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INTERNATIONAL 




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PuMished With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


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By Judith Miller 

Hew Yale Tom Service concerned prevented the U.S. tech- Nevertheless, two sources agreed 

. n 3 '• VALLETTA, Malta ire mcal j5 am from arriving in time, that the team was delayed primari- 

- u* t* nti-terroriszn experts wen7 '«i 1 ,° thes ? acw *? Jts - ly due to Malta's reluctance to 

". w 41nB“’*;.,pute to Malta to hrfn .5° „ Egypt knew u needed advice sanction an open U.S. presence, in 

' and assistance, but it believed that spite of the Egyptian request. 

J.^^?M! !! nl ***H stonn *d the plane, alone" one soutm .ai/T-Ther^u Malta Initially refused to permit 

- have been saved on that plane had hebeoptar, cm official sa«L When 

. ,_ < *-5V7 te who ®0fce on con- the Americans strived in Sme,” the M^ 1 ** restyaa 1 dig re q uest, he said. 

that they ncH te identined source said. the Amen«Mprop«ed amvrng w 

■ ? i; >' 4 !-sid that Egypt had remnsted it q -tt— , an Italian heBcopier from Sjgouclh 


clayed U.S. Team 
Malta Hijacking 


'aUJlj 



VALLETTA, Malta — u.S. 
nu-terrorism experts were en 


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u W wu-iwivmin Mpens w 

“> *Wt» to lS1 r « 


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•i - ::?**£&• 

^Sf^V pH! sources, who 


‘V sourc^, who ax>ke on con- the America 

^ t^®y n °t be identified, source said. 




.'■■.■■ !r : .^-‘7 

“‘."r'Kifc? 

•.■ s 1 s —am . 'tali' 


Libya Says Egypt’s Army 


to Attack 


^ - % *r. 

? rov-:r-:: » 


^ .* IT ‘ tio^aid that Egypt had remje&ted n Q . . , , B an Italian hclicopier from Sigocdh 

:-. JS C - b ^ Ie f ^U-S- .Air Base inSicily. Malta tweeted 

1 -??r^sS3^taSK«StJar£^ team is the latest in a series of this as wdl, two iuroes said 

J ' promptly agreed soon ^o^EgyptAir Boons 737 **“* ^ team fly in an unmarked 

ip provide aid, the sources said. A' took off from A ^hwiv A^r^n^nv- private plane, from a country and 

'^W 3 ^^S^.T ekiIled<tur - " *25 EgSi^SSSn^ airport Ote sources dediJd to 

"• : 'e u; ^ ■ . • • plMe was diverted. After lengthy consideration, the 

’ " ie uni *? 1Iin ff ie ss te permit The sources declined to discuss sourccs the Maltese govern- 

‘-m = 7, v ■ tetetary aircraft to land, pro- what. kind of assistance the Ameri- Tacai approved this proposal The 

" ic ^* acled negotiations with , Malta cans were providing, how manv ex- technical team, which was already 
; - L^ycr^^o 1110 ^ 8 of emry, confusion pens were en route, the *«W na- assembled and waiting, boarded 

!5j^ in the ground and serious gaps in true of their mission, or their the private jet and took off for 
r ..^ ; y ^ x wim a mi c a Dons among the parties itinerary. Malta. It was in the air, dose to 

■■' Malta, when the Egyptian com- 

= p mando raid got under way, the 

vi JwyaSays Egypt’s Army 
: - Massed, Set to Attack saii-Us " 

'-thr y objections. 

■-*i » He described the atmosphere in 

the control tower, which was com- 
municating with the hijackers and 
the pilot of the plane, as one of 
“massive confusion." 

A Maltese source said that Malta 
had informed Egypt of the impend- 
ing arrival of the U.S. expens 
shortly before its commando as- 
sault began, but that there was no 
direct line of communication be- 
tween the commando team on the 
ground and the control tower. 

■ Upsurge m Terrorism 

Ihsan A. Rijazi of The New York 
Times reported from Beirut: 
Guerrilla activity by the under- 

ground Palestinian group headed 

— T"/* ""4 Cammefnn by Abu Nidal, accused by Egypt of 

Esmat Abdel Megirid masterminding the EgyptAir hi- 
1 ®° w combat prepara- , jacking, appears to be increasing, 

yip bans, it said. „ . w 

^R^iaW^ sniirrM ea.'H r K m Prr,rw_ Mr. Abdel Meeiiid said that The group said in a statement 



Reuter* 


■ rr ? X? BEIRUT — Libya Charged Fri- 

1 ^ ® that Egyptian troops massed at 

. _ «? 'f^ SE ^‘ he Libyan-Egyptian border had 

■-■ ^-i ^^xwnpletefl combat preparations 
' “ 5 md were planning to attack. 

7-* .’ Sl ^w ?:/ ■ Egyptian officials quickly denied 
. ■ allegation, although they ac- 

! ; r rj - a 5 ij^'inowledged that security along the 
'*■■ CaptQ feWder with libya had been tight- 
N, ‘ i >JL - ntj . ;taed since Nov. 23, when an Egypt- 
1 ' - Jiiar: ]’j;Air airliner was hijacked to Malta. 
- N:rvpr^Egypt has blamed Libya for spon- 
^ Tjt. f,7soring the hijackmg. 

L.”‘« ip^' : The official Libyan news agency 

■ ■' -ret s-y ^ JANA. monitored in Beirut, marie 

^ the chaigein a report from TripolL 
“JANA learns from reliable 
^Ei^utcb that Egyptian forces 

^ttr -lfessed in the past few days along 

me Egyptian-Libyan border have 

■ now cn^leted combat prepara- 
jjjLtr dons," it said. 

™ >£n ■ i .» v* 




U.S. Chides Israel 

As Slow to Help 

Spy Investigation 

Bv David B. Otraway official, in Israel was running his 
‘ Washington Pm Semce ' own espionage operation in Wash- 
WASHINGTON — The United ingion. and neiiher (be formal !s- 
S La ics said Friday that Israeli an- raeli intelligence communii> nor 
thorities “have not yet provided the his own political superiors knew 
full and prompt cooperation we re- about it. 

quested" in the case of Jonathan The findings assert that Mr. ?oi- 
Jay Pollard, a U.S. Navy analyst lard approached Israeli officials 
who allegedly sold military secrets and they did not approach him. 
to Israel. and suggest that one motive for 

A State Department spokesman, using Mr. Pollard was to find ou: iT 
Charles Redman, said. "We regret United States was spying on 
this delay and are urging the Israeli israeL 

gorernmem to respond promptly." i ndli p end eo! corroboration 
Mr. Redman sau. the Isnteh gov- cc , u j ( j not ^ obtained for the re- 

c™.“ eDl ■.v n . rm i, ,ri . l K e f! suite of the Israeli inquiry. Some 
States without explanation that f int jings clearlv serve the interests 

two Israeli (hpl«nats left the coun- f Boveromem and ti,e 

try on Nov. 22, following the arrest 


of Mr. Pollard. 

"We had no explanation for that 
departure. We were not informed,” 

Mr. Redman said. "We are dis- /~*l. TT G 

mayed that the government of Isra- *tj* 

el was not as forthcoming as we ' 

would have hoped and expected, rt t jri > 

Bui the important point now is that l FiVT t fits. 

we have full and prompt access to 

those involved." - T\* 1 

The two diplomats have been /a. 8 nYhifhTnflfS 
identified in press reports as Dan ^ I/WWIIMIW 
Ravid, an aide to the Washington 
science attache, and Yosef Yagur, Rnuer. 

the science attache in the Israeli ACCRA. Ghana — Ghana has 
Consulate General in New York expelled four U.S. diplomats, only 
City. days after a spy swap appeared io 

The statement was the most criti- end charges and counterc harges of 
cal of Israel from the United States espionage between the two coun- 
since the Pollard case began. But tries, Ghana’s government radio 
Mr. Redman said, “I don't think said Friday. The United States ar.- 
there’s been anv implication that nounced it was retaliating by expel- 
the normal rdauonship has been In ling four officials of the Ghanaian 
some wav fundamentally interrupt- Embassy, 
ed." Obed Asamoah. secretary for 

An Israeli Embassy spokesman foreign affairs, informed Robert 
said the embassy would have no Fritz, the U.S. ambassador, Thurs- 
comment. day night of the decision. He said 

In Jerusalem, Prime Minister the diplomats’ activities were 
Shimon Peres of Israel sent a mes- “wholly unacceptable and not con- 
sage u> Secretary of Slate George P. ducive to good relations between 
Shultz offering to return any docu- Ghana and the United States.'' 
meats stolen from the United The state-controlled news media 
Slates if the documents are found accused the four diplomats of 
to be in Israel’s possession, Wash- working for the U.S. Centra] Jmel- 
ington Post correspondent William ligence Agency. 

Claiborne reported, quoting offi- They were named by the Ghana 
rial sources. News Agency as Lawrence Gorufi. 

The prime minister's message, head of the U.S. Information 
the -xiurcer. S3:d. al:r avured Mr. Agency in Accra; Koceri Lee K;,c. 
Shultz that Israel in the future will an administrative officer at_ the 
abide by a 1 9S3 agreement between U.S. Embassy; Bruce Dean “elfL 
the two countries not to conduct and Annette Wood a ms. 


(Continued on Page 5, CoL 6) 


Esmat Abdel Megirid 


po-TT "Rcfiable sources said the Egyp- Mr. Abdel Meguid said that nn j‘5*g 0, E““ “ * *“!«»”* 
tian rttjmewas planning a military F®P l ™» coOectmg ewdaice of F^bai Thursday that it had 


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v - cr- 

'id 

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tian regnnewas planning a military couecung eviamce oi ^ ^ 

attadkon Libya after mobffiSng mvolvemem in the hnack- two Pal«timms mJordan, 

P“P^ “d deludinf ”L«“ *“« 


ri hjfSJ 


33Z5K 

JSD 


them to brieve . tbat ihe jEgypiiau 

hme f&y 

In ^^Bister Es- 

mat Abdri-Mt^n^mEgypt said 
that Ks j»antiy:l^;rtepp^ up 
security: oir die but that it 
was not plannings attack. 

He said that Cairo took the mea- 


ifluniijn soon as it had been assembled. ag«ts of the Jordanian authorities 

fe3ci ; Kv- “^ e donpf accept thrir hrterfer- _ Arafat, diairmao/cf Bv Clyde Haberm'ir ' Chukaku-ha. cr Middle Core Fac- ai trams — Friday morning's The prime minister's message, head of the U.S. Information 

- - , l - r - ^d. "Egypl will resist tiie Palestine liberation Orginiia- ;:iVl r tr . r . tion. Some ' irired after alleg- events came as a sIiock. the -xurcer. s3:d. al:r avured Mr. Agency in Accra; Koben Lee Kj.c. 

terrorism by all means.” - tim. TOKYO Saboteurs described «*!>' having datizged the Asakusa- Most of the damage occurred in Shultz that Israel in ihe future will an administrative officer at the 

Military sources in Cairo said The group, which operates under by authorities as leftist extremists b^hi train statiocin eastern Tokyo Tokyo, where virtually the entire abide by a 1 9S3 agreement between U.S. Embassy; Bruce Dean T-.-Kl 
that Egypt before deciding its next the n.w of el-Fatah-Revolution- slashed vital cables and set fires “ a firebomb attack. network of publidy operated com- the two countries net to conduct and Anneiie Woodams. 

move, was awaiting the outcome of aiy Cbimcil and often uses other early Friday at key sections of the It was not clear what formal muler ^ains was knocked out for espionage operations againsL each In Washington, a State Depar.- 

investigatiocs into the hijacking. ■ titles such as Arab Revolutionary Japan National Railways in Tokyo charges, if anv. would be brought, about 10 hours. other. They said the message mem spokeswoman said Friday 

Asked Tuesday if he was consid- Brigades, said it was responsible and Osaka. ’ A^ordm 0 ' so vrtice ihe actions B l lt “ pilal Lv s,l0 P? ed short of an ap 01 ^- expulsions were ■ nv.ar- 

““7 ering ihe to mitiiai7 option,” Mr. for^ kilfina the two men. Hussein al- ^1 , 4 1 . cateiy veined mth pnvuie commui- The message was conveyed by ranted and than i had ordered me 

*' ■ ; Jj£j aircS , a ^.^ ( ^ s ^ 1 a connec- 5^3. “W e never call for Bitar and his son. Mohammed. TTw aRjaremly well-coordinated were taken msu opt nu motormen er u^ijus and quasi-public subway Mr. Peres in a meeting Wednesday four Ghanaian Embassy staff 

1Z tion berireen-^aand the n^n SSw e ^l for peace, and if we ? t 7 ”* A l^es that connl^tolhe public net- night with the Uiambassadof, members to leave in 4S horns, the 

—3; to Malta.’. ^ aoecwx Nahar, Lebanon’s lradingnew^pa- ammuter lmes to shut down dur- rest government plans to mm over ed so much as inconvenienced. sources said. The sounds said the bv Ghana. " 

Egyptian officials have said they “Ad«iri<mU)M^war is not an PSjff"* mwmng rush hour and thenun! nulroac s>» which The annoyance, however, was of- message was not in written form. 'She said the United States also 

— bdievelabya was bdhind the hi- easydeS'^L woriedforMr. Arafats“recun^ jn^g a m^tm^^ey to b .- aperaung s« a heavy oeiicit. to |J0 conside^ble. and an estimated ^ j _ haddecideduresiew.andpovibiv 

-^H^cldog. AtotaloT 59 persons were NafeL^Stor of the *5™* “* acmBed the son of work for millions of nders. pnsaienands. 6.5 million to 12 million people ■ Pollard Tied to Israeli Office terminate, U.S. aid to Ghana. 

gjfcilied during the hijacking and in semiofficial al-Ahram newspaper, bem£ 30 ^ geat of • k) ™ iinan Damages were repaired by mid- Thai move will result b the loss were affected. Thomas L Friedman of The New which amounted to SI 5.1 million 

IA53* W the stocming of the plane by Egyp- wrote in a cotomn puUished Fri- govemmaiL afternoon, however, and service of up 10 100. 000 jobs, ahoci a third Osaka suffered far less, but York Times reported earlier from dollars this year. 

tS$ ;tian commandos. day diat Egypt would not go to war The 50-year-old Abu Nidal, ^ at * east partly restored on all of the total work force. Union offi- there, tco. more than 500,000 com- Jerusalem : "We do not plan to comment on 

...--7;=“' President Hosni Mubarak said with Libva. Estvol. be said, did not whose real name is Sabri et-Banna, ev'«ting rush hour. dais denied any link to me sabo- muters had to scramble. Sabotage An internal Israeli examination rrnnttmuwi nn Piwi> A TaI 


Saboteurs bombed Tokyo’s Asakusabashi station, above, and delayed Osaka commuters. 

Saboteurs Shut Rails in Tokyo, Osaka, 
Delaying Millions ; Radicals Arrested 


" ’ cool he said. *Egypi 
i5ier Es- tcl ™ sm ^ means.* 1 
rot said . “ J 


non. 




message was not in written form. ' She said the United State* also 
_ „ had decided to review, and pos.«i b !y 

H Pollard Tied to laaeb Office terminate, U.S. aid to Ghana. 
Thomas L Friedman of The New which amounted to SI 5.1 million 


wrote in a column published Fri- 5 U¥CLUiU “ 1L - aiterooon, However, ana service 01 up to lUU.UUUjObs. about a liurti Osaka suffered far Ics. but Fork Times reported earlier from doll ars this year. 

day that Egypt would not go to war The 50-year-old Abu Nidal, 'y®® least partly restored on all of the total werk force. Union offi- there, too, more than 500,000 com- Jerusalem: "We do not plan to comment on 

with T Jhvjr RffvnL be said, did not whose real name is Sabri ekBanna. lines by the evening rush hour. rials denied any link to the sabo- muters bad to scramble. Sabotage An internal Israeli examination „„ o, 1 r* 1 c, 


President Hosni Mubarak said with Libya. Egypt, be said, did not whose real name is Sabri d-Banna, “ics by tee evernng rttsn oour. 

^ Thursdif? tliat it was Egypt’s policy want to fight another Arab state or broke away from Mr. Arafat’s The Tokyo Metropolitan Police at several substations in the Osaka has found that Mr. Pollard was 

v^VsiSlo strike at aO forms of terrorism, to "punish an entire nation for a mainstream guerrilla group, el-Fa- Department announced that it had To Japanese — unaccustomed to ari v J CJUse ^ a ft ’ es te T ^ stretch of the working as an intelligence opera- 

- arid to -teach a lesson to ril those crime committed by an abnormal tah, in 1974 and set up a rival arrested 4S persons, including lead- political violence in recent years S hir.kan sen. ^ Japan s high-speed live for a secretive Israeli counter- 

.c^ho sec fit to attack iL" . leadership. " Faction. ers of a radical group known as the and greatlv accustomed to punctu- “bullet train ’ line, to run well be- terrorism bureau, a highly placed 

- hind schedule. Israeli source said. 

uotf*’ . Most of the damage, police said. The Israeli examination, the 

isfel TT G TV • TB . T ■ O _ T1 1 • Tl* "I _ was inflicted during simultaneous source said, was put together over 

U.S. Denies Reports It sought a Role m iLiiropean h lghter 

. . . eas. Shamir and Defense Minister Yitz- 

. By Axel Krause rand of France seeking a 5- to 10- bat role and oyer who would be “could yield important benefits" to mg duplicative efforts m tne inter- By setting fires inside signal box- hak Rabin, with the help of the 

hucmmanai Reraid Tribw percent share in the fighter project responsible for its design. the Nonh A dantic Treaty Organi- ests of fielding the most capable es and cutting electronic communi- chiefs of the branches of Israeli 

PARIS — US and West Euro- Some West European air indns- But Mr. Mitterrand revised that zanon. and cost-ef feci Liveaircral: weapons cations cables stored in gu iters intelligence. 

^ ■ *. pean mflitarv officials denied Fri- executives said Friday that the position op Nov. 8, at a mating in j n the letter, Mr. Weinberger ^>“ Ienxs P<»si b!e - alongside the Lracks, the attackers Mr. Rabin. Mr. Peres and Mr. 

"^fa^sldwtiiat Detense Secretary Caspar U.S. proposal appeared to have Bonn with Hamm Kohl, the west said that the “alliance’s resources A Wes L German industry source, knocked out switching systems, Shamir personally interviewed 

Jj'y art Weiiiberecr ba.i sought a direct been aimed al delaying the Europe- German chancellor. Mr. Milter- ^ uxilized most effectively if speaking on the condition that he telephone hookups and computer- some of the key figures involved in 

role in the development of the an program, and that it implied a rand said he expected Frances we work closely together to assure a not be identified, said ihai, based ized booking operations. the case, the high Israeli source 

—r. * ..1 European Fighter AinaafL direct u.S. role in the development stake m the program not to exceed jygjj jgygj 0 f commonality and in- on the reports of the letter’s con- No group claimed responsibility, said. Tbeir report was largely com- 

... .. w ■ of the plane, including access to 10 percent. teroperabAitv" between ihe Euro- tents, the U.S. proposal appeared but the Tokyo police immediately pleteby Wednesday afternoon. 

*.** . '“WS3id instead that Mr. "' e ™ - West European technology- The four partners are now orga- pean combat plane and “our own to hate been aimed at detavins the suspected the Chukaku-ha, a band Israeli officials relayed the pre- 

wntien recMtly to the “We are not seeking a direct role nizmg a consortium to design and programs." project. ” of radicals that was formed in the liminan' findings Wednesday to 

‘tfly?** 56 ministers of Bntam, West - m or t0 interfere,- a Penta- budd the plane. Tliey hope to pro- similar 10 1960s has linked itself to vari- the U.S. ambassador, Mr. Picker- 

,'AlAS Germany, Italy and S^m urgmg spokesman said in Washing- duce abort 7M aircraft for the four .7“^® weSteSfn^? the^m^ronS^ pSid-m ous causes. Police estimates of the ing, according to IsraeU gwenr- 

trans-Atlanuc cooperation in fu- wtL « It « a for cooperation to countries, and several hundred for smd tta J .fr. W^bager s rd^ ^ £ Sfi 5 inTfr-wr membership range from ment source. The findings presen 1- 

^UHenfl.^^progrm, -ft***--* -flf „ ^SSXSfjSKS SS?lRS.X 3.000. - » Ml Mpta « «. 

: - -■ According to published ac- of future programs.” mitagon spokesman in ^ ^ ^ ^ ru. four cartners have en now approaching middle age. addmonnJ details, were disclosed 

• counts, Mr. Weinberger wrote on Britain. West Germany- and Italy Washragton, rradmg poroons of i J nmde no ^ the The Chukaku-ha is most closely Thursday to The New York Tunes 

Aumicr sviih the letter, said Mr. Weiubereer had several leading U.S. aerospace maae no Oi.iciai rea^uon to uie , cwj „ A s ^ lUAn . . NnH : M - hu.h.k a,h, n i^is n a;. 


taee. 


strike at aD forms of terrorism 
arid to “teach a lesson to all those 
*tffwho see fit to attack iL" 

' : 


^ A 




#3$ 


U S. Denies Reports It Sought a Role in European Fighter 


. By Axel Krause 

[iaomuujnal Herald Tribune 


rand of France seeking a 5- to 10- bat role and over who would be “could yield important benefits” to ing duplicative efforts in the inter- 
percent share in the fighter project, responsible for its design. the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- ests of fielding the most capable 


-e-riA ’ PARIS — U.S. and West Euro- Some West European air indns- 

«■ • i « • i f ■ m/ MA*iitrvK cnin Fnnnv tnflf fhf* 


But Mr. Mitterrand revised that ration. 


and cost-effective aircraft weapons 


(Continued on Page 3. Col. 5) 


INSIDE 




■ ■ J 


^ UJS. rbfe in the development of the 
gi-ijj European Fighter AiranfL 


direct u.S. role in the development stake in the program not to exceed jrfgjj 
of the plane, including access to 10 percent. teroperabi 

West European technology. The four partners are now orga- ^ 

“We are not seeking a direct role nizing a consortium to design and programs.' 


‘ ‘ -V- 

i€ 


. v £ y^y 


project. 


i S 1 


:r According to published ac- of future programs.” ine remagon spokesman in £~i nshl „ for ^u e . Svv £_ whi A The four current Winers have en now approaching middle age. additional details, were disclosed 

• ? counts, Mr. Weinberger wrote on Britain. West Germany- and Italy Washington, reading poroons of S ™ USoS d ZZ nmde no the Tb e Chukaku-ha is most closely Thursday to The New York Tunes 

Oct. 25 to the defense ministers of agreed in August to proceed with the tettw^said Mr. Weinberger had lamrioatini?. ** French Drooosal associated with long-standing pro- by the highly placed Israeli source. 

i *-*?.')' Britain, West Germany, Italy and development of the plane for use m praised the European project as_ a P P & . ' tests by fanners embittered by the A spokesman said the State De- 

Spain, the participants in the air- the 1990s, and they were later “most important milestone in Trans-Ad antic cooperation, Mr. "Neither the French, nor the expropriation of their land two de- pan mem would have no comment 

craft project. The accounts said his joined by Spain. France withdrew Western Europe^ efforts to coop- Weinberger said, “would entail ac- U.S. propose, os we understand cades ago to build a new interna- on The Times's report. 

^ z&'.y suegestioQ resembled a recent pro- from the project because of dis- crate in conventional weapons de- cess to and use of our best shared them, make sense to the West Euro- tional airport at Narita, 40 miles The examination’s preliminary 

pcsal by President Frangms Miner- agreements over the plane’s com- wdopmenL There efforts, he said, technology with the aim of redoc- pean industry." he solid ( 65 kilomeiers) east of Tokyo. findings say that a senior IsraeU 

$ Ethiopia: Sunken Cheeks Now Bulge, hut Aid Hasn’t Ended Famine Threat 

rtA^^LL .By BlairiC Harden mates that nine out oflO of those people are being fed. year, die changes wroughL in 12 months were Yet despite the smiles of die children and ihe 

Washington Tosi Service Fred C. Fischer, U.S. coordinator of emergency astounding. optimism of their parents, who say they are eager to 

y • a w KOREM, Ethiopia — A year ago stretchers were relief in Ethiopia, said, “What we have done is save the In Lhe camp’s four hospital sheds, Ethiopians last farm again, the Ethiopian famine still presents an 

dispatched everyimoming in this famine camp to lives of most of the 7.9 mfilioa who were at risk. Some year slept six or seven to a bed, shivering in rags in die imminent threat of mass death. 

. . SAUDI ARABIA collect' bodies. They- were brought to tbe morgue tent, have died, but it is in the hundreds of thousands, not highland cold. In those sheds last week, they slept erne Like lens of thousands of Ethiopians who have left 

,U‘ y SUDAN NJMA- • /*"'*' washed, and wrapped in shrouds fashioned from food- the millions. It is erne of the world's great success or two to a bed. wrapped in thick wool blankets. the famine camps, most of the people leaving Korem 

^ — '"l / s aid bags. stories.” Mr. Fischer was speaking of the combined The cholera isolation ward where 228 people died in this week will not be able to feed themselves fer at 

N XrwfN . . , . least a year, relief officials said. 


■ /■ - . 


Marcel Carton, a French J 
diplomat kidnapped in 
Beirut, was reported in 
good health. Page 5. 

■ A Yugoslav village rejoices J- 

ter a Mexican scholar ih-.-ni: d 
that ancient Troy was Miiii 
there. Page 1 

■ U.S. drug officials are 

alarmed oier the spread ot a 
new form of cocaine. c.ii!=<i 
•‘crack." Page 3. 


SUDAN 




SAUDI ARABIA 






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Addis Ababa 

ETHIOPIA 


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washed, and wrapped in shrouds fashioned from food- 
aid bags. 

Outside the morgue, mothers, asters and wives sat 
in the dirt morning afeer morning and wept 

Last week the morgue was empty. Senes of stretch- 
ers, which once, had borne as many as 100 corpses a 
day. lay on the flow, of the morgue; gathering dust. 
Just outside, faL-cbeeked children played and sa n g, 
joyfully oblivious to ihe pasL . 

The one-year transformation of Koran from a bur- 
geoning ianrine camp where doctors felt helpless to n 
" shrinking. feeding center where doctors are bored is 
testament to a worldwide relief operation, that in the 
past year has defanged, if noi defeated, Ethiopia’s 

great famine. 

/V year ago* relief food reached only one out of 10 of 
the 7.9 million Ethiopians threatened by starvation, 

according to United Nations figures- ^ 

Now, after the emergency importation of about 1.1 
mink m ions f about 1 mildon «tnc tons) of food and 
lhe expenditure of about S13 billion, the UN esu- 


f What we have done is save the lives of most of the 7.9 million who 

were at risk. Some have died, but it is in the hundreds of thousands, 
not the millions. It is one of the world's great success stories/ 

— Fred C. Fischer* L’.S. AID official 


efforts of 35 countries, several UN agencies and 47 
nongovernmental organizations. 

At tbe bright of tbe emergency last March there 
were 43 famine camps feeding about one million 
people. Tbe remaining 23 camps now feed fewer than 
70,000. Ethiopians walk away from tbe camps nearly 
everyday. 

To a journalist who passed through Koran last 


On their farms, many of which are perched on 
inaccessible ridges in the nonhem highlands, the}- will 
be just as dependent on outside food aid as they were 
this past year at Korem. 

“These people are going to have to live for the next 
year or so on the grain, oil and skim milk that we take 
out to them." said Hugo Slim, administrator for a 
child nutrition center at Korem that is run by the 
British chapter of Save the Children, a relief 
organization. 

Plentiful rains and a good harvest in much of Africa 


KJ2S5 5 ISIS have ended the food emergency in 16 of the 21 coun- 

-if tf’?S 0d UN Food and Agriculfure OrgLnzalion. 

acr-*rtir in i h Chronically arid nations such as Chad. Burkina 

■ P - . 1 roni 3 attached pgjQ Niger, Mali and Mauritania are not expected to 

to a scale. Lss; week many of them refused the harness "JSl r Zl 


and grabbed onto the hook os if to do a chin-up. While 
being weighed, many giggled. 


need outside food in 1986. Good crops have cut relief 
(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 


■ The guerrilla war in Colom- 
bia is heating up. Page 4. 

■ Rebels in South Africa de- 

clared a “general escalation" in 
violence following land-mine 
and rocket attacks. Page 5. 

ARTS/ LEI SURE 

■ The art of Barcelona is cele- 
brated in two extensive London 

exhibitions. 6. 

BUSINESS/FIN 4.NCE 

B Japan's current account s nr- 

plus shrank slightly in October, 
but was still a hefty 54 .T bil- 
lion. Page 9. 

■ Saudi petrochemical output is 

putting pressure on the uorid 
industry. Pan 4 of Bob Hascr- 
ty’s series. Page II. 

SPECIAL REPORT 

B Christmas shopping: an inter- 
national guide. Page 13. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3Q-PECEMBER ^ 1985 


A New Trojan Theory Launches a Thousand Yugoslav Dreams 


By Hcniy Kamm 

Nflr York Tima Service 

GABELA. Yugoslavia — None of the evidence is in 
yet, but the people of this village about 15 miles island 
from the D alma tian coast have begun to act as tfam gh 
•they are sitting on the cradle of Western civilization. A 
steady flow of tourists from many countries strength- 
ens them in their belief. 

It all began last summer, when news reached here 
'from Mexico that a scholar had published a theory 
that ancient Troy was not where Heinrich Schiiemann 
excavated it more than a century ago in Asia Minor, 
on the western coast of Turkey, but in Dalmatia. 

The Mexican, Roberto Salinas price, said his read- 
ing of Homer's “Iliad” left room for no other conclu- 
sion but that Gabela had been Troy. 

Because the “Iliad" is the wellspring of Greek histo- 
ry and that, in turn, the bedrock of classical culture, 
:Mr. Salinas Price's displacement of Troy from Asia 
Minor to Dalmatia would malce modem Yugoslavia 
-the fountainhead of Western civ iliza tion- The Yugo- 
:siav press seized on the theory with ardor. Not surpris- 
ingly, the Greek press has paid no attention. 

Mr. Salinas Price published his book in E n gl i s h at 
Scylax Press in San Antonio, Texas. When a corre- 
.spondent of Tanjug, the Yugoslav news agency, sent a 

dispatch, it was so inundated with requests for special 
articles that it took the unusual step of publishing in 
■bard cover both the original book and a Serbo-Cro- 
atian translation- They are selling well at about $7 a 

copy. 

Mr. Salinas Price, for whom Homer is said to be a 
lifelong p.i«sinn_ based his theory on what he considers 


geographical and astronomical anomalies in the “Ili- 
ad" that preclude an Asa Minor Troy. After years of 
research, which first brought him to Yugoslavia in 
1967, he concluded that Gabela was the only possible 

site. 

He theorized that the reason for the millennia-old 
geographical error was political. In the seventh* centu- 
ry B.C-, Mr. Salinas Price suggests, Greeks cleverly 
transferred all the place names in the “Iliad” to 


“We believe!!!” indicates the thought has taken told. 

At the mnmw'i, the association occupies only the 
apartment at the bade of a schoolhouse that until 
recently was occupied by the teacher. Bat before the 
next tourist season starts, the whole school trill be 
moved to make, way for what the 2J00 villagers tope 
wfll be the beginning of Troy-Gabela’s golden age. 



Already, the enterprising private sector of this Com- 
munist country has produced an ample range of sou- 
territories that were then Greek. Homer lived in the venir articles —Troy ceramics, maps, car stickers, sun 


eighth century B.C 
Yugoslav archeologists gave the theory short shrif t, 
proclaiming to a man and woman that no archeologi- 
cal evidence has ever been unearthed to buttress the 
new thesis. 

“We don't care wfaai the archeologists say,” said 
Dragan Bradvica of the Gabela Tourist Association, 
which was quickly formed and gave the unemployed 
Mr. Bradvica a job. “We are very enthusiastic here and 
arc ready to dig on our own." 

As soon as the first tourists showed up last summer 


visors, model ships end little lions of Tray. 

The rums of an Ottoman mosque have been turned 
into a mini-amphitheater, where cl a ssi cal Greek and 
modern Yugoslav folklore performances will entertain 
next summer's visitors. It was inaugurated on the new 
Troy's greatest day so far— a triumphant visit by Mr. 
Salinas Price in September. 

Three television crews and 60 or 70 reporters and 
photographers covered the event. Mr. Bradvica. re- 
called. The scholar was greeted by applauding villag- 
ers and hundreds of outsiders. “People wanted to 


the fanners of Gabela knew they had a good thing. than k him for bringing back fame to Gabela." Mr, 
They inspired local youths with visions of tourist Bradvica said, emphasizing “back." 

V t0 S °"J? f JS HE.* After the welcoming ceremony of bread and salt 

three hills, .which is owned by «mfflts of Rorow ^ ^tJSual dance luckily but mexpEca- 

bly caned Ihetnam. die. tata of tbevilgft fane 



NATO 

each side but cannot agree on 


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personnel on 





NYT 


f- w ana su* “F was taken to see a Euripides drama set in Troy, 

tune for weeks to make accessible a badly overgrown r 


wasteland. According to Mr. Bradvica, the scholar was moved 

The tourist association does not actually pretend by the enthusiasm and dearly aware of his responsibil- 
ihat the site is the Troy of old but it does nothing to ity. “If they can prove I'm wrong,” the toons; official 
discourage that idea, either. A visitor's book full of quoted Mr. Salinas Price as saying, m commit 


discourage 

enthusiastic comments along the lines of one man s 


The Yugoslav press seized on 
the theory with ardor. The 
Greek press paid no attention, 


suicide.” 


WARSAW (AP) —The Polish 
academics from tep univesraty job 
pon reforms won in the Solidarit y era. 

Most of those dismissed had bees 
students. Beaon Mislriewio, mi nis ter o f higher 
purge as part erf a staff review repaired by die tor, 1 
Co mmunis t Party control over unwe rati e i 
Among those dismissed were three rectoo 
Warsaw Polytechnic, Karol Taylor of O darwfc 
Kaczmarek of Poznan University 
at their schools. 


i. 


t 

1 




Bishops Urge Eucharist for Divorced 



The Associated Press 

VATICAN CITY — Bishops 
and archbishops from three 
countries have suggested that 
steps be studied to allow Catho- 
lics who have divorced and re- 
married to again receive Holy 
Communion. 


At least 165 members of the 
hierarchy from around the world 
are attending a two-week, ex- 
traordinary synod here of the 
Roman Catholic Church, which 
opened Monday, to assess the 
effect of the reforms of the Sec- 
ond Vatican Council, held from 
1962 to 1965. 




Pope John Paul II prayed with bishops before the start 
of one of the Friday sessions of the extraordinary svnod. 


Bishops from Austria and Ja- 
pan suggested Wednesday that 
divorced and remarried Catho- 
lics be allowed to participate 
fully in the church. On Thursday, 
a Canadian agreed. 

“1 feel a tremendous sympathy 
for persons in that situation and 
I would certainly like to be able 
to reach out to them and come to 
their aid,” said Archbishop 
James Martin Hayes of Halifax, 
vice president of the Canadian 
bishops’ conference. 

In a closing session of a synod 
on the family in 1950, Pope John 
Paul II said divorced Catholics 
who remarried outside the 
church “can and ought to partici- 
pate in the life” of the church, 
but could not receive the Holy 
Eucharist unless they abstained 
from sexual relations. 


Manila Bars Ulster Conference Plans 


Foeo 



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Australia at 


U.S. Air Base 


To Meet by Christmas 


LONDON (Rentere) — _ . 

Hoareau, was shot and kitted outside his tome. 
Friday, the police said. His a ssailant Bed. 

Mr. Hoareau. 34, was a minist er in the r 
Mancham, who was overthrown in a 1977 
to power. The Seychelles government 
Hoareau and Mr. Mancham after an 


-- 4 
■■■'** 





•V' 

■ ^ . 


S' 

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Reuters fnrm am in the movinCL % 

Agmce France-Presse mental conference set up to give the the issue. dou wac at tte_center cf de Mnenot^te (f, 

MANILA — The PhOippmes Irish Republic a consultative role Mr. King said the action by the t£Le 

barred Australia on Friday from in Northern Ireland is likely to Northern Ireland Unionists. who abortive 1981 coup . v ,, , _ , , . 

using a U.S. -maintained nrOrtary meet within Lhree weeks, the British regard the agreement as the first disguised as tourists and oy Micnael notice. 

base here to protest what it termed minister in charge of the p r ovince step towards Irish reunification, 

an “ineiilt 11 4 a DiwMAHt F^ rr lrn a n S j ia i’if * w 


“The PhiHppme government is 
withdrawing its authority to allow 
Australian aircraft to land or use 
the Clark Air Base for any purpose 

i m - — -l. g - — i -_a 


an “insult” to President Ferdinand said Friday. raised “vay diffic ult issues. 

£ Marcos by the Australian for- The secretary of stale for North- “I don’t quite know how they 
eign minister, Bill Hayden. em Ireland, Tom Kin& said he ex- have thought where they go from 

peeled the Anglo-Irish Conference there,” the British minis ter said* 
to hold its first session before “It raises very difficult issues. 
Christmas. We are all members of the United 

Britain and Ireland established Kingdom Parfiament,” he said, 
whatsoever,” the Foreign Ministry the conference in a Nov. IS agree- “and this does involve arapp tm g 
said. " meat aimed at ending the political the majority view.” 

Mr. Hayden told the Aust ralian deadlock and violence in Northern Meanwhile, Prime Minister Gar- 

Parliament on Tuesday that there Inland between the Catholic mi- ret FitzGerald of Ireland has indi- 
were “human rights abuses by nonty and the Protestant majority. Gated that he plans to renew a cam- 
some organs of the government” in The agreement was given its final paign to change the republic's 

the Philippines and that there was parliamentary endorsement Huns- consritorion and make it more ac- 
“extensive economic injustice re- day when it was passed by the Irish cep table to the Protestant majority 
suiting from the government’s reso- Sraaie* The^ British Foreign Office in Northern Ireland, 
lute inaction against the privileges ^ British and I ri s h govern- When he first came to office in 
and political power of its wealthy uieuts formally ex ch a n ged notifies- 1981 as bead of a short-lived cosh- 
oligarchic patrons.” toons Friday of their acceptance of tion, Mr. FitzGerald began a cam- 

The dtnatim he und had “nm- * C 3 E recmcnt paign 10 rid the 1937 constitution 

»ided fertile eround for the British House of Com- of its mom overtly Catholic orar- 

*%££& Seffion -o^ 15 Norttem Irish Romsmnt . . 

to When he again became prime 
minister in 1982, the campaign was 
set aside while the government be- 
gan another initiative aimed ai end- 
ing 15 years of sectarian strife in 
the North. 

In a speech on the sew accord in 
the Senate earlier this week, Mr. 
FitzGerald made a last-nmnne ad- 
dition to his prepared text 


Sakharov’s 


v 

in the Philippines. 


members resigned their seats 

in VletteruTthe Australian Em- protest fe accord. They plan to 
bassy, the Foreign Ministry said it 


was 


"surprised why it was neces- 
sary for the foreign minister of 
Australia to insult and attack vi- 
ciously the head of state and gov- 
ernment of the Republic of the 
Philippines/ 1 


U.S. Rightists 


Scorn Talks, 


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Soviet Asserts 


Ml 


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represent an impediment to the es- last year. They catted for ravtstigaKHs asrapn 
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MOSCOW — Pravda, the Soviet ety,” he said. Mr. Andereoo was hriefiy ar resied aiKf rftMed G^hifefeenhe viated 

Communist Party newspaper, criti- Only on this basis could Dubfin Bhopal days after tone methyl isocyanate gnspresdroter the central 
rized conservative pobtied forces credibly propose to Northern Prot- Indian city cm Dec. 3. 


V A’. 


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the United States on Friday, estants “a coming together in 
saying they are trying to undermine peace, and by agreement and free United States, Brazil and Fi ance hea d ed arfist-of 
the results of the Geneva summit consent, of the two parts of Ire- submitted- to a board of inquiry by the government 
meeting and resist an arms accord, land," Mr. FitzGerald said. ■ . . 

An article assessing American 



reaction to the meeting be t we e n 
President Ronald Reagan and the 
Soviet leader. Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, said most U.S. news analysts 
the summit meeting 


China Softens 


Astronauts toPractice Constraction 


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Soviet relations. 

Pravda said U.S. commentators 
believed it was important that the 
two countries had agreed that nei- 
ther side would win a nuclear war 
and that neither sought military 
superiority over the other. 

“This does not mean thaj there is 


Warning Over 





*■* 


CAFE CANAVERAL^ .Florida (UH) — Two US. astronauts 
the space shuttle Atlantis prepared for a six-tour spacewalk Fi 
practice boflrfmg techniques .that could be used to- cti a s t rac t a space 
statical. | 

The astronauts, Jeny JEoss and Sherwood Sprin g, planned to erect & 

• ^ . I j ■.« v * * ■ , « * ■ 


- 




f- * 


■jrw* 


-n- -w-7- '45-/oot (13.7-meter) tower raid assemble 

Ho ney Ivon O' - sttuJ y difficulty Of mmm^tiating 

(O & . • The spacewalk and another rat ! 



Reuters 


A 


DM 

n 


structures to 
dejects to weightlessness 
on Sunday are expected to help space 


‘ r'Vi 




BEIJING —China’s too najottr crews begin- assembling a spare 

a tor in talks with Britain on ptomed for tjge early 1990s. - - 





-V 


A UW UVb nwaiu *-» lUUlf li| ■ - • — _ _ 3Lf. - - ■ - . .V ’ ■ j| .* . 

nobody in the United States today Fnda y “ state? p _ A 

who is displeased with the results of P^t ^pujig Bnlam agamst ma^- * W U1C 

the Geneva meeting," Pravda add- nig pohueal cfaanges m thecoloror Ahnrf BeuBdto wtoTOtonwredaspiesioe 
ed. “The for^oftiie mflitaiy-in- But he sad a was important fra coop in 1965, said in Madrid thathewasYonnin 
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EDUCATION 

DIRECTORY 


idfl be published on 


DECEMBER 7, 1985. 


For in for m atio n, ffetgg contort 
FrxtnfoUe OAmnt, 
International Jlemld VrSbun^ 
or your nearest IHi'repm & itntine- 




6 

Kte?" 




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in an aunty 
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b-- - 3 


ct] 


tion would already like to .H° n SK° n g’ s pohdcal systcm.now Jgiontir Zak has been jigged fa d malowt fiance mini ii i n r r wpfarfn'e r 

emasculate the content of the Ge- m ® rt ~ aV01 ^ whai he catted Leopold Ler, who was rdGeyed from his office “fra health reasons^Oct. ^ It.— • -* 
neva derisions and to do all they contradictions afterQnna takes the news- agency CLK reported Friday, 
can to hold back progress rai reach- ovct the cotony mI997 . . 

ing accords on key issues of war „ Chl ^ s m 

and peace.” Hong Kong, Xu Jifltrm, said Nov 


f 


CTi, 




n . . . 23 that there were signs that the 

tlrri qmg0 ! government there had deviated 

^t tto smimt mewing was no &o m the terms of last December's 

uoned Britain against hasty re- 
v)ne cannot bdp noticing the forms. 

fact that, as if at the wave of a ButKeZaishao head of the Qn- 
toton by an invisible conductor, nese delegation in the Joint liaison 
the U-S. mass media have begun Group, which worics out details of 
these days to curtail discus si on of the- Hong tT nqg agreement, said ■ 
the results of the UJS.-Soviet sum- Friday that Mr. Xtfs awe* had to ’ 
mit, M Pravda said. be read as a wholes * ■ • 


^^p^riiarDcntagf c onunissi od in a report submitted tothel^islatuce 


“y r ■ la 

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hips 


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erlands 


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pn 
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: Reuters : J* 

THE HAGUE — The Nether- 
lands said Friday that its armed 


The redoction of nucle ar 
y™s proposed this month on. the 
same day the cabinet decided Lo 


“Someone is deariy sedring to “Them^ressioalhaveis thereis forces would train and,eqnq) them- authorize dqplavmeat of the cruise 
localize the effect of Geneva, to no deviation from the Joint Dedar seizes for omy two wartnne nuclear missiles. That dedsiem was made 


slow down the positive process and ration’s spirit on the part of (hc :i6lcs ™aead of the curiemrix, do- despite strong ODDosmon acroa 
^ British side," he said after the, spitesteongcritidsm of theieduo- the country andamoM some ment 

which the summit gave to tins pro- group ended four days of talks. non hy-ft® NATO allies: bersof Ml Lubbo^swra SE 


cess,” the newspaper said. 


CHURCH SERVICES 


Britain plans to introduce a mea-- Prime Minister Ruud Lubbers Democratic Party, 

sure of democracy in 'Hbmr Kong; said after a cabinet discussion that TV m™.*. ■ . ' 

in September it attowed some S the dedrion on niidear roles could 
on the colony’s LMskiive Council n< *' ^ deteA S d Iran ^ govern- 



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VWtJK-Colarnbw, 75006 Parts* Moira St.- 
SuffMGL Sundajr worship Sn Engltsh 9A5 
am, Rov. A Sapraorvilk. TeL: 6Q7A7JI2. 


in .1 goo cmtCTra^ gp Y Brame ai. 

S 1 ? 8 : -abo faces a general deetkm hi 


PARS SUBURBS 

EMMANIA BAPTIST CHURCH, 56 fat do* 
fens-RofiinSi RuoR-Molmorsan. English 
iptfllung, iw n flalicd i atf doaom f na t km. 


to be filled thro 

— ■ 

Mr. Xu's comments, seen widely 
in Hong Kong as meddling by toq- U-S- nucle ar cruise 

ing, salt shares tumbling an tb* . we see the two as a mw .u - • . . ■ T , 

Hong King stock markeL L single entity, it was the fine of the £2^ opiwisitkm L^jot 

“The convergence of "the Hong c ah inet that we should stick to our - gsm m g strength m 

Kongpolitical system now and at • postitm toth questions*” he 
t I997is very imoort 


■ m 

New 

,n& 

huj 

- Sy 

y '-.-d ihc 

l/’ r. to 6e- 
;- T ' : 'Jr.chJ 

important 
■ irffieiji 
there to 
;e ihe NriS 

m say &K 
or did 


— ■ *- - 

ranged. 







Sii 9^45/ WonNp: 1 <M& Ofh*r odivities. 
Call Dr. B.C. Thomas, Poifor. 
{1J47'^9.T5J9- 


Ofszuon polls. 

ter 1997 is very important," Mr.. Ke Lubbers emph««7ftH that ^ 

said “Otherwise, the actions will Mr. uibbers said thal LordCar- Jr?J nWc< ^ not mean ttoNethtf- ^ 
not be coordinated and 

be some contradictions.’ 

China has promised t_ _ 

Hong Kong's economic and social opposilion to" tiie reduction. NATO response to Soviet de- 
systems in a seif-administering^ in nodeaiToles. ••• ployment <rf SS-20 mK-lfffTTm»*viK 







IMMANUS, OfURGH near dfy ce nt er. 
Rfendy chnstian feflowiWp. Smday 1 1 iOO, 
TeLt [08] 316051, 151225. 


J — — — — — — » my. - fL l j . . ry, j| 

“special economic region’' after . The. l^^ d«asion means drop- “Thereisoftena W 

1997. Mr. Ke said Friday that ^ “dear tasks'asrigned to mg that all membS^te^to ^ 

future nofitical svstein had nrrf vnf - IWO. SQUadfOnS O# F-16' fidrfar iete Same bmMa. w l - . b»i‘ 




Tffn 


To place an advertisement 
In this se ct ion 


fleam contact: 

lb Elizabeth HERWOOD 
LSI Ave. OlhMuDc, 


fiiture pofitical system had not yet.-’ iwo sqrodrons trf Frlti fightojets same position,” he said. **F« «- 
beat decided. Qnan^pat^phmes.Tbe mnplifWme n £ma 

Forrign diplomats said they to* F-l^are^eqt^ped tCMfc&rer nu- some allow nuclear weanonsrohe 
lieved Qdna did not want poKtidtir,- dwrbt mb san d ttoQrtfflstodrbp stored on their «Yii 
parties to develop in a democratic', atomic toth ctor^t; ■ ‘ V *ttow that We are now-savmv we t 

In a joint statement, Britain and K^Ta rid go res anxl^ m^fear-npped Eaztier, in Brnssde a It A 


5 M«ai- 
^nrn 

& ,n 
Buc] 

pen d 






925X1 Ntuffljr Cedes, France. 
tLilki 


TcLi 747.12.65. 


, ; / 


* ■ 




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- • ... •;..^V. vr : ■ • • - • rx. ••• 


nifii * uucua r. deters 

-reft posture and its aedilnfi^^' 


Sence 

celed 


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Shultz-! 


Lingo* 


clear 




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Page 3 


P 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 1985 





'Crock, 9 a New Form of Cocaine, A 




i 




A 4 
■■ 


Foundation; 

Fast ^^ tai&e Top 

;: 7l: ^si^v^^TT ded ago, 

^ :is*=%52»SF . aggressively -conservative 

: J:; a a? 51 * vJJ ® fffeS* Foundation;** a 

• . •**.. to fhi Reagm idmimstzar 



— - j- — — - 1 

si Brookings institution 
_ conservative American 
aterptise Institute wiach axe 
der aind, until rectetiy, were 

trustees are 
brewer, and 

hi — SlBOD, S fOl lllCT XJJS. 

• V' [^^essmy secretary. Its analysts 

X:;. ^ X “Oi cxpeaed to devdppKgh- 

original ideas m major <vnt- 
’ f T: ^ to shape scholarly thinking. 

. ; __ ■'-•c. r A “dier, they are expected to tau- 


««y are expectea toau- 
• Vjj sources m Congress and in 


:. N ^ C,U, li*N Rern 




what 

are beco ming ripe, and 
'oduce terse position papers 
nt can be used to sway political 
. gumenL 

■ scream and boDer lo get 

,.7 - lo go out to bunch wth 

. ® i lfj^feople, to find out what’s going 

. s ~ said Phillip N. Truluck, ex- 

" fw.. ut ive v * ce pre sid ent of Hep- 

“We don’t sh around smok- 

' pjp^ *“* t h inki n g <*“p 

s^^ioughts.” 

: , ^ Burton Yale Pines, vicepresi- 

' : ~’*iedk W ^ *& = ni for research, added: u Ev- 

■ - AS-*.- *** here is an advocate. We 

'• :: recognize that we are here to 



m 


- ' Pa »portk'*ar Snb: 

V\rr»-.. . ! 


manners 



__ V^Jon fuming to Surface 

{j die navy's 10 four-star ad- 

■'■ •■• :r. pi.rr^ ihirals today, four wear the gold 
jg olphins of a submariner! They 
the two top aHrnrrak 

- '-l“ ^ ^ J- Crowe Jr, chairman. 

. "J b^, J the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and 
- - ‘‘’v to: stUDes D. Watkins, chief of naval 
' Until recently, naval 



„ Naval officers trace the rise of 

submariners to Admiral Hy- 
“ /-"’ Wasij^ian G. Rickover, who forced a 

■ k&toctant navy to mm to nnclear 

■ "■? i ~' ® -s 5:iy >WBr » first for submarines and 
^ r - L '- hx.-^j^jaly later for surfane ships, and 
' ' Li bivj.^o recruited the top naval 
- rvzs; ^ Ijc cademy graduates. For years, 
•r-^.'he shortage of nuclear subma- 
rine officers kept them at sea and 
sit of the running for mag or 


~‘=na 


■“^S. 


commands ashore, but today 
they are gaining senior rank. In 
the words of one officer, 
“There's just too much brain- 
power in thatgroup to keep them 
down.” 


BOOP-BOOP-EE-DOOP — The tratitional Macy’s 
Tha nks giving Day parade in New York City featured a 
67-foot-Mgh (205-meter) balloon of the cartoon charac- 
ter Betty Boop perched coyly on a crescent moon. 


who had vanished six weeks -ear- 
lier. He was promptly arrested. 

Shorter Takes: Alexander M. 
Haig Jr, who has served both as 
secretary of state and allied com- 
mander in Europe, has been 
mentioned by his literary agenL, 
Norman Brokaw, as a likely Re- 
publican candidate for presi- 
dent. Mr. Haig, however, says h 
is “too eady to talk about 
. . . The farm crisis has become a 
boon, for consumers. Because of 
food surpluses, the Consumer 
Price Index is expected to rise 
only 22 percent this year over 
last, or only a little over half the 
increase for aQ prices, according 
to the Agriculture Department. 

... New York Gty’s drought 
emergency is over, seven months 
after it began, and New Yorkers 
are free to water their lawns or 
fill their swimming pools, now 
that it’s too late. 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


ShortTakes 

New York state has banned 
corporal punishment in the pub- 
lic schools, the eigh th staff; to 
take such actum. Except for Ha- 
waii, the other states that do not 
allow it are aD in the Northeast: 
New Jersey, Massachusetts, 
Maine, Rhode Island, Vermont 
and New Hamp shire in most 
s t a t es that do p er mi t corporal 
punishment, however, local 
school boards may ban h. 


Les policewoman, was enjoying a 
day off at. a Las Vegas casino 
when she got tacky at the slot 
machines. No iadqxrt, but the 
man working. The next 

to hers was a murder suspect 


i 1 


\"ain5t(i|; 


• ■ ralaa 
■^r.s «rci3ax 
.-rr 7r VzsAz 


yew Zealand Bisks End htcomeFell 
Jf-ANZUS. U.S. Warns Since 1973, 


i^sfedy Bernard Gwertzman 

- . 7 i?^2iiTfe! Mam York Tunes Sendee 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan 
■■ i^taainistndoQ has told New Zea- 
. rf iHEirf that if ii goes Through with ^ “ the test two weeks 

■ i ; toils to enact ls^isbiioii barring mmcatmg that he mlended to pro- 


would be forced to review its com- 
mitment to New Zealand’s defense 
under ANZUSL ■ 

But because of statements by 


U 



What effect such a move would 


. , i-.-rr Kr arrfuIfiElie officials said this week that a 10 Ngw Z e a la nd 

- »--:d l asctHong dispute between Wash- 
on and Wehmgtoa over visits 
. c y-rs. rkss® f J-SL Navy ships had reached a 
L . ^-X^ViaisEsive poinL 
. X-siscusifin agns appear to poin t to an 

.Artil t(u» iruifiiol drf p mw / wnm it- 


Democrats Sexy 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The pretax 
income of a typical middle^noome 
-American family with children 
shrank fay 10.8 percent, or a total 
$3,152, over the past 11 years after 
accounting for inflation, the Dem- 
ocratic members of the Joint Eco- 
nomic Committee have reported 
In 1984, such a family W 
have on New TwitanH j$ muyua ni 525,836 in income before taxes. In 
There is no imminent threat lo (be 1973 f the typical middle-income 
country. Australia, which is also led family with children had a pretax 
by a Labor government, has said it mcomc worth $28,988 in 1984 dol- 
would retain its own militazy tics ^ the congressional committee 



1 ? 

?'• X"' 


- ? 




.-;Jr -T- 


dlingion’s policy. 

acd to “act to meet the com- Some a dminis tration o fficials come levels, but was most severe — 
i danger” m case of an attack b<di ® ve the hupact would be mostly f 34 perce^loss— for the poorest 
nrv of them. psychological, cMiring concern famihes with c hild ren and least so 

he Labor government of Prime a ? Boa *L t ?H P^ u l a ' ~/ OT wcaJ * y 

. jirecs^ister David r*™ * has said it non * ^ Biwz y s valued its famhes, the report said. 

" r to sedc pSSneataiy ap- dose tks to the United Stalts. . Theavrrage lossfor aU fannlie&. 

^ K PaulD - Wclfowite, assistant sec- including those without ctaldren, 

^i^owering the prime minister to «tacy of state for East Asian and ^ a J out 

~ ,S in*n d KSrt .night T.- Pacific affairs, said in an intaview Most of the toss has occurred 

- - -/tag nuclearwSpons. m New 7 -“ l9nd ufc,i * i£m thal *® 1979 ‘ 


smee 


on New Zealand idevuion that is 

to fag broadcast Dec. 12: One reason for the reduction has 

*1 flank the probable consequence been tbe economy’s relatively poor 
of such a review would be that if performance since 1972, tbe report 
New Zealand enacts legation said. 

tha t rives the force of law to that A Republican committee econo- 
part ban, that we are going to have mist said after-tax income would 

Ss fromT^STsecurity to dfectiydy tommare amance Mu» = i ;;= 


■/mg nucitau: weapons. 

j^ dhe proposed law, which, would 
■* H r!te&Bnze the prime minister to 
_ ' ce the decision by himself, mod- 

t an earlier draft that gave Fe- 
asibility for the decision to a 






NetherUfl® ^ toS STS Otfamnyincome.be^it.tmld 


{ r; ! ! ! « 


u Nudeai* 


»ne minister “The U5. aTltanca rdatibusbip ha vc reflected tax cuts since 1981 

^(fugh State Department offidal ^NcwZatadwoolda.l.-hc size of invite in the 


1 there was no indication that 


Mr. WoUowitz said the United 


; Laogehadchanged hisappoo - 1 hoped to retain its defense tT 0 

■^^-WLSSa . U.S. Officials Plan 


... . . .. He said dial New Zealand “real- _ . 

-■ i .J.^SS5Si r * B Intelligence Firm 

' r ' “It can either face a future where 

■- w continue the land of fmitfhl WASHINGTON — A US. in- 

- : < 3 # , t P q ? °5L cooperation we’ve had, where we teQjgence official said Friday that 

^ force the New Zeshnd^v- oontI g >ute jointly to stabOity in a he and President Ronald Reagan’s 

science adviser would soon resign 
to establish a company that would 
go off on a brand new coarse. helps inte rnational corporations 

"And I flunk there are a lot of build their own intelligence sys- 
unknowns and uncertsnties. But I - terns. 

think it’s going to be a less stable Herbert Meyer, vice chairman of 

world in general and I think modi the National Intelligence Council, 
less stable in the area of New Zea- said in an interview that be and 
land's own interest That’s some* George A Keyworth 2d plan to 
thing that New Zealandecs wQl resign by Jan. 1 to form Lhe compa- 
have to judge.” . ny, to be called Keyworth, Meyer 

The adnmristnttkm ft is TnteroaiioaaL 


^mmtio^y that an American region Lthink has been 
- — uot:carry nndear . am 

. ----- 7 go off on a brand ucw cc 



1984 and that has already pro- 
' . I'.^d a crisis in U -S.-Ncw Zealand 


%rr ■’.^^itiom. The rift began when Mr. 

lge barred the viat of an. Amesi- 
■>' ji. destroyer, the Buchanan, last 

- . •T' ^^«er after Washington refused to 


. S... Aether it was armed with nu- . interfering in New Zealand's inter- Since 1983, Mr, Maj er has been 
.... — ~ nal affairs, hut officials acknowl- in' charge of an office under the 

edge that the United States is hop- dire ctor of central intelligence, 

ing that Mr. Lange will decide not William J. Casey, that produces in- 
to go ahead with the Legislation tcnigence estimates. Mr. Keyworth 
when be recognizes be cannot have has been director of the White 
both an anti-nudearpoEcyaadan House Office of Science and Tech- 
Americau defense commitment. , . oology Policy since 1981. 


wea P ons - 

?: ; >s a matter of policy, the United 

.. s - ^-^tes declines to oo uf i ah or deny 

a particular shq) is carrying 
s, *»T • 1 sJ^jtfdesi r weapons, asserting that it 
r rC ~: :■ inot grve such signals to the So- 
.. . . ‘“'jjs : !«i Uruou. 

. T 1 *- ^ rtn 



j^yilsnd, stopped dmirtg TttidR - Tbe miclfSftr dispute has been titen 
% & ice information with it, and can- seriously in Washington ' for Tear 


Gas Blast Kills 5 in Glasgow 


Rewr* 


& icemformaticHi witir it, and can- seriously in Washington' for Tear 

that if the United States does not GLASGOW — At least five per- 
respoiid force&Dy, New Zealand's sons were lolled Friday when an 
policy could spread to allied cbim- .explosion and fire, apparently 
tries that allow vishs by American caused by a gas leak, destroyed an 

age enacted a law banning nu- ships without questioning whether apartment budding here. Four oth- 

thry cany midear weapons. . er persons were injured. 


“ ‘ last summer’s ANZUS raeet- 

*0, -r 1 ; ;jiP>cretary of State George P. 
... ~ ^ & , jftdt z said last summer that if Mr. 

\ V sir . (f-. 


; . ~ \ a ^,age enacted a aw oanning nu- 
'V-- ^ar ships, the United States 

-r 

I . ’ 

• , • * 'jJT 


% Jane Grass 

Mew Tims Sonic* 

NEW YORK — A new form of cocaine is for sale on the 
streets of New Yorir, alarming law enforcement officials and 
re h abilitation experts because of its tendency to accelerate 
abuse of the drug, particularly among adolescents. 

Tbe substance, known as crack, is already processed into 
the purified form that enables cocaine users to smoke, or 
freebee, the powerful central nervous system stimulant. 

Previously, freebasers had to reduce coca me powder 
rimnsdves to its unadulterated form by combining it with 
baiting soda or ether and evaporating tbe resulting paste over 
a flame. 


cocaine powder U processed into pure beige crystals known According to data collected through the telephone hot 
as “rocks” and then packed into transparent vials resembling Hue, 60 percent of the users soon the drug, with the remain- 
large vitamin capsules. 

The crack sold on the street in New York range in cost 
from S2 to S50 depending on the number of rocks in the vial 

Because of crack, new cocaine users 
have graduated more quickly from 
inhaling to freebasing, the most 
addictive form of cocaine abuse. 


ing 40 percent evenly divided between freeb 3 sing and intra- 
venous use. The pattern, however, seems to be changing. 

Of Lhe three methods of use, freebasing offers the most 
immediate high (within 10 seconds) and the shortest one 
(approximately S minutes) and thus leads to the most fre- 
quent, debilitating and costly habit, experts say. 

Kevin McEneaney, director of clinical services at Phoenix 
House, an international network of rehabilitative centers, 
said he was concerned by reports of sexual degradation from 
women using crack. 

Cocaine, particularly in its freebase form, is a euphoriant 
and its users often describe increased sexual appetite and an 
interest in previously untried sexual practices. Mr. McEn- 
eaney said. 

Finall y, Mr. McEneaney said, there is the nsk of unpre- 
dictable medical complications. By stimulating the central 
nervous system, increasing heart and respiration rates and 
elevating blood pressure and body temperature, cocaine has 
been known to cause coronary arrest, strokes, convulsive 
seizures and other less serious disorders. 


Since crack appeared on the streets of the Bronx last year. - ■ <■■ ■ — ■■■■■■ 

spreading throughout the dty and its suburbs, new cocaine ^ paradoxically is sometimes less expensive than the 

users have graduated more quickly from inhaling to freebas- amount or pow der, currently retailing at S75 to 5100 a gram, 

mg, the most addictive form of cooinc abuse. necessary lo produce ibe equivalent freebase. 

in addition, crack dealers have found a ready market in Meanwhile, narcotics officers from the New York City 

pajpte reluctant ro escalate to mtrayeaous miec&qo of poU a Dwanmem have shut a few of the so^alled crack 

cocaine because of the Fear of acquired i mm une deficiency houses, where soles are made and users gather for smoking 

^ r EfP inc -. binges that can last for several days. 

T>mg abusers are always looking for the ultimate high, , , . , , , _ , 

asking each other, ‘Did you try this, did yon try thatT ’’laid Earlier ^ nionih, agents of the federal Drug Enforce- 

Wilfiam Hopkins, who directs tbe street research unit of the aent Adm i n i s tration arrested a cocaine dealer and then d . enforcement officials aaree that 

state Division of Abuse Services. “This. I have ^ded a Hariem apartment where he was reputedly produc- M«ncai oeperts ana Jaw entorcemeni oiiiaais agree mat 

. auosimoe rtousc aavices. i ms, i nave viioMam <2 T«Knsds\ of crack -«-h dav for net dailv crack should not be considered merely a slight variation of 

CTgy MUMIO believe, it bmlfipg. Ths n lhe wreotte ^|at^|mg i j t cm.<ls)olo^Et al :aaay,l 0 rnttoaus ^ u brausefretb^st is such a 

j j , , . , . . . . . di/ferent experience, both qualitatively and quantitatively. 

Wid^read ure <rf mack has not been report^ causide the WTule law enforcement officials are increasingly turning “The high there people describe is not even comparable,” 

NewYork area. Bw Dr. Arnold M. Washton, who is director their attention to crack, ns abusers are showing up m local ^ Dr. Washion of Regent HospiiaL “It is unmatched in its 
of addiction research and treatment at Regent Hospital in treatment centers, where cocaine- related admissions were euphoria and exhilaration. Cliniaaiis need to knew- about iL 
Manhattan and research director for a national telephone rising dramatically even before the new form of the drug was need w abou , iL ^ enforce mem people in 

hoi lme” for cocame users, predicts an “epidemic" of available. other pans of the country need io know about iL In no wav 

freebasing because of the availability of crack. Experts estimate there are ai least five million regular ^id h be compared to snorting cocaine hvdrochloride 

As the use of crack has spread in the metropolitan area, cocame users in the United States, with perhaps a million of powder. It’s almost like we're talking about a different drug 

drug officials have begun raiding “factories” where the them in lhe New York metropolitan area. here.” ° 

la Test on Rats, Artificial Blood Cells Succeed in Sustaining Life 


By Boyce Rensberger ^ncs, tbev could 

Washington Paa Smi£ never substitute entirely for real 

WASHINGTON — Medical re- b J ood - researchere found, 
searchers in San Francisco have the arnfiaal cells woe able to ^ 
made artificial red blood cdls and **** 1315 ■* en sub«inited for 95 


then used them, in salt water, to 
replace half the blood in rats. 

