Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


**•”•••• V : 

v**y- ■ : 

’V 

ffs-irt . . ' ; •_" 1 - 

Stc- • • I 'f | 

■' - 

V— . -. . 

.... 

KJP •. - ."V 

- . : 

V'i’. . ■ •- 


<*•■«** 4tSt> •*— 4* j 


ft-.-: .. . 


*.r.-. v. ' r -.' 


‘ J “ <■« h 

r - - ' »• \ 
* ' 


A* ' 
PT^ : 




fir-- 




■vx ^ 


I ffHw *.* 

a» » 

*r 1 


ar.*vs*- — * 

-JM> ;*•*» • 

rntt-: — 

Ww.-m - 

*■* •v.-" ' v 
« r i- - 

W* — • 


K3*"* •' 
»■> 

'.w-'-* - ■ 

« , ; y •- 
*Vt» 

kf& l’ ='* ' 




»=-* 

» •* -• • • 

"A 




m <**•*;■ 

t* ■*••- * 


^ ... 


. . w- 

I* 5, — 


AS 

..a 


vf*‘ , 

:^v>; 

.^r” . • .*•• •• 


»■* .. 

* v ‘** w . 


The Global TVewspaper- 
Edited in Paris - • - 
_ Printed Simultaneously • 

• ^Parifi^^don.amri 

WEATHH DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 1 B 

JMo. 31,922 - 



INTERNATIONAL 





ington Post 


«B»no ftflCDift 

Mm .3)1 

Unn OASDDr 

«Bfr 

. Omada C4U) 

f Cfsml™-CiIUD 

BmnA-IflPA 

£ppi . ..mi. hop. 

S Fa*nJ 7J»FJA 

_ Franc* 620 F 

*' Owwv-JUODM. 

CrM Brnm-— 50 P 

Grace WDr 

Iran _!!56ob 


brad lilTOOfiO 

My UDQlm 

Jonfcn «0«i 

Kaipj ShLZUO 

Kuhw 500 Hi 

[Jww* ,Qi00 

l tor* LDA.0JS 

UBwnboura— n LFt. 

Mateo 105 Eel 

Mofad 35 Cm 

Mcracco ■ 6 50 Ob. 
Nahwfcxtis 275 B 


Nooray_JJ30N*f. 
Oman— OJn Ui 
Ponugol 90 Ex. 

Qawr 6S) Krii 

top of Inland J0P 
SarfAntta-OffiL 

Spam 110 Plat 

5-wte »20SJC/. 

Santei<and.2205fT 

Im« CL5B &n 

T«W — TX40M0 

UA£ jsJODrii 

ULS. ML (Em UM55 
TngMkMa — MO 


ZURICH, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


- ... 


m * ^ 

m\ -•• . ; :>i 

l -- ■ "’** 

W* - ? • >••:• A 

m • • ; v T 

Mr- \ 

i»> e •• 


•U# 


Role in World Court Kill 4 


■. r 


By Bernard Wcinraub 

Mew y«* rbnet Serrtw 

WASHINGTON -rUseRcagaD 

administration announced Mon- 
day that the United States would 
fonnaSy cease to recognize the au- 
thority of. the Wodd. 'Court except 
in non political cases, 

The move redefines and sharply 
limits the U^. rde in the World 
Court, officially called the Interna- 
tional Court of Justice. Officials 
said the United States would con- 
tinue to deal with the cami on 
“mutually submitted” disputes in- 
TOlvingcommerrial. U^al or border 
problems with otiuar nations. 

The announcement «aiH that 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
had sent Javier Pfcrez de CuHIar, 
the United Nations secretary -gen: 
era!, a formal notice of termination 
of U.S. acceptance of the compul- 
sory j urisdiction of the 15-member 
International Conn of Justice, 
based in The Hague. 

“Our experience with compul- 
sory jurisdiction has been deeply 
disappointing,” said a State De- 
partment statement .announcing, 
the decision by President Ranald 
Reagan. 

Termination of that U.S. accep- 
tance, agreed toby President Harry 
S. Truman in 1946, will be effective 
in six months, the State Depart- 
ment said. 

The Slate Department said U.S. 
acceptance of the court's jurisdic- 
tion remains strong and the action 
“does not signify any. diminution of 
our traditional en m mitmwit to in- 
ternational law and to the Interna- 
tional Court of Justice in perform- 
ing its proper functions.” 

“The objective of the ICJ to 
which we subscribe, the peaceful 
adjudication of international dis- 
putes, were being subverted by the 
effort of Nicaragua and its Cuban 
and Soviet sponsors to use the 
court as a political weapon,” it said. 

This was a reference to a case 
brought by Nicaragua against the 
United States that is now before 
the court, in which Nicaragua al- 
leges that .the United States con- 
trols and directs Nicaraguan rebels 
in violation of international law. ~ 

The case, which grew out of the 
minin g of Nicaraguan harbors, : 
marked the first time that the comt 
had bent asked .to intervene j&A : 
current armed wnflvL The Umied 
Stales initially argued that the 


UNYoteAids 
Bourguiba, 
U.S. Says 

By Bernard G wer t zm an 

New York Tima Sendee 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration- decided not to veto 
a United Nations Security Council 
resolution condemning Israel for 
its attack on PLO headquarters 
outside Tunis because of intelli- 
gence warnings that'. a U.S. veto 

might lead to the overthrow of the 
pro-Western Tunisian government 
by Libyan-badkedmobs, according 
to administration officials. . 

After criticism from Israel and 
American Jewish, organizations 
over its decision to abstain on the 
vote Friday ni g ht, the administra- 
tion moved Sunday to explain its 
position privately to Israelis and 
others. The Security Council voted, 
14-0, to condemn Israel far Hs at- 
tack last Tuesday. 

Secretary of State Geozge F. 
Shultz telephoned Foreign Minis- 
ter Yitzhak Shamir of laud, who 
was in New York, to assure him. 
that the United States remained 
committed to strong action against 
terrorists. 

He also told Mr. Shamir ihe 
United Stales agreed that the Israe- 
li attack on the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization headquarters 
was a legitimate act of self-defense 
against a series of PLO-ordered ter- 
rorist acts, Israeli and UJL pfBgiwl« 
said Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. Shultz anthomeH the Israe- 
lis to make his comments public. 

The administration derision ,-io. 
abstain «mgin the Israelis 
American Jewish groups by sur- 
prise. They had earner praised 
President Ronald Reagan far his 
support of Israel But an Sunday, 
several groups issued statements 
critical of the administration for its 
action. 

The decision not to veto the Se- 
curity Council resdution was made 

ly before the counol was to vote on 
the Tunisian complaint, a White 
House aide said 

He said that although there was 
considerable sympathy by Mr. 
Reagan and other high officials for 
the Israeli action, there was over- - 
whelming information suggesting 
that if the United States vetoed the 
resolution it would provide Libya 
with an emotional issue that could , 
send leftist student and other 
groups into the streets, possibly to 
destroy the U.S. Embassy, and per- 
haps to overthrow the government 
at fterident'Habib Bourguiba. 

For several months. U-S- offi- 

(Con&med on Page 7, CeL 1) 


court lacked' jurisdiction- is the 
matter, arid thqrin January Mr. 
Heag*n decided to withdraw from 
the-casc, . 

■ • . offirials mahaan tint. the' 

composition of the 15-judge«)urt, 
a United Nations agency that sits 
at The Hague, is essentially hostile 
to.the United States. Many mem- 
ber nations, including the Soviet 
Union and Cuba, have failed to 
accept the tribunaEsfiaasdictioiim - 
political matters. -w : .- • 

One U.S. offia^pcapted but 

tedTrira^waSor ^jurisdiction 
of the court have placed iinrits on 
iii authority.' 

UJL officials say (hat Washing- 
xon will adherc^to Jhe court's rifl- 
ings in conm^rcial and other cases 
in winch it and otter governments 
mutually submit their disputes. 
Last October, for - example, the 
court settled a 40-year-old territori- 
al dispute over fishing rights be- 
tween Canada and the United 
States. . 

Officials said ih** 1 as far as they 
knew the move to limit the U.S. 
ride in the, court did not require 
congressional approvaL 
- .The American judge on the 
court, Stephen M. Schwebd, prob- 
ably will be unaffected by the deci- 
sion. Other countries that do not 
recognize the court’s jurisdiction in 
political disputes also continue to 
have judges sitting on the paneL 
Simflariy, U.S. financial support of 
thecoort is not expected to change. 
Tte court has no enforcement pow- 
ers. 

In 1984, -the administration an- 
nounced it would not accept the . 
court’s authority , in disputes in- 
volving' Central America for the 
next two years. Under the terms of 
the April action, the United States 
was obliged to inform the court six 
months before the two-year expira- 
tion if it wanted to withdraw from 
the court’s compulsory jurisdiction. 

Adminis tration officials suggest- 
ed that if flic United States did not 
take its action, other Third World 
countries could start highly publi- 
cized cases against It Ware the 
court 

Administration officials note 
that when President Truman ac- 
cepted the rampulsqiy jurisdiction 
^^e .ebdr^ he efid so , qn the: as- . • 
Sjumpftoh ttet otternatibris 'would 
follow suit. , v . 


Army Says They 

a/. 1' ‘ i' T 

Murdered Jews 

OnW^tBahk 

; Comp iled by Our Staff From Dapaiches ' 

TEL AVIV — Israeli soldiers 
kilted four Palestinian guerrillas 
tear the occupied West Bank town 
of Hebron, the army announced 
Monday: 

It said the four belonged to a cell 
responsible for the murders of 
three Jews, including two hikers 
whose bodies, riddled with bullets, 
were found in hills outside Jerusa- 
lem on Saturday. 

The army said that another guer- 
rilla was wounded and captured in 
the encounter on the southern 
slopes of Hebron. The statement 
did not disclose when the incident 
occuxred ra whether the group fired 
badiL 

The statement said the group 
had been active in the Hebron, Ra- 
inaTiah and Bethlehem areas of the 
West Bank ate was responsible for 
the murder of a Jewish settler in 
Ramahah in March. 

The army announcement coin- 
cided with a claim in Toms that the 
Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion’s military co mmand was re- 
sponsible for an explosion that col- 
lapsed a Jerusalem apartment 
boose Monday, killing one person 
and injuring 1 1 others. 

. A statement issued by the Gener- 
al Command of the Palestinian 
Revolutionary Forces ate pub- 
lished by the FLO’S WAFA news 
agency said that the bombing was 
in retaliation for the Israeli attack 
last week on PLO headquarters in 
Tunis in' which 72 persons died. 

In Jteualem,-a police spokes- 
man said that the explosion was 
caused by a gas leak 

Earlier, an anonymous telephone 
caller to Agence France- Presse said 
a dissident PLO group was respon- 
sible. (Reuters, AP) 

■ Egyptian Meets Arafat 

The chief political adviser of 
President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt 
< met. with tte Paiestiae liberation 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1)' 



Clausen Says 
World Bank t o 
Expand Lending 


By John Burgess 
and Hobarr Rowen 

Washington Past Service 


which is accumulating with the 
IMF, for balance-of-pay meats 
loans to the poorest countries. 
China ate India have agreed not 


SEOUL — The president of the j 0 on the fund, which would 
World Bank, AW. Clausen, said 1^* mue jj 0 f a available for the 
Monday that the bank now had Lions of sub-Saharan Africa. 


political backing from all major na- 
tions for an expansion of lending 


On Tuesday, Mr. Baker is to ad- 
dress the conference and give de- 


Lhat would probably require a gen- u.u *»vc uc- 

eral capital increielriihin wo ^ of a much-pubhozed initial ive 
years 011 wo ™ :1 ®ebt crisis. 

His statemetu here came after [Mr. Baker was to propose that 

James A Baker 3d, Ibe U.S. Trea- 

sury secretary, said before an influ- Nigerians are debating a pot- 
ential financial advisory body that ble IMF bailout. Page 2. 

“resources should be made avail- 

able" if the demand for loans rose ^ Worid R aT 1 i- commercial 
past the World Bank’s ability,’ to banis make sso faiUion worth 0 f 
providethem. new loans to at least 15 indebted 

Mr. Clausen said that the World countries over the next three years, 
Bank s present resources could sirs- p i aced source said Mon- 

tain lendmg as high as S14 bflhon a da y United Press Interna tional re- 
year Mmpared with the current ported from Seoul. 

$1U bilhon in lending, but that ._ ».«, u-n- . , er 
more capital probably would be r °“ 

needed sutrting in the fiscal year World Bank arte lhafi from emn- 
that ends lime 30. 1987. meraalbanks— would be turned at 

f ii .v .i . .u eight large debtor counuies ana 
-We are Snutg full throttle at ibe 3^,, other countries with 
moment and will be for the foresee- j tt, ^ 

able future,” he said. ^ ^ u the “ Ufces ^ ^ 

loans would be made on the condi- 
His remarks came after expand- d ^ ^ recipients respond 
ed lendmg was given formal en- rj.I, ^ 

dorsemem at a mating of the de- mth Konomc reforms.! 


Burned cars Ottered streets in the Tottenham section of London on Monday. 

London Police Warn They Will Use 
Gas 9 Plastic Bullets Against Rioters 


velopment committee, a panel of 22 


with economic reforms.] 

U.S. officials initially considered 


The London police commission - 


finance officials that advises both a S5.4-billion program to be jointly 
the bank and the International administered by the bank and the 
Monetary Fund. IMF that would consist of the S2.7- 

The Worid Bank and the IMF b,llion IMF 10181 fund Md a Me 
formally open their annual meeting amount of new money from the 
Tuesday in SeouL World Bank. 

The World Bank makes long- However, conference sources say 
term loans for development pro- (he idea of joint administration has 
jecis. The IMF makes short-term been abandoned in the face of op- 


By Edith M. Lederer . The London police connnteion- TOe rioters, both black and loans to nations with credit prob- position from developing countries 
The Associated Press Sir Kmneth Newman, said that white, appnred to be blame police ]aos helps them arrange loans (hat believe it would lead to too 

inismoN _ Police warned ^ e 8ent armed uith plasuc tte death of Cynthia Jarrett, 49, ^ commercial banks by fixing many restrictions on management 

aiiSSA-. *hZ ^ buU ?» “J* gas to Tottenham who died of an apparent heart at- conditions for economic reform! of their economies. 

S ^ hnght of bul dlD “S 3 po^. ^ of her The United Stales is the maia con- The bank and many developed 

SLSfio!St fdlov«Sb^v£ St‘J“TT“-“T sMlyC0 °' h ®““S:turday iii8hi. iributor to bolb insutudotis. cotumtes had objected to the idea 

lotce in which one txdiceman was . U ^’ m - . r ^ enne J^ * n ot her conference action, the that the bank guarantee commer- 

Idlled and 232 were mured. , ® ul 1 W15 * 1 T ? pu ! ^ P*#}* of P°Bceman, Keith H. Blakelock, development committee and the rial credits in order to reverse the 

lahte and 232 were nyuretL London on nonce that _I will not “was savagely murdered" during IMFs interim committee endorsed decline of private capita! to coun- 



against rioters following urban vio- without using them, 

lmce in which one policeman was i wish to put all people of 

killed and 232 were injured. London on notice that l will not 

• Twenty civilians also were hurt shrink from such a decision should 
as more than 500 youths, some I. believe it a practical option for 
armed with shotguns and ma- restoring peace and preventing 
chetes, fought polio; Sunday night crime and injury,” be said, 
and Monday morning in ibe rariaJi J - ■British police have never used 
ly muted north London district of plastic bullets in riots outside 
Tottenham. Northern Ireland and tear gas has 

not been used since the 1981 riot in 

Liverpool 

Sir Kenneth said that the riot, 
the fourth major outbreak of urban 
violence in a month, was the first in 
England in modem times in which 
guns were used and a police Officer 
was killed 

Douglas Hurd the home secre- 
tary, said that he fully supported 
the use of plastic bullets “if police 
find themselves being attacked by 
petrol bombs.” 

He said that the possibility of 
using water cannon in future dis- 
turbances was being evaluated 


The bank and many developed 
countries had objected to the idea 


(Continued on Page 5, CoL 5) 


iMr s interim committee endorsed decline of private capital 
the use of a $2.7-billion trust fund, tries that need credit. 


Group of 5 Said to Accept Level of Dollar 


Reuters 

SEOUL — The major industrialized democra- 
cies are for now satisfied with the dollar’s sharp, 
but orderly, decline of the past two weeks and will 


push, either by talking the "dollar down or heavy 
central bank selling, could send it into a free faQ. 

Karl Otto P6hL the president of the West Ger- 
man Bundesbank, has stressed in Seoul that the 


refrain from any new measures for fear of provok- Deutsche-mark-dollar rate, now at about 2.60 


ing a crash, monetary sources said here Monday. 

At a meeting during the weekend, the finance 
ministers and central bank governors of the so^ 


Deutsche marks to the dollar, had settled into a 
range that the central bank liked. 

A source said that central bankers have now 


called Group of Five — the United Stales, Japan, “drawn a line under the dollar.” But the exact 
West Germany, France and Britain — reviewed location of the line was not disclosed, 
the strategy to dqpress the dollar, which has in- The sources said West Germany feared that its 
volved some central bank selling of dollars. The exports would start to be hurt if the dollar fell 
sources said that the Group of Five members much more than it already has. 


agreed that no new action was required. 

The sources said the group feared that a second 


The Group of Five report raised the dollar in 
Europe. Details, Page 17. 


In U,S. 'Rust Belt , 9 Towns Cut Fat by Closing Down 


A VICTORY MARCH — Anlbal Cavaco Sihra leading his wife through a cheering 
crowd after his Sodal Democratic Party finished first in the Portuguese elections. No 
party won a majority, mid a minority or coalition government appeared likely. Page 6. 


By Lindsey Gruson 

New York Times Service 

CLAIRTON, Pennsylvania — Deeply in debt 
and with less than 51,000 in its bank accounts, 
this sted-making city laid off its entire 14- 
member police force ate 10-member fire de- 
partment in early September. 

“We’ve cm the fat to the bone and now we 
have to cut essential services,” Mayor Daniel 
Pastore said. “We're broke. But what’s the point 
in filing For bankruptcy? You’ve got to pay your 
bills anyway. We’ve got to show the banks we’re 
doing something and then they'll talk." 

In an attempt to balance its books and per- 
suade the banks to renew its line of credit. 
Gait-ton has, in the words of one official “closed 
the city.” It has laid off its five-member clerical 
staff and turned off many streetlights. It is 
selling city-owned property and has all bul 
stopped repaving streets. 

The financial problems that have overtaken 
Gairton, a town of 12,000 people situated 15 
miles (24 kilometers) south of Pittsburgh, are 
common to muniripalities in the part of the 
United States that has come to be known as the 


Rust BcIl Like Gairton, many are insolvent 
ate have had to slash services. 

McKeesport, which has a projected $700,000 
operating deficit, has laid off five police officers 
and two clerical workers. West Homestead has 
laid off nine of 14 employees in its public works 
department. 

West of Pittsburgh, in Ohio, Mingo Junction 
has reduced the work day to six hours for the 46 
full-time city employees and has laid off 125 
summer employees. Other layoffs are likely, as 
is a 15-percent pay cut for all city employees. 

“It’s a bleak picture,” said Charles W. 
Bansch, a policy analyst with the NorxheasL- 
Midwest Institute, a Washington-based center 
for economic and environmental research. 
“Many of these towns aren't going to make iL 
They’re going to have to go through bankruptcy 
and let the chips fall where they may.” 

The municipalities’ financial problems grow 
out of the severe depression that in recent years 
has savaged the American steel industry,’ put- 
ting more than 700,000 persons out of work in 
this once prosperous region. 

Steel companies — hurt by the strength of the 


dollar, which has made imported steel less ex- 
pensive, and bypassed by the economic recovery 
— have closed one mill after another. 

The plant closings have reduced ihe property 
tax base, the main source of revenue for most of 
the towns. Despite sharp tax increases, munici- 
pal income has plunged just as record unem- 
ployment is creating extraordinary demands for 
services. 

In the Iasi five years, for instance, Gairton’s 
total revenue has dropped to S24 million from 
S3.1 million. Income plummeted even though 
the city raised taxes to the legal limit and im- 
posed higher service fees, according to city offi- 
cials. 

The single largest reason for this decline was 
the loss of revenue from the U.S. Steel Corp.. 
whose plant sprawls along one entire side of (he 
city. In the last two years the company’s total 
payments to the city have declined by nearly 50 
percent, to S3 million, city officials said. 

Like Gairton, many steel towns expected the 
lack of money to be short-lived. They had be- 
come accustomed to the cyclical nature of the 

( Con tinned on Page 5, CoL 3) 


Economic Horizons in East Asia Are Broadening 


Thewritcr recently completed a jour-year assiffiment in East 
Asia for Theffe» Yaklimes, as a correspondent based first in 
Tokyo and then m Manila. ' 

- By Steve Lohr 

New York Timer Sendee ... 

TOKYO— Gicung (h Kwanrtmembera her childhood in 
a one-room farmhouse in the New Territories of Hong Kong. 
If yon wanted to lake a bath, she recalls, you had to trek to a 
distant public faucet, fill a pail and carry it back. 

Today, the 26-year-old woman lives with her husband and 
two duldren in a high-rise building a short distance from 
where the farmhouse stood. Their two-zoom apartment is 
cranked by Western 'standards, but it is equipped not only 
with indoor plumbing but also with a refrigerator, gas stove, 
etecceic rice cooker, television, telephone ate stereo. Al- 
though she never finished grade school, she expects that her 

son arid daughter w£Q both receive college educations. 

In Singapore, Teo Kok Eng stands at the edge of a 
commodity trading pi l Above the din. the 27-year-old trader 
says : “If you are good, you can become very rich dam g this. 
And T plan u> be rich:" 

In Tokyo’s ’ Akihabara district, a sprawling electronics 
bazaar, Yasushi Kameyama, 20, an engineering student, 
paws knowledgeably through a bin of eompu terefins at one 


paws knowledgeably through a bin of computer chips at one 

of the manysmall shops. ^ Having come to Akihabara since he 
was 12, he nowassembles his own computers and writes his. 
own software.: . 

He hopes' lo'take -a career path far different from the 
traditional Japanese dream of joinirig a big company and 


staying therefor file. “1 want to start my own company,” Mr. 
Kameyama says. U I want to be an entrepreneur.” 

That is economic growth talking, and these three individ- 
uals are its human face. They embody the sense that things 
are getting better, opening new opportunities, new horizons 
for ordinary people. 

After foar years spent living and reporting in much of the 


The impression is of a region in 
ascent, of the voices and images of 
rising prosperity and expectations. 


Asian side of the Pacific Basin, a journalist leaves with the 
angular impression of a region in ascent, of the voices and 
images of rising prosperity ate expectations. 

In tins vast region, there are, of course, exceptions to the 
trend of increasing wealth: notably, the Phffippines. Thai, 
too, there are special cases such as Australia and New 
Zealand, two nations loosening their traditional ties to 
Britain ted Europe and linking their economic futures more 
dosdy to East Asia and the United States. 

StiS, the generalization bolds. Despite fits and starts, 

setbacks and exceptions, life is becoming materially better in 
this part of the world. And the political, social and interna- 
tional consequences of economic growth are evident. 


For Ihe most part, the countries in the Asian Pacific are 
not giving foreign bankers sleepless nights. From this part of 
the world, rarely heard are the strident strains of Third 
World nationalism, with its perceived demons of American 

imperialism and multinational corporations and its demands 
for global redistribution of wealth. 

Instead, the countries of tins region are most interested in 
keeping world markets open to their competitive prowess. 
They do not want a new deal just a fair deal. 

The core of the region's dynamism is East Asia, dominat- 
ed by Japan and dependent on U.S. markets to absorb the 
goods streaming from these export-driven economies. 

Sometimes, the economic advance is forcing political 
change. In South Korea and Taiwan, for instance, develop- 
ment has fueled internal demands for political liberalization, 
which must eventually be accommodated. 

“You can’t have a modem economy coupled with the 
stone-age political system,” one Seoul executive observed. 
“The pace will be measured, but some loosening of the 
political reins is inevitable.” 

Now, to be sure, anxiety is the mood of East Asia. Growth 
rates have fallen off sharply for most of its economies, and 
the United States, the region's lifeblood, is threatening to 
enact protectionist legislation. 

For the so-called Four Tigers — South Korea. Taiwan. 
Singapore and Hong Kong — a slowdown tends to be 
defined as annual growth at less than a double-digit rate. 

Japan, for its part, still ranks as the top performer in 

(Continued on Page 7, CoL 4) 


INSIDE 


■ NATO beard the US. reac- 

tion to the Soviet proposal on 
nuclear missiles. Page 1 

■ The US. government operat- 
ed normally as the Senate 
moved toward a vote on in- 
creasing the debt limit. Page 5.. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ The Vienna State Opera 

showcases two of its leading 
singers in Donizetti's “Maria 
Stuarda.” Page 8. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ 09 demandin the non-Com- 

munist worid is expected to rise 
52 percent in the next six 
months. Page 11. 

■ Washington ted Bonn that 
telecommunications talks must 
include ways to open up the 
West German market. Page IL 

TOMORROW 

The mind of Ronald Reagan 
reflects the thinking of an ideo-. 
logue and a politician. Insights. 





AP/IMl 

Nelson Mandela, the im- 
prisoned nationalist, 
does not have cancer, a 
South African official 
said. Page Z 



Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 


In Nigeria, the Talk Is of IMF 

Debate on Loan — and Austerity — Dominates Country 


By Edward A. Gargan 

jVew York Times Service 

LAGOS — Barely five weeks af- 
ter seizing power in a coup, Nige- 
ria's head of state. Major General 
Ibrahim Bab an gi da. has catapulted 
this country of nearly 100 million 
people into an enormous town 
meeting. 

Day after day, on dusty street 
corners, in tiny shops and air-con- 
ditioned offices, people are argu- 
ing. waving fists and shouting 
about the International Monetary 
Fund. The debate is particularly 
acute in the pages of the country's 
newspapers. 

The debate turns on whether Ni- 
geria should accept a 52.4-billion 
ioan and the rigorous economic 
austerity measures that would ac- 
company it from the monetary 
fund to help alleviate the country’s 
acute financial problems. 

“IMF Loan: A Tentacle of Capi- 
talism," said The Daily Star. 
“IMF: What For?" asked The Sun- 
day Herald. 

And Last Sunday, in a sermon at 
the First Baptist Church of Lagos, 
Bishop Festus Segun looked out at 
General Babangida, who was in the 
congregation, and said. "Those in a 



The flavour 
of an island 
in a single 
malt 





SCOTCH WHISKY 


Ibrahim Babangjda 

position to take the decision on the 
loan should note that we already 
have debt burdens." 

The bishop's view is widely held. 
Business executives and bankers, 
labor leaders and university profes- 
sors support it. Nigeria has never 
borrowed from the IMF. Many Ni- 
gerians say that taking a loan now 
and accepting the stringent eco- 
nomic changes required by the 
monetary fund would be unaccept- 
able because Nigeria's sovereignty 
would erode. 

"The IMF loan," according to a 
newspaper column by two leaders 
of a civil service union, would cre- 
ate “more idle hands which are 
responsible for armed robberies, 
bank brokings and many more 
types of crime waves, coupled with 
misery and underdevelopment." 

The public discussion over bor- 
rowing from the IMF, the likes of 
which has not been seen since the 
military overthrew a civilian gov- 
ernment in December 1983, was 
touched off by General Babangi- 
da's announcement that he was in- 
viting Nigerians to comment on the 
country’s economic future. 


Exceptional 

Sales 

NINA RICQ 

Couture and Boutique 

Fabrics 

Wednesday 9 
and Thursday 10 October 
from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm 

20. RUE DES CAPUCINES 
THIRD FLOOR 


Part of that future, the general 
said, could email imposing painful 
economic policies, including the 
drastic devaluation of the naira, 
Nigeria’s unit of currency, as well 
as the ending of subsidies on petro- 
leum and agricultural products and 
sweeping cuts in the government's 
work force. 

To many economists here who 
have access to the economic data 
that measures the country's state of 
health, Nigeria is at a precipice. 
“They’re looking down a dark 
well," a Western diplomat said. 
“The country is flat broke. Its in- 
come is declining. It has overbor- 
rowed and can’t borrow any more. 
Its population is rising rapidly." 

This year, Nigeria is expected to 
spend 43 percent of its SI 1-billion 
national budget for paying the in- 
terest on its foreign debt. Already, 
according to Western bankers, the 
country is 120 days behind in re- 
paying certain short-term debts, a 
lag that has prompted Western 
bulks to continue issuing letters of 
credit lo pay for imports into Nige- 
ria. 

According to some economists, 
Nigeria's ability to earn the foreign 
exchange it desperately needs to 
pay for Western machinery, spare 
parts, medical supplies and food is 
threatened by the possibility of a 
further drop in oil prices. 

Against this -backdrop. General 
Babangida has said that Nigeria 
must address the issue of whether 
to borrow from the IMF or not. 
Some journalists say they believe 
he has already decided to accept 
the loan. But, nonetheless, it is the 
fun of the debate itself more than 
the issues that seem to have riveted 
people's attention. 

“Nobody could debate at all un- 
til four weeks ago,” said Arthur 
Ezenekwe, the Lagos bureau chief 
of The Daily Star. 

“Linder Buhari, nobody could 
talk or write about anything,'' he 
said, referring to the jailing of jour- 
nalists by the previous government 
of Major General Mo hamm ed Bu- 
hari, which quickly chilled any crit- 
icism of its performance. 

In one of his first acts after tak- 
ing power, General Babangida or- 
dered all journalists released from 
prison- "Now the ordinary man in 
the street is talking about the loan," 
Mr. Ezenekwe said. “The general 
impression is that taking the Ioan is 
bad" 


Tripoli Truce 
Holds ; Fate 
Of Russians 
Is Unknown 


Pilot Dies as UJK. Jets Collide 

United Press International 

CARLISLE, England — * Two 
Jaguar jets of the British air force 
collided Monday near here during 
a train in g miss i on, killing one pQot 
and slightly injuring the other who 
parachuted to safety, a military 
spokesman said 


Revlm 

TRIPOLL Lebanon — Thou- 
sands of refugees returned to Trip- 
oli on Monday as Syrian troops 
occupying the northern Lebanese 
port strengthened their grip in stra- 
tegic areas. 

There was no word however, on 
three Soviet officials kidnapped in 
Beirut last week by a group de- 
manding an end to the fighting in 
Tripoli 

The group, which killed a Soviet 
diplomat, Arkadi Katkov, after 
seizing him with the others, has 
made no authenticated statement 
since Wednesday, although the 
Tripoli cease-fire appeared to meet 
their demands. 

A purported message from the 
kidnappers was telephoned to a 
news agency in Beirut on Sunday 
night saying that the hostages 
would not be freed and urging the 
Shiite Moslem fundamentalist 
group Islamic Jihad to continue to 
hold its American and European 
hostages, h appeared Monday to 
have been a hoax. 

The reported execution of a U.S. 
diplomat held hostage, William 
Buckley, remained unconfirmed 
despite the announcement last 
week by a caller claiming to repre- 
sent Islamic Jihad that he had been 
killed 

In Tripod it was a bitter home- 
coming for many of the estimated 
500,000 people who fled the city 
during 19 days of fighting between 
Moslem fundamentalists and Syr- 
ian-backed leftist militias attacking 
them. 

The city still lacked water and 
electricity, and few shops had re- 
opened Red Cross trucks brought 
in emergency supplies. 

Police, now reinstalled in build- 
ings scarred by bullets that 
changed hands twice in the fight- 
ing, said that no more than 30 per- 
cent of refugees had found their 
homes immediately habitable. 

■ Strikes Fight Palestinians 

Shiite Moslem militiamen fought 
fierce battles with Palestinian fight- 
ers at the Sabra and Chatila refugee 
camps in Beirut on Monday, Unit- 
ed Press International reported 

The fighting at the camps in Bei- 
rut's southern suburbs closed the 
main highway from the chy center 
to Beirut International Airport. 

Each side blamed the other for 
the fighting. Sabra and Chatiia 
were devastated by battles between 
Palestinians and Shiite forces in 
June that killed more than 600 peo- 
ple. ~ 





MOURNERS PROTEST — Demonstrators paraded on 
buses in Soweto over the weekend during the funeral of 


Mandla Kenneth Molokomme, a schoolboy who wasfataSy 
shot At one point, police fired tear gas into the crowds. 


Prison Official Denies That Mandela Has Cancer 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — A South 
African spokesman denied Mon- 
day that Nelson Mandela, the im- 
prisoned black nationalist leader, 
has cancer. 

A spokesman for the Prisons De- 
partment said that Mr. Mandela, 
67, suffers from an enlarged pros- 
tate. Family members who visited 
him last month reported the same 
diagnosis. 

The spokesman said that further 


tests were needed before any deci- 
sion could be made about an opera- 
tion. 

Mr. Mandela, who has been in 
prison for 23 years on charges of 
sabotage and plotting revolution, is 
the life president of die outlawed 
African National Congress. 

Meanwhile, the government an- 
nounced reforms Monday of apart- 
heid laws that have segrqpited all 
movie audiences and reserved most 
movie theaters 'exclusively for 
whites. 


Movie theaters in some major 
cities will be allowed to apply for 
special permits to admit blacks. 

The Sunday Times of Johannes- 
burg, the country’s largest newspa- 
per. has urged the government to 
tree Mr. Mandela, and joined other 
papers in criticizing President 
Pieter W. Botha’s proposals for ra- 
cial reform. 

The newspaper urged Mr. Botha 
to lift the state of emergency that 
was imposed in parts of the country 


in mid- July to extend policepowers 
a gains t black rioters. ; -\"- 

A policeman was -injured, late: 
Sunday by a crowd that threw 
stones in the Crossroads squatter 
camp near Cape Town, and police 
said a black baby was hurt when a 
house was firebombed at Chester- 
ville, near Durban on the Indian. 

Or gan V 

More than 730 people, mostly 
blacks, have died in 20 months of 
protest against apartheid racial dis-' 
crimination. (Reuters, AP) 


* 


NATO Gels U.S. Reaction WORLD BRIEFS 


To Soviet Missile Offer New U.S. Space Shuttle Ends Mission 


COME 


T O 


BEIJING 





IHE GREAT WU1 SHEKAB3N HOTB.-BBJING: BODMS AND MRS i 5 PtSWJRANIS/ 3 LOUNGES / CNEMA / tMEAIEP / CMMMftG POOl / HEAUH CLUB / EW05 COUITS / EBUWRO ROOM / BU3NE3S 

CtNTsP/ME£7ir«FAOlIT£S/tfATESfTK5Ml78TO:ir2 ' < 

COME TO SHERATON 


Now the hospitality of Sheraton 
awaits the business executive 
in the capital of the People's 
Republic of China, at the new 
Great Wall Sheraton Hotel Beijing. 
With 1004 elegantly furnished 
rooms and suites. A choice of 
restaurants with classic French 
to tracfitional Szechuan to 24-hour 
coffee shop dining. A business and 
international communications 
center. A fulfy-equipped health 
club with on indoor pool and 
tennis courts. All with the style 
and corn fort of Sheraton matched 
with the gracious charm of China. 





WELCOME TO SHERATON HOTELS 
IN ASIA, AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND 


_ The Great Wall 
Sheraton Hotel Beijing 

amsflANE SHERATON HOTELS, INNS A RESORTS WORLDWIDE 

^JtuciOAND NORTH DQNGHUAN ROAD. BEUtNQ. PEOH.es REPU&UCOF CHINA 

wand TELEPHONE: 5055$® TELEX: 20049 GWHBJCN 

>"u* Iho ■xso.ioStv oooote or TTT 

INSTANT RESERVATIONS WORLDWIDE 
w For instant confirmed reservations at the Great Wall Sheraton 

Hotel Beijing, call your Travel Planner or Sheraton in you city. 

IMAUAND EW*3*Ok iawana Swnsorv HcwsaaitaSwrtonHWl SNCAFOM Cenwy Pert 3»*aw Snamm awcSpniowiSroaOTlTW*/ 

BBUNUOw own IBorrq MONO ICON© SIwatonHonoKOnoHoHiatowBalAIVSRNIAPH Lot lalShMlcfl Haw JMWHrOirni>»NMC9onCSAKAANAgiMi»nww 

omj OUNW9wmnOunttt«m AUS&WSVDfCY9ieiaWnVlWnlM>ihSaisaA^9)W^K)txmH3i«a£3MPSm9wnwnEwr, 

AMR* 9WWIW *VW» Bow. Aid SWINGS Spir® (WMl QAHWN SwMon Darwin fW»; NEW 2SA1AMD AU3LSNP Persian SffJHGA Shorawn BatoAja. 


The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — The United 
States gave its allies in the North 
Atlantic Treaty' Organization a de- 
tailed reaction on Monday to the 
arms reduction proposal made last 
week by the Soviet leader, Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev, a U.S. official said. 

Richard N. Perle, assistant secre- 
tary of defense for international 
security policy, outlined the Rea- 
gan administration's views at a 
meeting at NATO headquarters of 
senior defense officials from 15 al- 
lied nations, according to Peter An- 
tico, a spokesman at the U.S. mis- 
sion. 

Mr. Antico declined to describe 
the substance of Mr. Perle’s re- 
marks. 

Mr. Perle spoke to the members 
of NATO's High Level Group, a 
panel that meets regularly to review 
modernization of the allian ce’s tac- 
tical nuclear arsenaL Mr. Perle is 
cba jnran of five group, which in- 
dudes all NATO members except 
France. 

It was the first opportunity for 
American allies as a group to hear 


disclosed that a NATO meeting to 
review Soviet nrissib! deployments 
would be held shortly before -the 
Dutch government's scheduled an- 
nouncement on Nov. 1 of whether 
it will accept UJ5. cruise missiles on 
its soil. 

The Dutch government said 
more than a year ago that it would 
give final approval for deployment 
of the 48 cruise missiles if, on Nov. 
I, the number of Soviet SS-20s was 
378 or greater. 

At the last meeting of NATO's 
Special Consultative Group in Sep- 
tember it was announced that the 
number of SS-20 missiles deployed 
in eastern and western Soviet 
Union had grown by 18 to a total of 
441. 

Last week, however, Mr. Gorba- 
chev said the number of SS-20s 
stationed within s triking distance 
of Western Europe had been re- 
duced to 243. 

■ Carrington Welcomes Plan 
. Lord Carrington, NATO’s secre- 
tary-general, on Monday wel- 
comed the new Soviet arms propos- 


EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, California (AP) —The fourth U.S. 
ice shuttle, Atlantis, made a safe desert landing Monday to end its 
estinc maiden mission, in which it deployed two military communi- 
cations satellites. 

The U.S. space agency said that the riiuttle’s five-man crew, all military 
officers, had conducted a series of tests of the spacecraft’s systems and 
said that Atlantis had been “solid throughout the mission." 

Although a news blackout was maintained throughout the four-day 
unssiotL Atlantis's primary payload was identified by reliable sources as 
two Defense Satellite Communications Systems satellites. The 
are of a new type described as jam-proof and shielded against the 
electromagnetic bursts created by nuclear explosions. 

China Warns Against Student Protests . 

BEIJING (Reuters) —China’s state-run news media warned students 
Monday not to stage unofficial protests against government policies in 
what foreign diplomats said was a response to demonstrations against 


students today must not belike those of the late 1960s and early 
1970s who thought mass movements were natural and reasonable," China 
Legal News said in a commentary, also broadcast on television and radio. 
“If there are people who do not want the party’s leadership or who reject 
the open door policy and the stimulation of China's economy, tins is 
utterly wrong and undermines the socialist democratic legal system,” it 


■ Hundreds of students in Beijing and the central city of Xian have 
paraded ewer the last month against Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone’s 
visit to a shrine which honors veterans of Japan’s invasion of China in rite 
1930s and 1940s. 


the reaction of the Reagan admin- als as a basis for negotiation, saying tt i » - . i . /i , _ 

isfration to the proposals made by he did not believe they were an JQ63LI1 AttBCKS \ i QflSCT VHllYC Policies 


Mr. Gorbachev last Thursday dur- 
ing an official visit to Paris, 

Mr. Gorbachev called for a total 
ban on arms in space and a 50 
percent reduction in UjS. and Sovi- 
et strategic missile forces. He also 
proposed separate nuclear arms 
talks with Britain and France, and 
said the Soviet Union already had 
reduced the number of its SS-20 
medium-range nuclear missiles 
aimed at Western Europe. 

In a related development, it was 


British liberal Leader 
Urges Falkland Talks 

- The Associated Press 

LONDON — David Steel, lead- 
er of Britain's opposition Liberal 
Party, has urged the Conservative 
government to begin talks with Ar- 
gentina on the future of the Falk- 
land Islands. 

“Public opinion would prefer to 
see the future of the islands guaran- 

the rwocounma, Mr. Steel sad posed ^ace-based missile 
on his return to London. Mr. Steel 
met President Raul Alfonsm of Ar- 
gentina on Sunday in Madrid, 
where Mr. Alfonsin was awarded 
the Prize for Freedom from the 
Liberal Internationa] Congress. He 
was given the honor for Ins role in 
restoring democracy in Argentina. 


attempt to divide the West, Renters 
reported in Washington. 

However, be also said the Soviet 
proposals as they stood were not 
acceptable to the United States or 
the rest of the West • 

Lord Carrington said that if 
Moscow genuinely wished to seek 
an arms agreement the November 
summit meeting between President 
Ronald Reagan and Mr. Gorba- 
chev “can give it a push in the right 
direction." 

He spoke after meeting with Mr. 
Reagan and Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz. 

Asked whether proposals made 
by Mr. Gorbachev were an attempt 
to divide the United States from its 
allies, he said: “I don't think they 
are necessarily an attempt to divide 
NATO." He added: “1 think it’s 
going to be extremely difficult to 
divide Europe from the United 
States." 

■ Reagan Reiterates Stance 
President Reagan reiterated 



Edward Heath 


BLACKPOOL, England (Reu- 
ters) — Former Prime Minister Ed- 
ward Heath attacked the British 
government on Monday, highlight- 
ing strains within Margaret 
Thatcher’s ruling Conservative 
Party on the eve of its annua l coo- 
ierence. 

Mr. Heath, removed as Conser- 
vative leader by Mrs. Thatcher in 
1975, said the party was too con- 
cerned with its image and not 
enough with the government’s fail- 
ure to deal with Britain’s economic 
problems, notably unemployment. 
Recent opinion, polls have shown a 
mg swing to the left, among the 
electorate. J 

“There are innumerable resolu- 
tions about presentation. What we 

have to do is recognize that after six 

yews the policies have not dealt 
with the problems," Mr. Heath said 
on British television. The Conser- 
vative conference begins in this sea- 
side resort on Tuesday. Security is 
cstnandy strict f ollowmg the IRA 
at l 351 year's conference 
mBi^tonmatehfiveperacms 


Visiting 

New York City? 

Gramercy 
Park Hotel 

Distinguished 500 room 
hotel with excellent 
Restaurant, Cocktail Lounge, 
Room Service and Piano Bar. 
Overlooking Gramercy Pirk 
with newly decorated, 
comfortable rooms. 
Singles $85-95 
Doubles $90-100 
Suites $115-175 
Group rates and attractive 
monthly rates available. 
Call Gen. Mgr. Tom O'Brien 
(212)475-4320 
Telex 668-755 
Cable GRAMPARK 
21st St. and Lexington Ave. 
New York, NY, USA. 10010 


:ense 

program was an instrument of 
peace and said, “It is not a bargain- 
ing chip," United Press Interna- 
tional reported from Washington. 

Speaking to about 250 Republi- 
can Party leaders at the 'White 

House, Mr. Reagan sought to — reuon»i * 

quash speculation that he might 1010 GMT, an Iraqi xnffitarvs^^^* 1 ^ carried on* at 
accept curbs on his Strategic Do- jets “launched a devastating Sd SSfffL? 1 Btate The 
fense Initiative m exchange for a safety,” he said. - 011 “ e "^ble of Eharg and returned 

reduction in Soviet nuclear arms. 


Iraq Announces New Kharg Raid 

ini nrid-AwmsL w*» 


had 


“Why should this effort Till us total devastation" until Iran am£nL spare any effort tomflk* 
with hope?" Mr Reagan asked Iraq began attacks ouKW « ^ 1^4 

Because n would not kill people; Iran to negotiate peacfcThS islandlu^^^ 

s’satrasrS 

would demSitanze the arsenals on ' , 

Earth. Because it’s the essence of ^ i tr 

science and mankind joining for r flP tfiA nPPftpH 

mankind's highest ideal — - peace . ' 

md ought 

showroom and anotW a 1 .“ *»■“’* 

"ZX**"** — jJ fS^StSSSST “/ran 


on Earth. 1 

He said that work on a fmuristic 
“space shield" against nuclear mis- 
sile attack “must go forward” . 



UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 

BACHELORS •MASTERS* DOCIORATC I 

For Worig Acrimk Ufa I 

Send delolJed resume- 
far fro* evaluation. 

PACIFIC WBTBtN UNWBOTyI 

400 N. Sepulveda BhrtL, 

Las Aneeles. California 
*60», Dept. 23, UJA 


Two British aircraft engineers in said Monday. (Reuters) 

®S s ‘ : »ffle=was'e!3Si. 

a BaiW . ...... (UP!) ~ 




% 






an* 


tm, 


— - 


■T 

. ..* ^ • • 




A * 



' INTERNATIONAL me* ALP TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 

Page 3 




ji « u . ’ Sa 

f.lSrwJ Ifjr ..*■ '■" ,!ir 'V 

illasCaj, 


D BRIEFS 

SjhuUit KndiJliji 


« ff ••' <- 

afp *•<:..■ 

fctttf W- 

•** r 'M- . 


1 Nziifrntfc 


* •$*•"■«■ 
W»BfT •*•■■• 
8 f«F t.«»' 

* war-- lv 
■ 

ite :• * 

«p**^ -' 
WT*v 


ASH’** 


■...« -^crprtlk 


• - ' iti 


V* K^'.r 


IBM’s Super PC. 

ir key to more power. 


The IBM Personal Computer AT 
has so- much capacity - and is so 
powerful - that we like to call it 
our Super PC. 

It was designed to help you 
manage larger than average 
amounts of information. 

At speeds up to three times 
faster than those of early PCs. 


J-his Super PC is available with 
a 20-megabyte fixed disk. 

And if your need for power 
increases, you can add another 
20-megabyte fixed disk - which 
gives you enough storage to hold 
20,000 pages of information. 

Or the names of 100,000 of 
your best clients. 

The random access memory of 



either 256KB or 512KB lets 
you use the most sophisticated 
software available, such as IBM’s 
multi-task windowing program, 
TopView. 

As your business grows, so 
your Super PC can grow. 

All the way to 3 megabytes. 

Now, with so much vital 
information stored and processed, 
you’ll need to protect it. 

So the Super PC comes with a 
lock and key that lets you secure 
both data entry and retrieval. 

And although the Super PC 
is much more powerful, it still runs 
almost all the programs written 
for the other members of the 
IBM PC family, giving you a choice 
from the largest, most diverse 
library of business software in 
the world. 

The IBM Super PC. 

Your key to more powerful 
personal computing. 

For further information write 
to IBM United Kingdom 
International Products 
Limited, West Cross House, 

2 West Cross Way, Brentford, 
Middlesex TW8 9DY, 

England 

(Telex 27748). J=^£T=: 


LITTLE TRAMP CHARACTER LICENCED IV ■UllLCt INC.S* GGK 




r 


Pali 1 ' 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune. 


PuMUimI With The New York Ttow md Hit Washington Pori 


Manila Mocks U.S. Law 


Affronts to justice in the Philippines have 
deepened the despair of democrats over the 
1983 murder of their champion, Benigno 
Aquino. They confirm the cynicism that greet- 
ed President Ferdinand Marcos's pledge to 
pursue and punish the perpetrators. It seems 
unlikely that those on trial, especially the top 
general accused of covering up the crime, will 
be convicted of anything. The Marcos tyranny 
seems determined to radicalize its opposition. 

The judges who have now withdrawn to 
weigh a verdict against 26 defendants in the 
assassination trial have been left with Utile 

evidence to consider. They themselves barred 
important, incriminating information with a 
bizarre application of America's Miranda rule. 
And the trial prosecutor, in a righteous, mis- 
placed show of resistance to U.S. pressure, 
refused to offer other evidence delivered by the 
State Department from the U.S. Air Force. 

The false obeisance to American standards 
arose when the court was asked to admit the 
voluntary statements of the f earner chief of 
staff. General Fabian Ver. to a prior inquiry. 
Flanked by lawyers and friends, he had wel- 
comed the commission's questions. He was not 
a “suspect" and confessed no wrongdoing. But 
he did falsely deny that his forces had tracked 
Mr. Aquino's movements. He also made other 
conflicting statements that struck the board of 
inquiry as an indication of ins complicity in 
covering op a military murder plot. 

The court, citing America’s case of Miranda 
vs. Arizona and other civil liberties precedents. 


Three Ideas for Japan 


A delegation from the Japanese Diet will be 
in Washington this week, wngagmg in the usual 
careful and skillful political reconnaissance. 
The delegates will be particularly interested in 
U.S. intentions regarding trade and Japanese 
imports. These conversations follow a familiar 
pattern. The Americans dwell on the tremen- 
dous disparity between easlbonnd and west- 
bound trade between the two countries, and 
warn that truly terrible things will happen — 
an uncontrollable political reaction — if it 
continues. The Japanese, who have been hear- 
ing these same warnings continually for IS 
years, nod solemnly and go home reassured 
that nothing much has changed. 

Perhaps both the Japanese and the Ameri- 
cans can do a little better this time. The real 
concern in the United States is Japan’s failure 
to take its full share of responsibility for the 
stability of the international trading system, a 
system that is absolutely vital to Japan’s own 


prosperity. To be specific, three points: 

Fust, economic growth rates. The American 


First, economic growth rates. The American 
economy has slid into a period of low growth. 
This is a time when the other major economies 
— notably Japan's and West Germany’s — 
ought to speed up. Both are anxious about 
their internal deficits and are running in sec- 
ond gear. Both can afford to shift into high. It 
would serve their interests, and the world’s. 


Next, money. Thrift is a virtue, up to a 
point. But Japan, a nation of assiduous savers, 
is now sending its savings abroad — mainly to 
the United States — in amounts that have 
wildly skewed the exchange rates. It is time for 
the Japanese to begin investing more in their 
own country, a rich country that fails to pro- 
vide a service as basic as sewerage to most of 
its people, and leaves cherished amenities such 
as park land in extraordinarily short supply. 

Third, the Latin American debts. As a coun- 
try with enormous surpluses of capital to ex- 
port, Japan could make a historic contribution 
to Latin development. Instead of buying dol- 
lars and supportin g American overconsump- 
tion, the Japanese might more usefully buy 
pesos, cruzeiros and australs. The risks would 
be greater, but the returns to Japan and the 
world would be greater still, and not in the 
narrow financial sense alone. 

The present unbalance of world trade, with 
the gigantic Japanese surpluses and even more 
gigantic American deficits, is totally instable. 
Those surpluses and deficits cannot be sus- 
tained indefinitely. Everybody knows that. 
The strongest industrial countries have the 
largest obligations to show courage and initia- 
tive in working toward a better balance. That 
means the United States. It also means Japan. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Bold Gas-Pricing Plan 


Federal regulators propose a bold new pric- 
ing plan for natural gas that would reduce 
waste, create efficient incentives Tor produc- 
tion and save consumers SS billion a year. It is 
in everyone’s interest — except the producers, 
who stand to lose the S5 billion and are lobby- 
ing hard against it. Will Congress resist them? 

Under the current tangle of laws, a thousand 
cubic feet of natural gas can be sold to pipe- 
lines for anywhere from 78 cents to $7. Con- 
sumers do not see these wide variations on 
monthly bills because the pipelines average 
out the cost of their purchases. Still, the system 
is unfair and inefficient. 

Gas owned by one producer may sell for a 
fourth as much as another's simply because it 
was discovered five years earlier. One town 
may pay half as much as another 50 miles away 
simply because its pipeline has access to 
cheaper, regulated supplies. The inefficiency 
burdens the whole country because consumers 
with a lot of cheap "old” gas have little rea- 
son to conserve. 

The ideal reform would be modeled on the 
decontrol of oil. All price restrictions would be 
eliminated. Owners of existing price-regulated 
reserves would get a windfall and a portion or 
that would be taxed away. But Congress has 
□ever been able to legislate reforms that bene- 
fit some narural-gas producers and consumers 
at the expense of oLhers. That is why the 
administrative fix offered by the Federal Ener- 
gy Regulatory Commission is so attractive. 

Under tbe commission's plan, consumers 
would retain rights to the cheaper gas current- 
ly delivered by their pipelines. But the cost of 


additional purchases would be charged direct- 
ly to buyers rather than Mended into a com- 
posite price. To ensure that tbe market for this 
unregulated gas is competitive, local distribu- 
tion utilities and industrial consumers would 
be free to buy directly from gas producers; 
pipeline companies would be obliged to trans- 
port these direct purchases at reasonable cost. 
Consumers would thus enjoy the old bene- 
fits of price regulation plus the efficiencies 
of competitive pricing. 

The reforms would, however, be costly to 
producers, who have been able to sefi unregu- 
lated gas at very high prices to pipelines only 
because the pipelines blend it with low-priced 
supplies. Once the markets for regulated and 
unregulated gas are separated, producers of 
high-cost gas would be forced to lower prices 
for industrial customers, who could otherwise 
switch to fuel oiL 

According to Robert Leone, a Harvard Uni- 
versity economist, tbe reform would cut gas 
bills in 15 Northern states by S3 3 billion a 
year. Producers believe their total loss in reve- 
nues would be closer to S5 billion annually. 
Not surprisingly, they are working vigorously 
to block the plan in Congress. The producers' 
friends oo the Senate Energy Committee have 
written a bill to quash the commission’s plan. 
Senator Bill Bradley, a New Jersey Democrat, 
and Senator John Heinz, a Pennsylvania Re- 
publican, will Lry to save it on the Senate floor. 
They deserve support from natural-gas con- 
sumers and everyone else who cares about 
economic efficiency. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR OCT. 8 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Cortes Debates Portugal’s Status 
MADRID — The Cones reassembled [on Oct. 
6], and the situation in Portugal became tbe 
subject of discussion. Sedor Azcarate. the Re- 
publican leader, questioned the Government 
about the despatch of three Spanish cruisers to 
Lisbon and the concentration of troops on the 
Portuguese frontier, which he considers as 
contrary to neutrality, and about the forbid- 
ding of manifestations of Republican solidari- 
ty in Spain. He concluded by justifying Portu- 
gal's revolution [of Oct. 5] as being brought 
about by political corruption. Premier Jos6 
Canahgas replied that news did not permit of 
the assertion that the insurrection had tri- 
umphed. Foreign Governments, therefore, 
could not recognize the new regime. Monar- 
chical solidarity, he stated, will not engage the 
Government in adventures; Spain will respect 
the changes sanctioned by Portuguese opinion. 


1935: League Votes Sanctions on Italy 
GENEVA — Invoking for die first time Arti- 
cle 16, the famous “sanction” article, the 
Council of the League of Nations by unani- 
mous vote [on Oct. 7] found Fascist Italy guilty 
of waging war in Ethiopia in violation of its 
obligations under the Covenant and the Kel- 
logg Pact According to Artidc 16 of the Cove- 
nant, Italy, by conducting a war against Ethio- 
pia, is deemed as committing active war 
against all other members of the League, which 
are now bound to sever trade and financial 
relations with her and all intercourse between 
their nationals and Italian citizens. This was 
probably the League of Nations' greatest day. 
Acting with a promptitude that contrasted 
vividly with its delays in handling the Manchu- 
rian crisis, it established responsibility for war 
guilt by branding Italy before the whole world 
as the instigator of the present conflict. 


INTERNATIONAL herald tribune 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chatman 1958-1981 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chamm 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL AST 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

Executive Editor RENE BQNDY Deputy Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Assoade Publisher 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN Assaaau Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director ef Opmotota 
A aoaate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Directory Ciradakm 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Admadar Sales 


ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director cf Advertising Sides 
Iniertiauoaal Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Chari ra-dc-Gaullc. 92200 NemDy-sui-Sdne. 

France. Tel.: { 1) 747-1265. Tdex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 02W-8051 ~ 


Direaeur de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Ana Headquarters. 24-34 Hennessy RtL. Hons Kong TeL 5-285618. Telex 61170. 
Managing Dtr. U.K.: Raida MadOefm, 0J Long Acre. London WCL TeL 836-4801 Tela. 262009. 
Gen. Mgr. W. German: W. LouerbaA Frlabtehar. IS. 0000 FrunkfmtM. 7Z (059)726751 Tic. 416721. 
S.A. au capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Nanlene B 732021126. Commaxtan Paritdre No. 61327. 
US. cuburiptlon: S 322 yearly. Seamd<lass postage paid at Lang Island Qty. NY. 1 1 101. 
® 1985. Imermmal Herald Tribune. AO rights reserved. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 




On Testing, 
Reagan Is 
Inflexible 


held that the general should have been warned 
of his right to remain silent, and Manila’s 
Supreme Court agreed, 10 to 3, that his testi- 
mony could not be used against him. 

If they care, the Filipino jurists would dis- 
cover that DO UiL court would so construe the 
constitutional protection against forced sdf- 
m c riminati on Courts in both countries en- 
force that protection by excluding confessions 
obtained without wanting about the rights to 
legal counsel and to remain silent But it per- 
verts principle to treat General Ver like Er- 
nesto Miranda, a rape suspect grilled alone by 
Arizona police. No such warnings are required 
in America of witnesses who volunteer testi- 
mony that turns out to be damaging. 

Inexplicably, the Manila prosecutor looking 
to prove a military conspiracy then added to 
his own burden. He struggled to reject Ameri- 
can evidence strongly suggesting that the Phil- 
ippine Air Force had tracked and tried to 
intercept tbe airliner carrying Mr. Aquino to 
Manila Airport, where he was murdered. 

The prosecutor, Bernardo Fernandez, first 
com plaine d that affidavits by six American 
airmen were improperly authenticated. Then, 
instead of asking them to testify in person, he 
dismissed their evidence as indevant 

Mr. Marcos will try to hide behind these 
allegedly U.S. judicial safeguards and techni- 
calities to advance his home-grown outlawry. 
The right verdict is that his legal system, like 
bis regime, has been tried and found wanting. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


By Tom Wicker 


directly contravenes lawful obliga- 
tions the United States has underta- 
ken in two formal treaties ratified 
by the Senate. 

The preamble to the limited Test 
Ban Treaty, or LTB, clearly states 


make the ultimate judgment whether 
some specific test-oan treaty is in the 


some specific test-ban treaty is in the 
U.S. interest, and that nothing in ei- 
ther of the previous treaties could 
force ^ him to accept a test ban he 
considered disadvantageous. 

But to take the position that the 
United States will not even engage in 
good-faith negotiations to try to work 
out an acceptable test-ban treaty is, 
in effect, to argue that the national 
commitments accepted in the LTB 
and nonproliferation treaties have no 
force that the Reagan administration 
need recognize. Thai is exactly the 
administration position. 

Tbe reason usually given for oppo- 
sition to a CTB is that compliance 
with it could not be adequately veri- 
fied. The weight of scientific opinion 
is on the other side; but even if verifi- 
cation were the primary problem, 
that is a subject for negotiation — for 
seismic stations on Soviet territory, 
for instance, since Moscow agreed m 
principle to such stations during talks 
with toe. Carter administration. 

Also dted against a comprehensive 
test ban is tbe need to maintain the 
reliability of existing nuclear weap- 
ons. Again, powerful scientific opin- 
ion — outside, but to some extent 
within, the national nuclear laborato- 
ries — holds that testing is not need- 
ed to maintain reliability; but even if 
it were, deterioration would affect 
Soviet as well as U.S. stockpiles. And 
if uncertainty about weapons reliabil- 
ity resulted from a test ban, that 
might work against either ride’s risk- 
ing^ fust stnxe. 

The real reason the adminis tratio n 
opposes even negotiating for a CTB is 
its desire to continue nuclear testing 
— for Mr. Reagan’s general nrilitaiy 
buildup, for the development of new 
weapons such as the warhead for die 
submarine-1 annehed Trident D-5 
missile, and for what the president 
calls his “non-nuclear" Strategic De- 
fense Initiati ve. 

The New York Times. 




Freedom’s poll* 11 ’ 


Obligations 
In Academia * 


N EW YORK — On Oct 7, 1963, 
little more than a month before 


In little more than a month before 
his death. President John F. Kennedy 
signed the Limited Test Ban Treaty 
ending nuclear tests in the atmo- 
sphere. Observing the anniversary, a 
number of officials of the Kennedy 
administration have issued a call for 
President Reagan to Join the Soviet 
Union in its moratorium an under- 
ground nuclear testing during the last 
months of this year. 

They might as well be shouting 
down a rain barreL Mr. Reagan does 
not intend to halt U5. nuclear test- 
ing, either by temporary moratorium 
or by negotiating a comprehensive 
test ban treaty. Senior administration 
officials told Leslie Gdb and Michael 
Gordon of Tbe New York Tunes that 
at the summit meeting in November 
Mr. Reagan would inform Mikhail 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, of that 
longstanding position. 

The statement of the former Ken- 
nedy administration officials serves, 
nevertheless, as a timely, if futile, 
reminder that Mr. Rea gan ’s stance 


flo$T SCIENTISTS WT THINK 

'zrAn wps’ cah 


THfcY THiHK THiS 15 FANTASY. 



'Star Wars A Dreadful Paradox 


W ASHINGTON — Deep in the 
thicket of arguments about 


YY thicket of arguments about J 

strategic defense lurks a dreadful par- 
adox: Measures to defend population ked to attack, the 
centers from nuclear attack will in- tegic forces are 


By Alton Frye 


crease the number of weapons target- destroying each other. That 


iwers 7 stra- 
marnJy at 


ed on cities. 


means that humans would be 


program on wbat it calls the “Mos- 
cow 011010 "” — tbe requirement to 
destroy the Soviet capital 
Moreover, quite modest increases 
in d tfepso can t rigger this shift in 
targeting The installati on of a Small 
number of anti - ballistic missile inter- 


This paradox is rooted in the con- Yet it does suggest that initial attacks 
flicting demands of defense and de- would largely be directed against mil- 


By Sidney Hook 

S OUTH WARDS BORO, Ver- 
mont — Something is odd about 
the movement on US. campuses to 
oraanize opposition among scientists 
to research on President Reagan’s 
Strategic Defense Initiative. On some 
ram p uses, this opposition extends to 
all defense-related projects. 

Advocates of a no-researdi pledge 
profess strong belief in academic 
freedom. But since such freedom ex- 
ists only in a free society, it follows u 
that commitment to academic free- ▼ . 
dom f*nt n, t <; a moral obligation to 
support the defense of a free society 
threatened by a totalitarian enemy . 
Soviet scientists advocating a compa- 
rable boycott would wind up m psy- 
chiatric institutions or in Andrei Sak- 
harov’s tragic internal exile. 

_ When Nazism only indirectly 

r/f/BV threatened America, there was no 
'jmJnMw^Ar such movement among scientists In- 
deed, some leading figpres in todays 
„ , Mw movement enthusiastically partio- 

iBsthe Mos- in development of the atomic 

«ruirementto bomb after Albert Einstein persuad- 
taL . ed Franklin D. Roosevelt to antho- 

dcst increases ^ze it. Fear that Nazi scientists would 
r this _ shift m Hitler atomic weapons galva- 

ioq of a small ^ scientific community into 

; missile inter- gjjpport of defense research. 


that the parties are “seeking to 
achieve the discontinuance of all test 


achieve the discontinuance of all test 
explosions of nuclear weapons for aU 
time" and are “determined to contin- 
ue negotiations to this end." . 

In the preamble to the Nuclear 
Nonproliferation Treaty of 1968, 
subsequently submitted to the Senate 
by President Nixon, tbe LTB com- 
mitment to negotiations for an end to 
nuclear testing was specifically re- 
called and the parties restated their 
determination “to continue negotia- 
tions to this end." 

Notwithstanding those national 
commitments, honored by Presidents 
Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, 
Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter, the 
Reagan administration announced 
July 19, 1982, that it would not re- 
sume negotiations with the Soviet 
Union toward a Comprehensive Test 
Ban Treaty, or CTB. In December 
1982, Mr. Reagan ordered a U.S. vote 
against a United Nations resolution 
that all nuclear testing should be out- 
lawed; the resolution carried, 111-1, 
with 33 abstentions. 

