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INTERNATIONAL 


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Published With The New York limes and The Washington Post 

ZURICH, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1985 


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brm Abducted 

i 

In Beirut 

. Diplomats Seised 
Near Embassy 
1n.2 Operations 

United Press International 

BEIRUT — Gunmen kidnapped 
four Soviet diplomats in two opera- 
tions in West Beirut on Monday, 
witnesses and officials said. 

~ The four men were abducted 
from two Soviet Embassy cars, 
both of which were found aban- 
doned later within several blocks of 
the embassy. 

Alexander Soldatov, the deputy 
to the Soviet ambassador, informed 
the Lebanese Foreign Ministry that 
four members of the Soviet mission 



Pieter ty. Botha 




S V- 


31 - 




a 


* 


• .Rcurcrx * j m 

***“ Africa said Monday that he 

SwSif^refoniL 
^ the «3«cted the idea of votes for 

Mr. Botha also attacked foreign 

iSwT f ° r - raSter P°^calchanJ!s 

a * nMwhite 

His remarks came after adver- 
usemems were published by proro- 
meni South African business lead- 

ws appealing for negotiations on 
snanng power with blacks. 

Mr. Botha said at ihe Cape Prov- 
“£® congress of his ruling National 

v 11 ** outgrowing what 
he called negative aspects of apart- 
heid, South Africa’s system ol ra- 
cial segregation. 

His congress speeches oyer the 
past two months have been 

watched closely amid intense do- _ 

imsuc and foreign pressure for' were abducted in two separate inci- 

change to give a direct political „ :'--d : - ... denis near the Russian Embassy, 

voice to the country's voteless nJ independent tribal, home- diplomatic sources said, 
blade majority. “ n * t »*_ _ ’ The Christian Voice of Lebanon 

Mr. Botha criticized foreign At the Pretona _TransvaaJ_ Con- radio named three of the Russians 
pressure for faster reform, but add- - at * a£ ^ e “ , aides for and said the fourth was the em bas- 

ed: “I am the first to concede that mt “T e 2 n S jn South African affairs, sy physician, 
the process of adjostment and »/“: B°tjM rawed these i attacks “The abductore took Arkady 
change is still far from completion. M ® n “ a y- He abb defended his se- Katokov and the embassy doctor 
“The history of the Afrikaner f ? rces J a # uns ? criticism of from the first car and Oleg Spirin, 

and other lan guage groups is char- their actions during noting m black • an attache, and Valery Kornev, a 
acidized by a struggle against t ^ wn ^biP s i 0 [ ver the past 20 months second secretary, from the second 
domination and today we arecon- that has clahned about 725 lives. car,” the broadcast said. The doc- 
linuing this struggle for Freedom bv Because we ranam committed tor was not identified, 
means of steps of reform, freedom ^.P 63 ^, “ sa “:' ** s ® uth Africa The kidnappings were believed 
for oursdves and for everyone who - v ? ot . s H ITCI1£ “ Te d to control to be tire first involving Soviet offi- 

sharcs tins country with us.” by fire-raismg, stone-throwing ciabin BeiruL .' T7 - T T O ti •T’l O a 

Key U.S. Economic Index for August 

month, the South African currency o elwae “ ^dthKmal, absolute known. Political sources, however, " ” 

plunged on world markets and the a P a ™»ed; mrd black majority rule, said it was Kkely that the abduction 
country's economic crisis deepened comtmtmen t to black was linked to Syrian-backed offen- 

when Mr. Botha’s speech faded to homeLands and to segr^ated sive agains t Moslem fundamental- 

schools and residential areas. ists in the northern Lebanese port 
He said: “It is, however, impor- dty of Tripoli 
tant that from time to time in this “It is possi bl e,” a Lebanese dip- 
countiy of minorities, we meet each lo made source said, “that the kid- 
other in political structures in order nappers want the Soviet Union to 

(Continued nr Plage 4 , Cot 5 ) 




auto 



Tbm Airoaafad Pn 


meet imernational expectations. 

But on SepLll in Bloemfontem, 
Orange Free State, he announced 
plans to restore South African citi- 
zenship to millions of blacks made 
foreigners by the creation of nomi- 





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5 


By Henry Weinstein . 

Los Angeles Times Service 

BERKELEY, California — 
Alice Waters has always 
thought her politics were pro- 
gressive. As a student here in 
the turbulent 1 960s, she demoii- 
strated for free ^teech, strag- 
gled to end U5. involvement in 
Vietnam and worked as a Mon- 
tessori teacher. 

Then, in the eaiiy 1970s, Miss 
Waters started a little restau- 
rant called Chez Panisse. With- 
in a decade; the restaurant had 
become famous, and Miss Wa- 
ters was the doyenne of “Cali- 
fornia cuisine,” on innovative 
style of cooldng that dnpha- 
azes fresh local ingredients. 
Gradually, her work and that of 
a handful of other chefs trans- 
formed Berkeley into a culinary 
mecca. 

Still, Miss Waters believes 
sbehas not abandoned her past. 
She donates food .to the poor, 
and she says that one of her 
goals as a restaurateur is to pro- 
vide conditions as pleasant for 
her workers as she does for her 
diners. 

So it came as a big surprise 
tins spring whoi labor organiz- 
ers entered the kitchen at Chez 
Panisse and thrust a union leaf- 
let into her hand. Miss Waters 
and other restaurateurs in 
Berkeley suddenly found them- 
selves the targets of an organiz- 
ing campaign that accused 
them of providing substandard 
wages, benefits and working' 
conditions. 

By aB accounts, it is a strange 
labor struggle. Most employees 
of the restaurants show no sign 


of wamiqg the union. They are 
a varied lot and include psycho- 
logists, sculptors, free-lance 
writers and students. 

So, the union leaders initially 
thought it might be easier to 
approach some of the owners, 
whose liberal leanings were pre- 
sumed to make them more sym- 
pathetic to organized labor than 
their workers. . 

In addition to Chez Panisse, 
' the union targeted a dozen res- 
taurants, including the 4 th 
Street Grill, run by Susan Nel- 
son. who was active in the Cali- 
fornia prison reform -move- 
ment, and Augusta’s, owned by 
^Bonnie Hughes, who once led a 
successful union organizing ef- 
fort ar the San Francisco Muse- 
um of Modem Art. 

So far though the union has 
been successful only at Augus- 
ta’s and a s mall restaurant 
called the New Orleans Bar and 
Grill 

. Miss Hughes, Augusta's 
owner, agreed to recognize the 
onion without a struggle even 
though the restaurant is barely 
in the blaok and even though 
she considers herself tr- fair em- 
ployer. “When you have princi- 
ples, you have than all the time; 
otherwise they're not princi- 
ples,” Miss Hughes said. 

But what once looked to 
some union organizers like a 
sure thing has turned into a bat- 
tle that couki last for years. 

An organizer for Local 28 of 
the Hotel Employees and Res- 
taurant Employees Internation- 
al-Union, Danny Cassidy, said, 
“These people are all in favor of 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5) 


With Gorbachev 

By Bernard Weinrauh The chief U.S. negotiator. Max 
New York Times Sen-nc M. Kampebuon. said before the 

WASHINGTON — President sesii 9 n slaned thal be hoped the 
Ronald Reagan plans to meet later would propose a “serious 

this month with the leaders of six counteroffer, 
major industrialized nations to dis- He said that, despite numerous 

cuss his summit meeting in Novem- 

ber with the Soviet leader, Mikhail It is doubtful that the Russians 
S. Gorbachev, the White House an- have a lead over the United 
nounced Monday. States in space defense. Page 4. 

Those invited to the New York ■ ■ - 

meeting were the leaders of Britain, press reports on the contents of the 
France, West Germany, Canada. Soviet proposals. “1 don’t know \ei 
luuy and Japan. details of what we might re- 

Edward P. Djerejian. a White ceive" 

House spokesman, said that the al- The Soviet proposals were out- 
lied talks will focus on arms control lined to President Reagan bv For- 
as well as East-West economic and eign Minister Eduard A. Shevard- 
pohttcal questions. The meeting na dze in Washington on Friday, 
wi! take place Oct.23 and 24 while u.S. press repons said Lhai ihev 

Mr. Reagan and the other leaders called for reducing both superpow- 
arem New York to attend ceremo- ers" strategic weapons systems fcv 
tues commemorating the 40thanni- 50percenL 
tersary of the United Nations. Secretary of State Georae P. 

“The presence of the Western Shultz said that the plan signified a 
leaders at the United Nations in change in the Soviet position, but 
October provides a timely opportu- [here was no indication that the 
nity for such a working session,” Russians had modified their objec- 
said Mr. Djerejian, The spokesman tions to U.S. space-weapons re- 
search. 

On Sunday. Mr. Shultz said that 
Mr. Reagan would not relinquish 
At the moment. White House plans to develop space-based de- 
officials said, a working luncheon fensive svsiems, which the presi-. 
between Mr, Reagan and the six dent has’ called a better way to 
leaders is scheduled for Ocl 24. prevent a Soviet missile atiac 1 : Lhan 

„ • . ... . But officials said that Mr. Reagan the threat of nuclear reorisaJ. 

^J^^^, Fn Z? iSptadKI! !? g ranu prcdicted GT ?P.growth of may also hold separate talks with “Anv deal on research would be 

WASHINGTON —The govern- whaHy unchanged for th. prevt- 4 percent on an annual basis in the some of them. ridiculous because there would be 

meat’s main gauge of future USL £tro PfT d to * P^ - ^ quarter and an even stronger The call for a seven-nation meet- absolutely no way to verify whether 

U*»y}A^ O nous Ulb iJUTIbl VI11UU Ul economic activity rose a soUd Q.7 P ?' ^ 5 Rf 0311 rate in the fourlh - ing or the Western industrialized or not it’s being obsen’ed ” Mr. 

pressure Syria to stop its assistance pereou tn August, giving fuitha- However ’ other ^.vsts main- democracies underlined Mr. Rea- Shultz said in a television interview 

to the leftist and Communist mfli- evidence that the economy was re- mnustnai producuon all post- tamed that the current rebound ga 0 ’ s desire to arrive in Geneva for on Sunday, 

tias of north Lebanon." bounding from a yearlong slow- “SOUd [gains. would be more modest because the his meeting with Mr. Gorbachev th,* nponthnno - mil n 

The fundamentalist Islamic Ji- <towT1 - Howev-cr, the gross national domestic economy was still being wih a fairly unified Western alii- anii SI 

had organization threatened Satur- The Commerce Department said measureof thetotalval- badly hurt by foreign competition, a^ce behind him. administration ^ ^ 

d»S% rina dLA« K ^^cemiBlode.ofLeadh.s N-ta- IM economist offida.s Sa id. n,e mnO, 

leftist militia targets in retaiiadon. Eraomut lndicatois matched a re- . S J 0 ”®" ; 8 ^ at Wharton Econometrics, another between Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gor- Kampelman. were no? dis-' 

A witness, who demanded ano- vuedO-1 tnctease m Jniy. Boflt Suh ^!L r L“ 5J “JiSSS forecasting Bnn. predicted annua- bachevistobeheldNov.l9and20. "teed tapping wi'h an ngreJ 

fl Geneva Talks Resume ment reached ufier ihe t 3 iks o 

from Geneva. U.S. officials have warm 

Viktor P. Karpov, the chief Sovi- against any breakthrough befor 
« negotiator, refused to reveal de- the summit meeting between Mr 
tails of the proposals. Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev. 


Mexican Earthquake Death Toll Over 5,200 

Maria Lopez Sanchez stands outside Mexico City’s Benito Juarez Hospital reading a list of 
earthquake victims in search of her niece. Authorities said the death toll of the Sept. 19-20 quakes 
•had passed 5200. President Miguel de la Madrid of Mexico named a commission on Monday to 
oversee the search for any survivors still trapped in the ruins of destroyed or damaged b uildings 


said that the White House was 
“awaiting acceptances from all the 
parties." 


Gives More Evidence of Rebound 


awwa Uig ^LACCl- W1ACU LUC me iwo ■: A o “ - * 

occupants of the Soviet Embassy been reported as a much weaker 0.4 far below the administration’s 5 

car wore dragged out at gunpoint, poem max** JSTS ??££ percent projection. 

mc _v_... i pii _. hpT1 Economists were heartened not “ e 3^- pace was Tar below 

“It was about 2PJM. when the ^ b y the August gain, which was *e 5 percent growth rate being The August advance was 

ki^iappmg occurred, the witness - m expectations, but also forecas ^ by the admimstration for powered by contributions from six 

said. I suddenly saw a ^lue Peu- ^ JuJy . s the second half. of the 1 1 available indicators, 

geot car intercept the Soviet Em- mvn r<w>Kna » iMMa The hipeesi cnntrihuiinn ram 



SifcidCiSitaSJto coming months. 

a 0 *ttn, . , . . _ . ic boom, but I think things are 

When the driver refused, he picking up a little bit” 

started pounding the wuidow with Mr. Chimerine and many other 
the wooden butt of his AK-47. The analysts are more optimistic latelv 
window shattered and the gunman mainly because they’ believe lhai 
was able to open the door. the Federal Reserve may lean on 

“The. men inride the Soviet Em- interest rates, keeping them stable 
bassy car looked foreign. One was or lower for a considerable time to 
tall, well buDl and the other was a help devalue the dollar. The 
blonde. Both seemed between 30 to strength of the dollar has severely 
40 years old. They did not put up a bun U.S. industry' s ability to corn- 
fight, although several shots were pete internationally, 
fired by the gunmen in the air.” 


workweek, the number of new busi- 
nesses, new orders for consumer 


....... , _ _ uraM _ ucw U1UCIS .... g-uusu,,.,-. such extraordinary session, also duce extraordinary developments 

Michael Evans, head of Evans _ called by the Russians, was sched* in arms control or East- West rela- 

Economics, a Washington forecast- (Continued on Page 4, Col. 7) uled for Tuesday. tions. 

For Some U.S. Firms , Smaller Is More Profitable 


A police spokesman said the em- spokesman, reacting to the new 
bassy car, a beige Honda, was numbers, said they continue “to 
found' abandoned later a few show the world what can be accom- 
blocks away. plisbed when the government low- 

Detafls of the abduction of the ers taxes and cuts regulations.” 
Other two Soviet officials were not But Mr. Chimerine said that the 
immediately available. 


By Steven E. Prokesch 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The huge industrial corpora- 
tion, which has dominated the U.S. economy as 
Larry Speakes, lie White House & skyscraper dominates the skyline, is being cut 


down in size. 


U5. companies, orjoint ventures with them, are But it also came to be embraced as a iustifica- 
increasingly the producers. lion for building huge empires even when their 

Even International Business Machines Corp^ size did not necessarilv mean big profits and 
which as recently as the late 1970s prided itself their managers lacked the skills to ’run the ex- 
on producing everything from the semiconduc- panded operations, 
tors to the software used in its computers, has v, - - . , 0 

In industry after industry, companies that now embraced a vastly different strategy. having con tempi a t^the^d vent of'shjb^mar- 

KSSSSSSKJSStt - a^'SS'^.'SsiSS! 

MasfssBSsrasss ggsastssasw 

pires dial prided themselves on offering eom- ™ P«sidem to charge of mattufeauriog devel- ^ ^ ^ atoul is ^ 


loag-nm health of the economy re- oomSiL 

Morimoiriuafemeessaiddtey A : that federal bodge, defidts To" changes fly in the face of the eonven- struWurul & of the American economy." said 

had been contaciei by the Soviet be cut severely, to, among other QffCTinge tF ^ r ° * ^ tional business wisdom descended from such ^Hliarns. an assoriate professor of 

Embassy to hum. for the missing things, reduce the upward pressure ^ in doiaa to V m bKkim a» aV from industrialists as Carnegie. Henry Ford and John !£"' adntmtsiral.on at Camegte-Mcllon 

diplomats and then security umB on mtamsi rates. a mines-tom^k^ ShSoxj tot to pr" f>- Rockefeller. They not only owned huge fac- Omvemtly. to Pittsburgh, 

were following up the matter. The Reagan administration had vailed since Andrew Carnegie’s dav tones, but the raw' marerials that Fed Lhose b°me management experts and economists 

forecasted that the economy would Ford Motor Co for example once raised f acl °ries. In that way. tfaev made sure that high- b^eve that the disintegration of large corpora- 
SOence on Meeting rebound sharply in the second half sheep w pro vide the wool for its cars’ uohol- volume production was never intemipted. tions uil3 substantially improve the competitive- 


- . .. . .... sheep to provide the wool for its cars* uphol- - . — . .. .. . , _ 

There was no further word Mon- °* ^ e r 5 3 ^ n B ^ ro ™ a stery. Now* it buys elsewhere half the pans that To develop demand or ensure that there was ne ^f ™ biaies in world markets, 

day regarding a news conference at prolonged penod m which sw-eiling ^ a ^ y aol yj e em^ ^ itself, always a market for their manufactured goods. The American economy is going to operate 

which kidnapped Westerners in jpports slashed activity in U.S. in- Firesione Tire & Rubber Co. has stopped many of these industrialists moved into distri- more fiejtibly. and. as a result, we’re going lo be 
Lebanon were to be presented, o^istiy. malcfng truck radial tires and is marketing a bution. more competitive." said Michael J. Piore. a 

Reuters reported from Beirut. Call- To support that view, adminis- competitor's product. The control of all the key aspects of a given P roressor of economics at the Massachusetts 

ers saying they represented Islamic (ration economists point to a van- General Electric Co. no longer makes micro- business, known as “vertical integration." was Technology. 

Jihad said earlier that a meeting ety of statistics that showed wave ovens, CAT scanners cm - the ice makers in the foundation for the rise of the American Others, such as Robert B. Reich, a professor 


was being organized 


strength in August. 


its refrigerators; Korean. Japanese and other industrial marvel. 


(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5} 


i 


Captain Criticized 
^ Texas Controller 
Before Fatal Crash 


j 

( 


I 

^ ' United Press International 

7 « WASHINGTON —The captain 
> of a Delta Airlines jet that crashed 
} during a thunderstorm near the 
i Dalha-Fort Worth airport, lulling 
136 people, criticized the air traffic 
controller handling the flight for 
“lack erf experience," a transcript of 
the cockpit recordings showed 

Monday. 

CwKain Edward Connors, re- 
. corded on the aircraft 18 minutes 
{before the crash, was heard saying 
>of the unidentified air traffic con- 
troller: “He's sleeping. Gel him out 
of bed." Moments later the captain 
said; “Getting kind of hot in the 
oven with this controller. See, that’s 
whal ibc lack of experience does.” 

f «t week, an air controller at 
Washington’s National Airport 
was pfoyd on adminis trative leave 

jt l - I* ■ At kd/) trt 




Simone Signoret, 64, Dies in France; 
Actress Was Political Activist, Writer 


after a* large passeogerjet had to 

abort its takooiff to avoid a 

ter crossing the runway. 


-. DrtMwnerfn/tM!; Th. AboghImI iW'lW 

hedicopr . Sbuone StgiK)ret, flt left in her Paris home, starred with Laurence Harvev in 1959 in ‘Room 
atthe Top,' one of more titan 40 films in idndt she appeared in a career begmnijug in 1942. 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — Simone Signoret, 64, 
the French actress, writer and hu- 
man rights activist who starred in 
more than 40 films, died Monday 
of cancer at her home outside Paris. 

Miss Signoret’s roles ranged 
from the golden-haired femme fa- 
tale in Jacques Becker’s “Casque 
tfOr” (19511 to the aging prostitute 
in Mosfae Misrahi’s “Madame 
Rosa,” which won the 1977 Acade- 
my Award in the United States for 
best foreign film. 

“She fought until the end. She 
dkd as she lived, with courage." 
said -her daughter, Catherine Alle- 
greL Miss All egret said her mother 
died at her country home in Auih- 
etnl-Auihouillet, in the Eure region 
west of Paris. 

Miss Signoret was married to 
Yves Montand, the singer and ac- 
tor, for 34 years. They were one of 
France’s most politically active ce- 

les. 

!eni leftists, the couple 



gradually shifted toward, more 
moderate politics, denouncing hu- 
man rights abuses and the rise of 
racism in France. 

Miss Signoret made one of her 
last public appearances this year at 
a street demonstration supporting 
an ami- racist youth movement. 

President Framjois Mitterrand 
sent a telegram to Mr. Montand, 
saying: “It is with sadness that 
France learns this morning of the 
death of Simone SignoreL From 
‘Casque d'Or’ to human rights, ac- 
tress and writer, she spoke for more 
than 40 years to the hearts of the 
French people. In the name of all 
those who loved and respected berj 
in my personal name, I offer you 
my sad condolences." 

France's culture minister. Jack 
Lang, said Miss Signoret “incar- 
nated to perfection the stubborn 
fighter, defending until the end the 
most hopeless causes.” 

In the past decade. Miss Signoret 
shifted to writing. 


In 1977, she reached the best- 
seller list with her memoirs “Nos- 
talgia Isn’t What It Used to Be." 
which explained her political views 
and recounted her life with Mr. 
Montand. 

Her “Adieu Volodin." published 
in January, was also a best seller. 
The 566-page novel about two im- 
migrant Jewish families between 
the wars is laced with scenes out of 
her own life and Mr. Montand’s. 

Critics called Miss Signoret the 
complete actress, the rare taiem 
who successfully negotiated the 
difficult transition from the ro- 
mance and sex of youth to the bore- 
dom and anguish of middle-age. 

She was catapulted to stardom 
with “Casque d'Or.” in which she 
played a clever working-class beau- 
ty. She won an Oscar in I960 for 
her portrayal of a sensuous older 
woman in “Room at the Top." ihe 
film ihal brought her the best jc- 

(Connnued on Page 4. Col. 1 ) 


INSIDE 

B Shootings by British police 
touched off violence and raised 
disturbing questions. Page 2. 

B The Akaii Dal’s victory in 
voting in India’s Punjab region 

raised hopes for peace. Page 2, 

■ Pfo-Sj rian militias reported 
earns in their sieae of Tripoli. 
Lebanon. ” Page 4 . 


The Parti Quebec ois elected 
a new leader. Pierre- Mm 1 John- 
son, 39. Page 5. 

B Wine has furnished the occa- 
sion for a compendious exhibit 
in New York. Page 6 . 

BUSINESS/FI NANCE 

■ Japan's current-account sur- 
plus narrowed to 53.49 billion 
in August from $4.9o billion tn 
July- Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

A look back at the early days of 
the United Nations, and ihe riv- 
eting issues that confronted the 
■'■munition then. 


1 

















Page 2 


ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


i C V 7 J 


-ST 


Protesters, 

Police Clash 

■ 

la Frankfurt, 
Other Cities 


The Assonant Pros 

FRANKFURT — Young left- 
ists protesting a neo-Nazi party 
meeting and the death or an anti- 
Nazi demonstrator broke windows, 
wrecked cars and looted shops in 
IS West German cities, the police 
said Monday. 

More than 270 people were ar- 
rested in the disorders Sunday 
night and early Monday, and dam- 
age was estimated in the millions of 
dollars. The most violent distur- 
bances took place in Frankfurt. 

The unrest followed the death 
the previous night of a protester 
against a National Democratic Par- 
ty meeting in Frankfurt. He was 
run over by a police vehicle. 

Berlin police said that a similar 
protest by 200 people against the 
neo-Nazi party resulted in 20 ar- 
rests and caused extensive damage 
along the city's Kurfurstendamm 
shopping street. 

The West German authorities 
said that young leftists had mount- 
ed violent protests during the early 
morning hours in Erlangen, Stutt- 
gart, Gottingen. Cologne. Biele- 
feld, MQnster, Wuppertal. Duis- 
burg. Hannover and Oldenburg. 



Police Shootings, Riots Raise 
Disturbing Questions in U.K. 


By Jo Thomas mob tried to bum down the police Britain’s two million blacks and 

Sc* York Twm Service station, and a major rioL ensued. Asians make up four percent of the 

LONDON — Twice in five Although those involved in the uoial population, but they are con- 
weeks the traditionally unarmed violence in Birmingham and Brix- cen ira ted in the cilies. where unem- 
British police have shot an inno- t° n wwe whites, blacks and Asians, ployment and disadvantage are the 
cent member of a family during a tjuesuon of race and racism worst. A report issued last month 
raid on a house in search of some- inexorably turned up in the debate by the Policy Studies Institute con- 
one else. Both shootings were de- ° vcl ' why the riots occurred. eluded that at least a third of Brit- 

scribed bv the police as tragic acri- Enoch PowelL Parliament mem- ish employers discriminaie against 
dents. Both touched off mob ber of the Ulster Union party who black job applicants. 


The AococMd fV®» 


Policemen in Frankfurt leading a protester away. 


U.K. Unionists Meeting 
Over Kinnock, Scar gill 


violence. 

The shootings, now being inves- 
tigated by the' police, have raised 
serious questions among Britons 
about police training, weapons and 
procedures. The disturbances, 
which occurred in communities 
that were scarred by rioting four 
years ago and where there are many 
ethnic groups, have raised funda- 
mental questions about what the 
British can or ought to do to bring 
peace to neighborhoods that resi- 
dents describe as tinderboxes of 
unemployment and despair. 

In Birmingham in August. John 
Short house, a 5-year-old white 
child, was shoi to death in his bed 
by policemen who broke into his 
family's apartment to search for his 
father in connection with an aimed 
robbery. The police said the gun 
went off accidentally. 


Only one in 10 
British policemen 
carries a gun, but 
concern has been 
growing in recent 
years about the way 
in which the guns 
are used. 


Only one in 10 British policemen 
carries a gun — one in five in 
Greater London — but concern has 
been growing in recent years about 
the way in which the guns are used. 

In 1980, Gail Kinchin, 16, died 
after being hit by police bullets at 
the end Of a Siege ID Birmingham. 
She was pregnant and the man 
bolding her hostage bad tried to use 
her as a shield. Three years ago. a 
Birmingham police bullet fixed into 
a bed narrowly missed a 3-year-old 
girl. 



-.1 


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Michael Groce. 22, whose mother was accidentally shot by 
police Saturday, was arrested on fireaiius charges and bis 
bail was set Monday. He is flanked by bis attorney, Paul* 
Boateng, and his grandmother, Mrs. Eupbemia HamQton. 


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wounding a London policeman, year. Except for Asians who work Brixton district on Monday, but 
was shot by the police and lived, in family businesses, 95 percent of calm prevailed following rioting 

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Reuters 

BOURNEMOUTH, England — 
Britain's lop union leaders met 


that a vote for the miners was likely 
to be seen by the electorate as an 
unwelcome victory for Lhe left. 


clitic vi 1/iiu.Ao oiiu ruioua in me - _ _ . . _ ^ - _ . ,• _ “ . -T — r . , .. — Wii'H * 

inner dries would lead to a Britain Bntian. who was then Since 1981, officers have been Groce, whose shooting by a police- ^L. [ h; , .r. , > 

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Hours later, a crowd wrecked “unimaginably racked by dbsen- home secretary, said he would con- encouraged to cultivate contacts man sparked the rioting, appealed 
two police cars and sent a constable violent disorder, not rec- S'** 61, whether more revisions in the with community groups, schools, for an end to the violence: 

to the hospital with head injuries, ^ ^ same nation it has firearms guidelines were needed af- and sports teams in areas they po- Gangs of youths, most of them 

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There also were demonstrations Monday at the Labor Party confer- The transport union was among 7 W0 w ™? „ Binning- [ 3een _ or perhaps, a nation at alL” t®" Shorthouse child was shot to lice. black, hurled rocks, backs and oth- 

in Hamburg. Munich and Frei- ence to decide where they stand on those meeting Monday to decide ham neighborhood of Handsworth. He said they should be offered gen- death in August in what the poUce At the same lime, Guy Cumber- er missiles at police in sporadic 

burg. a forthcoming clash between lhe whether they wilt back the miners' ^ vvo “ a J ,s <5 / r:ols a con- CTOUS terms to leave the country, called an accident. batch, a psychologist who has stud- violence Sunday night. The police 

Officials said the protests in all partv leader. Neil Kinnock. and the leader again. It alone controls fronuuoa between onlookers and prime Minister Margaret In Handsworth, where an arrest ied the police in Handsworth. said: said 48 persons were arrested. 

15 cities were set off by the neo- leader of the coal miners union, 1 .250,000 votes at the conference, P°bcemen. Thatcher, when asked about this was enough to set off serious vio- “Police officers tend to be more During a seven-hour rampage on 

Nazi party meeting and the death Arthur ScaigiJl. where the count after most debates U 11 Saturday morning in Brix- suggestion, tersely rejected it. lenee. almost everyone intervi ewed attracted to arrests than crime pre- Saturday, 149 persons were arrest- 

of lhe protester. The five-day conference that regularly exceeds six million. *on. Cherry Groce, 38, a black Many community leaders pointed recently said the root cause of the veolion. Promotion is based on ed. four buildings were heavuy 

In Frankfurt, a police spokes- opened Sunday has been dominat- The Daily Mirror newspaper, mother of six, was shot and serious- out that the vast majority of the tension is unemployment. that In one study of 1,000 com- damaged and the streets were lit- 

man said that 255 people bad been ed so far by Mr. Kinnock’s bid to which supports Mr. Kinnock, said Lv wounded in her bedroom. The young adults in this group were More than 55 percent of the mendations, not a single one was tered with more than 50 buraed- 

taken into custody. tame the party's left wing in an in an editorial Monday: “The La- police said it was an accident A bom in Britain. work force in Handsworth, once a Tor crime prevention.” out cars. 

Most were released, the spokes- aLtempt to attract moderate voters, bor Parly had better make up its - - __ __ — - , — _ — 

man said, but two persons were The battle will be fought mind this week whether it wants to ■* 

TJsZttgaSsi ^ Puniab Volins Raises Hones for Peace WORLD BRIEFS 

that caused 2 million Deutsche erameot pay back £1.5 million Mr. Scargjll is only one of Mr* J if - — r _ 

marks (5747,400) worth or damage. ($2. 1 million) In fines imposed on Kinnock’s left-wing targets. He 

veariona^sirike “ih“ tt* “in MiESMES . Victol 7 of -^li Dal Perceived as Setback for Extremists 5 NATO Allies Approve Copter Study 


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Punjab Voting Raises Hopes for Peace 


picton of looting, the spokesman yearlong strike that ended in of the Labor council in Liverpool 
said. March, who are locked in a battle with the 

He said that eight police officers Mr. Scargili's National Union of Conservative government over mu- 
were slightly injured in Sunday’s Mineworkere needs a two-thirds nicipal finance. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

5 NATO Allies Approve Copter Study 


Bv Steven R. Weisrrun 

m 

•Vn ■ Tori Times Sernue 


., , .. ,.a . , BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Five West European NATO nations have 

Irader of Khahstmi, the name of parties, the Akali Dal is fundamen- agreed to proceed with a feasibility study in their effort to produce a joint 
the nation sought by Sikh radicals, tally rckgious m onentauon. Its nava i ^ i aa icai transport beiicopier in the 1990s, an spokesman for the 


demonstrators damaged several proposal into Labor Partv poliev. he would like to see the Marxists, P™*™; f*™™. m u " a , ia ™=* . _ « n ' National armaments directors of France, West Germany, Italy, the 

police vehicles, including water He narrowly won a similar vote members of the so-called militant ^ ^ j* 314 o t Punjab last w«k has Y« it was also clear from lhe irol or Sikh temples from lhe hier- Netherlands and Britain signed a memorandum. of understanding Friday 

cannon. ai conference of the Trades tendency, out of the party. ncw .“J 21 Indl ^ J 311 ^ ,ectJ ° n “f t ^ m - A ar ^2- v 01 pnests ‘ .... . . for a 14-month feasibility and pre- definition study to develop the design 

In Wuppertal. MQnster and Union Congress earlier this month. The leadership won a substantial three years of vierfeaw and lur- Jems lie ahead for Mr. Gandhi and The party could thus also have 0 f jh e helicopter, designated the NH-90, for Lhe years 1994-2000. 

Duisburg, in North Rhine-West- The congress groups nearN 100 victory Monday when the confer- J? 0h °' w demaads by* Sikhs. But for die mam Sikh pohucal party, trouble running the state on a a NATO statement said that about 700 medium-sized helicopters, 

phalia state, demonstrators dam- unions with 10 million members, ence overwhelmingly rejected the voung a m shows iihat the task the ^ah which raptured 7. of stnctly secular basis. weighing eight to nine tons, were expected to be produced in two versions, 

aged police cars and broke win- Mr. Kinnock plans lo intervene moves to set up separate sections remains exirwteiy difficult. the 115 seats in the state legislature. This in fain, may be the leastof one to be carried on a NATO frigate currently being developed and the 

dows at several police stations. j n the debate and warn delegates within the partv for black and Because of the threat of more In part, the Sikh party won be- its problems, because- the Akali Dal other for army transport. 

About 250 stone- throwing pro- Asian members. " assassinations Dv Sikh terrorists, -cause of sympathy for lhe assassi- victory also represents a triumph of 

testers in Handover, shattered win- Black supporters of the proposal Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi took nation of its president, Harchand longtime party eldere at a time T ■ . j T1 J 

dows at six banks and a police 1&U Hurtat Malcb m Ubaka said it was the onlv way to invohre “ enormous nsk m scheduling the Singh Longowal, who negotiated when the violence is bemg earned Iraqis KeDOrt AttaCK Oil Khflr g Island 

cniinn in Reuter* * it. election now. the Punjab accord with Mr. Gan- out bv disaffected vouths who re- J- t? 


ICOREBOAR 


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dows at six banks and a police ^ ^ 

station. In Oldenburg, three police Reuters 

staiions and two patrol vehicles DHAKA, Bangladesh — At 


ethnic minorities in Lhe 
Mr. Kinnock's deputy 


were damaged. least 150 people were injured Sun- tersiey, argued that Labor favored -!°. r . rno °^ ralc w lhe decnotw. 

In Municlu the police arrested day when fans fought each other the creation of a genuinely mukira- on of sedition, reeung Bui anoun 

f wo persons who slashed tires on with iron rods and stones at a soc- dal society and must remain a par- blUer antagonistic toward khe germg suspic 
'3trol cars in front of a police sta- cer match between Bangladesh's ry “that does not ivide its mem- S9 ven ^ 3enti wfu 5 h “ cnjaIs - }bai 

OtL two largest clubs, the police said- bers according to race.” ^8 lTom ~ 


Mrtv election now. the Punjab accord with Mr. Gan- out by disaffected vouths who re- /n „ . .. 3 f . O , 

. p " v " Only seven months ago the ma- dhi in July that cleared the wav for iect them as their leaders. , (Raiters) ■ Iraq said Monday that us warplanes had 

’* nas- • m _ rt'i l > L .i.a Jaa^.a. * km «ll al. _ ■ _ j _ t _ i launched another atlnek on Iran’c kThn ror T cl and nil terminal in tlw» Ouir 


Manv Sikh vouths had already flinched another attack on Iran’s Kharg Island oil terminal in the Gulf 

* . . J _ U J an/I a I.m. - .La a Ti__ — i«_ j a _ _ -i ■ 


i Tl\j nAnjfn I ITJTQTll^QilAn f A yn dv raaicais wno wantea me norm- uai viaory so mat 5iKD leaders lime dealing wim terrorism, said ' 

J- i V71 ^ * mWja IJ1 II I i 1 CUcUC em Indian state to secede. Some would have the onus of combating DUbir Singh, a Sikh businessman 

^ * e\en praised the two Sikh securitv terrorism, who is dose to the parly leaders. “If T Inimiairnn Wnmc aI F 'C* T ntin Ttnla 

A I B ACl guards accused of murdenng Mr. Even more imponanu the re- they tiy to curb them too much, lJlu g Ud ;«B ” aiU» Ul laU 1 mU Ii X 1.U1B 

jj OrJLO-TVTClC OTFnTv rV XO * jQ lTI n«T / A ■ ■ Gandhis mother. Prime Minister turns demonstrated continuing re- they'll be criticized. And if they MADRID (Reuters) — Eresi- 

Indira Gandhi, last Oct. 3 L sentcoent toward Mr, Gandhi’s don't do anything about terrorism, dent Julio Maria Sanguinetci of 

. r c , On Wednesday, voters in the governing Congress (0 Party by theyll be cruicized,” Uruguay, in an interview published 

, e* i or imts ffwce could buJ Id a successful program to wjth the proper coordinaiioc. we state swept these same Sikh leaders most Sikhs, in spile of the prime the task of bringing lhe radical Monday, accused the European 

GENEVA — Officials at the stiile us further spread. can tackle it* 1 into power after a campaign in minister's recent conciliatory ap- Sikh youth into the mainstream Community of being a major desia- 

World Health Organization said We don t nave the tools now for Dr. Assa ad said his orgamza- w hj^ denounced extremism proach. Sikhs make up about 60 now falls to Mr, Barnala, bilizing factor in Latin America, 

they have won the medical and fi- treatment, and we cannot say when lion s sccreiary-general. Dr. Half- pledged to work out tbdrprob- percent of the Punjab population. Mr. Baroala is known as a deeply “The greatest threat to our 

nancial support needed to draft a we might find a cure, he said* ‘‘So dan Mahler, had stressed in an ad- j ems peacefully. Keeping order The bineraess stems from the religious and contemplative man young democracies is lhe commer- 
worldwide strategy for combating this is the dilemma that AIDS rep- dress at the conference the need for now becomes their responsibility as detention of tfiousands or Sikh whose hobby is painting. Many dal war industrial powers are wag- 

acquired immune defidency syn- resents. The disease, which has a worldwide strategy to combat much as the prime minister's. youths in Punjab, the armv raid last politicians doubt he has the ing against us,” he said in an inter- 

drome. or AIDS. spread to all continents, was Inst AIDS. Dr. Mahler indicated that On Sunday. Saijit Singh Bar- year routing extremists from the strength and skill to bold his own view published in the Spanish 

Dr. Fakhry A. Assaad, chief of 1^, , - m United States in the division of communicable ois- na r^ 59^ a moderate Sikh leader Sikhs' Golden Temple in .Amritsar, fractious party together, let alone newspaper B Pai&. "The European 

the or ganiza tion’s division of com- 1981. It is caused by a vims that eases, headed by Dr. Assajd, 3 longtime advocate of more and the anti-Sikh rioting after Mrs. soothe the tempers of the disgrun- Community today has a great de- 
muni cable diseases, said the Gene- attacks the body s immune system, would have financing and support xifgiis for Sikhs in the Punjab, was Gacdhfs assassination. tied radicals. stabilizing power over Latin Amer- 

va-based organization was abouito . “jcnujoycrof cases has doubled lOTSxh a program. formally sworn in as the first pop> Historically, Sikhs have had His first tough decision could be ica.~ 


since 198 3- NEWS ANALYSIS 

Shot out of power, the Sikh lead- 

era refused to denounce terrorism would actually welcome an Akali 
by radicals who wanted the north- Dal viaory so that Sikh leaders 


Gandhi's blessing, is hardly likely - u 

to change that view. ^PP^S sources say the repeated attacks on Kharg have seriously 

“The Akalis will lave a difficult hamper f d . taa ** capacity to keep up the oil exports needed to finance its 
time dealing with terrorism,'' said war ^ 


.Vph York Ttmts Service 


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Dr. Fakhry A. Assaad, chief of yio, \ m _ unj[eu f u,es m tI,e oivisioii 01 tonununu-iDic uib- 59, a moceraie Sum leader Sikhs Golden Temple in Amritsar, fracuous party together, let alone newspaper H Pais. Toe European 
the organization's division of com- '981. It is caused by a virus that eases, headed by Dr. Assaad, a longihrie advocate of more and the anti-Sikh rioting after Mrs. soothe the tempers of the disgrun- Community today has a great de- 

municable diseases, said the Gene- ^odv s immune system, would have financing and support ngh^ f or Sikhs in the Punjab, was Gacdhfs assassination. tied radicals. stabilizing power over Latin Amer- 

va- based or ganiza tion was about to . "? e ntunper of cases has doubled for juen a program. formally sworn in as the first pop j- Historically, Sikhs have had His first tough decision could be ica." 

prepare a proeram to coordinate H? States every year officials said 1 an element i^y elected chief minister of Lhe close ties with Hindus since -they over whether to call for a reduction Mr. Sanguinetii. who begins an 

research and Information-gather- since'®". of the prt^unwifl be development state since 19S5. He pledged to turn broke from Hinduism 500 years in the 85,000-man paramilitary po- official visit to Spain on Wednes- 

ingL He said officials hoped to have Saenusts at the Geneva confer- of a simple, easy-io-use test ror the away from the confrontations of ago. The Congress Party has also lice forces stationed in the state and day, said that he and other Latin 

the outlines of the program set by eocestressed that AIDS shouldnot disease that can be applied in field ihe past ana work for solutions long had appeal amoag Sikhs, par- the release of thousands of Sikhs American leaders urged Prime 

the end of this year. be compared with a plague. They conditions. “within the ov erall Framew ork of licularly dty-dwdlers, the poor and still in jail. Minister Felipe Gonzalez last week 

The ptitrv or the World Health that since it was difficult to In addiuon. officials said the oij unity jr.d integrity of India. “ lower castes, and Mr. Gandhi's Politicians say he will have little in the United Nations to be the 

D-oanizat ton i nm the battle a cainst disease through casual ganizauon would seek to expand The euphoria over the election popularity in India seems as high as choice but to push for both these spokesman for the region in the 

AIDS could orovide a cruri^de- ccinUi ^' h ^J h ^ il3aJssnQU,dseek number of cdiaboraimg medi- results has been almost universal, ever. steps even though many Sikh lead- European Community. Julio Maria SangUmetti 

m<*nt ihn his hfen lacking unLil 10 ei ? djc 3 l ? *V^ l ^ 1T0 “8^ a str3te " centers in industrialized coun- -^, e ^,3 1^ eieojon." Mr. But with the returns. Punjab be- ere acknowledge privately that the - „ - ■ - 

now a centralized program for co- &y,^J'f It3 tiri S spread. 1^0. where most ofthe reported Gandiu said inis weekend, refer- comes yel another in a long list of arrests and police presence have y>i n- • D 1 • . . 

ordinatine researc/no^lSna car- TTus ,! s a djsease lhal f “ "J? 1 °! a Al ? S ca5es ha \ e - bee *lL t aS nng to his party's defeat by the Indian states dominated by a re- helped keep peace in Punjab. PllillppiH€S RepOrtS Malays ian Attack 

ried out in Eurooe and iheThiited wo ‘" an . ^ *° II ?' 10 ^ Dr - 'V - such regions as Asia, central Afm.a Sikh party, “but the verdict was a gionaily based political party. Mr. Gandhi and other poiiti- ZAMRO>Ssir A rrrv pwZ / ad\ xr\- r 

^ “ V ou 1° ^ lL ^ atin y; hc! l ^ victor.’ for the issues and principles Some analvsis fear this could pose cians dearlv hope that with a big (AP J T P 0 ^ ***** 

StaiM. as well as a central reposi- You reaJJy h;ive l0 ^ j|, e disease, have been AIDS cases but where no ^ democTao. and nr,rrin!«ic/fnr nmhlemx for Indian unitv in the viernrv behind bim Mr Warnnla Monday that four Malaysian gunboats and three helicopters attacked a 

^ radier than ju,t get it from casual medial ceolm working nlh „hi c ”°SghL- fongnm. S wSm hi M^^conm.um.y «, a any somhem Philippine killing 

mformauon cn the incurable dis- exposure. And that is why we think, WHO to fight it- In London, even ihs self-styled Moreover, unlike other Political tou eh on ten-orism. ksvOcius. 


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spokesman for the region in the 
European Community. 


Julio Maria Sanguiiietti 


Philippines Reports Malaysian Attack -d?* 


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ease. 

The outlines of the program 
emerged at a iwoday conference 
here last week that brought togeth- 
er scientists from the United Slates. 
Britain. West Germany, France 
and Australia who are working 
with the health organization to de- 
velop a strategy to fight the disease. 
More than 15.000 people are af- 
flicted with the disease worldwide. 


Lange Rejects U.S. Pressure, 
Maintains Anti-Nuclear Stand 



velop a strategy toTight the disease. T ^ . . izc New Zealand's ban on visits by 

More than 15.000 people are af- WELLINGTON. New Zealand warships carrying nuclear weapons 
flicted with the disease worldwide. “ ■ Prime Minister David Lange would mean a deterioration in rela- 

, hJ _ said Monday that New Zealand lions between the United Suites 

WC v a !j h n would 1,01 back dowT1 oa its “**•* and New Zealand, a long-standing 

network of coliaboraung medica^ nuclear ^es despite pressure ally. 

SlI^. The Ui State Department said 

!“ , d '^ n l r 0 ?***, ,L Repealing a pledge made on Fri- Saturday that if the legislation went 

^ u n KS' at D the A nrohtem^ fronTa day ‘ ^ shru Sged ofr a Ui ahead Washington would have to 

waming ^ ieguiaiio ° 10 ,omai - r N rssr M 

view and provide guidelines that ’ n -^NZUS defense pact, 

will be up to individual countries to 43 Sudanese Die in Desert two share wntii 

can ^ r ° UL Ratten Mr. Lange said the warning was 

Although the scientists condud- KHARTOUM. Sudan — - Truck couched in almost identical terras 
ed that the multiple strains of the drivers have found the bodies of 43 to earlier Washington statements 
AIDS virus made finding a cure a Sudanese who apparently died of and it showed that his speech Fri- 
“long-tenn process” Dr. Assaad thirst and starvation in the desert day had not altered U.S. attitudes 
asserted that this in itself provided while traveling by camel to seek in die seven-month quarrel, 
a basis on which his organization work in Libya, police said Monday. He said New Zealand would 


Separatist in New Caledonia 
Looks Beyond Victory at Potts 



David Lange 

New Zealand has said it will ht- 


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He said New: Zealand would reduce legation before the eS CaSS inde P end «*« for New 

remain in ANZUS and have a good Spokesmen for the territorv's 

relationship" with the United a warsls ip is zoi nuSttr-amedS 50jD°° of European descent 
Stales but what we are not going nuclear-raw-red before i*u ,7 denounced a system that gave them 

to do is surrender our nuclear po- lowed ^New Z^laJd °XL < * ^ ^ 

liev. regions although thev won more 

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IVlig IUU. not uw lltu LUC lidULUUC 4U UC rpCtfl#nlC w ° 

In London, even ;h? selT-styled Moreover, unlike olher political lough on terrorism. t • i J P - ; ^ 

J - Y — ^ a The consuhuIar> regional command in Zamboanga Gty said ^3 

civilian residents were killed or believed taken hostage by Malaysian j 

Q% „ 0 - • tit 'Ml • soldiers 1 in the attack Thursday on Maddanas Island in the Tawitawi ; 

Separatist Ul IVeW iMWuOTUCL °f fia -^ “i 41 ^ WwJ the attack was in retaliation for a 

I reported raid on ScpL 23 by suspected Filipino pirates in the Malaysian 

T m ~D j T/i - Tg tm state of Sabah in which 1 1 persons were killed. 

LOOKS Beyond V ICtOTV at ±OUS J 1 L e * n ?S t ^ helicopters, bombarded the island, 

J J which is 650 miles (about 1.000 kilometers) south of Manila, then sent 

ashore soldiers who allegedly looted and burned houses. 

Spain to Expel Officials of Polisario 

MADRID (Reuters) — Spain ordered Polisario Front representatives A 
Monday to leave the couiury within three days as six fishermen seized by ^ 
the guerrillas orf Western Sahara arrived home. 

“The government ha* taken a vary serious view of the attack," Foreign 
Minister Francisco Fem&nda>0rd6itez said on Spanish radio, H arid has 1 
resolved to expel all ^members of the Polisario and to dose their offices in 
Spain.” The front said it bad attacked the vessels by mistake, taking them j 
for Moroccan naval boats, and warned Spain to keep its navy dear of the a 
coast of Western Sahara, where the guerrillas seek an independent slate, j 

Reagan Ifints at New Post for Heckler 3 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Preddent Ronald Reagan said Monday he ' 
wanted to talk to Margaret M. Heckler, the secretary of health and 
human services, about something new he might like her to do, biit denied 
ho was going lo dismiss her. She is the head of the government's largest 
department. _ 

^v,vw vi kfUJU^Uli UtXCKH Mr. Reagan denied reports that his chief of staff, Donahf T. Re^an, I 

denounced a system that gave them Jean-Marie Tiibnou had won prifadentiaT approval to remove Mrs. Heckler from the cabinet. \ 
control of only one of the four j uauu But saying he would not dismiss her “docs not mean I don’t have 1 

regions although they won more soflKthing.elsethatl wouW i waniheriodo,"hesaid. . . . J 

thin 61 percent of the total vote, the minister for New Caledonia. f 

Becaure of new electoral bound- the regional coundlswiti have wide p 1 U .• 4 

arie*. the anti-independence vote executive pow ers at the expense of f OT 1116 ilCCOrn . | 

IS JSEl? 3£3l 10 lhe » h At least 30 people to B^u hare been kfiW in floods folldwmg two I 

mea epan. here the conservative . Mr. TjTwou made cTear that he weeks oftorratuial tains thatdzove 200,000 people from' their homes, thev 
Rally for Caledonia in the Repub- saw winning in the regions as mere- “ ■^ l T 

Snd^nStoj 1 fuI1 inde P cadcnce - About 900,000 otSSty eusfOfMre in the northeastem United States wen/ Vj 
L < TfaSf*S* , SiS. or Jf* 2 i^ Kana K fnml r 3 fon “ a Still without electricity Monday, and officials said.it could take a few 1 

^ .h.M’aky- more days to restore power after the hurricane designated Gloria. ^The 

tess radical pnwnd^ storm Friday is blamed for at least 16-deaths md MTmillion in damage 
E^jS^E'h 0011 , 1 CCl 4 ralc mov^meuts, it took just from NonhCarolina to Maine. . ■. r ^35 

ELS£2?- ta,IC 10 WOd£ ° n ** a **“ “^tory-wtde A 'bomb exploded to Lnxemhoag early Monday .on top of a swimming 

vote. But that was enough to ensure popl compiex, causing about. S720.900 worth at aamage but no 
^ S ^ Ka:i conirdof the North. Center. and thepdice said. A po&c official said itwas.lhe i^^lent of ftSSb 
plan developed bj Edprd Pisaflii Loyalty Islands regions. • , ^ blasts in Luxembourg, sines Mav. • ^ ' v -;V fjfp) 




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NOUMEA. New Caledonia — 
The Melanesian separatist leader, 
Jean-Marie Tjibaou. savored an 
election victory Monday and called 
on his supporters to concentrate on 
building up regional power in New 
Caledonia. 

Mr. Tjibaou '5 Knnak Socialist 
National Liberation Front won 
control Sunday of three out of the 
four newly created regional coun- 
cils in this French Pacific territory. 

Only the area around Noumea, 
the capita], was held by loyalist 
parties, who protested the election 
as arranged by the Socialist govern- 
ment in Paris, which is committed 


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his is your current personal computer, 
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the shelf, for example) reside 
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Now, once the people in your 
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HVlfCR NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1- 1985 


A Soviet Lead in Space Defenses Appears Doubtful 


Bv Walter Pincus tering U.S. bombers and cruise 

Pos: Seme? missiles, weapons sometimes re- 

WASH1NGT0N — Last week. ferred w> “ "air breathers’' as they 
in the latest administration asset- remain in the aimosohere, unlike 
tion chat the Soviet Union is far uMCtCOOtiiiental nussllcs. 
ahead of the United States in devel- “P? 13 . a 8 ree l ^? 1 

oping space defense technology to of the past Soviet stratenc 

destroy encmv nuclear missiles, the defense effort has gone into build- 
White House national securitv af- mg.ihousands of air defense radars 
fairs adviser, Robert C. McFarlane. anti-aircraft uussiies and tens of 
said that Moscow “has the most thousands of jet tighter- in lerecp- 

advanced” space defense program l °R. . 

“on the faceof the Earth.- Nonetheless, the U.S. Ajj Force 

Not only does that contradict ^ ®-J® £°mber 

Soviet assertions of a U.S. edge in ™ d v^uise missiles, which hug ihe 

— - terrain and are difficult to detect, 

would be able to penetrate those 
defenses for many years to come. 


and panicle beams, which someday have the potential to give them an have 

may be used to shoot down in com- advantage for some SDl-relaied lasers fOT r 1npo<1 _ 

ing warheads, the Soviet Union has tasks” Testing of 

“no identifiable lead in the applica- The Russians also “have very ex- scale deployment sjrctem could be- 

tions of these technologies to a tensive networks" that would allow gin in the early IWU 5. 
space-based strategic defense.** production of radars critical for If the Russtans^slop^ sorae test- 

The undersecretary of defense surveillance, targeting and tracking ing steps, the pubucawm Mds, a 
for research, Donald H. Hicks, also in any future space defense system, complete ground- based laser sys- 

told Congress in his annual state- the two added. But they pointed tern designed to snoot down incom- 
ing warheads could be ready for 


Congress in his annual state- the two added. But they pointed 
meat this year that the Soviet out that “both the U.S. and the 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Viktor P. Karpov said In Geneva that the Soviet Union is 


m 

; Simone Signor et, 64, Dies in France 


in the 


space defense research, it is at odds Consequently. Soviet hegemony in 
with a variety of Defense Depart- this area is not considered particu- 
ment and U.S. intelligence assess- lariy threatening by most U.S. ana- 
ments of which country is leading lysis. 

in space weaponry. To defend against some U.S- 

Just as the Reagan adminisira- missile warheads, the Russians also 
tion sometimes seems given to hy- have put great emphasis on butid- 
perboJe in describing the Soviet ing a traditional, ground-based 
space defense program. Moscow- is anti-ballistic missile system around 
guilty of understatement in deny- Moscow, much like the one abort- 
ing that it even has thoughts of doned as obsolete by the United 
strategic defenses. As recently as States in 1976. 

Friday, a spokesman for Soviet Yet this Soviet effort is Tunda- 
Fo reign Ministry. Vla dimir Lo- mentally dissimilar from the U.S. 
meiko, said in Washington that Strategic Defease Initiative, os the 
Moscow “does not have any space space defense program is formally 
weapons” and “is not engaged in known, which is trying to deter- 

r.- ri . , . R . m research on space attack weapons." mine the possibility of a compre- 

™ rfSTilK Soviet Union hensive mSdtfenri™ “umboSa" 
<■“ based in spacer 

Prince Cbannaat" (Prina Chaim- ?< E**"** ."g! J? ‘bia mote Mpbiakated^ 


Just as the Reagan administration seems 
given to hyperbole in describing the Soviet 
space defense program, Moscow is guilty of 
understatement in denying that it even has 
thoughts of strategic defenses. 


‘drastic solutions.' 


(Continued from Page 1) France, and she grew up 
-'tress award at the Cannes Film Paris suburb or Neuiliy. 

.Festival in 1959. „ . . 

In “Le Chat” 119711 directed bv WhJe Worid War 11 was break ' 

;Pie™&a^Defeni:SdS jg l 0ul P " ^ 3 ons. there is little evidence that cept or space defense research, i* 

>tor Jean Gabin played an elderW 10 dipped the name Karainker. and J losco ^ " u P““ d ** Uml ^ cent tesumemy to Congress casts 

couple locked in a love-hate rela- her mother remamed m Bnttany. [C>0 X her mother's non-Jewish States in the sort of computer lech- doubt that the Russians have any 

"•tionship. addressing each other refugees. Sunone relumed raa i den name. In 1944. she married nology and exouc weapons fimda- lead. 

; through their cat. 10 . P ^ s “l 940 ^ Ul ? Yves AllegreL the director. 10 a comprehensive shield LasL spring, for example, the 

In “Chere Inconnue” (1980) (I MCl English in a junior high school ^ against enemy nuclear warheads. U.S. Air Force told a House Ap- 

Sent a Letter to Mv Love) she before finding a secretarial job al a Blond, sensuous and raspy- The Soviet strategic defense pro- propriations subcommittee that, 

, portrayed a love-starved spinster f^st newspaper, Le Petit Pari- voiced, she incarnated prostitutes gram is primarily focused on coun- despite years of research on lasers 
■.shackled in her invalid brother. sien. She stayed eighl months. in suc h films as “Macadam.” — 


deployment “by the eariy-to-mid 

1990s." 

A Central Inidtigeoce Agency 
report to Congress in June also 
expressed concern about Soviet ef- 
forts to develop such a system, but 
concluded that it “probably” could 
not come until “after the year 
2000 ." 

Other U.S. government state- 
ments on Soviet research suggest 
how tricky forecasting can be. In 

“Soviet Military Power,” for exam- 
ple, the prospect of testing a Tda- 

Union does not surpass the United Soviets lead in some aspects” of lively limited Soviet “spaced-based 
States in any of the 20 “basic lech- radar technology. particle beam weapon i ntend ed 

nologies that have the greatest po- General Abrahamson described 10 di » T1 P. 1 sa«lhte electronic 
tential for significantly impremng ^ Union ^ “W*®* ^ forecasl for the 

nuhtaiy capabiliues m the next 10 ^sixi lasers and perhaps potential- !n a , une M stalHMnt 

to 20 years. ly ahead of us — TdoSt know for 

Lieutenant General James A. J, re ; n the area of neutral Darti- 10 a Senate Apprqpnaaons sub- 

Abrahamson, who heads the re- c i e Y>eam technolcutY" whic^ no- commiuee ' Peered that the “$o- 
seareh program, and John K. Sell- leni jall V could bemused in smm v * ets eventually attempt to 
era chief of the Defense Inlelli- ^ bufld a space-based" particle beam 

gence Agency’s strategic defense _ _ . weapon, but added that the “tech- 

branch. in congressional testimony “P® 1 * a S ree ““f “ e “O™* nical requirements are so severe 

also seemed idativety sanguine Union has two ground-based lasers that we estimate (here is a low 
about U.S ad van Laves in advanced their Saryshagan test range. In probability they will test a proto- 

iechnology. past, the lasers have been used type before the year 2000." 

The United Stales, they said, had 10 b^e OT blind U.S. satellites The bulk of the present Soviet 
a “substantial lead" over the Soviet orbibng overhead. But there is no ballistic missile defense effort has 
Union in “the key technology of conventional wisdom on how been directed at what analysts call 
computers" needed for battle man- threatening such devices could be- the “traditional” anti-ballistic rrris- 
agement of a space defense system. coine - ale approach. This consists of 

They added, however, that the Rus- The Pentagon publication “Sovi- land-based radars that direct land- 

si ans “have a strong program in et Military Power" states that “by based launchers capable of firing a 

optical computers which could the late 1980s, the Soviets could missfle at an incoming warhead. 


shackled to her invalid brother. 

i_ “She was a very demanding ac- Meanwhile, she had become a d’ Anvers’ (1947) 

.’tress,” Mr. Granier-Deferre said, regular at the Cafe de Flore, a Left and “Maneges (1949). 

^ Dir ^! 0 l^f r S ha I! nled f by ,i lJl ( e ^ S®* 6 ™ 18 S P 0t for y2 unE "Between her tears and laughter, 
thought or boichmg her. of not Let- wniers, act<ws and artists. There imitate sentiments come 

ting her lap all her talent and re- she would raeel and befriend the thmynh ■■ Didier Deco in. the film Umoid press inwrerumsl But the two leaders disagreed on evidence that those who seek peace sources said, was apparently 

sources. Young actresses absolute- poets, Boris Vian and Jacques Pre- novelist, once said. "She WASHINGTON — President whether the peace talks should be will not be left at the mercy of those quested by the United States in 

ly adored her." vert, the artists. Albeno and Diego doesn ' t p iav a role she lives it.” Ronald Reagan met for nearly an under an international framework who oppose it.” order to reassure Congress of Jor- 

Simone Signorei was bom Si- Giaconunetti, and the philoso- ^ ■ ' hour Monday with King Hussein that would include the Soviet “But peace, not arms, has been dan's opposition to it. 

mone Henrieite Kaminker on p hers. Jean -Paul Sartre and Simone Miss Signorei and Mr. All egret of Jordan and agreed to work for Union. The United States has the focus of our Hicnictinn* with Peace have stalled on the 

■ March 21. 1921. in Wiesbaden, de Beauvoir, whose leftist political divorced in 1949. ihe year she met direct negotiations between Jordan urged bilateral talks while Jordan our Jordanian friends,” Mr. Rea- question of Palestinian 


Reagan, Hussein Back Direct Jordan-Israel Talks Syrian Allies 

See Gains in 

Tripoli Raid 


Germany. Her family moved to views she shared. 


Mr. Montand. They wed in 1951. and Israel. 



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has supported an international gpn said. “All share the same objec- tion. The United States has 
conference. rive, direct negotiations under ap- out any talks involving rep resen ta- 

N either Mr. Rea gan nor Hussein propriate auspices before the end lives of the Palestine Liberation 

n-i _r *t_- n 


Reuters 


BEIRUT — The defense of Trip- 
oli by Moslem fundamentalists ap- 


mentioned Palestinian participa- of this year." Oraancation until it recognizes Is- ^ared’ Vo weaken Monday ^s~p!£- 

uon re the peace tjts. He added, “Our discussions were nd's right to exist and accepts two _ SYrian militias rep0 rted 

The time to begin e now. Mr. as frank and honest as our friend- UN Security Council resolutions d™;n«ni adintw® nn ihirrf 

Ragan said in fnrewil remarks ship is deep ” that involve the return of Arab 

with the kiag by his side. Hussein said: **I have reiterated lands by Israel and peace negotia- Lebanese city 

Hussein repeated his pledge that Jordan's commitment to a ne- lions. -ri. «nid a m.imn 

made last week before the UN gotiated settlement of the Jordan!- Last Monday, President Hosni force was besieging the heal^y de- 

General Assembly, saying: We an -Israeli conflict within the con- Mubarak of Egypt got a cool recep- feuded port areaT 1 

are prepared to join all parties in text of an international conference lion from Mr. Reagan when he SDokranea for two of the Leftist 
assuring a negotiated settlement to implement [UN] Resolution again prodded the United Slates to ^^s ^ altacks ^ 
free ol belligerence and hosule 242 that provides for peace with break the deadlock by talking to dai ^ ^ 

Syrian-held hills and penetrated 


acts. " Israel in return for occupied Arab the PLO. 

■Mr. Reagan said. “We have just lands. 

bad a very productive meeting." “I have repeated to the president B Mubarak. Mitterrand Meet 
He mentioned the proposal for a what I said to tire United Nations Mr. Mubarak, winding up a 
S 1.9-billion arras package for Jor- three days ago.” he said, adding l(Way trip to the United States 
dan which was submitted lo Con- that he referred to “Jordan's unwa- and Western Europe, met President 

^ I 1. I ■ UTL — ■ t __ . • * ■ ■ _ . - _ 


defense lines at the city’s southern 
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■ Communications with Tripoli 
were cut for the second -day and it 
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gress last week and said: “These vermg condemnation of terrorism, Francois Mitterrand of France for 
arms are important in meeting Jor- whatever its source ” lunchat the Elysee Palacd on Mon- ^ firsTVw^Sof 

dan s proven defense needs and as The statement on terrorism, day, Reuters reported from Paris, fighting that they had failed to ad- 

“ vance very far. . 

Four Syrian-backed militias 
launched a drive against the Islam- 
ic group, the Unification, or Ta- 
wheed. movement, on Saturday af- 
ter it rq acted proposals for Syrian 
troops to alter and padfy the dty. 

Challenging Syrian influence in 
Lebanon, the leader of Tawheed, 
Sheikh Saeed Shaaban. said Syria 
was preparing a massacre In Tripoli 
and his men would only disarm 
when other. militias. did. . 

Details of casualties have been 
hard to obtain since the assaulL 
Before that, more than 200 
killed and 1,000 


Botha Speech Backs Reform, U.S. I ^siting 
Criticizes Foreign Pressure Indicators 


Up in August 

(Continued from Page 1) 


(Continued from Page 1) Leading businessmen in South 

to discuss matters of mutual con- Africa called Sunday, in full-page 
cem without the one group having newspaper advertisements, for the 
the right lo dominate the others.” abolition of apartheid and negotia- 
Mr. Botha said he was willing to lioas “acknowledged black 
reconsider the structure oF the Pres- leadeTS " 00 shari °g P ower - good s and a dip in the number of 

s *2?*^ advisory Appearing in both English-lan- weekly unemployment claims. — 

body exdudmg blades that recently guage and Afrikaans newspapers, pm.r h.»tt began.- Bef< 

recommended the abohuon of pass ^7 Idvenisement was sign^by 91 mdex 111 P«>p!e were 

laws restricting blacks freedom of leaders of South AfricMCompa- A f 1116 dccJlIie “ the average wounded' in. fighting that caused 
moveracnt - Dies and subsidiaries of interSa- 400,000 people to flee Tripoli. 

Blacks, unlike Indians and peo- uonal concerns. KfSrSS The Lebanese government or- 

ple of mixed race, are excluded _ . hints demand b falhng, a lowenng dCTed Monday the distribution of 

from Parliament and have been P™* ** headhnc ’ of raw-nntenals prices, whi di sug- awusandsofblanketsandfb^ra- 

told to exercise their political rights There u a better way. gesls weaker demand, and a declrae nons among the refugees. 

m tribal homelands or through lo- Among those who signed it were m 011151311(11118 credlL The pro-Syrian Arab Democrat 

cal councils in their townships. Harry Oppenbeimer the head of One indicator, contracts for cap- ic Party said its men broke through 
In anoiher development* the An- Consolidated Mines; ltd . equipment, was unchanged Tawheed defenses in the northeast 

golan goveraraeni said that South Harr > f Bloom, chairman of from the July level. earlv Mondav A snakes man in 

African planes had mucked its ^ ST 5 .! 0 '?’ R?Uy ' lo another assessment, the Na- Bei ™ 1 for ^SyriaifStional So- 

!0Ka “ a wulh “ lm fSS c^AffitSSTS- fiSUMlir -r* 1 * 4 


early Monday, killing more 
.Angolan soldiers. 


S/STSTu Economists predicted Monday thai fora^i in Urn sonU, 


sS; , ti!'Aw4i 1 ASSd?to^ mk 


aid dial the South A /rican qpma- SSSSawSKS 6i-6 ^ ^ ^ 

i^T. 0 ^ wffixSc of^JnimnnesborgO.nsolidmed. 

Union for the Total Independence It also contained names of the 
of Angola. heads of the South African subsid- 

_ . . , iaries of Tovota, Kodak, Hewlett- 

■ Businessmen Appeal Packard. BMW, the Coca-Cola Ex- 

Eariier. Sheila Rule of The Aw port Corn.. Colgate-Palmolive, . . . 

York Times reported from Johan- Mobil OiL General Motors, Cili- a T^ccssiOti by the end of I9S6. 

nesburg: bank and Volkswagen. 


In an even more ominous assess- 
ment, the association said 52 per- 
cent of the 350 economists who 
responded to the latest survey be- 
lieved that the country would be in 


Sudan Asserts 
Rebel Leader Was 
Behind Coup Bid 

Reuters 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Colo- 


Union Straggle in Berkeley 


Kathleen Cn nd John Garang. leader of insur- 

of the association, said the majority ^^ sout ^ era f'V^ Sudan, was one 
of economists felt that the federal 311 attempted 

government's huge budget deOdls ^ ^ 


(Continued from Page !) 
unions in Poland and South Africa, 


said she came to Berkeley in 1964 
“to fight m the streets." She was 


Identified the other two as Yaa- 
goub Ismail and Youssef Kouwa. 

Colonel Garang is the.leader of 

vn.l • - . * . K A . 


books." 

Mr. Cassidy acknowledged that t=rs. worked as a 
some of the nonunion restaurants schooluracher before she got in- 
might be paying wages comparable volved in the restaurant business in 
to union establishments. But he 1972. 


active m the Students for aDemo- 3 Thieves in GuSOlgdlOU the Ethiopian-bleked Sudanese 

Montes sori Are Sentenced to Death S3!£ 


United Frea Intenwtiaud 

BEIJING — A court . h« sen- 
tenced three 


fighting government troops 
southern Sudan. Mr. Ismail is a 




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la response. Miss Nelson and thugs. Miss Nelson said. Nooethe- 


dissident soldier-politician -from 

ffiSJSaME »«■<■« Kortofaaprnvmca. 

the official Peoole’s Dailv reooned. . ™ non-Arab Fur and Nuba are 

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the newspaper said Sunday. -. vrth the attempted coup. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1985 


f l^M 


Page 


®y Margot Homblowcr 

Wathingttm Pan Service . 

TLm. m . 


ton in Boston: A Decadelong Social Experiment ThatBackfired 


School enrollment has fallen from 94,000 pupfls to 
56,000, and- a system that was 61 percent white in 1974 is 
now 13. percent minority; 

Duong a decade of academic and administrative chaos, 
test soqres plunged. ihe-drop-CHit rate soared, 70 schools 
dosed and more than 1,000 teachers were laid off. In 1 1 
yearv the system has .had right superintendents. While 
there 'has been slow improvemeat in the hst three years, 
few of those who abandoned the system for parochial or 


shooters are lom. .^Jtectoii and police sharp- 

days, no one ihmS? ♦ fr0fl5 Bos «» High. 

«*oot baSfi.TSy y.y % **■ 

. Mere S,T^ ^borhood^: 


SLTKse 
who ride 


More SiTdSET*® 0 *?^' ' 
busing riois,and^f^ hai! ^ Sed - **** Bostoa '^ «**■' 

iySiSiSiS S 6 ^ ***** "i* 

the nation. '■ l *h es f school Integra tioa battles in 

rityJr. *%X 'Arthur Gar: 

officials had schoolf chargpg that Reeled 

nation's °P9««* a dual sysuan, the 

than ^\ CTm school system is more racially segregated 

h« achieved elsewhere in the 

as a lt ^wddy viewed by blacks and whites 

±^ciai experiment that backfired, ■ 

case iSrii? 8 ; ° mi ! y issucd GnaL orders' m -’iHfae 

operations to tfe. now- 
415 ordS Tj° School Committee. But he left behind 
T 0f to. and a system still beset with problems. 


suburban schools show signs of returning. 
Mavor Raymond L. Fiynn. who has f! 


Mayor Raymond L. Flynn, who has five children in 
parochial schools and one at an experimental public 


parochial schools and one at an experimental public 
school, said, “Parents, black and white, took tbtir kids out 
of school, because they didn't see a future for public 
education.'’ 

Even the most unreconstructed busing critics had to 
agree with Judge Garrity that, in 1974, Boston schools 
were in need of reform. School districts had been gerry- 
mandered to separate the races. Of 150 elementary schools 
in 1973, the court found that 62 were more than 96 percent 
white, and 32 wens more than 85 percent black, • 

But when the city’s all-white school committee refused 
to draw up a busing plan — a resistance unprecedented 


among northern cities subjected to court-ordered busing 
— Judge Garrity brought in experts who devised a plan so 
inflexible, and so indifferent to the sensitivities of the 
city's insular neighborhoods, that it sparked a_rebeUio& 

“The discrimination- was stunning,” said Ellen Gurney, 
head of City-wide Education Coalition, a local civic 
group. “Hie entrance of the judge was a good thing in that 
it wrested the school system away from the Irish and 
Italian politicians who viewed it as theirs for paLronage 
and theirs for their children, but who weren't willing to 
give blacks the same chance." 

However, Miss Gainey added. "In hindsight, the plan 
the judge imposed was disastrous" and "disruptive and 
cataclysmic." 

Judge Garrity ’s plan paired South Boston, poor and 
Irish, with Roxbury, poor and black. Even communities 
that were relatively well-integrated were forced to bus 
their children across town, according to a strict mathemat- 
ical formula. 

