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INTERNATIONAL 





Published With The New YoATimes and The Washington Post 


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ZURICH, THURSDAY* OCTOBER 3, 1985 


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in Beirut; 


■^By Andrew Tamowski - 

- Reuters 

BEIRUT — One of the four So* 
viet Embassy employees being held 
hostage was shot to dea th Wednes- 
day, and the Modem kidnappers 
threatened to kill, the other three 
unless their demand for an end to 
fighting in the northern city of 

Tripoli was met ' — 

Police found the body of Arkady 
Katakov, 32, the consular secre- 
tary, m Moslem-controlled- West 
Beirut. . . . 

Twelve hours latex ah anony- 1 
mous caller, claiming to speak for 
the kidnappers, told an -interna- 
tional news agency the other three 
bosses would be freed if attacks 
on “Moslem Tripoli” stopped. 

“Falling this we will continue to 
execute the hostages and will -hold 
the Soviet Union toils responsibil- 
ity for restraining its stooges in. 
Lebanon,” the caller said. 


U.S. Looking 
ForExrQA 


By Stephen Engdberg. • 

New York Timer Service 

WASHINGTON —Federal au-' 
thoritiesaro searching for a former 
officer. of the ClA who has-been 
identified by a Soviet defector as a 
double agent according to.Reagan 
administration officials. 

The former officer was identified 
Tuesday. as Edward L Howard. 
The officials said he had held ah 
“operational" post with the Central 
Inteffigencc Agency. 

They would not say in what 
country Mr. Howard had served, 
although another source -said ho‘ 
had. access, to “significant” refor- 
mation thatj pauTdSffvefeh darit^ ■ 
aging if gium to tfe Sdv&tfiHon. r 

According to. an inidlrgcnoe- 
source, Mr. Howard worked for the 
agency’s clandestine sendee under 
the deputy director for operations. 
This official said Mr. Howard was 
believed to have fled the United 
States. , - ' ■' - - 

[The Associated Press, quoting a. 
State Department document, said 
Mr. Howard had worked for the 
Agency for International Develop- 
ment from 1976 to 1979 and was 
assigned by the State Department 
to Moscow in 1983.] 

While it has been revealed that 
some former GA officers have sold . 
classified agency documents to So- 
viet agents, officials said there was 
no record that an officer of How- 
ard's status had been found to have 1 
worked on a continuing basis for' 
the Soviet Union. 

Ute officials said Mr. Howard 
left the CIA about one and a half 
years ago to take a job as an eco- 
nomic analyst with the New Mexi- 
co legislature in Santa Fe. 

Philip Baca, director of the fi- 
nance committee for which Mr. 
Howard worked, said Mr. Howard 
had resigned, effective Sept 22, for 
“personal reasons”: Mr. Baca 
would noL discuss the case, but said , 
he had been interviewed by “feder- 
al officials*’ who assured him that 
their investigation did not concern. 
Mr. Howard’s legislative work. 

Mr. Baca said Mr. Howard, was a 
“low-key guy" in his “early 30's, 
perhaps 32 or 33” married and 
with a son. 

Vitaly Yurchenko, a former, se- 
nior official of the KGB, the Soviet 

(Continued on Page 4. Cot 51 


He said be spoke for Lbc “Islamic 
Liberation Oiganization - Khaled 
Ibn al Walid Forces,” which in a 
previous call had announced the 
"execution" of Mr. JCatakov. 

A second caller demanded the 
withdrawal of the $yriankbacfced 
militias that have been auadring 
Moslem fundamentalist forces in 
TSpoE since Saturday. Their with- 
drawal was given as a condition for 
freeing the other Russians. 

‘ Indicating that he believed that a 
cease-fire had beta arranged, this 
caller demande&a pledge that at- 
tacks would ujft-be resumed if the 
hostages were freed. 

“We detpre readiness to set free 
die three hostages should the trace 
continue, a total cease-fire prevail, 
the armed men withdraw and a 
pledge be' made that attacks on 
Moslem Tripoli do not resume," he 
said. _ . 

- Mr. Katakov’s body was found 
42 hours after he and Valery Mir- 
kov, a c ommer cial official; Nikolai 
Svirsky, the embassy doctor; and 
Oleg Sparine, the cultural attach 6 
were seized by gunmen in West 
Beirut . ■ . 

. Another caller; saying be spoke 
for .the same group,- told a news 
agency the Soviet Embassy would 
be blown up unless it was evacuat- 
ed by Friday afternoon. There were 
no way to confirm the authenticity 
of lbe' caH; several have been re- 
ceived since the kidnapping, some- 
times making conflicting fkiinw 

This was the second time kid- 
happemn West Beirut are known 
to‘ have ItiBed a foreign hostage 
since the Wave of abductions began 
in Jantuny " 1984. The shadowy 
group Islamic .■ Jihad still 

holds captive six Americans and 
four Fr enchmen 

The body of a British teacher, 
Denis H31, was found May 28, a 
day after his kidnapping. It was 
fpund dose- to where the body of 
Ml Katakov ‘was found Wednes- 
day. ; 

‘ Despite; the .kidnappers’ de- 
mands, fighting continued in Trip- 

(Coqtinned.onP^e4^CoL7) ' 



U.S. Says Raid on PLO 
By Israel Was Justified 


TS« Ancdokad Press 


Mikhail S. Gorbachev, left, with President Francois Mitterrand at Orly Airport 

Gorbachev Opens French Visit 
With Bid for Space-Arms Ban 


By Michael Dobbs 
and Gary Lee 

Washington Part Senice 
. PARIS — MikhailS. Gorbachev 
sought Wednesday to win French 
support for a ban on space weap- 
ons as be opened his first official 
visit to the West as the Soviet lead- 
er. 

- Speaking at Orly Airport, Mr. 
Gorbachev made it dear that he 
intended to center his four-day trip 
on opposition to President Ronald 
Reagan's space- based defense pro- 
posaL He urged President Frangois 
Mitterrand to join the Soviet 
Union in “preventing an arms race 
in space and ending it on Earth." 


French officials and Western 
diplomats here view Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s visit as pan of a public relar 
dons exercise by the Kremlin lead- 
ing up to the U.S.-Soviei summit 
meeting in Geneva in November. 

The Soviet leader wants to con- 
vince Western European govern- 
ments and the public that there is a 
dangpr of a new phase in the arms 
race if the United States goes ahead 
with plans for space- based de- 
fenses 

In a somewhat restrained wel- 
come for Mr. Gorbachev, Mr. Mit- 
terrand avoided any allusion to 
France's differences with the Unit- 
ed States over Mr. Reagan's Strate- 
gic Defense Initiative. 


I-.;.. • 


Divisions Tear at U.K. Labor Party 

Kmnock Loses VotemQash WUhMmers 9 Scai^iU. 


By Karen DeYoung 

Washington Pan Service. . 

BOURNEMOUTH, England — 
The specter of Britain's yearlong 
strike by coal miners, which ended 
last spring, came back to haunt the 
Labor Party on Wednesday in a 
way that seemed to symbolize its 
internal divisions. 

, The party leader, Ned Kmnock, 
narrowly tost a key vote at his par- 
ty’s conference after a dash with 
-the leftist leader of the National 
Union of hfineworirers, Arthur 
Scargifl. • 

: Delegates at the annual confer- 
ence hoe rose to heckle and shout 
their preference. Some believe the 
party cannot afford unquestioning 
support of the trade union move- 
ment, and still' hope to win elec- 
tions, others feel such a victory 
would not be worth having. 

. A bitter public debate on televi- 
sion was the one thing the Labor 
leadership under Mr. Kihnock 
wanted to avoid. In Mr. Kinn ode’s 
view, the strike itself was bad 
enough for Labor. 

The strike was called on die de- 
mand of union leaders, without a 
ballot by miners, to protest govern- 
ment plans to dose a number of 
mines in the stale-owned industry: .■ 
It degenerated into a year of Illegal 
picketing and violent dashes with 
the police; Ultimately, ..h .ended 
with the miners having gained little 
and having lost much. 


That kind of confrontation, how- 
ever, was the main reason why Mr. 
Scargill, and many other delegates, 
came to Bournemouth. Support for 
the miners, he said, was a matter of 
principle, and “power without 
principles for a Sodalist is unthink- 
able:" 

In the end, Mr. Scargjll won the 
battle. But he appears for the mo- 
ment to have lost the war for the 
heart and soul of the party. 

The specific issue fought 
Wednesday was a resolution of the 
miners’ -uman calling on the party 
to pledge itself, should it win the 
general elections that must be held 
here before 1988, to make the min- 
ers whole again. 

The union wants all cases of min- 
ers found guilty and sentenced to 
prises because of activities during 
the strike to be reviewed; any miner 
who permanently lost his job due to 
the strike be rehired; all lines in- 
curred by the; union during the 
strike be reimbursed out of govern- 
ment funds. - 

It was the last part that Mr. Kin- 
nock and the so-called Labor mod- 
erates rejected, on grounds that the 
party could not endorse retroactive 
nhflngwt in the law. 

Mr. Kinnock lost the vote largely 
because the huge Transport and 
Gteaeral Workers Union decided to 
throw its block of 1 -25 million votes 
behind Mr. Scargill. 

The final count was 3.5 million 


He stressed that the Soviet lead- 
er's visit comes at a time of “con- 
flicts, sufferings and attacks on the 
dignity and rights of man." 

the two leaders, flanked by their 
wives, stood side by side as the 
national anthems of the two coun- 
tries were played. After brief state- 
ments, they drove io Paris for the 
first of three rounds of official talks 
at the Mr. Mitterrand's official res- 
idence. 

Mr. Gorbachev was given honors 
of a head of state although his offi- 
cial position is general secretary of 
the Soviet Communist Party, a post 
he assumed in March following the 

(Continued on Page A CoL 6) 


Untied Press Imermuttmai 

■WASHINGTON — The United 
Slates said Wednesday that the Is- 
raeli raid on the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization headquarters in 
Tunisia was understandable and 
justified, as President Ronald Rea- 
gan sent a message expressing “sin- 
cere condolences" to President Ha- 
bib Bourguiba of Tunisia over the 
loss of life in his country. 

Mr. Bourguiba had condemned 
the United States for its “negative 
and unexpected" support of the Is- 
raeli air raid Tuesday, which de- 
stroyed the PLO headquarters, kill- 
ing dozens of PLO members and 
some Tunisians. 

The While House spokesman, 
Larry Speak es. said that the United 
Slates “values Tunisia" as a “close 
friend." 

“We certainly extend our sincere 
condolences over Lhe loss of life in 
the raid," said Mr. Speakes. He 
added that Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz had deeply de- 
plored the “rising pattern of vio- 
lence in the region, including the 
attack" in Tunisia. 

Mr. Speakes said that the raid 
appeared to be “a legitimate re- 
sponse" by Israel to terrorism. 

A State Department spokesman, 
Charles Redman, said that the Is- 
raelis had informed the United 
States that the air raid “was not 
intended as an offensive act" and, 
“In our view, it is legitimate self- 
defense to respond to acts of terror- 
ism." 

The United States was isolated 
among Western nations in its sup- 
port for the raid. 

Israeli officials pointed to the 
US. support and insisted that 
world opinion endorsed the attack, 
which was said to be in retaliation 
for the Sept. 25 slayings of three 
Israelis on a yacht in Lamaca, Cy- 
prus. 

The Israeli foreign minister, 
Yitzhak Shamir, interviewed bv Is- 
rael Radio from New York, where 
he is attending the United Nations 
General Assembly session, said 
that most nations approved of the 
raid and there would be “no politi- 
cal price to pay." 



Yasser Arafat, the PLO leader, clenching his fist in anger 
after inspecting die ruins of die his group’s headquarters. 


“There is general recognition in 
the world of the fact that Israel did 
what is necessary," he said, adding: 
“It certainly has Lhe right to strike 
at the terrorist organization that 
attacks citizens both at home and 
abroad.” 

“The statements of both the 
State Depanmem and the U.S. 
president recognize this principle,’’ 
he said. 

“This is what Israel did," Mr. 
Shamir continued, “and I don't 
sense in the political atmosphere 
any condemnation of this action." 

Arab nations staged a mass 
walkout when Mr. S hamir ad- 
dressed the General Assembly later 
in the day. 

Tunisia urged the 15-nation Se- 
curity Council on Wednesday to 
condemn Israel and demanded 
“just and integral” reparations for 
the damage the bombing had in- 
flicted. The, co unci] was convened 
one day afua- the raid. 

Foreign Minister Beji Caid Es- 


sebsi said: “We invite lhe Security 
Council to condemn rigorously the 
deliberate act of aggression by Isra- 
el and to demand just and integral 
reparations for the damage." 

In Tunis. U.S. personnel were 
warned to stay inside their homes 
Wednesday after Tunisia criticized 
the United States for its “negative 
and unexpected” support for the 
Israeli air raid. 

Britain, France, West Germany, 
Italy and the other countries in the 
European Community ail con- 
demned the raid. Several other na- 
tions, including Japan, Greece and 
India, condemned the raid as an 
unwarranted attack on a sovereign 
nation. 

Mr. Speakes said that the White 
House national security adviser, 
Robert C. McFarlane. told Repub- 
lican leaders meeting with Mr. Rea- 
gan on Wednesday that the Israelis 
had intercepted three boatloads of 
PLO members heading for Israel 

(Continued on Page A CoL 3) 


to 2.9 million. A two-thirds vote 
would have forced the party leader- 
ship to consider adopting Mr. Scar- 
gtll’s demand as party policy. 

Mr. Scargill is not a popular fig- 
ure in the party, and a recent poll 
showed four out of five members 
felt he would hinder, rather than 
help. Labor’s chances of coming to 
power. 

But during Wednesday's debate, 
be was cloaked in the mantle of 
labor solidarity, and tbe responsi- 
bility the party majority still feds 
for the miners’ struggle and for the 
party’s roots in the union move- 
ment, 

“1 want a Labor government I 
want a sodalist government" said 
Ron Todd, chairman of the trans- 
port workers, “but I will not betray 
the national union of my workers 
LogetiL" 

Earlier. Mr. Scargifl had de- 
scribed the conflict as “a class is- 
sue" being fought out inside the 
party itself. “Our movement's been 
hijacked” away from its original 
power base within the unionized 
working class, he said. “This move- 
ment ignores that fact at its cost," 
be warned. 

To this, and other comments 
shouted from the floor, Mr. Kin- 
nock responded sarcastically. 
“Don’t let a political party take any 
note of electoral considerations.” 
he said. “That would be class 
treachery, wouldn't it?” 



Belgians, Dutch Propose 
October NA TO Meeting 


By Steven J. Dryden 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — Belgium and the 
Netherlands said Wednesday they 
have proposed a special NATO for- 
eign ministers' meeting in New 
York as the appropriate forum for 
discussing East-West relations be- 
fore President Ronald Reagan 
meets next month with the SovieL 
leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

The proposal for a North Atlan- 
tic Treaty Organization gathering 
was an apparent expression of irri- 
tation at the exclusion of the two 
countries from Mr. Reagan's invi- 
tation to the leaders of five major 
allied powers to a pre-summit 
meeting. 

The Belgian -Dutch initiative was 
the second setback this week for 
Mr. Reagan's efforts to show West- 
ern unity before the summit confer- 
ence. France declined Mr. Rea- 
gan's invitation Tuesday in a move 
officials described as a demonstra- 
tion of French political indepen- 
dence. 

A spokesman said that Foreign 
Minister Leo Tindemans of Bel- 
gium. in consultation with his 
Dutch counterpart, Hans van den 
Broek, sent a letter Tuesday to Sec- 
. , , . . , _ reiarv of State George P. Shultz 

Arthur ScargOL the miners leader, at the Labor Party requesting the NATO meeting 
conference Wednesday. Applauding are the party leader, “around Oct. 24 in New York,” Lhe 
Neil Kinnock, right, and the deputy leader, Roy Hattersley. same date and location of Mr. Rea- 


H» AMOQQtad rr 


gan's proposed talks with the lead- 
ers of West Germany, Italy, Brit- 
ain. Canada and Japan. 

The proposal also demonstrated 
the Dutch government’s strong re- 
action to being left out of a key 
meeting on arms control as it pre- 
pares to make the sensitive decision 
of whether to deploy NATO cruise 
missiles. Dutch officials said. 

“We are a loyal member of 
NATO,” Mr. Tindemans said in a 
telephone interview. “We want to 
be taken seriously." 

Frans Van Daele, the Belgian 
Foreign Ministry spokesman, said: 
“Belgium thinks the appropriate 
framework for examining East- 
West relations remains in NATO." 

Belgian officials said they hoped 
France would attend the NATO 
meeting. France belongs to NATO, 
but not to its integrated command 
structure. 

The Belgian proposal was pre- 
sented to the NATO secretary-gen- 
eral, Lord Carrington of Britain, 
who is responsible for seeking a 
consensus among the 16 member 
nations on whether the meeting 
should be held. 

The center-right government of 
Belgium's prime minister, Wilfried 
Martens, in the face of strong pub- 
lic opposition, went ahead with the 
deployment of NATO cruise nucle- 
ar missiles earlier this year. 



By Joseph Berger. 

New York Times Service 

LOS -ANGELES — Rock Hud- 
son. 59, whose name was synony- 
mous with masculine good looks in 
Hollywood films for more, than a 
decade, died in his sleep Wednes- 
day after. a battle with the incurable 
.disease AIDS. 

Mr. Hudson’s publicist. Dale Ol- 
son, said die actor died at his Bev- 
erly Hills home. “Th e cause of 
death has not been determined, but 
it was AIDS-complicated," be said. 

Mr. Hudson's acting career end- 
ed with a recurring; role last season 
on the television series “Dynasty." 

In the middle of 1984 ‘it was 
discovered he had acquired im- 
mune deficiency syndrome, and bn 
July 21 he was rushed u>rhe Ameri- 
can Hospital of PariSi where he 
stayed only a few days before re- 
turning to Hollywood. . 




i \ v ^y. 


his friends and admirers, who orga- 
nized a benefit for AIDS research. 

“1 amnot happy that Tam sidt," 
Mr. Hudson said in a statement 
read to~tbe gathering-' “I am -not 
happy that I have AIDS, but if that 
is helping others; I can^ at least, 


know that my own misfortune has 
' had some positive worth." 

. The, most common victims of 
AIDS are homosexuals, intrave- 
nous drug users and hemophiliacs. 

Rumors persisted' for years that 
Mr. Hudson, contrary to his image 
rtf a lady's man, was homosexual. 
Tlte reports flourished anew when 
it was announced he was suffering 
from AIDS. 

People magazine reprated that 
Mr. Hudson had been a. homosex- 
ual since he began in films, and that 
his 1955 marriage to his agent’s 
secretary, Phyllis Gates,, was set up 
by Universal Studios to discourage 
the ramora The cctiple separated 
the following year and were di- 
vorced in 1958. Mr. Hudson never 
remarried. _ . 

Blessed with a, broad-shoul- 
dered, . 6-foot-4-inch (I.94-meter) 
physique, dark, brooding eyes and 
a sonorous voice, Mr. fiudson was 
an enormously, popular screen 
presence. : . 

Yet & did not begin to win 
broad respect fra. his] skills as- an 
actor until he played an imperious 
Texas' rancher in “Giant;", a 1956 
role that , anted him .an Academy 
Award nomination, and a series of 


romantic comedies in which he was 
paired with Doris Day. 

In the first of those comedies. 
“Pillow Talk” in 1959, Mr. Hudson 
began to poke fun at the hysteria 
ins looks provoked. 

More recently, Hudson starred 
on television in two series, “McMil- 
lan & We" and “Tbe Devlin Con- 
nection," and on “Dynasty." - 

Rock Hudson was bora Roy 
Scherer Jr. in Winnetka, Illinois, on 
Nov. 17, 1925. During the Depres- 
sion, his father left the family. His 
mother remarried, and the actor, 
then 8 years old, took the surname 
oF his stepfather, Wallace Fitzger- 
ald. 

After service in the navy, he went 
to Hollywood in 1946. where Hen- 
ry Willson, a talent scout for Sdz- 
iuk Studio, liked photographs the . 
actor had sent him. . 

As a novice actor, he was a fre- 
quent target, of ridicule. His first, 
unsuccessful- screen test became a 
. standing Hollywood joke when jt 
was- used as a “How Not To Ad" 
instructional reel at 20th Century- 
Fox. 

In all, he appeared in 62 films. 

. After the success of "Giant" 
made him one of the top box office 



U.S. Seeks Fund lor Third World 


Rock Hudson in a 1960 
movie publicity photo. 

attractions in the world, Mr. Hud- 
son went on to play lieutenant 
Frederick Henry in “A Farewell to 
Anns" in 1958. His other f ilms in- 
eluded “Written on the Wind" in 
1956, “Twilight for the Gods" in 
1959, “Ice Station Zebra" in 1968, 
and his last, “Tbe Mirror Crack’d," 
in 1980. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration, showing its con- 
cern about the failure to alleviate 
the world debt crisis, has come up 
with a proposal to pump more 
money into Third World countries. 

Tbe proposal, details of which 
were still sketchy Wednesday, 
came shortly before Third World 
nations opened a meeting in Seoul 
to consolidate their stand on relief 
from mounting debts and on what 
they believe industrialized nations 
should do to alleviate world pover- 
ty. 

Treasury Secretary James A 
Baker 3d of the United States met 
late Tuesday with leaders of the 
largest UJ3. banks, all large Third 
World creditors, to explain details 
of the new U.S. plan, which he said 
would be presented formally Tues- 
day at tbe annual meeting of tbe 
International Monetary Fund and 
the World Bank, also in Seoul - 

The administration, according to 
sources who spoke to The Associat- 
ed Press on condition that they not 
be named, sought to create a new 
fund to be administered jointly by 
the World Bank and the IMF. 

The fund, would raise $5 billion 


to $6 billion over the next five years 
to help countries meet their finan- 
cial obligations and promote long- 
term economic growth, especially 
in employment. It was unclear 
whether the fund would offer loans 
or outright grants. 

Latin America’s leading debtor 
countries, in particular, are begin- 
ning to balk at carrying out tbe 
a us Leri ty programs demanded by 
the IMF as a condition for contin- 
ued assistance. 

The governments of many debt- 
or nations are concerned about the 
political unrest and economic suf- 
fering caused by the austerity 
plans. 

Leaders of these debtor nations 
have made it known in recent days 
that they believe that a new ap- 
proach to world debt problems 
must be found. 

. Mexico, devastated by an earth- 
quake last month, feels a particular 
urgency in seeking relief. On Tues- 
day, it won a six-month postpone- 
ment of a - S 950- million payment on 
its debt. 

The World Bank said Wednes- 
day that it planned granting con- 
siderable extra funds for Mexico 
because of the earthquakes. 


The U.S. plan envisions a shift 
from encouraging debtor nations to 
rdy almost solely for relief on the 
IMF, whose loans are intended to 
help solve short-term balance-of- 
paymrnts problems, and more on 
the jointly administered fund 

In the Seoul meeting Wednes- 
day, deputies from the Group of 
24, representing developing nations 
from Asia. Africa and Latin Ameri- 
ca, held talks preceding the formal 
session of the 149-nation IMF- 
World Bank conference beginning 
Tuesday. 

Contents of the talks were not 
disclosed, but monetary sources 
said that a planned second-day 
meeting probably would not be 
held, apparently because the dele- 
gates were in general agreement on 
the main issues. 

The group, in a report published 
in August, said that its main con- 
cerns were reform of the interna- 
tional monetary' system, which it 
feds works against poor countries, 
increased access to foreign loans, 
more tune to pay back debts, great- 
er flexibility by the IMF in setting 
criteria for rescheduling debts and 
lower interest rates. 

{AP, Reuters) 


INSIDE 


■ The mayor of South Africa's 

black township of Soweto faces 
many problems, not the least of 
which is surviving. Page 2. 

■ Hi. bases become an anti- 

government rallying cry in the 
Philippines. Page 5. 

■ Iowa has activated an emer-. 
gency law to help debt-ridden 
farmers in the state. Page 6. 

■ Anxiety over AIDS is grow- 
ing in Asia, but reported cases 
of the disease are few. Page 7. 

SCIENCE 

■ Balloons are proving a low- 

cost, low-energy tool for explor- 
ing the universe. Page 14. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Orders to U.S. factories rose 
a modest 0.9 percent in August, 
the government said. Page 15. 

■ West German industrial pro- 

duction fell 2.8 percent in Au- 
gust, according to preliminary 
figures. Page 15. 

TOMORROW 

The number of problem gam- 
blers who play state lotteries in 
the United States is growing. 





-:-ln --- - \ ..-4: i 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


The Mayor’s First Job: Survive 


In Soweto* There Are Too Many Bombs, Too Little Housing 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

SOWETO, Souib Africa — The 
day started well for Edward Kune- 


bave got a whole couple of tom of ing on a bookcase in the parlor. 


bananas for you." 

Then Mr. Kunene. who has been 


It's like this every day.” 

The reporter was 'shown out. 


mayor for a little less than a year. More petitioners had arrived. 


ne. Then, somehow, it come unr.iv- went back to his offices, behind the Most of Soweto's people do not 


eled. 

As mayor of Soweto, the sprawl- gasoline bombs. township councils they head are 

ing black township outside Johan- Among the people waiting out- discredited as black fronts for 
nesburg, Mr. Kunene accepted de- side his door was a woman in blue white trickery. To try to dispel this 
livery of tons of donated potatoes with a baby strapped to her back, perception, the council might try to 
and powdered milt- from a while She wept openly, beseeching him to improve living conditions. But the 
government minister who told him reverse her eviction from a shack in money to do so can be obtained 
the shipment would provide a someone's backyard. only by raising service charges paid 


barbed wire that guards against vote for the mayors, because the 


township councils they head are 
discredited as black fronts for 


government minister who told him 
the shipment would provide a 
weapon against Marxist extremists 


only by raising service charges paid 


Another petitioner called on the potential constituents — not the 


who. he said, were intimidating telephone with some less distinct W3 Y 10 3!tra ^ votes. 


township residents into not buying request and the mayor's outburst Soweto, in any event, does not 


food. could be heard far bevond the door lend itself improvement, an ef- 

Mr. Kunene seemed to like the of Room 226. That' is the office f ° rt a resident likened to trying to 
potatoes, saying they showed that where Mr. Kunene holds court be- transform a forced labor camp rate 
he and his council, who are reviled neath a large, framed color photo- a T S son - 

by many blacks as stooges of apart- graph of New York City, donated I® a year ofunrest m South Am- 
i : j i_ " j __i ■ - l., ire l " ca in whirn Tflfi rwmf* have died 



WORLD BRIEFS 


UIWW IUMHU 1 W, 

Top Soviet, Chin ese Ministers to Meet 

BELTING fRcutersl — A senior Soviet diplomatic official sai 


blacks assioogB of apm- Otj domiri Edward Kunene, right, the mayor of Soweto, accepted a sack of potatoes as South Africa’s 

ship of more th^L5^Konpeo- could "not quite remember. “d a sate of emergency has been minister of health, Willie van Niekerk. delivered donated food to the black township, 

pie. By the time he had finished an m 3$ are ? S- 1 mc ^din8 , 

“You wait until tomorrow,” the interview with a reporter in midaf- S ?*'r ta hundreds of local black away from death. There s no use are able to talk to the government. 

. . _ - ^ffi.vinlr kmfA AW<V*lrA/l Klf w ** 'T't a. . ..A miLa- 


"You wait until tomorrow, 


health minister. Willie van’ Nie- temoornfais takeoutlunch of chick- baye been attacked by running or budging. 


kerk. told him enthusiastically at en and fries was cold. 


the ceremony at which the potatoes “You sec, 1 ordered lunch.*’ « ,, ,, , . . ... „ . «—*- . . ... 

were handed over. "Tomorrow we said, gesturing toward the food lay- Kunene s pnvau? home is hot time. But he said someone bad were made for the blacky people white authorities to give the ap- 


youths wielding rocks, gasoline 
bombs and machetes. 


He said that when he took over we talk about life for the blade 
his advisers warned him "it was a people and about- the laws that 

L,i ,! - J 1 I r r i * _ VI 1- I - 


are able to talk to the government, mostly, in shades built in the yards 
The government can hear us when of people who rent out the space to 


it their income. 

council was set up by the 


being rebuilt after tt was razed by a to lead and "you cannot buy lead- without their consultation. 

r«.i t. u:. „i u:- *• ' , . j _i . .1 


| firebomb. His official residence ership. He was asaeo aooui me army m niacx rep resen la non was uuung 

bears the scars of a similar attack. As for resigning, he said: “We Soweto, deployed under the emer- root. Few blacks believed it. More- n r rri | x P TKirJcmn rati TflY TtlTl 

He took office last year when the don't expect that somebody should gency proclamation. He said young over, the council, hard up for mon- Jli.6«1£££U1 IS X OJLC1 Ol X/1V y * 1 ^ A, * u 
man chosen mayor, Edward Man- tell you. ‘Move out of the house,' radicals "can bum cars in front of ey, has tittle to deliver. For in- /&p\ RenuhKcair congressional leaders sain 


He was asked about the army in 


pearance 
black rei 


of fulfilling promises that 


representation was taking 


they exchanged invuanons, me ujiu-uu /vmuua -7 

day. But that report did not specify whether they had accepted. Mr. 
Ilyichev said that the dates would be se tried through talks at diplomatic 


Every piece of jewelry has a Story to tell. \ man chosen mayor, Edward Man- tell you. ‘Move out of the house,' radicals “can bum cars in front of ey, has tittle to deliver. For in- 



yosl was shot to death. 


without somebody moving in. them, but they don’t do an; 


So how does a survivor feel? The Somebody has got to occupy the That seemed to suggest 


answer seems to be: fatalistic. 


lything." 
L that he 


stance, the mayor said that only 
777 houses had been built this year, 


Mr. Kunene, 53. was bom in a helping our 


bouse, somebody has got to be wanted more toughness from an far fewer than needed and priced 


army that critics see as apartheid's higher than many could afford. 


shack in a resettlement camp. He From his office window, over- brawn. But he said it did cot mean Black activists argue that people 
was educated at a Roman Catholic looking barbed-wire fences and that soldiers "must shoot our chH- like Mr. Kunene should withdraw. 


mission station. He is a farmer gas- barren ground, a convoy of white dren.” The nightly curfew imposed rather than seek to legitimize white 
oline station worker who became a soldiers could be seen patrolling here from 11 PM. to 3 AM. did offerings of municipal control that 


clerk in a lawyer’s office and laier Soweto. In the corridors of the not make any sense, eilherj he said, are not reflected on a wider scale in 
worked with the Rio Tinto mining mayor's offices, white technocrats He said Lhe real issue, the one a nation where the blade majority 
company. came and went, their salaries paid 


company. came and went, their salaries paid that really consumed most of his of 23 million remains voteless. 

He is a short, round man with by the Soweto City Council. time, was the shortage of housing. But Mr. Kunene said the pota- 

s lick hair, who favors three-piece "I think it is better to work with- Mr. Kunene said that at least toes and dried milk represent “a 


suck hair, who favors three-piece "I think it is better to work witb- 
p ins tripe suits. He often speaks in the system.’* Mr. Kunene sa id , 


Mr. Kunene said that at least toes and dried milk represent “a 
130,000 people were waiting for the step forward in bringing our people 


frankly, particularly about the low "in the sense that we are able to Soweto council to allocate them a together and showing our people 
voter turnout in township elec- communicate in a proper manner, house to renL Some have been that the councillors, who have been 


tions. The government will be able to waiting since 1977. While they elected democratically, are really in 

"The people did not understand understand what I'm saying. We wait, they live with relatives or, power." 
what this local authority meant to 


& ilias LALAoUNIS 


the black people,” he said in an 
interview. "And people are suspi- 
cious of government policy so they 
are reluctant to come forward or to 
vote. So most of them, well some, 
they voted but they did not know 
what they were voting for.” 

Turnout in the last elections was 
under 10 percent, residents said. 

Of the dangers he faces, the may- 


Botha Rejects Plea From Within Party 
To End Home , School Segregation 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — Presi- 


PARIS - 364, RUE ST-HONORE iPIACE VENDOME) 
GENEVA - "BON GENIE". ZURICH - ‘CRUDER" 
ATHENS - 6. PANEPISTIMIOU AVENUE 
HOTEL GRANDE BRETAGNE & ATHENS HILTON 
MYCONOS. CORFU. RHODES 
NEW YORK - 4 WEST 57 TH STREET & FIFTH AVENUE 


or said: “They say that if you ask lent Pieter W. Botha rejected calls 
for trouble. youTl get trouble. So I :rom within his own party Wednes- 


a cornerstone of apartheid that die- judging South Africa according to 
tates where minorities may live. He a double standard. He said the 


have volunteered myself. I am fac- day to end segregation of South toria's segregation system. 


accused President Ronald Reagan Group Areas Act was not discrimi- 
of hypocrisy for criticizing Pre- natory. 


ing this challenge. 


.African neighborhoods, business 


A minority within the party had 


He added that "there’s no need districts and schools, declaring it 
to be nervous because fm already would be suicidal for whites. 


Addressing the Cape provincial called for the act to be revoked, but 
congress of his ruling National Par- the move was rejected. 


involved. Even if I resign, 


Mr. Botha said, "if other popuia- 


still be after me. It’s like runnina in South Africa’s Group Areas Act. 


.Mi 












Jal For whites. ty in Port Elizabeth, Mr. Botha said Mr. Botha said, “if other popuia- 

Mr. Botha ruled out any change Western countries were demanding lion groups have rights and a right- 
’s Group Areas Act. too much change too quickly while ful claim to humanitarian treat- 

ment, then 1 say that the whites, 

— ■ who in turn have their own minor- 
ity groups, are also entitled to jus- 
tice and to live” in the manner they 
• choose. 

Mr. Botha has repeatedly em- 
phasized his commitment to re- 
forming apartheid. South Africa’s 
system of separating people by 
jfc. . . race, but has resisted foreign and 

domestic pressure to dismantle it 

“Wc are dealing with a hypocriti- 
cai^ Western world," Mr. Botha 

"In the United States, President 
Ronald Reagan, who has much to 
' say in his mispronouncing way 
about apartheid, is shoving Indians 
- low reservations,” be said. 

South African police officials 
gf| ||ggjjj£ |s&:. said Wednesday that two blacks 

had been wounded and at least S6 
arrested in racial violence that 
erupted in five segregated town- 
ships during the night. 

They said racial violence had 
spread through five townships! 
from Pretoria in the north 10 
Worcester in the southern Cape 

wflPsv* About 700 people, the crver- 

whelming majority of them black, 
have been killed in 13 months of 
racial unrest. 

In Lusaka, Zambia, South Afri- 
.. ’ ca's outlawed African National 

Congress rejected Mr. Botha’s lat- 
est political reform proposals, an- 
nounced Monday, as meaningless; 
and a "treacherous charade” and a 
recommitment to apartheid. 

'■” **««** V - - Mr. Botha's promise to appoint 

blacks to the president’s advisory 
coitncil to discuss their "own af- 


Bargain Wine. Bill Vetoed in California 

SACRAMENTO, California “ 

(LAT) — - Governor George Deuk- 
mejian has vetoed as "unfair to 
consumers” legislation that would 
have outlawed bargain sales of 
prestige European wines and 
champagne by granting monopoly 
control to a few authorized import- 
ers. Calif ornia vintners have ar- 
gued that the bargain sales hurt 
domestic wineries. 

Rejected Tuesday by Mr. Deuk- 
mejian, the wine bQl was an at- 
tempt to stamp out a flourishing 
"gray market” that has been out- 
maneuvering authorized wine im- 
porters and undercutting autho- 
rized prices by as much as 50 
percent 

The recent bargains have been 
made possible by the U.S. dollars . 

strength abroad and by a two- George Deukmejian 
tiered price structure that French 

wineries have maintained for their buy the wines on the European 
top wines — a lower price for Euro- retail market, pay for shipping, and 
pean consumers and a higher price still are able to undercut the price 
for Americans. Gray marketeers of official importers. 


5 .Policemen Hurl; in Stuttgart Protests 


FRANKFURT (UPI) — - Hundreds of demonstrators throwing fire- 
works and paving stones battled police Wednesday in Stuttgart on the 
fifth day of rioting in West Germany, Five police were hurt and 200 
protesters were arrested. 

There has been daily violence in. 15’dties since the death of Guenther 
Sane at a leftist demonstration against a rally of the extreme-rightist 
National Democratic Party. 

More than 600 arrests have been made. The demonstrations turned 
violent Saturday after a; demonstrator was crushed by a police vehicle in 
Frankfurt. 


Bonn Wants Draftees to Serve Longer 

BONN (AF) — The West Germ an cabinet moved Wednesday to offset 
a projected drop in the country’s armed forces by extending active duty 
for draftees to 18 months. 

The measure, if approved by the parliament, would take effect July 1, 
1989, a government spokesman said. Currently, all West German men 
age 18 and over who are physically fit must serve 15 months. The 
government wants to maintain the peacetime force at 495,000. The 
Defense Ministry has warned that military strength could fall below 
300,000 by the end of the 1990s if something is not done. 

The cabinet also voted to extend the period of “alternative service,” or 
civilian jobs for conscientious objectors, from 20 to 24 months, the 
spokesman said. 


For the Record 


• A woman mjs®ed by the bombing in Rome of a British Airways office 

died Tuesday. She was one of 14 people iqured in the attack SepL 25. A 

young Palestinian has been charged up) 

The fugitive leaderof the underground Solidarity ueboo in the seaport of 
Gdansk, Andrag MtchaJowski, has been arrested for alleged “illegal - 
acuous,” the news agency PAP said Wednesday. (UPl) 

West Germany rejectel a proposal by East Germany and Czcchoskrva- 
laa for a zone free of chenncaJ weapons in Central Europe. Chancellor 

Helmut Kohl said he wanted global rather than regional, cuts. (Reuters) 




Correction 


A New York Times dispatch in Tuesday’s editions misstated the 

SO® “ theprodufr 


— ■■ w me umiw auucs in me proauc- 

i ^ °o«ipan/s Japanese joint venture makes 25 

percent of them; GE makes the rest ltsdf in the United States 



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Australia Calls French A-Tests "Sabotage’ 




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By Esther B. Fein 

New York Times Service ■ 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — The foreign minister of 
Australia has condemned France’s 
refusal to cease midear testing in 
the South Pacific, calling the 
French government's actions "acts 
of sabotage on the tcrriloiy of a 
nation which considers France to 
be its friend." 

In a speech Tuesday to the Gen- 
eral Assembly, ihe minister, Wil- 
liam G. Hayden, said France “in- 
sists on provoking dispute through 
its testing policy and activities m 
the region. 

After a tour last month of nucle- 
ar testing sites in the South Pacific, 
President Francois Mitterrand of 


France invited the leaders of the 14 
countries in the region to visit the 
area and verify its safety for them- 
selves. 


Mr. Hayden said that such assur- 
ances of safety were countered by 
the fact that France did not hold 
tests in its own area, of 

“where we and our friends live.” 


New winter 
collection 


.The French representative. 
Claude de Kemoularia, . said his 

country had a right to conduct tests 
in the area because they were “es- 
sential to security.” He repeated 
assurances that the testing posed 
no hazard to- the region. 

la his main address, Mr. Hayden - 
also touched on other aspects of 
nudear weapons. He said his coun- 
try “declined to endorse" the 
American development of an anti- 
missile system, declaring that 


“there should be no weapons in 
space.? 

He added that if such systems 
were already in place, they should 
be removed. 

■ TV Cneir Reported Blocked 

French naval forces Wednesday 
blocked a French television crew 
from joining the protest tug Gram- 
peace before it reached the nudear 
tea she, Greenpeace protesters 
told Reuters in Wellington. 

The radio .operator on the pro- 
tost yacht Vega said by radio that a 
French corvette shadowing the 
Greenpeace .blocked the G amma. 
organization crew from boarding 
die ship in the - Marquesas; the 
northernmost island chain in 
French Polynesia. ' 

He 'said there had been no vio- 
■fence m the incident near the Mur- 
uroaatoll test site. 


1, ; 'M” 


Qadhafi Cancels Hans to Visit UN 

UNITED NATIONS. New York (NYT) 

(fc gX on Monday nighi that Lionel ■ 


dn'-Sr’^Mondiy Colo^ Q^"^ 

SS.I^TSS. oVXa a^c™- 

"3SJl“i£ aS Uw wot effect restricting tavelof UN™P.l°y» 

from Libya, the Soviet Union and four other nations. Mr-Treda “ff 
the actionhm contrary to the UN charter. “We think that the tune has 
come to move the UN headquarters if the United States continues taking 
these measures.” he said. 


BELTING (Reuters) — A senior Soviet diplomatic offiaalraid 
Wednesday that the Chinese and Soviet foreign ministers had agreed to 
visits the first such meetings since relations between the two 

nations deteriorated in the early 1960&. „ , _ 

"We have agreed in principle to exchange visits, the Soviet Union s 
deputy foreign minister, Leonid F. Ilyichev, said at Beg ing anpoit after 
arriving for the seventh round of talks on normalizing Chinese-Soviet 
relations. 

China’s foreign minister, Wu Xueqian, met his new Soviet counterpart, 
Eduard A Shevardnadze, for the first time in New York last week .and 
they exchanged invitations, the official Xinhua news agency said tbe neat 


WASHINGTON (APj — Republican- congressional leaders said 
Wednesday that they had little hope for passage of a tax-revision bill this 
year, and they reported to President Ronald Reagan that there are senous 
divisions in the House Ways and Means Committee. 

The Senate majority leader, Robert J. Dole, of Kansas, said that if his 
chamber gets ihebill from the House by Nov. 1, "that wffl give us tune to 
act this year,” although it “will be vety dose.” . . 

The House minority leader, Robert H. Michd, of IDmow, said that 
even if the House meets the Nov. 1 deadline, the bill “may be m such form 
that this president simply could not buy it.” 


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Ex-Pentagon A ide Cites 
Firms’ 'Espionage Units 

^ n g e ^berg The subcommittee also Meafed 

n*» >«* Tima senate internal meanos byiht Justice Do- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


Heckler Dismissal Has Regan Stamp 

Corporate Chain of Command Tightens in White House 


Page 3 


Aw York Tima Semico 
WASHINGTON — A former 


ru n!.. N “7. -A former panment and Defense Department 
defense Department investigator in which the ayriri^ iiTam wT r^h 
nw charged that as many as 25. other for the slow pace of cases 
rmlitary contractors have illegally developed on fraud . ... 
ob^mn^ Pentagon documents to Samar Charles E. Grassley, il 

Republican of Iowa who is chair- 


help them bid on govemment con- 


tracts. He said many of the compa- njan of the subcommittee, criti- 
mes have set up “espionage units” coed the prosecution of procure- 
to steal the material meat fraud cases “Those 

“Ctesified documents which axe. of us who have watched the rmit's 
prohibited from ever leaving” the performance for these three years 
Defense Department “are regularly arc having a hard time not condud- 
trafficked among private consul- ing the effort has been little more 


trafficked among private consul- 
v lams, _ companies in the jirocme- 
'T mail industry and military and ci- 
vilian employees of the 
government,” the investigator, 
Robert L. Segal, said in testimony 


are having a hard time not conclud- 
ing .the effort has been little more 
than show biz." 

Victoria Toensing, deputy assis- 
tant attorney general in the Crimi- 
nal Division of the Justice Depart- 
ment, defen d ed the department’s 



prepared for a subcommittee of the record, saying' there were but a 


Senate Judiciary Committee. 

He said some of the companies 
revealed by a government investi- 
gation to have set up “espionage 
units” were “household names,” 
but he did not identify any. 


“handful” of such cases three years 
ago when the spedal unit was cre- 
ated. 

Since, she said, the special unit 
and the department's fraud section 
have brought 34 indictments mid 


Margaret M. Heckler 

Senate Panel 
Examines 


Mr. Segal told the administrative criminal informations against 36 
practice and procedure subcoin- individuals and ^ corporations. The Aabdacd Pms 

mittee that he was the chief investi- . She noted that crimroal pro$ecu- WASHINGTON — The chair- 
gator in the case against GTE Gov- dons could be brought oriry in in- man of the National Transpona- 
ernment Services Carp., a military stances in which “fraudulent intent tion Safety Board has testified that 
contractor that last month became dr corruption can be proved be- he is concerned about the shortage 
the fust company indicted on youd a reasonable doubt" of experienced air traffic control' 

charges stemming from the theft of “In the va& majority of cases of lers, the ability of U.S. inspectors 
classified Pentagon planning docu- procurement waste or fraud,” she to monitor airlines, and a “trend” 
meats. said, “fraiid either is not present or. toward hazardous incidents on 

i “GTE is but the tip of the pro- cannot be proven." crowded runways. 

1 verhial iceberg,” said Mr. Segal, ■ Navy Otamanc System Jim Burnett, whose agency inves- 

who left the Defense Department’s »„ „ f. . . tigates airline accidents, told a Sen- 


ernment Services 


. j “GTE is but the tip of the pro- cannot be proven." crowded runways. 

A' verhial iceberg,” said Mr. Segal, ■ Navy Gbamanc System Jim Burnett, whose agency inves- 

who left the Defense Department’s , f. . . tigaies airline accidents, told a Sen- 

Criminal In«srigari^to^m. ^ibcommitKe Tuesday tot, 

January. He said there were 25 , V™* K P orted Washing- despite his concerns, airline travel 
companies under investigation, tv. mvV . admowledrrin* wid*. “*» * 10 


companies under in ves titration- “L. . . ; . . . continues to be “the safest wav ro 

man? of which “app^TE£ J* »»*• ' 

espionage units whose main ftmc- Investigators have found no 

dm isto obtain copies of highly “ comjmon denominator" that 

classified documentsin drdoto wouW Unk any of the air crashes 

give their companies a competitive this year, he said. 

iwIoa ” *®S “*e estimated $300 muhon a Several accidents have made 


Mr. Segal testified at a 1985 ^ ^ year for aviadon 

.u JzZi. ^ nes. , 


.S'Sf bef0 ^' “ 0US ' r5M J Va^i^viSu.s“nto 

His testimony was so^endedafter ^tStcoixnmmS, ^^odore ^ . , e . . . 

a J JS UCe u De P. anm l cnl othciBi James B^^Sker, atoSdS . D F®8 the Serrate hearing, the 
rushed to ttemreropbone to warn mlmai bveiligatiM has found the E^eralAvia- 

thai it might harm pendmg onm- ^ vulne^e” to manipula- 5° n Mnmutotum, Donald D. 
□al cases. ^ . Engen, defended his agency and 

a , P® 11 “ the system s computers by 31 


safety. There have been nearly 


A copy of Mr. Segal s prmarea ^ders. " ' „ wcre 

statement was mistakenly mduded The investigation found “an um- ^ He vowed to m< 

m a packetoft^nnony distributed ber of probS which require im- f 01 ^ ^ safety regulations. 


said, “We’re keying the system 
safe.” He vowed to aggressively en- 


by a Senate staff member. mediate and effective comitive ac- uuier witnesses suggestea mere 

The Justice Department would tion,” he said.- are signs that controllers, many of 

not comment ipeaficalLy on Mr. Commodore Whittaker dis- ^hem hired in the last Tew years, 
Segal’s testimony, but said in a dosed ^ ^ ^vy was conduct- “V overworked, 
statement it contained “massive ^ a “cradlfi-tb-grave inventory” Transportation Secretary Eliza- 
distortiona.” of thousands 1 of F-14 fighter jet bethR Dtde has said, that the gov- 

At the hearing, the Defense De- parts Hke those federal prosecu tors ernment plans to hire nearly 1 ,000 
partmenl’s chief investigator of say were' stolen from the supply additional controllers over the next 
procurement fraud. Inspector Gen-, system and smuggled to Iran. two years, bringing the force to 
end Joseph H. Sherick, acknowl- He said the navy already had about 15.000, but safety experts 
edged that the federal government determined that none of the three noted it may be two to three years 
remained “overmatched” in its at- classified parts for the E-14 and the before they can handle traffic at 
tempt to ferret out fraudulent con- -28 classified parts for the plane's congested terminals, 
trading practices- Phoenix missile system are missing. Captain Louis McNair, an offi- 

“We’re out' there dcaling wjtb, - . The test of :the. thousands of dal of the Air line Mots Assodar 
some very sophisticated schemes components for the two weapons tion, told the pand: “Our greatest 
on how to take us to the cleaners, ” do* not have secret classifications concern is the continuing and 
he said. Later, Mr. Sherick said that and were not covered by the review, growing demand to Handle more 
improvements had been made and made after^ authorities m San Diego . and more aircraft by a relatively 
that “we’re overmatched now, but broke up the smuggling rmg lasl inexperienced controller work 
we won’t be." July.' force.” 

Shuttle Set lor Secret U.S. Mission 


Other witnesses suggested there 
are signs that controllers, many of 
them hired in the last few years, 


By Lou Cannon 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, denying that his 
chief of staff was responsible for 
dismissing Margaret M. Heckler 
from the cabinet, said of Donald T, 
Regan, "He’s on our side.” 

But senior administration offi- 
cials familiar with the sequence of 
events' that led to Mrs. Hecklers 
removal as secretary of health and 
human services said Mr. Regan had 
newer sided with her and was deter- 
mined to force her out of the cabi- 
net. She is to be nominated as am- 
bassador to Ireland. 

Since Mr. Regan left the Trea- 
sury Department early this year in 
a job switch with James A. Baker 
3d, he has made no secret of his 
desire to put a corporate stamp on 
the presidemjs cabinet and push 
out those whose style or compe- 
tence he questioned. 