Thus did Reagan administration 
policy override lawful national com- 
mitments, and those senior official* 
made it dear to Mr. Gclb and Mr. 
Gordon that it still does. It is true, of 
course, that Mr. Reagan is charged 
with the national security and has to 


terrence. Defense aspires to escape itary installati ons, in he 
from the condition of vulnerability mg retaliatory damag e 
imposed by modem weapons of mass ultimate hostages, 
destruction; deterrence seeks to man- But assume that defenses eventual- 
age that condition by ensuring that ly became 90 percent effective, per- 
no attacker can make himseu im- nutting only 10 percent of an at- 
mtme to reprisal These amb itions tanker’s warheads to reach their 

coexist uneasOy in both American 

and Soviet strategic programs. - 

The vision of a perfect shield ani- Better defenses 
mated President Reagan's heartfelt 
call in March 1983 American sd- nwreweaponsi 

entists to devise anti-nuclear do- nimpdntrifioe 
fenses. Advocates of the Strategic OUtwaotcmes, 

Defense Initiative, which is also valuable turseti 

known as “star wars," have acknowl- £ 

edged the unfeasdtiHty of absolute 
defense, but they argue that even less- targets. Counterforce a 
than-perfect defenses would be worth no longer be an option 
the huge cost. tary assault coaid not hi 


s of reduc- 
ties are the 


ceptors around Moscow, as permit- American scientists have pro- 
led by the 1972 ABM treaty, meant foundly influenced defense poBcy. 
that more than a few dozen warheads They successfully led opposition to a 


were assigned for possible attack on yu ibai would have entrusted devd- 


came from the superpower arsenals, pranie . when the United States en- 
woaldvew lately beamed at a nnh- £. an atomic monopoly, they in, 
tary installation — a disaster, to be th* wwammait tn propose the 


toe act that made civil authority 


Better defenses mean 
more weapons must be 
aimed at cities, the most 
valuable targets. 


targets. Counterforce attacks would 
no longer be an option; a fragmen- 
tary assault could not hope to curtail 


to cope w 
small nucli 


small nuclear powos, with accidental that it could stfll reach the other’s 
launches, and with limited Soviet most valuable targets. But since a 
strikes. Even imperfect defenses country could not be sure which 10 


would complicate Soviet attack percent of its weapons would get 
plans. Unfortunately, as attack plans through, it would nave to allocate 
become more complex and difficult, most of its weapons to those targets, 


become more complex and diffic ult, most of its weapons to those targets, 
military planners must assign a grow- name ly, the cities. In the absence of 
ing fraction of weapons to the taigets arrangements to reduce nuclear 


considered most valuable. Without weapons drastically, evolution to- 
>r«T 1tl|H l agreement to abandon deter- ward heavy defenses would not only 


rence based on retaliation, growing elicit expanded offensive deploy- 
defenses of cities surely mean in- ments, it also would force a basic 


defenses of cities surety mean in- ments, it also would force a 
creased numbers of weapons targeted shift in targeting, away from m 
on those cities. Why is this? targets ana toward the cities. weapons available to both sides? 

Contrast today’s situation with one The Soviet and American arsenals 

in which “nearly perfect defenses" would become' akin to those of Thewriter, Washington director for 
aredeployed. Currently, with offen- Fiance, Britain and China — city the Comal on Foreign Relations, 
sh*' weapons abundant and dtiesria-' busters. London bases its strategic wrotethisfirrlhe Los Angela Times. 


tary installation — a aisasier, oc t hff 

sure, but not one comparable to las- 
ing a metropolis. The reorientation in togIirRau j 
target plans drives by unconstrained eQcrKV to 
defenses would mean that an acri- wa5 1 
dent would probably involve an ur- ^ Soviet 
ban catastrophe. A defense would srientis 

have to Junction perfectly; otherwise, r _ s _ arc } 10 
having drawn fire to the city, it would milfte nvff 
be worse than worthless. toacceptc 

Several lessons emerge: UnreguJat- on j£tre 
ed strategic defense cannot cure toe ,, 

dangers of mutual deterrence; it can J" 1 ^ 

cmnpm md Uym. H* pom tiri of 
more discriminating defense — for 3n ^ 
example, in facilitating reductions in y|, af ' 
offensive forces by increasing confi- 
denoe that a smalle r a rsenal could . 
survive an attack— can only be real- 
ized if Russians and Americans can 
agree on what types of defenses are 
compatible with strategic stability. . 

President Reagan must determine 
Iww best to serve to purpose of curb- “P. 
ing the nnclear menace. Through im- 
perfect dflfgnfas that increase toe Ti n inn’ s a 
number of nuclear weapons targeted 
cm U.S. dties? Or through negotiated Hf* wit 
reductions in the number of such e£ 

weapons available to both sides? 


The writer, Washington director for 


OPEC Must Salvage Its One Success 


L ondon — opec is losin 

t teeth by tbe day. Even the 


By Jonathan Power 


dis are discounting their oil And 
the influence of tbe Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries in 
the Thud World has been dedining 
for years. Where is the OPEC that 
in the 1970s saw hsdf as a leader in 

vtdopLng countries? It cannot even 
find the will to save its me out- 
standing success — the Internation- 
al Fund for Agricultural Develop- 
ment, whose fate may be decided in 
a meeting in Rome late this month. 

In 1 974, when the quadrupling of 
oil prices announced OPEC as a 
major new actor on the world stage, 
a special session of the United Na- 
tions was convened to discuss its 
demands — a reordering of the re- 
lationship between toe industrial- 
ized countries and the Third World. 
The following year OPEC leaders 
reiterated thrix commitment. 

Yet today they have little to 
show. The promise to help fund 
other cartels has come to naught. 
Tbe talk of creating alternative de- 
velopment and financial institu- 
tions geared to Thud World needs 
has gone nowhere. OPEC practices 
have, in fact, tended to strengthen 
existing institutions. And OPEC's 
aid budgets, once generous, have 
been pruned seventy; most devel- 
oping countries have never been 
compensated for the damage done 
to them by the big ofl price rises. 


The success of OPEC aid pro- 
grams has been mitigated by the 
tangled politics of the Middle East. 
The 1967 decision to pay subsidies 
to Egypt, Syria and Jordan gradual- 
ly helped aid a period of Egyptian 
militancy against Isra el , and also 
against toe Arab monarchic^ Saudi 
Arabia in particular has managed, 
to neutralize negative attitudes to it 
by radical Arab states and move- 
ments such as Syria and the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization. 

Even so, the ofl-ridi countries 
were unable to use toe threat of an 
aid cut to dissuade Egypt from 
signing the peace treaty with Israel 
Nor have they been able to per- 
suade Syria to abandon its flllianeg 
wito toe Soviet Union, or to gain 
support for tbe Fabd plan for end- 
ing tbe Arab-IsraeH conflict 

OPEC’s development aid to Afri- 
ca and Asia has differed little in 
quality from Western aid. The 
OPEC countries have lacked tbe 
expertise to develop innovative de- 
velopment strategies geared to 
Third World needs. 

OPEC donors have had to de- 
pend on co-financing arrangements 
with the World Bank and the Euro- 
pean Development Fund to find 
efficient ways to spend their mon- 


ey. The one institution founded by 
the cartel the OPEC Fund, has not 


been particularly innovative. Only 
Kuwait's development fund has 
shown imaginati on. 

OPEC also has a thin record on 
foreign investment (Only 5 percent 
of Kuwait's foreign investment has 
been in developing countries, even 
including the Arab ones.) 

One would hope, then, that the 
OPEC countries would fight a little 
harder to save the International 
Fund for Agricultural Develop- 
ment, which came into being as a 
result of an OPEC initiative 10 
yean ago. Unique among develop- 
ment agencies, its boanl members 
come equally from developing 
countries, Western countries ana 
OPEC member nations. 

IFAD concentrates its resources 
on helping small farmers. It has 
built an enviable reputation. But 
for the last two years it has been in a 
finanra‘n1 erigjg over the petty issue 
of how much OPEC should contrib- 
ute compared with Western donors. 
Should it be 4Q percent or 42 per- 
cent? Both the united States and 
OPEC have been obdurate. 

OPEC members do have argu- 
ments for reducing the size of their 
payments — Nigeria, under the 
present fonnula, contributes more 
than Britain does. But the central 
issue remains whether OPEC, for 
once, can stand by a commitment it 
made when it was riding high 
International Herald Tribune. 

AO rig/as reserved. 


Acbeson-Lflliemhal plan. This offer, 
to sumaider the monopoly of atomic 
energy to an international authority, 
was accepted by all countries except 
toe Soviet Union. 

Scientists' pledge to refrain from 
research on the SDI, or “star wars," is 
made rtvrre puzzling hy their freedom 

to accept or dedine such research. No 
one is p r es surin g them. They are not 
required to approve of foreign policy 
or any federal defense-research pro- 
posal like everyone, they may dis- 
cuss and protest. 

What explains the difference be- 
tween the scientific community’s atti- 
tude when Germany threatened and 
today when the Soviet Umon, a more 
formidable enemy, threatens? 

Perhaps the most important rea- 
sons arc political naivete and lack of 
sophistication about the theory and 
practice of communism. Most scien- 
tists should be aware of toe Soviet 
Union's announced intention to use 
nuclear arms —a threat voiced after 
its rift with China. 

The effort to enlist scientists 
against defenseresearch is being used 
to intimidate tome willing to serve 
their government,- ; to mobilize pres- 
sure by building * efirnate of hostile 
opinion on campuses — by public 
d e nunciation, by planned protest 
marches against laboratories, by ob- 
scenely comparing decent citizens us- 
ing their talents in defense of the free 
world with Nazi scientists. Such tac- 
tics assault toe academic freedom of 
those who disagree with assessments 
of U.S. society and foreign policy. 

Not everyone in tot anti-research 
movement is a. scientist- concerned 
only with weapons’ feasibility — a 
highly technical problem where dog- 
matism is inappropriate. Participants ^ 
in cl ud e unilateral nuclear disanners ’ 


and those who mistakenly believe the 
choice is “Red or dead." 


Today, we know a great deal about 
the lethal effects of nudear weapons. 
Avoidance of war is more imperative 
than ever. The SDI seeks to lessen the 
likelihood of an aggressor’s attack 
and diminish the magnitude of devas- 
tation of its arms. 

Moreover, the Soviet Union is ac- 
celerating a similar research program. 
If Ame ri can organizers of toe freeze 
had their way, the Soviet Union 
would be tire onty country pursuing 
this goal 

To their credit, most scientists who 
have pledged not to en gage in space- 
defense efforts have protested the 
barbanc treatment of Mr. Sakharov 
other freedom-loving Soviet sci- 
entists. Why t he n do they advocate a 
policy that increases the Hkehhood of 
a world in which they themselves may 
suffer his fate — or worse? 


The writer, emeritus professor rtf 
philosophy at New York University, is 
senior research Mow at the Hoover 
Insttiutton on War, Revolution and 


Peace, at Stanford. California. He 

« ** comment to The New 
York Times. 


Under Reagan, a Dismaying Trend to 'Headlessness’ letters 


W ASHINGTON — Every day in 
every way the Reagan adminis- 
tration reminds me more of a pat- 
down administered by John L. Lewis, 
the irrepressible leader of the United 
Mine workers. It was at a critical 
turn in Ins war of secession against 
the American Federation of Labor. 
“The AFL has no head," Mr. Lewis 
rumbled in bis withering way. "Its 
neck just grew up and haired over." 

Headlessness has been a hallmark 
of Reagan administration perfor- 
mance in more than enough rec en t 
events having to do with foreign po- 
licy and national security to suggest 
that this is no series of flukes: It is a 
While House way of fife: Part of it 
has to do with squalid power strug- 
gling, compounded by ideological 
nitflocL Another part has to do with 
the keepers of the Reagan flame; At 
all cost, it must be sheltered 
Whether we are talking about big 
deals (prepanuionsforthe November 
summit meeting, or spiraling violence 
in tbe Middle cast) or relatively small 
deals (the “promotion" of the Health 
and Human Services secretary. Mar- 
garet Heckler, to toe post of ambas- 
sador to Dublin), toe pattern is toe 
same. The substance and the merits, 
not to mention toe truth of the mat- 
ter, get lost. 

“Heckler's Ouster Shows Regan’s 


By Philip Geyelin 


Power.” was the headline in the 
W ashington Post account of how the 
White House chief of staff had car- 
ried the day, as if this was a profes- 

everytbdng- What Mrs. Heckler's 
trashing showed was that Donald Re- 
gan has tbe touch of a jackhammer 
when what is called to is a dentist 
drill and novocaine. What it also did 
is cast America’s president as leading 
man in a ludicrous charade. 

“Malicious gossip," the president 
said, angrily — as if tbe gosapers 
were not the president’s nm He cer- 
tainly did not think of embassies as 
“dumping grounds" — when it had 
bets obvious for weeks that tbe 
White House was maneuvering for 
Mrs. Heckler’s removal. She had 
done “a fine job,” the president said 
happDy, but he thought “she might 
Hie a change of pact*’ True enough, 
Mrs. Heckkr, stony-faced, did look 
as if she would have given everytiang 
at that moment to be somewhere dse. 

Stffl groping, the president said 
earnestly that “we have a need for an 
ambassador, and Ireland is 
vary impatient” — as if (owing to a 
White House penchant for true- be- 
lieving pohtical appointees) there was 
not now an extrao rd inary surplus of 


competent professionals stalking 
State Dcpanment corridors. Even 
small lies need a ring erf authenticity.. 

Not sa the White House insists; if 
the pieadenfs sincerity is not self- 
evident. how to account for his ex- 
traordinary approval rating in toe 
opinion polls? It may be, as some 
political analysts say, (hat Mr. Rea- 
gan possesses a certain magic immu- 
nity from toe credibSiiy gap prob- 
lems that have confounded other 
presidents. But there is more to state- 
craft than approval in the polls. 

Co nsider toe p reliminar ies to the 
summit meeting; Mikhail Gorbachev 
is all over teteviaon, taking toe anna- 
control initiative, displaying a gift for 
smooth dissembling, for blowing 
hard and soft, for hitting the right 
European nerves in his demagoguery 
on “star wars." He did not turn the 
head of President Francois Mitter- 
rand of France, bat his command 


leaders. And his seduction of Es 
an public opinion may well pay 
alliance discord. 


in advance, announcement was mad* 
of a preliminary summit meeting of 
the seven powers that meet annually 
on economic mottos (Britain, Cana- 
da, France, Italy, Japan, toe United 
States and West Germany). Mr. Mit- 
terrand declined. That Ire may have 
welcomed a chance to dedare French 
independence for domestic political 
needs is no reason to give it to him. 

Next, the Belgians and the Dutch 
demanded to know why a full NATO 
foreign munsters* meeting was .not 
indicated in the interests of proper 
pre^ummit consultation — tbe more 

so since both are in political difficulty 
at home on the question of dmlqying 
the intermedia t e-range missiles the 
United States considers so important 
to its bargaining position m the arm g . 
control talks. The tuimimstrxtion be- 
latedly bought the idea. But why did 
toe allies have to bejz? - - 

Or consider t&e rombKM of the 
U.S. reaction to the Isradi. air strike 
in Tonutia. Can any interested party 
now say with certainty whether the 


Some UN Successes 


- the °P in *on column 
United^ Nations: 40 Years Are 
Bnou&for a Verdict* (Sept 28): 

Charies Krauthammer’s comments , 

chafing at Mr. Krauthammer's sena- 
existence for the first 

time of a true world forum. 

The United Nations represents 
nearly every nation on Earth. With 
““wwahty must come problems, 
^agreements, disorder andtoeotoer 

mesKv HUM, . 


tion is helping him along; in one 
stroke it managed to stye the Adantic- 
alliance the lode of instant disarray. 
Without troubling to tell tbe French 


condone" such acts? The second- 
day fino-taning of toe first day’s 
qUK* reflexes only made it worse, 
soaring Israel's initial delight without 
mollifying tbe Arabs' instant dismay 
Washington Past Writers Group. 


reaumeyot thon3. ^ 

SSaBsaSS 

SS£®«aass 

responses to Third 
Woriddevefopinent needs. 

MARYEUEN LOWE. 

Geneva. 


i r ';- ‘ . 




THE EUR* 


0Set't 


•a- • : j ; 

: ; • K- 


Cm 


a T* *v-' 

r*. i;.: 


•?« I- ; 




i- 5.-W 


3i V ■. : < 

- 

b'J-V-t 

r, I; : j-.i 

£ «•[ Vfi,. 

H " g’-’r* 

> r.. 

.M.Ws *- 

S K ' 




y * i-' 

k l) 


ifejSSr s 

' *.. Os- 


SiffVJT 
r£r.- . 





: . A ^ 

•r»* SJCVcr-"- < "•■Si,- 

-a|*KK : ^", 7 = v<r\ 

?5feS*SS 

I**?** 

-lmfa>_ a,-- -i- ^ »: 

; £*4«L? 

to itittrr. -.. J* V^- 

* to* rcu.:-.'?^.'^’ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 


Page 5 


■Urn ■ . -■* in,- 

torr- >.. .. 

fcar* t •*?. . ' ■■ n *c:. : 

l*c. -r ■■ Pr '4»‘* 


.Mai fa -.-=■ — 


*M»* *:■ — 
•f-i-i- • 

rycr • > r_. . 

r< J? -v* 

■tea*; ,. 

• 

fcssi&i.-. - 

TV- ^ 

;'„i. , 

-V’VT -■- 
K-^R ■ . 

fcr; . 

‘A 

•_ 

«*.CV .M . 
%ciii~f. - . . 

C5CTS-. 

»'*■* 

Kte: S 1 
%-Trr. . 
ttscM. u- 
9V> -•• -. 
*: at^rr 
JK 

i' • 

'-4 

«a fc r:-.: : 

•A’-.;. .- 
*■&?;- • . 

1 * •«*- 
«U~‘ - - 


‘ c- ..“ * 

, I ^ ' I "* , 

• '• rj Sj£.; 
!' 1 >» . '- 


..’" '^4- 
' ‘ 9: 'Tj. 


"T;* .-■' £. 




As Deadline Approaches 
On Borrowin^limit 


TTw /loortourf 

WASHINGTON - WhDe the 

government Jived without credit in 
what President Ronald Reagan 
“lied an “emergency situation," 
the Senate scheduled another at- 
tempt Monday to end a filibuster 
over a balanced budget plan that 
has stalled legislation to increase 
federal borrowing authority. 

“We have to do something,*’ said 

Senator Robert J. Dole, of Kansas, 
the majori ty leader. But there was 
no indication of a 'quick end to the 
tangle that kept the Senate in ses- 
sion over the weekend and delayed 
Mtion on increasing the national 
debt limit to more than J2 trillion. 

At the White House, Mr. Reagan 
urged a gathering of Republican 
supporters to work for passage of 
the plan to set statutory limits on 
federal budget deficits in order to 
achieve a balanced budget by 1991. 

“We’re backing what I believe 
can be a historic proposal," he 
in his fifth appeal in four days for 
the plan. “That's one proposal that 
is worth fighting for.” 

The president also complained 
that the proposal was “being held 
hostage for wrangling oyer the debt 
cei lin g, putting the federal govern- 
ment in an emergency situation. 
The business of our nation must go 


forward.* We need the debt railing 
increase passed.” 

The Reagan administration, hac 
requested an increase in the nation- 
al debtlimit from its current SI. 824 
trillion to $2,078 triDion. 

The House increased the debt 
limit on Aug. 1 as part of its budget 
outline. But a separate vote is need- 
ed in the Senate. ; 

Supporters of the balanced bud- 
get plan offered ty Senators PhD 
Gramm, Republican of Texas; 
Warren B. Rodman, Republican of 
New Hampshire, and Ernest F. 
HoUings, Democrat of South Caro- 
lina, have seized upon the debt lim- 
it legislation as a vehide to force 
action, on their proposal 

Their plan, m. effect, calls for 
annual deficit reductions of 536 
billion, bringing the deficit from its 
current annual level of $200 billion 
to zoo by the beginning of the 1991 
fiscal year on Oct 1, 1990. 

The president would have the 
power to make across-the-board 
spending cuts to meet the annual 



Two procedural votes on Sunday 

demonstrated that a majority of 
senators support the plan, but the 
votes did not achieve the two- thirds 
majority necessary to end the fili- 
buster that has brought the Senate 
to a halt. Another vote to cut off 


Israelis Kill 4 on West Bank U.S. Towns 

(Continued from Page 1) Egypt signed the Camp David TWvWTl^ 

Oman ith finn r-hfliranan Vacee-r mmiv sinvwitt wilt. Tempi vlMJov TT U 


(Continued from Page 1) 
Organization chairman, Yasser 
Arafat, in Tunis on Sunday, The 
Associated Press reported. . 

The adviser, Osama cl-Baz, who 
is also first undersecretary of 
Egypt’s Foreign Ministry, met with 
Mr. Arafat after his arrival on a. 24- 
hour visit, Pales tinian sources said. 

The visit was the first to Tunisia 
by a senior Egyptian official since. 
1979, when Tunisia broke diplo- 
matic relations, with Cairo after 

West German President 
Begins Israel Trip Today 

Ratters 

BONN — President Richard von 
Weizslcker begins Tuesday the 
first formal visit to Israel by a West 
German president since the two 
states were created neariy 40 years 
ago. 

At a briefing last week, Mr. von 
Weizslcker, who was a soldier in 
World War II and the son of a Nazi 
diplomat, said . that,“)reintenibnuice 
■wili be a major th eme ip all- meet- 
.rings” during the ..four-day -yurif. 


Egypt signori the Camp David 
peace accords with Israel 

Israel,' meanwhile, gave Egypt 
until Tuesday of this week to inves- 
tigate the killing of seven Israeli 
vacationers by an Egyptian police- 
man in the Smai and to look into 
reports that they may have died 
baa use Egyptian officials denied 
them medical aid. 

The Egyptian fired for no appar- 
,ent reason on a group of Israeli 
vacationers camped Saturday at 
Ras Burka, a scenic desert spot on 
the Gulf of Aqaba. 

In Washington, President Ron- 
ald Reagan’s narinnal security ad- 
viser. Robert C McFarlane, said 
Sunday that progress toward direct 
IsraeU-Jordaman peace negotia- 
tions could be realized within a 
month. 

In a television interview, he said 
he believed King Hussein of Jordan 
and Prime Minister Shimon Peres 
of Israel had a commitment to 
peace, which H wiD be renewed and 
can achieve sore milestones of 
jm)fei^within'am time” 1 


(Continued from Page 1) 
industry and believed that the steel 
companies would recover. So they 
tried to bridge their deficits with 
heavy borrowing. 

But interest payments on the 
loans sim ply postponed the crisis 
and drove up the budget deficits, 
officials said. Import quotas, union 
concessions to management and 
expensive modernization programs 
faded to staunch the flow of cheap- 
er, foreign sted and the mills stayed 
shut. 

Now the loans are coming due. 
With the political climate hostile to 
federal aid, h anks have cut off the 
municipalities’ lines of credit. As a 
result, many local officials say then- 
communities are near bankruptcy. 

“There’s no future, no future," 
Edward Supemovicb, a lifelong 
resident of Qairtou, told Senator 
Aden Specter, a Republican of 
Pennsylvania, who toured the area 
in September. 

“It’s a dirty rotten shame,” said ■ 
Mr. SopemovicV ^retired steel- 
worker. 1 ’ 4 


Major Issues Before U.S. Supreme Court 


By Sruarr Taylor ]r. important cases between January membership. The Associated Press 

Ne» York Tint* Semw an i ear W ul * reported.] 

WASHINGTON - Tta Sc, JJitof El £ .The won has agreed to «. 
preme Court began its new torn ^ decisions by two federal appeals 

Monday facing a long hst of poBa- .. ^ . courts striking down sure laws in 

rally charged cases.and an ag^res- Pcnnsylvania ^ mnok tha[ sei 

sive push by the Reagan adraims- S various conditions on access to 

gtehrhr«ltai<tawr- ^ od « fordoes 

■ . quotas in filling jobs, to make up ""o do not comply. 

8e^SEg,“evitiSR^?; [j^.P 351 discrimination or increase He Justice Dcpantnau cmcrcd 

StrSgious elute in sdioolTlnd «P'»*numon m Hie wotk the case m July and filed a bnef 
a force. urfflnE the court to overrule Roe vs. 


bias injury selection are among the 


rce. urging the court to ovemile Roe vs. 

The law in this area remains Wade, its 1973 derision that worn- 


Camra Fran 

Senator Ph3 Gramm 

debate was scheduled for Monday. 

Despite the government’s credit 
crunch, the government operated 
normally Monday. 

However, John J. Niehenke, act- 
ing assistant Treasury secretary for 
domestic finance, said the govern- 
ment had a cash balance of $6.2 
billion at the dose of business Fri- 
day and that this was likely to be 
exhausted Monday. 

Deputy Treasury Secretanr 
Richard G. Darman sent Mr. Dole 
a letter saying that, when the gov- 
ernment till becomes empty, *Ti is 
my understanding that, upon such 
notification, the Federal Reserve 
wiH then have to notify the banking 
system not to honor any govern- 
ment checks or electronic fund 
transfers.” 

Other officials said that checks 
already issued, such as government 
payroll and Social Security checks, 
would be honored. 


major issues that the court has , “7 T , waae, its ivn aeasura mat wom- 

aereed to consider cloudy despite four previous Su- en have a constitutional right to 

... " . , , preme Court decisions, because the abortion, as “arbitrary" and un- 

Tne admuustrauon has . filed sharply divided justices have workable. It said the court should 
bnas ur^ng the court to abandon agreed on dear rules for only a leave state legislatures free to regu- 


its precedents legalizing abortion, 

to outlaw court-ordered and gov- * 

SSffiSSfiSSS The 1985-86 ten 

and to reverse lower court findings __ 

that the rights Of blacks had been many matters Ot I 

violated in major voting and jury , 

selection cases. as any in recent y 

Meanwhile, Attorney General 

Edwin Meese 3d’s blunt critiques limited number of situations, 
of the court and its precedents have The court plans to review 
displaced the more deferential consiitutionahtv of a layoff 


The 1985-86 term could shape the law in a s 
many matters of intense ideological conflict 
as any in recent years. 


hdwin Meese 3d s blunt critiques limited number of situations. late or forbid abortion as they did 
of the court and its precedents have The court plans to review the until 1973. 
displaced the more deferential constitutionality of a layoff plan • The court was to hear argu- 
stanc e of his predecessor, William adopted by the school board in menls Monday for the first time on 
French S m it h . In Charles Fried, the Jackson, Michigan, that gives pref- whether the drawing of election 
solicitor general-designate, on erence to minority groups over districts to give one party an ad- 
leave from Harvard Law School whites with more seniority. vantage violates the Constitution 

Mr. Meese has a Supreme Court The case has implications for the and whether judges can strike 
litigator who is seen as far more constitutionality of affirmative ac- down such gerrymanders, 
amenable to the a dm i nis tration’s u on p lans by public employers all The case is an appeal by the state 
ideological banner. over the country. ' of Indiana of a decision by a special 

Mr. Meese has railed the court’s [On Monday, the court expand- three-judge federal district court 
insistence on strict govern m ental ed its study of affirmative action in validating, the stale’s Republican- 


amenable to the a dm i nis tration s u on p lans by public employers all The case is an appeal by the state 
ideological banner. over the country. ' of Indiana of a decision by a special 

Mr. Meese has railed the court’s [On Monday, the court expand- threo-judge federal district court 
insistence on strict govern m ental ed its study of affirmative action in validating, the state’s Republican- 
□eu trali ty toward religion “bi- plans by agreeing to review a quota drawn districts. 
zarre” and has denou n ced as “infa- system for promoting blacks and A Supreme Court derision find- 
mous" some 1960s precedents ex- Hispanics among Cleveland's fire- ing gerrymandering uncons titu- 
pa ndin g the rights of criminal fighters and agreeing to study tional would spawn challenges to 
defendants. court-ordered quotas for union districts all over the country and 

The court is unlikely to make the ' 

sharp departures from precedent 
that the administration seeks, how- 

^•irS d ^ d on^ U.K. Police Warn Rioters 

more justices. And none of the nine 

appear ready to retire. (Continued from Page 1) ment at the Broadwater Farm Es- 


ment at the Broadwater Farm Es- 


Nonetheless, if the number of an attack, by about 100 youths late .* a public housing 

important cases that the court has wielding machetes, knives and an project at the center of me not area, 
already accepted for review is any axe. Press Association, Bntarns do- 

i , p- ."V rtMuc miAtwi miff- 


guide, the 198S-86 term could 


. . . , mestic news agency, quoted wit- 

shape the law in as many matters of ihStte^'Sfi » tSf£ea£d 35 they badseen ring- 

intense ideological conflict *« anv “l , 771, leaders with two-wav radios and a 

5 at hospitals and 163 were treated at V an and truck loaded with garbage 
in recem years. the scene for less senous injuries. ^ fu U of bricks and nibbk being 

The nine justices span the ideo- Five were reported m senous con- ^ ^ p^ect. ! 

logical spectrum, and their deri- dition. including one officer who ^ Zn\ecu in a neigh- i 

sions m recent years aa pohucally was hit on the bead by a slab of of ^o-stoiy Victorian 


tinged issues have shifted unpre- concrete. 

dictably from slightly left to slight- Seven persons suffered shotgun 

ly right of the middle of the road. Jnriiidino two nolicemen 


row houses, W3S a nightmare for 

ly right of the middle of the road, wounds, including two policemen jj^ed 'b^'overhead walkways 
For example, decisions laid and four journalists, and one civil- which allowed rioters to throw mis- 
down in the Lerm that began two ian suffered serious stab wounds, ^ escape. 

years agp were widely seen as evi- authorities said 

dence that the justices were moving Rioting in 1981 hit 20 towns and 1ATki . r on 

toward the administration's view cities in England injured hundreds Die m Lalitomia riieop 
that religion should play a greater pf police and rioters, caused mil- United Pros International 

role in public life. But last terra the lions of dollars in damage and led SACRAMENTO, California — 
court forcefully reasserted a need to 4,000 arrests. Smoke from a grass fire blew across 

For strict separation of church and In the last month, riots have Interstate 5 highway here Sunday 
state - swept Birmingham, Liverpool and and triggered a five-minute, 33-ve- 

The justices ordinarily hear aigu- London. hide chain collision that killed 10 

ments through the end of April and Authorities said that they had persons and injured 43, officials, 

issue decisions in the term's most turned up firebomb-making equip- said. - — 


invite the kind of judicial interven- 
tion in the political process that the 
administration has deplored. 

Bui it might also shift the bal- 
ance of power nationally toward 
Republicans. So the Republican 
National Committee, hoping for a 
precedent to use against Democrat- 
ic-drawn districts in California and 
elsewhere, has come in on the side 
of the Indiana Democrats. 

• In the first major test of 1982 
amendments to the Voting Rights 
Act, the court will consider an ap- 
peal by North Carolina from a rul- 
ing that the state's 1982 redistrict- 
ing plan violated the rights of 
blacks. 

The 1982 amendments, over- 
turning a 1980 Supreme Court de- 
rision requiring plaintiffs to prove 
intentional discrimination, were 
designed to make it easier for mi- 
nority groups to w-in suits challeng- 
ing election districts. 

• The court will consider four 
cases involving religion's role in 
public life, making this the third 
consecutive term in which the jus- 
tices will play a conspicuous role in 
debate on the issue. 

One case poses the question of 
whether groups of public high 
school students should be allowed 
to conduct prayer and religious dis- 
cussions using school facilities on 
the same basis as other student 
clubs. 

• In criminal trials, both sides 
are allowed to remove a certain 
□umber of potential jurors without 
stating a reason. In a Kentucky 
case, the court will look aL a key 
issue: whether a prosecutor may 
constitutionally use these “peremp- 



Edwin Meese 3d 

tory challenges" to remove all po- 
tential jurors who are black in hope 
of improving his chance of convict- 
ing a black defendant. 

• Several other cases involve im- 
plications of the court's landmark 
1966 ruling in Miranda vs. Arizona 
thai police officers, before ques- 
tioning a suspect, must warn him or 
his rights to remain silent, and to 
have a lawyer present. 

The court has somewhat limited 
the scope of the 1966 ruling in the 
past two years, and Mr. Meese, 
who has called Miranda “an infa- 
mous derision.” is said to be con- 
sidering whether to urge the court 
to ovemile it. 

• The court will review a deci- 
sion striking down controversial 
rules that the administration issued 
in January 1984 that prevent doc- 
tors and parents from denying life- 
prolonging treatment to severelv 
handicapped newborn babies. 


TRAVELLERS REASSURED ' WATER 
IN BOMBAY SAFE TO DRINK'. 


Based on his long and intimate acquaintance wiih 
Bombay our foreign correspondent writes: 

"Of all the things that people drink in Bombay, 
water has never figured prominently. 

Most prefer Tonic in Bombay, Mar- Ejfl 
tini in Bombay or Orange in Bombay. Tum 

Indeed, anything that one would 
usually mix in Bombay. 

But. let me assure you, there 
is no need to stay clear I 

of the water. 

Those rumours • rf 

which infer that .9 

water does not mix i I 

with this most _ = jjjar __ 

distinctive of Im- r\ l . .InS tig? aw - :'8 

ported London Dry jjLty %!]* ; H 

Gins are well and j fl 

truly ill-founded. 1 ’ HM’J JVJ ‘ If 


i/J 


M 


i isS— 
..-rf. 'Sfi 





Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 


Bucharest Destroys 
Churches, Buries History 

Dynamite, Bulldozers Gear (he Path 

For a Grandiose Government Center 


By Henry Kamm 

Hew York Times Service 
BUCHAREST — More than 10 
churches, including some of his- 
torical and architectural impor- 
tance, at least three synagogues and 
many other buildings have been 
bulldozed or dynamited in' the cen- 
ter of Bucharest to make way for 
new buildings to house offices of 
the Communist Party and the Ro- 
manian government, a project or- 
dered by President Nicolae 
Ceausescu. 

Leading up to the grandiose 
buildings, there is to be a Boule- 
vard of the Victory of Socialism. 
295 feet (about 90 meters) wide 
and about a mile (.63 kilometers) 
long. Huge public buildings will 
line the thoroughfare. Monuments, 
fountains and trees will adorn iL 
“The idea of constructing a cen- 
ter for the capital, of course, be- 
longs to Comrade Ceausescu,” said 
Petre Vraciu, a chief architect at the 
dry Planning Office. “The archi- 
tecture will show the imprint of our 
period. It is an original attempt to 
represent its spirit in an architec- 
ture that is new, but also recalls the 
andent tradition of Romania." 

Mr. Vradu said he had no infor- 
mation on the identity or number 
of historical buildings that were be- 


ing demolished. The Romanian 
press has reported on the project 
without mentioning the losses it 
entails. Much of the demolition 
takes place behind newly erected 
fences and at nighL 

A reporter who was photograph- 
ing a synagogue soon to be de- 
stroyed was threatened with arrest 
by guards, told it was forbidden to 
photograph the building and was 
driven from the area. 

Resident Westerners said that 
since last year, when the scope of 
the destruction became evident, 
many Romanians had voiced to 
them their indignation on religious 
and aesthetic grounds. There have 
also been complaints of evictions 
on a day's notice of people whose 
houses were condemned. 

The decision to demolish the 
buildings was announced after 
work was under way. It was done 

without public discussion or expla- 

nation. The full scope of the project ""“churches destroyed in the 
is not known, and many say they include the Alba Postuvanu, 
fear much more destruction is to 
come. They say important architec- 
tural monuments far from the cen- 
ter are also being destroyed. 

They include the Vacaresti Mon- 
astery. an 18th-century complex 
that in the early days of commu- 
nism served as a secret-police pris- 



Social Democrats Finish First 
In Portugal but Lack Majority 


Dm NmrYvtr* 


The Malbim Synagogue in Bucharest shortly before it was to be destroyed. 


on. The 18th-century Cotroceni 
Church was razed last year. A 17th- 
century church was reported de- 
stroyed to clear a path for the well- 
known 16th-century church of the 
Mihai Voda Monastery, which is to 
be moved to its site after the demo- 
lition of its monastery buildings. 

center 

include the Alba Postuvanu, where 
the national hero Michael the 
Brave was crowned prince of Wala- 
chia in 1594; the Old and New 
Spirea Churches, the Izvorul Ta- 
maduirii Church, known for a mi- 
raculous spring, and the 18th-cen- 
tury Doran don Church. 

Particular regret was occasioned 


by the destruction of the Branco- 
van Hospital, a 19th-century neo- 
classical building on a central 
square, Piata UniriL Mr. Vradu 
said it was “of no architectural val- 
ue and insalubrious.” 

Reports of destructive remodel- 
ing of old city centers have also 
been received from the provinces. 
Some villages were reported to 
have been notified they would be 
razed to create more arable land. 

The projects, which contrast 
with a general policy of stark aus- 
terity in meeting citizens’ hacir 
needs, are ascribed by Ro manians 
and diplomats to Mr. Ceaosescn’s 
striving to place his personal stamp 


on all Romania, in what is bring 
officially called the Ceausescu Ep- 
och. Choirs, broadcasters and writ- 
ers maintain an almost Continuous 
chorus in praise of the president. 

A great variety of his books, 
bearing such titles as “Militant Sol- 
idarity With All Democratic and 
Progressive Forces for a Better and 
Juster World," fill store shelves 
otherwise poorly supplied because 
of a paper shortage. Texts of his 
speeches published in the press are 
interspersed with such posses as- 
“Strong applause and shouts of en- 
thusiasm; in long-lasting chorus 
shouts of ‘Ceausescu and the peo- 
ple!’" 


FOR CHINA TRADE 
INFORMATION 
AND FULL 

BUSINESS SERVICES 
YOU NEED 



4/F, Dominion Centre 
59A Queen's Rd. East 
Hong Kong 
Tlx: 74903 RIGGS HX 


HOTEL DU RHONE GENEVA 

A prestigious dwelling 
on the Riuer Rhone 
Next to business and 
shopping center. 

Quai Turrettim 
1201 Geneva 
Phone (0221 31 9831 
7V. 22213 hrho 

A member of HRI 
The Leading Hotels 
o/ the World 



Reagan Message Is Read at Aborted Fetuses ’ Burial 


By T.W. McGarry 

Los Angeles Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — More than 
16,000 aborted fetuses, the objects 
of a heated court battle over their 
disposal, have been buried after a 

f raveside service that included 
ymns. prayers by five clergymen, 
a supportive message from Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and a U.S. 
Marine Corps color guard. 

A three-year court battle that 
went all the way to the U.S. Su- 

E reme Court had barred Los Ange- 
5 County from conducting a reli- 
gious burial for the fetuses. The 
courts had said that to do so would 
lend the weight of a government 
body to one side of the abortion 
argument. 

County Supervisor Mike Anton- 
ovich, who took a leading role in 
the ceremony, said he did not be- 
lieve the service Sunday violated 
the court order. The county govern- 
ment did not organize the ceremo- 
ny, Mr. Antonovich said, only the 
actual buriaL 


The ceremony was organized by 
Americans Committed to Loving 
the Unwanted, an anti-abortion 
group. About 250 persons, many 
carrying placards and banners with 
anti -abortion slogans and pictures 
of dismembered fetuses, attended 
the two-hour ceremony. 

They beard a message from Mr. 
Reagan, read by Mr. Antonovich, 
which recalled the battle of Gettys- 
burg in the American Gvil War. In 
his message, Mr. Reagan compared 
the U.S. Supreme Court derisions 
le galizing abortion to pre-Gvil 
War decisions that upheld slavery. 

“Just as the terrible toll of Get- 
can be traced to a tragic 
io of a divided Supreme 
Court, so also can these deaths we 
mourn," Mr. Reagan said. 

“Once again a whole category of 
human beings has been ruled out- 
side the protection of the law by a 
court ruling which clashed with our 
deepest moral convictions. From 
these innocent dead, let us take 
increased devotion to the cause of 
restoring the rights of the unborn.” 


White crosses stood at the foot of 
each of six coffin-like wooden box- 
es containing the 16,433 fetuses. 
The three marines said they had 
been assigned the duty at the orga- 
nizers' request 

Mr. Antonovich's own com- 
ments at the service were made as a 
private citizen, not as a representa- 
tive of county government, said his 
chief deputy, Kathleen Crow. 

But the presence of Mr. Antono- 
vich, as well as Representative 
Robert K. Do man. Republican of 
California, Senator Joseph Mon- 

X a state senator, and other leg- 
os, along with the marine col- 
or guard, gave the ceremony an 
official appearance. 

“Persistence is what allowed us 
to have a resting place today for 
these little boys and little girls," 
Mr. Antonovich told the crowd. 

The fetuses were discovered in 
February 1982 in sealed plastic 
bags of formaldehyde stored in a 
steel bin outside the home of the 
former director of a medical lab- 
oratory that has since been closed. 


The A ssaamtd Press 

LISBON — Portuguese voters 
have rebuffed Prime Minister 
M&rio Soares’s Socialists in favor 
of the center-right Social Demo- 
crats in parfiamentazy elections, 
but po party has won enough seats 
to form a new government 

Chances dimmed Monday that a 
majority government would 
emerge from the elections when a 
new center-left party, which fin- 
ished third in the voting on Sunday, 
announced that it would notjoin a 
coalition with the Social Demo- 
crats. 

The Democratic Renewal Party, 
which took nearly 18 percent of the 
vote, said that it “wQl not be part of 
any government formed or under 
the direction of any other party.” 

But Democratic Renewal, 
founded four months ago by sup- 
porters of President Antimo Ra- 
malbo Eanes, indicated that it 
would “not undermine" a minority 
government if certain political con- 
ditions were met by a posable So- 
cial Democratic minority govern- 
ment. 

Those conditions reflected Dem- 
ocratic Renewal’s calls during the 
election campaign for less bicker- 
ing among parliamentary parties 
and closer cooperation among the 
presidency, the cabinet and the 
parliament. 

With all hot five of the country’s 
4,095 precincts reportin g, the So- 
cial Democratic Party won 29.8 
percent of the vote, followed by the 
Socialists with 20.4 percent. Demo- 
cratic Renewal took 1 7.9 percent of 
the vote. 

The Socialists and Social Demo- 
crats had been coalition partners in 
the government until last June, 
when the Social Democrats forced 
the election by withdrawing from 
the government. 

Returns on Monday from the 
National Election Center indicated 
that the Social Democrats would 
receive 88 seats in the 250-seat as- 
sembly, the Socialists 54, the Dem- 
ocratic Renewal Party 48, the Com- 
munists 36 and the Christian 
Democrats 20. The four remaining 
seats are filled by deputies elected 
by Portuguese living abroad. 

The Social Democrats are led by 
Anibal Cavaco SBva, 46, who said 
his party was ready to govern and 
was prepared to discuss formation 
of a coalition with “aD democratic 


gam represents an increase oTW J£! SS* 

P* 0 ®? 1 tiveto help Portugal out of its eco- 


tive elections when the party, 1 *** 
second , behind the Socialists 36 
percent 

The Socialists' 1 5.6- percent drop 

not only represented a repudiation 

of unpopular economic austerity 
measures but also a serious blow to 
the aspirations of Mr. Soares, 60, 
who has been planning to run for 
president. 

Me. Eanes, 50, a two-tenn presi- 
dent, is ineligible to seek a third 
term. The presidential election 
must be held before the end of this 
year. 

The Socialists had directed their 
campaign at winning the 43 percent 
of the vote that under law would 
have given diem a parliamentary 
majority. They had campaigned on 

their successes in bringing Portugal 

into the European Community and 
reducing inflation from 30 percent 
to 17 percent. 


live to help Portugal < 
nofnic problems. 

Ever since Portugal resumed 
democratic elections in 1976, two 
years after leftist army officers 
overthrew a 48-year rightist dicta- 
torship, no single party has been 
able to secure a nugority that 
would allow it to govern alone. 

That has resulted in unstable co- 
alitions and five parliamentary 
elections in the past nine years. 

I lira* Pires, head of the Chris- 
tian Democrats, said the emergence 
of another major party “only 
makes matters worse." 

The Democratic Renewal Party 
has hinted that when President 
Fanes leaves office he may seek to 
become prime minister. Others say 
he wQl choose to act behind the 
scenes. 


parties. 

The Social Democratic 



The laboratory routinely examined 
aborted fetuses for clinics and hos- 
pitals. 

Anti-abortion groups originally 
asked to give the fetuses bunal ser- 
vices as deceased human beings. 

The Los Angeles County district 
attorney sought court penmssian 
for the burial, but was mocked by 
suits by the Feminist Women’s 
Health Center of Los Angeles and 
the American Civil Liberties 
Union. 

The case was fought up to the 
U.S. Supreme Court, which refused 
to review a state appellate court 
finding that the county could not 
organize a burial service because it 
would “enlist the prestige and pow- 
er of the state" on the side of the 
argument that abortion is murder. 

A last appeal by the feminis t 
health center to block the burial 
was rejected Sept. 26 by the Cali- 
fornia Supreme Court. 

■ Demonstrations Increasing 

The ceremony came at a time 
when public demonstrations of 

anti-abortion sentiment are again T q - . _i ■*-» • «p» 
on the rise nationally. United Press 111 oOUttl XcIClliC 
International reported. 

In Dallas, a protest threatened 
by an anti-abortion group and a 
boycott planned by almost 90 cler- 
gymen have pressured Presbyterian 
Hospital into halting the perfor- 
mance of abortions on demand. A 
spokesman said Saturday that the 
hospital’s abortion polity has been 
suspended until the Board of Trust- 
ees can review iL 

On Friday, thousands of people 
protesting abortion marched in 
peaceful rallies outride hospitals 
across the country in protests 
aimed at forcing those institutions 
to halt abortions. 

Rallies organized by the Chris- 
tian Action Council based in Falls 
Church, Virginia, were held in Lou- 
isiana, Michigan, Virg ini a. Florida, 

Ohio, California, Tennessee, Geor- 
gia and Connecticut. 


Party’s 


French Shadow 
Greenpeace Ship 


By Penelope McMillan 

Las Angela Timer Service ■ 

LOS ANGELES — Nelson Rid- 
dle, 64, a composer and conductor 
famed for his lash arrangements of 
songs for Ella Fitzgerald, Frank 
Sinatra, LmdaRonstadt other 
ringers, Sunday of cardiac and 
kidney failure. 

Mr. Riddle was nominated five 
times for an Academy Award and 
won an Oscar in 1975 lor marie 
adaptation for the soon of the film 
“The Great Gatsby," based on the 
F. Scott Fitzgerald novel 

He also won two Grammy music 
awards, the first in 1958 for “Goss- 
Country Suite," and the second for 
Miss Ronstadfs 1983 “What’s 
New" album of richly o r chestrated 
old standards. 

Bom June 1, 1921, in Hacken- 
sack, New Jersey, Mr. Riddle start- 
ed playing the piano, but took up . 
the trombone at the age of 14. He 
played with many famous danre 
bands, including those of Jerry 
Wald, Charlie Spivak and Tommy 
Dorsey. 

He became a staff arranger fra: 
NBC in Hollywood in the late 
1940s and music director of Capitol 
Records during the 1950s. But he 
became prominent during the 
1950s from his free-lance arrang- 
ing-conducting on record sessions, 
especially for Mr. Sinatra and Nat 
(King) Cole. 

It was hiswoik with Mr. Sinatra 
that brought Mr. Riddle his great- 
est recognition. His best-known al- 


Reuten 

ABOARD THE FRENCH 
CORVETTE BALNY, South Pa- 
cific — French naval forces contin- 
ued Monday to shadow the seafar- 
ing ecologists of Greenpeace off 
France’s top-secret nuclear test rite 
in the South Pacific. 

Two days after bringing his 
197-foot (60-meter) tug Green- 
peace within 40 miles (64 kilome- 
ters) of the rite at Mururoa Atoll 
its captain, Jonathan Castle, said: 
“We’re quite happy sitting here in 
the nice trade winds off MuroroaJ 
He sounded relaxed and confi- 
dent Sunday during a two-way ra- 
dio interview Grom this French war- 
ship. 

The seaman, from Guernsey in 
the flannel IjJands, is leading a 
protest against a new series of un- 
derground tests due to begin later 
this month. He gently mocked a 
show of French naval strength 
around his ship and two accompa- 
BAHRAIN — Saudi Arabia has’ nying Greenpeace yachts, 
started screening donors and im- “There's four warships with all 
ported blood supplies for signs of the guns, missiles, Exocets and tor- 
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syn- pedoes in the world on their ride. 

1 It’s a bit funny that they're the 
frightened guys," be said. 


Saudis Test Blood for AIDS 


Reuters 


drome, the director of the Saudi 
Central Blood Bank said Monday. 


BEST WINNING CHANCES WORLDWIDE! 


Now try the Lottery with only 
80,000 Tickets awfc 

|M|i 44,900 winners Ifla 

1PF WINNING CHANCES: 1 :2 

Yes. only BO .QOO tickets p ar ticipate In the 121“ Austrian Lottery, 
bringing YOU closer to BIG WINS like these: 

1st Prize: US$ 624,000.00 
2nd Prize: US$ 312,000.00 

3rd Prize: $ 260,000.00 2 Prizes of $ 208,000.00 

2 Prizes of $ 156,000.00 2 Prizes of $ 104,000.00 

31 Prizes of $ 52,000.00 35 Prizes of $ 26,000.00 

PLUS 44,825 Other Cash Prizes up to S 15,600.00 

Total Prize Money: $ 22,089,680.00 

• Your winning chances are the beet worldwide, since one out of 
•very two tickets wins at least the cost of the ticket 

• All winnings paid out tax-free in any currency, anywhere. 

■ For your protection, the Austrian Lottery is under strict govern- 
ment control. 

Make a dale with luck! Order now, using coupon below, your 
tickets) for the 1 21“ Austrian National Lottery 
to 

PROKOPP INTERNimONflL 

the official distributor tor the Austrian National Lottery. - 


29 Mariahiifer Str. 


A-1061 Vienna, Austria. 

D Please send 

PuU tickets) BLUSS 438.00 each 

Half tickets) at US S 21 9.00 each 

Quarter tickets) at US S 109.50 each 

valid tor aH 22 Weekly Drawings of the 121* Austrian National 
Lottery beginning Nov. 1 1*. 1985. For the maBmg of afl winning 
[fits. I add US S 12 far Overseas Airmail Postage (or US S 8 within 
Europe). "*■»-— *** * ■ 

1 enclose total payment of US S .... 

with check payable to J. Prokopp. 

*•••□ Please send further information. 




Name. 


• Address 


L City/Country 

OMGRROWe 


ZIP_ 


(PIMM p«n dwrtif}. 

MAIL TODAY e WIN TOMORROWe MAIL TODS' 


(tribune 


r .§t$§Y§« 


Leaders Vow to Proh 

Economic Recovery ; 



2farl 

Tate advantage of our special rates fex new subscribers and 
weugr/eyouanextramonfoofTribsfteewithaone-yecr 
subscripfioa Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand 
price in most European countries! 

r TnSubsmpfon-Manogef, Infemafond Her dTlrib^nT" 

I T81 , avenue Charlesde-Gtwle, 92521 NeuDyCedex, France. 
Please enter my subscription for: 7«**x,rrance. 


□12mantis 
' (4-1 marsh firee) 

□ 6morrihs 
(4- 2 weeks free] 

□ 3 months 

f+ T vwwkftee) 

□ My check 
aendosed 



4 . 


Nelson Riddle, U.S. Arranger 
And Composer, Dies at 64 


h um with the singer was “I’ve Got 
You Under My Skin" in 1956. 

He also wrote the musical back- 
ground for successful television se- 
ries such as “The Untouchables" 
and “Route 66.” His theme music 
for the latter program was one of 
the first television show themes to 
be recorded and released commer- 
cially. 

■ Other deaths: 

Annie Laurie Kilpatrick, 98. who 
won the first Miss America pageant 
in 1912, Thursday in Orlando, 
Florida. 

Sergd Jaroff, 89, who left the 
Soviet Union shortly after the Rus- 
sian Revolution and was the cre- 
ator and long-time director of die 
Don Cossak Chorus of Soviet feni- 
gits, Saturday in Lakewood, New 
Jersey. 


Police Say Female Agent 
Was Slam in FBI Mix-up 

Workington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Rolan Ah- 
rens, the first female FBI agent 
killed on duty, was shot and lolled 
in Phoenix by two fellow agents 
who mistook ter for a robbery sus- 
pect’s girlfriend, the city’s police 
chiefsaid. - • 

Tlie shooting occurred Friday 
during an arrest when Miss Ahrens 
stepped into a dimly lighted pas- 
sageway with a drawn gun. Chief 
Ruben Ortega said Sunday. < 


r 

V 


4 





Ift 


fMajoj; 

: JW tfte S^o ., . 
iafed !*r . 

4*f tetet? ?,, r .^=Scgf 

s-:; 7 n>r# ' : 
^tawoniL: ci-p- ., ' ”S2i 
yftm A?t-T 
ip*rtterw a sifc ? 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TliESDAY. OCTOBER 8, 1985 


«v-T , tA 
. Mfltekl &'*ra • . •Vr^' 

ijtoeSi*-^ .- J 

. t«s* ? - ; . t 
'■■•BetSrmxr.- 

'■‘'SjSZT - 



v.-.- 

- 

. 1. 



« r -' : 

. n - % , 

rf-^. 

ft . 

. L-^i 



nx rr- 

- .. '■‘v 

1 rrJ ' 

■ 

X * “- ■ 


K kKr 

« «. r •• 

• K^a54. t 

W - 

■ ~ 



i*- 

" ■ '■ '■ iK , 


• ’ - V 


~ 

n£ t- 

~'.7~ 


7 



r 


sC 

— * 

m Wi. 

Kruijp j, 

jri 

in FBI lb 

l.x 

» — k - 

»W -T* 

r.r 



- 

- *' J 

ri* a.- 

• ' ’ ■ 


• 



*** ' 

-Z.: 


.\r~ 

' 

.. 

4 'V*- ■ 

• 


ttvisunc 


<-;k 



t*' '■-* 


r*— 


U.S. Says 
It Feared 
Overthrow of 



^ TV c Libya, 

**, Dus at 64 % 


(Continued from Page 1) 
aals said, tenskms have been Ugh. 
between Tunisia. and Libya, with 
the Libyans infiltrating armed 
agpnts into Tunisia, etpeflmg that- 
sands of Tunisian workers, 
sending its jet fighters over -Tuni- 
san territory. In retalktion, Tuni- 
sia has severed diplomatic relations 
■with Libya and ordered all Tuni- 
sians there home. 

Mr. Boorgtdba, on a trip to. 

Wa shingt on last June, sought and 
received ah assurance from Mr. 

Reagan of continuing UJt military 
support and political backing for 
Tunisia’s sovereignty and temtori- 
al integrity. 

Mr. Reagan’s statement of sup- 
port, which has been reaffirmed 
publicly several tin><*s as tendons 
have risen between Tunisia and 
Libya, was meant as a warning to 
Libya, officials say. 

ash ing t oa said it was caught 
completely by surprise by fee Israc- , 
fi air attack in which Israel's Amar- 
i can -made F-15 jets attacked 
Yasser Arafat's headquarters. - 
The adrnmigrruti CTi issued con-. 
tradictory statements about the 
raid for most of last week, first “We found ourselves in the posi- 

expressing support then -backing ti/w rif hawin g hripwri thft Timiairwus 
off. This only complicated the bl ock th#» I Jby ans fawn ranging Mg 
problems for Mr. JBcuiguiba, ad- trouble,, only to have the TsradHs 
ministration officials said. . . seemingly do- the Libyan work : for 

Initially, the White House sup- ' them,” a Whitc House official said. 

Egl*" I ^*? uac i. as Ie f fl y Tunisian officials also warned 
justified, and raid nothing about Washington^ foaHr fte Unhed 
the violation of Tunisia’s sever- 
dgnty. A White House official said 

Simday that the statement Tuesday ^mgPthave tobre^ diplomat- 
^ ^ relate even tbougtnheyneed- 

zL r!2JP? k ^’. 5“ ed Amcrican s^port against Lib- 
ya. The Tunisians also pressed at 
the Security Council far a prompt 
vote, fearing the longer the debate 
continued, the poorer their govern- 
ment would fare, U.S. officials 
said. 

The Reagan a rf in in i tf rarow be- 



Economic Horizons in Asian Pacific Are Broadening 


Larry Speaker above, 
the White House 
spokesman, .firetf 
described the Israeli . 
raid in Tunisia as legally 
justified, a comment 
d Momati in 
T unis warned could ■ 

destabffizette. 

government erf. 
President Habib 
Bonrgriba, above right, 
of State 

George P. SbAz,ii^it, 
later inodtfied the U.S. 
position. ■ 



But Robert C McFariane, Mr. 
Reagan’s national security adviser, 
said Sunday that there was no con- 
firmation that Mr. Buckley had 
been lolled. Some State Depart- 
ment officials believe that he died 
several months ago, bat they said 
they had no solid information on 
tbecase. 


(Continued from Plage 1). 
recent years among the advanced 
industrial nations. And the rising 
protectionist sentiment in Wash- 
ington is partly attributable to the 
fact that Japan and Hs East Asian 
neighbors have been so extraordi- 
narily skillful in selling ihdr goods 
and labor to American consumers 
and companies. 

The Pacific Barin is the home of 
the biggest winners in the economic 
development game. The Four Ti- 
gers are the front-runners, of 
course, but such countries as Ma- 
laysia and Thailand have also 
impressive progress. Withthc diffi- 
culties of development having been 
underlined by the experiences of 
Latin America and Africa in recent 
years, the accomplishments of the 
Pacific nations stand out all the 
more. So what is the key to their 
achievements? 

To Burnham Campbell, the chief 
economist of the Asian Develop- 
ment Bank, the answer is free en- 
terprise. “The most successful 
economies in this part of the world 

are generally the ones that have 
followed the free market model/' 
Mr. Campbell said recently in Ma- 
nila. 

This, too, is the verdict of the 
Reagan administration. Senior 
members of the administration 
louring the Pacific Basin region 
have looked about them and, well- 
satisfied, have seen their vision of 
the world confirmed — proof that 
the capitalist, free enterprise sys- 
tem has found fertile soiL 

Others see things a bit different- 
ly. “The real success stories in this 
part of the world are patterned af- 
ter Japan, not on some free market 
model,” observed Eric Nickerson, 
senior economist of Bank of Amer- 
ica's Asia division in Tokyo. 


. The troth, it seems, lies some- 
where between the generalizations. 
If the region is an endorsement for 
the marketplace, it is a qualified 
endorsement indeed. 

Generally, the most vibrant 
economics in this part of the world 
do have a bias for markets. Yet the 
belief in market forces is based on 


In essence, the pure free enter- 
prise approach is viewed as naive. 
Naohiro Amaya, one of the archi- 
tects of Japan's postwar industrial 
policy over three decades as a se- 
nior official in the Ministry of In- 
ternational Trade and Industry, 
was once asked why the bureaucra- 
cy just did not let maiket forces 


The driving force for Japan for the past 
100 years has been that we are poor. That 
was the whip that people at the top used to 
get people to make sacrifices/ 

Nobamiten K«g«m 
Economist 


prag m atism; it is viewed as an effi- 
cient mechanism for allocating 
goods and services in most cases 
but by no means alL Moreover, 
there is little ideological commit- 
mem to the free enterprise system. 
The notion, so often espoused in 
America, that individual sovereign- 
ty and democracy go hand-in-glove 
with free market capitalism does 
not have much of a following in the 
East. 

Nor does the belief that Adam 
Smith’s invisible h an d is necessar- 
ily seeking out results that are in 
the best Interests of the economy or 
the nation. Particularly in the East 
Asian economies, government in- 
tervention and regulation are pan 
of the formula. 

“We believe there should be 
some friction in the system, and we 
make no bones about it," says Ng 
Kok Song, a senior official in the 
powerful Monetary Authority of 
Singapore, the main financial regu- 
latory agency there. 


take over, cow that the Japanese 
economy was fully developed. His 
reply: “We can’t take that happy- 
go-lucky attitude.” 

And in the drive for develop- 
ment. culture counts. It is hard to 
measure, it does not fit easily into 
the development models of econo- 
mists or of experts at the interna- 
tional lending agencies, but it mat- 
ters greatly. 

Most notable are the “neo-Con- 
fucian” societies of East Asia, in- 
cluding Japan and the Four Tigers. 
Their populations are comparative- 
ly homogeneous, the work ethic 
runs deep, education is cherished 
and they have been guided at key 
stages in their development by re- 
markably corruption-free bureau- 
cracies. 

Yet there are considerable differ- 
ences in the cultural patterns in 
these countries, and their econo- 
mies tend to reflect those differ- 
ences. Those economies dominated 
by the individualistic offshore Chi- 


nese are filled with smaller, family- 
run businesses, while the commu- 
nal culture of Japan seems best at 
nurturing large corporations. 

As T.H. Lee, the president of the 
China Petroleum Co. in Taipei, put 
it: “You put three Japanese togeth- 
er, one becomes the leader and the 
other two follow him. But if you 
put three Chinese together, they 
run off in three different direc- 
tions.” 

Japan, given its level of wealth, is 
a world onto itself. In many ways it 
stands a pan from its neighbors, 
though its influence pervades the 
region, with not only its products 
seemingly everywhere, but also its 
language and culture. 

in Canberra, Australia, a taxi 
driver finds that his customer has 
lived in Japan, so the cabbie starts 
chattering away in Japanese. In 
Cebu, a favorite Philippine destina- 
tion for Japanese tourists, the chil- 
dren begging on street corners have 
teamed to make their pleas in Japa- 
nese. In Noumea, New Caledonia, 
the shop signs in the French-speak- 
ing territory are often translated 
into a second language, Japanese, 
to accommodate the honeymoon- 
ers from Tokyo. 

The Japanese are the nouveaux 
riches of Asia, if not the world. The 
roads on the California-sized archi- 
pelago are filled with shiny new 
cars. Tokyo is brimming with new 
hotels, office buildings, restaurants 
and shops. 

Amid all this prosperity, one 
anomalous attitude prevails: that 
Japan is still a poor island nation. 
Despite all the visible evidence to 
the contrary, the assumption of 
poverty remains an article of faith 
in the Japanese consciousness. 
“The driving force for Japan for the 
past 100 years has been that we are 
poor,” says Nobumitsu Kagami, 


chief economist of the Nomura In- 
vestment Management Corp. 
“That was the whip that people at 
the top used to get people to make 
sacrifices." 

The poor-island-nation mental- 
ity is more than a quaint cultural - 
eccentricity on the pan of the Japa- 
nese. It has also been an implicit 
justification for keeping Japan 
closed to foreign people and for- 
eign products. A poor island nation 
cannot afford open borders or open 
markets. 

This attitude helps to explain Ja- 
pan’s seeming intractability on 
trade matters. "Japan isn't a dosed 
market: it's a closed society,” ob- 
served Hisamichi Sawa, a Tokyo 
securities executive. 

To put thing s in focus, Japan is a 
country where consumer groups 
demonstrate in front of the U.S. 
Embassy against less costly citrus 
fruits. 

The assumption of poverty has 
been enormously beneficial to Ja- 
pan, as an energizing ethos for a 
nation with few natural resources 
that must export to survive. But. in 
many ways, the perception no long- 
er matches the reality; its result is 
to lower global economic growth 
and intensify trade frictions. 

Because japan saves so much, 
sells so much and buys so little, it is 
the target of criticism not only from 
the West but also from its Asian 
neighbors. In brief, their complaint 
is that Japan is a wealthy member 
of the club of industrialized nations 
that behaves like a cheapskate, not 
paying its dues. 

Many of Japan's leaders recog- 
nize the need for an adjustment in 
the national mind-seL 

“Now,” says Kiichi Miyazawa, a 
leader of the ruling Liberal Demo- 
cratic Party, “we must learn to be 
rich.” 


ite House spokesman, .was the 
result of hasty decukm-malting. 
“We would have been muc h better 
off if Speakes said nothing and we 
gave ourselves more time to assess 
the situation,” he said. 

Mr. Shultz, who happened to be 
in New York meeting with Arab 


* via. uu * U1UL vriiu ruau 

foreign ministers that Tuesday ™ 

morning, condemned all acts of vi- SU PP°- of W 


olence, but his remarks were rally 
made known four hours after Mr. 
Speakes bad issued his statement 
That meant that news agencies car- 
ried reports around the world of 


The While House issued a state- 
ment saying that while Israel had 
cause for the raid, such an. ad of 
violence could not be condoned. 

That night. Mr. Shultz added 


the White House backing the Israe- seraa! paragraphs to a speech in 
li attack. New York to go out of his way to 

Mr. Reagan seemed to Mr- Bqmguba and say that 

endorse the raid by ’making im- the cyde of violence in the Middle 
promptu comments condemning East had to stop. In an interview 
terrorism and saying every rmtipw Thursday, Mr. . Shultz said Israel 
had the right to attack terrorists, could have chosen other ways to 
He said he had full confidence in retaliate against terrorism than a 
Israeli intelliggnn^ t »hirh riwftnwt bombing raid on Tnxosia. 
thePLOhadorganizodthe seriesOf < And on Saturday, after the Unit 
attacks onlstradis, including the ed States abstained m-theSecupty 
slaying of three .Israeli tourists in .£pimtil, Mr. JReogan called Mr. 
Cyprus on Sept. 25. Israel has said Bourgmba *V gifted statesman” 
its raid in Tunisia was in response who was among those deserving 
to that attack. “our support and onr prayers.” 