Boston was given little time to adjust to Judge Gam'ty’s 
orders, issued in June 1974 and imposed the following 
September. 

“The way the whole thing was handled created a feeling 


of despair," Mr. Flynn said. "The government provided 
no role for parents, black or white. The political process 
broke down. If there had been greater community and 
parental dialogue, the results would have been much 
different." 

Some sociologists argue that the schools would have 
become majority black and Hispanic, even without bus- 
ing, However, the city as a whole, while it has lost 
population, is still more than 70 percent white. 

At South Boston High, the only school to be placed 
directly under court receivership in the histoiy of school 
desegregation, Jerome Winegar, the court-insLalled princi- 
pal stands in (he marble lobby each morning as buses 
disgorge hundreds of black. Hispanic and Cambodian 
youngsters. 

“When I came here nine years ago. there were metal 
detectors, and 90 police officers in die halls,” to protect 
students from racial violence, Mr. Winegar said, "but I 
haven’t heard a racial slur in sit years." 

The school which serves mostly poor students from 


all white, an overcrowded, dilapidated school that wa: 
focal point for “Souihie." as the neighborhood call s its< 
Now. only 300 of Sou thief’s 1,500 high school-age studet 
go Lhere. 

Throughout the system, "sports and extracurricui 
activities went down tbe drain" after busing, said 1. 
Foreman, public information director of schools. "Be 
ton’s teams were once class A. Now they're class E. Th 
play Martha's Vineyard and Cuttybunk," rural enclave 

Boston's public schools still remain a place for peop 
who cannot afford to go elsewhere. Sixty percent of "i 
pupils come from families on welfare. Three-quarters Ir 
ia single-parent homes. 

“The cynicism and the injustice was that anyone wf 
had the money could get out of ilT said William Bulge 
president of the Massachusetts Senate, who has taken tl 
last of his nine children out of the public schools. 


public housing projects, is 37 percent black. 31 percent 
white, 18 percent Hispanic and 14 percent .Asian, he said. 


white, 18 percent Hispanic and 14 percent .Asian, he said. 
Before Judge Gareity's orders, Slouth Boston High was 


“The moral high ground," he said, "was token by thos 
whose children were unaffected, the judge who Lives i 
Wellesley, the Globe editors who live in Brookline an 
Lincoln, the court experts who live in Concord and Lea 
in gt on." all wealthy suburbs outside the city. 





In Belize, Key Maya Grave Is Found 


Civilisation May Have Flourished Until Spanish Invasion 



Elect? Leader 


By Christopher S. Wren 

New York Times Service 

MONTREAL — Pierre-Marc 
Johnson, a political moderate who 
favors independence, for Quebec 
Only as a last resort; has been elect- 
ed leader of the. Parti Qufbecois. 
He succeeded Presuer Rene Leves- 


que, who has stepped down. 
Under Canada’s parliamentary 


S stem, Mr. Johnson, as leader of 
e majority party, also is to sue- 


Camara fas* 

Roberto (FAabuisson 


D’Aubuisson 


the majority party, also is to suc- 
ceed Mr. Iivesque as the premier 
of Quebec: He is to be sworn in this 
week. ; \ J 

Mr. Johnson, 39, is the son of a 


popular' former premier, the late 
Daniel Johnson, and has been serv- 


Steps Down 


In Salvador 


is? 


By Marlise Simons 

We»> York Tima Service 

SAN SALVADOR — Roberto 
d'Aubuisson, the standard-bearer 
of El Salvadof’s militant right, has 
stepped down as the bead of his 
party, the Nationalist Republican 
Alliance. 

His resignation Sunday is said by 
many diplomats arid politicians to 
be a tacit recognition that he has 
outlived his usefulness as party 
leader. They also say he has- be- 
come a liability to his backers, in- 
cluding important sectors of the 
country’s -military, -/businessmen 
and landowners. ■ ' = ’- - -■ - ; 

The party has been weakened by 
internal -squabbling, desertions, 
loss of funds and a crushing defeat 
in the March legislative .elections. 

But Mr. d'Aubuisson saidjliis 
resignation would not. end his- role 
in Salvadoran politics. He ibid 800 
delegates at the party’s national 
convention Sunday that be would 
head a new political institute to be 
formed by tbe party soon. . 

At the institute, he said, he plans 
to train young leaders, drawing cm 
“my experiences, in .Salvadoran 
politics" and. on “everything _ 1 
learned in -Taiwan.” Mr. d’Aubuis- 
son took “courses in' poKtical war- 
fare" in Taiwan a decade ago, . one 
of his aides said. \ • 

Alfredo Cristsmi, 37, a coffee 
producer who joined .the alliance 
only a year ago, was chosen. unani- 
mously its new president fora two? 
year . term. Mr. . Cristiani studied 
business administration at George- 
town University in Washington, 
and has headed the powerful asso- 
ciations of Salvadoran coffee and 
cotton growers. _ ' 

Like other landowners in the 
party, he lost large parts .of his 
holdings to .the agrarian redistribu- 
tion program several years ago. 

The tall soft-spoken and pol- 
ished Mr. Cristiani seemed a sharp 
contrast to Mr. d’Aubuisson, a 
small fiery figure. 

Although Mr. d’Aubuisson was 
cashiered for involvement in coup 
plots when be was >a National 
Guard major with a long career in 
intelligence work, be made a come- 
back as the key figure in the so- 
called Broad National Front, 
which declared it would “save El 
Salvador from Communism," 

President JoseNapole&a Duarte 
has said the front was formed to 
carry out actions that tbe military 
themselves could not undertake. 
Foreign diplomats and critics have 
described the front as a network 
tha t fed names of “subversives” to 
military and paramilitary death 
squads to defend the interests of, 
the country’s well-to-do. 

Once the front was converted 
into a political party, the National- 
ist Republican Alliance, it grew 

rapidly and in three elections won 
dose to 40 percent of the national 
vote. Last year, Mr. d'Aubuisson 
came close to winning B Salva- 
dor's presidential election, and be 
openly accused the United Stares 
of blocking his victory through 
“political mn D envers ana funds. 

U.S. diplomats have consistently 
linked Mr. d’Aubuisson to. death 
squad activities, to the 1980 assassi- 
nation of Archbishop Oscar Ar- 
nulfo Romero in San Salvador and 
the abortive conspiracy last year to 

if in ihe U-S. ambassador io El Sal- 
vador, Thomas- R. Pickering Mr. 
d’Aubuisson, who on several occa- 
sions has been refused a visa to 
enter the United States, has -always 
denied the charges. "• 


Daniel Johnson, and has been serv- 
ing under Mr, Lfcvesque as -the 
province’s; justice minister.- Al- 
though he did not have Mr. Leves- 
que’s endorsement ■in the race for 
party leader, be was considered the 
front-runner. •* . 

In a departure from tradition, in 
dues-paymg members of tbe Parti 
Qi£b6oois were eligible to cast bal- 
lots Sunday at 741 polling stations 
around the province. Monitors re- 
ported a heavy turnout. . ■ 

With 99 percent of the ballots 
counted, Mr. Johnson had 56,658 
votes, or nearly 59 percent of the 
total 



felfttrt 


Pierre-Marc Johnson, the new leader of the Parti. Quebe- 
cois who is to succeed Rene Levesque as Quebec premier, 
with Pauline Marois, one of his opponents in the race. 


medicine and law. He chose a ca- 
reer. in politics after practicing 
briefly as a physician. 

During the election campaign, 
Mr. Johnson said that Quebec 
should confront “the challenge of 
economic growth'’ within Canada 


# ■ 

In remarks acknowledging his 
victory Sunday night, Mr. Johnson 
did not refer directly to sovereignty 
for Quebec and emphasized the 
need for conciliation and unity in 
the party. : 


and retain the goal of sovereignty, 
once central to the party, only as 
insurance. 

He said he would not hold an- 
other referendum in Quebec on tbe 
sovereignty issue. Mr. Levesque 
failed by a 3-io-2 margin in a 1980 
. referendum to ggm a . mandate to 
jugptiat? sovereignly for Quebec. 

. Mr. Johnson has. also. endorsed 
freer 4rade 'between Canada and 
the United States and has called for 
the government in Ottawa to con- 
sult. witiL Quebec and other prov- 
inces more closely in economic 
planning: - - 

His plans for Quebec include a 
reduction of provincial government 
spending, a freeze on taxes and the 
creaticm of a fund to promote eco- 
nomic development 

Sunday’s selection confirmed the 
transition that the Earn-Qu6becois 
has undergone since it won power 
nine years ago. 'Die party has 
moved from a feisty group of 
French-speaking activists working 
for a sovereign Quebec to a more 
traditional party conforming to the 
constraints of Canadian federal- 


* Mr.; Johns® alsoinadtagKture 
toward Enelish-SDcakcnj’and other 


1 'titanic 'groUps 1 OTtridefthei 'par 

"> o-lvLijLir-iLii r-JLi- 


Swtkhmg'tira&^Frpqch. to engusn, 
fife said ^at despite past tensions, 


“1 V mbw w ith stttsntyWtfcah build 
together For the beuermenYoFQuo:" 
bee as a^whole." , v , 

PauHne Marois, the province's 
manpower minis ter, finished sec- 
ond with about 19 percent of tbe 
vole. Jean Garon, the agriculture 
minister, was third with 15 percent. 


Guy Bertrand, the only separat- 
t candidate, -received less that 2 


1st candidate, -reedved less that 2 
percent of. the vote and -did not 
attend the party’s- celebration Sun- 
day. Some of his supporters walked 
out, saying they considered Mr. 
Johnson committed to federalism. 

Mr. Johnson, . whose grandfather 
was' Irish, was bora into 1 a promi- 
nent French-speaking family in 
MontreaL He holds deghees in 


cal career spanning a quarter cen- 
tury for Mr. Levesque, who left the 
Liberal Party, founded the Parti 
Quebfecois in 1968 and brought it 
to power in 1976 by tempering its 
nauonahst ideology with promises 
of good government. 

One of Lhe first challenges con- 


By Boyce Rensberger small dry-states into much larger Archaeologists know that just 

Hasfiirgion past Serried and more politically complex na- before the Spanish conquest the 

WASHINGTON — Newly dis- tion-stares. empire-building Aztecs, who lived 

covered ruins indicate that the an- **^ ur entire view of the Maya has some 750 miles to the west around 
dent Maya civilization of Central * >eei1 wron S. ’ said Diane Z. Chase. Mexico City, were poised to subju- 
America, long thought to have col- w ^°- k* 1 husband, Arlen F. gate the Mayas. Mrs. Chase specu- 

lapsed centuries before the Spanish ^ laSe ’ discovered and excavated la ted that the man may have re- 
conquistadors arrived in the 1500s, burial site. “Just because they ceived the earplugs from Aztec 
continued to flourish right up to stopped building pyramids doesn’t rulers trying to sway his allegiance, 
the Sp anis h invasion. mean there had been a decline in 

Last month, two Florida archae- culture." Before the Aztecs could domi- 

ologisxs excavated a Maya grave The Chases, both of whom teach naie the Mayas, however, the Span- 
con Laining the richly adorned body at the University of Central Florida iards invaded, bringing infectious 
of a man who appears to have been CMando, have been working in diseases that, within a century and 
a powerful ruler. Belize for seven years under spon- a half, killed an estimated 70 per- 

Thc researchers said the remains, worship of National Science cent lo 80 percenL of the Maya 
found near the coastal town of Cor- Founda lion. population. 

ozal in Belize, probably are those of The burial site was found be-, 

a leader who ruled a Maya province neath a modest stone shrine that 

that may have extended over 9,000 had become covered with soiL 

square miles (about 23,000 square The chief clue to the man’s status TRAVELLERS RE. 

kilometers). The grave is only was a pair of gold earplugs inlaid 

about 500 years old, dating to the with jade and turquoise. The plugs, /,V BO <7 l IB A. Y S - 

period just before the Spanish con- which once fit inside a large hole in 

the earlobe, flared out to cover the 

The discovery adds weight to an ear. Small metal bells dangled from _ . - , 

emerging view that the final centu- the lower edge Ba*ed on his long ana u 

ries of the Maya civilization were c,«,h rw* Bombay our foreign corre 

not a period of decadence and de- “Of all the things that 

dine, as has long bee® ihdd, but one bnl m i dent jcal u^those water has never figured pi 

oftranation to a different kind of W0I ^ by n|kls ^ Most prefer Tonic in E 

soclc ™ preme symbol of power." The tini in Bombay or Orange 

During the classic period, from Chases said they believe the man Indeed, anything that 

about AD. 250 to 900, the Mayas would not have been buried with usuaflvmix in Bombav. 
built elaborate religious centers such important symbols if he were Rut Ut me sssury’voi 

dpnmatti by d» peal pyramids nol a ruler o( pen po™. , " u ‘; L * V a ?J 0 ' 

that remain tourist attractions in L . n P neea to tl,?ar 


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o s aag issgaggw 


TRAVELLERS REASSURED * WATER 
IN BOMBA Y SAFE TO DRINK'. 


Based on his long and intimate acquaintance with 
Bombay our foreign correspondent writes : 

"Of all the things that people drink in Bombay, 
water has never figured prominently. m i 
Most prefer Tonic in Bombay, Mar- iJB 
tini in Bombay or Orange in Bombay. jTgfE 
Indeed, ai\\-thing that one would 
usually mix in Bombay. 

But, let me assure you. there 
is no need to stav clear ■ 


fronting the party’s new leader will 
come from the Libera] Party, which 


come from the Libera] Party, which 
hopes to defeat the Parti Queb&ois 
in a provincial election. The Liber- 
als; led by Robert Bourassa, have 
led tbe incumbent party by as 
much as 20 percentage points in 
public opinion polls. 

.The Barti Quebecois's mandate 
expires in April but some party 
strategists want the new premier to 
call a provincial election once the 
legislature- reconvenes Ocf. 15. 


Guatemala, Belize and Mexico's 
Yucatan Peninsula. 

In the ensuing centuries, howev- 
er, architecture on the grand scale 
declined, leading archaeologists to 
think ibe civilization -was disinte- 
grating. 


New British Paper Planned 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — The London Post, 
a new evening newspaper, is to 
start publication next spring. News 


The new view' is that, instead'of International said Monday. Rupert 
building pyramids, the Mayas con- Murdoch, who controls News Ln- 
centrated on extending their com- lemationaL said the paper initially 
ciercial and political ties over would be sold in the London area 
steadily larger areas, convening 'but might soon be distributed else- 
political entities that once had been where in Britain. 


of the water. < 

Those rumours 
which infer that ! 
water does not mix 
with this most 
distinctive of Im- 
port ed London Dry 
Gins are well and 
truly ill-founded. - ' -i^Tr 




\Ai 


MIA | 

■ ■» m \ 


y 




U.S. 'Sacrifice’ Is Urged 
To Cut Budget Deficit 


United Press In/emarional 


1SUL 

The election also closes a poLiti- 


WASHINGTON — David A. 
Stockman, former U.S. budget di- 
rector, has called for a period of 
u across- th e-board national sacri- 
fice,*' including large .tax increases 
and sharp spending reductions to 
cut the U.S. deficit. 

“i think the events of the last 
couple of weeks indicate the joyride 
is over," Mr. Stockman said in an 
-television interview on Sunday. 


High Style 


FINE SERVICE IS ALWAYS IN FASHION 




AT AIR FRANCE, THERE’S ONE 
THING THAT NEVER GOES OUT 
OF STYLE: OUR ATTENTION 
TO THOSE IMPORTANT DETAILS 
THAT MAKE YOURFUGHT 
A TRULY UNIQUE EXPERIENCE. 
FROM THE WARM WELCOME 
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AND FOOD, WE BRING A TOUCH 
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AND AT AIR FRANCE, THAT'S 
SOMETHING THAT WILL NEVER 
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OH BUSINESS IN EGYPT 


COME TO SHERATON. 


Corrie ten minutes from the airport, to 
the centre of gcn®mment of 
administration of exhibitions. Come to a 
superb- new business centra with word- 
processor and 24-hour telex. Come to 
Cairo's oasis of relaxation - to poolside 
cabanas and bars and a dazzling array 
of fine foods from many lands. Come to 
the Heliopolis Sheraton . . . where 
Egyptian hospitality comes alive. 


Pi 


,v.-" mmW. 

■fix?***-:'? - :v A — - m% 
''' 


• j , 
r <• « 




w * 


loti 


Office of H3 AI Is Bombed 


The Associated Pmj . 

AMSTERDAM — A small 


bomb erolodfed Monday atthfi of- 
fice of HAL the Israeli -tiatiomat 
airline, ca u si ng Utile damage' dnd 
nn ioiories. police said. 


Shercrton Hotels, inns & Resoris Wo rldwide 

Thehospitality people of TEE 


r s * s i‘- v 


o ? 1 


bo injuries, police said. 


For reservations and informahon call 
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Sheraton Hotel or Reservations Office 



j-f m .. .'1 , 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1985 


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ARTS / LEISURE 


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jading subvdv took pubfiiher see *o jranu- 
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^ ,0^ 




Celebrating the Art of Wine 

By John Russell of iL So have tapesLries, glass, sil- or 1742 by Paul de Lamerie. the 

Nvh- Y orL Tw*t Servne ver, porcelain, photography, the Victorian centerpiece in silver and 

N FW YORK “Wine Cele- niiniaiure. the poster, the glass by John Samuel Hunt (184SL 

bra lion and Ceremony" at the Picard, the bookbinder, the wall- or the noble British baluster goblet 

Cooper-Hewitt Museum ii a large, paper designer and the mowe still, that dates from the early 8th cen- 

Our century has seen small mas- tuiy. As for the gigantic silver wine 
terpieces of commercial presen la- cistern that was made in England in 
lion such as the illustrated French the 1790s. an unwary sheep could 
book called “My Doctor. Wine" on drown in it and not be noticed till 
which Raoul Dufy lavished ait pcs- morning. 

existence even earlier? Sculpture and affection in die Some or the more sponacular 

and primmaking have made Such 1930s. Arusts or more rec«i « turns have no less spectacular assc- 

have designed wine labels, made nations. There is an engraved glass 
drawings for illustrated histories of of 1 785 that belonged to Catherine 
wine, and in general acted as the Great of Russia and bears her 
henchmen or a profession that has monogram. There is a flute — the 
served us as well in times of travail mil thin glass that goes very well 
and stress as in limes of euphoria, with champagne — that bears the 


roomy and convivial affair. How 
could it be otherwise, when the ico- 
nography of wine-making is a rich 
and ancient subject, hallowed since 
Greek and Roman times and in 


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All this is spelled out at the Coo- 
per-HewiiL which draws nol only 
upon its own labyrinthine collec- 
tions but upon its neighbors, the 
Metropolitan Museum and the 
Morgan Library, and upon special- 
ized museums the world over. 
(Even the corkscrew has its histori- 
an.! Given the eligibility of almost 
any work or an in which grapes 
play a role, we should not be sur- 
prised at the range and variety of 
the show. No exhibition that in- 
cludes both a photograph by Baron 
de Meyer of Nijinsky- raising some 
grapes to his mouth in “L’Apres- 
Midi d'un Faune” and a cartoon of 
“Mo5t et Chandon coming face to 
face with the widow Cliquot" can 
be called monotonous. 


arms of Charles II or England. 
From a later day there are some 
ideally unfiissy pieces of glass that 
belong to Hugh Johnson, the histo- 
rian and cartographer of wine who 
is a major contributor to the cata- 
log. 

One unit of measurement in all 
such matters is the museum that 
was opened not so many years ago 
in the chateau at Mouton. near 
Bordeaux, which is the headquar- 
ters of Mouton-Rothschild. Roth- 
schild taste tends traditionally to- 
ward the rich and the rare, and the 
visitor to Mouton is confronted 
among much else with a rhinoceros 
bom mounted in silver gilt, a silver- 
gilt statuette of an itinerant har- 
vester made in Breslau in 1573, a 



O’Neill’s 'Iceman’s 

% 

A Stirring Restagiiig 


Nicholas de Larmes sin’s 1690 engraving of a publican. 


Sa&sanian silver cup that is oroba- 
Some of the categories choose blv at least 1,500 years old, and a 
themselves It is by right that the Chinese poicdain lain W. of the 
bottle, the decanter and the glass K ' ang ^ which ^ 

are there, together with the cooler, was poured into the upper com- 
the coaster, the goblet, the cup, the pan mem and kept warm by relays 
chance, the amphora, the rhyton. c f jj 0l water in Lhe compartment 
the kyhx and the krater. The majes- hdow. 

lie cognac still and lhe no less raa- Nor extremes of imacina- 
jes uc double-screw press the one don lhtl ran rioi ^ ^ ci Hf 

lent Tom Cognac, in France, the Antwerp in the mid- 16th century 
other torn Epemay remind us g0 unrecorded in Mouton. with ail 


that lhe making of wine and spirits 
can be not merely “big business." 
in financial terras! but a hefty busi- 
ness in terms of technology. Even 
the monumental winepress illus- 
trated in Diderot's Encyclopaedia 
does not outclass these two stately 
exhibits. 

In every one of these categories 
the variety of what we see at the 
Cooper-Hewitt (through Oct. 13) is 
quite remarkable, it ranges from 
publicity postcards of distant date 
to champagne bottles (empty, alas) 
of a size that few of us will ever get 
to handle. In the domain of antiq- 
uities, of Lhe decorative arts during 
the northern Renaissance, and of 
the great age of the undecorated 
glass and decanter, the aesthetic 
standard is often remarkably high. 
Later developments are not scant- 
ed. either, and the Swedish plastic 
gobleL of the 1980s is given equal 
lime with more genteel contriv- 
ances. 

At the Lop level, I doubt that we 


that meant in the way of exotic 
materials, shells, ostrich eggs and 
faniasticated mounts. Bui then it 
goes without saving that money 
was not spared in the preparation 
of the Mouton museum. TTie Coo- 
per-Hewiti exhibition, though 
sponsored by Most et Chandon 
and Henri ess v Cognacs, cannot be 
quite so lavish, but it has a distrac- 
tion all its own. And. along the 
way, it racks up a remarkably large 
□umber of rare and covetable ob- 
jects. In fact it would constitute an 
excellent concise guide to the deco- 
rative arts in many of their aspects 
even if the word “wine" were no- 
where mentioned. As for the minu- 
tiae of wine making, it would still 
be fun to go to Mouton, but visitors 
need not feel that New York has 
sold them short. 

One thing may. however, strike 
us. Everything about the making of 
wine is treated in depth at the Coo- 
per-Hewitt. Almost everything 


making of wine, the serving of 
wine, and the symbolism of wine. 

What we miss, almost entirely, is 
what happens when people' sil 
down and drink wine. Paintings od 
that theme might as well not exist, 
almost- There is an amusing col- 
ored engraving dated 1798 by that 
formidable English satirist James 
Gillray. Called “The Loyal Toast" 
it shows us a group of men with 
glasses raised. But the wine looks 
like red ink, the toast itself is made 
fun of. and the least one can say of 
the men in question is that they 
would never make the grade as con- 
noisseurs of wine. 

One reason is. no doubt that the 
Cooper-Hewitt is not a museum of 
painting. Another is that great 
paintings — whether about wine or 
about anything else — are very ex- 
pensive to insure, even if they could 
be borrowed. (Manet's "Bar aux 
Folies-Bergere" and Renoir's 
“Boating Party at Luncheon" must 
always be among the great absen- 
tees in exhibitions of this kind.) 


Furthermore, many paintings of 
people drinking are hideous. Even 
those who prize Dutch and Flemish 
painting very highly indeed can re- 
member some memorably dreary 
paintings of people who have had 
too much to drink. 

So it is for us to come away from 
the Cooper-Hewitt and act out the 
fantasies that will have come to us 
while there. We may not be able to 
afford the great Renaissance table 
ornaments, the English 18th-centu- 
ry silver or the engraved glasses 
that look their best as the wine is 
refracted in candlelight. But some 
Old Master engravings, a decent set 
of glasses, a decanter Lhai will not 
bankrupt us and one or two other 
inspired but economical purchases 
will serve us almost as well. In fact 
we shall sympathize with, but not 
envy, the Guild Master's family in 
Basel in 1559, who appear in a 
painting from the Kunstmuseum in 
Basel They have every kind of stuff 
on the table, and clearly they are 
doing themselves well. But better 
than ourselves? Never! 


By Frank Rich 

Yew York Times Sen-Ice 

N EW YORK — Nothing glows 
when the lights rise on Harry 
Hope's waterfront gin-mid ana 
flophouse in Jos6 Quintero's new 
production of “The Iceman Com- 
eth." What cooks dimly into view 

is a mol dering, black-and -brown 
cave, barely discernible in a 
smudged, gray-green haze. The der- 
elicts who populate Eugene 
CNaD's play describe this squalid 
setting as “a morgue" and “a 
tomb.” as “The End of the Line 
Caft” and “The Bottom of the Sea 
Rathskeller." 

■ 

As designed by Ben Edwards 
and lighted by Thomas R. Skelton 
at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater, 
Hope's saloon of 1912 looks as 
ghostly as those bonom-of-the-sea 
glimpses of the Titanic. But in “The 
Iceman Cometh" the bodies of the 
inhabitants are still visible — still 
terrifyingly alive, twitching in the 
sil l To see O'Neill's bums sprawled 
comatose across their sooty dive is 
to know one of the most harrowing 
images ever produced by the Amer- 
ican theater. 

For most plays, that image 
would be an ending. In “Iceman," 
it is only a beginning. O'Neill be- 
gins with a vision of existence at 
rock bottom and then, for nearly 
five hours (three intermissions in- 
cluded), just keeps plunging down, 
taking us and his characters past 
despair to utter hopelessness: we 
cannot go home until we under- 
stand that the only truth that exists 
in life is the truth that kills. The 
guide for this pitiless journey is a 
hardware salesman named Hickey 
— a role that brought Jason Ro- 
bards fame when he first played iL 
under Quintero's direction, in the 
1956 Circle in the Square revival 
that helped restore O'Neill's then- 
tarnished reputation. In the current 
staging, which originated at Wash- 
ington’s American National The- 
ater. Robards has reunited with 
Quintero, and both men arein bril- 
liant form. Along with some other 
outstanding actors, led by the su- 
perlative Donald Moffat, they give 


Martha Graham and the Fear of Paris 


Alexandre Savin the cashmere designer in paris 


shall see many things finer in their about the consumption of wine is 

kind than the silver cup and cover looked into, also. The uses oi the 

_ chance are pursued even to the foot 

of the Cross, where no less an artist 



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than .Albrecht DOrer shows the 
blood from Christ’s wounds being 
collected in vessels of Lhe kind thaL 
we see in a nearby showcase. Du- 
rer's contemporary. Hans Burgfc- 
mair, likewise presses the analogy 
between wine and blood 

A fifth-century Coptic tapestry 
points to the association of the 
grape with continuity and felicity. 
The miracle at Cana, where Christ 
turned water into wine, is por- 
trayed in an early 19th-century 
Swedish painted wall hanging. 
Hugh Johnson has Lem a colored 
engraving, dated 1746. in which the 
standard of weights and measures 
first promulgated in the reign of 
Henry V7II is copiously illustrated 
In a word this show tefis us just 
abouL everything that we could rea- 
somablv want to know about the 


The .4 ji mated Press 

P I ARIS — Martha Graham is no 
newcomer to the Paris dance 
world but Lhe 90-year- old grande 
dame of modem dance still feels an 
overwhelming sense of terror every 
time she takes her troupe before 
new audiences. 

“It is a terrifying moment for me 
when I come to Paris." Graham 
said in an interview at the start of 
her company's run this month at 
the Theatre Musical de Paris. “But 
I love it anyway. 

“Paris has been for centuries a 
wonder place for the mind and 
spirit of man- 1 feel in a way, 
though 1 shouldn't but I'm vain, 
that 1' m competing, and that terri- 
fies me." 

Graham's Paris visit launched 
the Festival d’Aulomne. the per- 
forming arts festival that runs 
through December. Among her 
ballets performed: “Song" (1985). 
inspired by the biblical “Song of 
Songs"; “Diversion of .Angels" 
(1948): “Errand Into the Night” 
(1947); “Judith" { 1980); and “Acts 
of Light" (1981). 

Religion is an integral part of her 
creations. Graham explained “The 
■Song of Songs' is to me a song to 


life, a glorification of the beautiful, 
the sensuous, the frightening in life. 
'SoDg' is a series of duets showing 
how love attacks two different peo- 
ple. It’s joy, fear and jealousy," she 
said “It is a song of the senses." 

Graham is one of the pioneera of 
modem choreography and con tem- 
porary dance movement She has 
performed in Paris five times, and 
has had her own troupe since 1929, 
using it as a springboard for stark, 
angular works that convey the 
deepest human emotions. 

She often refers to fear. “Fear is 
a sensitivity to danger,” she said. “I 
once saw a great ballerina throw 
herself on the floor after a perfor- 
mance of ‘Giselle.’ She was weep- 
ing because she thought she had 
betrayed what she knew, herself, 
the people and God” 

Graham said her vision of hu- 
man movement with its capacity 
for grace and passion, love and 
violence, was a reaction against 
“decadent" ballet as it was taught 
in the United States in the early 
1900s, when she first donned toe 
shoes. 

*T had to give up everything I 
knew, everything that was beautiful 


for me. and find the truth," she 
said 

If age and arthritis have slowed 
her once supple body and sprightly 
step, they have not dulled her mem- 
ory. 

Dressed in a fuschia tunic over 
pants, her swollen hands shrouded 
in black gloves, she recalled her 
first dancing lesson. 

“I remember looking in a micro- 
scope when I was 4 years old. My 
father was a physician and he 
showed me a slab of water. He 
asked me what it looked like and 1 
said, ‘It’s pretty water, but it has 
wriggles in iL' 

“He said, ‘Yes, it’s contaminat- 
ed. We must look for the truth.' 
And I feel that was one of my first 
dancing lessons," she said. 


Y ul Brynner Recovering 

United Press international 

NEW YORK — The actor Yul 
Brynner, 70, is recovering from 
bacterial meningitis, a disease of 
the brain membrane, his pnblidst 
said, and may be released from the 
hospital soon. He was hospitalized 
early last month. 


us as stirring a production of 
O'Neill's masterwoik as one might 
hope to see. 

The word “masterwork" is not 
invoked lightly. “The Iceman Com- 
eth," which was written in 1939 and. 
first produced in 1946, is equal to 
and perhaps more influential than 
“Long Day’s Journey Into Night" 
and “A Moon for. the Misbegot- 
ten.” the two other towering plays 
at the end of O'Neill’s career: 

“Iceman” occupies a secure posi- 
tion on the continuum of 20th-cen- 
niry drama that runs from "The 
Lower Depths" to “Waiting for 
Godot;” seeing it now, one finds 
the seeds of contemporary Amen-: 
can plays as diverse as “Who’s 
Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and 
“Glengarry Glen Ross" within its 
rat-infested corners. 

If O’Neill's theatrical architec- 
ture can be ham-fisted and his lan- 
guage repetitious, his tragic vision 
r emains undiminished by time. In 
“Iceman.” we see man's desperate 
need for sustaining illusions, even 
as the hollowness of those illusions, 
God induded, is cruelly exposed. 

The illusions are referred to as 
“pipe dreams” in the play’s argot. 
During the 70-odd minutes that 
precede Hickey's arrival id Harry 
Hope's, we learn that the bar’s al- 
cohol-sotted inmates, a “Who’s 
Who in Dipsomania” ranging from 
a defrocked Harvard-educated 
lawyer to prostitutes who think of 
themselves as “tarts,” all ding to 
some such pathetic self -del uaon: 
they are all masters at rationalizing 
yesterday’s defeats and perpetuat- 
ing tomorrow's false hopes. 

When the newly sobered-up 
Hickey appears, he vows to bring 
his old cronies peace and salvation 
from guilt by forcing them to put 
aside those lies for good — to lace 
the fact that they never will gradu- 
ate from the social ash heap. “Hon- 
esty is the best policy” Hickey 
proselytizes — not realizing that 
he. too, continues to ding to a pipe 
dream and that the destruction of 
that last illusion will bring no peace 
except that of the grav& 

Like the characters in “Moon” 
and “Long Day’s Journey” who 
share a bloodline to O’Neill's 
brother James, Hickey could have 
been written for Robards. In his 
three-piece suit and straw boater, 
with his flashing teeth and whore- 
house bonhomie, the actor is the 
consummate salesman — a hard- 
selling, evangelical drummer whose 
all-American vulgarity becomes a 
kind of charisma. 

After that go-getting, finger- 
snapping self-assurance is shaken, 
Robards seems to be pouring de- 
cades of preparation (as indeed be 
is) into delineating Hickey's col- 
lapse. His chuckles '(invariably 
punctuating the wqrd happy) hang 
ghoulishiy in the septic air; his eyes 
recede into deep, coal-black sock- 
ets; his feet shuffle- under the 
weight of dread; his bray sluts and 
slides into an ashen croak. Once 
Robards reaches his marathon, 
self-immolating confessional of 
Act IV, he is the major-domo of the 
charnel house, ... 

As be sweatfly expatiates his un- 
speakable, guilty secret — his ha- 
tred for his murdered wife — Us 
Hickey seems to be repeatedly con- 
fronting his own pasty face in the 
mirror and recoiling in nauseated 
disgust at the sighL . 

It’s hard to fathom how this per- 
formance could have been better in 
1956 — or how Robards could ever 
have a better foil than Moffat, who 
plays Larry Slade. 



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Some people have a talent for 
travel. They look upon travelling as a fine art 
These true coonotsseuzs require the best. It 
is for them that tfac Louis Vuitron craftsmen 
oeate luggage and perpetuate the tradition of 
custom-making perfected over the hist 130 


years. 

These skilled artisans ens ure foot each 
trunk, suitcase and bag, be it of the classic 


Monogram line or the new 

^ the Louis Vinton stamp of 
stremnh, durability and refinement 

They meticulously select their materials* 
traditional Jeathec and brass, or innovative 
spaoe-qge fabrics such as Kevlar* and authen- 
ticate their work with the renowned initials. 

The Louis Vuitron coocept of luggage is 
unique. It has been maintained sincelSS. 

In Fans and the major cities of the wodd. 


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INTERNATIONAh HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1. 1985 


I’illlr 7 


* . I . 


ARTS /LEISURE 



Seasonal, Notes From New York: Europe Is Transplanted Into the Heart of Manhattan 


vJ; ;■ 


Home at Chanel sMndjjT 


Iniemanotud JJtndd. Tnbtmr 

■ — Wl»i betweeh 

Dolce Vita and La BeDe 
Vi^ die Europeanization of New 
Yodc keeps snowballing. In the las t 
couple of weeks, and in a fluny of 
luncheons, cocktails, dinners and 

Hebe Dorsey 

gala evemngs, showrooms were es- 
tablished^ fashion boutiques were 

opened, perfumes were knocked 

and Maxim's, the temple of Paris’s 
nanghty^ Belle Epoqne, was trans- 
planted into the heart of Manhat- ■ 
tan. 

The Italians opened, the season 
with “Ecco lltalia," a store promo- 
tion at Bloommgdales that had ev- 
erything, from pasta to a “Ballo 
Mascherato” and the U. S. Ambas- 
sador „u> Italy and Mrs. Maxwell 
Rabb cut hand from Rome Dona- ’ 
tella Girom belli, president of the ■ 
GfrombelB groop, one of Italy’s 
biggest clothing manufacturers. 


With list of U.S. Fiction, 
U.K. Critics Pick a Fight 


By Marcus Eliason 

The Assochiied Press 

L ONDON — ■ British critics have 
* produced their choice of the 
top 20 American novels published 
since World War II. raising a few 
literary eyebrows across the Atlan- 
tic. 

The list, confined to living writ- 
ers, was drawn up by a panel of 
three writers and critics for the 
Book Marketing Council. It in- 
cludes a few obvious choices, and 
ignores some acknowledged mas- 
terpieces. 

Thomas Pyncbon’s “Gravity’s 
Rainbow” is there, alongside Ralph 
Ellison’s “Invisible Man.” Joseph 
Heller is included, but for “Soine-. 
thing Happened,” rather than his 
lour de force satire on war, “Catcb- 
22 .” 

Apparently eager to exclude the 
obvious, the panel picked Norman 
Mailer, not for “The Naked and the 
Dead." but for “The Deer Park." 
Philip Roth's “The Ghost Writer" 
is included but not the rest of his 
Zuckennan trilogy, and not even 
"Portnoy’s Complaint." 

Mary Gordon's “Men and An- 
gels," which has just been pub- 
lished and has not been widely re- 
viewed, was preferred to* her 
bestseller “Final Payments.” 

J. D. Salinger., authpr of .“The 
Catcher in the 1 Rye," doesn’t. 'ap- 
pear at all, while some of those who 

do are less than household words. 7 

•%.*» 

DOONESB URY 

•excuse*#, ^ , 

6O0PPEOPL5! MY SUPPLY 

HUSBAMP5UH0NT SIPS IS 

1 HASAMSSSASB 

FOR YOU! 

\ 



Walter Abish’s brilliant satire on 
postwar West Germany, “How 
German Is It” figures on the list, 

. with “The Recognitions" by Wil- 
liam Gaddis, and “Song of Solo- 
mon” by Toni Morrison. 

The panelists — Hennione Lee; 
the critic, and the writers Melvyn 
Bragg and Malcolm Bradbury — 
were asked to include little-known 
works and some black and female 
writers. 

Six women made the list, one of 
them black. The other black chosen 
is EDison. 

The weekly Observer newspaper 
quoted Mary McCarthy, who was 
excIudcdJrom the-Iist, as calling it 
“a weird list It sounds as if there 
have been a lot of compromises. So 
many are second, third or even 
fourth choices of a given writer’s. 
work." 

Gore Vidal, who got in with 
“Myra Breckenridge," was quoted 
as saying; “Let us start from the 
premise that all such lists are ridic- 
ulous, but I suppose, as these lists 
go, it’s fine." 

The Book Marketing Council 
represents British publisher in the 
drive to promote literature, and has 
already stirred controversy with its 
lists of the best British books. 

It denies that the lists are mar- 
keting sruntSj 'saying they are de- 
signed to encourage readers to dis- 
cover* books! 'they- may nor; have 
known about. 

In an. mterview.Ldesaid, “It’s an 
absurd exerase but I think it's .fun, 
mid if if gets more people to'read 
good books, it's' worth it." 

She said the choices were tough 


“It was very difficult to .exclude 
Salinger, Kurt Vonnegut or Wil- 
liam Burroughs, and we had a long 
and sort of difficult conversation 
about that. 

*T think we all frit that the word 
'best* has to be taken with a sort of 
license. We thought we were pro- 
moting an interesting and variegat- 
ed mix of novels,” she said. 

Some of the books were picked 
becanse they are little-known hare 
and deserve a British audience, like 
“The . Recognitions” by W illiam 
Gaddis and “The Sheltering Sky" 
by Paul Bowies, she said. 

The list, is alphabetical order: 
Walter Abish: “How Germanis It" 
Saul Bellow: “Humboldt’s Gift” 
Panl Bowles: “The Sheltering Sky” 
Ralph EHisoo: “Invisible Man” 
WBliam Gaddis: “The Recognl- 
tions" - 

Mary Gordon: “Men and Angels" 
Elizabeth Hardwick: “Sleepless 
Nights" 

Joseph Heflen “Something Hap- 
pened" 

George V. Higgins: “The Friends 



/i&Arfoo mixm 

-- - - - rru&ir ? 




of Eddie 
Rachel Ingalls: “Mis. Caliban" 
Alison Lurie: “The War Between 
the Tates" 

Norman Mailer “The Deer Park" 
Bernard Malamud: “The Assis- 
tant " '■ V 

Toni Morrison: “Song of Solo- 
■ moo”. 

Thomas Pyncbon: “Gravity’s 
Rainbow? 

Philip Roth: “The Ghost Writei" 
Isaac Bashevis Singer: “The Slave" 
John Updike: “Rabbit Run" 

.Gore Vidal: “Myra Breckenridge" 
’Eudcnt Wdty. “Losing Battles" 


Metropolitan Museum 
Files Plans tor Annex 

Hew York Timer Semee 
NEW YORK— The Metropoli- 
tan Museum of Art has filed plans 
with the Landmarks Preservation 
Commission for a new $35-miJlion 
structure. 

The addition, tohouse European 
sculpture and decorative arts, with 

temporary loan shows, is- the final 
dement in the 'museums master 
bufldingplan, outlined in 1970. 


PARFUMS 

VENDOME 

9, Sut rvc C=s‘;siione. 7500 1 Po::5. 

• Tfi. (1 j 2AO.Ji3.96. 
t lift* - runcy 

poif s j^KL-ry he if 

DLTY FEE - 40 % - rNGtiSr 1 5 ->.^ 


New winter : 

collection : 

ESCADA 

at European 
‘ export prices ■/ 

Marie-Martine 

8,Ruede Sfevres,Parfe6tiL 
TeL: (1)221844. 
Credit cards . V 


with worldwide sales of $75 mil- 
ium, flew in to open her new, steel 
anti marble Gamy’s offices on 
Fifth Avenue. 

Ginombdli was also celebrating 
the opening of a new boutique- at 
Bloomingdale’s- The finale of her 
stay was a blade-tie and dinner 
dance at the Hold Pierre, with a 
fashion show organized by the art 
director Nando Miglio, who 
thought nothing of draping the en- 
tire ballroom with white silk. 

Sergio Valente, a pro mine nt 
hairdresser who coifs the coDec- 
tions of Valentino, opened a replica 
of his Via Gondola salon in Rome, 
at Bergdorf Goodman's. Mario Va- 
lentino, a manufacturer of shoes, 
bags arid ready-to-wear, who has 
Gianni -Versace design his women’s 
leather line while Claude Montana 
does his men's, opened a new bou- 
tique in the Olympic Tower, on 
Filth Avenue. 

The French were equally strong 
on the scene. Stiphane KeLan, who 
designs Montana’s shoes, opened 
in New York, as did Isabel Cano- 
vas, who has one erf the prettiest 
accessory boutiques in Pans. Rob- 
ert Barash, the president of.Par- 
fums. Jacomo lire, launched his 


new perfume, “Rare," at Rigiiie’s 
and S. T. Dupont, famous for their 
fountain pens and lighters, opened 
still another boutique on Madison 
Avenue. - 

Two Paris fashion houses. Char 
nel and Cardin, whose owners used 
frankly to detest each other (Coco 
Chanel so disliked Pierre Cardin 
that she would time her fashion 
shows the same day and at the same 
time) shared social headlines — 
and pretty much the same guest list 
— in New York last week. To 
launch its latest perfume, “Coco," 
the house of Chanel held a fashion 
show of its couture line and a 
black-tie dinner party after a per- 
formance of Puccini’s “Tosca," 
with Luciano Pavarotti and Mont- 
serrat Caballfe. 

Tins marked the opening of the 
Metropolitan Opera season, and 
was the first lime the opera had 
been tied up with ’ a commercial 
event. But Chanel did raise $1.2 
million for the opera, by underwrit- 
ing the $I,000-a-head dinner and 
donating $250,000 — a gallant ges- 
ture that prompted Beverly Silk to 
say that commercial sponsoring 
was becoming “inevitable.” 

That evening, which had le Tout 


No*’ York dressed to kill, was a 
mixture of French and Americans 
with Emmanuel de Margerie. the 
French ambassador to the United 
-States, Nancy and Henry Kissin- 
ger, Anna Moffo and Roben Sar- 
noff. and David and Helen Gurley 
Brown. The American fashion 
world was represented bv Carolina 
Herrera and Oscar de la fcenta. The 
box of honor was presided by Ce- 
dle Zilkha. chairman of the eve- 
ning, while the from boxes were 
decorated with such socialites as 
Nan Kempner. Lynn Wyatt, Pat 
Buckley, Judy Taubman. Casey 
Ribicoff. Mildred Hi] son and 
Dr&da Mele. the public relations 
person for Guy Laroche. Leonard 
and Evelyn Lauder were with their 
famous mother, who has just 
brought out a book called: “Estee 
— A Success Story,” published by 


Random House. (An unauthorized 
biography by Lee Israel "Eslte 
Lauder — Beyond the Magic.” is to 
be published by Macmillan, much 
to Mrs. Lauder's chagrin.) 

Claude Pompidou, the wife of 
the late French president Georges 
Pompidou, was in town for a board 
meeting of the Soci&te Kandinsky, 
of which she is president, but she 
soon found herself center stage. 
Kitty d'Alessio, president of Cha- 
nel U. S. A and Alain Wertheimer, 
chairman of Chanel who orga- 
nized the evening, sat with Lena 
Horne. 

Fashion-wise, it was a sea of se- 
quins and brocades, and the glitter 
made one forget the dull scene of a 
few seasons back where all women, 
it seemed, went around in lugubri- 
ous black dresses. The wind is lurn- 


Los Angeles Foots Its 8th Annual Street Festival 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — The eighth 
annual Street Scene Festival in Los 
Angeles drew an estimated one mil- 
lion people on the weekend, and 
featured such stars as the actress 


Morgan Fairchild, grand marshal 
of a parade on Sunday, the rock 
star Stevie Wonder and the come- 
dian Joan Rivers. At the opening 
gala, Donny Osmond sang his new 
song, “LA. Street Scene.” 


ing, and Nancy Kissinger, in a lean, 
pink, exquisitely draped, dress by 
Yves Saint Laurent, pointed the 
way towards more elegant, re- 
strained evening fashion. 

Two days later, the crowd 
changed costumes and ran to the 
opening of Maxim’s, another fes- 
tive event which exhausted (he lim- 
ousine supply in New York. The 
guests, serenaded by romantic vio- 
lins, were stunned by what is in 
effect, a bigger and better Maxim's. 
“It’S like a dream," said Mis. Pom- 
pidou. “It's just like home,” said 
the decorator Valerian Rybar. 
“Wonderful," said Chantal de Ke- 
moularia, the wife of the French 
ambassador to the United Nations, 
who came escorted by Herve Al- 
phand, the former ambassador to 
Washington, But Liz Fondaras, a 

socialite with homes in New York, 
East Hampton and Paris, was less 
pleased. “I don’t like the idea of 
Maxim’s becoming another Long- 
champ’s ” she said. “There should 
be only one Maxim's, in Paris.” 

The New York version, which 
look four years to build, had 100 
people working nonstop until the 
very last minute. Working with his 
licensees all over the world, Cardin 


commissioned the bronze sconces 
and bar railing from India and the 
foliaged rug from New* Zealand: 
The delay was due to tile stiff New 
York safety regulations. Cardin 
had to buy fireproof wood in the 
United States, then ship it t<y 
France to be worked into elaborate 
Art Nouveau paneling. " 

Manhattan’s Maxim’s sits on 
two levels. On the first floor, open- 
ing on Madison Avenue, is L’Ora- 
nibus. a less expensive restaurant 
that was decorated by Rene Gruau, 
the fashion illustrator of Christian 
Dior. The main restaurant, on the. 
second floor, is reached by a gran- 
diose double stairway. With naiads, 
waierlilies and stained-glass win- 
dows, it is a replica of Maxim's in 
Paris, but several times larger. 

The 564,000 question is whether 
Maxim's will make il The fashion 
and society cro.wd is pretty much 
monopolized by Le Cirque. La 
Grenouille, La Cote Basque and 
Mortimer's at lunch, while the 
business tycoons are die-hard habi- 
tues of The 21 Gub and The Four 
Seasons. “Maxim’s, e’en Paris, e’est 
la France." said Cardin. “I’ve spent 
a lot of money and I don't expect to 
make any." 




will show the Spring Summer coDection 
monday October the 7 th at 12.30 




Mijano Cdlezioni 




bv invitation on) v 



will show the Spring Summer collection 
sundav October the 6 th at 600 pm 


Milano Collezioni 


by invitation only 


MISSONI 


will show the Spring Summer collection 
Sunday October the 6 th at 430 pm 


Milano Cdlezioni 


bv invitation on lv 



will show the Spring Summer collect bn 
mondav October the 7 th at 10.45 am 


Milano Collezioni 


bv invitation onlv 


■4 iW , 2m 


r. * . * 










— _ B 'alii ( «*a 


Page 8 


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1985 


Ueralb 


INTERNATlONAi 



Sri fouilC Gorbachev, 


/Wife 


SDI Cannot 


PubtUbrd Wiih The Ne* York Time* and The Washington Port 


A Pre-Summit Pattern 


Something of a pattern is being established 
as the Reagan-Gorbachev summit approach- 
es: The Russians moan that the American 
position is unthinkable; many Americans, and 
Europeans, nod in agreement; the Reagan ad- 
ministration frets that the wily Gorbachev is 
making public relations hay; but then the 
Russians shuffle forward all the same. 

This is the way it was when the Kremlin 
came back to the negotiating table after having 
walked out, when it eased off its hard-to-get 
pose and agreed to a summit, when it dropped 
its insistence on outlawing self-evidently un- 
outlawable research on defensive strategic 
weapons, and when it went beyond slogans 
and said it would be offering a new proposal at 
Geneva to reduce offensive arms. 

From this account, we do not draw any hard 
conclusions- Things are moving, but one rea- 
son is that the Russians are retreating from 
unserious positions. Their strategy of playing 
to American public opinion eats at some 
Americans, but it is forcing the Russians to 
moderate their position in order to appear 
presentable in foreign eyes. The more the Rus- 
sians seek to g«un propaganda advantage, and 
to position themselves to put the blame on the 
Americans if the summit fails, the more mod- 
erate they have to become. This is the other 
side of the propaganda coin. 

^ Still, it troubles the United States to see the 
Soviets trying to manipulate American opin- 


ion. Hence Secretary of State George Shultz's 
insistence on Friday that the private talks at 
Geneva are the proper forum for the explora- 
tion of the new Soviet position. They are. 

It is the annual visit of the Soviet foreign 
minister to the United Nations that has 
prompted this latest surge of public diplo- 
macy. There may not be a comparable surge 
until the summit in November. 

Careless optimism remains unwarranted. If 
the two sides stopped right now they would be 
far apart on the big arms control issues, not to 
speak of the other issues of regional disputes, 
human rights and ideology that Mr. Reagan 
also hopes to discuss. Nor does either side 
appear to have calculated the final price it is 
willing to pay for an arms agreement The 
Russians have made some relatively easy 
choices. Neither the Russians nor the Ameri- 
cans have yet addressed the hard ones. 

The notion is current in Washington that 


Mr. Gorbachev, having consolidated power, 
can do pretty much what he wants. That is 


can do pretty much what he wants. That is 
almost certainly not so: He has removed only 
one man from the place where it counts — the 
Politburo. It takes a large faith in President 
Reagan's bargaining talents, moreover, to be- 
lieve that the Kremlin will reverse course and 
end up accepting his Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive in the form in which he continues to press 
it. The tough part has not even begun. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Can Pretoria Be Trusted? 


As a classic French treatise warned in 1716, 
“Even the most dazzling diplomatic triumphs 
which have been gained by deception are 
based upon insecure foundations. They leave 
the defeated party with a sense of indignation, 
a desire to be revenged and a resentment that 
will always be a danger.” Id South Africa they 
have yet to learn that lesson. 

In what seemed a dazzling triumph, the 
white regime in Pretoria broke its regional 
isolation in 1984 by signing a nonaggression 
pact with the Marxist leaders of its poor, black 
neighbor Mozambique. As brokered by the 
United States, the pact was a straightforward 
bargain: Mozambique would deny help to 
black exiles preparing attacks against South 
Africa, and South Africa would stop arming 
insurgents inside Mozambique. 

Mozambique kept its word. South .Africa 
did not. Besides encouraging the Mozambique 
rebellion (first instigated by Ian Smith's Rho- 
desia), the South African army has bombed 
and invaded .Angola, another Marxist-led state 
whose territory it had promised to respect. 

These aggressions are meant to express defi- 
ance of South Africa's foreign critics. Their 
real effect is to knock the last props from 
under President Reagan's claim that “con- 
structive engagement" would moderate South 
Africa's conduct and racism. The main exhib- 
its had been the pact with Mozambique and 
the cease-fire with Angola, through which 
Washington hoped to promote a still wider 
agreement for the independence of Namibia. 

South Africa admits the Mozambique be- 


trayal and no longer blames the rebel actions 
on “an international web of bankers.” But 
Pretoria says its violations of the agreement 
are “technical” and that acts like clearing a 
landing strip constitute “h umani tarian" aid. 
In the captured diary of one rebel, that aid was 
listed as 26 tons of munitions. 

President Samora Machei has astutely 
turned South Africa's duplicity to his coun- 
try's advantage. His Marxism recently proved 
no impediment to a cordial visit to President 
Reagan, who assured him of America’s “dis- 
tress.” Expressing gratitude for U.S. aid. Mr. 
Machei urged .Americans to tome to Mozam- 
bique as “famine fighters” and investors. 

This turning represents a real gain for the 
Reagan administration. Relations with Mo- 
zambique had been cool even hostile, since its 
chaotic struggle for independence from Portu- 
gal a decade ago, during which it turned to 
Moscow for weapons and diplomatic support. 
Bui when drought struck Mozambique in 
1984, it became the largest recipient of U.S. 
food aid. It has now joined the International 
Monetary Fund and the World Bank and is 
overcoming a reflexive hostility to the WesL 

As for South Africa, it ought to reflect on 
the conclusion of that old French treatise: 
“The negotiator should recollect that he is 
likely for the rest of his life to be constantly 
engaged in diplomatic business, and that it is 
essential for him to establish a reputation for 
straight and honest dealing so that thereafter 
men may be ready to trusL his word.” 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


For a Broad-Ranging Summit 


Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevard- 
nadze's visit to the United States seems to 
leave open the question of whether he was 
positioning his country for serious negotia- 
tions on nuclear arms reduction or only mak- 
ing more points in the Soviet propaganda 
campaign. It is obvious that there has been no 
significant movement at Geneva. Nuclear 
arms reduction is the most important issue 
that will be discussed [at next month's sum- 
mit], However, deepening understanding and 
coming to terms on as many issues as possible 
will contribute to that goal.' whereas an ail-or- 
nothing approach locked tightly to aims re- 
duction could doom the talks to failure. 


stage one. provided they could be satisfied of 
the non-PLO credentials of the Palestinians 
who would attend this first meeting. [Prime 
Minister Margaret) Thatcher’s agreement [to] 
receive a delegation containing two Palestin- 
ians is intended to strengthen the king’s band 
as he goes in to plead with Mr. Reagan to allow 
at least the first stage of the original scenario to 
go ahead, ir it does not. the fear is that the 
opportunity presented by the Jordan- PLO 
rapprochement will soon be lost. 

— The Times (London). 


How Would Mexico City Cope? 


— The Japan Tima (Tokyo). 


Hussein Returns to Try Again 


King Hussein is in Washington again. Last 
time he was there, just four months ago. he 
impressed President Reagan wiLh his determi- 
nation to move forward, at long last, toward a 
negotiated settlement of Lhe Palestinian ques- 
tion and of the future of the West Bank. The 
king has offered a four-stage scenario. First, a 
senior U.S. official should meet with a Jorda- 
nian -Palestinian delegation, whose Palestinian 
members would not be overtly identifiable as 
PLO representatives. The Americans were suf- 
ficiently impressed to be willing to envisage 


Disasters, natural or man-made, seem to 
occur with such chilling frequency that the 
mind develops automatic defenses for coping. 
We reassure ourselves nervously: It was a 
once-in- a- lifetime thing; it’s so far away; it 
couldn’t happen here. But the devastating 
scale of earthquake destruction in and around 
Mexico City is a reminder that the worst can 
happen anywhere. We cannot cannot take any- 
thing for granted, it seems — not even the 
notion that we live on a stable surface. 

As our hearts go out to the victims in Mexi- 
co. our beads cannot help but think about the 
vulnerability of that sprawling metropolis of 
18 million (the world’s largest city) to other 
disasters. How would Mexico City cope with 
an epidemic or a breakdown in social order? 

— The Milwaukee Journal 


FROM OUR OCT. 1 PAGES. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Austria Arrests Three Russians 1935: A Polish Gesture to Ukrainians 


ST. PETERSBURG — Nothing yet suggests 
any improvement in the relations of Austria 
and Russia. On the contrary, the fashion in 
which the Austrian authorities act on the fron- 
tier has given rise to recriminations on the part 
of the Sl Petersburg press. For some time past 
the fact of being a Russian subject sufficed to 
render suspicious any passenger traversing the 
frontier. In the last three days three Russians 
were arrested and thrown into prison on a 
charge of espionage. They have appealed to 
the Russian Embassy in Vienna and asked to 
be set at liberty. The Russian Ministry of 
Foreign Affairs is taking very energetic mea- 
sures in this case. It is to be feared that if 
these 3cts continue, the Russian Government 
will be forced to take similar measures 
vis-A-vis Austrians traversing the frontier. 


WARSAW — For the first time in many years 
the Prime Minister of Poland received [on 
Sept. 29 and 30] Ukrainian leaders represent- 
ing a minority of nearly 6.000.000 and listened 
to their suggestions for bettering relations be- 
tween the Poles and Ukrainians. This evidence 
of Polish-Ukrainian reconciliation, following 
the recent elections, from which the Ukraini- 
ans emerged as the only minority adequately 
represented in the new Polish Parliament, is 
considered to have unusual importance owing 
to efforts being made to bring Poland closer 
to Germany and Hungary as a counterblast to 
So viet-Czech- Roumanian moves in the field of 
mutual assistance pacts. It is significant that 
the leading German newspaper has expressed 
satisfaction at the improvement in Poland's 
relations with her minorities. 


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•.CUR I 


Invader of the West 


Be Kept Off 


By Dominique Moisi 


The Table 


P ARIS— The pomp of Versailles; 

smiles from Mikhail Gorbachev’s 
wife. Raisa Maximovna ... In a 
sense, the medium is to be the mes- 
sage in Mr. Gorbachev’s first official 
visit to the West since he took charge 
of the Soviet Union in March. 

The French are flattered to be the 
general secretary’s “first choice." 
They hope that the visit which starts 
tomorrow mil redirect attention to a 


Soviet foreign policy 
goals have not changed. 


positive French international role 


and help to repair the negative image 
left bv the Greenoeace affair. 


present, but since they are not likely 
to disappear, indignation is slowly 
giving way to resignation. Attitudes 
toward Poland illustrate tins new 
mood. The unofficial compromise 
that has been reached there between 
an oppressive, self-censoring regime 
and a restless but self-contained soci- 
ety looks to many in France like a 
satisfactory and realistic outcome. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s trip to Paris 
should not fool the West. Behind the 
smiles and a newly energetic style, 
basic Soviet foreignjpoiicy objectives 
have not changed. While it smiles at 
Western Europe; the Kremlin takes a 
tougher stance in the Eastern bloc 
and at home, and mixes seduction 
with toughness toward the United 
States. Mr. Gorbachev should be re- 


a - ■ 

By Tom Wicker . .... 

EW YORK — The new Soviet 


A 


v 


left by the Greenpeace affair. 

For the Soviet Union, the trip to 
Paris in the month preceding the Ge- 
neva summit has propaganda value. 


States. Mr. Gorbachev should be re- 
ceived politely, but exchanges should 
be firm and without illusions. 


rjj 


N ew YUKA — xnc new OUKICI 

proposal for a 50-pesrcent reduc- 
tion m the two superpowers' offen- 
sive weaponry has made it dear t hat 
no serious arms control agreement 
can be reached unless President Rea- 
gan's Strategic Defense Initiative is 
“on the table” at Geneva. 

All of the details have not been 
rii yj n y d, and probably will not be 
for some time, but the new Soviet 
position obviously is considered con- 
structive even by the usually skeptical 

ReaganadmiiustrarkHL 

Mr. Reagan himself said that the 

. W J .*» t» ■*!_- L., 


proposals outlined to him 
Foreign Minister Eduard Shevard- 
nadze and in a letter from Mikhail 
Gorbachev could lead to serious bar- 
gaining and that “progress can be 
made” in the arms control talks. 

The other side of the coin is that 
the new Russian approach was cou- 
pled with a demand tor a cessation of 
work, apparently including laborato- 
ry research, .on the SDI to develop a 
space-based missile defense. 


It is meant to convey an image of 
ooenness, and the Kremlin's “new 


openness, and the Kremlin's “new 
lode,” while adding credibility to So- 
viet arms reduction proposals. 

From Paris Mr. Gorbachev doubt- 
less intends to speak to Western opin- 
ion as a whole, and to put the United 
States on the defensive, by stressing 
— with the help of the media — an 
image contrast between Soviet good 
will and American rigidity. 

Mr. Gorbachev's visit is awaited by 
the French with a mix of satisfaction, 
curiosity and skepticism that reflects 
the evolving international, domestic 
and cultural context within France. 

Satisfaction stems from the fact 
that the Soviet Union has singled out 
France from the European pack — as 
if to demonstrate Soviet respect for 
French firmness on the Euromissile 
issue and approval for France's criti- 
cal stance toward President Reagan’s 
Strategic Defense Initiative. 

Paris is reviving a tradi lion of regu- 
lar bilateral meetings that Soviet be- 
havior In the late 1970s and early '80s 
(in Afghanistan and Poland, in par- 
ticular) and the French Socialists’ 
need to prove their pro-Western ori- 
entation had interrupted. Soviet be- 
havior has not improved either on 
human rights or in Afghanistan; one 
could in fact say that it has deterio- 
rated. Still, once the West had won 
the Emomissile battle, resumption of 
East-West dialogue paved the way 
for a French return to dialogue. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s visit is also satis- 
fying from the French point of view 
because it provides an opportunity to 
reaffirm the independence and origi- 
nality of French foreign policy. More 
prosaically, Paris hopes that the visit 
will lead to an improved trade bal- 
ance with the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Gorbachevs visit excites curi- 
osity because he heads a new leader- 
ship with many new faces — a team 
that should be around for a long time. 

There is skepticism as well. No one 
expects much in terms of concrete 
results from the visit. It is widely 


The writer, associate director of the 
nitut Francois des Relations Inter - 


Institut Frmqas des Relations Inter - 
rationales, contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


Bv Anttnlo In Ext) rasa ( Utbon). CIW SvwWart*. 


A Simple Question for France to Raise 


Mr. Shevardnadze was scarcely out 
the White House before Mr. Kea- 


of the White House before Mr. Rea- 
gan was telling r epo r ters that “we are 
determined to go forward” with the 
SDL Geon» Shultz, the secretary of 


By Efrem Yankelevich 

The writer, son-in-law of Andrei Sakharov, is a farmer manberof the Soviet human rigfus movement. 


N EWTON, Massachusetts — The last time Mikhail last one, released through BUd in late July, showed Dr. 
Gorbachev went abroad he was not vet theecner- Sakharov allegedly leaving a hospital on July 11 and 


Gorbachev went abroad he was not yet the gener- Sakharov allegedly leaving a hospital on July 11 and 
rotary. Nevertheless the KGB felt obliged to do reunited with his wife. However, so far there has been 


al secretary. Nevertheless the KGB felt obliged to do reunited with nis wife. However, so far there has been 
something to save him from a few potentially embar- no confirmation of this claim. The last words from 


something to save him from a few potentially embar- no c onfirma tion of this claim. The last words from 
rassing moments. It certainly did not want to have Gorki were Mrs. Bonner's postcard of July 4 in which 
Margaret Thatcher or some nasty journalist inquiring she strongly indicated that she was alone. 


about the whereabouts of Andrei Sakharov and his 
wife. Yelena Bonner. On the eve of his arrival in 
London it released presumably two-month-old pic- 
tures of Dr. and Mrs. Sakharov. The pictures, taken by 
a hidden camera, were released on Doc. IS, 1984, 
through a West German newspaper, Bild. 

Will the KGB let Mr. Gorbachev down now? Do not 


Our only hope is that Mr. Mitterrand will not forget 
to ask Mr. Goroachev a simple question: “How are the 
Sakharovs?” And that he will insist on an answer. 

In June 1984 Mr. Mitterrand accepted assurances by 
the Soviet news agency Tass that the Sakharovs were 
alive and weQ, and lie went to Moscow despite an 
outcry in the French press. (The outcry was justified, as 


SDL George Shultz, the secretary of 
state, reiterated that position m a 
later news conference. 

If the Soviet proposal really is as 
promising as the administration has 
suggested, Mr. Reagan cannot credi- 
bly s ustain his insistence on the SDL 
He says, for example, that when the 
detailed Soviet plan is laid out at 
Geneva, “we hope it will be free from 
preconditions and other obstacles to 
progress.” But his insistence that he 
wifi “go forward” with the.SDI is just 
such a “precondition” and could be- 
come the crucial “obstacle to pro- 


Will the KGB let Mr. Gorbachev down now? Do not outcry in the French press. (The outcry was justified, as 
President Francois Mitterrand and the French public we know now.) He shocked Konstantin Chernenko by 

1 I _ » . ■ .i ■ .^1 ■ M n. I i m ■ .1 mm . _ «• 


gjress” on deep reductions in offen- 
sive weapons that he also advocates. 


deserve at least 10 minutes of a videotape featuring the' mentioning Dr. Sakharov’s name in the Kr emlin din- 
Sakharovs? Four such little tapes have been released to ing room. It took courage. But courage alone does not 
the West in the last 1 5 months. They have now become produce results unless mere is consistency. 


the West in the last 1 5 months. They have now become produce results unless there is consistency. 

■ f V A A m ■ V V w ^ m V VI n m mv m m 


the only source of information on the Sakharovs. 

What if there is no videotape released by Oct. 2? This 
would be bound to suggest a gloomy possibility that 
there is nobody to take pictures of. 

ir there is a videotape, that will not be a consolation 
either, since it is becoming increasingly difficult to 
accept the authenticity of Soviet-supplied tapes. The 


In May 1985 Prime Minister Laurent Fabius 
launched a now French human rights policy by declar- 
ing a freeze on French investments m South Africa. 
I wonder if similar measures were considered in regard 
to the Soviet Union. I hope that French human rights 
policy is not just a search for easy targets. 

International Herald Tribune. 


East-West Arms Control and Beyond 


sive weapons that he also advocates. 

Moscow, before and particularly 
since Mr. Gorbachev's ascent to pow- 
er, has clearly established its strong 
opposition to strategic defenses. The 
latest evidence is in its willingness — 
not yet detailed and probably noL yet 
as comprehensive as necessary — to 
pay the price of drastic reductions in 
its offensive arsenal. 

The reasons for the Russians' ada- 
mant stance are numerous. They have 
good cause to fear that superior tech- 
nology might give . America serious 
advantages in a defensive arms race. 
Security considerations as wdl as the 
determination to remain an equal su- 
perpower with tii‘e United States 


G ENEVA — When President 
Reaean and General Secretary 


By Evgeny Chossudovsky 


Mr. Gorbachev's visit excites curi- VJ Reagan and General Secretary j & J J 

osity because he heads a new leader- Gorbachev meet in November they 

ship with many new faces — a team will face a unde array of difficult thrust of the first of the “basic 

that should be around for a long time, tasks. Many stem from marked — principles of relations between the 
There is skepticism as well. No one and.' in the Soviet perception, .con- U.S. and the UJLS.R." signed by 
expects much in terms of concrete turning — deterioration of U.S.-Sovi- ' Presidents Brezhnev and Nixon in 
results from the visit. It is widely et relations. Statesmanship of the Moscow on May 29, 1972, would be 
viewed as a mere observation round, highest order will be required on both welcome, since this would unequivo- 
albeit an important and useful one.' sides to make a meaningful start in' cally acknowledge the legitimacy of 
In terms of French domestic poli- dismantling the main obstacles to a the political, so cial and economic sys- 
tics. the Gorbachev visit is a chance constructive and stable relationship, terns of both states and their right to 
for consensus-building. It satisfies Yet the importance of the occasion - full-fledged and equal membership of 

the various political parties — with should provide motivation to move 

the exception of the extreme right — forward. An initial general exchange This is the first of two articles. 

and tends to serve President Witter- of views would malre sense. — 

rand's plans for “cohabitation” after Priority objectives — all of them the international community. The es- 
the general election next March. interconnected — should include res- sence of this principle is that “in the 

The domestic cultural climate, too. t oration of a modicum of mutual nuclear age there is no alternative to 

has evolved. Present attitudes toward trust; re-activation of bilateral rela- conducting ... mntual relations on 

the Soviet Union are a mixture of lions; a measure of tangible progress the basis of peaceful coexistence” 

realism, cynicism and resignation. in aims control; safeguarding of The necessary political impetus 

After decades of fascination with longer-term international security for should be given' to restoring and, if 


0 would drive Moscow to match a 

to slow down the nuclear arms race at spsc^based U A defense; but Soviet 
afi levels, as well as to refrain from leaders can have little desire to make 
further 'structural- di versi fic ation ~ of - *he. huge mves bn ea t -and undergo the 


weapons systems. This would.be in. 
Lhe interest of the domestic econof 
mies of both countries.. - - 
The three-pronged nuclear arms 


economic adjustments that such an 
tinderoilring dearly would require. 

, Just as. likely, the. revolutionary 
shift from offensive deterrence to 


This is the first of two articles. 


the international community. The 


The domestic cultural climate, too. 
has evolved. Present attitudes toward 
the Soviet Union are a mixture of 
realism, cynicism and resignation. 
After decades of fascination with 


sence of this principle is that “in the 
nuclear aae there is no alternative to 


the revolutionary essence of the Sovi- all, including Third World countries, 
et experiment, the French imelligen- Some analysis say that trust is not 
Lsia belatedly discovered the total! - the issue. Bui restoration of at least a 


Lsi a belatedly discovered the totali- the issue. Bui restoration of at least a 
taxi an nature of the Soviet system 10 minimal degree of confidence is in- 
years ago. with Alexander Solzbenit- dispensable. Work on resuming nor- 
syn’s “Gulag” trilogy. Today the mai bilateral dealings in the non- 
trend is toward banalnraiion of Soviet military sectors cannot begin so long 
“evil" and an overall cynicism. as both sides keep their fingers on the 
The intelligentsia seems to have trigger. Besides, there is the oft-ne- 
exhausted its capacity for indigna- glected psychological aspect and the 
lion. The reasons that justified criti- need to reassure an anxious world, 
cism of the Soviet Union are all still A solemn reaffirmation of the 


nuclear age there is no alternative to 
conducting . . . mntual relations on 
the basis of peaceful coexistence.” 

The necessary political impetus 
should be given to restoring and, if 
possible, strengthening the “fabric” 
(to use Ambassador Anatoli Dobryn- 
in's term) of U.S.-Soviet relations in 
the cultural, humanitarian, scientific, 
technological maritime, comm uni ca- 
tions, trade and economic fields. 

However, it cannot be overempha- 
sized that no enduring and significant 
relaxation of tension can be achieved 


control talks in Geneva have so far strategic defense would force equally 
been barren of results. Hence, as the. drastic changes in the structure and 
summit approaches,- attention on power centers of the Soviet military 
both sides will presumably center on ~ a prospect that the civilian leaden 
this crucial sector And it is above all probably do not savor, and that miii- 
in this sector that an anxious world tary leadera may strongly resist, 
expects the meeting to reach some The senous domestic problems, 
measure of tangible progress. • both economic and structural, that 
The various moves, proposals and ^ ac ® Mr. Gorbachev should cause 
responses in this Geld are public bim, moreover, to seek an improved 
knowledge. So are the major differ- climate in Soviet-American relations 
ences in positions. . - which is unlikely to result from a 

Limited accords or a rapproche- defensive arms race but might 
mem on specific matters, arch as the begin in an agreement to reduce 
possibility to seek a prompt condu- offensive armaments, 
si on of a comprehensive test ban trea- That the Russia n s oppose a strate- 

ty. would be welcome. But the main gic defenseior good reasons does not 
problem is how to advance in all entitle them to their own preoondi- 
three interlinked areas in the face of tion — - that . the SDI be abandoned 


divergent postures, especially 
sped to the Strategic Defens 


with re- before negotiations begin. Nor can 


Defense Im tia- tiiey rationally insist on halting 


live. Even a partial removal of the American laboratory research, 
obstacles —about which Mr. Gorba- But deployment of a strategic de- 

chev spoke with remarkable frank- fense may be, as Richard Nixon has 
ness to Time magazine recently' — stated, ‘the ultimate bargaining 
ran wm a formidable task. chip” — one that, properly used. 

