 1 Formula Selection F - 

1 a 1 Fonditoilo— 

1 a I Governor. Sec. Fmrj* 

( d ) Frank!- Trust inirrsms 

(w) Haussmorw Hldgs. n.J 

lv>> Mestw Funos 

I wl Horiron Funs _... ■ — 

(ml IBEX Moldings Lfe — 

I r 1 ILA-lGB. 

( r 1 (LA-IGS 

1 a 1 inierfuna sa 

(wi imermorkei Fund 

< d I intermlnlng MiF. Fd Ir. B _ 

l r 1 int'l Securities Fund 

l a i investa DWS— 

1 r 1 invest Atlanliaues 

1 r 1 1 fa I fortune inrl Fune SA 

(wi japan Selecilon Funa 

iwl Japan Pocfllc Func 

(ml jeffer Ptnc. inti Lid 

Id) Klelnwart Benson Inf! Fd. 

[iwi Kielawan Bens. Jao. Fa 

Iwl Korea Growtn Trusi 


Esv 

s :.i *;;• 


. s i: 9 ? 

I ■ '. 

wM -'Ul 


■*CF 'iiTi-i 
- s "■■* 

1 ’0*7 

_ '• '-."2 

I TtMi 

. * 

.. 1 i:<: 

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1 a 1 Lelcom Fund 

U) Leverage Can Hold 

1 d i Uouiooer 

(w) Lu*funa _ 

imi Mognafund N.V 

id) Mediolanum set Fc 

I r 1 Mcteore — 

(wl NAAT — 

I a ) Nikka Growm package Fc_ 

Iw) Nippon Fund 

1m) NOSTEC Portfolio 

(wl No voter investment Fund— 

(wl NJLM.F _ — 

Im) MSP FJ.T 

1 d 1 pacific Mar Iron invt. Fd 

fwi PANOJRPi inc 

I r t Porfori 5w R Es> Geneva — 

I r ) Per me 1 Value N.V 

I r 1 Pleiades 

(w) P5CO Func ll .V - 

iw) PSCO Inti. N.v 

1 a I Putnam int'l FufW - 

l r 1 Prl-Tccn 

I w > Quantum Func N.v. 

Id j Renta Fund 

( d ) Rennnvesl 

1 a ) Reserve insured Deposits __ 
1 w I Rudolf Wolff FiA Fa Ltd 


(Wl Somural PortlaliO . 
iC a > 50 FT sen. SA Lu»emt«uig _ 

ilw) Seven Arrows Fund N. J 

(w) Stale S’. Bank Faulty i-cgsrJl 

(w) SI rates* investment Fund 

Id) Syntax Ltd.’i Class ai 

[nl Techno Growth Fund 

Id ) Thornton Australia Fd Ltd 

(a) Thornton HK6 China— 

l a > Thornton Japan Func Lie 

Id ) Thomton Orient. me. Fc Uc_ 

(w) Tokyo Poc Hold. (5ea) 

Iwl Tokyo Pac. Hold. N V 

(wl TranspacJIIC Funa 

(wi Trans Europe Fund 

( d ) Turquoise Fund 

(w) t weedy. Browne n.v.ClassA 

I w) Tweedv.Browne av.aossB 

im) Tweedv.Browne (U.K.i n.v— 

fd) UNICO Fund I 

Id) IJNI Bond Fund. 

( r ) UNI Capital Fund 

( d 1 US Federal Seeurltes 

( d ) US Treasury Income luns 

iw) Vanderbilt Assets— 

(d I world Fund 52*. -.. 


s 1.1 21 
s '.ur* 2i 
. s 2:51 
_ s £921 

KK i&T'. 19 
_ S 58- 
_ S :i9*.; -. 

_ 3 IS2.9T 
_ S I3638J - 
_ I «.:? • 

_ 5 lisa: 

_ S T'.AI ! 

iCJUij): 

_ S 1116. 
_ S»l4T81 

- S 2581- i 
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_ I 9’J2 1 
. 3 :ti.-<£ 

_ 1 174.32 1 
5 ISIS** 1 

- * 2:2 6 , 
SF i*»;.oi - 

_ S 1225.91 ! 
. S 1146.41 
_ S i31K 
_ i M *e 

. s ts;i I 

_ S ciUS 

. 1544480 ' 

LF 2S71M 
LF :05SJ8 
. S 1 12181 
. 5 122JG2 
SF litis 
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_ S Si-4 10 | 

v. — s :o.i: 1 

- 5 24 ?£ | 


S 1187 
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. S 102C 
_ 5 1233 
_ i 10.90 
5 111 K 
. S 15324 
S 10C 07 
_ Fj 5SJ7 
. S 129.9! 

. 5 232323 
. 5 75959* 
. 5 101984 
DM 7L4C 

. S 7195.12 
. 5 757784 
. 5 1045 


1 1287 
_ S 13.90 


Hotel Parker Meridien 
A monument to the fine art of living 

• "IV T T T 1 ^ 


in New^brk 



W** : . W a 

■ e * -' 5 f 2 * * " -"■-■.1 



In the heart of Manhattan 
stands a hotel where the 
service, the exquisitely 
refined facilities and the 
luxurious decor have 
established a veritable 
monument to the fine art of 
living in New York. 


The Hotel Parker Meridien, 
experience the fine art of 
French living. 

For reservation: Hotel Parker 
Meridien: 1 IK Weil 57tb Sir., New York, 
NY I00IU; TcL: f 1.2 121 2*55000 . or call 
“Meridien Reservation International" 
(MR!) *39.12-44 in London. 

There are over 40 Meridien hotels 
worldwide, in Paris. Montreal. 


& 


New York. Busion, Houston, 

San Francisco, Newport Beach/ LA. 
New Orleans. Rio. Bahia. Cairo, 
Kuwait. Jeddah, Al Khobar* Dhahran, 
Abu Dhobi, Tokyo, Hong Kong. 
Singapore, Colombo, Athens, Portugal. 
Dakar— and many other cities. 
Opening soon in Vancouver. 


The international hotels with a french touch 


Travel companion of Air France 




NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 


VQi. HlBfl LOW Last 


Te»oco 

Ba*lTr 

DooLT 

PSvEG 

BaurTwl 

WstgE 

TWA 

AT&T 

MMil 

B*tT DfB 

Nln 4 PS 

WornrL 

BeoICa 

FtBkSv 


84C8B 34% 
*5323 40% 


Om High LOW Loll CO*. 


am Wi 
22337 311* 
20331 16% 
19394 46% 
1923? 22V* 
14641 23% 
»W HV 
!3oJ3 51 Vj 
1175B ®V. 

"S» 42 
10837 441* 
100S8 3® ? « 


Indus 145654 1470417 1447.2S 1455.77 4- CL 12 

Trans 67050 4S2.12 671.00 676.77 + 171 

Util 1654)1 165.78 16388 16450 — 177 

Comp 582.90 587.77 57857 5828S - 131 


Composite 

industrials 

Transe. 

unimes 

Finance 


hkxi Low Close arse 
115.94 I1S50 11174 + 115 
133417 13250 13281 +0.16 
109.16 10170 1094)5 +118 
5984 59 J2 59.75 +104 
I24J2 12480 144/9 4-0.15 


Tiiesd^s 

1M® 

Closing 


AMEX Diaries 


m&s paQ indg x 


aaafx Most Actives t 


ve l. KM tow Lott . Ota. 


Advoncod 

Declined 

Undtiansod 

Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
volume up 
volume down . 


ComoosJie 

indLnrrjois 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Bonks 

TromP. 


Week 

close are* 

410A3 +1« 

wo « + 1/7 

flln +133 2H4B 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Banos 

utilities 

Industrials 



NYSE Diaries 1 


□me 

Prev. 

Aduoneed 

792 

558 


769 

7095 

Unchanged 

4U 

386 

Total I*suc6 

5HUS 

2039 

New Highs 

116 


New Lows 

2D 

10 

volume up 

56,771,120 


volume down 

65,743^88 



Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Vol. at 4 PM UM 5 MM 

Prev. 4 P.M.vol 91 JIIUW 

Prev consolidated dose 112815.990 


Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEX Sales 



Bur Sales "Sh'rt 

Mov 25 177377 503.775 A2B3 

Nov. 22 182829 539/65 1918 

NOV. 21 _____ 208/50 555,957 3,155 

Nov, 70 1684117 481809 2836 

Nov! 19 180.107 507ASJ 10834 

■Included In the SCI** naures 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
UP to the closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere, 

I Vo The Associated Press 


Industrials 

TrensP. 

utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


High Low Close Cn go 

224.12 2218 1 27151 +0/2 

179.13 17182 <7882 +147 
87 AS 8786 B7A3 — 105 
24.07 23.94 34413 +0.04 

301.16 300.11 30167 +083 


4 PAA. volume 
Prev. 4 pm. volume 
Prev. cons, uohime 



N.Y. Stocks Make Slight Gains 


244 * ?6 AAP J 6 24 

19 101* AGS 

50V 32'* AMP. 

734. 184* AMR pi 2. IB 9.1 

23 AtJRpf 2/7 118 

22 19 ANRp) 212 10J 

11% 7 % APL 

154* 9 ARX 

5TH 32*, ASA 2430a 53 

27 rtf'* AVX 31 15 

28'* 20V] AZP 282 108 

634* 38% AbtLoti 160 28 

757 * 1 54 * AcCOWd 80 II 

344. 10 AcmeC 50 35 

101* 7 AcmeE 820 4 5 

19 1S”3 AdaEi lJ2el06 

30 13% AdroMI AO 21 

IS 1 '* 64* AdvS/S Sit 35 

364* 22V* AMD 

12v- 10% Adobe n 

16% 144* AdabpfA 

174* 15V. AOOOPfB 

13t* e r* AOves* 13a 1.1 

S3MB 344* AetnLf 264 5.1 

57t* 53% AetLpt 5.1W 9J 

40i* 23 1 * Atimns 180 10 

3** 2i* Alieen 

604. 4491 AirPrd 1.48 15 

244* 17V; AlrBFrJ M 28 

21* 14* Al/vioa s .10e 58 

33% 33 AlaP plA J82 148 
rU 644 AlaP dal 87 10.9 
67% 66i; AlaP of «J30 10 A 
106% 96 : * AlaP of 1180 108 
72'.* 70 AJaPpf 984 105 
764. 60 AlaP Pi 088 11.1 
264* 13% Al5kA,r .16 8 

30% 121* Albrios J8 IJ 
33 ’m 264* Alblsrra -6 24 
31% 2244 Akan 80 10 
38’* 271* Alco5ld 184 24 
324. 21 Ale.AU 1.00 38 
30 204* Alecdr 

391* 721. AllgCp 1/4; 18 
IT’s 24»: AlgCopT 286 11.1 
34. 20'. Alvlnt 180 58 

204. 16'* Alflln Pf 2.19 111 
«* 85% Algl DtC 11.25 125 

34 4* 381. AllgPw 2.70 85 

24 16% AllenG 80b 26 

23'. 15% Alla Pd 
43'* 42 Aia5annl80 48 
ratj 62 AMS ?f A 4.12 #2 
63 554. AldS ?!C t 74 !' 

Ill 1031.- Ald5clDI280 iiJ 
1034* 100>* aldS PlF 
651* 47% AIMStr 280 3.4 
91* 3% AlllsCh 

34 L* 24 AlisC Pf 
30i* 233* ALLTL 1.96 78 
38V.- 30% ALLTpf 286 55 
39 f m 29% Alcoa 180 38 
19 10'* A max .101 

36' i 27V* Aim at 380 10.9 
34 22% AmHes 1.10 38 

24. llj AmAgr 
271. 16V* ABnkr 
70 53V. ABrnnd 3.90 65 

30V* 2 5% ABrd of 285 9.1 
70V* 54‘* ABrd a! 2 JO 4.4 
120 561* ABdcsl 180 U 

30'* 20% ABMM 36 38 
31'* 20V* ABusPr 84 21 
o4'= 48% AmCan 290 48 
25% 22% ACanpf 280 10.9 
56’.* 42 ACanpf 3.00 58 
118 103 ACanpf 1175 118 

22% 18 ACaoBd 280 10.1 
M'* 25% aCodCv ISle 92 
11 5% ACenfC 

£84* 441* ACvan 1.90 23 
29% 194. ADT .92 3.4 
24 +* 19 7 * AElPw 286 1C.0 
494] 344* AmE.P 186 28 
?«•'« 14% AFamIS 68 18 
36% 24i. AGnCc 180 38 
It 8 AGnl wt 

5<pj 52 AGnl of A$54el04) 
714. 484. AGn ofD 284 48 
37 29 AHeril <80 38 

T3’t> 7’* AHoiSt 
M's 49 'b AHome 2.90 4.9 
■79% 74% Amrtch a 80 6.7 
101% £2 AlnGrp M A 

166 114 aiGpp) 585 Is 

284* 14 AMI J2 29 

4%- 2% AmMol 
29 13'* APrpsCS 80 2.9 

■3T* J ASL Fla 

18’* 12% ASLFI pf 2.1® ii7 
154* 11V. AShip 80 78 
35=* 36% AmSkf 180 48 
e8% 354* AmStor 84 18 


15 283 23 22% O + V> 

15 74 19 13% 15% — V* 

7 87QS 40V. 39 Vi 40 + % 

103 m 23% 23*k + » 

2 23% 23% 23% 

2 201* 201* 201* — V S 

5 103 i04* 10% 10»I + % 

14 105 15Vu U!b 15 + % 

5«l 38% J71* 374* — - .* 

99 fZS* 724* 72<» + % 

7 590 26% 264* 36% 

17 1321 «Vj 61% 62% + % 

17 II IT* 234* 23% 

102 11»S 11% 111* + M> 

11 5 7% 7% 7% — t* 

73 18V] 18% 1946 — V* 

8 21 19S* 194* 1U1* _ % 

22 99 15% 15 15% + > 

3« 2370 27 36Vi 26*. + % 

700 12'* 12 12 

159 164* 16 164* + % 

|99 17V* 17 17 — 1* 

16 395 11*] 111* 11'.*— '.* 

17 4937 51+a 51”i 5I?« + 4* 

45 56 554* ASH — '* 

7 778 401* 39H 40 + % 

10 7% 2*. 2% 

13 1066 MF* S9H 60 — H 

12 20 21% 211* 21% + % 

1633 1”* I’* 1*» 

69* 23% 27 1 * 28 +1 

64x 81s 8 8 

11900V 3T* S4T* 84% +3H 
830*104 1034.102%— 1* 

60C0v89’i 091* B9V] +2H 
700V 74'* 73 741* + H 

8 *42' 194] 194* 19ij— 1* 

22 187 294. 29% 294. + Vi 

13 345 31 % 304. 31’+ + % 

51 1086 27 26% 264*— »* 

16 326 36% 36% 36V* — ’* 
420 31% 31% 31% — 1* 

26 60 28% 28% 284* — % 

22 II 84 4i 84H 84%— % 
36 26’ a 25% 25% — % 

618 S4% 22’* 23% — % 

31 18% 13'* 18% 

33 904* B9i* 90% — ’* 

10 503 32% 32% J2Vt— % 

13 314 23% 231* 23% 

8 105 19". IB 7 * 19 — 4* 

9 4989 45% 44% 45 — % 

145 66% 65% 66 — % 

206 Vi o0% 60 s . 

9 106% 106 106 — % 

55 100% lDO'-a 100'* 
t 508 65% 64% 65V* + 4* 
671 3' 7 3% J% 

11 27% 27% 27% 

9 44 25'* 23 281* - % 

1 37V* 37 1 * 371; — 4 i 

34 1075 3a’* 35% OS 7 * 

860 11% 11% 11%—% 

9 29% 271* 27 1 *— V; 

25 2136 30% 29'.* 30 + % 

1716 1% 1% 1% + % 

10 206 26% 26% 26% — % 

8 363 404* 59% 60 + 4* 

72 3041 30' i 30'i 

2 604* o0% 60% — 4* 

20 436 119^119% 1194.— Vi 

14 60 24 23% 23% — % 

15 6 30% 304* 304. 

14 1246 66% 641* 65% +1% 

13 26 254* 25*. 

651 57t* 57 571# + % 

4 118 117 117 — '* 

13 22 I1». 21* + ' • 

34 27>* 27 274* + 1* 

39 S’: 4 7 » 4"i — % 

17 672 58 571= 57% + % 

26 12B 27% 27’. 27V«— % 

9 2429 22'« 224* 224*— '» 

16 45323 45% 47 r s 48% + % 

15 306 29% 291; 29% — ’• 
9 1074 33% 374* 33 — ’* 

59 13 12'* 12'»— % 

1205 56' s 55% 56% + % 
92 66% So 6*1*— % 

11 1 J6T] 367* J*"* — '« 

51 9 8’# g + % 

12 4295 60’i 59% 59% — % 
9 uni 98% 9 7% 98% + % 

22 314 99% 98% 99% + ’■» 

1 lo4 164 164 +1 

9 4514 18% 18% I8%— % 
953 r« 2% 2% 

7 IBS 17% 17% 171* + > j 
34 84= 6% 8'.*— % 

411 17% 17% 17% + '* 
9 45 11% 11% HVs— '■ 

II 1719 35 33% 34% +1% 

11 503 64'S 64% 64% - V* 


United Press htienuwonal 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchanged managed to finish slightly 
higher Tuesday even though an afternoon rally 
faded. 

The Dow Jones industrial average finished up 
0.12 to 1,456.77. 

Broader indicators increased. The New York 
Stock Exchange index rose 0.15 to 1 15.74. Stan- 
dard & Poors 500-stock index added 0.32 to 
200.67. The price of an average share rose five 
cents. 

Advances edged oui declines 7S6-774. Vol- 
ume totaled 123.1 million shares, up from 91.7 
million Monday. 

“This is the pause that refreshes.** said Jon 
Groveman. head of equity trading at Laden- 
burg. Th .-ilm.m n & Co. “As long as the bond 
market holds anywhere near current levels, it 
will be very difficult for stocks to engage in a 
significant sell-off.** 

“The path of least resistance is up," Mr. 
Grove man said. He said profit-taking has been 
limited because portfolio managers are worried 
that their performance has lagged the progress 
of the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index. Man- 
agers are holding their positions, hoping the 
market will go even higher. Mr. Groveman said. 

“The market has seen some minor profit- 
taking but mostly things just slowed a bit," said 
Alfred Harris of Joseph thal & Co. in Sl Louis. 
He called the slowing “normal and natural" for 
a market that has seen good moves up. 

Mr. Harris said lighter volume early in the 
day when the market was lower shows that no 
one feels any urgency to get out of stocks. 

“We are in a high quality market." Mr. Harris 


said ‘‘The companies with good solid balance 
sheets and good earnings visibility have been in 
the vanguard of its move up." He forecast 
higher prices before the end of the year. . 

Texaco was the most active NYSE-ltsted is* 
sue. dropping 2V* to 3214 in volume of wore 
than eight million shares. President Alfred De- 
Crane said on Monday that Texaco Inc. mav 
not be able to afford an appeal of the record 
S 1 0 J-billion damage award that a Houston jury 
last week ordered it to pay Pennzoil Co. He 
added, however, that any Chapter It proceed- 
ing would be a “last alternative" after all other 
lA fl.il remedies had been attempted. 

American Express was second on the list, 
ed gin g up W to 4816. 

Baxter Travenol was third, adding '+ to 14. 

Merck & Co. added It to I26 *b. The company 
said its board proposed a 2-for-l stock split and 
increased its quarterly dividend to 90 cents 
from 80 cents. Among other pharmaceuticals. 
Symex jumped 31* to 79tt after reporting an 
increase in quarterly earnings late Monday. 

Warner Lambert jumped 2 to 42. It said it 
would take a $550-million charge in the fourth 
quarter after divesting its three rem a i n i n g 
health technologies businesses. It also autho- 
rized a buyback of an additional 8 million 
shares. 

Among blue chips. AT&T was up to 23 <i, 
Westinghouse gained % to 46(4 and General 
Motors fell ^ to 70. 

In high-technology and semiconductor is- 
sues. IBM was unchanged at 139, Cray Re- 
search rose ‘ri to 66% and Digital Equipment 
jumped 2% to H8Vi. 


160% 100% 
17% 10% 
29"; 18% 
56% 35% 
5% 4% 
37 17% 

39% 28% 
38% 27 
28 17% 

28% 16% 


AtIRcpf Z80 1J 
AHOSCP 
Auoot .40 1 J 27 

AufoOl 41 U 22 


Aralon n Me 1.1 

AVEMC M U 16 


Avery J > 8 U 14 

Avnrl SO t J 31 

Avan LOO 7 J 14 

Avdln 17 


. 7 160 
71 13 
« 23% 
323 57 
12 4 % 

11 36% 
303 354* 
1229 331* 
1367 27% 
92 20% 


158% 160 
11« 11% 

23% 234* + Ik 
56% 56% + % 
6% 44* 

36% 36% + % 
35 35 — W 
33 33% - '.» 
27% 27% — V* 
20 % 20 % — % 


12 Month 
High Law Slack 


Sis. Close 

Dlv. Via. PE 1 00s HlBtl LowQuol.Oi-ge 




46 v* ASIralA 

51 ASIrpfB i 
M AT&T 

33 AT&T oi 

34 AT&T pf : 
17 1 * AWafr s 
10% AWalof 
12 AmHotl : 
63 ATrpr ! 

6% ATrsc 
tfi 1 , ATrun I 
26'= a moron 
12’- AmesDi 
19** Amelek ' 
18% Amtac 
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27’= AMP 
11'; Amoco 

10’ - Amrfp 5 
22% AmSIh 1 
32'. Amstod 1 
1% Anaano 
16'. Anion 
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33% AnOav i 
9% AndrC r 
17 Angelic 
23% Anheuss 

52 AnheuPf : 
13% Ani»tr 


84 75% 
4 58% 
17 14641 23% 
115 41 

66 42 

9 189 23% 
120z 12'= 

5 254 12% 

67 72 

68 17 
29 88% 

8 12 47" s 

23 333 25% 

15 840 24% 

63 231* 
565 IS, 

9 1297 68% 
V 1827 34% 
17 SI 14 
11 60 18% 

10 43 38 

17 841 46 

1234 3U 

25 

33 21S 48-1 

16 31 T44U 

15 206 27U 
13 3073 36% 

337 73V] 
20 306x!V 


75% 75V* 

58A] 58% + % 
23% 23% + % 
40% 40%— Vt 
41% 42 — % 
181- 28*6 — U 
12% 12’+— % 
11% 12 
71% 71% + 
16il 17 +1 

57 BB’-i +1 
47’A 47% + % 
25 25% — <1 

24’i 24’A — 

22 % 22 %- % 
IV. T%- % 
67% 68 + % 
33% 33% + U 
13% 13% 

18% 13% + 'm 
37% 38 +i* 

45% 45% 

2% 3V* — % 
24'A 24% + % 
24% 25 
37% 47% — 1 
14% 14% + % 
26% 27% + % 
36 


72% 73'* + % 
18% 18% + % 


16% 10V. 
15% 10% 
12VS 9% 
2 % 
19% 15Vi 
34% 10% 
391* 154* 
15V* 8<* 

24% 171* 
31’* 26’* 
1041* 84 
28'* 14% 
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15% IV* 
114* 6% 

221* 15VS 
24% 13% 
43’* 30% 
18". 11U, 
30% 16 
28’* 17 
68% 40% 
27% 15% 
37 23% 

44% 35 
*0 % 341= 
127% 7? 
231* 16% 
29% 23% 
671* 42 
455 288 


Anthem B4 3 27 
An they 44b 12 8 

Apache 38 23 12 
AochP wt 
AnChPuitS-10 11.1 
ApPwpi 4.1 B 126 
APlDta l-76t 56 55 
ApaIMfl 11 

ArchDn ,14b 6 13 
AriPpf 368 11.9 
ArlPpl 10J0 10 a 
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Arkla 1J» 5J 21 
ArlnCp 
Armada 
Armco 

Armcot 210 112 
ArmsRb / U I 
ArmWIn 1J0 11 10 
ArowE 20 1 A 
Artrn 32 1J) 37 
Arvins 30 19 10 
Arvlnpf 200 10 
Aiarco 

AshJOil 160 AA 9 
AxhlOal 196 9J 
AMDGS 1.40 36 13 
AsdDpt 4.75 3.9 
Athlone 160 73 60 
AtCvEI 258 931 10 
All Rich 4B0 63 
AtIRcpf 3J» J 


3 14% 

6 irk 

1435 12Vk 

114 1% 

198 11% 

7 33% 
2250 31% 

48 14% 
1481 26% 
17 30% 
150:101 
142 25% 
1105 18% 
253 % 

2 14 
112* 9 
7 18% 
532X 14V| 
1372 42 
188 14% 
41 221* 
138 28 
1 66% 
186 19% 
835 36% 
72 42U 
1304 391* 
124 122% 
6 20% 
62 28% 
1911. .677* 
1-655 


16% 14% 

13% 13% 

12 12 — '» 
1% l%— >4 

18% 18% 

33% 33% 

31% 314* 

14% 16% — V* 
24’* 26% + 'l 
30 X 
iai ioi 
28% 28% 

18% 18% + % 
Vs + 

13% 13%— U 
8% S% + ‘« 
18% 18% * % 
16 16 
41'.* 6V5 + '.j 
16 14% — i= 

22 22 — ’= 
27% 28 
66% 66%— 1% 
18% 18%— % 
35% 36% +1% 
62% 62% + U 
38% 33V: — 1 
122% 122%— 3% 
20% 2 fl’A — % 
28’= 2846 + 'k 
66% 66% + 4* 
455 ’ 455 - +10 


FcnmJc One champion Alan Prcst. runner-tpMchefe Ahoreto. 


Miss America 1986, Susan Alan, predecessor Shariene WeSs. 









i 












nnw"* 

HIOBLO* iW 




17% 
52 
20% 
9 

27% 

10 % 
24 
21 % 
29% 
i'h 

26V= 1796 
31 22V* 

46% 24% 

18% 

16% 

28% 

154 * 

40 
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361= 

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451* 

26% 

Z7 


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Spadal nfrudutiary rofoi far Mwwixcfban. 

Baa» ai de fte '«d«ed 

Vdd8raghM*di31.M86 


ESMK!3EB1^! 


To: Subscription Manager, Intematiortd Herald Tribune, 

181, avenue ChartesHde-Gaulte, 92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. Td.: 47 47 07 29. Telex; 61 2832. H 

Please enta- my subscription for: lii 


Please enter my subsc ription for: Hi 

Ql2mo*s □fimonfts ( +2 ^) Q 3 months ( + 1 ^f k ) ■ 

My check is endased. Please charge my credit card account; « 

apsp ^pfEip^p scp ! 


