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«e* i 




The Global. Newspaper 

Edilcd ln Paris - 
■' Printed Simuhanaiasly • 
in Pans, London, Zoridi, 


WEATHSt 



EVITRNATIONAL 




DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 20 


No. 31,967 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


48/85 




PARIS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


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"A r. lu . 

Li' 1 . I • I H 

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:eEK Killed 


on 


z - %J«d«th Miller.; ' . 

. • ^ lg» Nov York Tima Service 

■ ■ 4* V V* , VALLETTA. Malta —Most of 

.m r ' W who perished in the 

J n | 6 *,'V. e ffimando storming of a 

2 Egyptian, airliner Sunday Tiffir 


uCUer ; However, an offidaJ close to the 

Service ' ' . investigation said that the fire 
la — Most of aboard _ the EgyptAir Boeing 737 
dished in the was ignited not bygrcnad es thrown 
of a by the hijackers aboard the plane, 

unday night but by explosions set off by the 


jv_ 2 Egyptian airliner Sunday night vy explosions set on py tne 

- . '/■B*rU - died from smoke mhaiarint^ not co mm andos to gain access to the 

' mil bullet grounds, according to a high- jetliner. 

ir ihii rabldng hospital official in Malta. The official said that many of the 
, Jbfi statement, by the medical 57 passengers laded during the as- 
-“■ic... J ' chief at SL Luke’s Hospital, Dr. aamt had died from the explosions 




:: an ''It 1 7 uwuuu, jl» 4. «uui unu um uum me explosions 

■■ - 7 ,.. “pUy*/ Angelo J. Psaila, on Wednesday themselves or from smoke inhala- 
: ^ sifcfcj; wcnldappear to support assertions . tion from ttie fire ignited by the 
; “•’ "T 1 !w. ■ by Egyptian officials that the pas- explosions, not from the grenades. 

wore not lolled by gunfire A total of 59 persons died, m- 
• Egyptian commandos. ‘ duding one passenger killed by die 

Malta Faced 


Pressure to .... 
; : Z*lAMow Assault 


«*>!*'*■"*■ 
t n-T ~* nt =a s ■ 

l<!i «S<4 


By E.J. Dionne Jr. 

'Rew.Yoric Tima Service 


q VALLETTA, Malta — Malta's 

5 mnunud Vu,;, dedsiori; .to allow Egyptian troops 
r : .jr.jp.T^biir to stoop Ttrhgacked airliner was 
made raider: heavy diplomatic and 
.. : - r V.^ politick pressure, some of which 
“® ai m mfliiated;sBamst the operation, ac- 
- fc !*h£ cordingfto.Mtihese officials, diplo- 

• v;;;; mats fimfrothers fanriSar with the 


- V--" i episodSftr“:-' •• • 
t • • ..“Vv* f test !$.. TTtodeciacafio aBow the assault, 

. .. J.' I in whidr;57 fives were lost, was 

*. . ' ..f‘ t ■■ to ' descritedas. especially difficult far 

Malta becanie of its .financial and . - . ___ ^ ,7 

*tih political J&s to its do 6 & neighbor, '-innelo Mnsud Boonici 

' ■ !'■ Libya. A-S 8 th passenger died later 

io the bospkaJ -and another was from a comxol tower at Luqa Air- 
■“ " 'C nendtoiu raurderwLbjr fte hqaekers before port. 

■■ - Qjg assaidt 

- tCt : . To its dismay, Malta found itself Members of the Maltese cabinet 

■» iirer. . a-, 1 caught m ' the sharp, longstanding 5,150 wcre Sphered at the tower, as 

fe dispute between ^ypt and Libya, were foreign diplomats, including 
At the same time, Maltese officials representatives of the United 
appeared concerned with establish- Statts^Egypt, the Palestine Libera- 



^TOQnaaoft " 


ing a dear record 6 f toughness tion Org aniza tion, Britain, Austia- 
j’aamst terrorism, partly to ctffset a fie and Libya. 


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TKASCO 

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The Merotb^ts 


Jtlief among some Western na- The Americans, the Egyptians 
lions that H had -been lax. in the and the Palestinians remained at 
past . \\ the tower throughout the ordeaL 

The fan de tails of the reasoning but they, lit« the other diplomats, 
behind Malta’s derision and the were mainl y restricted to a lower 
pressures it came under .are still not floor. At one point, according to 
known. But statements by Maltese intercepted radio communications, . 
officials and interviews with the. the Libyan^ ambassador, Ali Ne- 
'^'plomats and ot hertlfam Sqp^sitiy gem;' joined tho -primo mirmtim- in > 
the dficmom made dtmhg thedr- - thc control room- .'■ 


deal demonstrate the difficulties 
that were faced by tins tiny archi- 
pelago in the Mediterranean. - 
From the time the plane, landed 
Prime Minister Cannelo Nfifeud 
Bonnict directed the negotiations 


One diplomat said Malta's deri- 
sion to allow the Egyptians to fly in 
their commandos on a C-130 was 
made between 3:30 and 4 AJvL 

(Conthmed on Page 4, CoL 3) 


hijackers before rhe assault and one 
person «du>died later. The incident 
began when the hijackers seized the 
Cairo-bound plane as it left Athens 
and subseqnouly forced it to land 
in Malta. 

The official dose to the investi- 
gation said that the Egyptian com- 
mandos had detonated at least two, 
and possjftriy three, explosions to 

gain access to the plane. The first, 
he said, was placed in or near the 
cargo hold. Egypt has acknowl- 
edged detonating only a smoke 
bomb. 

The new finding *; could prove to 
be embarrassing to Egypt since the 
official said that the investigation 
might show that the commandos 
used an explosive that was far too 
powerfuL 

The identities of the hijackers — 
thought to number three to five — 
have not been positively estab- 
lished, but Egypt has accused Lib- 
ya of instiganng the hijacking. 
Egyptian officials have linked tne 
hijackers to Abu NidaL a pro- Liby- 
an Palestinian who is a foe of the 
mainstream Palestine Liberation 
Organization faction led by Yasser 
Arafat 

Egyptian authorities and the of- 
ficial close to the investigation said 
that 27 of the original 98 passen- 
gers and crew members aboard 
EgyptAir Flight 64S had flown that 
day to Athens from the Libyan 
capital, Tripofi. 

Egyptian officials also asserted 
Wednesday that the hijackers had 
at fiisi instructed the captain to fly 
the plane to Libya. This contention 
was at variance with the public ac- 
count of the pilot and that of other 

nffira'ak in Malta. 

The official dose to the inquiry 
asserted that (he Egyptians had 
placed explosives directly above 
the cargo hold. Most of the passen- 
gers who died were seated in the 
back of the plane, near the hold. 

Passengers said (he hijackers 
tossed grenades at them when the 
Egyptians attacked the aircraft. 
Egypt has said the grenades were 
phosphorous and capable of ignit- 
ing the inferno that engulfed the 
plane. 

But the Valletta hospital chief. 
Dr. PsaDa, noted that although 
many passengers were, treated for 
shrapnd wounds, which are made 

ds^^^^\lnte marks ^Shat are 
caured by phosphorous bums. 

The baggage compartment at the 
rear section of the plane was dose 
to oxygen tanks and to foam that 

(Coatinued on Page 4, CoL 1) 



J mat w US 1211 UX? Y 

Jonathan Jay Pollard, a navy analyst accused of spying for Israel after being denied bail. 

>f the hij ac kers — 

slSJu: Peres Opposes Questioning In Spy Case 

a the hiiackme. 1 Jl Cx 1 ■/ 


FBI Says Analyst 
Gave Israel Scores 
Of Secret Papers 

By William Claiborne 

Washington Post Service 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres indicated Thurs- 
day that he was opposed to the 
interrogation of Israeli diplomats 
by U.S. law enforcement officials 
investigating alleged spying for Is- 
rael by a U!S. Navy counterintelli- 
gence analyst. 

Mr. Peres, in an interview on 
state television, said: “In the Unit- 
ed States, we do not interfere with 
the judicial process, and in Israel 
we will act according to Israeli 
law.” 

[At a bail bearing Wednesday in 
Washington, the- Federal Bureau of 
Investigation said the coimterimd- 
Iigence analyst. Jonathan Jay Pol- 
lard, had admitted that he provided 
Israel with hundreds of pages of 
classified military documents, in- 
cluding one 15-inch slack of mostly 
top-secret papers. The New York 
Times reported.) 

The prime minister's comment 
came ater diplomats 

based in the United Slates returned 
to Israel reportedly because of 
their alleged association with Mr. 
Pollard, who was arrested Nov. 21. 

Israeli sources confirmed that 
the two diplomats were Elan Ra- 



Anne Hendersou-PoUnrd also was charged with espionage. 


lid, an aide to an Israeli science 
attache at Israel’s embassy in 
Washington, and Yosef Yagur. a 
science counsel in the Israeli con- 
sulate in New York. 

Foreign Ministry officials re- 
fused to discuss on Thursday why 
the two diplomats had been re- 
caJJad One ministry official said: 
“There’s nothing unusual about the 
mobility of diplomats. They come 
and go." 

Israeli government spokesmen 
would uoi say whether Israeli dip- 
lomats would be made available to 


1 ” T> 

~ ~ Ulster Protestants Leave 
■ ^ ^Parliament Over Accord 


INSIDE 


TRANSCO 

•Hfau&xx* LONDON — Northern Irish 
AmrwKS®, Protestant politicians resigned 
^T *| tr from Parliament on Thursday after 
’. . the Houseof Commons approved a 

'a *"* " Tff SS treaty giving the Irish Republic a 
formal voice in the province. 
Spokesmen for the Unionists, 
:v representatives of the Protestant 

majority of one million who want 
Nonhem Ireland to remain British, 
^ said they would seek re-election on 

1 the. same day. 

•* Unionists hold 15 of the 17 

ji r Northern Irish seats and they said 


By Brian Mooney 

Reuters 






^ tire etections, likdy to be held early 
**** year, would be a referendum 

on tfe deal which thev decry as a 
- — 7 - step toward Irish reunification. 
t- 1 ®** The 650-seat House of Cmn- 

■\ mons approved the agreement by 
/ 473-47 on Wednesday and the pact 

will be lodged with the United Na- 
\\ \-..r ***£■'« *;. dons. It passed its last hurdle late 
' Thursday when the Irish Senate ap- 

proved the accord on a 37-6 v«e. 

- t^***J*: ‘* The agreement estabhsbes an in- 

e ;T. tergovemmental conference with a 

permanent secretariat to give the 
Irish Republic a presence in Noth 
: — jjnS'ic.v- Ireland to represent the interests of 
- *; $ the 500,000 Rrmian Catholics. 

Prime Ministers Margaret 
1 ‘ Thatcher >»r*d Garret FitzGerald* 

^ v* the agnatories <rf the Nov. 15 

- " agreement said they hoped it 

would break a cyde of violence and 
politic al ifrmtUnric that has plagued 
„ N orthem Ireland since Britain par- 

^jinoned it from the south in 1921. 
; ^:fj t T Two members of the Detnooatic 
* Unionist Party, the Reverend Ian 

Paisley and Peter Robinson, were 



•^tir*** 






— — SJTiS'5 v- 
_st. 7* .-.is 


the first to tender their resigna- 
tions. 

“My reason for tins action is that 
I believe the Anglo-Irish agreement 
is an act of treachery to the people 
of Ulster,” Mr. Paisley said. .-. 

Another prominent Unionist, 
Enoch Powell, accused Mrs, 
Thatcher of giving way to pressure 
from the United States. 

Mr. Paisley warned Mrs. Thatch- 
er that her government would be 
faced with “confrontation” if it ig- 
nored the elections. The Unionists 
have said they will avoid violence. 
Inn their challenge could provoke a 
serious political crisis. 

Four Unionists, including Mr. 
Powell, are in danger of losing their 
seats, which ibey won by slim mar- 
gins in the 1983 general elections. 

However, their nationalist oppo- 
nents were reported to be consider- 
ing not standing in the new elec- 
tions to reduce their impact 

Twenty members of Mrs. 
Thatcher's Conservative Party 
joined the Unionists in voting 
against the agreement It also was 
rejected by 13 Labor politicians 
who said that it did not go far 
enough toward reuniting Ireland. 

In an article in The Times of 
London, Mr. FitzGerald said that 
both communities were protected 
by the new agreement 

“Unionists are now formally as- 
sured by both governments, in a 
solemn and binding international 
agreement," he said, “that there 
will be no change in the present 
status of Northern Ireland without 
the fredy given consent of the ma- 
jority.'* 



Fernand Braudel, 83, 
French Historian, Dies 





IN COLOMBLA — A woman clasps her daughter, the 
only one of four children to survive the Nov. 13 volcanic 
disaster. Refugee housing remains a problem. Page 3. 


■ Guerrillas unsuccessfully at- 
tacked a South African energy 
plant. Page 4 


WEEKEND 

■ With Day-Glo fake fur, 
young artists construct a new 
bohemia in downtown New 
York. PageS. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ President Jos£ Sarney of 
Brazil announced domestic eco- 
nomic measures. Page 9. 

■ Saudi businessmen seem re- 

luctant to invest in local enter- 
prises. Part 3 of Bob Hageny's 
series. Rase 10 . 


Compiled h' Our SiJf Freer. Dupctckc 

PARIS — Fernand BraudeL a 
French scholar whose w orks on the 
Mediterranean developed an en- 
tirety new approach to history, has 
died, his publisher said Thursday. 
Mr. Braudel was 83. 

Widely regarded as one of the 
century's greatest historians, Mr. 
Braudel was a founder or the "new 
history" school and his research 
and method won him 20 doctor- 
ates. 

He was received into the Acade- 
mic Framjaise in May, after a de- 
cade of ignoring hints that he 
should apply for membership. 

Mr. Braudel combined geogra- 
phy, meteorology, sodal history 
and the detailed study of ordinary 
individuals in a broader approach 
to historical analysis. 

He edited the influential review 
“Les Annales" since 1946 and 
trained a whole generation of 
French historians in his eclectic 
tastes. 

He was a teaching professor and 
then honorary’ professor at the Col- 
lege de France since 1949 and hdd 
numerous teaching and research 
posts in France as weD as .Algeria 
and Brazil. 

Mr. Braudel was perhaps best 
known for his classic work “The 
Mediterranean and the Mediterra- 
nean World in the Age of Philip 
II." 

He composed the book during 
five years in a German prisoner-of- 
war camp, drawing from memory 
on the notes of a decade’s research. 
His fust book, it was published in 
1949. 

Mr. Braudel broadened tradi- 


tional historical research methods 
to include the economic, social and 
cultural forces that help shape his- 
tory. 

This was the approach of “ An- 
na! es.” founded in 1929, which at- 
tempted to incorporate into histori- 
cal study the insights of the 
then-new social sciences. These in- 
cluded the structuralist analysis 
practiced by anthropologists and 
sociologists, the intuitions provid- 
ed by Freudian psychoanalysis, 
and above all, Marxism's stress on 
economics. 

In 1980. Mr. Braudel published a 
three- volume work on capitalism, 
which assured his prestige in the 
United States and Britain. 

He was bora Aug. 24, 1902, in 
LumeviUe-en-Omois, in the Meuse 
region of eastern France^ He first 
taught high school in Algiers, gain- 
ing his first contact with the Medi- 
terranean world, then in Paris. In 
1935. he left France to Leach for 
two years in SSo Paulo. 

He returned to Paris to continue 
bis studies and teaching and in 
1949 was named to the prestigious 
College de France. 

He bad spent 25 years studying 
the Mediterranean before launch- 
ing on a history' of France and a 
three- volume work, “Civilization 
and Capitalism," published in 
French in the 1970s. 

"The Dynamics of Capitalism,” 
one of the three works, points up 
what Mr. Braudel considered the 
determining influence of econom- 
ics on history. 

“Economic history ... is not a 
noble history," he once said. “It 
must confront prejudices. But how 


'-rrr-: 
* * ' 




At Cuba’s Guantanamo Bay , Suburbia Sits on a Fault Line of the Cold War 


' - ■ * ‘ft 


• - v -Ml* 


By Michad Wrisskopf 

Washington Post Service 
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba —This 

Thanksgiving weekend, the U.S. Navy 
pfans to Bast a special Halley’s comet 
watch at Windmill Beach. 

For a gmnH donation, participants can 
gaze through binoculars at the famous 
celestial streak, quaff beer or boy a T- 
sinrL The proceeds will, go to the local 

Parent-Teacher Association. _ 
ll will be a typical American onting, 
except .for one conspicuous difference: 
The road to Windmill is flanked by anti- 
tank ditches and mine fields. 

■ -The navy base on this southern coast of 
Cuba is, a curious blend of smaH-town 


U.S.A. and armed camp — suburbia on a 
fault line of tbe Cold War. The 18-bole 

-golf course is surrounded by a barbed- 
■ wire fence, the yacht 'dub shares an azure 
Caribbean Sea with gunboats, and the. 
R-icVin Robbins's ice cream store is de- 
fended by Stinger anti-aircraft missiles. 

Twenty-six years after Fidel Castro's 
revolution transformed Guantanamo 
into a geopolitical lightning rod, the navy 
warily occupies the only US. mffiiwy 
facility on Communist soil 45 square 
miles ( 1 J 6 square kilometers) strategical- 
ly prime land leased in perpemiw to the 
United States under President Franklin 
D. Roosevelt’s Good Neighbor Policy. 

“Git TPO " as the navy calls the base, fcC 


on hard times in the late 1970s as the 
Carter administration cut its budget and 
manpower and questioned the usefulness 
of abase that Kir. Castro and the Soviet 
Union have called a symbol of ‘‘Y ankee 
imperialism." 

But President Ronald Reagan, deter- 
mined to bolster U.S. power in the Carib- 
bean, has renewed the commitment to 
Guantanamo. 

Last year's $44.3-miIlion budget for 
base operations nearly doubled the 
spending limit of five years earlier. The 
navy plans to spend $40 million for new 
housing, commissaries and other facilities 
to improve the lifestyle on the hilly, arid 


compound for its 6,000 servicemen, de- 
pendents and civilian employees. 

On a tour of Guantanamo organized 
by tbe navy Iasi week, the guide proudly 

pointed out si eel girders where the first 
McDonald’s fast-food restaurant is being 
erected. 

“Guantanamo is a highly visible re- 
minder of our resolve in the Caribbean." 
said Captain John R. Condon, the base 
commander. 

As a strategic asset. Guaminamo 
points Hke a finger into the Caribbean, 
whose sea-lanes cany two- thirds of U.S. 
oil imports and other important raw ma- 
terials. It affords the nary an eye on 
Soviet ships steaming to Cuban pons. 


The largest U.S. naval fleet training 
base in the world and a supply center for 
the Atlantic Red, Guantanamo is grow- 
ing in importance as the navy nears its 
600-ship goal. 

Guantanamo’s name once stood, with 
Berlin and Quemoy, the Nationalist-held 
island off China, as a code word for 
superpower tension. 

It was an international flashpoint for 
three decades. In 1959, its gates were 
dosed; in 1962, the Cuban missile crisis 
forced evacuation of US. civilians, and in 
1979, 1.S0G U.S. Marines staged a mili - 

( Continued on Page 4, CoL 7) 


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U.S. Arms Offer 
Stands for Now, 
Official Says 


the U JS. law enforcement authori- 
ties for questioning, although they 
reiterated Israel's promise of full 
cooperation in the investigation. 

The officials said that a report on 
an "examination" of tbe Pollard 
case probably would not be com- 
pleted before the end of the week. 

Officials said there has been a 
series of diplomatic exchanges with 
the United Suites since Nov. 21. 
but a Foreign Ministry official add- 
ed, "I don't see why we should spell 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5) 


By Michael R. Gordon 

Afar York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Tbe United 
States does not intend to modify its 
latest negotiating proposal signifi- 
cantly before the Geneva arms 
talks convene again in January, the 
director of the Arms Control and 
Disarmament Agency said. 

At the same time, the director, 
Kenneth L Adebnan, indicated 
Wednesday that the Reagan ad- 
ministration expected the Soviet 
side to make some adjustments in 
its position. 

Sir. Adebnan said there was no 
need for the United States to act 
because American negotiators had 
presented a new proposal at the 
end of the last round of the talks, 
which ended in November, and 
were awaiting a Soviet response. 

At the conclusion of their meet- 
ings In Geneva last week. President 
Ronald Reagan and the Soviet 
leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, is- 
sued a statement agreeing to “ac- 
celerate the work” at the negotia- 
tions on “nuclear and space arms." 

Asked about that statement, Mr. 
Adelman said that progress would 
be speeded up “if the Soviets can 
come forward to bridge some of the 
gaps between our proposal and 
theirs." 

Specifically, be said, the Soviet 
Union had to stop linking progress 
on reducing offensive arms to a hall 
by the United States of research 
and development of the Strategic 
Defense Initiative, the Reagan ad- 
ministration's proposed space- 
based defense system. 

Mr. Adelman also called on the 
Soviet Union to abandon its effort, 
at talks on in termed iate-range 
weapons in Europe, to limit the 
number of U.S. aircraft. He also 
said additional emphasis had to be 
given to verification issues. 

Administration officials said the 
□ext round of arms talk* would 
begin in Geneva on Jan. 16, as 
previously scheduled. In addition, 
many officials, including Mr. Adel- 
man, take the view that the next 
move is up to the Russians since 
Moscow has not responded in a 
comprehensive way to the most re- 
cent UJ5. proposaL 

But other officials said the ad- 
ministration bad not had a chance 

(Continued on Page 4. CoL 6 ) 


i ^ ** W 




Fernand Braudel 


can one not insist on the factors 
which constitute every day life? 
How do we not ask what one eats, 
what one drinks, how’ one dresses? 
These are the unknown questions 
being put forth by new historians." 

Among the followers of the 
school of new history in France are 
Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, 
Georges Du by and Pierre Gouben. 

Id France, Mr. Braudel's books 
are much less read than novelistic 
history-writing based on Mr. Brau- 
dels approach, for example, best- 
sellers such as “Momaillou" by Mr. 
Ladurie. a former proieg£ with 
whom Mr. Braudel quarreled. 

But in the U.S. and other mar- 
kets, the works of Mr. Braudel and 
contemporary French historians 
whom he influenced outsell French 
novelists, philosophers and sociol- 
ogists such as Claude Levi -Strauss 
and Michel Foucault. 

Mr. Braudel received 13 honor- 
ary doctorates from universities 
outside France, including Yale, 
Cambridge, Oxford and Madrid. 

(AP, Reuters, WT) 


Guantanamo 


* ^‘ s —> 
CaftWMirSH 


OtVENTE PROVINCE 


»• Boquaron 


U.S. Naval* 

Ba»Q 


Caribbean Sea 


and Kenneth L. Adelman 

nse. 

meei- 

sident 

%% Court Denies 

o “ac- 

E? Mistrial in 

it, Mr. 

would A • 

““ Aquino Case 

^ The Associated Press 

_ . MANILA — The Supreme 

iyC " nei Court cleared the way Th ursday for 
a lower court to announce its ver- 
tanau ^ tna] of 26 persons ac- 
searc . cused in the assassination of Ben- 
raLe ®. c igno S. Aquino Jr. 

311 ad_ The court voted 9 to 2 to throw 
ipace- out a f or nutria] fg^d last 

week in the case of the slain opposi- 
Dn the tion leader. 

effort. The petition asserted that the 
■range judges favored the defense and that 
it the vital evidence against the accused 
e also had been suppressed. 

! 10 be Chief Justice Ramon Aquino, 
who is not related to Berugno 
id the Aquino, called Lhe petition “utterly 
would devoid of any legal bases whatso 
16, as ever." 

lition. The two dissenting justices said 
Adel- the case had been dismissed much 
: next too quickly. 

since Judge Augusio A meres of the 
! in a court that tried General Fabian C. 
3 st re- Ver, the armed forces chief, and 25 
others on charges of murdering Mr. 
ic ad- Aquino, said the three-judge panel- 
hance would meet Friday to decide when 
gv to release the verdict 
' The court said it had reached a 

unanimous decision on Nov. 12. It 

had set the announcement for Nov. 
20 , but the Supreme Court issued a 
temporary restraining order to give 
it time to rule on the mistrial peti- 
tion. 

General Ver. a longtime ally of 
President Ferdinand E. Marcos, is 
widely expected to be acquitted. 
The general has been on leave since 
be was indicted on findings by a 
civilian fact-finding board. 

Opposition lawyers following 
the case have predicted that most, 
if not all, of the defendants will be 
cleared. 

The resolution dismissing the re- 
quest for a mistrial gave no reason 
beyond the statement by Lhe chief 
justice. 

Chief Justice Aquino had voted 
last week as an associate justice to 
dismiss the petition outright, but 
the majority of his colleagues de- 
cided to hold a hearing first. He 
was named by Mr. Marcos to re- 
* r? 1 ^ pkee the former chief justice. Felix 
, me - Makasiar. who reached retirement 
: 63 ~j age this week. 

“? eSi The mistrial petition was filed by 
. ^ relatives of Rolando Galman. who 

the military had named as Mr. 
ine Aquino's assassin. .and two dozen 
“ prominent dozens, including three 
■"«. retired Supreme Court justices and 
five university presidents. 

°5?° . The petition accused prosecutors 

and judges in the case or colluding 
to acquit all the defendants. It also 
accused Mr. Marcos of making 
y™- statements that influenced the 
* 1lh court. 

Justice Gaudio Teehankee. in a 
dissenting opinion, criticized the 
:l and Court for not giving, him time to file 
inan ^ a more complete dissenL 
re ? c “ General Ver and the other defen- 
!>aoI ‘ dams are accused in the deaths of 
rauss Mr. Aquino and Mr. Galman. Mr. 

Aquino, who was Mr. Marcos's 
on ? r " chief political rival, was gunned 
^J nes down in August 1983 as he was 
being escorted from a plane that 
n .y_ brought him home from three 
IHT * years’ voluntary exile in the United 
States. 

__ Soldiers testified that they shot 
£2^ Mr. Galman after they saw him 
MA shoot Mr, Aquino. 

■ Election Bills Passed 

-** , ] The National Assembly enacted 
Thursday the country's new elec- 
tion code and a bill setting the 
order of succession if the presiden- 
cy falls vacant before an election, 
Agence Franee-Presse reported 
from Manila. 

on A third bill specifically calling 
for the February poll was approved 
earlier and is expected to be en- 
acted by Saturday. 

>/». Mr. Marcos is expected to sign 
bz all three laws shortly, although op- 
position members of parliament 
!_ are set to contest the constimtion- 
5 _i aiity of the third hill before the 
ntt Supreme Coon. 




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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 



Static Greets French Deed for Private TV 



WORLD BRIEFS 


By Richard Bernstein 

New York Tunes Service 

PARIS — A government plan to allow 

France's first private commercial television sta- 
tion to transmit from the Eiffel Tower has 
generated a storm of protest 

The French government awarded a license for 
a private television station last week to a 
French-Italian consortium that is to begin 
broadcasting in February. The license is being 
viewed as a revolutionary step in French televi- 
sion broadcasting, which always has been a 
government monopoly. 

Nonetheless, the government’s plan, includ- 
ing the use of France’s best-known monument 
to transmit the programs of the new station, has 
tuned into a flamy partisan political issue 
with the rightist opposition accusing the govern- 
ing Socialist Party of attempting to create a 
station that will be under its political control. 

The lic ensing derision, reportedly made by 
President Francois Mitterrand against the rec- 
ommendations of some of his advisers, will turn 
operational control of the station over to a 


All of this has taken on new 
Of tile annrraii-h nf IwiilntivC 



because r * Ah- Controllers End Protest - 

e Sections next ^ ^ ^ ended W 

which 120 people collapsed from p 






ATHENS (Reutm) 
four-day hungprj^ 
and throe had tort 


Att flights in and art of Groce re 

said. 


uananau^^~r-~i a^ort worces sam. , 


Broadcasting antennae atop the Eiffel Tower. 




character of a television station that will be 
subject to the will of the authorities." 

The transmitter itself would not c 
outward appearance of the tower, which j 
is used for transmissions by the government 
broadcasting service. 

The dispute is the latest element in a centre- when, in a sunrise move Nov. 15, the gov- 
versa! and long-snuhed effort by France to ermneut pushed through legislation authorizing 

inaugurate what is viewedvradely as a new era in the government broatosting service to bufld Li ^dress bad; 

comnramranons and entertainment. transmitter on the Eiffel Tower for the use of the Sources sard tte officials and*gr«i»£ 

Both left and right agree m principle on proposed private station, the opposition quickly after meeting with fringc beoefia!woi?r£j ' 

ending the traditional goweramau monopoly on ac^^rf^Smestabtoha new channel talks on Ov=rnnKp^»“ jJfgJJSSi ^ 

tdevison broadcasting, but each also has ac- favorable to itbefore the elections dilute its contmUerS took part m the protest, tne 
cused me other of hying to gain political control power 
of the proposed commercial stations. 

and 40 locS ones to be supervised by a newly 

created National Coundl For Audiovisual Com- riremnstaoccs 

miuucation, which would enforce cwr*»"r rules, *bat is done under these _ „ _ 

including minimum numbers of programs pro- 0311 be revoked as soon as we are in po . I n .mdTand F W^ish wings of the liberal and Social Ouataai 

duced in France. * 111 "Pty. advocates of the government plan tbeFrHKO Sections Oct. 13. The few parties, partners is Iheotr 

During their 23 years in power before the ten accused the opposition, particularly Mr. ^ Martens, increased the&rmgority 

Socialist victmy of 1981, thY rightist parties Chirac, of having put obstacles m the wih of ■ 

operauomu couuui « mi »umvu u.« ^ a never moved to end the government monopoly <“* private station by engaging m drawn-out aFlen ^s 0C a<3jriaiaiLna9fcfcw change* t 

group of French industrialists who have had on broadcasting. Soon after the Socialists took ^tiatkms over the use of the EffdTowerfor , . ^ Re appointed Guy Verbofciadt, thepretefcar 

personal ties to Mr. Mitterrand. control they opened radio to private competi- broadcasting. ssrti — - — - ~ x ,K ~ *u«**»» — — - — 

“This plan constitutes a veritable despoil- tion and announced that they would do the The license- announced last week was awarded 
meat of the city of Paris based on one of the same thing for television. to a French-Italian broadcasting syndicate, led 

most prestigious monuments in its patrimony,” The plan for television approved in August by by Silvio Berlusconi, a commeraal television 

the mayor of Paris, Jacques Chirac, said of the the Socialists was attacked by the opposition for operator in Italy, and two French industrialists, ^ I q n l*JC Arttinin Q ■ ; . 

p lan to construct a new transmitter on the Eiffel giving decisive control over programming to the Jfirfime Seydoux and Christophe Riboud, both jy jf j pTI JtLtXpClS iicHv* UI gH II I' fi l UOl 

Tower. “It is testimony to the obvious political government's supervisory council. of whom have personal ties to Mr. Mitterrand. A - - 


• Viouiw IV AI UCLVlb UH# A 

"Mat the government is doing is merely.; P,,Ujan Leader ( '111^61*8 CoaC&ie 


Mo reens rccutos) — Prime MmggMltiiedttoiaa 


his senior mmisicia. »«- - — ,TTT — 1 r -— ■ *« 

Parrish liberal Party, as one erf h* three dWpane mnm 
of the budget. Mr. yohofsiadi replans Frans Gflx*)mi,Y 
returning to a business career. 


From Optimism to Doubt: Moscow’s 
East-Bloc Allies React to the Summit 


By James M. Markham 

New York Tuna Service 

BONN — The Soviet Union's 
Warsaw Pact allies have reacted to 
the Soviet-American summit meet- 
ing at Geneva with subtly differing 
positions, according to a variety of 
authorities on Eastern Europe. 

Within the East European camp. 
East Germany and Hungary have 
put the most optimistic interpretar 
dons on the two days of encounters 
Iasi week between Ronald Reagan 
and Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

In the last year. East Germany 
and Hungary have quietly coordi- 
nated their foreign and economic 
policies, which assume a widening 
of their extensive economic links to 
Western Europe. 

Appearing on Hungarian televi- 
sion, GyuJa Horn, state secretary in 
the Foreign Ministry, said that the 
meeting had accomplished “more 
than anyone could have expected" 
and concluded that the Geneva 
talks heralded “a new chapter in 
Soviet-U.S. relations and through 
them in East- West relations." 

Touching a theme that stirs great 
interest in East Berlin and Buda- 
pest. the state secretary said that 
the earlier deterioration of Soviet- 
U.S. relations had restricted “the 
international possibilities" of small 
and medium-sized European na- 
tions. 

“It follows from this.” the For- 
eign Ministry official said, “that if 
Soviet-American relations improve 
— and things did move in this di- 
rection at Geneva — then for us 
this is certainly more favorable 
than the previous situation." 

Addressing a weekend gathering 
of his Central Committee in East 
Berlin, Erich Honecker, the East 
German leader, described the Ge- 
neva outcome as “heartening and 
as such positive." and he welcomed 
the decision to hold two further 
Soviet-American summit meetings. 

Once Mr. Gorbachev' met with 
his allies on Nov. 21 in Prague, the 
state-run media in other Warsaw 
Pact nations began to echo the So- 
viet Union’s cautiously upbeat 
tone. 

But in the hard-line Czechoslo- 


vak press, there were undertones 
warning that apparent shifts in the 
Reagan administration's attitude 
could prove “illusory." 

The day after the Prague gather- 
ing, General Wqjdech Jarnzelski, 
[he Polish leader, made an unex- 
pected visit to Bucharest to meet 
with President Nicolae Ceaucescu 
of Ro mania. The two leaders issued 
a rather gloomy communique, 
which some Western diplomats 
took to be a reflection of Mr. 
Ceaucescu's fear that improved So- 
viet-American ties could diminish 
the effect of his prized indepen- 
dence in foreign affairs. 

The economies of Poland and 
Romania are in difficulty, which 
some analysts believe lessens their 
political weight within the Warsaw 
Pact And unlike East Germany 
and Hungary. Poland and Roma- 
nia are not particularly attractive 
trading partners for the West and 
so may expect fewer benefits from 
East-West detente. 

According to Western diplomats 
and academic analysts, the Polish 
reaction to the summit meeting ap- 
pears to have been conditional 
too, by a continuing argument with 
the United States over credit sanc- 
tions imposed by Washington after 


Warsaw's crackdown on the Soli- 
darity movement in 1981. 

The Hungarian and East Ger- 
man views of the summit meeting 
have posed the question of what 
leeway Mr. Gorbachev will allow 
his allies in their dealings with the 
West. At a Warsaw Pact meeting 
last month in Sofia, the language of 
a final communique made a bow to 
the Hungarian view that small na- 
tions should have a role to play in 
forging detente. But the communi- 
que balanced this with calls for 
unity within the Communist alli- 
ance. 

“I would say that this is a matter 
that has not been fully decided by 
the Soviet leadership," said Chris- 
tian Meier, an expert at the Federal 
Institute for the Study of Eastern 
Europe in Cologne, West Germa- 
ny. 

■ Romanian Reaction 

Ro mani a’s official Agerpres 
news agency quoted Mr. Ceausescu 
as saying Thursday that the Gene- 
va meeting between U.S. and Sovi- 
et leaders had been a disappoint- 
ment. It said he urged both 
superpowers to reach a swift disar- 
mament accord. Reuters reported 
from Vienna. 


y % jV 

* •<* 


<} 



Th« Anoomd Praai 

WELCOMING CEREMONIES — Prime Minister 
Rajiv Gandhi of India, and his wife, Sonia, with Prime 
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone of Japan and his wife, 
Tsutako, cm Thursday. Mr. Gandhi, who began a four- 
day visit to Japan, urged the country to share its wealth. 


Experts Link Transfusions to AIDS Spread in Africa 


By Lawrence K_ Airman 

New York Times Service 

BRUSSELS — As scientists in- 
tensify their search for the reasons 
why so many Africans are suffering 
from AIDS, new studies reported 
here point at least in part to risky 
blood transfusion practices 
throughout that continent. 

The average African has a 9-per- 
cent chance of becoming a carrier 
of the AIDS virus one year after 
receiving a transfusion of blood 
that has not been tested for the 
virus, according to calculations re- 
ported by Dr. J. Desmyter of Leu- 
ven, Belgium. 

Blood transfusions are only one 
of several factors in the spread of 
acquired immune deficiency syn- 
drome in Africa, according to par- 
ticipants in a recent meeting in 
„ , . Brussels on AIDS in Africa. They 

The Associated Prat presented more new data showing 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — , that promiscuity among heterosex- 
uals seemed to be the most impor- 
tant factor in the spread of the 
disease on that continent 
Yet the frequency of the pres- 
ence of the AIDS virus in blood 
donors makes it “imperative" that 


Troops KiU 3 at Haiti Protest 


Four persons were killed, three by 
gunfire, and 14 were injured Thurs- 
day in Gonalves when Haitian 
troops opened fire during the sec- 
ond day of demonstrations by un- 
employed youths. 


African countries develop a strate- 
gy' toe a safe and reliable blood- 
bank system. Dr. Desmyter said. 
With rare exception, donor blood 
in Africa is not tested for evidence 
of AIDS, a process that demands 
expertise and technology that 
many countries cannot afford. 

Small studies in Rwanda, Ugan- 
da and Zaire found evidence of the 
AIDS virus in up to 20 percent of 
the blood donated for transfusion, 
according to Dr. Nathan Gumeck 
of Sl Pierre University Hospital in 
Brussels, me of the organizers of 
the conference, which drew more 
than 700 participants from 51 
countries, 16 of them in Africa. 

Similar studies for evidence of 
AIDS in donated blood resulted in 
figures of 5 percent in Kenya and 2 
percent in Zaire. 

These figures contrast with less 
than 1 percent in the United States, 
where all donor blood is now tested 
for evidence of AIDS before it is 
used for transfusions. 

Another factor cited in the 
spread of AIDS in Africa is that 
health workers often give injections 


with needles that they do not steril- 
ize between uses. 

AIDS has spread over much of 
Central Africa in the last two years 
or so, participants in the Brussels 
meeting said. About me AIDS case 
in five involves a child, as against- 
one in 100 in the United States. 

Data about AIDS in Africa are 
incomplete and vary from country 
to country depending on the 
amount of research done in each 
country. 

Some African participants were 
angry over medical journal reports 
by Western scientists and press ac- 
counts by Western journalists re- 
porting that AIDS was widespread 
in Central Africa and may have its 
origins there. About 50 of the Afri- 
cans signed a statement that said in 
part that papers reported at the 
meeting “did not show any conclu- 
sive evidence that AIDS originated 
in Africa.” 

The African doctors said that 


risks of AIDS spreading among 
promiscuous heterosexuals in the 
United States and other developed 
countries. According to Dr. CIu- 
meck’s summary, the optimists say 
that AIDS is unlikely to spread 
among heterosexuals for these rea- 
sons: 

• The percentage of cases of 
AIDS believed to be spread by in- 
tercourse among heterosexuals and 
reported to the Centers for Disease 
Control in Atlanta has remained a 
small and stable fraction of total 
American cases since the disease 
was first detected in 1981. The. 
overwhelming majority of cases oc- 
cur among homosexual men or us- 
ers of intravenous drugs who share 
contaminated needles. 

• Since the AIDS virus has been 
detected in semen but not in vagi- 
nal secretions, the virus may be less 
easily transmitted from women to 
men than from men to women. 

• What appears to be the hetero- 


Militia Shells 
3 Villages 
In Lebanon 

Reuters 

SIDON, Lebanon — Israeli- 
backed militiamen shelled three vil- 
lages Thursday after a post they 
hold jointly with Israeli security 
agents came under Katyusha rock- 
et fire, Lebanese security sources 
said. 

• Israeli troops hunting for guerril- 
las, meanwhile, set two houses 
ablaze in a raid on the village of 
Sbebaa in Israel’s self-declared, 
border security zone but made no 
arrests, they said. 

Artillerymen of the Israeli- 
backed South Lebanon Army mili- 
tia stalled the villages of Arab Sa- 
lim, Kfar Roummaneh and Kfar 
TTbnit just outside the zone shortly 
after the dawn rocket attack. 

A militia spokesman told a radio 
station that there were no casual- 
ties in the rocket attack. 

Separately, the charge d’affaires 
at the Swedish Embassy in Beirut, 
Lars Bjanne, said Thursday that 
the embassy is to be dosed because 
West Beirut's chrome violence has 
made normal work impossible. He 
said that the embassy would be 
reopened when conditions permit 
In Oslo, Norway also announced 
that it would dose its embassy tem- 
porarily. 

■ Syrians in Beirut 
A 100-man Syrian military wwi* 
arrived in Beirut on Wednesday to 
help preserve a truce bet w een rival 
militias after bitter dashes last 
week, The New York limes report- 
ed from Beirut. 

The soldiers have joined 38 Syri- 
an Army observers who have been 
in West Bout for five months. 



7*500 Ethiopian Jews . . _ _ 

The attorney general. OmxrAbdnl-Atti, also has established a an 
tee ip review the activities of aHrefief oi gaitlra tktn swcriiBg with rtf 

in Sudan, die Sudan News Ageaty nyetted. 

The Marines being ocpeScd, the Jomt Vcfanrai y Ag ency, the Ini 
tional Ot t l*'4* c Migration Commission and the hrierpRaiuiimut 
mittee for Migration, were wedding m Sedan without the appro 
licenses, the attorney general said Wednesday. - - 

Stevens Era Eads in Sierm Leb^e 

FREETOWN, Sierra. Leone 
(AP) — President State Stevens; 

80, leader of this West African 
country tor 17 years, has retired 
and handed over power 
Mr. Stevens’s chosen successor, 
dor Genera! Joseph Saida Mo- 
was s w orn in Thmsdagr- The- 
sideat said Wednesday in a 
jeedi broadcast nation- 
wide that be had ftd i corfSdencein 
General Momoh, 48, an army com- 
mander who won an officially re- 
ported 99-percent approval in bal- 
loting earlier this yen - ' 

When asked reoently about Mr. 

Stevens’s future role. General Mo-_ 
moh said that from the day the 
president handed over authority, 

“he has nothmg to do with govern- , . r 

merit, nothing whatsoever* • Joseph Sudn Moro 



because AIDS was a global prob- sexual spread of the disease in Afri- . ■^ S1 . c ™ nt George Bosh and church. 



In Paris 

the luxury of the last century 
is alive. And breathtaking! 

HOTEL 

INTER- CONTINENTAL 
PARIS 





THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL 

9. INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS 

3 rue de Casriglione, 75040 Baris-Cedex 01. (331) (4)2603780, Telex: 220114 
For reservations call: Amsterdam: (020) 26.20.21, Brussels: (02) 751-87-27 
Frankfurt; (069) 27 100620. London: (01) 491-7181. Milan: (02) 87.72.62. ur cad your nearest 

InterContinental sales office or your travel agent. 



lem, not just an African problem, 
efforts at linking an African origin 
to AIDS “do not contribute to fu- 
ture centred programs." 

The Africans also called on the 
World Health Orgamcatkai, the 
Organization of African Unity and 
other major agencies to finance 
control measures. 

Scientists are divided about the 


ca could be due to factors that are 
as yet unrecognized. 

Pessimists, however, who con- 
tend that AIDS is likely to spread 
among heterosexuals, point to re- 
sults of a survey in San Francisco. 
That survey found that 21 percent 
of homosexual men said they had 
had sot with at least one woman in 
the last five years. 


MANAMA. Bahrain (Restere) — A se ni o r Iranian «*»natyi<»r 
reported Thursday as saykgtiuttriamte forces would soon lafiadi; 
offensive against Iraq, wtadh tea been preparing for a fresh assault 
the Guff war fronts. j - 

Mohsea Rafiq-Dnst, minisier of the Revohtikmaiy Guard, t 
paramfihary youth org ani z ati on; “In the neg ftamn an extensive > 
avc will be hunched by xhelshmic combatants." Iran’s national 
agency IRNA reported. 

In Baghdad, meanwhfle, a mfimy spokesman said that Iraqi f 
a gain raided Iran’s mam ofi export tcnruual on Kfang Island r 
northern Gulf, which has been attained jpt^cutetSy sace rrmMt - 
The two nations have been at war for fire jates. .. V •< 

LosAngdesMayDedarea^Sanctoa 

LOS ANGELES (LAI) —After an emotional debate, a divide* 
Angeles City Council has adopted ft resolution drriarfng the.d 
sanctuary* for Central American refugees fleeing political pence 
arid violence in that homelands. 

The resolution, adopted Wednesday on an 8 ~b vote, is largely sym 
But if signed by Mayor Tam 3nuBey, it w3I instruct city officials ; 
vetontamy assist the U& Immigratiott and Naturalization Sera 
finding and (toortingi^egffafiensfrom El Salvador and Guateraa' 
estimatod 300,000 inmirerante from those countries live in Los An 
The resolution wouhf ehqmwcF day employees to ignore a pe 
refugee .status in providnigprfjHc services. The council also reaffic 
Los Angeles Ponce Department poBcy of not arresting or detr 
. . .. undocumented immigrants merely for being in the country illegall 

ruti ^w edcmteiPxsmmtoseefc-4 3 f rea] j c ^ttecgcuinsi(«hcigtmdgwfakmimdQcumeat^imm4 
the freedom of six American hos- ran be over to tbe immig ration service, 
tages. He said he remains optimis- V' 

tic but cautioned that “things can r ni . fKp Rpmrrl 
go horribly wrong,'’ The Assodat- -T OrHW JltfCOra 

A US. grand jury hardened Hughes Aircraft Co. of allegation: 
former enq&yee that Hughes paid SI million in bribes to a 
Arabian businessman to win a $1.8-b31iott contract, the compam 
Wednesday in B Seguudo, California. 1 

- An Orthodox print in the Soviet Union has been exeoried for th 
he allegedly.playtsd is the failed hijacking of an Aeroflot plane two 
ago, Keston College, a Soviet monitoring group in Bri tain, rep 
Tnursday.il did not say when the execution i 
was earned out. 


A spokesman for the observers 
confirmed the dispatch of tire sol- 
diers but (fid not say how many 
there were or what they would do. 

■ Church Envoy to Return 
Terry Waite, the envoy of die 
archbishop of Canterbury, said 
Thursday he plans to return toBei- 


The Associat- 
ed Press reported from London. " 
The envoy arrived in Londori 
from a three-day trip to the United 
Stales, where he met with- Vice' 


officials. 

Mr. Waite, who 


traveled 

twice to Lebanon to meet widrthe 
kidnappers, said he planned tbxe- 
tum to Beirut on Sunday or Mon- 
day. 

The kidnappers are demanding 
that Kuwait free 


oned after bombings at timM 
and French, embassies. . 


Britain, rep 
Teymuraz Qrikhlad: 


Correction 

bom article in id* International Herald Tribune of Nov. 18, the 
Gabriel Gazraa Marquez was incorrectly identified as Mexican. 

Colo mbian 


China Is Expected to Enter 
Asian Bank Despite Taiwan 


United Press International 

MANILA — China applied 
Thursday for membership in the 
Asian Development Bank, follow- 
ing three years of negotiations. It is 
expected to be admitted by April, 
despite opposition from Taiwan. 

The development bank is the last 
mzyor world organization to which 
Taiwan belongs but China doe& 
noL It appears that Taiwan will 
retain full membership after China 
joins, 

P.S. Ha rib a mn an information 
officer for the bank, said that Chi- 
na's entry “will not affect the status 
of any existing member.” 

Beijing is expected to take ad- 
vantage of the bank's resources and 
low-interest loans to pursue its 
modernization program. 

However, not all issues appear to 
be resolved Some that remain in 
doubt include Taiwan's refusal to 



UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 

tee WwV, Aeriiuli, Uh ftpwiUKt [ 

Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 

PAOHC WESTERN UNWBWTYl 

MON. Sepulveda BtvdU 
las Anoei—. CattuaTtia . 
TOM9,0*i.[.23rUAA. 


change its came from the Republic' 
of China, and the question of plac- 
ing limits on Beijing's borrowing to 
satisfy other Asian members who 
fear a drain cm bank reserves. 

A brief statement by the devel- 
opment bank referred to China as 
the People’s Republic of China and 
said, “ic is expected that PRC will 
become a member before the next 
annual meeting to be held at the 
end of April 1986" Officials de- 
clined to discuss the name issue. 

Other bank sources, however, 
said the issue of Taiwan's name was 
a “stumbling block” and that there 
was a “whole list of possibilities" of 
what might eventually be accept- 
able both to China and Taiwan. 

C.P. Jhong, general counsel of 
the bank, said that China would be 
represented on the 12-member 
board. He. also said there were still 
“plenty of questions to be dis- 
cussed on membership 

China expressed interest in join- 
ing the development bank as long 



China, Frees American 
Jailed After Hotel Fire 


CP. Jhong 


Sewers 



ago as 1974 but negotiations began, 
in earnest in February 1983, offi- 
dalssakL 

The bank, which aids develop- 
ment through loans and technical 
assistance, has 45 members. 


EsL 1911 

Just tell the taxi driver "sank roo doe noo” 

• 5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

• Falkencurm Str; 9, MUNICH •: 



United Press Iniemadonat 

BEIJING — China freed Thurs- 
day a US. businessman who had 
been sentenced to 18 months in 
prism for accidentally starting a 
hotel fire in April that M ll rd IQ 

persons. 

Court officials in the northeast- 
ern city of Harbin said that Rich- 
ard Ondrik, 34 r was paroled 13 
months before his scheduled re- 
lease. 

He was arrested June 26 and 
convicted Ang. 13 of starting a fire 
m Harbin’s Swan Hotel. Five 
North Koreans, four Chinese and 
Mr. Ondrik’s Hong Kong business 

partner died in the April 19 fire, 

A spokesman for the Intennetfi- 
ate People's Court tn Harbin said 
.that Mr. Ondrik was freed after 
“feting with Chinese law enforce- 

ment offidals. He said Mr. Ondrik 
was accompanied to the mee rinp ky 
Charles Ray, wee consul at tteuS 

Consnlirtw % Sheny ang 

Mr Ray, contacted by telephone 
at a Harbin hotel, said that Mr. 
Ondrik was unavailable for conn 
ngt but was expected to leave 

Utaia “as soon as he can mate it 
out.” There, were no terms attached 

to Mr. Ondrik’s panti^ Mr. Ray 
said. *■ 

W«ero sources said thai Mr 
yndrik was released early for aood’ 
kbavibr, despite having s&vafavi 
than half the term stipulated. 


Mr. Ondrik, , 

American in a Chines e jal 
expected to leave Harbin f a 
umon with his parents, who 
Hawaii. 

In addition to his 18-mcml 
fence, Mr. Ondrik was orde 
pay about 170.000 yuan (S5 
m damages. 

.. Mr. Ondrik’s company, X 
Projects Southeast Asia Ltd. 
the fine in mid-October. Hi 
yen applied for parok at thrift?, 
time. 4l j 

Prosecutors charged that tJt’* r 
started about midnight whe • f 
Ondrik fdl asleep while smoki 
bed. Mr. Ondrik, who was ir^ 
bin cm business, said he cou 
. recall having sm o ke d in be 
night of the fire and did not ' 
ally do so. 

Two Chinese hotel emp ' . 
were convicted of negligence, 
seniors said the deputy sc 
chief, who was in charge t 
prevention, was drinking in t 

td bar, and the employee in < 

’of the floor where the fire bo 

was not at Ins post. 

The new hotel's fire alam 
rtuoke detectors were not w< 
the night of the fire. ' ^ 

Western analysts said tbt_ ' 
vw particularly sensitive be '' 
of the deaths of the North Ko 

s®ne : of whom were bdiev -" 
ofifta 


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CSTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


Page 3 


»j»u ^ 

-‘-sc: ^ , - r: co!i 


■ s ^,, r . .. ■ ■ ' .-,. *<.*’*& c<5 & 

?.... , " ; iF’-auSb, % 

.W. , :• ... JW 


Control of Plant Genes 


••• ■■>.: 


By Keith Schneider plants would unfitirfy lose the re- 

Nc» Yeric Thna Sente* gills of A«r labors. 

WASHINGTON —Die Reagan Mfflfcau Fenwick. the U.S. am- 
administration has thrustitsdf into ^ assa ^r to the conference, said 
to international dispute over the ^ al A* Reagan admimsi»6oa 
avaikbffily of genes essential io the was aware of the need to intensify 
wori<Ts supply of food. the global effort to preserve generic 


;iaia ""*** 




' WASHlNGTON-DieReagan 

iuliHitliHnlinn line s¥ . 




The administration, is vigorously AtaSmisr 

.^WBrtae 

conference mRomei » establish a f-SK ™ l • dd€galcS 

new global system for collecting 

and storing endangered genedcr^ f “ 3Dgr co “: 


- and storing endangered genericr^ Mrs. Fcnwrefc. a former con- 

Jersey. said 

^ ^ Stocks, seeds and tissues^* teiqjhooe that a less extensive 


• . ..." -• ?*!#. 


c,r ^ 




■ ; - V -^* 3 SS 


' nu ^ r:i l*.nd> Ln § 




assays ** «»- 

- AgricnitureOiganiation, called on ,J! We ?"Ji nc ?J todnp&steihis 
industrialized nations to provide ?^ cn1 ' ^ we a 

• up to $100 nriffion anmSwto ST h ^ n ^ >rove 
Third Worid countries mterested^ thM we know works/* 
collecting and storing rare p ?n«« She added; “Scientists have al- 
varieties that have valuable genetic ways had free access to genetic ma- 
characteristics. tenal hrid by the existing netwedr. 

' Most of the plant and animal *“* 

pus useful to agriculture have J^fn ha PP en ^ 8 nw P ro ' 

beeafotmd m the less-devdoped • _... , . . 

nations of the Southern Herd- , Th f d Worid <Wegates insisted 
sphere. that their nations should be com- 

Xl . . ■ . ' pensated for the seeds and plants 

While die United Stares is the fomto whhm their borders. J&de- 
pnmaiy opponent of the P ro P° s &t' cades, these ddegates contended. 


the U-S. stance is supported by seed companies from the tndusri- 
Zealand, Australia, alized worid have transplanted the 


£• uanaoa, .New z^ala 

^naLpf.K .*. Japan arid Britain. 

^ M^UJp * . {Jg offici a te mai 


japan ana cmam. _ genetic trails of wild and primitive 

U.S- maintaTq cd that a varieties found only in Third 

new system for storing genes was World nations imo hybrid varieties 
not needed; that an adequate, that are worth fortunes. 



though less extensive, program ex- The U5. seed industry, accoiti- 
taed; that the proposed UN con- ing to the American Seed Trade 
trot could lead to undesirable no- Association, has 
strictkms; and that scwl prodocers ceedmg $7 basen. 


that have developed eBte stnrins <rf 

‘a- • 

UN Approves 
Measure Urging 
Falklands Talks 


The proposal to gsmMkh * sys- 
tem administered by the United 
Nations, some delegates said, rep- 
resents an inexpensive means for 
compensating the poorer nations. 

As genetic engineering becomes 
more prevalent, the control of ac- 
cess to genes is shaping up as a 


r \T-!nm Plans 


; Tb/^bn - fiscal issue. 

NATIONS New j^SSSSSS^S 
UXGcnad Asscm- as oil hSbcen to tire 2Dth century. 

Ny has refused to endorse a British „ . 

amendment on the right of the resi- Pr^erving a stock of genes is 
dents of the Falkland Islands to “Scntal to modem agnculture As 
self-determination. Instead, it over- 


“-‘'clrssi^n 


^hetanngify adopted an Argentine- 
backed resolution urpng the two 


ger and faster, they have become 
dependent on an artificial environ- 
ment of pesticides, fertilizers and 


■\- : -:teU 

-' : ; 3sr?:' 


^7-' MCfeL 
• KLYt 
■rv;:.v.;i so? 


Ihviarea'SaBfe 


- • -Z jfhi2:X 

- • - ur-ETP 

. .. 

• . u .AiriiCas. 

,*yg(S . 

- "ssa’lS^^' 

•’ ■■■:■; sssit? : 

. . • 


i _ , , . cess, the rianis have become vul- 

, The vote Wednesday tmthereso- nerablc to new diseases and other 
lotion was 107-4, with 41 absten- 

Solomon Islands. f 1 ® 14 ret T t ■ 

tance to disease and to survive ex- 

Two Bntish a m en dments reaf- treme environmental conditions, 
finsmg the right to sdf-delennma- and breeders then seek to improve 
-timi of people in general .and -the the 'heartiness of modeot crops by 
re s idents of the Falkland i s lands in mmhining them with yn« from 
particnlar were voted down 60-38. the older plants. 

with 43 abstentions, and 57-36, -n,-*- f u ^ p .- im ; na 

A -r lnese trails are beaxnmg m- 

wjth 47 abstentions. creasingly important to food pro- 

The United States and several of duction as rising costs for pesti- 
Bn tain’s other allies abstained on cides and fertilizers, declining 
-tire British amendments and sup- water res ou rces, erosion and dis- 






WHfiam F. Keougji waving to tbe crowd that greeted him in 
las hometown of Waltham, Massachusetts on his release. 

William F. Keongh, 55, 

c5 7 7 

Ex-Hostage in Iran, Dies 


ported the resolution. 

Argentine forces invaded tbe 


ease take a toQ on farmers. 
Scientists estimate that up to a 


Falklands, which Argentina calls million species of plants and am- 
■ the Malvinas, in 1982 to assert their mak, nearly 10 percent of tire 
oountzy’s claim of sovereignty. A .known number of b-vmg otfflnisms. 
British task force retook tire islands may become extinct in tbe next 20 
l in a 74-day war. years. 


TV Assocvn td Press 

WASHINGTON — William F. 
K cough. 55, who was one of the 52 
hostages held for 444 days in tire 
U.S. Embassy in Iran, died 
Wednesday at Ins borne here. 

He was diagnosed within a year 
of his release in January 1981 as 
having amyotrophic Intend sclero- 
sis, an incurable degenerative ail- 
ment of the central nervous system. 

Mrs. Keough said her husband 
did not attribute his »nnt»« to his 
captivity. Another hostage, Rich- 
ard Queen, developed multiple 
sclerosis during bis captivity, 
prompting his early release. 

Mr. Keough was superintendent 
of tbe American International 
School in Islamabad, Pakistan, 
when he visited Tehran in 1979 to 
investigate a new assignment at a 
similar school in ban. 

He was at tire U.S. Embassy on 
Nov. 4 when Iranian students’ and 
Others loyal to Ayatollah RuhoDab 
Khomeini sored tire building and 
most of the people, in it. 

Maurice PodoJoff, 95, 
Basketball, Hockey Pioneer 

NEW HAVEN, Connecticut 
(AP) — Maurice Podoloff, 95, who 
was both first commissioirer of the 
National Basketball Association 
and a picsdenl of the American 
Hockey League, died Sunday. 

In 1946 he was named president 
of the Basketball Association of 
America, the forerunner of the Na- 
tional Basketball Association. 
When the BAA merged with tire 
National Basketball League in 
1949 to form tbe NBA Mr. Podo- 
loff was named commissioner. 

Bom in Russia, Mr. Podoloff 
came to the United States with his 
family as a child and was reared in 


New Haven He graduated from 
Yale in 1913 and Yale Law School 
in 1915. 

He never played basketball, but 
as commissioner be took the game 
out erf high school gymnasiums and 
put it into professional arenas. 

While beading tbe NBA, Mr. Po- 
doloff also was president of the 
American Hockey League. 

Pablo Serrano, 75, 

Spanish Scttiptor 

MADRID (AP) — Pablo Serra- 
no. 75, one of Spain’s best known 
sculptors and a major exponent of 
expressionism, died here Tuesday 
of a heart attack. 

Bom in CririUen. in tbe eastern 
province of Teruel, Mr. Serrano 
studied sculpture in Barcelona 
from 1922 to 1930. when he left Tor 
Uruguay. He returned to Spain in 
1957. 

Most major museums have held 
exhibits of Mr. Serrano’s work. Be- 
fore he died, he was working on a 
sculpture of King Juan Carlos L 
commissioned by the Spanish par- 
liamenL 

■ Other Deaths : 

Horatio F. Vester. 79, owner of 
the American Colony Hotel in Je- 
rusalem, of a heart attack Thursday 
in Jer usalem 

Andri HonebeOe, 89, who direct- 
ed 38 movies, Wednesday in Nice. 
His films included “Le Bossu" (The 
Hunchback), “Le Capitan” (The 
Captain) and “Famonus" (Gentle- 
man-Burglar). 

Richard Price, 55, a co-founder 
with Michael Murphy of Esalen 
Institute, Monday after a fall while 
hiking in Hot Spnngs Canyon. Cal- 
ifornia. 


Colombian Coffee Town Needs Houses 

\ oicano Refugees May Soon Wear Out Their Welcome 


By jarr.es Brooke 

$e* Vort Tunes Service 

BOGOTA — Now that rescue 
operations for Colombia's devas- 
tating volcanic eruption and muds- 
lides have ended, the major prob- 
lem is finding permanent housing 
for the 8.000 survivors. 

Seme aid officials said they be- 
lieved the problem might intensify 
rather than ease in ceding weeks. 

Now here is the problem more 
acute than in the :cwa of Chin- 
china. which was second only to 
Anaero in the destroet’oc it experi- 
enced. The Nevada del Ruiz volca- 
no erupted Nov. 13. killing about 
25,000 people. 

Last v.-eek in Cbm chiEa. wood 
smoke from cooking fires drifted 
through lines of bundr> drying in 
the centra) patio of the School erf 
Immaculate Mary. 

In a classroom that is now home 
for four families, Marta Li via Mu- 
riilo Enado sat cc a soiled mattress 
while several of her eight children 
played on the cement floor. 

“’The riser took away our tittle 
house," she said. “I don’t knew 
what we are going to do now." 

Many homeless families moved 
in with relatives or neighbors im- 
mediately after the mudslide. But 
the refugees may wear out their 
welcome soon and be forced to find 
other she! ter. accor ding to Bryan 
Lamer cf the United Nations Di- 
saster Relief Office. 

In Chisdiina. the Colombian 
Red Gross has temporarily shel- 
tered shout S&D people in three 
schools. 

Most of the people in the shelters 
were poor women like Mrs. Murillo 
with aaar.v small children. 

"i heard toe riser at our door, 
and *e only escaped with what we 
had on our backs." said Giixnan 
Londono Castasa. pausing as she 
served her five chtidren a thin pota- 
to soup. 

In another c lassr oom. Asiniega 
Gomez fed her 25-day-old baby. 
Santiago, while her 5-year-old sou, 
Maurice, played nearby. 

“The river toot ny husband 
away." she sad. “There is nothing 
left of my house.'' 

Red Cross volunteers said that 
many of Chischica’s homeless 
came from its poorest neighbor- 
hoods. Confined :o rite most unde- 
sirable had in town, they had built 
bouses standing precariously on 
stilts cr. the banks of the Chine hina 
River. 

When the volcano erupted, some 
of its ice cap melted, swelling the 
river to a height 15 to 20 feet (4.5 to 
6 meters) higher than no rmal. The 
water surged down narrow moun- 
tain canyons and swept the banks 
clean of houses and vegetation. 

"Those are my two Dodges." 
said Mario Gonzalez, pointing to 
two 10-ton trucks twisted and half- 
buried by silt Nearby, the remains 
of another heavy truck were 
wrapped around a tree, its load of 
large coffee sacks strewn down- 
stream. 

On one side of the stream, the 
Hood had bent and crumpled a 10* 
foot-high steel aqueduct. 

The river swept 1,500 people to 
their deaths. Many of the bodies 
were recovered as far as 15 miles 
<24 kilometers) downstream. Only 
70 of the people trapped by the 
flood waters were saved. 




'l I JtaMsateT 

• rCS 


9/ MEYADO 
»to 


COLOMBIA 


“Ounoy 

ECUADOR 


“This was veiy different from 
.Arm ere." said Capuin. Hector Es- 
famffw Alvarado of the Chin china 
police. "Here everyone died.” 

In Annrro, on the other side of 
the volcano, 4,000 people were res- 
cued after being trapped in a muds- 
lide that sprawled across a wide 
plain. 

The flood also has bad an eco- 
nomic impact on Chinchini- 


The town, marked by steep 
mountain slopes, is in the heart of 
Colombian coffee country. The 

high quality and abundance of 
bans grown there helped finance 
the National Center erf Coffee Re- 
search. which was built on (he 
banks of the river. The center pro- 
duced and tested new strains of 
coffee and cocoa beans. 

Last week, a brown stain reached 
halfway up an outside wall of the 
research center. Although the mud 
and water had receded, the interior 
was heavily damaged. 

Tbe flood W3iere also knocked 
out eight bridges, cutting Chin- 
chin! off from the departmental 
capital of Manizales. 

While workers rushed last week 
to complete a 200-fool -long sus- 
pension bridge over the river, peo- 
ple waited in tine to ride on an 
improvised gondola that volunteers 
pulled back and forth across the 
river. 


PiageT 


Mb 


18 carat gold 
quartz 

warer-resistant 


Scientists Narrow Search 
For Cystic Fibrosis Gene 


By Criscine Russell 

it Liihincton Pan Service 

Washington — American 

and British scientists have made 
several key discoveries that dra- 
matically narrow their search for 
tbe elusive gene that causes cystic 
fibrosis, the most common fatal ge- 
netic disease in the Western world. 

The new findings are expected to 
lead soon to a diagnostic test for 
those who have the highest risk of 
getting the disease. 

Cystic fibrosis causes tbe body to 
produce abnormally thick mucus 
that dogs the lungs’ and tbe diges- 
tive system. Although advances 
have been made in treating the 
symptoms, no cure for the disease 
has been found. 

The average life expectancy for 
people afflicted with it is 21 years. 

In a series of four articles pub- 
lished this week in the magazine. 
Nature, three teams reported inde- 
pendently for the first time that the 
cystic fibrosis gene is located on 
chromosome 7, one of 23 pairs of 
gene-carrying structures found in 
each human celL 

Two of the teams identified new 
genetic markets that may signal the 
presence of the cystic fibrosis gene. 
The markers are located close 
enough to the gene to allow revolu- 
tionary molecular techniques (o be 
applied to pinpoint iL 

Identification of (he gene could 
lead to the development of treat- 
ment for the underlying biological 
defecL 

Scientists say that even before 
the cystic fvbrosis gene is located, 
the new markers may result in the 
development of a diagnostic test 
that might be used for prenatal 
diagnosis of the disease. Such a test 
also might be used on adult family 
members to determine whether 
they are carriers before they at- 
tempt to conceive children. 

Researchers of the University of 
Utah and the National Cancer In- 
stitute emphasized, however, that 
the tests could onlv be used on 


families in which there is a known 
history of the disease. Tbe screen- 
ing would not be specific enough to 
work as a test in the general popu- 
lation. 

