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PARIS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1985 


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George P. Shultz 


U.S. Strategy 


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Latere Growth 

By Alan Riding - 

New York Timet Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO —The Rea- 
gan administration's decision to 
promote a new strategy to deal with 
Latin America’s debt marts a turn- 
ing paint in the region’s three-year 
financial crisis, according to for- 
eign bankers and government offi- 
cials here. 

They said Wednesday that 
Washington now accepted the Lat- 
in American contention that 
growth-oriented policies would en-i 
4 ' able the region to meet its huge 
debt obligations more effectively 
than the austerity programs de- 
manded until now by the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund. . 

The sources also noted that, in 
preparing an initiative to be an- 
nounced in Seoul next week; the 
administration had for the. first 
timeendcvsedtheprindple’that the' 
governments- of leading - Western 
nations should play a direct role inr 
easing the debt crisis. . •! . - V." 

“This is the first new: approadi 
that we've seen since the debt crisis 
began,” a Brazilian official said. 
“It’s still too early to know whether 
it will be radical enough, but it 
nonetheless marks a significant 
shift in U-5- thinking.” 

Evidence of this came Tuesday 
when the Treasury secretary, James 
A. Baker 3d, arid Paul A. Vofcker, 
the ch airman of the Federal Re- 
N 1 serve Board, called in the heads of 
five major UJL banks to brief them 
on the administration’s plans arid, 
to urge cooperation. Until now, 
Washington Disregarded the IMF 
as the main intermediary between 
debtor nations and their commer- 
cial creditors. 

Banking sources said the United 
States initiative involved de-em- 
phasizing the “policing” role of the 
IMF and using the World Bank as 
well as commercial banks to pro- 
vide new resources that would per- 
mit Latin America’s main debtor 
countries to resume economic 
growth. 

Mr. Baker is expected to intro- 
duce the plan next week in the 
presence of senior Latin American 
’V officials who will be among finance 
ministers and central bank gover- 
nors attending the 40th azmiiaf - 
meeting of the IMF and World 
Bank in South Korea. . 

Officials here said they fust pa- 
edved a change in UR policy last 
week after President Jos6 Sarneyof 
Brazil told the United Nations 
General Assembly that his govern- . 
' ment would no longer acc ep t IMF- 
type austerity programs. They said 
that Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz congratulated Mr.Sarney 
on his speech and said, (he United 
States also now favored growth. 

But wdl^placed US. bankers 
said that the real turning point "ap- 
parently came July 28, when Mr. . 
(Continued on Page 3, CoL3) 


By Bernard Gwertzman .■■■■ 

N ew Yak Tima Serna : 

NEW YORK — South Africa's 
' apartheid system is “doomed^ 1 ac- 
cording to Secretary of" State ' 
George P. Shultz, and efforts most 
be made to reach p nfirirn] rompm . ; 
mise before a - videat ^riVolutioii 
. overthrows the wMte mill only gov- 
ernment. . " 

Otherwise, Mr.-, Sfthliz. warned 
Wednesday- night, yjBs Mack mar 
jority might Sdy wind up ex-' 

South Africa Restricts the reznis- 
non of profits er income to non- 
rendeuts. Page 11. 

changing orie.s&t of oppressors for 
another and, Ves, could be worse 
off” 

In a speed) to the National Com- 
mittee on American Foreign Po- 
licy, Mr. Sfaul tz-said South Africa’s 
current system tif racial separation 
“must go” ' - - 

... The only alternative, he said, “to 
a radical. Violent outcome is a polit- 
ical accommodation now, before it 
istoolate.’* 

In an interview Thursday with 
-The New York Tories, Mb. Shultz 
urged that the South African gov- 
ernment “signal” its wdHngness to 
engage in the search for a political 
compromise with the black major- 



Gorbachev Unveils 
Arms Reduction Plan 


Bv Michael Dobbs medium-range missiles at Geneva This omission occurred again 
Washington Pat Semce which were previously linked, at during a new s briefing by his press 

PARIS — Mikhail S. Gorbachev Soviet insistence, with parallel talks spokesman, Leonid M. Zamyatin, 
launched a major Soviet arms con- on strategic and space weapons. and a senior member of the Soviet 
trol initiative Thursday by publidy Mr. Gorbachev said that the re- negotiating team in Geneva, Yuli 

proposing that the United States alizauon of the Soviet proposals A. Kvitsinsky. Mr. Kvitsinsky said 
ana the Soviet Union agree to halve would result in a substantial step that Moscow was prepared to per- 
their strategic missile forces and forward to the goal of "prohibition mil “basic research" on space re- 
negotiate a total ban on the devel- and total liquidation of nuclear feose systems, echoing a position 
opment and deployment of space aims, the total delivery of mankind taken by Mr. Gorbachev in an in- 
weapons. from the threat of nuclear war.” terview with Time Magazine last 


This o missi on occurred again 


truw miAiuui a. uui uuujt* - — ■ — — i 

launched a major Soviet arms con- on strategic and space weapons, 
trol initiative Thursday by publidy Mr. Gorbachev said that the re- 

proposing that the United States alizaiion of the Soviet proposals 
andthe Soviet Union agree to halve would result in a substantial step 


weapons. 

He also called on France and 


“There can be no victors in a month. 


BriSntosSi teJjS^^dutSi nuclear war," he sdd. “It is lime to Both French and British officials 

draw a practical conclusion from reacted coolly to the Soviet leader s 

Casoar Weinberger savs the this: Stop the aims race." call for direct talks. In the past. 


Caspar Weinberger says the this: Stop the aims race. 
U.S. has tracked a missile with a While advancing no sp 
grotmd^iased laser. P^3. £2°* S. JEK LTZ 


While advancing no specific new both countries have refused even to 
proposals on space weapons sys- consider such negotiations on the 


_ n« Auoouttd Piws 

Mikhail S. Gorbachev, left, with Prime Minist er Laurent Fabhis in Paris. 


While Watched by FBI, 
Ex-CIA Man Escaped 


iymwnt “signaT uTwaKngnesTto B y Stephen Engelberg Howard worked for the agency 
engage in the search for a political • New York rimes Service from January 1981 to June 1983. 

compromise with the black major- - WASHINGTON — A former It was not clear how Mr. Howard 

ity by freeing Nelson Mandela, the officer °f the CIA, identified as a learned he was a suspect in the 
prominent blade -political prisoner doBtole «8«tt working for the Sovi- <»»■ 

knd agreeing to negotiations with et Union,, has disappeared while . The search was the first public 


. him and- the outlawed African Na- Bn “ er surveillance by the FB 
tirvnal Cm igwac . cording to law enforcement 

“That would be a huge event for cdals and intelligence sources, 
the South African government to The. sources said Wedni 


et Union, has disappeared while The search was the first public 
under surveillance by the FBI, ac- sigh of fallout from the defection of 
cording" to law enforcement ofS- Mr- Yurchenko, a KGB officer 


ils and in telligence sources. who came over to the West while 
The. sources .said Wednesday 2“ ? ssi §P^ eat “ a 

1 _ ■* vmnat Wml An atm 


Mr. Shultz said, “and- that . that the former Central Intelligence So ™-' 1 < % ,Jom f uc cover. 


would be tranmatie for them.” Agency officer, Edward L. How-. taw cniorccincni ouiaai ia- 

Mr. Shultz said there were many ard, used the cover of a moonless e case *4® 

pt^siBle ways forthe Stmth African night to dude agents of the Federal Trrf °2, , _ __ 

authorities to indicate their desire Bureau of Investigation watching was not miended to coo- Edward L. Hoi 

for a peacefal transitibn. his home in a remote area <rf Santa 131X1 brm or prevent his flight be- 

“ItSSdbemtbefoimofideas- Fe. New Mexico. causeno l^al Pyoceedmg had been Sept. 22 from lus job aS r 

ing people from prison and saying Officials said Mr. Howard was begun againsL him at the nme he icsaide toale^slativefi 

BtX* are w&g to deal SS identified as a double agent by Vi- fir «“ n,e mder mane m the New Mb 

them, as in them^of Mandda,” uly Yurchenko, a Soriet Stefli- * agC t, 2? “t"* ! 

he said. aJce Officer defected to the said theofficiaL “It was amoonless the btelligence agency. 


One law enforcement official fa- 
liar with the Howard case said 



nuclear arms with the Soviet 
Union. 

Unveiling his proposals during a 
speech to members of the French 
parliament, Mr. Gorbachev signifi- 
cantly altered several previous So- 
viet negotiating positions in an ap- 
parent bid to rally West European 
public opinion behind him before 
be meets with President Ronald 
Reagan in Geneva in November. 

In Cincinnati, Ohio, Mr. Reagan 
questioned whether the Russians 
were willing to destroy nuclear mis- 
siles aimed at Western Europe, or 
simply planned to move them to 
Asia. 

Mr. Reagan also stood firm on 
plans to go ahead with research and 
testing on the Strategic Defense 
Initiative, his proposed space- 
based missfle defense program. 

The U.S. president, who has of- 
ten accused Moscow of intransi- 
gence, said of Mr. Gorbachev’s 
speech: “Everything they’re saying 
is a change in their position.” 

In addition to confirming that 
Soviet negotiators have already 
presented a proposal calling for 50- 
percent cuts in strategic weapons 
by the superpowers, Mr. Gorba- 


tems, Mr. Gorbachev appeared to grounds that their independent nu- 
interject a note of ambiguity into dear forces were insignificant com- 
ihe strident Soviet attacks on the pared to the larger arsenals of the 
Strategic Defense Initiative by superpowers. 


omitting a specific call for a ban on 
research on space weapons. 






Noting French and British ob- 
(Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) 






m 



um 


i 




“We have said that . Mandela West in July. 


grace officer who defected to the 


Howard was not intended to “con- Edward L. Howard percent cuts in strategic weapons 
tain” him or prevent his flight be- by the superpowers, Mr. Gorba- 

cause no legal proceeding had been Sept. 22 from his job as an econom- chev made these points: 
begun against him at the time he ics aide to a legislative finance com- ■ Insis ting that Moscow could 

first came under surveillance. minee in the New Mexico legisla- “no longer ignore” the modemiza- 
“This man was a tramed agent,” ture. He took that job after he left tion of French and British nuclear 
said the officiaL “It was a moonless the intelligence agency. arsenals, be called on France and 




night and he carefully picked his 
time to leave.” 


Friends and co-workers said they Britain to join the Soviet Union in 
were strum ed by reports that Mr. direct arms talks. Previously, the 


should.be released and that they However a Rcatan administra- ™? toleav f- ^ ^ **** f by reports that Mr. direct arms talks. Previously, the 

chnnM rW on*k a . a friz-on Vo ^ a “H™ 111 ® 11 ? - Tt was a loose surveillance, the Howard had provided intelligence Russians considered French and 

official said. “To imply that this information rnthe Soviet UricZ British as pan of the over- 

JESiw was a muff is not accurate. These They described him as a politically all Western total in bilateral arms 



Mandela; 
was the.pi 


erred- sine* 1962, piovidmg information to the Sonet men weTi . n , 
Gnion until afto he left the CIA. with him at 


. .1^ his speech Wedhesday, titkd The official said such actions could 


under orders to stay conservative, hard-working family negotiations with the United 
I costs.” man whose only major mistake was States. 


Ti — I - While some CIA employees have Ins arrest last year on charges of - nc saiu uiai me soviet uiuuu 

^ ^ 85 sold, stolen cifcssified documents to aggravated battery. had unilaterally reduced 'ihe num- 

SSSS S^SS^T™io> Soviet intri5|Mwg operative!. thare Tin .MW on« A> Mr. H«- teofiu.SS.^medhmHnnsemt 
faBacy of puri^our nondemo ^ ,tment of “ acUve CiA is no recorf of a.CTA employee ard threatened three men with a siles stationed “m the Europran 

mrifp ton fact” tn «, ,, m . working onla continuing basis for gun following a confrontation in a zone and targeted on Western Eu- 


Poucy, Mr. S p nlfz s aid tha t , events serious a security breach as the re- 
in. Iran arid Nicaragua showed the croitmrat of an active CIA employ- 
fallacy of pushing “our nondemo- ee.- ■ . 


• He said that the Soviet Union 
had unilaterally reduced ihe num- 


eraire allies too £ar and too fast” to 
change their system. 


OVAAUlg VU Ifl, V\<ULl 

{Sonrces told The Washington Soviet intdlgence. 


tun* ■ n. t ^ osl identified a Double agents who spend years was convicted and placed on pro- The Dutch government has made a 

j, seo ? nd fearer C3A officer, appar- establishing themselves in a rival bation for five years. According to decision on the stationing of U.S. 

ed fnraaiy “untiycanrtrengthen entty named by Mr. Yurchenko, intelligence agency are called assoriates, Mr. Howard was a gun cruise missiles dependent on the 

iOV1Cl flni * j w ^° had not fled the United States, “moles” in espionage jargon. The enthusiast number of Soviet missies targeted 

but that it had not yet taken action question whether the CIA has ever [Mr. Howard was an air force on Western Europe, 
glpqwy,-. oe?Bid^ ' against him.] been penetrated by a Soviet mole officer's son and a former Peace •The Soviet leader defined the 

. ^ In hisspeecn, Mr. Shultz said the . Meanwhile, the FBI said- has long been a subject of heated Corps volunteer. The Washington term “strategic forces” in a way 


New Mexico bar, officials said. He* rope to 243, the June 1984, IeveL 


A French Jewish World War Q veteran tried to protest 
Thursday as Mikhail S. Gorbachev laid a wreath to war 
dead. Later, Mr. Gorbachev heard the mayor of Paris 
criticize the Soviet Union's human rights record. Page 3. 

Syria Says Pact Signed 
To End Tripoli Fi ghting 


United States had to engage in “the Wednesday night that a warrant 
pofitiis of the real world for bote bad been issued for Mr. Howard’s 
moral and strategic reasons,” deal- arrest charging him with espionage 
iug “with the difficult moral in conspiring to deliver “national 
choices that tee real world pre- defense information” to a foreign 
- ... government. The FBI said Mr. 

“Webave friends and allies who 
do not always live up to our start- “ 

dards of freedom and democratic - T ' IT 

govenuncnt,”hcsaid, “yetweean- . I Anpql I 
not abandon: them.” XAi/cfClI. JjUl 

■ The Umted States’ adversaries 

“are tee worst offenders of tee . 'Thtninh n RZoes me 
principles we dBrish,” he said. But lmfUffl O BleSSOI^ 

the nuclear age gives the country no n T , 

other chmce “but to seek ■tohTtinn« jonn rlurst 

by prfiiical means.” An S ela T,ma Service 

r He said the nation must also find , DETROIT — Richard Kaczor gazed with 
away to reaxxnd tot errorism “that forioni eyes at the pyramid of Michigan State 
is consistent with our ideals as a Lottery tickets covering his kitchen table, 

free and law-abiding society.” Heaped before him were tens of thousands, 

. In Mr perhaps hundreds of thousands, of 50 cent 

Shultz sought to distinguish be^ “ d S1 tic * cets * tied in worthless bundles, 
tween tee Reagan adnStration’s ir “W * 31 1 .^ Mr - 

distaste for tee Sandinist govern- Karaor said, *is, *WhyT - 
meat’s ideology and larger strategic Mr. Kaczor and Ins family are lottery los- 

rnn^wic era. Big losers. 

“We most oppose the Nicara- Mr, Kaczw has been fired from his nob: his 

guan dictators notrimply because 15 “ T™™ **« « m bopdes* 

Sct are Communists” he said, ^ m losing its home, 

“but because they are Communists ’ ^ E £P erts °° P^ologKal gambling say teai 

who serve themtrastsof tee Soviet •- ** famfl y ^ 311(1 odiers ^ *** 

Union and its Caban drent, and some of tee more tragic consequraces of state 

who threaten peace in th i s hemi- lotten^. . ... 

sphere." 1 The Kaczors troubles began less than two 

said that if the: Nicaraguans ^ *8° ***■ K^czor's wtfe, Valerie, 

had adopted “even a nentralinter- 1 32, '^L°? ,o kae 3 ***“ 

nation^posture” after their revo- >“ 

hi tion;- i£d had not threatened " whose husbandearned about S20.000 a 
their noghbots, “tee Umted States-- b^an cadung bad checks and spending 

(CwSedonPage^CoLS) . hundreds of dollarseveiy day on lottery ude- 


question whether tee CIA has ever [Mr. Howard was an air force on Western Europe. 

been penetrated by a Soviet mole officer's son and a former Peace •The Soviet leader defined the 

has long been a subject of heated Corps volunteer. The Washington term “strategic forces” in a way 


Reuten 

DAMASCUS — A peace accord 


or areas of Tripoli since Saturday 
against a major assault by several 


dispute in the American inielli- Post rqiorted Wednesday.] that includes U.S. medium-range 10 in Lebanon s pn>Sy nan militias. 


gence community. • Administration officials hav< 

An intelligence source said earii- said that Mr. Howard held an oper 


Administration officials have Pershing-2 and cruise missiles sia- oorenraa pon or i npou was sigrw 
id teat Mr. Howard held an oner- tioned in Europe but excludes Sovi- “tetia leaders Thursday and 


northern port of Tripoli was signed 
by militia leaders Thursday and a 


Syria, whose troops, tanks and 
artillery ring tee city, authorized 


er this week that Mr. Howard was ational post with the CIA. Accord- et SS-20s with European targets, cease-rue was due to take effect at tee assault ^ter Tawheed rejected 
thought to have fled tee United ing to The Associated Press, State His formula calls into question tee Syrian television report- an “{her. bynan-brokered peace 


States after he abruptly resigned (Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) future of the U-S.-Soviet talks on 


The agreement came three days 


accord for all militias to disarm and 
allow a joini peacekeeping force of 


Legal Lotteries: A Tyranny of Numbers 

Though a Blessing for Stale Treasuries in the U.S., Addicts Pay Dearly 


Using a home computer to select tee him- Lotteries are tee least common form of 
dxeds of numbers to bet, Mrs. Kaczor would betting by compulsive gamblers, experts say, 
occasionally win several thousand dollars but tee number of problem gamblers who 
and become convinced teat tee had worked play the lotteries is steadily growing, 
out a computerized probability system to Experts on problem betting say teat when 
beat tee odds. a state creates a lottery it also creates new 

By the time it was over, tee had cashed an gamblers, a small but &gtuficani minority of 
estimated quarter of a million dollars in bad whom become pathological bettors who 
checks, had lost most of ft on tee lottery, wreak painful and expensive havoc on them- 
spent some of it on luxuries and, on one selves, their families and society, 
occasion, had talked her husband and her “The real issue is tee availability of gam- 
father into helping her cate bad ch ec ks. blixig," said Valerie Lorenz, director of treat- 
Mrs. Kaczor, whom a psychiatrist has diag- ment for tee National Foundation for Study 
nosed as a compulsive gambler, is now in Treatment of Pathological Gambling, a 
prison serving a three-year to 14-year sen- private, nonprofit agency in Baltimore, 
tence. “The housewife, in tee past would never 

Her husband was dismissed from his job of gamble,” tee said. “Now, when she goes to 
16 years at a pharmaceutical company after the supermarket, tee’s going to be able to buy 
he pleaded guilty to helping his wife cash a lottery tickets for a dollar, and then tee’s 
worthless money order and was placed on going to buy more tickets with larger 
probation. Mrs. Ka czar’s father also was put amounts of money. That's tee pattern, 
on probation after making a similar plea. A federal judge, Horace Gilmore, who pre- 
Mr. Kaczor, 39, cannot find a job. He is sided over one of the many criminal proceed- 
coDecting unemployment benefits, has de- ings against Mrs. Kaczor, said: “I think it is a 
dared bankruptcy and cannot make the sad case, I seriously think tee states ought to 
mortgage payments on tee family home. (Continued on Page 3, CoL 4) 


after tee abduction of four Soviet Lebanese and Syrian army Lroops 
diplomats in BeiruL Callers said to enter, 
the four would be executed unless A source dose to tee Soviet Em- 
Syri an- backed forces stopped at- bassy, meanwhile, said an evacua- 
tacking fundamentalist Moslem tion order for some of tee 150 Sovi- 
forces in TripolL ei citizens in Beirut could be 

The body of one of tee diplomats imminent. An anonymous caller 
was found Wednesday in Beirut, said Wednesday that" the embassy 
Syria is a dose ally of the Soviet compound would be blown up un- 


Union. 

The Soviet charge d'affaires in 


less evacuated by Friday. 

Several Soviet diplomats were 


Beirut, Yuri Suslikov, said earlier seen Thursday accompanied by 
that he was pessimistic about tee armed guards buying audio and 
fate of tee other three diplomats, video goods at shops near tee 
and Soviet sources said that some heavily guarded embassy, 
or all of tee Soviet community in The" Soviet source said that Mos- 


or all of tee Soviet community in 
Lebanon might be evacuated. 


The Soviet source said that Mos- 
cow felt helpless to save the re- 


Shortly before tee Syrian televi- maining hostages and that only 
sion report, tee Syrian press agency Syrian action could save them from 
SANA reported teat tee Syrian sharing tee fate of a 32-year-old 
president, Hafez al- Assad, and tee consular secretary, Arkadi Katkov, 
Tripoli Sunni Moslem fundamen- who was found shot dead Wednes- 
talist militia leader. Sheikh Saeed day. 

Shaaban, agreed on a draft accord The other hostages are: Oleg 
aimed at halting the Tripoli fight- Spirin, 32. an attache, married with 
ing, a 5-year-old daughter, who has 

“They discussed necessary spent nearly three years in Beirut: 
means to establish peace and secu- Valery Mirikov, 37. a commercial 
rity," the agency said, adding: representative, married with two 
Their views were identical over daughters, who has been in Beirut 
ways and means to deal with tee for about two and a half years; and 
situation in Tripoli.” Nikolai Svirsky, 40, the embassy 

Sheikh Shan ban's radical Islamic physician, who is married wiib a 
Unification Movement, or Ta- daughter, who arrived in Beirut 
wbeed, has held tee port and interi- four months ago. 


■ M 


INSIDE 

■ Tunisia asked tee UN to con- 
demn Israel strongly, for its air 

“raid on the PLO. Page 2. 

■ Toxic chetmcal accidents oc- 

cur daily in the UjSL, a report 
says. Page 3. 

■ Private businesses are thriv- 
ing in China. Piq>e 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE =’ 

■ An OPEC meeting broke up 

as members were .unable to 
agree on production alloca- 
tions.. Page 11. 

SPORTS 

■ The New York Mets won 


In Echo of Early Years , Mideast Conflict Shifts Back to Israel, West Bank 


■i: ft 


cunebed a title. Page 19. 

TOMORROW 

Simone Signorel is remembered 
as actress, friend and neighbor 
by Mary Blume. . . 1 


By Thxxnas.L Friedman 

_• New York Tima Service . 

■ " JERUSALEM — The Israeli air 
" strike a gain** tee Palestine Libera- 
tion. Organization’s headquarters 
in Tunis tmderacotes the degree to 
which the Arab-Israd conflict has 

been transformed in tee last year. 

The conflict, which was once pri- 
marily, between Israel and sur- 
rounding Arab- countries, has 
.evolved mto a struggle almost. ex- 
clusively betweraTsadL.aDd.tlie 
Palestinians, with tee Arab coun- 
tries as spectators. - - 

Although tee scene of the latest 
clash was Tunis, Israel’s statements 
and actions suggest teat its motiva- 
tkm for the attack stems from "md- 
dents teai have beetr talcing place 
inside . Israd and oa the occupied 
West Bank and Gaza Strip. . - 

.In the last 12 months, tee level 


and ferocity erf Palestinian attacks 
against Israelis there have intensi- 
fied from stone-throwing and tire- 
bunting to abductions and stab- 
bings committed by individual 
Arabs against individual Jews. 

Sixteen Israeli men and women 
have been killed in such modems 
over tee past year in Israel, in tee 
occupied territories and in nearby 
Cyprus. 'At least 12 others have 
been wounded. 

A substantial percentage of tee 
attacks appeared to have been di- 
rected by tee PLO. 

But what i$ new about tee wave 
of violence, according to Israeli 
military experts and West Bank Ar- 
abs, is that a majority of tee attacks 
in Israd and its occupied territories 
were initiated locally by individual 
Arabs who used crude homemade 
weapons and showed an unusual 
tuidadty. 


Examples are the recent stab- 
bings in broad daylight of two 
heavily armed Israeli soldiers in 
Hebron and the shooting of Israeli 
soldiers at point-blank range in Ra- 
maUah and E Bireh earlier this 
year. 

“Why should we delude our- 
selves regarding what’s happening 
between us and the Arabs who are 


The local origin of tee attackers, 
Mr. Schiff said, “proves that tee 
coals are glowing right here and are 
not always imported from Amman 
or Beirut, Damascus or Algeria.” 

While Arab officials in tee West 
Bank publicly condemn the acts of 
violence against Israelis, some Pal- 
estinians are privately applauding 
the attackers. 


bear the brunt of tee fight against 
Israel Today they appear to be 
developing tee attitude teat they 
can only maintain their hold in tee 
West Bank and tee Gaza Strip by 
taking the initiative themselves. 

That feeling appears to date 
from the decline of tee PLO as a 
military force capable of putting 
pressure on Israel. 


. . . the older generation in the occupied territories 'loathed Israel 

as a state, the children hate Israelis both as Jews and as people. 9 


under our control?" asked Zeev 
Schiff, tee military editor erf tee 
daily Ha’aretz. 

He described recent events as 
“tee buds of a civil war, another 
round of war between two popula- 
tions grasping the same plot of 
land.” 


Meron Benvenisti. a former dep- 
uty mayor of Jerusalem and tee 
leading Israeli expert on land use in 
the West Bank, said the Arab-Is- 
radi conflict appeared to be shrink- 
ing back to its p re-1948 roots. 

In tee earlier years, local Pales- 
tinians looked to outside forces to 


“This is a grass-roots reaction," 
Mr. Benvenisti said, “and Israelis 
will have to address themselves to 
something real now — not an ene- 
my across tee border but one with- 
in, which is just where tee conflict 
started 100 years ago.” 

Palestinians. Israeli academic ex- 


perts and military officials who 
oral with tee West Bank cited sev- 
eral factors that have helped trans- 
form tee conflict. 

They pointed to tee rise of a new. 
more militant generation of Pales- 
tinians in the West Bank, and the 
influence that the war in Lebanon 
has had on that generation. Many 
cite tec actions of the Israeli set- 
tlers, tee transfer of tee PLO head- 
quarters to Amman, Jordan, and 
the release of 600 Palestinian ter- 
rorists into tee occupied territories 
in a prisoner exchange. 

A recent analysis in the rightist 
Israeli newspaper Ma'ariv said that 
tee old generation of leaders, tee 
contemporaries of King Hussein of 
Jordan and of Yasser Arafat, the 
PLO leader, “are gradually dying 
out and bring replaced by young 
leaders who have grown up and 
developed under Israeli rule.” 


According to the newspaper, a 
researcher noted in his doctoral 
dissertation teat while the older 
generation in tee occupied territo- 
ries "loathed Israel as a state, the 
children hate Israelis both as Jews 
and as people." 

The old leadership, the newspa- 
per added, favorably compared Is- 
raeli actions in tee territories to 
those of the more heavy-handed 
Jordanian administration, "so to 
make do with the lesser of two 
evils." 

But for tee new generation, tee 
paper said, “There is but one real, 
hostile regime which they encoun- 
ter day in and day out, and which 
they are forced to confront at every 
road junction, every movie theater 
entrance and every bridge over tee 
Jordan River.” 

The younger Palestinians also 

{Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1985 


Arafat Says U.S. Helped 
In Israeli Raid on PLO 


By Jonathan C Randal 

Washington Post Service 

TUNIS — Yasser Arafat, the 

chairman of the Palestine Libera- 
tun Organization, said Thursday 
that U.S. tanker aircraft helped re- 
fuel the Israeli Air Force planes 
' that attacked his personal head- 
quarters near here Tuesday. 

He also said at a news conference 
that he had left his headquarters to 
g q jogging on the beach only IS 
minutes before the Israeli aircraft 
leveled the complex with bombs 
and air-to-ground missiles. 

Mr. Arafat said that he knew 
which U.S. base in the Mediterra- 
nean was involved in supplying the 
tanker aircraft but would name it 
only “at the appropriate time.’* He 
declined to explain why he would 
not name the base now. 

Other Palestinian sources have 
suggested that the Israelis refueled 
at a North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 

U.S. Revokes Thai’s Visa 
.After Attempted Coup 

The Associated Press 

BANGKOK — The United 
States has denied entry to a Thai. 
Army colonel who allegedly led a 
failed coup attempt on SepL 9, a 
spokesman For the U.S. Embassy 
said Thursday. 

The spokesman said Colonel 
Manoon Roopkachora could not 
be given asylum because be had 
attempted to overthrow a legal gov- 
ernment. 


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zalion air base in southern Italy. 

Quoting from the authoritative 
British International Institute of 
Strategic Studies, Mr. Arafat con- 
tended that Israel does not own 
enough tanker aircraft to have con- 
ducted the raid without “strategic 
and operational coordination” 
with the United States. 

He said that eight fighter-bomb- 
ers escorted the refueling aircraft in 
addition to tbe eight that carried 
out the attack;. 

Arguing that the U.S aircraft 
that he alleged were involved had 
been lent as “part of the strategic 
agreement between Israel and 
America,” Mr. Arafat asked: “Can 
you explain bow more than 20 air- 
craft stay in the air for more than 
seven hours from takeoff to land- 
ing, refueling" twice on the way to 
target, once headed home? 

“Do you want to convince me 
that the 6th Fleet has not felt the 
existence of these planes in tbe air 
for seven hours?” Mr. Arafat 
asked, referring to the U.S. 6th 
FleeL “The Americans cannot say 
they didn’t know." 

Asserting that Israeli officials 
had said that they had informed the 
Americans of the planned raid 
ahead of time, he said tbe U.S. 
administration and President Ron- 
ald Reagan accepted his attempted 
a ssassinati on although he, as PLO 
chairman, was the “one who signed 
the Jordan-PLO peace initiative." 

Denouncing the alleged Ameri- 
can collusion and Mr. Reagan’s im- 
plied endorsement of the raid as 
“absolutely shameful,” Mr. Arafat 
said the Americans were “bombing 
the peace process." 




Labor Party 
In U.K. Sets 

Economic 

Platform 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Poli«i) Activate mdwtJaniMsfcfci Offer 

WARSAW fUPD A group of seven jailed activists of the * 

said^sd^lhat * 

offer to free political p^nere if ® w - ■ 


r h' * ^ 
it" 1 - 


r W irec puuuwu ' 

elections on Oct 13 was “imprecedmted 



ItHAMBAdnOI 

Neil Kinnock, center, leader of Britain’s Labor Party, took a break on Wednesday to ring 
with members of a miners’ choir during a Welsh Night celebration at a Bournemouth hotel 

Ex-CIA Man Escaped While Under FBI Watch 


(Continued from Page I) 
Department records show that Mr. 
Howard was assigned to (he U.S. 
Embassy in Moscow where his cov- 
er was a job as a budget specialist 

■ Soviet Intelligence Disaster 
While disclosures that CIA em- 
ployees may have been feeding in- 
formation to the Soviet Union has 
alarmed U.S. intelligence officials, 
several of the officials said that Mr. 
Y urchenko’s defection and those of 
other Soviet intelligence officials in 
London and Athens represent a 


major disaster for Soviet intelli- 
gence, The Washington Post re- 
ported from Washington. 

Tbe KGB “has been hit with an 
earthquake that’s above 8.0 on the 
Richter scale, and we’ve been hit 
with a few hail stones," said George 
A. Carver, a 26-year CIA veteran 
who left tbe agency during the Car- 
ter administration. 

A former CIA director, William 
E Colby, said, “If we had lost three 
ranking defectors in the last couple 
of months, we'd be in an uproar." 


Bui other officials said it is far 
from clear which superpower has 
suffered the greatest hemorrhaging 
of sensitive information. 

Some intelligence experts sug- 
gested that, while Mr. Yurchenko's 
defection may be a short-term CIA 
bonanza, the loss of Mr. Yur- 
chenko and other recent Soviet de- 
fectors to tbe West actually repre- 
sents setbacks for the West, since 
they can no longer be used to gath- 
er information inside the Soviet in- 
telligence establishment. 


SfiSSss: 

Britain’s opposition Labor Party were Henryk Grzedricwskl Roman 

voted Thursday for currency ex- Andrzej Wisniewski and Stanislaw Woronko, 

change controls and tax penalties 

on Britons investing abroad, en- _ , , i A ,, | 

doming an economic platform that tt 1 T flf flV Tfavft F Oiled AraD AuaCK 
would turn around the ruling Con- .. , «xn-j „„ 

servatives’ free-market philosophy. LONDON (Reuters) -British poheeb^ 

The Labor Party, on mefifth day Arab guerrilla attack in London after arresting a Jordanian and an Iraqi. 

of its weeklong annual convention, police sources said Thursday. _ . . . .. , T .. ^ 

also voted for the Erst time for a The men were detained under Britain s prevention of ienunsm Ac% 
minimum wage for all Britons and and charged in court with conspiracy to cause explosions, a police 

the introduction of a 35-hour work- spokesman said. . , , . , ' - - . 

week. The sources said both were alleged to have had grenades m their 

Minimum pay received a two- possession when they were arrested- - ' 

thirds majority endorsement, 

p^yfplalform at the*next dec- Duarte Is Said to Free 4 in Bargaining 

non. SALVADOR (WP) — The Salvadoran government has freed 

Prime Minister Margaret f prisoner in a gesture designed as the first step in meeting 

Thatcher, who must call a general ja^p^s’ demands for the release of the da ughter of Ptesident Jos* 
election by June 1988, has chided Napoiedn Duarte, according to a government source. 

Britons during six years in office QpadaJiipe Duarte Durdn, 35, was abducted by gunmen Sept. 10 

for what she terms pricing them- ^ Mend, Ana Cecilia Villeda, 23. A group calling itself the 

-e o _ ... — ... , - a - n-M:... . 


selves out of jobs. Pedro Castillo Front later claimed 

The deputy Labor leader, Roy Mr. Duarte with demands for release of g 
Hattersley, who outlined the pro- for the freedom of the two women, 
gram, said: “We will not solve the _ — * . 

Sihanouk Says Rebels Make Progre ss 

tinkering with the exchange rate. UNITED NATIONS, New 


ability and contacted 
prisoners in exchange 


UNITED NATIONS, New 


to change the patterns of York (NYT) — Prince Norodom 


ownership and organization.* 


Sihanouk has told the General As- 


The program also indudes the sembly that his rebel forces are 
reimposition of at least partial con- holding their own against the Ha- 
trols on the movement of money noi-backed government in Phnom 
into and out of Britain, tax sane- Penh. ' 


Peres Calls Hussein’s Move ' Good 5 but Not Enough 


By Christopher Dickey 

Washington Past Service 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres welcomed on 
Thursday signs from King Hussein 
of Jordan that the peace process 
may still be alive despite Israel’s 
bombing of the Palestinian head- 
quarters in Tunisia. 

But Mr. Peres was quick to add 
that Hussein’s reported remarks in 
Washington to a closed session of 
the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee were not enough. 

Hussein told the panel that no 


stale of belligerency exists between 
Jordan and Israel and that Jordan 
recognizes Israel’s right to exist. 

“I take it as a good omen, but not 
as a sufficient change," Mr. Peres 
said. He declared that if Hussein 
meant what he said, he should state 
it publidy. 

Answering questions at a press 
luncheon. Mr. Peres seemed confi- 
dent and was visibly relieved that 
Washington's reaction to the raid 
Tuesday was mOd. 

Because Israel believed that the 
raid would possibly trigger a nega- 


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tive international reaction. Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s character- 
ization of tbe attack as an act of 
self-defense was “for us, shall I say, 
a refreshing surprise," Mr. Peres 
said. 

The Israeli prime minister 
played down the fact that since 
Tuesday U.S. officials have tried to 
moderate their initial endorsement 
of the strike. Mr. Reagan's remarks 
were “crystal dear,” he said. 

Mr. Peres reiterated his govern- 
ment’s perception of current efforts 
to seek a Middle East peace settle- 
menu 

“I am wholeheartedly for peace," 
he said. “I don’t think that an Arab 
country that is ready to negotiate 
with us for peace is doing us a 
favor. We are not a dimity organi- 
zation. 

“We don’t do a favor to them 
when we seek peace, and they don’t 
do a favor to us when they seek 
peace,” he said. “They need h. We 
need it" 


Mr. Peres said he believed that 
Hussein wanted and needed peace. 
“I hope that this momentum will be 
continued in spite of the many dif- 
ficulties and many complications,” 
he added. 

Hussein has faced Jerusalem 
longer than any other Arab head of 
state. 

The Jordanian leader has con- 
cluded that he needs the support of 
Yasser Arafat, the Palestine Liber- 
ation Organization chairman, in 
order to advance the peace process. 

In a Television interview 
Wednesday, however, Mr. Peres in- 
sisted that Hussein did not need 
Mr. Arafat's help. 

In general, he said, “Hussein is 
not happy with Arafat’s entire ac- . 
livity.” 

Mr. Peres said that “inwardly, 
the Jordanians are also constantly 
in doubt as to whether the PLO ana 
Arafat really mean 1 what they say." 


tions on firms that refuse to repa- The prince, who is recognized by 
triate foreign profits and the setting the United Nations as the Iegjti- 
up of a state investment hawk to mate head of nation of Cambodia, 
fund increased spending in indns- asserted in a speech Wednesday 
tries chosen by government and that forces of the opposition coali- 
public works. -don he led had recently made in- 


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Mr. Hattersley said, “The Labor roads into regions near the Cambo- 
Party stands acoised of wanting to 

interfere with the free operatic? of “^7 for ** ^eamaesa. The 
free»market forces. I plod guflty.” rebel aDumce consists of two non- 
Party leaders interrupted ie Communist groups and the sKhmer 
proceedings to redouble attacks on Rouge, wiich is Cramnunist 

MkThalcher after her govern- 1 T he P I }? ce 
ment announced Thursday that im- clahns by Hanoi, ms troops had not 
employment has reached a record been “renoudy wrakened by the 
3.34 million, a rise of mOOO in the scnalled fag yictones of the Viet- 
unadjusted figures in the past namese offensive this year. 


sders interrupted the Communist groups and the Khmt 
: to redouble attacks on R^e, which ls Comnraiust 
her after D nvrm- The prrnce said that despit 



Prince Norodom Sihanouk 


month. 

Shutde Goes Up With Secret Satellites 

nationalization of virtually every CAFE CANAVERAL, Florida ( AJP) — Atlantis, the fourth and last 
means of production in Britain, a U.S. space shuttle of the current series, was launched mto.oibit Thursday 
policy that the leadership has said on a secret voyage, carrying a crew of five and two £ 100-million military 
it will not accept communications sa t elli t es. The flight is expected to last four or five dayi.fr 

The Labor conference this year Nine minuus after the Atlantis liftoff at 11:15 AJVL, Mission Controf 

has been marked by a dampdown Center in Houston reported that the spacecraft was in a secure orbit, 
on the radicals by the party leader. Forty minutes later, Nfission Control reported, “AQ.systems onboard are 
Neil Kinnock. operating and the mission is proceeding as planned.” 

The exact launch time had not been announced publicly until just nine 

m inutes before liftoff. Defense Department offi cials had said that tbe 
!?• . secrecy would make it more difficult for Soviet satellites and spy ships 

r ire jLI^HIISgeS offshore to monitor die flight 

T 1 " r vff. The Atlantis flight is the second specifically DefcnseDepartment space 

Jt 1 oreign UniCC shuttle mission. As on the first one, in January, the identity of the payload 

1° ______ has leaked to news organizations. Rdiable sources have reported the : 

H ill mill g ill TJ.lv. astronauts wfll dqsloy. two Defense Satellite Communications System 

& * satellites designed so an enemy cannot jam their communications and 

formers they Could be used by the president to send emergency instructions to 

LONDON — Fire gutted part of nuc * ear aroun d die globt . 

Britain’s Foreign Office a few yards n i • n • n • o .a 
from where Prime Minister Margo- DUlgamn DeiUeS DdM J^eCTCt Agent 

*** SlCq>mg ^ ROME <UW) — Sergei I. Antonov, the only Bulgarian dSendant 
Soarksshowered onto the roof of 31 the trial of Turks and Bulgarians accused of plotting the 1981 
Mil Thatcher’s official 5rid£S£ 1 W By ^ ** Ba ^ aisa 

Na 10 Downing Street,, as more aU JS C a fc,T ric ? d iS^ S * ccna ?® BIt *- #1> ,, , . , . 

than 70 CremrofoughTthe fire at . He ^ d^nussed testimony by an employee of Balkan Air, the airline., 
the adacent Foreign Office. Fire ™ ^ ^convinced dial Mr. Antonov was a secret agent ' There i# 

broke out in a part of the building . A ^ d 

where workmen were carrying ran Mr. Antonov had been the Rome station chief of Balkan Air for five 
major renovation. ye3SS ?J% ™t. hc V* arrestcd 111 Nov - ^ 1982, on charges of “active 

Cleaners and night staff were cam P hat f e “ the shooting and wounding of the pope by a Turkish 
safely evacuated from the 1 10-year- ^ A f ca '. °? May 13, 1981. He is the only one of three 

-old building and nobody was far Bu lg a n a n drfcndanl5 ™ u “ custody and attending the trial 
jured, the police said A fire brigade 

spokesman said: “We have no rea- Fnr tllP Rppnivf 
son to believe that it was other than 1 Ur U1C XVCCOra 

an acadent" The 12th game of the World Chess Cliaiiipnmdiip rematch bet^ 

Foreign Secretary Sir Geoffrey champion, Anatoli Karpov, and his challenger, Gary Kasparov was 
Howe said after inspecting the drawn after 18 moves Thursday night. The matrfi is tied at six points 
d a mag e that the blaze would not each. (Rwten) 

disruptthe ministry's work. A For- £>&> Maria Sangufaettf of Uruguay arrived fa Madrid on 

ogn Office spokesman said that no Wednesday from Rome on a three-day state visit to Talks in' 
papers had been lost or damaged. Madnd are expected to focus on economic issues: (UPI) 

: 1 nlSf 5 betwe«i Uganda’s main goerrffia movement, the National 

Reastance ^5;, and the ruling Military Council woe artioumed mdefi- 

WORLDWIDE mtdylhTOdaym Nairobi ^ (WW, 

ENTERTAINMENT .p,°M miners voted tmammeosiy Thursday to end # 


Neil Kinnock. 

Fire Damages 
Foreign Office 
Building inlLK. 


where workmen were carrying out 
major renovation. 

Cleaners and night staff were 


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Rrsstance Army, and the ruling Military Council were artioumed indefi- 
nitely Thursday m Nairobi iww 

TTnJShl^ .^ 7 ' 0 ® 0 v oted unanimously Thursday to end A 

J? bvia 8 Si* 51 savcr *“ mines. Mer, lafaT- 
l^Jras and the government of Victor Paz Estenssoro agreed to end the 

97 ^hers. (UP!) 
MMdtetown, Pennsyfaama, triggered a nndear chain 
rMction Thursday 10 restart the undamaged Unit 1 reactor at Three Mile 
IdMd nude^r power plant. It has been dormant since March 28, 1979, 
when an acadent damaged the adjacent U nit 1 

Correction 

u^5^ EBzabeth ’ 800111 Africa ’ in some editions' of 

Iraq Again Strikes atKharg 
And Major Iranian OU Fidd* 

Realm „ 

mmal while ''tag thitaqwodd con- 

no™ oii r«id ^ arsas 

The raid Thuredav on Khars. shipping sourtes in the 

oil export outlet, was ' Gl “ previous raids .on Kharg 

the 1 9th smee Aug. 15. The ariack- tampered Iran’s ofl ex- 
on the ofl field was the first fa a P 0113 ^ te rminal, . . 

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roz, 35 minutes eartierTas “aidd^ ^ “ ,rafll , • * 
intensive and destructive," . . officials said <Fhi a fag 

All aircraft and naval vessels in- ^P L 19 damage<i 'p)pe- 

v<^ved returned safely to. base, he' ^. es . ^ otiber installations it - 
“S: • . ° ase ' ,ie Khaig.-bmthey added that. W 

The attacks were intended “to P lailcs » M , 0 avoid Irainan defenses,, 
keep Ions rukrs without ml m. ffa too high to aim weH 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1985 


Page 3 


inIJ.S. 


5f»K 


iSfifS 






' "4<g^' . -T'-’V-.: 
Jf t-C . . 

KBttL' 1 " 

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•****■ • ■;; - -v 
& -:*■.? ... 


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wMlakep 


% Stuart Diamond 

- New ycri. Times Service ' . 

-• WASHINGTON — Al least 
6,928 accidents involvin g . 
chemicals have ocanred in.' the 
United States during the last five 
. -years, killing more than 135 people 
and injuring nearly 1,500, accord- 
ing to a U.S. government report not 
yet released. 

Some environmental, expens es- 

pressed surprise at the number and 
size of the spills on the list. 

. The report, the government's 
first systematic effort to study the 
causes of such acddoite,^was com- 
-missioned by the Environineiital 
Protection Agency earlier this year 
'in response to December's disaster 
in Bhopal, India, where a toxic gas 
leak killed more than 2,000 people. 

Drawing on an incomplete list- 
ing, the report's data disclosed that 
. abouL five accidents a day since 
-early 1980 had released loric chem- 
icals from small and large- compa- 
nies, most of them involved in 
- •chemical production or storage. - 


Nearly [hre&qnarters -of the ac- 
ddentsyiere e^pjants; and the rest 


m 


e ac- 


ddehts mchided^stqragi: lank /ail-, 
ores, valve probleais and h uman 

Cruxe s' s . V ; • • 

Thftcompilationis only a partial 
list because data were drawn only 
from selected information banks 
and. areas of the country. They in-, 
dude- New Jersey, Texas, Califor- 
nia, the Midwest, Ohio, certain, 
newspapers and a national chemi- 
cal accident reporting line. 

' The earliest source compiled ac- 
ddeots Xrom l980, although otoer 
sourccs listed only two years. The 
average source Ssied 3.7 years. 

Had the entire country bisen: con- 
sulted, the. number of. accidents 
would be two and ahaff to three 
times Wgjier, acconfing to Industri- 
al Economics Inc cf Otmbridge, 
Massachusetts, thelrakconsultam 
of the four that preparedthe study. 

“We got only tojgdgta we could 
get .quickly smdl Janies. Cum- 







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” - • Reuters - 

- PARIS — The Soviet leader, 
'Mikhail S. Gorbachev, sal impas- 
-sively Thursday as this mayor of 
^Paris, Jacques Chirac, delivered a 
jsbarp attack on the Soviet Union’s 
•human rights record in a speech aL 
;*tlie dty tafl. - 

' Mr. Chirac, leader of toe RaBy 
Jot the Republic, France's oppost- 
•tion neo-GauHist. party, dinged 
'the Soviet Union with failing (olive 
'up to human rights electees m the 
-1975 Hdsinki accoriiL 
v *T think.with emotion of all those, 
■deprived of freedom because, of 
'their convictions,” he said- ‘T am 

Soviet Makes 
ArmsOffer 

(Cbnliniied from Page l) v - 

- j ections to toe indnsion of their 

< 'midear forces in the U.S.-Soviet 
■ arms talks in Geneva, Mr. Gorba- 
chev said that it followed thal**it is 
time to start between us a direct 
dialogue an this theme and try to 
'find an acceptable way out through 
joinr effort” . 

Mr. Gorbachev said that Soviet 
SS-20 missiles deployed in retaEa- 
'tkm for toe droloyment of U^. r . 
.missiles bad all been withdrawh 
from "standby 1 alot."" He added; 
that "the stationary installations^ 
for housing, these missiles will be 
dismantled within, the next two 
months.” 

U.S. intelligence sources said in 
'Washington last month that they 
-had detected a Soviet redeploy- 
ment of 27 SS-20 missiles out of toe 
.European zone in recent weeks. 
The sources said that the SS-20 
..bases appeared to be undeigpuig 
modifications that . would allow 
them to be the sites for an equal 
-.number of SS-25&, anew Soviet 
•intercontinental ballistic missile. ^ 


alsothink^g-of those Jews who are 
not allowed to leave the country." 

Me. Gorbachev, on the second 
day .Of a fodr-day stay in Paris, 
snm^ihrousihout Mr. Gnrac*s ad- 
dress. When the tranriatoir reached 
the pasgagp oo human rights, ins 
face became expressionless. 

In iris own qieedi, Mr. Gorba- 
chev dwelled 'on toe dty of Paris 
and Jinks between Russia arid 
France. 

;• Prime Minister Laurent Falrias, 
who met later with toe Soviet lead- 
er, said he had jpyen Mr. Gorba- 
chev a fist" of . human ri^its cases 
toat France wanted to rmse. 

He did hot ^edfy which names 
were included, bht .smd: "He took 
myiisC- , ’ • . 

Among dw cases that French of- 
ficials have said they want to dis- 
cuss are those of two Soviet dissi- 
dents, Anatoli B. Shcharansky, 
who is serving a.l3tyear prison sen- 
tence after bang convicted in 1978 
of spymgfbr toe United States, and 
Andrei X>. Sakharov, the nudear 
physdst who was awarded toe 
1975 Nobel. Peace Prize for Ins hu- 
man rights activities. 

. Mr,. Sakharov has been confined 
to the dty of Godti since. 1980. 

1 Mr. Chirac also criticized Mos- 
cow s over the ^ze of its armed 
fmne&, winch he. said were far be- 
ymd tbose needed for national de- 
fense. ^ * . _ 

u : After. the. dty hall ceremonies, 
Mr. Gorbachev went to meetings 
with. toe parliamentarians with 

Mr. Fabius. 

Earlier he laid a wreath at toe 
Arc de Xriomphe war memorial af- 
ter being driven up the Champs- 
•Elysees. 

A Jewish war- veteran with a Star 
of David around his neck was led 
away by security men as Mr. Gor- 
bachev and his-wife approached. 

Security police also led away an 1 
unidentified nun who shoaled “as- 
sassin” as toe Soviet leader’s ar- 
mor-plated limousine drove by. 


mings-Saxton, a chemical engineer 
an d partner at the company. 

- *This is the first attmipt to focus 
on icutety - hazardous chanicals ” 
he said! 

The study, “Acute Hazardous 
Events Database” said that the in- . 
formation was designed to help de- 
termine which substances were 
mpst often involved m releases of 
ypry. .toxic chemicals and what 
caused the rdeases- Federal offi- 
cials said they would use toe find- 
ings in developing policy or legisla- 
■ tion to reduce toe risk.: 

“It enables us to move away 
from speculation and toward abet- 
ter idea of the frequency and Sever- 
ity of toxic chemical accidents,” 
said Frederick W. Talcoo, who 
managed the study for the Environ- 
mental Protection Agency. 

- . However, Mr. Talcott said, it is 
still difficult to draw general con- 
clusions about chemical plant safe- 
ty from the report. 

’ "I can’t say looking at this histo- 
ry whether we should be assured or 

not about the .likelihood of very 
serious events," he said. As to what 
it will take for that knowledge, he 
said, “We’re still thinking about 
that " 

The draft of the study comes to 
public view seven weeks after a 
chemical leak at a Union Carbide 
pesticide plant in Institute, West 
Virginia, sent at least 135 people to 
the hospital. 

In the study, spills and emissions 
amounted to 420 million pounds 
(about 190 millio n kOograms) of 
chemicals; 468 instances of death 
or injmy were recorded. The evacu- 
ation of at least 217,457 people was 
involved. 

“When toe accident at Tncrimt* 
people thought chemi- 
aeddents were rare,” said Da- 
vid D. Doniger, a senior lawyer at 
the Natural Resources Defense 
Council, a public interest law firm. 
“But here we have storage tanks 
and valves and pipes and other 
equipment failing al the rale of five 
times a day. It really brings home 
the magnitude of chemical acci- 
dents.” , 

The study did not say what pro- 
portion of the dead and injured 
were, chemical plant workers or 
what proportion toe public. Mr. 

Qimm i ng s-Saxton said most of the 
deaths appeared to be workers, but 
that toe injuries were more evenly 
split. 



Tha AuodoMd Press 

Workers search debris in an effort to rescue 9-year-old Luis Ramon Nafarrate. 

Workers Are Digging Toward Boy 
Trapped 2 Weeks in Mexican Home 


Reuters 

MEXICO CITY — Rescue workers dug with 
their bare hands Thursday to within a few feet of a 
9-year-old boy trapped alive for two weeks under 
the rubble of toe Mexican earthquake. 

They said they hoped to reach Luis Ramon 
Nafarrate soon. The boy has been lying in toe ruins 
of his home in toe city’s central district since the 
building collapsed in toe SepL 19 earthquake. 

The workers said they were not sure the boy 
would be found alive borause be was weakening 
rapidly from thirst, hunger and cold. 

His father, Mauri cio Nafarrate, said two police- 
men had heard noises coming from toe rains last 
weekend and alerted rescue workers, who contact- 
ed Luis with special sensory devices. 

He was toe tost trapped person to be found alive 
in a week, renewing hopes that others might still 
survive in debris passed over by rescue teams. 

Foreign rescue experts aided by sniffing dogs 
had focused their efforts on big buddings, particu- 


larly two hospitals, a school and a high-rise apart- 
ment block Most of toe foreign rescue teams left 
Mexico earlier this week 

The experts and volunteers dug out more than 
1,000 survivors in toe first week after toe earth- 
quake. but thousands more are known to be miss- 
ing. Among toe survivors were about 40 newborn 
babies rescued from toe ruins or toe maternity 
wards at toe two hospitals. 

The diggers working toward Luis said they be- 
lieved that his 57-year-old uncle, Luis Maldonado, 
might also be alive. 

The rescue workers who contacted toe boy asked 
him questions, instructing him to up once for 
"yes" and twice for “no." He told rescuers that he 
was a child, that he was alone and that he could 
move. He said he was cold, but not badly hurt. 

Luis's father said he was out shopping when the 
earthquake struck and returned to see his home 
collapse in a cloud of dust. 


U S. Shift on Tntin Debt Is Called Turning Point 


Laser Tracked Missile 
In Test, Weinberger Says 


Compiled by Our Staff Front Dispatdies 
'■ . PHILADELPHIA — Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger 
/said Thursday that toe United 
States had tracked a . missile in 
. -space with a ground-based laser, 
beam last Friday in toe first suc- 
cessful U.S. experiment of its kind. 

The experiment was ^one in ase^ 
ries being conducted under Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s research 
program into space-based missile 
.defenses, 'which might ultimately 
•be deployed to destroy attac ki ng 
missil es in flight. 

I "We succeeded for the first time 
in demonstrating .our ability, to. 
trade a sounding rocket in space,” 
Mr. Weinberger told toe Philadd- 
, phia World Affairs ConndL He 
said the test succeeded “after ad- 
justing the beam -for atmospheric 
' distortion." 

It was the first time a laser beam 
-aimed from Earth had ' been pro- 


jected through the atmosphere to a 
target in space,- Defense Depart- 
ment officials said Later. The beam 
was aimed from, a U.S. Air Force 
base in Mantf Jiawaii, at *, rocket 
fired, from a test range in Hawaii 

The Pentagon attempted a simi- 
lar space experiment in July from 
Hawaii, ■but the- laser operators 
were unable ip lock ooto the target 
property. , • 

Mr. Weinberger said that Soviet 
'ground-based laser weapons could 
now interfere, with U-S. militaiy 
satellites apd -might be able to hit 
UJS. mfes3es : m flight within five 
years. 

He'said it was vital that the U.S. 
space defense program, winch the 
administration calls the Strategic 
Def ense Initiative, not be used as a 

bargaining chip at the Geneva arms 
talks. y‘ ■' 

(Reuters; AP) 


(Contomedfrom Page 1) 
Baker flew to Uma to attend the 
inauguration of Pern’s new presi- 
ded, Alan. Garefa Pfcrez. 

Mr. Gania used the occasion to 
denounce the IMF and to declare 
that debt payments would be limit- 
ed to 10 percent of the country's 
export earnings. 

. The bankers said Mr. Baker was 
reportedly more impressed by the 
quieter: arguments to favor of 
growth that he had heard in private 
meetings with Presidents Rani Al- 
fomsto of Argentina and Julio Mar 
ria Sanguinetti of Uruguay. 

“I think Baker for the first time 
focused in on the debt problem and 
began listening to what his advisers 
were teDtog him,” a banker said. 

Financial experts said the ad- 
ministration's plan to become more, 
involved in the debt crisis were ac- 
celerated by toe rapid deterioration 
of Mexico's financial position since 
the beginning of this year followed 
by toe economic damage caused by 
toe earthquakes SepL 19 and 20 to 
Mexico City. 

Mexico’s new troubles, albeit 
brought on' largely by falling ml 
revenue, also reinforced growing 
resistance to IMF “adjustment” 
programs elsewhere in Larin Amer- 
ica because, until Late 1984, Mexico 
had been held up as proof that the 
fund bad the right prescription for 
their economic ills. 

At the same time, while comma:- 
dal banks agreed Tuesday to a six- 
month extension of S950 million in 
principal due from Mexico on Ocl 
I and Nov. 4, the country’s need for 
$2.5 to S3 billion to cover debt 


payments maturing in 1986 was al- 
ready distressing its creditors. 

“Even before toe Mexico earth- 
quake, we £ere beginning to head 
for a crunch on Mexico,” -am offi- 
cial at a large U.S. bank said. “No 
onewants to get in any deeper. And 
regional banks are busily trying to 
get out." I 

Adding to toe gloom were signs 
that, after recording huge trade sur- 
pluses last year, such major debtors 
as Brazil. and Mexico were facing 


new difficulties to exporting to toe 
industrialized world because of 
growing protectionism. 

Foreign bankers said the basic 
idea belund the Reagan adminis- 
tration s initiative was toat debtor 
nations needed more time and lee- 
way to rebuild their economies 
than has been permitted under toe 
IMF's "shock” belt-tightening pro- 
grams. 

The sources said toat Mr. Baker 
was expected to encourage greater 


State Lotteries Proving Irresistible for Some 


(Coo tinned from Page 1) 
start reconsidering this whole lot- 
tery business." 

Laurie Kipp, director of public 
relations for the Michigan State 
Lottery, said: "The Valerie Kaczor 
case is an isolated case. This is the 
only incident like this that we know 
of since the lottery started bade in 
1972." 

But there are similar stories of 
lottery-related problem gambling 
across the United States: 

• Glenwood Herbert Stout, 55, 
was recently released from federal 
prison after serving three years of a 
five-year sentence for embezzling 
$500,000 from a New Jersey credit 
union toat he managed. Mr. Stout 
says that he spent most of toe 
funds, which he stole over 10 years, 
to buy tickets in toe Pennsylvania 
and New Jersey slate lotteries. 

• Patricia Yvonne Smith, 35, a 
bank teller in Toronto, was sen- 
tenced to 18 months in prison in 


October 1983 after embezzling 
$183,000 from her employer and 
spending it on the Ontario lottery. 
“She was buying about 5.000 tick- 
ets a week,” said Donald .Angevin e. 
who prosecuted toe case. "We had 
it figured that she had to spend 
every waking hour either making 
up numbers, stealing toe money or 
checking her numbers." 

• Carol De Gulis. 46. mother of 
four, was put on three years federal 
probation in May 1984 after plead- 
ing guilty to embezzling $38,600 
from toe" New Jersey bank where 
she worked as an assistant manag- 
er. She had spent toe money on 
state lottery tickets. 

The judge in her case, Herbert J. 
Stern, said: “It makes you wonder 
about these advertisements funded 
by the state. Play, play. win. Get 
rich quick. ’Be an instant million- 
aire.’ This is toe way we raise reve- 
nue today. Fifteen years ago, we 
used to prosecute people for thaL" 


Most professionals in toe field of 
compulsive gambling are not seek- 
ing toe abolition of state lotteries. 
They are. however, seeking state 
funds for research and treatment of 
problem gambling. 

A handful of lottery states as 
well as Minnesota, which has no 
lottery, have funded such research 
or treatment. 

The legislature in Iowa, where a 
state lottery began in August man- 
dated that 0.5 percent of toe lottery 
gross go to a gamblers assistance 
fund to be administered by the 
slate Department of Human Ser- 
vices. It is estimated that about 
$500,000 a year will go into toe 
fund for treatment of problem 
gambling 

“Some people referred to it as 
conscience money," said John Fair- 
weather, legislative liaison officer 
with the Iowa Department of Hu- 
man Services. 


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Emergency Proposal 
To End Budget Deficits 
Gains in U.S. Senate 


use of so-called structural adjust- 
ment loans by toe World Bank as 
well as to approve increased World 
Bank guarantees of commercial 
bank loans to toe region. 

Some Brazilian officials said 
thaL while this strategy addressed 
the question of growth, it would 
not reduce toe huge burden of in- 
terest payments thaL in most cases, 
continue to be met on time despite 
long-term reschedulings of princi- 
pal outstanding. 


By Helen Dewar 

IVashin^um Past Service 

WASHINGTON - An emer- 
j>ency proposal to erase budget def- 
icits and force Congress and the 
White House to create a balanced 
budget within five years gathered 
steam Thursday in the U.S. Senate. 

Some senators predicted that 
legislation raising the federal debt 
ceiling to 52 trillion could not pass 
without iLThai legislation is neces- 
sary to keep the government func- 
tioning after Monday, when its 
cash balances are expected to run 
OUL 

About 40 senators, including 
several Democrats, joined Wednes- 
day as co-sponsors of a Republi- 
can-drafted amendment to reduce 
the deficit from S 1 80 billion to zero 
by threatening mandatory across- 
the-board spending cuts if annual 
targets for deficit reduction were 
not met. 

They plan to push it as an 
amendment to toe debt measure, 
which Treasury Secretary James A 
Baker 3d has said must be passed 
by Monday so toe government can 
keep borrowing to pay its bills. 

By Monday, the government's 
cash balances will be “virtually ex- 
hausted” and “toe situation will 
deteriorate sharply toereaf ter,” Mr. 
Baker said in a letter to the Senate 
majority leader, Robert J. Dole of 
Kansas. 

The surge in support for toe defi- 
cit-reduction measure, drafted by 
Senators Warren B. Rudman of 
New Hampshire and Phil Gramm 
of Texas, both Republicans, 
prompted moves by the Democrat- 
ic leadership in both houses to 
come up with counterproposals. 

In the Republican-controlled 
Senate. Minority Leader Robert C. 
Byrd of West Virginia was working 
with Senator Lawton Chiles of 
Florida, toe ranking Democrat on 
the Budget Committee, on a Demo- 
cratic plan that included tax in- 
creases as well as spending cuts. 

In the House, where the Demo- 
crats are in control Speaker Thom- 
as P. O’Neill Jr. or Massachusetts 
and other Democratic leaders were 
exploring strategy for dealing with 
the debt bill if, as they expect, toe 
Senate sends it back to toe House 
with a deficit-reduction rider. 

“Almost any balanced-budget 
proposal could pass toe House” un- 
less a more attractive option is pro- 
posed, commented a House Demo- 
cratic aide, who said a task force 
was likely to be appointed to draft 
an alternative deficit-cutting plan. 

Under toe Gramm-Rudman pro- 
posal, the president and Congress 
would be required to keep their 
budgets within limits phasing the 
deficit down to zero by fiscal 1991. 
If toe limit were exceeded by more 
than 5 percent, toe president would 
be required to cut equally from 
entitlement programs and discre- 
tionary spending, including mili- 
tary. 

