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INTERNATIONAL 



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PARIS, SATURPAY-SIINDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 


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William Buckley, in a pho- 
tograpb released on Friday 
in Beirut by his captors. 


Beirut News 
Played Down 
By Soviet 

By Philip Taubman 

New York Tunes Service 

MOSCOW — Compared to the 
crisis atmosphere and. collective 
angst that usually grip Washington 
when Americans are held hostage 
or killed abroad, Moscow has 
maintained a stoicism this week as . 
Tour Russians were kidnapped in 
Lebanon and one of them lolled. 

There have been flashes of anger, 
particularly a Kremlin, statement 
Wednesday jhat called the killing . 
an “atrocity that cannot be par- . 
donecT and accused Israel of being 
indirectly' responsible for. the at- 
tack. .. • • ...... . • ■.■ ■• 

Bat, forihetpastpart, theKrora- .. 
lin has masked any frustra^pri or 
FtfeoccnpatldD ;yidi the develojK. 
meats in Lebanon whhabusiness' 
as-usual posture and has tightly 
limited news coverage. : 

It remains to beseen whether 
Moscow’s alternative approach to 
handling incidents that usually are 
given extensrye coverage in the 
Ame ri can press will succeed. . 

With one Russian known dead 
and the three others in extreme 
danger, the Kremlin has apparently 
fared no better than the White 
House in handling McslemiundaK 
orientalists and controlling events in 
a small turbulent nation far brim 
its bordera. ' 

it is not unusual fear Moscow to 
withhold information about un- 
pleasant events,- But, whatever the 
motivations, in tips case the Krem- 
lin produced the kind of restraint in 
news coverage that many experts 
on combatting terrorism advocate 
tp rob terrorists jrf the attention 
they crave; \V. - • \ f 

The controfled flow ctf newshas' 
also prevented the kind of acopon- 
lation of public pressure that even- 
tually forced President Ronald 
Reagan and his senior aides, iot 
example, to focus (bar attentfon 
almost exclusively on the hijadrixig' 
of the TWA flight last summer and 
led President Jimmy Carter to con- 
centrate so heavily' on the Ameri- 
can hostages held in Teheran. 

Reagan aide s sa id the intense 
coverage of the TWA hgackfogi fo- 
cluding interviews wj^f«a3ies J of 
the hostages and > five- television 
conversations with sbnw of the 
Americans held captive-in Beirut, 
generated enormoas pressure ba- 
the White Hodse to resolvelte cri- 
sis. - 

.. By giving minimal coverage of . 
the kidhap^ngs the Kzexrilin runs^ 
qo risk of be£g pressed to' act or.^ 
not to act 

When the incident began Mon-' 
(Continued on Page^CoL S) 


Friday with President Francois Mitterrand in Paris. 


By Andrew Tsumbwsld 


BEIRUT— Moslem 


an n o u nced- Friday the execution of 
a UB. diplomat as about ^half , of 
Bdrut’s 150-member -SoyfotvaMit- 
mnnity was evacuated toSypa ffd- 

lo wing the Iri Hn appn^djf f m n r rW 

of a Sovjct «msalar c^aaL 
A. typewritten statement, signed 
by TslamicJihaid, ash^05wyg 
that las dahned lo ’kM. sii _ 
napped America^’and’ four 
Frenchmen, saidi’” '?!-. ' -fe 

. W e announceibe ctecuuon of 
the William Buckley (foDowiog 
the rdeasc cauunmuqu^ . . - . - 

after bis trial apd 'ccaiviction for Mikhail S. Gorbachev, left, daring a news conference Friday with President Fran 

peitkapattqginrC^A crimes:'*'- . 

■niCTe was nb way todctmnme if - _ - 

Mrs. Gorbachev Seen 

j w n after Not Chic 

mg emaciated and anguished after q 7 

19 months in captivity. 

A U.S. Embassy spokesman said By Aline Mosby degant,” bnt not yet what Parisians 

dm embassy had ho reason not to - York Times Service call chic. 

'bdieve that Mr. Buckley had been PARIS — Raisa M. Gorbachev " Pierre Cardin, who outdid a ri- 
kifled, ahhongji his body haS not may eJectrified many West- val Yves Saint Laurent, by getting 
bem found. hmers with her elegance, but her Mrs. Gorbachev to come to his 

[President Ronald Reagan said official appearance in the fashion show first on Thursday, 

Friday thai the United States had wo^a fashion capital drew mixed praised her as “elegant and beau ti- 
no confirmation of the report that reviews. fuL” Mr. Cardin does business in 

Mr. Buckley had been lolled. The '- Female Parisian eyes zeroed in the Soviet Union. 

Associated Press reported , from m \frs_ Gorbachev from the mo- Laurence Beurdeky, fashion edi- 
-Wagungton.]^ - . . . meat she stepped off the airplane tor of the newspaper France Soir, 

The^statcment, issued at mid- Wednesday with her husband, agreed that Mrs. Gorbachev-, with 
night Thursday. said the execunoa Maldhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet her smile and poise; is “rather ele- 
wasin revenge for IsraeTs ^jaid leadcr . , gStTd wrQ &Sed. I was sur- 

on Tuesday mitbe Tunis headquar- ^ « Moscow her short hairstyle Sr£ed” 

ters of the Priestine Uberanon Or- and wide cape outfits have pushed “The gray tweed suit she wore to 

a^jaswt 

'2gSffr^ jss»,sksks: 

non of about 70 Russians began Mr Gorbachev became Soviet blouse was a bit rad looking, I 

3 HS=te«: ra , aaifif < ia , s 

Monday was darmed on behatf ^ But in the contest of Paris — its Mrs. Gorbachev’s short haircut 

mol^Vfoslem group, was kflled beauty, its slender women and lax- brought the opinion “too puffed 0 - r . , . n . v ■ 

Wednesday; . ury stores— Mis. Gorbachev looks Drou * ai tnc op™™ 1 puncu Ra^ Gorbachev talked Fn 

■ Three borioads of : Soviet evacu- uj some fashion observers “rather (Continued on Page 5, Col 1) the French couturier, afte 
eesleftriieheavLlY Fortified ambas- .. .. 

sy.-ccpipaupdTK^^ of 

pmjoyjet jimRtiflia feti, heading for ; 
fte' -mounfrihs'-above Beirnt "on.. 

} ^a yi ^ B»y itv^T)amgyrm . . 1 > . .u 

: The ponyoy fdlowed tl» same 
route- taken by 39 U.S. hostages in 
June ’after; they were held for 17 
days by Shnte. Modern gunmen 
who- bad hijacked their Trans 
World Airlines plane. .. 

Most of . the evacuees were wom- 
en, who smiled and waved as the 
convoy pulled out It was headed 
try aDroremiTitiatrudccariyinga 
smglc-barreled anti-aircraft gun 
ana escorted by several carloads of 
armed men. ■ 

About 25 men, some of yriiom 
said they were t^plomats, also left. 

An embassy official declined to 
giye : details. Until Friday there 
were 'believed 'to have bem about 
45 Soviet diplomats in Brinit 
■’ An anor^noous caller demanded 
Wednesday that Soviet dipltmials 

evacuate the embassy by_ Friday it« Anootfad pren 

: (Contfamed on Page 2, Col 4) Mrs. Gorbachev studied Otympia by Edouard Manet at die Jeu de Paume museum. 


Gorbachev 
Is Positive on 
Reagan Talks 


The Astooend Pros 


By Aline Mosby 

■ New York Tuner Service 

PARIS — Raisa M. Gorbachev 
may. have electrified many West- 
erners "with her elegance, but her 
first official appearance in the 
world fashion capital drew mixed 
reviews. 

Female Parisian eyes zeroed in 
cm Mrs. Gorbachev from the mo- 
ment she stepped off the airplane 
Wednesday with her husband, 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
leads'. '■ 

In Moscow her short hairstyle 
and wide cape outfits have pushed 
Russians ‘toward the styles of the 
West 

In London hast December, where 
the Gorbachevs paid a visit before 
Mr. Gorbachev became Soviet 
leader, her furs and high-heded 
boots brought excited London 
headlines, such as “Dressing for 
Diientef’ 

But in the context of Paris — its 
beauty* its slender women and lux- 
ury stores — Mrs. Gorbachev looks 
to scene fashion observers “rather 


elegant,” bnt not yet what Parisians 
call chic. 

Pierre Cardin, who outdid a ri- 
val Yves Saint Laurent, by getting 
Mrs. Gorbachev to come to his 
fashion show first on Thursday, 
praised her as “elegant and beauti- 
ful” Mr. Cardin does business in 
the Soviet Union. 

Laurence Beurdeky, fashion edi- 
tor of the newspaper France Soir, 
agreed that Mrs. Gorbachev’, with 
her smil e and poise; is “rather ele- 
gant and well dressed. I was sur- 
prised.” 

“The gray tweed suit she wore to 
the Cardm show had a velvet collar 
and long skirt which is right in 
style, it was not bad taste,” he said. 

But, Ms. Beurdeley went on, “the 
blouse was a bit sad looking, I 
would prefer red. And the big error 
is her high-heeled shoes. They 
should be lower. And she should 
have worn black stockings.” 

Mrs. Gorbachev’s short haircut 
brought the opinion “too puffed 

(Continued on Page 5, Col 1) 



Raisa Gorbachev talked Friday with Yves Saint Laurent, 
the French couturier, after seeing his latest fashions. 


By Gary Lee 

Washington Post Service 

PARIS — Declaring himself 
“somewhat encouraged” by a “seri- 
ous response" from the White 
House to the package of Soviet 
arms control proposals presented 
last week, Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
set a relatively positive tone Friday 
for his meeting with President Ron- 
ald Reagan in Geneva Dext month. 

“It was not the usual ‘No,' " Mr. 
Gorbachev said during a two-hour 
news conference held with Presi- 
dent Francois Min errand at the 
Elysee Palace. 

But Mr. Gorbachev received a 
setback for proposals be unveiled 
Thursday when Mr. Mitterrand 
said France would not agree to di- 
rect negotiations on its nuclear 
forces with the Soviet Union. Mr. 
Mitterrand urged the Soviet leader 
to continue the current negotia- 
tions in Geneva on arms reductions 
with the United States. 

Mr. Gorbachev, making his first 
visit to the West since taking power 
in March, had proposed that 
France and Britain open direcL 
talks with the Soviet Union on re- 
ducing medium-range missiles 
based in Europe. Britain also indi- 
cated Friday it was not ready to 
accept the Soviet offer to negotiate. 

Mr. Gorbachev, 54, coupled his 
repeated calls Friday for a renewal 
of the spirit of detente with con- 
tinuing sharp criticism of President 
Reagan's Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive, which he said must be halted if 
the two superpowers were to make 
any progress in negotiating arms 
reductions. 

But he also voiced a judgment 
that talks in New York last month 
between Secretary of State George 
P. Shultz and his foreign minister, 
Eduard A. Shevardnadze, had giv- 
en him “an impression of promise 1 ' 
for the Geneva summiL 

Asked about the prospects for 
failure at the Geneva meeting, Mr. 


• Gorbachev’s aim is to split 

the U.S. and Western Europe. 

• UJS. envoy to Bonn sees no 
propaganda victory for Soviet. 


Gorbachev replied: “Let us not 
prejudge the summit.'' 

At another point, he added. “We 
have decided to add complemen- 
tary proposals to give impetus lo 
the Geneva negotiations." appar- 
ently signaling that the Soviet 
Union's strategy of appealing to 
Western countries with a series of 
arms-related plans win continue in 
the weeks before the summit, 
scheduled to take place on Nov. 19 
and 20. 

In addition to the package of 
arms proposals the Soviet Union 
outlined to U.S. leaders in Sep i em- 
ber, and Mr. Gorbachev presented 
before the French National Assem- 
bly on Thursday, the Soviet leader 
has proposed a joint ban on testing 
of nuclear weapons, and a morato- 
rium on deployment of intermedi- 
ate-range weapons. 

Mr. Gorbachev, the first Soviet 
leader in memory to held an orga- 
nized international press confer- 
ence. projected a broad-ranging 
grasp of the world's problems dur- 
ing the conference. 

Anns control dominated the 
public and private exchanges be- 
tween Mr. Gorbachev and Mr. Mit- 
terrand, who concluded three days 
of talks Friday. The Soviet leader 
was returning Saturday to Moscow. 

Seated a few inches from Mr. 
Gorbachev, Mr. Mitterrand based 
his stiff rejection of the Soviet pro- 
posal on his contention that the 
French miss ile force was too small 
to permit him to negotiate any of it 
away. 

“France must stay above the 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 7) 



U.S. Unemployment Rose Last Month 
As Manufacturing Jobs Fell Sharply 


By John M. Bern' 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON —The U.S. ci- 
vilian unemployment rate rose one- 
tenth of a percentage point to 7.1 
percent last month as the entry of 
more than half a million persons 
into the labor force more than off- 
set a 372,000 increase in the num- 
ber of jobs, the Labor Department 
reported Friday. 

The number of manufacturing 
jobs dropped by 110.000, the larg- 
est one-raonth loss since the end of 
the 1981-82 recession in the United 
States. Manufacturing employ- 
ment has declined by about 
340,000 since January, primarily 


By John Noble Wilford 

.New York Tinier Service 

NEW YORK — Scientists say 
they have discovered the first direct, 
evidence, 65-mfllion-year-old soot, 
that fire once_swept the wbrtd and 
con tribu led to the mass extinctions 
of dinosaurs and many other forms 
of life. 

fa a report m the journal Science, 
published Friday, chemists of the 
University of Chicago said the 
“surprisingly large amount” of soot 
appeared - to- be worldwide and 
could only havebeen produced in 
fiames or hot gases. They said it 
'represented fallout from, a dense 
sinoke cloud' that must hav& 
brought a killing darkness and chill 
to the world. ■ 


From the soot residue, found in 
ancient sediments, the Chicago 
chemists theorized that the fires-' 
torm was ignited by the impact of a- 
huge asteroid or comet. 

The findings were seen as further 
evidence supporting the hypothe- 
sis, advanced six years ago, that an 
extra terrestrial object struck the 
Earth with such violence 65 m£Dion 
years ago that the airborne debris 
of dost rock and vapor cast a pall 
over the world. 

In the darkness, the theoiy goes, 
plants withered, grazing artiroak 
starved and the predators that fed 
on them became extinct, as did 
more than half of all the plant and 
animal groups. 

The . soot discovery introduced 


another lethal factor, fire, to the 
scenarios of catastrophe. The con- 
flagration set off by the impact 
probably destroyed much of the 
world's * vegetation, the chemists 
surmised. 

The flames consumed oxygen 
and poisoned the air with carbon 
monoxide. The smoke, even more 
than the dust clouds, absorbed sun- 
light and sent temperatures plung- 
ing worldwide. 

The scientists also said the dis- 
covery suggested that nuclear war- 
fare's wintry effects on dimate 
could be more extensive and devas- 
tating than have been predicted. 

In their report, the team of Chi- 
cago scientists, Wendy S. Wolbach. 
Dr. Roy S. Lewis and Dr. Edward 


.Anders, called the soot found in the 
sediment at three widely separated 
sites “an ancient analog of the 
smoke cloud predicted for nuclear 
winter." 

“It may therefore help determine 
some important parameters for the 
nuclear winter calculations." they 
added. 

As often happens in science, the 
investigators were looking for 
some thing, else when they discov- 
ered the soot. Dr. .Anders, a profes- 
sor of chemistry at the University 
of Chicago's Enrico Fermi Insti- 
tute, said in a telephone interview 
that clay samples from Denmark, 
Spain and New Zealand were ex- 
amined for traces of noble gases, 
such as xenon and neon, that could 


have been residue of the impacting 
meteorite. 

These samples were from the 
same sediments in which geologists 
found anomalous amounts of iridi- 
um. an element rare on the surface 
of the Earth but more abundant in 
meteorites. 

It was this discovery, since rein- 
forced by findings at more than 
two dozen other sites around the 
world, that led Dr. Luis W. Alva- 
rez. a Nobel prize-winning physi- 
cist at Lawrence Berkeley Labora- 
tory. and his son. Dr. Walter 
Alvarez, a geologist at the Universi- 
ty or California at Berkeley, to their 
asteroid-impacL hypothesis to ex- 

( Continued on Page 3, Col 6) 


• 

because of a large rise in the vol- 
ume of imported goods. 

The unemployment rate for 
blacks rose to 15.3 percent after 
having dropped a full percentage 
point to 14 percent the previous 
month. The rate for whites fell 
from 62 percent to 6.1 percent. . 

Even though the length of the 
average factory workweek rose by 
one-tenth of an hour, with the de- 
cline in the number of jobs the tola! 
number of hours worked fell. That 
suggests that there was little if any 
increase in industrial production in 
September, analysts said. 

Janet L Norwood, commission- 
er of labor statistics, told the Joint 
Economic Committee of Congress 
that although the unemployment 
rate rose from August's ,7-percent 
level, the figure “remained below 
the Febroary-July plateau” of 7.3 
percent. 

“The civilian labor force broke 
out of the no- growth pattern which 
existed from March to August and 
increased by half a million in Sep- 
tember, with most of the pin about 
evenly split between adult men and 
women,” she said. 

In the past 12 months, the civil- 
ian labor force has increased by 
about two milli on workers, with 
about four-fifths of the rise occur- 
ring among adult women, Mrs. 
Norwood said. 

“At 98.1 million, the overall 
number of nonfaim payroll jobs 
was up very slightly from the Au- 
gust level.” she said. “Gains took 
place throughout the service-pro- 
ducing sector and in construction. 


fa contrast, manufacturing em- 
ployment declined by 1 10,000, with 
the largest losses in machinery, 
electrical equipment and motor ve- 
hicles. Part of ihe decline in autch 
mobile-industry ■ employment re- 
sulted from strike activity and part 
from the changed patterns of re- 
tooling for new cars.” 

Mrs. Norwood said that since 
January' the number of jobs in ser- 
vices has gone up by 770,000, in 
retail trade by 450,000 and in con- 
struction by 190,000. 

“In manufacturing, however, 
there has been a loss of 340,000 
jobs, with nearly half of the drop 
occurring in machinery and electri- 
cal equipment," she said. 

Labor Secretary William E. 
Brock issued a statement in which 
he stressed the positive aspects of 
the employment report, mention- 
ing neither the rise in the unem- 
ployment rate or the drop in manu- 
facturing employmenL 

“Aimost 109.3 million Ameri- 
cans were working in September 
another record high," Mr. Brock 
said. 

“And 8J million Americans 
have been added to the payrolls in 
the Iasi 34 months — an average of 
250.000 a month," he added. ” 

“The length of the manufactur- 
ing workweek in September grew to 
40.7 hours — die longest in more 
than a year," the labor secretary 
said. “Meanwhile, our service and 
construction industries continued 
to register healthy employment in- 
creases." 








INSIDE 

f 

■ The United States implicitly 
i. «' wanted land not to attack the 

PLO in Jordan. Pagel 

■ A former CIA agent may have 
passed the Soviet Union infor- ■ 
matioa cm UJS. intelKgeace- 

■ gathering methods. Page 3. 

I Ronald Reagan endorsed a 

■ congressional plan for a bal- 
; anced ^bndgei by 1991. P*ge3. 

, . ART/LEISURE 

! ■ The FIAC international con- 
temporary art fair opens ai the 
Grand Palais in Pans. Page d. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE - 

■ The IMF is ready to lend. 
Modco $300 mfllioa for .post- 
ejaake reamstrnctiOT- Page B. 

SPECIAL. REPORT 



Shetkh Ahzned Zald Yamam, the Saudi o3 minister, at 
-the meeting in' Vienna where OPEC acknowledged 
failure; to apply , price. Output rules. Page 13. 


New Zealand Is Relishing Battles With Two Giants 


By Seth My dans 

New York Tunes Service 

WELLINGTON, New Zealand — For this 
small South Pacific nation more or less between 
Australia and the South Pole; the sudden lime- 
light from its diplomatic battle with France has 
been riarrlmfl . 

Since the Greenpeace vessel Rainbow War- 
rior was sunk by French agents three months 
ago. New Zealanders have been astonished to 
find themselves in the role of hero as the French 
government concedes more and more guilt 

And that is not all A dispute over the defense 
alliance between Australia, the United Slates 
and New Zealand has pitied New Zealand 
against a second Western giant, the United 
States. 

By insisting on baiting nuclear-armed and 
nuclear-powered warships from its ports, New 
Zealan d has pushed Washington toward revis- 
ing or abandoning the treaty that has served the 
three partners wi thout serious problems since 
1951. 

The wrangles with France and the United 
States have aroused feelings of both self-assur- 
ance and uneasiness here about future relations 


with countries seen as New Zealand's protec- 
tors. 

“It's all very well to say, anti-nuclear, anti- 
nuclear,” said .Ashley Lovett, an airline repre- 
sentative. "Somebody’s having a very good time 
posturing. But we nave to live in a modern 
B’orld* which people conveniently forget. So 
now we’re all alone.” 

France is considered a key' ally in the Europe- 
an Community, whose backing has helped en- 
sure a market for the agricultural exports on 
which New Zealand's economy relies. 

Washington's friendship and its defense com- 
mitments have provided an essential sense of 
security for a nation acutely aware of its isola- 
tion from its Western allies. 

But for the moment, there is a heady sense 
here of holding the moral high ground in the two 
disputes, both of which grow out of New Zea- 
land’s opposition to nuclear arms. Prime Minis- 
ter David Lange, taking a hard line in both 
cases, appears so Tar to have been getting the 
best of things. 

The garrulous prime minister seems to be 
enjoying himself as much as he did in March a! a 
debate over nuclear arms at Oxford University. 


The audience at the forum agreed that Mr. 
Lange had trounced Jerry FalwelL leader of the 
Christian evangelical lobbying group known as 
Moral Majority. 

“It boosts New Zealand's profile in the world, 
although the point of that is somewhat moot," 
Mr. Lange said of New Zealand’s newfound 
international prominence. “We would also have 
a higher profile if we had a calf with eight legs. 1 

In a recent interview, he conceded that two 
simultaneous international crises were stretch- 
ing the resources of his government. He illus- 
trated his reaction lo the situation by seizing a 
handful of his graving hair and tearing at iv 

Government officials assigned to everything 
from educational reform to Antarctic affairs 
have been put to work on Greenpeace and on 
ANZUS. as the defense alliance is known. 

“I’m sure all my government ministers would 
be worn-out husks after two years on the job if 
we were running at the pace we have been 
running," Mr. Lange said. 

Critics led by the opposition National Party 
leader, Jim McLay, have accused Mr. Lange of 
having too good a time, and even of acting like a 
(Continued on Paae 5, CoL 4) 



Prime Minister David Lange 













r 


L 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, (MTOBER 5-6, 1985 


- L.HI 


** 


U.S., in Wake of Tunis Raid, Warns 
Israel Not to Attack PLO in Jordan 


By Norman Kempster 

Las Angeles Times Serna 

NEW YORK — The United 
States has implicitly warned Israel 
against attacking Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization bases in Jordan 
the way Israeli planes attacked a 
PLO facility in Tunisia on Tues- 
day. a Senior Slate Department of- 
ficial said. 

King Hussein of Jordan “proba- 
bly has as good or better a record of 
fighting terrorism as anybody.** the 
official said Thursday. Asked 
whether the United States had is- 
sued any warning to Jerusalem, he 
responded. “I think they are well 
aware of King Hussein's record on 
terrorism-" 

Ariel Sharon, the former defense 
minister, told Israeli reporters ear- 
lier this week that Hussein should 
learn a lesson from the T unis attack 
and remove PLO offices from Am- 
man. 

“Israel under no circumstances 
can tolerate the presence of terror- 
ist organization commands so close 
to its border." said Mr. Sharon, 
who now serves as minister of in- 
dustry and trade in the coalition 
government. 

Asked this week whether Israel 
would attack Jordan, Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres said. "I differenti- 
ate between Tunis and Jordan. Jor- 
dan fights terrorism and doesn't let 
terrorists leave its borders Tor Isra- 
el Tunis gave refuge to the head- 
quarters of the PLO." 

The State Department official, 
who spoke to reporters on the con- 
dition that he not be identified, 
said the United States would urge 
the world community to deny sanc- 
tuary to terrorist* and groups that 
promote terrorism. 

The official said Israel had ob- 
tained intelligence information 
that the PLO base near Tunis was 
linked to some of the recent terror- 
ist attacks against Israeli citizens in 
Israel, the occupied West Bank of 
the Jordan River and Cyprus. 

The officials made clear that this 
information prompted the Reagan 



“Mv 


fieuttr»4JR 

Vernon A. Walters 


which the Israelis have no direct 
quarreL 

U.S. spokesmen say the PLO ad- 
ministrative offices in Amman 
have not been linked directly to 
terrorism. 

But the Israeli government con- 
tends that terrorism is die PLO's 
only function, and often attempts 
to hold the organization responsi- 
ble for all attacks on Israel, even 
ones for which other organizations 
claim responsibility. 


■ US. Rebukes Its Accusers 

Don Shannon of the Los Angeles 
Times reported from the United Na- 
tions in New York: 

The second day of Security 
Council debate over the Israeli raid 
in Tunisia broke off Thursday in a 
heated exchange between the Unit-* 
ed States and Libya. 

The U.S. ambassador, Vernon A. 
Walters, president of the 15-nation 
council, angrily rebuked the for- 


adnunisiration to express its under- eign ministers of Libya and Cuba, 
at- who had accused the United States 


standing for Israel's reasons in 
tacking Tunisia, a U.S. ally with 


of complicity in the Israeli attack. 


country has fought two 
great wars for freedom in this cen- 
tury," Mr. Walters declared before 
adjourning the session until Friday. 
“We have annexed no territory nor 
have we enslaved any people. 

He said the United States had 
nonetheless “suffered grievously at 
the hands of terrorists," citing the 
killings of U.S. ambassadors and 
the hijacking of U.S. citizens. 

"From states like Libya or Cuba, 
we accept no lessons in internation- 
al conduct, nor do we permit them 
to determine our foreign policy,” 
Mr. Walters said. 

Foreign Minister Ali Abdd-Sa- 
lem Treiki of Libya had charged 
that Israel could never be curbed 
because “the plague of Zionism" is 
protected by the U.S. veto in the 
Security Council. 

A t a news conference, he said the 
United States had refueled the Is- 
raeli bombers that struck the PLO's 
headquarters near Tunis. 

“In the last few' days, the Ameri- 
cans said one Libyan plane passed 
the Tunisian frontier, but they 
didn't see six Israeli planes," the 
Libyan official said 

The United States has denied 
that it assisted the Israelis and says 
it was informed of (he raid only 
after the Israeli planes struck. 

At the council's session Wednes- 
day. the Cuban foreign minister. 
Isidore Malmierca Peoli, pointed 
to the White House's original de- 
fense of the Israeli action as legiti- 
mate, a position that was later 
modified. 

Mr. Malmierca said that the 
United States was considering a 
similar strike against Nicaragua. 

No resolution has been formally 
presented to the council. Tunisia 
has asked the body to condemn 
Israel and has demanded the pay- 
ment of reparations for die loss of 
h uman life and property. 

An Israeli source who spoke on 
condition that he not be identified 
reported that Foreign Minister 
Yitzhak Shamir of Israel contacted 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
privately Thursday and asked him 
to ensure a U.S. veto of any con- 
demnation of Israel. 


Indicates Cptepsed Wafers m 


Budding 




I 


^Entrance 




Street 



Rescuers 
Gose In on 
Trapped Boy 
In Mexico 


WORLD BRIEFS 




sP 






Labor Party Votes to Back Nicaragua r 

BOURNEMOUTH England fUPIt - The Labor Party resolved., tyl?.’ ' 


Nirairagua to fi^t U.Sj-supponrf ( “ a ^, ^ 3is annual. convention, 

unankSy 5 passed a ‘resolution condemning U.S. foreign policy in 


Th* Awoo jWl Press 

A diagram showing, from above, the apartment buOdmg 
where 9-year-old Lads Ramon Nafarrate is trapped. 


Moslem Group in Beirut 
Says U.S. Hostage Killed 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MEXICO CITY — Mexican sil- ^SiS^Sdto NKrasuTfw « long as. and as a-coimterbalancti. 

ver miners worked nonstop Friday ^ UpKnutafe* supplied by the Umted States 

goTCxamem. the Central Intelligence Agency, private sources, etc 

U.S. Deploys 2 Military Satellites 

quake in Mexico’s history. CAPE CANAVERAL. Florida (AP) — The crew of the new U.S. space 

Rescuers heard Luis Ramon Na- shim]c AUanlis deployed two advanced communications satefliles on 
farrate s voice early Friday as he F - . ■ continued' Lis secret military mission, reliable sources said, 

appealed for help. “Get me out, get Neither NASA nor the Defense Department would confirm the de- 
meout," hecalled. Later in today. ^ oyment of the satellites, which were attached Uo_ die sa^ ro^t 
rescue workers said that they rocket was to boost them into stationary orbit 2^300 miles (36,15c 
shouted through mounds of rabble ... eters) where the payloads were to sqrarate and travel:*) 
and heard the boy's faint voice. ““ ' s ^ do ^ The National Aeronautics and Space Admnusiranon’s 

Jorge Negrete, a spokesman for stateme m came five minutes after liftoff Thursday, wfaattt and the 

the workers, said that rescuers "J, “doing well” and that all systems on board were^perfonuqtg 
asked the boy if he was there and f aclor n v - 

the child answered: “Yes." He said ^ n: ^ Tis expected to last four to five days, with tbr astronauts 
the workers did not Uy to talk to scried of experiments. Sources identified th^rargo as qw 

faun further because they did not .. communications satellites of the new model DSCS-3, which are 
want to exhaust him. shielded against the electromagnetic pulse effects of nude® explosions. 

Such satellites would be used by the US. president in an emergency,^ 
transmit orders to American nuclear forces around the globe. 


% 


& 


(Continued from Page 1) 
afternoon or it would be “demol- 
ished over their beads." 

The purported announcement of 
Mr. Buckley's killing, sent to news- 


during talks in Damascus between 
Tripoli's fundamentalist leader, 
ShwHi Saeed Shaaban, and Presi- 
dent Hafez al- Assad of Syria, was 
due to take effect at midnight on 


papers and news agencies in Beirut, Thursday, 
said it was “in revenge for the The cease-fire opened the possi- 
blood of martyrs" killed in the Is- bility thm three Soviet nffirials wh o 
raeli air raid against PLO head- were abducted Monday might be 


Mr. Negrete said the brief talk 
with the boy came after the discov- 
ery of a cistern in the debris. He 
said that it was trickling water to 
where the child was believed 
trapped 

The miners from the coal town of 
Tax co, 90 miles (150 kilometers) 
south of Mexico City, were work- 
ing on hands and knees at the end 
of a 14-yard (13-meter) tunnel. 

The incline d tunnel was one of 


New Probe Opened in Pope Shooting 

ROME (AP) — Italian magistrates have opened another investigation 
into the shooting of the pope following trial testimony that implicated 
several unindicted Turks, a judicial source said Friday. 

This will be the third investigation of the assassanabon attempt earned 
it at the Vatican May 13. l9Sl.byMehmetAli Agca. a Turk, to the first 


out 


_ rrinl a gca claimed that he had acted alone and he was sentenced to 

The inclined tunnel wasone of pnsorc But he later turned state’s evidence and said that af*' 

luciea Monday nngnr oe £ ^ * second trial initiated last May in Rome; reven persons were 

quarters. . freed. A group called WanucLIb- indicted following Mr. Agca's declarations. Three of themes indicted are 

Ibe communique from Islamic — — s-- n.- .1 m. chance on Wednesday after policy- | M i; QV1 nnri fi-uir are heinc fried in absentia. The tNiTDOse of the 


Jihad charged that Mr. Buckley, 57, 
was the Central Intelligence Agen- 
cy station chief in Beirut before his 
March 1984 kidnapping. 


eration Organization —ifcn al Wa- 

lid forces has nlaimwri responobB- 
ity for the kidnappings. 

The kidnappers have demanded 
that the Kremlin put pressure on 


The gn^p said n would release Syria t0 m ^ pn^. 

i fundamen- 


parts of a confession that n said ian ^tias on Moslem 
Mr. Buddey had made, and it a ted m TripoIi m retum for 

its Sept. 14 release of a Presbyten- ju* ^ hostages, 
an minister, Benjamin M. Weir, as n^, r ., ^ . r , • A , 

dear if radical fundamentalist 

A^ri^ldfour COmmandm “ I™* 1 


LT cept the agreement to hand their 

who have been abducted m Mos- e . JZr 


Shultz Says U.S. Urged Tunisia to Accept PLO in 1982 


ail' 


New York Tunes Service 
NEW YORK — Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz has said that 
the United Slates urged Tunisia to 
absorb some Palestine Liberation 
Organization personnel when they 
were forced to leave Beirut in 1982. 

But he said in an interview 
Thursday he did not mean that the 
United States had anticipated that 
“a headquarters would be estab- 
lished out of which terrorist opera- 
tions would be conducted.” 


In August 1982. as the result of 
an agreement negotiated with Leb- 
anese intermediaries by a special 
U.S. representative. Philip C. Ha- 
bib, the PLO agreed to withdraw its 
forces from Beirut rather than face 
an impending Israeli attack on the 
city. Until then, the organization 
had its main base of operations in 
Lebanon. 

The basic outline of the agree- 
ment was worked out in July 1982, 
but it took several weeks to find 


Arab countries willing to take the 
PLO. “The United States was very 
active in going around, as you re- 
member, when it was quite appar- 
ent that nobody wanted the PLO in 
their country, in trying to find 
places where’ they might go." Mr. 
Shultz said. 

“So, yes. we did," he said, when 
asked if the United States had 
played a role in persuading Presi- 
dent Habib Bourguiba of Tunisia 
to accept the PLO. 


lem-controDed West Beirut, but 
said the Israeli raid was “a clear secunty 
sign of the fail ore of every form of Moscow is 

reconciliation with Israel and 
America.” 

Washington has repeatedly re- 
jected the kidnappers' demands 
that it put pressure on Kuwait to 
release 17 Arabs jailed for bomb- 
ings there, in return for release of 
the Americans. 

A cease-fire in the northern city 
of Tripoli which was negotiated 


avy weapons to Syrian troops 
d let them enter to take charge of 


a dose ally of Syria 
and its main aims supplier. 


men heard sounds from the rubble 
of his former home in the center of 
therity- 

Tbe Sept. 19 earthquake, mea- 
suring 8.1 on the open-ended Rich- 
ter stale, killed at least 7,000 peo- 
ple. Thousands are still missing. 
The boy is thought to be the last of 
the missing who will be found ali ve. 

Huddled under blankets in a 
small car 30 yards from the scene, 
the boy's parents said they were 
confident that be would be pulled 
out alive. 

Rescue workers said the opera- 
tion was proceeding slowly because 
they bad to hollow out a circuitous 
path to avoid dislodging rubble 
and hurting the boy. (Reuters, AP) 


in Italian custody and four are being tried in absentia. The purpose of the 
new investigation is to determine if others should be indicted. 


Portuguese Election Campaign Ends 


Soviet Press Remains Stoic 
In Reporting Beirut Attacks 


LISBON (Reuters) — ■ Portugal’s 
political parties wound up a 
three- week general election cam- 
paign on Friday. 

The 11 parties and political 
groups appealed for a high turnout 
of the country’s 7.6 millio n voters 
on Sunday, saying that the result is 
crucial to political stability and 
economic recovery before the 
country’s entry into the European 
Community in January. 

Observers foresaw a tough battle 
between the former allies in the 
outgoing government — the Social- 
ists led by Prime Minister M&rio 
Soares and the Social Democrats 
headed by Anibal Cavaco Siva, an 
economist 



n: 


s - 
?= 


Anibal Cavaco Silva 


S«15lNWOH>SANDFCn*5 

DoorcsauKY 

DAUTINIHEW 


(Continued from Page 1) 


The process was repeated 


10 Churches Invited to Vatican Synod 

VATICAN CITY' (UPI) — Pope John Paul II has invited 10 Protestant 


day abductionof three Wedtteedey night n/.et one C the 


Soviet officials and the embassy four Russians, Arkady Katakov. 
doctor in Beirut, there were no in- 32, a consular secretary at the Em- 


said. 


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The pontiff also named two U.S. cardinals, John Krol of Philadelphia 


temiptions oF television program- bassy. was found shot dead in West , *““ u ?F u,a 

* bulletins Neither Ht and Bernmri^Law of Boston, ^ speoal ddegates to the extraordinary 


ming for news 
did the story lead the evening news 


. . , . meeting, scheduled to be held from Nov. 25 to Dec. 8. 

SRtfttSCBiM 

woru aoout tne annex, i uesaay s but there was still little informa- involved m • ecumenical discussions with Rome The AnoHmn I mhoran 
newspapers contained no mention non. The names of the four hos- 


of it’ " Tkp ¥ clh f dist ’ Gredt Orthodox. Russian Orthodox, Presbyterian and Bap^ 

t3ges wrre not^^ubl^T^ are among the faj.fe dicing Omstiaa unity witi Zc 


!iV 


-r- 


The first report about the ind- Kremlin’s comment appeared Vatican, 
dent was broadcast on televirion Thursday on page two of Pravda. 

and simultaneously published by limited news coverage has. /jrnhallWP ParrifS A 01*00 mi MpVffPf 
Tass on Tuesday evening, more ?° l _ prevented curiosity about the fcilHIIMl mc i dl UCS Agree UH lTierger - 

foan 24 hours after the kidnap- incident from spreading, a Mos- HARARE, Zimbabwe (NYT) — The country’s two m^or political 
pings. cow resident said that he and his parties have reached a broad agreement to merge at a meeting between 

The short dry statement repro- ^ ^ Epmc Minister Robert 'Mugabe and the opposition leader, Joshua 

duced Wednesday on page five of made public, were eager to Nkomo. it was announced. 

Pravda, called the kidnappings a was happe ni ng. ^ ^ OffidaUdosc to the talks saidThuxsday that Mr. Mugabe will scrveasL 


=~ >_• 








‘heinous crime" committed by 
“bandits” from an “arch-reaction- 
ary ultra right-wing organization. 


"This terrorism is a first for us," president of the party and Mr. Nkomo wiU beone of two via: presidents.^ 
he said, why not give the names, Relations between the two current parties, Mr. " ' 


W.ir, 
le-.i ; 


u National Union and Mr. Nkomo’s ZimbabSSicam^OTlS 

. Within hours of the TWA hijack- Umon, have been marked by personal and ethnic antagonisms. 

S 6 ; T™ nf f m.Wadungton Mr. Mngabe was to leave Friday on a three-week trip to the Caribbean 
Ti c c * o j D , *** to Nw York, where he wfll address the United Nations. Final 

L.S. Senate Panel Backs Department s anti-tenronst squad, approval of the merger is scheduled after his return. 

had been sent to the Middle East to 

blient Momenta! School stand by tor a possible rescue at- R^COrd 

iTSSSSSt , tarf«d- two sauffites. 1 'common icaSom sattUitt and U. 


•V«nr York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON —The Senate 
Judiciary Committee has approved 
a proposed constitutional amend- 
ment that would allow public 



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schools to set aride a moment for ^££3*5*1 ^ ^ ^ 

r meditation in pub- ikdrut was also prompted bv fean ' ThcTl^ ^rniir rnnf: i t r ,, (Reuters) 

i .American military action! ' C \} ma 3? Friday, by a 90-2 

There are unfikd/to beany offi- ^ Stod ' aam ** daectOT ** Office of Manage- 

ial reonrlc in 


silent prayer or 
lie schools. 

The amendment adopted by the 
panel Thursday must be approved 
by a two-thirds vote of both houses 
of Congress and ratified by 38 
states io become part of the U.S. 
Constitution. It is aimed at blunt- 
ing the effect of a Supreme Court 
decision that banned moments of 
silence designed solely to promote 
religion. 


CHURCH SERVICES 


PAMS 


CENTAL BAPTO7 CHURCH. T3 Si» dul 
V-^ColombHH., 75006 Pari,. Mtfro St] 


5«lpk». Sundoy wor sh ip in EngMt 
cun., fcnr. A. Soremwwilla. Tal.: 607.67.02. 


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QoS Or. B.C Thames, Pastor, 749.13.29. 


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nations. 11:15 in, Sundays. BIBLE STUDYi 
TOa.m., Sundays: 7:30 p.m. Tueidav, 
Dr. Roy W. Bart ri d. Pastor. WH.COML) 
[On fy English Language church hen.) 


TOKYO 

CWBSTtAN CHAPEL NEW QTANi HOTEL 
OAROe^ opmdoJy 8i30-Kh30ojn. Sun. 
da/ 8^0-9:30 and ftofrashnenti. Call haW: 
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pleaue contact: 

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IS! Are. 

92521 NeuiUy Cedes, France. 
TeLi 747.12.65. 


dal reports in Moscow about the 
movement of Soviet forces or com- 
mando teams. Western diplomats 
said they did not even know wheth- 
er the Soviet Union bad special 
anti-terr ori s m units. 

The first Tass statement, using 
the kind of oblique, understated 
language that Moscow prefers fm 
sensitive matters, simply reported: 
"The competent Soviet agende* 
are taking all necessary steps ir 
order to save the Soviet citizens." 


Correction 


Because of a caption error by the 
Camera Press agency, a photo- 
graph of Richard Eyre, a British 
director, was identified in the Oct. 
4 Weekend section as David. Hare, 
the playwright Mr. Hare is shown 
at left 



k 


. t 

■ 


Briton Says He Was Held in Beirut 


alpr 

■Yori 


"not comparable" to other recent 
seizures of American hostages. 

He said that he and Mr. Dona- 
hue had been subjected to a series 
of abductions by various rightist 
factions. 

The most recent, he said, oc- 

~o— r . ^Mr. Haden-Guest telephoned a 

The writer, Anthony Haden- ^ York shortly before 
Guest, identified the American as midnight Thursday to announce 

Steven Donahue of Hollywood. London. Reached . - «uuuu. «, 

Honda. He said they were collabo- “ ere * “ c be had been freed bv ™ ud ' ^ added, had “kidnapp«i 
rating oaa book about thenarcot- f 18 ca P^° rs and allowed to denart ^ Donahue from the Rahme 
Damascus. From tfc, 

& lKflCT “ Paris - th ““>» 


A Tw York Times Serriut 

NEW YORK — A British writer 
reportedly abducted in Beirut by a 
Christian rightist group turned up 
Thursday in London saying lhat'he 
had been released. He said an 
American colleague was still being 
held by the armed group. 


Qined Sept. 28, when members of 
me Rahme group seized the two 
pen from the custody of another 
STO a B ® n11 restaurant But 
Mr. Haden-Guesi said that he Had 
released several times, and 

ma * ‘Mz- Donahue was the main 
targeL j 


'%6 


O 


' 

a . ■ 
'••■fr s ; 


■ I 




He said he and Mr. Donahue* 
previously had been held by a rival 
nghust group called Lahoud. La- 


ics trade in Lebanon and its ptditi- 


cal implications. Their abductions, 


group. 


he said, were linked to the project. 

Mr. Donahue's wife. Joanna, 
said she had known for some time 
that her husband was being held, 
but that the State Department had 
only given her clearance Thursday 

sriEfssf'Zrsrs a ««. 


saia Mrs. uonanue naa told the tribuiinff rx? ■ a 
government thiswedc that her hus- ° r ? ew York 


band tod hem hdd “agamst his nonficti^ 3 1 

umr in i wtmnn cmn> Afimicf it: a ■ . 


'4SSSSI! Special Unit Formed ' 

5k°SSi3SSygfSS££ ToSeekRa P^“U.iL 

ban n^itist group. He said the , ***** * 

^ wiBfog to release l °NDON — Scodand Yard has 
MT. lAjnahue in i.- set U P a special squad to track rap- 

as. joggers, have 
tacked at least 23 women on the 


x. ’'■■■ *i-' 

r-S...,. 

f ft s - ■ 

■ 


% 




•- ' 


wilT in Lebanon-since August and He said he ViSS I?rieains - n 

that Mr.. Haden -Guest was with _.T led several 


Mr. Canahan said the depart- boy 
meat was avesngaung the cases, DOTaC/h 0 S L H B l sad Mr - 
bul they were “not potiticaT and know! 



on the subject, was assisting 


lie 


lAvestigators had. started the . 
|est operation of its kind in 

to capture -two 
w ^ lc ••ben. brewed respon- , 
T ^ a string of attacks on worn-' 
M dunng jhc past three yearfc - 


r 






©TTER^ATTONAL HERALD TIUBIJNE^-SATLIRDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 


Page 3 


i . .. -llfm. 






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*»-■» - - ‘ C\v| 

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s-’- rS 

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Heiru 1 


^ Norman D. Dicks 

v /;.; PlanBacked 
y;To Balance 
> JJ.S. Budget 

ByJDavid Hoffman 

! *. H'osAtngrMi Post Service 

*>n| ^ WASHINGTON — President ; 

~ir^ Ronald Reagan endorsed Friday a 
■i m rongressional plan to force a bal- ■ 
’■ 3§S meed U5. budget by 1991 , as Con- 

gross prepared to vote on legisla- 
; lion raising the federal debt celling 
j to more than $2 trillion. - 
j - Mr. Reagan called the congres- - . 
9onal plan “an historic agreement 
?• ] lo bring U.S. spending under ooa- 
1 trol and at long last put the United 
States on a path to a balanced fed- 
aral budget.” He said the 11 -year- 
si d congressional budget process 

• ■‘has failed.” 

The plan would force reductions 
of roughly $36 billion a year in the 
' . U.S. bndget defirit, which is now 
estimated at $180 biffion for the 
current fiscal year, 1986. By 1991* 

, the budget would be balanced. 

. The plan is attached to the . 
*i' lation raising the debt ceiling above 
,:i the $2-triHion mark. The govem- 
~ mentV cash balances are expected 

- to ran out by. Monday, forcing 
■ 1 Congress to act so the government 
Can continue borrowing to pay its 
bills. 

Mr. Reagan’s endorsement fol-i 
. - ~ lowed a groan dswcli of support for 

the plan bn Capitol H2L 1 
On Thursday, Senate and, House - 
.7 “ Republican holders 7 closed Tratiks- 

• bdimd tire plan and the speaker of 
the House, Thomas P. O’Neill Jr, 

. .7 ■' .said that Democrats, as wdl, may 
' embrace “something of that na- 
ture.” “ 

The plan is similar to past efforts 
’irli- by ibe White House to set yearly 
targets that would gradually rednee 
die deficit. However, Mr. Reagan 
. ■■ was unwilling in the past to make 

the deep cuts in mxlitaiy. and- db- 
. . mestic programs that would lead to' 
\ r * .--a balanced budget, and Congress - 
"0 - also proved unwilling to make 

• them. 

The new-plan would set the tar- 
' - .gets in law, possibly making it more 

- difficult for both Mr. Reagan and 
Congress to avoid them. 

The president said in endorsing 
the plan that he sdQ expected Con- 
gress to meet past commitments for 
military spending to rise 3 percent 

• - ? above inflation each year. 

■- ■. He also vowed that “we will hon- 

. ■ or our commitments on Social Se- 

• . " curity," without saying what those 

*. commitments are. Mr. Reagan hai 
.tried twice this year lo reduce So- 
7 dal Security benefits. 

. "• Mr. Reagan also appealed Fiv 

day for approval of. a constitutional.’ 
"amendment balancing the budget 
f _ While Congress earlier this yeai 
3 jg» '-approved deficit reductions of 
JJf 355.5 billion for next year,, defidti . 

^r emain the dominant issue oh Cap- 
I j ^4tol HilL - , 

In other congressional. action 

• ] ^Thursday, the House Ways and 
: ; j ^MeansCommittee, finally broke a 

• ■ j --'ihree-day deadlock over procedure 

■:;\X * and took its first votes on overhaul- 

ing the lax code. 

.. It agreed to an amendment that 
would increase the defidt unless 
taxes were raised in other parts of. 

: the lax code. 

lf[J| The cbmnrihee decided not to 

^ tax workers’ compensation, black 

. lung (a miners’ ailment) benefits, or 
porkers' disability payments: al* 

. -though both Mr. Reagan arid tire 
, -chairman of the House. Ways and. 

- Means Committee; Dan Rosten- 
. . J kowdti, Democrat of ffiinpis, had 

wanted to impose such taxes. 

The pand also voted to repeal 
income avera g in g , which, now al- 
lows taxpayers with large jnmps in 
. ‘ income from one year to another to 
avoid sharp increases in taxes. Mr. 