There are at least 30,000 cystic 
fibrosis patients in the United 
Slates, and about one in 2,000 in- 
fants is bora with the disease. A 
child must inherit a defective gene 
from both of his parents to have the 
disease himself . 

About 10 million .Americans — 
one in 20 Caucasians — are 
thought to be asymptomatic carri- 
ers of the defective gene. 




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Standard Products 
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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


3 Rebels Die in Attack 
On South African Plant 


Bjr Alan Cowell 

ft'iw York Tima Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Ami- 
goverament guerrillas staged a 
rocket attack ou one of South Afri- 
ca’s strategic energy plants early 
Thursday and police said the three 
assailants were killed in a gun bat- 
tle as they sought to flee. 

The 122mm rockets were said to 
have ffriwui their targets at the Sa- 
sol plant at Secunda, 80 mQes 
(about 130 kilometers) east of Jo- 
hannesburg. 

Political analysts said, however, 
that the attack appeared to repre- 
sent an effort by guerrillas of the 
African National Congress to esca- 
late their war against the policies of 
racial separation called apartheid. 

The attack and incidents mother 
parts of the country this week rep- 
resent perhaps the most dramatic 
guerrilla activity since a car bomb 
exploded in Pretoria in May 1983. 

in the northern pan of the coun- 
try, meanwhile, troops supported 
by dogs and helicopters used ar- 
mored vehicles to scour remote 
bush roads for mines following a 
series of mine explosions this week 
in which a black tractor driver died 
and four white soldiers were 
wounded. 

So far, five mines have been acci- 


dentally detonated by vehicles and 
four have been discovered before 
they went off, the latest Thursday. 
South African newspapers have re- 
ported that witnesses saw three 
men crossing the Limpopo river 
into Zimbabwe in the area where 
the mines were laid. 

The army urged farmers in the 
area, in the northern Transvaal 
close to the border withZimbabwe, 
to avoid travel on din roads, where 
mines are laid more easily than in 
tarred highways. 

Foreign Minister R.F. Botha 
warned Zimbabwe on Wednesday 
that South Africa would cross the 
border in pursuit of guerrillas if the 
minings continued. 

But Zimbabwe’s government ra- 
dio said Thursday that the govern- 
ment bad on many occasions said 
that it would not permit its territo- 
ry tobe used as an infiltration route 
into South Africa by anti-govern- 
ment guerrillas. 

[Foreign ministers of the six 

black independent states nearest 
South Africa strongly condemned 
on Thursday the Pretoria govern- 
ment's threat to send troops into 
Zimbabwe. The Associated Press 
reported from Harare, Zimbabwe.] 

In the attack in Secunda. four to 
six rockets were fired at Sasol in- 



Peres Opposes Questioning m 


feurfrCFl 


PROTESTS TO END — The Reverend Jesse I* Jackson 
and Marion Barry, mayor of Washington D.G, march in an 
anti-apartheid demonstration in Washington. Organizers 
announced on the fust anniversary of protests at the South 
African Embassy that the demonstrations would end. 


stailations that convert South Afri- 
ca’s abundant coal into oiL accord- 
ing to General Johann Coetzee, 
South Africa’s commissioner of po- 
lice. The country’s oil supplies are 
limited by an international embar- 
go on petroleum sales. 

la a statement issued from its 
headquarters in Lusaka. Zambia, 
the African National Congress said 
it would not confirm or deny re- 
sponsibility for the land-mine 
blasts in the north of the country. It 
denied that its guerrillas used Zim- 


babwe as a springboard for mili- 
tary action in South Africa. 

■ Plane Shot Dom 
- Angola said Thursday foal South 
African fighters shot down an An- 
tonov- 12 civilian cargo plane Mon- 
day, killing 22 persons on board, 
Reuters reported from Lisbon. 

Anti-government guerrillas said 
Wednesday that their anti-aircraft 
guns shot down an Antoaov-12 air- 
craft Sunday in the same province, 
killing 10 Soviet and 11 Angolan 
Army officers. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
out the details of diplomatic ex- 
changes." 

Government spokesmen have 
said that espionage activities in the 
United States would be counter to 
longstanding Israeli policy. . 

■ 3 US. Espionage Hearings 

Philip Shewn of The Hew Yak 
Times reported earlier from Wash- 
ington: 

Mr. Pollard and his wife, Anne 
L. Hendersou-PoIIard, were denied 
bail at Wednesday's hearing after 
FBI agents told U.S. District Court 
in Washington that be had provid- 
ed Israel with hundreds of classi- 
fied military documents. 

The court hearing was one of 
three Wednesday involving Ameri- 
can citizens accused of espionage. 

Mr. Pollard, a civilian who 
worked in a special navy anti-ter- 
rorism unit, acknowledged that he 
had been a spy for about a year and 
a half, the FBI agon said. 

Law enforcement officials, 
spe aki n g to the court, seemed to 
raise the possibility that Mr. Pol- 
lard, 31. had also assembled docu- 
ments that could be of interest to 
the Chinese government 

An FBI agent testified that sev- 
eral classified documents relating 
to the Chinese military were found 
in a suitcase belonging to Mr. Pol- 
lard. 


efetfs re- 

«, Yurchenko, the Sffdtet deSoaas ^ bond pendto gjriai, leaned 

Mis. Pollard, who was also ar- » Moscow Nov. 6 ^^ WHne nt’*Ca« , Swy «*&.- 

rested on espionage charges, told a ^oneoftiw defendants Al ^ pollards’ ba fl hearing, gp - $ 

fnend that rim had pleas, FBI agent. Esgese J. Nohkraper, # 

a presmtsmon at Je Chi- Adored details of Mr. PoBarfs 

— ««d. them — al 1 buf ^^poned coofesnoo and sad ^ar- . 

lari — have confessed to esp* ^ Pollard had ad m i tte d reCc itiu g ^ • 

oage. . - , about S2^0Q a mofithfitom an fc.> 

ja testimony at the ban ^ contact jnestchai^e for Afl»- 

for Mr Chin- two agents j oenp e an . grinding 

Federal Bureau of some dasrified -fcagber than tap 

^oridedn^detarisof^^^ secret" ; 

mem’s case against Mr. Qnn. The gowrametS h» prorided 

was arrested Saturday. little infcnnatioaabwttliettpe of 

RlarkJdinson,oneof titcagatts* msnsiri Mr. BoQnd par- 

testified that Mr-. ch,D * ponofiy provided laleaeModde- ^ 
worked for the intelligence ageaejr jaSs woe scarce at Wwfarad tfg . - 

from 1952 w his n^ement«nt«L eewn hearing. 

was such a valued agent to vx - 


□esc F-mliMy," the agent said. 

Two law enforcement sources 
said after die hearing that they 
knew of no ties between Mr. Pol- 
lard (Twwa but both said (hey 
lacked fuD knowledge of the docu- 
ments that nffirials said they bad 
found in Mr. Pollard’s possession. 

At anmhar bail hearing, this one 
in Baltimore, Ronald W. Felton, a 
former communications specialist 
with the National Security Agency, 
was also denied release on bond 
after the FBI reported that he had 
ad imtfwri spying for the Soviet 
Union. 

In Alexandria, Virginia, a U.S. 
magistrate ruled Wednesday that 
Larry Wu-Tai Qnn, a retired ana- 
lyst for the Central Intelligence 
Agency, must also remain in custo- 
dy until his trial on charges of spy- 
ing for China. 

The four arrests, the first of 
srioch came Thursday, were pan of 
what officials said was an extraor- 
rotmdup of Americans ac- 
of spying fa foreign govern- 
ments. 

A Bqiwn fl rimtntgtr ation official 
said eariStiris week that stili more 
espionage arrests are expected due 
to information provided by Vitaly 


i» 


Mr, NoitkamparBridtoctaa* 
Red documents, inefedmg levari i 
involving the unitary 
ties" offordgfi govec amaa , won ■ 
found, is the PoOards’ Wjriibpcit 
apartment. Other secret docamatit 
were found mMre. PoBstfipuno 
and m her husband’s a&aae, the 


Ctast italic 8 
cjals honored him at a banquet m 
Beijing in 1982. , . 

Mr. Johnson also testified that 

about a year ago, in 
woman whom the human sdentifi^ 

SiESS jSdS Mr . am ^ _ 

who ! accused of receivmg more Seme Ajcameats. the FBI 

than $140,000 from theOunwefor 

i nf ormation, had “at least three 
bank accounts in Hong in- 
cluding one that contained S9SJJQ0 
in 1983 and another that the au- 
thorities said they believed was for 


■m 


» Aw 


gold bullion. 

Peter Meyers, Mr. Chin’s attor- 


mA involved “CACRR? 
he kte a t iO ed as the acron y m for a 
military weapons system. Accord- 
ing to “Jane'* Weapon Systems," 
an antboritariro ttMfe to weapons, 
CACTUS if a graded surfw»4o-*ir 
syttem. manufactured in 
Africa. 


Smoke, Not Bullets, Killed Most on Egyptian Jet 


(Continued from Page 1) 
was used as insulation there and in 
fot overhead racks of the aircrafr. 


When the bomb exploded, the 
official close to the investigation 
said, it set fire to the foam insula- 
tion, which produced a toxic gas 
that asphyxiated many of the pas- 
sengers. 

“The first bombs were badly 
placed and much too powerful.” 
the official asserted. 


FAA Orders Checks 
On U.S. Airport Staffs 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Aviation Administration has or- 
dered emergency measures at U.S. 
airports that will require back- 
ground investigations for all air- 
port, airline and contractor person- 
nel who have access to airplanes 
and secure airport areas. 

An official with the Transporta- 
tion Department said Wednesday 
that the FAA also will seek legisla- 
tive changes to require more thor- 
ough background checks for air- 
port employees than now are 
permitted under some federal and 
state laws. 


■ U.S. Warned of Hijacking 

Michael Dobbs of The Washing - 
ton Post reported from Athens: 

The U.S. Federal Aviation Ad- 
ministration warned major airports 
to expea a hijacking attempt by 
Iranian-trained extremists shortly 
before the EgyptAir takeover, ac- 
cording to a copy of the telexed 
message on file with the Greek au- 
thorities. 

The m essage, which was routine- 
ly circulated to the Athens airport, 
said that 400 individuals of various 
Middle Eastern nationalities were 
undergoing training in Iran in air- 
craft hijacking. It gave details of 
176 false Algerian passports alleg- 
edly procured by the Iranian au- 
thorities for possible use by terror- 
ists. 

The telexed message predicted 
that a hijacking would take place 
somewhere in Europe or the Mid- 
dle East in late November or De- 
cember. It added, however, that 
there was no precise information 
about which airports were most at 
risk 

The U.S. agency's telex offered 
no evidence to support its accusa- 
tions against Iran. 

The message gave the names, old 


numbers and new numbers of the 
1 76 Algerian passports allegedly at 
the disposal of Iranian-trained ter- 
rorists. 


strange to look for any relation 


between Libya and this sad event.’ 
added. “We challenge any* 


He 


to 


■ Qadhafi Denies Role 

George James of The New York 
Times reported from New York: 

The Libyan leader. Colonel 
Mourner Qadhafi, denied in a tele- 
vision interview Wednesday night 
that Libya had played any role in 
the hijacking. 

“It is very far from reality," Col- 
onel Qadhafi said. “It is very 


one to provide any evidence 
prove it is true:" 

Egyptian officials, including 
President Hosci Mubarak, have ac- 
cused Libya of backing the hijack- 
ing. 

Colonel Qadhafi. speaking on an 
American television news program, 
said that Mr. Mubarak was respon- 
sible for the deaths “because be 
killed many innocent people who 
were in the airplane. He’s responsi- 
ble for the loss of life." 



A First Thanksgiving in 



Moamer Qadhafi 


Malta Faced Pressure to Allow Assault on Jet 


■ By William R. Long 

Los Angela Thnts Service 

BOACO, Nicaragua — The 
“Abraham Lincoln Brigade,” orga- 
nized and outfitted in California, 
came to Nicaragua to build a new 
village for p w Ma mn in the moun- 
tains southeast of here. Conditions 
were hard and work fell behind, but 
the American volunteers were de- 
termined to have all the walls and 
roofs up by Thanksgiving. 

Laboring long hours, they made 
it In fact, they feasted on steak and 
chicken and hamburgers with seven 
to spare — in the mistaken 
that Thanksgiving fdl on the 


own it and others who will join 
them. 

Six of the fawwiies had bees Sw- 
ing in a long, dirt-floored shed at 
the 2,000-acre (808 hectares) coop- 
erative, most erf which was once a 
cattle ranch. Others occupied small 
shacks with mud walls and 
thatched roofs. 

The guerrilla war being waged 
ag»ms t the Saiidlnists recently has 
flared up in the Boaco area. Same 
of Mombachito’s young men art 
fi ghting on the government side; 
and one was killed in a skirmish at 


newly 


apprized afaeof an&tis 
group but mftrfbeUScMMtod 
gocxnBas haw nor Mtacfced iL 
MnOduraffpshttuia group of 
American ^ most cf 

ftemQlB fafliteiz ati fr- Ao u t half 
coMtmctkitt wAdsecpt — — paid 

thei r Cwate kycdcmg wood- 

. at day* 

later, <Sd wfaafocre leara from a 
visitor tiaf fl*ey had cctfmmri 


«*. 


"3* -on the tired Thms- 
dajT M^ R-rfer aAed, “Wefl, 




the nearby town of Las Laja&. He Wtfl SWstojgoritdp town and ede- 
Mombachito cooperative has a bretoagm.” 


(Continued from Page 1) 
Sunday, seven hours after the hi- 
jacked plane landed. 

The oiher crucial decision was 
soe to allow the plane to refuel and 
leave. The Maltese authorities said 
it would have been improper to 
allow the plane to leave after it was 
known that murder had been com- 
mitted on board. 

But there also appear to have 
been practical concerns. The cap- 
tain. Hani GalaL has said that the 
plane depressurized during the air- 


borne gnnfight between a hijacker 
and an Egyptian security guard, 
when bullets pierced the plane’s 
airtight shell. 

. Mr. Galal said Tuesday thar tl 
plane could have not flown higher 
than 14,000 feet (4,275 meters). 
“We couldn’t have gone any- 
where." he said. 

Libya's role in direct negotia- 
tions with the hijackers is murky, 
but several facts have been estab- 
lished. 

The hijackers clearly sought to 


Consumer potential 
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ABC 


BIGGER FAMILY 


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REST OF 


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SIX MEMBERS 


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PRESS % 

10 

8 

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ABC. Pivstigio dc hi Pimsa de Espafia. 


ABC: Madrid 's General Dady Morning Newspaper since 1905. 


Address: Serrano, 61 Telephone: 435 31 OO Telex: 27682-27683 


have Mr. Negem board the plane to 
efisenss the situation. The ambassa- 
dor refused. “He was afraid to go 
out there, and I don’t blame Him * 
a diplomat said. 

Egypt has accused Libya of be- 
ing behind the hijacking, bat Mal- 
tese officials have firmly refused to 
comment in any way on a Libyan 
role. Their reasons are evident: Al- 
though Malta's relations with Lib- 
ya often have been troubled, the 
Island nation cannot afford to ig- 
nore a military power so near. 

Moreover. Libya has given sub- 
stantial help' to Malta’s economy 
both by direct investments and by 
offering jobs to Malta’s unem- 
ployed. 

In official briefings. Paul Mif- 
sud, the government spokesman,, 
has suggested that Malta was under 
substantial pressure from Egypt to 
allow Egyptian troops to undertake 
the attack. 

According to one diplomat, Mal- 
tese officials believed that “there 
was an imminent danger of more 
people being killed." In fact, be 
added, “there was no indication of 
the terrorists shooting people 
a gain " 


At a U.S. Navy Base in Cuba 


third Thursday of November. 

finished building rHwr Hflqgfg anti McDonald’s, Missiles Meet 

had their fust harvest," said Steve 
feeder, 36. of Pacouna, California. 

'That’s kind of the way we fdL" 

The new Abraham Lincoln Bri- 
gade was founded by Abe Osher- (Continued from Page X> 

off, 70, erf Venice. California, a for- tary exercise in response Iff the 
mer Communist who HAmyd io presence of Soviet troops in Cuba, 
the first brigade, an American voi- “Maybe we’re finally being ao~ 

un leer unit that fought in the Span- cepted as neighbors.” said Miner 
ish Civil War from 1936-39. Later, Chief Petty Officer Tony Suftaer- 
Mr. Osheroff was a carpenter, a tin- “There's no tension betneenns 
labor leader, a budding contractor and the Cabans these days." : 


warn- 


and a lecturer. He has been a guest 
lecturer at the University of Cali- 
fornia in Los Angeles on the war, 
and filmed a “personal documenta- 
ry** about the ‘fighting, called 
“Dreams and Nightmares." 

In mid- 1984, Mr. Osheroff began 
raising funds to finance a boosing 
project in Nicaragua. He wanted to 
lend a helping Hand to the leftist 
Sandinist revolution. 

The Nicaraguan Housing Mims- 
try welcomed the offer and said 


The navy tries hard to foster the 
tnmqmlity. Scstries-man W* ob- 
servation towers with M-16rifles 
but require a smxn^ennisra» 
folodd their weapdreL rase officers 
avoid embarrassing MrrCastro by 
refusing to divulge the TumrtMr erf 
Cub an defectors who jump tire 
fences into Gnantjaam o. 

Mr. Castro refuses to cash die 
$4,085 monthly rent check from the 
United Stales, although Captain 
Condon noted that “tire checkntt 


that a peasant cooperative, Mean- not voided — they’re still go «£?:' 
bachita. near Boaco in the central Meanwhile, planted along The 
province of file same name, needed pink oleanders and squat sa&ipe ^ S^MEtstaboa 1,200 Cuban troops 
new homes for the 22 families that trees dotting the roadskfcft^W. stxsosed b the scrubby frontier. 


30AG0 britmirifr: ) 

jnp in Sj paaiA unA 1 

Thro^hoet fte ba^ an mvad- 
ing enemy wouidiicepdes of scrap 
metal desgned to stop tanks in 
what file Mtvy eiBs “ l andior val- 

cafled “btowfaS^ftenkthe nar- 
row highway w ti&tds through 
QMBMMftiyidy : tfr be filled 
wfhexpfcwvtK ’ v 
Nbtiti ng better syafwfizerjie 
uneasy peace *h«n NdnfT'GBiA, 
once rite' man tborf9#&re for 
thousands of Cubans working on 
the bdSe aad tar US. servicemen 
wtoXfeqBenied the bonJeSos and 
badhfje^h b o ring towns. 

Norih Gate was dosed - in June 
195% after Mr. Castro rook power, 
and is gtmded now by 400 U^. 
Mimaes in camouflage fatigues. 
They defend the base perimeter 

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U.S. Declares Firm Stai 


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i win i 


Aims Offer 


(Continued from Page 1) 
to decide how to follow up the 
summit developments and that 
some gestures or proposed new 
arms control measures should not 
be ruled out. 

Referring to Soviet criticism of 
(he Strategic Defense Initiative, 
Mr. Addman said, “We have to 
presume that the Soviets will 
change on that score someday.” He 
cited Moscow's change of heart on 
intermediate range nuclear forces 
as an indication that the Soviet 
Union sometimes significantly al- 
ters its position whoa, the United 
States holds firm. - 

Soviet negotiators walked out of 
talks on intermediate range weap- 
ons after the United States began, 
deploying missiles in Europe but 
the Kremlin has since stated its 


willingness to start negotiant an 
“interim" agreement cn smffi g a p- 
ons. ../ .... .. 

In a related devtiopme^ -ad- 
minislration officials -confirmed 
that the number of SS-2£gM the 
European portion of w "Soviet 
Union had'bee& reducedio 243. 

In October, Mr. Gorbachev an- 
nounced that Russia had reduced 
the n umb er ot SS-20s that oould 
•strike Western Europe to 243. He 
said the 243 fignre represented the 
number of SS-20s that Russia had 

in June 1984,b<rfare it responded to 
the deploymait of U^.- weapons in 
Europe. He called on the Noth 
Atlanta; Treaty Or ganizatio n to 
stop deploying new U.S. missiles. 

■ NATO Plans Initiative 

The bfortb Atlantic Treaty Orga- 


nization plans a new initiative at . 
stalled East- West talks in Vienna' ; 
txfore Christmas, Foreign Minister 
Hzns-Dietrich Genscher of West 
Germany said Thursday, according 
to a Reuters report from Bonn.. 

The talks between NATO and ' 
the Warsaw Pact nations began 12 
yeah ago and are aimed at reduc- ; 
mg conventional forces in central 1 
Europe. 

Western sources in Vienna era- 
firmed that NATO was considering 
moves to break a deadlock in foe ' ’ 
talks and conceded foe West need- 
ed to respond to proposals made by i 
the Warsaw Pact in February. . 
Thoreprqxisalsmclu^danmitial 
cut in US. and Soviet forces in "=• 
central Europe of a total of 33,000 ‘ 
troops. 


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Page 5 




. ■ „ t *. 

.' fa -^ ARIS — Ben Kingsley is a sEght and 
^ ft J “PP 1 ® “an Whose outsize stage and 

•■• :•-' .' ‘^:ti'N5 I* • SCie “ ^sew* is achieved not by 
" c % cts hw by subtlety and 

v '-? coxuxmratuHi; afhekerof asmile, asiddone- 

.* • •' 

• Li^g. “Gandhi,- m wtaefa he made E Oscar- 

- r ; ‘ ^ inning screen debut, he dominated a teem- 

‘ .. ;■ : "-Sn ^^L ProduCti ° n by stlcer ^critcric and 

.i ! ; ^Before “Gandhi” Kingsley was already a 
■■ ’ : ;; S*eih,PS respected classical actor whose stage rates 
" - C** K.7S5? fr 2? ^ Scpeers in “Nfcfaolas 

■• ■ NicUeby” to Trofimovm "The Chetiy Or- 

... '■■- ' SS chard," from Brecht’s Baal to Demetnns in 

• Broo k’s celebrated production of “A 

. i : v Now he is playing Othello with the Royal 

. r^pOTi; •■■ ■ 


’s Dangerous Othello The Death of Modernism: 


■“ • . '-Mi W. “I 


■ •• ^ ’'i »j 


‘ playing Othello with the Royal 


Mary Blume 


^*4*, ; 

■ '■’^niiSS^C Shakeqieare Company in Stratford and re- 
hearsmg a new play for London by. Bernard 
f Pomerance (“The Elephant Man") in winch 
he plays an American Indian; his wife, AE- 
son Sutdiffe, will direct His second Harold 
Pj?ter — die first was the excellent 
tlfflifi “Betrayal — is called “Turtle Diary,” opens 
0**U Sunday in London arid co-stars Glenda 
. Jackson. He played a desert sheikh named 

'~, -Zft3 Qstfcj r > Selim in a dreadful clinker called “Harem.” 

■ -i ' lb: ^ that just opened in Paris. 

Despite his harrowing schedule, Kingsley 
'“‘‘.Sflaaeh * came to Paris for just one day to promote 
, Lflifcjj; “Harem,” handling a stream of interviews 
jjjj **< with astute aplomb. 

S “I enjoy it. 1 learn something,” he says. He 
■“ :a is soft-spoken and confiding. “I get my in- 

.^^ In befewf formation from people, yon see. Pm not 
^ e( bada?7 academic, never was at schooL I don’t get h 
bin ^ ram toomnments or landscapes. Every face, 
tjjj every meeting, goes in somewhere. I love iL 
"■iiWap If I can meet 1 1 people ina day as exposed 
:;n i*2v to 7. HI go for II- 
Riel- jdSJ* Part of the pleasure conies from being in 
- ,J t-'raiotarT' . coo * ro ^ ; -An actor is remembered by what 
other people say about him, Kingsley said, 
and he would just as soon subtly guide (bar 
words. 

Ac i 411 < * ont k 1 “yane intrude into certain 
13 6X605 ^ rey bfe that l don't feel they can 

1 cope with anyway. You give what you think 
j! Ai will feed the conversation and what you and 

- ill Ulha the other person can cope with mTlcmg 

about-” 

- !*;» fe-. His control gives the sense of being hard 

won; Eke the best actors Kingsley can have 
VCj* an air of dan^r. Itis, he arid, an mMhmR that 

, ai *rad- he has wi thin himself and that be uses m his 
.■..TfW* dptheflo. 

f “QtfuJlo b^ins the play cMlmrng #»i w wy < Ynft 

else — Tut your swords away 1 is one of Ms 
first hues. Becanse he knows about violence, 

- .ve. .is44. s he’s at great pains to calm the Senate, calm 

^ ir the father, eg™ the w arring factions. He's a 

” :a1, very violent man who goes through life say- 

ing I don’t want any confrontations because 
*?■:? 5V!Er7 if I have a confrontation somebody's going 
: Vi:. N« - to get killed. * . . T ‘ . 

- ipinc; ^So very often therather ptdite, restrained 

Ca^aico; and courteous people are the ones wb) know 

f - !?i scientifically that if they allow themselves to 
;a.ivAr cross a certain line of provocation, the roof 
will came ofL 1 am the same, rve learned to 
p , ‘ ^ handle it, IPs all right " 

: '^ E - Kingsley’s Othello is a warrior, an exile 
a Mcmr — an Arab, not, Eke Olivier's 
-•* -7” Othdlo, a blackamoor. “I have to wodt with- 
“! - in my Emits physically and 1 cannot play a 
. ,.^ teass black man. Ninety ^percent of my efforts 
-■ -'Harrs® would go into hoidmg this inqiersonatiQn 
:.:r ur-'fecss together and the character, I am sure, would 

— ^suffer. Td rather breathe more life into the 

r character.” 

rvW His Othello wears long robes. CThey’re 
yner flowing and they can move, they get dis- 
turbed like the disturbed aura around the 
.. «( -sjsri man himself.") Teny Hands, the director, 

" a ^ encouraged him to play a 19th-century 
s.v^ilSfl* Othello because in that century “Othello” 

■ :• air i b was Othello’s play. 

•V^ aSjt i “This century has not seen many Othdlos, 

".-7- '-si®- h has seen many lagos. We tried to redress 
" ‘ ^ the balance because if you don’t have that 

center, that extraorefinary warrior in the cen- 
ter and not some gormless foreigner, then the 
■ **^5 P^y apart u Desdemonais not hngdy 

. -i a *** attracted to this man, as a warrior and by ms 
sexual prowess, where is the play?” 

. .. - Kingsley's father was Indian, his mother 

. ‘i-'& 3 SS& EngHsh. There was no problem, he said, 

' growing up in a town in the north of England 
^jwith the name Krishna Banp was his 
blather who told him that if he was gdug to be 
. an Eo^ish actor he had better have an En- 
» glish name). “My dad was much loved as the 

local doctor. And Eke all good Gujaratis — 


in Af^Qfi 


uir «m 

". u * <4 »fcS 

"“siit, A 
" to tai? 1 

'.V-R^M k 


laid 

\av 


Mi^si 


y Base in (H 


■:r as ? B «» 


;!!•: r n 


. that's where his family came from; he 
from East Africa — he adapted extremely 
we!L He was an English doctor with a tweed 
suit an da stethoscope and glasses, driving an 
old Humber. Zt was the most ectraoidinaxy 
transformation,” 

’ Kingsley never attended acting school. “I 
auditioned for RADA [the Royal Academy 
of Dramatic Art] and they said no thank, you. 
I think T did a very arrogant audition that 
probably said I don’t Think I need to go to 
school ! don’t know, because the next week I 
did another audition for a professional com- 
pany and was immediately accepted. Drama 
school hdps you get to your first audition 
and some people desperately need three 
years to get there. I didn’t" 

." He started off in a theater for children, 
moved on to provincial repertory and in 
1966 auditioned for the RSC ana was ac- 
cepted. “By the time I would have been 
leaving RADA to go to my first audition I 
was working for the Royal Shakespeare 
Company, so in fact h worked out very 
wdL" 

At present he thmire of doing the great 
classi c stage redes and, on screen, contempo- 
rary comedy in she vein of the new Pinter 
film. 

“I enjoy the titanic energy of Shakespear- 
ean tragedy in front of 1,300 people — for 


me there is great joy in that. I find equivalent 
joy in fli c king a look or pausing and saying 
what on film is funny, and the camera 
catches it and it provokes lu ghtw in the 
cinema. Heroic acting onstage and subtle 
comedy on film is what I aspire to at the 
moment. The balance may swing the other 
way.” 

It already has, in Kingsley’s wzy and com- 
ic Hamlet. “Hamlet is a very witty man. The 
wit is a quintessential part of bis inrgTligwira* 
In order for the audience to fed a sense of 
loss at the end, you have to warm them with 
his irony and wit and his wonderful observa- 
tions on the people around him. And then 
you fed the pain of the loss, the pain of “to 
be or not to be,” the agony of “the rest is 


saw that, a few yean Latex. That's all (hat's 
left. Maybe the odd photograph, maybe 
there’s an article written — we can get very 
obsessed and upset about our history in prim 
becanse we know that actually race the dust 
has seated, sometimes that’s all we’ve got 
left and it’s very sad to be misinterpreted in 
print. 

“Memories of a performance have to do 
with the people in that room, in that thea ter, 
at that time. I'm afraid that’s the way it has 
tribe. If there arc any reverberations we try 
to protect them, but I'm fascinated by how 
certain actors have striven to hand some- 
thing on. The very touching stories I get now < 
from books — that Mrs. Garrick gave Kean 
a pair of gloves that she swore Shakespeare's ! 
father had made. Wonderful! 

“Kean had a sword as Richard HI, I don’t . 
know where it came from, it may have come 
from Garrick. That sword now bdongs to 
Larry Olivier through Gielgud, through Ir- 
ving. through Betterton, through all the ac- 
tors. That they should one day say 1 think . 
you should have this, old boy, that's dyna- 
mite, that’s the whole noble side that goes 
agains t the ephemeral side. It's a prop sword, 
irs probably blunt and bent, but there’s 
something going.” 

Were be to be given the sword, Kingsley 
said, “I'd weep buckets. 1 don’t thmk I’d 
recover for the rest of my life." If not yet the 
sword, he has inherited Olivier's longtime 
adviser, a woman named Fabia Drake vho 
lives in Morocco, where Kingsley filmed 
“Harem,” and who helped him form his 
Othello. 

“Fve now started to confide in her and ask 
her what she thinks I ought to do next, and 
they’re very rare, these people, very special 
and one has to cling onto them.” Kingsley 
asked her if he should play Richard III 
(“Don’t bother, dear”), Shylock (“Don’t 
bother, dear. Well perhaps, let me think 
about that one”), Prospero (“Don’t bother, 
dear”). Then she told Kingsley, who win be 
42 on New Year’s Eve, that he must play 
King Lear before he is 45. 


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■ ■ 

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Kingsley’s Arab Moor, right, with David Suchet as Iago. 




silence,” because this wonderful witty mind 
is going to be snuffed out. So I think there’s 
no good moping about with a skull in your 
band. He's a lovely fellow, I mean he really 
is. He's an adorable man.” 

After “Gandhi” Kingsley appeared in 
London and on Broadway in “Kean,” a one- 
man show about the great 19th-century ac- 
tor. He is moved by the ephemeral nature of 
the actor’s craft, which gives it both its 
nobility and its pathos. 

“Finally the ran ends and people say oh, I 


“She said it needs that son of physical 
stamina to get you through three and a half 
hours of that rage against the coming of the 
night or whatever.” 

Kingsley said he felt terrific about Fabia 
Drake's advice and could not wait to take on 
Lear. When be does, he will approach it as 
one must — as if he were the first man to 
play it “As if it came through the letterbox 
that day in a brown envelope, and somebody 
said, read this, do you think it’s any good?” ■ 


i ■ .u« .*» * 


A New Bohemia in Manhattan 



by Manreen Dowd 

N EW YORK — Arm Magnnson 
sits on a worn couch in her But 
Village apartment, rummaging in 
the junkyard of American culture. 
She talks, with affectionate mdHcery, about 
icons and totems and slogans, past and pre- 
sent. Her allusions spill out like the contents 
of some crazed time capsule — Steve and 
Eydie, “The Beveriy. Hillbillies," Patty 
Heaist, Gidget, TV evangelists, Lawrence ■ 
Welk. Tim Morrison and the Doors, Chic ken 
McNuggds, high-fiber diets, midstate pork, 
princesses, Mantovani, Mr. Spock, “Beyond 
the Valley of the Dofls.” 

Magnuscm, 28 . conjures up these spirits in 
her satirical skits for downtown duos such 
as Area, Danceteria and the Pyramid. Her 
characters in c lu d e Mrs. Rnmbo, who shoots 
her way through Bloomingdale’s to save 
Nancy Reagan from getting a NewWave 
makeup job at the Yves St Laurent counter. 

In the past. Arm Magmison, who had a tat 
pan in the movie “Desperately Seeking Su- 

san, "would have been described as an a^ir- 
mg actress and her territory would have bew 

called the bohemian part of town. Now she is 
a performance artist with a wit following 
md the area where she Eves and works is 
simply called downtown. 

She is at the center of the vivid New York 
arts community that has captured interna- 
tional attention spinning what has cameto 
be known as “the downtown style.” Tne 
artisis cannibaEze high art and the mass 
culture of the last three decades — television, 
suburbia, pornography, Saturday morning 


cartoons, comic books, Hollywood gossip 
magazines, spirituality, science fiction, hor- 
ror movies, grocery lists, lop-40 lists. 

“It’s everything turned inside of itself — 
it’s sensory overload," Magnnson said. “It’s 
a postmodern conglomeration of all styles.' 
You steal everything.” 

The community tends to hug the edges of 
Manhattan inland and carefully avoids that 
older artists’ haunt, Greenwich Village. 
While past bohemians were rebels, with con- 
tempt for the middle class and the mercan- 
tile culture, many of the current breed share 
the same values as the yuppies uptown. 

This is a blue-chip bohemia where artists 
talk tax shelters more than poEtics, where 
American Express Gold Caras are more em- 
blematic than garrets. 

“It's not chic to be a starving artist any 
more,” said Joe Dolce, a writer and publicist 
for the nightclub Area, “it's more cine to be 
mating millions. Bohemia meets David 
Stockman.” 

Despite its old-fashioned aroma, the word 
, “bohemia” offers a valuable context in cod- 
si doing New York’s art scene. Historic com- 
parisons with other fabled countercultures 
can help make sense of downtown’s heady, 
kaleidoscopic imagery and values. 

Bohemias such as Montmartre, Montpar- 
nasse and, more recently, St Gemudn-des- 
Pres in Paris; the area north of the Chelsea 
Embankment in Loudon; Schwabing in Mu- 
nich;. North Beach in San Francisco; and 
Greenwich Village in New Yak have been 
havens where artists and their hangers-on 
lived, worked and gave each other support — 
artists contra nwndo. 


The real passion of many of the bohemi- 
ans was for ideas. There was always much 
argument in these places about aesthetics, 
much talk of politics and social change. The 
poEtical bias of most of the artists, until 
recently, was to the left and away from the 
establishment Most early bohemians argued 
that art itself was the result of the feelings 
that arose naturally in common folk. That 
idea, however, like many that surfaced in 
bohemia, was challenged almost from the 

b eginning . The poet Baudelaire, a bo hemian 
who hated bohemia, argued that art was 
artifice, that it did not arise from life bat that 
the proper life should be art Oscar Wilde, 
some years later, concurred. 

Robert Motherwell, one of the founders of 
the Abstract Expressionist movement re- 
calls that when be was living in Greenwich 
Village in the 1940s, art was regarded as a 
spiritual quest “The material options for 
modernist artists in the 1940s were much 
more limited than they are for artists today," 
he said. “Due to the low standing then of 
American modernist artists, rarely did such 
artists expect to make money at alL I naively 
used to think it was immoral to know a critic 
or a museum director.” 

Bohemia also acted as a precursor of taste 
and change in standards in an and behavior. 
It usually took at least a generation for such 
change to be discovered and accepted by the 
society at large. 

New York’s downtown art community, 
viewed in the context of bohemias of the 
past, certainly displays aspects similar to 
most of them. like the artistic and nightclub 
Continued on page 6 


Reports Greatly Exaggerated 


by Paul Goldberger 


N EW YORK — “The fan that 
many so-called modem architects 
still go around practicing a trade 
as if it were alive can be taken as 
cme of the great curiosities of our age,” the 
critic Charles Jencks wrote in 1977; modem 
architecture, in his view, had “expired finally 
and completely.” 

Jencks was not alone: Numerous critics 
have spoken over the last of modern- 

ism’s rod, its collapse, its upheaval its death. 
Whatever the favored metaphor, the mes- 
sage was the same — modem architecture's 
time was over. 

In many ways, of course, it is. Modernism 
in its various forms wQl never again, at least 
in our time, bold sway over the creative 
impulses of the age as it did for the first six 
decades of this century. But if the last few 
years hare shown us anything, it is that 
modernism has not so much died as been 
transformed, and in a different guise contin- 
ues to occupy a position in contemporary 
architecture that is not so far from the main , 
stream. Modernist ideology does not have 
the meaning it once did, and modem build- 
ings do not lake on the same form, but a 
resurgent modernism appears to be edging 
back toward the center of the architectural 
stage. 

There are many indications of this, and 
they go beyond the continued activity of 
architects such as i.M. Pei, Edward Lairabee 
Barnes and Richard Meier, emin ent practi- 
tioners who have long worked in the mod- 
ernist idiom and went on doing so even as 
the ideological ground beneath them began 
to shift. More important than is the fact that 
some of the better younger architects, such 
as Steven Hofl, Bernard Tschumi, Tod Wil- 
liams and George Ranalli, have chosen to 
eschew the return to historical interpretation 
that has become so common. Instead of 
being post-modem, these architects try in 
their work to expand the modernist vocabu- 
lary. 

The impulse toward a resurgence of mod- 
ernist sentiment will coalesce, surely, around 
the exhibition the Museum of Modern Art 
has planned for February to mark the cen- 
tennial of the birth of Ludwig Mies van der 
Rohe. It will be a major event, promised as 
the most complete retrospective of this mod- 
ernist masters work ever mounted, and it 
has already stimulated several books on the 
great Internationa] Style architect; the effect 
of all of this will certainly be to restore Mies, 
whose significance has been obscured not a 
little in recent years, to the forefront of the 
architectural consciousness. 

Nearly as important, certainly, is the im- 
mense outpouring of opposition to the Whit- 
ney Museum's plan to alter and obscure 
portions of its Marcel Brener-designed 
building — which is nothing if not a modern- 
ist monument — with an altogether differ- 
ent, post-modernist addition by Michael 
Graves. This anti-Graves effort has readied 
an almost hysterical pitch, and its tone has 
been that of a passionate defense of modem 
architecture as represented by the original 
building. 

There has been no such outcry over the 
Guggenheim Museum's plan to alter and 
expand its Frank Lloyd Wright building, 
and itis hard not to wonder if one reason for 
this is that the Guggenheim’s architect, the 
firm of Gwathmey Siegel & Associates, has 
proposed not a post-modern but a modernist 
addition. It is not Wright's own brand of 
modernism — it is more along the lines of 
the International Style rendered in tile — but 
it is a modernist work. . 

But if modernism is back — and one 
should repeat that it never wholly left ns, 
whatever the sentiments of some critics — it 
now takes a form not at all like the one it 
possessed before. The current wave of inter- 
est in modernism has none of the moral force 
of the original modernist revolution, none of 
the certainty that this would be a style that 
would transform the world. Neo-modern- 
ism, if we can call it that, is aesthetic, not 
ethical; its interests are in celebrating the 
look, not the meaning, of modernistm 
Orthodox modernism was a style of pris- 
tine; cool austere buildings, its extraordi- 
nary reserve exemplified in the glass boxes 
and flat-roofed booses of the postwar era. In 
its greatest examples it is stunningly beauti- 
ful but it is the beauty of spareness, not of 
excess. The neo-modernism we are begin- 
ning to sec is less direct; we might even call it 
a kmd of baroque modernism, full of com- 
plex surfaces and intricate spaces that use 
the design vocabulary of the modern move- 
ment but to much more manneri st ends.The 
ultimate neo-modernist work, in a sense, 


might be Bernard Tschumi ’s plan for the 
Parc dc la Villetre in Paris, in which little 
modem structures become fantasy build- 
ings. 

Orthodox modernism, as conceived in Eu- 
rope in the first two decades of this century, 
was utopian; its dream was a social one as 
much as an aesthetic one. It wanted to break 
away from history, not embrace it. Its open 
physical form was seen as symbolizing not 
only new technological possibilities but the 
openness of a new, egalitarian society. The 
modem movement was conceived in reac- 
tion to bourgeois culture, but it sought not so 
much to rise above that culture as to change 
it. 

The great irony of the modem movement 
is that it achieved its presence throughout 
the world not by acceptance of its utopian 
ideology but by rejection of it. for it was not 
the moral imperative of modernism that 
made it the nearly universal commercial ar- 
chitectural sty le after World War II; rather, 
it was the style's ability to be replicated 
cheaply and rapidly, and the appeal of its 


In art, second-rate imitations are irrele- 
vant; in architecture they have a pernicious 
importance, for they shape the world around 
us, often more fully than do the great works. 
And the failure of the modernist vernacular 
was surely modernism's greatest failure in 
architecture, for it was this — the wretched- 
ness of places like Third Avenue in New 
York ana Paris's La Defense — that made 
modem architecture seem not merely ex- 
hausted but worthless. 

By the late 1960s an architecture of reac- 
tion to modernism bad begun. Robert Ven- 
turi. Charles Moore Philip Johnson and 
Robert AM. Stern, to name but a few post- 
modern practitioners, within a few years 
established a pattern of significant architec- 
ture based on a rejection of many of the 
visual trademarks of modernism. By the time 
Jencks wrote of the death of modernism in 
1977. there really did not seem to be much 
vital life left wi thin the modernist idiom. 

But most post-modernist architects and 
critics assumed that the ideology of modern- 
ism and its aesthetic were inevitably inter- 
twined. and that it would all disappear at 



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Paris’s La Defense: Hastening the ’’death” of modernism. 


austere forms to the rapidly growing corpo- 
ration. By the mid-1950s the most common 
modernist buildings were office towers and 
suburban office parks. 

A parallel but hardly identical phenome- 
non occurred in the visual arts, where the 
heroic works of Abstract Expressionism, the 
equivalent in painting of the great modernist 
maslerworks in architecture, by the late 
1970s seemed more and more to be pieces of 
art history. Here, too, the sense that these 
works were radical was becoming more diffi- 
cult to sustain, and much current work, par- 
ticularly by younger painters, took on a 
much less abstract form. 

It is not surprising, then, that in architec- 
ture as well' as in art the most restless minds 
began to look elsewhere, away from modern- 
ism. In architecture the crisis of modernism 
was far more serious than in art, for the body 
of modem architecture consisted not merely 
of great maslerworks that seemed to be slip- 
ping into history, but also of a dismal land- 
scape filled with mediocre, crude structures 
in the modernist idiom. 


once, when in fact the ideology and the 
aesthetic had long since parted company. 
The moral force of modernism bad ebbed; 
what was left was the aesthetic, stripped of 
its ideological baggage. 

And that aesthetic, operating on its own, 
continued to be a vocabulary within which 
buddings were made, albeit in a kind of 
ideological vacuum. Thai is where it is to- 
day: More a pure aesthetic than an ideology, 
it nonetheless continues to yield significant 
architecture The work of such architects as 
Frank Gehry, Charles Gwathmey and Rob- 
ert Siegel Richard Meier, Mario Botta and 
Cesar PelLi, among others, is surely a quest 
into aesthetic issues that are modernist in 
nature — surface, space and abstract form. 

The neo-modernism erf the mid-1980s 
does not look like the modernism of an 
earlier generation. Consistent with its inter- 
est in aesthetic matters over social meaning, 
it is more mannered, more complex visually 
than most earlier modernism: Meier’s work 
is sufficient testament to that It is also 
sleeker, for it tends, especially in the hands 
Continued on page 7 



Bernard Tschumi’ s neo-modernist plan for the Parc de la Villette in Paris . 





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A New Bohemia 


Continued from page 5 


society of Berlin during the years of the 
Weimar Republic, downtown believes in 
freedom of expression and pleasure. The 
place looks and sounds like “Swinging Lon- 
don” of the 1960s, when young people up 
and down the King's Road in Chelsea lived 
for rock and dressed up in the outlandish 
costumes of Carnaby Street. 

New York's current bohemia differs from 
its predecessors, however, because its alti- 
tude toward money and politics has changed 
drastically. The idea of the poor, struggling 
artist has been rejected, as has the idea of the 
affinity between an and the common man. 
Moreover, the attitude of the rest of society 
toward bohemia has changed. People are no 
longer shocked by it: they're often titillated 
and desperately seeking its style. 

Just as bohemians have grown more like 
yuppies, so a credit-card culture dizzy with 


consumption has grown eager for the prod- 
uct of bohemia. “What is very far out in 


September is totally embraced by the follow- 
ing spring." said Hilton Kramer, editor of 
The New Criterion. 

Partly, this is because the imagery of this 
arts scene is easier for the average person to 
understand — paintings of Fred Flintstone, 
silk-screens of Kraft grape-jelly jars, poems 
about Ozzie Nelson, performance art featur- 
ing live versions of “The Dating Game." In 
any case, there is, suddenly, a great appetite 
for downtown New York's style, in humor, 
fashion, film, writing, art and music. 

Amos Poe. a New York filmmaker, recalls 
that several years ago he sought to make a 
movie of downtown vignettes and received 
little response. “Now a lot of producers are 
calling up and saying. ‘When are you going 
to do that downtown thing?' “Downtown 
has become a myth, something exotic." 

Pilar T jmosner, 30. a fashion designer 
with a shop on gritty Avenue A in the East 
V illage said she couid barely hang up one of 
her new creations, such as her Mrs. Ram bo 
camouflage cocktail outfit (inspired by her 
friend Magnuson). before “the buyers from 
Macy's are down here scrounging for it." 


The fascination has been fanned by the 
success of three movies set downtown, made 
by directors who live there: Susan Sei del- 
man’s “Desperately Seeking Susan," Jim 
Jarmusch's “Stranger Than Paradise” and 
Martin Scorsese’s “After Hours"; by the 
popularity of “Bright Lights, Big City," the 
Jay Mclnemey novel set amid chic down- 
town dubs and restaurants; by the influence 
in rock of Talking Heads and in music and 
fashion of Madonna and Cyndi Lauper, all 
of whom got their start downtown; and by 
the art explosion in the East Village that has 

given young artists who were unknown a few 

years ago the son of celebrity and wealth 
previously reserved for rock stars. 

The satire of icons and cliches that defines 
the downtown style has been called nihilistic 
nostalgia and aprfes- garde. The classic and 
the kitschy, the serious and the shallow are 

yoked, provoking greater confusion than 
ever about the distinctions between art and 
decoration, art and entertainment. 

“1 used to wonder what young artists 
would turn out like who grew up with Andy 
Warhol's pictures on the wall as acceptable 
art and thousands and thousands of televi- 
sion images stored in their minds,” said 
Henry Geldzahler. a critic and former cura- 
tor of 20lb-century art at the Metropolitan 
Museum. “The result is the East Village. 
Their art is not just precious things that 
change hands at high prices. It’s more art as 
blood that courses through our veins. It’s a 
way of living, a way of being. . . . What 
looks to us to be glitzy and vulgar is to them. 


I'm afraid, quite natural. It’s what clothes 
whe 


looked like when they were lrids. what com- 
ics looked like- what MTV looks like. The 
materials that made up their world were not 
wood and oil and paint and all those won- 
derful cranky things we used to like.” 

Two of Ann Magnuson’s closest friends 
are Kenny Scharf and Keith Haring, who 
have become art stars downtown, with wait- 
ing lists for their work and annual salaries 
easily in the six-figure range. Scharf. 27, 
draws colorful landscapes, many inspired by 



Madonna's downtown style in “ Desperately Seeking Susan. 1 


the 1960s televirion cartoons “The Jetsons" 
and “The Flints tones.” H a ring , 27, first 
known for his subway art, does graffiti-esque 
dra wing* featuring his trademark doodles of 
a crawling baby and a barking dog. 

Haring is opening a boutique in SoHo in 
January, the Pop Slop, to sell his art on 
shoelaces, wallpaper, T-shirts, radios and 
patches — a sort of Laura Ashley of the Neo. 
“Some of us have finally gotten to the point 
where we don't fed we have to suffer what 
Rent Ricard called ‘the Van Gogh syn- 
drome,' where, if you’re an artist, people 
don't like you to make money until you’re 
dead,” Haring said, sitting at a desk with a 
Mickey Mouse telephone at his elbow. 

Another member of the crowd is Grade 
Mansion, 38, who legally changed her name 
from Joanne Mayhew Young to that of the 
residence of the mayor of New York “jnst 
for the heck of it.” Her trend-setting gallery 
on Avenue A in the East Village lodes more 
like a fun bouse than a lucrative dealership. 

Down the street, the Batislavia boutique, 
owned by Pilar Lunosner and Carmd John- 
son, features a vest covered with National 
Football League labels and a skirt covered 
with the Budweiser logo (not a set). 

Because it often appears that downtown, 
to paraphrase Lauper, just wants to have 
fun, the young artists are often called on to 
explain why a product that looks like fun, 
and bohemians who have fun, should be 
taken seriously. 

Scharf addressed the sensitive issue of fun 
recently in An News magazine. “The whole 
thing about fun — I like to have fun,” he 
said. “I think everyone wants to have fun. I 
think that having fun is being happy. I know 
it's not all fun, but maybe fun helps with the 
bad. I mean, you definitely cannot have too 
much fun. OJL, it’s like I want to have fun 
when Pm painting And I want people to 
have fun looking at the paintings. When I 
think, what should I do next? I think: more, 
newer, better, nower, f unner ." 

Denizens of downtown subscribe to the 
Oscar Wilde premise that “one should either 
be a work of art or wear a work of an." The 
downtown look is a sort of postpunk, neo- 
New Wave jumble in cascading decades, 
ranging from Victorian morning coats to 
Marilyn Monroe sundresses to - bikers’ out- 
fits. A couple enters the Pyramid Club on 
Avenue A with chains of naked baby dolls 
dangling from the belts of their jeans. A man 
shows up at Area wearing a dinner jacket 
with fashion magazine covers glued over 
every inch of material. 

Where there have been artists’ colonies 
there have been fabled watering holes. In the 
1850s, Baudelaire, Dumas ftis and Henri 
Murger gathered at the Brasserie des Mar- 
tyrs. a cafe on the edge of Montmartre. In an 
unfashionable slum south of Washington 
Square before World War L Eugene O’Neill. 
John Reed and others sat around a seedy 
saloon called the Golden Swan, which they 
rechristened “the Hell Hole" and which be- 
came the main source of material for 
O’Neill’s “The Iceman Cometh." The grub- 
by Cedar Street Tavern on University Place 
in Greenwich Village became the hangout 
for Abstractionists such as Jackson Pollock, 
Franz Kline and Willem de Kooning in the 
1950s, and later drew the beat poets Allen 
Ginsberg. Jack Kerouac and Gregory Corso. 

Now tiie top artists gather at glittering 
nightclubs. The nature of bars suits the in- 
creased collaboration among artists in the 
1980s. Dubs have become art galleries and 
experimental theaters and fashion runways. 
They host book parties, photo exhibits and 
Continued on page 7 



Boston's Public Garden, with its celebrated swan boats. 


Museum Season in Boston 


by Fox Butterfield 


B OSTON — It is museum season 
here, with a lifetime of paintings by 
Renoir on display at the Museum 
of Fine Arts and the opening of the 
critically celebrated Sadder Museum at Har- 
vard University in Cambridge. 

The Renoir show, through Jan. 5, is mak- 
ing its only U. S. stop in Boston; it drew 
record-breaking crowds in Paris and Lon- 
don. Already about half the 450,000 tickets 
have been sold. 

The Sackler Museum, designed by the 
British architect James Stirling, has been 
hailed by Philip Johnson as “the dearest 
simplest, and to my mind the best museum I 
have seen to date.” Its main stair, rising 
dramatically through six stories in a straight 
line, has been praised as a daring and bril- 
liant device. The building has also been criti- 
cized for a dreary exterior. 

The Fogg, Sadder and Busch-Rdringer 
museums (this third Harvard mnmum is de- 
voted to German art) are jointly exhibiting, 
through Jan. 5, “Modern Art at Harvard." 

Boston's historic downtown area is very 
compact, largely dating from the 17th, 18th 
and 19th centuries; hence most sightseeing 
tours can easily be made by foot. Perhaps the 
best place to begin is the observatory atop 
New England's tallest building, the John 
Hancock Tower in Copley Square, open 
from 9 AJvL (weekends from 10 A.M.) to 11 
PAL The view is spectacular — as far as the 
White Mountains of New Hampshire on a 
dear day. 

The Freedom Trail, a three-mile tour of 1 6 
historic sites connected by red lines in the 
sidewalk, makes a delightful walk if the 
weather is not too cold. Maps are available 
from the Boston National Historical Park 
Visitors Center at 15 State Street (tcL 617- 
223-0058). 

A good place to begin is Charles Bul- 
finch’s gold-domed State House atop Bea- 
con H3L Then walk into the North End (an 
Italian neighborhood with Italian restau- 
rants lining Hanover Street) to Paul Revere’s 
house. Built in 1680, it is the oldest building 
in Boston. 

The trail ends up at the Charlestown Navy 
Yard and the U.S.S. Constitution — “Old 
Ironsides," a 44-gun frigate launched in 1797 
and undefeated in 42 battles. It is the most 
popular tourist attraction in Boston, and 
deservedly so: The ship's cramped decks, 
rope hammocks, tall masts and rows of can- 
nons offer a glimpse of how sailors lived in 
another century. 

Although it takes a little more effort, one 
of the most rewarding experiences in Boston, 


a leas, for anyone who lived flu™*** 
tofifljL is a visit to the John F. Kennedy 
Library (617-929-4567). at Columbia Point 
on harbor just somh of te 

Southeast Expressway andgetoff atEfflt l /, 
then follow the signs past The Bos 
and the Boston campus of the University of 
Massachusetts. 

The library-museumis h ^ as ^ 1 S i wtjJl 
marble and glass edifice dwfewrfbi f ” 
PeL It offers an exhibition of Kamaly fam- 
ily pictures as wett as a moving 30 -mimite 
film on President Kennedy’s life. 

Among musical events, theBost^ Ballet 
will perform “The Nutcracker" Dec. 5-29at 
the Wang Center for the Performng Arts, 
270 Tremont Street (617-542-3600). Hdrets 
are S13 to $23. The ballet’s new artistic 
director, Brace Maries, fresh from his success 
building up Ballet West in Salt Lake City, 
said he hoped to work a sirmlar transforma- 
tion on the Boston corps. Feb. >9, Mam 
will offer a choreographer’s festival featuring 
the world premiere of a new work by Mara 
Morris. Tickets will be S1530 to $28.50. 

In Cambridge, the American Repertory 
Theater at 64 Brattle Street (617-547-8300) 
wnk to have overcome Yankee Puritanical 
aversion to the theater and, under Robert 
B rust tin, found a home for itself near Har- 
vard Square, It is now offering “The Change- 
ling" by Thomas Middleton; the world pre- 
miere erf “The Juniper Tree,” an opera by 
Philip Glass and Robert Moran, starts Fri- 
day in previews. Tickets are $11 to $24. 

Boston does not rival New York or San 
Francisco in the quality of its restaurants, 
but the revolution in American culinary 
standards bn* struck here, with estimable 
new places opening almost every month, it 
seems. Among the best is Restaurant Jasper 
(617-523-1 126) at 240 Commerical Street on 
the waierfrontin the Neath End. Handsome- 
ly appointed widiArt Deco fixtures, Jasper’s 
serves an excellent warm duck salad with 
spiced pecans. The loin of lamb, charred on 
the outside with cracked peppercorns and a 
moist rosy red inside, is a papular choice. 
The sumptuous cheesecake is made with 
goat cheese and fresh raspberr ie s. 

The Marquis de Lafayette in the new La- 
fayette Hotd (617-451-2600), owned by 
Swissair, has rapidly gained adherents. The 
managers of the hotel (on the edge erf what 
Bostonians caB the Combat Zone, a dreary 
strip of bars and adiill bookstores) hired 
Loins Outhiex, who runs L’Oasis, a Mtcbtim 
threo-star restaurant in La Napoole-Plage in 
the south of France. Mr. Outhier designed 
the Marquis de Lafayette from tableware to 
menu, and sent over several of ins disciples 
to staff the kitchen. 


A reliable favorite is Stem Robot 
227 - 337 DL inside Old City HaS, ftc TSfiS 

Second Empire **™f»* »^ ***** 

James Michael C urfey ha d balm oo 4 
(The restaurant ovencofcs the Kmgs Chapel 
Burying Ground, the (driest- cemetery in 
town.) Under the andiapc af ajLchdaad 
owner. Lucien Robert. the menu chasm 
hsss rapidly chan sisatac ether Stduoa$^e 

restaurants. ‘ ■'■'' 

At any of the above resriottaut^dumer Gar 
two with wine wffl be abase SJflft 
For seafood, the most popotef attraction 
is one of the three hraadira ofLegat Set 
Foods (the easiest to find tecooKj t-rownm 
is in the Park Pta Hotd Plaza; 

617 - 426 - 4444 ). The fish chowder** bm 
brew, and the sol e. scrcd, ha&tat and tmxifr 
fish are always EresL Tte is wa& 

ing in line; no reservations ' a reacccpted. • A 
meal for two wifi rtn»-S 3 ^-fe^S 6 ®; 8 qpai<fix^ 
on choice of beverage. ; . 

Thanks to the of Boaoc 

and an enormous ' 
straction,ibei 

the city has more l 

three years. idkmag^Aankt^Aaftagyi 
The Ritz-Carfcaa: ( 6 !’ 7 ‘- 536 t 5700 ‘), over- 
looking the Bosuw 

the elegant dowager cf Ae cm’i hoKidiics. 
Rates are $175 »>3225 foe * ooafcfc. Intis 
financial districts 

( 617 - 45 1 - 190 GJI wwfawonsE^wpeai-ayfc 
hotel in the renmMed^AalJbereive Bade 
building; SlTO-taSSM lor m double 
The new Ch ides Hc^r&e Charier 
Square near the 

Kennedy Cam- 

bridge offers Ss«-(*er^ rew»»odations 
right in Harearf 

ous shops and ia*Baaagbttfe®i|»-Sl 45 to 
$ 185 . For sooacwhafcfe** o y thri veqaaitea, 
the Park Plaza flfta fll tt h a -good 





# . 


V. '< 


V 


,4 

* 


•* 

'■■r-rr 


: - a 




: * r 

. .a 
7* * 


iff 
‘ '<Ft 





Most hotels pack- 
ages during the faRandwiafer., ' - ^ 


surcharge of 
„„ . „ Tdetron 

Stnet,ocrm 

liaum, 


Museum of Fhw 
nue. Renoir tickets 
S 1.75 ) may be 
( 800 - 582 - 8080 ) or, w 
Fogg Art Museum, 
from the Sackler: 

29 KirklaadStreet. AB 
day 10 AJi£ to 5 FJ£_ . 

Admission S3, under 18 free. 

U.S.S. .ConmlutiOK Ckirttibm Nary 
Yard, 9:30 AM. to i'ASPMAdtmssiaifree. 

Kennedy Library, Ce^^ibSt.'Patnt, 9 AM 
to 5 P.M. Adndstim $E3fc’' • * • ’ • - ■ 


-*>* 


■ 

:-w 

- :*• 




-.m 
■ : -* 


'flats 

•: - H 

'■■MSCs 

... 


- m 


'.•a? i 


r-5 pm. 


G 1985 The mtSvk Thna 




VIENNA. Konzerthaus (tel: 
72.12.11). 

CONCERTS — Dec. 1: Vienna 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Miguel 
Gomez Martinez conductor, Jose 
Francesco Alonsopiano (Rodrigo, 
Turina). Vienna Chamber Orches- 
tra, Philippe Entremcn conductor. 
Ola Rudner violin (Haydn. Mo- 
zart). 

Dec. 2: Alban Berg Quartet (Bar- 
tok, Dvorak). 


Dec. 3 and 4: The Chamber Or- 
chestra of Europe, Murray Perahia 
conductor/ piano (Bach, Mozart). 
Dec. 9; Vienna Symphony Orches- 
tra, Semyon Bychkov conductor. 
Andrea Lucchesini piano (Chopin, 
Shostakovich). 


Gabriele Sima soprano (Mozart). 
Dec. 17: Haydn Trio, Wolfgang 
Schulz flute (Haydn, Mozart). 

Dec. 18: Hagen Quartet. Oleg Mai- 
senberg piano (Brahms. Mozart). 
Dec. 19: Vienna Chamber Orches- 
tra, Johannes Prinz conductor, Do- 
ris Adam piano (Janacek, Mozart). 
Dec. 20: Vienna Synqihony Or- 
chestra. Horst Stein conductor, 
Gottfried Homik baritone (Han- 
del, Stravinsky). 

Dec. 21 and 22: Vienna Chamber 
Orchestra, Herbert Prikopa con- 
ductor (Schubert). 

•Musikverein (tel: 65.81.90). 


DECEMBER CALENDAR 


Dec. 15: Hans Zanoteffi conductor, 
Shoshana Rudiakqv piano (Cho- 


CONCERTS — Dec. 1: Vienna 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Christoph 
von Dohnanyi conductor (Berg. 
Dvorak). 


Dec. 10: Artis Quartet (Beethoven, 
Schubert). 

Dec. 14: ORF Symphony Orches- 
tra, Heinrich Hollreser conductor. 


Dec. 2: Tonkfinstler Orchestra, 
Walter Veigl conductor, Kimiko 
Nemi piano (Bach, Rubin). 

Dec. 4: Kuchl Quartett (Bach, 
Dvorak). 

Dec. 6 and 7: Tokunstler Orcbes- 



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PARES - CHAMP d* MARS 


1 SALON DES 

AfflIQUAIRES 

22 NOV.-r DEC. 


Hriduufifc 


ICOLE 

MIUTAIRE 



Ira, GOnther Theuring conductor 
(Bach). 

Dec. 8: Arnold Schdnberg Choir, 
Nikolaus Harnoncourt conductor 
(Handel). 

Dec. II: Haydn Sinfouietta, 
Manfred Huss conductor (Rossi- 
ni). 

RECITAL — Dec. 13: Alexander 
Jenner piano (Debussy, Jelinek). 
Dec. 17: Krystian Zimennan piano 
(Bach, Chopin). 

Dec. 20 and 22: Brigitte Fass- 
baender soprano, Irwin Gage piano 
(Liszt, Mahlex). 

•Staatsoper (tel: 53240). 

BALLET — Dec. 3: “Daphnis and 
Chloe" (Fokine, Ravel). “Firebird” 
(Fokine. Stravinsky). 

Dec. 13, 19. 23: “Vienna Waltzes" 
(Balanchine. J. & R. Strauss). “Die 
Puppenfee” (Hassreiier. Bayer). 
OPERA — Dec. 2: "Die Walkure” 
(R- Wagner). 

Dec. 5 and 9: "La Boheme" ( Pucci - 
ni). 

Dec. 6, 20, 28: “Die Zanberflote.” 
Dec. 7 and 11 : “II Trovatore" (V er- 
di). 

Dec. 8: "Fidelio" (Beethoven). 
Dec. 12: “Jenufa" (Janacek). 

Dec. 14 and 30: “Salome" (R. 
Strauss). 

Dec. 16: “Madame Butterfly" 
(Puccini). 

Dec. 17 and 21: “Ariadne auf Nax- 
os” (R. Strauss). 

Dec. 18: “The Barber of Seville" 
(Rossini). 

Dec. 25 and 29: “Le nozze di Fi- 
garo" (Mozan). 

•Volksoper (tel: 53240). 
MUSICAL — Dec. 7. 10. 16, 20: 
“My Fair Lady" (Lerner, Loewe). 
OPERA — Dec. 1, 6. 8. 14, 19, 21, 
23, 26, 28: “Hansel und GreieT 
(Humperdinck). 

Dec. 4: “Der WildschQtz” (Lortz- 
ing). 


“Contemporary Art" (Borofsky, 
Dokoupfl, Eckell, Duarte, Senise). 
To Dec. 15 “Modern Cl assies” 
(Portinari, ScgalL Malfatti). 

To Dec. 15: “The Apprentice Tour- 
ist: Photos of the Amazon Region 
by Maureen Bisflliat and Mario de 
Andrade." 


ENGLAND 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (teL 
638.41.41V 

CONCERTS — London Sympho- 
ny Orchestra — Dec. 3: Lukas Foss 
conductor/piano (Ives Mozart). 
Dec. 4: Brian Wright conductor, 
Manoug Parikdan violin (Beetho- 
ven, Weber). 

Dec. 14: Raffaello Monterosso 
conductor (Btilini). 

Dec. 31; 'John Georgiadis conduc- 
tor/ violin, (J. Strauss). 

Dec. 1: PhHhannonia Orchestra, 
Jan Latham- Koenig conductor, 
Stephen Hough piano (Ravel, 
TchaikovskyV 

Dec. 6: GinldhaB Symphony Or- 
chestra. John Lubbock conductor 
(Berio, R Strauss), City of London 
Sinfonia, Richard Hickox conduc- 
tor (Poulenc, Vivaldi). 

Dec. 8: En glish Chamber Orches- 
tra, Jos6-Luis Garcia conductor- 
/ violin (Bach, Haydn). 

Dec. 9; National Westminster 
Choir, London Chamber Orches- 
tra, lan Humphris conductor (Han- 
del). 

Dec. 10: London Concert Orches- 
tra, Robert Ziegler conductor, John 
Alley piano, lan Watson piano 
(Mozart, Offenbach). 

Dec. 15: BBC Concert Orchestra, 
James Galway conductor/flute, 
BBC Singers (Humperdinck, Mo- 
zart). 


23. 26-28: “As You Like It” 
(Shakespeare). 

•British Museum (tel: 636.15.55). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan, 1986: 
“Buddhism: Art and Faith." 
•Hayward Gallery (tel: 928.57.08). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 16: 
“Torres-Garcia: Grid-Pattern- 
Sign,” “Homage to Barcelona” 
•National Theatre (tti: 633.08.80). 
THEATER — Dec. 10, 11, 21, 23, 
26-28: “Love for Love" (Con- 
greve). 

Dec. 12-1 A 16, 30: “Mrs. Warren’s 
Profession (Shaw). 

Dec. 17-19: “The Duchess of 
MalfT (Webster). 

•Tate Gallery (tel: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 
“Scott Burton." 

To Jan. 10: “Kurt Schwitters," 
•Victoria and Albert Museum (tti: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 2: 
“Beatrix Potter The V&A Collec- 
tion." 