The threat of such cuts is expect- 
ed to move Congress to make its 
own deficit reductions, possibly in- 
cluding tax increases as well as 
spending reductions. Some backers 
of toe proposal indicated it would 
improve chances for tax increases. 

At a news conference Wednes- 
day to demonstrate support for 
their proposal Senators Gramm 
and Rudman said they believed it 
had enough votes to pass toe Sen- 
ate and contended toat the debt 



Robert J. Dole 

measure could noi pass without it, 
a view shared by many others. 

With mounting public concern 
over deficits, reinforced by the 
symbolism of a S2-trillion debt 
only five years after indebtedness 
hit the Si-trillion mark, many law- 
makers are reluctant to raise toe 
ceiling without a demonstration of 
intent to control deficits. 

The House, in effect, approved 
the increase in toe debt ceiling 
when it passed a budget blueprint 
Aug. 1. But the Senate, operating 
under different rules, must take a 
separate vote. 

Senator Dole, pressing for 
speedy consideration of toe mea- 
sure. is caDing Monday the “drop- 
dead date” when toe government's 
borrowing authority would be e>.-, 
hausred. 


Shultz on 
South Africa 

(Continued from Page 11 

would have had a less clear strate- 
gic interest in opposing them.” 

Mr. Shultz said the United 
States' national interests required it 
to back democratic change every- 
where, and "no less in such areas of 
strategic importance to us as Cen- 
tral America, South Africa, the 
Philippines and South Korea.” 

But, he added, its influence in 
encouraging democracy is often 
limited in countries “where it has 
never before taken root where rul- 
ers are reluctant to give up then- 
privileged status, where civil strife 
is rampant, where extreme poverty 
and inequality pose obstacles to 
social and political progress.” 

He devoted particular attention 
to toe situation in South Africa. 
The Reagan administration recent- 
ly imposed limited sanctions on 
South Africa to head off more 
stringent actions in Congress, and 
has stepped up its criticism of Pre- 
toria’s failure to deal forthrightly 
with the need to change toe system. 

“Americans naturally find apart- 
heid totally reprehensible,” he said. 
“It must go. But how shall it go? 
Our influence is limited.” 

Mr. Shultz said toat it was im- 
portant not to undermine the South 
African economy in an effort “to 
topple toe white regime.” 




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ment and balcmce at 12% interest. 
Contact Mrs. Robert E Sktotan, 27OT 
Old Spanish Trdt. SSdeJ, Louisiana 

7046i75A 


LUXURY NYC DUPLEX perrthouse 

cmvfan xn teThepteotaopIxttiatt- 
ed NY Bving, a spectacular one of o 

land duplex penthouse, 2 bedrooms 

gutdery fortnd drang many 3 fufl 


berths. 2 huge terraces phn a wrap 
around bdainy provide views north, 
SOUth, west & east. A xoretarfd 
jr both king ond errter- 

51,250000. Ctd A lyew 

G%lj^a21^2DiW8a 
a 212-9KW089. Telex: 


taMgJtf SJ J50J0a_Cpfl 


669251 MDIR. 


ELEGANT HKTOMC 19-ROOM En- 
gfcsh Tudor Motion nestled privantty 
an 2A acres fLBtininutBlwea Colora- 
do Springs. Numerous postftxSttaj ea- 
st for personal estate, oorparaie re- 
treat, business venture depend ng an 
zoning variances. Complete brodiun 
Price Jljooitn. Sanyo 
McGorrity, VAN SOfflCK ft CO, 
4760 FWndge, Colorado Sprngy 
0380907. 


WYOMING RANCH furnished ready 

to go. Near Cody entrone lo Ydtow- 
stone Park on Shoshone Pared. River 
frontage. Spectacular view of moirtt- 
tamand nay meadows. Abounds it 

wMfe. Winter range of Eocky Moan- 

Ion Sheep. Perfect far famfly or qued 

nmch. Very privde yet very occessi- 

ble. Serious inquiries arty. Respond to 
Bax 2818. Herdd Tmm, 92521 
Nealy Cedex. France 


LUXURY 1 BEDROOM eondominMn. 

Over 1000 sail. I bedroom. IK bath 
condo with axeig creo. South expo- 
saa with terrace, joanzi tub ta max- 


ing ZIZ-4 
980-3089. 


: 669251 MDK. 


COIONUI ESTATE of 3950 m. ft. m 

prime dowirtown locatton Phoerix, 
AZ. 1 Mock east of Mon St. *440.000 
Other land & mveslmenh awrfabte. 

Tel 602-25460137252-1172; 2243 N. 

Atvraado, Phoonix, AZ 85004 


2S MOB DOWNTOWN HOUSTON. 
ML6 acre nskktfM properly, bet 
Ful hardwood trees, i2Daae private 
take stocked with game fak Senoudy 
for sde at erfy £70,000. Cafl Snga- 
pore 4821867. 


2 south 

sq.fr. Newty deaxan 
tfeerdew. Scntfandl 


ft2£0 
HTcl 

8672521 


DAB EN A SEW CANAAN Gomedi- 

ajt. Executive type homes tor red ft 
sale. Heawnt N.V. Gfe suburb. 
NaScnwxte con 

lifebelts R£ 2036557724. 


French 


COUNTRY LIVING NY. E 69IH. 

Modem duplex 2 he*o 
IrtOOsa.TwSi 1000+ 


1400 sq. ft. wrth IWW+ green jxx- 
denpafia USS550J0Q! 2>f734-7%Q 


USA 

COMMERCIAL 
& INDUSTRIAL 


OHKEMMDMG 
WASHINGTON. D.C. AKA 
25% interest in a new bidding hr 
usssxym 75_0ajqAHracloi«, to- 
ld value qppnxdmalely S6 mffian. For 
detail. a* or write 
WALTS BURNS 
BEGQ B4TBJNAnONAL 

2121 Wisconsin Aw_ N.W. 

Sfe. 100, Work, D C 20007 
let (202} 9448434 or Tbc 440036 


HJO% LEASHJ 51,000 sg. ft. buidng. 

North Carofcna. Price E67SM, down 
f£I3SAT0% net return. Fwn 
... . +1036. Box 610745, N.Mione, 
Ft 33261 USA. 


SHOfWNG CH4THB, Wprfxngtan 

DC area, AAA let tarty mxmaaeed 
returns. Ms HI [703) 522 T343. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GERMANY 


BONN Spurious firahed houses, 
fufly equipped, up ta 6 persons. 
DM! X to per day. Bams Hous- 
ma Aoeney. Monte OwwmboLT^ 
I D. Tel- (0) 228-224345 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LAYHUR Wl OtT Grosvenor 

Syasa.K! 

flats CTvtdaUe from E21W375 per 
wte Stucted in □ poet rondennd 
location nets' Marble Arch & Oxford 

Street. These a u abnerts are set m a 

newly refurbished block, epproathed 

h 

marbl e courtyt xd. coat ap attuwrt b 
^d^&^fc l ^‘fSS l A«fcjey 

JXUHY^EOBCylWEAPAXTMMS. 

KaeMbadge/Owbea. Over 100 
Sf^vSStfwfios. 1 ft 2 bedroom 
u u artwenS. Afl modem a anva ae nces. 
Uhanwtn stay 22 days. Pnoes from 
El 45 per waste. Please co n tort Lor; 
lame Ybung, NOT Aparhnen ft Nrf 


CENTRAL LONDON - Ene gniy sen- 

Daly moxl service (Mai. 
tSSSTfri JCrAr TV. Phone for bt> 
ehsralOl] SB 1342 or wrrte Presiden- 
ud Eslcrtte [Mcyfair] Ltd.. I University 
St. London WGE al£ 

LONDON. OKSEA, WLI ute f* 

nod hou*e mtert street afftofagai 
Square, beaufiftiHy renovnled ft re- 

SSrSteL 3 bwkionrt. 2 bathrooea. 

2 inceptions, targe knary btehen- 
/bmakfest room, tfl»y roan, ptmfty. 

ON NEAR BUCKINGHAM Pk4 
—arbfyhMMVmeyM 
t far short term 0 week ■ 3 



rar»"tSKjE 

o, carpets, atrtem. wardrobes. 


rtHAMOffgUfXURYRATS/ 

ms to W / fo r rttntotet. TeL- 
431 3191. Telex 89S23B7 G. 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


EATON PLAC^ LONDON SW1 
home, newfy moderrized ft fumohed 
by interior desgner, 2 double bed- 
rooms, 2 bathrooms. 1 eraate pn 
rabfcl tekwroom, Iwoe reoteon. 
fully e rx x gwri mw. tin. 

£9fe/«e^. tek 0836 712806 


LUXURY SHWKH) FIATS M Ken- 

Htgkxi b the aAenxAw to expensive 
hote aaaxnmodotian. Contort Aw 
drti & C org CTi^, 71 /23 Mqcb Gate, 


Telex 418216 


TtL pi| 589 2956. 


IOPBON MABIE AWH rw, jrf- 


ccrtering luxury 2-bedroom fkrts. fufly 
equipped, color TV, linen tad 
phonos. £250-£450 


. - . tele- 
phones. £250- C*50 par week. Craw- 
ford Hofiday Rtrts 33 Crawford 
Street, London W1-6M02 6165. 


BEW ft BUTCHOFF. A targe selection 

erf properties in St John's Wood, 
Beg enh Auk, Sens Cartage. Hemp- 
stead ft e n ve ww . 6 monlfis +. Tel 
01-586 7561. Th 883168 ACO G 


bOTOON. For Ihe best furnished flats 
mid houses. Consult the Spedcfat* 
PhiSps. Kay and Lewis. Tck South of 
Pa-k 352 8111. North 


51 35. Telex 


Park 722 
G. 


ALONGSIDE MUSS OF PAflOAID 

^Rdcne to asritrd London: beautiful 

Mlwiifted EdwartS- 


340 


| ALFMAM APARTMB4TS fey 

serviced apartment*. 5 mins. 

ifalia i Le to Oxford St / Bcxid St . 

Harley Sr E57per day. Td London 
01-636 28 21. Tr 884130 Mdff G. 


CCHRAL London. Luxur y fum nhed 
fkrts. American ttrtwm- E2B0/week- 
: 4 or £175/ week- sleeps 2. Tet 
2204 or 01-486^ 34TSpq 


FOR FURMSFB) IETTN35 M S.W. 

London, Surrey & Berkshire. Contort 

MAYS, Oxshott far 284) 3811 UK. 
Trite 8955112. 


JOfM BIROf h« 20 yean axpenence 
in Renhrfs. Long or shot tervxioes. 
Central & subinan London & Aber- 
deen. Beds ft Cos 01-499-8802. 


B8*1AM ft BEEVES LETTMG Office 
whether tacking for a home - or have 
a property to W in N.W. London aw 
speoafak Ul-435 9681. 


GREN ft CO. Exafler# Seledxxi of 

Houses ft Fiats for rente! in North, 
Northwest ft Central London. Tek 01- 
625 8611. 


INTERNATIONAL EXECUTIVES / Vis- 

itors to London - for qucSty furrxshecf 
apartments & houses edi Hurtersjxm- 

dai (0U837 7365. 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 
Deluxe terete Voleriusstr. 174, 
Amsterdam. 020421234 « 623S2. 


PETER BRUM MANELAARDU 
Inti Hoatea Swten-Rmdte 
Atsttadmisl: 020-768022. 


ITALY 


SOME. BEGANT, SMOOUSi. sury, 
fufly fif tehed, rqxesenlohve, 7th 
fioofi ai-candmoned cttttmnf wdh 
2 double bedroom^ 2 baths. My 
equipped kridwn, reoefrfion. tfning 
room, wious baOt-in cupboards S 
storerooms, kxgafy terraced, over- 
taddng Mt Memo, ekae to river ftdly 
center. Free inunoriately. * 
hicHy reconanended. FI 
or8TI9554 office hours. 


MSAN FURNISHED APARTMENT to 

let $900 monthly. London B7Q 0512.1 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


SBn/ES-MBiDGN. Residential awf 

mant 3 bodroanE, double Siring, 
equipped kitchen. Bariroaras, ter- 
races. cellar. Gauges 
Wdtana r fat anca to * 
horserirtna inti 

pork ft 

6J500FF 

For ido now . 

26 Rue Bmeies. Tel: con c ierge 534 46 
67. Senes or Owner. Houston Texes 
713 464-1907 


' fwnshad, uKTUq oi 

now l.lKi,000 ftby 


mduded. 


ARE YOU 1BH> of cornt u dy thong- 

ing hotel# Extremely Ovtfznd deni 
pension for profesiond bu si nessmen 

/ wonxm avotabta centad A« (884 

during week ext permanent /seen per* 

SB. Excellent citrine, drier 
roqiwed- Frendl/EngEih 
phe sf refe r oxea deuuxJ- 
ecL Write Box 2797, Herdd Tribune. 
92521 NetxBy Cedex, Frexwe 


5TH NEAR MAUBBTT 

with 


Charming (taptar t 
character, wing vrilh 
2 bedroonOj boths, 



kitchen, 
Veit Friday 2 - 4-30 
GALANDfc PAJD5 5. 


LUXURIOUSLY RESTORB>1Bfli cenlv- 

ry manor house, exquisdety furnished 
qntxye^ e xigpd pamfiny, 2 bed; 
room, n bulo, rtyi Bjmy, orand 
scion, firepkxe, betxra throuffxxjt. 
frrfly equated bfchon, low' 
quiel, 35 mm. Paris, pi, 
mexttt»-jutffiBdl0393203. 


74 CHAMPS-&YSSS 8th 

StodA 2 or 3-rocxrr e^xxtment. 
Ore month or more. 

IE GLAJBDGE 359 67 97. 


SHORT TSLM STAY. Advantogw of o 

hotel without inaxiveniences, feel of 

home in mae stueics, exm bedroom 

and more m Pcrri. SOSflJM: 80 rue 
de rUmvwsM, Paris Tthj 544 39 40 


SOUS, 40 KM. PAKS, very beautiful 

house in tattooed tile. 4 receptions, 6 

bndroorro, 6 bdfB, mod's flat, 3 na 
park, FI 8JX0/ month. AveAfele now. 
m Paris 551 35 38. 


MAK E YOUR SHf AT TOMB 7 days 

to 3 morjths in ftrt, 1^ roan gporf- 
mete, fufly equipped. Tek 306 78 79. 


SHORT TBDH N LATIN QUARTER 

No oHents. Tek 329 36 83-M 


USA 


Brcmd New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 
Hotel Suite 
Residence 

offering 

pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 
feest u ring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Available 

Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


NYC 2 B8XOOM APA8TM94T an 

Fabulous Sutton Plao» Mar E. SBrti St 
in luxury doeSnno n btdcfcig taattxing 
chic tacchon & great nver ft aty 
views, fi X rent ixrf w ni sh ad of 
51750/ month or fumahed a 
SSJJOO/morth. No fn. Avtdode un- 
medefldy- Ccotod Mr. N in NY: 21& 
75ft81 



MIAMI, HXWDA^MR 

g rtabaon ft Itfin America 
offiexB. bUHWS addw. full office 
I service, business wprgamgtius. Tek I 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


URGENT EXOLANGB hffiW YORK 
anal studto + term, ff’erfod East 
ode location, near ILN.J For daeS^B 
1 berfroam eportment Paris near Kue 
St H ono r e. Tat 367 16 33 Fexa. ■ 


TO R94T JU.Y/ AUGUST 1986. Pro- 
venoi or Sirgundyj v<a wife at least 6 
bedrooms. Wntn 91 9 Arota Wav. Los 
Angeles. CA 90097. 


SMGLE M0IMR septa Paris opart- 
babysnting. 


Bit torfm^poss rfJ ty | 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


EUIE EX-SreCIAL FORCES Nam vet 
seeks cfiartL DELTA man taghly 
tnxnecLVynarslopBrtT. private expe- 
rience. prdteonofism assured res- 
cue. courier, bodvgucxd, etc Contort 
light Foot Inc. 81J965M754 or Sute 
221. 13014 North Data Mabry, Tam- 
pa. FLA 33618 USA. 


GENERAL 

positions wanted 


ATTN: PAMS-BASED VIP: 

Do you require o P e rto me l Ar ijluflT 
Exaphand Ameriam Wornm 
(Young, wrth "jota de viweT seeks hi 
or part-time position at Gd Friday. Ai- 
frnctive, sense of humor, iupor-effte 
and tecreet. Superior badigroud (ond 
referenc e d in entertainment mdustry 
(tod c or p orate enviromert. 55rgud 
French/ &gCsh, xxcdlent s e c r etaries. 
PJL stalls, knows Peris Wl, free to trav- 
el- Please write Bax 2B15. Herald Trv 
bune. 92521 Neufty Cedex. Froxto 


M<Z NTHUGS1T HOSTESS 24 Lon- 
don based looks tor openings. Inter- 
ested in bums end ext. Free to 
XaveL Tek 01 22S 83 68 3pn>-12 


SC CITIZEN, fluent m Sponidi, 
French and German, typing & ' 

saeta post in xrtl company. 

Geneva 31 (7 02 


MALE 30 SBK5 POSITION as Person- 

c4 Assistant to hrta-rmrioiiJ Busmess- 
meto. Please prior* Tnsten. London 

01-9829552 


YOUNG JAPANESE MOOB, mubfln- 

gud, wel Ira w H id seeks interesti n g 
— ' * m Tokyo. Tek 588 15 90T 


FRENCH WBUC R&A 

seeks job USAEurope, b 


23, 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


u nirn iir SSKS for AMB8CAN 
"UfttKVt RRMS in PAHS 


EngEsh, 
socretanes. 


qmred, Erdriri shorthand, 
tetaxrits. wire or phone: 138 
Victor Hugo, 75116 Paris, Fra 


72/61 


Dutch or Gemot 
cf French re- 
B&igud 

._J Avenue 

Peris, Frcnoe. Tek 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


AMERICAN UMVBtSTTY M PARIS 

seota part trine teochers for: H)P, Law 

ft Fmcs, Itrtl Buriness, Coporata 

Direct bnatanerfl. PhD or appropriate 
profession^ qwrfrfidtean reenrirsd 
VdKd work permit or EC nationd only. 
Send detce of pro f ess io nal experv 
ena £ cv. to Bar 2784. HoraW Tri- 
bune, 92521 Neufiy Codex. Frtmce 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


B4GUSH SPEAKING, non-smoking, 
non-drinking retired couple with nurs- 
ing home fcmerience seek posticxi to 
are tar elderty invalid or aider per- 
son or ample in your awn feme 
i mmedwtely. Piece* reply to HT. Bax 
2204, Friertadsr. 15, 60w Fraekfurt/ 

Mom. Gernxxiy. 


BflGUSH NAPNB ft mortan' helps 
Nosh Agency, 53 Church Rd. Howl 
S ussex, OK. fit Brighton [2 7$ 2TO44 


OBv US tamte, 29. seeks pott le 
/Trench frenCy, e^nrienced reriate 
tximes/yodrts. Vjrynia, Pons 2241828 


AUTOMOBILES 


BUCK REGAL 197B 

reSton. 35X00 

undent. Teb Owner 9-2 pm ftrri 
760 05 Ext 29 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAflC RENT A CAR. Prestige con 
with phone: Rofls Sprit, hte cedes, 
Jaguar, BMW, Smorano, smai an 
46 r Pterre Charon. 75006 Port TeL 
Telex 630997 


7203040.1 


rFCHAROC. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

TIC CAR SHIPPING 
SPECIALISTS 

225 64 44 


PAHS 

CANNES/NICE 
F8ANKFLRT 
BONN / COLOGNE 
STUTTGART 
MUNICH 
brembhaven 
NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
LOS ANGELES 
MONTREAL 

AGBOSWOWb 
Leave it to us to bring fl to you 


Q39 43 44 
il 0BT_8G 51 

O R 212921 
■31) B8081 
TO 10 45 
■ 43063 
■ 7051 
TO1 7605 
568 7288 
866 6681 


HtANKFURT/MAlMW. Gcrmavy. H. 
bermarei GmbH. Tefc 069-4^071. 
Pick -op cfl over Europe *ro/rxnhips. 


AUTO CONVERSION 


• SLHECDNVKT * 

The wfa t way la im part a 
Ei i up it car Wo Bm IIAA. 
Wo ridwvde American insurer 
provides di required insuraa 
and guarantees your car wft 
pass afULSi government staxted* 
or your money back inducing 
co rww lta n aaL 

Write or phone for free brodane. 
GStatANYH 607152425 or 
HI wl / 

AriraoCAN D4TL UM3ERWBTBS 
Oberfndau 7678 
D-6000 Frankfurr/Main 


DOT 4 EPA 
CONVERSIONS 

Dorse ta Tha UiA. 

The ffirrfrt Wqyl 

we hSvee bcSdwg 

UX. CUSTOMS CI£ASAN£T ft 
PKX-UP SBMCE FROM PORT 

EUROPEAN RNE CAR 

Imports ft Conversions 
36JI 31st SL l 
718729-2407 Tk 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX F8& AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 

WNE FOR ns CATALOG OR 
HffiE BUY-BACK FOLDS TO: , 
SMR9DE&V- P.O. Ben 7568, 1118 2H 
Amsterdam Air port, T he Netherlands. 

Phono (020)152833. Tete 12568 

SHKIDE I nr 576 Fifth Avenue. 
7fli Floor, New York. N.Y. 1C036ASA. 
Phone (212) 869-4484. Tete427%5 

SHVSBE SA, Chcussee de~WdR 

Phone: (02)64l9^SS'dec"SB90 


sl.u£ ,ny 

c 5101009922 


ff A / DOT 

CONVBSNNS 

* Gudoras broteraoe/bendng servtoe 

* Pick-up ft deivery txrywhere in the 

Ecstern US. ft lean 
■r Proftraiond work using arif the 
higheat quAty e pmpcfierft 

* Gcwcmtoed ff A / DOT op 
OLAMPAGNE IMPORTS 


2294 North PuRd-. . . 

PA. T 944ft, USA Tefc 2lS 822 6852 
Telex 4971917-CHAMP 


DOT/ BP A CONVERSIONS 

Shipping, boning, nunzxx. 
Door to door service Europe 
to USA, i 


European axonxrtrire axteu i c e. 
Swatstroat 117, 2586HC 
The Hogue, Holland 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


MERCEDES 

R4 STOCK M OUR SHOWR OOM 
M SOOAM (ROTTERDAM). 
BRAID NEW AND READY TO GO: 

IX 280 SB. 

IX 500 SL 
13X500Sa 
2X 500 SEC 
JAGUAR 
SO V. 4.2 

ANIHOPE/DOESKM 
OARS’/ BtSCUTT 


CRAMBftY/DGBKN 

ANiaOPE/GREY 

AMBOPE/8BCUT 

E.A.S-SCHIH)AM 

HOUAffl) 

■SGRAVHANDSEWEG 408 
PHONE 010-378488 
TREX 23757 EURO M 


EXCAUBUR 

The ~di new" 19BS Series V Exooibun 
ere now ovrataUe. 

These are ItwmoO luxurious Exafiwn 


aver bdS. Comcrfy leottrt 
and counflees other feohres ore metad- 
ed in our prices. 

We an provide fee S ta n dard 305 CJ. 
en^ne model fix $53^00 or the High 
Output 350 CL high perfonnrtoc e rood- 
dfd $63^00. 

We hove 3krk, White and Ivory core in 
Rimedate stock. 

Cotrtort 

BRAT ENTERPRISES 
n New York at 
16)673 2884 
te 33(93? 25 74 32 
for mm infomtabon 


TRASCO 

INTHBMATIONAL 

LHD. Mercedes Tax Free 
Uraousines 36" ft 44" 
Armoured an and bnousines 
Coach bufe rare 
Other meftte ft rxfln 

Over 100 units m rtoek 
World wide detery 
Dired from source 
D^T. ft EPA 

Tek London J44}fl) 629 7779 
Tete pi) mam IRAS G. 

Titara London Lid. 

6S& Pork Lone. London W.l. 

Swrtzxrktod-UIC.W. Genscny 


IML SA 

OFFICIAL BOLLS BOYCE 
DEALS FOR B&.GIUM 

TAX FRS CARS 
ROUS ROYCE BENTLEY 
RANGE and LANDROVBt 
SAAB 

me MDOarajRG7482 
1170 Brussels 
TEL: 2-673 33 92 
71X20377 


ENGLISH EXPERTS 

Lha ktoououe of Tax-free 


We 


PORSCHE. BMW. ft ROLLS-ROYCE 
LH/RH teva New ft IVtrOwned- 
8 years experience in Import/Export. 
Docuntecrton, shipping etc 
USA our 
Take advant ag e 


HUGHES MOTOR COMPANY 
Bowneasoutti, Enakred 
[01 2Q2 744643! 

The 41254 HUGFCS G. 


TRANSCO 

THE LARGEST SHOWROOM 
AND STOCK M ELBbOPE 
Keeping a constat dock of more that 
300 brttod new ore of aO Eurapecxi -h 
Japrtoese makes compeUvefy priced. 
Tck free tnfas ifiuifna tataiunne. 
Send fcr nSterm cntdogoe. 
Tng u co SA, 95 No o r de tarwi , 


Tel 323/542 62407x 35 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSOC. for i u i iteiu te del i very 

ROM STOCK 


band, ranverdon in USA 

RUTEINC 

TAUNUSSTl. 52. 6000 RAMGURT 
W Germ., tel fm%-232351. Ik 411559 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 

Since 1972. experi en ced ax trader for 
' ' cedes, Poreche. 8MW, Jaguar. Im- 
Sate oeSvery. Inport/aport, U5. 
DOT £ EPA. shipping For tourist tnd 
deter. Oceanwide Motors GmbH, 
T err toe g enrt r . 8. 4 Dueaeld orf, W . 
Genrxtoy ^ 2lf-434646. fk B5B7374. 


1985 CLOSE-OUT SALE 
Mercedes / BMW / Porsche 
500/380/290 SH7SEOSL 
BMW 745/635/535 
1986 MODELS NOW AVAILABLE 
Porsche 944 Turbo / MB 300 SL 
Abo preowned 1979/80 Porethes 
Cte nr telex Mrakfa. W. 6nm 
{01 89-465041 or 42. The 522851 
American owned Kid operated 


EUROPE ft USA SPECS. , 

Al mate tar woridwide delivery from 
stock. Send for a TAX-FRH czttteg. 

BMW - MERCB3ES - PORSCHE 
VW - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 

EUROPE AUTO BROKERS Inc 
18714,3430 ARt 
Tefc n 3402-4 13M 


P08 714, 3430 AR htewtogein 

L Tbt 76068 EAB hi 


TAX HIE CARS 
P-C.T. 

Afl mote, cU modcJs, brand new 
Itatelo, 147, 2018 Anhrerp. Betanxn 
Tefc 3^1 Oft Th 35546 iHkCART 8 
Send USS5 for arfteg 


20 YEARS AUT043RAN9 
Relafale German «r rtater offers new 
M e rratte BMW Porsche, Fermto. Tefc 
(0) 731-60001 Rx 712861 AUTEX 


EUROPORT TAX FREE CARS 
Cafl For free eddoo. 

Beal 2011 , toha duu Axporf.Haflond. 
Tek 010623077. Tbu 25Q71 B>CA* NL 


7RANSMUNDI BaGIUM, 21 Gertei- 
seboan, B-2241 Z oereel, Antwerp. Tefc 
03384.1054 Th 3230? Transm B. ta 
stack: ALL TYPES, NEW ft USED. 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

inflM 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Rhone; Gill your local IHT representative with your text. You 
will be informed of the cost immediately, and once prepayment is 
made your ad will appear within 48 hours. 

Cosh The base rate is $9.80 per line per day + local taxes. There are 
25 letters, signs and spates in the first line and 36 in the following lines. 
MinirhUm space is 2 lines. No abbreviations accepted. 

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A Dampened Nigeria Observes Its 25th 


By Edward Gargan 

New York Times Service 

LAGOS — Twenty-five years 
ago the Oba, or tribal chief, of 
Lagos paid rainmakers S2.S00 to 
ensure that a downpour would not 
spoil a ceremony in which, the Brit- 
ish flag would be lowered for the 
last time and the green-and-white 
banner of the new country raised in 
independence. 

On Tuesday, as Nigeria’s latest 
military ruler stood at attention 
watching army and navy units 
march by in Tafawa Balewa Stadi- 
um, it poured. The country was 
observing its 25th anniversary of 
independence. 

“In these economic hard times, 
we can't afford such things’’ as rain 
control, said a newly appointed 
government official. He was 
squeezed under, a canopy, a frail 
refuge from the sheets of rain that 
lashed the concrete stadium. 

After two civilian governments 
and six military coups, the last in 
August, Nigeria has fallen on hard 
times. The promise of indepen- 
dence that surged across Africa a 
quarter of a century ago — a prom- 
ise of economic opportunity, uni- 
versal »dprarirtn and political free- 
dom — bw»n infgey unfulfilled 

In a televised address Tuesday, 
Nigeria’s military leader. Mftjor 
General Ibrahim Babangida, paint- 



f The story of our 
first 25 years is the 
story of the nation’s 
wealth being 
stupidly 
squandered.’ 

-■ - thg Guardian - 


Ib rahim Babangida 


leader’s views said that he would 
announce a plan Jan. 1 for a return 
to civilian government within three 
years. 

In many ways, the government’s 
task seems insurmountable. 


forward-drooping head gear of the 
southern Yornba. 

Moments before General Baban- 
gida arrived, a torrential rain 
drenched the precision drill team 
that was standing at attention on 
the stadium’s cement 


A rifle-and-cannon salute by the. 
assembled troops brought an eerie 
conclusion by rousting hundreds of 
translucent-winged fruit bats from 
their shadowy sleeping places. 
Squalls of *hiw> wheeled over the 
stadium. 

To the Nigerian press, the anni- 
versary scarcely seemed like a cause ' 
fee- celebration. 

“Today, a score and five yearn 
later, we are afraid to look into the 
future,” The Daily Times wrote. ■ 
“We have been humiliated by huge 
debts. We grope about in vain for a ■ 
b anner without stain.” 

The Guardian put it more blunt- ‘ : 

!y. 

“The story of our first 25 yeos,” 
it said, “is the story oi the nation's . 
wealth being stupidly squandered 
or corruptly approp riated by the- 
r uling class, resulting in a thicken- 
ing plethora of false starts in van-,', 
ous areas and eras in our political 
and economic life.” 

"The thing that we do not have' > 
in this port of the world is sincerity 
of purpose.” said Dr. Doyin ■ . 
Oktrpe, a senior physician at Royal - 
Cross Hospital “In this country, . 
we do not do any thing for pas ten- . 
ty. In tha country, in most African., 
countries, poverty is not very far-, 
•from us.” 




jVV 


* 


The country’s population is ex- 
ploding, with nearly 100 milium ground. Undeterred, the 
people and a growth rate sufficient strode to a red-carpeted 
General Ibrahim Babangida, paint- to produce a population of 148 aril- review the military parade. 

ed a bleak portrait of the country’s ^on in just IS years. Barely (me- For two hours, he and the entir e People who have never seen ' 
course since independence. quarter of the population can read, military leadership stood with their wealth have a tendency to try to 

Nigeria, he said, has undergone And, in the words of a Western arms stiffly at their rides while unit amass as much money as possible - 
“social upheaval, political instabil- diplomat, “the country is broke.” after unit splashed ankle-deep when opportunities arise. Dr. 
ity. religious intolerance and eco- Nigeria, a major ofl producer through the downpour in a slow Oknpe said. He said that desire has 

that was once one of the wealthiest march. led to corruption. 

African nations, is burdened by 


nomic hardship. 

Then General Babangida an- 
nounced a 15-month national state 
of economic emergency. He also 
declared a ban on imports of rice 
and corn and an end to the practice 
of trading oil for consumer goods. 

He said Nigeria needed health 
care that is not only for the rich, 
drinkable water for the majority of 
die population and repairs for the 
country’s crumbling roads. 

“All of us,” he said, “must make 
Hard choices involving great diffi- 
culties and requiring sacrifices 
from everyone and every sector, 
including the armed forces.” 

General Babangida dropped few 
hints about when Nigeria would 
return to civilian rule, saying only 
that his government would make 
an announcement next year. But a 
senior official f amiliar with the 


* 


Abortion Warning to U.S. Catholics 


Nr*' York Times Service 


heavy foreign debts and declining 
income due to falling oil prices. 

The country is considering ap- 
proaching the International Mone- 
tary Fund for the first time to bor- 
row about $2.4 billion. The IMF 
would require that Nigeria adopt a 
•drastic package of austerity mea- 
sures in return. 

At the independence celebration, 
young girls outride the stadium 
carried trays of brown eggs and 
balanced baskets of empty bottles 
on their beads. Women wrapped in 
layers of brilliantly colored fabric olics who supported a full-page ad- 
woe escorted by men in tnufitional vertisement, published in The New 
agbadas, or gowns. York Tones last Oct 7, that said 

The beaded pillbox-shaped hats there was a diversity of opinion 
of the northern Hausa bobbed among Catholics on the morality of 
alongside the benst-like hats oi the abortion. The advertisement, 
eastern Ibo tribe and the squashed, signed by 97 Catholics, indudms 


Church has issued a stem warning 
to Catholics who dissent from the 
church's opposition to abortion, 
that they are going 
as well as 

church doctrine. 



28 nnns, priests and brothera,.said- 
NEW YORK — The American that it was wrong to bold that the 
of the Roman Catholic only legitimate Catholic position* 
was that abortion is morally wrong | 

in all instances. 

pgrrifrmf Joseph Bcmanfin of 

Chicago, ^atrrnari of die C omnitf- 

tee for Pro-life Activities of the" 
National Conference of Catholic 
The warning was aimed at Cath- Bishops, said in a statement from 

: — L • * ”” ’ Washington on behalf of the bah- ’ 

ops, “The church’s teaching in 1 

matter is binding not only because" 
the church says so, but beranse tins 
teaching ex pr esses the objective de- - * 
mands placed em ail of us by ; the ’ 
inherent dignity of human fife.” 


Tripoli Abductions , Fighting Seen Directed at Syria ; 

Troubles of Damascus In Lebanon Could Strain Its Ties With Iran, Russia 


t 

. V 


* i 


By John Kifner 

New York Times Service 

NICOSIA — The kidnapping of four Soviet 
diplomats in Beirut illustrates not only the mud- 
dled. murky twists of Lebanese politics, but the 
difficulty Syria is having in imposing its will on 
the fractious Lebanese. 

The abductions Monday apparently were the 
work of Islamic fundamentalists of the kind 
who once served Syria’s interests as suicide 
truck-bombers helping to crush U.S. influence 
and policy in Lebandp. 

Two organizations.1 Islamic Jihad and a hith- 
erto- unknown group calling itself the Islamic 
Liberation Oiganization-Khaled ibn Walid 
Forces, issued claims of responsibility for the 
abductions, which were said to have occurred in 
two separate incidents. 

Both groups raid the Russians were being 
held as hostages to force an end to the fierce 
fighting in the Lebanese port of Tripoli, where 
Moslem fundamentalists have been battling 
Syrian-backed militias that include members of 
the pro-Moscow Lebanese Communist Party. 

Diplomats in the region say they believe that 
the kidnappings and die fighting in Tripoli are 
pan of a turn of events directed against Damas- 
cus. 

The situation threatens to strain what some 
diplomats say are increasingly edgy relations 
with Syria’s major ally in the region, Iran, as 
well as Syria’s patron and main arms supplier, 
the Soviet Union. 

The battle in Tripoli has been raging for two 


weeks. The city, Lebanon’s second largest, is 
ringed with Syrian troops, artillery and tanks. 
About 500,000 of the city’s population of an 
estimated 700,000 are reported to have fled. 
Much of the city is without water or electricity 
and fires are raging out of control. 

The city is being held by the Sunni Moslem 
fundamentalist group known as Tawheed, or the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Unification movement, which is headed by 
Sheikh Saeed Shaaban. The followers of the 
clergymen have effectively ruled much erf Tripo- 
li for the last two years, imposing their own 
version of Islamic law — among other *m g s 
dosing bars and hairdressing salons. 

They have come into conflict not only with 
Christians but with Alawites, who have roots in 
Syria. 

The Alawites are a schism erf the Shiite branch • 
of Islam; Sunni Moslems do not consida- them 
Moslems at all 

Alawites, although once an underclass and 
numbering only abmit 1 1 percent of the popula- 
tion or Syria, are the dominant force in the 
government of President Hafez al-Assad, main- 
taming power through cliques in key postions 
throughout the military, political and intelli- 
gence organizations. 

The Alawites in Tripoli are defended by a 
Syrian-created political organization, the Arab 
Democratic Party, and its militia, the Arabian 
Knights, popularly known as the Pink Panthers 


because of their raspberry-colored fatigue uni- 
forms. . . 

These Syrian-oriented farces have been-, 
joined by several other Syrian-backed Lebanese 
militias, the Lebanese Communist, 

Party, which has been playing a larger role in. 
recent months, in an all-out assault an Tripoli in 
the last few days. . 

The kidn ap p er s deman tfing tfew Rus- ’ 
nans put pressure on the Syrians to call off the .1 
local militias. » 

Ayatollah Rnhollah Khomemfs government • 
in Iran maintains close ties with Islamic funda- . . 
meotahsts in I.ehanrm, particularly in the area . 
around Baalbek in the Betas Valley, where the * 
Iranians have sent their own RevoJntkinaiy ' 
Guards and preachers to help spread their ver- 
siOT of Islamic revolution. 

Thus far, this has been with the blessings of • 
■Mr. Assad, butthere have been signs of strmn of _ 
late, dne to the difficulty of controSing die ’ 
f undamen talists • 

HezbaOah, or the Party of God, and other ; 
fundamentalist grixus, broke ranks when Syr- ■ 
ia’s current major local aSy, Ihe mainstream • 
Suite militia AmaL The groups tried to wipe out ’ 
supporters of the Palestra Liberation Or gan t- . 
ration leader, Yasser Arafat, in SahnC ^Chatila * 
and other Palestinian quarters of Beirut last ! 
spring. Iran also the fighting. 

Sheikh Shaaban has appealed for Moslems to ' 
come to his aid and has called on Ayatollah l 
Khomeini to save Tripoli. 


; \ 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1985 


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By Clyde Haberrnan 

.New York Tima Smfce, 

TOKYO — A South Korean 

coun has sentenced 20 college stu- 
dents to as much as seven years in 
prison for occupying the'.US. In- 
formation Service building in cen- 
tral Seoul in May. 

The sentences Wednesday mere 
considerably harsher than those 
generally imposed on student dem- 
onstrators in recent years. 

They seemed to reflect a tougher- ■ 

government attitude toward dis- 
sent. Many foreign diplomats in 
South Korea trace the attitude to 
thefour-day takeover of the Ameri- ; 
can offices by 73 students. • 
Although the demonstration 
ended without violence on May 26, 
following long negotiations be- 
tween the students and U.S. diplo- . 
mats, the South Korean govern- 
ment felt seriously embarrassed 
and threatened to retaliate. 

Since then, there has been a se- 
ries of campus raids, and scores of 
students have been arrested. OfTi-. 
dais have dismissed teachers and 
ordered the transfer of judges con- 
sidered too “soft” on convicted 
protesters. 

“Considering that no violence 
was involved, these are very severe 
sentences,” a Western diplomat 
said Wednesday. 

The longest prison term, seven 
years, was given to Ham Un Yong, 
a senior at Seoul National Univer- 
sity who headed a campus group 
called Sammmtu. The government 
has labeled the group pro-Commu- 
nist. 

In addition to the prison term, 


entences 


Mr. Ham's ciyiT rights are .bang 
suspended Joe three years; He had 
beat charged under the National 
Security taw, which is commonly, 
invoked against, defendants ac- 
cused, ofabetting North Korea. In 
the most .extreme cases, • tbe law 
allows the death penally. 

The 19 other def aidants were 
indicted under less severe. statutes: 
and received shorter sentences. • 

Kim 1 Min Suk,- also a leader at 
Seoul National University, and an- 
other student were given five-year 
sentences. Nine of the others re- 
ceived four-year terms and seven- 
were .given three-year terras. 

The 20th defendant, the -only 
woman on trial, was given a sus- 
pended sentence of. two years, ap- 
parently because she expressed a 
willingness to “repent.” 

The 153 other students who had 
taken over the U.S. installation 
were given shoii jail terms soon 
after the incident or were released 
with warnings. 

The trial, in the . Seoul District- 
Criminal Court. had been uncom- 
monly stormy and w as punctuated 
by- sporadic outbursts by defen- 
dants who shouted anti-govern- 
ment slogans. 1 ' ' 

Two weeks ago, two opposition 
members of the National Assembly 
were indicted on charges of inciting 
a separate detnoastration at Korea 
University on Sept. 6. One of them 
was a defense lawyer in the con- 
tinuing trial of the 20 students, and 
he was disbarred as a result. 

In protest, 21 other defense at- 
torneys, resigned. forcing tbe court 
to appoint replacements. 



Entrepreneurs Bloom in China 

Private Businesses Have Multiplied 15-Fold Since 1980 


Bishop Desmond M. Tata of South Africa, center, at Westminster Cathedral in London 
with Anglican church leaders, Reverend Samuel Van Culm, secretary-general of the 
Anglican Consultative Council, at left, and Reverend Keith Sutton, bishop of Litchfield. 

Boycott of White Shops Ends in Natal 


The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — Black 
trade unions and community, 
groups called off Thursday a 
month-old boycott of white shops 
in South Africa's Natal province,' 
saying it “threatens to divide rather 
than unify” foes of apartheid. 

Tbe nationwide black consumer 
boycott remains in effect in most 
parts of thc coantry and has crip- 
pled some white shops and forced 
others to dose. 

Thousands of students contin- 
ued to boycott classes Thursday 
across South Africa. 

Police headquarters in Pretoria 
said that a riot patrol shot and 
killed a black man on Wednesday 
in King William’s Town in tbe east- 


ern Cape province during a clash 
with rock-throwers. 

In Cape Town on Thursday, a 
court postponed for two weeks the 
case of eight journalists, including 
camera crews from U-S.-based tele- 
vision networks, who were arrested 
Tuesday while covering a student 
protest rally. 

Tbe eight journalists, who ap- 
peared in court, were released 
Wednesday without bail. They in- 
dude Wim de Vos, of tbe Nether- 
lands, and Anion van der Merwe, a 
South African, employees of CBS: 
and George De'Arh. of France, and 
John Hall of Britain, employees of 
NBC 

Also arrested were Craig Mat- 
thew and Pierre Rommel acre of 


World Television News of Britain; 
Bernard Bisson from the French 
photographic agency, Sygma; and 
Rafiq Rohan, a reporter for the 
South African Capitol Radio - 

In Bournemouth. England. Brit- 
ain's opposition Labor Party gave a 
thunderous reception Friday to Ol- 
iver Tambo, leader of the outlawed 
African National Congress. 

Mr. Tamb o accused Prime Min- 
ister Margaret Thatcher's govern- 
ment of allying itself with apart- 
heid. 

Meanwhile, Mrs. Thatcher was 
meeting with Bishop Desmond M. 
Tutu, a Nobel laureate and a lead- 
ing apartheid opponent who advo- 
cates nonviolent change. He is in 
Britain for a church meeting. 


By John F. Burns 

.Vfw York Times Service 

BEUING — .As a boy growing 
up amid the rice paddies of Jiangsu 
province. Zhu Bingrong read the 
tracts of Marx and Mao. 

He has never heard of Adam 
Smith or “The Wealth of Nations,” 
the 18th-century handbook of lais- 
sez-faire capitalism. But each day 
he bicycles down to a street comer 
here, sets up a crude table and 
demonstrates an axiom set forth by 
Smith in 1776; that the entrepre- 
neur, in pursuit of personal gain, 
can simultaneously promote the 
general welfare. 

Mr. Zhu. 30. is a tailor, an indi- 
vidualist with one of the fastest 
pairs of scissors and surest eyes for 
a nipped waist that have been seen 
in Chongwenmen district here in a 
generation. 

After only a few months in busi- 
ness he has built up a thriving trade 
in the pinstripe suits and natty 
sports jackets that have been the 
rage since Deng Xiaoping lifted the 
sartorial tyranny imposed by Mao. 

In the streets of China, away 
from tbe wrangling of the political 
elite, Mr. Deng is celebrated for 
policies that have placed popular 
well-being ahead of ideological 
concerns. Nowhere is this more evi- 
dent than among the practitioners 
— and clientele — of the growing 
network of free enterprise. 

“Deng Xiaoping,” Mr. Zhu said, 
“he's wonderful; it’s his policies 
that have made all this possible.” 
With a wave of his shears, be mo- 
tioned toward the vegetable sellers, 
furniture makers and bicycle re- 


pairers clustered about his table on 
Taijichang Street. 

Across China more than IS mil- 
lion people work in private busi- 
ness, two-thirds of them people like 
Mr. Zhu who ore self-employed. 
When Mr. Deng took power in 
1978, private commerce of all kinds 
was proscribed and punished. 

Equally impressive is the rate of 
growth: 660.000 private businesses 
by 1980, 9.3 million at the end of 
1984, 10.6 million now. Recent fig- 
ures show that 14 percent of all 
retail sales take place in the private 
sector. 

In many neighborhoods the pri- 
vate markets have become the focal 
point of life. In Beijing Liter? are 
more than 500 such markets, often 
several in a single neighborhood. 

Western economic historians 
who visit here say there has been 
nothing to match it in any Commu- 
nist country, not even the period in 
the 1920s when Lenin, ruling a na- 
tion ravaged by civil war. encour- 
aged free enterprise in the SovieL 
Union. 

The same point, in different 
ways, is made by Mr. Deng's politi- 
cal enemies at home, who say that 
what is going on here is an aban- 
donment of Marx’s creed. 

“We are Communists; our goal is 
to build socialism." Chen Yun, 80. 
the central planning advocate who 
is Mr. Deng's strongest critic at the 
pinnacle of power, said at a nation- 
al party conference last week. 

Mr. Deng, on Lhe defensive, has 
adjusted his polemics, but not his 
policy. Replying to Mr. Chen's 
conference speech, he spoke of the 
“greediness, corruption and injus- 


tice that are inherent in capital- 
ism.” then reaffirmed the positive 
role that free enterprise can play. 

In licensing free enterprise. Mr. 
Deng has sought to tackle several 
problems. One was the chronic 
shortage and sloth of everyday ser- 
vices. palpable to anyone who 
knew Mao's China. 

Whether it was getting a meal, or 
a haircut, or a snapshot on Tienan- 
raen Square, China before the 
Deng era was hopelessly undersup- 
plied. 

Mr. Zhu can make a jacket for 
less than $2 plus the cost of the 
cloth in three days; the same ser- 
vice in a state-run shop can take 
several weeks. 

Since 1980 there has been a 600 
percent increase in retail and ser- 
vice shops, most of them privately 
run. China's Horatio Algers have 
opened nearly six million stores, 
one million restaurants. 800.000 
transport concerns, 750.000 repair 
shops. 640.000 service shops and 
stalls and 40,000 companies that 
build or repair homes. 

If a Chinese drinks in a teahouse, 
stays in a small hotel, needs his 
shoes fixed, likes fashionable 
clothes and hairdos or likes to 
dance to a Western beat. Lhe 
chances are good that he will pa- 
tronize a privately owned concern. 

The new businesses have filled a 
gaping hole, and by providing bet- 
ter service. though often at a higher 
price, have prompted state and col- 
lectively owned stores to improve 
their performance, in addition, 
they have provided jobs to millions 
of people who would otherwise 
have been out of work. 


ears, Middle East Co nfli ct Shifts Back to Israeli Territory 



(Continued from Page 1) 
are less afraid of the Israelis than 
were their parents. 

“The generation that grew up in 
the territories before- 1967 wit- 
nessed Israel crush three Arab ar- 
mies at once,** said Amnon Cohen, 
an expert on Palestinian history at 
the Hebrew University .of Jerusa- 
lem. 

“They were shocked by this and 
they took the might of the Israeli 
Army for granted. The young gen- 
eration do not suffer from this 
shock. They grew up with the Israe- 
li Army of the 1973 war and Leba- 
non.” 

The ability of the Suite Moslems 
to drive the Israeli Army out of 
most of Lebanon appears to have 
had an important psychological 
impact on West Bank youths and 
to have contributed, in part, to the 
new wave of violence. 

Israeli mflitary officials say they 


believe that the 600 Palestinians 
freed May 20, who included, some 
of the best-known Palestinian kill- 
ers of Israelis in the last 20 years, 
are bong closely watched and are 
not engaging in subversive activi- 
ties. 

The freed prisoners do serve as 
important role . models, however, 
the officials said. The 600 men were 
freed to the occupied territories as 
part of an e xchang e of 1,150 pris- 
oners for three Israeli soldiers. 

In the last IS years, Israel has 
systematically destroyed the tradi- 
tional Arab leadership in the West 
Bank and Gaza Strip through ex- 
pulsions dr dismissals from posts. 

Only one mayor of a major Arab 
town, Bias MT-Freq of Bethlehem, 
remains in his job. The others are 
under the administration, of mili- 
tary governors. 

In the absence. of. strong and 
moderate local leaders, the young 


generation is looking to the re- 
leased prisoners for inspiration. 

The Israeli cabinet agreed to the 
prisoner exchange under the urging 
of the parents of the three Israeli 
soldiers. Officials also believed that 
if they did not meet tbe Pales tinian 
guerrillas’ specific demands, the 
three Isradis could be killed. 

Another factor that has helped 
make the recent violence possible, 
the experts said, is the weakening 
of Israel's intelligence-gathering 
capabilities in the West Bank and 
Gaza Strip as a result of the Leba- 
non war. 

The day-to-day gathering of in- 
telligence in the West Bank was 
always carried out by agents of the 
Shin Beth, the security agency that 
is Israel's equivalent of the FBI. 

But when the Israeli Army in- 
vaded Lebanon, the Shin Beth, 
with its experienced case officers 
and members fluent in Arabic, 


transferred much of its resources to 
assist the occupation. Many of its 
agents still work in southern Leba- 
non. 

According to Israeli military 
sources, about 20 Shin Beth agents 
were killed during the invasion of 
Lebanon and in the suicide car- 
bombing of the Israeli intelligence 
headquarters in Tyre on Nov. 4, 
1983. 

“The main tool for fighting ter- 
rorism is intelligence,” said a senior 
Israeli officer in the West Bank. 

In addition, the nature of the 
violence in the territories is chang- 
ing, making it more difficult to de- 
tect in advance, the military officer 
noted. At most, he said, only 50 
percent of the recent attacks have 
been directed from the outside. 

The rest, he said, were underta- 
ken by individuals who are no long- 
er willing to wait for the PLO to 
win the tighter them. They act on 


their own or in self-contained s mall 
groups that are very hard to pene- 
trate. 

The PLO presence in Amman 
has contributed to tbe recent spate 
of attacks, the Israeli military offi- 
cials said, because it is easier for its 
leaders to meet other Palestinians 
there than it was in Tunis or Al- 
giers. 

Israeli military officials say they 
believe that Mr. Arafat has been 
pressured to step up violence inside 
Israel to improve his image inside 
the organization. 

Mr. Arafat reportedly is consid- 
ering recognizing Israel's right to 
exist as pan of a Jordanian-PLO 
initiative to open talks with the 
United States on peace in the Mid- 
dle East 

The last factor contributing to 
the increase in Arab violence, ac- 
cording to Israeli military experts 
and Palestinians, has been the be- 
havior of the Jewish settlers. 


The settlers have increased their 
efforts to expand their settlements 
into densely populated Arab areas. 
They have atiacked the homes of 
the Palestinians released from pris- 
on and are conducting their own 
armed patrols in West Bank towns 
following attacks on Israelis. 

Israeli military experts say the 
settlers have been provoking the 
Arabs. Rabbi Moshe Levinger, a 
leader of the settlers, sat outside a 
refugee camp for two months wait- 
ing for an Arab to throw a stone at 

him 

“The settlers say they are moving 
into the Hebron marketplace be- 
cause they want to lire with the 
Arabs.” said Amnon Cohen, a his- 
torian. “In reality they want to re- 
place them. They want friction in 
order to justify bringing the army 
in and imposing harsher security. 
We must not only condemn Arab 
aggression but Jewish aggression.” 


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NEW YORK 





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HOlel Plaza Athenee 
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With the boom in offshore investment 
products* the fund investor has no lack of choice. 

But-such variety has made the task of 
matching funds with investment goals more 
daunting than ever. 

On October 14, Personal Investing 
tries to bring some order to the chaos with the first 
of what will, he twice-a-year surveys of international 
funds. The leaders and laggards will be listed in 
every major categoiy of fund. 

And the experts will offer some hints on 
the theory and practice of fund investing. It adds 
up to must reading, and a ready reference for the 
serious investor. Don’t miss it 

Advertisers may calk 
• Peter Bullock 
Financial Advertising Manager 
. . Herald Tribune 

63 Long Acre 
London WC2E9JH 
Telephone: (01) 8364802 


01L<S?M)NEY 

AN INTEI{NfflQNM^HERAIJ)TRnBO^ 
OILIMYCaNFERENCE 

LONDON. OCTOBER 24-25.1985l 

re Surviving in a competitive environment ”, will be the theme of the sixth International Herald Tribune/ Oil 
Daily Conference on r Oil and Money in the Eighties The program, designed for senior executives in energy 
and related fields, will address die key issues affecting the current energy situation and assess future trends 
and strategies. H.E Professor Dr. Sobrato , Minister of Mines and Energy, Indonesia and President of the 
OPEC conference , and John S Herrington, US. Energy Secretary', will head a distinguished group of 
speakers from Europe, the Middle East, Latin America and the United States. 

OCTOBER 24 OCTOBER 25 



KEYNOTE ADDRE5S: 

— Professor Dr. Subroto, Minister of Mines and Energy, 
Indonesia. 

COMPETITION FOR MARKET SHARE 
— Moderator-. Herman T. Fronssen, Former Chief Economist', 
International Energy Agency, Paris. 

— HF. KepSnger, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, 

The ICeplinger Companies, Houston. 

— AJirio Parra, Managing Director, Petroteos de Venezuela 
(UJC) SA, London. 

— Douglas Wade, Senior Energy Analyst, Shell International 
Petroleum Company Ltd, Laxba 

THE IMPLICATIONS OF OPEC PRODUCT IMPORTS AND 
DOWNSTREAM STRATEGIES ON THE OIL MARKETS. 

— Nader H. Sultan. President, Kuweit Petroleum International 
lid, London. 

HOW TWO MAJOR OIL COMPANIES ARE SURVIVING 
IN A COMPETTTTVE ENVIRONMENT. 

— Allen E Murray, President, Mobil Corporation, New York. 
— Arve Johnsen, President-, Statoil, Stavanger. 

PRODUCERS AND REFINERS STRATEGES IN AN ERA 
OF GROWING COMPETITION. 

. — John R. Hdl, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ashland 
Oil Incorporated, Ashland, Kentucky. 

— Eija Mcinivirta, General Manager, Neste Oy, Helsinki. 

— Nicola Mangel, Assistant to the Executive Vice President, 

Ente Nazior^ldrocnrbim, Rome. 

— Saud O. OunaHdi, Manager, Supply Coordination, Petrorrin 
Participation, Dhahran. 


NEW OUTLOOKS FOR UNITED STATES' GY POLICY. 

— The Honorable John S. Herrington, United States' Energy 
Secretary. 

NORTH SEA OIL- SfflKIORN OF TOMORROW’S 

PROSPERITY. 

— Join Moore, MJ 3 ., financial Secretary to the Treasury, 

United Kingdom. 

ThE EFFECT OF FLUCTUATING OfL PRICES ON THE 

BANKING SYSTEMS, SHARE VALUES, INSTITUTIONAL 

INVESTORS AND WORLD BANK LOANS. 

— Robert B. Weaver, Senior Vice President and Globd 

Petroleum Executive, The Chase Manhattan Bank, NA, N.Y. 

— Peter Gignoux, Senior Vice President, Shearson Lehman 
Brothers Ltd, London. 

— Robert L Franklin, Founder and President, Lawrence Energy 
Associates Incorporated, Boston. 

— Ian M. Hume, Assistant Director, Energy Department, The 
World Bank, Washincpon, D.C 

MEGAMERGER TRBMDS AND THE FUTURE OF THE OIL 

NDUSTRY. 

— Robert F. GreenhiS, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley & 

Co. Incorporated, New Yak. 

NON-Q>4VENnONAL Ofl. SALES. 

— Nicholas G. VoOte, OB Consultant, London, The Hague. 

— Chafes L Ddy, Manogng Director, LM. Ftschel & Co. Ltd, London. 

— Dieter Kempermam, Managing Director, Union Rheinische 
Braunkphle n Krafls toff A.G. 

— Rosemary Mdradden, President, N.Y. Mercantile Exchange. 

CLOSING PANS. DISOJSSION OF CURR04T ENERGY ISSUES. 

— Paul H. Frenkel, President, Petroleum Economics Ltd 




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Page 6 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune. 


PobUnfard With TJvt V oA T!dm» ud TV Pont 


Victims of Free Trade 


A mighty urge has been building in the 
Congress to do something, almost anything, to 
show concern about the huge U.S. trade defi- 
cits. Even senators and congressmen with un- 
swerving commitments to the principle of free 
trade are feeling the need to demonstrate sen- 
sitivity to the domestic troubles caused by 
foreign competition. A likely vehicle for that 
concern is a proposal by Senator William Roib 
of Delaware, and others, to extend and expand 
the Trade Adjustment Assistance program. 

The Roth proposal would impose a small 
“adjustment fee" on all imports to pay for 
extended unemployment benefits and retrain- 
ing for workers who lose jobs to foreign com- 
petition. It has an advantage over other pro- 
posals aimed at helping U.S. workers: strong 
bipartisan backing, especially within the pow- 
erful Senate Finance Committee, and inclu- 
sion in the budget reconciliation measure that 
the Senate is expected to take up soon. 

The plan also has intuitive appeal. Open 
trade is surely good for the United States and 
other countries in the long run, but m the short 
run the costs of adjustment fall heavily on 
certain people and localities. Why not make 
the people who profit from importing goods 
into the United States help ease the resulting 
hardships? Senator Roth and the bill's co- 
sponsors point out that the needed levy on 
imports would be so small (probably only one- 
tenth of 1 percent of import value) that the 
United States’s trading partners would proba- 


— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Russians This Time 


Three Soviet citizens were still being held 
prisoner in Lebanon even as the report came 
that a fourth, a diplomat, had been executed 
by an Is lami c fundamentalist group fighting in 
Tripoli against Lebanese elements backed by 
Syria and. through Syria, the Soviet Union. 
Few people, we surmise, are going to be able to 
deplore the murder without wondering wheth- 
er it might noL be therapeutic for the Kremlin 
to get a taste of the medicine that it has long 
been prescribing for others through its various 
approaches to encouraging international ter- 
rorism. But this in itself is not an adequate, let 
alone an attractive; reaction. 

This appears to be the firsL time Soviet 
citizens have been taken hostage and banned 
in the charnel house of Lebanon. As a result, 
there is much curiosity about what the Krem- 
lin may da One theory has been that terrorists 
have hesitated to hit Soviet targets for fear of 
an immediate and crushing response. Now we 
will see whether Moscow moves to protect, 
remove or avenge its people, and whether it 
slackens or keeps up or even increases its 
support for its Lebanese friends in the field. 
These are important questions bearing on the 
whole Soviet role in the Middle East 

It is painful buL necessary to note that in 
somewhat analogous circumstances of threat 


to its Lebanese presence, the United States 
abandoned its role as a would-be patron of the 
country's integrity and unity. In a little-noted 
sequel, the Soviet Union then deliberately 
moved into some part of that same role, princi- 
pally by backing Syria, which sees itself as the 
single legitimate overseer of Lebanon, 

Syria has been conducting a hard policy' of 
enforcing order of a sort in Tripoli and of 
otherwise trying to assert control in Lebanon. 
The United States is not pleased with the 
means, but in the absence of any other feasible 
way to slop the bloodletting and disintegra- 
tion, Washington has quietly endorsed the 
Syrian policy. It has done so notwithstanding 
Syria’s own readiness to sponsor and condone 
terrorism, including, it is believed, terrorism 
directed at Americans. Washington thus has 
acquiesced to the Soviet supporting role. 

This leaves the United Stales in a strange 
position on the latest hostage-taking. Even as 
it takes a consistent position against terrorism. 
Washington cannot fail to hope against hope 
that Moscow’ will review its cynical support of 
terrorism. Yet the United States finds itself 
forced to acknowledge the job that the Soviet 
Union is performing in Lebanon, one that the 
Reagan administration largely yielded. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Panama Is Off the List 


Strike Panama from the list of restored Lat- 
in American democracies that the United 
Stales has been celebrating 

In a democracy, the military is not expected 
regularly to depose or impose presidents, as 
the Panamanian National Guard has done five 
times in three years. In a democracy, civilian 
critics of military power are not supposed to be 
decapitated, with the apparent collusion of 
the military, as happened two weeks ago to 
Dr. Hugo Spadafora. 

In a democracy, journalists are not normally 
threatened by military intelligence operatives, 
and United Slates ambassadors do not feel 
obliged to warn opposition newspapers that 
they risk being closed down unless they mute 
their criticism — as Ambassador Everett 
Briggs felt obliged this week to warn reporters 
and editors of the daily La Prensa. 

If what is happening in Panama is democra- 
cy, Nicaragua can fairly claim it is being sub- 


jected to a double standard. The right name for 
the Panamanian regime is dictatorship, and 
the country’s real ruler is the National Guard 
commander, General Manuel Noriega. 

Panama faces problems, starting with the 
effects of the larger Latin debt crisis, which has 
dried up the normal flow of capital to the 
region. And the United States has every reason 
to try to get along with whoever governs Pana- 
ma. But these realities do not oblige Washing- 
ton to pretend that the power plays and brutal- 
ities of a military regime are consistent with 
democracy. General Noriega should not un- 
derestimate the United States’s strategic inter- 
est in Panama’s political future. 

.America's access to the Panama Canal de- 
pends in the first instance on the stability of 
the regime that guarantees it- That guarantee is 
worth no more than the regime's credibility 
among its own people. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


The Art of Cutting Red Tape 


[Christo] is the subject of an array of books 
and movies. And like some other artists in 
history, artists like Leonardo. Michelangelo, 
1111011, and, in our own day. Picasso, he is 
known simply by the one name. Unlike them, 
be is that modem phenomenon, a man famous 
For being famous. To say that, though, is to 
do an injustice. 

The sheer scale of Christo's projects, the 


energy with which he pursues them (the wrap- 
ping of the Pom Nenf has been on his list since 
1976), and the skill with which he consum- 
mates them are in a class apart. It was not 
simply a question of the ingenuity of wrapping 
the 12-arched bridge in silken pleats while the 
traffic kept rolling, it was the little matter too 
of persuading hard-nut politicians such as Par- 
is Mayor Jacques Chirac and President Fran- 
cois Mitterrand that it was worth doing. 

— Michael McNay. The Guardian (London). 


FROM OUR OCT. 4 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: China Opens National Assembly 
PEKING — Today [Oct. 3] is notable in Chi- 
na's history, witnessing the inauguration of the 
Constitutional Assembly, the first Chinese na- 
tional body embodying the principle of popu- 
lar representation. The greatest enthusiasm 
prevails throughout the empire and the Drag- 
on flags are flying everywhere. In opening the 
Assembly, the Regent declared that it repre- 
sented the people's verdict, and although only 
the initial step towards a constitution it was an 
emblem of hope in the country's great future, 
showing that C hina is in accord with the 
world's progress. The Regent recognized the 
need for improved conditions and harmony 
between all classes. The inauguration of pro- 
vincial Assemblies last year marked the first 
stage of representative government in China. 
The Constitutional Assembly extends the rep- 
resentative principle to the empire as an entity. 