1.32 27 

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120 &1 

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50 63 


50 13 


30 29 

11 

630 35 

11 

450 102 


4 Me 5 

23 

238 53 

10 

25 15 

11 

2412 77 

7 

2.96 104 

6 

450 106 


154 85 11 J 

2438 73 

7 

4.18 12.1 


150 105 IBS 

150 9 A 

6 

50 63 

9 

2430 12.1 

7 

.70 23 

9 

52 22 


130 541 


650 16 


A0 65 

15 

280 64 ) 

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883*165 


72 043 

10 

152 5.1 

12 

2A3 4.1 

5 

187 66 


589*116 


531 « 93 


136 15 

13 

ZOO 68 

13 1 

240 6.1 

10 






Americcn Diners 

(Express SSfgS&uOub 


Card accounr number 

SigncAwe 

Cod expry dote 

Name 


Address 


City/ Courtvy 


Tef/TeJex 

27 - 11-85 

J 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1983 


liesda^ 


■msa 


dosing 


Ta W« Include tte notionwide nrlce* 

■ up to ttM dosing on Wail street 
chhI do not rettoct late trades eiseurtiere^ 


34 23% 

on 3t 
33 

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21* MW 
»* MV* 
IT* MW 
67% SOW 
>5* 




8 % 

> m 

* £5 

19% 
XI* 

7»V* 

32% 
19 


HU 

8013J I 
84 114 




282 HU 

Ul tj 

»r uo ioi 
Pf 185 10.1 
Of £28 102 
PtOJO TO* 

Vf 2X3 HU 

* 7J0 IM 
of 752 107 
V* 7M IDS 

of *43 107 


15 
» 
15 

ISO IS M 

to 

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104 74 14 
IUD 107 
740 t3 

43 34 
114 U 
loo oi n 

iS2 52 S 
1-S6 ss 7 
123 AS I 
MOeUVS 

80S 24 13 

24» 2518* 

.18 U 17 
jo :j a 
«J U 7 


23% JWT ■ 
231* J River 
14% Jentswy 
UH6 JoonF 
34 JeHPtl 
41 JerCpf 
SJ% JerCof 
5216 JerCpf 
si JerCpf 
IS JerCpf 
.6% Jewlcr 
3346 JohnJn 
38% JoftnCn 
5Mb JhflCpf 
2216 Joroen 
2016 Jastens 
21% JovMfo 


1.12 17 17 

S4 IS 12 
.12 4 12 

T4M1U 
1-52 73 B 
9.34 11 J) ■ 

8.12 114 
8JM 1U 
780 113 

an n.i 

24 

1J0 £7 T5 
200 21 IB 
405 77 
LOO 40 If 
SO 13 15 
140 40 28 


70 3Mb amb 
185 3716 3416 
127 3T16 3016 

n in m 

414 5116 5016 
1100x 15 83% 

tea 71% 7116 
SOX 72% 7116 
220x 70 Am 
10 is* mb 
111 1416 M 
5501 4816 4716 
1890 4816 4016 
5 59 59 

26 2416 2314 
208 2516 2616 
472 2346 216 


ao% 

37% + V6 

b5 + is 

8 “** 
71 % + % 
72% +1% 
70 +16 

1946— 16 
14 +16 

4816 +116 
4816—66 
5* 

2316 + 1* 
2416— 1b 
2316 


Hi 

17W 
2416 
21 % 
2 % 
1516 13% 
37% 25% 
64% 45 
«P6 2416 
17*6 1016 
27 24% 

2216 17% 
2116 15% 
37 32 

04 95 

171* 12% 
4846 34 
24 % 

60 
2316 


2916 

77 

2CFU 
321* 271* 
224* 14% 
4416 3316 
TV 12% 
10 716 

47% MV1 

3 % % 

2T% 14% 
32% 25% 
3566 2716 
37 30V6 


2946 2416 
49V* 53% 
1716 U% 
TM6 




o g QyoLW ISO 23 14 471 41% S*lh 41% +116 
IBM 71 QuoOef 984 7.1 70x105 104 IDS — % 

25 17 QuotcSO 80s 14 If 75 23% 23% 23% 

10% 5 Qoonex 18 1338 5% 51* 5% + % 

££ S'***™ - *30 54 11 3f 30% 2*1* 39% — lx 

27% J4V* QkR«H 74a S 17 1*3 2716 26A. 24V.— % 


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37 37 

43% 42% 
44 44 

am 28% 

72 72 

15% 15% 
131* 

27% 

1516 
13% 

74% 

416 41* 

52% 51 
5216 5216 
15% 1516 
47% 44% 
38*4 34% 
18% 1816 
17% T7V6 
916 8% 

38% 38% 

s*s% 


38% — % 
50%— Mr 
35 + % 




Page IT 


400 110 
1 JO 111 

Mbit 

02 

5 

1.16 

313 

12 

A 

83 

22 

SI 

20 

1.20 

<0 

Mi el If 

2i5 

81 

1J3 

58 

5J2 

6.9 

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285 

7.1 

1.92 

88 

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48 

80 

.9 

80 

14 

1.13 

48 

un 

44 

120b 19 

280 

2.1 

1.13 

19 

1 800108 

223 

88 

280 108 
2.90 10J 

336 

08 

284 

97 

14USI 

284 

118 

281 

118 

18* 

25 


U.S. Trade Panel 

Says Japanese 

Dumped Phones 

1 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. International 
Trade Commission ruled Tuesday that Ameri- 
can businesses had been bun by mobile tele- 
phones from Japan sold is the United States at 
less than their “fair value.” and ordered anti- 
dumping duties. 

Paula Stem, who chairs the commission, said 
that imports from Japan had captured three- 
quarters of the growing U.S. market for such 
telephones, which are used chiefly in cars. 

Because of the ruling the U.S. government 
will impose a special “dumping duty" on the 
Japanese phones. The duty will raise the price of 


2*% ZoleCp 182 45 13 42 29- 29 29U 

TV. Zopcrfo .12 1J *7 233 9% 9 ! - 7% -t- % 

32% Zovrej X8 5 17 370 5*1* SA’i 5ft*- — ’.1 

1AV- ZentlhE 90A 453 IE 1 ;. 18 «'■* * % 

15% Zeros J2 ) A 17 27 20% 23 lb 36'k — ■» 

244, Zumin US 3J 15 108 2Tt 39% 39% *- '« 


WSE H^is-Lows 


27 

3 

9 

40 40 

12% n% 
35% 35 
206 91* 9 
AAO 1216 12 
70 27% 27 

§2^2^ 

2 S "* 

99 11% 

SB 9% 966 
20 19% 

49*6 49 
122 121 

® 14* 
31% 
42% 42% 
20 19% 

2B% 27% 
3% 2% 
42% 42% 
14* 




37 

SS 
3$ 

n* 

MVS 
95 

16* 10* 
70 56 

21% 17 

m ira 

71% 5816 

as* an% 
»* i* 

37% 2Mb 
10% 5% 
17% 12 
3316 36* 
22% 
7% 
20 

23 
8% 
4% 

24 
19% 
241* 
13 
30% 


r-H 


12 % 

43* 

25% 

34% 

50 V, 

54% 

19* 

2216 
12 % 

*% _ 

13% 716 
28% 21* 

59% JSV6 SoxPIo 
43% 32% Sctitmb 
14% 9*6 

33 Z3% 

41% 53% 

45% 




K-U 


39% U 
2Mb U 
10% U 
22% U 
18% U 
21 U 
8% U 
10*6 U 
2SU U 
24% U 
17% U 
84% U 
33V. U 
44% 32% U 
7V* 4% U 
21* 151b U 
32% 25 U 
59% 46 u, 
34% 28% U: 
72* 57 U 
28 21% U 

24* 22% U 
68 53 U 

72 56% U 

24 21* Ui 

52% 37% Ui 
15% 87% U 

2% u' 

10'A Ui 
9* U 
18% Ul 
25% Ul 
1316 U 
34 Ul 
14% Ul 


13 

14 

58 


38 

7 

13 

14 

i 33 

13 

44 

16 

53 


83 

7 

118 


188 


124 


113 


10.9 


102 


109 


118 


l 18 


38 

12 

68 



m 


47V* 

30 +16 

14* + % 
24* 

2116 + % 

25 + * 
»%— V* 
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37% + 16 
44% — % 
14 — *6 
733’-. + * 
37% — % 
60 % — 1 % 

7 

21% + Vk 
33V.— >* 
59% 4-1% 
* 32% + % 
% 71% — % 
27* + % 
24% + % 
48 + % 

48* +1* 
21* + % 
SOU + M 
110% + % 
72 
2% 

21% 

18 

31*— % 
44*— % 

26 + % 

29% + % 
19 + % 




Floating-Rale Notes 


Dollar 


71 + % 

13 % + 16 


<2% + % 

57 % + % 


Denmark Do 88/90 
Denmark ff /04 
Die Ente Otsf * 2/94 
Dreamer Finn 
Dresdner F 6 il< 
DmsdnerFlnfi 
EUaraaoHuett 
Edff 

EAf 7 (Mthlr 1 
Enel 00/85 (Mfhfy| 
Enel Oc 
Enbfl 

ira Banco/n *2 

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EecfO 

Exlertcr lntft /96 
Fe rra ra 9 Stwmi») 
Ferrovl* 93/99 
Ferrara**jvf 7 
Finland 90 (MOW) 
FkwWiPraerNfts 

f>sJ Barton 9 1/94 

Firil Bk Svs» 9 * 

Firs Bk SWI 97 
FtrS BkSysjOM 
Firs 04090 97 
Firs! Chi cooe « 
FirsCMasaM 
Firs City Texas 95 
Firs inter 95 
Ford 91 

Fortune S+L*l 
Full Ini 94 /ft 
GenftoanceBf/f! 

Oenitaenrk 93/94 

Gzh87 

Drt .72 

GxDPero 

GzBfll 

Cfrefl 

GiAmer 4 // JSfSarK 
Great Lakes S*Lf] 

G 1 MMtem 92 /fS 

GrtndknnfJ 

GflnOtetrjfX 

Gl Western 89/94 

H 4 HSamael 9 k 

HIM Samurt PerP 

yltooncnns 

rtomesmSH. 95 Cep 

Mono Kona Perp 

HkSnanohoIBbftfP 

Hydro 02 (MJWvJ 

HyaruUIMthly) 

Id 91 

loUnaK/QS 
rndoneUaOrt] 
IblKovN 
inland 94/99 
Ireland 97 
irelM* 

I*velmer 90 
Ifvetmer 93 
Mafrff 
Italy 897 U 
1689 OS 
C inn 87 
J 6 Maroon 97 
MOFetm 
K»nHniOy«S 
Klelnnan Ben 91 
Klehmart Ben 98 
KlelMart Ben P«v 
Korea Dev Bk 86/19 
Korea E>OiBk 8 S /88 
Lincoln S+L 99 
Unfin Cerp 95 
LwrdiBkPera 
Ltovds Bonn Pern 
LW«ts 93 
Uavtbf 2 

LWrdsM 

Lien 92 

Malays 94 /W 
Motorsla 08 / 1 J (Mlttl 
MCtoYsfo Aprtir/2 
MnktvWa DecS 9 /« 

MolavraNAl 
MolovMnaiAS 
Man Han 94 
Man Han ft 
Man Han 94 iwktyl 
mot Mia *4 
Mar Mia t >9 
Mar MU 96 
Mcnra J 71 MOTV) 
Mellon Bk 91 
MMiondBkPerp 
Midland Bk Pern New 
Wdtandimw 
AAufland lmf 9 
Mdffind Ira 92 
Midland IM 91 
Ubteidintff 
Mitsui Fh 97 (Coal 
MlrtuiFInW 
MgnCrurMN 
MMB» Den 92 
Nos 97 teas I 
Hat Bk Detroit ft 
Hat Carom Bk 89/94 
Hot West Ptra (A) 

Nat West Per* (B 7 
NattMWPMfl 
Hat west Finos 

Nor West Perp(C) 

NOT West «4 
Mat WtSt Fin 92 
Not West Fto Perp 
Neste OvK 
Nn> Zealand 87 
Nr 5 te«Dr»ei 
Nordic Int 91 

oust 

0O» 

0 % 95/99 

Onshore MMna n 
Ottmare Minins 86 

Pirelli 91/04 
Pnc 97 

Pi Banken 0/91 
Queensland I BoDW 
Renfc 9 l 
R %84 

a vp B 4 c DoltakS? 

PteNyOf 

RrvNvtB 

Romsetiiidsan 5 

RDCB 5 

RtePfrp 

f?«e 84/94 

saBomsnn} 
SanwaBHFMBS 
Sacra Inl Fin * 4/04 
Scenea Ini Pin 92 


•V 1SH4 

8% 194)2 

[tl 2M1 

fltt. 71-04 Ml 
Ilk 21-11 99J 
SU 27-82 
816 2M7 
lib 27-02 
7% 1683 
14331- 
n 0340 
1% 17-12 
8% ZWJ 
Mb JWE 
7% 8881 
7* 23-12 
Mb 3003 
lib 20432 
8% ISOS 

Mb 3M1 
8% 39-11 
Stk IM2 
B*. 39-11 
81* 3602 
Mb 07-02 
8.1625114)2 
8% 7M2 
3W 27411 
Mb 06-12 
Stk 15415 
Br- 2411 
lib 1501 


WO 
•% 84-1 
Mb 2741 
B% 03-0 
8% 3441 
87. 770 
8% 29-1 
Itk IM 
IM 240 
8% UO 
850 
Mb 210 
iv. oi-o 
B5b ISO 
Mb HO 
Mb 0*0 
S*k 78-0 
Mb 170 
Itk 2Wt 
stk lwr 
SU 1JO 
sis u-a 
Mb WO 
Mb IM 
It 29-1 
Mb M 
IK 200 
s% do: 

Sib 2Stt 
B% 200 
HVj 270 
s% 29-1 : 

Mb esc 
B% 090. 
lib 12-r. 
8b. U4E 

8 esc 

H 214* 
8tb 300- 
SK 04-11 
SN »W 
Mb 29-11 
7% 18-U 
8 1SW 
8% 0904 

im osi: 

8M Tf-tc 
8% 0304 
BU 29-11 

P. 2409 
8*k 1*02 

IV 8901 
1% 18-12 
Mb 19-17 
81i M4E 
SU 29-11 
lib 19-12 
■kb 1903 
Pb. WOl 
■ Ik 24-12 
S D9-U 
* 3004 

89. 0*40 

aw mi 

Mk 4403 
81k UOI 
Bib 79-12 
Mb 3001 
Ilk 20-12 
7% 23-12 
816 06-01 
88k KW7 

Mk 21-01 
Stk 1804 
■U SH2 
Mb 1604 
■% 2S04 
Mb 13-05 
Mk 2702 
*M 0904 
Mb 14-12 
Stk 1705 
Ilk aw 
BM 29-11 
tv 11-04 
BK 04.12 

8% 2341 
SK 2/07 
■I. 12-12 

Mb 19-12 

■% nos 

Mb 2740 
IK. 2102 
Itk 3803 
■lb 19-» 
Ml UOI 
Mk 9901 
8t» 0W2 
114)4 
Mb 1401 
t 05-13 
8% 2H3 
M. zroi 
stk iwa 



Wells Faroe 97 
WMJsFarpaOO 
wells FaraoFrtW 
WKtnac 97 ia») 
WmsGtvnTl 
World Bk Pent 
World Bk |9/«4 
Yokohama 91/94 
Yokohama 97 (Con j 
ieniraispkosski 


Coupon Next BIO Aslcd 
Uf7529-ll 9947 99J7 
8V. 09-12 99^4 9954 
Mb IM2 9956 99 AA 
Mb 1802 99 J* 99.44 
8% 1803 I DO-171 0U7 
7-8501612 9950 99J0 
755 29-11 98AS «85 
Mb 0204 T002IKXL31 
Ilk 1802 99.15 «935 
8V 1501 1BU5I0CU5 


Dollar 




















































































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


Tuesdays 

AYIEX 


12 Month 
High low Stock 


Sta. Oasi 

MOsWtalLOT QuotOi-B* 


19ft Uft Awnfll £0 46 6 17ft 17ft 17V.— V. 


Closing 


Tobias include Hie nationwide prices 
up la Hie cl Ml ns an Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


UMgnm 
HU Low Statt 


3ft ADI n 56 

5ft AL Lab a .16 IX 19 
8 AMCs 15 

3W AM Intt 10 

3ft AOI n 

69 ATT Fd SJ2o +3 
zvy AcmePr 

9ft ACTTHHJ JO U X 
9ft Action U 

lft Acton 

lft MinRs 8 

32ft AdRUBl .16 A 18 
3ft Aeranc 

29ft AfilPhs JO 1J 22 
5ft AlrExn 

8 AtrCoi 10 

9ft A real m 1 JO 11 J 
ft Alomco 

85ft Almlton 11 

5ft AlbaW 
5ft Alalia 

i„ Alpha In JB 3 
ft Ainu n 

31 Alcoa (X 175 112 
17ft AbaCP 45 

3ft AmBrtt JH ZB 26 
10ft Amdahl JO 15 19 
5ft Amedeo 48 1.1 
8ft Am BIH .15 14 5 
4 AmCno 11 

31 AEtpwl 
4ft AFniC A 44 

AFruc B 39 

3ft AHIIOM 
4ft Alsraef 


Tift AMzeA 
12ft AJWmB 
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3 AmOII 
47ft APeH 
13ft A Free 
Aft AmRItV 3 

lift ARovIn l-78el24 
3 AScfE 20 

49ft Aiunun -90e U 
44 Axon or Me 15 
5ft Axonsc 


44 

39 

8 

4 

52 34 65 
52 U 47 

21 

ZOO 37 17 
J4b L7 20 
3 


72 74 18 
100 


lft Ameol 04 U 11 
4ft Andol 24 

1ft AndJcb 

9 Andrea 72 74 18 
Sft Angeles 100 

ft vjAnolov 
3 AraoPt 

Sfe £jey 8 

Armtrti 

£ft Armefs 9 

7ft ArrowA 70 20 1 


16ft AnmBI 14 

Aft Asmr B 30 Z1 61 
^6 Aatrvx 12 

ft Asfrotc 

7ft Astral of 100 14J 
ft AttsCM 
2 Audtotr 
lift Auslrrtf n 


■5 lffft 
747 lift 
77 lft 

17 2ft 
1004 36ft 

44 3ft 
38 5114 
34 7ft 
38 8ft 
80 10ft 
65 ft 

31 117ft 
S3 5ft 
25 Oft 

18 Oft 
33 ft 

20001 34ft 
1717 31ft 
23 7ft 
916 13 
105 7ft 
2 10ft 

19 6ft 
454 43 

570Qz 5ft 
1900Z 4ft 
213 4ft 
23 7ft 
13 14 
2 14 
ISO s 
91 4ft 
V 54ft 

18 14 

1 7ft 
342 14ft 

20 4ft 

19 53ft 

32 47ft 

2 Aft 
40 2ft 

3 6'4 

84 Zft 

4 Oft 
59 8 

85 lft 
319 3ft 

11 6 
2 4M 
48 5ft 
7 9ft 
1 1914 
492 9ft 
I 13ft 
573 114 

4 12ft 
62 ft 

108 lift 


Aft 4ft + ft 
16ft 14ft + ft 
10ft 10ft 
4ft 4ft 
3ft 3ft — ft 
86ft 87ft + ft 
3ft 3ft 
IQUi 10ft + ft 
111* lift— ft 

129 1* + "* 

2ft 2ft 
36ft 26ft — ft 
3ft 3ft + ft 
51ft 51ft— ft 
714 7ft 
8ft 8ft + V. 

"» 10 £ + « 
117 117ft + ft 

8 Aft + ft 
9ft 9ft + ft 
9ft 9Vj + ft 
ft K— % 
33ft 33ft — 1 
30ft 31 — ft 
3ft 2ft 
12ft 13 + ft 

7ft 7ft— ft 
HA. I Oft — ft 
6ft Aft + ft 
4] 41ft— ft 

Sft 5ft— ft 
Aft 4ft— ft 
4ft 4VS + ft 
7 7ft 
13ft 13ft — ft 
13ft 14 
4ft 5 

4 Aft 
54 54ft 
13ft 14 
7ft 7% 

14ft 14ft— ft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
53ft 53ft + ft 
47ft 47ft + ft 
Aft Aft 
2ft 2ft— ft 
Aft Aft — ft 
2ft Zft + ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
726 8 + ft 

1 lft + ft 
31* 3ft 
5ft 6 + ft 

4ft 4ft + ft 

5 J — W 
9ft 9ft + ft 

19ft 19ft — ft 
91* 9ft + ft 
13ft lift 
lft lft— ft 
12j% 1^> + ft 

2ft 2ft 
12ft 13ft + ft 


4\ 3ft 

37 13ft 
3ft lft 
3ft 2% 

15ft 9ft 
Uft Sft 
lift 8*1 
llPi Oft 
4ft 2 
37VS 23ft 
7ft 4ft 
9\* Aft 

4 W. 
Aft 4 

13ft 10ft 

13 4V. 
15ft 10ft 
33ft 30ft 
20ft 1 Oft 
lav. 10 

37ft 21ft 
19ft 9ft 
19 PM 

38 14ft 
lft ft 

19ft 11 
19ft Til* 
33 11V. 

14 9ft 
5ft 2ft 

19*4 13ft 
26ft 19ft 
38ft Z7 
4Jft 29 
4ft 3ft 

5 2ft 
Sft 3ft 

lift 6ft 


40 U 13 
■32a 34 


4* 44 II 

II 


1-BO 1+4 
32 1.1 14 

40 IS 17 
IjOO 16 12 
15 


AS 11 IS 
40 Z9 IS 
24 
JO 

15 

44 U 16 
160 


649 4% 

76 24ft 
22 2V. 

12 2ft 
9 12ft 
10 ID 
1 13ft 
3 Oft 
38 » 

8V 26ft 
6 Aft 
35 P 
20 3 

30 5ft 
18 101* 
57 9ft 
47 lift 
213 29ft 
46 20ft 
1 16 
IB 27ft 

6 17V6 
123 17ft 

302 

IB 14ft 

7 14 
533 16ft 

9 lift 
79 4ft 
52 19ft 

A £ 

164 42ft 

3 4 

4 3ft 

5 4ft 
17 Sft 


Sft CDI 8 

5ft CM1 Co 11 

lft CMXCp 
7ft C55/7 

• CO«NJ 18 

4ft CastaA 5 

10ft CaIRE 1 JB 11.1 8 

6ft CalPTTW .341 93 21 

lift cornea 4< U f 
lft Camani 
Uft CMares J8 18 
lffft CdnOCC M 
27ft CWine 11 

4ft Cardiff 10 

tft Cara 1 1 

8’* CareA .10 3 16 

4% CareE B 15 

38 CaraPpf5J» UL9 
14ft CasflA 30b 43 11 
23ft CosFd 220 a t* 
ft CasFdrt 
2 Castlnd 
4ft Cenlenl 
20ft CenMpf 350 11J 
10ft CenISe 1.S78124 
23ft CenSofDZOO BA 
Sft CeleC JO Z7 18 
IVi ChmpH 39 

12ft ChmpP 37 4.1 17 
Uft ClltMA 6 .16 J 13 
17ft CMMBl .16 9 14 

Uft ChlRv 1J0a S3 12 
6ft ChfDvg 

IB Chilian .17 .S 29 
14 Citadel 5 

20 Cl I PH IXOb 3M 9 
20ft CtvGas 1J0 X8 10 
35ft Oarml IJOe 44 
7 OortC JBe Z9 10 
24ft Clarast -850 14 9 


JBe 2.9 io 

X5a Z4 9 


lift Ctapmj .16 IJ 
3ft CoonJtr 
63 k Coho JO Z2 
lft ColF wls 
9ft Cam led 
7ft Coniine .18 
6ft CarwD 
4ft CmoCn 
Sft GnpFct 17 

14ft Cnchm A0 Z1 14 


4ft 4ft 
24ft 24ft + ft 
2ft 2ft 
Tft Jft— ft 
12ft 12ft 
10 10 
13ft TJft 
Oft Oft 
Tft 2ft— ft 
28ft 26ft— ft 
AM 6ft 
9 9 + ft 

2» 3 + ft I 

Sft Sft— V. 
10ft 10ft— ft 
Oft 9ft— ft 
10ft II — ft 
29 2»ft + ft | 
19ft 3Dft + ft 

18 18 — ft 

27ft 27ft + ft 
17ft 17ft— ft 
76ft I6ft— 1* 
37 37 

ft ft 

14ft 14ft + ft ' 
14 14 

15ft 16ft + ft 
lift lift I 
41* 4ft— ft 

19 19 
25ft 25ft 
38ft 38ft + ft 
41 47ft +lft . 

4 4 I 

3ft 3ft— ft 

4ft 4ft + ft 

8 Bft + ft 


22ft +lft 
9ft— ft 
lft — ft 
8 + ft 

13 — ft 
Aft 

lift + ft 
8V. + ft 
15ft— ft 
lft 

15ft— ft 
18ft— ft 
S3 V* +1 
10ft -r ft 
2ft 

14 

Aft— ft 
48 — ft 
Tfrft 

24ft— ft 
lft— ft 
2ft— ft 
8ft 

29ft +■ ft 
12ft + ft 
23ft + ft 
7ft + ft 
2 

17ft— ft 

lift 

18ft 

20ft + 1* 
9ft — ft 
33 —lft 
30ft— ft 
S2ft— ft 
31ft 

44 — ft 
966 
35ft 

131* + ft 
4 

9ft 

Sft 

22ft + ft 
7ft 

lift— ft 
6ft + ft 
Sft + ft 
19ft .-tft. 