However, we are dealing with no could yield the greatest accomplish - 
ordinary diplomatic meeting but with ment of Mr. Reagan’s admirustra- 
one whose outcome will affect the don. What will be necessary, how- 
destiny of mankind. A deter min ed over, is that be soften .his refusal, 
joint effort at accommodation is im- expressed in his last news conference, 
perative. No sensible option should even to consider any form of trade- 
be foreclosed. The modern history of involving the SDL 
international relations does i-o^ in Even if tne SDI were placed “on 
examples where clarification of in- die table” at Geneva, the result 
tent coupled with a fresh, imaginative would not necessarily be total aban- 
and politically flexible approach to a domnent of strategic defense. It is the 
set of interconnected issues, as well as negotiators’ business to examine all 
readiness tor mutual concessions, implications of possible tradeoffs, to 
helped to find common ground even determine the consequences for each 
in situations of utmost difficulty. side in each possible case, and to ar- 

rive, ifpossible, at an agreement most 

The writer, a Soviet citizen, is a advantageous to both ades. 
former senior, official of the United What the new Soviet position has 
Nations and now a fellow of the UN tnade as clear as anything can be is 
Institute for Training and Research. that a simple deal can be quickly 
He contributed this comment, which had, but that it is up to Mr. Reagan to 
reflects soletv his own views, to the let his negotiators negotiate: 
International Herald Tribune. The New Fork Times. 


through a resumption of non-military 
cooperation unless the two leaders 


cooperation unless the two leaders 
also reach a political accord at least 


The Bill of Rights Is an Old Nuisance 


B OSTON — The state of Ore- By Anth ony Lewis 
gon. a few years from now. J 

makes the Reverend Sun Myung 
Moon's Unification Church its offi- strained by the 
rial religion: only members of that dom in the Bill i 


church may hold public office or 
teacb in any Oregon school or col- 
lege. Such a law would be unconsti- 


itees of [ree- 
ls — the first 


tutionaL right? Wrong, according 
to the present attorney general of 


10 amendments to the Constitu- 
tion. Those are the familiar protec- 
tions' for freedom of speech and 
press, the rules against unreason- 
able searches and seizures, the pro- 


the United States. Edwin Meese hibition of cruel and unusual pun- 
says there is nothing in the Const!- ishments and so on. 
tution to keep a state from setting When it was adopted in 1791. the 
up an established church. Bill of Rights did apply only to the 

Pennsylvania creates a board of federal government. The First 
publications with the power to close Amendment , for example, begins. 


free spe ech and other basic rights. 

Mr. Meese, in his Bar Associa- 
tion text, sought to roll legal history 
back 60 years. He condemned as a 
violation of states’ rights the settled 
legal view that the 14th Amend- 
ment “incorporated” and applied 
to the states essentials of the Bill 
of Rights. “Nowhere else." the at- 
torney general declared, “has the 


principle of federalism been dealt 
so politically violent and const! ru- 


Today no idea is too far right to appear in official 
Washington. The lunatic fringe has been let in. 


so politically violent and constitu- 
tionally suspect a blow as by the 
theory of incorporation.” 

Why did be advance such a far- 
out notion? Given the lack of schol- 
arly support for or even interest in 
it where did he get the idea? . 

He may have got it from someone 
on his own public affairs staff. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Gorbachev: Image Only? ’’ . ,l « not surprising that no king 


d awn any newspaper that “regular- “Congress shall mak e no law ...” 
iy criticizes public officials.” Would But over the last 60 years the Su- 
the Constitution allow that? Abso- preme Court has held that the es- 
lutdy. says Mr. Meese. sectial protections of freedom in 

Georgia passes a law requiring all the first 10 amendments are em- 
defendants in criminal cases to take braced in the “due process of law“ 
the stand and testify against them- guaranteed by the I4th. That 
selves. Any constitutional problem amen dment, adopted after the Civil 
there? Not in Mr. Mcese's view. War. limits what the states may do. 

Of course Mr. Meese has not ad- As long ago as 1925 the Supreme 
dressed himself to those particular Court had that freedom of speech 
hypothetical slate laws. Bui if he was protected from repressive state 
means what he has slated in print, action. In 193 1 it applied the free 
he thinks that thev would alt he nr e« clause of the First Ainend- 


Gary L. McDowell As a political 
science professor at Tulane Univer- 
sity. Mr. McDowell last year de- 
nounced the Supreme Court for 
making the stales respect the reli- 
gion. speech and other rights guar- 
antees in the Constitution. He then 
went to the National Endowment 
for the Humanities, where be han- 
dled grants to celebrate the 200th 
anniversary of the Constitution. 

Nowadays no idea is too far right 


“ I since Richard II I has borne his name. 

The front page of your Sept. 4 since all three. Richards died violent 
editions featured an analysis entitled deaths. (We have not had too many 
Gorbachev: A New Image for the Henrys since the Tudors, either.) 

concluded that. Prince Charles will probably remedy 
M&hail Gorbachev “has sold hirasdf that lack. He recently included. Rich- 

Sf 5 , F* ^ dd i. ve 5 ®n his ard III in a list ofhis personal heroes, 
hews. But since Aug. 6 the Soviet o.ajrp inoniisr 

uon has had a unilateral moratori- - - CLAiR£ J ORDAtt 

.um on the testing of nuclear weapons. Lonaon. 

1 think that should be on the front There are three prime suspects in 
page every day of the week. the Tower princes' murder: Buckinc- 


There are three prime sngwyts in 
the Tower princes' murder: Bucking- 
ham, Henry VII and Richard In. 
Richard had no reason to kill/ them: 
They were imprisoned; their murder 
would destabilize his rule {as it in- 
deed did); he had a just and coura- 
geous reputation. The princes’ moth- 
er entrusted her daughters to him. 

“No one has dared to retdve the 
name- Richard for an Fnfcfah king,” 


to appear in official Washington. 
The lunatic fringe has been ab- 


hc thinks that they would all be 
consutuliooaL He thinks that anv 
state is free to establish a religion, 
censure ibe press and compel de- 
fendants to incriminate themselves. 

All of that follows from a speech 
prepared by the attorney general 
this past summer for deliverv to the 
annual meeting of the American 
Bar Association. The original 
sp«ch was a remarkable text, the 
most radical document io come 
from a legal officer of the United 
States is generations. 

Mr. Meese attacked the idea that 
state governments should be re- 


press clause of ibe First Amend- 
ment to keep Minnesota from shut- 
ting down a newspaper In 1963 it 
sard steles were bound by the Sixth 
Amendmen t's guarantee of right to 
counsel and must provide lawyers 
for poor defendants. 

The court divided in the past 
about whether and how to apply 
particular guarantees to the stales, 
but the general question has long 
since Been settled. No Supreme 
Court justice in memory has argued 
that lhe Constitution should be 
read to &mt only federal govern- 
ment imrosJons crn religious liberty. 


The lunatic fringe has been ab- 
sorbed into the state. The radical 
right is determined to impose its 
doctrines — impose them even on 
the Constitution. 

In the end. Mr. Meese evidently 
found his own words politically em- 
barrassing, He omitted the strong- 
est when be delivered his speech. 
Later a spokesman said the attor- 
ney general thought that “some” of 
the guarantees in the B31 oT Rights 
should apply to the states. But his 
people still distribute his full text, 
and it no doubt expresses his most' 
wishful view of what should happen 
to American freedom. 

The New York Times. 


SUE DURR. 
Munich. 


For Good King Dick 


Regarding the opinion column “ 500 
WJ Oil Richard Trirkv ffir 


years On. Richard Tricks His Fans" 
(Sept. I?)byA.L. Rowse: 

It is tree that Richard m was less 
popular in the south of Fnol^ 
winch regarded all northerners as for- 
eign barbarians, than he was in the 
north. But in the north his pop ular ity 

was such that he achieved serai-lee- 


Mr. Rowse soys. Richard was duke of 
Gloucester. The present', duke of 


Gloucester. The present . duke of -fi ./ 
Gloucester. Queen Elizabeth IPs first * 
cousin, is named Richard. . • - 


radary status, brim remembered as 
^GoodKing Dick'Tor centuries after 
his bnct reign. As for the treatment of 
** s body, a victorious 


PHILIP BRUITON.- 

r n 

rans. ; 


- - ^Mulc.lt.has not' been - proyecL'iliai 
Richard Ut did iiof kill his nephews. 

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OCTOBER j f 1985 ■ 

■ ■ 

FUTURES AMD OPTHMW 


USINESS/ FINANCE 


Page 9 


Chi 


— -cago-ouigapore utik 

w orks in Currency Test 


...... . • rr 


By H.J. maedenberc 

Hew York Tima Service 


■ ■ ■ 

Egyptians Harvard Review Seeks New Image 1 Japan’s Surplus 

Increase Magazine Needs | m ? g fflj *" ^*~1 |l \n VL^oc 

A*l D Formula to Lure Bk I i Mfltl II I BusmessR^wi €m\MMD ▼▼ w 

Ull Jr nces More Readers = * _2 I T • A ■ 

Khars Attacks * >^^*£5* BK. JMBli 'HHF I m AtlgUSt 


On 86 801 JtS - 

nadons — theUiriS^Tt^tr 8 five - leading mdustrifllizcd 
Britain — . France - West Germany, Japan and 

concerted action 11 ^? ' ^ afte1KXM1 « plan to take 

ca uVed ^T 6 down *** ^ die dollar. That 

quicldv. hut .u. y £li u ! 2 f ' ^ 8ders - t0 want- to act 


quickly, but, at IS .' aQerS 10 WMl 10 aci 

mantels in the United States ~ * 

w»e closed. Becauser of the Dllt the proposed 
Joiage between the Chicago f 1 

Merc and the Singapore ex- Imkages between 

were^ie^WiaSf ^ndon and the U.S. 

“fy ma y fa “ problems.” 

“Jd in Singapore, Simcx T 

Dci ^ lsche ““k and yea futures had experi- 
enced Lheir busiest day since the exchange opened era SepL 7, 

wmtracte traded on Che Simcx last Monday 
may not have been much, compared with our daily volume in 
g ,^ e uture& > a did give alert traders who were long the rinlW 
8 their positions when our market was. closed,’* 

said Wi lliam J. Brodsky, president of the Chicago. Merc. “And 
that is what exchange linkage s are supposed to do.” 

. specifically, the growing lin ka ge of futures ^ Trfiflngps grrrxfe 
tune zones is aimed at providing traders with as opportunity to 
use both nuked markets as if they were one. For. example, traders 
who had sold short yen futures on. the Chicago Men: were able to 
buy out of their positions on the Simex hours before United 
States and European exchanges opened, Mr. Brodsky said. 

B ECAUSE the dollar dropped 5 percent — its largest one- 
day decline — last Monday, this ability to offset contracts 
proved beneficial to traders who used this service. It akr> 
opened np the entire subject of 24-hour global markets. 

“One reason the Chicago Merc-Simex linkage has thus far 
operated without any problems is that both markets have agreed 
to abide by American exchange regulations, n said Eric C. Bettd- 
heim, a member of the London law firm of Sidley & Austin and a 
leading authority on international market Jaws. “But the pro- 
posed linkages between London’s stock and futures exchanges 
and those in the United States may face problems.” 

One problem. Mr: Bettdheim said, is that Britain’s large 
securities, money and commodities markets have, until now, beat 
largely unregulated, with trading conducted undo' the honor 
system. Although a number of groups in London’s financial 
center are now working on plans to strengthen self-regulation of 
their various markets, “nothing like the American Securities and 
Exchange or Commodity Futures Trading Commission is con- 
templated,” he said. 

Because of the absence of a. British body of organized laws 
governing futures trading, the basic premise :of the proposed 
li n kag e s between London’s stock and commodities exchanges 

(Coutiuned op Page 17, CoL 4) . 



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w 

Kharg Attacks 

Are Blamed 

- The Associated Press 

CAIRO — Egypt increased on 
Monday the price of its various 
grades of exported oil by 25 cents 
to 45 cents a barrel in a move that 
one Official said was related in pan 
to Iraq's attacks on Iran’s main 
export terminal in the Gulf. 

The decline in the dollar's value 
and a decision by the Soviet Union 
to temporarily halt exports of crude 
oil to the West also were died for 
the-, second consecutive monthly 
price, increase by Egypt, which is 
not a member of the Organization 
of Petroleum Exporting Countries. 

Hamnad Ayoub, the Ofl Minis- 
try's foreign marketing chief, said 
the price for .the top-grade GnlT of - 
Suez and Ras d-Bihar crudes will 
be $26.10 a barrel in October, 45 
emits higher than the price that 
applied in September. 

He said the Bdayim and Ras 
Badnm blends of cal will sell for 
$25 a barrel, up from 524.55 in 
September, and that the price of 
Ras Ghareb heavy crude cm will be 
523.50 a barrel, 19 25 cents from 
the previous month. 

Egypt’s daily oD production av- 
erages about $70,000 barrels, about 
half of which is oeported. Egypt is a 
minor oQ supplier to the United 
States, but its main customers are 
in Europe, Africa and Asia. 

An authoritative ministry 
source, who spoke only on condi- 
tion that he not be identified, said 
the October increases were 
prompted by “a shortage on the 
world market for the time being.” 

One factor, he said, was a drop m 
Iranian oil escorts caused by Iraq’s 
bombardment of Iran’s Kharg Is- 
land oQ terminal Iraq said Man- 
day that'its warplanes raided 
Khar g island for a seventh straight 
day. 

Kharg Island handles 90 percent 
of Iran's petroleum exports. 03 
and shipping sources in the Gulf 
said Hamay from the Iraqi raids 
has severely disrupted- Iran's - ex- 
ports, which earlier had beat aver- 
aging about 1 -5 -mi I H on bands dai- 
ly. 

Hie Egyptian official also men'- , 
tioned a Soviet cutback in oil ship-' 
meets, which has. not been con- . 
firmed by the.Soviet government. 


Magazine Needs 
Formula to Lure 
MoreReaders 

By Steven E. Prokcsch 

New York Times Sennce 

NEW YORK — After de- 
cades of idling business people 
how they should handle their 
marketing problems, Theodore 
Levitt, the new editor of the Har- 
vard Business Review, has one of 
his own to worry about: the Lee 
Toblers of the world. 

Every other month, when the 
magazine published by the Har- 
. vard Business School crosses Mr. 
Tobler’s desk, the chief financial 
officer of B.F. Goodrich Co. 
scans the table of contents, tears 
out those two or three articles 
that might one day come in 
handy and files them away. “Ii is 
not a publication I read from 
cover to cover," confessed Mr. 
Tobler, whose favorite ma gazine 
is The Economist, the British 
weddy. “I haven't met anyone 
who reads it from cover to cov- 
er,” be added. 

Bui finding a formula that will 
win more current readership — 
and readership of more or the 
magazine — is viewed as Impor- 
tant. Advertisers, who are often 
wary in the first place of using a 
magazine that comes out only six 
times a year, think it is criticaL 
The magazine's policy erf bunch- 
ing ads in the front and in the 
back of the magazine does not sit 
well with them either. 

“The Harvard Business Re- 
view is a tough sale,” admitted 
William A Janowsky, its general 
manager. 

To make the Review’s meaty, 
articles in its 200-phis pages less 
painful for managers to swallow, 
Mr. Levitt says that be might 


L£ig| 


Harva rd Business Review 

y fci ■ 




vj .* 

* 


f * : i i 


’j. -f L # 


The New York Ti 


Theodore Levitt, Harvard Business Review’s new editor. 


even uy whal would be the big- 
gest change at the magazine since 
it went bimonthly in 1948: pub- 
lishing a thinner, “less intimidat- 
ing” version once a month. 

Mr. Levitt also is encouraging 
experiments with different deliv- 
ery systems. A joint venture with 
the Public Broadcasting Service 
is already producing six video 
programs, each modeled after an 
issue, and an audio-cassette 
product is being test-marketed. 
His goal is to get subscribers to 
read — or watch or listen to — 
much more of the Review as 
soon as they get ll 

Currently, “it’s easy to pul off 


reading it,” said Mr. Leviu, 60. 
His publishing experience began 
in the fifth grade in Dayton, 
Ohio, when he founded a news- 
paper with Erma Bombeck, the 
now prominent humor writer. 
He also worked as a sports writer 
for The Dayton Journal while in 
high school, he noted during a 
recent interview in his office on 
the Harvard Business School 
campus. 

Going monthly also might be a 
way for the Review both to 
shorten the three to nine months 
it currently takes to get an article 
into print and to boost advertis- 

(Con tinned on Page 17, Col Sj 


Reutcrj 

TOKYO — Japan's current-ac- 
count surplus narrowed to $3.49 
billion in August from $4.96 billion 
in July but was well above the 
51. 19-billion surplus a year earlier, 
the Finance Ministry said Monday. 

The current-account, the broad- 
est measure of a nation's trade per- 
formance, measures trade in goods 
and services as well as interest, divi- 
dends and certain transfers. 

The surplus in the merchandise- 
trade component narrowed to 
54.38 billion in August from S5.41 
billion in July but was above the 
52. 1 S-billion surplus a year earlier, 
the ministry saicL 

It said that exports fell to S 13.71 
biUioD from 515.12 billion in July 
but rose from 513.15 billion a year 
earlier. 

Imports dipped to 59.33 billion 
from 59.71 billion in July and 
S10.97 billion a year earlier. 

At the same time, the deficit in 
nonmerchandise trade, which re- 
fers to items such as banking ser- 
vices, shipping fees, insurance and 
income from investments abroad, 
widened to 5818 million in August 
from 5371 million in July and was 
down from 5891 million a year ear- 
lier, the ministry said. 

The August deficit in the balance 
of payments, which includes the 
current account plus the flow of 
gifts and foreign aid. capital loans, 
official settlements and reserves, 
narrowed to 53.03 billion from 
53.91 billion in July and compared 
with a S1.98-biUion deficit a year 
earlier, the ministry said. 

The long-Lerm capital account 


deficit fell to S6.53 billion in Au- 
gust from a record 8.87 billion defi- 
cit in July, and compared with a 
3.17 billion deficit a year ago. 

■ Japan Moves on Program 

Japan set deadlines Monday to 
speed up its "action program" 
aimed at easing the way for foreign 
products to enter the Japanese 
market and to reduce criticism of 
its huge trade surpluses. The Asso- 
ciated Press reported from Tokyo. 

A government task force pledged 
to give foreign companies a greater 
opportunity in bidding for govern- 
ment contracts after Tuesday, and 
outline how they may have a voice 
in shaping Japan's product approv- 
al measures by next year, a Foreign 
Ministry official said. Japan's trade 
partners have been accusing Japan 
of d raggin g its feet in both areas. 

Most of the new deadlines in 
those and other areas were not 
specified when Japan first an- 
nounced the market-opening pack- 
age on July 30, saying it would be 
put into effect over three years. In 
some cases, Monday's action 
moved up deadlines that had been 
set in the program. 

The task force also promised to 
reduce the time many overseas 
companies must wait for approval 
of their products' entry into Ja- 
pan's market. For example, it will 
certify pharmaceutical products 
within 18 months and automobiles 
wititin one month, said the official, 
who asked not to be named. 

Currently a foreign automaker 
must wait up to 70 days for such 
approval 


liberalizing Efforts by Japan Make Foreign Stocks Attractive 

land nil "mtYii-nal Tran and Wrtn- ^ * A O 


Reiners 

TOKYO — Japan’s steps to lib- 
eralize its financial markets are 
paying off in the stock market as 
foreign companies, domestic bro- 
kers and individual investors see 
foreign shares as a new growth 
area, stock analysis say. 

‘'Investors expect there is an op- 
portunity 'to make more money 
there now,” the chief of the Tokyo 
Stock Exchange foreign shares sec- 
tion, Kiichi Oda, said Monday. . 

Tax breaks, foreign stocks' low 
price/ earnings ratios, a market 


Hooded with cayh and an increas- 
ingly global stock market underpin 
the new attitude, analysts said. 

Beginning in January the tax on 
foreign dividends will be the sam e 
as on Japanese dividends. Investors 
will pay no tax on the first 100,000 
yen (5450) from each company, 
compared with a tax-free allowance 
of only 50,000 yen on combined 
foreign dividends now. . 

“ r Overseas dividends, averaging 5 
percent compared with 1 percent 
cm domestic stocks, will then look 
more attractive, brokers said. 


Foreign issues also look better 
with P/E ratios of around 10 com- 
pared with an average 30 for Japa- 
nese companies, stock analysts 
said. 

Foreign stock analysts in Tokyo 
and highly publicized takeover bids 
in foreign markets have also awak- 
ened Japanese investors to a chance 
for large gains. 

Tokyo is the largest stock market 
after New York in terms of both 
the volume and value of shares 
traded. Moreover, in the last two 
years, new money from special 


trust management accounts, indi- 
vidual savings and a shift of institu- 
tional funds from overseas bonds 
to equities has Hooded the market, 
according to the international fi- 
nance division chief of Nikko Secu- 
rities Co„ Tadashi Matsui. 

Many companies ate the desire 
to raise yen capital and public rela- 
tions reasons for being listed in 
Tokyo. But some analysts also not- 
ed that with the advent of 24-bour 
global trading, the more shares list- 
ed on every major exchange the 
better. 


Since last year, there has been an 
upsurge in interest from foreign 
companies looking for a Tokyo list- 
ing after ihe exchange simplified 
application documents and aban- 
doned a requirement that overseas 
auditing be duplicated in Japan. 

In June 1984, Sears Roebuck £ 
Co. became the first foreign stock 
to be listed in Tokyo in eight years. 

So far this year three new compa- 
nies have been listed, bringing the 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 6 ) 


I. Canada Will Liquidate 


H 


1 ECU 90242 05995 20125 . 47515 1«4H03 20941 .44003 10MB 179093 

1 SDR LQ5H 075517 20294V 103574 L91102 119S7 570249 23MB 22909 

CWngs/n London and Zurich, fixings Jo other European center* Hew York rates at 4 PM. 
io) ConmercM franc (b) Amounts needed to bvyonormund to Amounts needed to boy one 
OaHart m ) Units of 700 (a) UnttsoftADO M Units of WOOD N.Q.: not Quoted; ALA.; aetavattobt*. 
<*) Toberc*eao***:SUSAM 


C u rren c y per UJJ 
IKOmmi 09440 
Spaa, peseta 14120 
SwttLIo rm *045 
Tdwraes - 4043 

TViat bant 24375 
TMrtcimilira 542.10 
UAE dlrtMtn 30725 
Veaez-boNv. 1409 


Another Bank in Alberta 


UJLS 

080 

10011 

10J2 


Brazil crux. 7,49000 
CamxftnS 10495 
CMlNNVSBB 2948! 
Danfsii fcnKM tJS 
BnpLpQUtf 1345 


Conner per itSS 
Flit, markka 5L7T 
Greek drac. 12900 
Hone MonoB 7X 
Indian r u p ee 1L7233 
MoLnmkm 1*12300 
Irish ft 00*34 

Israeli sbek. 1/0100 
KtawaAltifiaor 0397 


Qprsney per U5i 
Motor. Hag. 24475 
Mex.peso 37300 
mrw.krooe 7.90 
PblL peso 1843 
Port, erode 14400 


SLAfr.roptf 


1139 

2/4938 


Kffgrting: 10177 Irish t 

Sources: Beaeue du benetae tBmsebft Banco CommorckOe itatiana] (Milan); Borne Ha* 
thn at e Oe Parts (ParWi Bo * of Tokyo {Tokyo}; IMF (SORJ; BAff fdtnar, rtyat, dimamX. 
Other data from Reuters and AF. 


Interest Rates 


SepL 30 


1 month 


Smooths 


1 TOOT 


(SDRL 


potior p Mm ir ' Fraec sterling Franc ECU IZ7R 
7*4 4*4* . **-4** **-10 ' t *r*K 7V. 

• 7M* 0*4* 4*4to 119W-11* 10*-10* SWW 7* 

I ‘ 4 M K -4*4 *4 H 9W-1T* lOW-IW 7* 

% 8*4* 4*4* 4*p 4H. n*-H* H-11* 8*-** 7* 

«M* 4*4* 4*4* IWWl lWb-11* MW. 8 

l- Maroon Guaranty (Joitar. SF. Pound. FFl; Lloyds Bank (ECUS; Reutov 
Ratos ootteob* to interbank denostts otsi/nltHoa minimum (or oautualentL 


ECU SDR 
8«te8* 7* 
9*4* 7* 

4*4*- 79b 
8*4* 7* 

1*4. 9 


1 mon t h 
Z mounts 
B months 


7 4W-B9W 
7*~e * 
tfe-lvi 

8 h»-89b 
Bfe‘ 8 * 


SepL 30 


Com Pdpst »M7f tfm 


Source: Reuter* 


Om MoeKi Marnoofc 


Sqx30 

Mtrrfg Lynch Rondr JUtotg 
30 day average 742 

Toterafg Ketenmt Rale index: 7J& 

• • f 

Source -■ M orrM Lynch. T oler at e. 


Ll ItotmntteiilUi 
v CoU Money 
. One nrontb iBMrtoH 
lemth inUrtunt 
trotth inMrteo* 


Coh Money 
9T4oyTr9«tffY*tt 
tomb iirtertiotik 


99tu 9* 
9* 9* 

97/tt 97/M 
95/16 95/M 


11 * 11 * 
12 11* 
lift 111/1* 
11 1/14 113/32 


Gold 


Hong Kong 
Lucemboarg 32640 

ParvtnxSUto) 32704. 

Zorich «U5 


mKOMlRatft 

Gafl Money 


Swwr ReutortrGomn 
Lwbm Banket Tokyo. 


5 5 

513/14 615/1* 
67/16 4fe 

Commenoanx, OMt 


Mew York 


Sga.30 
FJR. Qih 

Dsd 

- — - -140 

12703 -247 

32545 —3.10 

325J5 • — 20S 

32200 —500 


Luxembourg^ Paris and London official tlx - 
ftps; Hone Kong and » Zurkh opening and 
ctaslng prices: Hew Voric Comes current 
contract AH prices In l/JL S per ounce, 
gourde: Reuter* 


r |7 . ’ - _ A 

LW _ 1 i 


V % k 

•1-’ Stf >1 

- ‘ '1 <•; 

r ■ -I 

k - ^ v ■ ,-#g- 

. I f ^. 

» n . v 6 ■ 


iTo Our Readers 

of thfi Eve-tour time difference between Pari* andNw. Yodt 

•' H fedNew York carmen and.mowy aKj.t-Ut »todt 

:■ ■ , :'i<° U.&. markel dosings will be available p aD editions. , . 

• : AX - 1 . . 

. ■ w . . ' 

- • . 

'••jr.- Ma&ets Closed •/ 

RnmcW aBAeU yaxe.JoWi Mouln? b find 



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■* • * ^ ' • 
■■-.f 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

OTTAWA — The Canadian 
government said Monday that it 
will seek a court order to liquidate 
Northland Bank of Calgary, Alber- 
ta, and will appoint a commission 
of inquiry to determine why it and 
another regional bank failed. 

Northland and Cnna/tinn Com- 
mercial Bank, of Edmonton, were 
closed SepL 1 after months of 
losses, but Northland was given 
time to find a merger partner or 
reorganize. 

Canada’s minister of slate for 
finance, Barbara McDougall, said 
Monday that several reorganiza- 
tion proposals for Northland were 
examined, but that none proved to 
be viable. 

The failures, tire first in Canada 
since 1923, have caused an uproar 
in Parliament, and Mrs. McDou- 
gall said a nonpartisan forum was 
needed for senior public officials to 
“explain their actions.” 

Prime Minister Brian Mulroney 
appointed a. Supreme- Court of 
Canada Justice, Willard Estey, to 
begin hearings op Wednesday. 


Inflation in Peru 
FaBs Sharply 
Under Garcm 

United Press. International 

LIMA -— Peru’s inflation 
rate slowed to 3.5 percent in 
September, the lowest monthly 
increase this year, the govern- 
ment said Monday. 

The drop was the first con- 
crete result of a series of price 

freezes and other economic 
measures taken by President 
Alan Garda Perez since he 
came to office on July 28. 

. In August, the 'inflation rate 
wasl0.8 percent. Accumulated 
inflation for the last 12 months 
was 188.2 percent, a slight drop 
from August’s accumulated 
rate of 191.7 percent. Before 
Mr. Garda was sworn in, ana- 
lysts predicted that inflation 
would exceed 200 percent this 
year. 

The Garcia administration 
also announced that it would 
nearly halve bank interest rates 
oh loans, the third time ir has 
done so since taking office. 

The • Central . Reserve Bank 
said interest rates would be re- 
duced to. 45 percent from 75 
percent on.Tbesday. When Mr. 
Garofa took office, interest 
rates were 280 percent. 


Shortly before its collapse, CCB 
received 255 million Canadian dol- 
lars (about 5186 million) in aid 
from sue chartered banks and the 
federal and provincial govern- 
ments. The combined cost of the 
collapse of both banks is expected 
to suroass 12 billion dollars. 

Although the assets of the two 
banks amounted to about 4 billion 
dollars, that represented only 
about 1 percent of the total 400 
billion dollars in assets held by 
Canada’s 14 domestic banks, Mrs. 
McDougall said. 

“But they were important re- 
gional institutions, and their loss is 
a serious matter to Western Cana- 
da and to the nation,” she said. 
"Both banks had expanded to ma- 
jor dries across the country." 

The government’s previously an- 
nounced legislation to compensate 
uninsured depositors of both banks 
will be introduced next week, Mrs. 
McDougall said. 

The federal government has j 
promised to repay all uninsured . 
deposits of both oankss although 
the Canada Deposit Insurance 
Corp. normally only covers depos- 
its up to 60,000 dollars. 

She said previously that the un- 
insured deposits total about 470 ; 
milli on dollars at Northland and 
430 million dollars at Canadian 
Commercial. 

Mrs. McDougall said that a cu- 
rator’s report submitted to her on 

SepL 27 staled that the book value 
. of Northland's loan portfolio did 
not reflea an adequate provision 
for loan losses, and that the amount 
required to provide for the loan 
losses would exceed the amount of 
the bank's capital base. 

The curator's report said it 
would be pointless to allow the 
bank to continue operating unless 
there was an immediate major re- 
structuring. (Reuters, UPI) 


■ 

■ ■ 

Manufacturers Hanover 


is pleased to announce the opening of 
our new subsidiary in 

Sydney 

Manufacturers Hanover Australia Limited 

■ 

The addition of this subsidiary expands and strengthens our 
worldwide network of over 100 offices in 42 countries. It 
indicates our continued commitment to the international 
corporate and financial communities. A commitment which 
provides you access to the global expertise, state-of-the-art 
electronic technology and the creative financing solutions 
needed to manage your business. 

As a full service merchant bank, Manufacturers Hanover 
Australia Limited can provide you with a complete array of 
financial services, including: 

• Australian dollar lending 

• Merchant banking services 

• Foreign exchange 

• Corporate finance 

• TVade services 

• Cash management services 

• Money market trading 

• Swaps 

• Leasing 

To discuss our specialized banking services in Australia, contact: 





Barney F Doran 

Managing Director 


Joseph F Patterson, HE 

General Manager 


EXTERNAL US. 5 BONDS 

AND 

BONOS NOM1NAT1V05 

THE WESTON 


GROUP 


JSnquiries to : 
CB-1003 LAUSANNE 
2 Rne de !a Paix. 
Telexr 25869- 
TcLt 021/201741. 


Manufacturers Hanover Australia Limited 
Level 14, State Bank Centre 
52 Martin Place 
Sydney, N.S.W 2000 

Telephone: (02) 230.1000 Telex.- 177329 

MANUFACTURERS HANOVER 

The financial Source.® Worldwide. 

















* 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1985 


NYSfi Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Vol. High Low Lest 


PdiVcfc 

BeaJGa 

ruPowf 

Terr ran 

GnFds 

Gould 

Exuon 

CesiAi r 

flfevin wd 

IBM 

Gaodw 

AllRfch 

AT&T 


ITT Co 
Mobil 


30144 

2(017 

18743 

1634? 

16238 

15071 

12363 

11W2 

no2j 

10552 

9M 

9650 

9558 

85)6 

8101 


64% 
37H 
13 ** 
*6% 
!1B% 
33 
SI Vs 

44% 

124%. 

29 

61*. 

31ft 

34% 

2916 


S7U 

3S% 

37* 

45 

un 

79ft 

51% 

29 

45* 

123 

77V fl 

60% 

20U 

33ft 

28ft 


118% 

Jlft 

Sift 

Z9to 

46ft 

124 

7714. 

61ft 

20ft 

xr-i 

Mfc 


til 

— ft 

— ft 
+1U 
■Mft 
+1% 

— ft 
+4ft 
+ ft 

— ft 

+lft 

— Vo 

— ft 


00<ra High Low La* Cfl9. 


Monday? 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX Most Actives 


High Uvt Itfl Cbg. 


Incjiji 13MJ» 1S3&J11 U1&J55 I J2JJ3 4- 7J4 

Trans 640.92 646 J7 632.77 04057— JJW 

ytll 149.62 1 SQM 148J4 + 0J1 

Como 534.99 54046 53140 536.91 + 1.29 


impost l« 

Industrials 

Trane 

Lfiuirm 

Finance 


Hlgfi Low 

105.19 10441 
121.23 T20.73 
1Q2J1 101.76 
W56 5436 
107 JA 10744 


CNni Cb-w 

105.19 -¥027 
121 J3 +026 
10220 —028 
5423 — 1&4 
W4® +244 


Ciflie 


Closing 


Advanced 
Dtchntd 
unchanged 
Tpltll IS*U*» 
N6w Hlgtrt 

N4w Lows 
vofumeup 
vaiumedawn 


275 

254 

245 

904 

7 

27 

ZAJ&e* 5 
JJ7U07O 


Ompofltg 

induslrtai* 

Finance 

inwuee 

UfMNtt 

BonH6 

Tramp. 


mu 

29429 

365.51 

329.77 

2W53 

296.10 

25622 


cut* 
+ 042 
+ 0.01 
+ 0-91 
+ £75 
— 048 

-oa 

+ 220 


Week 

Ago 

296J0* 

2*113 

36130 

337JM 

27041 

T*4JV 

2604S 


Y«or 

Ago 

24726 

27177 

29077 

87003 

21050 

7Q9.1 A 

22089 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


G«e Prt*. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Sands 
Ulllllk* 
tndusi rials 


Close 

79 JO 
76.9a 
B724 


cri-ge 
-0.14 
+ 081 
-030 


Advanced 

OeciUHtd 

Unchanged 
Total Iwn 
Now Hlons 
Maw Lows 
volume ua 
volume down 


602 

785 

440 

2007 

59 

52JIU00 

38J87J90 


5«Pt.TO 137,801 

Sear. 25 127.995 

Seen. 1A — 134 JIB 

Srot.23 15X854 

Seal. 20 JM.7P7 

’Included In the sales figures 


Bar Sales •Sh'rt 

137,801 36&6T7 Ml 7 
127.995 337-487 *66 

134 JIB 346.72V IJSJ 

15X854 mao ora 

15X707 17X474 2&TO4 


Vol. of 4 PM 1KU2M0B 

Prtt. 4 P JA. voL . HWOWfl 

Pw consolidaM dose IISttlMfl 


FmtHd 
BAT In 
WOtolti 
Wlckes 
CM I Cp 
WTwEni 
Hv9fcvp 
WnnoB 
Do » Pd 

pocvieP 
pdlrFIn 
HmtG n 
PGEpfW 
AM Inti 
Ijorfmr 


■ft * 

St Sh 


•9:51 


10ft 9 
16ft 15 


9* -ft 


7ft 7 
16. 


.« *« 

14ft 14ft 


14 -ft 
714 

Uto — ft 


7154 + ft 
2 - 


17 16% 

rae 23ft 
3% 3ft 
29*. 28ft 


14ft -ft 


7 + % 

3ft + ft 

m —ft 

PH +1 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


AMEX Sales 


Tonies include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do nol reflect kite trades elsewhere. 

Via. The Associated Press 


industrials 

Transp. 

UWMe* 

Finance 

Composite 


High Low 
20X67 20X64 

165-71 1&U6 
2**34 78.91 

2067 20.45 

J82JH 1B1J2 


Close arwu 

20X87 +0.9B 
.16X17 +0.H 
79 JU +0L11 
2055 +9.10 
IB2J8 +0.79 


4 PJWL WlUfM 

prev. 4 pm. volume 
Prev. cons, volume 


xsoojoo 

5,7SUX» 

&7MJ00 


amex Stock Index 


12 Mo mn 
High Low St9ch 


Close 

Onr Yld. PE 1005 Hlgn LOW QuOl. C* 


Stocks End With 7.8-Point Gain 


l?Monlvi 
KKHi Low Block 


Sis. Close 

Ply. Via. PE lmiUghLOfr QlWl. WR 


T? Month 

WtflLow 5Wc 


Sis. CMm 

o iv. ru. pe roosHifUi low GuotOite 


2+ft 14 
F7ft 9ft 
16ft 9ft 
21ft 13 
SOft 26ft 
23ft 18ft 
25ft 23 
14ft 7ft 
blft 34ft 

27 lift 

28 ft 19 ft 
40 36ft 
25ft 19ft 
24ft 12ft 

I Oft 7ft 

19 15ft 

20 lift 
17ft 8ft 
37ft 22ft 
12% 6ft 
15ft 9ft 
49ft 32ft 
57ft 52ft 
37ft 20ft 

Ift 2ft 
57 «2 

24ft 16 

2ft Vim 

33ft 29 
8ft 6ft 
B2 64ft 
Bt 69% 

74 59 

75 59 
16ft Hft 
26ft lift 
25 12ft 
33ft 26ft 

31 ft 23ft 
38ft 27ft 

32 21 

2£ft 20ft 
B9% 72ft 
20ft 20ft 
20%. 76ft 
90 85 

34ft 27ft 
23ft 16ft 
23ft 15ft 
44ft 4? 
64ft 62 
63 60 

111 IDBft 
101ft 101ft 
60ft 47ft 
10ft 3ft 
34ft 24 
29ft 22ft 
39ft 29ft 
19ft 13ft 
38ft 32 
34 22ft 
140ft 90ft 
2ft 1ft 
23ft 16 
70 54ft 
Sift 25ft 
7Dft 56 
116ft 56ft 
28ft 20ft 
60ft 47ft 
25ft 22 
5?fe 41ft 
2m 17ft 
30ft 25ft 

II 6ft 
57ft 44ft 
27ft 19ft 
24ft IBft 
49ft 32 
25ft tZft 
36ft 22ft 
16 6ft 
56ft 51ft 
96'-? 64ft 
71ft 45' : 
3ftft 28 
13ft 7ft 
66ft 46 -h- 

295 210ft 

47ft 26’- 
97ft 73 - 
W* 62 
150 N2'-a 

78ft TBft 
4ft 2ft 

29 16ft 
lift 5 
18ft 12*4. 
15ft lift 
35ft 26*. 
67ft 35ft 
78 46ft 
57ft SI 


AAP 

ACS 

AMCA 

AMP 

AMR 

AMR of 

ANRpf 

APL 

ASA 

AVX 

a zr> 

API Lab 
AccoWd 

AcmflC 
AcmoE 
A da Ex 

Adm«ir 

AdvSrs 

AMO 

Advent 

Aerllgi 

AtftnLI 

AelLol 

Ahmns 

Alleen 

AlrPrd 

AirDFrv 

AiMaas 


7.18 94 
267 1U 


2M 5J 
J2 26 
272 71J 
1>I0 2J 
,'■0 24 
40 31 
*32b 4 J 
1.92a 1 1.1 
-32 1.9 
J3f 38 


14 131 21 20V. 21 

12 176 15ft 15ft 15ft 

3 10ft 10ft 10ft 

10 2039 14 IDft U 
7 4035 40 38% 3*ft 

6 aft 73ft Mft 
19 23 *x Oft 23ft 

7 9ft 9ft 9ft 

229 389s 30 28ft 

EB 146 TIPta 11*. 17ft 
7 979 a- 4 72*a a 
16 979 56?s 54=8 56*. 

15 118 20 3m 

103 lift 13ft 7J 

fl 79 7%. 798 7W 


t’wwi/ Pri^f hilemdftnniil 


+ ft 
— ** 

— 'a 

— ft 

— ft 

— ft 
+ ft 


+ ft 
+ ft 

— ft 


B6 17ft 17ft 17i± 


164 SJ 
5.79O10A 
1J0 19 


1.48 19 
M 17 
joe 5.7 


7 ? 17 17 17 

30 192 74ft 13ft Uft 

lb 3165 2? 35ft 26ft 

20 50 9 * 

II 90 13 12ft 12T« 
15 3143 44ft 44ft 44ft 
211 55ft 55ft 55ft 
0 1107 31 30ft 31 
83 3*. 2ft 3ft 


A#OPpfA3 97 117 
AlaPdDtf J7 iu 


83 2ft 
357* 52ft 
112 22ft 
43 1ft 
26 J1 
41 7ft 


30ft 31 
2ft 3ft 
STM 53ft 
22 32 

1=W 1ft 
30ft 30ft 
7ft 7ft 


— ft 

+ 'M 
+ U 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 

— ft 


AlaPaf 

AfoP of 

AiaP p( 

AWPof 

Alogsca 

AlskAJr 

Albrtos 

Alptsns 

A/con 

AicoStd 

AlexAIr 

Alexdr 

AllgCo 

Aiglnf 


9 JO 11 J 
9 44 11.9 


0.14 HI 
8J8 IU 


7Qz 77Vi 77*4 77ft 
51402 7* 79 77 


15*1 10 
1.40 6J 


Aiginaf li« 117 
AkolpfCll^S 111 
AligPw 170 9.4 
AllenG ,40b 18 

AildPd 
Aid&gnn 
AfdS al A 

AldSPlC 6.74 iu 
AldS OfDHOO 11.1 
Alas pfF 


A/idSfr 112 
AlllsCh 
AlfeCpf 
ALLTL 1J4 
Alcoa 7 JO 
A max .10 
Amen pf 100 
AmHtCa 1.10 
AH«»f 3 JO 
AmAgr 
A&afrr 

ABimd 3.90 
AB^Pl 175 
A Brdol 167 
ABdCSi 1J0 
ABusPr .64 
AmCan 190 


3.90 7.1 
175 95 
167 4j 
150 1A 
.64 14 
190 5A 


AConcri UBO IU 
ACanpf 3JJ0 ftJ 


ACaPBd 120 10J 
ACopCv 2.51 e 9J 


ACentC 

A Cyan 1.90 19 
ADT .92 17 
AElPw 126O10L9 
AmEvD 116 3.3 
Atomic A8 2JQ 
AGnCp 1 00 14 
AGfll wt 

AGnlaf A 537*107 
ACnJ PlBSiOe 7 j 0 
AGfiPtD 164 45 
AHerit UO 35 
A Hoist 

A Home 190 4.9 
AHme of 100 3 

AHo»P 1.12 14 
Amrtcti 660 75 
AinCrp A4 5 
AlGOPf 595 4.1 
AMI .72 15 
AmMar 

APresds 50 19 
ASLPio 

ASLFI Pf If? 146 
AShia 50 62 
AnriSfd U0 SA 
Am S lor 64 1.1 
ASlrplA 4J8 bJ 


ASlrpfB 6 JO 11J 


53502 60 ftTl bAi 
380z TtT i 69 70'? 

9 17 13ft 13ft 13ft 

fl 572 19ft 19ft 79ft 

76 76 21ft 21 ?l 

11 318 27ft 7TA 27ft 

26 1059 25ft 25 25 

12 69 331c 33 33 

433 28ft 27*. 28 

22 223 24ft 24 24ft 

37 7&ft 76^ TV's 

352 22ft 22ft 

4 70ft 18ft IBft 

3 *P m * 92ft 92ft 

9 502 29 28ft 28ft 

14 151 21ft 20ft 21ft 

71 60 17ft 77ft 17ft 

6161 44ft 44 44ft 
24 64ft 64ft 64ft 
147 61ft 60ft 61ft 
37 100 107 100 

1 101ft 107ft 101ft 

7 2975 53ft 51ft 53*4 

445 3ft 3ft 3ft 
a 2 9ft 29ft 29ft 
0 47 27ft 27ft 27*. 

29 937 33't 33 33 

1217 13ft 13ft 13ft 

2 37ft 32ft 32ft 
22 3354 28 77Vi 2ft 

23 720ft 119 120ft 
208 l*t Hr, Ift 
Q 41 22ft a 2ft 

B 803 55ft 55 SSft 

5 29 29 

2 55ft 5511 55ft 
17 975 115ft 115 115ft 

14 S 26ft 26 26ft 

10 508 54U 53ft 53ft 

7 25 25 25 

119 47ft 46ft 47ft 

43 20ft 20ft 20ft 
32 27ft 27 27 

42 32 6ft 6ft Aft 

13 1252 49ft 49 49ft 

24 103 24ft 24ft 24ft 

8 3029 20ft 20ft 20*. 

14 5543c 41ft 41ft 41ft 

15 263 23ft 21ft 23ft 

8 4721 79ft 28*. 29ft 

566 71ft 17ft 17ft 
55 54ft 54 54ft 
234 78ft 77'i 78ft 

ass 5* sn* 59 

10 7 J4';i 34 34 Vj 

164 10ft 10 10ft 
12 1964 59ft 59 59ft 

5 264ft 264ft 264ft 

15 4184 47 46ft 46ft 

3 737 88ft 87ft 07ft 

22 1513 85ft B4ft BSft 

2 142 142 142 

10 285* 71ft 20ft 20ft- 
713 3ft 7ft 3ft 

4 325 IP* 17ft 17ft 

71 38 6ft 6ft 6ft 

6 1518 15 15 

« 55 13 12ft 12ft 

10 703 29ft 28 29ft 

ID 300 56ft 56ft 56ft 

30 69 60ft 69 

8 57ft 57’i 59ft 


—7 

—Ift 

■H*. 

— ft 

— ft 

— ‘-a 

+ ft 


+ ft 
+ ft 

— ft 
+1 
+1'A 
+ ft 

— ft 


NEW YORK — Prices were mined at the 
close or (he Neu* York Slock Exchange Mon da v 
in active (fading. The Dow Jones" industrial 
average, which rose S.74 Thursday, was up 7.84 
lo 1.323.63 at the NYSE close. 

A more than 7-point advance in the price of 
General Foods, a heavily weighted component 
of (he Dow Jones industrial average, was largely 
responsible for the blue chip index being in plus 
territory, analysts said. 

Philip Morris, the giant tobacco and beverage 
company, agreed Friday to acquire General 
Foods Tor 5120 a share and the boards of the 
two companies approved the merger agreement 
Monday morning. 

Declines led advances by an 8-7 ratio and 
volume amounted to about 103.6 million shares 
on the first day of the new extended trading 
hours, compared with 106.1 million Thursday. 

Neither the New York nor American stock 
exchanges opened Friday because of Hurricane 
Gloria. 

Prices were lower in active trading of Ameri- 
can Slock Exchange issues. 

“The direction is to the downside." said Rob- 
ert Kahan. director of equity trading at Mont- 
gomery Securities in San Francisco. “If you take 


out General Foods, you have the market flat to 
down." 

Mr. Kahan said that, “everyone is on the 
sidelines waiting for a direction to emerge. It’s 
hard to come up with a cogent reason to buy 
stocks at the moment.” 


Marvin Kail, of Sanford C. Bernstein, said 
the market tested the 1.500 level and must build 
a base in the 1.300 to 1.520 area before moving 
higher. “It's a very bored, lackluster market.*' he 
said. 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department reported mat its composite index 
of leading economic indicators rose 0.7 percent 
in August. 

The Federal Open Market Committee, the 
policy-making arm of the Federal Reserve, 
meets Tuesday but most analysts believe the 
Fed will maintain its current monetary policy. 

“The Fed's hands are tied," said Mome Gor- 
don or Dreyfus Corp. “The central bank is 
unable to move forcefully to stimulate the econ- 
omy and unable to restrain money supply." 

Richardson-Vicks was the most active 
NYSE-listed issue, jumping sharply. Unilever 
raised its bid for the company to S60 a share last 
week. 


-!-2» 

— '£. 

— 'M 


UMorlti 

Hftli Low StoCfr 


Sis Owe 

m*. rid PE WsH.phLo* ovcf.aigv 


ITMonm 
High Low Shock 


Sft. ClOM 

0*. Yl± PE Wi Hitf Low Qwt. a>’9* 


— ft 

— ft 
— > ft 

+1 

+JV* 


+ ft 

— ft 

— ft 

— ft 
+ ft 

+ ft 

—I 
+ ft 

— ft 


- ft 

— ft 
+ ft 


+ ft 

— ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+2ft 
+lft 
+ ft 

— ft 
+ ft 
+3ft 


+ ft 
+Tft 
+4ft 

— ft 
+ Ya 

— ft 


24ft 

41ft 

42 

27*i 

13ft 

20ft 

7?'^ 

18 

41*4 

SO 

29ft 

28ft 

1b 

69 

37* o 
23 
23ft 
36 
45ft 
4ft 

24ft 
27ft 
46ft 
lift 
77 ft 
34ft 
71ft 
19ft 
16*- 
15ft 
12ft 
2 

19ft 

26 

34ft 
31 Vj 
39ft 
!5ft 
24ft 
30ft 
102 
24ft 
2*'4 

15V, 

17ft 

72ft 


17ft AT&T IJ0 55 15 
32ft AT8.T of 164 4.4 
33ft AT&T pf 3.74 9A 
16ft AWalr 5 1.00 18 0 

43 A Wot pf 1J3 If 
11 AtftoSat US 44 
77V, A rtf Hoi! UO 114 7 


IjftO 15 0 
3 iM 
50 IB 13 


bOft ATror 4.940 7 A 
6ft ATrsc 

26ft Am* run 1j0 15 0 
■Mft ArnesD 30 5 20 

14ft Amefok 50 35 12 
10ft Am lac 

4 Amfesc 3 

SOU Amoco 3500 5 JO 8 
2Bft AMP 72 13 22 
lift Amoco JO 25 16 
17ft AuifWS 10 

22ft AmSlh 1A0 4-2 9 
30 Am Sled IjHC 4.1 u 
Ift Anocmo 

16ft Aniog 20 


9S5B 21ft 
1590 3B*« 
2630 39ft 
86 76ft 
102 67 
2Q0z liU 
122 17ft 


6 67 
45 17ft 
114 42ft 


369 a 
230 21ft 


3 

350D 5J0 fl 
72 25 22 
JO 25 16 


127 23ft 
124 4 ft 


1.40 4J 


7VU AflCtlOT 
30ft AnClav 
0ft AcidrGr 
17 Artftlfc 


6.1 

12 JT 


54 15 15 
50 25 13 


21ft Anneuss 50 14 12 
40ft Anheu Pf 160 £3 
13ft Anlvtr 2 $ 1.7 17 
9 An mem JD* 5 IB 
10ft An Ifxi v A4t> 10 9 
9ft Apochc J8 25 70 
ft ApcUPwl 
15ft AdcJiP UfUlO II A 
21ft Appwpt 165 10 J 
77ft ApPwpf 4.16 116 
26 U Appwpf 180 Tib 
19ft Aplpra 1-76! 9j0 19 
8ft AoolMg 55 

T6U ArcfiDn -I4t> .7 1? 
25ft ArlPpf 158 110 


5390 66ft 
1912 32ft 
178 12ft 
329 21ft 
116 XT* 
1QQ1 47ft 
1230 3 

136 20ft 
334 24ft 
159 41ft 
it iy* 
97 23ft 
4612 32ft 
7155 67ft 

41 16ft 


S3 12ft 
2 14ft 
256 71 


20ft— ft 
38ft— ft 
39ft + ft 
26ft + 46 
67 — ft 
lift + ft 
17ft 

66ft + ft 
72 — ft 
42ft + ft 
41 ft — 1U 
21U 
23ft 

4ft + ft 
65ft + ft 
31ft- 
12 

21ft + ft 
33ft + ft 
39 —2ft 
3 

20' •— Vi 
24ft 

4fft + "A 
13 

23ft + ft 
32U +1ft 
67ft +2U 
16ft— V* 
IT-— ft 
14ft— ft 
ir + ft 


24ft 
39ft 
38 
34ft 
19ft 
30U 
27 
27ft 
J7 
45ft 
44 *i 
34ft 
170ft 
24 

29ft 

98 

64 U 
153 
17ft 
29ft 
54ft 
5U 
31 U 

Wu. 

JrTH 

W* 
38 U 
25ft 
28ft 


lift 

27 1 - 

29ft 

22ft 

12ft 

lb 

15 

17ft 

23ft 

37 

35 

24ft 

79 

IBft 

22ft 

77 

42 

lt»ft 

10ft 

18ft 

34ft 

4U 

1T>i 

28U 

10 


ArnnWj AS 15 8 

ArmWfn U0 U 9 
Arm W pf 175 107 
AroCp 150 4A 9 
ArowE JO 75 16 
Artra J2 .9128 

Arvlns JO 3J 9 
Asarco 

AS#] I Of I 1J0 45 
AShlODf 450 10.1 
AshlO pf 3.96 95 
ASdDGs I A0 4 j 6 10 
AsdO Pf 4.75 AS 
Aftikme 150 8.1 11 
AlCvEI 25B 9.9 9 

A fJCE Of 157 65 
Art Rich 4JM AS 
AllRcPf 230 f.9 
AllasCp 

Augaf A0 U 21 
AutoDf 58 U 20 
Avalon n J95e 15 10 
AVEMC 30 25 15 
Averv 50 20 12 
Avlal! n 11 

Avne# 50 15 22 
Avon 100 EA 12 
Avdln 18 


106 13ft 
571 34 
100: 35ft 
13 27ft 
145 13ft 
1W 23ft 
79 24ft 
1942 21 
95T rft 
1 44ft 

16 4 
857 30ft 
IBB 90ft 

4 19ft 

159 26ft 
I 88ft 
9609 61 ft 
1 W'i 
73 Tift 
78 22ft 
1258 5DV: 
290 

94X20U 
559 374 
76 24ft 


2268 24 
42 21U 


13ft lift 
33V: 34 + ft 

35 35 — 

27 27ft + ft 
13ft 13ft— ft 
22 * 23ft +1 
23ft 24ft + ft 
19V 20 —1ft 
33 33ft 
44ft 44V 
41ft 41ft 
30 30ft — ft 
90 r 5 96ft -Oft 
T9ft V9*k 
25ft 26ft— ft 
eSft BBft— 6 
60ft 61ft +1ft 
I46U146U +« 
11U 11U— ft 
22U 22U— ft 

49ft 49ft— ft 

5ft + ft 
30 30ft + U 
30 Vk 30ft— 1ft 
24ft 28ft 
33ft 30ft— ft 
23ft 23ft— ft 
20ft 21ft + ft 


33U 

22ft 

47 

Wft 

16ft 

32ft 

75ft 

27 

13ft 

39 Vs 

25 

47ft 

30ft 

13ft 

35ft 

lftfe 

27ft 

34ft 

38ft 

J7Vh 

tfl 

76ft 

58ft 

Bft 

71 

77ft 

37ft 

37 

97 

33 

26ft 

44?b 

» 

33ft 

45ft 

40 

201 

22ft 

19ft 

6ft 

9 

15 

21ft 

49ft 

?4tt 

40ft 

26ft 

24ft 

26ft 

36U 

2»U 

59ft 

50 ft 

51 
61 

42ft 

24ft 

9ft 

44W 


20U BoaKVO 1.12 45 
13 BftkAin JO 6.1 
48 BkAznPf 4.91012J 
63 BkAm of 753*1X4 
17ft BkAm Pf 258 
27ft BkARtv 140 &8 
47ft BonkTr X70 4J 
21ft BkTrpf 250 9.9 
8ft Bannwr J3e 2 
T9 Bard 56 1J 


19ft BamGp 50 3-7 
25ft Borne# 5 TJM 35 


77 Barvwr JO 2A 
7 SASfX .120 1 J 


7 SASfX .120 1 J 

23ft BotlSCh .78 25 

lift Baxtrr J7 2.9 

20ft Boy Fin JO J 


24ft BovSlO 2J0 63 
31ft Bearing 7.00 3.1 
26 1 'j BearCa 150 45 
49ft Beatpf 3J8 4.9 
17ft Becar M 11 
35 T, s BectnD 150 25 
Ift Baker 
3ft Baker pf J9f 
17V: BefdnH J0 3J 
22ft BefHwf 56 1 J 
3 BetHwPf 47 25 
75 BellAll 650 75 
24ft BCE g 258 
14ft Behind J2 14 
30ft BertSoU 250 72 
47 ft BekiAH 50 14 
22ft Bern Is 150 34 
27ft BenfCP 240 55 
30ft BeMgl A3Q \\£ 
134ft Senefpf 550 35 
78 Belief Pf 2JQ IT J 
16ft Be neat it 1 JO 74 
3% BenotB 571 
3ft Berkev 

10ft BestPd 54 77 
14ft Berh5ll JO 2 A 
37ft BethStpf 550 114 
IBft Bemstpfzso iu 
28ft Bevenv 32 $ 

79ft BigThr 40 34 
13ft Bloctf n 
17ft BlockO 44 14 
22ft Bide HP 1.92 54 
14ft Blair jn 3B1 
39ft BfckHR 2J0 44 
33ft BodngS 148 24 
36ft BoteeC 150 45 
J8 Bal58CPf5J» 94 
1 8ft BoO&tr .70 J 
28ft Borden S 752 ZS 
19ft BargWo S6 44 
4ft Barmns 
29ft BasEd 344 84 
66 BOSEpf 858 707 
T * BosE or 1.17 104 
lift BasE or 146 10.9 
19ft Bawatr 72 34 
26ft BrtgS! 140 54 
43ft BrlstM 758 35 
3ft BrltLnd 
21ft BrttPt 1.99* 65 
22 BrtTZpp 41e 25 
1ft BrocX 

16ft Brckwv X32 45 
29ft BkvUG 1T2 74 
30ft BkUGPf 3.95 11.9 
15 B«m5h 50 .9 

24ft BmmGp 156 <45 
32ft firwnF 148 25 
28ft Brnswk 740 2J 
29 BrshWl 52 1.7 
ISft Sundv 50 45 
T5ft BunkrH Z76 17.9 
14ft BurfnCt 
24ft Burllna 144 6.1 
44ft BrJNfh 140 25 
6ft BrtHoof 55 85 
46ft BflNpf 553*105 
10ft Bumdv 44 44 
50ft Surryh 240 44 
17 Butlrln 52 4.7 
1ft Buttes 
2ft Bates Pf 1451 


82 1 
237 IBft 


82 ArlPo# 10.70 114 
U A/kSsf 40 24 9 

16 Afkta IjOR 55 Z7 

ft ArlnRI 
lift Armada 
6ft Armca 

15V, ArmCPf XI0 10J 


5 an 

8 33ft 
C 30ft 
325 20ft 
70 12ft 
1481 20ft 
IS 30 
20x 95 
80 23ft 


957 21 

61 h 


1 lift 
S£0 9 


17 19ft 


18ft + ft 
25ft + ft 
33ft + ft 
aiL* 

19ft -1 
Tift 

25k- ft 
27ft + ft 
95 

23ft + ft 
2 D.Vl- 
m— 
lift 

9 + ft 

19ft— ft 


14ft 6ft 

35ft 22 
18ft 75 
24*. IBft 
2ft ft 
10 2 
61ft 36ft 
30*. 18 
IBft 17ft 
lift 7ft 
23'v 77ft 
23ft 15ft 
5ft 2ft 
62 46ft 
55ft 34ft 
53ft 49ft 
47ft 30 Mi 


BMC .121 
Balmco JO 17 
Bkrinfl .92 55 
Boldor 46 14 
vlBaldU 
viBldU pf 
BoMCd \M 24 
BoKCP wl 
BaflvMf 50 IJ 
BalfvPk 

BJtGEs 1J0 41 
BricOm JO 3L7 
Ban Tex 

Bandog !J0 14 
BkBas 240 55 
BfcB DfB jM 1,9 
BkNY 204 5J 


80 

9 78 

U 2176 
13 246 

217 


7U 6ft 
22ft 22ft 
16ft 15ft 


20ft 30 

1ft 1ft 


13 214 
4 
876 
n 45 
8 1568 
11 410 

991 
ID 568 

5 88 

2 

6 245 


16ft 16ft 


10ft 10 
21ft 2Dft 
21 *- 21 


1ft 2 
40-- 49 
45ft 45ft 
S- 53ft 
3^ft 33ft 


6ft— ft 
22ft- ft 
T5ft— ft 
20 — ft 
1ft + ft 
6ft— ft 
56 +lft 
23 — ft 
16ft + ft 
10 + ft 

20^1 

71ft + ft 
2ft 

49 — ft 

45ft 

53’-* 

39Vi— '4 


0 487 25 
5419 13ft 
23 40*1 
260 63 
140 15ft 

12 60 TPm 

6 943 59ft 

2 25^ 

13 92 13^4 

74 160 35ft 

14 45 21ft 

ID 409 34ft 

13 flO 18ft 
9 572 7ft 
16 1249 28ft 
64 3880 12ft 

58x24 

9 70 37ft 

12 5 32ft 

820900 37ft 
73 69ft 
50 134 14ft 

14 63d 55ft 

101 2ft 
55 4 

10 II 13ft 

11 540 34ft 

10 34 
8 1439 87 
1597 30ft 
18 12 22ft 


8 5170 39ft 


20 6! 45 

11 44 33ft 

9 273 39 
2 37ft 
«M72ft 

r 22 

17 

5 

30 Tfe 
57 1389 14ft 

190 22 Vi 
18 1U5 35 
76 935 23 
25 46 17ft 

15 1085 T7*« 
9 29 MVj 

389 20*. 
12 177 55ft 
14 3368 45ft 
18 297 43 
12 55ft 
29 35 29ft 

11 1065 39'A 
11 7371 20ft 
14 235 10ft 

8 402 39ft 
lQOz 82*i 
4 lift 
1? 13ft 
8 3155 21ft 
12 74 28ft 

15 3233x54ft 


52 4.1 


13 26 4 

B 111 30Va 

13 40 2aft 

383 1ft 

23 Z7\j 
B 18 39ft 
17 33ft 

a 10 2ift 

20 293 30ft 
lo 328 49 

8 225 35ft 

14 203 31ft 

66 2 18ft 

73 18U. 
12 137 16ft 

199 27 

9 916 62ft 

7 6ft 
1043 51 
» 2T1 11 
12 3081 65ft 
79 130* 12ft 
479 1ft 
3 2ft 


24ft 24ft + ft 
12ft 13ft — ft 
40ft 40ft— ft 
67ft 63 
15ft 15ft 

27 27ft + ft 

58 58 — 1ft 

25ft 25ft 

12ft 13ft + ft 
34ft 35ft + ft 
21ft 2lto 
33ft J4V* + ft 
17ft 17ft— ft 
7 7ft 

28 28ft — ft 

12ft 12*-— ft 

ZFfc 24 + ft 

31 ft 3Tft— ft 

32ft am— ft 

35ft 37ft +126 
66ft 69ft +2 
13ft 14*6 + ft 
55 . 55** 4- ft 
2ft 2U 
3ft 4 

73% T3V2 + ft 

33ft 34 + ft 

34 34 +1 

85ft 86 — ft 
27ft 29ft— ft 
aft au. — ft 
39 39ft + ft 
44 45 + ft 

32ft 33ft + ft 
J8ft 38ft + ft 
37ft 37ft 
172ft 172ft —3ft 

a a + ft 

16ft 16ft— ft 
4ft 4ft 
.7ft 7*6— ft 
13ft 14ft + ft 
16ft 16*6 + ft 
44ft 44ft 
21ft 22ft— ft 
34ft 34ft— ft 
22ft 22ft— ft 
17ft 17ft 
17ft 17ft + Hr 
33ft 34 — ft 

20ft 20ft + ft 
54ft 55ft— ft 
44ft 45ft— ft 
42ft 42ft + ft 
55ft 55ft + ft 
38ft 28ft + ft 

38 38ft— ft 
19ft Mft — ft 

9ft 10ft + ft 

39 3*ft 

82ft 82ft +1*i 

17 11 — ft 

13ft 13ft— ft 
21 21ft + ft 
27ft 77ft— Vi 
53ft 54 - *4 

4 4 


30ft 30ft + ft 


28 28ft— ft 

1ft 1ft 
27 27ft + ft 
39ft 39ft 
aft 33* i — ft 
Zl« 2196— ft 
J0ft 30ft— ft 
4flW 48ft + ft 
35ft 35* + ft 
30ft 30ft— ft 
18% T0W— ft 
IBft 18ft— ft 
15ft 16ft + ft 
26ft a — ft 
63 62ft + ft 


*96 6ft 


50ft 50ft— ft 
10ft 10ft— W 
64ft A4ft— 1ft 
lift 12ft +1 
1ft 1ft 
2*- 2ft— ft 


a 20ft CBl In 1 JOo 65 117 21ft 21ft 21ft 

125 60ft CBS 100 27 19 5252 110ft 107ft 110ft +1*1 

Bft 4ft CCX 9 57 4ft 4ft 4*2— ft 

12 9 CCX of 1J5 11.9 370S TOft 10ft 10ft 

60ft 36ft CIGNA 250 45 35 2412 54ft 53ft 54 +1 

32ft 26 CIGPf 175 9J 90 29ft 29ft 29ft + ft 


12 9 CCX ef 

60ft 36ft CIGNA 
32ft 26 CIGPf 


32ft 26 CIGPf 175 9J 
53ft 49 CfGcrf 4.10 82 
7ft 1ft CLC 
57ft 28V* CNA Fn 
lift 9VJ. CNAl 1J4 115 
28ft 16ft CNW 
47ft 35ft CPC inf 120 4J 
26 16ft CP Nrt 1J0 AJ 
22*9 19ft CRJIMI 257*105 
21ft CSX 1.16 65 
40U 28ft CTS 1.00 11 
12ft 7ft C 3 Inc 
33ft aft Cabot .92 43 
17ft 6-n coesar 


4.10 BJ 331 49ft 4«ft 49ft + ft 
_ 58 Tft 1ft 1ft + ft 

10 369 50T* 49ft 50ft +1 ft 
134 115 12 11 10ft 1<K~ ft 

137 IBft 17ft IBft + >4 

120 4J 12 899 47 46ft 46ft + ft 

140 6i 9 45 aft aft a — ft 

257*103 60 20ft a 20ft + ft 

1.16 65 8 5632 Wg 23ft 24ft 

150 11 75 32ft 31* 32% 

438 742 8ft Bft 8ft + ft 

.92 43 8 326 22ft 21ft aft— I 
14 2235 14ft Uft 14ft + ft 


25ft 17* Col Fed J8 25 4 797 18 17ft 17ft— ft 




54V« 35V> CaJFd pf 475 102 
21 13ft ColISm JSb 15 


151a 12 Camml .12 S I0B 13 13 13 


24 47ft 46 T A 46ft— 1 
66 17ft 16ft 16ft— ft 


26 15% CRLfcg JO 462 ?2ft 7lft aft— ft 

6ft 2% CrtWftg .16# 86 2ft 2% 7ft 

40% 30ft Cam So 5 1J5 3J 13 619 39ft 38ft 38ft + ft 

15ft lift CdPacs J§ 165 12ft lift 12 — ft 

22U 16ft Con PE a 50 31 19ft 19% 19Vz— ft 

228% ISQ'A CapQtS JO .1 18 448 196ft 193 195% + % 
77ft 17ft COftHds J7 35 8 654 20ft 20ft 20*4— ft 
110ft 100% CaoHpf 95 le 90 1 108% 100% 100% 

12ft Tft Caring g J8 23 9ft 9*6 9ft— Vi 

4P5 Coil Isle 158 16 9 96 29ft 29% 29*6 + ft 

36ft 18 CeroFt JO 1J V0 117 Tift 23 23% + ft 

30ft 27ft CarPw 250 105 7 4081 26 25ft 25ft— ft 


26ft 20ft CorPpf Z67 1T5 6 24ft 24ft 24ft + ft 

48 35ft CdrTec Z10 55 13 70 37% 37ft 37^ 

lift 6ft Carrol 57 1.1 9 50 Bft 6ft 6ft 

24>~ 18 CarPlrs 50 3J 7 78 ll^i 17ft 17ft— ft 

31 aft CdrlHw 1J2 4.7 72 189 26 24ft 26 + ft 

46ft a CdftWr 53 15 12 56 34ft 33ft 34ft +1* 

18ft 12ft COSCNG UO 75 7 26 !5ft 15ft 15ft 

16ft 9ft CostlCk 1307 12ft lift 12 + ft 

29 I5*i CstlCpf 158k 12 24ft 26ft 26ft 

15 12 CSflCpf .90 4J 18 14ft |4ft 14ft + ft 

38 «■ 28ft ColrpT 50 1 J 1533 35ft 35ft 35ft— ft 

27ft 19ft CeC9 J6 11 10 86 2«ft 23ft 2*ft + % 

129% 68% Cetera* 440 35 H 913 124% 12a 124ft— ft 

lift 7ft Csnsv XNe a 25 229 r* 9 9ft 

45 34ft Cental 2J8 5J 9 201 41ft 41ft 4Tft + ft 

26ft 18 Centex JS 1.1 10 339 22% 21U 22ft + ft 

27 » CenSW 252 BJ 7 88T 34ft 24ft 24ft— ft 


2J8 5L7 9 201 41ft 41ft 4Tft + ft 

JS 1.1 10 339 22% 2114 22ft + ft 

252 BJ 7 887 24ft 24ft 24ft— ft 


J1U 20ft CenHod NJ 6 226 35*4 2 5Vk »n— ft 


46 36ft CnJLtpf 450 IQ5 


250:43 


aft 1M CnTIPS 1 M 9J 10 595 18 17ft T7ft— ft 


29% 20% CnLflEI 258 BJ 7 243 04ft 23ft 24*i + ft 

37 31ft CLoEr pf 4.18 T2J ?£ 34ft 3* 34 

\T\ 8ft CaMPw UO 1QJ IQ9 3X7 13ft 12ft 13ft + ft 

21ft 14ft CVfPS 1.90 9J 6 59 20 ?9*fe T9ft— ft 

lift 2% CtfitrDf 9a 4% ift 4ft + ft 


12ft S'A CnfrvTI JO 69 f . . _ 

aft 17ft Genvllt 2JG 135 8 Z3 lTft T TU IFu— ft 

\5*- cn-ftod jo 19 n 444 ip* 24 24 —ft 

30ft 16V, CaSSAlr JO U 2311662 29ft 29 29ft— ft 


9a 4ft 6ft 4ft + ft 
101 lift lift lift + % 
a 17ft \TU 17ft— % 


25ft TSft Chmpin J2 25 
27ft 20ft Chrni Pf TJ0 55 
sift 45ft Cnmr of 4 jO 9 j 


9Vb 7 % Owwnso JO 4.9 15 339 


1572 21 TOft 20*6— ft 

5 24 m 2J^b — IJ 

28 50 49ft 49ft 


4ft 1 vfChrtC 
1ft % viChl w* 
4ft Ift vIChrtpt 


7ft 8'H + ft 

m zu 7ft — ft 

H ft ft 

9*6 2*i 2k. + ft 


6Jft 39ft CMM 350 7J 5 728 50 49 491% — 1 


48% 39ft Oncnaitf SJ5 11J 
56ft 51 OxXM Pf1QJ482U 


22ft 16ft Oi d»a .73 
XT- 24ft Chemed 152 
64ft 27ft Chin NY 
56*6 51 OiNY Pf LDSi 
55H 49 CllNY pf Ajfft 


1-2 5 46ft 46ft 46ft + ft 

W 23 g i 53 52ft- ft 

jj 9 25 aft 20*% 2 m 

55 11 332 28 77 27ft— 7% 

7J 5 945 3418 TOft 33ft— 1ft 

75 139 54ft 54% 54% — ft 

75 64 sy± 52ft 52ft— ft 


39ft 22 C hesek 1J4 35 10 46 35ft 35 35ft + ft 

JT- 31 ChesPn zofl U 9 522 3T* 31ft 22 + ■* 

39 7TA Chevm 2*0 6J 9 5*23 J7 1 - 36ft 37X4* + ft 


39 7F± Chevm 

200 12S ChlM'w 

80S* 53ft CMJVU Pf 


103 28 VZHTM 124ft 124ft— ft 

_T2 JS. 54% 54% 


29ft 16ft ChlPnT JOe 1.1 9 153 26ft 25ft 26% ft 

Tift Tu QikFull J4t Z9275 19 5 r « Bft 8'A 

56ft 29ft OirrtCr M3 189 56ft 56% + >6 


13ft 5% Oirbln 
13ft 9ft chroma 
56 44ft Chrmpf 


189 56ft 56ft 56% + ft 

48 10ft 10% 10ft 

41 39 lift T2ft T 2ft— U 

_ 4 54 54 54 


38ft 25ft Chnrsfr 150 25 3 2655 36ft 35ft 35ft— U 

77 44ft Chubb 2J4 JJ 12 782 69 6fl iSi +1ft 

63% SDft ChiMPtdJfl 7.1 206 5fft 59% 59ft +1 

20ft !3ft Church 5 44 10 13 1434 15% 14% M%— ft 


27ft 21 CilCprp 222 9J 9 31 CTV 23*% 23ft 
51 36% GnBftll 117 63 8 7 49ft S5JJ * 


19ft Uft OnGE 116 125 7 237 10% 17ft 18 + % 

34% 26 ClnGPf 450 125 Wz 31 31 31 

73% 57ft CiflGDf 9J0 119 100:71ft Tift 71ft +lft 

26H IBft OnMH J1 3J 25 232 1+t lffft ?9i^ V£ 

JT 20 OrdK .74 15 11 TOl 30% jSi _ ft 

Jl Ch-Ottr .10 J If 201 TOft 19ft 50 — S 

30ft 15 Circus 14 IS 26ft 26% 26ft— ft 

ITIA riil^rn 4 -U Cl 1 rtan VT-7 “ 



SiS WA ernars 2Jd Sjt 'i vB 3pS Sh J* 

"6 SS S£% B,A? ^,S3 5 3 IS T T- 5 

OS sv. z&$li 10 7 ,a s Its 'is '555^ 

rai 2TH. ClartE in us 171 31™ 3^2 31-4, 

E? 6 T 3 .59 Ji 1 * ii lift + h 



n 14 

d ?es««6tt*n 


From tne t CH1NG or "Book of Changes 1 vwhich 
consists of 64 exagrama devised by rhe first 
Chinese Sage Fu Hsi (B.C 3322) and to whieti 
erolana&ona were added also by Confucius 
(B.C, 550-473) 


cviTVii U 
S/nit; Cf PrtM**t* 


TOft 17 Cfwcri 150 16 9 in IBft TTft im Z 2 

aft 20 civqgf in u a tEI aftT 2 

ZJ% 17ft Ml 264 110 6 T731 22 ml » + 2 

44 JI'A CIvEfpf 7 JO 12 J 100: 59% 59% » 

64-- 51% CJvEf Pf 756 114 H & * W 

I6*e 0% Cievtffc J3I 29 I0A. 