1935: Italian Troops Invade Ethiopia 
PARIS — War began in Ethiopia [on Oct. 3] 
with the advance of Italian troops on two 
fronts. Adowa, scene of Italy’s defeat 39 years 
ago, when 14.000 Italians fell before the spears 
and guns of Ethiopian warriors, was bombed 
by Italian warplanes. Mussolini's Air Force 
also rained bombs on the nearby towns of 
Adigrat and Agame. Hundreds of people, in- 
cluding women and children, were killed, ac- 
cording to Addis Ababa dispatches; Rome 
dismissed the charge as “an old and much- 
abused expedient” Messages pouring out of 
the Ethiopian capital told of the Italian ad- 
vance. The Italians began their forward move- 
ment before dawn from Wal-WaL on the Ital- 
ian Somaliland frontier, in the south, as well as 
from Eritrea, in the north. A Custos Agency 
dispatch published in Paris gave total casual- 
ties in the first day’s advance as 1,700. 


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JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 19581982 


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Vi 1985. international Herald Tribute. AH rights reserved 


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1985 


bly accept the required change in trading rules. 

The Reagan administration, however, has 
stoutly opposed other import surcharges and, 
while it has not yet registered opposition to 
this one. may well be reluctant to embrace it 
The administration has consistently opposed 
the whole concept of earmarking programs for 
workers hurt by trade on the sensible ground 

that such workers have no larger claim to 
public help than workers displaced by techno- 
logical change, faulty management, high inter- 
est rates or domestic competition. 

It also turns out to be very hard to pinpoint 
eligible workers: a study of earlier trade ad- 
justment programs found that workers given 
help because their jobs had been permanently 
lost to foreign competition were much more 
Likely to be recalled to those same jobs than 
were workers who were not helped. 

A better strategy might build upon the 
worker adjustment programs already being 
funded by the Labor Department. While these 
programs are still quite new and generally lack 
money Tot extensive retraining or worker sti- 
pends, they have encouraged considerable in- 
novation by states and involvement by private 
companies. Unfortunately, even as the Con- 
gress considers voting money for a new' dis- 
placed- worker program under the beading of 
"trade,'* it is also in the process of approving a 
huge cut iu funding for the existing programs. 
That does not make sense. 



Attack in Tunis 

Frailty of U.S. 


By Philip Geyelin 

„ 1 .u- readv to talk to “all parties in pnrju- 

W ASHINGTON — „ a negotiated settlement, in an 

dwice of Tun** Sm tamgerent and 

come as a surprise; Israel S sense of . acts « 
how to-provide for its securuy was Israel bad already, set 

well-etablistoed in Iraq m 198 and ¥asn . 


W choice of Tunisia 
come as a surprise; Ism 


in Lebanon for the last three yea«- w ^ quibble over language. 

The lesson wni large m the Tunisian Arafat’s headquarters that 


lawlessness of the way Israel S 

Its national security than H says cl ry ^ Mr. Arafat 

about the mindlessness of the way the bad reason % indeed there is 


about the mmdlessnessottne way me * hand. Indeed there is 

re^ble widence that only by chance 
ests ID the Middle EdSL • m Arafat not shot? up - ax a 

Secretary of State George Shultz Jrf Mf 
had a large part of the lesson right: sotediued T ■ 


had a large part of the lesson ngtu: 

US. sccutityTas be understands it, ume of the kraeh attack. 


UA secuniy, as ne So i s also idle to argue over 


ever ooos to oeai wnn me sources u. l__i. 

strife and instability in the Middle reason enough •• ■ 

East This means “we need tobe dear at terrorists by way 2 


tasu inis means wcneanuycuMi — — 

in our opposition to the actfof vio- suffers cruelly at 

Ir-rrrv. . frv^r, ntMfler thfiV COnSMUCnCeS COUpL tte lOOTe SO 


fence from whatever quarter they consequences couau me -xuutc 
come, and without respect to the ^re- when they TT^Mr. 

sumed rationale ford£n” he saiS in Arafat escaped doesnm alter the im- 
response to the Israeli raid on the plications for U.S. pouqy. _ 


U7 LUC ldldUi ldiU V'u uiv — .. - 

¥ J 9 fTW • n It* Palestine Liberation Organization fa- This is the pohey equ^atot ofia 

Gorbachev s Charm Campaign Backfires SKSSf*? 


W ASHINGTON — During the 
Androocv-Chemenko era. the 


VV Andropov-Chemenko era, the 
central aim of Soviet policy was to get 
Western front groups to stop the de- 
ployment of medium-range missiles 
in Europe. That failed. The central 
aim of the Gorbachev Kremlin is to 
stop U.S. testing of space-based de- 
fense weapons, this time using the 
most modem communications tech- 
niques to appeal to “world opinion. " 

The Charm Offensive must have 
seemed like a great idea to the new 
Soviet leadership. Western media of- 
fer easy access for the Russian anti- 
space-defense message: But Mikhail 
Gorbachev is beginning to discover 
that playing with public opinion is 
playing with fire. 

Credibility abroad. Watching him 
answering questions on television. 
Western viewers no longer compare 


By William S afire 


Mr. Gorbachev said there were 


uvuuuuMUiuUt "vnuj aavb uw nwnii I _ - - . • 

ing. But Mr. Shultz was in New York, sassmation. It professes to be pusH- 


He is not as smooth as cracked up 
to be. He takes long, d ramati c pauses 
before saying ominously — never in 
pessimism, mind you — that “we 
have reached a point beyond which 
events may get out of hand.” This is 
intended to strike fear in the hearts of 
his listeners. But be is not such a hot 
actor. His dramatic pauses are melo- 
dramatic; television's eye resists such 
attempts at manipulation. 

Credibility at home. The Kremlin 
decision to go public with its appeal 
for a defense freeze exposes the Sovi- 
et people (no longer “peoples") to the 
sight of their leader saying what the 
average person knows to be untrue. 

In an interview telecast in the Sovi- 
et Union as well as France, a French 


“exceptions” to Soviet policy in re- 
unifying families “when individuals 


at the United. Nations. iflS a P« ace 

And it was to the White House that encourages an 
Israel was looking for renewal of its counter tenons 
license to practice “sdf-defense" out- policy. The Ui 

side the bounds of international law. 

Talking by phone to Israeli officials, 

moments after die statements from lnCbeStB 


him with his dour predecessors: they interviewer. Yves Monrousi, dared to 


measure him against his buildup. ask about human rights. 


Life in a Nuclear World: 


O SLO — It is not easy to think 
optimistically about the future. 


Not only has man shown a histori- 
cal penchant for fighting wars, but 
now he lives under the shado w of a 
weapon that could make the next war 


By John Ansland 

This is the second of two articles. 
easy to think Some people see the nuclear-winter 

it the future, question as irrelevant. Any attempt 
own a histori- by the United States and the Soviet 
jig wars, but Union to destroy each other’s strate- 
: shadow of a «pc nuclear forces, they say, would 
e the next war involve the use of perhaps 10,000 


the last, one that gives the nuclear warheads. The destr u cti o n would be 
powers the means to wipe out fragile unimaginably catastrophic, even 


civilizations built over the ages. Even 
if the world's leaders show no desire 
to engage in nuclear war, it is not easy 
to escape die fear that they will stun> 
Jble into one. 

It does no good to pretend that the 
danger does not exist To embrace 
simplistic slogans about nuclear 
freezes and nuclear-free zones is to 
embrace empty hope: 

The hard reality is that there are 
50,000 nuclear warheads in the 


without a nuclear winter. 

Those who espouse the nuclear- 


in point know state secrets” — mean- 
ing Andrei Sakharov, the dissident 
scientist who has been kept out of 
touch for decades — but claimed “we 
will continue to resolve these ques- 
tions without fuss, on the baas of a 
humanitarian approach.” Sure. 

Mr. Gorbachev then wanned to his 
topic. “You mentioned the ‘Jewish 
question.’ I would be glad to hear of 
Jews enjoying anywhere such politi- 
cal and other rights as they have in 
our country. The Jewish population, 
who account for 0.69 percent of the 
entire population of our country, are 
represented in its political and cultur- 
al life on a scale of at least 10 to 20 
percent. Most of than are people well 
known in the country.” 

That is the old Hitier technique: If 
you tell a lie big enough, some people 
will believe it Most .Russians are wdl 
aware that there are virtually no Jews 
aL the top of the party, the military, 
the KGB or the foreign service. The 
number of Jews permitted higher 
education has been cut in half in the 
last 15 years. Why do at least 350.000 
Jews ache to leave the Soviet Union? 

Credibility with kidnappers. An un- 
expected downside to Mr. Gorba- 
chev's oouning of opinion is the Rus- 
sians' new vulnerability to terrorism. 
The only governments terrorists try 
to intimidate are those concerned 
with opinion. With the crowd-pleas- 
ing Mr. Gorbachev in power, some 
murderous zealots seem to fed Mos- 
cow is no longer above blackmafl. 

Russia cannot be forced by kid- 
nappers to tell its Syrian client to ease 
up on the terrorists' friends, but nei- 
ther can Mr. Gorbachev fail to react. 


rocess. And it 
radi approach to 


policy. The United States considers 


gr antin g 4, *legitimacy , ’ to tile Israeli pTOUlOEC peace UTB UJ fUS . 

account so long as 

Americalets itself be 

mote a Middle last “peace process" jerked around by its 

are of no account for as long as the J J 

United States allows itself to be closest HtfideaSt ally. 

jerked around by its dosest Middle J > 

East ally. This is not new with the • ’■ 

Reagan administ ration. What *wgy he retaliation against terrorist attacks as 
new is that the adminis t ra ti o n • may a “l egitimate expression of self-de- 
hot be conscious of the crippling con- fense** — a policy that it apparently 
traditions in its approach. lades either the will or the wit to 

On the one hand, it engages King practice for itself. 

Hussein in a carefully coordinated Make that a four-car collision: By 
strategy to produce direct negotia- proclaiming Israd tobe a U.S. “sedi- 
tions involving Israel. Jordan and city asset,” the administration regn- 


The best efforts to 
promotepeace are of no 
account so long as 
America lets itself be 


closest Mideast ally. 


some kind of Palestinian represen ta- larly invites die inference dial what- 
tion. The PLO chairman, Yasser Ara- ever Israd may do in its own interests 


fat, has been inextricably entwined in is perceived by the administration to 
this effort as a would-be arbiter in be in UR. interests as welL So when 


selecting those Palestinian represen- the White House confers “legilima- 


ta lives. The administration 


cy” on Israeli strikes against terrorist 


that King Hussein cannot move far nests, wherever they are, it ought to 
without Mr. Arafat’s acquiescence, be dear what it is legitimating. . 


Mr. Arafat, in torn, is no more than Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin 


the best of a very bad lot in the of Israd made it pretty dean No 


splintered PLO, whose worst de- “immunity” anywhere for terrorists 


meats do not want either Mr. Arafat in general and for PLO headquarters. 


or King Hussein to move at afl. in particular. Did that include Jor- 
Yet, on Monday, there was Ronald dan, where the PLO has offices? Mr. 


Reagan at the White House praising Katnn scarcely needed to repeat rum- 
Hussein for “moving steadily and self; he had already pointedly and 

t* tl. l:.* t - 


Rabin scarcely needed to repeat him- 


courageously forward.” The king, for publicly warned of “dangers” to 
his part, was repeating to Mr. Reagan King Hussein if security on the West 


winter concept say that, to 'escape If he does nothing about pro: 
from this dangerous atuatioiiibude- his nationals, he wtil be seen in 
ar stockpiles must be drastically re- opinion as being as weak as Mi 


“Jordan’s unwavering position in 
condemnation of terrorifin, irrespec- 
tive of its nature and source.” 


King Hussein; if security on the West 
Bank “deteriorates.” 

Now you can make a case for one 
or another of these policies — but not 


ar stockpiles must be drast 
duced, leaving them below 
that would trigger a nudes 


Although there is controversy about 
what this number would be, it could 


Ally re- opinion as bang as weak as Mr. Rea- 
he level gan has been, but if . he dams the- 
\ winter. Sunni Modems, there goes Iraq, 
y about Thus does H Sm3m’ Mike” discover 
it could that publicity, so easy for a world 


On Tuesday, King Hussein was. dl at once: There is no case to be 
inyiug the same message directly to' made for seeking to engage Hussein 


be as low as a few thousand, perhaps leader to get, can turn pitiless. 


Capitol HOI, explicitly idling a meet- anti the other more moderate Arabs 
ing of Honse members that “Jordan in a peaceful settlement while 
recognizes the right of Israd to existr Israd a green light to ride rouj 
That meets the condition written into across international frontier: 


across international frontiers any- 


1,000 warheads on each side. 

But it cakes great optimism to fore- 


The New York Tones. 


law for US. arms sales to Jordan. He where in the Arab world. 


was also saying that Jordan was . _ Washington Post Writers Group. 


world. Possession is limited to a few see the nuclear powers agreeing to 
countries: the United States, the So- such drastic reductions. 


viet Union. Britain, China and Even if the number of warheads 
France. Perhaps Israd has a few war- were significantly reduced, the ques- 
heads. and other countries certainly tion or whether defenses are desirable 
have the means to produce them. would remain. In fact, radical redne- 
The countries that have nuclear tion of the number of offensive weap- 
weapons are locked in historic strug- ons would make defense a more rea- 
gle. There is little chance that the sonable possibility. Even if it were 
Soviet Union will give up its ambi- not technically possible to have an 
tioos to become a global power or effective space-based defense, the 
that the Western allies will cease to United States, and eventually the So- 
resist this. We must reconcile our- viet Union, could decide to use anti- 
ing struggle. ballistic missiles to protect their land- 


The Finns Are Looking Down No longer 

H ELSINKI— The Famish capi- - By William Plafi dent was Helsinki’s vote in 1983 ii 
tars monumental sculptures J v..: •— £— 


selves to continuing struggle. ballistic missiles to pr 

Fortunately, unclear arsenals have based nudear forces. 


a chastening effect: They lead Ameri- 
can and Soviet leaders to treat each 
other with respect In 40 years, there 


If, as is likely, the leaders of the 
nudear powers are not prepared to 
make drastic reductions, we must 


has not been an accidental nudear content ourselves with continuing to 


explosion or an unauthorized firing. 
But if a conflict should break out, the 
question of using nuclear weapons 
would arise. It is uncertain whether 
American or Soviet leaders would be 
prepared to be the first to use nuclear 
weapons. But one cannot be sore. 

Concerns over the scope of damage 
in a nudear war have been magnified 
many times by the realization that an 
atomic war could provoke a “nudear 
winter,” a drastic change in dimate 
that might wipe out mankind, at least 
in the Northern Hemisphere. 

This threat is bound to have come 
to Moscow's attention, and Washing- 
ton dearly is taking it seriously. The 
National Academy of Sciences has 
given a preliminary endorsement to 
the nuclear-winter concept, and a 
Pentagon study concedes that there 
may be something to it, but adds that 
this is no reason to alter strategy. 


live in an extremely dangerous world. 


look gloomily groundward. Each of 
Finland’s past presidents has a me- 
morial, each downcast. The equestri- 
an statue of the great Cari Gustaf 
Mannerhelm, modem Finland's sav- 
ior, stares moodily down. The bear at 
the door of the National Museum 
looks at the ground. Why are they aO 
so depressed? The Finns are a cheer- 
ful people, very different from ihdi 
neighbors ana former rulers, the 
Swedes — among whose many admi- 
rable qualities gaiety cannot be 
counted. The Finns can be gay, hard 


adopted a foreign policy of strict neu- 
trality, meant to reassure Soviet lead- 
era that Finland would defend its 
own territory, and thereby Russia’s, 
even from an intrusion from the 
West At the core of tins policy, de- 
veloped between 1944 and 1947, was 


Negotiations mil continue, if only though their national life has 


because Western governments need The problems with Modi they live 


them to calm their publics and (he are not new. Finland’s relations with 
Russians seek them to divide their Russia will always be a problem be- 


The ’40s and ’50s were 
desperate years. Today, 
Finns aremore open, 
Finland is booming. 


opponents. Some agreements may be cause Finland is where God, in his 
negotiated, but they wfll not signifi- inscrutable wisdom, chose to put it: 
canity change the baric equation. The controlling both sea and land ap- 


military, it seems dear, will always proaches to Le 
stay ahead of the negotiators. burg. In the pa 

I wish greater optimism were posri- was a Russian. | 
ble. It is aoL We have little choice but Swedish crown 


hes to Leningrad, ex-St Peters- 
In the past, even when Finland 
Russian grand duchy, after the 
sh crown bad ceded it to Russia 


that Finland abstained from any 
comment on superpower matters that 
did not directly concern it 
There has recently been a charge 
in the quality of tins neutrality th»t 


dent was Helsinki’s vote in 1983 in 
favor of a United Nations resolution 
condemning the U.S. invasion of 
Grenada. Finland had abstained on 
the UN vote that condemned the So- 
viet invasion of Afghanistan 
These developments have been 
called a departure from the estab- 
lished standards of F innish neutral- 
ity. They clearly reflect the influence 
in Finland of that political moraiism 
that is such a powerful factor in Swe- 
den and Denmark. This is a moraiism 
that often observes a double stan- 
dard. The West tends to be its chief 
taigex, whereas it usually is taken for 
granted that critkdsm of Soviet policy 

will have no desirable effect. • 7' 
There is a further explanation, 
however, for what the Finns now call 
^positive neutrality ” Past policy ex- 
pressed exactly that deep pessimism 
reflected in the public art of the capi- 
tal. The 1940s and ’50s were desper- 


to reconcile ourselves to life under ia 1809, the Finns managed to defend 


^ observers Russia, in a Cold War atmospheric 

SSL™ S? ma - . Toda -V Finns can tfforcl to bfe- 


the nuclear sword. 


their autonomous laws and institu- 


Our only real bope must reside in dons, their separate crown (the czar 
the belief that the leaders of the an- became tiudr grand duke), and their 


dear powers will continue to avoid 
any conflict in which the the use of 


Lutheran religion. 

After World War II (when Fin- 


nudear weapons might be coorid- land, of course, had allied itself with 
ered. The nuclear powers, for all their Germany in order to recover the ter- 


mutual antagonism, have hide t 
estin mutual suicide. 

International Herald Tribune. 


have Hide inter- ritory lost to the Russian invasion of 
- 1939-1940X the Finns managed to 

■aid Tribune. maintain their autonomy. They 


dents are cited. Finland’s govern- 
ment two years ago took a formal 
stand in favor of the total prohibition 
of nudear weapons. TTris was consis- 
tent with Sweden's position, but 
amounted to a criticism of the North 
Atlantic Treaty praaaization doo- 
trme t hat ho lds it is indispensable in 
the deterrence of Soviet attack that 
NATO not renounce the first use of 
nudear weapons. The second met- 


A Bad Wrap? Henry Just Might Have Approved 

By John L. Hess 


LETTER 

No French Water gate 


have more like their Nordic neigh- 
bors, even lecturing the Wiest, Be- 
rause they have a new confidence m 
themselves. They feel good abort 
their future. 

They have reason lor this. FmlmSd 
today is proroering, booming. In re- 
cent years the country has experi- 
enced consistent economic grbwth ai 
a rate of 3 percent or better; with 
nsing employment and f aTlmo mfla- 
uon (6 percent expected this, year, 5 
percon Forecast by the Oigamzation 
for Economic Cooperation and Dfe- 
velopment for 19S6). Irivesfiwrit^s 
high. Since the 1960s, Japan ■& the 
only advanced industrial naribn-'fo 


iS§. 


lerox 


r CU'* 


fake * ' 


•h • 


Houii 


j£itev 
£W)-,u . 


? hi* 






P ARIS — What, one wonders, would Henry IV 
have made of it? There he sits, the evergreen 


1 have made of it? There he shs. the evergreen 
gallant, astride his bronze horse, serenely gazing over 
his bridge— the Pom Ncuf —suddenly wrapped like a 
fancy pared by the artist Christo. One suspects he 
would be more interested in the passing girls and 
would not mind the packaging very much, foe Henry 
was a tolerant man. 

Tolerant? Imagine. Just over his left shoulder stands 
the Louvre, where on the feast of St. Bartholomew in 
1572. saves of his wedding guests, fellow Protestants 
all were massacred. Before him (met stood the old 
Pont Notre Dame, where Parisians pelted his Swiss 
guards with a murderous rain of stones and arrows. 

When Henry passed by in 1594 to be crowned in 
Notre Dame, those same Parisians cheered him, and he 
said, diplomatically, “I do believe these poor peo- 
ple were tyrannized." 

Henry is more famous for saying that “Paris is well 
wonh a Mass.” The French have long since forgiven 
this apparent frivolity. 

Actually, he aigured Protestantism twice. Hie first 
time he did so it was to avoid the fate of the other 
Protestant nobles on die feast of Sl Bartholomew. 
Then he slipped out of Paris to lead the Protestant 


off until he attended that Mass five yea 
With the Edict of Nantes in 1598, Hei 
France a rare interim of religious tolerance, 
ordered a grand program of useful enpn e erin 


including the completion of the Pont Neuf. _ _ 
Opened m 1607. 29 years after wort: be gan 

Interestingly, Henry quashed plans to build mer- 
chant bouring on the bridge, objecting that it would 
block his view from the Louvre palace. It took nearly 
two centuries more for esthetes to raze the similm 
buildings on the bridge upstream, resulting in the 
present grand riverscape: 

I doubt Henry would have been terribly shocked to 
see his bridge in a shroud. He could hardly have 
foreseen an age when packaging would be everything; 
contents nothing. But m his lifetime the bridge and the 
adjoining Place Danphine were a court of mirades 


tolerance. He also zI?l?f 1 ?. Ua r c ' evasi<)11 charge. That ^ ■ 

ESS 


of individual wealth —higher 
m Britain. The Firms boast 'thht 
have become the Japan 


a ■ 010 n °t so it his Zjc ^ K reflected mtbecoub- 

£5*3*. A,n ®“ a “ people finally foreign policy. This is a 

not of weakness, ffied. 
a troubling question for the fotureis 


jfe 




[JtyKus- 

tfceRos- 


SBbtTS of -wiw* for S. b “‘ ““ rcv ®*-How Re*- 
rrimoc r k®* ao previous react. as the contrasts wider 

2™5, '°L, whKl > to atontThe betw “ tharo^ tSSocooo- 
■JSrieSSF 1 * a ^. 1 ^ 01 'oolting for a ■“*. retrograde sodety rjuMfee ■ 

i5lE! no to “pale their and dynamism of -the five 


forces in victorious resistance. By 1589 be had inherit- 
ed the throne, but die Catholic League bdd him 


He has, in short, seen worse. Hisamdusios might ^ ^ To mfer tl*: higMevW!^ made up 

wmething like that of a famous maltre (Tbdid oT the could dislodge a president m ae 

BeDe Epoque who, when asked why he practiced flam- f ■■ ^dnSgtonV^^ tE* 

beang, replied: “It pleases the clientele, and it doesn’t % Program? 

hurt the food very much.” Fan, ” Sept. 27) is m m £Ly2 ama " Russia ’ m 

7 or at least ro ^ry, Understood in Estonia. R®- 

The writer, a former foreign correspondent, a now a The Greenpeace larly S visiuS^ 

commentator for Channel 5 in Hew York He contributed 1 <>4e the FrooSpresujJ? 11 001 ^ oflmiakh^K 1 °^&?SSS 

Otis comment to the International Herald Tribune. tZ~ CQL dinnr^ii ***8® tou**®* ot te- 

JAY HFNderson. Russraus ou tour parties^Jt , 

" Hong Konp mn st make (hear think. ' .v:’** 


•r-W'-i 

g 


The writer, a former foreign correspondent, is now a 
commentator for Channel 5 in New York. Recontributed 
this comment to the International Herald Tribune. 


lods^theS^ ^ ^ not di rp. y^ted not o&f by Sowet. 
ioage the Frendi president. officials but fav T 


m:? 

: I?;. 


JAY HENDERSON 
Hon 8Kong. 


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October 4, 198$ 


WEEKEND 


Page 7 



ers 




AR1S — That Parisians are very cos- 
ttaty is hardly news. Pleased with 
themselves for being Parisian, they 
. .nonetheless use the word parisUn- 
Isme to.deaote a sort of factitious sophistic*- 
non. Urbane, they detest city slictos.- In- 
stead of skyscrapers and Mk Pei's pyranjkL. 
they chensh for their vfflage^ike atmosphere 

Mary Blume v ; 


A m * 7 Vtt U-ls 
dotext Vuiwhfa 


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n No Lons 


small squares Eke the Place Dauphihe. Even 
.families who have lived here for generations - 
are nostalgic for their. rural roots. 

. So it can only come as good news «1i»t 
even the most dynamic Parisian ex ecu tives 
may soon h a n g on. their glassy office doors- 
that most sympathetic of sjgn^ “Gone Fi- 
shin’ In the once-pcJliited: Sang, the fish 
are bitting again and fly B«h«rrna n j>iy. head 2 
ing for trout-stocked lakes in the Boas de 
Boulogne. 

. , Last week at the fourth Salon de Ja P&fce 
de Loisir, an international trade show for 
fishing tackle manufacturers, there were the 
usual displays of rods and reds, dry flics, wet 
flies, streamers and nymphs, waders and 
creels. There was also a display stand for. 
APNLE (T Association, des Pficheurs de 
NemUy-Levallois et Environs), a group that " 
has pioneered trout fishing in the Bois. 

APNLE is headed by a massive* blushing 
aea “ ‘ 


’-pompier named Edouard AmtiiaO 
who is based in a landlocked Paris firehouse 
but who dreams of the trout in his native 
Pyrenees. Almost smgle-handeti, he has.orr 
ganized the stocking of six lakes in the Bois 
de Boulogne, as well as fly fislmig lessons for 
members of his group and jolly meetings 
where Pari sians can tell each other about the 
one that got away. On AFNLE’s display 
stand was a huge stuffed caip-caught in the 
Bois. It wdghed 27 kilos (59.5 pounds). .. 

Another stand at the showbdonged to the 
fishing magazine “Lc PScheur de France^* 

. winch has in the its current issue a splendid 
article, “Take the Mfctro to go Fishing.” It 
was written by Mkhel Drn nThin le — who 
also covered urban an g lin g for Le Monde ; — 
with photographs by an ardent native Pari- 
. sien angler, Jean-Qaude DuforaL Both men 
■are in their 30s. . _ 

The Seine is a lot cleaner than it once was 
- and fish are rising to the bait The older 
generation of fishermen with their longbam- 
boo rods has died out and younger Parisians 
do not yet know of the pleasures in store: At 
the moment, Duforax reckons, there are only - 
200 anglers in central Paris. It is, so far, a 
sport devoid of snobbery- — popular -mid •. 
very easy-going. * . 

“The quality of the Seine was . deplorable 
from 1968 to *78, and 1973 was the most 
polluted year of ah,” EhouDriole atirf- “That * 
was sudi a bad year that dungs could only 
get better, and they have. 1 " . • :> . ■ 

Of course the passerby (the Paris angJer 
who seeks peace may as unhang iqaferod) ' 
always ask the Qshomen if;they cat the^r 
catch. Duforat's answer is always the, same. : 

“Sure, and I don't need to grease foe pan 
because they are so oily.” In fact the quality 
can be so good that some angers are thought 
to be professional restaurateurs cutting 
down on fishmongers’ MIL . 

“Fishing is Paris is very difficult, very 
chancey — a 3- or 4-kflo carp can get across 
the Seine in no tune at aH,” Droulfiok said: 


^ou can get 20 ltiloa a day or DOthicg at 

Isn't that the usual angler’s l amen t? 

“Yes, but Paris is particularly tricky, and 
Paris is particularly falLof fish.” 

The most common catches, rubber tires 
and old boots arider^are garden, or roach, 
.which is fried when -small and baked when 
large: arbelette, which translates into the 
Ttnfwtunate: name of^ "bleak; sandre, vdrich 
doesn't seem 1 o translate at all; and the 
ua^onal pd» ; und peniL Fishing is al- 
lowed all year eucept for a brief dosed sea- 
son- on pike,- .tad 'the simplest tackle will 
-.suffice, •.'£ -• & 

The two-Tbest ^jols for dty fiyhftig are 
piobably'-the AH&e des Cygnes; below the 
rppEcaofyflie -Statue of liberty on the Pont 
. de Grcoc33c, aixi the bank of the Be St, Louis 
betwcca- the Pout Louis FhiHppe and die 
islan^wesuan tip. 

'^Hwcarp off the lie Sl Louis are especial- 
ly Kvdy DrouUucde said, “and for some 
rc®b& riiey -always follow the mme route, 
stiaituig from the bank, swimming to the 
- Pout Loms-Phifope, and . then taH-ng the 
tfia^onal to thoitdtd de Ville.” 

":‘!*^The carp at the He Si Louis are very 
Duforat: 



jy—rz** said. “A three-pounder has 

- as XDiuch fight as a ten-pound trouL” 

Mother good spot is next -to the 
outdoor swimming pool, ^the Piscine 
Ddigny. The lcmg^cpalar Canal SL 

■ blocked ofiTbutmitsbo ttom^ri: ecrevisses 
amhicames ea ger to swallow a hook baited 
with potatcrOT carroL (A French company 
dial ^ecializes in powdered ground bait to 
be spxmkled on the water's surface — flavors 
. indpde couscous, bariey and coconut — 
recpcouriends a mixture called Magic Sensass 
for . Paris, but onfinary maggots or earth- 
W^ns are sufficient and can be found more 

-: "The left hank of the fie.St Louis is too 
nassy for pleasant fishing. The lie de la Citi 
offers Notre Dame but nothing special in the 
way , of fish. The Pont de la Concorde is one 
of the rare spots where one can find tanche, a 
fish the Larousse Gastronomique describes 

as.delicate when it does not taste of mud. 


Duforat said it was not rare to catch 20 
Irilos of fish within four hours. “In that case, 
I take them out of the water. I look at them. I 
photograph them. And then I put them back 
m the water. I might keep one for dinner, but 
not the biggest because mat is rarely the best 
one to eau” 

He is skillful enough to have entered trout 
fishing competitions in the Bois de Bou- 
logne, but be does not believe in such con- 
tests. “They are too serious. Fishing is seri- 
ous, but one mustn’t take oneself seriously.” 

The organizer of the trout competition, 
Edouard Annirail of APNLE, said the lakes 
in the Bois always contained 800 to 1,000 
trout these days. “We add about 200 kilos a 
month,” he said, “and they range in size 
from 300 grams to 8 kilos." 

The next big competition, Ocl 13 at the 
Lac du Reservoir near the Grande rascade, 
is expected to attract 120 contestants, in- 
cluding some from England. a British 
fly-tier, who was showing off his craft at the 
fishing tackle trade show, “Anyone mad 
enough to go trout fishing in the Bois is mad 
enough to buy one of our flies to fish there.” 

Hie pragmatic Englishman was not reck- 
oning with the special dreaminess of Pari- 
sians. “We would Eke to thmk of people 
coming homc from their offices, picking up 
their fishing gear and just dropping a line for 
an hour or so. What relaxation, what es- 
cape;” Edouard Annirail said. 

. “It was a crazy dream at the be ginning , ** 
he added. “But sometimes crazy dre ams 
work.” They do: Although Paris-based, his is 
■the biggest fly-fishing club in Franc?. 

Armirafl and his fellow fishermen are 
probably reflecting a collective nostalgia of 
the sort that inspired a prefect of police 
nearly 20 years ago to declare hunting season 
open in Paris. 

When a city councilman objected that 
hunting was illegal in Paris, the prefect, 
Maurice Grimaud, poetically replied: 

“The prefect of police did not wish to 
deprive Parisians of dreams so badly needed 
in urban settings. He liked to think that 
because the season was open, more than one 
Parisian might go to work of a morning a 
little less morosely, dreaming, as be passed 
building sites, of open land and forest trails, 
and mistaking for a friendly gamekeeper the 
first traffic cop he meets.” ■ 



Waiting for a nibble behind Notre Dame. 


AutOoiKb Dufcaof - 


Political David Hare, Leader 
Of the Angry Younger Men 


by Mel Gussow 


N 


EW YORK — For a playwright, 
the moment of artistic self-identi- 
fication can come with his first 
produced play, or, perhaps, with 
an early effort. In David Hare's case, the 
turning point occurred with his third full- 
length play, “Knuckle;" a convoluted mys- 
tery dealing with corruption. 

The dicums lances of the play are charac- 
teristic of the author's unorthodox career; 
After finishing it, he showed it <o his agent, 
who rgecied it Hare then gave it to another 
agent, who loved it. “Knuckle” was optioned 
by a major commercial producer and pre- 
sented on London's West End in a 1974 
production starring Edward Fox and a Ca- 
nadian actress named Kate Nelli gan. Hare, 
largely known as a promising playwright- 
director in the alternative theater, was con- 
vinced that the play would be a success. 

As it turned out, the reviews were general- 
ly negative and the audiences nonexistent In 
a day. the playwright went from elation to 
depression. The play ran, however, and peo- 
ple began discovering it. Some stormed out 
of the theater in outrage, others returned to 
see the play again. What gave Hare confi- 
dence was the knowledge that he could evoke 
passion in people. “Knuckle” confirmed his 
hope to be a playwright, and it branded him 
as controversial. In the 1 1 years since, he and 
his work have been surrounded by what he 
refers to, melodramatically but accurately, 
as a “swirl of passion.” 

All of his plays — including “Plenty," the 
film version of which recently opened; “A 
Map of the World,” which opened this week 
aL the Public Theater in New York; and 
“Pravda,” the Fleet Street comedy written in 
collaboration with Howard Bremen — as 
well as his movies and television films have 
provoked similar reactions, polarizing audi- 
ences and critics. 

That Hare is a playwright with a political 
consciousness — at 38, the most prominent 
of a second wave of Angry Young Men — 
only deepens the controversy. At issue in his 
work are such subjects as the collapse of the 
British empire, the debilitating effects of the 
class system, the myths of patriotism, the 
loss of personal freedom. Peter Hall, artistic 
director of London’s National Theatre, who 
produces Hare's plays, calls him “one of the 
great disturbers" — a disturber of the theat- 
rical peace. 

K NOWING Hare only from his work, 
one would expect to meet someone 
abrasive instead of the polite, gen- 
teel person he is. Not until a recent lunch in 
New York did I become aware of the depths 
of his reserve. With a suspicious glance at my 
tape recorder he said, “My girlfriend said the 
other day, ‘If people who think of you as a 
well-known playwright only knew how much 
of your time is spent cowering in doorways 
in order to avoid meeting people you’re too 
shy to speak to — *" 

Referring to Joseph Heller’s novel “Some- 
thing Happened,” Hare explained: “Some 
people give other people ‘the whammy.’ 



David Hare 


Camera Piau 


Heller says it has nothing to do with power, 
sex or position. It's just that in some people's 
presence, other people can't make sentences. 
They talk gibberish. That's me.” 

Having watched him direct actors in re- 
hearsal and heard him mimic some of his 
contemporaries, I suggested that perhaps he 
had a latent talent for acting. He seemed 
horrified at the ihoughL “I can’t act,'’ he said 
flatly. “Acting involves access to your feel- 
ings. I can’t summon up a feeling without 
becoming self-conscious." 

Despite his shyness, he can be extremely 
articulate. Probably those who give him the 
whammy do not know il The impression he 
gives is one of cool aplomb, and with friends 
he warms up and becomes expansive. 

In public terms, Hare's breakthrough 
came with “Plenty," a play that reflected ms 
youthful obsession with World War II. 
Hare's heroine, Susan Traherne (played in 
London and New York by Nelli gan and in 
the film version by Meryl Streep), works 
with the French Resistance. She is bitterly 
disillusioned with her postwar life, a period 
paralleled by the decline of Britain as a 
world power. The play ends with a flash- 
back, Susan on Armistice Day, in a field in 
France, embracing her life to come with the 
vow, “There will be days and days and days 
like this." 

• Hare’s later collaborator. Brenton. said in 
admiration: “That line is bony with an al- 
most tragic weight. You’re thinking, 'Indeed, 
Susan, there will be days and days Eke that 
— and you’re not going to have any of 
them.’"’ 

When “Plenty" opened at the National 
Theatre, the reviews were discouraging. 
Stubbornly. Hall kept the play in the reper- 


tory until, slowly, it gathered an audience 
and critical respecL Four seasons later. 
“Plenty” went to Broadway and was an 
immediate, though controversial, success. 

For a time after “Plenty.” Hare was at a 
loss for a subjecL Then, on the way home 
from Australia, he stopped in Bombay and 
his mind was bombarded with images of the 
Third World. The result was "A Map of the 
World." which views the entire Third World 
through a UNESCO conference whose prin- 
cipal speaker is a character named Victor 
Mehta, an esteemed Indian novelist who in 
the course of the play is pressured to recant 
political positions. Mehta, played in New 
York, as at the National, by Roshan Seth 
(Nehru in the movie “Gandhi”), is deeply 
conservative, politically the opposite of 
Hare. Yet Mehta's arguments are presented 
with so much wit and charm as to convince 
anyone unfamiliar with Hare that he is 
meant to be the playwright's spokesman. 

I N London, Anthony Hopkins won ac- 
claim as Hare and Benton’s character 
Lambert Le Roux, a diabolical pirate, 
most of whose vic tims deserve to walk the 
plank. He is the dark soul of “Pravda,” a 
composite comic portrait of Fleet Street ty- 
coons. Lambert makes an art of soul steal- 
ing. After seeing “Pravda,” the novelist Phil- 
ip Roth sent Hare a letter saying that the 
playwright's major talent was obviously for 
the Satanic and the mali gn. “That certainly 
gave me pause,” Hare said. 

“Pravda" was Bren ton’s idea, proposed 
last year as a subject loo large for one of 
them to handle alone. Though each writes 
his plays with painstaking slowness — Hare 
in longhand in his London study — they did 
“Pravda" in a flurry, eight months from first 
word to opening nighL 
Besides the sinister Le Roux, there are 
various hypocrites, frauds and fools on 
stage, in the government as well as in the 
press, including a drama critic who sleeps 
under the copy desk and a rising young 
journalist who offers a moral justificaiion 
for a newspaper’s not admitting its mistakes. 
People trust a newspaper, he says, and to 
print a correction is “a kind of betrayal. Jt's a 
matter — finally — of journalistic ethics.” 

Though the play is a collaboration, it is 
right in line with Hare's insistence that plays 
should respond to their times. For him. be- 
ing a political playwright comes with the 
national territory — and his major theme is 
“the cost of Evi’ng lies” and the price one 
pays for “deciding not to live lies.” 

One of the many paradoxes of Hare's life 
is that, while remaining true to his politics, 
he has become an insider, sending his mes- 
sages out from major platforms, beginning 
with the National, where he is an associate 
director as well as playwrighL As a con- 
firmed leftist, he could be regarded as a mole 
in residence — except that he is a mole 
welcomed by the man in charge. Hall, who 
seems to regard him as a kind of house 
dissidenL 

Hare sees no contradiction in his presence 
there. “In England," he said, “subsidized 

Continued on page 9 



Art Recalled in 100th Anniversary Year 


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by Thomas Quinn Curtiss 


E RICH yon Stroheim died in 1957, known ld youD- 
ger moviegoers chiefly as the defeated film direc- 
tor turned former star's valet in “Sunset Boule- 
vard,” .and remembered by .strivivuig studio 
bosses for his insane mastence on realism and his generous 
.spending of their money: 

•’ As a pioneer, together with, D.W. Griffith and. Charlie 
Chaplin, he raised American cinema from me chani cal me- 
diocrity to an art form. This year is the cenleanial of his 
birth, and his contribution is bang rediscoverei A program 
. of films be directed found rcqxmsive audiences in Los 
Angeles, and a newly edited version oThu unfinished film 
[ “Queen Kelly," which he wrote and directed, for Gloria 
Swanson at the request of -Joseph P: Kennedy, wasjrecently 
released. ",:1. f 

’ A legend of Hollywood’ s golden age. Stroheim tote from 
the ranks of extras to command some of the most a x n a ang . 
.and original projects in cinema history. Once he plotted a 
coup to occupy. Universal City with troops and take-over its 
management. He abandoned the plan on his wife’s advice: 
.‘They don’t do such thing s in America." . 

Ben Hechi referred-to him as “the wild man qf.jnqvie^ 
land." For Sergei Fjwwtgm he was the director. Louis B. 
Mayer disliked him for his low opinion of Mayer’s mental- 
ity and bis cynical- remarks about women. 

He was born Sq>L 22; 1885, in Vienna. His accoontof his 
background has been questioned; the enobling “yon’* in his 
n ame may have been nis own addition. He is said nyhave 


been educated in a military academy and to have served as a 
lieutenant in the imperial army. 

In abom 1909 he left Austria to cry his luck in the United 
States, where he wrote for a local German daily, did a hitch 
in the National Guard, sang ballads in beer halls. As a 
traveling salesman for a dress company he reached San 
Frandsco in 1912. In California he worked as a railroad 
section hand, as a forest warden and as a lifeguard at a Lake 
. Tahoe hotel IBs cavalry training brought him a job as a 
riding master and he arrived in Los Angeles in charge of a 
carload of horses. 

H OLLYWOOD was already a center of filmmaking 
in 1914- This j ack-of-all- trades Austrian decided to 
try acting. After long waits in the extra pools, he 
made his screen debut as a black Confederate soldier who 
falls from a roof when pierced by a Yankee bullet in “The 
Birth of a Nation.” D.w. Griffith, Douglas Fairbanks and 
others engaged him as an assistant and part-time player, 
giving him a chance to study the new-fangled medium's 
techniques thoroughly. 

When the United States entered World War L Stroheim’s 
accent, sinister scowl, monocle and military manner might, 
have led to his arrest; instead they contributed to his 
cinematic progress: He was cast as a dastardly Hun in 
propaganda films. Billed as The Man You Love to Hate," 
be was seen seeking to seduce Red Cross nurses, throwing 
babies out of windows and ordering Belgian peasants exe- 
cuted by firing squad. 

Carl Laemmle, the German-bom founder of Universal 
Pictures, visited the scene of this villainy and congratulated 


Strohdm on his realistic acting; Stroheim begged a private 
audience, sold Laemmle a script he had written, won 
permission to direct it and secured the leading role, that of 
an Austrian doctor on furlough in the Tyrol who makes a 
fatal play for the wife of a visiting doctor. 

He bad titled it The Pinnacle," but Laemmle said: 
“People will confuse it with ‘pinochle.’ We'll sell it as ‘Blind 
Husbands.' There are more of them than pinnacles.” 

“Blind Husbands" struck gold. It was different, a bit 
shocking, expertly acted and directed, introducing a fresh 
style. It established Strohdm as a leading filmmaker. 

Laemmle was delighted with his find, who without delay 
delivered The Devil’s Passkey,” set in Paris after the 
Armistice. Stroheim wrote and directed but did not act in it. 

He then designed a glittering spectacle of high life in 
Monte Carlo, with the central role written for himself: an 
imposter preying on idle rich women. Entitled “Foolish 
Wives.” it was advertised as the first million-dollar movie, 
and the “S” in his name was a dollar sign. 

During its filming, trouble began to brew. The produc- 
tion required almost a year to complete and the wriier- 
direc tor-star had a habit of adding scenes to his script. He 
refrained from this only when his cameras and lights were 
taken away from him. The miles of film be had shot were 
given to others to edit, which angered him greatly. Nonethe- 
less, the venture was a huge commercial success, with 
complaints about its immorality bringing long lines to the 
box offices. 

Another lavish spectacle seemed in order, so Stroheim 
wrote “Merry-Go-Round,” set in Vienna before and after 
the war. He had Vienna's streets, palaces and playground 


re-created and Emperor Franz Josefs golden carriage pur- 
chased for a parade tableau. 

A young Universal executive, Irving Thalberg, viewed 
these expensive preparations with misgiving. He had anoth- 
er actor take the role Stroheim had written for himself; 
then, after several weeks of shooting. Thalberg replaced 
Stroheim with a studio hack as director — a high-handed 
move that shocked Hollywood, for it meant that studio 
executives would henceforth be in actual command of 
filmmaking. 

Other studios, however, were eager for Stroheim's ser- 
vices. The Goldwyn company signed him at once and left 
the subject matter to him. He chose Frank Norris's 1899 
novel “McTeague,” a Zolaesque tragedy of the San Francis- 
co slums — and filmed it not in a studio but in the mean 
districts of the dty and in Death Valley, site of the novel's 
finale. Six months later he delivered his masterpiece, named 
after the novel's theme: “Greed." 

Meanwhile, though. Goldwyn had merged with Metro to 
form MGM. Stroheim's bosses were now Louis B. Mayer 
and his old nemesis Thalbetg, who had joined MGM as 
manager of production. 

“Greed’s" 42 reds required seven hours of projection, 
which Stroheim proposed splitting into two showings. 
Mayer and Thalberg rejected this suggestion and a shorter 
compromise, butchering the film down to 10 reels. Even in 
this form, however, it retains its majestic sweep of destiny 
and its dramatic impact. 

Before he could terminate his assoaation with MGM. 



Continued on page 9 Erich von Stroheim 


The Attoocned fwii 



New Notes on the Minimalis t. Aesthetic 


by John Rockwell 


N EW YORK — The founding trio of minimalist 
composers — Terry Riley, Steve Reich and Philip 
Glass —have long resented being grouped together, 
Reich has been particularly bitter about what he 
feds to be a dinumshmeot of his individuality. Yet the group- 
ing, especially the pairing of Reich and Glass, continues, and 
not just by critics. It is perpetuated by the record companies, 
which have poured new releases by aD three onto the market 
recently. One company. Nonesuch, almost simultaneously came 
forth with recordings by Glass and Reich. 

Despiie wounded egos, the grouping continues to make sense. 
The three share an overall meditative, repetitive aesthetic, one 
that rewards concentrated attention to subtly shifting configu- 
rations of reduced materials. Their very differences, ever more 
overt over the past two decades, do not so much invalidate the 
grouping as cast fascinating new light on what they still share. 

The most noteworthy of the new record releases from this 
trini ty — albeit an unfortunately flawed album — is Glass's 
three-LP “Satyagraha.” The release is noteworthy because this. 
Glass’s first opera for conventional forces (completed in 1980, 
following “Einstein on the Beach” for deciric ensemble and 
untrained voices, and preceding “Akhnalsn") is one of his finest 
worts. 

- The subject is the young Gandhi in South Africa, as he 
crystallized the philosophy of nonviolence that was later to help 


free and unify India and to prove so powerful a weapon in the 
American civil rights struggles of the 1960s. The text is drawn 
from mythically appropriate passages from the Bhagavad-Gita 
and qreg entirely in Sanskrit. The music, scored for unamplified 
operatic soloists, chorus, strings, winds and electric organ- 
captures with enormous conviction the rapt, meditative quality 
so suited to its subject. 

The CBS recording was made with the New York City Opera, 
which will bring the work into its repertory next fall; it has much 
to recommend it, Douglas Perry is the fine Gandhi, and Oaudia 
Cumming s. Rhonda Liss, Scott Reeve. Robert McFarland and 
Sbeiyl Woods provide satisfying vocal authority in the other 
parts. Chi the whole, the City Opera* chorus and orchestra 
handle the music tidily, too, though without the richness and 
weight brought by the Wurttembeig State Opera in its produc- 
tion in Stuttgart (as seen on a German telecast tape). 

And here we begin to encounter the problems. Overall, this 
recording is too brusque, quick and overwrought to best convey 
the glowing calm of Glass’s music. This is odd, since the 
composer was involved in the choice of performers and in the 
recording process. But the conductor, Christopher Keene, con- 
sistently chooses tempos that are too fast, and shapes the 
ph rasing too bluntly — as he does in so much of the more 
familiar music lie conducts with the City Opera. 

Dennis Russell Davies in Stuttgart, who treated this score as 
if it were a descended of Bruckner's symphonies and of 
Wagner's “Parsifal," has a far more sympathetic insight into its 
secrets. Furthermore, Glass made a few cuts in the third act 
before the first American performance, then sliced away still 


more for the recording, which contributes to the abrupt quality. 

The recording was made like a rock record, with multiple 
overdubbing to achieve the ensemble effect. That might contrib- 
ute to the sense of schematic rigidity in the musicmaking, except 
that Keene’s conducting too often sounds that way in the 
theater. More damaging is the use of reinforcing synthesizers 
and artificial echo. There is nothing wrong with either of these 
techniques — both can be exciting, especially in music con- 
ceived with such umbra! mixing in mind. But here the addition- 
al synthesizer parts lend the loud portions a tubby bass- 
heaviness and a crude, neon-lit brightness. 

It's as if not just Keene but those overseeing the production. 
Kurt Munkacsi and Michael Riesman. distrusted Glass's work 
for conventional classical forces and wanted to reclothe it in 
semi-rock guise. As members of Glass’ ensemble, perhaps they 
miss the punchy electronic intensity of that sound, and have 
thus, consciously or unconsciously, made the “Satyagraha” 
orchestration conform more closely to what they’re used to. 

That all said “Salyagraha” remains a lucid limpid joy for 
anyone susceptible to its charms. This is the only recording the 
work is likely to get for years to come, and it hardly destroys all 
the work’s many beauties 

Also out is Glass' single-disk soundtrack album from Paul 
Schrader's film “Mishima. "Although Schrader cut the film to a 
temporary synthesizer version of the music, be also made the 
inevitable nips, tucks and pads, adapting the music to his needs. 

Continued on page 8 





.?n.7* ?17:: ; fz;.\ v-:-^ 




Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4-. 1985 


Travels Without Donkey 
In France’s Wild Cevennes 


by Joseph Fitehett 

F LORAC, France — A corner of 
France ihai has eluded the national 
passion for domesticating nature is 
the Cevennes, a mountain range in 
southwest France. Its winding river canyons, 
bare mesas and wooded hillsides are un- 
spoiled. Dark slate-roofed hamlets, isolated 
and ageless, are often accessible only by a 
hump-backed stone bridge. 

Tourism in the Cfevennes — sometimes 
considered thin fare compared to the gastro- 
nomic and cultural richness of Provence 
across the Rhone river or the Dordogne to 
the west — offers increasingly varied accom- 
modation and interest. 

A watershed between the Atlantic and the 
Mediterranean, the Cevennes offer contrasts 
(hat are savage by French standards. In 
winter the high plains are lashed by snow- 
filled winds that can bend double a cross- 
country skier. Summer is torrid, searing the 
hilltops and warming even the mountain-fed 
River Tarn on the floor of its winding, wood- 
ed gorge. Seeking pasture, sheep climb to 
cooler air: In the Cevennes are France's last 
drives of sheep on the hoof (not in trucks). 

The people of the Cevennes are the de- 
scendants or stubborn pastoral Protestants 
who fought France's last war of religion. 
Three centuries ago this month. King Louis 
XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes, which had 
provided religious toleration in Catholic 
France. In response, the peasants of the 
Cevennes waged a guerrilla war, keeping 
royal armies at bay for three years. 

A quest for traces of the epic Cevennes 
produced a travel classic by Robert Louis 
Stevenson, who spent 12 days trekking 
through the mountains in 1878 and the next 
year published portions of his journal of the 
trip as Travels with a Donkey in the C£- 
vennes.*' Stevenson, who had been troubled 
by brushes with intolerance in his native 
Scotland, was fascinated by tales of the reli- 
gious fanaticism that led to the Protestant 
revolt in Pont-de-Montvert, near Florae. 

"The head and forefront of the [royal] 
persecution. Francois de Langlade du 
Chayla, was a conscientious person, who 
seems to have been intended by nature to be 
a pirate. A missionary in his youth in China, 
he there suffered martyrdom, was left for 
dead, and only brought back to life by the 
charity of a pariah. Having been a Christian 
martyr, Du Chayla became a Christian per- 
secutor." 

Protestant peasants, led bv “Spirit Si- 
guier. as his companions called him — a 
wool-carder, tall, black-faced and toothless, 
but a man full of prophecy." attacked du 
Chayla's house, overwhelmed his soldiers 
and captured du Chayla. Dragged into the 


TRAVEL 


main square, he was ritually stabbed to 
death by Seguier and each of bus followers. 
Citing tortured relatives, “each gave his blow 
and a reason, then all kneeled and sang 
psalms around the body till the dawn. 
. . . Tis a wild night’s work . . . and it 
seems as if a psalm must always have a sound 
of threatening in that town upon the Tam." 

Some stretch of the Tam should be visited 
by boat A little river tour near Malbne in 
flat-bottomed boat manned by local oars- 
men reveals a mysterious cliff formation in 
its looming beauty. More and more visitors, 
however, are taking to the light, supple fiber- 
glass canoes available all along the river. 

Canoeing the Tam gorge, with its little 
rapids, is usually scarcely more dangerous or 
harder than punting at Oxford, though in 
early spring the swollen, ice-cold river can 
swirl unwary tourists into underwater caves 
in its banks and fatally pin them there. 

We started one afternoon just outside 
Florae and paddled downstream for four 
hours ■ — an easy, scenic trip, on tran sp arent 
mountain water, through tame wilderness. 
Motorboats are banned, so the journey is 
constantly inviting for a swim or picnic. We 
chose a sunny day. on the advice of Freda 
White, whose 1952 book “Three Rivers of 
France" is an indispensable companion to 
Stevenson's journal (and was reissued in 
paperback last year by Faber and Faber). As 
White promised. “Under the sun. the rocks 
show their colors of red, red ochre, amber, 
blue and gray. Without light they dim.” 

C EVENNES meals fit outdoors appe- 
tites. Knowledgable friends sent us to 
one of several local inns whose fare is 
partly supplied by poachers operating in the 
Cevennes National Park. It was an unpre- 
possessing roadside establishment near Ma- 
lfcne, the only public hint of its specialties 
being a cryptic phrase on its sign: “augment- 
ed menu on request" Thai evening ^“aug- 
mentation" was brook trout, which restau- 
rants are not allowed to sell in France. Local 
officials who eat there (and act as protectors) 
report autumn feasts of game. 

Tourist offices in Florae or Aids will pro- 
vide schedules for the Cevennes's increasing- 
ly popular winter attraction: cross-country 
ski treks that take small parties for several 
days across the Causses. a huge plateau di- 
vided by river canyons. Occasional ruins of 
castle outposts are' a reminder that this bar- 
ren country was never able to support a 
town. On special short skies, led by an expe- 
rienced guide, reasonably fit novice skiers 
can manage these treks. 

For hikers or bikers, a detailed 187-kilo- 
meter route through the Cevennes, including 
a good map, may be found in Adam Nicol- 
son’s 1983 “Elf Book of Long Walks in 
France." 





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From Dout* Peg* No. II Uo VoraQt dm hi Chores." photos Donat ftwr*. tact Mote Doramodi 


In the hills of the Cevennes ; sheep are still driven on the hoof. 


From May to mid-October, a favorite ho- 
tel in the Cevennes is the CMteau de la Caze, 
a 1 5 ih -century castle in a bend of the Tam. 
Just outside Malfene, it is well situated for 
excursions on the gorge or over the deserted 
Causses. On a terrace overlooking the river, 
Madame Roux and her daughter serve elab- 
orate versions of the region’s cuisine and a 
memorable selection of bleu des Causses. 
sheep ’s-milk cheese fresh enough to wipe out 
most memories of its belter-known neigh- 
bor, Roquefort Rooms range from 330 
francs ($42) to 400 francs ($50). 

The best gateway to the Cevennes is 
Nimes. so most visitors pass near Anduze, 
the Cevennes village where France's oldest 
pottery operates. The Anduze potters' big 
urns are still made to the design brought 
from Italy by Catherine de MMiris and 


originally used for the o ran gene in Ver- 
sailles. Inexpensive, for handmade urns (less 
than $75 for the largest), they take years to 
weather to the soft reddish hues for which 
they are renowned — and there is a yearlong 
waiting list for the largest size. But the An- 
duze potters refuse to step up their produc- 
tion: “People always seem to be in such a 
hurry," said one, describing what he judged 
to be the extravagance of flying a dozen arcs 
to the United States. Pressed about the story, 
he produced the order form — from Bloom- 
ingdale’s. They wanted us to start exporting 
them,” be said, adding that the potters had 
turned them down: “If you export, you have 
to mark 'Made in France,' and it would be 
silly for us to make a change Eke that after 
doing pots the same way in the same place 
for 350 years." ■ 


While the music fits the action very well. Glass has recast it in 
suite form for the Nonesuch record. 

Since the mid-1970s. Glass' major works have been his 
operas, including “Einstein." In between, he composes all 
manner of lesser efforts, some striking and others rather too 
obviously trivial and formulaic t for example, “The Olympian — 
Lighting of the Torch." his corny anthem for the opening 
Olympic ceremonies, on the Columbia album “The Official 
Music of the XXIII Olympiad Los Angeles 1984."). “Mishima." 
by and large, is one of his belter pieces of such incidental music. 
There is some real color and drama to be heard, and the 
performances — again overseen by Munkacsi and Riesman, 
with the Kronos Quartet playing the string-quartet portions — 
are excellent. 

If the “Satyagraha" set makes that score sound worse than it 
should, the new Nonesuch recording of Reich's “Desert Music" 
portrays the music in a more sympathetic light than the live 
performance at the Brooklyn Academy last year. The perform- 
ers for the concerts and the recording were the same, with 
Michael Tilson Thomas conducting a chorus and members of 
the Brooklyn Philharmonic. 

“The Desert Music" is an ambitious choral setting of poems 


lit Continued from page 7 

by William Carlos Williams that in part seem to articulate a 
minimalist aesthetic and its mystical underpinnings- Last year, 
the score sounded like a slightly stale rehash of many of the 
musical devices (mannerisms?) Reich had conjured up over the 
previous decade. But on this record there is so much real beauty 
(the feathery, floating string passages, for instance), and the 
choral passages seem so much better integrated into the context 
of the whole, that the piece sounds genuinely important 

The real minimalist pioneer was Riley, whose “In C” of 1964 
— a piece in which Reich bad a hand — defined the idea of a 
motorically kinetic, subtly shifting tapestry of sound. 

Since then, Riley’ s career has not developed as flamboyantly 
as those of Reich and Glass. Mostly this is because he retreated 
for many years into the study of classical Indian music, a study 
thai bad serious religious overtones. 

Recently, however, he has begun to emerge on records again 
with music that suggests a real effort to reclaim his status as a 
Western composer while incorporating his absorption in East- 
ern music. TTte Kronos Quartet has issued a rwo-LP Riley 
album on Gramavision-Gravity, “ ‘Cadenza on the Night Plain' 
and Other String Quartets." and the West German Kudcuck 


label has a disk entitled “Songs for '(he 10 Voices of the Two 
Prophets." The string-quartet album lias a somewhat stiff quali- 
ty. as if Riley’s inspiration, which he is accustomed to spinning 
out in fluid solo keyboard improvisations, was constrained by 
the academic formality of the medhu|L But there is a real charm 
to these pieces and the Kronos musicians play them beautifully. 

The Kudcuck record combines purling synthesizer playing 
from Riley (the album title, for all its transcendent overtones, 
also refers to Riley’s Prophet 5 synthesizers) with English lyrics 
sung by the composer in a soft, slightly husky baritone. The 
texts are elliptical and spacey, ana the music is fall of the 
metismatic ornamentation and gentle glow" of the slow introduc- 
tory portion of an Indian raga exposition. Yet the textures of the 
synthesizers, while recalling the harmonium familiar in some 
Indian music, have a distinctly Western flavor, as well 

This may not be a Western compositional statement of the 
magnitude to which Glass and Reich aspire in their major 
scores. But as an honest and unassuming personal example of 
the fusion of India and the West, it speaks from the same 
impulses as “Satyagraha" and has much to offer. ■ 

© 1985 The Nett York Tunes 


A Festival of P eppurs 
In the Basque Country 

. tfEspeleue is at the village’s vrae- 

E SPELETTE, France — AfHg* ^?ed restaurant. Euzkadi. In the lon& 
else in France, the garlands of fiery familY . s tyie dining room of a tradition^ 
red peppers would look out of farmty ^ Qj e center of the village, 

Se Darraldou (Urtib <M™»« 


outside whitewashed farmhouses, 
restaurant hearths and butcher shop win- 

Patrioa Wells 

dows, even serving as the subject of an annu- 
al festival the last Sunday of October. 

All over the Pays Basque, rhephneni d’E- 
spelene shows up fresh as well as dried, green 
as well as red. It is ground and chopped 
pickled and stuffed, appearing in just about 
every dish that will take bold seasoning. 

Young and barely piquant green peppers 
go fresh and whole into omelets or are 
chopped to season the vegetable and egg 
mixture known as piperade. A mild red Span- 
ish variety is filled with a smooth salt-cod 
mixture and baked. The traditional hot red 
pepper, dried and ground, is used as liberally 
as ground black pepper anywhere else. 

The piment cTEspeletie is slender, three to 
four inches long (7.5 to 10 centimeters) and 
hot, but not ultxa-hoL Rather, it is a marvel- 
ously elegant chili pepper with a rich, almost 
sweet piquancy, a neat that does not attack 
the throat or the bade of the palate but offers 
a pleasant, lin gering tingling on the middle 
of the palate and the tongue. 

Hot peppers have been growing in the 
Pays Basque since the days of the Conquista- 
dors, perhaps even since Columbus intro- 
duced hot peppers to Europe^ Although the 
ha 2 y, humid climate is hardly suited to the 
tropics-loving plant, pimau lias played such 
an important role in Basque culture that 
farmers haws managed to breed more than a 
dozen varieties that thrive here. 

In one famous Basque preparation, jam- 
bon de Bayonne, die dried, ground pepper 
serves two purposes: Rubbed into the bone 
of the ham as it cures, the pepper acts as a 
preservative. Whan rubbed on the exterior, 
the rosy red color gives the bam a festive 
look, and adds, if only slightly, to the final 
flavor of the sEoed meat. 

Some scientists suggest that the reason 
people like hot peppers is that, in response to 
a burning tongue, tire brain secretes endor- 
phins, a natural opiate, providing the pleas- 
ant euphoria that can follow a spicy meaL 

Whatever good feeling the chili provides, 
its cultivation derqandK tremendous man- 
power. Until 1983 there was no organized 
Basque pepper industry. Individual farmers 
grew the peppers, dried and ground them for 
their own consumption, and sold anycxcess. 


SSSwand scSambW eggs), fresh pepper- 
omelets and tripoxa. an unusual veal hou: - 
dinTor 5 blood sausage, served with a mildly: 
wjicv dark tomato sauce. ' . ; 

^Tbe most typical dish of the viDage » , 
called m a preparation of ground mfc 
S and fresh cbite. seasoned forte; 
with ground piment d'Espletie. ■ 

During the fall and winter the speaaity to . 
try is sabnis de palombes. a dense, FuIMIa- 
wred stew prepared wrthlocal wfldpigwtu- 
red wine and vegetables. This is a mid dish, 
good for those who are not fond of stroogi- 

Sa &2kSdTs r daily specials include Samr/;' 
dav's saucisse confiie au chou and Sunday 
pot au feu grand mere. Wine choices range 
from the local frouleguy (not a very uttitttr.- 
- ,pp wne) to the more substantial -Spanish . 
Rjraa. All the Biperra cooperative’s products ■ 
cam be purchased at the restaurant to take' 
home. (A selection of Biperra products can-, 
be found in Paris at Fauchon, 26 Place de la 
Madeleine, and at the Coraptoir Ahmentaue. 