12M0R» 

HU Low Stag 

101* 696 

25ft 13ft 
9ft 5ft 
Sft lft 
10 4ft 
14ft su 
15ft TV* 

20 9ft 
26ft 17ft 
14ft Tftft 
19ft 17ft 
3ft 2ft 


Tft lft 
1716 71* 

35 25ft 

48ft 28ft 
17ft ft 
Uft 7ft 
23ft 17ft 
lft ft 
Aft <6 
25 13ft 
31ft 23JJ 


3 n* 
SV* Sft 

ISft Tft 
Uft 6ft 
5ft 3ft 
24ft 17ft 
26ft 191* 
20ft 10ft 
Bft 31* 
8ft 2 
38ft 25ft 
16ft 12ft 

4 ft 
7 3ft 

»JS * 

27ft 6 
3ft lft 
74ft 36ft 
38V* 18ft 
A 2ft 

S3 

13ft 8V* 
34ft 23 
20ft 12ft 
Uft 12 
18ft 9ft 
29ft 18ft 


«ft Aft 
18ft 13ft 
■V. 4ft 
lft Zft 

Sft 2ft 

23ft 17ft 
40 30ft 

'tft It 

25ft 15ft 
Aft 3ft 
Sft 2 
13V* 18V* 
7ft Zft 
ft 48 
14ft 13ft 
ft ft 
10ft 4ft 
1ft ft 
17ft 10ft 
Sft 2ft 
12ft 8% 
9ft 4ft 
25 Uft 
4ft ft 
34ft 211* 
10ft Aft 
1046 A 
9ft Aft 


5U. Cost 

Din. YU PE NOS HI0HLU M.Qttt 


Sis. Ctoe . [ 

Dl*. YU.PE 1801 HU Low QuotOrae 


** s 

ICO 198 
11 
17 
400 

8 89 
20 

9 92 

1J0 145 26 

-a* 15 38 

22 32 

-Me Z1 3 | 
.1*15 » IS 
1A4 4J 16 173 

1.00a U I 2 
9 30 

7 30 

1J2 85 20 

1 372 

S7t 

39 1.7 12 63 

37 U 9 139 

25 


JBO 25 
9 A6 25 
400 2J 
•27c 15 
50 23 


A0 4A 43 

*• “5 

371 62 13 
14 

150 55 9 
6J6C222 7 
.12 

15 44 I 
41 


Tft 7ft 
17ft 17ft 
Bft 8 
4 3ft 
5ft 51% 
13% 13ft 
12ft 12ft 
15ft 15ft 
25ft 24ft 
12V* 12ft 
181* Iflft 
2ft Zft 
ft ft 

, 1 $ 

34ft 34ft 

% 5% 

13ft 13ft 

23 Z2ft 

M fc “ft 


14* lft 
5ft Sft 
Sft Tft 
Tft 7ft 
4ft 4ft 
23ft 214* 
26ft 2AW 
Uft 13ft 
Bft Sft 
3ft 3ft 
39 38ft 
16 ISft 
1 ft 
4 Sft 
* f 

s & 

711* TO 
35ft 35*. 
Sft Sft 


14V* 14V. 

lft lft 
Sft Bft 
3ft 28ft 
18ft 18ft 
74ft 14ft 
15ft lift 
27ft 27ft 


7ft 

17» + 

8 — ft 
4 — Hi 
Sft + ft 
13ft + U 

Skits 

25 + ft 

1 2ft — ft 
1814— ft 
2» + ft 
ft 

EL 

■9ft + ft 
344* + ft 
381* + 16 
18 + ft 

13ft + <6 

1-* 

S + V* 


I**— v* 
51* + ft 

£ + ft 

z£ + ft 
26ft + V" 
13ft— ft 
lft 
34* 

39 + ft 

15ft — ft 
ft + ft 
4 A- <6 

f 

Aft— ft 
SV. 

36ft— ft 
lft 

70 —lft 
35ft— ft 
Sft + ft 
514— ft 

Uft + ft 
lft 

lft 

28ft — ft 
18ft + ft 
lift + ft 
15ft 

Z7ft + ft 


.11* 3 19 
.10 1-0 2S 
20 21 24 
AObO 12 


3* 9ft 
31 ISft 
15 Sft 
80 Sft 
2S 21* 

4 18 
42 3lft 

1716 1416 

21 ft 

5 23ft 

56 61* 

674 2ft 

7 lift 
S 5ft 

20 46 

540 U ft 

3 

25 141* 
19 3ft 

8 101* 

4 7ft 
29 18ft 

22 114 


Bft 9 
ISft ISft 

• 8 

Bft Bft + V. 
21* 2ft 
18 18 — ft 

301* 31ft +1 

14 14 — ft 

ft ft 

22 22 — ft 

6ft 41* 

2ft Zft + ft 
lift lift 
5ft Sft + ft 
ft ft 

13ft 13ft— ft 
ft ft 

* ‘ST* 

74ft 14ft— ft 
31* 31* 

ID Vs 101* 

7ft 7ft 
18 ISft 
IV. 114— ft 

15 15ft — Aft 

10 10 —ft 

9ft 91* 

9ft 9ft + ft 


Uft Bft 
22ft 16ft 
18ft 6 
49* 1VS 

W Uft 

10ft 3*. 
Sft 116 
12ft 9ft 

15V* 1) 
13W 9ft 
15ft lift 
13 Aft 
SOM 23ft 
. 10ft 4Vi 
44 28ft 

38ft 21 

•1 5ft 
117ft 89V* 
32V* 121* 
2 ft 
7ft 4V. 
26 14 

101* Tft 
12ft 5 
26 141* 

16ft Aft 


Sft >6 
Aft 4 
4ft lft 
1514 la'6 
2ft 1*4 
®U 25 
16ft 7ft 
13ft Uft 
4ft lft 

ir« 12ft 

5 2ft 
17ft 13 

6 2ft 

ISft 9ft 
U Tft 
12ft BV: 
26ft 12ft 
20 8 
381* 201* 
37 23*. 

4ft 2ft 
Sft 3 
■ ft ft 

19ft 15ft 
9ft 22ft 
16 Aft 

11 S16 

12 7ft 
15 9ft 
4416 27 
36 13ft 
lift Sft 
13V* 10ft 

, 15ft 11 
36ft 26 
151* 0 


49 

SO 22.8 


1.000 84 8 
a 44 11 

ABt 4.9 22 


JO TJ 6 
U8t S3 14 


17 

» « 17 
.9 24 
DUX 


11 

21 

130 4A 16 


a as 7 
JO 7JJ 11 
,10b 3 12 

30 1J 10 
4 

tun 9JB 

30 1.9 u 

a 14 12 
urn 34 20 


36 43 B 
2JHH 7J7 9 
32 43 
IJ0630J 7 
II 
17 

A8 1J 17 
14 

S BJ 11 
43 10 

32 

A0 l.| 12 
•05c A II 


14 10ft 
5 22ft 

74 1714 
1 lft 

49 16ft 

75 Aft 
44* Sft 

3 lift 
42 12ft 
28 17ft 
11 14 
57 lift 
13 29V. 
5 5ft 
1Z 42ft 
1 95 26ft 

116 Sft 
MH1S 
487 29ft 
60 tft 
3 Sft 
5 231* 
11 9 

26 9ft 
32 241* 
178 ISft 


17ft 1714+14 
lft lft 
1614 16ft 
6V6 Aft— ft 
Sft Sft— ft 
TUh lift + ft 
12 12ft — ft 
lZft 12ft 
U 14 
IV* 1114— ft 
29ft 2?ft + V* 

28ft 28ft— ft 
Sft 5V. 

115 US —I 
aw 29i* +i» 
lft >« + ft 

aft ait— ft 

a ?fti)S 

23*. 23ft + ft 
15ft ISft + ft 


Aft zft : 

2ft lft i 
aft i6ft i 
an* 5714 1 
19 1014 

14ft 9ft 
Uft 9ft 1 
14ft ID I 
26ft Bft 
low 8ft 


5b. Ctaw 

Phr. YHL PE Wfc High Low ftgtQjbt 
10 3ft 3W 3V.— 14 

19 lft lft lft 

20 9 2114 21 21 

21 316 40ft 40 40ft + ft 

SB J 34 120 T7ft 17 17ft + 1* 


11 

9 

JO ID T1 

JO Z1 18 


IB 143 13ft 12ft 13ft +,ft 


89 1116 Uft Uft 

4 14 14 U 

57 lift 10ft Uft + ft 

1 9V. Oft 9ft 


M 18 

24 

93 130 


US. futures 

Via The Associated Press 


Season Season 
High Law 


Open High Low Close Dkl 


Dec 1TUB 17230 

Mar in in 171.00 


Csi. Soles P rev. Sales 1495 

Prev. Day Oaen Ini. 11.671 off 37 
SUGAR WORLD II (NYCSCE) 
112JM0 Ibv- cent* per lb 


17075 17230 
171 JO 171.91 


Season Season 
High Law 


Hue. 2b 

Open High Low dose Chg. 

Grains 


WHEAT (CUT) 

5jD 00 bu minimum- dollars nsr bushel 
1631* 2J9Y1 Dec 3J914 UOVl 

1741* ZB7 Mar 3J9 129 

4_o2 2a May anv. irav, 

172V* 263 Jul 2831* 285 

US 2fl StP 2at* 285 

385V* 253ft Dec 295ft 2*7 

Ext. Soles Pnra.Salas 11856 

Prev. Dav Open I nt. 29J88 off 728 
CORN (CS 77 

5800 bu mini mum- dal tars per bushel 
295 214ft Dec 239ft 280ft 

277 2241* Mar 280U 281ft 

2J1U 231 Mav 242ft 283 

286 233 Jul 242ft Z42ft 

270 224ft Sep 231ft 232 

235ft 220ft Dec 228 228ft 

274ft 232ft Mar 23S 235ft. 

Ed. Sales Prev. Sales 35382 

Prev. Day Open tnf.T 4X788 off 2377 
SOYBEANS f CET) 


7.7S 

3X0 


ft 

530 

538 

5JB 

— X4 

9X3 

3.14 

Mar 

+23 

+06 

6X8 

— X9 

7.15 

338 


Ul 

+41 

+20 

+22 

—.15 

+70 

179 

Jul 

AX 

634 

+35 

+35 

—.15 

632 

424 

Seo 

ft 

+40 

+40 

+S3 

—.15 

+96 

4X2 

Oct 

+79 

+43 

+63 

— .13 

7JS 

6.25 





+76 

—.13 

733 

441 

Mar 

7J| 

7JS 

7J4 

7J4 

-.11 

Esl.SoteS 


Prav.Sales 

+452 





1251* 127V* —ill ft 
325*. 327ft —aft 
205ft 107ft -81 

28114 284 +.01 ft 

282ft 2a +8114 
29514 2SSft +JJlft 


280ft +8314 
240ft +81ft 
241ft +aft 
280ft -^07 ft 
23114 +JB16 
237ft +811* 
235ft +82 


Prev. Day Oaen inf. 94836 utviSS 
, COCOA (NYCSCE) 

' 10 metric tans- S pot ten 


EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

|B1 miniorvpfiot fOOoct. 

9217 8480 Dec 9186 9202 91.96 91.99 

. 92.74 86.10 Mar 97JS 9200 9153 91.95 

l 91.93 8673 Jun 91J2 91J6 91JD 91J2 

I 91J1 B7JB Sop 91A1 91 A5 9180 9181 

! «1J0 87 JB Dec 91.10 91.13 9189 91.10 

91 JO 87a Mar 9079 9082 9079 9079 

9069 88a Jun 9050 9053 9CL50 9050 

.9041 89 J9 Sep 9027 9027 9034 *0J3 

feat Sales Prev. Soles 15 32B 

(Prev. Day Open lnt.160831 oHSS 


18S30 18700 
1.4410 18590 
18320 18490 


AM HAL .IflV IJ 
4W Halifax 84a 3 
l 1 * Holml 

61* Harnptl .9311 LI 8 
21ft HnOymn 85o 2 9 
13ft Honfrds 50 15 16 
ft Harvev 

211* Hasars .IS 8 10 
26ft Hesbr pt 2M £8 
aft Hostine .40o 13 10 
Sft Him 

12ft HltfiCrs J8f 25 9 
Sft HlthCh 

Aft HlthEx 18 

Uft HeimM a 45 10 
10 Hetnlck .10 3 9 

r* Hflidor » 

3V. Hdient 
v i HelmP. 

3ft Henho 69 

lft Hlrairl 

9 ft Matron IS 

lft Hofmon 

7 HdII/Cp 24 13 7 

15ft HmeGn 
a Hmlnspf295 121 
lift Horml S 56 23 15 
6 HrnHor 
ft HrnH wt 

13V. HollPlv 130 93 16 
Jft haHPwl 
3ft HOuOT 74el7.9 
lift HounE 11 

16ft HubelAs .76 22 13 
UftHubdBS 36 22 13 
<Zft HubOl pf 206 33 
17ft HudGn AO 18 17 
61* Husky g 36 £2 


76 ft 
5 4 

86 2 
30 12V. 
323 lft 
5 27ft 
27 9 

10 !« 
SS lft 
73 13ft 
49 2ft 
13 14ft 
18 5ft 
16 11 
49 lift 
17 111% 
IS 26 U. 
173 17V. 
120 38ft 

“I % 

its ^ 

’i e 

1 7ft 
169 5ft 
5 Bft 
75 lift 
9 37ft 
229 26ft 
38 lift 
5x11ft 
403 14ft 
70 3Sft 
V 13ft 


6 5ft 
216. Zft 

i£k 

45 27ft 
14 1ft 
Z78 15ft 
3 40 W 


60 81* 
87 91* 

14 lift 
40 15ft 
UC 2 
136 3ft 

37 ft 

15 Aft 

2 Zft 
U lift 
6 Zft 

B 20ft 
732 Hta 
181 22ft 
243 24ft 

2 S IS 

50 18ft 
24 6ft 
626 4ft 

3 161* 
42 24ft 
IS 23ft 

3 62ft 
5 at* 
429 71% 


ft 

4 — ft 
2 + ft 

Uft— ft 
lft 

27 — ft 
9 

12V.— ft 
lft 

13V*— ft 
2ft— I* 
141% 

5Va— m 


lift + ft 
26V. + ft 
17 — V. 
37 —11* 
29 — V* 
3ft + 1% 

3 ft-fc 
19ft— ft 
28ft— ft 

51* + ft 
Sft— ft 
lift + ft 
36ft— ft 
26ft + ft 
11 W— ft 
lift + ft 
14ft— ft 
ISft 

13ft— ft 


73k 8 

Sft 538 + ft 
2ft 2ft — ft 

sft as + 1% 

25V. 25ft— ft 
a 27 —i 
1ft lft + ft 
15V* 35ft— ft 
40 40 

301* 30V* 

9 9 — ft 

14ft Uft + ft 

r «=tt 

14ft 14ft— ft 
lift IS + ft 
2 2 + ft | 

■S 

4ft 4ft 
2ft 2ft 
Ml* 141*— ft . 
7ft 2ft + ft 
201% 20ft 
34ft 25 +1% 

221* 221* 

24ft 247k + ft . 
7ft Tft 
ft ft 
ISft 181* + ft 
4 4ft + ft 
4 Aft + ft 
141* 16V*— ft 
23ft 23ft— ft 
23ft 23ft— ft ! 
62ft 62ft —lft 
Sft aft + ft 
Aft 6ft— ft I 


10 

i 28 10 9 


Uft 13ft + ft 
lft lft— ft 
9 9 — ft 

II* IV* 

7ft Tft— ft 
21a Zft 

oi* in* +i 

"Hit 

im in* 

17ft Uft— ft 
12ft T2ft— ft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
17ft 17ft 
a 22 + to 
19 19—1% 

56 56V* — ft 

a 2iv. 

Sft Sft 
12 12ft + ft 
151% 15ft + ft 
201* 20ft— ft 
91* 9ft + 1% 
2T% 22ft + ft 
41* 4ft + ft 

Sft Sft 
Bfil* 85ft— ft 
211%. 71ft— ft 
Uft 16ft— ft 
8ft 5ft 
19ft 19ft— 1* 
Uft 14ft— 1% 
261* 26V* + ft 

2 £ Slit 

151% 151%— Mi 
161% 161% 

17 17 — ft 

17 171k— 1% 

1916 19ft— ft 
lft lft + 1% 
171% 171*— ft 
8ft Sft + 1% 
lft 11* + ft 
Sft 6 + 1* 

7 71% + 1% 

'% N? ■ 

n»a in*— ft 


H Month , 
HtahLw Stock 

2ft lft 

sv* lft 

7 2V% 

718 Tft 
Sft +ft 
161% 101* 

77 60* 

IQft 6ft 
26** ISft 
16<* 121* 

4ft 74 
asft 17ft 
Sft 3 
UV8 7ft 
171* 12ft 
MW 13 

IM v* 

12ft Tft 
4ft 3*% 

22ft in> 

23ft ISft 
4o azv* 

221* 16ft 
34ft 301% PofpfE 
BU> 216 PuntaG 


7ft Sft 
Sft Sft 
20ft 15ft 
JO IS 
lft ft 
Uft 11 
10ft Aft 
17ft 16 
2ft 1U 
4ft 1ft 
ISft TOft 


OBI 

iumlw auoL Chi* 


36 188 M 
JD| 21 
150 28 12 
SB 18 
30 

-U 18 14 


36 

JO IA 13 
11 
581 

46 108 

140 93 4 
IS 

U0 53 33 
la 7.1 9 
4J5 11.1 
234 113 
437 1X4 


184 lft 1*1 
22 74 3ft 

44 61* 6ft 

'58 £ 1 

I 141% 14M 
7 76W J» 

61 7V. 7ft 

S IB ]£» 
I5ft 15ft 
23 3W 3ft 
27*6 2?*- 
38 3ft 3*4 

ia 121* « 

z ^ r 

\ k k: 

lflft io^ 
7 31% 3ft 

82 19ft WJ* 

73 S* SS* 

TOOK 3814 Kft 
J1 21 2« 

6 32ft 32ft 
10 S 5 


iM- »:• 
398— »%' 

,a-ft 

7 $ft7{? 
it + ft 
ISft + VtJ 
3ft 4C 

^ 

12 — ft 
lift + ft. 

a‘.% — v% 

kt&' 

191% + J% 
23ft— ft 
38ft— ft 
20*% + W 

32ft + .ft • 
S + ft . - 



4*8 JV. 
A -3ft 

Aft 3ft 

18S !S 

30ft 17ft 
Sft 116 
7 34b 

» 22ft 
331% Z2ft 
Bft 4* 

a i2*% 

291% 164% 


R 

J3t 5i a 

.12 3 48 

ja 43 a 

“i5 

1320 73 


TO 

10 

■10e 23 12 
JQ 18 IS 
JB U 23 
M A 79 


860X1 10 
f 86 22 


JO MM 
80 X6 13 


185 38 13 
10 


70 6ft 
10 31* 

3 20 
79 ISft 
59 Vi 
6 12ft 
a wft 

6 Uft 

25 2 

25 31% 

a 161% 

42 44ft 
SO* SO 

£ & 
79 5ft 
22 Aft 
1 10ft 
76 17 
21 191* 
101 II* 
63 AM 

7 261* 
1 2Sft 

131 81% 

m 19ft 
202 23ft 


61* 5}%- 
3V* 3W- 
20 30 • 
18 IS - 

ft ** ■ 
12ft 12ft- 

UW 1M4 
Uft 1«K% 

3ft SS’ 


54% Sft 
416 436 

10ft 10ft 
UW 16ft- 
19 U. 1914 
lft IV* 
Aft 6ft 
261% 2614 
25ft 25ft 
7ft 7ft- 
Wft T9g 
22ft 22ft 



3337 

1945 

Dec 

zfto 

2120 

3102 

2107 

—27 

2392 

1955 

Mor 

2200 

2214 

3)91 

2200 

—21 

2422 

1960 

Mar 

2255 

2265 

2250 

2248 

—27 

2439 

I960 

Jul 

2286 

2289 

2277 

2282 

—23 

2430 

2023 

Sep 

2305 

2305 

2305 

2304 

—22 

2425 

2055 

Dec 




2315 

— 23 

2385 

2029 

Mar 




2325 

-23 

Est. Sales 


Prev.Sales 2X09 





CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

S Per dir- 1 point eoiKUsSQJMOl 


7546 

J00A 

Dec 

7250 

7260 

7245 


+4 

J504 

4981 

Mor 

7231 

.7342 

7234 

+2 

-7X60 

-7070 

Jun 

.7217 

7222 

7315 

7220 

+1 

J3D3 

.7174 

Sep 

7200 

7317 

7200 

Tan 


7568 

7195 

Dec 

7195 

7)95 

.7195 

7190 



6J9 478 
782 485 
739 489 
688 497 


478 Jon 488 4.93ft 

48514 MO r 4J5ft 49914 

439 May 533V* 508 

497 JuJ 509 5.14 


498V* Aug 5.10 S.13 


Sep 505 506 

NOV 5071* 5071* 
Jan 5.16ft 518 


6371* 5191* Mar 

EsI. Sales Prev. Sales 30000 

Prev. bay Open lnt. 7X738 Off 427 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBT1 
100 long- da Iher* per tan 
18400 12580 Dec 14050 14X50 

16300 1Z700 Jan 14000 14130 

20650 13000 Mar 14050 14030 

14X50 13X50 May MUD M)J0 

167 HO 13430 Jul 14130 14X30 

15X70 13530 AW 14230 14X00 

1A73Q 13530 Sap MX 00 UXOO 

14930 13630 Oct 14130 14130 

15030 KMOD Dec 14230 14X30 

15030 13630 Jan 

Est.Salaa Prev. Sales 14618 

Prev. Day Open inL 4X389 up 598 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT3 
40303 1 to- dollars per 100 lbs. 

2935 1SU Dec I9JB 1980 

29JJ7 1832 Jan 19J9 1980 

3860 1938 Mar 1988 1988 

37A5 19J5 May 1935 1975 

25X5 1986 Jul 1935 1935 

25.15 1988 Aug 1936 2030 

2435 1955 Sep 1930 1935 

2230 1950 Oct 

21. W 1950 Dec 1930 30-10 

21 AO 1980 Jan 

Ed. Sales Prev. Sales 15359 

Prev. Day Open lnt. 0789 w»479 


437 432 

494ft 498ft 
532 537ft 

SOB 5.13ft 
530V* 5.13 
504 506 

535V; 507ft 
5.161* SIB 
S29 


Prev. Day Open Ini. 1BJ19 offS76 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

ILOOO us., cents per lb. 

19030 uixo Jan II17S IU60 

17750 11X50 Mar 11400 11440 

16X50 11195 Mav 11490 114BS 

15750 11180 Jul 11500 11530 

1B050 lllOO Sec 11X50 11150 

11425 11150 Nay 

11300 11300 Jan 

161 JS 11150 MV 

Est Sales 600 Prev. Sales 467 

Prev. Day Open lnt. 4740 up 93 


COPPER (COME7U 
f 25300 Ibs^ cents per lb 


11280 11285 
11330 11380 
1050 11400 
11485 11450 
11X53 11X00 
11220 
11280 
11280 


14280 +120 
14180 +110 
14070 +150 
74IJD +180 
141-50 +120 
141.50 +1J0 
14050 +130 

;ss ts 

141J0 —JO 


4070 

6030 

NOV 




4045 

—40 

84J5 

5850 

D0C 

(0JK 

6150 

6875 

(875 

—40 

14-20 

5875 


41X0 

61X0 

61X0 

6IXS 

—40 

flft.QO 

5970 

Mar 

61X0 

4240 

6150 

6145 

—40 


40X0 


6Z15 

4245 

AIM 

.r 

—40 

7440 

6035 

Jul 

4245 

63X0 

6230 

TTti 

-40 

70.90 

6890 

Seo 

62X0 

6X30 

6255 

H 


71L30 

7030 

fl* 

Dec 

6X25 

(170 

(X20 


67X0 

6255 

Mar 




6X55 

67 JO 

6290 

May 




6X90 

—40 


6X25 





6470 

—.40 

6440 

6158 

Sep 

Mm 

65X0 

45X0 

6450 

—40 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 15J41 





Prev. Day Open lnt. 79J65 up 1.03 
ALUMINUM (COMEX1 
40300 Jba - cunts pee lb 


Est. Sales 1J10 Prev. Sales 1J29 
Prev. Day Open lnt. 7837 UP 280 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

S Per franc- 1 oclnt eouafs EUKWI 
.1X770 -09670 Dec .12350 .12850 .12850 .12180 

.12750 .10995 Mar -I2S30 

.12665 .121® Jun .13780 

Est. Sales 4 Prev. Soles 17 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 189 VP 12 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

Seer mark- 1 pobii equals S03001 
J912 J971 Dec J900 3339 3896 J933 

J94S J040 Mar J93S J974 J931 3967 

3979 3335 Jufl 3964 .4004 2964 .4001 

J975 2762 Sep AO50 8050 8050 4041 

Est. Sales 3X201 Pf*V. Sale*. 71J44 
Prw. Day Open lnt. 54652 up S30 
JAPANESE YENUMMJ 
Sner yen- 1 paint equals S0300Q01 
300186 303905 Dec 304958 3049H 3049S7 JXM9H 

304993 304035 MV 304968 304996 304966 304988 

305003 3042a Jim 304986 305010 004985 303X8 

004320 MI690 Sc a JXSC19 

004985 30415a Dec 30SU8 

E*t-Saies 17517 Prev. Sales 12300 
Prow. Dav Open lnt. 39J24 off 116 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Sper franc-1 point oauols SO 300! 

87M 2531 Dec 8756 8804 87S3 8794 

8831 3835 iftir .4800 .4552 8799 .4841 

.4875 8190 Jun -48SD 8895 8850 .48EH 

8860 8790 Sep 8940 

Est.Sala 23.938 Prev. Sales 14535 
Prev. Day Open Inl. 35J10 up 289 


I 31% 
551* 33ft 
7ft 1 
4 2ft I 
7 3ft 

3ft lft 
2ft ft 
40ft 30ft 
Uft 5 I 
23ft lift 
Tft (ft i 
3 21% I 

13 7 I 

U 10ft . 
4ft 2ft 
(ft ft I 
11 3Vi I 
lift 9ft I 
7V% 3V* . 
Aft 11* 
fft 4 I 

ioft m i 

10ft 2ft | 
23V* 13V* i 
41 25 . 


II 3 
8 327 

in in 

13 

92 

.12 25 10 

-12e 15 1281 

148 

1 180 216 
6 U 
JO 13 21 131 


51% 51% 
52ft Slln 
lft lft 
Aft 4 
Bft Bft 


39 38ft 
tfft 69% 

zn* 20 V* 
lft ift 
2ft 2ft 
12ft 12ft 
15ft 14ft 
Sft 3ft 
ft ft 
Tft 7ft 
10ft 10ft 
4 Vi 4ft 
31% 31% 
Sft Sft 

a* as 

3ft 3ft 
21V* 20ft 
341* 341% 


51%— 1% 
53ft + ft 

m + 1% 

4 

8ft + ft 


39 + ft.l 

T&- ft 
Ift + ft 
2ft + V% 
12ft 

Uft + ft 
3ft- ft 
ft 

7ft— ft 

10ft 

41* 

3U + ft 1 
Bft— ft 
391 + 1% 
Sft— ft 
21ft + ft 
MV* + ft 


J 

JOb 48 11 


16ft 11 Jodvn JOb 48 11 

7ft 5ft JoccfK 13 

4ft 2ft Jet Am ? 