. The initial American comments - In rate comment by a Jewish 
provoked anti-American anger in group Sunday, Kenneth J. Bialkin, 
Tunisia, and farmed rumors that chairman of ' the Conference of 
the United Stales had assisted lira- - Residents of Major American Jew- 
el in the raid. The U.S. ambassador ish. Organizations, said: 
to Tunisia, Peter Sebastian, cabled' “In faffing to support IsraeFs act 
argent messages from Tunis, of6- of sdf-defensc against PLO head- 
dais said, expressing concern that quarters in Tunis, America and 
unless the admimstranondrastical- America's detenmnatkm to resist 
ly changed hs public policy, the Arab 'terrorism have been tested 
Bomgmba government would be in and found wanting, raising grave 
trouble. .• questions about our country’s wfll- 

The jmd fn letHgencft in gness to seek OUt and punish 

afficuds in Washington said^ that thosewho attack and murder UJS. 
Libya, which had faded to “desta- citizens — among them the 250 
bilize" Tunisia in recent months, marines who died at terrorist hands 
might now be able to succeed by; in .Beirut And the latest victim of 
(along advantage of what appeared Arab terrorism, the American dip- 
to be U.S. connivance with IsraeL lomat, William Buckley.” 



PeaA-Continerital Hotels 

— a world cf great value 


w «. ■ 


,ip° 


MStoVv 


. 0 1 d#* ° ■ 



RaH-GmHmitfrf H ids 


Fommfy hter-Canlfnentai,Haltk 

, Karnchi-LAixrre-RaiualpiYKtl -Peshawar 

for Central Resewatipns please contact 
Tel: (92) .21-515021 
Telex 23617 PEARL PK 

ClubRoackKarachf-Pald^an. 

UteHInteriiato 0) 


Who gels voted time and again the world’s best airline: 

Yossine A. Abdallah, Nahid Abdcimoneun, Marcel Abiy, Mono Achermann, Peter Acheimonn, Ranee Advani. Hans Aeberhard. Albcn Aebcrh. Hangoerg Aebi. Rene Acbischcc Hugo Aellig, Hoorn Aernu Walter Aesrhbachcr. Alfred Acschinunn. Paul 
Aescfalimann, RucNadeem Ahmed. Sandca Akehatsl, Helene Akertdom,.Thonius Akers. Ezekiel Akinbayewa, Benedict Akiunjm. Hams Ahydeross, Viuorio Alberico. Esther Aleitandri. Elfnede Alexander. Thomas Alexopaukn. Kaspnr Alig. Koo 
Aiings, DotU ADen, Andreas Aflenspach, Max Alienbutger, Hamit Altinay, Ahmed .Abdel Aly. Graiielld Amadon, Dominique Amaudmz, Bernhard Ambauen. Hemncb Amberg,Zannis Ami rails, Joel Amiroao. Mojecd Amisu. Roger Ammarm. Willi 
A mm a nn , Benno Ammaon,Max Am mam. Franzitka Ammann, Huujoeig Am man n. Regula Ammeter, Silvia Amstuu. Thomas Andjus, Josef Angehrn. Marcel Ansermoz, Mhjana Antonie vie, Pius Aregger. Son ja ArikaL, Silvio Arleiti, Gudrun Aril. 
Filippo AimeB, Susanne Arndt Charles Ami, Monika Arnold. Bruno Atpagaos. Xaver Arpagaus, Ursula Aner. Josef Artho. Peter Aschwanden, Bernard Auderset Marie Audet Gottfried Auerbach, Michele Augeard. Sylvam Aruolle, Marianne 
Axelson. Abdallah Ayari, Loois Bachmann, JoserBachmann, Willy Bach m ann, Peter Bachofnec, Edgardo Badiali, Robert Badoud. Francois Badoux. Barbara Baenrunger, Thomas Baennmger.Urs Baenzigcr. Waller Baer. Anton Baeurle. Veena Bahadur, 
Peter Balmcr, Willy Bnlmer. Maria Bambergec. Fred}- Bannwan, Rqjss Alberto Barau. Daniel Barben, Hansulrich Barben. Martin Barboteo, Gam-Maria Bareli, Andrea BaronL Lucia Barros. Dolores Barms, Marune Ban, Musiafa Borea. Vinorio 
Basicheuo. Benina Bates, Dhaqju Batlhvala, Sarkis Batman! i. Heinz Baumann. Run Baumann. GortTried Baumann. Ralph Baumann. Arnold Baumann. Franz Baumann. Reinbard Baumbergec. Hermann Baumberger. Alex Baumgartner. Robert 
Baumgartner ElisabcthBaui, Darnel Bau5ch,Auguslo Bautista, Jean Bayard. Ariane Bazin, Peter Beard. Susan Christine Beanie. Hans Becker, LorenaE. Becker, Cecile Beckemtann, Robert Beeler, Thomas Beer, l_l Inch Bee tsc hen, Roland Regain, Roger 
Behr, Sigrun Below, Sona Benke, Rene Benois, Doris Benoit, Rpger Benz, Elisabeiha Beranek. Hans Peter Bcrchtold. Alexander Berger, Juerg Berger; Jose T Berger, Jan Berger. Thierry Bemachoi. Ursub Bernard. Adrian Berner, Ursula Be me r, Ulrich 
Bernhard, Gilbert Berthoud, Carmen Benomcu, Rati Bhabha, Carla Biases. M icheline Bibi, Andreas Bichse L Peter Btder, M ariu s Biegc L Eric Bielcr, Simone Bieher, Michele Bieri, Marcel Bigler, Pete r Bigler, Markus Binder, Silvia Bmz. Hansjoerg Binz. 
Thomas Birefaer; Dieter Bircher, Hanv-Uirich Birrer, Robert Birrer, Martin Bischofberger. Karl Bissig. Yvonne Bfami, Urs Blacnlcr; Patricia Blake. German Blanc, Walter B laser, Erwin Biases, Beatrice B laser. Roland Blatter. Ernst Bbttmann, Anna 
Bladmaim.Mt>iiBerrat Blazquez. CHristiane Blum. Claudia Bodenmana. Kurt Bodmer. Peter Boehlen, Paul Boem. Adrian Boeni, Horst Boeoigk. Eugen Borsch. Jakob Boesch. Mare Bocsch. Max BoKli. Felix Bohnenblusu Cbarles-Andrc Boichat Paul 
Bolling. Fritz Bollei; Anne BolOger.'AIbenBoliingei; Peter Bobs, UvaBooddttLManoBooetti.Louis Boa MeretBoag Joseph Boog, Walter Boog, Olivia Borbola, Beatrice Bom, Andre Bomand, Werner Bosshard, Andre Bo&shardi. DmaBoiros.Mohamed 
Bounaitla, Marie-Martme Boorgeois. Marie- Dominique Bourgoin. Bernhard Bouvard. Valerie Bovay. David Bowler, Gilbert Bozonet. David Braegger. Maya Braendle, Cotdub Bmendli, Annelies Braendli, Willi Brand. Kurt Brandenbeiger, Prime 
Brand aim i, Erika BrennschweiJec Ernst Braunschweiler. Irene Breiiettfellneq Cristina BreiLenmosec, Heinz Brennwaid, Roland Bresch, Chantal BrigueL, Hendrikus H. Brink. Use Brix. Danieb Broca to, Peter Brodbccfc, Sntmnc Bruand. Hermann 
Bruehlmann, Peter Bruehimann, Kuri Bmetrwilei. Franzuka A. Bmelsch, Karm-Danicb Brueisch, Werner Brun, Georgette Brunello. Anne Marie Brunn. Jacqueline Brunner. Georg Brunner, Andres Brunner, Hchti Brunner. Manfred Brunner. Elsa 
Brunner, Piero Brunnei; Werner Brupbachct, Albert Bucher, Anna Maria Bucher, Hans Bucher, Anton Bucher. Alfred Bucher. Erwin Bucbec. Erich Buchli, Zorica Buchmano. Paul Buchmann. Marie-Antoinett Buchs. Astrid-Neily Buchser. Ham 
Buecbell, Barbara Buechi, Ernst BuehL Ruben BueU. Franz Buenler, PelcrBocrki, Aibin BuerkJi. Rene Bueschi. WemerBuetikofcc. Hans-RudolfBuetikofer. Judith Buetlcr, Fridolin Buetier, Roland BueUer, Marianne Buetuker. Martha Buff. Joel Buircy. 
Janet Ann Scott Biyok. Tberese Burckhardt, Marie-Rose Bure!, Walter Buritart, Candida Burk hard. Ernst BurkJurd, Edith Boms. Adolf Businger. Gail Bullet; Henry Butter. Toni r»h ah»r Jean-Philippe Cachm, Jose Luk Cadcnas. Lisa Callaghan, 
LadisboCalvarm, Michele Cammarola, Anita Cam pile II i, Flemming Cammdt, Marie-Ange Cangiani, Sylvia Gaped et, Maryse CapelJL Aldu Cappucdo, Gerard Capron, Daisy Capt. RaTicCarali. Paulo Canlozo, Maria Cartino, Georges Canard. Josiane 
Canny. Amir Cash, Martin Caspar; Andrea Casaoi, Isabelle Cassereau. Annemarie Casiclbcrg, Roland CasteUa, Giuseppe Caslelbno, Maria Catalano, Beatrice Cattaoeo, Suzanne Cattrysse, Paul Cavallasca, Georg Cavigclli. Alfonso Ccrtudas. Miroslav 
Ccmy, GabrieUa Ccruui. Louis Chanty, Nur Chandra. Michel Cbappaz. Michelle Charlton, Joseph Che. Ruth Christen. Arts Christodouloii, Efsiaibia Christoforidis, Rosa Chukwu, Giorgio Cioccari. Jean Paul Clement. Thierry Clerc. Louis Cochard, 
MaigriT Coimbra. Susan Cottier, Boris ComazzL Carina Combremont, Antonio Comi. Rinaldo Compagnone, Gabriele Comunetti, Stefan Conrad, Loredana Constamino. Nicolas Coppex, Luis Cordoncs, Isabelle Comaz. Beatrice Comu. Alfredo 
Correia, .Alex Cortez, Bernard Cosandey, Renzo Cossettini, Fritz Cottier; Aone-Maric Couderc, Gerard Coudray. Franco Crescen. Tunothy Crowch, Iwan Csauri. Niklaus Cueni. Annin Cnjan, Rm marie D'Ambros. Marc D’Hooghe. Carmen D’Siha. 
Jacobus J. De Regl, Bgmyage De Sihra, TTziana De Stivestro. Francoise De Week, Alain Decasurd. Claudia Deliebre, Peter Degen, Matjohine Deillon, Christian Deiss, Daniel Delagoutte, Liliane Demaurex. Miron Denan, Christian Denzler, Hans 
Deogisch, Tiering Dcsam, BrigiD Desarzens, Jacques Desbafllets. Anae-Use Des meules. Marianne Desponds, Jean-Cbude Devaud, Francis Devesa, Enzo Di Salvatore, Eusuuio Diaz, Tiziana Diaz. Sarnia Dib, Friedrich DiehL Annc-Margaiethe 
Die pat, I vo Dleimdm, EU sabet h Diethelm, Hana. Dimitrov. Ernst Dinkelacker. Etienne Dirmyes, Bruno DioE, Mileiiko Djurovac, Laura Doenlas, Sahel Dolatshabi, Eugen Domeisen. Jose Dominguez, 1st dor Doncaecz, John M. Done Ion. Alfred 
DoppeDiofet; Meinrad Dormann, Ernst Doitnann, Alberto Dombiercr, Christine Douglas, Katrin Du bach. Mong Thu Dubois. Daniel Ducormmm. Peter Duersteler, Ramon Dufey, Eric Dufresne, Panagtous Du lias, Francois Dumont, Claude Durund. 
Francis Dupont, Marcel Dupre, Alain Dupuis, Jbrahtm Durgut, Karl Dumber. Dani Duschak, Hansjoerg Duller; Yves Duvemay. Hansniedi Eberie, Beal Ebersold, Peter Ecker; Paul* Pierre Eckert, Thierry Ecuyer. Stephen Edwards, Constantin 
Efiusayuis, Chantal Egc,BUusc Eggenberg, Hans Eggenberget; Simone Eggenschwilcr, Wahraut Eggenschwyler, Anton Egget; Sooja Egger, Paul Eggimorm, Mania Egbuf. Hans- Ulrich Egli, Alfred Egli, Ingeborg Egli, Bernhard Egli, Elisabeth Egloff. 
Roger EgiolI, Henrmnn Egloff. EmO Ehrat; Peter Ehrnt, Heinz EhTensbeiger. Piene Ehrler. Ueli Eichctoergcc. Hans-Rudolf Eichenbeigec, Urs Eicher; Esther Eisenegger, Erich Ekenegger, Werner^Eisenhut, Myna El Kastaui, Sophie El Sayed, Karina 


EUhmeU, Andreas Ektner, Hanspctcr Elsener, H an s E J setter, Alfred Elsenec, Katrin Emch. Richard Emge. Anastasia Eramanoutidou, Joseph Emmenegget. Bcatriz EnggisL Ru dolTEnglc r. Nicholas En tract, Hermann Eppenbctgcr, Yavuz Eras lan. Bruno 
Fib, Doris Ethardt, Fritz Ernst, Gerund Ernst, Josette Escher. Wbmer Ener. Helen Ewa. Roland Exer, Antonio Exposito. Manuel Exposiio. Christine Faeh, Lawrence Fairbrother, Doris Fajr, A drey a Fakoussa, Edith Fallegger. Joseph Familusi. Hans 
Fanthausec, Bernhard Fankhauser. Lisbeth Fan k h aus cr . Christiane FissL FnutcoisFavre, Margrh Federet; Georg Federer, Fulvio Federi, Lydia Feik. Barbara Felber, Martina Felder. Andreas Felder. Fritz Feint, Branka Ferek, Norman Fernandes. Luis 


Fernandez, Ramon Fernandez, Suduwadevage Fernando. Jose Ferreira. Gian carlo Ferrero, Claudio Fesia, Rene Fetiz, Markus Ftabase, Enrique Jose Fierro, Stephen James Finlay, Sjachrul Ftrdaus. Christina Fischer. Annclis Fischer, Peter Fischer. 
Astrid Ftsdhet; Brigitu Ftschet, Andreas Fischer; Charione Flame n-D'Assigny. Rolf Fleischnet; Anna Fleimers. Ingeborg Flessa. Rostnerie Flores. Daniel Rueck. Werner Fluceicr. Monika Fluckigcr. Prisca Flueler, Gisela Fluty, Judit FoeraoetocL 
Wemer Foemch. Rosnurie Fontana, Claude Fontana. Sylvie FonUutnaz, Antonio Fonts, Claudio Forino, Guntur Erik Forsgren, Heinz Foiaiec, Stephen Foster, Louis Fbureade, Hans Frankhausr, Michael Fraser, Kurt Frauen (elder. August Frehner, Ruth 
Frei, Jakob Fret, Juerg Frei, Rudolf Frei, Hemz Frei, Ruth Fretbutghaus, Raima Frey. Ulrich Frey. Kurt Frey. Richard Frey. Walter Frey, Hans Friedli, Ruedi Friedrich, GsbneOa Frigerio, Elveleio Frigerio. Alice Frischfcnecht. Rolf Fniz, Cesare Frost. 
Thomas Facts. Antoine Fuchs, Jem-CJaude Fuchs, Alois Fueglistaller; Ricardo Fukuhara, Charione Funke, Rene Furrer, Juetg Furrer. Susanna Furthmueller, Beatrice Gabbi, Anita Gaechter. Vincent Gaglio. Jovan Gajic. Nicolaos Galaik. Martin 
Gallati, Blaise Gullet, Evi Gslliker, Eugen GoOiker, Iain Galloway, Antonia Gamma, Angela Gannon. Ruth Ganiettbeic. Christian Gantenbein, Monika Gamncr. Fredi Gartz. Santiago Garcia. Carlos Garcia. Jose Maria Garcta-Fehc Diego Gariboldt. 
Theodores Garafailaltis, Mario Garont, Mario Gasser; Maria Gasser; Ursula Gasser; Eric Gasser; Olivier Gam. Suzanne Gaudry, Max Gautschi. Waller Gcgenschatz, Lomu Gcissbcrgcr, Eva Gcnsbueblcr, Karl Gcisser. Andreas Gerber. Beal Gcrola, 
Reinhard Geyeg Hehnutb Ginthier, Sergio Giordani, Alfonso Giordano. DlnoGiorguntonL Francine GLrud, Mare Girard. J can -Claude Girod, Thierry Giroux, Pierre Gisiget; Anton Gislcr, Elisabeth Gislet; Jean Gtvran. Karl Glatz, Kaethi Glooc. Irene 
Giutz, Niklaus Gmuendei; Christine Gnaegf. Josef G nos, Brigitte Godidek, Paul Goetti, Hans Goldinger, Fermin Gomez, Emilio Gomez. Vicente Gonel la, Guillermo Gonzales. Angeies Gonzalez. Edith Gonzalez, Gen rod Good. Orville Goonawanlena. 
Rosario Goriiet; Christian Gntber, Waller Grabaer, Waller Greeser, Thomas Graf, Rene Graf. Josef Gralak. Filippo Gramegna. Patrick Grasso. Wiliam Green. Thomas Grendelmeiet, Markus Grendelmeier. Ruth Greter, Rene Greub. Carlyle Grey. Rertc 
GrigDOln, Robert Grimm. Susanne Grindsted, Rosemarie Groebli, Kurt Grotimund, Rene Gras jean, Rose-Marie Gmsjean. Thomas Grass, Juerg Gross, Daniel Gross, Roland Grossenbachei; Hansjoerg Grotzec, Silvia Grubenmana Ludwig Gruca, 
Hedwjg Gtumter, Gallus Goblet; Doioa Gucu. Joergen Guenther; Adrien Guerra, Joao Antonio Gue metro, Beatrice Gugelmann, Then Guggec. Suzanne Guggisbeig. Jean-Mare Guiliet, Peter Guillod, Vhlentm Gqjan. Dieier Guldencr, Michael Gubar, 
Joachim Gusek, Madeleine Gut, Beatrice Gulhauset; Robert Gutmann, Mariana Gygsx. Urs Gygcr. Ralph Gysel, Michel Gyslmg. Peter Haas, Jean-Marc Habegger. Urs Habenhuer. Reto Haeberli. Vreni Hacberlin, Kurt Haechlcr. Verena Haegi, Kun 
Haentmerle, ABtcnHacmmerli, Kurt Haenggi, Walter HacnL Viktor Hacnsenbcigct; David Haem, Erich Haenner, Hansncli Haessrg, Hemz Haeusler, LQianc Haeusler, Juan Hal'ner, Alexander Hagen, Kaspar Hapnann. Urs Hake, Javed Halai, Fritz 
Haldi, Eduard Haller; Annoncmta Haller, Kurt Haiser, Heidi Haltinec, Marcel Haldnnet; Christine Hamersky, Franklin Hamilton. Thomas Handlosec. Sandra- Mar Handschin. Rudl Hanemann. Harry Hanselmann. Lissi Hansen, DeUef Harder. John 
Harper, Max Held, Markus Heim, Thomas Henzi, Tomas Heppter, Sihria Hermann, Mane Hernandez. Gabriela Hen; Kurt Hcrren. Srefan HerriL Friedrich Hcrnmum. .Anton Herrmann, WiUy Herscovrci, Ham-Peter Herzog, Re in hold Herzog. Daniele 
Hese, Fred Hess, Heinz Hochensr; Alfred Hoenigscfamid. Hans Hoeppti. Ruth Hofer, Harts-Peter Hofer, Mcdard Hoffstetter, Susanne Hofmann. Elisabeth Hofmann, Thomas Hofmann, Jaroslava Holan, Arthur Holliger. Ench Homberger. Esther 
Hombeiget, Christoph Honegger. Doris Honmer, Hugo Horbec, Pia Hory, Marline Hosdam. Peter Horz, Mario Hubeli, Rolf Huber, Ernst Huber, Arnold Huber. Erwin Huber; Alois Huber, Richard Huber, WjUcrHubcr, Ulrich Huber, HanspctcrHubcr, 
Andreas Huck, Gabriele Huebner, Heinz Hulscbmid, Johnny Hug, Peter Hug. Rudolf Hug. Agnes Huggler. Alois Humor. Peter H umbel. Daniel HumJer. Do ro thee Humpcrt, Elisabeth Humphreys. Samuel Hunziker. Konrad Hunziker. Hans-Joerg 
Hunziket, Peter Himziker, Marie-Fraocohe Hunziker, RolfHupfer, Juerg Hu rtet. Ms nine Hus son, Gencvrevr Hu tier, Clemens Huysmans, Lydie Hyjazi. Francis Ibeh, El Debdah Ibrahim, Salcfa Ibrahim-Mohamed, Heinrich Ilg, Peter Ilg, Martin Imfdd. 
Rosmarie 1mm. Joseph In Albon, Erika lndermaur, Alfred Inbelder; Mieko Inoue, HeDe Irgeas. Waller Isaak. Hans-Rudolf Isch, Werner IseLin. Satomi Is hi da. Mounlr lskandac, Brunhilde Islet; Repine Isoz, Andreas lien, Marlies lien. Rebecca lien, Heidi 
Iversen, Shankar lyet; Margrite Iz, Laslo Jabkutkay, Christian Jacomel, Lisekme Jaeger, Joerg Jaeggin, Rolf Jjermann. Ernst Jakob, Re rate Jakob, Jens Jakobsen, Sokrates Jakovidis, Nicole Jaquerod, Robert Jaques. Walter Jenni. Gilbert Jenny, Edgar 
Jeronimo, Horst Jerosch, Beatrice Jcuncbomme, Arnold Joe hr. Peter JoggL Nicholas Johnson, Dons Jobo. Jennifer Jones. Jean Jorat, Francois Joris. Thomas Josi, Paul lost, Peter Jost, Christina Jost, ELiane Jost, Charles JoBcrand, Zahrko Jovanovic, 
Cedomir Jovfc, Denis JugeL Manuel JuncaL Walter Jtm, B lan La Jussel, Jo serine Jutzelec. Manuel Kadakshamanu Ernst Kacch. Max Kacgi. Waller Kaetin, Berta Kuelin. Malhilde Kaempf. Meric Kaempfen. Hans Kaeser, Anton Kaiser. Paruyrous 
Kalopesas, Hans Kaitenboch, Rene Kammennann, Soonie Kandawalla, Juerg Kappeler, Guenther Kappler, Sebastian Kari, Beatrice Karlen, Bernard Karrer. Hansrudotf Kaspai; Daniel Kaspar, Lotti Kauftrunn, Beat Kaufman n,Feliciias Kaufmann. 
Badruddin K a ra. Michael Kazis. Andreas Kces, Isabelle KebL Maria KeUenbergei; Daniels Keller. Thomas KeHec Peter Keller, Heinz Keller; Francois Keller; Hans Keller. Judith Keller; Verena Keller. Daniel Kelly, Ruth Kermanshahu Georgine Kent, 
Vtarenj Kern, Sissy Kent, Josef K c ssc lrin g, Peter Kessler; Robert Kessler, Martin Kessler. Stuart Kennet; Marie Yvonne Khabk, Noshir Khamhana, Haider Khan, Marie-CUude Khedoud, Simon Karl Khosla. Jabra KJioury. Paul Kiefer, Catherine 
Kienet Lotto Kilchenmann. Jovine Krone, Thomas Kipfet, Steve Kinn, Joachim Kinoes, Kishcn KirpolanL Sabine Kitsch. Marpret- Maria Kissow, NeDy Kistler, HanvJueig KJaiber. Christos Kiapsis. Franz Klarer. Harts Klaucnbocsch. Franciska 
Klein, Anion Kite bet, Wtitraut KoeDnuim, Jeao-Ctande Koenig. Markus Koenig. Pius Koepfli, Jack Koflet; Kun Kohler; Elizabeth Kohler, Franz Kofalrass, Helen Kois, Jean-Paul Kolara, Roland Koller, Bruno Roller, Hanspeier Koller; Rena it- 
Kotymvanos, Theresia Korb. Janos Kovac, Franz Kovacs, Gen Kraft, Bruno Kramer. Andre Krauss, Rolf Krebser. Thomas Kreis, Adolf Kroem, Peter Krone fibers, Detief Krueger, Silvia Krueger, LuborKrulis. Maria Krznar. Nesenka Krznar. Charles 
Rubier, Marianne Kueng, Susann Kueng, Sylvie Kuenzi, Rudolf Kucnzler, Meinrad Kuenzli, Rolf Kuemet, Matthias Kuhn. Herbert Kuhn. Urs Kuhn. Hans Joerg Kuhn. Peter Kuhn, Deomuih J. Kublunga. Max KuIL, Peter Kummcr. Bernhard 
Kuntmer, Hanriuerg Kummet, Andie.Kummcr, Juerg Kunz, Alfred Kunz, Christoph Kunz. Marius KurigeqTakako Kurihara, Andreas Kurmann, Renee Kurtbclen, Mira Kuster, Lawrence Kwok, Conado La Fauci. Step hone Lncassagne. Franz Lackner. 
Peter Laatanch,SannnBLnlaoni, Dimitri Lanzetti,PctcrLamnanii.DeWuig Lou, Fred Lauih. Kim LeDuy.Jean-ChrlLe Grand. Art Lee. Daniel Lehmann, Heinrich Lehner, Chris tine Leibundgut, Markus Leimgruber, Gertrud Lcmp.RiutLengwiler, 
Mkssil Lerinsky, Kari Leu, Pad Leo, Heinz Lcuenberger; Hansjoerg Leuenberger. Hung-Wai Leung, Slepban Leonig. Pierre Levrot, Alain Levry. Jan Liby. Margrii Lienert, Alfred Lienhard. Eva Lindstrand. Andres Llambias, Caroline Locher, Doris 
Loetscbez, Daniel Loewensberg, Michele Loiudice, Maria Andrea Lopez, Maueo Lorino, Maurice Lovis, Eduardo Lubanzadio, Guy Ludwig, Joianda Lu etcher. Franztska Luescher, Marcel Lueihi. Barbara LuethJ, Hans Lirethi. Emile Lueihy. Belinda 
LnfL Maynard Lusambili, Matthias Luihen Anne Layer. Arthur Maag. Quo Maag. Chandamb Macaronopoulos. Meinrad Maechter, Wendelin Mae drier. Hans-Ueli Maedec, Manuel MaerfcJin, Gerard Magariello, Raphael Maiga. Remy Mai re. Yvette 
Main, Maria Maizi, Sandra Makein, David MaJus. Javed Khan Malik. Giuseppe Man gia capra, Ursina Mani, Rene Manz, Anna-Maria Manzancro, Kwok Fee Mao, Hans March hrwitz. Abraham Merck, Raymond MarkowsLi, Hans Markwalder, Oskar 
Markwalder; Juergen Marti, Paul Marti, Rrne Martin, Cbrbtoph Marttn. Mans Maninelli, Jorge Martinez. An to nio Martinez, Paul Marty. Kim Maraer.Joseline Mascheroui. Patrizia Masciarelli, Ronald Masereeuw. Danielle Maspoh, Ursula MasshanL 
Ana Matakovic. Roland Maibieu. Andreas Mothioudakis, Leo Matins, Marion Mathys. Brigitte Mathys. Mato Matos. Heinz Manet; Matgrith Matdi, Heinrich Maurer, Hans-LUnch Maurer. Roland Maurer, William Mawliioney, Hossam El Dine Mazhar, 
Stcfiuto Mazzola. Franz Mazzooa. Ian Me PhaiL Raymond McCann, Paul McCutcheoa, Jacqueline McGowan. James McPeake, Jelly Medina, Wolfgang Meerkamp, Brigitte Meertamp. Thomas Megido-Gureia. Michel Mehltreucr, Erwin Mchn. Roland 
Mdenberg, Daniel Meiec Wbmer Meier. Esther Meieq Georg Merer; JosefMeiei; Bruno Meier; Kun Meier. Gertrud Meier. Susanne Meier, Christian Meier. Roger Meier. Alfred Meiet Franz Meier. Verena Meiec Gerhard Meierhofer. Haruueli MeriL 
Kun MeiH, Hans Meister, MargritMeli. Vroni MelL Rufus Mendin, Melina Meaezes, Sigrid MengeL Margrii Menzi. Pierre -And re Mereerau Stephan Merkii, Lucette Mermoud. Christoph Messer li.Csaba M ester. Barbara Meuenleiiet Kurt Metticr. 
Marianne Metz, Roger Metz eocc, Marianne Meyer; Foier Stefan Meyer; Juerg Meyer; Nicole Meylan, Maryse Mezerghes, Georgios MichaOovic, Stefan Michel. Walter Michel, Urs MicbeL Joseph MkheDod. Claudio Michelucd, Jcan-Mzrccl Michonci, 
Erika Mierech, Josiane Mk asset. Gaylord MDckelson. Michele Millioud, Hitts -Peter Milhscbeq Not Minor, Robert Minder. Theresia Minder, Peter Mtschler, Therese Moegli. Phedro Mogoje, Andrew Mokqadi, Rached Mokrani, Claude Mollet, 
Terrance Monahan, Nicole Monay-Michaud, Francois Monnier, Fred Monnier. Aldo Monianari, Ruben Montandon, Michael Mooij. Eupen- Elias Moor, Thomas Moot. Rolf Morach, Maria Moreno, Emil Morf. Chariy Morisod, Ingrid Morrone, Irma 
Moser; Beat Mosec, Oswald Moser; Efisabelh Moaimson. Hanm Mosunann, Katherine Motti. Patrice Mourey, Gisela Mpare, Markus Muecke. Bernhard Mueggler; Angelika Muehlberger, Peter Muehlebach, Ueli Mueller, Erhard Mueller. Marthy 
Mueller; Anita Muetkc, Robert Mueller; Andreas M. Mueller; Theophil Mueller, Hans Mueller, Charles Mueller; Max Mueller; Rudolf Mueller, WenrerMuellei; Hans pelerMueller. Konrad Mueller, Albert Mueller, Margrith Mueller, Jacqueline Mueller. 
Erfcki MncDot; Ernst Mueller, BemhanJ Mueller, Renate Mueller-HeDwig. Marie- Lau re Muniz. Maki Murano. Arthur Muri, Kathleen Murphy, Carina Mu eerier, Anthony Mwaniki. Guity Myers. Anna Nachu Teresa Nodal. Isidro Nodal Akihiko 
Nakamura. Tomotaka Naitnsuka. Robert John Nosh, Trudy Naueq Mechthilde NebeL Emmy Neff, Josiane Negron, Danielle Neuhardt. Jiri NepustiL Susanne Neukom, Sandra Neukomm, Anne-France Nguyen, Magda-Habib Nicolas. Wemer 
Niederberge t,Thomas Nieihammet; Harry Nieuvriaods. Georges Nigg. Esther N iggE. MikiNishimura, Patrick Noculi. Omar NotaL Mercia Nogueira, Ziba Noorbakhsh. Daniel Notter. Inge Nuernberg, Beatrice Nussbaumcr. Horry Nussberger. Christer 
Nygard, Patrick Obertrolzer, KunOberholzet, Btandine Obeifi, Regma Odermact, Daniel Oeggerii, Margrii Oehmchen, Kathrm Orschgei; AdolT Oeschget; Kon DenerU, Angelika Oeyn hausen. Marin Ogg, Sabiu Olanrewaju, Hermogcnes Oliveros. 
Martin Olloz, Sunday Ayodele Oni, Beat OicIL Catherine Orelli Moactr Antonio Orosco, Birgit Ostwald, Marie-Louise Oil Felix On. Roland On, Mkhel Pahud, Jose Palma, Antonio Palma. William Palmer. Mario Palmieri, Marcelui Panchaud. Hee 
Chung Pang, Rqjkumar Paqjwani. Guillermo Panzer, GBkeria Papayorgioglu, Viviane PardeUec, Richard Parfio, Catherine Parisod. Abdul Parkar. Francisco Parra- Lobo, Corinnc Pascal, Edmir Paschoeno, Leopold Posileimer, Myriam Pategay, Jean- 
Marie Patty. Carlo Pedruzzini. Piero PedracchL Alain PeHeianu An dree Fkloso, Anton Penal va. Lydia Pereira. Maria Rosa Perez, Candida Perez, Francises Perez. Miguel Perez, Monica Perirti. Marianne Perreu Alain Perrin. Raymond Perroud. Rita 
Pesavcrao, Fianziska Pe teamen n. Sven Petersen, ChanuJ Peth. Biljana Petkovic. Paictotn Pemyce, Francesco Petrmaio, Leonardo Pezzano, Emst-Wemer PfcllTer. Kun Pfenninger, Jean Pfiner, Robert Pfister, Walter Pfistcr.Chnsuuie Picren. Mauro 
Pieigtridi, Roger PiOet, Guenter Pin hale, Adolf Plrchm user. Albert Planzec, Rolf Ptaanec, Yvette Planner. Guy Piets, Cynthia Pocali, NauzerPocha, Paul Poellinger. Mark Polling. Giuseppe Ponao. Ma tilde Ponzio. Franz Ponmann, Sywert POstutna, 

, Patricia Pousaz, Michele Pootot, Fkancis Pow. Juan Prades. Walter Pranti, Robert Praznik, Kun Preisig, Mohan Pritiiwani, Georgia Psiroukis. Andromachis Psychas, Joerg PufahL, Arthur Puorger, Jakob PuischeL Kusthc QueL Tanq Qureshi, Abdul 
Qurestu, MDos Radqievic. Peter Paieber, Panoyotis RaAopoulos, Ursula Rahn. Mttjana Raicevic. Peter Rajesh. Rajko Rajic. Nihal Ramadan. Peter Ratnel. Llsetta RamellL Buqor Randena. Lisbeth Rasu Manfred Rave, Peter Reber. Yvonne RechsteineL 
Jaroslava RedUch, Peter William Reeve. Mortis ReglL Isabella Reguia. Orlando Regusci. Walter Reich. Injtnd Reich. Christine Rej drier. Margaret Reilly, Marlies Reinhard. Karl ReisnchcL Wemer Reiser. Ernst Reisec. Wemer Re n tsc h. Armin Rcpiy.Marc 
Repond, Elisabeth Revai, Felix Reynaud. ManNo Rezzonkro. Nicole Rhein. Anton Riaisch.5oqJa RJem. Daniel RJesen. Corinne Rietmsnn. Trudi Rieue, Teodora Riezu. Claude RigoJL Francesco Rinaldi. Ench RmdJubacher. Flonan Rlsch. Rene Robert. 
Horst Erich Robitzkrti, Erwin RodeL, Felix Rodcl, Robert Charles Rodonski, Leslie Rodngues. Jose Rodriguez, Claudio Rodriguez, Consudo Rodriguez, Eduard Roelli, Eugen Roesli, Rudolf Roetterer, Beat Rohrbach, Wemer Rohrec, Andja Rokavec. 
Antnoki Roman, Patrick Ronchietlo, Elfricde Rontzai, Antonio Rosa. Jao Rosival, Alessandra Rossi, Julius Rossi. Ernst Rossi. Max Rouch, Sibio Roth. Max Roth, Robert Rothmund, FranzisLa Ruch. Esther Rudrn. Rudoir Rueegg. Harald Ruegg. Andre 
Ruegg. Jean-Jeques Ruegg, FriaRuembeli, Juetg Rue tsc h. Margrii Rue Isch i, Tony Rnettimann, Fllho Carlos Ruiz. Supom Rungniangroj. Bhgitu Rusch. Vittorio Rusdtto, Jean- Paul Rusiilon. Gerard Ruth, Esther Ruiz. Peier RyfTel, Hansniedi RyffcL 
Ruth Rysec, Ms tilde Si boles, Romeo SaganJc, Georges Sahyoun, Herbert Sailer. Juracy Sal*. Ahmed Salih. Mart Salatiie. Zamir Salman. Sonbol Salmassi. Michael Salraino. Rene SamL Diaz Andre Sanchez. SedarSantosa. Pedro Sarbosa. Petra Soridis, 
Roland SorietiL MaricJosec Savoy, Maya Saxer, Mervat Sayam. Alfred Schaedeli, Albert Schaefb, Claudia SchaeqRodoirScluer.Gerold Schaerer, Kun Sehaerti, Bernhard Schaeuble. Paul Schallcr. Raphael Schaller. Markus Sc bar. Erich Schuetz. Ernst 
Schuctz, Juerg Schubmacher, Marcel Schuhwcrfc. Franz Schunacbci. Hansjoe® Schumachct Heinz Schuppis^r, Ernst Sdnuppli, Heinz Schunet; Chnstianc Schwab, Hilda Schwager, Otto Schwarzer, Benina Schtveizer, Doris Schweizer, Max 
Schweizer, Wemer Schwendetser, Ruth Sch witter. Erwin Schwizer; Iris SchwtdL Anneliese SchwyleL Paola Scipkme, Cresccnzo Scmnnach, Gabrielle Sedleger. Malta Abdel Rahm Seif, Theo Senn, Emanuel Senn. Sema Sc may, Lucia Serena. Valeria 
SeriolL Mario Sfom, Prarqil Sh anker. Rajesh Sharma, Mubarak Ahmed Sheikh, Tbi Annabella Shin. MarieBese Shoaubu Steven Siakos. Priscilla SibugodL Werner Sutler, Anton Siebec. Remi Sieber, Walter Sicber. Hans-Peter Siegentitakr. Bruno 
Skffmtbaiei; Wolfgang Siegfried, PjotrStemaszko, Urs Sics, Jakob signet, Henri Sigriji, Waller Sigrist, Vroni Slgrist, Manuel Simon, Ingrid Slmoonin, Madeleine SimonyL Heinrich Singer. Marian Singer, Serge Siristn. Martin Sixt, Jon HouM-elmgSIob. 
GovertSlob, Andre Snow. Ahayomi Sode, Charles SodjL Simon SocmuL Moritz Soiand. Fausu Solari. Kun So Wed holt Sam irSolunan. Angelika Sontheimei; Ramon Soto, Victor Sousa. Manuel Souio. UnSpaeiig. Hansniedi Spahnq Marcel Spahr. 
Virginia Spencer-Smith. Daniel Spescha, Susy Spichllg, Martin Spies?. Michael SpiUeq Hansrudotf Spin n Ice RolTSpirtg. Roland Spilleler. Axel Spreter. Marcel Sprunger, Albert Spycher. Thomas Spycher, La-lad 5ripraduL Douwe W. Sinai. Annegrci 
StadehtifliD, BrigiuShullei; Marius Sueheli, Erich Suehli, Esther SiaehlL Christian Sahel, Heinz SiahcL Theo Soklei; Giovanni Stallone, RudolfSlaub, Fritz Siauh, Brigitre-Martha Slaub. Hans Status. Thomas Stcfaninr. Juerg SicfTen,MaitanneSti:lIcn. 
Herbert Stokes, Agnes Stoll, Emil Stofl. Jakob Stoll, Susanne Siolz, Francis S louder, Marc Srratun, KurtStrasser, Jakob Suaub, Ruth Strebel, Charles Streich, Hanspeier Suet t, Christine Sire it, Monika Streuit. Maty Stuart. Ivan Stube(j. Hans Stocker, Urs 
Stucki, Writer Stucki, Irene Studeq CturioOe Studer; EmstSUidei; Peter Sendee; Daniele Stucdeli. Melchior Stuedlein. Kari Stueizinger, Robert Stuessi. Daniel Stulz. Armin Stuez, Bruno Seyger. RudoirSulzer, Martyse Suntcr, Waller Surber, Rolf Surber. 
Gabi Surenraan, Malalckal Suresh. KurtSutei; Bnmo Suneq Hans-Rudolf Sutler. Alfred Suiter, Orasri Suvachananonda, T. V. Swaminathan. Brian John Swifl. Olga Taloti. Junto Tanaka. Yew Fci Fred Tang. Alain Tanner. Victoria Tamda. Marc Tcuscher. 
Heinrich T^etgd. Jean ThibaulL Theodor Thomas, Verena Thom men. Kara pan Thusy an Ui Jcume r, Paul ThUL Regina Valadnrcs. Ronald \Sn Rossum, Carmen \tngas, Aram \hman. Bruno X'bsia. Ingrid Vcdcnbrant, Heinnch Veneiz, Ursula Venom 
Mario VerganJ, Eric^ Vfen efwy, Erich Micha Vifeerahofei; Barbara Villa, YGuijarro Rita VlBilba, Enrique Vinci. AlTred Vio la, Ursula Ybegclin. Ulrich^ Vortuirger, Jean-ManrMiille,Chrtstine%iHe.LionclMilIiez.RobbenWijg<.ThcreseWabcr.Rayinond 
Wehrii. Omar Weibel, PelronelU Weideli, wflfried Wtilcn orann. Mauro Weingan, Vreni Weinmann, Marc Weiss, Martin Weisskopf, Mart is Weliert, waiter Wenger, Peter Weiik, Arthur Wenzel, Juarg-Eugen Wemer, Jean-Piene Werro, Rudolf Wenh, 
Bernard Wettstein, Walter Weyerma on. Bandy Whiting, Felix Wick. Franz Wicki, Hans Wicki, Susanne WidJer, Sybille Widmcr, Peter Widrig, Halts Wiederbehr, Wemer Wieset Paul Wiesli, Peter Wicsner, Ursula Wiggcr, Heinz Wiki, Dominique 
WBlemin. Hodges Wi Earns, Alfred Wlnktor, Patricia Winslow, Renate WpL JoscrWinh. Kun Wire, Toni Wire, Daniels Win. Juerg Witschi, Horu Wltrwe^ Joachim WoUT. Barbara WoHram, Franz Wranbek, Karl Wucrsth. Hermann WuesL Philippe 
WUetinich. Peter Wucthrich. Rene Wuethrich, l mi Wulischleger. Hans Wj-ss. Rosemarie Wyss, Maya Wyss. Theodor Wyss. Rene Wyss. Kaviu Yadav. Auuko Yamaguchi, Yultio Yomashita. Atsuko Yano. Mohammad Yaseen, Kuniima Yuvanakom, 
MarBs yarf i W einer Zahnd, Fransislca Tat, Georgette Zakhary, Armin Zangget, Fritz Zangger, Monica Zarun, Paul Alfred Zarb, Madeleine Zbinden, Charles Zbinden, Wemer Zbinden. Waller Zchnder, Juerg Zehnder. Alfred Zeindler, Juerg 
Zellweger, Trudy Zubhu, Rene Zueifc, Josef Zueget, WaKer Zuegcr, Max Zue relief. Mzriies ZuesL Ruedi ZumhaclL Trudi ZumbuehL Max Zuuuteg. Josef Zumsteg. Brigitte Zumstein, Verena Zurosiein, Urri Zwciftl, Daniel Zwick, Hans Zwicly. 

Lack of space means we can only show you here a representative tenth out of a present 
total of 17,958 prizewinners honored with award after award by the passengers and professional 
organizations since 1976. The reason why all our employees have earned these awards is that, year 
after year, they put themselves out to ensure our guests and customers feel well looked 
after by Swissair. swissair^ 





Page 8 


ENTERiSATIOrVAX. HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 


r 


i 


ARTS /LEISURE 


A Mink DeVille Monologue 


By Michael Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

F | AR1S — With his emphasis on 
sartorial style, historical purity 
and romantic themes, be has been 
called “the Lancelot of rhythm and 
blues," “the Prince Valiant of 
rock” and “End Flynn with a gui- 
tar." 

Willy DeVille, leader of Mink 
DeVDle (“We thought the name up 
stoned one night"), was “one of 
those kids you used to see shivering 
on stoops in Alphabet Gty, over by 
Avenue C, 'the Far East,' the junk- 
ies called it" 

His New York inflection ap- 
proaches a foreign accent. “Actual- 
ly I was born in Stamford, Con- 
necticut, when it was still a factory 
town, 1 950. My mother worked in a 
factory. My hair bad a ducktail in 
back, 1 was a greaser. Everybody 
gave me a hard time in school. I 
went to bed with a transistor radio 
under my pillow. 

“Then the factories began to 
close. You couldn't go downtown 
and stand around in from of a 


record store and look greasy any 
more. These 'Rah Rahs’ moved in, 
rich kids in the suburbs. I started 
smoking dope and hanging out 
with kids who would run away to 


I woke up with his hand on my 


the Village on weekends. My father 


kept telling me. ‘You’ll never 
amount to anything.' My father 
was an Archie Bunker meathead. 

“There was a big scene in Wool- 
worth's parking lot. Me screaming 
at my mother, her trying to pull me 
back in the car. me running 
through back yards. I went down- 
town to Atlantic Street and then 
down the through way and I gave 
that town the finger. 

“Actually me and a kid named 
Floyd split together. His father 
beat him up. We were both 15. 
Floyd was dealing. Most of my 
friends were dealing, drugs and 
anything illegal. 

“1 lived under a cardboard box. I 
slept on rooftops under wet mat- 
tresses. I was standing in a doorway 
one morning looking green and this 
dude who was a barker at the Cafe 
Wah said I could sleep in his room. 


knee. He said would I be his 
He knew a friend of mine from die 
street, Robbie McKenzie, now goes 
by the name of Fast Floyd in San 
Francisco, son of a colorful charac- 
ter. Guy said, ‘Robbie used to be 
my boy.' I got scared and got out of 
there. This is all crazy stuff. 


“1 learned a lot in those days, 
figure out where people are coming 
from. They call it ‘street smarts' 
now. it was kind of like Oliver 
Twist But a lot of these hard-nose 
greaser kids started going off to 
reformatory- Eventually I ended up 
in the Tombs and the Brooklyn 
House of D. Then I met this kid 
who had a lot of blues records and 1 
listened to John Lee Hooker and 
learned a few chords on guitar. 



'Maria Stuarda’ in Vienna Showcases 
Agnes Baltsa and Edita Gruberova 



Willy DeYOIe: “Your classic American success story. 



“I played Robert Johnson and 
Little Walter tunes Sunday nights, 
hootenanny night, in Gerde's Folk 
City, me and Floyd. 1 played bot- 
tle-neck guitar with a knife handle 
and some harp. But Bob Dylan was 
walking around the Village then, 
John Hammond Jr. The Band was 
Hammond’s bandi This was heavy 
stuff for a freckly-faced 17-year- 
old white kid who wanted to sing 
the blues. They were like the big 
guys, I mean these were serious 
people. Td never get a record deal 


and there but every week 1 combed 
The Village Voice" trying to End a 

& Lo play in New York. Then I 
a little ad for a bar called 
CBGB. 1 don't know why, it was 
just instinct- 1 knew. I was sure. T 
know the ropes in New York,’ I 
told the guys. ‘We can do it in New 
York.’ We hired a U-Haul and got 
out of there. 


smoking people idling yoo how big 
You're going to be, pullmg out these 
little brown bottles — 'Here lad do 
some of this,’ and cocaine’s blow- 
ing your head wide open. Phony 
chicks, phony industry people fall- 
ing all over you. 


“I tried to form a band but noth- 
ing was happening. 1 really hated 
Cream and the Stones and the way 
they mad* the blues so boring Stu- 
pid hippies playing dumb music. 
Pop music was just terrible in the 
'60s. Everything got distorted and 
out of shape. Then Floyd had to get 
out of town because he knew he 
was going to get popped. He went 
to San Francisco and got a band. 
He said, ‘Come on out, lots of mu- 
sicians out here. John Lee Hooker 
lives out here.’ 


“By this time, 1977, I had my 
musicianship really together, I 
knew how to put a set together, 
build up and get the crowd, grab 
them and take them home. I 
thought nothing could get the job 
done better than straight-ahead 
barrel-house drinking music. We 
played stuff like 'Boon Boom Out 
Go the Lights' by Little Walter, 
none of this self-indulgent 'Spoon- 
ful' or ‘Back Door Man* stuff. 
There were three bands playing 
CBGB then — Patti Smith, the Ra- 
mones and Television. We moved 
right in. 


“So I started to do junk, right 
away I knew that was for me. I 
could hide in there. I went out on 
the road, I knew a dealer in every 
town, but I couldn’t do more than a 
50-minute set because I couldn’t 
stay away from a bathroom longer 
than that. I shot morphine for four 
years. Morphine and cocaine. Got 
scared though, got to a point that I 
knew I was going to die. 1 didn't 
want to appear in The Village 
Voice after Eve LPs: Hock musi- 
cian WiHy DeVnie found dead in 
the Chelsea Hotel’ 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 

V IENNA — The idea of an op- 
era house's unashamedly stag- 
ing a work as a showcase for two of 
.its leading singers is almost quaint- 
ly old-fashioned in the era of the 
stage director’s supremacy, but the 
Vienna State Opera has come up 
with its first hot ticket of the young 
season by doing just thaL 
The singers are the Greek-born 
mezzo-soprano Agnes Baltsa and 
the soprano Edita Gruberova, who 
comes from Bratislava, just a few 
miles down the Danube in Czecho- 
slovakia. Both have risen to’ be- 
come international stars during the 
4 terewte or so *hat they have been 
linked primarily to the state opera, 
so the idea of patting an a show 
that would give both a chance for 
display was a natural. 

The vehicle chosen was Donizet- 
ti’s “Maria Stuarda,” which con- 
centrates an the confrontation in 
love and politics between Mary 
Stuart pud Elizabeth l offers plen- 


and baa the budgetary attraction of 
being able to barrow the 13-year- 
-old sets and costumes of the En- 
glish National Opera. 

“Maria Stuarda" is something of 
a stepchild among Donizetti's out 


put, even during the be! canto re- 
‘ ’ ie last three decades os so. 


“I spent a terrible two years in 
the Bay Area. Too many hippies. I 
finall y put together a drummer and 
a bass player and we worked here 


Talk about your classic Ameri- 
can success story. I learned how to 
structure songs with a good hook 
line at the end. I made my first LP, 
the kid comes through the door. 
Now everybody's saying Yeah 
man, you’re the greatest.’ Cigar- 


Then I met Lisa, my wife. Junk- 
ies always say that love is the only 
thing that can cure you. Now we 
work hard, two-hour sets. Now I 
got nothing to hide from 1 got 
something to be proud of.” 

Mink DeVille: Lund, Sweden. 
Oct. 8; Barcelona, OcL 10; Tou- 
louse, France, Ocl 11; Paris (Olym- 
pia) Oct. 14-15: Ghent, Belgium, 
Oct. 18; Amsterdam, Oct 24-27. 


vivalof the last 
The libretto stripped Schiller’s 
“Mary Stuart" from 21 rales down 
to six solo parts and concentrated 
on amorous conflict at the expense 
of affairs of state. The libretto gave 
offense, so the intended Naples 
premiere in 1 834 took place with an 
entirely new Kbretto. At La Scala 
the following year, the tide part 
was adjusted downward for MaH- 
bran. That production also encoun- 
tered censorship trouble. The 
work's modem revival at Bergamo 
in 1958 ended almost a century of 
oblivion. No autograph score ex- 



;;c • * 
y‘~ r - ‘ 


Jn& * v 
I $Ui& ‘‘ w 


i 


n 

X 


I - 


■ ri’ji - 


v- 


P - 
i;ir ■ 


And ZMopr 

Agnes Baltsa (top), Edita Graberora in “Maria Stuarda.” 


COMPANY 


pride. Both singers won prolonged 
and deserved ovations. 


ists, anhfa mass of secondary mate- 


Independent Japanese Film in N. Y. 


By Dolores Barclay 

The Associated Pros 

N EW YORK. — Japanese film- 
making has been dominated 
by a studio system that left little 
room for independents. Now “Hi- 
matsuri" (Fire Festival), directed 
by Mitsuo Yanagimachi, has 
emerged at the New York Film 
Festival as one of the first indepen- 
dent prod actions from Japan. 

Unlike Akira Kurosawa's 16th- 
century epic, “Ran," which opened 
the 23d annual festival, “Himat- 
suri," although infused with tradi- 
tionalist themes — Shinto spiritual- 
ism and nature — illuminates 
modem Japan. 

Set in a small village in south- 


west Japan in an area known as the 
center of Shintoism, the movie fo- 
cuses on how modernization chal- 
lenges sacred ritnals and sacred de- 
ments in nature, such as trees, 
water and fire. 


It is the stoty of a womanizing 
lumberman who clashes with local 
fishermen and developers who 
want to build a marine park. He 
defies local customs, such as hunt- 
ing and killing monkeys and train- 
ing dogs to stalk and kill boars,’- 
until be has a spiritual awakening 
in the forest following a storm. — 
Once he feels in harmony with 
nature, he thinks there should be a 
human sacrifice. He kills his entire 
family, then himself. 


Yanagimachi got his idea for 
“Himatsuri” from an incident in 
California. The wife of a Japanese 
businessman killed her daughter 
and son and tried to kill herself. 
She was charged with murder. 


Murder-suicides are relatively 
common in Japan, and Yanagima- 
chi said the Japanese understand 
why the mother would not want to 
leave her children behind. - - - 


“The act of kfllmg so many peo- 
ple defies all common sense,” he 
said, referring to his protagonist’s 
act. “Maybe the gods’ power was 
behind hnn, maybe he had sex with 
a god. From this, you can see all the 
ancient Japanese stories behind it.” 


riaL The current production is 
based on Armando Gatto’s 1981 
revision of the existing material. 

This is a wade that really de- 
pends on the singers. Musically it is 
hardly out of Donizetti’s top draw- 
er — this is indeed its Viennese 
premiere, although the composer 
was an important figure in Vienna 
in his lifetime. Asidefrom an at- 
tractive sextet, a trio and some cho- 
ral bits at the end, it is a series of 
arias and duets of which the hit 
number is the second-act confron- 
tation of the two queens, which was 
Schiller’s un historical but theatri- 
cally effective idea. 

Baltsa and.Gruberova were My 
to their tasks. Baltsa’s slim 


If “Maria Stuarda" has had an 

ifl-faied career, it was manifested in 
Vienna in tenor trouble, with a late 
cancellation producing the usual 
scramble. John Fowler, the Leices- 
ter at Thursday’s performance, cut 
a pale figure in ms duets with the 
two queens, although he sang ade- 
quately on his own. Hans Helm 
was an almost amiable Cecil 
though he has little to do but insist 
on Mary’s execution, and Kurt 
Rydl was a sonorous Talbot. 

Adam Fischer led a well-paced 


the staging, which at least did not 
burden the singers unnecessarily. 

Additional performances of “Ma- 
ria Stuarda *’ are scheduled for 
Wednesday and Saturday. 




performance, although there ispro- 
lorches- 


yn^ue makes her a physically 


dons little of interest in the 
tra. Desmond Hedey’s effectively 
stylized sets and lavish costumes 
.are stfllqiihe serviceable, and Gris- 
cha Asagaroff ^ credited .with. 


Another novelty last week, not 
likely to be seen again in Vienna, 
was a new production of Mozart's 
“Abduction From the Seraglio,” 
designed expressly to tour the Aus- 
trian provinces. 

Peter Heyduck’s simple and flex- 
ible sets are designed to fit almost 
any stage, and Wolfgang Weber’s 
-staging is straightforward and tra- 
ditional Musically the most im- 
pressive performance came from 


tajcr ■ 

f ' ' ‘ 

8 eAsii.- ■ 


the youngcondiictor, fJlf Schirmer, 
while die c 


cast of yqung singers of- 
fered performances richer in prom- 
ise, thanirr immediate satisfaction. 


•£. ■ • 



WHERE TO FIND LUXURY 



IN THE MIDDLE EAST 





ABU DHABI 
INTERCONTINENTAL 
HOTEL 

Phone: (fCl-2| 363777 
Telex: 23160 


ALAIN 

INTERCONTINENTAL 

HOTEL 


BAHRAIN 

THE HOTEL REGENCY 
INTER-CONTINENTAL 


Phone: (971-3) b54 654 
Telex: 34034 


Phone:(973) 231777 
Telex: 9400 





DUBAI 

INTER-CONTINENTAL 

HOTEL 

Phone: (971-4} 227171 
Telex: 43779 


MUSCAT 

INTER-CONTINENTAL 
HOTEL 
Phone: (968)600500 
Telex: 5491 


RIYADH 

INTER-CONTINENTAL 

HOTEL 

Phone: (966-1) 465-5000 
Telex: 201076 


THE ADVANTAGE IN THE MIDDLE EAST 


0. INTER CONTINENTAL” HOTELS 


For reservations call: Amsterdam: (020) 26.20.21, Brussels: 513 78 27/5, Frankfurt: (069) 23 08 52, 
London (01) 491-7181, Milan: (02) 87.72.62, Paris: (01) 47-42-07-92. 




credible figure as Elizabeth, and [ 
she conveyed the monarch's jealou- 
sy and dominating temperament 
with powerful and secure vocalism, 
although she at times seemed to 
operate uncomfortably dose to her 
limits. Gruberova has made her ca- 
reer largely in such coloratura roles 
as Zerbinetta and the Queen of the 
Night, bat die filled the more am- 
ple lyricism of the title role without 
apparent strain (except on a couple 
of top notes) and touchingly con- 
veyed Mary's womanliness and 


i« V.:.,y 


Charleston Plans 


Torgy and Bess’ 
To Mark Birthday 


The Associated Press 

C HARLESTON, South Caroli- 
na — “Porgy hid Bess" is go - 1 
mg home, in a sense: The curtain ; 
goes up Thursday on a production 
that marks the 50th anniversary of 
the New York premiere of George 
Gershwin’s opera about black tene- 
ment life in this Southern city in the 
early 1900s. 

“I'm excited about doing it in the 
place where the story originated,” 
said James Tyeska, one of two ac- 
tors who will play Pony. He said 
the producer, Richard Lewine, and 
director, John Feamley, were ap- 
proaching the show as a drama. 

“So many times people have 
thought that ‘Foray and Bess’ is a 
comic piece, but there is one tragic 
moment after another,” said 
Tyeska, who wiH alternate with Ar- 
thur Woodley in the lead during die 
10 performances at Gaillaid Mu- 
nicipal Auditorium. 

Vanessa Shaw, who with Daisy 


The international Herald 
Tribune's daily paid circulation 
continues to break records, up 
5% in the past year and 27% in 
the past five years. More than 
a third of a million people in 
1 64 countries around the world 
now see each issue. And latest 
figures indicate that this rapid 
growth continues. 


International Herald Tribune circulation 
figure prepared for OJD audit for period 
from July 1,1984 to June 30,1985. 



198485 


1M639 


I 


Newman will portray Bess, also 
the idea 


said she liked the idea of perform- 
ing just a few blocks from the for- 
mer black tenement that was Cat- 
fish Row. 

“It’s like being a part of some- 
thing much bigger than doing a 
play or doing a musical,” she said. 


& * 


IPStl: 


Smithsonian Gets 
Set of Almanacs 


United Pros International 

W ASHINGTON — The 
Smithsonian Institution now 
has-a complete bound collection of 
(he Old Fanner’s Almanac, first 
published in 1792 by Robert 
Thomas at Sterling, Massachusetts. 

Jud Hale, the editor, and Rob 
Trowbridge, publisher of the alma- 
nac, presented the collection of 
what they call “the oldest contin- 
ually published periodical in the 
United Slates" to theN&tional Mu- 
seum of American History. 

The almanac became famous 
and successful because a printer’s 
error for 1816 forecast snow in 
July. The editor recalled all the al- 
manacs. .be. could find, but. he 
needn't have: A volcanic eruption 
mi Java . in 1815 did produce snow 
in iulv 1816 in the United States. 




* 


- -s- 




vy# #v) 







fiSfeSS 

V. -5VS;-. 


K. v -■ 







4 


- ' * 


>**■&-*: ’ 


j&jy -- ’ ' 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, X98S 


Page 9 


Ira be 


r »t(i i 


ARTS/ LEISURE 





K . 

iA 


OP — 

- 

i* 

* • 


kiJ Herdd 


f ,^or and 27V 
^crs.Morete' 
•.-^on people^ 

r ound ihe w* 1 ’ 

swe-Andbs 
^ that 4% fipc 


U Ma******’"*. 

-• <2 


cSffitr 



By Hebe .Dorsey 

International Herald Tribune 

■fcAILAN — Tile mood here is 
“ v A couture — a giant step. It is 
Hke watching a street urchin turn 
mto a marcbesal 

'■ Long known for khaki fatigues 
and muitaiy sportswear, Milan do- 
■ signers are now showing a more 

MILAN FASHION 

lofty look," elaborately cot- and ' 
draped,. in silk and satin. That are 
several reasons for this chang e 

First, the designers ate okier and 
richer. They axe all . moving into 
grand establishments' 'that demand 
equally grand clothes. Second, they 
arc tuned into the U. S. market, one 
of their greatest assets. Finally, the 
designers need to eh«n»» in order 
to survive, for there is not in MQan 
the turbulent undercurrent of 
young- talent one finds in Paris, 
London or New York. 

The new couture result is an im- 
peccably wefl-gnoomed look, with 
hats, gloves^ even parasols. There 
are fewer pants and more evening 
outfits. Even bathing suits are 
treated with' an elegant hand: 
draped whh Grecian precision at 
Kiizja, featuring a fancy back cowl 
at Gianfranco Ferris's, covered with 
short draped togas at Gianni Ver- 
sace's- The. utilitarian jumpsuit, 
too, became iiltradressy. Ferrfe 
m ad e it out of Mack satin, grpip 
featured h in her famous Fortuny 
pleats and Versace covered it with 
black seqtdns. 

The luxury Ceding was estab- 
lished right away with the Krizta 
collection, shown in a new $6-mfl- 

lkm eUaWiiihmMt that mrdndfS g 

theater seating 480, and 
white marble floors, and three 
courtyards filled with modern 
sculpture and giant ma gnWKac . 
Aldo Pinto, husband of Mariuccxa 
MandeOi, who designs Krizia, said: 
“Others invest in yachts arid 


DOONESBURY 


fT$ GREAT yn, 

TOSEBTOU -njn 

AGAHB0ME! jjjfe, 
f J l 


uture Mood 


houses. We’ve invested in our 

warfC ‘ 

Manddh took a deep jump with 
a snpersoc^isticated took that had 
echoes onMriapardH’smad acces- 


loong, but updated with V-neck 
-sOk T-shim instead of blouses, 
and with bennudadiorts.and flat 
shoes. Her wEdest accessories in- 
cluded long shined gloves that 
opened around the shoulders like 
gtantflowm. ' " 

F eminine in away that is highly, 
viable yet not coy* Mandeffi has 
boflt up a strong following of wonh 
enwhoappretiatehex Djmasty-Hke 
dothea. Her V-shaped sihouette 
had assertive, yet not -aggressive, 
shoulders, a small waist empha- 
sized by short, croppod jadi ets and 
long, fluttering pleated skim. A 
New York retajler. Boimic .KeHer, 
who recently opened^. Krizia bou-: 
tique on Madison 7 Avenue, called 
the cbOectioii fveiy; young aid 
-fresh, and very American in spirit 
as wdl as Itatian.”'. 

ManddH used -ar lot of white 
crepe, which, gsye a pristine look to : 
the collectidcb - She showed crepe 
Bermuda pants- and long tomes 
with emerald andturquoise bead- 
ing, Selma's new statns-symboi 
sweater is decorated with a gentle 
butterfly instead of die usual jtmgle 
beasts. -■ 

A new, yoonger and sexier Fart, 
dearly under the spell of Japan, 
showed nrim-slrirts and figure-hug- 
ging l>lack leather, renmriscent of 
the Paris designer Azzecbne Alala, 
who put curves bade into fashion. 
But Fetrt is stfll best with his big 
shapes, such as loose pants, silk T- 
shirt and - an ampin «aTlr jacket, all 
hdd togietfaer by a huge ofai carded 
with leather rapes. 

like most Milanese designers, 
Fenfe moved out-of his Hand beige 
scene into more color and more 
prints. His favorite combination of 


sntimoLm OMASA 

ARDUWMTH .SWEUNEtM 
HALLuemrm Mosnyim 
M&N6,ISE£- HMJ3N51HESE 


red and . black, worked out well 
Versace scored a tri ump h whh 
the snappiest, sexiest, youngest col- 
lection in MQan. One saw a lot of 
flesh here; skirts way above the 
knees, ffimsy linen jackets worn 
over bare slnn, T-shirts loose and 
deeply cut on the sides, fluid dress- 
es draped so loose they lode like 
they might fall off any mimilr. 

The couture look here was most 
evident in short white linen spen- 
cers over- billowing Mack satin or 
stiff organdy skirts. The long dress- 
es of metallic mesh, which Versace 
introduced a few sedans ago, are 
draped and much softer and 
lighter. New fabrics included jun- 
gle prints that had a three-dimen- 
skmallook. hi Hack and while they 
had a lot more chic than the usual 
brown and beige variety. 

. Versace, who said he was looking 
at Street fashion again, trimmed an 
excellent gram) of short black 
leather soils with steel chains and 
steel beds on blade pumps. The 
Hack wool leggings, topped by 
long s weate rs draped over the hips, 
were also closer to street than sa- 
lon. Black, sharply oil wigs, dark 
glasses and all those steel chains 
gave a funny, comic-strip flavor to 

the odhxtton. 