I andais et Basco-Beamais, 52 RucMom- .■ 
martre.) For details on this year’s Fete du 
Piment (TEspelette, Oct. 27, contact the co- 
operative. TeL- (59) 29.87.57. 

■ mm/ t HAT may well be the finest pepper 
\)k/ omelet in France is found' in Bay- 
f ? onne at one of the region's most : 
authentic and charmin g bistros, Euskaldiina,' 


Pays Basque <«nr»» the days of the Conquista- m m/ j HAT may well be the finest pepper 
dors, perhaps even since Columbus intro- %TL / omelet in France is found in Bey- 

tf uc eri hot peppers to Europe. Although the ▼ ▼ cone at one of the region's most : 
ha 2 y, humid climate is hardly suited to the auth enti c and charming bistros ^Euskald una, • 
tropics-loving plant, pimau has played such which is Basque for “Basque." This is not 
an important role in Basque culture that only a friendly, relaxed place but a pretty 
farmers have managed to breed more than a one as well: Blue and white gingham- 
dozen varieties that thrive here. cheeked curtains and tablecloths give it a 

In one famous Basque preparation, jam- homey air, as do the copper pots, old Ricard ■ 
bon de Bayonne, the dried, ground pepper carafes and local posters. From the dining., 
serves two purposes: Rubbed into the bone room you can sneak a look at the activity in 
of the ham as it cures, the pepper acts as a the kitchen. 

preservative. Whan rubbed on the exterior. The restaurant is run by the. friendly and 
the rosy red color gives the ham a festive outgoing Arroxa Aguirre. At first sight you 
look, and adds, if only slightly, to the final may thinlc she's a neophyte in the kitchen, 
flavor of the sliced meat. until you find out that this 32-year-old has 

Some scientists suggest that the reason been at it since she was 13, when her mother, 
people like hot peppers is that, in response to Genevitve Muruamendiaraz, tended the 
a burning tongue, the brain secretes endor- stove. 

phins, a natural opiate, providing the pleas- Palm and serious, she runs the small res- 1 
ant euphoria that can follow a spicy meaL taurani almost single-handedly, up early 
Whatever good feeling the chili provides, morn mg to prepare pastries and get 

its cultivation demands tremendous man- most of-the dishes going. She turns the stove 
power. Until 1983 there was no organized [q a ^ngl«t assistant during serving . 

Basque pepper industry. Individual fanners hours tends the tables herself, 
grew the peppers, dried and ground them for pepper omelet — delirious not only 

their own consumption, and sold any excess- for Us fresh, mfld green piments but for its 

A few years back, local restaurateurs 
and. merchants noticed that fewer 

fr< S h SS 1 ^ t ? atE s^j2 a -£ l r ld « 

ber to first- frost. .. fresh wfute tuna from Samt-Jean-de-LiE 

To save- the piment cTEspeleae. farmers smothered m-soft, sweet onions cooked with 
formed a cooperative called Biperra, Basque * or vinegar and topped™* more of 
for piment, or hot pepper. It was through the those fabulous green peppers; ami chipirons, 
cooperative that the dozen varieties devel- a Fencre, tooth-tender squid sliced into loops 
oped by farmers were discovered, since every “d cooked long and slowin the black squid 
fanner saved his seeds from year toyear. ^ farm-fresh sheep s cheese, a brebts 

“Out of those 12, we've selected out the b . om n ^ b - v Bmcous, makes a happy mar- 
four varieties we find the best,” said lion riage with die local red house wine. 
Darraldou, commercial director of the coop- Euzkadi, Rue Prinapale, Espelette, 64250 
erativc. Now they are treating the pepper Cambo-ksrBenns. Tel: (59) 29-91 -88. Closed' 
varieties the way winemakers treat different Monday, Tuesday, and two weeks at the end of 
grape varieties — looking for the blend that February. Mentis at 50, 80, 100 and 115 
produces a ground pepper that is complex francs, including service but not wine. A la 
and most typical of the region. - carte, about- 150 francs a person, including 

This season, 50 fanners will supply the wine and service. Nocredit cards. 
cooperative with about 40 tons of peppers. Euskalduna , 61 Rue Pannecau, 64100 Bay - . 

These will be turned into powder or puree, onne. Teh (59) 59.28.02. Closed Sunday . , 
pickled whole in vinegar, even, blended with nights and Mondays, and Oct. 20-Nov. 4 and 
tomatoes and other spices for a Basque Dec ■ 30-Jan. lO. A la carte, about 125 francs a 


A few years bade, local restaurateurs 
and. merchants noticed that fewer 
and fewer bouses each September 
were decorated with the festoons of drying 
red peppers; fewer farmers were willing to 
devote the long hours to the harvesting, 
stringing, drying and grinding that generally 
kept the family occupied from early Septem- 
ber to first- frost. 

To save- the piment (TEspelette.. farmers 
formed a cooperative called Biperra, Basque 
for piment, or hot pepper. It was through the 
cooperative that the dozen varieties devel- 
oped by farmers were discovered, since every 
fanner saved his seeds from year toyear. ’ 
“Out of those 12, we've selected out the 
four varieties we find the best,” said L£pn 
Darraldou, commercial director of the coop- 
erative. Now they are treating the pepper 
varieties the w ay winemakers treat different 
grape varieties — looking for the blend that 
produces a ground pepper tint is complex 
and most typical of the region. 

This season, 50 fanners will supply the 
cooperative with about 40 tons of peppers. 
These will be turned into powder or puree. 


ketchup known as ketchupade. 

One of the best places to celebrate the 


person, including wine and service. No credit. 
. cards. m. 




VIENNA, Bosendorfer Hall Uei: 
65.66.51). 

RECITALS — OcL 9: Richard Fuller, 
piano ( Bach. Haydn ). 

Oct. 10: Rolf Kohlrausch. piano (De- 
busscy. Beethoven, Brahms;. 
•Konzenhaus (tel: 72.12.1 1 K 
CONCERT — Oct. 6: Vienna Cham- 
ber Orchestra. “Toy Symphony" (Leo- 
pold Mozart). 

•Kunsderhaustiel: 57.96.63;. 
EXHIBITION — To Oct. 6: “Vienna 
1870-1930 Dream and Reality: The 


WEEKEND 


HOLIDAYS 

SAFARI 

OLD-STYLE SAFARI EXPERTS 

19g6 Soeod deconuna ndude 
r-Jew Year <n tienya. A tiovry urfon FJJBiiOn 
U* Kxfch&i Bufrner. A «creshnq ovteBon 
January 1986 1 > Londcw EMO&tt? 
luxury 5ofan m Kenya hostel bw S» Onsmter 
Lever BT. Fefannry 1986 e» London BXXuXL 
SAF ARI C ONSULTANTS LTD. 

S3 Gt-CUCESTS ‘’LACE. LONDON. W]H 3PG 
TeL- 01-66 OJi, Tefe* M SaFaB G 


PORTUGAL 

HOLIDAYS 

see classified 


4 days pheasant shooting. 
Scotland, *3 00-400 bir&dUly. 

Vacancies November. 
Oufctandinc arcmnmodjtioiL 

Major & Co. 

Ksrlew, AberieM). 
PcTtbriure. PHIS 2JE. UK 
TeL- 0887 20S40 Tele*: 7637! 


SHOPS 


PARFUMS 
VENDOME 

9, R ve cfc Cottiglione, 75001 Peris. 
T*).: (1)260 ^3.96. 

perfumm - - scorv« - fancy jewe-'s - 

highdcis ptilli- luxury hair occc-.jorun 

DUTY FREE - 40% - ENGLISH Srox-N 


greatest names of the Viennese fin-de- 
siede." 

•Slaatsopei lid. 53240). 

BALLET — Oct l: “Daphnis and 
Chloe" (Fokine, Ravel). 

OPERA — OcL 6 and 9: “Maria 
Stuarda” (Donizetti). 

OcL 5 and II: “Le Nozze di Figaro" 
(Mozart). 

OcL 10: ‘TannhSuser" (Wagner). 

BELGIUM 


BRUSSELS. Music de Costumes et 
Demelledd: 51 1.27.42). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. l:“Opera 
Costumes from 1959 to the PresenL” 
•Palaisdes Beaux Ansi tel : 512.50.45). 
EXHIBITION —To Dec. 22: “Span- 
ish Splenders and Belgian Villages, 
1500-1700." 

•Mus&es Rovaux des Beaux-Ans de 
Belgiqueftel: 5I3J5.46). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: 
“Goya." 

•Mustes Royaux d'Art et dTiistoire 
del: 733.96.10). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: “Los 
Iberos.” 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


BRAZIL 


SAO PAULO. 18th Biennial Celebra- 
tion del: 572.77.22), 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 15: “Con- 
temporary Art." Borofsky, Dokoupfl, 
EckelL Duane, Senise. 

To Dec 1 5 “Modem Classics.” Ponin- 
ari, SegaJL Malfatti. 

To Dec. 15: “The Apprentice Tourist: 
Photosof the Amazon Region bv Mau- 
reen Bistiliatand Mario de Andrade." 


DENMARK 


HUMLEBAEK, Louisiana Museum 
of Modem Art (lei: 19.07. 19). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. I : “Russian 
Avant-Garde', 1910- 193Q Maleviich, 
Kandenjky. Gontja/ova. 

KLAMPENBORG. Bellevue Theater 
(tcL39.87.87). 

DANCE — - To Qcl 20: The Daflish 
Dance Theater. “The Life of Dance." 

ENGLAND 


BIRMINGHAM. Town Hall (tel: 
236.38.89). 

CONCERT — OcL 8: City of Birming- 
ham Symphony Orchestra. Simon 
Rattle conductor (Beethoven, Sibe- 
lius). 

GLYNDEBOURNL Touring Opera 
(tel; 8IJ24.1 1 >. 


OPERA — Ocl 8 and 10: “Carmen" 
(BizeU. 

Ocl Ocl 9 and 1 1 : “Idomeneo" (Mo- 
zart). 

LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
638.41.41). 

CONCERTS — Oct IO:LondooSym- 
phony Orchestra, Pierre Boulez con- 
ductor, Hanna Schwarz soprano 
(Mahler, Schoenberg). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Ocl 13: "The 
Piano Past and Present" 

To Ocl 20: “Gustav Mahler: The Man 
and the Musician." 

To Nov. 3: “Egyptian Landscapes: 
Weaving from the School of Ramses 
WissaWassef." 

To Nov. 3: “Roderic O’Coner." 

To Nov. 3: “Vera Cunningham and 
Matthew Smith." 

To Nov. 3: “Gwen John." 

JAZZ— Ocl 30: Dave Brnbeck. 
THEATER— To Oct 31 : “Les fLfis^r- 
ables” (Hugo, Musical Adaption: 
Boubil and SchOnbuig). 

•British Museum (tel: 636. 1 5 .55). 
EXHIBITION— To Jan. 1986: “Bud- 
dhism: Art and Faith," 

•London Coliseum (tel: 836 DI.] t). 
OPERA —Ocl 5. 8. 11: “Cosi Fan 
Tutte” (Moran.). 

Oct. 10: “Rigoleuo" (Verdi). 

Oct 9: “Don Carlos” (Verdi). 
•National Portrait Gallery (tel: 

930. 1 5-52). 

EXHIBITION— To Ocl 13: “Charlie 
Chaplin 1859-1977.” 

•Nati onal T heatre ( lel:633. 08.80). 
THEATER — Sept 7-9: "The Enter- 
tainer" (John Osbome). 

Ocl 5 and 10: “The Dutchess of Malfi" 

I John Webster). 

Ocl 8 and 9: “The Real Inspector 
Hound" (Tom Stoppard) and “The 
Critic" (Richard Brinsley Sheridan). 
Ocl 10-12: “A Chorus of Disapprov- 
al" (Alan Ayckbourn). 

•Rova) Opera House (tel: 240.10.66k 
CONCERT — OcL 27: Orchestra of 
the Royal Opera House. Sir Charles 
Mackerras conductor (“Handel’s 
Messiah”). 

OPERA — Ocl 5: “Elisir d’Anwre" 
(Donizetti). 

•Serpentine Gallery ( id: 40260.75). 
EXHIBITION —To Nov. 17: “Land: 
Photographs by Fay Godwin." 

•Tate Gallery (tel: 821. 13. 13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. !0: 
“Pound’s Artists." 

To Dec. 1: “Howard Hodgkin: Prints 
from 1977-1983.” 

•Victoria and Albert Museum del: 
589-63.71). 

EXHIBmoNS —To Ocl 6: “Julia 
Margaret Cameron 1815-1979“ 

To October 22: “Textiles from the 
Well co me GoOectioo: ancient and 


modem lestiles from the Near East 
and Peru." 

Ocl 9- Jan. 19: “Shots of Style: Great 
Fashion Photographs Chosen by Da- 
vid Bailey.” 

To Nov. 17: “Browne Muggs: English 
Brown Salt-Glazed Stoneware." 
STRATFORD- upon-AVON. Royal 
Shakespeare Theatre (tel: 29.56.23). 
THEATER— Ocl 5, 8, 9. 10: “Othel- 
lo" (Shakespeare). - 

Ocl 7: “As You Like It” (Shake- • 
speare). 

Oct. 10: “Troilus and Cressida” 
(Shakespeare). 


FINLAND 

HELSINKI, Finlandia Hall (lei: 
904.04.21). 

JAZZ — Oct. 8: Ella Fitzgerald. 

FRANCE 

DUON, Musee National Maurice 
Magnin del; 67.1 1. 10). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 18: “XLX 
Century French Portraits-" 
MONTPELLIER. Music Fabre deL 

643434). 

EXHIBITION —To Ocl 20: “Miro." 
PARIS. ADAC Gallery (tel: 
2T1.9626). 

EXHIBITION — To Oct. 17: “Isa- 
belle Emmerique. Patricia Giansini. 
Michel Locosl Raphael Levy, Jean- 
Pierre Pignard." 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
277.1233). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: 
"Malta." 

Ocl 100 an. 1 : “Klee el la Musique." 
•Centre Culture! du Meaqne (tel: 
549.1626). 

EXHIBITION — To Ocl 26: “Cinq 
Visions Mexicaines," 

•Fonda lion Anhaudttd: 582.66.77). 
JAZZ — Ocl 1 1 : Simon Hanssen 
Quartet (Cage, Toilet). 

•Galcrie Alain Blonde] (tel: 
278.66.67 L 

EXHIBITION —To Oct. 12: “Entik 
Chambon.” 

•Calerie Andre Pacitli (tel: 
563.75.30i. 

EXHIBITION— ToOcl 31 :“Kara" 
•Galcrie Alain Blondel ttel: 
278.66.67). 

EXHIBITION— ToOcl 12: “Emile 
Cbambon." 

• Galcrie Caroline Corre (tel: 
354^7.67). 

EXHIBITION —To Ocl 26: “Jesa-, 
Claude Biraben." 


•Maison de la Rigioi] Nord Pas-dc- 
Calais (tel: 770^9.62). 

EXHIBITION — Ocl 14-N<w. 13: 
“Tresoredu Noid: Les Musees." 

• Mu&ie d’Art Modern* (tel: 
723.6127). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “Vera 
Srekdy." 

•Music Carna valet (tel:272.2!.13). 
EXHIBITION — To Ocl 27: “Les 
Grands Boulevards de Paris." 
•Musfede b Publicitedel: 246. 13.09). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 4: “His- 
tored'Affiches." 

•Musee des Arts Decoratifs (tel: 
260.32.14). 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 6: “Life: 
1946-1955). 

•Musee du Grand Palais (tel: 
261-54. 10). 

EXHIBITION— ToOcl 13: “Fotre 
Internationale d’Art Con tempo rain." 
To Jan. 6 : “La Gioire de Victor Hugo." 
Ocl 9- Dec. 16: “Sir Joshua Reynolds: 
1723-1792." 

•Music du Louvre (tel: 260.3926). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 6: “Le Brun 
iVetsaHles." 

•New Morning (tel: 52351.41). 

JAZZ — Oct 7 and 8: Richie Cole 
Quartet 

•Opera (td: 74257 JO). 

OPERA — Ocl 7. 9, II: “La vera 
storia" (Berio). 

•Cteira Comique (tel: 298. 12.20). 
CONCERT — Ocl 7: Qoamor .Via 
Nova (Berg). 

•Salle Gaveau (id: 56320 JO). - 
RECITAL — Ocl 7: Teresa Uactma 
piano iCbbpin. Debussy) 

•Th45tre du Rond-Point 
(tclL256.70.80). 

CONCERT —Ocl 6: Qnanetto Bee- 
thoven di Roma (Beethoven. Schu- 
bert). 

DANCE —To Oct 19: Classical Mu- 
sic and Dance of India. 
STRASBOURG. TMiiit Municipal 
(tel: 36.43.41). 

OPERA — OcL 11: “Lohengrin" (R. 
Wagner). 

GERMANY 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

OPERA — OcL 5: “Lucia di Lammer- 
moor (Donizetti), 

Ocl 7: “The Barber of Seville" (Rossi- 
tak 

OcL8;“DcrTrrajbador (Verdi). 

Oct 9: “Das Rbeinaolrl" (Wagner). 
Oct 1 l;“D«Wild3mt2~(Loraing). 
COLOGNE, Oper dcr Stodt (id: 
2125.81). 

OPERA— SeptS and 10: “Turandot" 
(Puccini). 


Ocl6 and 9: “LaGazza Ladra”(Rossi- 

Ocl II: “Lucia di Laxnmermoor" 
(Donizetti). 

FRANKFORT, Cafe Theater (tel: 
77.74JS6). 

THEATER — To Ocl 31: “The 
Homecoming” (Pinter). 


•Oper (td: 25621). 
OPERA— Oct. 6: ‘ 


OPERA —Ocl 6: “Die Zanbcrfl&te" 
(Mozart). 

Ocl 7: “Fiddio" (Beethoven). • 

Ocl 9: “A Masked Ball" (Verdi). 

Ocl 1 1 : “Don Giovanni" (Mozart). 

HAMBURG, Staaisoper (tel: 
35.1535). 

BALLET— Ocl 5.6.9. 11: “Midsum- 
mer’s Night Dream" (Balanchine. 
Menddssohn). 

OPERA — Ocl 5.6, 8:“Die Zsubcr- 
fWle" (Mozart). 

MUNICH. National Theater (tek 
22.13.16). 

BALLET — Ocl 5: "Papdlon" (Of- 
fenbach). 

OPERA — Ocl 6: “Tosca" (Pucdm). 
Ocl 9 and 11: “Moses cod Aaron" 
(SchOnbeig). 

ITALY 

BOLOGNA, Galleria d'Arte Mo- 
dem* (td: 5028.59). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 30: “Luigi 
BerteUi." 

•Teatro Communal e (id: 2Z29.99). 
CONCERTS — Orribes g a del Teatro 
Comunaledi Bologna — O cl 5 and 6: 
Wotdemar Ndssou ocmducior (R_ 
Wagner). 

FLORENCE, Masco Arrhcologko 
(td: 2I3Z70L ' 

EXHIBITION — To Oct 20: "The 
Etruscan Cirilizatioa." 

•Tea&o Cornua ak £ Firenze (id: 
277.92.36) ■ ' 

OPERA — Oct 6 and 9: “Faust" 
(Gounod). 

MILAN. Teatro alia Scale (tel: 
80.9126). 

CONCERTS —Orchestra dd Teatro 
aJkScala—QcL 5: Waiter Wdlcr con- 
ductor. Juri Bashmet violin (Bartok). 
OcL 9-11: Gianandrea Gavscscni con- 
ductor, Viktoria Mullova vioKn (Men- 
delssohn, Bruckner). 

JAP AH 

TOKYO. Scibu Ait Mnsdm (td; 

981.01.11). 

EXHIBITION— To Ocl 13: “Span- 
ish Ptoongs of the 16th and )7thoen- 
tuncs"(H Greco, Vdosqhes). 


NETHERLANDS 

AMSTERDAM, Concengebouw (tel: 
71.83.45). 

CONCERTS — Ocl 5. 7, 8: Nether- 
kuxds PhilharmonicOrchestra, Antoni 
Ros-Marba conductor (Rosrixu. Mo- 
ant). ‘ 

•Rijksmuseum (td: 732\J2\). 
EXHIBITION — Ocl 24-Jan. 26: 
“Spanish Maswre," H Greco, Murillo, 
Velasquez. 

MONACO 

MONTE-CARLO, Galcrie d’Art Mo- 
derns Le Point (td: 50.68. 17). 
EXHIBITION — ToOcl 1 9: “20 Cen- 
tuiy Artists," Bal thus, Magritte, Picas- 

SO. 

25 3Z27L C Princesse Grace (Ml: 
CONCKT — Ocl 6: MoatoCarlo 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Lawrence 
Foster conductor, James Galway flute 
(Tchaikovsky). 

SCOTLAND 

EDINBURGH. National Museum of 

557-3?.50) ieS ° f Scol,and < tel: 
DOOBITiON — To Nov. 3: “I Am 
Come Home: Treasures of Prince 
Charles Ed wan) Stuart," 

33*ufS? W ' Thealre RoyaS ( lc L 

SP AIN 

3179£mV° NA ‘ FesUval (tel: 

CONCERTS — Ocl 7- Orebestre d 

&. I Sl^X“ IKiDaor 

ano^( Menddasoh q, Brahms. Schu- 

mSm™ de! 

WJNCE -Oct 8: DonceTheaier of 

_S**RB 8 JU» 


LAUSANNE, Die Hermitage Foun- 


somsts in the French-speaking Swiss 
Collections.” 

LUGANO. Villa Favorita (tel:' 

EXHTbAiON — To Ocl 15: “4T 
Mastecpieces from the. Museums oT 
Budapest” 

(Pentiums (id: 25 1 .69 JOL 
OPERA — Ocl 5: “Rigoletto” (Ver- 

yee 6: TXc Meistersiziger von NQrri- 


Oo. 9 and Yk “Macbeth” (Verdi). :> 
Ocl 10: ‘T-’Elisu 1 d'Aniore" (Donizet- 
«)- 

WOT EP STATES 

NEW YORK, American Museum df 
of Cameroon.” 

36Z60.00). /' 

OPERA — Ocl 7 and JO: “Tosca^ 
(Pucdm). , 

Ocl 8 and II : “Falstair (Verdi). 

Ocl 9: “Der Rosenkavalier fRi 
Strauss). * 

Mu9eum ^ 

EJOIffimoN —To Jan. 5: “ladiaT : 
*3: “Karl BodmeYs America:? 

SJ5Ba» #f . Mod " n ; a «. 

— To Ocl Ir “KuA’ 

To D ?;' 3: Pho««raph»" 

hjendma, “ 

iS^. ! 

SSJfjW -T oOcl 6 :^' 

Ma,,K: ^ Re ; 
Washington D.cLNauanaL Por-i 

; ^arssss^ 

WALES ^ 


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Davie, Hall te 

i ^ EnghA’String . 

1 xf f ^ 0u s lu< ? f i cow-. 

fl V i ‘ f piano (Mcnddg-j 

9: Hungarian State . 


i.r ^ 


^ anc «afromInduLl.' 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1983 


Page 9 



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by Roger Coflis 


H 


OW can a company cut its travel 
costs about 10 percent, get better 
travel service and make a pretax. 

■ profit of 5 percent or more on 
every travel dollar it spends?. By. going into 
the travel business — not by going it alone 

(this can be costly and hazardous for a com- 
pany that lacks expertise and clout in a 
jungle of airline deab and bulk discounts) 
btn by forming a joint venture with an estab- 
lished travel agency that will, manage arid 
staff an agency on the company^ premises, 
dedicated to its specific travel seeds, in re- 
turn for 50 percent of the profit. 

So far, 20 companies, in cluding hanv^ 
advertising agencies, multinational trading 
and construction finns and a Fleet Street 
newsp^, The Daily Telegraph, are doing - 


Staff of the Phoenix ventures, on the other 
h a n d, have every incentive for saving money 
And providing the best possible service, be- 
cause they serve two masters. “We have an 
organization within the organization which 
we can control," Meet said. ■ 

A director of a major international adver- 
tising agency that formed a joint venture 
with Phoenix three, yiaxs ago said: “What 

started off as a way of tidying tip our admin- 
istration by putting all our travel together in 
the budding and getting a better service has 
been developed into something that is giving 
a real finandal return. Last year we saved 
£25,000 to £30,000 on our travel bill — that’s 
about 12 percent— and made 10 percent on 
pretax profits. We are now thinking of the 
joint venture as p art of our mainstream busi- 
ness." . . 

Harbourae Stephen, managing director of 


lar lines. His joint venture, with its turnover 


Some travel 


just tins through a novel program called the 
Phoenix Travel Partnership, marketed by a 
London-based group. Phoenix Travel. - 

A company with an annual travel budget 
of at least £300,000 ($420,000) enters imoa 
partnership with the holding company of 
Phoenix TraveL A new travel agency is ' 

ventures are 

tion by the International Air Transport As- • 1 

sodanon. Each partner holds 50 percent of TYTOV1 ft 1 Tl & A TP3 I 
the equity. The board consists of executives f iU V 1UllJ D ** M-XsOM. 
from both sides. The managw and staff are • 1 . . 

appointed and trained by Phoenix! Premises, tmflTIP .lfll Tfitlim. 
usually m the company’s building, are rented - - - T • .V*' 1 

to the joint venture. The agency may work 
exclusively as an in-house travel department 
or solicit business from outside For exam- 
ple, The Daily Telegraph, to its surprise and 
delight, has built up an agency with nrmna) 
sales of more than £1 million, only 20 per- 
cent of which is for the newspaper. 

Phoenix is a privately held company with 
revenue of £30 milli on (75 percent of this in 
joint ventures) and pretax profit of about 4 
percent. Profit at some at me joint ventures 
is as high as 10 percent. Michael Lancaster, 

Phoenix's chairman, said the program was so 


successful that “group profit per £1,000 of 
turnover is higher than any of the multiples," 
or major travel agencies, such as Hogg Rob- 
inson, Limn Poly and American Express — 
the last of which, Lancaster claimed, is los- 
ing money on its travel services. 

Competition in the business- travel market 
has become so intense that travel agents woo 
corporate customers with promises erf cost 
savings, improved services, management in- 
formation repents and discounts on air fares 
and hotels. Most agents give extended credit 
to corporate customers — for instance, 45 to 
60 days — even though the agents have to 
pay the airlines by the 15th of the following 
month. Agents routinely give, customers re-, 
bates on their normal 9-percent c ommissio n; 
2 to 3 percent is usual, 6 to 7 percent not 
uncommon. Consequently, agents may be 
earning as little as 1 to 2 percent on turnover. 

The problem is that, however high a dis- 
count you get, you can never be sure the 
agent is choosing the most economic way to 
go. Agents ftwrn “override" commissions bn 
some airlines and routes, which can be as 
high .40 percent.. Apart from -not .passing . 
these on to you, they may be biased' in 
sending someone on a direct flight from 
London to Dar es Salaam instead of a less 
expensive routing through Geneva.. 

Iqbal Meer, general counsel of ITM, a 
5500-million trading conglomerate that has 
joint ventures with Phoenix in London and 
New York, said it was also a question of 
commitment “If I went to the travel agent 
down the road with 12 destinations in Africa 
and asked him to let me have the most cost- 
effective itinerary ’for routing one of our 
executives, he wm probably have to spend 
half a day to work it out Now, whether he’s 
prepared to do that service for the ticket he's 
going to sell me, I have my doubts." 


of £1 million, has pretax profit of 6 to 7 
percent He believes turnover could grow to 
£1.5 million without adding staff. 

AH of Phoenix’s joint ventures benefit 
from the override commissions and bulk 
discounts negotiated by the group. “We hide 
nothing," Lancaster said. The benefit to 
Phoenix is shared costs and the ability to 
open hew ventures without capital risk. The 
parent com p a n y has virtually no overdraft, 
as a condition for the partners is that they 
settle invoices by the 12th erf the month. 
Typically, the company’s computer is direct- 
ly linked with that of its joint venture. 

. Lancaster said a major advantage of the 
program far American companies is that it 
provides a way to tircumvent U.S. regula- 
tions preventing an organization from own- 
ing a travel company unless the corpora- 
tion’s travel business is less than one third of 
the travel company’s turnover. This rule 
does not apply if an overseas subsidiary 
forms' a travel joint venture and sets up an 
office in New York, as ITM and at least one 
major bank have done. Another advantage 
of having a joint venture in New York and 
London is that the two offices can work out 
the best way to ticket international travel. 

. Some joint venture partners use their trav- 
el agencies as a means to transfer, money 
from countries with stringent exchange con- 
trol regulations. This can be done by prepaid 
ticketing and other more arcane methods 
that Phoenix is reluctant to talk about. Some 
companies use their share of the profits to 
give untaxed travel benefits to executives. 
And all employees of joint venture partners 
get a 5-poxsnt'disctiimt on vacation pack- 
ages. 

There is one perk in particular that may 
tempt the most skeptical company into run- 
ning its own travel -agency. As a director, an 
executive qualifies for agency staff rebates 
on air tickets, car rentals and hotel rooms. 
For example, each of JATA’s 60 airlines 
allocates two tickets a year at a 75-percent 
discount to each accredited sales office. 
Non-IATA airlines may be even more gener- 
ous. And many carriers offer free tickets as 
promotions and rewards for a certain vol- 
ume of b usiness . This means that even the 
mostperipateticexecutivecaneiyi^virtual- 
ty free travel anywhere in the world. ■ 


David Hare 


Continued front page 7 


theater is under attack from a right-wing 
government. Let -us, therefore, use the Na- 
tional Theatre to attack that government 
from a nationalized stage.” 

With proroering careers as playwright, di- 
rector and filmmaker. Hare is peripatetic. 
He spent the summer on the run between 
London and New York, redirecting the pro- 
duction of “Pravda" at the National, direct- 
ing “A Map of the World" in New York, 
preparing for the opening of. the movies 
“Wetherby” and “Plenty" and finding time 
to take his three children camping in France. 

Redirecting “Pravda,” Hare led his actors 
through w>aff alterations in dialogue^ occa- 
sionally acting out a sequence ana belying 
his professed lack of ability for performing. 
Hie directorial approach was confidential 
rather than autocratic, yet there was never a 
question about who was. in cha rg e. 

In New York, rehearsals of “A Map of the 
World” were demanding. The production is 
physically complex and there was the addi- 
tional difficulty of getting the American ac- 
tors adjusted to unfamiliar political material 
and a fragmented, cinematic style of story- 
telling. 

One day, rehearsing at the Public Theater, 
Hare — dressed in his customary jeans and 
sneakers, shirtsleeves rolled up — stood in 
the orchestra and led Ins actors slowly 
through their paces, worrying less about 1 the 
lines than about stagecraft. At one point, he 
told Elizabeth McGovern, who has a leading 
role; that he wanted her not to be naturalistic 
but to be in a state of “animated suspen- 
sion.” Both the director and the actress 
smiled at that How do you play “animated 
suspension"? 


With “Map of the World” opening, he can 
now concentrate on other matters, beginning 
with his next movie, “The Butter Mountain,” 
to be filmed in France. In his previous work, 
women have generally acted as a land of 
moral conscience. “The Batter Mountain,” 
he said, will carter around a woman who 
Hare called “absolutely devoid of redeeming 


■ qualities.” Let Philip Roth make of that 
what:he wilL 

Reflecting on his youth. Hare said: “I 
used to. go to the dry dock when my father’s 
ship was being overhauled. I loved those 
ships.” He described what he called the 
‘Tower life" below deck, and the elegance 
above. “As purser, my father had a nightly 
. cocktail party. You still dressed for dinner 
on ships m the 1960s.” 

Years later, in Australia, Hare visited Syd- 
ney Harbor. He recalled: “I was sitting at the 
wharf by a window in a Chinese restaurant. 
It was 9 o'clock at night and suddenly my 
father’s old ship, the S.S. Oriaha, came into 
the harbor and it moved right past the win- 
dow. Its lights were on, and it was just the 
most beautiful sight It was very, very ro- 
mantic." His eyes seem to light up at the 
memory. “Those ships," he said, “were is- 
lands oftimelessness 

Beneath the apparent contradictions of 
Hare, and beyond the political conscious- 
ness, is an idealistic yearning for improve- 
ment, in his own work, in the theater, in 
Britain. The impulse is almost visionary. 
One feds that he is dreaming of the “days 
and days and days” to come. ■ 

Excerpted firm The New York Tones Mag- 
azine. • 


TRAVEL 


Connecticut’s Small Shoreline Towns 


by Nancy Jenkins 


G 


CONNECTICUT may officially be 
part of New England, but there are 
vast stretches from the New York 
border eastward that look suspi- 
ciously like suburbs of New York City. Not 
until you get beyond New Haven docs New 
England really begin. There the population 
starts to thin out, the urban' sprawl swings 
north toward Hartford and the shoreline’s 
towns and villages begin to take on that air 
of huddled concentration around a harbor, a 
river, a white-painted steeple that spells New 
England in earnest. 

with easy access from New York — by car 
along Interstate 95 or on Amtrak’s Boston- 
bound trains, many of which make stops on 
the shoreline — these quietly bustling, hand- 
some little towns have a special appeal. They 
arc full of interest and even a certain easygo- 
ing, rusticated kind of sophistication. 

Guilford, Saybrook, Lyme and Old Lyme, 
Waterford, Groton and Stonington — the 
towns along this stretch of the Connecticut 
shore have their origins largely in the mid- 
17 th century, when disgruntled and adven- 
turous offshoots of the colony of Massachu- 
setts Bay Puritans threaded their way down 
the winding rivers and along the deeply in- 
dented shoreline south of Cape Cod. From 
their earliest beginnings, these were towns 
that made their living from the sea — fishing, 
coastal trading and, for a brief but glorious 
period, whaling. Shipbuilding was the most 
important, industry, the one that made all the 
rest possible. 

The towns still focus on the sea but today 
are apt to be geared toward recreation. 
While Stonington is still a commercial fish- 
ing port of some importance, and the old 
shipbuilding tradition is maintained at Gen- 
eral Dynamics’ Electric Boat Division in 
Groton, this kind of enterprise is limited. 
Yacht clubs and sailboat refurbishers are 
more common than the old shipyards, and 
ship’s chandlers, ropewalks and sail lofts 
have been replaced by hotels, restaurants, 
gift shops and the inevitable condominiums. 

Of all the towns along the shore, none was 
more important in its mid-19th-century hey- 
day than Mystic. The town’s chief chroni- 
cler, Carl G Culler, a founder of the Mystic 
Seaport Museum, said this little town, hardly 
more than a village, produced “more noted 
ea ptains, a greater tonnage of fine ships and 
a larger number of important sailing records 
than any place of its size in the world." 
Cutler estimated that more than 1,000 ves- 



sels, from 30-ton sloops to the 1,679-ton 
Cape Horn clipper David Crockett, had 
been built along the banks of the Mystic 
River over a century’ and a half — an aston- 
ishing record for a town whose population 
rarely exceeded 1,500. 

Much of Mystic's appeal is as a center 
from which to explore the surrounding sea- 
shore and the hills that rise behind the shore. 
Along with the broad stretches of sandy 
beachfront, there are nature preserves with 
well-marked trails, vineyard! cider mills, 
and other, almost equally charming towns 
and villages within easy reach. Fishing boats 
and sailboats can be hired for daylong and 
half-day excursions. 

The star attraction is Mystic Seaport Mu- 
seum, a monument not just to the past of a 
Yankee whaling and shipbuilding town but 
to the maritime history of the United States. 
Begun in 1929 as a local marine historical 
association, the museum is not, as popularly 
believed, a re-creation of the 19th-century 
town of Mystic. Drawn from many sources, 
it is intended to be an idealized New En- 
gland seaport. 

On the nearly 40-acre (16-hectare) site of 
the George Greenman shipyard, one of the 
largest shipbuilding outfits in Connecticut in 
the mid- 19th century, the museum has 60 
buildings, including bousra, shops, industri- 
al and co mm ercial buildings, even the tiny 
Fish town Chapel It also has about 300 his- 
toric craft, including the Charles W. Mor- 
gan, the last of the great Yankee whaling 
ships, buill near New Bedford in 1841; the 
Joseph Conrad, a Danish-built, square- 
rigged training vessel; and the LA. Don ton, 
a Banks fishing schooner built in Essex, 
Massachusetts, in 1921. 


At this time of year, the crowds begin to 
thin and it becomes easier to glimpse what 
life must have been like in a town like Mystic 
ISO years ago. Much of the re-created town 
works: At the print shop, the Liberty clam- 
shell platen press, built in 1880, prims docu- 
ments for the museum; the shipsmilh makes 
ironwoik for rigging the seaport's vessels: at 
the Preservation Shipyard most of the con- 
stant work of restoring and refurbishing goes 
on in full view of the visitor. 

The museum library is a valuable resource 
for researchers and students of maritime 
history as well as for genealogists tracing a 
family connection to New England. The 
Morris and Stanley Rosenfeld collection of 
historic ship and yachting photographs, a 
recent acquisition, should also be of great 
interest once it is cataloged and displayed. 


A! 


rivers go, the Mystic is short It rises 
in a marsh of sedge and cattails, 
. curves under the interstate, broadens 
in a smooth-flowing arc that divides the 
towns of Groton and Stonington, narrows 
again to sweep under the Mystic drawbridge, 
then courses down to the sea at Noank, 
about five miles (eight kilometers) from 
where it began. In good weather, the road to 
Noank — State Route 215 south from West 
Mystic — makes a splendid bicycle tour, 
with plenty of dow nhill runs to complement 
the occasional uphill struggle. 

Mystic offers other attractions. Gravel 
Gift and High Streets, lined with early- and 
mid- 19th century homes of seamen, ship- 
builders and whaling captains, climbing the 
hill to the imposing Union Baptist Church, 
provide a pleasant hour's walk. Farther 
afield, the Denison homestead, another his- 


TW Now Y*V fii-e. 


tone house, is next to the Denison Pequotse- 
pos Nature Center, a 125-acre natural sanc- 
tuary with a number of trails. Including one 
laid out for the blind, complete witb braille 
notices. There are beaches at Noank and at 
adjacent Groton Long Point. 

Five miles from Mystic along highway 
U.S. 1 is Stonington, which for all its atmo- 
sphere of literary and artistic gentility is 
home port for Connecticut’s only remaining 
commercial fishing fleeL A good place to 
begin a walking tour of Stonington is at the 
far end of Water Street, where the Old Light- 
house Museum, an octagonal tower and 
granite building, houses the collection of the 
Stonington Historical Society. 

Stonington's houses are, if anything, bet- 
ter preserved, more numerous and of greater 
interest than Mystic’s, and a stroll along 
Water and Main Streets is a pleasant way to 
occupy an hour or two. There are lots of 
gambrel roofs, lots of Greek Revival details 
and a certain amount of Tara-like pompos- 
ity. Like Nantucket. Edgartown and ihe old 
parts of Newport, which it much resembles. 
Stonington has streets lined with rather large 
houses set closely together and crowding out 
to the edges of their lots. The closeness of it 
all presents a sense that everything is well 
ordered. . . 

Touring vineyards may not be an activity 
usually associated with the Connecticut 
shore, but the Garke Vineyard (id. 203-535- 
0235) on Taugwonk Road, just north of 
Mystic, is a commercial vineyard (chardon- 
nay. pinot noir. nesting, seyval) that wel- 
comes visitors until about the middle of 
October, when volunteers are needed to help 
with the grape harvest. ■ 

« !•» gs The New York Times 


Erich von Stroheim Anniversary 


Continued from page 7 


Stroheim had to direct “The Merry Widow,” 
starring Mae Murray and John Gilbert. He 
revised the operetta libretto into a romantic 
melodrama that delighted gushing fans but 
had sardonic touches that pleased spectators 
of intelligence. Its success helped secure the 
future of MGM. • 

Pat Powers, an independent producer who 
was an old friend and admirer of Stroheim, 
now asked the director ^ do a film for his 
organization. Stroheim had in mind a story 
about Alt Wien starring himself as an Aus- 
trian prince forced to marry for money de- 
spite his love for a girl of the people. In 
essence it was a variation on “Old Heidel- 
berg," but in its treatment “The Wedding 
March" was a study of a great empire in 
decay. 

Again rebuilding Vienna. Stroheim had 37 
magnificent sets constructed, reproducing 
Sl Stephan’s cathedral the Hofburg palace 
and the Graben avenue. After “The Wed- 
ding March” had been before the cameras 
seven months, Powers grew worried and sold 
his holding to Paramount The first half of 
the film has startling strength and pictorial 
splendor, but the second half was mangled 
by clumsy editing into a separate film and 
Stroheim forbade its showing in the United 
States. Seen abroad as “The Honeymoon,” it 
was lost when the only known copy was 
burned in 1957 in a fire at the Gnemathfeque 
in Paris. 

“Queen Kelly,” begun in 1928, had been 
conceived as a silent film. When talking 
pictures seemed certain to replace the silents, 
Kennedy halted production. This action, it 
proved, terminated Stroheim’s career as di- 
rector. He was engaged by Fox to direct a 
talkie, “Walking Down Broadway,” but un- 
comprehending executives withheld it from 
distribution and subsequently destroyed it. 
Stroheim was deemed a dangerous financial 
risk and he was reduced to acting under the 
direction of lesser men. 

In 1936 he was rescued from oblivion by a 
call to act in a French film. His sympathetic 
performance as the German prison camp 
commander in Jean Renoir’s “La Grande 
Illusion” restored him to stardom, and he 
was much in demand. * 

Though none of the major films Stroheim 
directed can be seen as he constructed them, 
all exude a compelling force. As a paragraph 
by a great writer can disclose his style, so 
these remarkable films reveal a dis tic five 
creator. His methods warrant examination. 

Frank Capra tells in his autobiography of 
his disappointment when as a message boy 
be watched Stroheim shooting a short scene 
for “Greed” that Capra concluded he could 
have got through iff a jiffy. Certainly he 
might have registered the scene quickly, but 
to what effect? He mentions the endless 
retakes in work that took most of the night, 
the players on the verge of revolt as they 
were stung by bullying commands — all for 
a simple scene in an office, concerning a 
violent dispute between two men. Bur what 
went into the scene lent it a power that 
survives. 

Stroheim cast a spell over his co-workers. 


as a journalist who visited another “Greed” 
location testified. The company was about to 
rehearse a scene in the tenement house where 
the dim-witted dentist, McTeague, lives with 
his wistful wife, Trina, who hordes the mon- 
ey she has won in a lottery as the two sink 
into poverty. Everyone connected with the 


production spoke of McTeague and Trina as 
people might of neighbors, gossiping about 
their traits and habits. Here is the seed of the 
magic that made these characters real to 
audiences. The art of Stroheim was not so 
much matter-of-fact realism as form of di- 
rect communication. 


“An artist of genius is one who creates 
without imitating, and who draws out of the - 
depths of his own being the least predictable 
part of his work," Rene Gair once wrote. 
“How man y in the history of the cinema fit 
this definition? Whatever their number, 
Erich von Stroheim is at their head.” ■ 


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United Press International 

NEW YORK — Share prices finished mixed 
in active trading on the New York Stock Ex- 
change on Thursday after failing to muster an 
afternoon rally. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 0.56 to 
1,333.11. 

Among the 1 ,980 issues traded, advances out- 
paced declines 7S3-717. 

Volume totaled 127,540.000 shares compared 
with 147.330,000 on Wednesday. 

Traders said stronger- than-expected late Sep- 
tember car sales reports and President Ronald 
Reagan's assertion in Ohio LbaL his tax plan 
would pass in this session of Congress helped 
lift the market in midafiernoon trading. 

But Trude Latimer of Evans & Co. said Lhe 
predominant sentiment turned out to be disap- 
pointment that the market could not follow 
through on Tuesday's advance. She said the 
culprit for that failure Wednesday was the bat- 
tering hospital management stocks received on 
news ihnt hospital utilization rates were still 
declining. But Revlon Inc. was to blame on 
Thursday, she said. 

“Thursday's culprit was Revlon," Ms. Lati- 
mer added. “The hottest sector is the rumor 
stocks and one of the most active and high- 
profile of that group has been Revlon." 

In late activity, Revlon requested a trading 
halt pending an announcement to be made after 
the market closed. Expectations that the cos- 
metics and health care concern was about to 
announce a leveraged buyout cooled the activity 
in Revlon, Ms. Latimer said. That trend spread 
to other rumor stocks and to some blue chip and 
computer related stocks that had started to 
improve, she said. 


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M-l Falls $400 Million 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The basic U.S. money sup- 
ply measurement, M-l. fell $400 milli on m late 
September, the Federal Reserve Board said 
Thursday. The decline had been anticipated 
M- 1 , which represents funds readily available 
for spending, comprises cash in circulation, 
deposits in checking accounts and non-bank 
travelers checks. The aggregate still remains 
well above the upper limits of the growth targets 
set by the Fed in its attempt to stimulate the 
economy without reviving inflation. 


After the market dosed, Revlon said it would 
be acquired by Forstmann & Little Co. in a 
leveraged buyout. Revlon has been trying to 
counter a hostile takeover bid from Pantry 
Pride. 

Revloa declined % to 54. 

Traders said confusion and concern charac- 
terize the market outride of the takeover spot- 
light. "Everybody’s earnings are coming in 
weaker than expected and even though some of 
this has been discounted by the market already, 
the market reacts negatively when the earnings 
are actually announced," said Peter F einman . a 
partner and block trader for Montgomery Secu- 
rities. 

"Since then, investors have been receiving 
very disappointing news on corporate earnings, 
the factor that really drives the stock market,” 
he said. 


12 Month 
h km Lou Sleek 


Sis. Ctow 

DW.Y1BLPE lahHUHLBw OvoLOMK 


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5 Craig 

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33% CvcIops 1.10 2J 


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146 47 
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am 

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43 29 

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32V 23% 
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22% 7% 
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u* n 
28% 21% 
23 V 14% 
50% 41* 
40* 47* 
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34% 22V 
24% 21% 
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12 7% 

S% 2V 
24% 15* 
16 11% 
10 % 2 % 
78* 65% 
14% 6% 
20% 15% 
33% 26* 
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5 4 

5% 4 
<6% VI V 
% 


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’’•I!, . -Sft 


Stfltisticalndex 


AMEX-jprioot ' . P.U . EotiiinBm - - _ 

AMEX BMVKMf P04 g EE? * Z 

-MYSEpriew P.W Gold 22* M 3 ■■' • 

i?- 12 p i • 

cowtfwrtcks P.W MmwivnmDfYPiD 
Currency rales P.ll 0b ^"'™«y p.ib 
commodrtiB p. 74 OTCrtc* pit 
OfyMOTfc P .14 OIW m orft, SSJ 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4. IQS?" - 

TECHNOLOGY 





«mli>S£ribunc, 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 10. 

Page 11 


©ENi ,=r 


rjectronic Imaging Is Seen 
Having Revolutionary Role 

By DAVID & SANGER 

New York TbrmScnice ’ 

N ™B- < ^ f ^f A A? hc ^Jsoniaii Institution’s cav- 

a^jaas;?; 

.miles from the mus«^ !T 

'SSSSSSET** p® 1 ™ 01 computer. Using anScof 
sands of drawings, documents ~ ■ ■ ■ 


Revlon 
■Agrees to 


- ' iv'* •" - 

V U. if }J 

V > M 




: “ . CT^ viuvuuiVUia 

and photographs electronical- 
ly. digitizing the images and 
‘storing them on magnetic and 
Optical disks. 

* “What’s remarkable is that 
. this is more than just a storage 
•and retrieval system,” said 
Robot L. Martella, who is 


It is now possible 
to merge text and 

drawings ona PC 
relatively cheaply. 


$3-BUUon Pact 
With Forstmann 

The Associated Pnst 

NEW YORK — Revlon Inc, the 
cosmetics maker that has been 
fighting a takeover bid by Pantry 
Pride Inc, agreed Thursday to be 
acquired by Forstmann Little & 
Co„ a private investment banking 
firm, for an indicated S3 billion. 

Revlon's senior managers mil 
participate in the Forstmann 
group, a joint announcement said. 

Trading in Revlon stock was sus- 
pended on the New York Stock 



OPEC Talks Fail 
To Find Accord 
On Quota Issue 


JV *ti' * ; M '\~ 

*•* tf-^ v 


v — _ . ^ j v ' 




. . _ « - — o — ; ^ ui lAAiia, ui muuumx 

the i m ag e s into books and reports. 

r Electronic imaging has been around for a while, but until 
recently it has been possible only on very costly enfrmm»r 
systems that only the biggest architectural companies, aerospace 
designers or auto manufacturers could afforeLNow, however, a 
host of products are coming to market that main- it possible to 
■ tuerge text, photographs and drawings on ordinary personal 
‘ computers, often for a few hundred or a few thousan d dollars. 
t The result, many believe, could be. revolutionary, both for the 
publishing industry and for office workers. 

Not surprisingly, more than 90 percent of the data fed into 
personal computers is alphanumeric — text or numbers. But 
' entering a ream of data already printed on paper is laborious. 
.Thus, most of the scanners available for personal computers are . 
. optical character recognition devices, essentially cameras 
that run over a page of text, detiect fight from dark, *iS*n try to 
discern the distinctive shape of each typewritten character 

O NE BY ONE, the scanner translates those shapes into a 
signal sent' to the computer, one that frornthe micro- 
processor’s perspective looks identical to the si gnal re- 
ceived when a typist presses a key on the keyboard. 

Pictures and drawings, however, must be handled differently. 
■Because they can take on an infinite number of shapes and 
shades, they cannot be “recognized” by the computer. So 
processors partition the picture into thousands of pieces, like the 
tiny dots that make up a newspaper photograph. Those dots are 
detected by a light-sensitive semiconductor, which translates 
them in digital form to the computer. Later, the imag e can be 
reassembled dot by dot. 

Storing the data and malting it useful, however, are two 
different things. “W hat’s new far personal computers is the 
application software that panes the images, interprets them, and 
merges them, with the text,” said Rolando Esteverena, president 
of Datacopy Corp., a Mountain View, California, company that 
markets a $4,000 scanning device for a variety of personal 
computers. 

The application software can identify each image, and asso- 
ciate it with a text file. Thus, a personnel file stored in a data-base 
program could display far more than just an employee’s name, 

- address, salary and employment history. It might also bear Ms 
picture, a replica of his signature, and perhaps even a fingerprint - 
— limited only by the resolution of the display screen. 

But as manufacturers of the systems concede, photographs and ■ 
drawings consume enormous amounts of memory. An 8%-by-l 1- 
inch (21 .7-by-28-2-centimeter) photograph could contain from 4 

(Continued <» Page 17, CoL 4) 


Currency Rates 


Cross Bated . Oct 3 

S K DM. FJF. I*J_ GMr. BJF. .**.;• Yw 

Amct trdsa 2JW 4JH9 151725* 34JOS* MM7»‘ £554* 1373* » 0950 y 

1 BnnMlf(a) 517225 . 7&00 2R2W USDS . 1WT • 1U5 34JU 25J»* 

Frankfurt U4SV 170 — 31745* UW* MJ1*. 4«7* 12233* 12I4* 

London (b) 142S3 173*1 TUBS 152200 4.1*70 7530 10« 102X25 

Milan U07J0 £52MS 675X1 HUS SUM ' 3UI BUS UH 

i' How York(c) 07012* 162 OjOI UMXO -IMS 533* 1142 2EMS 

PaO* 10735 1UU 1053 4515 X 27*7*- 15037* 373S2 1771* 

Tokyo 21JJ0 303X5 0073 3M6 11X7* . 71 J* . 3*7Ji* . *RJX 

Zurldi 2.14*5 ‘ 1 11X15 ■ 24745* 07307* 71405* 4X054* 1X033* 

I ECU 0X20 05*13 3XU4 47482 1XHJI 24*15 44X675 1X0M T7U5 

I SDR 1X640 0751** 2X1741 HA 1XKU7 17774 JM#« 23054 2277*4 

' Oodtva in London and Zurich. ObcAwa to amor European cmatun. Now YOrt nw«s at 4 PM. 
fai CammercM franc (hi Amounts Mwdlod to buyenapaund let Xmouif* MKfcd la buy ant 
dollar ft Units of TOO (r) UnHwaflMOM Units of JOOOD HJX: net mtoiwd: ILA. : naf nvaUab/e. 
1=) To bar ooa pouad: SUSXOi, 

Other DoIl*r V«Ioe« 

enmsaev pot UiX Convey w UXi Cwrwtcr Mr USX Comae* PW USX 

Arsen. (nutral 080 Rn. markka £47 Malay.rtoo. 24425 . SKor.woa 89010 

AastraLS 14213 - Qmkdnx. 13035 Mkhr 3*3X0 .iMtaM M230 

; AMtr.scfelL UL44 Haag Koanf 77775 NonMavM 7X45 »— O-k re an 7XB 

Beki.fki.fr. 54X7 • UtaramlUMI HiUmw 1740 TahfMI 4031 

Brazil cm. 7X60M f«do-n»rtali T.T21J0 Fort atM 74*00 ■ MMt 36X45 

i Canadians 1X672 Irtstiz 0X522 Soadlrlval 3X5 Tortdttnro 542S5 

A chkiemyoon 100« IwaoHMek. 1X78X0 Sin#.* . 2135 UAEOIrWmi 14725 
DoHiMkraM 9J82S KswaHl dinar 0X00* SAff.iaad 250 Vaa-Mh. 4445 
Egypt, pound 1X3 
c Sterling: 1X07 irWi c ■ 

iot»x»5; Bonoue du Bonofux (BrunvtiJ; Banco ComrrmrMe Itoffcma (MOan); Banouo No- 
tomato de Pvrts (Parts); Son* of Tokro (Tokyo); IMF t SDK I; BAH fdktor, rfyot dMvmJ. 
Other data tram Rautonand AP. 


Interest Rales 


Knroenm»Bcy Bepari tx Oct 3 

Swiss muca:' 

Donor D-Mark Franc Stortlag fuk *Cu SDR. 

1 month 7M 4M«. 4h*4N 11 W-ll w. 91WCI. BVt-m* 7% 

.2tnonttU> 8-8 W» 4VMW 11V11W. lBlh-Uh. -XIMH TV. 

J u ft prMM IMH 4VfH . AMR : 11 Wlh )Db-WH 1 ISrlH 7*. 

6 months BVMV4 , 4*t rflk 4W-4W HW-llh. lOPR-HI* • BW-Mk 726 

ivwr BfWdlk 4 >Mk 4 0*4*6 11-11*6 lWM«k FW 8 

Saurats: Moraan Guaranty idottar, DM; SF, Pound, FF); UOYt Bt Bonk (ECU); Rmdtrs 
(SDR). Patm* oppilcatto to interbank deposits of St mlUlan minimum tor ravtvahat). 


■Cu SDR 
ato-BM 7% 
-XlWt |6 746 

• *-*46 746 
BW-Mb 746 

nw * 


Itpy Money Kate* Oct 3 


Agfam P oHi r P eytHi 


iwtad llotts 

DfSCBOOt Rote 
Pentral Foods 
Prime Rn*a 
Broker Loon note 


Close Pnv. 
TV, 7Vi 
7* 715/14 
*Vj - *» 

8* ■ V* 


1 month 
3 ml MAC 
1 months T 
6 months . 
I year 


7 *6*8 16 
7 *6-5 a 
"8 *6-846 
Mk.XUi 

Ih'tW 


Com Paper n-17* dovs 7J0 775 

KnonthTroasaryBBU 095 7X1 

t-monifc Treasary BHIs 732 730 

COY 30-59 day* 735 7X5 

CD’s 60*9 days 740 . 740 , 

West Germany 

Lombard Rate 530 550 

OWfhlsat Rat* 411/16 5 

dm M emk tiderkaak _4*/i4 49/14 

Mnontt Mertnak *» M 

totonlk lirttrtHBk A A 

Francs 

MervemtMltgto .Wt n* 

CoU Monty *7/14 -9» 

OKMnoath mMraaok ■ 916 97/14 

Smooth htiertaok » Wk 

FbkmUi taiertooM 95/14 95/14 

BriMa 

Boat Sou Rate life UV> 

Call Money T2 11% 

91-dar.Trtasury WU 11 3« HKB 

S-mandMaferhaak 11V33 1U6 


Discauiri Rate * $ 

Coll Money 6* 4W* 

»da* lntsrtaofe 47 /14 4704 

Snrea.- Atvh « QnlMrdBifc Cf*». 
UI*mol*BmkoirMv*. ■ 


Source : Reuftrs. 


UA Mwwey Marhetltadi 

■ • . -0fet3 

JHsrrifl LVMCB RMdy xssals 
18 day avorogo yield! •• • 7X4 

TtkNM IgtHTpn Rato Indn: 7378 

Source: Merritt LYiKthTohftfa. 


Gold 


0ct3 

-.am. pm. arao 
Hong Kong 32445 32440 Unch. 

Lsninbowg 32475 ' "— " Uhch. 

Parts niSkM) 325.91 32649 +230 

.Zorteh . 324*5. mss . +JJ0 

London 32639 -06*0. —MS 

new York . SOM, ■ +s» 

Lunmboun. Parh and London official ttx. 

Ingst Hone Km and Zurich opening and 
dosing prices; New York. Com** current . 
amtrvcL At! aricm to US. soar ounce. 
Source; Renfro. • - 


- ... ' />. I. . 


pendedou the New York Sioii A flame-cutting machine for processing flat steel at a Hoesch plant in West Germany. 
Exchange late Thursday after ris- 
ing 37J cents to $54375. The stock ry • O • O- 7 Cl C* I • 1 

forging Success m Steel, Sans Subsidy 

mg several proposals as an aliema- ^ ^ 

aveio the panuy mde bid West Germany’s Hoesch to Resume Dividend Payments 

The aBteemenl eflllR lor Fnr«t- •* J 


Revlon disclosed that it was weigh- 
ing several proposals as an alterna- 
tive to the Fanny Pride bid: 

The agreement calls for Forst- 
mann Little to pay $56 cash for 
each of Revlon's 283 million com- 
mon shares outstanding, or $138 
billion. With Revlon debt to be 
assumed or refinanced by Forst- 
mann Little, the total value of the 
transaction would be about S3 bil- 
lion, the companies said. 

The accord stipulates that Rev- 
lon’s worldwide beauty-products 
business be sold for $900 million to 
a group led by Adler & Staaykin, 
another investment firm. In addi- 
tion, Revlon’s Norcliff Thayer 
healihrproducts unit and its Reheis 
Chemical subsidiary is to be sold to 
American Home Products Corp. of 
New York for an undisclosed sum. 

Fors tmann Little said it planned 
to invest about $445 million of its 
capital in the purchase of Revlon, 
with the balance financed with 
bank loans. The purchase is subject 
to approval by Revlon’s sharehold- 
ers and completion of the sale of 
the beauty-products unit 

Revlon’s decision to accept the 
Forstmann little proposal came 
after it received a sweetened $53-a- 
sharc offer from Pantry Pride. The 
latter, based in Fort Lauderdale, 
Florida, operates supermarkets 
and other retail stores. 


By Warren Getler 

International HeraU Tribune 

DORTMUND, West Germany — Hoesch 
Werke AG is a rare success story among Europe’s 
struggling steelmakers. Being privately owned and 
profitable, however, has produced its own set of 
frustrations, not the least of which is coping with 
the foreign comped lion’s unrelenting resort to gov- 
ernment aid. 

One of the first European steel manufacturers to 
streamline operations, Hoesch has been able to 
produce steady, albeit modest, profits since 1982. 
Analysts at West German banks expect earnings 
per share at Hoesch to rise to as high as 20 
Deutsche marks ($7.47) from 13 DM in 1984, 
boosted significantly by Hoesch’s position as a 
major supplier of steel sheet to the booming West 
Ge rman auto industry. 

This year, the West German steel and engineer- 
ing group wiH pay its first dividend since 1977, 
expected by analysts to be 5 DM per share. 

"The fact that we’ll pay a dividend this year is 
evidence of the success of our restructuring efforts 
since 1980,” said Hoesch’s chairman, Dctlev K. 
Rohwedder. 

"We were almost bankrupt four to five years 
ago,” he said. "After slashing raw steel production 
by 40 percent and laying-off half of our work force 
of 26,000, we are now one of two West German 
steel companies showing sufficient profit to pay 
dividends." 

Mr. Rohwedder declined to project 1985 profit, 
but said sales would grow some 5 percent from last 
year’s 735-biHion DM. Hoesch posted a 1984 


profit of 94-million DM, compared with 5 1 9-mil - 
lion DM in 1983 and 19-million DM in 1982. 

Those figures, however, were distorted by ex- 
traordinary gains that included government subsi- 
dies and liquidation of reserves. A better reflection 
of the company’s steady growth in earnings would 
be the operating profits of 21 - milli on DM in 1982, 
31-million DM in 1983 and 182-million in 1984. 

Thyssen, Europe’s largest steelmaker, has said it 
will pay a mini mum dividend of 4 DM on the 
current year ended SepL 30, ending a two-year gap. 
A privately-owned chversified steel and engineer- 
ing group with sales nearly five times that of 
Hoesch, Thyssen returned to profit in the 1983-84 
fiscal year, reporting world group net earnings of 
181-million DM after a 5503-million DM loss in 
1982-83. 

Kldckner-Werke, the third major West German 
steel producer set to return to profitability, said 
recently that it expects to show an operating profit 
for the current year ended SepL 30 after breaking 
even last year. No dividend is expected. 

Eckehaxdt Schubert, steel analyst at West- 
deutsche Landesbank Girozentrale in Ddssddoif, 
said he is cautiously optimistic about prospects for 
Hoesch and other privately owned West German 
steel makers on the comeback. 


“In the short term, the prospects for Hoesch and 
others are quite favorable,” he said. “Hoesch is 
reaping the benefits of its modernization efforts 
and its connection with the German auto industry, 
but the overall market in which they operate sim- 
(Contmued on Page 15, CoL 3) 


:ts for Hoesch and 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

VIENNA — The Organization 
of Petroleum Exporting Countries 
failed Thursday to agree on how to 
share output among its 13 mem- 
bers. 

Oil ministers deferred until a De- 
cember meeting further haggling 
on requests by some members for 
higher quotas. This week's meeting 
in Vienna was called because a ses- 
sion in July failed to produce agree- 
ment on the issue. 

An Iraqi delegate said after- 
wards that his country would in- 
crease its output anyway, and sev- 
eral other members are likely to 
continue surpassing their quotas. 

Ecuador boycotted Thursday 
evening's meeting and said it may 
quit OPEC if other members con- 
tinue to oppose a rise in its quota. 
The other ministers agreed to meet 
again Friday morning, but there 
appeared to be no further pressing 
business. 

A temporary drop in Soviet and 
I ranian supplies has boosted prices 
in recent weeks, but many OPEC 
officials fear that prices will plunge 
early next year unless producers 
show more restraint. 

At Thursday’s meeting, Iran, the 
United Arab Emirates, Gabon and 
Qatar also formally asked for high- 
er quotas. But the ministers gener- 
ally believe that they cannot afford 
to raise OPEC’s overall output ceil- 
ing of 16 million barrels a day with- 
out flooding the markeL, and no 
member was willing to reduce out- 
put to make room for others. 

Participants said Kuwait, evi- 
dently seeking a compromise, as- 
serted that the requests of Iran and 
Iraq were most urgenL The two 
countries have been at war for five 
years, and recent bombing by Iraqi 
jets has wiped out a large part of 
Iran’s export capacity. 

On Wednesday, Iran had op- 
posed the idea of raising any mem- 
ber's quota, but the Iranians 
changed tactics Thursday morning 
and requested a larger quota for 
themselves, though they would be 
unable to use it at present. 