1>% ftJefAwt 
9ft Sft Jetron XII 9J 13 

6ft 2ft John P d 

1176 S JehnAm JO 58 8 

lift 6 John I rid J 

Aft 2ft JumPJk 22 


24 lift lift lift— 1% 
84 Sft Sft Sft + ft | 

1 ^ M 

I TVs 7ft 7ft + 1% 

52 3ft Sft 3ft— U. 

52 5ft 5ft Sft , 

36 IV* Bft 8ft — ft 

63 Sft 3ft 3ft + ft 


19.13 19JA 
19.15 19J0 
19X5 19J7 
1950 1980 

19 JO 19M 
19J8 19X5 
19X0 19X5 
19X0 
19X5 20-10 
XUS 


7860 

41X0 

NOV 

Dec 

44J0 

7650 

4470 

Jan 


7160 

4Z90 

Mar 

S3 

(+75 

4420 

Mov 

6X45 

4450 

Jul 

4+50 

52.10 

4+90 

Sep 


49.10 

4895 

Dec 


5X35 

4940 

Jan 

Mar 

Mav 


5830 

50X0 

Jui 


5150 

5150 

Sep 


Est. Sates 


Prev. Sal «s 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 


67X5 3SJM Dec 67X8 67JS 

67.45 54X5 Feb 63J0 64J7 

67J57 5530 APT 6180 6230 

66J5 56JS Jun 6182 6X15 

6580 55J0 Aue 59S0 6050 

6080 5750 Oct 5b50 5V JO 

65J0 59.10 Dec. 6060 60.70 

EaL Sales 20239 Prev. Sales 25X86 
Prev. Dor Open InL 65X82 up 685 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME1 
44X00 lbs.- cents per lb 
7980 60-50 Jan 6675 67^ 

7170 6062 Mar 6730 6BJ» 

71JD0 6060 APT *6X0 6735 

70JXJ 40.10 May 6570 6570 

(830 65.10 Aua 66X0. ,6660 

ESI. Sales 1X88 Prav.Sato W05 
Prav. Dav Open ML 10X14 up 169 
HOGS (CME) 

30X00 ub^ cent* per lb 
50X5 3635 Dec 47X5 47.90 

50.47 38.10 Feb 4450 47X5 

47J5 3412 Apr 4160 42.40 

49X5 39J0 Jun 4365 44.15 

49X5 «85 Jul 4170 4435 

51X0 40X5 AUO 4X30 4360 

41- 10 38JJ7 Oct 40X0 4083 

42- 50 30J7 Dec 40X0 *1X0 

41X0 4080 Feb 4075 41X0 

Est. Sates 6X61 Prev. Sated 7,166 
Prev. Day Open Inl. 28.187 up93 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38X00 lbs.- cents per lb 
76X0 5575 Feb 61.90 63X2 

75.40 5565 Mar 62X5 43X5 

7560 57X5 MOV 63X5 6102 

76X0 57 JO Jul 63-50 6495 

73.15 55X0 Aua 61JS 6X25 

EsL Sales 5X54 Prev. Sates 3X00 
Pray. Dav Open Hit. 4633 up2M 


COFFEE C (NYCSCE) 

37600 lbs.- cents per lb 

16660 129X5 Dec 157X0 15860 15651 15860 

167X3 12850 Mar 162X0 1(360 161a 163.19 

16750 131X0 May 16460 16680 163X0 16630 

16965 13150 Jul 167X5 1*9.10 167.20 169X2 

171 60 13X75 Sen 170X5 171 JO 170XS 17137 


Currency Options 


.Hoc. 26 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
option B Strike 

Underlying Price Cali*— Last Puts— Last 

Dec Jan Mar Dec Jcei Mar 
12609 British paands-cants eer imtt. 

BPoand 1» 1760 r r r r r 

147-24 J35 r r r c r 0.75 

147X4 140 760 r 760 0X5 r 1X5 

147X4 145 XflQ r 4X0 060 1.70 4X1 

147X4 IS 065 1X0 175 3J0 t r 

147X4 155 0.10 r l JO r r r 

jUSaeCc— dlnp pellar i c a ms per unit. 

CDollr ta r x r r s 0.10 

7160 73 0X9 r r r r r 

7240 74 0X1 r 023 161 r r 

SUM west German Marks-centa per anil 
DMarh 2* » r r s r 

3933 33 SSI * r r i r 

39X3 34 r s 563 r s r 

SS 35 435 r 460 r r r 

39X3 76 3J3 r r r r r 

SS 37 X32 280 2X7 0X1 r 08 

SS 38 TJ3 165 Z16 004 016 063 

»X3 3* 062 0-0 181 0X0 044 r 

39X3 40 0.14 082 1X0 ON 1X8 r 

FFranc 130 0.75 r r r r r 

6X30X90 Japanese Ven-lOCHa of a cent ebr antt. 

JYen 43 r 662 r r r r 

4939 66 r r 3JS r r 0.10 

49X9 47 ZB0 r 26S r 0X2 0-1 S 

49X9 48 1X2 1XB ZU 0X3 r 0X3 

49X9 *9 tt.9* L» 12 J" 18 OX 

49X9 SO 0X8 066 O.90 060 r r 

4Z6M Swiss Francs-centa per eatr. 

SFrenc 40 778 % r r s r 

4763 41 4X7 * * r s r 

4763 43 467 r r r r r 

4763 45 267 r r r r r 

47S 46 ZOO r Z79 0X2 r 068 

4t£ a IX W Ul 0.14 oxl r 

4763 48 084 060 168 r 0X6 r 

Total call VOL 17X88 Cali ones lot. 20C119 

TSSJSJtwdL LK7___ Pdf Open lnt. 166X3S 

r— Nat traded. »— No option otterad. 

Lagf is premium (purchase artee). , 

Source; AP. 


Prey. Day Open In). 1,959 off 8 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5X00 Iroyaz.- cents per trav ol 
62SX *026 Nov 

12306 5906 Dec 4280 (Z76 

12166 5W6 Jon 4306 *316 

11936 M76 Mar 6406 6416 

10486 4196 May 6476 6496 

9*56 6296 Jul 4576 *576 

9406 6216 Sep *666 6676 

799.0 652JS Dec 4B1J7 481 J 

7B9X 664X Jm 

7706 6706 Mar 49SX 6JSX 

7526 6826 MOV 7016 TOLD 

7466 6956 Jul 7126 7156 

729X 6496 Sop 7346 7345 

Est. sates 18X00 Prev. Sates 3QJ09 
Prev. Day Open lnt. 90X93 UP 2609 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 trav az.- dot kxs per troy az 
334.00 33060 Dec 

37150 25750 Jan 32558 355 SO 

36250 26450 APT 3S760 157X0 

36660 27360 Jul 35960 36CJ0 

3*960 30360 Oct 36450 36460 

37160 34760 Jan 3(860 JiOS 0 

Est. Sales 4873 Prev. Sates AXIS 
Prev. Dav Open lnt. 18,112 up 37V 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

1C® troy iK- dollars per ax 
14160 9160 Dec 104X5 104X0 

12760 91X0 Mar 10425 106X5 

11460 9160 Jun 10760 10760 

11560 9770 SOP 109X0 109X0 

1 1060 104X0 Dec 

Est. Sales , Prev.SaleS 7363 
Prev. Dav Open lnt. 7X54 up 341 
GOLD (COMEX) 

1 00 troy oz- dal I ors per tray ai. 

33260 321160 Nov 33770 331X0 

48960 30160 Dec 331X0 UZ50 

Jan 

Feb 33*80 33490 
Apr 339 J® 340X0 
Jun 344J0 345X0 
Aua 3 XL® 348-90 
Oct vn ai vn <ui 
Dec 358X0 358X0 


Apr 36460 36450 36450 
Jim 

Aua 37360 37860 377X0 
Prev-Soles 50290 
lnt. 126692 up 3600 


43X5 
43.10 4365 
4425 
44X0 45J10 
4560 45X0 
4450 4460 
47X5 

4885 


0*3 
6216 4246 
6300 429.1 
4K6 437X 
6456 6466 
4546 4547 

4426 4419 
4736 6782 
*rtn 
6945 6927 
7016 7026 

7126 7138 
7345 7345 


351X0 352.10 
35460 35490 
35960 35U0 
36860 »1X0 


16360 102X5 
10360 10485 
104X0 10410 
W7X5 107X5 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130600 b«L tt.-J per 1X00 bd. ft. 

18760 13140 Jan 14580 144X0 

19560 13970 Mar 151-50 151X0 

17680 145X0 May 15560 15690 

18360 14960 Jul 159X0 14160 

17*60 15250 Sep 14110 161X0 

181 JO 15650 Nov 1(230 142.40 

1(4X0 144X0 Jan 14760 14760 

Est. Sales 790 Prav.Scles 807 

Prev.Day Open lnt. 4859 up 5 
COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

50000 lbs.- cents per lb 
7360 5761 Dec 61X0 4160 

7475 5877 Mar 6170 41X4 

70X0 5190 May 42X5 62J0 

7065 58X0 Jul 60X5 4025 

4L50 S2.40 Oct SUB 5415 

59X5 50X5 Dec 51X0 51X5 

44X5 5230 Mar 

Est. Soles 2JOO Prev. Sales 2X18 
Prev. Dor Open Inf. 21370 off 154 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

40X00 gal • cents per aal 


9X5 7965 
6.KJ 76.10 


Est. Sales Prev. Sates 15.774 

Prev. Day Open InL 3L917 off 1.125 
CRUDE OIL (NYME) 


9815 

69.15 

Dec 

9875 

69 JO 

Jon 

9815 

7800 

Feb 

85X5 

6850 

Mar 

00-30 

6+00 

Aor 

7+98 

68X0 

MOV 

7SJ9 

71X0 

Jun 

7X35 

7140 

Jul 

7+15 

7070 

Aua 

7X50 

7725 

Sea 

7250 

7130 

Oct 

Dec 


144X0 146X0 
150.90 15160 
155-50 15630 
159X0 14070 
14260 163.90 
16230 14460 
144X0 147X0 


41X2 4130 
4181 4177 

6168 42X0 
60X5 6017 
6405 54X9 

51X5 5167 
5227 
52X2 


8885 8899 
88X5 89X7 
88X0 8027 
in 75 mg 
7860 71*3 

7650 7S5C 
73 JO 7460 
74X0 74X0 

7360 7360 
7333 
7365 
X5 


39- * 31ft 
ift 2ft 
Uft 10 

ft ft 


14ft 10U 
ai* 22ft 


2ft lft 
3ft 11* 
4ft 3ft 
72 12ft 
3ft 13ft 
14ft 8ft 
13 Bft 
Z7ft 16ft 
9ft 2>% 
34 V« 20ft 
7ft ift 
J4Vk 9ft 
3 lft 


KnGspf 460 11X 
KnCp C jo 16 


tCeyPh JOI 74 

KevCa 9 

KkJdcwf 

Ktaork 

Kirby 

KHMfo _ 15 

KleerV 62r .9 
Knoll <5 

KooerC 232 87 95 


LSB 

LoBora 

LoPnl 10 

LndBne X0 18 12 
Lndmk 80 26 8 
La*?r 70 

Ucuren 18 

LearPP 3X0 1L7 , 
LeePh 13 

Lehigh s 88 13 11 
LelsurT 8 

LbtFPh 60 IX 10 
UleRst 



620z38fe 

381* 

38ft- ft 

2 

70 

3% 

Sft 

3ft + ft 

9 

2 

131% 

13V* 

13ft + ft 

11 

19* 13ft 

lift 

13ft 

14 

56 

im 

10ft 

10ft— ft 

18 

16 

W’A 

18ft 

lift- K 

24 

815 

9% 

9ft 

9ft + ft 

9 

5 

Zft 

2ft 

3ft 


64 

3ft 

3ft 

Sft 


15 

3ft 

3ft 

Zft 


X 

Zft 

2ft 

.K + i% 

15 

1 

5ft 

Sft 

Sft 


15 

,2ft 

Zft 

% .. 

IS 

17 

15 

Uft 

14ft— ft 

95 

157 

Z7V* 

26ft 

26ft— 3% 


17 13 

20ft 181% 

iSS .S5 

rift m 
23ft lift 

10ft 7ft 
<9V. 33ft 
61% 3V% 


17ft 1JV% 
7ft Sft 


lift 41% 
12ft 8ft 


aft 14ft I 
221% 15ft 1 
12 416 1 

161% 516 < 
22ft 13ft 1 
27ft 10ft < 
Tft 31% 1 
7ft 41% 
2ft I 1 
24ft 14 1 

17ft 4V% 1 
14ft 8ft 1 


91% Sft 
15 lift 
13ft 10ft 
12ft 90k 
12ft 9ft 
12ft 9ft 
121% 8ft 
34 32 

aw so 

39ft 24ft 
24ft 191* 
2ZV% 17ft 
74VS lift 
34ft 19ft 
11 IV* 
23 17ft 

a« 15ft 

30ft lift 
19ft 14ft 
21 14ft 

au> lsv. 

21ft 17ft 
111% lft 
29 14ft 
411* 32ft 
431% 341% 

"ft 3 ^ 
43ft 32ft 
Bft 51* 
13ft 4ft 
13ft 4ft 
Sft Zft 
U 7ft 
lift 8ft 
451% 231% 
27ft 15V* 
2ft ft 
Uft 
13ft 
2W 
a 
13ft 
12ft 
4ft 
ft 
91% 

11 

ISft 


2X0 19,1 
2X0 UX 

14 

80b Z9 10 
■10 X 
X» 44 T9 
1X5 XX 15 
IJOe 47 12 
53 

JO 13 17 
-25r 56 9 
32 « ,* 

160 BX 13 
22 
7 


512 13ft 
62 lffft 
22 8V! 

31s 10ft 
ia la 
1 17ft 
109 15ft 
223 251% 
791 lift 
302 48 
47 4ft 
120 lift 
142 14ft 
1 17ft 
426 Oft 
19 91% 
123 Aft 
488 Aft 

J&3T 

1 3ft 
14 ft 
12 5ft 
90 10 


131* Uft 
ISft ISft + ft 
Sft Sft— ft 
IOVA 10ft +1 
17ft 17ft— 1% 
17ft 17ft 
ISft 15ft + ft 
251% 25ft + ft 
TOft 10M»— ft 
47ft 48 + ft 

4 -Aft + ft 
lift lift— ft 
16 U+lk 
17ft 17ft— ft 
7 8ft + ft 
8ft 9ft + ft 
ift 41* + ft 
31* Aft +1U. 
18ft Uft 
Bft 33ft 
3« 3ft 
ft ft— ft 

56% fft— 1% 

9ft fft— ft 


14 V 191* 191* 191* 

66 8 13 26 201* 20 70 

42 7 ft Sft 6ft— ft 
13 8ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
J4 1.1318 10 22%. 21ft 22Vk— W 

34 3 20 36 26 251% 25ft + V* 

16 4 4 4 

X5e 1.1 S Aft Aft Aft 

Till 

82 IX 17 6 251% 251% 251% 

.321 45 12 126 17 14ft 14ft— ft 

30 IX 27 1(87 13ft 12ft 12ft— ft 


.12 13 4 
160 105 
137 106 
1X5 106 
135 KL9 
12 106 
120 106 
04 111 
*06 127 
330 113 
267 107 
232 107 
264 106 
Z 62 10J 
1.12 108 
237 107 
2X5 1Q6 
260 106 
7J6 707 
2JB 11.1 
2X4 106 
232 113 
1X9 10X 
124 43 11 
480 11.1 
*60 116 
4X5 10X 


50 

32t 9.1 11 
80b AX 13 
X0 28 11 
130 43 II 
35r667 
1X0 78 9 
30 27389 

JB 36 
88 13 19 
7.70 93 


9 — ft 
14ft— ft 
12ft + ft 
lift— ft 
11V* + 1% 
lift — 1% 
lift + ft 
34 

32 + ft 
2M%— ft 
24ft + ft 
21ft + ft 
231* + ft 
24V* + ft 
TOft + ft 

19 + ft 

aft + ft 
10ft— ft 
2BK 

40ft + ft 

45 
ft 

43 +« 

7ft— ft 
4ft— ft 
10ft 
3ft 

9 — ft 

10 —ft 
24ft — ft 

_ 2Sft + ft 
ft ft 
24 U 34ft 
Wk- 
2ft 2ft 
26ft 26ft + ft 
12ft 12ft 
12 12 


fft fft + ft 1 
14 14ft + 1% 


lft lft 
lft lft 
Aft Aft— ft 
21 211% + ft 

2ov* aw* 

11 111% + 1% 

81% Sft 
18 18 — ft 

7ft 7ft— ft 
3* 34—1% 

71% TVk— ft 
29ft 29VS — 1% 
lft lft— 1% 


The Daily 
Source for 
International 
Investors. 



19ft 
341% 
20ft 
21ft 
13ft 

% 

9* 

111% 
31% 

9ft 
3ft 

2 % 
12ft 
<ZV% 

2 

£ 

7ft 

s& 

ft 
9 

Aft 
9V, 
7ft 

4 

3ft 

86 
341* 
Sft 

'T ft 

Uft Bft 
lift ‘ lft 
lift 8ft 
12ft 9ft 
14ft lift 
94 49ft 
M U 
231% 17ft 
75Vo 40 
BSM 41 
M 2ft 
7ft Aft 
lift Sft 
tft ift 
771* 451* 
Uft 7ft 
WU 4ft 
5ft 416 
Sft lft 
a 14 
lift Sft 
7ft 11% 
’ 3ft 
Zft 
111* 
21ft 
1* 
4 

lift 
Sft 
11% 
19ft 
3ft 
Mb 


fft Aft 
Uft ift 
10ft 4ft 
Uft 5ft 
31ft 13ft 
fft ift 
17ft 1M 
41% 2ft 
31% lft 
22ft 9ft 
771* 4»% 
4 3ft 
30ft TOft 
3ft 11% 
2N 97 
4W ift 
35ft 24ft 
lift Oft 
lift Sft 
Sft 2ft 
41% 4 
10ft 4ft 
38ft 2W 
20 7ft 
7ft 4ft 
20ft 149% 
3ft . ft 
13ft lift 
6Zft 5) 

29V* 22ft 




56 1.9 14 
38 

88 47 a 
.10 LB 

8 

83 U 10 

60 X 7 
.14 16 10 


24 13 
JMt 12 18 
J 111 

J4_18 

31 

sn 23 27 
701 

. IDt 17 
70 26 12 


41% 41e + ft _ 

a 1 
29ft 39ft 
Sft 3ft 

7ft 7ft + 1% ; 

SI* Sft 

81* 55 1 

94* 9 * 

23ft 23V*— ’* _ 

26V, 261*— ft - 
14ft 14ft , 

5ft Hi— V% " 
’»%— ft J 

17 171%— ft - 

Uft TOft-li'," 
5V* 5ft 
13 131%— ft 

33ft 33ft + 1% 
ioft left— v* 

691% 49ft— ft- 

* "tlt- 

4ft + ft'- 
5ft— ft - 
2ft + ft - 
114% + ft ' 
lOft " 

% 

uft + a. . 

5ft + ft 
in*— 8 , 
71* . 


08 IX 24 
BUionxB n 


js u 10 

.Me IJ 26 


88 Zl 13- 
84b U 14 


m 

5ft- 

1ft- 
19ft- 
10 • 
2 

4ft Aft - 
41% 41% - 
32ft 22ft • 
38 38ft- 

1ft lft 
Uft Uft • 
17ft 17ft • 
4ft Aft 
lft 11* ■ 

2 &^r 


J3t SX 42 HO Sft 5fe Sft 

.14 2J 30- IS 7 Aft 4ft 

931 5ft 51% Sft 

72 157 7ft 41% 7 

78 17 13 22 17ft 17ft 17ft 

7 11 8ft M Bft 

88 31 13 a- iK 15ft 14 . 

if 3ft 3ft 3ft' 

12 ffi » M 

n 489 12ft 12 IM 
7J9.117 19 J' TOft 70 70ft 
- 11 3T. Aft Aft 4ft 

JS 26 9 39 14M 14ft UR 

48 TV* iy* TV* 

IXOe 6 43 55CU2S 271 271 

26 Tfe Ife Ife 

60 1J 77 14 3Sft 38ft 38ft 

80 3X 15 34 .nib II 11 . 

..47 37. ■ 7ft 8 

697 3ft 3ft 3ft 

. 17 7 5ft Sft 5ft 

A *JS JS' JS 

170 TO 22H 27ft ZB* 

2 1249 lift 141% Uft 

J4t 4J 371 51% Aft 5ft 

267 146 36 M 171* 17ft 

17 134 I ft ft 

38 1» Uft 111% lift 

7X6 127 100z(l 41 41 

J91136 ,15 3 2ft 3 

34 192 151* 15* 16V. 

55 2ft 2ft 21* 

L8B 9J 1 29ft 29ft 39ft 


JB 1J B. 
X0 31 13 


±r 

>■ I. 

|: 


60 1J 17 
80 36 15 
..47 


J4t A_7 
1267 146 


m 

-j r 


■ (Contmned on P^e 19) 


ConmiwHties 


Close 

High LOW BM 

SUGAR 

Freticb francs per metric ton 


London 

Commodities 


High Low Bid Aek 

SUGAR 

Star! leg per metric tan 


Noe. 26 
Previa ea 


1419 

1400 

1405 



Dec 

1430 

1420 





144/ 

14S7 

1457 



May 

1JU 

1574 

I49f 



Aoq 

1530 

1515 





1565 

1565 

.1558 

1570 

— 12 

Vo 


1X00 bbL. donate per ML 
31.17 2+38 Jan 

3892 

389S 

3871 

3873 

—78 

3043 

3+25 

Feb 

30X9 

381V 

29-90 

2991 

—33 

29X8 

2413 

Mor 

29 J9 

2948 

29.12 

29.12 

—41 

2945 

2193 

APT 

2175 

21X3 

2841 

2850 

— 39 


72*5 


2812 

2818 

27X0 

27X0 

— 4B 

27X6 

2X78 


2755 

27X7 

2734 

27J6 

—42 

2753 

2AAS 

Jut 

2727 

7728 

27XS 

27X5 

—37 

37X3 

3+90 

Aug 

2*95 

27X3 

2+90 

2690 

—JO 

27X0 

2+00 


2670 

2470 

26X2 

2+65 

—.16 

3*73 

25.14 

Oct 

2650 

2+50 

3*50 

2+50 

— JM 

2+90 

1325 


2+30 

2+30 

2+30 

2630 

—33 

2+30 

25X0 


25JW 

2UM 

25X4 

25X4 

—J09 

3645 

26X5 


26X0 

26X0 

3+00 

2+00 

—13 

Est. Sate* Prw. Soles 1+316 

Prev.Day Open lnt. &548 up 1773 





Stock indexes 


I Finonciql 

US T. BILLS (IMM) 

*1 million- pis of 1D0 pet. 

9168 85X7 Dec 9195 93X0 

9166 8660 Mar 9Z.94 92.99 

92X6 8761 Jun 92X5 92JB 

9266 B860 Sep 9288 9260 

92X6 B9X5 Dee 92X0 92X0 

91.96 8968 Mar 91X9 91X9 

9189 9060 Jun 91X3 9186 

9187 90X3 Sec 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 4X00 

Prev. Oay Open fnf. 79J9B off 158 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

5100600 crln- eta & 3&ids of 100 PCf_ 
90-16 75-13 Dec 89-21 89-27 

09-18 75-14 Mar 88-22 88-30 

88-18 74-31 Jun 87-31 87-31 

87-24 00-7 Seo 

87-1 80-3 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 15652 

Prev. oov Open lnt 66665 off 1X14 
, US TREASURY BOND5 (CBT7 
(8 pct-siaunhms & M of l ao pen 
82 574 Dec 80-34 81-3 

80- ZS 57-5 Mar 70-17 79X7 

79-a 36-29 Jun 78-18 78-27 

75-77 36-39 Sep 77-19 77-39 


82 

57-8 

Dec 

B0-2S 

57-2 

Mar 

79-20 

56-29 

Jun 

78-77 

56-39 

See 

78-2 

5+25 

Dec 

77-8 

5+27 

Mar 

7+20 

6+12 

Jun 

7+5 

6+4 

Scp 

7+24 

62-24 

Dec 

7+24 

67 

Mar 

7+4 

EsL Sales 

6+25 

Jun 

Prev. 


76-74 47 Mar 74-4 7A-4 

164 66-75 Jun 73-25 73-25 

EsL Sales Prev. Sal esl 49 JR 

prev. Derr Open lnt J 19602 off 5620 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT) 

SI 000* Index-Pt, 4. 32nds of 100 pet 
89-30 81-17 Dec BBS 8814 

09- 1 80-4 Mar 87-4 87-13 

87-72 79 Jun B6-7 84-8 

BA- 50 79-10 SOP 

Est. Sales Prev. Safes 3624 

Prev. Day Q&on im. 10XZ3 uoZSS 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMMI 
SI million- PtSOt 100 PCS 
9260 8SJ4 Dec 97X6 9Z2S 

9ZA4 B6jS 6 Mar 9136 92 36 

92.18 96X3 Jun 9247 92X5 

91.79 B7X6 Sec 

9069 8864 Dec 9140 91X0 

90X5 8860 Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales _ 332 

Prev. Dav Open lnt. Mtf up 10 


9Z94 9265 
9164 9Z94 
9Z7S 92X6 
9248 9248 
9219 92.19 
9169 9169 
91X3 91X3 
91 J7 


89-18 89-20 
88-71 88-23 

8F2S 87-Z7 
07 
84-9 


80-22 80-37 
79-15 79-21 
78-16 78-22 
77-19 77-34 
76-39 77 
76-4 76-8 

75-17 75-10 
7*31 75 

7+14 7+17 
7+3 7+4 

73-34 73-25 


87-33 87-30 
8+33 86-26 
85-31 85-34 

8+28 


9Z26 9227 
9726 9226 
9201 92X2 

91X1 
9140 91X0 
01X9 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cents _ 

20290 175X0 Dec 301X0 301.90 

205.10 1 EC-30 MOT 20L50 204X5 

30660 18190 Jun 204.90 205X0 

2C7JO 187X0 SOP 206J0 206JO 

Est. Sales Prev.SalK 41941 
Prev. Day Open lnt. 10X23 OK2XR 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cents 

217X5 1B860 Dec 20740 317X0 

21 1-35 19060 Mar 210X0 21160 

21160 197.00 Jun 

214X5 20065 Sea 

E st. Soles Prev. Sales 4661 

Prev. Oav Open lnt 11X31 Off 504 
NTSfi COMP. INDEX (NYFE7 
points and cents 

117X0 101 X Dec 116X0 114X0 

110X5 10560 Mar IT7AJ I17.9S 

I2O60 106X0 Jun lia.90 11190 

lzoxo le&io see iifxs luxs 

Eat. Sales Prev. Sales 7X04 

Prev. Day Open ln|. SJ71 Off 716 
MAJOR MKT INDEX (CBT) 
paints ona eights 

277 349* Dec 2741% 376 

277ft 270ft Jan 27sta 27(1. 