To Jan. 26: “Hats from India." 

To May 25: “British Waterco- 
lours." 


man n- 


D’encre,” Victor Hugo's 
scripts and drawings. 

•Salle Gaveau (td: 45.63.2030). 
RECITAL — Dec. 3: Daniel Adm 
piano (Brahms, Schubert). 

•Salle Plcyti (td: 4233.7239). 

CONCERTS —Dec. 2 and 9: Co- 


25: Thomas Christian David 
conductor, Knmagai Fumi- 
hiko piano (Mozart). 

Dec. 26: Emmanud Krivine con-, 
ductor, Michel Dalberto piano 
(Beethoven, Schubert). 

Dec. 27: Borislav Iwanov conduc- 
tor (Beethoven). 


logne Orchestra, K. Nagano con- Dec. 3: Berim Baroque Orchestra, 


ductor (Beethoven, Brahms). 

Dec, 5, 6, 7: Munich Philharmonic 
Orchestra, C. Cehbaidacfae con- 
ductor (Bruckner, Ravel). 

•Thifitre Musical de Paris (tti: 
42.61.1933). 

JAZZ MUSICAL — To Dec. 19: 


8 : 


“Black and Blue" (Segovia/Orez- 
zoH). 

•Tour Montparnasse (tel: 
417193.41). 


Konrad Latte conductor (\ r rvaldi). 
Dec. Ih Bantixrg Symphony Or- 
chestra, Horst Stein conductor 
(Dvorak, Schumann). 

Dec. 16: Berlin Radio Symphony 
Orchestra; Riccardo Chaill y con- 
ductor (Ives; Mahler). 

Dec. 23: Berim Concert Choir, Ritz 


•Stmtorf -^fibwhm of Art (td: 
470.10.m : i - - 

EXHBCOON — To Dea 15: 
“300th Anniversar y of Bach's 

Ty"tV n 

Jnlul. 

•Tobacco and Sait Mcsoim (td:4 
47630.4 IX 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: 
“Ancient Mexico: Histocy and Gv- 
Hb ario nm Mkhoacan." . 
•Yamatane Museum (tel: 
669.76.43). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 25 
“Japanese Paintings." 








MONTE-CARLO. Opera de Mon- 


EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “Four 
Centuries of Ballet in Paris.” ., ; 
•Wally Findlay Gallery 
(4235.70.74). 

EXHIBITION — 

“Andrf Bourrii." 


REClTAlS — Dec. 4: Jorge Bdet 
piano (Chopin^ Schnmann). 

Dec. x- Walter Klien piano (Mo- 
zart, Sohubot). „■ 

Dec. 20: Alfred Brcndel piano 
(Haydn, Sdiubert) 


te-Cario (td: 50.7634) 
"-LET — Dec. 


BALLET — Dec. 21, 22, 24: 
“Theme and Variations” (Balan- 
drine, TdukcrvskyX “L’Apprenti 
Sorcaer” (Lacolte, Dukas), “Te 
Drum’* (Lacotte, Bizet). 

Dec. -22 and 30: “Jours Tran* 


CKRMANY 




To Dec. 17- COLOGNE, Oper der Stadt (td: 
213531). 

OPERA— Dec. 1,4. 6, 12, 13, 18, 
21 : “Hansel und Gretd" (Humper- 
dinck). >' * 

Dec. 5 'and 14: “Madame Butter- 
fly" (Puccini). 


Dawn” (Haigen, Mendels- 
sohn), “life Grcles” (Ammann 
Adams) 

Dec. 23, 25, 28:.“24 Heures del; 
Vie dTine Femme" (Lacotte, Ni 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: Dec. 7: “Die Zauberfl5te" (Mo- 


BELGfUM 


BRUSSELS, Palais des Beanx Arts 
(tel: 51230.45). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: 
“Spanish Splenders and Bellas 
Villages, 1500-1700." 

•Musfees Royaux des Beain-Arts 
de Belgique (tti: 51355.46). 
EXHTBITION — To Dec. 22: 
"Goya." 

•Musces Royaux d’Art et d*His- 
lo'ire (tti: 733.96.10). 

EXHI BITION —To Dec. 22: “Los 
fbeios." 


Dec. 20 and 22: BBC Symphony 
Orchestra, Gennadi Rozhdest- 
vensky conductor (Prokofiev). 

Dec. 26: Royal Philhar monic Or- 
chestra, Norman Del Mar conduc- 
tor, Yehudi Menuhin violin (Bee- 
thoven). 

Dec. 27: Royal Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Barry Wordsworth con- 
ductor, Barry Douglas piano (Ros- 
sini, Tchaikovsky). 

Dec. 29: Camerata Lysy, Alberto 


Lysy conductor/violin, Yehudi 
Menuhin violin ((Bach. Vivaldi). 


BRAZIL 


SAO PAULO, ISth Biennial Cele- 
bration (tti: 572.77321. 
EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 15: 


EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 23 
“Miracles in Carved Ivory: Kodo 
Okuda." 

To Jan. 26: “Matthew Smith," 
“Told: Traditioa in Japan Today." 
“Nibonga." 

MUSICAL — Dec 30: “The Pi- 
rates of Penzance" (Gilbert & Sulli- 
van). 

THEATER — Dec. 12-14. 16-21, 


MONTPELLIER, Opera (tel: 
6631.11). 

BALLET — Dec 9: Le Jeune Bal- 
let de France. 

OPERETTA — Dec 24-27, 29-31: 
“Cibouletre" (de Flers, de Crois- 
set). • 

PARIS. Centre Georges Pompidou 
(td: 4177.1233). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec 16: 
“Malta." 

To Jan. 1: “Klee et la Musique." 
•Maison de Victor Hugo (tti: 
417116.65). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 31 : “Vic- 
tor Hugo’s Drawings." 

•Mus£e d’Art Mod erne (tel: 
4733.6137). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: 
“Vera Szekdy,” “Modem Masters 
from the Thyraen-Bornemisza Col- 
lection." 

•Music Camavalet 

(tti:417121.13). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “Eu- 
gfcne Bigot-" 

•Muste du Grand Palais (tel: 
416134.10). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec 16: 
“Sir Joshua Reynolds: 1723-1791" 
To Jan. 6: “La done de Victor. 
Huge" 

•Music du Louvre (tel: 
42.603936). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 6: “Le 
Bnm & Versailles.'' 

•Musie du Petit Palais (tel; 
4165.12.73). . 

EXHIBITION — To Jan_5: “Soldi 


341.44.49). 

BALLET — Dec. i and 13: “Lcs 
Sylphides" (Fokine, Cbqim). 

Dec 21 26, 27: “The Nutcracker” 

(Petipa, Tchaikovsky). 

OPERA — Dec 4 and II: “Ma- 
dame Butterfly” (Puccim). 

Dec 6, 8, 11 15. 18, 30: “Hansel; 

und Gretd" (Hi^Mudmck). 

Dec 7 and 14: “Tristan und Isol- 
de" (Wagner). 

Dec 10: “I Barbiere di SNigda” 

(Rossini). . 

Dec 16: “Salome" (R. Strauss).' 

Dec 17: “Tosca” (Puccini). 

Dec 19: “Fidelio" (Beethoven); , 
Dec 21, 23, 25, 29: “Zar und Zim- 
merman” (Lortzing). . 

Dec 31: ‘ J Orpheus in the Under- 
world" (OffenWh). 


zart). 

Dec 15,17, 23,35: “Zar und 22m- 
mermanh" (Lortzing).' 

Dec 21 26, 29: “Un Bafio in Mas- 
chera" (Verdi). 


27, 29, 31: “Pas de Six de 1: 
Vlvandiere” (Sl lion, Pugm), “Gi 
stile” (Lacotte, Adam). 



SCOTLAND 


halt. 


BOLOGNA, Teatro Com'unale 
(tti: 5199.47). 

OPERA ^Dec 3, 5, 7,10, 12, 15, 
17^ “Der- Froschfttz” (Weber). 
MILAN,: PadigEone. d’Arte Con- 


EDINBURGH, National Galler 
(td: 5563931). 

■ EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 24 

“Netherlandish Drawin gs " 

To Jan. 5: “The Christmas Story.' 
.•National Gallery of Modern At 
(td: 5563931).. 

EXHIBITION — To Jan 5: “Bti 

Uitz. Prints 1920-1923." 



tem pora nea (tti: 78,46.88 0: 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jan 13: 


^Gina Pane: Partitions," “Richard 
Long- Salvatore Scarphta."' 


w*n»$TATB 


•Philharmonic (tti: 
CONCERTS — Berlin 


JAPAN 


NEW YORK, Metropolitan Muse 
urn of Art (td: 535.77.10). . 
'EXHIBITION — Jan 5: “India!’ 
•Museum of Modern A 


metric Orchestra — Dec 7 and 8: . TOKYO, Bunka Kaikan (tel* 

Herbert von Karagan conductor 82831.11).. . " — To Dec. 3 

CONCERT — Dec 5; Tokyo Me Photography” (Bennarv 

troplitan ■ Symphony Orchestra, iRc®, Spanp> 

Jean Foumet conductor, Yo-Yo Jan " . Contrasts erf Fora. 
■Ma ctilo (Dvorak^ Mendelssohn), Abstract Art 191C 

•Idemhsti Gallery (td: 2133LH). 

EXHIBITION - — To Dec 22- 
“Tbe'Worid of RirnPh SchooL” 

•Matsuoka ; MuS&im (tel: 


»v* V, 


(Dtijnssy). 

Dec 13: 
ductor (Brahms, 

Dec 18 and 19; Seiji Ozawa con- 
ductor, Peter Serkin piano (Mo- 
zart, Tchaikovsky). 

Dec 21 and 22: Yehudi Menuhin 
conductor (Bach/ Mozart). 



Dec 30: Herberytm Karajan con-, evjrrfm. 

Dec. 1 and 2: Hans Hilsdoif con-' ^“^roaerie- ^: • 
ductor (Bach). ..■■•.•■' •National Museum of Western Art 

Dec 6: Thoman Christian. David; (td: 8283131). ... \i . • , „ . . ... 
conductor, Yorika Ikeya piano EXHTBITION —ToDec. 8: “Vm- 
(Beethoven). ; . cent Van Gq^tu"- - 


1980.' 

SAN FRANS1SCO, Museum c ■ - 
Mod&n(tti: 863.88.00). ‘ • 

EXHIBITION — Dre 5-Feb. 

"El mer B ischqff 1947-1985." , 

WASHINGTON D.C^ Natiom 
(^35737.00). 

ECHttBlTIONS :— To Feb. i k 
Women on Time." .. . P 

1 3: “Private Lives of Pu^ \ 
he Figures: Tbe^ 

ry fmSky Print 


?^ s; _T he Nineteenth Cenu ^ 









INTERNATIONAL BE3EL4IX) TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


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byftagCTCoffis 

1 j- Ultimate state-of-the-art 
-tl . travel is having youx own custom- 
" 1 ; 11 / j LKU 3 et ' l™<» at ridier end 
and a gaggle of vice presidents to 
■npp out'any woblems along the way. But for 

execntives still clawing way up the 

oorporaic pyramid or those in business on 
: wsr own, state-of-tht-an means knowing 
%ow to cut comers in style. 6 

It never hurts to drive a bargain, especially 

. ^«lue for money does not always depend 
wn bow much yoo pay. For example, it is 
posable to fly first class, or even Concorde, 
, for Kule more than the cost of a busmess- 

•• i il $*** u *?“ tidcet ’ . OT 10 stay at the Bitz for about 

: ■- the same pnce as the Holiday Inn. On the 

hand, there is no sense in goin g for 
Jr* It .economy if it’s flexibility you u sed A super- 
. m \"^ -saver ticket can be costly if you must sud- 

*** t'laj, change itinerary. 

For most people, getting there as comfon- 
3 tfc. JjJfe ably and conveniently as possible is what 
cuC? 1 .counts. Bat state-of-the-azi is knowing 
whkhairiinesprovide the best busmes&-dass 
u-, .service both, in the air and cm the ground; 

' ^ and it is knowing how to pace yourself by 

rv.,- ' ’ l 'fc allowing for stopovers and weekend breaks, 

:r-:e often at marginal expense. 

i.-iVT* of In Europe, patches of liberalization (such 

NS* as the recent Angle-Dutch agreement), co- 
cadsting with more protectionist regimes, 
? ^.VJ 5 ?*mC have intensified competition across the 
boajd » ““long the system at airiine fare 
•: ^ structures . seem even more arbitrary and 

- ' ? 'i cn -' 8 J: ^ chaotic. Here's the first pan of a checklist to 
help you through it; the second pan will 
^ appear nextweek. 

• Check out your travel agent. A good 

c business agent should provide a 24-honr 

_ ' computerized information and reservations 

service — but make sure it isn’t biased to the 
1 agency's favorite airline. Does your agent 

- V f give you a rebate on turnover? (This could be 

from 2 to 6 percent, d trending cm the size of 
' fl.': W\ £ your business.) More important, do you get 

• : r ; ' ! ? * iotk\ benefit of bulk discounts for air tickets 

" and hotel rooms? A London-based agent 

: "-’•Whafuj*® who guarantees British Airways 300 return 
rscaj] Concorde flights a year is able to offer them 
for “about the same as the business-class 
■' iiwd u-vTa fare.” A good agent knows the ins and outs 
/•''.•vy-jtyj * of promotional fare offers and can juggle 
■ ■' Or 133 ^®.- rates and travel sectors for the best possible 

.* i-.-li-i deaL This can be done by manipulating “fare 

■ adito construction umis,” whkh means you can 

: •_ j^. have an additional trip at no extra cost For 

• i. njsT * example, if you buy a round trip from Lon- 

don to Sydney, you can have a London- 
: ^ Stockholm round-trip ticket thrown in for 

"... use any time. Buying a round-the-world tidc- 
:7***f- et in London instead afNew York can save 
- 4you about $1,200. Less orthodox is to buy a 

— - 1 ‘cross border” ticket from which the agent 

*'■ tost detaches the top coupon; for example, cm an 
; ^ Amsterdam-Lcm don-N ew York flight you 

■j - can depart from Loudon but benefit from 

z .-y-Tr-j the much lower fare originating in Amster- 
; r^\" dam. Most IATA agents can now offer you 

Wv^r such a deal, although you have to be careful 
”‘T 7 which adrHnes you choose. All agenuf should 
, ■’ V ’ offer you a “bottom fine^ service demon- 

■ * jr ‘~ • strating, on customized print-putt, how 

' r ‘z ^ much money they are saving you. ’ 

• Check out your own deals. Oneway is to 
• T i..j subscribe to the ABC or Official ^iriine 

” "j Guides electronic editions for your personal 

computer. Unlike the usually biased 1 airlin e 
v - -> booking systems, these give impartial infor- 

— mation on fares and Khedules and are a 
v-se ,• i good way to keep travel waits on their toes. 

Failing this, carry an ABC or OAG monthly 
. _ r jv pocket guide with you on a trip. OAG is 
possibly more comprehensive for ; North 
. America, while ABC has the edge in Europe. 

• ( .H* They are invaluable for last-minute rgiggmg 

r 0 f schedules, and also cany connections by 

■ _ t. t regional airlines (such as Crossair between 


ass 

^jr. 

■ *;"7* 

. :: >Jnfer 

tof. 
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_ jazz concerts- Clubs are a place to do busi- 
ness, to make contacts. 

“These people are ambitious and goal- 
driented and they want to make money and 
■ be -successful,*' said Steve Rnbell, who runs 
the successful Palladium nightclub. “They’re 
-hot content to sh around and talk about 
-politics. Nicaragua doesn't raise their inter- 
: est They talk about themseJves.” 

' Area is a disco-cmn-art gahoy, redecorat- 
ed with a whole new theme and artworks 
. every six weeks. The Palladium took this 
"Style to the limit, hiring the critic Henry 
- Geldzahler as its art curator. The dub com- 
,,misaoned top young artists to he^> decorate: 
Scharf designed a black-lit corridor with 
floors covered in a rainbow of shag carpet 
' and walls swaddled in Day-Glo fake fur, 
Haring painted a backdrop for the d ance 
flooTi Jean-Michel Basquiat did a mural over 
■one of the bars. ... 

While the social scene is lively, it is, m 
many ways, conventional. Reflecting the 
“more conservative trend in the rest of soci- 
ety, many artists say they are cutting back on 
-drugs, alcohol, cigarettes and sex. “There’s 
not much freedom of sex because of all the 
<£seases. n said RubdL The more conserve 
five tenor also flows from the fact that there 
are not many taboos to break any mo re. 

Poetry and new writing are blossoming 
here, breathing new life into the 20 -year-old 
Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church in the 
Bowery, which offers a continuous round of 
readings and workshops. Ginsberg, who 
lives nearby, comes to read, as do yotmger 
artists suchi as the poet Rent Ricard and me 
novelists Kathy Acker and Drad . Leavitt- 
Jod Lewis, published in the East VfllageEye 
newspaper, pained “Homage to Ozzie Na- 
son”: 


a 

job 

still 

supported 

a 

family 

Comparing his bohemia with this one, 
Robert Motherwell does not think it is fair to 
fault young artists for their self-promotion. 
‘To pretend the 19th-centujy idea still exists 
of pure artists against a world of Philistines 
is naive,” he says. “The middle class is not 
monolithic any more; it’s subdivided into a 
thousand different specialties. The contem- 
porary world has become a place where most 
people are sort of entrepreneurs.'’ 

Just as Maik Rothko was once tortured by 
the idea of making money, Ann Magnuson 
has been tortured by the idea of not making 
it. She has watched some in her aide, Scharf 
and Haring, Madonna and Susan Seidd- 
tnan, reach the top in a handful of years 
while she still lives in a frugal walk-up. 

T ngpn iw ** over it for awhile, but I’ve 
come to terms with it,” she said. Tt hit me 
like Scarlett realizing she doesn't care about 
Ashley. Somehow it doesn't matter. What’s 
better than having friends and enjoying life 
together? That's what's great, regardless of 
who becomes rich and famous out of h.” 

That noble speech delivered, she smiled. 
“And yet, don’t we all want to live in crea- 
ture comfort? Don’t we all want to have a 25- 
inch Sony color console compact laser-disk 
home entertainment system?” ■ 


Excerpted from The New York Tones Mag * 


TRAVEL 




Page 7 


Mantua: A Monument to the Gonzagas 


by Beth Archer Brombert 


Basel and Brussels, or Etymon Airways be- 
tween Plymouth and Schiphd). Promotion- 
al, or discount fares, are also worth sorting 
out for yourself. The most innovative are 
British Caledonian's “Time Flyer” between 
Gatwfck, Amsterdam and Frankfurt, whkh 
depends an the time of day you fly. Round 
. trips be twe en Gatwick and Schiphol, for 
example, vary from £109 at morning peak 
time to £69 in the middle of the day. Restric- 
tions are advance booking and a minimum 
of one night’s stay, but not the usual Satur- 
day of APEX ana FEX fares, which effec- 
tively excludes their use for business travel 

These days, hotel rooms are discounted in 
the same way as airline tickets. Several travel 
agents have formed consortia for obtaining 
bulk, discounts for hotel rooms. For example, 
Woodside, a Boston-based consortium, of- 
fers c o rporate clients up to 50 percent off 
regular room rates in 8,000 hotels through- 
out the world.. Bui such deals are often 
limited to the really big corporate spenders, 
$200,000 and more. It makes sense for the 
medium- to- small business nd the indepen- 
dent traveler to check with one of the new 
hotel or room brokers who may be able to get 
you a discount of 10 to 45 percent. . 

■ Check out business-class options. This is 
a jungle all its own, an arcane area of seat 
pitches, self-adjusting foot rests and cabin 
configurations. TWA and Pan Am have up- 
graded business-class cabins to a six-across 
configuration, and most airlines now offer 
standards of comfort at least as good as the 
fiist class of the 1 970s. Most long-haul busi- 
ness-class passengers are now offered limos 
or helicopters at the main hubs. British Cale- 
donian offerc a free Immpricknp within a 40- 
mile (64-kDometer) radius of Gatwick and a 


Check out the 
jungle of options 
in business class. 


similar service in Manhattan SOUK afrtrn ef 
give access to executive lounges. Some air- 
lines charge a premi um for business class, 
while some, like KLM and SAS, do not. On 
short- haul fli g hts some airlines, such as Air 
France, offer business-class passengers a 
cabin with more leg room than the folks in 
economy. In Lufthansa’s new business class, 
tourist passengers have the same space and 
amenities as those in business class but there 
are distinctions on the ground. 

• Check out the trans- Allan tic options. 
People Express and Virgin Atlantic, offer 
exceptional fares between London and New 
York. People has a £147 ($216) one-way 
unrestricted fare (baggage handling is a 
small extra and you need to buy or bring 
your own food), while Virgin has a £149 one- 
way economy fare and an “upper class” fare 
(equivalent to a normal first class) of £499 
one way, for which younlso get a free econo- 
nry-tickei f or use any time. .These fares com- 
pare; with British Airways’ £786 economy 
and £1.332 business-class returns. 

• Consider a weekend break or stopover. 
Some airlines (notably .SAB, Honan, Iberia, 
Austrian and Icdandair) offer free 24-hour 
packages for passengers in transit on long- 
haul flights. Others, such as Singapore Air- 
lines and Cathay Pacific, offer inexpensive 
hotel deals. The Leading Hotels of the 
World, a marketing organization, has excel- 
lent bargains this winter in its Great Afford- 
able Program. For example, a three-night 
stay over a. weekend at the Hold Georges V 
in Paris costs 2,940 francs ($375) a person, 
including American breakfast, which is 50 
percent off the regular room rale. ■ 


M ANTUA Italy — BuOt around 
three squares,' on three islands, 
Manua is suspended like a mi- 
rage on three lakes formed by 
an elbow of the River Minrio. A tributary of 
the Po. the Minrio was an avenue of trans- 
portation for people and goods in Mantua’s 
golden years. When Isabella d’Esie came to 
the city as a bride in 1490, she arrived by 
barge from her native Ferrara. Seen from the 
east bank of Lago inferiors, the city looks 
tike an undiscovered side of Venice. 

Almost equidistant from Milan and Ven- 
ice, Mantua was sought as an ally by every 
Renaissance power. Under the rule of the 
Gonzagas, the city was the seat of one of the 
most brilliant courts of Europe. Ludovico 
Gouzaga, second Marcbese of Mantua, em- 
ployed Andrea Mantegna as bis court paint-, 
er t or 40 years, and GraBo Romano served 
bis great-grandson as architect and decora- 
tor tor 22 years. 

Unlike Florence or Rome, which leave the 
visitor frustrated by an abundance of trea- 
sures too vast and too dispersed to be seen 
even during a two-week stay, Mantua can be 
seen in two days. With its excellent food and 
compact area, it is the perfect stopover for 
the motorist, though equally accessible by 
train; within the city there is no need for a 
car. The ideal time to arrive is on a Wednes- 
day, so you can see the major monuments 
(many of which are closed on Monday or 
Tuesday) and be up by 8 AJVL for the 
Thursday maikeL 

From the terrace of the Hotel San Lorenzo 
you can survey the center of the city. Direct- 
ly below are the round tiled roof of the little 
church of San Lorenzo, the Renaissance 
tower whose astrological dock still tells the 
time, and the Piazza deDe Erbe, scene of the 
weekly market. At daybreak Thursday, itin- 
erant merchants noiselessly drive their vans 
through the undogged streets (signs in hotel 
elevators say parking in the vicinity is pro- 
hibited Wednesday night) and into the 
square to set up their white umbrellas over 
stalls laden with everything from designer 
shoes to kitchen gadgets. (1 bought a well- 
made yellow cotton sweater for about 510 
and a pair of glove-soft while for 

about 513.) 

The Piazza deUe Erbe is a long rectangle 
flanked by red brick and ocher-stuccoed 
porticoes that house shops and eating places. 
Within its perimeters stands the Palazzo del- 
la Ragione, a handsome mid- 13th-century 
brick building whose crenelated facade has 
retained its round-arched windows and ar- 
cades. Closing off the far tide of the square is 
the Palazzo del Podesti, ancient seat of the 
commune’s government, built in 1227. Op- 
posite stands the pristine Romanesque 
church of San Lorenzo, built in 1082. 

Separated from the Piazza deUe Erbe by 
the Palazzo del Podestit is the tiny Piazza 
Broletto, over which a relief carving of Vir- 
gQ, somber as a saint in a niche, contem- 
plates the day’s activities. Seated beneath a 
Gothic arch halfway up the wall, his great 
works on his knees, he reminds all who raise 
their eyes that he is Mantua’s native son. To 


Modernism 

Reviving 

Continued from page 5 

of such architects as Pelli, Kevin Roche and 
Helmut Jahn, to celebrate the ability of mod- 
em technology to create unusual surfaces in 
glass. 

In the sense that modernism has become 
an architecture of appearances more than an 
architecture of a value system, it has become 
curiously like wfaax many many old-guard 
modernists accuse post-modernism of bring. 
In neither case is there a strong sense of a 
moral mistioa to architecture — if there is 
anything that denotes the architecture of our 
time, modem or post-modem alike, it is the 
concentration on what we might call formal 
issues, the preoccupation with what things 
look tike as opposed to what they mean. 
Modernism is exhausted as a vital force; the 
modem movement forfeited much of its 
claim to moral authority when it became the 
corporate styles 

The modernist architecture being pro- 
duced right now does have some real if 
subtle, differences from that of a few years 
ago. The critical one is a new confidence, a 
new bravado almost, and 1 suspect this 
comes as muc h from a general reaction to 
some of post-modernism’s excesses as any- 
thmg dse. 

Inis hardly means that we are moving 
away from post-modernism, but the last 
year or so has seen a movement toward 
designs that are more resolved, less visibly 
anxious and shrill, and if the current interest 
in modernism continues, it will stnely en- 
courage still more simplicity and directness 
even in that architecture that is historirizing. 

In this sense, the Mies van der Rohe retro- 
spective takes on particular importance, for 
Mies was, in the end, the least ideological 
modernist of all. He had relatively liule 

interest in theory* and his buildings were 
ultimately statements about pure form and 
space, not about the broader issues of mod- 
ernist ideology. Students of Mies have ob- 
served for years how his supposedly rational- 
ist buildings are not so rational at all; the 
I-beams on the outside of the Seagram 
Budding, for example, are but decorations. 
Given the choice between beauty and truth, 
he invariably chose beauty — and thus set 
the tone, unwittingly, for the neo-modemism 
that is emerging around his centennial. ■ 

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The market in full swing in Mantua's Piazza delle Erbe . 


his right is a tile-roofed colonnaded stair- 
case, the Sotioportjco dri Lattonai, a pho- 
tographer’s challenge for the play of tight 
and shadow againsL its multiple openings. 

The grandest square is the cobbled Piazza 
Sordello, dominated on the right by the 
ducal palace and on the left by the Bonacolsi 
(later Castigtione) palace, both constructed 
in the late 13th century and echoing one 
another's crenelated brick facades. After 50 
years in power, the Bonacolsi, Mantua’s first 
dynasty, were ousted in 1328 by Luigi Gon- 
yj g a. The expulsion of die Bonacolsi is dra- 
matized in Domenico M or one’s 1494 paint- 
ing (ask to see it in the ducal palace), which 
also shows the Gothic facade of the now 
baroquified 12 th -century cathedral on the 
far side of the square. 

The dimension of Mantua’s past greatness 
is easily perceived in the halls of the ducal 
palace — three buildings interconnected so 
that their 500 rooms are grouped around 
seven gardens and right courtyards. An es- 
cort is mandatory, but one can proceed at 
one’s own pace from hall to bail, the cento- 


SWTTZ. N '- r ,r\_/ 


AUSTRIA 


ITALY 


Mantua 


Adriatic 

Sea 


Ligurian 

Sea 


Miles 100 


The New YoH, Tima 


ries unfolding in the decorations of now 
empty rooms. 

]t is worth inquiring in advance what pans 
of the palace may be open. In the spring of 
1984 ] was told' that Mantegna's master- 
piece, the Camera degli Sposi. was under 
restoration and would remain closed for 10 
years. But last July it was open, one panel 
already completed, its colors revived as 
though painted yesterday. The room will be 
open when the restorers are on holiday or 
otherwise engaged. Isabella d'Este’s music 
studio and library are closed for the same 
reason, but are scheduled to be reopened by 
next spring. 

The Camera degli Sposi, or bridal cham- 
ber, commissioned by Ludovico Gonzaga 
and completed in 1474, is the jewel of the 
palace. In this most magnificent family al- 
bum, three generations of Gonzagas appear 
with their relatives, courtiers and pages. 
Bright skies cast a golden light on the un- 
compromising realism of the figures. Wrin- 
kles, moles and sagging chins are candidly 
portrayed. 

Dating from the same years is Leon Bat- 
tista Alberti’s church of Sant ’Andrea. The 
coffered ceiling and grandiose arches, more 
reminiscent of the Pantheon than of a place 
of Christian worship, demonstrate the syn- 
thesis of the pre- and post-Christian worlds. 
(The huge cupola was added three centuries 
later.) Mantegna’s tomb is in the first chapel 
on the left. Apply to the sacristan for illumi- 
nation; a gratuity placed in a tendered bas- 
ket goes to the church’s charities. 

Another great Gonzaga structure, de- 
signed and decorated by Giulio Romano, is 
the Palazzo Te. built for Isabella's favorite 
son, Federico. (The accepted explanation of 
the palace's name is that it is the abbrevia- 
tion of tqeto, in tbe local dialect a cut made 
to lei the waters flow out. The Gonzagas had 
reclaimed this once marshy island as their 
horse farm.) 

In the ballroom, tbe Sala dri Cavalli, Giu- 


lio painted from life Federico's favorite hors- 
es. enshrined between fluted pilasters under 
scenes of mythic battles. Each hall has its 
theme: the Bailie of the Titans: the story of 
David; the myth of Psyche. 

When the Gonzaga line died out, Mantua 
came under Austrian domination in the early 
18th century. An outstanding example of the 
art of that century is the Teatro Sciemiiico in 
the Accademia VLrgiliana, a few blocks be- 
hind Lhe ducal palace. Tbe theater is in such 
impeccable condition it is hard to realize that 
the 13-year-old Mozart performed there on 
its inauguration. 

From the same period is the Palazzo 
d'Arco, which houses the furnishings of its 
original owners. An outbuilding dating from 
the Renaissance displays kitchen utensils of 
the time, from strainers to macaroni makers. 

Opposite the Palazzo d'Arco is a resuu 
rant with one Michelin star. II Cigno (The 
Swan} is an attractive establishment of many 
years' standing, specializing in the uncom- 
mon cuisine of the region. Mantua's pasta 
sfogiia (egg pasta) is the most delicate I have 
ever tasted. Wrapped tike a half moon 
around the unlik ely filling of pureed pump- 
kin and crushed amaretti seasoned with nut- 
meg. it is served with melted butter and 
Parmesan cheese and called lonelli di zucca . 
available in most local eating places. 

II Cigno has dishes based on the ancient 
cuisine of the duchy, whose lords and ladies 
delighted in rare spices and unusual combi- 
nations of agro-dolce (sour and sweeL) for 
fowl or game birds. It serves duck in a duck 
liver sauce, lightly orange-flavored but quite 
unlike its French counterpart. The owner, 
Gaetano Martini, produces a red wine, ru- 
bino mamovano, that is worth sampling. 

Until recently, II Cigno had no competi- 
tion in its doss, but it now has a worthy rival 
in L'Aquila Nigra (the Black Eagle, in the 
Latin spelling of one of the old sectors of Lhe 
city). Tbe restaurant occupies a Renaissance 
mansion in an alley beside the Bonacolsi 
palace. A functional entrance hall gives littie 
inkling of the handsome rooms beyond or 
the excellent food. The menu lacks some of II 
Cigno's originality, but the tone is less pre- 
tentious and lhe bill is notably smaller. 

An old-fashioned and long-established in- 
stitution is the Cento Rampini (100 Meat 
Hooks), once a wholesale meat market. 
Prices are moderate, and the menu is the 
classic home cooking or the region: stinco di 
maiale (braised pork shanks), siracotto (pot- 
roasted borsemeat), lonza di maiale al lane 
(loin of pork braised in milk). 

Not least of Mantua’s attractions is the 
proximity of Sabbicneta, about 20 miles (32 
kilometers) away. Built in the second half of 
the 1 6th cemurv by a Gonzaga of a collateral 
line, ii was the capital of his miniature 
■duchy. In 1588 one of the first covered the- 
aters was built there by a pupil of Palladio, 
Vincenzo Scamozzi. Sabbioneta affords an 
exceptional experience of the Renaissance, 
illustrating how far advanced in urban archi- 
tecture Italy was over its neighbors. ■ 

Bah Archer Brombert is working on a novel 
set in 16th-century Italy. She wrote this article 
for The New York Times. 


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Page 8 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PuUbhnl Wlib TTw New York Timcn and The Washington Post 


Democracy in Honduras? 


Jose Azcona Hoyo appears to have been 
elected the next president of Honduras, poll- 
ing about 25 percent of the vote in last Sun- 
day’s balloting. That does not sound so bad. 
considering that he had eight opponents. But 
one of them, Rafael Leonardo Call ej as. polled 
more than 40 percent — and still lost. That 
strange circumstance fairly defines the state of 
democracy in Honduras today. 

The retiring president, Roberto Suazo COr- 
dova, crudely sought to control the choice of a 
successor. After provoking conflicts with the 
supreme court, major party leaders and, most 
important, the military command, be became 
chiefly responsible for an election law that 
contradicts the spirit of the constitution and 

virtually guarantees instability. The law 
awards the presidency not to the person with 
the most votes but to the leading candidate of 
the parry whose candidates gained the mosL 

So what? Is not democracy a tainted form 
throughout Central America? Military com- 
manders dictate to presidents everywhere ex- 
cept in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, and in 
Nicaragua, political rights are reserved only 


for supporters of the Sandinist regime. But 
Honduras U special because the Reagan ad- 
ministration's policies have made it so. It is the 
main U.S. military base for operations on the 
Nicaraguan and Salvadoran frontiers. It is also 
the main base of the U.S.-backed “contra" 
army battling against Nicaragua. 

North Americans should care about demo- 
cracy in Honduras not only for appearances 
but because U.S. interests require stability 
there. Honduras is not immune to the unrest 
that threatens its neighbors. 

It has a long history of abrupt changes of 

regime; no elected civilian government has yet 

been succeeded by another. As has been dear 
for 37 years in nearby Costa Rica, true democ- 
racy is the best guarantor of stability in Cen- 
tral America. The pseudo-democracy in the 
rest of the isthmus undermines the legitimacy 
of leaders and only invites military coups. 
President Suazo Cordova ignored this lesson, 
put political maneuver ahead of legitimacy 
and leaves the Honduran people, and also the 
United States, to live with the consequences. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Of Security and Sausages 


To keep it lightly secret, the State Depart- 
ment classified a list of 400 American meat- 
packing plants that European inspectors say 
foil to meet Lheir standards. Publication of the 
list, tbe department feels, would threaten na- 
tional security. After alL if the American pub- 
lic began to form doubts about the basic integ- 
rity of the national supply of sausage and pigs' 
knuckles, the panic might easily spread, to 
Iamb and chicken. From there it could even 
affect public faith in tbe hamburger. 

The case begins with the rigorous, not to say 
prissy, sanitation rules that the European 
Community imposes on packers who want to 
sell in Europe. Those rules are to be applied to 
American packers next fail and the European 
inspectors came to have a look at their facili- 
ties. Europe's agriculture program supports 
the price of meat the same way that the Ameri- 
can program supports com and wheat. The 
Community has its prices too high, for reasons 
familiar to' any U.S. senator, and the rising 
costs of Europe's gigantic agricultural surplus- 
es push it into one financial crisis after anoth- 
er. Most governments, including European 
ones, occasionally resort to bureaucratic inge- 
nuity to keep out unwanted imports by invok- 
ing some ostensibly unrelated standard. 

When the European inspectors produced 
the list of packers who failed their inspection. 


the U.S. Department of Agriculture immedi- 
ately foresaw a wave of anxiety — and falling 
meat sales — if the list became public. It went 
to the State Department, which, for diplomatic 
reasons, wanted to avoid further inflammation 
of the long and testy quarrel over trans-Atlan- 
tic agricultural trade. The Community's politi- 
cal people saw the point and agreed that it 
would be much better not to let the list out- 
Tbe Stale Department hastily stamped it clas- 
sified on national security grounds. 

So a nasty tittle row' has been averted, but at 
a substantial cost. A degree of injury has been 
inflicted — nothing fatal but the bruise is 
visible — on people's right to know what their 
various governments are up to. 

Beyond that, it is a notorious failure of the 
American security system to attempt to cover 
loo much. There have been repeated references 
to that in the spy prosecutions that have be- 
come an unhappy staple of the news. The 
American system, the security specialists 
warn, keeps trying to classify too much paper 
with too many people and as a result some- 
times loses genuinely important secrets in its 
endless scramble to control marginal stuff that 
has been stamped merely to avoid political 
embarrassment. In which category would you 
put the list of the 400 meatpackers? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 

No Patient Talking in Malta? 


The hijackers, who reportedly joked after 
executing passengers, cannot be forgiven. 

The largest number of hijacked passengers 
killed during a rescue operation in history died 
in an exchange of fire between Egyptian com- 
mandos and the hijackers, posing a question 
[aboutj the accepted theory in the Middle East 
and other countries that no compromise 
should be made with terrorists. In the past. 
West German and Israeli commandos have 
stormed planes and rescued passengers. In 
1975 and 1977 the Japanese government com- 
plied with the hijackers' demand and released 
convicted criminals in exchange for the life of 
passengers. People may have different opin- 
ions on the measures taken by respective gov- 
ernments. Hie question is how patiently the 
officials concerned negotiated with the hijack- 
ers before reaching their final decision, and 
how prudently they analyzed the situations. 

Whenever similar incidents lake place in the 
Middle East, we sense political frustration in 
the cold-blooded terrorists. The latest incident 
has not exposed the background, but many 
people seem to have felt the Palestinian peo- 
ple's frustration. In taking various anti-terror- 
ist measures, the countries concerned must 
lake into account these and related points. 

— The Mainichi Daily News (Tokyo). 

Not a Word on H uman Rights 

Mr. Gorbachev’s speech to the Supreme 
Soviet [on Wednesday] was a reminder that 
despite the peace and good will which would 
seem to have flowed like honey from last 
week’s summit in Geneva, little as yet has. 
changed. There were hints of flexibility on 
Afghanistan — but these were evident at Ge- 
neva — and the flexibility anyway would seem 
to be conditional. His appeal on a nuclear test 
ban has already met with tittle response in 
Washington, while the warning on weapons in 
space was also a predictable reprise. One inter- 


pretation must be that after letting President 
Reagan escape from Geneva with his Strategic 
Defense Initiative intact, Mr. Gorbachev- 
wanted to reassure his own military' that his 
grasp of priorities had not slipped. 

As for the West. we must still await the signs 
of good faith, particularly on human rights, a 
subject which was (to no one’s surprise) un- 
touched upon in [Wednesday’s] address. There 
is no going back on the human rights commit- 
ment. If the two blocs are on the verge of a 
moderate detente with the promise of future 
summits, individual freedom must not be rele- 
gated to the bottom of the agenda, 

— The Times (London). 

Proliferation Is on the Wav 

At the U.S.-Soviet summit last week, one of 
the so-called “minor" accomplishments was a 
joint declaration of intent to cooperate in 
discouraging tbe spread of nuclear weapons. 
Actually, the two great powers have been co- 
operating in this area for several years. The 
need for even greater cooperation is evident 

The Carnegie Endowment for International 
Peace released a study the other day warning 
that the danger of nuclear weapons prolifera- 
tion has increased markedly since 1 9S4. Expert 
Leonard Spector said that India had increased 
its production capability by 1,000 percent 
since it first exploded a nuclear device 1 1 years 
ago, and was moving toward the construction 
of “an undeclared nuclear arsenal." Pakistan is 
on “the threshold of becoming a nuclear weap- 
ons state.” Both nations have denied any in- 
tention of building a nuclear arsenal. 

Israel is widely believed to have a ready- to 
assemble stockpile of 20 to 25 nuclear weap- 
ons, while South Africa has acquired enough 
plutonium for 15 to 30 nuclear weapons. 
North Korea, while far from acquiring a nucle- 
ar weapons capability, is moving ahead with 
efforts to buDd a large nuclear reactor that 
could produce plutonium for nuclear weapons. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 


FROM OUR NOV. 29 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Ulster to Organize Regiments 
LONDON — The Dublin correspondent of 
“The Standard” says: “At a meeting at Belfast 
[on Nov. 29] of delegates representing every 
Ulster constituency it was agreed to draw up a 
declaration refusing to pay any rates or taxes 
imposed by a Dublin Parliament. A committee 
was appointed for the purpose of organizing 
the men of Ulster into regiments and £10,000 
was subscribed for purchasing arms. This may 
sound theatrical, but it can be taken as certain 
that if a Radical Government is returned fin 
the coming British elections] Ulster will be an 
armed camp in a few weeks. It would be idle to 
assume that this is mere bluff. Electors in 
England would be making a mistake in imag- 
ining that Ulster will not fight if the Home 
Rule Bill is passed. The enthusiasm and deter- 
mination of the province are unmistakable." 


1935: Uprising Is Crashed in Brazil 
RJO DE JANEIRO — One hundred and fifty 
persons were killed and more than two hun- 
dred injured in fighting daring the Communist 
uprising here, it was officially announced [on 
Nov. 28], but these figures do not include 
casualties in the north, which are reported to 
have been very heavy. One hundred rebels 
alone were killed at Pernambuco. President 
Getulio Vargas, who watched artillery and 
infantry crush the revolt in Rio, issued a mes- 
sage proclaiming the end of the Communist 
rebellion. The situation in Rio was critical for 
several hours [on Nov. 27). Members of the air 
force rebelled and government troops were 
compelled to recapture the aerodrome with the 
use of artillery. Rebels from the Artillery 
School also turned their guns on the Aviation 
College and set Che to the hangars. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1959-1982 
KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOLS1E 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL AST 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEW1R17 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 
Executive Editor RENE BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Editor RICHARD R MORGAN 

lioun Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS 


Deputy Publisher 
Associate Pubhdw 
Associate Publisher 
Director of Operations 
Director of Circulation 


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International Herald Tribune, 1S1 Avenue Charies-de-Oanlle. 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine, 

France. TeL: (If 47.47. 1165. Tekx: 612718 (Herald). GiHes Herald Paris. ISSNr 0294-8052. 

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fi 1983. International Henm Tribune. All rights reserved. 



What About the Sanctity of Hunwn Life 

•/ V rrv hold mC 



W ashington — if you want to know 

what policy is, ask a waiter why you can’t 
substitute rice for mashed potatoes. The answer 
is policy. It's another term for not thinking. 

Policy in one of its many guises is responsible 
for the death of more than 50 passengers aboard 
an EgyptAir liner. The policy in question holds 
that you never negotiate with terrorists, who are, 
in the words of Secretary of State George Shultz, 
not “worth the time of day. They're not even 

PC ^r. Shultz made those renuufs before Egyp- 
tian troops attempted a rescue in Malta that, it 
now appears dear, was doomed from the start. 
Even after the results were in, the United States, 
adhering to policy, commended Egypt for taking 
action. Never mind that more than 5u passengers 
had been killed. Everyone was congratulated. 
Everyone had stuck to policy. 

The hijacking of tbe Egyptian airliner was a 
particularly nasty terrorist incident It seems to 
have been led by a madman who danced in the 
aisles and cracked jokes after executing passen- 
gers. Neither he nor his colleagues enun c iat e d 
demands, aside from demanding that the plane 
be refueled. They were edecticafly and somewhat 
contradictorily armed with small caliber pistols 
and hand grenades. The former were sometimes 
inadequate for up-dose executions; the latter 
were more than adequate to kill many people. 

It goes without saying that it is easier to 
second-guess, with the facts at your disposal, 
than to make a decision amid terrible confusion. 
The lauer is what Egyptian, Maltese and perhaps 
U.S. officials had to do. None of them wanted 
things to turn out the way they did. 

Nevertheless it is clear that a mindless policy is 
being substituted for hard thinking. 

The policy holds that you never negotiate with 
terrorists and that if possible you km them. The 
idea, besides having a beguflingsunpheuy, is to 
discourage other terrorist acts. The trouble with 
that is that terrorists are sometimes suicidal and 
could not care less that they have no chance of 
success. Martyrdom can be “success.” 

Even aside from that, though, is the suggestion 
that what fuels tbe policy is something besides 
logic — machismo and resentment. U.S. admin- 
istration spokesmen talk of terrorism as if it were 
an insult to American resolve, as if terrorists 
humiliate an administration that once thought 
the problem so simple and talked about it in 
those teims. Only Jimmy Carter was incapable of 
dealing with terrorism. A new administration 
would banish it from the Earth. 

In a statement issued after the botched rescue 
attempt, the U.S. State Department said, “Ter- 
rorism, by its very nature, rejects the values 
civilized peoples bold dear.” True. But terrorism' 


By Richard Cohen 

succeeds beyond the incident is question if. in 
the fight against it, governments also rriect “the 
values civilized peoples hold dear” The foremost 
value is the sanctity of hitman life, especially the 


for the one 

not attad L™ ‘ f di Mala mow to 1 50 



terrorism, tixm , like the terrorists themselves, 
governments will have substituted' other values 


Attack Terrorists in Their Lairs 


Idhearted, if you are a 

M IAMI — The world is By Howard Kleinberg ^J^roragrandmotha^era. 
paralyzed by terrorists— ^ Y00 are crippled or 

to,- *.••-= 


, paralyzed by terrorists 
ruthless, lawless, vicious, mur- 
dering zealots who prey on in- 
nocent persons and place civi- 
lized nations trying to deal with 
them in untenable positions. 

Do the civilized nations sit 
back and let tbe scene play its 
course, as tbe terrorists get their 
message to a watching world 
while hostages die by the hour? 

Or do they storm the terror- 
ists 1 stage — in Sunday’s case, 
an airliner —causing the deaths 
of many but snuffing out the 
terrorists before their cases 
reach our tiving rooms via tele- 
vision or before whatever their 
demands were could be met? 

Yoa will get compelling argu- 
ments on both sides of the issue: 
But what should not get an ar- 
gument is that those terrorists. 
Eke all other terrorists, are get- 
ting their automatic weapons 
from somewhere — their gre- 
nades, their ammunition and, 
yes, even their intelligence. 

It would appear to me that 
the best way to deal with terror- 


of the cancer — at those janm 
tries who support it with mom? 
and anns- Let’s not bd our- 
selves. We know who they are 
and we ought to deal with them, 
economically and mihtatjy. 

And if we know the location 
of terrorist bases, we ought to 
take a cue from the Israelis. 
Knock them out Assault them 
by air, land and sea, and damn 
the consequences. We have to 
learn to fight this ^ftyle of 
war. I long ago decided that 
there is no great value m trying 
to have world opinion on your 
side. It does nothing. for you 
wheat your scat is being bdd 
jwfla oft by barbarians. . 

Terrorists are at war with all 
civilized people. They do not 
ask if you are socialist or capi- 
talist, tf you are compassionate 


2^>™ on, ° UMn “”* y 

be toll 

with as we deal with nations 
No summits. Terrorists must be 
dealt with the way w ^ 
d^mnassldllera.WeffliKtgrt 
at them before they h ijack , b*“ 

Shultz said Mi S unday ; ^Ter 
rorfsts deserve no quarto:. Ter- 
rorists should have no place ro 
hide. We must stamp out tte 
terrorist activity. No one should 
re any quarter, no place to 
Jc, for these terrorists." 

And those who do give sha- 
ter, nr at "" a l s and encourage- 
ment to terrorists should be 
dealt with just as if they them- 
selves were the taronsis. Oth- 
erwise, when will all this end? 

The writer is editor of The 
Miami News. This comme nt was 
distributed by Cox News Service. 





BY HOLCK In Pol [llkan ICeWHVwto)- CAW Svndhsf*. 


A Return 


From Ulster Gomes a Fragile Signal to Other Lands 

By Charles William Maynes 


W ASHINGTON — Can people 
taught from childhood to hate 
one another acquire tbe trust neces- 
sary to live peacefully and produc- 
tively within a single political system? 
Margaret Thatcher and Garret Fitz-’ 
Gerald are trying to say yes, with 
their courageous and historic agree- 
ment giving Dublin an official voice 
In the British province of Northern 
Ireland. If they succeed, more than 
the divided Catholics and Protestants 
of Northern Ireland will benefit. 
Such diverse countries as El Salva- 
dor, Israel. Jordan and South Africa 
may derive valuable lessons. 

A myth widely propagated by the 
U.S. government is that the formal 
establishment of democratic proce- 
dures ends a nation’s political prob- 
lems. Today the Reagan administra- 
tion insists that tbe rebels in B 
Salvador must abandon their de- 
mand for power sharing and partici- 
pate in “free elections." Although the 
nature of the armed struggle is very 
different in each case, the United 
Slates opposes violence by the Irish 
Republican Army in Northern Ire- 
land, the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization in Israel and the territories 
Israel occupies, and the African Na- 
tional Congress in South Africa. 

These cases involve peoples fated 
to live together yet who cannot seem 
to do it peacefully. The minority fears 
the majority. It makes no difference 
whether the latter holds power demo- 
cratically or autocratically. 

In El Salvador, those in power have 
always either cooperated in military 
repression or been powerless to stop 
it- So those who lose elections fear 
that they may not be allowed to five 
to contest the next one. They demand 
a share of power in order to ensure 
that government organs cannot be 
used unfairly to end their right to 
participate in the political process. 

In Northern Ireland die Protestant 
majority has systematically used the 
power it has acquired democratically 
to suppress the Catholic minority. A 
democratically elected city councillor 
in Belfast can honestly acknowledge 
himself to be a ‘Trigof ' and say that 
Catholics and priests in Northern Ire- 
land should be ‘'incinerated.” A free 
election can never solve the political 
problem faced by the Catholic minor- 
ity in Belfast, when the result is to 
put such a man in power. 

In Israel there is, correctly, a deter- 
mination to maintain the Jewish 
character of the state. Some urge ibis 
for religious reasons, but even more 
fear what an Arab majority might do 
with power acquired democratically. 
This is one reason whv Israel is going 
to have to part with the occupied 
territories whose Arab populations 
pose a demographic and thus demo- 
cratic threat to the Jewish state. 

White South Africans are terrified 
by the idea of one- man-one- vote. 
They fear that blacks, now disenfran- 
chised. will use the ballot to suppress 
whites just as whites have used the 
ballot to suppress blacks. 

Where ethnic hatred is so great, 
there are only three solutions: popu- 
lation transfer, partition or a h rating 
process that, in lime, builds trust. By 
stressing this last loo seldom used 
alternative, Mrs. Thatcher and Mr. 
FitzGerald may help not only their 
own people but others as welL 
In most cases of this nature, a pop- 
ulation transfer seems out of the 
question. In Israel, Rabbi Meir Ka- 
hane makes the racist case for driving 
from Israel and tbe occupied territo- 
ries all Palestinians. In South Africa, 
a similar racist case calls for deansing 
the white areas of all nonwhites. But 
the establishment parties in Israel 
know that if Mr. Kahane were ever to 
cany out his policies, Israel's vital 
psychological bond with the United 
States would be permanently severed. 
And South Africa, for its part, has 
found i 


Nor is partition an easy or always 
available solution. In Ireland and 
what was that called Palestine, parti- 
tion has already taken place. But the 
populations, while more concentrat- 
ed than before, are still intermingled 
and further partition seems more 
likely to create new problems than 
solve old ones. In South Africa, parti- 
tion could be an answer but even then 
the small white population would 
fear its new large, black neighbor. 

So these countries are left with the 
hardest policy of all — a long-run 
effort to re-establish trust between 
communities trained not to have it. 

It is interesting that the British- 
Irish formula resembles that em- 
braced — but never implemented — 
by Menachem Begin, Anwar Sadat 
and Timmy Carter at Camp David. 
That formula calls for transitional 


arrangements that postpone any final 
settlement but offer two hostile com- 
munities an opportunity to work to- 
gether to develop tbe degree of trust 
that will be necessary if they are ever 
to arrive at a diplomatic solution. 

In the case of the British-Irish set- 
tlement, Mr. FitzGerald had the 
courage to confront the nationalist 
cause in his own country by accruing 
that Northern Ireland could never 
become part of greater Ireland except 
through the voluntary decision of the 
Protestant majority. MrSL Thatcher 
had the courage to confront the 
unionist cause in her country by ac- 
cepting that the Irish government 
should have a voice in the affairs of 
Northern Ireland in order to protect 
and calm tbe Catholic minoriiy. 

Besides courage and compromise, 
there was another key ingredient in 


The Way Out of a Desperate Situation 

By Thomas Flanagan 


N EW YORK — The world press 
has properly settled upon the 
words “hopeful” and “fragile" to de- 
scribe the British-Irish agreement 
Fragile it indeed is. Like those Protes- 
tant extremists of whom Ian Paisley 
is the most picturesque but not the 
most lethal embodiment the ERA 
and Sinn Fein will almost certainly 
obstruct the accord’s provisions. 

Britain, for the firk time in the 
sorry 64-year history of Northern Ire- 
land, has recognized that the active 
involvement of the Republic is essen- 
tial if the rights of northern Catholics 
are to be protected and seen to be 
protected. Elements in the unionist 
community will see this as a greasy 
slip along the slide at the bottom of 
which lies unification with the south. 
And perhaps they are right No com- 
munity was ever riven an unrevoka- 
ble safe conduct through history. 

But the agreement expresses for- 
mal pledges that such unification will 
take place only when it is the ex- 
pressed wish of the majority. That 
should snfficefor men and women of 
good will and rationality. How large 
a constituency that is remains now to 
be tested. My own belief is that, in the 
two communities, it may be a huge 


one. That is why “hopeful” seems to 
me as crucial a word as “fragile.” 

The desperate situation into which 
the north has drifted promotes that 
quiet desperation which is the most 
ominous sort of alL The ugly tragedy 
that has been c ranking itself out an 
the television screens of the world for 
a g eneration has become a series of 
static, frozen images — Saracen tanks' 
rolling down the streets of a bombed- 
out slum, sectarian obscenities 
scrawled upon dirty walls, children 
hurling ch unks of bock, hooded mm 
in funeral processions. Frozen im- 
ages, and therefore changeless. But in 
fact history is change. 

The Social Democratic and Labor 
Party, because it is moderate and 
non violent, is the voice of the major- 
ity of Catholics in the north, but the . 
deployment of realities in the prov- 
ince, realities that include tank 1 * «nd 
brutal searches, has reduced its pro- 
gram to homilies upon the ethical 


being prompted, out of a resighed 
fatigue, to tAe note that Sum rein 
has a program directed in the^most 
vivid way posable against thasesecu- 
rity forces which — it is now almost 
umveradly accepted in CtthoEccom- 
mumties — leave, let us say, much to 
be desired. What has.: desperately 
been needed is a machinery tiS'rive 
northern Catholics firm and viable 
evidence that their property-iheir 
dignity and their full avu fights are 
undo: the entire protection- ra a law 
they can accept as impart™! 

Margaret Thatcher, that resufette 
champion of the ri ght* of Soottish 
shepherds on theifiaidsQff thexoast 
of Tierra del Fucgo, is made ofwah 
stuff. And file may well hays come at 
■ last tO rcc ogn l Tg that the dfef fecti oK 
of tbe minority commnnity m North- 
ern; Ireland is now so cntire. that its 
aspirations can be denied omy at the 
cost of an tmenifirig BBA&atf&sam 
■anarchy, maintained by a standing 
arnty^agaDasonmem^^^ . : 


attractiveness of 

Political process has been frozen, 

and in the varamm n d gnifirant nnm- ~a novel set in 10th 
ber in the nationalist comonmity are contributed das comment fr. 


The writer, a. 
and author of the 
“ The Year of the 








By Philip C^ye&o 

WASHINGTON — A frwtfc 
tv linguist who mteprefed tgri. 
John Kennedy and CSaatedit Gs&fie 
anda Rusrian baptist wfeotra^afcd- 
for Mr. Kawedy tad 
shchevboth me ftesmQhfg: 
By mutual consent with tbriroppo- 
sire numbers, tiary tore up 
The nuances of afies too£*s, .ftey' 
steffi. are too tricky jo osssuaHe-sg 
objective record of eu«ly 
great men are living to«»*sy, 1 
Howewr this was fcwflefi at <& 
oeva, *e .proWea» ranafas? ~ ’ 
man's word agahat ratteft; : 
they don’t speak the soon tar - 
is aotOBtch fadtpH there a&j 
rial witnesses in atteadasca- 
Ii does seem dear, though,. H 
sunewaffisg . 

emp ha sizing * 
human nights. 


Qcvs summit, for boxes Gfe 

the anvil of sanamny he fnur^km- - 

mere d out as a 

for the first time i» .fc-*: 

what Henry -lGniaiH.mllhrft-.a- 

“coocepouJ bMKMafi^jEa’fihnQQn- 

dmet of U^4Sovirt : 

“finkage” a new •- 

Whatkfr.R ca g M W M '^cBlogKSc- 
ba3 Gorbachev, he. . 

was notgoing to otjO 

the SDIaafe Soft 
.that he.kBea^e^®^ft®S:-SovMt • 
rdazkxK m : he 

wished to a 
take 6ato. _ ’ r 
coffiScf 
Hats 
on aadjfe 
batty UiS.1 
Al y 

fte 
that 



0 


r 


» J 

'If:-. 

iTtiiOJIl 








{t v packag e — American encourages 
meat and aid, which may reach as 
much as SI bOlioo. The gamble being 
made by Britain, Irebad and die 
United Slates is that joint good gov- 
ernment can temporarily shelve each 
Irish community's passionate desire 
foTSelf- go va mm entniitflat k iic wh eii 
both can make a rational derision m 
a framework of tolerance. 

Can it work? Already the hotheads 
in both parts of Ireland are working 
to overturn the agreement. The odds, 
then, are not good. But this is one 
a gr e em e n t that people of^ood wiH 
should want to work For rf it fa3s# 
tlu amsoqoenccs wi& beleH (Kit ooly 
in Ireland. Zealots wffl draw bloody 
lessons in arch distant areas as Cen- 
tral America, the Middle East and 
southern Africa. Even in these had 
times, American money in support of 
tins agreement will be well speaL 

© 1983 Charles William Moynes. 





\ V-- 






l '^3. 


is that 
: j»me js back: 

w&jngywf! 

peficyprp? 
put to 


hard practice ty the jatsi^nt face 
to face with his'Sovi«. CObat<iparL 

And th&real-cpMjaioaXn^ 
not so much who won o^lpst but 
whether this sfccategy wiH *t)raikrany 
better dfe second time arraanL 
Part of die answer is lost in un- 
certainties about bow the Soviets wifi 
respond. Another part is lost in dif- 
ferences of opinion over bow well it 
waked the first time; Mr. Kissinger 
argues that ft waked asefitfly to pr^ 
dace ditente, -and that detente 
worked until Mr. Nbum was in no - 
condmoh to make anything work. 

• But Mr. Kissinger concedes that 
“Knkagie - . . is not a natural concept 
for Americans" — that political dxs- J 
continuity, bureaucratic fragments- . 
don: and American pragmatism rob ■ 't . 
Anjeoea Of ^sense of time or cotf- 
textot the seamless web of reality ” If 
that is President Reagan has bis 
wibk'cuf fiat for him. More than in 
any/adrramstration in recent memo- 
ry, Seamlessness has not been a dis- 
tingmshmg feature of his administra- 
tion's conduct of foreign policy. 

WasAin gton Rost Writers Group: 


** a 


THE 



&ARE?£ 






A Palestinian Appeal 

Eleven years ago tbe United Na- 
tions named November 29 as Inter- 
national Solidarity Day for the Pales- 
tinian People. Last year the United 
Palestinian Appeal a Wasbmgton- 
based charity, organized a fund-rais- 
ing dinner shortly before that day. 
The UPA is modeled on the United 
Jewish Appeal which last year raised 
$638 nnffion in tax-deductible funds 
for Israel from the United States. 

Since many American corpora- 
tions have a vested interest in the 
Arab world, the UPA thought it ap- 
propriate to hold its dinner in Saudi 
Arabia. (In 1983, American firms ex- 
ported SI6.1 billion worth of mer- 
chandise to die Arab world.) It was 
natural for the UPA to assume that 
American corporations would be 
sympathetic to an American charily 
that works to alkvkte the day-to-day 
hardships of ordinary Palestinians. 

A fund-raising banquet was held in 
Riyadh on Nov. 17, 1984, wader the . 
auspices of Prince Salman bin Abdul 
Aziz, the city's governor. AD Ameri- 
can companies working in Saudi Ara- 
bia were invited. Many sent no one 
but some were represented, as was 
the UJ5. Embassy. Prince Salman 
told the approximately 200 diners 
that whatever the legal and historical 
rights or wrongs, the world should 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR* 

‘ '• \ i - 

‘ while voices are rising nr supp o rt of 




not foiget the needs and sufferings of 
an ancient people humbled by wars 
and niatflfla) hardship s. 

In my capacity as chairman of- the 
board of trustees of this charity. 
I told the flnriianee ahonr the turmaWT- 
tariaa objectives of the UPA and how 
it was a nonpolitical private vohm- 


ations of humani ty. I . said that tiie 
UPA was coming to the. help of an 
industrious and civilized people de- 
prived of their homes, their lands 
and, all too often,' their dignity. 
“Help us with your ideas and. your 
donations," I said, “but whatever you ; 
do, for lnmamtyls sake, do not wash 
your hands and walk away." • y 
Sadly, many, did just that Dana? ^ 

resenlatrves of C American ferns ^toV' 
taledless than $4,000. No doubt due . 
to tbe Saudi royal family's genuine ’ 
sympathy for the Palestinian/ pHghl, 
put perhaps also as a reaction to the 
American indifference. King Fahd 
donated $1 nrilBon the next day. 
Prince Salman gave $100,000. ' 
Thanks to generous support, 
the UPA has reinforced its educa- 
tional and health programs and. has 
actually started buMng a nursing ~ 
college in Jerasakm wbose total cost 
will exceed $2 nriflkxi. 

As International Solidarity Day " 
cranes around again tins year — - 


— it will be kterest&^b^ee how 
many win remenS)^.tiie]SaIestimBn 
refugees; many of.whoiaLstiRBve in 
app&lHng- camps, sometimes within 
sight of they ocguTaf 1 forms and 
homes. UnHk&titeRr^inJews who 
have never known are 


VtotenceFafled in Malta 

Getting tough with hijackers will 
not t fiscoorage their leaders, whose 
supply of suicidal recruits is never- 
end ing. An d since the Western pow- 
ers refuse to unite to isolate those 
mgher-ecbekm culprits, the framer 
mpstsfege the blame when security is 



now encouraged ' to eempite to, the' breached and a plane is hnacked. 
-Pa lestin i an s’ edejg rtiir within living If only the prime mini 


ntemojy' and their- most rfwttWwwt 
wish continues to be the right to re- 
mm to the land where they belong. 

. . - mohamm^tarbush. 

•' ■" '■ Paris. 

*Not aZiomst Affair’ 


• MQesCq 
Jews in the I 


dand raises the bogey of 
Jmted StatesJiflymg dual 
’ ' C Zion 


minister of Malta 

had- let the EgyptAir plane be refu- 
eled, time .would have ban on the 
side of the trapped passengers. 

.ROSE L. HEIFETZ. . . 
NemQy-sur-Sone, France. 

' I hope the tragic massacre at Malta 
will t each a lesson to the diehards 
who preacb drastic measures I ikg as- 
saulting the hijadeers, as in the 
'air. If safety first for 


- "Cf 


w 


.e 


m 


4 . 1 . 


v r 


Sr DetTkxdS’ letters, Nov. 20). - hmnan fivwls theimperativt, negpti. 
and for all let Mr. .Copeland a turn is in order. BynSotiSnowtl 


Once 

and his ilk understand that Israel is 
not a Zionist affair, it is a Jewish 
affhir. And by its mere eristence, Is-, 
rafi brings about an association of 
Jews and non- Jewifii friesuJs. ’ 

: . .harry N- LEyirr. 

London: 

Mr, Copeland's kttcrscraitaiiLlit- 
tie bin ijrgudfce and areaahrfpftiL 
' . -' CLD SACHER. 

•!- : *: • '_*• ! -Gsiaadl Switzerland. 


By negotiating with 

the Palestine liberation Oraaniza- 
bOT, Itaty saved all the fives on the 

.•■tSTO"* ft® use of force 

m Malta, 59 people were kdtod. 

Itaty Denmark and other coun- 
mes have .not heshaled to pat the 
avjs of mar soldiers at risk in 'the 
East oh peace nwgdnnc but 
no mnooeni European civilian fijould 
be invoked in this denial war. 

A. RASMUSSEN. . 

Copenhagen, 


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FRIb'vi, jkuvember 29.1t98F 

TECHWOtOOY 

Computers Also Gm Have 
Too Much ou Their Minds 

By ANDREW POLLACK 

^ ,ffhr rpr* 77mt3 SmdCf 

T — Personal computers are becoming able 

I^Ll to sero more thmgs on their minds at once. But as with 
• I ^1 P co P‘®> having too many things on one’s mind some* 
nmes leads to tronhle. 

H a i^wlynew type of software, known as 
resident software, that is one of the latest fads in the 

Memory-resident programs usually do not handle mainstream 
>udl “ word Processing or financial spread sheets, 
'iu P«wide accessory functions such as calculators, note 
pads and phone lists. And as their name implies, they do not have 
to be loaded from a disk each time they are needed. After beine 
toadai once,_they si t quietly in 

"TTiere’s a nuclear 
war going on inside 
personal computers,” 
David Winer says. 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 



Page 9 



ena 


the back of the computer's 
memory while the main appli- 
cation is running and pop to 
the surface instantly when 
they are called upon. 

Such programs are becom- 
ing popular because they are 

generally inexpensive, useful 

and easy to use. But as more 

are used, they are beginning to interfere with each other and with 
the main program. The result is that sometimes the memory- 
resident programs do not work when they should. Ai other times, 
.roe entire computer operation can come to a halt as the programs 
battle for control 

“There’s a nuclear war going on inside personal computers, ” 
s aid D avid Winer, president of Living Videotext Inc, a software 
company that recently introduced a memory-resident outlining 
program called Ready. 

Borland International, a major manufacturer of such memory- 
resident programs, seeks to reassure customers in a reoent adver- 
tisement that its new product. Turbo Li ghtning, win not “crash 
and bum.” Despite the colorful language, most industry experts 
say the problem is not that serious, but one that nevertheless must 
be addressed if the industry is to avoid alienating customers. 