!7ft 10 UvpkOf I.U1 5 ir! vPt iSS_u. 


T7ft IU l.lll 2 12% 12% 19%— W 

41ft 26ft ctom 1J6 3J T2 2126 4Cft 39% ISi + iS 
26H 1 At ChfbMd JM 15 17 w S3 S- T * 


BANCA COMMERCIALE ITALIANA 


14ft ChlDBW JD# 15 17 97 ■ ' 

38ft 25 Jd ChWffP 150 21 19 W7 ^ S Sft- n 

Zfl’i Cluefpf 150 4J ? 23^ ^ 2 

2Yi. Cworn .« is U 1154 inft "IS 10% — S 

36ft 16% Cocrsy » .40 U 10 H42 3ft 3S iSlS + ft 

74% 59% CocoCf L90 4J 14 W\ SK mt SSfc— 

sssassta. » 

sss'as&a y * gsis 


26ft C0IG« i» W 2t2 rn S? Bft 


28ft 

110 

109% 

50 

37% 

a% 

lift 

32% 

18ft 

lift 

24ft 

76ft 

30ft 

31ft 

35ft 

35ft 

24% 

45ft 

39ft 

20 

a 

15% 

M 

341 

47ft 

50 

36 

47ft 

Bft 

33ft 

54ft 

JT% 

25ft 

28ft 

28ft 

TOW 

TOft 

ia% 

17 

TO 

18 

47ft 

96ft 

TOft 

*ft 

51*6 

2 

11% 

24ft 

38ft 

40% 

2ft 

39 

41ft 

20*6 

27 

16ft 

23ft 

27*% 

15ft 

40ft 

49ft 

11 

39% 

52% 

19% 

52*% 

34 

70 

44ft 

50% 

MW 

35ft 

33ft 

88% 

10ft 

38ft 

Sift 


U ft 
99ft 
101 
33ft 
23ft 
fi 

T5W 

0W 

25ft 

13% 

14% 

19 

59 

20% 

Z2ft 

23ft 

23% 

12% 

11% 

24% 

16 

a% 

72*6 


CSOPf 145 
C50 Pf OlSJ5 119 
C5GPfnl5J5 lfO 
Comb In 2.16 5J 
CmoEn 1 -00 19 
Cornells JO 1.1 
Com/Wf J6 2J 
Comdre 


CmvE 350 T05 
ChE Pf 150 IU 


CwEPf 250 11J 
CwEPf 257 9,9 


C*E Of 8J0 125 
ComES 252 9J 
Comwtt 1J0 3 J 
CPsvc JO 15 
Comoer JO 25 
ComgSc 


J’6 

19 

31% 

15*6 

14 
14*6 

MX? 

14% 

14*6 

10U 

9ft 

15% 

Tft 

31% 

69% 

4% 

% 

4 

20% 

16ft 

33% 

*6 

27ft 

31 

14% 

15 

8*6 

17% 

17% 

11 

30% 

26% 

5 

32 
23 
17% 
49% 
IN 

40W 

Z796 

43ft 

50ft 

22% 

15% 

50W 

8ft 

30ft 

33% 



150 25 
UO BJ 
2J0 95 
JO XI 
2J0 .7.1 
650 25 
4JS 10J 
550 105 
1.10 35 
2J2 45 


CAP pm 450 14 J 
CnPPfD 7J5 14J 
CnPprV AM 155 
CnPpfU 160 15J 
CnPprT US 145 
CnPprR 450 15J 
C11P prP 198 1 55 

S PprN 355 15J 
PprM 250 145 
CnPprL 2J3 US 
CnPprS 452 \5j 
CnP prK 2J3 155 
Curt CP 2J0 65 
CtfCpfA 250 25 
Coriflfl 


Contlfrt 

CnttTJPf 

CNlHTd 

Cnllmo 

ContTsH 150 8L1 


CfDoM J2 4J 


CnDfpf 450 125 
vjCookU 


Cooor 152 4.1 
Coopl pf 2.90 75 
CaprTr JO 2J 
CooovLs J0 15 
Copwld J2I . 
CPwld Pf 148 07 
Cardura 54 35 
Conlit 56 45 


CornGs 1J8 25 
CarBIk 150 12 


Craig 

Cram lift) 45 
GnavRs 

CrckN Pf 118 11 J 
CrckN Pf l£3e 55 
CrmpK 1JD 5L3 
CrwnCk 

CneZel 1.00 27 
CrZefpf 453 105 
CrZel pfC45D 75 
Culbro 50 25 
CuUnef 8 


CumEP Z2D 3J 
Currlnc I.IOalfU 
CurtW 1J0 3J 
Cydm 1.18 U 


7 27% 
0Qz1 10 
.2503J09 
7 291 42ft 
9 667 25% 
10 482 19ft 

15 15 16% 

7 304? 10W 
7 2477 

17 
11 
125 
301 JQZ 

6 67 

10 21S 

21 1350 

7 ITS 

12 736 
1244 

13 776 36% 
TO 17 19 

9 9 29*6 

6 279 13 

8 1347 33ft 

1 TO3 
16600: 44 

16 48 

11 294 31*6 

I 384 39ft 

1089- 7% 
23b TOft 
1530Z52 
40 29ft 

11 23% 

£ ** 

23 26 

40 2Stt 
13 24*6 
23 16ft 

i 15 

47 26% 

17 16% 
18 1363 40*0 

3 86 

16 53. 7ft 

. 256 1% 

22 49% 
769 ft 
8 ' 80 10*6 
0 1584 22% 
2640 T7ft 
280: 36 
130 1 

16 1BB3 37% 
107 39 

7 43 15 

14 381 22*6 

86 9 % 

. 76 18% 

15 49 24 

11 36 11*6 

18 1341 46% 

17 46 

16 2 9ft 

\1 512 37% 

25 1616 50*6 

22 19% 
5 52% 

12 9 27*6 

14 129 68 

18 16% 37% 

28 46% 
16 ft 

18 39 3» 

22 1358 17ft 

4 394 64% 

12 10 % 

16 ? 36 

e 33 47% 


27ft 27ft 

no no 

100% 109 
41 41% 

25% 25ft 
18% 

Idfe 
9% 

TOft 
16*6 
17 

23ft 
69ft 
27% 

31*6 


— ft 
+1 


— ft 
+ Hi 
+ ft 


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Head Office: Milan - 443 branches in naly 


Banca Commeruaie tcabana. whch has 
had a Representative Office in Peking, 
People's Recubflc of China, since 1981. will 
transfer its premises to Jianguomenwai 
Dajte in order to offer its clients a more 
convenient meeting pant for 
establishing business relationships with 
the Chinese market. 


m the Pacific region, Banca Commeraaie 
itaiiana has branches m Tokyo, 

Hong Kong arid Singapore, as well as 
Representative Offices in Osaka and 
Sydney. 


Thanks to its participation in Leasepack. 
Banca Commercial® itafena is also able to 
provide complete assistance in trie 
leasing sector 


c tr.\ 


fr*r 


Peking Representative Office. 

19 Jianguomenwai Daiie. 27tfi Fiocr 
Beijing 

tel. 507766 ext. 5022 - 5157 * 5153 
telex 22579 BO PE CN 

L&ASERAGK - C^na intsem a tional 
^Packaging Leasing Co . Ltd 
fRcx3m 225. Oanmen Hote! 

Beijing 

tei. 538751 ext 225 
tefex 22039 LEAPA CN 




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During the first six months of 1985 

The International 


Herald Tribune 


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international 



1985 will be a record year 
for the IHT. During the first six 
months, when the overall inter- 
national advertising market grew 
by less than 1%, the IHT increased 
its advertising revenue by 35% - 
a gain of over $ 3.4 million. The 
results below are for Atlantic area 
English-language publications as 
tabulated by the Rome Report’s 
international measuring service. 

In the Pacific area, too, the 
IHT was the fastest growing 
international publication, with 
a growth of 98% over the com- 
parable period last year 


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0 PAGES IN MAGAZINES: QUARTER PAGES IN NEWSPAPERS 


( J 


% 


1984^5 

164.639 

1983/B4 

ism) 

198^fe3 


Circulation also set record levels: up 27% in the last 5 years 


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IHT paid drculation grew to a daily 
average of 164,639 for the July ’84 -June ’85 
audit period 

dearly, international advertisers and 
the value of the world's only global news- 

fbr full information concerning the IHT and 





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The International 
Herald Tribune 

Published with 

the New York Times and the Washington Post . 

Printed simultaneously in 

■ 

Paris, London, Zurich, The Hague, Marseille, 
Hong Kong and Singapore. 

181. avc. Charles-de-GauIle, 92521 Neuillv Cedex, 
France. TeL; (Oil 747 1265 

The global newspaper 

Bringing the world's most important news 
to die world's most important audience. 


I. 


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Itcraite^ 


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-Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1985 


i 


Monday!? 



ClOSHlg 


Tobies include the not kin wide prices 
up to ttie dosing on Well Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 MOflfh 
High Low Stoct 


Dlv. YK. PE 


SlL 

TOSS High Low 


Oosc 

QudL Qi’ge 


(Continued from Page 10) 


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78 78 

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16* 

25ft 

33* 

12* 

33 

18 

29* 

21% 

26* 

62* 

71ft 

70ft 

34% 

22ft 

13% 


24* 

30* 

12* 

1 

r 

37 
a % 
33% 

B% 

12% 

24% 

7 

a 

7* 

3ft 

10% 

12 

21* 

47% 

15ft 

32 

39ft 

15ft 

24% 

2 

14 

10ft 

T9ft 

2* 

76* 

39ft 

85ft 

23* 

41% 

22ft 

48 

46ft 

30 

42ft 

32ft 

31* 

25 

2* 

19ft 

25ft 

51% 

7 

25 

48% 

19* 

19ft 

T9* 

a* 

19ft 

14% 

16 

24* 

32 

12 

32 

17* 

28* 

20* 

25* 

61% 

21% 

20ft 

33% 

21* 

13 


74% — ft 
30U- ft 
12% + % 
life 

5ft— ft 
9 Yj— 1ft 
37ft— 10 
11 -6 
34 —7 
8%— 2% 
17ft— % 
24ft +2 
7 — % 

23 — % 
7ft— ft 
3ft 

1D%— ft 
12 + % 
21% 

47% + % 
15ft 

32% + % 
39% + % 

15ft 

24ft + % 
2 — % 
14 — % 

10ft 

19ft— ft 
S3 +2% 
46ft + % 
76ft -I- ft 
29ft— % 
MVk + ft 
23ft + % 
41ft + ft 
22% 

48%— Ift 
47ft— * 
30 — % 
43ft 

33% — ft 
31ft— % 
25ft -I- ft 
2*— % 
19ft 

26 + ft 

51% + % 
7 — ft 
25 — 1% 
4fl% 

19*— % 

19* + % 
19*— % 
22% — ft 
19% 

14ft— ft 
16% — % 
25ft — ft 
32ft— ft 

12 — ft 
32ft 

irft— % 
29ft + ft 
21% + ft 
26ft— ft 
62ft— * 

2lft— ft 

20ft— ft 
34% +lft 
22 — ft 

13 — ft 


I 


M 


1 


23% 

49ft 

24ft 

39% 

14ft 

38 

42% 

18 

27 

11* 

8ft 

lift 

a* 

38* 

55ft 

45% 

16 

46ft 

28* 

10ft 

21ft 

29ft 

17ft 

42ft 

8ft 

25* 

38% 

2% 

38% 

39* 

lift 

17ft 

100 

75% 

44ft 

14 

36 

15% 

3% 

30ft 

12ft 

65ft 

17% 

13ft 

15ft 


-24 


15* WACOM 
25% MCA S 
19% MCcrp 1J0 
36 MCorpf 150 


10 MDC 
27% MDU 
34 ME I 
Tift MGMGr 
10 MGMLTq 


J2 

2.72 

JO 

.44 

JOe 


55 
1.16 
4J5 1QJ 


IDO 23 B 


23 

J 


9A 


7% MGMu wt 
7% MLConvn 
11% ML Men 
12* MB Lt g .7*f 
18 Mtxonla 
38% Mocv 
36 Macypf 
10ft Mod Res 
30ft MaglCf 
1* Mat As? 1800c 
10* Manhin JO lj 
12ft Mann ni J2 
14ft ManrCs .16 
15% ManrCwl 
27% Ml r Han 3 JO 
5ft viMonvi 
17ft vIMnvl of 
23ft MAPCO 100 
ft Morale 
25% MarMId 1J0 
18 Marlon s J8 
8* MortcC 32 
13* Markpf 1J0 
70 MorriuT SA 
47% MrshM 2.70 
a% MortMs 100 
Bft MorvK M 
74 Masco 
10% MassMr 
lft Mase/F 
22% Mo&Cp 
10ft Masliic 
48% Matsu E 
9* Mattel 
Aft Motel wt 
lift Moron 


1 A T7 
40 
70 6 
9J 

X7 10 
7.9 9 
1J 14 
X5 39 
J 


1.9 17 
17 12 


IB 


2.9 8 


36 

JO 


17 7 
J 37 
3A 
XI 

6 15 
40 17 
30 

71 
17 16 
IS IB 


2.96 1X3 
1-32 112 
J4r .7 


9 

16 


6f9 

991 

696 

5 

318 

23 

76 

236 

1122 

107 

161 

?a 

13 
AB4 

1076 

40Z 

69 

86 

461 

206 

14 
838 

22 

993 

259 

27 

304 

128 

29 

296 

22 

12 

196 

776 

2834 

396 

1001 

a 

318 

16 

101 

238 

882 

199 

BS 


1 7ft 17 
46* 45ft 
20% 19* 
33ft 38 
12ft lift 
35 34ft 
38 37% 

17ft 17ft 
24ft aft 
9ft 9 
7ft 7* 
11* lift 
13% T3 
29ft 28* 
47ft 42% 
43 42% 

10ft 10ft 
43ft 43% 
2* 2ft 
lift 10ft 
14 13ft 

a* 21* 

16 15 

34* 34 
6 5* 

17ft 17ft 

31* 31% 
34% 34% 
9% 9ft 
14* 14* 
B9 S8b 
67* 67 

33ft a* 
13% 17ft 
32ft 31% 
13* 13% 
7b 2% 
29* 28* 
lift lift 
49% 49 
13ft 13% 
9ft 9 
12 * 12 


17* 

46 — ft 

a 

38ft + * 

12 + ft 
34ft— ft 
37ft 
17* 

24% 

9%— % 
7ft + % 
11* + % 

13 — % 
29ft + ft 
42% — ft 
42% —1% 
10% + % 
43ft— % 

2ft 

11% +1% 
13ft— % 
22ft— ft 
15% — % 
34% — ft 
5ft— % 
17ft— % 




+ ft 

31% — ft 
34% + % 
9%— % 
14*— Mi 
89 — ft 
67ft 4- ft 

av- + * 

13% -f % 
32% +1tt 
13% — 

2ft 

20* 

11* + Vi 
49—91 
13% + 91 
9% + M 
12 — fc 


12 Month 
High Low Slock 


Ste 


Dte. YhLPE life High Low 


Close 

QuoLGhto 


44* 33% Mead 

IJM 

10 

9 

644 

24* 15ft Mtvux 

24 

1.1 

11 

282 

39ft 25* Mearm 

* JB3 

XI 

14 

933 

56% 40* Mellon 


XA 

7 

236 

soft 24 Mellon p 

F2JW 

93 


57 

48% 35ft MelvfH 

144 I A 

12 

574 

70 51% Merest 

lJfl 

1 17 

TO 

706 

117* 70* Merck 

X20 

1 10 

75 

1226 

88 *ru Meratti 

100 IJ 

13 

91 

36* 25% AtorLvnn 

JO X9 

11 

4866 

3% 1* Mod Of 




530 




life 5J 
J9elU 


22 12V. MettPf 

35* 28* M0SOR 
7* 5% Mesob 
4ft 2% Mcstefc 
61% 48 MtE PfG 7J8 112 

3* 2 wr Fd JTeUS 

21* 17% MI161 Pt 205 9.9 

M% 14% McflER \A0 BA 


7* 4% MlddPv 
55% 37* MUcon 
15ft 8% MidSUI 
20ft 15ft MldRoa 
Kft 25* MWE 
15ft IQ* MlltflR 
86 73* MMM 

39ft 27* MlnPL 
II 3% Mhnlns 
8 4% Mitel 


1A 

5.1 


04 
734 
1-331 

100 63 
276 9A 
M 40 
150 4J 
276 XI 


7 1« 16* 

12 33* 

7 207 5* 

31 3% 

IDz SB 
248 2* 

1 20* 

13 16* 

6 4ft 
1618 47 
4207 9ft 
BO ?6ft 
10 24 29 

IS 4} lift 
13 2284 76* 
B 142 33* 
489 4* 

417 6% 


Tl 

30 

9 

3 


28% 
74 * 7k 


34* 25% Mobil 2J0 7 J 9 8033 29ft 
2% % vIMobJH 

8* 5* MoOCot 10 197 6% 

33* 17% Motiosc A0 1J 11 899 27% 

14* 1ft MotlkDt 734 1* 


39 

3* 

47* 

28% 

42b 

60% 

108 

B" 

z* 

Tfi% 

3» 

5% 

m 

58 

2ft 

20* 

16* 

4ft 

46% 

9 

16 

28% 

10* 

75* 

33* 

4 

6* 


39% — * 


48ft 

28% 

42% 

61ft 

108ft 

59% 

27ft 

2* 

16ft 

33* 

5* 

3% 

a* 

16* 

4ft 

46* 

9% 

T6ft 


+ * 
+ % 
+ ft 


+ * 
— * 
— % 
— * 
— % 


— ft 
+ % 


+ % 
— % 


28* + ft 


53* 39 JltanCo 
19% 14* Me nr eft 
55* 40* Monsan 
30* 16* MofiPw 
19* 15* MOflS! 

10ft 7* MONY 
21* 13% Moores 
78 2D MoOTM 
31 24 Vq Mo rM pf 2JQ 
34ft Morgns 2J0 


1051 
JQ £4 
250 54 

■25 1 ®- 1 

g? 4 - 1 
104 4J 

9J 
43 


ID 

22 

11 

11 


47 

a% 

21 

38 

39* 

768k 

14* 

32ft 

22* 

14* 

7* 


75* Morgn pf 6J6e 80 
39* MorKnd MB 3 A 
18% MorwS 
75% MlffRtV 
25ft Mortons 
29% Motor la 
19* Munfrd 
8% Munses 
23% MurpQ 
16% MurrvO 
11% MufOm 
1% MverL 


M 3.9 
TJraelOJ 
M 2 Q 
J4 1.9 
J4 2.5 


1JQ 14 
.40 13 
1*44 10J 


109 46% 
6 14* 
2457 46* 
3797x28% 
68 18* 
10 222 9 

12 TA 17* 

13 34 a 
72 27% 

6 613 45 

28 85ft 
480 43* 

HOk 

J* jflrr 1 

152 lT^j 
760 22 
1812 34* 
6 21 * 
4 13% 
78 29* 
32 18% 
26 13* 
<3 2% 


10 

14 
9 

a 

15 
11 


12 

11 


5* 

26* 

1% 

46 

U* 

46 

28 

18% 

8ft 

17* 

22* 

27 

64% 

35% 

43 

a* 

16* 

JTtt 

34ft 

21* 

13% 

now 

XTTB 

2 


10% 

76 

33* 

4ft 

6* 

29% 

» 

ft* 

27% 

1* 

46 

14* 

46* 

28* 

18* 


+ * 
+ % 
+ % 
— * 
+ * 


— % 
+ * 
— % 
— * 


— % 
+ % 


17* 
22ft 
77 
44% 
BSft 
43 
20* 
17 
37 
34%. 
21* 
13% 
29% 
18* 
13* 
2 


— * 
+ % 
— % 

— ft 

— ft 

— * 
— % 
— % 
— * 
+ * 


— ft 

+ ft 

— ft 
+ % 


— % 


[ 


N 


1 


21% 

36% 

2014 

22% 

44* 

36 

14ft 

36* 

1* 

59% 

28* 

29% 

18% 

35* 

33% 

2D 

19* 

30% 

51% 

4* 

33* 

32% 

11% 

29 

15% 

53% 

33ft 

18 

13 

33% 

30% 

18ft 

12* 

46% 

29 

a* 

76ft 


1 


3L7 
3J 
2.7 
_ 1J 
232 8 A 


.90 IS 
1J0 5J 


-36 12 


'-25 

J2 


10 
2 A 


SB* 

59ft 

31% 

•O^D 

30* 

11* 

10% 

70 

87 

52 

39* 

50 

15 

6% 

79* 


3J 10 
50 II 
9.9 
1X6 
1X1 


36* MavDStr 1JS 
43 MoyTo 2J0 
21 McOr pf 2J0 
20* McOrpt LAO 
16* McDerl 1J0 
T* McOri wi 
6* McDld JO XI 15 
48* McOnld SB U 14 
63* McDuD 10 U 1 
37* McGrH 1J0 13 15 
257* Mclntg 
37 McKcsb 
9* Me Leon 
2V? McLeo wt 
a* McNeil 100 


X40 


5J 12 
16 


AT 8 


762 SOft 49* 
176 55* 54* 
11 22 * 22 % 
827 24% 24% 
1360 17* 17* 
200 3 2* 

1 9* 9* 

1536 65 64ft 
1475 tfPb 69% 
1155 43 47* 

26 26* 26* 
49 45* 45% 
233 10*. 10* 
29 2* 2* 

20 24* 74ft 


4«*— 1ft 
55* + * 
72% 

24% 

17* -f * 
3 + % 

9* + % 
64* 4- % 
69*— % 
42*— % 
26*— % 
45ft + % 
10*— ft 
7* * 
74ft — ft 


70U 

32ft 

19 

56% 

IB 

9* 

46* 

3V» 

21* 

32% 

35* 

39 

26% 

17ft 

18* 

33* 

17ft 

17% 

77* 

28% 

48* 

19 

60ft 

45ft 

20% 

IB 

15% 

51% 

37 

46 

69* 

41% 

4* 

56* 

14* 

40* 

28* 

55* 

35 

47ft 

7* 

97 


15* NAFC0 100 63 
27?a NBDs 1AQ 4A 
12* NBI 
17% NCH 
28* NCNB 
22% NCR 
9% NLlnd 
27* NUI 
% NVF 
35* NWA 
22% NolCO 
21* Nashua 
10ft NtCrvv s 
21* NaiOts? 220 7J 
27* NDfetPf X2S 70 
16* NDtetpr US 9J 
lift NotEdu 
23* NatFGft 208 BJ 
34 NatG VP 228 4S 
2% NtHom 
24 Nil 
19% NMedE 
7% NMhte5 
23* NlPnest 106 19 
70% NtSeml 
50% NtSem pf 400 77 
7 Sft NtSvcln 100 12 
lift HS fond AO U 
10 Neras JAo 5 A 
26 NevPw XB4 gj 
12ft NevP pf 1 JO 10J 
15 NevP pf 1.74 102 
9% NevSvL JO 4.9 
34% NEngEI 3J0 BJ 
24% NJRSC 220 BJ 
2fi% NYSEG X56 1X7 
60* NYSPf BJ0 112 
21 NYSpfA 3J2C130 
15 NYSpf XU 1X0 
26ft NY5 pfD 3J5 1X3 
13ft Newell JO 3J 
31* Newtiol J4 7J 
12% Newtlll IJOelOJ 
7% NwtURs 
34ft Newmt 
1* Nwparfc 
15 NEaMP 
24% NlaMpf 3AD 113 
26 NlaMpf 300 123 
28% NioMpf 4.10 1U 
2D NlaMpf 25*1X1 
14% NlagSh lJ5el2J 
11* Nfcotet 
25% NICGR 
13 NoblAf 
10% NordRs 
54* NorfkSo 3-40 S0 
8* Noriln 
32* Nerstr 
12* Nonek 
46% NACoal 1.10 1.9 
31* NAPhll 
13* NEwO 
12* NoeSlUK 1 JB TX9 
10* NlndPS 1 J6 140 
40% NoStPw 152 77 
28% NSPwpt 3-60 1X6 
35* NSPwpf 4J6 97 
54* NSPwpf 700 110 
31ft NarTel JO 
3 Nffttat g 
30ft Norrrp 1 JO xa 

8 NwSIW 
32% Norton 200 SA 
21% Narwst 1 JO 7J 
48%Nwstpf XTOelU 
20* Neva J 6m 1.1 
77 Nucor AO S 
3 NutriS 08] 

68* NYNEX 6J0 8J 


11 

24 

7 

9 


72* 8-3 
100 24 


208 1U 6 


.12 S 
3JH IQJ 
-12b 3 


JOB J 


100 10 

!J2* 9 A 


IS 14 16 
A 183 31% 

11 239 15% 

12 SI 19* 

8 358 35ft 

10 1761 33% 

974 11* 

• .S 2 ^ 

21 867 49* 

12 684 a 

a 57 26% 

IS 351 12 
77 269 31% 
1 32 
3 19ft 
19 157 19* 
7 86 25* 

6 263 46* 
.59 3% 
388 26* 

11 194? 22% 

7 7* 

17 47 Z7* 

32 IBIS 12* 

205 52 
74 31% 
3 14% 

a tt* 

176 30% 
17UZ15 
1002 17 
188 10% 
167 41 
25 25% 

364 24* 

lOQz 73* 
M 27% 

8 18 
6 30* 

79 16% 
14 54ft 
5 17% 
12 8* 
3S2 43 
3153 1% 

2821 17* 
100129 
330Z32 
50z 34% 
19 25% 
47 15% 
105 13 
527 28% 

365 13* 
108 14* 
532 68% 

49 12* 
700 45 
101 15ft 
41 57ft 
24 33* 
32 18* 

5 5D2S 15* 
10 1713 lift 

6 235 45% 
1440Z36 

100:46 
400e 63* 
1016 33% 
93 3ft 

9 578 47 

156 9* 

13 1567 37% 
75 1865 24% 

51 52* 
10 325 23% 

12 262 44ft 

29 3* 

7 1349 7B% 


16 

31ft 

15% 

18% 

34* 

32% 

11 

27% 

* 

47* 


10 

26 

5- 

9 

a 


17 


45 

9 

9 


9 

6 

7 

8 
ID 


26 

11% 

30* 

32 

19ft 

18* 

25ft 

46% 

3ft 

26 

21* 

7* 

Z7ft 

12% 

52 

30* 

14% 

Tl* 

30 

15 

17 

9* 

40* 

25* 

23* 

73* 

27ft 

17* 

29% 

16* 

54% 

17ft 

8* 

42% 

* 

17% 

29 

31* 

34% 

25% 

14* 

12* 

a 

13 . 
13% 

68 

12* 
44% 
15 ■ 
56* 
33* 
18* 
14% 
II 

45 
34 

46 
63* 
32* 

3% 

46* 

8% 

36* 

24 

51* 

23% 

43% 

3* 

77% 


ir Month 

High Law stock 


Six Clow 

to. Y1A PE 106s High Low OujI.OT* 


22% 18* 
57 48* 

113 185* 
110% 103% 
29 U, 2D 
34ft 24% 
97ft 71* 
16% 11* 
34 24* 

37 38 

37ft 29 
60% 45 

*25 H 

67* 51 
29% 22ft 
31% a% 
16ft 13 
73* 56 
70 S3 
90 76 

92ft 77 

16* lift 
70 56* 

70 55% 

68* 55% 
a 27 
21* 17 
113 100 

76* 62ft 
70 55* 

26* 21% 
9ft 7ft 
36* 23* 
10% 5* 
17* 12 
33* 26* 
29 22% 

12* 7* 

28% 70 
25ft 73 
12* 8% 
9* 6% 
33* 24 
31% 19* 
36* 23% 
19 13 

37 2Sft 
51* 38* 
14% 10% 


OcdPpf 230 TIJ 
OcdPpf 625 11 J 
ocejppnwo KS 

oedpf 1x02 110 
ODECO 100 


Ogden! 
Oodnpf 
OhElcdl 

QfaEdpf 

OtlEdpf 

OtiEdPfl 

OhEdpf 


4J 

XI 

22 


1JQ 
IJ7 

US 1X9 
150 12^4 
pf 4,44 12J 

" “ >32 

724 114 


17 

17 


8 


OflEdP* 736 110 
OhEdpf 820 1X7 
OH Ed Pi 3JQ 1X7 
Oh Ed pr IS? 12.9 
OhEdpf 120 120 

h|dpf 9.12 110 

hEdPf X64 13.1 
OhEpf TQ4S 11 J 
OhEp! 1X76 110 
OfiMotr AO 33 
OhP pf 801 11.9 
OttPpfB 700 110 
OhP PfC 700 1U 
OhPpfH X79 1X2 
OhP PfG 227 114 
OhP pfF 1400 1X8 
OhPpfE X48 H.7 
OhP PfD 7Jfi 11 J 
OkJaGE 200 90 
OUoG Pf JO 93 
Olln 120 4J 
Omncre 

Qnetdd JO 50 
ONEOK X56 9.1 
OrpnRk X14 X3 
O range J3t SS 
Orton C J6 XI 
OrlonC pfl-12 8J 
Orion P 


16 


Orion pf 

Orion of 

OutbdM 

OvrnTr 

OvShlD 

OwenC 

Oweniii 

Orfbrtf 


50 65 
X75 95 
54 30 
J2 12 
JO 33 
1^0 43 
ISO XB 
M 16 


3 21 
16 54 
106* 
49 106% 
434 23% 

226 30% 
1 86 % 
1839 14* 
310*31% 
3001 35% 
1003 34% 
150154 
15QT56* 
201 64% 
42 28 
18 30% 

a 15* 
TO 70 
1002 M 
902 91 
50x91 
11 12ft 
lOQz 67% 
20050x 65% 
209001 66% 
1 30* 
57 20 
50x109ft 
30x 72% 
3A52DZ 66% 
10 1720 22% 
1702 B% 
13 4220 33* 
131 Aft 
40 13% 
288 2Bft 
329 25% 
112 9% 

31 24% 
509 24ft 
619 10* 
5 

18 29 
261 21% 
73 33 
170 15* 
426 33% 
417 47ft 

a 12ft 


1D6* 

106 

20% 


86% 

14% 

Jl% 

34ft 

34ft 

54 

56* 

64% 

27% 

30ft 

IS 

70 
66 
88% 
91 
12ft 
67% 
65% 
66% 
3D* 
I 


40 

10 

10 

16 


aw 

66% 

72Vt 

8* 

32* 

6 

13* 

27* 


32 


7 

13 

12 

a 

10 

77 


9 

24 

23% 

10% 

7* 

28* 

21ft 

a* 

15 

32ft 

46* 

72% 


21 

54 

106* 

106 

21 

29* 

86% 

14* 

31% 

34 Vi 
54 
56* 
64% 
27* 
30% 
15 
70 
£6 
91 
91 
12ft 
67% 
65% 
66% 
30*. 
20 

T»ft 

72% 

66% 

ZZft 

a* 

33* 

6* 

13% 

a* 

25* 

9 

24ft 

24ft 

10% 

7* 

29 

21% 

22* 

15ft 

a* 

47ft 

12* 


+ W 


— * 

— ft 
+ Vi 

- Vk 


— 1 
+ % 

— 1 


— ft 


+ * 

— Vk 

— ft 

— * 


+2* 


— 1 
— & 

+ ft 
+ * 


+ ft 
—lft 

— ft 


+2ft 


+ ft 
— * 


+ % 
— ft 


+ ft 
+ ft 
+ * 




( 


1 


16 

31% + ft 
15ft 

19ft + * 
35% 

33ft + ft 
lift— ft 
27% — ft 
* 

48ft— I 
223k— ft 

lift — % 
30*— % 
32 — ft 
19ft. 

19ft + Vk 
25ft— * 
46* 

3ft— * 
26 ft 

21*— % 
7* + % 
77% 

12ft— Vk 
52 + * 

31% + * 
14% + ft * 
11*+ ft 
30% + % 
15 + * 

17 — * 
10* 

40W— % 
25* 

23*— ft 
73* + * 
27* + * 
17* 

30* + * 
16*- ft 

54ft 

17% + ft 
8* + ft 
42% — 1 
*— * 
17*— ft 
29 +1 

31*—* 
3416 4% 
25ft— 1ft 
15ft + ft 
12ft— ft 
aft— ft 

13 — % 

14 . + * 
68%—* 
12*— % 
44% 

15 -ft 
56*— * 
33*— ft 
18*— * 
14% — * 
11* * 

45% +* 

34 —1 
46 +3* 

63*— 1% 
33ft 

3*— ft 
46*— ft 
9W.+ * 
36ft— ft 
24ft + ft 
51*—* 
23% — ft 
4J%— ft 
3* 

a — ft 


a* 23* PHH 100 X9 13 a 34% 34 34ft + ft 

47ft 31% PPG 7-60 14 10 437 4fl 44* 45 + ft 

11% 16* P&A jftO X7 16 39 22* 22% 22% 

aft 13* P5ACW ISO 100 S 19 18* 19 + ft 

14ft 11* POCAS 1-54 110 24 14 14 14 

20ft 14ft POCGE U4 1X4 7 4620 17* 17* 17*— * 
46ft 34* PocLlg 322 BJ 13 636 40* 4Q* 40* + * 

33 24% PcLum 1J0 XI 25 6557 39 36% 39 +6 

10 5* PocRes 05e 6 13 119 9 8* 9 + ft 

19ft 13% Poe Rs of 200 11-2 72 17* 17% 17*. + % 

17% 13 PQCSd A0 X9 10 107 13* 13ft 13* + % 

82ft 61% POCTele 5-72 32 8 4631 69ft 66ft 69ft + ft 

IS 9ft PceTln A0 33 7 12 12 12 12 

31* 23% PodfCP 2-32 X3 8 826 78% 27ft 27*— % 

36 30* Podfpf 407 122 29 33% 33% aft— W 

43% 26% PoMWb 00 XI 17 213 29% 26ft 28*— % 

34% 26% PahnWpf 2J5 82 31 27* 2}ft ZF% + » 

39 329b PalmBc 1 JO 15 32 83 34 33* 33* + % 

40% 20ft PcnABk JO 1.9 71 10 36* 36* 36*— ft 

8ft 4 PanAm 3843 7ft 7 7ft + ft 

4 1ft PmAwt 179 2* 2ft 2* + % 

21 13% Pondckn 2D 1A 70 334 lift 14% 14* + % 

41% 32* Ponh&C X30 60 11 2661 34 32* 34 +1* 

8 3% PuntPr 29 1193 6% 6% 6* + * 

19* 13* POPTCft .401 13 969 19 18ft 18ft— % 


12 Month 
High I#* Slock 


SB. . Close 

Dlv, YkL PE lOBsWiLow Quot OW 


IZMonfb 
HtehUNi Stock 


Dtw. YU PE 


IfcKWiLow 


Ck re • 

QuoLCH'ge 


34% 

30 

24* 

a* 

16% 

47ft 

42% 

94% 


16% 

32% 

112ft 

129ft 

41ft 

26 

53ft 

28* 

aw 

7* 

36* 

43% 

24* 

24* 

42% 

20* 

41* 

73 

70 

27ft 

left 

12* 

3ft 

19 

43ft 

11* 

62* 

17 

28% 

26 

20ft 

a* 

30* 

29 

20% 

13* 


24ft 

23% 

15% 

22% 

9* 

32% 

40ft 

93 

17ft 

11* 

25% 

103% 

T23ft 

27* 

7A9i 

26ft 

17ft 

21* 

2% 

aw 

25% 

5% 

16% 

31 

18% 

27ft 


RipBfc I0£ 
RVpBJc pfXU 

RjhCot J2 U 

P.evco JO 3J 
Revere 

Rwtefl 1J4 40 
Revfn wd 
ffvintrfa 

Rudim JO 3J 
Rewird M XI 
RevnlnsljfiO S3 
Revlnpf 

Revln pflX96 1X0 
ReyMtf 100 ID 


RevMpf 2J0 X9 
:k 


40 

13ft 

5* 

8* 

2 

IT 

2* 

7* 

46 

10% 

18ft 

14ft 

15* 

19 

73 

17 

aw 

11* 


Rchvcl 

Rteoen- jm _ 

Rit&Md 31 20 

Rvrdrn 

Robfhw 1.12 X3 
Robtsn 1J0 62 
vf Ratlins 
RochG X20 110 
RochTl# 2-44 6J 

RckCfrn 
Rocflnvl 1.12 XI 
RohmH X20 3 A 
Rohrln 

Roln Cm 00 10 
RoflnE 6 

Roll Ins -46 40 
Roman 

Roper 04 £4 
Rarer 1.12 2J 
Rowan .12 10 
RovfO 1390 S3 
Rovlnt s 
Rubrods 
RussBr 

RusTpg Jd 40 
RyanH 100 3J 
Ryders &o 22 
Rvtond 06 30 
Rymer 

Rymarpfl.17 90 


6 69 2D 

2 

162 aw 

23 516 24ft 
2 277 16* 
15 4133 46% 
11021 46% 
■64 96 
14 9 22ft 

ID 177 14% 
6 72Z7 26* 

1 w* 

1167 129% 
8 105 33* 
121 25* 

2130144 64* 
20 23ft 
807 2% 
116 2* 
36 34 
118 26* 
315 7% 

5 2707x21% 
a .34* 


14 

15 

8 



18* 16ft ™_Ed Pf 2J1 123 


.10 A 
08b 10 


9 

11 

12 

30 


1189 18* 


766 36* 
148 64* 
225 67% 
35 24* 
20 1347 lift 
17 102 IT* 

56 2* 

72 12 
» 17S4 42 
44 1957 7* 

7 4306 62% 
16 ai 13* 

204 27% 
101 16ft 
24 !9Vk 
314 25* 
II 1993 27* 
14 47 22% 

5 . 409 17* 
12% 


12 

10 

ie 


% 
16% 
45% 
45* 

04ft 

'22* 

14 

26 

109% 

129ft 

33* 

25% 

57ft 

a% 

22% 

2* 

33% 

36 

7* 

20 

36% 

18* 

35ft 

64% 

65* 

a* 

10% 

n» 

2 

11* 

39* 

7* 

62% 

13ft 

a* 

is 

18* 

25% 

27 

22% 

17ft 

lift 


If 

0Q 24 10 


22W + % 
2*— % 
33% — % 
26 — % 
7 * + * 
20 — ft 
36*— % 
16* _ 
36* + * 
64*— ft 

67% +1W 
24* + * 
10% —2 
11% , 
2% + % 
Tl%— % 
4IW— % 
7% 

62% +T 
13% 

27 + ft 

10 

19% + % 
25% — ft 
27*+ % 
22ft— * 
17* +1* 
12ft + % 


I 


] 


18* 

19 

BW 


7* Pordvn 


751 8 7% 8 


11% 

1ft 


11% PorkEl 

JOe J 

12 

3 

13* 

13% 

4 PorkDrl 

J» 20 


984 4% 

4 

2Bft ParkH 

1.12 14 

11 

21C 

33ft 

32* 

14* ParkPn 

021 25 

51 

287 

20* 

20 

1% PotPtrl 


2 

143 

2ft 

2 

11% PoyNP 

04 53 

13 

IS 

12 

11* 

13V PavCstl 

.76 7.1 

13 

St 

14ft 

74 

6ft Peobdy 

JO XI 

25 

779 

10% 

W 

fk Pen go 
43* PenCen 


'12 

161 

658 

* 

49% 

% 

48% 


20* +1% 
2*— % 
12 + % 
14*— % 


%- *k 
+ % 


5S% 44* Pennev X36 A9 9 1061 48% 48ft 48% + * 
27* 23 PflPL 156 105 B 545 24* 24% 24* + % 


40ft 30% PoPLbf 440 1X1 
40% 32 PoPLpf 4 JO 1X1 
Wft 40ft PoPLpf 800 123 
29% 74* PaPL drfM2 110 
27% 21ft PaPLdarX90 11 J 
a% 23* PqPL dprX25 11 J 
31ft 26* PoPLdPfX75 1X1 
101 BBft PoPLprllDO 10l9 
109 99 PaPLpr130O 115 

PaPLpr 80Q 1X1 
PoPLpt BJO 1X1 


70* 55 
74% 60 
41% 34 
35* a 


12Bza% 36% a% 
350z37% 37ft 37ft— ft 
5QKa 70 70 

6 28* 28* 28*—* 
52 25* 25* 25*— ft 
4 aw aft 28ft 

B 31 30% 31 + ft 

8260x100% 1D0 100% + % 
fiOtnWft 102* 1D4ft +1* 
6TQZ 67% 66 66 — % 

... 17Dz72 72 72 

Penwft 120 59 12 240x37% Uft 37ft + * 

Penw Pf 100 6J 9x 23* 23% 23* + % 

50 31% Ptfinaol 120 40 20 338 47* 47ft 47% + * 

Tin* 12* PeOPEn 120 74 7 95 16ft 16* 16ft + * 

24* 14ft Pepfivi JO J 19 104 23* 23% 23* 

60% 37* PepsiCo US 30 11 2223 59* 59ft 59* + % 

30* 21* PertcEl J6 20 13 892 25% 24* 24ft— % 
9% 7% Prrrdofi 1.129149 6 
16* 10ft PervDs 

44 31 PetrTe 

28* 24* PefRs 3J20143 

17 14 PelRspf 1J7 90 

6 7ft Pfrinv .90C77J 
53ft 33* Pfl»r 108 XI 14 MOO 47% 47 47* + % 

24 IT* PtielpD 313 20ft 19* 78 — ft 

SB 34 Pheto pr 500 90 9 51* 51 51 

46* 78 PWbrS J4 1J 19 <Z11 35* 35% 35%— W 

16* 12* PftUaEJ 120 1X7 5 7678 14* 14 14 — ft 

37% 30 PhllE pf 408 102 WDz 35% 35% 35% — ft 

U 40tt PMIEpf 700 1X3 4801 52* 52* 52ft + W 


27D 7ft 7* 7% 

702 13% 12ft 13*—* 
100 30 14 233 39* 39ft 39ft— * 
60 26% 25* 76 + ft 

12 16* 16ft 16* 

34 3ft 3% 3ft + ft 


I 


4* 1% Oak bid 436 1* 1% T%— W 

36% 25* OaklteP TJ2 40 12 3 34ft 34ft 34ft *• ft 

35ft S% OedPef* 250 BJ) 9 3672 31ft 38* 31 ft + 

14* 9% OCCJP wt 172 ?3ft 12% 13* +1 

24ft a* OcdPpf 250 1U 3 22ft 221% 22% — ft 


Dow Jones & Company, Inc 


and 




The Oklahoma Publishing Company 


have acquired a subsidiary of Exco International p.l.c. 
which owned approximately 52 % of the outstanding 
common shares of 


Telerate, Inc, 


from 




Exco International p.l.c, 


We acted as financial adviser lo Exco International p.i.c. 


Goldman Sachs International Corp 



September. 1985 


69 53 PhllE pf X75 116 

71% 9% PMIEpf 707 730 
ID* 8% PhllE pf 1 J3 115 
61 46% PhllE pf 7J5 lift 

10* 7* PhllE Pf US T3J 
126 103 Phil bf 17.12 1 42 
T16 97 PhllE pf T5J5 140 

74 57 PhllE Pf 9JD T3J 

Al 47ft PhllE Pf 7 JO 112 
23ft 15ft PhllSub 1J7 4J 12 


1002 64% 64% 64% + % 
60 70* 10% Iff* + * 
153 9* 9* 9* 

50X 57 57 57 

92 9% 9* 9* 

7Qzl20Vz 120% 120W— % 
15Qzl89 108 ID? 

160x 71 70ft 70ft—* 
B50Z 59 - 57% 59 +1% 

42 21ft ZT 21 


95* 73* PMIMr 400 5J 9 7386 75 73% 75 — * 

26* 13* Pm loin 00 20 13 484 23ft 22* 22* — * 

18* lift PfillPfs 100 BJ 8 3820 12* 11* 12% 

24* 22* PhIPt pf 104e 42 2120 24* 24* 24* + % 

3% 20* PhllVH 00 10 12 68 25% 25ft 25ft 

35* 23* FledAS 28 9 9 109 30% 30 30% — % 

34 25* PleNG 2J2 70 11 23 31% 31ft 31% 

25ft if* Fieri 15 3S 22% 21% 21*—* 

63% 38% Pllsbry IJ2 30 13 2864 58* 56* 5BW— * 

34 21% Pioneer 1J4 50 5 193 22ft 21* 22% — % 

26* 13% PkytrEI j08a 0 198 14* 13* 14*— Vk 

45% 29* PltnyB 1 JO 30 11 400 39* 38* 39* + % 


73% 37% SGM 200 X7 17 

12% 9* SLInd 27 L9 10 

32* 19% SPSTec JO 20 13 

19 15 Sabine 34 J 35 

21* 16 SobnRv X50tl3L5 

20* 12ft SMBs JO 1J 16 

12ft 5* SfgdSc 26 

2* 1ft SfgdSwt 

38* 23ft SaflCIns 00 U 21 

34* 24* Safewy 100 53 10 

35 23* Saga J2 2J 11 

23 17* SLiOLP. 1J2 BJ 7 

11* 9% SPaul 108 IQJ 

8* 3* vlSaJOflt 

IS* 24W SotlleM .16 J 15 

54 51 SailMPf 302« 70 

28* 20ft SDieGs Z24 90 8 

9* 6* SJuonB 009100 10 

44 31 Sondr 00 1J 19 

25* 20 SAhltRt 1.94 7J 13 

35* 23* SFeSoP 100 X? 14 

46 30 5graljet 104 30 12 

35* 29% SgtWeJ 1A0 XI 15 

T9* 15ft SotrfRE JO 1-1 46 

72*6 16* SovElP 140 W 7 

12% 10% SavE pf 138 TIJ 

9Vk 5 Savin _ ^ 

13ft 9ft Savin pf 1 JD 11.9 


1537 74ft 

24 11* 
208 29 
160 15* 
132 18% 

J. 1 ! 
81 1* 
124 32* 
1648 30ft 
432 23* 

25 20* 

140 10% 
41 6 

371 32* 

16 52% 
511 25* 
174 BW 
529 36ft 
9b 25 
2225 32* 
1415 43ft 
15 33% 
4 IB 
62 


73 73 

11 % 11 % 
28% 78V4 
15ft 15ft 
18% 18% 
17 17ft 
9* 9% 

lft 1* 
32ft 32* 
30% 30* 
23 23 • 

3% 20% 
10 .10 
5ft 6 
31ft 32% 
51* 52 
25 25 

8* 6* 


— % 
—I* 

— ft 
+ % 
+ * 

— W 
+ % 
+ % 

— ft 

— * 
— % 
— % 
+ % 
— % 
+ * 
— * 
— w 


SS 


-28% 21ft SCANA XU 90 8 
52% 33 SchrPIO 


_. 108 IS. 13 

4SW 33% schbnb 1 JO 15 9 
14* 8 SCiAll .12 10 17 

33 22* Scoalnd JM 13 

61% 52* $cart=*l .90e 10 10 
44% 29* ScofTP 1 Jd 30 10 
16* 12% Scottys .53 40 ID 
45 24ft SeoCnt 02 1 J 9 
13 ID* SeaClPf .106 JJJ 
16* 13% ScaC PfB XI 0 112 
UW 13% SeaC pfCXIO 117 ■ 
27% 17* SeoLnd 08 20 B 
5% 3% SeaCb 

44* 35* Seaorvn JO X0 11 
71% 15% Seagal 18 

32% 22ft SeolAIr 04 10 17 
32* 2Z% SealPw 100 4.1 8 
65% 46% SaortoG 100 1J 18 
0?% 29ft Sears )J6 S3 9 
31* 23% Sec Poes 1 J4 S3 A 
40% 26* SvcCps 08 1J 17 

16% 11* ShOklee 72 &1 21 

26W 15 Shaw In 00 ZB 7 
40* 29% ShefIT X45o 6-3 7 
30 Ui 21 ShelGIo 00 30 5 

40 25% Shrwfn 92 20. 12 

8* 5ft Shoetwn 9 

Id 12 Showfat 00 4J 13 
19* 14* SlwPaC 106 93 9 

41 26* Sirrgar 00 12 8 
33% 27* singrpf 150 100 

18 12ft Skyline 08 35 76 
26ft Tffft Slattery AOe 10 18 
15% 7* Smith In J2 Al 
71* 50* SmkB 280 44 10 
79* 46% Smuckr 108 10 17 
41* 3ift SnapOn 1.16 13 12 
15ft 12W Snyder 200 130 15 
43% 31% Sanat 200 50 8 
19* 13% SonyCb .15e 10 13 
32* 22ft SooUn 1 JO 4.1 24 
40ft 32* SomxC 3-30 8 9 
23ft 16% StcCppC 200 1X9 
30% 23% Soierln 208 90 11 
49% 38% Soudwn 100 22 11 
35 24H SoetBk 12D 4.1 IQ 

9* 6ft SoetPS Xnt3O0 41 
37* 20* S Cal Ed X16 90 7 
23% 17 5otimCo 204 10-5 6 
26ft 20 SoIrGbs 150 74 3 
44 30* SNET1 272 6.9 11 

39* 37 SoNEpf 3J2 9.9 
27ft 22% SaRypf 200 100 
31 24% SoUrtCo 1 J2 &5 

39% 24ft Saatlnd 100 2J 9 
51% 49% SOtfbd Pf 4JD 7J 
16* lift SoRov .12 9 13 

Oft 5* Soumrk J4b 13 4 
51% 47 SamkPf AJBelJJ 
31 16* SwAin .13 0 15 

17* 11% SwtFor 


18% 11* SwtGos 124 IS 7 

ij -8 


90 41% PlbiBPf X12 27 

14% 9* Pllfstn 

21 17 PEonPtn 

17* 8* PtanRs 
lift 7 Piantm 
13* 8% PlOYbOV 

28* 19% Ptosty 

22 12* PbgoPd 


27 78 77ft 78 +1 

733 13* 12V 13ft— ft 
58 19% 19* 19* + % 
2D 12 18 665 16* 16 16W + ft 

.28 9% 9ft 9* + % 

49 Bft 8* 8* + Vk 
3.20* 2D* 20*— * 
181 13 12*12*— ft 


.16b U 11 
12 

04c -XI 13 

00 41 29 ... _ . _ _ 

33* 24ft Poland 100* 12 121 804 31* 31ft 31* 

19* 10% Pondrs 00 J 32 2825 14* 14 14ft + ft 

JO 47 51 17 17 17 

05e 29 26 65 15ft 15% 15% — ft 

7 


456 18% 17* IB — * 
1402103 103 103 
2 23% 23% 23% 

77 377k 33 33% 

28 32* 32* 32*— Hi 
74 34 33* 33* + % 

*29 28% 28 28% + Vk 

5902 44 43 43 —2 

120GZ 40 39ft 37ft — % 


21% 15ft PuPTQl 
22ft 14* Parrec 
21% 15% PortGE ISO 100 
106 91 PoGpf 11J® 1L2 

24* IB* PorGPf 260 1TJ 
35* 30 PorGPf 400 1X3 
34* 29% PorGPf 422 132 . 

38% 3 Patttcfi 1-56 40 13 
34 22* Putin EJ X16 70 9 

46% 36% Pot El pf 450 IDS 

41ft 32ft Pat€l Pf 404 WJ . 

25% 18* Pretnli J6 10 78 104 23ft 22* 23% + ft 

40* 31 Prfmrk 2-20 53 8 46 40ft 39V 48ft + % 

30* 14ft PrtraaC 13 1463 17% 16% 16% — ft 

36ft 16% PrlmMs 09 J 27 348x35* 34ft 34*— % 
5*W 50* PnoctG X60 40 15 1299 56* 56ft 5d%— % 
15 8 PrdRss 21 818 13% 12* 12* + % 

4 7ft 35% Prater U0 33 15 14 39% 39 39% + ft 

2* 2 PruRCn 
8% 8 PruRIn 
74% 17* PSvCal 200 97 9 
21% 16% PSCcripf XID 1D0 
10% 6% PSlnd 1 
26 21ft PSlnof 330 14.1 
9 6V PSfnpf . 104 128 


71 

63 

A3 

6A 


8* 6* PSlnpf 708 1X1 
53 41 PSlnpf 7.15 740 

52% PSlnpf 9 A4 143 
48 PSlnpf 832 148 
49* PSlnpf 8J8 147 
51 PSlnpf X96 147 
Bft 3% PStfNH 
TTA B* PNH PfB 
24% 13 PNH PfC 
22 71% PNH pfD 

22ft 11% PNH PfE 
19* 9ft PNH pfF 
20% 10ft PNH PfG 
29% 22 PSvNM 2J8 107 


168 2% 2 2 — % 

7D 8% 8 8% 

521 20* 20% 20*— % 
24 19V 19* 79*— ft 
1TJ 10 215 9 fl* HW + % 

lOz 24ft 24* 24ft 
TAOz 8* 8% 8% — % 
12902 8ft 8 fift + ft 
2002 49 49 49 — ft 

lDQz 65 65 65 +1* 

100Z 57% 57% 57% — % 
2QZ 57 57 57 +1 

302 61 61 61 

273 7ft 7* 7ft 

7 15* 15ft 15ft 
1 22 % 22 % 22 % 

4 19% 19% 79% — % 
270 2D* 19* 20* + * 
14 17ft 16ft 17ft + V 
47 18* 18* 18* 

299 26* 26ft 26* + % 


32W 24% PSvEG 2J4 1D0 7 3502 27% 26* 26% — % 

14 14 13W 13* 


is 10% PSEGpr 100 ia: 

40% 31 PSEGPf 4L30 113 
48 36* PSEGPf 5-05 113 

73ft 70 PSEGpf B.16 11 J 
20ft 16 PSEG Pf X17 11 J 
63V« 50 PSEGpf 6-30 110 
23* 17* PSEGPf 203 11 J 
71 56* PSEGpf 770 177 

73% 57V PSEG pf 7 JO 110 
69 55* PSEGpf 7J2 11 J 

88 70 PSEGpf 902 113 

4% 2* PubUck 


1002 37% 37% 37%— % 
90002 43* 43* 437k— 1W 
1 70 70 70 —Jft 

4 19% 19% 19% 

2002 58% 58% 58% — % 

17 21V 21* 21V— % 
105 66 66 66 — 1* 

21002 68% 68ft 68ft— ft 
166007 66* 66% 66* + * 
240z 84 84 84 

50 3* 2* 2ft 

5 13* 13* 13*— % 


15ft 9ft PireOFo .16 17 11 

9 A PR Cm 6 2 6* 6* 6* + % 

17 lift ProetP 176 1X4 7 384 14% 14% 14ft 

21V 11 PuUfihtm .12 10 16 2D1 12* 12 12* + * 

*55 061 13 m SfJ 19% ir2 + % 

W4 6* PVTO B 747 6* 6* 6ft 


E 


£5% 

105 

23V 

10% 

34V 

26% 


] 


\Lr 9&/A ?■£ .. rowoo 100 too + % 

lfrji QuokSO JD 40 18 226 20* 19* 20% + % 

6* Quonot 23 34 7V< 7% 7W— Vk 

?7. >-MSJW 349 Z7T* J7VS + 

U*t QklMI J4e 13 152 2Rfe ink + to 


c 


9V 

49* 

40 

112 

38% 

9* 

4* 

19V 

U% 

46* 

9% 

71ft 

7* 

78% 

17% 


JM] 7 

104 25 
150 95 
400 4.1 

105 97 
JO 27 


36 12 


100 23 
14 50 

.44 0 


53* 

lift 

21* 

24% 

16V 

17ft 

12* 

12% 

1ft 

4?fe 

10* 

3 

17V 

49ft 

37V 

57ft 


6% RBlnd 
34 RCA 
29* RCA pf 
79% RCA Pf 
31ft RCA Of 
6ft RLC 
3% RPC 
17* ftTE 
8* RodfCf 
30% Rote Pur 
5% Romod 
16% Ronco 
r% RongrO 
51* Rovcm 
9% Rov mfc 

36V Rarffin 100 3J 
5* RcodSt AO 68 
15 RdBotpf XI2 US 
16V RdBdtpf 3.120180 
11 RlIRcf IJ301X4 
6* RggnEq 
7 Pedmn 
8ft Reece 
% Reoai 
77* ftetchC 
4% RggAJr 
1ft RepAwl 
5* RaGitos 
36 RepNY ... __ 
23 U. RNYpfCll2 110 
53% RNYptA6J4elU 


1 


71 6% 

11 2281 41* 
40= 37 


77ft 

37% 

7% 

3* 

17* 


8 
16* 
3% 


JO 4J 


JO 2J 


JC 

104 


X9 

30 


1 

13 144 

5 

9 32 

JM m 
15 2527 46* 
57 1848 
9 7 

M 795 _ _ 

25 1056 71* 

12 11% 

12 4475 49V 

494 J* 

57 13 
« 16V 
10 4 17V 

14 138 9% 

13 144 7% 

30 2 9% 

, 586 \ 

n 99 37 

4 700 3% 
100 IV 
8 165 7ft 

8 85 45* 

19 V 

20 5S 


6% 6*— % 
40% 41* + * 
37 37 — % 

97ft 97ft +lft 
37* 37ft + % 
7* 7* + Vk 
3* 3* — W 

17* 17* 

13* 13* + 91 

44* 45% — M 
7* 8 
16* 16* , 

3* 3% + % 
69% 70ft— 1* 
11 11 + Vs 

49* 49*— Vk. 
5* 5* + ft 
14* 14*— * 
16* 16V— Vk 
12V— * 


12V 

9 

7 

9% 
% 


I 


35*— lft 
SVk SV4 + (i 
1* IV 
7* 7V + * 
45* 45*.+ % 
26V 27 


88% 63ft SwBeft 600 
29 19* SwEnr J2 XI . 10 

26* 19V SwtPS U8 X3 -9 
17* 11% Sporton 02 14381 
27* 15* SPftCfP 
59 34* Sperry 1.9? X8 9 

43* 35% SnuarD 1 J4 1 52 10 
72* 45 54Uftb 1.76 .16 17 
23* 17ft Staley 08 40 21 
23* 17V StBPitf 06 XB 11 
18% 11 StMatr J2 29 ■ 11 
50* 39* StdOOh 28) LI 8 
23* 9ft St PacCS JO 04 t 
16ft 12% Standex 02 4,1 9 

31* 23* StonWk 104 16 11 
11 W 9% StaMSe UOalU 
3* 2* Steego .12 40 
20ft 15* Starchl Jfi X8 18 
12ft 9* StrJBCP -76 60 9 
34ft 25ft SferlDg 1 JO U 13 
26 15ft SfevnJ I JO SO 
33ft 25% StwWm T0B 65 17 
U 10 5lkVCsf 100 7.5 
45* 37* StanvW 100 4.1 B 
34* 24 StoraC 00 XI 13 
51% 35 StoeShp 1.10 XI 10 
ZTV 16% StarEq L92 1X1 13 
11* 1% vIStorT 
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Gulf States Reach Pact 
On Closer Economic Ties 


Reuters 

RIYADH — Finance ministers of 'the six 
member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council 
have agreed to coordinate monetary policies 
and unify customs duties, it was announced 
Monday. 

Finance Minister Jawim Mohammed. ai-K- 


horafi of Kuwait said at the end oT a two-day 

line with 


— T »uw wiu ui a. inirui 

flacccing nei^ that the agrcemeal ft'as hi line wj _ 
a joim economic accord drawn up in 1981 to 

fora: closer economic finks. 

He did not say if the new accord entailed the 


introduction of a common currency in die m 
suws. which has been recommended in the 
past He said, however, that a coordinated sys- 
tem of customs duties would be applied from 
Jan. 1. The cotutoi includes Bahrain, Kuwait. 
Onnn, Qatar. Saudi Arabia and the United 
Arab Emirates. 


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Germans Bid | For Some U.S. Firms, Smaller Is More Profitable 

V Or tJOntlYkl ?soor ^— ^— | - •; • . .- T KOOf — ssoor — * — — I . 

"**■ w I’ ASJV , Hoechst it / I iCConniHied from Rage I) determine where in their business Ford, which has pared its North competitors by doing less them- 

/‘'tl * , ' 400 ■ : . tflO-MN . . / 400 - /I of business and public policy at systems their greatest competitive American suppliers by about 30 selves. 

V/I | V5/ • / / I Harvard University, .see the trend strength lies and focus their re- percent since the end of 1981. California Steel Industries, a 

v,1 UiLcU i 300 . i goo- ' / 300 - / I “j'bst another dangerous sign that sources accordingly. At the same Lime, the suppliers company that imports steel slabs 

1 • / ■ a / ‘I'm ^ United Stales is consigning it- Xerox Corp. now buys about 20 are being given an unprecedented from Brazil and other countries 

200 A / 200- /\ / 9 oo - a /X. / I ^ ^ tbe eventual role of a second- percent of the electronic parts that amount of responsibility. Ford now and finishes them in plants bought 

.. f A \ / 200 A / \ / ■ rate industrial power that, merely go into its photocopiers; as recently frequently involves them in design- from Kaiser Steel, has just moved 

tj_ , 100- '“' l "'sj f v \ j f I assembles what the Japanese b uild, as 1979, it bought virtually none, ing the parts that they have been into the black, which an integrated 

Jolm Ta gli^h Qg 100 r w 100- ■ Union leaders are also con- Such out-sou icing has enabled Xe- asked to manufacture. A.O- Smith Kaiser Sted had not been able to 

fi> Ser *i<* n ..... ■ I especially about large com- rox to come up with the funds for a Coip^ for example, designed the achieve for several years. ; 

— Last Mav 1 J. f J, 1 .1 I I Ol 1 1 I I I I I I I 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 -1 I parties’ growing practice of buying, new photoreceptor plant and a new engine subframe for the Taurus Firestone today makes money on 

BASF, the West German chemical — — - ™ 78 ,BO *— ,B4 ' 7S ?7a *— M B or “oui-soura^g,” parts, products toner plant, said H. Barry Bebb, a and the Sable, Ford’s newest mid- truck radial tires, unlike three years 

grant, capped a major acquisition “ d They f«r that the Xerox vice presidenL sized cars. ago. RCA Corp., which had a loss 

wTvepy laying out SI billion for an practice will only accelerate the The dismantling of big corpora- That kind of involvement is be- of $575 milhon making and mar- 

Amencan mk and paint maker In- «,»-■ ... „ '. movement of highly paid manufac- lions is also significantly altering coming the rule rather than the keting its own videodisk player, has 

““J? 1 - ’ . j~V_ l0 . DeVv . competitors in Asia, bflesand elcctrooics under attack worldwide recession hit the compa- luring jobs to lower-paying U.S. . the way they are managed. One of exception in other industries as made "very high profits” market- 

tariier this year, Hoechst, anoth- Amenca Eastern Eu- from Japan and the United States, nies hard In 1980-82, they were companies or foreign countries. the most noticeable changes is the wdL ing Japanese-made video cassette 

er industry leader, snapped up Ro- _ the export revenues that chemicals shaken by two di-price shoots and “Out-sourcing is a serious prob- effort to develop closer, long-term Autoworkers at General Motors’ recorders. 

senihal Technik, the technoloev m . c West German oonqjanies re- generate have assume d particular slackening demand. lem in all American industries,” relationships with suppliers, much Rochester products division, in Some companies see marketing 

arm of the Rosenthal potc^uT: . heav Jy involved in bulk significance. Last year, chemicals Now they want to make the most said Donald F. Ephlin, the United as Japanese companies have done. Rochester, Michigan, worked with someone eke’sDroduct as a kev 

S^P- At about the same tW ^ 8X16 accocnted for 15 percent of aD of the rebound. The earnings Amo Worker union’s vice presi- Ford, Xerox and General Elec- company engineers to design an MV to keen Japanese brands out of 

Bayer, the third of Germanv\ heady pace. West German exports, up from 13 growth of 1983 and 1984 already dent in charge of dealing with Gen- trie are among the companies efficient process for making fuel- ^ > ma ^ tc a , least to limit 

chemical giants, announced amhi . Hoe ™ st -y it « largest^ share of percent 10 years ago- has leveled off, but has not era! Motors Corp. sharply reducing the number of injection systems, which GM had inroads The amo industry 

■ t, ®“ Pi, 3 "* to boost its drive into ^ ^• has idea BASF ’ Jay® and stopped. After posting an average Virtually evoyone agrees that suppliers they do business with, been buying exclusively from out- may have created the biggest stir by 

the U.S. pharmaceuticals market 10051 ° eaV ^ y .“J t ^* at - dirBC ^ Hoechst moving in sneb different sales growth of 13.7 percent in this corporate disassembling helps even as they buy more parts from side suppliers. adopting this tactic, but it is hardlv 

including the construction of « Ba y=r, regarded l^r many as directions is ironic in that the three 1984, the companies reported an explain the huge increase in divesti- outside vendors. They want to While it remains to be seen the odv one embracina this siraie- 

m u 1 timillion-dollar research centm- 106 “ . ****» bas also companies share identical roots, average gam of 1QJS percent in the tnres. There were 900 last year, make themselves more important whether this kind of worker am- ev 

in ConnecticuL btovedmto specialty jffoducts, but They were all founded in the late first six months of this year. with a market value of $29.4 bil- to ihdr suppliers, thereby increas- tude spreads to other industries or *■ ' 

West Ger man y*; three _? st foct ^ 4d Jts ««gies on 19th centuiy by German chemists Bayer, with the largest sales vol- hon, according to W.T. Grimm & ing their leverage with suppliers. fades away as out-sourcing grows, 

chemical company also toe' lls P^ 11 foundering who developed organic dyestuffs tune in the first half of this year, Co., which specializes in mergers “We realized that we bad to be- one thing is already dear: Compa- 

world's three largest until 1981 tt? . e big Agfa-Gevaert fox nourishing textile mills. said earnings before taxes rose 16 and acquisitions. come a preferred customer,*' said nies are reaping bigger profits, de- I STOCK U5S USS 1 

when Prvnt AAAni v n' • pnoiO-mvisiOD. ■ Between ihe two world wars, lhe oereenr to nf MS ll also helms emlarn the crurrPm Nicholas Scheele. the director of vdooinp nroducts faster and male- I rw,v/r U >.n A ik A ; n - R 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1985 


Page 13 


$500 


Profits of West Germany’s Largest Chemical Companies 

Ntt income m mOUrns of dofai, tranalataa ftom mfte acunwi exetenga re» 


A luuucers 

By John Tagliabue 

Vph- Yortc TtmZSemn 



$500 


SS00I 


Hoechst 0 




cals! to sew 


the only one embracing this strate- 

gy- 


come a preferred customer,*" said nies are reaping bigger profits, de- 


STOCK. USS USS 

DeVoe-Holbein 

International nv 6% 796 

City-Clock 

International nv 276 376 

Quotes ad of: September 30, 1985 


For the last two years thrv haw ^ has bucked slave labor during World War II second largest, repented a 373 per- and foreign companies. And it 

enjoyed their biceest earninoc iae . speodmg freely for and produced gases used in Nazi cent earnings increase, to $603 mil- makes finding a solution to the re- . 

boom since the mid-l 97(k t aopnsioons that are not far extenmnation camps. Allied occu- Hon, more than three rimes the rate cord trade deficits all the more dif- f/in/rn T vlmivi rr 

ihdr UJS. conn Lern artt wh removed from the commodity nation powers broke up LG- Far- of revenues, which were up 11.9 ficulL qjQJjQTV XilOC/XlMsiric 

staggering under the comWi^S cb ? mc ^ bn^iess. ben after the war, and divided its percent, to $8.4 billion. Hoechst, UA manufacturers may moan . ^ 

burdens of the su-nn? bard cm the heels assets among five companies. No. 3, said earnings jumped 11-5 about the mounting competitive (Confirmed from Page 9) * there was only thin investor inter- 

foreign competition mid weakSSSt ? ^ 'SJ 5 ® 1 -? 1 T nm ? n t . Ba ? a > BA ® F Hoechst re- percent, to $577 mfflion. on a 7 J threat from Japan, South Korea or total to 14, while eight have applied esL 

/-> weakenmg don, BASF paid an estimated$100 caved the mam shares. Today, the percent sales rise: to S7.8 bullion. Taiwan. Yet the proliferation of *r.L. » — i., E 


2 % 376 


recent 


demand, the West (ri»rm»n7^™r D< -^ estimated $100 caved the mam shares. Today, the percent sales rise, to $7.8 billion. Taiwan. Yet the proliferation of OT said rhev will apply ® ul t b ree weeks ago morning 

nies have available mniTai COffl ^ a " £ Qfihon for a Monsanto plant in three together outsell the combined Still, the warning lights are depe ndab le, cost-efficient suppli- . . sales of foreign shares hit a record 

However menvJ^f northeast England that produces cbeimcal companies of any other blinking again. ers in those countries is driving . 15 ® reversal of the trend 2.8 million, compared with a full- 

vere stiimn'nf products for the man- European country. For one. thing, there is a petro- down the price and driving up the . 0Win S t b? opening of the for- day average of only 1.6 million in 

still vivitTand Wr« w 6, nylon and acrylic fi- Each of West Gennany's big chemical industry growing rpthe quality of parts. stock division ml 973. Six of 1954 Average daily value runs 

fhree an.Vmhartr4nc.^?Tn 1 ^ S bere. The purchase of that plant three has tried to keep a stable of Gulf. For another, much of die And that development is riving V? co mp anies listed withdrew over around 3 billion yen, a third the 
acouisitinne ati w £J > !?.. i ?i j m 4kes BASF the world’s largest diversified c hemicals , but each has recent recovery was fueled by an UJS. companies much more fieri- . L bf 5C foUowmg years and the daily value of domestic stocks trad- 

Trtrticularlv in a ^ roa< ^ producer of acrylonitrile, which is been heavily invested in commod- export boom that was a result of biiity in deriding which parts, or 10 a low of 10 last ed in the second section. 

ns ®^ l ma ^ ce synthetic fibers. lty chemicals. the increased strength of the Japa- entire products, for that matter, ^ ay w b en Sperry Corp. withdrew. “People used to be uneasy about 

$8 billion. 53165 airea °^ near . Although few analysts are peg- The combined impact of compe- nese yen and the dollar against the they should make themselves and Companies said it cost 10 million foreign things, but this indicates a 

n,_ , , .. .... 8* n S acrylonitrile 'as a stellar tition Erom oil- rich nations and the Deutsche mark. which they should buy: They can yen a year to maintain a listing and more open attitude," Mr. Oda said. 

me goal of the buying binge; To growth product, most sav that! — 1 

entrench themselves tn areas that BASF has positioned iiself to make [ r = = = 

hwd promise of growth, and thus the most profits from iL 
gird againa downturns. “The idea is that if you are in the 

While that goal pervades the game, then be the biggest player," 
strategies .or all three companies, said Howard Coates, the chief 

their tactics to achieve it differ, chemical analyst at the London y-y-v-v • • -4 a 

Analysts and industry officials say stockbrokeragc of deZoete & Bev- \\/T I A 1 

g&sgs working in partnership 

with r herit^ or ^11 n^ition^ 

Wolfgang Munde, executive direc- diate chemicals, might yet turn out W A ^r ■* " * " XLO V_xJL CtXX A ICtLl V/I. 

tor of the Cbeimcal Industry Asso- the highest winner with the greater . j 

riation. “It's in their strategies that gamble* m 9 

th of re tteS 0 ifo^^o rai \Umi i ivj Krincrc iTc tni 1 If tt^lp 

IMU111UJ.CI Ui 11 lblo llo lllLllllUlC o llCi 1 

recent years, industry wisdom in. sidiaries, the firms already do an - -5- 

the United States and Europe has. Average 70 percent oftheir business | • # l* 

been to stress specialty chenncri outside West Germany. 4 m ^\. 4/* 'if <4^% m ^ 

products, like ^ pharmaceuticals -oi*' With boaLsjeel and other mq'or I ■ 1 I | J I | f f 1\/ If I I I 1 C/ 

new plastic materials, -leaving the smokestack industries ^in the.dol- A M Ml I . L/L\y w I 1 I I yL 

production ^of cheap bulk dram- -drums; "ind sectors- like riitomo- : | C J 


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_ Cl9U 

HWffl LOW BlO ASK 

SUGAR 

Sterling per metric ton 

Od 1XM0 131.00 N.Q. N.O. 
Dec 140*0 137.20 14040 I4fl*0 
Mar 15000 14 6*0 14020 '48.40 
May 15300 1»W 152 JO 152*0 
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Od N.T. N.T. 164*0 1*5 40 
volume 2,160 Jots off 50 ions. 
COCOA 

Sterling prr metric ion 
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DOC 1.788 ljm 1 .705 1J07 
Mar 1*» 120* 1*16 1JBI1B 
MOV 1*44 1 JU2 1*40 1*43 
JlV 1*5« 1*4? 1*50 1*52 
Sod 1-657 1*45 t*5? 1*54 
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1*00 


1444 

1*W 

1.725 

1.760 

1.765 

1*20 


1*30 1*35 
1*76 1J7B 
1.715 1.718 
1.743 1.744 
1.7«0 IJ*5 
1.780 1AT0 
1J70 1*00 


volume. 1.915 >ot& of C ions 
GASOIL 

U3. dollars oer meliic Ion 
OCt ?W_5C 260 55 24150 763 -75 2*200 2*225 
Nav 260 25 256.50 2S&30 2».?5 258-50 258.75 
Dec 255.75 253 00 2$425 2S430 254 *0 254.75 
Jan 252-50 250J5 251.75 252*0 251 25 251-50 
Pen 24825 347.00 3*7.75 24625 2*725 247.50 
Mar 340 30 24030 34030 242.00 24030 74030 
API 336*0 733.75 24330 23530 233.75 £1430 
MOV 732 00 23130 238.00 33330 230*0 731*0 
Jutl 22**0 22730 22730 228*0 227.00 231*0 
volume: 2361 lots of in tons. 