Mrs. Heckler’s supporters and 
critics say that her case was an 
example of how Mr. Regan has 
succeeded in making his job as 
chief of staff different from that of 
his predecessors. Under him, the 
White House has become hierar- 
chical. The Regan team, an official 
said with pride last week, “carries 
out his directions.” 

It is not new for a Reagan chief 
of staff to lake aim al a member of 
the cabinet. Mr. Baker openly 
called for the removal of Secretary 
of Labor Raymond J. Donovan 
when Mr. Donovan came under 
investigation for alleged links to 
mob figures. Several White House 
officials, including Mr. Baker and 
Edwin Meese 3d, then a White 
House counselor, participated in 
the conflicts that led to the resigna- 
tion of Secretary of State Alexan- 
der M. Haig. 

White House officials also 
played key roles in the resignations 
of James G. Watt as secretary of 
the Interior Department and Anne 
M. Burford as head of the Environ- 
mental Protection Agency. 

But in all of these resignations 
the president remained distanced 
from the maneuvering of his aides. 
They never put him in the public 
position of dismissing a cabinet 
member, or of trying to represent a 
dismissal as akin to a promotion. 
For a long succession of Reagan 
chiefs of staff, both in Sacramento 
when he was governor of California 
and in Washington, it was axiomat- 
ic that Mr. Reagan was uncomfort- 
able with personnel derisions and 
that he “never fired anybody.” 

During Mr. Reagan's first term, 
the conflicting power centers in the 


White House gave embattled cabi- 
net official an opportunity to find 
allies. Mr. Meese rallied to the sup- 
port of Mr. Donovan. Mr. Baker 
spoke up for David A. Stockman, 
director of the Office of Manage- 
ment and Budget, and my have 
saved his job when Mr. Meese and 
others contended that Mr. Stock- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

man should be dismissed because 
of his published confessions of 
doubts about Mr. Reagan's eco- 
nomic program. 

But in the second-term White 
House, where Mr. Regan is the un- 
disputed strong man, there are no 
rival power centers that can be used 
as a court of appeals by a cabinet 
official who falls into disfavor. 

A White House official said Mr. 
Regan sent Mrs. Heckler “signals 
of nuclear proportions” that he 
wanted her to leave. 

"She refused to hear the signals,” 
the official said. 

Mrs. Heckler, 54. a former Re- 
publican congresswoman from 
Massachusetts appointed in 19S3, 
has been considered by administra- 
tion conservatives as being too lib- 


eral. Her appointment was made in 
part to blunt charges of unfairness 
in administration policies dealing 
with the poor. But by most ac- 
counts. Mr. Regan’s objections 
were almost entirely to Mrs. Heck- 
ler's political manner and personal 
style rather than her ideology. 

“She was very individualistic and 
wanted to deal with the president 
directly” said a senior White 
House official. Mrs. Heckler, the 
official said, didn't conform “to 
Regan's idea of what a Cabinet 
secretary ought to be.” 

Associates of Mr. Regan said he 
arrived in the White House deter- 
mined to replace Mrs. Heckler. His 
negative views may have been rein- 
forced by Jack Svahn, the chief of 
policy development and then Mrs. 
Heckler’s deputy, who considered 
her a poor administrator. Mrs. 
Heckler fought back, which only 
increased Mr. Regan's determina- 
tion to dismiss her, officials said. 

The chief of staff prepared “talk- 
ing points” for the pres ideal, one of 
which described the Dublin post as 
a “promotion.” A While House of- 
ficial said Mr. Reagan, who is 
proud of bis Irish roots, agreed to 
make the argument to a skeptical 
White House press corps. 


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Cuba’s 'Mariel’ Refugees 
Legally Accepted in U.S. 


By George Volsky 

New York Times Service 

MIAMI — Every day. five days a 
week, about 225 Cuban refugees 
are interviewed here by special 'im- 
migration and Naturalization Ser- 
vice examiners, and practically all 
of them become permanent resi- 
dents of the United States. 

Five years ago these men and 
women were pan of a group of 
125,000 refugees who came to this 
country from the port of Mariel, 
west of Havana, in what was per- 
haps one of the most controversial 
migrations in American history. 

Many of these refugees experi- 
enced discrimination and econom- 
ic hardships far worse than had 
earlier waves of immigrants from 
Cuba, but, with their new status as 
residents, they are beginning to 
merge into the m ains tream of 
American cultural and economic 
life. 

“We from Mariel had to begin 
from zero." said Eduardo Suarez, a 
television cameraman in Miami. 


“In five years, we have done what 
those before us look 20 years to 
accomplish.” 

Perry A. Rjvkind, district direc- 
tor of the immigration service of- 
fice in Miami, said “Fidel Castro 
sent us a lot of riffraff, but most of 
the Mariel people are hard-work- 
ing. legitimate people.” . 

When President Jimmy Carter 
authorized the immigration in 
April 1980. it was envisioned by 
Washington as an orderly process 
of transporting aboard U.S. vessels 
some 20,000 Cubans who were ei- 
ther relatives of Cubans already 
here, dissidents or former political 
prisoners. 

But the immigration turned into 
a huge, disorderly exodus, manipu- 
lated by the Castro government, 
which placed on boats bound for 
Key West, Florida, more than six 
times as many refugees as expected, 
including thousands of prison in- 
mates, menial patients and others 
whom Havana called .“antisocial el- 
ements.” 


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Los Angeles Tima Service 

4 WASHINGTON — The US. 

. Air Force plans Thursday to inau- 
gurate the fourth, space shuttle, the 1 
Atlantis, in a secret mission drat is 
expected to mini two satellites de- 
signed to relay nnssfle-launching 
orders from the president to mili- 
tary commanders in the field. 

Air force officials have divulged 
little about the flight and refused 
Monday to comment on the cargo. 

But testimony by Pentagon offi- 
cials before Congress, data about 
the satellites and schedules for oth- 
er shuttle flights dedicated to mfli- 
tazy uses point to Atlantis* rote in 

launching fh** piKtaiy tiiwH»iiiiniwu 
toons satellites. • 

There also have been suggestions 
that the flight, carrying a crew of 

U five military officers, will beused to 

1 conduct experiments in connection 
with die US space defense pro-., 
gram. - - , 

The launch of the Atlantis will 
bring into service the last shuttle 
that the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration is authorized 
to build. At 169,680 pounds 
(76,915 kilograms), it is lighter than 
the other three — Columbia. Chal- 

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Thursday's mission is the second 
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It is believed that the Atlantis 
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The satellites are intended to 
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tii 4- 




Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 





New Proposals by Soviet 
Disappoint U.S. Officials 


By Bernard Weinraub 

Kw York Times Service 


some old ideas," an official said, 
“and have not brought in an offer 


WASHINGTON — Reagan ad- in lhe ^ ame ballpark as what we 
ministration officials expressed were talking abouL" 
disannmntmm* 9 lw.t .h* Snviw The officmJ sajd that the sense of 


disappointment about the Soviet 
Union's new arras proposals in Ge- 


disappointment was especially tra- 


neva as the chief U.S. negotiator derscored by a Moscow proposal 
prepared to return to Washington ^at, essentiaUy. would allow the 
for consultations on the American Russians to proceed with deploy- 
response. ment of two land-based interconti- 

Offidals said Tuesday that the nenial missiles, the SS-24 and SS- 
negotiator, Max M. Kampelman, 25-. However, it would bar the 
was returning to lhe United States United States from deploying an 
“for personal reasons.” but that it array of nuclear weapons in early 
was likely he would meet ranking of developmenu 
administration aides to discuss the adnunistrauon official said 

Soviet proposals and consider a of the Soviel P^P^ 11 


possible counterproposal 


premature to write it off,” echoing 


Although PresTdem Ronald Rea- * ™ that^the measures were nego- 
gan and White House spokesmen bating positions that could be soft- 
declined to discuss the details of en £“- , „ . , , 

the Soviet arms proposals, outlined But another official said that it 
Monday and Tuesday in Geneva, appeared as ti U.S aims control 



Rubble in Tunisia Is Searched for Bodies 

Tho pt g imder tom ieti but also more modern F- 

CompM by Ow staff Fnm Dopadta struck. Some Palestinian military ing that invasion. 1 pe j;. _ i 6 and F-15 warplanes. 

TUNIS — Hundreds of Turn- officers were killed in the raid, he his top aides guwrill The aircraft blasted the PIO 

si an and Palestinian rescue workers said, adding that no high-ranking ers then moved their oasc complex with such precision that 

searched for bodies Wednesday in PLO officials were among the vie- sa. Tunisian-owned beach cottages 

ihe ruins of the Palestine Libera- tiros. _ A caber 17 near bv were undamaged, 

lion Organization headquarters af- Asked earlier about Israel's dec- iKrvfnr the Lar- Tunisian police said that most of 

ter a bombing raid by Israeli war- iaradon that the air raid was a clami 2 l f e *^S„, m n denied it the known casualties were found in 
lhe ruins of a viUa where member. 




lion Organization headquarters af- Asked earlier about Israel's dec- ilitvfor the Lar- Tunisian police said that most of 

ter a bombing raid by Israeli war- iaradon that the air raid was a denied it the known casualties were found in 

planes. reprisal for last week's killings of oaca killing. . . narrid- the ruins of a villa where members 

Yasser Arafat, the PLO chair- three Israelis aboard a yachl in Lar- wasinvolv^, gtl^gh 0 f force 1? were gathered, 

man, vowed to retaliate for Tues- nac^ Cyprus. Mr. Arafat said that P® 1 ? 1 who were Three of the ruined buddings 

day's attack. ’ the Israelis bad used a similar “ex- three Israe- were villas, and the fourth was an 

Palestinian officials said that at cuse j 0 invade Beirut." arrested for killing apartment block where Force 17 

SS3SSSS ijaaMKM SSSSS3S 

Turns suburb of Borj. Cedria. . Tbe .Israelis ousted Mr. Arafat ^uon^^t^ command post. (AP.Heuters) 


His reference was to the Israeli 


U.S. officials said privately that proposals had “made no dent in 
there was considerable disappoint- l h e,r thinking and that, for the 
ment over the measures moment, the Russians appeared to 

“They have basically repackaged have “put something down which is 
close to being norm ego Liable." 

Mr. Reagan brushed aside a 

r = WALLY FINDLAY question Tuesday about the Soviet 

Galleries International I""- - "" 

new yofk - ehioago ■ palm beach II . . . , , 

beverl, his - pan, I Officials said the Soviet propos- 

|| als included 50-perceni cuts m U.S. 

EXHIBITION 


President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt expressing his anger 
over Israel's attack on the PLO headquarters in Tunisia. 

U.S. Says Air Attack on FIX) 
By Israeli Jets Was Justified 


quarters staff and about 20 Tuni- . v ■“ i,™ iom 

dans were killed in the raid on the mvaslon ° f Lebanon m June 1981 
Tunis suburb of Boij Cedria. The Israelis ousted Mr. Arafat 
About 100 people were injured, the from his stronghold in Beirut dur- 

PLO said Hospital sources said — - 

that there were at least 47 con- 

Othcr reports said that up to 70 Gorbachev j 

people had died. 

Represematives of the 4.000- (Continued from Page 1) 
member Jewish community in Tu- , . „ . . 

nisia strongly condemned the raid ° f KoflStant,n U ' Cher_ 

saying that Tunisian Jews “joined e 2f°v , ™ „ . . , 

burning the victim*" JSMSSBSMS 


while another mentioned eight jets, of the villas as 
The Israeli arsenal contains Phan- command post. 


Gorbachev Asks Ban on Space Arms 


rence. Mr. Mitterrand does not Mr. Gorbachev is the first Soviet 
want to be involved in a Soviet leader to visit France since Leonid 
propaganda campaign against the L Brezhnev did so in 1977. French- 
UrutedStates- Soviet relations, traditionary 


» 3*£aS£f j JtMsssaaa; ™sEv***>m**- ™**^^f*j** 

Mr. Arafat, speaking in an inter- Tkf mestic pressure to take a tough line i errand's eiecuon in 1981 because 

view Tuesday night with Italy’s Jr cor ? , . . with Mr Gorbachev on human of his outspoken support for the 

state-run RAI television from Tu- Fren^ matorrn honor of thejns- “■ wroa deployment of U.S. Cruise and Per- 

nis. said he bad escaped injury be- demonstrations were The Soviet Union probably has a shing missiles in Europe. 


(Continued from Page 1) 


isrsL ” d jsffrat - **■«. 


clear weapons while the same re- 
duction would involve only long- 


facts on the raid but added: “We miJitary junta,” he said, 
certainly deplore acts of violence in ° A a Wednesday Mr Arafat 


In interviews and statements more negative human-nB^W ^ statement, Mr. 

HeaUoauuarenedPWrereU.- up „ ^ ^ m,. ^ G<S*ch=v said the Soviel Union 

“My people will respond to this chev has sought to influence West- “^S^ti^^thSnimu- was ready to 8®od JjJ- 

offidal tororism andwdie Israeli ^ £2 SsmTwXsSJiublic revulsion tions with states of (UMte 

military junta," he said of a new l s P ,ra] «n the arms race ™ 0 f dissidents and cal systems. He called for the logic 

OnWednesdav. Mr. Arafat w hile at the same time conveymg ° of mutual understanding to prevail 


SaSifflBB 


nu iu ujc tim w .-luftuou ccTiauuy uepiore acis 01 violence in , ■ -v T , ; an impression of Kretnhn ilexibui- « - -a -— — - — 

“The air strike against this back- [he region, including this act of a stJ ? ng 1116 ty. Hehas tied Soviet proposals for Suckers with such slogans as 

m. " Slates and its nosmon reeardine v . tiiant mu" and “Gor- 


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proposal was described as a re- 


Speakessaid 

“We understand the reasons" for 


A senior State Department offi- 


newed attempt to reduce U.S. nu- IsraeU fan continued, dd jdd tlul an pBOem slilI enKnts that lhe auack was “an 


oposal was described as a re- iWii,»rMcnnt"fnr A senior State Department offi- said it was dear from US strale g* c nuclear weapons to re- Parif Several hu- 

wed attempt to reduce U.S. nu- da! said that an eKdaliog neaeni s^emenls that the attack was “in on space-based defend P ^ ^ Jading 

's&zjsssstizii ^ d 0 ?r,^ oneactsofvi " ^ ^ 

wieVuidoe. leaMoreey.ype. raejir eomplialion" m Ihe Reegen w . IorJ ^- ervatione about Mr. Reagan's plans d^»ttatanonpubIicdemonflni 

Kisss assMtara 


dear svstems based in and near tSl 

r " . u * We do not condone acts of vio- 

Etrope and capab’e of hittrng the lMce of My lype - 


Soviet Union. 


of violence in the Middle East in 
the past two months “could be a 
major complication" in the Reagan 


over the “anu-logic of confronta- 
tion." 

He said the Soviet Union wants a 
return to d&tente, the prevention of 
the arms race in space, in its ending 
on Earth and the promotion of in- 
ternational cooperation. 


offered no similar limits on its me- 
dium-range nuclear weapons based 
in Europe. 

■ Negotiators Meet Again 


U.S.-supplied F-16s in the 1 ,500- 
mile (2,400- kilometer) flight to at- 


tvnve the peace process. 

He pointed to Egypt's immediate 


tack Tunisia was a violation of the termination after the raid Tuesday 
■ Negotiators Meet Again Control Act. of talks with toael on a border 

tic j r. . . In a brief exchange with reoort- dispute over the Taba region. Presi- 

long^ange miclear^brces'^nret era at ±e White EKonTiISy, dent H^ni Mubarak inade the de- 

Wedn^dSv The SiodaS PtaS Mr - Rc ^ an ^ ^ ?sion after reiuimng from an 11- 

reo^d fSmOe^ ** lo slrike back at tef- tnp to the United States and 

reported irom Ueneva. rorisls ^ j ^ thc Europe. He was said to be angry 

The session between teams head- ndn neoole " and frustrated over the Israeli at- 

I u.. -T- iv:i..„n . . .. - — ■ ■ 


ed bv John G. Tower and Viktor P. 


and frustrated over the Israeli at- 


But Mr. Shultz told diplomats ^ Tunisia. 


SSSES — — - One Soviet Hostage Killed 

“^ s - F - 15Jrts By Kidnappers in Beirut 

would continue to pursue Middle REYKJAVIK — The United ..... 

East peace efforts, while carrying States has begun stationing a (Conhssued from rage 1) said: “Procrastination in this mat- 
on the armed struggle in Israeli-oc- squadron ofl8U.S. Air Force F-15 oti, which is ringed by Syrian ter, let alone violence again st the 
cupied Arab territories. jet fighters in Iceland to replace the troops, tanks and artillery. Leftist Soviet citizens, will farther aggra- 

Recalling his appearance at the current squadron of 12 F-4s, the militias backed by Damascus at- vale the guilt of all those who have 


| Karpov lasted two hours and 10 from Mt j ons at the United King Hussein of Jordan, in United Nations 1 1 years ago. when local U.S. naval and air base has tacked forces of the Sunni Moslem anything to do with this matter." 

- S° viel 111,551013 10 ll3e Nations, “I fear that what we see Washington meetings with con- he declared that he held a gun in announced. It said Tuesday that group called Tawbeed. or Unifica- The government said it had al- 
um ted Nations. always is, in a sense, a contest be- gresaonal leaders, condemned the one hand and an olive branch in the this would strengthen the defenses tion Movement, for the fifth day. ways advocated an end to the 

The date of the next session was [ween the people who want to move air raid and also warned that tin- other. Mr. Arafat said: “This still of Iceland, a North Atlantic Treaty Sbdkh Saeed Shaaban. the lead- bloodshed in Lebanon, 
not announced under a policy in- toward peace and the people who identified opponents may use the holds true." Organization member, and im- er of Tawheed, who has refused to : ; 

traduced for security reasons in the are afraid of it." attack to wreck the emerging peace Mr. Arafat said he was very dose prove monitoring of air traffic in let Syrian troops in to pacify the jy FnnBwmfiiui PI on 

second round of talks. He said he did not have all the Drocess in the troubled rerion. when the bombs and missiles the North Atlantic. dty, left Tuesday night with Irani- uiiutripiwu rum 


e afraid of it." attack to wreck the emerging peace 

He said he did not have all the process in the troubled region. 


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Admiral Becomes U.S. Soviet sources in Beirut reported introduced conscription of five 

w' v that there have been “high level" years or more for men aged be- 

Crowe, Citing Budget, Stresses Need lor Cooperation SSSSlSS" 1 D “ Rou8e 

Se.- York r, ma sen-.ee to wasteful duplication in weapon caliber usually leads no higher in 

WASHINGTON - Admiral programs, to the neglect of such the navy than the rank of com- SSllStfnthri Jf d if 6 

William J. Crowe Jr. has been operational needs as ammunition mander or captain. retease of ^ B - olher ls “? d | 0° Ha- 

sworn in as chairman of the Joint and spare parts, and to battlefield Now that he has reached the top A pmre JSL, t -statement, read 

Chiefs of Staff and began his duties confusion in such operations as the in the military hierarchy, at the top t hfSmln«™in« new; nmeram Cambo * ans t0 ^ 

with a call for greatercooperation invasion of Grena^Ln 1983. of his agenda ^will be PentagoS °n ^niam evening news program, Cambodians. 

among the army, navy, air force Admiral Crowe digressed from budget. After voting a trillion dol-l ■ " 


dty, left Tuesday night with. Irani- 
an mediators for Damascus and 
talks with Syrian leaders. 

The Soviet Union is a dose ally 
of Syria and its main arms supplier. 

r* : ■ - 2 


New Gmscriptioii Plan 
Reported In Cambodia 

Reuters 

BANGKOK — Cambodia has 


Sere York Times Service 


with a call for greater cooperation invasion of Grenada in 1983. of his agenda will be the Pentagon 

among the army, navy, air force Admiral Crowe digressed from budget. After voting a trillion dol- 
and marines. ' the usual expressions of gratitude lars for defense during President 

In remarks at a ceremony Tues- hopefulness Tuesday to ad- Ronald Reagan’s first term. Con- 
day outside the Pentagon, Admiral dress a pointed comment to the 400 grass is balking at adding to the 
Crowe said that “the need for joint ^^^7 officers who serve on the current $300 billion a year. 


International Inc. 


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operations, joint thinking, and staff of the Joint Chiefs. For Admiral Crowe, lowered ex- 

joint leadership has never been "1 am well aware of the difficulty pectaiions will mean trying to keep 
greater" as the military confronts of shedding your individual service peace between the chiefs of the in- 
the end of its budgetary buildup, orientations and addressing the dividual services as they fight to 
Admiral Crowe. 60, the former breeder concerns of lhe joint are- save prized programs. - 
commander in chief of Pacific and “■ be said. *The fact is, however. He also will face congressional 
Indian Ocean forces, succeeded for J omt opentoons, attempts to overhaul the generous 

General John W Vessey Jr to be- J oult lhmbn & ^ J oml le3dershj P military retirement system, which 
come the 11th chairnin of the EfV b ^,|T ealCr ^ *5** 

Joint Chiefs. As such, he is the the global challenges, and in order difficult as the availab e pool of 
senior military adviser to the presi- 10 S* ** most out oT our fimie qualified youths drops sharply, 
dent and the secretary of defense, resources. Events are likely to force Admi- 

c ■ • .. . ■ Skilled and Articulate ral Crowe to take a larger role on 

Several proposals are pending in ™.. . j. W h arms control issues than did Gener- 

Congress that would strengthen the George C Wilson of The Wash - _, ho - fn „ p VMrc 


dent and Lhe secretary of defense. 


Several proposals are pending in 
Congress that would strengthen the George C Wilson 
chairman's hand in minimizing in- ington Post reported 
tereendee rivalries. Critics have Admiral Crowe cai 


Events are likely to force Admi- 
ral Crowe to take a larger role on 
arms control issues than did Gener- 
al Vessey, who in almost four years 
as chair man never had to take any 


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2-5 years experience. French fluency required. 
Personnel of this firm havo been advised of thin advertisement. 
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POSITION Gi TronsJatw-fevrsor - NATO grade IT -4 
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Basic monthly salary <t Lire 5,371 .293 plus authorized dknvonces. Tax-free. 
Language requirements; Excellent knowledge of English. French and Italian at 
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It is very important that candidates submit a very d e to il ed resume in English citing 
education, qualifications, work experience and po si t i on desired to Ihe fofcrwing 
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teraervire rivalries. Critics have Admiral Crowe can be witty, in- hLdT potion tan bstina d£ 
charged that these rivalries have led tellectual rnd tough, but above all aoJ^SJ* of continuing to ob- 

-SiheSl? lerve the SALT-2 treatyuLts on 

T HEADQUARTERS— I -Mv^Sher used to sav ‘Your “HE!®" missfle lauilcfaers - 

EM EUROPE (NAteT] 

have an ^ mmi” ^ 

be of Efwfish mother tonaue or have a I r^.i r- : _i i t-v only on the advisability of abiding 



Other Crweisms charmed Dem- {«■ SALT-2 but also on the scrap: 
ocrats and Republicans at the ad- Q[ of th e AnSl 

nriral s confirmation hearing be- s w^ -i -JJ!*®.. - fh fh _ c~ 

fore the Senate Aimed sSrices 

J Union, u SALT-2 limits are 

Nunn limt scra PP ai ' ^ chiefs, will have to 

him^rhe , rS^m?1n l f£ C 2£ J 11 ^ wh«her the potential for an 
SSpsflhlSlt- nght unlimited number of warheads 
place at the null time. jeopardizes Mr. Reagan's concept 

Admiral Crowe (the name ■CrT 

“k,™ "i i- ku 01 a ^pac^Dased strategic defense 
rhymes with brow, j is seen_ by g a m - ns t nuej^-u missiles. 

ffJSRSSSSft'Kto Admiral Crowe almost certainly 
U ' S ’ wiD be asked by the Reagan admin- 

SSMTtjyS 




2finl 


Take advantage of our speddrdtesIornewsiAxabersan^ 
we II give you an extra month of Tribs fieewilh aone-year 

strascnphon.Tcrtdsavi^^ nearly 50% off the newsstand 

price in most European countries! 


ant commander on a diesel subma- 


dent a 90-minute briefing without 
notes on the challenges in the Pacif- 


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AGBVCE SPtoAliSfe DES iNG&OEURS ET CADR 
12 Rue Blanche, 75434 Pans CHJEX 09. 

Tel. .• 280.41.44, Ext, 71 - 285.44.40. Ext. 42. 


• 38 Yeung Woman, certificate of v««r- 
iialionallrade, mors than lOyaariof avpe- 
rience os ossafanf expert trilingual French. 
English, German, having wor k ed with many 


Sp 8 "*^ Fre, * h ' 

sTCimwM, navuTg wonura wim mony y rn r r , < I n |-L- in ■» f TWMVM ,. li Utn 4 rnn is 

foreign ma riteb, am toos abroad wM, aq. ^ lo move irom Under a compromise bill pend- 

.o nud«r sufnixrmcs. ™ b, dre Houre Anntd Scmres 
462. Paris-Cadm i. Codrm i ^ MmS 4 * 7 - Pon ” Bom in La Grange, Kentucky, Committee, the Joint Chiefs’ staff 

• fliwim.... r —iu ii iLhu.i , « mu, u-,, i . Admiral Crowe graduated from the of 400 would be placed under the 

£££ UANa.ilA.a2my in 1946. .hen sote direction chairman. Ad- 

•«p«riBK» In Europe/ South Africa. Saeks German, Spanish, Mian fluoftfty spoken; earned a mastcr of SCienCC degree miral CfOWC S hand would be COfl- 

P 0 ^* 0 ", « A dvertising Director in mutfi- sdos c*p. on 35 morkefs of. Europe. Afnco, from Stanford University in 1956. a siderablv strengthened, and poten- 

t w 

country Quonfied, friendly penanaBty. keting, legate, deborafion Data Pracaukia JPF 1 964 and B dOClOfate m pO- pOVTClftll tDilttaiy voice SIHCC the 
Good knowiedg* of French a Garment, training aspach, oeeustomed to tc m nw mh ulical science from Princeton in position of chairman of the Joint 
AvoUoW* inwwrfotojy. Ref.: 443. Para-Ca- and to travel ncfensiWy conddtra propet- 1965. An academic career of that Chiefs was created in 1949 

ol*. Refj 440, Parit-Cadm L ' 

• BUSMESSMANAOEMBIT, 3V. French, • WH*, 40, Wlng-al fcsgfhhrtWnrf, _ __ 

U.S. Searching for Ex-CIA Officer 

port, import.oidf, controHor in London & B**, ,n '•** wtoia dr^viopment, conttruc- . __ 

Arr’is, teeki rtrtpons*le position in ftnaic*. tton end c ora hudfan motoriob, and HmApy fCOODIIOea ITOIO r*ge I) ScttalOr Malcolm Wallop. Re- 


SSJ* b “ ,CT “ *■“ “ 

u n - rxnpy m . , . .. I ever need a new c hair man, this is 

i *soT . Admiral Crowe, a big man whose « 

- 285.44.40. Erf. 42. unifonn usually is slightly rumpled. Besides the international issues, 

• ENGtNKBt, 29 yoon. Fronds High School is one of the few officers to rise far Admiral Crowe must deal with the 

afier.^jeoing offers propoS ed reorganization of the 

apancsn, rrenai, Aljjerton, Gorman natiora. fajm the ODtOCratlC Admiral H\- r^r .1 fhieffi 
-*aod kng«»fedfla mm on o u amont.ialf confi- /- r.- ■ , _ r__ JU “ l V--mci5. 

d«nt. sescs dwiUngmg potion in «ngi. ®an G. Rickover to move from Under a compromise bill pend- 

neering businau or oHar Ud in Franca or diesel tO nuclear submarines. mo m thr .Hmiv Armwi 


! 

□ 12lTX3nfhl 

I ( + 1 month frea] 

_ □ 6 months KZT- 

I 4+2weej®free^ 1 - ^7^ - lvet *| a nioa. | 3nn 

I DSmorfh. . Si S— 

. fczEZSliil 

| D My check - T*?” . 1,410 7fi0 . 4 |, 

I lss*2£B ~LFd G?Z 


• BUSIHE5S MANAOEMBIT, 39. Franch, 
fluent Cngfish, Spanish, aconomia & busi- 


litical science from Princeton in position of chairman of the Joint 
1965. An academic career of that Chiefs was created in 1949. 

U.S. Searching for Ex-CIA Officer 


Senator Malcolm Wallop, Re- 


rj* "jyg ] Union’s intdligena agency, de- publican of Wyoming, a former 


port, ■mport l ai«dH, esntroflar in London & 8*, in r*al Mtota dovatopmanti soratruc- . __ 

Rwh, mponsflile poshton in ftn«K». hon^nd con rtvdfa n motenob , and to mhay \OMl0tiea IrOnj r*ge I) ScttalOr Malcolm Wallt^), 'Re- 

irtmriatlonrf irwfing, consulting, fra* ta ■momwing nyOragting. wirfi accart an R. Union’s intelligence 3genCY, de- publican Of Wyomine. a former 
trawl, mailable new for North & South nendol Control, Marketing, ad Gcnarol tmrvaA > n u/ M : n T,.iv Up «. m*mlw nf ih^ 

Anwrieo, South East Asia, Europe, Africa. Manognwnt. SHKS NgMouwl poiitiwi m fCCt V,^° ^ , We$l / u *y- “ UW SOBtfll Intelligence 

ttuf.i 444, Porii-Cadruj t. mortinotionai, wWy bos^i in Para but partadly has been givmg the CIA Comraittee, said tiw committee has 

■ export txade manaao. 43 M the names and identities of Soviet been urging William J. Casey di- 

introducttonirirwwa^ Co ‘*" / ‘ agents arowid the worid, including rector of the QA, to put more 


«■#., 464, Parit-Cadm L ' ' murtwwiionoi, orWy b««J m Porn but portodly has bon giving the CIA Committee, said the committee has 

■ export txade MAMAM*. 43 Mi the names and identities of Soviet been urging William J. Casey di- 

brtrodurttonfcrwwoT^ Coc *" / ' agenBaround the world, including rector of the CIA, to put more 

Europe, M w fih w enwii basin, stetekon- "EXECUTIVE, 15 yaan np in Rnandal Several SOld K> have 31 One time emphasis OB ferreting OUt double 
bot»d economy oroe (East, Arab end Aliri- pfowfog and ccnmsl, stroiegic planning and {ldd positions with U.S. inielii- 320115. 

(energy. metdBwgy, ogncuUuw d - i ndustrial, own busria. Gonwmen products and *vr- ™ Ulan I U yearS^ UUSe gSttCC OHS been able tO penetrate 

•betronic), mtermedtot* and eensumor vioM. mm Colombia Umimrrity 1947 + have been healed debates m the the KGB and the GRU, the Soviet 


con sraasj, ummiea m tecnnoiogy Irens- a emia pm e ii i. m a A 1 waft top ffloHMi n tioi i- -m, U, Will*,™ , 4il...ri«> ■ ... 

Imv nght^ industries. eopitfaq*pm H t, als 'm the US and in Euopa, cwd 3 yean In m ^ Mr. Wallopaid. tiiai U^. mtelll- 

(energy. metdBwgy, ogricultoH d - i ndustriol, own busriu. Ceruumen products ond ter- ™ Uian I U yeSTS^ there gSttCC OHS DCCn able tO penetrate 

•betronic), mtwrmediot* and eensumor >*»«. mm Colombia Unhmrdty 1947 + have been healed debates m the the KGB and the GRU, the Soviet 

goods. PROPOSES hd tViSad mstarci: to Frandi Susuims School, good Spanish, soma CIA and QUlSlde about whether the military int riltp ipgnp agency “Anrf 
nigh periornwig eontpanbs, with ariiqjetod German. French national, natoraCndian in MMW had been OCnetKUed hv a vmi loot », (hi rich nf 

agraemenb, to praawte, (Wop and isn. praewa m the US S 8KS. dwOm^ng pwi. “8^ “ PT™**!? “ I™ '«* « ™ lenity on 

pom* their co in mo iod aethritiei. Ref.: 444, •*»» with ictoum t i onol ca mpu s or innat- SOWCt mole, the espionage OUT side, which IS a good deal less 
POriUMesl. - - - - - . - 


praens in H» US. SCBtS dhottanging peti. 
tion with j am n a tionot co mpa ny or innat- 
irme bank. Refj 4S9, Ptea-Cedrm L 


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Charge my. 
Cl Access 
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Sweden 

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□ Euraard 

□ Madwaxd 

□ Visa 


Condwpyyefcte. 

Ci d account f I 
number 




■Sgnolure. 


Soviet '‘mole." the espionag 
world's word for a double agent. 


severe than theirs," 


• - ■ 

L ,d ^ - „ ^ — Telex • - • - 3-10-85 : 


Anal 

frith 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


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Page 5 


Marcos Foes Begin to Confront U.S. Bases 


By Steve Lohr 

1 A/int' York Times. Service 

OLONGAPO, the Phffippines 

Richard^ Gordon, the mayor of this 
mountain-rimmed port, puis it 
bluntly: “Okmgapo is a company 
town." In Olongapo’s case, the 
company happens to be the Penta- 
gon. 

TOe town's nightclubs, bare, ho* 
*** restaurants, massage parlors 
and 250,000 people are almost 
wholly dependent on the huge U S 
naval base at Subic Bay, whose 
grounds cover an area slightly larg- 
er than Manhattan and whose gates 
open into Olongapo’s main street 

Yet in Okmgapo, and even in the 
mayor's office, there is a hint of the 

ambivalence Filipinos incr easin gly 
express toward the presence of two 
big U.S. military bases on thehr soil, 
Subic Bay and the nearby Clark Air 
Base. 

Mr. Gordon recognizes that the 
American base is his town's life- 
blood. and at a time when the Phil- 
ippine economy is depressed and 
businesses are closing down, he 
notes with relief, “No one is bong 
laid off here, thanks to the U.S. - 
Navy” 

Mr. Gordon also speaks know- 
ledgably of- the Soviet buildup in 
Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam, 70 mfn - 
utes away by jet across the South 

fThtrm Sol 

Yet the mayor, acknowledges 
that he has other feelings as well. 
“As a principle, no one wants the 
j j foreign bases here,*' said Mr. Gor- 
' don. 40, whose father, a, former 
mayor of Olongapo, fought for the 
town's independence. Until 1959, 
Olongapo, which lies 50 miles (80 
kilometers) northwest erf Manila, 
was part of the Subic base. 

U.S. strategic interests in the 
Philippines are now confronting a 
rising wave of sentiment against 
the bases. The movement is partiya 
resurgence of Filipino nadonahsm 
and partly a reaction to continuing 
U.S. economic and military sup- 
port for the embattled government 
of Ferdinand E Marcos. 

To the left, including a. fast- 
growing Communist insurgency, 
the military bases are a symbol of 
- America's neocolonial influence 

Failure of Ariane Rocket 
Is linked to Leaky Valve 

The Associated Press 

PARIS — Officials say a leaky 
valve in a motor caused the failure 
of the European. Space Agency’s 
A sateKte launch from Kourou, Guy- 
ana, on Sept. 13. 

Arianespace, which markets the 
space agency’s Ariane rocket, said 
Tuesday that the leak occurred in a 
valve controlling the injection of 
hydrogen into a third-stage motor. 
Scientists destroyed the rocket 
when it went out of centred shortly 
after launch. 


and Washington's backing for Mr. 
Marcos. At anti-government dem- 
onstrations in .Manila, the removal 
of the American bases is a rallying 
point, along with calls for die over- 
throw of the “U.S.-Marcos dicta- 
torship." 

Moreover, with stepped-up op- 
position to the Marcos government 
and increasing influence of the left, 
more middle-of-the-road politi- 
cians have come out against the 
bases. Last December, a dozen 
prominent opposition leaders 
signed an agreement that foreign 
bases must he removed. 

Although opposition to the bases 
is vocal and growing, it does not yet 
appear to command majority opin- 
ion. In an independent nationwide 
poll issued last month, 43 percent 
of FiKpinw surveyed agreed that 
the American bases should “kept or 
tolerated," and only 23 percent dis- 
agreed. 

The agreement between Manila 
and Washington permitting Ameri- 
can use of the bases does not expire 


until 1991. But the health of Mr. 
Marcos, 67, is uncertain, and the 
position of any successor govern- 
ment toward the bases is unpredict- 
able. 

"The loss of the bases in the 
Philippines would be a body blow 
to Western strategic interests in the 
Pacific and globally,” a U.S. diplo- 
mat said. 

‘ As a fallback, the United States 
is trying to lease alternative sites in 
Guam and on the islands of Micro- 
nesia and the Northern Marianas. 
Military estimates of the cost and 
lime that would be required to re- 
place Subic and Clark range from 
$2 billion and three years to $5 
billion and eight years. 

It would be impossible to equal 
the location or the skilled work 
force at Subic, the center of support 
operations for the 90 ships, 550 
aircraft and 70,000 troops of the 
7th Fleet in the Pacific and Indian 
oceans. 

Subic lies at the center of the 
ocean lanes running from the Sea 


of Japan to the east coast of Africa. 
The Marianas, by contrast, arc far 
more peripherally situated, being 
four days sailing time from Subic. 
Guam, too, is more remote. 

The navy estimates that a day’s 
work shift at Subic costs about one- 
sixth the rate in Japan and one- 
seventh that in the United States. 

The centra] indictment of U.S. 
foreign policy in the Philippines, 
heard from both Marcos oppo- 
nents and congressional critics, is 
that Washington is focused single- 
mindedly on the bases. Washing- 
ton's fixation, they argue, under- . 
mines its efforts to press the 
Marcos government for political 
and economic changes. 

“Despite all the pretty rhetoric 
about America's moral and histori- 
cal interests in the Philippines, the 
military bases are the central con- 
sideration to the U.&,” said Jaime 
V. Ongpin, a leading businessman 
and a Marcos opponent. “And 
American policy is held hostage to 


Thousands of Students in Chinese City 
Protest Japanese Trading Policies 


Rnam 

BEIJING — T housands of Chi- 
nese students in the central city of 
Xian have protested against Japa- 
nese trade policies and- a visit fay 
Prime Minister Yasuhiru Naka- 
sone to a Tokyo war memorial, 
witnesses said Wednesday. 

They said between 5,000 and 
10,000 students from different col- 
leges gathered Tuesday for five 
hours on a city square. Some stu- 
dents made speeches denouncing 
Mr. Nakasone for visiting a shrine 
to Japan's war dead,, including 
those who invaded China in the 
1930s and 1940s. 

A statement from the Chinese 
Foreign Ministry appeared to indi- 
cate official sympathy for the ideas 
behind the student protests, al- 
though the government did not or- 
ganize the demonstrations, foreign 

di plomat* said. 

Many students demanded that 
China put restrictions on trade 
with Japan, to halt what they said 
was the dumping of inferior Japa- 
nese goods On the Hnnwa market 
a witness said by telephone from 
Xian. 

“Some of the speeches sounded 
pretty angry, but overall there was 
a holiday mood,” the witness said. 

Xian, a former imperial capital 
of China, is about 600 miles (1,000 
kilometers) southwest of Bojing. 

The Xian protest follows similar 
demonstrations in Beijing last 


month when several hundred stu- 
dents paraded on Tienanmen 
square with banners attacking Mr. 
Nakasone and. the “second Japa- 
nese invasion,” a reference to the 
flood of Japanese consumer goods 
entering China in recent years. 

The Chinese Foreign Ministry 
said after the Beijing protest th«r 
the official visit by Mr. Nakasone 
to Tokyo's Yasukuni shrine had 
seriously hurt Chinese feelings. 

A witness said the Xian protest, 
on die 36th anniversary of the 
founding of the Chinese People's 
Republic, had been announced on 
posters written by national student 
union officials. 

China’s official press has also 
expressed dissatisfaction with Jap- 
anese trade policies. 


■ More Imports Promised 
Mr. Nakasone has promised to 
increase Japan’s imports from Chi- 
na to “solve the problem of trade 
imbalance,” the official press agen- 
cy Xinhua reported Wednesday in 
Beijing, according to The Associat- 
ed Press. 

Xinhua said Mr. Nakasone made 
the pledge when receiving a delega- 
tion of Chinese journalists Tuesday 
in Tokyo. It gave no detail* 

Since diplomatic relations were 
established between the former 
wartime foes in 1972, Japan has 
become China’s biggest trading 
partner. 

Japan’s trade surplus with China 
climbed to $2.84 billion in the first 
half of this year, compared with 
$1 .25 billion for the whole of 1984. 


Survivors (Haim That Ugandan Troops 
Massacred 24 in Retreat From Village 


Agence France -Prase 

MITYANA, Uganda — 1 Troops 
of the Ugandan government mas- 
sacred at least 24 civilians with gre- 
nades and automatic weapons and 
pillaged houses and shops as the 
army retreated from advancing re- 
bel forces, surviving residents re- 
ported. 

One of them said 18 people had 
been herded into a group by sol- 
diers, and killed by grenades fired 
from a launcher. 


Mityana is 38 miles (60 kilome- 
ters) west of Kampala. It is on the 
main road to the western town of 
Fort Portal, which is also held by 
the rebels. 

The rebels of the National Resis- 
tance Army say they killed at least 
25 Ugandan troops while taking 
Mityana. Peace talks in Nairobi 
between Uganda’s nil mg military 
council and the guerrillas have 
been adjourned until Thursday. 




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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 





(Hlif MONEY 



AN INTERNffl^^ 
(M,MLY(XWERENCE 
mMXKOCTOBER 24-25.m5. 


" Sun-ivinf : in a competitive environment *\ will be the theme of the sixth International Herald Tribune/ Oil 
Daily Conference on 'Oil and Money in the Eighties". The program, designed for senior executives in energ 
and related fields, will address the key issues affecting the current energy r situation and assess future trends 
ami strategics. H.E Professor Dr. Siibroto. Minister of Mines and Energy, Indonesia and President of the 
OPEC conference, and John S. Herrington, U.S. Energy Secretary, will head a distinguished group of 
speakers from Europe, the Middle East, Latin America and the United States. 

OCTOBER 24 


OCTOBER 25 


KEYNOTE ADDRESS: 

— Professor Dr. Subrofo, Minister of Mines cjkJ Energy, 
Indonesia. 

COMPETITION FOR MARKET SHARE 

— Moderator; Herman T. Franssen, Former Chief Economist, 
International Energy Agency, Paris. 

— H.F. KepTinger, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, 

The Keplinqer Companies, Houston. 

— Abrio Parra, Managing Director, Petroieos de Venezuela 
(UK) SA, London. 

— Douglas Wade, Senior Energy Andyst, She! International 
Petroleum Company Ltd, London. 

THE IMPLICATIONS OF OPEC PRODUCT IMPORTS AND 

DOWNSTREAM STRATEGIES ON THE OIL MARKETS. 

— Nader H. Suftai, President, Kuwdt Petroleum International 
Ltd., London. 

HOW TWO MAJOR OIL COMPANIES ARE SURVIVING 

IN A COMPETITIVE B'lVIRONMENT. 

— Alien E Murray, President, Mob! Corporation, New York. 

— Arve Johnsen, Preadent, Stafoil, Stavanger. 

PRODUCERS AND REFINERS STRATEGIES IN AN ERA 

OF GROWING COMPETITION. 

— John R. Hall, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ashland 
Oil Incorporated, Ashland, Kentucky. 

— E*a Malrnrvirta, General Manager, Neste Oy, Helsinki. 

— Nicola Mongelli, Assistant to the Executive Vice President, 
Ente Nazionde kkccarburi, Rome. 

— Scud O. Ounalah, Manager, Supply Coorcination, Pefromin 
Partiapahon, Dhahraa 


NEW OUTLOOKS FOR UNITED STATES’ ENERGY POUCY. 

— The Honorable John S. Herrington, United States' Energy 
Secretary. 

NORTH SEA OIL Sffl>CORN OF TOMORROW'S 

PROSPERITY. 

— John Mo ore, M.P., Financial Secretary to the Treasury, 

United Kingdom. 

THE EFFECT OF FLUCTUATING 08. PRICES ON THE 

BANKING SYSTEMS, SHARE VALUES, INSTITUTIONAL 

INVESTORS Ah© WORLD BANK LOANS. 

— Robert B. Weaver, Senior Vice President and Global 

Petroleum Executive, The Chase M an hattan Bank, NA, N.Y. 

— Peter Gignoux, Senior Vice President, Shea-son Lehman 
Brothers Ud, London. 

— Robert L Franklin, Founder and President, Lawrence Energy 
Associates Incorporated, Boston. 

— Ian M. Hume, Assistant Director, Energy Department, The 
World Berk, Washington, D.G 

MEGAMERGER TRfrtDS AND THE FUTURE OF THE OB. 

INDUSTRY. 

— Robert F. Greenhl, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley & 

Ca Incor po r a ted, New Yak. 

NON-CONVENTIONAL CHL SALES. 

— Nicholas G. Voute, 03 Gonsuitanf, London, The Hague. 

— Charles L Ddy, Managing Director, LM. Rschd&Co. Ud, London. 

— Dieter Kempermann, Managing Director, Union Rheinische ~~ 
Braunkohlen KruftstofF AG. 

— Rosemary McFadden, President, N.Y. Mercantile Exchange. 

CLOSING PANS. DISCUSSION OF CURRBMT ENERGY ISSUES. 

— Paul H Franlcel, President, Petroleum Economics Ud 


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Dutch Leader Says NATO, Not U.S., 
Would Control Cruise Missile Firing 


77ic Auxiated Press 

THE HAGUE — Prune Minis- 
ter Ruud Lubbers says that if UJS. 
cruise missiles are deployed in the 
Netherlands, the United States will 
not be allowed to use them “inde- 

peademly and without control.” 

Under a U-S.-Dutch deployment 
treaty being prepared, Mr. Lubbers 

said, the missiles “will never be 
fired without allied control and 
consultations." The general out- 
lines of the agreement were speci- 
fied by the government in a letter 
sent Tuesday to the Dutch parlia- 
ment. 

“In the treaty, we want to say 
explicitly that the missiles may only 
be used within the framework of 
the allian ce- *' Mr. Lubbers said. 


Nicaragua Rebels 
Get Fiscal ’86 Aid 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — New UA 
hu mani tarian aid became available 
to anti-Sandinist guerrillas in Nica- 
ragua with the beginning of the 
1986 fiscal year on Tuesday, and its 
First use will be to pay bills for 
5400,000 in food, medicine and 
clothing that the insurgents bought 
on credit. 

Future aid under a S27-miHion 
U.S. aid package is to be provided 
in similar fashion through lines of 
credit, reimbursements or direct 
payments from the State Depart- 
ment to suppliers, officials said. 

This logistical decision, long 
awaited in Congress, is expected to 
cause difficulty involving receipts 
and invoices demanded by U.S. ac- 
counting procedures. Such docu- 
mentation is difficult for guerrillas 
to obtain from local suppliers of 
food and other goods. Critics of the 
aid program also have expressed 
concern that the practice could 
mask purchase of military supplies, 
banned by Congress. 


The Netherlands, he said, was not 

yawing a veto against possible use 
of the missies. 

The Dutch center-right coalition 
is to make a final decision on Nov. 
1 whether to deploy the nuclear 
missiles. The Netherlands is the 
only one of the five North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization nations in- 
volved in the 1979 missile decision 
that has not decided on deploy- 
ment. 

Cruise missiles have been sta- 
tioned in Britain, Italy and Bel- 
gium. Pershing-2 missiles are in 
West Germany, which also win 
take some cruise missiles. A total of 
572 medium-range missiles are in- 
volved. 

If deployed on Dutch sod. the 
missiles would be owned and 
manned by the United States, but 
military use would be subject to 
NATO procedure. Mr. Lubbers 
said. 

In the view of the Dutch govern- 
ment, he said, NATO is an alliance 
of “free, sovereign nations who will 
all be involved in any decisions to 
be taken on the use of nuclear 
weaponry.” 

The proposed treaty is subject to 
Dutch parliamentary approval if 
the government decides to accept 
the 48 cruise missDes allotted under 
a 1979 NATO decision. 

However, a U.S. embassy 
spokesman in The Hague said the 
American version will be an execu- 
tive agreement that does not re- 
quire congressional approval. 

The proposed treaty’s emphasis 
on alliance procedures and the out- 
right rejection of a veto is viewed as 
a compromise between Foreign 
Minister Hans van den Broek and 
Defense Minister Job de Ruiter. 

Mr. de Ruiter reportedly wanted 
as many guarantees as possible that 
the mi^iles could not be used with- 
out the consent of the Dutch gov- 
ernment. Mr. Van den Broek has 
repeatedly said that NATO con- 
tains sufficient procedures on al- 


lied consultations in case of grow- 
ing tensions between the 

superpowers, and emphasizing, 

such procedures in a U-S.-Duich 
treaty is unnecessary. 

In 1984. the Dutch government 
announced it would only accept the 
cruise missiles if the Soviet Union 
deployed more than 378 SS-20 mis- 
siles by Nov. 1. 1985. Last month. 
NATO said. 441 SS-20 missiles, 
f a e fr with three nuclear warheads, 
were in place. 



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A- 


Rimd Lubbers 


Iowa Law Aiding Farmers 
h Activated by Governor 

foreclose on 10 percent to 12 per- 
cent of its farmer borrowers na- 
tionwide this faJL 
Al though the law does not guar- 
antee a farmer a reprieve from fore- 
closure, it places the burden of 
proof on the lender before foreclos- 
ing. 

The 


By James R. Dickenson 

Washirtgue » Post Service 
WASHINGTON — Governor 
Terry E. Brans tad has proclaimed 
an economic emergency in Iowa, 
automatically activating a state law 
tha t enables farmers to go to court 
and request a one-year reprieve 
from foreclosure erf their mort- 


The debt-moratorium law re- 
quires farmers to make interest 
payments, but does not guarantee 
tha t any moratoriums will be grant- 
ed. 