> ; ; Reagan and Mr. Rostenkbwski far 

■' vored repeal. 

• - Retaining income averaging 

would have cost billions of dollars 
in revenue, leaving tbe comnnttee 
J even further in the hole, 

i’. , . - Although the votes were the fin t 

; J. substantive moves ^that the commit- 

i* 1 ' tee has they marked only a 

tiny stq? in the long process Of tax 
overhatd. 

Staff aides said the fact that the 
“"first day's action leaves the oem-. 
• : Jfc -hnttee with reduced U^ revenue 
was not significant They pointed 
-out that all committee actions are 
- tentative and subjeex to c han ge. 

i v “It’s going to 1 m a (dpw process,” 

said the r anking crananitee Rqiiib» 
■lican, John Duncan frf Ten n essee. ^ 
•‘■*1 would think a real good month.” 




i eapon 
ntmiies 


New York Tima Serrtet. . ’ 

WASHINGTC5N- ^ A House . 
Subcommittee has /voted to block 
future tests of the U& Air Force’s . 
oewantirsaldike weapon, aslong as 
the Soviet Union continues a mora- 

tofimn rw srmihir -. te^riri^ rang res. 

stonal sourcessauL 

Tbe pand, the House Awm^ni- 
ations Subcommittee cm Pefeose, 
also approved Tlmrsday a mflitaiy . 
spe sTbag bffl for the new fiscalyear 
« $292 billion, the same levd per- - 
mittedm 1985. That is $10 bmiffli 
less than the amount Congress ap^ 
proved in earSer budget actions. 

The subcommittees actions face 
screening by a Honse^Seaiate ato- 
ference committee. 7 

The subcommittee alio voted to 
trim President Ronald Realm’s 
anti-mi ssile - H^fancy jeescareh. p tfy . 
gram to SZi blllion .ficm $2.75 
billion. Represen taliveNorqtan D. 
Dicks, Democrat of -Washington, 
predicted that , an effort would be 
made to cut the p rogram further as 
the ap pr o p riation measure moved ' 
through Congress- ■ ‘ 

Pentagon officials said that the 
cm bad been ejected and that 
they hc^'tfc'Si^^ 
store at feast part of tbe inoney. 1 Mr. 
Dicks smd the subcommittee also 
canceled an'airfbrceair-to-air mis- 
sile, the Amraain, but did not cut 
any other majtH’.arms programs. 

The Hoaseyotedefflfex tins year 
to ban tests of the anti-satellite 
weapon, an airborne rocket that 
sends a high-speed, nonexplosive 
wariiead into orbit But the ban was 
overturned in a House-Senate con- 
ference committee, and last month 
the air force succeeded in destroy- 
ing an orbitmg satdKte in its first 
test against a space target. 

. The new move toward halting - 
testing is expected to standa better 
eh«n<y. bhcmise the conferees who 
will .ultimately work, out tire bill’s 
details are considered sympathetic 
to controlling space weapons. But 
Mr. Dicks,who sponsoredthe ban 
with Representative Lex AuCoin, a 
Democrat of Or^on, said it would 
still be ^very difficult to make h 
stick.” 

Critics of anti-satdSte weapons 
said that once they were fully tested 
itwouMteimposabletolinmthrir 
use effectively through an aims 
control treaty. They said a treaty 
was needed to protect nriKtary sat- 
ellites on which the United States 
depends for reconnaissance and 
early wanting of an attack. The 
administration has said such a trea- 
ty could not be enforced. 

— — ~7~ 

State Dept. Withdraws 
Kahane’s Gthendi^ 

. • The Associated Press , ] 

; WAaSNGTON — The, State 
Departinerit said Friday that Rab- T ’ 
bi Mm Kahahe, founder of the 
mflitant' Jewish Defaise League, 

' has beat strippied of Ins U_S. citt- 
zmsitip because of his membershg) 
in Israel's parliament, the-Knesset 

' By becoming a foreign goyern- 
ment official, the. rabbi disqualified 
himself to remain &.U.5. arizen. 


AMERICAN TOPICS 



Tha ABoaMd ftwi 


CXEAN-UP CREW — More than 500 aspirants entered a UJS. company's contest to 
find a look-alike for Mr. Clean, who appears in a television commercial for a household 
cleaning product Finalists from around the country gathered in New York Thursday, 
and David Scott Crawford, of Stow, Ohio, holding trophy, was named the winner. 


Tjienol Poisonings 

Remain a Mystery 

Although several suspects 
have been questioned and re- 
leased, the case of the fatal poi- 
soning at random of seven peo- 
ple who took Extra-Strength 
Tylenol capsules laced with cya- 
itidp! is yet to be solved. The in- 
vestiganon has cost Illinois state 
police $3 mQHan, The New^ York 
: Times -reported. 

The manufacturers, Johnson 
& Johnson, took the product off 
tire shelves and tested 1.5 million 
bottles. Cyanide was found in 
three of them. At the time of the 
killing s, Tylenol was the leading 
over-the-counter brand of pain 
remedy In the United States, 
with 35 percent of the market. 
Within 18 months, after an in-' 

tensiv e advertising and public re- 
lations campaign, it had recap- 
tured 28 percent. 

One consequence of die case 
was that virtually all nonpre- 
scription drugs in the United 
States are now packaged in 
tamper-resistant containers. 

ShortTakes 

The American public is losing 
some of its confidence in the di- 
rection die country is going and 
isnowjust about evenly split, 45- 
44 L on whether it is headed the 
right way or off on the wrong 
trade, according to a New York 
Tunes pod of L277 adults taken 
last month. The remaining 11 
percent had no opinion. The poll 
of 1,277 adults was less positive 
than similar polls in May and 
July. President Ronald Reagan’s 


popularity remained high, how- 
ever, at more than 60 percent 

The 194th edition of the Old 
Farmer's Almanac has predicted 
another odd. snowy winter for 
the United States. The almanac 
is best known for its prediction 
of an entire year’s weather three 
months before tire year begins. It 
missed out on the recent hurri- 
cane designated Gloria, but cor- 
rectly forecast the first hurricane 
of 1983, although a week early. 
Jndson Hale, the editor, said, 
“We use the latest of scientific 
information. We really make a 
very serious effort.” 

Drivers who aren't sure if they 
have had one drink too man v can 
now attach a $295 breath-test 
device to their ignition that pre- 
vents them from starting the car 
if they have had enough alcohol 
to fail a police tesL An override 
allows tire car to be started with- 
out a breath test, but the driver 
has been warned. Some parents 
are having the device installed in 
the family car for their teen-age 
children. 

Who is going to invest in farm 
land at a time when farmers are 
going broke and land prices are 
declining? Gty folks, that’s who. 
as a tax shelter. They often invest 
for a limited number of yean, 
with the fanner having the op- 
tion of buying his bind back 
when times get better. U.S. News 
& World Report magazine re- 
ports that a dozen or more com- 
panies have sprung up to pump 
outside money into agriculture 
and that at least one Wall Street 
firm is forming an agricultural- 
investment u ni t. 


Shorter Takes: Los Angeles 
school officials have proposed 
that every school in the vast dis- 
trict be put on a year-round 
schedule within five years as a 
way to cope with surging enroll- 
ment One in five U.S. births 

now occurs out of wedlock, ac- 
cording- to the National Center 
for Health ‘ Statistics, and the 
trend is increasing. . . . Hoboken, 
New Jersey, across the Hudson 
River from Manhattan and an 
ever more expensive place to rent 
or own a home, plans to require 
property developers to provide 
low- and middle-income housing 
along with luxury condomini- 
ums. 


Mission Improbable: 

A Politer New York 

The Association for a Better 
New York has begun a campaign 
to teach cabdrivers, waiters, 
street vendors, bank tellers and 
other people who serve the pub- 
lic to be more polite. Alphonse 
Salomone, chairman of the cour- 
tesy co mmi ttee, acknowledged 
that the task is huge. “We are 
lighting candles,” he raid. 

A New York hot dog vendor, 
Buford Davis, said, “I have al- 
ways considered courtesy a sign 
of weakness." The campaign in- 
cludes a training film and work- 
book that says visitors should be 
greeted with a smile, good 
grooming and a good attitude. 
One bellhop remarked, “They 
really ask a lot.” 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Sub Finds Abundant Life 
In Lake Superior Probe 


#^'•#1 Cored. ;V 

i* .H A . • aa--., - f .• .? • . -■ . 

‘ ■ "-r : .1- ' ■ 7 ■ 






’ By Kevin Klose ■■ • 

- Wtuhbtpm Peat Service _ 

CHICAGO — Tiny shrimp car- 
pet the depths in ratimagined pro- 
fusion, and steep, rocky cliffs rise 
abruptly from a smooth plain. 

Fish carve and sculpt caves so 
diligaitiyriiat tlw bottom is actuaL 
|y being changed, and sunken val- 
leys are so thiddy covered with 
afeae that they look Eke Alpine 
meadows. ; 

This pictnre of abandonee, scien- 
tists were Surprised to learn recent- 
ly, is Lake Superior, North Ameri- 
ca’s largest body of fresh water. 

Explorers 'ray their pioneering 
voyage hundreds of feet below the 
surface in a mmisubmarme called 
Sea-Link U revved; important- 
new information about the largest 
of the five Great Lakes. .. 

‘‘It has erven us -an- important 
Ceding for use first time of what the 
lake is rraHy all abonv" said I>avid 
Long ah investigator on the expe- 
dition. . - 

More than .two dozen scientists 
explored the lake In Sea-Link H. 
One of their most Important pre- 
liminary findings, they said, is that 


the lake’s waters are far more abun- 
dant with fish and aquatic life than 
surface surveys had indicated. 

Scientists at Midwestern univer- 
sities and institutes said that data 
collected during the expedition 
may bring a new understanding of 
major e n vironmental issues facing 
the United Stales and Canada. 

; A second series of minimbmar- 
ine probes is planned for next year. 

Until the arrival in July of Sea- 
Jink II and its mother ship, the 
research vessel Seward Johnson, no 
submersible vessel had been capa- 
ble of investigating the lake’s deep 
waters for extended periods of 
time. 

Ever since inland lakes became 
seriously polluted in the postwar 
years, UJS. and Canadian scientists 
have been trying to understand 
their ecology by sampling water, 
'bottom layers, temperature and 
wind and water currents. 

Because Sea-Link U can . dive to 
great depths for as long as four 
hours, it is well soiled to those 
tasks. Self-propelled, it has a large, 
spherical glass cabm and looks Kke 
a fish bowl surrounded by plumb- 
ing. 








The sub and mother ship left in 
late July and Tracked across more 
than 500 linear miles (about 800 
kilometers) of Lake Superior be- 
fore returning about a month ago. 

Dr. Jeny Raster, a biology pro- 
fessor at the University of Wiscon- 
sin at Milwaukee, said explorers 
found the lake bed thick with tiny 
crustaceans known as opossum 
shrimp, a major food source for 
fish. 

No light pierces the darkness 900 
feet (274 meters) below the surface 
at day or night. When the sub's 
spotlights cut through the black- 
ness, Dr. Raster said, he was aston- 
ished to see the lake floor sparkle 


Ex-Spy May Have Given Soviet 
Information on CLA’s Methods 


Iran Says UN Fads to Represent Values of Majority 



. AfiARbarVdayati 


By Elaine Sdolino ■ 

■ Nm York. Tima Semcc 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — Foreign Minister Ali Ak- 
bar Vedayati of Iran bas denounced 
the United^ Nations as a post- 
World War U affian ce of victors 
that “does noi represent the shared 
values of the majority” of its mem- 
bers. 

Mr. Velayati said Thursday: 
“The indifference md feeble reac- 
tions of the United Nations, and 
especially those of the Security 
Council, to the repeated acts of 
aggression by the Iraqi regime 
. against . Iran has given the world a 
very. unfavorable impression of the 
United Nations in dealing with in- 
ternational tensions and crises.” 

' Iran has consisttntly accused the 
Security Council of failing to con- 
demn Iraq for karting the stale- 
mated five-year-old border war. 
. Although Iraq has.expressed a will- 
ingness to negotiate a settlement, 
.Iran has refused to eod the war 


until Iraq is condemned. Iraqi citi- 
zens are repatriated, war repara- 
tions are paid, and President Sad- 
dam Hussein of Iraq is overthrown. 

Mr. Vday&ti characterized the 
efforts of Secretary-General Javier 
P&rez de Cu&llar to end the war as 
“sincere." But he defended unilat- 
eral mitiiary actions against Iraq as 
"the only means of stopping or 
reducing aggression.” 

Mr. Pfcrez de Cufillar is the only 
mediator trusted by both sides, but 
he has been unable to convince the 
Iranians to agree to comprehensive 


By Stephen Engelberg 

Nr* Times Service 

Washington — a misting 

former CIA officer is believed to 
have given the Soviet Union signifi- 
cant secret information about the 
methods the United States -uses to 
gather intelligence in Moscow, ac- 
cording to congressional sources. 

The sources said Thursday night 
that the former officer, Edward L 
Howard who is bring sought, had 
been trained in the secret tech- 
niques as he was prepared to be 
sent to Moscow as an operational 
officer for the Central Int ellig ence 
Agency. 

The FBI has said that Mr. How- 
ard 33, served in the CIA from 
January 1981 to June 1983. One 
official said Thursday that he left 
■ the agency after failing to pass a 
routine polygraph, or lie-deteclor, 
test and had not served in Moscow. 

The official would not character- 
ize the type of problem found by 
the polygraph but indicated that it 
apparently was not related to espi- 
onage. Another official said a test 
result suggesting espionage by an 
employee would have started a 
wide-ranging criminal investiga- 
tion. 

CBS News quoted Senator Da- 
vid F. Dnrenberger, a Republican 
of Minnesota and chairman of the 
Select Committee on Intelligence, 
as saying Thursday night that the 
security breach causal by Mr. 
Howard could be as “serious as 
anything this country has seen in 
the past.” 

Mr. Durenberger said that the 
suspect might have provided de- 
tails of how the United States got 
sensitive information from the So- 
viet Union. 

The intelligence committee has 
been briefed on the potential dam- 
age said to have been caused by Mr. 
Howard. Officials ray he is one of 
two U.S. intelligence officers iden- 
tified as Soviet recruits by a Soviet 
defector, Vitaly Yurchenko, a se- 
nior member of the KGB, the Sovi- 
et intelligence agency. 

Government officials said 
Thursday that the second suspect 
had been identified while investi- 
gating the defector's statements. 

The officials would not say whaL 
agency of the government had em- 
ployed the second suspect, al- 
though one intelligence source in- 
dicated it was the National Security 
Agency, which deals with the raosi 
secret U.S. codes and communica- 
tions. 

Officials have said that Mr. 
Howard fled the country during the 
weekend of SepL 21, shortly after 
his friends and co-workers had 
been questioned by the Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation. 

Mr. Yurchenko is being ques- 
tioned at an undisclosed location in 
the United Slates. 

One official said that Mr. How- 
ard and tire second former intelli- 
gence employee were the only 
Americans under investigation as a 
result of information provided by 
Mr. Yurchenko, who defected to 
the West in July while he was in 
Italy. 

Officials said that Mr. Howard 
worked in the clandestine service of 
the CIA. He was charged Sepu 23 


Where Ex-CJLA. Agent Fitted in Hierarchy 

Or^anizalk>nofU»Centrati««fl«>erK»Asc^. 


Deputy Director 


Comptroller 

Director of 
Policy and 
Planning 


Director ot 
Personnel 


General 

Counsel 

Inspector 

General 

Equal 

Employment 

Opportunity 


Directorate of I 1 Directorate of I Directorate of 1 1 Directorate of 
Intelligence I ) Operation* I Science and I Administration 

I I Technology I 


Deputy Director 
for Operations 


X ations. 

Velayati, in language char- 
acteristic of Iranian officials in UN 
forums, referred to the Israelis as 
“latter-day Nazis” in condemning 
the recent Israeli bombing of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
headquarters in Tunisia. 

For the first time in four years, 
however, Iran did not call for the 
expulsion of Israel from the United 
Nations. In the last three sessions. 


Assistant Deputy 
Director for 
Operations 


with millions of tiny dots of light. 

“You could see the shrimps' tiny 
eyeballs everywhere. The water lit 
up with the reflection of their 
eyes,” be said “I never expected it 
to be like that.” 

William Cooper of Michigan 
State University, coordinator of the 
expedition, said scientists also were 
surprised to discover that burbots, 
large lake fish, were carving caves 
and depressions in the soft, glacial 
clay comprising much of Lake Su- 
perior’s bottom. 

“They may have enough impact 
to actually alter the configuration 
of the lake bottom,” he said 


Iranian initiatives were thwarted 
by parliamentary procedures that 
avoided an assembly vote. 

Mi. Velayati also attacked the 
motives of both the United States 
and the Soviet Union for the Gene- 
va summit meeting next month as 
“highly snspicious," although he 
did not mention the Soviet Union 
by name. 

Libya's foreign minister, Ali 
Trefiri, similarly accused Israel of 
terrorism, which he likened lo the 
crimes of Nazi Germany. He pre- 
dicted that just as Rhodesia had 
disappeared and become Zimba- 
bwe, so would Israel and South 
Africa disappear. 

He also had bitter words for the 
United Stales, which recently 
placed restrictions on the move- 
ment of UN employees from six 
countries, including the Soviet 
Union and Libya. 

“Let us take the United Nations 
to another place,” he said, one that 
respected the United Nations. 


Staff Elements 

Induces foreign Intelligence, counter- 
intelligence, covert actions and 
communications 


Area Divisions 

Divided into geographic sectors - 


Edward L. Howard, accused of being a double 
agent, served in the Soviet Bloc division 


Source: -TtieUS tntsttswnc* Gwwnuntfy. br JenrayFUcheOan. 

# 1 935 b)r Bat/tager PubSshmg Co 

Th» Ntw Vari Timw 


with conspiring to provide national 
detease information to a foreign 
power. 

Officials have said that Mr. 
Howard eluded the federal authori- 
ties and fled from his home in San- 
ta Fe, New Mexico. 

An intelligence source said that 
Mr. Howard, “a disgruntled em- 
ployee,” approached the Russians 


with an offer to provide seem in- 
formation. Various officials offered 
conflicting accounts on whether 
Mr. Howard began working with 
Soviet intelligence agents before or 
after he left tiie CIA. 

A Reagan adminis tration official 
said that Mr. Howard left the agen- 
cy after he was assigned to a post in 
Moscow. 


Researcher Says Screening Tests Fail 
To Eliminate AIDS From Blood Supply 


United Press International 

BOSTON —An AIDS research- 
er has said that the nation’s blood 
supply is still not safe from the 
disease because of small but poten- 
tially important errors in the tests 
used to screen donor blood. 

“Unfortunately, our blood sup- 
ply is not safe," Myron Essex, 
chairman of the department of can- 
cer biology at the Harvard School 
of Public Health, said Thursday. 

He said claims that the blood 
screening tests are more than 99 
percent reliable in detecting evi- 


dence of contamination by the 
AIDS, or acquired immune defi- 
ciency syndrome, virus are “grossly 
inaccurate." 

But a U.S. official maintained 
that the U.S. blood supply “is 99 
percent safe." Dr. James Mason, 
director of the U.S. Centers for 
Disease Control in Atlanta, told a 
Harvard University forum that 
there have been only 210 cases of 
AIDS transmitted through con- 
taminated blood transfusions 
among more than 13.000 cases of 
AIDS. 


Ancient Soot 
Tied to World 
Firestorm 

(Continued from Page 1) 
plain the mass extinctions 65 mil- 
lion years ago. 

“The Alvarezes opened up a 
field," Dr. Anders said, “and a lot 
of us wanted to get in on the an.” 

Bui the cloy did noi yield any 
traces of the noble gases that the 
chemists were seeking. Instead, in 
dissolving the material for analysis, 
they found substantia] amounts of 
graphitic carbon, or soot It was 
mainly in the form of fluffy parti- 
cles less than 40 millionths of an 
inch across. 

Examining the particles under an 
electron microsnipe. Miss Wol- 
bach. a chemistry graduate student, 
and Dr. Lewis, a senior research 
associate at the Fermi Institute, 
along with Dr. Anders, determined 
that the structure of ihe clusters 
was characteristic of carbon depos- 
ited from flames. 

They said it was unlikely that the 
carbon came from the meteorite 
itself, for meteorites do not contain 
that much carbon, or from the 
Earth where the impact occurred. 

WQdfires. the scientists conclud- 
ed, "seem to be the most plausible 
source of the soot layer.” 

Even if the object hit the ocean, 
the scientists said, the impact could 
.ignite fires on continents hundreds 
of miles away, the result of heat 
radiating from the exploding fire- 
ball and the expanding cloud of 
rock vapor. If the impact happened 
in the Bering Sea, as some geolo- 
gists have suggested, then Europe. 
Asia and Noth America would 
have been within ignition range. 

The report said, “The surprising- 
ly large amount of sooi suggests 
either that much of the Earth’s veg- 
etation burned down or that sub- 
stantial amounts of fossil fuels 
were ignited also." 


Italia n, Albanian Aides Meet 

The Associated Press 

ROME — Foreign Minister Giu- 
lio Andreotti and Albania's foreign 
commerce minister, Shane Kor- 1 
bed. discussed broadening eco- 
nomic ties between the two nations 
on Thursday in Rome, the Italian 
Foreign Ministry said. 



• : 1 

77 ~ ' 

' ' v <, 


^ ■ 








Qiwit; tcd&A in 18 -lT. gold, with dale. 
Sliding stainless seed bracelet. 


BV LG A R I 

10 VIA PEI CONDOTTI • ROMA 
HOTEL PIERRE NElVYORK 
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r 


Page 4 


- - T- T 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 




U.S. Envoy to Bonn Sees Little Risk 
Of a Russian 'Propaganda Victory’ 


By Warren Gerier 

JnttnujiiortaJ Her old Tribune 

BONN — The new U-S, ambas- 
sador to West Germany, Richard 
R. Bun, sees little threat of the 
Soviet Union gaining, a “propagan- 
da victory" in Western Europe be- 
cause of Moscow's recent proposal 
of a 50-percent reduction of nucle- 
ar weapons and a ban on space- 

based defenses. 

"I think we should have a little 
more faith in public opinion in the 
West, recognizing that Soviet pro- 
paganda offensives have limited 
half-lives and that people look for 
substance," Mr. Burt said Thurs- 
day in an interview. "In examining 
the Soviet proposal, it's going to be 
subs lance that counts." 

Mr. Burt, 38. arrived in Bonn last 
month after serving two years as 
assistant secretary of state for Eu- 
ropean affairs. 

U S. officials said Thursday that 
the Soviet announcement that it 
had reduced to 243 the number of 
SS-20 missiles aimed at Europe 
might be intended to block deploy- 
ment by the Dutch government of 
NATO cruise missiles. Deploy- 
ment is to begin Nov. 1. 

But Mr. Bun said, "all signs 
from The Hague are positive about 
the Dutch following through with 
deployment” 

“The question is whether the So- 
viet Union is going to make an 
unverifiable precondition, namely 
the banning of all research on stra- 
tegic defense, for any progress to 
occur on offensive "force reduc- 
tions. I don't believe such a ban is 
credible and would be seen by the 
public at large in Germany and 
elsewhere as offering new support 
for arms control negotiations in 
Geneva," he added. 

Mr. Burt said Mr. Gorbachev's 
proposal to halve the number of 
US. and Soviet nuclear arms “ca- 
pable of reaching each other's terri- 
tory," while calling for separate ne- 
gotiations with the British and 


Union to treat Europeans as sec- 
ond-class countries." 

He acknowledged, however, that 
Mr. Gorbachev’s call for 50-per- 
cent cuts in nuclear arms, leaving 

fine prim aside, could have a wide 
public appeal in Western Europe. 

To counter the prospect of the 
Soviet Union being seen in Europe 
as more flexible than the United 
States on arms control issues. Mr. 
Burt said that Washington must 
“demonstrate that we have an open 


'What this reflects is 
a tendency for the 
Soviet Union to 
treat Europeans as 
second-class 


countries.’ 


mind in Geneva and, secondly, we 
must demonstrate that we' re open- 
minded about the views and con- 
cerns of our allies." 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
West Germany and other West Eu- 
ropean leaders repeatedly have 
urged that arms control talks in 
Geneva adequately address the 
threat of Soviet medium- range mis- 
siles. namely the SS-2Qs, targeted 
on Western Europe. 

"Under no circumstances would 
we enter into an arrangement with 
the Soviet Union that neglected 
European interests, more spedfi- 


On the one hand, he's trying to 
appear internationally as the new 
Soviet man, a man of peace, while 
secondly trying to bring pressure to 
bear on the United States by driv- 
ing a wedge between the Europe 
and the U.S." 

The ambassador said he was 
confident, however, that France 
would not prove the weak hide in 
the Atlantic alliance 

President Franqois Mitterrand 
of France has made clear his objec- 
tions to Reagan administration 
plans to develop a space-based de- 
fense system. But that fact, Mr. 
Burt said, did not bring into ques- 
tion France's co mmitmen t to the 
alliance. 

"When the chips are down, the 
French have been very, very loyal" 
he said. “Take Mr. Mitterrand's 
speech to the West German Bun- 
destag supporting deployment of 
Pershmg-2 and cruise missiles." 

Mr. Burt said. “The Russians 
failed then, in 1983. to split rite 
alliance over medium-range missile 
deployment, and I think they will 
fail again on the questions of SDI 
and the Geneva arms negotia- 
tions." 

U.S. plans for a space-based mis- 
sile shield are formally known as 
the Strategic Defense Initiative, or 
SDI. 

In West Germany, the issue of 
formal agreement to participate in 
research on space defenses would 
not be viewed by Washington as a 
litmus test for affiance loyalty, Mr. 
Bun said. 

The West German government 
has yet to decide whether it will 
sign a general agreement of under- 
standing with the United States es- 



Soviet Strategy: Dividing U.S. and NATO 

Offer of. 4rms Talks With France and Britain Emphasises European Bond 



, - *•:* 


By James M. Markham .. 

•Vcw York Times Service 

PARIS — Mikhail S. Gorbachev has carried a ;r— - , , . 

Soviet diplomatic offensive into what he c alled h^p erode public support for basic NATO P 051 
“the heart of Western Europe" by announcing a ^ons over t * 3e tcrnL 


pCicy objective o! the Kretttlm. TTtet* U Uttle at “and dt* spmeho* »*** **«■, 
expectation that Mr. Gorbachev’s latest offen- 
sive will open a schism in the alliance but it may 


series of arms initiatives crafted to split Wash- 
ington from its NATO allies. 

By offering Thursday to open separate arms 


Even if the content of some of his proposals 


these systems. 

Any negotiation involving France and Britain * 
would leave nonnuclear West Germany ex- . 
nosed- the treatment of American medium- 
£mge 'weapons as “strategic’^empmsMS a ■ 

- Soviet goal of de-Unkmg" them 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


raises skepticism among .NATO experts, the f ro ^ ^ e ( j e f e nse of Western Europe. - 
new Soviet leader has demonstrated a vigor ana tikdihood that Britain or France’ will take 

news-making capacity that have struck many ^ < j oes not seem to be grear. Mr. - 
French commentators.. Mitterrand has always insisted that before the 

"There is quite a change with this Gotha- 5^^, Umji their nuclear striking force, deep- 


valks with France and Britain, Western Europe's che Y" Michel Tatta w 5° cuts would have to be made m the Soviet and ■ 


two nuclear powers, Mr. Gorbachev empha- 


Sty 1 of roimdingboard into' Western Europe nuisday from calling forFrendi reduc- 

nifrinn oAmcc IHonl/iMMl cunJpc Gorbachev. He has defllv fielded questions none. The evocative number of 243 SS-20 sys- 


Soviet Union for Le Monde. “He is clever. 

In the past two days, Paris has been a useful 


U.S. strategic arsenals. _ . . 

Skillf ully, however, Mr. Gorbachev refrained 


Richard R. Burt 


cally, we would not sign an agree- 
ment that limited U.S. in termed]- tablishing guidelines for the partic- 
at e-range systems, like the ipation of West German companies 
Pershing-2 and cruise missiles, that in the U.S.-sponsored strategic de- 
did not also constrain Soviet de- fense rescan* efforts, 
ployment of SS-20s." Mr. Burt “A U-S.-West German agree- 

- ment on strategic defense research 
“l want to be perfectly clear.” he would make good sense,” Mr. Burt 
said “The cruise and the Pershing said “We are not twisting any- 
French over their independent nu- missiles are deployed in Europe not body’s arm here on the subject- 
clear faces, did not signal a depar- only to protect Europeans but to We’re letting the German govero- 
previous Soviet posi- sustain a strategy of deterrence p 

which, in the final analysis, is es- 
sential for the security of the Unit- 
ed States." 

Mr. Burt said that Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s four-day visit to Paris this 
week was an attempt to divide the 
Western allies. 

“Qearly people are now fasci- 
nated with Gorbachev and his 
charm offensive," he said “He’s 
pursuing a double-track strategy: 


Hire from 
dons. 

Moscow is continuing to insist, 
he said that U.S. medium-range 
missiles based in Europe be subject 
to overall strategic ceilings while 
Soviet medium-range rockets tar- 
geted on Western Europe be free of 
similar constraints because they 
cannot reach the United States. 

“What this reflects," Mr. Bun 
said “is a tendency for the Soviet 


ment make its own decision." 

Mr. Burt has been critical recent- 
ly of the opposition Social Demo- 
cratic Party’s effort to seek talks 
with East Germany to create a nu- 
clear-free zone in Europe. But he 
said that he did not see any major 
switch in alliances by West Germa- 
ny's leaders, regardless of which 
side of the parliamentary aisle they 
sat. 

"The notion of West Germany's 


drift toward neutralism is greatly 
exaggerated" he said “What’s in- 
teresting now is that every respon- 
sible sector of German public opin- 
ion emphasizes the importance of 
alliance membership and the im- 
portance of U.S.-West German re- 
lations. as was the case in my meet- 
ing last week" with Willy Brandi 
and Hans-Jocben Vogel, leaders of 
the Social Democrats. 

“I do dol detea any major de- 
bate in this country about Germa- 
ny’s continuing role in NATO, the 
Common Market or any other mul- 
tilateral Western institution," he 
said 

Mr. Burt sees West German- U.S. 
relations evolving into a "mature 
partnership," one in which U.S. 
sensitivity to German attitudes has 
grown and in which “West Germa- 
ny has shown a healthy willingness 
to take on greater responsibilities 
and play a leadership role." 

Last month, Mr. Burt succeeded 
Arthur F. Burns, 81, former chair- 
man of the U.S. Federal Reserve 
Board 

Mr. Burns will be a “tough act to 
follow," said Mr. Burt, one of the 
youngest ambassadors to any ma- 
jor nation. “Ml. Burns was very 
much respected in a country that 
respects age." 

Mr. Burt was born in Chile 
where his father was a minin g engi- 
neer. He is married to Gahl Hodg- 
es, 32, a former State Department 
deputy chief of protocol and White 
House aide to Nancy Reagan. 

Before entering government, he 
was assistant director of the Inter- 
national Institute of Strategic Stud- 
ies in London and later covered 
national security affairs in the 
Washington bureau of The New 
York Times- 


cutting across ideological frontiers. 

By proclaiming that the Soviet Union had 
only 243 SS-20s “on standby alert" targeted on 
Western Europe, he made a bid to' influence a 
pending decision by the Dutch government cm 
deploying U.S. ground-launched cruise missies, 
according to French and U.S. officials in several 
capitals. . 

Six weeks before he is to meet with President 
Ronald Reagan in Geneva, Mr. Gorbachev ap- 


Gorbachev. He has deftly fielded questions 
from a team of French television journalists in 
Moscow; he appeared Friday at a news confer- 
ence with President Francois Mitterrand. 

Mr. Gorbachev's suggestion of two-way arms 
talk* with France and Britain, according to a 
U.S. official, seemed aimed at filling a gap in the 


nous. The evocative number or »-zo sys- 
tems coincides with wbai the Russians contend-. 
is the combined strength of the French and;-.- 
British nuclear arsenals. - _ 

Though speaking Thursday to French legisla- 
tors a the National Assembly, Mr. Gorbachev 
wemed to have the Netherlands in mind when- 
Soviet proposal put forward Monday at the he disclosed that his country bad reduced its SS- • < 
wui. nMMcihiv i-aKins for 20 strength in the western part ot roe Soviet _ 
Union to the level of June 1984. 


Geneva arms talks. While ostensibly calling for 

— ., r a 50-percent reduction in U.&. and Soviet strale- _ . .. . 

pears to have developed a diplomatic strategy S»c weapons, the proposal counted U.S. medi- At that time, the 
that aims at putting pressure on the United urn-range missiles m Western Europe as strata- would deade to go ahead with the 

States through its allies in the North Atlantic gf but left untouched the Soviet SS-20 of U.S. erase missiles <n Nov. 1 , 1985 . u the.’ 

Treaty Organization. The Russian's main tarael systems. Soviet Union expanded its total armory oF 378 

has been the U.S. space weapons program, but “They obviously realized there was a hole SS-20s. Last P 111 ■ 

be has found other pressure points in Europe, there," said the American official, who is famfl- deployment at 441, including missiles aimed at 1 
Splitting the Western alliance has long been a iar with the details of the Soviet Geneva propos- China and Japan. 



Gorbachev Makes Call 
For Revival of Detente 


(Confirmed from Page 1) out such an agreement, “1 don’t 
threshold of credibility ” he said, know that we would be able to 
Mr. Mitterrand softened his re- engage in negotiations at all. 
jection by saying that France was 


Mikhail S. Gorbachev, left, and Francois Mitterrand. 


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(Continued From Back Page) 


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See- York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Charles Col- 
tiflgwood, 68, a CBS News corre- 


who covered "WoHd War 
the Vietnam War and a host of 


In 1959 he succeeded Mr. Mur- 
row as host of the “Person -to 'Per- 
son’* series, one of the series and 
specials he hosted oydr the. years, 
including “A Tear oT the White 
House With Mrs. John F. Kenne- 
dy" in February 1962. 


always prepared for an “exchange 
of views" cm the subject of its nu- 
clear forces, which is about one 
seventh the size of U.S. and Soviet 
nudear forces. 

In response to Mr. Mitterrand’s 
rejection, Mr. Gorbachev recast his 
proposal during the conference. 
The Soviet leader said he would 
favor starting “an exchange of 
views which might lead us into ne- 
gotiations." He added that he 
thought that “the French leader- 
ship fell the constructive thrust of 
our proposals.” 

In his presentation, Mr. Mitter- 
rand repealed French criticism of 
the UJL Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive, bat separated them from the 
Soviet attacks on the outer space 
weapons proposal. The French 
president -repeatedly noted that 
France and the United States were 
allies. 

Mr. Gorbachev fielded a range 
of questions, from Soviet vulnera- 
bility in Lebanon, to the fate of the 
dissident physicist, Andrei D. Sa- 
kharov, exiled in die Soviet dry of 
Gorki. His performance represent- 
ed a stylistic and at times substan- 
tive departure from the brittle lan- 
guage and hardened positions 
often associated with his predeces- 
sors., 

>. Harkeninghack to the peijod of 
detente in East-West relations ^that 


Mr. Collingwood retired from 


correspondent until his 


Mr. Collingwood was chief for- 
eign correspondent for CBS News 
from 1964 to 1975. He covered the 
warfare in Indochina from the ear- 
ly 1960s and went 10 South Viet- 
nam on special assignment in 1965. 


toward the d&tente era. 

“D&ente is not just m the spirit 
of recollection of the past," he said, 
but “a lesson we could draw from.” 

The Soviet leader said that , the 
case of Mr. Sakharov, has been 
Mr. Collingwood began his ca- Three years later, he became, the “submitted to competent authori- 


peaked in the mid-1970s, Mr. Gar- the Soviet Union was spending as' 
bachev called for “the need to do ranch, on strategic defensive weap- 
everytiuhg possible” to move bade ons as cm offensive arms. 


United Press in London. In 1941. 
lined Edward R. Murrow’s 
reporting staff in London, 
where bis assignments included the 


first American network correspon- ties for consideration,” an advance 
dent to be admitted to North Viet- from the previous Soviet insistence 
nam. Mr. Collingwood was the an- that the Nobd Peace Prize-winning 
chorman or correspondent for physicist., banished from Moscow 
several broadcasts on Vietnam in m .1980, could not be allowed to 
late 1972 and early 1973. leave the Soviet Union because he 


■hi muv|a. t .I - ... , possessed state secrets. 

. g. . ... In. 1975, Mr. Collingwood was But Mr. Gorbachev’s manner 

After the war, he came back to appomted a commander m the Or- 


, - , - did not mask his firm stance on 
der of tire British Empire^ ranw$- disputed inleniational and domes- 
mticm of fas coainbutions to Bnt- tic issues. 
ish-Amencan friendship and The Soviet leader tightened the 
imderstanffing. He was also wa5 pressure he has put on UA leaders 
awarded a Legion of Honor medal to come to an agreement on space 

weapons by threatening that with- 


by France. 


'The officials were briefing re- 
porters after publication of a new 
booBet detailing the U.S. view of 
Soviet strategic defense. 

The booklet was issued four days 
after Foreign Minister Eduard A. 
Shevardnadze called at the United 
Nations for world backing for a 
Soviet “star peace" proposal. 

In a preface to the document, 1 
entitled “Soviet Strategic Defense 
Programs," Secretary of Stale 
George P. Shultz and Defense Sec- 
retary Caspar W. Weinberger 
strongly defended the U.S. plan. 

. “Tne Strategic Defense Initiativ e 
is a prudoit and necessary response 
to the ongoing extensive Soviet 
anti-ballistic missile effort, includ- 
ing the existing Soviet deployments 
permitted under the ABM treaty ** 
they said. 


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■ Rea^n Reaction - 

President Reagan said Friday 
that Soviet demands that he aban- - 
don his Strategic Defense Initiative " 
“do not deal with the real issue of - 
peace,” United Press International *- 
reported from Parsipanny, New' 
Jersey. 

Mr. Reagan used a political ;' 
speech to a Republican Party fund- - 
raiser to stress his refusal to retreat - 
from his space weapons plan. 

Refusing to trade his program ~ 
for reductions in offensive nudear ■■ 
arms, Mr. Reagan said: “We will go' 
forward with it seeing if it cannot • 
be made into a great protector of 
our people and the people of the 
world." 

Meanwhile, senior officials of- " 
feted a detailed baas fir an earlier 
allegation by Mr. Reagan that the 
Soviet Union was “about 10 years 
ahead of ns" in developing a de- - 
fense against ballistic missile at-’ 
tack. 

Administration officials said 
Moscow has been working on mis- 
sile-defense systems since the early ' 
1950s with 10,000 scientists and 
engineers and could have proto- ‘ 
types of a working system in this 
decade. 

Paul H. Nitze, special adviser on 
disarmament, and Richard N. 
fate, assistant secretary of defense 
for international security, said that 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALDTRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUTflOAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 


Page 5 


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Paris Thinks 

Soviet Wife 
Lacks Chic 

(Cmtumed from page }) 
up" from an ajuwiincer .o^ dwT 
rtate-nm Radio France, Fra^oise- 


■ When Mis. Gorbachev arrived ai 
the Ministry of External Relations 
on Thursday wearingthe same stray . 
suit to hroch with Prime Mimsui 
Laurent Fahius that she worn 
when she §ot off the plane Wednes- 
day, critiasm rose. . . . - !• : 

“Princess Diana of En g la nd 
wears, the same dress twice in . pub- ■ 
He but -ax least she waits two years,' 
said Odik Pouget, a journalist .at 
Radio Monte Carlo. . 

Mrs. Gorbachev’s brown chiffon ■ 
gold-striped evening dress, worn 
for dinner. Wednesday withPtea- 
dent Francois Mitterrand at the 
Elysie Palace, brought adornment 
from the fashion critic of the news- 
paper Le Monde. ; 

“She probably has to support the 1 . 
Dom ModcLfashion boose m Mos- 
cow,” said Nathalie Mont-Serram 

Mrs. Gorbachev’s appearance at 
the Cardin salon, next door to the 
government guest house where _sbe 
was staving, stirred anhthw itp a)^ 
The official program had called for 
bo- to see a fashion parade at. the 
Saint Laurent salon. Only at the 
last min ute was the Saint T-ayiw nr 
appointment postponed to. Friday 
and Mr. Cardin’s scheduled- for 
Thursday^ 

Mr. Cardin denied rumors that 
he had complained to the "Russians 
that Mis. Gorbachev should accept 
his invitation first because he re- 
cently signed a contract to buy cav- 
iar and vodka for his Maxim’s res-, 
taurants in world capitals. He also 
wfll market Cardin perfume and 
cosmetics in the Soviet Union be- 
ginning next year under a copro- 
duction agreement' ■*' 

“I invited her weeks ago and I 
received a cable from the Kremlin, 
days ago. accepting,”- Mr. Cardin 
said. . 

“I pnt no pressure on her. She 
said she wanted to do s omething 
for a friend of Russia.” He recalled 
that be also staged Paris’s first fash- 
ion show in Moscow m 1983. . . . 

Mrs. Goibachev sat on an ultra- 
modern chair designed by Mr. Car- 
din in his showroom to watcha 
parade of about 50 hi£h fashion 
outfits. 

She refused a glass of champagne 
and watched without expression 
the winter styles, such as evening 
gowns of lavender sequins or black 
velvet selling from 30,000 francs 
($3,750) and short black trousers 
with colored short coats from 
20,000 francs. ■ 

Mrs. Gorbachev told Mr. Cardin 
that the clothes on the models were 
“not commercial but I respect them 
as works of art" the designer said- 






Mitterrand during a dmna at the palace of V< 


.CetxpUcd lff Our Suff Fnm Ddpmcka 

. . Johannesburg — Somh 

African security- fences killed two 
black mm overnight when they dis- 
persed crowds throwing stones in 
segregated black townships, police 
said Friday. " 

Meanwhile, on Friday 15 aril- 
rights activists from around the 
world signed a .letter urging die 
South Afpcan gpvemmenton Fri- 
day “to lay down yoor aims and 
stop the bloodbath.”. . 

In the riokhc^ one black man 
died when sohfiers dispersed stone 
throwers at Kwazakele township 
near Port Elizabeth in the eastern 
Cape, $ dgqkesnaa said. 

The army; was called into the 
townships last October to help the. 
pohce force control unrest that has 
daimed^more than. 730 lives in the 
past .20 months. 

. In the Made township of Gugu- 
letu near Ope Tom, another 
black man died , vdien . police fired 
shotguns against stone throwers. 

' In London on Thursday, Bishop 
Desmond ML Tutu, said after meet- 
ing. Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher that be was “slightly more 
hojpefuT- >that Britain would hdp 
pressure die South African govern-. 


menl to abolisb its apartheid sys- 
tcm oT racial separation. 

However, Bishop Tutu, the 1984 
Nobel Peace Prize laureate, said 
Mrs. -Thatcher had expressed her 
-firm opposition to economic sanc- 
tions as a' means of pushing the 
South African government from 
apartheid. 

. Joan Baez, the American singer 
and president of Humanitas Inter- 
national, wrote the activists' letter. 
It declared support for Bishop 
Tutu “in the face of the monstrous 
oppression, cruelty and violence of 
the Sooth African state." 

Among those ngiiing were Lech 
Walesa, leader of Poland's out- 
lawed Solidarity labor movement; 
the Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, the 
American civil rights leader and 
politician; Mayor Andrew Young 
of Atlanta; Corelta Scott King the 
widow of Martin Luther King Jr.; 
Cesar Chavez, the American farm- 
workers onion leader; two Soviet 
dissidents, Alexander Ginzburg 
and Vladimir Bukovsky, who now 
live in the United States, and Kim 
Dae Jung, the South Korean oppo- 
sition leader. 

' (Reuters. UPI, APJ 


New Zealand 
Is Relishing 
Limelight 

(Continued from Page 1) 

down. They say he is not sufficient- 
ly concerned about the dangers of 
alienating the country’s allies. 

When the two dramas have 
played themselves out, some com- 
mentators suggest that New Zea- 
land may find it has entered a new 
era of sdf-suffidency beyond its 
current reliance on the United 
Slates. It already has distanced it- 
self from its colonial parent, Brit- 
ain. 

For now. New Zealand’s atten- 
tion r emains fixed on the events of 
the day, which one security guard 
described as “Greenpeace- AN- 
ZUS. Greenpeace-ANZUS." 

Newspapers chart the progress 
of a flotilla of small Greenpeace 
vessels that have started to arrive at 
the rite of a scheduled French nu- 
clear test on the South Pacific atoll 
of Murnroa. The Rainbow Warrior 
was to have led the flotilla. 

An Auckland court is scheduled 
to begin a preliminary hearing in 
November cm charges of murder 
and arson against two French 
agents who were arrested a few 
days after the Rainbow Warrior 
was sunk cm July 10. The ship was 
sunk with two bomb blasts, killing 
a photographer wbo was aboard. 

One of the defendants, Capitain 
Dominique Prieuf, was recently 
moved from a. jail to a heavily 
guarded nnHtaty prison. Hundreds 
of yards of barbed wire were coUcd 
around the site, and soldiers took 
up poations along its perimeter. 

Police have received many re- 
ports about suspicious Frenchmen 
lurking in the vicinity. 

The owners of a delicatessen, for 
example, Wilhelm and Judith 
Hiener, reported that three French- 
men in leather jackets had come in 
to buy food. 

“They all seemed tough, the sort 
of people who stay fit,” Mrs. 
Hiener was said to have told the 
police. Furthermore, she said, 
“they all bought expensive food 
and left.” 

West German Pdice Say 


United Prat International 

FRANKFURT — Demonstra- 
tors broke windows and hurled a 
firebomb in two West German cit- 
ies, Frankfurt and Northheim, ear- 
ly Friday in a seventh day of vio- 
lence. 

The police said only two inci- 
dents were reported and the vio- 
lence that broke out Saturday after 
the death of a demonstrator in 
Frankfurt appeared to be subsid- 
ing." 


The Internationa! Herald Tribune’s daily paid circulation continues to break records, 
up 5% in the past year and 27% in the past five years. More than a third of a million 
people in 1 64 countries around the world now see each issue. And latest figures 
indicate that this rapid growth continues. 


Mi mm 

Internationa! Heraid Tribune circulation 
figure prepared for OJD audit for period 
from July 1, 1984 to June 30,1985. 



Id 4,639 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 


ARTS/LEISURE 


Mare and Beautiful Poussin Drawing Is Auctioned at Drouot 


International Herald Tribune 

P I ARJS — A sale Wednesday ai 
Drouot had the ideal balance for 
an early season auction: a large 
number of pleasing drawings that 
will appeal to buyers with limited 
funds, two drawings combining 


SOUREN MELIKIAN 


great beauty and the utmost rarity, 
and a dozen or so more that were 
well worth the attention of sophis- 
ticated collectors. 

Jean-Louis Heard, assisted by- 
Bruno de Bayser, an expert In Old 
Master drawings, conducted a 
three-hour auction that included 
more than 180 drawings, mostly 
from France, Italy and the Nether- 
lands. The outcome was an unqual- 
ified success. 

From the international collec- 
tors' angle, the key piece was a 
sketch in brown wash by Nicolas 
Poussin (1594-1665). one of the 
towering figures of French painting 
in ihe 17th century. His drawings 
hardly ever appear at auction and 


are almost as rare in the trade. 
Dealing circles report that one was 
sold in recent months by Daniel 

Wildenstdn to the Paul Getty Mu- 
seum. 

Not surprisingly, the Poussin 
had acted like a magnet on dealers 
from all over Europe. Titled "Mo- 
ses Defending Himself Against the 
Jethro Girls,'' the sketch offers a 
variant of a drawing in the Louvre. 
French specialists date it to the 
years 1630-1640. The drawing sold 
Wednesday is executed on two sep- 
arate sheets laterjomed together by 
the artist. The two parts do not fit 
very well and the main one is in 
lighter shades of brown. This was 
often done by 17th-century artists 
when doing preliminary studies in- 
tended as drafts for more elaborate 
work. On the back of one of the 
sheets, a drawing dashed off in pen 
and ink. with the silhouettes out- 
lined in a few nervous strokes, is a 
first Lhought of the same composi- 
tion. It provides a rare insight into 
the creative process of Poussin. 

The more elaborate sketch in 
wash is essentially a study in move- 


ment and chiaroscuro. Women in 
the ancient Roman drapes consid- 
ered suitable by 17th-century 
painters when handling Biblical 
subjects walk about in an Arcadian 
landscape. Poussin did not bother 
to detail the features. There is a 
wonderful litheness about their 
movements, in contrast to the staid 
altitudes of the figures in his oQ 
paintings. 