“It’s a pretty messy area," said William H. Gates, rhairman of 
Microsoft Corp., which makes the MS-DOS operating system 
used on the' IBM Personal Computer and compatible machines. 

M EMORY-resident programs have existed for a few years 
but have proliferated only in the last year. Spurring this 
was the success of Borland's Sidekick, a program that 
provides “desktop accessories” such as a note pad, phone list, 
electronic appointment calen dar and calculator. 

A person working on a spread sheet who gets a phone call, for 
example, can instantly pop up the note pad and take down a 
message, or pop up the calendar to schedule an appointment and 
then return to the spreadsheet. More than 600,000 copies of 
Sidekick have been sold since its introduction in mid- 1984, 
according to Philippe Kahn, president of the company, based in 
Scott’s Valley, California. 

Keyboard enhancers, such as Prokey from Rosesoft Inc. of 
Seattle and Superkey from Borland, are also popular. These allow 
the user to replace a sequence of keystrokes with a single key or 
word. 

Others that have been more recently introduced include outlin- 
ing programs, spread sheet annotating programs, spelling check- 
ers and electronic thesauri. With computers coming with more 
memory, industry executives envision more and more uses. 

One problem that arises is that the main application sometimes 
. (Continued on Page 12, Cot 8) : . • 


Plans to 
Privatize 

State to Reduce 
$25~BiIUon Stake 

By Paul Nwafor Ejime 

Agcnce Fraaee-Pmte 

LAGOS — The Nigerian gov- 
ernment is p lannin g to mm a large 
portion of its share in business over 
to private enterprise, according to 
Commodore Bbitu Ukrwe, chief of 
general staff in the three-month- 
old military government. 

In a meeting with media execu- 
tives in Lagos on Wednesday, he 
said the government's 23-billion- 
naira ($24. 9- billion) investment in 
state-owned and partly state- 
owned businesses was producing 
“unsatisfactory* 1 results. 

“The government will take steps 
to divest itself of major equity par- 
ticipation in economic ventures 
which are better left to the private 
sector,” said Commodore Ukiwe, a 
member of the Armed Forces Rul- 
ing Council. 

The Nigerian leader. Major Gen- 
eral Ibrahim Babangiaa, who 
seized power in August, announced 
last month in declaring a 15-month 
state of economic emergency that 
the government would seU off hold- 
ings in state companies. 

Commodore Ukiwe said 
Wednesday that government 
spending was “significantly'' ex- 
ceeding revenue. He said that 75 
percent of the 10.9 billion naira in 
state revenue collected over the 
first 10 months of 1985 came from 
chL 

Nigeria has serious foreign ex- 
change problems. It spends about 
half its annual foreign earnings on 
debt servicing. 

Commodore Ukiwe stressed the 
new agricultural policy, based cm 
self-sufficiency in food crops. 

Under next year's new sugar po- 
licy, he said, “Only those who par- 
ticipated in local production will be 
allowed to import sugar until na- 
tional self-sufficiency is achieved.' 1 

Commodore Ukiwe reported 
good harvests this year. Imports of 
rice and com have been banned 
under the emergency program, 
which also includes pay cuts of be- 
tween 2 percent and 20 percent in 
the mili tary and civil sectors. 


Stock Quotes to Cross the Water 


London-NASD Data Swap 
May Speed 24 -Hour Trade 

By Steve Lohr 

York Tinaa Scrsice 

LONDON - Around-the-clock trading of ma- 
jor United States and international stocks moved a 
step closer to reality this week with the announce- 
ment by the London Stock Exchange and the 
National Association of Securities Dealers of plans 
to swap price quotes on more than 550 British and 
U.S. issues. 

The announcement by the two trading bodies 
follows a number of other moves to expand share 
trading internationally. It heats op the competition 
among exchanges to establish links that will even- 
tually allow investors around the world to trade 
any major stock at any hour. 

The information -sharing will expand the hours 
during which investors can receive stock price 
quotes on actively traded UiL British and other 
international issues. American investors, for in- 
stance, will have access to the prices at which 
London market makers will buy and sell the largest 
U.S. stocks, such as International Business Ma- 
chines Corp.. during London trading hours. Lon- 
don trading begins at 4:30 AM. New York time. 

The quotes on approximately 300 British and 
non-British stocks traded in London are expected 
to become available beginning next April to trad- 
ers and institutional investors over the display 
terminals of NASDAQ, the automated quotation 
system of ibe NASD. At the same time, London 
investors and traders will gain access to quotes via 
a similar London Stock Exchange quote system of 
the most actively traded U.S. over-the-counter 
issues. 

Both the New V ork Stock Exchange and NASD 
had been holding discussions with the London 
Stock Exchange about global trading hookups. 
And traders in the United States viewed the an- 
nouncement this week as a sign that the NASD 
had scored important points in becoming the fo- 
cus, through its automated quotation system, of 
the move to international share trading. 

“The NASD has made a coup," said Peter Da- 
Puzzo, bead of retail equity trading for Shear son 
Lehman Brothers. 

He said one reason the securities dealers a? soda- 


Unking the N AS.D. and 
the London Markets 


Under the pilot project, price quotes of 
stocks on the two markets are shared. 
Investors in either Ihe U.S. or Britain 
can obtain quotes and telephone or 
telex to the country where trading is 
going on, even though their own 
exchanges may be closed . 

Eastern 24 « 

Standard 22 . • . 2 
Time 21 • * 3 

2 °. London Stock . 4 

Exchange hours 

19 • \ 5 

N.A.S.D. 

18 hours t 

17 vgrtltei 


14 


13 12 



The N«m Yo«k Tunu 

lion could move faster in establishing a link was 
that its system of competing market makers was 
more akin to the system that the London exchange 
was developing. The Big Board is continuing to 
investigate linkups for trading with the London 
exchange as well as exploring a cooperative effort 
with the Tokyo Stock Exchange. 

Mr. DaPuzzo said that the availability of price 
quotes from London was important prior to the 
opening of trading in New York when there had 
been a significant development overnight on a 
major American stock. Early quotes from London 
were also important when U.S. investors wanted to 
know what prices were available to them on major 
British and international stocks. 

The joint announcement this week “ties in with 
the whole movement of interest in how pension 
(Continued oo Page II, CoL 1) 


Brazil Unveils 
New Measures 
To Cut Inflation 


By Richard House 

Washinfiion Pott Service 

SAO PAULO — President Jose 
Samey sent Congress on Thursday 
a new package of tax reforms and 
government spending cuts that 
may reassure bankers worried by 
Brazil's decision to sidestep the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund's disci- 
pline. 

He announced “drastic mea- 
sures." including a federal hiring 
freeze and a 10-percent cut in pay- 
roll costs for state-owned compa- 
nies. All new federal investments 
will be personally approved by ihe 
president. 

Finance Minister Dilson Funaro 
said the measures would reduce 
next year’s federal deficit by 35 
trillion cruzeiros (S3.S million) to 
0J> percent of gross domestic prod- 
uct. This year's estimated deficit is 
2.7 percent of GDP, which mea- 
sures the total value of a nation’s 
goods and services but excludes in- 
come from foreign investments. 

Following talks in Washington. 
Mr. Funaro said earlier this week 
that Brazil would not seek early 
IMF approval for its program and 
was not presently interested in re- 
scheduling its 5103-billion foreign 
debt. 

The minister told a congressional 
commission that he had been under 
strong IMF pressure to continue 
recessionary policies. The IMF had 
demanded that 19S6 government 
accounts yield a surplus of almost 4 
percent of GDP. 


Mr. Samey also announced mea 
surcs to deregulate the economy 

and clear away bureaucratic com" 
plications. A privatization pro 
gram, starting with the national cri 
company Petrobras, would help re 
dues the dentil, he said. 

And for those earning less thar 
S300 a month, the top tax burden: 
will drop to around 4 percent fron 
12 percent. The extra burden wil 
be carried by twice- yearly taxes or 
the nation's top 3.SOO companies 
and on capital gains. 

These measures are tougher that 
those taken to fulfill the six succes 
sive IMF agreements made by tin 
former military-backed govern- 
ment. The moves come as Brazi 
prepares to renegotiate 516 biltioi 
in short-term credits due to expire 
Jan. 17. 


GATT Accord Paves Way for Global Trade Talks 


By David Tinnm 

Imerncnonol Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — Members of the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade ended their annual meeting 
Thursday with a compromise 
agreement that opens the way for 
new mlkc on world trade in late 
1986 or early 1987. 

Under the arrangement, the 
points of contention that pitted the 
United States and its supporters 
against a small group of developing 


countries were deferred for consid- 
eration by a newly formed prepara- 
tory' committee that will draw up 
an agenda and set the ground rules 
for a new trade round. 

The main disagreement centers 
on the opposition of Brazil, India 
and a few other developing nations 
to the U.S. demand for the inclu- 
sion of services in the next talks. 

The compromise averted a 
feared polarization on the service 
issue by removing it from public 


debate and putting it into a more 
confidential discussion where ac- 
commodations can more easily be 
found. Even so, negotiations on the 
trade issue loom as extremely diffi- 
cult and divisive. 

According to the agreement, the 
services issue may still be included 
in the formal agenda, thus satisfy- 
ing the U.S. delegation’s demand. 

But the developing countries 
won assurance that their special 
interests, notably continued prefer- 


ential treatment for their exports 
and a standstill on protectionist 
measures by industrialized nations, 
would be given priority treatment 
by the preparatory panel. 

Michael Smith." the deputy U.S. 
trade representative who headed 
the American delegation, called the 
outcome “a victory for GATT." 
The Reagan administration earlier 
had warned that it would seek solu- 
tions outside GATT if no progress 
were made at this week's meeting. 


Police Say Fraud 
FoundatJMB 

Reuters 

LONDON — Police said 
Thursday ihai they have found 
evidence of fraud in 1981 at 
Johnson Mat they Bankers Ltd., 
which collapsed last year and 
was subsequently rescued by 
the Bank of England. 

The City of London police 
commissioner, Owen Kelly, 
said it is now up tc- the director 
of public prosecutions. Sir 
Thomas Heiherington. to de- 
cide whether to initiate criminal 
proceedings. 

JMB, a subsidiary of Johnson 
Matthey PLC, one of the five 
London gold market members 
that set ihe price of gold each 
day. crashed last September af- 
ter reported a loss of about £245 
million (S360 million) because 
of bad loans. 

The Bank of England orga- 
nized a rescue costing around 
£100 million after it became 
dear that JMB’s difficulties 
could have a serious effect on 
the world gold market. Recent- 
ly it said Johnson Matthey 
Bankers would be sold. 


Qinrency Bates | Deutsche Bank Reports 

5.1% Pretax-Profit Rise 


'mi mm 

i 

c - 

DJIA. 

F7=. 

ILL 

OMr. 

BJF. 

Noe. 28/27 

54.' Yen 

2A5 

4202 

11250* 

3470* 

0.1445* 

. - 

5-54* 

134JS* 

14152 » 

5177 

755HS 

202175 

4537 

2.7735* 

174775 

_ 

245575 

25585* 

25311 

3733 

— — 

32775* 

15785 > 

8070* 

444* 

12142* 

14585* 

1478 

_ 

37383 

115828 

352748 

44253 

75545 

38853 

2777*5 

iTixoo 

252*00 

SUM 

2217* 

— 

UMO 

3X43 

8195* 

8815 

1 — 

04401 a 

2545 

77535 

173148 

- 24485 

5152 

zons 

201X8.. 

7725 

1094 

35581 

— 

4511* 

2712* 

14447* 

2595 

3837*-. 

. -an ns 

2757* 

785* 

25.72 

1157* 

38.15 

39051* 

•443 

— > 

25875 

108* 

'82545 * 

2754* 

0.122* 

7SJ35* 

447*1* 

•“TT 

1X354* 

M72 

05714 

270* 

47351 

15*24* 

25814 

44571* 

1821 

17X47 

UMM2 

83*187 

277*4* 

•54147 

157748 

3.12*4 

501934 

27782 

21078* 

ltd SDR rates as of Nov. 27. Ctafrnra to London and Zurich. Rxkm tn outer 


Amta-dom 
mwtWa) 
Frankfurt : 
London QO 
Milan 

MWYArkCc) 

Paris 

Tekvo 

Zoric* 

l ECU 

(SDH 


BmmncMlm 

(a) Commercial franc (bj Amounts n—tw to buy am pound (ej Amounts iwc /t d to Buy one 
dollar Ci Units of 100 fx> Units onjXOty) Units of 1HOOOH.O.; not ovatrd/ NJk.; natovallablr. 
I*) To bur wm pound: SUMJST 


Currency nt UXt 
Men. post) 49U» 
Norw. krona 74575 
PSn.MW 1U0 

Port.MCMfo WOOO 
Saudi riwii 3.451 
Stows 2J03 

S. Afr. road 15774 
S. Kor. wan 


Currency pot 
savwnmlt 
Smb. potato 


other DtoOtor Values 

currency per UiS Currency per USS 

Amen, austral MO Rn. markka LST2S 

AtnfruLS 1-4A2B oraekdrac. 15000 

Auotr.acML 17 JO Hew Korn S 7JD15 

Mto.fin.fr. 51 At Indian rupee 12J482 

Brazil crax. 9.10000 - Inda. raptati LUOJDB 
QnwdtanS L37BS Irtdit 08X7 

adnata yuan &3015 UraeUtoek. 1/UftJB 

DaolM krone MM Kawidtf floor O2V01 

Band, pound U35 Matoy.rtao. MM 

(Storting: 151 Irtthi 

Sovran: Banouo do Bmnotwc (Brustotsh Banco Commercial* ttoUana tMIfonl; Honour No- 
nonato do Porto {Parts J; Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo); imp (SDR).- BA1I {dinar, rtyot, dlrtxm); 
GfM&cHk (nmta). Other data from Reuters and AP. 


Taiwan t 

Thai baht 

TWMiDltra 

UAEdtdwm 

Vaitcz.be Rv. 


UJU 

07718 

14775 

7.4*5 

3M0 

243)75 

5S770 

04725 

1X20 


By Warren Gedcr 

Initrnmional Herald Tribune 

DUSSELDORF — Deutsche 
BankAG. enjoying record trading 
results, reported Thursday a 5.1- 
percent jump in pretax group oper- 
ating profit in 1985’s first nine 
months from three-fourths of the 
full 1984 figure. 

The results set West Germany's 
largest commercial bank on course 
to exceed last year’s estimated re- 
cord pretax operating profit of 3.7 
hillioa Deutsche marks (S1.45 bil- 
lion). 

The increase; however, reflected 
a slowing of profit growth from the 
first six months, which showed a 
7.1-t 


1 


Interest Rates 


E wr a wo r r etoey Beperifi 

Swiss Franck 

Dollar D-Mark Franc StorUna Franc 
1 month MhSU. 4t*4M 4tHto IIMIt. IWH 

1 months IMh «WU, 11 tw-11 >». Idrfh 

) months IMS fl W 4W-4P. lllto-lllh WWW 

4 months live* 4Vr4*k llfwllfc 7*M0W 

1 nor B1V8H. 4**6 tMti 11t%-llU lO-IOla 


Noe.38 

ecu SDR 
Bto-nt 7*. 
BW-fH 7k. 
IWft 7S 
S*rk«, 70k 
IMh 7W 

Sources: Morgan Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FPi; Lloyds Bank (BCUI; Routers 
(SDR). Rates aonttcoDie to Interbank deposits of it million minimum for «aa fvatenf). 




uni tod (Into* 

DtoCMml Roto 
FodarnlFudi 

Prime Roto 


Clou Pro*. 

7Vr 7VS 

CM. M 

TVS Vb 

PM 

Com PONT W-177 MTS 0*1. 7J0 

MMidi Treason- Bin* — 7.M 

UnMtt Tre asu ry Bib — 7J< 

■COV 3047 dan — 7J0 

.CD’S 4M» dan 

HfntPtrmopr 
' LzrmbQnt Rote 
ONratgU Bate 
'one Month interbank 
34aualh Interbank 
Moonth tnttftMnk 


— 7 JO 


5J0 530 
*50 *00 
*70 *45 
*25 405 
450 *30 


France 

' kttonrenfiao Rato 
CaH Money 
onfrmoan internanfc 
smooth Intemonfc 
44D0ath Interbank 


n. 

BV to* 
nt n* 
Pa » 
nt slant 


Briia la 

Bank Base Rat* ,,tb 

CORMoan not nio 

yi-dav Traasery Bin 111/14 U M2 

-Stosnto latokank 113/32 117/M 


7* 77/16 

Oft Oft 


Ducoualltoto 
■ Can Money 
(Bdeyfatortmik 

scarrtx: Reuters. Commenbank. Credit 
. Lyonnais. Book of Tokyo. 


AaUua Dollar VepMdfa 

Nod. 28 


1 man III 

2 months 

3 months 

4 months 

7 year 

Source: Reuters. 


sto-ou 
Bh-a* 
0 Mi >1 lb 
IX-lh 
0M.-IK 


11A Moaey Marte* Fnnda 

Nor. 27 

MerrtH Lynch Ready Assets 
30 dev nveraae yield; 739 

Telerate interest Rale hue*: 77U 

Source: MerrtH Lvncti, Telorere. 


Cold 


Non 28 

.. *M. PJ*. 

Mona Kean sbm bums -iffi 

uneeaibeara 32730 — —330 

Ports (12J kHo) SOM JOS* —370 

ZUriCft 32730 32405 -175 

Leaden 3247S 334J0 —US 

Hew York — asd. — . 

Uixerttbaum. Parts and London othdat fix. 
inps: Mono Kent ant Zurich opening and 
dosing prices! Now York Cornu ament 
contract. All nrkaa In UJL Soar omko. 
Source: Reuters. 


Markets Closed 

Because of the Thanksgiving holiday in theUniied States on Thursday, 

there are no NYSE, Amex and OTC stock listings in Frida/s editions. 
Further, there are no U.S. futures or options data m tins edition. U.S. 
foreign-exchange data are from Wednesday^ weekly U A mon^r- 
report, which normoHj’ comes out on Thursdays, wOI be released 

Friday. 


crating profit from one-half of 
full 1984 result 

The group's earning perfor- 
mance ateo reflected a high degree 
of dependency on trading earnings, 
an area in which Wot Germany's 
major commercial banks are seek- 
ing to expand their international 
competitiveness. Deutsche Bank 
last week announced plans to es- 
tablish investment-banking opera- 
tions in Tokyo. 

F. Wilhelm Christians, one of 
two managing board spokesmen, 
gave no absolute figure for operat- 
ing profit, following a general prac- 
tice among West German batiks. 

Operating profit at West Ger- 
man banks includes wminy! from 
the banks’ trading on their own 
accounts in securities, precious 
metals and foreign exchange — a 
figure that most banks are loath to 
disclose, largely because they are 
allowed to use such earnings to 
bolster unreported reserves cover- 
ing possible loan losses. 

Deutsche Bank officials hinted 
earlier this year that the consolidat- 
ed group earned 820 million DM 
on own-account trading in 1984. 
That figure was used to calculate 
the estimated 3. 7-billion- DM oper- 
ating profit for the year, a number 
unconfirmed by the bank's man- 
agement 

Trading earnings, buoyed by 
what Mr. Christians called the “re- 
naissance" of international interest 
in West Germany’s stock and bond 
markets, otceeded the full 1984 fig- 
ure by 18 percent at the parent 
company in the first 10 months of 
1985. In securities trading alone, 
earnings were up 42 percent from 
the 1984 comparison period. 

Mr. Christians said that parent 
bonk operating profit in the Janu- 
ary -October period showed stron- 
ger growth than the consolidated 
group, climbing 8.1 percent from 
10 / 12 ths of the full parent bank 
1984 result. This, be said* reflected 
stronger trading performance in 
the domestic market than abroad. 
No comparison six-month figure 
for the current year was disclosed. 

Parent-bank partial operating 


Bank Predicts 
Baker Loan Plan 
Will Win Support 

International Herald Tribune 

DUSSELDORF — The Third 
World debt-rescue plan proposed 
by the U.S. Treasury secretary, 
James A Baker 3d, ultimately will 
win the support of imematioaal 
commercial banks because there is 
no alternative, Alfred Herrhausen. 
a spokesman for Deutsche Bank 
AG’s managing board, said Thurs- 
day. 

According to Mr. Herrhausen, 
U.S. officials have asked major 
Western commercial banks to sig- 
nal their support for the plan by 
Dec. 15. Treasury Department offi- 
cials in Washington could not be 
reached for confirmation Thursday 
because of the Thanksgiving Day 
holiday. 

The Baker plan, which was put 
forward at last month’s Interna- 
tiona] Monetary Fond meeting in 
Seoul, calls for commercial banks 
to increase lending to the world's 
15 most troubled nations by S20 
billion over the next three years. 

Mr. Henhausen said he doubted 
whether Washington would receive 
a declaration of support from the 
bulk of the banks concerned by the 
December deadline. He said there 
are a number of issues needing clar- 
ification, including which country 
should be selected as the major test 
case for the program. 



profit, which excludes own-ac- 
count trading, rose 22 percent to 
1.57 bdicEn DM in the first 10 
months from 10/12ths of the 19S4 
result. This also reflects a slight 
slowing from the first half, when 
there was a 2.8-pcrcent increase, to 
945.2 minion DM. 

A drop in Deutsche Bank’s inter- 
est-rate margin — the difference 
betw een interest earned and inter- 
est paid — to an average 2.96 per- 
centage points in the first 10 
months from an average 3.16 per- 
centage points last year was largely 
offset, Mr. Christians said, by an 
expanding credit volume. He said 
the chances are good for a slight 
rental in West German capital 
market rates early next year, raising 
the bank's 1986 profit prospects. 

Mr. Christian noted that the 
bank would again make significant 
provisions for possible bad debt, 
stressing that there has been no 
major easing of risk to foreign cus- 
tomers and tiiat there is a rising tide 
of corporate bankruptcies among 
mid-sized West German compa- 
nies. particularly in the depressed 
home-building sector. 


For private banking in Switzerland, 
an exceptional bank. 


T hrough our offices in Switzer- 
land otter a full range of 
sophisricared banking services, 
from foreign exchange and pre- 
cious mends - to private banking. 

And now that we are part of 
American Express Bank Ltd., our 
private banking has raken on a 
whole new dimension. Through 
this global link, we provide access 
to the unique investment oppor- 
tunities and asset management ser- 
vices offered by the American 
Express family of companies. 
Moreover, for certain clients, we 
also provide such valuable “extras" 




as Gold Card * privileges and the 
exclusive Premier Services. 31 ' for 
round-the-clock personal and crave! 
assistance. 

While we move with thc 
times. our traditional policies do 
not change. At the heart of our 
business is the maintenance of a 
strong and diversified deposit 
base. Our portlolio of assets is also 
well -diversified, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a conser- 
vative ratio of capital to deposits 
and a high degree of liquidity — 
sensible strategies in these uncer- 
tain times. 


If TDb sounds like the sort of 
bank that meets your require- 
ments, visit us on your next trip 
to Switzerland. Or telephone: in 
Geneva, 022/3721 II: in Chiasso. 
«»l /44 1091 . 

TDB offices ill Gtttilw'. Lot! J ill. Pjris. 
Lnximbwty. Chuisso. Alontt Carla. 
.V.w ua Zurich. Butui'i Ai.-is. SJ" 
Pm/m. 

TDB. iht Bih emu nurci.;! lunk- 

in Switzerland, ‘is j numhir of the 
American Express Con.p.W). uhich 
i'.\is Mils vf i.S:> 6 vj biliim; iind 
(hart Ivi/ Jen' t quit) »f CSS 4.9 kiffiuu. 





Trade De\dopment Bank 


Tht ThiJi Dci\(vpffl(ftt Btink budding in GiHivj. 

31 96-9S. rut Jit Rhine. 

An American Express company 









Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


OHVMMRt It 


Saudi Businessmen Reluctant to Invest at Home 


By Bob Hagerty 

uenutianal Herald Tribune 


Imemattanal Herald Tribune 

RIYADH — The digital tele- 
phone system is a marvel of reli- 
ability, and new six-lane highways 
coil around the cities. 


Before businessmen begin to 
lake long-term risks, though, they 
need confidence, and that quality is 
conspicuously lacking. One indica- 
tor is that the share price of Saudi 
American Bank, widely considered 


Saudi Arabia’s gover nme nt has smong die stronger institutions, 
used its oil riches during the past IS k* 5 plunged 10 about 4SQ nyals 


years to create a lavish infrastruc- ' 

turc of utilities, transportation and After the Boom 
housing along with such basic in- 
dustries as oil refining, petroebemi- living on Less in Sandi Arabia 
cals and steel. In its plan for the p 


next five years, the government is 
calling on businessmen to bring 
funds back, from foreign bank ac- 
counts and build up a layer of pri- 
vate enterprise worthy of that in- 
frastructure. 

So far. the response has been 
meager. 

Bankers, under pressure from 
some government officials to lend 
more to private business, complain 

that they receive few serious pro- 
posals for manufacturing projects 
needing finance. They say that Sau- 
di businessmen tend to pursue only 
projects that offer a rapid payoff, 
such as government contracts. 

“j think Saudi businessmen are 
very selfish,” confided a young 
Saudi technocrat. “They are wait- 
ing for the boom years of the 1 970s 
to come back." 

If so. bankers and government 
offi cials agree, the businessmen 
probably face a long wait: Even if 
the ofl market does rebound, the 
government has completed most of 
its crash program of moderniza- 
lion. 

In today's Saudi Arabia, said a 
European banker based in Riyadh, 
“there are not many opportunities 
anymore that promise you over- 
night wealth." 


Third of fiv e articles 

($123) from more than 1,300 nyals 
in 1983. 

Bankers say the main reason for 
low confidence is that the govern- 
ment, whose oil revenues have fall- 
en about 75 percent in the past four 
years, is spreading less money 
around. For die fiscal year ending 
next March, the government has 
budgeted spending of 200 billion 
riyals. But a leading economist, 
who asked not to be identified, esti- 


• ‘That’s normal.” said Prince 
Sultan bin Salman, the 29-year-old 
son of one of the kingdom's most 
powerful princes. Prince S alman Jp 
bin Abdul Aziz, who is the gover- 
nor of Riyadh and a brother of 
King Fabd. Prince Sultan, who re- 
turned to the civil service after hav- 
ing flown aboard the U.S. space 
shuttle earlier this year, quoted an 
Arab proverb that “money is a 
coward." 

The general uncertainty makes it 0 
all the more difficult for business- f*" 
men to realize that the kingdom is [ 
in a “natural transition” from 
heavy government spending on in- 
frastructure to an era led by private w 

business, expired Sheikh Mo- pnnee Sultan bin Salman: 


hammed AbalkhaiL the finance 
minister. 

Some Saudis, of course, have 
continued to invest at borne 
throughout the slump. For exam- 
ple, there was strong demand last 
spring for an offering of shares in a 
new Saudi pharmaceutical and 


“Money is a coward.* 


mated that actual spending wffl to- medical-supply company, and a 
tal 160 billion to 170 billion riyals, proposal to invest private money in 


down from 283 billion four years 


it's still an economy driven by 


petrochemical and other projects is 
under discussion among a group 
led by Sheikh Ahmed Juffali and 


government expenditure,” a senior Fluor Arabia, an affiliate of U.S.- 
foreign banker said. Saudi govern- based Fluor Corp. _ 


mem spending is equivalent to The government is trying to ease 


about 56 percent of gross domestic the way for entrepreneurs by insist- 
producu the total value of a oa- ing that foreign companies that win 


don's output of goods and services, big military orders agree to help set 
excluding income from operations up high-technology joint ventures 


abroad. That compares with about with Saudi partners, 


one-third in the United States and 
Japan, and 45 percent in Britain. 


To win a giant contract early this 
vear for a military-radar and -com- 


Add the collapse of Lhe Kuwaiti municauon system. Boring Co. and 
stock market, die Iran- Iraq war General Electric Co. of the United 


and the generally unsettled state of States promised to line up foreign 
the Middle East, and Saudi busi- investors willing to plow around 


nessmen in recent years have found 
plenty of reasons to hesitate. 


$800 milli on into such ventures. 
Among those planned are an air- 


Recession Begins to Strain larger Companies 


craft-repair and -maintenance cen- 
ter and companies involved in mili- 
tary electronics, computer services 
and telecommunications. 

A similar program is to play a 
major role in the planned Saudi 
purchase of Tornado military jets 
from Britain. Abdulaziz A. Al-Za- 
mil. industry minister, said that the 
Tornado program was likely to be 
about as large as the Boeing-GE 
one. 

Also crusading for private in- 
vestment in cooperation with for- 
eign partners is National Industri- 
alization Co., a new privately 
owned company designed to identi- 
fy and develop industrial projects. 

“We still have a lot of confidence 
in the future of this economy,” said 
MahSOim B. JalaL, rfrarrman of 
NIC. But even his company has 
suffered from the general lack of 
confidence; when shares in NIC 
were offered last year, the compa- 
ny's bankers had to scrabble hard 
to find enough buyers. 

Many foreign bankers say busi- 
ness confidence eventually will im- 


Iiuernationil Herald Tribune 

RIYADH — Saudi Arabia's recession has devastat- 
ed hundreds of the mar ginal companies thrown to- 
gether to grab government construction contracts dur- 
ing the oil boom. Now, bankers say. the four-year-old 
slump is straining many of the larger and better- 
managed companies. 

One example is Arabian Homes Co-, a builder of 
luxury villas for expatriate executives. The Jeddah- 
based company, owned by Dr. G.N. Pharaon. Talal Y. 
Zahid and others, is fundamentally strong, bankers 
say. 

Nonetheless. William Atkinson, president of Arabi- 
an Homes, confirmed that the company was unable to 
persuade enough Hanks to refinance debts mat uring 
this year, and a loan-syndication proposal led by 
National Commercial Bank of Saudi Arabia fell 
through. As a result. Mr. Atkinson said, the company 
had to defer principal payments on its debt, which 
totals 200 million to 300 milli on riyals (S55 millio n to 
$82 million). 

Banks, especially some of those that serve the Saudi 


uisiAucvi prove. 

“lhe country is basically a very 
The company remained confident about long-term solid, going concern,” said an 
prospects and was moving into sales of villas to Saudis American banker with long expert- 
as well as expatriates. Mr. Atkinson said, adding: ence in the region. “You’ve got to 
“There are so many opportunities still around.” remember these guys are sitting on 
Also feeling the strains of recession is Arabian Balk top of the world’s biggest lake of 
Trade Ltd., an importer of cement, owned bv the otL" 

Family of Mohamed. Abdullah. Hisham and Khalid Tomorrow-: New petrochemical 
Ahreza- plants help reduce reliance on oiL 


A spokesman for Arabian Bulk Trade said the 

company had “no serious debt-repayment difficul- 
ties" and had never defaulted on any payment, but he Coffee Export Onntas 
added: "Sudden action by the offshore banks has 'r 

created short-term cash-flow problems for companies Eased During Quarter 
in the construction and building-material supply busi- 4 f P 

nKs."^ lo cal p roductionof amcm ws rismg, he LONDON- The laiematiomd 
Arabian Bulk Trade had responded l>y pmlmg Coffee „„„ 
more emphasis on agnculture-relaied businesses nnd iiTSpecled decision to 

on bulk-cement handling overseas. allow lhe shipnSu of more coffee 

Arabian Auto Agency, a distributor of construction to the world market during the cur- 
and agricultural equipment headed by Emir Zdd M. rent quarter in a bid to reduce high 
Sudairi. had "inevitably been adversely affected by the prices. 


market from offices in Bahrain, have grown wary of severe downturn in the Saudi market," said John C. The ICO said it had derided that 


lending to construction companies in general 
Mr. Atkinson said bank directors were “lightly 
shell-shocked” over the collapse of some large boirow- 
ers in the industiy. bat he argued that the bankers were 
“overreacting” in the case of Arabian Homes. 


Murray, financial director. But Arabian Auto contin- members that export more than 
ued to trade profitably and "to enjoy the support of 25.000 60-kilogram bags a year win 
our banks.” he said. When asked specifically whether be allowed to ship 45 percent, in- 
the company was seeking to defer debt payments, Mr. stead of 25 percent of their animal 
Murray declined to comment. export quota during the quarter. 






Bejond the debt crisis- 

Latin 

America 

die next ten years. 


Sponsored by the International Herald Tribune & the Inter-American Devdopment Bank. 

London, January 27-28, 1986. 


Jnited States to examine 


and corporate leaders from Latin. America, me Caribbean, Europe andme United States to examine 
the outlook for Latin America over the next ten years. 

As places at the conference are strictly limited, we reccmmend that senior executives from the 
banking and business community interested in attending, complete and mailtiiei^isliatkmfann today. 


JANUARY 27, 1986 

Chairman: Lee W. Huebner, Publisher, 

International Herald Tribune. 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 
Antonio Ortiz Mena, President, 

Inter-American Development Bank, Washington D.C 

SNAPSHOT OF THE DEBT CRISIS, RESCHEDULING MOVES, 
ADJUSTMENT PROGRAMS 

Eduardo Wiesner Duran, Western Hemisphere Director, 
International Monetary Fund, Washington D.C 
LATIN AMERICAN INITIATIVES TO TACKLE 
THE DEBT PROBLEM 

Jesus Silva Herzog, Finance Minister, Mexico. 

‘Femao Brother, Governor, Central Bank, Brazil 
HOW THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
SHOULD ADAPT 

Michel Camdessus, Governor, Banque de Frcmce. 

Robin Leigh-Pemberton, Governor, Bank of England. 

HOW MULTINATIONALS HAVE MADE A SUCCESS OF 
OPERATING IN THE REGION 
CJ. van der Klugt, Vice-Chairman, 

Philips Industries, Bndhovea 

Peter Wallenberg, First Vice Chairman, 

Skandinaviska Enskilda Banker, Stockholm. 

REVIVING INDUSTRIES IN LATIN AMERICA 

The Honorable Edward Seaga, M.P., Prime Minister, Jamaica. 

Francisco Swett, Finance Minister, Ecuador. 

Amaldo Musich, Director, Orgarizad6n Tedvnt, Buenos Aires. 


JANUARY 28, 1 986 

Chairman: Anthony Sampson, international writer, 

Ecfitor erf The Sampson Letter. 

NEW EFFORTS TO STIMULATE TRADE WITH THE AREA 
Oaude Cheysson, European Ccammisaoner, Brussels. 

D-C Felipe Jaramiilo, Chairman of the Contracting Parties 

NG MOVES, to the GATT, Geneva. 

THE NEED FOR A LONG-TERM SOLUTION TO THE DffiT 
Director, PROBLEM AND FOR NEW CREDITS 

Enrique Iglesias, Foreign Mi raster, Uruguay. 

Manuel Ulloa Bias, former Prime Minster, Peru. 

THE COMMERCIAL BANKS' VIEW OF LATIN AMERICA 
David Rockefeller, Chairman, International Advisory 
iL Committee, The Chase Manhattan Bcnk, New York. 

EM William Rhodes, Chairman, Restructuring Committee, 

Citibank, New York 

De. Werner Blessing, Member of the Board of Managing 

jbnd. Directors, Deutsche Bank, Frankfurt. 

□ESS OF PKSPECTTVES ON ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

a) Central America: 

Carios Manuel Castillo, former Vice President, Costa Rica 

b) Andean Region: 

Manuel AzpurOa Arreaza, Finance Minster, Venezuela 
THE FUTURE: REVIVING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT, 
THE COMMON INTEREST 

raster, Jamaica. Lord Harold Lever, former Chancellor, Duchy of Lancaster. 

‘Rodrigo Boteno Montoya, Member of Brandt Comrrestoa 
t, Buenos Aires. Colombia 

ROUND TABLE: DiSCUSSlONOF A CURRENT ISSUE 
* not yet confirmed Participation from severd key speakers. 


REG^niATIONINFORMATKKV 
The fee for the conference k $595 or the 
equivalent in a convertible currency lor each 
pertidpant. 

AH UX based part i apon t s ere subject to VAT 
15%. Fees are payable in advance aid wffl be 
returned in full far any aricrilctai pcstmaried 
on or before January 13, 

Please return registration form to: 

International Herald Tribune, Conference Office, 
181 Awnue Chariesde-GauBe, 

92521 Neutty Cedex, France. Or telephone 
1 jf l- 1 (33 1) 47 47 16 86 or tde* 613 595. 


COTflFERHVCE LOCATION 

IhePa-kUre Howl, Pkmay, UxKfao WHY 8BX. fU 1) -*99££T1. T«ta* 71531 

^Poaotroenshgbewre»v^toconfercnneporti dpj a i .neoBeccriodholddreaty- 

CQNHSffiNCE Registration form 

nap* fra folp^ng poro qxji it fry ite conference Jonuory 27-28. □ Ch,d( endened. □ PWac , 


SURNAME. 


RRSTNAME. 


OttANV. 


INTER-AMERICAN 
DEVELOPMENT BANK 


Ucral«:Sribunc. 


dlY/COUNUtY. 


ill.TVt.ljt Tte.nl IV »• 


ramwNE. 


29-11-85 


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INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 


For Those 
Who Have 
Everything: 


UNIQUE OPPOBTUMT Y 

FOR AN RWESTME^ P. '. '-; 

the tourism business in xtaly 

In the sootfa of I oh m* good ar/nfl/wJ c&w e eti em * c re a w bmi'i 
targe ppperty of orer 3 (tbrart mffl on iqm rf lendOT ar fa Jm r > bwIcM 


guff with access to private beeches. Projec» xbaadr m at b aa n d m lhe fecal 
namul and centxal e own anefla aa fanrilare . Today piojicli-. otfefe fl. 
iliff— n-nt fees with bailing aadnrialhn for IJ2 odBBoae eftt. • gDK fpao 
mime marine, etc. . -■ ; - 

The entire project twpirea inwceoaecre over five am at aaoredCSiaflinp at 


One, two and three bedroom luxury apartments 
overlooking the Mediterranean. World-class Health 
& Beauty Spa featuring authentic Dead Sea mineral 
baths. International Business Center, Shopping, 
Dining and Entertainment, on the premises. 

Plus 5-star hotel services 24 hours a day. All at 
The Daniel — the most distinctive resort in Israel. 

Prices start at two-hundred, seventy thousand 
U.S. dollars; financing available. 


today value inrhMnp Ox bad. The pramta wii&cs u pt tedfeKt .mtea 
withconqjuia with specific scperieaee far dtattfeaT the ea&oe jgi^tA^ow 
up wiH be pven oohr id wbB known B^ctfafa&faad catetpritcaT t.t 

Write to: CASELLA T. 136 - SJM, 20100 Mfrgm-Tnfy. 


:nn Lx 


NET YO RK QTg . 
CMQCE F5TH AVHH$ 0ffi®0 

This i 2Vi heAaore 1V> bo* 
meai lacred icbcirt cTScw YadcCar’i man 
warbi MftrRih Anacact wm fantdl 


OKLAHOMA; ILSA. 


DO 

THE DANIEL 

Residence & Spa 


warfautfcrFaiAnaue Miai ii i i n ii hw J 
of New Mil ai i oiMre banc Tnaap 
Toner, dantal Cm>qpo BtS nd banda 
Catai PriLae «B * jaardoaMto. 

Come kne to * bfirib deooaaad U mp- 
rio, Uy xBed la uay me bnfldqc 

wah Miy Bmj aataUBf adoaa an 
Otf. B 1700 ooS. of totot Era^^aoa ioefad- 
mg p ffl t no oaa m«nK& 

lanmniletaqtdBed pBBB A1 dai 
far adf S4SODOOl Bfai pJi aoljr p l rara . 

Rr auMMH <nti daub. aoMaa: 

He- wSmsZedbB, ISO K 77th St, 
Apt I6C.NV. 10021 USA. 

212/517-3272 


lOOeOAOECWTRE 
RANCH WITH VACRMtE 
MNOAI. RIGHTS 


HerzKa-on-Sea, Israel 46769 
Tel: (052) 544 444 TLX: 341812 IL 
London Office: 

14-16 Cockspur St., London SW1, England 
Tel: 839-7194 TLX 8950055 


BUY AMERICA 
IN SMALL SUCES 


A new inveamem opport mu ty in 
the development of American real 
wtaU with high oMor capital 
giiiw and guanaleed returns. 

For details contact: 

Budding Ground Offvtoprog n H 
■ intaniaHonal Ltd, 

96 Oiifwicfc tdgh Road, 
London W4 1SH. England. 
Brokers enquiries welcome. 


A f reeh old property ghiotedtn 
a rapkly growing area bound- 
ed by Kghwoy 16 «3, 

water &. as- terreinah. Mean 
services. The contiguous acre- 
age divided by _good State 
roads. Ranch operated by 
same family from 1909 w3h 
2200 H e refards which under- 
uses acreage. Land comprises 
green pastures & woodland | 
with numerous ponds & j 
s treams. Seven farmhouses & j 
all equipment to run ranch. 80 | 
miles cattle fencing. OR and; 
gas wells ore operating on the 
site. A first doss US investment 
with owner, witling to fund pur- 
chase by qualified buyer.. 


Box 034213, 63 Long Acre, 
London WC2E9JH. 


tank aco 


STOP! 


ANGBL1NE DALLOZ gives you the 
opening to save from F.F. 10,000 to F.F. 20,000 
per square meter. in the golden area of Paris 


Sale bjr action after saavre of Bad property in tin Courts of Justice of CRfTBL (94) 

Oo Ttmndny Dmaifaw \% IMS at 9i30 tutu 


Avenue Georges 160 m 2 

Avenue AAontcagne 270 m* 

Near Avenue Foch 320 nf 


3/00,000 FJ=. 
6J5Q0flQQ F.F. 
7J500JXX) F.F. 


Telephone number in Genera (22) 21 2723 - Telex: 427458 GffO 


REAL ESTATE COMPLEX 

at IVRY-SUR-SHNE (Val-de-Mame) 

1 ’^1?' ^ * tArwrir. 1, rue Unio«k47 6c^<9, SO, 51 Oooi Auj>uxt»C«5fxKn. SS to 59 
T\, BU Pc»4-Voifc rt-CcuturiBr id 11. r ue Motta proloogfce. Sndwfing LAND 

| total area:! ho 93 a 03^1 

. -and BUfLDINGS 

STARTING PRICE * 35,000,000 FRANCS 


■? 


Pfaa* comae* S.CP. COURTEMAT, BBADEALWXJMAS, lowyan, 
17 oveiwo da Lorabala, PAC1S 16th. TAL . P)4 Sl2A4A40. 


Own land in the greats 
American West I 


Rveor more 
acres of 
this land can 
Here's an outstanding oppor- I be yours, 
tunity to acquire a sizable I Easy credit 
piece of America's xanchland ■ * wr ” s . 1 
atk very modest cost.’ B ava,labte 

Sangre de Cristo Ranches Inc., the land de- 
velopment subsidiary of Forbes Magazine, 
the American financial publication, is now 
offering for sale scenic ranchland in Colorado's 
Rocky Mountains. Spectacular land for a 
homesite and a lifetime of appreciation. 

Minim ran 5-acre ranch sites starring at 54,500 
Send today for fact kit and full color brochure 


. BEST KEPT SECRET 
IN FLORIDA IS ON KEY 
BISCAY!® YACHT'S MAN’S 
PARADISE 


LS minutes from rfawulDWU . UumL 
46S loet on protected water conlefflpo- 
tarj raidesce hidden in mpictl reiu 
forest, extra faoid fortesnu court, men 

boose or ptisals reoatribg studio. Kra- 


Dorothea Bailey, Assoc. 
Camarota Landstrom Realty 
■ 706 Condon- Bird. 
TLey Biscayne, EL 33149 
(305) 361-57?7 


5ffa Am. (70**1 ExduHva 

ATTENTION 

INVESTORS! 

Yo »M n ’’ )o»-2200 iq.h. condo 
on 5th Avo., residential 70‘s aver- 
boltfng Ceitrd Park, 2 Wgh ter- 
moas, senior arizen, occupy 7 
room apartment worth ot least 
double asking price of 1 J m3- 
non. High financing O.K. Corpo- 
nite purchase, excellent tax shel- 
ter nwri 


K«n Bau Res (212) 472-1-147. 
MJ. Paynes Inc. (212)303-5800. 


FORBES EUROPE 


sanoheue ansro ranches we. 


P.O. BOX 86. D6Dt WT 
UMDOMSefttSUT 


LONDON SSftl I 
ENGLAND 


NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI 
854 aero plantation 

Excellent farrnkmd 
Excellent ti mb er 
7 Stocked FUh Ponds 
Bwlfettt hunting 

SI ,750,000 cash . 

WWter - 

HJ. Breaks hex 298, 

. .. JoMtviD^ LA 71343. 
TeL*.3T3. 339-791 5 

Other properties for soto. . . 


CVTKRNATIONAL 
REAL ESTATE 


Appears every FRIDAY 


T ° P*°te an acfnrtaenwnt canted 
°w office m your country 
■ t"*ted in Cknrified Sedion) or: 


..HV; 


Do mMquaBouvtof, 
httMiHilwnul Herald Tribune 

T?^ 1 fttmre. 

*- Teton 413995. 



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BUSINESS RpUilPUp 

BASF Profit 
Surged 34% 

In Period 

. Reuters 

- LUDWGSHAFEN, West Ger- 

many-BASFAG.thebigcto- 

cal5 group, said Thursday rfrat 
nme-n««th group pretax profit 
row 3W percent, to 2.46 hfilion 
Etaitsdie marks ($968 mfflionl 

rose 0.08 percent 
to 3172 bHlion DM. GnopSte 
QgtoBS aid pot include the sales of 
sndi acquisitions as Inmont Com, 
saw “* ma ^^ cni board cha^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


Page II 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


man, Hans. 

The company said parent com- 
pany pretax profit rose 49 percent 
yq aales climbed 4.8 percent in 
first nme months of 1985. Parent 
company profit in the period was 
1 JO bilhon DM, up from 869 bul- 
lion DM in the like 1984 period. 
Sales were 15 J6 billion DM, BASF 
said. 

Mr. Albers also indicated rimr 
BASF would increase its dividend 
from last year's 9 DM; but he de- 
clined to be more specific. 

Higher profit, Mrs. Albers said, 
was due to strength of the UJ. 
dollar in the first nine months of 
1985, which tended to hdp experts 
to the United States, lower expen- 
diture on extraordinary items, and 
higher capacity utilization. 

Sales had increased in Europe, 


Ashley Offer 
Oversubscribed 

Reuters 

LONDON ■ — Klein wort, 
Benson Ltd. sad its £62.8-mil- 
uon ($42.7 million) offer Thurs- 
day of 46 JS minion shores, or 
BJ percent, of Laura Ashlev 
Holdings PLC, the fashion ana 
furnishings group, at 135 pence 
each was oversubscribed. 

Thousands of investors 
jammed the street outside the 
City branch of Barclays Rant- 
PLC that was acting as receive 
ug bank as the deadline ap- 
proached. 

The basis of allocation would 
be announced as soon as possi- 
ble, Kletnwon. Benson said. 
Trading is due to start Dec. 5. 


Mr._ AJbers said, particularly in 
Spain, but he gave no figures. 
North American sales r emain^ 
fiat in dollar terms compared with 
the first nine months of 1984, he 
said. 

Mr. Albers said that domestic 
business had picked up during the 
second and third quarters. 

On another matter, the chairman 
said that UJS. antitrust authorities 
had cleared the planned acquisition 
of Akzo NVs fiber-making subsid- 
iary, American Enka. The acquisi- 
tion would double BASFs activi- 
ties in nylon fibers, boosting 
annual sales to more than 2 billion 
DM. 


Cathay Pacific 
To Sell Public 
25% of Shares 

• Reuters 

HONG KONG —Cathay Pacif- 
ic Airways Ltd. said Thursday that 
it would sell up to 25 percent of its 
shares to the public ic the first half 
of 1986. Stock analysts said the sate 
could be worth 2 billion Hoag 
Kong dollars ($256.4 million). 

Swire Pacific. Ltd. owns 70 per- 
cent of the Hong Kong- based air- 
line, and Hongkong £ Shangha i 
Banking Corp. the remainder. 

Analysts said Cathay Pacific; 
looking to its future after Hong 
Kong reverts to China in 1997, 
might be trying to strengthen its 
claim to being a local airline. Swire 
Pacific is owned by a British com- 
pany. 

Stockbrokers said the move was 
also part of a world trend to capi- 
talize cm growing investor interest 
in the airline business. 

In addition, analysts said, the 
airline appeared to have reached 
the lop of its profitability. Cathay 
Pacific, founded hi 1946, was once 
Hoag Kong's only local carrier but 
now faces competition from Dra- 
gonair and a subsidiary of British 
Caledonian Airways. 

Michael Miles, chairman of Ca- 
thay Pacific, said proceeds from the 
share sale might be used to service 
pan of Swire's debts, which stand 
at about 2 billion dollars. 


Dollar Reaches 1985 Lows 
In Light European Trading 


Cotrfnkd b Our Staff From Dupatchc 

LONDON — The dollar fell 
sharply Thursday in thin trading 
on European markets, slumping to 
a 17-month low against the Deut- 
sche mark and a 19-month low 
against the Swiss franc. 

U.S. operators were absent be- 
cause of the Thanksgiving holiday. 
The New York foreign exchange 
market was dosed. 

Dealers said the dollar's fall was 
caused by the anticipation of a 
drop in American interest rates and 
lower- than -forecast U.S. economic 
indicators. They said the light trad- 
ing exacerbated the dollar's under- 
lying weakness. 

In Frankfurt, the dollar was 
fixed at 25318 DM, down from 
Wednesday's figure of 25495. The 
U.S. currency ended the day at 
20895 Swiss francs in Zurich, 
down on 2.0943. 

In London, the pound finished 
Thursday at $ 1.478, up from SI. 474 
at the dose Wednesday. In Tokyo, 
the dollar recovered slightly to 


dose at 201.05 yen. up from 200.65 
the previous day. 

The pressure on the dollar 
against the mark in Frankfurt was 
fueled by dollar selling, some from 
Switzerland, dealers said. The U.S. 
currency traded as low as 2.527 
DM before it recovered somewhat. 

The bearish dollar sentiment was 
reinforced by a feeling that the five 
major industrial nations — Britain, 
France. Japan. United States and 
West Germany — were serious 
about wanting the dollar lower. 

This feeling was combined with 
speculation that central banks may 
have intervened to stop the dollar 
from rising after Wednesday's re- 
port that the U.S. deficit on mer- 
chandise trade had narrowed to 
SI 1 J billion in October. 

In Paris, the dollar fell Thursday 
to an afternoon fix of 7.725 French 
francs from 7.77 on Wednesday. In 
Milan, the U.S. currency slipped to 
1.713 lire from 1.723.75, its lowest 
late figure since June of 1984. 

(UP/, Reuters) 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Philip Morris Inc . Launches 
$500 Million in Bond Issues 


COMPANY NOTES 


Ah nwhum i Co. of America is sell- 
ing its 133-percem stake in the 
unprofitable Furukawa Aluminum 
Co. to Furukawa. Electric Co. the 
majority shareholder, Furukawa 
Electric said in Tokyo. 

Bayerische Motoren Werke AG 
has agreed to buy a 23-percent 
holding in Loewa Opta GmbH' 
from Dresdner Bank AG, raising 
its stake in the electronics group to 
31 percent, BMW said. 

Chrysler Corp. said it was offer- 
ing buyers 8.6-percem financing or 
direct rebates of up to $1,000 on 
many of its 1985 and 1986 model 
automobiles. 

Damder-Beoz AG is talking with 
China about possible twimirai co- 
operation in producing heavy 
trucks, a company spokesman said. 

Fiat SpA said it had agreed with 
SILT, Italy’s state telecommunica- 
tions company, on the formation of 


a joint-venture telecommunica- 
tions bedding company. 

Hooker Corp. said its board 
would advise shareholders to ac- 
cept a partial offer of 244 Austra- 
lian dollars (51.68) a share from 
GSH Investments Pty., winch is 
bidding for 30 percent of each 
shareholder’s stake. Announce- 
ments that James Harcfie Industries 
Ltd. and National Mutual Life As- 
sociation of Australasia Ltd. plan 
to accept the offer mean GSH is 
‘likely to gain effective control 
Hooker said. . 

Hoya Corp. plans to set up a 
joint company in Japan next year 
to develop glass as a new material 
for computer memory. 

Nissan Diesel Motor Co. has ap- 
plied to the UJS. Environmental 
Protection Agency for permission 
to sell its 4-ton and 5-ton trucks in 
the United States next year. 


Toyota Motor Corp. is consider- 
ing raisins prices cm its car exports 
to the United Stales to offset losses 
from the growing strength of the 
yen against the dollar, Toyota said. 

Trans World Antilles’ takeover 
by Carl G Icahn, the investor, w31 
probably be delayed by revised fi- 
nancing arrangements he is mafcfag 
for Sl.27 billion, instead of the 
$770 million he originally sought, 
sources dose to the arrangement 
said. The sources said Mr. realm's 
ability to take over TWA was not in 
jeopardy. 

Westland PLCs proposed, par- 
tial purchase by Sikorsky Aircraft, 
a subsidiary of Um ted Technol- 
ogies Corp.. is to be discussed Fri- 
day by concerned European heli- 
copter makers and defense officials 
at a meeting with Britain’s defense 
secretary, Michael Heseltine, a gov- 
ernment spokesman said. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Slightly firmer fix- 
ed-rate Eurobond prices encour- 
aged PhiHp Morris Inc. to launch 
$500 million of bonds, bui trading 
in most sectors of the market was 
listless Thursday because of the 
Thanksgiving Day holiday in the 
United States, dealers said. 

However, dealers attention be- 
came focused on the DM-fioating- 
raie-note sector, where prices of 
outstanding issues fell sharply in 
early trading on news that Decem- 
ber’s 3.84-billion-DM new -issue 
calendar would include eight notes 
totaling 1.775 billion DM. 

Prices fell as much as 30 basis 
points before recovering to close 
about five basis points below 
Wednesday's levels. 

Dealers said the initial view was 
that the December calendar would 
add too much new- supply, but that 
the eariy price declines appeared to 
be an ovetreacuon. 

Floating-rate notes in other cur- 


London Exchange, NASD to Swap Stock Quotes 


(GtotimiedfromP&ge9) 
funds diversify their assets,” said 
James Davin. head of international 
equity trading at First' Boston. 
Corp. and a member of the . board 
of governors of the National Asso- 
ciation of Securities Dealers. 

Although the agreement initially 
involves just a swap of information, 
rather than an actual expansion of 
trading, the NASD described it as a 
first step toward the creation of 
such a link. 

‘This is an initial step but an 
important step toward a global 
equity-trading system,” Gordon S. 
MackHn, president of NASD, said 
Tuesday in London, where be had 
been holding talks with London 
exchange officials. The board of 


the securities dealers association 
has already approved the arrange- 
ment. The directors of the London . 

t-Yffruno* wtwe’h hug ngtvwl in prm. 

dple, are expectedto clear the two- 
year pilot project soon. 

Once under way, NASDAQ’s 
2,500 “level two” automated quote 
display terminals across the United 
Slates will cany price quotes on 
stocks in The Financial Ttmes- 
Stock Exchange 100. These are the 
largest companies in Britain, in- 
cluding Royal Dutch/ Shell British 
Telecommunications PLC, British 
Petroleum Co n BAT Industries 
PLC and Glaxo Holdings PLC. In 
addition, NASDAQ subscribers 
will receive the price listings on 
aboal 180 non- British stocks in 


which there is active market-mak- 
ing in London off the exchange 
floor. 

For its part, the London board 
will receive price quotes on 200 
leading NASDAQ industrial and 
financial concerns, including Intel 
Corp., Apple Computer Inc. and 
MCI Communications Corp., 
along with about 75 non-British 
international companies whose 


U.S. depository receipts are traded 
on NASDAQ. 

The announcement follows 
closely on other moves toward 
global trading. Last week. Institu- 
tional Networks Corp_ blown as 
Instinct, put into operation an elec- 
tronic shares trading system in 
London through the terminals of 
subscribers to Reuters, the news 
and information service. 


BUSINESSPEOPLE 


Distillers Names New Director 


Have all the advantages 
of a bank account in 
LUXEMBOURG, without 
actually being there. 

To discover the advantages of banking in Luxembourg 
with BCC , all you have to do is to simply mail the attached 
coupon. We will promptly despatch to you by airmail our 
booklet containing detailed information about banking 
in Luxembourg. __ 

The BCC Group has offices in 70 countries, its capital 

Fun^ exMSuSSl.000 million and total assets U SS14J300 
million. The Head Office and branch of the Bank of Credit 
& Commerce International S A. in 
you to make full use of the unique advantages offered in 
Luxembourg which include:- 

1. Total confidentiality of 
investor's affairs by the laws 
of Luxembourg. 

2. The benefits of being able 
to open and operate an 
account in Luxembourg 
without actually going 
there. 

3. Investments and deposits 
made by non-residents 
are totally tax-free 
and there is no with- 

holding tax on interest 
or dividends. 

4. Luxembourg is a stable, 
prosperous fi nancial 

centre in the heart of 
European Economic 
Community. 


Mail this coupon toryourfWtf 

R amv nr Credit and Commerce 

-DANK OF BOULEWORowi.ro km « 

INTERNATIONAL S-A. 




International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Distillers Co. the 
Scotch whisky giant facing the 
threat of a hostile takeover bid, 
gained a powerful ally Thursday by 
naming Sir Nigel Broackes a non- 
executive director. 

Sir Nigel is chairman of Trafal- 
gar House PLC, a construction, 
shipping and oil conglomerate 
whose interests include the cruise 
ship Queen Elizabeth II and Lon- 
don's Ritz. Hold. 

John Connell chairman of Dis- 
tillers, said (Ns appointment was 
pan of his plan to gain more direc- 
tors with experience outside the li- 
quor industry. He rejected the idea 


that the appointment was related to 
expectations that Argyll Group 
PLC a grocery-store operator, will 
soon announce a bid to acquire 
Distillers, whose top brands in- 
clude Johnnie Walker whisky and 
Gordon's gin. 

Taibeiyo Securities Co. has 
opened a representative office in 
London and appointed Sbmzaburo 
Noganri chief representative. Mr. 
Nogami was senior general manag- 
er of the international division in 
the Tokyo head office. 

Manufacturers Hanover Trust 
Co. has named Kenneth G. 
McCracken a vice president. He is 
with the UK domestic group in 
London. 


UcensM Beata «i Secun&es 
COMMISSION FREE BUY OR SELL 

'Laura Ashley - Price on requesT 


Beectum 

Glaxo 

lp * . 

Brito) 1 

fl. Aerospace 


Telecom 
C & Wireless 
&EC. 
Reuters 
Thom 


burmond debt warrants on request 

7OGKMEJCtetnSg.lDnGBnE£2Aax.Ei>0M(l 
THTpOcne locJai 7T5B020 
Teter 261362 ROHES OEV-Z 


Swiss R+D-Compony is looking for 

LICENSEES 

to manufacture and <fotribirte 
seawater-resistant and up to 

lrWC withstanding 

PUMPS 

for all European Countries. 
Worldwide patents. Prototypes 
for testing upon request. Minimal 
initial capital requirement: 

S.Fr. 100,000. — per country. 

Box Number 1287 f. 

Ofa P.O. Box, 8022 Zurich. 


I 



Kingdom of Spain 

U.S. $500,000,000 

Floating Rate Notes due 1999 

In accordance with th& provisions of the Notes, notice is 
hereby given that for the six months interest period from 
29th November. 1985 lo 29th May, 1986 the Notes will carry 
an Imprest Rate of8^#% per annum 

Interest payable on 29th Mav. 19S6 will amount to 
U.S. $417-93 per U.S. $10,000 Note and U.S. $10,448-35 
per U.S. $250,000 Note. 

Morgan Guaranty Drust Company of New York 

London 
Agent Bank 


rencies ended essentially un- 
changed, while dollar denominated 
fixed-rate bonds firmed by about 
point. 

Philip Morris’s package of 5300 
milli on in 9^ percent, four-year 
bonds priced at 100% and S200 
million of 10-percent, 10-year 
bonds at 99>i were well received. 

A belief that the issue was pan of 
a general refinancing effort foil ow- 
ing the borrower’s recent acquisi- 
tion of General Foods Corp, rath- 
er than to raise new money, buoyed 
interest in the bonds, dealers said. 

Both tranches dosed within total 
fees, with the four-year issue at a 
discount of 1 J7 and the 10-year 
bonds at a discount of about 1.78. 

In other new-issue activity, Walt 
Disney Productions launched 625 
million European currency units of 
S^i-percent bonds due in 1994 at 
10014, while Pechmey tapped the 
French franc market with a 500- 
milli on-franc, lOft-percent, five- 
year bond issue at 99 3 A 


For die blest information on 
De Voe-Hoibein International nv 
and Gty -Clock International nv 
please call collect 31-20-627762. 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Corner 
Strawi nskylaan S57 
1077 XX Amsterdam. 

The Netherlands 
Telex: 14507 firconl 


THE TOP 


F R E 



A L I T V 


F 1 R 


Comite Colbert 

Chaumet: A Dazzling Dynasty 


Jacques Chaumet, tthChairman 


magne" that 
rally placed 


Destiny definitely played a pan in 
the original ascension of the House 
of Chaumet. When its founder 

came to Napoleon's rescue after the 
Ficsr Consul’s horses bolted in front 
of his shop, he was rewarded with 
the orders tor the "Gown of Charlc- 
thar Napoleon so dramati- 
zed on his own head at his 
coronation and the sumptuous array 
of rubies and diamonds he gave to 
his future Empress, Marie Louise, to 
wear the day of her marriage. Bur 
fate has nothing to do with the fact 
char over 200 yean later this family business, now 
into the lOdi generation, still reigns supreme in die 
dazzling world of French haute joaillerie. 

"The hallmark of our success," says co-chairman 
Jacques Chaumet, "is the distinctive quality of 
whir we present, our enormous rapacity to adapt 
to the demands of our clientele, our personal 
availability and, most particularly, the speed with 
which we can fulfill the desires of our customers." 
Chaumet’s superb service is anchored in the tradi- 
tions of Bawl css craftsmanship. Above the discreet 
elegance of their Place Vendomc salons, skilled 
craftsmen combine the latest modem techniques 
and research wicb irreplaceable hand workmanship 
to create anginal settings that reveal the full 
magnificence of incomparable precious stones. 
This combination of tradition and innovation has 




percent 

them France’s top exporter of haute joaillerie. 
Today, Chaumcr stores in London, Brussels, Gene- 
va, Tokyo and New York are showcases for the 


ig Stol 

Place Vendomc. 

In 1970, Chaumet joined an even 
older name to its own by buving the 
renowned Brcguet watch firm, estab- 
lished in 1775, and these inimitable 
timepieces have become a Chaumet 
best-seller. 

As might be expected from their 
auspicious debur. Chaumet dajms a 
singularly loyal clientele. Mar.v dis- 
tinguished families have been com- 
ing to them For jewelry to mark 
grand family occasions for four, five 
and even six generations and the splendid diamond 
crown, tiara and necklace displayed at the b:- 
centenary proves Chaumet still cx cells in creatine 
crowns for royal heads. 

Tradition is matched by coniemptuan creativity. 
Ob jets tfart, a classic Chaumet speciality, acquired' a 
new dimension with the introduction of "Les 
Nouveaux Regards," historical antiquities embel- 
lished by imaginative contemporary settings The 
"Pierres d'Or,” a collection featuring lustrous cabu- 
chons of pure gold, is such 3 success rhar a boutique 
line called the "Perires Pierres d’Or" has been 
added. Other best-sellers: the stylish Octuor pen- 
dants set with semi-precious stones and the Liens 
d'Or, based on single or double bands of gold. 
From their regal past, reflected in the recently 
restored 18th century salon by Lcgrcnee Ic Jrur.c 
and the museum with its unique collection oi 
model tiaras retracing 20 0 years of French jewelry, 
to the latest necklace gleaming in its Place Vcn- 
dome display case, Chaumet continues as one of the 
most glittering gems in the crown of Parisian 
jewels. 


-AN ASSOCIATION OF TUI. MOST PRV.STIOlObS N AMI S OF Till- FBI NCII “SHT Lit VIVKI * 3 Kls UU 1>I L \ HsLV: • I- Mm. 


i AN ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE COMITE COLBERT i 


FOR VICTIMS OF THE 
COLOMBIAN VOLCANO DISASTER: 

AN APPEAL TO IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS, 
COMMODITY GROUPS, LABOR UNIONS, 
AND ALL THOSE ENGAGED 
IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE 

As a result of the volcanic eruption, Colombia is experiencing dark hours. The stricken areas are in 
greatest need of medicines, foodstuffs and clothing, and especially earth moving and agricultural 
machinery to help move the mud and debris from the area. 

Flota Mercante Grancolombiana will accept appropriate donations in ports served by its 19 ships 
throughout Hie world and will transport these relief supplies to Colombia without charge. 

If you would like to contribute, please. call your local Grancolombiana agent for information on 
soiling dates and delivery instructions. 

You will hove the heartfelt thanks of the Colombian people for any help which you may be able to 
provide. 

Flota Mercante Grancolombiana, S.A. 


General Agents in North Continent*. 
DammanA van der Heide 
Agenturen B.V. 

Boompfes 57 

301 1 XB ROTTERDAM - Holland 
TeL: 010-630 444 


Agents in U.IC/Ere: 

Bahr, Behrend ft Co., Ltd. 
Indiabuildings 
Waterstreet 
LIVERPOOL L69 2BW 
Tel.: 2364871 





This advertisement appears as a metier of record only 

European 

Economic Community 

ECU 100,000,000 

87a % ECU Bonds of 1985/1993 

Issue Price: 100 % 


New Issue November 28, 1985 


Deutsche Bank 

Aktiengesellschati 


Bayerische Vereirtsbank 

AHienQ«eUsch-atr 


Banque Nation ale de Paris 


Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. 


Bank fur Gemeinwirtschaft 

A*rtier.fi«ol!£chah 


Baring Brothers & Co., 

Limited 


Berliner Bank 

AttienjeseiiscneH 


DG Bank 

Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank 
Kredtetbank International Group 


Sodete Generate 


Lead- Managers: 


Co- Lead- Managers: 


Commerzbank 

Aktiengesellschatl 


Gene rale Bank 


Co-Managers: 

Banca Commerciafe 
italiana 

Banque Internationale 
a Luxembourg S A. 

Bayerische Hypotheken- und 
Wecbsel-Bank 

AkilengaMlI&ctiBfi 

Berliner Handels- 

und Frankfurter Bank 

EBC Amro Bank 

Limned 


Dresdner Bank 

Aktiengeseliscnaft 


, 8 ' 


Westdeutsche Landes bank 
Glrozerrtrale 

Swiss Bank Corporation 
International Limited 


Bank Brussel Lambert N.V. 