The Fendi sisters reportedly 
spent SI miiiinn on a weekend ex- 
travaganza that entailed flying 
more than 150 people first class to 
Rome from aB over the world. The 
reason: the launching of their first 
perfume, Fendi (a huge bottle dec- 
mated the runway). 

Kad Lagerfeld, who designs the 
FeodTJur collection, was also re- 
sponsible for the ready-to-wear. 
Butin this boose, which revolution- 
ized furs, ready^to-wear is still a 
minor art. There were some pleas- 
ant moments; especially in the first 
half of theooDecnan, with its black 
and 'white knitwear and its denim 
line. Blade swimsuits with generous 



Grand Ole Opry Celebrates 60 Years 
Of Keeping It f Close to the Ground 9 




Houpyoum im&wm 

HOOTS? INTO HIM AT APPLE. 

jo&nb/jcm- emmm-taso. 

PUmmiURB? 5/UCONWUEY 
ISAVBtfFUAI? 
PLACE 


Mini-skirted outfit by Fetrt 

d&collet&s were topped by giant 
white terry robes, and detum was 
happily combined with silk prints. 

Deftly playing with short and 
long and muring all kinds of prints. 
Lagerfeld was not in step with the 
con tore feeling of other Milan col- 
lections; instead, be stayed strictly 
with ready-to-wear. 


SO I GATHER.. / 

HEX, SETTLE ' 
DOm.MLL 5 ^ y - 

*r ms. 










\68tfA+ 


By Jim Lewis 

United Press International 

XJASHVHXE, Tennessee — 
IN Those facing the stage of the 
Grand Ole Opiy are missing it. 
You see the real show when you 
turn around and look at the people 
who come to see the performers on 
the country’s most venerable live 
radio show. 

In the old days, some of the fans, 
rural people who drove halfway 
across the country to the Opry, 
dressed in overalls. They got a sim- 
ple show. It wasn't slick- It still 
isn't. 

Tt was a Saturday night — Nov. 
28, 1925 — when Uncle Timm y 
Thompson, a bearded patriarch ac- 
companied by his granddaughter 
mi the piano, picked up his Blue 
Ribbon fiddle in front of a carbon 
microphone and kicked off the 
“WSM Barndance" from a sound 
cubicle measuring 14 feet (4 me- 
ters) by 17 feet. 

Two years later, the show’s orga- 
nizer. a' former Memphis newspa- 
perman named George D. Hay and 
known as “The Solemn Old 
Judge;" dubbed the program the 
Grand Ole Opry. 

The Opry would eventually 
spawn a "third coast" in the enter- 
tainment industry, host presidents, 
and launch the careers of country 
superstars such as Dolly Parton, all 
by following Hay’s formula for ap- 
pealing to rural America: "Keep it 
close to the ground, boys." 

The 60th anniversary celebra- 
tion, starting Thursday, will peak 
with the broadcast of the show Sat- 
urday night. On Monday, the 
Country Music Association 
Awards show will be nationally 
telecast. A two-hour salute to the 
Opry wifi be taped in November 
and telecast in January. 

Herman Crook, who on Dec. 2 
will be 87, is the only performer 
who has been on the Opry for all 60 
years. He plays harmonica in the 
Crook Brothers band. 

"The Opry has changed quite a 
bit," he said. “It’s not supposed to 
change. Country music doesn't 
change. George Hay would never 
have allowed drums. I wouldn’t 
have a drum because of all that 
racket and noise.” 

He said a drummer plays with 
bis band, but he doesn’t like it. 
*Tve had to call him down about 
the nose. Drams don’t go with 
country musk, with suing muse." 

Crook said he began performing 
on the Bamdance show about a 
month after it began, and has 


missed only three performances, all 
because of illness. 

Performers were not paid in the 
early years. “They used to line up 
outside just to get on the radio," 
Crook recalled. 

“Radio was something new. Peo- 
ple back then didn't think about 
money. They were tickled to be on 
the radio. We always had plenty of 
people to play. After two years we 
were one of the lucky bands and 
(bey started paying us $5 a piece. 
It’s like everything else, we get 
more than that now." 

He explained, as be has done for 
60 years: “I've never taken a drink 
of beer or whiskey in my life. I 
never smoked a cigarette, never 
used curse words in my life, but Tm 
a Crook." The line stfll makes him 
laugh- 

Asked if some of the performers 
did drink and cuss. Crook replied, 
“A lot of them bad drinks, you 
know. But I don't have any time for 
that drinking. 1 don’t know wheth- 
er you call them drank. There is no 
doubL that some of them were 
drinking when they went on stage." 

Hank Williams, late in his career, 
showed up at the Opiy drunk many 
limes, and was eventually suspend- 
ed for his unreliability. 

Among other controversies over 
the years was the one caused by the 


16 months for remarks she made on 
the air after police arrested mem- 
bers of a religious group at a Nash- 
vflte shopping center. 

“They arrested 15 people just for 
telling people that Jesus loves 
them. That really burdens my 
heart,” she said over the dear- 
channel, 50,000-watt station. 

Among the high points in 60 
years was a visit by Richard M. 
Nixon when the Opry moved from 
Nashville's old Ryman Auditorium 
to its new quarters at the Opry land 
amusement complex in 1974. Nix- 
on played the piano and tried to yo- 
yo like Rev Acuff. the "king of 
country music." 

President Ronald Reagan visited 
last year on the occasion of A cuff's 
81st birthday. 

The Grand Ole Opry's manager, 
Hal Duram, was asked why the 
Opry has lasted so long. “I don't 
know if there is any one ingredi- 
ent," be said. “Generally through 
the years, it has been the perform- 
ers themselves. Today the Opry is 
the result of what those people did 
— the Acuff s, the Tubbs, the 
Crooks, the Williams, Minnie 
Pearl.” 

But Acuff, who lives in a small 
home on Opiy land property, said: 
“I ihmlc the general public has 
made the Grand Ole Opiy." 


NORMAN J. LAWRENCE 

umhiim* drll 

STORE YOUR OLD 
i FUR IN A NEW I 

SILK RAINCOAT! Mil 
Brochure on request 
Li 417 Fifth Aw. NYC lOOUi 


PARFUMS 
VENDOME 

? Ri--; dr. Cajlrgnon", 7500? Pgrij. 
1*1 ;ij 260.43.94.. 

* perfume.. • ri^ - jee-rves • icncy ■ 

i-!cm pg-ii • luxury hott cctfssorie: 

DUTY FREE - 40% - Er.G^H 2POT3:- 


ESCAM 

in Paris 

at European 
export prices 

Marie-Maitme 

8, Roe de Sevres, Paris 6th. 
TeL: (1)2221844. 
Credit cards 


AUTHORS WANTED 
BY N.Y. PUBLISHER 

Leading wbndy booh pubfaher seeks manu- 
senpts of at types, fiction, non-fkson. poetry, 
juvenle, scholarly and retaous works, etc New 
authors welcomed. Send lor free booklet H-3 
Vantage Press, 516 W. 34th St., New York. MY. 
10001 USA 



PRESENTATION OF THE OUTSTANDING 
NEW CREATIONS BY DA(JM' 

8?* cratal 
FRANCE 

COUPE - RIVIERA - F 3250 

AU VASE ETRUSQUE 

11. place de ta Madeleine - PARIS 8* 


Alexandre Savin the cashmere designer in Paris 


A LL DESIGNS 
LL STYLES 
LL COLORS 
/ LL PRICES 


EXCLUSIVELY FOR 

Cashmere House 

2. rue d’Aguesseau 
angle 60, Faubourg St-Honort 

PARIS 8* 
EXPORT PRICES 
TAX FREE 


;v, 

—2r j 




(94PLICE 











Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8 , 1985 


NYSE Most Actives | 


VOL 


HW LOW Lot dig. 


WomrL 

Gould 

£ 3 % 


CfMNG 

Mod PS 

MCA 

AT&T 

IBM 

AMI 

TexOGa 

Burgh 

PhllPt ■ 


30532 37*. 
T7KH 36% 
16644 39* 
16294 IBM 
15731 40 

F9004 SM 
121MB 42Vli 
12035 mm 
11532 29% 

non 214 

11013 125 
10913 I7tt 
9907 U 
9754 5 SVi 
9059 TZ% 


17% 

«M 

SS 

4Kb 

109k 

2BVb 

21 

123* 

Mto 

T7Vk 

S3 

m 


34b. —I 
3SV. — Tft 
39% + V, 

IB 

41* -Mb 
55 -fib. 
«% + % 
II — % 
2Bta — 1% 
X* — »k 
124 V. + ft 
17* + 5 

171* — to 
S4to —lb 
12% — ft 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own KMi Low Lost CML 

Indus 1336-D5 1335.9} 1315.19 132437— 437 
Trans 64454 649 JQ 63S33 44232 — 433 

Ulll 154.75 155 j67 153.16 15400— 108 

Comp 539.93 54348 53448 53326— 2.70 


NYSE Index 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages 


i Bonds 
utilities 
industrials 


7956 

7642 

•220 


aeon 
— ojb 

— 0.19 
+ 003 


NYSE Diaries 


Clow Pro*. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unch an ood 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lotts 
Volume up 
Volume dawn 


5BI 

961 

443 

1935 

20 

43 

23.111050 

5U9I440 


614 

369 

469 

1972 


HHm Law CtaM CVk 
I Camooslls IBSiSt lO&M 10535 —an 

Industrials 12103 12072 12101—003 

Tramp. 1043 VH49 10249 —103 

Utilities 5503 5405 5502 —WO 

Finance 10037 107JM 10L11 —151 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Oct. 4 . 
Oct. 3 - 
Oct. 2 , 
Oct. 1 . 


■Included in me sain figures 


Buy tales "Sim 

1+5.112 30024 2.174 

199056 374J13 4033 

171496 402097 5422 

164012 4RU01 1066 

194134 524014 1012 


Monday 

MSE 


VOL at 4 PJ 
Pm.4PJN.voL. 


95053030 I 
101.178030 I 
PfxvconsoJMalcdcJae U&559J2B; 


Tables include tin nationwide prices 
dp to Hie closing on Wall Street amt 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press. 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 
Total ihw 
N ew H tofts 
Now Lows 
Volume up 
V olume daw n 


194 

SI 

763 
6 
2D 

-J093 

153.100 


*9 


193 

292 

362 

747 

4 


NASDAQ index 


Composite 
l Industrials 
I Finance 
1 insurance 
Utilities 
. B anks 
I Tnmsp. 



1—2.16 28003 M*S6 

_ I — 109 28409 2*706 
360.10 — 142 3JSJ3 ZJM8 
3301.17 — 107 38907 266J2 
1 — 0.12 26L53 212-92 
-003 296-10 210.17 
1—242 23652 23543 


I Standard & Poor’s Index I I | | AMEX Sales' 


Industrials 

Transa. 

UtUtttes 

Finance 

Composite 


High Law Oom Oh 
20442 28205 20043 —15? 
16803 166.16 16644 —107- 
B0 l21 7955 7903 —043 

20.79 TOM 2049 —0.10 
18302 1 3100 13147 — IOS 


4 PAH. volume 
Prev. 4 P JW. vatuine 
Prwv. am rabim 



b 

f-' 


I AMEX Stock Index 


B JS S- — 


KUantti 
igdiLow Stem 


»*. vid. PE 


msHMlLOw 


Ctote 

QucLQra# 


02 24 17 
273 114 7 


34% 16 AAR 

ig StS^A 

50M 26b AMR 
2Mb IBM AMR pi 
2S% 23 ANRpf 
141 m 7Sk APL 
61 tb 34* ASA 
27 11* AVX 

Bh 1916 AZP 
60 36* AbtLnb 

251b mb ACCOWU 
24* 12* AemeC 
18* 7% Active 

19 15vg AdaEx 

20 13K) AttmMI 
17* Bfb AdvSvs 
37* 72-M AMD 
12% Ml Advesl 
154k 10 A«rflex 
49* 32* AetnLI 
57V5 52* AetLPf 
37* 21 Ahmns 

3* 2Vs Albert 
57 42 All-Pro 

24* 17* AlrbFrl 
2% 1* A1M005 

8% 6* AloPdpf 

82 65* AlaPpt 

74 59 AloPpf 

75 59 AlaP 
26* 12* 

25 12* A! 

33 u. 26* Al 
31* 23* •. 

r Z7* AlcoSId 
71 AlexAlX 
20* Alexdr 
09Vk 72* AllgCP 1J4t 24 
26* 24* AtoCppI 246 107 
28ft 20* Alolnt 140 54 
2D* l(Ak AlglnPt 119 121 
9* 35* Algl pfCHOS 124 

34* 27* AllgPw 2JQ ?J 9 
23* 16* AllenG 40b 27 15 


179 39* 
54 12 

. 707 23* 

140 26 15 1575 55 

40 25 15 156 20 

.40 3.1 56 “ 

JOb 40 II 25 

1.92*114 50 

02 14 7 54 

Stt 34 20 54 

15 73*7 

.12 1J 20 192 

12 120 

264 61 15 2444 


27 ,j 



3 

1 

190 

Xft X% X* 

IJ 

16 

X 

XM 20% 20ft 

73 

11 

329 

Ub 27 

% a 

40 

25 

1304 

25* 24 

ft 24% 

X7 

11 

IX 

X* 32 

* 32* 

33 


308 

27b 27 

27* 


X 

172 

28% 27 

ft 27b 


23* 15* AS Id Pd 
43 42 AldSgn n 

- ■■ ~5pfA 612 60 

jptC 674 ]14 

AldS pfDIZJO 1U 


144 

TOO 


49 « 

r 62 AMS i 
60 AldS I 
107 AldS I 
102*101* AMSafF 
60* 47* AlldShr 212 
9* 3* AllisOi 
34* 24 AltoCPf 
29* 22* ALLTL 
39* 29* Alcoa 
19* 13* Amax .1M 
3D* 32 Amax Pf 340 
34 22* AmHas 1.10 

2* 1* AmAgr 

23* 16 ABakr 
7D 5«* ABrand 390 
30* 25* ABrd pf 275 
70* 55* ABrd pi 247 
116* 56* ABdCSt 140 
3Mb 20% ABMM 46 
2fi* 20* ABusPr 44 
60* 47* Am Can 290 
32* 42 ACanPi 340 _ 
114* 103 ACan Pi 1375 124 
. 20* 17* ACopBd 
30* 25* ACaeCv 
11 6* ACaitC 

57* «% ACvan 
27* IK* AOT 
24* 19 AElPw 
49* 32* AmEXP 
25* 13* AFamls 
36b 22* AGflCP 
16 6* ACM wt 

S6* 51* AGnlpfASJTi 
96* 64* AGnlPfBSJSOi 
71* 46 AGnPfD 244 
36* TB AHertf TOO 
13* 7* AHotSt 


46 24 14 54 21* 21* 21* 

12 76 IS* 14* 15 + * 

I 10* 10* 10* 

6 3966 38* 37* 38b — V. 

218 90 1513 23* 23* 23* + * 

247 1IO 7 23* 23* 23* 

72 9* 9* 9* 

200 61 179 39* 39 39* — * 

.... uvs im + w 

23 23* 

53* 54*— * 
_ 19* 3D 

13* 17* 12*— * 
7* 7* 7* 

17* 17* 17* + * 
17* 17* 17*— * 
14* 13* 14 
25 24 <4 »* + * 

9* 9 9* 

14* 13* 14 + * 

44 43* 43*— * 

54 le 90 34 55* 55* 55* + * 

MQ 44 8 209 30* 30 30* + * 

55 2* 2* 2* 

920 55* 54* 54* — * 
48 71* 21* 21* + * 
39 1* 1* 1* 

23 7* 7* 7b— to 

121b 79 79 79 

]0Qz 71* 71* 71* + 16 

30* 71 71 71 + * 

‘ — .... + ^ 

— * 
— * 

— to 

- * 
— * 

.... _ — * 

564 79* 1H 70*— * 
4 26* 26* 26* + * 
642 25* 23* 25* +1* 
II 13* 13* 18*— M 
2 93* 93 93* + * 

481 29* 28* 29* 

. 57 22* 21* 22* + * 

11 56 17* 16* 16*— * 

4386 44* 44* 44*— b 
16 65* 65* 65*— * 
63 61* 

41 107* 

15 102* 

29 7 <56 54* 54* 54* + * 

99 3* 3* 3* 

7 29* 29* 29*— to 

64 9 IS? Z7b 27 27 

30 29 1672 33* 3Z* 32*- * 
815 13* 13* 13*— * 

90 3 32V. 32* 32*- * 

44 22 1779 77* 27* 27*— * 

126 1* 1* 1* 

9 91 22b 22b 22* + * 

70 8 786 55* 53b 54*— 1* 
94 6 29* 29* 29*— * 

49 5 55 55 55 — * 

1.4 17 1628 115*115* 115* 

05 15 5 34* Mb MW— to 

IS 14 3 25* 25* 25* 

50 9 579x51* 58b X — % 

60 187 45* 45 45 —1 

l: 4 111 111 111 — * 

104 26 20* 20* 20*— * 

251* 9.1 9 27* 27* 27* + to 

43 10 6* 6* 6* + * 

100 35 13 1248 49* 49* 49to- to 
.92 30 24 32 25* 25 H 

2060114 1 2111 20* 20* 20* 

U6 30 M 3610 41* 41 to 41*— to 
AS 2.1 15 m 23* 231k 2314 
140 15 8 1413 2HW 2SU 28*- to 
168 10* lOto 10* 

100 4 55to 55 55 -to 

a 

IS 10 12X34 33* 34 — * 

II 10 — 


■ ojrz am — n 
L alto 61 to— to 
1 107 lOTto— to 
I HE* HE* 


66% 46* AHome 2J0 12 |1_ 5386 SAW 54* 


47* 26b AHflep 
72V. Arnrtctl 


*8 


97* 

90to 62 AlnGtP 
153 112* AIGPPf 
23* 16 AMI 
4* 7* AiTlMot 

29 15to APresdS 40 34 
13* 5 ASLFM 
IS* 12to ASLFI pf 2.19 140 
15* 11* AShto m 60 
35* 26b AmSId 140 50 1 
67* 35* AmSIor 44 1.1 II 
46* ASIrpfA 433 60 


1.12 14 IS 6077 45* 

660 7.5 a 945 88to __ 

M 4 22 862 83* 33* 8 
US 40 2 140 139*13 

4.1 910903x17* 16* 1 



3*2 


AStepfB 640 119 


_ . TAT 100 S3 16)11 
32* AT&T pf 344 94 
42 33* AT&T pf 304 94 

27* 16% A Wotr S 140 34 8 
13* 10 AWdtpf 105 9.9 
13* 11 AWPSPf 105 10,9 
28* IS AmHOH 240 164 6 
42* 26* Ainaran 140 33 8 
5D 24* AfflMD JO 5 3) 
29* 19* Ametek 40 30 13 


_ 12 % ._ _ 

212 30* 30% 

$ 833 * 

57* 57* 


i-* 


+ * 



Amaat 3^ 
Ampco OO 



4.1 9 

4.1 14 

20 

59 

3.1 31 

10 16 
25 13 


73* 12* Am reo » 

36 22b AmSttl 140 

45V. 30 Amsted 140 
4to 1* Aaacmo 
74* 16V4 Anloo ' 

27* 19to Anchor 143 

4«to 30* AnOay 102 

13* 9* AndrGr 04 

77V. 17 Angelic 40 
34* a* Aiiftotas.JO 
71* 49b Aniwupf 340 5.1 
19V. 13* Anlxtf 00 1J J7 
16* 9 Anthem JS4 J 18 

15* TO* Anttmr 44b 30 9 

12* 9% Anodte a K 11 

2 * ApchP wt 

19% 15* ApchP 1110.10 114 
74to 57 ApPwpf 3.12 121 
<7 53* ApPwpf 740 120 

34* 29* AoPwpf LIB 130 
31* 27 ApPwpf 300 129 
39* 17* AMDta lJ6t 97 17 
15* I* AppIMg 
24b 1616 ArdiDn 
30b 26 AriPpf 
34% 14 ArfcBst 


49 f 4077 68* 


24 21 25B4 30U. 

■ 25 m 


“5 


2* 

J£ T* 

403 20 W" 20 + * 
51-25 " 

72 43% 42% 

45 13* 13* 13* 

IKS 23% 23» 23% + % 

Z4 13 4507 33% 33% 33% + to 
1393 70 68% 70 + * 

67 16* 16* 16*— to 
08 11 12* 12*— % 
1 14* 14b 14* 

ass r l 1 ^"!a +M, 

179 18* 1B% IB*— to 
2109 67 67 67 — % 

509 61* 61* 61* -1 
14x32 31* 31*—% 

2x 30* 29* 29* + % 
401 Uto IB IBto + to 
93 1216 12* 12* 


.Mb 7 12 2810 21% 21 2lto— % 


3JB 120 . 
ii 3i t 
IOS 50 27 


34% 16 Arklo 
ft to ArtnRt 
11% 6b Armeo _ 

22* 15* Armcpf 2.10 110 


24* 13* Arms Rb 48 
39* 27b AnnVVIn 


3J 

30 9 

99 

40 9 
10 16 
10132 
30 9 


38 29* ArmWpi:._ 

34* 23 AraCp TOO 
18% 12% ArowE jo 
XV. 16 Arlra 32 
27 15 Arvln s JO 

27b 17* ASOTCO 
37 23* AsMOU 140 40 

44V. 35 AshtOPf 1» 90 „ 
34b 34* AsdDG s 140 42 11 
ZI* IB* Alftlone 140 83 * 
29* 22* AlCyEI 2JB 90 9 
6416 42 AHRIdl 440 60 
153 l«m AHRcpf 200 19 
17b 10* AHosCp _ 

29* 18b Auoor 40 10 a 
54b 34* AutoOl 48 14 19 
Sto 416 Avalon n OSe 10 10 
3116 17* AVEMC 40 19 15 
39% 2BM Aven> 40 19 13 
Tib IB Aviull n 13 

3816 77 Avnel OD 17 21 
25% 17* Avon 200 3.1 1? 
20* 16* Avdln 18 


13 » 29b 29%- % 

72 23% 23* 23% + to 
1016 21 20% 28*— % 
165 * % . 

531 B% 3* 8%— to 
B 19 IB* 18b— % 
10 13b 13b 13b 
475 35% 34 34* — I* 

IBJz 38 X X + * 
75 X* 27 28* +1 

5 U*. 13* 13to 

12 22* 22* 22*— to 
96 24b 24% 24%— % 

474 19* 13* IB* — * 
IX 33* 33to 33to- to 
2 41* 41* 41* 

521 33* 32* 33* +1* 

13 19% 19* 19*— to 

79 2616 26 26b + to 

5991 62* 61% 61b— 1 
2 149 149 149 — b 

13 11* 11* 11*- to 
345 22* 72 22b — 16 

552 49% 48 48 — 1* 

48 Sto 5to Sto + to 
1? 30* 30* 30* + * 
322 32* 31% 32%— * 
516 24* 24% 24* 
m 20% 29% 29*— % 
71MB 25 24* 3C6 

75 21 to 21 21* 


Mto 

35* 

IB* 

24* 

2* 

30* 

18* 

11% 

23V. 

23* 

5* 

62 

55% 

47* 

33b 

22 % 

47 
74* 
16* 
32* 
75% 
45 
13% 
39* 
25 
41* 
29% 
l» 
35% 
16% 
27* 

5S 1 

38% 

4016 

74* 

Mto 

58% 

3* 

11 

17* 

37% 

37 

97 

X 

26* 

44% 

57 

34to 

45* 

48 
40* 
22b 
19% 

416 

k 

Mto 

IS 

Mto 
29 V. 
29% 
9* 
51 
61 
X 

«% 

94% 

22 

S* 

M* 

25% 

31* 

<52 

32b 

23% 

5* 

28 


6b BMC .121 
22 Batmen AO 27 
15 Bkrlnfl 02 57 
IS* Balder J6 lO 
* vIBaWU 
18b Balls , 
ii* Bally Mt X U 
7% BallvPk 
17% B tree 5 170 82 
15% BnCOn* 00 37 
2 Do. Tex 
46b Bandog IX U 
84* BkBos 2A0 54 
30* BkMY 2.04 49 
20b BankVa 1.12 4L5 
12% BnkAm . OO U 
40 BkAm Pf 401812.1 
62% BkAm vt TJS3B12A 
13% BkAm Pf 203 
27 BkARtV 200 8J5 
47b BankTr 270 45 
35% BkTrpf 402 93 
8% BannM- JOe 3 
19 aorri^, SS IS 
19% BamGp 00 16 
25b Bametl 104 30 

vsasr 

I % 

31% Beorino 1O0 3.1 

5 S g 

tt* MP I« K 

3% ^Spt A9I 

S §SJSS b, 6 | s 

lSS ielflnd ^ M 

2 !* tSSgH % B 

22b Bends TOO 20 

16* Beneatn LX 77 
3% BenalB 071 


I7to Beffilf P15O0 114 
8% Betb5t Pf29 110 
sb Beveriy ■% jo 
19% Blgljr . OO 15 
3* BloCTtn 

7U BlodcD M U 

2% BkkHP l.W SO 
4% Blair Jn OBJ 

s 

8% BPttBW- .W 3 

BOB'* S 

t* 144 M 

%a B B& 

1% BrHM^ ..... — 
2 Brin PP. 018 27 
lto Brock „ 

&I6 BrckwY 132 40 


:oS 


1.99B 44 


9 7% 
436 22* 
723 16* 
40 X, 
100 1 % 
39 29% 
520 16V, 
13 10 
1376 20b 

164 21* 
392 2* 
103 30% 
443 45* 

47 41% 
348 2Sb 
Mil 14 
56 40* 
44 63 

25 28% 
T* S 

53 

165 

740 

136 inn 

IS 1038 

i5 jfi 

8 16633 39% 
203 73 

5 425 13% 
754 55% 
544 2% 

26 4* 
W X 13* 
11 X 35 
1 34* 
8 1441 66* 
1059 30* 
18 37 22* 

3 2619 38% 
21 43 46b 

H 39 34% 
9 307 40* 
5 37* 

IBr 48 

lOz 21 * 
84 16% 
115 S 
108 7to 
$7 263 Uto 
728 16b 
4 44* 
2 21 * 
17 2684 33% 
17 5D8 23% 

as 27 IS 

14 3793 45 
19 139 43* 
|4 96* 
29 X 29to 
11 879 41* 

ii no m 

TJ 7 9% 

7 386 37% 

TIL 

a 57i a* 

12 7*0 27% 
1$ 3SK0 55’A 
13 11 4 

B 504 31b 
13 3 Vto 

496 1% 

23 67 27% 


7% 7* — % 
22% 32% — * 
16* 16% — to 
19% 1?*- * 
I* 1* 

2SH 29% + % 
15% 16 — % 
9b 9%— * 
20* 20% + to 
21V. 31* 

2 2 

49b 30* + * 
44 44* 

40b 41% + to 
24% 24%— * 
13V. 13% — to 
40* 4C%— % 
67* 63 
Uto 15% 

Z7b 23% + to 
59* 59% + % 
42b 42b— * 
13 , 13% * * 
34% 35* + * 
22* 22* 

34* 34*— % 
17* 17% — to 
7V. 7%— to 

Z7% 27%— to 
12* 12% + V. 
24% 24% + * 
30* 30% 

37% 32* + * 
38% X — to 
71* 73 — * 
12* 13% — * 
53V. 53V.— 2% 
2 2 — to 

4 4* + to 

13 13 — to 

34% 35 + % 

srIa+% 

Xto 30% + * 
22% 22V. + % 
X 38*— * 
46* 46*— % 
34* 34% + * 
39* 40% + % 
37% 37* 

40 40 +1 

21 * 21 *— * 
Mto ISto— to 
4% 4% 

7 7to 
13* 14% + to 
Mto 16*— % 
43% 43% — to 
Zlto 21% — U 
32% X — to 
23 23 — to 

I7W 17* + 4k 
18 IB* + to 
X X — to 
Mto 75*— to 
28* 28b + % 
*4* 44* — to 
42% 43 — to 

5££S_* 

40* 41% + b 
20 28% + * 
9* fto— % 
36% 34* — % 
83 S3 — 1* 
18 % 11 + to 

13% 13% + to 
22* jgto— to 
27* 27*— % 
54% 54%— lto 

30* 31 — to 
27* 
lto 
27 


Prices Decline on N.Y. Market 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices fefl Monday on the 
New York Stock Exchange in light trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which rose 
8.74 Thursday, was down 4.37 to 1,32437 at the 
dose. Declines led advances by more than a 3-2 
ratio. Volume was about 95.8 million shares, 
down from 101.2 million Thursday. 

Prices were lower in moderate trading of 
American Stock Exchange issues. 

“The market is suffering from breakdown of 
Taith in the financial system," said Wayne 
Nordberg of Prescott, Ball St Turben. 

Traders said credit problems such as those in 
the Federal Farm Credit System and Third 
World debt problems were making the market 
jittery. 

A stronger dollar and a weak bond market 
Monday also weighed on the stock market, Mr. 
Nordberg said. 

“Before we can see a much better stock mar- 
ket and high corporate earnings, we have to 
have much lower interest rales and a much 
lower U.S. dollar," he said. 

The Federal Reserve's failure to cut the dis- 
count rate after the Group of Five nations 
agreed to weaken the dollar continues to con- 
firm fears that the ''Fed still does not under- 
stand what has to be done to get the dollar and 
interest rates down,” Mr. Nordberg said. 

“The market is shapeless," said Monte Gor- 
don of Dreyfus Corp. “It’s not doing anything.” 

Mr. Gordon said heightened awareness of 
persistent Third World debt problems. Group 
of Five action to knock the US. dollar lower 
and the U.S. Congress's inability to cut the size 
of the federal deficit are all pressuring the 
market 


Mr. Gordon said that despite some signs that 
the U_S. economy is beginning to shake off its 
lethargy, the market will remain wary as kjog as 
prospects for improved corporate earnings are 
not developing. 

“The market is insecure and on the basis of 
that, it will move between 1,280 and 1360 on 
the Dow," Mr. Gordon said. 

Warner Lambert, near the top of the most- 
active list, was down sharply. Traders laid the 
weakness to rumors that there is an unfavorable 
report from France on Warner Lambert’s ex- 
perimental anti-arthritic drug Maxi cam. 

Gould was down. Beatrice Cos. was off 


Revlon was up. Pantry Pride sweetened its 
offer for Revlon to 55635 a share: Pantry Pride 
was off slightly. 

Some petroleum stocks were weaker, includ- 
ing Chevron. Mobil, Occidental Petroleum and 
Sohio. 

Monsanto was down. G.D. Searie St Co- a 
Monsanto unit, said several hundred lawsuits 

intrauterine device has caused medksaPprob- 
lems. 

Northern Indiana Public Service was giving 
up ground. The company said a federal court 
jury ruled against it in a SI 8 1 -million breach-of- 
con tract suit. 

In the aftermath of its downbeat projection 
on its third-quarter earnings, Burroughs was 
'lower again after losing 734 Friday. But other 
computer issues were stronger, including IBM, 
NCR Crap- Honeywell and Digital Equipment. 

MidCon Corp. was lower. 

On the Amex. active issues included Lorimar, 
Wickes Cos. and Ozark Holdings. 


12 Month 
HbfrLow Stock 


Dtv. YU. PE 


Sk. 

TafcHWrLflw 


dose 
GWX.ODe 



24to 
68* 45 
7% 6* 
23% 19% 
S3 46* 
18% Id* 
68 50* 

sim u 
6% 1* 
14 2b 


Jl — 41 

27*- * 


1.40a 65 
300 20 21 

US J)J> 

29 40 34 I 
US " - 

S3* 

9to 

23* 

47% 

26 

2Bto 
40% 

12 * 

Xb 

25to 

ITl3*_ 

26 15% CRLkO OO 

&% 2* CmpRg .161 
42to 3WA CgmSP s US XI 13 
1S% 11% COPocS M 
22% 16% Coupes 00 
228* 150% COPCIM 30 
27% 18 CQgH<l9 71 
12b 9to Carina 0 03 
28* Canute 108 



2|to .21% 21* + to 





S 12 caicpi 
to 28% Coft-pT 



75 

I1J 


X6 9 

18 CaraFt OO 10 1G 

30% 22to CarPw 260 10J 7 

26b 21 CarPBl 207 109 

48 35* CarTtC 210 55 14 

11* 6* Corral 07 10 11 
24% 17b CarPIrs 00 30 8 
31 21% CariHw 1J2 4J 16 

46% 22% CortWl 52 1J 13 
18* 12% CascNG IX 70 7 

r Jr SIS to* 

3 & 

27b 19% Cncn 36 XI 10 
129* 68* COIORM A9 35 11 
<4% 35% Catena! 458 100 

r 7to Canpv Oja o 24 
34b Caracl 20 57 t 
36% 18 Centex OS 1.1 18 
27 20% CenSoW 202 83 7 

11% Zlto CettHud 296 110 4 
21* 16to CnllPS 104 90 10 
TV* 20% CnLaEI 
13* 8b CcMPw 
21b 16 CVJPS 
11% 2* CenlrDI 
12% fib CnlrvTI 
X* 17* Can will 
X* 15b Crt-to«d 
30* 16* CnsAIr 
25% IB* Cbmpln 
27% am Cftmi of IX 
S«* 45% Quni p» 400 
9% 7b oiomSp 
4% 1 vlChiiC 

1% to vICMwt 
4* 1* vlChrtpf 

63* X’A Chase 

48* 39% Chase pf 

56% 58b Chase a! 655*1X1 
56% X Chase pf10O4e2D.i 
16% ChetaMi 3 U 9 
32% 24% CtesimJ 152 50 11 
44* 27% ChmNY 248 AS 5 
44% 27% ChNYOf 107 52 
56b 51 OlNVal 4 Ole 75 
39* X ChMPk U4 30 ID 
3B% 31 ChesPn 200 60 10 
3t 29% Chevm 200 60 9 

2D0 IWH ChlMhW 104 

BO’A 53* ChlMInf 
29% 16% QUPnT 
11b 7% OikFull 
58b 29% ChrlsCr 
I3to Wi Christn 
13H 9% Chroma 
58 44% Qnrnaf 

33b 25b Qtnrsir 
77 45b Chubb 

63* 50% " ' 

20% 13% 


19% 13% dflCI 
ClaC 


- JIKPBl 7»e 13 
6to CtaWr 32 9J 
5b Ctelrss , 

larkE 1.13 30 
lawH s 

TvCH 108 55 
200 9J1 

204 715 

'El Of 700 120 
_vpk J01 
Ivpfepf 1.1 II 
18% 10 Chrakpf ..921 
■ Clorax 




43* 26 to 

2s% 1 4b __ 

38b 25* CluetIP 

S to 9% Coactnr 
b 16* CaastlS 
60* 29 ClfiDf 



19% 13% 

32% S% „ 

28% 22% Cola Pal 
49* 39* CalaPaf 
24b Uto Cal Aiks 
16% 9 CMFdsi 
30to 25b COIFUrt IOO 40 
65b 49V. Colllnd 250 4J 
Mto 26b Cal Gas X1S 93 
a 48 CaIGspf 508 130 
21b 16* C5D of 202 110 
114 101 CSO 0<nl5O5 M3 
SB sto Comb In 216 
37* 23b CinbEn 
X* ■ Comdls 
18% 15% CoraMII 
29% iv. Comdra 
32% 26 CmwE 
32b 25% CwE Pi 
18% 13% CwEpf 
18% 14* CwE pf . __ ... 
U 66 CwEpfBIOO 90 
76% 59* CwE Pi 8J8 IU 
24b 19* CwE pf 
26% 22* CwEpf 
76% S CwE pf 
30% 20* ComES __ . _ 
97 78b CamESpVOD 10.7 

38% 22b Comsat 13 X7 
35b 23to CPSVC 3 
35b 23* Com par OO 
24% 72% COfMPSC 
45% 11% CptvSrt . 

3*b 24* conAas TOO 
20 16 Come ■ ~ 

31 21* CnnNO 


9% 19% 19% — to 

’B’RTBtB 

lij im 2W6 Kto + to 
M 22% 22* 22*— to 
1331 25* 25* 25to 

13 25 24* 24*— * 

376 X 37b 37% + to 
171 7to 6% 7to 

45 20% 2Jto 20*—% 
446 25b 25 25b + to 

109 40* 38b 39*—* 

49 Uto 15b 16% + * 
611 IZb 12* 12% + to 

14 26* 25% 26% 

36 14% 14b 14%— to 

9» 36 35% 35*- to 

16 24% 24b 24% 

587 126b 125*126* + * 

3 43b 43 43to — to 

290 9 8* 9 

113 41% 41* 41b + % 

88 33 21* 21% + * 

796 24b 24% 24% - to 

122 25V. 24b 25 — to 

156 18* 18 18* + * 

126 25ft 2Sb 25% +■ * 

434 13* 12% 13 

44 19% 19% 19b — * 

1451 4% 4* 4b + to 

58 11% 11* 11% + * 

14 17% 17% 17%— * 

65 24* 24* 24% + V. 

67 Ii 29% 29% 

1716 22% 30b 21 — * 

4 23* 23* 23* + to 

17 49% 49* 49% + to 

164 8 7% 7% — to 

79 2to 2to 2to _ 

, 27 3* 2% 2* 

1431 Slto X* 53% + % 

4 46b 46* 46* + to 

10 54 84 54 — to 

53 + % 

21b 
27* 

X* + % 
36% + % 
I* 54* — 1* 
I* 34*—% 
- 33*- % 

37b— % 
1* + * 
.. .. 59* +- * 
19 Mto 24% 24V. — to 
U 8% 3% Bto + to 
31 57% 57 57 — % 

5 lOto lOto U%— * 

590 13 12% 12%—* 

25 57* 57 57 + * 

4240 37* 36* 36b 

1503 65% 64* 65% 

14 56% 56b 56%— to 

379 14% Mb l«to 

199 24% 24* 24% + to 

40 49 48to 48to— - to 

673 18% 18 18% + to 

100X31* 31* 31* 

60*73 72* 73 + * 

400i 72 71* 71*— 1* 

280 Iff* ITto IH— * 

24 HU X 31 - to 

103 19* 19 19* — b 

13 1770 25* 34% 24b— b 

6 2818 43% 42% & + % 

5 81 B1 81 — % 

5 63 7% 7b 7% + * 

751 10% 9% TO* + % 

32 IM X to 30% 30to— to 

14 XI 12* lib 12 -h% 

9 X 18* U 18% 

50 20* 20* 20* 

6 mm 23 2Zb 22% — * 

2001 58* 58% SB* 

51 9b 9* 9%— to 

3 Uto 11* llto 
61 10% 9* into — to 

629 42* 41% 42*— to 

231 30% 20 20% * to 

749 36* 35b 35b — % 

130 10% Uto 10% — to 

322 29% 29 29 — * 

2 49 49 49 —1 

5 48% 47b 47b— 1* 

42 14 2880 70* 69% 70 + * 

3479 19% 18 18% + % 

AS 19 95 26b 26* 26% + to 

Sil X 1218 27 26% 26b — to 


008 U 8 
M 73236 



lOOZ 48 48 

902 23% Zlto 23% — to 

287 13% 13 13*— * 

189 29 28% 28% 

70 59% 59% 59* + to 

869 W 34% 34% — % 

10 50% 50% 5Db 4- to 

2x20% 20% 28% + to 
. 2DDW109 W7*iq7*— 2% 

5.T 7 263 43 G% 42% — to 

X7 ID 1179 28 27 Z7* — to 

IO W 277 20 19* 1 9b + to 

20 16 20X 17b 17% 12b + to 

778 IB 9% 9b 
2690 28 27% 27b— to 

2 28 27to 27% 

140 Mto Mto Mto— * 

112 17% Ub 16b— * 

1000X 87% 07% 87% + % 

I50z 70% 70% 70% + % 

I 23b Ob 23b— * 
12 25* 25 25* % * 

800r 77 77 77 — * 

• 50 27% 27* 27*— » 

JOT 92 92 92 —1 

_ 10 292 X 32% m + to 
1.1 17 3494 25b 25% 2S%— to 
14 8 34 25* 24% 25*— * 

11 164 am 23* 23*—% 

1426 11% 10% 10% — to 

19 13 XI X 14% 3S + * 

160 80 10 U Uto 13% 13% 

240 8.9 9 3 29* 29 29V. + to 


36 

100 100 
147 XI 
l.W no 
280 T1.9 


137 ion 

207 lto 

&49 no 
252 ?J 


12 Men* 
HKfiLaw Stock 


Dtv. YU. PE 


51s. 

UteHlgftUnr 


oom 
totemw 


15* 12% 

38 2714 

47V. X* 
50 39b 

36 Z3to 
47* 38% 

8% 4* 

33% 19 
54* 31* 
56 X* 
31* 15% 
25* 14 
28% 14% 
55* 31% 
Mto 14* 
23to 14% 
28to 14% 
18* 10% 

17 9% 

29 15% 

18 9b 
47b 31% 
10% 4% 

4to % 

11* 4 
24% 20% 
38to 15% 
40* 33* 
1% . % 

39 27b 

41to 31 
20% 74% 
77 15 

16* 8% 
23b 17% 
27% 17* 
15* 11 
43% 30% 
10* 5b 
39* 32 
52* a 
53* 49* 
24 18% 

70 40b 

44% 27% 
50* 43b 
65* 50% 
35* 22* 
33% 14* 
88* S3* 
10b 8% 
38b 30b 
52* 33% 


Conroe OO 30 
CnnsEd 240 70 
CenEpf 4j&5 10O 
ConE «; M 1X5 
CnsFrf T.IO 3A 
CnsNG 2X2 &5 
Canspw 

CnP MB 450 UA 
CrtP BID 705 144 
CnP ME 733 14 J 
CnPurV 440 1X5 
CnPDrtJ 160 150 
CnP erT 178 150 
CnPpfH 748 145 
CilPprR 400 1X9 
CnP orP 198 158 
CnP or N 185 1X4 
CnPorMX50 145 
CnP orL 203 145 
CnPprS 4JQ 154 


&S 


CnP prK 243 
CntfCn 2M) 
Contm 
Cantu rt 
Cntlllpf 
CIIIHM 
oil Info 

Cent TO IOO 88 
CfDafa 37 41 
CnOtpf 450 134 
vlCaokU 

Coopr 152 42 
Cooor pf 280 72 
CaprTr JB 25 
Coapvls 40 TO 
Copwld 221 
CpwtdPfXRI I 
Cardura 04 
Corr In 56 
CanjGs 128 _ 
CnfCrd 2*r 19 
Crane 140b 43 
CrnYR s 

CrckNPf 243a 48 
CrraoK 120 52 
CrwnCk 

CrwZM 1.30 X7 
CrZMpf 4U 108 


'K 


CrZel MC450 
Culbra OO 25 IB 
Cal Inef s 

QraiEn 120 34 
CUTTInC 1.10dU4 
CurfW 120 34 
Cydoos 1.10 22 


6 173 13* 
I 1282 34% 
. 2B*& 44 
II 47% 
r? 556 32* 
912049 42% 
805 6% 

350z30b 
130t 51b 

4 24 
X 24* 
rah 53 
27 25* 
8 25b 
18 73 
3 17* 
26 15% 
20 25b 
10 16* 
38% 
_ 7* 
624 1% 

426 50b 
« * 

J 72 10% 
1199 22% 
1621 17% 
2fflte34 
62 1 

16 415 36* 
11 37% 

40 

16 21 
II 78 .. . 
18 1150 45% 
14 44 8% 

11 370 37* 
X 2035 48* 
239 53b 
12 23 X* 

1J Ut 65% 
17 806 36* 
120 46* 

1 57* 
32 32% 
19 1263 14% 
4 <0 64* 

40 10% 

16 49 35b 

8 75 47* 


18* 

24% 

11 % 


13 13* 

33* 34% — M 
X* X* — * 
47% 47% 
ji% szto + u 
41% 42* + % 
6% 6% 

30b 30b 

51* 51b + * 
52* 52* 

23 28% + % 

23* M — % 
26 24 —lto 

S3 53 
25 25* — to 

25 25* 

24b 25 + * 

17* 17* 

ISto 15% + to 
25% 25b— * 
16 Uto 
37b Mto— % 
7* 7* 

1% 1*— * 
49^50^+to 

10 10 — % 
22% 22% - 
16* 17%+T.i 
33„ 33 s-J 
ft 1 r~ i • 
35% 36* + * 
37* 37b 
15b 15% + * 
21% 21*— to 
9% 9% + * 
llto IB* 

24% 24% + to 
11* 11% + Ik 
47% 45 +!to 
Bto B* 

X* 37 +* 

47 47% — 1% 

53% 53% + % 
23 23* + to 

64 64%— to 

36* Mto— * 
46b 46* 

57V. 57to 
32 32 

14 14%— to 
63% 64* 

10* 10% + * 
35to 35* — to 
48V, 49* +1* 


X* 15* 
13% 9* 
30% 72 
9% 5% 
15 6% 

38% 16* 

76 31 

5% 4 

lib 6% 

72 14* 
45* 29% 
20% M* 
66 S2W 
40% 24% 
33* 24V. 

26% 20* 

SZb 31% 

10 4* 
44% 34* 
28* 72 
37% 30% 
17% M 
67b 51* 
64b 49* 
25% 21* 
28% X 
27b X* 

27* 21* 

25* 21 
9 * 22 % 
29% X 
X* 26b 

34% 27% 

IMtoIX 
24 U* 
18b 10b 
21 14% 

38% 34b 
X* 20* 

11 6V. 
57* 31% 

125% 35* 
95 54* 

23* 16 
6* 4* 

10* 6% 
34* 25* 

73 16* 

61* a 

33* 23V. 
42* 32* 
37* 26% 
50 36* 

28% 3* 
15* 11 
24* 17% 
X* 16* 
47* 32% 
61* 46* 
40 3f* 

SO 39* 
35% 27b 
85* 68 
80* 64 

77 X* 

35% X 
83b 57% 
17* 13* 
18% 13% 
18 14 

18 14V. 

»W 8* 
77 20* 


□alias -66 30 10 
DomonC 20 15 
Dana Co 128 M 7 
Danahr 12 

□anal .18b 25 
DortKrs 1J6 4J 12 
DalaGn 15 

Daltdn 

Dicba 24 12 8 
Doyen 24 15 8 
DOYlHd J4 15 16 
DavJPL ZOO 112 8 
DPLM 7J0 110 
DoanFd 56 15 18 
Deere IOO 19 38 
Deimp 151 U 9 
DaitoAr UOO 25 6 
Deltona 

DlxCtis 104 20 17 
DanMtS 120 50 12 
DeSoto 1.40 42 10 
DetEd 153 11J 6 
DafEPf 758 125 
DatE M 726 120 
DE MF 275 109 
DEprR 124 127 
DE pfO 113 126 
DEMP X12 124 
DE MB 275 109 
DEMO 140 127 
DE MM 147 126 
DE prL 400 112 
DEpfK 4.12 1X1 
□EpfJ 1568 1X8 . 
Dexter 50 19 12 
DIGlw 64 30 
DlomS I26H11J 
DlaSh of 400 115 
DloSOf n 70c 32 
OkmaCp JO 32 3 

Dlefalds IOO 20 11 
Dial la] 14 

Dbnov 120 16 47 
DEIS 160 86 7 

DMrsIn 3 

Dome o -12 
DoraRs 272 92 9 
Donald 66 3J 9 
Don lev 1.16 22 14 
Doner 120 18 13 
Dover JB 26 12 
DawCh 150 SJ 13 
DowJn 28 20 19 
Downey 3 

Draw, JO 40 
Drasr 80 O 16 
□rexB 200 105 
Dreyfus 60 9 15 

duPail 380 50 15 
duPnfpf J50 95 
duPnfDf 450 98 
DUkeP 260 82 8 
DiAenf 870 105 
□ukapt 020 109 
Duke Pl 2JS9 HU 
Duteot 365 1LI 
DunBrd 720 11 X 
DaaLI 206 1X7 7 
DuaM 257 125 
DuqpfG 210 125 
DuaprK 2W 128 _ 
DvcoP? 60a U 12 
DvnAm 20 O 12 


26 16b 
199 U* 
509 23% 
X 8% 
131 7% 

1589 37* 
XX 36% 
260 4b 
It 7% 
237 17* 
1377 38* 
364 U 
I8te as 
if 37% 
946 25% 
100 23* 
154) 39* 
19 9* 
201 37b 
63 24* 
9 32* 
X77 14% 
lOOz 61* 
lOOz 61* 
X* 
25% 
49 75 
1 25* 

it r 

KJ 27* 
M 30* 
34 31% 
1 114 
23 21 
164 17 
1321 15% 
9 36* 
706 21% 
13 9* 

146 35* 
8468 109 
897 86% 
49*32* 
23 5% 
712 9% 

7144 29% 
76 20b 
429 52% 
18 X 
140 33% 
2282 34* 
446 40* 
144 24 

3136 12% 
817 18% 
10 19% 
E92 66 
4916 59% 
17 17 
352 46 
1349 31% 
liter 80* 
30: 75 
1 26% 
« w* 

975 X 

lOOz 17b 
2170: 17* 
»0 1£% 
)0 ){% 
5 24% 


16* 16* + * 
12* 13to + to 
23% 23*— to 

I* a* 

7to 7*— to 

36 36* — % 
34% 34% -1% 

4% 4b + * 
7to 7*— to 
U* Uto— 1 
X* 38 - to 
17% 17% + to 
65 65 +1 

37* 37*— * 
25* 25* 

23* 23* + % 
38% 39 + to 

9 9 

37* 37* + to 
23* 23b— % 
32* 32* + * 
14% 14% — to 
61* 61* 

61* 61* +1% 
25* 25* 

25* 25*- * 
24b 24b — * 
24* 25* + % 
25* 25* 

26* 26% — * 
26% 77% — * 
30 30* 

30% 31% + % 
114 7M —* 
20b 20b— to 
16% ltto— * 
15* 15% — * 
Mto M* 

21* X% + * 
9* 9* 

35 35*— * 

106% 1D7 
85* 86* + % 
22 22 — * 
5* 5to — to 
9* 9* — to 
29% 29* 

20* 20* — * 
51% 51 to — to 
31* 32 
33 33% 

33to 34*— * 
30* 39 — 1% 
23% 24 4- to 

12* 12% + * 
18* 18* 

19 19 

65 65 — 1* 

53* 59% + % 

37 J7 — * 

45 46 

31* 31% — * 
30* 80*— * 
75 75 — * 

Wt 26% 

34* 34% + % 
71* 71% 

14% 15 
17* 17*— to 
16% 17* +1% 
16% 16% — to 
13% 13% + to 
24% 24% 



43 29 EGG AS M 17 

17b 13V. EQKn 106 8J 

32b 23% ESvSt JO 20 13 

X* X EaoteP 104 4J 9 

20% 12 Eases A4 25 

13% 3% EratAIr 11 

5 1% EALwfO 

2% * EALwtA 

X% 7b EMfrpf 2J5L 
TS’A 9* EAlrpf8 2O0k 
33* 11% EAlTPfC 
28% X* EostGF 1J» 57 150 
23b M* EastUtl 206 9.9 8 

50* 41* ESKOdS 220 SjO 13 

60* 47* ED ton IOO 20 7 
1S% i (T- Echilni 
32% 70 Eckert 

32b Mto EdKBr 
18% 14% EDO 
34* Mb E award 
14* 10% EITora 
12 7% Elcor 

5* 2b ElacAs 
24* 15% EtctsP S 
U li* Elgin 
M 2% EhcM 
78V, 65% EmrsEI 260 19 12 
Mto 4% Em Rod ,8441 U « 
30* U* ErarvA JO 29 13 

33* Mto Erahart UOb xr 9 

22* Mb ErnpDl 176 OA 7 

S 4 Emppf a 1QJ 

lito lib Ensraen 104 70 9 

* EnExr _ 

»b x Enaicp 37 29 10 

X It* Eras Bus J6 27 12 

»to 17% E mar Ch IOO 77173 

106% 94 Eftietl pflaoe 90 
x% 17b EnsEsn UOb a 2 
2% 1% Ensrca X 

13% 9to Entera 

19* 15* EntmE 2O0ai54 

21% 17% Enlexln 106 70 11 

35 19% ERUtes 1.14 30 M 

4* 2% Ecwlrak 

73<A llto Egmkpf 2JI HO 

30% 29h Ehmkpf 

50* 31b EatRos 172 

n 9* Eowllec 36 

14% 10b Ertamnt 

24* 12% EssBus 



12 Month 
HWlLow Stock 


Dhr. YM. PE 




Om 

awt.anH 


34% 15 EsexC 6 
TB 15% EsfrflM 
21* 12* EtftVl 5 
6 1* vIEvanp 

9* 3% v Evan p 
12* 3to viEvnpfl 
43% 32* ExCaiO 
IT* 14* Excel sr 
54* 41 Exxon 


70 11 5 

72 40 21 41 

06 24 M 357 
78 

I 52 

i 2 

172 40 11 130 

LSMIU If 
300 6J 9 7310 


Bto 22V. 22to— % 
Wto 16% 16%— to 
23b 23% 23*— * 
lb 1% 1%— to 
2b Zto 2* + to 
3* 3* 3%— to 
41% 41 41 — to 

Mto 16* 16*— % 
52to 50% 52 + to 


70 52 PMC 270 30 34 

86* 6» FAICM 235 28 

X 20* FPL Cn 1.96 U 7 

13% 9* PabCfr X 18 X 

13b 10 Facet 8 

20% 8% Falrchd 70 XI 

39% 23* PalrcM 160 127 

16b 11% FoIrW .18 IO 9 

V 15* FamDIs 70 .9 X 

19* Ub Rxstel OO 63 12 

38« X FrWsIF 
28* 15% Farah 
13 8* FovDro 

6* 4* Fedora 

43* 29% FedICo 
52* 31* PedExA 
39 30b FdMes 

22to 14 FedNM 
75 16% FedIPI 


30* 2Sb FPanpf 
SRIt 


08 40 9 
70 20 19 
JHi S 8 
104 45 9 

IOO 40 10 
.16 0 
70 20 17 
271 87 
106 60 14 
OO 40 14 
X54 47 8 
130 44 15 
IOO 30 12 


2M 

V 

4 

*§ 

6 

43 

im 

277 

TBlS 

60 

1456 


25 1 

19% L . 

65% 48* FedbSt 
32 22* Fairo 

35 25* Fldcsf 

11* 5* FlnCpA 051 
5* 4% Fines irf 40 IZO 
37% 27b FlrtCPRl 625H9J 
6% 2* PnSBar 

22% Uto Flrasfti OO 42 14 
27% 14 FtAtlS 40 19 9 
58* 51 Ft All pf 675*11.1 
43 25* FfBfcSv (JO 45 7 

34 73 FBkRS 1JU XI 14 

46% 23* FBoflfS IOO 24 12 
Mto 19% FstCMc 1J2 64 
X* 44* FChl a pf 576*117 
17* Mb FtflTex m 54 10 
4SK 35 FfHTKpf 554*149 
44* 32* FfBTxpf 5730150 
19% 6* Ftaty 7 

28b 12b F Fed Ax 48b 24 9 
60 41 FFB X12 19 7 

55% 36* FlntslB 259 U 7 
34b 23b FlnM pf 137 84 
Uto 7* FIMfcss 74 U 9 
30% 16 PlNatnn 20 

7% 5* FstPa 
30b Z3% FstPa of 242 97 
X% 25* FfUnRI 200 70 14 
28* 17% FfVoBfc 08 30 9 
35% 19% FtWISC 1J0 37 10 
55* 46* FWISCPf 675 117 
42* 25* Fischb 108 40 

13 B* FMsFd jOSb A 

43 25b FlFFllG 8 1 J2 30 8 

52b 42* FltF pf 4310 U 
28b 18% Fleet En 44 13 9 
39b 30* Flora no 100 20 12 
13% 11* FlexlPt 141 124 
29b 19% FloMS [5 .16 J 17 

X IS Float PI 14 

45* 31* FJoEC .160 4 12 

29% 23 Fla Pro 116 87 8 

18% 11% F laSt I 40 24 14 

4% 3b FlwGen 
X 14b Flower 44 13 II 

-mvh 14* Fluor 40 20 

59 47* FaoJeC 270 41 11 

51% 40% FordM 140 54 3 

13* 10% FtDaar U* IOO 

llto 56* FiHawd 104 13 18 

15* 10b FasJWh 44 30 11 

13 7b FaxStP 48 54 12 

32% 24% Faxbnt 104 47 74 

Z7 22 Faxmvr 15 

22% 18% FMEPn l.HteSJ 

13b 9* FMGCn 
IIP* 7A FMOG UHiaiJ 5 
sm Mto Frame 40 XI U 
32% 22 Frfetm 40 15 X 
26b 21b FrusM 70 J 6 

32* 35b FruhfM 200 69 

36% 24% FlKfiia 40 U I 


888 63* 62 fib— 1 
1 79 79 79 — ft 

2875 23% 23% 23b 

92 

m to n 

28* 26 28to + * 
12 11% lift— to 

21% X* 2lto— * 
14 U M — * 
36* 3» 35*— % 
IS* llto llto— to 
8b 6% 8*— to 

4* 4b 4b— to 

41* 41b 41b— b 
44% 43b 43*— to 
33b 33W 33% + % 
Uto 17b 17% — % 
ISA T7to 17* 17% + to 
9 2d* 25% M* 

28 23b 23 23 — b 

13 17% 17* 17* 
470X54% 54* S4b— b 
314 27* 26% 27% 

19 26 25b 26 

1675 6 5% 5% + % 

10 5 5 J + to 

19 32b 32% 23% — to 
26 $% 5 5* + to 

1773 19 18% ISto— to 

175 23b 23b 23*— % 
110x58 56b 56*— 9k 

2T3 56b 35* 35b 

617 &% 37% 38 — % 
2109 20% 20* 23% + to 
13 46 45% 45% + b 

XI lib 11 llto + b 
25 37b J7 37b + ft 
1 35ft 35* 35*— * 
IB 7 6% 6%— to 

1866 27% K% 26%— 1 
66 53 5Z* 52% — %. 

292 46% 46to 46% + to 
83 28% 28b 2S% + b 
184 8% 8% 8* 

If 38* 30% 30* + to 
482 6b 6 6* + to 

M 27b 77 27 + to 

23 27b 26b 26b— b 
60 23* 23b 23%—% 
94 35% 35 35 — b 

1030Z 53* 53* 53* 

111 5 25 25 — b 

37 12% 12 ITto -ft ft 
615 35% 34* 34U 
456 51% 51% 51b 
877 19 18% ISto — to 

ISO 35% 35 35 — * 

4 13 13 13 — to 

5 V 22 % 22 % 22 to — to 
180 25b 24b Mb— * 
3 39 38b 38b 

533 26* 26 26b- to 

41 16* 16% 16% — Vk 
125 Sto .4% 4%- to 
259 19% 19% 19% 

567 14% Mb 14* 

9 54* 54to 54*— to 
3733 45* 44* 44% — to 

10 12% 12* 12* 

338 X 79b 81 + b 

509 lib 11% 11%- b 
35 12% 12 12b + b 

98 25* 24% 25 + to 

57 24 23% 23%—% 

75 » 18% 15%—% 

90 lib 11b 11%_ b 
157 SO 9b 9b- b 
915 19% 19 19M 

7 24* 23% 24% + to 
582 24b 34% 24* + to 
93 39b 29ft 29* 

30 30b + b 


97 


llMonlti 
MMiLp* Stock 


Mv.Yte.PE 


Sil. 

HKsHWtLCM 


QuoLarac 



I 


S' 


64 49 
46% 34b 

65 SO* 
19% lib 
24* 13 
17 S 
27* 20% 
21* Mb 
20b 15* 


35% Mto ICind 104 46 12 

19% 14% | CM it JSt 30 

11% Ob ICN 66 

33 22b ICN pf 170 IOO 

18* 141k INAfn 102 11.1 

Z7b 23 IPTImn LCe SO 
17* 14b IRTPrslJO 90 7 

ITT CP 10a _ 

ITTpfK 403 63 

ITT pfO 500 U 

irrpfN 22s 40 

TTpft 400 70 

U IM 00 50 

dahoP lUl u 

deals 

llPawr 164 114 

IPOwpf 110 HU 

. .fPowpf in no 

X 15b IIPOWPI ix iu 

38* 30b llPgwpf A12 11 J 

36b 77 llPowpf 338 110 

54* 46 JIPowDf SOS HO 

37>A M* II Paw Pf 400 llO 

MU M im_ 31 15 

40b Xb impChm lij* 50 

12 7to imelCp 

15b 9% INCO JO 17 

106* « lrxUMpf120G 117 
19% 14% IndIMpf 113 llO 

20% lib tndfMpf 125 1L8 

28% X% IndIGs S 204 70 8 

9b 4b inaxca on 

53* 39 InserR 200 5.1 17 

37* 28 InaRpf 273 67 

15* U inorTec J4 30 27 

35 19% fnidSft JBf 

48b 38% InldStPf 475 1IO 

Xb 16*.ine11co 170b SS 9 

6% 3% InsiRs 

Mto 11% intoRse I 

28 19 IntaRpf 303 120 

35% 25b IntgRpf 475 I3J 

9% 7to fttlfoa n 
Mb 8 IniRFn 

19% 16% llatSa 

73% 55b intorco 

13 9b Intrfst 

53% 41 Intrffi 

12* Bft IntfiMd 
Mto 15% IrttAlU 

US to 116 IBM 

29* i6* iractn 

33 25 

lib 4F. 

7* 3% IntHrwt 

68 2Bft InfHpfC 

42 23 IntHpfA 

Mb 19 

9 
11 


II 


479 Xb Xto Xb— % 
78- Ub Mb 14% + ‘ 
237 10 9b 9% 

24 27b 27 27 — b 

12 17* 17b 17b— b 
17 M 23% 23% 

41 13% 15b 15b + b 

20 10 4771 34* 33% 34 — b 
31 44b AM 64b + % 
14 61 61 61 —1 

1 496 45* 43* + to 

7 Mto 64% 64* + to 
187 rat n% 11* 

582 21% Xb 21% 

1034 5% 5* 5%— b 

758 X* X% 2T%- b 
lBQz 19* 19% 19* + to 
5Qr 18 18 IS — % 

MOz 19* 19* II* 
2SBE34* 34* 34* + to 
irate 3«b 33% 34% — % 
2S5 57* 32b 52b + b 
34 33% 33% 33% + % 
‘ 2X* 28* 25%-f-ft 
36% 36b 36% 

7% 7* 7*— b 

2674 11% Ub TUb 
10X102% 102* 109% + b 

8 18% 18* 18*— to 

7 19% 19 19% + to 

31 25% 25* 25% + to 
161 5* 5 5ft — to 

193 51% X% 51b— % 

9 35. 35 35 . 

5 14b 14b Ub— to 

264 21% Xb Xb + to 
14 43* fib 43b— to 
785 17% 17 17 - b 

62 4b 4* 

IBS IK Mb 
11 23% 25b 

13 32 Xto X* + U 
979 7ft 7b Tb— to 

7 9% 9* 9% + to 

92 llto 19 IT* + to 
494 65* 63b 64% + to 
1149 10b 10 10%— to 

25 48 47* 48 + Ml 

523 9b 9* 9b— b 

_ . 26 Tito 17 17 — b 

__ SL3 12 10988 125 123*124% + % 

JO 15 10 3M 26b 26b 26b + b 

IMF lav 1.12 15 13 383 Xb 30to 31% + b 

Intfttorv 1687 7 6b 6b— M 

236 4b 4 4%— to 

SI 48% 43b 4K— b 
11 27% » X —1% 

33 21% 21 21b — to 

619 39% 38% 39* — to 
465 39% 37b 38b— 1% 
1154 46b 45* 46 + % 

112 9% 9b K— to 
533 44* 43 43*— 1 

203 iWA 39% 39b +Jto 

29 31% Xto- XU— to 
98 19% 19% 19* 

20Qz 20% 20b 23b — b 
43 9% 9% 9% 

83 19b 19 19 —to 

65 38% 30% 33%+ % 
JflDyXto X X — to 
35 32b 32b 32% — % 
368 33b 33 33% + to 

110 lib Uto 11 1 
90 35% 34* M — % 

30 52* 52* 52*— b 


1/ — « 


2.100110 
303 40 12 
JB 50 5 
200 54 I 

31 43 6 


intHpfb 

44 34 IntMte 260 66 

40* 24b inliMult 1J6 40 

57b 44b IntPaor 200 52 S3 

16b 9b IntRcs 413 

5*% 35* InfNrfli 200 57 10 

OK X •IrripbGp 103 27 13 
22 13b IntBcOa - 13 

2Zb 17* IntstPw IM » I 

21 IS InPwpf 228 110 

13to 9% intSecn 10 

Xb 16% Iowa El 1JU IDO 9 

35 25 lawVIG 274 89 7 

2X6 77b lowflt pf 2X IU 

37% 26% lowaRs 341 U 1 

40 30% ipalco 304 9.1 9 

13b 9b IpeoCp J6 21 13 
40* 27% IrvBrtk 106 50 

53 42b 


IrvBkpf 4J4a 90 


38b 21% GAF 
37* 27b GATX 
32to 11b 
78% 54 

Wife 

7% 3 

£* ^ucpinc 
15b 7% Geortit 
22* 13b Galen 
12b 9b GeinllC 

12% 10 Gerall! 