2784k 271 Mar Z77Vo 277ft 

EsI. Sales Prrv. Sales 126 

Prev. Day Open lnt. 1X90 Off 46 


200X5 201.15 
203X0 mss 
204X5 20540 
20630 207X0 


30+80 30740 
209X0 21060 
21260 
314X0 


115X0 116.15 
117X0 11760 
11845 118X5 
11960 119X0 


774 2751* 

276ft 276ft 
276ft 277ft 


Commodity indexes 


Mood ITS. 

Reuters — 

D.J. Futures 

Corn. Research Bureau. 


Close 

flBJOf 

1.714X0 

121.95 

227.10 


Previous 

92X301 

1.717JJ0 

12)X8 

22&80 


Moody's : bose 100 : rec. 31. 1931. 

P - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Seo. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 

Chicago Board el Trade 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
international Monetary Market 
Of Ghtcoga Mermnflte Exchange 
New York Cocoa. Sugar. Coffee Exchange 
New York Cation Exchange 
Commodity Exdtanab New York 
New York Mercsittie Exchange 
Kansas Oh Board at Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


NYCSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


»/■» V, JW 191*. riv». UCTUCU 

sates: 111* lots. Open Interest: 26X73 
COCOA 

French francs per Ml kg 

2££ l-SH !S5 *' 840 —29 

MOT 1,910 1698 L994 1.999 — 27 

MOV N.T. tLT. 1.925 — — 15 

J/y N.T. N.T. 1.730 — —20 

Sep N.T. N.T. 1440 — —20 

Doe N.T. N.T. 1.940 — —20 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1.950 — —20 

Est. vql.: 14 late at 10 Ions. Prev. actual 
sates: 19 tote. Open Interest: <21 
COFFEE 

French francs per 100 kg 
Nov N.T. N.T. — ZO90 —10 

Jon N.T. N.T. — 2,105 —10 

Mor Z170 Z100 Z100 3,107 —36 

Mav 2.135 Z125 2.130 — -1J 

Jtv N.T. N.T. Z1«0 Z180 —30 

Sep Z225 2225 2J10 2X35 —12 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2X30 2X50 —10 

Est. yet: 37 lots of 5 tons. Prev. actuoi soles: 
7 kits Open Interest: 327 
Source; Bourse a u Commerce. 

i London Metals 


Nor. 26 

Close Previoes 

BW Ask Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 

Sterling eer metric tan 

£ P°J . 6KM0 65400 66860 M9X0 

Forward 67760 67760 k»260 69260 

COPPER CATHODES (Mlgk Grade) 

Sterling per metric tan 
SPOI 9*360 943X0 948X0 94960 

—,! 6aOT wtLS0 WJK 96750 
COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterllog per metric ton 
SPOI ?160 922X0 977JO 930X0 

Forward 94360 944X0 947X0 9S0X0 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ton 
Soot 767.00 Toeoo 243X0 264X0 

3,im ” tS * ®’-SB 272X0 

nlCftcL 

Sterling per metric ten 

Soar 2720X0 2730.00 3740X0 374560 

Forward 277060 278000 2770X0 2775X0 

Pence per troy ounce 

Seal 42460 475.110 425X0 437XO 

??raEn„rai 4374,0 ^ “ 

Sterling per metric tea 

Seal Sotc. Suso. — — 

Forward Susa. Suso. — — 

Starting per metric toe 

S001 39460 39S « 401X0 403.00 

Source: AP 


DM Futures 
0|>tions 

H Xeraibi «cri- trainer tt dmff cer nieri 


Not. 26 

Urlke Coils- Settle PnbrSento 

5?“* JOB Dee MOT Jim 

33 2J4 1XS 4X0 O0l 03 046 

2 2M 265 11X2 044 074 

2 Wf J -i? 2X5 0.1) 079 |J7 

*9 uXS 0*6 I6S 060 137 163 

41 0X1 0X1 1.15 140 IM Z« 

Edi mated total >ol N A 
Cods; Mon. »gL 7.102 open lnt. 4056 

pm : Mon. rof. 1497 open let. 3&KI 

Scarce; C ME. 


161X0 157X0 15740 157X0 16048 160X0 
165X0 16140 161X0 162X0 16440 1(4X0 
170X5 148 M MAX* 147X0 778X0 370X0 
174X0 172X0 170X0 171X0 17340 173X0 


COCOA 

Steiibio per metric ten 

Dec 1453 1437 1437 1X39 1462 146* 1 
Mar 1.700 1476 1476 1477 1J05 1X06 
May 1X19 14*6 1497 14W 1X36 1X27 
Jly 1X36 1X14 1X14 1X16 1X42 1X43 
sea 1XS2 1X35 1X34 1X36 1X60 1X62 
Dec 1X50 1,736 1X33 1X3S 1X55 1X40 1 
Mar 1X60 1X50 1X47 1X50 1X49 1X71 
Volume: 4471 lata of 10 tans. 

CQPFEC 

SteMne »er metric tea 
Nov 1X29 1X90 1X00 1X09 1X21 1X36 
Jan 1X65 1X30 1X« 1X41 1X71 1X72 
Mar 1,905 1X68 1X7B 1X79 1X13 1X14 
May 1X35 1X07 1X16 !X» 1X57 1X60 
Jly 1.963 1X30 1255 IMS 1270 1.973 
Sep 1,988 1,980 IMS 1.994 1X97 Z000 
Nov 2X10 2X10 2X10 2X20 2X20 2X25 
Volume: 4.155 Iota of 5 tons.- 
GASOIL 

U.S. dollars per metric too 
Dec 381 JS 378X0 277X0 278X0 28Z7S 28325 
Jem 27675 273X0 27375 273X0 278X0 27825 
Feb 270X0 26+25 26+25 26+50 27050 271X0 
Mar 2S075 25450 25+25 25450 258X0 25825 
Apt 244X0 244X0 244X0 244J8 Z47J0 34775 
May 238X0 23575 236X0 236X5 236X0 39X0 
Jan 233J0 23175 231X5 3140 33325 3375 
Jly 233X0 231 JM 231-25 232-SO Z3Z50 23275 
ABU N.T. N.T. 224X0 239X0 230X0 240X0 
volume: Z177 tats at 100 tons. 

CRUOE OIL (BRENT) 

Uj.doflws per barrel 
Jan 30X0 29.92 2975 29X8 30.10 30.15 
Feb 29-15 29X3 2SX0 29X1 29.15 2920 
Mar NY. N.T. 3825 2870 2810 2880 
Apt N.T. N.T. 27X0 2835 27X0 2830 
May N.T. N-T. 27X0 7750 27X0 2810 
Jun N-T. N.T. 2+10 27X5 3630 27X0 
Volume: 32 lota of 1X00 Barreto. 

Sources: Rrvters ana London Polrofeam Ex- 

chanpe ieasotl. crude dll. 





. 

L! 

Jo. Ire 

■asunes 


Noe. 26 j 
Dtgemmt Prev. . 

Offer BM YtaW YMd 

Lmealb bill 722 773 746 742 I 

(awetb HN 7X9 727 747 744 

1-rssr bm 745 741 7 JO 7X1 

Pre*. 

■M Otter YleM YMU 

30-vr. bend 99 7/32 99 9/32 9J5 9.97 

Source: Solomon Brother* 

Merita Lynch Treasury Mk 13344 
Cnanee ter ne any : + tun 
Average yield; 931 ft 
Source ; Merritt Lrnot 


Conoco Raises Grade Price 

United Press Iruernauoml 

NEW YORK — Conoco Inc. an- 
nounced Tuesday it vfl] raise tbe 
price of its West Texas intermedi- 
ate crude qQ. the domestic bench- 
mark. 65 cents to $29 a band, ibe 
highest once October 1984. 


Gmmoliities 


HONG- ICO MG GOLD FUTURES 
UJLS per ounce 

High 
Nov - N.T. 

Dec - N.T. 

Am— N.T. 

Feb _ N.T. 

Apl — 340X0 
Jim — N.T. 

Aug _ N.T. 

Oct -354X0 
volume: 27 
SINGAPORE COLO FUTURES 
U-SJPCTOBDCe 


High LAW Settle Battle 

Dec 33130 33130 32940 33130 

Feb N.T. N.T. 33X70 815X0 

volume: 60 lota of too az. 

KUALA LUMPtlR RUBBER 
Matayslaa cents per kSo 

_Oose _ Previous. 

BU AM EM «* 

Dec 177X0 178X0 177X0 178X0 

Jrn 17850 1793D 17B30 17930 

F»0 17930 BQ3B 17930 10030 

Mar 18030 18130 18030 18130 

Volume: 3 (eta. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
S ta gcpcre cents per iflio 

due Pruvtoas 

BU Aik BU Ask 

RSSlDeC- 15230 153X0 15155 15233 

RS5 1 Jan— 15430 155X0 1542S 15475 

RSS2Doe_ 14830 14930 148X0 149X0- 

RS5 3DeC_ 14630 14730 146X0 145X0 

R55 4 OeC_ 14230 14430 142X0 14400 

RSS5 Dec_ 13730 13930 137X0 139.00 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
(satoyskm rlnegttc par 35 teas 

ctase Itegwtiuas 

_ BU Ask BU AM 

One 70S 715 *95 704 

Jan 722 714 715 718 

Feb 732 734 715 728 

Mar 740 745 72B . 735 

API — . 745 750 738 740 

May — ; 730 760 720 740 

Jtv 720 7S0 710 730 

S«p 710 740 700 720 

NOV 7V) 7*0 700 736 

Volume; 10 lets of 2S tans. 

Seurat: Neuters. 


L S&P 100 

Index Options 


Mb MM M wk Jn Feb Mar 

MS - — — — 1/16. 1/16 - - 

IN Jtft 3fft — — 1/M J/16 1/M — 

175 m it 2m — in* l/it an* — 

i» uvi »■ isw n in* ib -wh m 

us p% m m m I* to ivuiyi* 

HB 5ft 4ft F* Tft ft lft Zft lft 

»5 lft » 4 4ft N Sft 4ft J 

X0 7/14 Tft 21/143 (ft 7ft 7ft — 

» irt6 ft an* ift - - - ISft . 

Total cafiteftne M7AS 
TOM COB own ftLSIUll 
ibbdpta votaBK 7*9*5 
TWstta f wmbdLEZaiT 

Mebltui Low 19346 CkmlMX + LB 
Source: CBOE. 


Cash Prices 


atmas 

Cemowdlty and Unit Tot /Sf - 

Coffee* 56nfas. I b ijs in 

Print doth 64/38 38 V*. yd _ +74 BjS v 

Irmi 2 Fdry. Phi h^, tan — - 3UL08 313X8* 

aap gyVr s* * 5 :; 

I |e»»&= tzSSfr 

ajtE.«.l.Basls.a)_ P _ 835 W' 

».S = ”i3s 7 JS* 

Source: AP. 34* 


835 MB 
99-MI M*» 

62S 1255’ 


DHWends 


fix. 26 J.’. 

Company Per Amt Pay Rec' 

INCREASED 

Q 36 1-27 12-27 ’ 

A JO 1-2 1>»“ 

Q 22 1-1 13-1*7- 

0 J3 2-7 1-17- 

q -*o "m SS: - 

1 * 

O 38. 1-1 1309. . 

INITIAL A ..-, 

Nattaaot Gypsum CO Q JB . 14 IB-W 

REVER5ESTOCX SPLIT . V- 
PC Quote Inc— Ftar-20 

SPECIAL ' . • 

Toledo Edtaan _ J2 U-a Qjgt- 



Behemla Inc 
GrrtriWtat Bbfbra 
Dycom Industries 
Mut tl bank Fnci Carp 
Unffed Industrial 


•a , ajs£ ' 

-• S* 12-20 

gcorp _ 90% M U-16 15 

rial - 18% 248 14*> 

STOCK SPLITS *x 


New Snatand EtactricSvs— 3-far-i . 
ytehoy Intet-teritnotoov — 4-for-3 

USUAL 



Pi Mcnf 


Source: _tlPI. . 


jCcralb^aB aStegrib oBc 


in 164 Counfries Axtsind 





t 












* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 









Voest’s Chief Quits as Losses Mount 


V. By David Hecmgcs 

■ : Aj ^tenuafottal Herald Tribune 

*mENNA — The director-gen- 
■ ~ •. ^ of Austria’s largest industrial 
concern, Voest-AJpinc AG, re- 
~_^^5igned Tuesday whea it was dfc- 
■ vJ^v^VIdsed that massive losses were cx* 
-^jr ^--Npected for this year. 

, Heribert Apfalier. 60, has led' the 

J*' ^ oasiooaKzed concern, which has 
- ■ than 70,000 wodcers, for the 
paSJ eight years. His resignation 

-C%g* toWed ^ implementa- 

. xion of a restructuring policy for 
■the company, based in Tina 

_.- t v A report submitted this week to 

- **- die holding company for ngtimai. 
;■ ! M enterprises, OEIAG, ajuiri- 

; - JMSS a deficit this year for Voest of 

- 4.Z bfflion schillings (1232 mffliai) 
, .'.'-following 6 billion sduUmgs of ac- 

cumulated losses for Voest-Alrane 
since 1981 . Mr. Apfalter had prcvi- 
• . " oosly announced a goal m mn 1 r<- fly. 
■ -j ; company profitable by 1987. 

■ Mr. Apfaher’s plan for getting 


Jnsoompany dui of .deficit by re- 
stnicturmg away from the tradi- 
tionaUron and sted sector toward 
such growth fidds as rmcro-dcc- 
tronics and plant construction has 
not paid off. 

A joint venture with American 


Hong Kong Has Deficit 
In Trade of $47 Million 

The Associated Press 

HONG KONG — - Hong Kong 
posted a trade-balance deficit of 
$47.1 million in October, after a 
surplus of $96 nriflion in October 
1984, the Census and Statistics De- 
partment reported Tuesday. 

Domestic exports in October to- 
taled $1.43 bilboo, down 105 per- 
cent from the like month in. 1984. 
Imports amounted to $255 billion, 
up 1.8 percent Re-exports totaled 
$8.43 balion, up 6.8 percent. 


Microelectronics Inc. for produc- 
ing large-scale integrated circuit 


difficulties and a venture with OKI 
Electric Industry Co. of Japan to 
malm large-scale* integrated circuits 
has foundered on environmentalist 
objections. 

The Austrian minister for na- 
tionalized industries, Ferdinand 
Lacdna, has made it plain that these 
massive inroads on tax revenues 
could so longer be accepted, and 
has insisted that Veen-Alpine num 
be out of the red by the end of 1986. 

Immediately after Mr. Apfalter's 
announcement. Voest announced 
that bis successor would be Rich- 
ard Kirch weger, 52, the head of 
MTurtbyr Linz-based company, Cbe- 
mie-Unz. Mr. Kirchwego- bad suc- 
ceeded in turning around that loss- 
ridden enterprise within two years 
and making it one of the star per- 
formers among Austrian national- 
ized companies. 


China Attracts 
$5Bfflionin 
Foreign Money 

Reuters 

BEIJING — China has attracted 
5536 billion is foreign investment 
between the start of its open-door 
policy in 1979 and September this 
year, Xinhua said Tuesday. 

It said fTvina signed contracts in 
the period for foreign investment 
worth $14.7 billion in 1*897 joint 

ventures, 3.408 cooperative firms 

and 109 farrign-ewped companies. 

More than SI billion of foreign 
money was invested in the fust nine 
months of 1985, 626 percent up on 
the year-earlier period, it said 

Guangdong province attracted 
$548 milli on in foreign investment 
in the first 10 months of 1985, 45 
percent up on 1984. it said. 

It quoted Chen Binfafl, vice gov- 
ernor of Fujian province, as saying 
that foreign investors will be ex- 
empt from capital construction in- 
vestment taxes. 


TmmcmnL 



Tu esdays 

AMEX 

Closing 


Tobias locfude tfte n a tion wtee prices 
dp to lt»e closing on Walt Street 
end Ho not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


Judge Says SCM 
May Sell Units 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — A federal 
judge ruled Tuesday that SCM 
Corp. . directors acted legally 
when they accepted a compet- 
ing offer and granted an option 
to sell two key businesses while 
fighting a takeover bid from 
Hanson Trust PLC, a British- 
owned conglomerate. 

U.S. District Judge Shirley 
Wohl Kram refused to issue an 
injunction sought by Hanson’s 
lawyers to prevent the rival pur- 
chaser, a group headed by Mer- 
rill Lynch, from exercising its 
option to bay SOM’s valuable 
pigment and frozen-foods busi- 
nesses for S430 million. 

Hanson contends that the 
businesses arc worth as much as 
5700 million and that it wonld 
have to abandon its takeover 
bid if SCM is stripped of them 
for less than they are worth. 
Hanson said it would appeal 
the judge's decision. 


Dollar Retreats in Europe and U.S. 


Untied Press fniemMonut 

NEW YORK — The dollar re- 
treated again Tuesday and dealers 
said they expected no immediate 
reversal of its gradual two- month 
slide. 

Much of the markets focus Tues- 
day was on rite Deutsche mark, 
which has risen less on a percentage 
basis than the Japanese yen since 
Sept. 22, when five major industrial 
powers agreed to bring down the 
dollar’s value. 

Since the last trading day before 
that agreement, the Japanese cur- 
rency has fallen roughly 12 percent 
from 242 yen while die mark is 
down about 8 percent from just 
above 2.88 DM. 

The Bank of Japan has denied 
that it has a target for the yen of 
200 to the dollar, saying only that it 
wants to stabilize the rate at a high 
leveL 

“People seem to be satisfied with 
a 200-yen dollar for the time be- 
ing," said Earl Johnson, vice presi- 


dent at Chicago's Harris Bank. 
"But the market is looking at a 
150-mark level for the dollar be- 
fore year-end." 

The dollar fell to 2.5420 DM in 
trading and closed in New York at 
2.5510, down from Monday’s 
25633 DM. Earlier in Frankfurt, it 
closed at 2.5689 DM, up from 
2.5640 DM on Monday. 

James McGroarty. vice president 
at Discount Corp. of New York, 
said that in addition to the “catch- 
up'’ factor, "the latest German eco- 
nomic numbers look pretty good 
on balance and people derided the 
mark is due to strengthen." 

Mr. Johnson said that U.S. eco- 
nomic statistics, on the other hand, 
“are showing a sluggish economy 
and there still are predictions of a 
discount rate cul The outlook for 
the dollar is decidedly bearish." 

The yen made less headway than 
the mark against the dollar, dosing 
in Tokyo at 201.10 yen, up from 


200,35 yen on Monday. Later in 
New York, it ended at 200.80 yen. 
up slightly from Monday's 200.65 
yen. 

In London, the pound closed at 
$1.4705, its highest level against me 
dollar since March 1984, and com- 
pared with Monday’s $1.4630 fin- 
ish. In New York, it ended at 
SI. 47 10 compared with SI. 4655 a 
day earlier. 

In other European trading, the 
dollar closed at 2094 Swiss francs 
in Zurich, down from 2.1015 Mon- 
day. It was fixed at 7.8285 French 
francs in Paris, up from 7.8140. and 
at 28925 Dutch guilders, up from 
18885 Monday. 

Late dollar rates in New York 
trading compared with Monday's 
late rates, included: 2.0915 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.1000; 7.7625 
French francs, down from 7.8080. 
and 1,722.00 Italian lire, down 
from 1.731.31. 


8%k Ml UflivRs 
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(Continued from Page 18) 


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LTV Upholding Steel Commitment Through Its Other Units 


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WorkWeor 


(Continued from Page 13) 
Bradford, an analyst at Merrill 
Lynch, called “a literal gold mine" 
— contributed nearly S2 billion in 
sales and $125 million in operating 
profits. 

LTV also has a small energy ser- 
vices unit, with sales of $647 mil- 
lion in 1984, which was marginally 
profitable last quarter, after two 
years of losses stemming from set- 
backs in the oil industry. 

For now, LTVs fortunes are still 
very much tied to those of the steel 
business, which is still sagging. 

Imparts ran at 26.2 percent of 
the united States market during 
this year's first nine months, down 
only slightly from 26.4 percent in 
1984, according to the American 
Iron and Steel Institute. Moreover, 
prices have declined 10 percent 
from their levels at the etui of 1 984, 
although there have been efforts 
recently by U.S. Steel to nudge 
ihwii higher. 


Mr. Hay said that LTV had 
made considerable progress in im- 
proving its sted operations — pro- 
gress that would have been more 
evident if foreign competitors had 
cut their imports into the United 
States market to 20.5 percent of the 
total supply beginning in October 
1984, as called for in their volun- 
tary agreement with Mr. Reagan. 

Outride experts agree. Mr. Brad- 
ford of Merrill Lynch, for example, 
said that LTV had achieved “phe- 
nomenal cost reductions" that 
could not have been equaled with- 
out efficiencies gained through the 
addition of Republic’s more mod- 
em plants. 

He estimated that LTV reduced 
its steel production costs by $18 a 
too in the third quarter and would 
have made money in steel if prices 
had not fallen by an average of SI 3 
a ton during the same time. “AD 
you need is for prices to stabilize 


and costs to continue to Tall for 
them to be in the black," he said. 

Although LTV lost S24.9 million 
in steel operations in the quarter 
ended Sept. 30. it was the best 
showing of the year for the steel 
division, and the' third consecutive 
improvement since a SI 52-million 
operating loss in the last quarter of 
1984. 

Over aH LTV lost $648.2 million 
in the first nine mouths, with the 
dosing of an aging plant in Ali- 
quippa, Pennsylvania, accounting 
for nearly $400 million of the total. 
The company lost $19.5 million in 
the third quarter, compared with 
S79.8 million in the period a year 
earlier. m 

Mr. Hay, and the former head of 
Xerox Corp.'s domestic operations, 
came to LTV as president and chief 
operating office in 1975. He be- 
came chief executive in 1982 and 
chairman a year later. He has 
moved to ease the company’s fi- 


7*4 + % 
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nandal squeeze by raising an esti- 
mated S 1 20 million so far by selling 
various units. Overall, he aims to 
raise S500 million within the next 
18 months. 

LTV has announced that it is 
negotiating to sell a steel mill in 
Gadsden, Alabama, to its employ- 
ees. The price would be about S50 
milli on. 

The company also swapped 
about S320 milli on in notes coming 
due between 1988 and 1994 for 
longer maturities. And it reached 
an agreement with Pension Benefit 
Guaranty Corp., a federal agency 
that guarantees corporate pen- 
sions, to stretch out payment of 
$175 million due in September to 
equal, annual installments for the 
next 15 years. 

LTV remains hi ghl y leveraged. 
Its debt as a percent of total capital 
climbed to 72 percent at tfae end of 
June, up from 60 percent at year- 
end. 


17 

.14 A 24 

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Soles figures are unofficial. Yearly fttolks ana laws reflect 
the previous 52 wm*s plus thr current wm4.exji not the latest 
fracing am. Where a ufir or steefa dividend amounting » 25 
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v— fradlnfl mttea. 

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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


PEANUTS 



BRAVE NEW WORKPLACE 

By Robert Howard 724 pages. SI 6.95. 
Elizabeth Sifion Books, Wang, 40 West 
23d Street, New York, N. Y. 10010. 

Reviewed by Herbert Mkgang 

A SPATE (or, rather, - glut) of books has 
come cot about management and corpo- 
rate life whose common message seems tope: 

.how to overpower yoor rivals by »i2c- 

as if they were stamped out by this same MBA 
cooMbaitter, thcycffex advice about every- 
thing from dressing for success to. applying 
military mwig in the company board room 
and marketplace. Their canny, commercial au- 



1 Vichy and 
Evian 

S Queen of : 

I Kings 10:1 
10 Nutmeg 

product 

14 Pope, in Assisi 

15 St.-John’s- 
bread 

16 Grandfather of 
Enos 

17 Nucleus locale 

18 Harshness 

19 Turns tawny 

20 Ofa set of 10 
22 Mary’s busy 

sister 

24 Not care 

for 

25 Uh follower 

26 Chief scene of 
Jesus's 
ministry 

29 Horsemanship 

32 Novelist 
Ehrenburg 

33 Vamoose 

35 "The mouth of 
a righteous 

man is a 

of life": 

Prov. 10:11 

37 Saturate 

38 Aviv preceder 

39 Aunt, in Avila 

40 Evaluation 
42 "Call Me 

."Berlin 

musical 
44 Attempt 

‘P* New York 


45 Fished with a 
large net 
47 Retort 

49 Month, to St. 
Dominic 

50 Portrayal 

51 Skim 

54 Glanced off 

57 Origin 

58 Rebekah's 
husband 

60 Kings who 
honored their 
King 

61 Deluge 
survivor 

62 Michael or 
Raphael, e-g. 

63 Second son of 
Judah 

64 Salvation 

65 City in the 1 
Ruhr 

66 Goose of Maui 

DOWN 

1 Nail or old 
plane 

2 Meat paste 

3 Revelations 

4 City built by 

King Omii 

5 Grates 

6 Acclaim 

7 Unit of energy 

8 Flourish 

9 Father of 
Judaism 

10 Apostle known 
as Levi 

11 A wife of Esau 


than the bustle os bustkar behind it, that t be 
customer no longer comes first. 

By contrast, tb^is somecold comfort ina 
book that raises questions about life in the 
corporate Utopias. Robert Howard, a scholar 
tram Amherst sad Cambridge wbo writes for 

1 a 


tnesc wn w naain t« 

I have deaded w some are now 

bonal oewnm e irts of 

allrapresentjosoi^^^jje 

santy the ssvs sotnethnqf-be- 

whar they ^. r ^ arin the boardroom atn be 

b> the U» -* 
ranks of the work plan 

Herbert Mitgeatg is on the staff of Ttety* 
York Times 

BEST SELLERS 


JSSSSSvSSXS. Weeks 00 «r a*-** 


28 Outward: 
Anat. 

29 Cheekbone 

30 Scene of the 
arrest of Jesus 

31 "Ash Wednes- 
day" poet 

34 Sea crossed in 
Exodus 

36 Behindhand 

41 Companion of 
Paul 

42 Lamb of God 

43 The Ascension 
was one 

44 Proverbs 
author 

46 Part of N.T. 

48 Spanish 
preposition 

51 Rude one 

52 Gad about 

53 Laborer of old 

54 Norman city 

55 Actor Richard 

56 Last Supper 
verb 

57 Nucleotide 
chain 

59 Farming: 
Abbr. 


ANDY CAPP 



OH, COME ON, PET, 
.1 HATE US BEING 
LIKE THIS— I'LL' 
APOLOGIZE 
IF NOU WILL 


WHYSHOULD I 
APOLOGIZE- WHAT 
- HA/E J CONE - 
7QG4Y? nothing 



, EXACTD/f THATS 
I WHAT 7HEFUPP/N* 
ARGUMENT 
WAS ABOUT 

dp 



WIZARD of ID 


Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



( -m>m hip his ft&mm -m ] 

WITH A C0m&&&T&U- 

iMtrATlOHCX&MAtfVM Ml 

) 

jlp^ j 





REX MORGAN 


philosophy in “Brave New Workplace * 
mg at several U.S. technological giants — 
among them AT&T, Eastern Arrhnes, and 
Hewlett-Packard — he finds dial, their com- 
puterized operations cause htuqan and, ulti- 
mately, corporateproblems. 