Banque Paribas Capital 
Markets 

Bayerische Lartdesbank 
Girozentrale 


CSFB-Effectenbank AG 


EuromobiHare S.p JL 


Norddeutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Sal. Oppenheim jr. & Cie. 
Trinkaus & Burkhardt KGaA 












*3 p age 12 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIB UNE, FRIDAY , NOVEMBER 29, 1985 

Bill Issued on Sale of British Gas Carp. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


Switzerland 


WKE GENEVA + LUGANO, Morv 
Gsta od ragxxv Loarno, otc 
can hvy moonificert new 
gPwlTTionh/chdetu'Yafa. Big dnice. 
frat raridncr prafcfc H SEBOLD 
O.OTlOC7 Louscnne 
_31 / 252$) 1 . Inflow office 91-687648 


■w® : wvay io-room viua 

m becnAful 13^00 sqjn. 


USA GENERAL 


873 ACRB in gorgeous Gremibner 
Gourty Wes Vfgrlaj farmng, CXQZ- 
["9. wSdlfw refuge. Feral, springs, 
braaia, spadws tome, guns) a 
IS outbmUngs. $873,000.00. 
421-9195. 


ARABIAN HORSE CATTLE RANCH in 
foe big sky country Montana. 1000 
deeded ocres. 1300 leased. A sports- 
man s perodbe 201-647-7941, 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


NYC 4Wk*y CONDO 

Dag Hommarskjold Tower 

240 EAST *7fo ST. 

1 Stock To United Notions 

-SPECTACULAR- 

I, 2, 3. & 4 Bedroom Ap a rt r unts 
bnmedote Occupancy 
New Ful Servien BuiWng With 
SwiRvnmg Fool, Hecdh uub and 
HouselreSpeig Services Avafabie 
RENTAL APARTMENTS 
ARE ALSO AVAILABLE 
For hfb CaU 2)2-759-8844 
Sal, Sun 1Q-S; Mon «o Fri 9-6 


MANHATTAN - NEW YORK 

57th Street Seal ■ Sutton Fter* Ana 
Old world charm 2 bedroom coop « 
mint condition, woodburring fireplace, 
separate (fining roam, modem new 
kitchen. 24 hour concierge. Pnat 
$410,000. Maintenance $893. WnM 
Owner; Mr, HP. KiA. 

325 E 57th St, NY. NY 10022 or 
coll USA 212-564-5285. 


NEW LUX 5 ROOM 2 bath condo on 
high floor & h* everioeldng Washing- 
ton DC across from Arfin^an Ceme- 
tery with gcr u gc. doormen, pool 
Wkimficenify Fimwhed. By owner. 
$225,000. Contact D. Kuppw. 130H4. 
CaurfhoreeSd. Arfir^jtan^VA 22201- 


Tefc 703 524-9S92. 

Courtesy Awn Kupper. 


ITT 440487 


NEW YORK APART MHVT owned bv 
dean ArtiSon com pany No fioM- 
ities-anly asset. 7 bed. 2 baths, taury 
apartment in best block Park Ave. 
Furnished. Reasonably priced 
S485A0O. For 100% of coped. No 
Tel USA: JJ>. Hobart (316) 


CENTRAL FLORIDA, FOR SALE 30 
and 


$3003300. Dr. Edwvd Carter, Bax 
1363. Leesbmft f*tada 32749. Tefc 

904-787-7111. 

DAH04 A NEW CANAAN Connecti- 
cut. Executive type homes tar rent & 
sale. Pleasant N.Y. Ctv suburb. 
French spoken. Nationwide connec- 
tion* GJTMtetts Rf. 2034557724. 

2 BBMOOM. 2 BATH LUXURY 

condo Miami. FLA. $72,000. By own- 
er. 12747 5W Pljf St, Miami FLA 
33)80 USA. 

USA 

COMMERCIAL 
& INDUSTRIAL 


tudor Kora 

FOR <*»B 
NEWYMKOTY 
480 Rooms Date lo United N alionf 
John G. Strong 

43 tango feL. t Hampton. NY T1937 
316324-4000 

50,000 FT. OfflCE BUILDING. 55 
mJton. Mid Nassau County, New 
York State. Excdent area. Must see. 
Broker 516-931-5241, P.O. Box 7021. 
HtdaviHe. NY 11801. 

REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


CANADA 


DOWNTOWN TORONTO LUXURY 
Apartment Hotel Designer A pp oin ted 
1 8, 2 Bockocm Suites. Kifl roanatio'v 
d fadkties inducing spa Leases avaT 
oble monthly or longer, ton $165 0/ 
month. Col or write The Horizon on 
Bay, 633 Bay Street. Taranto, Ontario 
Canoda M5G 2Q4 (416} 593-5547- 


TORONTO, CANADA - LUXURY. 

1 famished and squired 1 & 2 
suites. Su| 


FvBy funi 
bedroom 


80 Front 5t. East, Sta. 222. Toronto 
M5E 1T4 Canada. {4161 662-1096 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LUXURY EXECUTIVE APARTMENTS. 
Kiughtsbridge/Chehea Over 100 
fully serviced studio*. 1 & 2 bedroom 
apartments. AH modem convenences. 
Minimum stay 22 days. Prices from 
£145 per week. Please contact NGH 
Apartments, ~ 

Stoane 
1105. Tlx 


ja mm, rnun uahuu i 

rents, Nell Gwytm House, 
i Ave, Iordan SW3. Tab 01-589 
Tbr 295817 G. 


CS9TRAL LONDON - Executive ser- 
vice opartmerh in new buMngs, 
comfortably furnished and hilly 
equipped. Doiy maid service (Mon. 
through FnJCoior TV. Phone for Ifo- 
dmrePl] 388 1342 or write Presden- 
Hd Estates (Mayftxr) Ltd., 1 University 
St, London WOE 6JE. 


REGB4K PARK UGHT ONE bedroom 
flat with terrace, weD decorated with 
views over park. Reception, bedroom, 
US style kitchen equpmerl, bath & 
separate WC Fulty funxshed 
£220/ week Iona aompemy lets. Berger 
Ben dentid Utimp 01-724 3160. 


LUXURY SBtVKB) HATS 9* Ken- 
swrton is the ofiemative to expensive 
h as ocaxn mxJu iioa Contact Aw- 
deh & Coirpcriy. 21/23 Fokxe Gate, 
London WB 5LS. 

Telex 418216 


. Teb pi) 589 2956. 


LONDON MARBLE ARCH, war, self- 

catering Ii 

equipped. 


entering Iwunr 2-bodroom Hrdx, fully 
id. color TV, linen and tele- 


phones. El 50- £250 pet week. Crow- 
ford Hoiday Flab. 33 Crawford 
Street, London Wl. 0I-4Q2 6165. 


LONDON. For the best furnhed flats 
end houses Consult the SpcdaJut* 
Ptffips. JJay and Lews. Tet South cf 
Pork 352 8111, North of Park 722 
5135. Telex 27846 RSPE G. 


KB4SINGTON. NEWLY ... 
fuly furnis hed Hot. 4 bedrooms, 3 
bothroonq, separate (fining room, 
study, reception room. £700 
wed. Tel London 01 9378320. 


per 


LONDON HOLLAND PARK area, 
(harming 1 bwkoatn flat avdtabie 
Jmuory tar 6-12 month* £7 70/ week 
or exchange for similar in Los Arm- 
ies. Teh 01-243 0727 


LUXURY STUDIO flat, patio, new, use 
of attached leave complex, 6 mini 
West Brarngten Tube. £) JO/ week ne- 
goiiabfe. O. Noel. Tot London (01) 
74B 2570 eras, or 24Q 8855 


KENSINGTON, SW5. Nw 
oed fufly equipped luxury 2 betkoam 
flat, prrvans potto. Suitable far axn- 
pexty or aemme holiday let. 
C200/vmek. Tek London 01-37D 7978 


CENTRAL London. Lueury fumahed 
hers. £280/ week- 


flats, American kihhens. 

4 6r£175/week-u 
2204 or 01-486 341 


4 or £175/ week • dews 2. Tet 
3415[UK) 


S) 


Tt 

sn 

M 

(» 

12 

t> 

Tf 

Hi 

TC 


FOR RIRNSffiD LETTINGS IN S.W. 
London, Surrey & Berfcshna. Contact 
MAYS, Oxshatt {037 2M) 3811 UK. 
Telex: 6955112. 


JOHN BBtfH has 20 years experience 
n temds. Long or short tenandes, 
Central & suburban London & Aber- 
deen. Bach 8. Co. 01^99-8802. 


GRES« * CO. ExnAent Sefodioa of 
Houses & Hats for rental in North, 
Northwest & Central London. Tel: Of- 
6258611. 


INTERNATIONAL EXECUTIVES / Vfo 
ton to London -*»■ qu^iy wmlmd 
onartnw* 8. houses otfl rtmtenjon. 
don Cl 7-837 7365. 


HOLLYWOOD 

elegont. qi«i, 2 bedH^npsttad flat 
os soon at possible. £22&hwek nego- 
haUe. Tel 794 0280. 


HAMPSTEAD HEATH, WMWN 

self -con taxied fiat, 2 k»9* 


gfiSMHAM OFfBJ LUXURY FLATS / 

houses to let / for sale in Lon don. Teh 

01-43? 3191. Telex 8952387 G. 


MITRAL LONDON- , 3 baAaom 
e xru i tment. 6 month let £400 per 
week. T efc Q1-2B6 1700 ofler 6 pm. 


MAYFAIR. NEAR HJUONLsuoMb 2- 
bed flat, £250/ week, 01-589 82ZL 


(Continued from Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 
Defoe rentals. Vaferxsstr. 174 
Amsterdam. 020-621234 or < 


ITALY 


let SHX) mo n thly. Uanekxi 870 0512. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


81 AVEFOCH 

Luxurious ShxSae 


lease. No 
Vtdt 
Tek 


1? an n 5 pm 
43 59 66 72 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8H1 

5t«5o, 2 or Jraom rynrtimot. 
One month or more. 

LE OAIODGE 4359 6797. 

ETOO£ - VICTOR HUGO. AnaOMe 
Jen. for 36 mortis. Modem ttefren 
ord beds CM. 3 bedrooms, 2 with 
fireplaces. 4fo floor over garden- Bo- 
gart 1910 budding, no Marti Tel: 1- 
U 96 35 36 office or 1-ft 33 17 86 

SHORT IBM STAY. Advantage* of a 
hotel without tuonveniences, feel at 
home in iKo studies, one bedroom 
and more in Paris. SORQJM: 80 roe 
do rUniveniti. Pare 7lh. 454* 3940 

MAKE YOURS&F AT HOME. 7 days 
to 3 months in Pori* ?4lh and 15th, 1-4 
room apartnwrts. fofiy equipped. Teh 
1-43 06 76 79 

6TH ST GSUUAM DES PUB. ) merth 
lluliiig Dec. 3 room*, TO ta-m- bath, 
American kitchon. 6th floor Sr), nieo 
view. FflOOO. Tek 43 29 05 91. 

16dv 5 MONTHS, studio, ow, 
modem bu.-fcSr«, outer fuly 
equipped. F33CO. Hwre *6 47 88 96. 

ETOUE. Studta, *0 fight, brdwi, 

bath, security. F450Q. 17m, 5 roans. 
Christmas. F15JOOQ. Tefc 43 5303 73 

PH4THOUSE AVE MONTAIGNE, 
near Champs Bysoet, 120 sqj". + 
kiae terrace, hiflh dasv 723 *3 28. 

SHORT TERM M LATW QUARTS! 
No oflerts. Tel: *329 3883. 

INVALIDS. Luxurious stedta. Phone, 
TV. services. F*00/ doy. 47 0* 29 27 

0BUXE GAESBI MARAIS STUOia 
Dec. 15- Feb. 15 F35W. *2 74 76 S 

3rd MARAIS. Lovely shidta. beam, 
chctrader. F2800 reL TeU 47 20 94 « 

Paris area unfurnished 

16TH SUMPTUOUS TRIPIEX 

SO iflJn. THRACE, 2 BATHS. 

mad s roam, FI 9,000 riKxaet induded 
Justified key money for folly equfoped 
kndien. T* 43 57 79 67. 


25 KMS WEST PAMS, Auven sur 
Oise. Beautiful thatched roof house 
for rent. 140 sq.ni. 3 bedrooms, large 
Kving & (firing room, 
rags. H00 tajn. g 
mStfh. Tek 1-30 32° 


SWITZERLAND 


Brand New 

THE EXCELSIOR 

A U mque 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 

Featuring 

1-, 2-, and 3- 
Bedroom Suites 

All Magnificently 
Furnished With Luxuriously 
Appointed Kitchens & Baths 

Offering 

RESIDING FOR FORHG6SRS 

HSCAi ADVANTAGE 

UFBOUE SETTING 

DW1RONM04T FOR 
SPORTS AND IS5URE 

SWIMMMGPOOL 

FITNESS FAaUTES 

24 HOUR MEDICAL ASSISTANCE 

EXECUTIVE SOV1CB AVAILABLE 

Mooa SUITES 


SWITZERLAND {21} 63-51-04 
HE BON TORT 
1820 MONTRHJX 
Coll for (qtpo ln t i i ta ii t 


GSTAAD / 5WTTZBOAND 
Central, krxuriow, newly built. 

3 bodroorre + fiving room, flrepioce 
end dning area, modem kitchen. 
Close to do area For rent. 

For Further DetaB*. Coil: 

030 /4 50 71. 


IB 4 ZERHBK WITH SMBOIO whi- 
ter sports fodities in charming viBage 
nearby, 3 W room, new mwrtment, 
deeps A aca&onrty furnished 3. hJty 
eqwpped. with heated garage. Aval 
able for weeks from Jan. 8 . 1986 

onwards at tram SFSOO/week. Tel: 

Owner, hie of Mon 106241 781977. 


SWITZERLAND. G5TAAO, for rest 

December to February, cenfrd luxury 

apartment 2 double rooms. 2 bath- 

rooms. Borneo 0039-S5-4361233 


MORONS {ValaaL Imk old chalet 

far lab or rent Tet OS/77 22 95. 
_CRS ! _rt^lg5j4oiyB. 


USA 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 

offering 

pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., I yr. & 2 yr. (eases 

featuring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Betfroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marb/e baths. 

Executive Services Available 

Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


"EPHa.* CWI- 

aetge bwmng, ri^i floor, comer 
wrap windows. Overiaolon g Lmcoin 
Center. 316 bege roams, merfaie boitv 


a*pw«« 
month, «de: 


Rare 51958 / 
2T2-757-9582 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

IJ^A. 

PEW YORK CITY 

CARLYUHOTB. 

Live in Imnxy in tha new fuly 

fomahed desgner decorat- 
ed 2 bedroom / 2 bath 
uportment. Fully eowpped 
iritehen, mad H> hero* ser- 
vices. Owner leaving coun- 
try - will sacrifice and tort 
below marie! for 1 year. 
510,000 / M tilth. Contort: 
j (Mfcg* aymp-fa 

NEW YORK, PRIME lOCAIION 

6nB 76th otffthS pori. fomuhed. I 
betfroom, fireplace. $1350 > moroh 

hom Jon. t, 198*. lease regottabte. ref- 
erences required 

Wnte ta 

Box 42163. f-HJ, 63 Long Acre, 
Lotoun, WOE 9JK _ 
or cafl London 01/730 2435. 

ICW YORK aTY PBfTHOUSE, rtera 

enclosed, view of Matihattcn, contem- 
porary runrisiungs 2 bedrooms, 2 
bSfo. 2500 JQ. h. "side, 5000 sq. ft. 
putade. 54500/morth for mnmurn 6 
months, man item 1 year. Tri-Gsastd 
Properties, 3050 Bunyon Canyon WL. 
tojrAn^etes. CA 900*6 USA. td (213) 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

LUXURIOUSLY HIRMSHED 3-bed. 2- 
bath ranch type house, surrounded fcy 

spread over 3 acres, commenting 
view evs mtrcxTttdd waterway, lean- 
ed tadaomfle, Florida Owner wish- 
es « trade for eompxaUe property 
bi Span or Canary Islasds. bitarested 
parlies write: Piasep. P.O. Bo* 50399. 
Jew. Beach. FL 322*0. USA 

WANTED TO RH4T June 1 - Aug. 31, 
'86. modest house or aportmert m 
Petal « any town *> frence with Urcd 
cormedtorn. Send peture & rented ft* 
to B. Mrtchel. 3011 S. JadcMn, Ft 
Simh, A8 72901 USA 

EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVE 

POSmONS available 

PRODUCT DEVELOPMSITs U£ Pub- 
lisher of consumer, heolthoaie & red 
estate software, expandra overseas. 
Seda industry profesnon^for editors- 
af dewfopmert. Prefer generaisr with 
sales rapenenc* in multiple ooumties- 
Resumes; Pinpoint PvfaEshina Box 
13323. OoUand,Ca. 9*661. USA Re- 
quired in USA (San Francisco) 

037)7/36. 

GENERAL POSmONS 
AVAILABLE 

CHAUBKZNG OPPORTUNITY 

For Good Sotonon / Women 

No speaal expenenee required. 
Excellent eommssian. activity n cfl 
countries, work m your home area or 
worldwide. 

Phone Germany: (0) 6868/517. 

Tbc 445242 DE5 O or wnte 

D.T5, Sueddlee 2. 

D-6642 Mettloch 3 FJLG. 

GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 

YOUNG SWISS, self -motivated, «e» 
tile, quofified surveyor, presetay do- 
ing o memopemert osune by conp- 
spondence. German. English. French, 
seeks choUenamg position. England or 
wOrkhridK wiling to travel or relo- 
cate. Wnte Box 2W8. Herald Tribune. 
92521 Neuilft Ode*. France 

CONTRACT SPEdAUST and negotia- 
tor. Frenph-Engldh. 5 years oil indus- 
try 4- commetaai expenenee m vari- 
ous industries, seeks permanent or 
temporary pateon, can travel < relo- 
cate. Ports 47 41 03 66 tram 6.30pm 

AMERICAN PSYCHOANALY5T inter- 
ested m working in West Europe wJI 
aansider erffernarive pesmon. ?. Le- 
vrehal, 1162* Ventura BKtL. Sure 
402. Stuck) Gtv.CA 9160* USA 

BRITISH LADY PA SEEKS SERIOUS 
position vnmecfiatelv. 28 years, 
french. Used ta haveflmg. Tefeprane: 
01-87* 2976 London. 

BALLERINA- ?mra» Aerobe lirtnietor 
NYC wela position. For further infor- 
mation coffc 2)2-734-9240 l 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

MiAICDVTE SEKS far AMBOCAN 
miPItXVC FIRMS m PARIS: 
Engish, Belgian Dutch or Germen 
letoariet, knowledge of French re- 
quired, English shorthand. BRinguel 
tefexats. wnte or phone )38 Avenue 
Victor Hugo, 75116 Pots. France. Td: 
(1) 47 27 61 69. 

Don') mire 
INTERNATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

in foo IHT Classified Section. 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

WANTK) BfGUSH TEAOd, experi- 
enced. Working papers. Tel: HanAon 
46 36 15 78 Pare mornings. 

DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

AU PAIR- English spedmg. non-smok- 
er, driven Scene with housekeeping 
& care of 2 girls, 4 years old & 1 year 
old Please write: Mjcarla Scheu, 358 
Basswood Sd, Lake Forest, lUncft 
60045 USA. 

YOUNG COUPLE M GENEVA series 
youtg lady or nurse, French mother 
tongue, ovaRaWe ta travel within Eu- 
rope ta look after their daughter (8 
months). Acconvnodation in Genera 
not provided TeL Fiona: 022/28641 1 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ENGLISH NANNBA matfom helps 
Nash Agenre. S3 OenJiJft «2*r 
Suncx. O K. Brighton [27^ 29Q44 

AUTOMOBILES 


MERCEDE5 280 SUC 82000 bty inv 
mxukdefy i i xi ntri n ed. ar-axxfoorv 
ed. red with beige vehet irteoor, best 
offers aver US$l5,C01 Lm*"*wr9 
474036 ad 16s arwiagi 33076*. 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHARC RB4T A CARS. Piestne on 
with phanm Rofc Spur. Sfxnt, Ferrari. 
Porsdve, Mercedes, Jagxr. BAM, 
Emaamu, imefl cm. M> r I Renn 
Otatran, 75008 Pons. Tel: 472&3W). 
Tdex 630797 F CHARQC 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 


PARIS 


THE CAR SHIPPING 

“^42 25 64 44 


CANN&MCE I®* « 44 
FRAMGUCT tfclfflfOfl 

BONN / COLOGNE m iMB 
STUnGART 88081 

MUNCH p89ira 10 45 

Ei^MSlHAV'EN J04T1) 4^63 

NEW YCHQC ZT3 695 7061 

HOUSTON 7l| 931 76« 

LOS ANGEUES 21 J SAB 9288 

MONTREAL 514] 866 6681 

AGH4T5 WORLD 
Leave k to us 10 bring rl ta you 


FRANKFURT/ MAIN-W. Germany. H. 
Isermann GmfaK Tek 049-443071. 
Pick -ua all over &rope -ro/rtulups. 


AUTO CONVERSION 


• SURECONVBtT « 

The safest way to import a 
Ewrepeat am* into the US-A. 
Worldwide Amencan insurer 
provides a> required xsurance 
and auarantaes your car w® 
pass al US. government standorah 
or your money bode inducing 
conversion cost. 

Write or phone for free brochure. 
GERMANY 10) 69-7152425 or 
ffl)70il / 223059 

ambocan ktl uNretwwTee 

Oberfindov 76-78 
06000 Frcxikfurl/Main 


DOT&EPA 

CONVHKIONS 

Dene h The U5JL 
The Baht Wayl 
WE PROVIDE BONDING. 
US CUSTOMS CLEARANCE & 
PKX4JP SSMCE FROM PORT 

EUROPEAN HNECAR 

Imports & Conversions 
36-27 31st St. LJ.C NY 
718729-2407 Tl* 5101009922 


EPA / DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

e Custams bro ke rage/ bonding service 

• ftde-up & defiveiy anywhere in the 

Eastern U5. S. Texas 

• lYofe n icxxi work using only the 
highest quutty camponenfa 

• Gua ran teed ^ A / DOT apocwal 
CHAMPAGfC IMPORTS WC. 

2294 North Peres RA. HalfieM, 
PA. 1944C USA Tel: 215 822 6852 
Telex 4971917-CHAMP 


Mercedes-Benz Porsche BMW Fenrei 

EPA/ DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

Fast Turnaround time. All work done 
on ergmises. Sdes & leasing. 
ALPINE EXOTIC MOTOR OK 
1 14 Anderson Sheet 
Hadareadc, NJ 07601 USA 
Tlx- 322234 201-4880667 


DOT/B»A CONVOSIONS 

Shipping, bcxxSng, insurance. 
Door ta door servics Europe 
to USA, uu mpto ree g u ar an teed. 
European Automotive CcxnpfiwKe, 
Geven Deynoatweg 126, 

2586 BP The Hague. Hcfland. 
Phone (^70-559245 Tu 33230 EAC H 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
AX FRff AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 

WRITE FOR FRB CATALOG OR 
FSH BUY^ACX fOUTa TOs 
SHPSIDE BY, P.O. Bax 756811 1 18 ZH 
A m sterdam Airport. 7tie Nefherfandi. 
Phone {020)1 528 3 3 Telex: 12568 

SMPSB1E Inc.. 576 Fifth Wu^ 
7th Floor. Now York. N.Y. 10036OKA. 
Pho ne #3 369-4484 Teiex *37 965 

9HPSIDE SA, Chaussee de Wavre 
465, 1040 Brussels, Belgium. 
Phonm (02564990627etex 63290 


IMi SA 

OFFICIAL ROtlS ROYCE 
DEALS FOR B&GRJM 

TAX FRB CARS 
ROUS ROYCE BB4TIEY 
RANGE and LANDROVER 
SAAB 

Aha Used Cat 

roe ^OBJOURG 74-82 
1170 Bruiteli 
THu 2-673 33 92 
HX: 20377 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

LONDON 

The Mercedes Spe«dist 

Strekhed Umausnes 
Armoured Cat 
CoadvboRi Cere 
EPA 4 DOT 
100 Units b Stock 
prod front Sources 
Worldwide Defivery. 

6547 Ptwk law, London W.7, 

Tek Wl 1 . 6297779 
Tetexi (51) 8956022 Tros G 

Germany • London - SwiieHand 


mCEXS SPEOAUSTS 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 

far 20 years- 

1985 Modeh at Dteo^f P**= 
280 SL2B0 SB, 500 S, 
500 SL, 500 S£C 
1986 Modeh ftorn Stodc 
2306, 300E. 30QSL, MOSE, MOSS' 
300 SB, 500 SL 500 ^MO SEC 
Shipnent & defivery workhnde. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MAB4ZBMAND51R. }91 
M000 FRAM<HiHT/M 
TEL- (0) 69-73 30 61 
T1X 414018 


Cars of 
Copenhagen 

TAX FREE 

* h te rnmioi HJ Sdes 

* Worldwide Defivery 

* European Price Leaders 

* Tef: (Itf45 7 37 73 00 

* Telex 19932 DK 

55 Vodrcfhvcj DK-19D0 
CPU V.-DB4MARK 


TRANSCO 

THE LARGEST SHOWROOM 
AND STOCK IN EUROPE 
Keeping a coratant stack of more thv 
300 braid new an afal European + 
Jcpanese makes aampeth-riy priced. 
Tax tree o d es sh i nn i ng irauranca. 
Send far muftkotar free cahdogue. 
Transco SA. 95 NoanMaan, 
2030 Antwerp. Beigrem 
Tel 323/542 6240T* 35207 Tran* 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 

Since 1972, experienced car trader for 
M er ce de s. Porsche, BMW. Jaguar. Im- 
mediate defivery. Import/export. US. 
DOT & EPA. shipping Far tourist and 
dec for. Oawtwtde Motare GmbH, 
Tersteegenstr. 8. 4 Duesseidari. W. 
Gent x£/ (0) 211-434646, Ifac 8587374. 


IW5 PBiVB t YOUR 
CHRISTMAS PRESENT 
911 PORSCHE Crerara Cobrio, red / 
block, loaded DM84,950. 

500 SE nauftc btje/aay leather, 
loaded DMS5.982 
500 SL stand red/ black leather, 
boded dJS>4^25 

Cafl W. Germany (8274) 1971, 
71m 531021 

Abo avafabb - sevard Kofis Royces 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCH E FROM STOCK 

But Mrvki, toppi n g, InsuitSKS* 

RUTE INC. 

TAUMJSSTR. 52. MOOHIANGURT 
W Gentu, td (0)69-232351. ttx 411599 


EUROPEAN B USA SPECS. 

AH indies for worldwide defiv ery from 
stack. Send for a TAX-RSE catalog. 

BMW - MERCEDES - PORSCHE 
VW - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 

Europe Auto Broken Inc 
POB 214. 3430 AR Nforwegrin Hofiond 
Td: (0) 3402-41346. Tim 76068 EAB M. 


AiB. 300 SI. 500 SI, 500 SBC Mw 
Roi l Boyce 5 W Spirit '85. 7,000 km., 
Lcanbormvm Camtoch new, Ferran 
306 GTB new. P.CT. Belgnxn Tot 
03/231 J9/XX 


MBKBSES 500 St New 86 Decem- 
ber delivery: blue /black with cream- 
/beige tadher upholstery.- Reason- 
able price for qddt ids. Far detail: 
tab London 01-642 0B79 


«W PEUGEOT, Lad Row. Range 
Rover. Toyota. 4x4, tropied specs. 
Britos, Zonnetxson 18. Maoraen- 
broelc,Hdtand|W3044St92. 8x47082 


OB 500 SI, WW, 86, boded, various 
colors. Phone Germany H) 6668 / 
SI 7. Tbc 445242 DB D. 


HEALTH SERVICES 


HOTEL KURHAUS 


40 kras South of Berne 
Physed and peychubgiod e xh au s tion 
requires fire u tiwd , so as ta prevent oofi 
bpsa. For exompie. ipecffic prevenfive 
treatment wnh aotoGlCAi. CEiS 

ACCORDING TO PROF. NEHAN5. 6 

days cf treatment from SF3^00 - vrilhta 
foe fromework of efistingudhed fire 
doss hotel focZtjes, we off er you q 
cemprehenwe and nxtdent treatment 
aid convdescence praream with cam- 
. KLRHAU5HOTB, 


potent meefied cars. 

0+171 " 


1 SCHWeaBSGfiAD 

BERNE Td 037/39 26 12 


Mace Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

In tim 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Phone: Call your local IHT representative with your text. You 
will be informed of the cost immediately, and once prepayment is 
made your ad will appear within 48 hours. 

Cost: The base rate is $9.80 per fine per day + local tuxes. There are 
25 letters, signs and spaces in the first line and 36 in the following lines. 
Minimum space is 2 fines. No abbreviations accepted. 

Credit Cards: American Express, Diner's Club, E u r o c o rd, Master 
Card, Access and Visa. 


HEAP OFFICE 

Paris: (For classified only): 

(1) 47A7.46J0Q. 

EUROPE 

Amstuickiu: 26-36-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-242T. 
Brussels: 343-1899. 
Copenhagen: (01)32 9440. 
Frankfurt: [069) 72-67-55. 
Lausanne: 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-2544. 
London: [01) 8364802. 
Madrid: 455-2891 /4553306. 
Miksi: (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (02) 41 29 53. 
Rome: 679-3437. 

Sweden: (08) 7569229. 

Tel Aviv: 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt- 

UN1EP STATES 

New York: (212) 752-3890. 
West Coasts [415] 362-8339. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

Bryanstun: 421599. 


LATIN AMBUCA 

Buenos Aires: 41 4031 
(Dept. 312) 

Caracas: 33 14 54 
Guayaquil; 51 45 05 
Lima: 417 852 
Panama: 69 09 75 
Santiago: 6961 555 
Sao Paulo-. 652 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bcdmrin: 246303. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 

Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar 416535. 

Saudi Andwcn 

Jeddah; 667-1500. 

U.A.E.: Dubai 224161. 

FAR EAST 

Bmgkolc 390-06-57. 

Hong Kong: 5-213671. 
Jakarta: 510092. 

Man 3a: 817 0749. 

Seoul: 735 87 73. 

S in g more: 222-2725. 
Taiwav. 752 44 25/9. 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Melbourne: 690 8233. 
Sydney: 929 56 39. 957 43 20. 
Perth: 328 98 33. 

Podcfingfon. Q ue e n stt m d: 
369 34 53. 


CommSilties 


jMkl 28 





CWm 



High 

Lear 

■id 

Arte 

Ctifoe 

FrtflCh francs eee metric ton 



Mar 

uw 

1JS1 

1JM 



May 

UK) 

1<#97 

i/flM 

U10 

+ 20 


N.l. 

N.T. 

ua 

— 

+ 22 

■OCT 

1,480 

1A90 

1(480 

1,487 

+ 22 

Dee 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1(4TS 

1513 

+ 18 

Mar 

1M 

1JJS 

1«0 

1AM 

+2) 


tot* of so ton*. Prev. ixraoi 


sales; t.m tote, open interest; 21011 
COCOA 

FmdilmapirWIn 


Dec 

1660 

IJfoO 

USD 

14M 

— IB 

Mar 

U86 

188 S 

1475 

1485 

— 15 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

raw 


— 2D 

Jtv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.T60 


— 20 

Sen 

N.T. 

N.T. 

ijno 


— 15 

□•c 

N.T. 

N.T. 

wio 

— 

-15 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1(*20 


— 15 

fcst. 

voL: 23 Ion of 

M) tons. Prev. actual 


salos: 18 lots. Open Interest; 428 
COFFEE 

Frsocti tniocs per IW lea 
NOV N.T. N.T. — 2AM —10 

Jan NX N.J: - 2JJ90 ,+ to 

M«r N.T. N.r 2.120 1125 —10 

Mov W.T. N.T, ll« 2,144 — JO 

JIV N.T. NX 5.170 2,190 — 20 

Sep VSD 1220 1221 1230 — 25 

Nov NX NX ms 2268 —25 

Est. voL: 1 lots of 5 tara,Prev.oetu« *ote»: 
47 tats, Omo interest; 338 
Source: Bourse du Commerce, 


^LwidonM^i^J 


Abo. SB 

PlWlOM 


a«M 

ew ask 

ALUMINUM 
Sterflne per metric too 
spot 4S5JJ0 45AOO 45U» 

forwent 47150 479 JM 674JM 

COPPER CATHODES OlleO OroOe) 

SterVem per metrtetee 
soot 927 JO f34D0 

forwora 940-50 94700 94900 

COPPER CATHODES (StOP d ortD 
Sterllne Per metric ton 
seal 90000 91000 91600 

forward 93400 93700 

LEAD 

Stcrllno Per Metric tea 
spot 26SOQ HSS 0 

forward 27225 27250 

NICKEL 

Start lav per metric tan 

soot 270000 271000 271000 271 SOO 

forward 2755.00 276000 275500 274000 

SILVER 

Pence per troy ounce 

SOOt 411-50 41250 4M0Q 41500 

forward 42100 42400 42400 <2700 

TIN (Standard) 

Steel loo per metric too 
spot 5UW. Stmt. — — 

forward Suse. Susa — — 

ZINC 

Sferflmr per metric ton 

snot 39100 39X00 39300 39500 

Source: Routers. 


34500 

27200 


*5100 

47100 


93500 
949 JO 


91000 

94000 


345J0 

27250 


Reutm 


___of British Gas would have pnVT- 

LONDON — The government said the bin 

swatssfs 

^-■w-tsass SfiaKBS-i 1 


British Gas, which supplies gas 
MaAa analysis esomaied the to 60 percent of homesjan ^one- 


gest step so far in 
don program. 

‘ sis esomaied me »» , 

sale would net the Treasury be- ofindust^,^^ P 
tween £6 bOlion and £8 billion of £1 billion last y^- , 

(S8.8 bDHon and SU.8 Mlion). U> P*®® «£ 

Prime Minister Margaret state corporal^ e5ddnorr ™ 

niatdier said in the House of raised "to haif of .Enhsh jae- 
Commons that the 93,000 employ- . commonjcsnona PU. waa sour. 


London 
Commodities 


Nn.23 

Close Prevtoos 
KM Law Ma Aik M fok. 

SUDAN 

Sterflng per metric tea 
Dec 15QJ» 14BM M34» — MJalO 147A0 

Mar UO40 15*J» uaao 159fl0 157^0 157J0 
Moy UO0 15230 10140 )62M Ml J0 14100 
Asp. 149.40 149J0 147AB 1*00 14A00 U730 
Oct 17430 173/40 17140 T7280 17BJ0 T7M0 
Votume ; JSB Iota at 50 tan. 

COCOA 

Steritae per metric tan 

dec ua uts \oa urn uat ua 

Hat U77 U40 1J73 1 AM 14H U65 

Mot uoa M17 i ms \*U \ob -\M 

JlY IJ17 1^06 1JD9 1JW 1^06 L7M 

S«p 1,733 L725 1 7V 1J21 1^27 U29 

Doc 1J33 1J19 L718 1^20 1J29 

Mar 1J149 7^37 1J33 iXP 1J!44 V45 

Volunw: UP tats of 10 teat 


COFFEE 

Starttaa per me trie ton 


Nov 1J3S 1420 1«7 1J31 1432 1434 

Jan 1475 1450 1459 1442 1 JMJ 14U 

Mcr 1,910 1492 1490 1,900 1400 1404 

May 1441 1,92* L9S1 1434 1.931 T435 

JlV 1,974 1.967 1,908 1470 14*5 1470 

Sep 2403 1.998 1498 2490 1496 1.998 

Nov 2433 2432 2400 2430 2415 2425 

Volume : 1,957 lets of S teas. 

DASOfL 

UJ. Up— r i per metric ten 
Dec 27040 24575 25740 25740 27140 271 -SO 

Joe 26443 26140 2624S 26275 HATS 257X0 
Feb 25930 25530 2S6-5D 25675 2*175 2*1-50 


Apt 


) 2*430 24640 2*475 34830 24940 
ZBLS0 22100 23*40 2J6JD 237J5 27730 
23140 22740 22840 2»40 22940 23040 
Jpn 22940 227.25 22740 22*40 22775 22*40 
4 It 22940 776.00 22775 22840 22840 2&25 
AMO 22*40 22740 22840 22830 22840 22S75 
Vofuaw: 33B4 tats of 100 lens. 

CRUDff OIL (BRENT) 

US. doKars per barrel 

JOX 2170 2*35 2835 2835 2944 2938 

Feb 2733 2745 2740 2745 2830 38*5 

MO r N.T. N.T. 2645 2745 2735 Z770 

API N.T. NX 2630 Z740 2745 2730 

May N.T. M.T. 2530 2630 26.10 2740 

Jus NX NX 2530 2675 2545 27.10 

Volume: 10 lots of 1400 barrels. 




Asia n..,. 

Coninioite 


N&ti. SO 

HONWCONOeOLD FUTURES 
U^pweutie* M Ptorkm 
Hiab Lew Bid Aik Bid Afrit 

bs= 

5? - 3UM VSM SSo aK* S3o 340OT 

jSn II NX NX 33940 34140 MW 3«40 
Auo 3*440 34440 3*340 34540 34740 3*9-® 
Oct — NX MX 34740 34040 35140 3S300 
Volume: 26 tats at too ex. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
IL53 Per ounce 

32730 32730 01.10 E6M 

33140 33090 MTO M1^ 

N.T. N.T. 337 JO 333J0 


Dec . 


Feb 

Wfieiil kits at WO to. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Molovetan cents » Wlo 

CIOS* _ 
BU ASk 
Dec 176.50 177 JO 

Feb — 17940 W40 

Mar 18040 18140 

. Volume: 0 lots. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
‘Sleeapore cents per k9o 
Close. 

SM Axil 
RSS10eC_ 151-50 15240 

RS5 1 Jcn_ 15440 15*50 

RSS 2 DOC _ 14840 14940 

R5S 3 Dec_ 14640 14740 

RSS4Dec_ 14240 14*40 

RSS5Dec_ 13740 13940 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Matayslao rlopefts per 25 teas 
date 


Dec. 


Mar. 
Jtv _ 


720 

7*2 

7 52 
730 
760 
750 
7*0 
730 
730 


741 

74S 

755 

765 

780 

7*0 

770 

740 

7*0 


Volume: 18 lots of 25 tone. 


Previous 
BM Aik 
17740 17840 

17 150 779-50 

T79JQ 1SOS0 
18050 781-50 


Preview 
■I* Ask 
15340 153-50 

15540 15SJ0 

S3 « 

1*275 14*75 

13775 13975 


Pre vie w 

Bid 

715 725 

735 M0 

740 750 

750 7*0 

755 745 

740 770 

730 760 

729 750 

720 750 


Overloading 
Memories of 
Computers 

(Continued froE Page?) 

blocks out the tnenwiy-readeHl 
program. The resident programs 
EsuSiv work by warfiing. as n 
were, which keys on the keyboard 
are hit When the special key com- 
bination ihat activates the back- 
jefound program is bit. the program 
springs to life- But a few programs, 
such as the Xywritt and Sanma 

Word word-processng programs, 
seize total control of tbe keyboard 
in such 3 way that memory resident 
programs cannot “sec* *tai key s 

arc hit. . . , 

Yet 3 TK ? f k”* type of mteixaence 
occurs when there are several pro- 
grams residing in the memory' at 
Snce. AB the programs are trying to 
look at the keyboard ai ihe same 
rim* and, like a crowd at a parade, 
tbey r sometimes block one another's 
view. In coreme cases, the compui- 
er can be imznobihzed- 
The main problem is a lack of 
standards. Tlx costing IBM com- 
puter and MS-DOS operating sys- 
tem were only designed far one 
application ai a rime. When pro- 
grams like Xywriie were written, 
titaf creators assumed the pro- 
grams would have complete ccmtrol 
of the computer and never consid- 
ered that they would have to co- 
habitatc. Bur developers of memo- 
ry-resident programs figured out 
ways to circumvent this Enri Cation 
and. as often happens, the technol- 
ogy rushed ahead before standards 
could be developed. 

Software companies, led by Mi- 
crosoft, are working on developing 
standards - 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Nov.2&1985 

Nt CMOt volBb qu ot ati o n* are ipyiHled br tt»> Fund* Hxtad wttli tba ox e apM aa at wwt aaotax b <a»d on bawaw rtex. . . 

Tbe monKboi svmbou indicate freasasev otq u at a Mew na apnedtMI-dQUr; (w)-waakhrj (b> b l m o n thly; trj-resotortr# W-mtWMir. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

-(wl AJ-Mal Trust. S a. 


BANK JULIUS BAEN A CO. Ltd. 

-( d ) Batotxwd 

•Id) Contwf . 


-Id) Eavitxw America. 

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SF 91440 
SF 130340 

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-( d 1 Grobar- — 

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BNP INTERFUNDS 

-<w) Interbend ftand 


SF 120440 
SF 10*340 
SF 1*6440 


. S 12M5 
. S 102) 
OM 30-51 

. I 1079 

. latereaolty Padflc Otter S 1042 

(w) KrtereaattvN. Amer. Offer _ s 10-47 


■Iw) intercunencv iul 

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■Iw) Irrtercurrertcv Starllna . 
-twilii' 


BAN QUE tNDOSUCZ 


-Id 

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Aslan Growth Fund. 
Dlvertood. 


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FIF-Eurooe 

FiF-intarrattonal. 

FlF-Padfle- 


S 1147 
SF 92M 
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S 104077 


Indosoez Multi bonds A, 

Indasuex Muttibonds B . 

... indosoez USD IMALF) 

BRITANNULPOB 27LSL HeDer, Jersey 

■tel BritJotler Income ... t 070* 

-(w) Brits Jtams-Curr — S 1072 

-(d) Brit IntiAMcmaaLBorif s U96 

-(dl Brit. InfLO Marvx^portf C 120* 

-Iw) Brlt.Am. Inc. b Fd Ltd t 1.133 

-Iw) Brtt.GoWFuna__ S 0735* 

ltd) BTlLJwOT'Db^lS r F5ZZ 1 . .. 

•(w) BrtUereev Silt Fund C 0720 

-{d J Brit. World Lets. Fund 8 IJJ7 

rid) Brtt. Worid Team. Fund S (L7B4 


CAPITAL INTERNA' 
-{wl Ccultol Inn Fund 


S 4541 


REINVESTMENT BANK (U«J , ' a 
POB 1373 LiflOWntxrorB TK.477M71 


CREDIT SUISSE OS5UE PR 
(d) Actkga Sutmee 

Id) Bond valor Swf SF 10 

id) Bond Voter Bnark DM 10 


rb 


Bond Valor USriJOU-AR S 10957 

Bond Valor fSterUna £10Q7 b 

Band valor Yen Yen 1025040 

Convert Valor Swf SF 12)40 

Conwt Voter US-DOLLAR. S 126.12 




CS Foods- inn. 


-Id 
-id 
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-Id 
rid 
-id 
rid 
rid 

:i d d 

-( d 

rid 

DREXKL iURNKAM LAMBERT INC 
wlmdmter Houoo . 77 Lond on Wall 

LONDON ea cm norm) 

3}m wSa!3h?DJreflSiedZZZ" S* 1943* 

rim Winchester FlnanciaJ Ltd. 1 Uf 

rim Winchester Frontier _____ I 10270 
-iw WMwir Hold Ins* — — FF 10649 

riw) WorWwfde Socurttlos s 51.12 

l w) Worldwide Sowda I s 184340 


= If &fs 

CS Money Market Fund Cl 04740 

CS Money Market FdYen_ Y1 0013X00 

Enerwe-Vbtor SF 1. 

u»ec 


Eureaa-VMor^ 
Pacific -Valor. 


sf moo 

gB 


□ IT INVESTMENT FPM 

-H d ) Canceotrn 

-Hd) InH Rentonfond — 


DM 

DM 


3441 

9247 


Dunn * Herein * Uore Deere*, Brvaaelo 
rim) D4H Commodttv Pool — . J 3*2-54 — 

-(ml Currency B Gold Pool 1 15741 *** 

- m) Winch. UfO Flit- Pool *55974 — 

rim) Tn» world Rut. Pool S61641 — 

BBC TRUST CO .(JERSEY) LTD. 

1-3 Seale 5LSL Ktelter;0514-363TI 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

»ld line.: Bid — I l(L7l*Offer_— SII jOSI* 

9 ( d >Cob-: Bid S 1225 Offer S12A38 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
rid) Short Term’ A' lAccum)^. S 1J0M 
-id) Short Term 'A* (Dlstr) S 14000 

■lu ) Short Term -B' lAeatm)-^. S 1J025 
rid) Short Term 'B' (Dtatr) I 04698 


riw) Long Term 

FAC MOMT. LTD. INV. J 


S 2555 

...ADVISERS 

I.LouroncePnuntv HR1.EC4. <71 -<23-4*80 

riw) FAC Atlantic S 1X12 

riw) F&C European S 1579 

riw) F8iC Oriental S 3178 


NLMARB^* 

« 


FIDELITY POB *7L HemUha 

rim) American Values Common. ■* 9577 

rim) Atner Values CurLPret S 10*72 

rid) Fidelity Amer. Aseets t 7673 

rid) Fidel I tv Australia Fund — _ S 1149 

ri d ) Fldetltv Discovery Fund— S BUR 

rid) FtaefltyDlr.Svps.Tr S 12876 

rid) Fidelity Far Beat Fund — _ s 2*M 

rid) Fidelity InM. Fund s 7643 

-( d ) Fidelity Or tent Fund S 3X28 

-(d) Fidelity Frontier Food — S 1S.1* 

rid) FldeiMv Pacific Fond *15548 

Ftaetlty SpcL Growth Fd. S 1659 

... Fidelity World Fund— S 3841 

FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Aptott 01-8390013 

vO Dollar I ocome. 


rid) 

-(d) 

ridl 

FOR 

Lend 

riw) 

h 

■iw ) 


Forbes High I nc Gilt I 
Gold Income-^^^ra 



VBGoid Asarectatton. 
rim) Strategic Trading. 

GEFINOR FUNDS. _ 
-Iw) East Investment i| 


... S 41150 

riw) Scottish World Fund— t 13573 

riw) Slate St. American S 17478 

London: 01-4914230. G*rwvo:41-221KJW 


GLOBA L ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 


PB 119. St Peter Port, Guernsey, 

riw) FutarGAMiA - 

riw) GAM Arbttrope Inc. 
riw) GAMertco Inc. 


riw) GAM Australia i fie- 
ri w) GAM Boston Inc — 

-iw) GAM Ermltao* 

GAM Franc -ved . 


riw) 

riw) 

riw) 

-Iw) 

-(w: 

-Iw 

riw 


GAM Nona Kona Inc.. 


, .. i GAM International Inc 
Iw} GAM Japan Inc. 


I S 1 55.U 
_ S OM 
. S 11542 
. S 1776 
SF T19JS 
S 10044 
. S WL0I 
S 17044 


) CAM North America Inc. — t iu*t 
. i £*“ Unlt.Tntati. ma ^ 

-Iw) GAM PocJ Be Inc S 14977 

riw | GAM Pens. A Char. Worww — W8*0o 
-(wi GAM Pens- A Qwr. UJL Fd._ umaop 
■ iw) GAMrlrt ... S HAS 


riw) 

k 


MANAGEMENT (UK) LNL 
d) Berry Poc Fd. Ltd.. 


S 08 


r) G.T. Applied Science — S 

d ) G.T. Aeean HJL GwttbFd S 

d) G.T.ASFO Fund S 470* 


G.T. Australia pond. 
G.T. Europe Fund. 


G.T. Euro. Small Coe. Fund . 

GuT. Daflor Fuad 

G.T. Bond Food- 


G.T. Global TechnlsvBi 
G.T. Honshu P ath fi nd er . 


-I d ) G.T. Investment Fundn ... S 2149 
-jw) G.T. Japan Small CaFtmd^. s *B» 

rirtaT. TecbngtagvFdnd S W59 

-Id) G.T. South Chfoa Fund- — S TA92 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. INTI. BA. 
Jorsoy, P73. BON 63b Tel 0534 76029 
Berne. PjO. Bax 2622, Tel 4131 224051 
-(d ) Cnmbow < Far East) ___ SF-9 

- d 5 CSF /Balanced) SF 3 

•id ) European Equity Fund ,- DM1' 


irrtnLBond Fund. 


int Currency US.. 

tTF Fd C Technology] s 

0-Sea»Fd IN. AMERICA) _ S ___ 
DINE PLEMIMflLPOBnOPOJie Kp 
J JF Currency Ucnd_>^_ S 13197 


, , ■ Cunrencyi _ 

i J.F Horn Kang Trust, 

i AFPactftc Income Trim 


1631 


l^fflT^taSvrr y 1*58 

-+(w) Lloyd* Inti Drttor— — . * ' 
-Hwi Uoyds Inn Europe 

-+(w Ltayds Inti Growth 

‘ wj Lloyd* irtfT Income 

wj Uoyd* Inti N. America- 

wJ Uoyd* Inn Poct tlc . 

w) Uavds InfL Smaller Coe- 



riw) Swfos Franc- 

ORAtraC NASSAU GKOUP 
PB 8557L Ttta HOPaeffte) 48900 

ridl Bever D *1*00*10 en 1 1 S 3140 

PAR1SBA3-GROUP 

ri d ) Carton International 8 9443 

rid ) E CUPAR— ECU 103540 

riw)OBU-OM DM 12067$ 

S w> OBUOESTION SF NTS 

w) OBU-OOU-AR_ ST138JQ 

w) OBU-YEN. 

W) OB U -GOLD BN. 

d) PAROIL-FUNQ - 

(d { PAJtEUROPE GROWTH-, 
fd ) PARItfTER FUND 

I d ) PARMTER BOND FUND. 


-4-Cwi RBC Canadian Fund Lie. S T 
Writer) RBC For EastAPBcfffC Fd. S R3t 

-Hw RBC I an Contra I Fd S 3173 

-Hwi RBC tnn Income Fd S 1170* 

dj RBC MocCUrreocsr Fd s 2749 

w) RBC North AOMT.Fd. SR 

AND I FOND IlfTL FUND <«4-K ) am _ 

riw) tac: BM_ 4 tst Oder S 692 

riwJAcej Bid— S 652 Offer S ASS 

SVBKSKA INTERNATIONAL L 

17 DewoMWre SQ-London-cn-177- 

rir) SMB Bond fund, 253* 

-twj 5HB Inti Grawth Fuad ... 8 2677 


I The EstaWWxwetrf Trasf- 

EonDrOsHnfoM-ra 
PW £a&* Fung — J 


- S 173 
ECU 62JS 

S 19,16941 
_ S W4I 

- j mil 
SF 20270 

_ S 779 
SF 6671 

_ S 

_ S 9159 
DM 4147 
S 13773 
S 18542 
S 135*47 
SF 1US9 
S MS 
S «40 
S 1955 

S 38998 

latonMataoMaLFd-CL-e'.. S 888.19 


r> FH1Y Stars Ltd- 
1 Fixed Income Tracts^. 

.. I F o n set ex isoae Pt. — 

'wj Furetabw fl — 

Formuta selecrtaa Fd. 

. pondttedla - 

I Govern m. Sac Fumte 
■ Frank t-Trost ‘ 

i H amem o nn tfldu*. N.V- 

i Hestto Funds- 


Jd_ 


;w) Hiwtaon Fund. 
lIBEXHoMhm 

lLAriGB 

) ILArlGS 


[wl tnfermarket Fond- 


i mn Securtt*** Fund 
i laueeu dws^h 



S 1943 
8 13617 
t l IMI 


mi JeHer Pine, tut Ltd-.— tuam 
!d) IQetaWOrt Bereoa h»n Fd-__ 8 2362 


ridl 

pd) tnterratarMH 
rid i -Jaaon PortteHo] 
Irid) Slerang Bond Se 

ridlRMHMMl 

ridlSwpMH 
rid) UnhrersoJ I 
rid) uotvenxd j 




no Cstock gfi no i 

UNION INVESTMENT Freakfert 

d) UMrento DM 

djunWnam — DM 

d 


3 

^tflumrNS- 


Offwr Funds 

I Acttbond* Uweetmenta Fend. 


I AcRyestlntl 

I AWedLtd-M 



_ IfTtemotlcnol Fond - 8-T79J 

PWanceU: •«. 

5 & 



[Wl Stale SL Bonk EqoHV Hd»NV_ S 10.14 
w) Strnosy Investment Fund — S 2*7* 
d ) Syntax Lid.'(C1a*i A)’ J 1150 

is 

td) Thornton HX&CMna 4 NUB 

;d) Thornlea Japan Pend Ltd S 1X19 

d | Thornton OrlentlncFd Ltd- 8 104Q 

w] Tokyo Poc HoHL (Sea) S 11142 

_ j£y 8 15374 

*J S 10372 

Tins Europe Fund.. . — — FI 5077 

Tprqpotse Fund. ,. 8 12144 

- vXfernA — 8232172 

irCbnlL. 8 150246 

[ml TbMedYJBrowne (UJCJ n.v — s 18194* 

dluNiCOFond 

' i UNI Bond FureL_ 

■ UNI Capita) Fund 

' US Federal Securttes 
, -JUS Treaiurv tocome 
jw) VeretorbUt Aewts 
' l world Fund SA 



d liawweSrWMwSe lytTgL—^ t ™ 1? 

^■S 12)748 

8 1073 

8 4)70 
* 3*56 


f Draktor I nvoeLFund N.V. 
Dreyfus Amerlco Fdnd— 

Dfeyfus Rwd Jnri 

Dreyfus I n terto ntta o n t — 


DM- Deutsche Mar*; BF- Belgium Francs; FL- Dutch FiertniLP- 

P/V Sio 10 si per unit; NA- Nat Aval table; N.C-NaiCommunlcatedie-New.-S- - 

RedempN Price- Ex-Coupon; •• - Formerly worldwide Fund Ltd; 9 - Offer Price lad. 3% 


i preltnv charge; +-t- daffy stock price os on Amsterdam stock Exshanae 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

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SBCVKX 

USA ft WORLDWIDE 

Heed office r> Now York 
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Service- ffl aKCZTW. 


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>«es of 

-iters 


11 Ge 




BVTERNATlONAt HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


Page 13 


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ad verhshsg section 


ADVERTISING SECTION 






Peace - Work - Fatherland 


CflfWTOOO 


From the Kamerun Idea 

to the New Deal 

O ne of the main t hing s that strikes observers about Cam- 
eroon is its originality. It does not fit easily into stereo- 
_ types, yet in many ways is an archetypal African country, 
having a max of history, culture and peoples, whose richness and 
diversity is as little-known as it is remarkable. Cameroon 
seldom commands headlines, yet it is in a highly strategic posi- 
tion on the ‘armpit 5 of the West African coast, lying between the 
turbulent giants of Nigeria to the west and Zaire not far to the 
south. To the north-east lies Chad, scene of civil wars for the last 
20 years, which have miraculously avoided spilling over the 

frontier into Cameroon. 


Like so many West African 
countries Cameroon cakes its 
name from the Portuguese 
(see article 'A Rich Cultural 
Heritage’ - on page xx) who 
were the first Europeans to 
have contact with that part of 
Africa. For the next 400 years, 
after the Portuguese, there 
were the British, the Spanish, 
the French and Germans, but 
it was only in the late 19th 
century, in the course of what, 
was known as the ‘Scramble 
for Africa’ rhar what is now 
known as Cameroon came 
into existence officially (with 
frontiers not fully defined and 
somewhat different) in July 
1884 as the Germany Ka- 
merun Protectorate. Its crea- 
tion was pan of the European 
maneouvring prior ' to die 
notorious Berlin Conference 
of later that year. 

This was carved out of an 
elongated triangle of land 
stretchi n g from the Equa- 
torial Forest through the 
grasslands to the semi-arid 
Sahelian region around Lake 
Chad, whkh the northern tip 
of die territory touches. Hie 
area took in a multitude of 
peoples, very often splitting 
important ethnic groups into 
; two, as- was the casewnh the , 
Poulh' (Fulani) of . the 
Adamawa Plateau,- many of. 
whom stiD owe residual alleg- 
iance to the Lamido of 
Adama w a who resides in Yolk 
in Nigeria. . 

The German . connection 
forms part of the ‘originality* 
of Cameroon since, although 
the German - colonization 
lasted little more than thirty 
years, it had an important in- 
fluence on subsequent histor- 
ical evolution, particularly in 
what nationalists later came to 
call the Kamerun Idea. This 


came to be relevant after the 
World War I when the British 
and the French, having al- 
ready driven the Ger mans out 
militarily, excised chunks of 
territory and divided the re- 
mains of the colony in the 
name of the League of Na- 
tions in 1919, es tablishing the 
two mandared territories of 
East (French) and West 
(British) Cameroon. This 
division gave the preponder- 
ance of the territory of the 
former German colony to the 
French, buz the British re- 
tained an importanr strip 
along the Nigerian border 
from the coast to Lake Chad, 
i.e. the whole length of Cam- 
eroon. The French set up a 
separate administration, but 
the British effectively ran 
their territory from Nigeria. 
After World War II these in 
turn became United Nations 
Trust Territories, and the 
pressure from the UN for 
their . independence b ec a me, 
as with the other former 
German West African colony 
of 1 Togo, a factor in the move- 
ment for independence 
throughout West Africa. 

Thus, after the indepen- 
dence of East Cameroon at the . 
beginning of i960, with Aro~ 
madon Abidjjo as President in 
February 1961, a r e fer e n dum 
was held in the British- 
administered trust territories 
in which a paradoxical result 
was produced: the more pop- 
ulous southern part of the ter- 
ritory voted quhe convin- 
cingly to go in with the larger 
Francophone part, while the 
northern segment voted to 
stay with Nigeria. This rejec- 
tion was a blow to die Ka- 
merun Idea of reunification of 
all the former German terri- 
tory, and for some years the 


THE REPUBLIC OF 
CAMEROON 

(LAREPUBUgUE DU 
CAMEROUN) 


Area : 475.00Qsq Jem. 


Capital: Yaounde 


Population :9.54 million Official languages: French and 

(1984) English 

Key dates 

Independence -proclamation of 
the Republic (that is of the former 
French administered East Cameroon) January 1,1 960 

Reunification (of former British 
and French trust territories) as a 
federation October 1,1961 

Unification (Referendumvoting 

the end of federation) May 20, 1 972 

Coming to power of President 

PaulBiya November 6, 1982 

Form of : Unitary State, Presidential 

Government regime, monocameral assembly 


May 20, 1972 


November 6, 1982 


Form of : Unitary State, Presidential 

Government regime, monocameral assembly 

Administrative : 10 provinces, 
set-up 41 divisions broken down into 

sub-divisions. . 


National : '0 Cameroon. Cradleof our Fathers' 

Anthem .. 

Motto : Peace- Work- Fatherland 

Political Party : Cameroon People’s Democratic 

Movement sole political party 
reformed March 1985. 


Peace- Work- Fatherland 


Currency 


Religions 


CFA Franc (CFA 435 =» 1 USS/CFA 
560 = Cl) 

Christianity, Islam and Indigenous 
African religions ..... 


Main products : Coffee, Cocoa, Cotton, Petroleum, 
tropical woods. 

Main Towns : Douala (950 000 inh.) Yaounde 

(62000 inh.) Bafoussam, Maroua, 
Garoua, Nkongsamba,Bamenda, 
Kuniba. 


anniversary of the referendum 
was marked in Cameroon as a 
‘day of mournmg 1 for lost ter- 
ritory. But the solid decision 
of the south to join the Re- 
public of Cameroon was a mo- 
mentous one that had few pre- 
cedents and consolidated the 
‘originality’ as it initiated in- 
evitably the policy of bilin- 
gualism, since forty or so years 
of rule by the British and the 
French had introduced and 
consolidated their languages 
at the expense of German. 
This bilingualism gi ve n 
Cameroon a special pio- 
neering vocation in Africa, of- 
fering an example of a way out 
of the criss cross of linguistic 
zones inherited from colo- 
nialism which West Africa in 
particular suffers from. The 
model of Cameroon is one 
which the sixteen countries of 
ECOWAS (the Economic 
Community of West African 
States) could benefit from, al- 
though Cameroon itself is not 
a member. 

Reunification was one of 
the platforms of the Camer- 
oonian nationalists in the 
heyday of party politics which 
affected both East and West 
Cameroon in the years after 
die World War II. The other 
platform was -that of in- 
dependence. When both of 
these were achieved, the two 
main objectives of the radical 
Union des Peoples Comer- 
rouruds (UPC), which had 
been behind the armed rebel- 
lion launched in 1955, were 
achieved, and it was possible 
for the authorities of the 
newly independent Republic 
to master the rebellion in the 
years immediately following 
independence, although a last 
remaining ruznp of rebels was 
defeated only in 1970-71. The 


rebellion had an abiding leg- 
acy, both in the prominent 
place of security in the polit- 
ical consciousness of Camer- 
oonians, and, paradoxically, 
in providing a more dramatic 
context to the quest for unity 
which has been an abiding po- 
litical theme over the twenty- 
five years of independence. 

The key dates of the in- 
dependence era concern that 
unity. The independence of 
East Cameroon in i960 and 
reunification in 1961, when 
the federal republic was set 
up, followed by the progres- 
sive integration of the minor- 
ity Anglophone area into the 
larger Francophone area. Al- 
though this has not been 
without its problems, the En- 
glish-speaking populations of 
the former Southern Camer- 
oons have never forgotten that 
they are in Cameroon by their 
own free choice when they 
voted in the 1961 referendum. 

The major milestone along 
the road to consolidation of 
unity came the next year 
when, cm May 20, 1972, a 
massive referendum vote ap- 
proved a new constitution set- 
ting up a unitary state, to be 
called the United Republic of 
Cameroon. Although the new 
constitution actually came 
into force on June 2, it was 
May 20 which was sub- 
sequently always celebrated as 
the republic’ s national day. 

The new constitution did 
away with the separate powers 
of the federal entities of East 
and West Cameroon such as 
state assemblies, prime minis- 
ters and ministers and sep- 
arate civil services. It gave 
more power to the executive 
president and abolished the 
post of federal Vice-President 
which had traditionally 
always come from the minor- 
ity Anglophone area since foe 
President was a Francophone. 
This new political dispensa- 
tion gave an even more central 
role to foe single united patty 
in foe single united state, al- 
though the executive pres- 
idency and the power of a cen- 
tralized state in the French 
pattern has limited the role 
the party could play. 

After President Ahidjo was 
reelected as foe sole UNC 
candidate for the presidency 
in 1975, he decided to offload 
some of his work burden by 
creating foe post of Prime 
Minister. In 1979 the con- 
stitution was amended to 
make the Prime Minister his 
successor, but since Ahidjo 
was relatively young, there. 

Continued on page 17 


National Unity 

President PaulBiya , speaking at the Second Extra- 
ordinary Congress of the Cameroon National Union 
on September 14 , 1983. 

“National unity is fraught with diversity 
and complementarity, solidarity and faith 
in a common destiny, transcends all forms 
of particularisms, especially geographical, 
historical, linguistic, tribal and religious, 
making Cameroon a modern and powerful 
state where there is stability in justice, and 
equality of all, in respect of the duties and 
benefits of public services. 

This means that Cameroonians are first 
of all Cameroonians, before being Bami- 
Iekes, Ewondos, Foulbes, Bassas, Bulus, 
Doualas, Bakweris, Bayas, Massas or 
Kakas. This means that Cameroonians are 
first of all Cameroonians before being En- 
glish-speaking or French-speaking, Christ- 
ians, Muslims or Animists. 

It also means that the President of the 
Republic, Head of a secular State, regard- 
less of bus area of origin or his religion, is 
and remains the President of all Came- 
roonians. 

Lastly it means that Cameroonians in re- 
spect of every individual’s rights and of the 
laws and regulations of the Republic, are at 
home anywhere in Cameroon and that civil 
servants, in particular, should be able to 
serve the Nation wherever they are trans- 
ferred to by the State. 

In other words, national unity condemns 
tribalism, favouritism, and recommends a 
mentality and a spirit that are truly 
Cameroonian. It calls for a real national 
integration that is trustful, conscious and 
progressive.” 


Material prepared by Pofydore H. Bistouri zmth 
assistance from Stanford Willis, Jean Jacques Nsika 
and James Dugdale. 


A Message from the 
President of the Republic 


C ameroon, a land of dialogue and freedom, main- 
tains excellent relations with all peace-loving 
countries that respect its sovereignty. Its economy 
is one of the most robust on the continent as a result of the 
country’s political stability, its population’s seriousness 
and zeal with a growth race of 7.5 per cent, moderate infla- 
tion and a rather small foreign debt, Cameroon’s perfor- 
mance is exceptional in the present world economic situ- 
ation. Food self-sufficiency is not an empty slogan in 
Cameroon. Furthermore, the output from foe thriving 
and diversified industrial sector complements foe re- 
venue derived from the primary and tertiary sectors. 


- I. 1 / , 

V : J . 

\ 


Stringent Management 

The cornerstone of foe Government’s domestic policy is 
national unity and integration, foe guarantors of peace 
and progress in harmony. As concerns our economy, foe 
policy of self-reliant development, which we are trying to 
promote by making Cameroonians foe driving force and 
final goal of their development, does not mean national 
economic self-sufficiency, insularity or isolationism. It is 
an open-door policy towards foe rest of foe world, within 
a context of planned liberalism in which private initiative 
is encouraged and stimulated but regulated by the state, 
which is foe guarantor of the public interest. 

The policy of communal liberalism which I put for- 
ward during foe congress of our great national party last 
March in Bamenda (North-West Province) should be 
understood in this light. Communal liberalism expresses 
commitment to foster the development of Cameroon in 
accordance with foe positive principles of a liberal 
economy revamped and enriched with foe lofty values of 
Black-African civilization, especially solidarity and 
generosity. It presupposes not only foe fair distribution 
of the fruits of development to all members of foe national 
community but also foe necessary sacrifices arising from 
foe need to ensure foe progress of all in a free and just 
society. The development we want to promote through 
communal liberalism can be achieved only if all citizens 
adopt new principles. In this respect they must, first of 
all, accept to be ruled by the principle of stringency in foe 
management of public property and foe moralization of 
their conduct. They will thus shun such ills as fraud, mis- 
appropriation and extortion, laxity, nepotism.; com- 
placency and corruption. 