Ecuador's delegation, angered 
that its request seemed to be receiv- 
ing lower priority, protested by re- 


fusing to attend the evening meet- 
ing. Later, the delegation said thaL 
it planned to return home without 
awaiting the formal end of this 
week's gathering. 

“We need an. extra quota for 
peaceful purposes, not to sustain a 
war,” said Fernando Santos Alvite. 
head of Ecuador's delegation. If the 
request is denied, he said, Ecuador 
would “reassess” its membership in 
OPEC. 

Ecuador is one of OPEC's small- 
est producers, but its departure 
would be a psychological blow to 
the 25-year-old organization. The 

t Continued on Page 17, CoL 4) 


U.S. Auto Sales 
In September Up 
48%,toaRecord 

United Press International 

DETROIT — Buyer incen- 
tive programs offered by the 
nation's top-four automakers 
gave new -car dealers their best 
September ever as sales jumped 
48.1 percent from levels of a 
year agp. 

Combined with import sales, 
which reached 228,500 units, 
more than 1.06-million cars 
were sold, the first time more 
ihnn a million cars were sold in 
a single month. 

The seven companies — 
General Motors Corp„ Ford 
Motor Co.. Chrysler Corp., 
Honda Motor Corp., American 
Motors Corp., Volkswagen of 
America and Nissan Motor 
Manufacturing U.S.A. — re- 
ported combined sales of 
839.382 cars in the United 
States during the latest month, 
compared with 566,672 cars a 
year ago. 

The daily selling rate of 
34,974 cars compares with 
23,61 1 for the same period last 
year. The annual rate for the 
industry during the period was 
a strong 10.8 million cars, com- 
pared with 7.4 million last year. 


t 

Lloyd’s Suspends 199 
Of Syndicate Members 


Roues 

■ LONDON — A record 199 
members of Lloyd’s of London, the 
insurance exchange, were suspend- 
ed from underwriting Thursday af- 
ter failing to meet the exchange’s 
solvency requirements. 

The high failure rate reflects the 
huge losses facing some members 
amid allegations that part of ihe 
losses arose through fraud. 

The suspended members all be- 
long to syndicates managed by 
Richard Beckett Underwriting 
Agencies Ltd., or RBUA, which 
was formerly known as PCW Un- 
derwriting Agencies Ltd. RBUA is 
owned by Mmet Holdings PLC, a 
British insurance brokerage. Its 
syndicates are bring wound up 
with record gross underwriting 
losses of around £130 million 
($1833 million). 

As a result of the suspensions 
Lloyd’s, whose total membership is 
around 26,000, is setting aside a 
record £56 million from its £167- 
m ill i nn central fund to make sure 
all valid damns on policies under- 
written by the suspended members 
are met 

Members, or so called “names," 
of the RBUA syndicates include 
the Duchess of Kent and Adnan 
KashoggL All names have unlimit- 
ed personal liability for their mar- 
ket commitments and must each 


year show they have the assets to 
meet their Habahties. 

Lloyd’s said a further 27 RBUA 1 
members have been granted an ex- 
tension to Oct. 31 to pass the sol- 
vency test. Another 10 names, not 
necessarily RBUA names, were 
granted a two- week extension be- 
cause they are completing arrange- 
ments to pass the solvency test. 

Lloyd’s said among Thursday’s 
suspended names, six said they 
were financially unable to pass the 
test under any circumstances. For- 
ty-five names said they could pass 
the tesL but were unwilling to do so 
in the absence of detailed informa- 
tion on the affairs of the RBUA 
syndicates. Another 38 names sim- 
ply said they wore unwilling to pass 
the test, while others made no rep- 
resentations. 

About 1,500 Lloyd’s names be- 
long to RBUA syndicates with 300 
to 400 names very badly affected 
by the losses. Same 300 names have 
grouped themselves together and 
alleged that the losses principally 
resulted from fraud ana misman- 
agement by former officials of 
PCW. 

These names plan legal action 
against- Minet Holdings and 
Lloyd’s, although Lloyd's has im- 
munity in Britain from such action 
by its members. 




V‘ • 




" fw\ 
i 








LafftrJ 




' rt'i 


W ■ ■ a m# 

The man with exceptional goals 
needs an exceptional bank. 



IMF Is Seen Scaling Down 
Some Forecasts on Growth 


United Press Imtanaional 

SEOUL — The International 
Monetary Fund’s _ annual world 
economic report will predict con- 
tinued recovery for most nations 
but will scale down past optimism 
to reflect “uncertainties” in the 
global economy, IMF officials said 
- Thursday. 

The report, to be issued Sunday 
at the annual meeting of the IMF 
and World Bank in Seoul, bolds to 
the IMFs upbeat forecasts in its 
April World Economic Outlook, 
the officials said. But the officials 
said the report wiH predict a slump 
in economic growth of several 
tenths of a percentage point 

The April report and the outlook 
tb .be issued to IMF and Worid 
Bank delegates by the IMFs inter- 
im committee predicts that the 
world economy will improve in the 
second half of this year and contin- 
ue its recovery next year. 

A key assumption, officials said, 
is that the United States will over- 
come the downturn in its _ growth 
rate this year and rebound in 1986. 

After 63-percent real growth in 
gross national product last year. 


UJS. GNP will slow this year to an 
estimated 2.6 percent, the fund 
says. The IMF had predicted 3.4- 
percent growth for 1985 in this 
measure of the total value of goods 
and services. It is now forecasting 
33 percent for next year. 

Overall world output is now ex- 
pected to grow at a rate just below 
the 3.4-percent predicted in April, 
the officials said The same growth 
was predicted for 1985 but the pro- 
jected actual rale is now closer to 
3.1 percent, reflecting the unex- 
pected sluggishness in UJS. and 
other industrialized nations' econo- 
mies. 

The scaled-back estimates were 
prompted by fresh uncertainty over 
the uneven pace of recovery in the 
West, concern over high interest 
rates and the value of the dollar, as 
well as over how developing na- 
tions will cope with their huge for- 
eign debt, the officials said. 

“It basically reflects the uncer- 
tainties in the world economy," one 
official said. “There are some dif- 
ferent scenarios, but all these are 
based, on certain assumptions. 
.Some of those assumptions have 
been changed.” 


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The Trade Development Bank building in Geneva, 
at 96itS. rm du Rhone. 

An American Express company 





Thiffsdajs 

MSE 

Closing; 

Tables include the nationwide prices 
ue to the closing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


1! Month 

Mqh (_*« Slock 


Sis Cost 

Cii*. iiij PE IMstiittHLOo Quqi C"ar 


12 Gann 
Hrgh LO* VOO 


SB. Ob* 

B<«. VK.PE Highly- gyp* CH'B* 


34 Penwll 120 U n IE 38 37* 38 

10 Penwpt 130 M B 74 23% =Pk — % 

ji V: Pemuol Ufl 43 20 626 W 47%. 48% *■ % 


75 PwiplBa.00 9.1 300Q2 87ft 87ft 87ft— 2 

12®. PeooEn 1 JO U 7 210 18* 14ft IS* + 

14* PcoBv 3 jo J W 37 an 33% 23* — % 

»ft PatrtlCo 1.7H 10 II im 61* 60* 6C% — l* 

21V Pert El 56 2J 1J 548 24ft 24 24% + ft 

7% Pr Milan 1.126142 A 104 ,7®» rkk 7ft 
104a PorvDs 73 13V 13* 13V ■+ ft 

31 Prlrio uilf II JD jA 4 *0* + * 

24V PetRS 172614.1 X 26V- 26% 26V- ft 

14 Pet PS ol 157 95 34 Id 5 * MW 18% — % 

1'. Plrlrvv .9Da288 54 3*4 3 3ft + ft 

3311. Pfizer 1.48 3.1 14 JUt *5? 46V g “ * 

120. PholoO 1 097 20*. 20". 204. + 10 

34 PhHpnr 550 95 23 31 vs 51V 51V + V 

28 PhlbrS 54 15 19 M5 37 3SV 36V— % 

12ft PHIIqEI 120 153 5 1666 14V 14V. 14% + ft 


Mia IV': 
3058 22% 
17% 97k 
55 32% 

98 93 

24% 17% 
16% 1«% 
32% 25% 
130". 123% 
41V 27V 
28% 24VS 
48% 24V 


RjoCor A3 \A 
Ravco 50 10 
Revere 

Revlon 144 14 
Rvlnoffl 

Rextim .70 12 
Re«nrd .44 ii 
Revnlnsi^a « 
Ravin 002.96 1051 
PorMh 100 2.9 
Re/M of 230 £7 
RetiVck 1>BS 22 


1714 1648 
> S5% 53V 
I 91 97*8 

i 22% 22% 

1 14P) 14 
i 27V* 26% 
i 130V 129% 
1 34% 34W 
2»W 28* 
48 6738 


(Continued from Page 10) 


23% PhliE pi 380 12.9 
27* PtillE ol AaO 111 
53 PnllEpI *.75 113 
9% PnllE Pt 141 118 
8% PhliE Pt 153 114 
7% PtiilEpt 1J2 135 
92 PflilE PI15J5 116 
47V PhliE pf 750 114 
IS* PhilSub U2 67 12 


100: 99% 29Vx 29 , 'i— % 
40: 33% 33V: 33% +1 
IBCC 64 63% 63% — % 

128 1£»a 10% 10% — % 
42 9ft 9* 9% + % 
66 9ft 9*8 9% 
2000:112*8 112% 112% + V 
200: 57% 57% 57% + * 
38 20V 19*. 19V - ft 


100 SA 13 
150 7.4 15 
SJDelO.9 
J4e 15 10 
.40 .9 12 

861 

6.40 BO H 


73% PhilMr 4.00 U • 7757 76 74% 75V — I 

13V pnllpm 60 25 13 86 2 TV 23V 73V— % 

33% Phlllnol 150 1.7 6 57V S7V I7V— «V 

11 V Pt.ilP»5 1J10 8J 8 1097B 12V 12% 178 + % 

22V PhlWa* 1.04a 4J 904 2S 24*8 24ft + % 

20V PMIVH AO 15 13 113 26V 25% 24% + % 

23V PtodA S 78 .9 9 246 30V 29V 30% — % 

25V PieNG 2J2 7J 11 6 31V 31% 31V + % 

14V Pier I 15 41 22V 22% 22V— % 

38V. PIISZW 1J2 18 14 1661 61% 60V 61 + '-'a 

21% Pioneer 174 5 A 5 141 23ft 22% 23% + V 

29% PUnvS 170 3.1 11 403 39V 39 39 — % 

9*8 Pirtsm 255 17V 138s 13% + V8 

17 PkmPtn 63 19V 19% 19% 

8V Plenfts 70 17 18 85 16V 16% 16% — % 

7 Plontm ,16b 16 12 51 9V PV 9V + '« 

8% Plovbov 11 62 0% 7* TV— V 


22V — % 
Zfi% — V 
17 * % 
54ft— % 
97V 

aw 

14V + V 
24V — *4 
130% + V 
34% 

24% 

68 + % 
22% - ft 
3% — ft 
32% — V 
26ft — ft 
7V + % 
19% — % 
37ft — V 
18% 

36V + % 
66 + % 
60V— 2ft 
24V— V 
11 + !* 
11% 

2% 

12 

43% + V 
7V— % 
64ft + ft 

13V + ft 
24V + % 
17V + % 
19ft 

26 + V 

27V + ft 
21 ft— % 
17V + V 


8W PlonRs 70 17 18 85 16V 16% 16% — 

7 Pkjrrtm ,16b 16 12 51 9V 9ft 9V + 

6% Plovbov 11 62 8% 7V TV — 

12V PoooPti 50 47 X 639 12% 72V 12V 

24ft Potorld U» 28 136 6818 36 34V 15ft +1 

10% Pondrs A0 J 33 3914 15% 14% 15 + 

15ft PopToI JO 43 21 18ft 18 10ft + 



1% Ooklnd 

19 Ockpf 

25ft OoklteP 1 J2 45 12 
23% OcclPef 150 74 10 
9% OcclP .art 
81% OcclP p( 00 if 
20V OcclP Pi 150 11.1 
17ft OcclP pf 112 106 
46V OcclP dI 675 114 
105ft OCCIP PT1550 145 
103% Occlpl 1482 137 

20 ODECO 1.00 45 17 
24% Ogden 170 67 17 
11V OhloEd 158 127 A 
24V OhEdpf 3.90 110 

45 OhEdPf 7J4 114 
44 OhEdpf 7 J6 119 
16% OhEdPf 87e 24 
26ft OhEdgl 293e 98 
23ft OhEdpf 360 115 
23% OhEdpr 3.93 119 
13 OhEdpf 170 115 
53 CfhEdol tW 117 
lift OhMoIr .40 34 15 
55V OhPpfB 760 114 
55% OhPotC 760 114 
17 OhP ptG 277 114 
100 OhP nfF 1470 126 
21% OkldGE 200 87 10 
20V Olio 150 44 13 
SV Oroncre 

12 Oneida 50 5.7 40 
26V ONEOK 256 8.9 10 
22% OranRk 214 &3 10 

7ft Oronpo 531 5.7 17 
20 OrwnC .76 11 

23 OrlonC of 1.13 8.9 

8% OrionP 31 

24 Orion Ot 2.75 95 

19% OutbdM 64 10 7 

23% OwmTr .72 11 13 

13 OvShlP 50 37 12 
287k OwenC 140 47 6 
38V OwmKI 150 17 10 


573 1% 1% 1% 

2 16 16 H - 

7 33V 33ft 33ft- 
12529 34 32% 33% 

937 14% 132* 14% 

2 104V 103 106V 

3 22ft 22% 22% 

1 20 20 20 

149S S4W 5JW 54% ' 

60 106% 106ft 106ft 
14 106% 106% 106% 
133 20ft 20% 20V- 
310 30% 30 30ft 
1922 14% 14% 14ft 
300: 30 30 X - 

90: 5J 54 54 - 

1150z 58ft 56 57 - 

2 27% 27ft 27% • 

255 31 31 31 

13 28% 27V 28 ■ 

16 30ft 30V 30V- 
7 15ft 15% 15 m ' 
160: 65% &J% 65% - 
IBB 12% 11% 11%- 
200: 67 65ft 65ft- 
1000: 66ft 66ft 66V 
7 19% 79% 19V- 
60: 109ft 1095i 109ft 
9986 3% 22% 23 
892 33% 33% 33V ■ 
712 6% 5% 6 - 

71 13% 13% 13% 
64 28% 28% 78% - 
25 25% 25% 25% 
269 9ft 9ft 9W 
145 24% 24V 24V - 
168 24ft 23ft 23V 
346 10ft 10'. 10ft- 
9 28% 28% 38% 
59 21% 21% 21V - 
393 33% 33 33% - 

313 15% 15 15% - 

239 32% 32ft 32% ■ 
373 48% 48 48% - 

47 12% 12ft 12ft - 


10% Pondrs A0 J 

15ft PopToI 80 AA 

>4% Pofiec j45e 2.9 

73 Parte pf 150 7.1 
15% PortGE 1.90 10J 
91 PoGpf 1150 113 
18% PorGpf 260 113 
X PorGoI 4.40 Hi 
29% PorGpf 472 137 


A0 J 33 3914 15% 14% 15 + % 

JO U 21 18ft 18 18ft + % 

ASn 2.9 26 167 15ft 15% 15V + % 

150 7.1 30: 78 78 78 —2 

1.90 107 7 230 18% 18% 18% 

50 113 120:103 102 183 

L60 113 7 23'4 73ft 23ft 

140 HI 28 33% 33ft 33% + ft 

172 133 6 32ft 32% 32V + % 


PotltCh 156 47 14 541 36% 34ft 36% +1% 


22% PatmEI 2.16 7 A 9 
Vft PolElpr 450 97 
32ft PotEIPf 4.0* 104 
H% Prml s 76 15 18 
31 Prlmrk 130 S3 8 


791 29% 2P 29 — ft 

800: At 45% 46 

380: 40 39 39 — ft 

16 23 % 23ft 23ft 

94 41% 41% 41ft— V* 


14V PrimeC 13 2345 17 16V 16% — % 

16ft PrlmMS ffl 7 26 419 34% 33 X —1% 

50V ProclG 260 44 15 1444 56% 55V 56 — % 


& PrdRfS 21 

35% Prefer 1^0 36 15 
2 PruRCn 
8 PruRIn 

17V P jvCol 200 95 V 
53% P5Col pf 7.15 117 
16% PSColPf 210 10J 
6’h PSind 150 11.1 11 


6V PSIn of 1.04 11.9 
6% PSln of 108 111 
52% PSIn pf 964 145 
51 PSIn Pf 8.96 14J 
3% PSvNH 
8% PSNHpf 
BV PNH PlB 
1J PNH DlC 
11% PNH BID 
11% PNH pfE 
9V PNHBfF 
10ft PNHPfG 
22 PSvNM 228 107 
24% PSuEG 2fl4 104 
10% PSEG PT 140 107 
X% PSEGpf 4.18 113 
97ft PSEG Pfl270 115 
16 PSEGpf 217 117 
50 PSEGpf 650 114 
17% PSEGet 243 117 
96% PSEG Pf!225 121 
56% PSEGpf 7 JO 113 
57V PSEG of 770 116 
7V Public* 


9ft Puebki .16 17 
6 PRCem 
11V PuoetP 136 126 


21 lao 13ft 12V 13ft + % 
36 15 3 39ft 39ft 39ft — ft 

64 2 2 2 

88 8% 8 8 

95 9 220 21% 20% 21 
117 60:64 63% 63% — 1 

10J >3 19% 19% 19V + % 

11.1 11 6S8 9% 9 9 

11.9 1250: 8% 8% 8V + V 

111 3310: 8% 8 Bft — % 

145 10010: 45 65 45 -1 

143 300: 61 61 41 —IV 

3 424 7% 7% 7% 

300: 15 15 15 + % 

1 8 15% 15% 1SV 

5 2?V 22V 22V + % 

2 19V 19V 19V + ft 

45 20V 20% 20V + ft 

6 17% 17ft 17% + % 

134 19 1BV 19 +1 

107 9 541 27 26V 26V— % 

106 7 1147 27% 27% 27V + ft 

107 I 14 14 16 

113 100: 37ft 37 37ft +1 

115 50 ltl% 109 111% 45V 

117 94 19% 19% 19% 

114 *00: 59% « 59V 4 V 

117 913 21% 21V 21V 

121 80:701 100% 101 

113 4000: 68% 68% 68% 42% 

116 100: 68ft 68ft 68ft— 1ft 

45 2% 2% 2% 


.16 17 ID 111 12% 12V 13V— % 


2 7% 7% 7% 

240 14% 14ft 14ft 


23% PHH 170 29 13 
31% PPG 140 36 10 
16% PSA 60 24 IB 
I3V PSAdpf 1.90 95 
11% PccAS 154 117 
T4ft PecGE 174 104 7 

34% PacUg 168 21 14 
24% PcLum 130 10 26 
5% PacRas 3)56 A 13 
13% PocRSPl 200 11.1 
13 PocSel 40 29 11 
61% PncTele 5.77 84 8 

9ft PacTin 60 37 7 
23% PadfCP 272 il & 
30V Padlol 4 07 117 
26% PoinWb 60 21 17 
26% PainW Pt225 87 
37% Palm Be 130 IS 33 
»ft PanABk .70 1.9 11 
4 PanAm 
IV PenA vrt 

13% Pandck.n JO 16 1* 
32% PanhEC 370 67 12 
3% PanIPr 28 

13V Paarctt 601 >5 

7ft Pordvn 

11% Park.EI 03e 7 12 
4 PorkDrl 78 1.9 
28ft ParkH 1.12 34 11 


78 1.9 

_ _. .12 34 11 

14V ParkPn 5?t 2e 50 
1% PatPirl 2 

11% PovNP 64 57 14 
13V PavCsh .14 1.1 13 
6ft Peobdv 30 27 26 
n Pc non 
43V PenCen 
44V Penney 276 47 
23 PoPL 256 106 

J i PaPLpf 450 127 
4V PaPL(tar362 117 
21ft PdPL eorj.90 11.1 
23V PoPLdm225 116 
26V PoPLdort.75 123 
76ft PaPLpf 934 9.9 
BSft PaPLprllTO 10J 


163 34% 34ft 34ft — ft 
326 45% 44V 44% + % 
109 2«V 24ft 24% + % 
49 20 20 20 

16 13V 13V 13V— % 
1359 18 17% 17V + ft 

215 43ft 42V 43 + V 

5695 41% 39% 40% +1% 
45 9 8% 9 

38 18 17V 18 

15 14 13% 14 + ft 

4943 69% 68ft 68% — V 

5 12ft 12% 12ft + % 
369 28V 28ft 28V + V 
13 34ft XV 34ft 
647 28V 28% 28% — % 
94 27ft 26V 271b— ft I 
80 34V 34ft J4V + % 

39 37V 37V. 37% + % 
8020 7ft 6V 7ft + ft 1 

82 2% 7V 2% + % 
280 14% 13% 14 — 

2081 36% 35V 36%— % 
737 Aft 5% 6% + ft 

3222 IS* 77V 18% + % 
9523 7% 7 7%— % 

33 11% 13ft 13% + % 
119 4% 4ft 4ft — % 

141 33% 32V 33 
78 20% 20 20% + ft 

434 2ft 2% 2ft 

llffl 12% 12ft 12ft 

2904 14% 14 14% + % 

156 10% 10% 10% ^ 

33 % % %- Via 

352 48ft 47% 47V: — V 

1456 49ft 48% 49ft + % 

539 24V 24% 24% — % 

71 Dz 38% 37 37% 

16 29 28% 28V 

3 26ft 26% 26% + % 

57 28ft 28 28 

3 30% 30ft 30% + ft 
I5te 93% 93 93% + % 

1860:103 103 103 + % I 


PulteHm .12 16 16 173 12% 12% 12% — % 


18V Puralal 
6V Pvro 


178 19 18% 18%— ft 
334 7ft 7 7 — % 


SS% X OuCkOs 160 26 14 1298 54% 54ft 541*— ft 

105 91 QuaOPf 956 95 5570:100V 10W4 100V — ft 

73V 16V QuakSO JO 46 18 326 20% 19V 20 + ft 

10% 6% Quane/ 22 160 6fj 6V 6V — % 

34V 27 QueHar 16C St 10 135 28% 28% 28%—% 

26% 14% QkRell 34a 13 13 131 20% 20% 20V— V* 


9V 6% 
49% 34 
112 79% 

38% 31V 
9% 6ft 
4V 3% 
19V 12% 
14% BV 
46% 30% 
• 9% 5% 

21ft 16% 
7% 2% 

70% 51V 
17% 9% 

53% 36% 
lift 5V 
21% 14V 
16V 11 
17ft 8V 
12V 7 
12% 8ft 
1ft \ 
43% 27V 
10% 4% 
3 1ft 
12V 5V 
49V 36 
27V Oft 
57V 52% 
14% 24V 
X 23% 


RCA d! 460 46 
RCA pf 365 96 
RLC 30 2.7 
RPC 

RTE 56 33 
Radlce 

RolsPur 160 23 
Ramad 

Banco M 5.1 
RangrO 

Rovcm 64 6 

Rovmk 

Rovtlm 160 13 
ReadBI 60 6J 
RdBct pi 2.13 135 
R It Ref 133e10A 
RecnEa 

R*dmn 60 18 
Reece 

Re^lc 50 22 

ReoAIr 

ReoAwt 

RdGvbs X 19 
ReoNY 164 36 
RNY PfC 3.12 116 
RNYpfA 634911 J 


RNY PfC 3.12 116 
RNY pfA 634*115 
RepBk 164 55 
RepBk PfJ.12 7.9 


7ft 7*e 
44% 63V 
100 1M 
! 38 X 
I 7% 7ft 
3% 3V 
I 17% 17V 
i 13% 13V 
1 46ft 45V 
8% 7% 
16% 16V 
3% 3% 
72% 71V 
11 10% 
49 48V 

Aft 6 
15% 15% 

T* % 

Bft 7W 

9% 9V 
% ft 
36% 36 
8% 8V 
IV IV 
7% 7V 
45V 45V 
26% 26V 
55ft 55 
29V 29V 
25% 25V 


7ft t ft 
43V— % 
100 +1 
38 — % 
7V + % 
3V + % 
17V— ft 
13% - % 
46 — ft 
7V 

16V— % 
3V— % 
72 + % 

ID*— % 

48V 

lk + * 

9 — ft 

8 

9V + *4 
ft 
36 

BV 

IV- % 
7V — % 
45V 

26V- ft 
55ft— ft 
27V + ft 
25V 


74ft 37% 
12V 9V 
32* 19% 
19 15 

21V 16 
20V 13* 
17V SV 
7V I". 
38V Sft 
I*’n 24% 
35 22V 

23 17V 

11V 9 % 

n 3% 
35V 24"* 
54 51 

23V 20ft 
9V 6% 
12ft 87* 

44 31 
2SW 20 
35V 23V 
46 M 
54% 50% 
35% 29ft 
17> IJft 
a* lav 
12% 10ft 

9ft 5 
13ft 9V 
38% 21ft 
52% 23 
45% X’ 4 

14% a 

a 22% 

61% 52ft 
44% 29% 
14V 12% 

45 24V 

13 10% 

16% 13% 
It'* 13% 
27% 17V 

5% 3% 
44V 35% 
21% 15% 
32% aft 
32% 22V 
J9% 29V 
3iv a% 
IF* 11V 
40ft 24% 
16ft 11% 
26ft IS 
40% 29k: 

30 ft 21 

40 25% 
8V 5ft 

16 12 

19% 14ft 

41 24V 

a% 27ft 
18 12* 
15ft 7V 
71% 50% 
79% 46% 
41% 31ft 
1SV 12ft 
43ft 31% 
19% 13% 
33% ZV 
40ft 32% 
Bft 18% 
25V a 
30% a% 
19% 38% 
35 24% 

9ft 6ft 
27ft 20ft 
aft 17 
26V 20 
44 X% 
39% 12 
27* a% 

31 24% 
39ft 24V 
52% 49% 
167b lift 

8V 5V 
31 16% 

17% lift 
18% 11% 
88% 63ft 
24% 19V 
17% 11% 
27% 15V 
59 34% 

2v^ 

72% 45 
aft 17V 

a% i7v 


SCM 2.00 2.7 17 892 

SLIM .22 12 10 22 

SPSTeC 60 17 14 AS 

Soolne .04 3 36 21 

ScbnRv lllellO 159 
StgdBs JO 16 15 163 
SfgdSc 25 57 

SlgdSwt 10 

SafKlns 60 1J Z 204 

Safewv 160 AS 10 3073 

Soga 51 2J 10 270 

SI JoLP m 15 1 10 

5 Paul U» 106 69 

vISolant 123 

ScllWM .16 5 15 314 

Sal IMp! 147» 73) 364 

SDleGS 224 18 8 1104 

SJuanB .90e)DJ 10 72 

SJuonR 20 )5 

Sardr 60 1 J <9 62 

SAnltR) 1.94 76 13 42 

SFeSoP 73)0 33) 14 1 619 

Sara Lee 164 13 12 1179 

Sotol Pf 3.91e 73 6 

Ssiwei 1.40 4.1 15 6 

SouIRE 30 1.1 46 17 

SOvEtP 160 83 7 11 

SavEsf 128 116 16 

Savin 186 

Savin of 150 116 2 

SCANA 2.16 86 8 862 

SchrPio 168 36 M 852 

S chimb 130 36 9 3544 

Sc i At I .12 16 17 281 

Scoalnd J6I 13 242 

ScstFet ,90e 16 10 229 

SconP 134 33) 10 1352 

Scarfvs 52 AT 10 46 

Sea Crl 31 12 f 50 

SeaCtof 166 116 8 

SeaCpfBlIO 113 8 

5eaC ofC 2.10 113 10 

SeaLnd 48 25 7 372 

SaaCe 20T 

Seasrm 60 1.9 12 5311 

Sea QUl 19 750 

SealAJr 44 14 17 38 

SealPw 1.00 *3) 8 900 

Seen lJi 55 9 6412 
SecPoc s 1 J4 5J 6 859 

SelgLt Z 

SvcCps 48 1J 17 37 

Shoklee J2 53 71 41 

Shawm 60 26 7 65 

ShetlT 24S® 6.1 8 790 

ShelGlo 60 14 6 158 
Sflrvrln .92 26 12 14 

Shaetwn 10 377 

Showbt 60 43 13 17 

SlerPoc 166 9J 9 121 
Singer 40 1.1 V BIO 
Singrpf 350 106 11 

Skvline .43 15 76 1 03 
Smlthln 32 41 313 

SmkB 260 45 10 636 

Smuckr 168 14 17 9 

SnaaOn 1.16 34 11 654 

Snyder 23)0 13J 14 Z 
Sonet 260 5J I 441 
onvCP .15e S 13 Z16 
Lin lif 36 25 16 

SaurcC 350 86 II 
SrcCpPf 240 10.9 2 

SCrE Pf 250 106 3 

SaJerln 248 9.1 12 23 

Soudwn 1.00 23 11 484 
SoerBk 150 40 10 162 
SaetPS 2.131316 40 11 

alEd 116 93 7 2088 
uthCo 104 105 6 2173 
InGis 160 73 8 91 

NETI 252 76 10 160 

fSSv^ li i 

SaUnCo l.Z 65 W 

sssr^ijs % ,0 

^rk axT'llfS 

wAIrl .13 5 16 1283 

SwtPor 135 

wtGas 134 75 8 317 
iwBell tm 76 8 6678 
wfPS 163 11 9 218 
port an 52 34 378 90 

jpeclP JI 

Sperrv 152 3.7 915307 
Springs 152 45 13 Z 
ScucrrO 164 5.1 10 82 

Saulbb 1J6 25 18 I486 
S la lev 60 3.9 Z 170 
SrBPnt 56 19 11 411 


739* 73 
12% 12V 
29* 29% 
15V 15V 
18% 18 
17% 17% 
9ft 9ft 
1ft 17* 
33ft 32V 
Z% 31% 
Z% Z 
20V 20% 
10ft 10 
6V 5% 
Z 31ft 
51% 51% 
25V 25ft 
SV BV 
10V TPV 
35ft 35% 
24ft 24% 
Bft 32% 
44% 43V 
51 51 

34% Bft 
18% 18% 
19% 19% 
It* 11 

a 6% 

12V 
24V 24V 
49% 48* 
35V 34% 
12V 11% 
32% 32% 
55V 55ft 
42 41V 

ttft 12* 
33V 33* 
12V 12% 
15V 15% 
15* 15% 
19% 19ft 
4% 4Vt> 


73% + ft 
12% + V 
29% 

15V— V 
18% + % 
17% — V 
9ft 
lft 

33* + Va 
32% +1% 
22% + ft 

aft 

10 — % 
6% + * 
31% — % 
51% — % 
25% + * 
SV— % 
10V + ft 
35V— % 
24V + V 
Z% + ft 
44ft + ft 
51 + * 

34% + ft 
18% + % 
19V— ft 
T1 — % 
6* — ft 
12V + % 
24% 

49V + V 
35V. + V 
lift— ft 
32V- % 
55ft— ft 
42 

12*— % 
33V + % 
12V— ft 
15% 

15% 

19ft — ft 
4ft — V* 
41ft— V 
17ft + V* 

31 — ft 
24% — ft 
J2ft— % 
aft + ft 
17V— ft 

32 
13V 

21V- V 
40ft + ft 
23% + V 
35ft + % 
7% + ft 
14ft + V* 
17% 

35% + % 
32% 

13% 

7* — ft 
65V— ft 
74% — V 
33V— ft 
14% 

15 -% 
16ft— ft 
31ft -% 
37% + % 

Bft— V 
27% + V 

^*7 % 

XV + % 

9% + V 


5*-% 

13V— % 
7* + ft 

8%-w 

16V + ft 


69% +1V 
X% 20V 
19V 19% — ft 


a 24V 
32% 3?ft 
25% 25% 
17% 17% 
37ft 36V 
13% 13% 

21% a ft 

40% 39% 

24ft a 

35% 35 
7% 7% 
14% 14V 
18 17% 

36 34% 

32% 32% 
13% 13V 
7% 7% 
65% 65% 
73ft 74% 
M 33% 
14% 14% 
35% 34% 
16ft 16 
31% 31 
37% 


27% 

47ft 46% 
30ft 29% 

19% 


1.16 1 j 16 
.IV J 13 
160 4.7 
120 A3 14 
16 
13 

140 24 13 

8 

9 

62 2.1 20 
11 

64 1.7 < 
132 73 13 
1140 106 

11 

40 42 
116 102 
360 At B 
162 16 8 
166 54 6 
120 6.1 9 

i44el06 • 
60b 17 11 
240 11 13 

.18 T4 12 
40 U 16 
252 94 6 

140 44 10 
98 
25 

166 16 16 
68b 46 10 
40 26 TO 
60 12 12 
.90 5J 

140 1J 17 
17 

U6 34 13 
140a 18 Z 

140 104 
162 44 7 
48 26 10 
152 118 5 
172 132 
175 135 
147 132 
42B 113 • 

2J6 123 

Ti i 7 

48b 14 13 

40 24 10 


44 86 

25 

22 14 II 

225 144 

235 6J 
168 6.1 13 
233 107 
160 83 58 
2.16b 44 10 
347 66 

236 11.1 s 

032 103 
250 94 

12 

140 44 13 
48 13 13 

240 62 
244 4.9 10 
416 86 
1486136 


reakthroughs 




CJoS* 
Uw» Quot. 


HMhuSf Stock pH. nd. PE 

S3 66 VaEgpf 844 1J3 
79ft 70 VeEPpf 860 114 
M 53 VoEP pf 730 TT.l 
TOft 55% VaEPpf 745 11.1 
27% 13% Vfchffy S if 

stv 33ft Vemad 36 

85 . 66% VuIcnM 240 34 12 


«v Oe»e 

10V High LOW Quot Ojg 

270: 79 79 79 —1 

78% 78% .78% +1% 
200: 64V 64 MV— ft 
I30z 67% 67V An* + ft 
IS 24V 34%'24V — V 
184 56% 56% 56% + ft 
14 82 81% 82 — % 


41V ZV 
14V 5% 

% 35% 14 

G 4% 2ft 

S. 28 ft 19 

^ 4% 2ft 

- 42V 24% 

” 13% 9% 

25V 15 
12 3 % 

11V 9ft 
52 2VV 
a% 57% 


VP Carp 1.12 2.9 10 
Valero 

Voter pf 344 144 
voievln 

VanDm 140 44 7 
Vareo 

vorton 36 LI 16 
Vara 40 li 35 
Veeco 40 23 12 
Vendo 20 

VestSe 130all3 
Viacom 48 14 21 
VaEPof 732 11.1 


801 39V 
401 10* 
19 23% 
Z 2V 
32 23 
123 4% 

2223 24V 
42 12V 
796 15V* 
431 9% 

77 10* 
890 47V 
150Z69V 


10ft 10V— % 
23V 23% + ft 
2% 2% 

22% 22% — ft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
24 24V— ft 

T2V 12% — ft 
14% 14%—% 
BV 9% + % 
ID* 10V — % 
47V 47V + V 
69V 69V— ft 




1.10 74 
100 7.9 9 
44 24 13 
.90 44 10 
60 22 10 
40 29 10 


Frbkh Company 

Handbook ms 


37 UAL 140 21 I 
26* UALpf 240 » 7.9 
9% UCCEL I 
B* UDCn .15e 4 
18 UGI 244 «A 
20 UGI pf 275 >14 
8* UNCRea i 
10". URS 40-15 
21% USFG 220 *5 
26V USG i 168 ' 44 


Now in the 1985 updated edition, 200 
pages of indispensable information in English on 
a selection of 84 of the most important French 
companies, as well as basic facts on other major 
firms. Includes information on the French 
economy and major sectors of activity, an 
introduction to the Paris Bourse, and a bilingual 
dictionary of French financial terms. 

Each profile includes detailed information 
on: head office, management, major activities, 
number of employees, sales breakdown, company 
background, shareholders, prinapal French 
subsidiaries and holdings, foreign holdings and 
activities, exports, research and innovation, 1979- 
1983 financial performance, important devel- 


AEROSPAT1ALE 
AIR FRANCE 
ALSTHOALATLANTIQUE 
AVIONS MARCH. DASSAULT- 
BREGUET AVIATION 
AXA (MUTUHiES UNJES- 
DROUOT) 

BANGUE INDOSUEZ 
BANQUE NADONALE DE PARIS- 
BNP 

BEGHN-SAY 

bdermann 

BONGRAWS4L 

BOUYGUeS 

BSN 

CAMP&ION BSNARD 
CGHEALSTHOM 
COM GROUP 

CHARBONNAGE5DE FRANCE 
TO 

CHARGEURSSA. 

OMB*rrs frapcais 
OTALCAT a 
ClLSM&XTKRANfe 
COGEMA 

COMPAGNE DU MID) 
COMPAGNE FRANQUSE DES 
patrols -total 
COMPAGNE GfrlfeALE 
D’aKTRfQlt (CGE) 
COMPAGNE G&nftAl£ DES 
EAUX 

COMPAGNE lAHfrflN 
CS£D(T AGHCOIE 
CR&XTCOMMaOALDE 
FRANCE (CCF) 
CRfiXTDUNORD 
O^XT NATIONAL 
CROU2ET 
PARTY 
DUMEZ 

ELECTRONK3UESBK3E 
DASSAULT 
Hf AQUITAINE 
H’feA-BQTTRAH) FAURE 
ESSRjOR 
tfVES-ULLE 
FRAMATOME 


FRAN^AiSE HOECHST 
Gfe^feALEBISCUrr 
GROUPEVICrOIRE 
IMETAL 

JEUMONT^CHNBDB 

L'OR&U. 

LOWSVUnTON 

LYONNAI 5 EDESWUX 

MATRA 

ABBiOBS 
MERLIN GOON 

MIOfiJN 

MOeT-MB^SSSY __ 

PAJQBAS 

PSNODRICARD '5 

PEUGEOT 1 

POUET 

PBNTEMPS GROUP 

PROMODfe 

OLSUSTY 

LARHXXJTE 

RENAULT 

RHONEPOUiaJC 

ROU5SB.UOAF 

SAOLOR 

SAJNT-G06AN 

SANOR 

SODA 

SCREG 

SB GROUP 

SBTA 

SNECMA 

sooMg&j&ale 
SOCETtG&JfiiAlE 
D*B^TSBWSB5AINRAPT 
iflKCE 
SODEXHO 
SQMMBl ALUBEKT 
SPIEBAT1GNOUES 
TBEMECANIQUE 
THOMSON 
THOMSONCSF 
UNION DB ASSURANCES 
DEPARS(UAP} 

USINOR 

UTA 

VALEO 

VAliOl^EC 


opments and 1984-1985 highlights and trends. 

Indispensable for corporate , government 
and banking executives, institutional investors, 
industrial purchasers and other decision-makers 
who should be more folly informed on major 
French companies. French Company Handbook 
is being sent to 8,000 selected business and 
financial leaders in the United States, Japan and 
the Middle East. 

Other interested parties may purchase the 
Handbook at $38 per copy, including postage in 
Europe. Five or more copies, 30% reduction. 
Outside Europe, please add postal charges for 
each copy: Middle East $4; Asia, Africa, North 
and South America $7. 

HcralbSfeSnbunc 

FRfNCH COMPANY HANDBOOK 1985 
Published by 

Irvtemationcd Business De ve lopm e nt 
with the 

International Herald Tribune 


10". URS 40 15 13 
21% USFG 220 65 47 
26V USG S 168 '44 7 
12% UnIFrst 30 ! 14 12 
*2 UnlNV 5360 44 IT 
31% UCamo 164 4J 13 
32% UnCorb 340 64 13 
AH UrrionC 

13% UnElec 144 105 6 
26 UbEI pf 400 11.9 
26% UnEI PfAM.00 121 
52% UEIPfL 840 116 
20ft UnEI pf 298 1L3 
15 UnEI Pf 213 129 
21% UnEI pf 232 106 
48 UnEI pf 744 11J 
52ft UEI pfH 840 11.9 
Z UnEwn 
37* UnPoc 140 34 11 
87% UnPcpf 735 6.7 
50 Unrvfpf 840 126 
3% UnifOr 

10ft UnBrnd 11 

9% UBrfpf 

17ft UCbTVs .10 4 45 

22% UnEnre 241 53 32 
12% Ulllom 240 94 4 
23 UlllUPf 297 135 
12 UlllilPf- 230 125 
10% UllluPf 1.90 13J 
15% Unltlnd 60 29 I 
20* UJerSl 1.16 3J 11 
lift UWMM 13 

2 UPkAUl . 1 

26V USblrG .12 4 6 

5* USHom 

31ft US Loos 40 15 9 
24* US5TIM 32 25 13 
22* U5SIMI 130 27 2D 
49V USStlPf 740*119 
24V* USStlPf 225 74 


1239 48ft 47 47% + % 

286 MV X 30V + ft 
34 151c 15V 1SV 
566 25ft 24ft 24V— ft 
51 21* 2TV 21* + V 
100:25 25 25 +1% 

9fl lov ioft ioft 
7 11V 11V 11V 
516 34 33V 33V— V 

561 38ft 38% 38V + % 
131 14V 14V 14V— V 
172 109* 108% 1089* + V 
2425 J7V 34* 37% + V 
1455 53ft F2V 52V— V 
133 5ft 5V, 5ft 
397 17% 17V 17% 

20001 33* 33% 33% + V 

18 33 32ft 33 + V 

180: 69 69 69 

60 26V 26V 26V— ft 

7 19V 19% 19% — ft 
5 25* 25% 25% — ft 

150: 64 64 64 —1 

1001 67% 67 67% + % 

126 33V 23% 23V— % 
17*3 45ft 47% 47V + % 
109 108 10711 108 + % 

680: 64 63ft 63ft 
50 3ft 3% 3ft 
66 72 Z1% 22 + % 

30 17ft 17ft 17% + % 
150 28ft 27% 27*— ft 
2353 43% 41* 42 
1B4 22* 21V 22% + % 
17 29ft 28 ft 29ft + V 
3d 17% 17% 17% — ft 

8 14* 14* 14*— ft 

43 20V 20ft 20* — ft 
160 31ft 31ft 31% + V 
108 16% 16 14 — ft 

19 3ft 3ft 3ft 
2675 28ft 27* 27ft— % 

418 ift 5V 6 — V 
8 32* Z 32* + ft 
29? 37* 37 37* 

6700 32* 32 32* — V 

50 53* 53* 53*— ft 
942 32% Z 32*—.* 


Spain Backs Incentives 
To Aid Auto Industry ' 

Reuters 

MADRID — Spam has approved a plan of 
financial incentives designed to stimulate some 
of the nation’s old-established car manufactur- 
ers to modernize thar plants, government 
sources said Thorsday. 

An official for a U.S. automaker said the 
restructuring was aimed at making the Spanish 
subsidiaries of French companies more compet- 
itive with the newer fatalities of their U.S. rivals 
operating in Spain, such as Fad Motor Co. and 
General Motors Corp. 

‘The plan is aimed at the subsidiaries of 
Peugeot and Renault We have no restructuring 
program and do not require special funding, - 
the officials said. 

Government sources said commercial banks 
would be asked to provide funds for the scheme, 
with the manufacturers putting up 180 billion 
pesetas (S1.12 billion). The state will makeup 
the difference between the prime interest rate 
and the rate at which the banks lend mousy for 
the modernization. ' 

Over the last 10 years, Spain has given gener- 
ous subsidies, tax and legislative breaks, to en- 
able Ford and GM to set up assembly plants. 
French companies, 'such as Renault, Peugeot 
and Cnrofcn, have operated in Spain since the 
1960s but have agi n g facili ties, swollen wok 
forces and a wider production range. 



55ft 35* Xerox 3JW 63 13 3024 49 48* 48% + ft 

Eft 46% Xerox pf 5A5 1QB 6 54% 54% 54ft— ft 

29 19% XTRA M Z7 12 283 23% 22% 23% +1 



NYSE Highs-Lows 


N*w HIGHS 27 


AVxondn 
OtomdShOf n 
■Gowfdinc 
IrtfMuHtfd 
PoPL 11 pr 
SunComp 
UnBrnd pfA 


Amoxinc 

AopWDoto 

dnMJicm 

HCA 

McLemwt 
Playboy En 
Terodyrw 
Wean Unit 


AlktSWTPfF Amoco 
EnsrchdPPf Fstwisc 


EnsrefidPPf Fstwisc 
Gutton lnfl ITT CppfK 

p3^« cr R^Kr 

ttssr ffisss 


AMI ine 
BorrvwroW 
Cuillnafa 
Ideal Basic 
■N(jk»Ch 

Pwwator 

TowltMto 

WatofaDaTE 


AmPresklj 
CLC Am 
vtEvonPpfB 
IntJHrv wra 
Oaklnd l75p 
Quanex 
VarlanAsc 
WefnpfnRHn 


Oironxjl pf 
GlllittBCo 
IllPwodl pf 
PacLumbr 
Sterl Drug 
TrtaPoc 


COrrmbRsc 

GenSIgnof 

KanGasEI 

Parody no 

SpgaCp 

Vmcd 

WJUWreOJf 



ADVERTISEMENT - — : t 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Oct. 3, 1985 

Net atssf yaw quotstloai or* tupalVd br Nm Foadt IWad-wnh Mm ixcaptlon of mim qapia boMd m btsM pefoa. 

The marginal symbols tndiart* frwjoency of aaotatlDM suoaflM: (d) -dally; (w) - we e k ly; 0») -hLmanthly; (rj - raoBhaft; U> - irregularly . 




rirtemationd Herald Trfeune, Book Division 

1 181 avenue ChoHesde<5aulle, 92521 Neuilty Cedex, Franas. 

Please send me copies of French Gxnpany Handbook 1981 

I □ fodased is my payment. (Payment may be made in J 

I convertible Europe&i currency of your choice at current 
exchange rates.) 

□ Please charge lo my credit cardVEAD DJNSsQ amEXD 


CARD 


SGNAHJE 

tweamy fcr utf ui d 


NAME foUbdiVM. 

rasmoN 

COMPANY 

ADDRESS 

OTY/COUNTRY— 




<-^V 


rpT 


^1055 



DM - OoutadM 64ark; BF ■ BolaKim FtanarFL -Dwteh Florin; LF 
P/V irons s»PWun».NA-7*of*vo/(5o3; --- 
Rodampt-.PrK*- E«<auoao;«n - Fom^n v 





























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credit card 

issued in China 

bears our name, 
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Federal Card 











. r.-i... • ,v X zz r .' . : 




L 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1985 


Thursday 


II Month 
HIQti lew SIX' 


Sis. Close 

Du. yiA PE tfosHisfclBW Owl. Cft'JC 


12 ManrtJ 
HitpILOH 5)84* 


Sis Close 

piv. YIH PE 109s High Lout GiWt.OlBS 


134B S FrlesEn '4 s' B’k Bb 8% 

2* I4Vj prisons 71 ion J«22 2lto 12 

ITS, 1PH FmtMd SO 1706 19% 19% 19% — ’■» 

10% iVi FrtAwt .171 14 201 IBS* 18% 1D%— to 

12to 47. FurVH ,05e i 21 17 11 11 U 


;i, is pe Co J5r3*0 


m _?* _ "Ai •% + % 


lau l*'.j PennE s 100 7J 9 IS OT 23% 23%— to 

131a 9% PenpoS 4) 11 , T 10% 10% lOVa— 1% 


LLSl Futures 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open High i- 0 * C*«e ChB ‘ 


Season Season 

HW LOW 


Open High urn . Close Cho. 


i5*n 7% Penrll 2D U 7 3S Ft TC W- V. 

1% Pentrnv 158 l* lta 1% 

30 24to PeriniC JO 10 4 2£fc MJe 2«B— Va 

I3i* 11 Perinli .ito JS 20 32 12b lJto Ijb 


Closing: 


ID 2 

ISb 10b 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to (he dosing on Well Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


2?k l*k 
31% 24% 
l* 1 -! 7*b 

13% 9to 

m m 

16 to 15% 

5 2% 
177* 13 

6 5's 
ISto 7to 


113 

8 

79 

1J0 47 12 


08 40 8 
JO 7J3 11 
.10 .7 12 


Sii CMS* 

D.v rw. PE IWfcH.fllLW Quo' OiBf 


*Oi n 

AL Lol> B 

AMC 

AM Inll 

ATT Fd 

AcmePr 

Acmcli 

Action 

Aclim 

4dm Hs 

AdRirJ 

Adobe 

Aerorc 

AfilPbS 

AlrExo 

Air Col 

ArCal pf 

Aiamca 

Almlron 

AlbaW 

Atoka 
A 'chain 
Altec 
Alcoa pt 
dluCo 
Am Bril 
Amdahl 
Amedeo 
AmStll 
AmCoa 
AEiBWl 
AFrue A 
AFruc B 
AHI1HM 
A Israel 
AAAzeA 
AMBId 
AmOil 
APeh 
AmPIn v 
APrec 
ArnRrtY 
ARovIn 
ASoE 
A con un 
a con or 
A non sc 
Anneal 
A ratal 
AndJCO 
Andrea 
v|Anol v 
AmoPI 
Arievn 
Armlm 
Armel s 
Arrow A 
Arundl 
Asmr g 
Astray 
Asfrolc 
Astral Pt 
ATIsCM 
Altos wt 
Audlolr 
i Avondl 


27 

.It 1.1 18 
.14 .9 14 


10 

.16 4 17 

73 14 13 
73 

AO 1J 20 


18 5V. 

»S 14'-? 
2 1 6’k 

3984 37. 

S* 79 Vb 

10 2to 

11 94k 
128 10*9 

S3 Ito 


J.75 I M 

40 

J* 27 17 
JO 10 14 


4) 171k 
47 Sto 
1 46 
S 4*8 
30 9ii 
62 11 A. 
49 Ik 
19 S3 

4 

i2 rt 

15 11 
47 !k 
Mil 33 
306 24% 
10 J 
60S ir-i 


5 S'k 
]4Vb 14% — '.4 
16'-> Into 
3* 3*. + % 

79 79 — 4b 

2'.k 2Vj— 'k 

Ji* 9% — v, 
lO'i lfl r » + 7. 
Uj in— Ik 

3 Jto 
25Tb 25to — 'k 
771k 171k 
S'k S'k— ’k 
46 46 

84 8 lil — Ml 

9% 9U 

"fe 

B2to 83b + to 
6U 4’ i + Vk 
7 7 'b 

l0 5 

an S'k + ii 

2i4 3 + Ik 

ills 111* + 'k 
frJb 6ik— lk 


*’u 1H 
17*i B'k 
24Ui 11b 
30- 8 

35b l«l 

37 23b 

4K 7b 
l'A Ik 
197k 15b 

16 7Vl 

11 55k 
244k )6<k 

12 7b 

144k 10 
441.!. 27 
36 121k 

13 5b 
13 'jk 8b 
15'- II 
36b 94 
1SV» B 


(1.00 M 

SO 2J 13 


•B8 U 7 
liHb 14 24 


JO Cl B 
J2 « 
lJOWM 9 
.40 12 12 
10 
15 

M 1J 15 
12 
II 

50b 4J 9 
SI 

40 l.l U 
■05e A 15 


4!k 4lk . 
?■- 2b 
10b 11 ' 

14k lb 
25 b 2 5b 
10 10Vk 
12'k ITi. 

2 *k 29k- 
Ub 14b 
2^a 23l- 
|44k 1443 
4b 4b ■ 
101k lO'k 
lib 11b 
3’k 3'k - 

10*k 'O’k 
71 "S 21b ■ 
144k 151k 
33U 33' s 
27b 29b- 

^ *s- 

18b 18b- 
79k 79k 

6*k 6b 1 
18 lfl'1 - 


12 - a 9b Porini pt 1.10 8.9 
4b 2'-. PetLw 
Ik '« PelLwt 

6<k PcILOPf IAS 23 a 
lUk TV. PetLe pi UB 2*J 


IB 12* 12 124k + b 

1B6 21k 21k Pi 


Season Season 
Utah Low 


Open Hioft LOW Close CbB. 


PORK BELLIES (CME1 

ta 

nS 57JJS MOV 6ia OAffl 03 J 

M & S8JS * ^ +i5 


0t $n Ci 7i--X 76-11 74-» +| 

R fi-SwwssH « 

Si 7 ' & «P 7>s «r3B »» « 

; fecwni.nsS". 3 ” 


ss5§ 
41 }\C 


12 T 7 7 

31 Mi »lk 74t + >i 


CERT. DPPOSIT11MM1 
nmniion.pgollOigd 


25* lb PhiILD .24013.9 2 '20 17b lb Hk 


7 2b PlCOPd 

7 Tf a Pier I wt 3 

7*« 3'. PtonrSv 

n> 4S. Pliwva J4 117 » 

154k 1D'-J PttDsm JFti 


9 2'-'i 2Vi T'i 

27 41* 4'k Alt 

43 34fc 39k 39k — 'k 

2 Sb SU IL 

l 131k lT.k T3!k + 'A 


Grains 


llv. 4lk Pisaln 0£ 1.1 150 36 ,7-k r* r<i 


20ik Ijvj PierDo JO 


167 17b I6'.k ITi + ?4 


16'. j 12*! PIVGms .18 IjO 15 29 16 15 1 * 15b— 


4'.4 I'k PIvR A 
4b 2b PIvRB 
6b 3 PODCEU 
lUk 7b Ports rs 


ID S'* 3V* 3’k — !? 


3<.k— >6 Est. Sales 


WHEAT CCBT) 

MOO bu minimum- dollars Per bukbel 
IJJVi 2J9Vi Doc Z97W Z98 Z»5b Z95VJ —37244 

174 vg 207 Mar 3.03b 33»4*i Mtb M2 —SO 

4.02 284 Mav 7M ZVBVk 2.97 2 «BVe. — 3)1 'A 

177*3 263 Jul Z84b Z85 ZB2V, 282 U — .OHi 

3 AS 267 Sep 2B8b ZBBb 2B6Vj 287b —351 

Est. Sales Pw. Soles 6J20 


9137 BSJ4 DOC 

WM BfcS6 Mar 

91 B&43 Jun 
9TJS 87 J6 Spo 

90A1 8W4 0*C 

99.91 8120 Mar 

Est. Sales _ p™. 


9209 92.09 9202 9208 + JH 

9IJ3 91.73 AS 9JJD 


81 3b 3Vk J'*— Ik Prev.OgrOMnlat. non WTP 
48 214 ll>k 10b liv» + b CORN(CBT) 


COPPEE CINYC5CE1 9041 . 

mss ra 5 BHnBgffl S® E U »o~Lu.«s<i« f « 

rl Tl liil 

E it. Sales Prev. Sales 1.733 I 91.15 J673 Jun 

Prw. Da, Open Ini. 10.186 off 33 S7M Sep 


MO? 9173 91.73 91 AS 91J7IJ 

Mm 91JB 9128 9128 91* +* 

ere* Cad Wl > +J13 

MM 9IJ2 +JW" 

B20 Mar - +M- 

prev. Sales 35 


ink 12b PostiPr JOe 1.4 13 60 1 a 13*1 14 + Ji s3»0 du mini mum- dollars Drrbushet 

7*k Sb PrairOs 43 S'k 6b 6»k— b zn 214** DOC 224b 226 224 Wi 224V; —350b 

20Vk 13 ProltLS 10 37 lE'k 18b IBJk — b iio 2249! Mar Z3SV1 Z36\k 225 1351k —350b 


10'k 10'k- 
3(,Vs J6‘k 
lib "I’k 
10'k 10’k ■ 
ll'k 114k- 
14 v* 14*k 
34«j 35 ■ 

ll’k nH 


8b 6b ProHPJ 081 7 7 6-k 7 

i lb '.*» PremRs 2S *» . Ik 

14’k 9»4 Pres R A .96 75 5 2 12^ 12*« '?!?— ? 

124% 6b PresR B .96 82 4 5 lib 11*5 l»»k— Jk 

4 *k 34% Presto 13 60 J,-* 3b 3P*— 'k 

36* IB PrpCTs 126 B.1 13 31 IMe W»* 19*k .. 

23'k 15 PruEns 100 70 7 10 2D4h Mb MVa + w Prev. Do v Open Inl.l 20,967 att 2 

40 31'1 PSCol Pt 425 11J 1502 37b £»4 3W. — U envucmirnTI 

23'k 16b PofpfC 234 110 I 20*1 »k ^k + 'k 

J4b 29b Pol PIE 4J7 1X4 43 K’k 32% ^ 

2J'» 16*k Pat DID Z34 9 9 ISO 23b 2Jb 23b + H 

Bb 7b PumaiS 18 3b 3V> 3U 


121 'A 221 MOV 240V* 24tb Z40 241 V* —350b 

206 923 Jul 242b 243b 242 i. 243 —.00 'A 

206W 234b See 245V% 226b 234b 235 —01 

233b 220b Dec 222b 233b 230*! 231 —3)2 

2.74*1 225 Mar 242 242Vk X40b 240b — 0IVk 

Esi. Sales Prev.5ai%s 16-397 


SUOARWORLD II (NYC5CE1 

112000 lbs.- cants per lb. ... « ln Cjn +11 

7J5 300 Jon !'U 53 cn un +10 

923 3J4 Mar fs HI (O iM +08 

7.15 150 Mav 5J7 509 507 M7 tw 


Sm DOC 91 J? 9V9 9109 9L74 +2? 

Htin £ 9100 9142 9123 9127 +21 

SA73 JW 9«S 91354 9095 9009 +03 

a?M 5Tp 90LM 9006 9009 9003 +03 

B72B D«C 9027 9020 9026 90329 +04 

tOM MOT >997 89.97 8°04 8907 +0a 

M04 Ji B90S 8908 8904 8907 +0* 

§941 5*P 8942 8942 B9J7 8940 +04 


2741k 225 

Est. Soles 


rS6S Sv5 20% + % SOYBEANS JCBT1 


I AVI «1IT| Mi-0 ' 

a 32% 37% 32% 

ISO 23b 21b 23b + % 

18 3% 3Va 3’A 


10b 5 Quebgs 


5000 du minimum- donors Per bushel 
60B 50lto Nov 507b 5.11b 506V* 507*3 +0QU. 

6379 111 Jan 5.19 523b ilSV! 5.19 1 - — J»b 

7.62 53Z2 , 'i Mor S3J7 5J6b 521 U 532 —00b 

7.79 521b Mav 542b 546b 541% .542b -00b 

6J§ 526b Jul 549% 503% 508% 549 —00b 

674 525% AIM 5350 553 549% 549% -00% 

628 522 Sap SXI 545 543 543% +00% 

f^a STS Nov 543 546% 542% 543b 

54 3 554% _Jan . 554% 

Est. Sales 


324 Mar “ HI In U9 +i* E3» 5ata ' Prev.SaJes OSK 

^ W1 ill M M6 IS^DSop«in«.mi68 UP10OO 

B S S S 5 »SSr li ® s w%»-«is mwuw +« 

» p£Jv“ 7 " “ a fl erw Jffi IB ifflS .a 

«n lint '. 803121 off 4^ ***** ^ 


10*6 6b 
6% 41k 
10% 6'k 

2*H 21b 
ZT.S 12% 
7*a b 
19% 20 
43 23b 


.10a 12 
.040 0 
•93rl4J) 7 
■ 355e 2 1 
50 21 15 


.15 

U S 

5 

10% 

10% 

10% — Vk 

10' 4 

5*i 


16 

5 

164 

6 

31% 

6 

30% 

6 + 'k 

31 + % 

19% 

15% 

B'-S 

n 


yy 

15002 

5b 

5"! 

5'k— % 

9% 

6t*r 


71 

700r 

5% 

5 

5% 

17Va 

10 


7 

400 

*% 

Jb 

4% — *s 

4 

2 


4 

15 

6% 

6% 

6'z + Vk 

10b 

Jto 

JI 

4.1 38 

33 

140 

12b 

4% 

12*1 

4*k 

12% + % 
4*1 

l'k 

*'4 

% 

3% 


71 

538 

4% 

£'« 

4% 

4tk 

1% 

200 

30 22 

It 

178 

53*4 

1 

52% 

to 

53% + % 

1 + "4 

17 

4Vj 

9to 

2 

J*b 10 18 

13 

14b 

14% 

14 b— b 

IBto 

6*; 


.15 5 10 

200 55 

9 

17 

16 

04 52 B 
JtOe 25 B 
.ID J B 
53 


7*! + % 
5 

6 % 

22% + b 
23b- % 
1% 

31b— % 
16'k— b 
16 — Vk 
7Jk— % 
8% + % 
12 

7Tk + % 
12% — % 
2ik— % 
», + *. 


9% 5% RAI Jit 52 12 10 6% 6% 6% 

19% 15% Boson .13 0 46 35 19% 19 19% + b 

20 15 Rnnsbg .72 44 26 48 16% 16 16% + k 

17*k 16 RllSon 7 16b I6*» 16b + 

TOItp 17": Rltsoun Sie XI 2 17b 17% 17Jk— b 

4% 1% Redlpw 11 rs 2b 2b— % 


Est Soles prev Sales 6*433 1.4300 1.1905 Jun ’-4W 

ZZSSSS ssss (fisaMftii 

.o^rktonvSDerton _ » +14 

nii kES- tSa 7363 S3 3357 +17 7004 Dec 2311 


5*3 55A% Jan 

Est. Sales Prev.Sal«sl26.ns 
Prev. Dot Open int. 61,183 otf 150 


COCOA (NTCSCE) 
lometrlctens-Spernn 

s is ss s 9 

is i» Jr ^ fi m g is 

IS ^ gP 2426 WO M25 2g «6 

Est. Sales Prev, Sales "2589 

Prev. Day Open Int. 21.175 up 384 


a SB i S s Is * as-® 


J0U 2006 Dec 2310 XQ0 J» 2311 —5-, 

.7504 0981 MOT -J®’ -W2 JM —4 

73to JO70 Jun J2U JS60 J3SJ 2274 —3 

J300 -7176 Sea JK8 

Est. Sales J.UJ7 Pm SolM 1077 
Prev. Dav Ooen Int. 4032 ott 120 


SOb 33% PesrtA 
5?'k c0 ResD B 
6% 3b Fiesta sc 
5b 4 RstASCA 


7 16b !6Ve 16b + b 

2 17% 17% 17V,— b 

11 Ts 2b 2b— % 

28 142 37 34% 36b - % 

J2 1001 «2b <2b 42b— b 
13 44 4b 4b «b 

11 58 4 4 4 


12% 9% RtolelP 20 21 17 19 9b _9% _9b + % 


19% ■% Rckwvs 25 

30b 17b Rogers .12 4 11 

5b 1% RoonvP 
33’ k 22% RuOCfcPl 06 22 


25 55 17% 17% 17*9— V» 
11 3 19% 19% 19% 

73 lb 1% 1b + ’k 
I 25'- 35% 25b — V, 



ORANGE JUICE (NYCEI 
15009 res.- cents per to. 