Xto 31% GnCarp 
18% 14% GAInv 
58% 31% GflBCSh 
39* 22% GOnm 
20* 9 GnData 
13* 10* GnDevn 

84 60% GnDvn TOO U 8 
6S>i. S3 Gan El 220 39 It 

118* S3 GnFds 250 21 18 
9b 4b Gafttme 7 

18 11b G Hosts JO U 3 

23* ij% Gainst 35 IS 
65b 47b GnWUH* 224 36 

85 65b GMOt SOOr 7 A 

46* 16* GMES 051 .1 
43b 35% GMOt Pf 375 90 
SBV. 46 GMolM 500 96 
8% m GNC .16 30 16 
15* Iffl GPU 7 

93* SI GenRa 156 1.9128 
14b 6 GnRetr 6 

51% 39b GnSIml IOO 43 10 
81* 62 GTFlpf 8.16 1IU 



6b 2b Gansco 
19b Ob GnRad .10 U 44 
Mb 18 Const g 120 58 
26* 19 GstPt 148 U 
M 23% GenuPt 1.13 30 13 
27% 20* GcPac SI 18 77 
M* 23* CaPwpt 100 122 
30 25b GaPwpf 2300 83 

30b 24b GaPwpf 304 120 
31% 26% GaPwpf 3J6 HQ 
23% TB% GaPwpf 256 119 
23b 13% GaPwpf 252 1Z1 
Ub 22 GaPwpf 275 109 
68* 54* GaPw pf 780 123 
67* 54* GaPwpf 772 121 
37% 20* GertiPd 1J2 40 12 
23* 12% GerBSc .12 
23%- 13* Getty a .16 
72% Sto GIANT 
12% 5b GlbrFn 
27 17b GlffHItl j52 

67 48% Glltrtfe 260 

Mb 11% G lease 
14b 7b GkniFd 
Ift 


6* 

22% 

Uto 

4 

X 


OSe 
.1 31 


3 12 
-7341 

3 

75 

12 

0 3 


a 


GtablM 

5b GlabM PMJ3J 
8b GidNua 19 

lb GklNwt 

16* GSdWF JO J 6 

33 34% GdriCh 1J6 £0 

ft 75 Gdrcti at 7S5 V3 

9b 8% Gdrch pf .97 100 
30b 34b Gaadrr 140 U 7 

16b Mb GanttJ 92 U 19 

37% 1* Gould 08 19 


45 38* Grace 280 

34* 26% Graaors Off 
03 


Gratrar 
21* 10% GIAFst 
13% 14% GfAtPc 
Mb 30* GrtJcin 
X* 15 GNIm 
41b 32b GfNNk 
29b 22% GtWFbl 
20 13b GMP 

29% 22% GreenT 
30% 22 Gravfi 
*% 2b Grafter 
13% 9 GrawG: 

IM 6b GruOEl 
36% 24% Grumn 
7% 4b Gruntal 
27% 20 GulUnl 
45b 26b GtfWM 
18% 11* GullPr. 

14ft 11% GfRfUr 704 111 
41 30* Glf5U pf 400 107 

32% 25b GlfSU PT 185 113 
35* 28% GIISU pr 400 135 
20% 14 Gallon OO 10 



509 

336 IM 
520 62b .... 
1855 68% 47b 
82 36* 35* 
16 40 39% 

27 52% 51* 

567 14% 14% 

“ MW 
452 39% 38ft 
15600x 75* 75b 
077 3b 3 
415 9 Hb 

113 X 20b 
1 20* 20* 
2* X!4 30b 
968 Xb 20% 
fl 2fU W* 
280 27ft 27* 
61 27% 26 
19 2fb 
13 21* Xto 
in m 20% 
•a 25% B 
150X 64 66 

50x 64 64 -i 

fS 32% 32ft 
m »% 17* 
SO 24 23% 

733 9% Fto 
550 7 6% 

223 25 IS* 
407 65b 64% < 
395 15% 14b 
1585 12 lib 
339 1?k lb 

117 5% 5% 

343 9b 9% 
92 2 1% 

® 30% 3RS : 
87 X 30% : 
Ifflte BS 85 I 
lOOz 9b 9% 
7089 26% M* : 

S3 16% 16% ■ 
17958 36% 34% I 
S41 38% 38 
719 31b 30% ; 
S3 16% 16 ; 

168 16 15b ‘ 

67 54* 52b ! 
3 17 16% 1 

119 37% 37* ; 
531 23* 22% J 
45 18b 17% 1 
853 26% 25* ; 
385 27% 27* : 
190 5ft 5 
59x 9% 9% 

96 *U ffft 
3S9 33% 33b : 
X 5* 5% 

9 24% Mb ; 

13 5466 43b 42% , 
58 IS* 14% 

6 779 12b 72* ; 
4001 41 39 i 

24 29% 29* I 
73 32% 32* ; 
9 4M 20b 19b : 


H 


3ZM 

32% 

1% 

llto 

rat 

15ft 

X* 

30 

20 % 

Xb 

68 % 

36% 

12% 

28b 

29% 

22b 


17% 

25% 

13% 

34 

U% 

25 

23* 

22% 

15% 

ISb 

23% 

38b 

SB* 

29b 

26% 

24% 

40« 

19% 

34 
X 

49% 

10ft 

3Wi 

33b 

23% 

□ft 

36ft 

73* 

37% 

57% 

B3b 

20% 

27ft 

9% 

Uto 

» 

43b 

67% 

35 
28b 


22b HcdlFB UOO 3J 
24* Hcthfn 180 7J2 11 
to Hallwd JB 64 16 
6 Halve} pf 56 63 
26ft fttamPa 1J6 34 14 
12 McmJS 1470 9.9 
17 HanJI 
16% Hand! t 
16 HondH 
16* Hawn 
35b HarBrj 




lJ4a 85 
JA 26 12 
46 34 20 
AB 23 21 
lJO 14 13 
56 IS 18 
X 


7% Ha 

24ft Horn ptB 3J0 134 
24% Ham pfC 2.13 84 
13 HraRws 40 35 10 
23ft Harris 88 3J 11 
10% i-krcGrp 9 

22 Hanoi US 44 10 
24% Harfnu 188 If W 
14ft HottSe 180 10.7 11 
17% HawEI 144 79 9 
9b HMMA 40a 4.1 8 

22% Haztefn 40 14 M 
9ft HazLob JO U 24 
13b HIHiAm M 

19 HITCrPn .18a .9 
10% HlfUSA 


J6 


u 

24 II 


10ft Hecks 
13b HedaM 
14% Hellmn 
16% Hefl* 

39b Heinz 
19% Heinz wl 
12b HafneC 

10 HeirnP ... _ 

30% HeocWs 140 44 If 
10* Hemes. JJI 32 

23 Herltcpf 140 50 
16ft Harmnn _ . IS 
35 Harahv 140 30 13 

5b newton 
Xb Hewlpk 

24 Hescel 
M% HlShear 

9b HJVait 
18ft Mllnltnl 
Xb Hiuon 
26* Hitachi _ . 

35* Hofidov 1 JO 
65ft HoHvB 140 


.17 14 


54 

uo : 

J34e 


16* HmPsb 5 

7 HtneGpf MO 11 J 
28ft HrasTke j JJI 
10 HirerFB JO II 4 
46* Honda .400 J 8 
53ft Humean 240 13 13 
20b HrzflBn U8 19 11 
22 HrzBn pf ZJSelQJ 


93 27b 
2065 25b 
483 1ft 
14 Bto 
967 MTfj 

62 14% 
34 26b 

203 X% 
23 10* 
45 17ft 

266 57 
195 29% 
IX 9* 

14 23 
34 25b 

5 15% 
1204 23ft 

106 17 
307 99% 
300 32b 

J* 17* 
.98 20% 
139 10ft 
38 25* 
22 12b 
6S5 Uft 
70 20% 
353 16ft 
BB 12% 
221 16% 
IX 18% 
144 » 
560 57* 
61 29b 

63 18% 
257 19ft 

230 36% 
547 16% 

6 3! 

37 tab 

370 44% 
10 6ft 
5636 32 
2 27 
3* 20b 
103 11% 
123 25 

267 57b 

SS S£ 

IU 76* 

H ^ 

14 9% 

481 25 
14 12% 

ion xto 

1304 61* 
3039(33* 
Z3x27to 


27b 27b 
25 25 —to 

lft 1b 
8% Bft— ft 
39% 39ft— ft 
14* 14% + b 
20% 20b + ft 
Zl Xb— b 
IBb IB* 

17 17* 

56* 56% + b 
aft 29b + to 
9% 9%— ft 
25 25 

25* 25*— to 
15% 15ft + ft 
22b 22% — * 
M% 16ft— % 

29 29% + % 
32* 32*—* 
Uft 16% 

20b 20% + ft 

9% 9ft— to 
25% 23ft _ 
11% 12b + to 
15ft 16 —2* 
28 28ft— ft 

15ft 16 — b 

12 * 12 %— % 
14 16% + b 

13% 18* 

28to 20ft— to 
56 56b— 1. 

28b Mb— b 
18% 18b— ft 
10b 18b—* 
36 SB — J* 

un uu— b 

X 30 — ft 
17% 13% — b 
46* 46ft + to 
6b 6b — ft 
31% Xft— ft 
26ft 26ft— ft 
20% 20% 

11% — • 

24* 

56% S7 — b 
30% 3M + to 

30 M— ft 

75 76* ... 

lift lift — % 

B is-* 

32* 32* + b 
27% 27% + % 


35b 20% JWTl U2 38 16 
37 23% J River *-J6 1J7 IB 

28* 14 Jonswy M2 8 10 
TM ffftt JaonF 1339113 
47* 34* JeflPH 1J2 3J -7 
31* 24% JorCpf ’ 400 127 , 

66* SO JorCpf SJO 127 
106 9M4 JBrCpf TL50 138 

Ub 14* JorCpf 218 125 
13% 6% Jowfcr 
49ft 30b jotnJn UO 3J> 
46% 38% JohnOn 1J60 46 
52 50% JhnCpf 425 &3 

27% Xto Joroon 1J0 4.1 U 
Mto Uft Jiwten I 3 U14 
27* 22% JoyMfO 1J0 6 l1 M 


44 30ft 29% 29%— * 
842 33% 33ft 33Vr+ b 
» 18% TOb IK + ft 

hk ini.im 11%—% 

264 43* 48 -.43ft— % 

m x* xn xto + * 

10963 S3 63 +1 

407900* 180* UO*— to 
6X 17%. 17V> 17* +'»( 
86 .«*, CFb, TXt — b. 
3903' 43% 43ftt-43%— * 
.66 40% 40b mh 
15 X* Xto Xto— b 
24 M* Mb 24*— ft 
43 24% 24ft 24*— ft 
305X 23* 22b 23 — to 


9* 7% 
20% Uto 
45% 33* 
41* 30% 
17 14* 

IK 12% 
20* 15 
U* 15% 
llto 7% 
24* U 
39* 30* 
20b 15% 
X* U% 

50% 3K 



M* __ 

13* 13* 

Uto Mto— % 
35* 35* + to 
13% 13% 

42% 43 + to 

17% 17% — b 
SBh 30ft — to 
13% 79 


29* 

Xto 

17ft 

4ft 

lb 

Ub 

19 

55 

25% 

68ft 

ub 

15 

29% 

10b 

27 

Mft 

4* 

13* 

25b 

28b 

57* 

X 

34% 

46* 

Ub 

25* 

4ft 

15b 

15* 

Mb 

50% 

79* 

32b 

90to 

77% 

46* 

21 * 

a 

Mb 

SS 

37 

54ft 

38% 

36% 

28% 

4ft 

20% 

27b 

53% 

9to 

65 

X 

23b 

22% 

23* 

27b 

21b 

Mb 

19% 

Xft 

37b 

13b 

a 

25* 

33ft 



22b LAC n 

24* LN Ho 2876 9J 10 
77U U-E Rv ZZZrlSA 
1 U-CCn 
1 LLCwl 
5* LTV 
V LTVA 
36 LTVpf 
8* LTV i 
32* LTV l 
BU LTVpf 
10* LQUM 
19% LodGs 
6% Lotonre 


32 

UO 65 3 

, JO 3J 

Lofrppf 284 I0J . 

7b Lomiiro J4 10 10 
1% LomSOi 194 

10% Lowflnt 56 il 15 
11b LeorPf . 30 73 
Xb LearPpf 281 ill. 
n LearSg 280 4J 9 
13 LeoRrtls AO 25 13 

SHiSGT^H !? 

l«k lSpS 

2 Lanital 
13* Loftmn 


a 


113 Mto 74 

JfzbS* 

* i 

1932 6 
7 9% * 

1 37* 37* 
234 12ft lib 
119 34 32% 

227 9 Hb 

79 12b 12 
242 24% 24* 
17 M M 
4 27* a 
52 8b 7% 

16 4 3% 

179 11 IK 
344 12 U* 

9 22 X% 
265 48 47% 

17 15% 15* 
103 33% 32 

33 «b 40 
45 lib 15b 
Mb » 


24% + ft 
Uto + 

37* -lb 
IK— to 
33 — * 


« {5^' a 



job U 16 
82 2.1 IB 

1JB011J 
a UU, 

42% LO'F L32 2J 8 
68* LOFpf 05 - 6J 
22* LibtyCP 22 28 14 
56b Lilly 123 38 U 301 89* BM 
12 Lunltds .M J '75 1789 23* fib 
33 Undid 184 44 11 
19% LfltePI 2840 9J 
61% Uttel ZJOe 38 9 
a utton pf 280 9 J 

39* uckhd JO* Li 
X LoctHe JO 28 14 
23ft Loews * U0a28 12 
23b Logical 80 J U 
27% uxnFIn L40 4J 12 
18% LornMl * 2M 9.1 11 
2 LemMwf 
19% LomaxMo 
Xb LnStar UO 7.T 6 
45b LoneSM 537 10J 
Sft LILCO 
45b ULPH 
21 LlLpfJ 
14% LIL PfX 
14 LILPfW 
14% LILpfV 
17* LIL pfU 
Mft LILpfT 
»* LILpfT* 

TZft LILpfO 

20ft LongDs 
23* Loral . 

IK LoGerrf 



J2 2.9 U 
52 \3 17 

S 5J 10 
38 U 

.. LaPBC JOb 48 41 
2£b LaPLuf 450 178 
me LaPLpf 116 156 
24* LOOVG* 





X* 

25% 

37% 

23* 


14 11* llto 

s ^ a 

37% Laws! 200 38 U ^ AM S% 

isttsss ss-Fss 

f&tssk as isai* 

IM LukOM 88 36 14 11 Ub Ub 


252 916 7 


2S + ?! 
3fi + S 

22b + ft 
Ub— to 




3 


MACOM 84 U 15 
MCA* _ 40 

: MCerp 1J0 7J 4 

MDC 8 U ID 

i MDU 272 7J 9 

34 MEI „ 50 13 14 

llto MGMGr M 15 40 

18% MtMGrafu 34 
10 MS MUa 80a J • 
2* MGMuwl 
7 MLCoova 
11* ml Inc n 
rib MBUo M M 
18% Matnts 8 
38* Maey l.U 2J 11 
' 4J5 9J 


UO 23 8 



ACQUISITION 

OPPORTUNITY 


A 

% 



- ARAREFJND; 

WORTHY OF INVESTMENT; IN DEMAND. 


12 Month 
Wehjjw Stuck 


0%. VldPe teHHWlLow Qoot.Ch’BB 


28% Tb Met Atf UJOC 
IK 10% Moohfn 80 M 
Xft 12% Manhfft 82 23 
17b Mb ManrCl .11 - 
42b a Mfi+ten 339 M 5 
56* 44* MftHpf 6.13e TZJ 
52% 41 MfrHpf 582011 J 
M 5ft vfMonvf 3 

25b 17b vMnvlPf 
23ft 21% MAPCO 1 JO 38 8 
5 1 M ai nil 

2 * Morale 

38* 25ft MarMld 18 U 7 
S3* 42 AtarMpf 4J74 94 
39b U Marfoni 81 J 36 
17% 1% MarfcC 82 13 
17% 13% MorfcPf 180 11 
MB TV Marrtof if J 15 
75* 48* MntlM 270 4J 17 
44ft 23* MartMS 1J0 11 
U 8b MoryK JMI 21 
36 24ft Masco 86 U 16 
ISto 10* MuiMr- JO U 19 
3* lftMaxvF 
30ft 22*MatCP 2M Uk3 
Uft Uto Mad DC 182 IU 
45b 40* MatauE Jfr J I 
17* 9b Mattel 15 

Ub 6% Motel wt . 

Xt Mb Ma*SSrU8 21 10 
59U 43 Mavtg • 2JB 50 11 
Xto 21 McOrpf 730 93 
26% 2H6 McDTPf 260- KLS * 
30* IK McOort 1JB 97 
Mb zto Mcorl wt 
Mto M McDkf JO 22 IS 
70 49% McDnld .SS U 14 

17 63b McDnD Ub 27 3 

St 37% JMcGrH • MO ' 3L5 M 
30% 25ft-McM0 
S 37 MdKMg.240 
Ii 9* McLean 
4%. 2ft McLeawt 
29% 22ft McNeil UQ 
44% 33- Mood 
24% 15b ’ 

39ft * 

K 

33b 24ft 
48* 25ft MetVtll 
7« X* Merest 
TOb 79% Merck 
id . raft stantUf 



265 3 2% 3 

tb 12* iib me 

22 Mb ' Uto Uft— to 
J X 1530 16% 15ft 16ft + ft 

1193 36V. 35% 35ft + ft 

as site, si Xft + % 

252 4K 48* 48% + to 
150 Sto Sft Sft— to 
lo 17* 17* 17* 

553 33% 33% 33ft— to 

V Xto Xto. Xft + to 
U 52 52 SZ —to 

159 34b 33* 33*— to 
24 9ft 9b W 
2 Mto Mto Mto 
433 89b SI* BM- 
238 67ft 67 67*- 

22a Mft Sto 
774 Uto Qto in 
XI 32ft Xb 3Tft— ft 
257 Mto 14 14 

367 2% 2ftf- 2to + to 

27 29 1 8b m~ to 

23 uft n% lift— Vk 
628 52* X* Slto + » 
S97 Uto Uto Oto 

56 9ft 9to 9ft— to 
Uto Uto Uto + to 

at S* 

730 Uto TM 18* + ft 
254 ~ ' ' 

raw . 

■s aasa.Sto“ m 

• 4 zr- vT 

M J Sr 


ti 





3to 3* - 3to + ft 

dSdidSs+tt 




BB:* 





1J9* 56 
730U3 


Sto 1% 

22 12 ft ttoegPt 
35* 29b NteaoH 
7b 3* Moeob 
4% 2* Me rit * - - 
X* 43 MtEpfG 768 UJ 

ff-rjarasiHS 

^ 17* M^Ortf PH 94 


Iff* 14* MchER] 
42* 37to MWCOQ 
15ft 8* MldSUt 
20% 15ft MMROS 
32ft 25% MWE H 
ISb 10ft MlHnR 
86 73ft MAW 
39b 27% MlnPL 
10* 3* Mtenlnel 
8 4* Mitel 1 

Mb 25* MotaD 
■ Zto to VIMoWH. 
lift 5%ModCpr 
83% 17* Mehcwc 
IlK 1* MobkDt 
Slto 29 ■ MonCo 
IU* 14% Morrcfl 
>» 40% Monrat 
E% 14% MonPw 
(Bto MtoAlonSf 
10b 7ft iWONY 
KIM Moores ■ 

24% MorMpf 2 
34b Morons ■ 

'euttssl 


43 37% 

%- 7 '- 

]% B-rTI ® S 2 S 3 

SB 

=J3 Z9 IT X« 28b ^ : ^-% 

7 1 K IS K-* 

100148 « 40 + * 

60Z64* 64* 64* +1* 
501 62* 62* 6X5 + Vk 
214 2ft 2* m— to 
2 Xto Xto. Xto + to 
5 16b Uft Mb- to 
OT 57* 5W 54% — 1% 
m M M lft 

23 )SfP 

46 Xto 

_ U 11, . .. 

370 46 U 1X2 Mb -75% «% + » 
236 8J 3 200 34% 34b 34* + to 
133 - 4to’ 4 . 4 —to 
- Uf fto 6VA 6b— to 

280 75 9 3014 29% 29, 29ft— to 
43 to to to 
10 45 4 Sto A — M 

68 U 11 114 27% 27% 27* 

. 2954 1% -2to 2ft ' 
US 10 33 49ft 48* 48*— lto 

' Jffl 58 23 12 15 15 15 +,M 


UO BA II 
286 48 M 
LW .3 
1J0 68 ' 
176 95 11 
M 40 15 


•TO UTO 

U 16 —to 
20% 29 + to 
Uft 11 + M 


s* 

b 


47 29ft MorKnd Ite U'M 

33* U* MoraeS .H 40 14 

X UtoMtoRtV U9BMU W 

» 2Sb Mortons 44 20 8 


4.1 1015731 46 40% 41* — 5% 

72 11 219 23* ZTto 27%—% 

26 19ft W Uto 

113 -K Bto K + ft 

15 Uft 18b Ub + % 

a 42to 42 42 

12 20 as- 2D — ft 
0 w ITto 17»— to 
292 32b Xto 32 — ft 



99% 29* Motorfo M 1.9 14 3273 33ft 32ft 33 — ft 
26to l«b MunM- 34 IS 11 ITT Xft Xto Xft 
14% BtoMuMgs 3 M* M* Mto— ft 


UB 


ssmsiiassMS 

7% 1* MvtrL 


34 12 
32 11 
W6 


123 29ft 29ft 29ft — ft 

82 10% 18* U* 

83 13ft 13* 13% — to 

56 1% 1% lto + to 


t 


BSJb 


15% HAFCO 
22* NBDl 
12b NB! 

17* 

V 

23 NCR J 
9* NL Inc* 

27 KU1 
* NVF ' 

35% NWA 
22b NOkte 
' a* NoNwa 
Uft NtfCnv 
29%-HafDfsi 280 73 
Tib NafEdU _ 

23% NatFG* .308 . 33 
20* NFGjtf 230 W 
22* NIG VPS 
2* NtHnm- 
7 * , Nil 35 U 

T9W NMedE SI 23 
2» NtPraW 1J6. 3 9 
IM NIS0RH . 

IM NtSampf4j» 7J 
Stt fUSvctn UO M 
llto N stand . _4Q 26 
10 Nerai M 51 

26 NavPw 234 94 
12b NevPaf 160 187 
19% NewPpf 283 118 
15 ' HavPpf MS JiT 

fto NavSvL JO M 
Wt NEngEI 33 36 

^^GiJSlSI 

26* (CYSof 375 TL2 
61 NY5 pf 300 721 
15 NY5pf_ 2J2 VL5 
24% JiYSsfU? 375 126" 
13ft Newell JO 73 
Xto NewOal 44 13 
12* NawPII 4J0OZU 
7* HwMRa 72# 86 
34b Newmt 1J0 22 
b Hwoork 

15 NklMP 2JB 114 
24* MloMpf 360 12J- 
26* HloMpf 290 124 
28* NiaMpf 4.10-117 
4Tft MoMpf LW 122 
26b JflaMPf 418 22 
14* NTailSh U5eT28 
11b Nlarter . .12 1J. 

25* KICOR UK 105 
Uto NablAf ,12b. 3 
.TO* HortRl 
54% NartoSa 340 45 
ffU Merlin 

*» Naratr- 240 sls 
12b Nortek JB J. 

-U 1 

li* MMfUf l3*lftl 
Uto NlndPS T56 M2 

Ssssssr^ »- 

30b N u r Ura * 130 .27. 
!!S NwIPpf 250 106 

ft Ya 

48* Nwetpf &400W4 
50 Mwshrf 5710105 
Wto Nava J6a U 

27 . Nucor 60 - 3 

Akmxjfj 


15 36 15* Mft 

7 174 32b 3Z* 
9 263 14 IU 

H 3 IK 19ft 

8 195 35% 35 

13 1259 ^2* 32* 


-477 


llto 


_ 24 27ft 27% 

127. to ■ % 

14 1*91 95b 54* 
12 1475 2»k 22 

. 3 116 25ft 25* 

15 86 IU IT* 

27 585 3K 30* 

is- a mo 19 

T V t Wk Sto 

6 433 Wx* 

■ *!f A# 

X 1455 11% loS 
_ 9 Xft Xft 

12 13 32* 32b 

25 fi 15* 15ft 

7 a Ub . It* 
9 592X3K 20* 

■ isasu Mb 
ITOteW* 20* 

_ 3n17to 17* 
3 3 -10 U 

I «* 

9 3 ~25ft 2» 

7 579 X 24ft 
2DBZ33* 3Z* 
3031 M 72* 

.4 30to 

18 9 17to gfc 


9 53 


j jrastto 

35 tip 4SU-4** 
6 

16Bz2Bft a* 

IPs 

206 37% X% 
U -1U 12b D% 

43iS.?S 

8 a Uto Ub 

J J S S5 
f-’S 

3 7 i? Sis* 

• n,r s* 

lai 1 32% » 

9 wo 

46 ra* 23* 


b t}§ at s% 



36* 
35ft. 
lira* 
111 * 
1 34ft 


2Sft Oo*tSp UJ 46 Q 2 1 

as«S 3 Si?f 

on Page 12 ) 



Xto 32ft— i 

ifi *JP- 
































"■* v /i 

'its: »: ^ % 
-ass! t; *: , 


«*f»e 

;*■ 

t**WA» 

0 " ifiJT! - . 


•••; i:- 1 J 




AMEX fwlcn - P.U 
***** Noha/totnP.l* 

NYSE print p.w 
MYSS hlffo/tava p.12 
ConadiM Xads P-.n 
Curreft cr ram p.n 
CWMwdHIa p .12 

®*Ww* ■ F.H 


-*«rain» immp r 
' Fitno nd* iwtn p,n 
OoM mortals p.n 
interest run P.U 
. “wnwnnwionr p.ur 
Otttent . p.,2 

OTClMi . >JT 
0™r markets p.i* 


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 


JCcralb^sSfeSribunc. 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 

Page 11 





.JS 






t ». . • 
9 V» - ■ 
** Wi! . 

"9* • 

4 A- - 


>h« bA . 

w*. <hv- : 

* r,- 

fk **.- 

•f* -mzf- ■■ 

w- «■..<■■- 

*■4. «-••* 
«h te--t 
•• % *=-- •• 

th ■*- Vi. 

* *• -J 

U * ••• 


4F4. T- • 

<•=¥. *• ■; 
*'•*< — - 
•A.-v *: 


h«*4 «*-■•■> 

-» •■ 

T‘ 

•*-v v.~ 

d*\ "* • ■ 
•F ■>**••• 

• ft ■ 

fr* -■ 

iM- 

t ' r?I 


*••• ■ 

<«•. ». >•• ■- 
*** jt — - 


TV— -• 
.>■- ** ' 


le. »•.■ 

5p i :■ 

9fr ■ J . 

»*• •:. 


rs^. 

• W=* •- 

•- ■*» ■>” 

* T> - 

_ *r <V3 ' * 


*•:* r.~ 

5 Zm- 


£», N 


FWUBES AND OPTIONS 

New Strategies Transform 
Currency Speculation 

By JAMES STERJNGOLD 

New York Times Service . 

N EW YORK ■ — Playing the dollar is not what it used to 
po. Like many other inches of the inte rnational 

s ystem , the foreagn-cxchange market has been 
transfonped by the-introdnetion of futures and options 
products, and the dozens of strategies they have pawned. 

Esp^aUy m the last wo weeks — following the trabtfence in 
jr* ““f* a decision by major industrial nations to force 

fflfidoUat'^value lower — the new strategies have been pot to 
good use by sophisticated investors. Volume in the currency 
qpnons and futnres traded at the Philadelphia Stock 
and Chicago’s International Monetary Market soared after the 
meeting. 


But the multidimensional ir T ‘ 

new currency contracts have Volatility, 86 

& , rbS&SSS!S ■ weDasenhange 

S3T3T&T2V 

York, explained: ‘There are COIT 01 CT contracts, 

complications there that _ . 

sneak up and can get you if ~ 
you don’t, understand the variables.” 

A currency option is the right, but not obligation, to buy or sell 
a set amount of a currency at a specified .price by future 
date. The sell option is known as “call” and thp liny **pm," One 
pays a pre mi u m; ranging generally from 1 to 5 percent of the 
value of the contract, to open a contract Buying a Japanese yen 
c a ll_ — or selling a yen put — would be abet that the yen wfl] rise 
agains t the dollar. But there are important between 

those two approaches, as currency-options players .found two 
weeks ago. 

The key to currency options, Mr. DtQman said, is that, while 
they limit risk, they respond to a number of variables, each of 
which can move independently. The. first v ariab le is what hap- 
pens to the spot exchange rate between the dollar and the foreign 
unit. The second is the volatility factor. This is an expectation of 
how much the currency might s win g on an annualized bacig and 
helps determine the ™ of the p r e m iu m paid for the contract 
The higher the volatility level, the larger the premium. 

T WO less important variables involve the differential be- 
tween spot currency prices and forward market prices, and 
the level of short-term interest rates. 

“You can adjust the level of risk you have in the market with 
some precision, but you have to keep track of all the variables to 
really have controL,” Mr. Diliman emphasized. 

He provided the example of how a trader mi ght have correctly 
predicted last month that the dollar would fall sharply, taken an 
options position T>ased on this expectation, but had & potentially 

huge profit trimmed significantly hywn nang tliftiy tinimiMrlfM 
carefully. 

On Sept. 20,. the Friday before a meeting of central bankers 
from the United States, Britain,. France, West Germany, and 
Japan that was held cm Sunday, Sept 22, the dollar traded at 291 
Deutsche marks on a spot'basis. One' way to bet that the dollar 
would fall would have been to sell a put contract on the made On 
Sept 20, a contract that expired on March i4, 1986, at a rate of 
3.00 DM, carried a premium of 235 percent Mr. Dfllman said. 
That means that the trader would have sold a.51 mflfian pnt far 
$23^00, Jioping to bc^able lo. buy it back later at a Bower price, ’ 
and pocket the d iffe r e nce.-- , $ ... 

That premium was based cm ^vdatijity factOT of ~I5 percent 
meaning that within the^ ’’Mart yeaf^ the mafk was expected. to 
fluctuate no more than 15 percent rither', 1 !^ or down. 

By Tuesday, Sept ^fltf^Barhfid-tnmbled andthe mark had 
strengthened, pushing the doDar’s exrfiangp rate down to 2.72 
DM, a 63-percent depredation. That is all the gain a trader 
would have enjoyed if dollars had simpLy been sold for marks on 
Friday, with a cashing in on Tuesday. ; 

The results in the options maiket were markedly different 
• (CoDtiBued on Page 17, CoL 7) : 

j CunmyRaa* 


German 
Talks Are 
Backed 

U.S. Seeking 

Market Access 


. By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The United 
State has told the West German 

government that it would welcome 

talks in early November in Bonn on 
telecommunications trade. 

But Washington has stipulated 

that arch talks must also include an 

examination of ways to improve 
access to the large West German 
market, U3L officials in Washing- 
ton and Bonn said Monday. 

UK officials hope the talks mil 
give added impetus to the Ameri- 
can goal of including trade in ser- 
vices, such as some telecommunica- 
tions operations, in the next round 
of multilateral trade negotiations 
under the auspices of the General 
Agreement cm Tariffs and Trade. 

“We hope that these talks in 
Bonn could persuade European 
governments to share our view that 
government procurement-proce- 
dure guidelines established under 
GATT in 1980 should be extended 
to include procurement of telecom- 
munications systems by minis- 
tries,” said one UK Commerce 
Department official. 

“The proposed talks are not 
meant to he trade negotiations,” 
the nffiriai said. He added rhat any 
bilateral trade negotiations would 
have to be handled in a separate 
forum. ‘ 

The United States last week pro- 
posed to Christian Schwarz- SchH- 
Hng, the West Ge rman Post (Mce 
minister, that a round of fact-find- 
ing talks focus on the following 
areas: Regulations on establishing 
communications networks; post of- 
fice procurement policies; and 
standards for telecommunication 
equipment. 

UK Commerce Department of- 
ficials and sources at the UK Em- 
bassy in Bonn said die talks would 
seek to address the following com- 
plaints of UK companies: 

• That the West German Post 
and Telecommunications Ministry 
has tended.to favor domestic sup- 
pliers in procurement dgrisions. 1 

•■That standards set by the min- - 
istry have restricted dunce for con- 
sumers, and in effect forced UK 
companies to make direct invest- 

( Co a tinue d on Page 17, CoL 4) 


Measuring South Korea’s Economic Uncertainties 


GROWTH 

Yeu-to-yaaf change n raal orass 
national product In percent 



DEBT 

Total external long-term debt. 
1380-100 



EXPORTS 

Merchandise exportsLlBSO- 100 - 200 

Xoiw^-150 ' 


n— fctftog 
Cotmbim 


U *70 *7# ’00 '85 


EXPORT DEPENDENCE 

Escorts « a percent ago o(18B3 gross 
domestic product 37^* 


8% S*o 


Untied Brazil Japan Mexico Korea 
States 


Sources. MremaotvuJ Monetary Fund, Morgan Guaranty, world Bank 

The Nnr text Timat 


5.2% Rise Seen 
In Oil Demand 
Over 6 Months 


Korean Miracle Is Starting to Fade 
As Trade Curbs Threaten Exports 


By Susan Chira 

Hen- York Tunes Service 

SEOUL — The South Korean economy is a 
miracle. In little more than 20 years, a country tom 
span by war has become an emerging economic 
power. 

But the Korean nrirarJe gets its strength from 
booming exports, and now the rise of world protec- 
tionism threatens to undo the nation’s formula for 
rapid economic growth. 

The challeng e to South Korea's economic suc- 
cess makes inis week's annual meetin g of the 
International Monetary Fund and World Bank in 
Seoul all the more important. By coming to Seoul, 
the financial elite is applauding South Korea’s 
accomplishments. At the same time, delegates are 
tackling precisely the issues that concern South 
Korea most — trade and debt. 

South Korea has moved from a nation of farm- 
ers to one of traders in little more than a genera- 
tion. Men who repaired UK Army trucks during 
the Korean War that ended in 1953 now head 
conglomerates that export steel, autos, television 
sets, ships, in addition to semiconductors and 
other high-technology products. Their most im- 
portant market is the United States, where South 
Korean industriousness has already left its mark, 
from South Korean groceries in New York to 
semiconductor research laboratories in Silicon 
Valley, California. 

This year, however, will not see record growth 
for South Korea. Exports are stagnant for the first 
time in years, and the big industrial companies are 
being forced to lay off workers. The mam culprit is 
the lagging UK economy. Like its neighbors in the 
Pacific Basin, South Korea’s economic fate is 
linked to its ability to sell to the United States, 
which buys 35 percent of South Korean exports. 

The problem of setting to the United States 


affects Japan too. of course. But South Korea, 
which chose Japan as a model, is hurt more. While 
the two neighbors share a common work ethic and 
an aggresave export policy. South Korea’s econo- 
my is far weaker, partly because it lacks Japan’s 
large internal market. 

“We have to face the cold fact that we can’t 
expect the rapid growth rate that we have enjoyed 
in the past,” said Ahn Seung-chuL president of the 
government-financed Korea Development Insti- 
tute. 

South Korea faces challeng as at home. As 
part of its march to industrialization, South Ko- 
rea's authoritarian government has offered the 
nation economic progress instead of political free- 
dom. The government now faces growing political 
dissent and labor unrest South Korea's S45-b31ian 
foreign debt, the fourth largest in the world, con- 
tinues to trouble policymakers. And the increasing 
national wealth has made the newly rich people 
resented by the poorer. 

As protectionist sentiment rises, UK resent- 
ment toward Japan is spilling over to South Korea 
in an unfair way, South Koreans believe. The 
United States ruled that South Korean color televi- 
sion manufacturers were guilty of dumping, and 
several other cases are pending Last year. South 
Koreans were forced to accept “voluntary" re- 
straints on steel exports to the United States. And 
some quotas on South Korean textiles — which 
accounted for 23.5 percent of all exports in the first 
half of 1985 — seem inevitable this year. 

Yet -no one, in or out of government, is predict- 
ing that South Korea’s glory days are over. Busi- 
nessmen are moving to stave off protectionism by 
teaming with American manufacturers. Foreign 
bankers say they remain confident of South Ko- 
rea's ability to meet its debt payments and manage 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL 5) 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — Oil demand in the 
non-communist world is expected 
to rise 52 percent in the next six 
months, reflecting seasonal factors 
as colder weather begins, the Inter- 
national Energy Agency stud Mon- 
day in its monthly market report 

The 2 1-nation group of major oil 
consumers predicted that oil con- 
sumption outside the communist 
bloc would increase to an average 
46.9 million barrels a day In the 
first quarter of 1986 from an esti- 
mated 46.1 million in the fourth 
quarter of 1985 and 44.6 million in 
the third quarter. 

The repeat also said that demand 
for oil from the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries, 
which fell to a 20-year low as the 
summer began, rose steadily in the 
third quarter and should remain on 
a seasonal upward trend over the 
next two quarters. 

OPEC's production rose to an 
average of 15.2 million barrels a 
day in September from 14.8 million 
in August and 143 million in July, 
making an average of 14.9 million 
for the third quarter, it said. 

Thai is still well below OPECs 
production ceiling of 16 milli on 
barrels a day. 

Working from the agency’s fig- 
ures for projected production out- 
side OPEC and world consumption 
for Lhe fourth quarter, oil analysts 
estimate that demand for OPEC oil 
will rise to slightly more than 16 
milli on barrels daily in the fourth 
quarter and 17 miUjon barrets daily 
in the first quarter of 1986. 

Those calculations assume no 
change in consumers’ ofl stockpiles 
in the last quarter and a drawdown 
of inventories of about 500,000 
barrels a day in the first quarter of 
next year. 

The agency’s forecasts also do 
not take into account any reduction 
in production from the Soviet 
Union, which sells oil to India and 
customers in Western Europe. 

European customers of the Sovi- 
et Union said last month that they 
had been informed of temporary 
delays or cancellations of Soviet, 
deliveries scheduled for October. 

The agency said that Saudi Ara- 
bia’s production recovered in Sep- 
tember to around 25 million bar- 
rels a day. after having fallen by 
about 500,000 barrels a day in Au- 
gust from 26 million in July. 

Iraq's air attacks on Iran were 
estimated to have reduced Iran's oil 
production to around 2 million 
barrels daily in September, of 


which 600,000 barrels represent do- 
mestic consumption. Production 
was estimated at 26 million barrels 
daily in August. 

The study did not address the 
question of Iran's export potential 
which is believed to have suffered 
sharply from Iraq’s air attacks on 
the Khaig, Island terminal facility. 

The report said that Iraq, the 
United Arab Emirates and Nigeria 
all increased production at the end 
of the third quarter. 

The agency said oil consumption 
among major Western nations 
dropped 2 percent in the third 
quarter from a year earlier. That 
compared with a decline of 3.5 per- 
cent in the second quarter of 1 985. 

The report said onshore supplies 
of oil stood at about 2.9 billion 
barrels on Oct. 1, or 14 million 
barrels less than a year before. Thai 
represented 73 days of supplies, 
based on demand projections for 
the final three months of a year. A 
year ago, stocks on hand represent- 
ed an 80-day supply of oil. 


Ottawa to Add 
ToPowersof 
Bank Regulators 


OTTAWA — The Canadian 
government plans to “substan- 
tially increase" the power of 
regulatory authorities oversee- 
ing the country's b ankin g sys- 
tem through legislation to be 
introduced shortly, the minis ter 
of state for finance, Barbara 
McDougalL said Monday. 

“These changes will insure 
that we have the best regulatory 
system in the world," she told 
the House of Commons in the 
second reading or a separate bill 
that authorizes reimbursement 
of uninsured depositors in the 
failed Canadian Commercial 
Bank and Northland Bank. 

The minister gave few details 
of the new powers to be given 
regulators but said die changes 
will include bolstering re- 
sources of the inspector general 

°^But^sfie wanted Parliament 
that the 875-million-Canadjan- 
dollar ($625-million) bailout of 
uninsured depositors at the two 
banks that were dosed by the 
government on Sept. 1 should 
not be considered a precedent. 


Ontario Suspicious About Trade Pact 

Premier Fears Impact of a Canada-U.S. liberalization 


% * • • OlM. F-F. Itu OMr. 8J=. IF. YM 

Amsterdam UH <223 m<*5 • AH* AMR* &SS2* I3M0* UUly 

InMMtl 5X5* 7A1S 302M3 AJ545 1*1* 11808 JOWS 3U»* 

Frankfort TJM 1741 - — 32JB- }JS5x BAR* <927* T2223* 1223 * 

London lb) . -U145 ■ 174M 114408 152188 - 42» 7A17S MM3 38*455 

Ml ten . 177U8 OBSJQ 87258 32859 . .59833 -JM8S- Bd 8351 

New York(c) 8780* 285 858 VSI-SO 2982 ' S18S 2188 31535 

Parts MSI IT439S 105 ' 4428 X 230 I&027S* 17215 13285* 

Takro 31445 3B1J3 8043 3842 T1.9S- 7U9 387.12 * 9888 

Zoned 2J7T3 1B7B2 SUB* 2498* IWtt- 72915* <085* VD073* 

1 ECU 09375 05988 ZSKB 43408 1A9QJ7 24938 489982 1910 W85 

1 SDR LOOM A7497I 298855 HO. Nil ■ VUfi 579099 22955 23008 

Ooslnos m Landau and Zurich, fixings In oHiar European confer* Yortcratae at 4 PM. 

to) Commercial franc (h) Amounts needed to buy an. pound tel Amounts nmded to Buy on. 
dollar Cl Units of 100 fxl Untts of 1 /XU Cy) UnUsoflOM! AUJL- not aaotmt; tLA^ not available, 
(a) Tamtytma aoaad tsusxjta 


Currency per- UJJ Cumae? po IIJ4 Cwre ac y, no UJJ .' curreacy par mi 

Anted- mutral 090 Fta.martdai 54? Motor. rlna. 24505 S.Kar.voa 09020 

MMtratt 14144 smtarac rauas - Max . mm 38890 S m mmm m muo 

Austr.scML 1088 HoaoKoout 7J773 NvokltM, 790 I w l twai 79875 

Sate. fin. h-. 53J0 Indian n*aa 119765 PMLMM T740 T«MII 4018 

Bnnflcnn. 798090 l ad o . rente* 1,13190 ..Portaseudo U590 TtadbaM 3A37S 

Canadian S 1J65B ktti.. 09547 toodlityal XU TarkURre 54155 

CMoasarean 29948 israaBMak. T478JD Stao.5 ' 11353 * UACdktwm 34725 

OnaMi kraoa 99775 Kuaxdtldtaar 09008 S.Atr.rand : 29575 V an ar boP». UM 

EbvpL pound 193 
SSterUno: 1Z103 irtsti C 

Seuremc Banov, du SanaAw (Brvtmts)/ Banco Oommanctate ttatlcna (AUtanJ: Banmm No- 
tionaie dr Parts (Port*); San* of Tatar. (Tokyo); IMF tSORti BAII (dinar, rival, dktiam). 
Other data from Ravtdrs and AP. . 


Mr IL&8 
• <9070 

*a 14X30 
h 79875 
4018 
2A375 
X 54XSS 
BB 18325 
IV. 1445 


Interest Rates 


1 montn 7av9n, 

2 monttu am 

Smooths IMM. 
8 month* 1*4*1 

1 war Ife-Wi 


4.nr8* ii oh-11 « hvwi 

4 *w4 Y. lltfc-IVU W8.1M 

4M1k .119h-11* MM-HRh 

amh luo-im WMih 

8KM* n-nih inw» 


ECU SDK 
mux* 743 
8hrt<Hi 75h 
tMW. 7M 
H Mh 7*. 
DM • 


Sources: Maroon Guaranty (dollar, DM. SK Poona FP)i Uavtta Bonk (ECU); Rooters 
(SDR). Rotes onoUcaMe to Werbmk deaaaltaoftt million mfntmem (aromiivolantJ. 




Prime Rato 

motor um m o 

Com Poptr »M7» dart 
1 ■■onln T..nwyMI» 
8-fnonm Traoserr ■*» 
CDY 5849 day* 
an <8« day* 

WaNOMtaaor 


088MB8BI lahrtBBk 


CaSMMty 
C m ai oa tti IxUr t m* 

3400018 brtKhMk 


Dqpari a 

'Oct-7 


tv* m 
711/18 7W 
VA « 
H «. 
IX 730 
790 898 

728 728 

725 725 

741 740 


<35 411/18 

430 418 

<70 <11/15 
435 4* 


948 . ' 910 

9fe *7/18 

• no » 

wo wo 

95716 95/18 


tl» 11W 
IN H 
11 II 1/32 
11 3733 HS* 


S 5 . 

tvn of/u 

8985 N 


8 mouths 
lyaar 


74k-8h. 

-81/38-8 

am 

Stb-Bfb 

M-rno 

BHl-BM 


.1JK Mawey Market Finds 

Ox 7 

MarrtH L vmch Baody Asrnt* ' 

a d a ? «■ a— mas ha 

ToMroia interest Roto Indau . 7JD8 
‘ Source; Merritt Eynch. Tetemte. 


Cold 


f-*. V.' 


semeosi R eam odMt 

UnmebBaixetTekm 


Oa .7 

AJM. pal-. ar* • 

Hom Kom 32SJS 33U0 ~lflt 

LsmWmi 33620- — —438 

Paris OMUO) 33821 ' 32 (99 •' —435 

Xtridi 32595 hUI —US 

Landed BUS 32575 —22s 

Now York — ' 3*80 — tao 

Luxmttewra, Ports and London official, tlx • 
liio « Harm Nona and 2wwi aaentna am 

eteetno price; Ncr York Comox a /mm 
contract. AH Prices m US. Seer ounce. 
Source: Hrvtars. . 


By Douglas Martin 

New York Times Service 

TORONTO — Ontario, Cana- 
da's most populous and economi- 
cally powerful province, is emerg- 
ing as perhaps the biggest 
stumbling block to a free-trade ar- 
rangement between Washington 
and Ottawa. 

Tm not prepared to make a gi- 
ant leap of faith," David Peterson, 
premier of Ontario, said in an inter- 
view. He says be has seen scant 
evidence that free trade could help 
Ontario, while he is sure it could 
hurt in many ways. 

The Ontario leader plans a trip 
to Washington in two weeks to dis- 
cuss his reservations about free 
trade with Reagan administration 
officials, senators and congress- 
men. Next month, he wiQ press 
them in a meeting with Prime Min- 
ister Brian Mahoney, leader of die 
Progressive Conservative govern- 
ment in Ottawa, and with premiers 
of other provinces. 

Mr. Peterson has emerged as the 
most prominent skeptic of the ad- 
vantages to Canada of a trade ar- 
rangement. Without Ontario’s sup- 
port, experts say. an agreement will 
be very difficult to achieve. 

Ontario’s trade with the United 
States is greater than UK bilateral 
trade with Japan. With a third of 
Canada’s population — 8.94 mil- 
lion of 25.13 million people — On- 
tario produces more than half the 
country’s manufactured goods. 

As a consequence, if 14 weeks of 
hearings now bong held by the 
Ontario government result in a 
turning against free trade by Mr. 
Peterson and his minority govern- 
ment of the Liberal Party and the 
New Democratic Party, the politi- 
cal fallout would likely be severe. 

A third of the members of the 
federal Parliament are from Ontar- 
io. Also, Mr. Peterson suggests the 
next federal election is likely to 
turn on the free trade issue. 

“It is the single most important 
thing we've done economically in 
100 yeais,” he asserted. 

Mr. Peterson fears that trade 
talks with Washington will farce 
onto the bargaining table the 20- 
year-old amo pact with the United 
States, under which Canada pro- 
duces One car for export for each 
car it sells at home. UK officials 
have said that the auto pact must 
be included, while Canadian offi- 
cials have insisted that it should not 
be. Last year, the pact was worth 

26. 7 tnBjan Canadian dollars, SI 9.6 
billion at current exchange rates, in 

Ontario exports to the United 
States. 

The Ontario premier also worries 


that small industries, such as furni- 
ture and shoes, will not be able to 
adjust to life without tariffs, and 
that new high-technology indus- 
tries cannot develop without the 
government help a free trade agree- 
ment might outlaw. 

Perhaps most significantly, the 
Ontario leader points to a recent 
assertion by William Meririn, a 
Reagan administration trade offi- 
cial, that a trade arrangement could 
not exempt the Canadians from the 
sort of countervailing duties they 
most hope a pact would prevent. 

Mr. Peterson denies press re- 
ports that he was the only premier 
with doubts about free trade at an 
August meeting of premiers in 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. He said Brit- 
ish Columbia expressed worries 
about losing its right to attract in- 
dustry by pricing electricity cheap- 
ly; that Newfoundland feared los- 
ing fishing benefits, and that other 
premiers wonied that Ottawa's 
generous aid to depressed regions 
would go down the drain. 

Robert Bourassa — leader of the 
opposition Liberal Party of Que- 
bec, the second-biggest province — 
recently expressed concern that a 
free true arrangement could result 
jo Canada being swallowed up po- 
litically by the United S t at e s. 

Canadian federal officials have 
proposed talks to liberalize the 
5120-bDlioo bilateral trade, the big- 
gest between any two countries in 
the world. They contend that a 
trade agreement would guarantee 
access to the UK market at a time 
that protectionist sentiment in 
Congress is running high- Ulti- 
mately, they suggest, it would bene- 
fit Canada’s economy by forcing 
industries to become more compet- 
itive. 

But so far, Mr. Mulraney and his 


STOCK USB IBS 

DeVoe-Holbeu 

Imemauooal nv 646 796 

GtyOock 

International nv 2ft 3% 

Quotes as of: October 7, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 

note and (he weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 

Fim Commerce Securities bv 
Wold Trade Cenicr 
Stravinsky laan 857 
1077 XX Amsterdam. 

The Netherlands 
Telephone; OIU20I62 77 62 
, Telex: 14507 firco nl 


top aides appear to be “low-bridg- 
ing it," Mr. Peterson said, using his 
term for an extremely soft selL 
Indeed, in public statements, 
federal government leaders have 
emphasized the numerous ways 
they would prefer to stop short of a 
full free trade arrangement in order 
to protea Canadian economic, po- 
litical and cultural interests. 

“There may be ao negotiations 
with the United States at aO,” Joe 
Hark, Canada 's secretary of state 
for external affairs, said in a speech 
in Toronto on Friday. “Their Con- 
gress may refuse even to consider 
arrangements which would hmii 
t hei r power to threaten Canada by , 
protectionist bills.*’ i 

A document prepared by the . 
prime minister’s office suggested ; 
that any sustained opposition from | 
the Ontario government coold i 
scuttle the negotiations. The docu- 1 
meat, winch Mr. Mulroney’s aides 1 
characterize as a draft paper, advo- j 
cated underplaying the liberalized j 
trade initiative. 

- A top economic official said a 
chief area of concern was whether 
greater access to the market would 
mean more secure access, particu- 
larly if the UK opposition to doing 
away with countervailing duties 
holds. The worry is that Canada 
could be increasing its vulnerability 
to the protectionism it wants to 
avoid. 


inn FINANCES ET 
H=H MANAGEMENT 


NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS 
REPUBLIC HOLDING S.A., LUXEMBOURG 

(Formerly TRADE DEVELOPMENT BANK HOLDING S.A.) 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an Extraordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of Republic 
Holding S.A. {’RH’) will be hdd at I'Holel le Royal, 12 Boulevard Royal, Luxembourg, 

on October 29, 1985, at 2.30 p.m. 

for the purpose of considering and voting on the following matters; - 

1. Decision to put Republic Holding S.A. in liquidation. 

2. Appointment of Messrs. Jean Hass, Roger Junod, GG. Rodney Leach and Walter H. Weiner as 
Liquidators of Republic Holding S-A., each of them acting severally and individually. 

3. Approval of the Liquidation Plan submitted by the Board of Directors. 

4. Decision to maintain the Statutory Auditors' appointment in order to report on the Company’s. 1985 
accounts to the Shareholders meeting to which the 1985 Financial Statements will be submitted for 


isceUaneous. 


By order of the Board 
Edmond J. Salra 
Chairman 


NOTES:- 


Any shareholder whose shares are in bearer form and who wishes to attend the Extraordinary General Meeting must 


UULJS^ CE.VEV.1 (r ML’SAN.VE 

We offer ail types of financial, 
managemenl, and tax shelter 
services. Our strategic invest- 
ment program will offer mini- 
mum risk, with maximum 
profit, plus our bi-monthly 
New Tbcimoiogy for Investors 
newsletter Both programs are 
yours at no charge or obliga- 
; turn - fill in the coupon and 
! mail today. 

["l would like lo receive the FIMa" 1 
| Complimentary Investment 1 
. Service. ■ 

I FIMA FINANCES ET I 

■ MANAGEMENT SA. | 

• BOITE PO STALE 820 . ■ 

| 1211 Geneva l « [ 

* SWITZERLAND * 1 


L'^T- _ _ _ _ -J 


receipt at lhe registered office of RH at 13 Boulevard de laToire. Luxembourg doi later than October 28, 1485 ai 
5 pjn- The shareholder may obtain the depositary receipt and if required, the form of proxy, from any of the bonks 
listed below by lodging his share certificates al their office or by arranging for the bank by whom his certificates are 
held lo notify' any of the banks listed that shares are so held. 

Any shareholder whose shares ore registered will receive a notice of lhe Extraordinary General Meeting ai his 
address on the register, together with a form of proxy for use at the meeting. The proxy should be lodged at RH‘s 
office in accordance with the above instructions. 

lhe remittance of the form of proxy will not preclude a shareholder from attending in person and voting at the 
meeting if he so desires. 

The resolution concerning item 1. of the agenda requires a majority of at least two thirds of the votes of the 
shareholders present or represented, provided there is a quorum of at least fifty percent of issued share capital. 
There is no limitation as lo the number of shares for which any shareholder or ’proxy may cast vote*. 

The resolutions concerning items 2. to 5. of the agenda may be passed by a simple majority provided that no single 
shareholder or proxy may cast votes in respect of more than one' fifth of the issued share capita) or more than two 
fifths of aD shares represented ar the meeting. 

Shareholders may obtain copies of the documentation listed hereunder- 

L Hus notice 

2. Statement of Mr. Edmond J. Safra. Chairman of the Board and Liquidation Plan of the company. 

3. Information statement on Republic New York Corporation 

at the registered office and from any of the banks si the f ofl owing addreaaes:- 

* Manufacturers Hanover Limited 

8 Princes Street, London EC2P 2EN (England) 

* Banqne lute nm tionaie 6 Luxembourg S-A. 

2 Boulevard Royal, Luxembourg (Luxembourg) 

* Manufacturers Hanover Bank Belrhim 

13 Roe lie Ligne, 1000 Brussels (Belgium) 

* Manufacturers Hanover Banqne Noroume 

20 Rue de la YiUe-TEvecrae, 75008 Farm (France) 

* Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company 
Bockenbeimer Landatruae 51/53, Frankfurt (W. Germany) 

* Manufacturers Hanover Trust Com p any 

40 Wall Street. New York. N.Y. 10015 (U.KA.) 

* Republic National Bank of New York 

452 Fifth Avenue. New York, N.Y. 10018 (V-S-M 

* Republic National Bank of New York 

46 Berkeley Square, London W1X 5DB (England) 

* Republic National Bank of New York (Luxembourg) 5-A. 

103 Grand Rue, 1661 Luxembourg (Luxembourg) 

Republic National Bank of New York (France) S.A. 

20 Place Vendome, 75001 Paris (France) 

* Trade Development Bank 

30 Monument Street, London EC3R 8LH ( Englan d) 

* Trade Development Bank (Luxembourg) SA. 

34 Avenue de la Porte Nenve, Luxembourg (L u x emb ourg) 

Trade Development Bank 

96-98 Rue du RbBne, 1204 Geneva (Switzerland) 

Trade Development Beak 

25 Corao 5. GotUrdo, 6830 Ouasso (Switzerland) 

* Paying Agon of Republic Holding S.A. 








Tobias Include ttw nnt ton w H to prlcas 
lip to Hae dosing on Wall Street 
and do uotreftoct Into trades etaewtare. 


u im RusaBT It U IM i»- 

! ft g* i 3 i 3 i! i« ££ Kft 5 K + % 

PUB* 2i?ij 

3% 11% RvSSrpfl.17 9X 5 43 12% 12% 12* 




Dta. YU. PE MtaHMlLBW OWtCWg 


*+7 



2.9 

140 

17 

60 

U 

1X0 

9X 

1X4 IU 

1X4 1IL4 

3% 

U 

1X0 

11 



2X0 11.1 

A 0 

2.1 

SL72 

83 

A0 

33 

2X2 

83 

4X7 IU 

XO 

22 

225 

84 

1X0 

34 

JO 

1.9 

.20 

VA 

uo 

65 


19% 

UK 
19 
7% 

39% 28 Ut 
71% 14% 
2% lift 
16% 11% 
23% 13% 
11% 4J4 

m 4» 
55V. 44% 
27% 21 
40% 

40% 

78 'A 
29% 

M*. 58V» 
28% 24 
31V. 26% 
103 88% 

109 99 


143 
13D 
213 
149 
WO 
474 
120 
513 

131 met 

189 S 
539 47% 
905 48% 
4C «* 
30BZ 39 
802 39% 
290x 73% 
20 % 
am 

70% 


■im jo 

£*S% 




IIS. Futures 


HHi Low 


Open Htah Law data On. 


“ »”& It B 


28 21% 
23% 10% 


303 23% 19% 2M— % 
191 19% 19% 19% + % 





> 40 

+ 

% 

10% 

_ 

% 

1 24% 

+ 

% 1 

i 2% 

— 

% 

i 23 

+ 

% 

i 4% 

+ 

% 

i 11% 

_ 

% 

i 23% 

tata 

% 

i 1214 

p* 

14 

i 13%' 



% 

■ 11% 

+ 

% 

i 10% 



i 44% 

— 

% 

1 44 

+ 

% 

• ?a 



> BSU 


% 

48 


t 

. 2414 

' 

14 

■ 54% 


1% 

■ 82% 


% 


5 




50% 30% TDK -27« X 
34% 27%-TECO 2J4 7X 
12% 7% TG1F 1 

21% 12% TNP 135 7Q 
28% 18% TRE . 1X0 4.1 

83% 44% TRW 1X0 17 
4% 1% vlToc&l 

g* s-ismis a 

34 23% Tantfr 

15% 12% Tndvcfl 

48% 47% Toktmx 1X0 2X 
5% 2% Tricorn 
288 227 Tridyfl , 

24 14% Telrata J2 2.1 

48V. 30% Trim 

40% 30% Twrwln 44 17 
45% 33% Tomwo 2JO 74 
104% 92% Tancpr 11X0 HU 
32% 10% Tertfvn 

77% 2D% Tujorpf 2.14 10X 

a s 

44% 28% T«Qn 144 12 

39 26% Tex Erf MU 

SS»TS1S JfS 

21% 14% TaxOGS .W 13 

iS \a 

4% 2 Tod In 
59% 31 Textron 1X0 44 
45 33% Trarfrpf 2X8 47 

11% 5% Thocfc 

23 HI TtomE S . 

43% 30% ThmBel 144 19 
19% 13% Tjofijln 40b 39 
18% 13% ThmMed 40 24 
2Z% 18 ThrHW 40 43 

24 13% Tjdwrtr .90 81 
10B% 98% TWwt pl 9408 94 

10% 5% Tltarin 

«1% 40 Time 1X0 IX 

23% 14% TJmpta 

tt-B 

39% HMTodSw Ujj 44 

ns is mr as 

29% 24% TriEdPf X?2 H 
30V. 23% Tot Ed pi 175 110 
28 22% TriEd pf 147 13.1 

33% 27% TolEdPf 448 113 
■ B% Toricni 404 
53% 26 T oot RO t 4BU IX 
26% 14% TrCftmi 40 12 
17% 10% TWOCo 40 24 
5 1 Tosco 

17% 7% Towto 

41% 25% ToyRUs 
20% 17 Truer * 42 14 

76 1§* TWA pt 245 149 

34% 18% TWApfB 245 47 
32% 24% Trontm 148 40 
21% 17% Tranlnc 242 108 


33 35% 35% 35% + % 
9 333 31% 31 33% 

12 48 0% M H%— % 

14 109 24% 24% 24% — % 

"■r "ft % Tar* 

15 96 76 75% 74 +% 

13 232 17% 17% 17% 


3 19% 19% 19% + % 
14 117 74% 74% 74% + % 

16 1400 33% 33% 33% — % 

14 m M% 14% 1*% . 

13 258x 49% 49% «FA — % 

S iS 235% 233% 234%— 1 

If 3 

9 81 38% 37% TOJ + % 
13 1616 39 .38% .3*% — * 

124 183 103 183 — % 
ID 924 19% 18% 19 + % 

? a s i?% §%=§ 

?”*£!& Bit 

$ gass-! 

11 33 29% 3% 29%— % 

13 337 93 92 92%— % 

1377 3% 3% ,3%-g 

11 9027 18 >7% 17%—% 

16 14 29% 29% 29% + % 

4 ms 27. 24% 24% + % 

510 3% 3 3% + % 

10 522 45% 44% 45 — % 

2 49% 49% 49%— 1% 
93 4 9% 9% 9V. — V. 

25 44 20% 20% 20% + % 

15 2U 35% 34% 34% — % 

10 3 17% 17% 17% 

10 100 15% 15% 15% 

12 274 IMk 18% 18% — % 
281 15% 15% 15% + % 

2 98% 98% 98% — 1% 

482 7% 7% 7% 

It 948 56% 54% 56% — % 

17 85 19% 19% Wk + % 

8 

7 ”1 3% 29% 29% 

"s 4111 SjSgtg 
It 38% 28% 2g% + % 
33 29% 20% 2B%— % 
T7 26% 26% 24%- % 
i 1 32% 32% 32% __ 

i 7 485 H% 21% 21%-% 
! 13 as mb 47% 48% + % 
! 10 855 19 18% 18% — % 

I 10 117 14% 16% 14% + % 
597 3% 3% 3% + % 

11 7% 7% _7% — » 

25 991 33 32% 32*-% 

I 11 1£S ESS + * 

291 22% 22% 22% 
r 137 15% 14% 15% — % 
r 106 33% U% s%— % 
! M TO a% g% ago- % 
I 70 20% 20% 20% — % 



■■uyr.Ti 



Metals 


2145 MOV 24X0 24.12 
2338 Jun 25X0 25X8 
MS Jul SSM -25.# 

«* .*« M S3 
21 X 0 sep 2 SJer sus 


M0 
■+J0 
+X4 
■MN 
-JM 
—.18 

=3 

3SJ0 —31 


untm Nov 

301*0 Dec 331X0 33130 32930 


0*4 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

Option A Strike ■ - 

U nd e r Ivto o Price Crib— tnri Pete— Lost 

Dec Mar Jm Dec Mar Jon 
1JJ0B BrttUli PoondKwts per ontl 
B Pound 120 r r r 0.W r r 

141X5 125 17X0 r r OM r r 

141X5 130 r r r UB r r 

141X5 135 8joo r r 1X5 r r 

41X3 S AW 4.95 8X0 4.15 r 8X0 

141X5 145 2X0 A95 r 420 t t 

141X5 150 1X5 r 4X0 r r r 

141X5 155 0X5 >10 r r r r 

&jm coaadiaii DoUare-cenle per Belt. 

CDoiir • 72 130 r r r t r 

7X25 73 DJ2 r r 0X2 r r 

7X25 74 r us r r r r 

73X5 75 0 .12 r 039 _ r r r 

am Weri German Mark»4PBH permit. 

□Marie 32 r r US JM r r 

38-11 33 S39 r r 0.18 r 

38.11 34 r r r wo 030 r 

3B.I1 35 X40 4X0 r 0.17 r r 

3B.11 36 232 T t 033 0X2 T 

Sll 37 1X7 2X5 r J IX* r 

38.11 M 136 2X6 r US ■ ■ 

38.11 38 5 5 **8 1X3 

fill » 0J7 1X1 109 yff r r 

12SXM Ptem* FratK»-I0lto of a cent per mB. 

F Franc 120 r r 8X0 1X0 r r 

124X4 125 320 r r r r r 

UMLW8 JaponSe Yen-ioent* of a ceet Per writ. 