Genuine Bilingualism 

The communal liberalism in which my political action is 
rooted guarantees human rights and individual freedoms, 
while promoting social justice and peaceful co-existence 
among foe various linguistic, ethnic and religious com- 
munities. As a bilingual and multicultural country, with 
French and English as its official languages, Cameroon is 
making considerable efforts to enable bilingualism to 
become an ever-growing reality. Bilingual primary 
schools and secondary and high schools have been 
opened. A bilingual degree programme exists in foe Fa- 
culty of Arts and Human Sciences at foe University of 
Yaounde. In all foe faculties and professional schools of 
foe university, lectures are given in both English and 
French. 

There is an annex of The Advanced Teacher’s 
Training College at Bambili in foe North-West Province. 
A university campus for foe teaching of languages has just 
opened in Buea, chief-town of foe South-West Province 
(an English-speaking province). Since foe beginning of 
foe 1 985/ 1986 academic year, an advanced school for 
translators and interpreters has been functioning within 
this campus. The Official Gazette is published in both 
English and French while there is an English version and 
a French version of Cameroon Tribune, foe national 
newspaper. Programmes over foe national radio network 
are not only broadcast in foe major national languages but 
also in the two official languages. The same policy applies 
to foe national television network whose experimental 
programmes in March, May and August 1985 were tele- 
vised in English and French. 

In keeping with foe same policy we have instituted a 
programme for the teaching of English to public servants 
and other staff in the public and semi-public sectors. All 
these endeavours in favour of bilingualism fall within foe 
overall framework of foe assertion of our national identity 
and consciousness. They also reflect our firm determina- 
tion to build a state in which national unity and integra- 
tion constitute foe key clauses of the contract of progress 
binding all foe citizens, with one another on foe one band, 
and with foe Republic, on the other, so that a new national 
community based on a common way of thinking and 
behaving may emerge. 


An Indivisible State 

Cameroon therefore intends to harmoniously integrate 
within foe same political, economic, social and cultural 
entity, the two linguistic communities inherited from foe 
territories formerly under British and French Trustee- 
ship which were reunified on October 1, 1961. Unifica- 
tion came on May 20, 1972 and total unity on January 25, 
1984 giving birth to the one and indivisible Republic of 
Cameroon. 

However, harmony is not limited to foe Anglophone 
and Francophone communities only. It extends to all the 
provinces (10 in all), foe ethnic groups (about 300 ) and 
religions (Muslim, Christian, Animist) and to coexistence 
between Cameroonians and foreigners. 


A Liberal Investment Code 

As concerns foreigners in particular, I am pleased to note 
the appreciable role they are playing in the growth of our 
gross national product. Through their dynamic action, 




•Marou* ..'j 

SP@j 

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gaounoere 


rfwwnmn^r f 'rrurr i 

'• '// CENTRAL >;j 


fBafoussam 


yAOUNOE- 


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YokaOOumeJ 




ATLANTIC—. 
OCEAN "*« 


EJXtowy 

Ambon? 




our foreign economic partners - among whom there are 
many Europeans and Americans - are now making an in- 
valuable contribution to national development. 

It was in order to boost investment activities in Came- 
roon that my government drew up a New Investment 
Code that came into force on July 4, 1984- Again, on June 
13; 1984, 1 reformed foe structures and guidelines of the 
Aid and Loan Guarantee Fund . 

As a result of foe increase in its equity capital and sources 
of financing, the diversification of its sources of interven- 
tion. and foe softening of its loan conditions, this body is 
expected to give new impetus to small and medium sized 
undertakings. They will consequently become increas- 
ingly competitive. In addition, I have just signed two ord- 
inances redefining the functioning of banks and insurance 
companies so that they can participate more effectively 
than ever before in national development. Steps have also 
been taken to reduce foe time taken to pay foe state’s 
creditors so that investors may not suffer the conse- 
quences of administrative bottlenecks in their develop- 
ment activities. 

Such measures are meant to encourage investment by 
nationals and by foreigners because the implementation 
of our five-year Economic and Social Development Plan 
calls for a sizeable contribution from our foreign partners 
within foe context of balanced cooperation. I fervently 
hope that such co-operation, to which we attach the 
greatest importance, may be increasingly strengthened in 
foe interest of all parties. For our pan, we will spare no 
effort to further develop these bilateral and multilateral 
relations. 

For, considering the present world economic situation 
which is characterized by foe combined effects of eco- 
nomic recession and natural disasters, North-South co- 
operation is indispensable. 

Consequently, my government has always advocated 
fruitful dialogue between the two hemispheres for foe 
advent of a new world order based on equity and mutual 
respect. In foe present context where all nations are inter- 
dependent, such dialogue, when frank and mutually be- 
neficial, constitutes foe guarantee of a new commitment 
to growth capable of fostering foe well-being of foe entire 
international community. 

Paul Biya 





President Paul Biya addresses the Congress at Bamenda, 
March 21-24, 1 9^5- 

President Paul Biya 

Paul Biya mas bom on February / 3, 1933 at Mvomeka 
in Sangmelina District in the southern part of what at 
that lime was the French-ruled part of the League of Na- 
tions Mandate. Brought up as a Catholic , he was edu- 
cated first at the Lower Seminary bn Akoro , then in 
Douala at the Lycee Leclerc, from where in 1936 at the 
age of 23 he went to Paris to the Lycee Louis le Grand, 
proceeding from there to the University of Paris , where he 
studied law and administration from 1937-62. He was 
then whisked straight back to the President's office in 
Yaounde where he immediately became the head of the 
foreign aid department , before moving to the Ministry of 
Education , where he was first Direcieur de Cabinet of the 
Minister, then Secretary- General of the Ministry. By 
1967 his meteoric rise took him back to the Presidency , 
where he first headed the President's civil office becoming 
the following year Secretary-General to the Presidency, 
the most important civil service posting in the country, 
which job he held for the next seven years, concurrently 
with the title of Minister of State. So conversant was he 
with all the problems of government in Cameroon that he 
seemed the obvious choice in 1973 when President Ahidjo 
decided to create the post of Prime Minister , a job he held 
until he succeeded President Ahidjo in November 1982 . 









Page 1 + 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


>VERTISING SECTION 



The Economy: 
but also Agriculture 


W hat is remarkable about Cameroon’s economy is that, 
although Africa in general has been experiencing serious 
difficulties, and some countries have known disaster, 
Cameroon has survived fairly well, and even succeeded in some 
directions in improving its position. As the 1984 report of the 
World Bank observed, Cameroon succeeded in maintaining a 
growth of nearly 7 per cent, whereas most of the “states south of 
the S aha ra have their backs against the wall.” 


Even more noteworthy is the fact that this favourable eco- 
nomic climate has been maintained in spite of the period of po- 
litical uncertainty which surrounded the events of April 1984 
when the regime was in danger of being violently overthrown. 
There is no doubt that the rapid suppression of the uprising, and 
the closing of ranks which followed it, combined with the im- 
pression that President Biya was now at last decisively master in 
his own house and had indeed been given a breathing-space, all 
helped to bury any suggestion of instability as quickly as pos- 
sible, but it is also a reflection of the basic potential and satisfac- 
tory prevailing conditions in Cameroon. 


The Oil Success Story 
Superficially the key to the 
success story might appear to 
be the rapidly expanding oil 
production since exports first 
started in 1977, but it is not 
the whole story: oil produc- 
tion in any case remains rela- 
tively modest, and the Came- 
roonians themselves have de- 
liberately tried to avoid being 
dazzled by the increase in re- 
venues. VThat was as im- 
portant was the fact chat when 
the surpluses started there 
was already a considerable di- 
versified base in both agricul- 
ture and industry on which to 
build. The existence of this 
base has also meant that, in 
spite of the glut in the world 
oil marker which has adver- 
sely affected anticipated reve- 
nues in Cameroon as in other 


oil producing countries, Ca- 
meroon's position has re- 
mained sound 1. here, the con- 
trast with neighbouring 
Nigeria, where the much 
greater oil boom of the 1970s 
was accompanied by a catas- 
trophic decline of agriculture, 
is unavoidable and provides 
the key to Cameroon's posi- 
tion!. 

Although official figures on 
oil production and revenues 
have been hard to come by in 
the past « oil revenues have 
been kept in a separate budget 
outside the national budget 
and the figures not released - 
the purpose being, it was said, 
to prevent an “oil boom men- 
tality" - the general picture is 
now fairly well known, and 
production figures are avail- 
able. The oil sector in 1983 4 


contributed some 14 per cent 
to Cameroon's Gross Domes- 
tic Product. 

Current forecasts from reli- 
able sources predict that Ca- 
meroon's output will peak at 
something near this level 
(,7.6m metric tonnes per year) 
with production likely to taper 
off in the late T9S0S unless 
there are significant new dis- 
coveries. In the period from 
1977-84 Cameroon produced 
a total of just over 30m tonnes 
of crude oil ■with the 
SONARA refinery selling a 
total of some 4.4m tonnes on 
the domestic market. There is 
little new exploration taking 
place at the moment. Came- 
roon's ultimate recoverable 
reserves have been calculated 
at between 75m and 100m 
tonnes, so the country’s oil age 


Foreign Policy - Near 
the African Centre 

C ameroon’s foreign policy has tradido- very stria in r 

nally always been ‘centrist’ in African tsi " in s. th . eir Mingmu. 

and renting the idea tha 


C ameroon’s foreign policy has traditio- 
nally always been ‘centrist’ in African 
terms, and internationally non-alig- 
ned, although like so many other countries it 
has a more pronounced cooperation with 
Western countries better placed to provide as- 
sistance. 


In Africa its geographically central position 
has been reflected in policy: it was a founder 
member of the Organisation of African Unity 
in 1963 and tended to provide strong support 
to the Pan- African organisation in the various 
crises that have threatened it in more than 
twenty years of existence. This was par- 
ticularly true between 1972 and 1978 when two 
Cameroonians in succession were Secreta- 
ries- General of the OAU in the shape of Nzo 
Ekangaki (1972-74) and William Eteki 
Mboumoua (1974-8), who is now Cameroon’s 
Foreign Minister. 



ans are very stna in main- 
taining their bilingual stance, 
and resisting the idea that they 
are in any way a ‘francophone’ 
country. They conspicuously 
do not attend the Franco- 
African summits which have 
become an annual event since 
the early 1970s, and indeed 
are attended by observers 
from a great many non- 
francophone countries, some- 
times at very high level. The 
Cameroonians say that they 
do not attend meetings of the 
Commonwealth, so why 
should they take part in some- 
thing even approximately si- 
milar with France? Likewise 
Cameroon is a member of the 
Culture and Technical 
Cooperation Agency (The 
ACCT), set up at the end of 
the 1960s as an embryonic re- 
sponse to the existence of the 
Commonwealth. By the same 
token Cameroon has been an 
enthusiastic partner of the 
European Economic Com- 
munity (EEC) in its African 
activities, perhaps because of 
its connection in the colonial 
period with three different 
European powers, all of which 
are now members of the EEC. 


President Paul Biya and Mrs. Biya with Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher in London. 


In the OAU's most serious 
crisis from 1982-4 Cameroon 
was among those who ob- 
jected to the seating of the 
Sahrawi Arab Democratic 
Republic <'SADRj and boy- 
cotted the two summits in 
Tripoli <‘the second boycott 
was over Chad, indicating that 
the boycot related as much to 
antipathy to Colonel Gaddafy 
as to the specific issues 
raised). However Cameroon 
actively endorsed the com- 
promise which permitted the 
SADR's seating even with 
those countries like Cameroon 
which did not recognise it. 

Cameroon has always been 
strongly behind a firm line in 
opposition to South Africa's 
apartheid policies, refusing all 
trade Jinks and denying entry 
to South African passport 
holders. It also declined to 
support the policy of ‘dia- 
logue’ with South Africa that 
a few francophone African 


countries tried to initiate in 
the early 1970s, only to be 
suppressed at the OAU. 

The attitude of Cameroon 
to the countries of the franco- 
phone sphere of influence is 
also subtly ambivalent. As a 
country with strong economic 
ties with France, cemented by 
its membership of the franc 
zone, it inevitably has close 

links with the other franco- 
phone countries of Africa, 
participating in many com- 
mon organisations (although 
early in the 1970s Cameroon 
pulled out of Air Afriquc to 
form its own national carrier 
Cameroon Airlines'). The 
years, of French administra- 
tion in the larger pan of the 
country could not but help 
make their mark, and France 
was the main partner in the 
economic Lakc-olT, even if 
others were brought in as a 
matter of conscious policy. 

Nevertheless Camcrooni- 


could end before the end of 
the century. 

The SONARA refinery at 
Limbe (in the former West 
Cameroon) which came into 
operation in mid- 198 1 , helped 
Cameroon to consolidate the 
advantages to be obtained 
from having its own oil pro- 
duction. At present it is re- 
fining an estimated 1.2m 
tonnes of crude oil a year (a 
little over half capacity) which 
satisfies domestic demand 
with the exception of the 
demand for asphalt, lubric- 
ants, and other speciality pro- 
ducts. Some refinery products 
are in turn exported to neigh" 
bouring countries. 

The other major national 
enterprise connected with the 
oil business is the govern- 
ment’s own National Hydro- 
carbons Corporation (SNH) 
created in 1980 in order to 
ensure the exploitation of Ca- 
meroon’s own oil and natural 
gas resources according to its 
national priorities. The SNH 
holds 20 per cent of equity 
shares in local oil companies 
in partnership with interna- 
tional oil companies, assumes 
shares of production, and 
market’s crude oil on behalf of 
the state. 

The natural gas deposits are 
currently seen as the great un- 
explored natural resource of 
Cameroon. Known deposits 
are said to be perhaps as much 
as too billion cubic metres, 
but an ambitious scheme to 
develop a multi -million dollar 
LNG (Liquified Natural Gas) 
Plant at the coastal town of 
Kribi has been put on the 
shelf for lack of demand in 
Europe. The President of the 
French oil company ELF, 
Michel Pecquer has put a 
damper on all African LNG 
projects as far as the European 
market is concerned, saying 
that there are ample supplies 
of gas available in Europe 
until 1992/3. The lower spot 
price of oil was also a faaor in 
the loss of interest in LNG 


for Africa (ECA),and takes in 
ten countries from Chad to 
Zaire. It is very much along 
die lines of the West Africans’ 
ECOWAS which stretches to 
Cameroon’s western neigh- 
bour Nigeria, and involves the 
same kind of aspiration to 
trade integration with the 
eventual establishment of a 
common market, as well as an 
economic and monetary 
union. Ironically relations 
with the giant Nigerian neigh- 



William Eteki Mboumoua, 
Foreign Affairs Minister . 
Formerly Secretary-General 
of the OAU ( 1974-78)- 


Thus there was a symbolic 
importance in choosing 
Yaounde as the venue for the 
signature of the first agree- 
ment between a number of 
African countries (mainly 
francophone! and the EEC of 
the six in 1963. It was perhaps 
unfortunate for Cameroon 
that the Yaounde Convention 
became too closely identified 
with a paternalistic approach 
to aid in Africa, and with the 
ramifications of the French 
sphere of influence, so that 
when the agreement was en- 
larged to include all of Africa 
south of the Sahara as well as 
the Caribbean and Pacific (i.e. 
ACP), there were some who 
wanted a new name, and so 
the venue was changed to 
Lome for the 1975 signing. 
But the EEC connection is 
still highly prized, and Came- 
roon is" both an active par- 
ticipant in the work of Lome 
and a major beneficiary from 
its various instruments, not- 
ably the European Develop- 
ment Fund. 


hour, with which there are so 
many ties have been going 
through a bad patch of late 
because of disputes over fron- 
tiers and oil. 

Cameroon has already 
played a prominent pan in the 
UDEAC (.Central African 
Customs and Economic 
Union) set up in the early 
1 960s together with the four 
countries that had formerly 
constituted the French 
Equatorial African Federa- 
tion (AEFj, Gabon, Chad, 
Central African Republic and 
Congo. UDEAC has been ge- 
nerally reckoned to be one of 
Africa’s more successful 
smaller economic groupings, 
so Cameroon is well placed, 
especially with its own strong 
economic base, its plentiful 
trained manpower and its 
growing industries to play a 
major pan in the new 
grouping. At the moment, it is 
true, it is little more than a 


projects. Notwithstanding 
this setback, the Cameroon 
government is examining the 
possibility of developing a 
local gas industry. According 
to the Ministry of Mines, 
Liquefied Petroleum Gas 
(LPG) consumption (chiefly 
for light industry and for 
cooking in some households) 
increased by over 25 per cent 
per year between 1980 and 
1983, thus giving the lie to the 
view that there was no gas 
demand in Cameroon. It is 
hoped that SONARA may 
adapt to more LPG produc- 
tion, and it is also hoped to 
build a gas bottle factory, but 
the scale will still remain very 
small compared to the Kribi 
project. The energy situation 
in Cameroon also has to take 
into account the fact that the 
country has considerable po- 
tential for manufacture of 
cheap electricity through 
hydro-electric power. 


Agriculture Holding Out 

In view of the strictly finite 
limit to Cameroon's oil, there 
is general awareness that, in 
terms of revenue generation, 
the main resource of the 
country has got to continue to 
be agriculture. This employs 
about 70 per cent of the active 
labour force and is still the 
backbone of the economy. 
Besides being virtually self- 
sufficient in the production 
of fbodsruffs (which thus 
avoids the heavy import bill 
for food that is the bane of so 
many African governments 
trying to stay afloat), Came- 
roon is an important exporter 
of cocoa and coffee, and a sig- 
nificant producer of agricul- 
tural products such as palm 
oil, rubber and cotton. Small- 
holder farming is still the 
main source of agricultural 
output, with the peasant 
sector accounting for over 90 
per cent of production. 

It must nevertheless be re- 
marked that, due to oil, the 
share of agriculture in both 


Another grouping, this 
time entirely African, to 
which Cameroon belongs, is 
the CEEAC (the Economic 
Community of Central Af- 
rican States), 'rhis was set up 
in 1983 as one of the four main 
African regional groupings 
suggested by the United Na- 
tions Economic Commission 



Headsof State at a recall UDEAC summit meetttig fl. to r. I 
President Paid Biya of Cameroon , President A ndre Kolingba 
of Central African Republic , President Teodoro Obiang- 
Nguama of Equatorial Guinea, President Denis Sassou- 
Ngucsso of ( 'ongo and President Omar Bongo of Gabon. 


GDP and export earnings has 
gone down in recent years, 
even if production on the 
whole has nor: The agricul- 
tural sector contributed over 
30 per cent to the GDP before 
1980, but the latest estimates 
put it at 23-24 per cent. In 
recent years the high incid- 
ence of drought and related 
side effects such as heavy har- 
mqttan has affected perfor- 
mance and figures have been 
disappointing, but improved 
rainfall in the last two years 
should help figures to show 


Cameroon since 

en< ^. Most of ihem woe now 


land-locked countries six* as 
Chad or Central African K*- 




PU oSher areas of inftustruc- 


capacity, and - d ^ where there has been 

were recording 

He also noted that ^ du de the development o, 

not toipro^ set water supply, and tdecom- 


He also noted that matters 

not improved . ^ 


J*. firms which had set ... 

foreign firms ^ l0 m unicauons. 

hem up were called social expenditure (educa- 

ry to sort them out^ ^ ^ afe© account 

ophisucared uidustnes ^ tfac construction 

te said, and it was oonstrua i m cranes dot the 

mild them up slo J horizons of Yaounde Douala 

m a fairly smalls scale.. c ^ es ^ officc 

This reasoning is > spanment blocks 

and housing developments 
Gj spring up, concluding that in- 
i':/ frastructure development, 
long neglected, is directly or 
•if indirectly leading to much of 
gjgi Cameroon’s “onshore" 

% g Tt' difficult not lo con- 
dude, however much the 
* government series to “de- 
dramatise” the issue, that 

J : • V • there are many external symp- 

T-r rm y of an cal- boom. How- 
cvcr much the oil revenues 
V may still be concealed, people 

.'*■ •- ; know they are there. There is 

jy-i'i. • „ v no doubr too that the “smell of 

' . y \5 *- oil” has brought in a rash of 

j*;V expansion in the banking 

j.;- sector. There are now nine 

Phew: Camera . commercial bonks operating 

n tic coast, a man caraes out a ifaere where there were four 
imple tools. only five years ago. Conspi- 

. . . cuousiy the new banks are 

behind the govermncnt?s own ^ end to 


ihejn upwere called back 10 


mem — - T 

rrv lo sort them out. Large 
Sriiisucared industries were 
^adapted to local condmoiK, 
Z * S ^d it was better to 
build them up slowly starnng 


on a fairly smaH scale 


^ tiasoning is certainly 


m 








r„j.<u2L- . . 


At the resort of Kribi on the Atlantic coast , a mm carves out a 
log canoe toith simple tools. 


more buoyancy. In the 
1982/3 year, there were de- 
clines in the production of 
cotton, cocoa, pineapples, 
axabica coffee and bananas, 
although some other commo- 
dities (robusta coffee, rice, 
com, millets, palm oil and 
nuts) showed increases. 

The 1983/4 production 
figures were also very mixed, 
but the signs for this year axe 
much better, and the plen- 
tiful 1985 rains should also 
have good results, although 
the continuing after-effects 
of the heavy drought in the 
north will take some time to 
repair. 




Jr 




Photo: Camera Press, London 


deasion to press the&wdqp- ^ Fmich 

mem of PME (smrfrmd ^ m _ 




National 


dosma! development, espe- ^ ^ ^ rf (M 


. y— im.mnn*c ami U K « nuiuiw 

dally, m view of Cammxm s ^ ^ ^ 

good position 10 o*e ad- T mmurri and 


mPAr Luxembourg registered and 
*“*■*. ° f MxkBeEasf&SedBankof 

market mnaghboiu^cMn- e^.^ Oxnmerce lnter- 

mes, and one day perhaps of , ^ 


paper charter, and implemen- 
tation is still being worked 
out, but Cameroon is keenly 
interested, and will host the 
next summit of the grouping 
in December in Yaounde. Ob- 
servers see Cameroon, in alli- 
ance with rich but small 
Gabon as providing the neces- 
sary counter-balance to the 
otherwise dominant role that 
Zaire might play " in the 
grouping. 

Although France has only 
recently returned to its posi- 
tion as principal trading client 
of Cameroon (taking 27 per 
cent of exports compared to 
25 per cent going to the USA) 
it has consistently had the 
leading place as supplier, 
taking advantage of the franc 
zone connection and other 
mechanisms of France’s 
sphere of influence. In 1983 
France supplied some 47 per 
cent of Cameroon’s imports. 
Thus in economic terms 
alone, Cameroon’s relations 
with France are central to its 
foreign policy considerations 
outside Africa. More than 
many countries closely con- 
nected to France by history, 
Cameroon is keen on diver- 
sifying its external relations. 
The Americans for example, 
have a ‘sizeable’ investment 
presence, mainly in the oil and 
banking sectors, and Came- 
.roon is also keen on using its 
Lome Convention connec- 
tions with the EEC to involve 
others notably West Germany 
and UK. The latter, in par- 
ticular, enjoys considerable 
goodwill in Cameroon which 
has been under-utilised for 
business purposes (there has 
been a trade deficit since the 
late 1 970s when Cameroon 
first started exporting crude 
oil to Britain). Another 
country which has developed 
considerable interest in Ca- 
meroon is Canada, perhaps 
because it detects an affinity in 
the official bi-lingualism. Ear- 
lier in 1985 ‘Cameroon Eco- 
nomic Days’ were held in 
Canada with the principal aim 
of attracting investment, and 
there is a useful Canadian aid 
programme. 


Industry: Beating . 

Recession . 

The other main plank of 
Cameroon’s success lies in its 
relatively large and varied 
manufacturing industry, gear- 
ed to a large extent to the local 
| market. 

! Important industries . in- 
| dude food processing, bever- 
ages (there are a significant 
number of breweries), to- 
bacco, textiles, shoes, as well 
as metallurgical, mechanical, 
chemical, cement and plastics. 
From 1978 to 1982 inclusive 
the manufacturing sector re- 
corded average annual growth 
of some 1 1 per cent, and it 
contributed it per cent to 
GDP in 1982. It has, how- 
ever, shown some signs of 
being affected by the world 
economic slowdown as well as 
being subjected to some 
specific local problems. 

It is estimated by one 
source that the sector expe- 
rienced declines in output of 2 
to 3 per cent year in both 1982 
and 1983, although by early 
1984 the overall industrial 
production index turned up- 
wards: a slight slowdown after 
the April attempted coup did 
not last and activity continued 
to improve into 1985. The fall 
in performance was attributed 
to such factors as drought in- 
duced shortage' of agricultural 
raw materials, rising labour 
costs, high interest rates on 
borrowing (and higher than 
anticipated debt service pay- 
ments) increased cost of im- 
ported inputs and disruption 
in neighbouring maikets (the 
recession in Nigeria,, followed 
by the 1984 border closure is 
also said to have had some in- 
fluence). 

The government's attitude 
to industry is also being con- 
ditioned by the difficulties it 
has been experiencing in 
major industries such as 
ALUCAM, the aluminium 
smelter company which has 
been having financial troubles 
from depressed export prices 
and rising costs from a recent 
plant expansion, as well as a 
temporary cutback in hydro- 


mes, ana one aay peroaps m 
the market which could be of- ? gt !! ll T r’ 
fered by the larger Economic te hisnc ®- 
Community -of Central. Af- 
rican States. - • TheFlaas 

The public seemr has a 
major shareholding m. io- .. ThephSa 
dusrry, especially agro- devetopmen 
industry and heavy industry, what is < 
and the main instrument. ;of llberahsm," 
intervention is SNI (the Na- economy w 
tional Investment Corpora- sector has a 
non), although some bdsi- . ibc acooo, 1 
nesses have direct govern- witirinpriar 
meat participation. Many of tfce governs 
the state enterprises suffer work of re 
from poor conception and lodced sucfa 
management, and most^Eurve ia mtsi A 
been having difficulties- “if wftkfr fed i 
late. The gover nm ent has re- .rfbtdjE&art 
quested assistance thf ;iu$.da£fed **4 


national (BCC 3 ) have set up 


The Flan and the Budget 


The philosophy chat guides 
development in Cameroon is 
wixat is caUed' “planned 
liberalism," that is, 3 meted 
economy where the private 
sector has considerable scope 
fbc action, but must operate 

witi^priortiesestablished by 
m die frame- 
work: of national planning. 
Indeed such policies operate 
in roost ^African countries 
whk^ frd dxat they cannot 
affiwd jwten one African leader 
hjg. cafled “capitalism sauva- 


Worid. Bank ia ffh(t *e&p\ 0^^ IgBd^agntalismL. The 

tire parastatal sector, and current Dwdopmcnt Plan 


changes axe certainly in the 
wind. 


Infrastructures - 
Repairing the Neglect - 
Economic observers have 
also noted that of-late,-tiiere 
has been much visible sign of 
the large amounts of money 
now being devoted rotherevi- 
talisarion of CameroonY in- 
frastructure. “Real estatespe- 
miarion, construction^, and 
public works activities. Yre 
currently flourishing.^ It has 
been a fact that Cameroon’s 
basic infrastructure has' Iong 
lagged behind - some /jdf its 
neighbours. The comparison 


1981 10 1986 4s the Vth, and 
m jtaiodaced while Paul 
fiSysr was sf 32 Prime Minister. 

- The plan stresses balanced 
development and puts agri~. 
a&tire feniy and squarely at 
tbeceatre of the country’s de- 
velopment. As much as 40 per 
cent of the current plan’s fi- 
nancial requirements is to be 
provided by the domestic and 
foreign private sectors- 
The latest National Budget 
introdneed on June it, 1985 
and . promulgated on June 29 
can be taken as a useful guide 
to the kind of policies that 
Biya: has been pursuing and 
intends to pursue on the eve of 


has been made, for example^ drawing up a new Develop- 
between the Nigerian^sicic of' ment Plan^the VTth) to come 


the Trans-African highway, a~ 
solid stretch of tarred road to 
die Cameroon border where it 


intp.;££g?ration in 1987. The 
bpdga/.was balanced in re- 
venue and expenditure at 740 


becomes little more tixmva 'bilKdn CFA francs, an in- 
track as it continues its xpate' crease of X20bn, in absolute 


00 Bamenda. Out of a tocal of 
S5,oodkm of primary aadsec- 
Dndary routes there aretmly , 
some 2500km of tarredroadsj 
Among projects newly trim? 
pleted are the new Dcmala- 
Yaounde highway, mu T^hy 
1986 the “Bamend^f ring 


terms and t9_3 per cent over 
the 1984-5 budget (itself in- 
creased by 19.2 per cent over 
tireprevTOus year). 

Investment'- will represent 
41.9 per cent of the overall 
budget against 55 per cent the 
preyiousjrear. Rural develop- 


road” and key section^trif’ffie ; - initixf will receive over 16 per 
Trans-African highway? w 3 T cent ofthe total, an increase of 
be completed, but three ts a" ' 32fper cent over the previous 


much more ocnnpxeb&reive: 
plan for tarring roads^under. . 
the 1981-6 Devdopinem 
Plan, which should css- - 
tended into the new plan/' •- •- '-■■ 
The railway seaor willacii- 
ieve an import an t milestone 
next y en' when . the 
alignment .of the track. b6r 
tween Douala and Yacmndc ~ 


year. As much as 21 per cent 
of all capital -spending is ro go 
to road, pore air and telecom- 
munications infrastructure. 

The "budget, financed ‘'en- 
tirely.- 'from national re- 
Sfpju^s'' gave a priority place 
to emptoyinenr and housing. 

A _major concern for any 
Cameroon administration at 


and rising costs from a recent one of the first sections of. the moment must be the 
plant expansion, as well as a . track to . have been*; buik, dratnanc rise in indebtedness 
temporary cutback in hydro- begun by. the Gernmis and . yin recent years, although it is 
electric power allocations finished by die F rendrib 1926 stifr in a much-better position 
because of the drought. - is due to be completed. The ; as fir as debt is concerned 
ALUCAM seems fo be trying, new. S25oniillion line wjffl cut ...than most of its neighbours, 
to bounce back after a ro the total distance from 308km 'partiy because it can finance 
covery in tbe world market to 265km kn‘d iron outmiuy .of".' so much on its own resources 
and has recently announced the more dangerous T>aids ■ ' ■ and 'afford to service what 
plans for ‘major new invest- thai exist in the old line. This ‘ debt ir has. 
meats, including, in the im- will mean -that- the;- Trans^i ' . There is a wide belief that ' 

mediate future,- new port in- • Camerounais,one. of dieinajor ■ . Cameroon still has time and 
stallations. ' : ’ * railway projects in Africi fo - resources to keep the situation 

The other industry in dif- recent decades’ will fipaUybe. , .-under control and can still be 
Acuities, -however, the ‘huge - fully fimetionmg, a?T>ouala- r ./helped by the strong conser- 
CELLUCAM . pulp, and -Yaounde links' up the vative inclinations still pre- 
paper factory is more of a more modem section from - vailing iu govemmcnL The 
problem, having been dosed Yaounde to r : : iNgaouhderc^ handling ofthe phasing out of 
down for 5/ couple of years 625km of track sAich was/ oil revenues at the end of the 
now, due to r finanoal non- coinpletedliri^' * : 5 T ! . decade is also a Question mark 

viability. GELLUCAM was - It operri- the pQ^ibility over' die future But in the 
particularly in the mind of the' other of octcosion /forther shorr term Cameroon has 
head of theindustriaUstsfede- - north . to givV/Cameicxw a every reason' to be satisfied 
ration Syndustrican, Samuel more comprehenrive^nation- than fa ^ ar j 

Kondo, when he.critiased the wide rarilw^ system, or form larively better than most other 
various large turnkey, indus- &ejbma of a railway. .system countries of the African mn 
tries which have bcen seLupin octendmg .^ei^foouring tinenL 


.every reason' to be satisfied 
than its position is at least re- 
■ lovely better than most other 
countries of the African con- 

tin ent. 


■Sri ' 

t 

.'t'-SflV- 


.wM>l 

v iia 

i* p6 


dels, 

hr ti 






Y 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 



ADVERTISING SECTION 


REPUBLIC OF CAMEROON 


Self-sufficiency in Food a long standing Priority 

For a Developing Country like Cameroon, Agriculture is the best basis for Development. 


T he mobilisation of the rural population throughout the Cameroon has made it 
possible to show the whole world the vitality of its agriculture and the enormous 
potential of the country in this sphere. 

Self-sufficiency in food is a living reality in the Cameroon. It is the result of a dis- 
cerning policy which wisely puts agriculture at the top of the list of priorities. The basic 
objective of .this policy is; to consolidate the national self-sufficiency in food, to im- 
prove in quality and quantity export products and to raise the s tanda rd of living in 
■ rural areas. 

Agriculture is the key sector in the Cameroonian economy since it represents approxi- 
mately 40% of the G.N.P. and 70% of export value. The diversity of the physical, human 
and historical factors accounts for the variety of products. 

In North Cameroon, from Lake Tchad to the Benoue ... .. 

-Basin^ the Sahelian climate provides the best possible . _ 

region for millet, sorghum, rice and maize. In the forested 
southern regions with an equatorial climate tubers and 
the banana plantain predominate. It is the region of the 
cacao tree, one of the main export products, 
hi the coastal regions the main crops are palm oil, 

‘robusta’ coffee and bananas, while on the high western 
plateaux many food crops (maize, peanuts, beans . . .) are 
grown as well as manufacturing crops such as ‘arabica’ 
coffee. Soya has also been cultivated for some time. 

Efforts are being made both by the public authonties and 
other private organisations to bring about modernisation 
within the agricultural sector. Likewise, efforts are being 
made to promote agricultural cooperatives and FONA- & 

DER (Fonds National de Developpment Rural— National 
Fund of Rural Development) is granting loans to fanners. 

This organisation is accelerating its decentralisation 
programme in an effort to become more accessible to the 
fanner. 

In order to protect the agricultural producers in the 
Cameroon from the repercussions of the fall in prices on 
the world market, the government has created a price 
stabilisation fund, which is the “Office National de Com- 
mercialisation des Produits de Base” (“National Trade 
Office for Primary Products”) (ONCPB) whose head- 
quarters axe in Douala. 

■ ■ The Cameroon Government - 
- has made its Choice 

Agriculture must and will remain the priority sector 
witfamthecontesct of the National Development Pro^ '* H.E. Paul Biya, President of the 

gramme. . Republic of Cameroon 

In order to enable die agricultural sector to continue to 

play its role of central figure in the development prog- ramme was drawn up in order to achieve this objective, 
ramme to the full, while at the same time ensuring self- The food problem is all die more worrying as every year 
s ufficienc y in food for the population, public audiorides .shows an increase in the import of cereals (in particular, 
will henceforth place emphasis on the rationalisation and rice and com) which supplies the great urban centres, 
utilisation of the basic production elements: manpower. Long term studies, (Horizon 2000) indicate that the 
the land and other factors and the design and putting into cereal deficit may become even more marked, with the 
effect of an efficient plan of action for food distribution. rural exodus being one of the contributing factors. 

By this approach, the government hopes to provide die Furthermore, starchy foods and root foods which, at pre- 
active rural pop ulation with a range of material means, sent, are available in abundance, might well risk seeing a 
twhniral know-how and a right framework within which decline in the 1990*5 and it was pointed out that malnutri- 
to function,~which is so necessary to the development of tion and insufficient nutrition was becoming more of a 
all the farmers, breeders, fishermen and fish breeders risk for certain rural populations and low-income popula- 
suppiying the national food demand. tions. 

Likewise this approach is intended to revitalise the rural The government instructed MIDEVTV to study these 
milieu in the Cameroon by giving new drive to village problems and to attempt to resolve them. MIDEVIV 

nn Kaeirollw rtinrontrorpH ire ^ffnrre on ram nflrrimlarlv 

communities. 

The basic aims of this 




option are to: 

— increase the produc- 
tive capacities of the 
rural sector, 

— contain the rural .. 
exodus, 

— vitalize the agro-pas- 
toral sector 

— sustain scientific and 
technical research in 
such a way as to inte- 

■ graie it as much as pos- 
sible into the national 
machin ery aimed at 

food production. The emblem of the 

— make loans more ac- Cameroon People’s 

cessible to the smaU Democratic Movement 
farmers, breeders and (CPDM J 

fishermen. 

Up to now, the response to the population s food de- 
mands has been seen as satisfactory; it has even been con- 
ceded that as for as the food demand goes, the Cameroon 
is self-sufficient. 

Meeting such food demands, both in rural and urban 
areas, was achieved through production which was basi- 
cally traditional cultivation and breeding and small-scale 

or semi-industrial fishing. 

Due to the rapid growth in demography, the rural 
exodus, the ageing of a substantial proportion of active 
farmers, breeders and fishermen and accelerated urbani- 
sation, it would appear that the production capacities and 
the level of supply from the fractional sector in food pro- 
duction have now been exceeded- The situation is 
becoming precarious and it will be necessary to conso- 
lidate it by the appropriate encouraging measures already 
taken or planned by the government. . 

Self-sufficiency in food has always been one 01 the pnon- 
ties of die Cameroon government. A national food prog- 


H.E. Paul Biya, President of the 
Republic of Cameroon 

ramme was drawn up in order to achieve this objective. 
The food problem is all the more worrying as every year 
shows an increase in the import of cereals (in particular, 
rice and com) which supplies the great urban centres. 
Long term studies, (Horizon 2000) indicate that the 
cereal deficit may become even more marked, with the 
rural exodus being one of the contributing factors. 
Furthermore, starchy foods and root foods which, at pre- 
sent, are available in abundance, might well risk seeing a 
decline in the 1990*5 and it was pointed out that malnutri- 
tion and insufficient nutrition was becoming more of a 
risk for certain rural populations and low-income popula- 
tions. 

The government instructed MIDEVTV to study these 
problems and to attempt to resolve them. MIDEVIV 
basically concentrated its efforts on two particularly 
problematic areas: Productivity within traditional agri- 
cultural activities and the prices of foodstuffs in the large 
urban centres. A logical choice when one realises that the 
traditional sector supplies at least 90% of the food con- 
sinned in the Cameroon and that in large urban centres, 
die high prices of foodstuffs does on occasion appear to be 
beyond the means of those in low income brackets. 

The National Seed Plan 

In 1976 MIDEVIV launched the “Scmencier Nord” 
( c< Northem Seed”) Plan which aimed at the production 
and distribution of improved peanut and sorghum seed in 
the Sahelian and sub- Sahelian zones of the country. 

In 1980, MIDEVIV, with the assistance of the FAO, 
wished to extend this project throughout the entire natio- 
nal territory of the Cameroon. It was thus that the Na- 
tional Seed Plan came into being, drawn up with the aid of 
the FAO. This plan is one of the priorities of the Vth 
Five-year Plan for Economic and Social Development. It 
is already in a practical phase with seed centres in Mbanga 
and Ndop which have recently been added to that in 
Koundoung near Ntui where the first seed distributions 
were initiated for die provinces of Mbam, Mefou and 
Lekie. Six other centres in Bertoua, Batouri, Ebolowa, 
Ekona, Tonga and Sabale are planned between now and 
the end of the Vth plan. 

The improved seed ensures the purity of the variety and 
its race of germination makes it possible to economize on 
seed and ensures healthier soil conditions ■ The result: a 
harvest which is superior both in quality and quantity . 

Foodstuffs in Urban Centres. 

The Problem: The Price. 

In parallel with the action which it has undertaken as 
regards the production and distribution of the improved 
seed, the MIDEVIV was also instructed to slow down the 

rise in prices of foodstuffs; prices, which in a period of 


REPUBUQUE DU CAMEROON 

Paix — Travail — Patrie 

MINISTERE DE L'INFORMATION 
ETDE LA CULTURE 


shortage, are becoming prohibitive for families in a low 
income bracket. 

It must be appreciated, nevertheless, that all these actions 
have limited effects. This is why, in the future, the 
MIDEVIV proposes to pursue now lines of modernisa- 
tion as regards the production of foodstuffs, for example, 
manuring, the protection of plants and agricultural 
mechanisation. 

The Agricultural Cooperative 
in the Cameroon 

The Cameroonian Cooperative Movement has two dif- 
ferent faces today. On the one hand there are the coopera- 
tives which came into being during the colonial period or 
afterwards thanks to assistance from the Administration. 
On the other hand, there arc .cooperatives which only- 
benefit from support at various levels within government 
departments. However in both cases the objective re- 
mains die same. Raising the standard of living for 
cooperative members by grouping the limited resources. 
If cooperatives benefit from a certain amount of 
autonomy in management, they must nevertheless 
submit to State supervision. Moreover, there are various 
instruments regulating the cooperative movement in the 
Cameroon. One could mention the law of 7 December 
1973 on the Regulation of Cooperative Societies, and the 
Decree of 29 July 1 983 setting down the terms of enforced 
recovery ofcooperative loans. 

Closing the Road to the Desert thanks to 
"Sahel Vert*’ (Sahel Green Belt) 

The great drought which beset the African continent in 
the 1970*5 was the original reason for launching the 
operation “Sahel Vert” (Sahel Green-belt) in the Came- 
roon. This operation which involves, in particular, young 
people, is aimed at combating dry' conditions by reaffo- 
restation and multiplying contacts among young people 
from a variety of backgrounds, thus building up not only 
national unity, but also, international solidarity'. 

The Sahel Green-belt operation is being carried out in se- 
veral stages. The first is known as “Sahel Vert I” and 
began in 1977. This involved reafforestation of 1000 hec- 
tares over a three year period, which amounted to 
1 ,ooe,ooa trees being planted . 

Upon completion of Sahel I, Sahel II commenced. This 
is a six year project. 

Following the logic of Sahel I, this second phase is in- 
tended to consolidate the initial objectives, to improve 
ecological conditions and to give young people a taste for 
manual work and work which is in the interests of the 
community'. In concrete terms, Sahel II involves the 
planting of 2,250,000 trees, wells being sunk or improved 
and village copses being established. The number of nur- 
series are to be increased and the areas worked brought 
closer together in order to bring about an effective popu- 
larisation of reafforestation. This work is being carried 
out voluntarily thanks to the enthusiasm of young people 
from all parts of the national territory, the local inhabit- 
ants and the authorities concerned. Sahel II is making an 
effort to involve the local populations even more in the re- 
afforestation programmes. Thus, if Sahel I brought 
about reafforestation particularly in private or State 
owned areas, Sahel II is continuing the project in villages 
and scholastic establishments who are the holders of the 
zones thus re-planted. 

To date 1,765 hectares has been planted. It is planned to 
extend this operation to link up agriculture and reaffores- 
tation more closely. 

The Forested Sector 

Forest covers more than one third of the territory, which 
is to say, almost 20 million hectares, of which almost 3.5 
million are licensed for usage. There are numerous spec- 
ies, more than 300, of which around thirty could be util- 
ised and, these, eleven are destined for exploitation. 

The government has set in motion a strategy for the 
protection and regeneration of forests. With this in mind 
CENADEFOR (Centre National deDeveloppement des 
Forets - National Centre for Forest Development; and 
ONAREF (Office National de Regeneration des Forets - 
National Bureau for the Regeneration of Forests) have 
been established. 

The measures taken by the Ministry Agriculture in this 
sector have lead, within the current business year, to a 
more concentrated interest in forest exploitation in the 
forested zones of the country and the reinforcement of 
replanting operations with a view to ground conservation 
and halting the desert extension in the Savanna and 
Sahalian regions. 

As regards forest exploitation, and in spite of the crisis 
which has shaken the international timber market in 
recent years further to the international economic crisis, 
the production from Cameroonian forests has seen a 
regular and sustained growth from 1, 800,00m in 1983 to 
more than 1,900,000m in 1984- Estimates for 1985/86 are 
in the order of 2,300,000m. 

A similar increase was registered in respect of local timber 
processing (1 million m in 1983, 1,050,000 m in 1984) 
which serves as proof of the success of the government 
policy which opted for local exploitation of the product as 
opposed to exports of rough timber. Without the added 



President Paul Bird 

difficulties met by Cellucam and Sofibel, forest 
production would have exceeded 2 million m. 

It should be pointed out that various measures have been 
employed by the government in the course of this year to 
boost production, namely: a review lowering market 
prices of the various species of trees, abolition of taxes on 
products which are processed locally and the creation of 
differentiating tax zones. 

Furthermore, concerted efforts to encourage national 
participation in forestry' which were announced last year, 
will begin to be realised commencing from the next 
business year thanks to the credit extended by the 
Canadian government. 

Fishing 

The population of the Cameroon is increasing by 
approximately 200,000 inhabitants every year. According 
to the long term food plan, the average consumption of 
fish per head, p.a. w'ould be 13.5 kg (meat equivalent). In 
order to respond to the needs of the excess population of 
‘ the counrry alone almost 3,000 t of additional fish are 
required. 

National production consists of sea fishing, internal 
fishing (‘river, lake, still water, etc.; and fish breeding 
which as yet only accounts for a fraction of total 
production. 

In 1983 the total fishing resources in the Cameroon were 
estimated at 105,000 t. Of this amount 20,000 ton were 
accounted for in industrial fishing - 35,000 1, small-scale 
sea fishing - 50,000 1, internal fishing and fish breeding. 
The national product of 105,000 represents several 
thousand million francs, but it is not possible to estimate 
the contribution of the fishing industry' to the national 
revenue by taking into consideration only the added value 
of commercial distribution and the subsidiary or related 
activities of the fishing industry. 

Apart from the poor fishing resources, several factors can 
explain the reduction in productivity which has been 
particularly noticeable over the last five years: 

. — the price report (cost of 
equipment/selling 
price of fish) has not 
encouraged the owners 
of the vessels to reno- 
vate or improve their 
equipment such as 
boats and nets. This 
may result in less effi- 
ciency in fishing com- 
panies. 

The government is at 
present studying w'hat 
steps should be taken in 
Professor Georges Ngango, industrial fish ing in order 

Minister of Information and to cope with the current 

Culture problems. 





Water Supplies for Villages 

This programme which has several sources of finance, is 
being put into effect by the Departments for Agricultural 
Engineering and Community Development within the 
Ministry' Agriculture. 

— In 1984/S5, a donation of almost 1,500 million F CFA 
in the investment budget made it possible to prog- 
ramme the realisation or completion of more than 350 
operations; at present, progress with these operations 
is between 30 and do"., depending on the regions in- 
volved. 

— FONADER also allowed a sum of almost one 
thousand million F CFA in its 1984/85 budget which 
was essentially intended for the urgent development of 
a programme to supply villages with water. 250 dril- 
lings have thus been carried out and 125 planned for 
regions in the north and the extreme north . 

— The second (Danish; water supply programme in 58 
localities was completed during the first quarter of the 
year 1984/85. A third water supply programme for 100 
localities was begun in October 1984. 

— For the year 1985/86., a sum of more than 1 thousand 
million F CFA is being sought by way of national 
investment. 

Furthermore, the second FSAR project, for which fi- 
nance agreements have just been signed with the Banque 
Mondiale for a sum of more than 12 thousand million F 
CFA, will make it possible, among other things, to effect 
1,000 drillings in regions in the north and the extreme 
north which are constantly threatened with drought. 

In addition to this, within the framework of bilateral 
cooperation, three agreements have almost been con- 
cluded with the German Democratic Republic, Grear 
Britain and Canada. 

The volume of finance granted for the realisation of this 
programme is on a level with the importance which the 
government attaches to responding to the basic needs of 
the population. 

Nevertheless, much remains to be done, and it is in this 
knowledge and with a view to improving the efficiency of 
this operation that the Head of State has recently created 
the Comite National de L’Eau (The National Water 
Committee), one of whose tasks will be to put forward 
proposals for the harmonisation of measures taken in this 



REPUBLIC OF CAMEROON 

Peace — Work — Fatherland 

MINISTRY OF INFORMATION 
AND CULTURE 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


des femmes et 
des hommes 






au service 
des autres . . . 
etd'uneeconomie 

SOC/ETE 
CAMEROUNAISE 
D 'ASSURANCES 

SOCIETE ANONYME AU CAPITAL 
DE800 MILLIONS DE FRANCS CFA 
86 BOULEVARD DE LA LIBERTY 
B. P.280, DOUALA 

TEL 237-42.08.38 TELEX: 5504 KN 






NATIONAL 

PORTS 

AUTHORITY 

A vital tool 
for National 
and Regional 
Development 


5, Boulevard Leclerc 
P.O.Box 4020 Douala 

Telex: 5270 KN 
Telephone: 42.73.22 
42.01.33 

REPUBLIC OF 
CAMEROON 


Education and Bilingualism 

C ameroon has a high rate of school attendance. O fficial figures 
for 1983/4 show about iJSm children and young people receiving 
education, out of a total population of about 9 million. 

Institutions Pupils Teachers 

Primary 5582 i 3 563>852 31*030 

Post-primary no 7,8x0 670 

Secondary 365 218,057 6,795 

Technical 178 67,075 2,568 

Teacher training 21 3,596 388 


mary schooling. In large areas 
in the south of the country 
there is virtually universal pri- 
mary education. Even the 
poorest parents strive to sell 
more plantains or palm ker- 
nels to find the school fees, 
which most villagers manage 
to pay. In towns children of 
school age who are not at 
school are sufficiently few for 


as truants; there is, however, 
no compulsory education by 
law. In most villages all the 
children of primary school 
age, or the great majority, arc 
to be found in term-time in 
the village school, learning the 
“Three R’s” and the rudi- 
ments of History and ocher 
subjects; learning is often by 
rote. 

Only in the three northern 


REPUBLIC OF CAMEROON 

Annex to Decree 
No 84-1 489 
of 21 Nov. 1984 

to lav down th? procedure Jbr granting 
the benefits of /fie Investment Code 


Questionnaire to be filled in for 
all Applications for Placement 
Under l T arious Schedules of the 
Investment Code. 


I. - Presentation of the 
Company: 

1 .1 . — The name of the Com- 
pany, its legal form and regis- 
tered office.' 

1. 2. - Statistical registration 

number. Registration number 
of the Articles of Association 
of the Company. x 

1 .3. - Full name, nationality 
and number of shares of each 
partner in the registered ca- 
pital. Distribution of the share 
capital among foreign and 
local partners. 

1.4. - Exact company ad- 
dress (Post Office Box, Tele- 
phone and Telex). 

II. - Market Study: 

2. 1 . - Number establish- 
ments and locarions(s). 

2.2. - Evaluation of product 
supply (Evaluation of the 
output of existing local undcr- 

j takings. Evaluation of level of 
i imports). 

2.3. - Evaluation of de- 
mand. Domestic consump- 
tion and exports. 

2.4. - Analysis of the target 
market trends while indi- 
cating the growth rates of 
supply and demand. Evalua- 
tion of the share of the poten- 
tial market and the expected 
market. 

2.5.- Analysis of the market 
trend for imported substitute 
products or similar products 
showing: 

- cost, insurance and 
freight (Cl F) prices, 

- prices exclusive of taxes, 

- wholesale prices and the 
profit margins applied, 

- retail prices. 

2.6.- Brief description of 
the organization of the distri- 
bution network set-up (or to 
be set up). 

m.- Activities. 

3.1. - Specify the list of 
manufactured products, men- 
tioning their tariff description 
and commercial name. 

3.2. - Specif}' the raw mate- 
rials and semi-finished pro- 
ducts used and their countries 
of origin. 

3.3. - Briefly describe the 
manufacturing process of all 
the products and give where 
applicable, the references of 
the technical partner and the 
origin of the technology used. 

3.4. - For each type of pro- 
duct, specify the production 
capacity per item of equip- 
ment installed (or to be in- 
stalled). 

3.5. - For activities carried 
out, state their effect on the 
environment and the meas- 
ures to be taking in order to 
reduce, eliminate or check 
their harmful industrial ef- 
fects. 

IV- Investments and 
Sources of Financing. 

4-i.- Distinguishing be- 
tween local expenditure and 
external expenditure, specify 


the amount of accrued invest- 
ments and the time-table for 
carrying out the said invest- 
ments during the term of the 
schedule 

4.2.- Specify the sources of 
financing the programmed in- 
vestments, distinguishing be- 
tween company's of financing 
and external financial assis- 
tance. In the case of external 
financing for the undertaking, 
specify* the terms of the loan 
(interest rate, duration, re- 
demption table of the loans, 
the currency of loan repay- 
ments, etc.. 

V. - Reserve Accounts. 

5.1. - Indicate for a period 
covering the first five financial 
years of the term of the 
schedule requested: 

a) The results of the main 
operations (according to the 
principles and classification 
of accounts in force in the 
UDEAC region), under or- 
dinary law and the special 
schedule requested, 
bj Components used in cal- 
culating prices ex-works 
under ordinary law and the 
special schedule requested, 
and - for the Single Tax 
Provision - the selling price 
for exports to UDEAC 
countries. 

c) Cash flow drawn up in 
accordance with ordinary 
law and special schedule re- 
quested. 

VI. - Staff. 

6. 1 . - Specify the number of 
staff to be- used for the first 
five financial years of the term 
of the schedule requested. A 
distinction should be made 
between. 

- local and expatriate staff, 

- the managerial staff, 
supervisory staff and or- 
dinary workers; and 

- the wages paid to na- 
tionals and expatriates. 

6.2. - Specify guarantees for 
continuing vocational training 
programmes and, where ap- 
plicable, for the Cameroon! - 
zation of technical and ad- 
ministrative posts. 

6.3- Specify the profile for 
tbemanageriaJ and supervi- 
sory staff, 

VII. - List of Equipment. 
Give the list of equipment, 

machinery, tools, raw mate- 
rials, semi-finished products 
and packaging. Care should 
be taken to identify in the list 
of customs tariff in force in the 
UDEAC region, those that 
are imported and those 
bought (or to be bought) lo- 
cally. The countries of origin 
of the said equipment should 
be mentioned. 

VUL- Progress Report 
Companies operating un- 
der the ordinary law schedule 
and which apply for benefits 
under the Investment Code 
shall forward a progress re- 
port, balance sheets and ac- 
counts records certified by a 
professional accountant regis- 
tered with UDEAC on the last 
three financial years. 


For die full text ofDecree No 84-1489 
of 2 1 Nov. 1984 

Please write to: 

Minister e du Plan et d’Am£nagement 
du Terri toire, Yaounde 
Republic of Cameroon 


sons, is primary school atten- 
dance significantly below 95- 
100 per cent, and even there it 
is on average 70-80 percent. 

No education is in African 
languages. Of course, when a 
teacher shares a common 
mother tongue with all the 
pupils, he or she will use that 
language to explain English or 
French words initially. But 
the teaching proper is in En- 
glish or French. Many Came- 
roonians can read and write 
their own languages, but the 
school examinations are 
wholly in English or French, 
starting with the primary 
school leaving examination. 
This examination, which 
many take well into their teens 
as age regulations arc not 
always enforced, leads to the 
Certificat de Fin d’Etudes 
Primaircs (CEP), to use the 
French version. Having that 
still matters as many boys and 
girls without it cannot go on to 
further studies. 

The use of both English 
and French as vehicles of 
education is an important, 
indeed all-important feature 
of Cameroon’s “bilingua- 
lism.” As the only African 
country uniting areas of both 
French and English colonial 
and cultural influence, Came- 
roon uses both French and 
English for all official pur- 
poses - all government proc- 
lamations, for example. It is 
also committed to the conti- 
nued use of both languages in 
education. 

Tin's means, first, that the 
education systems inherited 
from the colonial era, but 
enormously expanded since 
then, have continued to use 
the same languages - English 
in the South-West and North- 
West Provinces, French in the 
ocher eight provinces. Sec- 
ondly, efforts have been ex- 


panded to ensure thar people 
educated in English leam 
French, and people educated 
in French I earn English , as 

much as possible . 

Now this policy has been 
extended to primary educa- 
tion. Special teachers have 
been appointed by the 
government to implement this 
introduction of the second 
language (really, of course, the 
third language for a Came- 
roonian child) at the primary 
level. 

At the .secondary level the 
introduction of the “other” 
European language was en- 
forced as early as 19^31 in feet 
secondary schools in ex- 
French Cameroon had taught 
English even before then. 
With the much increased 
teaching of English to “Fran- 
cophones” and of French to 
“Anglophones” (to use the 
normal Cameroon phra- 
seology) since then, especially 
at secondary level, the 
number of Cameroonians 
with fair knowledge of both is 
now considerable. 

Besides this task, Came- 
roon has considered the phys- 
ical expansion of post-pri- 
mary edcuation another major 
national task. It has been car- 
ried out energetically; there 
were 317 secondary school 
establishments in 1979/80 and 
365 four years later. 

In the French-speaking 
provinces there are ordinary 
secondary schools, sometimes 
called colleges, and grammar 
schools, lycees, similar to the 
universal French lycee, for 
“general edcuation”; and 
technical and teacher- training 
institutions. The lycees are 
government-owned; all or 
most are co-educanonai. 
Many cities have their lycees , 
in addition . to the more 
famous ones like the Lycee 
General Leclerc in Yaounde 
and the Lycee Joss in Douala. 

Private schools are very 
important in the secondary 
sector of education in Came- 
roon, even more than in the 
primary. Over half the secon- 
dary schools are private (187 
out of 317 in 1979/80), com- 
pared with a third or less of 
the primary schools. Private 
secondary schools include 
some run by thechurches and 
many secular ones. 

Thus the primary school 
leavers who go on to secon- 
dary school are a minority - 


an envied minority. Their 
numbers are considerable 
even so, because families do 

all they can to find money for 

the fees. The government’s 
own spending on education is 
high, including secondary 
scholarships and subsidies to 
private schools, both primary 
and secondary. The total 
budget for education in the 
current year is 65,000™ CFA . 
francs. 

The secondary school sys- 
tems of ex- British and ex : 
French Cameroon are still 
based on die respective 
European models, and thus 
far apart from each other. 
S ugge stions which have been 
made for a unified Came- 
roonian secondary school 
examination to replace both 

the French Baccalaweat and 
the British GCE havie not 
been pursued. 

A few schools use both En- 
glish and French in teaching. 
These are the Lycees Bi- 
lingua, Bilingual Grammar 
Schools, of which the first 
were established at Buea and 
Yaounde, while others have 
since been added. 

As in any country, the 
quality of language teaching 
varies, and the capacity of 
students for language 
learning even more. Buz in 
Cameroon die phenomenon 
common in Europe, of yotmg 
people quickly forgetting 
their school English or 
French, is probably less 
common, for knowledge of 
both official languages is very 
useful for many and indis- 
pensable for some, especially 
from the South-West and 
North-West Provinces - 

Cameroonian pupils and 
their parents, like those else- 
where, show a marked prefer- 
ence for “general education” 
with its emphasis on literary 
subjects, rather than technical 
education. The “general” 
curriculum has more prestige, 
owing to age-old and uni- 
versal prejudice, and - is 
thought co be the road, via the 
GCE or Bac, to clerical civil 
service jobs. 

Although preferred, die 
“general” system is not easy 
for even a bright pupil in the 
French system. As in France 
itself, the Bac is a severe rest; 
failure rates can be quite high. 
Buta remarkable number pass 
and goon to higher studies. 

The University of Came- 


roon, founded in I9&2* now 
has nearly rj^oosn^ents. Its 
main campus » 31 ^oundc, 

where the attached a* 3 **?* 
teacher training college, me 
Ecole Normal Supcflcure 
(ENS), is nearby. In *9/ 3 
decree provided for ■>»' cam- 
puses or “centres of the Uni- 
versity at Douala. Bum, 
Dschang and 

and these have now been 
started. 

Besides their own univer- 
sity, Cameroonians go to 
many universities in other 
countries to study. The majo- 
rity, many thousands, arc m 
Fiance. There are others in 
Britain, the USA and Canada, 
which, because it is another 
bilin gual country using 
French and English, has spe- 
cial ties with Cameroon. 

The last of the University 
Centres to si art functioning, 
that of Buea. starts in this 
month of November 19S5. Si- 
tuated on a new sire outside 
the capital of South-West 
Province, the campus will 
house initially a new Ad- 
vanced School of Translators 
and Interpreters (ASTI), a 
postgraduate school whose 
products are vitally necessary 
in a bilingual oountry; at pre- 
sent training of translators 
and inte r prete r s comes under 
die President’s office. 

Different European-derived 
educational aid cultural sys- 
tems have created definite 
differences among Came- 
roonians, although so . many 
other thing s unite them. En- 
couragement of unity needs to 
be done in such a way as to 
avoid any impression that 
unity means simply one sec-; 
tian g ivi n g Way to ano&er 
Thax is the atm of “bffin- 
guafism,” whatever problems 
occur in ksappbcarwn. . ' ' 

While aO the educational 
system is i fo ^ ioft am : in, tbfo re- 
gard, the University js ’par- 
ticufarlyso, for Canxxtipfiia&s 
from aSh provinces ' mee t to 
study together tbertv*f;Take 


vice afterwards. In drabser 
vice they can be and arepos 
ted a nywhere m the country, 
and unhyis advanced in this 
way. The changes, in die Uni- 
versify cOaklweO mean more 
success for Cameroon’s uni- 
que bffiagnatism, which its 
people c o ns ta n tl y say should 
be a useful example for Africa 
asawholc. 


mm 




Came 


iT 








1 Paris Oriy-Sud ■ monday. tfnjrsday, Saturday 
pnone 7^12 78 17 
> Geneva s monday 

pnone 361600/983243 m \ 

mr | 

1 London Gatwick 1 Sunday < 

prion® 3732981 i 

1 Rome: Sunday 

pnone. 4745133 1 


Cameroon has a fremendousfuture. 
industries here are rapidiy growing.: - 
It is just about time for your company to look for new 
opportunities. ; 

Cameroon Airlines offers you. their international network frev* m - 
European cities, with comecttoosto theft- African and Domestic 010 
networks to make your business top ; a very profitable one C 


CfllD 


SHE 


Welcomes you to Cameroon arid 


ijmgqi. Africa 

















yVS^ er ^ Child knows =*°«the P«- 
Ol who ^oPPedanchorin 

there. TUs is how 

s^ rC ° nqUiStad0reS the 

I^merun (German), Cameroun (French) and 
&meroon (English). Since tWrooSTfe 
reJlyl becoming bilingual, both Cameroon 

dependant on lan- 
piag^aWmu^h Cameroon Airlines sticks to 

rh^^ t T- haSS ^ sgedo£r dcscrt and ' the reunited 

cheerfi ^ embraces 
boundaries, over 130 tfisparare ethnic 

Sf ? U m-? Ve “ about varying Cram die 

HL? squarc tans ‘ trader Bamilekc, to the more 

Inside the triangular shape aloof Fulani and the shy Pye- 
the topogra phy c hanges from nries. It is glib to talk ofthc 
equatorial forest to mountain Christians in the south and 


ranges, to arid steppe, to 

- - 


the Muslim in the north; there 



are a large number of people 
who still prefer the indigenous 
African religions. Christians 
. and Muslim five side by side 
without problems and 
everyone believes m a rich Spi- 
ritual life; colonial attitudes 
only persist in the vocabulary 
- ‘les Pagans’, is said without 
animosity - just as illegiti- 
macy doesn't exist in Came- 
roon since no-one minds 
tuppence about that - alt 
children are gifts from God. 

In this section are drawings 
of zhe Kings of Bamoun and 
the calligraphic script may 
excite the curiosity of the vis- 
itor. Musical instruments Iflte 
the Balafon are of fascinating 
construction and sound; ex- 
ceptionally fine carvings in 
wood and metal are widely on 
display and the Carnivals and 
Festivals still centre on the 
great feudal lords who are 
treated with immense respect. 
Archaeological artifacts reach 
.back hub pre-history but of 
course tie best wooden carv- 
ings split in the sun and get 
eaten by termites - much is 
lost. 

Pan of the Cameroon’s cul- 
ture is to respect good brains. 
Le President du Renouveau 
(the New Deal President) 
Paul Biya is very bright 
indeed and he surrounds him- 
self with the intelligentsia - 
the Assistant Secretary-Ge- 
neral at the Presidency, Pro- 
fessor Joseph Owona, was for- 
mally Chancellor of Yaounde 
University; also Professor 
Georges Kgango (Economics) 
has just become Minister of 
Information and Culture. In 
the picture above they sit next 
to each other (Owana in dark 
glasses) at the March 1985 Ba- 
rn en da Congress of the party. 

For those who would like to 
know more about Cameroon 
before going there, two books 
are highly recommended: 
a) The Folio Society's Elspeth 
Huxley edition of Mary 
Kingsley's Travels in West 
Africa. The memoires of an 
upper class English lady who 
toured .West Africa at the end 







Professor George* Ngango, Minister of Information and 
Culture with Professor Joseph Oisatia dark glasses a: ike 
March 198$ Bamenda Congress. 

of the 19th century, quite ob- speaking to her in correct En- 


livious to all the difficulties, it 
was she who climbed Mount 
Cameroon (as referred to in 
zhe tourism article) and who 
never drank anything but 
freshly boiled tea (apart from 
just a little Claret). 

Latest Leakey theory has it 
that there were black men 
before white but Africans 
never had any doubt of it. 
Mary Kingsley recounts a 
pretty story which probably 
has a Jesuit racist spin to it. 
She tells about Cameroonian 
villagers who danrg the nighr 
away on a sand spit that has 
surfaced like a magic subma- 
rine in their river. Of course it 
is the season de secheresse and 
the villagers can momentarily 
escape from the narrow con- 
fines of the jungle enclosed 
river banks to the god-given 
playground. Mary Kingsley 
considers they were having 
such simple fun that they 
really should have been sent to 
Europe to prosalatise the 
whites. 

b) John Murray of 50 Alber- 
marle Street, London 
(Byron’s publishers) pub- 
lished Shirley Deane's new 
book Talking Drums in Oc- 
tober 1985. Shirley Deane is 
Mrs. S. J. Horsley, an English 
tutor to Senior Government 
officials and who works at the 
National Archives in 
Yaounde. She is naturally 
fluent in both English and 
French but insists on all her 
Cameroon Ministers/pupils 


giish. 

Her book is full of warmth, 
kindness and humour and 
leaves aside the pomp and cir- 
cumstance of government life 
in the capital for her secret life 
working away the weekends in 
a village some 30 kms from 
Yaounde. 

Men lead a wonder- 
fully indolent life brewing 
themselves palm wine, occa- 
sionally bringing in a crop like 
cocoa, censoring their wives 
for not tending to diem 
enough and occasionally 
chasing them with machettes 
if (hey are too exasperating. 
Women seem to like all this 
and merely grumble about 
their men as they work all day 
out in the fields and lug bad; 
the wood for cooking the 
evening meal. Only very 
rarely do the men get voo- 
doo'd or poisoned, they are 
counted on to be Virile’ and 
that is enough. Another nice 
characteristic of the Came- 
rounais is that they truly love 
their natal village and go back 
there as often as possible and 
cheerfully 2 c cep: a totally un- 
sophisticated life when only 
the day before they were in 
air-conditioned offices, at the 
best restaurants, cruising in 
BMWs and being appara- 
tchiks. 