The animals, which or dinaril y 
would have died from such a blood 
lOSS, Survived with Only minimal 
side effects, showing that the artifi- 


percent erf the animals' blood. Two 
of five rats tested this way survived 
for 18 hours. 

One advantage of tbe anifirial 
blood cdls is that they can be 
stored far at least six months. 





A «VSl / VI 
• # ■ .1 f . . . 


dal cdls were able to pick up oxy- abtwi tiian natural 

gen in tbe hmgs and ddive-it to the blood, and could theoretically be 
rest of the body. gtveo witbom regsrd to the recipi- 

The feat, believed to be the first “L 5 . 

of its kind, shows that it may be . C .* "V 1 . a '’ Ho “ 1 ’ apharmaceu- 
possible to develop a new kind of acal chemist at the University oj 
blood substitute that doctors could California, San Franasco, and 

uk in emergendes to treat human S s “ ea ^ I b: n S K _ Bur : 
victims of massive blood toss. The 1 J ene * 

anifidal cells contain hemoglobin AnDC t Stnibbe, repon thnr find- 

removed from whole stored blood ^ lssue , of i 2 urrLa | ^ C1 ‘ 

that no longer was safe to use. ^ rc ^?? SO£ l 

Research on blood substitutes 

The scientists who made the arn- began more than 50 years ago, bm 
firial cells emphasize that tfadr de- in recent years most" alien non has 
velopment is only an experimental focused on a synthetic oil called 
prototype and that it will be several perflnorocarboa Cheap and reb- 
years before they are proven to be tivdy nontoxic, this substance is 
safe and effective for use in human able to cany oxygen. However, the 
beings. federal Food and Drug A dminis - 

Tfae newly created artificial nation has refused to allow its use 
blood odls, in any case, can be of in humans because it does not carry 
only temporary value because they enough oxygen and because it has 
perform only one of the many func- other adverse effects, 
tioas of red blood cdls. In addition As a result, scientists have 

to carrying oxygen, red cdls must sought new ways to use the body's 
process carbon dioxide, a bodily own oxygen-carrying molecule, he- 
waste product, and regulate the moglobiu. Hemoglobin is available 
addity of blood. in large quantities of donated 

In addition to red cells, blood blood that has been kept too long 
also contains a liquid called plasma in blood banks to be safe. While 
and several other types of cdls lhai such blood must now be thrown 
are part of the infection-fighting away, tbe hemoglobin inside the 
immune system. red blood cdls is still good. 

Because the artificial cells lack “What we’ve done is found a way 


t 




fey* 


* 






+ • >\v.+l 


r * VW 



: 2m 




Ihft Anoomd P/rss 

Microscopic view of an animal red blood cell and smaller artificial cells, indicated by arrows.! 


glob in. Oxygen molecules easily 
diffuse in and out of the mem- 
brane. 


to take that perfectly good hemo- mal cells. They are manufactured 
globin and repackage it inside an in a process like that developed 
artificial cell,” Dr. Hunt said years ago to encapsulate “scratch 

_ . „ . . . and sniff” scents or the chemicals n 

The artificial cells consist of mi- imp regna te in carbonless “carbon Dr- Hunt said that artificial red 
crocapsules whose walls are made paper” cells, in addition to being used for 

of special fat molecules thaL spon- ' emergency medical treatment, 

taneously align themselves into Instead of these chemicals, the could be used in surgery for pa- 
sheets or bubbles, much like the fairy membrane surrounding the dents with rare blood types or 
membranes surrounding most am- artificial blood cell contains hemo- where donor blood is to be avoided 


Journal’s Apology Troubles the Press 

Action in Singapore Contrasts U.S. and Foreign Standards 


By Alex S. Jones 

New York Times Service 


Editor Imprisoned in Nepal 

Nepalese authorities have im- 
prisoned a newspaper editor for 


director of the International Street Journal and The Asian Wall 
League for Human Rights. Sleet Journal, said the company 

NEW YORK A recent apdo- BuDen, executive director wooJd 00 

gy to a Singapore court by the edi- -"f. w^udL, r-^._ court action was pending, 

tor of TbeASan Wall Street Jour- °f World Press Freedom Com- 

nal for an editorial has raised some Jj According to several journalism 

troubling journalistic questions, ac- and rights organizations, the con- 

cordtagto journalism and rights 5 ^ rd . **“* a P olo 8 I ? m S for tempt charges are part or a wdl- 
oreanization^ domg the job that journalists are established pattern in which the 

ta^rticular, the apology has ^ Singapcre govemmeni poiodicaHy 

touchS^off discussionon die ap- ^^^testhe limits of cntiosm 

propriaie response when a foreign that n wdl tolerate. 

court diallmges the editorial Free- this area." “It’s a signal to the entire foreign 

dom of an American news orgam- press corps and interaal press craps 

zaDon pu Wishing abroad It has Leonard R, Sussman, executive fan fa Povemmem has its limiis " 
also focused scrutiny on the degree director of Freedom House, a head of ihe International 
of ^freedom in Singapore. rights oraanprion in New York, League for Human Rights said 

On Nov. 19, Fred Zimmerman, said: Ids a hard call, and it points 
editor and publisher of The Asian up two sets of standards, one that 
Wall Street Journal, apologized to The Wall Street Journal has in the 
the high court in Singapore for any United States and one that it faces 

contempt of court caused by an overseas. And because of the differ- kiv 

«iittKWllii. 1 p«uwiOa.n.n»e 011 standards, the moral question is 5 "*% 

somewhat different Thursday, Ageuce FiS-msse 

ediiSE ^^’■fhe yEaimWall BHahari Kausitm, press seoe- reported from Katmandu. 

Street Journal and several oiher St'S Bhupamdh! Panu editor and 
parties. The ease is sun pending. <* SaP“ a 

TTtedhpmrf editorial desmbed .. OT weekly published in Pokers, was 

“what many Singaporeans believe -vwi«uh> fak* ” 6 arrested recently under the State 

is official harassment" of oppasi- P aieDu y ,aiSC - Offenses Acl He was charged with 

tion political figures, and particu- Lawrence Armour, a spokesman misspelling tbe name of Queen 
tally examined a series of court for Dow Jones & Co., tbe parent Aisbwarya Rajya Laxmi Devi 
actions brought against Joshua B. company that owns The Wall Ran a. 

Jeyaremam, the first opposition 

politician to be elected to Singa- 
pore's Parliament. tt o T 71 1 T\» 1 __ 

“We don’t know if Mr. Jeyarel- U ijlXpCl UipiOQld.tS 

nam is guilty," it said, “but even if X 

he Singaporeans (Continued from Page I) four persons given stiTf jail sen- 

wonldn’t beheve it because court die Ghanaian government's mo- tencesWntiylfter thev confessed 
actions, and especially Jibed suits, dves for this action other than to io spying for the United Stales, 
have long been used m Singapore W y we consider it imwarranted.*' were stripped or their citizenship 
agamsi opposition politicians.” she said. and driven to the Togolese border 

Several spokesman for journal- . jl ^ ccra Washington last week under police escort last Saturday, 
fop 1 and burp pr> ri gh t* groups have exchanged a nephew of Jerry J. according to the Ghanaian Tunes 
speculated that the apology may R^wbngs, the G hanaia n leader, for newspaper, 
have stemmed from a combination G ha n a i ans accused of inielli- According to tbe Ghana News 
of economic concern for preserving gence activities in Accra. Agency, Mr. Asamoah, tbe foreign 

the Journal’s printing and distribu- Mr- Rawlings' nephew, Michael afairs secretary, told Ambassador 

don system in Singapore and ediio- A. Soussoudis, 39, pleaded guilty in Fritz that the expulsions of the UJ5. 
rial concern for p res erv in g editorial United States to espionage diplomats were designed lo ensure 

ac ce ss to Singapore, both of which charges and received a 20-year sen- that the United States complied 
might have been in jeopardy. tence. He was released to the cusio- with an understanding between the 

But tbe apology may have sent dy of the Ghanaian ambassador in 
*"& dangerous message** that could Washington, Eric Oioo, on the con- 

damage efforts by F news organize- dition that Mr. Soussoudis leave 
finrK to fight curbs on press free- the United States soon, 
dom. saidFdiceD. Gaer, executive The eight G hanai a ns , including 



two countries. 


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INTERNATIONA! HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECBMBER X, 1985 











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Opening for Talks 

Is Seen in Moscow 

Cvnejfwnan Ittui 

Rrjt&ed in 'ftf Cm Be OmMdml 


Ik Ol**l [Wl a 4*jn ■ »lfc 1 W mJ* . 

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pun i t Leaders Vow to Push 

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Colombian Guerrilla War Heats 


By Joseph B. Treascer 
JVw York Times Service 
BOGOTA — In the last nvo 
weeks there has been a surge in 


fighting and rightist terrorism in 
Colombia's lone suerriHa war.sU- 


Colombia’s long gncrrilla war, sig- 
naling a further setback to Presi- 
dent Bdisario Betancur’s efforts to 
bring peace to this country. . 

Guerrillas of the April 19 Move- 
ment or M-19. have carried out 15 
attacks, including one in which 


they took over an entire town of 
35,000 people and held it for nearly 


35.000 people and held it for nearly 
eight hours. 

Paramilitary forces, said to be 
closely associated with Colombia's 
armed fences, are believed respon- 
sible for bombing the headquarters 
of the Communist Party and gun- 
ning down two prominent leftist 
leaders, one of them an Outspoken 
advocate of Mr. Betancur’s peace 
initiatives. 

In the last few days. M-19 has 
issued a series of threats to take 
over country dubs and public 
buddings and to kidnap executives 
of foreign corporations. 



Ltice Minisuy 


justice Minisu.' L^n-d 

Abou. 1» 


^sasassgs 

5^' ■ -wwc who were among 

Court justices. wnu « 

worldwide notoriety aearlyas 


^owheniri^dedaco* 


to ****** ^ 

Dominican Republic here and then 




BeBsario Betartcnr 


Apparently in connection with traordinary alert. Truddoaas at HrReuncur was moving 

those threats, four guerrillas last soldiers with rifles and submachine wtacn demands for 


4 STw “»* 

, amouoced 

; that it was bjeatang jbt 

pf of the luU to hmass 

letanc,ir S^TlSpoup also said h had 

Truckloads of ban; 

tssssz si’fefflrsr dinars 


months ago- ” P&c see ms 
possible without M-I9.wbiri! a t«. 
lie%ed to be -the auppnd-Ias^s: 
guerriDa gP» Py . 

The ne* vwfcace adds to Co- 
lombia's trottbtes only two weeks 
after the No*- 13 eruption of the 
Nevado del Rat vofcajjb that 
killed approximately 25,000 people 
and left S-OOGhometess. 

The military, w&fc po&ficiy «- 
pressing fite Mr. 

cur's efforts to^usao^the guerril- 
las. has long bear skeptical of this 
action. The vised forces chiefs 
have, argued Jhfet amnesties and 
truces cmiy gwe ftt gvrriftB an 
opportuniw to TOpe ute and re- 
ann for new advennaes. Many dip- 
iomats bdiew the jaaHtuy is se- 
cretly trying to' »b«age the 
president’s peace efforts tfamngh 
the use of jMiaivfany forces. c* 

For the moment, <hpkmats and ’ 
poliikal analysts sfl^, the battle at 
the Justice Miiwti ) has sevcneN 
polarized the n&tory ad M-19, 
and they say they expea increasing 
combat m the weds ahead 

Two su^l rebd gnjtqs. which 
had always rejected peace talks, 
have joined with M-W hi recent 
mouths is taffitiuy opewtions, and 


*r' c & 


1-r-r-iS. 

M 


x- ; 


/ v.- 


cm’ club where a childrens party boat posted on the root ot me na- ^ ^ country, the 

was under way. Two navy sentries tioual police headquartets. R^vnlSSonarY Aimed Forces of 

were wounded. Western diplomats and Colom- R^nonvy ^^wMia-oott. 

The thepolia irr b™ political rinad^thamce'thcy agKd » 


a third, the Popular Liberation 
Army, joined: M-.I9 is the takeover 


Anny.jotnod M-19 is the takeover 
of the town of Urrao, about 220 
mites (3 50t2ometen) northwest of 


— I — 


Bogota have been ordered on ex- lieve’M-19 has been pressing the mined *« ^ 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. SATIRDAY-SCNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 1985 


in Need 


Vi 

tv. . •’• ••• • nT-^ V 

•" :: 1 “ : 'c 


’hi (COnamed from Age 1) 

£'■ li" b ia Sudan, the second m 


■■ . ( 
» * « » 

*34." . .” 

ffinWBb mrm •" ’ 


jn Sudan, the second worst 


'V' f W :f 


‘0 3 - ,p { ^ v9^ ture Oiganfeaiion says will 

“* 5 Rf'r vifft fruVl am Wa 


2?2n " again, ihai stands 

V 1, 

&?£“ EsMopian government an- 
r*f>5' iCLaced in October that 5 J& m2- 
,,| %i. ki. viflCOnlP WnillH Ka thwatAnAfl Kv 


'*ic w */ ^d be needed to feed them. This 

than the combined food- 
, ^krO’^ce requirements of sJI the 

V Af Hrfl 


■ ofTiciais say there are two 
lie k?? 1 " re ?5ons for Ethiopians oon- 
crisis, even as most of Africa 
^'^Vh^vers. 


* I- 


V^LV^ ^ venL _ : - ’■ 

the rains this year, were- 
^cn -l^tlyand ended too soon in many 
A 'l ; 0ir *l “ost affected areas. 

„' :' l,li -i fcw ' t i ?conti > Ethiopia was so ravaged 
■ 'k J^t-vearby famine that it could not 
V y ^ /rii: hill advantage of the rain that 
L ; :flr kv; ^‘faU. Many farmers were toe 
to plant there were too few 
10 Plow, seeds were in short 
*^m 3iy, and insects and bacterial 


* N § j.' 1 1 ■ * | T^S^t were unusually destructive. 

* * - U | . %™ e °f tlw largest private relief 

• _ _ i ^"'sjmzations in Ethiopia fear that 

1 1 Haulers may starve on their farms 

- ’ ! ***pS? e noddle of 1986 unless more 

I one million tons of food is 

’■ v: : soon aod begins to move 

^■--*4 V — a food-deliveiy pipdine 
^ rTrr^! 1 *^ takes about 5ve months! 

*" •.**._ 1* I _ „ 

. It t ’ ; j -^What did we save these people 

. ' . — . ; ^fltotthis year, if we lei them starve in 

•> ; \ r asked Frank Carlin, the di- 

*»’ TT^-A here for Catholic Relief Ser- 

r.’.'-S the largest private relief agen- 

„ . ! " j * ' iS&iy 1 Ethiopia. 

■ - ■ ! ■ T^BpThus far only the U;S. govem- 

1 " 7 ... TTT^-^/^'it has made a firm pledge for 


i./ -V.' 


I rc fa» 


As it did this year, Washing- 
222 intends to supply one-third of 


%tever the United Nations deter- 


; ‘ 1 s ' i T^.\\ eT 1 is die emergency need. 

i 7 LTr“i a year of working with the 


.V.: t! 4^opian government, mosr do- 
^ give it high marks for honesty. 
>«x ; tfc jtiTbcre has been very, very little 

uption," said Mr. Fischer, the 

£ — i^^f official here for the U.S. 
> : t 5^jncy for Interna tiooal Develop- 

— ~y«r ; jt, which has spent $2S0 million 

■ past year whfle delivering 

- r: ■w5wS*®0 tons of food. “The food 
gone where it was supposed to 

7 : _ j^ ffhere have been chronic prob- 
.* however, in transporting re- 

^T^food from Ethiopia’s ports. For 

t,? «= it of this year, a shortage of 

■ rr-r— g-hanl trucks and frequent 

. sflU akdowns on the country’s ermn- 
"WKL^ig highway have combined to 
J a backlog of more than 




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100,000 tons of food at Assab, the 
main pwL 

The recoil arrival of more than 
400 new trucks, including 43 pur- 
chased by the Band Aid and Live 
Aid ^organizarions, now has relief 
officials here saying the transporta- 
tion problem is nearly solved. 

There also have been and contin- 
ue to be Tancorous disputes be- 
tween Western donors, who sup- 
plied 97 percent of the relief aid in 
die past year, and Ethiopia’s Marx- 
ist government, whose major ally is 
the Soid« Union. 

The Ethiopian government has 
refused to modify an agricultural 
pricing structure that Western 
economists say guarantees food 
shortages in this country of 42 mil- 
lion people. 

Ethiopia is listed by the World 
Bank this year as the poorest coun- 
try in the world, with a per capita 
income of 5126 a year. And it has 
what economists call a “structural 
food deficit,” meaning that it is 
unable to feed itself even in years 
without drought. 

Ethiopian farmers, some -of 
whom dll ihe most fertile land in 
Africa, must sell a large proportion 
of their surplus crops to the govern- 
ment at prices that do not cover the 
cost of production. 

Agricultural economists here say 
that most Ethiopian fanners re- 
spond rationally to such a pricing 
system: They do not produce more 
food than they and their families 
can eat 

Despite pressure from the World 
Bank; which offered more than 
S100 million in concessionary farm 
loans in return for price reforms, 
the government here made no ma- 
jor changes in farm policy. 

But during the past year, as Ethi- 
opia became the most celebrated 
hungry place on earth, the govern- 
ment has been active on other 
fronts. . 

According to Western diplomats 
and relief officials, the government 
this year waged a major and suc- 
cessful offensive against rebels in 
the north. 

While humanitarian aid valued 
at more than $1 bflBon ponied into 
the country from the West, about 
SI billion worth of Soviet-supplied 
arms and ammunition was snipped 
to Ethiopia to support the offen- 
sive, according to U.S. estimates. 
James Cheek, the U.S. charge 

d’affaires, said that “the past year’s 
war has poshed the Ethiopian gov- 
ernment deeper into the arms'of the 
Soviet Union than ever.” 

Accordingly, relations between 
the U.S. government and Ethiopia 
“have not improved a bit,” Mr. 
Cheek said. 

He added that the U.S. govern- 
ment had no intention of support- 


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VS. wheat stacked up at the Ethiopian port of Assab in 
March as it awaited shipment to famine victims. Since 
then, the antral of new trucks has eased the problem. 


ing the kind of long-term develop- 
ment programs that relief 
sp ecia l is ts say Ethiopia needs if it is 
to feed itself! 

Besides the offensive against the 
rebels in Eritrea and Tigre, for 
which the government frequently 
diverted long-haul trucks that ft 
had promised to use in famine re- 
lief, the Ethiopian government has 
been active on two other fronts. 

The government launched a na- 
tionwide “villagizauon" project 
that faces farmers to live in clus- 
ters of houses rather than on their 
farms. The program's announced 
purpose is to increase the availabil- 
ity of social services for rural peo- 

pfe 

But critics of the program, in- 
cluding several development spe- 
cialists and members of the govern- 
ment’s own Agriculture Ministry, 
say they fear tbs program will dis- 
rupt local food production. 

The other major initiative, a 
huge resettlement program, is in- 
tended to be a permanent solution 
to chronic famine in the northern 
highlands. 

The program, which has moved 
nearly 600,000 people in the past 
year, takes farmers from the over- 
populated and badly eroded north- 
ern highlands to more fertile lands 
in the southwest. Many Western 
relief specialists say resettlement is 
a sound idea. 

From its beginning last fall, the 
government said resettlement 
would be voluntary, and that fam- 
ilies would be kept together. Ac- 
cording to reports from relief work- 
ers in the north, however, the 
program has not been voluntary in 
thousands of cases, and many fam- 
ilies have been separated. 

A recent incident here at Korem 
brought to a head the anger that 
has been growing for the past year 


between Western aid workers and 
Ethiopian officials over methods 
used to resettle famine victims. 

On Ocl 27, the government sent 
armed soldiers imo the camp. Ac- 
cording to witnesses, they rounded 
up 600 “velim leers" for resettle- 
ment and ioaded them into trucks 
while about 10,000 residents of 
Korem, including some hospital 
patients, fled for the hills. They 
stayed in the hills three days. 

Last week the president of Doc- 
tors Without Borders, a French 
voluntary agency that works at 
Korem. bad an angry exchange in 
Addis Ababa, the capital, with the 
deputy director of the govern- 
ment's Relief and Rehabilitation 
Commission, 

“When people are taken away 
against tbeu will, when the militia 
come to offer resettlement, obvi- 
ously this is not a political prob- 
lem; it is just a human problem." 
said Rony Brauman of Doctors 
Without Borders. “We don't feel 
that our role here in Ethiopia is to 
keep quieu" 

“Why do all these people run 
away to the mountains?" Dr. Brau- 
man asked Berhane Deressa, depu- 
ty director of the commission. 

“Because members of Doctors 
Without Borders agitate them," 
Mr. Berhane replied tartly. 

Then, in an indignant tone. Mr. 
Berhane made a broader statement 
that underscored the uneasy, dis- 
trustful alliance that f amin e has 
forged between Western donors 
and Ethiopia: 

“I will not accept your insistence 
on setting conditions. You will be 
humanitarian if you do your job. 
You are not competent to comment 
on any other aspect of our pro- 
gram. We have different ways of 
doing things in Ethiopia. We can- 
not be dictated to.” 




Page 5 


Rebels daini' After Contacts 

Mine, Rocket He Believes French Hostages Are Weil 

AftflPlifi If) Reuters ... was riven a health renort/ 1 f> 

/llUlUia XU PARJS-A French government 

IIP* envoy said Friday that, after indi- 

A tnAQ reel contacts with kidnappers in 
UUUUi llll il>a \rh*nr>n fc* fra.r 


Tr.f Aiz-mchJ Prat 

JOHANNESBURG — The Af- 
rican National Congress claimed 
responsibility Friday for land- min e 
and rocket attacks in South Africa 
that it described as “a generalized 
escalation" of its war on whiie- 

minority rule. 

The black nationalist group, in a 
statement issued at its headquar- 
ters in Lusaka. Zambia, denied 
Souih African charges that the 
guerrillas who laid the mines en- 
tered South Africa from Zimba- 
bwe. I: said the guerrillas were 
“based and operating inside South 
.Africa." 

After the attacks, the South Afri- 
can foreign minister. R_F. Botha, 
accused Zimbabwe of harboring 
guerrillas and warned thai South 
African forces would cross into 
Zimbabwe in pursuit of them. 

The mines have exploded just 
inside what the government calk its 
most secure border, the heavily po- 
liced frontier with Zimbabwe. 

The rocket attacks on a key ener- 
gy plant at Secunda. SO miles 
(about 130 kilometers) east of Jo- 
hannesburg. caused no damage, 
and three rebels were killed. 

But they showed that the insur- 
gents have been able to smuggle in 
122mm projectiles despite tighter 
security over the months of rioting. 

More than 800 people have beat 
killed in id months of anti-apart- 
heid unrest in South Africa. 

In new violence Friday, the po- 
lice said that black snipers in the 
Crossroads squatter camp outside 
Cape Town had opened fire on a 
police patrol. The police said they 
responded with shotguns and auto- 
matic weapons, killing a black man 
and wounding two others. 

Increasingly, opponents of 
apartheid are using conven uonal 
weapons instead of stones and gas- 
oline bombs. 

Meanwhile, the minister of law 
and order, Louis Le Grange, an- 
nounced that the police; as of next 
week, will no longer help guard 
South Africa’s borders. He said 
that policemen could not be spared 
from their duties in black town- 
ships and that the axmy would as- 
sume border duties. 

(Police, using emergency regula- 
tions designed to curb rioting, 
banned the annual congresses of 
the National Union of South Afri- 
can Students and the South African 
Students’ Press Union, due to have 
been held in Cape Town next week, 
Reuters reported Friday from Jo- 
hannesburg.] 


Reuters 

PARIS — A French government 
envoy said Friday that, after indi- 
rect contacts with kidnappers in 
Lebanon, be believed that four 
French hostages held there were in 
good health. 

Before leaving Beirut earlier, Ra- 
zah Raad. a cardiologist of Leba- 
nese origin, had been quoted as 
saying he had been allowed to ex- 
amine a kidnapped diplomat. Mar- 
cel Carton, and found him in good 
health. 

“1 have seen none of the hos- 
tages,” Dr. Raad said after his re- 
turn from Beirut with another 
French diplomat, Pierre Blouin, the 
other member of a iwo-man team. 

Bm Dr. Raad said he believed 
the hostages were all in good health 
following indirect contacts with the 
kidnappers through the intermedi- 
ary. the Shiite Moslem Hezhallab. 
or Army of God. 

The French external relations 
minister, Roland Dumas, also said 
there had been no meeting with any 
of the kidnapping victims, but he 
added that the rescue mission had 
given hope for their release. 

“For the first time I am hope- 
ful,” Mr. Dumas said on French 
radio. “1 have never used this ex- 
pression before." 

Dr. Raad said that remarks he 
made on the hostages' health be- 
fore leaving Beirut were misinter- 
preted as meaning that he had met 
personally with Mr. Carton. 



Indm 


Dr. Razab Raad 


He said in Paris thai neither be 
nor Mr. Blouin had met any of the 
hostages, but they added that they 
had seen doctors who had treated 
Mr. Carton. 

“They are all in good health." 
Mr. Blouin said in Paris. “This is all 
we said in Beirut. The rest is extrap- 
olation.” 

“I saw Lbe doctors who treated 
him in Beirut and in Baalbek and 1 


was given a health report." Dr. 
Raad said. 

“At the beginning this report was 
alarming,” he said, adding that a 
week later the doctors told him that 
Mr. Carton's "condition had im- 
proved. He is now in good health.” 

There had been fears for Mr. 
Canon's life since the shadowy Is- 
lamic Jihad organization said last 
week that one of its four French 
hostages was "pitifully sick." 

Dr. Raad said he was very opti- 
mistic about the fate of the four 
French hostages. Along with Mr. 
Canon, the kidnappers are bolding 
Marcel Fontaine, a diplomat; Jean- 
Paul Kauffmann, a journalist; and 
Michel Seurat, a researcher. 

Asked whether he knew where 
the hostages were. Dr. Raad said; 
“I think they arc separate. But they 
are being held by the same pro- 
Iranian groups.” 

Dr. Raad and Mr. Blouin arrived 
in Lebanon on Nov. 19 amid inten- 
sive efforts for the release of four 
U.S. hostages also held by Islamic 
Jihad. 

They arrived with Terry Waite, 
an envoy of the archbishop of Can- 
terbury. who was returning to Bei- 
rut after meeting the Americans' 
captors on a visit a week earlier. 

The French team came after Is- 
lamic Jihad said that France should 
stop “stalling” in negotiations over 
its hostages. The nature of the ne- 
gotiations has not been disclosed. 


U.S. Glides Israel Over Spy Probe 


(Coorinned from Page 1) 
political leadership by emphasizing 
that that they were not aware of 
this operation. 

According to the high Israeli 
source, the examination came to 
four key conclusions. 

• Fuat, it found that Mr. Pollard 
approached Israel in April or May 
1984 and volunteered to get classi- 
fied information that might be use- 
ful to the Israeli government; that 
he appeared to have been primarily 
motivated by zealous pro-Israeli 
sentiments; and that he later asked 
for money for some services. 

• Second, it found that the Israe- 
li who oversaw his activities was a 
senior counterterrorism official ap- 
parently associated with the office 
of the prime minister’s adviser on 
terrorism. That office is a highly 
secretive, independent body that 
looks into all forms of terrorism 
against Israel. 

The official has been identified 
by Israeli newspapers as Rafi Ei- 
tin, who was the prime minister’s 
adviser on terrorism between 1978 


and 1984, under Prime Ministers 
Menachem Begin and Yitzhak Sha- 
mir. Mr. Eitan has denied involve- 
ment, and the highly placed Israeli 
source declined to specify whether 
Mr. Pollard’s supervisor was Mr. 
Eitan or another member of the 
same bureau. 

The counterterrorism official 
funneled some information he got 
from Mr. Pollard to the general 
Israeli intelligence community 
without identifying the source or 
telling his political superiors what 
he was doing, according to the Is- 
raeli examination. 

• Third, the examination found 
that Mr. Pollard initially offered to 
obtain U.S. intelligence informa- 
tion about Arab armies and Soviet 
military hardware in use in the 
Arab world, and was encouraged to 
do so by his Israeli contact. 

Eventually, Mr. Pollard also sent 
his contact top-secret U.S. intelli- 
gence reports about highly sensi- 
tive Israeli military matters, the in- 
quiry found. 


Because of the deep knowledge 
of Israeli activities indicated by the 
U.S. intelligence reports saicl to 
have been passed along by Mr. Pol- 
lard, his contact became convinced 
that the United States had man- 
aged to “penetrate” the Israeli mili- 
tary establishment, the Israeli ex- 
amination found. 

As a result, the counterterrorism 
official began asking Mr. Pollard to 
provide as many U.S. intelligence 
reports about Israeli military activ- 
ities as possible, hoping that thus 
the leak in the Israeli system could 
be tracked down, the Israeli inquiry 
found. At no time, according to the 
highly placed source, was Mr. Pol- 
lard asked to get any information 
direcLly related to U.S. national se- 
curity or weapons systems. 

• Fourth, the Israeli inquiry- 
found that the information ob- 
tained by Mr. Pollard had been 
relayed to the two Israeli diplomats 
in the United States and from them 
directly to the senior counterterror- 
ism official in Israel. 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 1985 


r— •: 


ARTS / LEISURE 


Furniture Designs Incorporate Humor, Fantasy 


By Michael Gibson 

TntemaUmaJ Hercid Tribune 

P ) ARIS — Rem ember Smokey 
Stover and his antic Furniture in 
the Sunday color comics section? 
Well, if you did not know better, 
you might assume that he was the 
chief influence behind the current 

exhibition of the Salon des Artistes 
DEcorateurs at the Grand Palais 
here. 

As evidence of this, consider a 
straight-backed chair with its seat 
trimmed in snakes kin and an 
aquarium (with live goldfish) jig- 
sawed into the back. This is just 
one instance among hundreds that 
makes the whole thmg a thoroughly 
entertaining venture, provided you 
are not there solely to find furni- 
ture for your home. 

Indeed, most of the objects 
shown have manifestly been de- 
signed with the idea that a table 
should not look like a table, though 
it could possibly look like a scale- 
model of the Louvre, preferably set 
beside a chair shaped like a lawn- 
mower and a sofa shaped like a 
slag-heap. 

There is, however, an automobile 
that looks like an automobile — a 
splendid, 186 mph (300 kph), 
wedge-shaped leather and burr- 
walnut dream by Franco Sbarro; 
and there are a number of yachts 
and sailboats that have their masts 
topside and their keels beneath the 
deck, which is conceivably unimag - 
illative but nonetheless allows them 
to float. 

Items such as desks tend to be 
less contortionistic than devices de- 
signed to seat the human frame. 
Toe latter apparently bring out a 
wild and slightly hysterical streak 
in many designers — as does the 
coffee table and the console. The 
result can be extremely funny al- 
though one cannot always be sure 
they were intended this way. 

A chair has a sort of bovine stub- 
bornness about it. It unimaginati- 
vely persists in standing on four 
legs, and in offering a back to sup- 
port the sagging spine. You can try 
for variations and the number of 
legs can be reduced to three — or 
even one or two provided the base 
is broadened at ground level. But 


the basic Western idea of the seated or pen that can ^jvethe convincing 
man, bent at right angles and appearance of intricate life to a 
feel touching the ground, com- landscape (he size of one's hand 
mands even the wildest digression (there is an exquisite one by Jan 
from the norm. Brueghel), a life that is usually 

Zortzos and Papamakarios, with more convincing in such small 
their zany snakeskin and goldfish drawings than in more ambitious 
gimmick, have apparently decided works done on large surfaces with 
to thumb their noses at destiny, the imposing means of ofl or tem- 
Olhers, who have come here with pern. 


some austerely contorted construc- 
tions, are still wrestling with the 
grim angel of ebairdom. 

As Tor the desks, they do allow a 
certain range to fantasy and a num- 
ber of offerings have taken advan- 


Renaissance et Manierisme dans 
les Ecoles du Nord, Ecole National e 
Superieure des Beaux -Arts. 14 rue 
Bonaparte, to Dec. I b. 

□ 

Baron Hans- Heinrich Thvssen- 


tage of these possibilities. Among Bomemisza de Kaszon, a business- 
these are the designs of Berthet and . man and collector or art. does not 
Sammut(a triangular variant of the 


believe in keeping his treasures 10 in France, arc his painting by Emil 
himself. His collection is risible to Nolde, Egon Shicle or Georg 
the public in Lugano and in Lon- Grosz. 

don and he also allows pan of it to The exhibition includes one of 
travel: more than 100 works by the finest abstract works of Franz 
artists of the present century are Kupka, an admirable Edward 
displayed at the Musee d’Art Mo- Hopper ia young woman sitting 
deme de la VUle de Paris. alone on a hotel room bed\ an 

The collection, which is the re- excellent Georgia O’KeeTfe, and a 
suit of Thy ssen- Bomemisza 's un- suitably disquieting Balthus. all of 
prompted choice, reaches from Co- which deserve to be known. The 
rot to R_ B. Kitaj, but its most collection and its owner are pre- 
remar table aspect is no doubt the seated in an amusing catalog pref- 
works from Central Europe. The ace by Anthony Burgess, 
baron owns some honorable works Maizres Modemes de fa Coliec- 
by Ctzanne. Toulouse-Lautrec, tian Thyssen- Bomemisza, Musee 
Gauguin and Degas but much (TAn Modeme de la Ville de Paris, 
more interesting, for a public living to Jan. 5. 


\ 3 



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* 


Dominique Durand 
design for a tabi< 




As Result of Drought 

The A ssodcaed Press 

PER1GUEUX France — The 
year's first truffles, scarce because 
of a summer drought, have made 
their appearance in ibe markets of 
this city in south-central France. 

Fetching nearly 2,800 francs 'schools, their work is generally 
(about $360) a kilogram (2.2 much livelier and more convincing 
pounds), or 1 ,000 francs more ihnn than that of their I talian con tempo- 
last year, the delicacies are earning raries whom they tended to a dmir e, 
their name as the “black diamonds They also allow us to wonder at the 
of the Ferigord." quasi- magical power of the pencil 


secretaire), Pochy and C rami ere 
(with secret drawers) and the coolly 
elegant item designed by Piette 
Paulin Tor President Francois Mit- 
terrand. The architect Ricardo Bo- 
flll has a handsomely pearly table 
set on legs in the shape of neoclas- 
sic pillars. 

The salon also addresses the 
problems of designing telephones. 
computers, space stations, under- 
water living spaces, posters, rags* " 
toys and jewelry. 

Salon des Artistes D&corateurs, 
Grand Palais, to Dec.15. 


The Paris Ecole des Beaux- Arts 
has a superb collection of Renais- 
sance and Mannerist drawings of 
the Germanic, Dutch and Flemish 
schools that the public uoes not 
usually have the opportunity of 
seeing. 

The exhibition, which will be 
moving in May to the KunsthaDe in 
Hamburg, includes 126 drawings, 
some of them in color, by such 
artists as Albrecht DQrer, Hans 
Baldung Grien. Urs Graf, Hans 
Bol and Pieter Coeck van AelsL 
There are also quite a few Fl emis h 
artisLs whose work is inspired by 
the elder Brueghel — sometimes to 
the point of outright pasdehe. 

The exhibition makes one point 
quite clearly by presenting a num- 
ber of works side by side: artists of 
that period did not think it improp- 
er to copy or imitate works they 
admired Indeed, the notions of im- 
itation and originality in art de- 
serve some closer scrutiny today, 
when many artists are tempted to 
suppose that unhampered sponta- 
neity will serve to express their 
most specific individuality. In fact 
the result is quite the contrary — 
which leads one to wonder whether 
individuality does not reside else- 
where. 

As for the delightful draftsmen 
of the 16th- and 17th-century 
Dutch, German and Flemish 


London Pays Homage to Barcelona and Catalonia in 2 Extensive Exhibitions 



admire. 

This difference from the rest of 
the country is not caused only by 
the Catalan demand for autonomy 
which has simmered in the penin- 
sula since the 15th century, but is 
confirmed even by the quality and 
kind of art represented in “Homage 
to Barcelona*' presented by the 
Am Council of Great Britain in 
collaboration with the Generali tat 


r j D _ ^ clocks, T 

buildings. The aesthetic philosophy ■■■ 
in which he expounded and ex- r. 
plained' his new work be called-"' 


Bv Max Wvkes-Tovce fall of 1932 to promote the Catalan Gonz&lez. Pau Gargallo (1881- worked in the avant-garde tradi- - 

L ONDON Th^rirvof lLrceln- avant-garde. 1934). and Manuel Martinez Hu- tion until 1920 when, married win 

... , ty . j gup better known as Manolo. three children, he moved to kJ 

/ na has always seoned to me More to the point in the current York. In 1922 he returned to Eu- 

more French than Spanish, more so show is the work of the Barcelonan Another aspect of Catalan deco- ^ 

as its first language is Catalan, akin members of ADLAN, principally rative arts is highlighted in the aJ this time be evolved a new' : - 
to longue aoc rather than to Casul- Joan Mir6 and Salvador DalL Even work of four ceramists — Antoni sr y| e 0 f D aiming hitherto unknown-' ' 
lan; and partly from dm feeling of a more telling are their predecessors: Seira (1869-1932) and his son Jo- toWcstexn an — a combination of"-' 
Mediterranean port like Marseille sep Sena (b. 1906): France® No- geometric abstraction, symbolic ^ 

rather than an Iberian provimcal Santiago Rusinol (1861-1931) gabs (1873-1941) who portrayed Imaecs from his Indo- American-” 
capital like Cuenca, Seville or Va- was a man of letters as well as popular Catalan life on pottery and hackeroond. and familiar contend 

lencia. Moreover, it is the commeri- painter, whose One early interiors glass; and Josep Liorens (1892- ships. 

cal and industrial center of Spain, are surpassed by his later portray- 1980), who in the 1930s was a col- i™K«ThT £ K 

and not in the least like the rest of als of the gardens of Spain. A iwbnmtnf with Raoul' Dufy 
the traditional hidalgic country we splendid example of this, “Pine Georaes Braoue. 

_ j : AvAniiiA* 1 ' _____ “ piameu uu uw wvi& »» - 

the last vear^af his life. ** am Of course the best-known pot- “Universal Coostnictirism." He 

^ C8r tery in the city is the mosaic of inspired his European friends Jeaii'j' 

Ramon Casas (1866-1932), is multicolored faience tiles that dec- and Sophie Tauber-Aip, Jean He*- ; /\ 

represented by a wealth of por- orate the park benches in the GfleH lion, Julio Gonz&lez, Theo van - . • 

traits, including those of Rusinol park, one of the famous creations Doesburg and Piet Mondrian with- 

and Picasso. There is also Isidre of the architect/ designer Antoni his ideas. 

NoneB (1873-1911), of whom Pi- Gaudi (1852-1926). GaudTs other In 1930, with. Michd Scupbor, he 1 - 

casso declared that Nonell's early creations for his chief patron, founded the shortlived abstract- " 
death deprived him of Iris only real Count Eusebi GfleU, of whom there group “Cercle et Caret” in Paits: ,,j • 
Spanish competition, and from is & portrait with his family by He moved back to Montevideo in Ji 
couanorauon witn tne uenerautat w j lom pica^ adopted the beggar Francesc Mirales (1848-1901), are 1934 and in the following year- ’’ 
(legislative assembly) of Cataloma an£ j gypgy themes of the Blue and celebrated with designs, color rid- founded an Association of Con--' 
and the Ajuntament (City Conned) Rose eos and objects in the show, as is structirist Art, through which he * 

of Barcelona. . GaudTs monumental Sagrada Fa- exerted a marked influence on- 7 " 

The exhibition ranges from the Joaquin Mir (1873-1940) was inilia (the Church of the Holy Fam- young South American artists, antf :u 
Barcelona International Exhibition o* 1 * °f ^ P«atest of la n dsca p e Qy), the four Gothic towers of whence he indirectly influenced the " 
of 1888 to the outbreak of the His “Banks of (he Ebro” winch have come, in the popular' early years of Abstract Expression—- 

Spanish Civil War in 1936, though i 11 Museum of Modem Art in imagination, to represent the city ism in New York, 
the real significance of the show Madrid, ranks with the finest work of Barcelona as truly as does the 
ends in 1929 with the Universal of Monet, whose friend he was. Eiffel tower the city of Paris. 

Exhibition, marked by Lhe d esign J^aquim Sunyer (1874-1956} a 

of the German pavilion by the Bau- friend of Renoir, is represented by “Homage to Barcelona,” Hay- 

in enchanting “Portrait of Maria ward Gallery, South Bank, London 
Llimona de Cades,” a “Pastoral” SEl, to Feb . 23; Palau de la Vir- 
now in the collection of the Catalo- reina. Las Ramblas, Barcelona, 
nian assembly, and two landscapes, spring 1986. 

.one with a foreground of trees in _ 




A. - 


ha us architect Mies van der Rohe, 
of which there is a scale model 
created this year by a Catalan de- 
signer. 


The highlighting of Mies van der 
Rohe's contribution to Barcelonan 
art shows a peculiar anxiety on the 
part of the organizers to emphasize 
the international aspect of art in 


Formalutx on Mallorca, the other 


A show of 98 of his paintings, . 
drawings and wood constructions'' 
selected by Maigil Rowell, curator^ 
at the Musee cTAxt Modeme mv 
Paris,' and splendidly cataloged by. 
her, now runs at the upper gallery 4 
of the Hayward. The lively spice- , 
dor of the homage to Barcelona'" 
should not' be allowed to deter one '* 


i vimtuuM vu mauuivo, uiw uuiu f r „ m ni ■ 

with a frieze of people — “Cala Among GaudTs assistants on the ™ W vpstom to see the sena-„ 

Fora” (Fom Bay). stained glass windows for the Sa- ^ wor ^ a m ^ or ar ^ L 


.7 



Julio Gonzalez’s “TVoman at Her Toilette** (1924-13). 


Famfla was Joaquin Tocres- 
There is the monumental “Woof Garcia (1874-1949) bom in Monte- 
the rity reinforced by the inclusion an at Her Toflette“ by Julio Gonza- video, Uruguay, ofa Catalan father 
of works by Max Ernst, Yves Tan- kz (1876-1942), who was a jeweler and a Uruguayan mother, who 
guy and Valentine Hugo among and sculptor as well as painter, brought him to Cataloma in 1891 
others, because they were once ex- Spanish sculpture of this period is and settled in Barcelona in 1892, 
hibited in the city, or in 1935 in something of which the world in where he studied at the Academy of 

Tenerife, under the auspices of general knows all too little. So it is Fine Arts from the following year. : 

ADLAN — Amies de l’ Art Nou good that this homage has the work Establishing himself as a painter in Max Wykes -Joyce writes regular Jt ^ 
(Friends of New Art) — a group of no less than eight sculptors. The . the city, and frequently traveling to . ly 

formed by the city's artists in the three masters among them axe -France, --Italy and -Switzerland; he -- tions. - - 1 .' .«. 


“ 'Torres-Gored : Grid — Pattera^x 
— - Sign, Paris —Montevideo 192&A Ij 
1944,” Hayward Gallery, South .y 
Banl^ London SEl, to Feb. 23; Furi^ ^ 
dacjdJoan Mird, Barcelona, Marck n 
13-May 4; StOdrische Kunsthalle, 
DUssddorf, July -August, 1986 




1 / 1 


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XTV md led dawn all . the diver he ings, drawing and w&iocolars a 

■ 1J1i: could lay hands on* makmgFrench few hours laler. at Sotheby's could 

, a 8* ra5t *P ccn ' aiw predating 1700 exceedingly hardy be greater. That blanket de- 

> rare * SCripQOn. ccvas virtually any form 

•• S? fiuT^- if °f ’* D0M y The boot in shot, is one of the of European painting that preecd- 

f are b <S5fr a i ^ dcarahfe worts of art seen in ed or bypassed Impressionism, 

i Sves rapt yoo- It was bought for 8 It starts with such towering fig- 

^never beofSS^rvK* 5 S®®*®“M(«boot 51.03 mSEon) unsasDeUuwu,Cor^ 

** Kj.KmxoiXcwYoA'Vho bet and goes on to peters for 
y mrin ■> rntwosalK says he bought h for stock. It is whom the wort kitsch is still too 
nmt utaJ mm acnptt IkM m proto^ bo«w, hc <fid do Itanoing - Frederick GoodaD 

Mnu m pl - 50 al . 1 “ instigation erf a ma jot and lhe like. If such an arbitrary 

. one ol Ita most nn- ■ American institution Quit was groupin g lias any r n pw ni^n A^ rm- 

lMweauiy manuscript alerted to *= erieeoce of ita Swi< is rtor^S^Stah 
” manuscript days before the sale are tte object of intense specula* 

MTOF.TV Mpt miiu and seems determined to raise the tkm, oltenby amateur dealers. 

4t . funds to buy it Tbe auction began with Vkaori- 

l,:: n is recent years was sold, in This week a comparable feat was an paintos from Britain, went on 
The sale was conducted at 80CCHI1 P I i s h«} on alareer financial to the Orieatalists, defined by sub- 

scale. A CaroK n giaa Gospel Book ject matter — Middle Eaoera 
completed in. the 9th century, prob- semes — rather j hpn style or 
ably at the Abbey of St. Amfmd in school, and concluded with Scandi- 
d France in the 16th oentm^T Soothon Handers was sold at navian an winch, dealers and auc- 
'french cqW h»H £ Vj 3 . aSSo a “fflion), with tionccrs hoped, was to get a big 

rr.:V- 1515. iSeSver plaques on S *i?? chaisti ' boon from an othiboioa of I^ush 

^tidings struck with maiks cor- The manuscript had not been painting held m London m 1984. 

„ "r e ~ i':r fading either lo the years 1532 secn ,.^? P fu Mxc since 193Z Hardly On Tuesday, they were all having 
% ,533 or to the years 1555-1556 scholar has set eyes on it a difficult time. More than 30per- 

r considered a later addition. . Il * tppearanoe created asensa- cent erf the works offered failed to 

' ■^'v ~T'wever, Sotheby’s expert on tl F tL Hamel notes that while find buyers. As the bidding on a 



’ ,] z V'ir ! ot by Eric Buff eta ud. 

r ,; N. 5 is a two- volume Gospel 
- with adniamres executed in 



% 


pint the date to 1533. De Ha- is preserved in the United “Rubmclla," stopped 

the 3. Kerpcat Morgan far below the £50,000 to £70.000 


at £36,000, 


Art Objects Double as Props 


By Edith Schloss 


R OME — For decades now in 
galleries we have been con- 
fronted with austere basic struc- 
tures in the minimal or conceptual 
mode that require viewers to add or 
subtract thought processes and to 
sense how the pieces modify or co- 


nn 


Detail of page from 9tb-century Gospel sold in London. 


estimate. 


imagine that Interestingly, the works by great estimate. £120,000 to £180,000, New York some perfectly respea- 
my outer uhmrinaied Carcfinpan mas ters all sold. A painting show- wiuch Sotheby’s expert says is able pieces that were sunplv too 


1 , -'“1 |1 , i ^ vvw«*huu wi iiu 012111^6 tO "“J v im i muHMitgiiW VOIUiUig^Ill jiUGHOS Oil 5QIO- /V p gfflmig gfp iw> WZUCI] 

’ (TQriians, who later moam- G^dBcxA wIl ever come on tbe ing horses and their groom in a based 

: thnme as Henri Hof France, i n a rke t,” the csualoger teasturiy stable by G tri ca nh was brought for 

. >L ~ ;• EngHsh expert first notes rained potential bnyes. But ‘Wmle £150,000, hi g h r . ^ inn _ 

■ “ :''.: f t he book. Winch contains an *e ilhunmat e d initials are beauti- estimate. The selling price for a such "kitsch. Nor does the £30,000 good pieces remained unsold "far ckHhcs ’ making ordxnaiy gestures, 
. ;-S:: spedfymg passages lo be H them is no miniature and (he wonderful landscape from Corot’s to £40,000 estimate carried by John below the low estimates. Some somfihow ' seer P P»»m* against ob- 

rtrHrffprpnf rsJi<nniig eaiMi nn fn^TliKivrvil ie Jfi rw\r firtf Daahm okni.r irr;Mr ^ ■- ^ r * t a i. « t ■* . lOMli nf drniAnu 1 . nr foil* art ilualirv 


ing rods, s li n gshots, tongs and ar- Roman nightlife activities and ere- 
rows, and seem to be insinunents aior of baroque performances as 
of torture or pleasure. There is a one of Rome's best-known person- 
touching) y primitive look to them, alities, has always been an artist as 
Everything — the large sculp- welL His little paintings and draw- 
lures outside, the small ones inside, ings. highly idiosyncratic, have al- 
and (he paintings and drawings — ways had a special appeal, 
forms pan of a consistent exerts- Now a new, lively gallery exhib- 
^■^“^Ta^d J ^ son. This is an anthology of 15 itshisassemblagra.'lSre arewd- 

These big constructions in smooth, year3 . wor * by Remond, l an f! Ca ' surprises here: small siruc- 
metallic or plastic materials, singly P° r0SSl « wbo arc among the finest, lures are mysteriously wrapped in 
or in repeated structures often laid mo f l po ^ c anists workin 8 m Iu *!y glistening white materials from 
to intellectual speculation but sel- .Concurrently with this which small horses, planes and toys 

dom to a sensual or instinctive ex- J 0 *- “ ^eainca! spaces all over peek out like half-revealed secrets. 

Rome, there have beai moving per- In these little monuments to a lost 

But the few large, fantastic ob- [ on ” an «. compositions invented childhood everything is shadowy, 

jecis resting in the garden of the by J^ P 3 ^ over lhe , , nuid, and touched on lightly. 
Pallavicini p aboft in Rome do the j e ]>in^ still in the Lf their chxtnn in some instances 

opposite. With their bewitching. Sa«en or made to behave as traps, verges on kitsch, this is a frank 
homemade look they are strangely obstacles, teases or liberators by expression of Oozninoi s eccentric 
evocative tuo ffleB tbeir pwsooaliiv. Bui all the quicksilver 

There is a queer contraption faw V n W P C or o 3 .™ 1 -' siiuaiions, objects are alive with a special poi- 
rn nA* mainlv of two huge rusty cog- “* “5 pan5 - ° f a ^ tua1, f3nUtSllc gnancy of their own — each a bit- 
wheds. Another, airy entity might P r PP s , ™«™ e l modern tersweet statement, a delicacy, a 

be viewed as a cage, triangular fauj' tale that sumngjy awakens us small poem, 
prow, gian t butterfly or a Winged 10 the predicament of being alive m “Awiirwi," Studio E, Via dei 

Victory. .An enormous knitting bad ^r ume. Coivnari 54. through Dec. If. 

is wound with thick, ship’s ropes. - CJautho Remand, and Riccardo 

A brick wall spouts from the grass, Gmwrexr/. sculptures, paintings Edith Sch/oas. a painter, v.rnes 

and an aluminium sphere - per- f d . Cas, T. d *l™? ror * regularly for the IHT on an shew- 
haps a wrecking ball or world globe p f^cin^Ua 24 Maggto £ w ^ 

— rolls on its ride. 43. through Dec. 10. 

But these structures were not E 

only made to be con lem plated. The Tunisian-born Dominot, ac- 

they were also created to work. tor in “La Dolce Vita" and various 

Invented by Claudio Remcmdi 

and Riccardo Caporosri one a the- 
ater man, the other an artist and 
architect, the objects serve as a foil 
for mysterious picture stories that 


Chinese Statues Damaged 

The Associated Press 

DUBLIN — Ireland has apolo- 


[ on high prices achieved at highly estimated were knocked staged to unfold in the space in gizod to China for d am a ge s to two 
Austrian and German auctions down at 30 to 50 percent below the ^ ront ^ them, in these composi- ancient, life-size clay sculptures of 
simply does not seem to relate to low estimate. At Christies several u , on ^_ , t ? ,Q “f? m homely warriors and horses in an exhibi- 
tion here on loan from China. 



lects of demonic or folk art quality. 
In the context the sculptures be- 
come brutal or tender, ominous or 
peaceful. Precarious existence in an 


• %s in tins particular style can ed de HamePs expectations, is all above the low estimate. ' on their ambitions. Othorsvise. ihe " 00 2 ® ar ^ a,n against these odd sculptures put 

7 ’>>. ■- jved to have worked conris- the mare surprising. Most remark- It was inevitable that some infe- proportion of failures would have A bought by a British together with the humblest materi- 

-l :,ci - f° r the court of France: a ^bte is the fact that* according to nor paintings with high estimates b«n higher. ootiple at a Christmas rummage als. 

v.. - " of Hours in a private oollec- reliable sources, the money came would not sdL Ferdinand Georg A tinrilar trend could be ob- ^ ^ ago for five pounds Inside the palace over whose 

v . JS7,' n New York and a Prayer “from private individuals, not an WaldmOUcrt soppy w*?ng “Chil- served in a verv different field, Is- for £**■$** poonds (S7Z270) ceiling Guido Reni’s “Aurora'’ un- 

■ V“V -in a Paris private collection, institution.” dren Gathered Round Young lamic an, both in New York on ibis wed: at Sotheby's in London, folds her dawn-pink draperies, 

“ " ‘ “ * - - - cojunm offered by the sale Doves" dated 1851, failed to sell as Nov. 22 ai Sotheby’s, and in Lon- ^cording to The .Assoaated Press, there are smaller sculptures and 

Of 19th-century European paint- bidding stopped at £100,000. The don on Nov. 25 at Christies. In T? e P 31111 *^ by_ Sir Lawrence paintings, conie crayon and pencil 

. ■■ Alma-Tameda, a \ ictorian artist of drawings. The paintings and draw- 

English and Dutch descent, ings, mostly from the hand of Ca- 

showed an Old Testament biblical porossi, are delicate and have a 

scene entitled “Joseph. Overseer of melancholy, surreal cast. 

Pharaoh’s Granaries." Sotheby’s The smaller objects are strange 
said the work was painted in 1 874. implements which resemble divin- 


r- _ . 

: - " ' ; .rrecuted for Queen Claude de 
V . "J^e, come closest to iL Henri 
j. 7 -' : arts was the son of Clande die 
‘ “ v - ; e and married in 1533, one of 
-jo dates suggested by the sfl- 
" ■ " "--aiks. The Gospel Book, must 
^ -I^been commissioned for the 
‘ l v -aag. 

T -- .^-itrary to whai the Paris caia- 
.^ggests, de Hamel stresses that 
.. :■«, -mnscnpt and the binding are 
^- ;iiporary with each other as 


In Search of the Real Rembrandt 


By John Russell 

New York Timas Service 


The big names were what collectors 
. held out for. 

J^TEW YORK — It was the One of the great tasks of art 


in tune and may lode stilted or 
affected or just plain ludicrous at 
another. 

Rembrandt with which no vis- scholarship since 1945 has been to Next, we must remember that an 

v '-asttated by the fact tiiat the i* 01 " 10 great museum in West red e fine the authentic achievement oil painting is not a constant. It is a 

: _jcript is in its oriknal sewint Berim. had ever had any trouble. It of Rembrandt. In the process, deep many-layered vegetable construct 

’ ; - i alone would be <*nnngb to was epitome not only of Rem- wounds have been mflicted. that changes, no matter how subtly, 

' the Gospel sold at Drooot of brandt, as he was popularly consid- The first thing to remember is from year to year. (Other, more 
.. “try importance to both cred, but of a cnivalric tradition that the authorship of some of the drastic, , man-made changes — such 

1 history and art history. It is that lasted wdl into the 20th centu- most beautiful paintings in the as repainting, clumsy restoration or 

iding, however, that mokes it .■ ty- Here before tbc. dcfightad viator world has often been, and . some- downright “improvanem" — must 

placeable work of art. was the “verray parfit gen til tunes is stifi, disputed. This is espe- also be taken into consideration.) 

— high-relief scenes from the knight,” fust set bef ore us by.Getrf- dally the case when & master-pupil We cannot know how “The Man 

Testament are the only sped- Qiancer in his “Canterbury relationship thickens the plot. With the Golden Helmet" looked 
of their land on record. They Tales” 600 years ago. There is in the Louvre a famous w Rode. We only know how it 

single instance of the silver The painting in question was Venetian 16th-century p aintin g looks to us now. It is a different 
1 carving made during the “The Man With the Golden Hd- called “Tbe Concert," as to which painting, and one to which we 
French Renaissance — Louis met." For many visitors it ranked no one can be quite sure whether bring different eyes, a different set 
— - with the bust of Queen Nefertiti as Titian or Giorgione had the greater of references and a whole new mass 

the single most memorable object hand in its authorship. There is in °f information. 

JNE SBURY in what had once been the Kaiser- England another Venetian painting We can of course see a painting 

lllnnann in nMiirnl aP |L* " - J n ^Tn4«MkiM« aP CaIa i*m> ® 


ANTIQUES 


PARIS • CHAMP da MARS 

SALON DES 

ANTIQUAIRES 

22 NOV.-r DEC 

Hoff dioufffr 


Ml LIT AIRE 

T.LJ. : 11 H/20 H 
W.E. : 10 H/20 H 





BUCCELLATI 

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’IMS FORlHE DUMPSTER* 
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I Friedrich Museum mcanraL Berlin of the period, a “Judgment of Solo- differently without rqecting its ai- 
| and was moved after World War II mon," as to which the name of tribution. If we happen to be the 

" to the Dahlem quarter. All over tbe Giorgione was long preferred to the Duchess of Alba, and one of the 

world there were houses and apart- name (now more generally in favor) Titians on oar walls in Madrid has 
meats in which it hung in reprodno- of Sdwstiano del Kombo. There is been there since it was painted and 
tion, and at the postcard stand .it in the current show of works of ait is further authenticated by a letter 
was “a license to prim money." frcmthelifxhtensrem from Titian himself that is also in 

So it was a blow to many people the Met a portrait of Jan Vennoe- our possession, it would be a bold 

wbcu last month it was declared to ^ ® atizen erf Antwerp who mar) who dared to say, “Thai can’t 
be not by Rembrandt, but the wo* served in the Spanish navy and be right" But it is rare for even a 
of an unidentified contemporary, died in battle. As to whether it is by great painting to be so well docu- 
The revisionist opinion was backed £yck or by Rubens, scholar- men led, and there are many as to 

by the Rembrandt Research Fro- ““P p * 10 ma ^ e *1* collec- which we have almost no documen- 
ted that had been set up in the ttve mind. tation at all 

Netberiands in 1969. The commii- L ^can count ourselves lucky to 

tee has a mandate to wort through belrvingm an age m which scholars ^ that omtraL the case of Rem- 

the whole corpus of pamtings teat do not rash to unfounded condu- 1 t r re *f ti y eIy , a ^?PH one m 

— someth rightfymSrome- ? oa *. ^ ready, to return the 


INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 

Andre et Berthe NOU FfLABD 

DEUX PEINTRES TEMOINS D'UNE EPOQUE 

1910 - 1970 

Documents sur Madame LANGWEIL et la famille HALEVY 

8 NOVEMBRE - 8 DEC EM B RE 1985 
MUSEE THIERS 27 Place Saint Georges Paris 9* 

Tous les jours 10 h-12 h / 14 h-18 h sauf Lundi matin 


LE BATEAU LAVOIR 


18, rue da Seim, 75006 - Tel... 4325 . 1 2.87 


Paul WUNDERLICH 


from November 26 


. - : ^ J 1FD, A LOT OF HOMELESS 
- Xf^lB THINK THAT UFE FOR 
' - .’V> rfMON TUB MEAN SIREE3S 
- ..ivey G01N6TD 6Ef 

; r - v . w st. mm do you wnk 
- .y - jvturb holds for you * 


the whole corpus of paintings 

tunes wrongly tbfna^S a smsU country, just as his now 

Rembran^?They could be wrong. of very high quality as to 

as everyone else can be wrong S ^adi the votes are not yet afl in. . if-teuSSr 

such matters, but as a matter offact None of these p amtings is dmorn- Smce Bodes day, our knowledge of 

their ooimcai about “The Man. 


ished 


paintings 


Rembrandt’s mOien has been vast- 



beautiful painting, and it hac for supported with rational argu- 
oenm fip DS had an enonoous con- 

stiS^Tbut it is not by Rem- Evoi so, it may stffl be asked 
brand L how the ecrors of experienced peo- 


FORMETA 

THIRD HELPING 
OF TURKEY, MAN. 

yms DEFNrrBUf 
PI MY FUTURE! 
\ 



., ION6-TE8M* 

mi,I6UE5S 

ISSL. T&fwrn 

wrum- ptE.tmurs 

s&f* CF CREAM. 

- 1 \ 



AUCTION SALES 


Such is the case with the “Anna 
With the Blind Tobit" in the Na- 
tional Gallery in London, which is 
now believed to be tbe joint work of 

Ts it7 therefore, a fak£*? A hoax? pte <an go undaecttd for so long. 15“ 

How could it havt been so firmly On tat rasonis that every gener- 

What looked right ttiodelSio. ^ 

day, when be bought it almost 100 ^ to us, u is not beca u se museu ™ m lhe worid - 
years ago for the Kaiser-Friedrich ^ *9 10 the job. We are witnesses, in facu io the 

Museum, as wdl as other scholars It is because be was the captive, slow emergence of an ever smaller 
erf the day? as we all are, not only of tbe infor- circle of Rembrandts. There wdl be 

There is undoubtedly a half- mation that was available to him many another demotion before the 
worid of faking and forgery, but but o£ the ideas, the loyalties and process is completed, but h is safe 
what we are concerned with here is the hierarchies of his day. In panic- to say that not many of them will 
a different matter. People of expe- ular, there is in painting a vocabu- touch as deep a chord of feeling as 
rience integrity can be “right” lary erf form that looks natural and the exclusion of “The Man with 
in their own day and “wrong" in predestined at any given moment the Golden Helmet,” 
tbe opinion of posterity. 

—Tbe Man With the Golden Hel- 
met" came to the Beriin museum at 
a time when an history was in its 
infancy. Connoisseurs hip was 
Largriy instinctual — a matter of 
experience, memory and flair. To 
have “an eye" was the fundamental 
tiring. The disciplines of documen- 
tation lay in the future, as did the 
armory of scientific investigation 
that grows more formidable year 
by year. The word of a Bode was as 

binding, in ihose days, as a band- 
shake between' men of honor. U 
should be remembered that those 
were expansive times. The more 
Rembrandts there were in the 
world, the richer we all would be. 

It is also natural that anyone 
who had a Dutch 17th-century 
painting to sell in those days would 
call it a Rembrandt if he possibly 
could. Present-day historians have 
identified and validated a great 
many Dutch 17tb-ccctury painters 
who had a style, a personality and 
an attraction that is distinctly their 
own. Before 1914, and even before 
1939, many of these artists were 
lost in the crowd and discarded. 


GALERIE MERMOZ 



PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

6, Kue jean-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 43.59.82.44 



GALERIE FELIX VERCEL 

9, avenue Matignon - Paris 8 e 
Tel. 42 56 25 1 9 


BOUYSSOU 

« de Paris a Nogent » 

november 20 - december 20 


GALERIE FRAMOND 


ROGER DE CONINCK 

Peintures recentes 


3, rue des Saints -Peres, VI*- (1) 42.60.74.78 


XIII* EXPOSITION 

"MAITRES 
I M PRESSION N I STES 
El' 

MODERNES" 


AMSTERDAM 


AUTOUE DE BARBIZON 


Amsterdam International Auctions B.V. 

ffirirfiim 

french c Winr 37nrtio)> 

“Gftc Mud/oit Sftom'; 

est 1913; located in the Old City, 

will present exceptional collection of fine French wines: 

MONDAY, DEGBHBER 9 . 1985 , AT 7:00 PM. 

Viewing days: Saturday 7 & Sunday 8, December 
from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. 

{bailiff; P.FJ. Saly) 

Elandsgracht 68. Amsterdam, Tel: Holland 020-23 03 43 


Boudin 

Corot 

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Jacque 

Joogkind 

Ltpiac 

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Ricfaet 

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Gcbn Douwes Fine Art 
1805 - 1985 
Jubilee exhibition 
from novsnber 18 through december 12 


Rokin 46, Amsterdam C. 
Opening horns: 
weekdays 10 am to 5 pm 
Sundays 1 pm to 5 pm 


LONDON 


j EXHIBITION ! 

'| DECEMBER 10 & 11. 1985. j 

j Holiday Inn Mayfair, London. i 

ANCIENT CHINESE GOLD. | 

| SILVER AND GILT BRONZE 

i Warring Scares up to the Tang Dynasty i 1 

Fully illustrated catalog available: 

Christian Ocvtiicr, • 12 Charles. Street. London WI, i 



LEGKR. ■■LaAiJIc" 

Jusqu'au 
14 decern b re 

Beraud. Calder, Cesar. Chagall, 
rautrier, Gauguin, Helion. Henner, 
Jongkind, Klee, Laurens. L4ger, 
Lepine, Marquet, Matisse, Matta. 
Metzinger. Montezin. Picasso, 
Stael, Utrillo. Vuillard. 

Catalogue upon reque&t 10s 

danlel 

maliiTgue 

26. avenue Maiignon 
7500S PARIS 
Tel.; (1) 42.66.60.33 


PARIS 

= WAliY FINDLAY - 

Galleries International 

new yorfc - Chicago - palm beach 
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2 Ave. Matignon - Paris 6th 

T«L: 42.2570J4 Itunkiy vflmi. wd u nfa y 
10 ant lo 1 fun. - 2s30 Id 7 pAt, 

EXHIBITION 

BOURRIE 

Permanent exhibition of 
ADAMOFF, ARDtSSOhffi, AUGE, 
BOUDET, CANU, CASSIGNEUl, 
CHAURAY, DUCAIRE. BTR, FABIB4, 
GALL GANTNER, GAVEAU, 
GORBT1, HAMBOURG, HBtfiO, 
KSME, KLUGE, LE PHO, MAIK, 
MICHa-HENRY, MlUNKOV, NESSI, 
FCUQUEUAAN, SSIRE. SMBAftl, 
THO MAS, V1GMOLES, VO LLET. 