JYen 40 6X5 r r 003 r r 

44X9 41 4X0 r r r r r 

3Sj» 42 am r r > r r 

46X9 « 4X0 r r r r r 

4X89 44 3JB r r 0^ r r 

4X39 45 238 3X4 r 0X2 r r 

4X89 46 1X4 r 2X9 074 t r 

S2JM Swt8» Fnetce-cnuH per OflH. __ , _ 

SFranc 41 5X0 r r OW r r 

4X49 42 r r r 0.13 r r 

4X49 43 171 r r r r r 

4X49 44 JOB 4X0 r 0M 9M T 

44X9 45 236 r r 0X4 r r 

Trtricoll vol. ^ Ati” . "" id.i2.hrt. 'inm 

TdSStCS SSS . ... PrtPPOPlri. 117311 

r— Not traded. *— No.eptton oHered. 

Lori 1* premium (purchase price). 

Source: AP. 


Stock indexes 


US T. BILLS tIMMJ 

Slmiman-ptsaflOOPcL 

9107 B5J7 Dec KLK 

9231 36X0 Mar 92X0 9250 

■ 9232 87JH Jw 92.18 W.W 

92X1 88X0 Sep 91 J3 9U3 

9138 89JB Dec 91X6 91X6 

9139 095B Mar 9131 9131 

91JO 9058 J0n._9»« ,»M2 

EsL Sales 55W. 1 ^»V.Sc0m 1137 
Ptwv. Day Open Int. 32327 off 3*3 
MYR-T R«AMJ RYlCBrn 
*100X00 on n-ots S. wUoo pet 

87-13 75-13 Dec 8M 85-11 

863 75-M MOT 84-T- M-12 

85-7 74-30 Jun H3-5 W-7 

84-4 88-7 Sri» 04 d-W 

83-11. »-2 ScJ-KS-B 

Eri. Sales Pnw.Sales 10422 

PtbvIdciy O pen Int. 40X83 uplST 
US TREASURY BOWPSICffg .. 

gr 

75-31 56-29 Sep 71-14 71-15 

74-34 54-25 Dec 78-14 70-17 

74-15 54-27 MOT 

74-2* 43-12 Jun 48-24 4B3T 

72^ 434 SeP 68-W 48-18 

a V SEr 

e£‘IS%. ** ^.5-0*186X99 
Prfv.Dav Open 1 01378375 1*6314 
EMMA (CRT) 

74-8 58-28 Mcr 75-t3 75-13 




m 


Market Guide 


I.. I^U-LM'rXJF Yr U 


55% 33 QuokO* 1X8 25 15 

105 ” QuS'pf 

23% 16% QuakSO 30 19 19 

7X0 53 W 

»» U % oS 34a 12 13 


IM l3ft.£*F£ 

147 *% 28% 28% + % 

’SiSJg 


^hai Group Forecasts 
Slower Growth in GDP 

Reuters 

BANGKOK — Thailand's Board of Trade 
said Monday »hat growth in the country’s gross 
domestic product will slow next year to between 
4J2 and 4J percent from its projected 4.8 per- 
cent in 1985. 

Last year’s growth in GDP, which measures 
the total value of goods and services excl udin g 
income from foreign investment, was 6.1 per- 
cent, the board said. 

Thailan d’s largest commercial bank, Bang- 


sou. 24% ZntoCp >-32“ig5 J S£ 2 f* 2 5 tt a. 
18% 7% Zapata .12 1-5 57 TW *% H 8 — % 

57% 31% Zavms X8 9 16 17» 52 W 51%— % 

37 lAVfe ZanlthE 10 527 17H lWk 16Wi^ VS 

rut 15% Z*™» 32 IX 16 31 19% 19% 19% 

37% 22% Zumln 1^ 18 11 32 34% 34% 34% — % 


N\SE Hghs-LoHS 


kok Bank Ltd-, earlier predicted that GDP 
would grow next year at 3.8 percent, down from 
its 43-percent estimate for this year. 


AlldSaaplF 

CrockNt odl 

ITT CPPIK 
OuakorOd* 
Triton En Pi 


Amaxlnc 
AmorHofel 
CNWCp . 
CM Data pf 
FHchbCo 
GenData 
Grace Co 
Kauf Broad 
McLmpi wt 
Puralator 
T rumen Inc 


Ameren BenUsCo 

EnsthdsPf Gen Food .. 
Newtiallnv NalndPSadl 

Revlon PfB Sturt Drop 
WMmhflStr WO Oh u cr ltl 


AmBrand* 

BrocJtHH 

ClnMIlcm 

CdUlnelB 

RuarCp 

GenSipnal 

HarrIsCe 

KenafCP 

NalceCh 


AmBrd247p< 

Bumdv 

Ctavpkl84p 

EbcW _ 

FrMcMEP n 

Games©* Inc 

HawletTPk 

A8ACOM 

PMIIpMOTT 

Revnldind 5 

WrilFarMl 


Col urn Gas 
GleasnC 
NSPw4S6of 
Triton Enev 
WrWev 


AmPmsldi 
BultosGspl 
Comptvsn 
Fatal Ctr 
GCA Co 
Gen Rod 
HCA 

McLean n 
PagoProd 
Tldewtref 


Commwlhies 


Oct 7 

Close 

Htah Low Bid Arte CUV* 

SUGAR 

R ea e h Irapq per metric tow 

Doc 1390 1350 L®5 J36S -35 

s B II 3 3 =1 

05 l3w 1X75 1X75 -34 

Due N.T. N.T. 1X10 1X30 —35 

Eri- unL: 1X00 lot* ri 50 tara- Prev. achiol 
satns: 1X14 lal*. Open Interest: 19X89 

COCOA 

ertfldt fruuci per 100 ■> 

s? r fR w. a H 

6 as as H = 

as K:?: ™ nw il 

6LT N-T. — lilt +20 

SSchweawMBle 

SS? SI:?: Elt: ”5 +io 

iSSr 1340 IX5S 1X50 1X41 Undu 

5SSC NT. N.T. 1X60 1X9S +3 

N.T. N-T. 1.901 1X35 +8 

Sep N.T. N.T. IXT7 — +4 

'ed. vof.: 2M^Pf 5 to**- Prov.aetuol talus: 2 
lot*. Open Interest: 302 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


London 

Commodities 


Htoh Low Bid Aik Bid Art 

SUGAR 

Starting per metric 1 m 
D ec 139X0 138X0 135X0 134X0 141X0 VflXO 
Mar 147X0 142X0 142X0 142X0 14*20 148X0 
Mar 151X0 147X0 14X40 14AJ0 152X0 75240 
AH 15640 155X0 1SL00 15020 191*1 15920 
Oct 142X0 158X0 158X0 75820 163X0 14420 
Volume: 1478 lots of 50 tone. 


COCOA 

SterlHig per metric ton 
Dec 1284 IJ76 UBl 1282 

MOT 1XZ3 1X14 1X14 1X17 

Mar 1X51 1JM2 1X42 TXg 

Jlr 1X60 1X0 1X0 1X53 

Sep 1X68 1X60 1X40 1X*2 

Dec 1X45 1X40 1X40 1X42 

Mar 1X50 1X40 1X45 1X52 

Volume: 1.184 tats al 10 tan*. 


1275 1274 
1X15 1X14 
1X40 1X41 
1X52 1X53 
1X57 1X58 
1X32 1X48 
1X25 1X45 


1X» 1X96 
1X32 L633 
1X42 1X63 
1X92 1X98 
1225 122* 
1240 1289 
1278 12*9 


Dividends 


COFFEB 

Starting per meftlc tan 
NO* 1X95 1X80 1.5*1 1X0 

job 1X30 1X19 1X22 7X^ 

MPT 1X60 1X53 1X62 14« 

MOV 1X95 1X85 1X85 

Jly 1227 1212 12U 1215 

SUP 1260 1258 1240 1252 

Nov H.T. N.T. 1X441 1290 

Volume: 1X19 lots al 5 tan*. 


GASOIL 

UJ* dollars per metric tan 

Oct 263X0 240X0 26280 243X0 20X024425 

Me taw 250X0 257 JO 25123 25330 25X25 
m SiSi ws 24925 vax ms 
Fob 74 * SP 246X0 24400 244X0 247X0 248X0 
EE CTXoSwSa*«S5»OT^a4a«» 

Au| 233X0 232X0 23225 223X0 224X0 22*4)0 

Mar nt. "TT.mamjnausaiM 
JOP 229X0 228X0 22400 227X0 229X0 229X8 
volume: 1.152 lots of 100 tan* 

Sources; Routers end London Potrotaam E* 
crmxpe loaoont. 


CnimSlities 


HOHG-KOIM} GOLD FUTURES 

USXpereance 

Htah Lew ■S°*Arii WU*** 
SSrl Jlt: nItI mxo moo moo Sxo 

Die _ TMBn 320X0 329X0 331X0 334X0 334X0 

^“^^SSSSSSSliSSSSS! 

ifiz nIt: nItISxowxowS^S 

Auo - NT. N.T. 347X0 349X0 351X8X3X0 
Volume; 24 lets of WO a* 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURE! 

ILSX per earn 

Htoh TjE» settle Settle 

volume: 125 tots of 100 a. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Matantan cent* per kDe __ . 


Nov 185X0 ' 181X0 1*6X0 187X8 

10S50 18450 1*7X0 1MJ0 

U45D 187X0 187X0 7MJ0 

FOO 188X8 190X8' ItoXO 190X8 

Mar 7*9X0 191X0 1*0X0 792X0 

volume: 6 lei* 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 


Cash Prices 


V 




8% + % 
1 % 

7% 

45% + Ml 

£% + « 

S +% 
22% 

24 — % 

16% + yj 

53 +1% 

97% +1 
22% 

13% 

2S% — 1 

m% — % 
34% — % 
24% + % 
M 
37% 

3%— % 
32% — % 
W#i— % 
7% 

19% 

37% + % 
18% — % 
34 — % 
4414 + % 
41 — % 

24% — % 
io% — % 
11% + to 

ii%= ft 

44 — % 

7% + % 
43% — .% 
13% — % 
24%—% 


r 


How to choose a travel agent. 
Getting the mast 
out of your travel budget. 

When is a train better them an enplane? 


STOCK SPLIT 



Wtaatarn Health Plain — Mar-2 



USUAL 





Q 

XS 

11-15 

10-31 


Q 

.12 

12-31 

12-10 


O 

JO 



Q 





S 

X5 

10-24 

10-18 

5trinMra Inc A 




a-anaual; nwnoatUv; 

a-aaui m t»; ntmt 

aaaaal 





Source: UPI. 






f\ 


London Metals 


i 


RSS 1 Nov— 

141X8 

144X0 

utxo 

165X0 

R5S1 Due— 

144X0 

144X8 

141X0 

145X0 

RSS 2 MOV— 

in ii 

15450 

154X0 

155X0 

R3S3 Now— 

131X0 

152X0 

152X0 

753X0 

RSS 4 Nov- 

747X0 

149X0 

148X0 

150X0 

RSS 5 Nov- 

MUD 

144X0 

143X0 

1*5X0 

KUALA LUMPUR PAIX40IL 




FOR fW AND PROFIT 

Every Fnaay in Weekend 


Oct 

MMArt 

Nn> 

Dac , 

Hi 

5716 1 

9il4 

71/16 

W 

2M ' 

«* 

PL ! 

H 

A 1 


“ 


WtolHJO UW177G Ora 777X1 — U® 
Source: cboe. 


Volume: 0tot»at2Stan* 
Source: Routers. 


DM firtures 
Options 

IK CuTam ttwt-ISJBBmart^cuef surmar* 


Venezuela Seeks 
Repayment Clause 

barter* 

CARACAS — Finance Minis ter 
Manuel Azpurfa Arreaza has 
asked creditor banks to accept a 
contingency H«n« fn Venezuela’s 
$21.2-billkm rescfandhlmg agree- 
ment in the. event of sharp iwmw 
in oil revenne or increases in inter- 
est rales. 

Bankers said Sunday, however, 
that they believe the abuse was a 
political ploy to (fivert objections 
to the a greem ent from biwim and 
oppoanon parties- 

TTie state news agency, Venpres, 
said Mr. Azxmrda. piemued. die 
proposal Friday in New York to 
the chairman of Chase Manhattan 
Bank, WiHard G Butcher. He also 
bad talks with Panl A. Vokier, 
diainnan of the UA Federal Re- 
serve Board. The agreement, int- 
daily reached in May, would re- 
schedule nearly all ot Venczuda.’s 
public-sector debt to e n m n w irifl ] 


-•^VffTDMrewrTH 




rY^ 




























































BUSINES S RCHImbm i b 

Cfarysler 'Hid Mitsubishi 

Han $500-Mi]]ioH Plant 

The Associated Prwxs 

™™-AND park, Michigan 
w n 3 & Co 5>- and Mitsubishi 

of Ja pan announced 

awOO-mfllion auto assembly plant 

The plant, to slart production in 

ssafss'iSs 

employ 2,500 workers* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER B, 1985 


Page 13 


E*-5 company wfflown50i>eT- 
wnture, named Dia- 
mond Star Motors Core. It wfll 
start wjth initial capital of $ 15 Q 
milhon, according to announce- 


■Arab Group Has 
Stake in Moseley 

International Herald Tribune 

LON DON - — An Arab in- 
wstmoit group said Monday 
that it bad acquired around a 
third of Moseley, HaDgarten, 
Estabrook & Weeden Holding 
Corp., a troubled Wall Street 
securities firm, for $12 million. 

The investors are led by Hlk- 
mat Nashashibi, formerly chief 
executive of Al-Mal Group, a 
small Arab-owned investment 
bank, and Omar Kassem, for- 
merly deputy chief executive of 
Al-MaL They declined to iden- 
tify the other investors. ■ 

Tic group is injecting capital 
into Moseley by buying new 
preferred shares, which are con-' 
vertibLe into common. Mose- 
ley’s capital had been depleted 
by losses of nearly $20 million, 
over the past year and a half. 


meats atChrysler hqulquairters in 
Highland Fflriq Michigan 

Diamond Starts chairman wiB be 
G. deni] Gardner, a general man- 
ager at Chrysler, while Yotchi Na- 
a general manager at MItsu- 
btsht, w]D be preadent arid 'chief 
executive officer. 

Chiysler’s chairman, Lee A. jap 
cocca, said that the final decision 
on the plant site was made “within 
the past week." 

“It was very dose. AH four states 
were very aggressive,” Mr. Iacocca 
Mid, referring to TUktois, Indiana, 

. Ohio and Michigan. 

Mr. Iacocca shared the. rostrum 
at Chiyder headquarters with Mit- 
subishi's president, . Toyoo Tate. 
Mr. Tate, speaking through an in- . 
tfrpreter, said ’there was no provi- 
sion for United Auto.Wodcers 
union representation at the plant 
and that he expected local labor 
pool to be the primary source of 
workers. 

Mr. Iacocca and Mr. Tate said 
the Bloomington-Normal area had 
“all the requisites*’ foe the assembly 
plant. They praised the area's 
transportation and fatal- 

ities as well as the culture, labor 
climate and tax base.. 

The plant wiITproduce Mitsubi- 
shi-designed two-door and four- 
door cars with a 1-8-fiter or 2-liter 
Japanese-made wn g fa r , the compa- 
nies said. Half of the cars will be 
sold in Chrysler dealers, and half 
will be distributed through Mitsu- 
bishi’s sales network, as previously 
anno u nced. Engines^ transnrisskins 
and accelerators will be shipped 
from Japan. . 

Chrysler of ficials in Illinois said 
the plant will indirectly create 
8,000 new jobs in the central Illi- 
nois area. 


Operations Chief 
Is Named at BT 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — ' British Tele- 
communications PLC an- 
nounced Monday the promo- 
tion of one of its youngest 
directors, Iain VaHance, to the 
new post of chief of operations. 

Mr. Vatiance, 42, was manag- 
ing' director of BPs biggest ‘di- 
vision, Local Communications 
Services, winch operates local 
telephone services m Britain. 

Sir George Jefferson, 64, who 
remains chairm a n and chief ex- 
ecutive, said he would have, 
more time to concentrate on 
strategy after Mr. Vail an ce 
takes np his new duties. 


Hanson Raises SCM Stake to 32 . 1 % 


The Associated Prest 

NEW YORK — Hanson Trust 
PLC said Monday that it has raised 

its stake in SCM Gorp. to 311 
percent from 25 percent of SOM's 
total shares outstanding. 

In doing so, Hanson, whose pre- 
vious bids to acquire SCM were 
rejected by the company, raised a 
major obstacle to SOM's agree- 
ment to be bought by an investor 
group that includes Morin Lynch 
& Co. and SCM management. 

* Hanson now has neatly enough 
stock to defeat the Merrill Lynch 
offer of S74 a share, or S910.2 mil- 
lion, which is contingent on the 
buyout group getting two-thirds 
backing from SCM shareholders. 

“Merrill Lynch can’t do their 


deal,” asserted Robert Pine, presi- 
dent of Rothschild Inc, Hanson’s 
financial adviser. 

Mr. Pine also repeated Hanson’s 
previous statement that it was pre- 
pared to top the Merrill Lynch bid 
if SCM dropped the “lock-up” op- 
tions granted to Merrill Lynch. 
Those options would allow Merrill 
Lynch to biry SOM’s Durkee foods 
line and its chemical pigments 
business for S430 million if its 
buyout of SCM failed 

In afternoon trading on the New 
York Stock Exchange, SOM’s stock 
was off 12fc cen is a share at $72.50. 

The Merrill Lynch proposal calls 
for SCM, which also makes Smith- 
Corona typewriters, to be taken 
private through a leveraged 


buyout In such a transaction, the 
purchase is financed mostly with 
debt that is repaid with funds from 
the target company’s operations or 
the sale of its assets. 

Hanson, a London-based com- 
pany with interests in building ma- 
terials, construction equipment, 
textiles, shoes and consumer prod- 
ucts, has been after SCM since Au- 
gust, when it offered $60 a share - 

The Merrill Lynch group raised 
the bidding to $70 a share, after 
which Hanson sweetened its offer 
to $72. On Sept. 11, when SCM 
embraced Mernll Lynch's new bid 
of $74 a share, Hanson dropped its 
oiler. But Hanson then bought 3.1 
million, or 25 percent, of SCM's 
shares in the open market. 


Carbon Group Discusses Acquisition 
Of Thames TV From BET* Thom EMI 

Roam 

LONDON — Carlton Communications PLC said Monday that it 
was holding talks with Thames Television. Thom EMI PLC and BET 
PLC about acquiring Thames. 

Trading in Carlton's shares was suspended earlier in the day after 
British press reports that Carlton was making an offer of £80 million 
($1 13 J million) for Thames. 

Thorn has a 46-percent stake in Thames and BET 47.9 percent. 

Carlton shares were suspended at 825 pence each. The group, which 
made a before-tax profit of £5.54 million on sales of £21.57 million in 
the year ended Sept. 30, 1984, specializes in video technology and 
television broadcasting production. 

Thom's shares, 367 pence at Friday’s close, opened 10 pence higher 
Monday at 377 pence each, but later slipped back to 372 pence. BET'S 
shares opened at 320 pence, 7 pence up on Fridays close, but eased 
back to 315 pence. 


Pantry Pride Counters Revlon Plan With New Bid 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Pantry Pride 
Inc* whose efforts to take over 
Revlon Inc. appeared blocked last 
week when Revlon chose to go pri- 
vate in a complicated merger and 
breakup, raised its hostile tender 
offer Monday to 556.25 a share in 
cash. 

Pantry Pride, ah operator of su- 
permarkets, said it was filing an 
amended complaint against Revlon 
and certain of its directors, charg- 
ing that the Revlon board breached 
its fiduciary duties in approving 
last Thursday a $56-a-share merger 
with Forstmann Little & Co. Rev- 
lon agreed to pay Forstmaim a S25- 
million fee if. the merger was not 

iwigiminafwd 


pany at a bargain-basement price.” contact lenses, blood analyzing 
Now, be and the rest of the Rev- equipment, pharmaceuticals and a 
Ion board are backing a buyout chain of clinical laboratories. These 
proposal at a price S9 a share below accounted for the vast majority of 
the$65 Mr. Bergerac had said Rev- Revlon’s health care sales of SI J 
Ion was worth. And what Mr. Ber- billion and operating income of 
gerac and the board endorsed looks $198.1 million last year. And health 
very much like the bust-up of Rev- care, in turn, generated two- thirds 
Ion that he deplored. of Revlon’s operating profits and 

Forstmann Utile, specialists in titan half its sales last year, 
leveraged buyouts, and members of Undo- the Fors tmann Little ar- 
Revlon's management, including rangement, Mr. Bergerac trill be 
Mr. Bergerac, are to take the com- cashing in the shares he owns in 
pany private by paying sharehold- Revlon and then making an invest- 
ees 556 a share, or $1.77 bSHon. ment in the new health care compa- 
Before that, Revlon will sell its cos- ny that may ultimately end up be- 
metics business for S900 millio n, to ing worth considerably more than 
another investment concern. his present Revlon shares. 

In addition, American Home 


Pantry Pride, wh^t had been Boeing Reports Jet Order 


COMPANY NOTES 


A sh l an d 03 Inc. of the United 
Stales said it has agreed to acquire 
J.T. Baker Chemical Co. from Ri- 
chardson- Vicks Inc., the U.S. 
health-care company, for undis- 
closed terms. Talks on the transac- 
tion were suspended last year but 
were renewed in July at Ashland's 
request 

Banqtte Paribas, the. French 
State-Owned banking group, is 
bedding talks with Quuter Goo- 
dison, the London stockbroker, 
that could lead to Paribas taking 
control of the firm, Goodison said. 

Bertelsmann AG of West Ger- 
many, Europe's largest publishing 
group, said it plans to pay an un- 
changed IS percent dividend for 
the year ending. June 30. The com- 
pany said it increasof profit and 
sales in all areas last year but (fid 
not give figures. ' * .A\ 

Ford Motor Ca of Canada Ltd.' 
will -import 30,000 frorit-whed- 
drive subcompact cars from the 
parent company’s Taiwanese affili- 
ate, Ford Uo Ho Motors LtdL, by 
the 1987 model year, according to a 
report in Ward’s Automotive-: Rie^ 
ports of the United States. - 

General Computer Carp, of the 
United Stales said it has cut the 
prices of its Hyperdrive and Hjfper-: 
drive-20 intonal hard disks for Ap- 
ple Computer Lad’s Macintosh 
personal computer. Hyptirdfive 1 
now costs-$l,695, $500 less, and 
Hyperdrive-20, $2,195, off $600. 

General Motors torp. resumed 
low-interest, financing- offers on 
some passenger cazs and trucks, 
otic track after the 1986 -iribdels 
officially went on sale. a 

Lorimar Inc. of thcUnited States 
saiditTcntativdy agreed to merge, 
with Telepictures Gorp. to form a 
company balled Lorimar-Tdefac- 
tures. Lorimar holders will receive 


22 Tdeptctnrcs common shares for 
each Lorimar: share hdd. 

MUmooti Mining & Manufac- 
turing Co. said it and Harris Corp. 
agreed in principle to form a joint- 
venture company for worldwide 
marketing, sales and service of 
copiers and facsimile machines. 
The new company will be based in 
Atlanta with an antidpaied sales 
base of $400 million. 

Mtodi w hl Motors Corp. of Ja- 
pan agreed to replace.5,824 defec- 
tive trucks sold , to China last year 
and give compensation for losses, 
according to nnprts in Beijing, but 
Mitsubishi said in Tokyo that the 
two sides were still negotiating. 

... -.03 ladfa lliL, the state-owned 
•company, said after-taxprofits rose 
30;peroent fo 8993 nriman rupees 
$35.8 mpon) in thryear ended, 
March, firoip 693.1 mtUioti rupees a 
year earlier. The reserves and sur- 
plus •tbc'company rose 10-2:65' 
bafion rupees, Up from L& billion 
previotidy. ;- 

SuBtcay Lt«L of Japan said it 
bought Kentwood Spring Water 
Lac. of New Orleans, Louisiana, hi 
a prepared statement the company 
declined to say how much it paid, 
but industry sources estimated the 
at lOJbUfion yen ($47.17 mil- 


pursuing Revlon since August, 
raised hs bid to $53 on the eve of 
the Revlon board’s decision to go 
private. That offer was worth an 
estimated $1.5 biltion. The bid of 
$3625 a share would be worth 
about $1.8 billion. 

Pantry Pride, which is based in 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, said its 
new offer was conditioned on Rev- 
lon's board rescinding an anti-take- 
over provision it approved Aug. 19- 

Pantry Pride said it believed Mi- 
chel C. Bergerac, chief executive of 
the cosmetics and health care giant, 
stood to gain more than $20 million 
und er his employment agreement if 
the arrangement with Forstmann 
went through. 

■ Bergerac’s Role 

Steven £ Prokesdi of The New 
York Times reported earlier from 
New York: 

■ Two months ago, Mr. Bergerac 
reacted to the Pantry Pride take- 
ova - bid by saying: “We are not 
going to sit around and let these 
bust-up artists take away the com- 


Etehos spe- 
cialty chemicals and the Northdiff 
Thayer unit of Revlon. 

When the dust settles, Forsl- 
m«nn Little and Mr. Bergerac will 
own and run the great bulk of Rev- 
lon’s booming health care business. 
Their portion is an enterprise esti- 
mated by at least one analyst to be 
worth as much as SI .8 billion. 

Their businesses will include 


Reuters 

SEATTLE — Boeing Co. said 
Monday that it has received an or- 
der from Martin air Holland for 
one 747-200C jet at an estimated 
value of $100 milli on- The aircraft 
is scheduled for delivery in March 
1987. Boeing said the airliner will 
be powered by four General Elec- 
tric Co. CF6-50E2 engines. 


The pursuit of Revlon by Pantry 
Pride increased the pressure on Mr. 
Bergerac to take some action. And 
after Philip Morris Cos. reached 
agreement to buy General Foods 
Corp. for nearly S5.8 billion and 
Procter & Gamble Co. agreed to 
pay $1.55 billion for Richardson- 
Vicks Inc., it became clear that es- 
tablished consumer products com- 
panies. such as Revlon, were worth 
considerably more than what Wail 
Street analysts only a few weeks 
ago had estimated. 

Nonetheless, the question re- 
mains: Is Revlon being broken up 
at a bargain-basement price? After 
all, the sold-off divisions will reap 
about $125 billion in cash that the 
Forstmann Little team will inherit, 
so Forstmann Little's net outlay 
appears to be only $520 million. 

But, Forstmann Little is assum- 
ing substantial debt. One reason is 
that Revlon bought back 10 million 
shares for $575 million recently to 
ward off the hostile takeover bid by 
Pantry Pride. Thus, with Revlon’s 
net debt — or its total debt minus 
cash — the price would be about 
$13 billion. 



OIL Cf MONEY' 

IN TI IE 

i.k;i huh 


LCMXKOCTOBER 21-25.1985. 

i sixth annual International Herald Tribune/ 
"Oil Daily Conference on “Oil and Money in the 
Eighties” will take place on October 24 and 25 in London. 

The theme of this year’s conference is “Surviving in a 
Competitive Environment”. The program, designed for all 
senior executives in energy and related fields, will address the 
key issues affecting the current energy situation and assess 
future trends and strategies. Key speakers will include : 

H.E. Dr. Professor Subroto, Minister of Mines and Energy, 
Indonesia; The Honorable John S. Herrington, United States 
Energy Secretary ; Allen E. Murray, President, Mobil 
Corporation ; Arve Johnsen, President, Statoil and The 
Honorable John Moore M.P, Financial Secretary to the 
Treasury, United Kingdom. 

For full details, please contact the International Herald 
Tribune Conference Office, 181 Avenue Charles-de-GauIle, 
92521 NeiriHy Cedex, France. 

Telephone : (33-1) 747-12-65, Ext 4568. Telex; 613595. 


% 


osMwCaip. of Japan and Ber- 
nard Tapie of Franoe have agreed 
to study the feasibility of setting up 
a Toshiba factory in France to 
make microwave ovens and possi- 
bly videotape recorders. 

Sperry Corp. of the United 
States said ^established a banking 
ceiUerinHtmgKongfOTmaAeting 
to the financial industry in the 
Asia/Pacific region. The center will 
provuto support for Sperry’s bank- 
ing customers in the region, to en- 
sure they are:up to date on the 
technological developments. 


-' Net Asset Value 
on October 3, 1985 

Pacific Selection Fond N.V. 
U.S.J1.47 per U.SJ1 unit 

Pacific Selection 
Fund N.V. 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

. . PRICES AT 2.1 OBS 

Ai LL5. DOLLAR CASH SI 047 

B: MLH.HCURRB4CY CASH $11.39 

O DOUAR BONDS $11.57 

TV MLA-TCURRENCY BONDS $1222 

Ei 5TBUNG ASSET CI1JJ7 

FORBGN & COLOflAL 
MANAGEMENT (JBJSEY) LIMOHD 
U MLUCAS1H ST9Sr^T>eJBUBSBr i CL 
TH.- 053427351 THBt 4192063 

• roe OTHBl F&C FUNDS, SEE 
INTERNATIONAL FUNDS UST 


Perpetuel Calendar 






I' : a 
i- 

\ m '-. .- ;> — 

V' / 












IWii y . ; i 







A solid partner 

in the DM bond market: 

Helaba Frankfort 



Helaba Frankfort operates from the 
heart of Germany's financial capital. 

Helaba Frankfurt - a govern- 
ment-backed regional bank - issues 
its own bearer bonds and SD Cer- 
tificates (Schuldscheindarlehen). 
With an outstanding volume of 
some DM 27 billion these securities 
are an attractive investment for 
private and institutional investors. 
Dealers and portfolio managers of 
pension funds, central banks and 
other financial institutions appre- 
ciate this paper as a top quality - 
investment with a high .degree of 
liquidity. 




Helaba Frankfort offers extensive 
facilities for DM bonds. 

Helaba Frankfurt is an active 
market maker for a variety of DM 
fixed-interest securities, ranging 
from the Bank's own paper to other 
instruments such as DM-denomi- 
nated straights, zeros and Euro- 
bonds. 

. Helaba Frankfurt’s placing power 
is considerable. Around the world 
institutional clients value the Bank's 
proven creativity and flexibility 
in meeting the challenges of today's 
markets. 


Helaba Frankfurt is a member of 
the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. 

For a solid partner in the DM 
bond market just contact Helaba 
Frankfurt, one of Germany’s 
leading banks with total assets 
exceeding DM 66 billion. 

Head Office: 

Junghofstrasse 18 - 26 
D-6000 Frankfurt /Main 
Telephone (069)132-3833 
Telex 415291-0 


Helaba 

Hessische Landesbank-Girozentrale- 








Monday! 

AYIEX 


dosing 


Tobies Include the nationwide price* 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect lute trades elsewhere. 

tta The Associated Press 


VHMh 
KfcfiLmr Stock 


Dlv. YU. PE WOsHMiLmr SSTty 


4% 

BAT In 

.150 3.9 

616234 

3% 

3% 

3% 

25% 

13% BDMs 


23 

109 

21 

20% 

20% — % 

3W 

IL BBT 


s 

2 

2% 

2% 

2% 

17V* 

9% BSN 



6 

10% 

10 

10% + % 

13'* 

{% BntJaer 

80 19 

10 

n 

10% 

10% 

1D%— % 

4% 

2'A BalvMwl 


174 

2% 

2 

2V* — % 

26% 

2T: BonFd 

2830 98 


20 

2S% 

25% 

25% 


16 

1.20 lap s 
M 13 71 
» 


JOt 88 16 
i4 U « 


3 10% 18% 18% + *• 

46 id m 10 + Ik 

n 1 % iu iw— 1% 

24 16% 16% 16% 

4 9 B% SW — Vft 
7i « w r/j— vk 

7 4% 6% 6Vl 

31 life 11% 1T%— Hi 
43 27V*i 27% 27% 

,5 % % %-* 

20 9% 9% ?% + Vi 

4 14% 14% 14% + % 
10 1% 1% 1% 

22 15% 15% 15% — % 
64 . 34% 34% 34% 

1 9% 9% 9% 

IB 2% 2% 2%— % 
1 13% 13% 13% + % 



.461248 6 
JO* 58 9 
2200 7 J 


7 7 7 — 9* 

2% 2% 2% — % 
IS 14% 14% — % 


30 2.9 12 
13 

.16 .9 13 

.16 J H 
1.20a 50 11 


.17 J 28 
5 

1 JOB 34 9 
1.93e 48 
JBe 13 9 
JStU t 


13 

48 U 11 
7 
91 


11 IS 14% 14%— % 

2x28% 28% 28% + % 

29 3*. 3% 3% + % 

3 5% 5% 5% — % 
SOz 29% 29% 29% 

18 11% 11% 11% 

4 16% 16% 16% — % 

U 7% 7 7 + % 

427 2 1% 1% — % 

967 T7% 17% 17% + % 

3 20% 20% 20% + % 

13 20% 20 20 + Vi 

4 7V* 7V» 7V» + % 

30 30% 29% 30% + % 
357 25% 25% 2S% — V* 
126 29% 29% 29% + ft 

10 40% 40% 40% 

9 8W 8% sw + w 
6 38% 38% 38% + W 
13 4% 4% 4% + V* 

9 9% 9% 9% 

71 4 3% 4 

18 19% 19 19% — % 

5 9% 9% 9% 

73 12% 12% 1ZW— Vi 

6 6% 6% 6% — % 
265 6% 6W 6% + % 

12 6% 6% 6% + W 

16 15% 15% 15%—% 
46 19 18% 18% — Vl 

137 9% 9% 9W— % 
119 49* 4% 4% 

131 4% 4% 4% — V* 

79 21% 20% 21% + W 
335 13t* 12% 13 
2 16% 16% 16% + % 
22 19% 18% 19% + % 





14% 14M 

k 8 

1(M 10W 
11% lift 


1% 

9% 

Vi JftfAwt 
5W Jatran 

.711 HU 

11 

100 

43 

Bh 

6% 

4* 

6%. 


6% 

2% jompa - 


17 

2% 

2% 

7Jk 

11% 

7 JrtinAm 

JO 4J 

10 

32- 

m. 

7% 

m* + ft 

11% 

6 Jetoilnd 

4 

29 

8% 

81ft 

7% 

3% JntpJkn 


19 

5 

3% 

3% 

3% 


151ft 13% 15% — V* 
33% 32% 33% + % 
27% 27M 
3% 3% 

19% 19ft 

*4 * 

18% 18% 

28% 27% 

7M 7% 

6% 6% 

T T* 





ify° u 

Alldi 


TOM 61m 
am iw 
<V> 4% 

31* iK 


40 48 39 
0 JZ U 28 
18 
10 

Cl 13 

180 48 9 
6.966214 7 

IS .12 


Jle 2J S3 
.lie A 38 
JO 23 32 
400 44 13 


i au 8% 

29 74% 14W 
28 6W 6% 
«0 6!ft 55* 
26 2% TV, 

12 20% 20% 
9x32ft XI Vi 
388 13% 13 
23 7* % 

12 19% 19 
28 6% 6% 

1226 3% 3 

7 10% 10W 

13 » ft 

34 18% 18 
192 1ft % 
47 3% BW 

4 2% 2% 

7 9% 9% 

1 6W 6W 
7 17W 171ft 

2D 1% 1% 

3 36M 36% 

2 30 30 

205 9 9 

141 9 8W 


e% + v* 
14% 

6 % 

S%— Vft 
2% 

20% + % 
3216— V* 
13% — V* 
%-ft 
19% — % 
6 %— % 
3 — 1ft 
10% + % 
3% 

18% - 5* 


18% — 9k 

Vft + ff 

8% + 1ft 

2% 

9%— % 
6ft + fa 
17% 

!%— % 
36% 

30 

9 + % 

8% + % 


29 


8.9 


67 

10 

2-5 


53 

18 

1.9 


53 



10% 6% 
27% 12% 
2% 4ft 
39% 20% 
17% 12 
10% 5Vi 
15% 11 
9H 6% 
4 2 

10% 31ft 
1 % % 
5% 3% 

4% 1% 

17 916 

4% 2 

18% 6% 
19 15% 

31% 20 
22% 141ft 
12 6 % 
3% 1 
1W 13% 
6% 2% 
6% 3% 
18% 11% 
1316 8% 

23% 16% 
24% 15% 
9% 616 


HAL .10* IJ 
HUBC 40a 12 12 
Halifax 84a J 
Halml 
Hal ml wrt 

Homptl 9311X3 I 

Honfrds JO 22 15 

Harvey 

Hasbrs .15 J 18 
HlttvCrs 9 

HtthOl 17 

HalthM 44 54 8 
HatnWr JOB 23 B 
Haidar 53 


Hasbr s .15 J 

HlttvCrs 

HtltlOl 

HdttiM 44 54 

HatnWr 208 U 

Haidar 

Heilont 

HefmR 

H®r*bO 

Hlndrl 

Hlptron 

Hofnxm 

HallvCfl 24 U 


17 TV 

1 181* 

16 5% 

553 2% 

5 1% 

2 7% 
T4 ZM 
5 m 

351 30-ft 
70 15% 


HmsGn 

Hmlnsp429S 118 
Hannls .54 16 13 
Mm Mar 19 

HmHwt 

HotiPty 180 iai 16 
HoHPwt 

HouOT 87el74 
HovnE 9 

Hawlln JSB 24 7 
HubaiA s 76 17 11 
HubelBs J6 34 12 
Husky g 36 51 


17 2% 

2 13% 

26 2V. 
173 18V 
418 17% 
361 21% 

48 21% 
309 6% 

56 1 

89 17% 
35 4* 

563 5% 
5 14 
17 107* 
35 21 
19 21% 

27 7 


,7% 7%- % 
18% 18% 

S 5 

2V. 2% + % 

1 % 1 % 

7 7 — % 

23% 23%— % 
1% 1% 

29% 30% + % 
13 15%— % 

7H 7% + % 
11% I1%— 1ft 
7% 7% + % 

? it* 

3% 3% 

2 2 % + % 
13% 13% 

2 % 2 % + % 
18% 18% 

16% 16%— % 
21V* 21% — H 
21V* 21V* — % 
6 % 6 %— % 
1 1 — % 
17% 17% + M 
4% 4% 

4% 5 + % 

13 13 —1 

10% 1Q%— % 
20 2SM — % 
20% 21ft — % 
6% 7 


2% 1% I 
7% 3% I 

19% 11% I 
19 % n% i 
14% 8% I 
13 9% I 

5% 4% I 

9% 2% I 
31% 18% t 
67* 3% I 

1% 5 I 
34% 9% t 

4* 2% I 

2% 1% I 
3W* 27% I 
19 W'A I 
13% 9% I 

14% 10 I 

26% 9% I 
10Vi 8% I 


14 2% 

15 4 

34 10 1 17% 

22 12 60 17% 

29 58 ■% 

31 3 9% 

1 M 
12 127 6% 

4 11 27 31 


29 4% 
16 1% 
17 5906 34 Vft 

88 S 28 43 15 

11 21 lDft 

5 3 13% 

JD 28 7 91 KPft 

JO 28 21 8X10 


2% 2* + V* 
4 4 + % 

17% 17% + % 
T7V6 17% — % 
8% 8%— % 
9% -9%— V* 
5% 5% + V* 

® 6% + Mr 
21 +1 
6 6V* + V* 

6 % 6 % 

33 33% + % 

4% 4%— % 

1% l% + % 
32% 33% +2% 
14% 15 + % 

10V* 10% + Vft 
13% 13%—;.% 
9% 10 
9% 9% 


2416 16% 
22% 15% 

12 4 

14% 4% 

19% 13% 
24% 18% 
27% 18% 
7% 3% 
7% 3% 

2 % 1 
25%. 16 
14% 6% 
13% •% 


OEA 
Oakwd 
OdalA n 

w- 

Oilalnd 

otstans 

OOkiOP 

Oppanh 

asst 

OjcfrtF 

OxorfcH 


19% 19% 

15% 16% + % 

1% 6% + % 
184* 18%—% 
21 21 + % 
23% 23% + ft 
41ft 4% + ft 
5% 5% 

1 % 1 % 

23% 23% + % 
12 % 12 % 

11% 11% — % 





37 

18% 

1816 

18% — Vft 



22 

31 

2% 

7% 

2% 




73 

9% 

V% 

9% 

Me 23 


18 

2% 

7% 

2% + V* 

-T5B LS 

9 

1 

9% 

9% 

9% 

184 

43 

15 

43 

33% 

33% 

33Vt + % 



57 

8 

14% 

14% 

14% + % 



4? 

3 

11% 





1 

no 

% 

W 

W 




173 

1% 

1% 

1W— w 

39 

19 

11 

.11 

20% 

20% 

20% — ft 

.92 

38 

10 

IS 

27% 27ft 

27% — % 


U 

i 

3 

29 : 
7 

MU 

13 

9 

42 

7 ; 


21 

77 


31 

44 1 

■ 1.1 

6 . 

37 

1J 

8 

5Qx 


7 

78 


19 

16B 

168 


131 

42 

9 

77 

28 


12 

i S3 a 
r 

23 

B 

u 

15 

ID 

u 

19 

175 : 

7JJ 

7 

2 

3 

20 

7 

W 

2S 

1 

8 


9 

89 

63 

12 

6 

18 

9 

2 

123 

31 

4 

IJ 

27 

305 

48 

9 

99 

U 

17 

12 

18 

17 

256 


6% 4% cm 

4% 2 GTI 
15% 10% GataxC 
2% 1% GalxvO 


32 4% 4% 4% + 1A 

106 19 VA 2% 2th 

8 11 11 II II 

27 140 1% 1% 1ft— ft 


17% 11% Jodyn 
7*6 5% Jacobs 
4% 2% Jet Am 


50b U 9 3 11% 11% im 

43 5% 5% 5% — 


9 159 4% 4% 4% 


17 13% NRMn 280 1U 108 13% 13% 13%—% 

20% 10% NRMBf 280 148 12 18% 18% 18%—% 

9% 5% Nantck 15 5 8% 8% B%— V* 

14% 1116 NIGsO 80b 13 10 17 12% 11% 12 +% 

21% 12% NtPatnt .10 3 126 M% 14% 14% . 


(Coatfmed ou Page 16) 


P: u i 


A~A-Ur.’V3s 


Floalkigjtate Notes 




ISSS" 


Dollar 


:-•***• 

►TV. 





\ 


4 V/*' 


X s V ' 


Wherever it is, we'H find it. 






' 1* » 


. *; r J * y * /■* ' - K ’/ ’ / 

1 * • -* * J * + * * S — ; • "* ' . « « _ ^ .A i m 0 * _ , 

?.K. Vs ; . - > i 1 ; /r\ '< ' /- ' ' ' • 

' I k'X'r l j- *. t J . / _ r - * . J, * / , ' ' J' s ' ’ ’ / . " t ' , 

/ it jV '***’ \ » f - / ' ' ? * ' .\i- if 1 * ’ ■ i a / , , ' t ** ^ 

\ ‘4 \ 'fih~T .rr.\' ^ S ' / * / j ' H-'V. > ^ „ r. *1 .*7 Y Af • 'i - >, - 

■Sid J i " ■ l ■ "J 'i! ;,: i 1 f \ ,;V -■ Y v ' 


*/. . V 








m i 

W : ! f ' ‘A- 


/ 


V-. - - ^ .>:/•*■ ,'--K j, /■ ' v ‘ 

' -A' !/>V'\ if- > 

• ' X-- '<* \ , • t’v . /’ \y V- ' • «=- 

, f ■ > 


s 


i < 


v 


/Z2. u~- 


W 


r 


\ t 



\ 


r y 


.-A 



t 

/ 






OIL. Wherever it is, well Bnd iL Oil 

is the primary source of energy. It is 
the power that moves the world mid 
will be so for many years to come. 

But. it is necessary to be prepared 
to wrestle this treasure from the ' 
earth's most secret strongholds, using 
the latest continuously evolving tech- 
nology, and to venture into hostile, . 
inaccessible places. 

Agip, Italy's national oil company, 
took up this challenge sixty years ago, 
probing imo the origins of the earth, 
experimenting with new techniques, 
and devoting to these activities - 
human and economic resources that 
are always up to the difficulties to be 
overcome. 

Wherever the possibilities of • - ■■ 
finding oO exist. Agip is present with 
its spirit of initiative and decades.of 
experience. The results achieved, 
alooe or in cooperation with leading 
oil companies, in 30 countries, an S 
continents, make Agip a reliable' 
operator many ail activity: . 

Even where no-one has ever 
reached. 


:■% - 

iv* n-n 
89-12 
9% IMS 
M.-8M2 
9% 1M0 
tt-11 
8* 17-12 
I* : w-11 
7% »» 
TO J5-W 


1% 0384 
8% 29-H 

aw- »« 




^3 


rit tr' 


v 


% 


A 


:\ v -. ./ 


/ 




3'- 






\ I 


&VI 




y rr°v 



/ 


-ri- 


rt.'B 

-T T ‘T*| 








Bar* 

UbNorWoyf, 

S2KS?„~" 


B^l 


IS 




Non Dollar 


^.ggs^s 





f 

























































. -- 1 -I 

" " j 

attf 


A 


don’t drive second 


Now there is a car, a particular- 
ly exclusive car, for people 
who really value performance, 
luxury and comfort The Audi 
200 quattro. Its concept is one 
of understatement on the 
one hand and high perform- 
ance technology on the 
other. Coupled, of course, with 
all the luxury trimmings 



that go to make a car of this 
class. And as the Audi 200 
quattro also comes equipped 
with permanent four-wheel 
drive for maximum grip, it can 
safely claim to be not only 
one of the most elegant, but 
also one of the most versa- 
tile saloon cars of our times. 



Vbrspiung durchTtchmt 








i 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 


U.K. Easing Monetary Policy, Firm Says 


Reuters 


wfl] be a crucial factor in the ex- 
LONDON — The British gov- peeled 1987 election, it added, 
eminent is easing monetary policy The firm said the government 
in anticipation of an expected slow- has raised its 1986 growth forecast 
down in economic growth next for the gross domestic product to 
year, the brokerage firm of Simon 2.1 percent from as low as 1-5 per- 
& Coates said Monday in its cent as the result of its easier poli- 
monthly economic review. cies. Growth this year is expected 

“The government may be wining to be about 3.5 percent. GDP mea- 
to bend at least slightly to the polit- sure the total value of a nation's 
ical pressure which is now on them output of goods and services, mi- 
le adapt a less rigid policy stance," nus income from operations 
it said. abroad. 

It noted that the government has Analysts expect the shift to a 
already tolerated exceptionally looser economic stance to be evi- 
rapid growth of the broad money dent in the budget For the year 
supply and large increases in pul>- be gi n n ing next April 
lie- sector pay. Economic policy The treasury's medium-term G- 
over the next six to nine months nancial strategy projected tax cuts 


of £3.5 billion ($4.9 billion) in 
1986/87, within the confines of a 
£7j-bfliion publio-sector borrow- 
ing requirement and £2.25 billion 
of state-owned asset sales. 


According to brokers, the trea- 
sury will have to raise its borrowing 

target in order to cut income taxes 
significantly because revenues 
from North Sea oil will be over £2 
billion below projections. 

Hoare Goveu Ltd. is forecasting 
a borrowing requirement of £9 bil- 
lion, while Laing & Cruickshank 
expects one closer to £10 billion. 

Simon & Coates added that the 
treasury may also be considering 
tax incentives. 


Africa Grouping 

Forms a Bank 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 


Oct. 7, 7985 


Net aiut value quotatio n* ora supplied by the Fund* listed wilt) His exception of same quoin based on Issue price. 

The marginal symbols Indicate frequency of quotations supplied: Id)- dally; Iw) -weekly; (b) - bi-monthly; (r)- regularly; (1) - Irregularly. 


ALMAL MANAGEMENT 
fw] Al-Mal Trust. LA. 


BANK JULIUS BAER A CO. Ltd. 
■Id) ~ 


S )*7J7 


-Id) Con bar. 


■Id I Eaulbwr Pacific — 
-|dl GroDar 

-Id t Sloes bar. 


BNP INFER FUNDS 
-lw| Inter bond Fund 


SF 894 J)0 
SF ue&oo 
sn»jxn 

SF 12*4.000 
SF 1171 JH 
5F 968JM 
SF 1509.00 


■Iw) Inlercurreno USS- 


_ S 12189 

_ * 10J» 

-fwj Intercurreney DM DM MJi> 

■Iwl InTernirrmcv Slerling £ 10.15 

-|wl inlerequitv pacific Olfer * 1IJH 

■Iwl inioreauftv N. Amw. Offer — S 10JJ1 


BANQUE INDOSUEZ 
-<d) Aslan Growth Fur 
-Iw) Dlverbond. 


-|w> F1F -America. 


-(wl FIF-Eurono. 
-I«v) FIF-Poc*tlC- 


1047 

8140 

17.00 

14.17 

19J2 
I05J1 
17138 
S 1030.56 


-id) indosuez MumuandsA 
-Id) Indosuez Mull Ibands B 
-Id) Indosuez USD (MJM.F) 

BRITAN NiAJ»OB 271, Si. Heller, Jersey 

• Iw) Brll-Dollor income S DJB82 1 

■Iwl BrlU Manas Cur r. 

-l d I Bril. IMIS Monoa.wjrtt J 


J d I Bril, mil s Manag.Porif . 
-Iw) Bril. Am. Inc & Fd Ltd- 
■ iwl Brlt.Gofd Fund. 


-iw) BrltJManag.Currency 

•I d I Bril. Janan Dir Peri. Fd— 

-{wi Bril Jersey Gilt Fund 

-Id i Brlf. worm Lets. Fund 

-t d I Brlf. World Tectin. Fund 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-(w) Capital tnt'l Fund 

-Iwl CooIttU Italia SA. 


10JS 

1.125 

1154 

1.1D0 

0738 

1405 

1.190 

09M 

1.151 

0708 


CREDIT SUISSE (IS5UE PRICES) 


3942 

1741 


H d I Actions Suisses . 


-j d I Bond Valor Swt 

-id) Bond Valor D-morh 

-1 d 1 Band valor U5-DOLLAR. 
■(d) Bona Valor Yen. 


. SF 414.25 
. SF 108XS 
DM 114.48 
_ S 12101 
Yen 1I114JH 

. SF 11900 

-(di Convert volar US-DOLLAR- S 12195 

■(d) Canasec SF MUM 

-{d)CS Fond* Bands SF 77.75 

.(dl CS Fonds-inH SF 111.75 

-( d I CS Money Market Fund S 1092.00 

-Id ICS Money Marker Fund _ DM 1055.00 


-Id) Convert valor Swf- 


-( d 1 CS Money Market Fund . 
■I d I Energle- Volar. 

■Id) us 


-f a 1 Europo-Valor. 


■(d) PadHc -Valor. 


(1031.00 
5F 145.00 
SF 78140 
SF 1A9.3) 
SF I MLOO 


DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Winchester House. 77 London Wall 
LONDON EC2 101 92IN7V7I 

■Iw) Finsbury Group Lid. 1 17&46 

-(ml Winchester Diversified S 1144 

-(ml Wlncnester Financial Lid. S 1QJ» 

-<mi Wlncnester Frontier— _ s 10028 

■ (wl Winchester Holdings FF 10554 

S 12.42 

Iwl Worldwide Securities S 47.0 

-fw) Worldwide Special 11687.16 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
-+i d I ConcenlrtL. 


-fid) Inn Rententand- 


DM 

DM 


3242 

9U7 


Dunn S Hargltt 1 Lloyd George, Brussels 

-Im) D&H Commodify Pool 134041*“ 

-1ml Currency & GoW Pool S 16147 — 

-(m) Wlneft. Lite Fut. Pool SWOJ* — 

(ml Trouts world Fut. Pool S 854 44 — 

EBC TRUST CO. (JERSEY! LTD. 

1-3 Seale st-Si. He(ier;0534O633i 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

1 1 d line. : Bid S 1020'Ofler JI0J14* 

1 1 d I Cap.: Bid _1 HAS Offer— 512JM9 

ITER NATIONAL INCOME FUND 
.(dl Short Term A' (Accumi — 1 

- [ d I Short Term ‘A 1 J Olstr ) * 

-(d) Short Term 'B' lAccumi S 

-(d) Short Term 'B - 1 Dfstr) s 

-j wl Lang Term.—. — .... S 


-ac imcmt! LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1, Laurence Pauntv Hill. EC4. 01-623-4680 


15023 

1JXI37 

12613 

0J391 

24.97 


(wl F&C Atlantic- 


-(wi F&C European, 
-(w) F&C Oriental. 


II JM 
13.93 
79.49 


FIDELITY FOB 6T& Hamilton Bermuda 
-(ml American Values Cammon_ S 90J8 
-(ml Amer values Cum.Pref__ 1 104.17 
H d 1 Fldelltv Amer. Assets 
-( d 1 Fidelity Australia Fund ___ s 1143 

■I d I Fidelity Discovery Fund S 1031 

■I d ) Fidelity Dir. Svws.Tr S 126J0 

-/ a l Fidelity Far East Fund. 8 ZLSP 

-(d) Fidelity I nTL Fund S 4743 

( d > Fldemv Orient Fund S 3144 

Id i Fldelltv Frontier Fund S 1334 

( d l Fidelity Pacific Fund t iszoo 

(d) Fldelltv SocL Growth Fd. „ S 1US 
-( d | Fidelity world Fund t 3441 


FORBES PO B487 GRAND CAYMAN 

London Agent 01-639-3013 

■Iw) Dollar Income S 


Iw) Fames High inc. Gilt Fd. 
fw) Gold Income. 


-I w) Gold Appreciation . 
-(ml Strategic Trading. 
GEFINOR FUNDS. 


742 

.99 

8.17 

4J1 

140 


(wl East Investment Fund- 

Iwl Scottish World Fund 

-iwl Siale St. American. 


S 38199 
C 11640 
S 16048 


London:01-4914m Geneva : 41 -223S5KM 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB 119, St Peter Port, Guernsey, 0481-28715 

Iw) FuhirGAM 5 a % 11033 

(w) GAM AiMIroge Inc S 13540 

Iw) GAMerica Inc s 13743 

(wl GAM Australia Inc S 10549 

(w) GAM Boston Inc S I07.il 

(w) GAM Ermltage S 15.72 

(w) GAM Fronc-voi SF 11040 

(wl GAM Hong Kong Inc S 9670 

(wj GAM Inlet-national inc. S 12976 

(w) GAM japan Inc. S 11180 

(w) GAM North America inc. S 107.48 

(wl GAM N. America Unll Trust- 10745a 

Iwl GAM PadHc Inc S 12842 

-( w) GAM Pens. & Char. Woridw._ lOO.vo a 


-Iwl GAM Pens. & Char. U.K.FiL— 9740 p 

-Iw) GAMrInt„_ S 11649 

(wl GAM Slngopore/Malay Inc s 9840 


-( w) GAM Sterl & Inti Unit Trust— 13945* p 

-Iw) GAM Svslems inc S 10248 

(w) GAM Worldwide Inc— — S 17146 
iw) GAM Tvche SA. Class A S 11440 


G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) LM. 
(d I Berry Poc Fa. Ltd.. 


I r ) G.T. Applied Science. 


-I d ) G.T. Asean H.K. Gwth.Fd- 
-fdl G.T. Asia Fund. 


(d I G.T. Austral In Fund, 
-t d I G.T. Europe Fund . 


-Iw) G.T. Euro. 5mall Cos. Fund S 

-C r ) G.T. Dollar Fund S 

-( d I G.T. Bond Fund S 

-I d > G.T. Global Technlsv Fd S 

-( d ) G.T. Honshu Pathfinder S 

-(d) G.T. Investment Fund S 

-Iwl G.T. jaoan Small Co. Fund— s 

-( r I G.T. Technology Fund I 

-Id) G.T. South China Fund 5 


1047 

1344 

1243 

4.T5- 

2642 

1248 

1472 

1446 

11X3 

1144 

27.14 

1840 

4245 

2344 

1441 


HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. WTL. SJL 
Jersey. PO. Box 6X Tat 0534 76029 


Berne, P.Q. Box 2M2, Tel 4131 224051 
-(d) Ci 


. . rosibaw (Far East) 

-Id) CSF l Balanced) 

-Id) Intnl. Bond Fund 

-(d) Int. Currency U4. 


SF 9.95 
SF 2548 
S 1175 
S 2642 


-(d) ITF Fd (Technology) 1 1115 

-(d) CSeas Fd (N. AMERICA! S 2779 

JARDINE FLEMING, POB 70 GPO Ho Kg 

( r ) j.F Currencv&Bond I ix«3 

( r ) J.F Hong Kang Trust S 3549 

(r) J.F Jap&Pocconv Y 2196 

< r i j.F Japan Trust Y 4670 

-) r ) J.F Jacan Technology Y 17473 

I r l J.F Pacific SecSJAcc) — 1 7.01 


LLOYDS BANK INTL, POB 434 Geneva 11 

-Hw) Lloyds Inti Dollar S 11648 

w) Lloyds Inri Europe SF 1I9JM 

w) Lloyds Inn Growth SF 167.90 

wl Lloyds Inn Income SF 319.00 

w) Uovas Inri N. America S 11648 

w) Ucvds Int'l Pacifi c SF 13648 


-Mw) Uoyds Int'l. Smaller Cos— 
NIMARBEN 

-( d ) Class A 

-(wl Class B-UJL . 


'iwl Class C - Japan . 


OS LI FLEX LIMITED 
-Iwl Multlcurren 


-* wJl 

.5 9173 


( w I Dollar Medium Term . 

-iw) Dollar Long Term 

-iwl Ja p ane se 1 Yen. 


■tut) Pound Srerllnti- 


-( wl Deutsche Mark . 

(wl Dutch Florin 

(wl Swiss Franc- 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB 85578. The HOOue (07D> 469670 

■I d ) Bower Baiagolngen++ 

PARISBA5-GROUP 
-(d) Cortexa Inlematlonal 

Hd) ECUPAR 

(W) OBLl-DM. 


1271 

1145 

1149 

13.10 

jaw 

1048 

1043 

10.12 


.*..88-17 


Iw) OBLIGESTION- 
-Iwl OB LI -DOLLAR, 
(w) OBLI-YEN. 


ECU 103675 
DM 174241 
SF 9540 
S 121540 


Y 10540940 
FL 111941 
. S 9379 

. . S 118X3 

-C d I PAR US Treas. Bond *CL S'. _S 11210 


-iwl OBLI-GULDEN. 
Id) PAROIL-FUND. 


(dIPARINTER FUND. 


ROYAL B. CANADA. PO B MfcGUCRNSEY 
-+(wl RBCCanodian Fund Ud.. S 1U»* 
ri-(w) RBC Far Easl&PadflC Fd- S 11.93 

-Hw) RBC Inn Cacrtal Fd 5 2347 

"Hw) RBC Inn Income Fa S 1146 

-t-td ] RBC Man-Currency Fd S 7675 

-Mwl RBC North Amer. Fd. S 9X6 


S KAN Dl FOND INTL FUND (464-236278) 

-iw) Inc.: Bid S 5.920tfer -5 679 

-(w)Acc.: Bid _S 5.94 Offer S 641 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devensni re 5aJjmdon-0l -377-8040 

-( r 1 SHBBond Fund S 3446 

-(w]5HB Inti Growth Fund S mm 


SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

-I d I America- Valor SF 47175 

-Id) D-Marh Bond Selection— DM 12341 
I d I Dollar Bond Selection S 13541 


-Id) Florin Bond Selection . 

(d I Inlervolor.. — ..... 

i d ) Japan Portfollo- 


I d ) Sterling Band Selection— _ 
i Foreign Bond Sel 


-(d) Swiss 
-(d) Swlssvalar New Seri 
-(d) Universal Bond Select. 
-Id) Universal Fund 


H d ) Yen Bond Selection. 


FL 12741 
SF 8140 
SF 84740 
— S 10749 
SF 10947 
SF 34200 
SF 8275 
SF 11342 
-Y 1055840 


UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

-Id) Amca UJL Sh. SF 3340 

-(d) Bond- in vest - SF 6740 

-(d) Fonso Swiss Sh. SF isz.00 

Id) Japan- In vwt. SF 89*j» 

H d t Satll South Afr. Sh. SF 32840 

(d) Sima (stock price) SF 21340 


UNION INVESTMENT Frankfort 

-Id) lln Iren la DM 43J0 

-fdlUnlfonds DM 29JI0 

-(d) Unlrak — DM 79.95 

-(d) UNIZINS DM 1 87X35 


Other Funds 


; w) Aril bonds investments Fund. 

;w) Activesi inti 

ml Allied Ltd 


w) Aaulla Inlematlonal Fund. 

( r ) Arab Finance I.F 

( r I Arlane. 


(wl Trustcor Int'l Fd. (AEIFI. 

w) Bond setex- Issue Pr 

m) Canada Gld-Mnrtaaae Fd_ 
d I Capital Preserv. FA 1ntL_ 
Clladel Fund. 


S 24X3 
S 1148 
S A 75 
S 15843 
S 891J7 
S 182173 
S 1(200 
SF 13575 
S 9X3 
S 1140 
S 142 


d) Thornton Auslr alia Fd Ltd _ S 1204 
.dl Thornton Japan Fund Lfd^_ S 1147 

tm) Cleveland Offshore Fd. S21«9JM 

I w) Columbia Securities 
r 1 COMETE 


wl Convert. Fd. Inll A Certs, 
w) Convert. Fd. Inn B Certs, 
wl Daiwo Japan Fund.— — 
(wl D.G.C . 


-I d | Dotlar-Baer band Fd. 


( d I D-mark-Baer Bond Fd. 


FL 9849 
* 82215 
S 1047 
S 3U3 
Y 10744 
S 88JB 
% 10)440 


(d) O. witter Wtawtdeivt Tst 

( r 1 Drakkor invest, Fund N.V 

(d) Dreyfus America Fund 


Dreyfus Fund Int'L. 


Drevtus Inter continent 

The EstabUehment Trust— 

Europe OblloaHana 

First Eagle Fuad 


Filly Stars Ltd. 


Fixed income Trans. 


Fcraefrjr Issue Pr.. 
Farextund. 


Formula Selection Fd.. 
Forefflalla. 


Gavumm-Sec. Fund* . .... 
F ran kf- Trust interzlns— 

Haussmarm Hldgs. n v 

Hestla Funds. 


Horinei Fund. 


IBEX Hold bias Ltd. 

ILA-IGB 

ILA-IGS. 


inlertundSA. 


Intermarket Fund. 


w) Korea Growth Trust. 


(d) Lelcom Fund. 


Iw) Leverage Coo Hold. 

( d > Unultioer 


(w) Lax fund. 


im) Moanafund N.V.. 


( a ) MedManum Set F8 

l r ) Met acre 

iw) NAAT 

Id j Nlkko Growth Package 


wi Nippon Fund. 


Im) NOSTEC Portfolio. 


i r j Parian Sw. R Est Geneva _ 

( r 1 Permal Value N.V 

(rl Pleiades. 


Iw] PSCO Fund N.V.. 
(w) PSCO Intl.N.V.. 


SF 139740 
% 131177 
S 110141 
S 13290 
S 105X6 
S 6742 
S 83211 
S 483020 
LF 281340 

LF 105548 

(d) Reserve Insured Deposits Sllinxi 

( w) RudoH WOlff Fut Fd LM S 127100 

(w) Somural Portfolio SF HIM 

id) SCI /Tech. SA Luxembourg _ S 10X6 


( d ) Putnam Inti Fund . 
( r l Pri-Tech. 


(wl Quantum Fund N.V.. 
( d I Renta Fund 

(dl Renttnvest. 


(w) Seven Arrows Fund N.V. S 185673 (w) 

State St. Bank Equity HdgsNV S 9X4 

I w) Strategy Investment Fund S 2342 

( d ) Syntax Ltd.'(Closs A|- S M43 

(w) Techno Growth Fund 5F 8048 


(di Thornton HK & China. 


( w 1 Tokvo Poc. Hold. (Sea) . 

(wi Tokyo Poc Hold. N.V 

Iw) Transpacific Fund 


( d ) Turauolse Fund. 


(w) T weedy JJrowne rLv-CkmA 

(w) Tweedy .Browne av.aossB 

(ml Tweedy -Browne (UJCJ n.v 

(d) UN ICO Fund DM 

d) UNI Bond Fund. 


UNI Capital Fund. 
<d) US Federal Securih 
(w) Vander b ilt Assets. 


(d) World Fund SA. 


S 944 
S 9177 
S 12851 
S 9071 
S 11072 
S 220333 
1 152746 
1101257 
7840 
S 115140 
S 116745 
S 10.18 
S -1219 
S 1277 


DM - Deutsche Mark; BF - Belgium Francs; FL • Dutch Florin; LF - Luxembourg Francs; ECU - European Currency Unit; SF - Swiss Francs; a -asked; + - Otter Priees;b -bid change i 
p/vsiofasi per unit; HA- Not Available; N.C- NotCommunlcated.'a - New; S- suspended; S/S -Stock Spill; * - Ex-Dividend; ** - Ex-Rts; **"- Gross Performance index July; «- 
Reoempl- Price- Er-Coupon; •* - Formerly Worldwide Fund LM; 9 - Offer Price Inel. 3N> or ell m. charge; ++ - daily stack price os an Amsterdam Stack Exchange 



.4 eence France- Prase 

LOME, Togo — Chambers 
of commerce in the 16- member 
Economic Community of West 
African States have formed 
their own bank to aid private- 

sector involvement in the com- 
munity and boost financial ex- 
changes with the rest of the 
world. 