For an apenpu of Cameroon 
before going there, £9.95 on 
Talking Drums is a worth- 
while investment - Bon 
Voyage 


Franc 
ational vi 

e, 

ai 

3531 
bis rr 

but Cam 
him as i 

iei 

is 

■oon 

own 


Mann Dibango: One of Africa's most celebrated 
mnerfigne with a world wide following. Still 
remembered for his early 1970s best selling record 
Soul Makossa. Inventor of the makossa style of 
music. Now considered a father figure for a whole 
school of younger Cameroonian popular mu s ic ian s. 


The Kamerun Idea 

Continued! from page 13 
was not much active talk of the don of the. constitution the 

succession. Since 1975 the Prime Minister succeeded the 
prime ministerial job, which President, and on November 
dealt with much of the day- 6, 1982, Paul Biya became 
to-dav work of administra- President, 
tion, was dealt with by Paul It took a little while for the 
Biya, who had previously new man to get mto his stride, 
been Secretary-General to the especially since Ahidjo, after 
Presidency. Ahidjo was re- what was seen at the time as an 
elected President in 1980, bur act of political imaginanm, 
at the end of October 1982 be seemed to be usnghis con- 
made the shock announce- rinuing influence as Chairm a n 
meat to he was to step of the party to umfctmme his 
down, apparently for health suaxsot. pis conflict ail- 
reasons. Inthe normal opera- mutated m the tnal « absentia 


of Ahidjo for treason (in rela- 
tion ro a plot of six months be- 
fore) in February 19S4, which 
was followed two months later 
by the tragic events of April 6 
in which a section of the army 
mutinied. It was only put 
down with heavy loss of life in 
the capital. 

Already by this time the 
broad lines of Biya ’s own ap- 
proach to his role had been set 
out when he became Chair- 
man of the CNU at an Extra- 
ordinary Congress, called in 
September 1983 in the light of 
the plot which had been ex- 
posed a month earlier. 
Because of the dangers of a 


new disunity which had been 
exposed by recent events, the 
main theme of the President at 
this Congress was unity, that 
which his predecessor had 
preached in his twenty-two 
years in office, but seemed to 
have forgotten out of it. 

The Congress also touched 
on other themes which have 
become a familiar part of the 
Biya era in Cameroon, such as 
the democrarisarion of the 
party, and "rigour, integrity 
and moralisarion.” These are 
an essential part of what has 
come to be called the New 
Deal (in French le Renou- 
veau) , a phenomenon which 


has been proceeding apace, in 
the face of which April 6 was 
only a temporary set-back, 
indeed seme would say was a 
necessary ordeal by fire. 

Identifying where (he poli- 
cies of the New Deal differ 
from what went before is a 
more complex exercise, for 
while there has been a sub- 
stantial change of style, and of 
the language of rh etoric, there 
has inevitably been much con- 
tinuity of policies, especially 
in the economic sectors, 
where there have been a 
number of success stories. 

The challenge of the New 
Deal is an ongoing reality. 


Touring in Cameroon 


I n Garoua, northern Cameroon, the sai- 
sons des pluies are marked out from 15th 
March until 15th September, the river 
Benou6 fills rapidly with water and this 
inland town suddenly becomes a port. The 
river swirls around the normally stranded 
quay and agricultural produce can be carried 
all the way to Lokoja in Nigeria to link up with 
the Niger river and the Gulf of Benin. For 
years there has been talk of building a Hilton 
four star hotel in Garoua but presently the 
three star 'A* Novotel, La Benou£, offers the 
best accommodation and food, from which to 
explore the north land of Fulanis and Kirdi, 
lions and leopards. You can hedge-hop from 
the Garoua Novotel to the Maroua Mizao No- 
votel passing by the Kapsikis which Andre 
Gide found to be the most beautiful region on 
earth - great basalt outcrops that would 


j appeal to Andr£. 

Just 120 kms north of 
Maroua is the superb national 
park of Waza but the visit 
should be planned for No- 
vember May - the best period 
for visiting Cameroon any- 
way. Waza is simply the finest 
animal park in West Africa 
and to visit both ‘Forcstiere' 
and ‘Yaeres’ types of land 
.animal life in these 400,000 
acres during March/May is 
fabulous prime viewing time. 
There is a campement at 
Waza which is quite good 
enough for one or two nights 
between Novotels. 

South of Garoua, midway 
between Garoua and Ngaoun- 
dere, is another and slightly 
larger animal park, Benoue, 
on both banks of the Benoue 
river and boasting vast num- 
bers of hippos, crocodiles, 
buffalo and the largest ante- 
lopes. There are also lions, 
monkeys, giraffes and fas- 
cinating brightly coloured 
birds that seem particularly to 
enjoy riding the Cob de 
Buffon piggyback. At the 
Black Buffalo campement 
there is even a good re- 
staurant; pare de phecocherc 
(wild boar) is the piece dc resis- 
tance; and the waterfall 
nearby is impressive. If you 
want to get away from every- 
body, hire the Great Caprain 
Campement just north of 
Black Buffalo with only 8 beds 
in an enchanting and totally 
private glade. There are so 
many animal parks in Came- 
roon that you could spend a 
month visiting them, never- 
theless Waza and Benoue are 
the most rewarding 
Railways in Africa are 
almost equally fascinating and 
the ride from Ngaoundere to 
Yaounde, the capital, can be 
completed in daylight. The 
wealth of Cameroon’s culture 
unfolds along the track with 
startling changes in topog- 
raphy and in ethnic type and 
’habitude’. At the station 
stops there is the din of the 
ubiquitous drum and the 
more interesting sounds of the 
Balafon, the thumb ‘piano’ 
and the xylophone, not to 
mention great horns making 
mournful blasts to hoot you 
on your way. At the stations 
lots of people are selling food 
and drink whilst others prefer 
to sell fetish carvings and 
ivory bangles, masks, pottery, 
raffia mats and bibelots of 
every kind. 

Yaounde is a handsome city 
built on hills with the splendid 
new P residence dominating 
one of them. Sunday service 
in the cathedral is something 
prodigious - drums again and 
music and singing that be- 
comes progressively more 
exile - and lunch afterwards at 
one of Y aounde “ Guide Mich - 
din" restaurants. La Trap- 


pola out near Bastos is one of 
the best restaurants in Africa 
and the 5 star Sofitcl Mont 
Febe is really a first class 
hotel, built on a hill over- 
looking Yaounde. There is 


the forest near the Gabon and 
Congo borders. 

Another beach excursion 
would be to Limbe -.reverting 
to its earlier German name 
after having been called Vic- 
toria by the British;, where 
beaches at Mite 6, Mile S and 
Mile 1 1 are all very fine. 
When roasting becomes 
painful, it is agreeable to visit 
the rea plantations at Buea at 
the foot of the mighty Mount 
Cameroon, 4,1 00 meters high, 
a hopefully extinct volcano 
that in the 6th century B.C. 

Carthaginian explorers called 
‘Chariot of the Gods’. The se- 
verely teutonic governor’s 
Palace at Buea will remind 
tourists of Cameroon's con- 
fused colonial past. Both Eng- 
land and France carved 
chunks of land from Came- 
roon after seizing it from Ger- 
many. In ‘old’ German Ka- 
mcrun you could go from the 
Congo river at Bonga f below 
the confluence of the Congo 
and Oubangui rivers 1 to 



jr*- ■ * * •' ' • * ' 

Photo: Camera Press, London 

A small and simple village , Roumaiki-Capstki that nestles 
amidst the Mandara mountains of North Cameroon. 


now a good road north west to 
Bafia and it is possible to get 
through to Bafoussam, 
Dschang and Foumban (see 
the palace). Dschang is really 
charming - average tempera- 
ture 22 degrees Celsius, alti- 
tude 1 400 meters. - a sort of 
Cameroon Baden-Baden. 

The new motorway from 
Yaounde to Douala has just 
been completed and the drive 
can be made easily in 3 hours. 
A very fine Novotel beckons, 
or an even more luxurious 
hotel, the Meridien, unless 
you prefer the surprisingly 
cheap Hotel des Roses. 
Douala is much the largest 
city in Cameroon, a bustling 
sea port and the commerrial 
centre - just like Bombay is to 
Delhi (Yaounde). It makes a 
very good base from which to 
visit Cameroon's beaches. 

During the day it is possible 
to take a trip to Kribi where 
the beaches are 15 miles long 
and beautiful with a nice 
gentle incline to the sea. Ex- 
ploring from the beach you 
can easily reach the Lobe 
Cascades - where a river pic- 
turesquely tumbles into the 
sea - or take a fisherman’s 
piroque to explore the forest 
edge for pygmies. For pyg- 
mies Kribi really isn’t ideal; 
these small people live deep in 


Dikwa - the town now in 
Nigeria, north-east of Maidu- 
guri, an ancient Fulani 
Emirate. 

Only the young should 
climb Mount Cameroon - 
when Mary Kingsley did it in 
the 1890s, the summit was 
shrouded in mist, a 'hurri- 
cane' was raging and all she 
saw were bottles left behind 
by energetic German officers. 
At Debundsche on the wes- 
tern slopes of the mountain 
you can count on rain every 
day most of the time, only one 
spot in southern New Zealand 
has more rain on this earth. 

Back in Douala there is time 
for dinner at the Beauseiour 
roof top restaurant and a look 
in at Happy Night (.lots of 
dancing partners at both ve- 
nues; before catching the 
plane to Dakar. 

ARABIC GLOSSARY 

Benoui- could be' sort of 

Waza- distribution centre 

Maroua - a great kindness 
never to be forgotten 

Soudan - double black! 
strikingly black 

Mali - used to be called 
French Sudan 



Photo: Camera Press, London 

Some youngsters strike up in this pygmy village band. Famed 
Jot their small stature - they rarely exceed 4ft bins- the Pygmies 
arc the oldest inhabitants of Cameroon. 


Ferdinand Oyono, 
Secretary -Gen era I, 
Presidency. 



Mho** 
















REPUBLIC OF CAMEROON 



Economic Policy of the PME Sector (Small and 
Medium Sized Businesses) in the Cameroon 


F urther to evaluation of the four previous programmes, the Cameroon has made 
plans for the Vth Five Year Programme which will involve a development 
strategy based on the following principles! 

- gearing industrialisation to internal and self-sufficient development in order that 
nationals may have greatly increased responsibility in all the strategic sectors of the 

economy, 

introverting its industrialisation in order to ensure the effects of training in all 

areas of the general sector and, in particular, in the agricultural sector, 

— opting for investments of a less capitali stic natu re, that is, making greater use of 
man power than capital investment. HHjjjH 


In order to carry out this policy, institutional support 
consists of nvo separate bodies and the Investment Code 
in which the very advantageous “C” scheme is aimed at 
assisting the small and medium sized businesses (PME). 


The two bodies are: 

1. FONDSD’AIDE (AID FUNDS). 

2. CENTRE NATIONAL D'ASSISTANCE AUX 
PETITES ETMOVENNES ENTREPRISES. 


FOGAPE 


FONDS D’ AIDE ET DE GARANTIE DES 
CREDITS AUX PETITES ET 
MOYENNES ENTREPRISES - AID 
FUNDS AND GUARANTEED LOANS 
TO SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZED 
BUSINESSES 

The aim of FOGAPE is to provide financial and technical 
assistance to small and medium sized businesses in the 
Cameroon by means of short, medium and long term 
commitments. It is authorised to: 

i) guarantee loans made by banking, financial or other 
establishments to nadonai small and medium sized 
businesses; 

2 1 to counter guarantee commitments made by such esta- 
blishments to small and medium sized businesses; 

3} to take shares in the company capital of Cameroonian 
small amd medium sized businesses or to grant them 
share loans; 

4) to gram direct loans to small and medium sized busi- 
nesses in order to finance operational capital, capital 
required for refurbishment or for the purchase of ma- 
terials and equipment; 

5) to promote insurance companies in the sotio- 
professional or business sectors; 

6) to contribute to the realisation of studies of projects of 
interest to the small and medium sized businesses. 

Among other things FOGAPE is intended to provide 
technical asstance in the areas of training, information, 
advice and accounting. 

In this capacity- it is responsible for giving advice in all 
areas, carrying out all types of studies, designing and 
applying all types of business management and budge- 
tary, financial and economic forecasts, drafting the legal 
and fiscal texts relating to financial evaluations which it is 
instructed to carry out on behalf of business concerns for 
which its regularly undertakes accounting and flnandal 
work. 

The operations carried out by FOGAPE do not exclude 
other types of assistance for small and medium sized 
businesses and may be executed either directly by 
FOGAPE or by organisations and other qualified ap- 
proved bodies or international institutions. 

Any individual or collective business concern, whatever 
its legal status, which fulfils the following criteria: 

— At least 5 1 of the capital and the directors must be of 
Cameroonian origin; 

— the annual turnover must be less than or equal to 1 
thousand million CFA francs; 

— is considered as a small or medium sized business. 

The ‘Fonds d’Aide et de Garantie des Credits aux PME’ 
(FOGAPE) was reorganised on 13 June 1984 by Decree 
No. S4/510 thus providing the Cameroon with a central 
structure for the financing of small and medium sized 
business concerns. 



Photo: Fathi Mahouachi 

M. Edouard Nomo-Ongolo, Minister of Commerce 

soda! and cultural development of the nation.The aims of 

national policy- concerning such business concerns are ba- 
sically geared towards: 

— the development of a diversified and effective indus- 
trial network; 

— the creation of jobs at a lower cost than that of jobs 
created by large industries; 

— the valorization of national resources in raw materials; 

— encouraging savings; 

— the integration of small and medium sized businesses 
into the production network; 

— support of large-scale industries through sub-con- 
tracting and industrial maintenance; 

— slowing down the rural exodus by establishing local 
production; 

— encouraging creativity; 

— technological control and development; 

— industrial decentralisation. 


Plans of Action and Realisation of the V th Plan 

With a view to giving added support to the measures and 
institutions set up to establish, promote and integrate 
small and medium sized businesses, the Vth Plan has 
envisaged a plan of action for this sector which basically 
aims at; 

— redefining the small and medium sized businesses in 
the light of the national realities; 

— adapting the Investment Code to these national reali- 
ties; 

— reorganising the tax system with a view to encouraging 
small and medium sized business operations; 

— rendering existing supportive organisations more effi- 
cient; 

— boosting training projects and undetaking the training 
of instructors; 

— The reorganisation of FOGAPE and the task of 
making financial institutions more aware in order to 
encourage these institutions to review their loan poli- 
cies to the benefit of small and medium sized business 
concerns in the Cameroon; 

— carrying out a study on the ways and means necessary 
for: 


THE PME (SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZED 
BUSINESSES) SECTOR 



I - The Diagnostic and Executive Account of 
the Vth Plan 

The development of small and medium sized businesses 
has always been one of the priorities of the Cameroon 
government when setting up its industrialisation policy. 
The establishment of nvo supportive groups since the 
1970’s (the National Centre for the Assistance of Small 
and Medium sized Businesses) bears witness to govern- 
ment concern in this sector and the preferential treatment 
accorded to this sector. 

The priority status given to the promotion of small and 
medium sized businesses shows the interest which those 
responsible in the economic administration of the country 
attach to the integration of this sector in the economic, 


Photo: Fathi 

The Port of Douala, the third largest in Africa. 



Hmo: Fathi Mahouachi 


REPUBLIGUE DU CAMEROON 


Paix — Travail — Patrie 


MINISTERE DE L’INFORMATION 
ET DE LA CULTURE 


1) The creation of mutual or interprofessional insur- 
ance funds, which could gradually be replaced by 
the regional banks who would collect and redistri- 
bute trade funds. 

2) Creation of a purchasing pool which would ensure 
the supply of raw materials to die various small pro- 
ducers in small quantities at wholesale prices and 
the continuous supply of tools and spares to these 
small producers while at the same time requiring 
them to establish an equipment plan using national 
funds. 

3 ) The creation of a coordinating body whose function 
would be to coordinate activities with die Ministries 
and institutions concerned. 

— Study of the various options available with a view to: 

a) encouraging the involvement of the most dynamic 
small and medium sized businesses in public con- 
tracts and sub-contracting; 

b) introducing co -contracting as regards complex re- 
search contracts entrusted to foreign consultancy 
bureaus. 

c) improving participation of the small and medium 
sized businesses in the various agro-pastoral asso- 
ciations. 


The Bassa workshop was set up in 197° w* 1 ** cfae hel £ 
ONUDI. It functioned independently up to 1973 wften 
CAPME was setup and was subsequently made an intcg- 
cal part of rbe this organisarioa- 


H-Orientatium and Aims oftfaeVIth Plan 
TheVIth economic, serial and cultural development plan 
must complement the na tional economic policy with a 
PME plan, the aims and objectives of windti will be, in the 
course of the next five years to concentrate its efforts 
around a central which will be the development and 
promotion of a performing wnail and medium sized busi- 
ness sector, perfectly: integrated into national economic 
policy. 



In the same vein, nine national projects amounting to a 
total value of 2220 million F CFA have been induded in 
the Vth economic development plan, as well as some hun- 
dred private projects. 

Realisation of national projects has remained limited. 
Only the CAP ME workshops have been financed: the 
branch offices in Douala and Bamenda have thus received 
funds over the years both for equipment and construc- 
tion. The Caroua branch office have just been made the 
subject of a public contract valued at some 690 million F 
CFA. 

On the other hand resolute action has been taken in the 
legislative and administrative areas. The Investment 
Code has been revised and the law of 4 July 1984 con- 
cerning the new Code gives high priority to encouraging 
the small and medium sized business sector. At the same 
time customs and tax problems which constituted a 
serious handicap for this sector have been resolved. 


» I * f 

■ : ■'#.£ .&>’■ S \ I 

; y ' V u , il 





FSmk Fain Mahouachi 


M.Jean Baptiste Yonke, Minister of Agriculture 


GA.PJVLE. 


Created in 1973, CAPME (Centre d’Assi stance aux Pen- 
tes et Moyennes Entreprises - Aid Centre for Small and 
Medium sized Businesses) is a public body of an indus- 
trial and commercial nature with legal status and financial 
autonomy. 

The aim of CAPME is to promote small and medium 
sized businesses, including small craft businesses. It deals 
with the coordination of actions taken by the organisa- 
tions and departments concerned in accordance with the 
guidelines of the development plan and the directives of 
the government authorities. (CAPME headquarters are 
situated in Douala and this organisation currently in- 
cludes five branch offices in Bassa (Douala), Yaounde, 
Bamenda, Garoua and Bafoussam. 

The services provided by CAPME may be divided into 
two main branches: 

1 . services of an economic nature carried out by the assis- 
tance and advisory department, dealing, in particular, 
with commercial research, training in management, 
accountancy, economic studies and the assistance lent 
to businesses with the preparation and subsequent; 
maintenance of financial documents, etc... 
z. services of a technical nature which is made up on die; 
one hand, of engineering services (carried out by the 
technical department), and on the other hand, of direct 
supplies realised in 3 workshops (Bassa, Bamenda, 
Caroua), dealing almost exclusively with the manufac- 
ture of parts and simple metal and solderingwork. .7 . . 
It is important to note die fundamental difference which 
exists between the services provided by the workshops 
and all the other services provided by CAPME. Tbeser- 
vices provided by CAPME, including those by the techn- 
ical department, are services of a formative nature. ’’ . 

The aim of these services is to create businesses, moder- 
nise them, extend or rationalise them. Such services are 
changing the structure of small and medium sized busi- 
ness concerns in the Cameroon. 

The interventions of the workshops are, on the other 
hand, of an operational nature: their aim is to assist the 
small and medium sized businesses to resolve their day to 
day technical problems, in particular, by the manufacture . 
of worn parts or pieces of equipment or the production of 
simple assemblies. 

If the first type of services are important for the structural 
development of the small and medium sized businesses in 
the Cameroon, die second are no less important since • 
existing businesses, confronted by shortages of spare 
parts and important everyday problems of a technical na- 
ture, are not using their production capacity to the full 
which means a loss for the Cameroon economy. 

Amongst die 3 workshops used by CAPME, that in Bassa 
(Douala) is by far die most important, from the point of 
view of staffj the large amount of equipment? installed 
there and the annual turnover which is realised. 



The emblem of the*. 
Cameroon People’s : 
Democratic Movement 
(CPDMJ - 


— making financial institutions more aware in such a way 
as toencotttSge them tore view their loan policies to the 
benefit of small and medium sized businesses in the 
• Cameroon; 

— carrying qur studies to establish how it would be pos- 
sible to: . r • . -V" • 

1) create mutuafor mterprofessiona] insurance funds 
. which could gradually be replaced by regional 

- banks who would collect and redistribute business 

funds; : . _ j_ _ 

2) provide piafi&Kiaesses with raw materials and the 
continw^ provirion and mainienance of equip- 

='• meat Spares while at the same time obliging 
mem tq draw.up an equipment plan using the 
coazmonfrBki^ > 

3) create a.obordmating body whose function would 

- be tq coordinate activities with the Ministries and 
iasriraikins concerned. 


aj increasing: the involvement of the most dynamic 
small and- medium sized businesses in public con- 
tracts, and sub-contracting, and promotion of their 
status; ' . ■ \ J' 

b) encouraging co-contracting in complex research 
contracts entrusted to consultancy bureaus from 
.abroad;.;. 

c) establishing participation by small businesses in the 
variousagro-pastbral sectors. 



REPUBLIC OF CAMEROON 

Peace— ‘Work— Fatherland-, - 


../N ■: . . 


MINISTRY OF INFORMATION 
AND CULTURE . •: 





ni- Programme of the Project 
In order co be effective, a promotion policy for the small 
and medium sized business concerns must be a global 
policy which c o ver s all the various aspects involved 
(legislation, taxation, assistance, finance . . .). Indeed to 
neglect any one aspect would automatically reduce the 
chances of success ofthe measures taken to integrate such 
a policy witii other policies. 

Consequently, the aforementioned objectives can only be 
achieved if the VTth plan takes a c er ta in number of steps 
toreinforce or re-establish actions already taken on behalf 
of the small and medium sized business sector. 


This basically involves: 
— reinforcing existing 

bodies of support, in 
particular, those re- 
sponsible for the pro- 
motion of small and 
. medium . sized busi- 
nesses. These must 
. not only improve their 
assistance, but also, 
extend the range ' of 
their activities, (sim- 
plification of adminis- 
trative procedures for 
. small business owners, 
supervision and con- 
trol of. dvil engi- 
neering work, advisory 
boards, assistance with 
/management, techn- 
ical assistance) 


















N 



and 

son 


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„ v;^ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29. 1985 


Page 19 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


The C.N.U. and President Biya 


6 NOVEMBER 1582 — In accor dance with thg 
wishes of the people of the Cameroon, Paul 
Biya was appointed to the highest office of the 
State by the spontaneous overwhelming and 
nnreserved support of the population, sec- 
ured from the outset by the total and uncondi- 
tional confidence of the Cameroonian people 
and^ that of the militants in the Cameroon 

National Union. 

This illustration of the progress of democracy 
on this continent, which was both reassuring 
and significant, was greeted with admiration, 
respect and worldwide acclaim. 



Kioto: Fathi Mthouachi 

The impressive Palais du Congres in Yaounde which houses 
the Secretarial of the CP DM. 

( Inset) H. E. Paul Biya, President of the 
Cameroon People’s Democratic Movement. 

Proud to see their country held up as an 
example in this respect, the Cameroon people 
returned to their task with increased ardour, 
enthusiasm and resolution, confident in the 
future and firmly commited to ensure the hap- 
piest of times ahead in furtherance of to their 
original experience of national construction. 
The Cameroon people were subjected to the most painful 
tests in the growth of the nation such as those which • 
manifested themselves in the subversive plottings, threats 
against the security of the State and man oeuv rings aimed 
at division and destabilisation which were experienced by 
the country. These plots were to reach their climax in the 

An El Dorado for Tourists 

Officials of the tourism department are faced with two 
major duties : advising foreign tourists, and serving 
Cameroonians who wish to go on holiday. An eleborate 
program has been drawn up, and is already bearing fruit, 
while still waiting for final objectives to be outlined. The 
combined efforts of both the government and the private 
sector would help improve this sector. 

Tourism like agriculture and oil production is fast 
becoming a determining factor in the fight against 
under-development. This, is seen in the substantial 
amount of revenue it brings to the country . The achieve- 
ments in this sector indicate continuous progress. 

First of all, the authorities have taken measures to 
gradually develop the tourism industry, first fornationals 


senseless operation in which several soldiers, lead astray 
by their own ambitions, attempted to overthrow the Re- 
publicand seize power through force of arms (June 1983.; 
Everything would have been done to oppose the sittings 
of die Congress in Bamenda which undoubtedly, if it ever 
had taken notice of the people of the Cameroon, was 
going to constitute a major event in continuing the chan- 
geover which took place on 6 November 1 9S2. A change- 
over so revealing in the forms which it was subsequently 
obliged to assume. 

The process of National Revival, could noi help appear- 
ing as a formidable evolution by a handful of individuals 
solely concerned with the maintenance of their privileges 
and die satisfaction of their own selfish ambitions, which 
was inevitable in the surge of new enthusiasm. 

The vigilance of its militant men and women and the 
patriotism of the Cameroon people and its eagerness to 
progress triumphed in the face of all the activities which 
attempted to run counter to this evolution any process. 
Evidently die objectives of the Congress in Bamenda 
would have been irredeemably compromised if such 
operations had not been denounced, combatted and dimi- 
nished by the national mobilisation which illustrated with 
such clarity the level of political maturity and civil con- 
sciousness of the Cameroonian people; up held by the fer- 
vour of its militants and the hopes of its citizens, the CNU 
thus realised its own vitality, tenacity and fidelity to its 
commitments. Its continuing task and its role in the 
nation is thus affirmed more chan ever before. 

When, on 14 September 1983, the second extraordinary 
Congress appointed Paul Biya to the Presidency of the 
Party, the latter commenced a constitutional reform 
which discouraged any inclination to attempt seizure of 
political power - thus for the first time in the political life 
of this young nation the beginnings of democracy allow- 
ing diversity in opinion was given to those nationals who 
might wish to canvas for public appointments in the 
country but who belonged to no political group or who, 
being members of the C N U would not be appointed by 
that Party. 

It was in this context that Paul Biya presented himself to 
popular vote as the candidate of the National Revival, the 
political programme for which the CNU had granted his 
nomination. He was going to see a true plebiscite ex- 
pressed by the large national consensus which was built 
around the new options enriching the numerous positive 
achievements in the work of national construction. 



A 'f >, 

mm 


nCouh n 
<s«« - isve 


m^llp 

sasi’iiilLfi 



NGOULOURE 
109 « - 1672 


Pj||g yg l | 


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■ ■ ■ 


■ ~ * ■ 





NSANGOV 

1603 - -- '»66 


‘ .FON —JUJIMOLUH j 

.1933 \ | 

I ZA* ! 


The family tree of the Bamoun Kings. 


Bamenda, Cameroon - 24th March 1985 

T he Democratic Assembly of the People wants to be open to all the national sensitivities and recep- 
of the Cameroon was born in nve to all the ideas and opinions which might offer a posi- 
RsmpnHa Anart from rht> nf rho tive contribution to the happy pursual of the Laskofnatio- 



Photn: Fathi Mahouschi 

Construction in progress in Yaounde 


T he Democratic Assembly of the People 
of the Cameroon was born in 
Bamenda. Apart from the cycle of the 
sittings of the Congress in Bamenda, events of 
an exceptional nature, which marked the 
development of the Party and the Cameroon 
nation since the preceding Congress in 
Bafoussam, brought home to the Cameroon 
the need to question the ability of the CNU to 
respond to the new requirements in the task of 
national construction as well as to the future 
concerns of the Cameroonian people. 

In response to this anxiety, expressing the wil- 
lingness of its militants and the vast majority 
of its compatriots it was unanimously re- 
quested that the UNC should be renamed. 

On 24th March 1985 at the Congress in Bamenda, the Ca- 
meroon National Movement became the Cameroon Peo- 
ple’s Democratic Movement, and thus the wish of the 
people of the Cameroon, to bring about within the Party a 
significant evolution of new hopes at the dawn of the na- 
tional revival, was realised. 

It is comforting that the need for such evolution has been 
felt and was able to be expressed during the sittings in 
Bamenda, thus demonstrating in no uncertain manner 
that the desire to become more open, liberalised and 
democratic which characterised the policy of the National 
Revival was henceforth a permameni feature of political 
life in the Cameroon. 

Consequently and henceforth, the Party today identifies 
itself with the notion of unification and that of progress. It 



airrw j.*** 





Photo: Fathi Mabouachi 
Ministry of Education -Yaounde 

and next for foreigners. There is therefore need for good 
quality. But at what price must such quality be offered? 
Discussions are still goin g on , on die type of hotels to be 
constructed and 'tourists to be accepted for entry. The 
double objectives would be to scrutinize foreign tourists 
and to encourage Cameroonians to visit touristic sites 
during their holidays. It is for this reason that certain de- 
partments were created in the Ministry of Planning and 
Territorial Development the Delegation for Tourism, 
and, the National Investment Corporation (SNI). These 
structures include r the construction of hotels in major 
areas of ijouristic value, the supervision and improvement 
of sites, construction of roads leading to these . sites, 
crowned by the training of workers who would serve in 
this field. As such, plans are underway to open a school 
for trainingtourism. hotel staff, as well as the introduction 
of foreign scholarships in this field. 

A Country Worth Visiting 

Ca meroon would not have been “Africa in miniature”, 
an El Dorado for tourists with attractive sites, if efforts 




Photo: Fathi Mahouacbi 


Bank of Central African States 




m 



Photo: Fathi Mtbouachi 


Douala 


Photo: Fathi Mabouadii 

Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications - Yaounde 


Oil 

It is now an established fact that Cameroon is virtually 
self-sufficient in oil and petroleum products. But as the 
Head of State has often insisted, oil is not a major con- 
tributor to the national economy. Oil is a passing re- 
source, and even though Cameroon may lie in the Gulf of 
Guinea oil field, there must not be any form of excitement 
about what is available. However, Cameroon has not neg- 
lected studies and exploration. 

Some fifteen companies have so far been involved. 
Seven of the fifteen are major explorers: Elf Serepca 
(France -Cameroon), Shell Pecten Oil Cameroon, Gulf 
Oil (U.S.A.), ANADOCO (U.S.A.), Total CFP 


§( 

o I 

V 


o^ eRAL % 

jg 

♦CAMEROON 


had not been made to improve this industry characterised 
by a vertical movement of tourists from the North to the 
South (Europe to Africa). The major step taken to achieve 
this goal during past years has been based on the exposi- 
tion of our tropical products at exhibitions for commer- 
cial produce. 

Working in collaboration with the media, Came- 
roonians are encouraged to participate in the develop- 
ment of the tourism industry because it serves as a catalyst 
to national unity. In like manner, there are visits within 
the country organised for young students, journalists, 
and parliamentarians. The General Delegation for Tou- 
rism also participates at state festivals and conferences. 
Much effort has also been made through publicity and 
public relations. A number of booklets and leaflets, edited 
by the General Delegation for Tourism in collaboration 
with the National Geography Centre, have been pub- 
lished. 



A traditional dance troupe from the Northern 
region of Cameroon 


wants to be open to all the national sensitivities and recep- 
tive to all the ideas and opinions which might offer a posi- 
tive contribution to the happy pursual of the Lask of natio- 
nal construction; the Assembly offers the people of the 
Cameroon a field of action which can reply to their 
abilities, their generosity and their ambition for the na- 
tion. 

Such ambition implies that the Party can depend on the 
dear thinking and frankness of its militants, militants 
who are critical and demanding of themselves and at the 
same time, open and tolerant. Such ambition indicates 
dialogue, concerted effort and loyal collaboration in civic 
spheres, demonstrating the willingness of a constructive 
democracy and the serious attitude of a responsible 
people. 

“UNITY - PROGRESS - DEMOCRACY”; this is the 
motto of the Democratic Assembly of the People of the 
Cameroon. It expresses first of all the willingness for 
unity, unity constantly reinforced, leading progressively 
and steadily towards real national integration; further- 
more, it demonstrates the resolve to build up a modem 
Cameroon nation, capable of promoting individual and 
collective growth, the spreading of justice and ensuring 
the security of the individual, his property and his rights. 
Finally, it confirms the irreversible choice which has been 
made to strive towards a Cameroonian society where the 
citizen, by leading an involved, active and conscientious 
life, effectively weigh up the choices upon which his own 
future and that of the nation are dependent. 

The crest, which best symbolises such great ambitions 
could thus only be the gilded lettering of the ideas of soli- 
darity, unity and progress of the Cameroonian people, 
constantly illuminated by the ardent flame of patriotism 
and militant commitment. 

May this flame thus unveil in all its splendour the spirit of 
our people”, was the wish expressed by Paul Biya, "and 
make it possible to fully renovate our Parry in order ro 
make it, not only a great political group, but also an in- 
strument for economic, social and cultural promotion as 
well as the moral force necessary* for the triumph of the 
ideals of National Revival.” 

Paul. Biya added, “likewise, may the Democratic 
Assembly of the People of the Cameroon, promote this 
society of community liberalism which is at the heart of all 
our desires; I am thinking of an assembly supported by a 
community’ of free men and women, firmly rooted in the 
homeland, confident in their futures, sole masters of their 
destinies and proud builders of the Cameroon today and 
tomorrow.” 

Fathi Mabouachi 


(France), and Oceanic Exploration ( U.S.A.j. Six others, 
ARACCA (U.S.A.), OXOCO lU-SA.) PEYTO < Ca- 
nada), Normin Oil Normafriquc (Norway), DENISON 
(U.S.A.) and Mobil (U.S.A. ), are associates with the first 
seven. Four main exploration licences have been issued, 
corresponding to our off-shore potential fields: Rio del 
Rev; Lokele, Kribi, and Douala. Exploration has also 
been done by Elf-Serepca on an on-shore potential field, 
between Edea and Kribi. In 19S2, the company an- 
nounced it had struck oil at a depth of 1.900 m., much 
closer to the surface than any in the world. Similar efforts 
are currently going on in the North of the country. 

While exploration continues it must be pointed out that 
a National Oil Refinery' - SONARA - was completed and 
commissioned on May 16, 19S1- The refinery treats two 
million tonnes of crude annually, but Cameroon’s total 
consumption is only about 700.000 tonnes. Created in 
1976, SONARA cost 72 billion francs to construct. It is 
located at Cape Limbob, some 13 km from Limbe 
(formerly Victoria). Products from the refinery include 
butane, gasoline (both ordinary and super) Kerosene, jet 
fuel, gas oil and fuel oil. All these, meet national needs. 

Cameroon also has substantial quantities of natural gas. 
The largest reserves are to be found around Lolabe near 
Kribi. A source of financing is still being sought, to 
enable the country to build a liquefaction plant at Kribi. 

All said and done, the distribution of petrol remains a 
major problem. The original plan to supply the South 
West, North West and West Provinces directly from the 
refinery by lorry has yet to become fully operational, 
while die rest of the country’ is supplied by tanker to 
Douala then rail and road therefrom. The main obstacle 
in distribution has been the absence of an adequate road 
infrastructure. 


REPUBUQUE DUCAMEROUN 

Palx— Travail — Patrie 

MINISTERS DE L’INFORMATION 
ETDE LA CULTURE 



REPUBLIC OF CAMEROON 

Peace — Work — Fatherland 

MINISTRY OF INFORMATION 
AND CULTURE 





ige 20 

2 

3 

4 

L 














« 126 27 


ACROSS 


1 Old playing 
card 
6 Greek 
porticoes 

11 Soft-shell 
clam: Abbr. 

14 Overhead 

15 Legume 

16 Court 

17 Nuts 

20 Tinseltown 
hopefuls 

21 Cads 

22 Implants 

23 Show contempt 

25 French 

physicist: 1775- 
1836 

28 Right of 
inheritance 

31 Terrible 

32 Loamy deposit 

33 Spanish queen 
before Sophia 

34 Nuts 

38 Festival: 
Comb, form 

39 Elijah, to 
Greeks 

40 Precious 
metals 

41 No longer 
fresh: drab 

43 Core, In 
Coventry 


45 Doctor’s 
orders 

46 Usa 

47 Silly 

49 Sled dog 

53 Nuts 

56 Furrow 

57 An explosive, 

for short 

58 Golf hazards 

59 They loop the 

Loop 

60 Guide 

61 Common or 
horse follower 

DOWN 


powerful child 

23 Nourishes 

24 Speech defect 

25 Second U.S- 
President 

26 Hebrew 

prophet 

27 Bards 


1 Bills 

2 Support 
sedition 

3 Catholic 
tribunal 

4 Supervisor 

5 Bank worker 

6 Young oysters 

7 Beer barrels 

8 Glory 

9 Hardwood 

10 Walrus 

11 " Tree." 

Mercer-Man- 
cini song: 1965 

12 What an 800 
number lacks 

13 Flagmaker 

18 Midi resort 

19 Rhea's most 


28 Chinese 
province 

29 Secret 

30 Outmoded 
32 Beds for Leo 

and Sraokey 

35 Lois Lane et al. 

36 gin 

37 Musical 
direction 

42 Elegant 

43 Weather word 

44 Passes a law 

46 Landed estate 

47 Israeli seaport 

48 Vintner 
Masson 

49 Sea, to Seneca 

50 Bator. 

Mongolia 

51 Bugle call 

52 Start Of N.C.'s 
motto 

54 Repartee 
adept 

55 Sault 

Marie 


<0 Nnv York Tones, edited by Eugene Malesha. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


mi 



/i a 


w 


m , e 




mm 


‘She's got SOMETHIK' up her sleeve [ 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these (our Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to (orm 
four ordinary words. 


NILTE 




HIRAY 


N1SUFE 


PINGRY 


THE PIANIST 
WAS A MUSICIAN 
TO THIS. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the Surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Answer his 


(Answers tomorrow) 


Yesterday's Jumbles: BERYL APPLY FILLET MORBID 

Answer The best wine after a long voyage— PORT 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


C F C F 

AIMm 14 57 4 43 d 

Amsterdam 3 37 0 31 fr 

A mens 20 68 13 55 fr 

Barcelona r « 2 3 6 fr 

Belgrade 3 47 3 36 o 

Berlin 0 32 -1 30 s« 

Brussels 3 I? ’ 34 cl 

Bucharest 4 3* 3 37 a 

Budapest 1 34 - 3 27 o 

Copenhagen 1 3a 0 32 cl 

Costa Deism It W It 52 fr 

Dublin 3 3o -J 2g *r 

edition rab 2 34 - 5 23 fr 

Florence 10 50 0 32 fr 

Frankfurt I 34 • 1 30 cf 

Geneva o 32 -o 2i sw 

Helsinki -1 30 -IS i m 

Istanbul 10 SO 9 48 sh 

Las Palmas 22 72 19 66 o 

Lisbon II 53 7 45 fr 

London 4 39 -3 » fr 

Madrid 5 41 -2 26 fr 

Milan 2 36 1 34 to 

Moscow -5 a -I 21 d 

Munich t 34-10 T4 fhv 

Nice 12 « A 39 fr 

OHO -4 25 -4 25 sw 

Purls s 41 3 36 Cl 

Prague -t 30 -6 18 sw 

uevhiavik 

Roma IS 57 B 46 fr 

Stockholm 30 - 5 23 sw 

Strasnourg 3 37 -5 23 sw 

Venice 5 41 0 32 fr 

Vienna -4 99 -B IB cl 

Warsaw -2 2B -8 W cl 

Zurich 0 33 -A 21 sw 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara W 59 7 45 cl 


LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 



C 

F 

C 

F 


6 

43 

d 

Bcmskok 

3U 

86 

25 

77 

a 

0 

32 

lr 

Belling 

3 

37 

-1 

30 

fr 

13 

55 

lr 

Hons Kong 

26 

79 

22 

72 

cf 

2 

3b 

lr 

Manila 

20 

02 

26 

79 

o 

2 

36 

o 

r.snw Del 111 

22 

72 

10 

50 

fr 

-1 

30 

sw 

Sfloul 

3 

17 

0 

37 

fr 

1 

34 

Cl 

Shanghai 

13 

55 

9 

48 

0 

3 

37 

0 

Singapore 

26 

79 

25 

77 



27 

0 

Taipei 

27 

77 

18 

64 

0 

b 

32 

d 

Tokyo 

17 

63 

10 

SO 

0 

u 

52 

28 

fr 

fr 

AFRICA 






-6 

32 


Alatars 

14 

57 

12 

54 

r 



Cairo 

23 

73 

12 

54 

o 



Caoo Town 

27 

B1 

17 

63 





Casablanca 

mm 


— 

■I 

na 




Harare 

24 

















Nairobi 

2A 

79 

12 

54 

cf 

-3 

27 

fr 

TaiKs 

17 

63 

13 

S5 

d 


s 41 .2 28 fr LATIN AMERICA 


Buenos Aires 23 73 19 

Canton 27 81 IB 

Uma 24 75 19 

Meulcn City 21 70 » 

Mode Janeiro 24 79 23 


NORTH AMERICA 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 


21 70 2 36 fr 

21 78 7 45 fr 

25 77 11 52 lr 


lackland 20 68 IS 59 fr 

Svdner 21 70 19 46 a 

d-daudv: fo-taoav; fr-falr n-hall; 
sh- showers; sw-snom; st-stormv. 


Anchorage 

Attoato 

Boston 

Chico go 

Denver 

Detroit 

Honolulu 

Houston 

Los Angeles 

Miami 

Minneapolis 

Montreal 

Nassau 

New York 

San Francisco 

Seattle 

Toronto 

Washington 


o-overcasi; pc-aarttv ■ 


FRIDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Slight. FRANKFURT: Showers. Ttmo. 
2—0 (36 — 321. LONDON; Rain. Temo. 6 — 3 (43 — 371. MADRID: Fair. Temp, 
7—1 (45 — 34). NEW YORK: Cloudy. Tomn. 14 — 7 IS7 — 4S). PARIS: Rain. 
Temp.4 — 3(43— 37i. ROME: Showers. Toma. 14 — 7(57 — 45I.TELAV1V: NA. 
ZURICH; Snow. Temp. 1 — 3 (34-27). BANGKOK: Fplr. Temp. 33-25 
191— 771. HONG KONG: Cloudy. Temp. 26 — 21 (79 — 701. MANILA: Showers. 
Tomp-TV — 23 ( 84 — 73 1. SEOUL: Snow. Temp. 8 — - 1 146 — 38). SINGAPORE; 
ThundereJorms. Temp. 31 — 25 188—77), TOKYO; Showers. Temo. 17— A 
(43 — 43). 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


PEANUTS 


BOOKS 



THIS TIME. MAKCIE.I LL 
PUNT.ANP YOU PE THE 
ONE UJHO TRIES TO 
BLOCK IT... 


reaity. sir? here \ I 

. I COME' J s 
t 


ittUWF! 


YOUR STYLE, MARClE,) 
LEAVES A LOT TO I j 
vBE I 7 ESIRH 7 ! J\ 


l \ I 1 ’ 


UiSU.£.\.U* K L(J\ 






ESTEE LAUDER: Beyond the Mag- 
ic. An Unauthorized Biography 

By Lee Israel 186 pages: SI 595. 
Macmillan, 866 Third Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. 10022. 


BLONDIE 


WHO IS A MV INSECURE s HOW INSECURE ) 
THIS ? COUSIN MATT j WAS HE ? * 


fE CAV HE WAS MARKED 
. HE NEVER DIP SAV j— 
— n 'i do" a <= 


ALL HE CCULP MANAGE 
I'LL TRy />, 


US® 


ESTEE: A Success Story 
By Est&e Lauder. 223 pages. $19.95. 
Random House, 201 East 50th Street, New 
York, N. Y. 10022. 









BEETLE BAILEY 


gentlemen, these 
MEETINGS A * £ TOP 
SECRET/ YET 

INFORMATION IS a 

LEAKING OUrf/Tjl 


WHC? IS 
RESPONSIBLE 
FDR THESE i 
LEAKS *// c 


X GIVE UP- 
WHO*- 


® "9 Max 
— - — \ flitfcee 


ANDY CAPP 


i — i 


c IMS Dari! Mural NaMPaptif Ltd . 
Din hi Nawi America Syndicate 


IJLm { Shame 

ESz-ss.-i 


OtseusriNG/ 




NO VNORSE THAN I 
EVER WAS. rr’SJUsrBtarl 
THENB-SCOVS^KtE J 
NASA S(TM3(ZEDB , T>( 1 
WHJ UE Km MOTHER'S I 


WIZARD of ID 


6 (£12' TO A M\U? 

I a; V V/fNTEP . 


WON 

arm 


simmer > 
CinsMfMCm 
wap-mi r 
L w&Mstd ^ 


/& 


gr Li ftd 



g&O 


- T , ''.-r 

SAV 


Reviewed by G. Bruce Boyer 

B EST to make one tlnng clear, at the dffltsec 
Estfe Lauder’s autobiography is nor 
diock-a-block with gossipy little stories about 
the rich and famous, though it docs haw its 

moments (a Christmas party given by the Lau- 

dors for Princess Grace of Monaco at which 
entertainment was provided by a Salvation 
Army band makes a scene to contemplate). 

Nor is ha detailed account cfEstfec Lauder’s 

private life. While she is at pains to say that a 
prime motivation for writing her story is that 
“Fve read so many myths about myself that it’s 
time to set the record straight,” die has no wish 
to be extensively revealing. For the names, 
dates flpri places one must turn to the biogra- 
phy. Lee brad, by checking tbe New York 
State census records arid past editions of the 
Manhattan telephone directary, an d by tr ack- 
ing down relatives, among other sources, has 
done her dogged spadework. 

Estfie Lauder was bom Josephine Esthe r 
Menizer in the borough of Queens on, accord- 
ing to Israel (lander isn’t t effing), July 1, 1908- 
Not much is ascertainable about her parents’ 
lives before they emigrated from Hungary. Hex 
mother. Rose Schott Rosenthal Mentzer 
(whether she was divorced, deserted or made a 
widow by her first husband, Abraham Rosen- 
thal, is something of a mystery), was a devotee 
of beauty regimens (she bought the largest jars 
of hand cream at the local pharmacy, wool 
regularly to spas, never went oat in public 
without gloves or a large blade parasoi if it was 
sunny, and began br ushing her hair in the 
morning “even before her eyes were open”). 

Estfie Lander’s father. Max Mentzer (whom 
she says left behind a privileged life when he 
farm* tO the United States hrrnging with hhn 
“valises filled with dapper clothes . . . and no 
profession that was meaningful cm these 
shores”), became in turn the manager and 
propri e tor of a hay and seed store; a cemetery 
and a hardware store where, as a child, Lauder 
recounts, she would gift wrap the hammers £md 
nails at Christmas, in what amounted to her 
first foray into “packaging.” 

Little Esty (a diminutive of Esther, and 
name of a favorite grand aunt) undoubtedly 
took her interest in cosmetics and beauty prep- 
arations from her mother, but it was her unde 
John Schott, a chemist who lived with the 
family when she was growing up, who intro- 
duced her to the preparation of facial creams. 


but the a 

of her ume. Es^ aII ^i°| q e S but was becom- « 

TEElifrO sqparaKd 

me known as 

under the s ^J^f^Four veara U«r 
The divorce did «aoUri« 

they worked out con* iflW ** 

Zt2&@SE!bStl 

se» 5 sH«asiS 

and remained partneism famfl> OU5 ^ 

etwstw v. 

Otinrea^^Msat Maxim’s, the facejJJ 
As^and polo natdies in Pate Beach, come 
off as rather dnIL , . ^ 

Lauder is p»«mnently abusmasperwc « 
rare «iHTl and energy, and takes utile 

interest in private anecdotes. Even her accoun 
of being robbed at gunpoint is not nearly so 
i., i*u bp tiu «iu » m rio nf a factory m 


t 


Na, »hat Estbc lander is interested in, and 
rightly so, is her adnevements. “What makes a 
busmesswomanT* she asks. Talent . 
Inteffigeace? Education? Lander credits pcrsis- 
tence.’ffhen she and Joe decided to go fullnme 
into the cosmetics business, the family l29wver 
and accountant strongly argued against il Af- 
ler tite first year, when they found their savings 
up and not a dime of profit, she was not 
dissuaded. Neither was she disheartened wait- 
ing right boms in the outer offices of a mer- 
rhnnfirtirigr ctH po ratxHi, riding six hours on a 
rickety bus ihrmigh searing Texas heat to sell 
berime to a small department store in Corpus 
Qmsti, or byiogfca- two years before l and ing 
an accountwhh Harrods. 

- Shit says, iad we have no reason to doubt 
her, tt>*t Ae had a “We were 

sellsgjara of hope,” she suggests eariy on, and 
tdls £ewomen of the world (and, in the past 
decade, the men), “Time is not on your side, 
but lamp 


. Bruce Beyer, the author of “ Elegance : A 
Guide to QuaBty in Menswear” wrote this re- 
view for The Washington Pest. 


Soiutioii ta Previous Puzzle 




REX MORGAN 


HARRV,WHEN 
YOU SEE PAD, i 
TELL HIM HE A 

ma$ his 
ih^urance > 

EXAM WITH PR. 
MORGAN ON a 
Y MONCAV 
A, MORNING { M 


WILL DO— AND DONT S E ) 
SURPRISED IF THE DOCTOR 
FINDS HE'S IN BETTER SHAPE 
THAN 1 AM • R — w J 


YOU KNOW. YD LOVE TO 
KNOW WHERE HE GOES, 
WHAT HE DOES WHEN WE 
DONT SEE HIM FOR A j 
Ar DAY OR TWO l 


/ WELL, rr ISN'T > 
1 SOMETHING THAT'S . 
HAPPENED SINCE L 
HE MET THAT YOUUG 
?• WOMAN, LUCVf IT 
I STARTED KI6HT AFTER 
W MOTHERS DEATH / , 


became ber life’s wok. 

Several years later (Israd says she was per- 
haps 19) she met and married Joseph Lander. 
During the early years of the maniage Estfie 
became iscreasmgty determined to start a cos- 
metics company. A son, Leonard, was bom. 


deoe £□□□ aaaaia 

EEDD Q3nC3 dQHIOEI 

□!=□□ snao nanaa 
QmQQnaaanaaaaag 
□inn ossa 
QOOOag 3DD3 □□□ 
OCOQ3 3QOQ □aOH 
□EaBaaaacDEaiiana 
eeec aaaa Donaa 
□b □ aniag oaaaaa 
I aaaa naa 
EEsnaaaaianaaaaa 
onnoa annsB anan 
□BEon anas aaaa 
DEnsa asan aass 


BRIDGE 


|j3Crn£Y 


■ Niwb A xnaricB Swidkoit* iftnSl 




GARFIELD 







OH, I'M SORRV. 

I DIDN’T KNOW 
THIS MAILMAN j 
WA© TAKEN 


THAT'S 
QUITE 
i ALL RIGHT. 


By Alan Truscotc 

/"VN the diagramed deaL the 
KJ dedarer survived by skDI- 
ful play. 

Although North had wdl- 
located honor strength, with 
no wastage in the enemy heart 
suit the final raise to four 
spades was distinctly optimis- 
tic. But it was vindicated .by 
the result 


the king and West vran with; 
the ace m this position: 


WEST 
*044 3 
9t 
O S32 


NORTH 
*A JS 
tno _ 

O Q 7S 

it® 




W)rid Slock Markds 


Via Agence France-Presse Nov. 28 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otheruise indicated. 


AtMttrdaoi 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aegon 

Akzo 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A’Dofn Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVG 

Buanrmork, T 

Calond HliJo 

Elsevler-NDU 

Fokkrr 

Clsi Brocades 

Helneken 

HOqgovMl* 
KUM 
Nourdsn 
Not Noder 
NcdUovd 
Oce Vonder G 
Pencttoeti 
Philips 
Robecc 
Rodomco 
Rollncn 
Roronto 
! Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VMF Slork 
VNU 


Hochtief 

Hoectnt 

■ ■ *- 

nocswi 

Horten 

Hussei 

1WKA 

Kail + Sail 

Karstadt 

Kaulhof 

Kioeckner HM3 

Ktaechner Werfce 

Kruap Stahl 

Linde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

MtmiKimonn 

Muench RuecK 

Nixden 

PKI 

Porsche 

Preussog 

PWA 

RWE 

Rhelnmelall 

Setwring 

SEL 

Siemens 

Thyssen 

veto 

VoDenwganwerk 

Wella 


GFSA 
Harmony 
Hlveld Sieel 
Kloof 
Ned bank 
Pres Slevn 
RittPlcrt 

SA Brews 
St Helena 

50301 

West Holding 


Close Pr*v 
4450 3930 
4375 3450 
575 580 

2340 2450 
950 975 

4350 4850 
2440 2425 
710 BJ0 
4575 4575 
NA — 
8500 «200 


tZMZZl * . -"V - 

I das* Prev. 1 

Snell 

660 


STC 

92 

94 

SM Chartored 

452 


Sun Alliance 

550 

543 

Tale and Lyle 

585 


Tesco 

295 

795 

Thorn EMI 

422 


T.l. Group 

398 


Trafalgar Hm 

397 

397 


160 


Ultramar 



Unilever L 


united Biscuits 

m 

272 


295 


Woo (worth 

573 

595 

P.T.30 Index : 113360 
Pravltnn : 113860 


F.T 6bE.l00 Index : 
Previous; 143860 

142960 



Hearts were led and contin- 
ued, foxing South to raff. This 
‘came in the long hand, the 
wrong one from South's aagto. 
He was immediately reduced 
to threee trumps while West 
held four. 

South finessed the club 
queen sncessfully and cashed 
the ace with a satisfactory re- 
sult. He then led a diamond to 


sounc: 

■ • *K« : ' 

V-.:? 

« J 

*J 

West was intent aft weaknir 
ing the dedarer’s ttit up hold- 
ing. which is usn^y the qjfltf 
strati® in such sknatms, so 
he Jed his remahting hem. 
This proved to be a subtle er- 
ror. 

South ruffed in his band, 
cashed the spade Jong/ finessed 
the jack, then cashed the' ace 


WEST 
*Q»43 
o asa 
* a as 2 

*K4 


NORTH 

* A JS 
9 10 5 4 
O Q754 

* AQ3 

mtKZ 

WIHK c- 10 9 6 
*J0S 
SOUTH 

♦ K982 

OQ 

O K J 

♦ JB7832 


Fraser Ngave 

Haw Par 

Inchcaoe 

Mol Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

OUE 

Shangri-la 
Sima Darby 
SVoro Land 
S'nore Press 
S Steamship 
SI Trading 
United Overseas 
WOfi 


AOS 595 
1J3 1J92 

1J2 2 

115 510 

B20 BJO 
246 270 

2.19 218 
NjQ. — 
1A3 U7 
224 226 

MS 580 
aBo Haas 
267 147 
180 1-40 

13 6 534 


Previous : 49781 


Stockholm 


Composite Stock Index : na 
P rovisos : NA 


Commerzbank Index ; 173480 
previous: 174080 


AN P. CBS 0«n index : 2»J9 
Previous : mil 


Rnusels 


Artwd 

Bekaert 

Cockerlll 

Cobeoe 

EBES 

GB-irma-BM 

GBL 

Gevaerr 

Hatokon 

Inlercom 

Kredtoftonk 

Petroflna 

Sac Generoie 

So Una 

Solvav 

Traci Ion Elec 

UCB 

unerg 

VleliieMoniaane 


2690 2665 

mwi 

294 210 

4900 4400 
3*00 3995 
6000 5973 
2730 2680 
5000 5150 
5710 5AM 
2980 2950 
12000 12000 
7040 6940 
2345 2345 
8400 8340 
6310 4000 
5220 5050 
56/0 5530 
2340 2245 
5050 5950 


Current Stack index ; 296086 
Previous : 294789 


Frankfort 


AEG-Tolefunken 
Alltanz Ven 
An ana 
BASF 
Bavnr 

Bay Hypo Bank 
Buy veroinstonk 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Coni Gumml 

Dalmler*Banr 

Degusso 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bonk 
Drasaner Bank 
GHH 
Horae nor 


22550 226 

1755 IMS 
410 <29- 

363 24650 
25450 25450 
438 439 

428 429 

NjQ. — 
456 443 

572 570 

26950 26850 
159 15880 
1145 1178 
431 433 

213 211 
6BS5069350 
338 339.50 
210 220 
349 3SI 


Bfc East Asia 
Cheung Kong 
Qiing Light 
Green Island 
Hang Sena Bank 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Elecirlc 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shana Bonk 
HK Tale chore 
HKYovmOtoi 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whamooa 
' Hvsan 
InrlCilv 
Jardlne 
JanUna Sec 
Kowloon Motor 
Mirantar how 
N ew World 
Shk Proas 

Stolun 

Swire Pacific A 
Tai Cheung 
wan Kwano 
Wing On Co 
Winter 
World Inn 


a<n •n an 

19.90 20.10 
14J0 1450 
850 850 

. 46 47 

1125 2.175 
1250 1250 
825 830 

njo 1160 
3150 3350 
4J0 650 
765 7 JO 
»60 9.75 

J.W 355 

JJS 725 

25.90 26.10 
060 060 
OW 050 
1260 1280 
1*60 1120 

10 10 
5250 5150 
,125 8J5 
1240 1270 
205 285 

29J0 29^1 
1.96 l.9« 
0J4 077 
\J6 1.78 

4.90 455 
2875 250 


AA Corn 

Aliled-Lyons 

Anglo Am Gold 

Ass Brit Feeds 

ASS Dairies 

Barclays 

Boss 

BAT. 

D eec ho m 

BICC 

8C 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boots 

Bowafer Indus 
j BP 

Bril Home SI 
Brit Telecom 
Brit Aeraseacc 
Brftoll 
BTR 
Surmah 
Cabin Wireless 
Codburv 5chw 
Charter Cans 
Commercial U 
Cons Gold 
Courtaulds 
Dalgetv 
De Been* 
Distillers 
Drlefantehi 
Ftoens 
Freest Ged 
GEC 

Gen Accident 

GKN 

Glayoc 

Grand Mel 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 


sins S12 

301 200 

S65 led 

270 248 

148 144 

447 449 

471 469 

271 274 

318 321 

248 251 

29 29 

581 5B3 

320 318 

263 272 

328 331 

548 583 

415 «I5 

204 205 

468 473 

218 235 

373 378 

280 302 

635 640 

170 163 

213 210 

233 231 

497 504 

190 187 

458 450 

490 497 

511 496 

516% 517% 

441 444 

S23*S S2SVS 

176 178 

721 718 

269 363 

15 19/321535/64 

390 388 

746 746 

304 304 

983 988 

208 310 

<33 441 

720 720 


Banco Comm 

Cloohctds 

Cred llal 

Ertdanla 

FormHalla 

Flat 

Generali 

IFI 

iiaicemerm 

■la loos 

Italma&lllarl 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

NBA 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rinoscenle 

SIP 

SME 

5/i la 

Stonaa 

Slat 



Asea 

Astra 

Ahas Copco 

Bolfden 

Eiedrahix 

Erloson 

Esseiie 

HondelrtKBiken 

Pharmacia 

Saob-Somia 

Sandvlk 

Skanska 

SKF 

Swedf AMatdi 
Volvo 


AftaeravaerMtn 1 
Previous: 44268 


MIB Current Index ; 1903 
Previous : isn 


Imperial Group 238 242 

Jaguar 319 333 

Land Securities 313 316 

Legal General 759 744 


Hang Seng index : K8559 
Previous : 1706JB 


Lloyds Bank 

Lonrho 

Lucas 

Marks and So 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 
Mai west Bank 
PandO 
Pilkinglari 
Piessev 
PrudeniiaJ 
Ratal Elect 


313 316 

rgf 744 

07 489 

188 188 

443 455 


181 187 

521 513 


434 439 

694 697 


451 448 

316 313 


136 140 

789 782 


Air Llaukhi 
AMhom AIL 
Av Dos Sou 1 1 
Banco ire 
BIC 

Bongroln 

SawoiiBS 

BSN-GO 

Carrelvor 

Charseurs 

Club Med 

Darty 

Du mat 

Eff-Aqultalne 

Europe 1 

Gen Eaux 

HacheHe 

Lafarge Cop 

Legrand 

Lesleur 

iflregi 

AAarlell 
Matra 
Merlin 
MIChOllR 
Moef Hennessv 

Moulinex 

Occidental* 

Pernod RLc 
Perrier 
Peugeot 
Printout os 
Radbtcchn 
Redouto 
Roussel Udal 
5anofl 

Skis Ross ignol 
Tataneean 
Thomson C5F 
Total 


AC l 
ANZ 
BHP 
Borai 

Bougainville 

Casttomalne 

Coles 

Coma too 

CRA 

C5R 

Dunlop 

Eiders Ixl 

(Cl Australia 

Mooenan 

MIM 

Mver 

No) Aust Bank 
News Coro 
N Broken Hill 
Pawfdon 
Q id Coal Trusf 
Santos 

Thomas Nation 
Western Mining 
Westoac Banking 
woods! de 


AllOrdllWrtes Index : 99158 . 
Previous ; mjB 


Akal 

AsahIChem 
Asohi Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridges tone 
Canon 
Casio 
C.ltoh 

Dal Nippon Print 
Daiwo House 
Dalwo Securllles 
Fonuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
FUflfJU 


AECI 

NJL 


Remdfoniein 

*74 Vs 

*77*1 


3050 

3850 

Rank 

467 

469 


20500 20700 

RMd mil 

714 

«2 


1425 

U35 

Reuters 

327 

327 


1790 

1830 

Roval Dutch t 

4339732 44 3732 


8100 

row 

RT2 

527 



1550 


Saatchl 




5275 

5550 

Suinsburv 

338 

3N 

Elands 

NA 


Sears Hoieniws 




CAC Index : 249JB 
p rev tons ; atan . 


1 Cow storage 
I DBS 


260 260 | 
S5S 5 JO | 



264 260 

4.76 462 

860 840 

3.14 3.13 

165 166 

b a 
4J0 AM 
1JD 168 
554 564 

37® 360 

248 248 
2M 3 
2.10 210 
2.10 110 
250 Z5B 
345 345 
4J2 4J8 

a® bjo 
ZJB 248 
155 360 

169 160 

SM BM 
248 245 
340 343 
468 460 
147 147 


405 410 

7M 759 
871 865 

730 730 

521 521 

1110 1100 
1820 1820 
398 3» 

1270 1290 
881 900 

781 77# 
7290 7260 
1430 K40 
2820 2040 
UH IBM 




and played duba. Since West 
had so more beans and the 
diamond jack was an entry to 
tbe closed hand, the defense 
was hdpksx. 

l£ .West had returned a dia- 
mond in the diagramed posi- 
tion he would have removed 
the side entry form die closed 
hand, and South would have 
bad no way to maneuver 10 
tricks. 


m 


Tp Our Readers 


Canadian stock market quota 
tions were not available in this edi- 
tion because of transmisson .piob- 
lems. 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


SPORTS 


/VI—* \ 


Irish Hire Holtz 
As Football Coach 



Page 21 


&& * 
A 

W i fe 1 * * 

?■( Mfl'“ 

?• * .V 

*#>*$**81 
YTSrflwc 
&CAt- 
= s*e- 
?■.* y* » 
E. 4*9*5 


1 ranked 234 in a class of 278 
SOUTH BEND, Indiana — As a coming oat of high schooL I 
student. Lou Holtz failed to qualify couldn't get into Notre Dame. And 
for Notre Dame. Now he is the here I am as bead cnaA of Noire 
university's 25th football coach. Dame; I just can’t say no." 

I ne ver thought Pd have this Holtz said “this is the dream of a 
Opportunity,” Holtz said Wednes- lifetime How many people at the 
u j ** ^ annoUJ3ce d that he age of 48 get to follow a dream?" 
had been selected to replace Gerry Notre Dame is accustomed to 
Faust, who is voluntarily stepping winning seasons, something Faust 
down after Saturday’s game at Mi- did not produce to the satisfaction 

am i. of fans, alumni and students during 

TmS-foot-IO, 152 pounds, wear his five-year, 30-25-5 career with 
^ass«,speak witha lispandhavea the Irish. 

Physique that appeals like I've Holtz acknowledged that Notre 
been afflicted with beriberi and Dame fans “expect a minor miracle 


scurvy most of my life," he said. 


SCOREBOARD 


-'■j’th- 




Basketball 


NBA S tanding s 




■ r flfWW 1 

I****- 

»<■ 


Sl£j* i 
Or 



■ASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Dfotataa 

. Per. GB 
AO — 
J» 5 
Mt 6 
375 TV. 
Aa 9V* 

-737 — 
MJ 3 
A71 S 
6V> 
Wt 


- 

-5[ -Boston 

13 

W 

2 

"'■•fx ■#**» Jersey 
.-jw ^ ‘PWfcxtolptita 
Washington 

9 

8 

7 

8 

t 

10 

' Ntw York 

y # 

4 

12 

Central Dtytalaa 

< S. JMUwouXm 

14 

S 

^9 Dotron 

11 

6 

'Atlanta 

8 

■v 

■Chicago 

7 

11 


jm 

300 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 


-E 

f. . j. 


m 




HI. 


•i\ 



.Houston 

12 

5 

JW 

— 

Dmvmr- . 