A. VIOALOUADRAS: Portraifs 
BALAJHN: Sculptures 

Holel George V - 47.23.54.00 
31 Ave, George-V - Paris 8tfi 

Inl fan. (AlOJOflA-l oa-130 Id 9 ul 




AGNEW GALLERY 

43 Old Bond St, London, Wt. 
01-629 6176 

OLD MASTER DRAWINGS 
AND SCULPTURE 

Until 20 December 
Mon-Fri 9 JO-5 -30; Thun, until 6-JO. 


250 ART DEALERS OPEN 
FROM TUESDAY 
THRU SUNDAY 
11 a m. to 7 p.m. 

2. PLACE DU PALAIS-ROYAL 
75001 PARIS- TEL. (1)42.87-27 00 


P*Ment Exhibition: 

"MARIONNETTES 
ET OMBRES D’ASIE’ 


GALERIE GUK7T 


1& Ar. Matignon, 75008 PARIS. 
TdL : 4266.65 Bi. 

COLLOMB 

Watenoolors 
Isa November 28 - December 24ssll 


fr= FISCHER FINE ART =i 

30 tCing St., SL James’s, London SW1 

01 -639 3942 

From Expressionism to Dado 
and Neue Sachlichkeit 

GERMAN ART 1909-25 
Until 20 December 
= Mon.-Fri. 10-5:30. _ 


1 


f SAGOT LE GARREC - 

24, rue du Four, Paris 6®, 
tel. 43.26.43.38. 

MIGUEL CONDE 

Engravings 

— until December 21 _ 

LONDON 


Drian Galleries 

7 PordMstar Place W2 2BT, 

Doeoffkbftr Exhibition in aid of 
Mexican Earthquake Vidm, Pafnf- 
«g* by various artich donated by 
hfaltma Nalea DaBy M pun. 


T 



r ->- ■ ,r-.) . 

. - - 













•w— ■* ■ >W -' 1 “ — ■ 


-• P 


Pa 


14 

T7 

20 



25 

3T 

3T 

38 

Si" 



47 

53" 

56 

5fl 


It 

( 

6 i 


1 


-11 : 


14 

15 

16 
17 
20 


21 

22 


25 


28 


31 

32 

33 


34 

38 


39 

40 

41 
43 



*V 


Page 8 


SATUKDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER1, 1985 



INTERNATIONAL 



Sr t b urn. How to Help die Soviet Union Get Out 





PnbJMwd With TV .V* York Tinw and TV Washington Port 


Time to Enter the EMS 


Britain is again debating whether 10 be- 
come a full member of Europe's monetary 
system, the EMS. Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher hedges. Many doubt the wisdom of 
her uncharacteristic hesitation. 

After fixed exchange rates were aban- 
doned, currencies gyrated so widely that 
business planning — and employment — 
were seriously affected. The EMS sought to 
attenuate the confusion through a plan to 
keep parities within Europe fairly constant. 
When market forces threatened to push an 
exchange rate beyond a certain narrow limit, 
governments were committed to intervene 
— by operating in the currency markets or 
adjusting their general economic policies — 
so as to keep the movement within agreed 
bounds. In extreme cases, parities could be 
adjusted, whereupon the game to defend a 
new pattern of exchange rales began again. 

The system has surprised the skeptics - — 
even in Britain, which stayed out Despite 
the vast growth of international money 
movements, short-term fluctuations be- 
tween European currencies have been limit- 
ed because countries have tried harder to 
keep their general economic policies in line. 
Whether this better policy alignment was 
caused by the EMS or rice versa is a chick- 
en-and-egg question that will never be an- 
swered but Lhe achievements are plain. Par- 
ticularly striking ha* been the smoothness 
with which occasional parity’ changes have 
been made when defense of a currency 
proved no longer posable — very' different 
from the previous damaging wrangling. 
Something of this European spirit can be 
seen in the broader international agreement 
two months ago to get the dollar down and 
the yen up by coordinated action. 


If Britain now came in. its inflation prob- 
lem would be eased Knowledge that its 
currency was henceforth linked with that of 
low-inflation West Germany would streng- 
then the resolve of British business 10 pre- 
vent labor costs from rising faster than 
abroad And since sterling would be more 
trusted internationally, it would no longer 
have to be defended by high interest rates. 

A steadier pound would make British in- 
dustry more adventurous, because business- 
men could judge future profits better. Last 
January. Britain had to raise its basic inter- 
est rate by as much as 4Vj percent to protect 
sterling. Whereupon the pound having fall- 
en 8 percent against the Deutsche mark in 
three months, shot up by 17 percent, unset- 
tling business in an already cold climate. 
Mrs. Thatcher fears that sterling will always 
swing because Britain is a major oil produc- 
er, and oQ prices change; But the swings 
would probably be less if sterling were inside 
the EMS. And since oil is about to become 
less predominant in the British economy, 
ihk particular objection is unconvincing. 

British adhesion would boost European 
unity — and assist painful efforts at the 
Community summit, which starts on Mon- 
day, to achieve a real common market by 
1991 It could also provide a convenient 
occasion for modest changes in Europe s 
existing exchange rate pattern, particularly 
between France and West Germany. 

The main argument, however, is that en- 
tering the EMS would make Britain more 
prosperous and stable. Adhesion should be 
prompt If it can prove its worth before the 
election in 1987 or 1988, it will be harder for 
a new government to pull out again. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Rain Forest Can Survive 


The tropical rain forests that girdle the 
equator are being rapidly cleared, and the 
destruction usually leaves nothing of compara- 
ble value, only floods, drought and barren 
land. To resist this devastation, the World 
Resources Institute of Washington has devised 
an imaginative plan that was considered last 
week in The Hague by delegates from inter- 
national aid agencies. They are being asked to 
pledge half the SS-biliion cost of the plan, with 
the rest to come from private corporations and 
the nations directly affected. The money 
would go for reforestation projects and other 
livelihoods for mose who exploit the forests. 

Tropical rain forests appear fertile because 
of the diversity of species they support. But the 
richness comes from 60 million years of evolu- 
tion. during which species proliferated and 
developed intricate interdependencies, like fig 
trees that nurture a particular wasp that polli- 
nates them. But the soil is almost always poor, 
because the rain leaches out nutrients. 

Fanners »ho clear the forest land learn that 
lesson after the first or second crop. They 
abandon the land to ranchers, who bum the 
weeds and raise cattle for a few- seasons. But 
the rains compact and deritalize the soil, then 
erode it. With the forests gone, floods follow; 
even the rains decrease. Each year, 1 1 million 
hectares of the world’s rain forests are wasted. 
All could be gone within a century. 

Why do Brazil. Colombia. Indonesia and 
others' allow forests to become moonscapes? 


Population growth and land hunger are the 
usual explanations that officials give. But there 
is plenty of land; the problem, as Catherine 
Caufield recently noted in The New Yorker, is 
chat 4.5 percent of Brazil’s landowners own 81 
percent of the farmland. In El Salvador. 2.000 
families own 40 percent Colonizing (he forest 
deflects the pressure for land reform. 

Shortsighted governments also yield logging 
concessions. The loggers take one tree in 10 
but desirov many more. Their roads make the 
forests accessible to farmers and ranchers, who 
complete the destruction. Everyone makes a 
quick profit ignoring the cost of replacing the 
trees — w hich, were it possible, would take 100 
years or longer. “Destroying rain forest.” 
Nicholas Guppy has written in Foreign Af- 
fairs. “is a means of avoiding tackling real 
problems by pursuing chimeras: a ’license to 
print money* which yields quick cash at the 
cost of ultimate catastrophe." 

The governments of nations endowed with 
rain forests are principally to blame, but for- 
eign loans have abetted the rape. The tragedy 
is that rain forests could be used productively, 
in ways that do not destroy than or the tribal 
peoples who inhabit them. The real causes of 
deforestation, the World Resources Institute 
concludes, are poverty, skewed land distribu- 
tion and low agricultural productivity’. If chose 
can be addressed, the rain forests and their 
teeming species need not perish. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Farewell to 'Fairness’ 


Since the last presidential election, the Dem- 
ocratic Party's National Committee has con- 
ducted 43 focus groups and commissioned a 
poll of 5,500 voters to leant how to appeal for 
votes. Last weekend the committee revealed its 
first findings. “When party leaders talk about 
fairness," a spokesman said, “middle-class 
voters see it as a code word for giveaway." 

“Fairness" was the party’s formula in 1982, 
when Democrats won a majority of votes cast 
for all offices. Is it a guaranteed vote-loser 
now? That depends on the kind of fairness. 

In 1982. Democrats attacked Reagan Re- 
publicans for cutting taxes for the rich and 
threatening to cut Social Security for the ordi- 
nary person. In a recession year the appeal 
paid off, but that may have been the last time 
this familiar rule worked. In the 1930s and 
1940s the great middle of the Ameri can in- 
come spectrum tended to see itself as the under 
half of society, with interests contrary to those 
of the rich on the top, and Democrats preach- 
ing “fairness" won most elections in those 
days. But in the 1970s and 1980s most Ameri- 


cans tend to see themselves as middle-class. 

The more success a democracy has in eradi- 
cating poverty, the smaller the political con- 
stituency for eradicating the poverty that re- 
mains. “People are telling us, ‘Please don’t ask 
us to care for people down the street before we 
take care of our own family’s economic securi- 
ty,' ” one Democrat said, the chairman of the 
National Committee, Paul Kirk, said the Dem- 
ocrats would not leave the disadvantaged be- 
hind. But for both parties, appeals that work 
best speak to the selfish interests of voting 
blocs — farmers, loan-hungry college students, 
soon-to-be Social Security recipients. 

The long-term interests of the nation and of 
the parties depend on fostering and focusing a 
spirit of generosity. The Democrats now sug- 
gest programs to help young Americans move 
upward to be college graduates, jobholders 
and homeowners — the kinds of programs that 
helped create the vast middle class of today. 
But none of these worthy initiatives translates 
directly into a formula to replace “fairness.” 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR NOV. 30 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: More Ships Adopt Telegraphy 1935: The Centenary of Mark Twain 


PARIS — Wireless telegraphy is already an 
old story and its importance as an aid to 
navigation needs no fresh argument. But its 
employment as a feature of a ship's equipment 
has been largely confined to the North Atlan- 
tic passenger service. Steadily, however, this 
system is being extended into Far East and 
Pacific waters. At least one line following these 
trade routes has equipped some of its vessels 
with wireless apparatus, and the general ten- 
dency to take every possible precaution 
against disaster was shown recently when the 
Austrian Minister of Commerce issued regula- 
tions requiring all Austrian vessels voyaging 
farther than Gibraltar or Aden to be equipped 
with wireless telegraphy apparatus. This may 
detract from the romance of the seas, but it will 
add much to humanity’s peace of mind. 


PARIS — The centenary of Mark Twain is 
being celebrated the world over [on Nov. 30] 
by those who have delighted in the humor, 
pathos and force of “Huckleberry Finn,” “The 
Adventures of Tom Sawyer” and other works 
of the man whose wjt made him the jester of 
his era. Mark Twain came into the world 100 
years ago in a little Missouri town named 
Florida. He died in 1910 after encountering 
fame and bitterest disappointment. His coun- 
try had showered him with money, honors and 
university degrees because be was the funniest 
fellow that had ever been bom in the United 
States, but nobody would take him seriously. 
The men he denounced loaded him with hon- 
ors. They laughed when he said: “Ain’t we gpt 
ail the fools in town on our side, and ain’t that 
a big enough majority for any town?” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WTLUAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT k. McCABE 
CARL GEW1RTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. PuNuher 

£xecvw>e Editor REN£ BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Editor RIC HARD H. MORGAN 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 


Deputy Publuktr 
Associate Publisher 
Associate PuNuher 
Director of Operations 


Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director cf Circulation 


ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director cf Ad*enuwg Sola 
International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Chartes-dc-Gauhe. 92200 NouHy-Sor- Seine. 

France. Tei.: ( 1 ) 47.47. 1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052 

Dirtaeur Je la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Managing Dir. Asia: Makohn Germ. 24-34 Homessy Rd, Hong Kong TeL 5-285618. Tekx 61170. 

Mmaguig Dir. UJi: Seim MacKkfm, 63 La g Aire, London WO. TeL 8364301 Tekx 262009. 



Gen Mar. W. German: W. Lauterbach FnetHJatr. IX 6000 Fradfiut/M. TeL (069)726755. Th. 418721. 
•al de 1.2, ~ 


S.A. au capital de 1 200.000 F. RCS Nanierre 8 732021126. Commission Pariuare Na 61337. 
U.S. subscription: S322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Island City, N-Y. II 101. 

1 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. 


ITT' ^ 


P 


ARTS — American leaders came home 
_ from Geneva with the impression that 
Moscow now would like to find a way out of 
Afghanistan. This was conveyed in public by 
Soviet spokesmen, who repeatedly spoke of die 
need for a “political solution, as well as offi- 
cially in private. They emphasized the role that 
United Nations mediation should play. 

There sze man y reasons to take this seriously* 
but there are also reasons why it will not be as 
easy as a simple ukase from Moscow. _ 

The war has dragged on for six yearn without 
any “light at the end of the runnel” — -to 
dispense with lhe Vietnam comparison. The 
cost and casualties have become a senous nui- 
sancc for the Kremlin, although they are not 
intolerable. They could go on indefinitely. 

NATO intelligence shows an increase m so- 
viet military action in Afghanistan recently, but 
That is not considered contradictory to Mos- 
cow’s message about a settlement. It could well 
be a last effort to achieve as favorable a military 
situation as possible before an attempte d tru ce. 

The war in Afghanistan has become a senous 

irritant in Moscow’s relations with the Third 
World, as the last UN condemnation showed. It 
Is also an obstacle in Moscow’s search for better 
relations with Beijing, and President Reagan 
has dear that Washington considers it a 
major test of Soviet intentions. 

So there are internal and external reasons to 
support the assessment that Moscow is pre- 
pared to seek a compromise. They may not be 
the most important, however. The spread cm 
mili tant Iranian- type f u nri a rne n t al ism has be*- 
come a new factor in lhe situation, worrisome 
throughout the region and possibly a threat to 


By Flora Lewis 

the stability of the Soviet Moslem population. 

In addition to the three million Af ghan refit; 

gees in Pakistan, there are a ndlibu m Iran. The 

office of the UN High Commissioner for Refu- 
ses found that they are well received, enab- 
led in towns and cities as well as in medal 
».tdements and becoming thoroughly indoOTL 
nated with Ayatollah Khomeini 7 s ideas. Funda- 

m e* olrA AnrmnA A P — -- — 



S ; Iran has to see it as a 

area. It is one point in this brutal . 
which America first saw as a Soviet dnye to- 
ward the Gulf, on which UjS. and Soviet 
ests have come to coincide. The 
gibus menace is proving greater than the soviet 
menace in a way that American, arms to tne 
umw niiu i ijwwuhm mpnmnwn « auvoo, r mu m» dauntless Afghan rebels cannot confront, 
mentalism is also gaining in the Afghan camps Moscow jjas to realize that no possible » 

in Pakistan, which is already, an Islamic stale meat could leave the puppet regime of i 
2 ““ U “ 1J T ! * ’ Karinal in place; it is much ioo hated and 

disoetfited. Nor is it conceivable that any land 
of international Guarantees could prop Mr. 


but is trying to hold Iranian extremism at bay. 

The evidence is that this trend can only grow 
as the conflict drags on. Everybody involved 



a^Suble regime, which would 

aid to an - t d nonalizned. Even 

have to be indepaww™ p^^, 

*>. u — *u» j-sSKSESSESS 

S^SiS'iJarettaii' *“ u “i“ 

» do* it rffecovdy. 

J^Sd hold its Jf* ttvoaU fhace Iw 

-JcMMwwni The sad fad t$ that no such 
majctfuv wnsen There is no zovera- 



• ■ m w 3 £ 

f £ i T 
v : _ s 


! >■ 


***** 


alternative reguoc is ^ible. There is ao 
xosoi in exile. The 



SSSer that thev cannot dump and replace. 

In a way. their situation is 

t*4 

,“■1 vfrfoam. because there is no Hanoi tc 

order and let them off Lhe 
h«*. eren hngnommy. An unprepared pulte 
5a leave clSos. not a new wm-SovTCl orde^ 
This is certainly Moscow * fault Ml « Mb 
explain why Moscow is willing to talk to % ash- 

Snabout Afghanistan. I ns also Ameri- 
ca should repress the tempuuoa to gioat ahouf 
SeKremli^s trouble, and should try to hdp 
fashion a competent substitute that nuU bt 
installed with miernauonal support in Kabul 

Thai will take time, and is probably bwouc 
the capacity of UN mediators. Amenta shouk 
support political talks among the rebels now 1 
looking to the day when a new regime can be 
organized- Even if Moscow has good new- mien 
tions, they wffl not be enough to end the war. 

The New York Times. 





4jg§| 

i 9k 


tag 


tati 

kSk 




The United States Cannot Ignore Hunger and Poverty" in Africa 


- ** 

- - m 


N EW YORK — The hungry people of 
Africa are very far awav fron 


Africa are very far away from America, 
in both distance and circumstances. Many 
Americans have difficulty imagining the con- 
ditions in which most Africans uve. Some also 
question the extent of American responsibil- 
ity there. Africa seems to them so far away. 


By Lawrence S. Eagleburger and Donald F. McHenry 


and they question whether aid can make any 
real difference to its seemingly unending 
plighL This is a sadly shortsighted view, for 
there are strong moral and practical reasons 
why Americans cannot ignore Africa. 

The seng is right: “We are the worid. 
Axnerica and other wealthy societies share the 
planet with hundreds of millions of people 
who lack the basic necessities of a decent 
existence. The tenets of all religions and most 
political philosophies hold that the rich have a 
fundamental responsibility to help the poor. 

It is also in the best secular tradition to act 
boldly in an emergency and to show humani- 
tarian concern without undue preoccupation 
with geopolitical or strategic considerations. 
Vast numbers of Africans face starvation and 
death, and their circumstances invoke our 
responsibility’ with particular urgency. 

Simple statistics reveal the gap between 
.American wealth and African poverty: An 
average .African’s income is less than one- 
thirtieth of the average American's. The gross 
national products of all 46 sub-Saharan Afri- 
can states amount to less than 6 percent of 
U.S. GNP. Africa must support 400 million 
people on an economy that produces no more 
than the state of Illinois. 

The fact that milli ons of Americans re- 
sponded as generously as they did in 1 984 and 
1985, with at least 5170 milli on in donations 
to ease African misery, symbolizes the readi- 
ness of Americans to respond to human pain. 

Even beyond humanitarian considerations, 
there are compelling reasons for the United 


States to help Africa today. America’s eco- 
nomic interests on the continent, for example, 
go beyond concern about oil in Nigeria and. 
strategic minerals in South Africa and Zaire. 
A stable, developing .Africa could eventually 
provide other raw materials and an expanding 
mar ket for industrial goods. 

Africa matters politically as welL If the 
United States genuinely cares about advanc- 
ing the cause of freedom in the wodd, them 
Africa, with its dozens of independent coun- 
tries, certainly merits attention. 

There are also Western security interests at 
stake there. The gap between che world’s rich 
and poor countries continues to widen — 
with most erf Africa at one extreme and the 
United States at the other. Thai golf, and the 
turmoil arising from persistent economic cha- 


os, might wdl be expkrited'by those, such as 
anti-Western fundamentalist movements, in- 
terested in adv an c in g narrow political, ideo- 
logical or noHtazy interests. But an American 
commitment now to Africa’s growth could 
help break down drviskms that will only grow 
more volatile if they are allowed to persist. 

International divisions may also cause dwi^ 
si on in America itself. Hostility or despera- 
tion in Africa can trigger racial feeiingsm the 
United States. In an interdependent world, h 
is important for the United States and for 
everyone else that Africa develop its human 
and physical resources as fully as possible. 

American experience can hdp Africa. In 
the 1930s America faced a de pression in its 
western and southern farm bats similar to 
what we see in Africa today. Thai crisis was' 


ended by years of tong-term concessional 
finance, work programs, soil and water con- 
servation projects and university programs to 
help fanner s cope with new challenges. 

Africa «*n us© America's scientific capabil- 
ity in agric ultural research, medicine and in- 
formation. Its Peace Corps, international 
businesses and voluntary agency staffs offer a 
large bank of experience to draw upon. 

Ameri ca help, and it should- The w orld 
cannot truly advance as long as one of its 
parts —a h ug e continent — lags far behind. 


--*3 

■ ■ •■■*3rt 



Mr. Eagkbtrger, a former U.S. assistant 
t of suae for 


secretary of state far European affairs, and Mr. 
McHenry, a farmer U.S. ambassador to the 
United Nations, an co-chairmen of the Com- 
mittee on African Development Strategies, 
which will issue a report an Dec. 2. They con- 
tributed this comment to The New York Times. 





But African Governments Need to Come (Jean on AIDS 



L c 


OS ANGELES — Did AIDS 
originate in Africa? Many 
scientists think so, but the hy- 
pothesis is cloaked in mystery — 
abundant drcumstantial evidence 
but siiQ no convincing proof. 
Many African governments deny 
that the disease even exists within 
their boundaries, let alone that it 
may have spread from there. 

Studies presented on Nov. 22 
and 23 in Brussels at an inter- 
national conference on AIDS in 
Africa added evidence that the 
disease is spreading at a frighten- 
ing rate in pans of the continent 
The focus is Central Africa, nota- 
bly Zaire, Rwanda. Burundi and 


to Zaire to report oo AIDS,” an 
official oT the Ministry of Health 
told a reporter Iasi ApriL 
The pursuit of knowledge is 
difficult in an environment of sus- 
picion. It is tmderstandable that 


By Harry Nelson 

Uganda. But the disease appears .But scientists who wish to do 
to be spreading to Kenya a nd AIDS research must avoid anger- 
countries to the south. ing prospective host governments. 

Dr. Robin Weiss, of the Cbes- Researchers doing needed ^de- 
ter Beatty Laboratories' in Lon- mkrfqgical and other sdcnt^ac African cations do not warn to be 
don, told the Brussels gathering of studies in Africa — already too identified as the place where 
about 700 scientists that “AIDS is few in number — -areal the mercy 
a spreading disease that has. be- ofgpvenunems that often tolerate 
come pandemic in much cf tropi- their efforts reluctantly, and that 
cal Africa.” Dr. Na than Chimeck, maynseasyexcusenottocooper- 
a Belgian AIDS researcher who ate, or eveu to expel them, 
helped diagnose some of the earii- Officials in Central Africa have 

est detected cases from Africa, damped a tight fid on the. news wide epidemic is to begomairw ri 

said that many African countries media’s acceSk to AIDS research- " * - *. -- - 

have not been repor tin g AIDS to era within their benders. “We Mr. Nelson is a Lae Angeles 
the World Health Organization- . don’t want any repo rters coming Tates meScal writer. 





AIDS originated. But if h did 
originate in Africa, scientists are 
convinced that studies there 
would bare great value for under- 
standing the vino — a virus that 
snot be ccetroSed if the world- 



A Plainspoken People Ought to Speak Up Plainly 


LETTERS 




C AMBRIDGE Massachusetts — 
There are few matters in which 
Americans have taken more pride 
than their commitment to plain 
speech. All have heard it: We are a 
down-to-earth, plainspoken people; 
we abhor evasion or cant And with 
this have gone two other claims: We 
Americans believe ourselves wisely 
alert to political motivation, evasion 
and chicane. And we are also deeply 
attached to the thought that more 
income is more enjoyable than less. 

I would like to urge that our sup- 
posedly forthright habits of speech be 
allowed to express what we all know 
to be true about politics and money. 

Specifically, we accept that politi- 
cians and political parties come to 
power with an obligation to their sup- 
porters. This normally involves im- 
proving their supporters* income. Yet 
this may not be mentioned in our 
time. Or, if mentioned, it is subject to 
indignant denial and rebuke. 

Thus, the Reagan administration 
came to office with the strong sup- 
port of the more affluent — company 
executives and corporate political- 
action committees, the f inanc ial com- 
munity, our more successful entre- 
preneurs, the otherwise comfortably 
rich as a class. There were many oth- 
ers, to be sure. To those just' men- 
tioned, Ronald Reagan was most vis- 
ibly beholden. From them cam* the 
large sums by which in our democra- 
cy political persuasion is aO too 
extensively accomplished. Those so 
contributing were obviously in line 
for tangible economic reward. 

Here, however, our commitment to 
candor came to an end. Three basic 
policies were early put in place by the 
administration — supply-side tax re- 
ductions, an astringent monetary pol- 
icy, a large increase in military ex- 
penditures. All had a wonderfully 
favorable impact on the upper-in- 
come brackets. All politically were a 
wholly normal reward by Mr. Reagan 
to his constituents. This, however, 
could not be said. Even Democrats 
were unnaturally reserved. 

Thus the supply-side tax reduc- 
tions with their large absolute benefit 
in the top income brackets and the 
companion cuts in social spending 
could not be seen as a service to the 
rich. Mr. Reagan angrily denounced 
a few vagrant statements to this effect 
as demagoguery. It was purely a de- 


By John Kenneth Galbraith 


braced candor is even more complete 
as regards monetary policy. Such pol- 
icy is held to be neutral as between 
rich and poor. In fact monetary pol- 
icy works through high interest rates 
that restrain the bank borrowing by 
which bank deposits are extensively 
created. Such interest rates are very 
welcome to those who have money to 
lend. Those who have money to lend 
normally have more than those who 
do not have money to lend. As eco- 
nomic truth, this stands with the pos- 
sibly apocryphal theorem of Calvin 
Coolidge that when many people are 
out of work, unemployment remits. 
Nor is this alL While rewarding 


those who lend money, monetary pol- 

>tqy!- 


icy works by creating the unempl 
ment that curbs union claims. And 
high interest rates attract from 
abroad the funds that bid up the 
dollar, discourage exports, make im- 
ports cheap, keep farm prices down. 
We not only redeem our reputation 
for dear speech, but have a much 
better understanding of monetary 
policy if we recognize both its service 
to the affluent and its highly regres- 
sive effect on workers and fanners. 

A more complex set of motivations 
is involved in the third major policy 
of the administration, the huge in- 
crease in military spending. The dy- 


namic of the arms race, the conserva- 
tive fear of communism, the liberal 
fear of being thought soft on commu- 
nism and the bureaucratic power of 
the Pentagon are all involved. But 
since the days of Dwight Eisenhower 
no one has doubted the powerful eco- 
nomic interest of the industrial half 
of the military-industrial complex . 

Weapons expenditures reward well 
paid executives, technicians and 
stockholders. Economic interest is 
sustained in Washington by a re- 
markably effective array of well 
lubricated lobbies, now commonly 
called consultants. A budget policy 
combining curtailment of social pro- 
grams with large continuing weapons 
expenditure reflects an interest of the 
affluent in having more money. And 
once again this is little mentioned 

Such woe the earlier services to the 
affluent. They continue now in the 
proposed tax bilk The cover story is 
amplification. The important intent 
a ad gleet is a further major reduc- 
tion in the top personal income tax. 
brackets. But this must not be said 
At most, only whispered. 

There is, h is dear, a basic asym- 
metry in our political discourse. One 
can be for help to the poor — to the 
hungry, the homeless, those without 
or prospects. But one cannot be 


publicly for a.pohcy on behalf erf the 
rich. America does have such poli- 
cies; they are a wholly 


Detente for Developmen 


Jc. 





dirty secret. There must be that cover 



effort at evasion is even de- 
rogatory of the afflu ent It implies 
that they are somehow disreputable. 
Yet it is not thought mtmacaSfy 
wrong under bar system to luriemon- 
ey and want morepl is rot un-Ameri- 
can. Dr. Johnson thought the pmsuit 
of wealth one of. the least harmful 
activities in winch men .'were on- 
ployed Once, of an evening, while 
watching a large New York office 
building empty itself of its occupants^ 
I thought how much better that those 
people were so engaged, not 
on war. pohtics or religion. 

If FI ^ 1 . _ “a _ ■ _ ,i • 


conceal obyioos political and pecuni- 
ary motivation behind unconvincing 
protestations as to some implausible 
public .good That, to. repeat, is to 
reject aproud dam to clear thought 
and phmi speech. And surely the dis- 
guise succeeds only with thaw whose 
beliefs are too eaaly cultivated 


The writer, emeritus professor of 
economics at Harvard, contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


Jn response to the qrimoncohnm*. 
D&ente Is Bade. Europeans Have Tall 
ing to DaT(No9. 23) by WiBy Brandc^- 

Not only Europe but also the oc| j 
aligned and developing coirn 
must exhort -Moscow ana W 
ton to translate the spirit of 
into international cooperation an 
freedom from hunger. Detente w 
not automatically release funds to ai 
development in die Third World. M 
Brandt aptly stresses the need to lip 
detente with global development. . * 
The European allies of the Unite* 
States may not deem it opportune 
issue joint appeals qf the kind ac 
dressed by India, Tanzania, Argent: 
na, Mexico, Greece and Sweden i - 
Januaiy and October (IHT. Oa. 31. ' 
But to, their own interest they shouk. 
back initiatives urging the UnitV 
States and the Soviet Union to brin * 1 % 
about substantial reductions in mfli ■ - 
tary expenditure and direct the fund ^ ^ 
and technological know-how thus re ' 
leased to global development. Affc 
all, money and technology are like ; , * 
Hindu god who has the power do / 
only to destroy but also to create.* 

RAMESH JAURA.' 

Bonn.- 




arm »ti ] 



Id -*> 



4*41 


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I 






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mj S 4 


*** r 

* 

L ** * 


A Master of Language and Conscience 



sign for invigorating the economy, 
' being the — 


“incentives” being the magic word. 
The rich were not working because 
they had too little income, the poor 
because they bad too much. 

There was a major sensation in 
1981 when David Stockman conced- 
ed that this was all really a cover for 
reducing the taxes on the affluenL 
Public admission erf the most predict- 
able or political motivations became 
an occasion for major surprise. Mr. 
Stockman was called severely to ac- 
count The American reputation for 
plain speech, indeed! 

The suppression of our much cele- 


W ASHINGTON — Whed Mark 
Twain and his wife Livy were 
alone or with friends, she called him 
“Youth,” seemingly an odd nick- 
name for the bewiuskered figure we 
remember from photographs But 
maybe not so odd when you think 
about iL The great American writer 
— his 150th birthday falls this Satur- 
day, Nov. 30 — was the creator of 
those everlasting youths; Huck Finn 
and Tom Sawyer, and much of the 
river-town waif Sam Clemens lin- 
gered in the mature Twain. 

There was, of course, much more 
than perpetual youth in him. A mile- 
wide streak of misanthropy stains his 
later writings, a savage despair barely 
veiled by satire. But despair (think of 
James Thurber in our time) seems to 
be the curse of great comic writers; 
and they are fortunately far more 
than the sum of their despairs. 

Twain left two legacies — a book 
and a way of writing English — that 
outshine the darkness behind them. 

Quite apart from that personal 
conquest of darkness, there was 
something heroic in Twain’s achieve- 
ment. He came of age as a writer in 
the last quarter ai the 19th century 
when American public-spiritedness 
and cnqylgnce were dimming , a time 
he unforgettably labeled “the gilded 
age." Yet he for his part was forging 
his hatred of cruelty into the river- 
odyssey tale of Huckleberry Finn and 


By Edwin M. Yoder Jr. 


Nigger Jon, a tale sometimes called 
“racist” but in fact the very opposite. 

“The Adventures of Huckleberry 
Finn” ran a gains t the sluggish cur- 
rent of the age. America was falling 
wearily back from Lincoln’s vision 
and plunderer? were in the saddle. 
Even as Twain portrayed slaves as 


however, be many decades bef ore the 
national consciousness caught up 
with Twain’s vision of natural justice^ 

Then there was the way he wrote. 

Fra all- his rustic poses,, he b ad a 
delicate ear For language. Up to and 
beyond the Gvfl War, the literary 

“ . T* ' 


human beings, not only in “Hudde- 
inn"bu 


berry Hon” but also in “Puddeohead 
Wilson,” various new theories of ra- 
cial superiority were being minted. 
They were deagned to rati onaliz e the 
backsliding from the promise of ra- 
cial equality, or to justify the submer- 


gence of peoples of color (“half devil 
and half child,” as Kipling would 


write a few years later) udder the 
tutelage of Victorian imperialism. . 
Twain wmi to have been among 


the few in his time who discerned the 
connection between domestic institu- 
tions buflt on racial discrimination, 
and the imperialist fever tbai'over- 
came even such younger Americans 
as Theodore Roosevelt. 

In one of die most idling scenes of 
“Huckleberry Finn,” the rustic Hudc 
weighs his disconcerting impulse , to 
help a fellow creature against the de- 
mands of "conscience.” He case tins 
depraved “conscience" aside, saying 
that if hell is the price 6T hdnme a 
runaway . slave, so be it It 



tradition had demanded a distinction 
between the formal lan guage in 
which literate folk expressed them- 
selves and the racy dialogue forms of 
Western or Southern burlesque. It 
was Twain’s contribution to blend 
them, to end the false separation. 

Only an American, says Bernard 
De Veto, could have written “the 
calm confidence of a Chricriat. with 
four aces.” -Perhaps a later novelist 
exaggerated when he said that all 
modern American writing “comes 
out of ram book” by Twain but there 
is a case for saying so. 

The year “Hudddserry Finn” was 

serialized, 1885; happened also to be 
the year that the painfully Stricken 
Ulysses S: Grant, with Twain’s hdp 
and parrauage, was straggling in ago- 
ny to finish his no-nonsense “Mem- 
otrs." Both books would ultimately 
ogoized i$ early nionurDcois of- 
American plain-speak. In than the 
Western American tributaries of 
heartland idiom entered the main- 
Stream otEngfrsh, altering it forever 
Train, that day on, Amroms had a 
language of their own: . 

. Washington Post Writers Group. 


< 

A Lethal Virus at liberty 

Despite dear evidence that fa 
AIDS virus is found in saliva, ui 
legislation is in effect to prevent It 
' spread It is believed that continudui^ 
exposure to AIDS-infected personsv . 
over long periods at work or school . 
transfers at least as much infeefee . ^ 
sputum as a passionate kiss. 

Failure to institute preventive mea* 
sures has several reasons. Special-in- 
terest groups are well organized 
Afj&tnst the population cn general 
which has no special forums but niuir - 
depend- on existing institutions. Tb* * 
general climate of liberalism allows 2 ^ 
test period on the innocent popula* 
tion before a restrictive consensus 
against danger can be mobilized ■ 

When an AIDS sufferer is con- 
fronted with the inevitable en d, a last" 
fling for pleasure can. lake him to one 
of lhe sex capitals qf Southeast Asia 


i 






***** 






ir. 



from the United Stales to Kenya — 
one of the. sex centers. Nothing is 
done to restrict the movement of even ' 

documented AIDS spreader. : 

Qutoanline exists for diseases sucb 
as cholera and malaria, which in the 
a iila 11111 are much less serious thac 
AIDS. The -tragedy is that only the- 
AiDS-infected person is aware of the 




ik*.:. 


1 u 


menace to an unsuspecting victim: 
"a s able to 


Smallpox was able to wipe oui 
sometimes as much as 90 percent ol 
the island nations of the Pacific do* 
primarily to medical ignorance. Lib 
autism and orgamzedseff-gratifica- 
tipu.may.have similar result* l0 day. 



«? 


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T7CT 


N OVEMBER 30-PE CEMBER 1. 1985 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 

Report, M-l, Page 10 




■-« . 

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KONOMCSCK 


1 * 11 * 

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„ _ '• •■• '.1. ■ . 'C. 

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lit Deflation 
Is the Challenge of the ’80s 


- r-J. 


»•»* 


-4.‘ 


"'- 01 . 



J**- 


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mu} I 


) 


• By LEONARD SILK 

. Tims Sfnitt 

N EW YORK— Economic policy-makers, like generals, 
have a tendency to fight the last war, and their last war 
was against inflation* But the actual battle now con- 
. v.rx . frontmg the United . States and other industrial coun- 

• .;■ • “ against dalarioa ■ 

: y° rid oil prices have fallen 25 percent since their 1981 peak, 
* - !r r 'i“ ^'fJSLf 0 ?! 1110 ^ JPnces have been falling since the start of the 

• / 980s. But the December issue of World Financial Markets, 

. 1 1 * ' ; ; ; t P°bhshed^by Mcwgan Guaranty Trust Co M shows that oil prices 

' K,r '’!i'T-„' L ^ Bre , hi Sb m historical terns relative to world prices of 
-■• ^ c ^manufactured goods. _ 

•• l\ ' In constant dollars, the - ’ 

■ price of crude oil is still nearly 
■‘.c j . ; ° J five times as high as it was 
- i >, before thefirstoD price explo- 

*• .■ ; . 1 ' , 1 ;^ 5 .. sion in 1973. Excess capacity 
"riband financial pressures are 
i ^'compeffing oil producers to 
increase their output. Prices 
apparently still have a way to 
faH 


• tv 


Commodity, ojl prices 
have dropped as 
industrial output 
falls below capacity. 


mertx i n 


? s * 


world commodity prices, especially for mwrak ar ud 
-T.J|| fibers, are under heavy downward pressure. An index of metal 


■ ■S'* 


-prices, which reached a peak of more than 130 in 1980, has fallen 
_ . ' . . to 50 this year — nearly a two- thirds decline, about twice as much 

. ? ^ 315 tbe overall decline m commodity prices. 

. Farmers in the United States lUve been experiencing a depres- 
“ 1 sr. j/sion. Since 1979 the ratio of prices received by American fanners 
; L-^to the prices paid by them, including payments for interest, iwq? 
- ■ rr^i ^.; and wages, has f alien 30 percent. 

T HROUGHOUT the world, farm prices have fallen in both 
dollar and real terms as a result of improved yields and 
growing output in the face of very slowly growing demand. 
::, >rci - Sluggish economic growth in the industrial world has inlenri- 
r- >fied the pace pressure on commodities and manufactured goods. 

— ' Growth in the seven mqor industrial countries — the United 
r States, Japan, West Germany, France, Britain, Italy and fjmfld* 
-»' u-vjj'— slowed from 5.7 percent a year during the 1 960s to 3.6 percent 
■tit { ; ‘ in the 1970s and has averaged only 2^ percent in the 1980s. 
jv . . The U.S. animal growth rate dedined from 4J2. percent in the 

'■• > r . 1960s to 2.1 percent in the first half of the 1980s. In Europe the 

-> _■ -ci- '. 'dedine has- been steeper. Real growth — the siwiiwi increase in 






py^gross nafional product, adjusted for infla tion — is estimated at 


l ! o ( a 


' 1-2 percent in West Germany and France and l.l percent in 
/' 7 Britain from 1980 through 1985. Japan has averaged a 43- 

■f ffHf J f .( Cu/l Ofl growth in the 1980s, after 11.6-percent growth in 

< -*c [.- The slowdown in growth of the industrial countries opened 

r ...;' wide gap between actual output and what economists call 
^“potential output^ — the production that could have been 
j ^achieved if labor and capital had been utilized at a high rate. 

_ The gap between actual and potential output has increased 

dow 


!: : ^unemployment and has brought down the rate of increase in wage 
r^^rates and unit labor costs. 

- v :-rJ >■ t- ^spite the immediate recovery, Edward L. Deniscm of the 
"j: 3rookmgs Institution stresses in a new study, Trends in Ameri- 

■ _ i i’can Economic Growth, 1929-1982,” that the 1973-82 period of 
^ rdow growth is not over. The United States, he says, now has “the 
. ; rj i c^- largest reserve of unused productive capacity since the 1930s.” 
.. : t r^-]Wage pressures, he adds, have been restrained by the long 
v ■ y: --^ duration of unemployment and the recognition of the productivi- 
.r ^ slowdown. 

Is inflation only, taking a holiday? While ho.Wi'ng HKgt - infi atia n 

■ ’,.-r : ; s never dead but only dormant, Morgan Guaranty declares, “By 

- - estimate, enormous output gaps prevail today in the tna/or 

mdnstrial countries.*' The gaps between potential and real out- 

_ _ . ■ . . .m » _ . tm _ _ _ m ■ s 


Mexico 

Raises 

Oil Prices 

■ 

hawses Affect 
Only light Grade 

Cappded by Dvr Staff Fr&n Ditpatchs 

MEXICO CITY — Encouraged 
by a firmer market and growing 
winter demand, Mexico has an- 
nounced that it was raising prices 
of its light-grade crude oil by an 
average of 76 cents a band. It was 
the second price increase in two 
months. 

* The government o3 company, 
Fetrtileos Mericanos, said that the 
new prices, which go into effect 
Sunday, would remain in force 
through December. Mexico has dif- 
ferent prices Cor its two types of oil, 
the light-grade Isthmus and the 
heavier Maya. 

As in due past, the new prices are 
based on the buyer's distance from 
Mexico, with the most expensive 
fees being charged to the closest 
countries. The government lowers 
its prices to countries far away to 
offset high shipping costs. 

Pcmex’s announcement Thurs- 
day said that the price of Isthmus 
would rise to $27.45 from $26.90 

E r band for the Far East, to 
7.60 from S26.75 per barrel for 
Europe and to $2835 from $27.60 
per barrel for the United States. 
Maya oil prices will not change. 
A similar increase in Isthmus 
prices that went into effect Nov. 1 
ended more than a year of price 
cuts for the light crude ofl. Maya 
prices were cut then for the fourth 
time this year. 

"Ihe December price increases 
correspond to the usual increase in 
consumption of crude during the 
winter season,” Pemex said They 
are also aimed at correcting distor- 
tions in market demand for Hgbt 
and heavy hydrocarbons." 

Although Mexico is not a mem- 
ber of the Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries, it had 
followed the cartel’s pricing guide- 
lines until last summer, when it 
broke away as the world oil market 
weakened and the country's sales 
plunged by more than half 
Mexico slashed prices in July 
and exports since then have recov- 
ered with November sa 1 « reaching 
132 million barrels a day. Pemex 



The Wc&hngxsr Pm 

Masahiro Yanaqisawa, right, an electrical engineer from Japan, works with Ed Dodson, 
center, and Ted Brnnke on control panel at National Steers plant in Ecorse, Michigan. 

A Steelmaker’s Japanese Lifeline 

Ailing National Taps Resources of Nippon Kokan 


U.S. Orders Halt 
To Import of 
Most EC Steel 


By Peter Behr 

Washington Pest Service 

■ PITTSBURGH — National Steel Corp. has 
turned to Japan for the capital, crediL, new tech- 
nology and work attitudes it needs to survive in a 
time of falling steel prices and growing competi- 
tion. 

National and its partner. Nippon Kokan KK. 
hope the American company can become a leading 
supplier of advanced steel products for the auto 
industry and other customers. 

Nippon Kokan, with annual output of more 
than twice National’s, is Japan's second-largest 
steel concern and one of the world's most ad- 
vanced producers. 

Last year Nippon Kokan purchased a half- 
interest in National Steel, the seventh-ranked L\S. 
steelmaker, for about $300 millinn. 

If the partnership succeeds. National Steel may 
become the center of an expanding Japanese com- 
mercial network in the midwestem United Slates 
including not only Nippon Kokan, but also two of 
Japan’s big trading companies, Marubeni Corp. 


and Mitsubishi Corp., and some leading Japanese 
banks. 

All however, will be sharing the risk that Na- 
tional, and the other U.S. steel producers are facing 
— a risk, ironically, that is sharpened by pressures 
of low-cost foreign steel on National’s profits. 

National Imergroup Inc H parent of National 
SteeL posted a loss of S13.3 million in the first nine 
months of this year, marking a deterioration of its 
situation from the corresponding period of 1984, 
when it made a S3. 94- million loss. The group is 
uniikely to snake a profit for full 1 985. 

With steel prices down sharply this year, and 
competition increasing from imports and products 
that substitute for steel the industry must reduce 
costs dramatically, said Howard M. Love, chair- 
man of National Imergroup. 

“If we have another year like 1985, it isn't going 
to be jus: the lenders, it’s going to be the owners 
who're going to Lake a hard look at that business 
and wonder whether or not it's worth investing 
additional funding,” Mr. Love said. 

Why has NKK shouldered half of that risk? 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL 1} 


By Car] Hartman 

The A if (Muted Fn 3 ** 

WASHINGTON — Most steel 
imports from the European Com- 
munity have been halted because 
the 10 member governments have 
failed to approve an agreement to 
limit European shipments, the Cus- 
toms Service said Friday. 

European approval of the Nov. 1 
accord was held up because Britain 
wants assurances iL can ship at least 
300.000 tons of unfinished steel 
next year to a plant in Tuscakxjsa, 
Alabama, according to a European 
source, who spoke on condition of 
anonymity. The source said that 
the British have an interest in the 
plant, which he did not identify. 

The Customs order prevents en- 
try or release of European steel to 
the UJS. market, except for pipes 
and tubes. It took effect Thursday, 
but was little noted because of the 
Thanksgiving holiday in the United 
Slates. 

Sian Gustafson of the U.S. Na- 
tional Steel Fraud Program, a do- 
mestic industry pressure group, cal- 
culated that the action affects all 
but S 200 million of the SI. 5 billion 
worth of basic steel mill products 
shipped to the United States from 
the EC this year. 

“We hope this measure will 
speed up the agreement." he said. 

The Reagan administration is 
trying to hold down imports of 
steel to preserve orders and jobs in 
the depressed domestic steel indus- 
try. 

Britain stated its reservations 
when the agreement was reached 
Nov. I. It since been approved by 
the ECs nine other members, but 
any endorsement must be unani- 
mous. 

{British diplomatic sources told 
Agence France-Pre&se that Britain 


is prepared to scuttle the agreement 
if it does not receive guarantees on 
its exports of semi-finished sec! 
products to the United States, 
which are not part of the accord.] 

The agreement would ex rend 
through September 1989 an accord 
due to expire at the end of this >ear. 
It slightly increases the shipments 
acceptable to the United States — 
to 5.5 percent of the total U.S. 
markeL from 5.4 percent. 

U.S. steel interests have enu- 
cized the agreement. But they have 
said that it is important to the Rea- 
gan administration's steel program, 
which seeks to cut total imports 
from 25 percent to ii.5 percent of 
the U.S. market. Steel agreements 
have been reached wiih 14 other 
countries. 

The American Iron and Steel In- 
stitute reported this week that more 
than 1.3 million tons of steel mill 
products were imported in Octo- 
ber, accounting for 17.3 percent of 
the domestic markeL 

Nearly 2 million net tor.s of site! 
mill products were imported dunng 
October 1984. representing almost 
one-founh of the domestic market, 
the Washington- based agency said. 

During the first 10 months of 
I9S5. imported steel mill products 
totaled 20.4 million net tons, com- 
pared with nearly 22 million net 
tons the previous year, the institute 
said. 

“Although there have beer, some 
month- to- month fluctuations, the 
central and indisputable fact about 
steel imports is that, for the 10 
months of 1985, they amounted to 
an overwhelming 20.4 million tons, 
accounting for more than S9 billion 
of our foreign trade deficit." said 
Donald H. Trautlein. chairman of 
institute and the Bethlehem Steel 
Corp. 


Tokyo Stock Exchange Admits 6 Foreign Firms as Members 


t 




put, it estimates, range from about 5 percent of gross national 
in the United States and Canada to more than 13 percent 
France and West Germany. 

Such gaps are likely to persist in the years ahead, restraining 
global growth and continuing to curb inflation but causing high 
[^employment and gluts of commodities and manufactured 
goods. 

— i: - - • . 


1,7 „■ 




Currency Bales 


: -yr. Me? 


|J |1 



By Susan China The four foreign securities firms rides firms have pressed to become we are not sure of the special evalu- rejected were Salomon Brothers. 

-Vfv York Times Service rejected were the U.S. companies members of its exchange. alive process” to select members, and W.J. Carr. Several executives 

TOKYO — The Tokyo Stock of Salomon Brothers; Smith Bar- The Tokyo Stock Exchange al- said Gene Da t tel, managing direc- said that Salomon Brothers might 
predicted it would sell 1.55 miltinn Exchange chose on Friday six uey. Hams Upham International tered its constitution to accept for- tor of the Tokyo branch of Saio- have been passed over because the 

barrels of crude oO daily in Decern- American and British securities Inc.; and First Boston Corp.; and eign firms in 1982, but because the mon Brothers. “We hope to be ad- largest share of its business here is 

ber. firms as members, markmgihe first the British firm of WX Carr. Sons Tokyo exchange , limited the mini- mitted in the future." .in bond trading rather than equi- 

Oil sales make up three-fourths time that foreign companies wiD be & Co. The companies selected will ber of seats to S3, seats were avail- -j definitely, unquestionabk ties. Mr. Dane! declined to com- 

of Mexico’s total ejqxirt revenues allowed to join the 107-year-old probably be able to trade on the able only when members withdrew <hinic that we deserved one of these mem. Salomon Brothers has also 

and are the principal source of cap- exchange. exchange early next year, said Har- or merged with other firms, and seats,” said Steve Richardson, had branch office status longer 

ital for making payments on its The firms selected were Merrill tiki Endo. an exchange spokesman, existing members were reluctant to branch manager of W.J. Carr's of- than either Morgan Stanley or 

$96.4-biIlion foreign debL Lynch Capital Markets; Gol dman. j 3 panese officials and foreign se- diIule lhcir ^vestment by creating fi C e here, Goldman Sachs. 

In Cairo on Fnday, Egypt’s oil Sachs & Co., and Morgan Stanley curities executives alike bailed the new M*- Eodo, the exchange spokes- Executives here also said they 

ministry announced an increase of & Co. of the United States, and decis ion, which addressed a major Afler P r °l° n S^ pressure from man, said a special committee had VVCTe surprised that W.l. Carr was 

25 to 60 cents for December export Jardine Fleming Securities Ltd, iniutm in trade relations. foreign governments as well as Jap- examined several criteria in select- not offered a seat because the 

prices of crude oD. Egypt is not a Vickers da Costa Lid. and S.G. anese nonmember firms, the ex- fog aew members. These included f |rQ J's equity commissions exceed 

member of OFEG Warburg & Co. of Britain. They * he of , fore! p securities change decided in August to in- capitalization, operating profit and s 0 ™ others that were accepted for 

And in a related development, will pay about S5 million for seats . st ^ “change marks CTease ^ membership to 93 seats. debL ratio of branch and home of- membership. First Boston opened 

OPEC-member Venezuela an- on toe exchange. e beginning o anew epixii. uie Friday’s decision left some firms fices. volume of business and com- a branch offices here just last June, 

flounced Thursday that it plans to Ten foreign securities firms and prea aen t ot tne t oxyo mock tx- bilier ^ about ^ e missions earned in Japan irading was thought to be a long shot 

offer stiH-undisdased proposals to eight Japanese companies had ap- m *™ 10 takeueni, said rn- ria used to select members, al- both stocks and convertible bonds, f pr membership, 

defend prices at the cartel's Dec. 7 plied for 10 openings. The ex- though executives did not publicly and the amount of experience in The firms who were passed over 

meeting in Geneva. change also swarded four seats to As Tokyo grows more important criticize the stock exchange. Japan. could wait years for a seat. 

(UP1, AP) Japanese firms. as a financial market, foreign seal- “We were very disappointed and Two surprises among the firms 


,7 

. -vJ^teOUCW 7-49 ■ J74 

v. - 479 JO 

2514 
UR 
79 

37.158 1 

01771 0L59U 27059 AJ29 
LD93TP 07X725 NjQ. U7K7S 

In umtoam? Zurich, torinos In other Ewvosaa cantor*. York rots* of 4 PM. 

, CtoMwiPB ft rf ftaoc toyQBt PPiwdfe]4 fiwa i On»to to<9teMt 

, -fr^pDarfV UnittOfm fxj Units of 1000 tyL UnttsonMOOfLQ.: not Quoted^ HJL: notwoHobta. 
r'tj Tob*r em temrf;#UXL4 


• ^ iwVWfct e) 

7J645 

•njr.-'jfcr* ante 

\ ’.JTld I 2071 


44875 sc 
1UB* 
0-1215 ■ 

ItelJd 

NjQ, 


EC Delays Japan ’s Trade Surplus Narrowed During October 




Or; 


“ s- 1 arm on 

Saudi Glycol 

By Bob Hagerty 

semaxtonal Heram Tribw 


' - u ..* ^jmmr oar iuj 

.■i* _ 1 w ■ i 


- "*-»■’ J 

^r. Jte.ta.fr. 

r *c&r . 


-- F 


tv 


i 


IteSfl 
17JS 
51 J2 
9,10000 

ue 

12015 
9.125 
1055 

flaitav: ITQlrtahE 


HovIChuS 
I 


uss 

5A9 
15000 
700 
12.11 

Iterate 1,12300 
IrUff OOK7 
UntelUi ok. 1,48005 
Kwaffidbwr 0 l 2898 
Malay, rm. 


Cannier pot IUJ 
45700 


SovtotraU 


1BJD 


Sateniyor 

Xitel 

Iterato 

SLKar.woa 


24955 

20314 


UOLf 
0J54Q 
15640 
7045 

Tateis 39 J9 

TOO llaW 24095 

TOrtcMl Dm 557 JO 
UACdhton 30722 
1525 




; Banqu* du Benelux (Bnmtdw); Banco Camnmr cM ifcti&wv (MUon); Amur Na- 
cto Parts (Parts)/ Bank at Tokyo (Tokyo}: IMF (SDR)/ BAU (dtoor, rival* t&rhom); 
akank (nMaJ OBmrOCfafrom R mdmrmanaAP. . 




Interest Rates 


- '■ 
I*'-- 1 " -• ■ 








IH’t' 


■v 


t-.- 


nomti 


t * 

. r. 


ityD epori tt 

Swlu Frendi 

Dollar P M ark Franc UarUitt Prmc 

0)3-014 4¥t4V$ 4M«i 71 Ml OU-CM 

XKrOM. 4H-444 4Kr4 4k 11 5V-11 ^ 

0K-0H 4 HrifW iWllh 9 Hh9Ri 

OKteUi «4h • 4 fe-4 * 11 1^11 h. ID v-ih** 

8 4VOM. 4*3-5 AM* 11K-11M, 10 1V10 U» 

vrees: Moraafi G u o /w fr ftoffar, DM* SF* Povntf* FFJ; Lloyds Bank (ECU)/ Routers 
pRl Rates appncukb to trrtertank deposits of si ntitUon minimum tar eauWnt). 

Noe. 29 


nanfttf 

nates 


Mml^9 

BCD SDR 
ouib 7a 
BMh 7ft 
OteOlfa 7A 

IhrlKi ?«• 

0te-SH 



7ft 


9ft 


7J0 

7.14 

724 

7-50 

7-50 


5JS0 

4SQ 

470 


■ > l "^»omiofert«t 


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i< .- mni iBinon* 
' ^ teto totonsoiik 


- ^ .teXi | 


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IPk 

03/16 


410 


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1 mont* • 

2 mantes 
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OBHKlttl S 

l rear 

Source* Routers. 


8ft -BU 
Oft-Ott 
Oft -Oft 
Sft-SVt 
0 ft-9 ft 


UJi.M 


Nbv.29 


Morrli) LmA tev Asset* 

30 ter ovoroas viola: 720 

Toferat* Intnvlt Rato Index: 7J09 
Source: Merrill Lynch* Tehrutes 


■tohi 


• m .. 


y B iter 

i > 

\ ft 

^ ■ -a* % 

l r . 

* ■'T »* 


BUI 


lift T1V3 
* 1116 114& 

m/» ni/M 

11 VU 111rt2 


■V *teotRate 


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5 

7ft 

Oft 


J 

7ft 

Oft 


* ^ 


.yFeeez Reuter* Commerzbank* Credit 
> •*;; teklMrtfTWva 



Gold 


fori. 39 


AM. . PM. 

KonoKOtiO 32470 32U0 

UutmOwra 37700 - — 

Paris nil UM) 33900 228JO 

Zvricli 37660 2Un 

T inffnn J27te 32U0 

flow rovK — 28.90 


— 0L12S 
UftdL 
•FOLIO 
-«5 

— 1J0 

— 100 


Lincrnoara. Ports and imkm o tfictot Rx- 
tops; none Knap ana Zurich oaa aln p and 
pHntno prices* Few York Cmmk current 
contract, Al* price* In 9i 

Source: Reu t ers. ■ 


/menutel Hmod Tribune 

LONDON — The European 
Community, apparently giving way 
to Saudi Arabian pressure, has de- 
layed a final derision on whether to 
impose a tariff on imparts of Saudi 
ethylene glycol a raw material for 
antifreeze and polyester. 

Tariffs of 13 percent imposed 
earlier this year on Saudi polyethyl- 
ene and me than ol provoked threats 
from the kingdom that it would 
retaliate by imposing higher tariffs 
on theSll billion or so of goods it 
imports annually from EC coun- 
tries. 

The ECs executive commission 
published earlier this week a notice 
raying that it had inmosed a 13- 
percent tariff on glycol from Saadi 
Arabia. But an EC spokesman in 
Brussels said Friday that the publi- 
cation was a mistake. The commis- 
sion had been “on the point" of 
imposing the tariff, but rto final 
decision bad been made, the 
spokesman said. He said the com- 
mission was studying a submission 
on the Saadis* view and probably 
would make a decision m about 
two weeks. 

European chemical companies 
say EC rules require the commis- 
sion to automatically impose 13- 
peicenl tariffs once the level of im- 
ports exceeds the small duty-free 
quotas granted to Saudi Arabia 
and other developing countries un- 
der the Generalized System of Pref- 
erences, 

Imports of Sandi glycol by EC 
countries so far this year have to- 
taled about 20,000 metric tons, the 
EC spokesman said. The value of 
such imports would be 26.8 million 
Deutsche marks ($10,5 tniHionl at 
conem prices quoted by Platt's 
Ofefmscan. That is more than 22 
times the Saudis' duty-free quota. 

Sau di-EC relations grew more 
harmonious in October after a 
meeting between trade officials of 
the European. Community and the 
Gulf Cooperation Council made 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL 4) 


Agence France* Preue 

TOKYO — Japan's current ac- 
count surplus in October shrank 
slightly from the month before, but 
still remained a hefty S4.77 billion 
with exports reaching a monthly 
record, the Finance Ministry said 
Friday. 

Separately, the government said 
that Japan's seasonally adjusted 
jobless rate in October rose to a 
one-year high of 2.8 percent, with 
1.59 million people out of work. 
That is a 0.1 -percent increase point 
over September's rate. 

The October current account, a 
broad uade measure that includes 
goods, services and remittances, 
was the fifth-laigest monthly fig- 
ure. The surplus in September was 
$4.88 billion. 

The gain from merchandise 
trade widened to the third-largest 
monthly iota] of $5.40 billion from 
$527 billion in September, the 
ministry said. 

The merchandise trade surplus 
reached $43.59 billion in the first 
10 months of this year, and eco- 
nomic analysts said'it is certain to 
top a new high of $50 billion in 
1985. 

Shipments to China, the United 
Stales and the European Commu- 
nity in October pushed exports to 
$15.99 trillion, an 8.1 -percent in- 
crease from the year before, the 


ministry said. That topped the pre- 
vious monthly record of 515.75 bil- 
lion set in December 19S4. 

Imports rose 2.3 percent from 
tbe year-before level to S 10-59 bil- 
lion, largely due to such variable 
factors as purchases of aircraft and 
gpld for industrial use. 

On the unemployment report, 
the government's Management and 
Coordination Agency said in its 
monthly labor survey that the re- 
cent increase in the value of tbe yes 
apparently has had an adverse im- 
pact on employment in manufac- 
turing industries. 

The report, released Friday, said 
that there were 14.65 millio n peo- 
ple employed in manufacturing, 
down 0.3 percent, for the third 
straight year-to-year monthly drop. 
About 1 1.94 million people were m 
services, up 2.1 percent, and 4.98 
million in agriculture and forestry, 
down 1.8 percent. 

The total work force was 58.72 
million last month, up 100.000 
from September. 

The report also rioted that em- 
ployment slowed down in October 
in a segment of the export-related 
manufacturing industries. 

The agency also said that Japan’s 
unadjusted consumer price index 
rose 1.4 percent in October from 
September, which was 1 percent 
above Aueust. 


The long-term capital deficit 
more than doubled to S7.22 billion 
in October from 53.10 billion in 
September as Japanese investors 
actively bought foreign stocks and 
bonds, encouraged by buoyant 
trends in New York. 

Tbe outflow of long-term capital 
reached 59.02 bOlion while the in- 
flow stood at SI. SO billion, with 
foreign investments in Japanese 
stock and bonds totaling $1.21 bil- 
lion. 

■ Special Loans Offered 

Tbe Japanese government decid- 
ed Friday to offer special loans to 
help small export -oriented busi- 
nesses cope with the sharp rise of 
the yen, which has meant smaller 
ven revenues for each dollar earned 


abroad. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Tokyo. 

Under the lOG-billion yen pack- 
age, worth S497 million, small busi- 
nesses may borrow at an annual 
interest rate of 6.8 percent — 0.2 
percent lower than the market rate, 
the Finance Ministry said. 

The yen has appreciated about 
17 percent against the dollar since 
September, when finance officials 
of five major industrialized nations 
agreed to cooperate in policies that 
would reduce tbe dollar's value 
against other currencies. 

■ Tariff Cuts Planned 

Japan said Friday that it will cut 
the tariff on imported bottled wine 
in April, a year ahead of schedule, 
Agence France- Presse reported 
from Tokyo. 


WOLFF SYSTEMS 
RESEARCH LTD. 

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USA-ta - 4 -355 - Kk.-,74perCDR- 
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I'* 





'T 4 l /. 




<P l' -1 


“ t 














Pa^ 


P 

115 

c 

14 C 
151 

16 C 

17 ^ 

201 

b 

21 C 
221 
23 S 
25! 


I 

1 

281 

i 

31' 

32] 

33f 


341 

38. 


■■ 

**. 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-5UNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 1985 


& 




NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Vot HW LOW Lost Old. 


iridays 


AMEX Diaries 


^ia«;paq Index. 


- — ^ nm w.w a* [^4” 

hU. -M. m 


j v 


BAT In 

Dom*p 

KevPh 

EtrUov 

DOftfJPfl 

Wanes 

AISOCp 

ImeOflg 

PGEpfS 

CMMA 5 

wickss 

WhrEn* 

PGEpfV 

MOOOA 

Cn£tor i 


4037 4% 

2329 2W 
2000 11 
1814 11 
1713 14% 
1SW lWfc 
1144 32ft 
1121 39% 
1081 25ft 
1033 18% 
1023 4ft 
908 17ft 
902 22ft 

S76 18% 

872 Uft 


open High Low Loot C ftp. 


11 + ft 

11 —4ft 
14ft + ft 
19ft 

32% + ft 


Indus 148028 148093 144199 1472.13— 156 

Tm tfllO 67429 680B3 AtoJl + 7.14 

Util 144X4 165.11 163-01 M4JO — 041 

Comp 59QJ7 594.16 58440 5B922 + 059 


Composite 

Industrials 

Tramp. 

uimnes 

PlranAe 


High Low 

117H9 11643 
13458 13173 
111,0ft 1HL27 
MUW 57.79 
19546 1»45 


Cloie OfM 

11455—0.13 
13342 — 027 
111JD8 +QJO 
59-B3 — 0X1 
I2SX0 +0.16 




CMU 


+ ft 
+ ft 
+ U 


dosing 


Advanced 
DecHned 
Uhgw n eea 
Total in« 
New Hfotti 


Volume up 
Volume down 


276 
. 235 
265 
776 
30 
7 

3.138400 
1 1685270 


industrials 

Ffnancr 

rnpjfonw 

UfTTttlM 

Banks 

TmnsoL 


Dow 

313X5 

3l4g 

41347 

378J2 

29041 

33226 

2B1J3 


wee 

+ £L94 
+ U£ 
+ 045 

+ 1.10 

— Q.W 
+ 142 


Week 

ABO 

& 

»4.V0 

227-78 

27457 


24253 

756* 

J97.W 

aj5-« 


33u> HW» ' Mi *1 ■ 

t***” SiS »* ■ 2£- + * 

3~S£ S3 *2 * *»• 


Bo**jr jflVi X 5* * I*- 

ontoEA ‘5: art* ®*b 

Cmwe *85 Sh- Ifc ai ■ 

ESS* rt» aS ^ ^ I 

SEE1 3 S’* BS-^ 


22420 


,i ] l i III 


m 

jjp +2: 
»* -m 


IHWS St =6H JS>% 

§5 £» 2* Si 

TwUW 55S CVj «* +rft 

AM* 5S 3ft » We + ft 



+ ft 
+ ft 
+ T - 
+1% 


NYSE Diaries 


AMR fH 22ft » 

asst is » ** 




Odd- Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Clow Prev. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Close 

81 Jl 
8027 
8116 


CtlW 

+ 127 
+ 0 43 
+ R09 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
volume down 


823 

673 

457 

1951 

140 

12 

39481450 

34479J00 


VoLoMPJM 84mm 

Prev.4 Pit voL 14U5UM 

Prey consolidated dose 17&16M40 


Standard & Poor's index 


amEX Soles 


Nov. 27 
Nov. 26 
NOV. 25 
Nov.S 
Nov, 21 


Bar sales *5b”rt 

2*477 552X75 2X§6 

155.145 OTJ77 
177J77 50X775 JJW 

182429 539445 2.918 

208450 555.957 3.155 


* Included In me sales figures 


Tables indude the nationwide prices 
up to the cJo&Jn? on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Md ue t rlofa 

Trans*. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


High Low 

22641 22501 
18L70 18051 
8707 8744 
2436 2419 
20340 201J2 


One Cbftft 

22521 — 056 
'18W +1J6 
8745 imcli. 
2424 — 0X2 
202.77 — 0J7 


4 PAL volume 
Prev.i pjVLvrtume 

Prev-COiWiVOtum* 


assqjOOO 


amEX Stack index 


Hto*) 

TCJT7 


WM 


+w 


12 Month 
High Low Stack 


Sis Close 

Ol*. YKL PE lWh KtahLow Ouot.Ctl'flg 



Prices Finish Mixed on NYSE 


12 Month 

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NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange finished mixed Friday in light 
tradin g following Wednesdays record-selling 
advance. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 3 J6 to 
1,472.13. Il established a new high at 1,475.69 
Wednesday. The market was closed Thursday 
for the Thanksgiving holiday. For the week, the 
Dow jumped 7.80 points. 