Mr. Branstad, a Republican, has 
been pressured by farm groups for 
months to proclaim the emergency 
and put the law into effect 

A spokesman for the governor 
said that about 40 percent of Iowa's 
1 10,000 fanners were in severe fi- 
nancial trouble: 

Mr. Branstad said Tuesday in 
Des Moines that bewailed until the 
current farm bill expired Monday 
to send a signal “designed to teH 
Washington, in a loud and clear 
voice. *We need help in the heart- 
land.’ ” 

It is estimated that the federal 
Farm Credit Administration may 


lender must demonstrate 

tha t he helped the farmer restruc- 
ture his debt as advantageously as 
posable, that he helped the fanner 
get into federal and state aid pro- 

S i and that the farmer had 
to make interest payments. 
Bankers urged Mr. Branstad not 
to invoke the moratorium because 
it was likely to force them to leny 
loans to farmers in the worst finan- 
cial straits. 

■ House Works on Farm BiM 
The House of Representatives 
continued work on farm legisla- 
tion, which has occupied its atten- 
tion for the last week. The New 
York limes reported Tuesday from 
Washington. 

On a 334-93 vote, the representa- 
tives overwhelmingly defeated a 
proposal to freeze price supports 
for wheat and other major farm 
commodities next year. 


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. By James LcMbyne , 

Nov York Times Soviet 

panama OTY-^whcn the 
Panamanian Army forced the 
country’s president to resign last 
11 apparently was an effort to 
wuy a growing murder scandal and' 
to end a power struggle within the 
anned-forees,- according to Pana- 
“itoian and fordgd political ex- 
pens here. • 

^The array commander. G ener al 
Manud Antonio Neriega, returned 
from a tap to Europe on Sept. 25 to 
squelch unrest The mflhary coup 
probably was provoked, the politi- 
cal analysts said, by public- de- 
mands for an mvestigatioainto the 
torture and decapitation two weeks 
ago of one of the army’s leading 
cntuSrDr. Hugo Spadafora. • 

Although no one seems to be 
absolutely certain of the rfi™* of 
’ events, i t appears that to soothe Ms 
opponents, m the officer corps. 
General Noriega felt it necessary to 
depose President': NIcotfs Arifito 
Barletta, which he did/Friday. 

Mr. Barletta had hinted that he 
might appoint a commission to in- 
vestigate Dr. Spadaf ora’s- killing . 
Several Panamanian political leart- - 
ers, pointing to strong circumstan- 
tial evidence, say the Wlithg alm/vt» 
certainly was carried out by the 
army, although perhaps not an 
General Noriega’s orders. 

Selected to become president by 
Genera] Noriega, Mr. Barletta al- 
ready was falling from favor be- 
cause he had failed to revive the 
country’s economy. He had alienat- 
ed virtually every sector of Pana- 
manian society with ineptly pre- 
sented policies that offered the sour 
medicine of tightening tax es , cut- 
ting protecting tariffs and reducing 
privileges for labor unions, several 
sources in Panama City said. ' ' 

According to Panamanian and 
foreign political analysts, General 
Noriega summarily summoned Mr. 
Barletta from the United Nations 
. General Assembly meeting in New 
York cm Thursday night • 

Mr. Barletta .initially refused to 
resign, but finally gave in after be- 
ing held and threatened for 14 
hours, according to members of 
Mr. Barletta’s family and other 
highly reliable sources. 

He reportedly tokl a.Panamani- 
an television station, as well as 
friends, that something other than 
a dispute over .economic policies 
had caused thft army .to for ce hrni to 
resign. The comment appears to 
lend weight to the belief that the 
army, which is known as the Pane- • 
manian Defense Force, deposed ■ 
him to stop an investigation into 
Dr. Spadafbra's death. 

The Iriffing, two weeks ago, 
seems to have focused discontent, 
because it was an unusually ^brutal-, 
act in a country that haa escaped -- 
the worst of the political violence - 
that has swept the- rest of Central 
America! Opposition .leaders, and 
Dr. Spadaf ora’s' family are continu- •' 
ing to demand that an independent • 
commission be appointed to inves- 
tigate Ms killing, and one of Dr. 
Spadafara’s brothers is backing the . 
demand with a hunger strike. 

Mr. Spadafora was a medical 
doctor with, a taste forrevolarions.' 

jcHned^^tafastora Gomez, then a . 
Sandinist guerrilla commander, in 
recr uiti ng more .than 300 Panama- 
nians tqhdp overthrow Anastasto 
Somoza, the Nicaraguan dictator, 
in 1979. .. 

After jorning Mr.Pastoraagain 
several years later to fight the San- 
dimrtgovernmenttheyhadhdped 
put m power in : Nicaragua, Dr. 



. .Nfcbife AnfitoBarletta 

•’ • r • 

Spadaf ora left to become an advis- 
er to Miskito Indlto rebels. 

In rcceto' months, however. Dr. 
Spadafora ha&spoken of Ms hope 
Of overthrowing General -Noriega 
and freeingTiis conntiy'of 1 army 
dominatibn, ; ‘'accor«fing to friends 
and associates who were with 
in Coista Rica. Dr. Spadafora alto 
accused General Noriega of being a 
narcotics trafficker who has cor- 
rupted Panama. : 

. According to Ms family tod to 
an official report by the Costa Ri- 
can police presented to thri Costa 
Rkan.-goyernment, Dr. Spadafora 
tried to slip across the bender into 
Panama on Sept 13. His decapitat- 
ed body Was found the next day 
just across the border, inside Costa 
Rica, stuffed in to old U.S. mail- 
bag according to the police report 
His head has hot been found. 


There are several indications 
that the Panamanian Army may 
have killed Dr. Spadafora. In their 
investigation, the Costa Rican po- 
lice found two witnesses who gave 
sworn testimony that they had seen 
Dr. Spadafora being detained by a 

Panamanian corporal at fl mili tary 

checkpoint on ottering Panama. ' 

Dr. Spadaf ora’s body alto had a 
symbol cot into it that read "F-8.” 
according to the report. 

. The authorities are not sure what 
the letter and number denote, but 
Jast year the army had a special unit 
known as “F-T that saved as a 
paramilitary force to repress politi- 
cal opponents during the presiden- 
tial election, according to weU-in- 
f onned sources in Panama. The 
army unit's leader was killed under 
mysterious circumstances, but the 
sources speculate that “F-8" may 
be the name of a new army unit or 
death squad. 

Some political analysts speculate 
that Dr. Spadafora was killed by a 
group within the army to force 
General Noriega to take a harder 
line with opponents or to embar- 
rass General Noriega and force him 
out of power. 

Colonel Roberto Diaz Herrera is 
believed to. have led internal army 
opposition that nearly deposed 
General Noriega last week, accord- 
ing to a well-m/ormcd political an- 
alyst in Panama City. Colonel Diaz 
is a. relative of General Omar Toni- 
jos, the Panamanian leader who 
died in a plane crash in 1981. 

Although the crisis may subside. 
Mr. Barietta’s resignation appears 
to have done little so far to dimin- 
ish tensions. Panamanians express 
deep cynicism toward the army af- 
ter three years in which the mOitaiy 
has either imposed or deposed five 
presidents. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


%u can alsojudgethe 
quality of a F 


Youths Continue Protests , 
Attacking Police in U.K. 


■' Renters 

LIVERPOOL > — Youths hurled 
chunks of masonry at police 
Wednesday in Liverpool after a 
night of sporadic violence here and 
in London that brought out hun- 
dreds of riot police for the fourth 
consecutive day. 

No injuries were reported in the 
violence, fkit police said 18 people 
were injured in the Toxteth district 
during, the night when 300 youths 
torlwl police patrols with hrirfrg 
and gasoline bombs. 

Four years ago, Toxteth was the 
scene.of some of the worst of the 
dtttartmnces tbqt swept ,20 British 
cities.' '* '• . - 1 ‘ - 
"' Th,"the^toiitii'Lto3op district _ot 
Beckham during the! night, youths 
burned and looted stores fra sever- 
athoura. --- ‘ 

-- Liverpool’s Anglican bishop and 
ltomtoCatitafcaidibishop toured 
Toxteth during the night calling for 
calm. Police maintained a heavy 
presence Wednesday an streets lit- 
tered withburned-out cars. 

. The trouble in Toxteth followed 
an outbreak of rioting last weekend 
in Mother' south London district,' 
Brixipn, and a' riot last month that 
devastated the Handsworth district 
of Binninghan.' 

Liverpool officials *aid tension 
had been rising far weeks as the 
city ' sank deeper into a financial 
erpas ihai t hr eatens -the jobs of 
30,000 rity employeea. 

The city council, touch is nearly 
bankrupt and touch is dominated 
by the leftist “militant tendency” 


faction of the opposition Labor 
Party, began dismissing city em- 
ployees after the Conservative gov- 
ernment rejected a plea for emer- 
gency fundk 

The council has attempted to 
defy the central government’s with- 
holding of grants in an effort to 
curb spending by local authorities. 

David Shepherd, an Anglican 
bishop, said Wednesday that many 
people in Liverpool's Mack com- 
munity felt a sense of deep resent- 
ment at the way the council was 

handling tile crisis. 

A police spokesman said that in- 
tensive effort s had been made to 
improve relations . with the black 
community since the 1981 riots and 
that he hoped this would prevent 
an. increase in tension. 

‘‘We’re hopeful that with the co- 
operation of residents and bridges 
we’ve built since 1981, we can keep 
the area trouble-free,” be said. 

Like Brixton and Handsworth, 
Toxteth suffers from high unem- 
ployment and poor housing, and 
police say it is notorious for drug- 
dealing. 

Die area is Britain’s driest black 
community, dating bade centuries 
to Liverpool's days as a center for 
the West Indies trade. 

Princess Anne, the daughter of 
Queen Elizabeth n, was visiting a 
workshop for handicapped people 
just outside Toxteth when the 
Wednesday disturbance took 
place. Police said she was in no 
danger. 


The Associated Press 

SINGAPORE — No victims of 
AIDS, or acquired immune defi- 
ciency tyndrosne,' have been found 
in Malayriabut fear of the disease 
is to widespread that it has been 
given the label. AIPS: AIDS-In- 
duced Panic Syndrome. 

Officials jn T hailand wony that 
anti-AIDS campaigners may. 
frighten away tourists. Singapore's . 
sperm bank suffers from a lack of 
donors because people are worried 
about the disease. China has 
banned the import of human blood 
plasma in an attempt to prevent 
AIDS from entering the country, 
and the Indonesian -Red Cross 
wants to bar homosexuals from do- 
nating blood- ....... 

Relatively few AIDS cases have 
been confirmed in at least sex Asian 
nations, where foreign visitors and 
imported blood products reedve. 
much of the blame. Health experts 
say they expect many more cases to 

■ be reported, however, toule anxiety 

seems to be spreading even faster" 
than the! virus. 

“People are reading aad.hearing 
so much about AIDS,”- said- Dr. 
Mahafingam Mahadevan* a Kuala 
Lumpur psychiatrist, “and this has' 
created some kind of mass hysteria 
or acute pome.” '. 

Among ti».tyirptoms,<faplayed 
by those suffering from anxiety 
over AIDS, the doctor said, are 


. Renters 

NEW DELHI — Efforts to sal- 
vage vital wreckage froin. anAir- 
Inmajeuhat crashed off Ireland in 
Junc will begin-TUesday. the Press 
Trust of India news agency said 
Wedh^day. Officials said a new 
attempt would bemade to discover 
: why the : plane crashed on -a flight 
fromMontreal to New. Delhi, kill- 
ing afl 329. people to board.' ; - 


depression, anxiety, irritability, 
lade of .concentration and insom- 
nia. AjPS,"he said, afflicts those 
with vividimagtnathms of the spec- 
trum of abnormalities associated 
whhAIDIiL .- 

“There are people spending 
money like cr az y gomg overseas to 
have their blood toted just to make 
abtohitdy sure they are free to the 
AIDS viruft” the doctor said. 

“The fear .of AIDS is causing 
- chaos,” be added. “It is threatening 
to break up fanuHcs.” 

AIDS cripples the body’s im- 
mune astern,: leaving victims vul- 
nerable to other diseases, including 
cancer. The World Health Organi- 
zation says it is most likely to strike 
homosexuals, abusers of injectable 
drugs who' share needles, and he- 
mophiliacs who require injections 
to blood dotting factors from do- 
nated Mood.. 

The disease apparently can be 
spread by sexual contact, contami- , 
nated needles and blood transfu- 
sions, but not by casual contact. 

No AIDS cases have been con-: 
firmed in Malayaa, according. to 
-.Deputy Health Minister Knnjam- 
booPalhmanaban, “but we want to 
make thn people aware of the dan- 
gers of AIDS sothai when itcomes 
there is no. panic.” 

“Qneday his suretocometo our 
shores,” tto,” he said. “We can’t 
escape that/*. ” 

The disease already has come to 
Japan, Thatiand,arina, Singapore, 
Indonesia and Hong Kraig: Re- 
ports to AIDS in the PMKppines in 
early September have not been con- 
firmed, officials said, butapublid- 
ty campaign in cdqtmction with 
the World Health Or ganization has 
bceristarted. 

Singapore’s Health Ministry 
makes the distinction that while no 
rlihiraT cases -have--been. dHrcted, 
five bito-riskind&winals have been 
identified. People at h^i risk in- 
etu&'ho m dsoruals arid prostitutes. 


The country is spending two mil- 
lion. Singapore dollars (almost 
$922,000) to build defenses against 
AIDS. All blood-donors now are 
screened. A booklet describing the 
disease is bong distributed, 60,000 
copies in English and 40J)00 in 

Chinese. 

An AIDS tot is available at five 
duties. The disease can be trans- 
mitted through sanen, but there is 
QO plan to ban ar tificial mtfmina. 

tito because so fittie to it is done in 
Singapore. 

“The sperm bank is dry because 
people are afraid to donate sperm,” 
a Health Ministry spokesman said. 

In Japan, where about 85 percent 
to blood coagulants used to treat 
hemophiliacs crane from the Unit- 
ed States, the number of AIDS vic- 
tims has doubled from four to eight 
since May. Five to the victims are 

hemophiliacs. 

- - The National Institute of Health 
said that 30 parent to Japan’s 
.5,400 hemophiliacs harbor the 
AIDS virus and has warned that 
the number of victims will increase 
significantly in the next few years. 

Xinhua, the official Chinese 
press agency, reported early in Sep- 
tember that China’s Ministry to 
Public Health had halted imports 
of all blood products except fra a 
small quantity of human serum al- 
bumin. The ban indudes frozen, 
liquid and dried human blood plas- 
ma, normal h uman immune globu- 
lar proteins, condensed platelets 
and several other blood products. 

No AIDS has beat reported 
among the Chinese although a 
tourist Erran Argentina died be- 
cause of the disease in a Beijing 
hospital in June. 

One death canted by AIDS has 
been reported in T hailan d; the vic- 
tim was a man who had just re- 
turned from studying in the United 
States. Eight other persons, includ- 
ing four male foreigners, are known 
to have the disease. 



One way of recognising a car’s quality is 
by its sales success in the really tough, 
highly competitive international market 
And by its success with the kind of 
demanding drivers, who never accept a 
reputation at its face value, but are 
determined to know exactly what level 
of technical competence lies behind it, 
however high-sounding the name. 

It’s with this type of buyer in particular 
that BMW is held in such high regard ail 
over the world. 

For instance, take the US over the past 8 
months: with an increase in sales of 
26%, BMW has without question been 
one of the fastest growing of all European 
manufacturers in that car-conscious 
country. 

And in Japan, a country recognised for 
its critical appreciation of technological 
innovation, BMW has produced an 
impressive 35% increase in sales over the 
previous year. 

Again, a significantly better performance 
than any other comparable manufac- 
turer. 

The reason behind this worldwide suc- 
cess? A sum of ultra-modem , 
hig h quality technolo g ies that you just 
can’t find in such abundance on an y 
competitive car. 

That’s why, for instance, knowledgeable 
drivers of exclusive compact cars 
everywhere are no longer satisfied 
simply with the “Made in Germany”mark 
of quality. 

Today, they are also increasingly 
looking for the “Made by BMW” symbol 
of innovation. 

That’s because the remarkable feature 
of all BMW cars, and especially its range 
of exclusive compact cars, is not 
so much the obvious gap between them 
and their second-class competitors, 
as the striking difference between them 
and every other so-called comparable 
alternative. 

We think it’s well worth your while taking 
a closer look at those fundamental dif- 
ferences. And that's an area where we 
believe we can give you some valuable 
and highly relevant hints. 


Electronic fuel injection. 

You’ll be surprised how many cars with 
impressive-sounding names, and 
equally impressive price tags, still offer 
you only conventional carburettor tech- 
nology. Not so BMW. 

For BMW the word “exclusive” means, 
more than anything else, the very latest 
technologies. 

That’s why you’ll discover that every 
BMW from the 3-Series 318 i gives you all 
the performance, economy and environ- 
mental “friendliness” of electronic fuel 
Injection - virtues that not only make 
a car contemporary but also contribute 
to its value in a strictly economic sense. 

Digital Motor Electronics. 

These days, any manufacturer with 
pretensions to quality, who doesn't offer 
Digital Motor Electronics (DME) in his 
model range, simply isn't offering you 
the best in engine technology. With 
BMW DME is a standard from the 325i. 
Digital Motor Electronic’s completely 
computerised engine control system 
means significant advantages in terms 
of fuel composition and ignition timing, 
giving you far-reaching benefits in 
the areas of performance, consumption 
and exhaust emissions. 

And that again is the kind of technolo- 
gical progress you’ll search for in vain on 
any competitive car. 

6 cylinders from 2000 cc. 

It goes without saying that an in-line 
6 cylinder engine gives you noticeably 
.greater running refinement than 
4 or 5 cylinders. With BMW you can take 
a 6-cylinder engine for granted from 
2 litres up (from 320i). 

The fact that 6-cylinder smoothness is a 
prerequisite for true class is doubly 
underlined by the way other manufac- 
turers invariably feature it in their 
“upper class” and upper-priced models. 
It’s also why people who prefer 
a 2-litre car, but don’t want to sacrifice 
anything in driving refinement always 
choose BMW. 


Electronic safety technolo gy. 

BMW has never believed in reserving the 
best in technology for its more expen- 
sive flagship models. 

Especially when it comes to safety. 
That’s why we offer the very latest ABS 
anti-lock braking system and the newest 
Airbag safety concept as options 
even on our compact range. But we don't 
stop there. 

You’ll even discover that you can also 
have the world’s most sophisticated in- 
tegrated engine/transmission manage- 
ment system on a compact BMW, 
when you choose the optional BMW 
4-speed automatic transmission with its 
electronic-hydraulic controls and 3 spe- 
cial direct-change gear programmes. 

All in all, the BMW 3-Series range offers 
you a level of technological sophistica- 
tion that makes it abundantly clear 
what you have a right to expect today from 
a top-quality compact car. 

Sadly for some, but fortunately for 
us, you'll only find progress like that on a 
BMW. 

A quick glance at any price vs perform- 
ance chart will prove quite clearly to you 
that in termsof overall economy and 
value for money, there's really no better 
way to arrive than in a BMW. 

And we’ve only given you here just a 
very few reasons why all over the world 
not only aspiring but also technically 
knowledgeable drivers are increasingly 
insisting on BMW. 

Shouldn’t you give the matter a second 
thought? 

You’ll find yourself in good company. 
Drive BMW. 

BMW cars. 

The BMW range of fine automobiles: 
the ultimate in performance, comfort and 
safety. 


BMW AG, Munich 





age 8 


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


Hcralb 


I>TERNATIONAL 



(tribune. 


PuMMird With The »n 1 oHc Tine* and Hie Wnahitqpon Poet 


Again, Mideast Violence 


■ Again, violence intrudes upon peacemaking 
• in the Middle East A mainstream Palestine 
Liberation Organization group claimed re- 
sponsibility for murdering three Israelis in 
Cyprus, and, citing that deed. Israel has con- 
ducted air attacks on PLO headquarters in 
; distant Tunis. The preliminary American judg- 
ement was, unexceptionabiy, that the air strike 
was a legitimate act of self-defense. But the 
strike is also bound to burden even more an 
effort at reaching peace that was already hav- 
ing difficulty getting under way. 

The Cyprus killings had made it marginally 
harder for Israel to stay the diplomatic course. 
The Tunis attack may weaken Yasser Arafat's 
work- with- Jordan wing of the PLO and leave 
King Hussein — embarrassed even as he visit- 
ed Washington — without the Palestinian 
partner he needs to step ahead. This would 
hurt. King Hussein, dragging pan of the PLO 
uncertainly behind him, has just endorsed 
"prompt and direct” negotiations with Israel. 
These previously unspoken words were taken 
in some quarters merely as an exercise he had 
to go through to help the Reagan administra- 
tion withstand the Israel lobby’s opposition to 
a new American arms sale to Jordan. But, in 
the Middle East, such words are important; 
people may live and die by them. 

Despite the violence, the Jordanian arms 
package remains on the congressional agenda. 
Advocates of the sale have to press the Israelis 
and their congressional allies to grasp the 
strong American interest in the political health 
of King Hussein. They must press the king to 


keep refining his terms. With a hostile Syria 
brea thin g down its neck, Jordan has a good 
military case for needing a new arms pipeline 
and a good political case for needing the visi- 
ble mantle of American patronage. 

When ihe king offered "prompt and direct" 
negotiations, the prime minister of Israel salut- 
ed his "vision of peace" and the opposition 
deputy prime minister dis miss ed his "ver- 
biage." They joined in rejecting the Hussein 
demands that negotiations I) lake place in a 
United Nations forum including Moscow and 
2) include the PLO. 

But Israel should not want to leave an im- 
pression that, while the king is moving, it is 
digging in. On the new arms package, the 
Israelis worry lest a rearmed Jordan join an- 
other Arab war against Israel They might 
beLier worry that a Jordan frustrated in Wash- 
ington may turn to another supplier, as Saudi 
Arabia has just turned to Britain, for arms on 
which there are no American controls. 

Here a firm American attitude is essential 
Bu t the Reagan a dminis tration's effort to com- 
pose a Jordanian-Paleslinian delegation to ne- 
gotiate with Israel is wobbling. No political 
decision is yet evident to invest the high-level 
prestige and energy necessary to advance a 
peace initiative and to cope with the regional 
turbulence it will surely generate. The admin- 
istration's notion of linking arms sales and 
peace moves is sound, but the process has to be 
handled with care and — as the latest violence 
has shown — with all deliberate speed. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Botha Embalms Apartheid 


It is time to acknowledge a widespread mis- 
judgment of South Africa’s president, Pieter 
W. Botha. All year, with the storms of protest 
raging around him, he has been elaborating a 
blueprint for "reforming" the racist structure 
of apartheid. From afar he often seemed to be 
improvising, now soothing his nation’s blacks. 

. now rebuffing them, as if to stifle rebellion 
with ambiguity. But now that he has laid out 
his "manifesto for a new South Africa.” only 
his foreign interpreters sound confused. For a 
man in his circumstance, be has been remark- 
ably blunt, consistent and purposefuL 

Mr. Botha is a semantic trickster. In one 
sentence he embraces "a united South Africa, 
one citizenship and a universal franchise.” In 
the next, that becomes a South Africa of. 
"units,” with at least three categories of citi- 
zenship and a franchise that keeps voters a 
universe apart In one breath, he describes 
blade South Africans as a welter of distinctive 
"cultures." In the next he calls them a single 
group that threatens to dominate the whites. 

Yet despite these obfuscations, Mr. Botha 
offers a program for reform that is totally 
coherent It is also pathetic. 

Implicitly, he acknowledges that his prede- 
cessors faded in their attempt to turn 23 mil- 
lion blacks into citizens of 10 barren, “inde- 
pendent" homelands. In the sendee of that 
scheme, millions have been uprooted or 
abused as aliens in their own land. Without 
abandoning this geographical apartheid, Mr. 
Botha would let the much-needed urban 
blacks remain in segregated townships and 
would invent new "group" boundaries to cir- 


cumscribe their political rights and muscle. 

The "homelands," four of which are labeled 
independent could each become one or more 
"units" in Mr. Botha's reunited South Africa. 
So would the walled-off black townships. 
Blacks would participate in political “struc- 
tures” on a unit basis, managing "their own" 
affairs, such as segregated education and hous- 
ing, and having “a say at higher levels." . 

Even at higher levels, there could be no 
black chamber of Parliament alongside the 
new Asian and mixed-race chambers advising 
the white one. But a few blacks might be 
admitted to the still-more- advisory President's 
Council, to offer “inquiries and proposals.” 

That is the Botha reform, unaltered by any 
of his moods over the year. Black leaders who 
accept it might be consulted, but never those 
guided from "abroad” by the exiled leaders of 
banned black power organizations. 

No less devious than the apartheid of 
"homelands,” Mr. Botha's scheme is even 
more explicit in its racism. And it is even more 
plainly designed to let whites divide and domi- 
nate blacks, without yielding any power or 
privilege. All this in the same week that South 
Africa’s white business leaders publicly Urged 
negotiation with acknowledged black leaders 
“about power sharing," full citizenship “to all 
our peoples" and restoration of the rule of law. 

Anton Rupert, a leading Afrikaner busi- 
nessman. says. "Apartheid is dead, but the 
corpse stinks and it must be buried, not em- 
balmed.” President Botha remains, sly and 
stubborn, the embalmer. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Israeli Jets Over Tunisia 

[Israel’s bombing of the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization’s headquarters] is an indica- 
tion that Israel prefers violence to the Pales tin- 
ian-Jordanian peace initiative. Israel also 
chose Tunis to destabilize Tunisia, which is 
currently troubled by its neighbor Libya, and 
■could bring the country closer to an anti- 
Western course, a fact Washington will not 
appreciate. The raid proves that faith in the 
United States and the will to negotiate, issues 
defended by moderate Arabs, bear no results. 

— De Standaard (Brussels I. 

Once again Israel has struck. By destroying 
the PLO headquarters, it proclaimed to all that 
the peace efforts linking the PLO with Jor- 
dan’s King Hussein and Egypt’s [Hosni] Mu- 
barak stand no chance of success. 

The United States speaks of “legitimate" 
reprisals. [But] tire Israeli operation struck 
hard at Tunisia, despite [Defense Minister 
Yitzhak] Rabin’s assurances that the latter 
"was not our target.” The raid is a catastrophic 
and unmerited blow to a country that has 
advocated dialogue and speaks a language of 
reason while exposed to Lhreats from Libya's 
Colonel Qadhafi. How are we to call on mod- 
erate Arabs to make themselves heard when 
ih«r voices are drowned out by so many explo- 


sions? More than the PLO, it was the negotia- 
tion process now under way that was the true 
target of the Israeli jet fighters. Given its other 
interests, can the United States watch the 
negotiations be destroyed? 

— Le Monde (Paris). 

Raising the Stakes in Geneva 

President Reagan's decision to call at short 
notice, a summit meeting of the Western pow- 
ers has underlined what everybody already 
knew, but what Washington had hitherto de- 
nied: that the stakes for the November meet- 
ing in Geneva between President Ronald Rea- 
gan and General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev 
are very high indeed. 

For months now. Washington has been try- 
ing to play down expectations for the Geneva 
summit. The calling of a special Western sum- 
mit meeting shows that President Reagan has 
been forced by the Soviet proposals for radical 
cuts in nuclear weapons to abandon the pre- 
tense that the November meeting can be just a 
low-key, get-acquainted session. A major arms 
control deal is now, in theory, up for negotia- 
tion and President Reagan cannot hope to 
dodge the issues raised by the Russian propos- 
als when he meets Mr. Gorbachev. 

— The Financial Times (London). 


FROM OUR OCT. 3 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Edison a Dkbeiieverm Afterlife 
NEW YORK — In a remarkable interview, 
Mr. Thomas A. Edison proclaims himself an 
absolute disbeliever in the immortality of the 
soul or a future life. He denies the individual- 
ity of the human being, declaring that each 
man is merely a collection of cells, just as a city 
is a collection of human beings. “Will New 
York City go to heaven?” the inventor asked. 
-**I cannot see any use of a future life. There is 
no more reason to believe the human brain, 
-which you call a soul is really such, than there 
is to believe that one of ary phonographic 
records is one and is immortal The brain is a 
record-making factory where the records are 
made and stored. It is a mere machine." Mr. 
Edison explained the will power which drives 
the brain as palpably a form of electricity and 
declared: “Whatever it is, it is material." 


1935: Roosevelt Sees No U.S. War Role 
SAN DIEGO — President Franklin D. Roose- 
velt, addressing the nation from the San Diego 
International Exposition [on Oct. 2], asserted 
that war danger was one of the gravest threats 
to the future of civilization, and reaffirmed 
the determination of the United States lo re- 
main unentangled in foreign wars. "It is not 
surprising," the President said, "that many of 
our citizens feel a deep sense of apprehension 
lest some nations repeat the folly of twenty 
years ago and drag civilization to a level from 
which recovery may be all but impossible. In 

the face of this, the American people can have 
but one concern and speak but one sentiment: 
Despite what happens in continents overseas, 
the United States shall and must r emain, as 
long ago the Father of our Country prayed 
that it might remain, unentangled and free." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman JW/ii.’ 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER. PvbbsMr 

PHIUPM. FOIS1E Extcunw Editor RENeBONDY Dtputr PuUuhtr 

WALTER WELLS Editor ALAIN LBCOUR AbocM Publisher 

SAMUEL ABT Deputy Editor RICH ARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

ROBERT K. McCABE Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director ef Operations 

CARL GEW1RTZ Xiwrwre Editor FRANCOIS DE SMA lSONS Director of CtraAtmon 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director t{ AdnrUstng Sola 
International Herald Tribune. I8l Avenue Cturlcs-de-Ganlle. 92200 NemUy-snr-Srine, 

France. TeL: t » 747- 1265. Tdex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. ~ 

Directeur de la pMcatwn; Walter N. Thayer. 

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Managing Dir. UK: Robin MacKichan. 6) Lang Am, London WC2. TcjJM&WLTekx 262009. TbSTI 
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U.S. subscription; S322 yearly. Second-class postage pout at Long Island Gty. N-Y. IIJOI. B5KB 
® 1985. International Herald Tribune. AO rights reserved 



Trouble in the Southwest Pacific 







bSL 


BESai 



\ lent iW- w bci 

'How’s this? You take a counterespionage boss and 
two minor-league spies in exchange for atop 
KGB agent and a mole to be named later.' 


W ASHINGTON — Interest in 
the sulking of the Greenpeace 
ship In New Zealand has focused on 
ihe tragicomedy in Paris. But it also 

highlights the fact that in a remark- 
ably short period, the southwest Pa- 
cific has been transformed from 
about the most tranquil region on 
Earth to one of the most turbulent. 

The ANZUS alliance is in disarray 
over visits by nuclear-powered or nu- 
clear-armed U.S. ships to New Zea- 
land. Large sections of the governing 
Australian and New Zealand Labor 
parties favor withdrawal from the al- 
liance, and nonalignmenL Thirteen 
countries in the region recently 
signed a treaty to make the South 
Pacific a nuclear-free zone, declaring 
their opposition to the acquisition, 
stationing and testing of nuclear 
weapons. Moscow, realizing that the 
treaty serves only to limit Western 
options, promptly welcomed it. 

The French department of New 
Caledonia is the scene of unrest and 
violence; a recent election there 
showed that its population remains 
deeply divided over the question of 
^dependence. Members of one of the 
parties involved have been to Libya' 
for advice and instruction. Cuba is 
taking an interest in the new micro- 
slate of Vanuatu, sponsoring its ad- 
mission to the nonahgned movement. 

The Soviet .Union, hitherto suc- 
cessfully excluded from the region, 
has gained a toehold there in the form 


By Owen Harries 

of a fishing agreement with another 
miemstaie. Kiribati, and more such 
agreements may follow. Moscow, 

Havana and Tripoli dearly see these 
email and vulnerable island states as 


nrtTiry in what is happening in the 
region. New Zealand continues to in- 
sist that it is a loyal member of AN- 
ZUS, but it b as managed in the 
course of a year to d es ta b ilize what 
had been the most stable of relation- 
ships. New Zealand and the island 
states. rank among the world’s most 
unlikely nuclear targets, yet they have 
spawned unusually strong anti-nucle- 
ar movements and made the issue the 
centerpiece of their foreign policies. 

All this' does not mean that the 
region faces imminent catastrophe. It 
does mean that the trends are gener- 
ally bad and (hat the United States 
should be doing something about 
them, especially as the situation to 
the northwest, in the Philippines, is 
deteriorating even more seriously. 

There are several problems to be 
faced. French midear testing in the 
area requires that a balance be struck 
between U.S. regional interests and 
its relations with a major ally. Silence 
and noninterference are the best 
course in this case. 

The political and economic vulner- 


ability of the small island states' also 
demands attention. The most impor- 
tant Step Washington can take is to 
curb the predatory activities of the 
American Tuna Boal Association 
members, who plunder the migratory 
species of the region. For many of the 
islands, these fish constitute their 
only significant economic resource. 

The gravest component of the de- 
terioration is the spread — beyond 
the usual leftist aretes into the Aus- 
tralian and New Zealand govern- 
ments and the population at large — 
of quasi-neutralist and pacifist senti- 
ments. These sentiments, wrapped in 
the of perceived threats, ig- 

nore the costs involved and the real 
ih np fit* facing the region. 

The basic U.S. concern should be 
to encourage the reality principle in 
the thiniHng of the region. It should 
be made absolutely dear. that the 
neutralist courses now being fol- 
lowed and contemplated will cany 
subs tantial costs in future relations 
with the United States. This would be 
better "alliance management* - than 
the flaccid compromising often im- 
plied by that term. It would also 
strengthen the hand of those -r- still 
the majority ■ — who support friend- 
ship and allianc e with America. 

The writer is co-editor, with Robert 
W. Tucker, of The National Interest , a 
new foreign poUcy magazine. He con- 
tributed this to The New York Times. 


Playing the Nuclear Numbers 


By James Reg ton 


W ASHINGTON — The Soviet Union’s latest bid in 
the nuclear numbers game is better than no bid at 
all but not much better. It keeps the propaganda game 
going, but it is an opener and not a winner. 

Moscow proposed a 50-percent cut in US. and Soviet 
nuclear weapons and presented it at Geneva as an insur- 
ance policy for the world. But as all policyholders know, it 
is important to read the fine print. 

Fifty percent of what weapons? Not all unclear weap- 
ons, it appears; not the Soviet medium-range weapons 
targeted on every North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
capital but the U.S. medium-range, land!-, sea- and air- 
launched missiles targeted on the Soviet Union. 

Larry Speakes, the White House spokesman, gave the 
proposal a medium-hello; for once he was certainly right 
The Soviet proposition is something like this: Both 
Washington and Moscow- have large numbers of intercon- 
tinental nuclear weapons that could hit one another. Let 
us cut them in half. 

But first: You must also destroy half your medium- 
range missiles that could hit the Soviet Union. 

And second: We will keep our medium-range missiles, 
since tiny cannot reach the United States (only Europe 
and the U.S. troops there where they have no right to be). 

As I understand it, Moscow would agree to "concede” 
these points only on the understanding that the United 
States would promise not to test or deploy defensive 
weapons in outer space. 

In effect, this is a proposal to play tennis with the net 
down when Mikhail Gorbachev is serving and to raise it 
when President Reagan is serving. Not surprisingly, Mr. 
Reagan did not think this was a very good deaL 
So the numbers game goes on. Mr. Gorbachev will 
discover in his meetings this week with Pre»deatFran$ois 
Mitterrand that his 50-50 proposal leaving aR those SS- 
20s aimed at the Arc de Tnomphe or even -at such 
nuisances as Le Monde, wfi] not play in Paris. 

The Reagan administration was very smart about this. 
It recognised that Moscow’s 50-50 proposal made more 
news than sense, and fixed up a little Western presummit 


meeting with the European leaders, who would have more 

to lose by such a deal than anybody else. No doubt they By Flora 

will have something to say before Mr. Reagan and Mr. 3 

Gorbachev meet next month in Geneva. T OS ALAMOS, New Mexico — 

And speaking of Geneva, it should be no surprise to the -L* The Russians’ new anns-control 
president that Moscow has came forward with what it proposal delivered Monday in Gene- 
calls an insurance policy for the peace of the world. In va, represents the first time they have 
February 1932, one of the first of me Soviet ambassadors, offered substantial reductions and 
Maxim Litvinov, made the first really startling Soviet not just cedings on existing arsenals, 
proposal for world disarmament- He made Mr. Gorba- At fast, there will be a start on real 
chev sound like a piker. negotiations. - 

"The Soviet Union," Mr. Litvinov said, “requires nei- It is a shrewd move by the Soviet 
ther the increase of territory, nor the interference in the leader, Mikhail Gorbachev, another 
affairs of other nations to achieve its aim, and could sign that Washington can. no longer 
therefore do without army, navy, mili tary aviation and all rely on Soviet intranrigence as an 
other forms of armed forces.” ’ excuse to avoid making its own tough 

He then dared the nations in the Geneva Palace of anns-control decisions. There is no 


How Not to Use the Bomb: 
A Hot Topic at Los Alamos 


By Flora Lewis 

I OS ALAMOS. New Mexico — raced to devise the atom bomb bef ore 
/ The Russians’ new anns-control Hitler's Germany could do it He is a 


Hitler's Germany could do it He is a 
slight, chipper 67-year-old, revered 
for his scientific eminenc e and his 
sweet temper, and he is certainly a 
man who believes in a strong defense 
for the United States. 

But looking back, he soys Ins first 
wish for Los Alamos now is not about 


Peace to match tins glorious vision. But they went out to 
lunch around the rim of the lake, and the Russians have 
blamed America at disarmament conferences ever since. 

Still something hopeful is afoot Everybody is talking 
nonsense, as usual but a lot of people are beginning to 
look at facts on the side. 

In Moscow, for example; Mr. Gorbachev has come out 
against booze — a daring experiment in that country, 
with winter coining on. 

In South Africa, the businessmen have suggested to the 
government -that apartheid is not good far business. 

In Washington, even supply-riders and conservative 
backsliders are beginning to agree that a 5200-million 
annual budget deficit, plus a SISO-bflHon annual trade 
deficit, plus a couple of trillion bucks of debt, is no daisy. 

Even Mr. Reagan, who once vowed to avoid the “evil 
empire” and refused to compromise with “reckless Dem- 
ocratic spenders,*' is sitting down with both* and the 
Russians are talking to the wicked capitalists in Washing- 
ton, whom they once said they would ignore. 

But it is not too bad. If it were any better we wouldn't . 
believe it, and if it were any worse we couldn't stand iL . 

The New York Tones. 


Expecting science to 
provide the answers is a 
way of saying, 'Let 
GeorgedoiL 9 


evidence as yet that the United States mtww nf tunrmtr r T**t 
has definitely faced up to these ded- ™yOJSOymg, Lei 

dons. The rattle on the Potomac is GeorgedoiL 9 

likely to rage even more furiously. e 

before it is settled. 

Nobody has a more immediate how to build newer and better arms, 
stake in the outcome than the sden- “Los Alamos has contributed xnag- 
hsts here at Los Alamos. Most of the nificentiy to basic research, useful m 
United States's nuclear weapons, industry and medicine as well as de- 
starting with the first atom bomb, terrence,” he says. “New we should 
were designed on this isolated desert add a large center to study strategies 
mesa. Many of the key approaches to for avoiding international conflict, 
strategic missile defense are bong in- looking at aims control verification. 


vestigated here, and were for a de- 
cade before they were packaged by 
President Reagan into the concept 
known as “star wars." 

The reflections, of the people who 
have given us the weaponry are in- 
structive now. 


strategic defense and so on.” 

He adds that "such a center would 
have enormous credibility, because 
this lab knows about the dangers, 
{henries, the opportunities, what may 
be feasible" . 

Separately, Donald Kerr.who has 


50,000 Holocaust Makers: How the World Got There 


O SLO — The nuclear powers have 
come to a strange pass. Unable 
to agree to get rid of the nudear 
weapons they have scattered about 


By John Ansland 

This is the first of two articles. 


the globe, they are now debating the it has also worked hard to prevent 
wisdom of trying to erect a defensive their accidental or unauthorized use; 


shield. If it were not a potential trage- the fact there have been no accidental 
dy, one would think it a joke. explosions testifies to this. 

How did we gel ourselves into this A growing group of civilian de- 
mess? How did we manage to move in fense intellectuals has surrounded 
40 years from a world with a single nuclear weapons with a complex the- 
nudear weapon to one with 50,000? ology. At first, the nuclear experts 
It does no good to hurl accusations in were able to work in the shadows, 
one direction only; there is blame Then someone realized that the fall- 
enough to go around. This becomes out from nudear tests was contami- 
clear if one examines the phases the rating the atmosphere. 


world has passed through on the road 
to toda/s huge nudear stockpiles. 

The first phase, as we have been 
reminded recently, opened in 1945 
when a mushroom cloud rose over 


Before the Russians had nudear 
weapons, they happily pointed to 
[heir dangers and launched a cam- 
paign to^Ban the bomb." Later, they 
began adding to the fallout, with big- 


Hiroshima. In the United States and ger and dirtier explosions. 


Europe, news of the attack was wel- 
comed as a sign that a terrible war 


President Eisenhower opened the 
second phase in the arms race when 


was nearing an end. Those of us who he authorized the Pentagon to go 


were set to lake pan in the invasion 
of Japan breathed a sigh of relief. 

Yet the global turmoil left by two 
world wars has con tinned. While 
avoiding the worst, the world has 
experienced a series of lesser wars. 

Meanwhile, a whole new arms in- 
dustry has grown up to produce nu- 
clear weapons. The military has de- 
voted much attention to developing 
ideas mi how to nse them. In fairness. 


ahead with two weapons systems that 
changed, the strategic equation: the 
solid-faded missile and the nuclear- 
powered submarine. President Ken- 
nedy continued these programs, de- 
ciding that America needed 1,000 
Min ut email intercontinental missiles 
and an array of submarine-based bal- 
listic missies. 

Stalin’s successors strove to match 
this pace but found it difficult. Soviet 


scientists lagged, and inefficient Sovi- 
et industry provided a further drag. 
Even with the help of spies, the Rus- 
sians made little headway against the 
comfortable American lead. 

So when the first nuclear crisis 
came, over Cuba, Nikita Khrushchev 
bad no choice but to bade off in 
humiHation. This opened the third 
phase. The Soviet Politburo decided 
(hat it would never again be caught in 
such a subordinate position. It 
launched a huge military buildup. 

In response to growing public con- 
cern, Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Khru- 
shchev agreed in 1963 to end atmo- 
spheric testing. And the nuclear 
industries quietly kept turning out 
more and “better" nudear arms. 

The fourth phase began late in the 
1960s. when the Russians started -to 
deploy an anti-ballistic missile sys- 
tem around Moscow. The Johnson 
administration, under congressional 
pressure, decided to counter with a 
modest system of its own. Uncertain 
about Soviet intentions, the Pentagon 
hedged its bets by putting several 
warheads on each missile — the so- 
called MIRV system, which stands 
for multiple independently targetable 
re-entry vehicles. 


Louis Rosen is a physicist who first been director of thc lab for six years, 
came to Los Alamos as a member of sounded the same theme on his last 
the Manhattan Project team, which day before moving east to a new post 

Technology has advanced," be 
said, talking about the work of Los 
I j riT| • Alamos in the last generation. “But 

fl I -_/kT I rlAI*P the issuer are (he same as in the late 
U vUl M. HO C5 . . 1960 s: missile defense and modern- 

... ization of strategic forces. The level 

I he Anti- Ballistic Missile treaty , of understanding of Congress and the 
and the MIRV capability brought the political leadership is no greater than 
United States and the Soviet Union ft was 20 years ago. 
to a fork in the road. In the -end, “What is missing is a view of the 
Richard Nixon and Leonid Brahnev role the UJS. should play on the world 
decided to limit anti-ballistic missiles stage, how our economic, political 
but to proceed to .develop. their.' [and] military life,- which support our 
MIRVs. In fact, they never seriously national posture, are to be woven 
discussed abandoning them. together, We act as though militar y 

Secretary of State Dean Rusk, pie- planning, arms control trade were 
occupied with Vietnam, had said the cadi an end m itself. . . 
decision on proceeding with multi- -«w c don’t deal with the fiinda- 
pie- warhead missiles should be left to mental issues that cause us to deploy 
the Pentagon. He and others involved these arms, which require an integral- 
ly the decision now say they made a ed view. We address technology 
mistake and that angle warhead mis- nroblems. !ik« ends* mfofiM n„r ™ 


mistake and that single warhead bus- problems, like cruise missiles. But we 
site premde greater stability. _ don’t ask why they are there at all 
The Russians were not helpful That’s frustrating.” 
with their brag invasion of Czecho- • Mr. Ken, who is 46, quoted Chur- 
slovaloa m 1968 rad refusal to nego- clulTs remark that “the next stone age 

bate senouslv about MTRV« until .1 j - > - 


date seriously about MIRVs until 
they had the requisite technology. 

Both superpowers, meanwhile! 
continued to equip their ground air 
and naval forces with so-called tacti- 
cal nuclear weapons. The number de- 


may come on the silver wings of sci- 
ence." That, he said, “should be a 
strong motivation to solve some of 
those issues." 

“What Fve learned," he said, “is 


A Theory on Post-Gloria Depression 


B OSTON — When the moment 
of enlightenment finally came, 
we were sitting around a kitchen 
table laden with candles, looking 
for all the world like believers at a 


Rv FHpti Goodman they bad stock in Gloria and the 
By Wien Goodman ^ famag fasler ^ ^ 

wind velocity. The more the fore- 
t was called off. cast brightened, the gloomier the 
nd, Gloria was im- forecasters. They were looking far- 


table laden with candles, looking event, the fight was called off. cast brightened, the gloomier the 
for all ihe world like believers at a In New England, Gloria was im- forecasters. They were looking for- 
stiance. The first sign of life in our pressive, but not the advertised kill- ward to devastation, and all they 
technological universe was not, er hurricane of the century. The got were chimneys and roofs, 
however, a supernatural knock on reaction in the calm after the storm What this post-Gloria depres- 


Whai this post-Gloria depres- 


tbe table. It was the reassuring hum was of relief tinged, weirdly, with son, or any other, comes down lo is 
of the refrigerator. regret Expecting a moment of glo- tbe^ Three U ttle Pigs Theory of Life. 


of the refrigerator. regret. Expecting a moment of 

Somewhere in the house a radio ry. some ended up with a mo 
was heard, then the light switches case of post-Gloria depression, 
sprang back in action, and soon the What a curious event in the an- 
odghborbood was out on the street nals of human meteorology. How 
singing the praises of Thomas Edi- do you figure the touch of disap- 
son and his entire crew. After two pointment at having been span 
days in the dark. Hurricane Gloria disaster? The flood that does 
was officially over on tins block. crest after we have sandbagged 
We stood around for a few min- city. The typhoon that fades a 


crest after we have sand 
city. The typhoon that : 


l a moment of glo- tbe^ Three Little Pigs Theory of Life, 
up with a modest We all grew up assuming that the 
ria depression. hero of the fairy tale was the pig 
is event in the an- who built the brick house. He was 
meteorology. How probably a prig of a pig, n worka- 
le touch of disap- hdic bore. But he was ready for 
ring been spared a trouble, i can. imag ine him sitting 
end that does not smugly in his bouse for months, 
ve sandbagged the maybe years, just waiting for the 
ra that fades after wolf to show up. But what if the 
ed to the gym. wolf had never , come? What if the 

jse. fed an amidi- wolf hadn’t blown in the other two 
,y before Gloria's bouses? What if his huff and his 


to 7,000, with no rational idea of how 
they could be used, or what a Soviet 
retaliation in land would nwnn. 

Ironically, it was not the growing 
U5. and Soviet strategic forces tar- 
geted on each other that reawakened 
the American public to the nuclear 
danger. Nor was h the steady deploy- 
ment of Soviet missiles targeted on 
Western Europe that reawakened Eu- 
ropeans. The European and Ameri- 
can publics were shaken out of their 
sleep by a NATO decison to deploy 
Poshmg-2 and cruise missiles in 
Western Europe, in response to the 
Soviet deployment of the SS-20. 

So the fifth phase opened in 1979 

when Europeans and Americans sud- 
denly found themselves living in 
the shadow of tens of thousands of 
nuclear weapons. Thus began a de- 
bate (hat is stiQ in progress. 

International Herald Tribune. 


These are the land of men Mr. 
Reagan is taDring about when he asks 
American scientists (o find a way to 
make nuclear weapons “impotent 
and obsolete." They have tremen- 
dous confidence, based on achieve- 
ment, about the ability to solve pure- 
ly scientific problems. But they are 
neither ashamed nor afraid to remind 
os of the limits of physical grimee . 

Expecting science, and billions of 
dollars spent on fabulous ■ experi- 
ments, to provide the answers is a 
way of saying, “La George do h." 
Science isn’t George. The advice of 
these scientists on what is lacking, as 
as on what. can. be done with 
their inventions and discoveries, is 
worth presidential attention. It 
should embolden Mr. Reagan to 
think beyond high-tech solutions as 
he decides how to answer Moscow. 