The author divides ins bock into three parts. 
In “The Computerization of Work," he tells 
how corporations use new technologies to ex- 
pand managerial, control at the expense of 
hard-won worker autonomy and efficiency. 
Looking at the underside of ^dehumanizing 
work mandated by managers, he mamtains 
that the drills, attitudes ^motivations trf 
woikezs are ccudal to week perf or mance and 
corporate success. 

a the next part— “The. Re-enchantment of 
the Workplace" — ■ the author finds Out a 
divided work force’s lower echelons consist 
mainly of women or ethnic minorities.. He 
deplores the severe health hazards cansed by 
toxic substances that maimfactuieraigtiore. In 
the fined part — “The Social Control of Tech- 
nology” — he pants oat that the workplace 
t h reat ens to tmdenmne such invitations as 
trade uxrious that have traditionally provided a 
counterweight to uncontroheid corporate pow- 
er. Aware that unions have not caiight upwith 
new technologies, he calls on them to have a 
voice in redefimng the values of the workplace: 

Howard believes the federal gover nm ent 
ought to do something about aO this. He sug- 
gests “new social legislaxioa designed to mstt- 
ftfrionainc more d w e tiv t m ec figniflii f far so* 
rial intervention in working life.” His solutions 
are vague but noble. A plosant fiono of notice d 
without outrage underlies “Brave New Work- 
place.'' To students of today s musical chairs in 

the executive suites, however, modi of what 
Howard has to say win come as no surprise. 


cowanne. 


FICTION 


T hi 


Lot W Mb 
MNUt 


THE MAMMOTH HUNT ERS, by Jon _ 
LA^^WOBEGON DAYsTby Gamw 

SECRETS, by 



THANKS FOR 
COMING 8V, 

SIS t WHAT DID 
PR. MORGAN SAV 
WHEN ' 

HIM Al 


! YOU’D BETTER NOT 
mention mental 

HEALTH > 



century. Some of the same plaints and com- 
plaints him up in, “The Jungle," Upton Su- 
dan's 1906 investigation of the Chicago stock- 
yards, and in the writings by other mbdendrers. 
The beat went on with Nelson Ajgrcain “Ou- 
cago: Gty on timMdre” and Wfflam Saroyan 
in his story “Aspirin Is a Member of the 
NJLA." (the New DeaTs National Recovery 
Act); both saw through the deadening pain 
caused by anporate manners and malfeasance. 


12 THE TWO MRS. GRENVZ UK by 
Dcwtoick 

13 SKELETON CRJEW, t 

14 THE CAT WHO W* 

Howard Fast — — 

NONFICTION 

1 ELVES. AND ME by Priscffla BmuBco 
P icjJcy with Sandra Hannon — r-- sr-.T 

2 YEAGER: An Autobiography, by Cbw* 

Yeager and Leo Janos — rr.-7" 

3 eSnoNG IN THE LIGHT, by Slnrtey 

MacLsme --- — 

4 IACOCCA: An Autobiography. by Lee la- 

cocct whb VfiJHam Ncrafc — -rr 

5 I NEVER. PLAYED THE GAME by 

Howanl Cosefl with Pfcter Bowwntre 

7 ONTm^JAD 1mHCTiARLESK.’uR- 

8 byRa^* G. Mar* 

thi ■ - 

9 GODDESS. bvAndMoySommcn — 


fj. Anthony Lo- 

tat ~ — — 

It FERRARO: My Scary, by Geraldine A. 
Feoaro with Linda Bins Francks 

12 SM ART W OMPL FOOLISH CHOICES, 

13 

14 A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE by 
Too Peten and Fbnr 

15 A LIOIT IN THE A’ 



*.10- 
2.20 
3 v 
ft' 56 

3 6 

4 S 

1 7 


Mri 


Ivi 


: 12 » 


Too Petanand Nancy Aoctia — 

HE ATTIC, by Sbd SOwr- 
Hem — —.142: 

ADVICE, how-to and miscellaneous^ 

FIT FOR LIFE by Harvey Diamood and W : 

Mari lyn D iwno ni t ■ ■ ■ ■ , ■ — R'K 

THESE CHAPPY) ATITIUDES, by Rob- 

5 3 
3-. 4 
2 'IS 
4. 32 


eriScMIer — 

CALIANETTCEbjOUattPinckocy with 

1 '■ -■ ■ ' 

WOMEN WHO LOVE TOO MUCH, by 

Rnhio Meawriai 

THE FRUGAL; GOURMET,- by Jeff 

ewAk ■ ■ ■■■y * ■. , 


BRIDGE 




GARFIELD 


*RuFF ms HIS ALLOWANCE IN DOS FOOD/ 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
|$ by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one loner to each square, to form 
lour ordinary words. 


TOANB 


_X1_ 



POANI 


m 

Ll_ 


KITSCY 


□znz 




Bjr Alan Tiuscott 

O N the diagramed deal. 
South began with a weak 
two-bid, and eventually settled 
in' four spades after West had 
scraped up a take-out doable. 
The three- spade rebid, by 
agreement, showed a six-card 
suit with maximum values 
since the par tn er shi p some- 
times ventured weak two-bids 
noth five-card suits. 

West led the heart king and 
could safely have continued 
that suiL He shifted, however, 
to dubs in the hope that his 
partner hdd the queen. South 
played the nine from dummy, 
overtook with the queen and 
took a diamond finesse. When 
tins lost, the defense reverted 
to hearts. South ruffed the 


GATHUC 


ICZC 

ID 


WHEN I7ENTISTS 
ARENTX THEIR 
PATIENT© ARE. 

Now arrange the dieted .tetters to 
tofm the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


tes cmnmni 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jwnbtes: CHOKE TRULY PALACE TERROR 
Answer: It could be the best Investment on earth!— 
EARTH 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Albans 

BarcetoM 

toferade 

Benia 

Brassed 

Budwrasr 

Budapest 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 
M 14 57 


II 

1 34 -2 
T9 Aft 13 
B 46 
4 39 

0 32 

1 34 
3 37 

2 3 
1 34 



Costa Dei 5M 

19 

66 

ii 

£2 

r 

1 


4 

30 

0 

.13 

fr 


ECS In burgh 

3 

37 

■i 

X 

a 

m 


10 

50 

5 

41 

r 


FranUort 


X 

•4 

25 

to 



1 

34 

0 

32 

a 


Hehtekl 

-5 

a 

-7 

19 

aw 

pi- 

Ittimbgl 

15 

Si 

9 

48 

r 

Op 

Los Pelmw 

S3 

73 

19 

66 

0 

On 

LIUmHI 

17 

63 

7 

45 

r 

ir 

London 

5 

41 

1 

34 

o 

Madrid 

« 

4B 

4 

3V 

r 

Wm 

Milan 

6 

43 

1 

34 

cl 

MOSCOW 

-5 

a 

-7 

19 

8W 

n 

Monies 

-1 

X 

-a 

a 

SW 

Nice 

10 

» 

4 

37 

d 


Oslo 

-I 

25 

-6 

21 

d 

PvSi 

Pori* 

1 

34 

1 

34 

0 

CD 

Prague 

-1 

X 

4 

a 

sw 

7 

Reykiavtk 

0 

32 

-2 

a 

0 

7 


13 

Si 

8 

46 

d 

<U 

Stockholm 

-2 

a 

-3 

27 

5W 


strasiMHira 

-2 

a 

-3 

27 

>0 


ASIA 


Bangkok 

Belling 

Hang Kong 

Manila 

tMwDftffil 

Seogt 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Tahtef 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

Aiders 
Cairo 
Cane Town 
CasattaBCg 


LOW 
C F 


HIGH 
C F 
3B 8ft 24 75 

9 48 2 3A 

23 73 20 AS 
32 90 24 75 
26 79 10 SO 
II S3 1 34 

10 *1 ft 43 

29 84 2S 77 
26 79 IS 59 
TS 59 8 46 


Lagos 

Nairobi 

Twits 


17 63 IT 52 
34 75 15 59 
27 81 17 63 
20 68 15 59 
X 86 15 


H 77 11 
19 66 I 


r 
d 
fr 
Sh 
59 Cl 
— no 
55 a 
46 a 


LATIN AMERICA 


BsemsAirts 

Caracas 

Uma 

Mexico Ot? 


24 75 13 55 
29 84 18 64 
27 B1 19 66 

25 77 5 41 


mods Janeiro — — — — no 


NORTH AMERICA 


Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zorich 


7 45 
0 33 
0 32 
0 


0 32 51* 
-1 X O 
32 -1 X sw 


MIDDLE EAST 

10 so 


A n chorag e 

At! ante 

Bastes 

Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 

Hanoi alu 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tei Aviv 

OCEANIA 


22 72 II 52 

22 72 W » 

23 73 IS 59 


17 63 13 55 el 

23 73 16 61 d 

a-eloudy; te-toggv: ir-telr; iwiail: 

sn- showers; sw-snow; st-styrmy. 


AacUand 

Sydney 


Los Anoeies 
Miami X 

Mtnnaapons *2 

Montreal . -4 
Nassau 26 

New York 9 

San Francfsee 16 

Seattle -2 

Toronto 0 

Wail! I rotor TS 

Oliver crai; pc-pvrtty 


25 -10 
73 13 
39 -2 
57 1 
46 -5 
52 1 
12 21 
81 21 
66 11 
82 21 
28 -0 
25 -8 
79 23 
48 3 
41 18 
X -7 
32 -4 
55 5 

dowdy; 


14 el 
55 d 
a r 
34 r 
23 PC 
34 r 
TO tr 
To d 
S3 PC 

70 PC 

18 cl 

18 fr 
73 fie 
37 r 
50 fr 

19 sw 
25 d 
41 d 
r-ram; 


WEDNESDAY'S FORECAST - CHANNEL: Modende. F RAM KFU ftT ; Foot V. 
Temp. -l — ix— a). LONDON: Shnwors. Twnn.4— 0 (39 — XU.MApRip: 
Overcoat Temo. 10 -S 150— 4TJ. NEW YORK: CteWtV- Temp. 15—4 (59-431. 
PARIS : Snow. Temn. 2— 0 (36 — 32). ROME: Rate. TOTP.K— 1^(54— ff .TTSL 
AVIV: NA- ZURICH: Forov. Teteft °—'2 m— a). »AHCKOIC: Show»ra. 
7enw.X— a (86— 73I.HONOKONO: Falr.T«r».»— MI77— 68 ).i«u«ila: 
cSJ^V. Toma 31 -24 (88-7 5). SEOUL: Foggy. 11-0 (32-MJ. 

SINGAPORE: Thunderslorms. Tamp. 29 — 25 »4 — 77), TOKYO. Cloudy. 
Temp. 14 — 4157 — 39). 


Wvrld Stodc Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Nov. 26 

Ckuiagpnces in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

AOflOfl 

Akzo 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A’Denti Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVG 

BuehrmormT 

Colond Hldo 

Etswler-NDU 

Fokfcer 

Gist Brocades 

Helneken 

Hooga va ne 

KLM 


Nat Neder 

Nedlloyd 

OceVanderG 

PokhoKl 

Philips 

(Inhi-ri 

rwucvu 

Rodamco 
Rnlbico 
Rorento 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


aase Pm. 

“eSo 

249 233 

HIM 11470 
13AOT 13880 
74J0 74J0 

B0 81 

905 905 

100.7D 101 JO 
255 253 

116 ntso 

2850 29.10 
in 17020 
74 76 

242 241.50 

20880 ajlja 

74.90 7390 

S *590 

„ SB 57.10 
SIX 81.10 

SI SI-** 

379 37850 
7820 7830 

5430 5380 
BIX B1.40 
13320 13870 
7350 7890 

47.40 4750 
18820 18450 
38150 38450 

36 382D 

2S850 254 

27250 277 


ANPJCB5 Goal Index : 23LM 
previous : 23730 


| Close Prov. 

Hochtief 


Hoechst 

259 26090 

HDOSCh 

166 169 

Horten 

233 m 

Hussal 

417419JD 

IWKA 

310 31 7 JO 

Kail + Sail 

3Z7 32950 

Karatadt 


Koufhot 

338 345 

Kloecfcner H-D 

320 324 

Kloedcner Work* 

MJ» «jg 

Krapp Stahl 

168 168 

Unde 

590 60250 

Lufthansa 


MAN 

196 19550 

MarmcsRKinn 

2*9 272 

Mucndi Ruedc 

2400 2200 

Nlxdort 

55X50 56050 

PKI 

795 703 

Porsche 

1290 1305 

Preussaa 

243 248 

PWA 


RWE 

19620 20050 

RhoEnmotall 

490 500 

Sdierlng 

654 6*3 

SEL 

30650 34250 

Stamens 

663 67050 


17550 179 




txrjin.il 

Wella 

685 67950 

i CBBinwnbtwfc Index : 176X6* 

Fravtaos : 17M50 


1 MKoaK { | 


finmb 


Arbed 

BekcKrt 

Cockerlll 

CotMaa 

£BES 

GB-lrawBM 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Hoboken 

intercom 

Kredletbank 

Petrodna 

Soc Genera l* 

Safina 

Soivar 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

VtoineMontegne 


2700 

8 m 

212 

4650 

3950 

5040 

27X 

SIX 

5620 

3000 

12400 

703a 

2370 

8400 

6400 

5300 

BOD 

2250 

5840 


2758 

5300 

317 

4590 

3985 

51X 

2740 

5140 

5650 

3050 

12400 

7040 

2400 

8420 

6590- 

5350 

5680 

2280 

SKU 


Csrreat Stock Index : 298U8 
Previous s 298836 


AEG-Tetetunken 

A lllma Vats 
Attanq 
BASF 
Server 

Bay Hypo Bom 
Bay VereliKOank 
BBC 

BHF-Uank 

BMW 

Ca n n n e r s fa m k 
Cent Gurnrnl 
oaimler-aenz 
Deguan 

Deutsche Babcock 
Datmene Bank 
Drvsdner Bank 
GHH 
ho m etier 


227 JO 237 
1745 1790 
426 429 JO 
24 7 JO 272 
Mkte 242 

432 431 

298 29330 
448 440 
581 598 
Z7A20Z74JD 
159 JO 141 
1209W 123 
426 429 

TI7-J0 22850 
702 711 JO 

34AM 34650 
223 228 
353 3SZJ0 



■n 

TTT 



V it 



ffi- 






E 






yr, 



T 





r*«Ii 

Twy< 


~9 f i 

IrtX 


Zv 

■TI 


ii 



E 

■■ 


E 

■n* - 






M'^-v 


TT 

B'L ' 


iTTi 

P-Ki 



ITTP 


BH 

IW; 





II 






i-- 



71 



rTl 






V 



r- 






2 



mm 



Job 


AECI 

Anglo Amer. 
Anglo Am Gold 
Barlows 
81 wear 
Buffets 
De Baers 
Diiefenleln 
Elands 


WO 940 
3085 3885 
NA SUM 
1450 VUO 
1850 MOO 
6650 8800 
1570 1595 
5625 5700 
MA. — 





Cteve 

Pw 

GFSA 

4000 

3950 

Harmony 

3S» 

3565 

HIvBta Steel 

990 

595 

Kloof 



NOtttKWlt 

1000 

1010 

PrasSlevn 

71» 

7300 

Met 

2625 

U10 

SA Brews 

830 

830 




Sasoi 

NA 

895 

west Hahflna 

9350 

9900 

Composite Stack Indue NJL 
Previous; 134950 




*1196 


290 

296 




Cii i jzrr-f 



AsaDairtos 


144 

Baretavs 


462 


677 

609 

BA.T. 

283 

288. 

Beedwn 

323 

323 

9 ICC 

251 

253 

BL 

27 

X 




DOCGr«n» 

310 

328 

Boots 

^ 2*3 

272 

Bawa ter Indus 


318 




Bril Ham* St 

397 

409 


202 

304 

urn Aeraspace 



Britoli 

235 

340 

BTR 



Burmoh 




637 

653 


199 

140 

Charter Con* 

211 

213 

Commercial U 

232 

237 

Cans Gold 

504 

512 

Courtewlds 



Dotoety 

443 

448 

De Beers t 

490 

495 

Distillers 

483 

491 

Orietantein 

SI 7* 

J17V2 

FteMis 

443 

450 

Free St Gad 

■ - 7, 

S27ta 

GEC 

178 

IM 

Gen Aoddent 

718 

734 

GKN 

267 

274 

GKZXOC 

19KU21/32 

Grand Met 

388 

m 

GRE 

748 

756 

Gukinm 

304 


GUS 

988 105744 

Hanson 

210 

222 

Kowfcs? 

443 

445 

ICI 

717 

739 

Imperial Graup 

233 

329 

Jaauar 

323 

332 


318 

321 


7« 

757 

Ltaydi Bank 

502 

514 

Lanrtia 

189 

119 

Lucas 

453 

451 

1. 1 - g.~ 1 - - 1 . - 1-. 

181 

188 


511 

513 


444 

457 

n« west sank 

709 

724 

PandO 

44S 

440 

Piiktagten 

313 

om 


m 

144 

Prudential 

712 

Tit 

Roroieted 

148 

144 

Randfontetn 

S78W 


Rank 

499 

469 

Reed Inti 

702 

7W 

Routera 

327 

332 

Raimi Dutch c 

44V. 443732 
534 544 

SaatcM 

745 

740 

Mnsburr 

384 

381 

Sears HaWtew 

1189k 

121 



CMS* 


Shell 

675 

tea 

5TC 

94 

96 

std Chartered 

457 

462 

Stm Alliance 

541 

551 

Tate and Lyle 

555 

553 


298 

300 

Thorn EMI 

414 

417 

TJ. Graijis 

419 

420 


383 

307 

THF 

161 

162 

Ultromar 

220 

225 

Unilever C 

TZik 1221/32 

United Blscutte 

298 

266 


310 

313 

woofworte 

STB 

5M 

1 F.T.X Index: 112*50 


Prevtaas : 1H6JI 



.F.TJULM0 index 


PrnvtoM : M55J0 



1 1 rtHnn II 

Banco Comm 

24745 34800 

dgahotote 

ir.'.l 


C redllal 

m-.i 

■f lJ 



r . ii 

Farm ltd hi 

14800 16600 

Flat 

SOX 

S040 

Generis 


in 


itaicamafitl 

■ ■ J... 11 


K<Ivl 

I 11 



Medfetoiro 

LFJ.' lF ; vIE 


2*99 


NBA 

3475 

3501 

Olivetti 

tw 

7900 

Pirelli 

3380 

3150 

RAS 

139500 136000 


T9 18 



2669 

2660 

SME 

1270 

1298 

Snfei 

4890 


Standa 


irii 

Stet 

■2a 

3638 

ImIB Current Index : TWO 


Pretrlooi : 18*3 



1 J 


Air UaukSe 
AlsnwnAU. 
Av Dassault 
BteMair* 

BIC 

Bangraln 

Bouyaues 

BSN-GO 

Cometeur 

Charaevrs 

□u& Mea 

Darty 

Dumez 

EH-AauttalM 

Europe l 

Gen Earn 


Lotorgc Cop 
Learond 


roreai 

Martetl 

Motto 

Merlin 

MMMin 

Moot Hemeny 

Moulinex 

O cdd e rtat e 

Pernod Rfe 

Perrier 

PewAeat 

Pimtemps 

Ratflatectei 

Redovte 

Octet 


SkURMtlenei 


Thomson CSF 
Tefal 

CAC Index : 347J0 
Prevtocs : S48je . 


5*3 400 

397 39S 

1250 1210 
803 818 

499 514 

1680 1660 
872 809 

2510 2510 

2866 2860 

698 686 

49810 49880 
1800 1897 
837 842 

225 317 

820 BOO 
769 772 

1460 1465 
684 

2430 I4M 
746 751 

2765 2785 
1575 1577 
1632 1660 
2430 2410 

1580 MM 
2140 2165 
71JS 65 
717 720 

722 778 

455 439 J8 
467 469. 

339 346 

397 401 

1832 1900 
1661 1661 
692 700 

1485 1495 
2915 2840 

699 695. 

320 315 


Cold StaroM 
DBS 

Fraser Neava 
Haw Par 


Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

Shangri-la 
Slme Darby 
S’pore Land 
Si oorc Pre ss 
S Steamship 
St Trading 
United * 
UOB 


Ctoic Prev. 


US 3jB2 
UD 895 
6.15 625 

2 284 
287 MjQ. 
815 530 
830 835 

238 271 
220 2X 
218 218 
ue lja 
233 245 

635 630 
ojn oja 
276 278 
1X4 1X5 

3X8 250 

lnd Index : 717X8 


AGA 

Alfa Laval . 
Asea 
Astra ' 

Allas Copco 
B alkten 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Essen* 

Handetsbankan 

Pharmacia 

SaafKSaxiki 

Sandvfk 

Skanska 

SKF 

s««nihMaich 


161 163 

248 248- 

315 318 

515 513 

157 154 

177 UD 
187 IM 
208- 200 
N49. 42B 

214 215 

202 Ul 
490 495" 

595 590 

110 *LQ. 



AC I 
ANZ 
BHP 
Banal 

BouacdnyUle 

C as Utm uln e 

Gates 

Comaleo 

CRA 

CSR 

Ounloa 

Elders lid 

i Cl Australia 

Magellan 

mim 


Nat Auri Bank 
News Coro 
N Broken HIM 
Poseidon 
AM Coat Trust 
Suites 

Thames Nation 
Western Mining 
Western: Bankteo 
woods! de . 

All Onfli 


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4JB 480 
8X4 862 

3.14 216 

187 188 
6 1 

486 405 

188 170 

5XS 5J6 
355 358 

240 2X0 
295 290 
3M 215 
210 2115 
255 257 
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480 485 
886 860 
280 2 3S 
385 360 

150 Ul 
586 550 
2X2 245 

Ul 3J8 
460 463 

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730 

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701 

/IS 

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113* 

1190 

Jaaon Air Una* 

6491 


Kallma 

900 

499 

Karanl Power 

1880 


Kawasaki Stsal 

131 


Kbin Brewery 

7*0 


Komatsu 

502 

500 

Kubota 

350 


Kyocera 

4090 

4150 

Matsu Elec Inds 

1200 


Matsu EtecWorta 



AMIsubdHBank 

1460 


.MHsubtahl Cham 

479 

490 

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344 


Mitsubishi Heavy 

374 


Mitsubishi core 

590 

' 994 




MltxukostH 



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949 


NEC 

1230 


NGK insulator* 



NlucoSec 

7 W 


Ntepan Koaafcn 



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571 

■ 577 

Nomura Sec 

UNO 


Olympus 



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1480 

1620 

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810 

7M 




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1688 

-1600 

Sumitomo atom 

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3M 

Sum mo f *artao 



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141 


tom Caro 



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963 


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379 

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12793J9 

Previous: HTtUS 
New index: H88J7 
Previous.: tsetxe 



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Lf V.HS-’ *’ ' The Assoaa/ed Presi 

\ -s NEW ORLEANS -Bum Phit 

* |*“.sk bk%> ' f -lips fbuptly rtssigoed as head coach 
Taf the New (Means Saints late 
\? , r . i ^.Monday, foregoing the final three 

■*-.r '"^Sub ^- yfears and SI .3 million of his con- 








tract.. 

•*■ , Team president Eddie Jones, <fi- 
1£«* OT a football operations Pat 
3M frO Peppier and public relations direo- 

■ »ior Greg Suit also xesigned at the 
• > v • ,:zy* l^Sc request of the team’s new owner, 
■'" ^ N Toro Benson, who said be will take 

~ _ over as presid ent/general manager. 

S*-..*. Phillips was 27-42 m f our- plus- 
octv^ «■ reasons at New Orleans (the Srirns- 

are 4-8 this year) and 86-80 for his ' 
.. „* K ; -tt; i« n [ career in the NFL. His son. Wade, 

-• -,.M. V ’^ K , z'fi* team’s defensive coortSnator, 

" ' r '*• lAts-'x was named interim head coach. - 

/ ; Jrtj 4 - - J* ^ . “Winning is the American way," 

. . * ""- ' sand Phillips, “and I'm glad ir is; It 

• 1 _ V i was winning that enabled me to go 

■ . : from Class AA hi gh school in Tex- 

: as to two head coach and eeneral 


•* manager jobs in the National Foot- 
“ ' ' ?M TtiCjjj- '' “ ball Lcagne. My job here was to 
•■■• 1 ,v.jj ; ._'*%> . provide a winning season, and I 

.* ’•'* didn't do that.” 


.Bason: 

• • ,\ *^s r . aston to 1 


didn't do that,” 

Reason said it was Phillips’ s do- 
dston to resign. “I didn’t ask for 
it," be said. “He told me he was 


. doing it for the good of the dub, 

Vf?r5 _ mwt F. fhp nhr an/5 f/w> mn *f 


" the good of the and for mc. ,f 
• - - He said be fired Peppier, Jones 

’ vn vncitoY^‘ ** Suit ^ost to get it aD done so 

• -« '.*i k- s._ * we’re all going in the same direc- 

V.V'**'*** don. We're not grang to have any- . _ , . 

• v body who was ass o ciated with Ac n»A»»B*idhwi hits in 212^ inning s while striking strode out 36 tunes and scored 71 

' . s tv? ^ * old dub." Ozzie GnDeii: In the tratfition of Carrasqod and Aparido. oat 127 and walking 63. runs in 491 at-bats. 

~- t 

• -V J j ■ 

5 g: The Striking Transformation of an Ugly Duckling 

a J - ■ intanattoaal Herald Tribune says, “is one of the nicest things in Mdby now finds the team being and Molby is given lull creative ter Netzer, whose 40-meter passes 

' • • r LONDON One of the plea- football. I’ve always felt" The £n- built around him. Coming forward, license to exploit your defense. were once almost too visionary for 

’■ ' '''I'-’v.hit.’r » are sogcct is to watch a ™|jt glish, barring the few, tend to belt it he can be an awesome presence, a Darts player indeed. We are be- his colleagues, has not pounced. 