Broader market indicators eased. The New 
York Stock Exchange index lost 0.13 to 1 16.55, 
down from the aH-lune high it set Wednesday. 
Standard A Poor's 500-stock index also backed 
down from its record, easing 0.37 io 202.17. The 
price of an average share fell four cents. 

Advances outnumbered declines by a 8-7 
ratio. Volume dwindled to 84.1 million shares 
from 143.7 million Wednesday. 

Hugh Johnson, head of the investment policy 
committee at First Albany, a regional broker- 
age, said money manag ers are be g i nn i n g to feel 
that the market has come a long way very fast. 

■The market needs some economic or mone- 
tary event to move it further and so far such an 
event is noticeably absent," he said. Because 
current equity prices already anticipate a dis- 
count rate reduction, the cut must materialize or 
“we may get a sharp correction," Mr. Johnson 
said. 

Money manage rs are beginning to feel edgy, 
he said. “They're more comfortable doing some 
selling than they are buying stocks at these new 
higher levels." 

But Greg Smith, research director at Pruden- 
tial- Bach e Securities, believes be market could 
go higher. 


M l Rises $2.8 Billion 


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The Associated Press 


72 52 FMC 220 32 34 78 68ft 68 dOft^ft 


NEW YORK — The narrowest measure pf 


the U.S. money supply, M-l, rose S2.8 billion in 
mid-November, the Federal Reserve Board re- 
ported Friday. 

The Fed said M-l rose to a seasonally adjust- 
ed 5616.6 billion in the week ended Nov. 18 
from a revised S613.8 billion the previous week. 
Originally M- 1 for the week ended Nov. 1 1 was 

reported as $613.6 billion. 

M-l includes cash in circulation, deposits in 
checking accounts and nonbank travelers 
checks. 


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“Oiw the past couple months, the stock mar- 
ket has given investors a lot to be thankful for 
and we believe it will give them more of the 
same during the December holiday season, 1 ’ 
Mr. Smith said 

Texaco was the most active NYSE-listed is- 
sue, rising 1 to 32Vi. The stock has fallen about 
S7 a share since a Texas jury said last week that 


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Texaco should pay $10_53 billion to Pennzoil 
for luring Getty Oil away from a merger with 
Pennzoil. 

Baxter Travenol followed, addin g 14 to 154. 

Public Service Electric & Gas was third, edg- 
ing up Vi to 305 b. 

Among blue chips, Chevron dropped 1U to 
38VS, Sears fell ?« to 37, General Electric lost \ 
to 65 H, Westinghouse Electric dropped V* to 
45 ’-i. American Express eased Vi to 4S">i, Allied- 
Signal rose !'j to 46V1 and General Motors lost H 
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12 7* Elcar J6 3J 

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24% 15* ElCtSPS X8 X 25 

16 11% Elgin X0 63 14 

°% 2 ElSdnf 
78Vi 66 EmrsEI 776 16 14 
13% 6ft Em Rad .94111.2 9 
20% 15% EmrvA JD 11 u 
33% 76ft Emhort 1x0b <6 iff 
23ft 18ft EmoDs 1X8 BJ 9 

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16% 12ft Enorgen 1X4 7J 10 

% EnExc 

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29ft 18% Enserch IXOb 7X144 
21* 17* EnsEx n IJOe 63 8 
2* 1ft Ensrce 24 

13ft 9* Entero 
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21* 17* Entexln U6 63 12 
35% 21ft Eaufxs 1J4 3X 21 
6% 2ft Enuhnk 
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31 25% Eqmk pf 

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24ft 14% EssGus X4 ix 15 


477 40% 
10 17 
642 29* 
52 27* 

4 17% 

7322 6* 

242 2 

193 1% 

29 14* 
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63 20* 

603 25* 
199 24* 
5097 50 
424 61ft 
996 13* 
1603 30* 

6 37* 
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407 11* 
263 31* 

15 25* 
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132 3% 
993 76* 
167 8% 

678 16 
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694 24* 

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55 36 
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187 B* 
131 15ft 

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17 17 

29* 29* + % 
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5* 6* + * 
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16* 16* + * 
20 20ft + *, 
25% 25*— % 
24% 24% + % 
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60ft 61ft + ft 
13* 13*— ft 
30ft 30*— ft 
32* 32ft 
15* 15*-* 
10* 10*— ft 
30% 30% — % 

wWJ- aql 
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12* 12ft— % 
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8% 8* + % 
15* 16 + % 
30ft 30* + % 
22ft 22ft 
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341b 34*— % 
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12 


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11* 7* KaJwdpf J6 6X 22 

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BUSUgSSRQUWPUP : 

, “ 1 ■ * ' ’— • - - • • • ■ •:> '••• 

Dresdner Says Profit 

Bose 3.3% in 10 Months 

■ ■ . 1 ■ 

■ ■ ■ % 

9 . /^L^f ai 7 Cc Gttk* bank partial operating h^l b e- 

FRANKFfJBT n * W Tt x £"*, dHgng dwn-acxjount trading rose 

Bsu&AG^f yST, “**“<*&«“ to 684.4 million DM inSeSst.10 

3?p55 SS£“teWB«rfcMW 

04 ** Wesl CSttman baaks tndidoaal- 

arsgs-pKSa- 

IS^SS*) *» year from an age for ihepreviSusW. 

rau^ D n ^i 984 .' I>resdDCT ’ s ' <*aSraS Hte ids 

^ - ^ r ^! ncr s counterpane at Commozbaok and 
Cb^^said the projected record Deutsche Bank, stressed the role of 

SS^SL? a l a a ^9 d ** “oparaUefed trading. earnings is 

*“"*■****. to Ibe chief factor iSddte^k's 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 1985 


JSorerGro up 
AgreestoBuy 
2 Redon Units 

Unnrd Pnaa IwtmBton* 8/ 

■ NEW YORK — Sale of a 
major piece of Revlon Inc, (he 
beauty and healih-care prod- 
pets company lhai succumbed 
to a hostile takeover bid Nov, ], 
was announced Friday for S690 
mflHon in cash. 

Pan try Pride Inc, Revlon's 
new owner, and Rorcr Group 
Iaft, a ptermaccnucab produo- 
or, said their directors had 
agreed to the' acquisition by 
Rorer of Revlon's worldwide 
ethical pharmaceutical bust* 


Saudis 9 Petrochemical Output Press 


^ — 

>14 


Page 1 


ustry 


‘ * i-s JSX'S?!** ?5»dn«paid7J0 jar. W-rtbootbS rocffic. Mr. 


■' * rf ? !«■ 

4 )V?i\ 
* ■ r is 

■i* i* * *i 

i .■ c;' ; 


DM i share on 1984 earnings. 

: Commerzbank AG, the mw H 
cf West Germany’s three largest 
commercial banks, said eariiar this 
wodt that expected record group 
profit this year of 1 5 bflGon DM 


year. Whboat being specific, Mr. 
Roller said that earnings from own- 
aooount trading in securities, pre- 
cious metals and foreign wfrftany 
in the Hist 10 months exceeded the 
full 1984 trading profits. 

Se ekin g to capitalize on robust 


higher dividends. Bm mrero^Sal 

. v j _• £: ': ^3‘f i AG ~the coon- trvity, Dresdncr Bank is about :io 

• ■ “ v 1 * t ^ ti^laigpi ajimneroal bank — oondude an agreemem permitting 

refrained Thursday from any the bank to establish nrwstmeat 
/ ’5 Sr pyoaasectzaivideaA increase de- banking operations in Tolwo, Mr. 

r ~ : -4 #* spite anticipation for banner group Roller said. 

":.f «feS“H profit of dose to 4 bffliou DM. Last Demsdie Bank last week an- 

* * ••* ■ :* 3^ Commerebank paid 6 DM, noonced plans to begin investment 

■/':* J?L, compared with Deutsche’s L2-DM banking in Tokyo next spring 

V 1 ; ‘ :5a pa y? lL D . ] , , through a jomt-ventnre with West 

■ ' *1 Tf !»’ ?■ Mr. Roller declined to specify German mdustrial partners. Com- 
‘ ■ X * a ^vi group operating profit, which in- mrazbank has a» said that it is 

' ti * e l udes earnings from the bank’s exploring ways to set op direct in- 
» -^4*5 §5'? trading on its own account, for the vestment banking activities in the 


- e ^ Jamiary-to-Oclober period. Parent Japanese capital 

. • fl - *1" 

* jjj, 

1 ^COMPANY NOTES 


The main units involved are 
USV Pharmaceutical Corp. and 
Armour Pharmaceutical Co, 
with combined 1984 sales of 
5410 million. Roreds sales last 
year were 5522 miffion. 

Britain’s Beecham Group 
PLC agreed Nov. 1 to buy Rev- 
lon’s Norcliff Thaver bealth- 
prodnos unit and Rehds spe- 
cialty chemicals business for 
S395 million in cash. 

Pantry Pride, a Fart Lander- 
da le, Florida, group that is 
tufting its principal activity out 
of supcrmaiket and retail-store 
operation, paid SI .83 billion for 
Revlon. But it said that prices 
would soar to wdl over S2.5 
JbaDion with debt refinancing, 
taxes, investment bankers’ and 
lawyers’ fees and severance pay 
for Revlon executives. 


?' v ■ 

■ - v t r<«, 

- :t ft 2 j-'i' 

<» •: £!*■ 
L .’. A - ^ L *; 


/ 

.Abo NY, .the. Dutch chemicals bas announced increases in the roc* 
groro» has announced the purchase ommended retail prices of its cars 
erf 2/5,000 ordinary shares, or 35 in West Gennaxry by sn average of 


*-■ 4 


(■* ' V 


u r^-Ji Holdings rLL, a paint-makmg Bcffiner Himdeis- imd Frankfmt- 
; : .I r,i; company, at 175 pence (S2J9)per er has ann^mr^t that par- 
;* jj i Sr. 1 share. Akzo said it was making an ent-company operating profit, cx- 
u :i 55jv) offer fox all the issued share capital eluding tradma on its own accotmt. 
ofBhmddL nWl233on Deutsche marks 

Bayerische Hypotheken- and ($48^ milHon) in the fust 10 
:i « Wetted Bank AG said parent- months of 1985, from 103 million 
H | bank operating earnings, mduding DM in 10/12 of 1984. 

trading on its own account, rose 7.1 FermentaAB, the Swedish phar- 

ii — »-? percent in the first 10 mouths of maceuticals maker, is negotiating 
"L* 1985 from 10/12 of 1984. Ute bank to increase to 45 percent its stake in 


* < ^ Y 1984. It gave no absolute profit officials said. Fennenta currently 
, ^ si'- 11 figures mduding trading. bolds 10 percent of the company, 

ft - ’f i?; Bayenscbe Motoren Werke AG Hfiteahraiid Industries In**., a 


i *j 

■ t - - A 

-a *r t 

■i - X 5*14 
“ ’■ -i S3 

■ ^ : RiV 

r. s - * 

" : 

- • * tfiu 

* j* 

- > £S 

•4 -4 • 

■ i .* r sa 

I 7i"J 
Ti Skll 
- — -X TVjT 


National Steel Relies 
On Japanese Partner 


. .. ~i bji CConiinned from Page 9) steel, scheduled to start operation 

- : -1 '* ro Susufce Dei. who moved fremtNip^ “ January. The other is : a continu- 
' iihi pon Kokan to become executive «is caster — a fasti efficiart steel- 
i' • ttSS vice preadem and a director of process, stiB on the draw- 

i : National Steel, explained in an in- iugboard. . 

* Ci • texview, ‘TVe th falk we c* n The loans will come pnmarily 

.;■ National Steel a viable, strong, 60111 Nippon Kokan’s traditional 
•J. ; good company.” bmks in Japan. 

c r i i -- •» s- » j^KSisaes 

■ • *##BS atdmdnm y mlheU 4 “ liK, , img, 

“ tore filling a rtfurissbed mffl at 
• economy, and NatiMaTS Great Lakes plant near 

riupaiticulflriy the Japanese economy, y 

> i-c S >15* ipauteQl upffli the United Mtbou&i National and Nippon 

■ ■■ Kokan have had a technology-shar- 

11 .! For almost 50 years, steel was the ing agreement for a decade, Na- 

*. *7 i :k * ^business of NatiouaL But by 1980, tional concluded it could not get 

’ f.fc tt became clear to Mr. Love that tbefuU advantage of NKK’s exper- 

»!: : ^;i r jnany of NatiouaTs plants were old, rise in dectro-galvanizmg teeb- 
« r .'^lineffident and outmoded. niques without a full partnership, 

> v feff So National Stepped noitsdiver- said Robert D. McBride, president 

^^sification cffonTSde the steel of National SteeL 
( = ^£tmdo«iy, sold its steel plant in Nippon. Kokan makes about 3 
: 2 1 ■Wcirton, West Virania, to the em- nnllitm tons of steel a year through 
i 5i ^pldyces, shnt down other facilities electro-galvanizing, a process that 
s^land concentrated on its three most deposits atoms of zinc car other a> 
H ■: ^^^nodem steel plants. leys on sted to protea it from rust 

i '= ?*£» After aWd by U.S. Steel Corp. to anticorrosion. 

c -J2-- y all of National Steel fell The Japanese connection may 

— "T[II<'1hn)ngb in 1984, the half-interest continue even after the steel leaves 
- — 5 was sold to Nippon Kokan. NatiouaTs dectro-galvamzing line. 

t ; : = ?e The strategy requires National . c 01068 °? ^ galvanizing 

i to coQCCQtntte on hish-cniali- Km ^ huge coils. But the auto 

products that would be least esc- intiustry wants sheets cut to order, 
/' j^posed to foreign and U A comped- caDed blanks, that can be fed mto 

\T vdifiA. ' j l, T * wtmcm 4ftrl Id Tnflkt* team- 


hospital-equipment company 
based in BatesviEe, TnHiana t said it 
has reached agreement to purchase 
all the assets of Support Systems 
International Ine, a maker of ther- 
apy systems, for 5100 mtiliou in 
cash phis contingent payments. 

Ijk» Ltd, which has been bait by 
sluggish m eta l markets, has an- 
nounced plans to reduce nickel 
production by up to 20 percent and 
lay off or retire 1,300 employees. It 
said it planrai to close three of its 
flanaHian nickel mines and curtail 
production at a fourth, and to re- 
duce production at its smelter in 
Gydach, Wales, and at its Indone- 
sian operations. 

Lama Ashley Holdings PLCs is- 
sue of 46.5 xnilliou shares, at a value 
of £618 million ($9.28 million) has 
been ovmubsoibed 34 times, said 
Klein wort Benson Ltd. which is 
making the offering. Investors have 
applied for about 1 j billion shares. 

Nesttt SA said it planned to ac- 
quire the pet-food businesses of 
Gerradef detect AG, a subsidiary 
of Hero Conserven, in January, 
Terms woe not given. 

Nissan- Motor Co. has an- 
nounced price increases averaging 
5400 per vehicle lor 1986 cars and 
trucks sold in the United States, in 
addition to an average increase of 
.5164 a vehicle announced Sept 27. 
Nissan blamed the higher value of 
the Japanese yen for the increases. 


B 7 Bob Hagerty 

/aiauiM/ Jfrnutf Tribune 

RIYADH — A customs agent at 
the airport here recently slopped a 
young Saudi whose baggage con- 
tained a plastic bag cf white pow- 
der. 

- After a tense moment, the young 
man demonstrated that he was an 
international salesman for Saudi 
Basic Industries Corp., or SABJC, 
w hich operates the kingdom’s new 
petrochemical industry. His suspi- 
dous-loolting cargo was a sample 
of powdered pol>eih>1 ore. 

Saudi customs agents presum- 
ably wiD soon get used to such 
cargo, but Saudi Arabia’s move 
into petrochemicals is helping to 
force a much more difficult adjust- 
meat an the industry worldwide. 
Traders in Europe say the buildup 
of production by the Saudis and 
other new producers already is con- 
tributing to s drop in prices. 

The entry of SAB1C and ocher 
new producers, notably in Canada 
and Mexico, means that “ibe West- 
ern chemical industry must go 
through another period of traumat- 
ic restructuring,” said Stuart 
Wamsky, chief chemical analyst at 
the London stock brokerage of W. 
Greenwd] & Co. That spells more 
closures of inefficient plants, par- 
ticularly in Europe, where overca- 
pacity is roughly estimated at 15 
percent. 

The industry can hardly say that 
it was not warned. Saudi Basic In- 
dustries, which isTO-perceni owned 
by the Saudi government, has been 
working for a decade on building 
plants to produce petrochemicals I 

EC Delays 
Glycol Duty 

(Continued from Page 9) 

up erf Saudi Arabia and neighbor- 
ing countries. The two sides agreed 
to di «»« the tariff issue as pan of 
an effon to reach a much broader 
agreement on trade and industrial 
cooperation. 

-it may take some time” to reach 
such an accord, Sohman a-Sohim, 
the Saudi commerce minister, said 
in an interview in Riyadh recently, 
“but ax least the bail started roil- 
ing.” 

Saudi officials argue that the tar- 
iffs raise raw-material costs for 
many European factories while 
protecting only a few European 
petrochemical plants that should 
be dosed as moficienu 

Abdulaziz A. al-ZamH, minister 
of industry, that the tariff 

situation “has to change.” Each 
year, tire EC must decide whether 
to reimpose tariffs once the duty- 
free limit is surpassed. Mr. Zamfl 
said he bdieved that reimposition 
of ibe tariffs on polyethylene and 
methanol would not be automatic 
next year. 

European producers^ argue that 
reimposition should be automatic 
and note that EC tariff rules apply 
to other big suppliers, not just the 
Saudis. “It is they who have chosen 
to raise it as an emotional issue,” 
said Mike Cockbum, secretary gen- 
eral of the Association of Petro- 
chemicals Producers in Europe. 


from natural gas formerly burned 
off as waste in the production of 
oiL The Saudi company has spent 
about S 10 billion on its first gsnera- 
tioa of plants and acquired exper- 
tise from such foreign partners as 

After the Boom 

Living on Leffi in Saadi Arabia 

Fourth qffne crudes 

Mitsubishi Corp„ Exxon Corp. and 
the Royal DuichVSheil Group. 

With those new plants, most of 
which began producing is die past 
year, SaBIC has become a major 
force, accounting for about 5 per- 
cent of worldwide capacity for 
making ethyteoc, the mdusoVs pri- 
mary raw material. 

The project is at the heart of 
Saudi Arabia's drive to reduce de- 
pendence on oil, which last year 
accounted for more than four-fifths 
of total exports- 

While the project is generally re- 
garded as weli-oosoeived, it has 
come into operation at an awkward 
time for the industry. After boom- 
ing in the 1960s and 1970s amid 
soaring demand for its main prod- 
ucts — such as plastics, synthetic 
fibers and detergents — tie petro- 
chemical industry’ has settled into 
sluggish growth. For the “foresee- 
able furore,” Greenwell’s Mr. 
Wamsley forecast that demand 
would grow just 2 percent to 3 
percent a year. 

Thus, Western chemical execu- 


tives fear, the entry of new produc- 
ers could provoke a price war. 
Many of ibe executives worry not 
so much that the prudent Saudis 
will undercut the market but that 
other producers wSI be panicked 
into slashing prices. 

Early indications do not dispel 
that worry. The price of ethylene in 
northwest Europe has plunged to 
about 1,225 Deutsche marks (5481) 
per metric ton from 1,570 DM in 
September, according to Platt's 
Olefisscan, a price-reporting ser- 
vice. Traders cite rising Saudi ship- 
ments as a major factor. 

Westers Europe’s petrochemical 


industry is most exposed to the new 
competition because European 
companies are far more reliant on 
exports than are U.S. producers 
and have more excess capacity than 
do the Japanese. 

By 1990, both Western Europe 
and Japan will switch from bring 
net exporters of ethylene and its 
derivatives to being net importers, 
according to a rccem forecast bv 
Sheik 

Given that threat, it was not sur- 
prising that European companies 
persuaded the European Commu- 
nity earlier this year to enforce 
standard 13-percent tariffs on im- 


ports of Saudi polyethylene, nhici 
is used in packaging and films, am 
on methanol, used in such product 
as adhesives, polyester fibers am 
resins. 

European executives say sales o 
methanol by Saudi Baric Industrie; 
have gone smoothly but that selling 
polyethylene is much trickier, theft 
are hundreds of grades of the mate- 
rial. and the supplier needs to pro- 
vide extensive technical support tc 
users. 

Tuesday: Saudi Arabia seams de- 
termined to maintain a ska/ply high- 
er level o/ oil expons. 


Moving ' Downstream The Perils of Refining 


Int&naUQnsal Herald Tribune 

RIYADH — Saudi Arabia has played its ace by 
building plants to produce baric petrochemicals, foi 
which its feedstock costs are far below those of most 
other producers. 

Now the Saudis face a difficult challenge in finding 
ways to move “downstream,” into projects that would 
turn those basic materials into more refined products 
that are higher in value. 

To make downstream projects worthwhile, the 
country needs to show that it can make more money 
by further refining than it can by merely exporting 
base petrochemicals. The big bundles are Saudi Ara- 
bia's high costs for building and maintaining plants, 
reflecting the harsh desert environment, and for ship- 
ping products, reflecting the long distance from major 
markets. 

When aB the negative factors are considered, said 
John A. Phil pot, a director of the consulting firm of 
Chem Systems International LtdL. “it’s difficult to find 
an jibing that looks strongly attractive." 


Nonetheless, the state-controlled Saudi Baric In- 
dustries Corp.. or SABIC. which operates tbs king- 
dom's base- petrochemical industry, is already moving 
downstream with plans to produce polyvinyl'chloride, 
which is used in such products as pipes and window 
frames, and methyl tertiary butyl ether, a gasoline 
additive. 

SABICs capital-spending plan for the next fire 
years includes 12 billion rivals (53-3 billion) for petro- 
chemical. plastic and fertilizer projects. Ibrahim A 
SaJamah, SABICs managing director, said in an inter- 
view that the company was studying, for instance, the 
possibility of making alpha-olefins, which go into 
detergents and lubricating oil. 

Other downstream possibilities include vinyl ace- 
tate and acetic acid, both used in paints and other 
products, as well as phosphate fertilizer to comple- 
ment the planned production of ammouia, Mr. Sala- 
mah said. SABIC also could move into another base 
petrochemical, polypropylene, he said, though outrid- 
ers such as Mr. Philpot said they' saw little advantage 
in that idea. 


Boating-Rale Notes 


X*. 29 [ li»*r/Mot 


Dollar 


Kaw/Mat, 

Anted (runts 
aim i run «9 
AJlterfirttfil? 

Altted lrtinNfD 
AfQoBksCar&n/to 
Alton* ic F 


SKive bodies and foodstuff contain- The question is: Who win bear 
i-S {las. . . .. the expense of preparing the sted 

? ? <•! That requires a heavy investment blanks and storing theta until they 
^iVnewasEi^Slities— as areneeded m the car plants? ^ 
iVTrach as S1.2 biDicHi by the end of The auto companies are onwfll- 
a £ 2*he decade. Bui lo limit thdr risk ing to store the sled arils or blanks. 
r 1 ^ Rational Tn^ y r m p and rfippon And National doesn t have the 


" Marubeni and Mitsubishi, the rted serwe centers, small mAvnA- 

-‘ r prading companies^ are arranging a sized companies that surround the 
■« J ^?:najor share of the debt fitranemg sted plants. The National accu- 
: i £ Ti}.?* *be two principal facQities in lives predict that Marubeni and 
. Mitsubishi wiH be buying and 

■ ?! -J/ One is an do ct io^ atvaniziiig lnie - building their way into the service- 
: -Xo produce high-quality coated center ML 


ii -l «»;— 
•■jc v^.,F 
£ ^ Vi 

m '■’• ‘-■a 

^Si-1 • 

•*z ¥ ^ 

j SSi- 


Company Results 

ftffv&nu* and proflts-Qr fosses. In f In local currencies 

unless otherwise indicated. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 

Inte rn at i onal Financing Or ganiz ation 
(United Nations) located in Rome (Italy) 

seeks fill position of 

Assistant Secretary 
Governing Body Affairs. 

Under general supervision of the Secretary, the incumbent will 
assist in the planning and conducting of all official meetings, 
including: 

— direction and coordination of meetings documentation; 
— drafting and presentation of management statements to 

governing bodies, meetings agenda, minutes and other 
related documentation; 

— study and follow-up of oil aspects of meetings proceed- 
ings. 

Candidates should have an advanced degree in social sci- 
ences or law and additional qualifications in international 
relations. Seven years progressive experience in management 
of development programmes and participation in meetings of 
legislative bodies. Proven managerial and organizational 
capabilities. Mather tongue English and excellent drafting 
skills. Knowledge of Arabic, French or Spanish desirable. 

Depending on experience and qualifications net base salary 
per annum will range from U.S. $32,605.00 to 
U.S. $41 ,308.32 with dependents, and U.S. $30,274.93 to 
U^. $38,101.37 without dependents. Cost of living allow- 
ance subject to change according to United Nations Common 
System will range per annum from U.S. $2,86 8~20 to 
U.S. $3,547.00 with dependents, and U.S. $2,663.20 to 
U.S. $3,271 .60 without dependents. 

Initial contract is for two years. Deadline for applications is 
31 January 1986. 

Send applications m firs* instance to: 

Box 212, the In ter n a t io nal Herald Tribune 
55, Via della Mercede, 00187 Rome, thdy. 


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Alter mm 96 
MOT MW 09 
Mar Mid 96 
Mcnrnw UWMf) 
Mellon Bk 96 
Midland Bk Pm 
AAKftond Bk Perp New 
Midland int fl 
Midland ini 89 
Midland l«72 
Midland inifl 
Midland Int 99 
Mittal Fin 97 IGoa) 
Mitsui Fin 96 
MonGremenM 
MM Bk Den 93 
NOB 97 (Cool 
Not Bk Detroit 9e 
Nal Comm Bl tt*4 
Nat West Pern I a> 
Nat Wist Pen> CBi 
N al West Finn 
Hat West FinOS 
Nal West Pert IQ 
Not west* 

Mia V««tFln41 
Nat West Fin Pm 
Neste Ov 94 
New Zealand 87 
Nz Sted Dev 92 
MonOcintn 
Okti86 
OK *4 
0»9S/99 

OHdmMMfqfl 
Offshore MJnlna |& 
Pirelli 91/96 
Pnc«7 

Pk BOnken BI/91 
Queensland fflofl *8 
Perm 91 
Wo 94 

HeoBk Dalles 97 
Pen NT* 

VteaNyM 
RatMdUdfi 3015 
RbcOS 

RhiPere 
Rta BUI* 

Saitonva fl/93 
Sanwa int Fin 88 
Sanwa rm Fin 96/04 
Sonma lrdFln93 
Sccndt Fin Aof*3 
Scondl FlnDec93 
Scotland inn 
SecPodflc*7 
Sec Pacific 97 
ShowtiiutCorp97 
Snd B8 
Sed 98/93 
steintB 
Sfemtn 


Coapoa Next did Askd J issuer/Mai. 


U42 99.91 10047 
0543 9*.7i 9*14 
714! 99.14 9974 
0145 9943 99.93 
1541 ML 1*75 
1341 *955 9*15 
0944 9958 1*U 
2045 100401*15 
1743 190.1610078 
2842 100431*13 
NMI 100091*10 
1345 9940 10000 
1142 9946 99.16 
0643 1GQA110Q.11 
1245 10U01G045 
9971 9*41 
2*43 lOOLlSNXLlS 
2842 10076100® 
OHO MELO10D53 
2543 1007*10076 
2842 99,95 1*15 
2743 100401*10 
994)9*45 
05-13 *940 UXL50 
0946 1064010050 
12-12 9945 9975 
M42 9953 9943 
09-12 100.1110071 
2942 99.95 1004S 
3844 100*101* 
*-12 100777*47 
1844 1*141*24 
10076100J6 
1612 99.78 9958 
1546 9852 98.92 
0944 9*55 1*19 
05-72 99.95 MO 10 
2842 99.97 100417 
0344 99.13 9*72 
1004)11*11 
M2 9*73 *9^3 
TF42 9&0S *&* 
0941 100001*10 

1612 99.98 180* 
19-12 99.93 100* 
1445*075*85 

V9JB M0* 
M-13 9936 10006 

1843 1*1110071 
2841 1U 121*72 
26-13 100221*3) 
09-121*6710077 
3844 100721*42 
0603 100061*16 
2841 »25 9945 
B*43 1*2010070 
T341 9952 99.97 
19-12 99.90 10075 
1841 99jtf 99.15 
3612 9978 99.93 
23-13 9773 9953 
0941 tOQ 0*1*14 
1642 100.1310022 

2141 100501*10 

1844 100235*33 

2742 99 30 99 JO 
1644 1*1310023 
354i 101 J0M1.90 
U45 1007210153 
2742 99.99 100* 
0*4* 1*1510075 
3612 U0.131OA23 
1345 99.75 10025 
2685 1*1010070 
- 10075107* 

1144 100081*11 
0611 1*111002) 

2641 100* 

2742 99* 100* 
12-13 99JB 99,68 

1613 9975 1*15 
1245 100.1410024 

2743 100051*15 
2143 9947 9947 

2642 99* 99JA 
19-1399J499.IS 
1141 99 J5 99* 
0641 9A00 9548 
09-12 9945 99.95 
IV06 99* 99.93 
1601 100041*16 
OS-12 1*1010070 
3603 100* 

2941 t*27700L37 
19 42 99.93 l** 
1644 9975 10058 
2212 99* 997 a 
3643 1*4010050 

2142 9V* 99A5 
8341 9970 99* 
0743 9850 99.12 
3041 99.99 non 
2613 9936 1*1* 

99* 100.18 

19-12 99.75 10075 


Soc Contorts 
SocGenftarN 
SocGhi novM 
Sec Den 97 
Snrall 
Spain tort? 

Spam 051 Mite ri 
Saam 88/93 
Spam 99 
Stand Chart 94 
Stand Chart 91 
Siand Chart Marto 
Slant Chan Mismatch 
sw + Cm Peru 
Stole Bh India V 
Sumitomo Tsf WU 
Sundsralxaaiken 93 
Stwden* 

Sweden 9Mb 
Suvfden to/0£ [Mltilvl 
Sweden 19*9 
StveaenPerp 
Talvo Kobe 97 td»i 
Talvtf 92/04 
TOkuaJn to/94 
i ok unn Cop 97 
Terns CMnnwfCi97 
Total Asia 94.rt9 
Tordom97 
Tort Tsf tort9 

T vp 44/04 
UbKer*ia#9i 
Uo Norway 99 

litOKmodom 90/93 
Wells FaryoSepfW 
Wells Farsoto 
Wells Fcroo 00 
WensFaroa Fee 97 
We5fpac97(CaF) 

Wms CXvn 91 
tmiOftkPerp 
World Bk 09/94 
Yoloitama ?i/94 
Yokohama 97 (Cos) 
Zemnai vkoss *1 


Coupon Next Bm Atkd 

8K C*43 1 50731*2 

r<. 1843 un f *ixr 

|v- tF-Qf IOOTTIKaS 
ret 1S43 IKIdMXUd 
8K X45 It* 441004 
BK 2742 ISC : 710073 
260 3 9976 94^3 
BK »42 100741* U 
hv - W99 1*39 

r-i 064T 10O.131K23 

f. 2M m &arx.\i 

fi ^ H43 13330 
BK OKI 9939 n 21 
tK L14S IICWX^ 
BK - 9917 IXJ7 

IK :>C2 icc.tfiiais 

K 1943 9916 9975 
T K 55-12 l*lflOC73 
TK 1C4I 9942 9941 
76. ;j-04 94.19 9929 
8K - 9947 9952 

IK 0941 9518 10073 
B l . C41 

BK ZX6 1*231*73 
BK T 943 i*Zt1*J7 
BH 0944 ®9.to :*J?D 
B-u 2ir32 9U2 9953 
8^ im: icai^ooTs 
BK 1442 19C73UC40 

b iH2 i*i6 :uci$ 

IK 0612 9100 9875 
tOtofll-K 9970 9970 
8K 7l42toJ0 9975 
0741 Wtf ».to 
B -* 27-12 99.1? 9972 
17976 W.T? 9977 
B'k 0*1? 99 IS *45 
BK I347 995e954& 
Fe 1842 6*40 99^ 
8H 1843 12) kl'XTfl 
7KC1613 «*& 

7£5 - 98*0 9150 

BK 0344 W07&tttL» 
IK 1842 9 13 14 997a 
B'-« 15-01 1*451*46 


Non Dollor 


Itsoer/MoL Coupon Next Bto Askd 

ADbevNolloncI 92/00 UK 1604 9945 WJS 

Ainwice+tdcsactt llv. 2545 99.?i ljcn 

AmBk097 MK 1442 1OO761007A 

Bk «teniTcom UK 21-12 1*751*74 

Bfr Nova Scot Id 00 U725314I 99.94 10004 

BkTokrtUrtB 11K 2143 1*1219043 

Balnd05un9i UK 2142 151*25 

BHguim94 UK 1041 100721*72 

Brim + west 92 11% 2MU «JD ?fl.92 

Britonala93 11K 0844 99 je? 99 to 

Gtlcortttrt! UK 17-02 KjG W73 

CepmeK I1K 23-U I5CX10C73 

Cr Fonder CA 11K V 10D7A10Q78 

D National 91/95 UK 1613 KXiIaIDU 

Denmark TO/to IK. 2443 1*46)0074 

Ho II tor B/592 UK W-C* 99a7 99 Si 

IU94 IU. 1541 IKIHXTS 

IfWondto UK 1442 1005470074 

Ireland K »1K B6I2 iWJPr*)9 

Uovds Eiito 9A UK 2642 10OCB MOll 

Mtg Bk Den 9Art9 1QOOC1 

Mail 10 12 07-00 10071100 11 

NdfhMWlde Bi93 UK 08-04 99.48 Wii 

NevrZMdond97 UK 14429970 99A0 

N Zealand 97 1IK 1«2 99*7 99J7 

ROSE IK 0442 to* to* 

5nd90rt3 11K 2601 100541*94 

Stand Chonstg Pern UK 161?to73 9LS3 

WaahvldiB&oc95 lt% 7945 94.90 9997 

Yorkffilrelnl91rt4 11K 27-12 UMiTROO 17 

Cm 97 1 Yen J AK 2244 V9M 99 78 

Cr Fancier Auof7 Yen ak 2742 to^5 99J5 

New Brunsmick 19/to *SjJ 

Bna 72 ( Dm J 5K Z7-12 1007A1K4I 

Bdslumto (Qmi 4K 284) l«S5i » 1) 

O&ctolDm) 5r« 2945 99^3 

Cammeiiaank to f Dmj 5K 2344 99.62 99 93 
DrestmerFte9QfDm) 4K i«43ioaMi*i4 

lkb FlnBvtoCoo 5 Z7-02 9975 »j0 

IM to (Dm) Cop 5 2W 99^7 1974 

Ireland 97 (Dm) 8K 1541 lttdU* M 

Motors 10 7005 1843 99^0 9945 

J.P. Maroon 95 Cop 5k 2642 99S7 WZ2 

PbC (Dull 9S BK 342 ttSt «r» 

Sec Poc 95 Cop <U46 99^3 99 

Sweden 97 (Dmi AK - 1*43102.42 

Wdls Foma to Can S 2540 *MN 

Cr Fancier 96 (Ecv i BK 12-02 TK.10IOC75 

CrNaitonaito 8%. 1541 loauiocJj 

Ireland 97 (Ecv) V* 2604 « if W75 

Italy 93 BK 3613 99 75 tolf 

SfgefaainPerp 9%. - 9862 97.1? 

Source ; Creel! Su/sse-Firsf Boston UtL 
Loneon 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 


Nov.29, 1985 


Wet assat value qootattaas ora supMad toy ttw Fuads fisted udlti the exception off soma quotes based on Issue price. 

Tbe atargbni symbols indaaiff frequency of quotation* su0PfM:(tf) -dally; (w) -yrtekJy; CbJ - bi-monthly i Cr) -rooatarfy; (1) - Irreaulorty. 


AL MAlL MANAOEMCNT 

-Cw) AFMoi Truer. «> A S 1E7A9 

BANK JULIUS BAEA * CO. Ltd. 

-Td) Boerbond - SF 9U20 

-( a } Gonbcr — _ SF isoiflo 

-I d ) EQutbaer America % 1220000 

ri. d ) Equtoorr Europe SF 1436000 

-(d) Enuaper Pocrflc _ SF 1193X0 

■(d) GtiPbQT. — ■ SF10JAM 

-( d ) Sradtoor SF 1&58-00 

BNP 1NTEAFUMOS 

riw) Lntertoond Fund * \V9j * i 

■<w) Irtfercurrcncv usi s 1027 

-<w) ipfercurrency DM DM VLSI 

-<w) intercurrencv Sterllno C J0L29 

ri iv) intefenotry PocHic Otter 8 11 m 

-fw) intorooutty N.Amcr. Offer ^ % fOS6 
B ANODE IND05UE2 

ri e ) Aston Grwtti Fund— f 11-67 

-<w) Otvertoona SF 92 ao 

-(w) FIF-Amerfco— — C 17-50 

■Cw) FlF-Eurpge — % 1629 

mtw*\ FfF-l ntw aoN a noi - 8 ii^m 

■<wl FlF-Poc*flC — — S 3041 

ri 0 ) indosura lAuinbend» A * 109,93 1 

-(d) fndasuft Multibonds 8 _ s teLOi i 
■Cd) IndHUOfUSO (MJA-F)__ S 101027 
BRtTANNULPOB 271 # St Helter, Jeney 
-(w) Qrtf .Deri tor income S 0.903* 

■(w? Brit J Mpnaq.Curr. — S 1075 

-I d S Brlv. tnru Manooportf * i,T98 

-Id) Brit. Infix MOnooForff £ WtL7 

■(wl Orir.Ain. IjtC. 6 FC Lid 8 USD 

■Owl Br ItXktid Fund I *J77« 

-(w) Brir/ulonoaCurrencv^ t 1L67* 

•( d ) BrfL Japan Dir Perl. Fd__ S LIBS 

-Cw) BrH Jenny Gift Fond c 0 3 20 

-(d) Brtl.Wortd Leto- Fund-. * l^&i 

-l d l brtt. Worw Tvcton. Fund s o7» 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-(«) Capital Inn t=\mrw9 — s 4 UR 

ri*} Capitoi IfolkiSA S 1923 

CmCORP INVESTMENT BANK (UxJ 
POB 1373 Luxembotirg TeL <77.9*71 

( d ) CtriAvexr Ecu — ECU 101L82 

( d ) Clllfiwesr UaviCfry * IOTAID 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

-< d 1 Actions Sul«s_^_ SF <0025 

ri d ) Bond Valor Swf — SF 1012S 

-(d) Betid Valor D-mark — — DM lOp.13 

-Id) Band VOtor US^JOLLAR I 10*57 

-(d) Bond Volof CSlerflnO— . c 10028 

ri d l Bend Valor Yon YortlTOftSO 

■Id) Convert Volar Swf___ SF 1210 
ri d ] Convert Valor US-DOLLAR* % 126.13 
ri d ) Conaser — SF 88A00 

-(dlCSFonds-BOtiO SF 7926 

-Cdi CS Fonda- Inn SF 1217s 

rid} CS Money Manut Fond __ $ 110400 
-(d) CS Money Marfeei Fond ^ DM 10 a 200 
-(d) CS Morwv Mancet F*md__ M0<7J» 

-Cd ) CS Money Market Fd Yen. yiooto3jW 

ri01 EneTBle-VOior SF UL75 

-Id) USSCC SF 82L0O 

-Id) EurPOCHVqldr — SF 18875 

nfd) Podflc -Vdtor SF 15850 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Winchester Hetna , 77 Lond on wail 
LONDON EC2 (01 920*7*7) 

-fw> Ffttstourv Group LM 5 128-36 

•Uni Wknchester CHver«fled__ 5 1U3* 

-im) wrncheater Flnandol Lld._» % 639 


1 Bnmnes Lambert 

‘ ' i 1WS 1994 

.. » — _ 2.ica \m 


r<* 

# > h; 

%m 

■ ‘J J t 

" ^rik 

r jj U 


j! JfRowi Bk of 

S -ifiSE. ' ' TO* w 

u r i6t3 mi 

f.jjer Share 0357 0505 


Anglo Amer. corp 
Ht HbK 1915 19W 

PTrtSTpraffM SMJ 
Prr Shore — woo 0.107s 


UlHotf 
Revenue — — 
Net ine. _ 
Per Shorn— 


TOS TOJ 

2493 82 12 
U2 1J5 
004 0.1* 


EVecirolux 


4Sb QtMT. 
Revenue — ^ 
Net Ine. — 
perSMit— 

Year 


Raxnord 

1*85 

ms 

12A5 

»_ 053 

ms 


<* - O^Wtto-DomlnkHi Bk 

r, j i;5 s &? r - . i*8s ijw 

: HWI 910 
~ 2 077 057 

'TO 
^ 415LSB 

XV l T?rS *WT0 2.M 266 

-• l j ii 


SMaaftos 
Revenue- 
Proflts — 


19K TOf 

2757D. 2UM. 
171A 159ft 


Revenue 
Nat int . 


WOOL 

36.16 

157 


*-42 

ae 

i*u 

921.1 


fr4 V 

fv 


SAS 

Ymir IBS WH 

bSbb*— w!wbl twia 

Profit#. **• 

ITaltodSMW 
Edterd (Jack) 


1984 

53S7 


JS5 *3 v TtwhHu. EatBra ijuvr/ _ 

T ?' MK 1W , WO nor. nK 1W 

i fer Shore — 

%* I . i&S&t&wS dxtnlta- 

1; l: i jtebryfo - uatopenitlans. 


U-S. 

MQuar. 
Rfivamie — 
Neff Inc 
Per Share — 

* Month! 
ftav*nue-ft_ 

Net Inc. 

Per Share— 


ms 

092 

ns 
a as 
i*ts 

1540. 
: 39j 
17* 


1*84 
4W.1 
1 U 
IU6 

1*84 

L170L 

235 

LM 


PtrsnarB— 

JAM net tedvrfM 

sij million treat etsoxitto- 

vid operations 


imnetbo&MrtodSl ncMes 
choree* otjtine cents nor 
more from retroactive otf>- 
torvafltao outv dtoW end 
writedowns ot stem. 


Maintenance Engineer 

Working in our Network and Teiecom Special 
Systems Department in Annecy - France. 

Please send your resume ref. HTB 114 TO. Ken Parker, 
Engineering Manager. DIGITAL EQUIPMENT Co, 
Wonon Grange READING - RG2 OTE ENGLAND - U K. 


■(te) Lone Term „■ s 2555 

FAC MGMT. LTD. IMV. ADVISERS 
1, Laurence Pountv HIIL EC4. 014234*80 
-iw) F&C Atlantic S 13-35 

-fail FAT Furewin $ 1£37 

4 W) FAC Oriental^- S 3352 

FIDELITY POB 47ft Hamilton Bermuda 
-(m) AmerJcan Vdlues Common— % 9523 
-dm Amer Value* Cum-Pref S UU22 


S UU22 

4d) FEdefltv Ajncr. Asset* S 70J23 

ri d i Fidelity Australia Fund S 11 J7 

-(d) Fhselirv Discovery Fund % 10J8 

-I d j Fldef try D(r. Sras-Tr S V2t3b 

4di Fidelity Far East Fund— s 2*3* 

4dl Rdelltv JnrL Fund % 7643 

-(d) Fldef Hv Orient Fund % 3UM 

■f d I Fidelity Frontier Fund— 5 15,1a 

-Id) FldelKV Padflc Fund— S 15548 

-id* Fidelity Sad. Growth Fd. % 1659 

ri dl FWeUtv World Fund S 3841 

FORBES PO B8870RAND CAYMAN 

London Aoent 01-83F3013 

-fw) Dollar Income S 648 

-(w) Foftoes>llOh Irtc. Gilt Fd C 9620 

-tw) Gate income $ 8,1* 

rival Cold Appreciation ,. „ $ 456 

4m) Strategic Trading % !5D 

DEFIMOR FUNDS. 

4w) East investment Fund 5 <1840 

riwl Scottktfi World Fund t 13543 

-(wl Slate Si. American 5 17428 

London:0l -471 <230, Geneve :4l-223555*a 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAOEMENT CORP. 
PB 119, St Peter PorttGuornsev# 0481-US715 

-fw) FaturGAM SA * 12759 

-(w) GAM Arbitrage Inc 5 1043 

-(w) GAMerlce Inc 8 153.16 

-(w) GAM Australia Inc. M . S 9841 
-1 wl G4M Boston tug- % 11552 

-fw) RAA* Prinnvm^ % 1746 

-fw) GAM Frane-val SF 11*45 

-Cw) GAM Nona Kona IIK.H. % 10054 

-C w > GAM imemaiianaj Inc. S 14441 

-fw GAM Japan inc... i 12044 

-fw GAM North America lnc-_ % 115 AS 
-fw GAM N. America Unit Trust- T1245P 
-Iw) GAM Pacific i"f % 137,17 

-tw) GAM Pens. & Char. )Q850a 

-(wj Gam Pans. 8. Chor. u.fcL Fd._ 10440 p 
-f W i fiAMfint s 11421 

-1W) GAM Sinpopore/MOJOY fnc_ S *490 

i-(w| GAM Stert & Inti Unit Trust 153.15* P 

r iw> gam Wonthwkte Inc S 191.9ft 

-<w) GAM Tycne S-A. Cfasa A % 1Z7.13 

G.T- MANAGEMENT < UK) Ltd. 

-fd) Berry Poc. Fd. J-»* 5 11X8 

■f r ) ClT. Applied Science-^ % 1400 

j-f d ) G.T. AsACrr H.K. GwthJ=d 8 1249 

-tdl G.T. Asia Fund s os* 

rial G.T. Auffiroita Fund__— S 26.12 
■(d j G.T, Eurwte Furto____, s 1445 
:(«) G.T. Euro. Small Cat. Pund_l 1623 

ri r ) GT. Dollor Fund S 1549 

ri d ) G.T. Bond Fuwrt — s 1247 

ri d ) G.T. Global Tecftn toy Fd % 1347 

-f fl ) G.T, HoMhu Pathfinder 5 3140 

rial G.T. investment Ftind__ s 71.11 
-( w ] G.T. Japan Small Ca.Fund _ s 4B39 

- r) G.T. Tecftwtoov Fund S 24*9 

-id) G.T. South China Fund S 1492 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. I MTU 84 
Jersev* PJ>. Bex 81 T«l 0834 74029 
Benw. P XL Bax 2622. Ter 4131 224051 

-( a J Crattbtxw (Far East) SF 1462 

-( a ) C&F ( Balanced SF 2452 
ri*\ EurDroa Equity Fvna— DM 11 J3 

-I d ) inlnL Bend Fund - 8 tfiJft 

-f d ) Ini. Currency US. $ 2 629 


0.903* 

1075 

U*8 

noj 

USD 

4327* 

1487* 

1JBS 

0220 

1461 

0795 


m) Winchester Frontier. 
w) Winchester HakUnss 


-\v»l wortoswidn Sccurlii 
<fnr) worldwide Special 


FF 

. S 164348 


•tfi iii fi i 
-a V '■£ 


j p. nwr. 1 


Malay skin 

-1*83 J*M 
<5047 58446 
73JU 1TD46 
0.103 0.16* 


Farm Hurt* 

5RSSS— ?gj =g» MSSS 

rs&ez * - 


’■ Basf 

9 MoottoF . . ms . m\ 

Revenue 324201 . 34070. 

Prcto Profit &44A iM 


Move and Live... 


^amooffladBl-Mornjat.Qu. :|“i|5a?S“f.!gtgT±r 


SOI 


OIT INVESTMENT FFM 

-+fd> Conccntra — DM 34** 

-K fl I lltf T DM 9\5L 

Dona & Haim e Uorfl oma. Brunets 
-ffW) DAN Comniartlffy Pod 836U4*^* 

-f m) Currencv & Gold Pool s 15741 

.(in] Wlrtdh. Ute Put Pool S55944- 1 ** 

-Ufi) Trans mono Fat. Pock — 

EtC TRUST CD.CJERSEYl LTD. 

1-3 Snore SL3t. NeJter.-apx-WSi 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 
Gt'dllnc/eU—.* ICJI^MfwwnifiS!* 

a icon.: B*a— 4 t23$ Ottvr si2z38 

SkTERNATVONAl. INCOME PUND 
-fd] snort Ttrm'AMAcaiffll— S TJ068 

-(d) Short Term VVfDbtr) I TJuo 

-f d) Shdfl Term'S* (Accurn) — S ljQ2S 
-( fl ) Short Term ’B (Dissr) % n3M 


NIMARBEN 

-Id) Ckzss A - 
-fw 1 Class B - U-S. 

-fw ) Class C - Janan - 

OBLIFLEX LIMITED 
-fw) itelitewnifv 

■I wl Dollar Medium Term, 

-f wl Dollar Lone Term— - 

-(wl jaeanese Yen 

-fw) pound sterifno 

-Iwl Dcuiutto Mark — 

-fw) Dutch Florin 

-(w) Swiss Franr 
ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB 05578. The HOOue (0701 <dto70 

-(d) Bever Bdwoh ttiw i 

PARISBAS-GROUP 
-fd) QhTexa J nte mol tonal 

-fd ECUPAR I 

•fw) OBLt-DM 

-f Wl QBLIGFSTIOM - 

-Cwl OBLI-DOLLAR 


1 *5.15 

J 10A4Z 

^-1 10031 

S 1242 

S 1148 

5 1140 

8 1343 

_C 1146 1 
DM 1040 1 
.FL 1047 
SF 1fU4 


3140 


-fw]OBLl-YEN. _ _ 

-fw) OBLI-GULOEM FL 105*40 

ri d ) PAROIL-PUND % 101 43 

-f 0 j PARED ROPE GROWTH 5 1142 

-(d) PARINTER FUND— — S 13047 

ri d { PAR1NTER BOND FUND S 1045 

-fd I PAR U5 Treav Band *0. B 1 - s iiaos 
ROYAL B. CAJtADAjPOB 344GUERNSEY 
-+lw) RBC Canadian Fund udL- S 1147* 
-Hw) SBC For Easf APocIflc Fd- 5 lZ-tfl 

-+(w) RBCInTJ capital Fd S 2748 

-Kw) RBC Inn Income Ffl. S Y1A4* 

— H d J ABC ManLCurroftCv Fd S 27-47 

-+( wl RBC North Airier, Fd-. - S 10.12 

SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (46-8-236270) 

-fwllnc-: BW S oJOOHer 5 637 

-IwlAcC.: Bk) 3 432 otter \ 63b 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devonshire Sa^LondonOl-377-dUO 

-f r) SMB Bond Fund s 2424 

•(w> 5KB frtu Growth Fund % 3637 

SWISS BANK CORP. {ISSUE PRICES) 


ECU T 036.17 
DM 123944 
SF *145 

- 51138.96 
Y 10489140 
FL 105*48 

- S 10143 
5 1142 

- S 13047 
5 1045 


(w) The Esiabtlshmenr Trust 

td» Europe Obhooiiona 

(w> First Eaoto c^ine.,, — , 

t r 1 Fifty Stars Lid — . 

(w) Fixed Income Trans 
fw) Fanselee Issue Pr 
fW) Farejrfuntl- 

fw) Formula Selection Fa.. 

I d f Fanfflfollra 

( d ) Goverom. Set Fund* — „ 

i d ) Frontai-Tnist inttrtnL 

fw) Haussmann Hides. N.v. 

fw) Hestla PuritN 

(w) Horizon Fund. - 

im) IBEX Holdings Ltd 

( r 1 . 

( r ) it-A-ir*S — 

( d ) Inierfund ^ 

(tor) Infermarket Cuv 
i fl 1 1niermlnVng iaui. FtL CL a B‘ _ 

I c r ) inn Securities Fund 


- Ec 5 

f 79,)6*.0I 
. 5 UU9 
, 5 104T 

SF 20120 
„ S 729 
SF 6641 
. S J7.17 
. S *149 
DfA <1A& 
. 5 137.73 
. % 10542 
. 5125447 
SF 11545 
. 5 9.W 

5 1040 

, 5 1949 

. 5 W.78 
5 50021 

5 1113 


5 139.17 
10840 a 
I0A40P 
S 11641 
5. *440 


-( d J Japan Portfolio 

ri d i Sierilna Band Setoctton 

-I d ) SwUa For dsn Band Sd — 

-Id) Swtssvator New Series 

-( d 1 Universal Bond Select. 

-( a ) Universal 


-< d ) Afnerlea-vatorM. SF 50140 

-( d ) D-Marfc Bond Select ton __ dm 123.1a 

-( d ] Dollar Band Selection 5 I4ft2* 

-(dl RorfA Band Sded ton FL 12840 

-(d) (ntervalor. SF B740 

-( d 3 Japan Portfolio SF 900.25 

-fd) Siefl Ine Bond Setoctlan t 109.12 

-I d ) Swlta Fordsn Band ftd _ SF 110.93 
-fd) Swiss valor New Series— SF 3 86-25 
-fdj Universal Bond Seieet. M _ SF 8350 
-f a j Universal SF 122.77 

-( d ) Yen Bond Selection Y 1055000 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

UalAntmUAWi,. SF 3540 

ftMAlniiMt SF 67.75 

-( d ) Fonso Swts» Sh. SF 17740 

Jrtl iftHtw-lftujyrt SF MOO 

-id) sanisoumAfr.su. sf 320 50 

-( d ) Sima (stock wlce) SF 223.00 

UNION INVESTMENT F rone furl 
-Idln-ir— to ir _ QM 4030 

‘f d ) fltiitewil* -- DM 29.90 

.1 rt > iininair DM BOO 

■i nf iifcirriMC DM 10745 

Other Funds 


-td) 

-Cd) 


(wl AetfOMSs (iwntmento Fund 
!( w) AcNyett 


fm> Allred _ __ 

(wi Adilto imemoilonol Fund __ 

1 r ) Anso Finance l.F - 

ff) 

(w) Trustcor Inti Fd. CAEIF) 

( w) Bondselejr-issue Pr. r 
em) Canada Gtd-Mortme Fa 

S al Caettai Preeerv. Fa. inn. 

wi OMdel 

ml CJevefand orfsnore Fd. 

(w) Columbia Securflfes— 

( r ) COMETE 

(w) Conven. Fd. inti a Cam 

(wl Camierf. Fd. B Cortot 
(Wl DalWG Japan Fund, — . 

CW) DjG.C. 

ri&\ Doltor'Gaer Pbnfl e* - 

-f d) D-anark-Bow Band Fd-^ I 
tOO. Witter WKf wide 1 vt Tsf. ^ 
( r ) Drakkor In vest. Fund N.v 


-( r ) j.F Curreney&Band t 7237 

-f r ) J.F Head Kong Tnisf— 5 3743 

•f Dj.FPeeific 1 neome Trusts Y 25L8s 

-IrU.FJapon Trust Y <M 

ri r ) J.F Japan Technology Y lute 

-f r ) Pociflc Seci(A«) S 741 

LLOYDS BANK INTL/ POB 439, Geneva It 
ruain* ft t \UQ 

-Hw) Lkwfls mn Europe SF islso 

-Kw) Ltoyai Inti Cirmum SF 1734ft 

*+fw) Lloyds inn Income SF 31740 

-Kw! LJovds Inti N. America—- 5 10545 

-+fwi Uovds Iftfl PodfJc SF 13440 

-M w) Lloyds Inn. Smaller Cos 5 1544 


Cd I Dreyfus America Fund. 
( d i Orevtua Fund imt .. _ 
|w) Dreyfus littercantlnervt. 


5 25.10 
5 \23£ 

5 4.75 

5 179.74 
5 94440 

51*1740 
5 T042 
5F 137.15 
5 946 

5 UJ1 1 
» 142 

5 210148 
FL 1034*1 
S 77042 | 
5 1143 

5 3152 

V 1A444 
5 97.95 

5104840 
DM 103140 
I 13.19 
5 121748 
5 102 
% 4140 

5 3646 


( d I Investa DWS DM 5949 

( r ) Invest AUnmi^ s tQ43 

r r ) ffaifartune mil Fund 5A-- 6 19^3 

(w) Japan Selection Fund 5 136.17 

fw) Jaecui Pacific Fund — s 11941 

(m) J offer Pmt Infl. Ltd 5 1042345 

(d ) Klein won Benson I ntl Fa s 23*2 

lw> KJelnwcrt Beni. Jqp. Fd $ FJi 

i wl Korea Growth Trust kw 8477.19 

1 5 944 

( d ) Leleam S i«34f 

iwi Leverage cinw% mqih s 1*157 

IdjUputoftr S13M40 

twt L.«rt tmti „ 5 Bfll7 

Cm) Moanetound N.V. S 15947 

( a } Msdlolomjm Set Ri -- « 21.90 

( r l Meteor* Y 10342040 

twlNAAT S 1145 

( a j Nikko Growth poekoae Fd s 9ouiL 

fm I Nlranflgi Ftmri - s 36 41* 

ifwi Mnsrrr Portfolio *531846 

(wl Novote c investment Fund s 10040 

(Wj NAME $ 17140 

fiwl MSP F I T. s I76J3 

t d 1 Pacific Hot Iron invt. Fd 1 1229.91 

(w) PANCURR) Inc S 7)2t 

f r \ Parian Sw. R Est Geneva ™ SF 1797.00 

( r ) Permai Value n.v s 132S.9T 

f r 1 PlrityiM 5 I!<7 JO 

(wi P5CQ Fund N.V S 132.93 

fw) P5CO Ijltt. N.V S :05<4 

( w> Putnam Em. Into, Sc Tr 5 949 

( d ) Putnam (nri Fund S 75.19 

f r ; PrLT^fffi „ . 5 88045 

(w) Quantum Fund ^ v $ UtAtQ 

#rf I Omntn c.iom LF MI "40 

i d j Rentlnvcsr LF I05SJ8 

(d ) Reserve insured Deports Sii7iM 

f n ) RudoJI Wolff Fut Fd Lid S I23a00 

(w) Samurai Portfolio ____ SF M9rt 

Itfl SCI fTetfl SA Luxembourg v S l\36 

I w) Seven Arrows Fund N.V 5 9 a<to 

(w) Slate 5f. Bank EauJtv HdgsNV 5 10 ^ 

fw) Stroteav investment Fund 5 2i2B 

id l Syntax LicL-fClaMA)' s n_5J 

(w) Tectma Growth Fund - 5F 0145 

( d ) Tnamtan Australia Fd Ltd S *.76 

fd) Thornton HK & China - I J.J7 

( d i Thornton Japan Fund Ltd 5 13J i 

( fl \ Thornton Or lent, ttvt. Ffl LW _ S Ufl 

(w) Tokyo poc. Hold, f Seal 5 tujp 

(w) Toirvo Put HakL N.v. 5 \02A 

Iwi Tronspoclflc Fund - 5 ; 

(wi Trans Europe FuQQ^ FI»-^ 

Id > Turauoi^Fund 

i w 1 Tweedy, Browne n.v.CknsA_ 5 2^1-32 
(w) Tweedy. Browne n.vXIIouB — S 
(ml Tweedv^rowne fU.K.) n.w — 5 l^] 0 -^ 

if fl) UN ICO Fund DM, *£5 

& 1175.12 

. ft 143740 
. 5 1D«7 

S 

. 5 103? 
s 1193 


t d i UNI Bond Fund 

( r j UNI Capital Fund - - 

f d ) US Federal Socufites — 
Id) US Treasury income tui 

(w) VonderoJU Assels— 

( d ) World Fund 5 A 


DM - Oeiitttfw Mar*; BF - NjmFr ana ;F l - Dutch Ftarfn: LF - Luxembourg Franca; ecu ■ European Currency unit; SF - Swl$e Francs; a - asked; + - Offer Pr lcos;li - bid enow* 
p/v no » 2 iper »ptt- NJk.-woi AwoHnw« ; NX. - NorCammunlasiedro -New; S - fufiamded: 5/B - Slock Split; - - Ex-Divkfervfj — - Ex-fts; — * . Grass Perf o m w oco IftWF October; • - 
npd9mat- Prf»- E*-Counon. •• - Formerly Worldwide Fund Lid; ® * Otter Price Ind. prelim, choree; 4+ - Wfv stack erica as on Amsterdam stock Eacdwmn 


■ • - ■; i l 


-Wffwj CW*.’®' 
■ •.-• - ■ * — — ^ 


“ 1 -.v- ** f ~ * ^ ’ * - ■ "t- 1 ’ S' S .. ' H -* 

■ - - . - — w- m. • -r--^ * •*' ‘.fm 










, Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DEGEMBER 1, 1985 


Srldayk 


n Month 
h tori Low Stt> 


DW.YW.FE 


Sfe. Obse 

wte Hlsn low Oust i 


n Month 
Htt Low Stock 


EHv. YULPE lOQs 


Low OmLOtat 


UMWlh 
HhtfiLM SlOCft 


Dftv. Yld. PE UUft Hktk Low Q«A Orte 


IS Month 
HttiLa« Slock 


Dta YU. PC 


fib. Gtatt 

10* W Lot <W-Q*» 


Hwa£» acek . M».v M-pe 
ZM 17K wftnhOs 1 JJ » I Sf IS 

•MIA Mh UMhllot 1A A3 8 W 




Qosne 


71 52% PStn pf 9M 119 5Sfa 99% 57* 5M +1 

63 48 PSInpf BJ3 1SJ T00Z54 54 54 

43 4»i PSlnpf L38 \6l 4Mfa 3*fc 51*51%—* 

70 54 PSlnpt 9*60 160 3007 60 60 60 —1 

66 51 PSInpf a96 16.1 300:56 55V7 55Vi— Ya 

14 M* PSvNH 3 1911 & 74 7ft 

24% 13 PNHpfC 4 23% 23% 2» + % 

»* 11% PNHpfD 9 21* 21% 21> + % 

19% 9% PNHflfP 18 18% im 

21% 10% PNHpfC 15 »fa 2fi% 20rt + % 

29% 2TA PStfNM 2.92 HU 9 236 28% 27% 28 

32% 25% FSvEG 1^1 U 1 19535 30% 30 3M + % 


27% 1» RfilnCm A) 13 31 IK 27. *** 76% 

18% 6% RellnEl 08 J 28 357 16% TO 1M + % 

13% 9 RoBlns 4b 33 18 TO 13% \$ 13% 

M 1% Romeo 287 » 2% 2ft- % 

19 11 Row M 43 15 15ft 15 1M 

47 24 Rqrer 1.12 32 17 4GB 36ft 34ft 35 -2% 

71 71% Rowan .12 14 67 427 1ft 8 8 + ft 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to tbe doting on Wall Street 
and do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 


12Mtonm 

‘ High Lot Sfedt 

“ 


MfcYhLPE IQiHMilm Out. Otar 


(Coarinued from Page IQ ) 


. 18% 10% ParvO • 

50ft 31 Patna 140 2J 

* 28ft 24ft Pat Rs X72«13a 

-17ft 14% PetRspf 157 95 

‘ 2% Pfrinv J0e24j 

r Pflatr 148 25 

: 24 12ft PturieO 

~5 5. 34 Photo Pf 550 94 


O 1M 10ft 18ft -I- ft 

140 25 16 485 50% 49ft 50ft + ft 

L72«lXe 7 27ft 27 27 

tJ? W 33 16ft 16ft 16ft— ft 

.908244 2 3ft 3ft 3ft 

148 25 16 3532 53ft 52ft 53ft + ft 
980 27ft 21 21% + ft 

550 94 6 52ft 52ft 52ft + ft 


15 12 PSEGPT140 95 

40ft 31% PSEGof 4.18 107 
41ft 31ft PSEGpf OO 104 
114ft 97% PSEGpnZJO 115 
77% 70 PSEfi pfl OI6 115 
Zlft 16ft PSEGpf 2.17 105 
66% 50% PSEGOf 650 1D4 
23ft 1B% PSEGpf 243 103 
73ft S8 PSEGpf 750 105 
71ft 54ft PSEGpf 740 104 
89ft 70 PSEGDf 952 105 

4% 2% PUOllCfc 

16ft 9% Pueblo .lb 15 12 

7ft 6 PR Com A 

17 12ft PuoefP 1J6 IL7 7 

7ft Oft PulPen 

6% 6ft PuiPCMrl 


35 14ft 13ft 14ft + % 
400x39 39 39 

300z4K 40% 40ft— ft 

1 114ft 114ft 11<ft 

74ft 74ft 74ft +lft 
7 21 20% 20% 

1060: 6» 64 64 — % 

4 23ft 23ft 23ft — ft 
«l 72ft 72ft 72ft 

802 70 70 70 — % 

440QZ 91ft 91ft flft +2% 

43 298 2ft 2ft + ft 

2 15ft 15ft 15ft— ft 

5 7% 7% 7ft 

rw 15 14ft 15 + ft 

23S 7% 7ft 7% 

9 7% 7% 7% + ft 


65% 47% RovFD U9> 5.1 9 3106 64ft 63ft 64 — ft 

17% 11 Roylftf* 19 |1 16% 15ft 14ft + % 

33 20ft RufamdB 48 14 22 170 33% 33 33% + % 

26 T4ft RuatBr 14 264. 23ft Zlft 23ft + % 

24. Wk RusToa J6 34 1} 103 22ft jlft Sft + ft 

31% 71 RvWlH 100 44 9 450 26 25ft 2b + ft 

32ft 22 Ryders 50 15 13 419 31ft 31% 31% + ft 

S 18ft Rvkpid 56 25 12 100 25ft 29% 25% 

20% 8% Rvmar 5 302 18ft 16ft 18ft 4-1% 

13ft 10ft Rymer pfl.17 ?J 53 12ft 12 12ft + % 


9 9ft5oatPS 2.131334 38 43 

27ft 21ft SCo I Ed 116 H B 2624 

23% 17ft SoulhCo 254 95 7 3992 

26% 21% SoInGss UO 65 f 196 

44 31% SNET1 272 A3 11 298 

39ft 32ft SoNEpf 182 f J 1 

20ft 24ft 50UIICO 172 53 68 


1131334 38 43 ft M 6ft— % 

2.16 H B 2624 25% 24% Wft 

254 95 7 3992 21% 21ft lift + % 

150 65 ♦ 196 2M 26% 26ft + ft 

172 44 11 298 43% 42% 43% + % 

352 fJ 1 39ft 39ft 39% + tt 

172 43 68 27ft 27ft 27ft + % 


20ft 16ft UnBIpf 2.13 105 2 19ft 19ft 19ft— ft 

32 . 56ft UClptH 850 1U TOO* 49 ff 69 4-1 

24 Zlft UnEJCpn 410 17 100 21% 71ft Zlft— ft 

52% 37ft UtlPac 150 35 12 2026 51ft 90ft 51 4- ft 


** 


BttiHfatoLcm O oet-Ortg 
94 21ft 2 » 2L .T £ 



"As. 