The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


utes sharing reports of damage to a we have evacuated to the gym. wolf had never . come? What if the 
fence here, a tree there branches Many, I suppose, fed an amidi- wolf hadn't blown in the other two 
everywhere. We lingered longer max. Is- the day before Gloria's bouses? What if his huff and his 
over the details of food that rad arrival people geared up for sorviv- puff hadn’t been up to snuff? 
been defrosted and bodies that had al with the purposeful pleasure to- Wen, somewhere in Gloria's race 

gone unwashed. There was the tally licking from our dealings with up the East Coast, her blow la up a 
strangest aura in the air, some of us the manmade disasters of dviliza- bit and the operative fairy tale 
fdt just the oddest bit gypped. tion. This was not gridlock, it was switched from the Three Little Figs 
It was as if, having been prepared wind and water. One day people to Chicken Little, leaving some of 
to suffer the worst, the worst had rounded up toe lawn furniture ihe natives fecimg a bit let down, 
not been bad enough. There we stockpiled flashlight batteries and It is an. odd one. I, for one, would 


The People of the Adige Camera! Lkdits! Policy! 

Your nmort, “Sinowatz Presses n „ ^ • 


lanstthe mountain villagersareW- 
y of Austrian oridn. You cannot 
therefore say that tbeterritoiy has a 

srssKsass?- - “ 

Italian. A .constitutional law estab- 

S 6 ® "SWa is completely 
bilingual (schools, courts, public doc- 
uments and so forth). 

FRANCO DELLE PIANE. . 

Milan 


were, batches battened down, met- put masking tape on the 
tie ready » be tested, adrenaline windows. But the next <1 
pumping, a contender in toe ring, dews looked a bet silly. 

But three rounds into tin main The newscasters behaved as if. 


put masking tape on (heplaie-glass .always rather be safe than .tony, 
windows. But toe next day the win- Until this week, it never occurred to 


Until this week, it never occurred to 
me that you could be both. 
Washington Post Writers Group. 


aara to FoUow' , .(Sepz 28):. 

-if 1 ®* 1 thought I would agree with 
Jota Kenneth Galbraith, especially 
terms economic forecasts of a few 
25#!!* honesty forces me to 
^™ t .“ 1 ® t he!s right in his ahfilvsis of 
™ald Reagan in ins current role as 
^g. boy-president ~ eveiybody's 
oest pal — currently pfcwmgin Hd- 

ywood-on-toe-PotoSTflome- 

uffles wonder though, -what would 
wSt? electricity: failed: 

Would ^ the-two-dimehaonal im- 


J«a flicker out 

•’ KEVIN. GOLD BERG. 

"'•! Paris. 




• . 


v 


Sv 

5? ' 

■N Si ;. 


s*. >V 



r.. . ' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


Page ? 


4J)yERX36lN^ SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


Part Two of a two-part section. 


Ha n- 
■» 

*r \*. T . 

•i M . 


theBorvk, 


L’Zi 

WfEr rj ' ■».' 


' : “-vs .1 



yA report from the travel 
arid duty-free industries to discerning travelers 


The success of the frequent-fliers clubs 
organized so profitably by the airlines haS 
not gone unnoticed in the electronic nerve 
center of the Leading Hotels of .the World . 
organization. "We launched our own 
Guest Club just a few months ago,” says 
che group’s energetic Swiss president, Ernst 
Scherz. 

"The membership is composed oF those 
guests From the U.S. who book rooms in 
our 200- phis member hotels through our 
U.S. computer center. The new members 
get special luggage tags which identify 
them to hotel staffs as valued clients, plus' 
ocher guarantees such as the best available 
rate, upgrading in some drcumstances, spe- 
cial little extras in their rooms and the like. 
It has been a very, successful program: 3300 



rms 

;/en 


of thcFW orld 

members signed up in just che first few 
weeks, booking more than 17,000 bed- 
nights.” • 

The Guest Club is just one of several 
new marketing initiatives undertaken by 
JLHW, which is intent on making the. 
world's travel agents just as aware of k as 
they are of ocher hotd names like Sheraton, 
Hilton, Westin and loter-CbririncncaL 


"Clearly we had to do something. Now 
LHW has a global electronic reservation 
system as welL There are 100 people in 
New York responding immediately to 
phone reservations, punching che data into 
IBM computers which are linked by space 
sa t ell i te, guaranteeing confirmation within 
24 hours. Last year our system handled 
more titan 500,000 bookings for well over a 
million bed-nighes, and the totals are climb- 
ing steadily. 

"Our b igg est problem these days is de- 
ciding which new hotels we will admit into 
LHW, and chen, sadly, which few hotels 
may have to be asked to leave. Sometimes 
ownership changes and a hotel’s standards 
slip. Sometimes a hotel’s owners just don’t 
have the finances to conduct the always 
expensive upkeep we demand. We have a 
team of LHW hoteliers constantly on the 
road, inspecting, evaluating, reporting.. It 
takes an approval vote of at least 75 percent 
of the current members before a new hotel 
is admitted, 2 nd I can assure you there's no 
tougher juiy in che world. We have just 
over 200 hotels now and our maximum 
is 225” 

■ A listing of just a few of die new 
additions to the LHW roster gives one an 
idea of the group's global sweep. 

The White Swan Hotel, in Guangzhou, 
with its 869 rooms, 58 suites and three- 



; ■ • - - v- , y *r-- 

,«v .v v . - - 




| : 'i : &s, :: 

t ""j . f : V 

«i€Ss!f' s 






In L.A., the Butler Did 


Who was che mysterious person who 
slipped into each bedroom in che gleaming 
470-room Sheraton Grande Hotel on Los 
Angeles' South Figueroa Street to turn 
down che beds and place liqueur chocolates 
on every pillow? Who knocked on che door 
at an appointed time with hoc coffee and 
the morning paper? Who handled jiffy 
suit-pressing and shoe-shining, and ordered 
up appropriate food and drink for those 


guests planning to entertain a few guests in 
their rooms? 

There’s no mystery about it. The butler 
did ir. 

"As far as I know, we’re one of che very 
few hotels in the world to have an English- 
sryle butler service on every floor,” explains 
Joseph Giudice, chc spokesman. "The idea 
came to us literally during a pre-opening 
staff brainstorming session. We were 


searching around for ways to provide truly 
unique services for the business travelers 
who make up che bulk of our trade, and 
someone on chc staff came up with the 
idea: butlers. The more we choughc about 
it. the better the idea looked." 

The butlers, alas, arc not all British 
Jccvcscs. most 1 raving been recruited local- 
ly. But the)- look as if they have stepped out 
of a P.G. Wodehouse novel, each clad in a 


To make the point that the Swiss winter sun is warming, LHW chairman Ernst Scherz sets 
up his office on the ice rink outside the Gstaad Palace Hotel 

"Our Great Affordables brochure has' story-high, atrium lobby is the organiza- 
been another best-seller,” Scherz notes. "In’ .-don's first foothold in China. In Dublin, 
it we’ve listed some excellent reduced-price, die Westbuiy Hotel— -150 rooms and six 
weekend package offers from some of- the suites — has been admitted, to join its Dub- 
world’s most prestigious and elegant hotels. ‘ lin sister hotel, the Berkeley. On the Dead 
Many customers and agents are under the ..Sea in. Israel, LHW's newest affiliate is the 
mistaken impression that these quality Ixv Daniel Hoccl and Spa, a bealch-and-beauty 
wls never offer a oarkapr twice. The truth is-: resort 


Fragrance Wins by a Nose 


mistaken impression that cbese quality hr* Darni 
tels never offer a package price. The truth is: resort 
we have to meet the competition and, lilre 
ocher hotd groups, wc are eager to bolster . txn 
weekend occupancy when our business-;' be/on 
traveler clientele has gone home. Great Work 
Affordables opens the doors of sane of the. 3050. 
world’s cop hotels to guests eager for a bit ■ 
of a bargain.” - - - pHI 

Jf yon haven’t heard of Leading Hotels 
of the Wald before, you can be excused. 
Although it was founded in 1928, che 
group has kept a low profile fa much of its . 
life. Only since 1973, when Sc h e rz became 
chairman of the group, has it begun to 
develop its commercial muscle. 

"Unlike che big hotel ch ains" he ob- - . 
serves. "LHW is not a single firm with one 
management, a single global image, a stan- 
dardized hotel logo and a fixed way of 
doing business. 

"Quire the opposite. We’re an affiliation 
of about 200 of the best hotels in the world, - 
the vast majority jndividiially-owned, some • 
family-owned, each usually possessing the 
reputation of being the top hotd in its 
community. The CriUon in Paris, for in- 
stance. The Plaza In New Yak. The Palace 
in Gstaad. The Savoy in London, the Via 

Jahretzdtsin in Hamburg, the Peninsula in 
Hong Kong, che Oriental in Bangkok, the 
Taj Mahal in Bombay. 

"These hotels are cops. But when the big 
multinational hotel chains began ro macure ; 
after World War II, ir became apparent 
that these fine deluxe hotels were being 
out-mar kerecL They could no longer afford . 
to sic back and rest on their reputations. 

They were losing out in the marketplace 
because travel agents found it easier to 
book diems into chain hotels with their 
electronic reservations systems, instant con- 
firmations, competitive . rates , arid global 
advertising to presell the client on. the 
agent's sdection of hotd. 


For information on booking into a hotel 
belonging to the Leading Hotels of. the 
World group, telephone London: (01 j 583- 


For the average male business traveler, 
hastening to catch a departing jetliner and 
pausing fa as shore a time as possible to 
pick up some duty-free fragrances, there’s 
little a no basic comprehension of what 
constitutes che subtle intricacies of a per- 
fume or cologne. For most of us, it’s a quick 
"Smells nice . . . How much? ... I’ll cake 
it,” and we're on our way. 

But to che few gifted individuals who 
guide the fortunes of the world’s leading 
fragrance houses, it’s not so simple. The 
"perfumer" in a major fragrance house Eke 
Maurer & Wirtz, located in Stolberg in the 
rolling German hills near Aachen, speaks a 


complex and many-layered language as he 
passes his nose slowly over a scene-retaining 
cesr stripe fa che hundredth rime of chc 
day. attempting to blend ingredients in 
such a way as to create che new scents char 
will be chc hallmarks of comorrow’s new 
brands of perfume, cologne, after-shave and 
soap. 

Martin Schimmelpfennig. export man- 
ager of Maurer Si Wirtz, tries to demystify 
che top-secret work going on in the 
M & W laboratories as technicians pains- 
takingly sort over hundreds of bottles of 
varied essences in search of tomorrow’s 
market leader. "We’re out to keep ahead of 


the competition by a nose.” he smiles. 

"In a fragrance like our best-selling Ta- 
bac Original," he explains, "rhe experts 
look for three distinct characteristics. First, 
there’s what we call in the fragrance busi- 
ness che top note. That's che perfume’s 
distinctive calling card, the firsr impression 
it makes on you. 

"Then we have something a little more 
subtle. Ic’s the middle note — what they call 
in the business rhe modifier. This is whac 
gives the fragrance its harmony and its 
character. 


Westin is offering 50 percent off its regular rates at all its 
mainland U.S. and Canadian hotels any Friday, Saturday 
and Sunday night. The bargain program is allied “ The 
Westin Weekend ” and, of course, there are certain limita- 
tions: it doesn’t apply to group travel, package tours or 
guests taking advantage of other special rate programs. 
But it’s valid for single and double occupancy and there’s 
no minimum stay. For details call MfcfoHe HoItertnWestfn’s 
Seattle headquarters: TeL (206) 443-5201 







f 7 IVlE IvE ^ Nem ^ 

JfSR HF the Travel Industry 

The Chinese are earnestly trying to make sure Western 
tourists feel at home when they arrive, up to and including 
labeling essential amenities in English. Alas, however, 
sometimes important messages are garbled in the transla- 
tion. For instance, one ladies’ lavatory was recently help- 
fully labeled “WC.” And the men’s lavatory alongside? 
"MC.” 


For bargain hotel rates, it’s tough to beat Cathay Pacific’s 
Stay-a-Whfle package deals. Most of tbdr deals in 24 cities 
along their routes involve foil breakfast and airport trans- 
fers. Some sample prices: $21 per night at the Airport Tra- 
vefodgeln Auckland, $51 per night at the plnsb Plaza Hotd in 
Seoul Your travel agent or the nearest ; Cathay Pacific ticket 
office has a supply of the Stay-a- While brochures. 




mm 


While some mdse Uses are opting for bigger 
and bgger ships (a pair of new 2,606-passen- 
ger liners Is now under construction), Sea 
Goddess Cruises Ltd. insists that Small Is 
BeantifoL Its two new, sleek, $34 minion lin- 
ers are run more tike private yachts than 
seagoing hotels. Their 116 guests (maximum) 
are pampered by a crew of 89. Water-SkHng 
or, when the ships are anchored, wind-surfing 
oil the fantall are encouraged. There are no 
first and second searings; you eat when yon 


want and sit with whomever yon choose. The 
two-year-old luxury cruise company deploys 
Its ships In the Mediterranean In the summer 
and In the Caribbean and off South America 
in the winter. 

Future itineraries and tariffs are 
included in fhe firm's attractive " Come Live the 
Sea Goddess Life" brochure, available from 
Sea Goddess Cruises Ltd, 5805 Blue Lagoon 
Drive, Miami, FI. 33126, U.SA Tel. (305) 265- 
8705. 


One of London’s tough-ticket shows this season is "Bar- 
num, ” with television star Michael Cranford in the title 
role. Another London challenge is that guile a few restau- 
rants take their last orders before final curtain, making for 
a scramble to find a cab and hightail it to a restaurant still 
open. Enter a firm called Company Entertainment, which 
has a lock on rickets to “ Bamum ’’ and eight other top Wesr 
End shows, and packages these along with candlelit din- 
ner-and-dancing in the Roof Restaurant high up in the 
London Hilton overlooking Marble Arch. Buckingham 
Palace and the entire city skyline. For the current brochure 
and rates, which start at around $55 for theater ticket and 
dinner, eontact Company Entertainment Ltd, TeL Loudon 
(01) 499-3772. 


stare hed-frenr white shire, morning suit, 
pinstripe trousers and rhe inevirable white 
gloves. The hotel claims to have more rhan 
a half-million dollars invested in burler 
uniforms and supplies for the butlers’ pan- 
tries on each floor, stocked so that no 
marecr wliac rime che butlers arc sum- 
moned, and no mareer whac rhe request, 
they'll be able ro satisfy che guest’s demand. 

"It’s sore of like having your own Hud- 
son, right our of 'Upstairs, Downstairs,’ 
says an awed guest, newly converted to the 
joys of on-call butler service. A major 
Grande Hotel difference, of course, is com- 
munications. Guests don’t rug at velvet 
bellpulls when rhev want service, and rhe 
butlers aren't congregated down in the 
servants’ hall below stairs. As a Sheraton 
butler explains: "You merely dial two num- 
bers on your room phone. That sets off rhe 
portable Cobra phone I have on my person. 
I’m with you shortly thereafter, because 
you've been able to contact me direcriy. 
avoiding having to go through chc hotel 
operata.” Old Wald service, in other 
words, by way of New Wald technology. 

Hotel guests meet the duty butler just 
after they’ve checked in. The bellboy makes 
a point of stopping at his desk, in front of 
the elevators, to make introductions. The 
role of the butler is quickly explained to the 
guests, who may be a bit confused as to 
where the hotel butler’s turf ends and the 
hotel concierge’s territory begins. 

The chief concierge at the Sheraton 
Grande is Brian Wieder. -a member of the 
prestigious Clef d'Or, and he explains: 
"The butler rakes care of all the guests’ 
needs in-house. Unpacking, if you want 
chat service. Refrigerating special medi- 
cines you might be carrying, or even special 
foods. Corking your own wine if you’re 
planning to entertain several nights in a 
row. Picking up and delivering your laun- 
dry. 

"At che concierge's desk, we’re on call 
24 hours, ro handle guests' requests for 
help outside che hotd: confirming plane 
reservations, arranging theater tickets, or- 
dering up limousines and taxis, giving 
advice on where to shop and whar to see." 

Sheraton’s butler service is available to 
all guests, not just chose in che VIP suites. 
"Our butlers arc yours, whether you're in 
one of our S135-a-night standard rooms or 
our $550-a-night suites,” Giudice explains. 

If you 'd like a butler at your service the 
next time you're in Los Angeles, the Shera- 
ton Grande's telephone number is: 
(213)617-1133. 


"And finally there's the end note. This is 
the odor which is most persistent and 
which gives the perfume ics personality." - 

This family firm, still headed by a trio of 
Wirtz males, began in 1845 when Michad - 
Maurer and his stepson Andreas Wirtz 
decided ro manufacture soaps of French, 
English and German recipes, branching out ; 
from the small retailing business they were 
operating in northwestern Germany. For 
almost the firsc 50 years, the company's 
soap-boiling planr bubbled awav in the 
backyard behind the family home. 

Today che company produces more than 
1,000 different brands of fragrance, toiletry ■ 
and grooming products, and they’re sold in 
more than 130 countries. The backyard 
business has become a global giant 





,4 I4Q-year tradition. 

Tabac Original became part of the firm's 
family of products in 1938, when M & W 
absorbed chc Austrian firm of Riva. which 
produced a luxury soap called Tabak. The 
brand name was gallicizcd, and today Tabac 
Original’s distinctive white bottle is one of 
che most familiar products being passed 
across dury-frcc counters around rhe world. 

Schimmelpfennig reverts to the perfum- 
ers’ language to rry to describe the Tabac 
Original fragrance. “The first impression is 
a high point of unexpected and refreshing 
citrus. You can smell that immediately, 
can't you? 

“Now inhale again. Can’c you feel it 
mellowing? Do you smell chc Field flowers 
that arc there too? The warm woods and 
subtle spices? The bergamot and petit 
grain?’ 

The result, say Tabac Original’s market* 
ers, is a fragrance chat's dean and contem- 
porary, lighr yer lingering. "It’s right fa 
roday.'' Schimmelpfennig insists, "right for 
tonight as well. It goes with everything, 
from denim to cashmere.” 



w„£u S&iV* 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 












itaiSBSS 


1® 


Gstaad's Palace 
Hotel is the center 
of village social life 
in this exclusive 
vear-round resort. 


Wy’i 

rtt 


: a 


Another 


Sell-Out Season 


for Gstaad 


"This time of the year, it’s al- 
most like were a cast onstage 
jusr before the curtain goes up.” 


>aj> Sliiwa Seherz. gazing 
across the vast paneled lobhv uf 


across the vast pitncled lobby uf 
riie Gsr.wd Palace Hotel, which 
she helps to run with her hus- 
band Ernst, "its as if the staff 
members ore going through the 
final rehearsal, memorizing 


their lines, making sure that 
they 're in the righc place before 
the overture sounds.” 

In just a few weeks another 
lively winter ski season will 
begin in Gstaad. Chalet shut- 
ters will be thrown open; the 
tiny, winding streets of this lit- 
tle village will become crowded 
with chic skiiers, boisterous 


holiday-makers and camera- 
clicking sightseers, all eager to 
sample just a bit of rhe high life 
in rhe ObcrLand village some 

say is the most exclusive winter 
resort in the world. 

"I think Gstaad's secret.'' 
says 46-ycar-old Ernst Seller/, 
whose family has run the 
Gstaad Palace for two genera- 
tions, "is char it is still a small 
Swiss village, unchanged, un- 
spoiled, even if the rich and rhe 
beautiful have made our town 
their winter holiday home. 

"We have only 1,000 hotel 
bed* in this village, which is 
not a lot. We could pack thou- 
sands more guests in here if we 
were willing to turn the devel- 
opers loose -and let them put up 
hotels, chalets and guest houses 
willy-nilly. Thar's what hap- 
pened in Saint Moritz, where 
rhev now have a couple of Club 
Mcds and 14,000 beds. And 
Zermatt, with irs 12,000 beds. 
They're holiday factories. No. 
our village fathers insist on 
keeping things just rhe way 
they've always been. Wc im- 
prove, bur wc don’t grow. 
Thai’s the secret.” 

What also doesn't change is 
the near-total dominance of 
Schcrz's Gstaad Palace Hotel 
over rhe entire Gstaad winter 
whirl. It looms up over the 
village sprawled at its feet like a 
noble overlooking rhe ranks of 
the yeomen he commands. Its 
150 rooms and -apartments -arc 
reserved each winter by some of 
the world's most powerful pco- 
ple. 

"We really arc a rather un- 
usual hotel," Seherz says of the 
72-vear-oId property which his 
father bought in 1047. "He had 
managed it for years, and when 
the owners decided to sell it, he 
had to come up with the cash in 
just 24 hours. Bur he managed 
to buy control, and we've never 
looked back since. We’re one 
of the few hotels in rhe world 
with more staff — 260 — than 
guests — 220. Wc close twice a 
year for three months each 
time: in short we’re only open 
half the time. Wc completely 
redo this hotel twice a year; it 
has a summer configuration 
and a completely different ar- 
rangement of facilities in the 
winter. We take in 5 percent of 
our total annual revenue in jusr 
one 24-hour period: New 
Year's Eve. Another 30 percent 
of rhe hotel's annual revenue 


comes from jusr one month. 
February. 1 don’t think there's 
another hotel in the world quite 
like »c." 

Staying in the Gstaad Palace 

is like staying in a marvcloush- 
equipped, lavishly-staffed Swiss 
country home. The accent is on 
informal luxury. The rooms 
aren't large, but they have even- 
possible comfort: heated rowel 
racks, nine channels of televi- 
sion. arrays of soaps and lotions, 
fluffy after-bath robes, marbled 


batlirooms and flowers, flowers, 
flowers everywhere. 

On the lower floors the hotel 
boasts the -athletic facilities of -a 

miniature Olympic village. 
There’s an icc rink, of course, 
for skflring and curling. A heat' 
ed indoor swimming pool. 
Weight and exercise space for 
the physical- fitness buffs eager 
ro pump iron, hang from their 
heels or cackle the Nautilus 
machine. And if one’s idea of 
exercise is a late-night boogie. 


chc Palace has plenty of dance- 
floor space. 

In the summer Niki Pi lie 
■and Roy Emerson arrive ro con- 
duct tennis weeks at the Palace. 
Prices for tlic week start as low 
as 2,050 Swiss francs, covering 
room, demi- pension and five 
hours of instruction per day. 

"The relaxing thing about 
Gsraad is that you can come 
back year after year and not 
much seems to liavc changed," 
Seherz continues. "But things 


arc changing all chc time. I m 
working now with several of 
rhe orlicr hotels in rown to 

persuade them to upgrade their 
facilities, to offer more quality 
in their accomodations. The 
more first-class rooms wc can 
put into the existing hotels, the 
better for Gstaad’s image " The 
Palace lias done its bit to up- 
grade available accomodarions 
by building a 21 -apartment cha- 
let adjacent to the hotel; 20 of 
the apartments have alveady 


been snapped up, mostly by 
buyers from abroad. And so 
Gsraad and its Palace begin yet 

another festive season. Places, 
everyone. Cu train going up. 

For information on Gstaad, 
contact the Gstaad Tourist Of- 
fice, 3780 Gstaad Oberland 
Bernois , Switzerland. For reser- 
vations at the Gstaad Palace: 
Tel. (030) 8 31 31. Telex 9222 
22. or contact your nearest 
travel agent or Leading Hotels 
of the World office. 


Crans-Montana’s 


Championship 

Countdown 


This sleek cluster of ski-resort 
towns not far from chc Swiss - 
Italian bonder finds itself this 


winter in a pleasant state of 
anticipation. "Next season.” ex- 
plains Walter Loser, a spokes- 
man for the local tourist board, 
"we play host ro the 1987 
World Ski Championships — 
the first Swiss villages to do so 
since Saint Moritz. Wc lobbied 
very hard for this with the ISF 
[international Ski Federation}, 


very best players gather each 
summer for chc annual Ebcl 
Golf European Masters, a tour- 
nament which today attracts 
some of chc world's top com- 
petitors. 

Much of the responsibility 
for making the ski champion- 
ships a resounding success will 
fall on the broad shoulders of a 
liandful of hotel operators and 
owners who have painsra kingly 
raised Crans- Montana up into 



agui nst lots of competition, and 
now chat we’ve won. we intend 
to make it the most memorable 
. championships yet.” 

The setting certainly can’t be 
beat. The southern view from 
the valley takes in the most 
massive range of the Alps, from 
the Matterhorn ro Mont Blanc. 
All winter Crans-Mon tana's 
slopes sound with the whisper 
of skis on snow-. AH summer, 
it's the click of dub hitting ball, 
because rhe resort boasts a mag- 
nificent 18-holc golf course 
which some pros say lies in the 
world's prettiest setting. The 


the elite of ski rcsorrs without 
allowing it to lose its simple 
charms as a peaceful, rural 
Swiss-valley village. 

Take Jacques Rey, for in- 
stance. He owns chc 13 -y car-old 
Q an s- Ambassador, nestled in a 
forest of firs just above the 
town. "Wc'rc certainly unique 
in one way,” he says. "The 
lobby in our hotel is on the 
seventh floor. Our 70 rooms 
and 20 one- and cwo-bcdroom 
suites are both up -and down 
from the lobby.” Tlic hotel at- 
tracts a moneyed clientele, not 
least because of the posh three- 


Of the world's truly great hotels, 
205 are members of 
The Leading Hotels of the World 


The 1985 Directory. 
The indispensable hotel 
guide for the 
discriminating traveller. 


The Leading Hotels of the World - 
205 truly deluxe hotels, recognised the 
world over as the places to stay. If you 
seek these standards, we invite you to 
send for your copy of our 1985 
director): 

For reservations, please call:- 
London 
01-583 3050 
[Individual bookings) 
01-583 1712 
(Meetings and Groups) 
Telex 299370 
Prestel 20002 

★ Paris (6) 079 0000 
Frankfurt (069) 290 471 
Elsewhere in Germany 01 30 21 10 
(Toll free) 

★ Geneva (022) 286 566 

★ Zurich (01) 302 0808 

★ Toll free through Sendee 800 


‘The ‘feadinjfHotels 
oftheFWforld 


LsUiMhJioJ W2x 

1 5 New Bridge Street. London EC4Y 6AU 


please send me a copv of uuir IsWfi 
Directory the 1 2S page full colour hotel 
guide for the discerning traveller 


Addntt 



Country 


bedroom and four-bedroom 
suites at the cop of die hotel, 
each room with its own bath. 
"Our accent is that of a family 
house. Wc even luve an open 
grill in rhe Rotisserie and Sepp 
Hugi, our prize-winning cha. 
is proud chat it is Swiss regional 
food wc serve here.” 


At the ICO room, five-star 
Hotel du Golf, it's Carrado Fat- 
tore who presides. "Golfers 
who have failed to break par 
during the day have their 
nerves soothed by the tinkling 
of our cocktail piano during the 
evening meal,” he reports. Tea 
is served in grand style, with a 
string ensemble in rhe back- 
ground. "This was the way 
things were done 50 years ago, 
when our hotel began,” he ex- 
plains, and management sees no 
reason co change things. The 
hotel remains the center of ac- 
tion even when rhe golf course 
is knee-deep in snow, for the 
fairways then convert into 
cross-country ski trails which 
begin just outside the Hotel du 
Golfs front door. 

The Hotel -Residence Super- 
crans achieves the impossible: 
cowering 17 stories high in a 
tiny Swiss village, yer manag- 
ing to blend almost invisibly 
into the scenery at the same 
time. Built into the hills over- 
looking the village, it’s sur- 
rounded by pine forests. The 
skibob runs just alongside, and 
paddiers can swim in tlic heated 
pool while looking our through 
glass walls ro the Alps across 
chc valley. "I chink we’ve got an 
unmarchable view of the Alps 
and the Rhone valley from our 
l7th-floor bar,” manager 
Eduoard Lorctan insists. 

The decor in Toni Kuonen’s 
Grand Hotel Rhodania is any- 
thing bur traditional Swiss; he’s 
done it up in the art- deco. style 



of rhe 1920s and ’30s. "The 
theme dominates our Deco 
d'Or nightclub, which has be- . 
come one of the .best-known 
places for a 1 are-nigh r rendez- 
vous." lie explains. "This win- 
ter we’ve got Jacky Clavier run- 
ning the club; he’s a 
well-known personality around 
here and I'm sure he'll be keep- 
ing things lively for us all win- 
ter." Just a few steps From chc 
hotel is Crans's busy and bus- 
ding main shopping boulevard, 
yet while dining in the hotel's 
La Faroe restaurant:, with chef 
Alfons Sutterlin presiding, the 
only sounds arc sighs of satis- 
faction and the clink of bottles 
and glasses. 


On die slopes above Crons- 
Montanu is die four-star Hotel 
Lcs Haucs de Crans. Heavily 
timbered, it’s built in chc nadi- 
tional Swiss style, yet inside it's 
a United Nations of differing 
locales. The heated swimming 
pool could pass for i tropical 
lagoon. Tlic bar is called L'Afri- . 
can Queen and guesrs drink 
under animals’ heads and 
mounted horns jurring from 
the walls. Tlic high-style restau- 
rant is a temple to the traditions 
of French haute cuisine. 


In rhe lobbies of Crans-Mon- 
tana's hotels and along its shop- 
lined village streets you can 
hear a babble of international 
languages. Lots of Indian, be- 
cause of . rhe village’s proximity 
to Italy. Much English.' Plenty 
of French and German. It’s a 
rruly international resort, now 
counting down impatiently un- 
ril that derisive skiing champi- 
onship when, for a few brief 
days, Crans-Mon caru will be- 
come die ski capital of the en- 
ure world. 

For tourist information on 
Crans-Montana, telephone the 
Tourist Office at: (027) 
4130.41. 


Events on the Crans- Mon tana Winter Calendar: 
December 28, 1985: 

Seventh Crans-Montana Musical Week begins with 
concert featuring Vladimir Ashkenazy. 

Christmas 1985 and February . 1986: 

Golf on Snow competitions. 

January 1986: 

Ebel Open Air Curling Championship. 

January 30, 1986: 

World Cup, Ladies'. Downhill Siding. 

February 14, 1986: ' 

World Cup, Men’s Super Giant. Slalom Skiing. . 
February 15-16, 1986: 

Equine competitions and snow-polo demonstrations on 
ebe Ecang Long. 

March 8-16, 1986: * 

Crans-Montana 21st. International .Bridge Week. 



* *.'*■ 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


Page 11- 


advertising SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


American Football 

for Fans Ab r 0 ad 


It could be any American hvine 

on an autumn afternoon- 
die television 
as padded and helmeted giants 
oash into one another. Glib 
commentators switch from slo- 
mos toUve action as quaner- 

^ ^ ombs s P Ut 

and Enebadcers move from the 

nickel defense into the full 
blitz. 

Only this isn’t America. It's 
a hving room in Saudi Arabia. 
Or a crew lounge on a North 
Sea oil rig. Or a rugby club's 
mining room in the south of 
France. 

Thousands of miles from the 

U.S. stadiums where the Na- 
tional Football League wages 
autumn’s gridiron wars, a grow- 
ing number of fans are viewing 
tapes of Sunday afternoon 
games (and "Monday Night 
Football" as well) on special 
videotapes mailed to them on a 
weekly basis by PonTel, a 
young German firm that has 
found itself a profitable niche in 
supplying the growing demand 
for American sports television 
around the world. 

"The tapes of all 13 NFL 
games played each Sunday are 
on their way to our Dusseldorf 
headquarters by Lufthansa jet 
freighter Sunday evening," ex-' 
plains Laura Pease, the Ameri- 
can who manages PonTel foe 
its German owner. "Monday 
night’s game comes over about 
30 hours later. They go imme- 
diately into our studio and are 


duped into the Various TV stan- 
dards: PAL, Sa?m, Beta." By 
Thursday, hundreds of tapes are 
in the .mail, each cape dis- 
patched in a padded envelope 
and due to be returned by the 
.recipient after viewing, upon 
pain of a latc-retum charge. ' . 

From hardscrabble begin- 
nings, PonTel has emerged as 
the largest purveyor of'North 
American sports programming 
to a hungry world marker. They 
cape National Hockey -league 
and National Basketball Asso- 
ciation games as well- . 

"We offer a pre-season game 
and the first eight weeks of die 
season for $139," Ms. Pease re- 
ports. "Then the next eight 
weeks for another $139- And 
ultimately all ten playoff, games 
and the Super. Bowl for a final 
$159- Additional games are $10 
per tape. And if you just want 
to order anv one game, 
it’s $15." : 

England receives die largest 
number df tapes each > week. 
U.S. football has been rapidly 
gaining popularity here, largely 
because Gunnel 4 shows 75 
minutes of American pro foot- 
ball every autumn Sunday. An- 
other her market for the capes 
is Saudi Arabia, and the Gulf, 
presumably because of the large 
community of American expa- . 
mate oil workers there. 

For details on signing up for 
PonTeJ’s sports tapes, tele- 
phone Dusseldorf (0211) 
626066. 



( Left ) Edouard Adler, head of the 
Swiss-based jewelry firm, flanked 
bv his sons Carlo and Franklin. 


(Below) One of Adler's Swiss showrooms. 



UfcV " 


&5c 4^1 ✓ ' 


Swiss Jewelers 
Arrive in London 


Look to your laurels, David 
Morris. Watch out, Chaumct. 
There arc new boys coming 
onto your British turf. The Ad- 
ler brothers, the Young Turks 
of international jewelry design, 
are setring up their newest pres- 
tigious shop chis autumn on 
London’s fabled New Bond 
Street; 

"Our new shop will be al- 
most opposite Asprey’s,” says 
39-year-old Carlo Adler, the be- 
spectacled younger of the two 
Adlers. 

"No, say it the ocher way 
around.” smiles 44-year-old 
Franklin. "Asprey’s is the shop 
opposite Adler’s." 

. . If the cwo energetic Adlers 
sound confident about setting 


up camp opposite one of the 
world’s most famous shops, 
they have reason. They’re on a 
roll, having opened three very 
luxurious shops . in Geneva 
since arriving in Switzerland in 
1972, and having successfully 
positioned themselves in che 
-profitable Asian marker in 1982 
with a new shop in Hong 
Kong. 

■ ■ What the Adlers sell is ele- 
gance, quality and tradition. 
Their customer list is secret, 
bur ir’s obvious some of che 
richest families in the world 
now have Adler jewelry in their 
wall safes. In the Arab world, a 
Koran lovingly encrusted with 
Adler jewelry and Adler gold is 
a universal status symbol; one 
recent Adler design consisted of 


Swiss Reissue Classic Wristwatches 


With increasing numbers of in- 
expensive computers and digi- 
tal displays adorning wrists 
these days, there’s an equally 
strong pull from che quality 
end of the market back towards 
the classic watch shapes of yes-, 
teryear. 


These days a 50-year-old Ro- 
lex or Patck Philippe is worth 
more than many -1985 watches, 
with discriminating buyers 
willing to pay much more for 
classic designs than for the 


timepiece first introduced al- 
most 60 years ago. 

The original Harwood had 
its birth in the mud and muck 
of World War I’s trenches. 
British watchmaker John Har- 



Great for Swimmers 

Olympic size healed outdoor pool 
and lavish indoor poci 


PALACE HOTEL 
GSTAAD 
SWITZERLAND 

Please call: 

Phone: 030/8 31 31 Telex 922 222 
or 

Jlbr^adiadFfotds of tbcWxid, 


split-second accuracy of today’s 
timepieces. 

With such a traditional mar- 
ket developing, it was inevita- 
ble that a canny Swiss manufac- 
turer would begin producing 
limited numbers of quality rep- 
licas of classic watches, antique 
on the outride but packed, in- 
side, with the most modem 
timekeeping assemblies. This is 
exactly what Forris is doing 
with the classic Harwood 
warch, a rop-of-tbe-market 


wood fought on the Western 
Front and learned the hard way 
what slime and rain can do to a 
wristwacch’s ability to keep ac- 
curate rime. He came our of the 
trenches resolved ro design the 
first automatic watch, without 
a winding stem, thac could re- 
sist both moisture and din. 

His classic, the original Har- 
wood, was first unveiled in 1926 
at a major watch fair in Basel. 
Its production was underwrit- 
ten by Walter Vogt, the Swiss 
bead of Forris Watches, who 


had invested considerable cor- 
porate funds in the project. The 
Forris firm was just 14 years old 
when it began marketing che 
Harwood, and the new watch 
helped the young firm achieve 
instant visibility in watch cir- 
cles, as it did again at che end of 
the last decade when Forris 
launched che Flipper warch 
with 19 interchangeable plastic 
bands In fashionable colors. 

The original Harwood, with 
its steml css circular shape and 
self-winding capability, was a 
sensation and spawned many 
imitators. Now, six decades af- 
ter its first appearance, Forris is 
re-launching it in 18-karar gold. 
The classic shape of the Har- 
wood, its simplicity of design 
and die feeling of worth it con- 
veys are all reminders chat some 
things never change, including 
the respect the world holds for 
the Swiss ability ro continue to 
produce the finest watches in 
die world 

For further information on 
where y ou may purchase a 
Fortis Harwood, telephone 
Grenchen, Switzerland (065) 
51.31.61. . 


The unique resort for skiing and golfing 

y 4 y 4 y 




/£ 


«y « 





/ * 




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» / 

r JL |Ji|| 

[fscefoiflKArtt | m . | 

crans-montana 

SUR-SIERRE SLBSSESCHWBZ-SVIZZERA-SWnZERLAPO 


HOTEL 

DU 

GOLF 


Organizer of the « 1987 Alpine Ski World Championships- and - since 1939 - of the « Swiss Open* 
40 ski-lifts and cable-cars, two golf courses (18 and 9 holes) *' 

Tourist Offices 41 21 32/41 3041 Address: CH-3963 Crans-Montana Jntemat. phone code: 41-27 



a 108-year-old text on leather, 
beautifully encased in 3.5 kilos 
(7.7 pounds) of gold adorned 
wich white, yellow and green 
diamonds. Adler has produced 
at least eight bcjcweled Korans 
to date for royal households 
around the world 

In distant Texas, a woman 
wears an Adler necklace con- 
taining 90 carats* worth of per- 
fectly matched diamonds. "It 
took us eight months to find 


precisely the right diamonds for 
that necklace” says Carlo, "but 
we refuse to hurry things. To 
the uninitiated the fact that 
some of the diamonds might 
miss being a perfect match 
might not be visible. But we 
would know. We make no con- 
cessions when it comes to quali- 
ty” 

If the Adlers seem imbued 
with ulcratraditional attitudes 
towards craftsmanship and 


quality, it's probably because 
the family has been making 
quality jewelry for a long rime 
— three generations to be pre- 
cise. "Our grandfather came ro 
Turkey towards the larrer pan 
of che last century, having stud- 
ied in Vienna.” explains Frank- 
lin. "He brought the sophistica- 
tion of European craftsmanship 
into Asia Minor, where he 
blended into it some of the fire 
and exoticism of the Orient. 
Our father, who runs our activi- 
ties in Rome, continued our 
grandfarher’s works. Now 
wc'rc bringing some of char fire 
and exoticism back into Eu- 
rope.” 

• Most of the Adlers’ stones 
still come from Asia: largely 
the gem markets of Thailand, 
Burma and Sri Lanka. The 
brorhers are frequently on long- 
distance jumbo jecs, traveling 
the Bangkok-Rangoon-Colom- 
bo circuit in search of che gems 
they require. 

"When we are looking for 
scones for a specific design, we 
can search for chem for up to 
two years,” Carlo explains. 
"Our forefathers bad ir easier. 
There wasn’t a scarcity of good 
stones a few generations ago. 
You could design your piece 
firsr and immediately find the 
stones to adorn it. It’s harder 
the way we have co work to- 
day.” 

Once the stones are selected, 
the brothers return to their de- 
sign srudios. Some 25 craftsmen 
work for them in Athens, an- 
other 15 in Rome. ‘Things get 
lively then.” Carlo says. "When 
you have talented craftsmen. 


each with a deep love for fine 
jewelry, each with firm ideas 
about how ro show the stones 
off to besr advantage, there is 
always a very animated discus- 
sion. 

"In fact, what quire often 
happens is tlut after calmly 
noring our ideas, we get togeth- 
er for a meeting, and rhere's a 
whole lor of shouting, scream- 
ing and roiling around on the 
floor — but at che end we come 
to a consensus.” 

What eon sri rotes rhe kind of 
consensus reflected in a piece of 
Adler jewelry? “We believe for 
one thing," says Carlo, "that 
too much gold can tend to stifle 
a stone. And. by the same to- 
ken. too large a stone can over* 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Great for Riding 

Outdoors and in the 


PALACE HOTEL 
GSTAAD 
SWITZERLAND 

Please call: 

Phone: 030/8 31 31 Telex 922 222 
or 

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.Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


( Continued from Page 3) 
whelm the beauty of line and 
form. The same factors chat 
shape a human's appreciation 
of an, architecture and fashion 

arc the factors that govern the 
aesthetics of fine jewelry." 

The hallmark, of the Adler 
look is rhe curved sweep. This 
necessitates many difficult ba- 

f uctre cuts, so thar each stone 
lends with adjacent stones on 
the sweep. "We often have to 
re-cut stones so that they are 
perfect in the setting. Of 
course, wc lose weight rhis way. 
But it’s the only way to achieve 
the perfect grading we de- 
mand." 


The Adler style is not just 
for millionaires. "We have very- 
costly jewelry, of course," ad- 
mits Onto. “But some of our 

items arc less expensively 
priced. We find that when a 
man comes in with his lady, 
he's the one who usually wants 
to spend a bit more to get more 
valuable stones and higher gold 
content into rhe piece. The 
woman is more likely to like 
something just because it’s 
pretty, and not care too much 
about its intrinsic value." 

For now. die eyes of the cwo 
Adler brothers as well as those 
of Franklin's wife Ley la, who 
does much of the design, are 
firmly on London. "Each of us 


will be in the Bond Street store 
for a couple of days mosr 
weeks.” Carlo explains. "Our 
good customers expect to see 

us, to calk over the stones 
they'd like mounted, to describe 

the designs they have in mind, 
and to hear our suggestions.” 

And after London? "Well, 
we really should have a shop in 
the U.S. Wc jusr turned down a 
deal to open one up on Rodeo 
Drive in LA. We just don’t feel 
chat we're ready yet. It’s a jun- 
gle there. To do it right, one of 
us has to move there and live 
full rime with the project. May- 
be that's something we'll find 
we have to leave to the next 
generation of Adlers." 


Itip&Sir 

Interchangeable within Seconcs iron'. IS cl Goid to Stee. or 
"Fashionable coloured Bracelets in Plastic 


! i* <?*■' ' : VijCi 




• -.•ia'.S'.iv.i- . ri 


f .. 

w 




After-Dinner Pleasure 
Is as Easy as ABC 


There’s a saying in Riidesheim, 
a village of 12,000 on the 
Rhine, that after-dinner plea- 
sure is as easy as ABC 

Asbach. Brandy. Chocolate. 

For some 100 years the As- 
bach family has been distilling 
fine wine here and aging it 
pariently in limousin oak bar- 
rels. After resting for at least 
cwo years it emerges as Asbach 
Uralc brandy, some IS million 
bottles of which were sold in 
Germany last year. Ir is by far 





The worlds firs: 3W-:::2: c w. ; .v.; ; cre:::ec .mb m:?:’. b> Fort* in 1926. 

The I i A R WOOD, a of hisie-\ .ir.or: wv.’.cr. -makers is n.-v. available ir. 'S c: Goid or Steel 

i’ortis Wa;ch !TD. CK-1540 Cirer.ehen. Sw;:?e:iahd. Tei Or»5.'5 ; 3 i 61 . Telex 9?-i“" 



Great for Hikers 

Discover ihe wonderful 
Green Highland ofGsiaad. 


PALACE HOTEL 
GSTAAD 
SWITZERLAND 

Please call: 

Phone: 030/8 31 31 Telex 922 222 
or 




Asbach Unit's headquarters welcomes some 150,000 visitors a 
year to sample its delicious brandies and chocolates. 


Germany's most prestigious 
brandy. 

"And we’re increasingly pop 
ular abroad as well,” says Nev- 
ille Plummer, who looks after 
the exporr side of the firm’s 
business. "We sold 2.1 million 
bottles overseas last year, dis- 
tributing our product to more 
than 60 countries. Duty-free 
selling has enabled us to intro- 
duce our brand to large num- 
bers of foreigners, and their 
preference for our brand .has 
helped us to break into overseas 
markets. In addition to brandy, 
we're also producing a 
schnapps called Fuxst Bismarck 
and Calvados Gilbert,” 

What is remarkable about 
the installation at Asbach is 
thar it is possibly the only plant 
in the world where fine brandy 
and fine chocolates come off 
the production line coget her. 


"For 60 years” Plummer re- 
veals, "the company has also 
been in the luxury-confection- 
ary business, producing brandy- 
filled chocolates. Together — 
separately — both our main 
products arc a delightful con- 
clusion to an enjoyable meal, 
don’t you agree?” 

About 150.000 visitors a year 
pass Through As bach’s doors to 
watch the firm’s 650 employees 
at their jobs. More than 60 
percent of these visitors are 
from outside Germany, and the 
10 company guides are fluent in 
a number of languages to an- 
swer questions during the 45- 
minute tour and, later, co chat 
about Asbach’s products in the 
welcoming confines of the tast- 
ing room. 

For information on visiting 
Asbach in Riidesheim, tele- 
phone 67 22 1 20. 



Nows from the Duty-froo Trod* 



Justerini & Brooks Ltd. has 
just taken die wraps off its new, 
deluxe brand, J -& B 15 Year 
Old Reserve. Each of the whis- 
kies used in the blend is at least 
15 years old— more, mature 
whiskies, in other words, than a 
number of. the competing 12- 
y ear -olds in rhe market. Its 
packaging reflects the slightly 
higher price that will be 
charged for this whisky : the 
bottle has a cork stepper and is . 
of a heavy, dark-green glass. . 

These days It’s possible to pot 
a Porsche in yonr pocket— as 
well as In your suitcase. The 
Porsche quality image has 
been applied to a long and 
growing list of travel and 
duty-free items. Sunglasses 
and watches woe first Now 
there are Porsche electric 
shavers and hair-trimmers, 
cowhide shoulder earryalls, 
pDots* overnight cases, titani- 
um ballpoint pens, papers, 
cigarette Harters and ether 
smoking -accessories. 


A new book that fairly bub- 
bles with excitement is 
“Champagne: a Vintage 
Guide to Sparkling Wine.” 
The authors, Isaac Cronin 
and Rafael Pall aid, have 
packed the *535, 96-page pa- 
perback with just about ev- 
erything you've ever wanted 
to know about the wine that 
the monk Dom Perignon dis- 
covered those hundreds of 
years ago in Epernay. The 
authors say that the bubbly is 
riding high now, ap 306 per- 
cent In consumption In the 
past five years, vs. a 2-5 per- 
cent growth in the consump- 
tion of still wines. Publisher: 
Simon & Schuster, 1230 Ave- 
nue of the Americas, New 
York, N.Y., USA. Tel. (212) 
245-6400. 

Iff next time, you pick up a 
bottle of Glenfiddich Scotch 
whisky off a duty-free shelf, you 
can be confident you’re not 
alone According to the “Duty- 
Free World Report 1985" pub- 
Ushedin Sweden, Glenfiddich. is 
the. duty-free world’s tap-selling 
bran/L The rune runners-up are 
Campari, Gordon's. Gin, Ba- 
cardi, Johnnie Walker Black 
Label, Harvey's Bristol Cream, 
Chlvas Rega l Johnnie Walker 
Red Label, Drambuie and 
Grant's Steadfast, in that or- 
der. 



The news that Pan Am is going 
to begin flying.- to Shannon 
again is gladdening the hearts 
of Irish merchants there. No, 
one will benefit more from the 
duty-free surge than Old Bush- 
mills Distillery, just over the 


Ulster border, - where the “ Co- 
gnac of Ireland ,r is distilled as 
it has been once 1608. Its pres- 
tige Black Bush brand has been 
stocked aboard a tail ship cur- 
rently cruising the Cf.S. East 
Coast on a promotional tour. 


Bon Voyage is compiled by Arturo Gonzalez, Director 
of Communications, International Herald Tribune. 




¥L FOO TBALL 

^marr 



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GSTAAD 
SWITZERLAND 

Please call: 

Phone: 030/8 31 31 Telex 922 222 
or 


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Mets Beat Cardinals, 1-0, on Strawberry’s 1 1 th-Inning Homer 


_ .. By Thomas Boswell 

' Washington Post Service 

ST. LOUIS— The Sl Louis Car- 
dinal emblem that dominates the 
right-field scoreboard in Busch Sta- 
dium sits a like, 'safe 500 feet from 
home plate. The resident Cardinals 
would need about three phop hits, a 
couple of bunts and a healthy sacri- 
fice fly to reach rt. Darryl Strawber- 
ry needs one swing. 

Tuesday night, in the 1 1th inning 
of a scoreless game that could easi- 
ly, bear the weight of any superla- 
tive applied to it. Strawberry hit 
reliever Ken Dayley’s curvebaU off 


Compiled by O ur Staff From Dispatches F rank Tatiana won his fourth ded- 

KANSAS CITY — Mike Witt sion in a row as Toronto's Eastern 
and Donnie Moore combined on a Divison lead over New York 
six-hitter as the California Angels slipped to four games. 


' twtasJJniNd Proa liSwn oH an B l 

Darryl Strawberry, at a reception Monday night in St. Louis. 


regained a one-game lead over 
Kansas City in the American 
League’s Western Division with a 
4-2 victory over the Royals here 
Tuesday rught- 

Wtii worked 734 inning s before 
. Moore came on to get his 30th save. 
Witt gave up six nits, walked one 
and struck out five. 

The Angels scored three runs in 
the fifth and chased left-hander 
Charlie Leibrandt, who had woo 
four of his previous five decisions. 

Brian Downing and Dickie 
Schofield each had a pair of hits, 
and Bobby Grich homered for the 
Angels in the second inning Scho- 
field singled and scored in the fifth, 
when Downing drove in a run with 
a double and scored. 