Source* ■ Reuter* and London Petroleum Ex- 
change (vcscti*. 






Sept 30 




Close 



High 

LOW 

■id 

Ask 

Cb’n 

SUGAR 






French francs pot matrftc ion 



Oec 

1320 

1*02 

1*05 

1*14 

-17 

Mar 

1334 

1*13 

1*21 

1*23 

— 10 

MOV 

1*6 

1*46 

1*46 

1*55 

— 15 

Aug 

1300 

1300 

1*90 

1.500 

— 10 

Oct 

NT. 

N.T. 

1330 

1*40 

— 5 

Dee 

H T. 

N.T. 

1365 

1385 

— 7 

EsL voi. 

1300 tots ol 50 tons. Prev. actual 

safex: 1 ,492 lots. Ooen Inieresl: 18370 


COCOA 






French franc* per 180 Kg 



Dec 

2*37 

2*20 

2*29 

2*30 

+ 6 

Mar 

2*58 

2*50 

2*58 

2*59 

+ 5 

May 

N.T. 

N.T 

2*80 

__ 

13 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N T. 

2*fe 

M 

+ 15 

Sep 

N.T 

N.T. 

2-100 

— 

+ 15 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2.100 

— 

+ 15 

Eif voi. 

65 fofs of 10 

tons. 

Prev. actual 

sales.- 57 lots. Open inleresl . 648 


coffee 






French francs per 100 kg 



Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1*42 

1*70 

+ 15 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1*90 

1.9» 

+ 20 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.935 

1*65 

+ 10 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.955 

1.900 

+ 7 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.900 

_ 

+ » 

Sea 

N.T. 

N.T- 

2*04 

— 

+ 40 

ESI, voi.: 

0 Jois off 5 tons. Prev. actual sales: 

y> lots. Ooen iniemi . 319 
Source. Bourse da Commerce. 




Ijondon Metals 


Sqx.30 

Ci4tt Prtvfout 

BM Ad Bid UK 

ALUMINUM 
5lirllnp per metric ton 
5«>r 6*5*0 6*6*0 692*0 6*230 

Forward 717*0 718*0 714*0-71430 

COPPER CATHODES fHM Grade) 

Sterling per metric tea 
Spot 941*0 962*0 96130 96250 

Forward 98730 9JJL0Q 98730 980.00 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Starting per metric von 
Snot 944*0 946*0 949*0 951*0 

Forward 973*0 975*0 971*0 973*0 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric Ion 
Spot 276*0 276*5 27730 77130 

Forward 28530 28530 284*0 28630 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric ton 
Spot 3100*0 3110.00 3080*0 3090*0 

Forwaro 310*0 315000 3100*0 3iQS*0 

SILVER 

Pence «r tray ounce 

Spot 429*0 439*0 431*0 432*0 

Forward 442*0 441*0 44330 444*0 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric Ion 
Spot 8715*0 8720*0 8625*0 8630*0 

Forward 8660*0 0665*0 8570*0 8580*0 

ZINC 

Sterling pgr metric ton 

SPOl 472*0 474*0 460*0 461*0 

Forward n«a no na no 

Source: AP. 


Cash Prices 



IlSrFutares 


Open Htah LBif Claw Om. 


Food 


30 

Ttar 


8636 Mar 2 


Commodity and Unit - - 

Coffee 4 San vas. to ■ — 

PrifTtcrom 64/to 39 ya — 

Steel Dll lots t Pin. Mon 

iron 2 Fdrv. PhHo- fcw 
Steal scran no 1 twy Pin. - 
Lead Soot, lb — . 

Copper cieci- ft 

Tin cStrairsff. d> - — 

Zinc E. Sf. L. Basil, tt 

Palladium. Ol ■■ 

Silver N.Y-.OZ .. 

Source. AP 


Mon 

133 

041 

*73*0 

213*0- 

77-78 

19-20 

6*49 

6.108V 


SepL Jft 


133 

8» 

473*9 

213*0 

86-87 

23-36 


Htatl Low 


open High Law dose Cha. 


Grains 




93-95 




Jul - 2*8 


ConmMfihies 


Esf. Safes Prev. Sates 8*11 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. 33.173 UP 1*17 

CORN (CBTI 

S*oo hi mJnintufit- doff tars per bushel 
295 2.14 V* Dec 22M 226 


2*6 2J6U 

109 —i*2 




S7*. JO 


SINGAPORE GOLD. FUTURES 
U.S4 per ounce 


110 

asm 

2*6 

2J5'4. 
2.74 fe 
Esf-Sdfc 


224% 

2J) 

233 

134Ui 

220^ 


Mar 2*»M 36% 
May 23*1* 24? Vi 
Jul 241 2*4% 

SeP 223% 236 
Dec 229% 233 
Mar 

Prev. Soles 16365 


222% 224* 
23K 225% 
2381* 2404* 

241. 2*» 

233% 2K% 
22916- 2*108 
241% 


+* 21 * 

+*Z» 

+*2% 

+* 2 % 

+*2*fc 

+*3 


Prov. Dav Open 1rtff.121.M2 UP 580 


FOREIGN & COLONfAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

W1CE5 AT 25«>.tfr 
A: US. DCUAK CASH SIO^S 

0. MUOTCURRBSiCY CASH ST Hi 

C. DOLLAR BONDS SI 153 

D= MULna/fRENO' bot jds sn.95 

E: STUUNG ASSET EUJM 

FGGSGN & CGiONAL 
MANAGEMENT UB2SEYT UMTTS 1 
U MUICA5TEP STREET STHEJEP JS^V ,G 
7H.- OSJASGJI TELEX -iiSSOU 

FOR OTHER F & C FUNDS, SEE 
INTERNATIONAL FUNDS LIST 


Dhklemb 


ScpL JO 

Company Per Ami Pay Rec 

INCREASED 

Asamoro Inc 5 .10 11-1 10-17 

INITIAL 

Groff industries S 05 10-25 10-15 

STOCK SPLIT 
Golden Enterprises — 4-for-3 
USUAL 




Treason'' 



Prev. 
High low 

Ocl N.T. N.T. 

Dec 330.40 3304* 

Feb « N.T. N.T. 

Volume: 60 toffs off 100 at. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cents per kilo 





Sept. 30 

■ 

Offer 

BM 

YMtf 

if 

3-won fh 

7*2 

7*0 

. 7*3 

7*6 

6- month 

7*3 

7*1 

7J8 

7*0 

One year 

7.41 

7*0 

7.96 

7.99 

Source: Salomon Bremers 





Bid as* 

Oct : 181*0 18200 

Nov 18250 18330 

Dec 18430 18530 

Jan . m ■ 185*0 1U*0 

Feb 186*0 1B8-00 

Mar 18730 18930 

Vohrme: 0 tots. 

5INGAPORB RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kilo 
Close 


Central Hudson O&E 
Coma Care 
Curtice Burns 
EECO Inc 
Frisch's Pesl 
Grace me 
Homesfahe /Mining 
MulHbork Flnci 
Paclf/c Tefesls 
Pexhom Cora 
Texas Inslrumenis 
Thunander 
UVd Virginia Bkshrs 

CHBimuoIr m-monthly, 
mmisal 

Source: upi. 


Q J4 

G *8 
O JO 
Q *8 
O *5% 
O .11 
O *5 
Q .16 
O 143 
Q 17% 
O 30 
S .05 
Q 41 


1M 

11-21 

10-30 

12-1 

10- 91 

n-6 

11 - 18 
10-18 

71-1 

12-2 

10-28 

10-21 

10-30 


10-10 

10-31 

10- 13 

11- 11 
10-9 

10- 9 

11- 4 
10-10 

10- 7 

11 - 1 
10-7 

10-10 
10- V0 


DM Futures 
Options 

W. German Atart-J2£40 nsrtecm&oernvrt 


ft 55 1 Oct- 
R5S 1 Nov_ 
RSSZOct — 
ftSSJOd- 

R5S 4 Oct 

RSS 5 Od — 


Bid All 

V5830 159*0 

162*0 16225 

150JS 1S1J5 

14BL75 149J5 

144.75 146J75 

139.75 V41J5 


Settle Settle 
326*0 32840 

330*0 332-70 

335*0 337*0 


Previous 
BM AS* 
T7B30- 18030' 
182*0 183*0 

1BCB0- 185*0' 
10430 18530 

18530 ’■ 18730 
187*0 189.00 

* j 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
16030 ; .16130 
16130^ 162*0 
15130 15250 

1WD 35030 
14530 14730 

14030 14230 


Est. Sains Prev. Safes 4.115 

Prev. Day Open Ird. 20371 0ttl766 

ORAMGR JUICE (NYCE3 
15*00 Ibs^ cento per lb. 

181*0 12740 Nov 134*0 13JJH 1*3*0 ] XLZS 

180*0 13330 Jan mjo JJloo uvb 

177 30 123*0 • Mar 129*5 T29J0 mSQ 129*0 

16230 12225 MOV 12&3S 12&90 128*0 M 

15730 122.90 Jul _ 1Z7J5 

Est. Soles 750 Prwv.Soha *17 . 

P tev. Day Open InL 4472 up120 




[■FiV] 

«.■ | < /iTTil 




3981 Mm- 


J300 ’ -7™ .Sep 
e*t. Safes ms fw.Salg^ 

Prev.Gov Open lilt. -A916 ott47 
FRENCH FRANC (IMMJ 


Ik. f I 


i B ^ r k 1 1 M A',' 


J255 J7S7 




1 1 1 IMJ 




1,1 V 1 r i mm 




:f i - r ' *»4 ' W ’ i' i T ’r ^4 


q-auarteriy; s-semL 


StrAe 

Calli-Settfe 

Sept. 30 | 

Puts-SetUe 

Price Oec 

Mar Jon 

Dec 

Mar 

Jon 

34 2*1 

174 129 

038 

0.96 

1.17 

37 US 

217 173 

0*6 

Ui 

134 

38 0.92 

148 124 

UB 

1*1 

— 

3? 038 

U7 1J2 

282 

237 

— 

« 036 

0.06 1*3 

n*L 

— 

— 

Estimated fetal voL n a 

Cans: Frl. vol 5*84 open int. 24*54 
Puis : Fru voL 833 am btf. 71*24 



Source: CME. 





NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL .MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 

OCTOBER 15. 1985 

FIDELITY 
PACIFIC FUND S.A 


Incorporated Under the Lwi of fanama 


Plcovc lako noiicc ihui the Annuul Gcncml 
Mce/iro S hjrc*hL>IJ'.Tv < ^ R/ciric Fund 

S. i the ■CnrpoMiM»n'i uill lake pfjee .ti 

\!/0 p.nL j: I he C* vpnniii««n a 5 principal of hor. 
?cmhn>kc Hull. Pembroke. Bi.-rniud;i i*n Ociohcr 
13. 

Thtf follniMn^ m.nicrs arc «»n the agenda h*r ihis 

Mcdim*. 

1. Elccic *n 1 4 seven i^i Dinrcrurs. specifically ihc 
rc-electi* »n * A jll presenr Directors. Mcbsr*. 
Edw-arJ C. Johnstjn VJ. VVilliam L Bsmc^. 
Charles A Frj^cr. Hisashi Kun.+au^. 

John M. S. Patriin. Harrs G. A. Severe mian anil 
James E. T*«nncr 

2. Review i if rhe Kil.inee sheet jnJ pn-ifii and loss 
ajiemcnr f»»r the fiscal war ended Mjs ^1 . 
1^3. 

3 - Rati ftcjt inn of the actions taken hi the 
Direct* »rs since ihe previous Annual General 
Meetmi: 

4. Kaiiric.'i ion & -f the acn*«n.s i.iken h% the 
Juvesi/Tvenf Alanaiier sjnee the previous Annual 
General Mceiine 

5. Ci 'Usideraf n.Ki *»f such other business us nu> 
properly c*»me before the niLX‘ima- 

Holders of reeisiercd shires m.iy vote Is prosy h\ 
m jiline a f» 'rm Reexsiered ShurehokJers Pnssv 

ohiained from ihe Corporations Principal Office 
in Pembroke. Bermutla. »vr from the companies 
listed Mow. to i he Corporation aff the folk-win^ 
address; 


Fideliiv PaeiHc Fund 5. A. 

RO. B»’n *70. 

Hamilton ?. Bermuda 

Holders ol hearer shares may vole by proxy by 
mailme a form of Ceruficaie of Depiisit and a 
fi.irm ot Bearer Shareholders Proxv obtained from 
the Coqvirations Principal Office in Pembroke. 
Berinuda. or from the companies listed below, to 
the Corporation at RO Box b70. Hamilton 5- 
Bermuda. Ahemarively. holders of hearer shares 
wishinu iv exercise their rights personally ai the 
Meet ini! mav Jepiisit with the Corpora ion the 
certificates (i*r their shiux?i or u Certificate of 
Deposit thenrli >r prior to ihe Meetitik;. 

All Proxies (and Ceriificates or Deposit issued to 
hearer shareh«jlderM must v x: received by ihe 
CntpomtHm n«'t later than Jill pan. un October 15. 
W'. in orJer 10 he effective at the Meeting. 

Bv Order of the Board of Directors 
Charles T. M* Cufik 
Secretary 

The Bank of Bermuda Limiieil 
From Sireef. Hamifroti. Bermuda 

Fidel tty International Management Limited 
2? Lovat Lane. 

L<.>rffdrm EOR ^LL. England 

Bjnk Julius Baer i. Co. 

Bahnhofsirasse 3h 
SO 22 Ziineh. Switzerland 

hredicthank S.A. Luxemboutgeoise 
43, Boulevard Royal. LuxemK^urg 


FIDELITY RVCIFIC FUND 

The Fund ainii f* »r consistem long term capital growth from -t diversified pu»t 1 folio invested in the Pacific 
with empluisr. «.»n Japan and ihe USA. The Fund is currently invested in Japan ipb.a^.i. USA 
i Hung h*mg t?.7"-i. \usirjlu fl .» and Cush H.Z 'o. The Fund w^rs bunched on Urh December 

l'4h l * ai ihe Nhiirc price of Sw.Ji The Fund was valued at S13t»m ji ihe share pnee of S144.57 on 
2^1 h August |Nh3 

Ci'piesof the 1 if ferine CircuLir and latest Qiuuierlv Report eon be obtained Irom Fiilelity Intemuikmal at: 

Ri i. Bus hTil. Pembroke Hull. n &«nd Street. 

Fast Bn Midway Pembroke. St. Helier. 

H.imilron. Bermuda. Jersey. C.l. 

T^-P ».vi*h 7c h fihh5 Tel: «I.W t 7hWi 

Teles i CM I a ^1>» Tele » : AjTad 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM Ol L 
Makmhui rtngglts per 25 tont- 

• Ctosa Prev tan • 

BM Ask BM Ask i 

Od 680 730 700 740 

Nov TOO 750 720 760 

Dee - 720 760 720- 770 

JOrt 730 770 720. . 770, 

F«b 710 760 TV5 7*5 

Mar 700 750 710 760 

Mav TOO 750 700 750 

Jly 690 740 700 750 

Sep 690 740 690 740 

Votome: 0 loll of 25 ton*. 

Source: Reuter*. 


3 U.S. Companies 
Accuse Japanese ’ 
Of Dumping Chip 

The A Honored Pros 

SAN JOSE, California — Three 
major U-S. semiconductor compa- 
nies Tiled an anti-dumping petition 
Monday against allegedly "preda- 
tory” Japanese practices. 

Advanced Micro Devices .Inc., 
Intel Corp. and National Semicon- 
ductor Corp. — three of. tbrfive 
largest U.S. semicon d uciopcompa- 
nies — announced the action at -a 
news conference. The memory 
chips are called EPROMS — -eras- 
able programmable memory com- 
ponents. 

Japanese companies that' make 
and export a type of memoqrchip 
crucial in sophisticated computet 
function were named in the peti- 
tion to the U.S. Commerce Depart- 
ment and the UJ>. International 
Trade . Commission. Among -the 
Japanese companies named were 
Fujitsu, Mitsubishi Electric. Co. 
and Hitachi Ltd- Japan's leading 
EP ROM producer. .. . 

The petition argued that the Jap- 
anese companies "are selling goods 
below cost, and pleaded for protec- 
tion against the imports by imposi- 
tion of countervailing dudes. 


Both Boards Approve 
General Foods Merger 

NEW YORK (UPI) — Philip 
Morris Cos. and General Foods 
Corp. announced Monday that ihe 
boards of directors of both compa- 
nies have unanimously approved 
the merger announced last week. 

Under terms of ihe agreement. 
Philip Morris, the tabacco and bev- 
erage giant, will acquire for S120 
per share all of the stock outstand- 
ing of General Foods. The merger 
is valued at SS.7 billion. 


21.K 

+.T3 

2131 

2130 

+J1 

+34 

21*7 

+J0 


+30 

22*1 

+.16 


+.15 


+.W 

22*0 



rax 41.40 Dec 

7oan sue Jm 

<7.90 <2S5 Mm T 

stm asm mov 

fr*_ 2P iui 

Sep 6130 61*0 
EASota Prev. Safes 24*1 

Prev. Day Open lift 77*90 off 500 

ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

40*00 tbs.- cents perl*. 

Od « 


6130 


<BW 

6290 

6125 


45*5 JUl 


60.15 

> 60*5 


! 60.10 

rrrr 

l 80*5 

S' ' r 1 

6055 

6U0 

1 SU5 

61.10 

1 61*0 

pJkL' 

6Z35 

mm - -X’' 1 

yam >>' 


6130 61*0 


tfbLir-, 


4160 +75 


Industrials 


4435 +70 


46.10 + 


46*0 +■ 

4835 +70 


4930 +70 



U* C i/I 


JLvL‘ J ] 


L ; P,' < J 

jfl 

1 '^. y.|ii 


Livestock 


.vJ. i 1 

v77T«^T7i] 


5425 






TLE^iTTWiT 


41.10 38*7 OCt 40*0 

4930 3837 Dec 4030 

Esff. Sales 6775 Prev. Sales 4775 
Prev. Dav Oaen Int. 18783 off 194 

PORK BELLIES (CMC) 

38*00 Rxs.-mtspcr to. 

76*0 5575 Fe* 61.15 6145 

7530 035 MOT 6125 63*0 

7530 57*5 May 6245 64*5 

76*0 57 JO Jul 6235 6572 

7215 5530 Aug 62*0 6370 

EsL Sales Prev. Sales 2392 

Prev. Dav Goan inff. 4.120 off 2286 


4117 4190 +35 


4050 4135 +1*5 


6090 4145 +2*0 
61-20 63*0 +2*0 
6230 64*5 +138 
6160 6570 +1.95 
6130 6170 +135 


—165 

—135 

—135 

—135 


; Vi 




30130 Dec 


327J0 —5*0 
33130 —530 


Rabobank Nederland, 
now with abranch office 

in London. 







« 

Stpt.27 


l PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 




Option A Strike 







Underlying Price 


Calls— Last 

Pots— Last 



Dec 

Mar 

Jim 

Dec 

M or Jna 

12300 British PDuods-cents per unit. 




B Pound 130 

11.10 

r 

r 

1*4) ' 

r 

r 

1 135 

7*0 

r 

r 

3*0 

r 

r 

140 

5*0 

r 

r 

5 JO 

r 

r 

145 

110 

4*0 

r 

r 

10*0 

r 

150 

1J0 

r 

4*0 

r 

r 

r 

155 

D.90 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

50Jm Canadian Mtois-ceitfs par orvff. 




CDollr 72 

r 

r 

r 

025 

r 

r 

74 

0*3 

r 

r 

r 

1*0 

r 

C23M Mfest German Mertcs-oaats per lmtt. 




DMortt XI 

461 

5*7 

r 

r 

r 

r 

34 

3*5 

4J» 

r 

021 

r 

r 

35 

r 

332 

4*4 

r 

r 

r 

36 

2.15 

231 

r 

0-63 

r 

r 

37 

133 

2*5 

r 

s 

r 

r 

r 3a 

1*8 

1*6 

r 

131 

s 


39 

071 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

125*00 French Fra* 

tcs-ieths of o cent per unit 



FFranc 115 

8.10 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

6,250*00 Japanese Ycn-100tks of a cent net 

r tmIL 



JYen 40 

r 

r 

r 

003 

r 

r 

41 

4-72 

5*0 

r 

r 

r 

r 

42 

150 

4*4 

r 

r 

022 

r 

43 

2JS 

r 

r 

027 

r 

r 

44 

2*0 

271 

3*5 

S£ 

r 

r 

! 45 

1*0 

229 

r 

r 

r 

46 

1.1B 

1*8 

r 

r 

r 

r 

61500 Swiss Francs 

-cents per unJL 





S Franc » 

r 

1071 

8 

r 

r 


40 

5.90 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

42 

4.12 

r 

r 

029 

r 

r 

43 

3*0 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

44 

2*7 

330 

r 

r 

r 

r 

45 

1.98 

2*5 

r 

128 

r 

r 

46 

130 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

Total can vet 1 *13 


Call open lot. 166*37 

Total pat voL 

971 


Pat 

open Inf. 1U262 

r — Not traded, s Mo option offered. 




Last is premium i purchase price 1. 





Source.' AP. 








39450 369*0 Jllfl 

Auo v • ■ 

ESf. Soles 30*00 Pm.SM* 5JW 
Prev. Day Open lnt.124779. off 1725 


Financial 


US T. BILLS UMM) 

SI million- pis of 100 pet. 

93*7 8577 Dec 92*4 92*1 9277 9230 

V23D 8630 MOT 9240 9237 9240 9237 

9132 87*1 Jllfl 92*6 92.19. 92*8 9219 

92*1 8am Sep 9177 9178 9177 9178 

9178 89*5 DOC 9147 9153 9144 9133 

91*3 9030 Jun . 91*0 

Esl. Safes Prev, Sales 3302 1 

Prev. Day Open Int. 33JK9 off L2A) 


+JD 
+*6 
+*5 
— *1 
+JEJ6 
■ +J06 


• Stack Indexes 


5P COMP. INDEX ICMK1 
polntsand cents 

290*5 • 175 J 0 Dec 1*2*5 1KU5 JUTS 182*0 4-JO 

20375 BE? - SS A*S2S‘ 18350 1B430 +J0 

aiASO '^i nsh jm • *rr 

-Pfwv.-Dcnrtteeolntr 53360-off 168 : 

VALUE UNC1KCBTI 
points and cents 

21220 18575 Sep 18930 1*975 18849 189*1 -49 

237*5 188*0 ' Dec 19210 19135 16925 19070 -30 

20940 192*0 Mar 19250 TO50 19200 19230 —30 

EsL Sates Prev. Sales 596 

Prev. DarGpen Int U365 atf277 

NY5£ COMP. INDEX CPfTFE) 
paktfe and cents 

117 JB 10120 DOC 10575 106*0 105*5 10570* +JD 

11875 10530 MOT 106^ 1JBM 1D6J0 106*1 .+m 

120*0 10670 JUft - 108*0- lfl&40 10730 108*0 ; +70 

108*0 .186.10 Sep 109.15 109.15 10f.l 5-TWJJ +J0 
esf.Safes 9,141 Prev. Sales >11118 
Prev.DarOBCfilnL 7237 ... 


105*5 10570* . +JD 
10630 106*5 .+m 
10730 108*0 ; +J0 
10f.l5 - WJJ +J0 


Commodity Indexes 


Cta* 

WVoodVs ; —L 8SU0f 

Reuters '-«;«■■■■■ . 1^97 JO 

DJ. Futures,^, \ . 115*6 * 

Com. Roseorcfi Bureau ■■ 222.90 

Moody-s : baso 100 : bec.31, 1921. . 
p • preliminary; ff - final 
Routors : base 100 : Sep. 18# 193V 
.Dow Jones : fjase 100.: Dec. 51* 1974. 


Previous 
- 89340 f 
1397*0 
11574 
223*0 


67-28 £7-26 Jim 

Esff.Safes Prev. Safes 60401 

Prev. Day Open In L235J83 otf&597 

GNMA (CUT) 

SHXMimprlfvpfe&SaMsoflOOpcI _ 

76-20 59-4 Dec 75-71 74-Zl M 76-S 

76* 58-20 MOT 75-23 75-23 75-23 75-23 

75-17 5^25 Jon .74-29 

75-2 , 65 Sep , ■ 74-1 

Est.Sales Prev. Safe* 80 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 4,137 off 807.- 


CBT 


Martlet Guide 


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i 1 M i i T J'i- 

1 1 • g*! ■ k i . '♦ ; 


ADVERTISEMENT - — ; . . ■ ■ ■ ■■■ . . 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed).- _ r Sfept.30,1 y&5 


Neff asset value q uot atio n* are to Paged by ffffie Fa nd* toted with the exreptfon of some quotes bairfd am feme price. 

The marginal symbols indicate freq u ency of qeobltoM t o pple drpn -> drily; (w>-wtektr; Cb)»M-memtiiy; cri -renu tarty; (D^irreauKarly. 1 


jtor a couple of years 
Rabobank Nederland has had d 
representative office in the City' 
of London. 

Rabobank Nederland is now 
extending /is activities by opening 
a Tull branch in London. 

This branch offers a comprehen- 
sive range of international banking 
services. 

Rabobank is a Dutch 

cooperative banking institution 
with total assets exceeding 
130 billion Dutch guilders. 

U ranks among the largest banks 
in the world. 

Rabobank derives its strength 
mainly from its dominant position 
in the Netherlands, especially 
in Dutch agriculture and 
agribusiness. 

Rabobank offers internation- 
al financial expertise through its 
own branches and representative 
offices abroad as well as through 
an extensive correspondent 
banking network. 

Member of ihc L'mcn Banking Group 





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CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

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CuRt^uo, N.A. Telex 3422. 


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R b to Sdl Ore Interests to BHP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TBIBinSE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1985 

COMPANY 


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Page 15 


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g- OHUlfe,. ™~ Dmpto Mtoci IWOmfflioadoU^Mr.U. 

afian energy group, said MonHa ' txm said. 

! wwJd “ n West Australian To r e P araieJ y. BHFs managing d£- The Mount Newman joint wo- 
od ore interests to Broken I^n t 6 ** 0 * *“! ddef oaortiv^Brian lu * e supplies most Australian 
^ rcdnoe Sroop debt bv abcMit u,t0 J’. said hi$ company would n “ds and has several long-term 
buBoa Australian dollars # « u? ?P a ? d * -01 billion dollars increas- «pori contracts with Japan, South 
liffion) but retain 100 percent S 8 lls stake “ Mount Newman to Korea and other couwries. 
i Australia FuntUu^ oen? erCent •“* “ TDM ^.80 per- On the Ddhi restructuring, CSR 
ren _ -j , cent said itwfll repay over the next six 

LoK said the restructuring will ■ In addition to a. '- » months all the existingJJelhi Aus- 

K ^ from CSR, BHP wmtlsTb^S |^ a ^ d debt rf 1J bUfidn dd- 

Ka i kS® “ d 9“ fren, E-perent Mourn N^miHute lare * ““ 0 ‘ ehanEe rates - 
- i 1 Iy ”’ 311(1 reduce debt by “^ d by Amax Iron Ore Coro„ Mr. repayment will be funded by 
pOrc L&aa ^ percenu Lotoasaid. n ’ the- proceeds of a 1985 share 'issue 

Under the phu, BH p -n s. BHFs ™uld W 8*0 million 

ir-cn» . t. ^ orir win buy dollars fnr iHa vr divestment of PDbara Iron, TDM, 

CSR s subadiuy, PUbara Iron S L i«7m£T?“ T CSR Pastoral Properties, Richter 

Mr P^ncJ 1 ites a 30- percent inter- TDM shsn* rep °?j ^ cr DrilHog Pty. and other assets to 

lestm the Mount Newman iron ore buv BHpf"s? R " ?dd raise 800 million dollars, and a 250- 

prcgect, and CSR’s 22-percem “ unffion-doilar net increase in long- 

w western Collzenes and Dampier terra borrowines. 


Ericsson Ends 

SU.S. Sales 
Of Computers 


. The repayment will be funded by 
Cbe-proceeds of a 1985 share 'issue 
to raise about 250 million dollars, ■ 
divestment of PDbara Iron, TDM, 
CSR Pastoral Properties, Richter 
Drilling Pty. and other assets to 
raise 800 million dollars, and a 250- 
miliion-dollar net increase in long- 
term borrowings. 


West German, Italian Groups Plan 
A Venture to Market Space Flights 

Compiled by Our Sniff From Dispatches 

■ ' BREMEN, West Germany — Aerospace groups in West Germany 
and Italy will cooperate in a venture to market space flights and the 
use of space laboratories and production units, one of the companies 
said Monday. 

ERNO Raumiahmechnik GmbH, a wholly owned subsidiary of 
Messcrschmiu-Bfilkow-Blohm GmbH, West Germany’s leading aero- 
space company, said it would set up a joint subsidiary with Italy's 
Aeritalia to give industry access to space as a laboratory and produc- 
tion sits. 

The new company, Imospace GmbH, would be an intermediary 
between the aerospace sector and other industries that at present are 
not fully aware of the range of commercial uses to which space could 
be put, ERNO believes. 

lmospace would offer development of space-based production 
facilities and transport vehicles as well as help with financing. ERNO 
and Aeritalia had leading roles in developing Europe’s orbiting space 
laboratory. 


Floating-Rate Notes 


Sep. 30 


Dollar 


4 --t: 


j Reuters 

( RICHARDSON, Texas 

Ericsson Inc., a joint venture of 
t-M. Ericsson Telefonaktiebolaget 
pf Sweden and Atlantic Richfield 
Co. of the United States, said Mon- 
day that it will withdraw from U.S. 
ixmsonal computer marketing to 
concentrate on, its core business of 
ideconmninicaiions. 

| Ericsson said the decision had 
teen prompted by depressed mar- 
et conditions for personal com- 
puters. 

;lt said its distribution agree- 
henis with 17S computer dealers 
pU not be renewed when they ex- 
tire at the end of the year, but 
Incsson will continue to service its 
rod acts. 

tr Separately, officials at the parent 
nicem in Stockholm said that 
ricsson wd soon announce fur- 
ler measures to streamline its 
publed information-systems sub- 
diary. 

■“We will take additional steps to 
reamline operations in Ericsson 
(formation Systems very soon,” a 
okesman said. He did not elabo- 
te. 

Ericsson began a streamlining 
ive at EIS after it showed a 217- 
illion-kronor (S26.9- miTltnn ) loss 
1984. 

i Ericsson's first half pretax profit 
is year fell to 644 million kronor 
3m 928 million because of lower- 
au-expected earnings at EIS. 
Explaining the move to pull out 
the U.S. market for for personal 
mputers, the spokesman said 
at Ericsson had not achieved the 
!es volume it esiqxscted! 


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Bk New York M 
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Bk NovoScoCfa M 
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Bta 25® 108251HL75 
Ita 2011 1001010030 
BW 27® 1884510855 
Bta 2011 9908 9938 
Bta 8012 99® U850 
99b 0010 1000010030 
Bta 72-12 997* 9936 
0 1012 9907 10007 

TV* 3010 1007610816 
Bta 86-121086310873 
9ta 1010 108161 0826 
B9k 14-11 10080 
Bta 1012 99® 10805 
tta 2011 10020 MOJO 
Tta 1012 99® 9975 
Bta 15-10 TUB 9936 
Tta 0010 T9J5 10010 
Bta 85-12 99® 10685 
Bta 21® 1000310813 
03-04 99.22 TT J2 
Bta 2011 99® HQ8S 
Bta 10® 98J8 99® 
Bta 0016 1680310013 
Ita 10121080710017 
Bta 1012 99® 10805 
IP 2011 1001810820 
Bta 1012 9060 9978 
89k K® 9*80 9930 
tta 2001 1084510055 
Bta 2012 1003610066 

8 1012 1081010030 

Tta 71-10 1D18210U2 
Bta 06® 1O0UU82D 
Bta 2010 9946 9936 
Bta 04® 1002410074 
Shi 13-01 1000010015 
Bta 1017 99® 10815 
Bta 7081 99® 99,15 
Bib - 99® 10085 

7M 23*12 9978 99® 
Mb 0081 99® 99® 
Ita 11® 99® 100® 
SH. 27® 1003310863 
Tta i0io lnurouo ' 
Tib 101# 18820100® 

9 2010 10170101® 

Tta 1011 10895101® 
Bta 27® 1080810816 
Tta 00101081118826 
Bta 30121081010020 
Bta 1681 99® 10006 
9 13-11 99® 10025 

l%k 2011 1000010810 
Ita -2011 1003410054 
Tta IMI lOQTfMQ® 
81k 04-171001010070 
Ota 2381 1888510015 
ita 27® 99® in® 
fta -12-12 99® 99® 

Ita 1012 99® 10815 
9 U-11 10L14I0024 


Mser/Mat 
Rente 91 

Rep tU Dates 97 
Rbc05 
Rt* 16/94 
5ottoma 91/93 
Soma bit FM A 
SaiMorm Fla 94/04 
Soma I itt Fin 92 
Soand Phi 4pr93 
Scandi fin Dtef3 
Scotland Inf 92 
Sec Pacific 97 
Sec Pacific 92 
Snawraul Core 97 
Sncftt 
Seat 90/93 
Ste Inf 09 
Sfe Intel 
5QcGtn90SK 
SocGenMem 
SocGmKovU 
SocGen97 
Sore 91 
Spate 92/97 
Soate 05 fMItHv) 

Snaln 88/93 
Spain 99 
Stand Chart Pi 
Stand Chart Tt 
Stand Chart MarfO 
Stand Chart Mlsmatre 
SM-f QitAmntNts 
Stole Bk urea® 
SomdomoTst 92/94 
Sweden 00 
Sw8flre 9BM5 
Swe eten 92/85 iMiMy) 
S wede n ®/® 

Sweden 93/03 
Sweden Pere 
TotvoKeae® (Cap) 
TteyvWW 
Tteuioln 92/94 
TakalAAta 94/99 
Tafdom 92 
TovaTsVfW 
Two 94/04 
Ub Norway® 

DM Ktepdocn*8W2 
Wetfs Fargo 97 
Watte Fargo 97 
WfcStpccCTCCap) 
WmsGIvnOl 
World Bk Ptrp 
World Bk»/M 
Yokohania 91/94 
Yokaharao 97 (Cap) 
ZentrotepkassTI 


Copdn Next BM AsU 
Hi Z7® 1B817W827 
81k 20-11 W® 9970 
Bta 07-10 99® 999S 

Bta i 0 to masiaojs 

8 05-12 1O074HML34 

Bta 26® 10000 
Bta 2981 1001710847 
Bta 19® 9934 1B0J4 
tta 15-90 99® 10850 
Tta 23-12 9934 9944 
Ilk 24® KXIA310873 
81k 21-11 99® 99® 

BM 1281 W42 99J7 
Bta ®-U 9058 99.12 
• Bta 3010 99® 16820 
BSk 24-12 99® 1 0086 
Bta 03-12 1008318623 
Bib W-12 99® 16025 
Bta 04® 1008010025 
ita 18® 1084510635 
Tta 07-11 1087010030 
Ita 1083 1882710837 
Bta 20)1 1004110871 
Ita 27® 1081610028 
Bta 2083 9934 9TJ4 
Bta 2082 1081416834 
Bta 2011 1080610016 
Bta 0001 1OO7OU0O 
1% 2D-H 1082010030 
Bta 11® 100® 
tta 13819932 9932 
TV* 07-11 100331®® 
Bta 2011 99® IOOl® 
Bta D® 1003710037 i 
Tta 05-12 1008410809 , 
79k 1081 9935 TT® 

8«k 1018 9932 9932 
BV* 2011 9953 99 JB 
8% 2011 10802161)87 
Blk 8081 1000210037 
Bta 00119933 9933 
Bta 2011 1082210032 
Bta 10® 1083510035 
Bta 17-12 1002510835 
Bta 16® 10Q40100JO 
B H-12 1002510035 
Bta 0010 9000 907$ 

Bta 21® 9075 99® 
V® 9? J4 99® 

8U 2M2 9934 99J4 
Bta 1011 9938 9938 
Bta 1082 9932 99J2 
Bta 1683 100251003$ 
3154314-12 9930 99.96 
7® 2011 9070 9090 
Bta - 1082010030 

Blk 1011 W® 9936 
8U. 1581 1082010030 


Non Dollar 


laoer/Moi. 

Anz Bkg97 
Bk Montreal H 
Bk Tokyo 88/90 
Ba lndQ9ucz91 
Btfgutfn94 

aucorpssm 
C*paie96 
Cr Fonder 00 
Cr National 91/95 
Denmark 93/90 
Halifax B/ 592 
1894 

Iretondf) 

Ireland 96 
Ltovds Eure 96 
MfgBk Den 96/99 
Migfik Den 91/94 
MW 10 

NattanwMeaS.95 
New Zealand 97 
Rite® 

Sad 90/rj 

Stand Chart Slg Pere 
Yorkshire int 91/94 


Ceapoa Next BM Askd 

Hta 1011 1003510035 
Uta 27-12 1003610856 
llta 21-11 1®T710862 
llta 21-11 1O0Z31OOJ3 
12ta U-n 1063718843 
llta 1011 9935 TT® 
llta 23-12 1003410854 
12ta O0M 1003010040 
llta 1012 1805810038 
llta 2011 1003610046 
07-04 99® 99 JO 
I2ta 1010 1062310833 
llta 1011 1007110011 
llta 06-12 1003618036 
llta 26-11 100 1510125 
I2ta 1010 1083218042 
12% 09-10 1003310092 
12 07-11 N8B01M1D 

0604 99® 99® 
llta 14-11 99® 99® 
llta 0011 99® 99® 
T2ta 3610 1O0B51O89S 
Hta 1012 9*42 97.12 
llta 27-12 100®100® 


ADied-Lyons PLC said iis pen- 
sion fund bought 350,000 Allied 
shares at 295 pence ($4.13) each, h 
is subject to a potential bid from 
Elders 1XL. the Australian brew* 
mg, agricultural and financial con- 
cern. 

Adas Consolidated Mining & De- 
velopment Corpb. based in Manila, 
said it will suspend operations at a 
copper mine aud mill in the Philip- 
pines b ec ause of a decline in world 
prices. 

Banque Paribas, the French 
stale-owned bank, said its Paribas 
Technology subsidiary has set up a 
S50-million venture capital fund to 
invest in fast-growing high-tech- 
nology companies in the United 
States, Japan and Western Europe. 

Chrysler Canada Ltd. union 


workers voted overwhelmingly to 
authorize a strike if current con- 
tract talks with the company fail, a 
Canadian United Auto Workers 
union spokesman said. 

CIT/AlcateL the French tele- 
communications concern, has re- 
ceived an order from Nepal for a 
digital telephone switching system 
worth about 100 million francs 
($113 million). 

Guest, Keen & Nettlefolds PLC. 
the British engineering concern, 
said it would increase its holding in 
its related Spanish company. Ayra 
Du rex SA. to 66 percent from 35 
percent. It has also agreed to buy 
the total share capital of Indugasa 
SA of Spain. No financial details 
were given. 


Klefnwon. Benson Ltd_ the Lon- 
don-based merchant bank, said it 
sold 50.000 United Newspapers 
PLC ordinary shares on Friday at 
303 pence (S4-24) each. The con- 
cern is financial adviser to Fleet 
Holdings PLC. the subject of a bid 
by United Newspapers. 

Malaysian Airline System, the 
state-owned concern, began its pri- 
vatization Monday by offering to 
the public 52.5 million shares, in- 
dustry sources said public response 
to the share offer is expected to be 
good. The offer closes on Oa. 30. 

Singapore Airlines said it will 
make two additional flights to the 
United States via Tokvo beginning 
Oct. 29. 


The Perpetual Calendar 


liiSi 


Source : Credit Suisse- First Boston LtOJ 
London 



.*t i _=. : 

. ... - a 




O 1985 FLJ. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO. 






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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1985 


■y 


I 


Mondavi 


AVttX 


Closing 


Tables include tne nationwide prices 
up fo Hie dosing on Wolf Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere, 

Tin The Associated Press 


itMoniti 
HJ91L0W SfDCfc 


SK Close 

Dir. ^10. PC lOhiHlffiuow Quai.C* Be 


1 

A 




| 

29 

■Vi 1/ 

17% CHIMBS 
16ft OliRv 
6ft ChfDvd 

.16 .7 

• ‘MW* A 1 

7hm 

4*- ADI n 26 

114 

Sft 

5% 

5ft -4- ft 

71 % 
12 

■ UUu O-J 

.17 D 

IB 

Pi ALL®!)* .16 II % 

727 

13ft 

13 

13% — % 

38% 

15% Chum 5 

£7ft 

IT AMC .15 .9 IS 

3 

16ft 

16ft 

16% 

33ft 

12ft Citadel 


Tt 

2ft AM InN 7 

1305 

J ft 

3ft 

3ft— ft 

32ft 

18% CltFsi 

iJDOb 3D 

68ft 

66% ATT Fd 5D70 6D 

106 

7&ft 

78% 

78% + % 

33% 

ZOft C hr Gas 

1 J0 3D 

6 

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20 

7ft 

7ft 

2ft— ft 

42ft 

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1.93e IQ 

lift 

BW a cmeU J2 13 27 

6 

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45 

23% Oarasl 

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44 

n % 

11 

lift— ft 

22ft 

11% Clooav 9 

.16 1.1 

Aft 

lft Acftn 

25 

ift 

lft 

lft + ft 

6ft 

3ft Coanltr 

J0 21 

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ft Acln wrt 

49 


ft 

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10ft 

6% Cohu 

4*. 

lft AdmPs 9 

21 

3% 

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1% CdF wt 5 

M'4 

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136 

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17\i + ft 

12 

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11 

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51% 

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17 

6 

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4ft Cm »Cn 


12 

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56 

Mb 

9 

9% 

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lift 

47 

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3% 

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28% 

4% 

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me 

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65W Almira n 

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30 Alcoa of JJ5 114 
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234 AmBrll 
10% Amdahl 
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43% lBftAExpwl 
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AFruc B 
4^7 AHhtiM 

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7 

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Bft 6% AmPJtv 
16ft Vi’S a Ravin 

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52% 4W A xon un 
4 44 A xon or 

51*1 A ran sc 
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2W Anajcb 
TO Andrea 
5^- Angles 
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251 22ft 714 
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114 
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44 
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ftft 5ft 
17ft 
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4 ft 


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84% B4ft + ft 
6ft Oft — ft 
TOft 
ft 


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3 

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04 
10 10ft 

1 40ft 
302 30ft 
20112D0Z 5 
20 4900Z S 
7 533 ^ 

6 


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239 4ft 


772 44 

1 51ft 


10 


30 144 


51 0 


74 


464 73ft 

49 Jft 


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6 

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154 

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24 

7*4 

lift 

lift 

13*4 

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9%. 

13ft 

34 

17ft 

Ift 

4ft 

t 

19'A 


M 3D 


B 

IB 


77 45ft 
135 Oft 


J2 6D 17 


3ft Argo Pi 


5ft Ariern 
4ft Armtrn 
5ft Armels 
7ft Arrow A JO 2J 
17ft Arundi 
oft Asmrg .15 IJ 
94 Aafre* 

1 AsTrotc 
7!* AsTrotpl 1D0 13.1 
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2ft aiiqs wi 
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734 Avanar JO 5J 


ID 

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P 

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20ft 

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74 12ft 
344 lft 


77 


2 
877 

5 
12 

6 


14 
3 

14ft 


14ft 

7ft 

17ft 

3ft 

51 

A4ft 

A 

2 

5ft 

2H 

10ft 

7Jb 

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3ft 

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Aft 

5ft 

eft 

20ft 

Bft 

12ft 

lft 

ne 


33 — ft 
22 — ft 
2ft— ft 
12ft + ft 
Aft 
10ft- ft 
40ft + ft 

30 — ft 
5 + ft 

5 + ft 

4ft— ft 
Oft— ft 
12ft — ft 
4ft ■*■ ft 
4ft + ft 
51ft— ft 
ft— ft 
14ft 
8 + ft 

13ft + ft 
2ft + ft 
51 +TH 
45ft +lft 
Aft + ft 
2 

5ft 
2ft 
10ft— ft 
7ft — ft 
ft 

3ft— ft 
5% + ft 

5 

6 + ft 
8ft + ft 

20ft— ft 
? 

12*.— ft 
lft 


3ft 

77H 

74ft 




3ft— ft 
3 + ft 

74ft— ft 


I 


B 


3 


4ft 

25ft 

3ft 

15ft 

13ft 

17ft 

10% 

4ft 

26ft 

7ft 

9ft 

4ft 

4ft 

Oft 

13ft 

22ft 

4ft 

32ft 

34ft 

15ft 

24 

19ft 

19 

29 

lft 

|9ft 

19'* 

23 

10ft 

10ft 

5% 

18ft 

26%- 

37ft 

41ft 

4ft 

5 

5*i 

34ft 

13ft 


.15e 4 .1 


DO 


18 70 
17 

J2o 3D 


DO 5D 10 


34i BAT In 
13ft BDM& 

1 ft BRT 
10 B5N 
Oft Badger 
7ft Baker 
7ft BokJwS 
7ft BolvMud 
22ft BonFd 2D3e ?D 
*S 2 kj Bansirg 
Oft BnkBId 
3ft Barca 
2ft BamEn 
4 BarvRG 
»0ft Baruch 
10% BeldBIk 
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20ft BengBr 
21ft BIcCp 
9ft BloV 
21ft BlnkMI 

?ft BIOR B S 
9ft BIOP A S 
14ft Blesng s 
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12ft SlountA 
12% Blounts 
Tift BolqrP 5 
7 Oft Bowvqj 
9ft BcrwvlA s 
2ft Bawvnr 
17ft Bowne 

19ft Brscr g 
26ft BmFA 
27ft BmFB 
3«« BrnF pf 
7ft Buckhn 
3ft BuCkh pf JO 105 
24ft Buell 
7ft Bushn 


5 

23 

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14 


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J71 15 
7 DO 1AJ 

2 

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J2 

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DO 17 
IDO 4J 11 
16 
15 
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DO 2D 


D5 

DO 


JO 

D4 


09 12 
3D 12 

19 


4J 


10 
14 

2D 13 


D4 

IDO 

1DQ 1? 9 
IDO 25 11 
DO 103 


DO 1.9 


5500 3% 

715 20ft 
16 2ft 
64 10ft 
16 10ft 
4 13ft 
40 9ft 
7 2ft 
10 25ft 
10 6ft 
24 flft 
IB 4 

4 3 

5 4ft 
3 10ft 

153 lift 
434 ft 
468 27 
74 32ft 
TO 15 
22 23 

6 14ft 
35 14ft 
27 2 

187 % 

314 12 
10 12ft 
184 13ft 
56 11 

1 10ft 
62 4ft 
S3 16ft 
70 23ft 
20 34ft 
95 39ft 

5 3ft 
14 3ft 
20 4ft 
10 31ft 

2 7ft 


3ft 3ft 
20ft 20ft 
2ft 7ft 
9ft 10 
lOVt IQI* 
13ft 13ft 
9ft 9ft 


- \ 
+ ft 


— ft 
+ ft 


2ft 2ft 
25ft 25ft 


6ft 

8 

3ft 

2ft 

4ft 


6ft 

S 

4 

2ft 

4ft 


— ft 

— ft 

— ft 

+ ft 


“ft 


10ft 10ft 
1! llfct 
ft ft 
26ft 26ft 
3lft 31ft 
14U 14ft 
23 23 

14ft 14ft 
14 14 

26ft 
ft 

11 lift 
lift lift 
12ft 13ft 
10ft II 
10ft 10ft 

4 4ft 

15ft 15ft 
23ft 23ft 
33ft 34ft 
38ft 39ft 
Jft 3ft 
3ft 3ft 
4% 4ft 
37ft 31ft 
7ft 7ft 


+ ft 


- ft 
—lk. 

— ft 


— ft 

— ft 

— ft 


— ft 

— ft 
+ ft 
♦ ft 


+ ft 

— ft 

— ft 


+ ft 
— ft 


— ft 


[ 


1 


20 7ft GDIs 
!K> 5ft CM I OB 
3ft IftCMXCP 
19ft Uft CPS 
CSSn 


7 9 18ft 18 ’/■ 18ft + ft 

18 2195 10ft 9 9ft — ft 

6 lft V* lft 

34 2.1 11 34 16 15ft 16 

27 9ft 9 9 


17 Month 
High Un Snick 


sis. dose 

□hr. YU. PE lOBiHlBllLOitf OubLCITpi 


MU 


9ft OreaNJ 
4ft CaaUA 
14ft 10ft Cal RE 
28ft 18ft Cdrrsal 
Aft jft Cation n 
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7ft caiorap 
11 Camca 
lft Campfil 
13U CMorca 
25ft CWIne 


17 

O 11.0 0 
DO 23 20 
24 


lft 

10ft 

18ft 

2 

lBft 

35ft 


-® 1 M ’3 

A 3LI B 


JO 


13 

3ft 

15ft 

8ft 

5ft 

22ft 


4ft Cardiff 
lft ConJ II 
8ft CaraA 
4ft CareEn 
2ft Casoten 
14ft Cast LA 


10 

17 


79 10ft 
5 Aft 
57 lift 
3 26ft 
26 
53 
11 Oft 
340 14ft 

>3 lft 
55 15ft 
1? 34i A 
7 9ft 


LV-VB 


.10 .7 


32ft 26ft CasFd 
7ft 2 Casfind 
4ft Centtwl 
20ft CenM P* 
70ft GentSe 
1 4ft CtrvBu 
5ft Otac 
7 Chmp-H 

12ft ChmoP 


16 
17 

D07Z3D 6 
JSbU 9 
220a 7D 


31 

14 ft 
19 
9ft 
4 

17U. 


150 120 

J.S7el3D 


25 

4 

2A 

17 

2 

7 

25 

2 


2 
14 
7ft 
7ft 

15ft 

3914 

3 

Sft 


JO 2D 


.72 


13 

1b 

5.1 56 

14 
17 
11 


2b 

5 

9 

9 


40z 29ft 
9 lift 
16ft 
714 
2ft 
T4 

19ft 
10 22ft 
19 19ft 
Aft 


11 

70 

312 

3 

403 


28 2? 
227 2S*»* 


10 

12 


10 

1 

31 

A 


12 


t?Ui 

2 Sft 
9ft 
5ft 
10 

21ft 

15ft 

20 

26ft 

14ft 

19ft 

3ft 

7 

1DU> 

9ft 

2ft 

12’4 

35 

T7ft 

13ft 

7 

2ft 

5ft 

25 

30ft 

3 


Aft ConcdF 
13ft ConrCo 
5ft Conqsl 
7ft Cana«*t 
5 CansOG 
16ft CnSTor n 


14 

7 

90 


6ft vjCOfitA 


TO 

4 


4 

15 

55 

190 

66 

127 

7 

292 

15 

2 

10 

67 

279 

730 

90 


29ft 
31 
39 
39 k- 
14ft 
4vg 
9ft 

4ft 

19 

9ft 

12ft 

7ft 

7ft 

Aft 

leu 

7ft 

18ft 

9 

4ft 

5 


754 20 

293 13ft 


B 


vfCnt A at 
17ft ContMII 
10ft Convstn 
10*4 Cooley n 
2ft CosCrn 
5k CosCx wt 
5ft CntCrd 
9ft CntrMn 
lft Courtld 
7Vj CrslFo 
25ft Crass 
9W CmCP 
7ft CrCPB 
4ft CrownC 
h CrufcR 
IV. Cr/sto 
13ft Cubic 
Curtfcr 
CuMEfl 


20 

J4r 2.9 14 


16 16U 
24 19 
lift 

18ft 


D6e 2D 

.iSe ID 9 
1D4 4J 76 
50 
43 


1 




J9 

.72 


1.9 

3D 


11 

70 


21 

41 

13 

10 

59 

224 

15 

1 

45 

6 

52 

3 

52 

1068 


2ft 
ft 
Bft. 
9ft 
2ft 
9ft 
33ft 
14ft 
12 
5ft 
ft 
lft 
68 20ft 

4 ** 


Aft 

lift 

2AU 

% 

Bft 

14 

lft 

15ft 

34 

Oft 

lft 

13ft 

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219 3ft 3ft 
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Bft Makirtg 
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15ft Mnftin 
12% MortPr 
9ft Maslnd 
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67% MlnPpf BD0 11.1 
7W MlnaW 
12ft MtChlE 
9% ManMB 
32ft Monppf ADO tID 
34% ManPpf ADO 10J 
lOVi MoocS JO 1 J 
10ft MoagA JS 1J 
15% MMftd n 
2 MlgRl wt 
15ft MlgGth 1D6 09 
9 MtgPln 
ft Mortm 
lft MTMed 
4% MovftL 
!W Muse Wl 
Bft Myerln 


JOe 22 


JBB Z8 B 


VS 

4 3% 

7^ 76ft 
277 15ft 18% 
. 2 17ft 17ft 
14 7ft 7ft 
3 17ft 17% 

5 13ft 13ft 
14 19% 19 

409 Aft Aft 
3 8ft 

• 8 29ft 29ft 
. JOfe 48 47*1 

100r 66 66 

1066QZ80 - BQ 
31 IB Bft -Bft 
565 13ft 13 
24 lift lift 
JOT 38% 38% 
2Q8D2% 42% 

6 "16ft 15ft 
127 lM^ISft 

■6 17^ 17. 
55 2 lft 
ISO 17ft 17ft 
4B 9% 9 

2 £ BS 
T ? -J ^ 

31 10ft 10 


T 

21 

7 

30 

B 

11 

+ 


27 

B 


16 

16 

13 


13 


Bft + ft 
1 
9 

2ft 

8Vz— ft 
17ft + ft 
1 + ft 

20ft + ft 
11% — ft 

15ft 

Zlft 

17 — % 
70% + % 
IB + ft 
5% + ft 
10ft— ft 
15ft— ft 
16 "+ % 
9ft Hh % 
19ft .+ % 
5ft 4 — % 
3%— ft 
3ft— % 
76ft— 1 
lflft 

17ft + ft 
7%— ft 
17% — U 
1»— % 
19% + ft 
4% 

Bft— % 
29ft + ft 
47ft— 1 
66 . 

BO +1ft 
Bft. * 

13 — ft 
lift + % 
38% . 
42% —1% 
15ft + ft 
Uft + ft 
17. -=i% 
1ft— ft. 
17ft— ft 
9% + % 
lft + ft 
4% + ft 
— ft 


v- 


10 — ft 


17 13ft 
20ft 18ft 
9ft. 5ft 
71ft 12ft 
17ft 11% 
71ft 13 
49% 31 


NRMn 
fiRMof 
Nantck 
NtPotnt 
NPinRt 
HP 


Aft 4% 
17% lift 


left 11% 
17ft 12ft 


7 

13% 

3 

3ft 

Uft 


5ft 

Aft 

lft 

2% 

9ft 


2D0 19.1 
ZDO 14.1 

15 

.10 D 
IDS 6D 15 
HPngc 1 JOe 5D 11 
NYTlmOS DO ID 14 
NewbE J5r 5D 7 
-32 2J 

11 

IDO 9D 11 
17 
7 


45 13% 
9 18ft 
12 Bft 
260 15% 
47 15ft 
19 20ft 
546 40% 
12 Aft 


37 29% 

» 7ft 
lift 5ft 
12% Bft 


Newcor 
NewLsn 
nwpei 
NE chlnn 
Mlchah 
NoeJind 
NoUx 
NCdOps 
N|P$pf 425 117 
NuHrcn 
NddDt 
Numoc 


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23 12% 
96 12ft 
15ft 

2ft 
Zft 
10ft 


2 
64 
219 
5 
2 
4 


13ft 13ft — ft 
15ft Tffi* + % 
8ft Bft— ft 
14ft 15%. +1 
Uft 15ft + ft 
20ft 20ft ■ 
39ft 40 — ft 
4ft Aft— ft 
12 12 —ft 

rift 12 + ft 

15ft 15ft 


15QZ 33*z 
11 2ft 
4 5% 

25 Bft 


6% 
lft 
2ft 
2ft 
10% 
33 


Zft 

5% 

Bft 


6%— % 

7ft + Mi 
2ft + ft 
10% — % 
33ft 


2ft 

5% 

B% 


I 


1 


24% 

27ft 

12 

16ft 

24% 

27ft 

7ft 

8 

2ft 


7 

14ft 

13 

15 

13ft 

12ft 

12% 

12ft 

36 

33% 

29ft 

36ft 

72ft 

74ft 

2<ft 

11 

33 

19ft 

20ft 


16% OEA 
15ft On lewd 
4 OdetAa 
Aft Odets s 
lBft Oifalnd 
10ft Olsten s 

3% OaPenh 
4% OrlolH A 
1 Ormond 
16 05ulvn & 
5Va Overs c 
6% OirfnJF 
0% OzorkH 
10ft PGEpfA 
m PGEpfB 
9 PGEnfC 
9% PGEpfD 
Bft PGEpfG 
79% PGEplF 
78% PGEpfT 
23% PGEpfY 
78% PGEpfW 
16ft PGEpfV 
18% PGEafT 
18% PGEpfS 
7ft PG^pfH 
16ft PGEptR 
Uft PGEpfP 
14% PGEpfO 


D8t> D 


12 

10 


ID 77 
ID 19 
P 

.15 3J 


DO 

24 


XL ID 15 


D2t 6J 
JO 2D 
1D0 109 
1-37 113 
1JS 108 
US 11.1 
UO 109 
4J4 126 
406 127 
120 1L7 
£57 17.1 
£32 11D 
254 11D. 
2D2 UD 
1.17 TOD 
237 109 
205 TID 
200 11D 


10 

10 


5 19ft 
64 16 

0 5%. 

1 Aft 

1 20ft 
39 23% 

8 5ft 
10 4ft 
21 1 % 

22 23% 

2 5ft 
75 Uft 
167 10ft 

12 13% 

3 12ft 
12 lift 
17 11% 
IB 11 
17 34ft 

524 32 
31 28ft 
1473 23ft 
1259 21ft 

23 23ft 
422 74% 

67 10% 
568 21% 
71 18ft 
5B Uft 


19ft 

15ft 

U 

20% 

23 

5% 

Aft 

lft 

73 

5ft 

13 

10ft 


19ft— ft 
16 

5% -I- ft 
6%— ft 
70ft 4- % 
23 + % 

5ft + % 
Aft + ft 

1% +ft* 
23 + ft 

5ft— ft 
13 — ft 
10% + ft 
13ft 13% + ft 
12ft 12ft- ft* 
lift + ft 
11% 

11 

34ft + % 
32 +ft 
__ 28ft— % 

27ft .27% + ft 
21ft 21ft 
Z2ft 23 + % 

23% 23% + % 
10% 10% 

21ft 21% + ft 
18ft 16ft— ft 
lBft Uft— % 


lift 

lift 

11 

34ft 

31% 

28% 


17ft 

21 

20% 

21% 

lift 

9M 

<3Vk 

47 

50% 

1 

40ft 


»ft 

M 

5ft 

lift 

24% 

2ft 

2b% 

’St 

JO 

13ft 

t» 

4% 

ft 

9% 

lift 

2ft 

7 

7 

7ft 

Bft. 

15% 

74% 

10% 

TDft 

16ft 

4% 


14% PGEpfM 
16ft PGEpfL 
14ft PGEsrfK 
t«ft PGEPU 
Bft FGEpfl 
15ft PGTm ' 
33ft PocLtpf 
38% PdCLtPf 
37 Podtpf 

J 1 P® 0 !? 

32ft PailGP 

.Sft Pan KMt 

17ft Pmi5& 

7 PotTch 
2Vc PayFon 
8U PetrTu 
15ft PenTr 


196- ltD 
ZJ5 11 J 

199 10J 
1-24 4J 
4D0 UD 
4,75 TU 
SJ» W9 


48 Ug 

UO 3J | 


7 17% 
4 20 
77 18ft 
6 209* 
1B0 10% 
BS .26% 

4062 40% 
9302 42 
752 46- 
174 Jfc 




rrvt Pen 
7ft Penrii 
%.Pwifrny 

2M PortnlC 
11 Perfnll 
9% Pertnipf 
2ft PptLw 
ft PetLvrt 
6ft Potuwpf 
7ft PetLepf 
1% PhlILD 
PkoPd 


^ObAJ 14 
UO 5J ID 

■ a5r4 H - 

1-BO 7£ 9 

20 U 7 


24 

23 

1 

19 

T7 

1 

93 

169 


37ft 

6% 

27- 

7ft 

4% 

9ft 




273 23ft 
4? 9 


jn 29 
,10e D 
1.10 9.1 


19 


269 lft 
11 27W 


37 12% 
43 17ft 
Zft 


IDS 2X6 


167 
. 6 
4 

1 


Pftr l wt 
PionrSi 


6% 

12ft 

30W 

8% 

7ft 

lft 

Uft 

12ft 

Aft 

22ft 

23ft 

40 

22ft 


2% 

2ft 

3% Pionrsv 
4 ft pitwva 
lflft P 77 Dun 
65ft PltfwOV 
Aft Plzzaln 
lAVa PIcrOQ 
Uft PJvGnvs 
2ft PtYRA 
2% PhfRB 
3 PopeEv 
7ft PortSvs 
19ft PnottL . 
Aft PnrftRd 
Aft ProtR Pf 
ft PremRs 
9ft PresRA 
6% PresAB 
3ft PrwW 
18 PmCT 8 
15 PrvEn s 
31ft PSCoiPf 
UU PgtdfC 
29ft PWPfE 


J6I07 » 
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1-00 2D U 
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62 

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3.9 


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4 
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1D6 7.9 13 
1D0 8.1 7 
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£34 1U 
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. 7 

72 f 
49 lft 
2ft 
4ft 
3ft 

5% 
17 Uft 
B 71ft 
10T B 
69 161k 
74 16 
3% 
3% 
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130 ss 

9 27ft 
7ft 

■a 

13% 


5 
20 
401 


13 
1 
5 

15 lift 


7 

31 


3ft 

19ft 


17 20ft 
2002 38ft 
13 20 


30 339li 


17% 17% 

19ft ZIL 

18ft 18ft 
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« 4 6. 

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27 27 

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23 23 ■ 

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lva J!r 

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12ft 12ft 
11% 12ft 
2ft 2ft 
% % 
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2ft 2ft 
4 Mr Aft 
3ft 3% 
5% 5% 

U 13ft 
71 71ft 
7ft 7ft 
16ft 16ft 
15ft 16 
3» J% 
3ft 3% 
3ft 3% 
wft igft 

Uft 13ft 
lift lift 
3ft 3ft 
19% 19ft 
19ft 19% 
3«ft 38ft 
20 . 20 
32 32ft 


+ ft 
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+ g 
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n 

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+ ft 
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— ft 

— ft 
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237% 

21% 

» 

3% 

23 

Uft 

2ft 

7 

II 

21ft 

35% 

lft 

13ft 

lBft 

Aft 

2ft 

28 

7 

14ft 


17ft SWPrd 

14% StanTH 
4 % SlrtC» 
lft 5ierlE7 
lift 

sft KfiSS 1 

lft Wrvrw 

3ft SunrtTt 

7 SwiCtV. 
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20ft EubTRf 
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4 Supinds 
11% SdDTSr 
Sugg£ 
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19ft 5 wfhin 
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DA 3 3 6 
19 


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91 22ft 
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13 


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p 


DB 2D 11 
D4bU W 


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7 
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1J0 5J 14 


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14 in 

11 31ft 

M IS* 
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1 15% 

Bi 5 

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38 23% 

38 m 

-52 8 


22 

18 

5 

7% 
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10% 


5ft 

18ft 

20 

14ft 

9% 

17ft 

2ft 

20ft 

Aft 

75ft 

90% 

6ft 


4% 

12ft 

19ft 

30% 

5% 

7 

34 

7ft 

lBft 

29ft 


5 Quebgs 
Bft RAI 
3ft RMS Ef 
15ft Ragan 

15 Ransbg 
10ft Raven 

6ft RtrncT 
Uft RltSon 
lft RltSowt 
17ft RttSoun 
lft Redlaw 
10ft RegalB 
33ft ResrtA 
3% RedAsc 
Aft MA8CA 
3% Rex Nor 
9% RtoietP 
Bft Rekwvs 
17% 
lft RoonyP 
3% RoyPhn 
22% Rudick 
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11% Russell 

16 RvkofE 


JSI 5J 12 


.12 J 43 
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41 14 10 


11 

10 

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1 B 
13 
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JO. 21 


Rogers .12 D 


17 

24 

11 


8% 
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3ft 
123 lift 
199 16ft 
7 12ft 
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11 16% 
lft 
17ft 
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3 15 

4ft 
4 

9ft 
17ft 


5 

3 

28 

14 


6 

6 

11 

9 


Dfla 22 


JO 

DO. 