^ ■* .» 


16% + % 
33% + % 
23ft + ft 
Sft + ft 
2b + % 


WU SawtM 1 j 00 24 10 1547 41% 40ft 41% + ft 


302 IM 16% 18% 4-lft 

53 12 % 12 12 % + tt 


31% 10% PultaHvn .12. 3 15 310 13ft 18% 13% — ft 


~*6% 29 PhBirS 54 1J 22 2663 43% 43% 43% + ft 
.. 16% 13ft PhlFaEI 270 14.1 6 220? 15% 15% 15%— ft 


■ 35 a PhJIE Pf 450 137 
' 37ft 30ft PtlREpf 458 TZ9 

■ 56 47 PhJIE pf 750 137 

-69ft 57 PhllEpf 875 127 
. lift 9% PhBIEpf 141 128 
# 10% 9 PMLEpt 133 127 

'10ft 8% PhllEpf 1_2B 125 
426 110ft PMIpf 17.12 139 

76 62% PhllEpf ? JO 727 


74 , 62% PWlEpf 9J0 717 SOz 75 75 75 4- % 

63ft 51ft RillE D# 750 124 4l0z 62% 62% 62% 

. «ft PhllEpf 1JS 129 BOX 60 60 60 + ft 

*55? PfHJSuto 133 62 13 27 21% 21% 21% 

95ft 72 PhD Mr ADD 55 9 3391 79ft 7BVi 7»ft 4-1% 
.26% 1A Ptillpln 50 25 13 107 23% 23% 72PA— ft 


70z32ft 32ft 32ft— T 
30Qx 37 36 36ft 4 ft 

500E S5ft 55 55 

300x bffft 68% 68% + % 

73 lift 11 11 + ft 

144 10% 10ft 10ft 

156 10% 10% 10ft 

2003024 123 123 

SOz 75 75 75 4- % 

410Z62% £3% 62% 

BOX 60 60 60 + ft 

27 21% 21% 21% 


31 ft 16ft Puniior 
10% 5% pyro 


63 33 

105% 91 
25 17 

10ft 5 
34% 27 
27ft 14ft 



54J 35 406 18ft 17% 18 + % 

7 321 5ft 5% 5ft— ft 


140 24 16 412 60% 59ft 59% —1% 
9-56 U _ 30X104 104 104 —1 

•8003419 214 23% 23% 23ft + ft 

, M 21 145 6ft 6ft 6ft + % 
140 U 11 393 30% 30ft 30% + ft 
■240 .9 16 305 26% 25ft 25ft— 1 


64ft 35% Phlltn pf 1J0Q 1 J 


2 56ft 56ft 56ft 


riB% lift PhHPf * 150 75 11 1757 13ft 13 13ft + ft 


-25ft g% PMPtpf 154a 44 
V30ft 20% PhltVH 40 14 13 
,85% »ft PftdAa 35 5 8 

- 84ft 29ft PtaNG 222 65 12 
* 26 ft 14% Ptor 1 15 


103 S% 23% 23% 

3 36 28ft 20ft 28ft— ft 

8 1671 34ft 33 84 + ft 

2 13 34ft 33% 34ft + % 

5 46 27ft 26% 27ft + ft 


9% 5% RBInd ,54* J 39 5ft 5ft 5ft— % 

49% 34 RCA 154 73 18 1829 48% 47% 47ft— ft 
40ft 33% RCA pf 35S 9JJ 1 40% 40% 40% + ft 

9% 6ft RLC JQ 25 22 64 7ft 7 7ft + ft 

4% 8ft RPC ^ 251 3% 3ft 3ft 

20% 14% RTE 56 26 11 217 21% 20% 21% + ft 

Ifft 8% Rocflce 11 129 Uft «*■ 

49 32 Rob Pur IjOO 2_2 15 950 45% 


■ A3ft 38% PUshfY 1-72 28 T4 868 61% 60ft 61 +1 


*.34 21ft Pioneer 1^4 
2S% 13ft PJonrEI JOB 
‘ 47ft 33ft PttnyB 1JD 
94 66 PltnBpf 2.12 

• uft prrtstn 

21 . 16ft PhmPtn 57 
. 1? tl PkfflRs 39 
' 13 7 Pfcmfm .16 

13% 7ft Piavbov 

• im 11% PocoPd 50 


1.24 55 12 728 22ft 22ft 22% — % 
JOB* J 161 16 15% 16 

L2g 2J 16 59* 49 47ft 48% +lft 

2.12 S 7 97 95% 97- +3 

844 12% 12% 12% 

37 A 24 18ft 17% 17%—% 

.28 1J 15 165 17ft 17 17 — ft 

.16b 13 13 1? 12ft 12% 12ft + ft 

75 32 8% 8ft Oft 

50 45 62 66 18 12% 13 


9ft 5ft Romod 21 1 191 

71ft 16ft Ranco 54 45 9 3 

5ft 2ft RonorO 
87 51% Ravcm M 5 27 

16ft Oft Raymk 
20% 19% Rovnrn 
53ft 36% Roythn 150 12 11 
10% 5% ReodBt J04 J 
21% 13 RdBot pf 2.12 119 
ZFW 16% RdBatpf 3.12817.1 


21 1197 8 

54 45 9 3 18% 

715 3% 

M S 27 257 85% 

3 9% 
555 20% 
50 32 11 966 50% 


JH? r? E 10 ™" ^ 7S 32 8% 8ft 8ft 

l 1 ? 1 50 45 62 66 13 12% 13 

?i W R* 0 !** 1-08 25 56 1316 39ft » 38% — ft 

Uft 10ft Pondrm 50 3 34 633 15ft 15ft 15ft 

21ft 15ft PopTcri JO 4,3 85 102 18% 17% 18% 4- ft 

22% 14% Portae 50 35 ID 17ft 17% 17ft 

21% 16ft PortGE 1J0 BJ 9 226 Zlft 21% 21ft + ft 


17ft 8% ReaiEq 
12% 7 Radmn 
12ft 8ft Raaea 
ift ft Reeat 
43% 27% RatctiC 
10ft 4% Reo Air 
3 1ft RbpA wi 


92 5ft 
33 15ft 
11 lBft 18 



1? 810 12% 12% 


— ft 

+ ft 
+ 1 % 

— ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 


74V* 41% SCM 
13ft 9% SLInd 
34 19ft SPSTa 
19 15 

T9ft 15V* 

20 % 12 % 

12% 5% i 

2% 1ft I 
38% 23ft ! 

37% 2Sft ! 

34ft 20% 

23 18% 

11% 9% 

8ft 3% 

38% 24ft 
28% 21% 

9% 6% 

Uft 8% 

43% 29to 
25% 20ft 
36% 24ft 
50ft 31ft 
37ft 29ft 
22ft 17% 

12ft 10ft 
9ft 5 
Uft 7ft 
aft 2i% 

59ft 35ft 
43% 32% 

14% 9ft 
a 23% 

61ft 9ft 
46ft 31% 

16% 12% 

45 25ft 
13 10ft 
16% 14 
27ft 17ft 
5ft 3ft 


JUS 157 36 
1-70 4.9 9 847 25 

.52 20 13 651 26 

in ?! a 7 a 

TJJ8 105 99 10 


150 75 
135 11J 


12% 6% RpGyps- JO 12 12 547 


25 19% PorG pf 250 10J 

35% 31 PorG pf 450 125 
34% 30% PorG pt 432 125 
43% 28% Potttdi 1.56 42 15 

34 g% PotmEI 2.16 47 9 

4MA 33 PotEIPf 404 9J9 

18% Pram I s -36 U 20 
S% 16ft Prtmfcs 1.10 5 A B 

5% Tfft PrimcrC 19 

M 16% PrlmMS J09 3 25 


L7 3 24% 24ft 24ft — ft 

5 20 34ft 34ft 34ft + ft 

5 7 34ft 34 34ft + ft 

3 15 59 37ft 36% 36% — % 

J 9 187 32% 32ft 32ft— ft 

J9 1DQZ 41 41 41 

3 a a 27ft 26% 27 

5 8 TO 20% S 20% 

19 5684 22% 2 Z2U 

3 a 191 38ft a 38ft + ft 


51ft 36ft ROPNY T 54 12 9 

aft 19 RNYpf 2.12 9 3 

29 23ft RNYofC 3.12 11 J 

34ft 24ft Rao 5k lit U 7 

2Sft 15ft ft&hCot 32 1J 

29ft 22ft Revco JO ID 29 

T7ft 10% Ravere 2 

55 aft Rovfon 1J4 3 3 18 

25ft 18ft Revnm JO 19 16 

15ft lift Rexnrd 54 29 ID 


JO 32 17 148 9ft 7ft 

34 22 11% 11% lift— ft 

73 Vi % % 

JO 15 14 11 a 31ft a 

5 1022 9% 9 9% -I- % 

61 1ft 1% 1ft + ft 

JO 32 12 547 9ft 9 9% + ft 

54 12 9 a 51ft 5! 51ft— % 

Li2 92 i a a a — ft 

M2 112 4 a 78 28 + % 

54 52 7 93 31ft 30% 31ft + % 

22 U _ 62 25% 25ft 25ft 

JO 3J 29 810 26ft 26ft 26ft— ft 
2 81 12ft T2 12ft + ft 

J4 32 18 a 57% 57ft 57ft 

JO 29 16 <6 24ft 24ft 24% + ft 


67% 50% ProctG 250 19 17 2T49 67ft 67 

15% B PrdRsO 28 1J 23 129 15ft 15 

48% 35ft Proter 150 35 16 2 41% AY 

» 2 PruRCn M2 2 

_Bft 7% PruRI n 15 8 T 


49 67ft 67 67ft + % 
79 15% 15 15ft + ft 
2 41% 41% 41% + ft 

a 2 2 2 

15 8 7% 7ft— Hi 


24ft 18% PSvCof 2J0 9J 9 2497 20ft 20ft aft— ft 


21ft 17ft PSCalpf 2.10 114 
10ft 8% PSInd 1J0 111 
aft 31ft PSInpf 350 146 
9 6% PSInpf 1JD4 119 

8% 7 PSInpf 1J8 T3J 

53 41 PSInpf 7.T5 15L9 


75 20% 20ft 20ft — ft 
751 7% 7ft 7% + ft 

TQz 24 24 24 —ft 

T980Z B 7ft 7ft— ft 
TTOOz 7% 7% 7% 

1405 45 44ft 45 


25% 18ft Reznm JO 29 16 46 24ft 24ft 24% + ft 

15% 11% Rexnrd 54 29 10 1U7 15ft 14ft 15ft + ft 

33ft 24% ft*Wlnsl5B 11 7 3425 29V 2BV» 29 
181 123% ReWnpfttW 100 10 130 130 130 — ft 

41% 35 Rev MU 1J0 29 188 34% 34ft 34ft— % 

27ft 24 RurM pf 2J0 B5 59 a 26% 27 

33Va 71ft RJteAJd JO 2.1 15 1037 24% 23ft 23ft— ft 
7ft 2ft RvrOfcn 50 71 3 2% 3 

36% 28ft Rbbshw 1 JO 32 9 114 37ft 35ft 37ft +1% 

41% 19ft Rototon 1 JOk 132 27ft 22ft 23% -I- ft 

24% 5ft vH Robins 91 Uft II lift 

24ft 18% RocflG 220 95 6 424 a 2% 22ft 

43ft 31% RoctrTI 254 6J 9 77 38% 37ft 37ft 

20% 18 RckCtrnl J6 9.4 566 18ft 18% 18% 

41% 79 RoekWl 1.12 11 9 1570 36% 35% 36 — % 

73 55% RohmH 2JD 11 12 189 70% 69ft 67ft— ft 

70 41% Rnhrin 10 1333 57ft 56% S7ft + ft 


a uft 

34ft 22% 

32% 22% 

39% a 

31% 24% 

19V. 11% 

30ft 17ft 
18ft 11% 

26% 17ft 
40ft 29ft 
a<& it 
42 25ft 
91* 5ft 
15ft 12 
19% 15ft 
43ft 26% 

33% aft 
17% 12% 

27 20% 

14% 7ft 

76% 50% SfnkB 


200 28 14 369 72% 72ft 77% 

J2b 1J 10 12 12 11% 12 + ft 

S JO 14 16 36 33% 32% 33% + % 

NJ 40 200 16ft 16ft 16%— ft 

2aol5J 168 15% 15ft 159b + ft 

JO U 17 331 19ft 18ft 18ft— ft 

a US lift Uft lift 

t 73 2% 2ft 2% 

JUS 157 36% 34% 34% —2ft 

1J0 49 9 047 35ft 34% 35 

J2 28 13 651 U 25ft 25ft 

JJ? 7 j a 7 a a a 

TJ8 104 99 10% TOft 10% + ft 

13 7ft 7% 7%— ft 

J4 A 14 1793 37% 36% 37% + % 

124 45 8 377 aft 26ft aft 

J9O10J 10 285 8% 8% B%— ft 

18 2 11 11 11 — ft 

JO 1J 19 m 34% 34ft 34ft— ft 

194 8J n 33 23ft 22ft a —ft 

LOO 2J 15 1569 35% 35% 35% + ft 

1 JO 3J 13 1248 49ft 48% 48% + ft 

1J8 40 14 10 37ft 36% 36% 

U 76 t 82 Zlft aft aft— % 

1JB 11J 14 lift lift llft-t-% 

54 5W 5ft 5ft + ft 

1.121 19 7ft 7% 7%— ft 

116 BL2 9 1433 aft 26ft 25% — ft 

1JB 29 16 aa 58% 57ft S7ft— % 

1J0 X4 10 4549 36% 35% 3S%— ft 

.12 1.1 16 365 11% 11 11% + ft 

J40 23 13 579 32% 82% 32ft 

•90b 1-5 11 a 59% 59% 59% 

1- 24 27 n im 46% 45% 45%—% 

32 15 11 53 13% 13% IM— ft 

42 1A 7 204 29ft 28% ® 

' IM 123 9 Uft T2 12 — ft 

:2.ia 13J 72 15% 15% 15% + ft 

M 19 14 661 75 24% 24% — ft 

69 3% 3% »— ft 

JO 1J 13 19a 45ft 44% 45ft + ft 
a a iBft 18% lawi 
■44 1J 18 136 32ft 

1 JO 15 9 107 25ft 

TJ6 48 10 4014 37% 

S1J4 45 7 761 29% 

75 19ft 
a 623 30% 

J2 43 17 104 17 

JO 24 8 274 24% 

2- 52© 64 7 497 39% 

50 3J 7 511 27ft 


57ft 49ft SovtUpf 4flp 7.T 18 56ft 56ft 56ft + % 

18 lift So Roy 15 J» 620 17 16% 16% 

Uft 5% Soumrk M 23 6 1251 10ft Uft 10% + ft 

51 46 5omfcpf &JS3ftl2J 73 48 47ft a 

a 19% SwAhi .13 J 16 12a 28% 27% 28% + % 

16% mSwVFor 17 7 10% 10ft 10% 

19 12ft SwtGas 134 7.1 8 70 17% 17% 17ft— % 

88% 66 SwB*f| 400 75 B 1916 00* 7^ 80ft + ft 

29 ink SwEor 53 22 9 23 23 22% 22% 

26% » SwtPS 732 8.1 9 245 25ft 24% 24% — ft 

17% 12ft Spartan 32 14384 ,42 15% 15 T5ft + % 

27% 15% SpbrfP 141 aft 21 a — ft 

59 36% Sperry 1J2 19 84 2051 50ft 49% 4M— ft 

LB 41 a a 36% 36% 36% — ft 

1J4 4J 13 1« 

1-76 73 M 1906 
JO 34123 153 

Ji 21 12 313 

32 17 15 B4 
240 14 9 822 


115ft 87% 
74 50 

5ft 2% 
Zm TOft 
18% 9% 

33% IBft 
45% 25% 



F 735 65 
F MVHJV 

JB9V 2 12 


9 ink SwEor 
26% a Sw+PS 
17% 12ft Sporton 
27% 15% SpoctP 
59 36% Sperry 

38ft a% 

~ , 2Sft 
49% 

18ft 
18ft 
10ft 


■-• TO .-3 * 

248 5J 

26% Uft UIHum 232 U.S 
30% a UlUppf 197 UJ 

«.« . 
1.16 12 11 


JOe 1-5 11 72 

1-24 7J 11 240 

32 15 II 53 
42 1J 7 204 
r 146 122 9 

:2.ia 13J 72 

48 19 14 661 

69 


J2 43 17 104 17 

JO 24 8 274 34% 

2520 64 7 497 39% 

50 3J 7 511 27ft 

S3 73 13 118 42ft 

12 548 8% 




+ % 
— % 
+ ft 


IM 
17ft 
12ft ! 

£* 

29 

9% 

3% 2ft 

20ft 15% 

Uft 9% 

41% aft 

27ft 16ft 

32 25ft 

14 10 

49% 38% 

33% 74 

sift aft 
aw 16% 

3% lft 
93% 42ft 

a% to 
a% uft 
6ft 3% 

39 28% 

lift 6% 

56% 43% 

1W% 90% 

49ft 40 
9% 5ft 
7% 7 

39ft a 

23 14% 

48% 30ft 
17ft 12 
22% Uft S 
39ft 38% SyumPf 
Uft 18% SymsCP 
83ft 46ft Syntax 
41% a Svntxwfl 
44 30% 5ysen 


36 25 12 
32 23 IS 
2J0 54 9 
1 40 20 9 


J4 3J 8 25 

53 U 10 174 

IS 3 \l '% 

Ijftnoa 18 
.12 42 a 
36 19 10 23 

30 59 TO 35 
120 3J 16 2722 
UD 43 771 

1J8 SS 79 15 

1J0 7M 300c 
1JO 23 f £7 
JO 1J 42 368 


rrTtt 


36% 36% — ft 
49 48 — ft 

78 78% + Ik 

23ft 23% + ft 
19% 79 — ft 
11% 11% 

27% zm— ft 
14ft + % 

S 2 TS 

lift + ft 

2% 

19%— ft 
13ft— ft 
39 

27% +% 
20% + ft 
12 % + % 
49% — % 

a 33% 


31% aft 

14% 11% 

25 15% 

44% am 

37ft 20% 
18% lift 
3% 2 

30ft 27ft 
nk s 
oft aft u 
44 24ft u 
33 23% U 

56ft 49% V 


l 5 19112 111% 1118k— ft 

J 50fa 72ft 72ft 92ft 

IB 2% 7 W m + ft 

2 12 * 23ft 23ft 23% + ft 

3 U 1« 18 

J 50 T74 aw aw ttw 4 % 

LS 336 45 44% 45 4- ft 

J 5 158 2*ft 26ft 26ft 4 ft 

j 93 a aft 29% + ft 

J 15 31% 38% a% + W 

9 9 14% 14% M% + ft 

J 9 a 24ft zm 23ft— ft 

J 39 2 44% 44* 44% + ft 

J 11 75 a 35V* 35% 

237 18ft 17ft 18 + ft 

1 44 3ft 2ft 3ft 

4 7 1681 30 21% 29 % + % 

1V21 6% 6)5 6ft + ft 

3 TO 5 36 35% 35% — ft 



1.10 Z7 12 101 40% 40 40ft 

1J2 1QJ 13 328 19ft 18% 1B%— ft 

689 1% 1W 1ft + ft 

M 4 561 93% 93 93 — ft 

IJOe 68 30 17% 19ft 19ft + % 

m 3J 39 821 22 a% aft + ft 

155 5ft 5 5 

48 1 J is 7 3M a a + ft 

63 Tift lift 1TW 

235 45 73 420 50ft 50 50% + ft 
Z25 23 4 104% 104 104 + ft 

1J0 3J 13 107 48% 48% 48% 

411 6% 6ft 6% 

1.19 154 162 7% 7% 7W 

1J0 10 11 104 39% 39 39ft 

J8 1J 18 M8 23ft 22ft 22ft— ft 

48 1J 14 242 47% 48% 49 + % 

J 17 71 5 13 13 13 

1JM SS 118 19% 19% 19% 

240 7J 2 33ft 33ft 33ft 

15 20 12 12 12 —ft 

TJ2 2J 16 1487 B» 81% 83 —ft 

76 42ft 41ft 41ft + ft 
44 1 J 19 53 44% 43% 44ft + % 


48 1J IS 

230 45 23 
Z25 23 
1J0 3J 13 

1.19 154 
1J0 3J 11 


J 17 71 
MM SS 
t 240 7 J 


m 29ft 
84ft 66ft 
T3 6ft 
4S 34- 
39% a% 
75 2Bft 

a im 

32ft T7W 
23% 16ft 
29% 22ft 
23ft U% 
9 26ft 
137ft 63% 
43 32ft 
34ft 30ft 
10% 9 
26% a 
25 22% 

2S% 23ft 
34 19 

aft 16% 

27 18% 

24% 20ft 

35ft aft 


50 23 TO 5 a 
.92 20 IS 345 
1JD 46 75 5509 
SJltWJ 8 

235 53 307 

1J2 54 » 1422x 
5J2 69 ij 522 

140 3J279 1477 
235 7.1 30 

%32 47 f 640 
135 65 U » 

JO J 23 111 : 

JO 3J 7 a 22% 22 
1.12 40 11 Si : 

1 JO 43 9 m 

lJDb 4J 7 2073 
2J0 2J 23 570 

~ 11 TOO 
2 
a 

13 441 

4 
63 

5 
3 

8 19 

6 
1 


28U 28% WtilNot 1 M A2 J 
24ft T7% 248 IM Ji 

69% 40% Waste 
34% 33ft ' 

r m » 

8% 

13ft 3% WbonU 

j. 15 

3Rk 23Vk WoisM 3 S U» 
VU M MMRH 2J0 ll3 W 

sss IF sss&“ s y s 

45ft 36ft WPtnPpnjg J* _ x 
,45 35 WstPtP 2J0 10 U 

14ft 10% WbfdTBlJD* * 
9ft 3ft WhASTL * 

3ft % WlAlrwf _ 

26ft 11 WAlTPf ZJOO BJ 
8% lftWCHA _ 

51 16% WCHA pf 7J5 347 M 


j»I 3|{QS g%= % 

m u n W s 2 « 

J* 11 li M M ^ 

20 u 10 « 3 jss sr* 

5u21 V OTJ TO gg + JS 

S ^ " 1 « S SI zm~ "j 

ss" 


m 


■ W..RI 


& El- Vi 

Sa 46 +t . IT 


ss ^ ass/5^ S S ™ ” 

Uft 4% WnUpffi t* S -U» 

a% 38k + h 83 20 Wim pf J 

+ Hi Utb 5Mi WUT1 irfA. „ .. 

<M 24 VMbB l» Jf &&. 

— M 4T* H* HHvc . ■‘ 2 : 12 II im SS— M 

— S 34 M wmrtl 1JB 42 29 2397 S»k £2 — H 

VP*l 37Vr Wivrpf ZM U » 4 f:* jfa 

*5 B%»““ 12 7 esc 


Jt5 44» * 2 

* M % 

*rt 2A* a» *«■ + g 

l4 u »k m M + f 



f&lf 


vtWhMt 

vjwptfp 

WMrtpf 

White 


=3 

+ % 31ft 25ft WhltC UO 44 ™ 

_ S J4% TOft WhHWU ^ M H 

js ^tsssss z s” f 

4. ft Uft 8 WRftod .12 J? W 


31ft 25ft WhltC 
34% TOft Whited 
26ft T7ft vmttak 
13% 6% WUktt 

Uft 8 Wftfred 


+ ft 19% 7ft WmoeG -TO J 6 _]g £L? + ft 4 

■I % 33ft aft winkmi IM a a lg W » 5*— W 

— ft 5% 2 wmnEL - ^ F* 3; 2 

tS 7% 5% wBSrt -job 1 J 1* * -S2 35% +% 

38% 30ft WtaObc \M 4J U Ub 35% 3» j* 

am lft Wfnnbo JO ZD M 550 If* ™ 'Si!? 7 


47V» J » 

— 1A 


+ ft 

13ft +J» 


412 121 


20ft + ft 
24 

23% + % 
34 —ft 


-10b 1 J 1* 30 6 5% 

t id AM 14 156 35% 35ft 


51% 25% VFCnrp 1J8 24 12 2S 50% Sift 52% + W 

Uft 6 Vaterp 140 256 13 12% 12%— ft 

25% U Voter Of 344 148 7 24% 21ft 24ft— ft 

3ft 2ft Vatovln ' . ‘ 9 » 2% 2%— ft 

Sft TO VbnfSrn LOO 40 7 25 23ft 25ft 2M 


20% 8ft Wfnnbo 20 ZD M 
8% 5ft Winner 

40fe 30%b wIkE^ 243 M * 

4M am WtacPL Z» 7.1 9 
3m zm WlsePS lit 74 I 
40h 3M WHoO IM 31 w 
M 7VX WoMVt M U .. 


34 7*fc T* 7J* 

l 

27 39ft 39 + ft 


2ft Macao 
2ft Vonoi 


44 IJ 19 


+ % 
— % 
+ ft 

— ft 
+ ft 

— % 
+ ft 
+ ft 


19% Oft 
32% 22% 


23ft 19% 
30ft 24ft 
49ft 38ft 
35 24% 



40 41 15 77 14% . _ 

1J6 8.9 11 93 1S% 18% 18% 

40 .9 10 641 42% 4T1 ft 42ft— ft 

L50 10J U 32ft 32% 32% 

48 33 18 195 T4ft 14ft Tift 

40e 1-5 24 9 26 ft 26 26ft + ft 

J240 222 8ft 7ft 8 + ft 

2L00 3J 12 2081 78 76ft 77ft + % 

1-30 IJ 73 27 92 91V* 9t%— % 

7 46* 46 46Ui— Vk 

1.16 3J 13 409 39 37ft 38ft— ft 

2J00 143 17 35 14 13ft 14 

2J0 41 10 1363 33ft 32% a — % 


050 107 


J2 40 222 81 

3J0 If 12 2087 71 

1-30 u a a 92 


50% 30ft TOR Jle J 16 4ft 40 
36% 27ft TECO 2J6 7-1 9 866 33ft 33 

12% 7 TGIF 13 69 Bft Bft 

a% 13% TKP 1J2S 46 9 137 18ft TOft 

28ft 19ft TRE UOO 17 27 87 27ft 27% 

83ft 68ft TRW 3J0 3J 37 247 78% 7B 

5ft % vlTocBt 782 ft ft 

87ft 52ft ToftBnf 1.16 IJ 15 118 79 78 

Aft 12% HODOV JOB ID 14 185 21ft 19% 


16 Ab 49 40 ft— % 

866 33ft 33 33% 

69 Bft Bft 8% 

137 TOft TOft 18ft + ft 

87 27ft 27% 27ft— ft 


42% 22ft Vorfa 
15 9% Vdro 

25% 13 Veec 
12 3% 

17% 9% 

13% 11% 

61% 29ft 
TOft SS 
74 59 

29% 13ft 
78 33ft yarn 
87ft 66% Vala 


Varan JA 10 23 227 

Vdro 40 27 41 180 

Veeoo 40 25 13 56 

16 a 

UOdJOJ 5 

* A u ue 

48 J a 285 

If 7J0 10J 3a 

t 745 105 2120 

B 18 56 

Vbmod 38 ao 

ValcnM 280 3J 13 69 


12 242 52% Sift 52% + W U 9ft WolwW J4 18 W « _ - 

140 256 13 13% 12%—% 5M'35Vi Wotwth 200 34 H 354 M SBft gj J 

7 H% 3f% 24ft— % 82% 90% Wofwpf 220 27 Jt 

■ 25 2ft 2% 2ft— Vi 5ft 2ft WrldAr „ 2 « * 

7 33 25ft 25ft 25ft 91 ft 54% WrlfllY U0o 73 15 70 9gJ 8gJ B™ 

22 JP4 4ft 4ft 4%~ 2ft Wdrftzr — ^ M g ! + % 

23 xn afi 27 27ft _ 16 IM WYlCLb * » 8 • ^ JS lSS— ft 

41 T 60 15 14% 14% — Vk 23% 15ft Wvms JO .37 12 7 16% 16% 16ft— w 


22 JP4 4ft 4ft 
2Z7 27% 27 27ft 
160 .15 14% 14%—% 

56 Uft 16 16% 

33 TOft 9ft 9ft— ft 
5 lift Tift rm 

12% 12ft— ft 
56ft 56ft— ft 
67% 67%— 1% 
70ft 70%— 1% 
__ __ 29% 30% +Tft 

aO 83% 79 83% 45% 

69 86 85% 85% — % 


5ft 2% WrldAr __ 

a% Sift WrffllY U0a 73 15 

4%" 2ft Whrttzr — 

16 10ft WYlCLb J2 22 32 

23ft 15% Wvnns JO 17 to 


60 35% Xerox 3J0 JA 20 2jOH gta g% + J* 

56ft 48% Xerox pf 545 fJ 756 Mb 56% ggjT S 

29 . 19ft XTRA jM 25 TO 3 25% 35 25ft + % 


23% 15 Tolley pf LOO 46 


92% 49% Smticftr 1J0 IJ 20 a 92 91 

46% 24% SmckrvH 7 46% 46 

tift 31% SrwpOn 1.16 3J 13 409 39 37 

T5% 12ft 
43% a% 


88% S&ftTcmfard 

38ft 23% Tandy 
15% 12ft Tndvcft 


46 20 22% aft 

If IS 2b BB 87% 

18 1787 37% 36% 

15 6 15% 15% 


>16e 9 U 2239 19ft 18% 1B%— % 
UD 42 1 28% 28% 28% 

3-30 53 44 40% 40 40% + ft 

f 240 10J 4 22ft 27ft 22ft + ft 

248 BJ 13 2 29% 29% 29ft 

1 Mb 73 12 28 42ft 42ft 42ft + ft 

1 J0 32 12 194 37 36% 37 + ft 


68% 47ft Tefcfmx IJO IS 14 TO 51% 50% 

5% 2ft Tetcom 10 11 3 3 

2a% 227 Tefdvn 11 505 280 279% 

74 12ft Tel rate 40 25 a 272 16 15ft 

57% a Telex 13 472 57ft 55% 

41 Vb 31% Temptn 44 LS 11 84 42 


— ft 

— ft 

— ft 

— ft 


— ft 

+ % 


242 42 9 
f 450 1QJ 
1J0 27 ID 


aft 26 

47 40 

38ft 26ft _ 

16ft WOCkht JO 15 
6ft Wokioc 
18ft WIMrtj .14 J 
20ft Wofoms -5D IJ 
17ft WkHRi 0148 _ 

29% WolCSv JQ IJ 
40 29ft Wdttjm 140 15 
53 40ft WdUlPf 1J0 10 
32ft 17% Wdmoo J8 73 


J 20 
IJ 18 


43 zm 
200x 41% 
54 3fift 
12 24 
117 6ft 


548 28% 
233x24ft 


29ft + W 
41ft— ft 
Ifift + ft 
23% — % 

+ % 
27ft— % 
24ft— ft 


30% 24% ZoleCP 
TTft 7% Zapata 
61% 32ft Zayree 
25 16% ZonithE 

aft 15% Zeros 
4ift aft Znmin 


UZ 45 13 4T 29ft 29ft ®ft + ft 
J2 L3 47 136 9ft 9% 9ft + ft 

48 J 17 12W 58ft 5 6jk 5» k +«k 
919 461 18% 18% W% 

J2 IJ 17 78 30% 2M ^ ^ 
L32 3J U W 40 39ft 39% 4- ft 


LS 11 


45% 33ft Tennco 3LM 7J 14 21V 40% 


US. Futures 

Via The Associated Press 


Noil 29 


High 


Open High Low 

Grains 


WHEAT CCBT) 

SJODbu mlnlmiim- dollars Per bushel 
3Lb3ft 2J?ft D«c 3Jlft 3J5 


Z77to Doc 3Jlft 3J5 3J0 034% +J6% 

3J4ft 2J7 Mar 3J0% 3J5 128ft 134% +J6ft 

402 284 May XU 3J2 109 111% +JB3% 

172ft 2J3 Jul 2J4 2J7 2J3ft 2J5ft +J2% 

345 2J7 5ep IBM 2J6 2J5 2J» + J2% 

3J5ft 193 Dec 197ft 197ft 197 197 + J3ft 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 11J44 

Prev.Dpv Open Inf. 29J54 up 106 

CORN (CBT) 

5300 bu mini mum- dollars per bushel 
195 114ft Dec 244ft 245ft 242 244 +J1% 

297 134ft MOT 144% 245 243 10% +J1% 

191% 2J1 MOV 244% 245 24M 243ft +J0% 

186 2J3 Jul 242% 242% 241 241% +J0% 

170 224% Sop 2JZ% 22Zft 231% 131% 

235ft 120% DOC 128% 228% 127 127 — JOft 

174ft 132% Mr 236 136 135% 235ft 

Est. Sales Prov. Sales 37J18 


297 
191% 
186 
170 
235ft 
174ft 
Est. Sales 


■'Priv. DdY Open lnt.141 J78 off 1992 

t SOYBEANS (CBT) 

1 1000 bu fnbilmum- dollare per bushel 


L 9WWV Ml 

6J9 478 Jim 5JM 5JQ5 

7J2 485% Mar 5.10 5.1 T 

7J9 489 May 5L16 5.17 

- 6.58 497 Jut 123 124 

* 474 498ft Aua 122ft 123 

638 496 5ep ill 111 

_ 6J2 498 Nov 111 112 

r 163 5 l» Jan 

6J7ft 119ft Mar 

'-Est. Safes Prev. Sales 24J42 

Prev. DavOpea ln>. 71648 off 507 

SOYBEAN MEAL{CBT| 

100 lonsr doUarsper ton 
18400 12540 Dec 14100 1441 

16330 127 JO Jan 14450 1441 

206.50 13100 Mar 14X00 1441 

16X50 132SD MOV MSJ0 

167 JO 13480 Jul 14340 14SJ 

15X70 13150 Auo 14440 

167 JO 13100 5ep 14400 

149 JO 136J0 Oct 

15DJ0 136J0 Dec 14100 I46J 

ISO JO 13400 Jan 

Est. Sates Prov. Sales 17J00 

Prev. Dov Open Inf. 43L28T off 194 


478 

485% 

489 

497 
498ft 
494 

498 
SJP 
119ft 


49B% 499 +Jlft 
5J5 105ft +J1% 

112ft m +ji% 

118ft 119 +J1% 

118ft 5.18ft +JT1% 
5JB 5J8ft +J2ft 
509 509ft +J1% 

531 +J2 

5Jlft +Jlft 


High Low Open High Low dose Chg. 

17100 138J0 Dec 177.90 179 JO I77J5 179J0 4400 

17X00 14250 Mar 17650 17650 17450 17850 +400 

Est. Sates 3J33 Prev. Sales 5412 
Prev. Day Open rnt. 115U iip 322 

SUGA EWORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 

11X000 lbs.- cants per lb. 

7J5 3J0 Jon 144 148 5J4 5J3 — J)1 

933 334 Mar 418 422 4T2 413 — J5 

7.15 158 May 635 441 432 433 — JB 

470 L7* JlJ 444 653 444 648 +J1 

482 424 Sep 464 +J2 

696 4J2 Oct 473 483 473 474 +J1 

735 425 Jan 487 +0? 

753 46! MOT 735 7J7 7J5 732 -nfl2 

Est.5aies Prev. Sales 9J54 

Prev. Day Open I nt. 96566 UP 944 

COCOA (NYCSCE) 

TOfnetrlc tons* Seer ton 

2337 1945 Dec 7145 2145 2115 2133 428 

2392 1955 Mar 2200 2217 2195 2214 +35 

2422 1 960 MOV 2253 2Z7D 2253 2270 *36 

2429 I960 Jul 2286 2300 2286 2300 +35 

2430 2023 Sep SIS 2315 2315 2320 +25 

2425 3055 Dec 2323 2323 2323 2333 +28 

2385 2029 MOT 2344 +28 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 2371 

Prev. Dov Open Int. 17J44 off 517 

ORANGE JUICE INYCE] 

11000 lbs.- cents pot lb. 

100JO 111-70 Jan 11285 11X10 11X05 11X25 —JO 

17750 11X50 Mar 11435 11430 UXbO 11X75 —35 

16250 111.95 Mav 11450 11460 11410 11455 +35 

15750 111 JO Jul 11485 115J0 11455 11580 +30 

10050 111-00 Sep 11X00 11280 11280 11280 +35 

11435 11150 Nov 11X15 +35 

11380 11280 Jan 11X40 +35 

16135 11150 Mar 11X50 +3S 

Est. Sales 500 Prev. Solos 500 


Hlfifi 


Open High Law Ckne Chg. 

1J560 1J670 lJSflO 1J675 +220 

1.4590 +390 


Jem 11285 11110 11X05 11X25 —JO 

Mar 1T435 11430 UlbO HITS —35 

Mav 11450 11460 11410 11455 +35 

Jul 1U85 11580 11455 11580 +30 

Sep 11X00 11280 11280 11X00 +35 

Nov 11X15 +35 

Jan 11X40 +35 

Mar 11X50 +3S 


Dec 14580 14680 14480 14530 +150 

Jan 14450 14480 14360 14480 +280 

Mar 14X00 14480 14260 14190 +120 

MOV lALOQ 14580 143J0 145JU +180 

JUl 14360 14580 14350 14490 +2-30 

Aub 14440 14450 144J0 14430 +X10 

Sep 14400 14450 14480 14450 +2J0 

Oct 14250 +L40 

Dec 14580 14680 14450 14550 +180 

Jan 14430 +240 

Prev. Sales 17,100 


Est. Sales 500 Prev. Sales 5 
Prev. Day Open Int. 6835 off 146 


j Metals 

COPPER (COME XI 
25000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

8435 5850 Dec 6130 61J5 6180 6130 

8430 5X75 Jan 6165 

Feb 6165 

8000 5930 Mar 6285 6250 6160 6185 

7400 6080 Mav 6280 6235 6200 6X10 

7440 6035 Jul 617D 6230 6225 6235 

7090 60.90 SOP 6280 6280 <280 6265 

7030 6135 Dec 6U0 6330 6380 6X15 

7030 6330 Jan 6X35 

67.90 6155 Mar 6X65 


14520 1.1905 Jun 14560 14670 14560 14675 

14465 1.1590 Dec 1J590 

Est. Sales 7J39 Prev. Sales .1X513 
Prev. Day Open int. 35332 off 292 

CANADIAN DOLLAR UMM1 
S per dir- 1 point equals S0JM01 
7566 7006 Dec .7247 7247 7215 7ZI8 

7504 J901 Mar 3225 7225 3196 3198 

3360 3070 Jun 3200 3200 3190 3180 

7303 3176 Sep 31 » 3190 3180 3165 

7568 3795 Dec 3170 3170 3170 3150 

Est. Soles X0S6 Prev.5alM 80S 

Prev. Dov Open int. 7391 off 130 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

S pot f ranoT point equals SPlOOOOI 

.12900 89670 Dec .13025 

.12900 .10985 Mar .12985 .12985 .12985 .12985 

.12665 .ia» Jwn „ .12925 

Est. Sales 5 Prev. Soles 13 
Prev. Day Open lift. 166 up3 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

S per mark- 1 point equals S OJOOO I 
8948 3971 Dec 3983 8995 8974 8986 

3982 8040 Mar 4020 4030 AMO 4021 

4011 8325 Jun JOSS 4065 4044 4056 

4050 8782 Sep 4096 

8373 8)00 Dec 4156 4156 4156 4150 

Est.5a!es 25844 Prev. Sates 268Z7 
Prev. Day Open int. 56891 

JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

S per yen- T point equals S0J00001 
004988 J039Q5 Dec J04940 

004996 J0O4O35 MarJ04949 

005010 J00422D Jun .004961 


J04W5 
J04946 
.004961 

JD04999 

004905 J0415B Dec 
Est. Sates 1L900 Prev. Sates 11184 
Prev. Day Open Int. 39862 up 57 

SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

S per franc- 1 point equals SUD01 
4804 8531 Dec 4819 4830 4807 4819 

4852 8835 Mar 4870 400 4857 4870 

4895 4190 Jun 4919 4925 4910 491? 

4860 4790 SW ■ 4960 

Est. Sates 16345 Prev. Sates aj65 
Prev. Dov Open I nt. 35343 up 33 


+145 

+155 

+145 


— 05 
—.15 
—05 
— \15 
—05 
—.10 
— vIO 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

60J00 lbs- dollare pot 100 lbs. 

29-55 18J4 Dec 1945 1X55 1X92 19.11 —80 

29J7 1X92 Jan 1953 19 JO 19 JO 1934 —32 

2840 19-08 Mar 1945 197D 1981 1948 —.10 

Z745 1985 May 1985 1935 19J0 T9J0 —80 

2585 1946 Jul 2005 2085 T9J0 20J6 +.11 

25.15 1948 Alia 2X15 20.15 1985 2X00 +85 

3485 1955 Sep 2X10 20 l 2D 2X00 2fUHJ +83 

2X80 1950 Oct 1950 +85 

a.90 TO80 Dec 2002 2X05 1780 1939 +.14 

a 40 TO J0 Jan 1938 +.13 

Est. Soles Prev. Sates 1X909 

_ Prev. Day Open Int. 44846 up L106 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMC) 

> 4OO0O tbs^ cents Per Ik 
6X35 55JQ Dec 
!>• <745 54 35 Fat 

. 6757 5530 APT 

)• 6685 5685 Jun 

i. 6540 5&M AUfl 

L 6040 - 5750 Oct 

-■ 6580 59.10 DOC 

Est. Sales _ _ Prev. 


Dec 6885 6835 6882 6&£7 

Feb 6470 65.10 6450 65J07 

Aar At>tK 62.92 

Jun £245 62JD0 6242 

Aua 61 JO 6185 6075 6130 

Oct 5940 6X00 5950 5935 

DtC 6065 6095 6045 61J0 

Prev. Soles 2X900 


^Prev. Day Ooen rnt. 67557 up 1843 

IJ^EEDER CATTLE (CME1 
44JOO lbs.- cents per lb. 

S' 7940 6050 Jan <740 <775 £785 <740 +43 

7170 6062 MOT 6050 69.10 6845 6855 +53 

:■ 71 J0 6040 Apr 6775 6&J5 6770 6X10 +40 

- 7030 6X10 May 6190 6635 6170 6485 +83 

1 6850 6110 AUB 6640 €739 6640 6780 +30 

;EsL Sales 1842 Prev. Sales LUO 

Prev. Dov Open Int. 1X191 upn 

HOGS (CME) 
v 13X000 cents per Ik 

5X85 3635 Dec 4840 4980 4887 4635 +75 

5047 3X10 Feb 4770 4787 4780 4745 +80 

4785 3612 Apr 4270 4X07 4150 4X85 +.15 

r 49 J5 3940 Jun 4485 4470 4435 44J5 +48 

. 4985 40 45 Jul 4425 4435 4485 4482 +47 

"• 5130 4&2S Auo 4X62 4X90 4345 4347 +82 

I- 41.10 3887 Oct 4X60 4QJ5 4040 4045 +30 

4950 3887 Dec 4185 4140 4L15 4140 +88 

r 4180 4D40 Fib 4180 4180 4180 4U5 +45 

f Est. Sales 6164 Prev. Sates 9363 
Lprev. Day Open Int. 2X142 off 1JK32 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 

3X000 lbX" cents peril). 

c - 7680 K.75 Feb 4485 6550 6612 65.10 +50 

7540 5X65 Mar 6682 6&J0 6487 65L30 +53 

' 7X60 5785 May 6535 6645 6550 6645 +50 

- 7600 5780 JUl 6530 6660 6555 6642 +J7 

’■ 7X15 5550 Aua 6345 6610 6X10 63J5 +48 

--Est. Sales X73B Prev. Sates 4394 

^ Prev. Day Open Int. 9,149 up 402 

j l Food 

\ ^COFFEE C (NYCSCE) 

• 1 37jooibs^ cents per lb. _ 

1 1 168J0 12935 Dec U95D 16540 15950 1658S +545 

^ 147J3 12850 Mar 16450 16856 16450 16856 +6D0 

76X00 13180 May 16780 17T45 16750 17145 +600 

■' . 17070 13550 Jul TO1.10 17657 171.10 17457 +4J0 

t l 17X90 13275 50P 17690 17786 17430 17786 +4J0 


6780 6230 May 6440 6440 6640 6X95 —.10 

£620 6385 Jul 6625 — 80 

6660 6150 Sep 6455 —.10 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 19857 

Prev. Day Open Int. 76466 off 1804 

ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

4X000 lbs.- cents per Ik 

7X60 4180 Dec 4610 4485 4610 4440 +30 

7450 4670 Jan 4480 +30 

Feb 4580 

7X60 42-90 Mar 4585 4575 4585 42L55 +30 

6675 4620 May 4640 4640 4640 4630 +30 

6345 4650 Jul 4785 +30 

5X10 4690 Sep 4780 +30 

49.10 4X95 DOC 4830 +.90 

Jan 4985 +.90 

Mar 5080 +.90 

5X35 4940 MOV 5075 +.90 

5030 50JO Jul 5150 +30 

5150 5150 SiP 52.15 5X15 5X15 5X25 +30 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 620 

Prev. Dov Open Int. 2855 oH2B 

SILVER (COMEX) 

5800 trey obl- cents per fray ax 

12308 5900 Dec 612J 6138 6078 6078 -8 

121 58 5958 Jan 6188 6188 6128 61X1 —8 

Fob 6165 

11928 £078 Mar 6268 6278 6205 6718 —18 

10488 6198 May 6360 6358 6285 6293 —18 

9458 6298 Jul 6428 64X5 6388 637 9 —18 

9408 6218 Sep 6508 6505 6498 6478 —18 

7998 6528 Dec 6658 6668 6588 6609 —18 

7898 6663 Jon 6658 —18 

7708 m3 Mar 6775 6775 6775 <754 —18 

7528 6028 May 6918 6918 6898 6854 — 18 

7468 6058 Jul 696.9 6963 6963 6953 —18 

7292 6495 Sep 7115 7U5 7108 70X9 —18 

Est. Sates Prev. Safes 37,100 

Prev. Day Open Int. 9X391 up 1212 


i industrials 

LUMBER (CM El 
130000 bd. ft.- S pot 1800 bd. ft. 

18780 13X60 Jot 14880 14880 1453D 14620 —1J0 

19580 1 39 J0 Mar 15X60 15X60 15L30 15ZJD -&Q 

17640 14520 May 15840 15SJD 15640 15730 —1.10 

18380 14958 Jul 16)50 16150 16O50 16220 +20 

17680 15X90 Sep 16X80 16X80 16380 16520 

1B1J0 15650 NOV 16X00 16480 16480 16430 —1.10 

16780 16X00 Jan 16050 —120 

Est. Sates 1887 Prev. Sates 1570 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 6534 up 171 

COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

50800 tbs.- cents per ttx. _ 

7X00 5751 Dec 6621 6045 5983 6043 —.17 

74J5 5X77 Mar 60J0 6070 6036 6032 — 84 

7000 5830 Mav 6080 6030 6050 6035 -50 

7085 5820 Jut 59JM 59J0 5847 5830 —42 

6550 5Z40 OfJ 5X50 5X50 5340 5X32 — 43 

5925 5035 Dec 5151 5140 5120 5150 —85 

6675 5235 Mar 5X12 +87 

May 5245 +.10 

Est. Sales 4500 Prev. Sate* 4248 
Prev. Day Open InL 23882 off 465 


HEATING OIL 
4X000 gal ; cents per eal 

CRUDE OIL 

1800 bbL; dollars per bbL 


Np open contracts. 


No open contracts. 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 


PLATINUM 

50 tray ox; dollars per trey ax 

PALLADIUM 

100 troy az; dollare per oz 


No open mfroctB. 


GOLD (COMEX) 

100 trey ox- donors per trov ax 
48950 3015D Dec 3Z780 32780 32X50 

Jot 

48550 30680 Feb 33180 33150 32680 

49680 a+TD Apr 33580 33X30 33050 

435JQ 3205D Jun 33530 33950 33580 

42840 33180 Aug 3050 3435D 34000 

395J0 33580 Oct 

39380 34X00 Dec 35X80 35380 34980 

36280 a 350 Feb 

38840 35580 Apr 

39450 36580 Jun 

38580 37150 Aug 

Oct 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 49.124 

Prev. Day Open lrif.136298 up 533 

I Financial 


—280 


395J0 

39380 

mm 



— X90 


— X90 


3HUBD —380 
37440 


20X80 175J0 DOC 20635 20450 20155 20240 — 155 

206-20 18130 Mar 20650 20650 20630 2048D —185 

208.10 18X90 JUfl 20X35 208J0 2D6.U 20655 —145 

20950 1B780 Sep 2D9JQ aOJO 207 JO 20X15 —145 

Est. Sales 56292 Prev. Sate* 58525 
Prev. Day Open InL 75,158 up 6335 

VALUE LfNI (KCBT) 
points an d cints 

a?85 188-60 Dec 20940 209JD 2 P6JQ 20755 —145 

21255 TO05D Mor ai50 71280 20980 a080 —185 

ai80 19780 Jun axio —180 

a6J5 20085 Sep aS30 —.95 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 4J05 

Prev. Day Open Int. 11840 off 2a 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYPE) 
points and cents 

117J0 101 JO Dec 117 JO 11755 11640 116J5 — J5 

11X90 1055D Mar 11980 11985 117J0 118.10 — 30 

120.70 70690 Jun 119J0 11950 11 595 11985 —45 

12040 108.10 500 12075 12075 12075 12040 — >60 

Est. Sates 8895 Prev.Sates 10861 
Prev. Day Open Jnt. 8590 up 257 

MAJOR MKT INDEX (CBT) 

pplntsand eights 

280ft 249% Dec 280 2n 277% 239 —ft 

2a 270% Jan 2aft 281ft 278ft 279% —ft 

282ft 271 Mar 290% 200ft 280ft 280ft —ft 

Est Sates Prev.Sates 482 

Prev. Dov Open InL 1545 up 48 


12850 

13180 

13X75 


■ 

Currency Options 


_. PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
'Opt ton A Straw 

-lUmtertrbro Price Calls— Loti P 

Dec Jo* Mar Dec Joe Mar 
9-B500 British PoviKfs*ceaVi per unfL 

U B Pound 1U 3XM s r r 

- T48J9B 130 1X70 r 1590 r 

■ 14X98 140 LTD r 080 r 

\ ' 14X98 T45 X80 r 550 030 

ft : 14 X% 150 055 150 XI 0 1JD 

14X98 155 r r IJO r 

W Y •seJiO Canadian DoUar^eeats per uair. 
ft x .ffionr 72 033 r r 018 

'V* 7X24 73 r r 032 056 

■ I . 7284 74 r r r r 

m^CJDI west German Merits cants par as It. 

¥ rrDMark 35 485 r 580 r 

St ir j980 36 XB0 r 4.12 r 

Jp G 39 M 37 284 292 337 r 

flb? y?M 38 184 1.90 244 001 

&& 3980 37 086 181 1J7 087 

SjS 40 024 063 183 040 

125891 French FranCN-lOths of a emt per uaJL 
E&FFnxtc 120 r r r r 

(SPBffi 125 r r 640 r 

IvtiA mS 130 r r X85 r 

WLBSSlJopnpoie Yrn TOCttn of a cent per unit. 
i^SrtSSi 39 1040 s r r 


Nov. 29 


IMM: 

a 

NYCSCE; 


COMEX? 

NYME: 


4944 

*44 

.*44 


"*TOV4M4 

ms® 



880 

698- 

610 

4J» 

3J03 

r 

184 

043 

Aap 


r 

r 

r 

140 

090 

039 

A 

rkfllt 

9 

a 




r 

r 

r 

445 

r 

104 

237 

1JS 

Mav 

iraait. 

9 


r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

030 

Awe 


UST. BILLS (IMM) /WOOOl 

si million- pis of TOO act I Route 

9X08 BSJ7 DOC 9X96 9X01 9X95 9258 +82 D J. F 

nsb 6bM Mar 9L97 9X11 9157 9XM +.11 Cam 

9236 8781 Jun 9XB2 *29\ 9X81 9251 +.11 t0m - 

9X56 8X00 Sep 9257 9X63 9XK 9X63 +.11 AAOOC 

9X86 8985 Dec 9230 9285 9X30 92JS +.12 p - pr 

91.96 8950 Mar 7286 9X07 9X05 9X07 +.13 

9149 9050 Jun 91 JB 9150 91J8 9182 +.14 

9147 9083 SOP 91S2 91-53 9L50 9155 +.13 

Est.5ates Prev.Sates 5L33A 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 39.585 off 313 

10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) I 

00800 pr|n-Pts8i32nds of TOO PCt l 

90-16 75-13 DOC 90-11 90-13 9M 90-7 -t* r „. 

89-18 75-14 MOT 89-13 89-16 894 89-9 +8 SHr. 

88- 18 7430 Jun 88-19 88-19 88-11 88-13 +8 SJS; 

87-24 80-7 SOP 87-19 +8 !“"■ 

B7-1 80-2 DOC B6-2B +8 y Vro . 

Est. Sates Prev.Sates 23J93 

Prev. Dov Open Int. 65481 UP 156 OOim: 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) NYME: 

(SjxS-aQtUMID’BtS & 32nds of 100 pet) KCBT: 

82 57-8 Dec BlrTO 81-25 81-16 »-a +12 NYFE: 

80-25 57-7 MOT 80-16 59-26 80-17 80-16 +12 

79-25 56-29 Jun 79-16 79-23 79-12 79-15 +11 - 

78-27 5649 Sep 78-21 78-W 78-14 78-17 +10 

78-2 5&2S Dec 77-29 77-29 77-20 77-22 +10 

77-0 5+27 MOT 77-2 77-3 76-28 76-30 +10 

76-20 63-12 Jun 76-10 76-12 76-7 76-9 +10 

76-5 • 63-4 Sep 75-25 75-25 75-19 7543 4+ 

75-24 62-34 Dec 7M +8 

74-24 67 Mar 74-22 +7 

74-4 66-25 Jun 7+9 +5 

Eti. Sales Prev.Sale53%890 

Prev. Day Open I ntj 17350 up 4444 

MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT) 

SI DOOx Indejc -pKS 0 32ndsof 100 P* 

89- 30 81-17 Dec 88-18 8B-20 88-14 88-19 +15 

89-1 804 Mar 87-18 87-20 87-11 87-17 +16 

87-22 TO Jun 06-13 +T6 i 

84-20 79-10 SOP 8S-T7 +17 

Eti. Sates Prev.Sates L950 

Prev. Day Open hit. UJM9 (ip 641 


—84 

+82 

+84 

+86 

+87 

+88 


—83 

+82 

+84 

+86 

+87 

+88 

+80 

+88 


I Commodity indexes 

Clou 

Moody's Clsd.f 

Reuters 1J07J0 

D_J. Futures 12134 

Com. Research Bureau. 227 JO 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 11 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Previous 

92140 f 
1,70780 
12186 
22680 


Market Guide 

Chicago Board of Trade 
Chicago Meramtne Exchange 
international Monetary Market 
Of Chicago Meceifllfl Exchange 
New York Cocoa, Sugar, Coffee E x cftongc 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Commodity Exchange* New Yerfc 
New York Merccmtire Exchmee 
Kansas City Board at Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


o 




74X3 


No oetton offered, 
r purchase price J. 


• r s 9 
Can open lev. 91U09 
Pel epee let. 168,078 


MTDEWIT (IMM) 
a minion- pfs of IOQpcI 

9X50 8SJ4 Dec 9X26 92J8 9123 9X24 

924* BL56 MOT 9132 9X32 9X30 9X31 

9X18 8643 Jun 9X13 

2-2 E-S SS? 9183 

8X34 Dec 9154 

9DJS aajo Mar 9\3S 

EstSaies Prev. Soles 45 

Prev. Day Open int. IJba off 74 

EURODOLLARS I IMM) 

ST mlllton-ptoof 100 pet. 

9X17 04JO Dec 91.99 9281 9156 91 S7 

92.14 06.1® Mar 91.98 9X01 91^ 9280 

Jun 9] J6 9IJH 

9141 87^ Sep 9149 9153 9149 91 JD 

J]f S3 B2£ SI-2 7 9, -25 9TJ7 

9180 8744 Mar 90.91 90.92 9X91 9095 

904J OT-M Jun 9058 9045 9058 9047 

9041 B9J9 _ 5eo 90L32 9032 op 77 9Q4Q 

Est Sales .Prev.Sales 31471 
Prov. Day Open int. 765870 UP&Z3B 

BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

S per pound- lo&lnt equals 308001 
1.4745 IJttOfl Dec 14805 74910 14800 14885 

14630 186B0 Mor 14605 14800 14680 I4TO 


+220 

+220 


of International Herald 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 

Trib ads work. 


32% 17% Terdyn 17 

U Hk Taam 40 16 
27ft 20% Tesorpf X16 9J 
40% 30% Texaco 380 9 J 22 
37ft 25ft TxABc 1-52 59 B 
44 25% TexCm 1-56 58 7 


17 653 22ft 

X6 512 11% 

9 J 64 23% 

9J 2234443 33ft 31% 

59 B 56 25% ! 

58 7 7» 27ft 




+ % 
+ % 
— % 
+ ft 
+ % 
+ % 
+ ft 

39 5ft tScElrf 22 M 8 l5? 34ft 5£ 3 S5— ft 

58% 52 TxETpf 580el05 45 55% 55% 55% + ft 

34ft 25 Tejtlnd 80b 28 12 217 TOft 29ft 30ft + ft 

ia% 86% Tex Inst 280 28190 790 IQZft 102% 102ft— ft 

6ft I Tex inf 1823 6% 5ft <%— % 

aft lift TexOGfi .18 LI 12 4*37 

34ft 28ft TxPoc M 13 72 TO 

aft 25ft Tex Util 252 84 7 5828 

4ft 2 Texfl In 12 

59ft 31 Textron 180 16 9 602 

28 24ft Thocfcpf 4.13 158 1 

72 TO ThrmEl 25 248 

43% 30ft ThmBot 136 34 TB 59 

20 15ft Thom In 48b 3J5 10 15 

18ft lift ThmMed 80 28 13 25 

24ft 18ft Thrifty 40 X6 14 212 

24 12% TktWtr .90 73 494 


— ft 
+ ft 

— % 
+ % 
— % 
+ ft 
— ft 

_ + % 

37ft 37ft — % 
TOft 19ft— ft 
Uft lift— ft 
24ft 18% Thrifty 40 28 14 212 23% 23 23ft 

24 12% Tktwtr .90 78 494 12ft 12ft 12ft— % 

10ft 5ft Tiger In 595 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 

61ft 40 rime 180 U 17 473 59ft 58ft 58ft— ft 

23% 14% Umplx . 18 1* 20% 20 29 — % 

5Bft » TlmcM L36 17 13 631 50% 49ft 49ft— % 
54ft aft Timken 180a 4857 9545 44ft 44ft + % 
9% 4ft Than _ 276 9 Oft 8ft— ft 

lift flft Titan pf 180 BJ 16 lift 11% 11%— % 

39ft 26ft TadShP 182 45 15 51 29ft 29 29ft + ft 

a% Uft Tokhins M 23 11 96 T7ft 17 17% 

a% 16ft TolEd&s 252011 J 6 243 2Tft 21% 21% + ft 
29ft 24ft TolEdpf 372 128 10 29 29 a + % 

30% 25 TolEdpf 3J5 1X9 1 29 29 29 

28ft 23% TolEdpf 347 124 71 27ft 27ft 27ft + ft 

33ft 28% TolEdpf 428 138 2 33 32ft 3Zft + ft 

20ft TOft TolEdpf 2.36 1X1 12 19% 19ft 19ft— ft 

30 9ft Tonka 8 .70 J 6 70S 29ft 28% 28ft— % 

£1*- 26 TootRol 48b J 15 29 56% 55% 56% + ft 

26*4 14ft Trchm % 80 25 11 1956 24ft 23% 24ft— % 


U2 101 Trchpf IQJSe 94 50 110% 110% 110%— ft 

19ft lift TaraCo 40 XI 11 45 79% 19 19ft 

5 1 Tosco 404 3ft 3% 3ft 

9ft 3ft Towle pf M 104 5 4% 4% 4% 

41% 25% Toy RUB _ 29 1100 37% 87ft 37ft + ft 

28% 14 Trocars 82 IJ 12 510 19 18ft IBft 

Uft 14ft Tram I n 614 U Uft 15 

72 8ft TWA 2681 aft 20 

16 13ft TWApf 225 74.9 62 15% U 

34 24ft Tronsm 188 58 VA 981 34ft 

22ft IBft Tran Inc 235 103 1 21% 

W 11% TARIIV 180 7J9 90 5 12ft 

21ft 15% TmCdonl.12 67 7 35 TOft 

57% 44 Trcnsco 699*113 51 4S 51 ft 

66ft 53 Tmsc pf 387 62 2 63 

53% 52 Tmsc pf 4J5 59 102 53ft 

24ft 19ft TranEx 2J6 118 175 19ft 

Uft 5ft Trtntscn 8 56 

25% 22 TrGPpf 280 9J 66 

13% 8% TrraOh 5 135 


i 29ft WaJCSv 80 18 18 38 3M 38ft 38ft + ft 

40 29ft Wdttjm 140 38 t 650 99ft 39ft 39ft 

53 40ft WoKJpf 180 38 2 53 53 53 

32ft 17% Wdmoo 88 28 15 S56 30ft 29ft 30% — ft 

36% 19ft WraCm 1095 34% 34% 34% + ft 

46ft Sft WorarL 156 34 14 3370 44 43% 43% — % 


EG Says Output Growth 
Slowed in 3d Quarter 

Roam 

BRUSSELS — Growth in industrial produc- 
tion in ibe European Cammnnity appears to 
have slowed in tbe third quarter or 1985 in 
contrast to the buoyant growth rates of the first 
half or the year, according to figur es released 
Friday. 

Tbe EC statistics agency, Eurostat, said out- 
put in the 10-member EG in the latest quarter 
had risen 33 percent from the third quarter of 
1984. 

But it said industrial production grew by only 
0.8 percent from the second quarter, and that - 
there was no growth at all compared with June. 
It said even this overall slight rise from figures 
for the previous three months masked static or 
negative growth in Britain, Italy, tbe Nether- 
lands and Ireland. 