. The Royals had forged the sev- 
enth tie for the division lead in 1 1 
days with a 3-1 victoiy Monday 
night in the opener of the four- 
games series. 

Tigers 6, Blue Jays 1: In Detroit, 


the base of the emblem, just above Dwight Gooden — perhaps word had shut out the Mets twice this 
the dock that read 10:44 P.M. of him has reached you — was to year, including a 10-inning 1-0 vic- 
. Only time will teD if the dock pitch here Wednesday for the Mets. toiy last montit. 
really began tolling another time — Then again, the Cardinals also had For the first nine innings. Met 
midnight, perhaps — for the Cardi- someone scheduled to throw: Joa- pitcher Ron Darling distinguished 
uals. It’s probably too soon for quin Andujar, the only man in himself. His only mistake was miss- 
such thoughts. Even this 1-0 New baseball who has won 20 games ing a suicide squeeze bunt with men 
York Met victory only pared the Sl each of the last two seasons. on second and third and one out in 
Louis lead in the National League’s But about the opener of the the seventh — r uining the best New 
Eastern Division to two games with three-game set: York rally of the nighL 

five to play. The Mets must do John Tudor pitched the first 10 Darling pitched nine innings of 
much more damage before this sur- innings for the Cardinals and a four-hit baO (the victory went to 
passingly tense game becomes cruel fate kept him from tying reliever Jesse Orosco), while Tudor 

Sanity Koufax’s major-league re- gave up six hits over 10 innings, 
cord for left-handed pitchers of 1 1 The conventional wisdom was 
shutouts in a season. He already that the Mets needed a sweep, 

whereas the Cardinals could enter 
the series relaxed. By altering his 
pitching rotation. New York Man- 
ager Dave Johnson altered (hat 
perception. 

Johnson worked it so that Goo- 
den would pitch Wednesday. Most 
managers would have opened with 
the 23-4 superstar, but Johnson de- 
rided on a novel twist to a pennant- 
race mind game: He stalled Dar- 


more than a pennant-race footnote; 

One factor, however, lends extra 
weight to Tuesday night's doings. 


Angels Win, 4-2, Regain Lead 


Yankees 6, Brewers 1: In New 


the Dodgers, who maintained a 5V4- 
game lead over Cincinnati, clinch a 
tie for the Western Division title. 

Reds 7, Giants & In San Francis- 
co, Eric Davis drove in four runs 


York, RBIs by Dave Winfield and with three hits, including a two-run a S“ nsl Tudor (20-8). 

Bobby Meacham helped Joe Nick- single in the eighth, lo kero Cindn- ?““* “ a “8 for Cardi- 
i “ nals. Johnson said with mtentmn- 


ro win his second game as a Yan- 

Red Sox 10, Orioles 3: In Balti- 
more, Bill Buckner paced Boston 
by driving in five runs on two dou- 
bles and his 14th homer of the year. 

Rangers 4, A*s 2: In Arlington, 
Texas, Don Slaught had three hits 
and drove in two runs and Jos& 
Guzman worked eight inning s for 
his third straight victory. 

Indians 9, Mariners 3: In C eve- 
laud, Andre Thornton broke 8 
sixth-inning tie with a two-run 
homer and the Indians went on to 
breeze past Seattle. 

White Sox 12, Twins 6: In Min- 
neapolis, Ron Kittle hit two two- 
run home runs to pace Chicago. 

Dodgers IB, Pukes 3: In the Na- 
tional League, in Los Angeles, 
Mariano Duncan delivered three 
hits and drove in two runs to help 


□ati's title hopes alive. 

Cubs 4, Pirates 3: In Chicago, 
Jody Davis hit a two-run homer 
and Leon Durham a bases-empty 
shot as the Cubs defeated Pitts- 
burgh before a crowd of 3,446 — 
the smallest attendance of Lhe year 
at Wrigley Field. 

Astros 2, Braves 0: In Houston, 


nals,” Johnson said with intention- 
al irony. “If we beat Tudor, who’s 
been their best pitcher, then we'll 
have Gooden with extra rest 
against Andujar with short rest 
[three days], in Lhe second game. 

“If we win that," said Johnson, 
raising his eyebrows, “then you 
know everybody will forget that the 
Cards have won 98 games and start 


rookie Charlie Kerfdd pitched a talking about them choking” 
four-hitter over 816 innings and Johnson also noted that Andujar 
Dave Smith recorded his 26 ih save “has always been a first-half piich- 
of tiie year as the Astros blanked er who’s had a tough time in his last 
Atlanta. (AP, UP!) ]Q starts. Last time a gains t us, in 


New York, he didn’t last two in- 
nings." 

From the start, Tuesday's game 
was a masterful pitchers’ dud. 
“Darling pitched the game of his 
lifetime. To me, be was the hero of 
this game,” said Kdth Hernandez. 

Darling walked the first man he 
faced, yet through five innings he 
gave up only two hits and allowed 
two men to reach second base. 
Twice he retired Tommy Herr (he 
of the 108 runs batted in) with men 
on second in the first and third 
innings. . 

Tudor, who already had pitched 
10 shutouts this year and four since 
Sept. 1, began even more impres- 
sively. Through four inning s he 
permitted only a walk to Hernan- 
dez, a soft line single to right by 
Ray Knight and a long fly out to 
left by Hernandez. 

New York’s big chance to break 
through came in the seventh.. 
Knight sliced a single to right and 
Rafael Santana lashed a liner off 
Tudor's left ankle, the ball carom- 
ing down the rightfield line to the 
Cardinal bullpen for a double. 

With men at second and third 
and one out. and with Tudor's an- 
kle throbbing, Johnson let Darling 
hit. Or, raLher, bunt. The squeeze 
was indeed suicidal: Darling bunt- 
ed through a 1-0 curve, and How- 
ard Johnson, running for Knight, 
was dead at home by 40 feet. 

Pitching continued to keep all 
doors shut tight until Strawberry’s 
rocket. Ironically. Dayley had 
started the 11th by striking out 
Hernandez and Gary Carter. 



Ron Darting \ 

The game of his lifetime. ’ 


Italian Runner Finds Fame Elusive in U.S. 


By Frank Utsky 

Sew York Times Service 


SCOREBOARD 


field has been weakened by injuries 
to Alberto Salazar of the United 
States, Rod Dixon of New Zea- 
land, T oshihik o Seko of Japan, j^- 
berto Cova of Italy and perhaps 


Football 


Baseball 


National Football League Leaders 


Tuesday’s Major League Line Scores 


“Nobody knows who I am," he He wanted to run and train. He 
said Monday. “Nobody knows my compromised — many pictures, 
face here. In Italy, my name is too much coffee and enough run- 
NEW YORK — Orlando Pizzo- famous. I like it when people come ning to fill his needs. 

lato has become a minor celebrity, u p to me and talk and take pictures This will be his fourth New York 

the kind only a few people recog- and ask for my autograph. It hasn't City Marathon. In 1982 and 1983, Carlos Lopes of Portugal. In their 
nize. happened enough to me not to like his trips were Financed by Champi- absence, Pizzolato's main challeng- 

He arrived in New York Sunday iL” on, the sportswear company that ers include Ahmed Saleh of Dji- 

for a week of promotional work for It almost happened last week in sponsors his club team. In 1982. he bouti, who won the World Cup, 

the Ocl 27 New York City Mara- Italy, where Pizzolato ran in a se- dropped out after 15 miles, his legs and the Americans Bill Rodgers, 


AMB RICAN CONFERENCE 


NATIONAL CONFERS NCR 



TEAM OFFENSE 



TEAM OFFENSE 

Son Dteoo 

Yards 

1457 

Rust) 

392 

Pan 

1245 

Dallas - 

ranis i 

1555 

Miami 

1655 

412 

12*3 

Chicago ' 

1S3S 

Denver 

1532 

*485 

1047 

San Francisco 

I4S2 

Cincinnati 

1528 

441 

887 

St. Louis 

1419 

Seattle 

1444 

394 

1070 

Now Orleans 

1338 

Pittsburgh 

1437 

551 

886 

Washington 

‘ 133S 

Cleveland 

1387 

724 

443 

Minnesota 

1313 

Jets 

1343 

421 

722 

Gtants 

. 1288 

Buffalo 

1308 

- 334 

972 

Tampa Bay 

,1247 

Kansas aty 

1278 

347 

911 

Room 

1259 

Raiders 

1272 

414 

854 

Atlanta 

1144 

Indianapolis 

1132 

474 

458 

Green Bay 

. 1142 

Mew England 

1130 

454 

476 

Detroit 

1005 

Houston 

- 930 

377 

553 

Philadelphia 

- • . 943 


TRAM DEFENSE 



TEAM DEFBMSC 

Pittsburgh 

Yards Rush 
«2 At 

*s ; 

&&&*' 

Yards 1 
9 fe 

Cleveland . 

1120 

341 

779 

Dallas 

1880 

Jets 

1139 

378 

741 

' Washington 

. .1084 

Rattlers 

1157 

358 

799. 

Rams 

1149 

New England 

1170 

418 

7SB 

San Fraidsco 

1155 

Houston 

1347 

498 

.640 

Phllactoinhta 

. 1346 

Miami 

1371 

527 

844 

Chicago — . 

1334 

Drover 

1378 

407 

971 

Green Bay 

1348 

Kansas City 

1399 

399 

1000 

Tomaa Bay 

1351 

Buffalo 

1405 

481 

734 

Atlanta 

1377 

Seattle 

1423 

441 

942 

Detroll 

1484 

Indianapolis 

1527 

590 

937 

SL Louis 

1499 

Cincinnati 

1702 

575 

1127 

New Orleans 

1501 

San Diego 

1832 

707 

1125 

Minnesota 

1595 


Pott 

1053 

972 

774 

<42 

MS 

hO 

M3 

725 

753 

<43 

457 

<70 

404 

474 


m 'sia 

401 <579 

440 <24 

331 81B 

447 488 

445 401 

419 915 

554 794 

470 HD 
580 797 

<09 877 
443 836 

478 1023 
57* 1031 


INDIVIDUAL ' 
Qoortertwck* 

ATT COM YDS TD INT 
■oats. SJ3. 123 75 10B* TO 4 

:*lajon, Cin. <3 52 589 7 1 

taring, Mia. 150 90 1134 7 3 

•lunketT. Roan HO 71 803 3 3 

IW lone, Pitt. 138 74 945 11 5 1 

[flea Sea. 140 80 1010 10 4 

I'Brien. Jet* 110 44 751 4 . 2 

lanleUan. Clev. 105 45 771 5 4 

:rway. Den. 154 83 1123 9 5 

j»nnoy. K.C. 129 47 977 7 4 

Won. HOU. 09 45 714 3 4- 

«»ei. lnd. 98 48 577 3 4 

arrogant, BN. 148 88 951 2 9 

Mon. N.E. 120 41 775 1 I 


McNeil. Jet* 

Warner, Sea. 

Bvner, Clew. 

Brooks. Cin. 

Allen. Raiders 
Winder, Den. 

BelL Buff. 

Pollard, PIN. 

Mock, Clev. 

Wonsiev, lnd. 

Recafver* 

NO YDS AVG 
BdL Buff- 29 205 7.1 

airlstnsn Rdrs 27 290 107 

Slolheorm. Pitt. 25 336 1JO 

James. 5J3. 24 305 123 

Lament. Sea 23 340 U7 

Shuler. Jets 23 245 107 

Upm Pitt. 22 375 17J) 

n Moore, Mia 20 274 13-7 

Nathan. Mia 30 217 10.9 

Colllrowrth, Cn. 19 337 172 

Allen. Raiders 19 140 1A 

Scoring (TsKMawni) 

TD Rusn Rec Ret Pts 
Turner, Sea 7 0 7 0 42 

llpes. Pitt. 4 8 4 

Brooks. Cin. 5 4 1 

Pale*. Jet* 5 3 2 


INDIVIDUAL 
Quarterbacks 
ATT COM YD5 TD INT 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Seattle oeo 308 014— 1 5 0 

Cleveland 801 102 05x— 9 II 0 

Will*, Thomas (7), Vend# Bern 18) and 
Scon. Valle (7); Setwise. Reed (I) and Wil- 
lard. w— Schuiw.4-9 . l — wi livs-ia. Sv— Reed 
IB). HRs— Seattle, Bradley (25). Cleveland, 
wmard (7), Thornton (311. Jacoby (20). 
Toronto DM OM 100-1 9 2 

Detroit 182 888 3b- 4 10 8 

Alexander, Level le (7), Lamp (71. Caudill 
(l)andWhttt; Tanono end Parrtsh.W— Tatia- 
na, n-14_ L— Alexander, 14-10. HRs— Evans 2 
(39). 

BastM 081 835 oat— 18 14 1 

Baltimore OM NO 080— 3 9 0 

Hum. TruBlto (9) and Oedraan; D Mar- 
tinez. Bell (4) and Dempsey. W— Hurst, 11-12. 
■L — DMartfaez. 13-10. HRs— Boston. Bucfuier 
. (14), Pw-Evans 128). Green well (3). Baltt- 
mare. MK-Yoona (281. 

Milwaukee oee 018 880— 1 5 3 

New York 111 MO 83 x- 4 8 8 

Cocanmwr, McClure (4), Darwin (I) and 
Hupperi; j Jttaicra, Rtehetfl («> and Haseev. 
W — JJflekro. 2-1. L-Cocanovrar, 5-8. Sv— 
Righetti (28). HR— Milwaukee. Householder 
( 101 . 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. 


Oakland 


1 


McMahon, Oil. 
Bartfcawskl, AM. 
Lomax, SIJ_ 
Kramer, Minn. 
Simms, Giants 
Montana 5F. 
Dickey, G.B. . 
Hippie. Dot 
awitson, NX), 
□.white, Dan. 
Brock, Rams 
OeBera, TA 
Thdsmntv Wsh. 
Cunnoahm, Pt)L 


89 

93 
124 
131 
111 
115 

94 
104 
107 
135 

99 
134 

130 44 577 2 
71 29 501 1 

Rastiers 


57 902 

58 422 

47 947 

73 1015 
53 800 

49 844 

49 453 

50 710 

51 745 

73 824 

55 743 

M 843 


Rashers 





ATT 

YDS 

AVG LG 

ATT 

YDS 

AVG LG 

TD 

Wilder, TA . 

102 

497 

4.9 

34 

85 

415 

4L9 

49 

2 

Dorset!, DaiL . 

49 

351 

U 

31 

73 

323 

4 A 

71 

3 

Rlaps. Alt 

92 

353 

XB 

33 

48 

313 

4j6 

36 

2 

Tyler. SJ 5 . 

42 

310 

5J) 

24 

54 

302 

SA 

33 

4 

Aadersn. 3LL 

. 44 

299 

45 

38 

47 

383 

L2 

» 

. 2 

kwu) a* nran. 

53 

277 

5J 

31 

44 

281 

4 A 

42 

3 

Crate, SJ=- 

42 

- 354 

6.1 

43 

70 

378 

AB 

17 

T 

Clark, GlB. 

39 

255 

6J 

80 

55 

243 

4JI 

19 

0 

White, Rams 

40 

245 

4.1 

30 

47 

341 

5.1 

41 

2 

Mntgmrv, DL 

45 

334 

34 

22 

43 

334 

SA 

32 

1 


Receivers 




Toronto 

New York 

Detroit 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Milwaukee 

Cleveland 

California 

Kaisas aty 

Chicago 

Oakland 

Minnesota 

Seattle 

Texas 


98 

94 

81 

80 

80 

47 

58 

West Division 


58 

42 

75 

74 
77 
89 

TOO 

i 

<9 

70 

75 

83 
B4 

84 
94 


GB 
JOA — 
-403 4 

319 17 
313 18 
310 18VS 
429 31 

347 41 

341 — 
-5M 1 

322 4 

375 13Vb 

348 14W 
•445 15 
399 27 


St. Louts 
Mew York 
Montreal 
Oi lease 
PtinaaeteMa 
Pittsburgh 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East DhrlUes 

W L PCI. 


GB 


59 

41 

74 

81 

83 

101 


NO YD5 AVG LG TD 


LG TD 
21 1 
33 2 

27 3 

40 2 

40 1 

TO 8 
38 4 

49 2 

73 O 
71 2 

17 0 


0 34 

0 30 

0 30 


Wttdr, TJL(RB) 

37 

173 

4 A 

17 

0 

J.Beli, TA 

25 

249 

VLB 

23 

2 

Cost) la, Da)L 

. 23 

209 

1X4 

32 

1 

Crate. S.F.(RB), 

21 

234 

IL1 

38 

3 

Monk, Wash. 

71 

173 

A3 

25 

0 

HAL Dali. 

» 

307 

1U 

m 

2 

Jordan, Minn. 

17 

223 

1X1 

23 

0 

McKinnon, OsL' 

16 

314 

19j4 • 

'48 

5 

Grean.St.l_ 

is 

758 

T7.2 

47 

3 

B-Jahnsoa, AfL 

15 

203 

1X5 

42 

3 


west Division 

Lon Angeles 93 64 

Cincinnati 87 49 

San Diego 80 77 

Houston 79 78 

Atlanta 44 93 

San Frandsai to 97 


324 — 
All 2 
323 14 
481 22VS 
Ail 251ft 
-344 43Vi 

392 — 
358 JH 
310 13 
303 14 
AOS 29 
M3 33 


OH 8M 811— 2 • 

3M 818 lb- 4 11 B 

Codiroll, Lcmgford (4) end Tettteton: Guz- 
man, Surhoff (9) and Slaught. w— Guzman, 3- 

2. L — CodlrnlL 13-14. Sv— Surhoff (2). HRs— 

Oakland. Kingman (29). Texas. O'Brien (22). 
California Bio ns boo — 4 ■ 0 

Kansas CHy M0 BOS 830-9 6 9 

wm.Maore (8) and Boom; LettjrondL Farr 
(5). Beckwith (8). Oulsanbenv (9) and Sund- 
berg. W-Mtltt, U*. L — Leibrandt. 17-9. Sv— 
Moore (3D). HR— California. Grich (13). 
CMcago 818 871 388-19 15 1 

Minnesota 808 388 381— 4 I 8 

Bannister, Sol liner (7), Gioater (8) and 
Fisk. 5k Inner (9); Smithson, Schnxn (5), Por- 
tugal (6), Lysmteer (81, Eufemfa (91 end En- 
ak. Reed (9). W— BamUster 9-14. l— S mtth- 
son. 14-14. HRs— Chicago, Kittle 2 (24), Baines 
(221. Minnesota. Brunanskv (27). Mel or lih — 
NATIONAL LEAGUE " 

Atlanta BM 0M 808-0 « 8 

Houston B28 BM 88 b— 2 5 ■ 

Badrmlon,McMurtry (8) and Cerone; Ker- 
fetti Smith (9)and Ashby. w-KertekU-Z. L— 
Bedraston, 7-15. Sv— Smith (28). 

PHtsburoh 188 Ml 810- 2 19 1 

Chicago Ilf 2M Oex— 4 4 8 

Reusctiri, DeLeon (8) and Ortiz. Pena (8); 
Patterson. Bailer (7), Smith (8) and Davb. 

W — Patterson, 20. L— ReuscheL 14S. Sv— 
Smith (33). HRs — Pittsburgh, Brown (4).ChF 
corn. Durham (211. Davis (17). 
andnwfll 208 189 828— 7 12 1 

Sat Fraadsco 218 3M 0M— 6 18 8 

McGafttaan R Robinson (4), Hume (4). 
Franco (B1 and Diaz. Van Gorder CB); Ham- 
maker, j Rebtaason IS). Moore (6), Garretts 
18), Will toms (8) and Nokes. Trevino (8). W— 
Hume,3-4.L— Garretts. 9-5L5V— Franco (11). 
HRs— OnOwiatt, Davis (7), Parker (31). San 
Fraodsca. Gladden (5). Driesaen (9). 

New Yortl BM BM ON 81—1 8 1 

St. Loots BM 0M OM 88— 8 4 I 

Darllna. Orosco (18) and Carter; Tudor, 
Davtev (1U and Porter. W— Orosco, 84. L— 
Day ley. 44. H R-Blew York, Strawberry (281. 
Sae Diego Ml 2M 0M- s 11 8 

Los Angeles 381 5M B1» — TB 15 1 

Oravedcy, WMna (4), DeLeon (4), Booker 
IB) and Bodiy; Honeycutt, Castillo (4). Ptoz 
(5) and Sdoscta. w— Diaz. 4J. L— Draveckv. 
13-11. 

(PhlladetptiiB at Montreal, pml rain) 


thon, which he won Iasi year. Sun- lies of races much like bicycling's 
day night, he ran in Central Park, Tour de France. Everyone seemed 
and if anyone's head turned when to want to lake his picture or get his 
he passed, he didn't notice iL autograph or have coffee with him. 


European Soccer 



Da Aaodabd Pna 

OUT — In a scoreless tie Wednesday in Istanbul, Fener- 
bahee (striped shirts) eliminated Bordeaux of France in 
the first round of the Champions’ Cup soccer competi- 
tion. Fenerbahce had won the round's first-leg match, 3-2. 


as limp as spaghetti because this 
was his third marathon in five 
weeks. In 1983, he finished 27th, 
high enough for the marathon 
sponsors to pay his expenses to the 
1984 race. 

When he won iL the first mara- 
thon victory of his career, his life 
was changed In addition to round- 
trip air fare, hotel room costs and 
SSu a day for food he collected 
$25,000 in prize money and a new 
Mercedes-Benz that he soon sold 
This year he wQ] receive the same 


Frank Shorter, Ron Tabb and Eat 
Petersen. ; 

No matter bow Pizzolato fares 
this year, he is unlikely to matjdi 
last year's drama. On a day much 
too warm and humid for marathbn 
running, be took the lead midway 
through the race and fought dff 
stomach and leg pains after that 
He stopped eight times as D&Ve 
Murphy of Britain drew nearer and 
nearer. He kept looking back, ad if 
hoping Murphy would go away. 
After 18 miles, when Pizzolato 


expenses plus $5,000 to $10,000 in started slowing. Many Uquori, 40- 
appearance money. ing commentary for ABC Teleyi- 

After last year's victory, he re- sion, said, "Gao, Orlando.’ 


turned to Italy a hero. The 8,000 
residents of Piovene Rocchette, his 
hometown west of Venice, turned 
out in force for a parade. 

Soon the telephone started to 
ring Almost every meet director in 
Italy wanted him to run. It was the 
chance of a lifetime to make money 
— and also the chance of a lifetime 
to run too much, wear himself out 
and get injured. 

“I didn’t ran a lot,” he said, “be- 
cause I wanted 10 preserve my ca- 
reer. I just want to run in strong 
races. Besides, the money in Italy is 
not like the money in the U.S.A.” 

He ran a few half-marathons and 
road races. In April he finished 
sixth in the World Cup Marathon 
in Hiroshima and set an Italian 
record of 2 hours, 10 minutes and 
23 seconds. 


Golf 


PGA Leaders 


Scoring CToacMowns) 

TO RuNl HOC Rat Pts 


Craig, S.F. 
McKinnon. CM 
Brawn, Mhm. 
Coffman, G.B. 
Anderson, 5tJ_ 
Carter. Minn. 
ClwOwlek. DaL 


Klnnabrow. On. 

4 3 

1 

0 

24 

Dfckarsoa Rams 

3.3 

0 

0 

18 

Slavers, SJ3. 

4 0 

4 

0 

24 

Ferrell, sijl. 

3 1 

' 2 

0 

IB 






Green, Sl.L. 

3 8 

3 

0 

18 

Scaring (tacking) 



B-lahnsoa All. 

3 0 

3 

0 

18 


PAT 

FG 

lb pts 

J Jonas. Det. 

3 2 

1 

a 

18 

Revelz. Mia. 

12-12 

10-11 

40 

42 

McMahon, Chi. 

3 2 

T 

0 

IB 

Lowery, K.C 

12-12 

M0 

58 

39 

Scoring (Kicking) 



Korns. Den. 

12-14 

a-s 

40 

34 


PAT 

FG 

La Pts 

Breech. Cin. 

15-16 

4- 5 

44 

27 

Butler, ChL 

14-14 

8-12 

38 

40 

Laahy, jets 

10-11 

Sr 9 

48 

25 

O’Danaehtia, £LL- 

15-15 

7-10 

49 

34 

Anderson. Pitt. 

12-12 

4. r 

38 

24 

Aimersea NLO. 

' M0 

7-10 

£5 

30 

Norwood. Butt. 

4- 4 

4- 4 

49 

22 

Murray, DeL 

M0 

7- 8 

44 

30 

Franklin, N-£. 

8- 8 

4- 4 

47 

30 

Septan. Dali. 

11-12 

M3 

53 

» 

Thomas, SJ3. 

8-11 

4- 6 

34 

30 

Luckhurrf. AtL 

7-r 

7-7 

42 

28 

Zcndelas, Hou. . 

4- 5 

5- 8 

44 

19 

tewebulke, T.B. 

• 6-7 

4- 9 

51 

24 


PulltTM 




Langford. Rams 

11-11 

4- 4 

-S3 

23 


NO YARDS LONG AVG 

McFadden. PBIL 

. 2- 2 

7- 9 

50 

23 

Camarillo. N-£- 

31 1449 

75 

447 

Wenching. 5J 5 . 

14-14 

3-5 

42 

23 


5542321 

378.989 

37)313 

148339 

362A40 

35X440 

35X774 

30X340 


Moistelenka, SJ3. 
Robv. Mia 
JenrUnas. Jots 
L-lottnson, Hou. 
Stark, ma 
Kfdd. Buff. 
Mentally, an. 
Norman. Don. 
Newsom*, Pitt. 


932 

585 

874 

WI 

772 


24 ICO* 
IS 759 
24 997 

39 909 


453 
41 7 
42.9 
42.9 
423 

412 

413 

4U 


. LOfltteta. Giants 
SoxaruOaU. 
Coleman. Minn, 
Birdsong, su_ 

Block, Oaf. 
Garda T.B. 
Runaoar, IF. 
Haves. Wash. 


NO YDS LONG AVG 
- 24 1110 IB 4b3 

775 
S42 

92S Afi 443 

938 57 42A 

S54 54 42A 

893 57 

445 55 


57 453 

a 443 


423 

413 


Leaders on th« PratewtaMl Golfers Associ- 
ation tear through the Texas Oaea, vriXcb 
e nd ed Scat. 38: 

Earnings 
1. Curtis Strong* 

1 Roy Floyd 
X Lanny Wadkins 

4. Calvin Peefe 

5. Hal Sutton 

6. Corev Pavln 

7. Roger. MaltMe 
& Mark O'Meara 
9. John Mahaffev 
IX Crate 5 tod lor 


SCORING 

1, Dan Poo lev. 7DA9. l Rev Ftevd. 7X51 1 
Corey Pavln, 7038. 4. John Mahaffev, TBAS. & 
Lonny Wocfldns, 7834. 6. Calvin Peele, 70 l 7] . 7, 
Larry Mize. 70J4. & Roger Maltbta. 7089. 9, 
Mark O'Maara 7097. ID. wavrw LevL 7130. 
AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
1, Andy Bean. 2793L 2, Fred Coupteb 277.1. l 
Greg Norman, 274A. 4, Mac OX!rody,274JL 5. 
Joev Stndalar. 27X2. 4. Greg Twteas. 274J. 7, 
Tom Watson. 274JL 8. Bill G lessen, 27X8. 9, 
Sandy Lyle, 2733. 10, Tom Furtzer, 2711. 
DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
1. Calvin Peela, 309. 1 David Edwards. 381 
X Jock Renner, .7*9. 4, Mike Rdd.J'O.&Ltevy 
Nelson. J4 9. 4. DavM Frost. .741 7. Dana 
TewglL 348. & Tim Norris, J3 ». 7. Hale Irwin, 
-734. 10. TWO fled wtttt JXL 

GREENS IN REGULATION - 
1, Jock Nieklam. jlAZ John Mahaffev. 315. 
X Bruce Ltettke. -714-4. Colvin Peete. 309. 3. 
Andy Bean, ML 6, Dan Pahl, JOi- 7. Wayne 


CHAMPIONS' CUP 
( First Round, second Leo) 

Penertwbce X Bordeaux 0 (Fenerbatice ad- 
vances on 3-2 aggregate). 

3teoua4,VelleBKl (Sleaua advances on 5-2 
aggregate). 

Juvenfus 4. Jeunnse iTEsdi 1 (Juvenhis 
advances on 9-1 aggregate). 

Trakta PlovtU v 1, 1 FK GOIobora 2 (GOtefiarg 
advances on 5-3 aggregate). 

Valerengen a Zenit Leningrad 2 (Zenll ad- 
vances on 44 aggregate). 
f PAOK Salonika ], Verona 2 (Verona ad- 
vances on H oagregote). 

FK Saraleva I, Kuusyl Lahti 2 (Kuusvsi 
Lahti advances an 4-2 ago regal eJ 


L CUP WINNERS’ CUP 
1 First Roand, Second Leg) 
Tatabanva 1. Rapid Vienna 1 (Roald ad- 
vances on 4-1 aggregate). 

Glasgow Celtic 1. Attelleo Madrid 2 (Aito- 
ttco advonces on 3-2 aggregate). 

Untversttatea Craiova X A3. Monaco 0 
(Craiova advances an 3-2 aggregate). 

Flamurtari VTora i. hjk Ketstak) 2 (HJK 
Helsinki advances an 5-3 aggregate.) 

Galway United 2. Lyngbv 3 (Lvngbv ad- 
vances on 4-2 aggregate). 

Dynamo Kiev 4. Utrecht 1 (Ovnamo ad- 
vances on 53 aggregate). 

widzewLablGafatosarayl (Aggregate 3- 
2; Galatasmav wins an anov-aaals rate). 

Bangor 0. Fredrikstad 0 (Aggregate 1-1; 
Bangor advmces on awsy goats.) 


Pont Be tumor* 

LG 

TD 

Dormeltv, Aft 


22 

911 . 

56 

4L4 

. Levi, Carey Pavln and Doug TeweiL -700 10, 


NO 

YDS 

AVG 

'Hatcher, Rons 


21 

866 

55 

4U 

Roger Mamie. -690 

woikrr, Rodrs 

7 

11) 

15J 

25 

0 

.Pont Returners 



AVERAGE PUTTS PE4 ROUND . 

Frvor. N£. 

15 

MS 

I2J 

05 

1 


NO 

YDS 

AVG 

LG 

TO 

L Craig Slad ter, 2X48. 2. Franfc Conner, 2U6. 

Upas. Pitt. 

6 

•• 73 

12J) 

38 

0 

Taylor, CM. 

• 9 

TOO 

ll.T 

21 

0 

2^ Ray Flavd. 2X77.4. BaMavOampetl,28J9.& 

James, SJ). 

6 

45 

KLS 

24 

0 

Mltcholl, S!J_. 

4 

45 

1U 

21 

0 

Mike Denote, Hun. A, Willie Wood, 28.98. 7, 

Hll), Buff. 

a 

*4 

105 

25 

0 

Stanley, GJ5. 

11 

.118 

107 

• IS 

0 

George Burns, 29.00. 8, Brad FaheL Z9JM. 9, 

Mntomrv, ftdrs 

a 

84 

105 

32 

0 

McCnfcy, Go Is 

13 

134 

105 

37 

0 

Rex Caldwell 294)6. TO, Dan Foreman, 294)8. 

WUttrtte. Den. 

10 

97 

V 

18 

0 

Cooper. PML 

7 

71 

lOl 

14 

a 

PERCENTAGE OP SUB-PAR HOLES 

Lank, ICC 

9 

84 

93 

16 

0 

Bright, T.B. 

7 

49 

9J9 

21 

0 

l, Craig Sladter, au. 2,Lonnv Wadkini and 

Di-ewrey. Hou. 

7 

S7 

LI 

14 

0 

Mandlev. DeL 

17 

• 111 

93 

19 

0 

Tom Watson. 200. 4. Rev Fiord. 206. 5. Tzo- 

Cl.Wtbrt, Civ, 

13 

105 

LI 

16 

0 

Me Iron. Minn. 

5 

45 

9J> 

» 


Chvng Chen, AG. 6, Mac O'Gradv. m 7, Hal 

KkAoff R*Wra*rs 

NO VOS AVG 



Martin, w.a 

6 

"S3 

U 

• 13 

0 

Sutton and Larry Netoocv TOO. 9, Andy Bean 

LG 

TO 

BJohnsn, AtL. 

. 9 

76 

8 A 

IB 

D 

and Don Poalev, .199. - 


UEFA CUP 

(Pint Roand. Second Leg) 

V ardor Skopin 1. Dynamo Bucharest 8 (Ag- 

grroare 3-2; vantaradvnnaes on awav goals). 

Lech PasnanO. Etarassla Manctieng lad bach 
2 (MOnehenglodboctt advances on 3-1 aggre- 
gate). 

Lokomol I v Letozlg X Colerf one 0 ( Lokoino- 
ilv advances an 4-1 aggregate). 

Lokomotiv Sofia A Apoel Nicosia 2 (Loko- 
rtwHv advonces or 4-4 aggregate). 

Hamrun Spartansdb Obmno Tirana 8 (Din- 

oma advances on 1-0 aggregate). 

Bohemia ns Praha 4, RoboVgsas Eta GyMr 
1 (Bohemians advances on 5-4 oagregote). 

Peritonei Belgrade «. Portlmonenae 0 (Por- 
Hzan adv an ce s or 4-1 aggregate.) 


ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Luton 1, lpswlcn 0 


Transition 


r. Hou. 
on, Dn. 
ion 
"■g.Ptt, 
TO.N.E. 

r &S‘. 

r. Jets ‘ 
i. Clev. 
ten. ML 
i. Inn 


S 144 283 

11 307 273 

■ 70S 253 

11 344 243 

11 355 03 

14 3W 23.1 
IBS 

115 -23 3 
T79 S2A 
290 223 


.52 

52 
34 
42 

as 

53 
v 

. 47: 


Kickoff Refuramr . 

NO VD& AVG LG TD 
5 .1*2 -384 99 1 


1 
.5 
S' 

13 

v -w 995 • 35 


0 

Rhymes. Miul 

13 

372 

3L0 

a 

0 

0 

Martin, NXX 

7 

207 

29 j. 

» 

0 

0 

Hunter, PML 

13 

324 

24J' 

46 

d 

0 

Freemn, TJ3. 

11 

358- 

2X5 

58 

D 

0 

Hall DeL 

.6 

MO 

2X3 

31 

0 

0 

Bright. T.B. 

4- 

•134 

22J 

4 r 

0 

0 

JWIkUtS, WStL .. 

a. 

334 

223 

'36. 

0. 

0 

Morten. Wash.. 

6 

131 

213 

27 

0 


EAGLES 

1. Corav Ftavln and Lorry Rlnher. 13. X Phll- 
le Black mar, Jodie Mudd and Joey Sind* lev. 
11.6. Fred Couples, Dav Id Ora Wtm.and Payne 

Stewart, 1(L 9, Seven tied wtth 9. 

BIRDIES 

l. Joev Skndeiar. 371 X Hal Sutton. 345. X 
wavrw Gradv, 342.4, Willie wood-332.XRooer 
Merttwe. 328. e. Ctorance Row 3M. 7. Brott 
Upper. 322. L Bobby C lomoett and Pred Cou- 
ples, 320. TO. Howard T Witty, 319. 


BASEBALL 
Anwneaa Lea gd s 

LEAGUE— fiuspandod BaHimare Manager 
Earl weaver, who was elected tram 50th 
games of a deublefieadrr Sunday In Now 
York, tor Ittree games. 

CLEVELAND— Stanea Pot Corral es. man- 
ager. to an open ended contract 
FOOTBALL 

Cnodlon PAdboli Lmmhc 
EDMONTON— Plocod Joe Holllmon, «f- 
ntrbodL on it* 80-dov iniured reserve tlsL 
fumonof Football League 
SAN DIEOO— Fired Tom Bass! dotensive 
caartSnator; named Day* Adolph to replace 
him. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Agreement Readied on Sale of Pirates 

PITTSBURGH (AP) — A group of public and private investors, 
committed to keeping the Pirates in Pittsburgh, reached agreement in 
principal on Wednesday to buy the National League team from the 
Gal breath family and Warner Communications Inc. The team will be 
sold for $22 million in cash plus the assumption of certain player salaries. 
The deal is subject to the approval of major league baseball owners. 

The Pirates identified the buyers as a coalition represented by Mayor 
Richard S. Caliguiri; Douglas D. Danforth, chairman of Westiugbouse 
Electric Corp.; Cari F. Barger, a Pittsburgh attorney, and Malcolm M. 
Prine, chairman of Ryan Homes Inc. 

Pittsburgh, last in the Eastern Division standings in 1984 and 1985, has 
Tailed to draw a million fans since the 1983 season. It has lost 101 games 
this season — the most by a Pirate team in more than 30 years — and will 
lose a reported S9 million. The team reportedly lost $6 million in 1984. 

Bruno Takes European Crown on KO 

LONDON (AP) — Briton Frank Bruno knocked out champion Anders 
Eklund of Swsden in the fourth round here Tuesday night to win the 
European heavyweight boxing title. 

Bruno, who dominated the twice-postponed fight from the opening 
bell, outclassed a defenseless Eklund, flooring him 20 seconds into the 
fourth round of a scheduled 12-rounder. Bruno is 26*1 lifetime; Eklund 
fell to 1 1-3-1. 

NFL Bills Dismiss Coach Stephenson 

ORCHARD PARK, New York (AP) — Coach Kay Stephenson, 
whose Buffalo Bills won only two games in 1984 and are winless so far 
this year, was fired Tuesday .’Hie National Football- League dub named 
defensive coordinator Hank BuDough to replace him. 

Stephenson, 41, had been the Bills' offensive coordinator until 1983, 
when he succeeded Coach Chuck Knox, who took Lhe head job at Seattle. 
Stephenson’s first team went 8-8; the Bills were 2-14 last year. 

Bullough, the defensive coach and linebacker coach with Cincinnati 
from 1981 to 1983, joined the Bills in January after a brief stint as coach 
of the now-defunct Pittsburgh Maulers of the United States Football 
League, He has coached in the pro ranks since 1970. 

Cocaine Dealer Gets 12-Year Sentence 

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Shelby Greer, accused of accompanying the 
Pittsburgh Pirates on road trips in order to supply some players with 
cocaine, pleaded guilty late Tuesday to seven federal drag distribution 
charges mud was given a 12-year prison term. Greer, 29, of Philadelphia, 
admitted selling cocaine to at least four former Pirates from 1 98 1 to 1 984. 

Greer was one of seven men indicted by a federal grand jury May 31 on 
cocaine trafficking charges following a lengthy investigation inio drug 
use by major league players. He is the sixth to have his case resolved. Four 
have pleaded guilty and two were found guilty; the trial of the seventh 
man, Jeffrey Mosco of Pittsburgh, is expected’ to resume litis week. 


Instead of goodbye, the riao 
turned out to be hello. Pizzolato 
held on and won. No longer would 
he ask for the autographs of sufch 
famous marathoners as Salazar and 
Dixon. ; 

“It was exciting to get their auto- 
graphs," be saii “because I Was 
not a top runner then. It's different 
now. 1 can compete with them. 
Then they were on another level, 
and I was their fan. Now they are 
my enemies during a race." 

Pizzolato is 27 years old, with an 
economical build of S feet 10^ 
inches and 137 pounds <1- 79 nifr- 
ters, 62.1 kilograms), ideal for a 
runner. 

He is to be in N ew York all week, 
doing promotional work, working 
out in Central Park, drinking a few 
beers and eating carefully. At lunch 
His next marathon, the 17th of on Monday, he studied the menu 
his career, provided his second vie- intensely. ! 

lory. It came Sept. I in the World “Iinguine is a pasta, yes?” he 
University Games in Kobe, Japan, asked. 1 

and he won in 2:20:06. “You are Italian and as king 

Now. preparing for this year’s that?" ; 

New York City Marathon, be runs “In Italy, it is a pasta. Here, 
10 miles in the morning and 10 in too?” ] 

the afternoon, or dse 20 miles in ^Here, too.” f 

one workouL Training is not re- “Linguine with clam sauce, red,” 
duced, even though the New York he said happily. "I like New York.” 



Unie4 Pren IfVarnmpul ! 

Pizzolato in the *84 New York race, when ‘riao’ meant hello. 











L 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


SCIENCE 


Balloons Prove Low-Energy Tool for Exploring the Universe 


m BRIEF 


i 




y- 


fHl 


R-i’Vl: — 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

New York Times Service 

A S the costs of space vehicles. 

panicle accelerators and tele- 
scopes soar out of sight scientists 
are turning back to the humble bal- 
loon — little 'changed since its in- 
vention two centuries ago — as a 
cut-rate tool for exploring the ori- 
gin and nature of the universe. 

AL the National Scientific Bal- 
loon Facility in Palestine. Texas, 
balloons large enough to enclose 
entire football fields are lifting un- 
manned scientific payloads of two 
tons or more to altitudes of up to 
30 miles {SO kilometers). There, ad- 
vanced instruments help to deter- 
mine what the universe was like in 
the first few thousand years of its 
existence and bow matter has 
evolved since then. 

At “float.’’ or cruising, altitude, 
the 50 or more big balloons 
launched each year from the rolling 
green farmland of East Texas hang 
suspended in the golden boundary 
layer between the Earth's atmo- 
sphere and space. Above them the 
sky is block and studded with stars 
even at midday, and below them is 
-the sunlit, azure sea of air. 

At 130,000 feei {40,000 meters) 
or so, the air is so thin that it 
scarcely obstructs or distorts the 
streams of cosmic ray particles, 
gamma rays, and other signals ar- 
riving from distant stars and galax- 
ies. 

“The balloon experiments them- 
selves are at the cutting edge of 
science.” said Alfred Shipley, direc- 
tor of the facility. “But besides 
yielding direct, results, these experi- 
ments often point the way in de- 
signing experiments to be flown by 
the space shuttle or planetary mis- 
sions. Hie scientists at the big par- 
ticle accelerators get valuable in- 
sights from balloon experiments, 
too. Balloons are not only much 
cheaper than space missions; they 
are also faster and more conve- 
nient. When a balloon experiment 
fails, it can easily be pulled down 
and repeated.” 

Founded in 1962. the National 
Scientific Balloon Facility now em- 
ploys about 70 permanent staff 
members and supports a host of 
research programs. 

One of its most important 


achievements was the 1979 discov- 
ery by a group headed by Dr. Rob- 
ert L Golden of New Mexico State 
University that cosmic rays some- 
times contain anti-protons — the 
antimatter equivalent of ordinary 
protons. Dr. Golden is now pursu- 
ing the quest for cosmic-ray anti- 
matter with another experiment at 
the facility's station in Ainsworth. 
Nebraska. 

Scientists at Palestine believe 
that ultrasensitive balloon-borne 
apparatus may detect a very pecu- 
liar Slate of matter predicted by 
theory. Ordinary matter consists 
mainly of such heavy particles as 
the proton, in which three quarks 
{the fundamental building blocks 
of heavy nuclear particles) are 
bound together by connective par- 
ticles called gluons. Most physicists 
believe that free quarks uncom- 
bined with other quarks have never 
been detected, but there is evidence 
that in the ultra-dense matter of 
neutron stars, quarks and gluons 
may be ripped apart, creating a 
kind of hash called a “quark-gluon 
plasma.” If the theory is correct, 
quark-gluon plasma may also exist 
in the instant of collision between a 
heavy, super-energetic cosmic ray 
panicle and the nucleus of some 
atom contained in a detector 
aboard a high-flying balloon. 

There are plans to build Earth- 
bound machines for accelerating 
entire atomic nuclei to high enough 
energies to observe quark-gluon 
plasma. But until then, the only 
source of the required nuclear pro- 
jectiles is cosmic rays. 

In the past few weeks, activity at 
Palestine has been feverish. Long- 
duration flights are best launched 
in early fall “turnaround,” the few 
days or weeks in which the prevail- 
ing east winds of summer give way 
to the westerlies of winter. Briefly, 
winds at all altitudes are often 
nearly lulled, and a balloon may 
remain aloft for a day or two with- 
out drifting beyond range of the 
base's radio-communication sys- 
tem or over some populated area. 

The balloon facility, created by a 
consortium of universities and oth- 
er scientific institutions, has a 57- 
million annual budget and is sup- 
ported almost entirely by the 



TV* Aacaowd Preo 


PREHISTORIC MOUTHFUL — Robert Emry, hold- 
ing a set of shark jaws, is framed by a reconstruction of 
the jaws of a 40-foot carcharodon megalodon shark, a 
predator that lived more than five million years ago. The 
jaws, five feet high, are part of a new permanent 
exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. 


Space 


National Aeronautics and 
A dmini stration. 

The balloons — the largest flying 
objects ever built — are expensive. 
Typical of the medium-size bal- 
loons scheduled to fly this fall is 
one built by Winzen International 
Inc. of Paris. Texas, to cany a 3.020 

pound {1,37 5 -kilogram) gamma. 

ray experiment for California Insti- 
tute of Technology. Only partly in- 
flated at launching, the balloon will 
stand more than 600 feet high — 


taller than the Washington Monu- 
ment. When the balloon reaches its 
float altitude of nearly 1 30,000 feel, 
the helium lifting gas inside it will 
expand and fill it to a volume of 20 
milli on cubic feet, roughly equiva- 
lent to the combined volume of 100 
Goodyear blimps. Balloons three 
times larger are sometimes flown. 

The Caltech balloon, made 
mostly of polyethylene plastic 
sheeting thinn er than that used to 
make sandwich bags, cost NASA 


about $45,000 to buy and requires 
about $6,000 worth of helium. No 
balloon can be used more than 
once; at the end of each flight, a 
radio command fires explosive cut- 
ters that actuate a rip cord, tearing 
open the balloon and opening the 
parachute on which the scientific 
package floats bade to the Earth. 

Balloons' are accidentally de- 
stroyed on the launching pad or in 
flight often enough to give experi- 
menters nightmares. Some bal- 
loons have completed their flights 
successfully, only to drop their sci- 
entific loads into deep takes or into 
the corrals oT suspicious fanners. 

Among the most ambitious ex- 
periments to be flown this year is 
Caltech's high-resolution gamma-' 
ray telescope, the first such instru- 
ment ever taken aloft. 

Since gamma rays penetrate sol- 
id matter even more easily than X- 
rays do, they cannot be focused by 
telescopes using ordinary lenses or 
curved mirrors. 

In the Caltech telescope, a slowly 
rotating mask consisting of 1,000 
hexagonal lead blocks allows gam- 
ma rays to pass through 1,000 hex- 
agonal holes, each of which focuses 
the rays into a faint image at the 
opposite end of the telescope tube. 
There, photons of invisible gamma- 
ray light strike a huge, waferlike 
crystal of sodium iodide, sparking, 
tiny flashes of visible light The 
latter are measured by electronic 
detectors that feed data to comput- 
ers and a memory bank improvised 
from eight commercial video cas- 
sette recorders. The final result is a 
computer-graphic picture of the 
sky’s brighter gamma-ray sources. 

Among the targets of this experi- 
ment are pulsars — stars that emit 
pulses of energy at remarkably reg- 
ular intervals — and two puzzling 
objects in the constellation Cygnus 
(Cygnus X-I and X-3). Both emit 
X-rays and may be black holes — 
regions of space where matter is so 
dense that even light cannot escape 
its gravitational field. 

Two other experimental pack- 
ages, one built by the University of 
Minnesota and the other by a part- 
nership including NASA’s Mar- 
shall Space Flight Center and sev- 
eral U. S. Japanese, and Polish 
research organizations, are study- 


ing cosmic-ray particles in search 
of dues useful in solving several' 
cosmological puzzles. 

Most of the particles that hurtle 
into the Earth are either subnuclear 
is size or are the nuclei of light 
dements. Atoms of iron and other 
heavy elements are rare in outer 
space, but they are especially inter- 
esting to astrophysicists because 
their relative abundances provide a 
gauge of the stellar processes that 
created them. 

Also this fall, a balloon- borne 
laser platform built by Jet Propul- 
sion Laboratory will analyze the 
upper part of the atmosphere for 
ozone and the oxides of nitrogen, 
common contaminants. An infra- 
red laser carried by the balloon will 
send a beam through the upper 
atmosphere to a reflector. The re- 
turning beam, modified by the gas 
molecules through which it passes, 
will then enter a spectrometer that 
will provide a chemical analysis of 
the air. 

“The great advantage of a bal- 
loon-borne laser,” said Christopher 
R. Webster of Jet Propulsion Lab- 
oratory, “is that we can obtain con- 
tinuous spectroscopic analyses of 
the upper atmosphere in situ, rath- 
er than having to sample the air in 
different places at different times.” 
This package of ours wfll also serve 
as- a model for a more compact 
version that will be flown on a 
mission to Saturn.” 


U. S. Tropical Disease Research Lags 

WASHINGTON fNYT) — The probability '“SSlSta 


be 


WASHINGTON (NYT) — The probabiliw ^ 

able to develop successful measures to jesued by the 

never been greater than it is today, according to a T oovern- 

Congressioual Office of Technology Assessment But *e fedjM govern 
—7: j: »r,a" cinn million a vear on tropical aisea» 


incuogy /\ssc»nicin- ■ — ‘^ ;c _ se 

meat is spading less than budget of 


research, a tiny fraction of its tu«u min t ™ — — : — — _ 
well over $4 billion, the congressional agency etimates. f 

Researchers have alxeady^ontribnted a Few unpo^mjnwategr 
tropical diseases: oral rehydration therapy to prevent d eatfa ifrom 
spectrum of diarrheal diseases; praziquantel a j n -w 


a oeouuaong -j . — v 

varuvan anti-viral drag that has proved effective fl S a m s t • 

. advances in biotechnology hope to have a vaccine c 


Scientists using recent «... 

against malaria on the market in 5 to 10 years. . j 

But research on therapies for tropical diseases has “gnud 

research on diseases of importance to the United States, whkh effo: 

bigger market for drug companies, the report said. Few new drags hae 

been introduced for human tropical diseases in the past two decades, tnc 
report noted, but there has been a surge in development in drugs to 
combat .parasitic infections in domestic a n i ma l s . 