The highly contrasted light ef- 
fects show how deeply indebted 
Poussin was to the Northern Euro- 
pean Cara vaggi esq ue school. They 
give the scene a dramatic intensity 
and a sense of mystery that made 
the drawing irresistible to private 
collectors — museums are less sus- 
ceptible to atmosphere and tend to 
go after the conventional 

Despite some restoration work, 
very cleverly carried out in recent 
months — several dealers had seen 
it in unrestored condition — it was 
the object of intense competition. 
De Bayser had given it a 400,000- 
franc ($50,000) es tima te. It went 
up to 1.3 million francs, which 
most dealers agreed was about the 


right international price. The win- 
ner was the Geneva dealer in 20th- 

century masters, Jan Krugier. who 
has long been buying Old Master 
drawings for his private collection. 

The other great rarity in the sale 
was a small landscape in pen and 
ink by a Flemish master Neyt$, 
sometimes spelled Nyts. and whose 
Christian nam e is given as CHIlis or 
Aegidius. Not much is known 
about him, except that he was 
christened in Ghent on April 4. 
1623, married Clara de la Pone in 
Antwerp in 1643, and was made a 
master in the Antwerp guild in 
1647. Ncyts was an admirable en- 
graver whose etchings, almost as 
rare as his drawings, are avidly 
sought after. Engraving seems to 
have been his main occupation, so 
much so that the techniques of 
etching and drypoint greatly influ- 
enced his draftsmanship. 

The landscape, signed and dated 
1650, shows a cluster of trees rising 
form a mound in the foreground, 
done in minute strokes and dots. In 
the distance, a second line of trees 
is done with equal precision in light 


shades of gray. The use of the white 
background made more intense by 

the unusual support — vellum in- 
stead of paper — is typical of an 
engraver's vision. High up in the 


sky. a tiny figure of God represent- 
ed as a bearded, draped man float- 


ed as a bearded, draped man float- 
ing in the air, points out a symboli- 
cal intention which has yet to be 
elucidated. 

None of the experts and dealers I 
spoke to could remember seeing a 
drawing by Neyts at auction or in 
the trade in the last decade. As 
beautiful as it is rare, the drawing 
should have soared. But as all pro- 
fessionals are well aware, when an 
artist's work gets so ran: as to be 
virtually forgotten, it fails to focus 
attention in the auction market and 
sells for very little. The master- 
piece, as good as anything done by 
his Dutch contemporary Van 
Goyen. fetched one-tenth of the 
price that a similar drawing by the 
latter, signed and dated, might go 
for at auction. At 21,000 francs, it 
was a superb buy made by a Swiss- 
based dealer. 

There were two other exquisite 


acquisitions to be made in the same 
sale. One, a Deposition of Christ in 
pen and sepia wash, was attributed 
to Luca Cambiaso, the enigmatic 
16th-century master who pro- 
duced. among others, geometrical 
figures that sometimes seem to an- 
ticipate Cubism. The drawing of- 
fered Wednesday was done in an- 
other manner- favored by 
Cambiaso. in which figures are out- 
lined in quick short strokes, each 
one at a slight slant. Because De 
Bayser had felt some hesitation as 
to whether it was by Cambiaso or 


some pupil working in his style, he 
had given it a 4,000-franc estimate. 


His guess proved to be Fairly close 
to the mark. It was knocked down 


to the mark. It was knocked down 
at 5,000 francs to a French design- 
er, Manuel Canovas, who is also an 
Old Master drawing collector of 


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Canovas also bagged the other 
drawing that could be bad under 
31,000 that day. This is a red chalk 
study of a man kneeling on the 
ground, his head leaning on his 
right forearm as it rests on his 
raised left hand The style is sugges- 
tive of Charles Le Bran, the court 
painter who designed the gardens 
at Versailles under Louis XIV- De 
Bayser had indeed “attributed*' the 
drawing to the master. In auction- 
room language, this means that the 
suggested, authorship is little more 
than a possibility. Collectors, in- 
cluding Canovas, and experienced 
-dealers seemed to be unanimous in 
considering it to be the work of 
Francois Verdier, a pupQ of Le 
Bran who employed mm at Ver- 
sailles. It went for a trifling 4,000 
frincs. 

The price is just about right for a 
little-known master often spoken 
of contemptuously in textbooks be- 
cause he did not innovate and 
sometimes made copies of Le Bran. 
That the outcome could be beauti- 
ful on occasion, as shown by 
Wednesday’s drawing, makes no 
difference to the price by today's 
standards. 

Such honest prices, which were 
not puffed up by hype, in a sale 
where most of the drawings came 
from private sources, created a con- 
text that inspired confidence. 

Here and there some crazy prices 
were paid for drawings that would 
not have created such a stir in Lon- 
don. The sketch of a seated woman, 
draped and bare-breasted, with a 
fatuous smile, by Charles Joseph 
Natoire (1700-1777), a pale imita- 
tor of Francois Boucher, rose to a 
mind-boggling 125,000 francs. 
This may mean that the buyer, dis- 
regarding an early but apocryphal 
inscription “Natoire," considers It 
to be a more highly regarded artist 
— Boucher perhaps. 

It is part of the never-ending 
game of musical chairs that spices 
Old Master drawing sales and al- 
lows the most modest buyer to en- 
tertain dreams of a making a coup 
some day. 



Concentration 


— 

wing (detail) by Zoran Music. 


Works at Paris Art Fair 


• - By Michael Gibson - !• bust). These prints seem to refute^' 
International fferiiU Tribune the notion that the horror of the" 

P I ARE — The FIAC interna- 1 camps was such, that no work of an 
tional contemporary art fair has h**? intensity necessary 
become a popular event in Paris, lo expresslt. Sober and i mp lacable,' ■ 

w -i ■ •*! na ’1 n- • fllAV -flit* Hflthoilt i4lAlnri/'i! r ‘ 


Rauschenberg 
InCaracmWith 
Touring Art Show 


Last year with 149 
hand it attracted 107,1 


tileries on they are without rhetorical effect,’ 
visitors to precisely because they are a person- 


the Grand Palais. This year it 81 testimony. Music could write 

* j ' ■- w TmivaV anrilc 14 Vrt L «~i* 


The Associated Pr 


opened witir the participation of 
133 galleries from 18 countries — 
124 of them presenting one-man 
shows.' 


C ARACAS — Robert Rauscfr- 
en here's traveling art show 


Diversity: is the rule, as always. 
New to Paris is the Texan John 


Goya’s words: *Yo lo vT under 
each one of them. 

. Abstraction is stiD a strong pres-, 
ence, whether in the serene warmth 
of Adam Henein (Gaierie Paris)!' 
the new Eurasian style of Tabuchi - 


en berg's traveling art show Alexander, 40, who m anages to use COBRA colors plus gold-leaf 
opened here, one oF the stops in 22 . the fashionable and often frivo- (^ u j*. Television gallery) or the.’ 
countries around the world in five tously arrogant Neo-Expressionist tnystic paintings and monotypes of 
years. idiom in a convincing manner (Ga- . Francis (Gaierie Jean Four- 


OverseasOiltural Interchange, ^ a r^ ten^n and 

which the artist, 59, pronounIS «tahty in lns : pamtmgs that make 


“Rocky" and describes' as “an ag- JfS T* 1 ™ 

gressive peace mission that uses art ^ a / oau °f extent that goes 
as communication.' 1 The exhibit 


It is called the Rauschenbera ^ Hervi Odermatt). For one “«)- Haxw Hartung. one of the" 

Overseas Cultural InterchnnS thcre ? 3 tension and proncere of abstract art, also has a 

rS'SL so - ^^ty in his paintings that make one-man show (Gaierie Daniel 

“rSv"' LX c^T-rS *«n instanttyleriiva Then Gervis). Somewhere bertveen ab- 
grSve peace missumtlS uses art ^ “a form ^content that goes representation are 

^commSation." The exhibit beyon^herandordjr sdf-compla- Jhc anxjety-ndden coflages of the- 
has already won critical acclaim in c ? mt s«j 5 «tivity of lus more expen- Bernard Reqindiot (Gaierie 1 

Mexico and Chile. ' sive coUeagu® in New York. The Baudomn Ubon). 

Rather than a retrospective of ^k- 

past successes, it is a romtantly- andpoUticalfa Wth 
changing affair that includes new /r- i “* br£ ? nze obcksks monu-- 

works insuired bv the artist’s stav n - 1 ^ a “ !T0 (Galenc Philippe niems that seem to quote both from" 

“A 30 - ® andTrom Bemim-s 

brought to the next^mbT^ving SSi oD (Gaierie Albert 

the public a look at the world as of craft Lo * b ) 311(1 Plerre whose tran- 

seen through Rauschenberg? eyes. ^ 30 u ^ usua] JC? pastel stfll-lifes remind one of 

gu S md pasuaave presence, whether Chardin (Gaierie Etienne de Cau- 

When the tour is done, the cd- the subject be an empty room, a sans) 
lection will go to the National GaL- still life or a painter in his studio ,, , , 

i„. .f »d..i if T _ ..... ouuuu. Amone the venerahli* nmwtm 


Baudouin Lebon).. 

The chic and classical depart- 1 ' 
ment includes Ivan Theimer, with 1 
his bronze obelisks and monu- - 
meats that seem to quote both fronr 1 
Greek reliefs and -from Bernini's 


Loeb) and Pierre Skua, whose tran- 
cpfl pastel still-lifes remind one of 
Chardin (Gaierie Etienne de Cau- 
sans). 

Among the vmerable ancestors 


lery of Art in Washington. “But if I 7rmn Mncin _i , " vmerable ancestors 

^ before it getsthereTtiie show’s de Sted ( a good selec- 

off. I only believe in art that’s prints, inswred bv m!ln^ f u° f \£3J^' h i G * lGn ? Jeanne Bucher** 
alive," he joked before the opening ^5^ , L ? n i ™ ho died only last 


alive," he joked before the opening » ^ w “° only last 

at the Caracas Museum of Con tern- ^ by ju drawings ^ ^ Gale f ie Fabi «L Boulalda) and 

lo Beijing^ . . ttEVIISESZS 


DOONESBURY 


cures in bronze (Gaierie 
Lelong). 


Ttmt6RflD&&e&ZM&Esm 
&^SK^ms>rr.Tm 
^^joestfrAPP , 

UP!* J 


BMSmJXm/CArtTAD&SINCS '■ 

SMHASPRe&PB? (MER MORE 
& 3 KffSPEI&fN& 7 HAN HI 539 
P^^SORSCOmt^! 




turn v&mouALDeBrmwAT 

AN AWESOME $2TW±m, EVEN 

RSPUducwiMLm/wim 
Ftmysmim T 0 MBmc& 
/wmspsR we Hmwao 


mfSTm? 

smup,mm 

iemm, 


Other forms include the chicr 
Pscpdo-narrative of Pat An- 
drea (Galene Elisabeth . Franck* 
the humorous papier mfiche momi- 

JSL° f ^ ea ?: Ju] es Chasse-Pot 
(Oalene Mathias FelsL' collase- 
^rnmgs by the Yugoslav^. 

a close Mfojtf. of. 
Jean Dnbuffet who speaks inraifwr 
te ldioni( GSM«rwn 

structuralsc ^ 
Jacob sen (cSraS- 
O^ise. and the g ranite and 

^ to runs throu^i Oct 13. A 


14655 


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chad by 1“ »n*itea Mi-!: 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3-6, 1985 


Page 7 


*>*7t •' ^ I, ■> M . • « 


ARTS /LEISURE 


■ ’ _ ’ .'A-i ■{/■■■. 



one 


By Mary Blumd 

International Herald Tribune 

T> ARIS-— When someone trea- . 
1. sored dies il is asif time should 
stop for a moment and life skip a 
beat. Not life cm our great and 
heedless globe, but at least in the 
Place Dauphine, the small square 
in Ibe eerier of Paris where Si- 
mone Signoret and Yves- Mon- 
tand had a ground-floor flat that 
bad a rather English air of cccd- 
ness and a mirror over tbe.dhim* 
neypiece in which she had steck 
snapshots of family and friends 
and the children of' friends. S-- 
mone loved - the small village that 
is thc Place and once gave me a 
traveling dock that showed time 
zones afi over the world. 

“In case,” her card said. Sou 
really want to know what time h is 
outside the Place Dauphine.” 

In recent weeks the brown aw- 
. nings -over the closed windows of 
her apartment looked so Amp that 
. one could only quickly turn .away 
and hope the day had not yet . 
come, when it (fid come on Mon- 
day, a small group of phoiogra^ 
[. phers gathered at her door, proba- 
bly more from shock than frpin 
news sense, for they knew she had 
died in her country house abort . 
an hour’s drive from Paris. 

Around the . photographers, 
people dined in outdoor- restau- 
rants and workers played boules 
as if it were just another Indian 
summer day. 

Life went on in part because of 
the shock and the unexpected sor- 
row. The French knew they had 
admired Simone Signoret; they 
learned that they had also loved 
her. Le Monde, the afternoon of 
her death, gave her a front-page 
headline and then said at great 



it 'was impossible to 
v . _ io ? §Ry abqra her. In its 
. awkwar&es, . ji^waf^the most 
Jwaitfefedbituiry T^iave ever read- 
• in France.- . • .. 

"Before I'knwiKT T Tth'ought of 
Simone S^tffismplyas the 
finest screen actress shtce Wmld 
War II. She was fearless m hex 
range — from tifc radiant Casque 
<EGr to- the belayed Alice in' 
“Room; at the Top," to the rad? 
died Madaxne.Rpsa 7-- and <hr 
was never. fe*£j»er ; 4han when 
working' wfth a film Crew. ’When 
shooting ended, $he.' -always ■ 
seemed, and sand she' 'felt;' or- 
phaned." - • 1 ,• ' ~£ '■ 

Orphaned pediaps,v3&t sur- 
rounded by Mends. Si^lad ex- 
traordinary delicacy^— the 
French word pudeur saysir^besi 
— and also she was thkbest s Gay 1 
teller one could bopfiffimeet; one 
misses most, I thmfc, thc.peqple 
one has laughed wrtfcthc most 
One reason shevrassuch a^good 
storyteller . w^.jfier remarkable 
meniCHy.Meirio^y.wBsdeqily im- 
portant to hoS&kba saw it as an 
often •inconyeniHH treasure. “My 
manorics dcH^tTKdoQg to me. The 

mrtmtmt OOC- 

sdf one is faffing about others as 
wbU," shesndi- :. 

Herairtobiograpby, “Nostalgia 
Isn't WhatitUsed to Be,’’ is in a 
sense about memory and about 
her attemp ts never ever m life to 
fall fair the hire of forgetfulness. 

-Her last book and first. novd 
was for many months .on this 
year’s best-seller fists. It was 
called “Adieu Vokxfia” and it was 
a vast panoramic tale centered on. 
‘a cast of Jewish immigrants- in 
*" Paris from.e^iy in the century to 
after World War n. In part it was 


a call to remember the small van- 
ished. craftsmen of Paris, the 
streets that had been bulldozed, 
the jews who had been taken 
away, though when it came to 
sending her characters to Nazi 
. death camps Simone, for once in 
her life, lost courage. 

“I came 10 love those charac- 
ters. Urey just came, one by one, 
and I wasn't expecting them,” she 
said at lunch a few months ago. *7 
-wasn't expecting anything. Final- 
ly, I had to end the book because I 
was in danger of never ending it, i 
was enjoying it too much, telling 
myself a sioty I didn't even know 
until I had told iL” 

Instead of sending her Jewish 
characters to die at the hands of 
the Nazis, she killed off some of 
them in a real train crash that 
made headlines in France in the 
1930s. “I couldn't face seeing 
them deported. It's a gift I wanted 
to give them, that they would be 
celebrated and respected in death. 
Because there was a great differ- 
ence between the deaths of people 
who died in that train wreck and 
the people who disappeared later 
in the camps.” 

As it turned but, that was our 
last lunch in the Place Dauphine. 
Sometimes we would eat on the 
sidewalk at Chez Paul, just out- 
side Simone’s window so if the 
telephone rang she could reach 
inside and answer it Sometimes 
we would eat a few yards down 
the block at the Caveau du Palais. 
J remember on a bright winter 
day at the Caveau hearing a noise 
outside in the Place while we were 
having another last coffee. The 
noise came from a straggly group 
of protesters shouting slogans 
against Montand. It turned out 



SimoneSignoret 


Robert Dooneoa/Roeho 


they were an animal protection 
group and Montand was a promi- 
nent member of an anti-cancer 
league that possibly counte- 
nanced animal experimentation. 

Simone listened to the shout- 
ing, then ambled to the telephone 
to call Montand, who was at 
home, two doors away. “Listen,” 
she said, “there's a bunch of peo- 
ple outside the restaurant demon- 
strating a gains t you. They seem to 
have come to the wrong address.” 

Within seconds, Montand was 
out of the flat and on the Place 


and Simone was at his side. I left 
them talking to Lhe demonstra- 
tors. 

An hour later, Simone tele- 
phoned. She and Montand had 
invited the protesters into their 
apartment, she said, and they had 
had a long talk. “I told them they 
didn't know a thing about demon- 
strating and I gave them a few 
pointers,” she said. The demon- 
strators left the apartment, revi- 
talized. “And they ended up lov- 
ing me,” Simone added, laughing, 
“which was, of course, the point.” 


A Spanish Fiesta in Belgium 


Matthus’s 'Judith’: A Compelling Staging in East Berlin 


By James Hdme Sutcliffe 

B ERLIN — The extraordinary 
success of Siegfried Matthuss 
fifth opera, “Judith," at East Ber- 
lin's Konrische Oper has added to 
the repertoire a strong new work 
with two magnificent central roles 
and some compcflingjy powerful 
choral music. 

Matthus reduced the five acts of 
Friedrich Hebbefo first drama, 
written in 1840, to two, and em- 
broidered it with passages from the 
fourth book of the Apocrypha. His 
intensely concentrated two-hour 
piece shows an original and in- 
formed musical dramatist at work, 
sure of his effects and using diem 
naturally without the affected 
modernisms of much avant-garde 
music. ' ■ '■ T 

Ibe dramatic story of the bibli- 
cal heroine has been the inspiration 
for about .16 operas: Judith saves 
ber native Bethulia from extinction 
at the hands of Nebuchadnezzar's 
unconquerable general, Holofer- 
nes. by worming her way into his 
confidence and then lopping off his 
drunken head. Bui only the ora- 
tories by Vivaldi and Mozart, infre- 
quently staged, have kept the sub- 
ject alive in the open, of our tune: 

Matthus has retained the soul- 
searching self-analyses that made 
HebbeTs protagonists so fasaaai - 
mg, tong before Fiend. Life has 
been easy fra: the conqueror Hdo- 
f ernes — who never knew his moth- 
er — and he longs for an opponent 
who will stand up to him, even at 
the cost of his own life: Too much 
success has made his existence' 
dreary. . r 

A widow with a destructive long- 
ing for a male, Judith is irresistibly 
drawn to Holof ernes, the mortal 
enemy of her people. Her chilling 
cry, “Open the gates. I must go to; 
Holoferaes,” winch closes Act I, is 
an exciting portent of what is to 
come, brilliantly bridging the single 
intermission. 

‘ Act I is a 11 dash, arid conflict. 


The lamentations of the starving, 
R^thnTiang are inter- 

- rupted by their jrigh priest Osias, 
the “Prophet” Daniel , and his 
brother Ammon, ■who is stoned be- 
cause he wants to opal the -city's 
gates and cud the siege. It also 
includes Holof ernes’ s grandiose 
monologne, Judith's dream and her 
damawH - that .ber stator Ephraim 
prove hislove-by murdering Holo- 

. femes. 

Act 2 is quieter.. Sensuous over- 
layered string passages with turns 
reminiscent of Schoenberg's 
“Yerklarte Nadit” accompany Ju- 
, di th’s seduction of Holof ernes ^after 

■ Ephraim’s assassination ■ attempt. 
Judith severs ha lover’s head with 
icy violence. The Babylonians flee. 

The Batimlians loot the Babylo- 
nian camp, praising Judith as “ls- 
Tad’s whore.” She realizes that her 
deed has changed nothing and that 
she can no longer live among therm 
The choral finale is a pasracaffi 
' to the biblical .text beginning 
“Lord, save ns . . • sung, iron- 
icaDy r whiIc Judith hangs herself. 
The opera ends with crashing re- 
peated chords as the chorus gri- 
maces rithorror at its future. 

• HariyKupferissts©ngisfierce- 

■ • ly -Exprcssiomstic, with geometric 

costumes by Eleoriore Kleiber, 
gray, blue and white face makeup 
by Manfred Schneider, and a com- 
posite decor by Reinhardt Zixnmer- 
mann -that allows both Bethulian 
and Babylonian camps to be expe- 
, riencedsinraltaneocriy; 

Holof ernes .and Judith solilo- 
quize an platforms on the extrem- 
ities of the orchestra pit and lit 
from below. They meet before a 
. yellow slk tent draped from the 
conqueror’s central metal control 

- tower, for all the world like those 
an the line that borders the two 
Gerinanys. Behind curves the par- 

•- dally ruined facade of Bethuna's 
fcopnv its pale inhabitants crouch- 
ing on steps and in niches. 

- ' ‘ Matthus’s opera has a curious 
history. It was commissioned to 


open Dresden’s reconstructed Sem- 
per opera house in February, but 
was taken by Kupferto East Berlin 
when he left Dresden to become the 
Komische Oper’s resident director. 
Matthus was thus obliged to com- 
pose another opera, his sixth, “Tale 
of the Love and Death of Comet 
Rilke,” for Dresden in a hurry. 
Since its premiere there, the opera 
has been staged by four other the- 
aters. 

“Judith” was completed so long 
ago that Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau 


sang Holof ernes’s monologue at 
the concert celebrating the opening 
of Leipzig's new Gewandhaus con- 
cert hall two years ago. 

The cast here was divided be- 
tween Komische Oper and Dres- 
den singers. Eva-Maria Bundschuh 
created the title role with such grip- 
ping intensity and astounding vo- 
calism that she received an ovation. 
Dresden's Werner Haseleu played 
a creditable Holoferaes, though 
lacking in the animal attraction the 
part demands: in thin black- 


rimmed glasses, he most resembled 
a party bureaucrat. 

The shimmering score includes a 
wealth of quiet background figura- 
tion coloring a couple of forward- 
placed melodic strands, as well as 
some virtuoso brass writing and 
violent percussion. Rolf Reuter 
conducted as if his life depended 
on it It was a thrilling evening in 
the opera house. 

James Helme Sutcliffe is a Berlin- 
based critic. 


By Rons Dobson 

B RUSSELS — The scarlet and 
yellow banners snapping out 
boldly above museums and culture 
palaces in Brussels signal a strong 
Spanish presence on the arts scene 
here, Europalia, the arts festival 
held biennially 10 focus on a mem- 
ber country of the European Com- 
munity, features Spain this year. 

Spanish and Belgian an teams 
have been at work for two years, 
delving into dark churches and lit- 
tle-known museums, stalking the 
cities of Spain, coaxing collectors, 
lingering in the Prado. Paintings, 
drawings, tapestries, sculptures, 
wood carvings, aliarpieces, pulpits, 
10th-century manuscripts, 3,000- 
year-old art from the Iberian is- 
lands, architectural maquettes and 
drawings by Spain's most famous 
maverick architect, Antonio 
Gaudi. are all on display in Bel- 
gium during Europalia, which ends 
Dec. 22. 

Parallel with the art exhibitions 
are" concerts, flamenco dancing, 
classical ballet, opera, song reci- 
tals: eminent visiting artists from 
the musical world include Monser- 
rat Caballfe and Jose Carreras, Vic- 
toria de Los Angeles and Teresa 
Ber ganza. Two plays by Federico 
Garda Lorca, one m Spanish, “La 
Casa de Bernards Alba,” another, 
“Noces de Sang,” in French, form 
pan of the Europalia theater festi- 
val; ISO Spanish films are to be- 
shown through October and No- 
vember at Lhe Brussels Cinema 
Museum. Other events and exhibi- 
tions are spread over several Bel- 
gian titles. 

The exhibition providing the 
most varied spectrum of Spanish 
art, “Splendors of Spam and Cities 
of Belgium" at the Palais des Beaux 
Arts, spans the 16th to the 18th 
centuries when Spain and Belgium 
were closely, if turbulently. linked 
under one crown. Much of this 
massed array of art from Spai □ is in 
fact Flemish art, since Spanish rul- 
ers, like the French and the Austri- 
an occupiers, appreciated and car- 
ried off from their Low Country 
possessions the paintings of the 
Flemish Primitives, the wood- 
carved figures and reliefs decorat- 
ing the churches, the Flemish-de- 
signed and woven tapestries, and 
portraits fay artists like Pieter Pour- 
bus, Brueghel, Rubens and Van 
Dyck- 

Interspersed through the display 
are Spanish artists, with Velasquez, 
El Greco. Francisco Zurbaran, 
Murillo, Ribera, Jan de la Corte, 



Zurbaran 's painting of the monks of Chartreux (detail) is 
on view at the Palais des Beaux Arts in Brussels. 


among the more famous. One of 
the H Grecos, a view of the city of 
Toledo with a detailed map of’ the 
center held in the foreground by 
the one figure in Lhe painting, is out 
on loan for the first time. 

Goya has an exhibition to him- 
self at the Museum of Fine Arts, 
both startling dramatic and lushly 
opulenL The series of savage little 
drawings that he showed only to 
close friends in his lifetime, provide 
the drama, illustrating the the vio- 
lence and callous cruelty of an ear- 
lier Spain and spilling over into his 
own times. 

Many of them underline the bru- 
tality shown towards women, the 
degrading treatment meted out to 
them not only by soldiers and ban- 
dits buL in marriage and daily life. 
In his own era. and for many years 
afterwards, none of the drawings 
could have been shown in public 
under repressive regimes. 

At the Museum of Modem Art 
next door, the contemporary paint- 
er and sculptor Antonio Lopez, the 


painter Antonio Tapi&s and the 
sculptor Eduardo Chillida have 
spacious exhibitions of their work, 
a revelation in the case of LApez, 
less known and less shown than 
Tapies, and a rare opportunity to 
see so many Chillida sculptures to- 
gether. Outside Brussels. Charleroi, 
hard-hit by economic recession, 
still manages to achieve high stan- 
dards in an shows; their Palais des 
Beaux Arts exhibits works by Pi- 
casso, Dali, Mir6. drawn from the 
artists' early and most creative pe- 
riods. which may well be one of the 
big successes of Europalia. Toumai 
has tapestries, Bruges shows a 15th- 
century Flemish painter, Juan de 
Flandres. who went to Spain and 
founded a whole school. In Ghent. 
Sl Pieter's Abbey has built an im- 
pressive exhibition round Santiago 
di Compostella, for a thousand 
years a center of Christian pilgrim- 
age. 

Ronu Dobson, who is bused in 
Brussels, writes >.vi the arts. 


AUCTION SALES 


M* Christian DELORME 

Auctioneer 

14, Ave de Messine, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: (1J 562.31.19 

HOTEL DROUOT PARIS 

Wednesday, October 23, 1985, at 2 p.m. — Room 5 

FURNITURE AND ORJETS D’ART 

mainly from the XVIIlth century 
Expert: M. Lacoste 

. Public viewing: Tuesday, October 22, 1985, 1 1 a.m.-6 p.m- 


Jessica Lange in Fine Form 
As G>untiy Singer Patsy Cline 


C APSULE reviews of films re- 
otiuly released in the United 
States: ' 

Janet Masfin of The New York 
Times an “Sweet Dreams”: 

Karel Rtisz has- cast Jessica 
Lange as the legendary country- 
a nd-westem anger Patsy Cline and 

, MOVIE MARQUEE 

lets her display her. rollicking, 
warm-blooded, vitality. 

' The real Cline, who died in a 
plane crash at the age of 30 in 1963, 
plays a more significant role in 
“Sweet Dreams” .than most. sub- 

jects of biographical films. Her 
thrilling voice is heard thxoughoot 
the film, with Lange expertly lip- 


synching, her way through such 
songs as ^ Pall to Pieces,” “Cra- 
zy,” “Bine Moon of Kentucky” and 
. “Walking After Midnight.” What 
elevates these scenes from the usual 
concert sanitations is the way 
Lange has molded herself to the 
music. Although the performance 
is prop-heavy, with britde.wigs and 
an enormous number of costume 
changes, die makes herself a per- 
fect physical extension of the vi- 
brant, changeable; expressive 
CSine. . . . 

The film conccntraies only indi- 
rectly. upon Cline’s artistry; it is 
more concerned with the vicissi- 
tudes of her second marriage, to a 
inan named Charlie Dick (played 
by Ed Harris). 


COLLECTOR’S GUIDE 


- OSKAR KOKOSCHKA - 

REVISED ~ EDITION OF THE CATALOGUE 
RAISONNfi OF THE OIL paintings BY 

HANS MARIA W1NGLER 

J would be grateful if any oivners of oil painiings by 

OSKAR KOKOSCHKA 

who have not completed, and returned questionnaires 
from me, should contact Tne aivnediatefy cis lam about 
to complete my manuscript. 

HcrniJohaim Wmkler', 

A -1080 Vienna - Tigergaaae 12, Austria, teb. (222) 42 96183*’ 


INTERNATIONAL. ART EXHIRITIONSi 


GALLERIES EXHIBITING AT THE 
GRAND PALAIS - October 5-1 3 


FI AC 85 


FIAC85 



October 5- 1 3 


( )jX'M d.iilv. 12-S jj.ni. 
Suliinbv , Siimtin . I0;i.n\.-Rp.m. 
Ilmrviiv. IO'.Lnt- 1 1 p.ni. 


IT GALERIE LAHUM1ERE =f| 

ANDRl MASSON 

paintings, pasfels, 
drawings 1 924-1 974 

September 26 - November 30 

HAC STAND A 50 
(Tel.: 225.99.68) 

£ 88, Bid da Courcefles 7501 7 Paris i| 


The next FIAC 
rubric will appear 
on October 12, 1985. 


MATTA 

TORRES-GARCIA 


Stand B4-C5 


#/mrcuRML 

9 avenue matignon paris 8 - 299.16.1 6 


DENISE RENE 

FIAC 85 - STAND B.49 

AGAM - ARP ■ ALBERS ■ CLAISSE ■ CRUZ-DEEZ 
DEMARCO - GERSTNER - GORDJLLO - LUQUE 
LUTHER - MAZON-GELER - MORTENSEN 
NARAHA - PATERNOSTO - PEREZ-FLORES 
SCHOFFER - SANTO J A - SOTO - VASARELY. 


JEANNE BUCHER 

rac NICOLAS DE STAEL 
GALLERY: LOUIS NALLARD 


galerie Etienne sassi 


14 Avenue Matignon, 75008 Paris - TeLs 723.40.38 

ANDR E BRASI UER 
MARTHE ORANT 


(1874-1957). 

i on permanent and exclusive exhibit i 


PARIS 


DIEGO GIACOMETTI 

HOMMAGE DE SES AMIS 


September 17 - October 3E 1985 


GALERIE EOL1A 

10, rue de Seine - PARIS Y E 
(1) 43 26 36 54 


GALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


, 6, Rue Jean-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 359.82.44 , 


Editions du mus& rodin i 


RODIN’S CORRESPONDENCE 

Tome 1, I860 - 1899 paper bound 155 x 24) mm, 56 lustrations, 252 pages FJr. 150.- 
on sale at Mus6e RODIN, 77, rue de Vneme 75007 Paris TeL 705 01 34 


' GALERIE ELD§E : 


105 Fbg. Stint-Honor 6 
PARIS 8". Tel: 256 35 80. 

GUY DE MALHERBE 

Tires, to Fri. 3 p.m. - 7 p-m., 

So) 1 . 11 am. - 7 p.m. g 
|L= October 3 / November 9 J 


GALERIE NICHIDO 

61 Faubourg St- Honors. Paris 8* 

TeL 36641B6 

NICOLE BOTTET 

October 8 to 31. 1985 

Open Monday through Saturday 
— *1 * 2-< 


10 am. - 12J0 


- 6.30 p.m. 


RHjGMM 

LEONQR FIIMI -> 

SepC.21-»C3cc.31 

£e CtmSreJortc 

Am gattarv 

Rj= des Mnmes 27 CSebbn) 
KXP Brussels 

WfedL-Sofc. 14-13/ Sun. U-Vi 

Also 

ongnals and eefcons of 


LONDON 

- FISCHER FINE ART =n 

30 King St.. St. James's, London SW1 
01-839 3942 

from Expressionism to Dado 
and Neue Sachlidikeit 
GERMAN ART! 909-25 

Opens 8 October 

e= Mon.-Fri. 1 0-5:30. = 


"ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES” 
"AUCTION SALES” 

appear on Saturday 

For more information, please contact your nearest I.H.T. 
representative or Franco is e CLEMENT, 

181 Avenue Oustas-de-Gcwfia, 92521 Nauilly Cadex, France. 
TeL: 747.1 2.65. Telex: 61 3595 


PARIS 


WALLY FINDLAY =u 

Galleries International 

new yorfe - Chicago - palm beach 
beverfy hills - paris 


EXHIBITION 


"Light of France" 

Permanent exhibition of 
AUGE, BOUDET. BOURWE, CANU, 
CASSIGNEUL, CHAURAY, FABIEN, 
GAU, GANTNER, GAVEAU, 
GORRm, HAAABOURG, KLUGE, 
LE PHO, MJOiEL-HB'KY, NE55I, 
VALTAT, NRJQU ELMAN, SIMBARI, 
V1GNOLES. 


2 Ave. Matignon - Paris 8th 

TbU X2S7074. monda)r Uwu. laturtJay 
10 gjn la 1 pun. - 2JO hi 7 pA 


Hotel George V - 723.54.00 
31 Ave. George-V - Paris 8th 

man. tfiru. uLlOJO oa.-t pjrv-UO !•< p» 
Sanday 7 pjn. • 9 pin. 


HOLLAND 


delft 

(the netherlands) 

37th art and 
antiques fair 


&!& 

U-y . 




museum 
het prinsenhof 


10- 27 October 1985 

1 1.00 a.m, (sunday 
1.00 p.m.) to 5.00 p.m. 

and also tue.-and 
thu.- evenings from 
7.00 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


9 octobre - 16 novembre 


George Segal 


Galerie Maeght Lelong 

1), rue dc Teheran, 75008 Paris 


9 octobre - 16 novembre 


Nicola De Maria 


Galerie Maeght Lelong 

14, rac de Teheran, 75008 Paris 


FERNAND 

LEGER 

Graphic work 

Illustrated books 
October 4 - October 30 

CAHIERS D’ART 

1 4, rue du Dragon 
Paris 6 e . Tel.: 548 76 73 


OLD MASTER PAINTINGS 

Flemish and Dutch 16th and 17th 

GALERIE CROUZET 

3, AUm Rifrserar (ground Roof) 

LE LOUVRE 

DE5 ANTIQUAIRES 

2, Flaw du Palais Royal 
75001 PARIS. Tel. (1)297 28 37 


GALERIE BRIGITTE ROCOURT 

12 rue La Bo6tie. Pans 8 s 

Catherine 
LOPES CURVAL 

1985 Paintings 

I September 20 - October 26 ~ — I 





■/'V 


Page 8 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 


Hcralb 


hmternatioinal 


Publi*h«d With The Nr» Vo A Time* and The Worfdngioa Pont 


fJribuU^ Selling U.S. Arms to Jordan: 


Comparable Standards? 


A common escape hatch through which be- 
leaguered foreign leaders often attempt to flee 
their critics is the argument that they are doing 
no more or no worse than what the democratic 
countries do. In recent days that argument has 
been doing especially heavy duty. Pieter W. 
Botha, to justify bis’ preference for keeping 
South Africa’s racial groups in separate living 
areas, claims that Ronald Reagan himself “is 
shoving Indians into reservations and entrust- 
ing all the affairs affecting their lives to a single 
bureau.” Wojcieeh Jaruzelski asserts, again, 
that his imprisonment of Poles for considering 
a work stoppage is on a par with the punish- 
ment of striking American air-traffic control- 
lers in 1981. Mildiai] Gorbachev, bridling at 
questions about the Soviet human rights re- 
cord, warns that he may have something to say 
abouL violations of human rights in America. 

Each of these charges can. of course, be 
answered on specific grounds. To Mr. Botha it 
can be said that Indians are not “shoved" into 
reservations by presidential edict but given the 
option of living there. General Jaruzelski 
needs to know that the American flight con- 
trollers were fired by the president for defying 
the no-strike pledge of their employment con- 
tract with the government. Mr. Gorbachev, if 
he made the usual Soviet-type criticism of, say, 
the tribulations of the activist Angela Davis, 
would have to explain why U.S. authorities 


Secretary of Collision 


The Department of Health and Human Ser- 
vices is where President Reagan most often 
collides with the modern social welfare state — 
where an administration hostile to many hu- 
man services must nonetheless administer 
them. As its head. Margaret Heckler tried to 
speak for fairness and compassion in a govern- 
ment not renowned for either. That she sur- 
vived for two and a half years is alone 
a mark of some success. 

An experienced lawyer and 16-year veteran 
of the House of Representatives, Mrs. Heckler 
was no political novice when she took over 
Health and Human Services in 1983. But a 


S330-billion budget and 145,000 employees 
pose a formidable political and managerial 


pose a formidable political and managerial 
challenge even in the most supportive climate. 

There is no such climate now, and some of 
the a dmini stration's most regressive policies 
have emerged in the department The “squeal” 
rule, which Mrs. Heckler opposed in the Con- 
gress but defended as secretary, would have 
required federally funded family-planning 
clinics to notify the parents of minors who 
received contraception or prescriptions. The 
“Baby Doe" rule would have interposed the 
federal government between parents and hos- 
pitals treating handicapped infants. 

Mrs. Heckler wanted to change the adminis- 
tration’s image. At her swearing in, she told 
Mr. Reagan she would “symbolize the com- 
mitment and caring" be felt for people in need. 
She did soften the administration's tone but 
was unable to realign its underlying policies. 
Though a tough infigh ter, she was not a partic- 
ularly good manager and was sometimes 


caught short on the details of programs in her 
department Recently, she reached a political 
impasse with White House officials over sever- 
al appointees to top-level vacancies. 

She failed to reverse the administration's 
callous and relentless purge of the disability 
rolls. When challenged in the courts, the ad- 
ministration stubbornly adopted a policy of 
“nonacquiescence.” It was finally Congress, 
not Mrs. Heckler, that reversed the policy. 

The administration successfully halted the 
longtime increase in hospital costs under the 
Medicare program. Instead of paying all bills 
reasonably submitted for Medicare, the gov- 
ernment now pays according to a fixed fee 
schedule, perhaps the most important change 
in health care finance since Medicare. Though 
the program was adopted before Mis. Heck- 
ler’s tenure, she deserves credit for helping to 
make it work in the face of initial opposition 
from the medical establishment 

She also recognized early the need to publi- 
cize the plight of victims of AIDS, acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome, and won tough- 
er enforcement against fathers who stop mak- 
ing child-support payments. 

What was clear in her tenure, as in that of 
Richard Schweiker, the moderate Republican 
who preceded her, is that for all its social- 
welfare dogmatism, the Reagan administra- 
tion has succeeded most when it has tried to be 
fair and practical For the most part, that is 
what Mrs. Heckler tried to be — and what the 
department and the public need most, in this 
or any other philosophical climate. 

— THE new YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Behind the Israeli Attack 


Some in Israel argue that going after the 
PLO in distant Tunisia was politically prefera- 
ble to going aTter the PLO in next-door Jor- 
dan, as such cabinet hawks as Ariel Sharon 
have proposed. The post-raid statement by 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres, in effect prais- 
ing Jordan for keeping the PLO there under 
control, was intriguing in this respect. What it 
suggests is that the Tunisia raid was prompted 
as much as anything by the internal politics of 
the divided Israeli government, that ultimately 
rt was an effort to pacify the hard-liners who 
were demanding action without destroying 
Mr. Peres's commitment to try to talk peace 
with Jordan. In that case the raid became 
action for its own sake. 

So action has been taken, though at a cost — 
to both Israel and its closest ally — that has yet 
to be totaled. The United Slates has few 
enough loyal friends in the .Arab world. Tuni- 
sia is one of them, and now Tunisia’s territory 
has been attacked and Tunisians have been 
killed with American-supplied planes. That is 
going to take some explaining, and not to 
Tunisia alone. Meanwhile, undoubtedly, the 
next round of violence is already being 
planned. Israel has shown that it can go a long 
way to reach its enemies. What it has been 
unable to show is that it can control its ene- 
mies closer to home. 


A Soviet Re thinking? 


One is not obliged to take [Mikhail] Gorba- 
chev at his word when he swears to the high 
heavens that the U.S.S.R. does not seek to 
“drive a wedge" between Europe and the Unit- 
ed States. Nevertheless, be went much further 
than his predecessors when he admitted that 
current circumstances force Soviet leaders to 
“rethink many established values, including in 
the military and of course the political field.” 
Let us hope so, for ourselves but also for the 
Polish, Afghan and Soviet citizens. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


Violence in West Germany 


— The Los Angeles Times. 


The West German chancellor, Helmut 
KohL has good reason to be alarmed about the 
rash of violent protests across his country. The 
riots appear to confirm the continued exis- 
tence of a hard core of nihilistic protesters of 
Lhe kind who have moved into terrorism in the 
past and have also brought violence to ecologi- 
cal and anti-nuclear demonstrations. Mr. 
Kohl’s instinctive response is to crack down, 
though this policy has so often proved counter- 
productive: It plays into the hands of the 
extremists by alienating others who become 
sympathizers. At times like these the state 
should stand paL and remind the police of the 
principle of minimum necessary force. 

— The Guardian (London). 


FROM OUR OCT. 5 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: A Definition of Irish Home Rule 
NEW YORK — Mr. John Redmond, M.P. 
and Irish Nationalist Party leader, made a 
statement [on Oct 4] as to what Irish National- 
ists mean by “Home Rule.” He is starting a 
speech-making tour through America. He 
said: “Our demand for Home Rule does not 
mean that we want to break with the British 
Empire. We are loyal to the Empire, and we 
desire to strengthen the Imperial bonds 
through a federal system of government It is 
Talse to picture us as desiring to fight our 
Imperial kin. We mean by Home Rule the 
same measure of self-government for Ireland 
as exists in each American State, with the 
difference that we are willing that the Parlia- 
ment at Westminster should have the authority 
for canceling legislation enacted in Ireland 
that it now has over all colonial legislation." 


1935: U.S. Navy Chief Assails Pacifists 
ATLANTIC CITY, New Jersey — Admiral 
William H. Standley, Chief of Naval Opera- 
tions, charges that pacifist organizations have 
thwarted naval building for thirteen years fol- 
low ng the Washington Naval Conference, and 
even now are directing a powerful influence 
against attainment of treaty strength. Admiral 
Standley named as opponents of an adequate 
navy the International Council for the Preven- 
tion of Wars, the National Council for the 
Prevention of Wars and the Federal Council of 
Churches. The influence of the organized paci- 
fist opposition was also manifest in the 
churches and schools, be said. Communist 
activities to the same purpose were coincident, 
the admiral continual, adding that it would 
appear that the Communists in this country 
control “the activities of the pacifists." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1*58-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PAIEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Pubhsker 

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Auoeute Editor FRANCOIS DESMAJSONS Director ef Circulation 

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International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Charlevdc-Gaullc. 92200 Neuflly-sur-Sdnc. 

France. Tel: fl) 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 02943052. _ rm *s ‘ 
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£ 1985, International Herald Triune. All rights reserved. 


The Arguments Favor Hussein 


have had so little success at keeping her down. 

None of these rejoinders, however, gets to 
the heart of the matter. What is that? Certainly 
it is not (hat the American performance is 
flawless, which it is not. Nor is it that many 
Americans are actively concerned with any 
hint of the abridgment of Lhe rights of their 
fellow citizens, although that is quite true. The 
heart of the matter is that the United States 
and the other democratic countries, possessing 
governments based on popular consent and 
judicial systems based on law, have a legitima- 
cy to their political authority and an indepen- 
dence lo their courts of which countries ruled 
by unelected, self-perpetuating elites cannot 
even dream. The measure of independence still 
enjoyed by courts in South Africa is the excep- 
tion that proves the rule. 

All this is clear enough to anyone who 
think s about it. We observe with some chagrin 
that not all Americans think about iL Some are 
prepared to blink away just about any defect 
in a closed society if it bears a superficial 
resemblance to a defect in the open American 
society. But the right approach is to work hard 
to root out the defects in the opaation of 
American society, while looking with a clear 
eye at the structural defects in such places as 
South Africa and the Soviet-bloc nations. 
Their protests will not wash. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


By Geoffrey Kemp 


W ASHINGTON — With the focus on such 
foreign polity issues as South Africa and 


the November summit meeting, the White House 
did not seem to be paying much attention to the 
recent visit of King Hussein. Then on Tuesday, 
the second day of the visit, the Israelis bombed 
the Palestine Liberation Organization’s bead- 
quarters in Tunisia, proving once again that the 
Arab- Israeli conflict will not go away. 

It has been the administration’s hope that 
Hussein's recent public statements about his 
willingness to lead a joint Jordanian- Palestinian 
team to negotiate with Israel, and the mild en- 
couragement given the king by Prime Minister 
Shimon Peres of Israel will be enough to nudge 
the glacial Middle East peace process. Ideally, 
the next step would be for the PLO to recognize 
Israels right to exist unequivocally and accept 
Uni Led Nations Resolutions 242 and 338. there- 
by committing U.S. officials to talk to the PLO. 
Direct Jordani an -Palestinian -Israel negotiation 
could follow, provided the composition of the 
Palestinian team was agreed on. 

Irrespective of the aftershocks of the Israeli 
raid, the path to peace is full of obstacles: Not 
only do the key players — Mr. Reagan, Mr. 


about Hussein. That could lead the king to say. 
Til go elsewhere" — just as the Saudis did by 
buying British arms recently in a deal reportedly 
worth dose to 55 billion. 

As the Congress prepares to debate the Jordan 


arms package, key arguments need to be exam- 
ined. The military reason for the sale is straight- 


ined. The military reason for the sale is straight- 
forward: Jordan is a friend of the United States 
and has woefully inadequate military equipment, 
especially for air defense. It faces a growing 
threat from Syria, whose armed forces have been 


dramatically strengthened by the Soviet Union 
since the 1982 Lebanon war. Providing Jordan 


Peres, King Hussein and the PLO leader Yasser 
Arafat — race major political difficulties among 


Arafat — race major political difficulties among 
their constituents, but other countries, such as 
Syria and the Soviet Union, have an nnlimii«¥ 
capacity to play spoiler. Even if direct talks take 


since the 1982 Lebanon war. Providing Jordan 
with arms is a natural step to help protect U.S. 
interests in the region. 

And politically, Hussein is more likely to take 
major risks for peace if the United States shows 
real commitment to his -kingdom’s security by 
providing aims for its defense. 

The military arguments against the sale con- 
cern Israel's security. Arms of the type Jordan 
wants (F-16s or F-20s, air-to-air missiles, im- 
proved Hawk surface-to-air missiles and shoul- 
der- fired Stinger surface-to-air missiles.) could 
seriously weaken Israel's air power in any future 
conflict against an Arab coalition that included 
Jordan. Israel depends on the superiority of its 
air force in the first days of a war, and Jordan’s 
new forces could prove extremely dangerous. 

The political objections to the sale are the 
exact opposite of the administration view: Hus- 



Gorbachev 
Deserves 
A Response 


y Nir 


Br EWK n Abottxht (SkmUwM. C&W SynlaM. 


But the long-run costs of denying Jordan the 
arms outweigh other considerations ■— and that 
is not to dismiss Israel’s fears about its security. 
A rejected, angry Hussein, under great pressure 
from his military to get modem equipment, will 
have to go elsewhere. Thai will further erode his 
ties with the United States. If he turned to the 


place, exchanging the Arab territory capuired by* son should move meaningfully on the peace Soviet Union, which is a possibility, it would 
Israel in 1967 for peace and guarantees of secun- process before weapons are transferred. That have profound political consequences and could 


ty is a task that would face formidable, perhaps 
irreconcilable difficulties In Israel: The Likud 
coalition, now sharing power with Mr. Feres and 
the Labor Party, is opposed to territorial com- 
promise. And Hussein cannot give up Arab terri- 
tory unless he has a green light from the PLO and 
a volatile, shifting coalition of Arab states. 