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8% 

6% 

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17ft 

16% 

17% 

B% 

16 

lft 

17ft 

2ft 

12ft 

4ft 

3ft 

9% 

17 

19ft 

1% 

6% 

25Wi 

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16% 

23% 


8% 

6% 

3ft 

U 

Uft 

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16 

lft 

17ft 

2ft 

12ft 

37 

Aft 

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4 

9% 

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19ft 

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Bft 

16ft 

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+ ft 
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— % 
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— ft 

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4- ft 

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8ft 

39 

10ft 

10ft 

9 

9 

10 

BTft 

74% 

AS 

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26 

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5ft 

7 

Bft 

11 

9% 

15ft 

28 

3 

7ft 

35 

40% 

20 

67 

Zft 

Uft 

4% 

1ft 

Bft 

15 

11 

Uft 

I2ft 

2 

19ft 

Uft 

15 

15ft 

7ft 

75% 


.lOf 1J 
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DO 100 
1J00 105 


1U 
2D7 11.I 
ADS- 121 
2DB II J 
JO- 3.1 
D3t U 
.15 16 
JO 3D 


Aft SFM 
7 SFNafA 
18% SJWs 
m sooc 
5 Sotom 
64k SDgaaf 
6% SDgopf 
» SDgopf 

56ft SDftOPf 7 JO 1TD 
53ft SDgopf 7J0 
18% SDgopf 
32ft SDgopf 
19ft SDgopf 
21% Sondgte 
3% 5anmrk 
Aft SoundB 
Aft Sound A 
m Sound Pf 1-2012J 
B% SoxnOn JOe 3D 
11% Starron 
17ft Sdum 
lft School P 
3% SclMgt 
12% SdLse - 
33ft Scope . 

12% ScurRn 
41ft SbdCo 
7% Seaport 
11 SecCoa 
Zft SelsPro 
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3ft Sekxs 
9ft SrvISGO 
7ft Servo 
6% Servatr 
9ft Setons 
ft Sharon 


11 


n 

a 

8 


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42 Bft 
12 36 

43 7ft 
10 6 

’ -1 Bft 

2 9 

6 9ft 
100185 
250168ft 
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3 22ft 
36 38ft 
5 24ft 

4 26ft 
34 5ft 


56 2J 


17 

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17 

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260 15ft 
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6 6 + % 
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9ft 9ft- 

85 85 — ft 

66ft 68ft 
44 % 
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24 24 — % 

26 7A — % 

5% 5%— ft 
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10 10 — ft 

8% 89k + ft 

12% 12%— % 
25ft 25ft— ft 
2ft 2% 

5ft 5ft 
15ft T5*!i • 

33ft 33ft— ft 
17ft 17ft — .ft 
63% 63% _ 

lft lft— ft 

11 11 
2ft 

ft . 

5 L 

9% 9% 

B% 0%— ft 
TOft 11% — ft 


10 

13% 

lift 

13ft 

21% 

Mb 

& 

77ft 

4 

20% 

2ft 

214% 

4% 

34ft 

lift 

15ft 

5ft 

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J3I 56 21 
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J0 L2 


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12 
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30 
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22ft 
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14ft 
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lSfc TdbPrd 

6% TandBr 

.5ft Te**ty 

2ft Team 
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97 TelonR 
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24% T eitm 
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2% TeUapb 
4 Tennev 
4ft Tensor 
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4 Mr TexAE -- 

16ft TexAE PfiLP 13D 
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26- TolEdpf *2 UD 
50 ToJEd pf 8^ UJ 
3ft Tarter JW7Q.1 
Bft TotlFHg J4 
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23 TatPtpf £88 TOD 
Bft TmsLx 
lift TmsTec 
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16ft TumB n 
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15ft UjiIvRu 
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1105 Aft 
89 6ft 

13 Uft 

19 6% 

15ft 
17 3ft 
67 3 
519 15ft 

1 56ft 

71 4*1 

28 13ft 
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131 34% 
130 11 
112 9. 

274 4% 

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109 5 

4 18ft 
41 Aft 
69 3ft 
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12 3ft 
977 14ft 

36 2 

77 

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30 14ft 

24 14ft 

14- 9 
10 4*i 

129 1 

25 16ft 
8 27 

151 9 

35 7ft 

7 » 

76 lift 

36 10ft 
33 13ft 
705 TOft 
58 71ft 
47 21ft 
95 lft 

5 .1% 
17 14ft 

14 Uft 
41 7ft 

15 12 

2 Bft 

3 16ft 
66 11 


5ft 5ft 
7ft 7ft 
Aft Aft 
5ft Aft 

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14ft 15ft 
561b 56 ft 
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11% lift 
10ft Uft 
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20ft 20ft 
21ft 21ft 
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BRADBURY-WILKINSON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEM?? I TfV 

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Monday ft^gl^. Eu ™l« on 
daydSngtev^^jSaMFri. 
' ' in Tokyo lo its low® E V ei? K ! la ® 

t'sr »"^r; 

- ib'SnS'^^^jjjy fdi 

since Dec. 4 lost f 1 **** 
frotQ Friday’s close nf «n f 

bJfr-WinuSil^J 
td Ti^S; If d r°? “ 215 «l 

**ES? 3 ?E*ES. 
%^*K2Sfa“ 

-■> j . Mr ' M , utos statements echoed 
those made earlier in Osaka by the 

; . r^rfw£5HJ 

. SatMb Sumna. "Neither the uS?- 
ed Stales nor Japan have a fixed 

.;■ ! - ho * far dollar should 

r k®>. “Whai we’re hoping 

for is that u*U fail funW •* P ® 


* 


:i 


The dollar traded at a record low 
1978* 50111 y® 1 in November 

A strong dollar has long been 
n«d by Japanese ofOdals-as the 
primary cause of the huge U.S. 
f^de deficit with Japan, which is 
^Pected.to reach $» billion this 
year. A weaker dollar makes Am er- 
ran exports less expensive. 

Nd ther Japanese official would 
comment on whether the central - 
bank had intervened in Monday’s 
market, but the Bank of Japan is 
thought to have sold between $1.5 
bilhon and $2 billion since last 
Tuesday to push the dollar lower. 

Against other currencies, mean- 
whlle^ the dollar held its own in 
nervous trading dominated by 
fears of further central-bank inter- 
vention, Against this- 'backdrop,' 
dealers said, martr^ treated the 
oonnally bullish news, that U-S. 
leading indicators rose 0.7 percent 
in August with an excessive degree 
of caution. 


In London, the dollar closed at 
2.6790 Deutsche marks, virtually 
unchanged from its opening ana 
Friday’s dose of 2.6800. The Brit- 
ish pound rose to S 1.4083 from an 
opening $1.3965 to end almost un- 
changed from $1 .4075 on' Friday. 

■ 

-In earlier trading in Europe, the 
dollar was fixed at midaftemooD in 
Frankfurt at 2.6699 DM, un- 
changed; at 8.1325 French francs 
in Paris, down from 8.1670, and at 
3.0165 Dutch guilders in Amster- 
dam, slightly lower than 3.0175 on 
Friday. In 2Surich, the dollar closed 
at 2.1935 Swiss francs, virtually un- 
changed from 2.1965 on Friday. 

# • • 

One London dealer said that sur- 
reptitious central bank interven-. 
lion may have held the dollar down 
in the face of good U.S. economic 
news. M It was very well bid and 
should have gone higher,** he said. 
Others, however, said they detected 
no activity. 

(Reuters, UPI) 


i. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


W“' 


U.S. Report Has little Impact on Traders 


• ■Klj'-.P 

.-‘fc-A** 


i 


y Christopher Pizzey In the secondary floating-rate- 

i r im rkrt vr R " flOT ™ DOle market, prices tended to drift 

The dollar- . bade a little, with seasoned issues 
straight and floatmg-raic-noie sec- generally showing losses of 2 to 4 


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tors of the Eurobond mur V-t were 
trniet Monday, with news <rf a 
slightly higher than expected rise of 
0.7 percent in the U.S. Index of 
Leading Economic Indicators hav- 
ing little impact, dealers said. 

Only two bonds had been 
launched by the end of the trading 
day, the Banque Franqaise du 
Commerce Ex ten cur came in the 
European currency unit sector and 
Emhart Corp. in sterling. 

However, floa Ling-rate-note 
traders said they are expecting a 
major U.S. bank to tap the market 
shortly, possibly with an issue to- 
taling as much as $500 million. 

Dealers and syndicate managers 
said market talk for the potential 
spread on such a issue, which they 
believe could have a 20-year matu- 
rity with an investor put option 
after 15 years, centered around 
1/16 point over the three- month 
London interbank offered rate. 


baas points. The S2~5-b01ian float- 
er for Britain was off about 5 basis 
points al 99.87. Dealers .added, 
however, that the market remained 
thin and dominated by profession- 
als. 

The 150-nuHion-ECU bond for 
BFCE carries a government guar- 
antee and pays 8ft percent a year 
over eight years. The par-priced is- 
sue was quoted on the marlret at a 
discount of Ift, made the total fees 
of 1% percent. The lead manager 
was Banque Nationals de Paris. 

Seasoned doHar-straight issues 
were mainly around ft point easier 
by the dose, having shown little 
change in the morning session, 
dealers said. They added that senti- 
ment was a little depressed by the 
indicator report but there was 
hardly any actual seUmg during the 
day. As in the floating-rate sector, 
trading remained dominated by 
professionals. 


. The sterling-straight sector saw a 
£35-miIlion issue from Emhart 
Corp. lead-managed by Klein wort, 
Benson Ltd. The issue pays 1 1 per- 
cent a year over- seven years and 
was priced at 100ft. 

It was quoted on the market at a 
discount of slightly under 1ft bid, 
just within the 1ft percent total 
fees. The same borrower also 
launched a 175-million-Deutsche- 
marlc Eurobond in West Germany 

Older sterling straights were 
mainly a touch easier in quiet trad- 
ing following falls of around ft 
point at the longer end of the Brit- 
ish government bond market, deal- 
ers added. 

The Japanese convertible sector 
had another active day after the 
Tokyo Stock Market rose sharply 
during Saturday’s and Monday’s 
sessions, dealers said. 

Selected issues moved sharply 
higher, with the 4ft percent bond 
dire 1999 for Mitsubishi Heavy In- 
dustries Ltd. again a strong per- 
former, jumping well over 10 
points; to end at around 205ft. 


To Singapore 
Works Well 


(Continued from Page 9) 

and those in Chicago and Philadel- 
phia has thus far been that all trad- 
ers would be treated equally, and 
all contracts would be uniform and 
exchangeable in both markets. 

“All well and good,” Mr. Bettel- 
heim said. “But under which coun- 
try's tax and regulatory laws would 
traders operate? In the United 
Kingdom, for example, the Inland 
Revenue has a flat tax of 30 percent 
op trading, but may also levy much 
higher taxes on an individual’s total 
income. Your Internal Revenue 
Service simply levies a maximum 
futures- trading profits tax of 32 
percent, but has yet to rule on gains 
from international transactions.” 

Another potential problem con- 
cerns broker insolvencies and. 
bankruptcies, he continued. As a 
rule, the clearing units of U.S. fu- 
tures exchanges, in effect, guaran- 
tee the funds of traders, which are 
by law segregated from the broker's 
money. This means that customers 
of a defunct U.S. brokerage house 
can get their money without wait- 
ing for the end of legal proceedings. 

“In the U.FL, there is n of segrega- 
tion of customer funds and. distri- 
button provision until the bank- 
ruptcy or insolvency is cleared up." 
Mr. Bettelheim said. “There have 
been cases here where brokers have 
used customer funds, including 
trust and discretionary accounts, to 
try to trade out of their predica- 
ment while insolvent or bankrupt." 

Another expert, Thomas A. Rus- 
so, a partner in the law firm of 
Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft, 
agreed with Mr. Bettelhetm's as- 
sessment of the potential hurdles to 
the continued internationalization 
or the futures markets but added: 

“The two biggest hurdles con- 
cern national sovereignty and pro- 
tection against, fraud. No nation 
will readily agree to have its citi- 
zens subjected to foreign laws. This 
applies to criminal acts such as 
fraud. While the Chicago Merc and 
Simex have agreed to a uniform set 
of rules, this may not be the case 
with the much older, much larger 
and more powerful London mar- 
kets.” 


(Continued from Page 9) 

mg revenues. Review officials add- 
ed. 

“I've got a lot of toys in my 
mind, but this is one of the more 
tantalizing,’* said Mr. Levitt 

Mr. Levitt appears intent upon 
practicing what he preached 25 
years ago in a Review article enti- 
tled “Marketing Myopia.” In that 
piece, still considered required 
reading. at business schools, Mr. 
Levin chastised companies for be- 
ing product-oriented rather than 
customer-oriented. Too many com- 
panies do not understand what 
their true business is, he wrote. The 
railroads, for instance, thought 
they were in the railroad business, 
□ol the transportation business, al- 
lowing the auto, trucking and air- 
line industries to take over their 
customers. 

As far as Mr. Levin is concerned, 
the Harvard Business Review's true 
business is educating managers so 
they can do their jobs better and be 
more responsible members of soci- 
ety — and not publishing a maga- 
zine every two months. 

Not that die Review is yet in 

longer of going the way of the 
passenger railroads. Paid circula- 
ion now stands at 243.000. an all- 
tine high for the 63-year-old publi- 
ation. And ad pages climbed 10.8 
■ercem in the first half of 1985, 
ccording to the Publishers Infor- 
mation Bureau Reports. 

In the fiscal year that ended June 
10, the Review’s revenues . rose 
tearly 9 percent, to a record $12.5 
trillion. Subscriptions, at S3S a 
rear, account for about 60 percent 
rf that sum. Advertising generates 
ibout 20 percent. And the rest 
comes largely from articles recy- 
cled in the form of reprints, boobs 
and the 11 foreign-language edi- 
tions that boast a circulation of 
more than 50.000. 

Profits, while not disclosed, are 
big enough to enable the Review to 
make a “substantial contribution” 
to the Harvard Business School, 
said Kenneth R. Andrews, who 
headed the magazine for nine years 


Suez Canal lo Raise Tolls 

Return 

CAIRO — The Suez Canal 
Authority announced Monday 
an average increase in. canal 
tolls of 3.4 percent, starting 
next Jan. 1. 


Review's Performance 

Annual paid circulation, in 
thousands, (or fiscal yea vs 
ended June 30 ^0 240 



230 


220 


210 


200 


'02 

June 30 


NTT 

before stepping down at age 69 at 
the end of Iasi month. 

Many other business schools 
have striven to copy the Review’s 
success, but none thus far has come 
close, file University of Pennsylva- 
nia finally gave up trying and earli- 
er this year folded' its Wharton 
Magazine. 

Another formerly ambitious 
competitor, the Columbia Journal 
of World Business, has a circula- 
tion of less than 10,000. “The fact 
most people haven't heard of it is 
an indication it hasn’t had the im- 
pact we hoped,” said John C. Bur- 
ton, dean of the Columbia Business 
SchooL 

Just how much impact the Har- 
vard Business Review actually has 
is still hotly debated among busi- 
ness executives and academicians. 
Many members of the business- 
school community criticize the Re- 
view for lacking the depth and dis- 
cipline of academic journals. 
“Most faculty members at most 
major schools would not consider it 
a primary outlet for their research,” 
said Richard R. West, dean of New 
York University's Graduate School 
of Business. 

Plenty of business people, on the 
other hand, complain that the Re- 
view's articles are still too steeped 
in academic theory and jargon. 
“The language used in the publica- 
tion is very heavy,” said Mr. 
Tobler. 

“It is a prestigious magazine 
business executives like to have in 
their office, but not many read it,” 
added Lewis H. Young, the former 
editor in chief of Business Week 


who is now president of the Die- 
bold Group, a management con- 
sulting firm. 

Despite what these critics say, 
articles in the Review are dearly 
read and reread — even if it is 
months or years after they were 
originally published. iDdeed. the 
Review sells 2.4 million reprints a 
year. 

During his tenure, Mr. Andrews 
shortened the average length of ar- 
ticles and even hired some journal- 
ists as editors in an attempt to 
make the magazine more readable. 
He also recruited staff members 
with stronger academic back- 
grounds. His goal was to enable the 
magazine to play a much broader 
role than just helping managers 
hone their business skills. He want- 
ed to prod managers to think more 
about broader topics. The role of 
business in society and its relation- 
ship with government were espe- 
cially important to him. 

While the magazine offers a 
heavy dose of how-to articles on. 
say. materials -resource planning 
and sales management, it also regu- 
larly runs articles on such subjects 
as corporate ethics, small-business 
issues and women managers. One 
1983 piece that drew a lot of mail 
was entitled “Managers and Lov- 
ers. 

The Review also has stirred con- 
troversy by criticizing American 
management In their now famous 
1980 article “Man aging Our Way 
to Economic Decline.” Robert H. 
Hayes and W illiam J. Abernathy, 
two Harvard professors, blamed 
American manufacturers' prob- 
lems in competing against the Japa- 
nese on their obsession with in- 
creasing short- term earnings. A 
special report that appeared last 
year attacked business schools for 
turning out these risk-aversive 
numbers-crunchers. 

The economic-decline piece may 
have been the most notable, but 
other influential articles that ap- 
peared during Mr. Andrews' reign 
include David Garvin's “Quality 
on the Line,” an analysis by the 
Harvard faculty member of why 
the quality of many American 
products i i lower than that of the 
Japanese, and several stories by 
David W. Ewing, the Review’s 
managing editor, on employee 
rights within the corporation. 

The Review promises to be pro- 
vocative under Mr. Levitt, too. A 
renowned marketing sage who has 


iflught at the Harvard Business 
School since 1959, this German- 
boni son of a shoemaker holds the 
record for most articles published 
in the Review: 25. Peter F. 
Drucker, the management author- 
ity. however, is breathing down his 
neck. 

Mr. Levin happily confesses that 
be has no qualms about resorting to 
exaggeration to drive home a point. 

Thai is exactly what he says he 
did in “The Globalization of Mar- 
kets," an article that appeared in 
1983 and was roundly attacked for 
being overly simplistic. The multi- 
national corporation that custom- 
izes its products for in dividual 
countries is dead, he declared. It is 
now the age of the global corpora- 
tion that sells standardized prod- 
ucts throughout the world. “Gone 
are accustomed differences in na- 
tional or regional preference," he 
insisted. 

Does he really drink so? Well, 
maybe not completely, be conced- 
ed. 

Noting that “it's a real rough 
world out there,” Mr. Leviu main - 
tains that taking a provocative 
stand is perfectly fair in the battle 
for readership time. “If you were in 
the steel business, what would you 
read first. Iron Age or the Harvard 
Business Review?” he asked. Right 
now, he obviously expects the an- 
swer to be the former. Clearly, he 
hopes to change that. 


Hanna, Grace 
Split Coal Firms 

The A ssocuxreJ Press 

CLEVELAND — MA Hanna 
Co. and W.R. Grace & Co. have 
agreed to end their joint ownership 
of two coal companies in favor of 
separate ownership, the companies 
announced Monday. 

The arrangement gives Hanna 
100- percent ownership of Terry 
Eagle Coal Co., Summers ville. 
West Virginia, and gives Grace 100 
percent of Rapoca Energy Co., 
Wise. Virginia. The companies had 
owned the two coal concerns 
through a joint venture. 

In a separate transaction, Hanna 
agreed to buy all outstanding debt 
of Midland Southwest Corp., an 
oil and gas drilling concern based 
in Midland. Texas. Hanna had 
owned 50 percent of the company. 


£ 


Monday's 

ore 


Prices 


NASDAQ Prices as of 
3 pun. New York time... . 

Via The Associated Press 


Montti 

ttigb-Lmr Stuck 


SaJnJn fief 

CMv. YU. 100s- HUD Low 3 PJM. Oft* 


12 Month .. . 

HioALow Stock 


12 Month 
Woo Low Stock 


Sales fat Net 

Dtv,Yl(L l0te Hton Low 3 PJA. 


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W n ADCTI 
lBlfc 14 AEL 
23ks life AFG 

25 10* ASK 

23 16 Aamftf 

12% Acad In 
im 7te Acetrtn 

20 17Vi AcvRaY 
74 llfa AdOCLb 

1016 6Vfa Adage 
IY4h S AdvOr 
SVfti 3 Aequtm 
17*fa UVs AfIBsfl 
23V? 15 AOCVRS 
UVfa 9% AirAAd 
1W 796 AirWisc 
3m 28ft AtaxB 

21 14 Allln 
iiu 4% Aigorex 
24ft 104 m AJeflrW 
224fa 15% AIMkzBv 
20* 17ft AlldBn 

5 1ft Allnei 
9ft 4ft AjpMiC 

14ft 6ft AltOS 
34 13ft AmCQ5t 
TZft 4ft AWAirl 
17 6ft AmAdv 
14ft ioft ABnkr 
14ft 10ft AmCorr 
m 5ft AConU 
17ft 13 AFdSL 
8ft oft AmFrst 
30ft 16ft AFfetCS 
37ft 30 A Greet 
14ft 8ft AmlnLf 
12ft 5ft AMoont 
17ft 10ft AMS 5 
36ft 26ft ANtlfU 
7ft 2ft APtivG 
4ft ft A Quash 
34ft t6ft A msec 
15 7ft AmSfls 

6 lft ASolar 
7ft ft A Sura 

44ft 25ft Amrtrs 

26 16ft Amrwsf 
Oft 3ft Amgen 
29V. 16ft AmskB 
7STU 14ft Antpds 
15ft 9 An logic 
151fa 7ft Afiartn 
39ft 13ft Andrew 
10ft 6ft Aoogee 

lift APOJOC 
14 Vo AttrtffC 
lift APfBlos 
ID ft Arid Cm 
18ft AridMf 
8 AoiaSlr 
3ft Archive 
15V. ArpoSy 
left Arbis 
6ft Artel 
10ft ASdHst 
5ft Astrosv 
15ft AfJAm 
25ft AfUltBC 
8ft AtlrtFd 
SV. AtiFht 
19ft Ah Res & 
2ft AlSaAri 
14ft AtwdOc 
5ft AulTrT 
4ft Autmrx 
4ft AfJXton 
3ft Avacre 
6 AvntGr 
17ft Avntek 
15ft Avatar 
13ft AviatGP 
4 AZKM 


17 

5 

28 

120 

42 

30 S3 694 
19 

3A U) 227 
223 
110 


JD 5L4 
t 

.100 IX 


1-40 3J 


.100 JS 
-40 13 
M 4L5 


A4 3nl 
t 

JO 4.1 


44k 42 
1 

JO 29 
55 JL8 
-40 17 


IM 3.1 
1.02 15 

1.60 48 


TJ0 39 
a a 13 


.14 1.4 


223 

26 

117 

83 

138 

12 

440 

2 


31ft 

27ft 

19ft 

30 

13ft 

7ft 

22ft 

40 

9 

17V. 

V 

27 

43ft 

u* 

30 

12ft 

10ft 

8ft 

Oft 

21 


2J 

J2 1.1 

40 19 
90 2 A 


m 

341 

116 

43 

400 

23 

420 

428 

82 

67 

16 

6 

20 

00 

813 

243 

7 

90 

5 

178 

821 

29 

132 

414 

312 

151 

17 

367 

% 

87 

119 

208 

760 

17 

1942 

1434 

636 

23 

257 

1 

396 

46 

367 

10 

138 

48 

41 


17ft 17ft 
IS 15 
18ft 17% 
lift lift 
20 19ft 
3ft 3ft 
8ft 8ft 
24ft 24 
1ft 1ft 
BVfa 8 
• 9ft 6ft 
3ft 3ft 
14ft 14ft 
20ft 20ft 
lift 10ft 
T4ft 14 
36ft 36ft 
21ft 21 
5ft 5ft 
19ft 19ft 
17ft 17ft 
19 - 76ft 
3ft 3 
4ft 4ft 
10ft 10 
14ft 13ft 
9 8ft 
7 6ft 
12ft lift 
12% 12 
8% 8ft 
14ft 14 ft 

» JL 

28ft 27ft 
31% 31% 
10ft 10% 
6 5% 

17% 17 
35ft 35 

29ft 28% 

10 m 

1ft 1ft 
% ft 
33ft 33 
» 24% 

8ft 7ft 


17ft 

15 —ft 
17ft 

lift— ft 
20 + ft 

3%— ft 
8% 

24 — ft 
. 1ft 
8% 

B%— ft 
3% 

14% + ft 
20ft— ft 
10ft— ft 
M —ft 
36% + ft 
21ft + ft 


Soles In Net 

Djv. Yld. 100s High Low 3 FMl dm 


21% 91fa 
35ft 22ft 
19ft 8 
57 34ft 
37 23Ui 
31ft 17ft 
7ft 1% 
16ft 8% 
8ft- 3ft 
22 15 

21ft 11% 
11 6% 
31% 18%, 

iT 


CntrSc 
Cenloor 
CenBc 
CnBshS 
CFdBJts 
Cermtk 
Getuff 
ChflpEn 
ChrmSs 
ChkPnt 
ChfcTdl 
ChLwn.: 
Chemex 
E - " 


20 

p 

17 


20 47 


22 

163 

214 

920 

3 

7 

168 

48 

54 

5 

178 

T7 

122 

45 


17% 17% 
12ft lift 
12% 12 
14ft 13% 
ID 9% 
12ft 12 
16 15ft 
22 % 21 
12ft 12 
19 18% 

8ft 8ft 
4ft 4ft 
78ft 18 
39ft 39% 
6% 6% 
11% 10ft 
6 5% 

22ft 22 
37 37 

10ft 

9% ___ 

26% 26ft 
10ft .?% 
14% U% 
5ft 5ft 
5 4ft 
5% 4ft 
8% 8ft 
7% - 7% 
19ft 19ft 
17ft 17% 
ISVfa 14ft 
4% 4ft 


9ft 

9ft 


19% 

17ft— % 
18ft— % 
3% 

4% — % 
10 — % 
14 + ft 

. 9 

6ft + ft 
12% + ft 
12% + ft 
• 8% — ft 
14%— ft 
8 — .% 
27ft— ft 
31ft 

10% + % 
5% * 

17ft 4- % 
35 

3 + % 

ft— ft 
29% 4- % 
10 +ft 
1% + ft 
ft + ft 
33 — % 
25 

8 ‘ — % 
25ft 
17% 

Tift 

12ft + ft 
14% 4- % 
10 

12% + % 
15ft- % 
21%— ft 
12ft + ft 
10% — W 
8ft— ft 
4ft— % 
18 — ft 
39ft— ft 
6% 
lift + ft 
5%— ft 
22% + % 
37 —ft 
9ft— % 


70ft 

19ft 

12% 

-44% 

34ft 

12ft 

7% 

23ft 

35% 


14ft 

31ft 


2Tft 

23% 

18ft 

20% 

48ft 

T8U 

4ft 


26% CMPOCS 
6ft Chronr . 
70ft ChrDwt 
5ft Otyron 
25%-dntos 
13% Cipher 
6 ClprkxJ 
4 Clrcon 
16ft CtzSGc 
MftCtaFW 
40ft 27% CtzUt A 
38ft 24% CtzUt 8 
9%-CltyFed 
20ft CtyNCp 
22ft CtartcJ 
15ft ClevtRt 
4% Oftitms 
13ft Coast F 
9 Cab# Lb 
24% COCOBtl 

m Logentc 
13% Cohmts 
2% CofabR 
8ft Cotagen 
4 Collins 
15% CotrTle 
IS GateNt 
4ft Comars 
11% earnest 
10% Comtsta 
1% ComcSkK 
31ft C merle 
22% CmcftU 
9ft CmlSh ■ 
23 CmwTl 
1% ComAm 
16ft Comlnd 
7% ComSvs 
13% CmpCds 
3ft Compaq 
15ft CmaCrs 
2% Compos 
5ft CCTC 
15ft CmpAS 
9ft CmpDt 
3% CWEnt 
-4ft CmptH 
5% Cmplitft 
5ft CmpLffc 
2ft CmriM 


1J0 SS 

TJOSblJ 
L53 AS 
-B4 32 


2D M 

30 2.1 
.12 12 


M 2.1 

job U 
.120 2 


JA 45 
1.04 13 
t 

!J6 54 
40 3.9 
•88*30 
J» 15 
2JI0 100 


S 6a 12 


Aft 

15ft 

Aft 

20ft 

21ft 

141% 


34 43 


15% 

4ft 

43% 

43 

13 

31ft 


.12 

.16 


J 

IS 


26% + 
10ft -- 


% 

— _ % 

14% + ft 
5ft— ft 
5 + ft 

5 - ft 
0% + ft 
7%— ft 
19% + ft 
17ft + ft 
14ft— ft 
4% + ft 


Sift 

U 

s* 

lift 

sift 

12% 

24ft 

W* 

- 10% 

>«% 

ft 

Oft 

5ft 

9ft 

TO* 

7ft 

If* 

F 

13 

te 

u 

■■*s 

l}ft 

2ft 

29% 

9% 


39% BBDO 
7ft BRCom 
14% Banco*! 
22% BcpHw 
5% BOfiCtOC 
6ft BonoH 
Wfa BKNES 
8ft BkMArn 
9ft BanM 
12% Bantus 
6% Baron D 

6 QsTnA 

7 BesAm 
31% BsctF 
38ft BavBko 

6ft Boryrv 
13% Bonbon 
29ft BerzUj 
10% Bio* 

9% Blgfieor 
9% Bindlri 
3ft BtoRcs 
4% Btoen 

I Basrc 
6 BlOKR 
5 Birdtnc 
2fr% BcotBn 
15ft BobEv 
6ft BrilTc 
lift BostSc 
4% BftnDkt 

II BsmFC 
8% BroeCp 
3te BftW 
lK BrvrTum 

8 Brunos 
IK BuMTS 
15ft Bmhm 
21% BMAC 

8 BosinTd 


220 4 J 

.90 £8 
1J6 4S 

M 84 

200 4-6 
700 105 

36 13 


104flM 
JKta 24 

.12 1.9 

132 a2 


1 SO SO 
J00 M 
.16 24 
J72 11 

JO* 10 

.12 23 

•26 T.l 

20 M 
Utt 4.1 


6 

20 

184 

TO 

14 

39 

431 

64 

38 

1 

2 

189 

4 

20 

43 

7 

994 

13 

26 

49 

46 

317 

146 

25 

13 

88 

127 

6 

810 

11 

148* 

84 

11 

551 

571 

9 

6 

331 

244 


41ft 47 
7% 7ft 
15% 15ft 
30ft 
8ft 8% 
9% 9ft 
43ft 43 
9ft 9% 
15% 13ft 
153b 15* 
« V 
im ■»!«• 

££ Joe 
32% W 

51% 

Aft 6ft 
]4ft 14ft 
31ft 30% 
14% T4ft 
14 13ft 

1M 20 
Aft 6 
9 Bft 

8 7Vt 
3QW JB 
1W. WJi 
M W* 
23ft 22ft 
CA 

22’a 22,, 
lift TJj* 
3ft 

1M * .12 
I5 1 A ljft 
19ft 

25ft 2474 
*% 6ft 


^Tft + ft 
15ft— 1? 
30ft + % 
8% 

9Vz 
43% 

iSS + s 

15ft- ft 
9 

11% 

?fcfa + ft 


ST%-H 
m— ft 
14% 

31% + ft 
74% 

13ft 

10 -ft 
6%— ft 

s*=s 

*ft-r ft 
23ft + ft 
4Vl— ft 
22ft 

nft + ft 

3ft 

15 — ft 
l»ft— {J 
15ft- g 
25ft + ft 



<9 

* rru 

mi 

■T 

. & 


A C COR 
4% CPRBD 
At* CML 
U CPI 
StkCPT 
4 CSP 
.JJfcCACl 
WiCbrvSc 
7% CoIMJc 

WJ*. COflflAC 
.J T 4 CdpCTO 
17 CraiiOD 
3% CoraerC 


01 

319 

2 

68 

*11 

52 

.901 40 S9 


5% 

Certtrt 


•tft 


184 

I0B 

flBT 5 >80 

*22 m; 

t I » 


Th 71fc 
GU 

9%> 9U 
mi lw. 

ioft 'Oft 

3% 2% 

iru lgft 

10 ?§! 
4ft 4* 

2ft 2ft 
13ft lift 

28% rot 
i% ift 
isft i*w 

IB 9ft 
13ft 13ft 


7ft ^ 

4ft— ft 
fft + ft 

5ft— * 

T-% 

im 

4% + W 
2% 

JS=* 

3% 

13% + V* 


sou 

12% 

74 

11% 

25% 

4U 

15U 

30 

13% 

816 

12% 

9% 

8% 

6% 

1016 

I9ttt 

im 

8 

10% 
9% 
27 
18% 
26% 
0% 
54% 
5 % 
0% 
42 
18% 
8 

1416 

2TU 

5% 

2216 

49 

10U 

11% 

60% 

5 

7% 

17% 

16Vfa 


2.70 57 
104 27 
-50a 51 
400 £5 


IS 

0 


22 20 


08 0 


.12 10 


211 

60 

74 

41 
26 
64 

102 
394 
165- 
414 
64 
64 
. 40 
46- 
54 
319 
74 
13 
97 
27 
' 8 
• 476 
59 

1961 

18 

133 

23 

167 

36 

44 

3 

97 

23 

39 

6 

3 

93 

•310 

225 

99 

20 

262 

80 

no 

16 

42 
764 

52 

286 

35 

IB 

21 

39 

66 

193 

3044 

704 

38 

139 

1035 

16 

47 

38 

5 


15% 

30% 

16V* 

53% 

34 

26% 

3% 

14% 

3% 

20% 

T5 

m 
••• 4M- 

* -7%- 
■10U 

10% 

26 

9% 

• 18% 

■ 7ft 
-37% 

14 - 
6U 
A 

E* 

32 

40 

36 

10% 

29% 

25 

18ft 

22ft 

15ft 

18ft 

47% 

V 

ft 

14 

4% 

12ft 

4% 

17% 

17ft 

lift 

19ft 

10% 

2% 

37ft 

39% 

9% 

26ft 


M 

34% 

32% 

28% 

27 


6% CmgPds 
9ft CraTsk* 
4% Cmptrtn 
?ft Cpfcff 
6 Carraftr- 
6 ConcptI 
14ft CnCap 
UU CCOPR 
12% CCopS 
5% ConFbr 
32ft CoPops 
3ft CacttPd 
2% Consul 
28% Cub Be 
8ft ClIHtlS 
4 CtLasr 
4% Convut 
12ft Cofwrss 
1ft Copt Bio 
14ft Coots B 

16ft Copytcl 
6 ■ Corcom 
5% Cordis 
37% CoreSt 
1% Corvus 
3ft Cosmo 
10ft CrfcBrt 
10ft Cronus 
20ft CrosTr 
9 CwnBk 
15% Crump 
lift CirflnFr 
15ft Cu turns 
lift Cvcaro 


200 W 
1080105 

2.16 160 


T.48 

08 


3.1 

25 


204b S2 


00 2.1 


208 40 


.14 L2 
00 3S 


SO 

S4 

SO 


10 

42 

20 


8 

46 

32 

7 

642 

441 

137 

379 

1 

60 

3 
135 
24x 
17 

• « 
1147 

1599 

1761 

481 

128 

30 

209 

m 

305 

115 

4 
10 
49 

123 


19% 

9% 

16ft 

3 

6% 

24ft 

10 

7ft 

lift 

8% 

7% 

2% 

6% 

lift 


15 15 — ft 

30ft 30ft 
16ft 16ft + ft 
52% S3 — ft 
33ft 34 + ft 

26% 26%—% 
2% 2% 

14 14% + % 

3% 3ft 
20ft 20ft + ft 
14% 14% — ft 
8ft 8ft— ft 
18ft 18ft—" ft 
7ft 7%— % 
.9% 10ft + % 

in raft 

25ft 26 
9ft 9ft 
18ft 18% + ft 
7ft 7ft 
37ft- 37ft + ft 
13% -13% — ft 
6ft Aft 
5ft 5ft— ft 
16% 16%-— ft 
32 32 

39ft 40 + ft 

35ft 36 + % 

10ft 10% + ft 
29ft 29ft— ft 
24% 25 
18ft 18ft— ft 
22 22ft + ft 
15ft 15ft 

18 18ft 
47% 47% 

« ’Hit 

13% 14 
3% 4Vfa 
12ft 12ft + % 
4% 4%— ft 
17% 17% 

17ft 17ft— ft 
11 11 — ft 

19 19 
10% 10%— ft 
2% 2% 

37 37 — ft 

39ft 39ft + ft 
9ft 9% 

29 

lfc 
26 
8ft 


16ft 5ft Exovir 


-13 


9% 9ft 9% 


9ft 

10ft 

3% 

22ft 

68% 

23ft 

8 

17% 

34% 

56. 

38U 

IBft 

6% 

9% 

15ft 

33 

32ft 

27ft 

19 

29ft 

9ft 

38ft 

15ft 

26ft 

29ft 

20ft 

30ft 

36ft 

66 


1.76 30 


M2 


4J 

XI 

10 

!?■ 

42 


40ft 

31 

26 


7% 

9 

6% 

16ft 

16 

13% 


11 

82 

28 


48ft 

3ft 

2% 

39 

9ft 

4ft 

B 

'h 

19% 

38ft 

7% 

9 

51ft 

1% 

3% 

11% 

33 

13% 

28ft 

22% 

21ft 

20% 


29 — ft 
Ifc + ft 
26 —ft 

19ft 19% 

9% 9ft + ft 
15% 15%—% 
2% 2%— ft 
6% 6% 

22% 23ft — T 
10 10 — ft 

7ft 7ft 
16% 10ft 
6% 8%— ft 
7% 7% 

.2% 2%— ft 
6% 6% 

17% IB - 
5% 5% 

7% 7ft 
8% 9 
Aft 6% + ft 
15% 16ft— ft 
15ft 16 +TA 
13ft 13ft 
6ft 6ft 
48 48 — ft 

3ft 3% 

2ft 2% 

38ft 39 

IWl. 14 

TtI TVH™ ra 

4ft 4ft 
7% 7% + ft 

mi 12% 

W lft— % 
19ft 19ft 
36% 37ft— 1ft 
7% 7% 

8% 9 + ft 

3ft 3ft 
lift 11% 

13% 13ft— % 
22ft 22% — U 
12%-lJH -I- ft 
28 ttft + % 
27% 22ft 
21 21% 

20 20% 4 % 


44% 

Bft 

16ft 

ZZft 

41% 

19ft 

T7V% 

6% 

lift 

19% 

34ft 

24ft 

23% 

3ft 

10% 

8 

29% 

14% 

14% 


5% FDP 
5 FM1 
lft FaitiRest 
10ft FormF 
45ft FrmG 
12ft FrtGPS 
4ft F*rcflu 
7 Flbrans 
21ft Fdlcrsi ■ 

33- Fifth! u '100 
21ft Ftorie. - 08 
lift Flmifc . 00 
3% Finales 2D 

5ft Flngmft." 

6% Fifligao. 

S % FAIaBk 1.12 30 
• FtARrv- 00 -20 

14ft FtATns 

lift FfColF 
22ft FComr 
7 FtCant 
16ft FDotaR 
10 FExac 
14ft FFRM 
15% FtFflCP 
10% FtFnMs 
19ft FfFlBk 
27% FJerN 
27% FMdB 
20% FNtCEn S 100 
25ft FRBGa 108 
19% FlSvFka 
17ft F5ecC 
20% FTenn 
30% FstUnC 
2ft FSakey 
10ft Ftexstl 
13% FiaFdi 
26% Flaw Ff 
7% FtowS S 
10ft Flurocb 
3 Fonorh 
12% FUon A 
72 FLIon B 
22ft ForAm 
13% FarestO 
12ft FortnF 
1% FortnS 
6 Forum 
4ft Foster 
14ft Fremnt 
6 Fudixk 
11% FuJrHB 


ISO S3 
100*140 

207*21-5 
000 20 
00 10 

04 IS 
100 5,2 
100 30 
30 
10 
00 20 
1.T0 5S 
100 40 
1.12 17 

08 40 
2D 1.1 
SO 11 

08 20 

09 S 

07 0 

.96 12 

100 6J 


06b .7 
.10 XI 
08 20 


20 

199 

129 

562 

1863 

2337 

41 

4Q1 

67 

* 6 
40 
19 
19 
230 
-28- 
29* 
— 1- 
.338 . 
IT 
4 
4 
17 
507 
fi 

• 8 

187 

17 

102 

71 

6 

74 

2 

*212 

m 

372 
177 
‘ 4 
303 
142 
12D 
13 
577 
175 
71 
65 
103 
6 
247 
1471 
133 


02 1.9 


140 

24 


7% 7% 

9ft 9 
7% 1% 

11 10ft 
50% 57ft 
16 15ft 
4% 4ft 
15ft 75ft 
28% 28 
52% 51% 
37% 37ft 
15ft 15 

' 4% 4% 

0% 6 
14ft 14ft 
29% 27ft 
30ft 30ft 
_25% 24ft 
16% 15% 
23% 23 
7 7 

38ft 38 
13% 13ft 
20 19% 

^1 Ti- 4i!L 

an zd72 

18ft 18 
28ft 28ft 
34ft 34% 
54 53ft 
36% 36% 
38% 37% 
2B% 28i fa 
20ft T9% 
36ft 36 
36ft 36ft 
3ft 2% 

12 11% 
18ft 18 
38% 38ft 
18ft 17% 
14% 14ft 
3ft 3ft 

17ft 17ft 
17% 17% 
30 29ft 
75 16% 

19% 19% 
2ft 2 
•9 8ft 
5 4ft 
23ft 23% 
6% 6ft 
16% 16ft 


7%— ft 
9ft +ft 
" ft 

70% + % 
58ft +1% 
15% — 1 
4% + % 
15ft + ft 
fflft 

51% — % 

37ft 

15ft 

4%—' ft 
Aft— ft 
lift + ft 
29% +lft 
30ft 

25 + % 

16% + ft 
23% 

7 — % 
38ft + ft 
13ft + ft 
20 

26ft— ft 
18% 

28ft + ft 
34% 

53ft 

36% 

37% - ft 
28%— % 
20ft 

36 + % 

3612 

2ft— ft 
12 + % 
18ft + ft 
38ft 

18 —ft 
14ft— % 
3ft 
17ft 

17ft + % 
30 +lft 
14% + ft 
19J4 

2ft- ft 
8%— ft 
4ft 

23ft + ft 
6% + ft 
16ft 


13% 

16% 

lift 

56ft 


IS 


10% 

24ft 

10ft 


20ft 

76ft 

22 

IBft 

15% 

9% 

13ft 

8% 

22 

12ft 

15ft 

19 

15% 


3ft GTS 
9% Galileo - 
Aft GamoB .10 
28% Gcnartch 
5 Genets ' 

1ft Genex 
8ft GoF&Jc 
4% .GerMds 08.. .9 
16 GUisGi JA M 
14 GisaTr 
)2ft Gotaas 
9% Grit 
14ft GouWP 
10% Grace 
5ft Grantre 
5 Grphi s 
4 GrpftSc 
10ft GWSav 
8 GtSoFd 
8 -GftCfa 
13% Guflfrd 


.76. 49 
04 30 


087-20 


05* 2 


3ft GIIB0C 150OC 


28 
SB 
325 
763 
2077 
376 
406 
• 19x 
323 
1 

938 

37 

244k 

49 

16 

53 

392 

383 

48 

18 

18 

.290 


4 
12 
Aft 
46 . 
6 
1ft 
24% 
8ft 
18ft 
15ft. 
13% 
27ft 
16 ' 
14% 
8% 
12ft 
7 

19%. 

9ft 

14ft 

* 


2% 4 
11% 11% 
Aft Aft 
44 45 

7ft 7ft 
1ft 1ft 
24ft 24% 
8% Bft 
IBft 18ft 
15ft 15ft 
13ft 13% 
21 % 21 % 
15ft 15ft 
74ft 14ft 

12ft 12ft 
6ft 7 
19% 19% 
9ft 9ft 
14ft 14ft 
14ft 14% 
3ft 3ft 


— ft 
+ U 
+ ft 

+ ft 
+ ft 

+ ft 
+ ft 

+ Vi 

— ft 


+ ft 
+ ’A 
+ ft 
— U 

-ft 


I 


H 


I 


I 


1 


/ T7ft 

4ft 

uu 

3016 

371ft 

30ft 

7ft 

22ft 

14ft 

9ft 

22% 

5ft 

tt 

19ft 

19ft 

28ft 

3ft 

7ft 

9tt 

14% 

5% 

15ft 

30% 

36% 

29ft 


20ft 

27 

19 

19% 

19ft 

25ft 

12% 

15ft 

6% 

28% 


7 DBA 151 15ft 15 15ft + % 

2ft DDI 78 3ft 3 3ft + ft 

6ft DEP. 41 11 10% 10%— ft 

8 DSC 5255 8ft 7ft, 7ft— % 

20% DatevSy 3435 g 20ft 21ft— ft 

20 ft DaJasF 3 30 30 30 

4ft DmnBIO 13 5% 5ft 5ft 4- ft 

lift Daicrds 24 M 92- • 19ft 19 19ft— {J 

8% Dta O 1239 ID 9% 9%— ft 

3ft D»wtdl 28 5ft 5ft 5V. — ft 

11 Datscp 6 22% 22% 22% + ft 

2ft DtaSi 3 3% 3 3% + % 

4ft Datum 83 6% 6 6% + ft 

5ft Dawson 48 5ft 5% SU— ft 

St DriiShS SO M 36 17ft 17ft T7ft + ft 

m DeCtSD 564 10% 10ft 10ft— ft 

20ft DtXfoA J2 16 1109 VK 28 21 - ft 

ft Dortous 56 1 L 1 

u DeneUx 146 Vi ft ft 

4ft DeatJVft 487 -6 5ft 5ft + ft 

7% DWP? 7 12ft 12ft 12ft 

JS DuSonC 572 2ft 2ft 2% + ft 

Ml Dlaned ™ « **>— “| 

1PA Piston - IN S’ 4 8*1 u 

22 Dirtiex 8 31 3016 31 + % 

UH dSSKi IM M 

3M Dome l^ 5 46 107 30 JWJ 30 + Vi 

12 DfdlH 00 10 16 16 15ft 15ft 

16% DovfDB 08 40 6 20% 20 20 

9% oSetr 16 . 17% 16ft 16ft— % 

Il2 O S6r 1S4 18% 17% 18% + tt 

DodcAl ■ J2 1J m 17ft rro TTft- * 
IM DunfcDS M U 164 2PA 3 HVi + W 

mb Durfroo S6 11 46 11 10% 11 ■+ ft 

52 m u » lft 1UJ im + ’* 

3ft Dvnscn 101 . 5 m 5ft 5ft 

16ft DvSdfc 193 26 25ft 2» + % 


24ft 15ft HBO 
21% 12 Haber 
9 3% Hotfco 

3ft 2 Kodson 
1% ft HateSvn 
18% 12ft HamOU 
25ft 17ft HaripGs 
34% 23ft HrtiNI 
lflft 5ft Hdttiws 
13 6% HawfcB 

5ft lft Hlthdvn 
23ft 14ft HcftgA fi 
34ft Uft Hct>OB 5 
8ft 3ft Helen T 
37% 19ft Helix 
38% 31% HenrdF 
13% 9 Hicham 
12% 3ft Hogan 
31 10ft HmFAi 
10ft 2ft Hmectt 
25ft 15% Hon Lad 
30% 23 Hoover 
6% 3ft Hon I no 
28% 13% HwBNJ 
29% 18% HunUB 
14ft 7% Kntuin 
24ft 15ft HnrpB s 
29ft 12% Hytruc 
lift 4% Hyponx 
9ft 5% HytekM 


00 -0 

805 

21ft 

27ft 


37H 

22 

20ft 


91 

4% 

3ft 


51 

2ft 

2ft 


3 

fe 

12 

.10 0 

328 

16ft 

16ft 

04 10 

380 

18% 

17% 

102 5J 

92 

30ft 

29ft 

00 20' 

21 

7ft 

7ft 

.141 

95 

7ft 

7ft 

342 

. 2ft 

2ft 

.16 10 

760 

16ft 

16 

J» 0 

<3 

17 

16ft 


280 

5fe 

4ft 


169 

19fe 

IBft 

.92 23 

12B 

33ft 

33fe 


2 

9ft 

9ft 


93 

5ft 

Sfe 


ai 

29fe 

29ft 


231 

3ft 

3% 

04 20 

49 

25 

24ft 

100 40 

702- 

25ft 

24ft 


19 

4ft 

4ft 


84 

27ft 

26ft 

.10e ' 0 

96 

22ft 

21ft 


29 

12ft 

12b 

04. 00 

21B 

23ft 

23 


554 

27ft 

27 


50 

10 

9ft 


2 

7ft 

7ft 


27ft 

22 + % 
3ft— ft 
2ft— ft 
ft 
16ft 

17ft— % 
30ft— ft 
7ft + ft 
7ft— ft 
2ft— % 
16ft— % 
16% — % 
5ft + ft 
18% — % 
33ft 

9ft— % 
S%— ft 

roe 

3ft + ft 
24% 

25ft + ft 
4ft 

26ft— % 
22ft +1 
12%— ft 
23% + % 
27ft + % 
10 

7% + ft 


I 


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15 6% 

5% 1 

SB A 

la* 

a* 1 # 

im rjj 

9% 4% 

im TV, 
rt 4,4 
uh St 

ou 

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36 1 5% 

am <o 
aou W 

25% 
20ft II 


CClTri 

EIP 

Enfp. 

Earl Cal 

EOT Lb 

EdCmp 

ETQilC 

EiPes 

Elan 

EBltO 

EttcBto 

ElCothS 

ElftNud 

ElcRnt 

ElCtMjS 

ElronEL 

EmaAir 

Emulex 

E rvsn 

End va> 

EndaLs 


.12 10 

106 11 
.120 U 

1S2 110 


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EnzoSI 

BA as 

EvnSu! 


17 

1 

90 

184 

412 

28 

.IS 

1B0 

903 

77 

1£2 

99 

1705 

174 

6 

20 

7741 

72 

161 

*3 

797 

161 


9ft 9 

fi tt 

lift 10ft 
34ft 32ft 
9% 9 
9ft 9ft 
13ft 13% 
Aft 6% 
7ft 7ft 
7ft 7ft 
13% TZft 
16ft 16 
14ft 14K 

12 VL 

B 7% 
12% lift 
8 7ft 
3% 3% 

Aft Aft 
10 9ft 
18 17% 

16% 16% 
72% 72ft 

B JS 

Z7ft 26% 
17ft 17ft 


9ft + tt 
Aft— ft 
llfa 

lift 4- % 
33% —1 
9 — % 

9Vz 

13ft + ft 
6tt— ft 
7% + ft 
7ft 4- % 
13% + ft 

14% + % 
llg-ft 

lift— ft 
7ft— % 
3% -6 ft 
6ft 

9ft- ft' 
17% — % 

J*-?s 

17ft 


19% 

33% 

13ft 

7ft 

10ft 

7% 

46% 

32 

26ft 

33ft 

lift 

15 

4% 

23ft 

33% 

11% 

M 

15% 

16ft 

35% 

10% 

22% 

13ft 

IB 

IBft 

25ft 

14% 

a£ 

25% 

14ft 

13% 

8% 


7% ILC 
16% IMS 5 

m isc 

3% leaf 
4% ImUTHK 
2tt Inocmp 
31ft ImUN 
20 IntaRsc 
14ft Jnttra 
15ft InstNtvv 
3ft Intoctn 
Bft IntoDv 

3 intaGm 
14 fSSCO 
22ft Intel 

4% tni(5v 
1% IntrTpl 

4 Infmd 
Aft intrfFir 

22ft intgohs 
4ft Intnngn 
11% intmK 
5ft Lrrtrmir 
8% intCJln 
ittlGome 
14ft Ini King 
7ft intlJHS 
4H InMariE 
S IRIS 
9% IT COS 
Aft Iomega 
9% Isomdx 
3ft l tel 


.16 S 


100 


.16 13 


1 

9ft 

9ft 

632 

. 30ft 

30% 

m 

12 

71ft 

29 

A 

5ft 

57 

Sfe 

4ft 

9 

3ft 

3ft 

114 

45% 

45 

169 

23ft 

25 

71 

17ft 

17 

295 

21ft 

20% 

508 

5 

4ft 

38 

11% 

10ft 

20 

3ft 

3 

143 

14% 

14 

3684 

26ft 

25ft 

214 

Aft 

4ft 

16 

' 2% 

2 

22 

10% 

10% 

33 

13ft 

12% 

2217 

25% 

24% 

» 

1 


451 

12 

life 

10 

7ft 

7 

477 

10% 

9* 

555 

9ft 

8ft 

-5 

17% 

17% 

69 

13ft 

13ft 

268 

6% 

6% 

Too 

2% 

zH 

93 

23% 

23 

285 

Bft 

Sfe 

31 

10ft 

10% 

214 

8 

7ft 


9ft 

30%— ft 
77% 

5ft 

5ft 4 -ft 
3ft— ft 
45 

25% + ft 
17 

21Vj +lft 
69L 

10ft— ft 

Ufa 

14ft + ft 
25% — ft 

2% + % 
10% - ft 
13% — % 
24ft— ft 
7 + ft 

life— % 

7 “ J* 
9ft— ft 
8ft— ft 
17% 

13ft + % 
6ft— ft 
2% 

23 

m 

im + ft 
7ft- ft 


U Mon til 
N telr Low Slodk 


Safes tn Nel 

Dlv. >ICL 1009 hi9h Low 3 PJA. OTo* 


10ft Aft Kavdon *5 n 8ft Bft + ft 

AT% 38ft Kemp 100 W 152 53% 52ft 53ft + ft 

41ft 26ft KyCnLf 100 20 69 37% 37% 37% + % 

8ft 4ft KevA 1 6% 6% 6% + ft 

11 6% KeyTm 55 7% 7% 7% + ft 

11U 2% Klmbrk 2 2% 2% 2%— ft 

21ft 13 Kinder 06 3 556 It im 18ft— ft 

74% 4% Kiev 06 0 34 7ft 7% 7ft— ft 

16ft 9ft Kruger 32 25 0 13ft 12ft 12ft 

29ft lift Kulcfce .123 10 636 life lift lift— ft 


[ 


1 


.11% 
TB% 
23ft 
T9ft 
..47% 
-2 Oft 
IBft 
. -17 - 
17 

59% 

32 

Bft 

15ft 

9ft 

4 

4% 
24% 
7ft 
20% 
33% 
36% 
Aft 
49ft 
25% 
33% 
26% 
29 * 


5% LDBrnfc 
9% LSI LOO 

10 LTX 
1%' La Poles 

20Vfa LoZBv 
12ft LadFm 

11 Laidlw 
.Uft LamaT 
14 Lancosl 
35 ""LoneCci 
21 fe Lowsns 

4ft LeeDfo 
fl% Lelner 
Afe LewisP 
2k Lexicon 
l7n LexkJta 
17% Uebrt 
4ft LfeCom 
lift LlIvTui 
T8ft UnBrd 
27% UncTel 
4ft Lim&rg 
21% LizClas 
20% LongF 
16% Lotus 
19 Lyndon 
7ft Lirphos 


100 30 
.16 S 
30 U 
00 12 
08 40 
.92 U 
02 1.1 


08b 42 

07 0 

00 10 

2L20 60 
.16 30 
J5 .9 
708 62 


113 

491 

48 

14 

1 

1 

23 

42 

8 

488 

157 

106x 

462 

4 

119 

135 

187 

161 

26 

IB 

705 

47 

3849 

1023 


5% 5ft 
17ft 17 
12% lift 
" 16ft 16 
06 46 

IBft 18ft 
15% 15 
15% 15% 
75ft 15% 
53ft 52 
29 28ft 
5ft 5ft 
9 Bft 


5ft 

17 

lift— ft 
16ft + ft 
46 
18ft 

15% 4- % 
.15%— ft 
15ft + ft 
53ft -f ft 
28ft— % 
5% 

9 4ft 


8; ft ft - % 


2% 2% 
20% 19% 
5% 5 
16% 16ft 
30 29% 

33% 33% 
5ft 5ft 
41 40 

21 20ft 
19% 17ft 
22% 22% 
20% 19 


2% — % 
79% — % 
5ft— ft 
16ft— ft 
29ft — ft 
33%— ft 
5ft— % 
40ft + ft 
20%—% 
17ft— lft 
22% 

19% —lft 


[ 


M 


1 


14% 6% MBI 159 

lift 6ft MCI 5109 

7ft 4% MJW 9 

Oft 3ft MP51 5 15 

24 15 MTS S 24 10 2 

32% 13% MTV 760 

17% Oft Made Tr 247 

27% 21% MadGE 208 9.1 25 

70% 7ft MaIRt 42 

74ft 7ft Marnt S 01e 44 

16% 8ft MalSd 9296 


7% 7 

Bft 8ft 
7ft Aft 
4ft 4ft 
76% 16ft 


7%— fe 
Bft— % 
6fe 
Aft 
16ft — % 


12 Month 
Hfeti Low Stock 


5atesfcn Net 

Dlv. Yld. 10DS High Lew 3 PA Ch'ge 


15 B% OvrExo 
16ft B DwnM fi 
6 % Oxooo 


20 10 


28 

57 

53 


9% 9 9ft + ft 
15ft 15ft 15ft 

S % ft 


[ 


1 


U2 4.9 
100a 27 


.13 17 
00 5.1 
t 


06 0 
77 
26 
05r 0 
1.12 44 


32 31ft 32 
TOft 10% 10ft * % 
25V& 24ft 25ft + % 
Bft Bft 8ft 
lift 17% 11% 

Bft 7ft 8%— 3ft 


24ft 17ft Monllw 

00 

40 

77 

20% 

19% 

20% fa 

ft 

72% 39tt MfrsN 

208 

30 

41 

64ft 

64ft 

64ft — 

% 

19ft- Uft Marcus 

00 

IJ 

10 

17ft 

17ft 

17ft 


9 - 3ft Moraux 



105 

3tt 

3tt 

3% 


13% 6% Moras! 



73 

10% 

9% 

9% 


37% 18ft MrldNs 

1.00 

15 

1863 

28ft 

28% 

28% — 

fe 


26ft 

6% 


34ft 24 
24% 13 
14ft 
Aft 
4% 

38ft 
141-fa 
lift 
10% 
20ft 
30ft 
39ft 
65% 

22 
36% 
22ft 
21% 
17ft 
36 
5% 
life 
7% 

30ft 
9 

6ft 

7ft 
24 


7 Mscol S 
lft Mosstor 


MOtnrS 
Maxers 
Bft Maxwel 
3ft MovPt 
3ft MavnOI 
30ft McCrm 
10ft Me Fart 
6 Medex 
' 4 AtedCre 
10 Mentor 
13ft MenrrG 
27ft MercBc 
37ft MercBk 
10ft MrehCo 
21ft MrAcs 
12ft MerlBs 
11% MervG 
Bfe MetrFn 
14ft Micorn 
lft Micro 
5ft MicrMk 
4ft Mlcrdy 
5ft MicrTc 
4 Micro? 
3ft MlcSms 
2ft MdPcA 
MdSlFd 


17 

41% 24?fa MJdlBk 
8 

2 7ft 
7 
44 
5ft 
27fe v 
76ft 
12ft 
20ft 
IDfe 


MdwAlr 
19ft MIIIHTS 
2ft Mintcm 
31% Mllfipr 
lfe Minlscr 
left Ml rat or 
7ft MGcsk 
MoblC B 
ModJnes 
Mo led r 


A 

13 

6 


.10 J 

08 20 
05 4 


1.92 50 
148 27 

100 52 
76 4.1 

40b 40 


06 10 


00 11 
174 14 

.44 20 

08 77 

0ie .1 

08 4.T 

.03 .1 

JSe 10 


39ft 26% Mole* 

22 14 MonfCl 

12 7fe ManAnt 
IBft 9fe Mortom 
34 23ft MonuC 100 40 
20U 14ft Mof Flo 01 
74 9 Mar Kg .16 10 

22ft 15ft Monrsn 08 2S 
7ft 2fe Moseley 
7e 12ft MotC lb 00 11 
64ft 30 Multmd 06 1.1 
26 l -« llftMvIons -ID 7 


49 

508 

44 

1995 

24 

54 

367 

374 

6 

4 

379 

1091 

2377 

97 

2 

21 

1160 

22 

233 

2 

82 

463 

19 

73 

709 

58 

63 

75 

17 

IBS 

209 

292 

41 

128 

206 

642 

35 

172 

246 

50 
60 

170 

416 

1199 

14 

4 

2 

22 

223 

134 

3 

1667 


i w a 
* 


21ft 31ft 
2ft 2ft 
31tt 31 
17% 16ft 

__ 

4fe 4ft 
31ft 37% 
11 11 
Bfe Bft 
5ft 5ft 
13ft 12fe 
14ft 13 
35ft 35ft 
62 61ft 
14% 14 
34ft 33fe 
1 8ft 16ft 
74ft 14 


I5fe 

16% 

2ft 

Aft 

6 

7% 

Aft 

5ft 
3ft 
19 
37 
A 


15ft 

16 

2 

6% 

5ft 

6ft 

6ft 

5ft 

3 

19 

36ft 

5ft 


21% — % 
2ft + ft 
31 —1 
16ft— ft 

'k 

4ft + ft 
31% — ft 
11 — ft 
&fe 
5ft 

T3ft + fe 
13ft— fe 
35ft + ft 
61fe— ft 
14% — % 
34ft 
IBft 

14ft— ft 
15ft— ft 
16 — % 
2% 

6%— ft 
n— ft 
7 

6%— ft 
5ft— % 
3ft 4- ft 
19 — % 
36ft— ft 


22ft 22ft 
3ft 3ft 
40fe 40ft 
2*n 2ft 
20% 20 
9% 9 

11% lift 
16ft 16ft 
6ft 6ft 
29 29 

20ft 19ft 
lift IDfe 
12ft lift 
29ft 29 
17ft 17ft 
11% 11% 
T9 IBft 
3 2fe 
14ft 14% 
SHft SBft 
T5ft 14ft 


22ft + ft 
3ft— % 
40ft— % 
2ft 

20 — ft 
9ft— ft 
lift 

left + ft 
6ft 
29 

20 + fe 

lift + ft 

lift— % 

29ft 

17ft 

11% 

IBft + ft 
2ft— ft 
14% 

58ft +2% 
15 + ft 


I 


N 


1 


[ 


1 


15fe 9 
Bft 3ft 
41 Vi 2Sfe 
27ft 14ft 
8fe 4ft 
23ft 14% 
7% 3ft 
TOft Aft 
19% 9ft 
20ft 13ft 


JBRStl 
Jackpot 
JOCkLte 
Jamwrr 
Jet Mart 

Jorlco 
Joniax 
Jraphin 
Junes 
■Justin * 


.16 10 199 
99 
235 
1 


£ 


•12 0 
% 53 

437 
40 

00 25 311 


life lift 
5ft 5% 
31fe 31% 
17 17 

ife 4ft 
31% 21 
5fe 5ft 
8ft 7ft 
T9U 18ft 
16% 16 


lift 

5ft + ft 

31fa 

17 -ft 
4fe 

21 — ft 
Bft— ft 
8 

19V* + % 
16 — ft 


I 


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3414ft Ufe XU« 

8% 4%. kv Phr 
33 20 ft teamen 
24ft im Karcnr 
17% 10% KM Sr 


263 

3 

06 XI 57 
lie 

-351 448 


17% T7V» 17fe 4- Vfa 
7% 7ft 7% — ft 
31ft 31 31ft 4- n 
16ft 15ft 16 — ft 
IT im IDfe- % 


*fe 

ITfe 

3 

50fe 

20% 

14% 

36 

7ft 

5fe 

9% 

10ft 

11% 

9^4 

27fe 

36ft 

12ft 

34 

30ft 

30% 

30% 

14 

7ft 

13ft 

21ft 

52ft 

47 

10ft 

17ft 

20% 

33ft 

36ft 

34ft 

55ft 

7 

9% 

31% 

IBft 

ljfe 


2% 

3ft 

18ft 

30ft 

lift 

Aft 

14ft 

lft 

2 

7% 

Aft 

6% 

5ft 


7ft 

23ft 

79ft 

Bft 

18 

1% 

1% 

6ft 

15ft 

28% 

28ft 

5 

6% 

14ft 

ISfe 

ltft 

18ft 

39ft 

4fe 

5ft 

19ft 

Afe 

6fe 


NM5 
Naocos 
HBnTex 
NtlCtv 
NtCptr s 
NDtzfn 
NHItCs 
NtLumb 
MMIcrn 
Noueie 
NalsnT 
Mellon 
NwkSec 
14fe NtwkSS 
2Mfa Meiitrgs 
NffirunS 
NE Bus 
NHmPB 
NJMtl 
NwkiBk 
NftWPt 
NwpPh 
NiCala 
NlkeB 
Harden 
Hordstr 

Hrak Bs 
NAtfln 
NestS v 
NwNG 
NwtFns 
NwNU 
NwstP5 
Noxeii 
NudPh 
Numrax 
Numeric 
NvtrlP 
NuMeds 


04 

200 

20 

04 

041 


00 


114 

45 

X4 126 
40 373 
1.1 371 

13 727 
J 50 
6 

276 
188 
19 54 

290 
83 
2574 
25 


02 
00 
1. 12b 
05e 
06 


00 

06 

04 

J2J 


104 

08 

00 

110 

1J8 


20 

20 

30 

0 

2 


174 
2 
5 
24 
134 
129 
1989 

823 
IB 3141 
40 7 

1.1 739 
5 171 
166 
261 
XI 69 
15 23 

19 468 

9J 49 

22 230 
219 
9 

12 15 

73 

44 


4ft 4ft 
9ft 9% 
24fe 24% 
41ft 41ft 
18 17ft 
73ft 13 
16 15fe 
A 5ft 
7% 2 

Zfe 2ft 
7 6ft 
6ft fi 
Aft A 
25 24ft 
31ft 31ft 
Bft 8ft 
24ft 26ft 
28ft 28fe 
29ft 29% 
14% 13fe 
21ft 21% 
9ft Bft 
lft lft 
13ft 13ft 
16ft lfi 
42ft 40 
46ft 46 
7% 6ft 
15% 14% 
life 17ft 

27 27 
20ft 20 
22fe 22ft 
50% 49ft 

5% 5ft 
5ft 5ft 

28 27ft 
9ft 9ft 
8ft 8ft 


Aft — ft 
9ft + % 
24fe t ft 

41?fa + ft 
17ft— ft 

73ft + % 
15fe— ft 
ft 
r% 

2ft 

7 

6 ~ fe 
Aft + ft 
24ft -r ft 
31fe— fe 
Bft — % 

28ft -fa ft 
29ft + % 
14% 

21% 

Bft- ft 
lfe -I- % 
13ft + % 
16ft -fa % 
41% —1% 
46% 

7ft + % 
1491 + ft 
T7fe 

27 — ft 
20% -I- % 
22ft 

49ft + ft 
5ft 
5ft 
Z7ft 
9ft 

Bft— ft 


I 


I 


5ft lft 
17ft 12 
46fe 32ft 
OrTfe 39ft 
isfe 
41% 23 
2% IBft 
25 11% 

9% 3 fe 

19% 12ft 
ISfe 22ft 
19% 12ft 

Bft 5ft 
7fe 4ft 
34ft 3ft - 


Oceoner 
Ocilfa 6 
OailGp 
onioCo 
Old Knv s 
OWRes 

ojdspfc 

OneBcp 

OnUne 

OrifcC 

Opnea 

Orbcnc 

OrDit 

OrfaCp 

OttiTP 


33 

60 

108 20 49 

200 40 2743 
700 30 39 

•74 U 212 
200 12.1 32 

J9e 10 268 
18 
59 

948 

077 

2J6 9.1 2D 


2fe M 
12ft 13% 
41ft 41% 
56% 55ft 
28 27% 

29ft 28ft 
21ft 21% 
24ft 24% 
6tt 6 
13ft 73 
24ft 23 
inn 13ft 
6ft A 
8 7% 

30% 29ft 


2ft 

13ft + % 

41% 4 % 
56ft 41% 
28 4 fe 

29ft 41ft 
21ft 4 % 
24ft- ft 
6 —ft 
13ft— % 
Mb +1 ft 
13fe 4 ft 
fe — % 
7ft + ft 
30% + ft 


32% 21% PNC S 
53% 39fe Paccar 
15ft 7 PacFst ■ 

15 IDfe PocTer 1 00 60 
1 6ft 10ft PoeoPti 
Bft 6 PancMe 
24ft 10ft Pansph 
20% lift ParkOti 
B 4 PatnlM 
12fe 5ft PaulHr 
I3fe Aft PaulPt 
1B% 7ft Pavduc 
ZZft 9ft PeckHC. 

33 20ft Pear I h 
10% 5% PegGId 

35 23% PenaEn 220 

31% 20ft Penlars 08 
15ft 7ft PeaaEx 
Tift 23ft Petrtte 
V3ft 4 Phrmct 
12% 7% PSF5 
17ft 14% PhllGI 
7fe 2 PhnvAm 
28ft 17ft PJcSav 
24% 16ft PicCafe 
37ft 27% PlonHI 
10ft 7 pion5t 
15 Bfe PoFolk 
34ft 16fe P Icy Mg 
29 21 Perm 

75ft 9% Powrtcs 
lift 5% PwConv 
37ft 19% PrecCst 
9 4% PrpdLe 

7ft 3 Priam 
16% B PricCm % 

66 36% PriceCo 

21ft 9 Prtronx 
6 4ft Pro dOp 
47 20ft ProoC 5 
15ft lift ProplTr 100 100 
T9ifa 13ft Pro v In 
7ft 3ft Pulimn 
26ft 12ft Porters 


772 27 

31 44 

410 10% 

39 13% 

49 T2fe 

212 7ft 

263 20ft 

259 life 

174 5% 

188 life 

5 9ft 

34 16ft 

157 73 

5 32ft 

161 7fe 

21 31ft 

95 26% 

370 lift 

148 24% 

476 5fe 

.10a 1.1 768 9 

_50e 32 582 15ft 

9 2ft 

207 24 

00 20 5 22fe 

.92 19 557 32 

.12 10 22 Bfe 

ID life 

738 18% 

222 24 

B 10% 

27 10ft 

.12 0 54 29U 

32 7ft 

589 3ft 

70 Bft 

879 57fe 

73 lift 

.16 X7 25 4ft 

.17 3 415 35ft 

26 12ft 

205 17% 

851 6% 

00 17 25 23% 


26ft 26ft 

43ft 44 

9ft 10ft + % 
12ft 13% 

12ft 12ft— ft 
7ft 7ft + % 
19ft 19ft— ft 
lift life + % 
5ft 5ft 
lift lift + ft 
9ft 9ft 
16ft 16fe 
»2ft 12ft*- ft 
32ft 32ft 
7ft 7fe — % 
30fe 30fe— fe 
26 26 — ft 

lift lift 
23ft 24% -fa ft 
5ft 5fe 
Bft 9 + % 

15ft 15fe + ft 
2ft 2ft 
23ft 23ft— ft 
22ft 22ft + % 
31% 31fe + % 
8ft Bft— ft 
lift lift -fa ft 
17ft IB 
23fe 23fe 
9ft 70% 

10ft 10ft 
28% 28% —1 
Aft— ft 
3ft 

B% — ft 
52% 52ft + % 
lift lift— fe 
4ft 4ft— fe 
34fe 35 
lift 12 + ft 

17ft 77% -fa % 
6 A — ft 
23 23% + ft 


12 Mont* 

High LOW STOCK 


Soles in Net 

Dlv. Yld. I DOS High Low 3 PM. CD's* 


IBft 

Bft 

18ft 

38ft 

23ft 

171ft 

69 

4fe 

10ft 

Sfe 

14 

14ft 

5ft 

26% 

7% 

life 

25ft 


11 


SlewS tv 
5ft Smet 
7fe Stratus 
29ft StrwCH 
13 Strykrs 
98ft Subaru 
3&fe SifOrB 
2\ Summa 
7% SumtHi 
ft SwiCst 
Aft SunMed 
Siiarlex 
SymbT 
Smfedi 
Svnirax ' 
SyAsoc 
3ft S/stln 
fife Svslntg 
13ft Svstml 


36 2J 


108 

1.92 


1.1 

30 


.10 1.1 


3 
8 

6% 

2ft 

14% 


08 


78 
20 
148 
4 
44 
80 
166 
208 
483 
48 
3 
7 
66 
44 
• 134 
341 
3 

10 

3 33 


16% 16 
6% 6% 
17 16fe 
33ft 33ft 
20ft 19ft 
156 ISQft 

9ft Sfe 
1ft 1% 
9% 9% 

3% 3ft 
Bft Bft 
lift lift 
3ft 9 
16% 15 
5ft 5ft 
70ft 10 
23 22ft 


16% -fa ft 
6% 

life — % 
33ft 

19ft— fe 
150ft -5ft 
65 —1 
2ft 

ft$K 

9% + % 
3ft— % 
Bft— % 
lift— % 
3ft + ft 
15ft— ft 
5ft 
10 

23 — % 


I 


1 


6ft 

3ft 

Bft 


14 8 

25ft 13 
7ft 4 
28ft 13ft 
8ft 3ft 
10ft 5ft 
34% IBft 
12ft Aft 
25ft 13ft 
2Bfe 13 

4% lft 

20 lOfe 
17ft 9ft 
12ft 4 
15ft Bft 
13ft 6 
28ft 14ft 
14ft Aft 
29ft Aft 
15ft 6ft 
14 Bft 
3% % 

17ft B 
30 7ft 
17% IQ 
12ft 6% 
30% 22ft 


TBC 

TCACb 

TocVlvS 

Tandem 

Tandon 

TcCom 

TIcmA 

TelPlus 

Telecrd 

Telepld 

TeMd 

T elobs 

Tetxan s 

TcrmDt 

TherPr 

Tbrmds 

TbrdNs 

Thortec 

ThouTr 

TimeEn 

TmaFIb 

Tlorarv 
Tofu 5 
TritSvs 
TrokAu 

TriadSv 

Tru&Jo 


.12 J 


1 

53 

9 
802 
3243 

9 

t 872 

2554 

J2 10 42! 