NYSE Hi^is-Lows 


AMRCppf 

AfflExpron 


MEW HIGHS M> • • 
Advon Sy ti AdofagfepCA AlrPrad 



Auteur. - . 
tf BaxfTrpfB 




MSP 




EanlsBFil 


jBiji j/ L,.,- 


Dtongy W 
Equftaxl 


HtSSrTpfl 

N5Pw411pf| 
OGCfiPpfJ 
PMntNGs 

RQoSpfl 


HanJbn tnv 

llwrillLi 

nwnwg 
IBM 
Lilly Eli 


MlfEtf pfG 


DvrroCpAin Eosta 


IDPwJMpfl 

JarCUSISpf 

Matvcrm 




TMpf 


Nucor 
OhEd«TOf 
Pterlinc 
PrfmMMs 
RTE Carp 


PafrteStr I 
PttnflvBow 





; 

teoneCor 


toprMkt 


[tflpleli 



UnttlKum 
VFCorp 
WPanPwpf 


AHdSgnpfF 

GaartUod 

LearPvfcvp 




ITraraibyH 
Utdlwnipf 
Vtebayinlrt 
WnPocInd 


RobfhwConl 
S U wvSi W ml 
Stews JP 
SunTrtiBkn 
SVntecwl 

W”1 

UpftohaCal 
vamadolrie 


PttntyB212 
PubanPta wl 





Transcopf 
Unflivr NV 
USUFEtnc 




LLKERaryfty 

Tfdtwatr 


UNonEuifn 


Uft 15 
20ft 21 




1 21% 
5 12ft 
35 TOft 


13ft 8ft TmsOfl 5 135 

47ft 29ft Trwiwy 180 19 13 78 

43% 28% Tmvrid M 18 14 1078 

25ft 12% TwtowtA 76 

34ft 17% TvfldOf 100 6.1 6 

49% 34% Travter 204 L3 11 1116 

58ft 50ft Travpf 4.16 7 A 213 

2Bft 22% TriCon 38801X2 159 

30 27% TriCnpf 280 U 8 

32% 7ft Trialns JO 0 5 347 
37 23 TrfaPc 100 28 10 164 

54 31ft Tribute 84 10 18 258 

6ft 4 Trienfr 8l«lU 6 105 
7% 5ft Trlco J0 25 13 88 
T7ft 12ft Trlnty 80 30 93 


175 19ft 
56 “ 

66 
135 
78 


’1 Lilt ^ 


+ % 
+ ft 

— % 
+ % 
+ % 
+ % 
+ % 
+ % 






35ft 14ft TrttEng .10b 3 24 


8 + ft 

25% + ft 
11% lift + ft 
46% 45ft + ft 
40ft JOft + ft 
23 23% +1% 

31 33 —ft 

47ft 47ft 
53% 56 +% 

28ft 28ft 
27 27 

32ft 33 +ft 
36 36% + % 

52ft 52ft— ft 
4ft 4ft— % 
18 €04 6ft 6ft + ft 
93 14% 14 14 + % 

82x30ft 29% 30ft + ft 


43ft 31ft TucsEP 3J0O 68 ID 129 43ft 43 43ft + ft 


18% 9% Tultax 

20% 16 TwtnDl 
48ft 30 Tyco Lb 
17% 12ft Tviors 


•48 X5 17 TO 19ft 18ft 19ft + ft 


JO SJ0 14 
JO IJ 14 
•40 19 12 


1 18 18 18 
22 47% 46ft 46ft— 1ft 
37 13ft 13% 13% 




International 

Investozs 


59ft 39ft UAL 1J0 XI 
TOft 28% UAL pf 140 7J 
17ft 10ft UCCEL 
30 22ft UDCn 4JD 16J 
TOft 18ft UGl 204 9J 
11% 0% UNCRu 


1 J0 XI 3070 * 47ft 48% +lft 

240 79 490 30ft 29ft 30ft + ft 

18 65 15ft 15% 15ft + ft 

400 16J 9 119 24ft 24% 24ft 

204 9J 12 100 21ft 21ft 21%— ft 
39 9% 9ft 9% + % 

14 10% UR5 A0 15 13 73 11% lift lift 

39ft 25% U5FG 2J0 5J 2203 TOft 38 38 —1 

46% 26ft USGs 1J8 3J 7 714 45% 44ft 45 

19ft 12ft Uni Fret 30 1 J 15 8 16ft 16% 16ft + % 

135 84% UnINV 430t XI 14 269 138ft 137 138% +3ft 

41% 33% UCotw 1J4 4J 16 382 38% 37ft 37% — ft 


64% 32% UnCoril 140 54 4293 64 

7ft 4ft UnJonC 79 7 


61ft 63ft +lft 
6ft 6ft— ft 


Sift 15ft UnEMe 1J4 90 7 3600 20% 20ft 20ft— % 


34% 28% UnElpfMlDO 1X5 
28 21% UnElpf Z98 10J 


5 22ft 32 32 + ft 

44 27ft Uft 27ft— ft 



Cash Prices 


Commodity and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santa. |h 
PrJnfdam 64/30 38V%vd — 
Steel bHleffl (Pltt.Lten — 
Iran 2 Fdry. Phlla- tan 
Steel scrip No 1 hw Pitt. « 

Lead Spot, lb 

Cooper etecL. lb — . 

Tin (5troJti) f lb 

zinc E- St. L. Baste, lb - — 

Paiiadiuvn»az 

Silver n.Y„ oz 

Sour co; AP L 


Pbo.29 

Year 
Frl AflO 
12 1J8 

8J4 BJ9 


London 

Commodities 


: — i. 

Asian 

Commodities 


London Meials 


Abe. 29 


Abit 39 


Non. 39 


ALUMINUM 


21X88 

73-74 

18-19 


21 300 


N0 

535 

99-101 

CM. 


0A5 

144 

7025 


Dividends 


Company 


Samenot B ancorp 


Abe. 29 

par Amt Pay Rec 


_ .is nm 11-39 


INCREASED 

Statewide Banoora Q 35 


1-15 1X20 


SPECIAL 


Jnccf-B 


.10 12-30 12-12 


Hlgb Law Bid Ask Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

Sterling per metric toe 
DOC 140 T47J0 _ 

Mar TO1JB 15900 16000 16040 15SJQ 15900 

MOT 16400 16X60 16400 16440 16X60 U2JB 

Aug 18900 16700 16840 16840 16740 16800 

OCt 17400 17X40 17X20 17280 17240 17X00 

Volume: 1«155 lots of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric ton 
DOC 1420 1406 1413 1415 1427 1421 

MOT 1470 1456 1467 1468 1473 1474 

May 1491 1478 1480 1489 1493 1494 

J»V 1J0? 1497 1*785 IJ06 1309 1 310 

SOT 1*726 1J17 1J21 1*733 1*727 1373 

D8C 1*728 1,711 IJ17 1*719 1*718 1*720 

MOT 1*735 1,730 1*720 1J30 1*733 1*737 

Vtiumt: 3*760 late of 10 fora. 

COFFEE 

SOarUagper metric ten 
Nov 1425 1412 Exp. — 1427 1431 

Jan 1*894 1*045 1*890 1*894 1*899 1462 

Mar 1*930 1*880 1*925 14* 1498 1*900 

Mar 1*980 1*912 1*975 1*980 1*931 1*994 

Jtr 2*020 1*956 2015 2020 1468 1*970 

SiP 2047 1*995 2041 2050 1098 2080 

NOV 2025 2025 2060 2090 2000 2030 

Volume: 3493 lata of 5 fora 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
ULSpronq 





•65900 <6000 45300 <5600 
68140 <1200 67530 <7900 
R CATHODES (HtefiGradOl 


I Uft Low Settle Settle 

Dec KLT. N.T. 3TO J0 32600 

Feb N.T. KT. 33130 331 JO 

Mor, N.T. NX 33330 33330 

Volume: <0 tots of TOO oz. 

■ 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 


91740 91100 fSJQ 929 JO 
■00 93900 - 94650 - mS| 


•1800 90MQ 91000 


4f 


Steritag per m etric tea 


Dec 174J0 177-3 177 JO NICKEL 

17800 17900, 17840 179UM Stwf&tei 

Feb 179J0 18000 17900 11000 Soot 

Mot, TOO0O 18100 1EI00 .18100 Forward 

Volume: 0 lata. ' silve r 

SINGAPORERUEBER 


27100 810 27X25 27X50 


268000 809000 870000 Z7UL0O 
273900 273008 278600 276500 


nSlDeC- 15150 15250 

RSS1 JOT— 15400 15458 

HS2Dec 14850 14940 

RSSSOec. 14650 14750 
RS5 4 Dac_ 14250 U450 

RSSSDeC- 13758 13950 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 


15200 1 Soot 


40900 41000 41150 41X50 
41150 41250 4210Q 48400 


14900 ZINC - 

14700 StaBiteg per metric foa 

14400 SPOT . 48800 40500 39100 39800 

13900 Source: AP. 


GASOIL 

Merchants Bk N Y .10 PC 12-20 124 U J. doSars per metric toe 


USUAL 


Bramatea Ltd 
Canada Packers Ltd 
Dviex Ud 
Fluorocarbon Co 
Holmes (DH) Co 
Merchants Bk N Y 
ttorweseo me 
ocean Drlng & ExPl 
Sorneraet Bancorp 


.13 M 1-17 
J3 1-2 124 
05 12-20 12-13 


27000 

26500 

25900 

24900 


May 


07 1-31 1-15 Jun 
35 1-2 12-13 Jlv 


§ 35 12-19 124 

03 ft 12-20 124 

Q 35 2-1 1-13 

O .15 12-28 11-29 


23100 

23100 

23000 


tttt: 


26L5D 25700 




26073 26235 


vi- 

f i-. -1 - 4 1 i 


r^V<L 




.■fry: 


'V.i'f ■_ i 

.r 1 rTfrr^rrt 



f y, :kl 1 

ffOQp rwenn 


■y.ji*. 


227.5D 22700 

TTrrr: 



22900 227 J5 

23000 


flfl wm 



LfiiTteasuries 


Mnr _ 790 766 

API 760 700 

May 750 780 

Jly 740 770 

S«P 730 760 

Nov 738 780 

VMume: State of 2S tans. • 


Afee.jp 


M YtaU YtoM 


o-aRRoat* m-monffily; e-quarterlr/ n*mi- 
ana do! 

Source: UPt . 


CRUDE Of L (BRENT) 


S&P100 

index Ontic 


Options 


Afec. 29 


5MHt fmMmJi ~fS P«ft| 

teict Dte Jon Feb Atar bee Jan 

17D TTJk — - — 1/16 1/16 1/16 — 

P5 21 Z14, ^ - 1/16 106 1/16 - 

100 IS** I6=k la 1 -* 101 1/16 V| Vi 9/16 

185 IM im llli 12ft 1/16 7/14 0/14 13/16 

l« i 7 0 0ft Vs 15/1 

■<5 2 5SUn A- 5ft 1* 3ft 

230 ft 1ft T* 5ft 6ft 

35 '1 11/16 IBft 9ft W6 


Jaa N.T. N.T. 2831 2748 2855 2843 

Feb 28.10 2700 2739 2758 27 JO 2705 

Mot N.T. N.T. 2*00 2730 2605 2705 

API N.T. N.T. 2650 2758 2640 2700 

May N.T. N.T. 26.15 27.15 2500 2600 

JOT N.T. N.T. 24.10 27.10 2530 26J5 

Volume: 12 lata of 1000 barrels. 

Sources: Reuter* and LontionPetcDtovm Ex- 
change (gasoB, crude oil). 


DM futures 
Options 


Commocfities 


W Otter Yield 
108802 ivtt«. VJ4 


S NJL 


Pm/t A 
900 , # 


SUGAR 


Non 29 


A* are* I source: Marrw Lynch. 


I Mar 
I May 

'oa 

Dec 

Mar 


1*380 

1400 

1*440 

1*470 

taT. 

N_T. 


1*303 

1*384 

1*440 

1*470 

N.T. 

N-T. 


1*373 

1094 

1*433 

1*470 

1*485 

1*568 


1*374 —11 

1599 —11 

1444 —12 

1*474 — 12 

1*586 —14 
1*569 —11 


Eta ^ L«0to of 58 tera Prw. ochiol 
soles: 565 lota Open latarest: 27045 - 


Brazil’s Inflation Grew 

Sharply m NOT emK^j 


No*. 29 COCOA 


i 7 I Bft 

unm 4L sft 
ft lft 5+1 T* 

'1 11/16 10ft 1ft 


* I SWlft 2ft 
1^ Sft Sft 4ft 
Sft AH 1ft 7ft 
9ft Wk UU - 


Total cull voftma UM 
Total cofl mh tot.StaUD 
TaMM vMrat 97*457 
TUN Mf wrnt let. 72033ft 
todac: 

IM 19125 lorn 19149 
Source: CBOE. 


IJ6 251 
(LBS UV 
8.19 122 

002 082 
— 052 


19561—079 


Cota: wra.vw.40B 
Puts: WravoLLBR 

Sou r c e : CME. 


cob QJ3 ' 882 
002 NJL 004 
0J3 TJ2 L32 
U6 108 U1 


tat. 42333 
taL 37*633 


mas per IN tat RIO DH JANEIRO — Inflation 

IS HS IS hS m Bnafl 15 prom in Na- 

MT MS - v 9 toi3a ' “P fro™ 9 peroeat the pre- 

!lt: \iO ~ w«* roomh and 9.9 oerc«it 


sp ws ns as 

& K:T: KT: 13S 

Doc N.T. N-T. 1009 

^ . MT- . N.T. 1*915 

_EsL yoL: 41 tats of IS tans 


sates: 25 tataOnm i n teres t : 441 


— UftCtk 

— —5 

— —5 

— — S 

Prev. actual 


Hrmlka taSrib niic 

Reaching More Than aThind of a Million Readers 
in 164 Countries Around theVforid. 


Not Exp. — ■ — • ' ■ tlnch. 

Jan 2040 2040 — 3310 . +20 

Mor lisp. 240) XU* 2ut +T? 

“ov M.T. M.T. 2>US 34 SB * 17 

& ftl? JSL a,w *SJ '*■« 

Sgr ^ g£ iS TS 

Seurat: Bourse duComnmrx. 


: me nre- 

WOUS mouth and 9.9 percent in 
November 1984. aoconungto fut- 
ores released Friday 

pendent Getulio Vargas Fouuda- 

tKHt " • 

“A govenuueut measure <rf eon- 
pmier prices put montb-to-im^th 
uuatknm. November at 11 12Der 
oent^p from Octobers 9j6 'p*£nt 
^ from 1035 penaeui la Na^an- 
bor 1984; 





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y 


CHRISTMAS SHOPPING 


A Celebration in Swedish Style 


urcefor 

ml 




SPECIAL ARTS AND LEISURE GUIDE 



iT6StOISi Stocking Up on Children’s Books 

By Kathy Stephen CMdira aged , one ro 4 will enjoy the “Snow- the way to find the “laud of the draztms^ ] 


^ 

I i ^ 


-iUo 


sbaur 



* *55^ 



E 


Christmas. 


rniS^^i 0116 10 4 ?? 1 ^° y **“ “Snow, the way to find the “land of the dragons." It is 
man board books, created by Raymond Briggs, for ages 7 to 10 S 11 “ 

mth their dreamlike illustrations taken from the a™, ■ 


~ uwtcu uy ivaymona unggs, j or ages / to 10. 

DON — Parents searching for the sort 22 th “ fiir illustrations taken from the Airv child interested in flvino ur,m« th^n^ 

of books that children of an ages will Kte. Published IwHamish Hamil- fcyibe-Tlie Plane" by RaAlantoll amiMui 

beg to .read again and .pin 3ll have four books are available at £IJ0 each. ftadley. Fo/ag= £S5 

a good chance of findin g them this Two books have been published for the bene- has three-dimensional diagrams with movin g 
*■ Of African famine victims. “The Children's P 31 ^ *bai ilhistrate the mechanica] functional 

Knot K ft mlljvfiAn . J nf nlanac #l. A % ? - - _# i ■ _ _ . ® 


ujwi unaer 3 ; a nanasome ctunce of anthologies Margaret Thatcher. It is published by Walker £7 - 95 )- " “ 

m many families will not want to be without. Books and sells for £2.99. All profits go to the For those who want die best of many worlds, 
and two books brought out to benefit famine Famine in Africa AnoeaL “The MhaelerhiM " the “Puffin Children’* Tr««™ - 


\ ia 5 . 


f Jrtii 1 1 to discover what a book is feeds his family in time of famine, is published Selections include such classics as “Curing 

[ iKKHlfljJ t “Helen Grimy's Baby Box," which by Collins and seDs for £1.95. Proceeds go to George," “Babar the Elephant" and “Where the 

— ' Srar — ^ 

S’*' £^d^£ 9 ^?M 7 ^ >liAedbyW “ II “ dtfight Ms f ms with “Tie Giraffe and tS'ptS 8 10 12 ™ 


-Tj 

I ■ as 

. 1 .* - «■.', 

* ’ 

r\ 

m m 

.. tr ** . 

r ‘ ■■> i# . 


Stevenson with new illustrations by Michael 
Foreman (GoDancz, £6.95) and Golden Apples 
by Fiona Waters with illustrations by Alan 
Marks (Heinemann, £6.95). 

“The Nature of the Beast" by Janni Howker 
is an example of a growing fiend toward realism 
m children’s books. It has won two British 
(Continued on Page 15) 


Toys of Germany: Keeping Adults in Mind 


By Errol G. Rampersad 

S TOCKHOLM — “Chris tina* in Swe- 
den," an album of festive music by the 
Swedish tenor Jussi Bjorling, i^n* it all 

in song, from the joyous strains of tradi- 
tional carols to the robust refrains of merry- 
making rides in the Scandinavian snow. 

_ For Swedes, the Christinas season really be- 
gins with the Lueiafest on Dec. 13, a time for 
celebrating a festival of lights at the height of 
winter’s darkness. In schools and offices all over 
the country, the day begins with white-robed 
I maidens, a crown of lighted candles illuminaL- 
mg their heads, serving coffee, saffron buns and 
pepperkakor, a Scandinavian variety of ginger 
snaps. 

One of several legends has it that Santa Lucia, 
a patron saint associated with light, was burned 
at the stake in Italy. The red ribbon adorning 
the iilu nrin aied crown in today’s festivities is 
said to symbolize the bleeding saint. The LucLa- 
fest tradition goes back to Roman Catholic 
limes in Sweden, and its celebration on Dec. 13 
marks the approaching turnaround in the winter 
solstice and the beginning of lighter days. 

The Christmas celebration iiself takes place 
on Christmas Eve, with the ceremonial julglog, a 
warm wine laced with aquavit, a hpically Scan- 
dinavian dear liquor flavored with caraway 
seeds, whetting appetites for a hearty meal. 

Dinner, a truly family affair sometimes 
grouping three and four generations, begin* in 
late afternoon with hafisk, a son of dried cod 
that is reconstituted and served boiled. This is 
followed by an unending variety of siUar, mari- 
nated herrings, as well as gravadlax, the very 
Scand i n avian salmon dish washed down with 
beer and aquavit to a chorus of repeated skais. 

_ The fish course the n gives way to the piece de 
resistance, the Christmas ham devotedly pre- 
pared by the natron of the day and served with 
a sweetened mustard and thick slices of limpa 
an equally sweet-flavored bread. Assorted sau- 
sages, pSies and Swedish meatballs round off 
the main course before dessert. 

Dessert is the momem of suspense siound 
Chris tmas tables in Sweden — and not -simply 
because of the irresistible sweet rice porridge 1 


that is served. Tradition has it that the lucky 
. recipient of a hidden almond in one of the 
servings win be wed wi thin a year. 
t It is at this point that Santa Claus main-* hi* 
: entrance, a member of the family having already 
agreed days before to play the role of Jultomte. 
Not unusually, the gifts are a reflection of quali- 
ty buys made during the hectic pre-Christmas 
shopping days. . 

In Sweden, there are excellent buys in furs 
and jewelry, glassware, ceramics and china, art 
and handicrafts, as well as woolens and fine 
linens. 

The leading department stores, AhJens, Nor- 
diska Kompaniet (known as NK) and Pub, are 
open seven days a week and here one can find 
everything under one roof. Some clothing bou- 
tiques are also open on Sundays in the center of 
the city. 

In addition to crystal from Orrefors, Kosta 
and Boda, there is a wide selection of pieces 
from lesser-known glassworks in the SmAland 
district, including plate motifs and artist collec- 
tions, from tiny presentation pieces to massive 
crystal sculptures. 

Most of these can be found at the large 
department stores, all within triangular walking 
distance of each other, as well as at specialist 
shops along Kungsgatan, the main thorough- 
fare. Notable among these for its huge pta*s 
selection is Nordiska KristalL 

Biblioieksgatan. the pedestrian street, houses 
some of Stockholm’s best fashion boutiques and 
jewelry sLores. 

Kerstin Adolphson, on VasteriSnggatan in 
Gamla Stan, the old town, is noted for leather 
bags, hand-embroidered blouses and hand-knit- 
ted sweaters, with a wide selection from the 
other Nordic countries, Denmark, Norway Fin- 
laud and Iceland. 

For furs, notably the Saga variety in minif and 
[ox, the big three department stores offer a wide 
choice, including imports from other Nordic 
designers, including Denmark’s Birger Chris- , 
Hansen. For more intimate shopping, there are ! 
several boutiques, such as BagedahJs Pfilsatelje, [ 
at SkSrhoImens Centrum; Sophie Ericson’s. at j 
Master Samuelsgatan 45, and Amoress, at Nott- 
landsgatan 5. 


A more colorful line of coats is produced bv 
Trance. Among them are two- and three- tone 
pieces in beaver Iamb, shearling lamb, sheared 
rabbit and coyote. 

Sheepskin coats, for men and women, are 
available at Olof Nyiander, SveavSgen 126. 

Although the best buys in Stockholm are in 
mink furs, 90 percent of which come from farm- 
(Commued on Page 15) 


From Paris, 
Gourmet 
Treasures 
The Chefs Use 


By Herb Attschull 


Similar toys in their modem incarnations can 
be found in every German city, town and vH- 

• ■ * v* m ^ " 


i -•* j;? 

I** 





nr. TiDEirtM/- - r )age. There is still plenty or the past, with all the 

* > r-^V T URplBERG — Gennany is fam- ncsia igj a of a Staff teddy bear or a Kaeihe- 
r\l ous for making .ceramics anc ^prea- Kruse doll, bnt the emphasis this year is on the 
-'-'“'’"Oj \ non optxs. cuckoo clodcs and apple fu ture> pn computer-driven robots and space- 

- r _ , strudel, but what gift can the foreign „p ,» h untin g Jdts. 

^ j ttasder take home^fOT Christmas that is more ^ - l ; 0 f . — _ , A 

^ “Deutsch” th-r, 9 A big setter, for example, is Tomy Toys’ 40- 

n 006 a loy? . , centimeter-tall (15W-inch) OmniBOT. a begin- 

^Jtjerman craftsmen have been renowned for ner > s robot with his own memory banks who 

for thdr pnxlucts made for ialk& ^ beeps. It sells for 80 Deutsche marks 

j* - .-onidraQ and the young at bean That tradition ($31.40). 

•- ' ‘ 35^ nHlc ^ ®Bve today. The Nuremberg museum is a charming place 

.' * -.jOne leading toymakex goes back to Goethe’s to visit. On a stroll through the three stories of 
far a shot, dean definition of the idea playthings nestled in a 300-year-old building, it 
Germany’s toy industry. Goethe’s Devil, is easy to forget it is 1985. 

^ Ksnariced that “Theory, my friend. The museum was started by Lydia Bayer, a 

® amply dignjgL” The West German toy indus- longtime resident of this area of Franconia, 
^ ■* practical learning that will be of use j ro m her own coDection. The curator, Marian 

*„ 1 .- * ®dnlt life Faber, said 200,000 persons visited the museum 

^ ^ racetu attack on television viewing by an last year, many from the United Stales, attract- 

'^/'.■.American critic, Ne3 Postman, has found a d mostly by model trains and the marvdous 

audience among West German toy- miniature dishes, glassware and furniture in the 
Glotze, editor of the trade pa- dolls’ houses, all handmade. (Many of the items 
ry.rii ■ . 6 Market,” wrote recently that Mf- in the museum will be on dinjlay at the Cooper 

^ 1 ^^Wan was right to anme that television de- Hewitt Museum in New Yoit March 3 to May 

— Jv W’ L SlrninJ - • . K - .1. 1 \ J 


^ ,■ ■* ^^'hnagmia^t by making the whole world tj.) 

* * ■ Dosto«^!d and other 19th-century novelists 

on ihe other hand , Mr. Glotze said, are found the German toymakers intriguing charac- 
1 1 “for through toys the child is able to ters, fashioning fantastically complex models. 

I' ^-^l^^secret origin* of his imagination sponta- These artisans were descendants of the medieval 
1 - HsiTiB hi* own creativity." Nuremberg craftsmen. The museum’s curator 

■ t through the toy museum in Nurem- recall^ dat Louis XIV ordered fromNurem- 

. >. t . be® -JrTf .h^. nasi and of berg silversmuhs a complete army of toy sol- 

Oennan loynuken areitm a mmsiaHne 


_ -V ’i-.’ 


S^-toiir ihrourfi i be iov museum m Nurem- T ^ ««ui jwm- 

SS cffmTSramic ^ew of the past and of bag of W 


yOtters a pano rami c view of the past ana oi 
available in stores and shops jodayi 
|®idiqy soldiers, stuffed animals and moo- 
castles and zoos (including a Noah s 
^*4 dozens of paired animals), fire engines 
tats, even a Ferris whed and carousel, on 


, - r '\s ?. ' : ^Q'cvery thiTig seems to he in mouon. 


diers for Versailles. Russian czars and Hapstsug 
emperors were also customers of the local 
craftsmen. 

German toymakers are just as painstaking 
today, although their best efforts are no longer 
toy soldiers. There is. for rnstanr? Artur Fi- 


scher, founder of Fischer! echnik, the second- 

largest producer of building kits in West Ger- 
many. 

When Mr. Fischer was released from an 
American prisoner-of-war camp at the end of 
World War II, he returned home to Tumlingen, 
a Blade Forest village, with 40 marks in his 
pocket. When he retired at 65 last year, he was 
head of a company with an annual' turnover of 
more than 200 million marks, employing more 
than- 1,000 people and turning out products for 
100 countries. Mr. Fischer’s idea, like that of 
most German toymakers. was. as he says, “to 
promote scientific experiences for children that 
they can use later in life." 

Mr. Fischer's chief product is the buil ding Wr 
which origi n ated in Germany a hundred years 
ago. With the 1,880 different building blocks 
available in these kits, plus the gears, wiring and 
electromagnetic units, anything can be built 
from robots to gantry cranes to manv models of 
.cars or trucks. 

Robots are the latest thing. Through a newly 
created interface, personal computers can be 
□ooked into the kit’s system and programs writ- 
t«i Tor producing whatever structure is desired. 
The space-age remote guidance system makes 
□se of eight channels and two frequencies. The 
computer package is available for 600 marks. A 
beginner’s kit costs 250 marks. 

These items are wired for the European 220 - 

voli electrical system, but you can order them 

for use with the 1 10-volt American system. The 

same u tree of the ever-popu lar German model 
trains. 

Maeridin, the largest firm, put its first me- 
chanical train on display at the 189! Leipzig 
trade fair, and its first electric train six veers 
later. Maeridin is now selling 80 different loco- 

(Con tinned on Next Plage) 






i// 







■S£8S£ 


L» ■ ft' S. 1 ' • 

* 


if* 


UnMeGral 


^ By Katherine Knonr 

LSI ~ " 

^ ARJS — It would take a book as long as 
55 L*# “In Remembrance of Things Past" to 

i catalog what can be bought in Paris, at 
Christmas and at any other time. You 
3 can Cnd ihe best in clothes, jewelry, fexxt funii- 
lure, objets d’art— and find them in some of the 
. most elegant stores in the world, whether 
around the Madeleine, on ihe rue Rov&le or the 
i P e du Faubourg Sl Honore; around the Opera; 

“ in historic ndghborhoods like the Marais; on 
the quiet back streets erf the I 6 th arrondissemeni. 
or m the great department stores like the GaJer- 
ies Lafayette, the Prin temps and the Samari- 
® laine. 

* ^ twice as exciting in this season, when 

c Pans dresses up for Christmas. The great shop- 
h ping street s get strung overhead with stars and 
® sh i mm ering mirrored globes that cast moving 
'• curtains of light, and the trees are decorated 
t with liny lamps that make them look like lace. 
The department stores do up their windows 
and their facades, of course, but, in some ways, 
they c an not compete witn the displays of the 
p&iisrenes and charcuieries'. miraculously deco- 
rated ca k es, and the world’s most imaginative 
dishes of foie gras shaped like ducks or like pigs, 
stuffed coqwlles Si . Jacques, venison pales, and 
truffled sausages — everything gl ittering with 
gelie — and smoked salmon on ornate cutting 
platters, with silver tails. 

^ ou can find clothes, jewelry, furniture and 
so on in other great capitals, but what you will 
find nowhere else —in quality, variety and price 
— is Pans’s treasure trove of cooking equip- 
ment, and generally of the beautiful and nracii- 
cal objects that make up les arts de hi lable. 

While there are maay stores in many neigh- 
borhoods that specialize in beautiful tabic set- 
tings, china and crystal, the best place for the 
real niiry^gritty stuff to turn out a French meal 
is the Halles quarter — not surprisinglv. 

Although the central market has left Paris, 
and despite the lunar architecture that is slowly 
replacing it, the streets thaL radiate out from the 
center still specialize in supplying restaurants, 
food shops, and individuals, ui everything from 
butcher-block tables and super meat grinders 10 
exquisite chocolate molds. 

And while you look at the kitchen-equipment 
shops, you will pass food stoics that may not be 
as elegant as Fauchon and Hediard but dial sell 
both wholesale and to individuals, a bewildering 
array of dried mushrooms in huge bags, canned 
truffles and truffle juice, pales and preserves of 
all kinds, and spices. 

In the equipment stores, you can find koi-es 
for everything from slicing tomaic« to slicing 
prosciutto [o chopping Chinese duck; whid* of 
ail sizes and shapes; varied nozzles for decod- 
ing with cream or mayonnaise; string cuucrs fi*r 
Roquefort and other crumbly cheeses: pans for 
fish; copper pots, pans and fiasins of all shapes 
and sizes (careful: the good ones are thick cop- 
per with iron handles; pans of thin. ^iinv copper 
with brass handles are .strictly for shnwt: udi- 
iron pans and cookers; pans with holo- 

(Continued on Next Page! 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-PECEMBER 1, 


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CHRISTMAS SHOPPING 




Finding Antiques in Barcelona 


By Mary Peirson Kennedy 

B ARCELONA — “To travel across 
Spain and finally reach Barcelona is 
like drinking a respectable red wine 
and finishing up with a bottle of 
champagne.” is how James Michener summed 
up Barcelona in his book, “Iberia." Barcelona 
can be many things to many people, but to an 
antique lover it is an especially exciting place. In 
the last 10 years, it has become what many 
experts consider the best place to buy antiques 
in Europe- With mere than 350 dealers, the 
selection is enormous. 

And for the Christmas shopper, Spain has the 
added advantage of offering a leisurely pace free 
of the frenzied, pre-December 25th crowds 
found elsewhere, since Spaniards do not ex- 
change gifts until Jan. 6, or Epiphany, the day 
the Three Wise Men made their way toward 
Bethlehem. 

“Barcelona? There is no doubt about it, they 
have the most superior antiques in Europe these 
days, the quality is so good and the prices are so 
modi better than anywhere else,” said Liny 
Ruddy, a doll collector from New York, over 
coffee at the charming, tum-of-the-ccniury- 
style cafe at the Centro de Anticuarios on Barce- 
lona’s elegant Paseo de Gracia. 

Opened in 1983. this modem confection of 
marble, glass and greenery houses 73 antique 
dealers and is the brainchild of Manuel Ramos, 
a genial yo ung rnan who is known by collectors 
as the “doll king."’ 

“Yes," he said modestly. “I have a few dolls. 


His three shops in the center — booth Nos. 32. 
33 and 34 — have not only dolls but all sorts of 
collector's items from Art Deco and An Nou- 
veau to antique jewelry. They offer the services 
of a “doll hospital" as well. 

After stamps. Mis. Ruddy said, dolls are the 
largest collector’s item in the world. 

According to Mr. Ramos; the biggest seller 
today in antiques is Art Deco and Art Nouveau 
(turn of the century to the mid- 1930s), and 
Barcelona is full of these items. At the Antique 
Center (55-57 Paseo de Gracia, Manuel Ramos, 
td: 215-9463). almost every dealer has stocked 
these decorative pieces. 

At the shop of Marion Pla (Nos. 70-71, tel: 
216-0198) there are Tiffany-style glass vases 
that are made in Catalonia and sell fa- around 

55.000 pesetas (S347). 

But if curved brass lamps with tulip-shaped 

shades and mirrors with Salome draped around 
them (at L’ Aurora, No. 2, tel: 215-8364) are not 
to your taste, perhaps the delicate filigreed gold 
earrings in the same shop win be. They start at 

13.000 pesetas and go as high as 160,000 pesetas. 
Besides these, there arefme silver-service pieces, 
starling at 12,000 pesetas, at Paco Rebes (No. 
73, tel: 216-0691) or 16th-century and 17th- 
century musical instruments. 

Sotheby’s of London opened up at this center 
in November, making Barcelona a truly interna- 
tional center. Since the Catalans have always 
been collectors of fine dungs, Barcelona’s shops 
boast not only authentic Spanish pieces, but 
also c hina, glass and furniture from ail over the 
world. 


Bui the Paseo de Gracia is not the only place 
to buy antiques in Barcelona- Every Thursday 
from 9AM. to 2 PJW. in the Plaza Nova in from 
of the great Gothic cathedral of the city. 20 to 25 
dealers gather under brown and yellow awnings 
to display their wares. 

The area around the cathedral is the old part 
of the city and is known as the Banio Gotico. 
Just to the right of the cathe dral are two of the 
famous “antique streets” — Calle Paja and 
Calls Baftos Nuevos — where there are nothing 
but antique shops jammed up against each oth- 
er. 

Across the way at No. 23, Angd Bailie (tel: 
301-5884) specializes in old books, posters, 
prints and etchings starting at 300 pesetas. He 
has a particularly interesting collection of old 
fashion plates bom die middle of the 19th 
century to the 1930s. 

At 21 Paja, Francisco Duch (tel: 302-3630) 

specializes in converting oil lamps to electricity, 
both table and hanging ones, and they can be 
used with American light bulbs. They range 
from 13,000 to 20,000 pesetas. He also has an 
attractive selection of Ait Deco lamp s starting 
at 14,000 pesetas. 

Don’t pass up the L'Arca de l’Avia, at 20 
Banos Nuevos (tel: 302-1598). Carmen Visas, 
the owner, has a 'storeful of delicate lace and 
cotton and linen nightgowns of the last century, 
starting at 6,000 pesetas. There are also wedding 
gowns and dresses, linen sheets (35,000 pesetas), 
baptismal clothes, tablecloths and museum 
pieces of 15th-century lace bed ornaments and 
bridal veils that sell for 1 million pesetas. 





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From Paris, Treasures 
The Gourmet Chefs Use 

(Continued From Page 13) 

bottom for roasting chestnuts; escargot plates, holders and forks: choco- 
late molds for makin g fish. eggs. Santa Clauses: a wide variety of dishes 
and glasses for all purposes; oven-proof earthenware bowls for onion 
*cup; earthenware terrines. with animal-shaped lids: round ladles, oval 
ladies, wooden and metal ladles: even cast-iron reflector panels for 
fireplaces. 

For your friends who wax nostalgic about French cafes, you can buy 
the real thing in cafe coffee cups — white with ridges, green with golden 
edges — wine pitchers, salt -pep per- and- mustard sets, butter molds, even 
plastic tags with the pictures of sandwiches that decorate all cafe 
windows. 

There are lots of restaurant-supply shops in Les Halles, and you will no 
doubt discover your own favorites. Here are ours: 

Perhaps the most famous is Dehillerin. IS. rue CoquQli&re, ler, Tel: 42- 
36-53-13. There is nothing elegant about this store. It is cramped, dusty, 
poorly laid out and largely reminiscent of an old quincaillerie. where tiny, 
specialized utensils are stored in wooden drawers stacked up to the high 
ceiling. The people who wait on you range from surly to outspokenly 
unpleasant. But it is a gold mine for heavy-duty equipment, specialized 
utensils and restaurant/ cafe dish ware. If they don't have it, they' can 
order iL 

La Bovida. 36, rue Montmartre, ler. Tel: 42-36-09-99 and 42-60-79-51. 
is another store devoted mostly to basic cooking equipment that also 
stocks plates, glasses, etc. 

A somewhat fancier store that still deals in basic equipment is A 

Simon. 36. rue Etienne Marcel, 


IPaMPIIS 



Perfumes - Cosmetics ■ Leather Goods 
Fashion Accessories 

Dim’ FREE - 40% 

13 Avenue de ( Opera PARIS 
297.43.SS 


rri 


Vetches 

and 

Jewels 



PARIS 


11. rueTranchet 
75008 Paris 
m 42.65.50.13 


rue 

2eme. Tel: 42-33-71-65. They sell a 
range of dishes and elegant wine 
glasses. 

Other big stores in the area spe- 
cializing in restaurant supplies are 
HorecoL 32. rue Etienne Marcel, 
2eme. 42-36-15-15: La Corpo. 19, 
rue Montmartre. Zeme. Tel: 42-33* 
S 1-35; and M.O.R.A., 13, rue 
Montmartre, ler. Tel: 45-03-19-24. 

For beautiful things, one of the 
loveliest stores in the area is Au 
Bain Marie, 20, roe Herold, ler, 
Tel: 42-60-94-55. L sells new and 
old objects for the table — silver- 
ware. fabulous glasses, old charcoal 
cookers with porcelain tiles, seltzer 
bottles, tablecloths, cozies and lots 
of cookbooks. 

For modem glasses, tableware 



German Toys: Keeping Adults in MBiidl 


(Continued From Page 13) 
motives and 256 railroad cars in computer- 
run systems that permit each car to move 
independently. 

A typical Maerklin train set can be bought 
for about 180 marks, bnt special offers are 
available. La some shops, the power system, 
locomotive and two coaches are being sold 
for as little as 9S marks. 

Of coarse, there are plenty of antique mod- 
els around, too. Germans are so enamored of 
model trains that Frankfurt is now holding 
an annual model train fair in November. At 
this year’s fair, 1 1 German firms had locomo- 
tives on exhibit, while 13 showed coaches. 

The Nuremberg museum is not the only 
toy collection in West Germany. Equally 
popular are the stuffed animals at the Marga- 
ret Steiff museum in the Black Forest village 
of Giengen and the model trains at the 
Maerklin museum in Goppingen. 

All the mus eums and most of the makers of 
toys are located in the same gingerbread pan 
of the country — in the foothills of the Alps, 
the Blade Forest, the Bavarian woods and 
romantic Franconia. This is the land of Snow 
White and Hansel and Gretd, the teddy' bear 
'and, reputedly, the world's first doll that was 
meant to look like a child. 

There are dozens of Steiff teddy bears, 
ranging from the original cuddly fellow of 
1907 to today’s fire-resistant, synthetic-fabric 
models. They come in white, yeOow. faram^l 
and honev. 

P 

RofinMeCfoi 


Steiff many other stuffed animals: 
The o riginal still the Steiff trademark, is a 
white elephant. The basic teddy sells from 20 
marks but rfpiiras of the original cost up to 
1,000 maftre New this year are the blond 
Teddy Petsy (65 marks to* 135 marks) and the 
white Passport Bear (155 marks). 

Then there is the Kaethe-Kruse ddL This 
year’s production is sold out, but orders for 
1986 are bring taken, said the company's 
owner, Heinrich Adler, rite founder's son-in- 
law. Kruse, who lived in the Bavarian town of 
Donauworth, was tired of seeing dolls made 
of porcelain and celluloid, all looking like 
miniature adults. So, in 1910, she created for 
her children a doll of soft felt with the face of 
a child. 

Persuaded that others might like to see hex 
product, she exhibited it at a fair for original 
design in Berlin. Representatives of FA.O. 
Schwartz, the New York toy store, were there, 
and they ordered 150 erf the dolls. Kruse went 
into production, and today the Dooauw&rfh 
company produces 18,000 a year, all hand- 
made. The cost: between 200 and 600 marks. 

Lego, which began producing building kits 
in Denmark 50 years ago, has the largest 
turnover in West Germany' Fischer is sec- 
ond Among the most diversified companies 
in the country is Ravensbmrg, situated in 
another Black Forest town. It makes a third 


being the oldest “toy*' in the world" 



Outside West Oawso% 
best knows for its puzzfc^TbeitaaB- 

est of these conranttaghi pieces, Sac 

rangesuptoa 


a replica of 
of Saim Antfcoajv 
anyone can 



do. not 



ptished), it 
square yards). 

Inbetwe 
many sizes and 
castles, -yfeinfifo and.tifo- 

braied pamtings. Tbe standard l^BQ-piece 
puzzle seHs for 23 xaarkl The 12j000-piece 
puzzle casts 148 mate . ' 

newx go wrong by 

heading for a 


f 


V 


the shape of aloaf, is thcfrAtfrite. Then, there 
is the weflrknawn Nfaaribttg . Lnbkucben 
(gingerbread) wtticb domes in . many shapes. 
smaHand huge, often- htctadSng honey, rai- 
sins or marzipan. Itcan be stored for months. 

For the traveler with a&eady beavtiy 

yariesy 

ten 

ity : 

markets 



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In Switzerland, Creche Figures and Crystal Sculptures 


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By Mavis Guinard 


G' 


goes into baking homemade cook- at Gerechtigkeitsgasse 73, Vitrine are many animal puzzles and Jean-Qamfe de Crousaz. Gs the - on tan! Ora deep bowl once used to 

ies or making presents with one's mixes high-quality objects, old and Mario Poster’s miniature villages more practical side, Michelle Deth- separate cream could hold a huge 

own hands. The children bring new. There are more Christmas- with bark roofs, costing 40 to 145 ureas has tamed out some nicely salad (45 francs). 

ENEVA — Switzerland, home from school lumpy clay ash- tree balls, in jumbo size and in- francs, or his tiny houses at 6J50 speckled vinegar jars - (from 1 17 Lucerne pottery is bordered in 
with its rich tradition of trays, macrame belts and enamel triguingly colored, by Rudolf francs. francs). bine with fruits painted on the 

individual craftsman- cuff links. Mojzisek for 25 francs. The stem- Kurt Naefs Celia construction In Lausanne, Art Suisse^ 8 me cream background. Stoppered 

, , — ship and respect for tk* ware is superb — champagne flute blocks can be assembled in a van-- Enning, has a selection of Swiss kirsch bottles are 68 francs. Jam 

? eCP J I ^ aLl . Ve handicraft items, gives the Christ- items p ^ func^o^ glasses made by Philip Baldwin ety of ways (90 francs). The sales- pottery from many areas. Berner jars arc 16 francs. From Rheinf ei- 


ther are meant for Oberiand pieces. from the villages den come fun figures of children 
it that 


ping center. It also sells some furai- hand-carved wooden toys. At 
ture and linens. Christmastime, a great deal of care 



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mm: 


Boutiques 

NINA RICCI 

Paris 

39, Avenue MONTAIGNE 
17, Rue FRANCOIS-! 


Cf 


Ready to Wear - Shopping - Week-End 
Sweaters. Pullovers , Scarves. Fashion Accessories, 
Perfumes , Leather Bags, Costume Jewelry. Gifts 
FAMOUS DEPARTMENT “ ROMANTIC NIGHT- WEAR 

OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY (from 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.) 
AND SATURDAY (dosed from 1 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.) 


grown-ups of Hebnberg or Steffisburghave a and modem vases with leaf im- 
Maybe. For an dark brown background with fig- prints (45 francs). 

lass! ' TOttew^textiles 1 o/^ewdrv is 75 francs. The two glass- adult, there is the m add e ni ng 64- tires and flowers. Thedeep (fishes Down the street, at Enning 6, 

City boutiques put the accent on blowers met wMe perfecting thdr graPaidope cube at a cost of 38 meant lo smw or to bdiio- Iwoyomgyewdmhnvebniltupa 

modern d«iensT the more tradi- ^ m Orrefors, Sweden. In their francs. tatoes, are ideal to display mm or reputation fornonpreaousjewdiy 

tional are displayed in Swiss craft Swiss aldier I they make crystal Hrimatwerk dolls start at 29.50 nuts. They cost 40 francs. Squat af fine design. A plastic earring 

outlets J glasses and sanded glass sculpftzres. francs, for a featureless cuddly one mifl: jugs, at 30 francs, could Jiave edited, by the Musee des Arts Dd- 

Nearby, at No. 79, tbe newly in bright colors, and rise to 145 many uses. All these pieces are coratifs comes in M a ri k or bright 

Between Bern's docktower and — 

the bear pit, the Heimatwerk. 


a-i. 


Kramgasse 61, features Christmas 
cliche figures by Brienz wood- 
carvers. A lamb is 20 Swiss francs 
(just under $10); a shepherd is 86 
francs. Since each piece is individ- 
ually carved, collectors pay ™«1i 
attention to the expressions. There 
are satiny wooden bowls and la- 
dles, trays and planers. To avoid 
the tedious wrapping of small gifts, 
fine woodchjp boxes come in all 


In Geneva’s old town is the Centre d’Artisanat Genevois, where 
graduates of the city’s School of Applied Arts show jewelry and 
untradhional pottery . . „ There are silver neckpieces from 350 francs 
to 450 francs and silver rings for 180 francs. 


colors for 25 francs. 

On the way to the station, just of f 
bustling rue du Petit Ch&ie, is Midi 
Pile, roe du Midi 12, a new gallery 
regularly showing contemporary 
pottery and weaving. 

Ursula S (aider’s unusual enam- 
eled vases and boxes are shot with 
of silver and gold (from 85 
i). A white teapot with six 
it doll casually fired twice, handpaint^d and caps for 220 francs by Marie Saurer „ 



opened Rathans Galeae has glass francs for a pleasant doll cast 

etched with the simplest flower gar- dressed in a knitted jumpsnh and glazed. . V seems an degant gift. There are 

lands Win- glasses are 16 francs, blouse. All the dothes can be un- A ceramist from Than : social- also weaves that are subtle in hue 
sizes, dome are decorated witn shot 6 francs. Initials or buttoned, taken off and washed, izes in a deep hocey-colotMback- and soft to the touch — thick pull- 

nosegays and landscapes. other motifs can be ordoed. On a Even more enchandngly dressed- ground. Gruy&re vases feature the overs from 250 francs, a poncho at 

On nearby shelves, crystal table fniicwood table, set for a small din- dolls are 315 francs. The boy is in emblem of a crane ,(40, ftancs), . 350 francs, deep-fringed shawls at 

pi.nc in to c h JL nlaies ner party, each glass stood on a corduroy overalls and a wool while the intexestiiig-ramaropf an 250 francs or an unlined wrap- 

gobtetavases or candlesticksfccnS small pewter dish. sweater, the g^ri is in a pinafore and old Bulle patter is spkkfcd black around coat at 700 francs, 

from Samen or HergiswiL To deco- At No. 15, among other clever is hugging a small bear, 
rare the Christmas tree are band- handmade toys, Irma Sitter shows a For a serious collector, the most 
made balls of gla^s as iridescent as wooden horse with a rope tail and prized doll has a Bernese costume 
soap bubbles. Small ones cost 5 mane as well as a wooden stall with with a coif of fine black lace and 
francs: medium ones, 730 francs, a striped awning to play store. real silver jewelry. It costs 2,700 
The store will mail them within The basement of the Hei- francs. Between these prices, wett- 
Switzerland. matwerk is another treasure house drcssed, equally irresistible dolls 

Further along the same arcades, of sturdy, well-designed toys. There are at Bcmbqae Chez Ruth, Mpser- 

strasse 12, equipped with oldtime 


. i 


! 5 1 



CONTRIBUTORS 

HERB ALTSCHULL is a journalist based in West Germany. 

MAVIS GUINARD is a journalist based in Switzerland who 
specializes in cultural affairs. ■ 

MADELINE LEE, a New York journalist with an interest in 
culture, an and history, is a contributor to Travel & Leisure, The 
Christian Science Monitor, the Chicago Tribune and the Boston 
Globe. 

MARY PEIRSON KENNEDY, a freelance writer based in Spain, 
“talizes in cultural affairs. She is a regular contributor to Reader s 
u. Lookout monthly nutg^irine and The Boston Herald. 

KATHERINE KNORR is cultural and leisure editor of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 

ROLUN MCGRAIL. a New York artist who has been living, in 
Paris for the past four years, contributes to numerous French, British 
and U.S publications including Vogue Homines, Mane-Chure, Tne 
New York Times, United Features Syndicate, Timeout and Esquire 
Magazine, She is currently working on films and the stage set ting for a 
music video clip. 

ERROL (L RAMPERSAD is on the editorial staff of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 

KATHY STEPHEN, a London-based journalist specializing in 
cultural affairs, is a contributor to The Christian Science Monitor and 
BBC World Service. 


accessories like trickles or bamboo 

rocking chairs. 

In Geneva's old town is the Cen- 
tre d’Artisanat Geaevois at Gran- 
d’rue 26, where graduates of the 
city's School of Applied Arts show 
their jewelry and un traditional pot- 
tery. Jean-Fran^cns Perena has bar- 
baric, cwflrmg neckpieces selling 
from 800 to 1,200 francs, and 
chunky rings priced at around 500 
francs. In a quieter mood, there are 
stiver neckpieces by other crafts- 
men from 350 francs to 450 francs 
and silver ring? for 180 francs. 
Gaines and toys will be shown in 
December. ■ 

At the branch -at 2 Avenue du 
Mail are batik lampshades in a 
large range or colors by Cordelia 
Babefc The shades that sell from 50 
francs to 300 francs (drum size) can 
be teamed with the many pdtteiy 
bases around the store.-. Gdieva l 
potters shape gjts stoneware, along 
modern lines. Some of thdr rigua. h 
tares for unusual- .pieces are Phi- J 
lippe Lamberey, Edouard Chapat ’ 
laz, Isabelle Amoudruz or 


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PjTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATCHDAT-SVXPAY. .NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1. 


1985 


Page I; 


CHRISTMAS SHOPPING i 






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> i (Continued From Page „ 

a nwriw-rf'-oUier lesser- 
qualitv bargains in Karakul " 

lamb from the island 


ationin the Swedish Style 

1*13) Onfcton^MA 1 hwu> _v _ ^ . _ ■ i i < - .. ^ 


Outstanding buys are also available in Hassdblad 


~U' 


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jXSite i^ aagaaNg: 

£gK£?S HanmgflUn, „d 


A ** 0 '" c and beyond lie eronsivc selection o( “ne»” bn»s, VAT^recdX'.S 
there are quahty antiques available at Stockholm’- -- - ■ 


of ike 
non- 


f«^5 yarn in 

^^mnortoFnUrad,inS^lS^^ 


Scandinavians. When you make a purchase. \ou should 
VAT rcca P t > wf,Jch endues yyj. to d cash refund for' ifce 
auction houses: Stockholm Aucrioi &ita^^ote^ K‘ JJSi® * e **» >« *«* » the 

tan 10, m the GaUerian complex, and Bukcwsti’s. W&hrm j ' - ^ ^ ijrpon of 

dorfsgatan $. P ikJ *■ V>dhrm ‘ Jfpanur^ you go to the VAT refund counter, casih recog. 

, „ ”™ e by the symbol of a rectangle with vrilcw and blue 

Shops are usually open between 9.30 A.M. and 6 P.M. , 

weekdays and 930 AM. to 2 P.M. on Saturday. The lamer L Unhie ^ .«* » most other European cjusiries, pur- 
Mparonem stores are also open from 10 A.M."io 4 P.M. on cha f es m and " ro: 20 oe oper.ee ur.:«! presenutioD 


/ r 


££*49 


f / 


nvm of Lapland. A mat mow and a nw'nSStoS 


captured from 
from the rode and shapedio 


\ mat g? 

characterize the nuggets washeof 

! , ffirmopY with nature. 

^Amoog the designs are Fireworks, neckfoc* ■ ■ ’ 

whneand yellow gold with diamSs ^Tk oSl ^ 7 
Juham Lmnovaara; Venezia necklace. p ^ mmn . 

ring and Rialto < ****& Lnca 



there is the Bussolajsoid watch, with 


1 Havgaard. For 
matching ring and cu£f 


a gold wa 
links, by Bj6m WecfcstrCm. 

rary pewtenrare. Svenskt Term, anSnLe’JTT? 1 ?”^ 
OTd^don and gifts from ft™**™ 

upholstery fabrics, handpimled materials, taSSjfS 


Sundays. 

The main shopping streets in Stockholm are Hamngauw, 
Biblioieksgaian, Kungsgatan and Drotang gata n 

□nJTiSS? Staa ’ lhc „ oW lown - *«y »« VasterlSnggatan 
and OsteiUaggaian, Store Nygatan and Lilia Nygatan. 

suS^^V« b ^fi u ? e * 91 ** «“*« located m the 

ail reachable by bus or the uamdbana subway sjstem. 

The main NK store, ai the corner of Hamngaum and 
Kegenngsgaran, provides round- ihe-dock telephone shop- 


— crescmauoD 

at the customs counter for the refund. U ihr purchases are 

bang checked with your iuggaae. they shouic’ be showr. at 
uie information desk before checking in f^r vour flight. 
Failure to do so could deprive you cf any refunds, since 

proof of purchase is based on poshest of the merchandise. 

A word of advice: If your purchase; are many — and 
particularly fragile — it is better ie ha\e ihem shipped. In 
this case, the tax refund will effset the shmpmc and insur- 
ance costs, not to m ention the nasties you save % ourself bv 
not being burdened mUj excess luaszs ar.d rising costs 
.An unusual bargain gift tha: car. De' purchased in Sweden 


pmg at 762-S800 or 762-8470 during opening hours, EnoT^h “ ai Christmas or'anv other time of -J:?-, ear — U a dur, -free 
is widely spoken in Sweden. Moreover, many establishnSts ^ or Volvo. ~ ' - I<X 


catering 

ho are 

Most credit cards and travelers’ checks are accepted 


throughout the country. Proof of identity may be 


lace. 



i 


II 



... . The savings, at current rnces. easily cover the 

catering 80 mtenauonal clientele have staff members 0051 £SHh ig to Sweden to take cehierv. 

wno are fluent m the major European languages. Volvo, which has its tourist and diplomatic sales denan- 

ment at its plant in Tors Linda, outside of Go ten bora, could 
arrange pickup at most large Swedish cities 
Saab has a large outlet in the nerth of Stockholm, on the 
from Arlanda AirporL Bom ccnpciiics live q ualif i ed 
lechniaans on hand to advise American catomsn on U.S. 
DOT and EPA conversions. The Swedish fusions plaie is 
valid for one year, and unernazzonai insurance for ihai 
period could also he obtained at ihi poim cf purchase. 


even for small purchases. Foreign currency and^oreim 
checks are not accepted, although exceptions may sometimes 
if these are From other ^ n dinav ian commies. 

The shipping office in the major department stores will 
send packages all over the world. The value-added, or 


New York 



By Madeline Lee 


s Museum Boutiques Mix Culture and Shopping 

writes under water and in extreme earrin« .if •>« u T _ .l i , A J. 


Kch.- MCj’i 


N 


EW YORK — Christ- 
mas time on Fifth Ave- 

SI n£f Lord W nf; Michael KaUk'sTterl 

Taylor’s sio^r-relling wi^do^ *f* lver f d j k footmark is S40 
with the cold ’air warmed bv the Xl - of m 4 brass is ^i 7 - 30 - 

smeU of roasted chestnuts and ring- c 5 pbnd ^ ‘hermos bv 

ing with Salvation Annv bells. ^ “ S34^0. 

Street vendors spread'their wares P°P IJ i ar ‘ tem * s a 561 of garden 
on carpets and freezing music stu- 1001 casl “ ooe P iece of 

dents play Bach and Handel while i 111 ? 13 ? 11 * 211 °- v (’ l "i 11 no1 ™si or 
pedestrians pause to listen. Masses ^' en , ’ , ^d the garden seis- 
of evergreens crowd around tne b\' bakai { 1926), SIS. A pjocke: 


temperatures- it ewte I ;«h. eamc ^ s ° r . - 3de ; racks of clothing — beaded, rair- 

SS.SSdM: r-SrS^sTTo 

Jon by Clare Cingher are S9.50. A S50 " 1 V1 " "" Jackets, \esis. serapes, 

travel mirror in black mai finish, by . f 15 ~J Tor ^ Guatemala, Mexico. 

fin vi' i iw.i M . J 



The Corar-Hivin Museum O China and Japan, 520 io 

A. — ^ ( jp ■*% • 


East 9is: Swe:i jeature an 
Indian baraar !hi.^ i inser, a tribute 
to Indian anisans. .A!sc for sale are 
objects from pre^ous stacks: a 
cloisonne eg£. STf ii:h siand: um- 
brellas of batik dost S4S: and 
hand-painted English Battersea 
boxes, eiizal on conper. 5S5 
S200. ' 


to 



BAiMcGnd 


»Cli 


? ?• 

n 




ti 


e? 



3 In France, the Direction Nation- In Switzerland, Terre des shows all over town. Indian caned wooden birds are S 13. A 

al ,da Secours Populaire, 9 rue Homines, Postal Account Number a PP eared in museum bou- * l 5 with the letters of the 

v: ;Froissard, 75003, P^ris, and Saint 10-11504. Maupas 49, 1004 Lau- n Si!? s ' alphabet on wood is S 15. Bonneted 

... j- 2 iyipmH.de PauL 5 rue Pre aux sanne. * ’ The sleek brass-and-smoked Atmsh^ dolls are exquisite, one 

— ^.itGacs, 75007, Paris, o rganize aid . _ , giass emporium at the Metropoli- dressed as a bride, another in cali- 

, -^.■^ndfeiveactivities for needy fam- nr , n ^ w , eai ** J 211 Street and Fifth Avenue) c 0 ®- a t S45. (Amish dolls have no 

. ...•^railis and elderly people during the O SLerma ™sgatan 71, 10_4«Stock- is perhaps the largest museum shop Features.) More personable, chunk - 
. ^Mteseason. 5 - speciaJ assist f nce *n the world. Since 1S70, the Met- ier ca^co dolls are 525.95. Small 

. s -Inltiurin, CMdren in Need Ap- » e “ oljd ^- v sea ® n ’ the ropolitan has had a small workshop houses in a varietv of shapes are 

" -I:! pea&EO. 200, Liverpool, JL69 wSj? on the premises where artists copy hand-caived and painted, SI 1 to 

■■ ." '3SW;«d the National Children's ° 435 ’m^ S tockholm. speciftcaHy masterpieces from the collections. S23. 

■ HqpR^c/o John Gray Director of gives ° ciujdren * The museum operates smaller bou- All museum shops sell calendars. 

v AA^cy, g5 Highbury Park, Lon- In New York. The New York uques at the Ooisiers Uptow-n, at postcards, posters, paper and 
" '~iZt raise funds for chil- Times’ Neediest Cases Fund, fjacys Herald Square and at the hoo“, butthe Asia Sodetv at 70ih 

: P.O.B. 5193, General Post Office, M“U>wm Library (40th Street and Stre « and Park Avenue has one of 

- Germany, the Aktion- New YorL N.Y.. 100S7, provides 5“™ Aventre )> with a slightly ™ «st collections of books on all 1 

• .i ^":-Sprprfdndi Franz- Lohe-Slrasse aid to children and families in New c ™ eren * ^phasis. aspects of soaety in Asia. Music of 

*■ : : V.I7.5300 Bonn 1. aids crippled chil- York City and its surrounding dis- Most popular items are copies of A ^ u | ^^^ies pbys in the shop 
■I’-'- .^.^Dd youth. Contributions may tncl. Woridvision InternationaL M Egyptian cat and a Chi- 311 “ 15 a T a ““^ on records and 
:-;-,hc-SEBt tq Akdon-Sorgenkind, Ac- 919 West Huntington Drive, Mon- ne sc,duck box. The seated and im- casseLt f s i° r SS.98 to S 10.98. Lan- 
j:. T Wffli’NunibCT 240, Cologne. rovia, California, focuses on aid to P 3 ® 51 ^ cat is $19.50 in polymer ® lessons on cassettes with a 
v InjSpauL .the Children's Home, victims of the Colombian disaster, re® 11 - 5 inches tall (12.8 centime- * >0< “ 216 priced at 514.95. 

^ tanfythe Brothers of San Juan de Also, the American Red Cross, at te rs), and S975 in bronze, 12*4 inch- . 0 Hjects for sale m museum bou- 
D** San Juan de Dios, Carretera 510 West 42d Street, New York, fs tan. The 1 8th-ceniiny ivory duck “« *Jten one-of-a-kind. R^ 


SI 50. 

A stuffed tjTannosaurus is SS. 
and a tnceratops. SS. A stegosaurus 
egg of plush zips open for the baby 
»teg to emerge, 525. 

The Brooklyn Museum has its 
own subway stop, the Eastern 
Parkway station, about 35 minutes 
from Times Square. The Gallery 
Shop is one of the best museum 
boutiques in the city, with antiques 
from all over the world, as well as 
new things. Recently, a heavy cop- 

People wait in line to aet into the “ D - ,OCK . C3m , es hi&h-priced rugs P 2 S&- * ««hct. j:gsaw puzzle of P" P ,al e from Turkey was selling 
small store run bv the Museum of j - runmure f rom die colleciion m antique \\c:lc mar is 550. A f° r SI5. At the other end of the 
Ameri can Folk Art and the manr designed by Marcel Brener. Alvar Gutenberg Dress, readv to sca ^ e was a P 3 ** of sealed emperor 

Christmas tree orodaims m all thnr AaIl °* 1 Juan Gris *** Le Corbusier assemble, S45, and it works, empress dolls, at $900; smaller 
the holidays have come again to amODg oLhers - P lais Chnsjsasuac ornaments ??« range down to SI 39. .An early 

New York City In quite a different mood is the [ rom - est Genrar -- V « Priced JOUi-caiiiiiy ivyodai mirror stand 

Shopping in museums has be- A^can Folk An Museum shop frora 53 lc S7 ‘ ““ camx chesl <*** S500. 

come the thing to do in New York, j 125 West 55lh Street, with two S 0 w™? « die efrec: of an Ori- From Mexico, a dull black ce- 

and. these shops have blossomed. £ lber one at 55 West 53d bazaarat the Museum of Nat- ramie bird is 55; petal-shaped can- 
Whai began as racks of posters and Strect md another off Fifth Ave- uraJ History that it is a temptation dleholders in the same black mat 
postcards has, in most museums, ?“V n RockefeiJer Plaza mall 10 targair. wifi Lhe clerks. The finish are S10215. These are a pieas- 
expanded to include everything Iead i J] S » the skating rink. Here shop, near the ■ th Street entrance ant contrasuo the brightly painted 

from reproductions of ancient “Pi PPPnal creations, plus a few J usl Centrz! Park West, has gleaming musicians, 124 inches 

Egyptian bronzes to a “space pen” ^ pieces, based on the American 
that writes on the moon. So sue- tradition. The ubiquitous 

cessful have these shops become ^eart motif appears in a handmade 
that annexes are opening up in WTeaIfa of twigs, for 340, nod a 
more convenient sites Mid town. heavy copper heart-shaped tray is 
Avoiding crowds becomes a R^-P^ted wooden hearts 
game, and the adept go to museums ma 7 c mce ornaments at 54.25: 
to do their shopping. The festivities “ d0 raelal l . em P ]at « used in raak- 
began eariy this year when an exhi- ^ U ^ LS - “ heart and animal 
bidon called “India!” opened at sha pes, S4.25; cookie cutters, 57 JO, 
the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 311 d a siting horse, S 10. 
a burst of gold and silk, followed by Paperweights in the form of 

chrmrc efl mier * nn^i T_^ j! Wmwri.- «... t I V A 


arc 540. A gold-cooled leather mag- pick up a pre-Columbian piece for 
azine cover from Morocco is 550. 

S 7 ?- Handmade in Brooklyn by Bui Lhe lust for possessions that 
Aiba Johnson, a cuili is S75. has driven us since caravans and 
The trouble with gifts like these ships first set out for loot is’ alive 

is that it is jusi too hard io give and flourishing in 
them away. The time has passed, today. 


museum shops 


Getting the Catalogs and Brochures 


Museum members get sub- 
stantial discounts, and profii 
from the shops goes to support 
museum activities. It is not nec- 
cswn to pay a museum en- 
trance fee to visit the boutiques. 
To order catalogs write to the 
Metropolitan Museum of An. 
255. Grade Station. New York, 
N.Y.. 1002S fjl.OGj or to the 
Museum of Modem An. Publi- 
cations. Sales and Service, New 
York. N.Y., 10019 fSC.OOi. A 
subscription, Christmas 1985 


io them at 725 Park Avenue. 
New York. N.Y., 10021. Also 
free is a brief brochure from the 
Museum of .American Folk An 
at 55 West 53d Street, New , 
York, N.Y., 10019, Attention: ! 
Mail Order. 

The Brooklyn Museum's cat- 
alog can be ordered from the 
museum at 200 Eastern Park- 
way, Brooklyn, N.Y., i 1238. It 
is also free. 

In New York City, call the 
museums for shop hours, which 


and spring J 9 $ 6 . j s 32.00. Asia do not always coinride with 
society s catalog is free: write miis-emn hours. 


, ^fcphigas 08034, Barcelona. 


r ra-M 



N.Y., 10036. 


on Books 


CHILZ 



box is reproduced for S24/ Japa- the Asia Society had a solid- 

nese netsuke are SI 7.50 to S21, and carv ' e d wooden animaL 8 inches 
a Han Dynasty horse, 5 inches tail, ^ OT S8: a sandalwood bowl, 
is $30. alw S8; a small brass box, S5: and 

Two young women stood gazing t* 05165 inlaid with bone or brass 
at the sad-faced head of the Virgin rrora S9 lo SI 1. 

(Continued From Page 13) land” in an exclusive form, there is from Michelangelo’s “Pieti” The At the north end of the lobbv 

"■jwanfe for its frank derriction of ^ c ^ 1 * mce F HU1 ^ ias ® a ^Py ’ s Ppccd at $150. another boutique displays antique 

■ ‘ 'tetffEris nf ^ tion with the Tenmel drawmgs. The Museum of Modem Art and conwmporarv lawnier norce- 

_ .® K *s of imcmplovnicol wov- Firsl . editioo Sealrta Potter (53d Street jtist TOt of Fifth Ave- lain, trood MdbtS A^S- 

books are expected to fetch £800 to pue) sells copies of functional ob- century Imari bowl (flawed) was 
£1,200 each. jects. many from its design eolke- $45. Indian rouge pots with lids 

Also to be auctioned are moving uon. One of these is the Bauhaus from the 18th century were S1G0 

picture books by the I9lh-cennuy chess set by Josef Han wig (1923k and small carved ivory perfume 

master Lothar Meggendorfer for whose pieces symbolize* their move- bottles, spherical with a pointed 

£200 to £300 and a Bestelmder Toy mem on the board, for SI 20, board stopper, were $20 
Catalog from 1805 that is expected extra. A pen designed by Paul Fish- Much in demand are the Indian 
to sell for £5,000 to £7,500. er for use in gravity-free space also bracelets of papier-mache, S3, and 


a list of recom- 
books for children of all 
2j®\* available by mail outside 
f^-^The address is P.O. Box 
.^®don SW8 4AU. 