13000 13220 +200 
13300 135-40 +1.90 
134J0 13600 +1JM 
137 JO 138J0 +1310 
13900 14000 
14000 M230 +00 


,8100 I27.40 l!tav 129 JO I*g 

lS» lS» 12500 -1J5 


127JU 1=JU i-l! E ,] Solus 22 Prev. SOI 

JtSuJ lMiii —100 Prev. Day Open int. 155 

T2S40 12&60 124.15 -1J0 GERMAN MARK (1MM) 


Prev. Dav Ooen int. 4032 ott 120 
FRENCH FRANC IIMM1 ■ 

S mwt° ne 3»CT lt .123)0 .13655. +16K 
12in 1DW Mar .12230 .12230 .12ZH .12365 +145 

.1210U -ivre! ^ 1J190 12W] 12W ^2295 

EW. Sales 22 Prev.Sodes 


14000 14100 —100 
1413)0 14100 —100 
14000 14000 —100 


Metals 


20 8 8 8 + % 

39 13b 11% 13% 

Si 4 4 4 + % 

2 52% 52b 57%— ’» 

2 46*, 46b 46b 





4 

6% 

6% 

rt- 

% 


12 

g 

54 


Ilk 

ito— to 



IB 

7 

5b 

5to 

5b 






2% 

:% 

7% 




15 



"b 

9b- 

% 






1 

1 - 

to 





3% 

.1% 

3to + to 



a 

.5 

5% 

,6% 

5% + to 





4b 

4b 

4b 




10 

16 

m 

5% 

6 + to 

JO 

2J 

16 

31 


8b 

3b - to 








JO 

11 


547 

9’ m 

9 

Q - 

to 



12 

1 

17b 

12b 

12b 



1%— Ik 
13% 13b + Vk 

"ft b 

3b 3b + ’■• 
7% 2% 

14% 14b 


.15e 19 i 
23 
8 


3 Vi* BAT In 
13b BDMs 
lb BRT 
9% BSN 

8b Badger 40 18 
7% Bo laws J2a 30 
2b BalvMwt 
22b BoJiFd 143e 40 

Ab Bamtr g 

s% art- BU A0 10 

7 l Bnrco 
2% BamEn 
4 BarvRG 
10b BarucM J7t IS 
4b Beard 

10% Bald Bit, 100 160 
b Beltran 

20% BergBr J2 U 
2% BethCo 021140 
21% BlcCo 
9b BtoV . _ 


3*4 3=% 

21% 21% 

2% 2b 

10 70 — % 

10% 10% — 1 0 

914 b 

2b 2% — b 
25 1 - 2S’.k 
6% 6b + b 
8 B + >k 


J2 U 13 

JOtl40 

.72 2J 9 
A0 17 IB 


21% Bln>Mf 100 O 11 
9b BloR B S 16 

9% BiOR A s 15 

14% BlfTJWS 40 U » 
% BlottE 

11 Blount A AS 18 13 
lib BlouniB AO 13 13 
lib BolarPs IB 


10'k BowVal 00 
2% Bowmr 14 

12% Bowne .44 27 13 
19b Brscng I0O 
It'.i BmFA 100 U 10 

27»* BrrvFB 100 26 11 

2% Buckhn 
3b Buckh PI 00 100 
7b Busli n A 


3 3 + Vk 

4% 4% 

10 % 10 % 

9b 9b 

11% ll'k 
5k !» + % 
27% 27b + tk 

2b r-k + b 
32% 32% + % 
14b 14b— b 
23% 23% 

14Vk 14Vk 
131k 13?i 
26b 26%— % 
% % 

» I2 — % 
12 + b 

12b 17% — % 

10% 11 + b 

3% 4 

16% 16b + Vk 
24 24% 


M** — Vk 


3 3 - % 

4% 4%— V. 

6% 6%- % 


!B% 1B% + % 


17% 

5*4 CM1 CP 


1* 116 

10 

9to 

9to 

+ 

to 

3 to 

Ito CMX Co 


45 

Ito 

lb 

I *2 



19% 

9 to 
Uto 

14', CRS J4 

8% CSSn 

21 

11 48 

16 7* 

16*4 

9 

ia 

1 

9% 

16*4 

9 

9b 

“ 

to 

Uto 

4*2 CooleA 


5 4 

6to 

6% 

6% 



14% 

10% CalRE 1J8 

107 

8 16 

12'k 

llto 

12 

+ 

to 

28% 

18b Calmol 00 

2J 

21 1172 

27 

26Vk 

27 

+ 

to 


3% Canon n 


14 5 

Sb 

5b 

5b 



10'4 

7to Calprop 001 

8J 

It 6 

9% 

9% 

9% 

+ 

% 


IB% II Cameo .44 30 

ISb 13b c Marco JO 

23b 18% CdrOcc 04 

3% 1% Cordli 
15% 8b Cores 
ftb 4Vs CnreEn 
4?% 37% CaroP pt 500 100 
S'.« 2% Cosbwn 06123.0 

22% 14% CastIA 0OD 5J 

=T% 26 b CasFd 2J0a 70 

7% 2 Castlno 
8V« 4% Chi II v»l 
31 20% CenMpt 150 11.9 

ia% 10b CenlSe 107*130 
19 u% CtrvBu 
»% Sb Colec 
a 2 ChmoH 


JO 20 12 

16 


I r-k ChtMAs .16 .9 13 


1 14% 14% 14% 

140 15% 15 15% + b 

5 19b 19% 19b 
27 34b 34 34 — b 

15 9% 9% 9% 

20 2% 2% 2Vk — Vk 

1 14b 14b 14b 
76 7% 7% 7% 

300i 47 46b 47 + % 

II 2% 2b 2% 

8 15% 15Vk 15% 

3 29% 29% 29% 

14 3% 3% 3% 

24 5% 5b 5% — % 

3(t 29% 29b 29% + % 

10 lib lib lib— % 

2 1AH 16b 16% — Ik 

13 7% 7% 7% 

136 2% 2 2% 


17*- Chi MB s .16 0 15 

)A% ChiRv lJOa 60 11 
6% ChtDv 9 
J} CnHDof 4 J» 

15b Cniltns .17 0 27 


16% 17% + V, 


12% Citadel 
lBb CilFst 


15Vk Clormt 103e 4.9 
sb ClorkC JBe 30 9 


29 20 19% 19b — % 

10 20b 20 20 + % 

20 7 6’k 7 + % 

ISDrJJb J2U 3? i 

238 » 29 29% + % 

111 » 25b 25% 

4 29% 29b 29% 


lib Uooav5 .is 1.1 12 
3% Cognitr 

6b Com, — . 

lb ColFwIS 
*tv Ccuntod 6 

B' j Coniine 
6b Cam do 
6b CamoD 
4' j CmpCn 
5% CmoFcl 13 

6% Coned F 14 

5% Conast 
1% Conqwl 
Ab ConsOG 
ConOGwt 

16' : Cnsrarn 21 

6% viCantA 4 

IT'* ConlMtl 7 

10b Convsl n 
78b Coaler a 


32 

39b 

39'A 

39b + to 

2 

B 

B 

B 


14 

14% 

14*t 

14*k- 

to 

fl 

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4% 

i%- 

to 

IB 

VH 

9% 

9Vk- 

to 

25 

4% 

4 

4Vk + % 

18 

IV k 

]g*5 

19b- 

% 

20 

v% 

9% 

9% + % 

IBS 

12% 

Tib 

12’k- 

to 

17 

IVk 

7 

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IS 

6% 

6% 

fito- 

to 

17 

6% 

6% 

6% 


7 

7% 

7% 

7% + Vk 

1058 

9 % 

9 

9t/k 


77 

4b 

4% 

4b + to 

90 

4to 

4b 

4b- 

to 

150 



— 


•JS3 

21% 

20% 

2FS- 

to 


U'k 

IJ 

13 - 

to 


2% ij«Cri 
% CosCrwt 
Sb CntCrd J4r 19 14 
9% CntrMn 

25% Cross 1A4 4J 15 
24b Cr&wIM 1.000 30 B 
9% CmCP 51 

lTk CwCPol 1.92 80 
4% CrownC 

% CrutcR 1 


1% CrvstO 
13b Cubic 
23b Curtice 
tk CusiEn 


18% 18% 

11% 11% + b 
18% 18% 

2% 2b , 

8% Bb 
914 9b 
32b 33b + b 
33% 33% + % 
14b 14b 
22b 22b 

% s £ + !% 
1% 1% 

20% 21% + b 
76% 27% + % 
b b— % 


1% DWG 081 40 
21b DaleEn J2 1J 
9b DamE A Z00 200 
e% DamEB UO 250 
31k Damson 
17% Dorrs ot 250 113 
!9*k Dams Pi 375 ISA 
10% DotoPd .16 1J 
3% Datarm 
3’ < DeRese 
3% Decrot S 
12% De/Vol 174 117 
1% Detmed 

4 Dsgnlm 3231 50 
7% Dosonl 

iO% DevlCo 
9V» DvnRsn 0Oe 6J 
S% Dlad A 
5% DtoaB 

9% DtoBltl JO .9 

1% Die icon 
36b Dlllrd JO J 

2% Diodes 

5 DlrActn 
1% DomoP 
b DmsP wt 

13 Damirs 
B'« Downev 
1% Driller 
9b Drum 
33 Ducom m 3J 

*■ Dunlap 

12% Duplers 08 26 
12 DurTsf 
9b D/nlct 
18Vk Dvncer 00 27 


lb 1% 
24% 24% 
7b 9b 
9 8% 

4b 4% 
22b 22% 
24% 74% 
13b 11% 
5b Slk 
3% 3b 
4% 4% 

15% 15% 
1% lb 
4% 4% 

8b B'k 
13% 13% 
9% 9*: 

7V« A’-k 
A'! 6*1 
37 k 30% 
ib ib 
AI Alb 

3*0 a 

s !? s -. 
2% 1% 


ib 
24% 
9%- Vk 
9 — % 

4*i — b 
22%— b 
74% f b 
11% - % 
51k— b 
3b- % 
4% + Vk 
15% + b 
lb— % 
4%— Ik 
Bb 

13b 4- b 

Prj 

7% + Vk 

37* +1% 


61% — b 
3 + Vk 

ffj- .% 


13% 13% 
74b 23% 
TVk I'.k 
T'i! 9b 
24 24.. 

% % 
13b 18 
!2b ll'.k 
13b 13 
28 27% 


+ 

13% + % 

23b — % 
1% 

9b — % 
24 — b 

% 

18 — b 

1 ms 

13 — % 
77% — '.k 


9% 6% 

16% 13 

7W **i 

6% 7« 

3b 2% 
48 31b 

*2% % 
ITk 
»% 2b 
8b 2% 
13'k 10% 
18 <7.k 

% % 
10% 4% 
7% % 

17% 10b 

4 2% 

12% 7% 

11% 4% 

4 6 

2B% 16 
»% 6 
9% 6% 


EAC 00 AB 

EECO J2 27 

EP.C 
ESI 
E04ICI 

Est go 6,966210 
EdwBa .12 
ElAudD 

ElcAtn 100 7.1 

ElecSd 

Etshwr 

EmMd n 0> J 
EavDvl n 
EnoMot 


Enslrpf 03fl167 
Ere WO 


Eskey 
Esfce/P* 100 160 
Espey 00 2J 

EvrJA JO 2J 

E»eel 00b 5-1 


B% B% 
14% 14b 
*b 6Vk 
6% A 
2b 2b 
33b 33 
13b 13. 

1 S 

20 19% 

a% m 

3*i 2% 

10% 10% 
17% 18 
b v. 
Bb 8% 
b b 
lib 12% 
2 % 2 % 
9% 9% 
Sb 5b 
Ab Ab 
17% 17b 
8% 8% 
8% 7b 


8b 

14% 

AVk— % 

6% 

37k- % 


'^+1 
19% — % 
6% + % 
2% + % 
10% - b 
19 +1 

'A 

0b- ;* 
b — Ik 
’3%-% 
2% 

F% — % 
5b 
6b 
17% 

0% 

7% — % 


Bb FPA 

16% Fading .40 
6 PolrFIn 
lb FalrtnC 
15% Forlvpl A~\ ; 
3b F Ida m 
11 FWvmB 00 1 
18% Fgterpn 00 ■ 
11% FischP 081 
6% PileCE 
22% Fluke IJSt . 

6% Food mi 

5% FttllllD . 
89% FordCndAX'fis 
ia% tontC A JO 
12% Forest L 
b Folomt 
4b FrtHIV 

14 FreaEI 


10 10 

19 b 19b + V. 
14b 15 
2b 2b 
16 !6Vk 
6% 8% 

12 12 
19% 19% — % 
12% 12% + Vk 
B% 9% +l»k 
27Vj 22% — 91 

!!'* HVk— % 

6% 6*1— Vk 

W 99 
22b 22b + % 
24% J4% — % 
fki 1b 
6% Ab— Vk 
21% 21%— *k 


21% 20 
22*1 Kb 
12 7 

3% 1% 

19b iJb 

6*1 2% 

A% 3'i 
18% 11% 
13b 8*k 

23tk I6*k 
24% 15b 
63Vk 42 
9% Ab 


1295 13J 
04 25 13 
19 


1765 7 

B7 l'k 


3% + % 
2b + % 
1Tb— b 
2b + % 
18b- Vk 
17% — % 
21 % 

21b — % 
6b— b 
1 — v* 


18% lib Russell JO 10 13 25 16b 16% 16% — % ^^.l*^|J,ySSL7iwi 
39% 16 RrkoH 00 24 U 30 2Sb 25% 25*3 — % iaOOOIbs- dollan pot 100 


»0? IM |5e? Ort ?i05 2108 20.95 20J99 —05 
2000 Dec 2L05 21J27 2005 7007 —-25 


COPPER (COMEX) 
25000 lbs.- cents per Us. 


39 18b 

S'k 2% 


5 53 4b 

529 Bb 
II IS 36b 

14 13 3% 

28 7% 
lOr 13 1 6 6% 


4% — b 
Ib + b 
36% — ’k 
5% + % 
7% 

6% 

1% 


07el70 

10 

JOe 10 7 

i .76 3J 12 
; ,7 a 30 12 
206 16 
J6 5.’ 


4 

4% 

4% 

Jto 



87% 

707s SDo 

pf 904 110 

SOI B4to 84 

Vk B4to 


378 

5 

4to 

5 



74% 

56"! SD9 

ipl 700 110 

50z68to 61 

to 68Vk 


6 

14 to 




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18b SDo 

■ of 207 11.4 

4 21to 2 

b 21b — 

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llto 

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11 38% 31 

to 38% 


37 

77to 

21 to 

7? 

+ 

to 

70‘i 


Us 80 30 

11 26% 26 

% 26% + 

% 

20 

72'* 

22'* 


+ 


Fk 

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nrk Alt 80 

19 Sto ! 

5 


12 

58% 

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a at IJO 120 

23 lp*k li 



89 

7to 

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17 8b 

% B%- 

"6 


39J5 2000 Dec 2LM ItJJ 2ft85 70-87 —JS 

29.07 2000 Jan 21J0 21J7 20.95 2D0B —29 

in «n 21.15 Mar 2140 21.75 21J5 21-25 — Jfi 

270S 2105 MOV 2V0B 2205 21.70 I1J0 — -K 

21.75 Jul 2225 22J8 2200 TIMS — M - 
£lS 7100 AUB 2238 7200 H.15 22.15 

24 05 2100 Sen 2205 2255 2230 2220 —JO 

22B0 2100 Oct 2250 2250 2205 2205 —JO 

ESI- Sales Prov. Salta 9JM 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 48,158 off 365 


25000 1 !».- cents ptr 
6O0O 58.45 

AO0O 6000 

B4J5 5SJD 

B4J0 58.75 

8000 SfSS 

7400 . 60.00 
J4.«B 6005 

70.90 ML9D 

7H30 6L60 

64JM 

67 JO 6255 

67 JO 6250 


GERMAN MARKCIMMJ 
Spar mor*- 1 point enualsSMOpi 
J83D 0971 Doc ^06 

2m 1ST 38 

Sales 3MM Pre£toJes3Uj 
Prev. Dav Onen int. 4SJ77B oft 22! 

JAPANEESE YENdMMJ^^ 


857 J8D4 338541 +54 

888 -3837 JB87 +54 

918 J918 0932 +33 

. .0963 +53 


iero-i' (■?<>*■ 

lubes l b( 1 


58.45 Oct 6100 6100 6000 AfcoS -.10 J pv yetl-1 POint OOUdlS 52000001 mm.M- *!%**%* ^ 

6040 Nov 6l.ee —.15 004720 003*05 Dec JM069O 3KM738 004490 .004725 +3S 

58J0 Dee 6100 6220 6100 61 JO —.15 Jo4737 .004035 Mor 004718 004758 3)04713 .004745 +35 

58J5 Jan 6175 —.15 nJnu 004220 Jim . JKM770 +36 

59.28 Mar 6200 6290 6200 A2J5 -.15 SiS M4158 Dec -W320 004836 004820004840 +20 

60.00 Mav 63.00 A3J0 6245 6265 —JO EjLSaFa, 18089 Prev. Sales lira 

6005 Jul 6360 63-60 «05 pSvTDOT Open Int. 34089 Ofllft 

6L60 D«: SS SS SS £ti -JO SWISS FRANC OMM) 

SS E Tz .... tfS =S "%£ anC }gr'3g a, %g' 029 0654 47Q5 +4, 

3737 ^5 Mar .4705 -4/60 Attn A 74S +fl . 

— A7a 0190 Jun 0760 0760. 0760 -4790 +45 


<W ICEEn 
24b ICH s 
1% ICO 
2% tPM 
3b iRTCps 
4% 155 .12 27 

1% ImpGp .He 40 

% Imnlnd 
30 imoOII a 160 
a*: Inlight 
11 Instms JO 1.0 22 
1% instSv 7 

2Vs insSvcf 051 105 
a% InlCIvg M 
10% inlmk .12b .9 
7b InIBknf 
b intBk wl 
Ab inIHva 
6 inlSeow 
4b intThrn 
4b inTnrpf 
13': Ionics s 
19% IroaBrd 


46% 

2 + V4 | 

2%— b 
7Tk — Va! 


37b + b 
7%— % 
19b— % 
1% 

2 % — % 
lib + !k 
17b — % 
3% + % 
% 

7 — % 
6%— % 
4b— % 
4b 

21% + % 

34b 


17b 11% jaei/n 00b 4.4 9 131 11% 11% 11%—% 


4% 2b JelAiti 9 751 4% 4b 4'k + b 

ltk % JetA wt 35 % % % 

c% 5% Jelron .71110.1 12 1A T* 7 7 + % 


6% 3 JohnPd 


36 J'k 2% 3 


ll’k 7 JohnAm JO 19 10 II 7% 7% 7%— b 

11% a Johnlnd 4 23 8% 6% 8% 

TVk 3% JmpJk n 19 11 3% 3Vk 3% + % 


4% 1% 

!6b 10 


13 10% 

1S% ,?b 


24 1S% 

237k 14 
4b 2% 


3% 2 
16b 10b 
30% 22% 


KapokC 

KavCo JO 10 
Ko»J n JOe 10 
KearNI A0 IT 
Ketiwln 00a 44 
Ketchm 051 30 
K.evCo JOe 80 
KevCa wl 
KavPh JO 11 

Klnark 

WrtJV 

KitMfg 

Kleerv 02r .9 
Knoll 

KugerC 232 BJ 


3to 3% 
12Vk 12% 
11 11 
13 13 

%'-4 18b 

18% 17b 
S'k 3% 
3% 3 

Wi 9% 


3V: 

12% 

11 

13 + Vk 

lBb - % 
18 + b 


2 % 2 % 
14% 14% 
27 26% 


2b— % 
4b + '•* 
2% + Vk 
14% 

26b + % 


14Vj 12b 
3 Ito 


171 

22 

13% 

t% 

13*: 

1% 

13to + v a 
1%— to 

E 

8b 

8*4 

Bb — to 

13 

1 

1 

1 

7 

9 

eto 

Bto— *■ 

20 

2% 

2to 

2% 

19 

9b 

91k 

9*i- to 


J5I IJ 3 
JOe 


ir *iS 

20b 

ITk + % 
13V« 

3b 

15’k 

21b 

17% — b 
76b +4% 
10% — % 
5% + ’k 
10% 

15b + % 
16'k + 
9b— % 
19% + v» 
5% 

3% — b 
3% 

7*b — % 
20% + V> 
17 — to 
7b— % 
16% — b 
13b— V> 
19b 

4% + % 
9 + b 

29% — % 
79 —1 

13b 

12' J + % 

40 + V! 

lAto— % 
16'k — % 
17b 

1%— ve 
17%— % 


13 

235 108 

21 

29 

J0a 1.1 A 
18 

.12 1.1 9 
7 
18 

IJO 150 
0OU AI 9 
24 

1 JOe 5.9 84 


1.16 10 15 
J4 14 IB 


34) 70 7 

.15 S 70 
7 

30 


04 4.9 12 
40 10 9 

8.90 11 J 
J4 10 27 
00 4.9 8 
110 

20 IJ 16 
28 ».7 16 
14 


106 89 A 
JOe 22 


JO 22 54 
.151 17 


l'k 

9to 

13b 

10 


17 ir* 
3% IBto 
9*2 SVj 
14% 1IW 
21% 12% 
23% 14% 
17% lib 
21% 13 
49 b 31 
17% 11% 
16Vk Mb 
17% 12% 
7 5% 

13b 6% 

3% 2b 
ll'k 9% 
37 29b 

ft 2 £ 

11% 5% 
12% Btk 


57 13% 
33 19b 
16 2 Big 

10 5 11b 

169 15b 

14 3 10b 

16 AT 16% 

11 61 20*: 

14 1538 40*g 

40 12 

11 24 12% 

11 4 15% 


7 IB 9 

17 21 2% 

I 10'k 
llQz 34 * 
7 59 2% 

35 % 

7 14 5% 

28 8% 


13% 13b 
18% 18% - 
8% 81k 

11% lib 
14% IS 
Hb 18b . 
14b lA%- 
20% 20% ■ 
39% 40% 
lib II 
U% 12 - 
ISb 15% 
6b 7 
9 9 

2b 7b- 
10% 10% 
34 34 

2b 2%- 
'k %- 
5% 5%- 

m 8% 


22% 15% 
ItVk 4to 
19b 13% 
24b 18% 
27% 10'k 
7% 3b 
7% 3b 
3 4% 

7% 4% 

25b 16 
14b 8% 

13 Bb 


O 

Jlib J 10 


Ji 13 
A0 1.9 77 
24 10 19 


05e ,f 
.15 12 

20 4J 
02 10 16 

021 60 11$ 


JO 10 TJ 6527 


14% 16 16% 

6% 6b Aik 
Wk 18% 19% + % 
20b 20b 20b 
23% 23b 23b - % 

4% 4% 4% — b 

6 n 5% 

4b 4% 4b + % 
4% 4% 4% 

23% 23b 23% + % 
12% 12b 12% — % 
13% 12% 12% + % 


irk PGEPtA 
9% PGEpfB 
9 PGEtrfC 
9vg PGEelD 
Vk PCEwE 
B% PGEpfG 
29b PGEpfF 
20V- PGEMZ 
23b PGEpIY 
18% PGcPfW 
16V! PGEPfU 
18b PGEpfT 
18b PGEpfS 
7% PGEpfH 
16% PGEofR 
14b PGEMP 
14b PGEctO 
14b PGEMM 
16% PGEnlL 
14% PSEotK 
8to PGEofl 
15-k PGTrn 
42% PocLIpI 
33 1** PoeLlpt 
47., Pacrfpf 
b Popes 
37% PaHCo 
5*i Pan last 


6% PoviiPt 
2b PovFon 
7W PEC 1 st 
36 PanEM 
iS'.k Pentr 


48 13 21 
44 
42 
50 
2E 

02) 70 13 
IJ0O 30 17 
IJO 50 10 


12 I lb 
1 12 % 
10 11b 
47 11% 
172 ll'k 
124 lib 
2f 11% 

71 33’k 
4 28!: 

15 23 
442 21 

1 23 
43 21% 

217 10% 
32 23 
749 18% 
B 18% 

2 17% 

1 20 

<0 18% 

10 10 

16 26% 
300* 33% 
ISO: 39b 
160* 44": 
245 K 

54 39 
2 6 % 
SO 7 

72 10b 
6 4Vk 

389*11 
40 36 
21 24 


13% 13V; 

12% 12% + to 
11b lib 
11 me * to 
lib 11% + % 
11 lib + to 
24-8 J4% 

31“i 31%— Vi 
2fito 2fito- to 
22’s 22% — to 
2)to 20% 

23 33 

23 to ZJto— to 
10’k 10'k — b 
21 22 + to 

101k ie% + % 
18 18 
17Vk 17% — to 
20 20 — % 
18% 18% 

10 10 

26b 26% + to 

38% 38% 

39b 39b 
44% 44to + ii 
% to — *« 
38to 39 + b 
6% 6% 

Ha Ab— -to 
10% 10Vs— % 
4'.' I 4'. ■ 

lO'.k io%— i , 
35% 75% — % 
Z3% 24 + % ! 


15% lib 
5b 3% 
28 17% 

7% Jb 
35 12b 

20 12b 

67 41% 

15% n 

4b 2% 
1% % 
Sto 3% 
6 3% 

4b Ib 

15 9% 

11 7% 

13*o Ab 
12% 9to 
13% BVk 
2 % 
19to 10% 
16*1 Bb 
15% 10 
ISb 7% 
7% 4 

15b 8% 

5% 3to 
20% 10% 
ISb 10 
25% 24b 
9> k Sb 
16% 7 
[>.< to 
10 % S'k 
11% 8% 
11% BVk 
51 to 38to 
14b 11% 
92b 65b 
23‘k 17b 
23% 17% 
75% 55b 
85% 61 
88 70 


17 38 13 

2 3% 

06 21 13 194 26 Vk 


52 5b 
8 23 15% 

11 IBVk 
6 6 63 


13 + % 

3b— to 
26% + to 
5b 
15% 

18% + to 


OATS CCBT) 

s 000 Du minimum- dollars Per bushel , 

13& 1 Mito 1J3U lJ3b l^to -00*4 ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

ik TT B* IS* !0 tt S* +». & 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 271 Nov 

Prev. Dav Open int. 3 . 26 3 up 2a 


7«fJ0 A40O J«1 64J5 — JO 

67.90 62S Ator 6405 6405 6405 6460 — j) 

47JO SLSO MOV 65.8® 

66® 6225 Jut 6500 — JO 

Est. Sal m 121(10 Prev. Sain 13088 
Prev. Dav Open inf. 78069 un 667 


Est.Sam 2SJ94 Prev. Sales VffA 
Prev-Pov Open Int. 2T04S w>3w 

f • Industrial" 


Livestock 


.16 10 7 96 11% 

3 2% 


J8 2J 7 10% 

10 36 B'k 

061 7 J 17 5 11% 

11 36 lib 

14»e 80 7 2 11% 


n%7% cattle icme) 

5“ 5 5860 59 JO 5855 59^ 

fi-j* ss gs as s as ss ss + is 

B-j! 6707 55 JO Apr 6115 6270 6100 6212 +J7 

trn? * 66 JS 56J5 Jun 6205 6300 A252 63^ +02 

’ail- to 65.40 SSJD Aud 6107 61J5 6005 61 JO +J0 


7000 

4105 

Oct 

Not 

Dec 44J5 

7600 

44X0 


7160 

4420 

Mar 45X0 

66.75 

4600 

May 

6305 

4505 

JUl 

5210 

4835 

Sep 



Dec 

Jan 

5135 

5135 

Mar 

MOT 

5030 

5000 

Jul 

Est. Sales 70 Prev.Sales 


Prev. Dav Open Hit. 1032 un 60 
SILVER (COMEX) 


60 JO 58.10 Oct 60-30 6000 60.10 +00 5000 trov 02.- cents par frw 02 

— « “* • 6400 5980 OCt 6180 6310 6»0 6380 +330 


-16b .9 45 1 7% 

22 118 9 
J7t 20 26 2315 11% 

JOI 12 4 Bb 

.101 18 7 5V» 

JO 21 II 122 «Vk 

31 4 


..ve i- ms) so. iu uci au 

I lb — Vi E if . Safes 22073 Prev. 5ginnSH 

J* Prev. Dav Open Ini. 49073 oft 72 

.to . . FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 


17% +% I 4-:,300 lbs.- cents per lb. 


B%— b 
1 1MP —4 
0% 

5% 

9*! + to 


23% 17to 
10% 7% 
21b lib 
11% 6b 
22 Vk 15to 

& 4b 
1% 

23 11% 


11% S% 

r* 1% 

7 3% 

9to 4 
21% ll'k 
25b 20»k 
l'l to 
12% 6 
18% lib 
Vs 4b 
28 19% 

7 Jto 
14% 644 


f— 


L 




1 

2% 

3% 

7% 

IVi LSB 
lb LaBorg 
3% LoPBf 


26 

31 

14 

X* 

3% 

2% 

lb 

Jb 

i H 

34i 

I9to 

11% LndBnr 

00 10 10 

5 

17 b 

17% 

17% 

19to 

11% Lndmk 

00 23 11 

103 

17% 

ir% 

17% + *i 

14% 

9*. Laser 

32 

35 

9% 

9% 

9*1 — to 

13 


32 

1 

V*4 

9', 

9b 

5b 

4% LCZKoa 


5 

Sto 

S"4 

5to *■ to 

27b 

19 LeorPP 

300 160 

42 

19 

IUb 

18b — % 

9% 

2'k LeePh 

12 

128 

ito 

6% 

6b 


3b LelsurT 

• 


6 b 

6*k 

fito — to 

Bto 

5 Levitt 

10 

3 

6% 

6% 

4% 

347tt 

9to UltFPh 

50 10 12 

33 

32b 

X\i 

32*1 

3Vk 

Ito UfeRsr 


8 

Ib 

1% 

lb 

4% 

2Vj Lilfld 


29 

4b 

4% 

4b + to 

2b 

1% Lodge 
27b Lorlmr 



lb 

i% 

1% 

39% 

16 

16/ 

JWk 

UOto 

30b — to 

19 

10*i Lumen 

08 5 28 

34 

ISto 

14% 

15 

14% 


14 

34 / 

lib 

iito 

llto 

13% 

9*k Lurlci 

10 

22 

10% 

lOto 

lOVi— to 

14% 

10 Lvctal 

5 

IU 

I3*k 

13*k 

13*! + '* 

26to 

9% LvnCS s 

JO 20 6 

141 

lOto 

9% 

9 to— to 

10b 

0% LvnchC 

30 20 22 

7 

10 

10 

10 


3 19 

104 18% 

312 25% 

16 22 7% 

31 2 J ^ 7 lk ¥ 

1 10 10 10 
61 10b Mb 10b— b 
15 10 10 10 +’A 

300* 46 46 46 — to 

73 14% 14 14 

170 90% 90to TOto — to 
12 22 21b 22 + b 


7232 5605 Od 6400 6260 6440 65J5 +1J5 

7X30 58.10 NOV 66.9S 6800 6650 WJ2 +1-10 

79 a 0 6050 Jan 69J5 7000 68J0 6902 +J2 

71 JO 6042 Mar 49.90 7005 6905 6905 +05 

7100 6040 Apr 6900 69.75 69.10 A90O 

7000 60.10 MOV 6800 68J0 683S 6005 —05 

6800 65.75 Aug 6800 6800 6800 6800 —.IB 


M II ™ *3700 U7J0 -1J0-' 

jtiw 4-90 18700 13340 Jofl 14238 14250 14100 14100 — T.T0 

ImJS 13VJD Mar 14600 147J0 14600 147J0 —AO 

47J5 +"m 17600 145.20 MOV 15200 15200 15100 15100 —.90 

4703 +J0 1B2M 149^ Jul . IS0O 1K00 15400 -J0- 

4900 +J0 17600 15290 Sep 157.20 157 JO 157 JO ISS.lW 

S +JD 1st 36 15650 Nov 15700 15700 15700 15800 —08 

5005 +J0 Est-Sates 1029 Prev.SalM 1J31 

3175 +J0 Prev. Dav Open Int 7463 w>8n 

5103 +J0 COTTON 2 (NYC E)_ " ' . - 

auwoib^cmhper^ ^ ^ +05 

72W 5701 Dec 5905 5900 590S 5908 +.06 

76J5 3L77 Mir HUB 6075 6052 -60L60 +1B 

6310 +330 7000 5BS9 MaY «- K «1 JO 60K J -06 

641.9 +330 7005 5840 Jill 59JD 5905 5905 59J8 +04 

6460 +335 6S00 *n ^ - OCJ " 54J5 5475 ' 5405 5445 — JO 

6M0 +BJ 59^ OS Dic SJBO 5303 5145 005 

6090 +33.9 . 6AJ5 54 JS MOT . • . 54.10 -JS 


5% 71 JO AO-42 Mur 69.90 70 

9*! + to 7100 60.60 Apr 6900 69 

4 7008 6010 MOV 6800 68 

19 M0O 65.75 AUB 6800 AS 

18% Est. Soles 3JD9 Prev. Sales 2.911 

25% + to Prev. Dov open Ini. 9,150 up 250 
7%— *» 


Nov 641.9 +330 7095 5060 JUl 59JD 59j 

5900 Dec 6290 6500 6220 6460 +330 6S08 5305 - Oc» ‘ 54J5 54. 

5V50 Jan 6290 6400 6200 6509 +337 59J5 5205 Dec 5380 52 

607J Mar 6420 6&.2B 6350 6590 +33.9 . 6675 . 54 J5 M«r 

6190 MOV 6520 6700 *450 6680 +34J Est. Sales _ Prey .Sales 1092 

429.1 Jul 6570 6820 6550 678.1 +346 Prev. Day Open Int. 21A02 UP244 

6210 Sec 6650 6870 6650 608.4 +350 * utatinc OIL(NYME) 


30000 lbs.- cents per lb. 
51.75 3405 Oct 

4195 

4400 

42X0 

430S 

+103 


3635 

Dec 

4405 

44.92 

43,95 

4402 

+00 


38.10 

Feb 

44J7 

4455 

4302 

44 J J 

+33 


36.12 


4005 

4100 

4050 

4055 

+.13 


3900 


43X0 

4395 

4350 

4357 

+.12 


4005 

Jul 


4405 

44J5 

4455 

+05 


40J5 


4332 

4350 

43.10 

4115 

+05 


3807 

Oct 

4050 

4050 

4005 

4005 

+50 

4900 

38J7 

Dec 




41X0 

+.15 


7890 6780 Jan 6860 6860 6860 709 J +318 

7700 £MM Mar 7150 7200 7120 7200 +360 

752JJ OMS Mav 7310 +360 

7230 ASM Jul 7340 7400 7340 7437 +37J 

Est. Sales IAMB Prev. Sales 0067 
Prev. Day Ooen Int 76-462 un344 


COM 6800 Nov 8410 B4JS B3J0 8304 +J0 

b£ot 69.15 DOC B4g- 84JB 83.50 gA4 +06 

8300 ' 6900 Jan 8X70 8375 8200 '83.10 +-H 

Soo mrn ™ 82H 8205 8105 8109 +02 

n50 SbS ’Miir 78-60 7800 BB 7BJ5 +20 



7500 6800 APT 7505 7505 74-65 7505 +.15 

73^ 6800 Mav 73JS 7175 7375 7000 +.10 


Ext. Sales Prev.Sales 6.979 

30900 31070 +12.10 Prev. Dav Open Inf. 29.158 up9l 

T1A50 +1710 CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

10OOhbL-donaraper.bM. __ _ 


FkKiilns 


32200 33270 .+7210 
32700 33700 +1U0 


K 2%=r. 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 18-405 uo407 


4 6to fito 6to— to 
40 48 4% 4% 4% + to 


123 

19 


.16e 23 20 151 


AB 20 11 
AOS 1-1 14 


5 to to to + to 
7 6b Ato fib— *» 

74 21*5 21% 21%-b 

1 1 7b 1/5 1W- % 

If CftS 

I** ” 

s » s a-n 

2 4to 4to 4to 


Currency Options 


PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 trav ax- dollars per oz 

9700 97.80 OCt 10295 +330 

14100 9100 Dec TOUTS. 10500 10100 1B4J0 +300 

12700 9170 Mar 10300 10600 1ELE8 10570 +300 

11400 9100 ..Jun 10425 10500 10425 1D&J0 +325 

11500 9770 Sep 104*0 10625 10460 106.70 +300 

Dec 1070-J 10700 10700 107 JO 

Eat Sale* Prev.Sales 250 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 6.158 up 5042 


2900 

2900 

S0O 

29.46 

29-45 

29-45 

27.96 

26.70 

r M<im 

2SJO' 

2700 

25JO 

Est- Sales 


2440 NOV 29-40 2902 29 JO 2901 +05 

23M Dec 2900 2906 2872 2877 —06 

2408 Jan 2800 21152 28J1 2025 — 06 

24JS Feb 2805 2807 27-03 2700 —03 

2413 Alar 2705 2705 27J4 CTJ6 -03 

2303 Apr 27J0 27.13 2700 27.02 +02 

w*5 MOV 2483 2650 2670 26.70 +05 

2278 Jun 2600 2603 26-40 26J5 +JM 

2445 Jul 2620 2*20 262® &.J0 +JXi 

2495 . AM 2605 2605 2A05 2501 +05 , 

2400 Sep 2500 2500 25.90 2579 +05 *, 

2406 Dec 2483 +05 I I 

Prev.Sales UL632 ■.# 


Prpv. Dav Open ltd. 65213 up UBS 


Oct 3 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Opt ton A strike 

Undertyloe Price Cons— Lost Pete— tail 

Dec Mar Jun Dec Mar Jun 
12500 British Pounds-centt per unit. 

B Pound 115 2700 r s r r 


7 19% 19b 19b + to 
13 32to 32% 32% — to 
44 1b ito lb + to 


JO 20 7 30 I0to 10 70 — It 
J6 23 10 34 l|to ISto 1|% 


115 

2750 

r 

s- 

r 

r 


125 

r 

r 

r 

005 

r 


130 

,r 

330 

r 

105 

r 


135 

80S 

r 

r 

100 

430 


140 

555 

r 

r 

300 

r 


145 

3J0 

4.90 

r 

7 JO 

r 


ISO 

100 

3X5 

r 

10.10 

1105 


155 

0.90 r 

r 

r 

r 



GOLD (COMEX) 

too Iray oz.- doUara per troy ax. 

49300 29700 Oct 325.10 33000 32440 

324J0 BIIU0 NOV 

40900 30100 Dec 32950 33570 328.10 

48500 30600 Pel) 33320 34000 33220. 

49A0D 31470 Apr 33800 34300 33690 

43520 32000 Jun 34200 34800 34)00 

428-40 33100 AUB 34600 35200 34600 

39520 33500 Oct 35400 35700 35450 

moo 34200 DOC 35900 36300 35920 

MS.m 35500 Apr 

39400 36900 Jun 

_ AUO 


Prev. Odv Open lnt.!21061 off 


8 3% 3% 3%— to 

.10 IJ 11 31 8to 8Vk B'k 


10 4b T Bar 
llto 4!k TIE 
13% 51k Til 


T_ 

J3» 50 21 


21 7 6 A 6 

415 5 4% 4to— to DMork 

60 26 6% 6% 6%— b 


Jib 13b Tab Prd JO IJ 12 II 16VS 16% 16% — to 


9% 6b TandBr 
15V, 9to Taslv 
4% 7b Team 
1% lto TefiAm 
22ti 13'k TctiSvm 


5 15 6% 6% A%— b 

-40 26 13 25 15% 15 15to 

SB 3Vi -3% 3’.k + b 
87 3 TS, 3 + % 

14 132 15to 14% 14b-s- % 


71 


r 

r 009 

r 


72 

IX* 

r 

r 0,19 

r 


73 

oxf* 

r 

r 003 

s 


74 

mj 

0-51 

r r 

r 


75 0.U r r r 

German Marks-centt per unit. 

r 


31 

r 

r 

r 002 

r 


32 

r 

r 

r 004 

r 


34 

400 

402 

r o.io 

0J9 


35 

356 

400 

r Oja 

r 


36 

206 

113 

r 030 

0X0 


37 

1.92 

271 

r s 

1.12 


38 

103 

206 

r 0X3 

s 


• 3* 

0.93 

106 

r 100 

r 



+5JD I 3IU4A limCAM | 

+500 

+500 SP COMP. INDEX (CASE) 

4520 points and cents 

+500 2BO05 17520 Dec 184-40 18500 18300 18420 +-40. 

4470 20X75 18231 A6ar 18600 187-40 185.40 1863J +^ 

+500 20650 18190 Jon 18825 18X25 187^ 18700 +J0 

+S0O 19220 18700 Sep 19025 190JS 18925. 18900 4 JO 

+500 : Esf. Sale* -7401 3 Pnrv. Soles 7S756 

+5jso Prev. Day Open J nf. 54J45 ofl 837 

VALUE LINE (KCST) . 

tMii mints and cents 

31705 18880 Dec 191 JO 19200 19040 1*1.15 +3& 

- 30940 19200 -MOT 1*200 19300 19200 19305 +J5- 

Est. Sales _ Prey .Salas 5238 .. 

Prev. Dav Ooen Int. 8J24 up 433 


Finoncial 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE1 . 

PoWsond cent: ^ 10645 107 JB . 10615 10600 +J0 

11825 10500 Mar W740 108JO .10720 10700 .+,15- 

12000 10690 Jun 10890 10690 10825 1OB-60 +.M 

J0SJ0 • 108-10 Sep ■ 10908 +05 


A 3b TnchTp 11 94 4>.k 4 4 — Mi 

20b lOto Techlrl JO 2J 8 U 13% 13% 13% 

214b 97 TelonR JOe J 318 1250x184% 180 lB4’,i +2% 
4b 1% Telecon 14 2 2 2 


11D 1400 r 

135 9 JO r 

I'M 6.70 r 

125 390 AJ5 


U5T. BILLS (IMM) 11025 10559 Mar 108, 

__ _■ J.-, I2S-0Q 10690 Jun 10690 106 

9307 8527 Dec 9291 9292 9205 9209 +01 109J8 108.10 5ep 

SsS 2^9 <“ r S5 2258 9252 «08 +01 Est. Sales 11 J48 Prev. MHjUSI 

&S -S tSHftfflS IS 7009 aR772 ' 

91 .JS 8905 Dec 9107 9197 9152 9156 +01 I i 1 b ^ 

91J9 8958 Mar 91JB 9128 9128 9IJ0 +01 | rnmRMMllfv Inripypt 

*103 9050 jun 9un H02 9i02 9104 - +0i |- coiiMwqiiy in oexes 

Est. Sale* -Prev.Sales 10 JS3 -- ~ 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. 33092 up 1046 


35% 24b Telfle* 44 IJ Id B4 36 35 36 + to AWWW JaeaetM Yen- worn* of a cent per unit, 

llto Bb TelDSa 40 32 14 3B lOto lOto + to JY * n 2 . S ^ £ 

1W 6b TelSCl 26 94 » Bb Bb a r 

S% 2b Telesnh 140 4% 4% 4to— Vk i] r™ S ,1 “J 

ab 4 Tereiev 11 26 41k 4to 4to J. ^ 

311k 22 TexCdg 1J0 29 23% 23% 23% + to 2 t? I 

20 7 TenAir J 243 17to 16% 17 — b t i 


W VR, TREASURY (CBT) 

H0a000prfr>-pt9S32ndsofl0apcr 
87-13 75-13 Dec 85-26 85-28 85-18 85-21 

86-2 75-14 Mar 84-24 B4-26 84-19- 8+22 

S5-7 7+38 Jan 83-25 83-28 83-22 83-24 

84-4 88-7 Sep 82-30 83 82-26 83-28 

83-11 80-2 Dec 82-4 82-6 82 82-2 

Esf. Sales Prev.Sales 0551 
Prev. Day OsenlnL 58336 up 705 


IPS 6b TelSCl 26 *4 * 8b 8b 

S% 2b Telesnh 140 4% 4to 4to— Vk 

eb 4 Termev 11 26 4to 4to 4 to 

Tito 22 TexCda 1J0 29 23% 23% 23*5 + b 

20 7 TexAir 3 243 17to 16% 17 — b 

9b 4% TexAE J4t 40 25 66 5b 5% PA + to 

7% l'k Tuscan 589 1% 1 l'k 

3to l'k TlwEn 27 2 1% 1% 1% 

A2 48 TolEdPl 7J6 120 3450x 60% 59 60% +2b SFronc 

*b 3% Torts I JW114 74 3to 3b 3%— to 

15% 6% TollPI g 34 1*00 15% 15b ISb — .to 

3% ’i* TotPlwl 58 2% 3 fc 2to— ft 

28% 23 TotPtpf 208 103 5 28 28 28 

14 3% TmsLic 12 2 12 12 12 


19% llto TmsToe 04 44 9 18 14% 14% 14% + Ik 


16'k 13b Trwiion «4 30 7 20 14b 14% 14% + % I Into) call vaL IMS 


40 6MO r r r r 

41 605 600 r UN r 

42 S3 5J4 UJ r r 

43 432 432 r 0.11 U) 

44 132 302 .r r r 

45 250 114 r r 004 

46 102 254 200 0J0 r 

62000 Swiss Frano-cent* per anil 

SFronc 40 6.98 r r 006 r 

41 r r r acs r 

42 5.10 r I 0.U 151 

43 4.M r r 02 r 

44 3X1- r r 041 090 

45 205 r r 004 r 

46 200 r r 104 r 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 


. . * OOH 

Moody's . 89170* 

j. Routers- ; ; — . 1,703^0 

DJ. Futures— — — 11706 

S' Com. Research Bureau. 775.90 

+* Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 193T. 

+« . p-pre»mirvory;f-flnoI- 

Reuters : base 100 ; Sep- 18, 1931. 

. Oovy Jones : base. 100 -. Dec. 31, 1974. 


Previous 
889 JOT 
7099.10 
716^5 

moo. 


mi r.t TriSM 0Oe aa 


32 IXk 9to 9% 


13to 6to TriaCp 09t 15 38 13 17b 12% 12%—% 


6% 3b TriHme 
11% T-u Trine X 
4 2to TubMex 
22% 16% TumB n 


8 3 4% 4 4to Last is prem 

18 49 6b 51k 6 — b Source: AP. 

22 3 % 3 3Ve 

34 10 16% 16% 16b— b ■ 


r — Not traded. » — No option offered. 
Lost Is premium l purchase price). 


Call open ML 177041 
Pel open Inf. 116057 


78-13 57-8 Dec 75-15 75-16 7W 

75-11 

+9 


57-2 

After -7+6 

7+9 73-30 

7+5 

+* 

76-6 

56-29 


73-6 73-28 

73-2 

+9 

75-31 

5+29 

Sep 72-2 

72-4 71-28 

72-2 

+9 


J+2S 

DOC 71-4 

71-6 7030 

710 

+9 

7+15 

5+27 

A/Var 706 

709 705 

69-17 69-13 

709 

+V 

7+26 

63-12 

Jun 69-14 

6+17 

+9 

72-27 

63-4 

Sep 


6027 


72-18 

<2-24 



6+7 


69-27 

67 

Mar - 67-23 

67-23 <7-77 

67-21 

+9 

A7-XS, 66-Z7 
pt. Soles 

Jun 

Prev.Sates2120O6 

<7-4 

+9 


Market Guide 


Prev. Dov Open In U52J96 w 7,971 


NYCSCEr 
HYCE: 
COMEX: - 

HYM8: 

KCST: 

HTFE: 


CMcaga Board ot Trade 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
international Monetary- Market 
Of Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
New York Cocoa. Sugar. Coffee Exchange. 
New York Colton Exchange 
Commodify E xcha nge, New York 
New Yorlc Mercantile E xc hange 
Kansas City Board of Trade 
New York" Futures Exchange 


31% 21 to TumrC 1J0 40 9 10 27% 27% 27% +"to 


10 8b TmEqn 
3% 1% Tylrwts 


48 Blk 8% 8b — to 
77 lb 1% J%— to 


4b 1% UNA 5 2 2 2 — to 

21% B% Ullmte 9 51 11% 11% llto 

13% 8 v Unicom 28 10b 10% 10%— to 

lib Sb Unimar 104*129 36 10% 10% 10% + to 

23% 15b UAirPd 54b 20 13 A 21% 21b 21% + to 

23 16% UnCosF s 50 23 A 3 21% 21% 21% 

2*1 1b UFoodA .10 7J 36 1% 1% 1%— to 

lAto m> UIV0d 15 7 14b 1Mb TMh 

I2to 13b U5AGW1 35 13b 12% 13Vk— to 

8ii S' m umteiv 21 6 7% 7b 7b 


CommSdities 


Ixindon 

Commodities 


Coim^lMies 


Cash Prices 


au s< m umiaiv 
10% 6% UnivPx 
30b 15% UnlvRu 00a 40 
ISb »<■ UrtvPaf 


36 1% 1% 1%— to 

7 14b 1Mb TMb .1^.. 

35 13b 12% 13to— to 
6 7% 7b 7b mocn 


ClOM 

HW Lew Bid Ask Orge 


Preach Irenes per metric ton 


Close ^tos WONC-KOMO COLD FUTURES 
High Low Bid Ask bm Ask U 00 per mmet 

SUGAR QOtt 

Steritog per metric ton .hW 14“ A* 


1 16% 16% 16% 


40 11% 11 11% + to May 


slm 5s, “54 Bee 14X00 13*00 14300 14400 14000 14100 KSi,”. NT NT'Smffl 

^ fS IS =i use ffitfiftSiSfS! Sfljgfijiss- S?:4w»«lSSS. 


10*1 9to VST n 0Oe 60 56 9% 9b Vx 

10 2to Vent 16 *% 9Vi 9% 

23% 16b VtAmC 000 20 9 220 17 16% 16% 


6'k 3% VtRsh 

% % Verna 


3 1 ii 3 S + . fc sa 


a* 53"! vaimi 


11 &51k 641k 64b — % 


9b 4". VIsuclG JO 29 8 2 7b 7% 7b 


12'- 1 8 Vaolex 00 40 11 


4 9 8% 9 + 


May 10*0 M 1026 1035 -25 ^nr 1H0O 15000 isi« 15500 lSfiO 15200 «70O moo 

Drt IS IS lwo l«n _ ^ Aoq *J.T. N.T. 16100 16100 15900 15900 2f" .{tT- HTffiioSS 

S2: ^ \i¥. \2& liS -* 1ASM '*** ^ r ^ ^ 

56 9% 9b 9b— to) Esf. val.: 1J30 Ms of 50 ions. Prev, actual Volume. 10AS lots of 50 fans. Au»- N-1\ , N-T345JK) 34700 

16 9% 9to 9% + % I soles: 1079 lots. Open interest: if,i97 COCOA Volume: 22 lots of 100 oc. . 

Sterflae per metric tea .... 

COCOA Dec 1J95 IJB0 1.7S1 1JB2 1J82 1JB3 SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES - 

French francs ner 100 kg Mar M* iJffl 1|M 1JM 1«1 U00per«mce 

Dee 2030 2025 2025 2035 +3 JH’ Jffi IS J«J p_. - 

Mar 20*0 2060 2046 20KS +1 5ep 1090 1063 10M iSo l5S 1064 TMh .‘loS Sett 

Jto NT NT 2070 Z uSS: “W , ' 8M 1*45 1040 1045 1033 10WS Oct' L_ NX N.T. • 314. 

sS. n't: NX 2075 — U%*L *° r !«■» »■*» 1-«B 1050 10S1 1050 One . 32800 32B0O 3» 

S N Nit: IS! - SSS: VommeiUMlatsaMOtans. • F v«aSST62totort lta^ Tl “ 

Mor N.T. N.T. 2070 — unau COFFEE vamme. 62 lots ai in oz. 

Esl.volj 5 lots of 10 toni. Prev. actual sales; Sterling per metric ton ; 



CommadRv apd Unit.. 
Coffee* Sontcs.lt) ____ 
Printctott, 64/3038 to, yd . 
Steal Mllefs (Pinj.fon— 
Iron 2 Fdnr. Philos ton _ 


Lwd Spot, to — 

CoFPTetrd.lt) . 

TlrtlSIraHsI, ID 

23nc.E.SLl_ Basle, ID . 
Paiiadlurn, az - 

Stive* 1 N.Y.OZ 

Source-- AP. - 


Oct. 3 : 
Year 

The 

Ago 

103 

102 

001 

171 

47300 

47308 

21 U0 

31300 

77-28 

87-88 

TSto-29 

22-26 

6+69 

62% 

4J345 

60599 

008 

005 

99% 

133 

. 40* 

701 


French francs per NO kg 


19% 14% VuIcCo 00 40 II 1 17% 17% 17% 


Dec 

2030 

nnoc 

*? <m: 

Mar 

20*0 

2060 

204* 

AAav 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2065 

■MV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2030 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2075 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2065 

After N.T. H.T. 2070 

Esi. woM 5 lots of 10 tens. Prev. 

7 koto Ooen Interest: 634 


TMh . Low Settle settle 

Oct- : N.T. N.T. 324J0 XMJD 

D« — . 32800 32800 32800 32S0O 

Feb N.T. N.T. 33200 33300 

Volume: 62 tots of 180 oz. > -. 


DM Bitimes 
Options 


IV. Cara»Mori-i2SJ» marts, cen/s per mar* . 


71k 3b 
28b 18b 
2»b 15 
7« 14b 

VA -k 
11% 4% 

ns 76 

2D'-k 13to 
11% 7b 
5% 2% 

9b *% 

Jto to 
10 6to 
12 7b 
10 1 
14 8% 

13% 4Js 

2% t 
4 2b 
29% 17b 
2b b 
78b S% 

111, Bb 
15Va 6b 
23% 7b 
21b ISto 
13% 6% 

30b 14 

W 3. 

3>, b 
32% 20 
!2to 1 0b 
8V! 2to 
237k 19% 

46' d 36to 
IBto 11% 

5% 2% 

17% 13% 

2 % 9 % 

8b 5% Yonk 
9% 3% Zlmer 


M I COFFEE Mor 

■ French francs per no kp Mm 

14 130 5b Sb 5to-to NOV 1015 1.718 1J80 1^95 —2 Jly 

13 2 22b 22b 22b— to jot N.T. N.T. Uvo 1040 —15 Sea 

47 1668 lA'A 15% 16% — Vk S ECr . MT N.T. 10&S- 10M Nor 


1033 1008 1011 l0l8 10W 1013 

1067 1041 1041 10*5 1051 1053 Malaysian cents ptWIo 


00 10 13 2 22b 22b 22b— to m 

.16 10147 1668 16b 15% 16*k— % w/ 

.11 J161 5 1614 16% 16%— to Stay 


69 % b b mm h Jly 

5 18 7% 7Vs 7% + to iSa 

Jt Jit 612 111 V* 107V2 109 -2% NOT 

1.17 60 18 212 l*to 19b 19% Esf 


.16 10 5 53 8% Bb 8% — Ik I jen. Ooen Inlsrasi: 302 


ear N.T. N.T. 10*5- 1090 +7 Nov N.T. 

toy N.T. N.T. 1075 1.920 —3 Volume: 14 

to N.T. N.T. 1080 1050 —5 eAS01L 

iea N.T. N.T. 1.9M — uneh. 

lov NT. N.T. 1.930 — Until. 

Esi. voi.: 11 tots el 5 Ians. Prev. actual sates: 22. 2S3 


Mar 1094 1072 1076 1077 1079 1084 

May 1J19 1X00 1X05 1X08 1,705 IX0E N „ 

Jly 1X46 1X40 1X30 1X45 1X20 1X45 g®? 

54m 1.786 1X80 1X5S 1X80 1X40 1X80 

NOV N.T. N.T. 1X60 1025 1X50 1020 ££ 

Volume: 1027 tots of 5 tons. mSt 

GASOIL Vc 

UJ. da Rare a 


. Oeie - Prevfous Pr 
BM Aik BM Aik 57 

™ — 1B4X5 1S7X5 18400 18500 » 

eC 187X?; 11800. 18500 1860O w 

S=- H M & 3 

^toSiriteS 040 ” ^ “ fii 


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Prte Dec CO !to* W *IL, PofpSetfle 
P^'SSF. 2* do BM iw- 

* jw 2£ S» 084 UA i W 

S 82 IS 3 . H 3 9 z 

. L20 — — _ 


1® *"4 to Bourse du Commerce. 

1J9113.1 7 ’1 I0‘ 9% 9%-% . 

17 57 II 10% 18% — to I fXi 

021 T3 8% BW 8% + M d ( Mb' 

11 10 10% 10 10 — % 1 

4 IU 13% 13% 13% + V» 

10 % % % 

5 1% 2% 2% 

03 21 10 10 29% 29% 29% + Vk 

63 1% Ito 1% . - 

12 I fito 6b 6b — % M»PCWV 

JO 12 17 10b Wk lDb ■+■ % 

1121 7% 7 7%— % « 

16 SB7 16b ISto ISb— Ito ^ , __ 

lid to U 10 19 19 19 + % Needwll lev Proa 

.16 IJ 4 206 12% 17% 17k 

14 268 17 16% 16% — % ST< 


Dividends 


Ott 3 

Per Amt Far 


Nor 24X25 
Dec 258X5 
Jan 29500 
Feb 25200 
Mar 244j» 

ApI 23700 
May 23400 
Jun 23350 
Volume: 2780 lots of 100 ton*. 

Source*: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
Chpnge (gaaoUt. 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 

2S2M2£ui C **’ ,S, ak^ 0 . Previous 

UniH WS »**»-' -'1«S IM0O IttJS lSSo 
3J5-S2 RSS ' Daf— 16500 16600 1622S 16275 
RSS2Not_. 15450 1S5M IGflO 

ftli ) Hov_ 15250 15150 15000 15100 

3JOM3MM RS54NOV- 14631! 15050 I46M 14*00 

RSS5NW_. 143J0 14500 1M0Q iSoO 


euimated fatal vsL 6Ju 
Calls: Wed. vaL 2X11 opMtct. 24089 
Source: CME. 


Treasury Bills 


T2J0 12-2 10*25 


Ijondon >leials 


5 I1D7 4% 3% 4 
t IS lli 1H !%— to Me! Hotrb — Mor-t 

P2S0 88 71 28% 28*1 28% + % 

50 16 9 5 II 11 11 . ■ 

37 133 7% 7 7 USI 

!W 7 21 T .. Bon* east Core 


STOCK SPLIT 


Oct X Jim 
Previous ■ s*> 

Bid Ask VI 


Ban* east Cotp_ 


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52 IT 6 2 16% 16% 16*k- % i carierHawtev 


68 9S P* 3to 3% EECO Inc 

17 14% 14 14 — to Elgin Matronal 

7 9Tr 9b 9b— to Fed Guarohfy 

11 71 7to 7% 7% Grace (WJL) 8 

5 4 3% 4 Hal* (HJt.l Sfe 


.WBEX Highs-Lms 


NEW HIGHS 10 


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msm-ua Eld 
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Winn- Dixie Stores 


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a i* t«.-w « „ ALUMINUM . 

9 •]? , ®1'9 Jg-fg SStrUno per metric too 

Q Vl'vl .,5 ? ? Se« $?50O 69609 69600 69700 

s ■*£ ’h 2 * {J*'f Porwora 71700 71800 71800 71800 
D 2 ,S1 COPPER CATHODES IHHK, Grade) 

S 19-Jf Sterling per metric too 

2 W S .R® ^ Soot *7900 91080 96500 96500 

a so"lS !rJ£ Forwon* - 100400100450 99000 99050 

i2S» copper cathodes (Standard) 

2 S! HrH SterHag per metric too 

§ m ii.to }£i2 5^ ' *SSS WM 94800 95000 

5 !?■" ]?+* Forward 98900 . 99200 97500 *7700 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MfltevtiCBi ringgHt per 25 has - 
Close 

Od_ % 

Dec» 7M SI 

Jan . . 710 760 

Feb. 700 750 . 

Mar M0 740 

MOY . 605 735 

Jun 600 730 

Sep ,. 673 725 

. Votoma: .8 Jots of 25 torn. 
Source: Reuters . 


Preview 

A*k 3-month 
690 ’ 730 n-rriorilfi 

no 760 One year 
720 m „ 


7M j Source: Soto man Bnthen 


a*j- : 

Prifc J, 

W - Yk« yield 

605 7.19 7X4 

7-M 703 700 

7-39 7.96 702 


Thai Airways to Boy 6 Planes 


jSSPIQO 

Index Ontic 


Options 


e 05 10-28 10+* Forward w#® 
O0J% IMS 11-27 lead 
n '1! .I 1 . - ? ]?3? starting pertnelrie ton 


■ Reuters 

"1 . BANGKOK - Thai Airways 
International Ltd. has K 

l . fiJL f ?J r - J^tional A-300-6Q0s 

- £*J»-i5SS- 


1.J 'If Sssr. ® .®S ®88.SB Btf'-'SWff ^ November 1986^d 1989^ 

S ** *J‘IJ Meriing per mrirteton Sli?“™-W*KS ,e ik' OWCUdv® said Thufe^*,,' 

wwbbbsB s,1Is a a 

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™ ££ aw 300 -■ ' - = : Tho 


were given. 


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S ft JU-21 1®-}? I Sterling per metric too 


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F. . - Source; caoB. - 


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. .'T?jr*v* 





BUSINESS ROUndup 


.WraRNATlONAL'HERALD' TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1985 






Page 15 




-.-v 


■ ^ • United Pros international 

t** RADNOR, Pennsylvania— Sun 
Co. said lljursday that ii had Ap- 
proved a four-part corporate ns 
siraemring that will include the 
creation of a' master limited part- 
neiship obtaining most of its do- 
mestic oil and gas properties. 

The company said it would take 
3 .' 5275-million charge against 
tHird-quartei earnings to reflect the 
cost of the restructuring, which win 
include the sale of some units. 

; rile four-part program approved 
by the hoard also rails for raising 
the annual dividend on common 
.g&ock by 70 cents in January and 
¥ accelerating the annual, rate of the 
share-rcpurckase program to about 
5200 rmlK nn, according to Sun’s 
chief executive officer, Robert 
McClemeats. 


e as a 


Tlie . after-tax . charge against 
thud-quarter wiring^ pria^y 
relates to provisions for losses on 
tne planned disposition of selected 
otl, gas and energy minerafcasstts; 

“We strongly believe tbit this 
course of action will be in the best 
mterests of our current sharehold- 
ers because of our plans to increase 
the. cash dividend on common 
stock, and also to accelerate our 
share repurchase program," . Mr. 
McOements said. 

“Furthermore, we intend to vig- 
.mousty continue our commitment 
to increasing both the q uant ity and 
the profitability of our energy re- 
serve base, through exploration, de- 
velopment. and selective acquisi- 
tions.” 

Mr. McOements said heioped 
to raise about $200 nulliqn by the 



Xerox Closes Insurance Firtn^ 



tt &r- 






t» *- 


*»■ 


r * 


The Associated Press 

-.STAMFORD, Connecticut — 
Xerox Corp. -announced plans 
Thursday to close one of its Crum 
& Forster Inc; insurance subridiar- 
ies and take a $1 60-minion, after- 
tax charge against third-quarter 
earnings. 

^ The charge win be nearly twice 
rtbe S8I3 million Xerox earned 
during the. third quarter of 1984, 
lading some WaD Street analysts 
to-predict the company would post 
a third-quarter loss. One analyst 
said the loss could run as high as 
$67 million. 

Xerox’s last quarterly loss was 
$12 million, or 26 cents per. share, 
in the 1984 fourth quarter. A Xerox 
spokesman said his company 
would not project its third-quarter 
198$ earnings, due out Ocl 29. 

David T. Kearns, chairman and 
chief executive officer of Xerox, 
said the company is phasing out the 
operations of Industrial Indemnity 


Financial Corp., a tfaMjeamg the 
reserves of L. W. Biegler.and re- 
plenishing the capital at all . of 
Crum ana Forster’s msurance com- 
panies byS200 milli on . 