• '■! <•._ grow into the hub the plavmakea: . long-striding juggernaut, difficult ginning to warm to the big Dane— Or even that England, which got 

v .-.Tatf fof 4 *' of the finest in an the land! Curiously, Mdby drew eacour- to shift off the ball, capable of and be to us, now that his place on superb mileage out of Trevor 
‘ -■ '■ r iiiar* • na«ac Hwnc Christian Andersen, a g gt P ent watching not Liverpool suddenly opening out play with 40- Denmark’s World Cup team is be- Brooking, another slow weaver of 

‘ bnt fairy tales do sometimes come nearest and dearest nd^»- meter passes that in England are coming assured. And, at 22, he is midfield quality, took so long to 

• . \ - true in die real world. bor, Everton. Last season Everton whofly unsn^jected. still learning his own game. appreciate that while soccer is 

- -'•- : Jan Molby currently stroldna won theEii^ishchampionsh4>and His sweet-striking has lately The strange thing is that the played with the feet, its greater an- 

• '■■■ in: r.g: rfyemool Wlr to o,- the European Cup Winners’ Cup, been converted into goals — from Netherlands, which once loved istscreate with the brain. Denmark 

- — " -EncIiSi soecer will have to bear “hpshtg the red shadow for the loose play, from free locks, from WIm van Hanagem, its own stroll- may be the land of fairy tales, but 

- 5 »•» to iNDHKEff" r«irm!eflted rcfermcrc m the <rtn- first time in 14 years. Sweet-timing penalties. The joy that he visibly mg minstrel, let him go: that the Britain by tradition does not clip 



Shortstop Guillen Voted 
American’s Top Rookie 


John McEnroe Meets the Press 


the Assoctaud Press 

CHICAGO — Ozzie Guillen, 
the exuberant rookie who cost (he 
Chicago White Sox a Cy Young 
winner but paki nnexpeoed hitting 
and lidding dividends, was named 

the Ammcan League's rookie of 
the year on Monday. 

“It can only happen to you one 
time in baseball," said G uillen, af- 
ter learning of the voting by the 
Baseball Writers' Association of 
America. 

*Tm excited and I'm happy that 
I was able to help the While Sax 
and do enough to be voted (his 
award," the 21 -year-old shortstop 
said by telephone from his native 
Venezuela. 

Guillen committed only 12 er- 
rors in ISO games last season, the 
fewest of any regular American 
League shortstop: a left-hander, he 
batted .273. 

He came to the White Sox last 
December in a seven-player deal 
that sent right-handed pitcher La- 
Marr Hoyt, the 1983 Cy Young 
award winner, to San Diego along 
with two minor- leaguers for Gu3- 
len, pitcher Tim Loiter, mfidder 
Luis Salimtr and a minor-leaguer. 


Third was another Brewer, in- 
fielder Earnest Riles, who got 29 
jy'mts; followed by outftdda Od- 
dibe McDowell of Texas, 25 
pants; pitcher Stu CHburn of Cali- 
fornia, 16; pitcher Brian Fisher of 
New York, 7; pitcher Ton Henke 
of Toronto, 5, and catcher Mark 
Salas of Minnesota, 1 

McDowell, CHburn and Henke 
got the other first-place votes. A 
first-place vote counted five points, 
with three awarded for second and 
one for third. 

“Of course I thought about the 
award, but most important was 
what 1 was able to do for the team," 
Guillen said. “My biggest thrill was 
getting the game-winning RBI in 
Trim Saver’s 300th win.” 

“He did not play like a 21-year- 
old rookie," said Chicago's manag- 
er. Tony LaRussa. “He played like 
a seasoned veteran. He far exceed- 
ed our expectations. We expected 
him to biz about 240 and provide 
us with same solid defense." 

Guillen is the third Venezuelan, 
after Chico Caxrasquei and Luis 
Aparido, to play shortstop for the 
White Sox and is the dob's fifth 
rookie of the year winner. The oth- 


GiriUen received 16 of the 28 ers were Ron Kittle in 1983, Tom- 
first-ptece votes — from two writ- trrie Agee in 1966, Gary Peters in 


ers in each of the 14 league dries — 
for 101 total pants. Ted Higoera, 
the left-handed pitcher of the Mil- 


1963 and Aparido in 1956. 

Guillen, was a 308 hitter in four 
minor-league seasons, but he began 


Ozzie Gnfflen: In the tradition of Carrasqod and Aparido. out 127 and walking 63. 


waukee Brewers, was second with 9 the 19S5 season slowly. He batted 
first-place votes and 67 points. Hi- just 210 through June lO, bat he hh 
guera bad a 15-8 record and 3.90 302 the rest of the way. He walked 
eamed-run average, allowing 186 only 12 times and stole seven bases, 
hits in 212^3 tunings while striking struck out 36 times and scored 71 


runs in 491 at-bats. 


The Striking Transformation of an Ugly Duckling 


International Herald Tribune 


says, “is one of the nicest things in Molby now finds the team being and Mdby is given full creative ter Netzer, whose 40-meter passes 
football. I’ve always felt." The £n- built around him. Coming forward, license to exploit your defense. were once almost too visionary for 


Jan Molby, currently stroking won the English championship and His sweet-stnkmg has lately 

■ :f: Liverpool bade to the WnnffJ theEurop^n Cup Winners’ Cup, been ccmvertod mto goals — from 
— . •EngfiMsoccer, wiB have to bear sh ^ ow for ^ pky.from fn* Jocks, from 

,i:r “ T0 ** USE* ourrepeated references to the sto- ome in 14 years. Sweet-timing penalties. The joy that he visibly 
ies oTSs laie countryman. Ids a the bafl tor the b!^ wbo« stadi- exudes m caressing the bail is 

• ^ om is 400 meters from Liverpools, something that grew up with him. 

u„_ u TTr , TT _- , was Kerin Sheedy, an Irishman At six he was taken under the 
• «-vI5 UlJirEUbo discarded by livetpooL wing of the Kidding dnb. By ado- 

— — — : “ — — Times and needs change. This lescence he was part of the Danish 

• - . . liioor;. * natural CMi^h reflex. As we dK- se^on, finding at test the forceful elite youth system, encouraged to 

- " <■ cover thelndtoib^nty in Mtdby’s ^ ^, 0 c0lM OTt ^ express himself, aflowed to experi- 

' A Ptey, and the xaetthat he wasbom ^ Mdby, Liverpool bought Steve merit with his talent while his coun- 


Jan Mdby, c urr e n tly Strok 
Liverpool bade to the summit 


Cemlkd bf (hr Staff From Dupauha 

MELBOURNE —With Tues- 
day’s second day of play at the 
Australian Oiks washed out by 
rain, the spotlight fell upon John 
McEnroe, who filled it amply. 

The world's No. 2-ranked ten- 
nis player shoved a reporter over 
the back of a sofa and onto its 
cushion and spat at a photogra- 
pher after they asked him if be 
planned to many his accress-giri- 
friend, Tatum OTJeaL 

“I get the same question all 
around the world," McEnroe 
yelled as he pushed Geoff Eas- 
down, a writer for The Mel- 
bourne Herald. 

McEnroe then spat at News 
Limited photographer Mike Pot- 
ter, who spat bade. 

Easdown said he had asked 
McEnroe if he would have his 
photograph taken with O'Neal. 
“Then,” Easdown reported, “he 
asked roc to leave the hotel 1 10M 
him I wasn't going to be ordered 
around by him. 

“He then went off the deep 
end. ... He pushed me across the 
room, grabbed me by the throat 
and tore my shin cdlai. Bui peo- 
ple started to gather, and he 
backed oft" 

At a 45-minute news confer- 
ence following the incident, 
McEnroe said: “The guy came to 
start something. I moved him to 
one side, and then suddenly I'm 
supposed to have assaulted him 
and he's physically beat up." 

During the conference, McEn- 
roe; giving polite and considered 
responses, denied having mar- 
ried O’Neal and that she was 
pregnant “That’s not true,” he 
said. “At the moment nothing 
has been decided. At some point 
we are going to get married, but 1 
honestly don't know when that 
will be." 

He also said that he was un- 
fairly treated by the media. “1 
have to deal with 10 times more 
amount of stuff than any other 
player," he said, adding that he 
had. been particularly angered by 
reports he had married O'Neal. 
“Why do I have to continue 10 
deny it here?” 

McEnroe, 26, said that despite 
bis anger he was “happier than 
I’ve ever been in my life. 1 appre- 


, Rob Hughes 


. cover the bidden beauty in Moby’s 

>m. ?ae l ; play, and the fact that he was bom 


BundesHga, which produced Gun- the wings of a swan. 


Football 


BRUM 


- Where Anderecn was bom, in Knld- whose first 100 games 

mg near Odense, the oonnectura is had all been as an Evertonten. - 


Irresistible. 


IWUUjy, uvrapum CKHlgUI 3LGVG U«II miuuu uutjii wuucuu wuu- J| m 

bMahon, whose first 100. games terparts in Britain were mostly LiOUege lOp^US 
Ld all been asan Evertrarian. - herded into systematizedTpresstir- “ 'tiw innvttemns in tm a* 
This intracity trading, this inter- ized games where result mattered «mcm (mmi poo crmH4« 


Basketball 

National Basketball Association Leaders 


Better mention the ugly duckling uoimd a Dane so few tm- more than performance. 


here and now and get it over with, derstpod, Mowed the departure of He is out there now doing his 

3 y e ^r"^?°’ m Jbat pediaps the most complete nrid- thing, and proving a gilt-edged, 

— .nwr*:- Stadram aSaff, tdder Lzveqjod has ever had. double-edged investment Dalglish, 

. - if. c — -1 s-^ Molt^ was not thought Graonc Sotmess was, as Molby • the confidant who tins summer be- 

as ewt a wbstitme privatdy concedes, Mdby and Me- came Liverpool’s manager, has 
' Lwerpool lost the Euro- ^hon rolled into one; Souness, started to use the Danish gift for 

_ “! • l'.T *® 11 career was a song- ^ with Sampdoria in Italy, can improvisation in ways that some- 

as rt had be^n wim Ajax^or strike tire ball sweetly, but also has times bewilder the opposition. 

• B r Tunatero^ fw whM* he was alro bitem the lacldeto win it ThreatenLrvopoolwithexces- 

^ ** fore . 8tUzmcd Molby generally passes on the sive pace in attack, and you are 

r - tadkKng bit; McMahon, though likely to find Molby operating not 

... cks & ? ^00,000 (about 5290^)00) feu him. jnches shcaler and 24 pounds in midfield but in his old role as 
r3a C1 “i. " was also a bit erf a joke back smaUei, is the mmder, Wessed with defensive sweeper, using his eye 

honre, saps the big, fellow, me the Souness hard-man streak. and his abSity to read and intercept 


Threaten Liverpool with exces- 


Tbc top 20 tiomt In Tbc AModcrtcd Prta 
cMm to wa uB no (nrct^iaee vntot In m»- 
nail m nnm wennto. total potato bond 
n 30-1 m. Me. oad km wmCi rmkinni: 

Record pt* Pw 
U*vnn State |4V) 1VM U« 1 

Xlowo (31 UM4 (JOn 3 

lOkJMwcna <61 M-0 1X174 S 


mnwgh bcdhm of Neva*) 
TEAM 
OffMM 

a Pi. 


UA. Lakers 
MUwaukee 
Detroit 
Houston 


gj going to Liverpool” 
i. The joke persisted this Septem- 
'■ ber as Liverpool offering him a 
fresh start, bt^an the new season 
^LfetfuUy. Critics homed in. oa 
Molby’s impazunt immobility, his 


ickfing bit; McMahon, though likely to find Molby operating not 
hit inches shorter and 24 pounds in midfield but in his old role as 
nailer, is the minder, blessed with defensive sweeper, using his eye 
re Souness hard-man streak. and his ability to read and intercept 

So instead of bang an outcast play. Go timorously to Liverpool, 


AMiamL Fin. (T) 

*-1-0 

1A5S 

4 

Denver 

14 

1630 

1U4 

SJMldiiaan (1) 

M-l 

971 

4 

Portland 

17 

1923 

11X1 

LFM4a 

8-1-1 

444 

9 

Boston 

13 

1460 

11M 

7-Auhurn 

4-2* 

741 

18 

Utah 

15 

1482 

112J 

ANebresko 

9-30 

722 

2 

Indiana 

13 

1454 

1114 

9Jlrianam Young 

1*30 

631 

11 

Phoenix 

15 

1449 

ilia 

lO.Tcnnessee 

7-1-2 

590 

16 

New Jersey 

16 

1780 

ina 

llAlr Force 

It-TO 

583 

13 

□altos 

13 

1432 

rna 

aFtartdo State 

4-20 

541 

14 

Oilcan 

16 

1742 

110.1 

I3L5U 

7-1-1 

425 

17 

Golden State 

16 

1142 

110.1 

TAArknnsos 

9-30 

370 

18 

LA Olppers 

14 

1529 

1094 

lATexos A8JW 

*-20 

347 

19 

Cleveland 

15 

1631 

108.7 

I6.UCLA 

4-2-1 

246 

4 

Phtladctonla 

13 

1409 

1004 

17.0klonama SHU* 

B-M 

249 

7 

Sacramento 

14 

1498 

mo 

l&Teras 

4-30 

238 

Atlanta 

15 

1584 

1054 

i9X»k> State 

4-3-0 

194 

12 

San Antonie 

15 

1565 

104a 

2B.Gcoreta 

7-2-1 

148 

20 

Washington 

14 

1439 

1D2J 


tUctxmlsdn. N J. 

Robertson. 5A 

Thomas, Dot. 
Dunn. Don. 
LOvor, Don. 


Cooper. Don 
Eaton, Utah 
Williams. Ind 
Bowls, pot 
O ktdJwon. Hou 


Stoats 

G Sit 
I. 14 59 

T5 44 
15 45 
14 39 
W 37 

a locked soots 

G BA 
T4 55 
75 54 

II 34 
13 31 

15 37 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


4i atypicaDy heavy Scandinavian bulk 
‘cf nearly M0 pounds (90.7 Mlo- 
& grams) pressed into a 6-foot- 1 
»‘ r frame (1.85 meters). 

■ “The late Dane," they called him 
it: behind bis broad back. One distin- 
-.^jmshed-Scribe weal so far as to 
cnofy~* Molby possibly had an in- 

w* tetnatioual future ■ — playing darts. 

. ,x 5-t 1 ; r , frexny of British nnmera 
jw-St c * idwte^ past- the ugly dudding 
s * jerighthave sunk without trace. He 
S’ i‘ admits; that test season he just 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Faust Resigns as Coach of Notre Dame 

CHICAGO (AP) — Gerry Faust resigned Tuesday as Notre Dame’s 
head football coach. 

Faust took over before the 1981 season, but fafled to produce antidpat- 
ed resolts; his four-year record is 30-25-1 , making him the losingest coach 


-r As tl» frenzy of British nmness with four straight victories. The Irish are 5-5 this season (the final year of 
! % * ^&rted past, the ugly duddmg Faust’s five-year contract), with one game to go, Saturday at Miami 
hi w;‘ e * anight have sunk without trace. He “I want what’s bestfor everybody," Faust said Tuesday, “but that’s not 

ffj‘^mits 7 that test season he just possiWe. . . .They stuck with me through some very bard times.” 

^ ^ safriy red shirt, and “4** Women’s SkrTour to Use New Format 

r\ But players of genuine top-class 

- jallber are rarefy deceived when .NEW YORK (AP) — The International Sid Federation has decided 

id r ■. L- ikw- ^.1. mith n1*n» tWot all ant* nu<K om llv lQDUtlt nmmAn’c WnrW oa rnnoim mill 


The UPi board of coaches tog-38 ratings 

New York 

14 

1333 

9i2 

(flrst-ptoce vote* md records In parentheses: 


Defense 



total pottos, hosed an 15 potato tor ttrrt Place, 


G 

No. 

Avs 

M for secoad, etc. and hut week** ranktags) : 

Seattle 

15 

1473 

9fL2 

L Penn 5tate (39) (11-0) 

413 1 

New York 

14 

1405 

IKM 

Z Oklahoma (2J (B-l) 

548 3 

Washington 

14 

1428 

10X0 

X Iowa <10-11 

521 4 

Boston 

13 

1355 

10*3 

4. Miami (Fla) (9-1) 

497 5 

Son Antonio 

15 

1803 

10t9 

X Michigan (9-1-1) 

458 4 

Atlanta 

15 

1621 

10A1 

A Auburn (42) 

300 9 

Cfevetona 

15 

1635 

109.0 

7. Air Force tll-l) 

28i ia 

Phtladetonio 

13 

1430 

109,2 

8. Nebraska (9-2) 

272 2 

Milwaukee 

IB 

1947 

ltwa 

9. TennessM (7-1-21 

223 15 

LA. Lakers 

IS 

1658 

nu 

TO. Brtghotn Youn* (10-2} 

332 13 

Denver 

14 

1563 

1VU 

11. Florida state (42) 

186 12 

Sacramento 

14 

1570 

112.1 

12. Louisiana State (7-1-11 

154 17 

Utan 

IS 

1485 

1113 

IX Arkansas (9-2) 

142 13 

Dallas 

13 

1446 

11241 

U. Texas A8JI6 (7-3) 

103 18 

Portland 

17 

1919 

113S 

li UCLA 152-11 

83 8 

LA CBPPers 

14 

1593 

1118 

14. Texas (42) 

78 19 

Golden State 

16 

1822 

nsa 

17. Oklahoma State (42) 

44 7 

Houston 

15 

1709 

113a 

li Oh to Kioto IB-31 

61 11 

New Jersey 

16 

112ft 

114.1 

1*. Fresno Slate (HUM) 

23 z 

Chicago 

16 

1843 

usa 

20. Georgia (7-2-1) 

30 z 

Detroit 

15 

1737 

nsa 

(S-Unranked) 


Indiana 

13 

1512 

114J 



W 

L 

PCL 

GB 

Boston 

11 

3 

JM 

— 

New Jersey 

» 

7 

M 

3% 

Philadelphia 

« 

7 

■442 

5 

Wash! not on 

6 

B 

429 

Sto 

New York 

3 

11 

J14 

8to 

Central Division 



Milwaukee 

13 

5 

.722 

— 

Detroit 

10 

5 

467 

ito 

All on la 

7 

8 

MO 

4to 

Clevetand 

• 

9 

400 

Sto 

Chicago 

6 

10 

J7S 

6 

Indiana 

3 

11 

-2V» 

> 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Midwest Division 



Denver 

It 

3 

-745 

— 

Houston 

10 

5 

■667 

m 

Utah 

9 

7 

A3 

3 

San Antonio 

7 

4 

AO 

4to 

Dallas 

6 

7 

MO 

4to 

Sacramento 

4 

10 

-3B4 

7 


Pacific Division 



l_A Lakers 

13 

3 

M7 

— 

Portland 

10 

7 

sn 

4 

Golden 5 fate 

7 

9 

*38 

6to 

LA Clippers 

6 

4 

M3 

6to 

Seattle 

6 

» 

-400 

7 

Phoenix 

2 

13 

.133 

11 


(Byaoreemnni wltn lr*o American Football 
CoacnMAHOdailon.twumon NCAAarean- 
ttreno» probation one torputaen to eomacta 
In bawl pamesora Inot Isaria tor top-30 earata- 
nratlon bv UPL Cumtirttv In mat catenary 
are Florida and Southern MefttodtslJ 


b‘‘ team experience. They told him compete in reverse order in the second. Under the old format, the first 
f J: That it todc patience to blend into leg’s top five began the second run in reverse order, the top racer being INr JL St a nd in gs 
« '*£.•, Jhe machine. They mged wbai is fifth out of the gate; after that, they competed in firat-nxn time order. American conference 

C==^ -: f- almost the backrocan Liverpool i i Ba ** 

iiSSr U\ motto: K«p gomg. keq> trying. Quotable N(¥ . Jrtl , w ^ m 

r*l» keep behevmg. . » . ... , N«w Enolond 4 4 0 ^47 2*0 300 

-j V’c r?’.' t . xxrep down there was bdief, at - * Boxing promoter Don King, after bang acquitted on charges of Miami a a t mtwo ns 

-Z r* Mnihv Ttmrt have Ml for- faffing to pay income tax on money he allegedly skimmed from his own ^^ coW * £ w t a 


Donllev. lllon 
Enalbll. Dan. 
wooirfdofc CM. 
Smllti. UAC 
WllPdns. AM. 


INDIVIDUAL 

Scortoo 

G FO FT Hi W 
15 147 145 479 31.9 

14 TW 103 443 31-4 

14 165 ta* 441 2&S 

9 95 54 344 27.1 

15 145 73 344 J4J 


"1 - , vlT'i;S 

— — 


f-t ihourib Molby must have felt for- faffing to pay income tax on money he 
^7%trildng the ball sweetiy," he company: “Only m America. 


? < M' 

r-:5i k- 


\\\ 

tfi 


*■.**<*. 
c ,1c & 




-'rf* e: 

■C&l 4 - ?. i 
r 'J 


■'+ i Mi 

r r»4 

im 

■ : { 



aavMomf 4 4 0 -500 

Plltmurati 4 4 0 Joo 

Houston 5 7 8 417 

andnnaTf 5 7 0 .417 

W«f 

l_A. Raktert B 4 o 447 

Donvar I * 0 -M7 

S*am* 4 4 0 Joa 

San Dlnw 5 7 O ^T7 

Kansas aiv 4 I 0 J03 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
East 

DaDas t 4 8 447 

N.Y. dams 4 4 0 447 

wasninatan 7 5 0 JBD 

FnlMolpMa 4 6 0 -500 

SL Louis 4 B 0 -333 

Central 

laOilcow 13 a 0 1 J00 


joo an its 

JOT 273 210 
417 306 370 
.417 399 325 

.447 274 24T 
MO 394 22 


FHtfd Goaf PcroentoM 

FO PGA PCI 
Thorpe, sac M 112 m 

Dawkins. N_l. B3 133 429 

Turpbv Clev. 78 T2S JM 

Mccrav, Hou. 74 122 423 

Johnson, SA 44 lit Al3 

RMUUBdlBfl 

O Off Def Tat AV9 
Lalntbeer. Dei. 15 5S MS 203 13J 

Williams. NJ. 14 &! 147 315 134 

Rutond. Wash. 13 43 102 145 12.1 

Oiaiuwaa Hou. 15 75 1M 179 11.9 

MakXM. PnIL 11 59 95 154 UA 

Assists 

e No. Ava- 

Jahnsan. LAL 13 173 133 

TAOfiUE. Dttt. 15 176 11 J 


244 

Cheeks, Phil. 

13 

122 

332 

Floyd. G-S. 

16 

144 

278 

Boolrv, Clev. 

15 

132 


Free Throws 




FTM FTA 

714 

Brtdgemon. LAC 

25 

35 

196 

Mullkl GA 

33 

34 

225 

Alnoe, Bos. 

25 

36 

210 

Bird. BOS. 

80 

45 

290 

Gervln, OU. 

40 

43 


»Ol icons 
Detroit 
Green Bov 
Minnesota 
Tempo Bay 

LA Rams 
San Francisco 
New Ortwwti 
Atlanta 


0 1.000 359 127 

0 -500 330 240 

D SI 

0 AT7 244 371 
0 .147 iff 350 

0 750 2» 19! 

0 sn 294 193 
0 J33 320 3Z3 

0 .157 ZlB 357 


RHMffrlMMd frea NMnaftanal 


<X)F— Jeff Stover and Keen* Tdimt, aBbvenitfBiig quarterback Dave Krieg for a first- 
period k>ss, typify SmFraxui^ Monday. In beating Seattle, 1^5, the 49»s 

had five sadts anti two interceptions and heW Seahawfepass«sto 17 of 41 for 177 yards. 


(xdlnAH atvbian tin*) 

Monday* Raton 
Son PrandMO 19, EMM* 4 

DKa 

N.Y. Ms at Do trull 
SI. Louis at Dallas 

CMC. 1 

Orretand at N.Y. G lards 
Dtevtr at putsburah 
Kewston al Cincinnati 
Tamm Bay « Giww Ba» 

LA Rams at Now Orisons 
MUnasata at PMUdotoiiia 
Nnr enoland at Indianapolis 
LA RaMors Of Atfonta 
Kansas CUv of Saortte 
Son Francisco at Wash burton 

- Buffalo at San bins 

Boc-4 

Cm fnoo at Miami 


World Cap Prologue 

WOMEN'S SLALOM 
(at S e st rl e rci Italy) 

1. Vrenl Schneider. Swtttar twul (l-.11.15. 
1:09,1 a) t:iL32 m mutes 

Z Ertjto Hm.SwttaKlana li:ll J«-l :w.n> 
2:2174 

3. NMiacIo Gtrc-Wra Germany tl‘,1153- 
1:09J5) 2^2J» 

4. Katra Zalc. VuooslAvta (l :0»j7j 
3:22Jg 

5 Monlai MM. Sweden (1:1X07-1:09^1) 
2:2Z78 

XBI»a FtmonWi Ochoa Saaln n:J2OT- 
V.W.m J:2U* 

7. Amw-Fkxoftey. France (1:1X41-1: 09 jtj 
2:2330 

X Mario Epple Beck, West Cermonv 
11 -.1148-1:1030) 2323 

9. Sytvfca Eder. Austria 1 1:1335-1 :Wm, 
and Marta netiL Wert Germany (1:1239- 
mun Kur 

11. MKrwta FlalnL Swlratnana. ZT2XS1 

IX Anita Wacht, Ausrta. 2:2154 



McEnroe and reporter, after a few ups and downs. 


date a lot of what I have. I know 
that without tennis I wouldn’t 
have all these advantages." 

McEnroe said hedidoouhink 
it likely that he would quit tennis 
any lime soon. Tm not saying 
I’m going to retire. I'm just say- 
ing there are times when it gets to 
you a lot more than at other 
times. 

“I mean, the world's not going 
to come to an end for me if I 
don't win the Australian Open. 

“I really wish I could say that 
if I washairassed one more time. 
I would walk away, 1 ’ McEnroe 
said “But I can’L 1 love playing 


tennis and these are things I have 
to deal with. 

“The incident at the hotel was 
a prime example. I'm here to 
play tennis. But people don't 
give you a chance. Being a celeb- 
rity like 1 am is like being raped. 
You can't do anything about it. 
There's absolutely nothing you 
can do about it." 