108 

A0 

1110 

629 

t 20 

56 
10 
93 
71 
689 
331 
22 
40 
56 
51 
15 
15 

00 13 45 


9 9 

23% Sfe 
4% 4 

14ft 14% 
3% 3 

10 % 10 % 
31ft 31ft 
e 7ft 

23ft 23 
24ft 24ft 
2ft 2 
11 IDfe 
14ft 14% 
4% 4 

9ft 9ft 
10ft 10ft 
25% 24ft 
Aft Aft 
7ft 7ft 
7ft 7ft 
13 

ifc 

12% 12 
28 2eft 
71% lllffe 
7ft 7ft 
23ft 23% 


,3^ 


9 

23 

4% + % 
14ft 

3 — % 
10% 

31% + ft 
B + ft 
23ft + ft 
24% + % 
2ft + ft 
10ft— % 
14ft + % 

4 — ft 

9ft 

1 0ft— ft 
25% + fe 
Aft 
7ft 

7ft- ft 
13 

ft— ft 
12 — % 
26ft +2ft 
lOfe— % 
7ft 
23% 


E 


1 


[ 


u 


1 


l5Va Bft QMS 380 

9ft . 3ft Quodrx 109 

13fe 9 QuakCs 08 3.9 6 

32% 16% Quontm 146 

Sfe 2ft Quest m 40 

13% Bfe Quixote 220 

12ft 7% Quotm 825 


9ft 9ft 9ft 
8 7ft 7ft— ft 
10ft 9ft 9ft — fe 
21% 2T 21 
4ft 4ft 4ft 
12tt 12ft 12ft 
IDfe 9ft 9ft — fe 


I 


1 


15% 

18ft 

1A% 

14% 

10ft 

7ft 

33% 

20% 

7% 

23fe 

10% 

35ft 

17ft 

7ft 

20% 

12ft 

10% 

20% 

17% 

16ft 

29ft 

43fe 

15% 

10 

22ft 

17ft 

33ft 

16ft 

13% 

24ft 

13 

life 

lBfe 

19% 


6 

lift 

Bfe 

6ft 

5ft 

3ft 

20ft 

12ft 

1ft 

17% 

5ft 

25ft 

Sfe 

Sfe 

11 

4ft 

7ft 

Ofe 

life 

7ft 

17ft 

29 

9fe 

3ft 

12ft 

10ft 

24ft 

11 

Bft 

16ft 

7fe 

Oft 

11 

11% 


RAX 

RPM 3 

RodSvs 

RadtnT 

Rodion 

Rogen 

Rrinrs 

RayEn 

RedfCr 

Readng 

Recotn 

RedtuiL 

Reeves 

RsrcvEI 

Reals s 

Reliab 

RpAutO 

RpHItt) 

RestrSv 

Reuter I 

RautrH 

Rev Rev 

Rhodes 

Rlblims 

RichEis 

Rival 

RoadSv 

RabNug 

Ro&Vsn 

Rouses 

RovPlm 

RovIRs 

Rust Pel 

RvanF s 


0ie 2 
06 17 


100 15 
24 )A 


134 
90 
16 
210 
5 

74 
281 
47 
13 
103 
26 

04 22 354 


20 15 
.12 .9 

.16 10 


.156 20 
JSe 1J 
1.24 15 
34 10 


00 4.9 
100 15 
06 3 

54 13 


lAl 

209 

28 

4 

24 

662 

90 

22 

1 

59 

137 

354 

30 

346 

461 

a 

68 

56 

15 

A< 

A 

424 


Aft 

75 

10ft 

Bfe 

8 

4ft 

28ft 

J7fe 

lft 

21% 

Bft 

29ft 

10ft 

5ft 

14 

4ft 

Bft 

lift 

16ft 

7fe 

26ft 

35ft 

13ft 

6% 

21ft 

76ft 

26ft 

12ft 

9ft 

23 

9ft 

3ft 

14ft 

14 


Sfe 

I4fe 

IDfe 

Bfe 

7ft 

4 

27fe 

17 

lft 

21 

8fe 

26ft 

lOfe 

5ft 

13ft 

4ft 

Sfe 

11 

T6fe 

7% 

xo vu 

35ft 

13% 

6 

21ft 

16ft 

27ft 

12% 

9ft 

22ft 

9ft 

3fe 

14ft 

15ft 


6% + % 
15 

IDfe 

8ft— % 
7ft 

28% + ft 
17% fa !6 
lfe 

21ft fa ft 
6ft 

29 falft 
IDfe 

5ft— ft 
13ft— fe 
4ft 

Bft 

11% — ft 
life— % 
7ft 

2Afe— ft 
35ft 

13ft— ft 
6 — % 
21ft— ft 
16% 

28% + % 
12ft fa % 
9ft — % 
23 + % 

9ft 

3ft — ft 
14ft— fe 
15ft 


24% 
24% 
20% 
23 ft 
13% 
29ft 
52ft 
25ft 
life 
28ft 
11 

22% 

14fe 

5ft 

32 

4ft 

A 

33fe 

5ft 

22ft 

37ft 

25% 

24ft 

48% 

22 

20ft 

13 

6% 


78 USLlCs 
13ft UTL 

5 liltrsy 
IDfe Unarm 

7fe Unifl 
14% UnPlnlr 
21ft UnTBcs 
life UACm s 
8ft UBAJsfc 
20ft US Col 

6 UFfiGro 
life UFsiFd 
6% UGrdn 
2ft US Ant 

21ft US BCP 
lfe US COP 
2ft US Dson 
11% USHCS 
3% USSWf 
lOfe US Sur 
25% US Tr fi 
17% UStotn 
I4fe UnTelev 
31 UVQB5 
13% UnvFm 
Pfe UnvHh 
5fe UFSBk 
3% Uscorf 


00 14 7 

153 

06e 0 44 

377 
123 
5 
321 
307 
2D 
11 
17 
26 
638 
76 
299 
40 
2 

1491 
26 
202 
sa 
67 
13 
35 
15 
B58 
47 

50 1122 


1.097 42 
100 11 
06 3 

.15r 10 
108 43 


1047200 
100 19 


06 J 
.72 33 
JO* 1 J 
12D 30 
20 1.1 

104 40 


08 


23fe 23ft 
14ft 14 
A 7fe 
15ft 14ft 
life lift 
2Sfe 25ft 
4Sfe 47ft 

23 22ft 
7% 7% 
16% 16ft 
B% 6fe 
5 4fe 
25fe 
3ft 31 
3 3 

23fe 23 
4% 4 

IB 17ft 
34fe 34% 
19 18ft 
23ft 23fe 
4Tfe 40ft 
17fe 17ft 

14ft I4fe 
10 9%* 

Sfe Sfe 


23ft— % 
14ft 

a -fa ft 

I5Vi + ft 
life— ft 
25% — U 
48% + fe 
20ft— % 
9ft— ft 
23 
7% 

16% — ft 

* +l « 
5 -fa fe 

25fe -fa ft 
3ft 

3 — ft 
23% — % 

4 

TTft— >4 
34ft fa % 
79 

23ft 

40ft— % 
17ft— ft 
life fa % 
9fe— ft 
5ft fa ft 


I 


1 


[ 


1 


9ft 4fe VLI 
14ft 7% VLSI 
12 4fe VMX 
20% Aft ValldLO 
22ft B% ValFSL 
42% 26ft ValNtf 
35fe 1914 ValLn 
18% 11% Van Dus 
Aft 2ft Venfrax 
2fiffe 13% Vlcoro 
14% Bft VledeFr 
14ft 9ft Viking 
20% 13fe Vlratek 
12ft 5fe Vodovl 
22 14% Volt Inf 


354 

34 

91 

763 

221 

100 12 792 
00 20 3 

00 20 52 

876 

09e 0 565 

230 20 39 

23 
86 
638 
927 


6 5fe 
12 life 
5ft 4ft 
6ft 6 
17 16ft 
37fe 37 
TOft 20ft 
17ft 17 
6 5ft 
17 16ft 
9ft 9% 
12% 72% 

17 lAft 
6% Sfe 

18 17ft 


6 fa % 
12 fa % 
5 + ft 
6% 

16ft— ft 

37% fa % 

20ft 

17 

Sfe— % 
lAft + ft 
9U— ft 
12% — ft 
17 + % 

Sfe— % 
17ft 


16 7ft SAY ind 
18% 10ft SCI Sy 
19% 10ft SEI 
life A SFE 
23 1« SRI 

TOft 6ft 5otecds 
44ft 29 Safeco 
23 life SafHHVl 
16 7% SfJude 

75ft 39% StPaui 
Aft 2% SriCpi 
11% 6 San Bor 

oiA 5ft soreisv 

50 32fe SavnF 
20% 10% SBkPSs 
lOfe 6% ScanOp 
16% lOfe ScanTr 
13ft 8ft Scnerer 
25ft 15fe SctilmA 
7ft 3% SClMlC 
15% 7 ScJStt 

2Dfe 7 Sdlex 
9ft 4ft SeaGal 
8% 4 SeoOOtO 

4ft 1ft SecTog 
9 1ft SEEQ 
28ft 16 Selbel 
ID 5ft Semlcn 
lOfe 6 Sensor 
Ifife lOfe 5vc Mer 
25ft 17ft SviYists 
23 13ft Service 

7fe 4% SvcFrct 
18 12% SevOak 

37% 73ft S hr Mod 


.IDr 10 
00 40 
20 1.1 
100 4J 


300 40 

.12 1 S 
1J6 30 
04 23 


32 16 
00 1.7 


00 40 

05 .7 

08 0 
00 40 


39% 29% 
20ft 12% 
14ft 7ft 
31ft 21ft 
1A 10 
10% 4ft 
17% m 
20ft life 
24ft life 
life 4ft 
17fe 11% 
16% lift 
24% life 
12ft Bfe 
4% 2 
54 31 

31tt 11% 
10ft Aft 
21fr life 
29ft 18% 
27ft 14% 
6ft 4 
38% 20fe 
28ft lAft 
9ft 5ft 
Jlft 27fe 
19% Bfe 
28% Sfe 
Bfe Sfe 
life 13 
16 3ft 
9ft 5 
X JPfe 
23% 11% 
34% 19 
Aft 3ft 
7ft 4ft 


Sh writs 
5helbv s 
Shew a 
ShQnsy fi 

StionSos 

Silicon 

silicons 

SrtlcVaJ 

Slllaix 

Slltec 

smiPin 

Slpplns 

SLezIer fi 

Skipper 

SratthL 

Society 

SOCtVSV 

Saftech 

SeftwA 

SonocP s 

SonrFd 

SOHOSP 

SltidFn 

5oulrxt 

Sovran 

Sovran & 

$*>*cdY 

Sactran 

SoecCtt 

Spirt 

StorSrs 

stotBid 

siundr 

StdMJc 

StaSIB fi 

StoteG 

Steiger 


.16 1.1 
08 10 

108 40 
.16 0 

.15 0 


00 SJ 

00 0 
104 30 


08 27 
05c 20 

02 20 
00 lfi 
.10 10 


07 10 


00 20 
730 3.9 

00 20 
.ISO 30 


B7 

397 

448 

lfi 

120 

1340 

730 

1 

77 

367 

109 

32 

70 
39 
10 
21 

138 

15 

1 

47 

18 

501 

89 

787 

34 

3fl 

58 
2 

285 

1140 

1575)i 

47 

252 

180 

2288 

57 

45 

34 

80 

2 

439 

1444 

13 

32 

5 

52 

243 

27 
200 
419 

82 

71 
s 

931 

79 

26 

152 

1187 

US 

212 

548 

4 

332 

59 

28 
739 
421 

2 

221 

166 

27 

55 


12 11 
13ft 13% 
18ft 18% 
6% Aft 
IB 17 
lBfe 18 
38ft 37 
16ft 16ft 
15 14ft 
A6fe 67ft 
5% 5 

Aft 6 
6^ 5ft 
49ft 49ft 
19ft 19ft 
8 7ft 
15fe 15% 
12tt 12% 
23 23 


3ft 

3 

8% 

4fe 

Sfe 

2 

2% 


3% 

8 

7ft 

4ft 

5ft 

2 

2 


16% 17ft 


6 

7ft 
14 


6 

7ft 

13ft 


18% 18ft 
20 19% 

4ft 4ft 
15ft 15ft 
33ft 13ft 

36ft 36ft 
17ft 17ft 
10% 9ft 
26ft 25ft 
lift lift 
5ft 4ft 
10ft 10% 
15 14fe 
1 Bfe IB* 
5ft 5ft 
13ft 13ft 
12 life 


16 

10ft 

7ft 

48 

TOft 

Tfe 


14fe 

9ft 

7ft 

47% 

19fe 

7% 


15ft 15ft 
2» 25% 
lift I7fe 
4ft 4ft 
71ft 2Dft 
16% 16ft 

4fe 6% 
2tft 23ft 
16% Id 
19fe 78% 
Aft Sfe 
15 14fe 
7% Aft 
7ft Aft 
25ft 25ft 
14 13ft 
30ft 29ft 
4ft 4ft 

5>a S 


11 —I 
13Vv fa fe 
IBft fa % 
Aft + ft 
18 fal 
1B% fa ft 
37ft fa fe 
life — ft 
14ft — fe 
67ft fa ft 

5 — fe 
A 

6% 

49ft 

19ft 

6 fa % 
15ft fa ft 
12% — fe 
23 

3ft 

8 

B'u fa ft 
4% — fe 
Sfe 

2 — fe 
2% 

18% fal 
6 

7fe— fe 
13% 

18ft 

19fe + ft 
Aft 

15ft — % 
33ft— fe 

36% + fe 
17ft 

Wfc— fe 
25**— % 
life fa fe 
4ft 

10ft 4 fe 
15 + % 
lfl%*- % 
Sfe fa % 
13ft — fe 

12 
15 

9ft — k 
2ft + fe 
47ft— % 
19fe + fe 
7tt fa fe 
15% 

25%— ft 
18W fa ft 

4ft 

20 fe-ft 
IM + ft 
6ft 

23% — ft 
16% 

IBft— fe 

5%-ft 

15 

Aft fa fe 
7ft fa fe 
25ft fa fe 
13ft 

30ft + fe 

4ft 

5ft 


I 


W 


1 


25% 19 WD 40 
16ft 10 WalbCs 
13% 5% WlkrTei 
25% 15% WfihE 
26ft 13 WFSLs 
life 10% WM5B 
9ft 5ft Wave tL 
14% 10ft Webb 
T8fe 6% westFn 

17ft 5% WfftFSL 
10ft 5ft WMicTc 
14% 4fe WtTIAS 
21ft ISfe WmcrC 
17ft 5 WfitwCs 
34% 2ift wettra 
Aft 2ft meat 
life 3 widcora 
4bft 2Bfe Wlllmi 
ISfe 7fe WlllAL 
77ft 0ft WmsSn 
10ft Aft WIlsnF 
7fe 3ft Wlndmr 
Bfe 2fe WlnnEn 
24% 14ft wiserO 
2ift n% WockM 
29fe 21 fe Worths 
9ft Aft Wrll w 
30to 21ft WYman 


.96 4.9 
04 20 


IB 
3 
199 

106 60 77 

00 20 67 

482 
55 

00 30 55 

106 
277 
3 

25 

00 20 22 

158 

.98 12 308 

100 
1Q7U 
33 
668 
28 
250 
305 
240 
27 
12 
227 
63 
11 


105 30 


031 

00 40 
00 5.7 
04 25 
.150 10 
00 30 


19ft 19ft 
12% 12% 
10^ lOfe 
21 20ft 
24fe 23ft 
lift life 
Aft 6% 
11 10% 
ISfe 15% 
14% 14 
7fe 7fe 
12ft lift 
ISfe lBfe 
10 9ft 
31 30fe 
4 3ft 
4ft 4 
44% 44 
14 13fe 
76% 16% 
5ft 5ft 
4ft 3ft 
7ft Aft 
75ft 14ft 
life lift 
25ft 24ft 
P* 8% 
23ft 23 


19ft fa % 
12% fa % 
IDfe — ft 
21 

24fe fal 
life 
6% 

11 fa % 

15ft 

14 

7fe fa % 
lift 
IBft 

9ft— % 
30ft fa ft 
3ft— fe 
4% fa ft 
44 fa % 
13ft fa fe 
16% 

5ft— % 
3ft— ft 
Aft- fe 
75ft 
lift 

25ft — ft 
B%- ft 
23ft fa % 


I 


1 


9ft 1ft Xebec 
13ft 5ft XJ ear 
17ft 10% Xidex 


660 2ft 2 2ft— k 

371 7ft 7 7ft fa fe 

339 13 T2fe 13 fa fe 


I 


1 


21ft 14% YlowFs 04 20 651 


19 lBfe 19 fa ft 


1 


30fe 5% Zen Lb 5 
13ft lOfe Ziegler 
40ft 30ft ZJaiUI 
7% 2% ZJtef 

12% Oft Zivod 
15% Aft Zondvn 


633 

08a 19 7ix 
Ud 30 90 

4 

m 0 ufi 


18ft IB 18 — % 
12% 12 12%—% 
37ft 37% 37ft 
2ft 2ft 2ft — fe 
» Sfe 5% fa fe 
lift 9fe 9ft— 1% 


Seize the world. 

The lutematiooal Herald Tribune: 
Bringing the World's Most 
Important News to the World’s 
Most Important Audience. 


• V ; tr - 













































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1985 


r’ 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

14 





17 





30 





B 




25 

28 

27 | 

■ 




■ 

36 

39 



40 


42 





“ 







24 


10 

IT 

12 

13 

16 




19 









PEANUTS 


[43 


13? 


32133 134 




38 


41 


44 


PIGPEN EVERS' LITTLE 
MOVE YOU MAKE RAISES 
A CLOUP OF PUSTf 



books 


CAPA 


By Richard Whelan 342 pages : $19.95. 
ROBERT CAPA PHOTOGRAPHS 


BLONDIE 


53 

54 

55 


61 




55"" 




67 





1 47 


48 


m 


85 


68 


50 


51 152 


56 157 


m 


58 159 [60 


ACROSS 


1 “You're a 
better man 


»« _ 


Kipling 
6 Express 
wean ness 
10 Distmpas- 
sioned 

14 Gossip's fodder 

15 On the" 
Mediterranean 

16 Was contme 

17 "But war's 


49 Equation word 

51 Double this for 
an insect 

53 Paul Scott 
novel, with 
"The" 

61 Zagros 
Mountains site 

62 Poi source 

63 Do effort 


Cowper 

18 Mozart's 
Vienna 

19 Kirghiz range 

20 Ben Kingsley 
role 

23 Venus, to Virgil 

24 Mineoand 
Bando 

25 Track circuits 
28 Pan of a 

ballroom dance 
31 Ceremonial act 

35 Word with 
bred or will 

36 A captain and 
a king 

38 Tuned drum 

39 E. M. Forster 
novel 

42 Vitalize afresh 

43 Makes a move 

44 Claus aide 

45 Blows z's 
47 Vichy is one 
48 " — Ibien!" 


64 Fluff 

65 Sister of Ares 

66 Disturbs 

67 Positions a golf 
ball 

68 Family branch 

69 Aquatic eagles 


DOWN 


1 Streetcar in 
London 

2 A sci-fi 
writer's award 

3 Oriental nurse 

4 Desert rovers 

5 Reynolds 
Broadway role 

6 “I never 

Moor": 

Dickinson 

7 Goddess of 
fertility 

8 Some camies 

9 LaGuardia 
structure 

10 Presidential 
hopeful in 1984 

11 " Lang 

Syne" 

12 Jacob's first 


10.1/01 

13 Year of 
Columbus's 
fourth voyage 

21 Gorbachev's 
villa 

22 Excuses at court 

25 Perjurers 

26 Horn or stock 
predecessor 

27 City in Tex. or ill. 

29 Witches 

30 Incites 

32 Prefix with 
line or mine 

33 Nimble 

34 Lazes 

36 Too 

37 Yugoslav 
tobacco- 
shipping town 

40 "How sharper 

than a 

tooth. . 

Shak. 

41 Emulate 
Demosthenes 

46 Trains 

48 French 
Revolution 
aftermath 

50 Delusion's 
partner 

52 Shutout spoiler 

53 Leave a lover 

54 River or canal 

55 Anagram for 
anew 

56 Stumble 

57 Army 

58 Thor’s Sire 

59 Sly trick 

GO Loch 



Edited by Cornell Capa and Richard Whe- 
lan. 242 pages. $35. 

Alfred A. Knopf, 201 East 40th Street, New 
York. N. Y. 10022. 


BEETLE BAILEY 


SA RGE i 
YOU 
SHOULD 
WATCH 

what you 

EAT/ 


PONY WORRY, 
SIR, I'M 
WATCH I M© 



VOU BETTER 


THEY'RE GETTING 
AWFULLY 



By Herbert Mitgang 

E VERYTHING about Robert Capa was 
larger than life, including his death. After 
be bad covered the Spanish Civil War, the 
Japanese invasion or China, World War II, the 
1948 Israeli- Arab war and the French war in 
Indochina, his luck ran out when he siepped on 
a mine near Hanoi while shooting the_ dying 
French campaign in 1954. Of course, pictures 
were found inside his camera; be had captured 
the scene on the battlefield in the last moments 
of his life. Friends who mourned him as weD as 
strangers around the world remembered his 
most famous picture — the falling Loyalist 
soldier in Spain, his rifle flying out of his hand 
at the instant the bullet struck. Capa had 
followed his advice to other photographers 


only loo well: “If your pictures < aren’t good 
enough- you're not close enough- 
Richard Whelan's biography .» first-rate in 
every way. right down to the ValuaNe list of 
Capa's published photo-stones — from his 
earliest pictures of Leon Trotsky m 1932 to his 
last in the Red River Delta in 1 954 for Life and 
Time magazines. Biographies of photogra- 
phers. witnesses to the lives of others, are not 
usually exciting; one exception is Cart Sand-, 
burg's of his brother-in-law. Edward Steich en . 
But in Whelan, who writes on an and photog- 
raphy, Capa has a wise and accurate. chroni- 
cler. "As everybody who knew and admired 
Capa can testify — from North Africa ana 
Sicily to the watering holes of London and 
Paris — he could be an inventive storyteller, 
particularly when describing his adventures. 
Whelan delivers the wonderful stories; most 

turn out to be true. 


To the men and women whose lives he 
crossed, Capa was a charismatic personality. 
Whelan recounts his love affair with, among 


others, Ingrid Bergman; their trysts. began in 
“ i and coni 


Solution to Previous Pi 


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ANDY C.APP 



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tuiy. Looking at the pictures, it becomes ap- 
rat that Capa 




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parent that Capa always saw the human story 
behind the event The faces of soldiers, wid- 
ows. collaborators and prisoners dominate the 
front-line action. His was hot impersonal 
newsreel-style photography; h was tbeborrible 
image of war itself; 


10/1/85 


Herbert Mitgang is on the staff of The New 
York Times. 


CHESS 


WIZARD of ID 


wife 

■C 1 Xete York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



n oti, io& tm&t *e? ] j 
UP, Cfov YCMP- Gfc£T OP- 





By Robert Byrne 


REX MORGAN 



*Mr. Wilson went to 

SEE HIS UOODR, BEAR." 


# IS HE GONNA 6lVEKW\ , 
SOMETHING TOR HIS 6R0UCH? 


GARFIELD 



Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one fetter to eacti square to fom 
lour ordinary words. 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
9 by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 

* /. - 


□ 

JATOE 

\ 

% 




J 

m bm 




PYXOR 



□ 





FLUNIX 

> 

orm 





HEM OPl£, WHERE'S TOUR 
LfJCKV SPECIAL STICK? 



ffT Ni 0WS 


jo-i 


EVER TONE NEERS A 
LUCKV SPECIAL STICK 





© IMS United Feature Sy«*c*t8.lne. 


A lexander Fishbein, a 

17 -year-o Id national mas- 
ter from Casper. Wyoming, 
scored 5l6-t£ to win the first 
Arnold Denker Tournament of 
Stale High School Champions. 

Fishbein demonstrated his 
skill in a sharp, hard-fought 
battle with Adam Lief of Los 
Alamitos, Calif. 

The advance variation of the 
French Defense, 3 P-K5, which 
Aron Nimzovitcb popularized 
around the turn of the century, 
is currently having a resur- 
gence. ' It avoids the doubled 
pawns of the Winawer . varia- 
tion, 3 N-QB3, B-N5; 4 P-K5, 
P-QB4; 5 P-QR3, BxNch; 
6 PxB, and it is not as fussily 
positional as the Tarrasch. 3 N- 
Q2. P-QB4. The classical opin- 
ion that White should have 
trouble maintaining his ad- 
vanced center has lately come 
into question. 

The center stategy Fishbein 
used was to rid himself of his 
QP with 6 PxP so he would not 
be tied down to defense, while 
he would rely exclusively on his 
KP to keep the black, position 
cramped. 

On 7 B-KB4. it was not pos- 
sible to counterattack with 
7...P-B3?, since 8 P-QN4, 
PxP; 9NxP!. NxN; 10 Q-R5ch 
is powerful Tor White. 

The fact that, after 9 QK2. 
White had not castled gave Lief 

J iroblems in finding a safe spot . 
or his king. The trouble with 

9 N-N3; 10 B-N3.0-0 would 

have been that it gave White a' 





ready-made attack just raring 
to go with 11 P-KR4! Liefs 

9 . . . P-B4 was reasonable, al- 
though Black could never hope 
for a later attack on the oppos- 
ing center with . . . PB3. 

Perhaps, after 10 P-K.R4, 

Black should have castled king- 
side — at any rate, after his 

10 . . . 0 - 0 - 0 , it was easier for 

Fishbein to switch to queenside 
than Lief may have judged: Or 
had Lief looked forward to his 
13 . P-N417 and gambled 
that his counterattack on ihe 
white king would come more sacrifice wijth 25 N-Qch, K-R2; 
quickly than his opponent's on 26 RxB!, Q-N2r 27B-N3, PxR; 
the other wing? • • 28Q| i Q2.'; 

Il is not clear what the out- Such a blunder as 33 w Qr 
come of the fascinating mono- Bl? indicated that Lief was in 
maniacal 18 . . . PxNPI? would -extreme time pressure, a state 
have been. But it was probably that must have afflicted Fish- 
□ot adequate, for example: 19 beiivtcn, since lie failed to cap- 
PxP. Q-R2; 20 KR-BIch. B-B3 Lure . with 34. QxR. Of course, 
(or 20 . . . K-Q2; 21 Pxpch, K- Black remained hopelessly lost 
K2; 22 BxP, P-N5; 22 PxPeh. after 34N-Q6ch. RxN;'35PxR, 
KxP; 23 QR-NI, P*N; 24 QxP; 36P-N6L - 

RxBdiI. KxR; 25 Q-N2ch, K- . After 41 P-R5, ft was going 
R2; 26 R-B7ch, QxR; 27 N- to cost Black both of his pieces 
N5ch. K-N2; 28NxQch, KxN; lo stop the passed pawns from 
29 P-Q 6 ch! promoting, so Lief Gave up. 

Lief tried lo keep his king 


position closed wtih 18 ... P- 
Q5, but Fishbein's line-opening 
return of.a pawn with 19 P-B5! 
squashed the plan. 

With the repositioning 23 N- 
N5 and 24 N-KR3, Fishbein; 
blocked the KR file: the major 
source of danger for the white 
king. Now lief should have 
displayed the same caution by 
playing 24 . . . N-Q2. Instead, 
his attempt to attack with 
24 . . . N-R5 left him prey to 
Fishbein's incisive exchange 



MADAKS 



□ 

n 


IP-1 


WHAT A CHIP 
ON THESHOULPEff 

usually ie. 


Now Arrange the circled letters to 
locm the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Answer just 




v v ^ y y ^ N 


Yesterday’s 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Juffiblas: CRANK SHYLY HOOKED ACCESS 

Answer Before they'll cash your check, they'd 
/ do this— 


probably 


CHECK YOUR CASH 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algorv* 

AxmlirtSom 

Affiant 

Barcelona 

Belgrade 

Berlin 

Brussel* 

Bucharest 

Budapeil 

Coaenltggen 

Costa Del Sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Itlanbvl 

Las Palms* 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

Nkc 

Oslo 

Ports 

Prague 

ftevtlavfk 

ROfTM 

StodUsaiTTi 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


HIGH 

C P 
28 « 
3T TO 

2* 79 
77 Bl 
30 63 

20 a 

73 73 

21 70 

19 66 
14 57 

26 83 
23 73 

20 68 
77 81 

21 70 

22 73 
7 45 

20 

30 84 
30 84 

20 U 
2V 84 

74 75 
4 37 

21 70 

» 77 
B « 
20 7* 
20 « 
9 48 
2B B? 
a 40 

22 72 

27 73 

19 66 
10 SO 

20 60 


LOW 

C P 
23 73 

10 50 
17 03 
16 61 

7 45 

11 53 
19 S3 

S 41 
7 4* 
10 50 
» 72 

14 57 

15 S9 

14 6l 
7 45 
9 46 

4 39 
13 55 
21 70 
31 70 

12 54 

12 54 
T5 59 

1 34 

5 41 

16 64 

5 41 

13 55 
5 41 
S 41 

15 59 
Q 33 
7 45 

16 61 
7 46 
5 41 
3 40 


ASIA 


cl 

fr 

fr 

fr 

fr 

cl 

fr 

fr 

fr 

o 

cl 

o 

a 

fr 

cs 

»r 

o 

el 

fr 

o 

Cl 

fr 

fr 

a 

fr 

Ir 

r 

a 

fr 

fr 

fr 

o 

fr 

fr 

fr 

o 

fr 


Bangkok 

Bailing 

Hone Kong 

Manila 

New Delhi 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


HIGH 

C F 
31 M 
19 64 
29 64 
31 U 
34 93 
19 66 

27 81 

28 82 

a a? 

24 75 


LOW 
C F 


2i 77 
IG 50 


25 

25 


77 

77 


24 75 
12 54 


17 63 
24 75 


74 75 
17 03 


cl 

tr 

0 

cl 

fr 

fr 

fr 

U 

Cl 

0 


AFRICA 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Cape Town 

Catebfmca 

Harare 

Lagos 

Nairobi 

Tirol* 


28 82 17 
30 BA 19 
16 61 4 

32 90 71 
28 82 15 
28 87 24 

74 75 14 

3V 04 18 


63 
68 
37 

70 

89 

75 

57 

64 


fr 

tr 

ft 

Q 

fr 

si 

Cl 

Ir 


LATIN AMERICA 


X 60 

27 81 


10 

IB 


Beenes Aires 
Caracas 
Lima — — — 

Mexico City 74 75 13 
Rio de Janeiro — — — 


SO 

64 


50 


Cl 

Cl 

HQ 

Cl 

na 


NORTH AMERICA 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 


19 66 2 30 


JO 80 
25 77 
28 82 18 


9 48 
15 P 


fr 

na 

fr 

Ir 

cl 


Anchorage 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 

Honolulu 

Houston 

LosAimte 

Miami 

Minneapolis 


in 0 i to 50 
10 64 14 57 


oh 

el 


Madams 
5rdncv 

d-eJautfv: fo-foggv; fr-tolr: n-fiou: 
ih shswcrs.' swsnpw, al-sfnrmv. 


Nassau 
New York 
San Francises 
Seattle 
Toronto 
Waaninmn 2* 
o-cvercast; dc ■ partly 


9 

26 

13 

20 

5 

21 

31 

70 

25 

30 

7 

22 

30 

25 

18 

» 

22 


48 6 

77 14 

n n 

68 9 

41 -9 
70 9 

88 24 
00 9 

77 20 
86 34 
45 4 

72 ID 
86 34 
77 13 

M n 
60 8 

72 0 

79 15 
cfaudv; 


43 ei 
57 fr 


36 

40 


fr 

5f 


16 PC 
48 oe 


75 fr 

48 r 


69 PC 
75 PC 


39 
50 
75 
55 
55 

40 


r 
fr 

PC 

fr 
ci 
fr 
4 o fr 
59 fr 
r-raki; 


TUESDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Smooth RMMCFURT: Pair. Tma. 
23 — 8 (73 — 461. LONDON: CfouOv. Temp. 19 — Uf06 — 0). MADRID: Ctauav. 
Temp. 27 — 13 (Bl— 551. HEW YORK: Partly cloudy. Tamo. 26— 16 179—011. 
PARIS; Claud r. Temp. 27 - 13 1 Bl — 55 j. ROME: Fair. Temn. 28— 12 183— Ml. 
TEL Aviv: Na. ZURICH: Fair. Terna 22 -B 177- 4«>. BANGKOK; 
Thunderstorms. TemP.M-24 i*)-77V MONO KOND: C"0j£V. T«no 26-24 
(79—75). MANILA: Thunderstorm. Temp. 31—24 (B8—7SI. SEOUL: Fair. 
Temp. 19 — 10 (06 — 501. SINGAPORE: Thunderstorm*. Temp. 30 — 25 
W-771. TOKYO! Foggy. Temn. 24 — 10175 — 011. 



Wbrld Stock Markets 

Via Agence France- Presse Sept. 30 

dosing prices in Local currencies unless achencise ixvdictaed. 



r Amtonfai- 


Ctee 

Prev. 

ABN 

49430 

488-50 

ACF HoWlng 

22400 

22350 

AEGON 

9X50 

9130 

iAKZO 

120 

121 

Ahold 

259 JO 

253-30 

AMEV 

281 

280 

a 'D am RuMwr 

8J0 

8J5 

Amro Bank 

EJL60 

34J0 

BVG 

216 

210 

Buehrmam T 

103 JO 

10X70 

Coland Hldg 

2SL20 

77.70 

Eisevler-NDU 

133 

130 

Fokiw 

75 

75-30 

Gist Brocades 

218 

2T5J0 

Helnokon 

103 

16150 

Hoogovofia 

01.10 

61 JO 

KLM 

54.10 

5U0 

Noarden 

46 A0 

47 JO 

Nat Nedder 

73JC 

7159 

Nedllard 

1800 

18X50 

Oce Vanctor G 

34X50 

34X50 

Pakhood 

AT Ail 

6X10 

Phfltem 

47 JO 

<7 JO 

Robcoo 

7SJ20 

74.90 

Rodamco 

13460 

134 JO 

ftallnca 

67JW 

47.40 

RDTSfllQ 

*6M 

4450 

Rovai Dutch 

187 

1B0JO 

Unilever 

33 

TWY 

Van Ommerni 

25.90 

70.10 

VMFStartf 

223 

231 

VNU 

22T 

219-50 

1 ANP.CBS Gen'l IMai : 214J» 1 

Prev tons : 21120 



1 1 Braweh 

Ar bed 

1660 

1650 

Bekctert 

4700 

6500 

COCkerUl 

207 

206 

Cabopa 

3520 

3S20 

EBE& 

32C0 

3150 

GB-inra-BM 

414? 

4140 

GBL 

2085 

2070 

GgvMrf 

4200 

4110 

HaDOken 

5250 

5310 

Inf or com 

2450 

7450 

Kredierbank 

9000 

«250 

Petroflna 

6200 

6140 

5oc Generalo 

1950 

1700 

Safina 

7030 

7590 

Solvav 

5380 

5330 

Traction Elec 

4010 

3920 

L'CB 

5200 

5760 

Unerg 

1850 

1820 

view* Man lagne 

8400 

8400 

Currant Stock lnawr : 2479.96 

Pravtous ; 34H25 



If frimbfart 1 1 

AEG-Teleftffiken 

141JQ 

1« 

Alfiora Vera 

1625 

1605 

Aflano 

383 

367 

BASF 

23450 

2tt 

Raver 

224JG2ML50 1 

Bay Hypo Bank 

444 

439 

Bov Vereins&enk 

443 

42S 

BBC 

*71 M 

771 

BHF-BOnk 

2S7 

353 

BMW 

47BJ0 

473 

Commerzbank 

238.90 234J0 | 

Cont Gufiunl 

151 JD T50L70 

Daimler-Benz 

904 

*53 

DMutsa 

40950 

389 

Deutsche Bofacack 

18X50 

ISO 

Deutscfie Bonk 

08130 

820 

Drndner Bonk 

29X40 Z&L50 

GHH 

1*150 

U9 

191 

rw 1 


Close Pnw 


Close Prev 


Hocnilef 

Hcec h st 

Hoesch 

Horien 

HossH 

IWKA 

Kali + Salz 

Ka r stotff 

Kaulhof 

Klaeckner H-D 

Kloeckner WerRe 

Kruno Stahl 

Llnae 

LufKhepnt&a 

MAN 

Mannesmann 
Muencn Rueck 

Nivdorf 

PKI 

Porsche 

Preussag 

PWA 

PWE 

Rhefnmetaii 
5chertna 
SEL 


760 75C 

223jc m ^ r, 

139 JO I30JO 
222 219 

389 39 a 

297 JO 295 
151 3S3 . 

291 ?9C 1 

32! 31950 r 
n 303 
78 76 

134 Tr 
547 S3? . 

22050 222-SG 1 
191 1905C I 
220JO 223 JO 
1B9C 10DC 
SO® 549 
658 053 

1300 1370 


"uB 


141£C1- 

211J0 2Q3J0 
344 357 JO 
544 533 


Stomens 

00150 

S90 J 

Thygsen 

148 

147 

veto 

208 

255 

Volkswagen ««erk 

325 

524 

Weilo 

00S6SX5Q 1 

Commerzbank index : IS45J0 I 

Previous : 1S40J0 


i 

1 

! Johiuwriiiirg ll 

AECI 

760 

760 * 


Anglo American 
Anoto Am Gefd 
Hcrfoies 
Bfwoor 
Buffets 
De Berry 

Driefontefh 
Elands 
GF5A 
Harmony 
Hlveto Steel 
Kloof 
Nedbank 
Pm Stern 

RtfSfRat 
SA Brows 
St Heteno 
Scuf 

West HoJdtng 


3375 

13800 

117D 

1465 

7550 

1225 

9250 

1740 

3450 

2S9G 

530 

sn 

:i s 

0175 

2000 

J60 

3235 

780 

760C 


3540 j 
19SCG2 
ll&S I 
1445 
7&5C 

1225 

S» 

1755 

3*50 

3150 

5301 

2175 

use! 

« 0 C 1 

70S 
3325 > 
TO J 
7800 


Cadbury Sctio 
Charier Cans 
Commercial U 
Cons Gold 
Cuurtcwidi 

Dclflehr 
De Bcersc 
Dcsiillers 
Dnetonteir, 

Fl sens 
Free 51 Ged 
CEC 

Gen Acddm? 

GKfl 

Glaxo C 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Gurruwa 

GUS 

Hansen 

Hawker 

ICf 

Imoeric! Group 
Jaguar 

Laid Seed ties 
Legarf General 
Lhrids Bank 
Lonmo 
Lucas 

Marks and Sp 
M etal Box 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bank 
Pend O 
Pilklnatan 

Pleysey 
Prudent^! 
Raoxl Elect 
Portfcnre>n 
Rzrik 
Reed IpH 
Realm 


134 133 

180 180 
222 222 
429 447 

152 149 

410 415 

427 433 

395 388 

SIS'* S18VS 
350 348 

SCOTS S2 n 
156 190 

606 595 

226 224 

T2 61'64 12 51/64 


335 

603 
273 
868 
196 
381 

604 
198 
275 
306 
659 
412 

152 


103 


384 

622 

815 

263 

130 

672 

140 

STTIq 

413 

674 

311 


3se 
66Q 
271 
803 
195 
377 
047 
19ft 
271 
301 
042 
397 
151 
380 
158 
483 
384 

617 

80S 

258 

134 

m 

138 

S79V* 

408 

609 

3T1 


AovaJ D-Jtch l 44 29 04 44 1/32 


CorttppfDe Stock Index ; 1WJ0 
Pnvton : IlflJfl 


RT2L 

SOOtCft! 

Scmburv 

Seer; Holdings 

Shell 

STC 

Std Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tate and L9 to 
Tosco 

EMI 
T.l. Gravp 
Trafalgar Hie 
THF 

Ulfratnar 
Unilever? 
united Bteajtis 
tfkskcrs 
WeaiMOrtri 


551 

490 

324 

086 

84 

427 

451 

473 


547 

m 


109 
680 
84 
424 
444 
469 
293 
357 
391 
342 
133 
266 
1O>0 1C 15/64 

170 174 

293 291 

480 471 


304 

393 

344 

133 


AA Cora 
AJiled-Lyeito 
Anglo Am Gold 
AiiBrtt Feeds 
AM Dairies 
Bardm 

BOM 

bat. 

D eecf wi n 

BiCC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Grotto 
Boars 

Bowaifr Indue 
BP 

Bril Home 59 
Brit Telecom 
BrltAorapaca 

Brltofl 
BTR 
Burmoh 
Coble Wirefgas 


STl^ar 

288 

5630. 

222 

134 

344 

584 

258 

321 

715 

32 

SIB 

aw 

20 T 

229 

50 

393 

198 

416 

238 

330 

292 

565 


117 

594 

KT.i i 
219 I 
132 j 
359 
579 
203 l 
321 ; 

* 12 } 


F.T.38 Index : 99MQ 
Prrvioin : Wit 
FJAC.W f aoejf : 129040 
Pre v to u t : 13B0JB 


MBao 


516 
545 
DC 
318 j 

§? 


si 

199 I 


Bonce Comm 

Crntrtfe 

Cisohmif 

Crnf I to! 

Ertdpilo 

Farmiiaifa 

FnH 

Generali 

in 

IfaScemantl 

H tti gas 

l^afmetwuirj 


3sa » 

S: 


Menteamn 

OOveftl 

Piielli 

ftAS 


2SQ00 74550 
3435 3400 
11850 Tl5t5 
3700 31 IQ 

iirao nooo 

17900 17900 
4759 44W 
82500 

1180 >1200 
48950 49200 
1940 W 
1X8800119000 
X31D0Q13O5OB 
2440 ZOO 
7440 7450 
220 3168 
1139QO1D0OOO 


[ Ctote Prev. 

Rkn6scerrte 

100*999 JO 

SIP 

qA|B 

iOTT 

2640 

SME 

1586 

1610 

Snki 

3866 

3860 

Stondo 

14910 15049 

Sfrv 

3680 

3600 

MiB Currant index 

: 1772 


Previous : 1755 



1 Paris 

Air LlauJde 

520 

524| 

Alcfhom All. 

733 mio 

Av Dosiauiv 

11*0 

1195 

Boncafre 

620 

630 

BtC 

474 

472 

Bongroln 

1450 

1450 

Bouvoues 

672 

682 

B5N-GD 

2060 

7100 

Carrefour 

2170 

2250 

Omwfi 

700 

6va 

CkibMcd 

448 44*10 

Darty 

1299 

1385 

Dcunei 

725 

728 

Elf-Aaultalne 

TB4 

180 

Europe 1 

740 

74) 

Gen Eau» 

600 

603 

Hartwtte 

1340 

raso 

Lafarge Co» 

473 

476 

Lear and 

2125 

2070 

Lnleur 

612 

609 

fOrear 

2299 

2315 

Mart elf 

1*40 

1*39 

Mofra 

1695 

1700 

Merlin 

1*60 

2008 

Mtohelln 

1035 

1039 

Motl Henntssv 

1800 

lift 

Mouitne* 

67 JO 

68J0 

Occidontore 

603 

686 

Pernod Rto 

669 

687 

Porrier 

430 

*34 

1 Peboeot 

369 

375 

1 Prlniennps 2*180 

296 

Rodtotectn 

315 

371 

Redout* 

1435 

UI5 

RguiSPl UOQf 

1448 

1461 

Sanofl 

585 

5*8 

Skis Rowtonol 

1230 

lira 

Tetomecan 

2495 

2 to 

Thomson CSF 

526 

no 

Total 

224 

316 

Asefl Men ; 177J5 



Prevteui * 19846 



CAC Index : 211 JO 



Previous : 212.10 



II Skppw* { 

Cota Storage 

&04 

110 

DBS 

5J0 


Fraser Neovo 

6 

6.10 

How Par 

117 

124 

ineham 

2J3 

212 

Maf Banking 

5l7Q 

SJQ 

OC0C 

140 

US 

OUB 

Nil 

183 

OUE 

NjQ. 

U2 

Sbangft4a 

1J6 

181 

Sim Darfcv 

1J0 

177 

SW,uafl4 

137 

245 

Sim Press 

6 

643 

SStoamaWp 

N.Q. 

B4U 

St Trading 

J 

116 

Unite Overseas 

1J7 

U3 

UOB 

160 

147 

Straff* Timet tod Index : 778*4 t 

mrkn;Wjy 



[| Suxfchotm 


S we di sh Maidi 
Volve 


202 202 
217 220 


Index : 3IX JO 


ADA 

Alfa Lovaf 

Am 

Astro 

aikh Copra 

Boliden 

CleCtrofinc 

Ericsson 

Esseffe 

■ l-i ■ Ji 1-tM. ■.!_ -> 

PtMTfflOdO 

Soob-Scanfa 

sonsm 

Akanska 

SKF 


VM 189 
20 8 * 
2 U ats 
408 410 

119 H? 
N.Q. 

14A 140 

218 219 

N.Ck — 
177 181 

kS ^ 

nS k 

NA 311 


ACI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Boral 

BougoInvUEe 
Cost tome lo e 
Com 
Como ICO 
CRA 
C5R 
Duntoe 
Elders txl 
«C1 Australia 
M ogefkso 
MIM 
Mver 

Naf Autl Bonk 
News Carp 
N Broken HID 
Poseidon 
Qtd Coal Tract 
Santos 

Thomas Notion 
Western Minina 
Westoac Banking 
Wooaslde 


7JU 

ABB 

7M 

X35 

1S7 


A25 

185 

146 

X40 

256 

385 


280 

242 

140 

5 

780 

285 

4. 

183 

104 

238 

382 

8.18 

180 


282 

5 

788 

130 

US 

8 

4.12 

184 

588 

130 

283 
3J2 
7J0 
200 

284 
US 
SO ft 
780 
280 

A 

182 

495 

289 


TOO 


Oidtaarln Index : wrj 
Prevtout ; 98988 


Altai 

Asohl Chem 
Asatii Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Conan 
Casio 
CM on 

Dal Nkwon Print 
Dolwo House 
Dalwci Securities 

F01UC 
FuU Bonk 
Full Photo 
Fulltfu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cobto 


japan Air Lines 
Kgltoto 
Kcmoi Power 
Kmasakl Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Krocara 
Matsu Etoc Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mwwoimi Bank 
Mitsubishi Qtom 
Mitsubtont Eiee 
Mlfsubisnl Heavy 
MitsubfsM Corp 
Mitsui and Co . 


330 
745 
78S 
740 
. 547 
973 
1550 
475 

1929 

1010 

899 

6150 

1510 

1 ?TO 

897 

038 

543 

1130 

5300 

ffT 

2340 

167 

730 

571 

410 

3180 

1069 

995 

1460 


725 

.795 

749 

547 

W 0 

1559 

463 

1(W 


no 

0150 

1579 

isto 

PS 

010 

mo 


572 
21B 
143 
’ 700 
SM 
390 


352. 


97D 

1420 

473 

349 


611 671 

494 464 


MltaUkaM 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

NOK Jneutoton 
NlkkoSec 
Nippon Kooafcu 
Nippon Oil 
Nkwon steel 
Nippon Yiften 
Nissan 

Nomura Sec- 

Olvpnpus 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

Shlmaru 

Shine tsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
S u mHomo Citaai 
S umi tomo Marine 
SumHomo Metal 
Toksei Cara 
Tafsho Marine 
Tofcedo Ctieid 
TDK 
THIln 

Tokio Morte 
Tokyo Elec. Pi 
Toopan Prbfttno 
Tortry Ind 
Toshiba 
Tovata • 
Yamoftfd Sec 


718 

646 

920 

855 

004 

730 

770 

198 


575 

mo 

974 

1510 


720 

045 

SI 

879 

798 

730 

705 

U7 

357 

570 

1290 

980 

1590 


Toronto 






GmaJm stocks via AP 


750 

720 

46« 

3360 

1700 

277 

739 

105 

440 

411 

tn 


534 

953 


2 ° 

71< 

660 

3360 

1090 

700 

156 

427 

595 

806 

364Q 


795 

553 

301 

1050 

790 


926 
20 IQ 
1 100 
55* 
341 

woo 

770 


NJfckeUBJ. Ind** ; mio.11 


New mdes : iuc.1? 
previous : moja 


it ii 

Adkt 

4330 

4300 

Ahisulsse 

730 

730 

Autocb on 

0000 

6000 

Bank Leu 

3670 

3700 

Brawn Bowl 

1450 

1580 

aha Goto? 

3075 

38S0 

Credit Suttee 

3800 

2020 

fkckwgtl 

3400 

3350 

Holderbarnc 

NjQ. 


intvrdhCMmt 

2800 

2BX 

Jacob SUCBard 

0510 

6550 

JtHnoii 

2975 

2805 

LoddllGirr • 

7090 

mo 

Meevaaplck 

5075 

5025 

Nevtte 

7300 

7100 

OerJfkonH 

1500 

1440 

Rocha Botsv 

9500 

*450 

S totet 

1380 

WO 

Scfdnater 

4450 

4450 

Sofcnr 

402 

390 

Survefifance 

4150 

4275 

Swfnalr 

7475 

1053 

SBC 

459 

4*& 

Serfs* ReRnuronce 

2075 

2050 

SwtoVbtkiraik 

1900 

I960 

Union Bank 

4100 

4100 

wtavermor 

5050 

4950 

Zorich In* 

2240 

21*0 

5BCMa!«fU0 


- 

PrrntmzmM 

• 


ICQ.: not quoted: 

KJL: 

net 

| avelfatote;4d:«*dvldefi& | 



WHAT WOULD UFE BE LIKE 
WfTHOUTIT? 



EACH FRIDAY IN THE W ’ 


2031 Abff Pixe 
301 AOCtandS 
SBSOAgntaOE 
10943 Alt Energy 
1275 Alta Nai 
2419 Algomo 51 
4950 At CO I I 
1200 BP Canada 
18199 Bonk BC 
38501 Bonk NS 
70744 Borricka- 
• 7887 Bonanza R 
141740 Braiome 
400 Bromefea 
3089 BCFP 
10570 BC Res 
9540 BC Phone 
2100 Brunswfc 
2800 Budd Can 
• 4700 CAE 
1000 CCL A 
1700 Cad Frv * 
5400 Ccenoeau f 
9300 C Nor Vliesf 
3500CPackn 
2911 Con Trust 
19936 Cl Bfc Com 
195138 CTIr* A 1 
' 405CUM1 B 
HOC Cara 
2462CeiB7wse 
37S Cefan 17 Sp 
6800 Cent rf Tr 
3150 CLntatox 
lOOCSXsfOA 
lOOOCDistaBl 
580 CTL Bank 
270DCttfckaR 
13550 Crowmx 
2400 Czar Res 
27747 Daon Dew 
400 Deem A 
2750 Denison A P 
8550 DenliM B- 1 
segoD euetc o n 
13000 OAcftcnsn A f 
2400 Dleknsn B 
32260 D otasra - 
29 Donohue 
1300 Du Pant A 
. 14500 Ovtox a 
280 Efcthom X 
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I MP Equity Svr 
300 C Falcon C 
M 5 Fkobrdoe 
1505 Fed Ind A 
200 F CUV Fin 
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72*391 NUWst m A 
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13900 OsAawa a f 


S2OT0 20H 2 «*+ Vb 
SISWi T84> 181 m + 
S1B10 18 IBta— VS 
318*4 T7to lVUs + 
SCPt- 13 ■* 1310+ Afc 
S1810 18 10—10 

510 Vfh- 94*— V* 

*33 33 33 + * 

495 485 485 — 5 
*13 rra is 
193 189 192 +4 

305 345 360 +15 

410 410 410 + 5 

SIMM 10U Ifrfci 
SB* ffUi a**— W 
213 210 213 + 3 

S2K 2 M 23* 

*13U 13 13—14 

*27 2&to 27 + H 

sim 15 15 

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*21 ft 21ft 21ft + ft 
*35 34ft 34ft — ft 
S42ft 49ft 42ft— ft 
Sfeft 30 3614 + ft 

SPft 9 9ft 

*7 6ft 10ft T6ft 
S15ft 15ft 18*4 
*9 Bft 8 ft— ft 

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H5 15 15 

5*4 9ft 9ft + ft 

37 7 7 + ft 

0 Aa 0 ft 4 - ft 
SJOft 10ft 10ft— ft 
2*5 -280 2&5 + 5 

120ft 20ft 20ft 
730 315 215 

400 380 400 +20 

365 345 3S -S 
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174+ ft 
S5U. 5ft Sft + ft 
SM frft 6 ftZ (1 
WW 6ft 0ft ^ 
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*22* 22ft 22ft 
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17ft 7V. 7ft- ft 
SMjk 20% 20% + S 
F'A 7 7ft 
tttft ISft 15ft— ft 
*17ft 17ft 17ft 
- *1148 lift lift 
ttJVb lift lift . 
*31 ft 31ft lift— ft 
*10 10 10 

345 +10 
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P 41 m 7 + ft 

516ft 16 U 
22ft 22ft 
J™* 7ft 7ft 
*28 20 20 

SIS 1l *+ ft 

*70ft 20*4 2 QU 4 . b. 

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53* ' 24% 25 +10 

*34ft 24ft 24*4+ ft 

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*9 0ft 8ft— 14 
«7% 42 42ft^ft 
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*27ft 27VU 37ft 
S13ft 17ft 12ft- ft 

an km 11 

*2°" A 2Dta— Mm 

"»k 17ft + u, 
375 -370 .■ 4 ■ 

«3ft 12ft 1314+ Vm 

335 225 335 +in 

«7U T7V, 17 ftlft 
*T8Vi lift lift— ft 

« T I s - 

™ 254 260 

*32ft.2lft JTft— « 


1850 Poe W Airtn 
S0OO Pomour 
19700 PonCon P 
1450 Pine Fahrf 
M7229 PPocer 
320 Provlgp 
IlSOOQueSturaa 
MOORavrockf 
3382 Redoath 
48O3RMd*IT50 
3341 Roger* A 
1700 Roman 
100 Rothman 
38766 Sceotre 
1100 Scatty f 
763? Sears' Con 
73082 Shell Can 
1510 Shemtt 
StOStor&rBf 
65400 Sauthom 
23700 Soar Aero f 
300 St Brodcst 
4088 Stofco A 
1366 Sidpfra 
120 Sleep R 
204 Tech Car A 
■ 0912 Tecfc B f 
15157 Tex Can 
2500 Thom n A 
44970 Tgr DRl Dfc 
2020 T o r sf or B f 
13700 Traders A f 
jQQTmsMt 
2D98 TrkiltY Res 
16510 TrnAltO U A 
28244 TrCan PL 
1152 Trimarc 
M3 TrJ ion A 
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47483 Turbo 
l87Unicon> A f 
WiCorKd 
2164 U Entprise 
TWou Keno 
jsgoventi At 
lOOa Vesfgron 
74H WardaJr 
2000 Wcslmln 
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18072 Woodwd A 
700 Yk Bear 
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522ft 


l» 
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3616 
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3434+ ft 
22+1 
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25J4+ ft 



postwar Berlin andconlixuied in Irwin Shaw s 
beach house in Malibu, California. The full 
5 lory ol his life is here, from his birth in 
Budapest as Endre Friedmann in 1913 — he 
adopted the name Robert Capa when his cred- 
its began to appear — to his sympathies for the 
Loyalists and anti-Fasdsts anywhere, to his 
friendship with Ernest Hemingway, John 
Steinbeck, Herbert L Matthews, Charles Col- 
lingwood and other writers. John Hersey de- 
scribed Capa as “the man who invented him- 
self" 


His troth lives on in black and white. A 
companion volume of 260 pictures, “Robert 
Capa Photographs," edited by Whelan and 
Cornell Capa, the photographer's brother, 
shows - what a stunning contribution Capa 
made to photojournalism in this warring cen- 


£ 


455 450 455 +15 

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51(1 Wt. Tfl + Vj. 

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15* 51k 5*+<* 

526 24 26 

nft 8% 8ft— w 
. SMi 23ft 24ft +1 ft 
STft 7ft 7ft 
Sllft 11U IT16— ft 
SI 3ft 13ft 13ft 

S2Sft 7m. 2 5ft+ ft 

S2Qft 20ft 20ft 

*20Va 2D 20W+ ft 

202 202 200. . 

^UUC (US 

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S13H 13ft 13ft— ft . 

113ft 13ft 13ft - 

*32 31 32 +1ft 

S20ft 29ft 20ft— ft 
52 2ft 22 ,22ft+ ft 

*27ft 27ft 27ft 
.saift 21 ft 21 ft + ft 
soft 9- 9 — - ft 

330 330 ,330 +5 

S2SW 35 25ft + Hr 
325ft 25 2Sft+ ft 
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■*2ff 19ft 
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• - 51 - 48 • -49- + 1 
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SI Jft 13ft Uft + ft 
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Total Sate 2215.111 zharm a. 


tadushiids Index: 




irox* him-Mlf*. 




High Low CkHto Ow. 
529ft 29ft 29ft + ft 
siaftiast.i 
sTift mk.zm+ ft 
311ft 70ft. il —ft 
*15 .idfc i«6— ft 
510ft M 10 ft 
SlOft _W*T«ft 
SIS •• 14ft 14ft— ft 
521ft 20ft 21ft + *0 
817ft -,17ft 17ft + ft 
117ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
319 190 T9 : 

SMft 30ft 30U 

sa 20 -20 


b - Previous 
IQUTV- 106-57 


sr-^ l? «* 


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■ " » ■ 1 



ii*- — — --••■ •— 1 p ~ ■ 

^■i 1 ^; 1 •'• , ~ - m 7— •-•..• »— -■ • »•— 

■■_ .■-'■^•‘JT”: ■■7 ,,■., ^7i ' , „ m . 9 - • v »* * ,— - ->■» «»,•■» •%— . .■*?i, .- » ► ••■-■' 



BNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER I, 1985 


SPORTS 



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« 

CanpUeU? Our Staff From b apat d IB 

SAK FRANCISCO JbJL 

MSisss 

gr«?£iss 

they a» m denjolishing^J u 
Aiigaei Raders. The Nmv OrleaS 
Saims; meanwhile, had lost 
starting offensive linemen against 

Tflnqw Bay and seemed headed for 

tlie cellar in the NFCs Western 
Division.-. 

But quarterback Dave Wilson 
working behind a patched-up fine" 
outperformed Joe Mon tana as tlS 

NFL ROUNDUP "" 

Saints registered a 20-17 Nation^ 
Football League ups?i victory over 
the 49ers here Sunday. 

Wilson passed Tor 189 yards and 
was sacked once, but Montana had 
perhaps the roughest day of his 

. career. He was sacked six times and 

intercepted twice; he completed 
only 12 of 26 passes for 120 yards; 
his completion average was under 
.500 for only the third time in his 
seven-year career. 

* The Saints had a 354-231 edge in 
fT o fifensive yardage. “Not bad & a 
makeshift line," said tackle Ralph 
Williams. “But I really don't con- 
sider us thaL We’re all profession- 
als. We wouldn’t be here if we 
weren’t,'’ 

Wilson’s 43-yard touchdown 
pass to Eugene Goodlow early in 
the fourth quarter was the score 
that stood up for victory. A 79-yard 
drive, ending with Roger Craig’s 
two-yard run, gave San Francisco a 
17-13 lead two minutes into the 
period. But three minutes later, the 
Saints scored on a three-play, 83- 
yard drive that began with Wayne 
Wilson’s 38-yard run. 

“This game will help both 
teams," said running back Wilson, 
who rushed for 108 yards. “Now 


, 20 - 1 7 


get some respect, ana the loss 
should help open the 49ers’ eyes." 

Rams 17, Falcons 6: In Anaheim, 
^antornia, quarterback Dieter 
Brock, a 34-year-dd NFL rookie, 
completed 16 of 20 passes for 215 

1 two touchdowns to lead 
me Los Angeles Rams to their 
fourth straight victory. The Rams 
are Off to their best start sine* 1978, 
while the 0-4 Falcons are off to 
rneir poorest since 1968. 

Vadnga 27, Bffls »k fa Orchard 
Park, New York, Ted Brown’s 22- 
yard TD run. with, just under three 
mhrntes to play gave Minnesota its 
decision over Buffalo. Quarterback 
Tommy Kramer threw three touch- 
down passes for the Vikings, in- 
cluding one to Brown, but 3-1 Min- 
nesota Squandered a 17-point 

halftime lead before setting up 
Brown’s game-winning run. 

Giants 16, Eagles 10s In Pteladd- 
phia, coroerback Elvis Patterson 
returned an intercepted 29 
yards for a touchdown 55 
into overtime, giving the New York 
Giants the decision. Patterson 
picked off a pass thrown by Eagle 
quarterback Ron Jaworsld and 
raced into the end zone behind a 
host of blockers to raise New 
York’s record to 3-1. 

Browns.21, Chargers 7: fa San 
Diego, Kevin Mack scored two 
touchdowns and the Clev eland de- 
fense registered six sacks as the 
Browns defeated the Chargers. 

San Diego’s Dan Fouts, a .rive- 
tune Pro Bowl quarterback, suf- 
fered tom right kftsg ligaments 
when he was decked by linebacker 
Eddie Johnson on a first-period 
pass play. Fouts, 34, underwent 
arthroscopic surgery Sunday night; 
he is expected to be sidelined from 
three to six weeks. 

Dolphins 30, Broncos 26: In 
Denver, Dan Marino won a much- . 
awaited duel with John Hway, 



Angels, With One-Game Lead, 
Face Key Series in Kansas Gty 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

CLEVELAND — The California Angels are back 
in first place. The Kansas City Royals are back home. 
Both are in place lor their American League West 
showdown. 

On Monday night, the Angels were to take a one- 
game lead imo Kansas City for the start of a four- 
game series that should go a long way toward deciding 
the division winner. California broke a first-place tie 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


Rftc*w*Uved Prats k* cr ria»ond 

Wide receiver Stephone Paige was in great form Sunday in rainy Kansas Gty. One of his 
two TD receptions came after the bail had slipped through the hands of Seattle defender 
Eugene Robinson — and through his own as well: Paige damped the ball between his thighs. 


passing for 390 yards and three 
touchdowns as Miami downed tbe 
Broncos. Marino completed 25 of 
43 passes and repeatedly kept the 
Denver defense eff -balance. Ehvay 
was I8-of-37 for 250 yards. 
Marino’s TD passes were of 69 
to Nat Moore, 24 yards to 
Foe Rose and 46 yards to Vince 
H eflin.' Fuad Reveiz’s field goals of 


yards 
Joe E 


40, 24 and 27 yards helped the 
Dolphins to a third straight victory. 

Miami safety Bud Brown inter- 
cepted an El way pass at his own 37- 
yard line with 15 seconds left to 
thwart Denvers final drive. 

Jets 25, Colts 20: In East Ruther- 
ford, New Jersey, Pat Leahy kicked 
four field goals and Freeman Mc- 
Neil rushed for 1 15 yards to hdp 


the New York Jets edge Indianapo- 
lis. The Jets had to punt only once 
as they won their third game in a 
row. 

The Colts had the ball inride the 
New York 10-yard line during the 
game's last five minutes, but finally 
were thwarted at tbe five on a key 
tackle by defensive end Marty Ly- 
ons. (UPI, API 


with Kansas City on Sunday by defeating Cleveland, 
9-3, while the Royals were losing. 6-3, in Minnesota. 

“What we need. to do is win one in a row," said 
Manager Dick Howser after the Royals had suffered a 
three-game sweep. "That’s where we have to start. It 
helps to be going home." 

The Angels didn’t look like world-beaters during 
the weekend as they dropped two out of three to the 
Indians — who have lost 100 games this season. 

“We're in as good shape as we can be," said Califor- 
nia Manager Gene Mauch. “This is what everybody’s 
been talking about for four or five months. Everybody 
said it would go down to the final series." 

Last year, the Angels and Royals were tied going 
into Lhe final week (Kansas City eventually won the 
division). This time, both have seven games left, in- 
cluding four head-to-head. California winds up the 
season with three games in Texas, while Kansas City 
finishes with three at home against Oakland. 

Kansas Gty has won six of nine games against the 
Angels in 1985. but the Royals' most effective starter 
against California this season, Mark Gubicza, is not 
scheduled to pitch any of the four games. Gubicza, 
who won both of his 1985 starts against California, 
lost to Minnesota on Sunday as Kent Hrbek drove in 
three runs and Mark Salas homered. 

Rookie pitcher Kirk McCaskill gave California the 
performance it needed to take over first place. McCas- 
kill gave up seven hits and struck out a season-high 10. 

McCaskill said a last-minute chat before the game 
^helped him relax. “I got a call in the bullpen on the 
telephone, and I thought it was long distance or 
something," be said. "But it was Gene Mauch. He told 
me. 'You’re not going out to win a pennant today. 
You’re just going out there for one ballgame.’ ’’ 

Blue Jays 13, Brewers 5: fa Milwaukee, Tony Fer- 
nandez had four hits, drove in four runs and scored 
three times to help Toronto reduce its magic number 
to three for clinching the Eastern Division. Lloyd 
Moseby had three hits, including a two-run homer, as 
the Blue Jays registered season highs in runs and hits. 


Yankees 4-9, Orioles 0-2: In New York, Don Mat- 
tingly hit bis 32d and 33d home runs of the year and 
Joe Cowley and Dave Rigbetii combined on a three- 
hitler to lead die Yankees in the first game. Don 
Baylor drove in four runs and Dave Winfield three in 
helping New York complete the doubleheader sweep., 

Red Sox K, Tigers 4: In Detroit, Mike Easier went 4- 
for-5, including a homer, and Wade Boggs had four 
hits to power Boston past the Tigers. Boggs raised his 
major league-leading batting average- to 311 Rob 
Woodward went eight innings for the victory in his 
big-league debut. 

White Sox 3, A’s 0: In Oakland, California, Tom 
Seaver and Bob James combined on a 10-hit shutout 
of the A’s. Seaver registered his 303d career victory 
and James his 30ih save of the season. 

Rangers 5, Mariners 2: In Seattle. Bill Stein’s three- 
run pinch-double in the eighth lifted Texas. Reliever 
Greg Harris, who allowed Seattle to tie the score at 2-2 
in the seventh, picked up the victory. 

Mets 9, Pirates 7: In the National League, in Pitts- 
burgh. Gary Carter's two-run home run with one out 
in the 10th enabled New York to pull within three 
games of Eastern Division-leading Si. Louis. Carter 
hit reliever Larry McWilliams's first pitch for his 1 3th 
homer of the mouth and 32d of the season. U followed 
a one-out single by Keith Hernandez. 

Expos 7, fimBnak 5: In Montreal Hubie Brooks 
keyed a three- run seventh with a two-run triple as the 
Expos downed Sl Louis. The Meis and Cardinals 
begin a three-game series Tuesday night in Sl Louis. 

Dodgers 7. Giants 2: In Los Angeles, Pedro Guerre- 
ro’s two-run single capped a three-run fifth and Bob 
Welch and Tom Nledenfuer combined on an eight- 
hitter to help the Dodgers complete a sweep of a three- 
game series with San Francisco. Tbe Dodgers’ magic 
□umber for clinching the Western Division crown 
stands at three. 

Reds 5, Astros 0: In Cincinnati, Jay Tibbs pitched a 
five-hitter and Buddy Bell drove in two runs as the 
Reds swept tbeir three-game set with Houston. Keep- 
ing the pressure on Fmst-place Los Angeles, Cincinnati 
has won four straight and 12 of its last 15. 

Cubs 6, Ptafltes 2: fa Chicago, Keith Moreland 
drove in a pair of runs with two singles as the Cubs 
handed Philadelphia its 10th straight loss. Moreland 
also extended his hitting streak to 18 games, tying 
teammate Ryne Sandberg for the league high this year. 

Braves 3, Padres 2: In Atlanta. Rafael Ramirez's 
bases- loaded walk with one out in the ninth scored 
Mill Thompson with the game-winner. (AP, VP /) 


% 


SCOREBOARD 



Baseball 


Selected U.S. College Conference S tanding s 


Major League Standings Major League Leaders 


* 


»! {TV’ 

» ——-4 * 


lit 



Alabama 

Tennessee 

Florida 

Miss. SI. 

Auburn 

Vanderbilt 

Georgia 

Ken lucky 

LSU 

Mississippi 


Illinois 

Indiana 

l two 

MIChfeflfT 

Mich. $1. 

Minnesota 

NrthwStm 

Ohio SI. 

Purdue 

Wisconsin 


SOUTHEASTERN 

Conference All Gomes 
WLTPfeORWLTPtsOP 
200 60 34 4 0 4) 128 56 
3* 20 
36 22 
22 36 
20 38 
20 40 
16 29 
0 0 
0 0 
9 0 


PAClFlCrlO 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


1 0 1 
2 a l 

2 1 9 
2 1 0 

1 3 0 

3 10 

2 10 
2 0 0 
2 11 


64 

99 

07 

98 


46 

73 

73 

63 


I 0 0 
I 0 0 

o i a 
o i o 
o i o 
o i o 
ooo 
o o o 

90 9 
BIG TEN 

Conference AH Gam** - 
WLTPlsOPWLTPtsOP 


60102 
88 -68 
69 48 
49 T6 
81 67 



Conference 

All Games 


East Division 




1 

' G 

AB 

ft 

H 

Pet. 


WLT Pts OP WLT Pis OP 


w 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

Boggs 80 s. 