Industrial Indemnity Financed 
Corp, based in' San Francisco, is 
engaged in the contract surety and 
fin anc ia l guarantee business. Chi- 
cago-based Biegjer deals in excess 
and surplus insurance lines, 

Mr. Kearns said Xerox conclud- 
ed that the contract surety business 
would not be profitable over time 
and Crum and' Forster has better 
uses for its capital" -. 

A spokesman said the dsoing of 
QFC, which has fewer than 100 
employees at five offices, would oc- 
cur over a period of several years. 

The actons came hardy two 
months after Cnnn & Forster post- 
ed a $4-mfllion, second-quarter 
profit, and after Xerox predicted a 
substantial turnaround in the sub- 
sidiary this year. Cram and Forster 
lost $15 millio n m. 1984. .. 


.aid of the year through a registered 
public offering of between 2 and 3 
percent of the master limited, part- 
nership units.-' 

A shareholder meeting will be 
held in early December, to approve 
transferring the properties to the 
master limited partnership, which 
win be called Sun. Energy Partners. 

In a separate action, the Sun 
• board declared a regular quarterly 
cash dividend of. 57.5 cents per 
share onafl full shares of common 
stock outstanding. The dividend, 
linrJiangfld from tie previous quar- 
ter, is payable Dec. 10 to share- 
holders of record Nov. 8 . 

.. The board also declared a regu- 
lar quarterly cash dividend-of 5625 

bents per share on Sun’s £125 cu- 
mulative convertible preferred 
stock, payable Dec. 20 to share- 
holders of record Nov. 8 . 

Continental Air Wins 
Latest Round in Court 

. The Associated Press 

HOUSTON — A US federal 
bankruptcy judge granted Thurs- 
day a request by Continental Air- 
lines for rejection of $1.4 billion in 
drums by striking pilots and flight 
attendants, as well as allegations 
that tbe employees were wrongfully 
dismissed. . 

. Members of tbe Air Line Pilots 
Association walked out Oct 1, 
1983 after the airline, seeking pro- 
tection from creditors under Chap- 
ter 1 1, slashed wages up to 50 per- 
cent^ 


Bell Group Unit 
Thought to Buy 
Shares in BHP 

Reuters 

SYDNEY — One of Robert 
Holmes h Court’s companies in 
the Bdl Group Ltd. is believed 
to have bought about 10 million 
Broken Hffl Proprietary Co. 
shares at 850 dollars ($6.07) 
each on Thursday, brokers said. 

They said a Melbourne bro- 
ker, Potter Partners, who repre- 
sented Mr. Holmes i Court in 
the . past, entered the market 
Wednesday with the buying or- 
der ax 850 dollars. weB above 
the market level at the time of 
8.04 dollars, but dad not suc- 
ceed before Thursday in putting 
the parcel together. 

• Potter and Mr. Holmes k 
Court declined to comment on 
any purchase. 

‘ The brokers estimated such a 
purchase, if on behalf of the 
Bell Group, a multinational 
transport and communications 
concern, would lift iis stake in 
BHP, tbe Australian energy 
group, to about 60 million 
shares, or neatly 6 percent of 
issued capital. Disclosure is not 
required under Australian secu- 
rities rales until a stake has 
reached 10 percent. 

There have been market ru- 
mors for many weeks that Mr. 
Holmes k Court plans a bid for 
20 percent of BHP. 


National Loss Underscores Industry’s Slump 


By Andrew Pollack 

Sew York Tunes Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Only- 
days after its trade association pre- 
dicted that business would soon 
improve, the semiconductor indus- 
try is demonstrating 3 g?in this 
wed: the effects of a yearlong de- 
pression. 

National Semiconductor Corp. 
reported Wednesday a loss of S535 
million for its first fiscal quarter, 
the largest in its history and the 
worst so far in tbe industry’s slump. 

Tbe report followed announce- 
ments earlier this week of austerity 
measures that included pay cuts by 
Intel Corp. and layoffs and salary 
reductions by the’ semiconductor 
operations of Motorola Iso. 

The industry that makes tbe sili- 
con chips used in computers and 
other electronic equipment has 
been mired in a slump caused by 
persistent excess inventories, slow- 
ing computer sales, and severe 
competition from Japan. 

As for the outlook for a turn- 
around, “it’s like waiting for Go- 
dot,” said John J. Lazio Jr., semi- 
conductor industry analyst for 
Morgan Stanley & Co. “I don't 
look for any material improvement 
over the sbon term.” 

Charles E. Sporck, National 
Semiconductor’s president and 
chief executive, appeared to agree 
in his statement Wednesday: “We 
have recently experienced a mar- 
ginal improvement in semi conduc- 
tor order rates," he said. “But until 
we have a significant and sustained 


improvements m those rates, our 
financial performance will contin- 
ue to suffer.” 

National’s loss, which had been 
expected, compares with a profit of 
S35.9 million, or 40 cents a share, in 
the first fiscal quarter of last year. 
Revenues in the 1985 quarter, 
which ended Sept. 22. plunged 20 
percent, to S423.4 million, from 
$529 million. 

National based in Santa Clara. 
California, also said it would close 
its operations for seven days during 
Christmas to save money, Tbe 
company this year has already laid 
off 1500 in the United States and 
others overseas. 

Analysts expect virtually all oth- 
er semiconductor companies to re- 
port operating losses for the third 
ca le ndar quarter and some to re- 
port losses for the fourth quarter as 
well. 

National’s loss is large because 
of its reliance on commodity prod- 
ucts that have been affected most 
by price wars, and because of heavy 
expenditures on modernizing faefl- 
hies. Third-quarter losses for com- 
panies such as Intel and Advanced 
Micro Devices might be offset by 
interest income or tax credits, while 
semiconductor losses for Texas In- 
struments and Motorola might be 
counterbalanced by earnings from 
other operations. 

All the companies are all acting 
to reduce losses. Intel recently in- 
stituted pay cuts of 4 to 8 percent 
for its entire U.S. work force and 
said it would shut its operations for 


six days during the Christmas sea- 
son. Motorola announced on Mon- 
day a scries of staff reductions de- 
signed to cut its semiconductor 
work force by 1500 to 1,700. It also 
said that salaries would be reduced 
5 to 10 percent. 

Despite the glum news, however, 
some analysis and executives say 
the industry has begun a modest 
improvement that should pick up 
steam in 1986. The Semiconductor 
Industry Association predicted last 
week that worldwide semiconduc- 
tor sales would increase by 18 per- 
cent next year. 


STOCK 

USB 

uss 

DeVoe-Holbdn 
International nv 

6 % 

7% 

Gty-Oock 
International nv 

27* 

37* 

I Quotes as of: October 3, 1985 



Investors seeking above avenge 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can amply write us a 
note and th e weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be seat free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Center 
Smtwioskylaan SS7 
1077 XX Amsterdam. 

Tbe Netherlands 
Telephone: 13 1X20)6277 62 
Telex: 14507 fire© nl 


REGLEMENT DE GE 5 TION DU FONDS 

PA ROIL FUND 


Modification de 1' Article 17 
Article 17: Girande. 

— Compagnie de Participations el dTnvestissements Holding 5. A, 
Luxembourg 

— Paribus Asset Management Inc.. New York, 

en nalite cf actionnaires de la Society de Gestion, et 
— Banque Paribas (Luxembourg) S_A, Luxembourg, 
en qualile de Banque Deposilaire. 

gaiandssent conjoin lement et solidaiiemenl 1 'observation par la Socifele 
de Gestion de loules lee clauses et conditions du present Kedemem. 
La Banque Deposilaire garaniil I'accomplissenrem de ses devoirs et 
obligations conlonnemcni au present Reglemeni de Gestion. 


Fail a Luxembourg. 


Pour Paroil Management Company SA 


Hoesch Forges Steel Success Without Subsidy 



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9«h 17-10 IOOJ7100.T7 

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20-11 96J5 VJS 
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. (Conti raied from Page 11) 
g!y is not Tree’ — within die Euro- 
pean Community, subsidization 
threatens to keep prices depressed 
quid protectionism from the United 
States threatens to distort trade al- 
together." 

- “Should there come another steel 
crisis, which I don’t expect wxQ be 
the case, com panies nice Hoesch 
and Thyssen will be able to survive 
intact because, of their early re- 
structuring, while other Goman 
companies, including Klftckner, 
could be in serious trouble,” Mr. 
Schubert said. - 
Confidence in Hoesch and Thys- 
sea have ted to a significant rise in 


to levels around 140 DM from 
DM at the beginning of the year. 

Hoesch’s Mr. Robwedder and 
other West German steel managers 
have seen the writing on the wall — 
die extension into next year of at 
least $8 billion in EC-approved 
subsidies to mostly state-owned 
steel groups in France, Belgium 
arid Italy appears inevitable. They 
are moving fast to Hmii the dam- 
age. 

The European Community 
agreed to-aDea 31, 1985, deadline 
for steel subsidies, but now appears 
to be moving toward a limited ex- 
tension tbat would allow stare aid 
to hdp offset costs in plant clo- 
sures. 

A recent report by the EFO Eco- 
nomic Research Institute in Mu- 
nich. said tiie West German steel 
industry would be forced to cut 37 
percent of its output and 32*000 
employees if Bonn did not match 
grants provided by other EC states. 
It said West Goman producers 
had received no more than 10 per- 


cent of EC-approved subsidies be- 
tween 1975 ana 1985 while generat- 
ing about one third of the 
10 -member group’s steel produc- 
tion in 19&4. 

"What we would like is that our 
European competitors be put on 
the gum zero-subsidy footing as 
the German industry starting next 
year," Mr. Rohwedder said. But 
the ritenns for that, he agrees, are 
Jim - 

Hoesch’s chairman, who served 
nine years as state secretary in the 
Economics Ministry in Bonn, holds 
the West German government 
partly responsible for failing to 
hold the European Commission to 
its subsidy deadline. 

“Experience shows that our gov- 
ernment is perhaps too ready to 
recognize the domestic political 
needs of partner EC states," he 
said. 

In the United States, Hoesch’s 
hopes of becoming a nutjor supplier 
of sheet arid steel springs for the 
automobile industry have been 
eclipsed temporarily by tbe failure 
of tiie EC and the United States to 
reach an agreement on exports to 
the American market next year. ' 

Hoesch, which uses the cost-effi- 
cient commons-casting method for 
nearly 100 percent of its raw steel 
production, anticipated a major 
boom in demand from customers 
in the United Stares, where contin- 
ous-casting is not as widespread. 

Mr. Rohwedder is particularly 
annoyed that Hoesch, having in- 
vested in a $ 12 -mflHon pipe-pro- 
cessing plant near Houston, should 
have difficulty supplying that plant 
because of U.S. constraints on pipe 
imports. He said Hoesch is one of 
the few European companies to 


u« 


Source : Credit Sutst+Wer motion Ltd 
London 


Have all the advantages 
of a bank account in 
LUXEMBOURG, without 
actually being there. 


To discover the advantages of banking in Luxembourg 
with BCC , all you have to do is to simply mail the attached 
coupon. We wltl promptly despatch to you by airmail our 
booklet containing detailed information about banking 
in Luxembourg. 

The BCC Group has offices in 70 countries, its Capital 
Funds exceed US$1,000 mil lion and total assets US$14,300 
million. The Head Office and branch of the Bank of Credit 
& Commerce International SA, in Luxembourg enable 
you to make full use of the unique advantages offered in 
Luxembourg which include:- 

1 . Total confidentiality of 
investor's affairs by the laws 
of Luxembourg. 

2. The benefits of being able 
. to open and operate an 

account in Luxembourg 
without actually going 
there. 

3. Investments and deposits 
* made by non-residents 

are totally tax-free 
and there is no with- 
holding taxon interest 
or dividends. 

4. Luxembourg is a stable, 
prosperous financial 
centre in the heart of 
European Economic 
Community. 


MaBthiscoupon (bryour FHee 
copy oPfnt M T a ilo n af and 
Porsooal Banking In Luxambourg' to 



Bamk of Credit and Commerce 

I NTERNA7TONAL SLA. 



Name 

Address, 


Phone; 

IHT4/10 


have pipe-production facilities in 
the United States. 

Hemmed in by subsidization in 
Europe and by the threat of further 
import quotas and various re- 
straints from the United States, 
where Hoesch currently has a sig- 
nificant stake as a supplier of steel 
pipe, Mr. Rohwedder is steering his 
company away from dependency 
on steel and toward further empha- 
sis on engineering technology. 

“We don’t want to grow in steel 
but rather reduce the relative 
weight of steel from its current 50 
percent level of our overall sales,” 
he said 


C.V 


lub 


Game of Stiff 
AMSTERDAM 

Oudcnjd-, VoorSuryual 157-159 
Telephone 020 -24 44 33 



ROTTERDAM 
Coolsingel 205 
Telephone 010 - 13 89 94 


NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

FIDELITY 
DISCOVERY FUND 

Sod£t£ dlnvestissemem & Capital Variable 
37 rue Notre- Dame, Luxembourg R.C. Luxembourg B 22250 

Notice is hereby gften that the adjourned Annual General Meeting of the Shareholders of FIDELITY 
DISCOVERY FUND, a Societc cTinvesiissemem & capival variable, organized under the lows of ihe Grand 
Duchy of Luxembourg (the “FuncTl. will now be held ai die principal and registered office of the Fund, 37 rue 
Notre-Dame. Luxembourg, at UilOajn. on October 16. 1985. specifically, but without limitation, for the 
following purposes: 


!. Presentation of the Report of ihe Board of 
Directory. 

2. Presentation of the Report of ihe Statutory 
Audi ton 

3. Approval of the balance sheet at April 30. 1985 
and income statement for tbe period ending 
April 30. 1985: 

4. Discharge of Board of Directors and the 
Statutory Auditor; 

5. Dection of six (61 Directors, specifically the 
re-election of all pre s e n t Directors. Messrs. 
Edward C Johnson 3rd. William L Byrnes. 
Charles A_ Fraser. Hisashi Kurokawa. 

John M. S. Patton, and Fmimuus: 

6. Election of (he Statutory Auditor, specifically 
the re-election of the present Statutory 
Auditor. Maurice J. Sergant; 

7. Declaration of a cash dividend to the 


Shareholders, and authorization of the Board , 
of Directors to declare further dividends in 
respect of fiscal year 1985 if necessary lo enable 
the Fund lo qualify for "distributor” status 
under United Kingdom tax law. 

8. Consideration of such other buaness as may 
property oome before the meeting. 

Approval of the above items on the Agenda will 
require (he affirmative vote of a majority of the 
shares present or represented at the meeting, with 
mo minimum number of shares required to be 
present or represented at tbe Meeting in order to 
establish a quotum. Subject to ihe limitations 
imposed by law and the Articles of Organization 
of the Fund, each share is entitled to one vote. 

A shareholder may act at any meeting by proxy 

By order of tbe Board of Directors 
Dated: 17th September, 1985 



Manufacturers Hanover 


is pleased to announce the opening of 
our new representative office in 


Shanghai 


The addition of this office expands and strengthens our worldwide network of 
over 100 offices in 42 countries. It indicates our continued commitment to the 
international corporate and financial communities. A commitment which 
provides you access to the global expertise and the creative financing 
solutions needed to manage your business. 

Manufacturers Hanover's long-standing dedication to China is further 
enhanced by this office opening which will complement our presence in 
Beijing and Hong Kong. We are well equipped to advise and assist you in 
promoting your business interests in this thriving market. 

For more information, contact: 

Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. 

Shanghai Representative Office 

Room 2606 Shanghai Union Building 
Yanan Road East/Sichuan Road, Shanghai 
Tel: 261888/263888 Tfelex: 33533 MHTSH CN Cable: MANTRUST 
Representative: Stephen Chung Kong Fei 


Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. 
Beijing Representative Office 

Rm. 114/116 lianguo Hotel 
lianguo Men Wal Da lie 
Beijing 

Tel: 502233/501986 (direct) 

Telex: 20446 MHTBI CN 
Cable: 6677 BEIJING 
Representative: Anne A. LeBourgeois 


Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. 
Hong Kong Branch 

43/F Edinburgh Tower 
15 Queens Road Central 
Hong Kong 

Tfel:(5) 8416888 

Telex: 73951 MHHKG HX 

Cable: MANTRUST 

Branch Manager: lames W. Sweitzer 


MANUFACTURERS HANOVER 

The Financial Source.® Worldwide. 


■c-zvf=_: 








► — , l'-ti 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4. 1985 




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Robert Capa, 7Iie New- Loot Paris 1947 


David Seymour. Arturo Toscanini, 1954 


David Seymour. Disturbed orphan l 1948 




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Werner BischcT, In the ruins of Warsaw. 1947 


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Henri Cartier-Bresson, The Ascot Train, Waterloo Station. London 1953 


Encb Lessing, Railroad workers, 1956 


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Photographs by WemeT Bischof, Rene Burn. Robert Capa, Henn Cartier-Bresson, Elliot Erwin, Ernst Hass, Erich 

From the archives of Magnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe in 
the immediate postwar years — striking images of a continent shaking off 
the debris of destruction and coming to life. 

Maty Blume, the International Herald Tribune's distinguished feature 
journalist, sets the postwar scene and interviews many of the photographers 
in her introduction. Tlie I.H.T. is pleased to present this unique volume that 
captures a decisive epoch and commemorates the work of some of the 
20th century's master photojournalism. 

Here" you'll find some of the most famous images and faces of our 
time. Once you open its pages, you will want to spend hours poring over this 
magnificently produced collection. Truly this is a book to treasure for 
yourself, and a beautiful gift as welL _ 

Available from the Internationa] Herald Tribune. Order today. 


W 


Lessing, Inge Morath. Marc Riboud, David Seymour, and other Magnum photographers. ' 

i^APTER THE WAR WAS OVER Hcralb«Ss£E s .(tnhuHC 

I International Herald Tribune. Book Division, Please shut m e — e-I _v . . _ 

181 Ave. CharteJfrGauile, 92521 .Neuflly Cedex,, France, ac US. $39.50 each, riiK^i^n7 he ^ ar Was Ow. ’ 
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HardtMver, 
.200 pages,- 
168 duotone illustrations, 
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Signature ; • ■ 

(DKCHory 1 m oedtt <ard 


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Address , •• 

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Country ~ • 


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** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1985 


Page 1.7 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar Ends Sharply Lower in New York 


Compiled ty Out Staff From Dispatches 

. NEW YORK — Tbe dollar 

dosed sharply lower in New York 
oa Thursday on signs of conceited 
intervention, dealers said. 

Several traders said they believed 
that European and U.S. central 
banks sold a modest amount of 
dollars ‘earlier in the day. 

“The central banks are dearly 
demonstrating that downside risk 
for the dollar remains great,** a U5. 
trader remarked. 

The dollar ended at 2.6200 Deut- 
sche marks in New York, its lowest 
level in about 16 months, compared 
with 2.6520 on Wednesday. 
t* Earlier in London, the U.S. unit 
ended at 2.6225 DM after drifting 
most of the day around its opening 
2.6470 DM and a dose on Wednes- 
day at 2.6470 DM. in Frankfurt, 
the dollar was fixed at midafter- 
nooa at 26459 DM, up from 
2.6410 DM previously. 

Tbe Bundesbank sold S29.3 mil- 
lion at the midday fix. West Ger- 
man dealers said this showed that 
the government was continuing its 
policy of maintaining a higher pro- 
file since the Group of Five na- 
tions’ meeting last month. 


Reports that the Group of Five 
have decided to timber depress the 
U.S- currency pressured the Ll-S. 
unit, dealers said. 

Gary Dorsch, senior money mar- 
ket analyst at G.H. Miller & Co. in 
Chicago, said traders were worried 
that “there may be some additional 
follow-up moves to help strengthen 
non -dollar currencies*' when senior 
officials of the International Mone- 
tary Fund meet this weekend in 
Seoul. 

“It is just speculation, but it is 
moving the markets,** Mr. Dorsch 
said. 

The British pound gained strong- 
ly against the dollar in New York, 
closing at $1.4260 from $1.4170 on 
Wednesday. The dollar finished at 
8.0100 French francs, down from 
8.0925 francs; and at 21420 Swiss 
francs, down from 21595 francs. 

The dollar was mixed to Europe, 
but fell to its lowest dosing levels 
against some currencies since April 
1984 after a late burst of selling, 
dealers said. Most of the sudden 
selling seemed to originate from tbe 
United States. 

The dollar lost ground against 
the yen in London, falling to 21255 


yen from 213 JO at the opening and 
213.80 on Wednesday. Earlier in 
Tokyo, the dollar ended at 213-70 
yea. down from 213.90 yen. 

Although in the long term the 

dollar’s direction seemed to be 
downwards, its short term course 
was more unpredictable, mosi Eu- 
ropean traders agreed. “The dollar 
is virtually rudderless. There is no 
clear idea where it is going.” a trad- 
er at a London bank commented. 

The British pound firmed 
against the dollar in London to 
close at S1.42S3. from $1.4155 on 
Wednesday. There are no major 
factors affecting sterling at the mo- 
ment, according to traders. 

They said that news on oil prices 
emanating from this week’s meet- 
ing in Vienna of oil ministers from 
the Organization of Petroleum Ex- 
porting Countries is being largely 
ignored. 

In other European markets, the 
dollar was fixed in Paris at 8.0735 
French francs, up from 8.054 
francs; and ended at 1144$ Swiss 
francs in Zurich, down from 21565 
francs. 

[Reuters, AP) 


Pretoria Ends Nonresident Remittance 
IhMopetoHelpEndFBghtofl Capital 

Reuters 

PRETORIA — Tbe South African central bank said Thursday that 
profits or income ranted before Jan. L 1984, or dividends based on 
these earnings, can no longer be automatically remitted to nonresi- 
dents, effective Sept 30. 

Economists say the restrictions are intended to prevent a devious 
flight of capital and plug a possible loophole in the four-month debt 
repayment standstill. 

The Reserve Bank said in an exchange-control circular that the rule 
applies to funds of a capital nature such as tbe sale of assets or profits 
from the revaluation of assets. 

A Hank official said approval for the forbidden remittances could 
be sought from the bank. 

The economists noted that foreign companies will still be able to 
sell off all or pan of their assets in South Africa and repatriate the 
proceeds. 


Merrill Names Lord Weinstock to Council 


OPEC Fails to Set Quota Pact 


THE EUROMARKETS 


New Yen Floating-Rate Note Is Expected 

lion among the Eurobond profes- 
sionals. 

The do liar-straight sector was 
also slightly lower in lethargic trad- 
ing. Only one new issue was intro- 
duced during the day, a SI 50- mil- 
lion bond for Nippon Credit 
Curacao Finance NY. 

The 10-year issue pays 10% per- 
cent over 10 years and was priced 
at 100%. Led by Salomon Brothers 
Inter national, it ended at a dis- 
count of 2 

Car gill Inc, issued a 50-million- 
Europcan -currency- unit bond pay- 
ing 8% percent over 10 years and 
priced at par. The bond was the 
company’s first public issue in any 
market. 

In other sectors, Japanese con- 
vertibles ended lower, with some 
issues dropping sharply. 


(Continued bom Page 11) 
country, struggling to repay about 
$8 billion of foreign debt, has been 
producing around 100,000 barrels a 
day above its quota of 183,000 and 
wants OPEC to “regularize’’ the 
higher leveL 

“It's tbe honor of the country 
that is important,’' Mr. Santos said. 
Last spring, OPEC sent a letter to 
Ecuador and some other members 
scolding them for overproducing. 

But Ecuador and other relatively 
poor members of OPEC contend 
that the quota system is highly un- 
fair. Tbe system, adopted in early 
1983 in an attempt to stop a plunge 
in oil prices, froze each member's 
agreed-upon output at about the 
levels then prevailing. 


Most members accepted a, fur- 
ther small cut in quotas in October 
1 984 when OPEC reduced its over- 
all ceding to 16 milli on from 17 J 

mi l l i on 

The poorer members have been 
pressing for a system that would 
base output quotas oa population 
and other measures of financial 
need. Such a system would imply 
deep cuts for such lightly populat- 
ed countries as Saudi Arabia, Ku- 
wait, the UAE and Qatar. 

Sh eikh Ahmed Zafci Yamani, 
Saudi Ara bi a's minister, arid his 
country was producing about 3 mil- 
lion barrels a day. That is weQ be- 
low the Saudi quota of 435 milli on. 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — With the dollar- 
denominaied Eurobond market re- 
maining nervous, dealers said 
Thursday that they expect the re- 
opening soon of the Euroyen float- 
ing-rate-note market following 
Tuesday’s inauguration of a Euro- 
lira market 

Bond market sources said that a 
15- billion-yen floating-rate note 
may emerge as soon as Friday for 
France's Caisse Nationale des 
Telecommunications. The sources 
expect the issue to have a 12-year 
maturity and pay 1/16 point over 
the six-month London interbank 
offered rate for yen. 

Tbe sources said they expect the 
issue to be priced at 100.10 and to 
be introduced in tandem with a 
Euroyen straight bond. 


Traders note that the first ever 
Euroyen floater, a 15-billion-yeu 
note for Credit Fonder, is current- 
ly trading above par at 10023. It 
was launched in July and also pays 
1/ 16 point over six-month Libor. 

The most successful new issue 
Thursday was a $ 100-million float- 
ing-rate note issued by Credit du 
Nord on its own behalf. The issue 

C ys 1/16 point over three-month 
bor. It ended above its par issue 
price at 100.02 percent 

Secondary market prices in the 
dollar floating-raie-note sector 
were generally a shade easier after a 
subdued day’s trading dealers said. 
Professionals were awaiting Thurs- 
day night’s report on M- 1 , the nar- 
rowest measure of die U.S. money 
supply. M-I was generally expected 
to decline $100 million to $500 mQ- 


Electronic Imaging’s Future 


(Continued on Page 11) 
million to 16 milli on picture ele- 
ments. “Only recently, as memory 
has gotten less expensive, has this 
become possible on PCs," said 
Sharon Kramer of Compuscan, a 
New Jersey competitor of Data- 
oopy. 

Meanwhile, optical character 
recognition itself is undergoing 
change. Last week Cauzin Systems, 
a Waterbury, Connecticut, startup 
undo-written by Eastman Kodak 
Co. and Xerox Corp. among others, 
introduced “data strips" that com- 
press pages of text into a narrow 
ticker-tape-width strip of paper 
dotted with small rectangular char- 


acters. The company plans to sell a 
$200 infrared scanner for personal 
computers, and has convinced sev- 
eral book publishers and maga- 
zines to publish computer pro- 
grams for lobbyists in strip form. 

“For the publishers, the cost is 
low: printing the strip is like print- 
ing a picture,” said Neil Klemfeld, 
a vice president of the company, 
noting that including disks in com- 
puter magazines has proved an ex- 
pensive way to distribute software. 
Moreover, he said, tbe strips are* 
subject to far fewer errors than op- 
tical character readers. “Best of 
all,’’ Mr. Klrinfdd added, “you can 
spill coffee on the strip — it won’t 
make any difference.” 


By Brenda Erdmann 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — - Merrill Lynch & 
Co. has appointed a top British 
executive to its advisory coundL 
The New York-based financial -ser- 
vices concern said Lord Weinsiock, 
61, managing director of General 
Electric Co. of Britain, has been 
invited to join the council, bringing 
its membership to six. 

The only other European on the 
council is Jcan-Yves Haberer, 
chair man and chief executive offi- 
cer of Banque Paribas. 

William P. Rogers, chairman of 
the advisory cotmcO, said the group 
was formed in 1984 to advise Mer- 
rill Lynch on a broad range of is- 
sues. Lord Weinstock, who has 
been managing director of the Brit- 
ish electrical and electronics giant 
since 1963, will be “a valued mem- 
ber of the council because of the 
breadth and scope of his knowl- 
edge of conditions in the United 
Kingdom and Europe,** Mr. Rogers 
said. 

Credit Suisse First Boston Ltd. 
said that Kail Miesel will join the 
bank as a senior member of the 
board beginning Jan. 2 La addition 
to his general new basin ess activi- 
ties for tbe CSFB group, Mr. Mie- 
sel will also be respo nsible for the 
bants investment in CSFB-Effec- 
tea Rank in Frankfurt. This sum- 
mer Mr. Miesel abruptly left bis 
post as a managing director of 
Deutsche Bank Capital Markets. 
Deutsche Bank AG’s newly created 
London unit. 

Nixdorf Computer AG has 
named Herman Valk as regional 
manager for Northern Europe. 
Based in London, Mr. Valk will 
oversee the West German comput- 
er maker ** operations in Finland, 
the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxem- 
bourg, Ireland and Britain. He suc- 
ceeds Albert Holler, who has been 
promoted to the main board of tbe 
parent concern. Mr. Valk’s succes- 
sor as managing director of Nix- 
dorf Computer Ltd, the British 
arm, is yet to be named. 

I.ttr International lid, in Lon- 
don has name d Hideo Yarnagishi 
managing director, succeeding To- 
drihiVn lahH, who is returning to 
the Tokyo bead office of the par- 
ent, Long-Term Credit Bank of Ja- 
pan Ltd. Mr. Yarnagishi formerly 



Lord Weinstock 


was general manager of Long-Term 
Credit Bank’s Los Angeles office: 

Westpae Banking Corp. has 
named Peter Blind general manag- 
er of its European division, which ls 
based in London. He succeeds Da- 
vid Murisoo, who also serves as 
chairman of tire London board of 
directors. Mr. Munson wiD retire 
early next year, but will r emain as 
nonexecutive chairman. Harvey 
Garnett, who currently is <*ief 
manager, credit policy and control, 


in the Sydney head office, w ill be- 
come dnef manager of tbe Europe- 
an division, succeeding Mr- SrincL 

War g Laboratories Inc- the U a 

computer maker, has n amed Pierre 
Metis to tbe new post of country 
manngwr for Spain. The appoint- 
ment follows Wang’s move to gain 
lull ownership of Wang Espana 
SA, winch was created in 1982 as a 
joint-venture distributor of Wang 
products in Spain. Previously, Mr. 
Metis was marketing ma n ager for 
Wang Belgium, a post in which he 
is succeeded by Jo LeroouL 

Babco AB, the Swedish engineer- 
ing grou p , has appointed Per Sand- 
berg «4nrf financial officer, suc- 
ceeding Ralph Hammar, who _ is 
joining Faluhus Drabamen as chief 
executive and managing director. 
Mr. Sandberg was finance director 
of Svenska Vary AB, the Swedish 
statt-owned shipyards group. 

Rnagat, the Spanish national gas 
company, has Juan Bwriosa 

Mr. Badosa was direc- 
tor-general for trade policy at the 
economy and finance ministry. 

G urbridgg In strum ent Go. of 
Britains^dRoyCotierilltookover 
as group managing director on Oct. 
1, Succeeding Terence Gooding, 
who continues as executive chair- 
man. Mr. Cotterill was managing 
-director of GEC Australia Ltd, a 
post in which he was s ucceeded by 
R.G. Elliot 


Z7JL Replaces MacGregor as Goal Chief 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Ian MacGregor, 
tbe American businessman who is 
in charge of Britain's coalfields, 
will be replaced when his contract 
expires next September, Energy 
Secretary Peter Walker announced 
Thursday. 

The chief of British Steel. Sir 
Robot Haslam, will take over as 
Coal Board chairman in September 
1986, but will work alongside Mr. 
MacGregor as a nonexecutive dep- 
uty chnirtngti from next month, 
Mr. Walker said in a statement 

Mr. MacGregor was appointed 
head of the state-owned National 
Coal Board in 1983. The National 
Union of h fi neworkers called him a 
hatchet man bent on demolishing 
the ailing coal industry. 


A former chairman of the Ameri- ‘ 
can metals giant, Amax Intv Mr. - 
MacGregor, 73, was hired by the - 
British government in 1980 to trim ’ 
the state-owned steel industry. He v 
promptly cut its losses by halving 
its work feat*. 

When Prime Minister Margaret : 
Thatcher appointed him Coal 
Board chairman, Arthur ScargBL. 
leader of the National Union o£ 
Minewotkers, warned of trouble, • 
and he later led Us miners out cm a 
crippling strike. - 

Mr. Walker messed that Mr. V 
MacGregor would rem a i n chair - 
man nwrii htn flnnfwrf nms OUL . 

“It is important for the industry - 
to know there, is somebody in 
place,” Mr. Walker said of Mr. - 
MacGregor’s successor, who was 
given a three-year contract... 


i 

I 1 


Thursday^ 

arc 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices as of 
3 pjil New York time. 

Via The Associated Press 


Sales In Net 

Dt*. Yin loos High Law J PJA ChVe 


11 ADCT1 

14 Aamftt 
TH Acodln 
7% Acelrtn 

m 

3 Aeautm 
13 to AflBMl 

taJ® 

7* AjrWtac 
28% Ato»B 
14 Alltel 
43* Alflorex 
10* Also W 
1546 AlleoBv 
17to AlldBn 
lit Allnat 
4% Ale MIC 
6* AMOS 
13* Amcast 
4*1 AW AM 

6* AmAdv 

HP* ABnter 
101% AmGorr 
5* ACantl 
13 ARtSL 
6V% AmFrst 
14*6 A F totes 
30 A Groat 
8* AtnlnU 
5W AMount 
lOt AMS s 
265% A HI l US 
2to APhvG 
1416 AmSec 
714 AmSfts 
ljj ASotar 



1.40 17 


M 11 


JO *2 


M 12 115 
1 - 

BD IS 275 
SB 15 640 
M 14 M2 


II 



IBto r 

6Vk Artel 
Iffto Asdrist 
Sto Astrosv 
15* AHAm 
2S% AtlnlBc 
B* AltfiFd 
8V. AH Fla 
19* AH Res s 
2to AtSeArs 
145% AtWdOc 
Sft AlrfTrT 
4% Autmtx 
4ft Auxton 
346 Avacre 
6 AvntGr 
171% Avntek 
1516 Avatar 
131% AvtatGf) 
4 AzTCM 


l« 15 M 

B67 

144 

140 4J M 
2 

100 18 *?3 
AO 23 111 
253 
316 
554 

.14 1J 41 

1 

49 

49 

1 

i 

48 
36 

.12 IjO 422 

40 

JO IS 19 

JO 14 11 

1M 

718 

451 

1 

I 9 

iS 

119 

47 

194 

10 

42 

20 44 6 


,k + * 

DA— ft 
-0ft + % 
14 + (% 

51% 

2D + 16 
16*6— t% 
.... 1836 + 1% 

5* ft H2 
mu. id 
1414 14 

9 m 

Mb 6V, 

ran iz 
ra% iiTb 

Bib 8V. 

1446 14V. 

814 8 
281% 27* 

31 U. 30* 

HVb 11 
65% 5V. 

1816 18 
357b 3516 
314 3 
2914 281% 

10W 18. 




mo ZD 


216 lH 

33V% 31ft 
25 25 

81% 814 
26*9 261% 
1774 171% 
121% 114% 
127b 12* 
15 14 

10 % 

SSi 

191% 1914 

4V 46% 
1814 18V. 
40 39%. 

4ft .6 
TW6 17 
44% 4 
22V9 22ft 
377b 37J6 

1474 1476 
5U 5J6 
414 47% 

5 

816 

814 . 
191% 1844 
1714 17V. 
1414 1374 
47k 4V6 


r 


1% 

U + 1 % 
H76 
416 
IZ 

117b— W 

814 

1414 

814 

281% + 1% 
31 — 14 
1116 + 16 
574— V% 
18 + *4 

351% 

3V. 

2874 

10 „ 
214 +fc 
*b + 1% 
3314—14 
25 

87b — lb 
241% + 14 
17V. + 14 
1176- V6 
T2V,— V. 
15 +16 
101b 

127b + H 
ISHr— V. 
191%— 1 
12V.— 14 
19V.— 76 
8 — *6 
4%. + 1% 
1814—76 

1174 + *6 
AW 
22 'A 

377%— lb 
101% + V4 
97b + Vb 
2776 + 99 
Wft— 14 
1474— 16 
Mr— » 
476 - 7b 
476— lb 
7 Vj — 1% 
8 — 1 % 
187b— 16 
1714 
14 

47b + 1% 


8 



rs 7> 
41% 4V. 
1074 974 

1976 191% 
» 51% 

19 U76 

10„ 91 

486 Jj_ 
286 27* 

» 121 % 
211 % 

iv. 1 V» 
Iftto 16 

a ss 

tv 97% 
137b IK 

WW 14%. 

101% 101% 


1074— 1% 

216 + 16 
1274 + 1% 
211m +114 
11% 

1M6— H 
374- lb 

97%— lb 

137b + 7b 
147% 

1016 


12 Month 

High LOW Stott 


Sctesln . hW I 12 Month 

Dlv. Via. 10*9 High Lew 3 P-M. ChVf I High Low Stock 


351% 221% CdtrBc 1JB0 
191% 8 Cento* 

57 341% CeflBc Z05U 38 

181% 128i CEshSs 
311% 1716 CF dBtes 
161% 87% cotue 

a ChkTctl 
ctiLwn 
8» 37b Chemox 



24 V. 

S3 


91* 

T 

afessp 

61% 274 CotObR 

151% 88b Cotaoon 
61% 4 Coinns 
36’A 247b CalUAc 1D0 
207% 1514 CoIrTto 
21 bk 15 CoktWl JA 
141% 47% Cemars 
207% ll'A earnest .13 
1576 1014 Ccmdta .14 
48b 176 Comdlal 
4314 318b Crnarlc 
43 2274 Cmcell 

13 97% CffllSh 


31 to Z3 CmwTl 
576 l16 CamAm 
30i* 141% Coinlnd 
1374 774 camSvs 
34 1J76 CmpCds 

1176 31% Comma 
251% 1414 CmpCrs 
4U. 274 Campus 
57b CCTC 
151% CmpAs 
91% CmpOt 
374 CptEnt 
41% CmolH 
5H Cmpldn 


3.10 5L5 
1D4 25 
50o S2 
IJO 54 


416 ... 

S&8S 

^ WA 
191* 1874 
111% I0W 
27% 28% 
381b 38 
4174 401% 
976 98b 


151* 

Sto 

8(4 

128% 

9*6 

ft 

10’A 

191% 

111* 


db a 


41% CmpRds 
ImTsks 


98% Cmi 

476 Qnputn 
8 lib eptett 
104% A Comshr 
94% 6 Concott 
27 141% CnCm 2M IU 

181% 14 '4 CCODR IJOallD 
2474 127b CCopS 2.16 16J 
547b 321% CnPdDS UO 3D 
5Vi 31% CoraPd D8 25 
■I* 21% Consul 

a 2874 CntlSc 2D4h 52 
18(6 IWCHHIts 
8 4 CtL asr 

MV. 47% Cenvst 
2114 12W Convrse 
57% Ilk CoprBlo 
an* 141% CoorSB 
49 141% Coovtal 

10V. 6 Car-corn 

117* 674 Cordis 

607* 3774 Cores I 
5 176 Conan 

71% 3V% Cosmo 

1776 low CrkBri 
141% 101% Cronus 
2974 20V. CrosTr 
14 9 CwnBk 

3474 1574 Crump 
3274 181% CullflFr 
281* 151* Culumi 
2 7 181* CVame 


JO 22 


TJ8 44 


.14 ID 

JO 15 

50 IJ 
SA A2 
30 23 


FOP 

FMI 

FamRest 
i FarmF 

i FrmG IJ6 ID 
FgdGas 
i Feroflu 
Flbrons 

Fdta-s 1J2 44 
FlflhTfi 1J0 3.1 

rImS m a! 

Finale* JO AS 
i FMmx 
Ftelgm 

FtATn s 
FtColF 
FConv- 
FtCant 
FDatoR 
FExsc 
FFCal s 
FFFIM 
FIFnCp 
FIFnMs 
FIFIBk JA 15 
FJerN 180 52 
FMdB 1J0 3D 
FNttte s 1 -« 19 
FRBGa 1D6 2J 



FomstO 1D0 6J 
i Forth F 

Forms 

Forum D6b 3 
Fostgr .w 11 
i Fremnt JO 2D 
Fudrck. 

FulrHS 22 l S 



13ft 

3ft GTS 



55 

4ft 

41% 

4% 

14ft 

9ft Galileo 



236 

Uto 

Uft 

12 

11% 

.10 

15 

47 

6ft 

6% 

4ft 

«% 

28ft GcMtdl 
5. GeaeiS 



1096 


AS 

45ft + ft 

Uto 



■a 

716 

7% 

7to 

10ft 




1ft 

1% 

1ft + to 

25 

89* GaFBic 



2« 

25 

Sift 

2416— to 

10% 

496 GerUtas 

J58 

1.1 

114 

7% 

7to 

7ft- to 

3*% 

14 GlbsGs 

34 

U 

30B 

19 

18ft 

IBft 

20% 

14 GioaTr 
12% Gatoos 



25 

15 

15 

IS + ft 

14% 



334 

Wft 

Wto 

Wto + ft 

a 

99* Gott 



4) 

21ft 

21* 

21ft 

me, 

14% GovIdP 

36 

4 S 

75 

15% 

lift 

1554 — ft 

ISto 

10ft Groat 

M 

2.9 

m* 

15ft 

15 

15ft + ft 

9ft 

5% Grontra 




894 

876 

B9k 

ire. 

5 Grphls 



484 

12% 

11*6 

in*— n 

au, 




3358 

7 

Sto 

7 + to 

22 

109* GWSov 

A8r 24 

9 

19ft 

18% 

18% — to 

12% 

8 GtSoFd 



9ft 

9ft 

7ft— ft 

ISto 

8 Gtetfi 



338 

Uft 

14 

14ft— % 

19 

15ft 

13ft Girflfru SBe 
ft GMBdC ISDOc 

3 




14^6 + to 






D 



| 

4% 

2ft GDI 



23 

3 

3 

3 

lift 




307W 

toto 

1096 


30ft 




5to 

5 

5ft + to 

37% 

20ft Datsvsv 



1492 

22* 

21% 

22ft + ft 


20% OalasF 




30 

X 


7to 

Ato DrnnBlo 



11 

5ft 

Sto 

57b .. 

108 

83 DartCa 

.13 


1 

102 

02 

® — 1% 


11% Datcrds 

JA 

lj 

3S 

IBto 

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8ft DU IQ 



9 

8ft 

Sto + to 

9ft 

3% DlSwIdi 



44 

5% 

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S% + % 

23ft 

11 Oancp 



S9 

22V. 

Zlft 

23ft 





36 




Bto 




25 

6ft 

6% 

4% 

7ft 




JQ 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft— ft 

19% 

9(6 DebSlis 

20 

1.1 

3T 

18 

17ft 

18 + to 

19% 

9% DedsD 



215 

11% 

lift 

Uft + ft 

30% 

30(6 OetelttA 

32 

2 A 

1147 

30% 

28ft 

39ft +1 








1 — % 

79* 

ft Dene ter 



84 

% 

ft 

ft 

9ft 

Aft Dentted 



T 25 

4to 

Sto 

4 + to 

14ft 

796 DlOQPr 



23 

12ft 

12(6 

12ft— ft 

5* 




342 

2te 

2ft 

2ft + to 

Uft 

10 Dkxon 



7 

1316 

13ft 

13ft 







4ft 


30ft 

Uft DlfltCm 



411 

29ft 

28ft 

29 + % 

3*96 




23 




1.1 

Uto DlrGnl 

30 

.9 


2116 

20ft 

21ft + ft 

R2J 

23ft DomB 

130 

17 

JB7 

33 

31ft 

33ft +lft 


13 DrdiH 

30 

13 

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141* DavlOB 

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1 

20 to 
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lift OrevGr 



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52 

237 


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281* 

074 

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301% 

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474 ElnNucI 
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414 EtCIMtS 
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674 EmiMh- 
574 Enwlgx 
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774 Eh Foci 
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121b— 7* 
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247* 

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177b Hell* 
317* HenrdF 
17 HlberCo 

3to Houon 

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23 Hoover 
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181* HuntJB 
77* HhlBln 
157% HntaBs 
13'* Hvbrttc 
47. HypofW 
57* HyiekM 


30 

ID 

1540 

20ft 

19% 

20 — to 



143 

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20* 

211* — ft 



74 

496 

496 

49* + ft 



19 

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29*— to 



15 

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202 

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182 

2496 

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180 

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34 

33 

127 

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11 

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18 

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1896 LlnBrd 


070 

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27ft UncTel 

130 

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29% 

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140 

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385 

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4050 

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1.92 

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34 

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476 

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lift 

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57* MfcrTc 



315 

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71 

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71 

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130 

3 

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JB 

13 

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148 

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273 

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a 



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9ft 

12ft 

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48 

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20ft 


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17 

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217 

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11* 





585 

11 

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10 

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JS 

24 


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in* 

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7ft 

— J m 



459 

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2* 

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21 

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2AU. 

1196 Mylans 

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941 

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JA! 



14* 


14% — % 





94 

5% 

5ft 

5% 

5 * 

2 NMkm 



1094 

2% 

2ft 

2% + ft 










&to NetsnT 

30 

25 

20 

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4to 

4*— ft 


6 HeBan 



95 

4ft 

6 

4ft 


5% NrrkSec 




4% 

6 

6 —to 


14* NhvkSs 



2451 

24% 

23* 

74*— to 


289b Neutras 



6 

31% 

31ft 

31ft —1ft 


7to NBruoS 




BV 

Sto 

5* + n 


23% ME BUS 
IBto NHmaB 

53 



24ft 

24ft 

P2J2 


JO 

27 

83 

I .J 

29 


19% NJH1I 

1,12b 3J 

15 

1 .71 

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179% 

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D5e 

3 

100 

IS 

14* 

15 

Rt.T;! 


06 

3 

9 

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21% 

21% 

u 

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1250 

10 

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9* + * 

7% 

1ft NIColO 
49* NlkeB 



27 

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1522 

139* 

13ft 

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75% Harden 






14 — % 


28ft Nordstr 

J4 

ID 

211 

Ea 

12* 

on + * 


28% NrekB 1 



203 


Uft 

46% + to 


5% Norstan 





4* 

«.— ft 


5 NAtlln 



58 



7ft— ft 


6ft NestSv 



40 


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■-v 

14ft HwNG 







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JS 

25 

52 



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208 


r , r'.'m 

21% + ft 

^BTV- 

IBto NwsIPS 

2.10 

94 

45 

1-' 1 v 

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22*— VI. 


39% Maxell 

IDS 

21 

139 



51 - * 

Wt 1 1 

4* NudPt) 
5% Nwnrax 



8 

3 

5 % 

Sft 

ss+a 


19% Numeric 






2Sto— to 


6* NutrlF 



36 


9 * 

9 *- to 

13 * 

4 * NuMed* 



353 


7* 

7*- * 





1 



1 

s% 

11% Oceaner 



29 

2 * 

2* 

2*— ft 


12 OdJtas 



144 


12* 

13 


33% OallGe 
39% QhtoCo 




41 * 


•1% + ft 

47* 

2J0 

45 

249 


54* 

56*- % 


IB* OIdKnts 

IDO 

34 

93 


27* 

279k — % 

23 OldRps 


25 

in 


29* 

29*— to 


10% OldSotC 2 JO ill 




*9ft 

lift OneBai 

39e 15 

390 


24* 

25% + * 





rift 



19ft 

12 * OpllcC 



739 

13 

13 — n 

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22% OeitaH 



IQ 

27* 

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27* +1% 

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159* Ortoanc 





13* 



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4ft QrtaCo 







20 

1316 Ocfimn 

30 

14 

59 

Uft 

12% 

12% — * 

s* 

26 OtirTP 
Bft OvrExp 

276 

93 

02 

44 


29* 

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9% 

16* 

6 

8 OwnMs 
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2t 


St 


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to 

15* 

to 1 


» Month 
High Low 


Sotos h Met 

Dtv. YkL 10BS High Lon *3 PAL ChU* 


1JZ SO 
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JO 55 


J» SI 


I 


U J 




3214 211* PNCs 

531* 3916 Paccar 

154% 7 PocFst 

15 1016 PocTW 

1476 101% PocoPTi 

SS to Mi 

■ 4 PaMM 

1216 54% PoulHr 

184 776 Paycftx 

22V% 9% PeoteHC 

31 2D to PeorlH 

MM* 5V. P«Gld ... 

35 23V. Pena Eli 220 7J 

311* 201b Pentar* J8 2* 

154% 77k PoopEa D5r S 

31(6 23WP»lr)tr 112 4* 
137% 4 Phrmet 
121* . 7V6 PSF5 
177% Ml* PhHGI 
77* 2 PtmxAm 
2BV% 1776 PICSOV 
34V6 146% PlcCaft 

37V% 27(6 PlortHl 

1076 7 PtanSt 

IS S* PoFotk 

34(6 1676 PIcyMO 

2f 21 Ponix 
39k 176 Powell 

ISTfc 91* PowrtC* 

11% 51* PwOnv 

3776 19V. Proc Cat 

9 4(6 ProdLo 

776 3 Prfem 
16V. 7V. PrlcCms 

44 3616 PrlcoCo 

2176 * Prtronx 
6 4(6 ProODO .14 14 

42 2046 PraOCl .12 3 

157% 1176 ProptTr IJO 93 

19V, 13% Prowln 

7to 3to Pullmn 

2 M 6 7266 PurtBn JO 13 



267b 2676 24% — % 
44(6 43(6 44(6 + (6 
10(6 10(6 Uto + to 
I3to 13 Uto 
14 1316 13(6— to 

19to Uto 19 — to 
121* 117b 1176. 

•SA 5 8 — to 

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mb 17 I7to + to 
127b 1276 tijb 
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31V. 311* 31V, +1 
26V4 24 24 

n 1016 10»— to 
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6(6 6to 416 + to 
9(6 9 9 —16 

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22% 2214 22V. — (6 
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23% Z376 2 Jto— to 
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301% 291* 304% +1(6 
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541* 5316 54 —to 
1176 1176 1176 + to 
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17% 171% 17»— to 
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12MDOB1 
HJBCl Low Slock 


DI9.-V14. 


Sales In Net 

MOl High ' LOW 3 PAL OTOe 


89 

4(6 




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774 Sway 

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416 Syntech 
TVi syntrax 
Uto iito Syxcon 
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7(6 3Vb SVBtln 
1116 476 SVtfalg 
251% 1316 SySmf 


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' - — 


















Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4> 1985 


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PEANUTS 

|VE MEARP THAT YOUR. THEY SAY IT'S JU5T WHAT KINI? OF PROBLEMS f ™ PROBLEMS « ^ .1 

AFVICE ISN'T ANY SOOP... ll POP PSYCHOLOGY.!. CAN YOU SOLVE WITH _\J J i 

— - -y SO I HAVE TO ASK | POP PSYCHOLOGY ? C{2 ^ II $ 

I V YOU SOMETHING... I -*a*aa* „ — ^ 


THE PCCTOR ^ 

BLO INDIE 

[ws SHOULD ALL LOOK 
INTO SEU=-DEJ=ENse r-* 



rTS V6HV IMPOC 
1 FOR US 


rue POvfc-^ 


I TWlESD «/ W WHAT u j [ J BOOSE IT 
HAND AT rt HAPPENED? I > — -v . — , i 

KAJOTE 5 V 


j \M,U. 


ACROSS 

1 Coptic church 
father 

SOrg-that 54 Wgls. 

« a “*» 55 N.H. and N.M. 

DiJ linger 56 Metric 

8 One of Zeus s measure 

disguises 57 Heraldic dog 

12 ft ind sound 55 Broadway 

13 Radio’s" offering 

Mrs. North" 6 , AJwav? 

1 5 Sen. Metzen- Si s!!!?*?—-. 

»!3ssr 63 ^r mfor 

19 York of the « Fra ™ rt 

a.e.f. > 


10-4 85 

46 "2001: 10 Buoyant 

Odyssey" 11 Bank of fering 

47 Pedantic women 13 Raphael’s 

52 Loki’s daughter "Sistine ” 


40 iviiiuui iduuci 

19 York of the S 5 ^ 

i?ES^ des ' -sees? 

Decade, e.g. _ „ 

23 Nautical chain 67 


24 Colorful royal 
line 

28 Lend an ear to 
“The Shadow" 

29 Coeur, 

Parisian 

basilica 

32 Estival’s 
opposite 

35 Crystalline 
medicine 

38 Redolence 

37 Zodiacal leader 

40 Moldavian city 

41 Farmer Italian 
president 

43 Covered with 
laurels 

45 Wreck 


4 Wgts. 14 Enzo , 

5 N.H. and N.M. noted basso 

•6 Metric 20 Antoine’s 

measure dread 

i7 Heraldic dog 22 Astronomical 

9 Broadway handle 1 

offering 25 Of the breastbone 

11 Always 26 Most unctuous 

12 Ginger root 27 A last name in 

13 Anagram for astronomy 

snore 30 Small hill 

4 Forbidden, in 31 Phillips 

Frankfurt University site 

5 cap 32 Jack or Tim of 

(mushroom) films 

6 Certain golf 33 Concept : 

shot Comb, form 

7 Racing 34 Pump polisher 

announcer 38 Photographer’s 

McCarthy concern 

DOWN 39 Biblical spices 

— - 42 Month after Ab 

1 Ammarai's sect 44 Tails for bulls 

2 Large antelope and hills 

3 Xhosa’s 46 Sanction 

linguistic 48 Spain's longest 

family river 


— . BEETLE BAILEY 


USUALLY, s 
WE DOtf'T i 
ACKNOWLEDGE i 
BIRTH PAVfe | 
AT OUR STAFF j 

L MEETINGS £ 


HOWEVER, SINCE LT- FUZZ HAS 
MADE ALL THE ARRANGEMENTS... 


Wo zr i 

U&X&. % 


2 Large antelope 

3 Xhosa’s 
linguistic 
family 


ANDY CAPP 


s' s 

tHIC- ( NOTMUCH 
•*/■* V OF A -< 

aggj. ( NIGHT. 

W [ EH, PET? , 


S8BS& 


r rrs a ecxx> nght ids 

THIS BU 3 KE WHEN BOTH , 
„ HIS LS 3 S MOVE IN 1 HE J 
N .SAME DIRECTION f. 


4 Ques. opposite 49 Kind of • 

5 Rockwell’s t engagement 


"Freedom — 1 

6 Snippet of 
music 

7 Detain, as an 
alien 

8 Gardener's 
purchase 

9 Waterpower 
or electricity 


50 Diving bird 

51 Red Cross item 

52 Actor Rhodes 

53 Dash 

58 Napoleon's 
"bravest of the 
brave" 

60 Garment cut 

61 Handy abbr. 


"nra! 

■ >' ' if 


WIZARD or ID 


£> New York Tones, edited by Eugene Ma l e s k a. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 




goto 

25 QOZr &|A 

fife- m&m 


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REX MORGAN 





f I WON'T TAKE THAT ENVELOPE 
FROM YOU.CLAUWA-BUT BEFORE 
I vou PICK rr up. let's talk ^ 
w ABOUT OTWEK OPTIONS/ M 


WO LECTURES, I 
PROMISE/ _ 


"fit's BEEN IN EVERY STATE 
IN THE U-S-. .. EXCEPT DlSNEYLANU" 


GARFIELD 


you're not Going 
to believe this 


WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOB 
SAWA STICK RETRIEVE A DOG? 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
$ by Henri Arnold and BoD Lae 


Unscramble these four Jumbtas, 
one letter to each square, to lorn 
lour ordinary words. 


OMIDI 


AWNTY 




JBV\ pAVfS 






BOOKS 


THE STORIES OF MURIEL SPARK 

314 pages. $18.95. 

£ P. Dutton, 2 Park Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. 10016. 

By Michiko Kakucani 

CCT TREATED the story," says the narra- 

1 tor of one of Muriel Spark’s recent nov- 
els. “with a light and heartless hand, as is my 
way when I have to give a perfectly serious 
account of things-” It is of course a good 
description of Spark’s adamantine style, and 
nowhere is that style more in evidence than in 
these collected stories. Indeed, the tales serve 
as a kind of magnifying glass, heightening the 
distinctive qualities of Spark’s want: hex cool, 
precise prose; ha- tricky, tricked-up {riots; and 
her wicked, peremptory sense of humor. The 
weaknesses of her fiction, too, are thrown into 
relief here — we notice, more acutely, her 
willful tendency to withhold information, her 
reliance on arbitrary, neatly symbolic endings 
and her reticence to involve us emotionally in 
the lives of her people. 

A convert to Catholicism, Spark has always 
displayed a sharp moral sense and a fierce 
Olympian detachment in her fiction; the read- 
er of ten has the sense that Spark is standing far 
away, looking down on her characters’ mortal' 
follies from a great distance as she mischie- 
vously twitches the strings of their destinies 
and moves them about with the same aplomb 
with which they attempt to manipulate one 
another through blackmail, deception and be- 
trayal. In such novels as “The Comforters,'’ 
“Memento Mori” and "The Prime of Miss 
Jean Brodie,” this narrative strategy has yield- 
ed some deliciously funny metaphyseal humor 
as wefl as some clever satire; and there are 
moments in these stories when the same quali- 
ties snap, instantly, into focus. 

Spark’s portraits of the English and Dutch in 
Africa capture, with Waugh-like acerbity, the 
pretensions and hypocrisies of the colonial 
Third World, and her depiction of the psycho- 
logical games that develop within dosed com- 
munities of people — a colony of expatriates, a 
trio of former schoolmates, a group of tenants 
in a rooming house — possesses a similar 
venomous vigor. 

Still, one often suspects that Spark does not 
. care a lot for her characters, and this chilliness 
is accentuated in her shorter fiction. With the 
exception of “The Go-Away Bird” — a longish 
story that beautifully delineates the inexorable 
patterns of fate in an African girl's life — these 
stories have a spindly, bony quality; they fold 
up on themselves like collapsible chairs, with- 

Sotutinn to Previous Puzzle 


bed Batin anna 
edge naan naans 
□□□□□□□an annaa 
□□□□□□ □□aasaa 
oasaa bsb 

QUJS EDO 01 01 13 BBSS SO 

□GEDna aann bbhb 

□EDO □□QBE BGinJB 

bebb Baaa □□hgb 

□DBC3QDICIB3 QIQE30Q 

□□□ aamaa 

BDQCDOBO QSniGBGD 

nnnna aanBanona 

□EBE5Q GH3DEI HOBO 
□BBC] □□□□ DE3E 


out giving us any sense of their people's inner 
Eves, their histories or their hopes ^motiva- 
tions. Irony is all in these stones — “J J 

S ind the raison d etre. The Fathers 
as,” for instance, is an altogether pre- 

tale about a literary fortune hunter 
who dumps the daughter of one famous man 
for the daug h ter of another. “The First Year of 
My life" is a slight, silly piece predicated on 
the conceit that babies are born omniscient ~ 
infants, Spark writes, “know everything that is 
going on everywhere in the world; they can 
mne in to any conversation they choose, switch 
on to any scene" ■ — mid lose this knowledgpas 
they grow (rider. “The Black Madonna” is little 
more than a fancy illustration of the old tnamm 
that you’d better be careful about what you 
pray for because you might get what you wan l 
I n “The Black Madonna," a statue carved 
out of dark wood appears to grant the wishes 
devout parishioners; a similar sense of in* 
otherworldly intrudes in many of these stories. 
Even when the context is not overtly religious, 
the imp licatio n remains that the supernatural 
exists, that commonplace lives are subject to 
mysteries that pass human understanding. A 
little flying saucer glides into a living room in 
“Miss Pinkerton's Apocalypse." and the hero- 
ine dispassionately notes that the saucer- is 
Spode, and that it is being piloted by a man the 


Zambesi,” disrupting the local festivities. Evil 
incongruously embodied in the persons of two 
small children malcqt an unexpected appear- 
ance in “The Twins." Ghosts,' also, figure 
prominently in several of the tales: in “The 
Executor," the restless spirit of a writer haunts 
his dishonest niece; in “The Leaf-Sweeper," a 
madman who wants to deny the spirit of 
Christmas meets op with an apparition of his^ 
alter-ego; in “The Portobello Road." a munr“ 
dered. woman keeps tabs on the people respon- 
sible for her death. 

As in Spark’s novels, nasty, violent doings 
proliferate freely in these stones: People either 
live separately, “frolicking happily but hbt 
together,” or collide precipitously with one 
another, getting tied up in complicated strata- 
gems that come to bloody conclusions. A wotp- 
an nicknamed Needle is choired to death in a 
haystack after she vows to reveal an (rid 
friend's secret. A farmer returns from jafi to 
find his wife with atwwhgrnwn, and lriTls them 
both. In what may be a case of -mistaken-’ 
identity, a man shoots his would-be lover arid 
then himself. Such endings may well ratify 
Spark’s distinctly dark view of human nature 
— an apparent belief m original an, combined 
with a conviction that people are better off 
living independent fives, free of messy entan- 
glements — but the reader too often feds that 
the author has stacked the cards against her 
creations 

Michiko Kakutani is on the naff iff The New 
York Times.. 


PrasnBo4^Foandm (%io ; 

United Press Tanrmaitmtd 

WARREN, Oitio— An at®mal edition of a 
book of letters by Pius II, pope from 1459 to 
1464, has been discovered among a coOectidn 
of dd books in borage at a county Ehrary hern - 
The 252-leaf jtwnnahnhrm, tidra - “Eputolae 
Famfliares,” was printed by Johann Kodhoff ; 
in Cologne in 1478, only about 23 years after 
Johannes Gutenberg invented thefiik printing 
press.. ■■■■■.-■ 


I >3 r985 IHMd Feature Svn9cats.kK. 


By Alan Truscocr 

O N the diagramed deal the 
bidding began at the one- 
level and seemed to continue 
forever. Once South had found 
the spade fit he was unwilling 
to defend at favorable vulnera- 
bility and persevered to six 
spades. The East-West six dia- 
mond slam was due to be de- 
feated by a dub lead, although 
unbeatable, as it happened, if 
East had been declarer. 

In six spades doubled. South 
received a normal heart ruffed 
in dummy and threw his dia- 
mond loser on the dub ace. 


BRIDGE 


The routine play at this point 
would have been a complete 
cross-ruff. This would have 
produced 10 tricks since tire 
hearts in the dosed hand, 
though established, do not 
score since South runs out of 
trumps. 

South saw that he could do 
better by ruffing only two 
more hearts in the dummy. 
The final raff was the Sjpade 
king, and he then overrode the 
jack with the queen. He stiQ 
had enough trumps to tie 
draw the enemy teeth and sur- 
render a heart trick. The result 
was down one. 


. NORTH 
4 KJIS 
O — 

. 4 14.3 

QAQ9 7 3 IIHIIII 0X1089 V 

+ KJ 9 * *QM 5 l 

■ SOUTH (D) 

* Q 19 T 1 32 

998flS-«a 

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■ *— 

' But and Wort wen Trtoenfcla. 
The bfcttng: 


«M( . 

Nnk 

Ban 


X* 

2-0 

3* 

IB 

Paoe 

fl O 

-5* 

PM 

e« 

DM, 

P*e 

DM. 

Paw 

Pane 


M (telmt king. 


COBIXE 


YERRSH 


WHAT 

PEOPLE ©1VE 
WHEN THEY LOSE 
THEIR INHIBITIONS. 

L — J 

Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Wirid Stock Markets 

V ia Agence France-Presse Oct. 3 

doling prices in local currencies unless olhencise indicated. 