For the near term, however, one problem dom- 
inates the Jordanian-Israeli relationship: the 
Reagan administration’s decision to sell a large 
number of sophisticated arms to Jordan. Prelimi- 


would establish his bona fides as a serious negoti- 
ator. Hussein should do what Anwar Sadat did: 
Take a bold, independent step forward. 

Which of these arguments best serves US. 
interests? The long, acrimonious fight the admin- 
istration had with the Senate in 1981 over the sale 
of Airborne Warning and Control System sur- 
veillance planes to Saudi Arabia was finally won 
because of the president's invoIvemenL Lobby- 


nary notification has been sent to the Congress 
and bets are that both houses will reject Mr. 


mg took up a great deal of Mr. Reagan’s time. 
Whether his advisers will want him to make a 


and bets are that both houses will reject Mr. 
Reagan’s requesL The president can uy to over- 
ride a congressional veto, but by that nme blood 
will have been spilled and harsh things said 


Whether his advisers will want him to make a 
similar effort now remains to be seen, in view of 
preparations for the summit meeting and the 
heavy domestic agenda. If the president truly 
believes Hussein is on the verge of a historic 
move, he may make the effort. 


All bets would be off for the peace process 
and, while disaster may not be immin ent, the 
stage would be set for a hardening of attitudes 
throughout the Arab world and in IsraeL The 
current generation of moderate Arab and Israeli 
leaders, prepared to exchange territory for peace, 
will eventually be replaced by a more extreme 
and far more dangerous brand of politicians like 
Messieurs Khomeini, Assad and Sharon. 


By Flora Lewis 

P aris — Mikhail Gorbachev’S 
visit to Paris, deliberately set be- 
fore his meeting with President Rea- 
gan next month, is both a dress re- 
hearsal and an effort to enlist support 
for Soviet proposals from America’s 
allies in Europe. 

The Soviet leader has quickly 
shown chat he is determined to make 
piavinnim impact and knows how to 
go about it. He reiterates Moscow’s 
basic policies, particularly the-omi— 
nous warnings about the future in the; 
absence of agreements. 

Bui. in an unusual departure foi* 
the Kremlin, he noted “how solid are 
the historical political and economic 
ties uniting the United States and 
Western Europe." It is “absurd,” he 
said, to think Moscow wants “to 
drive a wedge, to provoke a quarrel” 
between the Western allies, adding: 
“We are realists." 

He called directly on France and 
others to try to influence Washing- 
ton. but he made dear that in Mos- 
cow’s eyes the Soviet-American rela- 
tion remains central and decisive for 
peace here and elsewhere. 

The performance is skillful the 
mann er of making news is bold, and 
there is a clever echo of Mr. Reagan’s 
most popular points: that the goal is 
to eliminate nuclear weapons and 


■ p 




A 


that lasting peace cannot be based on 
fear alone. However, “It’s an illusion 


— what’s more, extremely danger- 
ous" to think that space defense can 

achieve the goals, he said. Security 




can only be achieved through “d b- 
rente, disarmament, increased confi- 


The writer, a senior fellow at Georgetown Uni- 
versity Center for Strategic and International 
Studies, was special assistant to President Reagan 
far the Near East and South Asia from 1981 to 
1985. He wrote this for the Los Angeles Tones. 


Adieu to Mata Hari, to the Cloak and the Dagger 


tente, disarmament, increased confi- 
dence and develop rneni of interna- 
tional cooperation.” 

These are things people want to 
hear. To support his assertion that he 
is reasonable and wants Europe to 
have a “larger role," he made some 
specific offers. He reversed die Soviet 
position of last January tying the 
three parts of the Geneva arms talks 
together. Now he says the issue of 
intermediate-range Euromissiles can 
be separated from negotiations on 
strategic weapons and space arms. \ 

And he offered to negotiate direct- ^ 


W ASHINGTON — This has 
been a season of defections 
and mishaps for the secret services in 
Europe, raising perturbing questions 
for spy masters in the West and even 
more so in the East. 

West German counterintelligence 
has to be rebuilt more or less from 
scratch following the defection in 
August of the high-ranking officer 
Hans Joachim Hedge, and there is no 
reason to assume that the last moles 
in Bonn have been flushed out. The 
discovery of French government 
complicity in the sinlang of the 
Greenpeace ship has made it neces- 


By Walter Laqueur 


penetrate; political secrets virtually 
do not exist. The Soviet Union is a 
dosed society, and breaches of secu- 
rity axe much more damaging. Even if 
the KGB were only half as good as its 


reputation, it should have known that 
Vitaly Yurchenko, who defected in 


Rome in July, had been a double 
agent for more than a decade. 

The KGB must also worry now 
about whether its agents are corrupt- 
ible. It is unlikely that this summer’s 
defections were the last. There was a 
time when Soviet agents abroad were 


for either side? There is a tendency 
among the public at large to exagger- 
ate both successes and failures in in- 
telligence, largely because few people 
have a dear conception of what intel- 
ligence can and cannot do. Intelli- 
gence is not an end in itself and does 
not have a life of its own; the conse- 


go to Helmut Schmidt (whom they 
liked much less). 


ly with the British and French on 
their nudear forces. He did not get 
anywhere on this with the French, 


quences of a certain operation can be 
assessed only in a wider context. 

Consider three examples. Pearl 
Harbor was the greatest intelligence 
failure in American history — and 
yet without it the American people 
plight never have been galvanized 
into a major war effort. 

Second, some 20 years ago, the 
East Germans planted an aigent dose 
to Willy Brandt. They must have 
thought this a fantastic success, but 
in the end it worked against them, 
when the agent was caught and Mr. 
Brandt (whom they Hked) had to re- 
sign, allowing the chancellorship to 


sary for the French to get rid of the deeply motivated. But their place has 
director-general of their secret ser- been taken by a new generation of 


vice, and some of his underlings. spies who are better educated and 


But there is no rqoicing these days more skeptical about ideology. Op- 


in KGB headquarters either No few- portunism seems to play an increas- 
er than three high-level Soviet spies ing role, reinforced by doubts about 


have defected in the last few months, 
and Soviet defections weigh 10 times 


the regime they serve, and it cannot 
be taken for granted that all will 


as heavily as Western ones. Western resist the temptations of the West. 


society is, after all open and easy to How significant are these incidents 


_ Finally, with the benefit of hind- w jj 0 earlier refused a Soviet request** 
sight, it seems that we much overesti- f or a joint co mmuniq ue denouncing 
mated the damage caused by Kim “star wars." But Mr. Gorbachev tried 
Philby and the other British spies of to show movement on everything dse 
the 1940s. They did, to a certain ex- so as to focus on space, 
tent, nullify British inidligenc&-gath- How far Mr. Gorbachev’s many 
ering efforts: As a result of their proposals signal a willingness to. 
work, man hours were wasted, money make real concessions in return for ; 
squandered and perhaps some lives his main demand to block “star wars" 1 
lost. But they had not the slightest development is not dear. It is puz - 1 
rnroact on policy-making m White- zling why he is so anxious on this 
halL Nor is it likdy that they knew icciu* cin/o it ic 1iVi»Tv 1st ho 4 f 


•/ i"..- 


hafl. Nor is it likdy that they knew issue, since it is likely to be a decade i 
wry much about the in tenuous of before anybody even knows if an exr • 


their masters. For better or worse, otic space defense is feasible. 


presidents prime ministers and H e may be giving a due when be 


chiefs of staff rarely lake intelligence describes the vast task he has set 
agents mto thcir conndcnce. himself for transforming the Soviet . 

' Does tins mean that mtdhgence no Union and its “methods of economic 


om avvui rresraem Jxwgan s view m * new. We feel this, we have begun to ’ 
the Soviet Union; they ran read re think manv established values, in- ' 

nhmit it m mp nrpcc Hitt nl/vnir Ann -t i: - .l « 



about it in tiie press. ^But cloak and duding in the military and of course . 
dagger are no longer the symbols of the political field. to make them fully ’ 
espionage, and the mam practitioners conform with new realities." 
no kingCT resembleM^a H^. The A huge new military effort would . 
namcoTthegametodayistedmoto not only drain resources, it would 1 
-guidance tertnqlogy. missile de- probably ^ ^ ^ ^ ; 

fense, oMbnune warfare and ffi0re t 'Sy about mmaging t£ 
coMtttedmcd^y tt general. economy jui when Mr. GMchev ; 

*“» "a** * move rapidly to mate, 
t * an 8 es * **e has todeal with the in- » 
“22?* vernal power structure before he deals ! 


Cur 




This coaid explain his haste, 
technologies with considerable mill- Mr finiWh™ .v,„ , 


Mr. Gorbachev used the occasion 




« Si ^ to . deUver Posits, couched in ! 


IBUIVOUJ uuiGicm uu»iu>. inc uuiicu a ti nn Thiele „«» iUL'.j 7i 

States needs political intelligence Ur o p -_„ 
from societies where such infSnna- "W? 

tion is not forthcoming. It is therefore call fm- 1 ex ^ ec ^ aDons -. **5 

preoccupied with verification and Sw SU JT 1 r l 

strategic deception. It has some inter- with Mr^SnH?™ lh |I ,ef0i n/ bC i? IkS ' 
est in Soviet technology but nothing shows Washm S- 

like the Soviet Umcm WrwhdS „ a 

concern with the acquisition of high h b ^ m outgone. Mr. Gorbachev*, 
technology from the West True, the . o^ 11 Eastern summit 


^ A 

<3 . 

*l„ ; . ! - v 

*1 rr 

*9 

*1 v ; 

£J 


Wi 


; r- 


Russians also want as hill a picture as , Bu ^8^ a ^ the same time. 

nnn«Md w ■ — £** not run into the problems Mr. 


■ ' >■ possible about everything haoDenme J, ■ me problems Mr. 

m the West, but given tWctentof havUl& ™ complaints. 


Jaruzelski: Hostage-Taking With a Twist 


W ASHINGTON — General By Charles Krau thamm er 
Wqjciecb Jarazdslti, the Polish 
liberator, recently ventured into the 


bright media lights of New York. 
And while there for the United Na- 
tions General Assembly meeting, he 
made a most bizarre offer for freeing 
the 250 to 300 political prisoners be 
holds. If, in the coming elections — 
which Solidarity has asked Poles to 


boycott as a show of no confidence in 
the regime — 70 percent to 80 percent 
of the electorate turns out, he might 
grant the prisoners amnesty. 

His stated rationale is that this 
would prove that Poland had re- 
aimed to “normalcy” The transpar- 


oui) so unusual But there is another 
kind of extortion that takes place on 
a far vaster scale and runs like a 
business. It is blackmail the old-fash- 
ioned way: for money. 

Consider the vigorous and rarely 

reported traffic in dissidents from 
East Germany to West Germany. It 
works this way. The East German 
government arrests an undesirable. It 
lets the West Germans know that For 
certain humanitarian considerations, 

say 100,000 Deutsche marks (about 
$38,000), it will release him to the 


■ 11A uib TTCSI, V KIVCU LUC CAICIK OI IWtm J , .. 

1 what is readily available to them. ™ n ^8 1 > lin . and the Netherlands at. 

such information is very often irrde- and the refusal of. 

m • vant and their efforts to gather it no hran 9°is Mitterrand of 

U/|/fl ff f '1/lief more than a nuisance. “ not 10 ® ve tiie appear-' 

rr \Ar A. 14/ lot' Tbe secretaries from the West Ger- an S? of accepted a summons. 

man government who defected to the ^i ne h f^ l P <Wer alliances are par- 

the talk about hostage-taking focuses ^ *** summer are cases in point — T?* difference, 

on the dflemma of theraiisonier: “Pf. P*™ °n the baud of what handicap if Mr. Reagan; 

what may be yielded in money, obei- £rphng once called the •'great game.” nS t Ifg® f l. convmcui 8ly that thef 
sauce and principle, to rescue inno- wom « 1 may have delivered s ^nns for agreement 


r- 


V * 1 =■-* ... 




kind you see in the 
nered bank robber 


the movies: the cor- contingency P lan5 dial will never oS5 l “ a W0u ! d credibility; and * 
ier or the distraught ■ ^ “*4-“ “y case. This will keep a ^ opportunity. S 

i-__. the fBine clerics m Fact RwK. The New York Times. - 


ex-spouse takes hostage a customer fB*ng derks in East Berlin and 
or a child. That kind is born of des- Moscow busy, but in the final analy- 


ent threat is that if Poles listen lo “the WesL Negotiations follow, then a 


Voice of America and the so-called 
Radio Free Europe" and other pro- 
vocateurs. their leaders stay in jafl- 
Tlic people have a choice: Cooperate, 
and your leaders go free. Protest, and 
they do not Your choice. 

Sounds familiar. This is, at course, 
the language of aQ hostage-takers. It 
is what Shiite fanatics say, whether 
kidnapping the Reverend Benjamin 
Weir or four Soviet diplomats: Free 
our brother terrorists (who blew up a 


deal is struck. East Germany gets its 
hard airrency (since 1963, more than 
2 billion DM), the dissident gets his 
freedom, and West Germany gets to 
perform an act of mercy. . 

An unstated aim of detente was to 


or a child. That kind is born of des- 
peration. The other kind is bom of 
calculation. To my mind, rt is tbe 
more monstrous, smee it issues not 
from distress but from moral blank- 
ness. What does it take to put a gun, 
methodically and cold-bloodedly, to 
the head of an innocent? Above all, it 
requires that one abolish the notion' 
of innocence. 

And that is a specialty not, as one 
tends to think, just erf terrorist ideolo- 
gies. but at totalitarian ideologies. 
Their great theme —and Has source 


Moscow busy, but in the final analy- 
sis, it is about as senseless as what the 

French did in New Zealand. The real 

action and the big money have lone 
ago moved elsewhere. . ° 




V Sw*. 


•>Ik^ 


EaZ? Mnssed -Letters , to the 
^to^and must contain the writ - 




The wrtier is author, most recently 

of "A Worid of Secrets: The Uses and 
limits cf Intelligence. "He contributed 
this comment to The New York Tunes. 


T * a &uaure, name and M 'ad- 
Jffc-kters should be faff and* 
Tf to editing We cannot 

tmsol *cued manuscripts. . 




encourage this kind of business. It of their great crimes — is that Efe is 
was thought in the West that in re- entirely pcditidzecL There is no inde- 


" l LK) the editor b 

Press Under Pressure and even as as 

Regarding "NicaraourP* bOViet nesrim^ 


turn for trade and technology, the pendent social space. Art, culture, Regarding^ Nicaragua’s Last Op- nri™!? 61 ^gune controlsw^yworS 
Russians would liberalize emigration, family, friendship are inextricably P<j stnan Daify Delivers the News the n.u.^ broadcast to the ramies 5 
But the Russians were squeamish political. And where everything is Censors Cut” (Sept. 25): ^-Russians. Arnie niAnj ^ama 

aWm.i . l tl*. i:.t i" - _ _ ■ * _ h.. . " uess. Lshjit,. v. i 


couple of embassies in Kuwaiti stop 
your Svrian allies f driving on Tripo- 


your Syrian allies (driving on Tripo- 
li), or else. We do not want to harm 
lhe hostages. Your choice 
Hostage-taking immediately con- 


about acknowledging the deal They politics, everyone 
took offense at the Jackson-Vaojk There are no minx 


jures up the image of a thug in a ski 
mask. Not so. In our day there is a 


amendment, which permits U.S. 
trade concessions (most-favored-na- 
tion-status) only for those Commu- 
nist regimes that ease emigration. 

Neither tin: Russians nor the Nix- 


rytme is .a poBticwm. 
innocents. 


• La Prensa hangs on by a very thjn fheTn^f* ^? cas ^ Afghani; 

bite? a* » p- 


6 ’l 


The dAate pvfsr what totalitarian- ^mist’s Soviet-style cmrorship conduct ,^ 

IS'MSEJ'JSKS!" 'logical. saboS 


* 

-Vi 


mask. Not so. In our day there is a 
genteel end of the business, and it is 
reserved for governments. General 
Jaruzdskfs extortion (“blackmail” 
said Lech Walesa the next day) 
stands out because the threat was so 
explicit and the ransom (voter turn- 


been gtnpg on for decades. There In October 1 917 Lenin and his men I wben NitSSuS 

have been a dozen attempts to define took over newspapers, magazines^ caK? Damei Ortega SaawSi 
il A couple of years ago, I thought I radio stations and cahed^OTshh! ^ 7 ^„ cens orehip an^teotiS 

hart fnunrf o moriro* a ono tAnirlr th* "wMirit!" TT .^^Orsmp Uleasure" Wo CACCpuUliJll 


though Moscow rejected it, not ev- vote. It is a pretty good rule of thumb, essential while they arefiEhS > rt « coSuEimSl SI 

erytme did. Romarna, for example, Perils this is a better" one:; a talent the attacks of us -badMriSklj 1 Su *«. It does 

has for years enjoyed a trade in souls, for hostagMakmg, grand and petty, known as ‘«mtras.’ "‘Sucty-five^* SOrsh iP, but mitigates S** cause '? aiJ . 
Your choice. Whai to do? Much of Washington Past Writers Group. after Crushing their laa^bnS^ ; ^TJijBAGLKf^ 

Brussels. • 


la trade in souls, 
i to do? Much of 


Washington Post Writers (Snap. 




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MIIM *Wi TV ’«■ l««k. Ttar. Ml TV lxU^M IVm 


ITALIAN FASHION 


A SPEa4L REPORT 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 


Milan Shows Its Charms 
During die 'Collezioni’ 


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Top: Giorgio ArmanPs short, snazzy suit; below, 
left, Krizia’s liquid layers and Gianni Versace’s 
daringly divine dress. - 


By Leticia G Jett 

MILAN — It is not a beautiful 
dry, not in the way Rome and Flor- 
ence and Venice are; in fact, it is 
rather dull mid drab, save for the 
regal presence of La Sca la . Bui Mi- 
lan just now is a city vibrantly alive 
with activity and productivity, and 
that in itself makes it irresistibly 
attractive. 

Every year thousands of people 
are drawn to Milan to participate 
in various spectacles surrounding 
one of Italy’s most important natu- 
ral resources: the desi g n , sale and 
promotion of some of the world's 
most beautiful and innovative 
products. 

His Milan that hosts most of the 
country’s important design fairs, 
from the enormous furniture fair in 
September to various fashion fairs, 
including the influential Milano 
CoDeaoni held in March and Octo- 
. her and which features the top 
names in Italian ready-to-wear de- 
sign. According to ns organizer, 
Beppe Modenese, last season the 
Collezioni attracted 1,700 interna- 
tional retail buyers, as well as 500 
Italian journalists and 600 from 
other countries. . 

Recently Italian designers have 
been chided far focusing more on 
the bottom line than on the hem- 
tine. Giorgjo Armani disagrees; “I 
believe Italian design is the purest 
in the world. Its creators have an 
eye to the future as well as an 
inherent sense of the past, which is 
amply part of our culture and per- 
haps most important of all we 
don't take ourselves too seriously.” 

Fashion is not only a highly visi- 
ble business; it also contributes 
mightily to the national economy. 
In 1984 sales from the textfle-doth- 
-ing industry; beauty products -and- 
lealber goods reached S39 billion, 
515 billion of which was in exports. 

One recent export that further 
underscores the international ap- 
preciation of the talent behind the 
Made in Italy label is an exhibition 
of a group of Gianni Versace's 
clothes at the Victoria and Albert 
Museum in London. 

' This was an unprecedented 
event, which earlier this month in- 
cluded dinner and a fashion show 
in the museum, as well as a series of 
seminars with the designer speak- 
ing to students and journalists. 

A selection of Versace’s work 
will remain on display in the mu- 
seums’s Raphael Cartoon Coon 
until Oct 30, where his models will 
be surrounded by Raphael paint- 
ings — created over 450 years ago 
as designs for tapestries in the Sis- 
tine Chapel — on loan from Queen 
Elizabeth IL 

Even the Milanese are caught up 
in this positive esprit. Gone are the 


days of hiding b ehin d the security 
of walled-in homes, leaving the 
jewels and furs safely out of sight 
With great relief, Italian women are 
doing what they love to do best — 
flaunting their precious baubles 
and wrapping themselves in lush, 
exotic furs. ■ 

Discreet displays of the good life 
were never particularly amusing for 
women whom no one could ever 
accuse of understated minimalism 
when it came to piling on jewelry. 

“We have it all here." Modenese 
said. “All of the industries relating 
to design, the fabric and yam mills. 
the manufacturing facilities, they 
are &D located within an hour of 
Milan. It makes this city the center 
of a very important life. It’s true, 
there are not that many things to 
sec as far as a tourist is concerned, 
but we have wonderful restaurants, 
beautiful homes right in the center 
of the city and some of the best 
shopping in the world. And don’t 
forget Memphis [the extraordinary 
furniture design firm, founded by 
Ettore Sottsass in 1981, that set oft 
a shock wave through the entire 
interior design industry making all 
the stodgy concepts of decoration 
de mode with its racy, flamboyant, 
irreverent and highly creative ap- 
proach to objects and their func- 
tion] had its beginning here." 

Now, too, everyone is getting all 
dressed up with plenty of places to 
go. Not only are the. shops along 
the Via Spiga and the latest hoi 
spot. Via Brera, experiencing ex- 
traordinary sales, but once again 
dining out is in, as is attending La 
Scala and even late-night dancing. 

As for the retail scene. Aide Pin- 
to, the business manager and hus- 
band of Krizia’s designer, Mariuc- 
. da MaadeHL said sales in their 
'boutiques were up 50 percent over 
last year. “The other day 1 got a call 
from the Via Spiga store and the 
salesperson told me an American 
woman had just left afier spending 
516,000. Earlier in the month the 
manager of the shop in Rome 
called to say sales had reached 52 
million tire (about 531,000) that 
day. It is a tiny place so naturally I 
thought she had made a mistake, 
that she was talking about the sales 
for the week, but she wasn’t," he 
said. 

(All of this wanton spending has 
led many Italians to gleefully refer 
to the dollar, the yen and the mark 
as “precious money.”) 

For those who need nourishment 
after a strenuous morning of shop- 
ping, the chic lunch spots in Milan 
include Bice, Torre diPisa, La Lan- 
terns, Q Girarrosto and Giannino. 
For dinner most of the above con- 
tinue to pull in an attractive, inter- 
esting crowd, while Savini, San- 
t' Andrew's, El Toula and the 


restaurant in the Palace Hotel Ca- 
sanova, draw what is generally con- 
sidered a “traditional elegant" cli- 
entele. After theater it's Biffi Scala, 
Savini Santa Lucia, described by 
those who frequent the place as “an 
extremely fashionable trattoria ” 
and again, Gi annin o. 

.After 1 1 PJvL the trendy preppie 
types head for the Bar Nazionale to 
mingle. For dancing Nepbenta is 
still popular, but now it has more 
competition with Cafe Roma and 
the punky Plastic nightclub. 

In the* next week as the spring- 
/ summer ready-to-wear collections 
begin these places will be filled 
with competitively dressed fashion 
professionals from Japan, the Far 
East, the United States and Eu- 
rope, all nibbling on superb pasta, 
watching the way Italian women 
are getting themselves up at the 
moment and pondering one of life’s 
more relevant issues: What will 
women want to wear six months 
from now? 

OF course the designers Figured 
this out long ago. They plan trig 
shouldered looks with defined 
waists, plenty of pants “for the sim- 
ple reason that women want them,” 
Luciano Soprani said, and skirts 
that are either very long or very 
short. Colors are mostly subdued 
neutrals except for a prevalence of 
strong blues and here and there the 
shock of bright colors. 

“My dothes will be very close to 
the body for evening,” Armani 
said. On the subject of dressing in 
general Armani maintains he be- 

(Coatuuted on Next Page) 



Top, Claude Montana for Complice sculpted 
jacket and short pants. Center, Luciano 
Soprani's tony textures and Gianfranco 
Ferr&'s tethered T-shirt 


On the Street in Rome, Summer Prevails 


• ROME — As the long/- hot” summer prolongs, Roman residents 
continue wearing loose cottons and linens, adding wide hip belts and 
amusing shoes to a super-relaxed look. City and country wear are no 
longer distinguishable. Despite a limited show of “correctly classical” 
clothing, the “extra-casual-ready-to-play" look appears to stretch with 
simple changes of weight and proportions from one season into the next. 

- ^ —SHEILA NARDULU 




iMoKtanUi 


These young women 
demonstrate what Italian 
women do best: assemble 
snappy separates with a 
panache that dearly 

demonstrates a sense of 
fashion independence. 




. A of the future 

Gianni Versace at the Victoria and Albert Museum 

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.. »***•*■«*«: 


Gala Fashion Show - Mercredi 20ctobre 1985, 19 heures30 - Raphael Cartoon Court 
Joumeed’etude - Jeudi 3 Octobre, de 10 heures 30 a 16 heures 30- Museum Lecture Theatre 
Les vetements Gianni Versace appartenanl & la collection du Musee seront exposes dans la Galerie 40. 





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Page 10 

A SPECIAL REPORT ON ITALIAN FASfflON 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 


Taking the Measure of Milan: A Guide 
To Shopping for Your Own Special Look 


By Kate Singleton 

MILAN — Many people consid- 
er Milan to be the quintessence of 
elegance. But why? You can buy 
Missoni knitwear or Ar mani jack- 
ets or Krizia dresses in cities 
throughout the world, after all. So 
the secret does not lie in the famous 
labels. 

To the contrary. The secret lies in 
the lack of labels. It lies in the army 
of anonymous artisans who make 
clothes to measure. The fabrics are 
superb and so is the cuL And the 
paces? Not necessarily exorbitant 

Try some of the following next 
time you are in Milan and you feel 
like being self-indulgent but origi- 
nal. You can trust the people who 
are serving you. They really do 
know which shapes flatter and the 
effect of a given material once it is 
made up. All the places mentioned 
will post to overseas clients. 

G & C Scalfl at Via Mercato 3 
( 10 minutes walk from the Duorao) 
has a wide range of exquisite wool- 
en fabrics, linens, cottons and silks 
for both men’s and women's out- 
fits. The men’s section is more tra- 
ditional — but then men’s clothes 
last longer, so it makes sense. 

A man’s two-piece suit in a top- 
quality Italian cloth wiil cost 
around 600,000 lire (5300); ajacket 
from 450,000 to 550.000 lire; an 
overcoat around 600,000 lire. 

The women’s section is larger 
and brighter and the fabrics are 
absolutely stunning. Scalfi makes 
up a few very smart models every 
season, so that you can get an idea 
of cut and new fashions. But you 
can suggest modifications, and 
they will leaf through copies of 
Vogue to pin down, what you're 
after. 

A woman’s two-piece light wool- 
en suit with a silk blouse will cost in 
the region of 600,000 lire; a skirt 
alone perhaps 150.000 lire. High- 
quality cottons and linens do nor 
cost much less than wools, so sum- 
mer and winter prices are similar. 


Normally, Scalfi can make up what, 
you order in a week or 10 days; but 
the first time, leave a day or two for 
eventual adjustments. 

Just three minutes away from 
Via Mercato is Via Madonnina. 
There at No. 2 is a shop called 
Alfonso Garlando. It deals in men’s 
and women’s shoes and has a suc- 
cessful line of trendy footwear, 
which they enrich with about 10 
new models each season. 

Women's shoes go from 49,000 
lire to 169,000 lire: men's from 
99,000 lire to 220,000 lire. And the 
delight of the place is that once you 
have selected a shoe that suits and 
fits you. you can have it made up in 
any one of a fantastic range of 
colors (invest in a matching belt 
and bag while you are at it). Wom- 
en’s sizes go from a 33 (which is 


snake-head dips and birds of para- 
dise that meet beak to beak around 
your waist (approximately 60.000 
lire). 

And if you cannot find exactly 
what you are after in this jungle of 
color, then explain what you need 
to the proprietor and she will have 
it made for you in eight to 10 days. 
The same goes for the costume jew- 
elry she specializes in. 

If you are interested in knitwear 
that is stylish but different, then get 
a uuri to Cotso Vercdli 31 (or get 
out at the Pagano subway stop). 
Here in an atelier Tina Bastiamni 
designs and displays cardigans, gj- 
lels and pullovers that are hand 
knitted in limited editions. 

Tina actually comes up with 
about 500 prototypes a year in fan- 
cy wools. But if none meets your 


The secret lies in the lack of labels. It lies 
in the army of anonymous artisans who 
make clothes to measure. The fabrics are 
superb and so is die cat. 


tiny) to a 45 (which is enormous), 
and you can also choose the heel 
height you want Orders take from 
IS to 20 days. 

If you would.like to brighten up 
the skirt you have just tailored with 
an unusual belt, make your way to 
Largo Cairo li (5 minutes walk from 
Via Madonnina) and then down a 
small side sLreet called Via Cam- 

r rio. There aL No. 15, you will find 
CampieBo, which stocks a color- 
ful assortment of belts with every 
conceivable type of clip, buckle, 
and fastener. 

There are super-elegant fine gray 
leather ones with a folded motif at 
the front or a floral buckle in two 
tones of gray enamel (55,000 lire). 
But there are also bright glittering 
belts in a special stretchy cord with 
fiery dragon fasteners, diamante 


requirements, she will produce ex- 
actly what you need in about 10 
days — men, women and children 
catered for. 

Prices range from 150,000 lire to 
170.000 lire an item, depending on 
the yarn. (Tina speaks English, 
French and German, so explana- 
tions are easy). 

Back in the center of town, you 
might like to indulge your taste for 
details. Underwear, for instance: A 
number of men’s shirtmakers will 
also make boxer shorts in the cho- 
sen materiaL 

Vittorio Stntscaldn in Via Gcsu 8 
is the very best for shirts. In fact, he 
will only start to supply you when 
be is quite sure the pattern is per- 
fect in every respect Thus, the first 
time may be rather a lengthy busi- 
ness. And the shirt will cost you 


Milan Shows Its Charm During 'CoUezionV 


(Continued From Previous Page) 

lieves that the height of sophistica- 
tion is “the woman who takes all 
labels out of her clothes.” 

Gianfranco Ferre said his whole 
collection works off of the T-shirt 
shape. Sometimes it clings precari- 
ously dose to the body, at other 
times it is loose and easy, most 
everything will be belted. His pants 
will be large at the top and narrow 
down onto the leg. 


Kiizia’s Mandelli is in accord 
with her peers on the option for 
women to show off taut, well-cared 
for bodies. “At times the line ad- 
heres to the body with vigor," she 
said. 

After all the show-and-tell in this 
world of conspicuous consump- 
tion, it is perhaps Giorgio Armani 
who best articulates what he specif- 
ically. and the Italian designers in 
general, seem to do best. 


Apart from their dedication to 
detail excellent craftsmanship, a 
special sensibility for color, texture 
and uncontrived structures it is 
their appreciation of the fine line 
between the real world and the ab- 
surd that has strengthened their in- 
dustry. 

"I believe in fantasy up to a 
point, but I never forget that ulti- 
mately a woman must wear the 
clothes I design. They must be 
sold." • 


around 200,000 lire. But there are 
innumerable cheaper but adequate 
shirtmakers in Milan There must 
be, because if you look around in 
the city center you will notice that 
half the male chests sport the tell- 
tale monogram that denotes the 
hand-made article. 

Guseppu at Via della Spiga 46 
(also right in the center) will make 
women’s underwear to order in 
about a month. Anything from 
nighties to culottes and petticoats 
(hut not bras) in silks, satins and 
finest cottons. 

A nightdress in apricot-colored 
hand-embroidered silk will cost 

250.000 lire; in cotton 100,000 lire. 
A petticoat and culottes of the sort 
now coming back into vogue, in 
pearl gray silk, will Ire about 

200.000 lire. 

The last word on details still has 
to be said, however. Go to Lorenz 
in Via Montenapoleone 12 and 
pick something out from the amaz- 
ing array of chintzes, paisleys, 
laces, tartans, ginghams and checks 
that have been made into watch- 
straps. You are not likely to spend 
more than about 20,000 lire ($10), 
and with this you will have revolu- 
tionized your faithful old time- 
piece. That is, if you have not al- 
ready succumbed to buying a 
completely new watch from their 
staggering collection. 

One last suggestion. You have 
been traveling and you know what 
a bore it is to find your purse bulg- 
ing with useless foreign coins, how 
embarrassing it can be when you 
cannot put your hand on your cred- 
it card, how worrying to discover 
you have midaid your plane ticket. 

Federico Boffi at Via Mascagni 
20 (opening in November, a short 
taxi nde from the center or a few 
minu tes walk from Tma Bastian- 
ini’s atelier in Corso Vercelli) has 
the answer, based on his personal 
analysis of the problem. It is a fine 
leather folder that contains a ring 
clip opener into which you slot a 
credit card holder, a ticket holder, a 
purse with four different-colored 
zip compartments for different cur- 
rencies, a passport holder, a calcu- 
lator — all in black leather. These 
units can be used separately, and 
they look nice. 

As for the folder, it is smart and 
simple enough to suit men and 
women as a bag; but it is small 
enough to fit into a briefcase. 
Prices: the folder costs 129,000 lire 
and the innards range from 33,000 
lire to 60,000 lire. Federico Boffi 
sells other exquisitely made bags. 
But his real delight is coming up 
with exactly the right answer for 
your requirements- 



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Anna and Carla Fendi, two members of the family responsible for some of die world’s most popular status symbols. 

The Fendis , Fashion’s Formidable Five 


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ROME — After meeting one or more of 
fashion’s legendary Fendi sisters, it becomes 
immediately clear that any number of adjectives 
could account for the other initial in their super- 
chic double F logo. 

Words like focused, flamboyant, fastidious 
and forceful come quickly to mind 

But Paola, Anna, Franca, Carla and Alda 
Fendi would no doubt choose another word to 
describe the prestigious leather, fur and ready- 
to-wear business their parents founded in 1925. 
Certainly it would be family. 

For above aQ. the name Fendi has cram to 
represent a strong, dedicated dynasty that pro- 
duces some of the world's most coveted status 
symbols, many of which are lavishly splashed 
with the double F signature designed by Rad 
Lagerfeld. 

This year marks the 60th anniversary of the 
fashion family and 20 years of close association 
with Lagerfeld, the man who also designs the 
Fendi ready-to-wear and the extraordinary fur 
collection and who gives aid and counsel on the 
enormous collection of accessories. 

To commemorate the occasion — and most 
particularly. Anna and Carla emphasize, to hon- 
or Lagcifdd, on whom they lavish credit and 
praise for his major contribution to (he interna- 
tional success of their business — Saturday 
night they threw an enormous dinner dance in 
Rome's National Gallery of Modem Art where 
a retrospective of his Fendi furs will be on 
exhibit until Oct 25. 

‘This is the first time in the history of this 
country that any museum has allowed fashion to 
be displayed," Anna Fendi said. “From a moral 


point of view it is an important step for Italian 
fashion in general” 

Even so, Lagerfeld is not particularly keen on 
the idea of homages, especially in museums. 
“It’s lovely chat they want to do tins, but for me 
the past is not what fashion is all about." he 
said. Tve told them that and they understand.” 

He acquiesced, of course, and in deference to 
his maxim that “the past is boring," included in 
the exhibition will be a collection of lively 
sketches depicting futuristic fur fantasies. 

“It is interesting, of all the people I have 
worked for [and Lagerfeld has probablyworked 
for more major houses than any other d esigner , 
including CUoS in thepast, Chanel and his own 
label in the present] it has been the most pleas- 
ant of my relationships,” Lagerfeld said. “We 
have not had a fight in 20 years and believe me I 
fight easily — I don’t start them, you under- 
stand. but don’t attack ...” 

Others have found the formidable five less 
coogemaL One long-time associate describes the 
second generation as: "Little lambs who are 
really fittle wolves," when it comes to their 
tough business tactics. 

- With lew exceptions, however, those who 
know and work with the Fendis have unquali- 
fied respect for their brillant marketing sense, 
loyalty to clients, especially those who support- 
ed them in the beginning, and their unwavering 
family fidelity. 

“In the beginning, my mother and father 
knew they wanted to attract the very elegant 
woman,” Anna said. “At that time 90 percent of 
these potential clients were carrying Gucd bags. 
No one ever thought about status symbols zhm. 
just that ideaL” 


Over the years they have more than attainec 
thatgoaL 

With 54-year-old Paola, the eldest sister, di- 
recting the $59-million operation, each memba 
of the family has specific duties, and over the 
years all but one of their husbands came into the 
business. Now the third generation is joining the 
r anks and recently designed a young, kicky anc 
inexpensive line of accessories labeled Fendis- 
sime. And a year ago last September, the first 
member of the fourth generation made his de- 
but. 

"We all feel so much younger now that our 
children are working with us,” Anna said. 
"Their greatest contribution is the freshness that 
comes with their youth. Knowing that my three 
daughters will take over one day gives me anew 
enthusiasm for everything.” 

Yes, but maybe there is such a thing as too 
mud) family, at work, at hone. Are they ever a| 
each others' throats? 

“Not at all," Carla said. “Most of the time we 
are working in different offices, concentrating 
on different projects. We come together when 
major decisions have to be made. Furthermore, 
we have our private lives. We aren’t together all 
the time. 

“Christmas is the big exception. Everyone is 
forbidden to leave town cm that day. It is our 
single most important family fete. We take turns 
every year and every year the group gets bigger 
and bigger. There are 1 1 in the third generation, 
then there are the husbands, the in-laws, the 
boyfriends and girlfriends.” 

. *We are a very big family," Anna added. . 

— LETlIIA GJETT 


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The andrd I a u g collection will be shown 
on October 9 at 9:1 5 a.m. in Milan - Hotel Principe & Savoia. 


Ferre Designing for Furniture, Too 





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andr6 laucj boutique. Via dena Croce, 76, Roma. Tel.: 6780006. 


I MILAN — Before Gianfranco 
1 Fcrrd was a ready-to-wear design- 
er, be was an architect. 

Despite his training, however, 
early on it was fashion that most 
attracted and fascinated him, and 
for more than a de cade he has con- 
centrated his creative efforts on 
this, his primary interest Always 
he has declined the frequent re- 
quests from interior-design and ar- 



chitectural firms to do licensee 
work for them. 

Although he has licensee agree- 
ments to attach his name and repu- 
tation to such items as leather ac- 
cessories, shoes, glasses, perfume 
and watches, for various reasons 
the perfect opportunity to specifi- 
cally meld his- architectural disci- 
pline with his passion for fashion 
never presented itself. 

It never presented itself that is 
until six months ago when B&B 
Italia, one of Italy’s more innova- 
tive furniture design houses, and an 
old friend, Paolo Nava, suggested 
that Ferre might be seduceofay an 
amusing twist on his talents. Why 
not. just for the fun of it, look at a 
chair or a sofa as if it were a wom- 
an? Why not indeed? 

Anyone can make a slipcover, 
but who could better design a dress, 
or better still a mini-wardrobe for a 
piece of furniture? 



Fcnt liked the idea a lot. It ap- 
pealed to the 41 -year-old designer’s 
sense, of style and his sense of hu- 
mor so he preceded to create three 
changes of “clothes" for one chair 
and two sofas. 


’ for One chair 



He did a crisp, no-nonsense 
white linen for spring and summer, 

a cozy wool “dress” for winter and 

a quilted satin number for evening.^ 

— letittia g.jett 

Moods by Krizia, ■ 
Affordable Looks ! 
For The Limited ' 


MILAN — In his unbiased opin- 
ion Aldo Pinto believes Kriaa’s de-‘ 
signer, Marincda Mandrill is "the 
most complete woman designer in 
the world.” ^ 

If there is some predjudice in 1 
raved m that opinion, what with 
nntO' being the business manage 
of Knaa aswdl as the husband of 
Mandrill, his enthusiasm and sup- 
port for her work could not be 
more genuine. 

Now, Mandelli and Pinto have 
decided to expand their customer 
base m a recent agreement with 
ine Limited, a chain of more than 
XW moderately priced women’s apt 
parri srores in the United States: 
7 s .. 01 February the company will 
ddivcr a 40-piece collection of 
clothing — in line with the store’s 
^ucture which wfll be 
railed Moods by Krizia. 

Aocording i° Pinto, The limited 
has projected “conservative" first- 
yrar sales of Moods at between $60 
and $70 minion. ■ 
tverythmg will be simpler, of 

STSJ 1 * aar «3? but it 

^ Krizia 

J 2 ?L T* Mariuccia wifl 

wants knows what she 

auts and she al ways ge ts it” 

— - — __ — UnfTTU G. JETT 



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IM^RNATIONAL HEBALD TRIBUNE, $ATUBPAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6,1985 


Page 11 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 1TALLAN FASHION 




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l . ,r Tin 1 lin#: 



?f By Sari Gilbert 

BB ^N Behind the dynamic 

Y & Italy's top stylists, 
or their imaginative use. of 
»lor and design, lies, an 
ve economic empire whose 
performance in. recent 
be described as brilliant. 
Armani, .whose debut 
years ago, today has a 
d turnover of more 
r fibre ($138.7 million). = 
1983 turnover is said to' 

Su Mttoa Mandrill may have 
Earned a si milar amount ua fran- 
jiuses and . royalties. Gianni Ver- 
pace reportedly sold 12 billion lire 
$orth of clothaig- in Japan alone 
last year: Basile, which is designed 
bylndano Soprani, sold 32 bullion 
Jire .worth in 1984. Missoni. whidi 
issoon to be starting its own line of 
prft-&-pbner in conjunction with 

Some people in the 
fashion industry 
■credit Valentino’s 
2 .- insistence on 
■.'a high-quality 
refinishing when he 
moved his ready-to- 
wear production 
■ ; back to Italy with 
helping to set high 
’ " standards that have 
paid off on the 
pret-^a-porter 
. . balance sheet 


Maraotto, a major Italian dothmg 
manufacturer, last year had 
knitwear-plus sales of 25.6 billion 
lire. 

•/ Valentino, with dose to 800 sales 
outlets worldwide and almost the 
only major Italian stylist today 
whose international reputation 
dates back to the 1960s, last year 
took in over 100 biOton lire, for 
sales of Miss V, Valentino 'Bou- 
tique and Valentino Menswear. 
Thai does not indude his couture 
collection, perfumes, accessories, 
underwear, linens and .'other prad- 
iids. 

• - -Bat 4ha£ sum-represests roaghly- 
one-fonrth of the 1984 turnover erf 
Gruppo -Fmanziaro Tessde, the 
[Turin-based dothmg manufactnr- : 
£r. which has been producing Va- 
lentino’s prtt-A-porter tolkctioiis 
qnce 1980 and which also manu- 

^jmmrcsArmflni.andtbeFraich 
designers Emanud Ungaro and 
J^ouis Ferand. - 
s Valentino, who for what manag- 
ing director Giancario Gxametti 
^enns “reasons .erf tradition”, still 
shows his ready-to-wear collection 
Sn PSms not Milan, probably can be 
credited with part erf the recent 
Italian fashion explosion. - 
I Some people in the fashion ii^ 
‘dustry credit Valentino’s insistence 
on high-quality refinidring when he. 
moved his ready-to-wear produc- 
tion bade to Italy with hoping to 
set high standards that have paid 
off on the prtt-4-porter balance 
sheet 




According to Mr. Gfcuneui, how- 
ever, the main reasons for the Ital- 
ian success ihdode die creativity of . 
Italian designers “who never stop. i 
experimenting”, and the fashion’' 1 



he relations. 

In a d dition, he said* “We We 
been able to rely .on the support 
and expertise erf Italy’s Icmgrstoad- 
mg. artisan and fabric tffimoos.”,- 
.The French, he; painted out, today 
buy 90 percent of then tadilcs m 
Italy. 

There is in Italy a happy mar- 
riage that exists .betWn : stylisis 
and. the increasingly modem Ital- 
ian dothmg industry. .-y • 

Armando Branchhu; prcsttLeot 
of the Association of Italian Ckithr 
ing and Textile Industries* said, 
“The stylists may be the engine, but 
to have a train you also have to 
have railway cars behind it” ' 

“Our manufacturers have shown 
flexibility jm/f imngmatinn ip fheir 


duction,” said Mr. Branchmi. The 
proof is in the production figures. ■ 

Last year, Italy's 28,000 dothmg 
and knitwear factories had sales of 
20,570 bUlicni lire and estimates in- 
dicate an 11.8-perceat increase to 
23,000 billioo lire this year. Cloth- 
ing exports nm/MintM to 8,690 bil- 
lion tire in 1984 and should reach 
9,760 billion hre, an increase of 
12J percent this yean 

The major industrial success of 
the Italian fashion «md do thing 
world is, erf course, Benetton. The 
company developed over the last 20* 
years from a small knitwear finn in 

Treviso in northern Italy into a 
multinational company with 400 
outlets in the United States alone 
and a 15184 turnover of 632 htQion 
lire. a -26.4-petcenl increase over 
1983 results. 

Other highly successful firms are 
Zegna. which prodoces Versace 
menswear; Maxmant winch has 
■ half a Aririm brands of its own; 
Lebole, which along with its own 
labd produces aQ. of Laura Biag- 
giotti, and GirombdE, which does 
Jenny (Versace), and Complice 
(Montana). . 

But there are some problems. 
Mr. Branchini says ckrfhmg manu- 
facturers are womed about high 
production costs undercutting Ital- 
ian competitiveness. In recent 
years, Italy's share of the Western 
European, clothing ‘ market has 
- shrank. Previousty; naly , s Europe- 
an neighbors bought 70 percent of 
ltahan dotlting exports, but that 
h»-flow.dechned- -to 56 per— 
■.cent: .‘\ 

. Umberto Ginoduetti, a designer 

and mim»ifnrfnr w w hr> has between 

400 and 500 sales outlets in West 
Gammy, Hence, Britain, Japan, 
the United Stares and Italy, said 
prices and services “will decide the 
future erf our industry.” 

.. . Mr. Ginochietti, who produces, 

, along with his own label, Tbkny 
Mugler in France and Ursula Con- 
: zen ui West Germany, last year had 
'a turnover of $21.1 rtnflian. for his 
'-own line alone:'. ■ v- 

' Pietro Ricdardi cf the govern- 
ments Foreign Trader Institute in 
Rome, said Italy’s dothmg indus- 
try has no more problems than any 
other branch of Italian industry, all 
of which suffer the restraints of the 
. prevailing high interest and infla- 
tion rates aswefl as the higher dol- 
lar cost of most unported raw ma- 
terials. 





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Amusing metallic bow bags for evening by Franco Moschino and to make sure no one forgets bis name he 
plastered it all over his shiny gold ami salver belts, above. Below left: Ugo CoreanTs pins and pearls. 

The Essential Accessories: Big and Bold 

ROME — No longer a matter of choice, the accessory has 
become essential, an integral part and often the focus of modern 
Italian clothing desi gn- Costume jewelry or bijouterie has fol- 
lowed the new shapes and proportions and consequently has 
become large and bold in design, taking mi dimensions impossi- 
ble or prohibitivdy expensive if made with predous or semipre- 
dous stones. Materials and colors are unlimited and unique 
combinations the norm. 

Metals, rope, gilded threads, pearls, crystal, pressed tur- 
quoise, rhinestones, imitation ivory and imitation anything are 
f redy combined in an exuberance of color and shape. Moderate 
prices permit a complete change of accessories more easily than 
a change of shoes. 

Jewelry design and ornamentation has been a peculiar Italian 
talent for centuries. The Etruscans began creating numerous 
decorative objects and jewels using a variety of metals (all 
considered precious) as well as gold. The precision and fantasy 
of their redmiq iies was so highly sophisticated that now certain 
objects would be extremely difficult or impossible to reproduce. 
The fm pftrtanrg and function of decoration design was not 
forgotten in Medieval manuscripts, by Botticelli or by numer- 
ous Renaissance or post-Renaissa n ce artists. 

Now modern technology, a freedom of. choice in materials 
and a continuing fantasy in design has placed Italian bijouterie 
in the role of the “essential” in the line of each season, 
a*,,*^* — SHEILA NARDULU 


Shoes to Foot the Bill 

ROME — Italy produced 496 mfllion pairs of shoes in 1984, exporting 
dose to 80 percent of the output — 393 million pairs — and earning 6,159 
billion lire ($3.4 billion) an increase of more than 17 percent over 1983 
export sales. 

According to figures provided by the National Association of Italian 
Shoe Producers, during the first five months of 1985, exports increased 
6.8 percent with an increase 14 J percent in value over the same period in 
the preceding year. 

However, Leonardo Soana, director of the Italian Association of Shoe 
Manufacturers, said that although exports are doing well in general 
(particularly in the United States, which imports a high quality, high 
priced product) inflation at home is undercutting Italian competitiveness 
in other areas. 