Effects of Eye Operation Questioned 

SAN FRANCISCO (UPJ) — Radial keratotomy. an operation used so 
far on- more than 100,000 people to correct nearsightedness, may have 

QAriraie r4rtmtknr*lrc ia IimH rtf 9 rKKirrh tffiUTI GOlldUCtlXLft 8- 


Thai Cultural Dating 
Revised After K3n Finds 


United Press International 


BAN KO NOL Thailand — Af- 
ter taking a second look at 1,000- 
year-old kilns in Ban Ko Noi, 280 
miles (450 kilometers) north of 
Bangkok, that had been partially 
excavated, a Thai- Australian team 
has unearthed deeper kilns, chal- 
lenging the belief that Chinese pot- 
ters developed the Thai ceramics 
industry during the 13th-century 
Sukhothai period. 

“This was the cradle of an inde- 
pendent Thai civilization as far 
back as the 10th century” said an 
Australian archaeologist, Don 
Hein. 


serious drawbacks, acco r ding to the head of a research team conducting ! 
five-year study of the procedure. . _ • • 

Speaking at the an n u a l nf the American Academy of Ophthal- 

mology, Dr. George' Waring, ophthalmology professor at Emory Univer- 
sity in Atlanta, said one-third of the 435 patients examined during the 
second year of the study had suffered visual fluctuations long after their 
eyes were expected to heal from the operation. A diamond-tipped knife is 
used to slice into the cornea. 

Also at the meeting. Dr. Arthur Ginsburg. founder and director of the 
Air Force Aviation Vision Laboratory at Wright-Parterson Air Force 
Base in Ohio, demonstrated a new system of determining visual ability. 
As well as measuring visual acuity more accurately than the standard 
Snellen chart, the Vision Contrast Test System show a person’s ability to 
see under different light conditions, such as dusk or bnght sunlight. Dr. 
Ginsburg said it can provide doctors with rally information on such 
conditions as lazy eye, cataracts, glaucoma and multiple sclerosis. 

Instead of using die progressively smaller blade letters against a white 
background, the new chart utilizes acomputer-composed series of aides 
with bars of different widths and contrasts. The bars are vertical'or slant 
to the right or left. 


Research Park on Bering Sea Urged 

WASHINGTON (UPJ) — In an effort to advance arctic research and 
help thaw diplomatic idations, Walter Orr Roberts, a noted U.S. 
atmospheric scientist, has suggested that the Soviet Uzoon and the United 
States create a research park on both sides of the Bering Sea.- 

In an article in Journal ’85, a publication of the World Resources 
Institute, he proposes that the research park include about 50 miles (80 
kilometers) of the easternmost tip of Siberia, 50 rnfles of the westernmost 
tip of Alaska and the 60-mfle-wide strait separating die two countries. 
“Within the zone, cooperative research could be conducted on biological, 
environmental, anthropological, cultural, atmospheric, oceanographic 
and other fascinating aspects of this unique region,” he said. 


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15ft 14% lift— ft 
3 2ft 2ft 

6% 6% + ft 
23% 24 
10 10 


13 Month 
High Low Slock 


Sales In 

Dlv. Yld. 10b High 


Net 

LOW 2 PM OH* 


9ft 5% FOP 
10ft 5 FMI 
Sft lft FomRest 
22ft 10ft FurmF 
68ft 45ft FrmC 
23ft 13ft Fed Gas 
I 4ft Feroilu 
17% 7 FID ran S 

if S^W, 

XU 21ft Floole 
18% 12ft Firtrtfc 
Aft 3% Final CO 
9ft Sft Flngmx 



7 

24 

10 

7ft 

11% 

s 


Aft 


7ft 

11 

a% 

7ft 

2ft 

Aft 


7% + ft 
11% -I- ft 
Sft— % 


™!=t 


7V» Consul. 
28% CntIBc 
8% aiHIts 
4 CtLosr 
4ft Convgl 
12V; Convrse 
1W CoorBkj 


Z40 14.7 
liOalCU 
116 14.0 
1M 32 


I8ft 18 
Sft Sft 
1W lft 
7% 8ft 
7 6ft 


2ft 
6ft + % 
18 

Sft 

lft 

Sft 

6ft— Vk 


2-040 52 


16W Cooytel 
10% 4 Cor com 

11% 6% Corals 

60ft 37ft CoreS f 
5 1ft Carvus 
7ft 3Vk Como 
17% 10% CrkBrl 
. left 10ft Cronus 
37% 20% CrasTr 
14 9 CwnBk 

34% 15% Crump 
32% IBft CultnFr 
28% 1S 1 4 Culums 
37 18% Cvcare 


16ft 16% 16ft 
16 15W 16 + % 

13ft 13W 13W— Vk 
49% 48% 49% + % 
2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
39 38% 39 + % 

9% 9ft «%— ft 
4ft 4W 4ft 

8% 7ft B 

13ft 13 13ft ♦ ft 

1% lft l% 

IBft 18% 18% — ft 
35% 33% 35 — ft 
8 7% 8 + % 

7*S 9ft 9ft— ft 

53ft 51ft 52W + % 
lft lft lft + ft 

3ft 3ft 3W 

11% 11% 11% + % 
14ft 13% 14 + ft 

22ft 22ft 22ft— ft 
13% 13ft 13ft + % 
29 28ft 2Hft + ft 
22% rt*-. 22ft 
21ft 21ft 21ft— ft 
21% 21 21% + ft 


33 

21ft FAMBk 

1.12 

X7 

366 

32W 

S FtAFln 

80 

24 13 

aw 

14% FfATn S 



105 

IV 

11% FICoJF 



10 

29ft 

22W FComr 

120 

52- 

M 

v% 

7 FtCont 

lJOeliS 

51 

38W 

1AW FDatoR 



S3 

lift 

18 FExec 

2*78202 

5900 

t?W 

7% FFCuls 



355 

2AW 

14W FFFtM 

JObZO 

15 

29ft 

15ft FTFnCP 

JO 

25 

9 

J0W 

19% FtFIBK 

M 

13 

95 

JAW 

27% F.'erN 

MW 

52 

30 

66 

27% FMdB 

IJU 

JJ 

29 

42% 

20% FNtCins 1J0 

3J 

/A 

40ft 

25% FRBGO 

MB 

2J 

n 

36 

T7% FSecC 

1.10 

53 

a 

429k 

Sft FToftn 

’.M 

42 

8 

44% 

Wft FstUnC 

1.12 

10 

35/2 

BW 

2% Ptofcev 



438 

I6W 

tow Final 1 

J8 

4J) 

29 

aw 

13% FloFdl 

20 

MJ 

514 

414k 

76V. FlaNFI 

JO 

Zl 

490 

19% 

7% FIOwS 5 



40 

17W 


3S 

2J 

12 

6% 

3 Forcrh 



53 

IIW 

12ft FLtalA 

JC? 

3 

1360 

19ft 

12 FUon B 

at 

J 

53 

34W 

SW ForAm 

96 

11 

433 

24% 

13% FonatO 

MW 

6 9 

91 

Sft 

12% FortnF 
1% FortnS 



1 

3% 



2M 

10% 

6 Forum 

JW 

J 

1246 

8 


.10 

Zl 

5 

29% 

14% F rerun? 

JO 

20 

98 

14% 

6 Fudrck 



671 

16% 

11% FulrHB 

32 

20 

65 


7% 7% 7% 

9ft 9% 9ft 
lft 1% 1%— Vk 
lift 10ft lift + ft 

4% 4ft 4% + ft 
n 16% i6H— 
28% 28ft 38ft + 
52ft 51% 52W + 

38 37ft 37ft 

15ft 15 lift 
4% 4ft 4ft — 
6% A 6 — ft 
lift 14ft lift -f ft 
2% X »ft +1 
3Dft 30ft 30ft 
26% 25% 24 *■ % 

15% 15% 15% . - 
23% 23 3 — % 

7ft 6% Aft— ft 
38ft 38 X 
13ft 13ft 13% + ft 
17ft 17 17 — 'ft 

20% 19% 20% 

27% 26% 27% + W 
28% 2S% 2Bft + ft 
Hft 34ft 34ft + Vk 
54 S3ft 53ft— ft 
36ft 36% 36ft- ft 

39 38 39 + % 

20 19% X 

37ft 37ft 37ft + ft 
37ft 36% 37 +ft 

3 2ft 2ft 
12 lift 12 
20% 20 20Vk + ft 
38% 38 38% — % 

18ft 17ft 18 
lift 14% 14% 

3% 3ft 3ft 
17% 17W 17W 
17ft 17ft 17ft 
31% 30% 30% + ft 
14ft lift 14W — % 
19ft 19ft 19ft 
2% 2Vk 2S— 1« 
8% B% Sft— ft 
4ft 4ft 4ft 
23ft 23ft 23ft 
7 Aft 6% 

16Vj 16ft 16ft— ft 


12% 

t:\um 



IS 

AVl 

6 

16ft 

rr-;- 1 1 



560 

T2 

11% 

IIW 

rTTT. . 1 

.10 

13 

2D 



S6W 

2B% Genet ch 



930 

46% 

45% 

8% 

S Genets 



549 

7% 

7% 


t% Genex 



270 

1% 

1% 

24% 

8% GaFBk 



36 

25 

24% 

tow 

4% GerMds 

JS 

Ml 

A2S 

. B% 

7% 


16 GlbsGs 

24 

IJ 

246 

18% 

18ft 

SW 

14 GrflaTr 



7 

15% 

15% 


lrw Gotoas 



63S 

MW 

13% 

22 

9ft Gott 



79 

21% 

21% 

IIW 

I4W G00WP 

26 

4J 

42 

15% 

15% 


10ft Groeo 

J4 

10 

5 

I4W 

MW 


5% Grontra 



24 

8% 


13% 

5 Grvhl s 



71 

12% 

raw 


4 GrpnSe 



5969 

TVk 



10% GWSav 

JSr 23 

4 

19 

19 

12% 

B GtSoPd 






15% 

8 Gtech 






19 

13ft Gulltrd 

JSe 

J 

6 

is 

14% 

15% 

% GlfBdC 

SJ»C 


1191 

n 

% 


4ft 
12 + ft 

6ft— ft 


7ft— % 
Tft— ft 


7 

1? 

7* 


| 




D 



1 


7 DBA 



341 

15W 

14% 

14%- ft 

4% 

7% DDI 



67 

3ft 

3 

3 — ft 

Hie 

6W DEP 



JV 

row 

10% 

ion— n 




49987 








2689 

22% 

21% 

22V,— ft 





104 

5% 

5% 

5% + Vi 

TM 


.13 

.1 

A 

102 

102 

102 — 1% 



24 

13 




19 - W 


8% Dio IO 



1227 

9W 

8% 

9%- W 

9ft 

3% DtSwtCh 




5% 

5% 

5W 





41 

Mft 

21% 

22ft + ft 





4 

2% 

m 

29k — Vt 

SW 

4% Datum 



150 

6% 

aw 

Aft + % 





18 

5W 

5ta 

5% + ft 



20 

1.1 

to 



17W 





1967 

12% 

uw 

11% — % 



32 

2J 

2333 

SOW 

29*9 

29% + ft 


W Dettau* 



15 

1W 

1W 

in + ft 

7% 




46 

Vk 

w 

w 


, ■ J * . | 



203 

6W 

5% 

sn- w 





13 

raw 


raw 


7Vk Dkaatc 



2S8 








161 

raw 


I3ft 









30% 

12ft DtetCm 



664 

sw 

28W 

sw— 1 % 

36% 




32 

30% 

30ft 

JC%— ft 

29% 

14% DlrCni 

30 

.9 

168 

21 n 

20% 

2 iw + n 





426 

3iw 





20 

13 

5 

raw 


15W 

77 

16% DuvIDB 

J8 

45 

253 

19% 


19W 



JBe 1.9 

IB 

10% 

10 

10% + w 


9% Ore«!r 



105 

16% 

JAVA 

ran 

19% 




987 

IBft 

17% 

17 %— ft 


14% DutetD s 

.24 

IJ 

169 

227k 

22% 

23% + ft 

12% 

9% Durl run 

36 

5J 

16 

raw 

IU% 

10%— ft 


9% DurFII s 

.U 

IJ 

528 

11W 


lift— W 





37 

5% 

Sft 

5ft F ft 

28% 

raw DynichC 



459 

TO 

26% 

27W + ft 

I 





E 



| 


15 Aft 6IP 
5% I EaotTI 
11% Sft Earl Cal 
35ft 24ft EconLit 1JX 


.12 IS 


11 

12% 

tA 

lift 

12ft 

IS 

9% 


7 EdCmp 
7% El Chic 
lift ElPa* 
Aft Elan 
7ft E&jrg 
10ft Eldon i 
. _ 4ft ElecBlo 
28% 12ft ElCatti s 
Ifft «% ElfNUCl 
19ft 12ft EKRnt 
12ft A'A ElcJMJs 
■“ 7% EiranEi 

6% EmpAJr 
5% Emufn 
2ft Endta 
Sft EndaLs 
15% EnaCuv 
7% EnFoct 
Bft E noons 
21% 10 ErcaBI 
X% 8ft Eauat 
8% sft Eaton 
«ft 25% EricTI 
28ft 11 EYRSur 
I6W 5ft Exovlr 


11 


,12e U 


1.52 112 


13ft 

13ft 

Mft 

8% 

17ft 

3A 

16% 

17ft 


AO 
1012 
, 1 
72 
X 
38 

% 
ID 

JA U 376 
1101 
A3 
126 
58 
964 
2A9 
2246 
140 
7 
597 
96 
led 
60 
162 
227 

2D II 2070 
259X1 855 

IBS 


« r ? 

10ft 10ft 10ft 
33ft 33% 33ft 
9% 9ft 9ft— % 
9ft 9% 9% 

13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
W J 7 
8% 9 8 — ft 

12W 11% 12 — % 
(ft 7% Bft -6 ft 
13 12% 13 

16% 15% 15ft— % 
15% Mft 15ft ♦ ft 
12% 12 12%.— ft 


8% 7% 

is 

7ft 7ft 
3W 3% 
10% 9% 

18 17 


3 
13ft 
7% 

3% 

9% — ft 
17ft + ft 


JO 14 


16% 16ft 16% 

14% 14% 14%— ft 
12ft 12ft 12ft 
8ft 8% 8% 

6% Aft Aft— ft 
27ft Z7ft 27% + ft 
lBVk 17% IB + ft 
low 9ft 10 —ft 


24 Vk 

15W HBO 

20 

IJ 

1774 

72 

20 

22ft 

12 Halter 



89 

22ft 

21% 

9 

3ft Hades 



A 

4Vk 

ilk 

3W 

2 Hodsoo 



125 

2% 

2% 

1% 

W HoteSrn 



IS 

7k 

% 

18% 

12% HomOJI 

.10 

J 

IBS 

16% 

169k 

25% 

ir- HaroGs 

24 

14 

35 

17% 

57 

34% 

23’W HrffNt 

122 

SJS 

94 

30W 

29A 

row 

5V» Hattms 

20 

ZS 

52 

7% 

7% 

13 

«% Ha wfc 3 

.141 


35 

■ 

7% 

12 

1% Hlttiln 



7 

. 29b 

2W 

5W 

1% Hllhdvn 



603 

2% 

2% 

23% 

14% HchoAs 

.16 

IJ 

104 

17% 

16% 

24W 

14Vj HctrsB 5 

JOB 

5 

24 

17 

14% 

Bte 

3% HelenT 



716 

5% 

5W 

37% 

W% Hrllv 



11VO 

19ft 

VBW 

38% 

31% HenrtfP 

97 

22 

1 

34ft 

34% 

34% 

17 HiberCp 

UMb 4-5 

19- 

Sft 

22 

13% 

9 FOcfcom 



51 

low 

9% 

raw 

3W Howsi 



'.95 

sw 

5% 

11 

10% HmFAx 



124 

Sift 

30 

raw 

2H Hmectt 



49 

3% 

3ta 

25W 

15% Hanind 

SA 

26 

165 

34% 

24 W 

30% 

23 Hoover 

123 

4J 

166 

25% 

24% 

28 

13ft HwBhM 



104 

27 

26% 

Sft 

18ft HuntJB 

.199 

J 

10 

22ft 

22 ft 

I4W 

7% Hntaln 



] 

12ft 

12ft 

241k 

15% KntaBs 

J4 

16 

70 

23ft 

23 

29% 

IT- HybfltC 



507 

27% 

27% 

IIW 

4% HyooRX 



8? 

10% 

10W 

9W 

5% HvtekM 



4 

Tft 

7ft 


4W + v» 
2ft 
ft + ft 


17% + W 


7ft ♦ Vk 
7% — % 

2ft 

2ft 


5ft— ft 
X — % 
3W— % 


7%— W 


10k. 7% ILC 

33% W% IMS 9 
13ft 7W ISC 
7ft 3% lent 
1016 4% Imumsr 
7% 2% Inocmo 

46% 31ft IndlN 
32 20 IntsRsc 

14ft inltrn 
33ft 15ft mslNrw 
lift 3ft tnteon 
IS Sft IfltBDv 

23W 13% isSco" 
r% 32Vi Intel 
11% 4% IntlSv 
15% 4 . intrad 
16ft AW IntrfFlr 
S’- aft InfBPti i 
io% lit intrman 
221- Wft intmec 
18 8% tntClm 

WJ5 8% I Gome 
2S-6 lift IlHKIflfi 
14% 7% irrtLMS 


15 

S 1291 
305 
4X 
1 
9! 

IS 75 
7 


83 

506 

ASA 


16 


*6 

3858 

339 

7 

12 26 
4227 
171 
384 
116 
1D9 


12 

3% 

25% 

lift 

1T2 

8% 


4ft InAWWI 


IRIS 
9% ITCpk 
AW temegp 
Vl* IWTldX 
3ft del 


“67 

247 

I09J 

117 

505 

6 

60 


in 9ft— ft 

31 30% 35% + V* 

raw n% n% — * 

4% A Aft + Vk 
5% 5% 5% 

4ft 4ft 4ft -f % 
45% 45% 45ft f ft 
26 25ft 2SW 
T7W 17% 17% — % 
21% 21% 21ft 
5ft 5 5% + % 

11 10ft 10ft- ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft 
14 12ft 12ft — I % 
26 25% 25ft — Vi 

«ft tft Aft 
10% 10% 18% 
n% raw raw + vt 

26 25% 25% — % 

7ft Aft 7 + ft 

11% 11% lift— % 

,«fc 9W 9ft 
lflW 17% 17% + % 
14ft 13ft 13ft + ft 

k r %+* 

zr* a a - % 

9ft 8% 9 + ft 

10ft + ft 
7ft 7ft 7ft 


15% 

4 JBR3M 

.1* TJ 

ii 

rtk 

3% Jwckpet 


21 

41 ft 

25% JoekLf* 


149 

27% 

14% JamWTr 


21 

8% 

4% Jet Mart 


It 

S% 

lift Jerhs 

.12 J 

239 

7ft 

3% Janidl 

* 

27 

10% 

AW JOBMSBI 


33 

19ft 

Juno j 


79 

30 1W 

raw jts» 

JO 14 

7 


1TV* lift lift— ft 

5ft 5ft 
32 33 + % 

17ft 17 17 

4ft 4ft Aft- ft 
21% 21 21ft— ft 

» Sft Sft-t-% 
7ft 7ft Tft 
19ft IBft 19Vk 
14% lift ltft- ft 


24ft MW KLAs 
X 20% Kamm 
24W 13W Knrenr 
17% 16% Ksstar 
16ft 6% Kpyden 
61% »Vh Kctno 
41ft 2AW KVCEU 

8Vj ivj Kevn 

11 fV Kevin* 


M 11 


25 


U0 

120 


27A 

2*2 

US 

24 

a 

3A4 

57 

ii 


18W 18 18ft + ft 
31% 31% 31% + « 
14ft 15ft I Aft + % 
11 10% 11 
.Sft 8ft Wt- ft 
3£,. Bft Dft +% 
■ » 31 3b 
8 Sft 5ft 
Tft 7% 7% . 


12 Month 
HWiLme Stock 


Sola ta 

Dtv. YU. 10b HWl 


Lo« 3 PM Chke 


11% 2% Kimork 
2lft 13 Kinder 
14% 4% r.rov 
16ft 9ft Kruoer 
29ft lift Kulck* 


36 

26 J 22SH 
26 2 97 

22 14 64 

-111 12 332 


3 3 3 - 

1«k lift 18ft- 
7ft 7% 7% — 
13% 13 13ft 
lift lift 11% + 


lift 

5ft LDBmk 






5% + V 

TSft 

IBft 

9% LSI Log 



870 

17% 

17 

17—9 

22Yk 

23W 

ID LTX 



122 

11% 

IIW 

nw— 

TO 

l»Vk 

8% LoPetet 



175 


16ft 

16ft— 1 

47% 

SOW LsZBv 

1J0 

Z9 

66 

47W 

47 

47W + 9 

31ft 

20% 

I2W LodFm 

.14 

J 

8 

18% 

16% 

16% + V 

15% 

ISW 

11 Lntdlw 

30 

U 

15 

15 

15 

15 

31W 

M 

IIW LumoT 

JO 

i-l 

24 

15% 

15ft 

15% + V 

raw 


14 Lancuit 

St 

AS 

120 

ISW 

15ft 

15ft 

12ft 

5 9% 

35 Lane Co 

92 

1.7 

5 

53 

53 

53 — V 

n f l 

32 

21% Lcvrsns 

32 

IJ 

1 

• 28W 

28W 

2SW— 9 


8W 

4% LeeDta 



58 

5ft 

AW 

5ft + V 

• • 

!5Vk 

lft Lelner 



145 

10 

fft 

9W + 9 

K r* 1 

9% 

4 

6% Lew la P 
2& Lexicon 

3Ba 4.1 

83 

120 

« 

% 


■T 1 


1% Lexktte 



14 

2% 

2ft 

2ft— V 

hti 

24ft 

17ft Liebrt 

JD7 

.4 

M 


19% 


^K T r^ 

44% 

38W Lflnvs 

J24 

S 

1 

44% 

46% 


29 

/W 

4% LfrCnm 



6 

5ta 

5% 

5W + V 

3% 

20% 

11% LIlyTut 

JO 

IJ 

702 

159k 

15% 

L5% 

15% 

if* 

18% LlnBrd 



1690 

3ZW 

jon 

32W +1V 

un 

J6ft 

27V, LincTel 

120 

65 

9 

33% 

33ft 

33% 

37% 


4W Llndbro 

.14 

79 

11 

5% 

5W 


9 

4VW 

21% LisCtas 

J5 

J 

1115 

<2W 

41 Vk 

41 Vk 

7% 


20ft LonoF 

i-a 

6.1 

65 

21 W 

71 


14ft 

-0% 

16% Lotus 



3184 

lift 

raw 


64 


7% Lyphos 



512 

20 

ivw 

19% + ft 



M 


14% 

lift 

7ft 

9W 

2A 

32% 

17% 


M i MB I 
Aft MCI 
4% MJW 
3ft MPSIs 
15 MTS 5 
13% MTV 
9ft MockTr 
27H 21% ModGE 
10% 7% MoIRt 
lift 7ft Mairlt s 
14% 7W MsrtSd 
24ft 17ft Munltw 
72% 39ft MtnN 
9 3V!i Morw* 
13% 6% Mortal 
37’- ItW MrtdN ( 
28ft 7 Mscol 6 
6% 1% Masitor 

24% 13 Mnxcr* 
14ft B% HfttM I 
Aft 31k MoyPt 
4% 3ft MoynOi 
38ft 30% McCTRl 
Mft 10ft McFarl 
lift A Medex 
10% 4 Meao-e 
28W 10 Mentor 
30ft 13 MertfrG 
39ft 27ft MercBc 
ASIA 37ft MOTCBk 
7S 10ft MrctlCo 
36% 21ft Mr d Be 5 
22ft 12ft MertBs 
31% 11% Me ryG 
17ft fft MotrFn 
34 14% Ml com 

“ lft Micro 
Sft MlaMJr 
4% Mlcrdy 
Sft A«crTc 
4 Mlcrop 
3% MjcSms 
. . 2W MdPcA 
41% 24ft MJdlBh 
■ 3 MdwAir 

27ft 19ft MIUHrs 
44 31% MUItor 

5ft 1% Minin' 
27% 16% Mlrvstnr 
lift 7W MGask 
12ft 6 MoMC 8 
!o% 13 Mocunes 
10% 6 Molecir 
39Vt 26% Mde* 

22 14 Monfa 

12 7% Mon An! 

raw ?% Murom 
34 23ft MoruiC 
2DU 14% McrFta 
U 9 McrKB 
22% I5W Moral 
7ft 2% Moseiev 
16 12W MOtC IB 

26% 1 lft MVtoi s 


547 

5698 

4 

237 

24 U 32 

1425 
381 

228 9.1 48 

51 

210 6 
2273 
* U 20 

24 U 14 

7 
901 

140 IS 456 

159 
320 
11301 
86 
» A* 


2D 

48- Z7 158 
84 

45 S H 

ia 


11% 

7% 

30% 

9 

lft 

7% 


67? 

142 14 10 

148 Z7 71 
19 

140 52 66 

Ji 42 72 

185 

406 19 62 

314 
125 
1,10 

46 14 213 
3236 
185 
3(75 
625 

124 X4 T9B 

.44 Z0 1724 
M 12 331 
SOS 
B9 

41 8 .1 52 

2D 

M 44 53 

a 

43 .1 158 

25e 12 38 


424 

140 42 5 

-01 2 
.16 14 46 

.48 2.5 ID? 
456 

-30 Zt 12 
.10 4 2333 


7% 7% 
Bft Sft 
Aft Aft 
4ft 4 Ik 
17% 17 
32 31% 

11% IBft 
2Sft 24% 
Bft lft 
lift 11% 
9 Bft 
20W 20W 
64% 64ft 
3W 3W 
10 % 9 % 
28ft 28ft 
21 W Zl % 
2ft 2W 
17% 16ft 

‘k’k 

4ft 4ft 
32% 32W 
11% 11 
9% 9 
5ft Sft 
15 14ft 
14% 13ft 
35% Eft 
61ft 61ft 
14 14 

34% 34 
isft raw 
13% 12ft 
15ft 15% 
16% 15ft 
2ft 2% 
6% A 
tft A 
5% 6% 
Aft «% 
6 5ft 
3 2% 

34% 35ft 

22W Z7W 
40ft 40 
2n 2% 
20 17ft 
9W 9% 
lift lift 
17% 16ft 
6% Aft 
30ft 29% 
20ft 20ft 
12% 11% 
lift lift 
30 29ft 
17ft 17ft 
lift 11% 
19% 1? 

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42W GVk 
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5% 5ft 
2% 3 

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Tft 6ft 
6% 6 
6% 6 
24ft 24W 
32W 31ft 
aw m 
2MV 26ft 
29% 29 
raw 28ft 
13% 14ft 
21ft aft 

a ft 

lift 13ft 
16ft T6ft 
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46ft 46ft 
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14ft Mft 
17ft 17ft 
27ft 27V 

21% 20ft 
22ft ZZ» 
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32ft 
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2AVk + ft 
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29Vk + ft 
t5 + ft 
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lft 
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Mft + ft 
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6ft-ft 

71k +ft 
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U2 4.7 

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27 24ft 26ft + W 
44ft Oft 44% + % 


12 Month 
WOULD* Stock 


Saleebi 

Dht. Yld. Wfc HWl 


Low 3 PM CWlee 


1 12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Solos in 
into High 


15ft 7 PacFsr 


Net 

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BW A PancMx 

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lift lift lift* 

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26% 26 2A — % 

n% 10 % ink— % 

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A% 6% 6 Vi— % 

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8% J Tnndun 
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72 11 Telco 

34% 16ft TlcmA 

ran- .Aft TMPfus 

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19%', lft Tel pets 
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. 4 .4'- 4 

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27% 28% 27% +1% 
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% ft % +% 
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m 3% Qoodrx 
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4ft 4ft 4ft. 

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Jta J 


15V. Sft RAX 
IBft T1W RPMS 
16% Bft RudSy* 

14ft Aft RodteT 
10ft 5ft Rodion 
7ft 2ft Rouen 
33% 20% Folnrs 
aw 12 W RovEn 
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23ft 17’i. Reodns 
Tfl’A 5W Recoin 
35ft 25ft RedknL 
12ft 3ft Reevos 
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4W Rellab 
7ft RpAuto 
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lift 3W RuvIRfl 
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19% 11% RyanPs 


54 13 


495 

s 

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15 Mft 14ft— Vk 
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8% 8% .«%— % 
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28% -2BW 28ft + % 
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48 (k 41k 
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27% 77 27% + ft 

38 37 37ft + ft 

14 13% 14 + % 

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12 % 12 % 12 % — % 

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16 15% 15ft— % 


24% 18 USLICs 
34% 13% UTL 
20 % s Uttrsy 
23% 10ft Unsmn 
13% Tft UnHI ■ 

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Pj* 2JW UnTBCB 15B XI 
»» nft UACffl* M 2 

TTft HW UBAisk 

28% 28% UBCof 
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26%, 26 a%-% 

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TO 9% TO + Vk 
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28ft 13% vicorp 

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50% 32ft SavnP 
20% 10% SBkPSS 
10ft 6% ScanOp- 
16% 10ft ScunTr 
13ft Sft Scherer 
25ft 15% ScMrnA 
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20ft 7 Setts* 

«% 4W SeaCd ■ 

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4% lft SocTat) 

? tft SEEQ 

30W 16 setra 

10 SW Semlcn 
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16ft 10ft SVCMCT 

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29% Shwmts IJB 
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MW 7ft SfteWI* ' 
jift aft Siranevs 
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10% 4ft smew 
17% vw silicons 
29% lift SWCVol 
24% lift SJIIOlx 
lift 4W SlrtflC 
17ft 11% Slmpln 
15% Tin Slpolns 
Mft 13ft Sinters 
12ft Sft supper 
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29% Uft SsneePB 

TO 20ft 

38ft IAW Soutrsf 
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The Global 
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Statistics Index 


AMEX nrlm p.ia 
AMBX MstWtomPjg 

my$E prim p.ig 
l»VSE Nsta/itjwi P .17 
Conodkm stocks pjo 
C urrency rotas P.is 
Camnmfiliet P .17 
Dividends p t i 7 


s ® T 1 >rW! rvports P,-, 
p Nn» rot* notes pjg 

G«kl martate • p.is 

•“IwpsI rotes p.15 
IWorfcet summary P.H 

Options p .17 

Otc Stock P,14 

Other markets PJ& 


« ™)WSDAY, OCTOBER 3. 1985 * 


WAU STREET WATCH 

Upjohn’s New Hair Restorer 
May Make Profit Grow, Too 


Analysts are also 
complimentary about 
fundamental changes 
in the company. 




r 


frfiU 


4gh- * 

**+ * 


"St 


By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

International Herald Tribune 

K ALAMAZOO, Michigan — Ever since a moonbeam 
ricocheted off Yul Brynner’s royal Siamese pate and 
twinkled the eye . of Deborah Kerr, bald fr yn 
' beautiful. At least that is Hollywood's version. Here in 
“ e Midwest, where Americans cover receding hantin^ with 
baseball caps emblazoned with the Tiam^ of seed «tiH tractor 
companies, bald holds the prospect of being big business. 

Upjohn, the blue chip pharmaceutical company based in 
a i a t jf 7 °v’ k developing ft promising hair-restoring product 
Already, thousands of men are uring versions of the drag via a 
“gray” prescription market in the United States. It was discov 

ered in the 1970s that an Up- - ; . • 

john medication for high * . _ 

blood pressure. Minoxidil, Analysts are also 

tad Upside Cffea of growing complimentary abort 

sh^o^^doil^e fandamented changes 

morning.” was one users’ in the Company, 
complaint. In some cases ■ * J 

women and children taWng 

the drug for serious hypertension grew tufts of hair on then- 
backs. 

Since 1983, when Upjohn began a 28-location drug test using 
2J200 men, no marked side effects have occurred with topical 
application to the scalp. Results so far indicate that one third 
experienced satisfactory hair growth. Another third benefited 
from some growth, or at least enough to retard further loss, while 
the rest, usually men past SS. have not been helped. 

As a stock, Upjohn has nearly doubled in price since late last 
year and almost tripled from its low in the summer of 1984. Then 
its price/ earnings ratio was the lowest in the drag group. Now it is 
the highest among the big pharmaceuticals. 

“Upjohn has become the single drug stock that is the heartbeat 
of the stock market” said David Saks, industry analyst for 
Morgan Olmstead Kennedy & Gardner. “When it's strong, the 
whole group is strong and when it’s weak all the drags are down.” 

M INOXIDIL has been the big kicker in the stock’s volatile 
surge, but analysts are also very complimentary about 
fundamental changes in the com pan y. 

“The basic profitability of Upjohn has substantially im- 
proved,” said David MacCaflum of Hambrecht & Quist, “with 
the best yet to come.” 

He also pointed out that the company has a relatively small 
market capitalization of around 30 million shares outstanding; 
“so a big hit with one product makes a big difference.” 

Mr. MacCallum puts Upjohn’s market value at $100 a share 
even without allowing for the potential of Regaine, which is to be 
the hair product's trade name, if and when the U.S. government 
approves it. That could be expected a year or two after formal 
filing with the Food and Drug Administration, scheduled for 
December. 

He said it is “entirely conceivable” that Regaine treatments 
could generate SO cents a day from each customer. If they numbs 
only 3 milli on of the estimated 25-million-plus bald Americans, 
that totals $550 milli on in annual sales for Upjohn, and would 
rank the hair restorer No. 3 on the current best-selling drug list, 
behind Tagament and Zantac, two ulcer medications. 

Paine Webber’s Ronald Nordmann, an early booster of Up- 
john because of Minoxidil, likened Regaine to Tagament and 
what it did for its manufa cturer, SmithkHne Beckman Coup. The 
greatest selling drug in history, it powered the stock up tenfold. 
Last year's sales of Tagament totaled $850 million. . 

“Upjohn offers an extremely jjbritfve risk/reward ratio,” he 
(Continued on Page 20, CoL 21 

| Currency Rates 


m: 


OomBiIm 

s 

Am rt rtow 1977 
■ruMisto) sues 
Frankfurt 2X4) 
London CD) 1X155 
Milan L7K7S 

Mow York (cj - — - 


ILL. OMr. BJv 
0,1469 * - tw • 

mbs*. linn — 
ixttsx mi • **»• 
1SKM 4JZ13 7539 

■ — - 59931 SUM 

1JV.50 UH 5177 
4J19« 17077 15JU2 * 

’ 1U1 • 7154 39951 • 

0.121 • 72585 • 45327 • 
1X9295 2X909 44J42B 

150151 17741 57.1441 


SJ=. Yon 
137395* 13930 V 
2455 2559* 

12259 • 13345* 
1051 B 30255 
. UU 0 U4 
2.1595 21450 

1736 1770* 

9950 

unis* 

15031 171442 
23995 227X05 


■S3--*: 


Closings In London and Zurich, fixings mother European cantors. New York rates at 4 PM. 
(a) Commercial franc th) Amount* needed to buy one pound fcj Amounts needed to buy one 
Hollar IV Units of mix) Units of 1000 (Yi Units of WOOD KO^ not quoted; na.: not available, 
(a) To bur one pound: MML1X17 

Other Dollar Valaefl 

Coroner oar UJjS C un on e r per UJU Currency uer U5J Currency per usj 

Arsen, austral 050 Ffe-aiarkka £714 Motor, ring. 2X44 S.Kor.wan 88950 

MMraLS 1X025 Greek cktxi 13050 Mu.peu 34050 Span, peseta 1605 

Amtr.scM. 1054 Moos Korns 73485 Morw.kreop 7577 S en. kroon 7.9625 

Beta.fta.fr. 5094 lodtaa rupee 115745 .. MW. POM 18X4. Taiwan! 4054 
Brazflcnrc. 7X9000 inaorupM 1,12150 parr.Mcuda 14350 Tmi boot 26365 

Canadians - 13*52 Irish* 05591 Sawfl riym 3X5 Turkish lira 54255 

CMnese yaceo 2574 Israeli sbelc 1X7950 5hM.S 01248 UAEdHIWl 34725 

Dan Istl krone 9599 Kowaltl mnv 03008 S. Air. rand 25157 Venex-boBv. 1455 

Edn*. pound 133 

cStomad: 1307 Irtsti c 

v Sources: Banatm do Benelux (Brussels l ; Banco CommercMo Itallona (Milan); Banttue Ha- 
flU tlonaio do Ports (Paris); Bat* of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BAll (dinar, rtyai, cSrtiam). 
* Odter data from Reuters end AP. 


Interest Rates 


flcralhS£Sribunc, 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


* 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 16 

Page 15 


Bonn Says 

Output 

Declined 

2.8% August Fall 
FoUmcs July Rise 


BONN — West German indns- 
. trial production, seasonally adjust- 
ed, fell 2.8 percent in August, ac- 
cording to preliminary figures, 
after increasing 2.4 percent in July, 
the Economics Ministry said 
Wednesday. 

The ministry had originally put 
the July rise at 1J8 percent 

The ministry said one factor in 
the August fall was the infi»gn«» of 
school and works holidays on pro- 
duction, which cannot always be 
entirely collected by seasonal ad- 
justments. 

“Indications are that school and 
works holidays weighed less on 
production in July than normally,” 
it said. “This probably means the 
July figures give a too favorable 
picture, while the August figures do 
the opposite.” 

It added. “Given this insufficien- 
cy in MBwnnal adjustments, it is 
more advisable than ever to judge 
economic trends over longer peri- 
ods than just monthly results.” 

Industrial production for July 
and August taken together rose 2 
. percent compared with May and 
June, it noted. 

Manufacturing industry output 
in the two months increased by just 
under 2 percent compared with the 
previous two months. In August 
alone, output by manufacturers fell 
23 percent compared with July. 

All areas of manufacturing in- 
dustry shared in the two-monthly 
rise except for the consumer goods 
sector, where production was un- 
changed against May and June. 

- Industrial production rose 4.5 
percent in July and August com- 
pared with the like period last year. 


$rn Factory Orders 
Jlr Up 0.9% in IJ.S. ; 
¥ Home Sales Fail 




Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Orders to 
U.S. factories rose a modest 0.9 
percent in August as strong de- 
mand for autos offset a decline in 
nondurable goods, the government 
reported Wednesday. 

Hie Commerce Department said 
the advance in factory orders came 
from a strong 2. 6- percent rise in 
orders of durable goods, items ex- 
pected to last three or more years. 


months. Sales rose a revised 5.5 
percent in July. 

More important to builders, who 
plan their new construction largely 
on the pace of sales, is the fact that 
sales are running 26.6 percent 
ahead of the same month last year, 
analysts said. 

Another significant figure in the 
report shows that only 5. 8-months 
worth or bouses remain on the mar- 
ket unsold, a total of 350.000. Only 


ThaNawYorn™ which offset a 1 . 1 -percent decline when the backlos of unsold houses 


William S. Woodside, American Can Co.'s chairman and chief executive. 

Corporate Chief Tackles Social Ills 

American Can’s Head Calls Work Self-Preservation 


By Kenneth N. Gilpin 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — On a recoil summery after- 
noon, William S. Woodside, chairman and chid 
executive of American Can Co., sat in his West 


Woodside, 63, is intensely involved in those mat- 
ters. 

He is the chairman of the Regional Plan Associ- 
ation, a private group that supported Westway and 
that makes recommendations on transportation. 


57th Street office overlooking Central Park here, housing, and recreation for New York, New Jer- 
and spoke with some emotion about matters be sey, and Connecticut. He is alw chair man of the 


considers important. 

He did not seem concerned, at that moment. 


Whitney Museum and president of American Can 
Co. Foundation. It funds civic and cultural organi- 


about his company's investment in Ttcor Mortgage za lions like Lhe Regional Plan ($30,000 in 1984) 
Insurance Co n which has been caught up in the and the Whitney (SI 24,000 that same year). It also 
crisis surrounding the troubled Equity Programs supports projects on public education, hunger, and 
Investment Corp. Nor was he at his most animated nutrition — for example, a study on hunger that 
when discussing American Can’s dramatic and Mr. Woodside said “dramatized the impact of 
successful asset-restructuring what happens to the minds of children whose 


in orders for soft goods. rises above the 7-raomh level do 

New orders to factories are builders begin to worry about over- 
closely watched by economists as building ’ (AP. UP I) 

an indication of industry's need or 

ability to add jobs and production 

capadtv in coming months. TT C C s- TT 

In another report issued SSlS UU 

Wednesday, the Census Bureau J. 

said that sales of new houses fell a ^ 

surprising 5.6 percent in August S)tl*3 Si fWf'O 

from July's levels, but remained far I-f A. l/f 

above the sales rate of a year ago. 

Housing sales and construction, Tw/rrif/i 

buoyed by lower home-loan rates, \Jrih J. 
have remained a bright spot in the 

sluggish U.S. economy. United Fress International 

Sales of angle-family houses fell ... _ . .. _ L L . „ 

to an annual rale or 705.000 in WASHINGTON — - President 
August after seasonal adjustment, Ronald Reagan named a federal 


U.S. Sets Up 


On Trade 

United Fress International 

WASHINGTON — President 


the agency said. 


strike force Wednesday to uncover 


Investment Corp. Nor was he at his most animated nutrition — for example, a study on hunger that 
when discussing American Can’s dramatic and Mr. Woodside said “dramatized the impact of 
successful asset-restructuring what happens to the minds of children whose 

Rather, Mr. Woodside was visibly upset about families fall below the poverty line” — and the 
the death of Westway, the proposed superhighway problems of transition.” such as displaced workers 
and waterfront development along Manhattan’s and untrained youth. 

£?% >?* 1- fountadon spent * percent of its 

cemed about a flap over a proposed new wing for me Ihu 

the Whitney Museum of American An. And he y ear wiU am “ unl t0 “J; 

was “appSed,” as he puTiTthatTwcSd-bc hoiL M %y° 0 £ ,de ^ ? f ^ 33 

_ » -f , ‘ p , _ U L percent will be directed to these areas, 

angtrate cosponsor tad tacked out of e hunger ^ look £ foundatal “ [SnTtard of buck- 

Like any number of compauies. American Can iho1 a PP . r . Mch . fAg* “ «"»' 
has been drawn into a varsery of community mat- concenl - said Joseph A Califano Jr., the former 

ters. But unlike a lot of chief executives, Mr. (Continued on Page 20, CoL 5) 


MeanWhile, the increase in dura- unfair trading practices harming 
ble-goods orders in August U.S. industry and to develop meLh- 
stemmed from a big surge in de- °ds of fighting them off. 
mand for automobiles, the Com- Mr. Reagan promised in a Sept, 
merce Department said The irons- 23 trade speech to establish the 
portation category, which includes interagency group as part of his 
autos and aircraft!, was up 10.6 per- refurbished policy designed to 
cent in August following a 5 -5-per- open foreign markets without re- 


cent July decline. 

Orders for military equipment, 
meanwhile, rose 3.9 percent in Au- 


stricting U.S. imports. 

He announced creation of the 


nieanwaue, rose 3.Y pereem m «u- ^agency group, patterned after 

5“ “■ft™* a IJ ^P ercCTI de - the jSti« Department's strike 

cu 25 , jm y- . . , forces cm crime, at a cabinet meet- 

The key category of nondefense ing ^ ^ Commerce Secre- 


. m ■ , on r „ n snot approacn ana got it tocused on areas ot great capital goods rose 3.6 percent in - M| , BalHriae to head it 

^“.2? conceS.” said Jo4h A. Califano Jr., the foraer August following a 4.6-percent July tary Malcolm Baldnge to head it 

immunity mat- _ decline. This category, which has “This stnke force is for real the 

executives, Mr. (Continued on Page 20, CoL 5) shown weakness for much of the White House spokesman. Lam- 

year, is closely watched for hints it Speakes, quoted Mr. Baldrige as 
can give on industry plans for ex- saying. “Free trade will not exist 
pansion of production facilities. without fairness." 

rJn 4V TIiaJm vf/ ra-M Vmnun Much of ^ 1.1-^pcrocaii decline Mr. Speakes said the U.S. trade 
JLUM JL UCU TT Ctl IU w Ir llUrf in new orders for nondurable goods representadve. Gavton K- Yeutter, 

O was in the food categoiy, although is examining about 12 cases eligible 

last weekend when the country be- duce far below its quota of 435 raa ^ odier industries showed a for retaliation. 

. . . . “ . .... _ K MirkArtb Ima TatlVi ImiaI nihan . . 


Coffee Group 
Reaches Pact 


Iraq. Iran Bring Their War to Vienna in new orders for nondurable goods 

J/ O was in the food category, although 

By Bob Hagcrty last weekend when the country be- duce far below its quota of 435 raa ^ odier industries showed a 
international Herald Tribune gan shipments through a new pipe- million, OPEC presumably could setback from the July leveL, when 
VIENNA — Iran and Iran, line across Saudi Arabia to the Red allow some other members to in- oto^s were down a slight 0.1 per- 


VTENNA — Iraq and Iran, line across Saudi Arabia to the Red allow some other members to in- 


In his September speech, Mr. 
Reagan also announced creation of 




E iawurr wMy P cpwim Oa .2 

SwJu Erandi 

Dollar D-Mark Franc Slartlau Franc ECU SDR 
imomb 7 *v -8 k. 4 tv-4 h. 4)wxn, mu-ni* 99wnfc tv. 

Smooths S4Vh 4(V4*. 44hXM> 11 9U-11 W. WM MM1A 7*. 

InwnM «««. 4VSXWI 4 TlV*-114h lW^lOW KM* Wk 
SnMrtto SV%4U> 4%r4V» 4%M*4 U«rU9h 10%i-lT ' 7W 

1 nor SMH 4844* 49M« lBhlrlllh 11 tt-ros 89M 7*. 

Sources: Moroot 1 Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FP>: Ltoyde Banit {ECU ); Reuters 
(SDR); Rates opottcoote to Interbank deaosdo ot St minkm minimum (oremthralenl). 


EgyM— ey Bates Oa.2 


1. ' 

Ki- 


r3» 

ki\\ 


IWMSMh 
DtuMntRda 
FeArafFaadi 
Prime Rat* 

Bmur Loan Rate . 
CoarPanr9».l7f«m 
Mumti Treawnr BIBs 
tMonEi treason BMs 
.~L CBhU i mnv* 

jUmtOinrumy 
Lmbrnti Hat* 

DwkigM Rate 
OiwMaidhlntcrtaiA, 


fcs — «. 

f 


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PM Maggy 

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"hr uvviH min wpip 

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7Vt Tk 

e 

m 9V3 

w w 

7.75 730 

731 7J01 

7.U 7.17 

735 735 

7X0 7X0 


530 ISO 

5 IUL 

49/14 — 

4(4 - 


9» » 

m 911/14 
9 7/14 V* 

9* 97/14 

95/15 95/1* 


life H«i 
in. » 

111/32 mu 
111* 115/32 


5 5 

4 9/15 4®/ 1 * 

5 7/14 5 7/1* 


Agtan PcHt Ppp Ri l te 

(Ja.2 

1 month 7 M.- 1 H. 

2 moattas 8 -01* 

3 m on tbs 8K>-8(ti • 

6 months ff*-BU • 

1 year 8 M-M 

Source: Reuters. 


UJB- M«Bey Market Fond* 

Oct. 2 

HUrtUl Lynch RMnhr AsmI» 

38 dor own»4 yield! NA 

Teterote Intern*! Rote Index: 7354 
Source: Merritt Lynch, Teterote. 



SSStF/Saotor*. Commerzbank- CrMt 
Lm i& *<*•**< Tokyo. 


AJH. PJM. Oh<H 

Honv KDH 3*435 - 324X0 + 1X0 

Lnxrmboo^ 32435 - +1JB 

ports ItUNW 32439 +1-04 

ZurM 3KJS 334.95 +2X5 

S 3WJS t“ 

New York — 

Luxembourg, Parts and London omeiel fix- 
inas; nons Kans end ^vrieb oaenmp and 
< JZjno prices: New York Cemex current 

contract Aiipricesln US Spa ooiK*. 

Source: Reuters. 


Compiled bp Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — The International 
Coffee Organization Wednesday 
established price-stabilization mea- 
sures for its 1985-86 fiscal year, 
which began Tuesday. 

The vote in the 75-nation ICO 
was 69-to-l, with the United States 
casting the only negative ballot. 
Costa Rica, Honduras, India, Indo- 
nesia and Peru abstained. 

The ICO said that an initial glob- 
al export quota of 58 million bags 
of 132 pounds (60 kilograms) each 
was agreed on for 1985-86, down 
slightly from a final 1984-85 figure 
of 583 million bags. 

The ICO said the mechanism for 
adjustment in the quota, aimed at 
keeping the price within the un- 
changed range of $130 to $1.40 a 
pound, allows for special arrange- 
ments in the current October- to- 
Dccember quarter. 

If the 15-day average price, cur- 
rently just below the $1.20 “floor," 
is still below that level in 20 mar- 
keting days, the quota will be cm 
by one million bags. If 15 days later 
it is still below SI 30, a further cut 
of one million bags talre$ place, 
with another triggered by a subse- 
quent fall to $1.15. 