Yesterday's 


EUROPE 


(Answers to monowi 

Jumbles: JOLLY KINKY CATCHY FIRING 
Answer A bachelor prefers to remain single, while 
others would this — ' "KNOT” 


WEATHER 


E.Y . K i .rE HIGH LOW 
C F C ff 

Alearve a 77 15 59 cJ 

AmrterUani XI 73 14 *1 sh 

Athem W M I* 41 lr 

Barcelona .3 K II M el 

m il w o d v V U 7 « tr 

emin a 75 i4 57 ei 

Brumteh 25 77 18 64 d 

Budwttsl 27 81 5 41 fr 

BndaPM 25 77 9 a lr 

Copenlmn 14 57 ID 50 la 

Onto Del Sol 8 D 17 43 d 

Dublin 17 63 13 55 o 

Edtaburgb 18 64 12 55 fr 

Plorwct 38 82 » 54 lr 

Frankfurt » 75 12 54 ef 

e«MW 27 B1 10 50 d 

Helsinki 13 55 ID 50 O 

Istanbul a a 11 51 Fr 

LOS Mmn 28 82 22 72 lr 

UtUaa » 75 19 U el 

London 23 73 17 63 d 

Madrid 26 79 14 59 tr 

Miton 25 77 12 54 d 

Moscow 17 A3 9 48 Cl 

Munich 27 81 9 48 fr 

Nice 26 7V 17 *3 fr 

Oslo 16 61 11 52 o 

Parts 28 82 18 44 cl 

Prune 26 79 ll 52 lr 

ReridavOc 12 54 7 45 fr 

pome 34 79 IS 59 el 

Stockholm 16 61 12 54 O 

Strasbourg 27 81 13 54 lr 

Vertce 23 73 16 61 tr 

Vitxuia 32 73 11 51 tr 

Warsaw 19 46 7 45 a 

Zurich 15 77 9 48 fr 


Prague 26 79 11 52 lr 

Reykjavik 12 54 7 45 tr 

Rome 26 79 IS 59 cl 

Stockholm 16 61 12 54 O 

Strasbourg 27 81 13 $4 lr 

Venice 23 73 16 61 tr 

ViOWM 32 73 11 51 lr 

Warsaw 19 46 7 45 o 

Zurich 15 77 9 48 fr 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara 24 75 o 32 fr 

Beirut 28 82 22 72 tr 

Damascus 32 90 8 44 fr 

Jerusalem 27 B1 21 70 fr 

TSl Avis 30 BA 16 61 lr 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 16 61 9 48 a 

Sydney 23 rs 15 so d 

d-cloudv; to-toegvi tr-tat: h-hali, 
stvsn o wors: sw><inaw; st-Morwiv. 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



e 

F 

c 

F 


Stang koft 

29 

B4 

23 

73 


Belling 

25 

77 

12 

54 

fr 

Hong Kong 

38 

B2 

21 

70 

cl 

WHanSta 

33 

90 

25 

77 


New Delhi 

33 

91 

24 

75 

fr 

Sand 

24 

75 

10 


tr 

ShancSral 

73 

73 

14 


fr 

Singapore 

27 

SI 

22 

72 

O 

Tataei 

25 

77 

n 

70 

r 

Tokyo 

as 

77 

16 

61 

0 

AFRICA 

Algiers 

31 

99 

22 

72 

tr 

Cairo 

33 

90 

19 


fr 

Cape Town 

, — 



— 



CasabfaiRcn 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

Harare 

•P 

— 

— 

mm 

no 

Logo* 

31 

83 

24 

75 

cl 

Nairobi 

37 

ei 

18 

64 

fr 

Torts 

30 

u 

li 

59 

fr 

LATIN AMER 

ICA 



Boaoos Abes 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

no 

Caracas 

15 

59 

0 

32 

PC 

Lima 


wo* 

— 

_ 


Mexico City 



— 

— 

— 

PC 

Rio de Jaieiro 



— 

— 

— 

no 

NORTH AMERICA 



Anchorage 

9 

48 

0 

32 

PC 

Atiaota 

33 

73 

16 

&1 

d 

Boston 

19 


13 



Chicago 

38 

68 

5 

41 

fr 

Denver 

aa 

68 

2 



Ds'aroH 

ii 

94 

1 

34 

lr 

Mono to hi 

31 


31 


lr 

Houston 

26 

79 

14 

57 

PC 

Los*e®eSe» 

33 

91 

16 

61 

fr 

Mtaml 

30 

86 

24 



WnaeapaHs 

14 

41 

4 

41 


Montreal 


61 

V 

48 

ir 

Nassau 

» 

» 

21 

70 

s! 

New York 

IB 

M 

11 

52 

r 

San Francisco 

29 

m 

14 

V 

lr 

Seattle 

W 

6 4 

9 

48 

PC 


Toroafn 14 

wascuagioa 2i 

aovnroort; oc -partly i 


ABN 

ACP Hoidina 
AEGON 
AKZQ 
Ahold 
AMEV 

A'Dom Rubber 
Am ra Bonk 
BVG 

Buetirmann T 
Coland Hlda 
Elsevier-NDU 
Fa*ker 
Gist Brocades 
Holnokcn 
Hooaovens 
KUU 
riaarden 
Nat Nrtloer 
Nedllavd 
Oca Vander G 
Paknaad 
Philips 
Robeco 
PodaniLu 
Rollnca 
Rorunlo 
ROVOI Dutch 
Unllevar 
VaaOmmeren 
VMF Stark 
VNU 

AN p. CBS Gen-1 inoex : 7MA0 
Previous J 215A0 


I Brawclw 

Arsed 

SekaerJ 

Cockeriil 

Ccbeoa 

EBES 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

GeWOft 

Hoboken 

iniercom 

Kredlenxmk 

Pel rw ina 

Soc Generate 

Safina 

Soivav 

Trod MM EFCC 

UCB 

Unerg 

vioilie Maniogne 


Finokfart 



Hochtief 778 780 

HOedlSl 23JJ0 223 

Hoosdl 135 138 

HOrtm 224.80 221 

tinsel 392 392 

IWKA_ M2 303 

Kali + Sab 369 346-50 

KOrstad! 286 288 

Keufhof 318-50 318 

Kloeckner H-D 3M 3G5 

Ktoeduwr Wertue 78 77 

Kjnjpp Stahl 142 13750 

Unde SS5 546 

Lufthansa 227.50 227 

MAN W 18750 

Mannesmann Z37J0 22S50 

Muencti Rueck 1950 1700 

NJxdori 577.50 57B 

PK1 680 670 

Porsche 1289 1285 

Preussag 376 TP> 

PWA 148 14850 

RWE 21850 319 

Rhelnmelall 323 

Sphering 543 540 

SBL 338 343 

Siemens 617 6 JJ 

Thyssen 147^0 14950 

Vebd 260 26130 

voikswagannerk 32950 330.511 
Weila 663 667 

GammarrhBwfe Index : >59830 
Pnnriaus : 159380 


GFSA 

Harmon> 

Hive id Steer 
Wool 
Nedbank 
Pres Stem 
Rusptal 

5A Brews 

SI Helena 
Scsoi 

West HMding 

Composite Stack 1 
Previous ; 1177.38 


3400 3458 
3800 2875 
656 560 

2050 2125 
1100 1070 
5900 6075 
1975 1990 
750 760 

3150 3200 
785 787 

7200 7450 


Shell 700 

STC U 

Sid Chartered 437 

Sun Alliance 466 

Tata and Lyle m. 

Tesca 268 

Thorn EMI 369 

T.l. Groan 388 

Trafalgar Hse 352 

THF 142 

unromar 306 

Unilever ( 10 11/32 

United Biscuits 178 
Vickers 298 

Wool wortn 490 

F.T.38 index : M10J0 
prevteos : 10I3JO 
F.T^E.100 Index : 13I5A0 
Previous : iHd 


Cold Storooo 
DBS 

Fraser Neove 
Haw Par 
Inch caoe 
Mai Bank Ina 
OCBC 
OUB 
DUE 

Shangri-la 
Sime Darby 

S pore Lend 
5-pore PltaM 
S Steamship 
5f Trading 
United Overseas 
1 UOB 


198 3 

5.4S £30 

A 5.95 
117 119 
112 115 
&60 5L65 

12S 825 

2J2 176 

127 NX). 
N.Q. 180 
1.78 138 
135 135 

6.10 6 

033 run 
182 3 

1J2 1.75 

160 ISA 


Mbs 


Straits Times ind Index: 76582 
I Prevtous : 7«bM 


Blue Cirde 
BOC Group 


1S» 1«9J3 
1647 1651 
MI 397 
240 233 70 
2W22»JP 
441 440 

440 439 

277.70 777 10 
380 376 

486 4H2J0 
2X7 74380 
NA 1*180 
N4. «6» 

NA 443 

ha mso 

NA 66450 
21* sat 
18750 194 JO 
365J0 159 


Bk East Asia 
Chming Kang 

China Light 
Green Island 
Hong Seng Bank 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Really A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Strong Bank 
hk Telephone 
HK Yaumatel 
HK wharf 
Hutch Whomeoa 
Hraan 
inn City 
Jardine 
JardmeSac 
Kowloon Molar 
Miramar Hefei 
New world 
SHK Proas 
Stoluv 

Swire Pacific a 
T ai Cheung 
Wah Kwong 
Wing On Co 
Winsar 
World InH 


2183 2Q23 
1790 1740 
is. 90 1150 

a 05 ILK 
42 41 

125 1175 
1160 10.40 
785 780 

11 1070 
34 34J5 
645 6JB 
780 785 

0371 a.ta 
130 3.30 

680 665 

2580 25J0 
OM 0JB 
088 087 

11J0 118 
1190 1160 
9.25 «J0 

42 39 

780 785 

1170 1280 
245 243 

3440 2170 
1.91 1.99 

084 086 

185 185 

.485 480 

1125 287* 


R3»al Dutch r 


Bonca Comm 

Controls 

Clgahateis 

CT4id llal 

Erldania 
Farm Hnlia 
Flat 

Generali 

tFI 

If alcementi 
1 la tana 
Italmablllarl 
Mediobanca 
Manledtam 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascente 

SIP 

SME 

Sfiki 

Slonda 

Slel 


Mr Lkjulde 
Alstnom Atf. 
Av Otnsauil 
Bon Cairo 
BIC 

Bona rain 
Bauvaues 
BSN-GD 
Car retour 
Chargeurs 
Club Mad 
Darhr 
Oumex 
Elf-Aaultalne 
Europe 1 
Gan Eaux 
Macho He 

La for go Coo 

Lea rand 

Lesiew 

l-Oreal 

Martoll 

Matra 

Merlhl 

Midwlln 

Moat Hennessv 

Moulinex 

OcoOenialc 

Pernod Rle 

Perrior 

PeueeM 

friniemm 

Rodloiechn 

Redouts 

Roussel Uclol 

Sanofl 

Ravtlanol 



SiMkhoha 


1990 3040 

2200 2200 


AGA 

Alta Laval 

Aseo 

Astra 

Altai Copco 
Boiidan 
E tact ro lux 
Ericsson 
Esselte 

Honda hban ken 

Pharmocla 

Smb-Soanra 

Sandvlk 

Skanska 

SKF 

SwedlshMalch 

Volvo 

AHaersvaerlden I 
Previous : Hut 


aci 1 

ANZ 8 

BHP 8 

Boral 1 

Bougainville 1. 

CasMemakne 
Cases 4. 

Comalca 1. 

CRA 4 

C$R 1 

Dunlap 1 

Elders Itl 3, 

•Cl Australia 2. 

Magellan £ 

MIM 1 

Mver J. 

Nat Aust Bank 6 

News Coro 7. 

N Broken Hill 1 

Pratawi 

<3id Coal Trust L 

Samos 5. 

Thomas Nation 1 

Western Mining X 

Westpoc Banking i 

Woodside 1. 

All Ordinaries Index II 
Previous : HWS88 


128 

139 

203 

203 

294 

383 

404 

406 

120 

130 

U? 

HA 

142 

144 

216 

216 

NjQ. 

— 

183 

IV 

17? 

Uff 

HA 

— 

490 

500 

9350 

94 

328 

240 

204 

303 

215 

219 


1260 1235 
2420 2430 


Full Photo 
Fufliw 
Hitachi 
Hitachi CaMe 

Javan Air Lines 
Kaiima 

NQmul rgiW 

Kawosakl Steel 
KJrln Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyposm 
Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mllsubtsbl Besik 
Mitsubishi Chem 
MltGupMfl Elec 
MtaUBtshl Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mltsukoshl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
NikkoSec 
Nippon Koaoku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Vusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Pioneer 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Shbnazu 

Shlnetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo Mar Ine 
Sumitomo MeM 
T oriel Corn 
Tatoho Marine 
Takeda Chem 
TDK 
Tetlln 

Taklo Marine 
Tokyo Elec. Power 
Toppan Printing 
Taray Ind 

Toshiba 

Toyota 

Yamakhl Sac 


Nikkei/DJ. index ; 1270046 
Previous : 1273080 
New Index: HMM 
Prev iU S : 103647 


Adta 

Alusubse 
AutaPhon 
Bank Leu 
Brown Bouerl 

abaGeigv 
Credit Suisse 
Etodrawatt 
Hoiderbank 
Inter di scount 

Jacob Suchard 

Jet moil 

Landis ©vr 

Moevonoick 

Nestle 

Oerltkan-B 

Roche Baby 

Sanckn 

Schindler 

Sutler 

SurveiGanee 

Swissair 

SBC 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swiss Vat ksbanP 
Union Bonk 
Winterthur 



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c-j? %=r.' *! •■' 

I -' ' • *■••• : - 


INTORNATIDNAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4. 1985 


Jv’-i-/ 


< 

— *- i -c 


Page 19 



■ SPORTS BRIEFS 

? i i' • - 

JCiants Eye Oakland, Get a Glare Back 

; —Tllc owner of the San Frandsfco Giants, 

: ^ Vedliesda y ^ wan* to roove his baseball team to 

.Oakland for the next few years wh3e a new stadium is bemgbuiltin 
. downtown San Francisco, but while the plan was endoreaf bv San 

‘ Fe «stttn,. Oakland’s raybr..Uond \&on, 

responded that he does not want the dub. .*■ r 

• riSEfS 5* hB # Giants play in Oakland would harmhis 

■ citys chances of regammg the Los Angeles Raiders or of attracting 
r. Mother National Football League- team. He also said that'Lurie-and 
. Fans tern showed awfully poor judgment” in announcing tie plans 

Co f SoSI 1SU ^ wth <* ** board of Oakland’s Alameda County 

.. Feinsteiii, calling it “a last-ditch effort to keep the team here,' said the 
\£™ w 1 ?? for Lune to pay San Francisco “several million dollar*" to 

■ jjy out his lease at Candlestick Part, the Giants’ home since 196a Hie 
lease expires m 1994 but, Lurie said, “Hie San Francisco Giants will not, 
.under my ownership, play at Candlestick Paik beyond this Season.’* ; 

• Lendl Out of Cup Singles M atche s : 1 

FRANKFURT (AP) — Ivan Lendl, the world's top-ranked playa, 

. said Thursday that because of an aim injury he was puHing out of 
Czechoslovakia’s singles matches in its Davis Cup tennis «imtfrnal 
starting Friday, 

-.Lendl, the U.S. Open champion, said he would play only doubles, 
v, adding that “I’ve bad problems with my right arm since Wimbledon-” 

' The team captain, Jan Kodes, nominated Tomas Smid aiidMiloslav 
Mecir to play singles, with f-eadl and Smid teaming up in ' ' 

Mecir was drawn to play Wimbledon' winner Boris Becker in the 
opening singles Friday, with Smid meeting Midiad WestphaL The 
doubles are scheduled fra: Saturday and reverse singles for Sunday, when 
: Becker meets Smid and Westphal plays Mecir. Becker and Andreas' 

■ Maurer are to play doubles for West Germany, -which defeated the 
United States, 3-2, in August to reach the <a»mi final, . 

FBI Report Implicated 5 Cowboys 

- ^‘nEW YORK (NYT) —The National Football I League is looking into 
an allegation made in a 1982 FBI report that five members of the Dallas 
. Cowboys agreed to shave.prants in gaim* in g»eh«ng a for cocaine in the 
early 1 980s. At the same time, 'the FBI has began investigating why its 
' agents did not act on the allegation when it was first mnrie . 

-The allegation was made in a memo randum written in December 1982 
‘ by a former FBI undercover agent in Miami who forwarded the report' 

■ two months later to the bureau's office in Dallas. In' his report, Dartid 
Anthony Mhrione Jr n the agent, said that two DaHas-area men had told 

• him that they had supplied cocaine to the Cowboys in exchange for 
' shaving points in several games. 

Jim Siano, the FBI supervisory agent in Dallas who received the 

• memorandum^ said in 1 an interview with .The Miami News that he had 
' filed the report without starting an investi gation }wnixa» hejudged the 

information to be too vague. A spokesman for the NFL said it was 
“talking to the authorities to see what, if anythin g , they have.” The NFL, 
he said, is conducting its own investigation “as we, routinely do with 
reports of this type." 

Pacific Conference Games Revived 

CANBERRA. Australia (AP) — The endangered Pacific Conference 
Games have been given a new lease cm life by a decision to convert them 
' in to a junior competition backed by a private promoter and based at the 
new Sports World Complex in Hawaii. • . • 

- A derision to conduct the games every two years,ih5tead of every four, 
was made Thursday at a meeting of the organizing fe de ration in Canber- 
ra. where C hina was admitted as a sixth member, joining Australia, New 
^ealand, Canada , Japan and the United States. 

■' The United States, which formally announced its withdrawal from the 
games six weeks ago, said it will continue to take part. , 

For the Record 

The Qdcago Cubs struck out Thursday, vrito' (he IDinxxs Smtreme 
Court upholding state and tity laws that effectivelyban night basei^ at 
Wrigley Field. : • (AP) 

Corrado Barazzutti, 32, the “little Soldier” of Italy’s 1976 Davis Cap 
winning squad, has announced his retirement from t«mk (UPI) 

Quotable 

• Petr Khma, who defected from Czechoslovaltia to .sign, with the 
Detroit Red Wings of the National Hockey League, who are owned by 
pizza baron Mike Ditch: “I like fun and I like Rambo. I Eke music. I like 
cars and I-fike pizza. I don’t know if I like hockey more or pizza 
more." (AP) 


Mets, Behind Gooden, Beat Girds Second Straight 


By Joseph Ditrso 

. Mere. York. Tima Service 
ST. LOUIS — The New York Meis 
soared ever closer , to first place in the 
National League’s East Division on 
Wednesday night- when Dwight Gooden 

K td them to a 5-2 victoiy over the Sl 

Suddenly, after two straight nights of 
excellent pitching and defense, there they 
stood: only one game, back with four to 
play in a pennant race whirling toward a 

melodramatic finish. 

Gooden, the 20-year-old master, was not 
at his overpowering best, but he was plenty 
good enough- He stopped the Cardinals on 
nine hits, struck out 10, pitched his 16th 
complete game and won his 24th this sea- 
son against four defeats. And he did it 
against. Joaquin Andujar, a 21 -game win- 
ner who had not lost to the Mets in more 


Dodgers Win 
]NL West Title 


The Associated Press 

. . LOS ANGELES —The Los An- 
geles Dodgers became the first ma- 
jor league team to clinch a division 
title this season when the San Die- 
go Padres, on Carmdo Martinez's 
tie-breaking home run in the eighth 
inning, beat the Cincinnati Reds, 5- 
4, Wednesday night 
. That set off a celebration mid- 
way through the game in which the 
Dodgers beat the Atlanta Braves, 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

9-3. as Orel Hershiserwon his 11th 
straight to run his record to 19-3. 
M3ce Marshall homered and got 
three of the Dodgers' 17 hits, driv- 
ing in three runs. 

Martinez's homer in San Diego 
came on a 3-2 pitch by reliever Tom 
Hume after (he Reds had overcome 
3-0 and 4-2 leads. 

Astros 7, Giants 2: Jim Pankovits 
led off with a homer and Houston 
scored four times in the eighth to 
win in San Francisco. 

Expos 3-2, PhflSes 1-3: Tim 
Raines had two hits, stole three' 
bases and scored twice in the first 
game in Montreal. In the second. 
Grades Hudson pitched a six-hit- 
ter and drove in a ran as Philadel- 
phia ended an i 1-game losing 
streak. Raines stole his 70th base in 
that game; he is the first major 
leaguer to reach that mark five 
years in a row. 

Pirates 9, Cubs 4: Johnny Ray’s 
three-run botner in the sixth rallied 
Pittsburgh in Chicago. 

ligera 4, Blue Jays 2: In the 
American League, Darrell Evans 
became the first player to hit 40 
home rims in both leagues as he 
helped beat Toronto in Detroit. Ev- 
ans, 40. who hit 41 homers for the 
Atlanta Braves in 1973, also be- 
came the oldest AL player to hit 40. 

- Brewm L Yankees 0: Milwau- 
kee rookie Teddy Higuera pitched 
a six-hitter in New York that ended 
the Yankees’ six-game winning 
streak. Bob Shirley pitched a four- 
hitter, but in the third inning he 
walked Paul Meritor with two out 


than a year, but who left this time in the 
seventh inning, four runs down. 

This was nothing like the opening game 
of the senes, a pitching classic that the 
Mets won in the 1 1th on Darryl Strawber- 
ry’s home run. This was an all-points strug- 
gle, and the Cardinals put at least one 
runner on base every inning. In the ninth, 
they put four on, scored one and sriH had 
the bases loaded when Tommy Herr hit a 
liDe drive to second base that Wally Back- 
man caught just over his head for the final 

OUL 

-Thursday night the Mets will send rookie 
Rick Aguilera out to pitch against Danny 
Cox. After that, they go home for three 
games against the Montreal Expos and the 
Cardinals stay home for three against the 
Chicago Cuba. 

Whitey Herzog, the manager of the Car- 
dinals, considered the simation and said, 
“It’s down to where we got to win, and they 


got to win, and it's not going to rain, and 
they got to win worse than we got to win." 

The Cardinals did reclaim their cleanup 
hitter. Jack Clark, who tore a rib muscle 
last month and missed 40 of the next 43 
ga m es. He struck out three times, but Her- 
zog proclaimed: “This is a much different 
team with Gark out there." 

The Mets seized the lead from Andujar 
at the start on a series of small things, and 
one controversial thing: A throw to second 
base that struck the umpire and enabled 
Backman to steal safely. That happened 
after Backman singled with one out and 
took off for second. He seemed to be out. 
but the throw from catcher Darrell Porter 
struck the umpire, Fred Brocklander, who 
was in front of the bag. 

“I never saw an umpire get hit by a 
throw to second in my life," Herzog said. 
“The guy would have been out. And the 
other umpires are laughing." 


But nobody was laughing when KeiLh 
Hernandez singled behind second, Gary 
Carter singled to center and the Mets led 
by one. 

George Foster opened the second inning 
with a short chop to third base that went 
for an uncontested tingle. Howard John- 
son s tingle to center sent Foster to third. 
One out later, he scored when Gooden 
grounded to shortstop Ozzie Smith, who 
got the force oui at second but not the 
double play. 

Andy Van Slyke led off the bottom of 
the second with a single to right. After 
Teny Pendleton flied out to left. Porter, 
hitting only .210, spiked a line drive into 
right-center and ran it into a triple. Van 
Slyke scored, and it was 2-1. 

In the fifth, the Mets eked out another 
run. Rafael Santana opened with a double 
to left-center. Gooden bunted toward the 
mound, Andujar grabbed the ball and 


whirled toward third, but the ball flew out 
of his hand for an error and both runners 
were safe. Santana soured while Mookie 
Wilson was bouncing into a double play. 

In the seventh, Foster led off by whack- 
ing Andujar's first pitch over the left-field 
fence for his 21st home run of the season. 
In rapid order, Santana singled, Gooden 
bunted him to second, Wilson singled him 
home and Andujar was gone. Now the 
Cardinals trailed by 5*1, and their grip on 
first place was looking very fragile, indeed. 

They gave it one last shot in the ninth 
when Gooden got two outs but walked two 
batters. Vince Coleman, O-for-19, singled 
to center to make it 5-2. Willie McGee 
tingled behind second, where Santana and 
Backman collided. The bases were loaded. 

Gooden got Herr to line to Backman on 
his 136th pitch of the game, then reflected: 

“1 got out of my rhythm a little, but I 
thought I had great stuff." 



Manager Tom Lasorda celebrated with champagne after the Dodgers clinched a tide. 


Angels Field Poorly, 
Royals Tie for First 


and Randy Ready's shallow fly to Thornton hit a two-run homer to 
right tipped off the glove of a div- help beat Seattle in Geveland. 
ing Dave Winfield for a triple. Twins 3, White Sox 1: Minneso- 

Indians 12, Mariners 2: Mike ta’s Frank Viola held visiting Chi- 
Hargrove went 4-for-4 and Andre cago to three hits. 


A’s 14, Rangers 3: Mike Davis, 
Steve Henderson, Mike Heath and 
Steve Kiefer homered in Arlington, 
Texas, to back Bill Kreugers five- 
hitter for Oakland. 


By Ross Newhan 

Las Angeles Times Service 

KANSAS CITY, Missouri — 
There had been a feeling for several 
years it would come to this: a sea- 
son in which no one would, or 
could, win the American League 
WesL 

The California Angels, a boring 
36-35 since the Ail-Star break and 
losers of six of their last nine 
g^rnaft, had a chance Wednesday 
night to take a two-game lead over 
the Kansas City Royals. A virtually 
insurmountable lead with four 
games to play. Champagne time. 

They responded with an embar- 
rassingly inept and unaggressive 
performance that helped create an- 
other tie for the division lead, the 
eighth in the last 14 days. 

Bud Black, who had won only 
one of his last nine starts anu 
pitched five innin gs or less in seven 
of them, held the Angels to three 
hits in a 4-0 victory. George Brett’s 
three-run, inside-the-park home 
run in the first innin g marred a 
strong performance by Ron Ro- 
man i rk, a victim of suspect out- 
fielding. 

Thursday night, the Angels' Don 
Sutton will face the Royals' Danny 
Jackson in the series final. Then the 
Angels head to Texas for the final 
weekend of the regular season 
while the Royals- r emain home 
against Oakland. There have beqn 
so many tie^ however, that it is as if 
a Monday playoff is preordained. 

The Angels led this race by seven 
and one-half games on July 21 . The 
Royals led by three on Sept. 14. It 
has become a race with no apparent 
end, and very little interest The 
attendance Wednesday night was 
28,401. up from 26,273 Tuesday 
night 

“The only electriciiy is in the 
lights,” Dan Qutsenberry, the 
Royals’ relief ace, acknowledged. 
“Maybe it's a case of having some 
responsible parents who don’t want 


their kids to be out late on school 
nights." 

No one was out late Wednesday. 
Black needed only two hours and 
eight minutes to pitch his first shut- 
out since May 21. A control spe- 
cialist who had been plagued by an 
inability to get his breaking pitches 
over, he struck out five, walked two 
and allowed only one runner to 
reach second. 

“The way he was pitching,” 
Mauch said, “we might have played 
a couple more hours without scor- 
ing. He picked a bad time to pitch 
one of his better games.” 

“I didn't make one bad pitch,” 
Romani ck said, “and I was down, 
3-0. That’s hard to take. I probably 
pitched ray best game of the year 
af ier that first innin g, but Black did 
it for nine inning s and I did it for 
seven. That was the difference.” 

In the first, the Royals’ leadoff 
hitter, Lonnie Smith, looped a sin- 
gle to left-center, where Brian 
Downing approached the seeming- 
ly caicfaable fly with inexplicable 
caution. 

Smith stole second, and Roman- 
ick made a costly mistake, hitting 
Willie Wilson on a two-strike pitch. 
Brett hit a fasi ball off the end erf 
his bat, p ulling a high fly down the 
right-field line. 

Juan Beniquez, playing Brett 
straightaway, made a long run. and 
frantic dive, but the ball bounced 
past him to the wall. Center fielder 
Gary Pettis raced to retrieve it, but 
Brett beai the relay. It was his 27th 
homer this year, the second inside- 
the-park homer of his career. 

Romanick, with only rate victory 
in his last 10 starts, said bis imme- 
diate reaction was that both the 
Smith and Brett balls would be 
caught. 

“Unfortunately,” he said, “we 
didn't have people there. It’s the 
way the game is. Brian must have 
froze three or four times when he 
lost balls in the lights. There’s noth- 
ing you can do about it” 




Baseball 


Wednesday’s Major League line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Toronto IN IN 1W-* S 1 PMMoMta 

Detroit an on Da*—* J a Montreal 

5TM3 and WhJtts Morris, Cory IB) and Par- . Grewond' 


' FWI Game 

MMolftMa DOB IN BOB— 1 5 B 

lontreaf 2M MB Bin— SOB 

Gross and VI roll; Smith. Rsardon (B) and 


Campbell [SI and Porter. W — Gooden, u-*. 
■ L— And ill or, 21-11. H I* -N ew York, Foster 
(21). 

s . e Cincinnati . - BM 021 100— 4 7 2 

4 • son Dtooo - IN 210 Bln— 5 7 0 

and B r own lo p. Home (7) amt Ola*. Von Gordor 


Sr. * fish. W— MorrU. 14-11. L— Sileb. W-1X to— . Butora.W-Snimi.1Bi L— Gross. U-13. Sw— (7); Show. McCullere (M. Gassaoe (B) and 


Cary (2). HRs- Toronto, Whitt OB). Detroit. 
Evans (40). Gibson 129). 

Milwaukee 001 DM 000—1 4 0 

New York BN ON OBB-B t 8 

Higuera and Simmons; SWrtev and Wyne- 
oor. w— Miauora, iSi L — Shtrter. W 
Seattle ON 200 MO— 2 S 3 

Cleveland 2N 401 Bln— rt T7 1 


Reardon (37). 


Second Game 


PtrifadetpMa 

Montreal 


Bachv.W— <SassOBa.5-3.Li— Honufcfti HRs — 
Cincinnati, Esaskv (21), Diaz IS). San Dlcaa, 
Boctiv to), Martinez (20).. 

Atlanta . IN ON NO— 3 7 1 


Hudson and Daulton; Palmer, Burke (T>. Las Aantln 


011 4*1 Ns-t 17 B 


O'Connor (9) and Yost. crBerTv [B).W— Hud- 
son. S-13L L— Palmer, 7-10. 

IMW York- ; lie BIB 20B — & 13 I 


. Moore. Tatolk M). Mlrebella (5), Lena 151, SLLeuta 


merry ro).W-Hud- Johnson, Schuler (4), Dedmon (S), ShrtWs 
KX 14), Garber (7) and Corone, Owen (7); Her- 

110 BIB 20B— ft 13 1 shlser. Howell (7). Nkdentuer (7) and Sdos- 
01B ON BN— ft 7 3 cla. Yeager [7J.W— HersWser.lM. L— Jehn- 


Lazorko (7), Nunez (WandVOIIOj CreeLEast- 
er Iv (?) mid Wl UartL W— Creel, 2i L— Moore, 
1t-7. HRs— Cleveland. Thornton (22), Vuko- 
vlch (7). 

California BN BN BOB— 0 3 1 

Kansas City 3N BN B1*-4 IB B 

Romanick and Boone; Black and Summers. 
yf— Stock, IMS. L — Romanick, u-P. MR— 


Gooden and Carter; Andojor, Perry (7). eon. M HR— Lae Angelos. Marshall (27). 


European Soccer 


Ittonsos City, Bren (27). 

’'Jilcnoo ■ 


ycnicogo BN BIB 008-1. 3 3 

Minnesota BN ON 31*-* 7 1 

-LDovls ond FWk; VWo and Solas. W— Vio- 
la, 18-1*. L — Davis, >3. HR— Chicago, Walker 
(24). 

Oakland 102 231 284— W » S 


CHAMPIONS’ CUP 
(First Round, Second Log) * 

- BarcelonaO. Sparta Prague 1 (Aggregate 2- 
2j Barcelona wins on away goals rule). 

. Aberdeen 4. Akrenos 1 (A M rdee n advances 
on 7-2 aggregate). 

Oman la 5, Rabat Aiax 0 lOmonlo advances 
on 1M aggregate). 

. Austria Vienna^, Dynamo Benin 1 (Austria 


Krueger ond ToiUetarbO'Brton (S); Mason, 
'Holes (4), Cook (7) andShweht.Bniniiner (ft). 
Pel rolll (0 1. W— Krueger.B-ia L-Mason.ft-15. 
HRs— Oakland. Davis (24), Henderson (3), 
Heaih (13), Kleter II). 

(Boston at Baltimore, ppd, rnlo> 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Pittsburgh ON ON 401—* 15 B 

Chicago Dll ON 100—4 12 1 

-Rhoden, Quanto (4) and Ortiz; Sutcliffe, 
Balter (S), Fontenot (7), Beard (7) and Davis, 
w— Rhoden, 10-1A L — Sutctitfe. ml Sv— 


ON Nt BB2 3 5 2- Vienna advances on 4-1 aoo regale). 


Sorvette Geneva 2. LlnfTeld 1 (Servette ad- 
vances an *-3 aggregate). 

. Bavern Munich 4 Garnik Zarbrxel (Bavom 

Munich advances an 4-2 aggregate). 

. Shamrock Ravers 1, Horrvea Budapest 3 
(Homed a dvances op- M aggregate),. 

CUP WINNERS' CUP 
(First Round. Second Leg) 

Rad Bays Pl ff e r dange ft AIK Stocknoiin 5 
IAl K Stockholm advances on 1341 aggregate). 
Gientoran 1, From Reykjavik!) (From od- 


Gutotte (51. HRs Pittsburgh. Roy (4), Ortiz uancos on 3-2 aggregate). 


FC Brugge 3, Boovista I (PC Brugge ad- 
vances on 4-fi aggregate ) . 

SV Hamburg 2. Sparta Rotterdam 0 (Aggre- 
gate 2-2; Sparta wins 4-3 on oenolties). 

Sporting Gltan 1, Cologne 2 (Cologne ad- 
vances on 2-1 aggregate). 

Osasuno 2, Glasgow Rangers 0 (Osasuno 
advances on 2-1 aggregate). 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

•' CHICAGO— Appointed Ken Harretren ex- 
ecutive vice president In charge at baseball 
operations. Named Roland Hemond special 
nsofartanl to the chairman of fha board and 
oresldenz. 

CLEVELAND— Warned Jeff Scott director 
of scouting ond Plover development. Named 


(1). Bream (4). Chicago, Sandberg 04). 
Houston BN IN 042-4 » 


Aorau ft Rod Star Belgrade 2 (Rod Stor JmHo pkr ■mana ger of HwMakw 

, „ Ihe InOsmattanal League. Sortl DwWW Tay 


austoa M0 IN 042-4 > ft advances on 4-2 aggregate). • ™ trtemattoned League, sew owwm tov- 

m FrandscD IN toe BOO— 8 4 0 Dynamo Dresden ft CereJe Bruges 1 (A» tor. oatflelder. to Hie Kansas city Royals to 

Sam. Dcnwiev (7) and Ashby. Miantcic (7>. - gn!sa i 0 m; Dynamo wins on awov goals). awlpk ? e *. wl1llr lraa> -. .. 

Spilman (9); Word, Davis (71, Mhotii (I), sanpdorto.1. Larina 0 (Sampdorla ad- SAN DIEGO— Announced ttioi Gorry Tenv 
Jeflcool (O) and Brmly.W— Cawley. 53. ft— vroces on 2-1 aggregate). Dteton,*hortsl0p.wi1liblsi the remaining five 

Davis, 5-12. HRs— Houston, PanfcovJt* <41.- duWo Praha 4, Limassol D (Dukki Praha fBOwtor season become of a 


Bass (151, Davis (20). San Francisco, Giaddan ' advances oa 4-2 aggregate). 


SAN DIEGO— Announced thol Garry Tem- 
pteton, shartstte. ml I mlM the remaining five 
games of the regular season became of a 
fractured bone In his shin. 


jj^ajor League St andin g s 


Boyar Uenflngen ?. Zurrtea 0 (Bayer uor- basketball 

dbigen advances on I24t agareaale)._ Nattooo* Basketball Assochtftoa 

” “ BOSTON— Obtained Jerry Sldttlna guard. 

. _ E f * _ P . . , from Indiana tar two second-round droll 

(Pint Round, Secooa loo) choices. 

PbUoseure i I. to gitok Mos uwr 3 DENVER— Cut Eddie Hughes, guarft and 

iportak Moscow -advances on 4-1 dggro- Andre Goode, forward. 

ii - -- ' ' - - GOLDEN STATE— Waived Erie Boyd. 

Viking 1, Legla Warsasrl (Legia Warsaw. auonJ _ 

tr® 1 ? 18 ?? ^ PHILADELPHIA— Cut Derrick Geru In and 

DundM UnHod Z Bohemians 2 (Dundee nm-y, L loya forwaros; Ed Me Togo* and 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Div Won 



W 

L 

PcL 

GB 

St. Louis 

98 

<0 

420 

— 

.Now YorV 

97 

41 

JM 

1 

.Montreal 

82 

75 

sn 

15VS 

Chieoge 

73 

82 

A 78 

22 ih 

PWiodetaWa 

72 

84 

A42 

as ‘ 

Pittsburgh 

54 

181 

448 421* 


West Division 



Angeles 

94 

4* 

-595 

— 

* Cincinnati 

St 

70 

•S54 

M 

San Dtooo 

ftl 

77 

-.513 

13 . 

Houston 

n 

78 

SOi 

14 

Atlanta 

44 

94 

JOS 

38 

San Fronekca 

i 40- 

98 

480 

34 

U-cilncned OMslen llflo) 




AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East EMvIaloa 




W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Toronto 

98 

59 

M 

— 

New York 

74 

43. 

- sn 

4 

Detroit 

82 

75 

so 

14 

Bon 1 more 

80 

74 

J13 

17Wi 

V Boston 

80 . 

77 

JM 

18 . 

JfcuiwauKw 

88 

89 

•433 

30 

Cleveland 

59 

Wtnt DWWoe 

too 

! 

471 

40 

- • California 

u 

70 

357 

— - 

Kansas cav 

BB 

70- 

aw 

— 

Chicago 

82 

70 

JIT 

- 0 

Oakland 

.74 

a 

'A78 

-ms 

Minnesota 

. 7 S'. 

84 

J72 

13V» , 

Seattle 

73 

85 

Ati 

15 

, Trios 

41 

77 

MS: 

V ■ 


UEFA CUP 

(Pint Round, tktcoM Leo) 

- Turim PaUaseurei I, Seartak Moscow 3 
'(Spartak Moscow -advances on 4-1 aggre- 
gate). 

Viking L Legla W ar saw l (Legla Warsaw 
ad va nce s on 4-1 aggregate]. 


United advances on 7-4 agg r egate). . 

Mahno ft ybtooton 2 (Aggregate 34; Video- 
ton wins on away goals ndo). 

PSV BindhovKi 4. Avenir Beggen 0 (PSV 
advances on 64 aggregate). 

Aarhus ft Wareeetn i (Woregom advances 
on6-2 aggregate). 


Keith WoHter^uards.and Jeff Cross, center. 

WASHINGTON— Waived Stv Primus, 
guard. 

FOOTBALL 

Notional Football L««gvc 
CHICAGO— Maced Kurt Becker, offensive 


Ponottilnatkosl, Torino) (Torino advances guard, on the tour week dlsoMed list; ho Is 


on 3*2 oagraaats). 


recovering from surgery an Ms right knse. 


Hammarby 4, Plrfn Blogeevgrad 0 (i i ^tv- Named Tom Thaver to raaioee him. 


maiby aOwmetS on 7-1 og gre g a ie). 


CLEVELAND— Activated- Brian Brennan. 


Nantes. ft ww RevMovlk ft (Nantes ad- wide receiver. Cut- Scott Bo bon, oHehslve 


vances on 4-2 aggregate). 

$t Gall ft Intonwzkmate 0 (Inter advances 
an S-l oggregat e K 


tOCKIft. 

GREEN BAY— Signed Tony Degrate, de- 
fensive lineman. Announced that veteran 


. F«vwy»rd Rotterdam 2, Snorting Lisbon l Lvnn Dickey will De the starting auartorbock 
(Sporting Lisbon advices on 4-3oggregaig). la Sunddrt game against Detroit 


Warder Bremen ft Chemomarefs Odessa 2 
(Odessa advance* on 4-j aggregate). .... 


NEW ENGLAND-T-Walvod Paul Lewis, 
running back, and Jan NorriftOofonslvo llno- 


InnsbnickT,FCUege3UJBgeadmnceswi man. 


5-2 aggregate): 


NEW ORLEANS— Announced that Dennis 


Motx ft Halduk Split 2 (Holduk Sflllt oa-. (Dirt) Winston; llnabackar, has retired be- 


vbmk on 74 aggregate). • cause of a contract dtown. 

ACM1 km 3. Auxerreo (Ml tan advances oo4- N.Y jGI ANTS— signed Casey iwterriiLdeten- 

3. aggregate)- • ; flve. lineman, to a three-year contract. 

St Mirren I Skrria Prague 9 ISt. Mlrren ' SEATTLE— Signed Dow* FlM*r, punter, 
dvances an 3-1 aggregate), . ' and Paul Stuns), wide receiver. Cut Jimmy 

-Real Madrid maiden ft AEiC 0 (Madrid CoiquiTL punier, naced Danny Greene, wide 


TCU Player 
Gtes 'Salary’ 

77ie Associated Press 

FORT WORTH, Toras — One 
of seven players kicked off the Tex- 
as Christian University football 
team for taking payments from 
boosters says hu “salary” ranged 
up to $1,500 a month, in addition 
to bonus payments he got when he 
made a big play. 

Ron Zefl Brewer, who played 
both as a defensive end ana tight 
end, said he received between $200 
and $1,500 a month from a Fort 
Worth land developer and TCU 
alumnus, J.C. Williams, and later 
received payments mailed to him or 
delivered by messenger, according 
to a report Wednesday in the Fort 
Worth Star-Telegram newspaper. 

“I was getting so much money 
that I thought the college level was 
pretty good,” said the fifth-year se- 
nior from Dallas. 

Brewer said all the schools he 
visited — Texas, Texas Tech, Bay- 
lor and TCU — hinted at payments 
he might get 

He said he received $2^00 when 
he signed a letter of intent to attend 
TCU. Then he got $200 a month 
from his booster until Jim Wacker 
became coach in November 1982. 
Thereafter, he received 51,500 per 
ffiimwM- in ra«Jh 

“After Wacker came in, my 
booster said he couldn’t pay me 
any more. But I started getting 
money through the mail,” Brewer 
said, in addition, after he made a 
big play, ‘They^d shake your hand, 
and there would be $100 or $200 in 
your hand.” 



THE CENTER FIELD CRUNCH — Czechoslovakian 
and Spanish players met with a thud during their Cham- 
pions’ Cop first-round soccer match in Barcelona. Spar- 
ta Prague won, 1-0. Wednesday night, but Barcelona 
advanced in the tournament because of an edge in goals. 


World Cup Meet Lays 
An Egg With the Birds 


United Press International 

CANBERRA, Australia — The 
scenes have been reminiscent of Al- 
fred Hitchcock’s film “The Birds,” 
not of a track and field meet. 

On the eve of the World Cup 
championships a score of people 
have been injured by magpies 
swooping to attack athletes, coach- 
es and the public. 

Werner Sailer, the West German 
who is the European team’s physio- 
therapist, and former track and 
field stars Gaston Roelants of Bel- 
gium and Klaus Wolfertnann of 
West Germany are among those 
bearing the head wounds lef t by the 
birds’ ferocious dives. 

A spokeswoman for the depart- 
ment of territories said: “It is al- 
ways a problem at this time of year 
when the birds are nesting. 

“The local people wear hard hats 
and cany sticks to ward the birds 
off. The attacks can be very danger- 
ous.” 

Sailer, who bad two nasty red 
gashes on his forehead, said, “I was 
out jo gging this morning when 
three or four birds attacked me. 1 
kept beating them off and they kept 
coming back. I was totally 
shocked.” 

During Wednesday's warmup 
meet at Bruce stadium, the pole 
vaulting had to be stopped momen- 
tarily when a magpie settled on the 
bar. 

A spokesman for the organizers 
said the “athletes should be in no 
risk, the birds won't be able to 
catch them.” 


■ Banks Hears Sour Note 

Willie Banks, the U.S. world re- 
cord-holder in the triple jump, has 
threatened to withdraw from the 
World Cup meet if he is not al- 
lowed to listen to music tapes while 
competing, The Associated Press 
reported from Canberra. 

Banks, who has said he gets 
much of his inspiration from listen- 
ing to musical tapes while compet- 
ing, said he was “upset, Tm really 
upset,” with a decision by the Inter- 
national Amateur Athletic Federa- 
tion, the world governing body of 
track and field, to ban headphones 
during Lhe three-day meet that be- 
gan Friday. 

Leroy Walker, president of The 
Athletics Congress, the sport’s gov- 
erning body in the United States, 
said he would discuss the matter 
with the IAAFs president Primo 
Nebiolo. 

“If you don’t file a protest I 
will,” Banks mid Walker and Russ 
Rogers, coach of the U.S. men's 
team. “If I go to the stadium and 
ihey don’t let me bring my Walk- 
man, I won’t compete.” 

Banks, who set the world record 
of 58 feet ll'-i inches (17 meters, 
95.9 centimeters) in June in the 
USA Championships at Indianap- 
olis, said be was able to listen to his 
tapes during the 1983 World 
Championships in Helsinki, when a 
similar ruling was set aside. He said 
the tapes were banned during the 
1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. He 
placed second at Helsinki, sixth in 
the Olympics. 


Yesteryear’s Rifles Are Used to Start New Sport in U.S. West 


advance* on S-l amrttoitl. 


receiver, on Hie injured r ese r ve list. 


By Bob Kerr 

77ie Associated Press 

RATON, New Mexico — The 
game and the targets were new. the 
rifles would have looked at home in 
the hands of- Buffalo BilL 

Taken out of locked cases and 
dusty attics, the weapons were used 
in the first black powder rifle car- 
tridge silhouette match in the Unit- 
ed States. Seme, though, were new 
replicas of the old rifles. 

Names on the scrolled and 
etched stocks ring through Western 

history; Winchester. Springfield. 

Sharps. 

A1 Hill of Amarillo. Texas, and 
James Carlson of Croflon, Nebras- 
ka. had 'come up with the idea of a 


silhouette match as a way to offer 
more competition for the venerable 

rifles. Silhouette is the newest game 
in sport shooting. Steel silhouettes 
of animals are the targets. To score, 
die shooter must knock the target 
off its stand. 

Hill, a member of the National 
Rifle Association’s black powder 
committee, was one of the officials 
who hdped run last month's shoot 
on a range just below Raton Pass. 

“1 don’t know exactly how it 
really started,” he stud. “We got to 
kicking it around and decided to 
have a silhouette match. That must 
have been two years ago. The rules 
were published in the NRA’s sil- 


houette rule book in January' and 
this match was the first.” 

The rules said the rifles must be 
single-shot weapons manufactured 
during the late 1800s. have iron 
sights and use cartridges loaded 
with black powder or pyrodex, a 
black powder substitute. 

All of the original guns must 
have been manufactured in the 
United Stales. 

Ed Middleton of Goodland, 
Kansas, led the field of nearly 50 
competitors with a borrowed 1885 
Winchester in the .40-.60 Ballard 
and Marlin caliber. Dennis Bruns 
of Cannon City, Colorado, was sec- 
ond with a Sharps. 

Several of the competitors used 


Springfield trapdoor rifles, the U.S. 
Army issue from 1873 to 1892. 

The course was tough for both 
the shooters and their antique ri- 
fles. It began with ten 12-inch sil- 
houettes of chickens at a range of 
200 meters. All shooting was done 
standing without a n»L 

Then came 10 slightly larger 
metal pigs, shot from cross-sticks at 
300 meters. Cross-sticks are a 
throwback to buffalo-hunting 
days. They consist of two sticks 
about 30 inches (76 centimeters) 
long hinged near the top. The long 
ends are embedded in the earth and 
the smaller vee formed at the top 
acts as a barrel rest for the shooter. 

Buffalo hunters, using guns that 


make a sound more like a whoosh 
than lhe sharp crack of a modem 
rifle, could set up at a range of 
several hundred yards and kill doz- 
ens of buffalo in a grazing herd 
without panicking the rest of the 
animals. Tire buffalo were wiped 
out in a few dozen years. 

Then there were 10 turkey tar- 
gets about 18 inches in height, shot 
from cross-sticks ai 385 meters. 
And, finally, 10 metal rams about 
36 inches in height shot from 500 
meters. 

“I'd like to see*this spread to 
regional matches." said Chuck 
Campbell of Fort Collins, Colora- 
do. “It would be great if we can get 
.in some practice before next year." 





Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1985 


OBSERVER 


The Meanest Cut of AO Susan R°thenberg: Wrestling With the Spirits 


By Russell Baker "He has made a disgraceful 

cboffirib^Sod now 3 ! Jaw “ 

toSTItousmd dollars lilcr. 
°°vf wer rov jaw. thoroughly stabilized. 
?' J Thats ,?? 1 mbvis with me to another town 

where abarber named Timmy stans 
I learned it from Comstock, repairing ^ d^ge done by my 

and afirfiJta l2dJ previous barber. Nuiudb I need la 


and smhnan laughs and laughs. dcnti5L ***, ^ 

“Don tever tell anybody you actu- y, e new man removes his 

ally believe Con^tock underetood sits down and bursts 

Rowers, says Suliman. Every- hitotears. 

body knows Comstock was a flow- weep at bought that a 

“ , K - fellow dentist is capable of work so 

It s always been fake £m. disgraceful as this." he says. 

Years ago. maybe 1954 or so, ^ 3 

sreo sound is all the race, so I buv □ 


stereo sound is all the rage, so I buy 
a stereo. "The best, 1 want the 


It's been like that all my life, and 


best," I tdl the salesman. He sells always will be. I guess, 
me a Hochmeister. I invite Frettick j t, ave my house painted and the 

over to hear it play my Harry Bda- painter, before starting, always 
fonte record. Frettick comes over. I shakes his head and says, “Wboev- 
have the Bdafonte record in hand u painted your house last time 
and am thi nki ng. “Eat your heart didn't knowwbat he was doing, did 
out, Frettick," as be stares at my ^ 7 " 

imI. I take the car to a new shop. The 
purfl mechanic M y S lhc old rh^. m a 

quality machiner * new battery when u should have 

It’s been like that aD ray lift P“ l f m r a aew “J 1 ™***' and as a 
7 result I now need six. fresh pistons 

El and two new tires. 


Basically, this is why I quit going Whatever the last painter, me- 
to barbers. The first barber I re- rhmi r. t dentist, barber, roofer, fur- 
member was Roy. When we moved nace cleaner, floor sender, pants 
to another town I went to a barber presser, pruning instructor, gadget 
named Nick. “Who has been cut- ^ i ^pnn or fashion adviser paint- 
ting your hair?' asked Nick, ed, repaired, bridged, clipped, shin- 
“Roy,” I said. “Why do you ask?!' gied, cleaned, sanded, pressed, 
“They ought to lake away his taught me, sold me or advised me 
barber’s license," Nick said. — whatever it was — it was all 

We moved to another town wrong, a total mess, a swindle, a 
where the barber was just plain BilL disaster, a shoddy piece of bus!- 


“Whoever has been cutting your 
hair has m ade an awful mess of iL" 
just plain Bill said. 

We kept moving. Fortunately, 
every new town had a wonderful 


ness, the full catastrophe. 

I have become too discouraged 
to do any thing about the ruin into 
which my life is falling. 1 sit home 
refusing to notice the roof is leak- 


new baiter to rehabfli to tej^di- '«El 

saster that the false barber had ^ ' Qeed 7 S ^ , 

made on my head in the last town. ^ otbear to think of theatrical 
lnfenor haircuts. Inferior stereo aftenn^ when, having movedto 
systems. Inferior flower pruning. I ^ ^ ^ ne Sng surgery 
am telling the story of my life. { i am anesl Sed Ind 

I go to the dentist this is a long ^ mto ^ op^^g 

tune ago - with a tootoche. He The^rgeon makes Ystrokt 
looks in my mouth. “What tooth t,;, ^ 


with his scalpel, peeks inside, rc- 


bui^sr made this mess in your ^ m bo^and Shakes me vigor- 
jaw?” he asks. ousIy . 

. “Nobody." I say. “I have not hp ■ T nhpv 


been to a dentist in 34 years be- 


“Wake up!” he cries. I obey. 
“Whoever did your last operation,” 


cause l always expected to die at |K ni^L 

the age of 33* and did not want to P 

wastemy limited time undergoing 5 hoeax rcvokeA 
maintenance and repair." Nto York Tima Service 


By Paul Richard 

Washington fast Sffnw 

W ASHINGTON — You 
would not guess it from her 
golden laugh or from her straight- 
on, streetwise tnoxie, but Susan 
Rothenberg. the painter, knows 
bow to summon spirits. Her pic- 
tures give no peace. 

Shades and visitations, sensed 
but not quite seen, lurk like ner- 
vous muggers in the shadows of 
her an. She calls them “the un- 
nameable.” One can feel their 
restless writhing in the fidget of 
ber brush strokes. Dark subsur- 
face powers agi tate her paintings 
the way Manhattan’s subways 
shake the city’s streets. 

Fourteen of her mis and two of 
her new drawings are on view at 
the Phillips Collection here until 
Nov. 17. Among the small and 
sweetly colored School of Paris 
paintings in that intimate muse- 
um, Rothenberg’s big pictures 
seem monumentally New Yor- 
kish. She was bom in Buffalo in 
1945. studied at Cornell and 
dropped out in the 1960s to hang 
around in Greece, but is now in 
many ways fastened to Manhat- 
tan. One feels its weight in her 
coiled energy, and in the cut-the- 
guff quickness of her talk. And 
with her paintings now selling for 
more than $50,000 she is among 
the hottest younger painters in 
that an-infested town. 

She headed for Manhattan at 
the end of the 1960s, and started 
hanging out with sculptors and 
performers, dancers and musi- 
cians. Few of her friends were 
painting, but Ro then berg kept at 
it. Then suddenly she hiL 
She was 31, and struggling for 
re«th, when DO less than W illiam 
Rubin, the imperious guiding 
spirit of the Museum of Modem 
Art. came thumping up the bro- 
ken stairs of her downtown sta- 
dia “It was the shock of shocks, 
the honor of honors.’’ she says. 
“He pointed his cane at three of 
my paintings and said, ’Have 
them brought to my museum.' " 
She was not a master then. She is 
not a master yet, but her an is 
dense with promise, and its 
strength is unmistakable — and 
the New York art world's scouts 
do not have time to waste. 

Ro then berg herself will not 
rush. She spends most of her stu- 
dio time “tilting in a chair, look- 
ing at the painting" She says her 






Rothenberg and Mondrian in the potato field. 


method is “corrective.'' “I make a 
mark and then retreat and wait, 
and wait some more. And then I - 
mak e another. It's all very myste- 
rious. And gradual. You sort of 
sneak up on the picture and get 
one piece at a time.” 

The postwar Action Painters of 
the New York School, who 
seemed to dredge their subjects 
from their souls, made their pic- 
tures quickly. But Rothenberg is 
patient “A painting needs some- 
thing else." she says, “something 
from another state of reality." 

The image of a horse was the 
first of many ghostly shades to 
show up in her art. For seven 
years it reappeared in painting 
after painting, sometimes in dark 


outline, sometimes head-on, or in 
pieces. Minimalism then was still 
in vogue, and Rothenberg was 
painting wholly abstract pictures 
— “the rule was keep-h-flar” — 
when s uddenly the animal began 
to stamp its shape on the flatness 
of her fields. Rothenberg can not 
tell you whether that strange 
beast was the dark horse of the 
nightmare, or the grand steed of 
the heroes, or the sweet colt of the 
spring, or all of these, or none. 

Her horse pictures astonished. 
(Rubin purchased one of them.) 
They seemed to contradict them- 
selves — and to prophesy the fu- 
ture. Half-depictive, half-ab- 
stract. half-fleshy and half-flat, 
they tied the restrained cool of 


of a sudden, there were the glasses 
and that white nose and a little 
piece of curl in the'hair." 

Why Mondrian? Much as she 
admires him, Rothenberg is not 
sure. “We’re opposites in many 


Luricn Ptrin/Tht Woriw ya n Port 


1970s New York art to the hotter 
figuration that was yet to come. 

The horse has stn departed, 
but other ghosts have appeared. 
The shade of Mondrian is one of 
them. The arrival in her art of that 
20 th-century master — who died 
in 1944 — was completely unex- 
pected. It happened late at night, 
she says. She was alone in ber 
studio, feeling frustrated and 
blocked when, in exasperation, 
she told herself, “Damn it, do one 
drawing." 5&e has described what 
happened next to The New York 
Times: “Within 30 seconds. Mon- 
drian’s face emerged. I wasn't in- 
tending to paint Mondrian. I was 
just moving my hand on the pa- 
per. It was like a Ouya board. A0 


often come again. His face ap- 
pears four times in the present 
exhibition. In ’‘Mondrian” 

( 1984), he is standing there in stiff 
astonishment as if surprised to. 
find himself once again alive. In 
The Golden Moment" (1985) he 
is sealed in his studio, carefully 
adjusting two squares of colored 
paper, he does not seem to notice 
that he has been embraced by a 
web of golden light. “He was so 
severe," says Rothenberg. “I want 
him to have fun.” In “Mondrian 
Dancing" (1984-85) he is doing 
the boogie-woogie in a Harlem 
nightclub, ft is said that shades 
abhor the sun, but Mondrian’s 
enjoys it In “ING-Spray" (that’s 
pig Latin for Spring) he is stand- 
ing in the midst of a freshly 
plowed Long Island potato field, 
his glasses shoved bade on his 
head. He is drinking in the sun. 

*Ihe light that warms his neck is 
a peculiar vivid orange. Beyond 
the dark plowed earth, beyond 
that . orange sunlight, the land- 
scape turns to green. “Mondrian 
hated green.” says Rothenberg, 
“but I thought I ought to tease 
him. I used this ghastly green. But 
then — in fear — I fdl bade into 
blade and white." 

Though Rothenberg will tdl 
you that she is "totally afraid of 
fear,” one fear rules hex painting. 
She is afraid of color. 

It is that ap prehension that 
rhains her pictures to Manhattan 
— and makes them fed so alien 
amidst the sunny, subtly colored 
French pictures at the HiQlips, 
Much advanced Manhattan art is 
ferodous black-and-white. Think 
of Franz Kline’s blades, and 
Rothko’s and Frank Stella’s, and 
the grays of Jasper Johns. Even 
when Rothenberg turns away 
from strict black-and-white — to 
give her white dog’s coat a tiddy 
yellow sbeen (“Al With Bananas” 
1984V or to hint at sexual passion 
(“Red Blush” 1984-85), or to 
tease the ghost of Mondrian — 
hex colors are not colorful. “If the 
image is really loaded, color 
seems a cheap shot." 


PEOPLE 

85,000 BoU Springsteen 
M15-MonATour3nds 

Brace Springsteen brought to 
“Boro in the USA-" world tourg 
a wvfialg ig dose before a crowd w 
85,000, in the Coliseum hi Los Anr 

geics- Tbe four-hour concert, which 
ended a 15-month tour of four con- 
tinents attracting about five million 
fans, opened, as usual, with the 
song “Bam in the U.SLA." before a 
huge U. S. flag. Springsteen later 
recalled rearing the “Pledge of Al- 
legiance" in grade school, saying ne; 
always thought the flag stood for. 
fairness. “We’ve been all over the 
States,” he said, “and I tearnrf * 

things that gave me a lot.ot /I 
hope, amfl teamed some tiun^j^ 
that made me sad. I guess the 
America was not the one I dafj 

out there often enough.” Urga 
the crowd to donate time and mon- i 
ey to local food banks, he noted, “If m 
you cheer for it, you ought to rio r 

something about it, because this e 
your hometown.” . . - The blues- ^ 
man Memphis SBn, on a U.S. 
tour, said Americans may not ap- C 
predate this indigenous musical n 
form but Europeans da especially £ 
behind, the Iron Curtain. “I think 

one reason we’re made ashamed of 
the blues is because the blues came f-J 

from the black people,” Slim said iL 
in Anchorage, Alaska. *The Euro- 
peans have more respect fpr it as-an ^ 
art” Sfim, 70, who has lived in 
Paris 1961, has toured Po- ^ 
land. East Germany and Romania, f - a 
"Behind tbe Iron Curtain I play in j ^ 
places like baseball parks mid Aj, 

they’d be full,” he said. “Peopla^e 
starving for blues. Those people ■*/ 
have the bines anyway, you know”- r 

. r O . . & 

The country music star Reeky 
Skaggs wifi potato m Jordan Jan. w 
4, in Galilee Jan. 6 , and in Jefusa- jta_ 
kan Jan. 9, at the request of the^b. 
governments of Israel and Jordan,' J a 
his record ooamany,J£jpic Records, 
said Wednesday. Skaggs, whose V 
hits include “Country Boy,” Jan 
“Heartbroke” and “Highway - 40 
BZues,”xs a contender in sixcaK^ uid 
ties in die Country Music Assooa- Vy 
lion finals On Oct 14. ' ; . > 


Richard C. HoOelet, correspon- 
dent for CBS News at the United 
Nations for 25 years, is teping the 
network to become public affairs 
counselor with the UN. Hottetei, 
68 , said he had taken early retire- 
ment and will assume his new flu-; 
ties at the end of October. 


r 


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I LYFORD-CAY, BafxTOB. Four bed 
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EXCH1BTT INVESTMENT 
btri&hed green farm for s tie 100 km 
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GBMANY MUNICH AREA- Large 
irolem 10 acre incholnd froperty 
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me with easy octal to mefor traffic 
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BUSAIEM FOR SSBOUS only, 
ry midtown ducJe*. about 400 


ry rradtown du 
Lower level: 
study, fatcher. i 


□bout 400 sqjn. 
|/chnrg. Ebrnry. 
s room vrth own 


IftaT EXCEPnOIRAL 

I'jqjn. bees to BfW 


PQCW-. (Vtcro g huso) - Ysx 

to Bftol Twer . The fined ro- hotel. 21 bedroom*. 19B4 tow 

mansnn to come an toe itbxxet. niOQOOO. Evade nl invest- 


Trdwne. 92521 


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both, laundry room & 1 fiJ bathroom. 
Upper Jewel.- 2 master bedvaro, 
waft-in dceels, 3rd bediocm with 
Shower. 5650,000. Write Sax 2726, 
Herdd Tribune, 92521 Neu9y Cedes. 

France 

.JERUSALEM, DUPLEX PENTHOUSE 
with wrotwound terraces, fiwmg <Sn- 
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er towel: 3 bedrooms + 2 baths, 
5450,000. Bar 2729. Herdd Tnbune. 
92521 Netrfy Oder. Franca 

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LONDON HAMPST EAD. Modem 2 

PORTO BCOE STONE BURT 
• house roroged as 2 idt-cae 

■V^nwrts to deep 7 with 4 bath- , 


teas to Dftel Tower . The tmt pn- 
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White stone baxle. a prinapd re- 
ception rooms + bedroom *u<e and 
6 guest bettoenss & metre. Prwate tfl 

to ail 4 Boors, radar dorm system. - . _ 

ro^TOang spcoL R^OOflOa Tri 

GOLF 7TH RUE K Ull£ 2 rooaa. new^ 

25,000 taia bordering golf ooune, redone, tartan, tower, 55 tain, 
• 55 fan. from Pane. Modern 1-jeyd Z5 m. oAtg, Direddte Wdro 

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wrie terror* L app roxm to tely 4.0W Neufly Cede*. France 

sqjn. garden & land, situated «i fcvefy ‘ 

urapait valley with panoromc views 

Rdy 564 833B5Z _ .«*»?: * V 5 - - 

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