Ecobank Transnational Inc. 
will have capital of $100 mil- 
lion, half of which will be pro- 
vided by member states by the 
end of the year. 


Mondays 

A\flEX 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 Month - 
High Lou Stock 


Div. YW. PE 


Sh. 

UK With Low 


Dose 
OuoLCh’ge 


{Continued from Page 14) 


22V2 16* PgtDfC 
34T!i 29H FsfpfE 
BM 2*. PuntoG 


244 114 
447 I3X 


m 19ft 19ft— Vi 
32ft 32ft 3Zft + ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft + 16 


8 1211 
. 5 111778 
_ S 978 
. S 4240 
. S 32X3 
. S 1.19 
Ecu 6288 


S 1742346 
. S B77JQ 
. S 1239 
SF 7(0X0 
. S 779 

SF 63.15 
. S 3< 78 

. S 87.97 

□M 4471 
. S 12258 

. S 101X3 

. 5130211 
SF 11285 
S 1041 
5 1043 

. 5 1849 

5 28673 

Inform In tag taut. Fd. CL r B'_ s 80542 

Inri Securities Fund s 1213 

Inuesta DWS DM 5240 

invHt AttantfotMS S 8X5 

ltd fortune Inri Fwid SA S 1740 

Japan Solerikm Fund 5 13674 

Japan Pacific Fund 5 111.14 

Jeftar Phis. IntL Ud S 1118140 

Kielnwnr) Benson Inri Fd._ S 2174 

KWnwari Buns. Jap. Fd. 5 8049 


chamtaGne. iy official 


DECREE. ONLY SUCH A COGNAC 


HAS THE UCHT TO BC CALLED A 


FINE CHAMFAGNE COGNAC. 


THE XO COGNAC by 

Exclusively Fine Champ 


■ si t.r.l ST l-D Rl TAII PKIC I I*J fill ISA PR It fS 



10-85 


10ft 

5 

Ouabgs 




2 

aft 

Sto 

SM + to 

1 





a 





1 

Oft 

5 Vi 

RAi 

JSt 

5 X 

12 

4 

6M 

Bft 

&M + M 

5M 

3ft 

RMS El 




3 

3to 

.lVi 

3to. 


19M 

15ft 

Rogoi 

.12 

X 

44 

16 

lffft 

IBM 

IBM— 

ft 

20 

3M 


Ronsbg 

Ratliff 

72 

<5 

25 

1 

'•* 

“St 


Vf. 

14ft 



xa 

15 

8 


12ft 

12M 


ft 

2M 

IM 

RKSowt 




10 

1ft 

1ft 

1ft + ft 

20 Ma 


RltSaun 

.538 3.1 


3 

17ft 

17ft 

17ft— 

M 

4M 

1ft 





12 

Tft 

2ft 

Tft 


13ft 

him 

RagolB 

Mb O 

11 

34 

14V> 

13ft 

13ft — 

M 

SOU 

15ft 




28 

214 

37ft 

36ft 

36ft— 

.ft 

AM 

3ft 




13 

51 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 


5ft 

3ft 

RstAscA 



10 

20 

4 

3ft 

3ft — 

M 

12 to 

9to 

RRrietP 

JO 

11 

17 

37 

7ft 

«ft 

9ft- 

(K 

19M 

BM 

Rritwy i 



25 

33 

17M 

ITU 

17M — 

to 

30ft 

17V. 


.12 

.6 

1) 

23 


19M 

19V. + ft 

Sft 

IM 


- 



m 

Ift 

1ft 

1ft — 

M 

7 

3ft 





325 

Aft 

AUi 

6V. 


34 

22ft 

Rudlck 

-Mo 22 

10 

3 

25ft 

25ft 

25ft — 

ft 

33M 

22ft 


-96 

22 


1 

2SM 

25M 

25M — 

ft 

7ft 

4ft 

Raw 



7 

6 

/ 

61k 

7 + M 

ISHr 

DU, 


JO 

IS 

12 

44 

JAft 

16 

16 — 

ft 

2*M 

16 

Rykotf 

M 

Z3 

15 

24 

25ft 

25ft 

25ft- 

to 


Bft 

8ft 

39 

5 

10ft 

10ft 

2 

48 


4 Sfm 

7 8FN pfA 
19ft SJWs 
2ft SMD 
6ft Sage 

5 Salem 
ft SCOrto 

53ft SDgopf 770 114 


6ft 

11 

9ft 

5ft 


KW 261A13 
_ S 949 
_ S 129653 
_ S 17229 
_ S 134940 
_ S 784) 
— S T76.14 
— S 19.97 
Y 10U74JI0 

_ s ia9i 

*87937 9 
S 2952* 

j 4969.77 

(w) Novolec lnveshnwit Fund I S 91.06 

(w) HAM.F S 14547 

(m)NSPF.I.T S 17376 

( d I Pacific Hortran Invt. Fd * 1234.14 

(Wl PANCURRI Inc. S 1879 


24ft 18ft SDgopf 2X7 114 
39ft 33ft SDgopf 445 11.9 
28ft 31ft Sandgto 40 28 
5ft 3ft Sanmrk .431 84 
4ft Sound A 70 34 
9ft Sound pf 170 114 
Bft SaxitO n 40e 15 
39v Scoofrn 
17ft Schem. SS 22 
1ft School P 
9ft Schwab 
3ft SdMgt 
_ 12ft SclLsa 
40ft 33ft Scope 
67 42 SbdCP 

2V5 1ft Seaport 
15ft 11 Sec Cap 
tft H SetsDII 
3ft Sotas 


2ft 

14ft 

7ft 

35 


xs 

.10 


44 14 
14 

7 

1.1 10 

4 ft 


.16 IX 7 


45 4U 4 4 — ft 

361 8 8 B — ft 

15 36 35ft 35ft— ft 
18 3ft 3U' 3ft — ft 
12 7ft Tft 7ft + ft 
3 5ft 5ft 5ft— ft 
2 IM Ift 1ft 
SOz 62 62 <2—1 

6 21ft 21ft 21ft + ft 

12 39- 3®ft 39 + ft 

11 28ft 28ft 2Bft + ft 
10 5ft 5 5 

7 5ft 5ft 5ft 

1 10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 
20 Bft Oft 8ft 
IS 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 
14 26IA 26 26 — ft 

10 2ft 2ft 2ft • 
9ft Oft 9ft— ft 
5ft 5ft 5ft— ft 
15 14ft 14ft— .ft 
33ft 33ft 33ft — ft 
62ft 62ft 62ft 
lft 1ft 1ft— ft 


8 ft 
6 

4ft 

11 

13M 

13ft 

2 

15ft 

I6M 


a*** 


. j Sgrvotr 
8ft Shears 
ft Sharon 
Aft ShapwJ S 
. . Bft SiarHSn 
ism ID SierSon 
ISM 7ft Slerai 
7ft 4 . SHco 
15U> Bft SikesA 
5ft 3ft Sllvrcst 
20ft 10ft SmfhA 
10U ID SmlhB 
9Vi 5ft Solilron 
7 SorgPrr 


10 

461 84 17 


"is 


3ft 

8ft 


4ft 4ft 
5ft 5ft 
3ft 3ft— M 
8ft 8ft— M 
10ft 10ft — ft 


16ft 

10ft 

11M 

lift 

12ft 


lfiOe 66 

7 

12 

rift 

11 M 

Tift— 

M 



716 

to 

ft 

ft 




6 

14ft 

14M 

14ft + ft 


22 

13 

Ift 

Bft 

Bft — 

M 

271 25 

26 

387 

lift 

ldft 

ioft + to 

201 

17 

5 

9 

V 

9 


.101 

17 

1 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft- 

to 

20 12 

10 

3 

9to 

9M 

9M- 

to 



16 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft 


M 32 


3 

19 

19 

19 


M 33 


1 

IBM 

lift 

IBM — 

to 


15 

3V 

7ft 

7Vk 

7ft — 

ft 


32 

15 

7Vi 

7(6 

7ft 


1JI2 105 


3 

9ft 

9ft 

Tft- 

ft 

1j06 103 


14 

10(6 

10ft 

10ft — 

ft 

ljn T07 


7 

10ft 

10ft 

lOto + ft 

1.19 1(L* 


3 

109k 

10ft 

10ft — 

ft 

432 96 


300Z45M 

45 

45 — 


1X5 103 


33 

14M 

14ft 

14ft — 

to 

12J» 105 


25 109ft 109ft 109ft + ft 

230 107 


5 

72 

71 M 

2IM — 

to 

221 107 


10 

21 

70ft 

20ft — 

to 

758 10.9 


10 

69 ft 

69 

69ft- 

ft 

8.70 105 


120 

80ft 

80ft 

BDft 



Ply, -rid. PE 


IM 

7ft 

IJVk 

lift 

1 

8ft 

2Vb 


It 


461 


70 SCEdpf 8.96 104 
2ft SwBcpn 
4ft SwSOP 

r Sponsor 
Spndth n 
H Spnotwr 
4ft SiHovn 

IM BtHovwt „ , 
21ft 17M StdPrd 44 19 4 
TTYi 44ft StdShr HLOOrllB 12 


48 U 22 


ffumtat* 

VU 3M 3ft 

SS § 

4ft 4VV 4ft + » 

ft M M 

jiS t2-ft 


2ta21ft 21ft lift- » 


m 72s stonwd 
21 Vm 14ft aterrm 
lift 6ft surtax 
22M 15M Stepan 
3ft TM Sterl El 
I2M SlriSxf 
5ft stansft 
ift sirmw 
3ft SumltE 
7 SunCfy 


48 IT 13 


23 

lift 

2ft 


JS 1J 7 
.TDe 12 22 


11 


2ift lift sunJr^ 


35ft 21 -sunrl _ 
1ft M SupCtc 
13ft 6 Suplnds 
18ft lift Suprjr 

% 

21 19ft Swift In 
7 3M Svnotay 
14ft 6ft SystEn s 


X8 2X 12 
X4b IX 14 


24 8 
23 10 


140 


11 

57 26 


(3 

5 

5 
462 

29 

75 

6 
IB 


’s w is-; 

* V T ^ + M 

2ft 2ft JM-^ 

nr m* ,s» £ » 
17ft IW; 19ft * JJ 
33M 32ft 32ft— ft 
1ft 116 116 

iafi m ioft + ft 

15ft 15 lift + ft 
ift ift ift + ft 


.10 17 10 


24 23 22ft 22ft — ft 
47 3ft » W 
2 7ft 7ft . 7ft. 


J» 57 21 


70 


X0 


61 
17 12 

24 13 


13 


70 27 8 


M 17 16 


9ft 4ft T Bar 
16ft 4ft TIE 
12ft 5ft Til 
21 ft 13ft TabPrd 
9ft 6ft TendBr 
15ft 9ft Tasty 
4ft 2ft Team 
3ft 1ft TehAm 
22ft I3M TehSvm 
77ft 40ft TtdlOp 749a] 44 12 
i 3ft TechTp 12 

20ft 10ft Techfrl 
4ft 1ft Trinxm 
36ft 24ft Talllax 
lift Bft TelOta 

14ft 4ft Triad 

Sft .216 Tales* 

At '4 Tenney 

10ft 4M Tensor 

31 22 TexCd a 

20 7ft TexAIr 
Bft 4W TexAE 
7ft y* Txscon 
3M TM ThorEn 
5ft 3ft ThrDA ... _ 

66M 51M TtdEd pf BJ2 127 
BOM 62 TolEdpflOjOO 13.1 
9ft 2ft Tortal 79tl34 

15M Bft TotlPfg 74 

2ft ft TgfPfwl 
28ft 23 TotPfpf 248 105 - 
14 8ft TrrtsLx 12 

T9ft lift TmsTac 44 44 9 
1616 13JA Tronaon X4 34 7 
lift 7ft TriSM. : XOa 4X 

6ft 3ft TriHmb 8 


tl 


170 


741 44 23 


25 

.10 Z5 17 


SV 5ft 5ft— ft 

ss a a 

15ft I5ft 1M-M 

a » a- 

(U 4 416 + !A 

13ft 13M 13M 

V 36ft 36ft + M 
10ft 10ft 

9M Bft 8ft— ft 
4M 4ft 4ft— M 
416 416 416 + M 

Bft Bft 8ft— ft 
2316 2316 23J4— ft 
17ft 17M 17V6 ■+ M 
5M % 4M-M 

116 1ft lli — M 
,444 
302 64M 64M 64ft -MM 

14ft 14ft 14ft 
2 2 2 
271b 27M 27M 
lift lift lift- M 
14ft 1416 1416 — ft 
14ft 14ft 14ft + M 
9M 9 9 — ft 

4 4 . 4 — M 


4 

13 

1 

10 

7 
1 

159 

1 

58 

8 
66 

111 

15 

25 

110 

17 

1 

301 

21 

464 

2 
IT 


Sates figures are unofftrioL Yearly highs and Una reflect 


dividend are shown lor the new stack only. Unless otherwise 
noted, rotas of dl riden ds are mutual cUabuneroents baaed on 
the latest declaration. H 


o—dMdendalSDcxtrots).'- 

e of dividend Plus stock dividend. 


b— annual rate of divi 

c — llqvldofing dividend, 
dd — called, 
d— new vearly law. 

e — dividend declared or paid hi pneeedliw 12 mantas, 
a — dhridand In Canadian fundi, subl act fa lift nan-rssldencB 

true 

I — dlvldervi declared after splll^jp or stack dividend. 

I — dividend paid fills voar. amllt e d. deferred, or no octton 
taken at latest dividend meeting. ■ 

k — dividend declared or paid fills year, an accumulative 
Issue with dividends In arrears. 

n — new issoe in me past 52 weeks. The hlgMaw range begins 
wttti the start of trading, 
nd — next day delivery. 

P/E — price-farmings ratkL 

r— dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 months, plus 
Stock dividend. 

s— stock split. Dividend begins with date of spltt 
sis — sales. 

t— dividend paid hi stack In prscedliH tl montfti estimated 
cash value on ex-efivktend or ex-dlstributlan date, 
u — new yearly high, 
v— trading halted. 

vi — in bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized un. 
dar the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such com- 
panies. 

wd — when distributed. . 

wl — when issued. . 

ww — with warrants. 

x—px -dividend or ex-rights. 

xdts — axrdlsfributlan. 

xw— without won-mils. 

Y — ex -dividend and sales (n full. 


vld — yield, 
z — sales hi 


fulL 


TJ Morin 
HWWLew »m* 


□to. Ykt PE 


TIM 3M TrMSX 
4 2ft TuUM** 
22ft ipt TumB n 
31ft 21ft TurmC 
to eft Tmean 
M ift Tvlrwte 


33 


170. 4X 9 


9 » 5ft » 

68 3M 3 .3 

5 15ft 15ft 15ft — ft 
' 2 ZF& 27M 
33 9 Bft 9 + W 

56 1ft 1ft 1ft 


Bft Ultmte 
iJW Unicom. 


21ft 

Itlft ... __ 

ISft lift UnjcoPf J5 87 
liu, Bft Untmar iX4elA0 
xm 15ft UAirM 
2(6 IM UFaadA .10 77 
3(6 IM U FoodB 
16ft 1TM UfMed 
22ft 12ft USAGwt 

BVk 5U> UrdtelV 
)4ib 9M UiwCin 
10 ' Oft UntvRs 
20 Vi ISftUnivRu 
1526 10M UnvPu: 


sat as 



71 

lift 

lift 

lift 

-- 

ft 



10ft 

ion 

ISM 

+ 

ft 


A 

13M 

tjm 

KJM 






into 




13 

10 

21 (m 

21M 

2IM 

— 



1ft 

ift 

Ift 





1ft 

Ift 

1ft 


M 

14 

176 

MM 

13ft 

1JM 

— 

ft 


lift 

lift 

l.fft 

+ 




7V. 

TV. 

TU 

— 

M 








16 



Aft 





16ft 

16ft 

16ft 




33 

lift 

17 

lift 

T* 




. . s- 


• . 
t' ., • . 


10M 9M VST n 
27ft 17ft valsors 
ID 2ft vertt. 
23ft 16M VtAmC 
6M 3ft VIRsb 
13ft 8(6 Ve rnlt 
616 3ft Verlule 
g 5 Vtasn 
4ft 2 Vhitoe 
18ft 12 Vina 
66 • - 53M Vaintl 
9ft 6M Visual G 
12M 8 Vootex 

hw -5- vvaust 


XOe 6J 
M 17 14 


XOb 2X 9 


70 2.1 14 


to 


70 U 8 
X0 XX .11 


W 


six 9ft yvb «M + w 

21 23ft 23ft 33ft- ft 

9M 9ft 9M 
16ft KM 16ft 
4 3ft 4 
9ft 916 9ft + ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 
5M 5M 5M 
a ift ift— M 
lift 14(6 14ft + ft 
65M 65W 65M +■ ft 
7ft 7ft Tft 
Bft Bft 8ft 
6 Vs 4M 6M + 1^4 


7ft 3ft WTC 
2S% IBM WtJtaur 
29(6 15. W«WS 

2(6 fc wmewt 

lift 4ft WstiH S 
130 76 WltlPSt 

20M 13M WRITS 
.lift 7ft WatscB 
5ft 2ft Wthfrd 
9ft WebDun 
W webcor 
3ft wedco 
6M Wtdota 
7 ft wedteh 
aft WeHttm 


18 
1J 13 


5(6 5U 516— M 
22ft 22M 22ft + M 


i7143 1813 14. ISft !5ft- ^ 


s 

7 13 
67 17 
1.9 5 


9ft 
JM 
-4ft 
10 • 
>2 

14 - 
13ft 
TV. 


4^ Welico 


177B127 7* 
11 


8ft 

3ft 

9M 

ft 

3ft 

10 


112 10(6 
as - 


70 


._ WellAm 
2M WelGrd 
30ft- 17ft WKCO 
aft.- ft Wosnco 
IBM '5ft WstBrC 
71ft 816 Wsfbra 
ISM Bft WPIflttl 
23ft 7Y6 WIHItti n 
2116 ISM W1RET 1X6 
13ft Ok WstSL* .16 
24M .-11M WbrEnt 
5ft 2(6 Wichita - 
3 Wtekes 
ft Wldceswt 


15 
87 14 
17 4 
10 


$ 


32ft 20 WIckMOtUO 
HnnEn 


8X 


36 


BM 2M WflML . 

23ft 1 9ft W Int In 274 HL9 
4 tfVfi 36M'WlsPpf A50 10.1 - ' 
4M Tft WolfHB JBs 3X . 
10ft I Wdsfrm- X0 4-4 10 
IBM lift WkWeor 72 12 6 
5M 2ft WwdeE 65 

17ft 12ft WwdePt 1JU 12X 
22ft 9ft W ortho 751 
71ft 13M Wrntbr JQ .1 43 


25" ft ft ft . .. 

12 8M 8 8M + ft 
Si 106ft 103ft 103ft — 2W 
5 19 ISft 19 

Bft Bft 

3(6 3(6 

T’S— k. 

3ft 3ft 

10 10 -.+ M 

__ . 9ft 9ft— U 
10M 10 f@ 

13W 13M 13(6— ft 
ft ft ft 
2ft 2ft 2ft 

31ft 30A, 31ft +1M 
1ft 1ft . Ift 

6 M 6W 6M— (6 

10 ft 10ft TOft 
TM Oft 7M + M 

15(6 15 15M— W 

15(6 19 19M 

„ 12M 12W 12(6— M 
140 12ft 12ft 17ft 
3 2ft 2ft- 2ft— M 

2486 4M 4 4 — M 

55 1ft 1ft Ift * ft 

530 29ft 2Bft 29M + ft 
490 7 646 4ft— ft 

14 20ft 30M TOM — M 
10Z 44ft 44ft 44ft + M 
B 2ft 2ft 2ft— M/. 

3 9 9 9. V 


42 

42 

5 

2D 

13 

3 

21 

1023 

102 

37 

36 


6 16ft 16W 16M— M 
187 3ft 3(6 3(6 

7 14U 14(6 14U + M 

182 9% 9ft 9ft 

7 T9 IBM IBM- ft 


8ft 5ft Yank Co 


11 . 22 7 


9ft 3ft Hitter XX 


76 3ft 3ft 3ft— M 


j AMEX Highs-Lcms^ 


NEW.KIGH5 


GouJdlrrvTr 

Teleflex 


MortinProc 

WescoRn 


Money Mdt Sandeafe 


NEW LOWS 28 


AndrsJacubs 
DeRoselnd - 
GrahomCn 
KeyCaA 
NuricarDta 


BatfvMfgwt CnreEntwl 

EtacAudDy Fluke John 

■HomHar. Implndust 

Laerlad MotrlRth 

RoonevPce Scageind 


Cbamc Ha 
GemcoNatl 
- InflHydm 
NuHortzn 

vintage Em 


AUTOMOBILES 


ROUS-ROYCE bullet proof 1976 LHD 
saver Shadow LWB wiltt (Mrion; VeL 
»m gr«a\ block Everftest roof with 
special beige leather him. AD secutry 
(Bdras incufina owner's ad-out ta 
Britan Home Onke, as new. CHfers m 
excess of £70,000. Vefc England 0708 
|J352l 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

IW CAR SHIPPING 
SPECIALISTS 


PAHS 
CANNES/MCE . 
fRAhflCFURT 
BONN' / COLOGNE 
SIUTGAKT 
MUMCH 
BBEMEHHAVfN 
NP/ YORK 
HCJSTON 
LO, ANGHJES 
MCNTREAL 



agbits womb 

saw » to us to bring it to you 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRANSCO 


T E LARGEST SHOWROOM 
NO STOCK IN EUROPE 


Keepg ' o random stock of more Ihon 
300 Void new oars of al European + 


Japanese makes competfvrfy priced. 
Tax bee t ales s h ipping bwirancg. 
Sand far n wwHe ell 


Tnxuca SA, 95 NoartWaaa, 

! 3030 Antwerp. D el alum 

Tel 323/542 &240T* 35207 In 


NEW MBRCmBS 

KXSOt for immediate delivery 

FROM STOCK 


Best service, sUprina, imwdncs, 
hand.- coavqrdan in USA 


RUTEINC 

TAUNUSST1L 52. 6000 FRANKFURT 
W Germ, tel (0)69-232351. tlx 411559 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back -Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

AUTOS TAX FREE 

TRASCO 

; INTERNATIONAL 

LHD. Mercedes Tax Free 
Lmoaines 36" & 44" 
Armoured coif'wid Emausnes 
Coach bidt cm , 

Other mcJws & woticr 

Over 100 ,uniti instock 

World undo debery - 
Direct from source ' 

D.O.T. & EJ*A . 

Tefc LandonM«ri| 629 7779 
Telex (51] 89S6&22 TKAS G.- 

Trans London Ud 

6567 Park lane, London W.l. 

SwrizerkudUK-W. Germany 

19*5 CXOSE-OUT SALE 
Marcedei / BMW / fbodi - 
500/380/280 SOJSEUSL 

BMW 745/635/535 

1986 MODELS NOW AVAHABU 
Panche 944 Turin / MB 300 SI . 

' Aba preowned 1979/80 Pccxdm 
Cafl or fain Menkh. W. Germaiy 
(01 89-465041 or 42. ]bc 522*51 
American owned ana ufwiuted 


AUTO CONVERSION 

* SURECONVHtl * 

The rafierf way to impart a 
Ewupeui car mta the USA. . 

Wcxidwide American iraufar 
-provides al required irsuranae •' 
and gugrentari your car wi 

pan alOl government shxxfaidi 
w^taur money bad mduefing . 
oonvenian OOP. 

Wrte or phone far free bnxfrdre. 

' GStMANYJOl 69^152425 or . 
mM/ 223059 

amsbcAn mtl (MDonmnas 

EUROPORT TAX 

FREE CARS 

Call or write far free atadpa, 

Bam 12011 

TelJK I(te»77 

Telex 25071 H*CAR NL 

RRffilRD TRANSAM 
NEW 1985 

Early awdaUty, 
with all FormoBtim eompletad. 

Far mare information, ad 
firtnca(93] 25 63 91 , 

- Oberfadou 7678 . 

CM5000 Fronkfari/Mon 

BPA / DOT- . 

CONVERSIONS ' 

* Gntamj brokeroge/bonrSng service 

* Pmmp & cMvery anywhere ri the 

Eastern U5. 8, Texas . 

* Professtand wad uang only the 

1985 ROUSLfiOYCE SPUR 

1985 ASTON MARTIN VOLAN1E 
for sds by owner. 

Tefc Franae 33 (9^ 25 63 91 • , 

* gXranteedl BA /DOT onrepval - 
QjAAtfAOf IMPORTSWC, .. 
2294 Nreft Pfam IhL, HaHfafcL 

PA 19440, USA Tel: 215 8226852 
Wax 4971917-CHAMP 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


New York 

Los Angeles 

Chicago 

Miami 

Orlando 

Dales - 

Moptreo l 


ACCESS USA 

One Wav 

FI 500 


F2400 
F2390. 
F2750 
P265a 
F3430 
FI 890 


Round Trip 
F2990 
. F4600 
- F3690 
* F4190 
. F3990 
-F5170 

fm 


u id'-fhota-efe u inghom 1 ^** 
15% (fisoouit an 1st dass 
PAHS tak^U 221 46 94 


(Cot lit 1502] 


NY a* WAY $1 

West Coast S145. Pans 


NTT.- 

9a 


HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


LUCERNE .GRAM) HOTEL EUROPE 
**•*• hat vacancies. Froe Parking. 
Tel 041 / 301111 Telex 7267. V 


USA- 


TUDOft Horn. 3® '.Ec5t 42nd 

New York Gfy. In fasbkxxtaie, fist 

Side Marfwttan. 1/2 block from UN. 
Single from S70-, doubles from J85. 


: 422951.wt 212-9868800. 


FOR SALE & WANTED 


LADY'S PEW SWISS Carom Golden 

Bridge' wakn. 5maff Axnonds 151 

&&£«£££» 

Tefc fc*7S7 TTW or 757 28 30 


Neuf cDthms designed by WiKj 
Smaf^iignetl by Crista Tefc 236 56 76 


HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 


Acoderaas 28, Albeits 10671', Greece. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


PORTUGAL 


7 1?AYS INCLUSIVE TOURS 

FROM PARIS TO: 




ft.- - 


i r -- 


J. * 


(•>-: ■" 


theeuro 

0SecU 


V'.u : 


5-M ’• 




LISBON. 


992700 

ESIORii/CASCAB FF2810 

COSTA VBtDE (OPORTO)- R 9 2461 

ALGARVE FF2810 

MADBRA FF29S0 


' Please Contact 

tek T«L- 742 55 57, Tbu 220550 


ittbiii zudartD: 


'b. 



h 


it' : s « 
: - »•(; 


DSBOPL 


5F1040 


BTORO/CASCAES ______ SO 057 

COSTA VBtDE (OFORrOMF1120 
ALGARVE... 91040 


MADBRA. 


.snow 


H u m Contact: 

Geneva 357410, The 27709 KB* 


:n- 


■ Far other- proyoms-crid dekxled 
tu ki rpahon, ail; your 

TRAVE AG0LT 


PRECIOUS STONES 


JEAN DELOR 


JEWHJK - CREATOR 

IF YOU COME TO PAB5 DON7 MISS 
OUR JEWa COLLECDON, 
FRB4QH QUAliTY & TRADTnON. 

seasonable prjck. 

SECOND HAND, 

SHUNG, BUYING, EXCHANGES. 

_TAX FREE 


1 RUE|DU HAVRE 
PARIS 81H 


FACING GARE ST. LAZAJS 
TEL. 294 25 55 


INTERNATIONAL 


ESCORT 

SBtVKE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 


Head office in New York 
§30 W. 54di 9, N.Y.C 10019 USA 


212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 


major aepf r cards am3 

CHECKS ACCBPTHJ 
Private Menibw stripe AvnSeUe 


TMs awar d w inn i ng service fas 
been fe atu r e d as the top & mast 
•xdusive Escort Service by 
USA 4 ritat m X kia d news metfia 
Ine fa dwg roefia aid TV. 


* USA 8 TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERtCAN 


ESCORT SBWtCE. 

EVBIYWHBIE YOU ARE OR GOL 

1-813-921-7946 

G* free from Ui: I-aOO-297-OB92 
CaB free from Ronda: 1 -600-2&0692. 
bowel Eastern w el co a i e s you badd 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT 5BIVICE 

IN NEW YORK 
7E: 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

KB49NGTON 


ESCORT SBRVICT 
ID KB4SMGT0N CHURCH ST, WR 
TH: 9379136 OS 93791^3 

AS mafor credit cads accepted. 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Servfce. 

T«fc 736 5877. 


ZURICH 


+ 

Tefc 01/57 


96 


ssrvm* 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

LONDON 

Poriman Escort Agency 

67 Oitaem Street. 

London Wl 

Tel: 486 3724 or 4*6 115* 

Al major credit card* owepled 

* LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SBtVIOE 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


AWSTOCATS 

' London Escort Service 

12B Wtomore SL London W.l. 

Al mdfor D«& Cards Accepted 

TSfc 437 47 41 / 5*T 

12 naan - midnight 

HEATHROW 

+ AND LONDON * 

* ESCORT SHWKEOl-834 6601 * 

MAYFAIR CLUB 

GUIDE SERVICE from 5 pm 
ROfTBOMM 10} 10-254155 

THE HAGUE. (0) 7060 79 96 

** G04EVA-HR5T ** 
DAflY ESCORT SKWCE 

Tefc 022/32 34 18 
+ WBNEND + TRAVH. 

ZU RICH-GENEVA 

GINGBPS ESCORT SERVICE. 

TBj 01/363 OS 64 -029/ 3441 *6 

ZURICH 

. Oevdfae Etaort Service 

Tefc 01/252 61 74 

ZURICH 

A1EXB ESCORT SERVICE 
. TEL 01/47 55 32 . 

h 

APPLE * MADRID f 

ESCORT »VKE ‘ 

CRBXT CARDS. 3330319 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


MADRID INTL' 


ETOORT SBtVKZ 
THj 2456541 OBir CAROS 


* MADRID * 


TASTE ESCORT.SERVKE 
TEL *11 72 57. CARDS 


* JASMINE * 


AMSTKDAM ESCORT S8WICE 
02Q-3666S5 


MADRID SHADOWS 


Tel: 2509603 

ECORT SBTVICE. CREDIT CARDS 


AM5TBDAM 

CU* ROSE ESCORT SERVICE 
STADHaUDRSKADE 125 

Tel: 020768606 - - 


ROME CLUB 


1146 {from 4 pm to 10 pm) 


* AMSTERDAM SHE * 

BCORT A COTES. 020-227837 


GENEVA *BEAUTY* 

SCORT SBtVKE. 022/29 51 30 


GBCVA ESCORT 

SHV1CE. Tefc 46 11 51 


CHOSEA ESCORT SERVICE. 


51 ’Beauchamp Place. London -SW3. 

TiTorSrSsilSfifMa.pnf- 


★ *****GH€VA BEST 


AMSTKDAM KIM SUE 

Soarf Srivioe Q2D-9583447953B92 


VIENNA BCOW.AsOBCr 

TH= 37 S2 39 _ 


LONDON TOP ESCORT S&mCE 


yT™ *.- xtaMRum a 

gS W Es f o t l + Tnwel Sscvv*. 


ESCORTS A GUIDES 


GBCVA - HHENE BGORT SBtVKE 
Tefc 36 29 33 

DIANA ESCORT SERVICE landan / 
Healfaow / Golwidc. Please ring UK 
016816608. 

NEW YORK. MIA, Renee & Gafarieffa 
Escort Saraica. 212.22341870. Major 
cmStcardL. 

MAANO + LUGANO ESCORT, guide 
and travel, service. Tefc Man 
02/685035 ' 

VIENNA 1 Snnmr BCORT sendee. 
Coritad; B3 63 04. CretSt- cards ac- 
• ceptad. • • - 

AM5TBDAM BBBIAbEITE Main 
cxid Fimde Escort Sendee. 01 20. 
329716 r 

COtOGI* -BOW- 
Enea Pams Escort & travel wrvicx, 
AH credit cards. 021 1-39. 50 66 , 

LOROON MAXME ESCORT Service 
Heafhrow/Gatwick, Oed&crrds as 
oeptacLTefc 937 4428 + 935 0570 

y SSM JEmSF*** 

V^^LE ESCORT^ 

MADRID IMPACT exxrf ok] aide 
serWce-AWaifluat. 25141X2 


««»»»« miw 

U ^ S ^ BCaa 

WNDON ESCORT SBVKE.Telr 937 




'taSSfSFjunS" 

BcasnsaiAF 

P^SBDORF/BSBWCOtOGK 
Domna Ewart Service 0211/3831 dl 

^WOW + AHAOwtina Escort 
_Sarwe. WP/364656. GwSr Ci^V 


‘SS2 , «"g^A“^ts- 

•ft® W““== 

dnn 01-938 SSt* ^ i 



Tefc 01/6958 71 






ESCORTS & GUIDES 

IONDONPATOMA ESCORT Service. 
Tefc 01-229 6541. 

MADBMOSHUE ESCORT AGENCY 

Hombun). 040/55 3? 914. 

CAROLE ESCORT SBMCE far Eu- 
rope. Canted London |44-lfc328 04 00 

WRLfNEGWEVA GUIDE Sendee. 
Tefc 283397. 

MUMCH SUPREME ESCORT Service. 
Tet 089/44B603B 

H . LH q w ngL ESCORT SBTVICE. 
London 01-899 0485. 

^^^^*4M ^ANET Escort Sendee 
Tefc (020) 326420 or 340110. 

- EVA'S ESCORT & Irav- 
rf sennee. Tefc 069/44 77 75 

p RANKI ! URl tAMA. Smanes Escort 
Servra. Cre* Cards. Tet 62 84 32 

ffisnecsnMAer 

™»JOBgrAlOUII*S«te. 


^gNMMSESCOKTUBKT 

MADRD SBKT10NS ESCORT Ser- 
nee. 4561474 Creckt (*nr , f' 

**y , *®-Pwy.ATr ESCORT + 

Gmde Service. Tefc 91 23 14 

s S?gS u ?,??SJ,s s - 

'Wil&S******* 

WMW">-«(I 



i • - ... 

: »?!. 


C. :■ .v 

t‘ ; . t 


f ■ T. s 

r . 

?: " : -• 




ir, .£ 

ft ri 


IT* V tt . 

: : ‘ 4 ; ■ 


v- 

UcR 


ft 


;■» ii , . :••• 

I# ' ’ 


*, ,r : 

3 .L i- 
S* .f 1 -v 


c. +* i 

Mis: 


t. f" - 


1. 

1 


vice. TAQI 2290076. ' 


^ivn - warn 

vw.Tel.9lSw 




w'.snMRIft FOUS 
jyww PI 20-964374 


«ugniE Escot 
<M*tataica. Tel:73 3n7 9ll 

vunui 






dcukT S 

Tab 069^9 V 


I tfL M y.^ss« w gu»n- 

BwaniP 


^TOTlIP* BCOn S***- 



itil 








[£& 



-tf* 

•^:r- 

y * ■ 

f» toon-' 


•’ •'* . _ 

C , «••>• - 


' * ii"it 


mi 


Page 17 


““HiCYMARKEIS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 


jrij 


A>c^ 


<r" 

vJA 


Dollar (loses Higher in European Trading 

-Ration , 

LONDON — The dollar ?- f Ddscss Y m ’ W n t ^ en crept large drop in the dollar in addition 
higher Monday in Eurone iwSJ. lli & hcr -again after U.S. markets to the shaip devaluation that fd- 
•—»--- ■■ L : .i 011 u l* oespite opened in thesftemnnn • ImW « ¥> - - -- - 


SSSrfSfin'&'t-S" “-S«^ 

saax&f 
sffiSbisssais *£—*«—*; 

of the session. Dealers said trade was 


opened, m the afternoon. lowed a Sept 22 agreement to act 

“The sales weren't enough to tut together to cool protectionist de- 
nerve the markets,” one Frankfurt Tnan ris in the United States, 
dealer said “But it was enough for But statements coming from the 
the market to getthe message that _ meeting suggested that the five na- 
me Bundesbank doesn't want the dons are now satisfied with the 
dollar over 266 marks. 1 * - dollar's value anj are fearful of 


and keep it lower forthe w^™£ dollar over 266 marks. 1 * - dollar’s value and are fearful of 

of the session. Dealers said trade was Britt and currency into a free- 

In London, the dollar predominantly mterbank,wjthcor- * aiLdralers said. - 

SSS '*■** ^ 

A 01 ^ The British pound, meanwhile, ^ direction m the short-term and 

the wo SS® - Against ended slightly firmed Trddsedut where **“ banJ “ would be- 

Sl-4145^LTdol^XS em to intervene on a large scale. 

SrtdoStfS&ii 5 ^ 0 and Fn ' Friday^sdosingof . Bul *5“* “f 1 S Sten “ to 3 

3 Ts close of 213^0. $1.4140, but rose to 3.7495 DM Jf®*. 160 ™ 

The U.S. currency also rose in from 3.7220 on Friday ' addcd “a 1 a ceiling of around 

London to 21655 Swiss francs t»— i . , . ‘ 167 seemed probable, 

from 11587 on Friday and to t °P e ^" . In earlier trading in Europe, the 

8.0650 French francs from 8 0400 ^ dollar was fixed at midafternoon in 

owtheweAadfromameetmgof Frankfurt at 16360 DM, up from 




started in the Far East and contin- 
ued into European trading in the 
morning as dealers covered short 


tries in SeouL Paris, up from 7.952, and at 1974 

Many dealers had expected fi- Dutch guilders in Amsterdam, up 


Producer Prices 
Rise 0.3% in UJL 

Return 

LONDON — The British in- 
dex of producer prices rose 0.3 
percent in September after a 
02-percent rise in August, and 
manufacturers 1 costs rose 02 
percent after a 0.7-percent 
drop, the Trade and Industry 
Department said Monday. 

The prices index was set at a 
preliminary 140.5 after 140. 1 in 
August, giving a year-to-year 
increase of 5.5 percent com- 
pared with 5.7 percent in Au- 
gust 

The year-to-year rate for 
manufacturers’ costs fell by 1.5 
percent after sinking 02 per- 
cent in the 12 months to Au- 
gust- 


U.S., Bonn 
Plan Talks 

(Continued from Page 11) 


Korean Miracle Starts to Fade on Export Curbs 


(Continued from Page II) current account surplus, while 
its economy. South Korea must South Korea is still running current 
leant, however, to live with lower account deficits, adding to the bur- 
growth. Economists say that that den of paying the foreign debt The 


current account surplus, while borrow heavily, resulting in con- South Korea builds 15 percent of 
South Korea is still running current tinuing weak balance sheets. new tonnage worldwide, 
account deficit* adding to the bur- ™ President Park Chime- But **« pknnere did not foresee 

hee was assassinated, setting off^a the wori^de glut in capacity and 
ntrrent account is a moan measure , noiitical crisis. Inflation the subsequent recession m world 
ttomctadB trade mmod.MdiK £22SSSSSS shippinTAlthough Sooth Korean 

“ 4 ™™«***te* Wfc STSTlS^SfSSSIR yrf*™ ^ tay with back or- 


gnjwui, economists say mat that o, paymg me loragn OCTL me nfr a 

means lessening South Korea's de- current account is a broad measure ■ fv f?; * 

pendcoceon exports and stimulat- that includes trade in merchandise aS a^nvervalued mSenw 

ing the damesticeconomy. -6-wtaA.Mk 


“Korea is now at a very critical Nevertheless, South Korea has ness. The next year. South Korea's ^ ers - ncw orders fell 47 percent in 
turning point,” said Koo Bohn- followed the path to industrial economy contracted for the first the firet half of this year. 


^ ? un % a ? <3U0r government coun- might that Japan blazed. Taiwan, iimi» since the Korean War, by 52 The auto industry has fared bet- 
? e J? r - “Lis moving from a newly Singapore and Hong Kong, the re- percent. In response, a new team of ter. Production rose sevenfold be- 
lndustnalizing country toward an zion’s other economic power- government planners depreciated tween 1974 and 1979. But capacity 
industrialized State.” houses, have concentrated tin tex- the Korean won. allowed enervv expanded too fast. and riano oil 


mdustriauang country toward an zion’s other economic power- government planners depreciated tween 1974 and 1979. But capacity 

industrialized state." houses, have concentrated on tex- the Korean won, allowed energy expanded too fast, and rising oil 

In Seoul, skyscrapers and hotels tiles, footwear, consumer prices to rise, tightened the money prices and world recession jolted 
do mina te the skyline, but close by electronics and financial services, supply and curbed government the market, halving production of 
are cramped houses. Company iim- While such light industries still ac- spending to reduce inflation from passenger cars in 1980. The govern - 
ousuies speed by menhauling carts, count for the largest share of indus- 20 percent a year to 2 percent in ment imposed a stringent reorgani- 
In modem factories, workers in trial production in South Korea, about two years: The strategy zation plan, assigning each compa- 

protectrve suits bend over million- the nation has readied beyond worked and the economy recovered ny specific niches, 

dollar chip-making machines. Not these sectors to shipbuilding, steel. 


until the slowdown in exports to Passenger-car production is still 


far away stand sweatshops where construction machinery, high tech- the United States posed new prob- relatively modest — 48,778 care in 


families work, eat and sleep be- nology, electronics and automo- 
tween shifts. biles. 

_ South Korea used to be an api- In iqR , fh _ tftn In wnMnjAC _ 


lems this year. 

The stories of South Korea's 


1984, according to Stephen Leist of 
the securities firm of Vickers da 


cultural mnmn»di£ Io 1983 ' ^ t0 P 10 companies— modern shipbuilding and automo- Costa in Tokyo. But the “Korea 

tion was poor Between 1 9?p P and mosl P f oo iioe hl among them bile industries, created during the car. an u ?**£^ SIVe 

1984 hoES^r wT Hyundai, Samsung, Daewoo and boom yeare, illustrate the strengths is ready to break into the U.S. mar- 


^ 

64 P £r ™ t d Kor “' s GNP ^ ™ policy. Brfora \m. South Korauu T 

K-EfKLESL .-55- srz & 


The faltering U.S. economy has 


THE EUROMARKETS 


aross n'aiimiaT 'nmdnrt percent of its exports. companies built relatively small cut South Korean exports to the 

mon: than 8 Dercmt vearlv But it is to South Korea’s work- ships, but government planners United States by 3.9 percent in the 

meats in West Germany in order to over two decades, increasing t ram && the nation owes its prosper- aimed higher. The government set fust seven months of this year from 
comply. « hiltinn in i !t y — “our construction workers in specific targets for growth and of- the like period last year, according 

• Thai mujiinational service in- ycaH” Middle East, our lady factory iSS mumrfactm-Ss subsidized - * «=“■* 

dus tries operating in West Germa- tomf 0 p _ ’nation’s goods and workers ’ blue collar workers," credit and generous tax incentives, 
ny have been faced with higher uniimi.d Mr. Ahn said. Lawrence Krause, a Output capacity in the ship- 


DM Sector Secs 3 New Issues as Prices Ease 


to the Ministry of Intematior 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 


ny nave oeen raceu win n«ner serviceSi ^ stowing to 4 to 6 percent 
costs and less flexibihty m working this year . Exports dropped by 4 1 
networks currendy percent in the first half, the Bank of 


Manitoba launched a 200-mfl- The issue has a sinking fund in available in West Germany than in Korea repons. 


workers, our blue collar workers,” credit and generous tax incentives. Trade and Industry. So Tar in 1985, 
Mr. Ahn said. Lawrence Krause, a Output capacity in the ship- South Korea has sold $6 billion 
this senior fellow at the Brookings In- building sector surged from 190 worth of goods in the United 

in t^teSZTtsZ't. Li stitution and a scholar of the South deadweight tons in 1972 to 4,150 States. And the won, influenced 

Korean economy, places the role of deadweight tons in a little less than strongly by the dollar, stayed high 
government planning far below the a decade. Today, three major con- and hurt exports in Asia and Eu- 


t Ikm-DM bond with a 6%-percent the last foor yeare that will reduce markets. Other coun tries in the region, no- planning far below the a decade. Today, three major con- ana uun «por« m « 

LONDON -—New issues in the coupon. The 10-year issue was the average life to 8* years. The The officials who asked not to *b!v Taiwan, boast equal! v dra- oT South Koreans to glomeraies operate shipyards and rope. Mr. Krause said. 

Deuische-mark sector of the Enro- priced at- 9954- and ended at a dis- bookrunner was Banca Commer- be identified, said Washington’s matic rags- io- riches stories. But ■ b ? Jrs , “. d 10 *2^ 

btmdmaiket were the feature of an count of IK against the fees of 2S4 daleltaHana. It was launched too proposal goes considerably beyond South Korea stands closer to Japan 5 ^ bCSaD m , 

otherwise qmet day Monday, with bans points. Lead manager was late to trade actively. tbeorigirial request byMr! as an industrial power and a poten- ^ early J 960s. The goveramem __ _ 

pncK in the dollar-straight and Westdeutsche Landesbank Giro- The French-franc sector saw the Schwarz-Schilling to initiate talks dal challenger io the United Slates exports by (rffexmg ey ffog) 

fioating-rate-note sectors ending zentrale. first issue of the current calendar, a over ihe general tdecommunica- and Western Europe — although l 9 ^- ull ® re st loans ;°r outruhi sub- rr ILLCilLfll' LflfZ . 

loww on the back of U.S. credit The next most active sector on 250-million-franc bond for AB dons tradebetween the two coun- South Korea’s relatively low per- < ? wenn p taxes ’ ^hshing 

m^ce^ dealers said. the new-issue front was the Euro- Hectrolux. The five-year issue pays tries. They added, however, that capita income and economic size (Continued from Page II) 

i Threcnew DM resues had been pean currency mnt maricet, dealers 11W basis points over five years the United States is not receptive to still place it in the ranks of the First, the premium on the put op- 

launched by the cod of the trading noted. and was priced at par. It ended Bonn’s desire to includeffade in developing nations. ^ t”®? ^chang e. The ad- rioQ ^nuact ^ ^ j t should have 

day, the largest being a 300-mil- Banque Paribas Capital Markets inside the IVi-basis-poim selling computers during the talks. Kim Kihwan, secretary-general ^ borrowed heavily wtien mark strengthened. But 

hon-DM bond for Dow Oienrical lead managed a zero-coupon bond concession at a discount of H4. of the International Economic Po- 1 om aDroacL Mr. Dillman explained that the 

Co. which pays 6% basis points with a total redemption value of Lead manager was Banque Nation- . *“■ Schw^-^bdhnB. havmg licy Council, notes that South Ko- Worried that South Korea would dollar's steep decline raised the vol- 

otct 10 years and was prured at par. 120 million ECU’s for Philip Mar- ale de Paris. *7?! tea’s 581 -billion economy and pop- lose its competitive advantage in atility factor built into the mark 

The lead manag e r was Deutsche ns Credit Corp. The issue was Den m a rk la un c h e d a 15-billion- Hl e Umtefl omics regarded _ tne u jaoon of 41 miriinn are dwarfed wages and conscious of the need currency option to 18.5 percent 

Bank AG and the issue aided at l priced at 55.70 basis points to give yen straight bond paying 6\4 basis Wes * German uni ca lions by Japan’s SI .2-trillion GNP and for a strong defense, economic from 15 percent. 


, , a — jAirnu. uwiinMj 

pnera m the dollar-straight and Westdeutsche Landesbank Giro- 
floating-rate-note sectors ending zentrale. 
lower on the back of U.S. credit The next most active sector on 
markets, dealers said. the new-issue front was the Euro- 

Three new DM issues had been pean currency unit market, dealers 
l aunch ed by the end of the trading noted, 
day, the largest being a 300-mH- Banque Paribas Capital Markets 
lion-DM bond for Dow Chemical lead managed a zero-couoon bond 


Watching the Puts and Calls 


day, toe brgest being a 300-mil- Banque Paribas Capital Markets inside the lM-basis-pomi selling computers during the talks. Kim Kihwan, secretary-general 

hon-DM bond for Dow Oiemical lead managed a zero-coupon bond concession at a discount of l'A . c ..... of the International Economic Po- 

Co. which pays 6% basis points with a total redemption value of Lead manager was Banque Nation- Mr - Schwaiz-Schillrag, havmg ^ Coujy^ notes South Ko- 
oyer 10 yeare and was priced at par. 120 million ECU’s for Philip Mor- ale de Paris. been warned by Washington that re ^ s jg i_biUion economy and pop- 

The lead manager was Deutsche ris Credit Corp. The issue was Denmark launched a 15-billion- Umreti States regarded the u ] at jon of 41 mini on are dwarfed 
Bank AG and the issue aided ai I priced at 55.70 basis points to give yen straight bond paying 614 basis Wes . 1 German tdeccmmumcauons by Japan’s SlZ-trillion GNP and 

11/16, compared with the total fees a yield at the issue price to the 1 993 points over seven yeare and priced marke . 1 25 ^justifiably restrictive, j 2 q million people, 

of 216 basis points. maturity of 8 J3. It was quoted at a at 100%. Lead managed by Fuji wrote m cany Aupist to Commerce | n ad^jjo^ Seoul’s military 

Jydsk Telefcm AB tapped the discount of % compared with total International Finance Ltd., the is- Secretary Malcolm Baldnge pro- needs a j ai ^ er proporl i on 
DM sector with a 125-mflhon-DM fees of 1 V4 basis points. sue ended at a discount of l?i com- P os ’ n B telecommunications talks m 0 f economy r han Japan’s mill , 

issue that alsopays a coupon of 644 Late in the day, the European pared with the total fees of 1%. Bonn. tary speoding.be says. Exports ac- 

basis points. Tne 10-year bond was Coal and Steel Community issued - In the secondary markets, deal- Bm UB. officials indicated to cornu for more than a third of 


Mr. D illman explained that the 
dollar's steep decline raised the vol- 
atility factor built into the mark 
currency option to 18 .5 percem 


120 million people. planners of the mid-1970s aimed at Had the volatility factor re- 

in addition, Seoul’s military expansion of heavy industries such mained at 15 percent, the premium 
needs drain a far larger proportion as shipbuilding, automobiles, steel would have declined to 0.74 per- 
of its economy than Japan's mill - and chemicals. The South Korean cent, Mr. Dillman said. Thus, the 


cent, Mr. Dillman said. Thus, the 
trader had to pay 513,400 to buy 
back the put option, and the profit 
was reduced to 510,100. 

The point is that the increase in 
volatility would havetad the oppo- 
site — and a beneficial — impact 
on the buyer of a mark call con- 
tract. bringing additional gain on 
top of the windfall from the mark's 
sudden surge. 

“You would have been silting 


tary spending, be says. Exports ac- economy responded by growing at trader who sold the put for $23,500 pretty by selling the put, but not as 

basis points. The 10-year bond was Coal and Steel Community issued ■ In the secon d ary markets, deal- But UB. officials indicated to count for more than a third of a record 14. 1 -percent rate both in would have been able to buy it back pretty as if you’d bought a call." 

also priced at par and was quoted an 80 -milIion -ECU bond paying ere said seasoned dollar-straight is- Bonn that the agenda proposed by South Korean GNP while Japan 1973 and 1976. But inflation also for $7,400 on Tuesday, and pocket- said John ProuL. head of currency- 

at 214, just inside the fees of 2Vi 854 baas points over 10 years and sues suffered losses of between 14 the Post Office Ministry had been depends on exports for only 17 per- rose, and workers demanded higher ed the 516,100 difference. op Lions trading at Donaldson. Luf- 

Knoie nAintF If timr Wti ^ 3 - - a* (h)14 "H — -1 ---» — - C - * .L. fl nvni s- . * * _■ iT. _ j .t I i _ l i i_" a_ f .. « i 


basis points. It was led by Dresdner priced at 99^4- The issue ^was aimed and Vi point on nervous profession- too narrowly defined, focusing too cent of GNP, according to govern- wages. Government-subsidized But at the higher volatility leveL, kin & Jenrette. “You have to know 

Bank AG: primarily at Italian investors. al selling. heavily on the volume of trade. ment statistics. Japan has a large loans encouraged companies to the premium fell only to 134 per- why you’re picking your strategy." 


primarily at Italian investors. 


Nondn4 

ore 


niM - 
HWiLmt Stock 


Sotabi m 

Div. YU. TfflSs Hbb Low 1 PM. ChVe 


12 Month 
HWiLo. Stock 


Soles in Ntl 

Ph». YU 100s HtBti Low IMlChge 


12 Month 
Hist) Low Stock 


Sotos In Net 

Dm. YU 10U Hluti Low 3 PJDL CHUB 


12 Month * 
HMILW Slock 


Solos In 

Div.' YU 100s HK 


Low 3PAOIW 


!2Month 

Hhm Lav Stock 

Dtv. YU 

Sotos in 

100 s 

Net 

Htoh Low 1 PM. CWoe 





126 

1U 

1H 

TV. + V. 

inv> 

tw Sun Med 



* 20 

TV. 

8* 

+ U. 

fVH 




57 

3*. 

3% 

3Vi — 'It 

14 

B SvmbT 



30 

84k 

nvs 

avi— ia 


6V. Switch 



SO 

11 

n» 

ifftt— 

Wh 

2Vt Syntrex 



6 


3W 

3H — Hi 

ir« 

l|y> Svscon 

M 

U 

12 


1TV 

17Vi 

26 W. 

14 SyAsoc 



16 

14tt 

14V. 

14Vh 


3V> SvsMn 



140 

We 

SVi 

SVi- ’A 

1W4 

64 Svslnta 



15 

10U. 

lOW 

1DU. 

2SVS 

IXVn-Systmt 

M 

A 

454 

21U 

21 M 

21 Vi — ’4 








































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 


PEANUTS 


54 

55 

56 



60 





64 





«7 







BOOKS 


1 Thick slice • 

. 5 Caesar’s mufti 
9 Cheer for 
Pavarotti 

14 Sena tor '5 
young helper 

15 Train for a 
bout 

16 More 
impudent 

17 Oriental nanny 

18 Roof edge 

19 His Monday is 
our Sunday 

20 Inform (on) 

23 Scale notes 

24 Rental 
agreement 

25 Like some 
yams 

29. Sharp answer 

33 Red as 

34 Slough stuff 

37 China, for one 

38 Take control 
on Wall Street 

42 Secreted 

43 Salinger 
heroine 

44 Ho’s partner 

45 Howard of 
baseball 

48 Actress or 
metalworker 

50 Popish Plot 
fabricator 

53 Rheine’s river 

54 Avoids taking 
a stand 


1 Saratoga is one 

2 Tales man 

3 “ in 

Calico." old 
song 

4 Indebted (to) 

5 Vicious 
African fly 

6 Brightly 
colored fish 

7 What Rainey 
wielded; 1933- 
35 

8 "What 

fighting for?”: 
R. W. Service 

9 Cook, in a way 

10 Autumn shade 

11 Mine entrance 

12 cutlet 

13 Writer Sarah 
— — Jewett 


MOONSHINE: 

A Lite in Pursuit of White liquor 

By Alec Wilkinson. 153 pages. $13.95. 
Alfred A. Knopf 201 East 40th Street, New 
York, N. Y. 10022. 

By Carl Sessions Stepp 

T HE SOUTH is fun of characters, and the 
writer Akc WiDdnson has laid hold of an 
epic me in revenuer Garland Bunting. 

Bunting, an alcohol control officer in Hali- 
fax County, North Carolina, is a backwoods 
personality worthy of Hanseiy O’Connor, an 
unlikely looking lawman bouncing around in a 
beat- 

pals undl, at the 
snaps his trap 
into sucker bait. 

In this slender volume Wilkinson sketches 
Banting and his work, and, through his skills as, 
a listener and observer, be offers an engaging 
glimpse of a rural Southern culture that is too 
often merely parodied or burlesqued. 

Rotund and balding with “a paunch like a 
feedsack,” Bunting is a nonstop tail-tale teller, 
a voluptuous eater, a wily and compulsive 
horse trader, a maverick free spirit who shoos 
doctors and once cured himself of Rocky 
Mountain spotted fever with medicine he kept 
for ins dogs. He may be, to boot, “the most 
successful revenue agent in the history of a 
state that has always been enormously produc- 
tive of moonshine." 

Solution to Previ o us Pirate 


aoa aana a 

0C30 0000 □ 

□mananiQn □ 

□am 0000 000000 

□GE3B3 0000000 
0DQB □amaaa0a 
QD000 OE30 

QQB0E300 0000000 
COB 00000 00000 
□00000 D0Q0 

anaaana 0000 

DQ000 0000 0D0 
□000 □0D0DQD000 
BB00 0000 00000 
ESG 0000 00000 


LE1RLGI 

J0/8/B5 


|A 


The reviewer, a former reporter and editor for 
The Charlotte Observer, teaches journalism at 
the University of Maryland. He wrote this review 
for The Washington Past 


CHESS 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


IF YOU DECIDE TO DO SOME- 
THING ABOUT YOUR ADDICTION , 
rr SHOULD HOT BE PBEP1CATED < 
OH WHAT YOUR HUSBAND DOES, 
CLAUDIA • IT SHOULD BE SOME- 
THING YOU WISH TO DO FOR 



| WHEN VOU ADMITTED 
THAT YOU HAD AN 
ADDICTION PROBLEM, 
i YOU TOOK THE. FIRST , 
STEP ftMARDS GETTING 1 



DON’T DELUDE 
J YOURSELF/ THE 
CHANCES ARE THAT 
NOU WILL—UNLESS YOU 
GET PROFESSIONAL 
HELP/ 



'Margaret sneaked up and kissed me ... 

BUT 1 ERASED IT.* 

I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
| a by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 

Unacrwnbta ttwaotowJumbtea, 
one tatter to each square, to form 
fourordfnwy words. 


GARFIELD 


YURMK 



Ll 


I BROANJ 



■•1 


THROXE 



■•I 




io-a 


JPIW BW?S 




an 


'5 IMS Ureled Feature Syndicate Mr 



By Robert Byrne 

TN the game between two Los 
1 Angeles players. Grand- 
master Larry Christiansen and 
International Master Jack Pe- 
ters from die He rman Steiner 
Manorial Tournament held at 
the Chess Set in Hollywood, 
Calif. Peters, who is the chess 
columnist for The Los Angeles 
Tunes, won an important game 
to make up his winning 5-1 
score in the double round-rob- 
in when Christiansen wrongly 
p r e ferred counterattack to de- 
fense. ' 

The development with 
6... Q-N3, pressing for the re- 
treat with 7 N-N3, introduced 
one of tire rarer ways of defend- 
ing against the Richter-Rauzer 
Attack. In recent years its chief 

champ iftn has hmi fha TimaiL 

an international master Igor 
Ivanov. However, the variation 
lost its distinctiveness, after 

7 ... P-K3, when Peters chose 

8 B-K3, Q-B2; 9 P-B4, convert- 
ing to a Scheveningen system. 
The likely reason was that Pe- 
ters uses this himself as Black 
and preferred the territory of 
his connoisseurehip. 

His 1 1(H) was steadier than, 
though not as enterprising as, 
either 1 1 Q-B3 fallowed by Wi- 
ll, or 11 PKN4. Peters was not 
in a rush. 

In such a position as that 
reached after 14N/1-Q2, Black 
can always get something akin 
to a French Defense by 
14 . . . P-Q4; 15 P-K5, but 
his 14 . . . P3C4 was more ag- 


gressive. He might have tried 
14 . . . P-QR4, except that, 
after 15 Q-K2, how coaid the 
consequent . . . B-R3 be 
achieved? 

On 16 RxP, the true test of 
White's opening strategy would 
probably have been 
16 . . . N-K4J? Instead, 
(ThrintiflUMBn went astray with 
16 . . . B-K3?!, permitting 
Peters to strike with 17 N-N6, 
QR-K1; 18 N-Q5! 

Now, 18 . . . Q-N2 would 
have allowed 19 NxNch, BxN; 
20 RxBl, PxR; 21 B-R-ti, but 
despite the forced recovery of 
the exchange with tbe superior 
pawn formation for White, 
Blade’s minor pieces will be- 
come active and offer consider- 
able compensation. Perhaps 
this should have been Chris- 
tiansen's choice. 

Instead, : he- tried 
18 . . . BxN; 19 PxB, B-Ql; 

20 B-B2, NxP, but after 21 Q- 
R5I he should have resorted to 

21 . . . P-B4, although 22 
RxBp, N-B3; 27’-$Ql lets 
White keep a solid, positional 
advantage. 

Christiansen’s aggressive al- 
ternative was 21 . . . N-B3; 

22 RxN!, F-N3; 23 Q-B3, N- 
K4; 24 Q-B4s Q-K2, bnt Peters 
gave his attacked rook all the 
gnotection it needed with 25 B- 

After 28 QxP, Christiansen 
was finally in position to recov- 
er some material, but he should 
have accomplished this by 
28 . . . B-K2!?; 29 R-B3!, 



Miqmim 
Btatttan attar 20 NkP 

QxR: 30 QxBf (30 BxBt, Q- 
K6ch), RxQ; 31 PxQ, which 
gives WadLsomc chance to put 
op a tight in the end gone. 

Instead, his. 28 R- 
K5^29 B-B2, BxR. 

K2 does not work after 30 R~ 
B3»„ M7; 31 Q-Q5); 30QxB 
presewed the character of a 
nziddte game in which the white 
minor pieces woddbedeadly 
in attack. ...» 

The aid came suddenly — 
after 33 B-Q4!, the threat of 34 
Q-N7mate could be stopped 
only by 33 . . VRxB, but then 
would follow 34 N-K7maie. So 
Christiansen gave up. 

SK3LUN BETOOK 



IURIADS 1 



■Wl 


WHAT A BWD6E 

PLAYEPHASTO 
LEARN HOY/TO PO. 


Now arrange the circled loners to 
form foe surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by tiw above cartoon. 


r i yx f ^fnn 


Yestartays 


Jumbte® KEYED WINCE 


(Answers tomorrow! 
INVITE BICEPS 


Answer What Wnd of a aame is croquet?— 
A "WICKET’ ONE 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


HIGH 
C F 
24 75 


17 A3 14 57 
36 7V S 36 


B1 IV 66 
TV 11 52 
37 U 52 

72 14 57 

73 11 ' 


Alton* 

Amsterdam 

Atjiem 

Bo n ce H um 27 

Belarade 26 

Bm-fto 14 

Brusteii 22 

Bacttarast 23 73 

Budapest 25 77 

Cg pWMW .13 35 

Caste Del Sal 26 » 

DubUn 15 59 

Edlnbvrah 14 57 

Florence 27 81 

Frank lari 16 61 

Geneva 20 «fl 

ftafsMU / *S 

I Manual 24 

Les Palmas 
UsMa _ 

London 1* S7 11 

m aerie 23 

Milan 25 

Moscow 1« 

Mu n<cil 

S£ » 


LOW 
C F 
13 55 


ASIA 


HIGH LOW 


12 54 
10 30 


54 
54 

45 
48 

46 
48 
3V 

_ 55 

77 81 21 70 
22 73 15 59 


7 _ 

27 81 
16 el 
21 


Pnsaae 
Reykjavik 
Rome 
Stockholm 
Slmfewn 
Venice 
VMM 
Warsaw 
Zurich 

MIDDLE EAST 


3 41 
77 13 55 
.. 57 13 55 
18 64 12 54 
24 75 16 61 
55 11 52 

24 73 14 57 
16 61 14 57 
45 2 36 

12 54 
S 41 
70 11 52 

20 68 14 57 

21 70 U 57 

14 57 7 45 

20 68 11 52 


26 7V 2 36 
29 84 21 TO 
32 90 14 57 
28 82 24 75 
28 82 19 66 


Betrat 
Damascus 

Jerusalem 
Tel Avtv 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 16 61 14 57 a 

-Sydney 20 68 IB 64 a 

ClrSOUdv: Moavr; R-Wr; MWIl o-overcaet; nc-eortly doudv; r-rnln; 
sh-stunvera; «m»0w; sMtarmy. 

TUESDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL; Rough. FRANKFURT: Rain. Tempi 
13 — TOl» —SOI LXJHDO N : Showers. Tetno. 15— » 159— 45). MADRID; 
OaudY. TW1HL «— NEW YORK: Fair. tai 22—10 I72—30J. 
PARIS; Stowers. Twnp- 19 — 11 1*4-531- ROMB ! Fair. Temp. 26 — 13 
rft— « i7tel. AVIV; Na. ZURICH: Ooudr. Temo. la — »l (M-S21. 



C 

F 

C 

F 


BO tmsH. 

29 

84 

24 

7? 