Thus, the number of pairs of Italian shoes imported by West Germany, 
where a medium-priced shoe is preferred, dropped by two million in the 
first half of this year. Mr. Soana said that there are also serious problems 
for the shoe industry at home. He said that Italian casual shoes were being 
increasingly undercut in price in the domestic market by imports from 
manufacturers in Taiwan, Korea and China. 

— SARI GILBERT 



Swg Nordulli 

Sharra Pagano's silver-plated and pressed turquoise 
necklace with matching earrings. 





***£<*? 

Hi 

U. 


' : v ' ;• . • r 

; i |;ii; ... 



. ~ Vl '‘ > ’• ; 




Belts, beads and bracelet from Valentino. 


ZIA 


SARI GILBERT is the Rome correspondent for 
The Washington Post, and European 
correspondent for the Boston Globe. She is a 
regular contributor to the Chicago Son-Times and 
CBS radio. - 1 

LETITIA G. JETT, a Paris-basedjoumaHst and 
special correspondent for the Chicago Tribune, is a. 
former manag in g editor of Elle International 
magazine. 


CONTRIBUTORS 

pendent for SHEILA NARDULU, a Rome-based photogra- 


pher and journalist, contributes regularly to the 
Sunday Tunes, the Toronto Globe and Mail, 
Newsweek and several Italian magaz i nes . 

KATE SINGLETON, a MDan-based journalist. 

- writes about Italian culture, 1 design and architec- 
ture. She contributes to The Sunday Times, Die 
Zeit and II Giomale, and has worked with “Casa- 
. beUa,” the Italian architectural magazine. 




FENDI 



NEW YORK 805 Madison Avenue 
DALLAS 4268 Oak Lawn Avenue 
BEVERLY HILLS 41 4 North Rodeo Drive 
PALM BEACH Esplanade, 1 50 Worth Avenue 
TORONTO 55 Bloor Street West 
LONDON 28 Brook Street 
FRANKFURT Goetheplatz7 
GENEVE 31 Rue du Rhone 

HONG KONG The Landmark, 3 1 3 Central Building Pedder Street 
TOKYO Sun Roser 4 Kioicho Chiydaku 
OSAKA Navio Hankyu 7-1 0 Kakutamachi Kitaku 


ROMA P.zza di Spagna 77 
VENEZIA S. Marco 2359 - Caile delle Osireghe 
PALERMO P.zza Crispi 9 
TORINO Via Roma 354 
MILANO Via della Spiga 23 


PARIS: 43 Rue du Bac 

MILANO: Via Montenapoleohe 1 
ROMA: Via Borgognona 38/B 
ISCHIA: Piazzetta dei Pini 


NEW YORK: 836 Madison Avenue 
MUNCHEN: 3 Amiralplatz 
TORINO: Galleria S. Federico T2 
VENEZIA: Caile Vallaresso 1312/B 


ICPvIZl/V via manin 1 9 milano tel. 02-659641 5 




741A 411* SCM 250 V 17 
12* 9* SL Ind -22b 17 11 
32* 19WSPSTeC JO 15 IS 

1* 13 SOUne JM j 38 

20 14 SobnRv 241el+4 

2DH 12* 5fedHs JO 17 15 

12* 5tfc StodSe 22 

9* HA StadSwt 


London Metals 


Clow PlWlOM 

BM ASk BM Aik 

ALUMINUM 
Steribio per aietrlc ton 
snot 65X00 454-BO 65450 68650 

forward 67770 67850 47200 47400 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Sterling per metric ton 
spot 950.00 951-00 949 JO 951 JO 

forward 97250 97100 97SJ0 97400 

COPPER CATHODES (Stnadardl 
Stemav per metric tea „ 

5POt 921JJ0 92300 92100 92400 

forward 95200 95400 93500 95BOO 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ton 

mat va qi 2A4J0 24200 24300 

ferward 27173 27200 27200 27300 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric Ian 
Spot 290200 291200 284000 2S56M 

forward 392100 292200 288500 289000 

SILVER 

Pence per troy ounce 

soot 421.00 42200 42300 4MOO 

Forward 43400 <3500 43400 437 JO 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling par metric ton HMI _ 

spot Siim — 843800 854900 

forward Susp. - 854400 844000 

ZINC 

Sterling rer metric ton __ 

spat 39000 19200 39900 40100 

Source: AP. 


Now offering 
CBOT 

BON D 

FUTURES 

WBea & BBS 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures and 
Futures Options on 
COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM -CURRENCIES 

• - LmrCrxernknee Rota 


$15 


* ROUND TUAN 
IMYAND 
OVERNIGHT 


’AppHet on/r to trades 

acceedtnR 750 contract! per 
catmAzr mrmPt Ftrtt 2 So 
contracts S2f rmntd rum. 


< jJI unc of uur pnofeselrmah: 
212-221-7138 

Telex; 2 — OGS 

BEPDBLZC CLEARING 
CORPORATION 

«iMtM«ntKTra 

lepeMr laltotal leak ctihwlw* 

A *12 Brawn PMKKU B«4 


volume; < late al 25 Forte. 
Source; Reuters. 


Gomnwclities 


JUT _ N.T. N.T. 31900 34100 33700 33900 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 34300 34500 34100 343.00 
Oct _ N.T. N.T. 34800 35000 34400 34800 
Volume: 25 late of 100 az. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U5i per ounce 


High low Settle 

Dec 327J0 327 JO 327.1® 

Feb N.T. N.T. 331 JO 

Volume: 40 lata at IDO az. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Ma lays Mm cents per ktla 

Clow Prr 

Bin Ask Bid 

Dec 1 79 JO ibojd ihioo 

Jan 18030 1BL50 18200 

Feb 18200 18X00 18X00 

Mar 18100 18400 18400 

Volume: 0 lot*. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cent! per kilo 

- Close Prat 

BM Ask Bid 

RSS 1 Dec- 15550 15400 15553 

RSS T jan_ 15425 15475 15750 

P.S5 2 Dec- 14850 14930 New 

RS5 3D0C- 14450 14750 — 

RSS 4 Dec. 1CJ0 144 JO — 
RSS 5 Dec. 13700 13900 — 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian rtngglle per 35 turn 


ConSnoilities 


High Law BM Ask arw 

SUGAR „ 

French (ranee pgr metric Ian 
Dec 1030 1*405 1415 1420 +13 

Mar 14® 1420 1-05 1.04 +4 

MOV 1473 1770 1.444 1-474 +3 

Aug 1516 1 JM 1504 1514 + 10 

Del 1540 1540 1532 1545 + 12 

Dec 1548 1545 1544 1550 +13 

Est. voL; 3000 late of 50 lane. Prev. actual 
rates: 1580 lots. Open Interest: 24478 
COCOA 

FreiicSi trance per 110 kg 

1590 1590 1585 1590 + 

1.920 1.930 1,900 1.920 


fbt. 4 

Close Previous 
High Law BM ARC BM Ask 

5UOAR 

Starling per metric tea 
DOC N.T. N.T. 14400 14950 15150 15350 

Mar 14250 15850 159.00 159-40 161.40 14200 

May 14550 14X00 14350 14350 145L2Q 18550 

Aug 17050 18850 18809 14850 17080 17150 

Oct 17550 17350 17X00 17X40 17550 17400 

Volume: X203 lots of SO tons. 

COCOA 

Steriiag per metric Ion 
Doc 1543 1555 1559 1540 1559 1540 

Mar 1,706 1597 1,703 1.705 1J01 1,702 

May 1530 1J23 1.730 IJ31 17Z7 1528 

jly 1J53 1.749 US* 1555 U49 1J50 

SOP 1.775 1773 1774 1777 1749 1775 

Dec U70 1745 1770 1771 1744 17&8 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1775 1781 1780 1785 , 

Volume: 1,185 late aflO tans. 

COFFEE 

Starting Per metric ton 
NOV 1,940 1545 1470 1490 1.944 1.954 

Jan 1490 1485 1.912 1.915 1.991 1495 

Mar 1,992 1499 1.922 1,925 2510 2515 

May 1,990 1,915 1442 1455 2510 2525 

Jly 1.990 1.945 1465 1485 2510 2540 

Sep 2500 1470 1480 1,990 2520 2550 

Nov 1.985 1,985 1.940 2520 2510 2580 

Volume: 9474 lots of 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

UJLdoHan par metric tan 
NOV 24423 264JD 26475 34850 26025 24&50 
DOC 26S75 20030 241 30 20175 26400 26475 
Jra 26275 25950 259 JO 24050 24250 26X25 

Fob 25875 25350 25875 25550 25775 25775 
Mar 25050 24575 24575 24450 24950 24930 
API 24075 23750 23750 23730 23930 23975 
May 23050 23050 22850 22950 23150 23250 
Jun 22950 22550 22575 22530 22850 23150 
Jly 23050 225.00 22530 22S75 22750 22950 
volume: 1,139 Ion at 100 tone. 

CRUDE OIL (BRENT) 

U5- doikn per barrel 

Dec 2855 2870 2889 2870 New New 

Jan Z0JB 2750 2775 2750 — — , 

Feb 27-47 2775 2773 2778 — — 

Mar 26-90 2440 2435 2880 — — 

*P» ®>-SS 2650 25JM 2430 — — 

May 24.15 26.15 2570 2470 — — 

Volume: 129 lots of 1500 barrels. 

Sources: Reuter* and London Petroleum Ex 
chanoe tuasoft, crude all}. 


, S&p 100 
indec Options 


Strike UBrUnt PuhJjai 

Prtc* NUT Dec JM Fee Hov StS Fee 
l4JI9 tt-___WMW- 
in 141* 143* lAi Ula 1/M J/M 5/14 7/14 

m VJ L0 9^ 10 I/m 7/14 13/M 1 S/14 

“flat M >t 1 7/142 B. 
IB llnuvuiw JL 2 1* 5 

in 1* tin* iw 1 «v an tv. Tie n 

IIS---_ UTi___ 

iMdaCnkme jkda 
T«W can awn tat. 505.175 
TMpdrWn MU66 
TrWwri 0PM felt. 44J547 

HMfeUUf Lap 11453 Bote 1K92 + 011 
Source; CBOE. 


Massey-Ferguson Shutdowns 

Reuters 

TORONTO — Massey-Fergu- 
son Lid. said Monday ii would sus- 
pend production Nov. 15 at its 
combine harvester plants here and 
in Brantford. Omario because in- 
dustry sales in North America bad 
dropped to record low levels. 



3-nxmtti bill 

Dtscoant 
Oder Bid 

772 770 

Mot. 4 

Prev. 
Yield Yield 

745 743 

4-«Datti bill 

771 779 

7.70 

748 

l-rearbiB 

777 775 

751 

7.90 

N-vear bead 

Bid Otter 
W3 28/32103 30/37 

Yield 

1020 

Prev. 

Yield 

1073 

Seurat; Salomon Brothers. 

MarrDl Lynch Treasury index; 13L29 
Change far me dev: +622 

Average yield: 045 % 

iwa. Merrill Lynch. 



DM Futures 
Options 


P.CermmMart-aSJRO marts, cents etr mm 


Xoc. 4 

Strike Calls- Settle Ptm-SeftM 

Price Dec Mar Jea Dec Mar Jun 

1 78 275 263 ILM 050 B72 

18 0.95 L73 272 0J2 884 15* 

39 441 171 173 OJB 177 1J2 

*0 0.15 083 UO 1J1 156 204 

<1 004 054 044 — — 245 

estimated total wL «JW 
Cote'. FrLveL 1802 apMM. 3*338 
Puts: "rl. vol. 2717 open lot. 77JM 
Sourer: vJ»tr. 


COFFEE COiYCSCE) 

mSo^ma^Dae 14050 14475 15930 16146 —614 
14753 12830 Mar 15153 14550 14153 16154 — 5J9 
M 147.18 13150 Mav 14175 16530 15170 15276 -852 
13 

1-8 | 

i I Currency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Opttona Strike 

UmleriylDa Price Cate— Last I 

Nov Dec Mar Nov Dec Mar 
12300 British Pounds-cents par unit. 

B Pound 120 4 • r 2400 4 

14455 125 * 1975 t 8 

14455 110 3 1180 r 1 

14455 135 r 9.15 970 r 

14455 140 r r 640 0.15 

14455 145 070 135 450 r 

14455 in r 030 273 r 

5550a Conodkia DaHare-cents Par antt. 

CDallr 71 r r r r 

7350 73 r r r r 

7350 73 r r 073 r 

42J00 warn German Mcrio-centi per mdt. 
DAtom 30 3 833 r 5 

3888 31 4 730 r S 

3848 32 5 654 r s 

3848 33 5 530 r 0 

3848 34 I 430 473 ■ 

3848 35 r 162 450 r 

3848 36 r 234 r r 

3848 37 r 1.74 274 r 

3848 38 035 150 175 r 

3848 3V 0.14 049 176 058 

3848 40 r 070 054 r 

1K4M French Frwics-iottii of a cent per unit. 

F Prone 120 r 645 r r 

12677 125 1.90 r r r 

67SUM Japanese Yen-UOths el a cent per unit. 
JVen 41 s r 75B 5 

«.14 42 r 618 470 r 

4814 43 r 612 634 r 

4814 44 r 4.16 473 r 

4814 45 r XU 344 r 

4814 46 2.15 270 240 r 

4614 47 ITS 140 159 r 

4614 48 045 052 143 074 

4614 49 613 040 6M r 

<2300 Swiss Fraacs-eents per naif. 

5 Prone 40 s 6«6 r a 

4650 42 S 550 r S 

4650 43 r 455 r r 

4680 44 r X10 r 051 

4650 45 r 118 113 r 

4680 46 r 148 r 610 

4650 47 042 058 r r 

_ 4*40 48 r 041 140 r 

Total call vaL tun con open 

TotolpalvoL 6975 Put open 

, r— Hat traded. 9— NaepHanoHered. 

Lost I* premium [purchase price). 

Source: AP. 




r 100 
60S 455 

350 r 


053 r 

809 r 

r 052 


0.12 r 

075 050 

r 141 


803 r 
UH 627 
610 045 

076 675 

659 174 


603 r 
607 042 

r 056 
079 151 


■at. IMM 
W. 150915 


yiaar nun Jim 

96M 9653 Sen 

Est. Sales 3531 Prev. So let 8721 
Prev. Day Open ML 4 6224 UP 190 
M YR. TREA5UHYCOBT1 _ 

Si 00500 prin-p*s&32ndBotiaopct ■ 
■8-11 7S-13 Dee 87-M 88-1 

87- 11 75-14 Mar M46 86-31 

16-10 7+30 Jun 85-2 88-1 

84-4 80-7 SOP 

8+19 80-2 „Dec M-ll tt-U 

Eri. Sales Prev.SaiM ix« 

Prev.Day Open ML <9569 oHW O 
US TREASURY BONDS com u 
I8pc+swo500-ids632ndeo(i00pd0' 
790 57-8 Dec 78-1* 2808 

77-29 67-2 Mar 77-6 77-1S 

76-18 58-27 Jun. 785 »-12 

75-XT SG Sep 757 75-10 

7+24 56-35 Dec 74 7400 

7+15 5+gr Mar 

72OT £F sen 71-03 71-27 

7620 BE 7613 7M* 

eSSte PtW.SateteWl. 

m^D^Onealnt317JU ueUM 
MUNICIPAL BO NDS (C BTj . 

Si BHbe Mda+pMAmtAatWOnet 
*8+33 n-W Dee M-W 1W2 

88- 2 MM Mar *+20 B-N 

550 79 Jun 

eSSoM- p35.S0M* 2512 

Prev. Dor Oooa Infc 7jm up 156 

*as=w«i » 

9X18 8656 Mar 92J4 9X16 

91-79 M43 Jun 

HJ9 HJ4 St 

prev. Ouy Open lnt UB Off 48 


78-13 Was 43 

7M 77-15 +3 

75-30 76-10 ■« 

7409 IS* 40 

7849 7+9 4d 

7342 +3 

78-18 +3 

7148 71-X7 +3 

71-4 +3 

70-10 7849 +3 

780 -HI 


88-11 8801 
8544 8524 


Commodity indevwc 


90+209 

K6Uref8 1 ' , • 1 tyt a * 

D-J. Futures '(nfil 

Com- Research Bureau - . 

Moody^ : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931 
p- preliminary; f- f(na] 

dow Jones . base too : Dec. 3t, 1974. 


Prev loos 

W.lflt 

225^0 


9230 9232 -54 
9X13 ttU —52 

.R M +51 
9159 +52 

9B2T +52 



US? Vortc 




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AMEX OrfCW P.14 Pnn .1 . - ...... 

n,aft L A*MiM*lkmsPM S5SSJ JiJ . 

. ^ , \ HYSepffbB P.12 Com niwluh^ p it 

1. ■*» wrse M»hWiow» PJ< intarwTrot« p)\. - -.'■.•■ 

..: S ^ ^ C-Wto! ***. P.U M0^ ta ^ Qry 
\« -tv is enmnev rate P.n orffa*. 

; i: ■;,: b^ ssr a-atL,- » -. 

*? !.’ ■■ •: SATURD AY-auiNUAY Oc 10BER xa ioa^ 

.? S, ■ ' — — — i — 

; ECONOMIC SCENE 

Shenzhen: ChinaConfronfe 
The Free-Enterprise System 

" ! By LEONARD SILK 

•■’•’. ' ‘ " 7?mo Serw'ce ■ _• 

S ^ ZH 5i a “ na ~' n * is Spe<^ Econcwmc Zone, an 
ont 10 attract foreign investment through 
special tax programs and other incentives, is the most . 
;■% *. .• : ^spectacular success story of China’s open-door policy It 

" " exSbSSn v, Principal support S for offshore oil 

«i>l°rati°n in the South China Sea, anhit is likely to become a 
-• o : exporterof food, textiles and petrochemicals 

: &M»nL£t 1 !^!? >I .k C * ? l< > bi l tas >J 1 x growth of Shenzhen ~ 

•- : v f ^ ^rom Hong Kong and is connected 

■ ■> :! ■ S^SSTSS rohth — can be seen in a number of 

. . s; i m^oTc SoaifS '“pqp^*^ 


(tribune, 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


** 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 12. 

Page 13 


IMF Sets 


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signed more than 2^00 for- - «~T I ' " ' 

sign investment agreements Ine closed-door 

valued at more than $ 1.6 bB- >■ 

Bon; it has attracted more policy old. not 

than 30 percent of all foreign VOI b w 
investment m China; it has WOrK ana we will 

seen the number of businesses . • not SO back to It” 
grow to 400, and is pl anning ^ 

307 more; its electronics in- .... .. 

dustiy has grown from one company employing 300 to 60 
companies employing 13,000; its total output has increased 29 
limes, and its per-capita output has climbed to almost $2,000 a 
year in a country where the average has been less *«" $100. 

J- As for the zone's problems, a key one is a blade market in 
currency. Three kinds of money circulate in *h«g area — China's 
currency, its foreign exchange certificates and Hong Kong dol- 
lars. The three currencies, which can be used for purchasing only 
certain kinds of goods, provide opportunities for major wheeling 
and dealing, • . • 

■ Z hang Hongyi, the general manage - of the ’Rank of China's 
Shenzhen branch, says the blade market in money is the alterna- 
tive to a black market in goods. He s ugg ests that the goods black 
market would come into being without the money black marfa* 
because of China’s effort, which he regards as necessary, to run a 
dual-price system. 

O NE set of prices is for domestic goods, with many subsi- 
dies to support the standard of living of poor people. The 
other set applies to imported goods. There is no way to 
raise an impregnable wall between the two. 

Some people here maintain that the three-currency system, 
complicated as it is, is a valuable s timulan t for business activity. 
But Mr. Zhang does not agree. 

“It's not good for the country to allow foreign currency to 
circulate,” he says. He adds that the disorderly currency system 
helped bring cm the huge scandal on Hainan, island involving 
government officials who imported cars at one rate, sold them 
inland at far higher prices because of monetary differences and 
then turned the profits back into foreign exchange for importing 
more can. 

~ This scandal and other criticism, Shwi7ht»n officials say, will 
not deter them from policies that have brought such prosperity. 

. “We know from experience that the dosed-door poGcy did not 
work and we will not go back to it,” One official said. * 

The open door does not. mean just an effort to pat out the 
welcome mat to foreign money and technology. The fTtinesa are 
also trying to. bring people here with wbom tbey wish to make 
friends, regardless of lhar politics or even their past connections 
with Taiwan or South Korea. Many are scientists, economists, 
business people and polilicians fronithe UnitedStates. . ~ 

For example,,. Ken Jernstedt, 68^ §_ member of the Oregon . 
Legislature, wtuvhas been a test pilot at Republic Aviation and a 
Coca-Cola dealer, is back in China for the first time since World 
War U. when he was a member of the Flying Tigers. 

Mr. Jernstedt, who specializes in affairs of the Pacific rim in 
Oregon’s Senate and has maintained dose ties with Taiwan, was 
wary when he and his wife were invited by the Chinese govern- 
ment for an expense-free trip. But he wantei to see his old base in 

(Condmad on Page 17, CoL 4) •: 




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For Mexico 

Loam Approved 
For $300 Million 

By John Burgess 

Washington Post Service 

SEOUL — The International 
Monetary Fund's executive board- 
said Friday that it was prroared to 
give Mexico emergency loans of 
$300 million to bdp repair the 
damage of last month’s earthquake. 

The IMF announcement came as 
the World Bank considered divert- 
ing alike amount of loans previous- 
ly approved for Mexico into emer- 
gency aid, accord rog to an official 
who is in Seoul for the annual 
meeting of the bank and the IMF 
next week. 

Shortly before the earthquake 
Sept 19, the hank approved a 5300- 
- millio n loan for. construction of 
low-income housing. The official 
said that loan in particular might 
be diverted to reconstruction. 

The international banking com- 
munity is assessing the damage 
from the quake, which lolled at 
least 7,000 people, and whether it 
wiD affect Mexico's ability to ser- 
vice ; its estimated $96 billion of 
debt.to foreign banks. 

That subject and the problems of 
other heavfly indebted Latin Amer- 
ican countries are expected to be 
major topics at the. Seoul confer- 
ence, bringing together finance 
■ ministers from 149 countries and 
more than 8,000 other delegates. 

■ Buzz Ore r UJS. Policy 
Clyde H. Farnsworth of The New 
York Times reported earlier from 
Seoul : 

A staple of conversation among 
those gathering for the IMF- World 
Bank conference was the revised 
U-Si strategy for fighting the would 
debt crisis. 

Turning away from previous 
support of IMF-imposed austerity 
programs, the Reagan administra- 
tion is now focusing on trade ex- 
pansion, encouragement of mar- 
ket-oriented policies in debtor 
countries, and mechanisms to get 
more money to the poorest lands. 

“The big message is that we're 
for growth,” said one Washington 
official. “If you attract capital with 
pro-investment, pro-market poli- 
cies, you can soften the harshness 
of the programs.'’ 

James ATBaker 3d, the U.S. sec- 
retary of the Treasury, is expected 
•to press hard on this issue when he 
addresses the conference on Tues- 
day. 

Officials of developing countries 
who have arrived early for consul- 
tations are reacting warily to the 
new U.S. strategy. 

Much of the skepticism is due to 
two apparently conflicting pres- 
sures: a worsening of the debt crisis 
in- both Latin America and sub- 
Saharan Africa and increasing pro- 
tectionist pressure in the United 
States and other industrial coun- 
tries. Major debtor nations main- 
tain that they cannot hope to repay 
their debts until they make more 
dollars by increasing their exports. 

For that reason, Reagan admin- 
istration officials are now saying 
that what is needed is trade liberal- 

(Confinued on Page 15, CoL 7) 


Harley-Davidson: A Long Road Back 

Import Tariffs ® /-< 

Help to Revive . V 

U.S. Cycle Firm 


By Nicholas D. Kriszof 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The Hell’s 
Angels motorcycle club and the 
California Highway Patrol sel- 
dom have much in common, but 
they could chat about their mu- 
tual admiration for recent mod- 
els of Harley-Davidson motorcy- 
cles. 

“It's amazing, the difference.'’ 
Michael O’Farrell, presides of 
the Hell's Angels chapter in Oak- 
land, California, said of the lat- 
est models. “They don’t beat you 
to death any more and your kid- 
neys are suD in tact.” 

Mr. O’Fanrdl is delighted with 
his 1983 Harley and expects that 
the Hell's Angels will continue to 
require all members to have Har- 
leys rather than Japanese-made 
bakes. For one tiring, he said, the 
club prefers to boy American. 

Likewise, the California High- 
way Patrol is buying Harleys 
again, after a 10-year period 
when it purchased Knwasakis 
and Suzukis. 

The newfound enthusiasm for 
Harleys is a sign of a revived 
vigor in Harley- Davidson Co„ a 
company that only a few years 
ago seemed destined to become 
the latest victim of Japanese 
competition. But the Reagan ad- 
ministration came to the rescue 
in early 1983 by imposing heavy 
tariffs on imported large motor- 
cycles. . 

Since then. Harley-Davidsan 
has made enormous changes, 
slashing costs and bolstering 
quality. It has come so far that 
today, executives of other com- 
panies attend its monthly semi- 
nars on efficient management. 

“What they did is a model for 
any company,” said Thomas I. 
Jacoby, an engineer at (he Sagi- 


... Bui Sales Sag 

AnreaJdoraesdc«aM8o*Hsri#y- 
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■»' ■81 .'82 *83 •8*r *85* 


■RaotmaonamreaQBSwa. 'Bft 
tEufarfu NoVak Son 


naw division of General Motors 

Corp- 

Lawrence I. Torieflo, director 
of advanced marketing at the 
Mercury Marine division of 
Brunswick Corp.. agreed. 
“They're doing some things that 
we in U.S. manufacturing all 
ought to be doing,” he said. 
"They’re doing everything they 
can to get a fighting chance." 

But Harley is not out of dan- 
ger. The competition remains in- 
tense and the market for large 
motorcycles is not growing. Tune 
may also be running out for Har- 
ley. The tariffs were designed to 
wither automatically, year by 
year. The first year they were 
almost. 50 percent; now, in the 
third year they stand at 24 per- 


Harley-Davidson execu- 
tives, from left: William 
G. Davidson, vice presi- 
dent rtf styling: Vaughn 
L. Beals, chairman: and 
James H. Paterson, vice 
president of marketing. 

ren t. By 1988 they will be down 
to 4 percent 

President Ronald Reagan said 
the protection granted to Harley 
was intended to give it time to 
adjust to the Japanese competi- 
tion. 

Harley adjusted in part by 
adopting Japanese management 
methods. But Harley officials ac- 
knowledged that although they 
may play the Japanese game bet- 
ter than' most U-S. playeis, they 
still have not caught up. 

Harley has adjusted in many 
ways, but a slump in the US. 
motorcycle market has meant 
that the company's domestic 
sales have fallen in recent years, 
despite a rise in its share of (he 

(Continued mi Page 15, CoL 1, 


Protectionist Push Draws Backlash ' 


By Smart Auerbach 

Wiiihirtgton Poet Service 

WASHINGTON — A backlash 
has begun against the congressio- 
nal push for stronger trade laws, 
with leading UjS. export industries 
arguing that protectionist bills 
would hurt more Americans than 
they would help. 

like the White House; these in- 
dustries appeared to have been sur- 
prised by the protectionist fervor 
that has gripped Congress since it 
returned from its August recess. 
Until late last month, the lobbyists 
had not been active in the debate. 

But now, farmers, high- technol- 
ogy companies and airplane mak- 
ers have joined retail groups in hy- 
ing to gather enough votes to 
uphold a presidential veto of a bill 
that would sharply curtail imports 
of textiles and appareL 
Thal bill has about two-thirds of 
die House and more than half the 
Senate as co-sponsors, and appears 
virtually assured of passage. 

On Thursday, the House Rules 
Committee cleared the way for its 
consideration cm the floor, where it 
is scheduled for debate Wednes- 
day. 


The textile bill has drawn strong 
support in Congress. Sponsors said 
that 300,000 workers bad lost their 
jobs over the past 10 years because 
of imports, which have captured 
about half the UB. market. The bill 
gained more support in the Senate 
with the addition of protection for 
the domestic shoe industry. About 
60 percent of the U.S. shoe market 
is held by imports. 

Signs have emerged, however, of 
an erosion of support, even among 
congressmen and senators who 
were signed on as co-sponsors. But 
vote counters do not believe that 
loss of support is enough to keep 
the bill from passing. 

In one sign of eroding support, 
proponents of the House bill beat 
back by a single vote an amend- 
ment in the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee that would have gutted the 
bill. In another, a vote in the Senate 
Wednesday night indicated that 
the bill may not have enough back- 
ing to muster the votes needed to 
override a presidential veto. 

“I think people are very queasy 
about it," said Senator John C. 
Danforth, Republican of Missouri, 
who called the textile bill “just too 
terrible to support" despite the ad- 


dition to the measure of help for 
the shoe industry, which be favors. 

Mr. Danforth estimated that 
such protection would cost U S. 
consumers $14 billion a year in 
increased prices for clothing and 
would jeopardize $33 billion of 
U.S. exports, such as soybeans, 
wheat, corn, aircraft and chonicals, 
that would face retaliation. 

Retaliation against airplane ex- 
ports of $2.9 billion could cost 
nearly 75,000 jobs, many of them 
from Boeing Corp. in Mr. Evans’s 
home state erf Washington, a Com- 
merce Department study said. 

“If Congress does anything in 
this protectionist vein, the only 
thing it's going to do is cost us 
jobs,” said Vi oo E. Henriq ties, pres- 
ident of the Computer and Busi- 
ness Equipment Manufacturers 
Association, whose members enjoy 
a $5 J-billion trade surplus. 

“We have heard from our cus- 
tomers,” said Mark Ellison of the 
National Association of Wheat 
Growers, which is planning a 
strong lobbying effort in two 
weeks. “If we start passing textile 
bills, the ability and willingness of 
these countries to buy from us will 
be severely hampered." 


Ctarinss frt London and Zurich, ftxirm In outer Europeon confer*. New Vtar* rota at 4 PM. 
to) Commer ci al traactb) Amounts nornse to bvrom pour* tcfAmovotan o eaet l toSuyenm 
OoHor Cl units of WO M Units of 1,000 (,) Units of HUM H-O; not ouotwd; HA.: not ovortnfctt. 
(sr) To Dor em pound: MVSMW 

Other Mlair Vatae* 

Comm per USA Currency per ' USA Currency 'per USA Currency per USA 

Aran, austral U0 Pta. markka &«7 Ma l ay, rt—.' XSM S.KW.WM OT270 

AntraLS ■ 1^033 Qraekdrnc. 13*25 Max para 14540 It p i p m l n 14230 

Aastr.scML IBM HdaaKoap* 7.7*45 HonxMao 7J0 d- k r ano 7Alt5 

MM.Sa.lk. SXSS MdManraaa TUTdS PM. pan 17J0 Taiwan » 4028 

Brazil craz. 7J40JX) lad&rw** 3,121.00 OorLarav* U&M TkalbpM 24225 

Canadians 1.3644 Irish t ■. 0JS47 Soodtrlwl 2*5 TarttakUra 54155 

Qrinosayacm 2.9M8 tsrahahafc. L4IM0 Mia-1 . . 2.118 UAE«rtaam 3*725 

Danish krona VMS toraoM d ln or 03008 8. Air. rand 25575 Vopaz. bally. 14*5 

Egypt, pound 153 

CStarfltov: IJOTBtrWit 

Sfcurcas.-' Bonnue do Benelux fBrvtoeM.- Botko Co mm orckUo fftUfono tMOonii Bonnue No- 
Horn* de Paris t Part*}/ Bade of Tokyo (Tokyo) ; IMF (SORJ/BAII (dlnor, rtyat cOrham). 
Odter data fnm Heaters aid AP. 


South Korea- China Trade Grows Hard to Hide 


By Sam Jameson 

Los Angela Tima Service 

SEOUL — Under glass on the 
coffee table in the office of Lee Soo 
Jang, overseas trade director of Kia 
Motors Carp., is a map of China 
with six of its provinces outlined in 
color. It is not the kind of thing one 
expects to see. South Korea, after 
all, has been shunned by China for 
nearly three decades. 

The map is there, Mr. Lee said 
recently, because Kia, the third- 
ranking auto company in South 
Korea, has bad more than 250 in- 
quiries from the six provinces since 
last October. The provinces are 
Guangdong, Fujian, Hubei, Hebei, 
Zhejiang and Jilin. 

So far. Mr. Lee said. Kia has 
made no large sales to China, but it 
has shipped 50 vans and trucks 
there as samples. It plans to re- 
enter the passenger-car field with 
exports to the United States in 

Mr. Lee said the Chinese, whose 


first inquiries to Kia dealt strictly 
with imports, are now talking 
about joint ventures and capital 
investment for an auto assembly 
plant in China 

With Neath Korea reportedly 
still urging China to refrain from 
making any contacts with South 
Korea, evidence of economic ties 
between. Seoul and Beijing is usual- 

H * * it quiet by the South Koreans, 
recall that in 1978 and 1979 
orth Koreans persuaded Chi- 
na to drop economic overtures to- 
ward South Korea. There are no 
diplomatic relations between South 
Korea and China. 

The new interchange, however, is 
growing so rapidly that his becom- 
ing almost impossible to hide. Even 
the United States has felt its im- 
pact. 

U.S. grain sales to South Korea 
declined by 21.4 percent in 1984 to 
$761 3 mtffi on, partly because of a 
sharp increase in Korean purchases 
from “others," as trade statistics 


Source: neuters. 


(LS. Mawey Market Finds 

Oo. 4 

. MirHll LynCB ModT Mutt 
31 day nenw vMM: 757. 

TaMratoMtairat RaM Mac- 7 JO* 

Source; Merrill Lmetu Tolerate. . 


Sources: Rmttnx CommeaOa*. Crtot 
Lywmofs. Berdr of Totem. 


0*4 

■ AAt.:. pj*.- . . CVOt. 

Mona peons 3»55 -.33120 +4JB- 

LBKcaitaura BUI — +425 

Parts tlXSkltol 9148 : 9Z54 +635 

Zartc* - 33425- .. 2272S - —M0 

Laadoa . . 33455 .' .32400 . +110 

Mcw.Yert . ' — •• .227 JO • -110 

L waalwi Parti and Jjandon official ftx- 
U wj; Mena Kona and ZurUSt eoentne and 
closing nrlcesi. Mow Yhdc Csmeac wim 
contract. All price* In UAUper ounce. 

Source: Reuters. 


BraaUSaidto Comider Tight limits 
On Haid-Currency, Interest Payments 

Roam 

' NEW YORK —Brazil has prep a red a radical plan to deal with its 
foreign debt of 5103 billion, which is to be submitted to its Congress 
shortly, according to the latest edition of Business International's 
weekly Money Report- 

Quo ring Brazilian government sources, the report Thursday said 
the plan included a freeze on hard-cuirency payments abroad when 
foreign-exchange resaves fall below $10 biffion and a 12-percent cap 
on interest payments on foreign loans. Foreign-exchange reserves are 
currently between $8 bQlion and $8i billion. 

In Brazil^ government officials declined to comment on the report. 

Most U.S. bankers doubted that Brazil would present the plan as a 
formal proposal to its international creditors, adding that it was 
probably one of the Brazilian planning ministry’s proposals for 
dealing with the debL 

“Evetything is going their way at the moment," one banker said. 
“Why stir up the hornet's nest for no apparent reason?" 

However, bankers noted that Brazil has dearly indicated that it will 
be seeking a looser eco n omic monitoring program with the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund. 


put iu Ibis figure rose to $108.9 
million, almost seven times what it 
had been. The “others" are largely 
China. 

TheUB. Department of Agricul- 
ture, in an issue of its magazine 
"Foreign Agricultural Trade of the 
United States, reported that China 
sold 462,000 tons of corn to South 
Korea last vear and is expected to 
export 900,000 tons there this year, 
meeting 26 percent of South Ko- 
rea’s demand. 

A UB. expert, who asked not to 
be identified, said Chinese sales of 
agricultural goods to South Korea, 
including cotton as well as grains, 
exceeded $300 million last year. 
Growing imports from China, he 
said, threaten to erode the United 
Stales’ agricultural market in South 
Korea. 

“We all hoped tht China would 
break out of its collective economy, 
and it has,” the UB. expert said 
with irony. 

Overall trade between Seoul and 
Beijing is also growing. In the midst 
of a 3 .5-percent decline in exports 
that South Korea recorded in the 
first seven months this year, an 
increase erf 13.1 percent in exports 
to Hong Kong stands out sharply. 

Last year; exports to Hong Kong 
were up by 57 percent, “reflecting 
indirect sales to China." U.S. offi- 
cials said. Hong Kong suddenly be- 
came South Korea’s third-best ex- 
port market, after the United 
Slates and Japan, with sales rising 
to $1.28 billion in 1984 from $817.7 
million in 1983. 

South Korean imports from 
Hong Kong also more than dou- 
bled last year, to 5468 milli on. 

Hong Kong trade figures for the 
first half erf this year show that 
South Korean otpons that passed 
through the British territory to Chi- 
na amounted to $221 million, or 4.2 
times the figure for the correspond- 
ing period last year. And South 
Korean businessmen say privately 
that some merchandise is bong 
shipped direeily, to places tike Hai- 


nan island, a part of Guangdong 
province, without passing through 
Hong Kong. 

The contacts that China has had 
with Kia Motors point to an even 
broader economic interchange. 

“No matter how aggressive the 
Chinese government may be in its 
attempts to modernize China, con- 
sidering the time that mil be neces- 
sary to industrialize the whole 
country, our level of industrializa- 
tion may be more appropriate for 
China,”*Mr. Lee said- 


RES INDB* 

An Account hr the Cautious Investor 
to Protect and Increase Capital 

(LS. DoXar Denominated 
Insured by U.S. Govt. Entities 
I m portant Tax Advantages 
Competitive 

Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
Immedate Uquidty 
Absolute Confidentiality 

CHEMICAL BANK, New York 

Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 

RES IN DEP 

Case Pastole93 

1 21 1 Geneva 25, Switzerland 


nd prospectus < 
application ft* 


OPEC Admits 
Its Inability to 
Regulate Prices 


By Bob Hagerry 

International Herald Triune 

VIENNA —OPEC oil ministers, 
ending a somber three-day meeting 
here, acknowledged Friday that 
they were unable to follow their 
own pricing and production rules. 

The Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries failed Id solve 
any of its major problems at the 
meeting, and observers said they 
saw no sign of new ideas on how to 
avert the threat of a further drop in 
prices. 

“OPEC is not even pretending 
any longer to be the guarantor of 
world oil prices." said John Gault, 
an economist at LED Consultants 
SA, a Geneva concent owned by 
Kuwait, a leading OPEC member. 

The oil ministers of boih Saudi 
Arabia and Indonesia described 
OPEC’s official prices as “guide- 
lines." Saudi Arabia, until recently 
the only OPEC member that strict- 
ly adhered to official prices, ac- 
knowledged that it had agreed to 
give discounts to certain major cus- 
tomers in an effort to boost sales. 

The Saudi discounts — so far 
awarded to Exxon Corp., Mobil 
Corp. and Texaco Inc. — “will 
have a profound impact on the 
pricing structure,” said Subroto. oil 
minister of Indonesia and presi- 
dent of OPEC. The discounts are 
based on a netback system, under 
which the price is set low enough to 
ensure the buyer a profit after tak- 
ing into account refining and trans- 
port costs. 

Remarking that “a new period is 
in front of us," Subroto said that 
OPEC minis ters would try to “con- 
solidate’' their pricing policies and 
to phase out “malpractices” that 
tend to weaken the market, such as 
netback sales. 

The ministers had announced 
Thursday nigh 1 that they could not 
agree on how to deal with demands 
by some members for higher pro- 
duction quotas. No member was 
willing to reduce its quota to make 
room for others, and ministers gen- 
erally believe that they cannot raise 
their overall output ceiling of 16 
milli on barrels a day without flood- 
ing the market. 


SpotOilPrices 

DownSharply 

Reuters 

LONDON — Oil prices tum- 
bled in chaotic European trad- 
ing Friday after ministers from 
the Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries ended 
their Vienna meeting in disar- 
ray over output quotas. 

Spot prices for North Sea 
Brent grade of crude oil fell up 
to 80 cents a barrel from Thurs- 
day’s prices. Sellers were offer- 
ing Brent for November deliv- 
ery at $27.90 after prices 
Thursday reached above 
S28.70. 

After a week when prices rose 
steadily on word of shortages, 
th reats by several OPEC mem- 
bers to raise production in the 
absence of a new division of 
output quotas led to panic sell- 
ing. Prices were still 50 cents 
higher than they were 10 days 
ago, however. 


The ministers could agree only to 
take up the matter again at a meet- 
ing scheduled for Dec. 7 in Geneva. 

Meanwhile, Iraq and Ecuador 
said they would continue to exceed 
their quotas, and Ecuador threat- 
ened to quit OPEC if it did not win 
approval for its production level 
Nigeria's oil minis ter, Tam David- 
West, said, “We will do whatever is 
consistent with the country’s inter- 
ests.” 

These countries are hardly alone 
in putting national interests ahead 
of OPEC rules. A Saudi prince said 
last week, “Now we are saying, ‘Ev- 
ery man for himself.’ " 

Some participants in the meeting 
suggested that OPEC would pas- 
sively waif to see how major pro- 
ducers outride the group, such as 
Britain, Norway and the Soviet 
Union, would react to a plunge in 
prices from the current range of 
around $25 to $29 a barrel already 

{Continued on Page 15, CoL 2} 


U.S. Business Cuts Back 
On Overseas Investment 


TheAucaaieJ Press 

WASHINGTON — U.S. com- 
panies plan to boost capital invest- 
ment in their overseas subsidiaries 
by only 15 percent in 1986, far 
below "the 15 percent increase ex- 
pected for this year, the U.S. gov- 
ernment reported Friday. 

The Commerce Department said 
a survey found that American busi- 
nesses expected to spend $39.9 bil- 
lion on expansion and moderniza- 
tion at their overseas subsidiaries in 
1985 and $40.9 billion next year. 
That compares with actual spend- 
ing in 1984 of $34.7 billion. 

Department analysis said the big 
increase being projected for this 
year is coming because of declining 
interest rates and the moderate eco- 
nomic recovery overseas. 

However, they cautioned that 
the actual gain is likely to fall short 
of industry projections based on 
past experience. 

Even if the gain is realized, 
spending by U.S. companies over- 
seas would still be below levels set 
from 1980 through 1982. 

The small increase in spending 
expected for 1986 may partially re- 
flect uncertainty of investors about 
the future pace of the business re- 


covery abroad and the foreign cur- 
rency value of the dollar, the report 
said. 

The petroleum industry plans to 
increase overseas spending by 3 
percent in 1986 to $17.2 billion, 
following a projected 18-percent 
increase this year. But spending 
will still be below the 1982 level 
because of the world oil glut and 
weak prices of recent years, the 
government said. 

The manufacturing industry 
plans to increase spending on capi- 
tal investment at overseas plants by 
1 percent in 1986 to $J6J billion, 
after a projected 16 percent in- 
crease this year. 

In 1985, all industries except pri- 
mary and fabricated metals 
planned increases. But for 1986, 
only the chemical and nonelectrical 
machinery industries are projecting 
increases in foreign spending plans. 

In other industries, U.S. compa- 
nies plan a 3 percent increase in 
1986 to $7.3 billion after a 7 per- 
cent projected gain this year. 

The biggest increase in this 
catch-all category is in mining, 
where spending is expected to go 
up 19 percent in 1986 following an 
expected 24 percent rise this year. 


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Page 14 



The Associated Press 

LONDON — Promoters of coffee said Fri- 
day that Americans are drinking less of it, and 
prefer soft drinks. 

The report by the London-based Internation- 
al Coffee Organization said all age groups in the 
United States drink less coffee now, bat the 
ftarfine is sharpest in the 20-29 group, based on 
figures collected in the winter of 1984-85. 

Tea, soft drinks and fruit jnices have gained 
from coffee’s decline, and 30.9 permit of Amer- 
icans now prefer tea compared with 24.7 per- 
cent in 1962. 

For soft drinks the rise was from 32 .6 percent 
in 1962 to 59.4 percent. 

Americans who drink^ coffee consume 333 
cups a day, compared with 4.17 cups in 1962. 
Per capita, that amounts to 1-83 cups daily 
against 3.12, the organization said. 

The organization began keeping records in 

1950. 



Salas figures ore unoffidoL Yearly highs and lour* reflect 
me previous 52 weeks Plus mean-rent week, but not Ihe latest 
trail no «tny. Whore o sent or sfodc dividend amounting to 25 
percent or mare has been pakLItie yam's high-low range and 
<flvtdend ora shewn tor Hie n ow s lack only. Unless otherwi s e 
mica rates ot dividends ora amnia! disbursements band an 
the latest declaration, 
a— dividend also extratsITl 
b— annual rat* of iflvldend pi us stock dtvidsnO/l 
e— HquMatlna dvMcnd/l 
eld— call*a/l 
d — new vcarty law VI 

e— dMdend de clar ed or paid In nrece dh io 12monttik/l 
a — dMdend In Canadian funds, sublact to 15% nan-residence 
lax. 

I — dividend Hectored after sput-up or stack dividend. 

I— dividend wold this war, am Itted. deterred, or no action 
lakon at latest dhddend meettno. 

k— dividend declared or paid IMs year, an accumulative 
Iseue wtth dividends In arrears. 

n— new Issue In the pant 52 weeks. The MoMow raise begins 
with the start of trading, 
nd — next day delivery. 

P/E — prlce-eorrdngs ratio. 

r — dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 mont hs . Plus 
jlIimJi aiulii— 1U. 

■—stock raOL Dividend begins with date of split, 
sis— sales. 

I — dividend paid In stock In preceding 12 months, estimated 
cash value on ax-dividend or ex-tfl sir button date, 
u — new yeortv high, 
v— tradtaa halted. 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganised un- 
der the Bankruptcy Act. or sacwtthH assumed by such cony- 
panics. 

wd —when Astr bated. 

vH — when Iswed- 

ww— with w a rrants. 

x— ex -dividend or ex-ctgtrts 

xdl*— ex-dstrlfautton. 

xw— wlllHwt warrants. 

y — ex-dlvldeiKj and sales In hill. 

vld — yield. 

i— sales In full. 


N\SEHghs-Lows 


Oa.4 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option A Strut* 

underlying Price Cans— Lost Puts — Lots* 

Dec Mar Jan Doc Mar Jun 
1UN BrfHsh Poaads-cants per MIL 
BPound l® r r r 0.15 r r 

14IA5 12S 1740 r r IMS r r 

1-1145 130 r r r 145 r r 

14145 13S 840 r r 145 r r 

14145 140 4N US DM 415 r 8JB 

14M5 w » 4.IS r t» r r 

141.65 150 1JSS r Ul r r 

14145 155 (LBS 2.10 r r r 

50480 Canadian DoUara-cents per adit 
CDonr 72 uo r r r r 

7X35 73 072 r r 0J2 r 

7125 74 r 045 r r r 

7125 75 an r 049 r r 

C24M West German Marks-cents par en». 

□Mark 32 r r *75 0X3 r 

38.11 31 Ut r r 046 0.11 

38.11 34 r r r too 030 

38.11 35 140 ABO r 0.17 r 

38.11 35 3 JS2 T T 033 042 

38.11 37 147 245 r S 146 

38.11 38 146 246 r 075 s 

38.11 38 S ■ 6 • S 143 

38.11 « 071 Ml ut ia r 

12SM8 French Frtmco-lOlbs efa amt per ualL 
F Franc 120 r r 8X0 170 r 

12<a« IS 020 r r r r 

645Q4M Japanese Yen-lSitks of a cent per unit. 

JYen 40 445 r r Oja r 

46119 41 640 r r r r 

4489 42 <90 r r ■ r 

*6-09 43 4JM r r r r 

4449 U us r r 022 r 

4649 45 238 104 T 042 T 

4649 46 146 r 249 074 r 

62480 Swiss Franctcntifa pgr enU. 

SFrtrtC 41 340 r r 847 r 

4649 42 r r r 0.13 r 

4649 43 371 r r r r 

4449 44 348 440 r M DM 

4649 <5 236 r r 04* r 

4649 46 175 344 r 1.12 r 

Total coll vgL 4464 Cab open laL TH471 

Total put VOL 2468 Pat open ML 117418 

r — Not traded.*— No apt Lon ottered. 