Delegates from Brazil, the larg- 
est ICO producing member, said 
that the United States had taken a 
“tough line” from die start of the 
conference by insisting that the 
problem of undershipments be re- 
solved before discussion started on 
quotas and prices. This “tough 
line” had oeen maintained 
throughout, as witnessed by its vote 
against the package, the delegates 

added. 

Producers were in favor of “ap- 
propriate” action to curb under - 
shipments, and of penalties in the 
form of quota cuts cm ICO produc- 
ers that sell coffee more cheaply to 
non-mem be»s than to members of 
the organization. 

“All efforts were made not to 
leave the United States isolated," 
said the bead of the Brazilian nego- 
tiating team, Alberto Letie Bar- 
bosa, He said the “compromise re- 
sult” on a package of measures for 
the 1985-86 year would “support 
'the stability of prices” and the nor* 
mal flow of coffee. 

Rollinde Prager. the head of the 
U.S. delegation, called the outcome 
inadequate: “We are concerned 
that the outcome may not bode 
well for the future of the Interna- 
tional Coffee Agreement or our 
participation in it," she said. The 
United States is the largest con- 
suming member of the ICO. 

(AFP, AP) 


The Daily 
Source for 
Mfexnatianal 
Investors. 


whose five-year-old war is intensi- Sea. At the same time, heavy bomb- crease their output without breach- ee EV. _ , Q( . Q a $300-raillion “war chest” to help 

lying, carried their conflict here ing by Iraqi jets has crippled Iran’s ing the overall ceiling. But Saudi . btupmems rose tost. 5.9 ouiion slrU gg|j ng American exporters 

Wednesday as oil ministers from main oil-export terminal on Kharg Arabia recently adopted a new po- J? August, a l.l -percent gam ana j n wc ,rld markets, 

the Organization of Petroleum Ex- Island and reduced its exports to a licy of offering discounts to certain high^t monthJy ino-ease since in-Hx;,:™, uwWfonina a urnt- 

porting Countries began a series of trickle from about 13 million bar- major customers. March. The department said total unfair trade, the strike 

Seettogs. rels a day, making room for more Saudi output has risen to an esti- ■ seasonally adjusted 

Iraq's oil minister, Qassim Taki Iraqi salel mated 3 million barrels a day from $1973 billion in August .following 

al-Oraibi, demanded an increase in The loss of Iranian supplies and a 20-year low of 2 milli on to 23 a 1 -2-pcrcent decline in July. subsidies ” ^ 

his country’s production quota to a sharp reduction in exports from million over the summer. The Sau- Meanwhile, analysis said ‘ 

more than 2 million barrels a day the Soviet Union have helped push di oil minister. Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Wednesday that August s sharp de- Besides Commerce and Mr. 

from 1.2 million. He indicated, oil prices up sharply in recent Yamani. was asked Tuesday clu ? e «> new-home sales was less VeuUers agency, oiher depan- 

however. that Iraq would increase weeks. But many oil traders expect whether the kingdom would raise s f nous indicated because of ments m the suike force are Trea- 
its production whether OPEC ap- that other producers will quickly production up to its full quota of “ e wa y “>e monthly sales rate has sury. State, Transportation and 

proves or not. increase their sales to fill any gap ih 4.35 million. bounced up and down m recent Agriculture. 


proves or not. increase their sales to fill any gap in 

“We have the right to produce the market and that prices are tike- 
what we want,” he told reporters, ly to resume their five-year-old de- 
“Our quota is not a real one." The dine by next spring. 

Iraqis argue that their quota was set Manx Saeed Otaiba, oil minister 

artificially low because of war dam- of the United Arab Emirates and 
age to export facilities. chairman of OPEC's market-mom- 

Iran’s dl minister, Mohammad ioring committee, warned that 
Gharazi, who last July accused Iraq OPEC could not take it for granted 


1 could not take it for granted 


of “stabbing OPEC from the in- that the price slide is over. Of the 
side,” contented himself Wednes- recent price rise, he said, “We know 
day with calmly rgecting the idea it is of a temporary nafure 


ter quotas for Iraq or any of 
s other 12 members. 


The six-member committee rec- 
ommended that OPEC maintain its 


The minis ter, toying with his self-imposed output ceiling at 16 
worry beads and dressed as usual in million barrels a day. That recom- 
a brown suit and an open-necked mendation left open the possibility 
shirt, added: “Iraq does whatever it that demands by Iraq, Ecuador and 
likes and in most cases it doesn’t Qatar for higher individual quotas 
abide by the rules.” could be considered within the 

Iraq’s export capability in- overall output limit- 


creased 


5 expot 
by 500,i 


,000 barrels a day If Saudi Arabia continues to pro- 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


NW LOW Last CM. 


hca 

AMI 

BaatCo 

NMME 

Coi-Pw 

cnwe 

gellSou 

Human 

Rtvlnwd 

MMcon 

■ lipoma- 

AHo» 

, Bwair 
IBM 
PtMPla 


33 Vi 30% 

17* IA 
40 39 

a* in 

26 * as 

2S«t 37 
W3ti 39V. 
26V. 23% 

55 Mvt 
tm 56% 
72*. 23l*i 

4«b 45% 
35 31% 

127 124% 

12% 12* 


31* —7% 
T7* —4 

39 + M 

m -a* 

a* + , w ' 

27% —1 
39% — U 
25* —3 
54% +3% 

60% +jw 
22% -* 
46% — % 
31% —3% 
124% —3 V. 
12% + % 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bandi 

uiiiinn 

induatrtaK 


Dow Jones Averages 


omo Mian low Lost cm. 

Indus 134X41 13S1J» 1327.96 133X67 — 7M 

Tram A5U9 659.53 64231 64724— *44 

Util 13X39 15542 151.16 I53J0 + 145 

Camp 544.17 549.28 53757 541J1 - 133 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


HIM LOW a Me CM* 
Campanile 1 07.31 «idj» 106J4 — 041 

Industrials 12X84 12X50 12250 —063 

Tnonop. 10442 103.40 10140 —057 

Utilities S5J6 55L2I 5521 -HOI 

Finance loxse I0MH toxin — ojm 


Odd-Lot Trading tn N.Y. 


Advanced 
declined 
U n c ha nged 
Total issues 
New Highs 

S lows 
moup 

Volume dawn 


777 HOD 

754 471 

488 428 

2019 1999 

57 43 

25 27 

A2S9.110 
Z26X050 


but Solos -suit 

L312 400201 1266 

4.184 524214 1,913 

7201 368277 2217 

7.995 3X7*487 966 

4JM 340721 IJS3 


Od. 1 164212 400201 

Sept. 30 194.104 524214 

Seat. TO 137201 368477 

Sept. 25 , 127.995 337.487 

Seal. 24 >34JU 340321 

'Included In the sales figures 


V\fednesdas& 

NVSE 

dosing 


VoLaMPJH 147J3UH 

Prev.4PJM.voL 130240000 

Prev conwltdnted dose TO7TOT , 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to ttio closing on Wall Street nod 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ rndex 


AMEX Most Actives __ 

VOL HM*I Low UM* ttc- 


Advonced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New High* 
Now Lews 


234 343 

249 216 

282 223 

765 782 

14 9 

15 *1 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Transn. 


Week 

i area *ao 

1—062 281JB2 
1 — 1.10 28636 
I + 1J1 36X06 
! +009 33032 

I —0.13 3UL33 
I 4-156 296.16 
r +038 255190 


Standard & Poor's Index 


him Low Close arm 
Industrials 20824 20X83 20585 — 1JS 

Tramp. 16827 16725 165.52 —063 

u i miles boas mm earn — dm 

Finance 71J» 2085 2087— 003 

Composite 18524 18406 18486—13)1 


AMEX Sales 


4 pja. volume 

Prev. 4 PjSft. volume 

Prev. cans, volume 


TerllPtg 

FmtHa 

Wlcfcas 

HmoGn 

Amdahl 

Mhiiinn 

■ lUVO 

Txscan 

Larfmr 

FallCp 

Hndvmn 


R R 

4% m 


M t 4 
I in * 


i 


TR ’fit = 6 
it 3Z ft i'« 

22% 21% 32% 


AMEX Stock index 


Hum I*w OMO WJ 

2247V 22X80 *0199 — O* 


12 Month 
HIM Low Stock 


Dt*. Via. PE Wb High Low QueLOTBe 


Stocks Lower on Heavy Volume 






"'VlPI 







7* 

» 

04 

00 

? r» 

104 

80 

70* 

68 

70* 

20% 

19% 

22 

a 


26 

25% 

33 

32* 

a 

27% 

27* 

24* 

79% 

79% 

24% 

Z7% 

10% 

93 

a* 

18 

93 

28* 


51% 
66 % 
45% 
36% 28 
U% 7% 

85 

97% 72% 
90% 62 
ISO 112% 
20% 18% 
4% 2% 

13% 

18% 17% 
15% 11% 
KHi 26% 
67% 35% 
78 46% 

57% SI 
24% 17% 
4|% 32% 

27% 16% 
13% 10 
28% 17% 
72% 40* 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices were mixed at the 
dose of the New York Stock Exchange on 
Wednesday in very heavy trading. The Dow 
Jones industrial average, which rose 1 2.32 Tues- 
day. was down 7.28, to 1,333.67, at the dose. 

Advances barely edged out declines and vol- 
ume reached a 2^-month high of 14733 million 
shares, up from 13034 million, in the previous 
session. 

Prices were lower in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 

“The market is taking a breather and trying 
to understand the ramifications of what hap- 
pened Tuesday.” said Edward Nicosia, chief 
technical analyst with the Minneapolis-based 
firm of Piper, Jaffray & Hopwood. 

The strength shown by major oil stocks on 
Tuesday was significant because it provided 
unexpected leadership to the broader market 
and because it occurred at a point where the 
broader market needed to hold support, Mr. 
Nicosia said. 

Portfolio managers are now deciding whether 
they should make the major decision to move 
bade into the oils, he said. 

“The move will rebuild confidence,” he said. 
“The threat of an October massacre has been 
alleviated.” 

Meanwhile, hospital stocks were at the top of 
the active list and lower. Hospital Corp. of 
America fell 7%. to 31 (A, after it said that 
hospital utilization rates are still declining. 

American Medical International was down 4, 
to 17H, and National Medical Enterprises. Hu- 
mana and Co mmuni ty Psychiatric were also 
lower. 


Carpi ina Power & Light was up in. active 
trading. Commonwealth Edison was lower. The 
company said it is considering various austerity 
measures, including a delay or halt of its nuclear 
construction program. 

Beatrice Cos. was up on rumors that Unil- 
ever, the Anglo-Dutch consumer products con- 
cern, is considering a takeover bid for the com- 
pany. 

Midcon Corp. was advancing strongly after 
rocketing 104b Tuesday on rumors that the nat- 
ural gas pipeline company may be a takeover 
target. 

CBS was higher after adding 6K Tuesday 
when Loews Corp. raised its stake in CBS to 
11.1 percent from 9.9 percent Loews was up 
modestly. 

Richardson- Vicks was off slightly. After the 
market closed Tuesday, the company said it 
would be acquired by Procter & Gamble for $69 
a share. Procter & Gamble was ahead. 

Revlon Inc. was higher again after climbing 
7% over the prior two sessions. Revlon is said to 
be negotiating to be taken private in a leveraged 
buyout in an attempt to counter a hostile take- 
over bid from Pantry Pride. Pantry Pride was 
off a brL 

Northwest Airlines was ahead. 

Oil issues, which were strong Tuesday, were 
off slightly. Exxon. Texaco, Mobil and Chevron 
were all off a bit 

U.S. Steel was up marginally while Du Pont 
was gaining . Both companies have large energy 
exposures. 

Harris Graphics was up. The financier. Ivan 
Boesky, said Tuesday he was considering a 
leveraged buyout of the company. 


12 Malta SK. . 

Hum ism am* Dlv. Yld. PE HU High i 
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12 Mann 
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32% 21% 

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Dlv. YML PE 

240 76 t 
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65% 48% 
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11 % 5 % 
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If 

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104 12% 12% 
131 22% 21% 
2 14% 14% 
363 m 18* 
161 9% 8% 

266 <% 4* 

m OU 43 

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951 19 m 

29 17% 17% 
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144 T7% 16% 
1048 57* 56% 
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530 5% '5% 

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224 5 5 

1487 19% 19 

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40 58* 58% 
325 36% 35% 

48 32 32 

395 39* 38% 
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192 11% 10% 

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202 8 % 8 % 

45 30% 30* 
390 6% 5* 

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300 26 25% 

168 24* 24* 

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15 12% 12* 
499 32% 32% 

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9 19 IntoR Pf 383 110 9 23% 25* 23* — * 

35% 25* IntoR pf 425 138 12 31* 31% 31* + % 

9* 7% loHoon 1515 

14* 8 intRFn 313 

19% 16* ItonSo 2W01U 36 19 »» t- m 

73* 55* Intern 108 48 13 1115 67* 66% 66% + * 

158 121% Inter of 7J5 S3 4 145 145 145 —1* 

13 9% Intrfat 80 59 5 389 10* 10* ID* 

51% 41 Infrlk 110 58 8 45 48% 48 48% + * 

12% B% Intrnad 168 10* 10% Hi*—* 

24% 15% IntAlU JZ 4.1 9 4 17* 17* 17* + * 
138*116 IBM 480 35 1214803 127 124*124*— 2* 
a* 16% IntCtrl 80 18 18 M54 26% 24% 25*— 1 


44* 44* + % 
17* 17* 

4* 4* 

177 18* 18% W* + * I 
9 25% 25* 23*— * 1 
12 21* 31* 31* + % ; 
1515 I* 7* 8* + % I 

313 9* 9% 9* 

36 79 U* 19 + 16 , 


24% IntFlaw 1.12 18 17 344 SSV, 29* 29*— * I 


11* 6% IntHorv 2845 7* 6 

7% 3% IntHrwt 42S 4' 

6>J 28% IfitHpfC 62 

42 a IntHptA 20 

44 34 lidMIn 280 65 9 451 40 39 

39% 31% IntMflPf 4J0 1I1B 2 37 36! 

37% 24* IntMull 1J6 49 11 144 37* 36 


2845 7% 6% 7 — % 

425 4% 3% 4 —.* 

62 49% 4SYr 48%— 1 

a 30* a a -2% 

451 40 29% 39* + M 

2 37 36% 37 +1% 

144 37* a »*— 1* 



57* 45% IntPrer 288 5J 52 3245 46* 44* 45 — % 

16% 9* IntRcfi 5S0 208 10% 10 W — * 

54% 35% IntNrib 288 58 10 1762 44% 43 44* + % 

7B 68% IntNtpf 680 88 400X 76* 76% 76% +1* 

MS 130% MINI pfJ050 63 1 192 1“ — 

43* 30% IntpbGP 1 JOB 27 13 1101 39% 


11 % + % 
68* +1* 



53 + % 

21* + U 







aJJ 





43* 30% IrdPbGd IJOB 27 13 1101 39% 
1% 13% IntBokr 13 125 21* 

17% IntStPw 150 97 8 211 19% 
_ 9% IntSecn W 31 18% 

* 15* lownEI 1J0 102 9 98 IQ* 

34% lOwllG 174 89 7. 49 38% 
26% lowoRS are 98 B --59X 33% 
30* l/; .lre . 3L04 W 9 . . 39 2 


311 19% 19% 19%— % ! 
31 10% — ' 




42* TrvBkef %36sy.l 


JMV awta 1.12 3J 17 
23* J River J6 15+10 
16 Jannwy .12 8*10 

10* JapnF 183el2J 
34% JaffPD 1 J2 38 7 
58% jarCpf 9M 12 7 
91* JarCpf 13JD 129 
80% JarCpf 1IJ0 1TJ 
14% JorC pf 118 128 
6* Jowlcr 19 

30* JafnJn IJO 3J 14 
38% JafmCn IMaAA 9 
50% JhnC pf 4J5 82 
21% Jargen ire 4J 1| 
18* Jastani re U 14 
22* JoeMlg 180 tO 15 


30%—* 

am — %- 

35* +1* 
52* + * 


39* 16% MCDarl 1 

70 Oft McDfUd 
07 63* McDnD 3 „ 

52 37% McGrH 188 

39% 25* MdntO 
38 37 McKOSS 280 XI 

79% 60% fUcKpf IJO 14 
IS f% McLaon 
6% 2% McLcowt 
29* 22* McNeil UOO 18 
44* 32% Mart . .IJO 3JD 
24% 15* Mesrut J4 U 
39* 25% Madtm JB 11 
56% 40* Malta 288 58 
30* 24 MeHonpIlfi 93 
48% 35* UaMIJ 184 33 
70 51% MarcSt UO II 

1)7* 79* March 330 3J> 
» 47* Mcrdtti IJO 1J 

36% 25% MerU 
3% 1% Mam 
22 12* MmoPT 

7* 5% Mmb 

4% 2% MosMc 
61% 48 MfEpfG 788 112 
64% 50 AUE Pfl X12 U0 
3% 2 MexFd J2B142 

18% 14% MctiER 180 BJ 
7% 4% Mlcklby JM 18 
sm MMcot 138 33 
15* B* NUdSUt 1331 
20* 15* MkfRu 1J8 XT 
32* 25* MWE 176 98 
15* 10* Mlltll R 84 40 
m Hfe MMM 3m 4<5 
39* 27* MAlPL 176 X0 
11 3% MlBIIIH 

4 4% AUM 

34% 25% Mobil 2J0 78 

2* % vlMobtH 

SB m> IModQpt 

. 33% 17% Mohosc 88 L7 
14* 1* JVtohkOt 

53% » MonCa 105) 

54 44* MonCopflKJ XI 

19% 14% MoimCfi JO S3 
55* 40% Monaan ISO S3 
30% 16% ManPw 100 7.1 
19% 15* ManSt IJOo 95 
10* 7* MONY JO 93 

21% 13* Moores 72 39 
28 20 MoarM 14M 67 

31 34* MarAtPf 

54* 34* Morans 

5 SSSEStf 

IP* 15*m£Sv 


27 J St £5 SSJ8 

9 15 14* 14* 

!4 361 91% 90% «%— % 

» s* 

16 'm raS 32% 32% — m 

” 11S 1 R6 + % 

n 29 28% 29 + * 

9 uSl S% UK 48* 

4 S3 12% 12* 19k + S Vl 
is jiM mm ss>& + % 

11 82 B% 55% 55% + * 

27 23 22* 22*— * 

18 24% 24% 24% 

1161 .18% 18 18% — * 
n? M M 

M 7 9% 9% 9% 

14 3297 65% 65* 65* 

■ 851 71% 70% 78% 

14 488 43% 41* dlil—l* 

1 26* 36* 26*— % 

13 351 46* 45% 44% f % 

- £ 74* 74* 74* 4-1* 

15 448 10% 9ft 9%— % 

330 2% _2% '2%— * 

9 35 26% 25% 2692 +1 

10 1003 40 39% 39% 

n TB1 25 - 20% 20% 

14 563 38% a 35% + % 

» 1701 49 48* 49 

74 28% 28* a* , 

12 768 43* 42% 43% + % 

10 32 63 S* 62% 

15 3823 109% n? 187 —l* 

13 a 59% sm — 

12 42M 28% 28* 

292 2% 2% 2* 

7 1464 16% 16* 16% + U 

7 153 5* 5% gh— * 

7 3% 3* 5*—* 

20 z9 58 SB —1 

11 4 T7% 17% 17% 

30 9 4* 4* 4* 

11 79002 56* 60% +3% 

3 2481 9% 8* 5*— * 

287 16% 14* 16% + % 

10 31 28ft 28% »- * 

15 15 IT 10* 11 +* 

13 3181 77% 76% 76% — % 

8 284 a 34 34% + £ 

248 4% 4% 4%— % 

287 6* 6% 4%— % 

1812616 ^ »% a|k— % 

■ M m 6 % 6 %— % 

iS 27* 27 27% — M 

10 TO 48* 47* 48* +l5i ij 

Ml. 49 49 ' 49 —a*".-/ 

73 « 15% 14% 15 




69, 30 29% 29*.+ % 
33*' 33 33: , '+ * 

30' »* 18% TB*+% 
177 12 11% 11% 

347 45* 44* 44*— * 
ZBr 73% 73% 73% 
120X104% 103% 104% 

130c 96. 96 96 —1 

2 17% 17% 17% 

53 12% 12* 12% + * 
9968 45% 43* «*— 1% 
362 40* 40% 40% + % 
18 51* 51* 51% + * 
2 34% 24* 24* + * 
276 24% 23% 24 +% 

180 » 23% 23% — % 


7 1195 

i? m 

44% 

26% 

20 % 

43* 43* 
26 26* 
19* 20* 

7 603 

10 

9* 9% 

45 

50 

m 

37% 27* 
16% 16% 

54001 

6 

70% 

23* 

70* 70* 
23* 23* 

K 



» 

liCa 

VtCmtiA 

10 175 

1711172 
8 S7 
12 1074 
968 

□3% 

26% 

24* 

24* 

12 * 

33% 33* 
25* 25% 
21% 24* 
24* 24* 
11 * 11% 

0 14 

tffl 

35* 35* 
18* 18* 

9 9 

6 57 


a* a* 

13 13% 


23 

15* _ 

Zi% ESyst 
20 EopleP 
12 Ecico 
3% EflstAir 
1% EALwtO 
% EALwtA 
7% EsAh-uf 
9 eAIrpfB: 
11 EAirnfC 
21% EOWGF 
14% EastUII 
41* EiKoda 
47* Eaton 
70* EODlns 
20 Eckara 

a* EdlsBr 
14% EDO 
22* Edward 
21% EPGdPf 
10% EIToro 
7% Ekor 
2* EfccAs 
15* Elchps 
11% Elgin 
2% Elsdnt 
65* EmnEI 
+:» Em Rad 
15% EmrvA 
26* Emhart 
16% EtnpOs 
4 Emppf 

11* Encraen 
EnEic 
22 EnsiCp 
n% EinsBus 
17% Enrdi 
52% Emdipf 
94 Emdi pfl 
17* En?E*n 
1% Ensrca 
9% Enfera 
IS* EnfesE 
17* Enicxin 

19*,« Eauns 



ire 29 13 313 34 % 
M0 36 10 137? 4d5 
,J0 U 18 43 24* 


23% 1 St, MACOM J4 1J 17 1492 17% 16* 17%—% 

49% 3% MCA 1 40 1M 47* 44% 46* — l* 

24% 19% MCera mo 7.f 6 .a? w* w* in— % 




1 38* 30* 3Nr + U 

39 12* 11% iTS— * 

3 P 34% 34% + % 
98 3* 38 38- — tt . 


14* n* PacA S 154 m . 19 

(Cootinoedoo F^aoe 17) 




I 






































SH: 


Est. Safes Prow. Seda 1X427 

Prev. Dev Open Int. 41.331 off 2*4 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CET) 

100 tans- dollars per ton 
18*50 TZLX Oct I31J0 HMD 


184.00 
14100 
336 JB 
1*150 
1*7-00 
W7 JO 
167B0 
14860 
Est. Sates 


12JJ0 DCC 13460 13530 

127.00 Jait 13530 13*30 

uaoo Mar nvjn i»jo~ 

13750 May W16Q 14130 

13400 Jul 14330 143J0 

13530 Aug 14330 14330 

13730 Sop 14400 14400 

Prow. Sales 12.902 


Est. Sates Prev.Sales 12902 

nw.DwOKnlnt. 39.494 aft MOO 

froYBEAM OIL (CUT) 

Kiooo tbs- dollar* per 100 lb* 

30-37 7030 Ocf 21.15 2M0 

7935 2030 Dae 2132 7U5 

2967 2030 Jan 21.45 2145 

2*60 21.15 Mar 21 JO 2130 

27.45 . 7L45 May 271 D 2110 

2525 21.75 Jul 2240 2242 

2515 21J» Aug 2245 2245 

2405 21 JO Sop 2760 2260 

2230 2230 Oct 2260 2260 

Est. Sates Prev.Sate* 9401 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 48323 off 440 

5MObumln7ipum- dollar s Mr b ush el 
IJtTVS Ml Dtc U* MSVk 

167%. 1-2616 Mar 1.33*6 13356 

163 15756 MOV 1J7V6 13716 

134 V6 13* JUl „ , 

EsI. Sales Prey.Sales 641 

Prev. Day Open Int. 3337 up 73 


Livestock 


12M0 —140 

13330 —160 

HUB ^400 
14000 130 

1459—200 

I ££ za 

141 JO — 1.30 


2104 . —M 
21.12 — kl4 

207 -vT3 

m =* 

2227 —.11 

2735 —.15 

2240 —.13 

2235 +45. 


2392 1955 Mar .2350 2360 

2422 1960 May ZWJ 2400 

2425 1960 Jul 2410 24T2 

2430 2023 Sea 3(15 2415 

2425 2055 Dec 

Ext. Sates Prev.Staes 1339 

Prev. Day Open Int. 20^91 UP 71 
ORANGE JUICE CNYCK) 

15000 KiSrcsnts per lb. 

1SU» 12740 Mov 13140 131J0 

1H40 12330 Jan T3 *jo 13*30 

17734 12340 Mar 12*35 12*35 

1*230 t2US May 12738 171 JB 

157 JO 12240 Jul 

Esf.Sates pr#v.SateS 535 

Prev. bay Open fnt 4J84 up Til 


Currency Options 






Dal Nippon Printing 
Fisc. Year 1985 1984 

Revenue 743350 677420 

Profits 2&7B0 23600 

Per Share — *042 3742 


Inches pe 

1st Half 1985 1984 

R avenue 931.1 9123 

Pretax Net— 3*2 3*0 

PerShare *22 0.1* 

TailedStalM 

Amer. Medical Inn 
4tt» Qtiar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 706.7 59*9 

Net inc 2SJ 413 

Per Share — OJO 049 
Year 19*5 1984 

Revenue 2650. 2420- 

Mef Inc 1636 137.1 

Per Shore — 1.94 16* 

1914 year net Includes choree 
of Sill mil! ton. 


Gulf & Western Ind. 

*» Gear. 1985 1984 

Revenue 4314 42*2 

Net Inc 774 74J 

Per Share — 1 J» UB 

Year 1985 1984 

Revenue 1680. 1490. 

Net Inc 234-3 ZS9.9 


Per share — Ml 337 

National Medical Erl. 

IStQaar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 0124 70X3 

Met inc 346 344 

Per Share — 045 045 

1964 results restated. 

Parker Pen 

Sed Quo r. 1985 1984 

Revenue 3894 3386 

Net Inc 760 772 

Per Share — . 044 0.16 

1st Half 1985 1984 

Revenue 7274 *326 

Net Inc _ 1*28 331 


2nd Quor. 1985 1984 

Revenue 3894 3386 

Net Inc 760 772 

Per Share — . 044 0.16 

1st Half 1985 1984 

Revenue 7274 6326 

Net Inc 102S 331 

PerShare — 038 020 

Winn-Dixie Stores 

1st Qoar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1400 1400 

Net inc 1864 194* 

PerShare — 04* 048 


30U 24** ZnleCp 132 4 J 10 

19 7V. Zapata .12 13 57 

574* 31V* Torres 48 4 I* 

27 i*u. zenlthE 10 

21** 15*6 Zeros 32 13 1* 

37*6 22*4 Zumln 132 XS 12 


32 43 10 13 28V* 2B<4 2816 

.12 13 57 405 IK n I + th 

48 4 I* 134 51% 51 51 

10 897 1*3* l**h 1*44 
32 1J 1* 87 IMS 19*k 1914- 4* 

32 XJ 12 *2 351* 35 35 


MNJWCanadl 


Gmrnotiities 



Previous 
■Id ANc 
TWIM 33*00 
32460 32*00 
mm 32860 
33160 33100 
33460 33660 
33960 34160 


9J9 

861 

7.91 

r 

544 

4.98 

4.10 

r 

r 

r 

*49 

r 

J60 

4*0 

X13 

363 

Ml 

369 

164 

240 

160 

5 

068 

262 

5 

140 


863 165 

1.17 r 


540 *10 

560 438 

192 1» 

110 158 


Financial 


"jssr-M" & „» „„ 

9270 1*60 Mar 9242 926* 

9232 1761. Jan 97 S 9726 

9201 Mng Sep 9150 9143 

91 J8 09J35 DM 9U0 9U0 

9139 8*38 Mar 9139 9739 

91 JD . 9030 JIM _ 9103 9163 

Est Sates Prev. Sales *347 

Pipv- Day Open lilt 3234* off 348 

It YR. TREASURY fCBT) 
siBBL800prtn-Dts*32nasafK»pct 
87-73 7M3 Dec 86 86-9 

06-7 75-14 Mo r 8+30 85-10 

85-7 7*40 Jim 8+6 8+13 

■4-4 8+7 - sep 

■8-11 frl Dec 

Eecsteeo Prev. Sale* 74*1 

Prev. Day Open Int. 57331 up 347 


9267 9268 — 6* 

9253 7254 —67 

9218 9218 — 64 

9X85 9185 —65 
7US 9L5S -64 
9129 91 29 —Si 
9763 9163 -JB 


85-15 05-16 —11 

8+17 8+17 -IT 

88-19 83-20 —11 

82-24 —12 

H-30 —13 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 

Dec UMS 18765 

20175 18130 Mar 18*20 18860 

20*50 18X90 Jim M9J5 109J0 

19270 11760 SOP 109JO 1B9J0 

Est. Sates 76*1 Prev. Sates 76402 
Prev. Dav Open InL S5482 up 1453 

VALUE LINE (KCBT) 

points and cents ■ 

21765 18*80 Dee 19150 19195 

20940 19200 Mar 19560 19530 

Eat, Sales _ . Prev. Sale* 5J04 

Prev. Day Oven InL 7791 up 215 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (KYFE) 
points and cents _ „ „ 

11730 10130 Dec KJ775 1060 

11875 10530 Alar 10860 10960 

12060 10*90 Jun 110.10 11X10 

109.15 10*10 SOP 10970 10975 

Ear. Sales 11613 Prev. Soles 114*6 
Prev. Dav Open InL *381 up 1,143 


Commodity indexes 


Close 

Moody’s — • 889 JO f 

Reuters 1,699.10 

DJ. Futures H&45 

Coin. Resear eft Bureau. 224.00 

Moody's : base 100 : Dee. 31, 1931. 
v - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base TOO : Sen. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Previous 

885.90 f 
1,704.40 
116.03 
22360 



HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U.54 per ounce 

Close 

Klee Law Bid ASK 
Oct N.T. N.T. 22X00 
Nav _ N.T. N.T. 32*00 32760 
Dec - 32800 32*00 32700 32900 
Feb _ N.T. N.T. 33100 33300 
API _ N.T. N.T. 33500 33700 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 34000 34200 
Aug - 34*00 34660 34500 34700 
volume: 27 lots of 100 at 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U66 per ounce 


High Lew Settle Settle 

Oct N.T. N.T. 33470 32X10 

Dec 32*80 3 2 800 JMJ0 327.40 

Feb N.T. N.T. 33300 331.70 

volunw: *S lets at 100 oz. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cent* per kilo 

Close Previous 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 

NOW 18460 18560 ISAM 18500 

Dec 18500 18660 1B560 18660 

Jan 185J0 18*50 IBS JO 186J0 

Feb 1B6J0 16860 18*60 18*50 

Mar 18*00 19060 18*00 19000 

volume: 0 lot*. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kfia 

Close Previous 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 

RSS 1 Nav_ 1*275 14X00 16X60 16X50 

RS51D*C_ 1*125 16X75 16X60 1*460 

RSS 2 NOV _ 1J260 15*00 15260 15X00 

RSS 3 Nov _ 15000 15160 15060 15160 

RSS 4 Nov _ 14*00 14860 14660 148-00 

RSS 5 Nov _ 14160 14360 14160 T4360 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian ringgits per 25 teas 

Close Previous 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 

Oct 680 720 680 720 

NOV 690 730 490 730 

Dee 710 760 710 760 

Jan — 720 770 720 770 

Feb — 710 7*0 710 760 

Mar 700 750 700 75D 

MOV 700 7SO ITC 750 

Jun 690 740 490 740 

S«P «90 740 *90 740 

volume: o lots of 25 tons. 

Sourer: Reuters. 


Ijondon Metals 


Close Previous 

Bid Ask SM Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per metric ten 
Spal (9*50 *9760 *9760 *9860 

Forward 71100 71*50 71960 719J0 

COPPER CATHODES (Hteb Grade) 

Sterling par metric tea 

Seal 9*560 *£SB 94*50 967.M 

Forward 99060 99*a 99360 99X50 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling per metric ten 
Spot 94860 95060 94560 94760 

Forward 97S60 97760 97560 97860 

LEAD 

SteHiiw pw mrtne ten 
Saat 27*00 27858 277 JO 27*50 

Forward 38*50 28*75 28*00 20*50 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric tan 

Spot . 311560 313060 308*00 309060 

Forward 314060 314560 311560 312060 

SILVER 

P e ac e per trey ounce 

Spot 42860 42960 42*60 427.00 

Forward 44*00 44160 0*00 43960 

TIN (Standard} 

Sterling per metric tan 
Spot 073066 073560 077*60 870060 

Forward 84*160 8*8560 *72560 873060 

ZINC 

Starting per metric ten 

SOOl 44X00 44460 45760 45960 

Forwort fW M M no 

Sovra: ap. 


Commwlities 


Oa.2 

Close 

High Lew Bid Ask arm 

SUGAR 

French francs ear metric tea 
Dec 1.416 1695 1610 1614 —3 

Mar 1426 1405 1424 1423 — 2 

May 144* 1435 1451 14M5 —3 

Aug 1490 1490 1495 1604 — 1 

Ocf N.T. M.T. 163* 1650 —7 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1670 1695 4-2 

Es*. voL: 1410 kits of 50 tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 975 tors- Open Interest: 1*7*4 
COCOA 

French francs per 109 kg 
Dec 2630 262* 2620 2635 — 13 

Mar X05S 165 S 2647 2651 — 18 

Mov N.T. N.T. 2645 — —20 

JtV N.T. N.T. 2670 — — 20 

Sco N.T. N.T. 2675 — —20 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2660 — —25 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2670 — —30 

Est. voL: 7 tola of 10 Iona. Prev. OCfuOl soles: 
51 lots. Open interest: *31 
COFFEE 

French tropes per 188 kg 
Nov 1.790 1690 tJB6 1,799 —5 

ion 1670 1670 1620 1640 —10 

Mar • N.T. N.T. 1655 1685 +5 

May N.T. N.T. 1690 1.919 1-25 

JIV N.T. N.T. 1600 1650 +40 

Sep 1 1.940 1.940 1620 — — B 

Nov NT. N.T. 1.920 — — 10 

Est woL: 8 lots of S ion* Prev. o dual sates: 3 
lols. Open Inferos: : 304 
Sourer: Bourse du Commerce. 


S&P100 
Index Options 


Strike CaU-tnd 
Price DO Nov Ok Jm 
MS M — nv. 15 


PotvuisJ 

Od He* Dec Jan 

1/t* l/M VU k 


171 llh Wt Wt im 1/M S/It M « 

ITS 51* HA. Tit 7K 7/1* Ilk 19/16 J 

IU ILK « 5 III % M I 


180 Ik A K S 1H JM SM M 

Its 4k ilk 2 n » I n F* 

190 um 5/u » i in n ii - im 

wj . l/i* h - - - - - 

so — l/te — — — — — 

Tutnl cad ksiuse 3W2U 
Total caH apes tai. S52J23 
TsWeut lOtont 3)U*S 

TWBl put BPH IBL60N9 

ledec 

mains lb»t7»9s OMieafui 
Source; CBOE. 


Treasun 


London 

Commodities 


Oa.2 

Close Pre»locK 
High Low Bid Ask Bid Ask 

5UGAR 

Starling per metric ton 
Dec 14240 14160 14000 14160 14360 141*0 

MOT 15140 14*00 14840 14940 15900 15040 

May 15*00 15X20 15260 15X80 15X80 15460 

Aug N.T. N.T. 15*60 159 JO 1*040 1*160 

OCt 16*40 1*440 1(560 1(5*0 14*60 1*760 

Volume: 1675 lots of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric ton 
Dec 1694 1.780 1J82 1.783 1.787 1.789 

Mar 1629 1619 1620 1621 1625 1627 

(Mr 1658 164* 1674 1649 1651 1652 

Jry 14*8 1656 1653 165* 1654 1657 

Sep 1673 1657 16*3 16*4 165* 1657 

Dec 1644 1637 1613 1640 1655 1659 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1621 1650 1653 1658 

Volume: Xo57 lots or 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Starling per metric too 
Nov 1445 1410 1412 1413 1688 1690 

Jan 1/65 1440 1451 1453 1430 143* 

Mar 1,710 1475 1479 1484 14*4 14*7 

MOV 1.735 1495 1.705 1J0B 1688 1489 

J|y V50 1.710 IJ2D 1J45 1495 1JD0 

See UM U*0 U40 1.7B0 1730 U40 

NOV N.T. N.T. 1J50 1620 1640 1JB0 

Volume: 34*1 lota of 5 ions. 

GASOIL 

U6. doltars per metric ten 

Oct 2*640 264J5 2*460 2*560 2*260 26X50 


Apt ZU0O 23540 23560 23565 23260 23X25 
MOW 23X00 230 JO 23*75 23140 279 JO 23040 
Jun 232.75 23060 23060 23060 22860 22*75 
Volume: us s lolsot lODten* 

Sources: Bouton onO Lonaon Petroleum Ex- 
cnonre toosott). 


D1VI Futures 
Options 

W. German Uort-ISM marts, cars Per won 


Ocl 2 

Strike Can-SaWa PuM-Sefite 

Price Dec Mar in Dec Mar Jm 

34 Ul U! 151 044 0.73 0.95 

3? 141 Ui in B6i 167 06238 

38 169 160 U9 169 1J1 — 

39 *71 L37 1.94 1*9 202 — 

40 M Id 16 - - — 

Estl mated total vot, SJ44 
Cans; Tue. voL SJMmwb tel. 2(680 
Peis : Tue. voL 1606 oeea Int 19J17 
Source: CME. 



I 


Dhidends 



Fit* 

Offer bio YMe Yield 
Xmontn 741 A99 7J4 745 

WTlOTSl 762 740 7 JO 767 

One year 7J9 7J7 7.92 7.93 

Source: Solomon Brothers 


K5P UP ID DATE WITH 


r i 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on Sept. 30 , 1985 : U.S. $ 128 . 51 . 
Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


Information: Pleraon, HekMng & Piereon N.V^ 

Heran^scht 214,101 6 BS Amsterdam. 













































































Dlv. 


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84 7ft 
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242 3ft 

59 ft 
4 7ft 
3 3ft 
427 5ft 
32 5 

26 21ft 
2 34ft 


4ft 4% 

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lft 1ft 
2ft 2ft 

2% 2%-Si 
1 1 

37ft 37ft + ft 
7ft 7ft— ft 
19ft 19ft + ft 
lft Ift + ft 
2ft 2ft 
lift lift— ft 
12% 12% — ft 

X v 

7ft 7ft 
3ft 3ft 
4% 4ft— ft 
4ft ift— ft 
21 21ft + ft 
36ft 34ft + ft 


22% 

15% Oakwd 

■08b 

5 

10 

32 

16% 

15% 

16% 


12 

4 OdetAn 




4 

5ft 

9% 

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16% 

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1 

6% 

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54 

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18% 

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24ft 

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77 

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54 

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13 

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4% 2ft Jet Am 9 

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lift A Johnlnd 4 

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ColBrop JOt B5 16 
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18ft IBft + ft 
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lft 1ft + ft 
lift 16ft + ft 
9 9 — ft 

Oft Oft— ft 
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lift lift + ft 
26ft 26ft + ft 
5ft 5ft 
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14ft 14ft + ft 
15ft 15ft— ft 



39ft 

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7 

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IF YOU CAN TELL US EXACTLY 
WHAT THESE WILL BE WORTH 
IN SIX M0NTHSTIME, 





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BUSINESS rounpup 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


COMPANY NOTES 


Page 19 


1 May Get 2d -Saturn Plant 








United Press International 

DETROIT — General Motors 
Corp. may build another Saturn 
auto plant and is considering the 
sale of imported cars through Sat- 
urn dealers, according to the com- 
pany’s chairman, Roger B. Smith 

Mr. Smith said Tuesday in an 
interview with the Detroit Free 
Press he wished GM had plant ca- 
pacity lo build upwards of a m3- 
lion Saturn cars. “I think we've got 
to add a little more," he said. ; 
ii GM plans to produce between 
T 400,000 and 500,000 Saturn Small 
cars starting in 1987-88 in Spring 
Hill. Tennessee. 

The company searched for about 
six months earlier this year for the 
lint Saturn site, and Mr. Smith 
said GM continues to update its 
files on potential U.S. sites. He did 
not know when a second Saturn 
site might be selected. 

“I think they [Saturn executives] 
have their plate full right now.** he 
said. 

Mr. Smith said Saturn may ex- 
plore persuading car lmg$ from 
GNTs overseas subsidiaries, includ- 
ing its operations m Europe and 
Brazil, to expand the Saturn lin* 
and allow dealers to sell a wide 
range of autos. 

To be successful^ dealers will 
vtfieed more than just one Saturn car, 
^Mr. Smith said. 


In a separate interview with -an- 
other Detroit newspaper, the News. 
Mr. Smith said GM may offer pub- 
lic shares, of stock in its financial 
subsidiary, General Motors Accep- 
tance Corp., but probably will not 
do that with its new Saturn unit. 

If slock were issued in GMAC— 
which Mr. Smith termed only a 
possibility —h. would be the third 
category of publicly traded stock 
spun off from the stuJ-edstingGM 
common slock. 


To Buy More SCM Stock 

. Reuters 

WASHINGTON — Hanson 
Trust PLC, the British conglomer- 
ate, said Wednesday that in a filing 
with the U.S. Securities and Ex- 
change Commission that it intends 
to buy more securities of SCM 
Corp., the U.S. typewriter, food 
and chemical concern. 

The filing follows a decision last 
Wednesday by a U.S. appeals court 
lifting a lower court order, that had 
temporarily barred Hanson from 
buying additional stock on grounds - 
that it might have launched an ille- 
gal ipnder offer in its Sept 1 1 series 
ofprivate purchases of 3.1 million 
SCM shares. 


Nissan Launches 
Sports Car With 
Ceramic Twho 


Pantry Pride Raises Bid lor Revlon 


Analysts Call P&G Merger 
With Richardson a Good fit 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 

CHICAGO — Procter & Gam- 
ble's products have taken a beating 
in the last two years, and the Cin- 
cinnati-based giant must be hoping 
that Richardson- Vicks’s Vaporub, 
and other Vicks brands, will soothe 
the ache. 

While Procter & Gamble Co. is 
trying to overcome its -problems 
with Crest toothpaste. Pampers 
disposable diapers, Duncan times 
cookies and Citrus Hill orange 
juice, analysts praise the company 
for seizing an opportunity to grow 
in the personal- and health-care 
mark cl 

P&G announced Tuesday that it 
„ had acquired Richardson- Vicks 
\ Inc in a transaction worth about 
S1J2 billion. 

By purchasing Richardson- 
Vicks, P&G will seek to combine its 
impressive stable of personal- and 
health-care products, such as Ivory 
and Camay soap. Sure deodorant. 
Head & Shoulders shampoo and 
Pepto-Bisxnol, with Richardson-? . 
Vicks’s team, which includes Vidal 
Sassoon shampoo,- -Oil of -Olay. 
Gearasil and FixodenL 

“Richardson- Vicks fits in beau- 
tifully with P&G’s personal-care 
products, which they have been 
selling for decades,” Robert W. 
Back,- an analyst with Rodman & 
Renshaw in Chicago, said. “It fits 
their distribution system. It . fits 
their mindset- These are Nd t 
brand names, and who is better at 
pushing brand names than 


Investment analysts predicted 


that- P&G, which had revenue of 
SI 3.55 billion in its most recent 
fiscal year, would, squeeze even 
higher mar gins out of Richardson^ 
Vicks’s high-margin products. 
They said P&G would do this by 
dismissing many of the people in 
Vicks’s distribution network and 
. by distributing Vicks' s products 
through its own system. 

P&G’s huge advertising budget, 
which allows it to command adver- 
tising discounts that a smaller com- 
pany, such as Richardson- Vicks, 
cannot, is also expected to help 
P&G improve the margins on 
Vicks’s products. 

Not even P&G's fabled market- 
ing prowess, however, has prevent- 
ed market share erosion for many 
erf its flagship, products. Colgate’s 
introduction of pump toothpaste 
. has badly hurt Crest, which is only 
now roiling out a p ump toothpaste 
nationwide. Similarly, Kimberly- 
Clark’s Haggles diapers have, seri- 
ously eroded Pampers' market 
share, and P&G has pished to rede- 
sign Pampers to regain shares .. 

• ‘Toothpaste and diapers are. fi- 
naDy ptateauing out with the new 
introductions,” Hugh S. Zurkub- 
Ien.‘ ah . analyst with “Salomon' 
Brothers Inc., said.' “Cookies and 
orange juice aren't doing stellar ei- 
ther.” 

. For the first time in years, P&G’s 
net income declined in the fiscal 
year ended in June, falling 28.7 
percent, to $635 nriHian, from $890 
million the year before. 

To help regain its momentum, 
P&G has introduced an armada of 
new products. 


Mezzanine Capital Corporation 
Limited 

Notice to the holders of the fully paid Bearer Depositary 
Receipts (“BDRs”) evidencing Participating Redeemable Prefe- 
rence Stares of US1 cent each (“Shares") of Mezzanine Capital 
Corporation Limited (the “Company”) 

Notice of Dividend and Capital Repayment 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the holders of the BDRs that the 
Company has declared a final dividend for the financial year to 31st 
May, 1965 of $0.5151 per Share. The BDRs are denominated In mul- 
tiples of units (“Units ) each Unit currently comprises 100 Shares. 
The dividend is. therefore, equivalent to $51 .51 per Unit 

The Company has also given notice that it intends to redeem an 
aggregate of 1,089,000 Shares at a price of $10.0075 per Share. 


the BORs the number of Shares comprising a Unit wfH, following the 
redemption, be adjusted from 1 00 to 89. The number of Units eviden- 
ced by each BDR will remain unchanged. . ... 

Payment of dividends and of the capital repayment will be made, 
subject to receipt thereof by Manufacturers Hanover Bank (Guenv 




of the Depositary or of any of the Paying Agents (set out on the 
reverse of the BDRs and at the foot of this Nonce), at any time on or 
after 3rd October, 1985. . ' . 

Payment wiH, In each case, be made, subject to any laws and/Or 

option of the holder of the relevant Coupon, by transfer to a dollar 
account maintained by the payee with, a Bank In New York City. . 

Copies of the Company's annual report may also be obtained 
from the Depositary and the Paying Agents. 

BOR holders are advised mat as a result of the capital repay- 
ment of $1 1 0.08 per Unit, the net asset value dot Unit of the Com- 
pany will be reduced from $1000.75 to $890.67. BDR holders 
should note that the price per Unit quoted on-the London Stock 
Exchange will adjust accordingly. 

Depositary and Principal Paying Agent 

Manufacturers Hanover Bank (Guernsey) Limited 
Manufacturers Hanover House, La Trucbot, , 

St Peter Pori, Guernsey, Channel Islands 

Paying Agent* 

Manufacturers Hanover Bank/Belgium SA 
Rue de iigne 13, B-1Q0Q Brussels, Belgium - 

Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company,- - 
Bockenhelmer Landstrasse 51-53, 

D 6000 Franldurter-am-Marn 1, West Germany 

Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company, . 

Shell Tower, 33/34th Storey,. 

50 Raffles Place. Singapore 0104 

Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company 
• 7 Princess Street, London EC2P2LH 

Manufacturers Hanover Bank Luxembourg SA, 

39 Boulevard Prince Henri, 

Luxembourg, Grand Duchyof Luxembourg - 

Manufacturers HanoverTrust Company, 

Edinburgh Tower, 43rd Floor,. 

15 Queens Street, Central, Hong Kong 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company, 
Stockerstrasse 33, 8027 Zurich, Switzerland 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York, 

i4Place Vendome, 75001. Pans, France. . 


Aeence France- Preue 

! TOKYO — Nissan Motor 
Co. 'of Japan introduced on 
Wednesday a sports car em- 
bodying the world’s first ceram- 
ic turbo-compressor. 

Made of fine silicon nitride 
. based, ceramic instead of the 
usual nickel alloy, the turbo's 
rotor gives the engine a high 
heat resistance and low inertia 
rating, Nissan said. 

The car is a version of the 
Fair Lady model introduced in 
September 1983. It has the same 
two-liter engine with six in-line 
cylinders and 24 valves. 

The company said that the 
low weight of the rotor reduces 
its inertia by 45 percent, which, 
combined with a lightweight 
al uminum impeller, reduces the 
power needed to accelerate the 
turbo-compressor. The re- 
spond time is therefore re- 
duced. 

The silicon nitride chosen for 
the turbine is a synthetic mate- 
rial of the kind used on laigp- 
scale integrated circuits, and 
adapted by Nissan for the new 


St Peter Port, Guernsey 
Dated 3rtf October, 1985. 


by: Manufacturers 

Hanover Bank (Guernsey) 
- - - Limited Depositary. 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Revlon Inc. 
said Wednesday that it had re- 
ceived a sweetened takeover offer 
from Pantry Pride intx, but said 
that another company also is inter- 
ested in acquiring il 

The big cosmetics concern also 
disclosed that it is considering the 
possibility of “a complete liquida- 
tion'’ or a leveraged buyout that 
would take Revlon private. 

Revlon said its directors met for 
an hour Tuesday night to consider 
the various proposals. It urged 
shareholders to "not make any de- 
cisions pending further advice from 
the Revlon board.” 