- 154 

626 

101 

233 

•372 

Oregon 

2 0 0 27 67 

2 20 104151 

Toronto 

• 98 

57 

A32 

— 

Brett K.C 

149 

530 

101 

175 

J30 

Arizona 

2 0 0 35 34 

3 1 0 71 48 

New York 

92 

62 

-597 

Ste 

Mattingly PLY 

152 

621 

101 

202 

325 

Arte. St. 

1 0.Q 24 0 

2 1 0 54 12 

Baltimore 

80 

74 

.519 

17V* 

Henderan N.Y. 

136 

523 

142 

170 

32S 

Or agon St.- 

1 00 33 20 

2 20 96104 

Detroit 

8Q 

75 

.516 

18 

Baines ChL 

151 

614 

83 

195 

31ft 

Washootn 

1 0-0 21 14 

2 3 0 70 88 

Boston ■ • 

. . 79 

77 

JOi 

191* 

Butler Cter 

147. 

572 

103 

176 

308 

Wash. Sir 

~ T 2 0 66 73 

■1 4 0 135165 

Milwaukee 

. . , 67. 

88 

432 

31 ■ 

Bocttte Oak. - 

132 

405 

47 

124 

30ft 

Stanford * - 

O 1 ft 28 45- 

1.2,0.103 90 

Cleveland 

• 57 100 

J63 

42 

Cooper MIL 

149 

609 

82 

185 

304 

UCLA • * 

: o ro 1 14 2t 

2 1 HOT *7 


West DtVltkxi 




Bradley Sea. 

153 

630 

95 

187 

302 

South. Cal 

_,0 10 .0 24 

m 33 54 

California . 

87 

68 

•561 

— 

Murray Bal. 

149 

558 

100 

167 

399. 

C&Btarato' 

0 3 0 1 56 U 

1 30104 B7 

Kama* CKv 

-86. 

69 

■565 

1 

■ Rons: ft .Henderson New York# 14%>- Rip- j* 


SOUTHWEST 

. 

Chicago 

81. 

74 

323 

6 

ken Baltimore, .no; E Murray, Baltimore, . 


too 

ooo 

9 9 9 
0 0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 


0 

0’ 

9 

0 

0 

9 

0 

0 

0 

0 


0 

0 

9 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

.0 


1 20 63 97 
3 0 8 VIS 80 
9 8.9169 29 
3 0 0 74 IS 


29 

97 


2 r o 
210 
2 1 0 
2 00 

2 10 MB 

3 0 0.105 


33 
44 
82 79 
94 52 
66 
57 


NFL Standings 

AMERICAN 'CONFERENCE 

CM 

wU 


.SMU 
-'Baylor " 
-TCli 

Texas ' Tech 

Arkansas 

Houston 

Rice 

Tern 

Texas A&M 


virgtnta • 
Go- Tech 
HJCaraSC 


Conference - All Games 
W. LTFteOFWLTPuOP 


1 0 0 
TO o 
9 10 
0 1 0 
00 0 
00 0 
00 0 
0 0 0 
D 0 0 


54 

31 

21 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


21 

9 

56 

31 

fr 

D 

0 

0 

0 


2 0 0 91 44 

3 1 0 104 46 
2 1 0 75 91 


3 1 0 
3 00 
T 2 D 
1 2 0 
2 0 0 
2 1 O 


81 

93 


06 
32 

85 8 7 
66135 
59 51 

86 50 


ATLANTIC COAST 

Conference * aji Gomes 
• W LTPtcQP WLT Pis OP* 


81 All UW 
Minnesota • 73 S3 A66 Ife 

Seattle 73 83 M 141* 

Texas 59 96 J81 28 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet GB 

St. Louis 98 58 628 — 

New York 95 61 Mft 3 

Montreal 81 74 .523 16* 

Chicago 74 81 -477 23>* 

Philadelphia 71 83 . .461 26 

Pittsburgh 53 100 .346 431b 

West Division 


Miami 
N.Y. jets 
New Ena rand 
Inaionapofis 

Buffalo 


3 

3 

2 

1 

0 


T Pcfcv PF PA 
' v O, J50 1I4\ 65 
950 91 S2 
300 70 ' 
J9B 50 
JN 46 


0 

0 

0 

0 


Cfemsoif . 
Duke:'- f- 
Maryland 
B9 JCorqllna- 
106 


1 00 

24 13 2 1 0 

77 

45 

Los Angeles 

92 

63 

-594 

— 

2 1 0 

55 45 2 I D 

55 

45 

Ctednnotf 

BA 

68 

558 

5Va 

1 1 0 

38 45 1 3 0 

72T20 

■Sot Diego 

79 

76 

.-510 

13 

0 10 

17 20 3 1 0 101 

64 

Houston 

78 

77 

-503 

14 

0 1 0 

3 14 7 2 0 

36 

51 

Atlanta 

63 

92 

.406 

29 

ooo 

0 0 2 1 0 

92 

50 

San Frondsco 

59 

9* 

381 

33 


ooo 

ooo 


2 2 0 
0 


77 S3 
85 49 


100 




BIG EIGHT 

Conference All Gomes 
WLTPfeOPWLTPtsOP 


Pittsburgh 

2 

1 

0 

.6*7 72 

20 

Cotenodo 

ooo 0 

0 

3 1 0 

71 

76 

Cleveland 

2 

2 

0 

300 69 

61 

town SL" 

o 00 0 

0 

2 1 0 

33 

77 

toUSlOT 

1 

3 

0 

350 49 

74. 

lamas' 

0-0 0 . 0 

0 

3 l 0 132 

77 

Tnctanatl 

fl 

3 

0 

JXO 92 

113 

Kansas SL 

0 00, 0 

0 

0 4 0 

48 

72 


West 




Missouri 

ooo 0 

0 

0 3 0 

57 84 

Kansas Cltv 

t 

V 

0 

J5B 111 

05 

Nebraska ' 

r; ■ a "ao 0 

0 

2 10 128 

42 

Denver 

2. 

2 

0 

-500 128 

.101 

Oklahoma . 

■ . 04>4> • 0: 

0 

10 0 

t3 

7 

LX Raiders 

2 

2 

0 

-500 96 

90 

ojcjasrr 7 

000 0 

0 

3 0 0 

86 

36 

San Dlega 

• 2 

2 

0 

3D01Q8 

m 


MISSOURI VALLEY 


# 

Seattle 

2 1 

3 

0 

300 106 

m . 


Conference 


All Games 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


1? 


Daltas 
N-Y. Giants 
ST- Louts 
Philadelphia 
/dslHneton 


3 

3' 

3 

1 

I. 


-T 

1 

1 

2 

J 


0 

0 

9 

0 

a 


JSQ 102 
JS0 84 
730128 
35 
46 


57 

106 

60 

131 


Centre! 


Tutsa 
Indiana St. 
Drake 
s. miaafe . 
IHInobjl.. 
W P Tax.SL 
Wichita St. 


WLTPlsOPWLTPtsOP 
100 3124 130 -SB 114 


1 0 0 
MO 
0 1 0 
ooo 

0 BO 
HQ 


17 10 
41.23 

o 31 
0 b 
.0 o 
0 0 


2 2 0 72100 
2 3 0 89 12? 

2 30 164112 

3 0 1 .100 46 
2 2 0 77.72 
13 0 60 88 


I I* 

i. A 


htoago 

• 4 

0 

0 

1*00 130 

69 


MID- AMERICAN 


Deireft 

' 3 

1 

0 

750 

90 

71 


•Conference 

AH Gomes 

i Minnesota 

3. 

1 ’ 

ft. 

75ft Tift 

90 

■ . 

WLT PfeOPW LTPtsOP 

: Green Bov 

*. V. 

3. 

0 

350 

74 

113 

‘ BowL Grn : 

1.0 0 

59 

30 

4 0 0 116’ 78 

Tampa Bay 

• 0 

4 

0 

J000 

66 

119 

Kent SL . 

■’ roo 

28 

3 

1 2 0 

28 61 

““ ■ 

_ West 



" 


NjfUaoli 

10 0 

17 

0 

13 0 

70124 

LA- Rams 

• 4 

0 

0 

10300 

.89 

52 

CentMkti,- 

‘TOO 

13 

7 

2 0 0 

40 17 

New Orleanr 

2. 

2 

Q 

JD0 

90 

HI 

Miami O. 

1 14 

41 

41 

12 0 

51 86 

Son Franciico 

2 

2 

0. 

' .300 107 ' 

76 

Ba(l. St.’ 

120 

42 

57 

.130 

60104 

Atlanta. 

. 0 

4 

0 

J300 

77 

134 

Toledo 

0 1 0 

19 

23 

1 20. 

SI 61 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 



onto Ul 

■ 0 10. 

7 

13 

0 3 0 

27 78 

Dallas 17* Houston 10 




■ - 


e. Weft. 

■ * 0.10 

3 

2ft 

1’2 0 

42 *6 

SL Louis 43, Green Bay 28- 




WJUlcMgan _ 

. (M0 

0 

m Jk 

17 

0 3 0 

.9 72 


Montreal 

ftamlHan 


BrtfO mb 

Winnipeg 

Edmonton 

SftftotCtHtfl 

Gaiporr 



LJL Raiders 35* New England 29 
cansaa CITY 28, Seattle 7 - ' 
giroft 30 , Tampa Bov 9 
iksoo 46 Washington 10 
Alnnesota 27. Buffalo 20 
N.Y. Giants 1A Philadelphia* Tfc OT 
New Orleans 2ft, San- Francisce.17 
Miami 3B Denver' 26 
N.Y. Jets 25, Indiana pails 20 - 
LJL Rams 17# Atlanta 6 
Cleveland ZT* SOT Diego 7 • 

MONDAY'S GAME 
Cfadmofl at Pittsburgh . 


GTX Standings 


Pac ifi c U. 
Fresno St. 
Utah St.' 
San Jos SL 
Up Bch st.. 
NMftx. SL 
Nev^-LSVflS 
Fllrton ST. 


.All Games- 
WLT Pis OP WLT Pts OP 
1 0 e 33 7 220 9278 


10 0 
2 1 0 
1 1 0- 
iib 
0 1 0 
0 2 0 
ooo 


26 A * 3 0 0 118 40 
61 82 22 0 64 92 
64 38 1 3 0 92127 
45 43 "2 2 0 92187 
1 3 0 65131 
1 3 0 88 87 
030 41 92 


Eastern Division . 
W L T PF 
..6*6 8 23fr 

5 7 0 257 

5 7 O 309 

4 7 0 253 

VMem Division- 


PA 

240 

263 


10 

9 

7 

4 

2 


1 

3 

4 
8 
9 


o. 343 
0 371 
0 290 
0 341 
0 166 


297 

196 

182 

277 

329 

296 


Pts. 

12 

10 

10 

- B . 

“20 

18 

14 

8 

4 


Air Force 
Utah • 
SfkDlee SL 
CefeSt. 
Hawaii 
New Mex. ' 
Wyoming 
Tx-ElPase 
Brig. Y*tg 1 


3 33 
30 54 
; 0 -0 

WESTERN ATHLETIC 
■' conference All 
•W LTPtsOP W L T PfSOR. 
3 0 0 UA 25 4 0 0 2P5 42 
2 0 0 84 46 
48 23 
64 72 
27 ‘ 29 
12 49 
7 49 
49.144 
0 0 


1 0 0 
1 1 0 
0 10 
0 t 0 
0 1 0 
■0 3 0 

ooo 

818 SKY 
Conference 
WLT PH DPW LTPttOP 


4 0 0 
2 1 0 
J 3 0 

0 3 0 

1 2 0 
1 3 0 
0 5 D 


148100 
98 71 
77T72 
04 95 
77 .108 
73137 
•92281 


3 1 0 109 68 
All Games 


SUNDAYS RESULTS 
Ottawa 23. Montreal 7 
HavnUtoo 30. Cattarv 13 



. men 

. ' tin Sen Fnendscol ' 

• Final . 

Stefan edbrrfli S weeten # dec Johan Krtofc* 
X- 64, 6-2 ; J p ' 

WOMEN 
•' • (In Now OdNM) 

Float . 

LiavcLUA. deL P«n Sbriver- 
7-5 


1 Idaho . 

20 0 

52 24 3 1 0 124 74 

Boise St. 

1 1 0 

68 58 2 2 0 98 87 

New.-Renq 

• V l 0 

St 35' 3 TO 144 5ft 

Montana 57. 

0 10 

21 5ft t 3 0 158132 

■ NJUlzofto 

0 10 

2 27 2 2 0 68 80 

Mato SL 

0 0 0' 

0 0 2 1 0 97 SB 

.Montana 

ooo 

0 0 1 2 0 64113. 

Weber SL 

..ooo 

0 0 2 1 0 TO 75 

# 

ivy LEAGUB 


- Conference ah Games 


W LT Pto OP W L T pts OP 

Harvard 

.10 0 

49 17. 2 0 0 59 20 

Penn 

/roo 

10 6 T 1 0 13 47 

Princeton- 

T 0-0 

10 ’T 1 1 0 23 37 

rata 

10 0 

10 9.10 0 TO 9 

Columbia - 

•or o 

17 49 0 2 0 17 69 

Brown 

0 1 0 

9 10 -1 >8.41 37 


Cornell- 

Dartmouth 


8 1 0 
O 10 


10. 

10 


020 
0 20 


26 

10 


-MAJOR INDEPENDENTS 1 
■ ' W LT Pls 


opeaaSoccer 


SPANISH ROT OIVJS40M 
) HoreuiB- 

: AltaHtorBUbaa ft RnU Marti? 8; 

VgltortjlM/ZofWoM. Vatoncto fc 

khAltettcaNtartcLitoelSoc 1 — fe*- ■ 

J-; S a naw. OMMiM *t 

Otto, Ul Potmea 3; Hwvto * \ 

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Jr- ■ . -■ . ■ .- 

iiVi'i' #-■ ■ - . 


Florida St. 
Pena SL . . 
Armv 
W. Virginia. 

MtamLFta. 
Cincinnati . 
MemptiSt. 
-&corom in 
SwAAte. \ 
ECorodM 
0wWn,C6L 

SW Igfc . 

msoiirsh 


4 

4 

3 

2 

1 

2' 

1 

2 

-2 

2 

.2. 

1 


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0 
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1 
3 
1 
2 
2 
2 - 
3 
3 

2 . 


O 

"Q 

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0 

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8 

0 

0 . 
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8 

1 


31 
33 

OP 
55 
63 

69 
45 
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52 
' 99 
59 
68 
-ii 151 
90 .155 
.79 79' 


40 

tv 
W 
• 82 
IU 
188 
74 
IDO 
.88 
77. 


Sunday’s line Scores 

' AMERICAN LEAGUE 
First Game 

Baltimore ’■ N N 080—0 3 0 

New York ltO.Dlft 02 b — 4 4 1 

MacGregor. Habvah 18) and Pardo, Demp- 
.sev (8); Cowley. RlghttlV <B) and Wyneear. 
W Cawley# L— MacGregor. 13-14. 5 v— 

Rlghem 071. HRs— N.Y. Mattingly 2 133). 
Second Gome 

Baltimore • -008 802 000-8 3 2 

New York . 300 m Six— 9 8 • 

Havens. 5neH (6). Bell (7) f Aase (81 and 
Dempsey; Barifl, Scurry (71 and Wynesar. 
~W— aerdL6-8L L— HavenAO-L Sv— Scurry (1 ). 
HRe— Baltimore, 0<Meffl*r (1). New Yorfu 
Baylor (22). Winfield (26). 

Boston • - no MO NM 14 1 

Defvait - 040 088 MO I 6 2 

Woodward. Lollar (91 and Gedman; Beran- 
guer. Scherrer 131J Cary 16), Onoof (9) ond 
Parrish. W— Woodward, HL L — B eren gu er. 5- 
A HR— Boston. Easier 1161. 

‘ California VIS 130 018—9 12 i 

Clave! and * 208 881 000 3 7 0 

* McCaUdn and Boone; Wardle,: Thompson 
m, pare 15). Ruble (5) and WHianL W— 
McCoskilL 12-ILL— Wo rdia.8-9. HR— Can ter- 
nfa. Miller (1). 

Kansas City Ottmi NMiO ft 

Minnesota 110 020 M M 9 0 

Gubicza, Hulsmonn (7) add QulrK# Butder. 
'Fttsan (71. Davis W and sate. W— Butcher. 
11-14. Lr-Gubleza. 13-10. Sv — Do vis (281. HR— 
Minnesota. Sates (9). • 

Toronto 400 333 W0— W 23 1 

Mftwaakee 012 000 109 — 5 8 1 

Davis, Acker (3L Caudill (7|. Henke (9) and 
WNtt,Hnrron (71 : Bwrrlx McClure tlLLOdd 
(4} f Porter Uh Lesley (7). Seoroge (8L Dor- 
-win (91 and Huppert. W Acker, 7-2. L— Bur- 
rNi e-IS. HRs— Toroitlo. Maubv (17L Whitt 
(17), Mirvraukee, Simmons (121. 

100 811 800—3 4 0 
080 OM 080—0 10 1 
Seaver. James (71 and Fisk; Young. Ather- 
ton (5) and Tetfleton. W— Seover, 15-11. L^- 
Young* 64. Sv— Jamas (382, HR— tttiteftBQt 
walker (232. 

Texas OOi 280 034—5 TO 0 

Seattle ■ an oot too— 2 9 o 

; Williams, Harris {71 ond Steughf; Youna, 
Vande Bere (82. Thomas (8 h MiraMta (8). 
Nunez (9) -and. Valle. W— Harris. 54. l— 
Young, T3-T8L ' ‘ 

- NATIONAL L8AGUE 
Hou ston 008 008 881 0 5 8 

ancbnaffl 210 4R D0x-5 11 • 

Kneppwv Solano <7) on d Barley; Tibbs and 
VanGorder.’ l w&kL— kmpht, 15- 
12. - - 
SL Loolf ' 008 412 080—5 S 1 

Montreal OH 702 30»— 7 B 3 

Horton. Campbell (6},Dayiev m.Lotiti (8) 
and Nieto; Schatzoder. Lucas (7), Burke (8). 
O'Cotanr (Bit Reardon W ond CTBeny, Bo- 
tens (82. W-LUOW, 6-1 L— Davlev. M. Sv— 
Roanfod (38). HRs— SL U O. Smith (62. Herr 
, (82. Mo it. Webstar (11h Waitech (322. 

010 204 080 — 3 7 2 
•22 818 tlx-6 M 1 
% Toliver* Tekulve (5), Shiponoff (7) and Vlr- 
oh: Trout end DeWa. W— Trout, l— T o- 

llver. 0-3. HR— Ch lengQ. Haftner (31. 

New Yoiir . , OflO 402 801 3-4 12 ft 
Pimbvrdb On 3oe m o-r n 3 

_ Fernandez. McDowell <81 r Otoko (ft) and 
Carter; Turnon, whm <4J r Clements (82, 
Gaante (92.Mewilllemo (9>, BkiecU ( 10 ) and 
Pern. W— Orosco, 7-6. L— ftttWUltavm, 64, 
HRs— New Yorx. Strawberry (27). Johnson 
mJr CQEfer (322. Pittsburgh. Morrison (4). 
So tffiteBB 800 819 815-2 9 2 

Attanf a 180 080 101— 3 7 0 

TiturmamL MCCuiiere (8). Walter |ft and 
Kjcimedy; MOTtor, Forster 19). Comp IWaad 
Ceriwie. w— Camp, M LHWcCuliers, 0.2. 
HR— Sot Otago, McRenwkls (151. " 

100 110 OML-2 8 9 
880 83i Jlx— 7 10 1 
MaaMMtetan (5>:WL Dovtef7L4tobktM>n " 
(71. Word Motto (81 ood Notcea? wtkh. 


108; Dw.Evone, Boston, 106; Winfield, New 
Yore,-10L 

RBls; MOttlng tv. New York# 148; E Mur- 
ray. Baltimore, 119; Wlnf told. New York, 1 12; 
Baines, Chicago, lift; Ripken, Baltimore, 106. 

Hits: Boggs, Boston, 233; Mattingly, New 
York, 282; Bobies, Chicago, 195; P .Bradley, 
Seattle, 187; Puckett, Minnesota, 186. 

Do u b le s: Mattingly, New York, 48; Buck- 
ner, Boston, 41; Boggs. Boston. 48; Cooper, 
Milwaukee, 39; Brett, Kansas aty, 37. 

Triples; Wilson, Kansas aty, 19; Butler, 
Cleveland, 14; Puckett, Minnesota 13; Fer- 
nandez, Toronto, 10 ; Barfletd, Toronto. 9. 

Home Recti: Da .Evans, Detroit, 37; Fisk, 
Chicago, 37; Balbonl, Kansas City, 35; Mat- 
tingly, New York, 33: G .Thomas, Seattle, 32. 

Stoleo Basel: R .Henderson, New York, 77; 
Pettis. California 56; Butter. Cleveland, 46; 
Wllsoa Kansas City, 43; L .Smith, Kansas 
City. 38. 

PITCHING . 

Woo- Lost /Winning Pd/Era; (12 deci- 
sions 1-GuldrVf New York. 71-6, J7& 136; So- 
bertiaeen, Kansas City. 19-6, JNL286; alburn. 
CarTtbmla 9-5, J50, 2.12; Cowley. New York, 
12-4. -706. 383; Kev, Toronto, 14-L JOO, 102. 

Struceoots: Btyieven, Minnesota 191 ; Mor- 
ris, Detroit, 189; P jBarmlster, Chicago, 183; 
Hurst, Boston. 179; Bums, Chicago, 17DL 

Saves: Qulsenberrv, Kansas CKy, 25; Her- 
nandez, Detroit, 31; B James, Chicago, 30; 
D -Moore, Californio, 29; J .Howell Oakland, 
29. 


m 

Weaver, : A Short Day , Twice 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Manager 
Earl Weaver continues to have 
rapport problems with umpires. 

Weaver was ejected from 
both games Sunday as his Balti- 
more Orioles lost a doublebead- 
er against the Yankees. New 
York has beaten Baltimore in 
11 of 12 meetings this year, per- 
haps accounting for Weaver’s 
frustration. 

In the first. game. Weaver 
conducted 10-minute argu- 
ments in each of the first two 
innings about a fust-inning call 
at home plate; when he came 
out of tbe dugout in tbe third 
for another round of talks, he 
was immediately ejected by 
crew chief Jim Evans. 

In the nightcap, Evans 
thumbed Weaver when the 
manager took the lineup card to 
home plate and again tried to 
re-open negotiations. 

‘It’s tough enough to deal 
with unintelligent people," 
Weaver said. “It’s worse when 


they tel] you untruths. Igno- 
rance always seems to prevail." 

“I've battled — I’ve fought 
and I’ve scratched — and I've 
survived," he said. 

U I was told out there on Lhe 
field that baseball has passed 
me by, so why don’t I go and 
play golf. They bring you down 
to iheir level." 

“U goes back to when I 
played with Baltimore," Don 
Baylor, whojiad.a homer and 
drove in four runs in the second 
game; said of Weaver and Ev- 
ans. “They are old enemies." 

The ejections were the third 
and fourth for Weaver this year 
and Nos. 92 and 93 lifetime. 

After the second heave-bo. 
Weaver, talking all the while, 
kicked dirt on Evans and 
picked up a handful of din and 
threw it at him. 

In his absence the Orioles 
were managed by Coach Cal 
Ripken Sr. {who was also eject- 
ed in the eighth inning of the 
opener). 



Dale Murphy’s rolling sSde upended San Diego second baseman 
Tim Flannery and kffled a potential double play Sunday in Atlanta. 


VANTAGE POINT/ Ken Denlinger 

Slow Learners in the School for Scandal 


McGee sr.L. 
Guerrero la 
R otaro Mon. 
Gwynn S.DL 
Porker Cla 
MoretaM Chi 
Sandberg ChL 
Horr SIX. 
Hernandez. N.Y. 
Oester Cla 
Runs; Murphy, 


H 

209 

150 

176 
187 
189 

177 
181 
177 
172 

151 


PCI. 


J2S 

3U 

jn 

jni 

M9 

JOB 

JO? 

301 

J01 




NATIONAL LEAGUE 
G AB R 

147 519 113 

130 462 96 

145 S41 188 

148 597 82 

153 607 84 

155 572 78 

147 587 lift 

154 577 96 

153 S71 85 

145 5D1 5a 
A Hama* I’M; 

StXauts, 113; Sandberg, Chicago* '116; 
RoJoes, Montreal, 1 0B; Coleman. St .Louis, 105. 

RBfsS Parker, CincJnnafJ, 120; Morphy, At- 
lanta, 109: Herr, St .LoulvIOK Moreland, Oit- 
cooa 102; Carter, now York* 98. 

Hits: McGee, St .Louis, 209; Porker, CJncJn- 
ttaiL 189; Gwynn, San Dlega 187; Sandberg, 
Chicago, 181; Horr,-5t J-ouls, 177; Morofond, 
Chicago, 177, 

Doubles: Parker, Cincinnati 42; Herr, 
StJLouk*, 38; GWlftan, Philadelphia. 37; Wol- 
fed), Montreal 35; Cruz. Houston* 33. 

Triples: McGee, 5t .Louis* 17; SamueL Phil- 
adelphia* 13; Rplnes. Montreal 12; Cofemon, 
Si IiwISflO; C .Remolds, HoustoruS; Gamer, 
Houston 8; M Wilson, New York, 6. 

• Home Rons: Murphy, Atlanta, 37; Guerre- 
- ro* Lds AnaeieSr 33; Carter, New York, 32; 
Sdttukfl, Philadelphia, 32; Porker, Cincin- 
nati 30. 

Stolen Bases: Cotemn, Sf.Louia* 109; 
Raines, Montreal. 66; McGee* St .Louis* 54; 
Sandberg, Chicago, 54; SomueL Ptotedetohia 

48. 

PITCHING 

WtaHLdSf/WlOTlnp PetJEraz HefOTber, 
Lpo Anodes. UKL JS7* 286; Gooden. New 
York, 23-4. J52* Franca Cincinnati 12-X 
teL 223; B -Smith, Montreal. 17-5, J71 2J7; 
w oka Los Angeles 134* 765, 277. 

5lrfkeoofs; Gooden, New York, 258; Soto, 
andnnofl290; Valenzuela Uo% Angeles, 198; 
RYOrti Houston, 1*6; Fernandez. New York, 
177. - 

ftnes! Reardon, Montreal, 38; Le .Smith, 
QiJcooo, 32; Power, dnchinorj, 26 ; D .Smith. 
Hdustw, 25 i Ooesowe, San Diego, 25. 



BASEBALL 
National League 

AT LANT A— Stoned Bryce Benedict, catch- 
er, to o three- y iepr contract. 

BASKETBALL 

Notional Basketball AssociaNoa 
ATLANT A — Agreed to lerms wrilh Jon Kop- 
cat center, on a four-yew Contract. 
FOOTBALL 


SAN FRANCISCO— Placed Mlchart carter, 
nose loefclo, on Jnliirod reserve. Signed Scott 
Garnett, nose foacie. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey loom 
. N.Y. ISLAND eR&— Rcfctiaod Dave fton- 
aereort and Merer Garr,rl9Hf wJnos*and Ivan 
Joly, left wing. Returned Kurt Loctooer, Rod 
Dalirnan, Tom Warden and Brad Lauer f right 
wkios; KmAfi Herem, left wing; Ml Ike Murrey 
and Rtefi Wfest. centers, and^eff Finley, ae* 
Itfiw mo aifl melr hiIiioMnsw learoo. Seni 


- - . . ... _ . ... Chris vietere* ae f e ne emon, to Ottawa o t tee 

Ni^B^ucrrt) aw Sdosao. w~- w«rien.l3-4. OnlwtoHocMvijOBwoiitfMIkeVolpe.flool- 
L— Meson, IW. HR i—A, Morahali (25). t«*r. to KHcheoer a< im ohi 


)*'ashmgron Past Serwce 

WASHINGTON — “Would 
you toll your editor.** said the 
friend, frustrated but not quite 
pleading, “to get those drug guys 
out of the sport pages. Put the 
names and the stories somewhere 
else, if you have to report it all but 
you people just deal with sports." 

By definition, Ians are perpetual 
children, among the last to recog- 
nize reality and to deal with it. 
Newspapers that ignore life beyond 
the white lines are doing everyone, 
including the athletes, a consider- 
able disservice. We will get back to 
emphasizing baseball w-hen the 
commissioner of baseball is able to 
do just that, and back to strong- 
side blitzes in college football when 
schools such as Texas Christian 
University stop buying playerSL 

The frightening part of the latest 
drugs-and-ch eating mess is how ca- 
sual it all seems to have become. 
On June 13, 1980, John Milner had 
nothing to do in the early innings, 
he bong a pineb-hitter for the Pitts- 
burgh Pirates, so he walked back 
into the clubhouse and bought two 
grams of cocaine from a dealer. 

After the game, Milner testified, 
he and Dave Parker "wem for a 
ride . . . snorted a little bit and went 
our separate ways." 

Thai was a fair year for sporting 
crime. 1980. Prior to thaL recruiting 
season, according to the letter of 
resignation from board member 
Did: Lowe, the TCU cheating 
scheme was concocted by himself, 
former Coach Fj\. Dry and a cou- 
ple of his assistants, over dinner. 
The necessary conspirators and 
funds were rounded up quickly. 

Most college football cheaters at 
least win. ft took TCU four years to 
buy more than a 3-8 record, and 
Dry was find after the 1982 season. 
At that time. Lowe said, there were 
29 players receiving more than the 
NCAA allows. 

He insisted Dry’s replacement, 
Jim Wacfcer, knew nothing of the 
illegalities. Some cynics cocked an 
eye when TCU went from l-S-2 to 
8-4 in Wacker’s second season, mir- 
acles being even less common in 
sports than religion. Sure enough, 
in addition to bang quite a good 

coach, Wacker had six of Drv’s 

«* 


double-dip holdovers, including 
the gif led runner Kenneth Davis. 

"A normal blue-chip player costs 
between. SI 0,000 to $20,000, a car 
and SI.000 a month.” Lowe said. 
Thai’s in addition to the chance for 
an education valued at perhaps 
S40.000. So the minimum wage at 
many, if not most, football fac- 
tories is S60.000 to 572,000. 

Moral madness, right? 

Well consider that for slightly 


more than Sl million a year (no- 
body has more than 15 blue-chip- 
pens in each class), the college foot- 
ball cheaters might generate more 
than S10 million a year. That's in 
addition to goose bumps and Inner 
glow for the likes of Lowe. 

Sounds like a wonderful return 
on an investment to me. 

Lots of us veterans of cheating 
scandals are rather pleased that the 
players are at least getting a decent 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Draw Is Made for Team Golf Tourney 

LONDON (AP) — The United States on Monday was named the top 
seed for the inaugural Dunhill Cup. a team championship event and golfs 
richest. Sixteen three-man squads will play for a first prize of 1300,000. 
The format will be singles medal play, all matches going 18 holes. 

Tbe U.S. team of Ray Floyd, Curtis Strange and Mark O'Meara was 
paired with France in the first round of the S12 million competition, to 
be staged Oct. 17-20 at Sl Andrews in Scotland. Second-seeded Austra- 
lia. represented by Greg Norman, Graham Marsh and David Graham, 
will meet Hong Kong in the opening round. 

The remainder of the draw (seeded nations first): Canada vs. New 
Zealand, Scotland vs. Brazil. Japan vs. the Philippines, Taiwan vs. Wales, 
Spain vs. Nigeria and England vs. Ireland. 

High-Flying Blue Jays Faring Red Ink 

TORONTO (AP) —The Toronto Blue Jays, within reach of their first- 
ever American League East baseball title, face losses of between Sl 
million and S3 million this season. 

“We can’t take it for granted that we’re going to be in the playoffs, 
because we haven’t clinched yet,” said Bob Nicholson, the dub's vice- 
president of finance. "But a good chunk of the loss would be eliminated in 
the playoffs, depending on how many games we play. You’d like to think 
thaC with the size of crowds we've had this year, we could have made 
more money. But right now*, we’re going to lose upward of S3 milliort" 

The primary factor in the teanrs loss is a difference of almost 30 
percent between the Canadian and U.S. dollars, said Nicholson. “We 
receive 75 percent of our revenue in Canadian dollars, but two- thirds of 
our expenses are in U.5. money.” he said. 


Mudd Leads Weather-Plagued Open 

SAN ANTONIO, Texas (AP) — Jodie Mudd completed a much- 
delayed 2- under- par 68 early Monday morning and took a four-stroke 
lead into the day-late final round of the Texas Open golf tournament. 

Temperatures were around 6 degrees centigrade <4l degrees Fahren- 
heit) with a chill wind when Mudd and 14 others resumed third-round 
play. They had been stranded on the Oak Hills course by thunderstorms 
Saturday: heavy rains Hooded the course and washed out Sunday's play. 

Mudd'5 13-under 197 is the (ours low three-round total for the year. 
John Mahaffey cut one shot off Mudd's lead by completing a 65 that gate 
him sole possession of **n.nnd pljce. Mark Hayes was next at o9-'202. 


slice of the take. We find nothing 
repulsive about a linebacker twice 
Carling Bassett’s size and several 
years older bring able to legally 
earn perhaps a fifth of her income. 

But if colleges are going to 
preach high moral standards, 
they’d better work at wiping out 
the cheaters. Recent NCAA legisla- 
tion is aimed at doing exactly that. 
Just guessing, but TCU may have 
turned itself in to the NCAA in 
order to beg for mercy later. 

In baseball. Commissioner Peter 
Ueberrotii is trying for the same 
showy force the colleges produced 
several months ago. He wants the 
players to submit to random drug 
testing three limes a year.' begin- 
ning in 1986. You would think the 
players would be bright enough to 
realize that Lheirs is a sport Lhat 
sells itself on being a public trust — 
and would quickly volunteer to suf- 
fer a slight indignity to at least offer 
the appearance of being clean. 

But through the executive direc- 
tor of their union. Don Fehr, the 
players have said: , *Nuis." On this 
issue, most of what the players have 
to fear is Fehr himself. 

Just as tougher rules will not to- 
tally eliminate college football 
thievery, random drug tests will not 
entirely snuff out the snorters from 
baseball. But they at least would be 
good-faith gestures to a public that 
demands lit tie from players other 
that) an honest effort and compli- 
ance with the laws of the land. 

Olympians don't fuss about test- 
ing. Neither should shortstops. 

In Fehr s defense, this is strong- 
arm renegotiation. The owners and 
players did. after all. agree to drug 
procedures in the spring of 19S4. 
Fehr has hinted that the union 
might bend, for a price. Right now, 
they seem the villains to a surpris- 
ingly tolerant public. 

If the fans had been livid rather 
than forgiving, if they had refused 
to pay to watch Keith Hernandez 
play rather than giving him a stand- 
ing ovation after his admissions un- 
der oath. Ueberroth surely would 
have suspended some players by 
now. He has a more important mat- 
ter tu resolve — credibility. To bor- 
row a line from Joe Patemo: It'll 
cither set belter or it'll get worse. 














« '■». • — k 


L TW ■ V ■ ■ •■Wt 





Pajie 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1. 1985 


.fiH**. 1 


V" ! 


POSTCARD 


PEOPLE 


^4 Teaspoonful of Maine 


Martin Scorsese’s Place on the Periphery ^ Tnasure in Florida 


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By Donald M. Kreis 

.4 f svciarcd Press 

W EST PARIS. Maine — Joe 
Peril am looks down the lull 
from his home and sees fertile 
ground: a valley full of forest and 
farmland, a village with a clothes- 
pin factory and the home of his 
neighbor. Ole. 

Ole (rhymes with holy), the 
farmer neat door, is the inspiration 
for many of the Maine tales spun 
by Per ham. 52, a retired high- 
school teacher. 

One of these stories concerns the 
fellow who I earns that the farm he 
has lived on all his life is actually in 
New Hampshire and not Maine. 
The farmer is elated. “I never could 
have stood another one of them 
Maine winters." he says. 

That's a textbook example of 
Maine humor, Perham says. So is 
the one about the fellow who set off 
one winter's day in his snowshoes. 
and comes upon a hat moving 
through the snowdrifts. Under the 
hat the man finds his neighbor, so 
the concerned citizen asks if he can 
be or any assistance. 

“"No.” comes the reply. “I still 
got my horse under me.” 

Stories such as that — delivered 
in the Yankee drawl that New En- 
glanders call Lhe Down East accent 
— provide more than just a liveli- 
hood for Perham and other story- 
tellers. Along with lobsters, L. L. 
Bean and moose bunting, such hu- 
mor is pan of the Maine mystique. 

“h takes more than a teaspoon- 
ful of brains to understand it," said 
Kendall Morse, 50. a retired boat 
captain who has also caned out a 
niche as a Maine storyteller. That 
saying, he added, was borrowed 
from the late Marshall Dodge, the 
dean of Maine storytellers. 

Dodge's “Ben and T albums 
started a small but persistent re- 
cording industry. Perham’ s "That 
Wonderful Old Two-Holer” 
reached the 4.000 mark in sales. It 
may not be a gold record, but it 
lakes up a favorite topic from the 
golden days of yesteryear: the out- 
house. 

"Maine humor lends to mildly 
satirize what society says is prop- 
er." said Perham. Which explains 
why a lot of the people described in 
the record seem to end up viewing 
the "two-holer" from the bottom 
looking up. 

Does this Down East view of the 
universe play in Peoria? Tve been 
to Detroit and Vail, Colorado,'' re- 


ports Perham. “I lay a little Maine 
humor on them. It always works.” 

Another storyteller, John Me- 
Donald, talks about Tukey Merrill, 
a “world-class direction-giver.” 
One day, Tukey gives a few motor- 
ists from Massachusetts directions 
to Bangor, which happens to be the 
nearest city. Some time later, they 
pull right back up to the porch of 
Tukey's house: it seems he has di- 
rected them 'in a circle. 

The woman in the passenger's 
seat gives Tukey a tongue-lashing, 
but be just puffs thoughtfully on 
his pipe. 


“Listen dear." he replies calmly, 
just wanted to make sure that 


"I just wanted to make sure that 
you could follow directions before 
I wasted my time directin' you all 
the way to Bangor.” 

Sandy Ives, a folklorist at the 
University of Maine, thinks tour- 
ists and summer people are more 
than jusL the butt of Maine humor. 
He believes they are the reason it 
exists. Noting that many Maine 
storytellers, including Marshall 
Dodge, did not grow up in the 
state, Ives maintain!; it was Maine's 
summer visitors who sparked the 
phenomenon by noticing that the 
locals seemed, well, different. 

“The people who come here have 
certain expectations," says Ives. 
"The Maine that this creates is not 
the Maine that you and I run into 
every day, but it's an imaginar y, 
mythical son of world that's very 
real to Mainers and non-Mainers 
alike." 

Tim Sample, 34, is perhaps the 
best-known Maine humorist. Sam- 
ple prides himself on adapting tra- 
ditional Maine storytelling to the 
more mainstream forms of comedy 
— hence the title of his popular 
album, "Down east Standup.” 

He tells people that his wife sells 
cosmetics, including a lipstick that 
features "exactly the same color as 
this safety orange that the hunters 
wear." 

“Well.’' he continues, "I person- 
ally feel safer ridin* in the car with 
Mother at night when she's wearin* 
that lipstick. I figure if we had a flat 
or somthing, you know, all sbe’d 
have to do is just stand out on the 
soft shoulder and just kind of puck- 
er up." 


An Buchwold is on a leave of 
absence. His column will be resumed 
shortly. 


By Esrher B. Fein 

VfH York Tinm Service 

N EW YORK — Walking 
around the TriBeCa neigh- 
borhood in Manhattan, where he 
lives. Marlin Scoisese looks a lit- 
tle out of place. 

His gray-threaded hair is 
groomed. The woman passing 
him has spiked pink locks. 

His jeans are pressed. The man 
walking by is wearing a skirt. 

His jacket is a serene tweed. 
The man (or is it a woman?) cy- 
cling down the street is swathed 
in Day-Glo. 

U is easy to imagine how pecu- 
liar Scorsese must have looked 
directing his most recent movie. 
“After Hours," which was filmed 
in this area and recounts the story 
of Paul Hackeil. a beige-suited 
computer programmer, who in a 
one-nighL downtown odyssey en- 
counters a maniac with a Mo- 
hawk. a sadomasochistic sculp- 
tor. a neo-‘60s waitress with a 
beehive hairdo and a vigilante 
whose weapon is a Mister Softee 
ice-cream truck. 

With his Little Italy accent and 
sensibility, Scorsese. 42. is a de- 
tached denizen of this environ- 
ment. an alien with temporary 
citizenship, an observer at a kind 
of United Nations of the street 
*Tve let a few’ people take me 
around, to get a sense of what's 
going on down here." said Scor- 
sese. who has lived in the neigh- 
borhood for about 10 years. "But 
basically. I understand Paul's 
point of view. He's not familiar 
with it He doesn't belong. That’s 
a feeling l can identify with." 

"Marty was always the quiet 
type because of the asthma and 
the breathing problems." recalled 
his mother. Catherine. “You 
know, he was excused from play- 
ing balL so he just watched the 
others." 

“Thank God now.” said his fa- 
ther, Charlie. “I think he passed, 
that stage." 

Scorsese may no longer be the 
wheezing youngster, but creative- 
ly he has retained his position on 
the periphery. From his first fea- 
ture film. “Who's That Knocking 
at My Door?” Scorsese has been 
an observer of life on the margin, 
and the movies he has directed 
since then — “Mean Streets." 
“Alice Doesn’t Live Here Any- 
more." "Taxi Driver.” "New 
York. New York.” “Raging 



New Shefl 


Director Scorsese: No “Temptation." 


BulL” “King of Comedy." and 
now “After Hours" — have stud- 
ied that idea from different an- 
gles. and through different lives, 
ensconcing him in the role of the 
outsider. 

“Who's That Knocking?" is the 
story of a young Catholic man 
who is sexually obsessed, yet 
mired in guilt and as such re- 
mains apart from both the world 
of promiscuity and religiosity. In 
“Mean Streets." a hoodlum- in- 
training never really seems to rec- 
oncile himself to the gangster 
world of Little Italy that he is 
trying to penetrate. Rupert Pup- 
kin in “King of Comedy" is so 
desperate for celebrity. 'he kid- 
naps a talk show host and for 
ransom demands that he appear 
on the show. And Paul in “After 
Hours" heads down to SoHo for 
w hat he hopes will be a romance 
with a stranger, only to find him- 
self in a nightmare where being a 
regular kind of guy is an anoma- 
ly. 

“To me, Bohemians are people 
in black-and-white movies, wear- 


ing black turtlenecks:" he says. 

Scorsese said he came to identi- 
fy closely with the “NYU Film 
School” method of moviemaking, 
which he described as “the gritty 
sense af having made a movie by 
hand. In California, the very fact 
that the center of the industry is 
there, the material and the tools 
are there. It’s more convenient 
oul there. It’s still hard to get a 
picture made on either coast, but 
there's a certain level of technical 
excellence on the West Coast that 
we don't think is very important 
out here. We think out here, on 
the East CoasL that it’s content" 

All of Scorsese’s movies, except 
“Alice Doesn’t Live Here Any- 
more.” have used New York as 
their backdrop and in some, like 
“Mean Streets" and “Taxi Driv- 
er,” the streets themselves be- 
came characters in (he plot His 
most recent project before “After 
Hours." however, would have 
taken Scorsese not only oul of 
New York but out of the country. 
“The Last Temptation of Christ" 
which Scorsese had worked on 


for about a year and a half, is a 
movie about Jesus based on a 
novel, and. was to have been shot 

on location in Israel. 

But the project was canceled by 
Paramount a few months before, 
shooting was scheduled to begin, 
after the studio and its parent 
company. Gulf and Western, 
were deluged with mail protesting 
the making of the movie. In fight- 
ing rumors that the film would 
portray Jesus as a homosexual 
and predictions that it would be - 
economically disastrous, Scorsese 
said he felt himself thrust again 
into the role of the outsider. . 

“There were all Lhese people 
talking about something they’d 
never even read, saying things 
which weren't even true and no 
one would listen to me.” he said. 

Although Scorsese seems to 
revel in alienation, there is one 
movie in his repertory that por- 
trays a world Scorsese is not only 
not apart from, he is clearly a pan 
of. 

“Italian am erican," which was 
presented at the New York Film 
Festival in 1974. is a cinematic 
tribute to Scorsese's parents and 
grandparents and their lives in 
the enclave of lower Manhattan 
which, because of people like the 
Scorseses, came to be known as 
Little Italy. It is a loving, 50- 
minute documentary, starring 
Catherine and Charlie Scorsese, 
set in their apartment (plastic- 
covered couches and all), and fea- 
turing a demonstration of how to 
cook meatballs and spaghetti 
sauce, which thoughtfully in- 
cludes the recipe. 

In the movie, as in real life, 
Charlie Scorsese and Catherine 
reminisce, among other things, 
about their marriage, life in the 
.tenements on Elizabeth Street 
and the honeymoon they took 39 
years after they were married. 
They speak in tandem, one pick- 
ing up a sentence where the other 
leaves off, two people conducting 
one conversation. 

’You should see what didn't 
get in,” recalled Catherine. 

"All these stories,” said Char- 
lie. 

“Marty would ask questions 
about stories we told him when he 
was a little boy." said Katie. 

“What a memory that boy 
has!” said Charlie: 

“It’s my favorite movie,” said 
Martin. 


A woman who climbed beneath cause be could not get patent rights 
Garrison Bight bridge in Key WesL in time, a . Hungarian newspaper 
Florida, and pawed along a cement reported. Erao Rubik, a Hungarian 

found a bidden envelope that scientist and now a millionaire, had 
earned her S50.000 in gold and a. been expected -to unveil his . new 
S 10,000 emerald. The find ended a* game — in which children put to- 




it 


can 


illif 


S 10,000 emerald. The find ended a game — in which children put to- 

treasure hunt staged by Md Usher, goiter different parts of children's |!|tPX * 

die ocean salvor who in July found furniture In the form of a game — III 1 "' 

millions of dollars worth of gold at The Budapest International Fair “ 

and stiver from the Spanish galleon Saturday.. .^« yl 

Nuestra Seoora de Atocha after a . □ Lf| ■* 

16-vear hunt. For seven days, bun- 

dreds of people combed Key The image of Abraham Lfecoln Til* 

West s streets, beaches and alley- ^ a j^mespux, country lawyer was . A 1 1 1 i 

ways for dues that would lead to a derm jtivdy smashed when two an- a IXiX * ' 

solid gold bar from the Mocha and throp oi og j sts round fine .English J 0 ' 

theeinerald donated by a local jew- ^ramong his garbage. 1 

elec. Deborah Benedict,^ of Key MxkBUD ' a Northern Illinois Uni- 1 ...... P 

West, had to follow a trafl of clues versit anthropology professor, ■ 

that took her all overthe island and d p^ oyd Mansberger were hired >- J ' ... . 
use a “Captains Log to interpret . ^ NatioQa ] Parit Service to 

the dues, said Btofh McHdey, a ^ ^ construction 0 f the Ss"^ £ 

spokeswoman for fisher s compa- Springfield home, where 5a iw? : 

ay. Treasure Salvor “This was m- UncolnUvedasa lawyer beginning £*>*-; V.'! 

^ S ^ cia ^ . l ? his political 'career. After removing r- 1 - _ _ 

sakL Ti was just perseverance. It floorboards of the back porch, * ' 

was^nen-e-wrackmg and it was |hey foi||ld a filled wiih gar. ^ 

^ bage, including chicken bones, egg- ^ 


aii< 


In 






.iiun*'- 


^ lW 5 


j ’.I-- - 




.•* \ -'k . 


fun. 


shells*, pottery and glassware. The 
two believe the litter found under 


| caB* ^ 


s* 1 * - 


SPi 


s^- r 


_ . . - „ ... two believe the titter found under ^ 

The pianist Vladimir Horowita jj Lincoln’s because the . . jr p- r ' 

will play ax La Seda in on ^ ^ ^ ^ j 344, .when . v f ' 
Nov. 17 and Nov 24. his firstap- ^ and. long 

pearances there m 50 years, aroord- thc previoU s owners 3 * P J / 

mg to opera house officials. Horo- M , p . * F-V" .. 

wiiz, bora in Kiev, Russia, in 1904, . .... g 

made his American debut with the . . u J 

New York Philharmonic in 1928 _ i,, 

and settled . in the United States. Marc-Aadri Hametin, 29,- of . (v- - 

Since 1953, he has given redials Montreal, on Sunday won the 1985 Trjiiici i--—' 


.ffi'-i* 1 - 

.s '■ 

t. S-Jr'" ' 

ffCTrf-- 


only infrequently. The concerts will Carnegie Hall International Amer- 

■ ku C^kiimann Qrhll- .mh /*vmrv»^tTf 1/in lfl ttiKlolt I® . 


include works by Schumann, Schu- ican Music Competition, in which ■ 

ben, Liszt and Chopin. 177 contestants from 13 countries - r 

□ vied for prizes. Prctiminaiy rounds 

_ . _ ‘ , . were held in June in San Francisco, 

Max Schmelmg, the former New York, Boston and ^ " 

heavyweight boxing champion, fi^ £ prize includes 

turned 80 Saturday. “I never want- _. h of « 1 5.000. S35.000 in 1 TV ! 


turned 80 Saturday. I never want- ^ of $15,000, 535,000 in 

ed to be the gnrat Max, and the career promotion, with a /W*L I i lit i * * 

man who was hailed as the boxing prem i e re perfonnance of a newl^^ 


man who was hailed as the “boxing premiere performance of a newly^ 1 ' 
sensation of the cenniry what he oQ^junissioned work and other re-, T l ~" 

knocked out the previously imbeat- ^ a„d orchestral boo kings, and,’ J r pi of l 
tm Joe Loms in 1936. (Louis J25 <000 recording contract. U C5 <U L. 


en Joe Louis in 1936. (Louis ^(^^ngconMcL ’UTB * 

knocked out Schmeling in only 124 * ' recoramg ^o 

seconds in a 1938 rematch.) “I of- □ * I |x'*a I* 

ten think about my past, but Tm _ . ... J jODitl v/H I 

much more imeresteS in the pre- r Pbaito Domingo, still searchUV^^ 

sent and future." said Schmeling, for relatives f 11155111 ^ , 1 a /'ffrer 
who was bom in 1905 in what was Qty sdwastating earthquakes. W/ IJtfnUlU' 
then the Geiman province of Pom- cancdedhisTou rre mai^ pen? . 

crania. He described himself as an mances m “Olello with the Lync 

optimist and said “I want to live to Domingo ap- 

vSgq" peared SepL 21 in the season pre- 

mier of the opera “Otello,” then 

*-* left immcdialdy for Mexico. The 

The inventor of the Rubik's . tenor Wiffiam Johns substituted Tor 

Cube will not display his newest him in the remaining perfor- 

game at an international fair be- mances. . v - 


itv'h.i-' 


1 

BJ 




;dSGT«. 

.Sawn : 
S'.i" 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ambucan hospital of paws, 

Accrzttoed VS. Hmpfiri. labour 
Emer cency Service Engfcsh sp oten ■ 
Bue uoss. 63 Bid. Victor Hugo # 922D2 
NEUILLY SUP SQNEJ10 mnutn From 
Bole). R>one 747 5J GO. 


EXPLORE YOUR INTERESTS wrth 
Women's Infrfe for ConUnung Edu- 
coti an'$ leffurn - business cn. wnl- 
ii3g of Open House, October 3, 12J0 ■ 
SjO. American College. 31 Ave. Bov 
quei, Pani 7. Tet 5559173. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS « 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CANADA 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 



^ TTTTtTTTH?? 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


phone. For wfo r rng h on contod: OC 
Comp.. Am Ftohbuseh 99. 4150 K re- 
Feld, W. GOTwny. Telephone: 

caisi 56io9i.iu.ffi3iia7ajCD. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBlTtBS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ErgLshJPcns (dailyl 63* 59 65. Borne 


HAVE A NICE DAY! BOKB. Have a 
nice dayl Bold. 


PORTUGAL Sff 
HoUavs & Travel 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


NORMANDY: 1 hour From Pons A 
Deauvile, pavetfe settng, we poper- 
iy ; XQth cerminf mil ennrdy oewrat- 
ed & fumishea in exceptond daw- 
Red MTOundm. Double size bvmg 
obow wotv, f m. ceAng with teg- 
ats. [ilrorv. 4 bedroono. 7 bdhs. J 


.ERUSA1EM FOR SERIOUS onlv. lumh 
ry mdrcr*m duple*, about 4QQ sq-m. 
Lower tevefc liven. ’^ng, fibrary, 
stody^ btchen. rowcT 5 TJom w* own 
borh. laundry room & ] FuB bat hr oom. 


CHAMPS DE MARS 


h charming mou n tain ppyjff OT 

LEYSIN: 


obove wotor, 
pco, fibrorv.. 

w.c, on me 


shower. S650.000. Wrtfe Box 2736, 
Herd d Tnbane. 92S21 Nemiy Cede*. 
France 


Sun. wow, old. high ct=js 
5 rooms. HO sq.m. ■*- bdeeny ■ 
mads »oom 

2 rooms. 72 Teh 330 26 G3 

AGB4CE DE LTTOUjE 




Overtaolcng o s plend i d Alpine panoro- 
rrs. 3G min. horn Monfreia and Ldie 
Geneve by cct 

- vou cor. cwn qjdtfy residences 


4 bedrooms, 7 boihs. J 
water terrace, large 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN LINES INTL 


f course. Justified 
[negofioUel. TH 


XVI ON THE PARK 



wrh indoor swuraning poof and 
fitness feefrys m on toed 
s iyi iom nert tar teurf and verft 
MS. golf, etri. 

Ftratatwci taw 5F. rates 
up to 55% mortgeg ev . 


Spec taoAr 250 sqm. + 30 sqj n. 
terrace, 3 receptions + 2 bedrooms + 
2 baths + 2 6 essmgs. 2 mads ryy ns. 


2 r 'Jura. 40 sq.m.. ewta. Sur 

A 13 -296 59 59 



REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


MONACO 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA 


a«;KUrt:i?7i 


PRJNOTALTFY OF MONACO 
IN HEART OF MONTE CARLO 
beoufiful ui tf umshe d opof H ne nt f 
modem bufcfing, near beadiest hah 
doss, 3 room, eMped Wien, cefcr, 
parting. FI Z00Q/ month + cha rg es. 
DTcuSMTE AG84CE XHERMSSa 


74 CHAMPS-S.Y5SS 8fh 



Studo, 2 or 3-roora apanmeot. 
Om morth of more. 

LE CLABOGE 359 67 97. 


GENERAL POSmONS 
AVAILABLE 


T* 193] 50 66 84 
Trine 469477 


SHORT TERM STAY. Advantages af o 
hotel wrttovtmaxiveacrxn fed at 


PARIS AREA 




home in nice sbdajone bedooni 
and mare in Parifc SOEQLIM: 80 rue 




. and more in Paris. SOGfiJM: 80 rue 
de rUnhers^ 7tfi; 5U 39 40 


5ENUS, 40 KM. PASS, very beautiful 


SAM* PAUL DE VR4CL Ercepnond 1 2 partings, bcepfiortd decorations £ 


tendance le e Frene e, 1854 Leynn 
SWnZSUANO 

V f025)3^ IT 55 TU: 456 120PLAICH 


sea vieWjtfpne estate, 
space. OTO k; m tand 


OVER 1300 OFFICES 
WORLDWIDE 


ry tem. F7 .400.000 P/omofton Mo- 
zart tfe*. Bureau du Buhl. I Prome- 


odrnhti. 

BATON 704 55 55 

TB£X BATON 630 855F 


rade d« Andars, 06000 Ptce. Teb 
73/6 8 37 37. iU lmmozar 461235 


7. Tlx lnvnoxar 461235 


MONACO 


Rare In The 


USA Allied Vai line* Inti Corp 
(OIOT) 312-681-8100 , 

O- cafl our Agency European offees' 

PARIS Monies International < 

(01) 343 23 64 n wi mviviv 

CD AWCTUDT WfJT 5 SPIB4DB) 34EVEL VlUA 

nWPIWVnl Sendees liu! 300 8 bedrooms, with v*w cw 

(069) 250066 harbor & Mediterranean. *rth private 

DUSSHDORf/ RATINGB4 



roong south, fomohe panoramic wvr. 
enriw x\h 5 -roam c partmertf. 

Lujunioinly Htted 6 Decorated 
155 sq.m. +■ 20 sqm. lagma equipped 


155 sq.m. +■ 20 sqm. logpK equipped 

PrindpaTity of MONACO kitchen, dining. Irvmg ^ OOTO. 
SPIMJ® 34EVB. yilLA P^oW'CtJdS^ 8^5^21 


535 55 32 office ham 


(02102) 4S023 i-M-S. 

MUNICH Lhts. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON hATSX 

(01) 953 3636 

Coll tar Ailied’s free estimate 


AGED! 

26 Bd Puneesse Gratofle 
MC 98000 MONACO 
T*j; (931 50 66 00 TK i794I7 MC 


BARBARA FR SLING 

6 Ptace Verdome. 29a 55 52 



VW AMBASSADOR PARK AND 
BE CONVINCED 
For mfa rm ofu fc 

globe plan sjl 

Av Mon-Repox 7fi, 

CH 1005 LAUSANNE. Switoeriand 
Td (211 22 35 12 71 k 25185 MEUS CH. 


Embassy 

8 An. dm 


Service 

Mmom 


house in htoricol dte. 4 tjeenBM 6 
bedrooms; 6 bctfta, infs fiat, 3 ha. 
parir RSjXW/marTth. Avodable no*. 

TSfenswT3538. 



75008 Pam 

T«fex znm f 


* -■ - c — ‘j — iirjfiM* 
Uf DMT UKJUntl TVekwnV 


YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AG&IT IN PARIS 
562-7899 



POSITIONS WANTED 


PHWCTLY TnUNGUAL 
EXECUTIVE A5SSTANT. 


Dud iiaJiumjElv < • <- wn/Freodi, a- 
IradnM, mid 40s, dynamic & rasoum- 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


7THINVAUCTES.3 •4 »ocms. ^eestore 
nq, 75 w jr.. [ivrr^. 2 sedrocmi 
upper nwr, lift. Tdecncne tar c^> 

oo»ntmert [16-11 25* 2 1 6G. 


SAINT PAUL DC VB4CE Mog ni toni 
mflo. 1 lewd, pcnorqn u c sea view, 5 
bedrootro, 5 befta. Pool (heated cov- 
ered. Hjnrmef -vmwJ. tpom. Passibi^ 


LUXURIOUSLY RESTCXH) Ifth certu- 
*j manor house, effqwrtefr taaished 
mques. .oriand pdnfcngs, 2 bed; 
roun d 257 bdhs, entry, Ifer br y.erqnd 
salon, Freptaoe, be a ms Evoif^nut, 


1SSY LB MCXUCAUX, near metro M. T wmty yean experience mo- 
and RES. 2-bedroom house, FSjXXL mmafaons &rope & Africa: 

Tel- 621 32 71. P™= feWtarv commerce, cmnstro- 

Son & frnonce. Seeks ichaler^ing and 
serinn pgpfo a 9ox 2707. hra Tri- 
bune, 92521 Neuffly Ceaest, Pr an ce 


FuBy equipped titohen, 
_qwei, 35 min. Pans. F) 


SHORT TOM W UTW QUARIBtl TRlISTWOinWlAOTpSP.tawgrc^ 
No ooeols. TeL 32938 83. 


li : ll * J 


\'njsk£2&sat 


h Jhort term Inunmwn 15 daw) Tel 
M, Water P21 33610 or [73) 2S3F& 


GREAT BRITAIN' 


NH/iar 


fiving be dr oom 


avndl heart A stils m chofcnging 
admy where mord rewords A finon- 
6d income ore equally npartant. 
GaE Paris 554 04 11. ^ 



46 




BIUNGUAL AMERICAN >rith work 


ISRAEL 


ETOtlE, 200 sqm.. 2 bedfocm. 2 
bdta. cdm. sunry. perfect coition. 
Justified high price. 



rz-e- gne"S car biir STUDIOS aPaRT- 
MHNB / CHALETS. LAKE G8CVA - 
MONTRHJX of in t h«e world ‘anna 




CONTMEX. jnvatl & metfvm moves, 
boggogs. cars «vorld«nde Call Char- 
Ip?- fir£ 231 13 81 (near Operaj 


JQHJ SALEM, MUST 5H1 taiary pent- 
house, riifr w'cp-araund terraces, 
center town, liumg. dfrting, stud;, me 

da room, knehen. 3 bedrooms. 3 
baths. S50C.OOO. fa 2730, Herald 
Tribune. 92521 NewllyCede^. e 


NEUILLY, TOWWALL Irfencr 4e- 


SV1TZERL4M) 


candhon Owner selb. Phone (I) 256 
44 16 office hours. 


5F1,920.QGO H. SS30LD SA. CH-! X7 
Lausanne. Teb 2: 25 It ■ •. 


DiABLStETS, YBO®. Yl LIARS, 
JURA & reran ci G5TAAD From 
Sft’OSW MzrtjSQes cr 

REV AC 5JL 

5: --tantfcnfcrrt. CH-1202 G84EVA. 
Ter «£73<15«L Telex- 22030 


LUXURY FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 

Fvfly serviced, choice of Mativ or 
□docent ro Kevngnm Psxe. From 
£300 to £550 per w, 3 monita to 2 


Cbarmmq ygq. 4 bedrooms. 3 baths, PA5SY. Luxurious 45 sqjn. shxfia. se^s pwt-feme pb Peris. Copy 

garden r 30 .000. 6 months at more. F450Q. 6 m o r i frl or wore, SCO 21 28 rewnttng, poafreodmg^ ora 


Tel: 380 40 33 



«ni pracsBor experience. Fans 946 

01 61 after joe. 


vmts Mcuntarzan Mcnoger-ent Lid 
01-491 3626. Tetex 299!Si 


U>TON. For the best tarrahed Rats 
aid houses Consult apeaorqts- 


NOTRE DAME (mar) 

In bnautiful ITth cmfury bidding, far 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


YOUNG WHi BDUCATHJ LADY 
Men on mtsreshng ntx Longuoam 
German. Engfah, ftench wJ&Kd 
^LContMf A Fta^per , Hofcfc 2. CH- 
5000 Aqraoi Teh Switzerland 064/241 


it ». i. 




Ph2fip». Kay and lew-4. TeU South oF 
Parii 352 Sill. North cf Park 772 
5135. Telex 278*6 RESIDE G 


Furniture. FIajOOO net. Sencus refer- 
ences requested Teh 563 2 60 


GEORGES MANOR 


Newty redone, 200 
3 bedrooms 4- me 


ooms 4- roads room, h 
F19j000. Tat 563 68 38 


IT’S WONDERFUL TO BE A WINNER! 


Internationa} Business Message Center 


KllH 





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ATTB4TICN EXECUTIVES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


AVE LAMBALLE _______ 

160 iqjnL, 2 reason*. 3 bedroom, 

F1?JQ06 -+ charges 764 (0 17. I 9“°^ tanglted ««s inter— 1 ” 



in fa Intarnctftar i qf Hmxdd Tri- 
bunm, whmrm worm than a AM 
of a i iriflEta n rto dw worieL 
wide, moot of wham a* a t 
brihra and indut&y. wfl 
rmad it Art# Jvtar in (Park 


HNANOAL TIMES 

AT HOME 08 AT WORK 
M THE NEIHBOANDS 


F8S INFORMATION with cpffto- 
horv. Esm |1 000 to 53^00 month. 
Baaome a fnaned oevrsov- fPX 73 
New Band 5f„ London wi. Errand 


CONTACT PBSON EUKOP1 
merdd & food aagrvmnls. 
ny (0)5682-1496771? 563040 


MULTUJNGUAL INTBZPRBOS Sec- 
retarid assatanoe. NY 212 6B86Q54. 


613595) bmform JOojtk «rr- 
wanna hhjj wi l imi emu you 


opgrstei a 


taring tfmt wo cat Mix yoo 
back, end ycur momtago wR 
fl apfflr wtmm 48 hoars, Thm 
refm h US. $9.30 or load 
m^ifYtdmrf par (mm. Yoa must 
Made eompMm and \ 


hand 


ninq-a?-?ubtet«n 
deuvtrr n 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


TAX SERVICES 

CURRENT t PRIOR wan U £ Tat 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Antferdam. D-tff. 
E h d hcrofi . Crortngs p. 
Haarnm, The Ha^ue, 
H—m df fl i liden. 
Le»*nfap. Oegdgns?. 
E c Hydcro. 

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1NT\ 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMFTHHNC 

U.S-A. A WORLDWIDE 


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Ootmdi. [fZ tat 501 362 5251 . fa 

255, He bgr 


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— ^ smow8 wAmEp 

retaoofai service far fa Pans area ***? *^A N TEACHB^ 34. 13 yean 
and Wntornwburbs. Tefr 758 U10 «P«*ee, US. & Wl. 


FAST BCCQ/nVE HCMMBWDB4G- 

Pcra & Western suburbs. 551 09 45 


PAGE 4 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


5n_ j =^rn- 

r*'!r • 

it" 1 "? 


a* D) 69-72 BO 43^ Frankfarf . 


tat 501 362 5251. fa 
WL A2 72542. USA 


55, Hcber Spring, AZ7g<3 t USA 

OFFICE SERVICES 


International Secretarial Positions 


OfFSHORE & UK 

LTD COMPANIES 


ry tu b%r«pficn ietph. 
g aeaae c an tor. 

PT A m ato t fert OTJ 23 94 30 Or 
± 16557 

Ejrcpet Business Newsp aper 


to — 


PROKOPP INTERNATIONAL 

official distributor for the Austrian National Lottery. 


[near per c*»cn end merog-ne*^ \X j 

titi of Men. Tifffcs 4if^iZa Crane 1 - { 
idonds. P e n cmc. tibo^c, Gib reftor end ] 
most dta 1 efthorc si i 

• Zor6t§?to£ zdnee ; 

> hwm6ctt arardsi.** 

m Namam e vfvoei I 

• Bearer item 3 

• Boat rajttwx j 

• Md. iBiE^tone 6 i«r 
from i xcta ncf o ry b ooHat from: 

SHiCr CORPORA^ 
SBKVKSl 7D 
HradOFfa 

Mt PUasanl. Dmadm, We of Mai . 
Teb Doedra (0624) 23718 I 
TWw628554 SSKT G . 

border, fiepwnrafr/e 
2-5 QW Bend 5» . Lcndsi WI I 
Td OT J93 4344. Tl, 22247 5CEJN 3 i 


U. S. A. 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 


A go mp tate penonc* & busfass serve e 
providng a imque c o fleJ ie n of 
rotated, versatile A rm^finoud 
maiwduab far rf soed S 
pr o wtfqnd occasions. 
212-745-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th Sf, N.Y.C 10019 
Service forsmtoM* 
Nemta Worffade 


YOURBEST SWISS 
BUSINESS B A 5 E 
IN ZURICH 

RAiY (WEGftSTHJ 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SECRETARIAL 
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SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
tofrandi P ra adeat muhng^onty group. 

BUSINESS -SC&tCS i 0 "^ Jgwfo 

saauRSfis 


RANDSTAD 


SWSS FINANCIAL 4 COMMERCIAL 


Tfahone * Ttta / MoA Services 
Ward_Piocespng / Trqgfan qn 
Conpany rerff ta fttai 

WTBDftlWNAL OffiCE 


A MAJOR FIRM 
OF CONSUUANTS 
to recruit for fa 
fail office (fth). an 


■OiNeUAL AOENCT^riy'a^d 
Inpartfy Office 

758 12 40 


'him , 

' 


Toric 758 12 40 


car^av :eajra oiSAo/i- COMPANY iihNIM in fintn 
!d==^‘oeian‘r«vrii«onc>virdt- m 25 yuan, offwtng Mvdvv I 1 ** 
Ircicw^'b'eofanrQu^xntho'iemdi'S- Bon E din W d W y u gga nlM d I 

ffai J v M wj paid. Uilliiiitirt Si paeialii ing werwas ^a». crcdxs. 


32 tfanrvxM. CH-8C0I Znxk 
i 0W 2U4ni..7fc: SJH56 9 


MEMBER WORtO-VnOE 


. ASSISTANT/ SECRETARY 
to General Monoosr * ChoHenqing po 
aeon far o Top bipenetieed fencud 
I E**?*"* S»«*PY. Age 2S-25. Fe^ 
Ensfi*. wmra eonatang fam 


OFFICE MANAGER 


ARE YQ^AN Qg^ A/m^ BOSS 

JBiwj esftSanf? 

i m heveT Just sand me a fob d es cr y 
frid IU contod to immeteoteTr. 
Sw 2781 Hfltdd Tribune, 9221 
Nftriy Cedfa. France 


je m t ii nat eetatML Mmunum m«etf- enrang, stock oadmgt kwairaett 
{steet L'bJIO.OOQ Hgh mud return and pfcximft. bcnbng zonno Ca ny 
i’oraafrt Per 6 etoMed ift f oi wtfa n. company formcnow wrid Wide 
|3ai 2589. hr ^d Trtaune. 92S21 Neutf- Pjriv fa 2637. Hcrtfd Tremne. 

92521 NeoSy Cm/, France 


l f CediL. Ftokj: 


ETOiCE 


PUtMSHRJ 


k0Ben3&n»L ft*BU5H - FRH4CH perfectly bi 
8tfh papdofs located Pom fhh Ptia to ngnutniff IQ experi- *creRpy ; mature, exaefciv I 

appFy with pfato & tot nunte to- ® » more, dnacma of ™*ann, word prwwg, ( 

Seladhra Ex e c u tive Ascatanta' s ? 5 ?»; TnefaJtijarpa- ****** ^ AvsttaKa 

' 91 rue du Rn. Sf. Hanarl d* rad c£j ^lOMfGBBap -P^toneiti |oh. pits* Excelenr i 

IWMi ihorrty Wt M «d cftpfetpci^. ’ Ml It 


“crajwy mature, exaefeiv Engfah 
snorthrad, word croc tana experi- 
enced Ftirape, US- AwfaJa leek* 
-pvmanem job Peek BcelM sokvy. 


C.CM. LTD 


a 29 MariahiHer Str. 


Since 1913) A-1 061 Vienna, Austria. 


> Dr. Hm 6«M Lens 
; TVS STOCK MARKET . 

THE DOUAR ft INIBBT KATE 
! DEVaOPMBITS 1985-1990 

j S5N 3-C2«094)^-06 
I A. *I«W p j s b tt to o n fer ev«n onesto 

> A bod yy.’ must hm’. 530 

{ PuSbsh» 

j GOTRAUD IBH VBOAO 
TO to* 08 D35S2 Wmiw Gmbot 


Turfed fOtort to^ RBersimaiY 


MUNCH/ GERMANY 
Mra ufa cftjrag trq Ar g cerrp on y «s 
offemig storage rad'or roraufacf.Jing 
ta ulme i ei wM as fanw rira , leta, 
telephone, computer end crae «er> 
wck. 20 ram from cewer of cr< 
Contod: 

VflU® SOBWE GMBH 
D789Q Wdtffa-T irw 2. W Gcfre. 

Tel (q 7741607 10ft K*. 792T410 


OFFICES 

VERY HRSH CLASS 


uXlOimiNE WO CO MPANY^ *5+ .»h»y iBqBraMS^te^ . 
MMtaryfraoapinfHl fer mojm Ait. l^Aw ifeVaSafi, 750I7ftra,l 

ondar ref. 101. 


IR- f?) 727 U 19 


wWmyfr«epi»fKf for MctAve 
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