Last Is premium (purchase price). 

Source: AP. 


Coimwilities 



NEW HTOK5 27 


coSmaip P 

GieasnC 
intrstBcdcr 
NwOiPleaadl 
TRW 440pf 
UnBmdefA 

Beatrice 

Crock Ntadl 
GouMInc 
Jewelcor 
RCA365P1 
Triton Enor 
Unit inum 

Chroma! p t 
FTPdlAliX 
Gultan ind 
KnixxiCp 
RcvilMZSOOt 
Triton En Pt 

WBelivthw 

ColumGCS 

FtHawPcai 

intMultfM 

Unit Brands 


NEW LOWS 27 


AmPreslds 

OnMIlcra 

GcnShmnl 

ideal Basic 

McLnxin 

RltaAM 

USTaboc 

AmerHatel 

Cullinets 

Gan Rad 

Intarfst 

PoaoPrad 

Terodrne 

VarMnAsc 

ApaidData 

EOKRtrn 

HCA 

Latargepf 
Purotaktr 
TovrteMfg at 
Veeao 

BankAmadlp 

GenDqtO 

House Fab 
MLCanvn 
Quanex 

Transcn Inc 


Company Results 

R e venue and prof) Is ar tosses. In millions, ore In local 
currencies unless otherwise I wtelnt 


RoasseLUdaf 
HI HaH 1985 1984 

Revenue , 6 470 5450. 

Profits 2*40 2820 

Vallourec 

lit HaH 19*5 1984 

Profit* 122) (0)205. 

ar Mss. 

VahedStMea 

Kaufman & Brood 
3rd Qoer. 1985 1984 

Revenue 23U last 

Net Inc 449 749 

Per Snore 024 046 

9 Months 1983 1984 

Revenue 414.1 4254 

Net Inc. 194 214 

Per Shore 122 133 

P -month nets Include tax 
ben efi ts ot SSJt million vs Si 
million, nsfauarter net also 
Includes tux Benefit of S24 
minim. 


NaTI Semiconductor 

1« O oar. 1986 1985 

Reyemw 4224 519 j) 

Net Inc. (a >534 359 

Per Shar*_ — D40 

oj taa. IffUnet Includes gain 

of SIP minim. 

Safeway Stores 

MOaer. 1985 19*4 

Revenue 44*9. 4jw. 

Net Inc. 89.1 387 

Per Share— . 148 065 

9Moalhs ins 1984 

Revenue 13440 13410 

Netlnc^ 16*7 1083 

Per Shrew—. 274 14) 

I98S nets Include ealn otXU.9 
million from Hale of units. 

West Point Peppered 

•h Qaar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 3113 J225 

5Jef Inc — _ 9.05 1043 

Per Snare.. 080 ins 

Tear 1985 1984 

Revenue 1J0O U30L 

Net Inc an 34 S573 

Per snare — 275 540 



Goimwiides 


Hlgb Lew eld 

SUGAR 

French francs per metric toa 
Dec 1413 13*5 17M 

Mar 1423 1375 1,403 

MOV 1441 V420 1435 

Alia 1475 1475 1,471 

Oct 1320 1J20 1308 

DOC N.T. N.T. 1545 

Est. vaL: 1710 tats of 50 tans, 
sales: 1485 lots. Open interest: 
COCOA 


1400 +W 
1409 4-5 

1441 4-8 

349S *3 

1420 4-4 

1465 +J 
Prsv. acfuol 
19448 


Dec 

2430 

2405 

2405 

2415 

—20 

Mar 

2450 

2450 

2440 

2450 

—5 


N.T. 

N.T. 

2455 


— TO 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2460 

— 

— to 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2469 

— 

—10 

Dec 

N.T. 


2450 


— K> 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2450 

— 

—15 

Eat voU 34 lots of 10 tan*. Prev. 

actual 

rales 

5 lots. Open Intareaf: 63 i 



COFFEE 





French traacs per 1M kg 



Nov 

L77D 

1470 

1465 

1473 

— 18 

Jam 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1400 

1430 

Unch. 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

14(5 

1465 

— 22 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1470 

1480 

— 22 

Jty 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1400 

1.920 

— 10 


N.T. 

NT. 

1415 

1437 

— 14 

Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

I486 

1445 

—5 


lots. Own Interest: 303 




Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


‘ L 





Oa.4 


Oder 

BM 

vieM 

If 

3raanm 

741 

649 

742 

7.19 

6 -montti 

746 

744 

7 j62 

741 

One year 

7*2 

740 

747 

746 

Source: Salomon Bremen 






dose Previous 

Bid Ask BM Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Starring per metric tea 

Soot 70030 70140 69540 *9*80 

Forward 72250 72340 71740 71840 

copper Cathodes (hmh erode) 

Starling per metric ran 

Spat 97840 97940 77940 90040, 

Forward 100140100240 100440 100*40 
COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling par metric tea 
Spot 9*440 96540 96340 96740 

Forward 98840 98940 98940 99240 

LEAD 

Starling aer metric Ma 
Spat 27840 2)840 27840 2)840 

Forward 28640 28)40 2862S 286.75 

NICKEL 

Storting per metric tan 
spat 315040 316040 315040 316040 

Forward 316040 314540 316040 316540 

SILVER 

Peace per (rev ounce 

spat 44440 44540 43940 4*040 

Forward 45740 <5740 45040 <5040 

TIN inaMard) 

Sterling per metric lea 

suet B69040 8*9540 873040 87*040 

Forward 063040 8*3140 867540 868040 

Sterling per metric ton 
Spot 46250 46258 45*40 <5648 

Forward nq net nq nq 

Source; AP. 


Armstrong Tire 
May Close Plant 

The Associated Press 

NEW HAVEN. Connecticut — 
The Armstrong 11116 Co. mi Friday 
announced that it may dose its 
plant in Hanford, California, on 
April 1, 1986. citing high operating 
costs that threaten the factory's 
ability to compete against import*. 

The Hanford factory, which pro- 
duces replacement radial tires far 
passenger cars and light trucks, em- 
ploys about 600 people. 

FaulC. James, president of Arm- 
strong Tire, said Che company de- 
cided to exercise its right to cease 
operations at Hanford after a cost- 
redaction agreement between Arm- 
strong and a union local failed to 
gain the approval of other locals 
coveted by the same collective bar- 
gaining agreement. 


rYXi* 


CkHB 

MoodVS— i 89540 f 

Reuters ; : — Uimd. 

DJ. Futures 117.16 

Cam. Research Bureau- 22400 

Moody -s : bos* 100 : Dac.31,1931. 


London 

Commodities 


Low aid AJk BM ASk 

SUGAR 

SfkrOq* par metric tm 
DOC 142J0 14040 14140 14140 14240 14*40 

soar 1 5128 14640 14220 14268 15140 15148 

May 15540 15140 15240 15240 15440 15540 

AU0 16140 16140 15220 19940 15140 16140 

oa K.T. NT. 16340 16420 16631) 16740 

Volume: 999 tots of 50 Ions. 

COCOA 

SOerflap par metric tea 
OlC I486 1475 1475 1476 1481 1482 

MflT 14M 141* 1415 1416 1432 142* 

Mar USJ 1440 1440 1441 1451 1451 

J*T 1462 1452 1452 1453 1463 1465 

5*P 1460 1457 1457 1458 1468 1470 

Pec IJM6 IW 1432 14M 1440 l JUS 

Mm N.T. N.T. 1425 1449 1448 1450 

Volume: 44?3 lots of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Sterling aer metric ton 
Nov 1405 14M 1495 1496 1411 1415 

Jan 1440. 1423 1432 1433 1441 1445 

MB- 1472 1456 1462 1463 1476 1477 

MOV UQ5 1490 1492 1498 1JD5 UQB 

JIT 1.735 1,733 1.725 ijie 1,730 1J45 

Sag 1470 1460 1460 1469 l53 14W 

NOV N.T. N.T. 1470 1499 1460 1425 

Volume: 11048 tots of Stans. 

GASOIL 

U4- dollars par metric tea 
Oct 26600 2025 26250 2609 30945 3S9JB 
Jtav 26140 25640 25740 257JS 26245 26250 
TBc 35575 25140 25340 25X25 25745 25200 
JOfl. 25145 24740 25050 25045 25*40 25440 
Feb 24840 24625 24740 24840 25041 25140 
Mar 2(140 23740 23945 24140 24*00 24740 
AP* 22500 22240 22*50 23540 23740 237 35 
Mar 23240 23040 23045 23140 23*40 2)440 
JOB x 23Q40 22940 22940 22940 23X25 23340 
Volume: MSB kits of no tan*. 

Sources: neuters ana London Petroleum Ex- 
ettanae CeasaUj. 























































• ’ '-.“.’-ji.'-,; 


* • «*** 

•» «£ 

r 4 . 


*** ^j. 
S*/* fie 


»sf <«:•' 

* *-*. i, 
**•'■'» **, 
MW •.‘.wua ' 

** 


roundup 


■ -l^v ^:V .,- ' 




TGSTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE^ SATUKDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 


Page 15 


: . Reuters ■'■' : ' .•- -- 

TURIN — Taiw o case ofa mergertfbar-mSking op- 

lyetween Italy’s Fiat Auto SpA^od ' ~ * 

Ford Motor Co.’s Europe^Hib- . ^*9"SRS iLaill ^ossSMe a)- 

sidiaiy have run ‘into trouble, a Fiat be scca wheth- 


er. of a mo^er df tetf-maiing op-- months of 1985, ahead of Ford 
qrations.^ ; ? _-c,- ■_ -• with around 12 percent. . 


.. tvcryiiOTg; .still -possible a)- Analysis have said that a merger 

aauuy nave run 'into trouble, a Rat til0 ^ 3 !_^ ia ^TObes«mwbeib- between Fiat and Ford would 
spokesman said Friday. ima^y agree on a_ fufl- shake the European car industry,' 

The spokesman said the two * deakwirich is and could drive some of the less 

companies had encountered major m ° re ^ spokesman said, exmapetitive car makers out of busi- 

diffiailties in agreeing on a fonau- ' difficulties were -scknowl- ness; Overcapacity in the industry 
la for pooling their car mamrfactur- - **8®* ^ diaaa month after Fiat is running at more than two million 
. ing facilities into a joint company ^ predicted an s^eanenu Um- units a year.' 

■ Fiat’s car division and Ford's bcno *8*“^ chasmab- of Fiat Gianni Agnelli, Umberto Agnel- 
; European subsidiary have been en- £ uto ' ^.diviaonof theTurinr . j? s older brother and chairman of 
• gaged m negotiations for more than 5?®®^ sr°up. said SepC 12 in the Fiat group, has repeatedly said 
t aw. If successful, the talks could ' is_gmng to be a. that concentration in the European 

' lead to the creation of an industrial defimte agreement on some kind of industry is inevitable. He has fore- 
warn that would have a 25-percent dea * *f tw «® Fiaumd Ford of Eu- cast that there will be only four or 
tEhare of the European car market. ro P e ’ .-. five groups left on the continent in 

The spokesman, who said talks Mr. Agndli also said he expected -10 years. 


m w ■ 

«n. " -v 

to r . r . . 


The spokesman, who said talks 


were contmumg between the two a statement to beissned by the end ; wa br without an agreement 
poms, said; 7* true that the u*. of this year. J ' \ ■' ; with Ford. Fiat is pressing ahead 

“ difficulty, but we . Fiat, which has started to geoer- with its modernization program, 
„ _ dlWewerc ■*« large profits after, investing 'and has earmarked the equivalent 
be obstacles. heavily io labor-saving technology, of $22 billion for investment in its 


going to be obstacles. 


**»■ -Um. 


- jir . , , , , «» MUAfl-saviux mjHBwuKr. of S2 . 2 billion for investment in its 

, problems had amen had a 13.4-percem share of the Eu- cars divirion over the next three 
over control and responsibility In ropean car market in the first six years. • •. 

Lottery Plan Set I Time ’ 2 Others Seen Joining 
On Henkel Stock In Bid for Group V Cable 


Nippon Kokan Hans to Take Over 
Silicon Plant in Arizona From GE 

United Pttu International 

TOKYO —Nippon Kokan K.L, the Japanese steel and shipbtrild- 
i ing concern, said Friday that it had agreed in principle to take over a 
1 rilicon-producing facility of General Electric Co. in Chandler, Arizo- 
na. Terms were not disclosed. 

The transaction involves Nippon Kokan’s acquisition of Great 
Western silicon plant, a component of GFs Silicone Products Divi- ' 
: sion. 

The takeover is pan of Nippon Kokan’s effort to diversify its 
i business and enter the electronics materials market, it said. 

Nippon Kokan will establish a wholly owned subsidiaiy to operate 
I the plant, which has an annual production capacity of 200metric tons 
of polycrystalline silicon. 

The new company will take over employees, facilities and other 
assets of the existing plant, Nippon Kokan said. 

Nippon Kokan said it and GE were aiming to reach final agreement 
this year on the proposed acquisition. 


Hunts Lose $1 Billion on Silver Soles 

Family Sells 90% of Holdings; Metal’s Price Rises Sharply 


Accountants Say Hutton 
Was Warned on Overdrafts 

By Josh Getlin Hughes. Democrat of New Jersey, 

Los Angeles Times Service Joel E. Mffler. an Arthur Andersen 


Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

DALLAS — The Hunts of Tex- 
as, who lost an estimated SI billion 
after apparently trying to comer 
the silver market in the late 1970s. 
have quietly sold 90 percent of their 
silver holdings, at a further Iks of 
an estimated Si billion. 

The news drove spot silver prices 
to lhcir highest levels in five 
months Friday in Zurich and Lon- 
don. On Thursday, prices reached a 
seven-month high at the New Yoik 
Commodities Exchange. 

Silver traded in Zurich Friday at 
56.39 an ounce, up nine cents from 
Thursday's finish and 34 cents 
from its price 24 hours earlier. In 
London, it rose to a five-month 
high of 56.515 before retreating to 
$6.39. 

At the Comex Friday, spot prices 


uveruraua rose briefly to S6.53. then slipped rraranunurny* 

^ lCrn w 113(1 helped to “pay off debts and 

bes. Democrat of New Jersey, Thursday pnees had risen 33.4 f un( j ongoing enterprises” he said. 
E Miller, an Arthur Andersen cents to 56385 an ounce, the big- ^ Whitaker said the sales had 


WASHINGTON — Members of auditor who participated in the gest one-day rise since March. 

1 Tb W fnhlffc the accounting firm of Arthur An- 1980 meeting, said Thursday that Announcing the sale Thursday, 

M TT V4UUC dersen & Co. warned executives of high-ranking Hutton executives Xom Whitaker a spokesman for 

. EF. Hutton & Co. in 1980 that knew about the pattern of over- Q, e Hum family, said the Hunts 

Westmghouse's investment bank- Hutton was making questionable drafts be had discovered. had sold 90 percent of the 59 mil- 




'--Viais 


%5S* 

•7- sag 
: i- m 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — Shares in 
Henkel KGaA, the West Ger- 
-man chemicals group, will be 
jail oca ted in alotieiy next week, 
because the subscription offer 
dosed heavily oversubscribed 
soon after it began, Deutsche 
Bank AG said Friday. 

Official listing on all eight 
West German bourses is not 
due to start until next Friday. 
Traders said - that nonvoting 
preference shares could be of- 
fered at 330 to 350 Deutsche 
marks (5125 to 5132) each. - 
i On offer are L5 'million 
shares in an open-ended sub- 
scription at 285 DM. 


Long Road 
For Harley 


cause the price of the metal to drop. 

In Europe, traders said that un- 
certainty over when the Hunts 
might sell their holdings bad de- 
pressed bullion prices, which 
should have benefited from the de- 
cline in the value of the U.S. dollar. 
Bullion prices usually rally when 
the dollar falls. 

In the late 1970s. the Hunt 
brothers. Nelson Bunker, W. Her- 
bert and Lamar, began one of the 
most disastrous speculation epi- 
sodes in U.S. history when they 
started accumulating their silver 
holdings, once valued at $10 bil- 
lion. 

During that period, silver prices 
climbed from below 510 an ounce 
to a peak of 548 in Janaary 1980. 
But by the following March, the 
^ price of silver had fallen to less 
n 1 _fc„ Tj_rif than Sll, leaving the Hunts with 

Nelson Bunker Hunt ^ ,, billi „ n 6 ^ loi5£S fnM 

had helped to “pay off debts and speculation on silver futures con- 
fund ongoing enterprises” he said. trarts - 
Mr. Whitaker said the sales had Because of the decline, the Hunts 

taken place over the . past nine were unable to meet their commit- 
months, in “an orderly fashion mems on silver futures. The Feder- 
ih rough regular market channels." al Reserve Board arranged bank 


New York Tim^ Service Westinghouse's investment bank- Hutton was making questionable drafts he had discovered. 

"NEW YORK •*— Three . of the ecs, which include Shcarsoa Lefa- bank overdrafts, but said they Hutton nmnaw lh _ 

largest U.S. cable . operators — man Brothers and First Boston dropped the matter after brokerage “same room as I was.” Mr Miner — — 

Time ln<V Td&Gommumcations Corp„ wifl first choose a handful of officials assured them the practice ^ heard £ tWin ^ hie 1970s. The sale, representing 
Inc. and Comcast Corp. — - are ex- bidders from the initial proposals, was legal ^ were 90 percent of the Hunts' holdings, 

pened to fond a coup to bid joint- Then, those chosen will be given During testimony Thursday bo 

ly for Group W Cable Inc, accord- additional information on the cable fore the U.S. House Judiciary sub- L® 51 May. Hutton pleaded guilty 
ing to sources close to those- systems, which each company can comittee on crime, members of the 10 2,000 counts of mail and wire 
companies. r •. use to make its final bid. accounting firm said they had pre- fraud involving overdrafts between 

_The three have made tentative ™ a„. semed Hutton executives in March July 1980 and February 1982 at 


gn-raruung Hutton executives fom Whitaker, a spokesman for through regular market channels." al Reserve Board arranged bank 
iew about the pattern of over- Qjg Hunt family, said the Hunts Because of the steady, sharp loans for the Hunts to prevent a 
afts be had discovered. had sold 90 percent of the 59 mil- drop in silver over that period, the default that could have threatened 

Hutton executives were in the 11011 unices (1.652 billion grams) of Hunts lost an estimated ST billion, the U3. financial system, 
same roan as I was,” Mr. Miller ®! ver had accumulated in the For months, investors had wot- Under the arrangement with the 


the U3. financial system. 

Under the arrangement with the 


ried that attempts by the Hunts to Fed, the Hunts were required to 
divest their silver holdings might dispose of their silver by 1990. 


The three have made tentative 
plans on bow they, would tfivide up 
Group Ws 2 million subscribers, 
and they plan io sell off a number 
of cable systems if they get control 
of the company from Westing- 
house Electric Corp., the sources 
'said. 

According to one executive 
among the potential bidding group, 

COMPANY NOTES 


London Bourse I IMF to Lend $300 Million 
Opening Door to QuaJte-Strichm Mexico 


W^tinohniKp Miiumnmi m An semen nutvon executives in fviarca **««■ 

guaSS^S^bS^tol4 1980 with evidence that the corapa- many of the 400 banks where it had 
mSflfteHnDcfcSdSiBaUe "y been writing millions of accounts. The practice allowed the 
ESon e dollars worth of checks on insuffi- company to have the mlerest -free 

tttw^mrasmess in a corporate dem ^ funcR . use of millions of dollars on certain 

Members of the subcommittee da > *■ 

The table operation is believed praised .Andersen officials for hav- The UiL government did not 
to have a cable cash flow of some- mg raised the issue. But some criti- prosecute any Hutton executives, 
where in tbejneaghbeahood of 5200 dzed the firm for failing io pursue The company’s own investigation 
million. the matter with outride authorities, recommended the punishment of 

• “I find it beyond belief that any 15 executives but exonerated Rob- 

accounring firm that saw all that grt M. Fomon, Hutton’s chairman, 
■m— ■■■■ - money floating around would not and George L Ball, company presi- 

don cap acity of 200 million pounds hfl . ve ^ nown that there was some- dem at the time of the overdrafting. 


Confrui Data Corp. odered its non capacity of 200 million pounds 
U.S. employees to mVr four days (90.9 million kilograms), 
off without pay in the next two Morgan Grenfell & Co. said it 
months, aff ecting about 40,000 ran- had bought 140,000 shares in Unit- 


fi l . ^ ContiMed ^ ^ n i 

v t rr mar it has cut costs and once from its Magnetic Peripherals sub- 
~ agflin is in the HianV, after heavy -si diary. Preactions of Caxtrol Da- 
- '■*> losses in 1981 and 1982. ' la's losses for 1985_ range from 540 

Vaughn E Beals, Hariey*s chair- rnilh on to 565 million. • 

. man, acknowledged frustration Drewlner Bask AG will list its 
that profits had not shown more shares on the Tokyo Stock Ex- 
r; improvement. But he imhet e d that diange this month,, subject to ap- 


ployecs. The conqiany announced ed - "Newspapers PLC at 297.625 


no mining kilograms). ^8 said Represen tatn-e 

Morgan Grenfell & Co. said it Romano L Mazzoli, a Democrat of 
bd bought 140,000 shares in Unit- Kentucky. 

|- Newspapers PLC at 297.625 The testimony by Philip PeDer, a 


tha t h would lay off 1,500 workers peace (54.24) each on .Thursday, partner in Arthur Andersen, and 
from its Magnetic Peripherals sub- The Morgan statement was other^ officials of the firm raised 
si diary. Predictions of Control Da- prompted by British disclosure questions about the statements of 
ta's losses for 1985 rangefrom 540 rales covering share trading in a EF. Hutton officials. Earlier, Hut- 
miTK ftn to 565 miTK on. • • • takeover situation. Morgan is ad- ton executives had told the sub- 
Dresdoer Bade AG will list its vising United in its hostile bid for committee that they had had no 
shares on the Tokyo Stock Ex- Fleet Holdings PLC. knowledge that their company was 

chanse this month, subject to ap- NGK Baudour SA, a wholly engaged in illeg al bank overdrafts. 

Company officials said they 


it wffl take time to get rewards from proval by the Japanese Finance owned Belgian subsidiary of NG 
many of the changes the company Ministry, the exchange said. A total Insulators Ltd., and Soctete Rfc- knew that Hu tton had engaged in 
has made, suchasbolsterin* quah- of 750,000 shares wffl be sold Oct gionale dTnvestissement de Wal- overdrafung, but added that they 
h . . i4^Hd. 15 in Japan for payment lonieof Belgium will set up a joint had not done so as part ofa system- 
- While 1986 will be “another 0**- 23,! venture in December to make ce- atic, raon^-making scheme, which 

gjuni-andrgroan year” he said, v' Holid«y Ims Inc. said it may not ^ , ramie catalytic honeycombs used isfllegaL . . 

1987 will n^rif a return to siibstan- be able to sustain its annual growth tp purify automobile exhaust. Under questioning by the sub- 
rial profits. Hariey, now a. private rate of 1-2 percent to 15 percent It NpKsaicL . committee chairman, Robert J. 

fcompany, did not supply profit figr said that with a tower annual infla-. Signal Q»s. said its U OP Inc. 

ores and estimates. . : tioii rate, k also, w^.-rtvising its umt was awarded .a contract by p rac JJ_ tlf i j TTpf 

Haiie/s story b«an m Kfilwau- *°®1 ^ growth, in earmngs per ChmaPetro-Chemical tnteraanon- i lOTlUcUl OX til 

kee in 1903, when the company was- share fo' between 2 and 2% times al l Co. .to .expand la chemical com- . . 

founded by one man called Hailey the mflation rate. . plex at Nanjing. China. Signal said UuitS tO AfiSlSt 

and three called Davidson. It out- .. lsura Motors Ltd. and C- ItiA & the capamty of the^ complex, which x 

paced its rivals in the Unhed Ca wffl mvest in Anadolu Auto- makes i lrnear alkylbentene the |n AfienCV S Sale 
States, the last of whom, Indian, motive. Sanayu ve Ticaret AS. a mam mgrediml m biodegradable o J 

dosed shop in 1953. After that, Turkish maker of tracks, an lsuzu detergents, will be expanded to Washington Pat Service 

Harley competed with European He said Isuzu WASHINGTON — Ray 


Mr. Pdler of Arthur Andersen 
recalled that, during his 1980 meet- 
ing with Hutton officials, Thomas 
W. Rae, Hutton’s general counsel, 
had said his company's overdrafts 
were legal Mr. Rae bad explained 
that the major factor permitting 
Hutton to engage in such transac- 
tions legally was that the company 
had enough assets to cover its 
checks, Mr. Peller said. 

Mr. Hughes reminded the ac- 
countants that they later turned up 
“mind-boggling" examples of Hut- 
ton’s overdrafts — such as checks 
written for 59.7 million on bank 
accounts that held less than 53,500, 
according to company documents 
provided to the committee. 


Outside Owners 

Reuters 

LONDON — The London 
Stock Exchange announced 
Friday that starting next March 
outsiders such as banks can 
own member firms outright. 

The move to allow nonm em- 
bers to take over operations of 
wholesale and retail sales of 
stocks precedes another major 
reform of the exchange next Oc- 
tober, when fixed commissions 
on share transactions end. 

The distinction between bro- 
kers, who act as agents for in- 
vestors, and jobbers, who carry 
out actual share purchases on 
the exchange, will disappear at 
the sam# time. ' 

Most larger broking and job- 
bing firms have already linked 
up with banks. 

The exchange also said firms 
wanting to join from March 
could now apply for member- 
ship. Admissions of new mem- 
bers have been temporarily sus- 
pended. 


(Continued from Page 13) 
ization that would create a bigger 
economic pie for everyone. 

“We want them to open up their 
economies to our exports, and if 
they do they'll be assured our mar- 
kets will stay open," one U.S. offi- 
cial said. The United States is also 
pressing other industrial countries 
to take larger shares of developing 
countries' exports. 

Last year, the United States ab- 
sorbed 60 percent of Third World 
manufacturers' exports, up from 40 
percent in 1980. Developing coun- 
tries took about a third of U.S. 
exports. 

But the views of die Reagan ad- 
ministration contrast sharply with 
those held by many in Congress 
who are urging protection against 
imports to help their constituents. 
Mr. Reagan has vowed to veto pro- 
tectionist bills but. has promised to 
pry open foreign markets for U.S.- 
made goods. 

In the past few weeks, it has 
become clear that the administra- 
tion is willing to go even further to 
head off protectionism. 


The administration has mounted 
an effort to get banks to reverse a 
slowdown in lending to Third 
World countries and has sought 
ideas from the banks about ways in 
which the World Bank, through its 
project and policy-based lending, 
could draw in more commercial 
bank loans. 

In addition, arrangements are 
being made to get more money to 
the poorest African countries, 
which have been hit so hard by 
droughts and financial reverses 
that many cannot even repay loans 
to the International Monetary 
Fund. 

The United Slates is expected to 
announce in Seoul that it will work 
with other nations to establish a 
special 35-billion fund for the poor 
countries, financed chiefly by re- 
payments now coming in on IMF 
loans made in the 1970s and by 
profits of the World Bank. 

To some of the delegates who 
have arrived in Seoul the United 
States appears to be reacting defen- 
sively. 


'hen the company war share to' between 2and Vh tunes a] ^ Co. .to .expand ia chemical com- rv . . . 

ne man called Hariey -the inflation rate. . plex at Nanjing, China. Signal said HuitS tO AfiSlSt 

led Davidson. It out- • Is*™ Motors Ltd. and C. Itoh& the capacity of the complex, which _T 

vals in the United Ccx wffl inwst m Anadolu Auto- makes linear alkylbentene the In Agency’s Sale 

ist of whom, Indian, m°tiv& Sanayu ve Ticaret AS. a main ingredient in biodegradable T3 J 

iri 1953 After tfiaL . Turkish maker of trucks, an lsuzu detergents, will be expanded to Washington Past Service 


RmUQSS&rilmnc 


bikes, madnnes fikeTnunqrit, Nor- 1 buy a 15-percent share and Wang Laboratones Inc. said it Brojoa,. a™ uua 

ton md Royal EnfWd. CItobS percent. had reached freem an mpnna ple (-S35 SSrfulltS S 

The company went public in MBtsoMsM Rayon Co. said it and U) purchase Walsh Greenwood In- reamed to work 

k 1965 androledsupreme at the top ‘ P* 1 ft* 0 * Co* signed a baric f^^Systimisln^apnvatdy {JEdESKSSeShttb 
^ end of the maA^Sth enormoS agreement w setepa jorat^me held fina nod serncs computer ^ toS] 

- bikes such as those portrayed in n«t y«r m/ran to produce and compmy. Toms^of the prop^d Wcchslw , s reagnSoocame 

andreariret data services known as 

bufld a plant with annual produc- “Shark. for selling the company. 

A company spokesman said. 

OPEC Aides Admit Inability Hwaoi SS!i £££ 
To Reeirtate Prices, Output HS.’KSM’E 

C7 y -I bankruptcy laws. The spokesman 

( Continued fam |w j3y the economist, “and earlier if we said UPI was expected to receive 


u w ^i H ! h NGT0 -i f is 

A r^Trhed uneoneni in nrfndnle WcchsJer - presadeit and chief 


PERSONAL INVESTING 


i ,i-4i IVif* 


movies such as The Wild One" sell worldwide Uu font's Conan, a acqmsiuon were w o^cioscu. 
and “Easy Rider ” material used inJtildiens and bath- Walsh Greenwood offers financial 

Growth was ‘explosive in the rooms. Du Font-MRC Co. will and market data services known as 
1970s, and in 1979 Harley pro- s plant with annual produc- “Shark. . 
ducal more than 50,000 bikes, a . : 1 TT" 1 

record. Most Harieys have engine -.-i-y. ‘ - _ . — w #¥ . 

OPEC Aides Admit Inability 
d'S’E'rs To Regulate Pnces, Output 

■ (Continued from P»t^ 13) ^eco^mi^^nd earlier if we 

biding motorcycfcmakCTjand Ka- . ^ from apeak of more than 540 While OPEC again has piw'en 
wasaki were buildingbiggcrand mth e]ave\m^ • itself unable to^bolish market 

bigger motorcycles and exporting Of all the devices employed to forces, the 25-year-old oiganiza- 
more ana more IO . roe umieu . » n Ctmv lli» itnrKno nf «TI n rip ^ g linn mnlinnK to ftwirlirwi or a enn 


. (Continued from Page 13) 

have a mild winter." final buyer proposals Friday. 

^ f lTi I <£^ rfm0rt tlUm S40 ■. ag r, h f pn r n Mr. Wecbsler, who had served as 

m toe late. 1970s. itself unable to abolish market upj Dre sidem and chief oneratme 

<™pfoyed to forces, the 25-yrar-old oiganiza- since March 27%mSnSi® 

fry to stpp the decline of ofl pnces non continues to function as a sort !W , *147 sm 


final buyer propc«als Friday. 

Mr. Wechsler, who had served as 


Oa a *T J <— - - -1 _ ■ j V*_T W “tv %*W I M IV VI VI* {/IIVW UVM WUUUWW IV 1IU1V 

States, Harley was fioundomg and so fa^ nothing has worked quite so of trade association. 


byilding a reputation as a 
.of unreliable, expensive, o 


■leaking 


well.as bombs. Those dropped by 
Iraq on Iranian oil-export facilities 


01 iraoe assoaauon. providing a 
forum for exchanging ideas and ap- 
pealing for restraint in the market 


ue receiving his annual S 1424>00 
salary from the company. 

The spokesman acknowledged 




k*®*- . . - ji . . ; in recent weeks have sharply re- Asked whether OPEC members that the arrangement is unusual 

; Quahty went to mu, apa BDor. ^nced Iran’s estports and provided were now just free-market opera- inasamuch as creditors in bank- 
ijnUions went to pot, M r.ueais a temporary boost in prices that tors like other oil producers, So- ruptcy and corporate reorganiza- 
saia in a recent vmi to New York. ^0^^ OPEC to dday hard ded- broto said: “What is so bad about tion proceedings genhally are con- 
Tn tnn off Ine nmblems. Lne reces- ■ -l . „ r , , +■ ^ ..j v .l. i 4 /i. -e 


To tq> off the problems, the recis- A<ms ^ 


sion of 1981 and 1982 an sharply ^ut prices: feB riiarply on the are changes in the matkeL" 
mto demand and produced the first ^ or non-contract, market on 
Ipsses for the company since the ftiday, and many traders and ana- 


that? We have to be realistic. There straed to be on the opposite side of 


the fence from debtors. 


fosses for the company since me F„d a y j and many traders and ana- 
Depresskm. lysts expect Turtbcr declines. 

, Just as Harley se^ed to befaB- K6Dm , are 

mg apart m anly 1981, a group of worldwide supplies of crude 
13 officers, led by Mr. Beals, pur- noiain plentiful At the -same 
chased the company and took n ^ H^nri in the nonrCommu- 
private. They studied Japanese ^ countries is down about 1.7 


, Just as Harley seemed to befall- TeSine 

ing apart in early 1981, a group of ^ worldwide 
13 officers, led by Mr. Beals, pur- ^ moi ^ n 


. pnvate. iney sroaica nist countries is down about 1.7 

; managemoit methods and over toe from ^ eariiec. Be- 

applied^ many oftoern. cause economic growth is stowing, 

• ; ’ \For example, they set up a v&na.-. mirn y anafets expect that cal de-' 

; oon of toe just-in-time mvmtoiy ^ continue to fall or stag- 
r system that is widely practic^ by renewing downward pressure 
• •* /. Japanese companies. Instead of on prices. ’ 

producing a large batch of a com- danger will come no later 

.. . ponent at onoe. Harley produces than next sprint** said Mr. Gault, 

ft components as they are needed. ■ . . ■ ■ ; — ; 

J.A “It used to take 72 days to make • • . 

a_frame; 1 expect it takes two days AimOUUCeS . 

now," Mr. Bails said. 

^- y ' ; The cut in inventoiy free d $2 2 Hpof riirfifT inar ■ •• 

milUon at toe plant m York, Penn- lie3U “ cu " 

. Sylvania, alone and sharply re- Sew York Times Service ■ 




New York Times Service ■ 

, NEW YORK— RCA Cotp. has 
announced that it would restruc- 
ture some of its electronics and 


DHEKNAnom POSITIONS 


71* continuing ntponslon of our unices to efients from ttw Anglo-Scucon onm hm 
crocitnd on im mediate need for a qualified end experienced 

MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT 

IMt' portion Involve* lowing existing client, independantiy, dl ert f auntance in 

eemfeeitid transoefiom wflfi Mi d c ff e Ea it em and Eraferr countries as well as 
acquiring new dients that fall within Aw fra me work of the required expertise. 

We require: 

— sound fcnowiedpo of Anafe-Saxon tow and commordd practices; 

— praaied wpenence in ine area of Imcmohovial tew d ionj 

— fiuaney >n EngUi and. a* an oduanrogp, good woridng knowledge ina Serfo- 
Doanan or Mickflo-Banern language; 

— Mffnfpiess to travel nnwievety; 

— Liechtenstein or Swiss citizenship, if passible. 

We offer? 

— o permanent end secure portion, 

■ —generous compensation with profit-sharing; 

. — a welt developed oranizationol structure Dated an the total technology; 
— (he usual soda! and fringe benefits. 

Please send your detailed appfaatioo with com pl ete CV t«d recent photo to? 

KARMA A.6. P1WC1RAUTY OF UECHTOKTHN, 

P.O. Bex 278, FL- 9490 VADUZ. Mr. Herzog. ■■ - — 


Labor relations softened, in part announced that it would restroo 
because of management efforts to uire some of its electronics and 
maintain an open-door policy and communications businesses and 
discuss employee complaints. Ath- takeacharge of $140 million before 
senteeism dropped sharply. . . . taxes, or $81 million after taxes, 

The company says that, as a re- against its third-quarter earnings, 
suit of these changes, 99 percent of The company said that, indud- 
motorcycles coming off. the line ai ing an after-tax gain oT$92.6 mil- 


suit of these changes, 99 percent of The company said that, indud- 
motorcycles coming off. the line ai ing an after-tax ^in of491.6 mfl- 
ibe York plant are free of defects, lion from the sale of Hertz Corix, 
compared with 50 percent five net income was expected to be 
yearn ago. Costs of fixing motorcy- ingher than in the quarter, last year, 
des on warranty have also plum- when it rqx»ied. earnings of $78 
meted, they say. million, or 74 cents a share. . 

•-For all these changes, a key un- -The company: said it would 
cferiainty is whether the overall phase out- and restructure some 
market will expand. Hariey . says product lines in its broadcast sys- 
that demographics are ideab The. teras.drwStoiL In addition, theccm- 
U-S. population curve bulges in toe .panv said it. plann^ to close its 
25- Lo43-y ear-old bracket, Harley’s West Pehn Beach, Ftooda..j»mi- 


bread and butter. 


conductor plant ini 986. 


EXECUTIVES 

AVAILABLE 


Portfolio Manager 

42, Swim; bilingual, F and G, with 
excellent working knowledge of 
English, solid ed uc atio nal back- 
ground (Business Administration 
School, N.Y., USA), presently 
working ' for o Zurich-based Swiss 
'bank, seeks new ehaHenging posi- 
tion os a top executive in intemo- 
tiond b on ki ng or finance, in Swtt- 
zerkmd or. abroad. 

.Write Io Cipher 44-131^131, 
fb&Odta. P.O, Box, 
CH-3021 Zurich. 


"INTERNATIONAL 

POSUIONST* 


every manwu 
A Saturday 


TOPtACEAN ADVSmSEMB^T 

oo nt oct ysur nww) 

Munafuifl Herald Tribune 

npunwiMe w Max Fereai 

1 81 Awe. Charies-deOaufle, 

92521 NewllY Codex. France. 
Tel: 747.1 245 • Telex.- 6T3595. 


The fall Surrey 

International 

Funds 

With the boom in offshore investment 
products, the fund investor has no lack of choice. 

But such variety has made the task of 
matching funds with investment goals more 
daunting than ever. 

On October 14, Personal Investing 
tries to bring some order to the chaos with the first 
of what will be twice-a-year surveys of international 
funds. The leaders and laggards will be listed in 
every major category of fund. 

And the experts will offer some hints on 
the theory and practice of fund investing. It adds 
up to must reading and a ready reference for the 
serious investor. Don’t miss it 

Advertisers may call: 

Peter Bullock 

Financial Advertising Manager 

International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre 
London WC2E9JH 
Telephone: (01) 8364802 


/. 




r 


TT 






I. 


L 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, S ATLHRDA V-SUND ArY , OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 


Iridayl 

AV1IX 

Posing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
ua to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Jii/ The Associated Press 


1] Month 

Htfiuw Stock 


DU. ritPE 


SlL 

ms nigh loo 


QoSfl 

ftffltChW 


<nu 

13ft 

3ft 

17ft 

ift 


JO 12 


Aft Asmro 
Yk. Asl rex 
1 Aslrotc 
7 ft Astral of ISO 11? 

£ AHsCM 


19'A 13ft AvonOI JO il 13 


35* 

1 

425 

3 

330 

21 


9Ui 9 9V* + Vi 

is** 12% i«*— ft 

1% Ti 1H.— ft 
13^1 lifts 13ft— V* 
ft ?* ft 
IS 14% IS + 'A 


B 


.150 3.9 


I?Wlontti 
HWi Ln Slade 


Div. YM. PE 


SU. 

HteHtflLOW 


own am 


18V. 

61* 

30’.. 


ja u 


7’.. 4'b ADI n 

IS 5% AL Labs .16 1.1 
37% 12 AMC IS .9 
5% Jft AM (nil 
83ft 06% ATT Fd 5m i J 
6 2ft Acme Pr 
11% 8% AcmaU 

9L. Adlan 

1% Acton 
1% AOmRs 

18'* AdRurt 
21 W 15 1 '. Adobe 
8% 4 Aeronc 

51% 29% AtilPb S 
9% S'* AlrE.D 

12 • AlrCal 

13A. 9% ArCol P< 1 JO 10.1 

H. % Alomco 
109% 65% Almllon 
9> 6 AlbcW 

5ft Aloha r 

7% Alahaln OS S 


AD 


14 13 
73 

1J 30 


*% 

15*% 

iN 


U 30 


* Alte* 


Altai wt 

Alcoa pi 3.75 10J 



14ft 

14 

i 

10% 

16% 




01 

73ft 

row 

8 

2% 

2% 


*% 

V% 

7 

10% 

10% 

U 

1% 

1% 


3ft 

3% 


25ft 

35% 


17% 

17% 

36 

5% 

5% 

n 

46 

43ft 

Sfl 

Aft 

t 

31 

tft 

9% 


11% 

11% 

20 

ft 

ft 

41 

83 

Wft 

38 

6% 

Aft 

JV 

7% 

Aft 

216 

11 



ft 


20 

% 

% 


70% - 
TVS 
9% 


6% + % 
9% — U 
11 % + .% 


6% + % 
MS— % 

'Vk + 


JOB 

20 

JMI 

.15 

100 


10% 

8ft 


S2 41 3* 


S'* 


42’ Y 
l’t 


7J M 


J4t> 14 18 


Wb 17% A’.znCn 
4% 2% AmBrll 

18% 10% Amdahl 
II’* 5% Amedeo 
13% t AmBIII 
49*6 34% AConm 
43% IPt AExtwl 
9 4% AFruc A 

A. AFruc B 
I*. AJHRtiM 
4ft A Israel 
11% AMzeA 
% AMBld 

3 AmDII 
471: APeH 
ft AmPIn v 
15% 12ft APrec 
8V2 6'.* AmRItV 
14": 11% ARorl/l IJSe 

6 3 ASdE 

53 49% A van un 

44 A xan or 

7 S'? A xan sc 
3ft 1% Amoat 

44. AndOl 
2% AndJEb 

SA. Angles 
% vIAngl v 
3"k ArgoPl 
5% Arlev n 
4% Armtrn 
SU Armei s 
7% Arrow A 
17V Arvmdl 


40 
17 27 
14 U 
1J 

14 5 

2 a 14 


23 
34 22 


JM 3J 


% + ft 

If* + re 

I30Qx 34% 33 14% +1% 

231 24% 24% 24% + % 
31 3 2% 3 

652 11V 11 11 — % 
10 6% 4% 4% 

37 10% 10% 10%—% 
I 49V 49V 49V + ft 
335 30% 29% 30 —1 , 
22 lOOOi 5% 5% 5% — % 

20 3000Z 5% 5 5 — % 

4 286 4% 3% 3X6— V 

« 9 4% 4% Aft — % 

12% 12% 17% + % 
4% 4% 4% — % 

4% 4% 4% + % 

53 S3 53 — % 
1 1 1 

14% 14% 14% 

8 8 8 

13% 13% 13% 

4 3% 3*i— V 

52% 52% 52% — % 
45% 45% 45% — % 
6% 4% 6% 


23 


207 

703 

10 

27 

19 

35 

140 

30 


4 

4% 

10 % 

2% 

4% 

7% 

11 % 

11% 

12% 

2* 


JO 


10 
13 14 
14 


$ft 

2% 

7 

1 

3% 

5% 

4% 


8% 


7% 

5% 

7% 

7 

1 

3% 

5% 

4% 

6 

8% 


1% 

5% 

2% + % 
7 — % 
1 

3% 

5% + Mi 
4% 

6 

8% 


4 21% 21V6 21%—% 


15% 

13> 

17% 

10% 

4% 


M 


18 IQ 
17 

.320 3J 


143C *0 


.40 4.9 10 


14 


J7I 16 16 


4% 3(6 BAT In 

25% 13% BOM 3 
3% 1% BRT 

9% BSN 
8% Badger 
7% Baker 
7X6 BaidwS 
... 2U BalrMwt 
24% 32V BfXlFd 
716 4% BOhltTB 
9% 4% BnkBItf 
4% 3ft Borco 
4% 2% BarnEn 
4% 4 BarvPG 

13% 10V Baruch 
12 4% Beard 

22% 10% BefdBIk 100 15J 
37% 20% BeraBr J3 1J 13 
4% 2% BelhCp X 3114.0 
34% 21% BIcCo 
15% tft BtoV 
24 21% BlnkMf 

19 9% BIORAs 

29 MV Blesng s 
1% % BlockE 

19% 11 BIOunIA 
19% 11% BlounIB 
23 116 BelorP: 

]6% 10% BOWVgf 
5% 2% Bowmr 

18% 13% Bowne 
24% i*v Brseng 
37% 24 V Bra FA 
41% 27% BrnFB 
4% 3ft BmFPf 
2% Bucklwi 


191 3*4 3% 3% + ft 

9 21% 21V 21V— % 
11 7% 2% 2% 

to toi* 10 10 

n> lm 11m io% + % 

5 13% 13% 13% — % 

9% W* 9% + % 
2ft 2 V 2ft — % 
25V 25V 25V 
Mb a% 6% 

8% 8% 8% + % 
3% 3% 3% — % 
3 7X6 3»— % 

4% 4% 4% 

1D% 10% 10%—% 
9 V 9 V 9U 
11% 11 V 11% + 


254 27V. 77 


10 3 


27% — % 
3 + V6 


|% 

34% 

13V 


14% Buell 
676 Bush n 


32 23 

9 

32 

Tift 

32% 

37% 

lie 

A0 2-7 

18 

A 

14ft 

14ft 

14ft 



11 

1 



23ft 



15 

1 

13% 

13% 

13% 


JO 2J 

4 

IB 


* 

26% - 
% 

ft 

-45 XB 

13 

IW 

17ft 

11»i 

12 


A0 34 



lift 

lift 



2A3 

14 

13 

14 +1 

30 


107 

11 

10% 

10%- 

% 

14 

1A 

4 

3% 

4 




27 

1A% 






41 

24% 

24% 

74ft 


1.00 23 

in 

8 

Jbte 

35 

35 - 

% 

1X0 16 

M 

82 

3V 

184k 

3S%- 

Vm 

A0 100 


4 

4 

3% 

4 + % 



3ft 

3 

3% + % 




4ft 

4% 


40 20 



3Dft 

30ft 



A 

17 

7 

A% 

4%- 

% 


JX 2.1 II 


16 

5 

1J8 108 S 
40 22 21 
24 


J601 84 16 
M 11 9 


JO 


20 7% CDIS 

12% SV CM I Co 
3% IV CMXCO 
19% 14V CRS 
9% 8% CSSn 
14V 9% CoasNJ 

Bft 4% CogleA 
14% 10% CoiRE 
28% 18V Col mot 
6% 3% Canon n 

1% % Caltnwt 

10% 7% Calprop 

H% 11 Cameo 
j 1% Camenl 
18% 13V CAAarcg 
35% 2576 CWIne 
13 4% Cardiff 

3% 1% Card! I 

8% 4% CareErv 

SV 2% Casblon 
22% 14% Cart I A 
32% 24% CasFS 
7% 2 Castlnd 
31 20% CenMof 150 110 

14V6 10% CentSo 1-570132 
19 14% CtrvBu 

m 5% Celec 
4 2 ChmaH 

171.4 12V: ChmoP 
29% 16% OiIMA 5 
29 17V ChIMB 3 

21V 16% ChlRv 
12 4% ChTOvg 

38 Vl 75V Chlltns 
33% 12% Cltodfrt 
32% 18V CIIFst 
33% 20% ChrGOS 


441210 
-B0b 5J 
2-20O 75 


11 18% 11% 111:— % 
279 10 9% 9% 

31 1% IV 1% 

9 14% T6V laV 
3 9% 1'i 9V6 + % 

34 9% 9% 9% 

25 6% 4% 6% 

43 12 11% 11%— % 

143 27% 27% 27% + % 
73 5% 5V 5Jj + % 

2 % V. % 

3 9 V ?\i 9V — % 

97 1456 14% 14%—% 
9 1% 1% 1% 

15 15V 13V 15V — % 
12 34V 33% 34V + V 

4 9% 9% 9% 

33 2V 2% 2U + % 
54 7% 7% 7% 

22 21 ZV 2b 

1 15% 15V* 15% 

4 39% 29V 29% — % 
3% 3U 3% + % 


25 


1201 2VV6 28% 29% — V 


JO 


.72 5J 
.16 .9 

.h a 

lJDd 6.1 


.17 4 


13Mb 14 
120 18 



17 

11% 

11% 

11% 

% 


2 

16% 

InW 

16% 

- ft 

17 

AA 

7% 

A% 

A%- 


1A 

1597 

2ft 


2% 


55 

13 

14 

13ft 

13ft 


13 

571 

17'*i 

17% 

17V5- 

V* 

15 

3 

2D ft 

2D% 

20V* + % 

1! 