'Another board meeting has not 
yet been scheduled, Revlon said. 

The various proposals concern- 
ing Revlon's future stem from Pan- 
try Pride's recent effort to acquire 
the company, an effort Revlon has 
been trying to thwart. 

Pantry Pride, an operator of su- ’ 
permarkets and retail stores that is 
based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 
offered last week to increase its bid 
for Revlon to $50 a share from $42 
if Revlon dropped some of the anti- 
takeover measures it recently 
adopted. 

Then, 15 minutes before Rev- 
lon’s board met Tuesday, Pantry 
Pride raised its bid to $53 a share, 
“conditioned on the Revlon board 
of directors accepting it” at their 
meeting, Revlon said. 

Revlon has 28 J million common 


shares outstanding, giving Pantry 
Pride's new bid an indicated total 
value of $13 billion. 

At midsession on the New York 
Stock Exchange Wednesday, Rev- 
lon's stock was up S3, 12V: a share; 
to $53.50. 

However, Revlon said its invest- 
ment adviser, Lazard Freres & Co„ 
“believed that more than $53 per 
share” could be realized from alter- 
native transactions or from an out- 
right liquidation. 

Revlon said one of those propos- 
als was an offer from "a major 
American corporation to negotiate 
an acquisition of Revlon.” 

A Revlon spokesman declined 
comment beyond the company’s 
announcement 


However. The New York Times 
and the Wall Street Journal report- 
ed Wednesday that Revlon has 
been negotiating a leveraged 
buyout with Forsunann Little & 
Co., a New York investment bank- 
ing firm that specializes in such 
transactions. 

The Journal, quoting unidenti- 
fied sources, said the buyout group 
might offer between $53 and $55 3 
share for Revlon. 

In a leveraged buyout, the pur- 
chase is mostly financed with debt 
that is repaid with funds from the 
target company’s operations or the 
sale of its assets. The target compa- 
ny's management typically is in- 
cluded in the buyout group. 


Champion Sells Some Packaging Mills 


The Asscetated Press 

ONTONAGON, Michigan — 
Champion International Corp. said 
Wednesday that it will sell most of 
its packaging business, including a 
Michigan plant, to Stone Container 
Corp. for up to $475 million. 

The operations to be sold to Chi- 
cago-bared Stone include a corru- 
gating medium mill in Ontonagon, 
a liner board mill in Missoula, 
Montana, and a corrugated medi- 
um and specialties mill in York, 
Pennsylvania. 

The sale also includes 39 corru- 
gated container plants and 13 bag- 


packaging facilities. Champion 
said in a press release from its 
Stamford, Connecticut, headquar- 
ters. 

Together the operations have an- 
nual sales of about $800 million 
and employ 7,000 people. 

“The sale of these packaging op- 
erations significantly enhances 
Champion’s divestiture program to 
reduce the debt incurred in its late 
1984 acquisition of Sl Regis Corp. 
and to focus on growth in its key 
pulp and paper businesses,” Cham- 
pion said. 

Thai acquisition was valued ai 
$1.4 billion, the company said. 


Barclays Merchant Bank lid. of 
London has obtained approval 
from the Japanese authorities to 
open offices in Tokyo. 

Bath lion Works of Bath, Maine, 
has reached a tentative agreement 
to end a strike by 4,500 members of 
the shipbuilders' union. It gave no 
details. The strike began July 1 af- 
ter the company demanded that the 
union accept a concessionary con- 
tract. 

Boeing Co. of Seattle has re- 
ceived an order from Texas Air 
Corp. for 25 of its 737-300 jetliners 
that is worth more than S600 mil- 
lion. It said commercial airplane 
Orders for September totaled 60, 
the best September since 1965. 

Chevron Corp. of San Francisco 
is to sell its interest in the Bluebell- 
Al iamgnu ofl fields in Utah for 
S360 milli on to Proven Properties 
lac. of Houston. Chevron said the 
sale is part of efforts to pay off debt 
incurred by its Sl3.4-ntillion merg- 
er with Gulf Oil Corp. in March 
1984. 

Federal Pioneer Ltd. of Toronto 
has subscribed for 44 percent of the 
share capital of a new company in 
Hong Kong, Fed-Supremetech 
Ltd., a manufacturer of switches, 
panelboards and switchboards, 
with a share capital of 5 million 
Hong Kong dollars ($643,000). 
Majority shareholder is Hong 
Kong-based Supremetech Ltd. - 

Hutchison Whampoa Ltd., a 
Hong Kong industrial conglomer- 
ate, has an option to purchase from 
its chairman, Li Ka-Shing, a 50- 


percem interest in office space in 
the China building in Hong Kong's 
Central District for 258 million 
Hong Kong dollars (533.17 mil- 
lion). 

Korea Heavy Industries & Con- 
struction Co. Ltd. of South Korea 
has signed a contract to build a 
$100- million cement plant for Suez 
Cement Co. of Egypt. 

Litton Industries of Beverly 
Hills, California, is being awarded 
two U.S. Army contracts totaling 
$278.8 milli on, the Pentagon said. 
One 5274.2-iniltion contract is for 
image intensification of nighl-vi- 
siou devices. 

Midtimedb Inc., a communica- 
tions company of Greenville, South 
Carolina, has completed its $1 -bil- 
lion recapitalization plan, ending 
an eight-month effort by manage- 
ment and the founding families to 
solidify their control of the com- 
munications company. 

RCA Corp.’s RCA Astro- Elec- 
tronics division of East Windsor, 
New Jersey, has won a contract to 
provide a commercial communica- 
tions satellite for Soctete Euro- 
peenne des Satellites in Luxem- 
bourg. 

Tootal Group PLCs main activi- 
ties showed improved profits in the 
first half of the financial year end- 
ing Jan. 31. and the textiles and 
clothing company, based in Man- 
chester, England, remains confi- 
dent in its forecast of pretax profit 
for the year or £27 million ($38 
million 1. up from £22-9 million. 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD. TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


ri$;. 


Page 20 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar Firms in Europe Amid Profit-Taking 


Compiled by Our Staff From Oapaiches 

LONDON — The doQ&r clos ed 
lower but near the top of its trading 
range Wednesday in Europe as 
profit-taking slowed the currency’s 
recent slide. 

“After the big seilofF this week, 
the dollar was brought back up on 
profit-taking with everyone finding 
themselves short of dollars but vay 
nervous at the same tune," one 
dealer in London said. 

In London, the U.S. currency 
dosed at 2.6470 Deutsche marks, 
up 2 pfennigs from its opening 
2.6280 and virtually unchanged 
from Tuesday's close of 2.6505. 
During the afternoon, it touched a 
high of 2.6520 DM. 

The British pound dosed at 


SI .4155 against an opening SI .4270 
and Tuesday's dose of $1.4120. 

Dealers pointed to a growing 
market sentiment that the dollar is 
due for an upward technical move, 
despite widespread wariness over 
central bank intervention. 

“I think one of the big banks has 
to test Ute upside to see what the 
central banks will do," one dealer 
in Frankfurt said. 

In New York, meanwhile, for- 
eign-exchange officers of Harris 
Trust & Savings Bank predicted 
Wednesday that the dollar's drop 
on the heels of the Group of Five 
currency accord will likely be 
short-lived. 

“G-5 will not be a long-term fac- 
tor," said Trevor Woodland, head 
of the bank’s corporate advisory 


desk. "Wc arc looking at a period 
of aberration based upon massive 
intervention.’’ 

The bank forecast that the dollar 
would firm against most ma jor cur- 
rencies by the end of the year, rise 
further by mid- 1986 and then taper 
off toward the end of 1986. ft 
pegged the dollar at 2.70 DM and 
224 Japanese yen by yearend. and 
at 3.0 DM and 250 yen by next 
June. 

In earlier trading Wednesday, 
the dollar was fixed in Frankfurt at 
2.6410 DM, down from 2.6778; at 
8.054 French francs in Paris, down 
from 8. 1765, and at 2L977 Dutch 
guilders in Amsterdam, down from 
3.018. In Zurich, the dollar dosed 
at 21565 Swiss francs, down from 
21695. (Reuters, IHT) 


Citibank Issue Is Increased to $500 MWion 


Reuters 

LONDON — The main activity 
in the Eurobond market Wednes- 
day was in the fioating-rate-note 
sector, where the size of a Gtibank 
issue was increased because of 
heavy demand. 

Prices of both the FRN and dol- 
Lar-slraight sectors ended slightly 
firmer after another quiet day’s 
trading, dealers said. 

The Gtibank issue was for $350 
milli on when it was launched in the 
afternoon. Demand was so great, 
however, that shortly after its intro- 
duction the issue was raised to $500 
million. 

The Gtibank issue pays 22fe ba- 
sis points over the one-month Lon- 
don intertank bid rate. The 20-year 
issue; lead managed by Merrill 
Lynch Capital Markets, has no in- 
vestor put options and is callable 
after the third year. 

One trader said the issue hit a 
hi gh of around 99.89 prior to its 
increase, just outside the 10-basis- 
point total fees. It subsequently 
closed at 99.8414, still well inside 
the 26-basis-point selling conces- 
sion. 

Another trader noted that as far 


as be knew, the issue was yet to be 
offered to investors in the Far East 
“Assuming there’s ao drastic up- 
ward move in interest rates, I can 
see this note going higher," he said. 

Floating-rate note traders were 
also kept busy Wednesday by 
strong demand for Tuesday’s 500- 
million-Deutsc he-mark floater for 
Commerzbank Overseas Finance 
NV. The 10-year note pays 14 point 
over six-month Libor with a maxi- 
mum coupon of 814 percent It 
closed Tuesday at 100.0314 percent 
but leaped up Wednesday io finish 
at around 10030. 

Otherwise, activity in floating- 


rate notes was thin with seasoned 
issues adding two to four baas 
points, dealas said. 

Seasoned doHar-straigbt bonds 
were generally unchanged to 14 
point firmer although selected is- 
sues at the longer ozd edged up by 
14 point as U.S. credit markets 

S it up during the afternoon, 
ers said. 

In other new issue activity, Orion 
Royal Bank Ltd. lead managed a 
50-miflion-Australjan-doQar bond 
for Security Pacific Australia Ltd. 
The three-year issue pays 14 per- 
cent over three years and was 
priced at 10044. 


Japan May Cut 
Shipyards, Trim 
Output, Jobs 

Reuters 

TOKYO — The Transport 
Ministry is pl anning a major 
review of Japan’s shipbuilding 
industry, with the aim of reduc- 
ing the number of shipyards 
and increasing productivity, in- 
dustry sources said Wednesday. 

Ministry officials said the 
ministry this month would ask 
its Advisory Council for Ratio- 
nalization of the Shipping and 
Shipbuilding Industries to draw 
up plans to help the industry 
face an expected drop in orders 
irt the coming years. 

Japanese shipyards currently 
build half the world's new 
ships. They received orders of 
8.4 million gross tons in 1984, 
they said. 

The Shipbuilders Association 
of Japan has said there is cur- 
rently a world o0~ tanker sur- 
plus of about 100 million dead- 
weight tons. 

The association's president, 
Kazuo Maeda, said recently 
that shipyards may have to re- 
duce their combined annual 
output to 33 million compen- 
sated gross registered tons from 
43 milli on now to meet an ex- 
pected fall in orders. The com- 
pensated measure is based on 
the weight of a standard cargo 
vessel and is used to calculate 
the work in building all ships. 
Mr. Maeda said the drop in 
output would mean cutting the 
national work force in ship- 
building to about 42000 from 
60,000 at present. 


Upjohn’s Hair Restorer May Grow Profits 


(Continued from Page 15) 
added, figuring its worth at $90 a 
share just on fundamentals. 

Mr. Saks wbo commented that 
all anyone can do is “fantasize" 
about Regaine’s potential. He fore- 
cast that Upjohn should enjoy a 
turnaround in upcoming third 
quarter results, at $120 a share, up 


from 87 cents last year. The second Forecast, estimates that Regaine 
quarter showed only a marginal will add about $5 a share to Up- 
gain and the first quarter was John's earnings in its first year on 
down. the market. 

Most analysts are forecasting “Let’s say that gives Upjohn 
that Upjohn mil earn about $6 a earnings of $12 or so three years 
share in 1985 and a dollar more out." he said. “That’s about a car- 
next year. bon copy of Syntex, area ] 963, the 

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American Can’s Chairman Tackles Social His 


(Condoned from Page 15) 

U.S- secretary of health, education 
and welfare and an American Gan 
board member. 

Among other projects, the foun- 
dation is evaluating a local school 
meals program, financing a project 
to improve distribution of supplies 
to soup kitchens nationwide, plan- 
ning a meeting of mayors and exec- 
utives on public education, and 
participating in a “partnership pro- 
gram'' with Marlin Luther King Jr. 
High School, an inner-city New 
York high school. Company execu- 
tives work on issues of business 
with students, who are urged, for 
example, to analyze American 
Can's annual reports. The compa- 
ny held last year’s annual meeting 
at the high school, and invited stu- 
dents. “Over the past few years, I 
have come to know about half the 
kids there,*’ Mr. Woodade said. 

Not all of Mr. Woods de's favor- 
ite projects are universally ap- 
plauded. Opponents of Westway, 
for example, have argued that it 
was environmentally unsound and 
that the funds allotted for it would 
be better spent on improving mass 
transit. “I saw Westway as a way to 
open up lower Manhattan, to clean 
up and revitalize the West Side, 
which is pretty crummy down, 
there," Mr. Woods de said. 

The foundation's 1984 budget, 
about 1.6 percent of American 
Gin’s pretax earnings last year, has 
been, cm average, greater than the 


At 


AT A GLANCE 

American Can 


41 Ba lter mmauntm in fhouMnds, 
u«pipwihntf>ti 


by Fortune 500 companies to sup- 
port social programs and the arts. 
According to a study of the philan- 
thropic activities of 130 major 
American companies, the average 
corporate donor gave less than 1 
percent of pretax earnings in 1983. 
“Only 10 of 130 companies that we 
looked at gave over 1.5 percent," 
said Steven D. Lydenbexg, a re- 
search assistant at the New York- 
based Council on Economic Priori- 
ties, a private research group. 


ThrNmiUittanM 

-June 30 IMS 1984 

Revenues S6&6.aD0 5824.300 

Hat income <5,900 35.800 

Earning* per share SI 63 SI 35 

YaarimM 

Dec. 31 1884 1983 

Ravanuea 54.213300 S4.G77.200 

Hat income 136.000 100.100 

Eamlngaperehare 54 90 S3 75 

ToMF assets. Dec 31 >964 S2.S26.70Q 

Current assets 799.700 

Current taMHies SSI .TOO 

Long-term deal ■ 527.300 

Bookvahie per share. Dec 31. 1964 £43.61 

Slock pnee. Sect 26.1085 
NYSE consoBOxted close S4S 

Stock pnes, 52-wttek range 60'X-4T , 

Erantoywaj. 1984 average 26200 

HesdQuaners Gre enw ich. Conti. 

NYT 

“Mr. Woodsidc is not unique, 
but he is one of the most effective 
and outspoken chief executives on 
the need to do these kinds of 
things," said Wmthrop Knowltoo, 
director erf the Center of Business 
and Government at Harvard Uni- 
versity and chairman of Harper Sc 
Row. 

For his part, Mr, Woodstde — 
who at moments looks more rum- 
pled professor than corporate 
chairman — says his own social 
consciousness has been considera- 
bly developed over the past 15 
years, during his courtship of and 
marriage to the former Mjg ^Ber- 

of Alcoholics Foundation, “When I 
met her she was working for Phoe- 
nix House, the largest drug-treat- 
ment program in New York, and 
she has been involved in the drug or 
alcoholism fields ever since 1 have 
known her " be said. “Migs turned 
me into a human being with real 
feelings' and concerns about 
things." 

And living in New York has been 
a revelation. “Before, I was a rather 


typical suburbanite who came into 
New York and went to the theater, 
but wbo never thought much about 
the problems of the urban poor or 
hunger or drug addiction,” Mr. 
Woodsidc said. Now, although the 
couple live at a oiuc Park Avenue 
address — Mr. Woodade made 
more than $1 million in salary and 
bonuses last year — “I am around 
the city a good bit in different ar- 
eas, in part because of my activities 
with the Regional Plan." 

A third influence, he says, was 
the experience of laying off thou- 
sands of workers during American 
Can's asset-reshuffling. “It was 
easy to see objectively what bad to 
be done, but it caused me night- 
mares and long sleepless nights," 
Mr. Woodskk said. This experi- 
ence, he said, spurred him to redi- 
rect the foundation toward prob- 
lems of economic transition. 

Beyond all this, getting involved 
in the soda! structure is "a matter 
of self-preservation," he says. “It 
directly impacts the ability to at- 
tract well-trained employees. If you 
don’t correct some of the things 


Recent earnings repons have 
. certainly been cheerful. For 1987s 
first hair, the company reported 

rev enues of $1.9 bfllion, down al- 
most 10 percent from a year earlier. 




tion is going to 
Because Mr. Woodside spends as 
m uch as 25 p ercent of his time on 
foundation projects, he could be 
vulnerable to the sort of criticism 
that has been leveled at William 
Norris, the head <rf Control Data 
Cosp^ who, some say, pursued so- 
cial activism at the expense of mar- 
ket share and profits. But so far, no 
one has complained about Mr. 
Woodsde's time allocations. 

“He and the company have 
achieved remarkable diversifica- 
tion. remarkable recovery in earn- 

S gs and remarkable growth,” said 
yron Rcoult, an analyst at Op- 
penheimer ft Co. “In part, I attri- 
bute all of that to fill Woodsde’s 
creativity and imagination, quali- 
ties that have been enhanced and 
stimulated by his outside activi- 
ties.” 


Net inrwne, however, came m at 
$813 million, up more than 27 per- 
cent For ail 1984. the company 
earned $ 136 million on revenues of 
$43 Whom 

Ail this has not gone unnoticed 
on Wall Street. When Mr. Wood- 
side replaced William May as chief 
executive in 1980, the company’s 
shares were at around $30. List 
week, the stock, one of 30 blue-chip 
issues that comprise the Dow Jones 
industrial average, was at about 
$54. 

American Can still makes pack- 
ages, biit they now are squeez ab le 
tubes and plastic bottles, not Dixie 
Cups or tm cans. And packaging, 
which used to account for a large 
percentage of revenues, last year 
accounted for just under half. The 
rest now comes from specialty re- 
tailing and financial -services com- 
panies, including Associated Madi- 
son, an insurance company headed 
by one-time mutual fund wizard 
Gerald Tsai Jr. Mr. Woodside says 
be bought that company primarily 
to get Mr. Tsai, 56, now an Ameri- 
can Can vice chairman, on board. 

Mr. Tsai and Frank J. Conner, 
54, (he company's president and 
chief operating officer, have be- 
come the core of a “strong manage- 
ment team," according to Charies 
E. Huge), chairman and chief exec- 
utive of Combustion. Engineering 
Inc. and an American Can board 
member. And, he says, Ur. Wood- 
side "knows how to delegate to 
these good people,” both of whom 
are candidates to succeed Mr. 
Woodside in 1987. 

Tbe restructuring still has a few 
loose ends. The company wants to 
sell its headquarters in Greenwich, 
Connecticut, and lease back only a 
portion of the building. 


V; 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 



' V*T'l tV 1 



LONDON BAY5WA7BT ESCORT Ser- 

vice. Tel 01 229 0776. 

MUNICH - WBCOME BCORT Ser- 

wee. Tefc 91 B4 39 





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ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Oct.2,1985 

■■ Net astet valua quatottoas are nppliefi by the Foods Bstert wtlh the axcep4tan of sonte MWesband a* Bbm pNcb. 

The nwretwi symbols Iran arte tre noe ncy or qantattons ■ptoe diM-BBl (w)- e »e ek 3Y,- tb) -tH-rnonttety; (O-iuWhJi !i; (Q— It nuielisl). 



AL MAL MANAOCMENT 
■ r w ) Al- Mnl Trust. iA _ 

SANK JULIUS BAER 8C8LM. 
-ld)Bp.„ 

-[ d ) Conbcr. 

H d 1 Dol/or-Boer bond Fd 
-Id I D-mark- Boer Band Fd. 

4 d I EauHwar America 

■Id) Eou/boer Europe 
-t d 1 Eaulboer Pod Be. 

-(d) Grabor— 

-( d 1 Stock bar 

BHP IHTERPUNDS 
-t«vj intertwnd Fund 
-(Ml Irrtercurrencv USS 

•(wl Inter currency DAA 

-( wl InhercTprencv Sterling 

-jwl Inleredultv Pact He Otter. 

-iw) Intereadhr t*. Antor. Offer 

BANQUE 7NDOSUEZ 

-( d 1 Aiion Growth Fund S 18*2 

-IwlDWretonq SF 85® 

-Iw) FI F -America 5 I7J0 

-{Ml RIF-Europe % tA17 

•(W) RlF-PodflC S 19JH 

-(d) IndasuexMuiltbands A t 10531 

-IdJ Indasuei Mu III bonds B S 12838 

-Id) IndasuerUSO IMM.F) 9 703054 

BRITANHI/LFOB 221, SL Heller, Jersey 

-(w) Brit. Do l tar income 5 8B7T 

■Iw) EtrlLS Manos-CulT 8 1803 

•(d) Brtt. InlLSManoBjJortf— _ S 1 j09V 

-rdl Brit (DfUManog.ParK C 1188 

-Iw) Brll.Am.IAC* FdLtd S IJP* 

•l»l Hrll.Gald Fund S 0730- 

-(*«) Br I LAtanoa- Currency C 14J4* 

-( a 7 BrIL Jarecei Dir Pert. Fd S I.1M 

■tun BrttJereev GH> Fund C 0225 

-Id! Brit. Wand Lels. Fund 8 1.131 

-(d I Brit. World Techn. Fund S 8494 


CAPITAL IHTERNATIOMAL 
-(wl Capitol Inn Fund. 

*(w) Capital Italia SA_ 


39A2 

^ - 77.81 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES! 

-Id) Actions Sulsscs SF 42175 

-101 Bend volar Svrt SF 10815 

-( d I Bond Valor D-mark DM 11431 

-Idl Bond Valor US-OOLLAR S 123.10 

-i a 1 Bond valor Ym. Yen 11153J30 

-( dl Convert Valor Swn SF Mass 

-I d I Convert VoTor US-OOLLAR. s 12842 

-tdl Concsrc — . SF 470JX 

-(dl CS FondvBonds ,i _ SF 77D0 

-Id) CS F«nds-inrt SF hits 

-Idl CS Money Market Fund S1091X0 

-tdl CS Money Merkel Fund— DM IQ5SJI0 

-(d) C5 Money Marker Fsnd r >03800 

-I d I Ener^te-votar SF 141.75 

-l d > uisec — SF 77SA0 

-id) Earoo a- Valor SF 1*873 

-I d ) Pod lie -Volar SF 15835 

DREXEL BURKMAM LAMBERT INC 
Winches) er House. 77 London Won 
LONDON EC2 (01 V2097V7I 
-Iih) Finsbury Croup Ud—_ S 13828 

-Im) Winchester Olverrttlea S 21 A* 

■Im) Winchester Financial Ltd. S IIL09 

-tml winchester Frontier % 10SJJ2 

-(wl Wtecnesler HaWIngs FF 10S54 

S 12® 

■(»*) Worldwide Securities * 4803 

-(wl Wortdwfde seeetol ■ - S 1*4875 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
-+( d ) can can hu_ 


-Hd) Inn OtntnHMn DM *074 

Do no « HBiHt * Urn) George, BreiseK 

■tm) DAH Ccmmod / tv Pool % 3*081 — 

-tm I Currency & Goto Pool t l*l«7 

-(ml WlnOi. Ll/e Fut. Peel 554009*— 

-(m) Trorn World Ful. Pool IS5U4 — 

EBC TRUST CO.IJERSET1 LTD. 
i-3 Seale sr_Sf. Hener.-otM*o33) 

TRACED CURRENCY FUND. 

S id line: Bid — * i833'Ofter 818*55- 

< d I Cop. : Bid S 1 B0 Oder 512.1*4 

international income fund 

■Id) snort Term (Accuml. s r sou 

-Idl Short term 'A' (Dletr)__ 8 IB03D 

-I d > snort Term (Aceuml S 1JU7 

-(d) Shari Term -fi - (Otetrl— 5 03409 


(w) Lone Term. 


S 3437 

FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1, Laurence PountV NHL ECA 01-423-4480 

-iw) F&C Atlantic S 1174 

•(wl FAC European - S U*1 

-(wi F&COrlreital I S 28.15 

FIDELITY PQB *78 Hasanten Bon n e do 
-<ml American Values Common— S 9838 

-tml Amor Values Cum7>rarf » 104.77 

-( d i Fideiltv Amer. Assets s 6932 

-( d i Fidelity Austroito Fteid, s 1772 

-i d 1 Fidelity Discovery Fund 5 1828 

-( d ) Fideiltv Olr. 5vgs.Tr S T24B2 

-fdj RdeHty Far East Fund ■ 2X31 

-Idl FTdellhf inn. Fund S *670 

-(dj Fidelity Orient Fund— S 3175 

-id) Fidelity Frontier Fund S 1137 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1983 


aaai naan 


PEANUTS 



age 21 


Wit ?>•.. 


MJ--. 

A;.- . . 

« •: 


BSP Lgia 

LniriLgsaJ 


TVS IS. ONE SECTION 
BOTHERS ME, THOUGH.. 


I THINK. TOU SHOULD 
CROSS OUT THE PART 
WHERE YOUR HERO 
TARES A NAP... 


BOOKS 


» L . 

vwwni - 


1BSS hbbb 

■BBB HU HflBBB 

F BB ! BBB H bbbbb 




BLONDIE 

DO.M9U KNOW WHAT M I SURE... Y 
THE NLMABeH ONE *** • s*_ V 
J^USEOPDMDBCE ©? r"^ 




A 4 *' ...• 


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**#*» u*r 

**• c 


1 Aggregate 

4— — rug . 

(dance) 

£ Novelist 
O'FTaherty 

12 Russian ruler: 
880-912 

14 S ego-flower 
state - 

15 Cotton thread 

16 Put lesser 
value on 

18 Former “97- 
pound 
weakling” 

19 Actress Ella 

. 28 “Spoon River" 
V poet 
' 22 Arab chief 

25 Barbara 

Geddes 

26 Colette novel 

29 Submissions to 

popular vote 

34 Morocco's 
capita] 

35 Kind of estate 

38 Frost’s "The 
Witch of- — " 

37 Blue dye 

*38 Clergyman's 
dwelling 

39 Burden 

40 “ — —and 
Lovers”: 
Lawrence 

41 Iowa, to Rene 

42 Malamud’s 
forte 


43 Altar used by 
ancient Semites 

45 Unexpected 
loss 

46 “Cap’n 

Lincoln 

47 Cape Cod town' 
49 Vagary 

53 Human being. ’ 

57 Southwestern : 
cottonwood . 

58 Among other 

thing, 

61 Grinder . 

62 Holdback 
.63 Fuzz 

64 Hammerhead 
part 

65 Victorian oath 
66-Oneof Ali’s 

wins ' 

DOWN - . 

1 Bar order, for . 
short 

2 Forearm bone. 

3 Middle: Prefix. 

4 Anathema 

5 Actress Hagen _ 

6 Usea shuttle, 

7 Attention' getter 

8 The Corsican _• 

9 Man is one 

10 Winged 

11 Bungle, with 
. . .“up" 

13 Sequoia in 
Calif .^world's 
largest living - 
thing) 


10/3/05 

15 Powerful 

beam 

17 Pardon 
21 Eurasian ' 
,-poplar 

23 Page heading, 
in some tomes 

24 Perform pope 

more . . 

26 Event in QcL 
... 1929 

27 Vietnam's 
capital^' ‘ 

28 Neurologist 
• Kraff&L-j— 

30 Abstainer of a - 
' kihcfc*'- 

31 Taboos: 

32 Extinguish, as 

alight : ' 

33 Property, e.g. 
38 Designed to be 

sung 

42 Less corrupted 
44 Monastic 
V.I.P. 

48 Topple 

49 Ironically 
extravagant 

50 Puzzler’s - 
favorite plant - 

51 Porter’s"- 

Horse... ." • 

52 Dail’sland 

54 Skin feature 

55 Pen sound 

56 Acrony m often 
in the news 

-59 Opposite of pos. 
60 Niho's kin 


BEETLE BAILEY 



/toe r 

U&Lf£Z 


ANDY CAPP 



CHEER UR 
PET. FVE . 

> QCfTA < 
LOVELV J 

► MEAL < 
WAITING 
FORNOJ j 



WIZARD of ID 


G 1 New York Timet; edited by Eugene Maluku. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 




REX MORGAN 


THAT DRUG DEALER LEFT AN 
ENVELOre WITH CLAUDIA/ 1 DIDMT 
OPEN rt BUT TM SURE IT WAS 1 
COCAINE { j 


GO ON 
HOME, BRADY / 
I WANT TO 
TALK WITH 
f- HER, 

L alone / 




GODDESS: 

The Secret Lives of Marilyn Monroe 

By Anthony Summers. 415 pages. 518.95. 
Macmillan, 866 Third Avenue, Sew York, 
N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yardlev 

A CCORDING ro Anthony Summers’s bib- 
. liography. Marilyn Monroe, who died 23 
years ago, has been the subject of 38 books. 
"Goddess" makes 39, and perhaps it wilt keep 
the competition quiet for a year or two. 
Though much of what Summers has to say 
about Monroe's celebrated life and mysterious 
death is based on circumstantial evidence and 
couched in cautious (not (o mention graceless) 
prose, his speculations are sufficiently plausi- 
ble to make one wonder if enough has at last 
been said about this sad story. 

“Goddess” is technically a biography, but 
Summers has deliberately passed quickly over 
certain aspects of Monroe's life in order to 
concentrate on others. He has little to say 
about her unhappy childhood, the details of 
which have been reported exhaustively; he 
spends only a few pages on her teen-age mar- 
riage to Jim Dougherty, another familiar story; 
and though he accepts at face value her rather 
pathetic pretensions to serious acting, he does 
not have much to say about any of the movies 
in which she appeared. 

Instead he concerns himself with matters 
about which there is still much to be curious. 
Sex is one of these, since the private sex life of 
one of the century’s most publicly sexual crea- 
tures remains a subject of discussion and ru- 
mor. Though sparing us the clinical details. 
Summers makes plain that Monroe’s sex life 
was exceedingly active but not especially joy- 
ous: she seems to have had no particular hang- 
ups about sex, but it seems to have given her 
little pleasure. One former lover told Summers: 
“Marilyn must have been frustrated almost all 
of the time. I think she regarded it as her 
function, being this great attractive female, 
that she was supposed to have sex with a man, 
because that was something she could do, that 
she could give. She wasn't very successful at it. 
in terms of her own fulfillment." Everything 
Summers reports suggests ihat this was the 
truth. 

She wasn't very successful at marriage, ei- 
ther. Her most famous attempts at it, with Joe 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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□□□□□aiOQniia 
□DQED E30E □□□ 

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noaHcina anna 
□□□□an □□□ □□□a 

□□□□ □ [JOCIE] EH30QG3 
BE0B CliiaB 30003 
□BSD E3C3HH 


DiMaggio and Arthur Miller, ended as unhap- 
pily as did her many attempts to have a child- 
pregnancies she inexplicably terminated. Sum- 
mers says, with at least a dozen abortions. 
Summers has not much more to say about the 
marriages than anyone else has. primarily be- 
cause DiMaggio and Miller have kept their 
own counsel. Suffice it to say I hat each mar- 
riage probably was doomed' from the start; 
Monroe, who "so desperately wanted conjugal 
and familial love, was simply incapable of the 
commitment and constancy out of which it 
grows. 

Perhaps she believed that if she slept with 
famous and powerful men. she somehow 
would become what they were. If Summers is 
right that toward the end of her life she had 
affairs with John and Robert Kennedy, this 
would seem the most likely explanation. In 
considering these relationships, if they existed. 
Summers ventures into slippery and dangerous 
ground; not merely is it territory where most of 
those in the know are either silent or dead, but 
it involves the reputations or two political 
figures whose iconographies have remained 
remarkably unchanged notwithstanding con- 
tinued, and sometimes devastating, attack. 

That Monroe slept with John Kennedy no 
longer seems to be a matter of much doubt; 
apparently she was jusL one among many. But 
Robert, “never the womanizer his brother 
won" is a more complicated case. Summers, for 
what it is worth, believes that he “fell for the 
flickering light of Marilyn's fragile spirit,” and 
that there was in fact an affair. He also believes 
Lhat Robert was the recipient of a distress call 
either direct or indirect, on the night Monroe 
died, and was involved in an effort to save her 
life — an effort that could have ended his 
political career had it been reported. 

Summers is as entitled to his theories as 
anyone, and the case he makes for them is. if 
nothing else, advanced without frivolity; un- 
like some who have written about Monroe and 
the Kennedy*. he has no political axes to grind, 
and he is engaged in no literary posturing. 
And. whether"he is right about all the details, 
about the essential truth he appears to be 
absolutely correct. He quotes Laurence Olivi- 
er: “Popular opinion is a horribly unsteady 
conveyance for life, and she was exploited 
beyond anyone's means." Whether the exploi- 
tation was by a studio executive, a political 
figure or merely a lover now unknown to us, it 
did not stop until she died. Though some may- 
feel that “Goddess" merely continues that 
practice, it is too dispassionate and sympathet- 
ic to be thus dismissed. 

Jonathan Yardlev is on ihe staff of The Wash • 
ingion Post. 

American Songbird Alights 
In England Alter Hurricane 

The Associated Press 

CHRISTCHURCH, England — A tiny 
American song bird landed here on England's 
south coast after apparently being blown off 
course by last week's Hurricane Gloria. 

Dr. George Green of the Dorset Bird Club 
said Tuesday that after the hurricane the 
yellow-breasted parula warbler probably 
“hitched'' across the Atlantic on passing cargo 


“hitched” across 
ships. 


* IF IDU'RE TIRED OF IT FOLLOWING 'jOU WHY 
DONtcHA TURN AROUND AN' FOLLOW IT Z ' 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• ' by Hariri Arnold and Bob Laa 


P0G5 CAN'T HURT ME AS 
LONG- AS ICARRV MV 
UJCKV SPECIAL STICK „ 


OF COURSE. SOMETIMES I HAVE 
TO CARRV TT P RET TV FAST 


Unscramble thaw four Juntas, 
one letter to each square, to form 
tour cmflnary words. 


LYJOL 


By Alan Truscott 

T HOSE players who de- 
fend by rule of thumb or 
from force of habit never ad- 
vance very far in the game. 

They can perhaps break 
loose from their stulified pro- 
cedures if they study “Winning 
Defense for the Advancing 
Bridge player," by Frank 
Stewart. In his book he urges 
players to think constructively, 
and the diagramed deal is a 
difficult example of the mental 
effort needed to defend well. 

The reader is shown the 
North and West cards, and has 
to defend three no-trump with 
the West cards. He leads the 
heart jack, and dummy's queen 
wins. South leads a spade to 
the queen, and West takes the 
ace. What next? 

West must work out the 


BRIDGE 


high-card situation. The first 
trick revealed that South has 
A-K of hearts, since East could 
not deal with dummy’s queen. 
South has shown ihe - spade 
queen, and must have the dia- 
mond ace. Lacking that card 
he would have saved dummy's 
heart queen as an entry and 
would immediately play dia- 
monds. 

So South is now looking at 
nine tricks: five in diamonds, 
three in hearts and one in 
spades. The only hope for the 
defense is to take four tricks in 
dubs. East presumably. has the 
club ace, since South's bidding 
suggested a minimum, and we 
must hope that be has the nine 
or the eight 

The routine play of a low 
club will fail, because South 
will be able to control the 


fourth round of Lhe suit West 
'must lead the king, and East 
unblocks the eight. West leads 
the four, and the J-7 score two 
tricks over the nine to defeat 
the contract. 


NORTH 
4> KB64 
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SOUTH (D) 

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WEST 

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bidding: 

South 

West 

North 

East 

I • 

Pass 

1 0 

Pass 

1 V 

Pass 

■1 A 

Pass 

1 N.T. 

Pass 

3 N.T. 

Peas 

Pass 

Pass 







































Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1985 


POSTCARD 

Book Boom in Brazil 


By Alan Riding 

.Vrw York Times Sente e 

R IO DE JANEIRO — A surge 
ol interest has been apparent 
for the past two years, but the 
crowds that flocked to the display 
area of an elegant shopping ™H 
here recently seemed to dramatize 
the point: In a country with little 
reading tradition, books have be- 
came Brazil's latest fashion. 

Parents took their children, 
friends agreed to meet there, visi- 
tors sought autographs of favorite 
authors and stocked up on supplies 
to last them through Christmas. 
For two weeks, Rio de Janeiro's 
Book Fair was the center of this 
city's busy cultural life. 

The attendance — about 75,000 
people in two weeks — surprised 
even its organizers. "We had hoped 
for about 20,000," Vander Soares 
of Editora Atica, a leading S3o 
Paulo-based publisher, said. 

The book fair's success was 
merely a symptom or a boom that is 
bringing a 20-to-30-perceni annual 
increase in sales of books of all 
genres, from serious nonfiction to 
poetry, from novels to children's 
literature. “The book culture is 
reaching out to the middle classes 
as well as to younger readers," one 
publisher said. 

Inevitably, to judge by one edi- 
tor's estimate that 90 percent of 
Brazilian homes contain no books, 
reading remains a minority pas- 
time. Yet, with projected sales this 
year of 40 million nonacademic 
books, including more than 7,000 
new titles, a sufficient market al- 
ready exists to sustain the 1 16 Bra- 
zilian and 14 foreign publishers 
who rented space at the Rio Fair. 

Newspapers give ample space to 
reviews of new titles and profiles of 
their authors, while television sta- 
tions now dedicate entire programs 
to interviews with writers, both 
well-known figures like Jorge 
Amado and Carlos Drummond de 
Andrade and such new faces as 
Marrio Souza and Joao Ubaldo Ri- 
beiro. 

Publishers, most of them still 
family businesses, have in turn be- 
gun adopting more modern mar- 
keting techniques to promote their 
books, sponsoring authors' tours to 
usually forgotten provincial capi- 
tals and looking for new sales out- 
lets in supermarkets and newspa- 
per stands — to get around the fact 
that this country of 130 million 
inhabitants has fewer than 600 
bookstores. 


The increase in book sales is tak- 
ing place during an economic crisis 
that has eroded purchasing power. 
But some publishers think this is 
contributing to the boom. "During 
moments of crisis, people turn 
more to bodes," Alfredo Machado, 
the owner of Editora Record, said. 
"On the one hand, bodes provide 
cheaper entertainment. On the oth- 
er band, people become more 
aware of the need to improve them- 
selves, to become cultivated, to get 
better jobs." 

Stfll more important is the return 
of democracy to Brazil in March 
after 21 years of military rule, dur- 
ing which all forms of cultural ex- 
pression, including bodes, were 
subject to censorship. 

A wave of new books has also 
focused on the recent past. Among 
current nonfiction best sellers, for 
example, are “Brazil: Never 
Again," detailing human rights 
abuses under the military regime; 
"The Subversive interest Rates" by 
Joehmr Bering, about Brazil’s for- 
eign debt crisis, and “An Organized 
Fantasy," the memoirs of Cdso 
Furtado, a leading economist and 
longtime opponent of the former 
dictatorship. 

Some publishers have developed 
highly successful editions of cheap 
paperbacks — costing die equiva- 
lent of $1 per copy — dealing with 
diverse subjects of public interest. 

Fiction is also prospering, with 
such international names as Milan 
Kundera, Marguerite Duras, Rich- 
ard Bach and Sidney Sheldon cur- 
rently dominating the list of best 
sellers. "We’re selling authors like 
Thomas Mann and T. S. Eliot who 
a few years agp were considered 
difficult," said Sergio Lacerda, co- 
owner of Editora Nova Fronidra. 
BraziPs largest publishing house. 

More important to the current 
literary moment, though, is the fact 
that the public is becoming more 
receptive to Brazil’s own novelists 
and poets. "Thanks to the best sell- 
ers, we can take the risk of creating 
a new market for new writers," La- 
cerda said. First editions of works 
by unknown authors usually run to 
only 3,000 copies but, if sold out, 
even these leave publishers with a 
small profit. 


Art Buckwald is on a leave of 
absence. His column will be resumed 
shortly. 


Julianne Baird: A Soprano 
Who Is Facinated by die Past 


By Will Crutchfield 

Afar* York Times Service 

N EW YORK — One of the 
most exciting new prima 
donnas in opera is Julianne Baird. 
You won’t be hearing her at the 
City Opera or at the Met. Her 
great roles have unfamiliar names 
(not Violetta or Mimi, but Gin- 
evra, Rostnene. Dru&iQa, Dafne 
and Euriflaj. She belongs to the 
early-music movement — her 
voice might be called an “authen- 
tic instrument" for Handel. Mon- 
teverdi and Purcell — and observ- 
ers around the world are 
beginning to agree that she is 
helping to lead that movement 
into a new level of dramatic per- 
suasiveness. 

Opera with original instru- 
ments is -still in its infancy, a 
movement on rite fringe of the 
fringe. But Baird has scored a 
series of successes in it over the 
past four years: Handel at the 
Spoleto festival in Charleston, 
Monteverdi’s "L’Incoronazione 
di Poppea” and Gluck's “Orfeo" 
with Concert Royal in New Yoric, 
Purcell’s "Fairy Queen” in To- 
ronto. She also performed in the 
controversial Joshua Rifkin re- 
cording of Bach's B Minor Mass, 
with one voice to a part, and re- 
cords document her style in Han- 
del Purcell and others. 

Baird's next New Yoric appear- 
ance is in concert with the an then- 
tic- instrument group Badinage, to 
play today at Merlon Hall. But it 
is essentially the opera singer, the 
interpreter of the great classical 
heroines, that her audience will 
bear. The vocal portion of the 
program consists of Giovanni 
Bononcini’s "Lamenio d'Olim- 
pia” and Handel's cantata “Lu- 
crezia.” 

The latter, probably best 
known to modem listeners from 
the performances of Janet Baker, 
is as in tense' a drama as many a 
full-length opera: Lucre ti a, raped 
by Tarquinius. struggles with her 
confusion, rage and shame, and 
kills herself, vowing vengeance 
from the grave. 

The singpr’s fascination with 
the past dates almost from birth 
— her mother and stepfather were 
medievalists teaching the history 
of language. “I grew up hearing 


Beowulf and Chaucer.” And mu- 
sic. In 1970 she went of the East- 
man School of Music in Roches- 
ter. New York, where she "had 
the good hick to be picked by a 
Baroque specialist, Erich 
Schwandt, who wanted a singer 
protegee.” "He derided to teach 
me harpsichord by the book." she 
recalled, "after Rameau, using 
pedagogical techniques of the 
18th century. He marie me read 
everything from the original nota- 
tion, and I learned all the agre- 
mentsT the highly developed sys- 
tem of French melodic 
ornamentation. 

This, and what she has gone on 
to do on her own, has helped to 
make Baird unique on the scene. 
Most revivalists realize the impor- 
tant role ornamentation played in 
the Baroque era, and some can 
distinguish between different 
styles of embellishment. 

But efforts to put it into prac- 
tice meet a variety of obstacles. 
Singers are usually trained to be 
versatile nonspecialists, and if 
they are going to sing Henze. 
Wolf and Faure the night after 
Scarlatti they can hardly master 
the old ornamental styles so thor- 
oughly as to make them their 
own. Usually they are singing or- 
naments written by someone else 
(perhaps with their cooperation), 
and learned, just as one would 
learn the original notes. 

All too often the approach 
when writing these ornaments is 
something like: "Back then peo- 
ple took a lot of liberties, so let’s 
do whatever comes into our 
heads." This often produces 
anachronistic embellishments 
that sound wrong to a sensitive 
ear. And that leads in turn to the 
opposi te approach, equally unsat- 
isfactory: "Let’s be very cautious 
lest we do something unstylish." 

The only real solution is the one 
Baird has taken: sbe has studied 
the old treatises with the disci- 
pline of a musicologist, for the 
purpose of throwing caution to 
the winds. Today, sbe can do 
what comes into her head because 
she can count on those things to 
be stylish. "Back then." she says, 
"it was all integrated, all a part of 
the expression. People didn't say, 
‘Oh! Ornaments!' ” 


The result is a combination of 
virtuosity and expressive free- 
dom. In The Philadelphia Inquir- 
er one reads of "the wildness and 
anguish that flashed through her 
singing." John Rockwell has writ- 
ten in The New York Times of ber 
"tremendously desirous Drusilia" 
and "voluptuously ornamented” 
Handel. Everyone agrees on her 
virtuosity as a coloratura singer. 

The praise has not been unani- 
mous. Baird sings with an "early 
music" sound — very littie vibra- 
to, tittle of what many would hear 
as richness. For some, that sound 
carries such a connotation of aca- 
demicism, caution and sexless- 
ness. For others, it simply isn't 
pleasant to hear. Andrew Porter, 
a critic sympathetic to the early 
instrument movement, said he 
was divided between admiration 
for the soprano’s style and "dis- 
like for the timbre of high notes 
that suggest the penetrating, vi- 
bratoless ringing of musical glass- 
es." 

Baird says the "cautious" cor- 
rectness some observers feel they 
see in the early music movement 
is more characteristic of the main- 
stream. "At Eastman," she says, 
"I thought, well I can see the 
molds the way they are, and I 
don't Fit. What should I do? We're 
fighting the same battle in a lot of 
areas in the real world: the safety 
in sameness. The McDonald’s ef- 
fect in America is scary." * 

For a singer who lakes her- ex- 
treme specialist’s path, the career 
opportunities are limited. Even 
some Baroque revivalists find her 
sound hard to accept "I went to 
study with Nikolaus Harnoncourt 
in Vienna, and what be had to 
teach about recitative declama- 
tion was wry helpful, bat he is no 
fan of 'early-music' voices. He 
just was not using my kind of 
singer." 

Despite early discouragement 
Baird was drawn to the stage. 
"After Harnoncourt" she re- 
called, "I derided that perhaps 
my railing was to be a musicolo- 
gist I went to Stanford for the 
doctoral program, and they did 
‘La Dafne’ of Gagliano. I played 
Cupid. I really got the bug that" 

The gap between academe and 
a performing career was bridged 



PEOPLE 


Hinckley Said to Flan 
Marriage With Patient 

Join W. Hinckley Jr, 30 , who V 

shot Pnadeat Ronald Reasu in 


77771 1 rwT^Hvi ■ r* 


Cat Mfcger/Th* New York Tie 

Singer Baird: Fighting “safety in sameness:” 


in part by six years with the Wa- 
verly Consent, starting in 1978. 
Though as a scholar she did not 
always agree with the group's ap- 
proach to performance practice, 
she found the experience invalu- 
able. "They were going around 
everywhere with early music, put- 
ting it across to audiences." Now 
she free-lances, living with her 
husband in Philadelphia but com- 
muting regularly to New York to 
leach aspiring Baroque singers. 


Baird is now considering 
branching out toward the daring- 
ly modern music of Mozart She 
has already done some songs and 
as early opera, and thirds sbe 
might venture Susanna in an orig- 
inal-instrument "Marriage of Ft 
garo." Whatever she does is not 
likely to be cautious. "One has to 
go to extremes, to effect a break," 
she says, "only then do we be- 
come brave enough to let individ- 
ual expression in." 


Pi - 


married to Leslie DeVeau, a 42- 
year-dd patient at the mental insti- 
tution where he is committed, ac- 
cording to reports by NBC News. 
However ber attorney, Marik Car- 
fin, said the report is "categorically 
untrue." The network reported diet 
officials said Hinckley has over- 
come his obsession with Jodie Fas- 
ter. Hinckley shot Reagan on 
March 30. 1981, in an effort to 
impress the actress, who starred in 
"Taxi Driver" and was then a col- 
lege student. NBC, quoting offi-t 
rials at St Elizabeths Hospital inv 
Washington, said DeVeau killed 
her 10-year-old daughter. The 
Washington Post said DeVeau, is 
mentioned in “Breaking Points,” 
Hinckley’s parents’ brick about 
their ordeal after their son shot the 
president. They describe DeVeau 
as one of those who have "encour- 
aged us through their letters, pray- 
ers and expressions of love.” 
Hinckley was found not guilty by - 
reason of insanity in the case. 

. . . Quintal Nobel the star of 
France's “Chateanvalkm" TV se- 
ries until she was injured is a car 
crash five months ago, married 
Jean-Lonb Juffim, a Nice jeweler, 
in Cannes on Tuesday. Thdr 4- 
year-edd daughter, Anoe-Charlocte, 
attended the ceremony, ft was Jul- 
ian's second marriage. Nobel wta », 
was in a deep coma for three weekly »• 
is suing the French actor Sacha 
Dbtd, driver of the car. 


Gene Pdl director of the Voice 
erf America, -said on Tuesday he is 
resigning iris post to become presi- 
dent of another U. S. government- 




Europe and Radio Liberty. As 
head of Voice of America for a 
year, PcS was in charge of the start 
of Radio Marti, the U. S. adminis- 
tration's news service aimed at 
Cuba, which went on the air on 
May 20. Pdl 48, joined fee VOA as 
director of news and current affairs 
in 1982. He left briefly to seme as 
Washington correspondent of 
WCVB, a Boston ramo station, re 
turning- to the VOA in 1983 to be* 




He was named acting director of 
the VOA in September, 1984. Inins 
new position, rdl will be based at 
RFEheadquartera in Munich. He 
has also served as Moscow corre- 
spondent for NBC News. 


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