J * those who want something 
a sale of chfldren’s books, 
the 19th century, will 
at Sotheby's, Bloomfield 

™ygW.9«raio. 

a n^ny t mtroduoe 


. unemployment 

'..i:]®®!® 2 story about the pursuit of 
. .<1 ‘mysterious beast in the moors. 

■ ;.t~ 8 a but powerful book 
and np (Julia MacRae 
,-^£6^5). 

IheGood Book Guide to ChD- 



ABce in Wonder- 



fcatar jewels 
^oves-Briefcoses 

TRAVB. GOODS 
and 

fm ■ m . 

perfume 

TROfS 

rti^ Paris 9 
42.66.46.48 

parking 
CAU MARTIN 


— wfFWiV::” 


h.' 
















-k. * •>* -•* 1 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-StTNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER I, 19S5 




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Tobies include the notionwide prices 
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I ’i #7 The Associated Press 


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$J? CI«e 

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33 13% 
72 2% 

42 141* 

74 » 

46 10% 

4 114k 
98 26% 
68 161* 

34 38% 
25 29 

43 3% 

16 33 

343 ’Vh 


1 29 


135 5V* 

2 19% 


3 5W 

11 11% 


128 3*3a 
72 26’* 
11 11% 
24 121% 
728 143* 
a 35%> 
715 14 


«b 

4% 

1% 

113b 

1% 

27% 

8% 

17% 

1% 

Ufa 

2% 

141* 

5% 

low 

11% 

26 

T5 7 * 

38% 

2K 

3% 

3% 

H 

39 

5% 

191* 

aw 

11% 

36 

26% 

111* 

11% 

14% 

35% 

13% 


4b 

4% + V% 
1%— Vb 
11%— % 

27V* + lb 
8% + W 
12% 

2 + Vb 

13% 

»— W 
14V* + H 
5%— <4 
101% + Vk 
11% 

26Vi 

16 - % 
38% + % 
29 — % 
37k 

3% fc 

29 

71b 

51* + Va 
19% + % 
aw + w 
livs— Vm 
36% + % 
26% + W 
11H + Vk 
12Vi + % 
14% + Yf 
354b- W 
13% + Vb 


LSB 

LaBorg 

LoPni 

Lndmk M 

Loser 

LotPP 3jDD 

LvePti 

LOtl left S jSO 

LdsurT 

LfttFPh JO 

UfeRst 

UHld 

Laaga 

Lor*GP 

Lorfrvu- 

Lumn J8 

LundYE • 

Lurie 

Lvdar 

LvnCSs JO 


' 13 

1J T1 


n 1% 
8 m 

23 

42 2M 
ITS 11 
10 17% 
76 fi 


8 

1J 10 


20 

21 

S 17 
11 
9 

1.9 11 


4 34% 

43 Tt* 
11 30 
15 1% 
80 3’A 

34 U* 
8 21 
91 4T*i 
ZA 17% 
9 13Vb 

44 11% 
46 1416 

119 im 


1% 1% 
1% 1% 
4U 4% 
Wb 201* 
104b HPb 
T7Vz I7V% 
74. 71* 

34% 34% 
7Vb 7% 


+ % 


■h U 

— % 


— Yb 
-l- to 
+ % 
9- V* 


2*% 29% 
1% » 


1% 1VS 

20% 21 


— to 


+ % 


411* 411* 

17% 17% 


12% 13to 
life life 


+ fe 
— U 


14to 14fe 

low 10% 


+ to 
— fe 


49 % a k<jn un 


44 4 ron pr 

5W A -or 1 4C 

1% Amoal 
4% Andal 
1% AndJcu 
o Andrea 
% Anoel wt 

tflAfiglo c 
3 ArgoPf 
S’*j Arwv 
3’k Armtm 
4% Armel s 
7^-3 Arrow A 
leia Arundi 
61* Asmro 
9\m ft&tre*. 

% Ashoic 
7 1 * As I rot Pf 
’* AMsC'M 
2 Audlotr 
ML AuSlmt n 
13% Avondl 


J4b 1.7 70 

IJSelTJ 

70 

.<>0e 1.7 
.«0e 7.0 


19 4la 
A 53% 
50 ^ 

5 14 
319 14% 


— '* 


— W 


jQ6 7.0 ri 
24 


28 4--5I 

14 54% 
4 44 J b 
2 4% 


— Va 

+■ % 


■+■ ’-4 

+ l* 


.72 7.9 18 


11 1 
27 r 


— % 

1,. 


1 -* 

28 3fe 


JO 11 1 

14 

JO Ll 61 
12 


19 4"» 

14 91? 


— ( i 

I — i,4 


5 19% 
133 9% 


■+■ % 
— 's 


1J0 14.0 


63 14 
433 1% 


1 ir* 

109 \ 

e 2% 

76 12’* 


+ Vtf 

+ Va 


JU 42 15 3 17% 


DWG 

DamEA 

DamEB 

Damson 

Damspf 

DamSPV 

DataPd 

Dclajrm 

DefLab 

DclVol 

Delmed 

Desanl 

Device 

DvnRsn 

Dlca A 

Dioa B 

DioSth * 

Dieicon 

Dil ira 

DlUrd wi 

Diodes 

DirAcIn 

DomeP 

DmcF w| 

Damir 5 

Ducom 

DupMk s 

DurT&l 

Dvr Id 


Mt U 
ZOO 22.9 
2-30 307 


230 11-6 
3.75 14L6 
.16 1.1 


32 rj rr 

1.74 10.7 9 


U0 73J 


2 17 


38 

30 17 37 
M 2.4 11 
MtbZJ 16 
J7e 1J8 12 


| Im 

8W 

7^4 

4% 

life 

25’^i 

14V: 

8% 

38% 

I6ica 

9 

13 r * 

9 

6% 

fi'-- 

26% 

1U 

72 

36’* 

T<* 

6 

2% 

% 

14% 

291* 

18% 

14% 

14% 


IV*— to 
B%— to 
71* 

4% + to 

27'* + '• 
2S% 

14% +■ V* 
0v s + to 
JP 

16’tf + to 

to + S 

9 + U 

13'* + fe 

9 

7 + W 

6% + T * 
25% — to 
Ilk — to 

72% +n* 
36% + % 
3«* — to 
6Vb + fa 

% — to 

14% 

29% 

18% 

14% — to 
15 


lOto 
21 to 
6V* 
Jto 
10% 
29% 
28'b 
2Vk 
39fe 
43 

41% 

17to 

10'A 

171* 

15% 

9% 

ITVi 

3to 

9 

1% 

5% 

3% 

77 

4to 

2Tb 

22% 

25 

12 

3% 

19% 

0% 

6to 

181* 

13U, 

25% 

22to 

9% 


fito HAL 
life HUBC 
4 vs Halifax 
m Katmf., 
6i* Hampli 


' lfc n 
J8a 13 13 
U4e J 


61* Hampli ,93ti0? 0 
21% Hndym n JSe 2 9 

13% Honrrds JO 1.9 16 
% Harver 

rito Hoslirs .15 J 10 
26% Hasbrof loo 4.9 
28W HFastJng JOo 1 J 10 
12% Himcrs -381 27 8 

5to HlttlOi 


6% HltftEx 18 

11% HetthM M 4-4 10 
A?b HetnWr J0e 14 9 

10 He! nick .10 J 9 
1% Hetdor 58 

3> HOllont 
to HelmR 

3% HersftO 64 

1% Hlndrl 

9fe HiPtron 16 

1% Hof man 

7 HolJvCp J4 !J 7 
151* HmeGn_ 

22 Hmlnspf 195 13.0 
14% Harm I s Jd 13 12 
6 HmHor 
% HrnH wt 

13% HotlPtv 1-80 9J 17 
3% HotlPwt 
3 fe HOUOT -76el7.9 
11% HdvnE 11 

8to HawJin J5e 11 7 

16fe HubelBS J6 3J 13 
17% HudGn -40 1 J 18 
6'* HusKy 9 -36 5.1 


10 8to 
6 20 % 

4 S»n 
553 2to 

10 8% 
46 26% 
46 27% 
£8 1% 
661 35% 
3 40fe 
1 31 fe 
32 I4fe 
37 81* 

23 9% 

5 14to 

3 8% 

6 15% 
5 Z 

161 3% 


103 % 

191 4% 


14 2% 

1 14% 

4 2% 


-7£el7.9 


J5e 11 


-36 5.1 


92 m* 

532 257b 
112 22% 
55 25 

’S Tt 

60 I9to 
7 6% 

290 4% 

14 16% 
7 I2to 
20 23% 
4 22% 
278 7% 


8fe 

20% 

5% 

2% 

6% 

26% 

26% 

1% 

35to 

40fe 

31fe 

141* 

8% 

9% 

14% 

8fe 

15 

2 

4Vs 

2fe 

14% 

2% 

20% 

24% 

22V* 

24% 

7Vk 

% 

19 

6% 

4to 

16% 

12 

23% 
22 fe 
7 


Bto + to 
20% t to 
5%— to 
Z%— to 
8% + to 
Ufa 

26% — % 

1% 

35%— % 
40to 
31 fe 

14U»— to 

*** , 
9fe— % 

74 to + % 
BV* + fe 
15 — fe 
2 

3% B_ 

% + to 

4 1 .* — % 

2fe 

1 4PM, — fe 
2%— to 
20%— to 
25 — % 
22% — lb 
24% — fe 
7to 

%— to 
19 — to 
6% 

4 Vi- 
169* 

12 — fe 
23% — to 
22% + % 
7 


14V* 

2% 

9ft 

12% 

4% 

15W 

20% 

2fe 

13% 

15to 

24% 

6 

22V* 

26% 

63 

21% 

7% 

22V* 
20 
23 V* 
16% 
26% 
7% 
7fe 
86% 
2Z% 
10 
25% 

20to 

27% 

8to 

12 

33% 

9to 

18 

16% 

MW 

78% 

22V: 

4% 

19% 

10 

2to 

fr% 

9% 

13fe 


12% MCO Hd 
TV* MCO Rs 
7% MSA 
6% MSI Dt 
2% M5R 
7% MacGrg 
8to MacScft 
v Maerad 

4 Moo Bk 
8% Motor* 0 
lOto Monad 
2V* MriftOf 

Slfe AAormof 

t£% Mrshin 
7 Jto MortPr 
10% Moslnd 

5 Matte 
9% MefRsh 
8% MOtSd 
Ifife Matrix s 
Bfe Mav Eng 
15 Mayflw 
1% Me Roe A 
fto McRae B 


-8% 92 


•16 J8 56 


2J3S 10J 

24 

IP 

JDq S 6 
20 

.12 1J0 10 


63 Medio 
15 Media 
5% MercSL 
8% MetPro 
11 Atotexs 
lfllb MctroC 
3fe McftGn 
6% MldAm 
17% Midmd 
7!b MiswtW 
12% MtdhIE 
9% MonMg 
101* MoaoB 
101* MogOA 
15% MMedn 
1% MtoRt Wt 
16% MtffGIh 
8 MtoPl n 
1 Martm 
3 MtMcd 
4% MovleL 

lto MUTPln 
to Muse wt 
9% Mvwln 


1J0 15J 
AQ 3A 10 
JOt 5J 12 
11 

1.16 1J 18 
■24 1.1 18 
Jttr Z3 6 


J 24 
9 


41 

6 

•20 23 12 
^0 L3 9 
2A 19 93 

J4 1J 29 
40 17 10 
JO 1.1 16 
■20 1J 16 
15 


136 SJt 
1-00 llj 


JBb 24 10 


66 14fe 
82 1% 
20 Pto 
38 Bfe 
41 2fe 
104 11% 

70 20 % 

35 1 

15 71% 

15 17to 
11 11% 
40 4ft 
4 22 
88 19% 
31 56% 

16 21% 
49 5% 
48 12 
53 15% 
136 21fe 
40 9ft 
44 22fe 

7 3% 

3 3% 

4 86% 
33 21tt 
28 B% 

9 19% 
9 15 

4 26% 

170 3% 

71 8ft 
2 29ft 

13 m 

478 14% 
2 16U 
26 in* 
876 18% 
5P 21 

5 1% 
121 17% 
145 8ft 

17 IV* 
43 6% 

2 7fe 

1 tS 

25 Sb 
17 11% 


U 14 
1% 1ft 


9ft 9ft 
8% 8ft 


— ft 


2% 2% 
lift 11% 


"*** 
lift 1Kb 
17% 11% 
17% lift 
4% 4% 
22 22 
19ft 19ft 
54% 56% 
21% 21% 
5% 5% 
11% 71% 
15ft 15ft ■ 
20ft 20ft ■ 
9% 9 to 
22 22 % 
3% 3% 
3% 3% 
B6fe 86% 
21ft 21ft 

8% 8to 

19ft 19% 
14% 15 
26ft 26ft 
3% 3% 
8% 8% 
29% 29% 
8ft 0% 
T4fe 14% 
16 16fe 
17% lHb 
18 18ft 
20ft 21 
1% 1% 
17% I74i 

8% m 

i% 1% 


+ % 


-% 
+ % 
+ % 


5% » 
4JV* 23% 

n% i5to 
2ft % 

26% l?te 

13% TVb 
2% % 
30 MVb 
13% 11- 

17% 9% 

4%. 2ft 
% Ml 
9to 6ft 
11 7% 

16% U% 
2% T% 
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7 2V= 

7% 2% 

5% ^ 
16V* 10V* 
10ft 6% 
20ft 15% 
16V* 121* 
4% 2ft 
6% 3 

13V* 7% 

17ft 12% 
24ft 13 
8% 6% 
1% ft 
im t% 
4% 3ft 
22% 19ft 
23% 15ft 
221* 16% 
34% 30ft 
8ft 7* 


PovFan 

PenEM 

PcnTr 

FECp 

PenRE s 

Penril 

Pentron 

PeriniC 

Pdlni 1 . 

Pprirti pf 

PerLw^ 

PetLwt 

PatLOPf 

PetLeof 

PelLe Bf 

PM1LD 

PlcoPd 

Pier T wf 

P'otirSY 

prtwva 

prtDsm 

Pizza Tn 

PIcrDg 

pivGms 

PlkR B 

POPflGv 

Ports vs 

PasllPr 

Pratt LS 

Pratt Rd 

Premia 

PmRB 

Praird 

ProeCT 

PrvEns 

POtptC 

Pot gfE 

PvnioG 


SI 

JO 26 10 
1J0 AJ tt 
JSrS OD 
TJ0 7J P 
JO 17375 


n 3 J! 

42 77 ft 
108 % 
3 24W 

6 7V* 


3ft 3% 

». — s 


24 24 — ft 

7ft 7ft 
2ft Vk ■ 

26% 27 +■ % 

t2fe 12% 4- ft 
12 12 

wS 9W— fe 
13% 13% - £ 
1% 1%— ft 

3ft 3% — ft 
6% 6% + to 
Jto 3% 

iS t®— s 

& * 
7S=Mi lS»k -J* 

3 3 — <* 

3’t. 3* + n 
in 1W 

TPM 23£ + % 

' h H + * 
10% 10% — fe 
3% 3% ^ T 
l«% 19ft + to 
23ft 23to— % 
2iv* 21ft + ft 
= 33^ + 1% 


SO XD 


21* W 
i * 


M M 1* 
1.10 M 


6 T» 

7 W 


1 J5 02 
12B ZU 
3J3 240 
J641A9 2 


16 7fe 
6 9% 


13 % 


35 3Vi 
26 6% 


jim io 
J0i m 20 
J36 1.0 

JO 

.16 1JD 14 


U 3% 
20 5ft 


36 

JO M 13 

J8I 


1J00 94 ^4 

UQ BJ 13 
1J4 7.1 9 

234 11.1 
437 133 


5 13% 

12 7% 

26 17% 
153 15% 

A 3% 

25 M% 

10 23fe 

6 M 
21 % 
0 

1 3% 

27 19% 

2 73* 
2 21to 

2 ^ 

7 4% 


— ■*% 
•vr* 
+ ft 
+ to 

— to 
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— % 
— % 
+ to 


10% 5% Quet>03 -W 33 *5 &A- W flto + % 


+ % 
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— to 
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— to 
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— % 
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— fe 
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7to 7fe 

n ie 

n% lift 


+ to 
— to 


7fe SWt 
5ft 3% 
4ft fe 
20% 15% 
20 15 

lfe to 

14% 11 
I0fe 6fe 
17% 16 
2ft lfe 
20ft 16% 
4*2 1% 

16fe 10ft 
50% 35% 
52% 40 
6ft 3% 

6 3% 
•44. 3fe 
18% 14% 
19ft 8ft 
30% 17U 

5% 1% 

7 3% 

34 22% 

8% 4% 

20 12% 
29ft 16% 


RAI 

RMS El 

RTC 

Ragan 

Rarate 

Ratliff 

Raven 

RtincT 

Rtf San 

RltSOWT 

RltSoun 

Redlaw 

Resale 

Resrt A 

RcsrtS 

RstAsB 

RifAsA 

Rex Nor 

RtoAJg 

RCkWYS 

Rogers 

RoonyP 

RovPfm 

Rudldc 

RBW 

RusseU 

Rykoff 


J3t A9 20 


.12 A 48 
J2 AT 28 


.42 35 § 
13 

7J2e 7.0 


1J2 e 64 


Jto 35 14 


ll 

10 

.10* 2J 12 
JO XA 
J8 1-7 22 
.12 A 20 


-500 2.1 10 

JO 15 14 
JO 25 13 


14 6ft 
3 3% 

1 1 
2 20ft 
26 18 
2 Va 
2 12ft 

6 17% 
1 1% 
2 18% 
17 3to 

13 16 
59 45 
100149% 

14 6% 
1 

11 4% 

231 16 
33 tffe 
1 19ft 
73 1% 

5 6% 

5 26ft 
47 8to 
133 19% 
109 23 


6% 

3ft 

1 

20ft 

17 £ 

12ft 

iffto 

I7to 

lfe 

18% 

3ft 

15% 

44% 

497* 

0ft 

5% 

4'A 

15ft 

16% 

19ft 

1ft 

Oft 

25ft 

8% 

19% 

22% 


6fe 

3% 

1 

20ft 

17?b 

71 

12% 

lfffe 

17% 

Tfe 

18% 

3fe 

1» 

44ft 

49% 

6% 

5% 

4% 

16 

m 

19ft 

It* 

6% 

26 r b 

ri 

19% 

2Zfe 


+ % 
— fe 

+ fe 


15% 9% 

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4% ,2% 

23 13% 
22ft 11% 
29fe 24to 

9% 5% 

76% 7 

life Bfa 
12% 9ft 
14% 11'/* 

24 18 

23% 17% 
75ft 60 
8flft 61 
88 70 

3ft 2ft 
7to 4% 
72Va » 
lift 3% 
3 to 
8% 4ft 
77V* 659* 
lOfei 7% 
Jlfe l4l> 
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23to 15to 
5ft 4ft 
23 14 

n% 5% 
7ft 1ft 

7 3% 
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8 3% 
34% lift 
39fe 71 T S 

fft ft 
13% 6 
Uft life 
6ft 3fe 

2ft lfe 
28 79% 

6% 3% 

Ufa 6% 


SierS»n ^ 


SfencR 

StKAA 

aiivrtd 

S^mcflS 

ScnniA 

SiiittiB 


m -2 


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tssr* & T -‘ a 

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HT UK 7tft 

19 7% Thi 

31 :i 'C-u 
3 3ft jy* 
5 315 « 

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15 10 




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6 19 :7 

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37 Tift 18 
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14 Tft 1ft 
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4 3ft 1ft 
68 6*s 571 


M '> */ 

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53 - fe 
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13% TabPrd -3C ^ 
6ft TandBr 
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TcnSnr. 

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97 Teian* i-W* -* 
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24 m TdfWv JO 1-J 
Bto TfftOfO A 
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16% TexA£ Crfl57 UA 
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38 *6 
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513 17% I2>| 
05 *5 f- 

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46 39% 39ft 
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21 23 zr* 

487 14ft 74ft 

r 5ft sw 
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13 NRMn L60 1&7 
lfllb NRMpf TjbO 1A1 
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14% NMxAr .79 4L6 19 


13% NPUiR! 1JL5 6J 15 
13 NPTOC 1 JO* A6 13 


4C 4.0 1? 
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9ft 

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4 

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4 T * 

12 

15ft 
4ft 
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21ft 
23 
19' a 
19 

38ft 

1% 

19ft 

w* 

23 

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10% 

5ft 

l«ft 

26ft 

38* 

42ft 

4% 

34% 

13ft 


.41) 4.4 11 


JO 32 


3\ BAT In .166 19 
13ft BDMs U 

lfe BRT 7 

2ft BSD r 
9ft 3SN 

8ft Badger .40 4.0 K 

8% BflldWS JZo 14 

2 BalvYl wt 
22ft Banrd ZT8t\QA 
4% Bonilro 

6% BnkSid .40 A4 11 
3'd Barca 

2ft Barn En 18 

4ft Barnwi JO 3J 
4 BarvkG 
4ft Beard 

10% BeidBIk 1-80 16.4 
ft Beltran 3 

20ft BergBr 22 1.1 14 
10ft BlcCas 

21% Blnl-Mf 14)0 12 

9ft BlaR 5 5 15 

9% BloRAs 16 

14ft Blesne s JO 15 12 
% BlaciE 

11 BlauniA -45 H 15 
lift Blount B .40 22 15 
lift BoforPs 15 

9% BawVal JO 




+ ft 
+ ft 


— ft 
+ % 


-32 1.1 14 


+ -b 

+ ft 
+1% 
+ ft 
+lft 
+2ft 
+ ft 


.40 22 15 
15 


9% 
16% 
Sft 
8ft 
31- 
2Jii 
40 
ISft 
2*3 
2 Sft 
6ft 
8ft 
13ft 

14% 
% 
10% 
1A. 
ITVj 
3ft 
12ft 
8% 
IS 
4% 
34% 
10 I 
10ft 
9ft 


EAC 

PECO 

EPC 

ESI 

EogiCJ 

EsfoCo 

Esflgp 

EchoB C 

ElAudD 

EfcAm 

ElecSd 

Eisinor 

EmMd n 

EmCor 

= Dnl un 

EnsV.91 

EnpOrl 

EnrSrv 

ESDn 

Enstr at 

Erolnd 

Eskev o* 

Esoev 

Esont 

Eli Law 

EvrJ 5 

Evrj A 

Ejtcei 


.40 4J 45 
.32 Z0 28 
15 

J7t 4J 13 

14 

1.00 5L4 9 

a.96eLZ.l 7 
.12 


1.40 &2 9 

40 


J3e J 


3Jte24.0 


^0 LB 
j48el3J 


1J50 113 
^0 L2 


.He 1J 14 
.10 U 26 
JO 10 25 
.£0C4J 12 


91* + to 
15*. 

8 

8%— ft 
2ft 

18%— % 
31ft 

i nr ,J| 

22% 

6%— to 
2fe + fe 
life 

5% + U 
13fe + fe 

8fe- fe 
ft — Va 
14ft + to 

3% 

10% 

7ft— ft 
18ft— ft 
!% 

11 — Jfe 

10ft + % 
10 + ft 

9ft 


3% iCEEn 
33% ICHs 
1 ICO 
3to IRTCps 
4ft IS5 
1% impGa 
\ implnd 
30ft ImpOIlgr 
5 Inflght 
lift Instras 
1% Insf5v 
Tib IrnSygf 
7 intCtyg 
70to Intink 
2fe IntBknl 
to intBkwt 
Si* IniHvd 
Oft IIP 
3% IntPwr 
Ift intPror 
7% IntThrn 
2% fnThrpf 
13'* Ionics s 
25 trOQBrd 


.12 2 A 

.12a 14 


JO 1.0 21 
9 

-25T 9.1 
j60 

.120 J 


.96 9.1 


10 5 

195 52fe 
IS 1W 
166 9 

3 4% 

23 3% 

76 ft 
1121 39fe 

5 6ft 
12 20fe 

290 Kb 
28 2% 
696 12% 

6 15ft 

^ * 
26 7fe 
1 10ft 
15 4% 

21 3% 

729 3% 

211 3ft 
45 21% 
10 35ft 


5 

52 

lft 

8ft 

4Jk 

% 
38% 
6ft 
20% 
Tfe 
2% 
12ft 
15 
3ft 
% 
7fe 
10ft 
4% 
3 to 
3Vk 
3!i 
2Tfe 
34 ft 


5 

57% 

lft 

9 

4% — to 
3to 
ft 

37fe + to 
6ft 

20ft— % 
lft | 

2=4 + fe 
12ft 

IS 1 - + to 
» + to 
% + to 
Tfe 

10ft— ft 
4% + to ; 
3ft 

31* , 

3% 

2?fe 
35ft +1 


7-* NWklPn 54 

33ft NYTimeS ^0 1J 17 
3'.* NewbE J5r 57 10 
liv a Newcor 22 2 S 
life NewLsn _ 14 

13to NwpEI 1-50 8A 13 
5% Nlchlnn 23 

6% Nichols 7 

1% Noeflnd 

2ft Nolex 22 

9% NCdO g s 
29fe NIPS pf 4J5 TLB 
4% NudDt 10 

Sto Nymoc 


79 13fe 

11 18ft 

15 8% 

1 10ft 
190 18% 

12 17% 
34 15fe 
52 26fe 

117 11 
440x48ft 

T8 4% 

63 lift 
140 16ft 

2 17% 

127 8% 

79 9% 

31 4fe 
111 4ft 
40 10% 

67Qz 33% 
12 5fe 
113 9% 


13to + to 
18ft 

8ft— ft 
10ft + ft 
isto + ft 
17ft 
15% 

20ft + % 
10fe— fe 
48to + ft 
4% 

11 — ft 

16 — ft 
17% 

8%— to 
9% + % 
4ft — ft 
4% 

10ft 

33ft — % 
5% + to 
9% + to 


16% OEA 
151* Cokwd 
4U OdetAn 
5*4 OdelB 


14 
A 13 


13% QtiArt 


IQ'a Olsens 
eft Opoenh 
4% OrloJH A 
1 Ormond 
16 OSoSvn s 


2A 1B3S4 

J4 S 20 

25* 1.1 
-75 L6 29 


6% OxfrdF 


OzorfcH 


-42 17 17 
J2t 47 12 
70 1J 28 


2 19ft 
9 20 
56 7 

11 7% 

13 24fe 
7 26lb 
43 4ft 
10 5fe 
T9 lto 
77 25ft 
34 16% 
367 lJiOi 


19ft 19ft 
20 20 
6fe 7 
7fe 7% 
23ft 24% 
25% 26% 
4% 4ft 
5% Sfe 
7 1 

24% 2» 
16% 16tt 
12ft 13ft 


— Vb 
+ ft 
+ % 
+ ft 
-Hfe 
+ % 


+ to 


SFNofA 

SJW 4 

5MD 

Sage 

Salem 

SDgo pf 

SDcopf 

SDoopf 

Sandgt# 

Sandvn 

5oamrk 

Sound A 

5ountiPf 

SoxnOn 

Soorran 

Sceptrn 

Sdieib 

Schwab 

SciMst 

SciLsg 

£coae 

ScurRn 

SbaCa 

Seaport 

SecCap 

Sets Pro 

SelsOir 

Sekxs 

5eligAs 

Semteh 

Servo 

Servotr 

Setons 

ShoerS 

Sharon 

SXsamls 

SterHSn 


1-45 37 13 
9 


JBS 104 
2-47 1DJ0 
44 5 1Z0 
B0 3.1 


-431 &4 11 
JO 3.9 B 
1 JO 11-9 
1J0 1A1 

20 


J& IB 14 
AA 47 23 
.10 IB 

A3 IB 10 


JO 7 7 


.16 U 10 


25ft 

I4fe 

5ft 

5ft 

10% 

8% 

17 
3% 

29 1 i 

lfffe 

5% 

Uto 

33ft 

18 
70 

lto 

TOfe 


% 

3%— ft 
7% 

5% + ft 
8% 

24% 4- fe 
38% + % 
25ft 
Wfe 

5ft + to 
5to— to 
10ft 

8 to— to 
16to— to 

Tim 

29 —to 
TOto— to 


(CooCEQaed <» Page 17) 


, • - 4ir > 




mm " " " r »" 




lift— I* 
33ft + ft 
18 + ft 
70 +fe 
ito + ft 
lOfe + % 
2Va + ft 
fe— to 
4ft 


LUTS 


j* 



s 




tn * 


13 

B6I 72 18 
29 .9 11 

IBQe 77 8 


.16 14 


7% + ft 
lfffe — % 

life — -ft 
Wto + ft 
12% 

%— ft 
lift— ft 
4 


in the Trib. 


Ill 


News hot from the 


+ % 


trading Boor in 


16ft 11 Jaclyn -50b 43 11 4 11% IV* 11% + 


7% s% Jacobs 
4% 2 1 * jetAm 

lto to JetAwt 


9 51b Sfe n + 

34 3to 3% 3% — 

1 l* to to — 


9% 5 1 * Jetron .7lf 8.9 14 97 Bfe 8 8 


6to 2to John Pd 


4 3ft 3ft 3ft 


9% Bowl A s AA 4J T0 


— ft 
+ ft 


lift 5 JonnAm JO 5J 8 122 Sft 5V= 5% 

11% 6 Johnlnd 3 5 Bto 8% 9% 

oft 2ft Jumpjk 26 47 4 % 4ft 4fe + 


Jto Bawmr 
12% Bawno .-ul 
iP r * Brsais 1B0 
27 BrnFA 1.90 
29 BmFS 1B0 
3% SrnFpf .c0 
2*** Buell ^0 
6 l : Bush n 


1.99 Ji 10 
1B0 2.J II 
.^0 9J 
aO \S b 


l«ft + % 
25 ft 


36-4 | 

42ft 4- 


42ft ^ 

4ft + ft 

31ft — ft 
5 ft— ft 


FPA 48 

Fablnd 20 22 8 

rairRn 1J 

roIrmC 

FarJv of ,4?t L® 


Fidotc 

FCoaHd 

FWVmB B3 Ui 11 


IC'c— ft 
25% 

16ft— '.* 
lfe + ft 
la% 

6ft — ft 


STs + 


8ft GDI 
S'z CMICb 

i c«y cp 

7% CSSh 
9 CcttNj 
4" : >1 cole A 
TC% Ca» Re 
11% Cameo 


ir ir 

"0 A 


IJ3 K4 
.44 L9 


72 JTft rift — 

gfe os, 4ft 
lft ft lft 
Sft S' s 3ft + 

ir.* ir* i:%— 

6ft 5*= 6ft 4- 

n . li ip- 
15ft 15ft 15ft- 


FstCro S fi 

FischP jbBt 4.9 21 
FilcGE 
viFlamo 

FlaSck .79 li 6 

Fluke TJ-t £1 15 
Fccdrrr- 5 

FoofeM 
FthillG 

Fcrs-CA JC 1 J 75 
FcrsfCB .18 .7 3 


.79 li» 6 
TJ-t £1 15 


17ft + ft 
13 — % 
13 ft— ft 
irk + fe 
5%— *k 
427* + to 
26ft 
17% 

7” ft — ' d 

6 + ft 


B5t 16 18 


2Sft + ft 


31ft KnGsPt 4.50 1U 
21b KapokC 2 

10 KavCP JO IS 9 
10% Kavjn Joe 2J 11 
9fe KcarNI -4Q 3.7 15 
75% Ken win BOa 4J 9 
14 Ketchm J6t 14 
71b fCevPfi J0I 
Jto KeyCa 
to KeyCowf 
2ft Klddewt 
3% Kilern 
3ft Klnark 
3% Kirby 

2 KleerV B2r .B 
10ft Knoll 


200x 40 
18 3% 
14 13% 


•02r .B 


22fe KagerC 2J2 8J 95 


40 +lto 
3% 

13% + to 
13% 

lOfe +* ft 
10% + ft 
IBft + ft 
11 + ft 

2% 
to 

3% + ft 
3% 

3% 

2fe 

2% + ft 
1<% 

28ft 


PLM 

PGEPfA 

PGEPfB 

PGEpfO 

PGEpfE 

PGEPfG 

PGEofF 

PGEpfZ 

PGEpfY 

PGEpfW 

PGEpTV 

PGEpfT 

PGEPfS 

PGEcfR 

PGEpfP 

PGEpfO 

PGEpfM 

PGEpfL 

PGEpfK 

PGEPfJ 

PGEpfJ 

PGTrn 

PacLf pf 

PacLt Pf 

Pegeg 

PailCp 

Partasf 

ParkCh 

PatTch 

PauiPf 


.12 1-4 6 
1 J0 106 
TJ7 iap 
1-25 104 

1- 25 105 
120 10-4 
434 118 
4Jh 126 
120 11.1 
237 104 
232 104 
234 103 
L62 103 

2- 37 105 
205 103 
LOG 103 
136 105 
2-25 1U 
204 107 
2J2 tlj 
127 104 
134 43 IT 
440 105 
7j64 105 


48 1.1 22 


IJXJa 3J 12 
30 
49 


8 

10 

16 

11 

no 

470 

902 

100 

1081 

12 

1 

43 

17 

3 

28 

3 

6 

12 

130z 

2250Z 

666 

126 

160 


8 fe fife 
14% 14ft 
12% 12% 
12 12 
12 life 
life lift 
34 34 


29 22ft 
Sift 24 
221* 21ft 
34ft 24! a 
25% 24ft 
2Zfe 22% 
19% 19% 
19 18ft 
18% lBto 
20ft 30ft 
19ft 19% 
JOfe 20fe 
TDto 10% 
SSfe 2Sfe 
42 42 

7J?A 72?z 

U 1b 
43% 42% 
7% 7 
31 ft 31ft 
4ft 4% 
10U 10U 


8% 

Ufe— % 
12% 

12 

lift — % 
lift— % 

34 

32ft 6- to 
28ft— ft 
24% 4- % 
22to + to 
24ft + ft 
24T« + ft 
221* + V 
19% + to 
19 

18% + U 

20ft 

?9li 

JUfe— to 
VM— ft 


Bank With Foreign Partners 
Opens in Special Chinese Zone 


Edward 


The Axscaaied Prm 


42 —2 


rp±— ^ 
TVk + 'U 
3>'a 

n 

10<m 4- >4 


BELJING — Chinas firsi joinwentore bank 
with foreign partners has opened in the Xiamen 
special economic zone, the official Xinhua news 
agency reported Friday. 

The Xiamen International Bank opened 
Thursday in the special economic zone in the 
southern province of Fujian. Xinhua said. The 
bank was established by the Fujian branch of 
the Industrial & Commercial B-^nt of China, 
the Fujian Investment & Enterprise Corp_ the 
Xiamen Construction & Development Corp. 
and the Panin Group Corp. in Hong Kong, 
Xinhua said. 



A Monihly Report for the Imemadpnal Mreitor 


*Yf 4L ^TL?(B>AUW # | 

it cralcLS^ erxb un c. 


PERSONAL INVESTING 


CatiuirtiKUiui mseus. Many nftlw zsorid's children 
urha hzvf rufl£ red from Leukaemia art nozt ain't 
dm to the properties discovered in the 
roy pt rizi-inklc ft originated M 

:r. .1 ladagascar, tzkere thousands of -^|1 

endemic pla nts are in Janser " jdmiMm 




■ » * * 


fi 

7 ' ■ wraist’feii 


I? f Ji ■ -i 


vemen 




have a lot to do with 


Ky.r \ mm .. ^ 




how your investments fare 

J • i rvn/' 




s 





in 1986. 







¥ 


• t 


-fi :i 


v ■ j#* 


> ■ t.v rfi 


Km 


* \ 



. a 


m 

Plants have fed the world 
and cured its ills since life began. 

Now we’re destroying their principal h. 
at the rate of 50 acres every minuti 


Pfaon; Mark J. Ptorkm 




Treasury Seuetmy James A Baker IH, center, and repres&wmx-es of other major non- Communist industrial coiuitru.’s. 7 
Stoltenbeig, Minister of ^feruznoe, Germany; Pierre Mvuster of Economy «£- Fuumoe^ France: Nigel Lawson, 

Kingdom: and Hobom Takeshua. Minister of Finance, Japan. 


m left to right: Gerhard 

of me Exchequer, United 


: v 


When the finance ministers of the five leading industrial nations met in New 

York in September, they decided on moves to lower the value of the dollar. Their decisions 
are already reverberating through world markets, provoking a rethinking of investment 
strategy worldwide. 

On December 9. Personal Investing, the International Herald Tribune’s monthly 
report for international investors, will look at the rapidly shifting outlook for 1966 on a 
maiket-by-market basis. Can the surge in West German shares be sustained? How will the 
Tokyo market cope with higher interest rates? Is Wall Street’s optimism justified? Drawing 
on scores of interviews with investment professionals worldwide. Personal Investing will 
describe the trends, opportunities and risks. Get an early start on your year-end portfolio 
review with Personal Investing on December 9. 

The International Herald Tribune. Bringing the world’s most important news to 
the world’s most important audience. 


W e live on this planet by courtesy 
of the earth s green covet Hants 
protect fragile soils from erosion, 
regulate the atmosphere, maintain 
water supplies for agriculture and 

prevent formation of deserts. Without 
plants man could not survive. 

Yet, knowing this, we are destroying 
our own life-support system at such an 
alarming rate that it has already become 
a crisis - a crisis for ourselves and an 
even bigger one for our children. 

The figures alone should tell the story 
- we destroy a tropical rain forest three 
times the size of Switzerland every yean 

. -.L" Off ,* <. *. 



m m 

What can be done aboutit? 

The problem seems so vast that there is - 
a tendency to shrug and say “What caji ’ 
I do?" But there is an answer. 



Pbota Courtesy ofRicbanf £vu» S du iUes 


within 25 years only fragments of the 
vast Malaysian ana Indonesian forest 


vast Malaysian ana Indonesian forests 
will remain. 


FOR INFORMATION ON ADVERTISING IN THIS SPECIAL ISSUE, CONTACT YOUR LOCAL IHT OFFICE: 


LONDON: Peter Bullock. IHT, FRATVKKlTlf^Tr Wnlfpaf^ IaiitgrhariL HONGKONG: Malcolm dean, IHT, 

63 Long Acre. London WC2E 9JR IHT, Friedrichs tiasse 1*&, 1005 Tai Sang Commercial Building. 

Telephone: (01) 8364802. 6000 Frankfurt/ Main. 2434 Hennessy Road, Hong Ka& 

Telex: 26000ft Telephone (06ft) 726 755, Tdbc 416721. Telephone: 5-285618/9. Telex: 6X170. 

NEW YORK: Victoria Wachna. IHT, PARIS: Pallida Gouuy, HTT, 181 Avenue 

850 Third Avenue, New York. N.Y. 10022. Qaiies-de-GauDe, 92521 Neuilly Cedex. ORREQUEST 

Telephone: (212) 752 3890. Telephone: (01 >4747 1265. ' THEFULLUST OF REGIONAL 

Telex: 427175. Tdex: 613595. REPRESENTATIVES. 


What we are destroying 

Much of the food, medicines and 
materials we use every day of our lives 
is derived from the wild species which 
grow in the tropics. %t only a tiny 
fraction of the world’s flowering plants 
have been studied for possible use. 
Horrifyingly, some 25,000 of all 
flowering species are on the verge of 
extinction. 

Once the plants go, they are gone 
forever. Once the forests go only 
wastelands remain. 


Ur. Kunara naans jenuaes, awwvr.yt w - 
Botanical Museum at Harvard Umnerrity has 
spent IS yean in the Amazon jungle collecting 
the 'magic' plants cf myth and legend arid : ; 
making them available to Western medicihz . 
and science. t *lhedriifi <f1hefiitoin? he says, 
grow in the primeval jtmgie.” - " y . 


The WWF Plant 

Conservation Programme 

. The World Conservation Strategy; 
published in 1980, is a programme for 1 
conserving the world’s natural resources • 

‘ whilst managing them for human 
needs. A practical, international plant -M 

conservation programme has been pre- ' ' 

pared based on WCS principles and is '• 

now well under way all around the world. - 

You can become part of it 

The WWF Plant Conservation 
Programme is a plan for survival which - 

von can hpln mato q i r__ *? 


♦ . 
I 

I 


•V. 


***** 
•fee- 5 


V* 


Who is the villain? . r 
There is ho villain - exo^^gbdrarite 
and short-sightedness- The desperately 
poor people who live in the forests have 
to dear areas for ciopsand fuel,buf 
they are doing this in such a way dsat 
the ^ v are destroying their ^ vfciy livelihood. 

Add to this the way in which ibe 
heart is brine ripped out of theforests , 
Smeet the HKpr tropical , 

timbers and we have a r«Spe for/: - 
disaster. 1 : • 


lyr . « **IUT|Tai mm 

BSwteSSSWSJ* 


■ — »». TVCltCCU 

your voice and your financial support 

Get in touch with your local WWF 
office for membership details, or send 

to the World 

WldWe Fund at: WWF International 

Mpmh^rchin itr I T rt ' - 


■* W _ 

i - r -^ 

■ P V. 


f 




f 


■ ■ ■ ■ . — — UW1LOC1 lri| 

Cil Save the plants 
1^9 that save us. 

WWF FOR WORi H PDklOrnifiv.. 


jr 

"irtl 

j* I 




y * 


. . fj-ai 



>.v f 


* r 





si- 

n.. 
















7Vf 

1* Xeoec 

161 



2* + Hi 

1W 

» Xke or 

476 

9 

a* 

9 + * 

17¥i 

TOW. XMftx 

1Z72 

14* 

14* 

|4*— ^ 




































































r-. 

• s 


■. ^ 



— .. . x * _ •*. jj£_i : «a iwripp- 






Page 18 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAT-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 1985 


ACROSS 

1 Outlet 

5 Draw ught 

. 9 Israeli 
statesman 

14 Bible, e.g. 

18 Resembling a 
pterodactyl 

19 Bellowing 

29 Commune 

near Bologna 

21 Dazzles a 
disciple 

22 Cozzens novel: 
1931 

24 Christie 
mystery, with 
“The*' 

29 Wagons for 
P.M. snacks 

27 Town on the 

Sava 

29 Hug 

30 Scurries 

31 Pinguid 

32 Mention 

33 Pickled flower 
buds 

30 Less straight- 
forward 

37 Inn for 
ralsiaff 

41 Harmonium 

42 Kuwait or 
Ecuador 

44 Slump 

45 Author of 
"Tamerlane 

45 Broadway hit 
1985 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


47 Degrade 

49 Fulton's craft : 
Abbr. 

50 yang, 

Chinese omelet 

51 S. Snead orG. 

Sarazan.e.g. 
55 “Blonde 
bombshell" 
VanDoren 
57 Too young 

59 Former Red 
Sox ace 

60 Dash 

61 Select 

62 “Doggone!" 
relatives 


79 Some Cooper 
Union grads. 

89 Iceland or 
Italy, e.g- 

84 Venturesome 
one 

85 Molds 

beforehand 


Initial Encounters By Mary Virginia Oma 


PEANUTS 


88 Catkin 

89 Liabilities 

99 Fragments for 
Fido 


1 

I 


4 

18 




22 




Z6 






63 He wrote 
"Lamia" 

64 Plan 
66 “Pari 


91 Buckingham- 
shire jackets 

92 “Ship of 
Fools" ship 

93 More carefree 

96 Parched 

97 Quality found 
in mantillas 


ana sung by 
Rigoletto 
67 Freudian’s 
forte 


101 J-G- Low 
103 Beatles' billet- 
doux 


33 

34 

3* 

41 



45 



50^ 



57 




61 


i« 


70 Bouquet 

71 G.&S. offering 

73 Bear, to 
Balenciaga 

74 Sung, 

Chinese 

dynasty 

75 Rank below 
capt. 

77 Excited 
interjections 

78 W'aianae 
wiggle 


205 Mock 

106 Ma Barker's 
specialty 

107 Noted Swiss 
mathemati- 
cian: 18th 
century 

198 Deciphered 

109 King of the 
Meccans: 1953- 
64 

110 Airy farewells 

111 Courage 

112 Shelters 


W 

63 


70 



74 



79 



65 




DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


1 Cosmic 

2 Alternative 
word 

3 Initials at Cape 
Canaveral 

4 Windpipes 

5 Worries 

6 Curtain 
holders 


14 Gaddi, 

pupil of Giotto 


7 Alpine river 

8 Dull 

9 Turk’s coin, to 
a Londoner 

10 Shut in 

11 Madonna's 
music 

12 Chewbark 

13 Specialized 
French cooks 


15 Due 

16 Blackbird 

17 To be, to 
Bibulus 

19 " nousle 

deluge" 

23 River to Moray 
Firth 

25 Torch-singer 
EC ting 

28 List entry 

31 Meal 

32 Word with 
sweep or cut 

33 An Ionian 
island 


34 “Eileen , 

old Irish air 

35 Creator of 
Jeeves, 
Psinitheial. 

36 Basil is one 


93 

94 

95 


ioT 




105 




109 







64 





ft-3Q 




FOOTBALLS pon't 

hate, MAgCfE' 






MOW NICE OF ^ 0 ^ 



V . 


BLONDIE 



? 


BEETLE BAILEY 


DOWN 


DOWN 


C 1 New York Times, edited fry Eugene M alesk a. 
DOWN DOWN 


37 Benedictine 
bigwig 

38 Historic W.W. 
11 battleship 

39 Smooth fabric 

40 Snowy-plumed 
bird 

42 Indian or 
orange 

43 Certain 
conduits 

46 Marble or type 


48 Transfix 

51 Chief 

52 Caught like a 

rat in 

53 Oxford 
university 

54 He wrote "Cry, 
the Beloved 
Country" 

56 Bohemian 


58 Plat, or mere., 
e.g. 

60 Browns 


62 Opposite of 
proximo 


63 Recognized 

64 Tapioca source 

65 Muezzin, e.g. 

66 Famed Boer 
leader 

67 Walking 

68 Cay 

69 Emulates J. L. 
Seagull 

71 Certain 
competitions 

72 Samekh 
followers 

76 Educate 

78 Slow Cuban dance 


81 Essences 

82 Alvin 

Childress TV role 

83 Camper's 
necessity 

84 Etymology: . 
Abbr. 

86 Arranged, as hair 

87 Martian: 

Comb, form 

89 Part of the am- 
biance 

91 Tomato blight 

92 Gentleman's 
gentleman 


93 Pullet prod- 
ucts 

94 Location of 
Henzadaand 
Harbin 

95 Film portrayer 
of Mowgli 

96 Entrance for 
Walter Morel 

97 Caron role: 1953 

■ 

98 Goggler 

99 Steep 

169 Stout topper 

192 F.D.R. project 

104 Big w Calif. 



ANDY CAPP 


WE'LL HAVE TO 
QETTHtS -<] 
WASTE PIPE >J 


BEYOND BELIEF: 

The American Press and the Coming of 
the Holocaust 1933-1945 

By Deborah E. Lipstadt. 370 pages. SI 9.95. 

The Free Press, 866 Third Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. 10022. 


BOOKS 


Reviewed by John Gross 

D EBORAH E. LIPSTADrS “Beyond Belier is 
a valuable addition to recent* studies of the 
Western response to the HolocausL Inevitably it 
overlaps to some extent with a book like David S. 
Wyman's comprehensive account of American reac- 
tions during World War II, “The Abandonment of 
the Jews"; inevitably, limiting itself as it does to the 
way Nazi enormities were covered by ihe press. it is 
more narrowly based. Bui that does not diminish its 
importance. It deals at one remove with deeds as 
well as words — the press may not make policy, but 
in a Tree society it certainly makes things easier or 
harder for those who do. 

In the first half of the book Lipstadt. who teaches 
at the University of California at Los Angeles, 
describes the darkening course of events from 1933 
to 1939. The main landmarks are grimly f amili ar — 
the Nuremberg Laws. KristallnachL the Anschluss 


— but her account of what the press made of them 
at the time contains a good deal of rewarding new- 
material. She has some particularly pertinent things 
to say about the difficulties put in the way of 
German-based correspondents by the Nazi authori- 
ties. and sometimes by their editors or proprietors. 

In general the men and women on the spot come 
out of the story much better than the editorialists 
and columnists back home. There were blind spots 
and follies (the fashion editor of the Los Angeles 
Tunes, in Berlin for the 1936 Olympic Games, cooed 
enthusiastically that “Zeus, in his golden days, nev- 
er witnessed a show- as grand as this"}, but most of 
the basic facts got reported. 

How they were interpreted is another matter. 
Their implications were repeatedly played down, 
and even more regularly flattened out; there was a 
persistent tendency to accoumTor what was going 
on in comfortingly “rational" terms. Hitler was 
trying to divert attention from economic difficul- 
ties; he was a moderate not fully in control of the 
extremist elements among his followers; German 
anti-Semitism was essentially a reflection of Ger- 
man bitterness over the Versailles treaty. 

Since every effect must have a cause, there was 


also no shortage of suggestions that the Jews had 
brought their troubles on themselves. Waiter Lipp- 
mann, in a particularly contemptible piece written, 
in May 1933, urged his Traders not to assume that, 
because on civilized things were being done in Ger- 
many, it could no longer speak as a civilized power. 
To do so would be as unreasonable, he argued, as 
judging tbe Catholic Church by the Spanish Inquisi- 
tion, or Protestants by tbe Ku Klux Klan, “or the 
Jews by their parvenus.” 

Lipstadt argues that there was a matrer-of-fact- 
ness in most newspaper discussion in the 1930s that 
blunted the edge of what could have been a far 
stronger popular response, and did nothing to pre- 




ALL OVER-' 1 



NO, NOT HIM. PET. 

.L&w/Errra/iAE 
-ra SET ONE. 







WIZARD of ID 



AVeMf 
tmsvMmz 
TUPN 


pare the public for_the lethal potentialities of the 


Nuremberg Laws. The ground had been prepared, 
in fact, for the much more grievous failure of the 
press during the Holocaust itself. Lipstadt points 
out how strange it is that there shotud still be so 
much debate as to when the outside world became 
aware that the Nazis had graduated from persecu- 
tion to genocide. There were official Alhed pro- 
nouncements during the war confirming that a pro- 
gram of systematic extermination was under way, 

W mm <!“ m ■ t ■ ■ V ^ *.1 



L^/f-30 




YOU PUT TW& <%&■ IN 



REX MORGAN 


and despite Nazi attempts to disguise what they 

s of the 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle 




were doing the essential features of the Final Solu- 
tion had become clear long before the war ended 

In order to understand why this information had 
so little impact, the critical question, as Lipstadt 
says, is “not when news was available but how it was 
made available.” Her analysis leaves no doubt that 
with very few exceptions — the Buffalo Courier- 
Express deserves a passing cheer — it was made 
available in an utterly feeble and often almost 
perfunctory fashion. Even the most horrifying news 
was lucked away on inside pages. 

In December 1942, when the Chicago Tribune 
covered a major report from the Inter-Allied Infor- 
mation Committee in which Nazi-occupied Poland 
was described as “one vast centra for murdering 
Jews,” the paper put the story on page 18 next to a 
marriage announcement. Tbe previous month The 
New York Times had run a story about a statement 
from a member of the Polish National Council that 
a million Polish Jews had been killed It appeared 
on page 16, next to a report on the hijacking of a 
truckload of coffee in New Jersey. Such eerie edito- 
rial decisions were the norm, and there was relative- 
ly little improvement until the end of the war. 


I'M GOING TO CALL THAT 
SEAUTY “SHOP AND ASK 
FOR THAT KAY W&8 ' 1 
HAVE A FEELING SHE 
WONT 8£ THERE. HARRY' 


THAT WON'T 
PRCVE THAT 
SHFS GONE 
<SO*\EWHERE 
WITH DAD' 


WEIL, 
SUPPOSING SHE 
has.lucyt WHAT 
CAN YOU DO 


I 



HELLO' MAY I SPEAK 
TO KAY, PLEASE*. 

Cl. 



Gl 


GARFIELD 


r KNOW I HAVEN'T WRITTEN VET 
MOM. I'M SORRV. VEST'LL COME 
VISIT VOU WHEN I CAH,OKAW? 


John Gross is on the staff of The New York Times. 



.flfcij 7/m, 



JON TAKES SO MANV GOILT 
TR1P6, WE QUALIFIES FOR 
THE FREQUENT FLYER PLAN 



My SAYS HE'S AWT EVENING 'CEPTCAT. 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


NIGH LOW 


ASIA 


HIGH LOW 


C F C F 


C F C F 


AKfflrve 
Amsterdam 
A than 5 

Barcelona 

Belgrade 

Berlin 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Copenhage n 

Costa Del Sol 

ODblln 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

un Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

Nice 

OHO 

parts 

Prague 

Reykjavik 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zorich 


16 61 

4 39 
21 70 
IS 59 

5 41 

2 36 

3 37 
5 il 
5 41 
2 36 

IB M 
7 45 
-2 2H 
13 55 
2 26 
7 45 


B M 

-1 30 


U 

1 

3 

O 

0 

2 

-1 

-1 


0 32 

14 57 


23 73 
12 54 


47 

43 

JO 


-9 16 
0 32 


13 55 
-1 30 

5 41 

1 34 

2 36 
16 61 

1 34 

2 3fi 

6 43 
6 43 
1 34 
1 34 


55 
34 
37 
3? 

32 
Jft 
30 
30 
6 46 
-2 28 
-6 IB 
-1 30 
-2 28 
o r 

-3 27 SW 
10 50 r 
17 43 
B 46 
-3 2fl 
-2 28 
-2 20 
1 

16 
39 
25 

36 


d 

d 

fr 

cl 

d 

cl 

o 

to 

fr 

fr 

cl 

d 

a 

d 

a 

6 


Bangkok 

Bailing 

Hone Kong 

Manila 

New Del III 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

SI non pars 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


21 

-5 

IB 


28 82 
3 37 
23 73 
71 B8 24 
23 73 11 
2 34 -4 
11 52 5 

30 B6 23 
20 68 16 
14 57 6 


70 O 
23 fr 
64 o 
75 d 
S3 cl 
25 fr 
41 d 

73 o 
61 r 
43 r 


AFRICA 


17 

9 

4 

4 

2 


o 

0 

a 

a 

a 

fr 

o 

d 

fr 

r 


Algiers 

Calm 

Cape Town 

Casablanca 

Harare 

Logos 

Nairobi 

Tunis 


— — 5 

— — 14 


21 70 10 
32 90 — 
W 64 " 7 

LATIN AMERICA 


41 no 
57 no 

— no 
» el 

— no 

— d 

— no 
45 fr 


Buenos Aires 


29 04 19 66 fr 
27 B1 17 63 r 
Lima 23 73 IB 64 0 

Mexico City 33 68 f 4 PC 

Rtade Janeiro — — — — no 


World Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Nov. 29 

Qo&ing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Gom Prtv. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aaoon 

Akzo 

Ahold 

AMEV 

ADam Rubber 
Arrtra Bank 
fiVG 

Buatirmann T 
Catond HkJg 
Elsevter-NDU 
FoJcJcer 
Gbt Brocades 
Hdneh en 
Hoogovens 
KLM 
N oarden 
Nat Neder 
Nediioyd 
Oce vendor G 
Pa k hoed 
Philips 
Robeco 
Bodamco 
Rollnco 

Ronnta 


Royal Du1ch 
Unlfo 


Unilever 

VanOmmortn 

vmF Stark 
VNU 


547 
258 
774,60 
138-30 
7540 
79.90 
0.95 
99 JO 
217 
12050 
20.10 
166 
74J30 
249 JO 
211.50 
7020 
5230 
59 JO 
BUD 
206 
381 
7020 
5630 
8070 
135 
7290 
47.10 
18220 


54050 

256 

77£10 

139 

75J0 

B120 

09g 

99 JO 
246 
11050 


2920 

253.50 

274JD 


16050 
75 
24050 
20920 
7050 
5250 
60 
B120 
207 
382 
7080 
5630 
81 30 
1J5J0 
7120 
47 JO 
18330 

73 M 
251 JO 
272 


ANPjCBS GW! index i 733M 
Previous : 239 JO 


-5 23 Sw 


30 

37 


fr 

Fr 


-l 
0 

-1 30 SW 
-4 25 Sw 
-1 30 
-4 25 
-4 25 Sw 
-3 27 sw 


NORTH AMERICA 


fr 

fr 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 


73 IS 4 39 


— — 1 34 

9 48 

28 82 B 46 


sh 

no 

no 

na 

fr 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 22 72 12 54 d 

Sydney 22 72 15 59 a 

cHrloudv; fo-toggv? tf-tair; n-hoii; 
sh-showers; sw-www; si -stormy. 


Anchorage 

Atlanta 

Barton 

Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 

Honolulu 

Houston 

Los Angelos 

Miami 

Minneapolis 

Montreal 

Nassau 

New York 

San Fnmcbco 

Seattle 

Toronto 

Washington 


-4 

21 

8 

2 

• 1 
2 

27 
14 
16 

28 
■14 
-5 
27 
11 

13 
-3 

0 

14 


o-overcast; dopotiIv 


25 -11 
70 15 
46 1 

36 -5 
30 -6 
36 -1 
01 19 
57 11 
61 12 
82 22 
7-24- 
23 -6 
81 20 
52 4 

55 8 

27 -8 
32 -3 
57 6 

cloudy; 


12 

59 

34 

23 

18 

30 

66 

52 

54 


fr 

r 

cl 

d 

d 

d 

r 

a 

r 


72 PC 
11 S«v 
21 fr 
68 fr 
39 PC 
46 r 
IB PC 
27 d 
43 Cl 
r-raln; 


SATURDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Chappy. FRANKFURT: Showers. 
Temp. 9 — 1 (48 — 30). LONDON : Showery Toma n — 2 (53 — 36). MADRID: 
Ctaudv. Tamp. Id — 1 f 50— 341. NEW YORK: Rain. Temp. 8-6 <46— «J. 
PARIS: stwwere. Temo. 12-3 (54-37). ROME: Partly doudv. Temp. 16-5 
161—41). TEL AVIV: Na. ZURICH: Showers. Temp, lfl — 1 (50 — 30). 
BANGKOK: Cloudy. Temp. 29 — 24 (84 — 75). HONG KONG: Cloudy. Temp, 
»~-14 (68 — 57) .MANILA; Showers. Temp. 31—24 (B8 — 7$). SEOUL: 5new. 
Temp, l — - 5 f34 — 23). SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Temp. 30 — 34 (66—75). 
TOKYO: MW. 14 — 11 £57 — 521. 


Arbed 
Bafcaert 
Cock or I If 
Cobepa 
EBE5 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

Gerart 

Ha Oaken 

Intercom 

Kredietbonk 

Peirofina 

Soc Generate 

Safina 

Solvav 

Trcctton Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

vieille Monfogne 


2790 

mo 

287 

4750 

3975 

5020 

2650 

5120 

5800 

2935 

12000 

7060 

2335 

8400 

6300 

5200 

5660 

2275 

5850 


B90 

8620 

206 

4900 

3900 

5000 

2730 

5000 

5710 


12000 

7060 

2345 

8100 

6310 

5220 

5670 

2200 

5050 


Current Stock index : 296347 

Previous : 296MB 


firankfimrt 


AEG-Telofunkon 

Alllgn* vers 

Aiiono 

BA5F 

Bayer 

Bay Hvpo Bank 
Bav Verelrabank 
BSC 

BHF-Banfc 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Cant Gumml 
Daimler-Benz 
Degifssa 

Deutsche Babcock 
Dautscho Bank 
Dreadner Bank 
GHH 
Harpenar 


22UQ225J0 
1748 1755 
417 4)0 

261 263 

25050 25450 
444 438 

432 428 

NjQ. — 
475 456 

553 572 

268 269 JO 
15020 159 

1135 1165 
425 431 

209 213 

57S6BSJ0 
335 338 

213 218 

344 34? 


I Close Prev 

■ 

1 

Hochtief 

757 

755 

Hoechst 

2S1J0 253.50 

Hoesch 

163 16450 

Horten 

226 

22! 


Hisssel 

413 

420 

IWKA 

309 30070 

Kail + Sal2 

327 JO 329 JO 1 

Karstodl 

339 

345 

Kaufhof 

340 

345 

Kloeckner H-D 

308 

316 

Kloeckner Werke 

93 

92J0 

Ktupp Stahl 

155 

162 

Linde 

574 

570 

Lufthansa 

221 

220 

man 

184J0 

191 

Monnesmann 

260 

261 

Mtrench Rueck 

2400 

2240 

Nlxdorf 

539 JO 

542 

PKl 

669 685JD 

Porsche 

1250 

1275 I 

Prcusuff 

245 

244 

PWA 

158 15050 

RWE 

191 19250 | 

Rhelnmetaii 

471 

485 

Scherlng 

635 

641 

SEL 

326 

332 

Siemens 

63430 

650 

Thyssen 

169 JO 17120 

Veba 

268J027C-M 

Voikswogenwerk 

401-60 

4Qfi 

Wella 

679 JO 

675 

CommerzbdAk Index : 172X49 


previous : itujq 




il BMHEKon « 

1. 

Bk East Asia 

■wan 

2X60 

Cheung Kona 

2030 

19.90 

China Light 

15 

14J0 

Green Island 

030 

030 

Hang Seng Bank 

47 

41 

> 

Henderson 

2.175 

2.125 

China Gas 

1X90 

1258 

HK Electric 

030 

025 

HK Realty A 

1150 

11J0 

HK Hoieis 

3150 

3150 

HK Land 

050 

040 

HKSharvg Bank 

7JS 

745 

hk Teteohone 

9J5 

9 JO 

HK YautnatoJ 

195 

190 

HK Wharf 

7 JO 

725 

Hutch Whampoa 

2040 

2SJ0 

Hyson 

DJ0 

060 

inn aiv 

099 

099 

Joraine 

1110 

1260 

JardineSec 

15.10 

1450 

Kawfoan Motor 

10 

10 

Miramar Hofei 

S3 

5250 

New World 

040 

025 

SHK Props 

1X70 

VX40 


Stoluy 

2 

235 


Swire Pacific A 

29 JSO 

29 JO 


Tai Cheung 

1J8 

1.9ft I 

WahKwono 

078 

074 


Wing On Co 

1J6 

1 1 Je 


Wlitsor 

4.90 

4_» 

world inn 

2575 

1475 


Hang Seng Index; 

771635 



PrevbHR • U6SJ0 






AECI 

935 

NA 

Anglo American 

3815 

3850 

Angfa Am Goto 

20000 20500 


Barlows 

1400 

U23 


BJmmar 

1815 

1790 1 

Buffets 

8150 

8100 | 


GF5A 
Harmony 
HhraM Steel 
Kloof 
Nedbank 
Pres Stern 
Rusolat 
SA Brew 
St Helena 


3900 

3350 

575 

2350 

920 

6325 

2600 

760 

4450 


4650 

4375 

575 

2340 

950 

6350 

2660 

710 

4S73 


West Holding 


6600 8500 


previo u s: NLA. 


De Beers 
Driftfontein 
Elands 


1540 

5350 

N_A_ 


15501 

5275 


AA Coro 

AllletRyons 

Anglo Am Gold 

A« Brtt Foods 

Ass Dairies 

Barclays 

Bass 

BAT. 

Beectwm 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boon 

Bawaier Indus 
BP 

Brit Home 5f 
Brtt Telecom 
Brit Aerossoce 
Brttoll 
BTR 
Burman 
Cable wireless 
Cadbury Scftw 
Owrler Cons 
Commercial U 
Cons Gold 
Courraulds 

Dalgety 

Da Beers < 
Distillers 
Drtefonteln 
F Isons 
Freest Ged 
GEC 

Gen Aoddent 
GKN 
Gtaxof 
Grand Met 
GRE 
Gtihuwss 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hawker 
JCI 

Imperial Group 

Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
Uoyds Bank 
Lonrtio 
Lucas 

Marks and Sp 
M etal Box 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bank 
P and Q 
Pilkfngtan 
Piossev 
Prudential 
Racal Elect 
Randfbntefn 
Rgnk 
Reed frtff 
Reuters 
Royal Datrti c 
RTZ 
5aatdii 
Salnsburv 

Hotdfrigs 


sim 

301 

S6S 

270 
148 
447 
671 

271 
31B 
248 

29 

581 

320 

263 


SIT 3 * 

303 
S64 
270 
156 
452 
669 
281 
323 
256 
29 
578 
323 
265 
328 
570 
433 
206 

S 

373 
303 
635 
T72 
215 
236 
501 
194 
475 
490 
515 
SIM 
443 
S23W 
176 
T20 
261 

15 19/321519/32 
388 ' 390 
748 746 


568 

415 

204 

468 

218 

373 

300 


170 

213 

232 

497 

m 

458 

490 

511“ 

$16% 

441 

03* 

176 

721 

259 


Shell 

SIC 

Shd Chartered 
5un Alliance 
Tate and Lyte 

TfcSCO 

Thorn EMI 
T.L Group 
Trafalgar Hse 
THF 
Uttramar 
Unilever £ 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
Wooiwortti 


429 


396 
160 
206 
12 W 
278 
298 
576 


ft. 38 Index :1142J0 
Previous : HUM 
F.T^JLloe index : 1439 jo 


KH 

Banco Comm 

maw 94NOD 

Oga hotels 

12660 12210 

Crvdlfal 

3200 3760 

Erldanla 

13000 12530 

Farai Hoi la 

17460 17200 

Flat 

5100 5015 

General! 