3 

21) 

19ft 

lift— ft 


19 

7 

A% 

7 


27 

56 

30% 

29ft 

29% 


5 

w 

25% 

75% 

35% 



35 

V-f, 

29ft 

79% 


9 

1 

31ft 

31ft 

31ft + % 


« Month 
HMiLdw Stock 


Div. YU PE 


5H 

1081 H Mi Low 


Ckn 

guotCttsc 


42% 35% Oormt 
12% 4% CtarfcC 

3% Coamir 


4% 

10% 

5% 

22 

13% 

12% 

13% 

MV 

I2V 

15% 


1J3C 44 

J8e 15 


40V OTi 4JV + % 


6% Cohu 
COlFiVtS 


1% 

9% Comted 
4% Cam oo 


4% Comap 
CmaCn 


4% 

5% CmpFet 
6% Coned F 
.. .. 4% Courtly 
25% 13% CawOn 
9% 5% Conast 
5% 1’h Conawt 

10 4% CansOG 

21% 16% CnStar a 
157b 4% ulCOfltA 
20 8 viCntApf 

26% 17% ContMtl 
14% 10% Convsrn 
19% ISV CapSavn 
3% ?% CaaCrn 

5% CnICrd 
9% CntrMn 
2S% Crass 1. 
9% CraCP 


«%— % 
4 - % 
19% - % 
12% + % 
7 — % 
6% 

»V — % 
7% 


iov 

9% 

35 

17% 

13% 

2% 

5% 

25 

30% 

3 


7Jb CrCPB 


. Crate R 
1% CrystO 
13% Cubic 
23% Ounce 
% omen 


4J 15 
51 
42 
1 


1.9 11 
13 10 


34 
1 

7 466 *6 

7 9% 9% 

W 4 Hi 
24 19% 19 

178 12% 12 

5 7 7 

37 4% 6V> 

? JS ft ._ 

2 IJV 13% 13% 

57 19 18% 19 

972 9% 7 9% + % 

44 4% 4% 4% + % 

59 4% 4X6 fl* 

144 21 20% 20% — % 

47 13% 13% 13 

13 18% M 16 — % 

IB 19 18% 19 + % 

ID 11% 11% 11% 

51 IB* 18% 18% 

20 2% 3X6 2% + % 

S3 8V 8% SV 
37 W 9% «6 
15 33% 33% 33% — % 

23 14% 14V 14% + % 

5 11% 11% 117b 

60 % % %— % 
128 1% 1% 1% 

44 21% 20% am— V 
5 27^1 27% 27%+% 


34 


52 15 10 
1J4 11 J 9 


J3t 55 11 
11 


3 1% DWG -08t 4.9 

27% 21% DofeEn 32 U 10 
15V 9tt DamEA 200 21.1 

ISU 8% DamEB 2J0 2SJ 

4% 3% Damson 6 

26 17% Dams of ISO 11 J 

24% 19% Damspf 175 112 

21% 10% Do to Pd .16 1J 

7 3% Dotorm 5 

4% 3* Decrots 

37% 25* Del Lon 
16 13% OefVal 

S’A 1% Del mod 

7 4 Dsgntrn 

9% 7% Desonl 

16 10X6 Device 

9*6 5% Dtoo A 

946 5% DiagB 

40 9% DlaBfti 

3V 1% Dtgicon 

% U> Digic wl 
76V 36V Dtllra 
6 7X6 Diodes 

9% 5 DirActn 

2* 1% DqmeP 

% V DmePwt 
14% 12 Domtrs 
2% 1% Driller 

13* 9V DrlvHs 

34% 23 Ducom 
1 % Dunlap 

20% 12* Duplex S 
14* 12 DurTst 
14% 9% Dynlct 
29V 18% Dvnaer 


JO 


91 
50 
48 
.9 22 


554 

13 

5 

1 

25 

142 

23 

2 

5 

11 


J 15 
10 


12 


JO 


20 
14 15 


M 26 11 
Mb 10 IS 
_27e 2.1 9 
JO 29 12 


47 1% 1H 1*6— % 

10 24% 24% 24% 

158 9* 9% TVs— % 

94 9U Pb 9% + % 
2BB « 4% 4% + % 

27 22% 22V 22% + V 
5 24% 24% 24% + V 
~ 12 11 % 12 +% 
5V 5% 5% + V 

4% 4% 4% 

32* 32% 32* 

15% 15V 15% — % 
1% 1% 1* 

4% 4% 4% 

BV 8% 8U 
13% 13% 13% — % 
7 7 7 — % 

6* 6* 4* + V 
19 32V 31X6 32% 

S '* ’B tt 

190 61% 61 

3 3% 3% 

8 iS 3S SS 

40 

62 13% 13% 13% — % 
5 1% 1% 1% 

52 9 9 9 — V 

408 23* 2336 23X6- % 
345 X6 X6 % 

35 17% 17% 17X6— % 
45 13% 12% 13% + * 
308 13% 12* 13% + % 

4 27% 27% 27% 


6 5%7B 

K 


M 49 39 
.22 2-2 2B 


9% 6% EAC 

16% 13 EE CO 
7% 4% ERC 

6% 2% ESI 11 

3* 2V EoglCl 13 

23% 17% EstnCo 1J0 49 9 

40 31% Estop 6.96e21j0 7 

15V 7* EchoB g .12 

2*6 * ElAudD 

25% 15% ElcAm 1/40 7.1 10 

4% 2* ElecSd 43 

8* 2% Elslnor 

13% 10% EmMd n JJ3e J 

19% 12% EgvDvtn 


4 

13 

34 

200 

83 


8 % 8 % 8 % — % 
14* 14% 14* 

6% 6% 6% — % 
6% 6% 6% 

2 % 2 % 2 % 




8 20% 20% 20% 

15 33% 33% 33% 

Mil 13% 13% 13V — 

20 t* % 

1 19* 19% 19% + % 

29 4X6 4* 6% 

13TO 3* 3 3% 

24 11% 10* 10* 

77 18% 18% 18*— V 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Oct.4,1985 


Net asset value quotations are supplied by Hie Funds listed with the exception of same quotes based on Issue price. 

The marginal symbols indicate frequency of quotations supplied: (d) -dally; (w) -weekly; (b) -bi-monthly; (r) - regularly; (I) -irregularly. 


ALMAL MANAGEMENT 
■(w) Al-Mol Trust. 5-A~ 


BANK JULIU5 BAER B CO. Ltd. 


5 147J7 


■I d ) Baer bond. 

■( d I Conbor 

-i d I Eauiboer America. 


-Id) Equiboer Europe. 


■I d 1 Eauiboer Pacific- 
-id) Grater 


BNP INTERFUNDS 
Iwl Interbond Fund 


SF 894J0 
SF 1184.00 
. S 1139-000 
SF 1264.000 
SF 1171 JO 
. SFMaoo 
SF 1509.00 


-in) imercvrrencv USS- 
■It, j Inter currency DM. 



i wl Inlercurrencv Sterling 

-Iwl Inlereaultv Pacific OMor 

-l w i Inlereaultv N. Amer. Otter 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ 

-I a 1 Agon Growth Fund 5 1047 

Iwl Diver tend ... SF 84.40 

-(w) FIF-Amerlcn S 1 7 JO 

■1*1 FIF-Europe S 14.17 

■1*1 FIF-Poclllc i 19-32 

(dl Indosue: Multibonds A 5 105.31 

-l d ) Indosue.' Multibands B S 173JS 

-Id) Indmuez USD (MM J= I S 103046 


BRITANNIA.POB 271. SI. Heller. Jersey 

■l wj Bril. Dollar Income S 0482* 

■I wi Brlt.5 Manag.Curr.. $ 


■I d I Bril. IntlS Managporil- 
( d i Br (i . mil -C Manag.Partt . 
■!wl Bril Am lnc-&FdUd_ 
Iwl Brlt.Gold Fund. 


•fwl BritJManaa.Currencv C 

-f d ) Brit. Jooan Olr Pert. Fd S 

■Iw) Brit Jersey Gin Fund c 

■id) Bril. World Leis. Fund S 

■Id) Bril. World Techn. Fund S 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

•I w ) Caolial inti Fund S 

•Iw) Cnwidl Italia SA 5 


10.17 

1.115 

1155 

1.101 

0.724* 

14J8* 

1.172 

0224 

1.144 

0704 


3942 

1741 


CREDIT SUISSE TISSUE PRICES! 

-Id l Actions Sulsses SF 416JS 

-Id i Bond Valor Swl SF 1QSJ0 

■i d ) Bond Valor D-mark DM 11444 

■I d 1 Bond Valor US-DOLLAR. S 1Z3J4 

-< d I Band Valor Yen Yen 11143.00 

-< d I Convert Valor s»f SF IUJO 

-Id) Convert Valor US-OOLLAR. S 723.97 

-i d ) Canosec SF «71j00 

' a i CS Fonds-Bondi SF 77J5 

-IdlCSFonavlntT SF 1IIJ0 

-Id) CS Money Market Fund S 1091 JO 

-I d 1 C5 Money Market Fund_ DM 10S5J0 
d l CS Money Market Fund 


-I d ) Enerolo- valor 
-Id) Ussec 


-id I Europa-Valor. 


-id i Pacific -valor 



DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Winchester House- 77 London Wall 
LONDON EC2 (01 92097971 

-Twi Fmsburr Group Lid S 12628 

-lm) Winchester Diversified S 7134 

■'m) Winchester Financial Lid % 1039 


(mi Winchester Frontier, 
■iwi Winchester Holdings. 


-Iwl Worldwide Securities . 
■ Iw) Worldwide 5oeclal . 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
■+ld) Concenfra. 


5 105.02 
FF 105S* 
. S 1242 
_ S 4403 
. 5 164470 


■+l a i Inn Rententand- 


DM 

DM 


3229 

B9.96 


Dunn & Hargltt 4 Lloyd George# Brunei* 

-<ml D8.H Commodity Pool S 340.01 — 

iml Currency & Gold Pool S 14147 


-<mi Wlnav Life Ful. Pool S 54009 

-(mi Trans world Put Pool s 85444 

EBC TRUST CO.IJER5EY) LTD. 

1-3 Seale Si-Si. Hefler; 0534-34331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

•rvtd lint; Bid __S lOJO-QHer 510429* 


12133 


. d )Cao.: Bid S 11.77 Offer. 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

■IdJ Shon Term'A 1 (Aceum) S 1J014 

-Id I Short Term^A' (Dlslrl S 1.0031 

■Id ) Short Term 'B' (Aceum) S 12714 

-I d ) Short Term 'B' I Dlslr) 5 0.94M 

ivt) Lana Term S 24.97 


FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
I. Laurence Paunlv Hill. EC4. 01-4ZM48O 


-Iwl FAC AHanflc. 


(w) F&C European. 
-Iw) F&C Oriental - 


S 1134 
S 13.93 
S 2949 


FIDELITY POB 67a Hamilton Bermuda 
-lm) American values Common— s 90J8 

-lm) Amer Values CumPref 

-(d) Fidelity Amer. Assets — 

-Id) Fidelity Australia Fund 

Id) Fidelity Discovery Fund 

-(d) Fidelity Dir. Svos.Tr 

I d ) Fidelity Far East Fund 

-( d ) Fidelity InH. Fund 

f d Fidelity Orient Fund 

-Id I Fidelity Frontier Fund... 


-( d ) Fidelity Pacific Fund. 


t d ] Fidelity 5 PCI. Growth Fd. . 
-id) Fidelity World Fund. 


FORBE5 PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Acent 01-839-3013 
-iw) Dollar Income. 


104.17 
S 49 24 
S 1145 
S 1021 
S 12437 
5 2348 
5 6743 
5 1148 

S 1340 
S 151.98 
S 1628 
3487* 


-lw) Forbes High Inc Gm Fd. 
(w) Gold Income. 


(wl Gold Appreciation, 
-(ml Strategic Trading- 
GEFINOR FUNDS. 


7J2 

.99 

8.17 

431 

lja 


-iw) East investment Fund, 
-(w) Scottish world Fund — 
-Iwl State Si. American. 


344 J4 
11630 
1SBJ4 


London : 01-4914230. Geneva : 41 -22355530 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB IW. St Peter Port. Guerm«Y.<M81-2B715 


-Iwl FuturGAMSJL. 


-(wl GAM Arbitrage inc- 
(w) GAMerlcn Inc- 


-|w) GAM Australia Inc. 
•Iwl GAM Boston Inc— 
-<w) GAM Ermltage- 


11023 
I35JO 
S 13733 
S 10539 
S 107.11 
S 15.72 
SF 11040 
S 96.TO 
S 129.76 

S 11180 

-(w) CAM North America Inc % 10748 


-I wj GAM Fronc-vOl . 


4*1 GAM Hong Kona Inc. 

-( w ) GAM International Inc.. 
-iw) Gam Jooan Inc. 


-I w ) GAM N. America Unit Trust _ 
•Iw) GAM Padllc Inc. 


-Iw) GAM Pens. & Char. Warldw._ 
-Iw) CAM Pens.& Char. UJ.. Fd._ 
-iw) GAMrtnt 


10735 o 
S 12832 
100.90 p 
9720 P 
S 11459 


-iw) GAM5lnooPore/Malav Inc — S 91L« 
-( w) GAM Start & Inti Unit Trust— 139 25* p 

-[wl GAM Systems UK S 10238 

-iw) GAM Worldwide Inc S 1714s 

-Iw) GAM Tvche SA Class A s 11450 


G.T. MANAGEMENT IUKI Ltd. 

(d) Berry Poc. Fd. Lid. S 1040 

-( r I G.T. Aooiied science s 1344 

-Id) G.T. Aseon H.K. GwJtLFd * 1244 

(d)G.T. Asia Fund — * 411* 

Id) G.T. Austral la Fund S 74 30 

-(d) G.T. Europe Fund S 1247 

I w) G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fund — S 1*22 

-< r 1 G.T. Dollar Fund S 1AW 

(d)G.T. Bond Fund S IIJ8 

-(d) G.T. Global Technlgy Fd S 1136 

( d 1 G.T. Honshu Pathfinder S 2437 

-Id) G.T. Investment Fund S 1835 

-Iw) G.T. Japan small CaFund— S 4133 

-( r) G.T. TechnolDOy Fund S 23J4 

-(d) G.T. Souin China Fund 5 1442 


HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. IMTL. SJL 
Jersey, PO Bax 43. Tel 0534 74029 
Berne, PJ3. Box 2422. Tel 4131 224051 

Id ) Crossbow f Far Eosll SF 9.79 

d) CSF l Balanced) SF 25.41 

Id) intnl. Band Fund — s 1039 

-(d) Ini. Currency US. - S 2442 

I d I ITF Fd (Technology) — S 1322 

JdlO-Seos Fd (N. AMERICA)— S 27.94 


JARDINE FLEMING. FOB 78 GPO Ho Kg 

( r ) J.F Currencv&Band — _ I 1131 

-C r ) J.F Hong Kong Trait S 3437 

-( r ) J.F Jup&Pac Canv V 22.9ft 

-< r) J.F Japan Trust . Y 44*0 

-< r I J.F Japan Technology — Y 17.100 
-( r 7 J.F Pacific SecS.(Acc) S 447 


LLOYDS BANK 1NTL* POB <38, Geneva 11 

-+(w) Lloyds I nr I Dollar 5 11630 

-Kw) Uovas Inn Europe SF 11930 

— ffw) Uayda Irrn Growtti SF 16730 

■+(wl Uoycfs Inn income 5F 31920 

-+(w) Lloyds inn N. America 5 11630 

-f-fw) Lloyds Int i Pacific SF 12430 


1427 


— M w ) Lfovds I nfL Smaller Cos— t 
NIMARBEN 

-(d) Class A S 8720 

-(w ) Class B - U3. S 97.91 

-iw! Class C -Japan S 9123 


OBLIFLEX LIMITED 
-iwj Multicurrency. 


-iw) Dollar Medium Term, 
-(w) Dollar Long Term— 
-iw) Japanese Yen . 

-Iwl Pound Sterling. 


w) Deutsche Marx 
-Iw) Dutch Florin — 
-[*) Swiss Franc 


5 1221 
S 1135 
5 11J» 

S 13.10 
C ’0.94 


FL 1043 

.SF 10.13 


□ RANGE NAS5AU GROUP 
PB 85578. The Hague (070) 449670 

-( d 1 Bever Beieggingen++ S 3800 

PARISBAS-GROUP 

-(d ) Cortexa international— 5 SUB 

(d ) ECUPAR ECU 102*41 

-(w)OBLI-DM DM124241 

(W)OBLIGESTION SF 9540 

( w) OBLI-DOLLAR I121SJ0 


-(W)OBLI-YEN. 


Y f» 

. S 9437 

. 5 11927 

-Id) PAR US Trees. Bond ■CL B*_ S 112.13 


-(W | OBL I -GULDEN , 
d) PAROIL-FUND. 


-Id) PARINTER FUND. 


ROYAL B.CANADA.POB M44SUERNSEY 
-+I*) RBC Conodlon Fund Ltd.- 5 ltJ»* 
-t-(w l RBC Far East&PacItlC Fd. S 11.93 

-+(w1 RBC Inn Capital Fd. S 3187 

-Kw) RBC inri income Fd. S 1134 

-f I d 1 RBC Man-Currencv Fd S 2425 

■+ 1 w) RBC North Amer. Fd.— S 9.16 
5KANDIFOND INTL FUND (44-8-234370) 

(wllnc: BIO S 5L92 Otter. S 429 

(wlAcc: Bid— 5 5.94 Offer 5 621 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devonshire Sa.London-01-377-0040 

-( r I SHB Bond Fund 5 2446 

CwJSHBintl Growth Fund S 2328 


SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES} 

-< d ) America- Valor SF 47125 


-t a I D-Mark Band Selection— DM 12331 

-id) Dollar Band Selection 5 13531 

-(d) Florin Bond Selection FL 13741 

-td) Intervolor SF 8130 

-fdl Japan Portfolio SF 84730 

-(d) Sterling Bond Selection c 1074? 


( d I Swiss Foreign Bond Sel SF 10»J7 

-( d 1 Swiss volar New Series SF 34230 

-( d ) Universal Bond Select SF B2J5 

-(d I Universal Fund SF 11142 

-Id) Yen Bond Selection Y 1055830 


UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

•(d) Amoa UJLSh SF 3230 

(d) Band-l nvest SF 66J5 

1 d) For sc Swiss Sh. SF 15530 

id ) Japan- Invest SF 89000 

(d)Sot« South Afr.Sh. SF 32030 

(d) Sima (stock prln) SF 31330 


UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

(d ) Unlrenta — — ..... DM 4320 

-Id) Unhands DM 29J» 

C d I Unirak DM 79.95 

IdlUNIZINS DM 11735 


Other Funds 


fw> Acrtbands Investmenls Fund. 

(w) Actives! Inti 

lm] Allied Ltd. 


Iwl Aaulla International Fund. 

( r I Arab Finance i.F 

( r ) Arlene. 


5 2443 

S 1148 
S 4J5 
S 15833 
f 89127 
S 1621 73 

(w) Trastcor mn Fd. fAEiF) s 1030 

(w) Bandselex- Issue Pr SF 13545 

(ml Canada Gtd-Mortgoge Fd 5 943 

(d ) Capitol Preserv. Fd. mil 5 1140 

(w) Citadel Fund 5 132 

( d ) Thornton Australia Fd Ltd— 5 1034 

( d ) Tnoralan Jaaan Fund Lid — 5 1137 

(m) Cleveland Offshore Fd. S 21493* 

Iw) Columbia Securities— — FL 9839 

( r ) COMETE S 784.16 

Iw) Convert. Fd. Inn A Certs 5 1079 

(wl Convert. Fd. inn 8 Certs S 3139 

I wl Daiwa Japan Fund Y 10259 

wl D.G.C. 5 BBSS 

-( d 1 Doilor-Boer bond Fd 5101*30 


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(r 1 Drakkar Invetf-FundN.V s 111778 

(d) Dreyfus America Fund 1 934 

(d> Dreyfus Fund inn. s 3892 

Iw) Dreyfus Intercontinent— _ S 3243 

iw) The Estabitahment Trust 5 LI 9 

(d) Europe OW tool lorn Ecu 6238 

(w) First Eagle Fund S 1722336 

trl Fifty Slurs Lid * 87732 

(w) Fixed Income Trans s 1QJ9 


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( dj FrankFTrast Interzli 

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. S 729 
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S 87.97 


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( r I ILA-IGB 


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t 1043 
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S 28673 


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(di lntennlnlnaMut.Fd.CL-B-. % 807.19 

( r ) inti Securities Fund t 1113 

(dl InvcsfaDWS DM 57.97 

( r] Invest AllanIRnm S 845 

(r) Hal fortune mn Fund SA * 1730 

(w) Japan Selection Fund S 12424 

(wi japan Padflc Fund S U&.10 


(ml Jetter Ptns. I nfL Ltd 51161271 

(dl KMnwort Benson I nt*i Fd. * 2174 

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(wj Leverage Con Hold 
id) LfquBn* 

(w) Luxfund 


tm> Magnatund N.V. 


(w) Ntpoon Fund. 


ml NSP F.l.T. 



I d ) Mediolanum Sel. Fd. 
I r ) Meteor* 

(w) NAAT 


(d) Nikko Growth Package Fd S 82X329 


m) HOST EC Portfolio 


wl Novotec investment Fund. 
W) NJLM.F.. 


d ) PoelHc Horizon Invt. Fd. 
wl PANCURRI Inc 


r ) P Orion Sw. R Est Geneva— 5F 139730 

r ) Pcrmal Value N-V 5 131377 

r ) Pleiades $110131 

w) PSCO Fund N.V. 5 13270 

w) PSCOIntLN.V. S 10546 

d ) Putnam Inn Fund I 6729 

r)Prl-Teeh $ 84188 

w) Quantum Fund N.V 5456144 

dl Renta Fund LF28T730 

d I Renttnvest LF 105538 


d I Reserve Insured Deposits $110972 

w I Rudolf Wolff Fid Fd Ltd $177X00 

wl Samurai Portfolio SF 11335 

dl SCI /Tech. 5A Luxembourg- $ 1039 

w) Seven Arrows Fund N-V S 97573 


I w. ■ rwiw — — —ii. — . . 1 ,/i/j 

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w) Strategy Investment Fund $ 2X52 

d> Syntax Lld.'(Ckm A)' f 10J4 

wl Techno Growth Fund SF 8038 

a) Thornton HK& China I 


Cw) Tokyo Poc Held. (Sea). 

tw) Tokyo Poc Hold. N.V 

w] Transpacific Fund 


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S 9377 
S 12831 
$ 9071 

$ 11035 


( wl Tweedy^rowne n.v.OassA 5 220133 

Iwl TweedyJirDwne tLvXlassS— 5 152734 
(ml Tweedy .Browne (u JO n.v_ $ 101X57 

(d)UNICOFund DM 79.10 

d ) UNI Bond Fund $115130 

r I UNI Capital Fund $116735 

(d) US Federal Securitas S 10.18 

(w) Vanderbilt Assets s izw 

(d) World Fund STL s 1246 


Work .: B .f : Br. 1 ? 1 ! 1 ™ Piphcs: FL.- Dutch Horln; LF - Luxembourg Francs: ECU - European Currency Unit; SF ■ Swiss Francs: a - asked: + - Offer Prlees;b -Md change 
P S10 >0 si Par unit; N A - Nol Available; NG-- NolCommunkotedro - New: 5 - suspended; S/S ■ Stock Split; * - Ex-Dh/ldend; " ■ Ex-Rts; *“ ■ Gross Perfo r mance index July; • - 


Redempi- Price- Ex-Coupon; Formerly Worldwide Fund Ltd: ©-Offer Price Incl. 3b. prelim, charge: ♦»-' daily stock price as on Amst er dam Stack Exchanoe 


HELP CELEBRATE 




THOMSON 


/VHQNMON 


SECURITIES INC 


mmmia? 


^ST 

OUR 100 th BIRTHDAY 


TTiomson McKinnon marks its hundredth birthday in October with a lotto 
celebrate. Since opening a single office in 1885. we have expanded 
steadily to rank as a major force in the financial services industry. Our 
annua revenues exceed $400 million and we have a capital base of 
more than $215 million plus assets totaling over $2 billion. 

As a full-service firm, we offer a comprehensive range of products and 
services to help investors meet the challenges of a demanding 
marketplace. As one of the largest privately-held firms in the securities 
industry (over 75% owned by employees through a stock ownership trust), 
we are small enough to provide sound and creative counsel on a 
personalized basis. 

At the turn of our century, we invite your inquiries on how Thomson 
McKinnon might be able to put 100 years of investment experience to 
work on behalf of you and your financial goals. 

ft may give you reason to celebrate too! 


Greenly House, 40 Dukes Place. London, England EC3A 5HJ 44-i 626-1511 
Brussels Paris Rome Monte Carlo 

Geneva Lugano Frankfurt Stuttgart 


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^ ^EW YORK - itTd^ar 

;J*«d mixed m New York on b£ 

: *• T y “*. op ??e to ? s S( * uared posi- 
s! bo^pdofihe weekend £££« 

• ■ ' 5 Sc f al ,? f monetary officials of 

.fiSta® 

: £ »' ^ ** Grou P of Kve meets 
> •;• Sa^y m Sec< South Korea. 

> ■ they are expected to review t he a>l 
1 ;: ; lart.sbde since thdr initial agree- 
' y menL 

*$• The dollar ended ai 16210 Deut- 
, \i sche marks, up Trom 16200 Tbins- 
. •« ctay. It rose to ZI500 Swiss franc? 
; from 11420 and to $1.4190 against 
■■ y' the British pound from $1.4260 on 
1 i ; Thursday. But the dollar was down 
; the yen, at 21Z20 from 


’ iiTKTTr ■ j uom 
’ v 23145, and against the French 

‘ £ franc,.easmg to 8:000 from 8.010. 

. y - Dealers said there was continued 
market feeling that the central 
banks of the five nations — United 
States. Britain, France, West Ger- 
1 > many and Japan — were still not 
■ content with the dollar's level but 

C there were no signs of in tervmtidn 

Friday. 

•„ : £. Lower levels are expected next 


week. Uncertainty over, the out- 
- cense of the meeting in ‘Seoul next 
week: of the lntemational L Mcme- 
tary Fund and World Bank was 
injecting some caution. 

The five naticas dn;S<rpL“22 
laun che d a joint effortto push the 
dollar lower* In Semit ^ey are ex- 
pccied to review the doflar’s subse- 
quent decline in the. tnaiVi*^ and 
to discuss whether Jhrther “steps 
should- be taken. - . 

“The basic tone of the market is 
still for a lower dollar,” said a deal- 
er in Frankfurt. “But the dollar has 
fallen - steadily since the 
SepL 22 and a technical move up- 
ward can’t be ruled out” 

In. earlier trading in Europe, tbe 
dollar ended in London at 16350 
DM, up from ■Thursday’s dose of 
16225. Last Friday, the dollar 
dosed at 2.6825 DM in London.. 

The British pound fefl to $14140 
from an opening SI. 4295 and 
Thursday's dosing $1.42525. 

Earlier Friday, the doOarfcfl.toa 
4w-year low against the yen in To- 
kyo, to its lowest levd against the 
mark in Frankfurt since April 1984, 
and, in 7-nrjrh and Fans, .to its 


■ ? PyrEBKATIONAX. HERAIJD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 Br * s .^Ta | 

^:J-yr:;y -I BUSINESS PROFILE / SirJohnOarkof Plessey Co. ^ 

UJLNew Car Sales — 

of Seoul Mec xine aw Recor d Some Londoners Wonder if His Drive Has Abated 

O United Pros Ttaemaiional 


lowest levels against tine Swiss and 
French francs since March 1984. 

' Dealers in London said the 
pound caxne under pressure when 
oil prices slumped on the European 
spot market as OPEC ministers 
ended thdr meeting in Viama in 
disarray over production quotas ad 
pricing. ' 

The dollar began its trading day 
in Tokyo by falling to 21 1.90 Japa- 
nese yen, its lowest level since the 
spring of. 1981. 

In London, the dollar ended 
firmer against the yen, at 213.20 
after an opening 211.75. Thurs- 
day's dose was 21255. 

Against the Swiss franc it dosed 
at 2.1875 after an opening 2.1255 
and Thursday's closing 2.1435, and 
ii cndcd at 8.040 French francs 
after an opening 7.950 and Thurs- 
day's dosing 8.015- 

Ar m&Bftcmooa in Europe, the 
dollar was fixed at 2.608 DM in 
Frankfurt, down from 2.6459 DM 
late Thursday, and at 7.957 French 
francs in Paris, down from 8.0735. 
The dollar dosed Friday at 21480 
Swiss francs in Zurich, up from 
2.1445 Thursday. • (Reisers, AF) 


THE EUROMARKETS 


«- >■&,- By Christopher Pizzey 

f? . Reuters 

"LONDON — Professionals 
r,i switched thdr attention Friday to 
u v the primary sector of the Eurobond 
\ ; | ? raaricet, where several new issues 
emerged, dealers said. The second-' 
p- ary market was quiet with prices 
generally ending little changed. 

The floating-rate note area was 
— the- most active, . with new notes 

!'- y /verging dftnrmmiatnri in thrift 4 if. 

ferenl currencies. 

The yen floaier for France’s 
' V. Caisse Nationale des Tilficom- 
*}. i, mnnications was launched, as ex- 
’ r\: pec ted, with a 12-year maturity and 
paying 1/16 point over the six- 
' month London interbank offered 
■ rate. The issue was lead managed 
bjr Daiwa Europe Ltd. 

• h'r Two sterling floaters were 


launched, the larger being a £100-. 
million note for Bank, of Nova Sco- 
tia. Tbe 1 5-year-issue pays 10 basis 
points over three-month Libor and 
was lead-managed by Samuel 
Montagu & Co. Priced at 100.10, it 
ended -inside- the total fees of 16 
baris points at 100.03. 

Tbe Bri tannia Jtafldmg Society 
issued a £75-iarillion, seven-year 
note paying 1/8 point over three 1 
month Libor. The first coupon, of 
1116 percent, was'fired over five- 
month Liborto allow time for pas- 
sage of legislation allowing build- 
ing societies to pay interest gross. It 
ended at 99.85, on the l>baris- 
point seHing concession. It was led 
by Hambros Bank Ltd. - 

Wdls Fargo & Gx issued a $150- 
.mTK pn, 12-year floater lead man- 
aged by Salomon Brothers Intema- 
tionaL The note pays 22Vi basis 
points over the one-month London 


interbank bid rate, the same spread 
as that for the recent Citicorp issue. 
On the when-issued market, it was 
quoted at 99.82, compared with to- 
tal fees of 19*4 basis points. 

- Tbe secondary, market in dollar 
floating-rate notes was unaffected 
by news that UJL unemployment 
rose 0.1 percent in September to 7.1 
percent. Prices generally ended 
with few changes from Thursday’s 
closing levels, with period Eurodol- 
lar deposit rates also showing little 
change, dealers noted. 

The dbUar-straiejhi sector also 
ended the day with little change, 
leaving prices narrowly mixed on 
the week, dealers said One trader 
commented that the market’s un- 
dertone is still reasonably firm. 
“We’ve been helped by the lack of 
new issues this week. . . . The mar- 
ket’s had a chance to absorb last 
week’s rush,'’ he said 


LONDON — New^car sales 
in Britain in September totalled 
143,165, the Society of Motor 
Manufacturers and Traders 
saidFriday.lt said that sales for 
the year to-date were 2.66 per- 
cent ahead of the 1,464,052 reg- 
istered daring the first nine 
months of 1983, the record 
year. 

The import share of the mar- 
ket was 56.9 percent, compared 
with 59.15 percent the year be- 
fore, while the Japanese share 
was 14.83 percent c ompar ed 
with 11.99 percent a year earii- 


Success Tale 

In Sh enzhe n 

- (Continued from Page 13) 
Kunming in Hunan province, 
where he was a flight leader in the 
3d Pursuit Squadron. 

When he got back to Kunming, 
he was astonished to find die 
walled city gone, replaced by one 
with wide avenues, rows of trees, 
modem holds and a population 
that had tripled 

Asked why he thought the Chi- 
nese had invited him, be said: “I 
don’t think they want anything out 
of me directly. The primary reason 
is they want to build better rela- 
tions with the United States and 
the state of Oregon.” 

He said they were interested in 
buying logs, and Oregon had plen- 
ty to seU “They’d rather have the 
logs thaw our fmi«hari lumber,*’ he 
added. “It’s the difference in 
price.” 

*Tm a believer in free trade,” 
Mr. Jernstedt said *T bke Reagan’s 
attitude. The world is going 
through a kind of leveling, ana this 
Chinese economy is not going to 
grow completely wn1«a they have 
outlets for thdr goods.” 

Spanish Car Output Grows 

Reuters 

MADRID — Car production in 
Spain rose 5.6 percent to 641,535 
vehicles in the first half of 1985, 
according to figures published Fri- 
day. 


By Sherry Buchanan 

truenualanal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Sir John Clark, 
chairma n of Plessey Co. PLC, 
keeps a low profile, and maybe that 
is why there is some speculation 
about his control of the large Brit- 
ish tdaxsmm unications concern. 

“The company has suffered from 
bring a fazrity-dominated busi- 
ness," says one I on don broker. 
“John Clark provided the driving 
force is the early days. In :1 k City, 
some people wonder to what extent 
he is stiO doing that.” 

The broker was referring to Ples- 
sey’s lower profits in 1984 and to a 
lower 1985 first quarter. The com- 
pany’s fust-quarter profits fell to 
£392 million ($55.9 milKon), from 
£42 millio n in the first quarter in 
1984. 

Sot John rarely gives interviews, 
but in person he comes across with 
a sense of irony and more than a 
touch of cymrism. He gives the 
impression of having seen it all but 
only lUting some of it. 

Plessey is stED a famil y-run bad- 
ness. Sir John is chairman and chief 
executive. He holds 1,038,990 
shares, and is the largest stockhold- 
er among the company’s directors. 
His brother, Michael Clark, is dep- 
uty chairman and deputy chief ex- 
ecutive and has 327,000 shares. 

Sir John retains a healthy ynse 
of humor about himself and his kin. 

“None of tbe Clark men have 
ever been brilliant. What we got is 
through application and bloody 
hard work/' be says. “On my Har- 
row school report, h said talkative 
and ineffectual.’" In spite of that 
report. Sir John went on to Cam- 
bridge University. 

And despite tbe fact that his fa- 
ther, Alan Clark, started the com- 
pany, Sir John was not painlessly 
parachuted in at the top. He joined 
it 1949 as an assistant to the general 
manager and worked his way up. 

As he tdls it, be paid his dues all 
along the line. 

After serving in a relatively quiet 
berth in the Royal Navy Volunteer 
Reserve, he went to work for Ford 
Motor Co. in Manchester, “getting 
up at 4:45 AAL to start work at 
6:15.” 

“I discovered what it was Kke on 
the- shop floor,” he recalls. “1 
shared a room in (tigs where I only 
had a blanket and it was cold.” His 







*?>&•■¥ 





MW 


Si 





%:■ ... 






Sir John Clark 


unheated room did not come 
equipped with a bathroom either. 

At 60, he keeps fit. “Tm on a 
permanent diet. Tm only having 
eggs tonight,’ 1 he says. 14 My tennis 
teacher tdls me there is no reason 
at 60 I shouldn’t be fitter than at 
24." 

Sir John has three children by his 
second wife Lady Olivia Ann Claris: 
and two children by his previous 
marriage. 

Despite a reputation of abrasive- 
ness, his view of management may 
vary from that of many so-called 
tough chief executives. ’ 

“Management has to understand 
people and to understand people 
you have to understand life. You've 
got to care,” he says. 

Nor does he thrive on conflict 
“No one is a natural manager. 
Leadership is not to lead 99 men. 
but the one hundieth man, " he 
says. “Management is dealing with 


unpleasemness; you have to be a 
person prepared to deal with prob- 
lems. Nobody likes that" 

In fact he considers himself to 
be too soft ‘Tm too tolerant Tm 
always prepared to forgive because 
I think I understand the other per- 
son's point of view," he says. “Tol- 
erance injects delay. Tm getting 
less tolerant; I perceive my own 
f ailings . Tolerance is like putting 
off a divorce you knew is inevita- 
ble” 

Bankers and brokers in London 
credit him with having switched 
from an analog to a digital tele- 
phone system in tbe mid-1970s and 
with having gotten rid of several of 
Plessey's unprofitable businesses. 

Plessey now has three core busi- 
nesses: 

• Telecommunications, which 
includes the British public tele- 
phone network. System X. 

• Electronic defense systems, 


which include Ptarmigan, the bat- 
tlefield communication system for 
the British Army of the Rhine. 

• Engineering and components, 
which include semiconductors. 

He now faces the challenge of 
transforming Plessey into a truly 
international telecommunications 
company with a strong U.S. pres- 
ence, and success in the American 
telecommunications market is a 
goal that still eludes him. 

Plessey’s UiL subsidiary, Strom- 
berg-Carison lac., which manufac- 
tures digital switching equipment 
for the U.S. telephone network, has 
failed to become a market force in 
the U.S. Plessey’s telecommunica- 
tions profits for tbe first quarter 
were down by £1 .9 million because 
of Strombog-Carison losses. 

Sir John hopes that by restruc- 
turing and paring down the subsid- 
iary, it will break even in mo years. 

Playing in the league with Amer- 
ican Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
and Northern Telecom Inc. doesn’t 
seem to worry turn. 

“Especially on tbe service and 
delivery times, the big boys suffer 
from the arrogance of size," he 
says. 

Plessey is also bidding against 
the French group, Thomson CSF, 
to sell the U.S. Army a radar sys- 
tem. Recently the French govern- 
ment protested against Prime Min- 
ister Margaret Thatcher’s alleged 
interference in favor of Plessey. 

With the Geneva arms talks 
coming up, the US. government is 
unlikely to award a contract in or- 
der to preserve harmony among its 
allies. 

Sir John is proud of his own 
American heritage. “I'm half 
American There is only one other 
son of the revolution who was 
knighted and that was Winston 
Chur chill, " he says. 

Sir John's grandfather was a 
weaver in the United States. His 
father came to Britain as a vice 
president with United Shoe Ma- 
chinery Corp. “to clean up the shoe 
business in Europe,” and built 
Plessey on U.S.-produa licenses. 

Sir John believes he has lived up 
to the challenge of his father’s lega- 
cy. 

“Yon know what my father told 
me four days before he died? He 
said: ‘Boy, you’ll find it's lonely at 
the top.’ God, was he right.” 


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The Global 

Newspaper. 







/! 











Page 18 


ACROSS 
I Publicize 
7 Llama’s cousin 
13 Gallant 
20 Brewer from 
Toledo 
31 Higher up 

22 Crescent- 
shaped figure 

23 More precious 

24 Dr. Seuss book 
2® Donahue from 

N.Y.C. 

28 Oriental 

2» Port . 

scene of Aided 
landing on 
Guam 
30 Security 
33 Annealing 
ovens 

35 Some news- 
paper ads 
37 Second self 
30 Fit 

42 Existence, to 
Aquinas 

43 Shaver 

46 Dr. Seuss’s 

" Stole 

Christmas” 

48 Pinch 
48 Pitch 

50 “Esto 
Perpetua” 
state 

51 Raggedy 

DOWN 

1 Relative of 
publ. 

2 Liberace 

3 Altar of the 
skies 

4 Dr. Seuss story 

5 Customer 

6 He's 

conditionally 
loose from the 
calaboose 

7 Air: Ahbr. 

8 Football-fac- 
tory employee 

9 Nice 

10 Start of a 
Shakespearean 
title 

11 Breton or 
Briton 

12 A moon of Uranus 


ACROSS 

53 This (girl), to 

Liyy 

54 African fox 

55 Benefit 

57 Week’s pay 

59 Jane Austen 

heroine 

60 Prickle 
62 Soak 

64 Timorous 
66 Hand down to 
heirs 

69 Forage plant 

70 Projection 

72 Some 
commuters’ 
destinations 

73 Book about 
Ann Landers 

75 Chips in chips 

76 Improvisation 
by Ella 

77 Drink to 

79 Gibb of 
songdom 

80 Part of a Latin 
paradigm 

84 Linden 

85 Ordained 

88 Locale tor an 
airboat 

89 Underling of 
the 11th 
century 

90 Moines 

91 Dr. Seuss story 


ACROSS 

94 Summertime 
hi N.Y.C. 

95 Frances H. 
Burnett 
heroine 

96 Expanse 

97 “Ode on 

Urn” 

98 Soricines 

100 Bess follower 

102 “Critique of 
Pure Reason” 
writer . 

103 One of the 
Jackson 5 

105 . . autumn 

turned to 
” : Shak. 

108 Bone: Comb, 
form 

110 Dr. Seuss’s “1 
Can Lick 30 
Other 

113 Exercises 

117 Passivity 

118 What Peart 
White did in 
films 

Z19 One of Willie 
Morris's roles 

120 Deposes 

121 They do 


122 Bundle of 
energy 


DOWN 

13 Next to 

14 Egyptian 
ocean goddess 

15 Ad come-cn 

16 Ribbed fabrics 

17 “Believe 

Not” 

18 Zeno’s porch 

19 Hill, to an Arab 

25 Dr. Seuss book 

27 Petemaji 

36 State of Brazil 

31 Anglo-Saxon 
estates 

32 First words of 
“A Tale of Two 
Cities” 

34 Dr. Seuss book 

36 The 

(“Orphan. 

Annie” character) 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 


Kid Stuff BYA. J.SANT0RA 

fi 12 Is F Is IS Tb Is iio mi its 116 I17 lie iio 




{30(31 ^■33 1 (34 


|« 14 1 


180 181 182 483 




1105 I I |108 1107 


rwi n»i 


in* (i is | iie i 


DOWN 
38 Pi follower 
40 Agt-’s cut 
41 A word to 

43 With no 
exceptions 

44 Weak 

45 Thomas Beer’s 
“The Mauve 

47 Singer Janis 
49 Dr. Seuss's 

“ My 

Pocket" 

52 Dr/Seuss's “If 

I The 

Circus” 

55 Rodomontade 
.56 Leftover scrap 
58 Piquant 
61 Lang, at a 
yeshiva 


© New York Times; edited by Eugme Molesko. 


DOWN 

62 Rhyme royals 

63 Kind of cycle 
65 Hamlet’s cry 

of disgust 
68 Outdid 

67 Overindulgence 

68 Picturesque 
71 Dr. Seuss's 

“Bartholomew 

the 

Oobleck” 

74“ Love 

You,” 1334 
song 

78 Herbert 
offerings 


DOWN 

79D.D.E.'S 

opponent 

81 Puzo subject 

82 Jordan town, 
once called 
Philadelphia 

83 Exhausted 

86 Pronoun for a 
calico cat 

87 Mantle, to 
Maris 

88 Grasp 

90 Nabokov novel 

92 Money 
changing 


DOWN 

93 Harassed a 
dribbler 

95 Causes for 
re-fusing 

98 Solid: Comb, 
form 

99 Passover feast 
101 “Gunn” actor 

in 1967 

103 Color 

104 “ Ideas,” 

1951 song 

106 Author San tha 
Rau 


DOWN 

107 St. 

Lawrence 
(home of 
G.B.S.) 

199 In order 

110 Charo’s aunt 

111 Command to 
Fido 

112 Canine ex- 
aminer’s deg. 

114 Western lizard 

115 A dog, for short 

116 B'way sign 


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SK3N3EON ;j 4 



THE KINGDOM OF THE WICKED 
By Anthony Burgess. 377 pages. $17.95. 

Arbor House Publishing Co., 235 East 45th 
Street, New York, N. Y. 10017. 

By Midhiko Kaku rani 

I N “The Kingdom of the Wicked,” his latest 
novel, Anthony Burgess takes up one of his 
favorite themes — freedom to choose between good 
and evil, a theme he has examined at length in such 
works as “A Clockwork Orange,” “The Clockwork 
Testament; or, Enderby’s End" and “Earthly Pow- 
ers.” This time he has chosen a monumental canvas 
for his study: He proposes to contrast divine grace 
and earthly decadence, holiness and sin, through the 
story of early Christianity’s rise during the Roman 
Empire; His narrative starts with the crurifbdon, 
weaves its way through the reigns of various corrupt 
emperors and ends with the eruption of Mount 
Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii 
The problem is not so much that the subject is too 
largo for Burgess to handle — he encompassed most 
of 20th-century history in “Earthly Powers” — it is 
more that be does not have any point of view or 
anything particularly illuminating to say about this 
ancient story. The book apparently grew out of 
research Burgess did for a television series called 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


BOOKS 



“A.D-.” and it reads like a mechanistic exercise in 
utilizing store d-up information. Heavily indebted to 
the Acts of the Apostles and works by Suetonius 
and Tacitus, it employs all the tired dmrices or the 
historical novel to try to give the reader a sense of 
verisimilitude. Minor characters uncannily show up 
at pivotal moments in history, famous people do 
what they’re famous for with varying degrees of 
Alan, and connections between all their stories are 
established with awkward transitions. 

We’re given blow-by-blow accounts of arguments 
among Christ's disciples, we're told about Tiberius's 
pet snake and Agrippina's owl, and we’re treated to 
oils of local colon “He passed through one of the 
lesser markets, where mimosa was on sale and 
crocuses in small lute, and lowly housewives did 
their own shopping for carcases of young lamb, 
wine-redjoinis of beef, little birds, palm grapes and 
fat gourds.” Such descriptions frequently have a 
perfunctory air about them, as though Burgess felt 
obligated to shoehorn them into the narrative occa- 
sionally. He is equally heavy-handed when it comes 
to inserting hits of history intended to show off his 
knowledge of linguistics and the classics. 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 


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The narrative and dialogue are strewn with 
phrases of Hebrew. Greek and Latin — as well as 
word-games involving these languages — and the 
characters, who are given to carrying on lengthy 
philosophical debates, all seem to share Burgess' 
obsessions with eschatology and theology. 

The casual irreverence with which Burgess treats 
the story of Christ and his apostles makes for some 
faintly amusing moments — a sidewalk observer 
who sees a beggar cured of his lameness by Peter 
says he always knew the panhandler was a cheat — 
but his penchant for low comedy is neither sus- 
tained a or developed to serve any specific end. The 
author seems content to simply retell a lot of famil- 
iar anecdotes selected to reflect his interests in such 
matters as progress, the cyclical nature of history, 
homosexuality and incest, and occasionally pausing 
to embroider' them with his patented verbal pyro- 
technics. 

No doubt Burgess could argue that he is not 
responsible for the dull clotted narrative of “The 
Kingdom of the Wicked.” that whatever infelicities 
the reader discerns spring from the pen of the 
narrator — an unreliable fellow by the name of 
Sadoc, a former shipping clerk given to headaches, 
drunkenness and assorted physical infirmities. “My 
Greek," Sadoc writes, “is not the tongue of Homer 
or Aeschylus but a sloppy ungrammatical sabir 
laclting Attic salt and tending to a saccharinity 
which sets ray teeth on edge. This property is not in 
the writer but in the language; . . . Whoever 
translates this, if it is ever to be translated may be 
rendering me into the barks of the Goths or the 
cooings of the Celts, by grace of the alphabet of 
Rome.” 

Although Sadoc surfaces periodically in "King- 
dom of the Wicked” he essentially functions as an 
old-fashioned omniscient narrator, invisible and all- 
knowing. Unlike Toomey, the narrator of “Earthly 
Powers," he does not shape the narrative through 
the power of his voice or his personality. And unlike 
the narrator of Robert Graves’s “L Claudius" — 
which covered much of the ground dealt with here 
— he does not play a significant role in the events he 
describes: as a result his philosophical stance as a 
skeptic barely matters. The narrator's main func- 
tion. it may seem, is to give Burgess a way of 
disavowing responsibility for the accuracy and 
shape of this most disappointing noveL 

Michiko Kakutani is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 


Wirld Stock \larkete 

Via Agence France-Presse Oct. 4 

Closing price* in local cunenaes unless otherwise indicated. 


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i . . ; 

“v- . ;Il^^ HEILUJ) TRIBinSEt SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5-6, 1985 . 

JT s 


Page 19 

.. . .. 

- ^ .SPORTS • 







"iii 




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Thief Got the Jump 
With Official Shoes 

The Jssochited Press 

Canberra, Australia —a 

thief ran off with the officials’ 
shoes Friday just boors before 
the opening ceremony "of 'the 
World Cup track and field com- 
petition. 