As to the overall business at 
hand, open officials said that 
Tuesday's rained-out program 
would be played Wednesday. 
Only 14 matches were oompletoi 
Monday, when heavy showers 
halted play. (UPI. AP) 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Leaders 


(ThroMh Gornw Of Nov. M) 
SCORING 


SOALTENDINO 

(Emptyoct goals In Purenttwsw) 


no Oretzfty. Earn 
3 00 LemlMK. Pah 
239 NaoJund. Mil 
jjU Props. Ptia 

Andprson, Ertm 
Avs Praser. Chi 
in Karr. Pha 
3 J 3 Tantl, Vcr 
177 Llntofnan, Bos 
258 SkJkro, Vcr 
147 Gartner, Wash 
Sundrtiwn, Vcr 
Savor d, Vcr 
Bratorv Minn 
Messier. Earn 
T. Murray, CM 
NIchOlK. LA 
CB Francis. Hart 
— Perreault. Bui 
3% Karri. Edm 


11 15 2* 
11 15 26 
11 14 25 
11 14 25 
10 15 25 
9 lb 25 


Baseball 


1143 lisa MONDAY'S RESULT 

1737 115J Utph 22 33 31 35—102 

1512 11L3 Indiana 32 34 34 27— in 

1794 iit7 Donttov 10-20 54 OS. Stockton 4-11 AS 14. 

Hansen 7-11 2-2 It; Ksllooo 9-16 3-7 20, Rich- 
ardson 7-102-2 It ReMandx: Utati42 (Malone 
r Pts Are wi! Indiana 4b (KenowBl. Assists: Utan at 
145 479 31.9 (Stockton 91: Indiana 29 I Richardson »). 

103 443 31-6 

■J SI w Selected CoDege Results 

73 344 J4J EAST 

» Colby 79, Malne-PreMue Isle 47 

FOA pa Columbia 77. RPI 40 
0 112 732 Fairfield 59, Urtca 40 
B 132 429 FrankUn & Marshall 97. Swarttmoni Bl 

* 125 AU Hamilton 44. Utica Tech 73 
'* 1=2 -9 s3 Lentah 13. Kenyon 53 

* ”1 -4'* RuMws 74. Falrieleh Dickinson ?o 

Trinity 91, N law is 41 

' ™ *99 W. Vlremla Tortl 05, Concord 44 
MS 203 13J Williams 45. SkWmors 73 
147 315 134 SOUTH 

102 145 lit Alabama 82. NW Louisiana 77 

04 179 11.9 asmson 83. M«L-E. Shore 57 
95 154 US Chartostan AX The citadel St 

Furman 72, NA-Ainfvllle 71 
No. A vo. Georgia Tteh 119. S^-A(ken 40 
3 173 137 McNeese St. 74. Mississippi SI. 67 

5 17s 113 Manhood SL *9, Term. Wesleyan 55 

3 122 9 A N. Carolina 51. 80. W. Carolina 57 

6 144 RandotolvMacon S3. OvhL Newport 54 

5 132 ZB sw Missouri 87. £. Texas St. 49 

Tam no 99. Concordia IN.V.i 74 
FTA Pel. TennessM Tech 87, Cumberland 65 
J* m Tn.-£hattano9M 107, Gearela CoL 61 
** Jrr l vm 106, Averert 67 
J? ** MIDWEST 

45 -Ml Bradley Bit Chicago SL S3 

43 Blitter 47, D«Pauw 72 

Denison 47, Wash. S. Jett. 44, OT 

Detroit 67. C»™. Mietllaan 64. DT 

I E. MlotlBen 87, YouiMStaMn St. 77 
Missouri 61, California 46 
North*®*) «T! 79. 111. Wesleyan 42 

OttofBrti 115, Urtkono 8? 

SOUTHWEST 

Hie Anpolo SI. 71, MeMwrrv 64 

3 Arkansas Sl li, Belmont ta 

« Houston Baptist 74, Montana 51. n 

I Oklahoma Oly 77. Cameron 72 

«d (l-.ll.14, Rite n. Talcum SL 4» 

Texas 94, Bepttsl ISjC. 1 48 
lj»-l!W.98> Texas Tech 4& Manana 58 
FAR WEST 

my rt‘,1153- CcHor odo 5t 7fc WU. -Green Bay U 
C. Was hin g ton 82, N. ArtJWUJ 70 
10M:0*O7> Howon paeuie U, FulNrton st. 80 
idano 78. Seattle 51 

107-1:09^1) laano SL 68. Tennessee st. 55 
MbinMOtn 87. BYU4tofu«II 80 
(tin [1:1299- N, Colorado 75. Phi nips 40 

Nev.-Las Vaeas 73. & Carolina 56 
1^1-1:09677 virgMa Tceti 90, Sowtnern Coi si 

W. Mlunvri 19*. HowolMflle 105. OT 
i Germany wnur st. 80. S. Utah 50 

TOURNAMENTS 

U5-1 -Msn, Crrtic Farads Tio-Ofl 

ty (1:1149- aiarosiaafUp: vahtarta SL m Seuttwm 
Tech n 

l 2T2L61 Third Ftwe: Pier tool nil. >2. Edward waters 
SA 49 


American Leawe raqUet of ttw rear: Ouebet 

1945 — Ozzie Guillen. Chicago Lemelln 

1944 — Alvin Davis, Seattle D Ainoui 

1983 — Ron Kittle, Chicago Cataar 

19*3 — Col Ripken. Baltimore Hruflev 

1*81 — Dave RlanettL New York Smith 

1980 — Joe Chorbooneau. Clevefand NY Itl 

1*79 — John Cortina, Minnesota, and Al- Rnmono 
froflo Griffin. Toronto Metache 

1*78 — Lou Whitaker, Detroit Herron 

1*77 — Eddie Murray, Baltimore Pltnta 

1974 — Mark. Ftorveh. Detroit Casey 

1975 — Fred Lvtul Boston Beaupre 

1974 — Mike Hare rove. Texas Melansa 

1973 — Al Bumbry, Baltimore MlimO! 

1973 — Carlton Fisk. Boston wamslw 

1*71 — Chris Chamblls&. Clevetand Milled 

1970 — Thurman Munson. New York May 

194* — Leu Pinlella, Kansas City St. L« 

1948 — Sion Bannsen. New York Soetaert 

1947 — Rod Carew, Mtanesata Rav 

1944 — Tommie Agee. Oil moo Penney 

1945 — Curt Bletary, BO I II more Mentn 

1964 — Tony Oliva. Minnesota Bllllneto 

1943 — Gary peters. Chicago Resch 

1942 — Tom Trerti, New York Chevrlw 

1941 — Don Sctnwll, Barton New J 

1940 — Ron Hansen, Baltimore Weeks 

1959 — Bob Allison. Washington Llut 

1958 — Aibte Pearson, Washington Hartto 

1957 — Tonv Kubek. New York Bnsdeur 

1956 — Lull Aparido. Chicago Coprice 

1955 — Herb Score. Cleveland vaneouv 

1954 — Bob Grim, New York 5euve 

1953 — Harvey Kutm, Detroit Bannem 

19S2 — Harry SviU pniladeiphia Skoredei 

1951 — Gil McDougatd. New York Chico* 

1950 — wait Dropa, Boston Bemoan 

1949 — Ray 5 levers, SI. Louis Edward) 

(Note: One player wu selected os Hie mo- Tonmt 

lortfeoBue rookie etfM year la ip«* aadma. Boucuor 
Homing a player from each league began la Havwprt 
II49J Behrend 


Transition 


BASEBALL Micald 

American League Mk> 

TEXAS— Traded Wavne Tolleson.lnflelder. Detroit (11 

and Dave Schmidt. Pllcner. » the Odcaoo 
WWto Son tor Ed Correa, pitcher, and Scott ]\TEff Gl 
Fletcher, Inflelder. lTXlX<i3l 

BASKETBALL WA 

National Basketball AnortoHon 
DALLAS— Traded Kurt NlmpMus. center, 

M the LA. Clippers tar James Donaldson, phlloaeuxita 

. wojwiwfon 

P®5 kT ® fcLL . NY Iskmdere 

Ndtloaal Football Looaue uy Roogeri 

INDIANAPOLIS— Cut Curlls Olckev. run- N(H| 
nine back. Plttsburon 

LA. RAIDERS— Si pned EMs Franks, de- 
fensive end. Placed Ricky Williams, del an- 
live bock, on wolverv. Buttolo 

HOCKEY Quebec 

Notional Hockey League Montreal 

DETROIT — Recoiled Lott Lambert, right Hartiora 
wing, and Claude Lafaelle, cenier, tram Adi- 
rondack rt the American Hockey League. Re- CAMS 

assigned Adam Oaios. center, to Adirondack, 

HARTFORD— Sent Jock Brownsch)die.de- St. Louis 
tensemotw to Binghamton of the ahl Chicago 

N.Y. RANGERS— ASSJoned Slmo SoarlngiL Minnesota 
defen s ema n , to New Haven of the AML Re- Detroit 
called Tonv Fellrlru aefonsemon. from New Toronto 
Haven. 

COLLEGE Edm onion 



MP 

GA 

Pvpna 

340 

9 

Barrasso 

945 

51 

Buffalo 

1305 

M 

Peelers 

119 

3 

Jensen 

784 

37 

Rhniln 

369 

23 

Washington 12) 

1276 

45 

Freese 

480 

21 

Lindbergh 

480 

23 

Jensen 

304 

20 

PBIladelPtita (1) 

1244 

48 

Vanblesbrourtc 

950 

43 

Scott 

136 

9 

Kielrtnger 

191 

14 

NY Rangors 

1377 

64 

Koam 

675 

30 

Peeters 

485 

31 

K lOO In 

120 

10 

Boston (11 

UM 

72 

Mooa 

926 

51 

Funr 

347 

21 

Edmonton (1) 

1373 

73 

Gosselln 

750 

43 

Sevigny 

267 

15 

Maiarchuk 

140 

14 

Quebec (1) 

1205 

72 

Lemelln 

1019 

60 

D'Amuur 

196 

12 

Calgary (1) 

1215 

73 

Hrudev 

(46 

40 

Smith 

581 

38 

NY islanders 

1227 

71 

Ramona 

733 

41 

Metacho 

345 

23 

Herron 

140 

14 

Plltstwrgti (4) 

1278 

83 

Casey 

M 

2 

Beaupre 

843 

53 

Melonsan 

325 

24 

MlimMota (1) 

1227 

79 

Wamrtev 

490 

26 

Ml lien 

490 

34 

Mav 

184 

13 

St. Louts (2) 

1164 

75 

Soetaert 

250 

1) 

Rav 

526 

33 

Penney 

440 

36 

Montreal 

1311 

10 

Billing! on 

140 

8 

Rewh 

442 

26 

Chevrler 

570 

3« 

New Jersey (3) 

1153 

74 

Weeks 

362 

24 

Llut 

760 

52 

Hartford (1) 

1141 

77 

Bradeur 

1125 

61 

Ca price 

207 

23 

Vancouver tl) 

1332 

92 

Seuve 

294 

17 

Bannermon 

232 

68 

Skorodenskl 

60 

6 

Chicago (1) 

rot 

93 

Bemnartn 

685 

50 

Edwards 

SK 

39 

Toronto 

1319 

19 

Bouchard 

373 

71 

Havwprd 

875 

70 

Behrand 

26 

S 

Winnipeg 

1274 10! 

Janecvs 

67* 

50 

Ellol 

45* 

5* 

Los Angeles (2) 

1270 104 

Stefan 

719 

47 

Pusev 

40 

3 

Mlcalet 

32S 

16 

Mto 

140 

16 

Detroit (11 

1234 in 


0 ota 

1 4J3 


NHL Standings 


WALES CONPeRENCE 
Patrick tHytokm 

W L T Pts GF GA 


Buffalo 

Quebec 

Montreal 


12 4 3 

9 7 4 

10 10 I 

B 10 T 
6 12 3 

Adams Division 

11 6 A 


ADELPHI— Announced me resianallM of CaiBory 
Steve La Rose, womens soccer coach. Vancauve 

COLUMBIA— Aiywuncea the rertermt Ion of Winnipeg 


Jim Garrett, too mall coach. 

LOUISIANA state— N amed Charles 
Bloom assistant sports information director. 

MONTANA— Flrtd LfliTV Donovan, foot- 
ball coach. 

PITTSBURGH— Fired Foge Fazlo.toomall 
coach. 

TEXAS-ARUNGTON— Announced It hs. 
dropped intercollegiate football. 


CAMPBELL CONPERENCE 
norm Dtolrtaa 
IIS 8 4 3 » 

:o B 10 3 W 

seta 4 10 S 17 

I 4 13 4 12 

a 4 13 3 II 

Smyth* Division 
non 15 4 2 33 I 

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jver 9 ll 2 M 

«g 111 1 « 

wales 5 14 2 19 


33 103 72 

23 M 73 

nun 

14 79 102 

IV 71 106 


Monday's Ream 

Minnesota [ J 

Buffalo „ * 

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TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1985 


OBSERVER 


PEOPLE 


The Baltimore Summit 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Following is 
an excerpt from the best-sell- 
ing memoir “First, but Never a 
Gentle man, " to be published in the 
spring of 1998. 

I had dreaded the summit con- 
ference ever since Jill Glossy, the 
White House photo-opportunity 
director, made the president order 
me to attend. The press ran vicious 
stones about my reluctance to go, 
but the worn came from Sam Don- 
aldson, the grand old man of TV 
journalism. 

Millions saw that snide show in 
which Sam used old film to argue 
that the First Gentleman was 
afraid there was “too much ertpe 
untj er his rhin and too many moth 
holes in his wardrobe" to bear com- 
parison with the Soviet boss's stun- 
ning wife, Grushenka Melodenko. 

As First Gentleman I was used 
to bang compared unfavorably. By 
the time of the Baltimore summit, 
remember, I had been compared 
with Nancy Reagan and pro- 
nounced “too paunchy,’* with 
Rosalynn Carter and pronounced 
“too dumb,” with Betty Ford and 
pronounced “too vulgar," and with 
Pat Nixon and pronounced “too 
disloyaL" 

This last referred to the time that 
the cameras caught me sleeping on 
the stage during Beulah's televised 
debate with President Bush. Or was 
it President Cuomo? I never pre- 
tended to be able to keep these 
people sorted out. and Beulah 
knew that I couldn’t when she 
asked if I minded her running for 
president. 

“Baby," I said, “you do anything 
you want to, and m be with you 
1.000 percent, but don't expect me 
to keep those politicians sorted 
out.” 

□ 


was young. This was not true. It 
was written to help Beulah win the 
vote of the a ging Californians who, 
of course, have bom just about the 
only voters left in California ever 
since families went out of style out 
there. 

The truth is, I come from Balti- 
more. Southwest Baltimore in a 
neighborhood which used to be 
called “Pigtown.” There are still 
people who remember me there 
from the days we used to meet at 
the saloons while baying a bucket 
of beer for grandparents too stiff to 
get out of the bouse. 

Speaking of a bucket of beer, 
that's exactly what I wished 1 had 
to dump on that cookie pusher 
Beulah calls a secretary of State 
when he said I'd have to invite 
Grushenka to tea in Druid H3I 
Park and then go to tea with her 
next day at Edgar Allan Poe’s 
house, where the Soviet delegation 
was being put up. 

That’s when I really blew my 
stack. If my old Baltimore friends 
saw me serving tea, they’d never 
stop sneering. 

□ 


Filmmaker Emir Kusturica: 
A Winner From Yugoslavia 


Fmir Kusturica (lefl) 
and a scene from 
‘‘When Father Was 
Away on Business.** 


Stars Turn Out in. Park 

7b Be nefitAJDS.Studki 

Elizabeth Tayfor and Aufa 
HepfatfB. rubbed shoulder* njj 


By Henry Kamra 

New York Times Service 


S ARAJEVO, Yugoslavia — 
Emir Kusturica concedes that 


thinks the film won't make 
enough money. He would refuse 


What’s worse was Grushenka be- 
ing Russian, because a lot of my old 
friends were of Polish and Lithua- 
nian extraction and didn't like Rus- 
sians. 

Well, everybody knows the up- 
shot. Tire papers at the time made it 
sound pretty sensational. I just 
want to get the real story on the 
record. I also want to answer the 
three questions everybody has 
asked me since that summit. 


u Emir Kusturica concedes that 
it is not an altogether bad thing to 
have won the Palme d’Or, the top 
prize of the Cannes film festival, 
last May for directing “When Fa- 
ther Was Away on Business.” It is 
making it easier to find backers 
for future films. 

But in most ways, he says, the 
award has made hun unhappy. It 
interferes with bis normal life 
with family and friends in this 
Balkan backwater, where he was 
bom 30 years ago and which he 
has no plans to leave. And it inter- 
feres with his real passion — play- 
ing soccer. 

*Tm not happy about it at all," 
said Kusturica. Uneasily, he shift- 
ed his muscular bulk about on a 
chair during an interview. “I fed 
the person who won the prize is 
not the same as me. He is another 
man , who walks behind me, while 
I remain the same — same last 
name, same first name.” 

Kusturica's euphemistically ti- 
lled film — father’s business trip 
was a two-year term in a labor 
camp — is set just after 1948, 
when Yugoslavia broke with the 
Soviet Union. During a time of 
mass arrests of those suspected of 
S talinis m, many others were arbi- 


trarily swallowed up by the 
camps. The father in the film, a 
minor state employee and wom- 
anizer, was one of them. 

Kusturica depicts the corrosion 
of the life of a tightly knit, tradi- 
tional Sarajevo family through 
the cruelly candid eyes of a 6- 
y ear-old boy, played by Moreno 
de Bartolli. who misses nothing 
and retains his sanity and courage 
through mordant mockery and 
flights into sleepwalking. Kustur- 
ica had a great deal of trouble 
raising the money to make the 
film. After all, he said, it cost 
$200,000. 

The manager of a local film 
company did bow out of sharing 
production costs because he was 
afraid of the script's political im- 
plications. But Kusturica refuses 
to blame Yugoslavia's Commu- 
nist and non-aligned, political 
system. “It reminds me of the 
Western situation.” he said. “You 
bring a script to a moneyman who 


Well, that particular summit was 
held in Baltimore. Everybody had 
got sick and tired of Geneva, espe- 
cially the Russians, who said they 
were fed up earing those bread 
crumbs dipped in melted cheese, 
and couldn't everybody summit it 
up for a change someplace where 
the seafood was good? So it was 
Baltimore. 

That’s why I dreaded the sum- 
mit. Now I have to confess. The 
campaign biography they pub- 
lished said I was from Califo rnia 
where I'd been a fanatic surfer with 
beautiful sun-bleached hair when I 


First of all, no, Grushenka did 
not like baseball, even after I told 
her that Russians said they invent- 
ed the game. “Russians could never 
invent anything so dull as this con- 
test between buds and socks," she 
said. “It is capitalist calumny.” 

Second, no, Grushenka did not 
refuse to accompany me into a Bal- 
timore club because (he KGB told 
her a strip-tease dancer was per- 
forming inride. What they told her 
was that the price of beer was out- 
rageous. 

Finally, yes, Grushenka loved 
the crab cakes on the waterfront. 
“So much better than that monoto- 
nous tea, you vulgar, paunchy, cap- 
italist hedonist,” she said. “Did you 
know crabs were invented in Rus- 
sia?" 


New York Tuna Service 


Although Kusturica disclosed 
that he, like the film's main char- 
acter, sleepwalked as a. child and 
that his father is a state official 
and Communist Party member — 
unlike his mother and himself — 
he rejected a suggestion that the 
film’s story contained autobio- 
graphical dements. Nor does he 
consider his film political. He and 
his scriptwriter, Abdulah Sidran, 
first saw it as the story of the 
mother, a victim both of her hus- 
band's unfaithfulness and the 
price he paid for it — denuncia- 
tion by his mistress and imprison- 
ment. The boy became the film's 
focus as work progressed. 

“My point of view had been 
hiding veiy deep inside me," the 
director explained. “It stems from 
a bitterness at what I see in the 
world as a whole, not specifically 
in this system. I think peering 
deeply into the soul of any person 
would not reflect favorably on the 
system in which he lives. Even a 
tughero is also a great loser." 

Kusturica describes hims elf as 
having the same disabused view 
of all countries of the world. His 
skepticism extends also to the 
United States, which he recently 
visited on a six-week tour ar- 
ranged by the United States In- 
formation Agency. “I saw a huge 
and powerful country,” he said. 
“In California I saw beautiful 
houses, but the people do not 
have time to live in them." 

The director’s life has always 
allowed for time to live, always in 
Sarajevo, except for four years at 
the Prague Film School. He 
painted outside the window of the 
flashy Holiday Inn, built for last 
year’s Winter Olympics, to a solid 
front of high-rise apartment 
buildings of the same vintage. “I 
grew up behind those houses.” he 
said. ’Tt was a simple life, in a 
part of town where the poor and 
the well-off — as well off as yqn 
can be in a socialist country — 
came together. I saw life as it was 
there very clearly. So clearly that I 
couldn’t make a film now about 
the lives of rich people." 

The Kusturica home did not 
incite aspirations that went be- 
yond soccer, the director said. He 


fell in with a neighborhood gang 
of Moslem youths liki> himself , of 
which he was the most mid dle. 


dass. “We were always running 
from the police," he recalled “I 






was glad to have had such a peri- 
od in my life. I would know how 
to make a film about stealing wal- 
lets. I never did myself, but I 
watched many times.” 

His parents, trying to wean 
Emir from bad company, suggest- 
ed that he go to Prague, where an 
aunt was living. A friend of Kus- 
turica's father, a movie director, 
suggested the city’s film school. 

The young Emir soon devel- 
oped an enthusiasm for what 




for AIDS, or acquired vsmac dfc. 
ficiency syndrome. About 
guests at t en de d the $25&-per-p^ 

son dianet, which was followed f* 

entertainment by French 

American edebrittea Earrin fig. 
pleased te cro wd with tet setfe 
s-mojn g during a due; with 
French performer Lfac Ramft tf 
the classic “Ccsx S Bon." Rcnand 
is president of the Association c& 
Artists Against AEDSL the gram* 




started as the family's way of. 
keeping him out of trouble. “I felt 


that ranking a film gives you a 
chance to put together all your 
experience and knowledge;” he 
said. 

Though Kusturica won a prize 
for the first short he produced at 
the school, the woric seemed total- 
ly outside the experience of a 
young Modem from Sarajevo. It 
was called “Guernica,” after the 
Picasso panning, and was set in a 
European dty in 1941. A Jewish 
family is ordered to report to a 
physician, to be examined to de- 
termine whether they are Jews. To 
calm his son’s fears, the falho* 
teDs him die doctor is to check 
whether their noses are too long. 
Frightened, tbe son gathers all the 
f amil y photographs and cuts off 
the noses. Then, recalling the 
pamting “Guernica,” which he 
had seen with his father, he as- 
sembles the mutilated photos in a 
composition In tbe style of the 
masterpiece. 

After winning a prize for a tele- 
vision picture he made when be 
returned to Yugoslavia, he re- 
ceived the cbance to direct his 
first feature movie. “Do Yon Re- 
member Dolly Bell?” — about a 
Sarajevo boy’s discovery of love 
— was awarded the Golden lion 
for a director’s first film at the 
1981 Venice Festival “When Fa- 
ther Was Away” was Ins second 
film. And, no, Kusturica said, 
matter-of-fact and unsmiling, he 
has never made a picture that did 
not receive a prize. 

While he is unimpressed by the 
honor, Kusturica values the utili- 
ty of prizes. He met Harry Saltz- 


i J " " ti 

i jr if M 


V/ ■£ 









man, the American producer, af- 
ter Cannes. They agreed on two 
pictures, both to be shot in Yugo- 
slavia including international ac- 
tors. “It means I can work under 
better conditions, 11 Kusturica 
said. Hie first, "The Spirit Wres- 
tlers,” will deal with a sea of 
Rus sian Christian fundamental- 
ists who emigrated to Canada in 
1905. 

Kusturica is enthusiastic about 
tiie second project “It will be very 
important, my biggest venture, 
the biggest film ever made in Yu- 
goslavia," he said, sounding al- 
most excited. It wiQ be based on 


“The Bridge on the Drina," a nov- 
el by Ivo Andric, the Yugoslav. 
Nobel Prize-winner, that is a Bi- 
ble for the people of the Balkans. 

Meanwhile, Kusturica tries to 
come to rerms with success. “Ev- 
erything that happened went 
against my character bid I HI 
l earnin g to live with it,” he said. 

“I am trying to do s o m et hing 
very difficult,” he said. “Hus or- 
dinary fife, which I love very 
much — Iwanttocpntinneitasif 
is. And at die ««ne time, -gate 
better films.” And, he added;, 
without chang in g hk serious toae, 
play soccer. ' 








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Asia or toe Pacific f5m Re^an, we'l be 
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you m confidence. 


MONEY TREES? 


Chuck Dangler, 

O p erations CaorrfflaKr 
Worldwide Investmenh 
rad Exchange Service* 

FO Bex 831, Oviedo ngridp 32765 U5A 




Tet pOfl 394*5(01 
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INVESTMENTS 
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PAGE 12 

TRANS CONTAINER 
MARKETING AG 



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MADRID UMO 5HWKX 24 bout*. 
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LUBMCATWG CMS. AIL TYPES - 
u o n ite M ve price*. TransmmS Bet- 
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Tiornm B. 


E 5 ES 5 ZEEE 


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YOUR ORKE M PARIS 




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MANMEUROR? 


MONTE CABtO 
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A aiw li tre l i ve ad Secretarial Strvices 
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Tet 93 50 82 28 Tfax 93 50 72 84 
Telex 479631 AIDES MC 
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• MC 98006 MONACO CEDEX 


DIAMONDS 






llOL Tfcfc, 264805 




W.lh’fr'.* 


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Tel, BRD ■ 221-55 18 K? formation * & domrotie tion 


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in Gu m m y 


d tax I Bank account* estobktoed I 
General business advice & assets**? I 
JPOL 17 W6degdhe5t London El 7HP 
wioi WWl. tbe 893911 G 


la repru eetri a Few 
SeleaCfienti 


YOUR AGB4T IN MOROCCO 

SCHAMASCHMAROCSA 

Write <2, Ave Hasson Seghir 
Qgg blanCTi 01, Morocco 
Cat 272604, 272652, 222221 
The 22901 






etex 628352 blond G. 


GUARANIS) INCOME 

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One of toe faramoet 'msuance compa- 
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Av. Man Repos 24, Qt-1005 Lausanne, 






Switzerland. Tok {21122 35 12. 
Telex 25185 MefiCH. 


Telex 25185 MeCs CR 
Brokers' faqaines Invited 


j.tM 1 


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Ptatatinl dens should be m need of « 
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An Amerian 36, spedo ffamr Fnwsh 
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