74280 73500 

IFI 

12960 13030 

Ifalcementi 

53050 53000 

1 taigas 

2161 2118 

Itaimablilarl 

145000144700 

Medlobancxi 

139200138000 

MonterOson 

2460 2460 

NBA 

3505 3451 

Olivetti 

8110 7830 

Pirelli 

3370 3380 

RAS 

135000135050 

Rlnascente 

1041 1018 

SIP 

2699 2680 

SME 

1420 1390 

Sola 

'VflflS 48V0 

Standa 

19990 15520 

Stef 

3646 3580 

NUB Currant Imtee : 1928 
Prevtavs : 1985 

PaHa 1 


303 

990 

209 

435 

717 

745 

317 

310 

774 

492 

190 

446 

184 

525 

469 

694 

453 

323 

138 

807 

150 

S73W 

474 

no 

336 


304 

983 


£53 

72 0 


319 

313 

759 

487 

188 

443 

181 

571 

434 

m 

451 

316 

136 

789 

146 

576Vb 

469 

714 

327 


431*4329/32 
532 537 

740 740 

390 388 

116>b TOW 


Air Lkmlde 
AJrtbom AtL 
Av Dassault 
Baieeire 
SIC 

Bgngraln 

Bauygues 

B5N-GD 

Cdmrtbvr 


5» 

597-50 

1240 

801 

495 

1680 


602 
397 JO 
1240 

m 

m 

1710 

175 

2590 


Chib Med 

Darty 

Dumez 

EK-Aaultalne 

Curoacl 

Gen Eoux 

Hactictte 

LotargoGop 

Logrand 

Lesteur 

I’Oreai 

Marrtli 

Matru 

Merlin 

Michel In 

Meet H et in e ss i 

Moulinex 

Occident ale 

Pernod Rle 

Perrier 

Peugeot 

PrinfeiTtPS 

Radlotechn 

Redouto 

Roussel uetsf 

xnofi 

Skb Rraignoi 
Telemecon 
Thomson CSF 
Total 


mf 

677 

478 

1840 

845 

228 

813 

775 

147D 

877 

2409 

737 

2765 

1530 

1AW 

2375 

1531 
2151 
6 &T 0 

m 

741 

446.10 
464 
343 

380.10 
T 8 W 
165? 
676 

1460 


497 

1868 


234 

844 

780 

1470 

m. 

2420 

7« 

2765 

1550 

1674 

2470 

1540 

2165 

7040 

717 

737 

455 

471 

392 



Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Neave 

now njr 

inchcooe 
Mai Bmking 
OCBC 
OUB 
CUE 

Shangri-la 
Sime Darby 
SWore Land 
S'pore Press 
S SleamsMp 
St Trading 
United 
UOB 


280 


095 085 
L93 1J3 

1J0 1J92 

020 &I5 
020 820 
2M 2M 
019 219 

NX). — 
1X5 1X3 

120 224 

6 595 
08 8 080 
258 257 

tM 180 
038 386 


Straits Times led Index: 49181 
Previous 


AGA 

A Kb Laval 

Ana 

Astro 

Atlas Capra 

Bolkfen 

Electrolux 


.. — - - - - 

nmaaDanran 

Wwmwcto 


SondvOt 

Skonska 

SICK 

SwedtahMateh 

Volvo 


165 163 
240 24D 
340 350 
510 510 
163 163 
182 180 
178 176 
217 209 
4S 44S 
209 211 
198 200 
490 490 
650 650 
115 1TB 
263 262 
221 222 
295 290 


Affaermvertdra Index : 44010 
Previous : 44018 


C $y*»ey t 


AC I 

ANZ 

BHp 


666 

317 


1805 

1556 

401 

1473 

2890 

690 

327 


CAE Index : 247 JO 
Previous: 349 jo 


Bacipcrfnvffte 
Casttamalne . 
Cates 
Co mat ra 
CRA 
CSft 
Dunlap 
Elders fxl 
ici Aurtrana 

Magrtfan 

MIM 
Mm 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Coro 
N Broken Hill 
Pwekton 
Old Goal Trust 
Santas 

TTromasNcrtian 
Wbst Mining 
West poc Bkina 
Woods) de 
All ordinaries I 
Previous: 99188 
Source: Routers. 


280 

4.73 

882 

XU 

LBS 

9LA. 

480 

185 

534 

149 

242 

9LA. 

NJL 

N-A. 

248 

140 

4J0 


284 

4J6 

040 

XU 

W 

8 

Ofl 

UQ 


288 

298 

X1D 

£19 

280 

385 

4J2 


1 CIOM 

Prey. 

Full Photo 

*1990 

2020 

Fulltau 

’SS 

1030 

.Hitachi 

705 

Hitachi Coble 

730 

735 

■ ■ 4- 

HOnOQ 

1160 

1160 

Japan Air Lines 

6570 

6790 

Kaltom 

487 

475 

Konscu Power 

1820 

1830 

KawosaU Steel 

136 

735 

Klrtn Brewery 

744 

750 

Komatsu 

501 

507 

Kubota 

338 

340 

Kyocera 

4050 

4030 

Matsu Elec Inds 

1190 

1190 

Matsu Erec works 

900 

897 

Mitsubtsni Bank 

1470 

1478 

MUsubtehl ctxvn 

£ 

472 

• Mitsubishi Elec 

344 

MUsubfshf Hecpvv 

s 

357 

Mitsubishi Carp 

573 

Mitsui and Co 

409 

409 

Mitsubishi 

647 

639 

Mitsumi 

820 

820 

NEC 

1240 

1240 

NGK insulators 

900 

892 

NlkkoSec 

736 

749 

Nippon Kogoku 

& 

1010 

1 Nippon Oil 

807 

Nippon Steel 

155 

753 

Nippon Yusen 
NEssan 

3 

342 

573 

Nomura Sec 

1030 

1020 

Olympus 

1010 

990 

Pioneer 

1580 

1590 

Ricoh 

1130 

1130 

Sharp 

891 

895 

5h]RMmj 

860 

056 

Shine bu Chemical 

823 

615 

Sony 

3330 

3960 

Sumitomo Bonk 

1600 

1610 

Sumitomo Chem 

240 

240 

Sum Homo Marine 

678 

686 

Sumitomo Metal 

3 

139 

Tabei com 

329 

Tafsho Marine 

541 

569 

TakedoChem 

886 

883 

TDK 

4010 

4050 

Tellln 

493 

499 

Taklo Marine 

396 

699 

Tofcvo Elee. Pouw 

2350 

2380 

Toppon Printing 

971 

980 

Toray ind 

512 

519 

Toshiba 

3$8 

356 

Toyota 

1150 

1160 

YamaJrttj sec 

695 

706 

NflcM/DJ. index: 

1278137 1 

Previous ; l2M1.ff 



Mtw Index :IMJ3 
Previous : 1806J7 



1 ZnrM 1 ! 


160 

NJL 

140 

MJL 

200 

4J3 

1-55 


2.IB 

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149 

040 

230 

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Asahl doss 
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Brkfgeatm 


794 

670 


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Dal Nippon Prim 
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Dalwa Securffln 
Fanuc 
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1090 

1020 

3M 

1290 


760 

671 

730 

521 

1110 

1020 


777 

7270 

U30 


1270 

861 

787 

7290 

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Alvsulna 
Aufophon 
Bank Leu 
Brown Bowl 
ObaGefgv 
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4475 

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6250 


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Non. 29 


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17699 AgnlCOE 
500 Agra indA 
39107 Alt Energy 
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1100 Baton Af 
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19123 BCFP 
149145 BC Res 
12450 BC Phone 
300 Brunswk 
69730 Budd Can 
67102 CAE 
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11575 

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2215 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 1985 


SPORTS 


<V r * r • 
’ - 


& 


Jets Get Chewed Up in Lions 9 Den; 
£owboys Do a Trick on Cardinals 

By Gerald F-skf naa good, either, losing 6 of their 7 O’Brien entered the game as the 

New York Time Service games played on. the road. But aE league's top-ranked josser, far 

; PONTIAC, Michigan — It was six teams who have visited the SI- overshadowing die Lions' Eric 
not the dome, die short work week verdome this season — Including Hippie. Bat this rime Hippie was 
or the noise of the crowd. the Miami Dolphins, the Dallas the more resourceful quarterback, 

. It was none ol the above, the Cowboys, the San Francisco 49ers avoiding pressure with quick 
■New York Jets agreed in the wake sod, now, the Jets — have lost. throws. Hie passed for four toueb- 
;of Thursday’s 31-20 defeat by the Ken O’Brien, the Jets’ quarter- downs, three tunes to Leonard 
■Detroit Lions. _ back, was sacked seven times, two Thompson. _ 

So what was it? causing fumbles that positioned the O’Brien did. complete 16 of his 19 

! “We stank it up today," said Joe Lions to some. Another sack put passes in the second half, but by 

■Reids. the Lions dose enoueh to eet a then the Lions were Ivine back at- 




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** y 
W> 




Tfexas A&M Cottons to Texas 


■Fields. ihe Lions dose enough to get a then the Lions were lying back af- 

The Lions had not looked very touchdown on the series. ter taking a 24-3 lead in the third 

quarter. O’ Brim, who was only 7 of 

ri— ■ A nna- n m 16 in the first half, wound up with a 

TAxas A&M Cottons to Texas SSffiJTSftffJSS; 

intercepted, but only b ecause the 
Th* Associated Press into the Cotton Bowl for the Erst Lions’ defenders had slippery 

! COLLEGE STATION, Texas — time since 1968. 

Texas A & M’s quarterback Kevin The Aggies wfll meet Auburn in Much of the pressure on O’Brien 
Murray, threw three touchdown that New Year’s Day game. The caused because his offensive 

f£* *■ Lon^orosare headedf or the Kne- E ffoSSt taffiE 

freshman Rod Hams caught one of bonnet Bow! to pkyAir Forc^ ^ especially William Gay. who 
£“ two J* 1 ™* a 21j>oim third . The A®es stopped Totas four Sj^SaSesiipasalcft^diiiid 
qu^ier riiai beai the Texas Long- um« inside their four-yard hue m sometimes as a right end. Twice. 

W «,0. and put the Aggies ^ *E5S*SSZS2 
Cup Race Postponed, h^don for a 7-0 halftone!^ on McE^y at left tadde^ 

xZl? JTc Mtnra/s 10-yard toudtdown pass o^Sense. there was the contiii- 

Not Enough Snow fl^ker Jeff Ndson. uation of ^epidemic of injuries to 

Untied Press Intenumomd ^ secondary, with both COT- 

■g™. to* - ti* ^SSn^t " 

SS* < ? p TTS’ T? ueicM^W to Henis. 

V^SamtVmc^uf^ce, ttf" *“» ^ 

postponed because James Flowers intercepting a rh. ^ k*. 

Otoe is not raot^h snow, offi- pass by the Texas quartSS, Bret 

■ C *^L^ m0 ^j CC u Fnday - -n Stafford, and returning it ri gh t the «|» « the VariMui 

. They said the race wiD be 7^ .. .iZT . ^ entering the game as the National 

rescheduled for Viflars, Switzer- ^ Longhorns 27. Conference’s worst team in yards ___ n «. 

■land, cat Dec. 14-15- for Han* The next play, the naming bade gained, were able to score readily Stamp Mitchell went over the Cowboys to score, but by 
Austria, on Dec. 20-21 or for Yl f* I*™ 16 yards. Then because they had help, fix taking a game's end the Cardinals were on the bottom, 35-17. 

-ladgastdn, Austria, on Jan 1 1- he scored 00 811 11-yard run for a 17-3 first-half lead, the Lions never 
2. VTUars is the most unlikdy ^l-Q lead. bad to travel more than 43 yards lost nine yards on a sack by Gay mg defeat the St. Lams Cardinals, 

iite, since little snow has fallen Stopping them on the pal line for any of their scores. that pushed the Jets bade to tbar 35-17, The Associated Press report- 

In eastern Switzerland, either. was the turning point in the game," The Jets* opening drive was 14. Dave Jennings punted only 34 ed from Irving, Texas, 

j Sunday’s men’s slalom was said the Aggies’ coach, Jackie Sher- aborted when O’Brien was sacked yards, so early in the second period The Cowboys, who lost to the 
Lnoved Wednesday from Corn- " ^ 3°° B° Cor don't by Gay, fumbled, and lost the ball Hippie led a short drive that was Cardinals, 21-10, on Nov. 4, also 

mayuer, Italy, to Sestriere. make it, it takes something out of on the Jets* 37 to Steve Baade. completed with a 25-yard scoring used a pass by HID on a trick (day 

’ y°U-" Late in the first quarter, O’Brien pass to Thompson. to clinch a NFL-record 20th con- 

Pat Leahy’s 29-yard field goal secutive winning season. 

r« _ . „ _ _ made h 10-5, but the next time the White’s fourth scoring pass was a 




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Stamp Mitchell wait over the Cowboys to score, but by 
game's end the Cardinals were on the bottom, 35-17. 


Site, sn 
In east) 
I Sunt 


McEnroe Wins Match, L»s es f| 
Footing, Temper, Fine 

Compiled br Osr Staff Fran Dispatches 

MELBOURNE — After slip- 
ping and sliding Friday to a sec- 
ond-round victory in the Austra- 
lian Open, John McEnroe ^ 
unleashed a stinging attack on the y? 
courts where the tennis tournament 
Is being played. 

McEnroe beat Dame Visser of 
South Africa. 6-4, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, but 
during the 2 hour and 23 minute 
match McEnroe had a running ar- 
gument with officials and was giv- 
en a code violation for an audible 
obscenity. 

He later said the court on the left 
ride of the main arena was “with- 
out a doubt the worst grass court" 
on which he had ever played. 

The left-handed Visser made the 
left-handed McEnroe continually 
stretch to reach shots and the tour- 
nament’s second-seeded player 
grew increasingly angry as he kept 
losing, his footing. 

“The court is simply not good n 

John McEnr« 

During the third set, he asked the up in the stands with las fnend Tatum O'Neal, the actress. 

toga:, if the m^Tcould be moved round match against the powerful Israelis by heating Amos Mans- 

lo the court on the right side of the Nigerian, Nduka Odizor. _ ’ n t-_ 

main are na which had been used **I don’t enjoy playing in condi- I fell I served very well and 

for the first four days. tions which I fed hinder nay game," extremely happy with the way l m 

Bdlenger listened to McEnroe's said McEnroe, who is bid ding to playing," said Ixaxae, who is 
appeal, but said he thought *hi». win the tournament for the first seeded to meet McEnroe m tne 
court on which they were playin g time, and his first Grand Slam title round of 16. 
was in good <vwiHiiuwi this year. “I don’t think I can play Odizor defeated Dan Cassidy of 

“Listen, if that court is in good ray best tennis on this court” the United States. 6-4. 6-3, 3^S. 6-4. 

rrtndituvn you've got h«rir on your He described the matches on the Two men’s seeds, both Amen- 
headT McEnroe yelled at the Cast surface as “one shot hit-and-miss cans, fell to young Australian play- 
balding BeDenger. tennis.” crs. Dairen C ahill , son of rate of the 

Afterward, McEnroe was McEnroe, who was involved leading Australian rules football 

$1,250 and for a mini - Tuesday in an incident with a re- coaches, beat 15 th-seeded David 

mum of 21 days for use of an audi- P«ter and a photographer at his Pale. 3-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-3, 6-0, and 
ble obscenity. He will not be able to itotd, Friday fdled a photographer Mark Woodforde ousted No. 16 
play again, after the Open, until the with a smash on a practice court Greg Holmes, 1-6, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2. 
Nabisco Grand Masters Grand He quickly apologized and by- . Evert was one of eight seeded 
Prix hEp ™ in New York on Jan. standees said be did not appear to players to gain the third round of 
14. hit the ball intentionally. the 64-draw women’s singles. Two 

“It's not really tennis any more; McEnroe was joined in the last seeds were beaten. No. 1 1 Barbara 

it is fighting for survival,” McEn- 32 of the men’s singles by fifth- Potter and No. 14 Lisa Bonder, 





3way Getting Third Shot at Steelers 

■itf Defense I$StM Tough, and Each Team Needs to Win 


i By Michael Janofsky 

r New York Times Service 

|EW YORK — John Etway and the Denver Bron- 
|vlD be back in Pittsburgh Sunday, and who could 
the odd turn of events of their last trip? 
.. Etf -amg Day, 1983: Elway, the heralded rookie 
| jQY^anford, in his professional debut, lasted all of a 
[uoohjnpletmg one of eight passes, throwing one that 
terceptea and looloag altogether unsettled. He 
at hs elbow, leaving the second half to Steve 

ir 

'.in a scenario that became common foe the 
that season and the next, the defense bailed 
jj ( Mit, iKercepting three of Cliff Stoudfs passes 

^ ft<> jvririgRHrf^ ^Tge^AS 'meBt , oeco5Wourl4- 

^Morebs memories: The next time the teams met, 

^ NFL PREVIEW 


Late in the first quarter, CrBnen pass to Thompson. to clinch a NFL-record 2uth con- “It's sot really tennis any more; McEnroe was joined in the last seeds were beaten, no. i i ttaroara 

Pat Leahy’s 29-yard field goal secutive winning season. it is fighting for survival," McEn- 32 of the men’s singles, by fifth- Potter and No. 14 Lisa Bonder, 

made it 10-3. but the next time the White’s fourth scoring pass was a roe said. seeded Stefan Edbeig of Sweden, both from the United States. 

MfJ nt fitAAlAitc Jets got the ball, O'Brien was hit by 53-yander to Hll in the third peri- He found an unlikely ally in the sixth-seed Johan Kriek of the Umt- Amre Hobbs of Britain def rated 

[Tl OUfJI/ dli M liV vlGlo Curtis Green, fumbled and Gay od. On Dallas’ next possession, defending women’s singles champi- ed States, seventh-seeded Joakim Potter, 6-4. 7-5,and Ann Henri ck s - 

recovensd on the Jets’ 43. Two H3L, off a reverse, threw a pass for on, Chris Evert Doyd, after she Nystrpm of Sweden, eighth-seeded son of the United States downed 

, _ . _ plays later. Hippie completed a 38- only the second time in bis career, struggled to a 4-6, 6-4. 6-0 second- American Tim Mayotte and his -B onder , 3-6, 6-3, 9-7. 

n JUrrh I finiil riGBd& tO Wot yard touchdown pass to Marie It went to tight end Doug Cosbie round triumph over Betsy Nagel- 10tb-seeded countryman Brad Gil- Claudia Kohde-Kilscfa of West 

Nichols. for 42 yards and set up Tony Dor- sen of the United States. bert, and 13th-seeded Henri Le- Germa ny, seeded fifth, took just 45 

« iwiriM vt-xi « This was bow bad ii became for sett’s three-yard scoring run. . “in mv mind a eood crass court oonte of France. minutes to beat Gigi Femandez of 

l^osing^Sk &iuh?Sy th^’dS iTrith Eari the Jets: Chi a Atod^uarte drive. White thrw three is the be^ surface to^a?^ in the beat ^ S^ultt_<rfthe the Umted j States,^-!, 6-2 wfage 

Cunpl^nmiung for 160 yardsTvras hardly surpris- 'g*, 1 ** ** P 3 ^ ® the^ halt of 18 y^ worid, and a bad gra£ wort is the ^ ^ 

bg7The Vto^usuaDy grveup a lot of yaitisM £ covoed each time. The Jets cop- m Mtlre Rrafro, 19yar^to Cosbie wortt surface,’’ she sakL 'The cottI wfafle Nystrom founds ytly UmtedStttes ovmpowne^tot^ 

grarnd. iSts do notnis by 5.) drw : “j® 3 -. 101 * certainly favors the mufcrfog. It is hard< ? to another^ Amech ma aronrica of Czechoslovakia, 6- 

Mumesoti «-7l at PMatWoKa Six lo«« are ra<ied with Hippie’s eight-yard with 1:08 left before mtennission, wj. but sfooerv" ^ Sammy Giammalva, 6-3, 6-2, 1, 6-1. 

pa»toTte5»n».d.M-3Ld gave Mta a 2I-17 lead. 5-7 « The aevegh^ededMuud. 

nlavnff« ftev twn h-rf team* Atiantn <.r»i The Jets could not recover. “I was really worried at first, . As Kcq “ “ e . ecQ ^~ Mctnroe s Kndc defeated David Mustard Maleeva of Bulgaria, who has ef- 

^ d , ^ _ P __ . said the Cowboys’ coach, Tom W ®2 ttas £„ Evcrt of New Zealand, 64, +6, 6-3, 64; fectivdy adapted her game to grass, 

ai * Cowboys Beat Canfinak Landry. “The Cardinals looked rve on^better courts, let s Mayotte was too powerful for his beat Myriam Scfaropp of West Ger- 

kmgs last three losses have been to had teams. (Eagles pamjy White, the quarterback really good. Then they kind of put it that way. compatriot Mark Dickson, 64, 64, many, 6-2, 6-3, and next meets her 

n n im n n ,* -n -ru n °f the Dallas Cowboys, threw four sagged in the second half. That Officials later said McEnroe 64; Gilbert beat Shahar Pedriss of 16th-seeded sister, Katerina,^ 6-3, 
. .rr ^i^^i touchdown passes Thursday, two happens to a team thafs not in the would be granted his wish and be Israel, 6-3, 6-3, 7-6 (8-6); and Le- 7-6 (7-3) winner over Japan’s Ma- 

j< thft firtf HmT Ttey in to wide receiver Tony H21, in help- race." given an outside court for his third- conte made h a bad day for the . sako YanagL - (AP r UPI) 

wcatner this season. (Prirkers by 615.) ‘ ’ - - 1 ' 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
Buffalo (2-10) at San Diego (5-7): The Chargers 
have lost their last two, by 6 points in overtime to the 
Broncos and by 2 to the Oilers on a field goal with two 


given an outside court for his third- conte made it a bad day for the sako YanagL 


(AP,UPI) 


•*> 

y -. >+ \ ■+*■*] 

Vi- -^3 


seconds lefL They have also pven up 101 points in 
their last three but the Bills nave not scored 


. divisal playoff g»me last season in Denver, tbeiT 1851 tiirc ^ games, but the Bills have not scored 
tht a pass that was intercepted i?tf in the nwra than 21 in a game all season. (Chargers by 916.) 
c and up the winning touchdown. The Seeders Houston (5-7) at Cmdonati (5-7): Given the tight 

24-to advance to the conference champi on- race in the AFC Central, neither team is out of 
' p-un contention for the division title. If Boomer Esiason’s 

i muor history. hip and CrisCoDinsworth's back are improved enough 

-jw,& though Elway may have established to let them play, the Bengali should win, even though 
df me of the National Football League's diey have not scored a touchdown in their last two 
j y> quarterbacks, playing in Pittsburgh win games, losing to the Raiders, 13-6, and the Browns, 24- 
* asier. like the Broncos, the Steelers lost ®tit in thor previoos matchup, the Oilers won, 44- 
md arefighting to stay in the lead of their 27. Since, Oliver Luck has replaced an injured Warren 
e Si edas are tied with the Cleveland Moon at quarterback — and he threw for 286 yards 
6 in the American Conference Central; agmnst San Diego. (Bengals by 7.) 
re tied with the Los Angeles Raiders at 8- Kansas Gty (4-8) at Seattle (6-6): The Seahawks did 

'West not exactly instill confidence in anyone in the way they 

any still in the running for the 19-6, to the 49ers Monday night after getting the 
'rve go fr om tmeh conference, the three ball four extra times on three interceptions and a 
icrs plus two wild-card teams— victories fumble recovery. But tire Chiefs have just ended a 
for both dubs. seven-game losing streak with a 20-7 victory over the 

i be f aring a defense that has given up (Seahawks by 714.X 

ban any other t*^»n in the conference and . N® 1 * Eng la nd (8-4) at Indianapolis (3-9): After los- 
rii than m other in the iwigna big in ovatime to the Jets, the Patriots must win this 
ever had5l guys swarming around the game to tie the Jets in the sta n d i ng. But it will not be as 
ne of thefl," Dan Reeves, the Broncos’ eas y 85 « might have been had the Patriots not lost 
ike other %y, sp eaking of the Steelers. three valuable members of the offense. Steve Grogan, 
fee Stederfwere noted as a that who quarterbacked them to six straight victories, is out 
Thqr're n< fcKmng nea rly rmu-h thic for the season with a fractured 1^ and tom ligaments; 
r &titl use fes a surprise element. They John H a nn a h , the right guard, ruptured a tendon in 
'-of speed, fid we have to handle that to ^ right shoulder and Ron Wooten, the left guard, 
^ sprained ligaments in his right knee. (Patriots by 6^.) 


6 in the American Conference Central; 
re tied nith the Los Angeles Raiders at 8- 
' West. 

utny trams still in the running for the 
ive go horn each conference, the three 
ers plus two wild-card teams — victories 
for bothxhrbs. 

i be racing a defense that has given op 
ban any dtiier team in the conference and 
air than aw other team in the league. 


he other i 
fee Steel err 
They're no 
r still use i 
'■of speed, 



Black Jockey Finds Prejudice 


Against Women 


By Vinxtic Perrone 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — When yon 


never seen a female rider that’s as the'board,” West said “Maybe he’s with junqxrs, you’re way sensitive 
good as strong, as aggressive as a just starting to get tihaip. But they to horses taking had steps. And she 
male rider." take yon off the horse, and he wins was. She’s a very intdBgenl per- 


have been a jockey for eight years, He added “Other than Chris the next time ool, and they say, 
averaging one race every 10 days McCarron, Tve never seen an ap-, ‘See; I told you she couldn’t nde.’ It 


son. 


averaging one race every 10 days McCarron, rve never sc 
and one victory every four months, prcutice look that great. 1 
people begin to wonder how you West will remain an i 
stay in financial shape. Terry West “ receiving a five-poun 

has a simple answer exercise. logram) weight allowanc ^ ^ 

West, 29, grew up in Washing- ^ wi ? s ^ aL * Kut win. It was West’s 24th victory in her dog. 

ton, D.C. and became a racing 271 raDes * H« best year was 1981, “i wouldn’t say Tm loody. I 

ranty: a black female jockey. But, fln J when she won 6 of 14 starts. think I work such odd hoars— I 

rasemiaOy, she makes a living exer- ttR She rides primarily for Vmceait get up around 5, get home around 

casing horses, at S6 a gallop. rhp rro,^- Lewis,' a small-time trainer of 10 11:30— everyone bat work at that 

She aspires to ride in more races ‘WdL she doesn’t have five oounds. bones who appreciates her in- time. And when they get home af .6 

but says discrimination — against so why use her? M^rinSwdi rights. “Horses will get along with o’dock m the evmrng, Tm ready to 


gets ltinda frustrating.’ 


West is gregarious, a natural 
amid the race track hubbub. Her 


win. It was West’s 24th victory in her dog. 

271 races. Her best year was 1981, ~i wouldn’t say Tm loody. I 
when she won 6 of 14 starts. ihmk I work such odd hoars — 1 


get up around 5, get home around 
1 1 :30 — everyone is at work at that 


her sex — prevents h. ' her that other reasoned riders will go to bed" 

“It’s a problem getting horses to West has declined to hire an he said “She Ctace, after West bad tiud 

ride," West said recently at Laurel agent “We’d both be broke," she kno T swfacn / a “°ra® ** 1 sore » aaclshe m undistinguished race wit! 
Race Course. “They always say, said, laughing. . c 311 be very (exact) about it gettable oatcome, her horse' 

“Why you gonna ride a gjrl? They She had just finished third in a West’s way with horses has do- er was approached and 
aren’t strong enough.’ I fed we’re cheap Ttaimmg nee, her mount veloped over nearly a quarter-cen- “Why’dyou.useagidjocke 

just as competent" as male riders, cha rging from last place to Fnieh wry. Her father operated a farm in way?" 

“The problem is most of us don’t one and one-half lengths Howard County, Maryland raising The owner looked at th 

ride enough to show we can do it the w inner . S till, ch* nn/wtain and showing jumping horses. West with, consternation and r 
just as wdl as any of the guys can." about future assignments on the '* f as boosted onto her first pony at “You mean that wasn't a be 
King Leatherbuiy. one of the horse. age 5. But she never, conshlaed • West recaBed the incident 

most successful trainers in Mary- “A lot of times, the owna will nding thoroughbreds until a friend grin, 
land racing history, said “With all say, ‘I don’t want her an a horse,’ encouraged her to take one for a “A lot of times, people 
due respect to females, Fve just even though the horse finishes on g^°P on a monting in 1977. The know I'm a girt," she said 


have trouble with," he said “She 
knows when a horse is sore, and she 
can be very (exact) about it." 

West’s way with horses has do- 


no Race S 

INTERCf 
6) at New! 
tael Mann 
ie Giants 
thrown fc 
■id solid 
ith victa 


ports Book has rated the 
[TERENCE 

)ik Gants (84); The loss 
tabor best receiver, could 
bpiy once in the last six 
tare than 200 yards. The 
[fense all season. In their 
te, and five times over an, 
’ouchdown or less. (The 

lanta (2-10): After 
tay finally get a 
Their final three 
the Los Angeles 
'tit all three to 

olphins have 
the last five 
jfis. The Bears 
quarters, which 
jid Atlanta. Stfil, 
home, and they 
icoday fright: They 
asm without a loss, 
" a Bowl after a 14-0 
Vibe pUyofli (Bears 

fekence \ 

fntrtn Q (7-5): If heceat 
the 49ers will have a 
they have won four 
^vemnwered tean^ the 
j WhSngton’s deftnse 
/an fl A b een very herd 
-i-u Jpi^Wcms have te- 
Steeles, 

i Cf43e&r. His arm is 
on ^ 49er^ 

Crt*,3pe49ers’ favor 
,ri,eriS« dieBron ? J8 ’ 

l me more than 


Terry West: “It’s a prob- 
lem getting horses to ride.” 


don’t 



SCO 

Tennis 

Australian Open 

MEN 

second Rounds Slofon Edboro# Swkl, d*f. 
Bud SdiurtL USe 6-3. *4. 74 (7-4): HuuhVOn 
Boeckoi/ Notfudof- Nolaon Aertz, Brca^ 7-i fr- 
X John SodrL U J5* dot Brad DrawdH. 
AusfrpLfr-7 r*B), M (7-5), 7-4 <7 -4>«; Johan 
Kriek, u JXe amt Dovld Mustard. n«m Zkx.M 
4-4. 4-X W; Tim GuJIlckna dtrf. Chris 
Lewf% Now ZJKLa 6-1 6- K 64; JoafcJm 
Nysfrom, SwecL do f. Sammy Gtammofya 
u A. 6*. 6-1 V* 64; John McEnroe, U-5^ dof. 
Danlo Vfanwr, S. Air., 64, 6a 34k 6-3; Brad 
Gi hrti UJUflef. Stator PorMsc, l snoot 64r ^ 
1 7-6 (66); Henr) Locanhb Pro- del. Amos 
Maradorf, Israel, 64, 6-1 7-5t Jav Lapldui 
Austral, del. Peter Thru pot Austral 74 (74), 
64. 7-6 (7-5); Darran Cahjiu Austral, def. Da- 
vid Pan, (is* 34 7-6 (7-21 ■ 6-1 6-0; Poor 
Doohaa Austral, dof. Todd NoUon, U^. 64.74 
(7416-1 ; Matt Anoer, UJX, dot Shlomo Click- 
MV Israel. 6-1 6-1, 5-7, 6-2; Nduka Odizor, 
Ntoertadef. Dan Cassidy, US.446HH64; 
Raberlo saod, AraMina.aef, Francisco Gon- 
xolei Paranuay, 14. 74 (IB-16). 64. 7-5; Tim 
Mayotte, USwdeL Mark Dickson. UJ^64. 6-4 
64; Mark Woodforde, AustroL def. Greo 
Holmes. Ui. l-h, 6-1. 64. 6-2. 

WOMEN 

Se co n d Ron a: Chris Evert Uont U^, d«f. 
Betsy Naoelsen, U-l 4-4 64, 6-0; Ann Hmn- 
itcfcssen. U.&. def. User Bander, Ui- 34. 6-1 9- 
7; Jo Durfe, Brlv^daf. Sara Comer, Brit, 6-16- 
3; Helena Sukava, Czechs def. Robin wjilifir 
(14. 64, 63; MaifueNa Maleeva, Bub. dot. 
riAyrtem 8chrapp,W.Gvrnv,62,63; Zina Gar- 
rison, U5.d»fl. Katerina Skronsk&Csetfu6-1. 
6-T; Olonvt# Bu le st i ut AintmL del Amanda 
Brown. Brit, 6-a 7-5: Amanda PbiawMb Aus- 
tral. det Ouisfkane Jollssont SwHz, 6-1 74 
174); Katerina Maleeva, Bvio* def. Masoka 
rawot Japan, 6a 74 (7-3) ; Catarina Lfndo- 
vlel. Sw fid U det. Efsuke Inoim, jam K 7-5; 
Oaudtfa Kohde-KIfsch, w. Germ, def. C W 
Fernandez, U5. 6-t 6-2; Ame Hobbs, Brif^ 
def. Barbara Potter, U3, 6-c 7-5. 


Football 
NFL Standings 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 


N.Y. jets 
New England 
Miami 
Indianapolis 
Buffalo 

CHrvelond 

Ptttsburah 

Houston 

CfncJnnotl 

UA. Readers 


Seattle 
San Oleao 
Kansas Ofy 


2 ie 
central 
6 6 
ft 6 

5 7 

5 7 

West 

6 4 

8 4 

6 6 
5 7 

d S 


T Pc#. PF PA 
0 592 323 228 

0 467 240 200 

0 467 290 745 

0 ,250 214 292 

0 .167 162 256 

0 .500 201 772 

0 JSOQ 272 210 
0 417 206 270 

0 .417 799 325 

D 367 274 261 
0 Mf 294 2S2 
0 J0D 2A7 244 
0 417 319 332 

0 J33 222 278 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


Dot las 
N.Y. G Keils 
Washlnoton 
Philadelphia 
SL Louts 

x-Ovlcapo 
Detroit 
Green Bay 
Minnesota 
Tamoa Bav 


Centred 
17 0 

7 6 

5 7 
S 7 
2 10 


Jfifl 2S9 231 
467 02 196 
J83 218 225 
300 200 710 
JOS 220 325 

1JJ00 359 177 
J38 261 280 
4T7 24A 281 
A\T 244 778 
.167 247 350 


wOrieanstK 
aints four £| 
snoreasoal 

lum Phillips' 

The Saints py 


The Rams 
[ ago, win- 
tame they 
bo longer 
filler last 


Soccer 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
Aftiee Zone 

Iran 3L Syrlo 1 


LA. Roms V 3 0 J90 258 19B 

San Francisco 7 5 0 J83 294 193 

New Orleans 4 0 0 JXX 220 3Z3 

Atlanta 2 10 0 .167 218 357 

(x-d Incited cflvtslon title) 

THURSDAY3 RESULT5 
Detroit 31, K.Y. Jets 20 
Dallas 35. S». Louis 17 

SUNDAY'S GAME 5 
Cleveland at N.Y. Giants 

Denver at Pittsburgh 
Houston at Onctmafl 
Tampa Bay at Green Bav 
LA Rams at New orisons 
Minnesota at Phil a delp hi a 
New England at Indianapolis 
i—A. Raiders at Atfonia 
KaKfts CMv at Seattle 
San Francisco at WaNihiofan 
Buffalo at San Dleaa 

MONDAYS GAME 
aUcoDo at Miami 


Hockey 
NHL Standings 

WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Dtvfslen 

W L T Pts GF GA 
PhUadelpMa IB 4 0 36 110 U 

Washington 13 6 3 29 87 60 

NY Islanders 9 7 5 23 81 02 

NY Rangers io H 1 21 02 71 

New jersey 9 TO 1 19 73 79 

Pittsburgh 7 12 3 17 82 03 

Adams Division 

Boston IT 7 4 26 89 75 

Buffalo 12 9 T 25 83 66 

Quebec 1 1 10 1 23 83 75 

Montreal 9 9 3 ZT B4 85 

Hartford 10 10 0 20 77 77 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Morris Division 

St. Louis V 8 3 21 71 76 

Chicago 9 10 3 21 91 95 

Minnesota 6 10 ft IB 81 &6 

Detroit 5 12 4 U 69 104 

Toronto 4 15 3 11 76 TOT 

Smyfbe Division 

Edmonton 15 4 3 33 T08 78 

Calaary 12 7 3 27 96 76 

Vancouver 9 12 3 21 97 102 

Winnipeg 8 13 2 10 83 112 

Las Angeln 5 14 2 12 71 V15 

THURSDAY'S RESULT 
Quebec 0 2 1—3 

Boston 0 0 0—0 

P. Stastftv 3 (101. Shots on goal: Quebec (on 
Keans) 6-10-9— 25; Boston ranMalarchukl 10- 
12-5—27. 


St. Louis 

Chicago 

Minnesota 

Detroit 

Toronto 

Edmonton 
Calgary 
Vancouver 
Winnipeg 
Los Armies 



W orld Cup Prologue 

ME NTS SLALOM 
TAf Sestrlpre, Italy) 

I. Solan Krlzal. Yugoslavia. ST41-S7.74— 1 
minute, si. 17 seconds. 

Z Robert Eriocfter. I lari v. 53L59.57.9fr— 
I L51JSS 

X Ron Petrovlc, Yugoslavia. 52J2-S9J6— 
1:5160 

4 Jonas Nilsson. Sweden. SX2fr-58J7 — 
1:SX03 

s. Mathias Bertlwid. Austria, 54 . id- 58. 13— 
1.5223 


Head ol Roma Team 
Denies Intent to Bribe 

Agence France -Presse 

ROME — Kuo Viola, chairman of the soccer miry 
AS Roma, denied Friday that be had paid 100 
Hra (about $60,000) with the intention of bribing the 
referee of a European Champions’ Cup semifinal 
match against the Scottish team Dundee United in 
April 1984. 

Rome’s public prosecutor, Marco Bosdri, an- 
nounced that he has begun inquiries int o the 
allegations. 

Viola said he “discussed these claims in a brief talk 
with Federico Sordfllo," president of the Italian Foot- 
ball Association, “in May 1984, but at the time all 
attention was focused on the cup final against Liver- 
pool." 

The referee; Michel Vautrot of France; “is one of 
the best in Europe,’' added Vida, a Christian Demo- 
crat member of ihe Italian senate. “My son, Riccardo, 
promised to send him a video of the match. Perhaps 
that’s why he has been accused." 

Vida maintained that he became involved in an 
attempt to expose a “big name" in football and, when 
be realized he would be unable to, informed the 
football association. 

“It is not true," Sordfllo said. “He only told me of it, 
in a confused and roundabout way, in September this 
year." He said Vautrot was above siupiaon. 

Sparuco I -.mdmi, accused of acting as an interme- 
diary for Viola, resigned Thursday as general manager 
of the second division club Genoa. He reportedly has 
admitted makin g no attempt to contact VaunoL 

■ U.S. Investigators In Paris 

Investigators from the New York Racing and Wa- 
gering Board arrived in Paris this week to check into 
tbe positive drug test of the thoroughbred Lashkari 
after the Breeders’ Cup Turf race in November, Reu- 
ters quoted French racing sources as saying Friday. 

The sources said the office of the Aga Khan, who 
owns the horse, was cooperating “100 per cent," 


friend worked for Lewis. But as a jockey, she does not 

Said Lewis, “When you grow up mind. 


Blanc paiN 


4t 

\ 






% 


Once, after West had ridden Ini ; 
an undistinguished race with a Jtar- ■ 
gettable outcome; her horse’s own^ ' 
er was approached and. asfced^ - 
“Why*d you use a gtd jockey, any?-'; 
way?" ' _ 

The owner looked at the matt : 


■ ■ M*a 


tfrVji iLtfqF* j 


•It . ' 

'a .-j - ■ 


■ ■* • . m* 

- 








i 















i 

t 


£??«20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 1985 


POSTCARD 


PEOPLE 


Upheaval in Turin Toun The Fall oi a Guru and His Commune 


Titanic Gets a Boost 


Bv Bd Schafer 

V. - The AssotM'** ^ ra3 

■ LrANNIBAL. Nfosouri — The 
fX seven-month f«uval cele- 
Waijng the ISOih areuversaiy of 
Twain's may have given 
Hannibal a big boost as a tourist 
: fifeaciioo. but it left the city's gov- 
; . «tanem in a shambles, 

;,Wiih ihe celebration in its final 
KkL the Mississippi River com- 
aunin of 19.000 people is without 
a mayor and three of its 12 city 
Couacilinen. victims of a bitter 
. squabble caused at least in pan bv 
the festival. 

"The sesqiri centennial celebra- 
tion has done remarkably well un- 
der adverse conditions," former 
Mayor John Lyng, a member or the 
festival commission, said in a re- 
cent interview. “Out of a budget 
that eventually reached $850,000, 
we are only about $ 20,000 to 
$25,1X8) short and we should may? 
that up with collections, sales of 
inventory and pledges bv the end of 
the month." 

Even before the event opened 
last spring, it ran into problems. A 
SI j million budget was proposed, 
but that was trimmed to $560,000. 

Organizers had envisioned a long 
series of concerts by top groups, 
permanent additions to the historic 
downtown district and even an in- 
ternational balloon race. 

An amphitheater was built on 
the southern edge of the town's 
waterfront, but a theme stage 
planned for the north era part 
didn’t materialize. The balloon race 
also failed to come off and some of 
the musical events were canceled. 

Meantime, Lyng was defeated as 
he sought re-election. Most acta- 
bute the loss to anti-festival senti- 
ment. 

However, Lyng’s successor, 
Richard Centra, resigned Nov. 12 
after being threatened with im- 
peachment. Three councilmen ac- 
cused him of misusing city equip- 
ment and labor, and illegally taping 
telephone conversations. 

The three coiindlmen, Wayne 
Pafford, John Hamilton and James 
Dexbeimer, also resigned. All four 
men said they would seek re-elec- 
tion in a special election in Febru- 
ary. 

Twain — Samuel Langhorae 
Clemens — was bora on Nov. 30. 
1835 in nearby Florida, Missouri, 
but grew up in Hannibal which 
was the setting for “The Adven- 
tures of Tom Sawyer” and “The 


MOVING 


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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," 
whose publication 100 yean ago 
was recalled on some souvenir T- 
shirts. 

Cerreui had made the festival an 
issue in his mayoral campaign , say- 

mg there were better ways to spend 
city funds for economic develop- 
ment. “I wasn't critical of the festi- 
val iiself," Cerretti said Wednes- 
day. “I was critical of the planners. 
We spent huge sums of money and 
got nothing for it." 

Although none of the impeach- 
ment charges against Cerretti in- 
volved the festival, his criticism of 
the festival had provoked resent- 
ment within the council. The coun- 
cil voted last month to suspend the 
mayor with pay pending an im- 
peachment hearing, which was can- 
celed after the resignations were 
announced. 

Local feelings were not soothed, 
either, by an article in the Wall 
Street Journal on Aug. 6 ; which city 
officials said “did a hatchet job" on 
the town and the festival by listing 
all of its negative aspects. 

“The reporter found and quoted 
lots of critics of the sesquicentenni- 
aL but apparently wasn't as zealous 
in his pursuit of (he other side of 
the story." wrote Gil StuenkeL. 
managing editor of the Hannibal 
Courier-Post. 

Throngh it all, however, the festi- 
val drew several hundred thousand 
visitors over the summer and nearly 
paid for itself. “We'll know after 
Nov. 30,” the official dosing, said 
the Reverend Peter C. Ha user, who 
quit the sesquiceniennial commis- 
sion in the spring because ''there 
were waves threatening to sink the 
ship." He has changed his mind, 
however. “1 believe a sizable por- 
tion of the community now recog- 
nizes that it was a worthwhile 
event. They didn’t think it could be 
pulled off. but it was." 

"Maybe some of the dreams 
were too large." said Tom Boland, 
president of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. Lyng added: “It’s just too 
bad that the political laundry was 
hung out to dry just as we were 
calling national attention to our- 
selves.” 

Twain would have loved it 

“When politics enter into munic- 
ipal government," he once wrote, 
"nothing resulting therefrom in the 
way of crimes and infamies is then 
incredible, it actually enables us to 
accept and believe the impossible." 


MOVING I 




CALIFORNIA 


NEVADA 


By Wallace Turner 

• V *W r«rt Times Service 

R AJNEESHPURAM. Oregoa — What used to le the reception 
center has become the departure lounge as the population of the 
Rajoeeshee commune ben: melts away. 

Throughout the day the red-dad followers of Bhagwan Shree 

Rjjneesh bring their luggage to a curb here, where it sits in the gently 

spiraling snowfall, as they wait 1 — 

for the bus that takes them out. ‘ Uw Washington \ 
Their gum has gone to India after £ | A - - — _ ‘ x 

a plea bargain on a federal indict- wj poiwnd ™ J 

raent for immigration fraud. -Jfi ^mwop* f 

There is an uneasiness among § j m u w gfcww grni Cg 

some followers as they face a new *j finw ° 

life. "I’ve lived here these years j Oregon 

where 1 was provided for," said y m 
Swami Sagar Chetcan. who was \ 
running the cash register at the \ nevada 

delicatessen. “My clothes were / CAUFORw ' 0 — 55Tioo 

clean. I had clean sheets. I was 

fed. I had a doctor when I was ill 7N ’ N *** Y ' af * r “ n * 4 

and a dentist when I bad a tooth- bought the Muddy Creek Ranch, 
ache. New I’m about to go out in 62,000 acres (25,000 hectares), for 
the world again, that success-ori- 55.75 mllion in July I9S I . 
euted place, and it worries me. 1 The commune invested about 
don't even have clothes to wear to $35 million, according to esti- 
be interviewed for a job. except mates published by Oregon news- 
ihese. What would I say. that I’ve papers. Oregon tax assessors in 
been a member of a cult?" the two counties where it is situai- 

Deriining to give his pre-corn- ed list its value at 531 million. 

mune name, as did all others in- The money produced a town 
tenriewed, he was wearing the red ^ ^ 3 j00 people. It 

colors of the commune members, has shops, stores, a farm opera- 
as well as the mala, a medallion don> 3 ^ 1 ^, a j el airstrip ^ 
with a picture of the guru, around ^ val]ey no or, a neel of buses ^ 

his neck on a suing of wooden lestanra^js, a hotel, all sons of 
beads, heavy equipment to build roads 


TVs N*w Ylcrt Jinn 


beads. 

It is a lime of embraces, of 
goodbyes, of promises to remain 
in contact, of shared memories. 

Waiting at the bus stop where 
they had put down their luggage, 
Putorna, a former Eastern Air- 
lines cabin attendant, and Shiva 
Nan da. a former structural engi- 
neer in Copenhagen, both said 
they had joined the guru in Poo- 
na. India. 

Putorna said she was jaded 
with travel around the world on 
her airline passes and had agreed 
to go with a friend, a New York 
stockbroker, to India, where they 
looked up the guru. "At that time 
Bhagwan was in silence, I sat and 
looked at him and it came to me 
that there was more in life." 

She came back to the United 
States and then returned to Poo- 
na to live. In 1983 she rejoined 
the group here. She drove a taxi 
around the commune. 

In four years the cult built a 
s mall dtv in this isolated valley 
that had' been carved by two 
small streams. The Raj nees bees 


and houses, and a dam to provide 
water storage. 

Where the money came from 
will be an issue in court actions 
that officials here say they expea 
to follow the commune’s depar- 
ture. 

Many Rajneesbees deposited 
their money with the Rajneeshee 
Financial Sendees Trust, which 
promised them they could have it 
back. But accounts have been fro- 
zen, although depositors still may 
use their credit cards to make 
purchases at commune stores. 

..Ma Prem Niren, 40, the mayor 
of Rajneesbpuram. told the com- 
mune's residents last week that 
they should plan to leave and that 
the place would be sold. 

Antelope is a village 20 miles 
from here that is populated most- 
ly by retired people and has been' 
the "gateway to Rajneeshpuram. 
Margaret HilL a Former mayor 
who is a critic of the commune, 
spoke bitterly of Rajneesh. who 
in 1981 left followers in Poona 


when he came to the United 
States. 

"Their leader is a crook,” said 
Mitchell in an interview. “Now 
he has left two groups of follow- 
ers in the lurch when the going 
got tough.” 

The commune rode roughshod 
over the residents of Antelope 
when they criticized it in 1982. 
Rajneesbees moved into Ante- 
lope. voted and took over the city 
government, renaming the place 
Rajneesh. At the Bhagwan’s sug- 
gestion, in the Nov. 5 election 
they voted to rename it Antelope. 

Life aL Rajneeshpuram began 
to fall apart in mid-September 
when Ma Anand Sheela, the gu- 
ru’s chief aide, left with some of 
her staff. 

Rajneesh announced to the 
others that Sheela, who is also 
known as Sheela Patel Silverman, 
bad done many bad things such 
as plotting muiider, tapping tele- 
phones and grabbing power. 
From Europe she retorted that 
the commune’s troubles stemmed 
from the guru’s demand for more 
and more jewelry, more Rolls- 
Royce curs for bis fleet, which 
numbers about 85, and other 
wasteful luxuries. 

On Oct. 23 a federal grand jury 
in Portland indicted Rajneesh 
and others on charges that they 
plotted sham marriages to bring 
his followers or foreign citizen- 
ship into the United States from 
his prior commune in Poona. 

Officials say they bdieve Raj- 
neesh learned of his indictment 
and fled Rajneeshpuram in a jet. 
He was arrested in Charlotte, 
North Carolina, and returned to 
Portland to face charges. 

On Ocl 28, Sheela and others 
were arrested in West Germany 
on charges made in a Wasco 
County, Oregon, grand jury in- 
dictment that they cried to mur- 
der Rajneesh’s physician in a 
struggle for power in the com- 
mune. 

On Nov. 14, Rajneesh pleaded 
guilty to two counts of the indict- 
ment. He paid a $400,000 fine 
and was ordered to leave the 
United Slates. He left that day, 
saying he hoped never to return, 
and is reported to be in India. 

Rajneesh’s followers here were 
told last week by Dyan John, fi- 
nance officer for the commune, 
that the commune had current 


debts to purveyors of about $1.5 
million and a long-term debt of 
$35 million, mostly to a web of 
Rajneeshee corporations. 

[Followers of the Bhagwan 
Shree Rajneesh have received an 
invitation from the Indian guru 
to join a commune in Poona, but 
those remaining at the central Or- 
egon settlement showed little 
enihu&iam Thursday about the 
offer. United Press International 
reported. Eighty-two of the gu- 
ru's Rolls-Royce automobiles 
were sold to a Texas dealer. Raj- 
neeshee officials said furnishings 
and equipment of the commune 
will be sold at an auction begin- 
ning Dec. 17.] 

So the guru's followers have 
begun to melt away. Theirs num- 
bers have dwindled to fewer than 
1 , 000 , and that is qnickly dimin- 
ishing 

Back at the commune, those 
not ready to leave met to talk over 
the past. On a bench outside the 
delicatessen a wo man in late mid- 
dle age talked of her experience at 
the commune. “Life is its own 
meaning" she said. 

She had lived in Bellevue, a 
Seattle suburb, and conducted 
therapy sessions at a humanistic 
center, she said, giving her name 
as Dyson. 

She heard things that attracted 
her to Poona. There she met the 
guru and derided, "I wanted to be 
with this man because be trig- 
gered a sense of wefl-beujg" 

She sold her home and moved 
to Poona. Then she followed the 
guru to Oregon. Now she will go 
back to the Seattle area to five 
with relatives. 

Ma Prem Mauon, a woman in 
her early 30s, was on duty at the 
main gate. She said she would gp 
back to Palo Alto, California, to 
visit her family, and then on to 
Santa Fa, New Mexico, where she 
was a waitress and masseuse. “If I 
had done the sex stuff, 1 would 
have made a lot more money,” 
she said, “but 1 was too shy then 
and now I'm too scared of dis- 
ease. I just missed out all the way 
around." 

On the road out, up the hill 
above Cundijeff Dam and Krish- 
namurti Lake, which is dedicated 
to the guru, the exodus passed an 
attractive billboard on which was 
printed: “I go to the feet of the 
awakened one.” 


A judge’s ruling on goods sal- 
vaged from the sunken liner Lusita- 
nia in 1982 deared the way Friday 
for a possible British-led effort 
raise toe Titanic. In the ruling. 
Judge Barry Sheen said the British 
government had no right to £2J 
million (about S3.2 million) in trea- 
sure that the salvager John Place 
recovered from the wreck of the 
ocean liner Lusitania off the Irish 
coast. Pierce said the judge's deci- 
sion removed legal snags over his 
plans to raise the Titanic from 
12.000 feet (4,000 meters) on the 
bottom of . the North Atlantic. 
"The Titanic is coming up. It will 
be about 18 months before we can 
mount the operation technically 
but there is nothing that can stop us 
now.” The 46,000- tun liner, on its 
maiden voyage, struck an iceberg 
off Newfoundland 00 July 15, 
1912, and sank with the lass of 
1,513 lives. The wreck was located 
about 375 miles (600 kilometers) 
south of Newfoundland in Septem- 
ber by a joint American-French ex- 
pedition. 

□ 

The rock philanthropist Bob 
Geldof is talking about famine-re- 
lid efforts but his record company 
reportedly has done an uncharita- 
ble thing by dropping his band, the 
Boomtown Rats. The Los Angeles 
Times said Geidofs attorney con- 
firms that Columbia Records failed 
to ex excise its optical on the Rats, 
whose last album, “In the Long 
Grass,” sold less than 75,000 
copies. Geldof has had other offers 
and expects to be with a U. S. label 
by Jan. 1. 

□ 

Plarido Domingo, the Spanish 
tenor, will give a benefit concert for 
Mexico's earthquake victims at the 
end of December in Madrid. Do- 
mingo, who lost four relatives in 
the quake, cancelled all engage- 
ments this year to raise funds for 
the survivors. 


£S 8 y Carter is shucking his tie 
and all other trappings of being 
“normal” and going into business 
for himself. Carter, brother of for- 
mer U. S. President Jimmy Carter, 
quit his job this month as vice pres- 
ident of marketing for a housing 
manufacturer so he can go into the 
mobile home business cm his own. 
“Billy was tired of trying to be 
'normal,'” his wife, Sybfl, said. 
“He is not a ’normal’ person and 


could not sit in a suit and tie <11 a - 
desk all day." He says be wants to 
put his jeans back on and get bjNk 
to real work. r 

□ : ' 

Mayor Edward Koch wants to 
dim the. Big Apple's lights next 
month to give New Yorkers a bet- 
ter view of Halley’s comet. The 
mayor proposed that some of uic ^ ^ - 
city’s tights be turned off on certain -* ■ ■ .. 
nights at certain locations between % ■* 
Dec. I and Jan. 15 to make the • >.. 

celestial light show more visible.. \ 

The mayor asked his Commission 
for Science and Technology 10 rec- : . C-o 
ommend steps the city could take , ^ 

to Him H ghi.c and improve the view • - ( T"\ 
of the passing come L Koch said he 
told the commission be coujo.^iot J , /.■.= 
order all the city’s lights thydnea ' * -t- 
"because it would make it more g 
.difficult to control crime. Howe* or 
I have asked them if there are some -fTT 
relatively small controllable places 
in this city — one of our beaches 
for example — where we can add 
the extra oops to control crime and 5 *^ 
where we can dim all city-coh- 
trailed lights in that area so that 
people can have the best possible 
view of the comet" xvvfe 


'f «■: 


cV *T J - 




. The attempts of (he producer Ar- 
non MBduufs to boy back Tern l&ag 
GtHbun’s critically acclaimed “Bra- 
zil” from Universal Pictures, which 
has not been released in the United 
States, reached an impasv: 
Wednesday when Sithie> J. Shew- 
berg, president of MCA Inc- wwic 
lum a letter naming terms that 4 .^- ,-igi ' 
chan says rule out any chance oi hi 1 - 
selling the film elsewhere. MDchac , 
says it also dashes any hope th..( 
tile fQm will be released in L>> 

Angeles by year’s end m order , 
qualify for 1 985 Academy Awar« 

□ 1 


m 

A municipal inspector checki 
Vienna hotels’ compliance with 
prevention rules set fire to a b.| 
room Friday, police and fire oil 
rials resorted. In order to del i 
mine whether some draperies wc% 
fireproof, the inspector held IJ 
lighter to them. According to Era 
beth Wimherger, the hotel owner! 
flame shot up but seemed to hi! 
been quickly pat out. Minutes l J 
ex, an employee shouted “the bi 
room is . on fire.” The blaze | 
strayed the stage, right painti4 
on the ceiling and pan of the r / 
structure * 


X. Sindl & medium mom, 
, on «*>ridwicfe. Cal Oiar- 
42 81 18 81 (near Opera). 


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READY FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCYI 

Two bedrooms, two bathrooms, separate guest’s doodtroom, 
fully fitted kitchen, marble floors, wall-to-wall carpeting in 
file bedrooms, highest quality of construction; planned and 
built by German General Contractor! 

UWfiff surface of 128 to 139 m2 
UvSm $80JXX) — to 85,000 — 

Ton year* mortgage made enmtiable by 
BANCO INDUSTRIAL DEL MBUTERRANEO MARBELLA 


Our offer for an inspection visit! 

Spend this years Christmas and New Year vacation in our pleasant 
Leisure Residence Village in Morbella I 
We will provide one of the above described A p artme n ts or Town Houses 


Retidem to From* 1854 Lsytin 
SWITZERLAND 

Tefc (025) 34 1 1 55 Tbt 456 T20 2LAI CH 


SWITZERLAND 

G5IAAD VAUET 

Attractive 2 to 5 room apartm e nt s 
avaiabte for faregren. m rypfad Swiss 
chalets in Oiateou cfOe*. SeoutiW 
to. QLPflT and centrally locoed. Pocks. 
from SFTWHO. Favorable mortgages 
at 6h % liter isT. Apcwtmenfv Abo 
Av ulite b m Montreim on Lake Gena- 
ua & other mounton resartL Crrtw. 
GLOBE PLAN SJL 
Av Man Repos 24. 

CH-1005 Lousanne, Swuzcrfand. 

TH £11 22 35 12 TU. 25185 MEU3 
Vails wdowned - Alio week e nds 


which will comfortably accommodate four persons, at the charge of 

U-S. $60 — PER UNIT PER DAY I 
We will provide ground transfer from and to Malaga Airport. 
Should you decide to purchase one of those units before your 
departure, this charge will be waved and we shall reimburse you for 
' your air travel cost for two persons from any European Crtyl 
For travel arrangements please contact your travel agent 
or calf us for direct flight booking assistance! 

Spain will join the European Community in 19861 
This will bring 12% Value Added Tan to property Transactions! 
One reason more to avoil yourself of our offer; combine an enjoyable 
holiday with a usefull inspection visit and, by making o may be 
already long-time pending decision to buy a holiday home in Morbella 

AT THE RIGHT TIME. SAVE VALUE ADOED TAX l 
We are of your disposal 

ALFRED WILLNER & ASSOCIATES MARBELLA 

Developers and Promoters of Leisure Property _ 

Carolina Pork No.5, MorbeUq , (Mo logo), Spain, Tel. (3452} 772 368 

TELEXJ77725 W1LN E 

We ore looking forward to wjbming you in Morbella Ibis Christmas! 


SWITZERLAND 

Fo re igner! ecu buv STUDIOS' APART- 
MENTS ■■ CHARTS, lake gbieva - 
MONTESUX Of in fheMi world bn&»r 
resom . CR AN5-MONTANA, LE5 
DUUSET5, VB9fl3L VU1ARS* 
JURA & of GSTAAD Fr*n 

SFllOjOOO. M o rt g ages 6C% at 

interest. 

REVAC 5-A. 

5? Mambnfhnt. 04-7302 GENEVA. 
Td 022/341540. Teto: 22030 


GSTAAD 


DUPLEX APA8TMD4T 
of abet* 96 sq m.. etegornV ferrrthed 
breurifd m ihe -:-t Dii 
Severd bdeono. Hotfal service r 
qured. Prtvtfe Twirnmnig poci “<".d nf- 
neu cefter ovofade m the omlcr^. 
for price and offer delah. " 1 

ptease pirn 04. MATT?, GSTAAD. ’ 

030/4 36 25 1 




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mdudm complete raid vorrti- 
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BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

U. 5. A. 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

cstcbkshed comfxrr/ seefa addtiond 
MPteJ IO edw /evotoomary techno- 
L:* 3 »cd breddvovgn m the nut mdusJry i 
created try sxorvnenr unnervty prafey 
w* m the uJSjk. Risi frmdeirta paid 
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Write- 

Her aid Tribune, 
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BROKERS / ADVISORS 

• 3'V? Cfesrffi con invfsi m orxs Amen- 

Exerting Todtnobghrf 

■n ihe n u f »ndu*!r f 
i'«o dreaK Flamed in 
tvm PrciKin annud iwe eventu- 
efrv recches 52®^ 

Invasion Enquria Invited; 
Vrtenal cwaifabte m Ernitsh. French, 
6o- 224G. Herald Trrbune. 
Neu*/ ^ede- Fi«e 

k 3’5ESEMTAT1VES WANTS) n di 

Sveopecn Z2vtrm^ io '.dl line of Seen- 
^ of largest suppfer m ihe US. 

■-OniacT. f-Vxie- Boas Lrd. a Pdnr 
Jl f eer. London $W'l. Td: 01-235 3036 
cr 01-730 1563 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


sus 20 MIUX3H, secured km need- 
ed Phone; Munch 64 47 50. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


DIAMONDS 



once, poriodfariy in USA & AntraKcc 

seeks goaerd naegsnmt podon 
with muh nA and ar y a iaMton where 
tvs partkJo- dbfito n mtl ra unu ge- 
mant con properiy be u t ii t eri , AvoB- 
ofafa eady \m.*x 42149, IHT M 63 
Long Acre, Uxdoiv WC2E 


TTTrTTTTTToTi 


ADMNS1MTQR/T8AVBL CbanS- 
rotor. Wi brad «tH mi Write to 


L 1 .’ fT ' TS 7 *. ! T J I , ' . ' ■ ' U V ! m ffl 


NYC, scab postion. Far furttar infor- 
mation cdfc 712-734-9240. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 



Your tot buy- 

fine cfonondi ns any price range 
a! lowest wholesale prto 
tfirect been Antwerp 
center of the diamond woridL 
Fid guorcpvtee. 

For free price fat write 


Select C fie n ta 


fotenrid efierrrs should be in need of an 
rodhndud to provide personal or bte>* 
ness services m Western Europe. Am 
Ameri ca n, 36, speak fluent French + 
Caimcvi and few a proven Iradr ny 
cord in U 5. & European butanes deal- 
ings. Am competent in handing private 
+ rammer od affen of a se mb ve no- 
lure. US. refer en u n am be povvdeci 
AB wqunes treated sadidentieAy. 


EdoUshed 1928 

Pdfeoareiraat 62. B-201B Antwerp 
Bdaum - Tefc (32 ^ 234 IF 51 
Ik: 71779 syl b. At the Diamond Oub. 
Heart a { Antwerp Okamond industry 



x 1 ? 


2215. LH.T„ Friedridatr. 15, 
6000 Frankfurt/ Mpin 


wn. 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMITB) MC 
U-SJL 6 WOUDWffiE 

A corr^plem perion d & bwnm service 
pfowdng a uraque cdleceon of 
ftd&zted. renofite & muh&naxd 
mtfrri duds tor dl socid S 

promotMOnd m.n nirmt 

212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
J30 Vv. 56th N.V.C 10019 
Service Representatives 
Needed Worldwide. 



FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


-VTn 


Lange Hg ai t i h e rt r 29. A nwerp 
Belgium. Tefc 03/23272%. tfe 3K43 


OFFICE SERVICES 


MANIL A: Be prasei* defr* cfiffiaA 
camotec tents . Share complete Focfc 
fees / usmkes, Mda rf office. Europe- 
an confidanlid, since 

1961. MCC PO Box 1569, MAkvda. 
Tefc 817-4187 {5 fines) Tbc 22232 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


WW YORK. USA. Midiown umque 
luxury dupto c pmim e rt l & office ei 
private bufcfng dso 1 otor axhvid- 
ud office. Price U553500 & SI BOO 
monthly respectively. Ara ifab to nene- 
dtoy. Tefc 212 575 1421 or 212-213 
8899 or write: Law Office, 134 Lexmo- 
ton Avenue. NY. N.Y 10016, USA 


OFFICES FOR SALE 


PrindpeBty of Monaco 

OfRGB FOR SA1£ 
in prestigbus, centrdly famt ed bu3d- 
irg, 326 sqjiL. mtenor layout may be 
deogned as reouied 
for further derails please aonaoch 

A.G.E.D.I. 

26 b* Bd Prinoesse Orariotte 

monte carlo 
MC 98000 fAONACO 
Tali (93) 50 A6O0 Telex 479417 MC 


Experienced bSngud FrenehTEngfcsh. 
Avdk hfe mid- Jon. Vkrm a vnifat 9JC- 
14073 Bwden Crescertf, few Gor- 
<tohA.NY 11435 USA 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


TRAVEL 
TRAVEL AG84T 
INIBMATlOfiAL RATE EXPERT 
NASHUA, NEW HAMPSMUE 

Cdoioto irte m o t i o o d drfeie regdor & 
spedd fares. DmIod A mcmtSi Wl 
rote "CHEAP STAR". Asset in training 
agents on uti&zoton of tariffs, etc Af 
SA8K & hderinjj ddb re- 
; <foe tfethor infarmtan, write or 
rf Grurecn Trawt Senriee, foraonnef 
39 JFK St^ Cambridge, MA 

_ ^ 61M54-8965 
An foud Opportunity Bppbye r 


* '4 1 1 v ' 


iwcrL in your home area or 
M642 HfariSS° 3 “/ FAG. 




r 




533 


WMZ!?, 


Cedea, Franoe 




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