More than 200 pairs of blue 
shoes, to be worn during the 
ceremony, were stolen during 
the night from a storage room 
at the stadium. • 

Officials had to borrow shoes 
from friends to take pan in the 
march, a spokesman said 



. ■ ThrAattcwed Pris* 

CANBERRA, . Australia — 
World nxoril-ho] to'WHlkBanks, 
with his favorite musit blaring in 


withdraw if he was not allowed to 
listen to them on the field — and an 
enthusiastic crowd estimated at 
1 1,000, be sailed 57 feet, 814 inches 


me,"' said' the enthusiastic Banks, 
who earlier in 1985 had set the 
world record of 58-1 1%. 

Banks' tapes had become the 
center of controversy Thursday, 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Tennis 


Thursday’s line Scores Davis Cop 


it*. 


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■vsw.'m 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
nru Game 
, Boston .. ju Qig j § 

.Baltimore MMNM 5 t 

. - OMa and Gedtnon; Stawort. T. Martinez 
. (3) and Dmw.W — Oteda.9-11. L— Shnuaa 
.5-7. HR— Boston, Arm a* (28b 
. Second Oame 

■Boston • • OM 13s no— ■ is s- 

. Baltlmora IN 2H 05* — y 12 j 

SoRors, Kkson (5), Lollar (7), Crawford (■> 
.and Sullivan; Hufinsan.5ncfl (5>,Mavera<7L 
. Habvan 171, Aaae (9) ana Porda Danwsev 
-ia>. W— Habvan, 1-0. L— Crawford. 6-5. Sv— 
•AOM (UJ.HRfr— Boston, evens (29), Bvdcner 
^(151. Baltimore, -SMs (17), Ormtsy (12). 
£?onxito an MB oas— • « o 

90S *2S Mi— 2 4 1 
■ " Clancv, Lavelle (5), Lome (6), Hanka U) 

■and Whitt; Terrall anal Parrish, w— TerralL 

■ 15-10. L— Clancy, t-4. 

-Milwaukee MB BBy BBS — Bit 

■ Aaw York iso mb BO* — s | t 

- * Lrarv. Searage (8) and Simmons; GukJry, 

■ Aj after IB) ana Hoastry. W— Buldrv.Zt*. L— 

: Coory, 1-4. Sv-Fteher (14). HR — New York, 
•ftendersoo (24). 

Cull font In • MB Mt Btl— 1 11 8 

• Kansas Cltr -2Ml»Wx— 4 7 1- 

Sutton, alburn Ml and. Boons; Jackson. 

5 Ouisanberrv (9) ontfSuntwrg. W — Jackson, . 

• 14-12. L— ( Sutton, 15-10. Sv— QwtaenteiTy (36). 

: HRs— Kansas Oty, White (22), Batbaal (36), 

■ Brett (28). ■ 

! Seattle M Me 030— 5 4 • . 

■Chicago bn ns Ml— 4 » i 

Swift, Vanae Bern (I), Munoz (i) and Scott, . 
Valle »); Nelson, James (U.Aooski (9) and 
: Skinner. Hill (9). W— SwUt,6-ia L— James. 8- 

■ 7. Sv— Nunez (U). HR— Scathe, Owen (61. 

! NATIONAL LEAGUE '■ 

[ Pittsburgh in sbs boo- 5 B 1 

i Chicaao BIS BM 49*— 13 is 1 

Kipper, Winn (6). Krawczvk (6tf dements ' 
l (71 and Ortiz; Abrews. Brwsitar <5),F erlman 
l (6), Enoef m and Lake, Davis (7). W— Pert- 
, man, ML L-Wtai* 3-6. Sv— Enoel (1). HRs— 

, Pittsburgh, Brawn (5). Chicago, Matthews . 
: (i*>. Coy (22). 

; Houston . . IN Ml <40 — 7 14 1 

. son Francisco MB IN 188-8 9 8 

; Haatticock.DJPino(71 and Ashby; LaPoint, 
r williams (7). Robinson m, Moore (9) end 
i Trevino. W— Heamcocfc.3-1. L—Lo Point, 7-17. " 

hr— H ouston, Ashby («. 

^Cincinnati 218 888 081— 4 B I 

• San Diego - in He 40x — t it | 

Tibbs, Buchanan (7), Smith (7) and Van 
, Gorder; Hawkins <md Kennedy. W— Haw- 
I kins. 184L L— Tibbs, 10-16, HR» — Cincinnati, 
i Parker (32). Son Diego. Owvww (6), Martine z ' 

. 121). 

t PtHtadetpWo . BM BM MB — I 13 1 

> Montreal IN BM BBB — 7 n I 

i Rawiev. Tokuiy* f 6), Carmen (Stand Dad-. 

< Ian; Laskey, SI. Claire (3), Lucas <51. CCon- 
i nor 17), Burke (8) and Yost, O'Berry 19). W— 

I Rowley, 134. L— Laskey. 5-16. Sv— Carman 

• ^7*. -HRs— PtHladefpWa Schmidt- (33). Mon-' 

• fraaLManctaue.m 
: New 


his ears, made World Cuplnstbiy (17.58 meters), 
and won his fast major interna- “This has be** 1 quite a year for 
tional championship Friday, soar- - --- 
ing to victory in the triple jump. He 
turned in one-tit sat meet records 
set in J3 events on the opening day 
of competition;' - 
Hdpedby the use of his musical' when the International Amateur 
tapes — . Banks' had' threatened to Athletic Federation, the world gov- 
: ‘ enring body of track and field, 

banned his tape player from the 
field. But Friday, the IAAF recon- 
sidered .after listening to the ma- 
chine for 216 hours and deciding 
that he would not be receiving 

coaching from the stands through 
his earphones . — a violation. 

“They said they wanted to listen 
to the tapes, so I let thou listen to 
Prince,” said Banks. “They also lis- 
tened to tapes by Steve Perry and 
-Whitney- Houston.” During the 
competition. Banks also listened to 
aH three artists. 

He may have needed them to 
beat a tough field that included 
Oleg Protsenko of the Soviet 
Union, the runner-up who also, 
broke the old World Cop record of 
57-0 set by BrazA's Joaode Oliveira 
in 1981. 

When Banks first appeared cm 
the track; he was warmly greeted by 
the spectators and responded by 
waving, smiling and blowing kisses. 

Each time he moved to the head 
of the rmrway, the. crowd dapped 
rhythmically, increasing its pace as 
B anks - raced down the runway. 
When, the competition had ended, 
he pointed with one finger on each 
hand toward the crowd and did a 
. back flip on the runway. 

Joining Banks in setting World 
Cup records were Canada’s Ben 
Johnson, with a time of 10.00 sec- 
onds in the men's 100-meter dash; 
Bulgaria’s Stefka Kostadinova in 
the women's high jump at 6-6%; 
East Germany's Sabine Busch in 
the women's 400-meter intermedi- 
ate hurdles in 54.45 seconds; the 
Soviet -Union’s Georgy Kolnoot- 
chenko in the men’s discus, 226-8, 
and the East German women’s 
1, 600-mcter relay learn, 3:1950. 

Marita Koch, who anchored the 
East G erman relay team, also won 
the women’s 200 meters, in a swift 
21.91, for her second World Cup 
individual tide. Koch, the world 
recoid-hdder in the 200. won the 
400 in 1979. 

The other men's winners Friday 
were Ethiopia's Wodajo Bulti in 
the 10,000 meters in 29:2256; the 
United States' Andre Phillips in the 


WORLD SONS PUYBm 
. ; SMift No* Jam>B -- 
(at Tokyo) X*. 

Sergio Cota], Saaln. cML.Sbaza SMnrishL 
Japan, 44, HI^H ■ ' 

Emilio Sanchez, SoaOvdOLTkovuM Fukut 
Jaoan, 7J, 6-1, 6-1. ' V 

Italy and CUM* tied, i-i 
tat Cog Ba rt Sardinia) 

OauflBo Punatta, ItalWdBfi Jose- Fernandez, 
Chile, 6-2. 7-5, 6-1- 

Rlcardo Acuna, Cnrte,deL Francesco Can- 
cellottL llaly, 6<L 6Z 46.H.7-6 . 

Romania aod Denmark Hoe, LI _ 

(at g u d w rwt)' . 

Pater BasHunsen^. Denmark, del, Adrian 
Moraj, Romania; 1-6, 4-4.' 6-L 4-Z 

Florin Sogareeanw. ’Romania. deL Mlghool 
Tausoa Danmark, 44, 6-1, 60. 

Itrart loads Britain, 1-9 
tat ■acntganM, Eegtaad) 

Shlamo CUckftoln, IsroaL del Jeremy 
Bates, Britain, 9-7. 

West Germany loads CBSChaslevaMa, M 
(M F rM rtt t w tl 

Boris Becker. West Germany, art Miroslav 
DMdr, DadnsloyeMs, 6-3. 7*. M 
Mexico loads BranC 1-4 
(at Porta Alogrs, Brazil) 

Leonardo Lava lie, Mexico, deCEtacla Cam- 
pos. Brazl(, 6-1. 6-3. 6-2. 

■ Yugoslavia loads France, 2-4 
Cat Belgrade) 

Goran Prplc. Yugoslavia, del. Yannick 
Noah,- France, 6-3, 4-6. 6 - 1 , 6-4. 

Slobodan ZlvoUaavlc. Yugoslavia def. Hen- 
ri Leconte. France, 4-6. 7-d. M, M. 

Soviet Union Nadi Argent! nn. T-i 
tot B u sne s Abes) 

Andrei Chemkov, Soviet Union. deL Mar- 
tin Jalle, Argent i na, 6-a 6-L 6-2. 

Sweden leads Australia, 1-B 
(at Malma Sweden) 

Anders Jarryd. Sweden, def. Peter McNa- 
mara. Australia. 6-4. 4-4. 13-T1. 



Cardinals Hold On, 4-3, 
Deal Mets’ Hopes a Blow 


Transition 


BASKETBALL 


CHICAGO— Waived Jett Adkins. Ell Pas- 
auale.and MDcsWnsbn.guafds.and Paul Bra- 
wvlch, canter. 

DETROIT— waived Spencer Koyvmod, for- 
ward, and Kenny Patterson, guard. 

l_A. CLIPPERS— Slgitad Ray Williams, 
guard, after Boston surrendered tberrrfglrtet 
Rrst refusal. 

LJL_ LAKERS— Waived Tony Neal, for- 

Mont, • 

NEW YORK— Signed Ken Bannister, for- 
ward. 

PHILADELPHIA— Remstatad . Daryl 

Lloyd, forward. 

PHOENIX— Waived . Granger Haft tar- 
ward, and wime Jackson and -tarry Everett, 
guards. . . 

PO RTLANDr-Wafved Brett Apategateapd 
1 Grapa-Wwams. ' - r 


By Joseph Durso 

.V«' York Times Senrire 

ST. LOUIS — After two rousing 
nights of baseball, the New York 
Mets took a noble but mighty tum- 
ble at the gates to first place Thurs- 
day night when they lost to the Sl 
L ouis Cardinals, 4-3. and fell two 
games behind with three to go. 

They were not yet beaten, but 
they headed home as the longest of 
long shots in a pennant race that 
would have been tied had they 
swept this three-game series. They 
will play their final three games of 
the season in Shea Stadium against 
the Montreal Expos while Lhe Car- 
dinals brace for three at home 
against the Chicago Cubs. 

One more victory by the Cardi- 
nals, or one more loss by the Mets, 
and the Cardinals clinch a tie for 
the National League East title. Two 
more — or a victory combined with 
a Met loss — and the Cardinals win 
it alL 

“It's no longer in our hands,” 
said Dave Johnson, manager of the 
Mets. “Now, we need help. This is 
our toughest loss of the season.” 

“They were three terrific and ex- 
citing games," said Whitey Herzog, 
manager of the Cardinals. “It's 
ironic: We’ve played 159 games 
this season, and we're two in fronL 
We beat the Mets 10 times and they 
beat us 8 times, and those are the 
two games between us.” 

It was a gripping finish to a grip- 
ping series, and it was played be- 
fore another sellout crowd of 
47,720 in Busch Stadium. But on 
the brink of a dramatic sweep, the 
Mets were stopped when the rookie 
Rick Aguilera was outpitched by 
Danny Cox and four teammates 
rushed into the game in the final 
three innings when the Mets threat- 
ened time and again. 

Keith Hernandez got five hits in 
five at bats to a torrent of boos 
from fans who had cheered him 
during eight years with the Cardi- 
nals. Bul the stage for the Mets' 
defeat probably was set in the first 
Natalya Lisovskaya in the shot put, him the No. 6 performer in history inning when they loaded the bases 
67-10%, and Olga Gavrilova in the and was the second-fastest legal with one out and got only one run. 
javelin, 219-2, and East Germany’s docking in the world this year, be- 
Hfldegard Komer in the 1,500 md- hind only the 9.98 by Olympic 

champion Carl Lewis of the United 
States. Last month, Johnson, a 23- 
year-old from Toronto, had set the 
Canadian record of 10.04 in the 
trials for the Americas team. 

Of the five world record-holders 
competing Friday, four won: 

Banks, Kodh, Busch and Lisovs- 
kaya. The only world reoordrholder 
to lose was women's javelin throw- 
er Petra Felke of East Germany. 

Gavrilova overtook her in the final 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Then Cox did strike out. Bui 
Coleman, emerging from a !-for-19 
slump with his third bit. outran a 
roller to shallow short. Willie 
McGee singled on the next pitch 
and it was 4-2. 

In the seventh, with two on after 
Hernandez doubled, the Mets were 
stopped when Carter popped out to 
second. In the eighth. Strawberry 
doubled and took third on a passed 
ball, waited while Foster struck out 
and scored on Johnson's single. 

Now it was 4-3. and Herzog 
waved to his bullpen a third time. 
Out came the left-handed Rick 
Horton and up went the right- 
handed Ray KnighL who Hied out 
to short center. Then Ron Garden- 
hire took a third strike and the 
Mets were done, perhaps for the 
season. 

In other games in the National 


League, as reported by United Press 
International: 

Cubs 13, Pirates 5: Gary Mat- 
thews hit a three-run homer during 
an eight-run sixth inning and Ron 
Cey hit a three-run homer in the 
seventh to help rout Pittsburgh in 
Chicago. It was the Cubs' fifth vic- 
tory in their last six games. 

Astros 7, Giants 2: Phil Garner 
tripled twice, drove in two runs and 
scored twice as Houston won in 
San Francisco before an an- 
nounced crowd of 1.427. 

Padres 9, Reds 4: Carmelo Mar- 
tinez drove in four runs to help beat 
Cincinnati in San Diego. 

Phillies S, Expos 7: Mike 
Schmidt hit a three-run homer dur- 
ing an dght-run third inning as 
Philadelphia hung on in Montreal. 

Braves 5, Dodgers 0: Dale Mur- 
phy's RBI double broke the tie and 
began a five-run eighth that gave 
Atlanta its victory in Los Angeles. 


Royals Lead in West; 
Yanks dose on Jays 


WflHe Banks followed his Wc 
57 feet, 8V& inches with an equally impressive back 


tors, 4:10.87. 

In the team scoring, with points 
awarded on an 8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 ba- 
sis, the United States led the men's 
competition with 36 points. The 
Soviet Union and Africa each had 
34, East Germany 32 and the 
Americas team 30. 


iTT M'-ifl 


' ST.LoulS ~ BM m 4 9 4 

' Aouiiero. mcDoihuH (7) and Carter; Cox. 
• Day lev (7). Worrell <7), Horton (II. Lahti (9) 

■ and Porter. W — Cox. 1 W. L-Agultera. ID-7. 
. Su— Lahti 119). 

I Atlanta BN 0M 9S6— 1B I 

■ Cm Anaetae ' _ BM MB BOP— ♦ 4/ I 

i * Smith and Benedict. Owen (6) ; ReuSL Hat- 
ton (7). Cow II to (SI and Yeager, Reyee (B). 
W — Smith. 9-10. L — Holton, 1-L 



,*«• • »■ ' • " o. 'go ' . ottanrtve .lineman, on 

... , major League sfandmgs stoWKwinwiiitoim. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
I, Eoct D Melon . 

^ W L-Pct. GB- 

Toronto 99 40- .620 — 

New York ' 9S 6J JtOt 3 

Do troll » 75 J2S IS 

Baltimore r 77 JH 17 

Boston 81 7B J09 I7Vk 

Milwaukee 68 90- .430 30 

Cleveland 59 TOO J71 39VB 

West DWtstea 


I 


j Kcnxos City 

B9 

70 

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. Colltornio 

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76 

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e Seattle 

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61 

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NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East OMsIob 

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New York. 

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x-Lds Ansetaa 
Inclmatl 
San Diego 
, Houston 
. Atlanta 
. Son Francisco 


94 65 J»1 — 

B7 . 71 JSI £6 
B2 77 . £16' 12 
01 70 "JD9 13 

• 65 94 A09 39 

60 99 J77 34 


Ix-cIInched division into) 


FOOTBALL 
Wa l tOBM Football League 

l— A. RAIDERS— Activated Russ Jensen, 
quarterback. -ftetgaMd Albert Myres. safety. 

LA. RAMS-^Armaiinced that Dennis Huh 
rail, offensive guard, will be side lined for a 
Tnlalmum of tour weeks because of wi Irriurad 
Ititgti. Named trvPankey. tackle, to replace 
Harrah in the starting lineup Jhh Sunday 
against Mlnaesofa.. NLY. JETS— Cut Cedric 
Mlnter, running back. 

WASHINGTON— Plaasd R.C Ttilelemann. 
offensive .lineman, on Inlured reeenreGL 
comerback; Reggie 
Brancrvrunin big back, end Joe Krokoskl, line- 
backer. Released Pete Cronon. center, and 
Tbdd .Uebensteln. defensive end. 

hockey' " 

National Hockey Lome . . . 

HARTFORD— Sent. Rick Heinz, goatttnder. 
ta Soft Lake aty of the I nte rnation al Hockey 
League. 

MINNESOTA — Reassigned Terry Martin 
arid Jtrl Poner, forwards and Karl Takka 
gaqttendec. to Sprtngfleid of the America! 
'No dd y Lfoguft- 

new - Jersey— sent ncti cnomomoz, 
right wing; Al Stewart, left wtno.and Sam 5L 
Laurent, goal tender.te (tie Maine Moririergof. 
theAHL, Returned Seim Burkaoooltender. to 
Toronto of ttw Ontario Hockey League. Re- 
leased Ralph Cox, right wing. Recalled Karl 
FrtasetLgaaHender, from Maine. 

■ M.Y.RANGER5 — Signed Mike Ridley, left 
wmg- .Sent Brent Sapergla. center, to New 
Haven of the American Hockey Loom*. Reas- 
signed Tony Fettlin' end Jim Wlemer, ae- 
. . ten s e men, and Steve Mortal center, to New 
' Haven of • the AHt_ ■' 

• 'QUEBEC— Sent Wavne Grout*, center; 
AAikg Hough, left wing, and Daniel Poudrier, 
defenseman, to Fredericton, of the AHL. Re- 
coiled Tony Currie one Jean-Marc Owlln, 
forwards. 

ST. LOUIS— Traded Gilbert Delorme, de- 
fenseman, to Quebec tor Bruce Bell, defense- 
man. 

- ' COLLEGE . 

FORDHAM— Named Frank MdJawhlln 
.athletic director. 


East Germany, seeking its third 
consecutive title, led the women’s 
400-meter hurdles in 48.62 and Kc- standings with 52 points. The Sovi- 
nya’s Sammy Koskei in the 800 in et Union was second with 46 and 

£45-15. _ • • ....._ i die Ein^e^&lecj. team thinijwith .. round, _with the best throw, of her 

GmpIbtmg~£Ee n fist of womm's - 39. ^ career, after having fouled on three 

winners were Soviet teammates Johnson’s effort in the 100 made previous throws. 



SPORTS BRIEFS 


Mookie Wilson opened with a 
angle. Then, with Wilson running, 
Wally Backman punched a ground- 
er through the middle, inhere short- 
stop Ozzie Smith grabbed the baD 
while crossing the bag, appeared to 
touch it with his toe and fired to 
first. But Wilson was railed safe at 
second, the Cardinals losing a dou- 
ble play and the argument that fol- 
lowed. 

The Cardinals then lost again 
when Hernandez’s single off the 
wall in right scored Wilson and the 
.Mets led by one. They also had Cox 
on the ropes. Carter bounced a sin- 
gle off Cox’s glove, Danyl Straw- 
berry singled to right and the Mets 
had the bases loaded with one out. 

But, just as suddenly,- the Cardi- 
nals recovered. George Foster 
bounced to third base, from where 
Teny Pendleton fired home for a 
force out Howard Johnson then 
bounced to Pendleton, who outran 


NBC Wins Seoul Olympics TV Rights 

NEW YORK (NYT) — NBC using a formula that for the first time t ? e 

links the price paid for broadcast rights to the amount of money taken in Ou e inning later, Pendleton sin- 
from advertising, Thursday won the right to televise the 1988 Summer 8}^ 10 left and, when AguiWa 
Olympic Gaines from SeouL The agreement calls for a base payment of tiirew a wud Ditch, dashed all the 
5300 milli on and a formula to split advertising revenues that could bring to dnnL from there he ned the 

the total fee to $500 million. «» re on Smith's force out 

Lining the UJS. broadcast rights to advertising revenue, according to 111 thc fourth, the Cardinals took 
participants in the negotiations, stemmed from the belief, widely held in 
the television industry, that the 1988 Games pose a substantial nsk to the 
broadcasting network. One concern is the 14-hour time difference that 
wiO reduce the number of major events that can be seen in prime-time. 


Danny Wlrite 


the lead for the first time in the 
series. Darrell Porter walked with 
one down and Smith singled him to 
second. Then came the key play: 
Cox bunted with two strikes and 
moved the runners to second and 
third. When Vince Coleman sin- 
gled to left, both scored and the 
Cardinals had a 3-1 lead. 

In the Mets’ fifth. Wilson singled 
with one down and Hernandez 
doubled past first with two out to 
make it 3-2. But the Cardinals were 
finally bitting and running after 
two nights of doing neither. In the 
sixth. Smith singled with' one down 
and Cox went to two strikes trying 
to bunt him to second. Then he 
Six days into the Whitbread Round The World race, the UBS Switzer- fouled off another bunt, but Agui- 
land was leading the 15 -yacht field off North Africa but Lion New lera was charged with a balk and 
Zealand was the overall handicap leader, officials said. fAP) Smith got second base anyway. 


Cowboys’ White Derides FBI Report 

DALLAS (AP) — Danny White, the quarterback identified as one of 
five Dallas Cowboys alleged in an FBI report three years ago to have 
fixed football games in exchange for cocaine, said Thnrday that “a 
Shirley Temple is about the strongest thing I put in my body.” 

White, Tony Dorsett, Tony HH1, Butch Johnson and Ron Springs, the 
latter two now playing for other teams, were identified as the players 
Thursday by the Dallas Tunes Herald. ‘Tutting Danny’s name in there 
just showed how ridiculous the whole thing was,” an NFL official said. 

For the Record . 


Compiled h j- Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

KANSAS CITY. Missouri — On 
the fourth (by of their four-game 
series with the California Angels, 
the Kansas City Royals finally re- 
gained first place in the American 
League West by winning, 4-1, 
Thursday night. 

Meanwhile, in New York, the 
Yankees had resurrected a pennant 
race of sorts in the East Division by 
defeating the Milwaukee Brewers. 
3-0, after the Toronto Blue Jays 
lost, 2-0, to the Detroit Tigers. 

The Royals had not been alone 
in first place in'the West since Sept. 
18. The Angels arrived with a one- 
game lead but lost three tunes while 
scoring just six runs in the series, 
and had been held scoreless for 21 
innings before getting a ran in the 
ninth Thursday night. 

“There was a lot of emotion in 
this series.” said Steve Balboni, Lhe 
former Yankee who plays first base 
for die Royals. “It would be very 
easy r to let down, but we still have 
three games left and we could still 
lose iL” 

Balboni hit one of Kansas City's 
three home runs, each measuring at 
least 400 feet, off Don Sutton, the 
Angels' starter. Frank White and 
George Brett had the others, and 
by the time they were through, Sut- 
ton was losing, 4-0, after five in- 
nings. 

The Royals received another lift 
from their pitching, getting superb 
work from the left-hander Danny 
Jackson, who had lost five of his 
last six decisions. But he toyed with 
the Angels, throwing just 93 pitch- 
es, 13 over the fifth, sixth and sev- 
enth innings. 

The Angels' offensive ineptitude 
is what probably galled their man- 
ager, Gene Mauch, the most. He 
held a pregain e meeting with Reg- 
gie Jackson before announcing that 
he had benched the 39-year-old 
slugger, who was hitting .077 
against the Royals. 

The Yankees, who were playing 
out their pennant pursuit of the 
Blue Jays in relative privacy and 
misty rain, heard a cheer from their 
crowd of no more than 5,000 dur- 
ing the seventh inning of that game 
when the scoreboard flashed the 
news that Detroit had held on to 
beat Toronto. The sodden faithful 
cheered again when the Yankees 
completed their victory over the 
Brewers, but the most cheering 
thing for the Yankees was Lhat now 
they were only three games behind 
the suddenly staggering Blue Jays 
and a three-game series between 
the teams was to begin Friday night 
in Toronto. 

“Now there's a glimmer — a 
glimmer of hope," said Dave Win- 
field. “Tomorrow, if we win, it will 
be a ray. We’re going up there to 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

win three. You have to win the first. 
Then you have to win the second 
and then you have to win the third. 
We’re going to have to try and play 
our best baseball of the year. If they 
fall on their face ... It's a slim 
chance, but it can be done." 

Ron Guidry gave the Yankees a 
boost with his pitching Thursday 
nighL striking out 10 in seven in- 
nings before Brian Fisher finished 
up. retiring all six batters he faced. 
Rickey Henderson had led off the 
first inning with a home run, and 
Don Mattingly singled in two runs 
in the eighth, giving him 144 runs 
baited in for the season and Lhe 
most for the Yankees since Joe Di- 
Maggio’s 155 in 1948. 

Still, the Yankees, whose pro- 
longed presence in this pennant 
pursuit is one of the unexpected 
developments of the season, must 
win all three games to extend the 
race until Monday, when each team 
would play a makeup game, the 
Yankees against Detroit in New 
York and the Blue Jays against 
Baltimore in Toronto. 

Tigers 2, Blue Jays (k In Detroit, 
Tom Brookens’ two-run triple in 
the fifth and Walt Terrell’s six-hit 
pitching gave the Tigers a three- 
game sweep of Toronto. Terrell was 
helped by three double plays. 

Red Sox 6-8, Orioles 2-9; Eddie 
Murray hit a two-run double dur- 
ing a five-run eighth that won the 
second game of the doubleheader 
in Baltimore. In the opener. Tony 
Annas hit a two-run homer for 
Bostoa 

Mariners 5, White Sox 4: Spike 
Owen drove in three runs as Seattle 
won in Chicago. {NYT. UPIi 

U Ueberroth Warns Seattle 

The commissioner of baseball, 
Peter Ueberroth, says the city of 
Seattle is close to losing its Mari- 
ners and that there is no require- 
ment for the team to stay if it is not 
wanted. United Press International 
reported. 

Ueberroth reacted after he 
learned of the King County Coun- 
cil's decision Wednesday to add a 
performance clause lo a proposed 
negotiation of the Kingdome lease 
between the team and county. 

The current lease runs through 
1996, bul the renegotiated agree- 
ment would allow the team to leave 
after the 1987 season if it does not 
attract 1.4 million spectators in the 
next two seasons and sell 10,000 
season tickets annually. 

The council’s amendment would 
not allow the Mariners to move if 
they do not win at least half their 
games in the 1986 and 1987 sea- 
sons. 


Cowboys, Giants Will Be Playing for First Place, the Last Word 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 


, have won six straight borne games against NFC East - Dickerson left the last game early with a slight injury, well as any team, and the Chiefs have rushed for 100 

: teams and are 3-0m the division this year. _ ' n — v - ■*' ’ — J - 1 • v: — : — 1 — 

Meanwhile, Oinkscale's picture adorns the bulletin 
- — * ^ ~ — “Is it a good pio- 


yards only once this season. With receiver Carlos 
Carson’s status uncertain because of injury, the 





(Rams by 6.) 

Philadelphia (1-3) at New Orleans (2-2): The Saints 
have won two straight and the streak probably will Chiefs' passing game is not likely to improve enough 
continue. They are back to playing solid defense and to help the team win. (No line.) 
the Eagles are oca a high-scoring team anyway, not New England (2-2) at Oerefand (2-2): The Patriots 
with three touchdowns in four games- (Saints by 3ft.) have been up and down, with one consistency: beating 
AMERICAN CONFERENCE bad teams and losing to good ones. The Browns may 

Buffalo «W) at Indianapolis (1-3): Kay Stephenson be better than their record suggests. They run well, 
was fired as the Bills’ coach this week and replaced by Gary Danielson is an efficient passer and twice they 
Hank Bullough, their defensive coordinator who has have held opponents to one touchdown. (Browns by 













. NEW YORK —The Dallas Cowboys and the New 

York Giants, with two of the National Football , , , - 

League’s most devastating defenses, meet Sunday at boaril m ^Giants locker room. 

•Giants Stadium in i£5£ time battle for the top spot tor f tasked. “My motto would want to know 
in the NFC East. - - - r . Hanah’s Reno Race A Sports Book has made the 

But lhe battle of words began earlier this week. Giants two-point favorites. 

. “1 don’t know- what gives them the right to call NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

themselves 'America’s Team,' " the Giants' Imeback- . _ ‘ ^ • 

• ;er, Harry Carson, said of the Cowboys. “There are 27- San Francisco (2-2) at Atlanta (04): This is the land 

otto chibs in this country.” ■ of game the 49ers could lost The Falcons, erratic as 

' ■ *-« *».-««"- ™ji loe. j« i/vcina ift ---'h in the league since 1970. The 

score points, will be BuUongb’s 

_ lie Bills' offense is not much 

against them because they are the reason we didn’t emotion for another upset The 49ers did not crack 100 better; so far, it has consisted erf Greg Bdl and not 
-make the playoffs” last season. yards passing, and now wiBhave to play without one much dse. Bell has 27S of the Bills' 336 rushing yards, 

* This nasty stuff is the precursor to wbat may wdl be 0 ^ tuost important receivers, the injured rookie and be is the leading receiver in the leag u e, with 29 

•a nasty game. • Jerry Rice. (The 49ers are favored by 12 points.) catches for 205 yards. (Colts by 3!i) 

. 1 The (Sants and Cowboys, both. 3-1, are tied to first". Qk»co (4-0) at Tampa Bar (0-4): These days the " N** Y «>rit (3-1) at Cincinnati (1-3): The Bengals’ 

"ta the division witbSTums: The Giants ted the BcSs^tStot ^uSSAguTand wffl fid no «*>rd « deceiving because they have average^ 

league in defense, tltt Cowboysare thiribm leadin mnehin lhe Burauem. who hJegiven up 30 points points agame. Whet is moie,their last game™slhar MMe^^^taStaawotth and Louis bpps (or 

■■ ' — — - best, a 37-24 victory over the Steelers m which the big yardage. (Doipnms by 7.) 

- • - — San Diego (2-2) at Seattle (2-2): Quarterback Dan 

Fours is our with a knee injury and the Chargers have 
never been able to win consistently without him. The 
Seahawks have played badly in two straight losses, 

over Houston last Sunday, sacked 


3ft.) 

Pmsbargh (2-2) at Miami (3-1): This is a rematch of 
last season's AFC championship game. The Dolphins 
won then, 45-28, and probably wdl again. Even with- 
out his favorite receivers, the injured Mark Duper and 
Mark Clayton, Dan Marino may not have much 
trouble with Pittsburgh’s defense, which gave up 366 
yards in the loss to Cincinnati on Monday nighL The 
Steelers are improving their passing game, with Mark 


ULCtmnuj*. * - * ... -r .l. iniuawi w i^uvci tarai. I ul uuuj ua*w ji - 1 

sssifiat* 


with their running gamehaving slowed considerably 

given up 122 



.interceptions with 13, and the teams are 1-2 m sacking OT mCTe -times. Tbe Bears now have a r w , . , , _ 

' quarterbacks: the Giants have 23 sacks, the Cowboys pain#; to complement the running of Walter Payton, defense shut down Pittsburgh s r unnin g backs. The 
■20. . and their- ddense always has been one of the best. Jets have won three straight, running wdl m the first 

. . K fotm holds, this wffl be a kw^scorit^ affair, /gcajs-i™ g_) . .and third, but thetr opponents in those games have a 

■.probably won on a mistake. The Cowboys, in4 victory ^ yu. Ti .__ won-lost record of 2-10. (Bengals by 1ft.) 

'over Houston last Sunday, sacked the quarterback 12 ,l«, Houston (1-3) at Denver (2-2): Tbe Oilers have so , , . 

for no apparent reason. The defense has given up 

points in four games. (Seahawks by 13.) 

MONDAY NIGHT 

Sl Louis (3-1) at Washington (1-3): This is a most 
critical game for the Redskins. They already have lost 
to two division rivals, the Cowboys and the Eagles, 
and have played poorly in all four games. The offense, 
Kansas City (3-1) at Los Angeles (2-2): Each team which has scored 46 points, especially has gone amiss, 
rebounded with a victory last Sunday in a similar Two years ago, essentially the same group set a league 
manner: outstanding defense. But the Raiders have a record for most points in a season, 541. But the 
sen, is a good test, because tbe decided edge , here, even with their third starter at defense has not played much better. With a 104) lead 
in fact, the Giants usually are at their b«t against Viking? can score. For some reason, the Rams do not quarterback in three weeks, Rusty Ifflger, a rookie against the Bears last Sunday, it allowed 45 straight 
division opponents; particularly tough ones. They always play bettor at home, and running back Eric from Oklahoma State. Tbe Raiders stop the run as points. (Cardinals by 2ft.) 


wih a better group of runners Jast mtvinc rwaHas w _ 

^offensive line that has unproved each week .and more m^na-back. Induce starts, h 


last two, . the Packers are returning to the hrmobDc cos are scoring 30 points a game, with consistently fine 

“ performances by John El way at quarterback. Ixguries 

" J **•■" J -' — too many paints, 

ran. (Broncos by 



their firstsweep of Dallas in 21 yeara— *and dutscoiad P<&«S of much hdp. (No line.) 

them, 47- M. That was the edge that put New York in MhnKsota (3-1) at Iris Angeles (4-0): The Rams 


the playoffs and Daflas ouT for the first . time in a look awesome, although none of their victories has manner: outstanding defense. But the Raiders have a record for most points in a season, 
decade. ’ tonabtowouLThis,tha 


(AP, NYT) 







art syQwto O ff TO hw ****** T vet M01*. ■ 


‘ GAR R.A R D: - - • 

f The Crows jewellers— 

I»a HCOENT 9T«ECT WNOOH • Wli.*44 ■ - 







Page 20 


ART BUCHWALD 

f No Countdown for Me 


YI7ASH3NGTON — NASA has 
” » just announced that it will 
choose a journalist to fly into orbit 
on a space shuttle flight next fall. 
The passenger will be selected from 
thousands of journalists by the As- 
sociation of Schools of Journalism 
and Mass Education. 

Minimum requirements ore that 
the. candidate be a citizen of the 
United States, have five yeans of 
journalistic ex- 
perieaoe and be 
wor king at the WT 
time. 

The applicant 
must pass a k»’ 
physical exami- R ; •53^' JH 
nation and be BiL 
able to demon- m 
strate an ability ¥m 

to comnumicai’e nr 
to mass audi- 
ences in the Bacnwald 
broadcast and print media. 

I'm aware of what you're think- 
ing: 1 would be the perfect person 
to take the flight! But before you 
nominate me I have to warn you I 
have no interest in going into space. 
□ 

Sure. 1 know your argument I 
am probably in better physical 
shape than any journalist in the 
country, and could handle weight- 
lessness more easily than most. 
And there is probably no question 
in your mind that f could do a 
better reponingjob. So why won't 1 
fly? The main reason is 1 have to 
dunk of myself before my country. 

This is the downside to the shut- 
tle flight They say I would have to 
give up four months of my life to 
prepare for the three- or four-day 
NASA flight. Since I've already- 
had intensive training flying the 
Eastern Shuttle 10 New York I 
don't see why I need more. 

The next thing that bothers me is 
that the candidate has to promise 
not to violate the privacy of his 
fellow astronauts. This makes no 
sense. If you can't violate some- 
one’s privky you have no right to 
call yourself a journalist. Space, for 

Play Postponed Again 

The Asiocuied Press 
FRANKFURT — The Monday- 
opening of a Rainer Werner Fass- 
binder play whose premiere was 
scuttled by Jewish demonstrators 
last week has been postponed until 
Nov. 13. to allow a “coding-off 
period.” city authorities said. 


all its grandeur, is still the story or 

human beings holed up in on alu- 
minum cigar, standing on their 
beads, hurtling around the globe 
while TV records them waving to 
the camera. 

1 have other reasons for turning 
down the flight. One is that I will be 
required to pool all the information 
1 gather with every other reporter 
on the ground. 

Why should I risk ray life so 
everyone efse can get my story? 
Pooling with other reporters is un- 
fair because the only reason for a 
journalist to go into space is to 
make his colleagues look stupid 
when he returns. 

□ 

The idea of NASA giving a jour- 
nalist a Tree trip in a shuttle could 
present a conflict of interest- Lei us 
say. for argument's sake, the food is 
lousy, the crew is fooling around 
and the much-touted walk in space 
doesn’t live up to the advertising. 
How can you report freely what 
really goes on behind closed doors 
on a shuttle when NASA is picking 
up the tab? 

The final thing that bugs me 
about the offer is that we journal- 
ists were NASA's fourth choice — 
after Senator Jake Cam. a Saudi 
Arabian prince and a schoolteacher 
named Christa McAuliffe. Senator 
Gam has milked everything he saw, 
as has the prince, and Mrs. McAu- 
liffe. who goes up next, isn't plan- 
ning to keep what she sees a secret 
either. By the lime a journalist is 
launched there won't be one new 
thing in space left to see. 

□ 

1 have only given a few reasons 
why 1 don’t want to go up in the 
shuttle. I'm not surprised that when 
you first read the story of NASA 
offering to shoot a professional 
communicator into the sky my 
name immediately came to mind. 
.And 1 hope T haven't disappointed 
any readers by withdrawing from 
the competition. 

Some of you. in your enthusiasm, 
may have already submitted my 
name. If so. please write to the 
NASA Journalist in Space Project. 
University of South Carolina Co- 
lumbia South Carolina and tell 
them to take me out of consider- 
ation. I don't want the NASA peo- 
ple to select me and then find out. 
to their embarrassment. I'm the 
only member of the media who 
doesn't want to go. 


INTERNATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 


PEOPLE 


Lawyer’s Novels Probe Business Ethics Vintage Car Speeding 


By Sandra Salmans 

Vru YWr* Times Service 

N EW YORK — As Louis Au- 

chincloss sees it, things have 
never been worse. “We’ve fabri- 
cated a society of wolves and coy- 
otes." he said. “Why does any- 
body think we're better than we 
were in the robber baron days?" 

it is more than 30 years since 
Auchincloss. the 68-year-old 
writer and lawyer, began worry- 
ing about business ethics. Recent- 
ly. with scandals exploding at 
military contractors, brokerage 
firms and banks, the rest of the 
world seems to be catching up 
with him. The Harvard Business 
Review- is holding its second an- 
nual competition for the best arti- 
cle by a manager or executive on 
ethical problems in business. It 
appeals to men and women 
"caught in the jaws of expediency 
and conscience.” as the review 
editor put iL 

Conscience, in business and 
law, is what Auchincloss has ex- 

S lored in most of his 37 books. In 
is just-published novel. "Honor- 
able Men,” his hero, a man of 
rigorous morality, debates the 
ethical pros and cons of takeover 
battles. In his forthcoming “Dia- 
ry of a Yuppie.” a lawyer — “a 
perfectly horrid young man” — 
scrambles ruthlessly to the top of 
the heap — a conclusion that sug- 
gests Auchincloss' increasingly 
dour view of what his characters 
call the “great world." 

“I wonder if there are any rules 
at all now." he said. “Do people 
care about anything else beyond 
being caught? Not from where I 
riL” 

Where Auchincloss sits most 
days is a small comer office of 
Hawkins. Delafield A Wood, a 
Wall Street law firm specializing 
in bonds. He is a partner in trusts 
and estates, a white-shoe special- 
ty in which he deals exclusively 
with private individuals. 

The firm itself is something or 
a legal backwater, according to 
Steven Brill editor and publisher 
of The American Lawyer, a 
monthly magazine. But Auchin- 
closs "is highly regarded c a a law- 
yer.” he said. “You don't hear 
much about him." he added, "but 
you rarely do hear about people 
in trusts and estates unless they're 
Rov Cohn.” 


Ttutchcf 





<r‘ 


Martyra K. Yee/TVe New York Tin 

Louis Auchincloss: “I don't think people like their lawyers writing novels.” 


As an author, Auchincloss gets 
mixed reviews. Literary critics of- 
ten dismiss him as nothing more 
than a novelist of manners with a 
sometimes labored style. Bui 
some academics and publishers 
praise him as one of the few au- 
thors who write about the busi- 
ness world with a real under- 
standing of its complexities and 
conflicts. He himself says that he 
bases his stories neither on his 
experience — he does no takeover 
work, and submits each chapter 
to lawyers who do — nor on sto- 
ries people tell him. “I make 
things up,” he said. But his plots 
clearly have some relation to the 
news. 

In “Honorable Men,” for ex- 
ample. the hero, Chip Benedict, is 
caught on the horns of several 
moral dilemmas involving the 
family business. To meet the de- 
mands of the market place, he 
moves the company into cheaper 
products and finances the expan- 
sion by takin g it public. He thus 
makes it vulnerable to a takeover 
bid by Bamheim Industries, a 
New England behemoth in 
household equipment. Initially, 
he fighls the bid with the usual 
artillery: antitrust suits; private 
investigations into personal lives. 
Then he decides that such tactics 
are repugnant, and that even his 
goal of saving the company may 
be morally debatable. He aban- 


dons the fight, sells his stake and 
makes a personal fortune. 

Is Auchincloss saying that the 
best moral course for a takeover 
target is to yield? 

“Who can possibly tell in a 
takeover?” he said. In a takeover 
fray, he added, “worse things 
may be done by the people who 
resist takeovers" than by the 
would-be acquirers. On each side 
of a hostile takeover, he said, law- 
yers “bring lawsuits that are not 
motivated, merely harassing; I 
was brought up to believe lawyers 
who did that were shysters." 

In both his moral scruples and 
his literary career, Auchincloss is 
used to feeling alone. In 1 956, law 
firms were said 10 have asked job 
applicants their reaction to his 
novel, “The Great World and 
Timothy Coll,” which explored 
whether it was possible for a man 
to retain his integrity at a Wall 
Street law firm. Now, if be is read 
at all by lawyers, it is for enter- 
tainment 

Tve been reading his stuff for 
years,” said Martin Lipton, a 
leading mergers and acquisitions 
lawyer. Lipton said that he reads 
the novels mainly for their por- 
trayal of society, rather than their 
observations on the law — and be 
staunchly defends the morality of 
fighting hostile takeovers. Still, 
he said, “lots or what Auchincloss 
has to say about lawyers and law- 


yers' clients and the way law 
firms operate is wdl taken." 

Upton's interest may be un- 
usual. Auchincloss believes be is 
largely unread by his colleagues 

in the legal community. “It’s 

most infrequent for businessmen 
and lawyers to read novels,” he 
said. “Only women read novds 
— and now they're going profes- 
sional.” Furthermore, he said, fic- 
tion-writing lawyers are regarded 
with suspicion. “I don't think 
people like their lawyers writing 
novds,” he said. “Many people 
think you can't do two things at 
one time. I think it's hurt me. has 
impeded my career. That doesn't 
mean it's wiped me out.” 

The reviewers have not wiped 
out his literary career, either, out 
the lack of critical recognition is 
plainly dispiriting. 

Auchincloss pulled oul a recent 
review in The New York Times 
that said if there was a wider 
moral about America in “Honor- 
able Men,” then “it has not been 
veryeffectively realized.” 

“Well, if it nad been, it would 
have beat ‘Moby Dick,’ wouldn't 
it?” Auchincloss said with a 
touch of asperity. 

He will be forced to retire from 
law next year under his firm's 
mandatory retirement policy. “I 
would be just as happy to contin- 
ue,” he said. “But I shall be per- 
fectly happy. Life goes on." 


event for pre-1905 road anstro- ■*-- 

crais, ended with oiganows accus- ter of fact- • ^ cLhst*. 

rag the driver of a speedy German saying- that hcAt; 

vdtenin of unseemly racing - at father J.Paf 

more than 20 mph (32 W* The A: ^ ^ 

1902 Daimler-Benz, entered by the !:r, son 

Mercedes Benz Museum of StuU- and has . a £i_’jjL who -asiutsd J 
gan, nipped into Brighton only I John Mg** 
hour 48 minutes after setting out stroke 

from London’s Hyde Park on the _ _ in 

57-mfle run Sunday. The Daimler- when Frances Papp» 3' SLi 
Benz, driven by Torn Marscfc, ar- Chicago to take her ne« « 
rived more than an hour ahead of Wittlujwda, for r*. - 

the next fastest participant — a poorer, there was nMm 
1898 Rochet tricycle winch was fd- ^oabTon which ** *®fr“ 
lowed by a 1902 French-bniit won S40nriilk>nintbe IIlin«j-Sia e 
Mors. “Our rules carefully state i nner* in 19S4. the bigg** 1 ’ 


cvenu saw uic vac** coutue WCU aaimujj , 

course, Peter Cooper. He com- c»Jiich and Greek service, then 

plained that the Daimler-Benz fan honeymoon in Australia. 

must have cracked along at more " 

than 20 mph, the average speed □ 

limit laid down by the organizers. j uari—a Baryshnikov danced. 

the Royal Automobile Club. “We Bette Midkr sang and thecas* « 

will tMimir iKa crti infirm An TnftC- — A .«v DCflOI iTlCk* 


fy this car from next year's run," AIDS research and care- The sow- 
said Cooper. "We do not want to ^ The Best of the Best at 
mm it into a race, as it could be the Metropolitan Opera House feu- 
dangerous for those taking part" tuiet j 30 stars, who donated their 
□ talents for the city's large* show® 

The publis her BMcoIm FoA cs jggjf deficbn- 

and his wife, Jtobwla, obmpgi * ^^^TBaryshBikm-. ap- 

at Hack disclos ed m Jjdapa. OfflE an , 

Wyoming. Forties, a tanner Ne« Mon/ - 


Jersey state senator, is the publish- 
er of Forbes Magazine: 

□ 

The American oil magnate John 
Pad Getty n said that as long as be 
has money, he will keep gjviuRU 
away. In a rare interview with The 


of HoBywri stare joined 
go's royal family in a weekend a 
festivities centering on the second 
Princess Grace Foundation- u 
e^PristtRaiRiwUI and his chil- 
dren. Prince Albert, Princess 
Stephane and Princess Caroline 
were the star attractions Sunday at 


Sunday Times of London, the re-. a fundraiser for the foundation, 
elusive billionaire who has become «hWi rmr s money Sac 


one of Britain's biggest philanthro- 
pists said be has no use for an 
income of £100 nriffion (about SM4 
mQiion) a year aid takes' pleasure 
in the endowments he is able to 
make. Getty, S3, was interviewed in 
die private London Qhric, where 
the paper said he has spent more 
than a year receiving triatment for 
phlebitis, an ttiflawnnarign of the 
veins. The reprater, Henry Porter, 


young artists. Cary Grant anil his 
wife. Etartara, who. chaired the 
event, attended along with Frank 
Sinatra, Roger Moore, Gregory 
P in* smA Jimmy Stewart. The first 
fund-raiser was held two years ago 
in Washington. 

□ 

Qomb EKsabrth II returned to 
Britain Sunday after & 26-day tour 


said Getty can pursue his pass io ns 'of 10 Commonwealth countries in 
for literature and the cinema of the the Caribbean, including a state 
1930s and 1940s from his hospital visit to the Bahamas during the 
bed. He also occasionally goes oat biennial Commonwealth Confcr- 



with friends and receives hospital ence. Her husband, Prince PhBip, 
visits from a select arete, including had returned earlier. 


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17B& Tatar 263X1 FANR IX & 


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I£ OARDOE 4359 6797. 


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