• 11 

5 

A 88 

Vt 

.Utah - 

18 

7 

.me 

2 

Pallas 

7 

7 

-500 

3Vt> 

San Antonio 

8 

8 

509 

3Vi 

Socramwta 

5 

10 

333 

6 


Pacific Dtvtsloo 



LA. Lakers 

.13 

2 

AO 

_ 

Portland 

11 

7 

All 

3Vfe 

.Seat! to 

8 

9 

.471 

6 

Go Wen State 

8 

10 

AU 

tvs 

LA. Clippers 

6 

10 

375 

TMr 

Phoenix 

2 

IS 

.118 

12 


Selected College Results 

■AST 

Cantata* a. MansfWd St. a 
PllUUxgh |B7. St. Francta. Pa. 73 
Utica SI, Niagara 71 

SOUTH 

DovWscn B3, Ersfctn* Si 
McNtoe SI. 47. Pan American IS 
N. Carolina St. W. Furman St 
OM Dominion 78. Rmfolpft-Macen £4 
W. Kentucky 69. andntufl SB 
MIDWEST 

Arizona 73. Illinois s*. 71 
BracUoy 6*. Toledo 57 
l B-Oticago 59, Mississippi 5t. 51 
OnfcknuL w. N. MleWflon so 
v«ai«o st. «, omon st.t3.OT 
Wbcansta lot. Las Angela* SL B8 
SOUTHWEST 
Wee M, Montana SI 
So. Metaodbt 77, NV* Louisiana 59 
Twtas 7a Cal-Rbmr*Mo SI 
ToxavEi Paso SL Appalachian SL 32 
FAR WEST 

Cgorostomm *1, HawcHWHIW 57 
Kentucky 9a Hawaii AS 
Louisiana SL 7a Washington 41 
Nm* Mexico 66. Morgan SL 50 
PcsMi-dlno 69. $L Mary's. Toms AO 
San Jttta St. 77. Hayward SL 55 


Detroit 




• k £ ! rnii-ci 


1Jjto.11 4), Indl 
■ wlenta 
NWwartoe 




?*. JL 1 

»| V .. 


i^F-s 

i 

>}+■ 


f, , 




WEDNESDAY? RESULTS 

» 35 24 28— T24 
M 34 29 33— l*t 
Bird 17-31 13-1347. Parish B-124-4 3a McHota 
4-138-11 20; V_hXmson 1444 7-73S, Long 10-185- 
5 3S. Rabounds: Detroit 44 ( Lalmbetr ■), Bat- 
tan 52 (Bird T2J. Assist*: Detroit 24 rvJohn- 
■on *). Boston 2A ID-Mhnson, Alnge Si. 
PtlUaMpMa 2S 34 37 33-111 

New Jersey 21 24 28 25— 1M 

Barkley 13-14 6-4 3a Malone 7-21 aid 23; 
King 10-17 4-10 27. Dawkins B-9 4-10 22. Re- 
bound*: Philadelphia 44 (Barkley 14). New 
Jersey 39 (Gmlnskl 10). Assists: Philadelphia 
22 ICheeksA). New Jersey 19( Richardson 1 1). ' 
New York . 32 21 i> 17— to 

Indiana 28 26 18 n— 7? 

Ewing 7-13 4-7 1L Cummings 4-12 34 15; 
Staraburv 4-9 M 15, Firm Inc 4-15 3-2 U. Re- 
bounds: New York 47 (Cummings 15), Indiana 
.53 (WtinamsD). Assist*: New York 17 (Spar- 
4), Indiana 10 iSMnsbury 4). 

U 20 29 29— N 
32 23 22 37—1)4 
Cummings 8-14 3-4 19. Pierce .7-12 2-2 14; 
Johnson Mi 54 24, Rollins 4-7 2-2 14. Re- 
boends: Atlanta 45 (Rodins 8). Milwaukee 54 
(Cummings 9). Assists; Atlania 22 (Johnson 
8). Milwaukee 34 (Presser 0). 

Wdsbhntea 15 22 29 31- 97 

San Antonia KM I1M-1H 

AAooref-157-S2S.GIbnere8-l35-5ZT; Roland 
9-11 7-13 21 Williams 10-31 2-2 33. Rebounds: 
.MasMnstao sf ttaAan* SOU ion Anton to At 
l Robertson 9). Assists: Washington 25 (Wil- 
liams 9), San Antonia 33 (Moore 8). 

Portland 25 21 38 24— 1M 

Phoenix 24 21 23 23- 93 

' Vondewep h o 11-23 10-12 32. Carr 7-12 44 30: 
.Edwards 5-131-11 1B.Davlse-172-418,NonCe7- 
12 3-4 17, Bebeuads i Portland 50 (Carr 13), 
■Phoenix 54 (Nance 13). *aMn Portland 35 
■IPaxson 7L Phoenix 29 (Adams 9). 
jailcaOO 39 23 23 14- *4 

Utah 27 30 39 33-414 

Danner 12-17 14-14 38. Bailey 8-15 34 I9f 
Woolrtdoe MSTHB 22. Gervln 9-18 2-22aRe- 
bauuds: CMoago 51 (Waalrfdow Oldham 8). 

- JUtah 49 (Malone 13). Assists: Chicago 14 

, (WoorrMoe 4). Utah 29 (Danttev 8). 

-■ ' Dearer 38 13 34 14—W2 

Coldw SMIo 30 27 34 23-104 

Carroll 1V2S 3-4 25. MuUki 5-12 44 14; En- 
1- ■ r MtfUili 13-24 24 3a Natl 10-1 A 4-5 24. Rebou nd* : 

, r Denver 5M Lever 121, Golden State 40 (Smith. 

~ Carroll IB). Assists.- Denver Z7 (Lever T4), 
Golden Stale 22 (Floyd-9). 

Houston 14 29 27 23 17—417 

1— A. CHtwers 12 27 27 34 It— » 

Otahman 1V20 14-18 34. McCray 3-11 34 24. 

•' Uovd 3-20 8-8 24; Maxwell 3-1511-11 27. Jehn- 
... ■< son 10-24 3* 23. Rebounds: Houston 70 
(OkHuw8m5),LoeAng*los40(NlTnphhie)2). 
AssWi: Houston Z7( Lucas 9), Los Angeles 35 
. .• IMaxweU, Johnson 4). 

-. jfc* 


Hockey 


NHL S tanding s 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 




r. r/jr.-j 



W 

L 

T pts 1 

OF GA 

PtiHaitatptala 

18 

4 

0 

34 

110 

<4 

Washington 

13 

t 

3 

29 

87 

48 

NY islanders 9 

7 

5 

23 

81 

82 

ny Rangers 

10 

n 

1 

21 

>2 

71 

New Jersey 

9 

W 

1 

19 

73 

79 

Pittsburgh 

7 12 3 

Adams Division 

17 

>2 

13 

Boston 

11 

* 

4 

24 

89 

72 

Buffalo 

12 

r 

1 

25 

83 

48 

Quebec 

18 

10 

1 

21 

SO 

75 

Montreal 

■9 

9 

3 

21 

84 

85 

Roritand 

'10 

10 

0 

2D 

77 

77 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Dtablao 


St, Louis 

9 

> 

3 

21 

71 

74 

Chicago 

9 

10 

3 

21 

91 

95 

Minnesota 

t 

ID 

6 

18 

•1 

84 

Detroit 

5 

12 

4 

14 

49 

104- 

Taranto 4 15 3 

Smvtte Division 

11 

74 

101 

Edmonton 

IS 

4 

3 

S3 

108 

78 

Coleary 

12 

7 

3 

27 

94 

74 

Vancouver 

9 

a 

3 

21 

97 

102 

Winnipeg 

■ 

13 

> 

IS 

S3 

IB 

Lae Angelos 

.- ' 5 

14 . 

'2 

12 

71 

US 


--r C 


~Z r - 


' . . C? 




Skiing 


:'^^Worid Gip Prologue 

-C ’*-’*' * 7 , WOMEN'S SLALOM 

, - ' (at sestrtorw Holy) 

-- v Annl KranMdtier. Austria 4450-4533— 

-J. '5.UJ1J2 

v-d. Brigitte oerttl, Swtoortand, 44J4-4SJA— 

- . . <3 K2U90 

.Ertko Hess, Swttserlond. 4A7S4&39- 

- v-;.'?' 

~ Atatela Svm. Yuaosiovla, 47.1D-45JS5— 

■ >3*32A5 

_ . •-*> MaJaenata Tlalfca Po*>nd, *737-4532— 
J>33J» 

■- -4. Marla Em>le Beck. West Germany, 47JD- 
• -V SBJ9— 1 -3339 

* -7. Marla Rose Qtxirlw Italy, 44S4-46JD- 
-1:3139 

/- Dareto Tlalka. Poland. 47 JU-4&79— 1 :33A5 

Vrnnl sdinddcr. Swftxertand. <L20- 
•- ji ^550—1 :3370 

■' -i-HL Corhme Skdimldhauier. Swttxeriand . 
.. ‘D i»J7-4430— l:3L87 

■ - s -11. Brlsitla Gadtent. Swltterland 47J» 
-^6.41—1:3194 

Christens Galanard. Prance. 47J4- 
^499— 1:3425 

" i -IX RoswHha Steiner, Austria, 473M498- 
Jrt428 

5 “-XAKartaBuder.Auitrta.4BJD44t)6— 1:3L2I 
-rf -ns. DanMa ZML Italy. 47J4-44A*— 1 :3L40 

■ .. o* £ - 


WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Buffalo 3 13-1 

Detroit .3 3 3—4 

Lodouceur (3), KJIma 2 (11). Gallant (12); 
Selling (4). Shots an goal: Buffalo (an Staton) 
5-6-5—14." Detroit (on Barrasso) 9-44—19. 
Montreal I B 3-3 

Washington 2 1 1—4 

Oirlsttan 2 CU). Ho worth (12). Carpenter 

(7) , Gartner (15); Skrudland (2), DaMln (12), 
DeBlois (2). Shots on goal: Montreal (enJen- 
i»n) 6-10-7—22; Washington (an Hoy) 0-9-12— 
30. 

Caleory 1 2 2—5 

N.Y. Ronvers 1 0 i-a 

Poadnskl 2 (A). McDcnahs 2 (101. Beers (51 ; 
Brooke (9). Pavellcfa (13). Starts 00 goal: Cal- 
gary (an VonUeshraucfcl 15-12-10— 77; New 
York (an Lemelin) 8-14-10-32. 

Wbml a eg 8 l 0-1 

PMIadetaMa 1 2 3-4 

Kerr 2 (23), Poulin (B), Prune H4),Dimlth 
(3). Haspodar (31; Bosaunon (12). Shots on 
goal: Winnipeg (an Frocsel A-3-4— 15; Phila- 
delphia (on Havward) 5-20-12—37. 

N.Y. Islanders 1 3 3 3-4 

Mbweosta 1 3 8 0—4 

accwein 2 (5). Breton 2 (14); Janseen (4), 
Bessy 3 (14). Shots on pool: New York (on 
Beauara) 114-00—27; Mhmaesta (on Hru- 
dav) 9-149-3—35. 

Vancouver 113 0—5 

Edmonton 3 11 •— J 

Smyl (8). Tombdllnl 2 (4), Lowry (3), LW- 
stor 14); AAwsler2n3).Grottfcy2 ITT). Coffey 

(8) . Shots ee goal: Vancouver (on Moog) 940- 
13-J— tS; Edmonton (on Broaeur) 11-6-12-4— 
33. 

Hartford 4 2 3-9 

Los Angeles g 8 0-4 

Dlncen 18). Francis (1». P*tter»on (5). 
■Gavin (5), Robertson 2 (4), Lawless (4), TUr- 
geao2no>. Shots on goal: Hartford Ion Eliot) 
10-13-14—45; Las Angeles (an Uut) 1W1-B— 
30. 

Toronto * 0 1—1 

PRMmrgh 4 ) 3-7 

Martha (2L Bullard 19), Shedden 2 (11). 
Lindstram (41. cnatm (4). Bkdsdelt (7); 
Smith 111. Starts os goal: Toronto (an Ramo- 
na] 54-10—21; Pittsburgh (an Edwards. Bern- 
hardt) 8-14-11 — 35. 


Tennis 


Australian Open 




i.iaj 1 -' ~ m 


Transition 


BASEBALL 


,.■* c 


# ' 


-KANSAS citvJ— S igned Jamie Quirk. 
» vetcber-lnftalder. 

' • " . Ofu 'SEATTLE— Named Roger Jangewnard 
' ■yuuttng (flrutior. 

" „ -r.' Z. * - Natlonol Leagoe 

f -v -04 1 CAGO CUBS— Honied Jim Essidnman- 
3xwr at Winston-Salem ot (tie Carolina 
* " ‘ rt-oague. 

FOOTBALL 

National FeatboU League 
-CLEVELAND— Signed Curtis Dlckav, nev 
tptag back. 

Z “PHILADELPHIA— Ro-sluned Jalro Pena r- 

jmdo, runnkw back. Put Jeff Cnrlsfensecv 

’cunrierbocfc on waivers. 
'.-WASHINGTON— Placed Calvin Muhom - 
mad, wide receiver, on the Inlured reserve 
Signed Joe Phillips. receiver. 
Coltaee Feotturtl 

BUCXn ELL— A nnounced the r —l on attan 
<* Boh Curtta head too»all ca«tL 
* .SE LOUISIANA— Announced that IFwIII not 
innew the BsMrad of Oscar Loftoa. head foat- 
-ball 




First-round 

Hana Mandllkuva. Catcnelovakla. def. Co- 
mine Beniamin. Bakersfield, Calif. 6-Z 4-1 
_ Katerina skronska. CKChosiovukta. def. 
Terry HaDadav, UJL M 4-3. 

. Pam Shriver, IIJL dot. Andrea HaOkova, 
Czechaslovokki, 4-1 4-1 
Wendy Turnbull, Australia. deL Susan Lee. 
Australia. 4-a 44. 

Betsy Nogelsen. Ui. def. Candy Reynolds. 
US. 44.43.04. 

Claudia KeWe-KJlfcn. W. Germany, dot 
Amanda Brawn. Britain, 7-5. 4-3. 

Mlm Swkflvn. Czechoslovakia def. Janlne 
Thomason. Australia. 44. 64 
Martina Navrarnma. US. def. DoeAim 
Hansel. US. 44L 6-L 

Men 

Flfit' T Q W ld 

Wally Mosur.AustroUa^taf.MenooOostliig. 
Netherlands, 4-7, 44. 44. 44. 

jakob Htasek. Switzerland, def. Carl Urn- 
beruer, AntraHa. 44 61 44. 

Darren CahllLAustrafla DeL Tarik Benha- 

blles, France. 64. 44. 44, 6-2 
Bud SctMltL US- del. Croto Miner. Auslro- 
llg. M, 74. WL 

Mark Dickson. US_ def. Mike Bauer. US. 7. 
A 6-1 74- 

jshn Frowtav.Auetrolki.deLSfephoneBon- 
neau, Canada 64, 44. 74. 

Danle VlBter^ootn Atrlcadef. Bill Scantan, 
US- 44 74 44 34 34 
Mike DePalmer. UL dec John Fltieeroia 
Australia 74 44 44 S7. 14- n 
Brad Drtweft Australia det Murk Wool 
drldoe, UJS. 74. H 7-L 


European Soccer 


UEFA cur 

. (Third Round, First Lxg) 
^•wrn 1, Milan 1 

.^*riNjj 0 ^| to#nt j ltn gj a ^ sa j3)S,R«8M*xlrkli 
.Dwidee united 1 Neuctiatal Xatnox 1 
Inter-Mtion 0, Leg to Warsaw 0. 

Athlefic BlRwo 1 Partvoat 1 
"“voorby 1 fc cologne 1 


Ivan LAMB. CsaehedevaUa. dot. Leenarde 
Laval le, Mexico, 44.04 64 4-1. 

Siebadan Zivol Inovlc. iTOaosiavkMfif . Scan 

Davis, US. 7-5 , 34 4.T. in 
John Uuyd, Britain, def. Team 5 mid, 
Crecnostovoktai 7-5, 4-7. >4 44. 

Bred Dyke. Australia, def. Henrik Sued- 
strum. Sweden, 44 44 44 
Mlchiel 5chag*ro< Netherlands.' def. Boris 
Becker, w. GenwmVi M. 64 ?4 *4i M. 

Mats wi lander. Swedea deL Gary Muller, 
5 oo «1 Africa. 34 4-1 74 *4 
Paul Annoccm. US. deL Roaen Green, 
US. 47. 74 44 74 


every Saturday, and a major one 
occasionally,” but added, “I am no 
miracle worker ” 

“I can't win the national champi- 
onship by any stretch of the imagi- 
nation. It’s going to be a long, hard 
uphzH straggle. It’s not assured.” 

Still, Holtz, who has a 116-65-5 
record for a college coaching career 
of 15 years at WflEam and Mary, 
North Carolina State, Arkansas 
and Minnesota, seemed confident 
that for many years to come be can 
— and wiD be allowed to — satisfy 
Notre Dame’s almost insatiable 
football appetite. 

“Without any equivocation on 
my part, this would be my last 
coaching job,” be said. 

Although Notre Dame tradition- 
ally gives its football coaches five- 
year contracts, the terms of Holtz’s 
contract were not announced. 

He was in the second year of a 
five-year contract at Minn esota. 
He had taken the Gophers from 1- 
10 to 4-7 in his first year to 6-5 this 
year with a berth in the Indepen- 
dence BowL Included in his con- 
tract, however, was a stipulation 
that he could leave at any time. He 
said Wednesday that he had the 
Notre Dame job in mind when he 
designed that danse. His son, Skip, 
attends Notre Dame. 

[“We are disappointed,” the 
University of Minnesota's presi- 
dent, Kenneth Keller, said in Min- 
neapolis. “At the same time, we fed 
progress is present Progress on 
which we can build. We thank him 
for his contribution. He’s helped us 
get to the point where we don’t 
need Lou Hohz anymore.”] 

Holtz, who was bora in FoDaos- 
bee, West Virginia, and raised in 
East Liverpool, Ohio, did what 
some considered a miracle job at 
Minnesota and had a 60-21-2 re- 
cord at Arkansas, where he went to 
six straight bowl games before tak- 
ing over the Gophers. 

“You either get better or worse,” 
Holtz once said. “You never stay 
thesamej If what you did yesterday 
seems big, you haven’t done any- 
thing today." 

Unlike Fanst, he has experience 
coaching at the college lewd, as well 
as in the pros, going 3-10 with the 
New York Jets before quitting with 
one game left in the 1976 season. 
He may be better equipped to deal 
with pressure from the notorious 



Becker Is Upset by Schapers 
In Australian Open 2d Round 


Micteel Schapers let it be known he had upset defeating 
Wimbledon champion Boris Becker, 3-6, 6-4, 7-6, 4-6, 6-3. 


Fighting Irish fans, who were vocal phis State University in Tennessee, 
in their displeasure with Fausi. 

“I attended one game here,” 

Holtz said. “I noticed the fans were 
unarmed.” (WP. UPI, AP) 

■ Bedard, Others Fired 
(Several other college football 
coaches lost their jobs Wednesday, 

The Associated Press reported:) 

Emory Bdlard, who had boldly 
forecast' that his iwm at Mississip- 
pi State would win the Sooth east- 
ern Conference championship this 
season, but who faded to win 3 
conference game, was fired in Siar- 
kcviBe Mississippi. 

The athletic director, Charley 
Soon, said Bellard’s contract was 
being terannated Jan. 15, but he 
was “immediatdy relieved of all 
duties." • ' • ‘ ' 

The final year of Bellard’s con- 
tract was bought out for $125,000 
following face-to-face discussions 
with the schooFs president. 

Rey Dempsey was fired at Mem- 


ihe school's athletic director, 
Charles Cavagnaro, announced, 
because “be chose not to resign.” 

Dempsey, 49, had a 7-12-3 re- 
cord in two seasons at Memphis 
State, going 2-7-2 in 1985. 

Bill Narduzzi. 49, was fired at 
Youngstown State in Ohio after 
coaching there for 1 1 years, compil- 
ing a 68-51-1 record overall and 5-6 
record this season. 

Florida A&M. in Tallahassee, 
fired Rudy Hubbard — he was 
asked to remain as assistant athlet- 
ic director but refused — who end- 
ed bis 12th season there with a 4-7 
mark, and Texas- El Paso fired Bill 
Yung. 

But the University of Florida, in 
GamsiiHe, added 'two years' to the 
contract of Galen HaU, and at Ohio 
State Earle Brace got a one-year 
contract extension, his seventh be- 
cause state law allows him to be 
employed for only a year at a time. 


The A sseaaed Press 

MELBOURNE — Michie! 
Schapers of ihe Netherlands scored 
a sensational 3-6, 6-4, 7-6, 4-6, 6-3 
upset Thursday of the defending 
Wimbledon champion, Boris 
Becker of West Germany, in the 
second round of the Australian 
Open tennis championship. 

Schapers, a 26-year-old from 
Rotterdam who is ranked 188th in 
the world, was playing in just his 
second grass court tournament. 

Becker, the fourth seed here, and 
ranked fifth in the world, never was 
able to play well on a day when a 
number of the top players struggled 
with slippery courts and the wind. 

Schapers threw his arms into the 
air at the end of the match, his 
emotions a mixture of triumph and 
disbelief. 

“I’ve been playing for the last 
couple of months and then losing 
matches like 9-7 in the third,** be 
said. 

"Against this guy, I it," 

The top seed Ivan Lendl of 
Czechoslovakia, and two-time 
champion Mats Wilander of Swe- 
des both looked shaky at times in 
four-set victories, while three other 
seeds lost second-round men’s sin- 
gles matches. 

Lendl defeated the junior Wim- 
bledon champion, Leonardo La- 
valle of Mexico, 6-4, 0-6, 6-4, 6-2. 
Wilander started slowly but 
downed Gary Muller of South Af- 
rica, 3-6, 6-3, 7-6, 6-4. 

The ninth-seeded Scott Davis of 
the United States, the 11th- seeded 
Tomas Snrid of Czechoslovakia 
and Henrik Sundstrom of Sweden, 
seeded 14th, joined Becker in de- 
feat 

John Uoyd of Britain beat Smid. 
7-5, 6-7, 7-6, 6-3; Broderick. Dyke 
of Australia beat Sundstrom, 6-2, 
6-2. 6-3, and Slobodan Zivqjinovic 
of Yugoslavia beat Davis, 7-5, 3-6, 
6-1, 6-3. 

The day, however, belonged to 
Schapers. 

He voUeyed and smashed well 
and took advantage of Becker's 
youthful mistakes in going for win- 
ners when more caution was called 
for. 

"I've been playing well for the 
last couple of months without get- 
ting any rewards, so I fed I deserve 
this,” said Schapers. “It's unbeliev- 
able, the best win of my career." 

He came into the match after a 
five-set victory over another West 
German, Wolfgang Popp, in the 
first round. Becker, like all the 
seeded men, had a first-round bye. 

Becker, 18 and the youngest to 
win Wimbledon, said he had been 
affected by the wind, but did not 
offer that as an excuse. 

“I surprised myself with how 
badly I can play," he said. 

Schapers did tremendously well 
not to fold under the pressure of a 
nerve-jangling match that lasted 3 
hours and IS minutes. 


He got the crucial break of serve 
in the eighth game of the fifth set, 
then saved out for the match. 

Lloyd. beaten as a finalist here in 
1977, played very well to beat Smid 
in a topsy-turvy encounter. 

Lloyd led by a set and 3-0, only 
to drop the second set and trail by 
2-5 in the third before pulling him- 
self together. 

“I was all over him and then I got 
over anxious. 1 was desperate to 
win, so then I started going for my 
shots a lot more and it worked.” 

The only other seeded man to 
play Thursday was the 12th, Paul 
Anna cone of the United States, 
who won. 6-7, 7-6, 6-4, 7-5, in his 
second- round match against cam- 
patriot Robert Green. 

Six seeded women won their 


first-round matches with no prob- 
lems, completing a list of 14 seeds 
to move into the second round. 

The second-seeded Martina 
Navratilova, ranked No. 1 in the 
world, beat Dec Ann Hansel of the 
United States. 6-2. 6-1, and the 
third-seeded Hana Mandlikova of 
Czechoslovakia beat Camille Ben- 
jamin of the United States, 6-2, 6-1 
Pam Shriver of the United Slates. 
No. 4, beat Andrea Holikova of 
Czechoslovakia, 6-1 6-3, and the 
fifth-seed Claudia Kofade-Kilsch of 
West Germany defeated Annabel 
Croft of Britain, 7-5, 6-3. 

Helena Sukova of Czechoslova- 
kia, the eighth seed, bested Janine 
Thompson of Australia. 6-4, 6-4, 
and the ninth-seeded Wendy Turn- 
bull of Australia trounced compa- 
triot Sue Leo, 6-0, 6-0. 



Powerful Drug Found 


The -Issociaied Press 
NEW YORK — The mystery 
surrounding the $2 million Breed- 
ers’ Cup Turf race has been re- 
solved with the disclosure Wednes- 
day that Lashkari has been 
disqualified after postrace tests 
showed that the banned drag etor- 
phine was in his system. 

Lashkari, the English-bred win- 
ner of the inaugural Breeders’ Cup 
Turf at Hollywood Park last year, 
finished fourth this year. 

Last week (he New York Racing 
and Wagering Board held up all 
purses from the S10 milli on Breed- 
ers Cup races at Aqueduct on Nov. 
2 because a postrace drug test at the 


Coleman Unanimous 
As NL Top Rookie 

The Assocuued Press 

NEW YORK — Vince Cole- 
man, who sped the Si. Louis 
Cardinals to the National 
League title, has unanimously 
won the NL Rookie of the Year 
Award announced Wednesday 
by the Baseball Writers Associ- 
ation of America. 

Coleman, who stole a rookie 
record 110 bases, swept all 24 
votes, becoming only the fifth 
unanimous winner in (he histo- 
ry of the award. Second was 20- 
game winner Tom Browning of 
the Cincinnati Reds, also cho- 
sen unanimously. 

. It was the first time a Nation- 
al League rookie has been a 
unanimous choice since 1959, 
when first baseman Willie 
McCovey of the San Francisco 
Giants won. 


Cornell University- laboratory had 
turned up a positive result. 

Eiorphine, a morphine analog, is 
a powerful stimulant known as ‘'el- 
ephant juice" because it is used to 
iranquihze large circus animals. 

“It ranges up to 10,000 times 
more powerful than morphine,” 
one expert told the New York Dai- 
ly News. “If there is one drug that 
does not belong in the body of the 
thoroughbred it is eiorphine. Even 
a slight overdose could kill a 
horseT" 

■ Italian Soccer Bribe 

Dine Viola, a Christian Demo- 
crat senator who is president of (he 
soccer club Roma, has admitted 
trying to bribe a referee before a 
European Champion’s Cup semifi- 
nal in April 1984, The Associated 
Press reported, quoting newspapers 
in Rome. 

Viola admitted paying 100 mil- 
lion lire (S60.000) to help “soften 
up" French referee Michel Vautrot 
before Roma's second leg match 
with Scotland's Dundee United, 
according to Italian press reports. 

Roma won, 3-0. to advance on 
aggregate into the final then lost to 
English champion Liverpool 

The Italian Soccer Federation’s 
bead of investigations, Corrado De 
Biase, said Viola and several club 
officials, including his son. Ric- 
cardo, paid the money to Spartaco 
Landini and a mysterious C.G. 

I-andini, qow manag in g director 
of the dub Genoa, has admitted his 
involvement but claims that he nev- 
er knew Vautrot and that be tricked 
Viola, the federation said. 

Viola has denied that the referee 
ever received any money, and 
claimed that he himself had been a 
victim Of extortion. 


World Cup Skiing Will S ee Some Changes, Some Constants 


By Sieve Kettle 

United Press Iruemaiional 


singer in the slalom. Weirather, the 1982 world down- 
hill champ irm, said he has recovered from a long back 

LONDON Although ^ no Olympic or “j££ in 

Sarajevo, aid he wffl do nothing KoonhOis this 
four-month World Cop do sexton promises stating he can pile op atou^h points to gain top 

rsonn class seedings in the two other events. 

The women's coach, Andreas Rauch, said his main 
hopes are pinned on Elisabeth Kir chi er. Austria's 
most successful woman in the past few seasons, Anni 
Kronbkhler in the downhill and Roswitha Steiner in 
the slalom. Kronbichler won Thursday’s cup prologue 
slalom at Sestriere. 

France 

The men's team has lost three racers to retirement, 
Michel Vi on, Patrick Laxnone and Michel Canac, and 
is pinning its hopes on Didier Bouvet, the 1984 Olym- 
pic slalom bronze medalist who hopes to break into 
the top 15 after ending last season in 18th place. 


races in the mountains of Europe, Japan and 
America. 

Franz Klammer of Austria, the most charismatic 
skier of the past decade, has followed the French ace 
Jean-Qaude Killy into a retirement of manufacturing 
expensive skiwear, but otherwise almost all the top 
stars will be back. 

The king erf the slalom and {pant slalom, Marc 
Girard effi of Luxembourg, failed to win a gold medal 
at the world championships last February, but came 
back to win his first overall World Cup title and take 
the cups in both of his specialist disciplines. 

This year, Giraxddli could be a force as well in 
downhill and challenge Switzerland's double world 
champion, Pinnm Zflrbriggeo, as the top all-round 
skier. 

Sweden's Ingemar Stetunark returns to have anoth- 
er try at regaining slalom supremacy, while the rising 
Swiss star, Kari AJpiger, has a head start on his rivals 
in the men's downhill. Alpiger won both races held at 
Las Lenas, Argentina, in August that count for this 
season’s World Cup. 

The Swiss women's wonderteam look every World 
Cup title last year except in the giant slalom, where 
Marina Kiehl of West Germany edged Michela Figjni. 

Figini, Maria WalHser, Erika Hess and their team- 
mates are back. But the women’s slalom races could be 
the keenesi-fo ught, with Hess defending her cup title 
against strong challenges from the United States, Italy 
and a French squad that includes the gold and silver 
medalists from the world championships. 

A new rule in this year’s World Cup is that only the 
top 30 finishers in slalom and giant slalom go through 
to the second run. This experiment wtD run only m 
December for the men, but for the whole season for 
the women. The onc-nm super-pant slalom becomes a 
separate discipline this year. 

The grading cup circuit starts fear the men Sunday 
at Counnayeur. Italy, and for the women four days 
later at Pay St. Vincent, France. The next week, the 
world’s top skiers tune up for the winter at the annual 
World Senes, switched from Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, to 
Sestriere, Italy. 

The circuit again takes in the major European 
centers — with Scandinavian venues restored to the 
schedule this season — then the women gp briefly to 
Japan and both men and women end up in the United 
Slates and Cn-naris toward the end of March for the 
World Cop finale. 

The following is an assessment of the hopes and 
prospects of the leading Alpine ski teams: 

Austria 

Austria begins the season without both its most 
famous racer, Klammer, the 1976 Olympic downhill 

champion, world champion and winner of more than 
30 cup races, and its longtime men's coach Karl Kahr. 

Kahr has been replaced by Dieter B attach, who 
successfully built up the Swiss women’s team. 

"We win have to start from scratch,” said Bartsch. 
“I don’t think that an Austrian has a chance this 
coming season to aim at the overall World Cup. 
However, we will certainly win a few races and I hope 
we can improve the overall standard of our team.” 

He still will have such specialists as the defending 
cup holder Helmut Hflflenner, veteran Haiti Weir- 
alter and Peter Winubetger in the downhill and 
Robert ZoQcr, Franz Gruber and Thomas Stangas- 


missed last season,” said Italy’s top downhill e;, Mi- 
chael Mail. “Before, nothing seemed to work for us. 
Tm convinced that well return to top form and win 
some races." 

Mair wiD straggle to retain his ranking as top 
national downhill er against talented 18-year-old Gior- 
gio Piamanida, who placed a respectable 18th in the 
second downhill at Las Lenas in his first cup 
competition. 

Italian chances in the slaloms could be high, with 
veteran Paolo de Chiesa, fifth in the FIS rankings, 
returning for his 10th season and joined by young 
Oswald Toetsch (fourth), Robert Erlacher — who won 
a prologue giant slalom Wednesday in Sestriere — and 
Richard Promotion. 

Among the Italian women, the Olympic slalom 
champion Paoletta Magoni, 21, is the best bet She 
won a bronze medal at the World Championships last 




It Really Is 
A Flaky Game 

Hammarby and FC Co- 
logne met for a UEFA 
Cup soccer game 
Wednesday night, but a 
snowstorm had beaten 
the teams to the field in 
Stockholm. The Swed- 
ish dub, perhaps better 
prepared for winter 
sports, prevailed, 2-1. 



The stronger women’s team has lost Caroline Attia 
lo retirement, but gained Poland's top two skiers. 
Malgorzata and Doroin Tlalka. They have married 
brothers from Grenoble and a team spokesman said 

the 22-year-old twins will have French citizenship 
“before the first race.” 

The Ttalkas, world champion Petrine Pdcn and 
silver medalist Chrisiefle Gragnard wiD give France a 
powerful slalom squad. The top downhill ers are Qau- 
dinc Emonet and Catherine Quittet, while Marie- 
Christinc Gros-Gaudenier. injured all last season, re- 
turns to the downhill team. 

Italy 

A coaching change after the Argentina races may 
have breathed new life into the men's downhill squad, 
Michele Stefcmi being replaced by Antonio SperoUi. 

“We've rediscovered our tranquility, that’s what we 


February and will be alongside veterans Maria Rosa 
Quario and the newly married Daniela Zini. 

Sweden 

Sicnmark, 29. with a record 79 World Cup victories, 
failed to win a race last year but is back with renewed 
strength. After 10 years aL the top, winnin g three 
overall titles, eight slalom trophies and seven giant 
slalom cups, this season he postponed practice on 
snow for a month. 

He did practice with his successor as the top slalom 
and giant slalom star. Girardelli, and they were report- 
ed to have held pace with each other down the slopes. 

This year, only three Swedes are ranked among the 
top 20 slalomists, against six last year. Stig Strand, 29, 
who finished second in the 1982-83 slalom cup. has 
retired and the 1982 world championship bronze med- 
alist Bengi FjaeDberg failed to qualify for the team. 


The new hopes are Jonas Nilsson, the 1985 world 
slalom champion, and Johan Wallner, who improved 
bis ranking from 150 to No. 17 in slalom last season. 
Switzerland 

This undoubtedly is the team with the most depth, 
and which has the top starting seeds everywhere but in 
the men's slalom. 

The men are led by the world's best all-round skier, 
the double world champion Zflrbriggeo. His prepara- 
tions for the season were delayed by his 17-week basic 
military training ending in early November. 

A bigger question might be whether Zflrbriggen's 
knee, mended by arthroscopic surgery just two weeks 
before he won the world downhill title in Bormio last 
February, will hold up. Some medical experts believe 
he resumed racing too soon. 

In downhill, his stiffesi competition wQl come from 
his own team, mostly Alpiger. 

There is a second Zurbriggen pushing to the top. 
Pinion's sister Heidi, 18, who was second in the world 
junior championships in dow nhill, slalom and giant 
and, like her brother, a good all-rounder. 

She has been outracing such established winners as 
Michela Figini, Maria WaDiser and Erika Hess in 
practice. Figini, overall and downhill World Cup win- 
ner last season and downhill world champion, and 
Walliser have to be reckoned with in the downhill, 
giant and super-giant, Hess in the slalom and giant. 

Liechtenstein, once a powerhouse, now is a two- 
person show: all-rounder Andreas Wenzel and Ursula 
KonzetL 

United States 

The 1984 Olympic downhill champion. Bill John- 
son, 25, threatened to quit the team last spring and 
boycotted a training camp. The emergence of Doug 
Lewis, bronze medalist at the 1985 world champion- 
ships, and the withdrawal of financial support appar- 
ently lured Johnson back. 

The weaker men's team consists basically of John- 
son and Lewis and a handful of skiers with World Cup 
experience but no lop 20 results. Felix McGrath is 
possibly the best of the up and coming group. 

Tamara McKinney, the 1983 women's cup winner, 
but winner of only two races last season, will be joined 
again by the surprise world gjam slalom champion 
Diann Roffe, bronze medalist Eva Tward okras and 
Olympic giant slalom winner Debbie Armstrong. 

West Germany 

The men's team is putting its main hopes on slalo- 
mist Fiorina Beck and giant slalom world champion 
Markus Wasmeier. 

Wasmdrr, 24, included grass ski jumping in his 
summer training, calling it “a good character builder." 
Beck, 27, is the husband of Maria Epple, West Germa- 
ny’s top woman slalomist. 

Marina Kiehl will defend her women's giant slalom 
cup title, backed up by fellow all-rounders Traudl 
Haecher, Michaela Gerg and Regine MSsenJechner. 
with Epple the best slalom beL 
Yugoslavia 

Although the team was weakened by the retirement 
of Jure Franko, Yugoslavia's only meda l i s t at the 1984 
Olympics in Sarajevo, the veteran slalomist Bqjan 
Knzaj, 28, is already in good form and Rok Pelrovic, 
19, should do well in giant slalom providing he fully 
recovers from a bad: muscle injury. 

Matga Svet, 17, and Katja Lesj'ak, 18, lead the 
women's team, with Svet the giant slalom gold medal- 
ist in the junior World Cup. Three others who may 
achieve good results are Andreja Leskovsek, 20. Dasa 
Segula, 17, and Barbara Kuhar, 17. All are treating 
injuries but hope to be fit for the season's beginning. 










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Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1985 


OBSERVER 


New England Gray ness 


By Russell Baker 

I AM in New England for the 
gray. Everybody tells you to 
come before the gray sets in. but 
this is poor advice. In summer, the 
place is overrun by rich playboys 


and playgirls, their yachts and their 


favorite New York boutiques. In 
fall. New England is just as bad. It 
is overrun by tourists who drive for 
days to gape at dying leaves. Can 
anything be more macabre? If it‘s 


something macabre you want, go to 
i York and look at the subways. 


after lunch. Or would set if it visi- 
bly rose. 

Winter in New England actually 
starts the week before Labor Day. 
when the sun sets just before the 
cocktail hour or smack in the mid- 
dle of Torn Brokaw, depending 
how you id! time; and it continues 
until the Third of July, the day the 
Boston Pops Orchestra traditional- 
ly comes out of its hall and tries to 
seeiis shadow. 

□ 


New' 

In New York you can recover in 
a bar where the entire clientele is 
uot morose about the Boston Red 
Sox. What do you care about the 
Boston Red Sox? Why would any- 
body spend good money among 
people who do care about the Bos- 
ton Red SoX? In New England in 
the fall they care. Dying leaves and 
dead Red Sox — that’s the New 
England autumn. Bui then comes 
the grayness. Ah. the magnificent 
grayness of New England. The na- 
ture of New England is gray. Puri- 
tan gray has been its favorite color 
for 36S years. Quaker gray is a close 
second. Counting-house gray is the 
natural complexion of the New En- 
glander. and silvery gray the pre- 
dominant color of New England's 
splendid seafood when it comes 
from the gray winter ocean. 

□ 


In ibis gray place that they say is 
not Boston I have seen very little 
except my friend Crowley who is 
silhouetted now and then against 
the fireplace blaze in a room be 
says is his parlor. 

-No. it is not Boston." says the 
muffled Crowley voice. -Disabuse 
yourself of the conceit that we have 
kept you in Boston. Here the sun 
was out just before breakfast 
Thursday before last; in Boston 
there can be no more sun until the 
Third of July at the earliest." 

Crowley asserts he has brought 
me to Nantucket, an island that 
Chamber of Commerce boomers 
call “the gray lady of the sea." This 
is an attempt to snare the tourist 
dollar by glamorizing Nantucket 
fog, said to be the thickest and 
longest-lasting since the British 
government outlawed burning soft 
coal in London. 


The quintessential New England 
holiday, Thanksgiving, is a con- 
scious attempt to reject the gray 
birthright with yellow squashes, 
golden pumpkin pie, cranberries of 
burgundy red and turkey basted to 
burnished brown. Yet the grayness 
irrepressibly seeps forth, slowly at 
first, then triumphantly in the fol- 
lowing week as the turkey carcass 
lingers on, and on, and on, casting 
a gray pall over the spiriL 

Chicago is the capital of wind, 
Los Angeles the father and mother 
of smog. The late Bill Vaughan has 
stated Kansas City's claim to being 
the slush center of the universe. 
Jean Shepherd has christened Buf- 
falo “the home office of winter." 
That's small time compared to Bos- 
ton. Boston is the capital, the father 
and mother, the universal center 
and home office of grayness. 

They say the grayness started 
this year, as it always does, on the 
weekend when standard time re- 
placed daylight saving. With that 
change, New England enters a peri- 
od when the sun sets a few minutes 


Since coming here I have seen 
plenty of fog all right, but plenty of 
rain, too. The rain is gray- It is as 
gray as I suddenly fell after a 
breakfast of warmed-up turkey to- 
day when Crowley said, “Fortu- 
nately there's enough turkey left to 
keep us going until the fog lifts or 
the rain stops and we can get to the 
supermarket." 

You have these brief depressions 
in the New England grayness, but 
they pass quickly. As Crowley once 
told me, “There is nothing so cozy 
as a fine, gray New England day, 
because it encloses the mind alone 
with the souL and makes it hard for 
street c rimin als to see you when 
vou're out for a stroll" 


He has a point, but there are 
problems, too. When I stepped out 
for a walk two paragraphs ago 
someone in the fog tried to cover 
me with gray shingles. That settled 
the question. I am definitely in 
Nantucket I must be cautious or 
they'll pave me with cobblestones. 



Japanese Reclaim Saipan, This Time for Touris 


By Clyde Habcrman 

New York Times Service 

S AIPAN, Mariana Islands — By the 
many thousands they step off the 
planes from Tokvo, two by two, one of the 
steadier processions of traveling couples 
since Noah's Ark. 

They are Japanese honeymooned, and 
the laige numbers who flock every day to 
the northern tier of Micronesia provide 
evidence that Japan has regained economi- 
cally some of the western Pacific islands 
that* it lost militarily 40 years ago. 

Japan dominates here even though Sai- 
pan is part of a United States common- 
wealth these days. Much of the northern 
Marianas, in fact, has been turned into a 
Japanese warm-weather playground over 
the last IS years. 

There is only one real industry, tourism, 
and most major hotels are in Japanese 
hands. Four of every five visitors to Saipan 
are Japanese, usually newlyweds lured by 
relatively inexpensive package tours. 

The same is true in far larger numbers on 
nearby Guam, which is an unincorporated 
U. S. territory with important American 
air and naval bases. Guam has even adopt- 
ed the slogan "Where America's day be- 


Signs in Japanese at a shopping center in Guam; Japanese 
tourists flock to Saipan, Guam and other islands in Micronesia. 



Th# New York Times- 


TRUST TEFUJITORYOF THE 
PACJFICGlfNDS 


#PHiUPPtNES / '-SBI 
firJL i. • 

f a? - GUAM . 


Pacific 

Ocean 


gms. 


Sew York Tunes Senice 


But of the 368,665 visitors to the island 
last year. 82 percent came from Japan. The 
S221 minion that they spent accounted for 
about half of all retail sales. 

In some sections of Saipan and Guam, 
Japanese signs are almost the only ones to 
be seen. Map? of Guam available at the 
airport are in Japanese, not English. Duty- 
free shops are stocked with high-priced 
clothes, liquors and other items considered 
prestige symbols in Tokyo and Osaka. 

The influx of Japanese tourists has 
meant growth for other industries as well. 
Two years ago there were three Japanese 
construction companies with offices on 
Guam. Now there are 10 because of the 
growing demand for new hotels, roads, 
airport construction and commercial 
buildings. 

Japan controlled Micronesia — the Mar- 
ianas, plus the Caroline and Marshall is- 
lands — from 1918 to the end of World 
War II in 1945. Micronesia was, and re- 
mains. a strategically sensitive area, cover- 
ing three million square miles of the Pacific 
and comprising about 2,000 islands that 
today have a total population of 135,000. 

Older islanders sometimes talk of the 
Japanese era as the good old days, partly 
reflecting disenchantment with the United 
States, whose trusteeship for the last 38 
years has produced little in the way of 
economic development 

In the 1930s Japan operated sugar-cane 
plantations, fisheries and phosphate mines 
on many islands. The Garapan section of 
Saipan bustled with shops, movie theaters 



Kathy Jones/Ilw New Ys*4 Tee** 


and geisha houses. Islanders were treated 
like second-class citizens, but at least, some 
say, things were lively. 

The United States wrested mOitaiy con- 
trol of the Marianas from Japan after fierce 
battles in 1 944. In a notably grim end to the 
fighting on Saipan, thousands of Japanese 
civilians committed suicide by hurling first 
their children and then themselves from 
cliffs on the island's northern end. 

Yesterday’s horror, however, has be- 
come today’s photo opportunity. Now, 
Japanese honeymoon couples take group 
bus tours to Suicide niff . 

The resurgence of Japanese economic 
influence is concentrated in the Marianas, 
but it is beginning to be felt elsewhere in 
Micronesia, too. From Palau in the western 
part of island chain to the Marshalls in die 
east, local political leaders regard Japanese 
tourism as their best chance to stimulate 
economies now largely dependent on Unit- 
ed States aid. 

The Japanese government has also be- 
gun to show interest in its former territory 
once again. It has steadily increased eco- 
nomic assistance, giving S 17.6 million since 
1980 to three semiautonomous -govern- 
ments in the American trusteeship — Pa- 


lau, the Marshall Islands and the Federat- 
ed Stales of Micronesia. A good deal of this 
money has gone for road construction and 
for fishery-related projects such as deep- 
storage refrigerators bang bu3t on the is- 
lands of Ponape and Dublon in the Feder- 
ated States. In addition, Japanese 
tuna-boat fleets contribute up to $2 million 
a year for the right to fish in Micranesian 
waters. 

Micrtmesians, especially those most crit- 
ical of the American stewardship, say they 
are glad to receive the help. “The Japanese 
went about it the right way," Asteno Ta~ 
kesy, a senior official on Ponape, said. 
“They asked us what we need, what we 
want The Americans are always telling ns 
what to do. They say, This is what your 
problem is, and here's how you must solve 
it.'" 

A foreign ministiy official in Tokyo, 
Akihiro Aoki, said Japanese aid was based 
on the government’s belief that “these 
countries have to be politically and eco- 
nomically stable." 

How deep Tokyo’s investment will go, . 
however, is not clear. Japanese business- 
men say they are hesitant to move in be- 
cause of lingering economic and social 


problems that have kepi Microuestan de- 
velopment at a low level throughout the 
postwar period. . «... 

Nevertheless, some American officiais 
worry that Japanese investors — - and per- 
haps some from rapidly developing A sian 
countries Eke South Korea — are getting 
ready. One person who expresses concern 
is Fred M. Zeder, the Reagan administra- 
tion’s chief representative in negotiations 
thyt would dissolve the American trustee- 
ship and give Micron esian states 

partial home rule and a guarantee of $2.4 
billion in United States aid over the next 15 
years. 

According to Zeder, a large share of that 
money, perhaps $1 billion, would be direct- 
ed at economic development. Bui Ameri- 
can businesses, he complained, may lose 
the competition for these funds because the 
United States House of Representatives 
recently rgected certain tax incentives for 
them that had been agreed to by Microae- 
cinnc and the administration. 

“It’s ridiculous," Zeder said. “We are 
going to the Japanese, or whoever else 
wants to go after this region, and we are 
banding them a billion dollars on a’ pJat- 
ter " 


Royrd Couple Op* 

EhmoringJapmS 


Prioce dairies and his 
am, opened “Toici; Tfb 
J apan Today. - aa ex& 

contemporary t 



runs through Jan. 26. D* 
visit to the festival at (fig ,!* A 
Center. Charles -»nd:i 


Center, Charles: -and'^ 
watched a poppet show: 
served a lea ceremony p 
by ftfidael i Bn 
mss a Japanese tea o 
school in London. The roy 
amxmoced.earikr is the 
they would visit Japan « 





4 


The West German j c 
GBntar Wifireff* who sp 
years dogatso d as a Tarias 
grant worker to write* 
on thca cqjotuuicp, bp. 
one naffioaDentsche mark. 
5385,000) to aid them. Tk 
wifl go (o the Solidarity W 


t#4 

■ m 


■A « 


at 


workers expiated by then 
m an power . Waflraffsboofc, 
Union" {At the Very Bouo 
sold 850^00 copies m six « 


■4EJ 


WBe Netnn said four ; 

Eon endowments' to assist f 
will be .set op -with part of t 
ttSSoa r ais ed by the Fan 
concert in September. Ndsor 
sized the Sept 22 concert 
University of Dtmois at I 
paign to draw attention i - . 

L«f American fanners a V * \ 
ham industry. * 




*4 

.If 


The son of the British** 
explorer Sir Freest 9m&ek v 
w h o pi on eered a rente to the 
Pole 16 years agp — read* 
BO*5 iis father failed to make 
Sbackietaa, on a visit to-the 
ioe stafiocrat the Soutb'ftil 
cjwx fberorae b» father nett 
J909,Nnf Zeriand amarrr lc 




-?1 

ifa 


dffec'rlSBfiefieton waTfhS 
bdt efsofcjBes to stop 12# 
(ITjS^pErfcrs) shod Of hit 
H&roide«qfs followed three 
-Chpfafa Robert F 
■" it tts*e ! 

. „ I912.oify.iD 

gfara^ian RoaH Aa 
become the first nh 
Earth's southernmost j 




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CAROU0IE H. SCHOUTBI 
+ 

PAUL LM. VERMHJ 


2 Young Ddphins 


Carotene and Paul 
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Nffi) TO CONTACT MAJOR James 
Taman, a doctor with Pteioris Third 
Army in Maodesfieid, UK in 1945. 
Jenny Lewis, 1423 Swire House, 
Choter Road, Hong Kan^, 


HAVE A NICE DAY! BOKS. Hove a 
nice davi BA j, 

HAPPY BIRTTfiJAY LOUJA. HAVE A 
mce day. 


REAL ESTATE. 


FOR THE FEATURE 

INTHNATIONAL 
REAL ESTATE 

TURN TO PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENTS 


FIRST INTBINATIONAL 
OIL AND GAS 


Pubic & P r i v a te US. Synd c at ions 
5200,000,000 In Various Amounts 


03 6 Gas - Tam, IKnots - Bonded, 
Production Purchases 
Reed Estate - Flori da , Cdo r odo - Re- 
sort Property, Cdmmerool, Industrial 
Communicationi - Caffomw. Cdoro- 
do - Cable & Microwave 5yPeaa 


Bonds back up, every progra m to insur e 
total pnvufment. 


the security of your 
Interested in serious 
A miramum mveslment of $100, 

We ore a pubke Ui eompanv that has 
operations in Europe under the none: 

FIRST TRIANGLE ST 
Please ad or writ* the Geneve office 
for further dotrib: 

12. rue des Cordon 
P.O. Bar 521-1211 
Geneve 6, Switzerland 


TeL (411 22-86 01 55 
* 77 153 TWFCH 


Telex 

Teiefat (41) 22-86 06 72 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

CAP FERRAT 

For safe in the world famous resort, 
beartiful vilo with gwenmeia pool over- 
kjokingthesea. For further mferniteiott 
JOWI TAYLOR SA 

1 Am. Afoert ler 

F06230 SAINT JEAN CAP FERRAT 
Tefc 93 01 24 24. 

AUTtCNTIC 1B1H OTTURY “genhl- 
harrantere" eompietov restored and 
ranauraed with kdi, Triple reception 
with monumental fteprocn. Beamed 
aSng throughout, stone vrolb, 4 mas- 
ter suites raid spacious 3-room guest 
apurtmerH. P3J2 miVion vteue sacrifi- 
ced at FI9 niSon. Ctel Made now or 
93381919SS47LoGoaeTte F 06400 
Cannes. 

CANNES-MANDBJEU 

Flahvila. 110 sgjiu, highly decorated 
and furnished with very nice 
landscaped garden [2000 sqjn.). 

Outer, mountain view-RjCuflOO: 
Owner Tefc 93 49 63 8a Tate* 230286F 

H»4CH ALPS 28 km from GENEVA 
NEW CHALET 

75 Hun, wftfa 1200 sqjn. land 
Majprificent view, ft 550,000. 
Builders Harold UBsridi 

F74250 PeShmnex. 

Tot 50.0364X0 eratengs 


COURCHEVB. 1550 M, stone bub 
chalet, 2 levels, 95 sqjn. inol Uvmg 
24 sq.m. Iirepiaoe,3bedv)omsanlst 
Boor, ponoiuink southern view. 
Bffijppal fetthen, large basement. 
F7 50/100, Amy, 11 avenue du Camp. 
69270 Fontaines. Tel: 78 23 31 46. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVDiCES 


COTE D'AZUR 

CANNES 

Case to center, outi t or ciu g 6iaoni 
apcrtinent in tm attractive Vidonao 

house in perfect conddioa. 
facing south, ail mode m contorts, go- 
rage, large cellar, 2 spans rooms, mce 
view on garden md surroumfings. Red 
bargeea 

nice FI 7D0 «X) 

Ref: Y07. 

JOHN TAYltit SA 
55 La Ornette 
06400 Cannes 

Teb 93 38 00 66. Teimc 47092 IF 


la offers 


COTE D’AZUR. MOUGMS. Excellent 
opparheity. 7 roams, 1,800 sqjn. 

^ pool, pool house; garage. 
rAJnUXX). Promotion Mozart, la 
RohT, 06000 hfic*. Tat 93 88 37 37. 
Tefex 461235. 


SmiNG 5MAU. RB80VATB) form, 
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fife & information, tel 43 07 7D ST 


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SCOTTISH CONNECTION: buy wur 
Europncm homestead in 5aHk*xi 

Oete simpiy 4 si^ierb apartments & 2 


penthouses in the magnificent & im- 
. A yacht-man's 


pewnq Skehnorfie. . 

hevnerrom home, a golfer s paradise, 
kve in leisure in the baronial style m a 
propwiy with spectodulor views of 
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Bute, the splendor of the hjk, rt* 
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vtsitor. Nobles took the water. 


the cM i 


I country 

buy your piece of Scotland 


see Skebnorte. 
, , Scotland cb an 

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TRAVEL SGtVICES FOR THE 
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big per anrajm of winch more than 90% 
is tor mternotion d travel Interested 
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BBOSE 15 DECBMBBt 1985 rm 
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Head. Purdnse and Contract Service 
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Projected emud 

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BOB INVTTHJ. 
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Established 1928 

PbBroonsIraul W, B-2018 Antwerp 
BoWimi - TatP2 3) 234 07 51 
Tbo 71779 syf b. n the Diamond Club. 
Heart af Antvmp Diamond industry 


UDlAAraNDS I ,05 CARAT & o«r 
GIA/HD perfect as. E4Wtas 


S4^mf*WrSn_Box2924, Harold 


.92521 NetJy Cadeiu finmee 


OFFICE SERVICES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


GREAT BRITAIN 


MBtfDiA MBtNATtONAL 
18 rue Iracur Maubourg - 6400 Comtes 
Tek 93^3.19.19 
Telex: 461803 F Meridn 
IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR 
oo old awatry house: near .Gram, 
baauSfoSy restored 18th cetaery j NEWLY 
“basricki an 7 acres af land. 7 boo - 1 aoerta 
mom, 3 reaeption rooms, fireplaats, 
kege poof, ask be- Christine. . 


OBSEA.MOOSINHOtB£3dou. 
He bedrooote, J bxrix, garag*. gar- 
deo. b oto e ee e , ImmculaMy tor- 
rated 9, egapped dma to fed 
toapoott Ready 
pca on. Fm ebold. 

949 0093 


£335,000. Phone 01 


MODBMZB) DUREX 
1 anrlooiniB H>de ftek, 
Loodcxi. 4 bedroom, 2brth», 3 rucep- 


OR IF YOU mrat SOMEIHMG 
tttriy modern: 4-bedroom vOa of ee- 
ceptiond design overioaking the Bay of I 
Cremes, guest house, 3 bedrooms. I few*, P 1 
house for peoonnH, large heated f 
ask for Robert. 


Mns, gamgm 64 year hose. Offon 
rec^ of US$480 JXX) considered. Teh 
wTHmAfey. 073QB44B1 


OR PBMAF5 SOMETHING FROM 

the Befle Epoque. Cannes GHEforn^ UMON NOTTV4G HU 0X0. at- 


spfendd 


mnilO i n. Otefeea 

. . ecorated. »ady 

move xito, 3 bodroams, 3 & ! firao _ 
doable raceplion, ifciig roam. Etch- 
en, gerdn. covered garage 2 «an» 
TekLopdonT011M227^. 


ixopertyix 
sea uww. 900 xpn. kving a 

t garden, 


withi 


sqjn. magnificent 
Jurgen. 


sinerb 
area, 6^00 
tok for 


dinct derignod studio hoase, 2/3 
bedrao n a , roof terraca, in private 
mews, ready far oeo fetatog baeBgfcl 


£50.000. Td 01-727 


Ford) 


1 tC£rs52,7ssr ,o ° l 

MHBDLA 93v43.19.19 


HOLLAND 


YOUR CONTACT M PROVENCE 
Houses with character. Chanter 
properties. Estates. Erode GAROf 
IP 55, 13532 ST-RBriY-O&PRO- 
VH^CECndex. Tel 909101 J8 +. 


AMSTBCAM UVMf BOAT, 
beout tful not n center at 
DR70JX)a Amsterdam 31 ' 


AUSTHAUA 


ABBOUME Agfetfenm thsily with 


TOITOU - CHAKNTB. CU stone 9- 
room hmhauM with large attra cti ve 
lot & bams. 520,000. far photos write 
Mwon. 10 roe de Cambrai, Parts 19. 


panaraqe e v i e wsl a& i boy- + rity. 
Never to be buritixA Price Au^4« 
ndfion. hdudediW (wthosa pan a. 


IffXhqit. 
house' 


TOURAJNE 5. fan Amboae, 20 fern 


Tours. Mamficen! residence, * bed- ] 




Mr- Nrthorv «Odfar (XKE^ Merig 
Howe, P-O. Ek&W, BteacW 3t8Xj« 

argaEap^ai 


20 MMU1B C0CVA. ««y beautiful 
properly _ 5700 sqm. wofleden & 


planted, 250 sqm. I 
2 horse stables & p 


TO. Fl^OOflOO. Please write: 

■mpmju'ie Commeracie, 
35 Grande Rue, 74200 Tenon. Franc*. 


GREAT BRITAIN 



SOUTH OF ENGLAND 




5w» registered company offers 

opportimrty to purchase one of the best 
country houses aid 3 cottages situated 


on 7-acre garden m most beautiful 
the sea. T 


ting 


/tear the sea. The house was fin- 


^■TWCBrnDCAsncH 

tocotecnttji»SQudtefrpatciCAi»toiM 
Furnished jponn, rnoq.of fiwiri fe.llth 


H*0 BUSHES CBffB 

62 Kefeengracht, 1015 CS 
TeL- 31 305& 57 49. Telex 16183. 
World-Wide O&mu Coatm 


MANOA: Be present despte difficult' 
economic lanes. SIct# complete fodE. 
Has / services, Makati office, Eurape- 
92J n 9 r 5S? , I!“ tf . confidonneL since 
1961. MCCPO Bax 1569, MMardo. 
Tek 817418 7 p fom) Tfe: 22232 


PARS 
Since 1 957 L&P. provides 


Wmcj neetin^rboms. 5 roe d’Artai^ 


’ 4704. Rx; 642504. 


YOUR OfBCT M PARS: IBEX. 
ANSWHflNG SSVTCE, lecretoy. 
eraaneb, maBbax, Sve 24H/day. 

TeL PAT: 46 W 95 95. 



ohed in 1699 far o Dartmouth merchant I Ctwtery 

/u OCnTMOl pKHWy 


. Bcncamanv 

wd can be »c4d fjfy furteshed. Further 
50 acres of laid crnSafale. 



Price on appfie rti o ri . 
Interosted ^tem e contadi 


PJDL Box 963 




UffiOUE OPPGJtrUPGTY TO purchase TOOacciesJi 

tfSawsssssii et-is 


jnD^Ws- Gnnte£fo»Ei u... . 
Jury 3 beckoonted EngEsh country cot.. 


tcsM wMi weakh qf expand beam Ca s tfewd U de s 
ond Innfenoolt firepfocoh Hi ames of aid go 


swimmmg pool, 1 bedroam tit*. 
Very soduded but 



ton grounds.'..., 

7114Q3 or Ql-580 2137. 


POME PMTHOU5E LONDON SW7. 

dos e Hyde Truly super dupfex 
RonHtousa wHrfobulas views. D»- 
sigri_fimh A atmoeplwre. 3 beds in- 
master sas*L fasdnat- 

• * i B ** | w*- 

roof deck &2 westerly befao- 
« New aeatioa in pHiad eie- 

Was 01-225 0111. • r 


Aiadridstr 


i feSax 2218, ULT. 
1^6000 FraSdurt/Moin 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE - 


XZALS 


RORBCE' 



mutw to fetotfa .w xfecs .' ri 
fowidtehy or ^iW ea tdiij lgBfete , W 


. Bdx 293% He«rfcfl5bga^i 
te2T Newiy Odritftaicte C. ; 


a ^ 


WML aaoRBr mm i w ura ra d . 


MQN&Xip-‘ 


■ .-0BSBS omm:' . 

^irrtriemattadn,toaeiiSmcn Prince 




to-- 



:PAidS!ft seBUBBS 


LA RADIO 


6th floor, 6ft, 
fctahlm, 



DE 5T Q OUD. Modem apart- 
'irax.ferfi doss, firing 4- 3 bedrooan 
+ 2 ben, equfoped lacdien 4- tw- 




REAL ESTATE 1 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA . 
PENTHOUSE M PAU 

penlbociee is ob ro>te l ) i ats 
-: j orasfo "’ «ig th* aty the fork 
Ae«te,»ii dfeoterfm iffebestA 

Ssr^^sfass r. 

feted w ote iids ha®» betel swLI 
fetd V iWepn firing area afc - - 
ri^nt^ppooramc torraoe + 7Q 
MBtay-ftcperty w i th 

OMr tewQfwO/ & 
aov feoci*i panto elevator; te 


A.. 

. 


TtecfcttOir cgnfeioaxig, daenu 
rimtirn fe [JSf. a&MM - 


HMCIO SON ARMADAMf 
JQKBOBIA* .HF- 


M9n4MMAWHMU| 


Tab t71 -289900 


PORTUGAL 


ItW, 70 ACRES, 
tournac devefepmant. Pbra 


- • rat 
‘■■rib. 

■ 

' iri rtv* 

• v Si' 

■ ■V.’- 1 


SWITZERLAND 


'■A 


LAGO MAGGIORE! 


ASCONA J 1 

fil this world fomotis rasort we of* 
doss osaortaw nh and houes^A 
ebon toe old “Sage of AscoSm 
I na lolw with indoor p ool, you vJ 
yw home. Prioes front 5ratLOOO 1 
SF1.M0JXXL Mortgages teiowl 
mterep rates. These rate estates 
few for itee to fa reigwa.' 


3* 

•. .'A 


BWBtAID HOME UD. v 
REHDTCA TIZJANA *. 
VIA LOCARNO 27 A . 
04-6612 ASCONA N 
THL 04-93-3521*4 


1 

’•■rife 


mv 


a 


UL CBWfrSt Gaud. Owner sels 20 
milk Bade rn-20 ha. residonrial park, 
«Wped, 4 raorw + kitchen. 




I 50 ntornings/oftar7ftm. 


BWAODB, ! bedroom, 37sg^ on 
cmelYrt" garden, pnvew entrance, 
mifet, perfect osnettan. R75 JHXX. Teh 
316 or 45 BM S 


7TH, MVAllOBr eitcaptionte 273 


iiih ion. N.V. sme ao w. 


1«TH MONTMARTK No 


NfegMptehdeta GteettrloSSyj 
5572,. 


ra70 ! reaT B fc48a5'65: 


SPAIN 


„ . fcwh.jpjaaii 

utegusrsauotien< 


WriiSBJEt 


automatic irrigeteon. & beeforans, 3 

a?sSfe«a 



SWITZOLAND : 

fiorejmn con buy 5KJDIC6/A& 
MENTS/ CHALETS. LAIff G»B 
MONIRHIX or n these world foe 

*8ATc3a«i 


KVfi 

■% 


_ . REVACSJL 

52Mortfatefant, CH.72O2G0O 
. Tefc. 022/341540= Tafe» 22C0B 


' H 

■sirt 

• * 5 

- 


VALAIS / SWITIHlAl 

CRAMS - MONTANA 


,TWOH U5CGUONS ■ 
T LUC. VAL DrAfMV«S 


ST LUC, 

t Hep ond chalets 25 to ISO iqJ* 

1 to S raome. Gra* 60S. tnterart t . 
: 6J5S. Deration 15 years. 
CfeneraBwIderL Direct safe. 
VAL PROMOTION SA- : 
UL Aw du Midi. Q+J95D HOfi 
Tefc 4147723 34 95 


®®*EVA - "pods dons Tm 


um Private sate. Bax 4217T, 

S3 long Act#, LondorvWOF W 


Page 72 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


[ 


•%ji« 


;.Si 


i. HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


■KBITS PARK London W& New zu- 

par knuty 10 tforay epertnent bfedt 

under cortoroebon, C oma l te iun 
Mon* 1986. Bcceptionteappwti ‘ 

2 adjacent flotr fXI ovdobte on one 
floor, coted Moke 6 bedroonu, 6 bolh- 

n» art, 2/3 huge reception room, 2 

bteccnim, 2 garage spaces. 24 hour 
security, Mrptuaa entrance foyer. 
999 year lease ate. £96MOO safe 
agents: Loswona 01 -409 2B0. 


LONDON, CHELSEA, 5W3. lowly 
period hmse n quid street off Codo- 
gat Squora, 5 roimte wofc from 
rnradi, beaitifufly renovteed to a 
very high stotewd, 3 bedroom, 2 
balnraoMi, 2raceptem, huge hnwiy 
felchen/brecfcfrttt raoay doah roam, 
uWy room, pcetfry, seebdedgaefen. 


ACCESS USA 

I neAng riw R2600 M17D 

Uwago R590 - F3450 

jtoV F2980 F3^ 

Orlando . F2S90 . F3450 
Ddfas- F3430 - F3660 

FI 890 ^ F3000 

<53 more tfestino6ocs _ 

_ J5% cfaoounl on Itf ckns 
PARS fet.(l) 42 3f 46 94 
(Cor. be. 15ttq 




“SA1 WAY m hm Amterddet 
Mwne m. Atoms. 2%, Taws 317, 
“ eo ™!»342, CoBfomp 320 rio AHcxv 


CBIlRALIOMIONPROPBmB. h*> 

Company wil fiid for sev 
dfeiis fhe, property of 


^ O^^Mgt^Damndt 


20-274041. Tlx i 4635 


Mrfhake, spegofots wranovat foa 

vwaocL Fv 


refudtehroart, art gad ontiquaL . 

Write:] 

Bwm sa PMfaeh'isswiafcBoaa I 

ZUnCrl 


TO IAX/SPO 
Europe return 


from 




KONo^rco«qoys - lowest 

fot^l^A Eort/Wartdnt . Ccrado 
- Corfebeon. Tek London 748 4699. 


HOTELS 


FRANCE 






.to. Tefc {1| 4260 

PARIS --PfanaMirubaau ••■N^ ]g 


^Z^l^raomHoCStiK 
j?rfwi.fodgcTdfc m45^m V 
1 1 


GHAT BRITAIN 



/ ba- / tat™/ 


HOUAAN Yenmr a.w lans.iS 22 3948.-, 




Impritnc par Offprint, 73 rue de rEvatffle, 75018 Paris. 


HOLIDAYS &. TRAVE1 


FOR THE PEATUE 

WEEKEND 

TURN TO PAGE 6W 


LUXURY SAILING YACHT. Sderi 
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fiommodote 10+ craw. 


■ aamuin, noczixn im 


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47,1." < 


HBUUf YACHTING. Yacht Chart* 

V Aozdenw 28. Athens 10671,Gr*ec . , 
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