B^lno 

2A 

79 

17 

43 

tr 

Hem Knag 

27 

81 

25 

77 


fitanBa 

30 

84 

25 

77 


EttseyOaBrt 


73 


70 


Seaal 


70 


59 

fr 

SAanatml 

24 

79 

19 

to 

Ir 

Stngapara 

29 

84 

24 

79 

O 

Tolmi 

29 

84 

25 

77 

fr 

Tokyo 

24' 

77 

20 

M 

Ir 

AFRICA 






A tolars 

27 

81 

IS 

61 

Ir 

Cairo 

30 

84 

18 

44 

Ir 

CmiTVwi 

25 

77 

8 

« 

d 

fn|Ahtom-w 

24 

75 

14 

51 

cl 

Harare 

29 

84 

11 

S3 

Ir 

Laaai 

Z7 

81 

25 

77 

O 

Nairobi 

28 

82 

7 

45 

el 

TMt 

29 

84 

18 

44 

Ir 

LATIN AMERICA 



BMenocAlm 




_ 

_ 

na 

Caracax 

mm- 

— 

— 

a— 

na 

Lina 

22 

72 

U 

41 

0 

Mexico Qty 

11 

M 

0 

32 


Rte da Janeiro 

27 

81 

23 

73 

D 

NORTH AMERICA 



AaeBaroat 

9 

48 

4 

39 

r 

Atlanta 

23 

73 

4 

39 

Ir 

■ratoa 


41 



tr 

Oilc&eo 

21 

70 

4 

39 

PC 

Dtavgr 

21 

m 

7 

45 


Detratl 





tr 

Ht®alaKl 

31 

88 

23 

73 

Ir 

Heratan 

27 

B1 

11 

S3 


LNAmW 

21 

73 

20 

48 

PC 

Miami 


m 


70 


es-tsKssosstflhi 

M 

ST 

2 

34 


Moatnial 


ss 




9Sa*£aeB 

30 

Bft 

25 

77 

d 

New York 

19 

to 

8 


Ir 

Son Frondsca 

u 

to 

13 

55 


Seattle 





tr 

Toronto 

134 

55 

4 


d 

WasMnaton 

U 

to 

10 

50 

fr 


186 — 777. TOKYO: FogOV. Temp.»— If 179— U). 


Wtrkl Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse OcL 7 

CUuing prices in local currencies unless odimeue indicated. 



i 

! 


CtaM 

Frav. 

ABN 

48450 

492 

ACFHoknna 

22150 

22480 

AEGON 

tasa 

90 

AKZO 

11480 


AheW 

251 

P+tV. < 1 

AMEV 

26450 

tr 2EJ 

A'Dcusi Rubber 

8 

■ 


S2JS0 

8450 

BVG 

214 

214 


99 

101 

Cfltand HUg 

2920 

2950 

EtMwter-NOU 

I22J0 

132.10 


7150 



215 

219.10 

HalnaSiefi 

14050 

182 

Hamnoa 

5» 

4OJ0 

KLM 

5150 

5450 



4650 


7080 

7150 

NMUfcmi 

1BZ 

184 


340 

MO 


6420 

6450 

PtllllPS 

46.10 

46.10 




Rodameo 

135.10 

13450 


4840 

4820 


4450 

4420 

naval Dutch 

18820 

18920 


319 

L ».< *■- 1 ■ 

Van Omrs.!r«M 

BJO 



21720 

nvA'i 

VNU 

213 21520 

anpjcbs a iwsex : araso 

Pravtaaa j mm 



f( Wi unii Im J 

Artwa 

1700 

6740 

1740 

4740 

Cocker III 

216 

219 


3545 

K 1 

EBE5 

3275 

J 


4250 


GBL 


2195 

Gevaert 

4350 

I 1 

Hoboken 

51 B0 

5170 


2455 


Kraafctaank 

Puli ulii ki 

9350 

6250 



1150 

7410 

Satina 

7650 

Soivav 

5480 






5170 



1870 

m 

trie Hie iMantaane 

an 

Cvrtwil Stock iMtex : 2535JS 

| pravian ; 251420 




AEG-TeiMUnkM 

157 15550 I 


ues 



424 

BASF 

24250 





11 miflvt rr/jw 

438 

440 


435 


BBC 

280 

s- 

BHF-Bank 

370 

BMW 

4944S65U 


EH 

24S 

5350 


977 

M4 


44050 

454 


174 

177 

vr.r.RB 

67047550 

1 Li - '■ 1 . j - , - . 1 1 


GHH 

IT:* K.i 

Hqnwner 

365 



1 CImc Pra, 

Hochtief 

755 

77S 

HOMjJJf 

233 

229 

Hoescii 

145 

144 


218 

218 

Huna 

392 

395 

IWJKA 

302 29950 

Kali + Soli 

377 17150 


282 

281 

Kaulhol 

319.90 319.90 

- • > J."-™ 

297 

298 


81 

80 



140 

Linde 

55950 55550 

LufTItonM 

zn 

230 

MAN 

IBS 

190 


33250 231 JO 



18S5 

NlxdPrf 

579S7U0 

PKI 

484 

480 

Poraefte 

1295 

1288 

Prrussoo 

249 

in 




220 21950 

faicanmetoll 

390 

401 

Setter Ina 

539 

542 

SEL 

33750 33450 




15250 15D2D 

Veba 

243 

■ 11 

Volkswoaenwerk 

332 


Write 

453 45350 




Pray low : 15H50 




Bk East Asia 

2150 

21.40 

Cheunc Kona 






Green Island 

Q 

BJB5 

Hans Sing Bc«-A 

4BL7S 

4255 

HsiKJanan 

250 





HK Electric 

885 

1150 

750 

11 

HK Hotels 

3+75 


HK Land 

750 

7.1S 

HK Teteohone 

855 



355 



7 

+90 

Hutch whamuoa 

27 

2450 

Hvsan 

041 


inn CHv 

Susa. 






1440 

1U0 

Kate loon Motor 










13 

1280 


2475 



24.90 

2450 


1.99 

1.91 


084 


wfavg On Co 

150 


Wlnsar _ 

wand mn 

2^ 

2.HS 

HatM Seaa indax 
Previous : 150754 

161754 





AEC1 

Anpio American 

Anaie Am Gaia 

Bartna 

BlYVDar 

BuHelS 

DeBoers 

DrMonhHn 

Elands 

GF&A 

Harmanv 


77Q 750 

3235 3225 

1B3O0 18000 
1100 1110 
U40 1430 
7200 7Z75 
122S 1570 
5025 5025 
1750 1775 

3350 J4K 

2850 2875 


HIveM Steal 
Kloof 
Ncdbank 
Pre3 Stevn 
Rusplal 
5A Brews 
SI Helena 
Scaol 

WeM HoUinp 


Cine. Prw 
570 565 

2165 2150 
1200 1140 
6000 6000 
2050 2000 
770 m 
3280 3225 
795 790 

7325 7423 


Composite Stock Index : 1171 JO 
Previous ; 1169 JO 


AA Caro 
Miicd-Lvons 
AnatoAmGeld 
ass Em Foods 
Ass Dairies 
Barclays 
Bass 
BAT. 

Beecnam 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
SOC Grow 
Booh 

Bawttter Indus 
BP 

Brit Home St 

Bril Telecom 

Bril iWm pe ei 
Brltoll 
BTR 
Burmati 
Coble Wireless 
Codbury Sctrw 
Owler Cons 

Commercial U 
Cons Gold 
Courl aukls 
Daluely 
Os Beers • 
Distillers 
Drlefonleln 
Fisons 

Free SI Ged 
GEC 

Gen Acctdeni 

GKN 
Glaxo I 
Grand Me# 
GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

(Cl 

imparlal Group 


STUs Stile 
286 291 

S6114 5614. 

234 234 


142 

384 

599 

268 

398 

220 

33 

518 

367 

203 

313 


142 


602 
271 
300 
220 
33 
571 
268 
204 
316 
566 
310 
197 
425 
211 
363 
302 
595 
134 
195 
229 
427 
157 
433 
430 

423 421 

5171. 5179k 

350 351 


am 

195 

425 

213 

363 

304 

590 

136 

195 

227 

424 

156 

440 

432 


600 611 

235 235 

13h.ll 31/64 
343 343 


Land Securities 
Leant General 

Lhsvds Bank 

Lonrho 

Lucas 

Marks end So 
Moial Ban 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bank 
Paneo 
PIIMnatm 
.Piessev 
Prudenllal 

Ratal Elec# 

Ranefdfflrtn 

Rank 

Reed mn 

Reutvrs 

Rovai Dutch ( 

RT4 

Scaieni 

Saliuhury 

Sears Hoidlnps 

Shell 

STC 


487 

417 

150 

385 

147 

478 

392 

647 


287 

273 

314 

619 

417 


146 


STSft 57617 
413 413 

671 667 

312 317 

44'.H4S 15/64 
547 551 


675 

330 

in 

691 

83 


dew Prev. 
5 Id Chartered 439 427 

Sim Alliance 463 468 

Tate and Lvle M 481 

Trace 268 266 

Thom EMI 367 387 

T.I. Group 390 388 

Trafalgar Hoe 353 3S3 

THF M0 Ml 

UHrtnroor IBS 3S 

Unilever k 1021/6410 11/32 
United Biscuits 179 181 

Vickers 288 2»i 

Waatwartti 493 49a 

F.T.smndax: 1012A0 
Previous : 1016JO 
F.TAE3N Index : I186JO 
Prey loos : 1313.18 


MHan 


Banco Comm 

Central* 

Claaholeis 

Crod Hal 

Erldanla 

Rarmilaila 

Fiol 

Generali 

IFI 

llalcementl 

Itatoas 

UalmablMarl 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RA5 

Rlnascenle 

SME 

Snla 

igr 


26320 25800 
3682 3732 

11795 11980 

3320 3275 
11140 11160 
13840 13950 
4770 4840 
42190 63000 
11310 11460 
48980 48905 
1920 1900 
130500 1 251 PQ 

132000133000 

2350 2395 

7510 7493 

21” 3302 
107500108900 
989 996 

2828 2J50 
1637 I Ml 
3815 3845 
14965 14T60 
3801 37W 


MIB Current Index ; 1795 
Pretrtaes : 1795 


Parte 


Air Ltaulde 
AisHtem A7L 

sat 

28950 

a5o 

Av Dassault 

1142 

1 140 


618 

616 




Beetwalm 

1341 

1341 

Bauyowes 

leas 

1975 

Carre; cur 

2190 

2190 




GubMcd 

417 

425 







Elf-Aouitaine 

177 

177 





579 

578 

Hodiette 

T273 

1302 


474 



2090 

TOTS 


450 



a-iia 

B--1 

I ■ UMy 1 

1314 

1311 


liwo 

tan 

Cz 

191S 

1915 


1024 


Moat Hamnsv 

1738 

1745 

fttesu *&w* 



Ocddeniole 

455 

440 

Pernod RlC 


441 

Perrier 

416 

412 




pr In temps 

260 

245 





1360 


RauraeU/daf 

1310 

S63 

1368 

544 

Skis RwH«l 

122S 

1X35 



B1 

men taxiCSP 

514 

515 



221 

AaeH IMU : 18X33 


Prev ton: i9i*o 



CAC ladax : 30SJ0 



previous : JBJt 




CoMStorape 

DBS 

Fixaer Neove 

How Par 

mchctsw 

Mai Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

OUE 

ShanarHa 
5lm» Darby 
Share Land 
Shore Press 
SSbs om i h lp 
StTradirv 
United Over se as 
UOB 


19* 3 

135 5JD 
6 6JBS 
229 1X3 

do N-a 
5J0 175 
820 83S 

278 276 
NA - 
NX}. 1J8 
179 180 

ua 032 

3 334 

1A7 169 

346 tea. 


Straits Times IM index : 7*339 
Previous : IBM 


AGA 

Alfa Laval 

SSR 

Alias Cooco 

Bonder 

EtocfrehM 

Ericsson 

Essettn 

HandeMxpiken 
Pharmacia 
Scab-Seen la 
Sanovlk 

tkr* 0 

SwedlshMalch 

Volvo 


128 NA 
204 203 

284 284 

407 405 

ISO 120 
N3J. — 
MB M2 

*2 
in 181 
177 174 

420 — 

500 495 

93 93J0 
238 336 

211 208 
220 HA 

AWo er ny u e ri d ee Index : 28330 
Previous : 38138 


Tahya 


Akal 

Auni Chem 
Asahl Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 


Canon 
Casio 
C l ton 

Dot Nlanan Print 
Dahuo House 
□ohm Securities 
Fanuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fill Hsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Coble 
Honda 

Japan Air Lines 
Kallma 
Kansai Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Etoc Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi cnera 
Mitsubishi Bloc 


344 3541 
804 777 

793 771 

757 757 

545 541 

KM0 1830 
1620 1590 
445 458 

1020 1030 
945 945 

902 915 

& S3 

1980 I960 
VSD 930 
665 660 

349 538 

U0S 1138 
5340 5230 
.550 560 

2098 2190 
U7 163 
759 756 

566 352 

404 406 

3320 3280 
1130 11» 
971 990 

1508 1440 
498 493 

878 377 


Mnsubtsftf Heavy 

Mitsubishi Corp 

NUtsulandCo 

MtHukafol 

Mitsumi 


NGK Insulators 
HlkkoSeC 
Nippon KOBOfcU 
Nippon OH 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yosen 

&5K 

Oivnwus 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

Shlmozu 

SMnetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumttomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 

Sum Roma Marine 

Sumitomo Metal 
Tatoei Corn 
Tataho Marine 
Takeda Chem • 
TDK 
Tallin 

TokJo Marine 
Tokyo Elec. Power 
Ttappaa Printtno 
Torav Ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yamal chi Sec 


450 4S5 

64 S Ml 
475 471 

680 690 

455 645 

WOO 9H 
880 B72 


783 790 

19S 196 

372 m 
991 585 

ran 1230 

1080 1M9 
1550 1530 
BSD 851 
779 778 

TOO 685 
718 6*9 

34*0 3480 
1750 1760 
277 279 

741 784 

158 163 

410 404 

436 661 

905 881 

3830 3710 
558 540 

*63 978 

2390 2680 
838 843 

568 544 

37* 377 

1K» 1070 
777 795 




1 E 



fBkfcrt/BLf . fjtda t : EP9U8 
previous : mrxra 


previous ; W3833 


Adla 

Ahauisie 

Autoafnn 

Bank Leu 
Brawn Baveri 
Gatoy 

Credit Suisse 

Etedrowtrtt 

Holderbank 

Inlerdlscounl 

Jacob Suchort 

Jetmali 

LundbGvr 

NiaayanphX 

Nestle 

Oerilkan-a 

Roche Baby 



Schindler 

5ulxer 

Surveillance 

Swtseair 

SBC 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swiss Vaiksbanfc 

Union Bank 

WlnMrtttar 

Zurich ins 
SBC Index : strjs 


E8 

4625 408 

4?" ^ 

7 J8 « 

2108 2150 
2010 2000 
4210 *ng 
430 4325 
2400 2450 


Seize tiieworid. 

The lnfiernatiooai Herald "Itibunc. 

Brip&ng the Worid’s Most 
ImpnrtantNews to the Woriifs 
Most Important Audknce. 


' GnQa&m. stocks da AP 


T17AbH Pboe 
55Addande 
10515 AcmteQE 
400 Agra lad A 
10060 All Energy 
1115 Alta Nat ■ 
1000 Atooma St 
zaio Aloof t 
KDBPCmdO 
41750 Bank BC 
194002 Bank N S 
8912S Bcjiricka 

J Baton A f 
Banansa R 
Brotorae 
sisoBramatoa 
3383 BCFP 
27130 BC Res 
9775 BC Phone 



15540 C Nor wool 
34000 CPockrs 
1005 Cm Trust 
100 C Tuna 
10047 Cl BkCom 
23583 CTlreA* 
500C Util B 
.jam Cara 
112C4tanese 
mcMennsn. 
3020Caitt1 Tr 
315 CHUM 
430ocineMex 
51640CdSh7A 
tnoCDMBBf 

2300 CTL Bank 

2100 Camara# a 

SmSa 

2200 Crawnx 
12075 CRT Res 
9633 Doan Dev 
74ao Denison A p 
9908 Dentean B f 
14700 Deveican 
47MDIcknsn Af 
MDktanl 
11509 1 


3670 Da Pant A 
38425 Dylex A 
2050 Stcittom X 

^»s. c 

8308 Fad ind A 
4W0FCftvFZn 
_350G«M»A 
Isaac Cor 


2T0M 

84709 GdO Cni de 

300 Gibraltar 
565DGOMcorpl 
23300 GL Forest 
51 Grevhnd 
ims»H Group* 
105 Hawker 
2422 Hayes D 
10000 Hm Inti 
S104H Boy CO 
23760 IflMHCO 


82Mk 20*h 

ntw im 

imi isti 
SOW l«t 
51706 17*6 
814 13V* 

nan wfe 

no 9 * 

SJ2M, 1316 
IS 485 

smt n*6 
tvs na 
819 19 

330 345 

410 4W 
516*6 IM 
8916 nt 
215 211 

sac am 
SUVb 12 
827 27 

516 ISM 
SI 5V, 1SV, 
812 12 
535 25 

52214 a 
33416 34 
842*6 4216 
511*6 11*6 
834*6 36*6 
5916 no 
*16*6 16*. 
815*6 13% 
8846 8*6 

*19 IP 
SI4tt 14*6 

Ies st 

8410 4*6 
SW 9*6 

8816 a 
280 280 
813ft lWi 
20*6 

220 213 

J90 375 

SIM 13 
STBS I2ft 
8416 6 

*7 7 

86*6 6*6 
SZOb 23*6 
8151b 15*6 
323 22H 

•sr « 

JR 7 % 

SlSlta 1516 
*17*6 17VS 
811th 111* 
fim me 

33M 31 V» 

STO 10 
345 340 

STta Afc 
• *16*6 W. 

m 2016 
* 11*6 1116 
sn*. 20*6 
825** 25*6 
504*4 24*6 


1200 Indoi 

860 lutandGos 

SUto 

,«2*k 

Ub. 

BM 

105700 Intt Then 

SOW 

816 

5059 inter PlM 
SOI lM» 

MZ16 

ST3*t 

42 . 
18*6 

2700 Jonnack 

SMb 

U 

MDKeteevH 

236 

'30 . 

4215 KMT Add 

7292 Laban 

SIS 

ttn* 

2716 

2330 LOnt Caen . 
19940 Lacuna 

SpWi 

51116 



34300 LebtowCe 
2400 Lumoalce 
60OMDSH A 
1300 MICC „ 
rngssMctanHX 

MOI Maritime I 

raffiii 

UZZMateaBW 


1310 


82016 20 
*17*6 17W 
53416 14 
37S 360 
8133k 12*6 
SI 4V, 1416 
345 335 

JU 


Mara Iw SB*6 

iWecoL 88646 


20*6 

18*6+ *6 
W 
8H 
17*6 

14 +«. 
18V* 

5 +18 

12*6+ lb 
192—4 
19 — Hi 
350 
410 

14*6+ 46 
9 —.16 
212—1 

24 +16 
12 

27 — 16 
15*6 — 16 
IW6 

12 —lb 

25 
2216 
34 

42*4+ Ut 
11*6— Vi 
M0— 16 
W0— Hr 
16*6+ IA 
15*6+ U, 
. 0*6 
19 —16 
14*6 
38M 

WO— *6 
«*+ lb 
. 4*6— Mi 


13M . 

20*0 

215 —TO 
ESS —5 
U 

1210— 4k 
410 + 46 
7 

6*6— 10 
23*6 
15Vl 

2316+ 4* 
13*6 
446 

7*6+ 1b 
18*6 
1516 

171*— 1b 
1116+ lb 
1116 

31*6+ *6 
10—10 
340 .. 
m— ib 

22* 

2014+16 

sr* 

. 15*6+10 

U 
38 . 

IS 

27*6+ VS 

nib— *6 
111 * . 
9Kb+ lb. 
T7*b+ lb 
1*0— *6 
373 +28 
W0+ 10 
V*Vt 

335 —5 
1*0+ *0 
I8V2+ 16 

39*6 

20A— 46 



1 =8 


Con 
33379 Sherrill 
ZB Staler Bf 
TSOOSoutlwm 
1741 Saar Aaraf 
10933 SletaiA 
5WSub*tre 

aftr-"- 

2OT Tee* Car A 
28377 Teck B I 
IflMTM Cm 
55400 Them N A 
S3D40 Tor Omsk 
. 3131 Torstar B f 
2548 Traders A 7 
450TmsW . 
1000 TrMtv Res 
49991 TrnAtta UA 
35700 TrCcn PL . 
4855Trimac 
1958 TrMaa A 

Af. 



14*6 1410— 10 
.1516 1516— *6 
516 M+ 10 
1816 1816— VS 
.38 39 

YW 716+ 10 
273 ao +5 
33; 34*6+1*4 
IM* 13*6— V. 
916 9V6 

8*6 8*6+ 16 
12*0 12V»— 10 
.37*6 3710+ 10 

35 ?1 

2M6 Sta 
9 9—16 

2416 3416— ,40 
.7*0 7*0 
II , 11 +16 
1310 1316— 16 
25ta 25»— 16 
tffc mo— 10 
Ml 215 +13 

230 338 —IS 

Ifi? wfc 

J446+ 16 
13*6 14 — 10 
-37*4 37*6— 1ft 
30*6 2016+ 10 

m m. + 10 

2M r 2»6+ 16 

338 238 

3596 2516— 16 

^*4^8 “ w 


«*6 « 49 v 

87 7 7 —U 

onto 12 1210 

« 810 9+*6 

430 425 425 — J 

nr* mo 1 ?*+ £ 

•ST'S* *3*7 r 

8TW6 -l»to 1946 
1tS^9405 J&W 7 * 


TSE 388 index: 


1 4*630 


2457.90 


0**1 


IfiS. CBPrf 


73424 MtfBKCda 


21540 Raitri Bttlk 

vkssst 

Total Sales 234ZS7 


MestrUte tadex; 


m 1 

81316 

8150, 

sr 

8i nS 

SS2 


u 5 

» 13 


^*0+10 

R\8i + * 

IB** 

~M0 2016 
as 25 


PmiQBi 

te7 -“ HJ7S5 






Banting has found liquor stills in swaiiySi 
bog pens, chicken houses, comBela^ .hraw 

icons and trailer trucks riding down the rugn- 

way. He has dressed up tike a woman, dehv^ 
cred sennons, paidkxi fish, buck danced, been 
a carnival barker and h»nlna logs at a sawnBii 
— all to outfox suspected moonshiners. 

“The thing about all of this is,” Burning 
explains, “the other people always have to 
guess what I’m about, and 1 know what I m up 
to." 

What be is up to mostly is canny conversa- 
tion. “Garland almost never stops t alk i n g,” 
disarming his marks with what Wukuison de- 
scribes as “a random streak Of nonsensical, 
scurrilous, imaginative, blustery, and occasion- 
ally poetic patter be calls ‘trash.* 

**6ooik yg ers unaware of who he is often Eke 
to have him around their outlets as a source of 
entertainment because it stimulates sales." 

fn the wrong hands. Bunting might appear a 
stereotypical ‘“Dukes of Hazzard" yoke. But 
Wilkinson, a writer for The New Yorker, is no 
cheap titerwy carpetbagger. He minds ms 
manners, throws himself into the action (get- 


out a still), and delivers a profile that is color- 
ful, respectful and warm. 

His overview of the illegal whiskey business 
strikes me as thin, bnt he suggests thai.it is 
thriving. 

Policing liquor means tracking down the 
stills and making buys from the se&as, enter- 
prises that are always risky- , - 

“These folks are suspicious, and they’ll kill 
you,” Bunting says. “They’ll shoot the grease 
right out of a biscuit and never even break the 
crusL** 

Moonshiners commonly get a pretty - good 
press — nigged nonconformists that they are 
— and revaiuers tend to be disosssed as strait- 
laced kill-joys. But Bunting, whose sleepy 
down-hone facade masks the instincts and 
brains of a top detective, more than holds his 
own in tire local-color department. ' 

Whether at the supper table, along oh a coon 
hunt or in the living room while Banting’s wife 
Colleen plays gospel music, WiDdnson is a 
careful listener and notice^ a pleasure to ac- 
company on this brief atcsyteOing trip into 
Dixie. 



Nest \ 


r 




































jr-rfc-’Sijv 


-9^ -T'-*rr. V'>,' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1985 


Page 19 


SPORTS 




By Throwing Jays 
A Final-Day Curve 

Compiled by Oir Staff From Dispatcher Striking him out with thethrr tj one 

TORONTO — Having failed ^ the game's final out. ; 
four times to reach the eme 300. A»Ued if l was going to win 

victory Jevd, Rhfl Niekro *** 300*;" Niekro explained, “I 

to pursue ins goal (fifferepfiy ia Us s ^ ou1 ^ finish it with a knoddebalL 
final attempt of the ) ieK I figured there was no other way to 
Strodav, In an 3<dfnm/% g imjtcfain game than BsmE the mtch 

¥ t- 6 thatgot me there” 


BASEBAIX ROUNDUP 


Nkkro, who has lost 250 times in 

his 2-year career with the Breves 

of Milwaukee and Atlanta and the 
strategy and style, the 46-year-oLd Yankees, used «"«*!■»> change of 
New Yoric Yankee righthander routine in a quest th»t imt | ww i 
pitched virtually the entire game stalled by three and -a no- 
wthout nsiqg has tamddetoall, the mliit mwi gn s fr«n- 

pitch for which be is famous. ... He rubbed down the arms of the 
The ploy woiied and Niekro be- Yankee trainers, Mcoahan 
the 18tb player in baseball and Mark Letendre. . 


came 


Wstoiy to win 300 games as the HBey ribbed my aim the past 
Yankees defeated theroronto Blue five games and that diAft a nfir «> 
Jays, 8-0. Niekro was the second we went die other way," «pb » jnad 
-fcuvv.b,.., "H. pitcher this season to reach the pla- Niekro, who was released by the 




; op only four hits to the 
muc Jays, who had clinched their 
In first division championship Satur- 
day, Niekro also became the oldest 
_ Catcher to pitch -ashntoot. Satrhrf 
- ' -?aige, who never revealed his true 


the game# their arms were bother- 
ing them, and they said no." . 

Niekro’s arm had up just fine. 
Working against a Erica p filled 
with reserves, who played while the 
i^tdar payers rested for the start 
age, pitched one in 1952 when he of tht Amwipm I aigm 
wassaid to be 46 years and 75 days ship series Tuesday night, Niekro 
old. Niekro registered his shutout gave up only one hit in.the first six 
at the age of 46 years and 188 days, innings, Cecil Fielder's two-out sin- 
With five strikouts, Niekro also gle in the fourth. . 
passed Ferguson J enkins to take •. Asked if he felt his achievement 
over seventh place on the aU-thne - was ««**nti»rt by- the Hnoip Toronto 
list with 3,197. used, he said: "Ihey had some guys 

But the day’s most remarkable who could hit the ball out of me 
facet was the way Niekro won. Ever ballpark. They, were tryin ^Th cy 



H» Hinrrt«lH> 

46-year-okl PM Niekro, working on victory No. 300. 


Riefs 


i<- KnA 


i: 


smee he began pitching in the ma- 
jor leagues m 1964, Niekro has pri- 
marily used the knocklebaZI, a pitch 
thrown by holding the ball with the 
fingertips on die seams. The ball 
doe&i’t rotate — it dips and darts. 
On Sunday, he threw sinking fast- 
balls, corveballs, screwballs and 
“blooper” pitches — not one 
knnckleball until after Tony Fer- 
nandez doubled with two out in the 

ninth inning. 

“I always wanted to pitch a 
whole game without throwing 
knuckleballs because people 
thought 1 couldn’t 


.were taking some good, healthy 
swings.” 

All 9, Royals 3: In Kansas CSty, 
Missouri, the Royals (having 
clinched the American League 
West title the day-before) rested all 
their regulars and were managed by 
third baseman George Brett Oak- 
land started Alfredo Griffin at 
shortstop, giving hfm an appear- 
ance in all 162 pmws this q fl s fl nn ; 
Mikc GaUego pinch hit for him in 
the second and went on to lead the 
winners’ attack with two doubles 

Mid a «in g|* '• 

Anris 6, Rangm5: In AiSng- 

n,Texa 


ting average. Boggs had 240 bits 
this sea s o n , the highest total since 
BabeHaman had WHor the 1930 
Brooklyn Dodgers. 

Tigers IV Orioles 3: In Balti- 
more, Detroit drubbed the Orioles, 
but the losers* runs came cm borne 
runs (by Floyd Rayford and Gal 
Ripken), giving them a major 


ton, Texas, Mike Witt struck out 13 


_ . . out 

without throwing 

‘w said after the game. “Today I said, batters over seven innings as CaK- 
* Let’s go out in the first wwimg and fami*, which was efimm&ied Satur- 
see if I can get them out without 
; throwing a knnckleball/ 1 (fid, so I 
; didn’t throw any in the second in- 
• ning, and then 1 went from there.” 

Niekro finally threw three 
knuckleballs to Jeff Burroughs, 




day, reduced its final margin be- 
hind Kampia City to «n« game 
Brewen 9, Red Sox& In Boston. 
Wade Boggs of the Red Sox had. a 
double and two singles to finish 
with a major-league-best 368 bat- 


: Sox 3, Marinew 2: In Chi- 
cago, Ed Correa, 19, won las first 
maj or-lcague start by allowing four 
hits, walking six and striking out 
six in hzs five innings’ work. 

Twins 4, Indbuts 2: In Minneapo- 
lis, Kfike SniM imn e nnnlp^ his ca- 
reer-highby winning his 15th game 
of the year, Cleveland, winding up 
60-102, tied a dub record far losses 
set in 1914 and matched in 1971. 

Reds 6, Dodgers 5: In Los Ange- 
les, Qndnnari beat the Dodgers on 
three hnnwiK , pne of them No. 377 
lifetime Tony Perez, tying him with 
Noon Cash for 26th place an the 
. all-time fist. 

Cubs 8, Canfinak 2: In the Na- 
tiopal League, in Sl Louis, 43,665 
turned out for the Eastern Division 


champions’ regular-season finale, 
bringing home attendance to a re- 
cord 2^62375 for the year. 

Jjkqras 2, Mets h In New York, 
Hubie Brooks led Montreal by 
driving in his 100th run of the year. 
Brooks is the first National League 
shortstop top 100 RBIs since Chi- 
cago’s Ernie bad 117 in 
1960. 

Braves 8, Gants 7: In San Fran- 
cisco, pinch-hitter Qaudcll Wash- 
ington's RBI single in the seventh 
snapped a 7-7 tie and banded the 
Giants their 100th loss of the year 
(San Francisco had been the only 
pre-expansion team never to lose 
ZOO games). . 

Astra 6, Padres 4: In San Diego, 
Jos6 Cruz and Alan Ashby fio- 
rocred to help Houston tie the Pa- 
dres for third place in the Western 
Division. 

Piffles 5, Prates <k In Philadel- 
phia, Kevin Gross pitched a four- 
hitter and J ohn Russell hit a three- 
run homer to beat Pittsburgh, 
which with baseball’s 

worst record -57-104. (NYT. AP). 


Prost Finally Gets by AU the Roadblocks 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BRANDS HATCH, England — Alain Prast’s quest for the Formu- 
la One drives' championship, the first ever to go to a Frenchman, was 
□one too easy. - 

Prost, that with Renault, lost the 1983 title in the season’s final 
race, in South Africa, by two punts to Brazilian Nelson Piquet. Last 
year, the gap was only half a point between Prost and McLaren-TAG- 
Poreche teammate Niki Lauda, the Austrian who won his third 
cfaanmi onship- 

Altioughhe again missed the title, Prost won more races than 
Lauda and was relaxed in defeat, confident of his talent. 

"It would be fantastic anyway if I could he in the running for the 
title every year” he said before assuring himself of the 1985 crown 
with a fourth-place in Sunday’s European Grand Prix. 

This year Prost has won five more races (and was disqualified from 
a sixth because his car was underweight by two kilograms); he has 
registered two seconds, three thirds and a fourth and has failed to earn 
points in only 3 of the 14 races. 

His 21 triumphs in 87 career grand prix races marie a success rate 
far ahead of all other current Formula One drivers. He is fifth on the 
all-time victory list behind Jackie Stewart (who holds the record, 27), 
Jim dark, Lauda and Juan Manuel Fangio. 

After capturing the crown Sunday. Prost said he’d like to win back- 
to-back Formula One titles — something never accomplished since 
the competition was inaugurated in 1950 — “and why not the 
In dianapol is 500?” 

Prost, 30, began bis racing career in 1972 on the kart circuits. He 
became the French and European champion before making an instant 
impact in die 1 976 Formula Renault Challenge, winning 1 2 of the first 
13 races he entered. 

In the next two years, he won the French Renault Europe and 
Formula Three categories, and was European F3 titlist in 1979. 

The breakthrough into grand prix racing came in 1980, with 
McLaren, and Prost scored a fifth and two sixth places in that fust 
season. He broke his contract after a year to join Renault, partnering 
Frenchman Rent Amonx. Prost scored his fust grand prix victory in 
France, and won again in the Netherlands and Italy. 

He started strongly in 1982, winning the two opening races, but a 
streak of bad luck {including a turbo flameoul four laps from victory 
in Austria) cost him the title. At the start of 1982, Gerard Larrousse. 
Renault's competitions chief, described Prost as a driver with “rare 
qualities, by nature courageous, daring, skfUfui and resourceful” 

But by the end of 1983, Larrousse fired him for another quality — 
frankness. “In midseason,” Prost recalls, “I told the ieam we had to 
make progress with the engine or we would be outpowered by the 
Brabhams’ BMW. And we were." Many of ins ideas were adopted by 
Renault — after he kfL 

He returned to McLaren, a team completely chang ed from the one 
be knew in 1980, and figured it would “take two years to win the 
championship.” 


The worid title is a personal triumph for Ptosl “People don’t give 
me credit for what I have done — they see only that I have failed to 
win the championship,” he had said before Sunday’s race. “If I win 
the championship, they will have to accept what I have done. Perhaps 
then I will get the recognition 1 think I deserve.” 

Afterward, he seemed indifferent to being the first Fre n c hm a n ever 
to win. “It is very important for the French, but l do not care too 
much if I am a F renchman, since I'm not too nationalistic,” be said. 

“I am on a British team. 1 am champion of the world and belong to 
the world. What is important is that 1 win.” ( UP1, AP) 



Afitn at Frona-Prasa 

Alain Prost: ‘And why not the Indianapolis 500?* 


Vikings Gamble, Lose; Rams Hold, Win 


Compiled by (hr Staff From Dispatcher 

ANAHEIM, California — It was 
a low-risk gamble, but the Minne- 
sota Vikings lost it. 

Spurning the almost automatic 
field goal that would have 

NFL ROUNDUP 

sent the game into overtime. Coach 
Bud Grant opted for a Darrin Nel- 
son dive over the middle from the 
Los Angeles I -yard line with one 
second remaining. The Rams 
stopped Nelson cold, preserving a 


SCOREBOARD 


Transition 


Baseball 


IAMIAU 




'i 


. CINCINNATI— ReWred BIIIV . DtMsn, 

third-tsosa coach. Tanuny Halm*, flraMmaa 
■* T coat*: Broca Klmnv buiipan coach, and 
-r Gears* Scftontar, coach, forth* IMS season. 
BASKET hAU. 

MaHoMri Baske t ball AModattoa 
SEATTLE— Roachod contract terms wlfh 
Tom Chomhom ond Danny Vnmoi.*or*mrd«. 
Aoaulrod J«H Cram, cantor, horn Dallas fcr 
“av future conddamWoni. 

FOOTBALL 


’ COLLI OC 

.- FLORIDA ABM— Find Matvln Gilliam, 
hantall coach. . 

MONTANA STATE— Nomad TUm Reed as- 
sistant man's atMatlc d tractor. 

NCA A N o m ad Ursula R. Walsh d tractor of 


Final 1985 Major League Leaders 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

C AB R H 
15S 412 1M 2U 


UCLA— Monad Tom> Donohua, football 
OMNft^ofhw-y»WMf»ian of M» contract. 

WESTERN ILLINOIS— Named Jamas 
Yoakal a s rtrtanf basketball coach. 

. XAVIER (OMo> - Wqmod Skip I 
ststant hasksffaali cooat--... 




Pofi 


Ml AMI— Acdvatsd Dai Johnson, twit and. 
Roteased Mika Smith, do l us ! vs bade 

NEW ENGLAND— Activated Emaat Olb- 
meomsTtncIc. Wohroa Tam Candwvaffan- 
stva (ward. 

NEW ORLEANS — Activated DavM Racka- 
ty, d oten atvo back, and Jaa KaMbrand. Una- 
bockor. 

H.Y. JETS— Acttvatod wwiav wanw.and 
Bobby Humaherv. wl«te rscsfvars. 

PHILADELPHIA— Ptacad Jon Nmmtl. 
Unabocfc e r. an Waned rssorva. Activated 
Tam Pol ley. Dnefaacker. 

PITTSBURGH— AcUvMsd John Goodman, 
defensive lineman, and Randy Raemuessn. 
offensive lineman. 

SAN DIEGO— Activated Gary Anderson 
and Buford McGee, ranntng bocks, wolvod 
Tony CMcUMb nos* tacMBondDoidd Ciw- 
dto. comerbocfc. ■ 

HOCKEY 


Tennis 


DsvisCop 


,• 

.' . . 


HARTFORD— A oi u l red Tim BothwoU, do- 

fensomim. from SL Louts for future eoraMsr- 

attanL 

MONTREAL — Aimouncsd the raHrement 
of Plarra Mandou. center. 

N.Y. ISLAND ERS-SIsned Brad Datsoma 
forward, and returned him to MsluoIOr team. 
Sent Rob Holland, uoalla; Km Letter and 
Vam SmWt, detenMtnen.and Mark Kamway. 
riaht wtna, to SamwfWd of the American 
Hockey LiQOuO. 

PITTSBURGH— Acamrad Paf Hushes, 
rioht wine, tram Edmonton for future amshl- 
eranans. Acautrvd Mika Metier, defenseman, 
and Randv Cunnevwoiih, left ertnB from But- 
fatofbrfutureco<ialderiottans.SentStaveGat> 
3DS, rlaht wtna. and Mike Howe, dsfe ns emo n . 
to Bcrtttmareot the American Hockey Leaaue. 


i ZONE FINALS . 

(WlMrs odvmio* to W tetd «n 
EASTERN . 

Now L Saute Karoo S 

(At Christchurch. Haw Zealand) 

. Kaltv Emmden daC.Bon»G« tam.B7.4-*. 
Evemden and Ruwtt Shnnaon, Mew Zeo- 

kavL dsL Vbuna Doe Joan and Jln»sun Yaa 

5.7, 64.M.K (Final match canealladj 

EUROPEAN A 
Hu— * * R nawiln S 
(At Becfeerast) 

Florin saoarcoanu. Ranatla, daL Peter 
Bastkmserv Denmark. M, 3M» B-L H 
Michael Tauaon, Denmark, deL Andrian 
Mareu Romania H BA H 


Women 


TOURNAMENT 
(At Fort Lawterdeia Florida) 
Steam M 

Martina Mavrtdlkjva. UJ. dot. StefH Graf, 
west Germany, M. 4-1. . 


Glal rarue tdS L Puerto Rico, and -Rabin 
White. US. del. Rw Fafrhank and Bavsrty 
Mould. South Africa, 6-Z 7-4. 

. . FEDERATION CUP 


Soccer 


, hhar? 1 ^. 






WORLD CUP OUAUFYING 
African Zone 

(Faarth Rotted. First Loo) 

Tunisia 1. Algeria 4 
Morocco X LBrva 0 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION. 
Baraefona a, SmvtUa o 
Valladolid 1, Osasunn 0 . 

Celta 1. Zaraaaza 2 
Gllon 2. Santander 0 
Real Ssetedad 1, EmtAol 0 
Real Madrid X Afietten Madrid 1 
I terc u ie a X Los Pol mas 0 
Cadis L AHaftce Bilbao 1 
Points: Real Madrid. AHeHeo Bilbao. Glkm 
t; VoltoJoUd. Z arootao B; Real Sodedad 7; 
Sevilla Valenda. CodtzB; Belt*, aarcetena. 
Attetlco Madrid S; Santander, Hercules, Oeo- 
suna 4: EtPcteaL Cetta, Las Poiraco S. 
ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 

PNBft: JwMfUEN; FicrentlnaAC Mnwh 

Roma Mason 7: litter Milan. Torino 6; Udte- 
ts*S; Verona. Barh Ptaa 4; SamodorlaLacce, 
Avdiino 3: Atatanta. C o mo 2 


(First Round) 

Japan def. Austria 34) 

Canada del Sweden. H 
Butearta def. Sovler union, 3-« 
Britate OeL West Genrue m . 3-0 
Cndiaelairakla del Greece. 2-1 
Switzerland del the i tefh erion ds. W 
Hunaarv deL Bekjlum, WJ - - 

Yuaaslavia deL ImtanL 3-0 


Golf 


Pet 

McGee, StL. )S2 412 114 JU JS3 

Guerrero. LA. - U7 d) « l» J20 

Raines, Mon. 150 575 115 1M JOB 

Gwvfln. SJX 154 422 90 1*7 317 

Parker, an. 140 535 M T9S J1.2 

Hernandez, N.Y. 13B 5»3 «7 m J09 

Moreland. OIL 1*1 587 74 IK) JOT 

Sandberg, OlL 153 *0* 113 U4 JOS 

Harr, SU_ 159 594 97 1M J02 

Cruz. Htn. . 141 544 59 153 J00 

Murpfav. AM 152 *14 118 IIS J00 

Reas: Murphy. AIL 1TB; Raines. Man. 115; 
McGee. su_ 114; Sandberu, CM- in; Cole- 
man. SLI— 107. 

RBie: Parker, Cln. 125; Murphy, AtUTM; 
Herr. 5U_.no; Moreland. CIU^IO*; G- Wilson. 
PM.1Q2. 

Hits: McGee. 31 L- 214; Porker, Cln. 198; 
GwynnrS.Du197;SandherB,0)L1B5; Murphy, 
AIL 185. 

Doubles: Parker, da. 42; G.WlUon, PhL 
39; Herr, SU— 38; WoUociuMML 35; Brooke. 
Moil 34; Crw.Hou.34; Hernandez, N.Y.34. 

Triples: McGee. SU_ 78; Ralnas, Man. 13; 
Samuol. PhL 13; Coleman. SUL te; Garner. 
Hou- ItL 

Hama Runs; Murphv. All. 37; Parker, Cln. 
34; GutrTera.LA.33; Schmidt. PhL 33; Car- 
ter. N.Y. 22. 

Stolen Sosas: Coleman. 5U_ 110; Ralnas. 
Moru70; McGee. Sl.L 54; Sandberg. CM. 54.- 
Samuel PhL SJ- • 

PITCHING 

Wan-Lari/WlunfM PeL/ERA: Hershhef, 
UL 19-3. JB44, 103: Oaoden, N.Y. 24-4, J57. 
L53; Franca. On. 1W. 500, 2.1B: B Smith, 
Man.te4.J83.291: WMctLLA. 14^, J7L2J1. 

StrUceeate: Gooden. N.Y. 258; Sole, Oil 
214; Ryan. Houu 289; Voienzuefa. LA. 207; 
Fernandez. N.V. 180. 

Saves: Reardon. Man. 41; LLSmttti. CAL 
33; D -Smith. Hou. 27; Power. Cln. 27; Gas- 
eoae. &D. 2 L 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

G AB R H PCt. 
Bern Bos- 150 553 107 240 J58 

Brett ICC IB 550 108 184 J3S 

Mattingly, SLY. 199 *51 107 211 J34 

FLHendsan, N.Y. 143 547 144 172 J)4 

Butler. Cle. 1S2 591 105 184 Jll 

Baines. Oil 159 640 n 198 J09 

Beflkmaz. CaL 132 411 54 125 504 

PJradtev.Sea. 159 641 99 192 JOO 

Buckner, B as. 141 573 B9 201 299 

B-Murroy. BoL 156 583 110 173 297 

Malltor, Mil. 140 57* 93 171 297 

Reas: fLHenderson. N.Y. M 4; Ripken. BaL 
TMlDw.EraiLBae.llD; EJ4urrav,BaLliO; 
Bren, KJC. 108. 

RBIs: Matttnoly. N-Y. 145; EMurroy, Bal. 
134; WteflriA N.Y. 114; Baines. CM. 113; 
Bren. ICC. itz 

Hite: Bogps.Bos.240; Matttegiv. N-Y.211; 


Buckner. Bos. 201; Pudtett.MIiL 199; Baines. 
ChL Ite. 

Doubles: Matllnplv.N.Y.48; Buckner, Bos. 
44; Boses. Bos. 42; Cooper, MIL 39; Brett, 
K.C, 38; G. Walker. ChL 38. 

Triples: Wilson. KC- 21; Butler, CM. 14; 
Puckett, AVn. 13; Fernandez. Tor. 10; Bar- 
fleid. Tar. 9; Guillen. CM. 9. 

Hama Haas: DaEvans. DeL 40; Fhfc. CM. 
37; BatbonL K.C 35; Mattlnoly. N.Y. 35; 
G.Thomia. Saa. 32. 

Stelaa Bases: RJfenOersoa N.Y.80; Pettis. 
CaL 55; Butler. Cku 47; Wilson. ICC. 43; 
LSmlttv KX. 39. 

PITCHING 

Woo-Loet/Wbmteo PeL/ERA: Gatdry. 
»LYw 2J-L JSL L27; Saberitaoen, ICC- 304. 
759,257; Cttbum.CaL9-3.J50i 209; Key. Tor. 
14^. 700. 350: Cowley. N.Y- l>4k M7. X9S; 
Dixon, BoL H MI. XB. 

Strikeouts: Blvleven, Min. 204; F.B canis- 
ter, ChL 197; Morris. Dei. 191; hurst, Bes- 
189; Witt. cal. 180. 

' saves: Qutscnbcrry, K.C.37; BJarrm-ChL 
*32; D Moore. CaL 31; Hernandez. Dot. 31; 
J-Howril oak. 29; Rlahettt N.Y. 29, 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Written 



w 

L 

Pel. 

GB 

x-T oronto 

99 

52 

415 

— 

Now York 

97 

64 

402 

2 

Dotrott 

. 84 

77 

422 

15 

Btatlmora 

83 

71 

414 

1* 

Bataan 

•1 

81 

Joo 

1SV» 

MDwaukea 

71 

90 

451 

28 

Clavtaand 

50 102 
Wast Division 

J70 

39W 

x- Kansas City 

*1 

71 

-562 

— 

California 

90 

72 

-555 

1 

Chicago 

15 

77 

425 

4 

Mlnnasota 

77 

85 

475 

14 

Oakland 

77 

15 

475 

U 

Soattte 

74 

88 

457 

17 

Toxai 52 99 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East DMstea 

-385 

2 BVr 


• W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

x*SL Louis 

101 

51 

423 

— 

now York . 

98 

*4 

405 

3 

Montreal 

84 

77 

-522 

15Vs 

Chicago 

77 

84 

478 

2318 

PfilltMMpiila 

75 

87 

453 

25 

Pittsburgh 

57 104 
Wast DMStofl ' 

JS4 

43M 

x-Los Ansatoi 

95 

57 

-585 

— 

ancJttatai 

8* 

72 

.553 

5 Vi 

Houston 

83 

79 

-512 

12 

San Dfoao 

83 

79 

-SI3 

T2 

Atlanta 

65 

95 

407 

29 

San Francisco . - 53 

(x-dlndwd dMsfan Mite) 

we 

J83 

33 


Sunday’s line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Now York 380 020 02 1 — t 7 0 

Toronto 80S HO 000— S « 1 

P. Niekro and Wyneear; Cerutti. Acker (5>, 
Caudill f7t. SDarit 1*1 and Hearrun. W— P. 
Nk*ra,16-!ZL—CerottLO-r- HRs— New York. 
Pitellariito (19). Cotta (1), Mattingly (35). 
Cleveland DM ON 190-2 9 1 

Minnesota 091 021 sta— 4 10 2 

Schulze. RuMe (*>. Creel (7) and Willard; 
-Smithson and Reed. W— Smithson, 15-M. L— 
Schulze. 4-10. 

020 210 203-9 * 1 
BOB 822 1M-5 13 3 
Porter. Walts (51. Darwin 18). Ladd (!) and 
Huppart; Hurst. Loiter (7) aid Gadman. W— 
Darwin. S-UL L— Hurst, 1VU S*— Ladd (2). 
HRs— Milwaukee. Robldain2 (3). Housenotd- 
er (11). Boston. Lyons (S). 

Detroit . 03§ 4« ooe—ll 14 o 

Batthnam Oil ON 080— 3 9 2 

Tanana and Parrish; D Martinez. SStewart 
(4). Havens (5). Snell (4), Bell (9) and Demp- 
sey. w — Tanana. 12-U. L — DMartlnez. 13-n. 
HRs— Detroit LctnanS (10). Baltimore. Rov- 
ford OS), Rjpken 125). 

Seattle BOB in 000— 252 

C Mr-one 119 MS 00*- 3 5 0 

Moo m o ne Votte.Cerrsro Davis (4),Jomee 
(9) and Skinner. W— Carrara, l-a L— Moore. 
17-30. Sv— James (32). HR— Chicago; Kim# 
125). 

110 OBI *80— 9 H 2 
CRy 182 ON 000— 3 4 1 

Codlroit Lonafard (4), /Aura (7) and O’Bri- 
en; MJones. Farr (3), Ferreira (4), Beckwith 
OT.Hglsman (91 endQtHrk. W— CodlrolLU- 

U. I I ones, 3-3. Sv-AAura rit. 

CaHferala NO JOO 839— 4 12 1 

Texas 921 991 810— 5 9 9 

Witt, Sanchez (8) and Nwron, Boone IB); 
S taught. Petralll O). B rummer (9). w— Witt, 
15-9. L — SurnoH. 9-1. 5 v— Sanchez (2). HRs— 
CalKomta. Miller (2). Keedy (1). Linares (3). 


13-10 victory Sunday and running 
their National Football League re- 
cord to 5-0. 

u !t was a high-percentage call," 
Grant said. “We had a chance to 
win the game on one play. I'd do 
the g»n8 thing again.” 

Said Nelson, hit first on the play 
by linebacker Tun Collins: “If you 
have a chance to win, you go for 

il It was a back (five, and I 

didn't make it.” 

The Rams had scored on a 2- 
yard third- period run by Eric Dick- 
erson and a first-half field goals of 
43 and 33 yards by Mike Lansfard 
before Minnesota launched a 
comeback. 

The Vikings actually had two 
tries at the game- winning TD from 
3 yard away. With seven seconds 
left, quarterback Tommy Kramer 
threw an incomplete pass, but Gary 
Green was called for interference, 
giving Minnesota one more shot 

A 16-yard yard run by Nelson on 
third- and-two had moved the ball 
to the Ram 1 and created the dilem- 
ma for Grant, who probably would 
have turned to Jan Stenerod for a 
field goal had the ball not been so 
close to the end zone. 

The defense, the biggest factor in 
the Rams’ unbeaten season so far, 
limited the Vikings to a 1-yard 
touchdown run by Ted Brown and 
a 24-yard Odd goal by Stenerud. 

Raiders 19, Chiefs 10: In Los 


Angdes. quarterback Marc Wilson, 
named to start just before the game 
and playing despite a sprained an- 
kle. passed for 241 yards and one 
touchdown and Chris Bahr kicked 
four fidd goals as the Raiders 
avenged an early- season loss to 
Kansas Gty. 

Seahnrks 26, Chargers 21: In 
Seattle. Cun Warner ran for two 
TDs and Norm Johnson kicked 
two field goals to pace the Sea- 
hawks. Seattle’s opportunistic de- 
fense intercepted Mark Herrmann 
three times and recovered a Herr- 
mann fumble (starting in place of 
the injured Dan Fouls, Herrmann 
passed for three touchdowns). 

Running back Gary Anderson, a 
San Diego first-round draft choice 
in 1983. made his NFL debut after 
playing three seasons in the United 
States Football League. He gained 
15 yards on right carries. 

Jets 29, Bengals 20: In Cincin- 
nati, New York won its fourth 
straight with the hdp of some con- 
troversial offidating. Jet quarter- 
back Ken O’Brien was short on a 
bomb for Wesley Walker, and 
Louis Breeden intercepted at the 
Bengal 6-yard line. Breeden contin- 
ued into the end zone, where Walk- 
er tackled him for what was ruled a 
safety. Cincinnati argued that 
Breeden's momentum had carried 
into what should have been called a 
touchback. 


Kirk Springs returned the ensu- 
ing free kick 58 yards to the Bengal 
18. A third-down unsportsmanlike- 
conduct penalty on linebacker 
Reggie W illiam s gave New York a 
first down, and O'Brien hit tight 
end Mickey Shuler with a 7-yard 
touchdown pass for a 26-13 lead. 

The game saw 29 penalties. 

Cowboys 30, Giants 29: In East 
Rutherford, New Jersey, Danny 
White shredded New York's de- 
fense for three touchdown passes 
and Rafad Septien kicked three 
fourth-quarter field goals to lift 
Dallas. 

White connected with Mike Ren- 
fro on scoring passes of eight and 
24 yards and hit Tony Hill on an 
1 8-yard er as the Cowboys raised 
their record to 4-1. Septien 's final 
two field goals came after fumbles 
by Giant quarterback Phil Simms. 
The game-winning kick, from the 
Giant 31, came with 2:19 to play 
after Gene Lockhart recovered a 
Simms bobble at the 19. 

Broncos 31, Oilers 20: In Den- 
ver. John Elway passed for 256 
yards and three touchdowns (in- 
cluding a 41-yarder to Steve Wat- 
son on a flea-flicker) to hdp down 
Houston. The Oilers were penal- 
ized 188 yards on a total of 15 
penalties; eleven Houston infrac- 
tions produced Denver First downs 
— an NFL record. (AP, UP I) 


REGULAR SEASON ENDS 


TOP fMNMri BPd omliMB te tba Lbbcmm 
T topfc y toa r—wifc wa wriad Saaduy In 
StriMMjFBratediwErandiCxMiavoNwIte 

awl: 

>-tac* Pria*. *34400 *5-71-57-71 — 275 

70-57-66-73—773 

7M%44-70-379 
75-68-54-73 — TOO 

72- 49-73-57 — 281 
74-49-73-0— 2B2 
74-49-51-72—3*3 

77-58-73-7—20 
77-7IM9-74— 284 

73- 49-72-70-34 


Football 


NFL Leaders 


Howard CtarX. S1Z009- 
Sam Tarranoo, S9JQQ 
Manual P Inara, 57,250 
Sava Banutefw. SUM 
Eamom Dancy, SSJSQ 
Ration Roftertv, 3SJ50 
Andy NcrDv UM8 
Trt; Chen, MSN 


Miami 
N.Y. JOtS 
Indtanapoll* 
New Btefentf 
Buffalo 



Top flalcfean and aarnteas In fan Sautbam 
Qpaa lown mnaBfcp Ii k B mu ted Sunday op tbo 
9W71 Wmard Grwn^ Uload Country CH* 
coarse te Catawba* P a rnate: 


r * 


U:' 




NHL 98838*888 
Sunday's Rnolte 
N.Y. l slanders K Baton 2 
Toronto 5, Buffalo 5 
VteiCDtnMr 7. Cafoanr 3 
Detroit S. Chteaoo 5 
Edmonton 4. Mlnnasota 3 
Mantraai 4. QmUc 3 
H-Y. RteWMV 5, N#w jars* V 7 


r 


.-.y >■ 

vr 


-j. 


Basketball 


, NBA PRE4CAS0N 
sundwro Roan 
Atlanta 117 ;' now Yonc n 
LA Lotted. 134. Boston 111 . 
Indiana 119. S ocremuto « 
Portland TM. LA. aippon 113 


Tim Sbrawb seajooo 
aarmo Ratal S37A08 
Bob Tteay. 82X800 
Jim Thom 015400 
Tony Sills, »£*» 

Payne Stewart, S11J25 
Jack Renner; S11J2S 
Bobby dampen, kitjzs 
joev Sindefar, *10.150 
Mike Sullivan, 3MB- 
Jeff Sfamarv IMOO - 
Corey PavfevSMOO 
Paul Azkieer, SL460 
Lorry Rlnkor, S5J00 
Gaaroe Andiar. J5J09 . 
Km GraabSUOD 
Jain MaJwBov, MM8 : 
Scoff ffaen, 8L900 
Tam Purtzar, wjee 

Andy BMiHM 
Stove Jean. S4A00 
Bab LOttr, SX350 


17 (5T 

64 55 » g— 355 

( HHHH P 

65-59-49-57 — 271 
9M74MK71 
IMMWWI2 
55-58-71-57—272. 
71-45-57-50—372 
5358-73-79—272 
49-65-58-72 — 274 
S7-65-W-71 — 374 

57- 7D59-59— 274 
5970-70-55-^274 
S-75-7J-57— Z’S 
5958-7058— Z7S 

70- 58-57-70— Z73 

58- 58-57-73— 276 

71- 6JWX5-72— Z76 
15-7M5TM7I 
4M07O57— an . 
5*40-70-71—276 
7057-7359—277 


ptmtamn 

Cincinnati 

Houston 

Denver 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
East 
W L 

4 

4 

2 
2 
0 

Central 

3 

2 
1 
1 

West 

3 2 


T PcL PF PA 

0 an i» as 

0 JQO 120 77 

0 ADO 99 123 
0 JM K U3 
0 M a T49 


0 400 93 II 

0 -AM 116 SI 

0 -2G0 149 165 

0 JOO 49 107 


Kansas City 3 2 8 -500 

LA. Ra loen 3 2 0 400 

Seattle 3 2 9 400 

San Dfeso 2 3 0 400 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
Eat 

Dallas .4 1 

5L Louis 3 1 

K.Y. Giants 3 2 

Washington 1 3 

PhUaddpttlo 1 4 

Central 
t 
2 


MO 

*750 

400 

-250 

joo 


0 4oo in 121 


CFL Standings 


Eastern DtrisfM 


Oilcneo 
Detroit 
Minnesota 
Green Bay 
Tarma Bay 

LA. Rams 
New Orleans 
San Frandsco 
Manta 


3 

3 2 

2 3 

0 5 

West 

J S 

3 : 
3 2 
0 S 


0 3000 
0* 400 
0 400 

0 400 

0 JMO 


0 14 00 

0 400 

0 400 

0 JJOO 


121 104 

ns wo 

134 143 
121 M2 


IS 85 
128 105 
113 80 
45 121 
54 83 

1<3 88 

HO 114 
120 183 
117 IS 
85 U8 

)« 53 

113 VB 
145 n 
94 162 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Montreal 010 109 085—2 4 1 

New York eei see 080—1 4 1 

Sehatzaaer, Burke (4). Reardon (8) and 
Yost; Latham. Niemann (47, Mytrs (8) and 
Reynolds. W— Se h otzedcr. 34. L— Latham. 1- 
1 Sv— Reorder (41). 

PUtsbereb ooo 000 ooa-o 4 0 

Philadelphia 085 000 OSs* — 5 13 0 

Rhoden. Winn (31 and Ortiz: Grass and 
Dourtoa. W— Grass. 15-13. L— Rhoden, W-Ii 
HR— Philadelphia. Rueeell (*). 

Cbtcaeo toe saa too « 7 0 

SL Lotas sei 00 s 100-3 * 1 

Patterson one Doris. Lake (4); Annular. 
Keoshlra (21. Horton (5). CwnabeH (77. BaJr 
(8). Soever (9) and Porter. Hunt (51. W— 
Patterson, 3-a L— Aitaular. 21-13. HR— Chlep- 
90. Lopes (It). 

Atlanta M0 WO 200- I 14 1 

San FriBWEsas 000 007 OOO— 7 4 I 

Bed notion. Dedman (6). Garber (7) and 
Owen; Wand. WU Hams (2), Moon (4), Robin- 
son (41. Gorretts (7). M Doris (71. Minton 19) 
and Trevino. W— Oeaman. 5-3. Lr-GarreltL 9- 
L Sv — Garher (I). KR— San Frortcfsco, Tre- 
vino (5). 

3*0 Ota 285— 4 9 0 
MS 080 880— 4 II 1 
Scott. KertaM (3). DSmlth (9) and Ashbt; 
Show. MeCul lerr (7J, Walter (?) and Kannedv. 
W-Kertold, 4-1 Lr-Show, 13-11. Sv-D Smith 
(27). HRs— Hourton. Cruz (91. Ashbv (4). 
a ad natal on 00 * til— * n a 

Las Asetaes bb Ml «2fr- 111 ) 

Brown tog. Power (8), Franca (9) and Van 
Gordar; Powell. Diaz (SJ.Hershlser U).How» 
ell (8),Nleden(uer 19) andSdaicta. Revest?), 
Yeuaer (y». W P ow er . e*-L— NledenAier.7- 
9. Sv— F r an co (12). hrs— C inelnntal. Davto 
(8). Perez (4). Parker (M>. 

300-Game Vinners 



W 

L 

T 

PF 

PA 

Pis 

Montreal 

4 

i 

• 

235 

M8 

12 

Ottawa 

6 

7 

0 

22B 

341 

12 

Hamilton 

S 

8 

0 

259 

280 

10 

Toronto 

i 

B 

0 

M 

315 

B 


Western Dfvffim 



Brit Chub 

10 

2 

. 0 

359 

329 

20 

Winnipeg 

10 

3 ' 

0 

404 

20* 

30 

- Edmonton 

■ 

4 

8 

307 

389 

14 


5 

B 

0 

253 

339 

18 

Catearv 

2 

10 

0 

196 

315 

- 4 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Ottawa 19. Taranto 15 
Winnipeg 32 British Columbia 25 


SUNDAY’S RESULTS 
Indtamoiu 49. Buffalo 17 
QUcsao 27. Tampa Bay 19 
Groan Bay 4X Detroit 10 
Cleveland 24, New Ensland 20 
New Orleans 23, Philadelphia 2) 
San Frond ko N. Atlanta 17 
Miami U Ptttsburtei » 

Denver 3L Houston 90 
N.Y. Jots 29, Cincinnati 30 
LA. Raiders 19, Kansas City 19 
LA. Rams 11 Minnesota 10 
. Seattle 26. Sal Duse 21 
Dana* 30. N.Y. danto a* 

Maadev*s Game 
5i. Louis at wosninann 


1. Cv Yeung 

2. Waiter Johnson 

3. Christy Mathewson 
2 Graver Alexander 
S. Warren Spann 

4. James Oalvin 

7. Chanes Nichols 

8. Timothy Keete 

9. John Clalidan 
ID. Eddie PlanK 
IL * -Stave Caritan 
11. Gov lord Perry 
il Mldioei welch 
u. Clwrias Rtetaourn 

15. x-Tam Seaver 
14. x-Phll Nlakra 

16. Lettv Crave 
16. Early Wynn 
(x-oOtvel 


511 

41* 

373 

373 

351 

351 

350 

354 

328 

327 

314 

314 

311 

308 

304 

300 

300 

300 



JgMFi FOOTBALL 

m ic SACK! 



YOm 
TEAM PLAY EVERY 


Wherever you live in the world, you can j 
see the NR game of your choice every week, j 
just days after the action. I 

How? PonTel, the NTL’s overseas licensee j 
since 1980, videotapes ail NR games in the | 
U.S. and distributes copies of all games to fit j 
all the world s video standards. I 

Each tape contains the complete, uncut game « 
you want, plus highlights of other games to 
give you 3 hours of NFL action every week. 

ORDER BY PHONE ! 

Just pick up the phone, and you can I 
enjoy a luxury not available to anyone living 1 
in the U.S. Any NR game you want, week I 
after week in your mailbox. Keep each cas~ | 
sefte for seven days, and return it in the j 
handy re-usable mailing pouch. Easy,j 
convenient, economical. j 

LOWER PRKES { 

And for 1985, prices have been lowered 
again. Half the regular season, 8 complete j 
games, plus highlights of many other gmnes, j 
for just $ 139. 

Additional games each week just $ 10 each. J 
So order now and join the thousands worid- 1 
wide who will catch PonTeTs NR this year! I 

FREE MEL SCHEDULE j 

If you order by this Friday, you’ll receive | 
a team-by-team NFL schedule absolutely free, j 

Pay with your credit card and the first game is j 
sent the same day. J 


OK out BY pm BE OR IBEX AHD CHARGE YOUR 
SUBSCBJPTtOM TO YOOB MAJOR CREDIT CARD. 

Off SEND THIS COOPOH TODAY WITH YOUR CHECK OR 
CREDIT CARD AUTHORtZATIOH. 

□ Yes. Send me X complete NFL Rimes, plus. higilliKhu, of 
(riher^jmes, on rental obneiles for only > J.W I n am lu 
See Ihe: 

O "PonTel Came uf (he IV, -ek 
□ \lv Favorite team 


□ Yes. Send me a second complete jyiw cadi week for* inly 
S 10 each. 

1 warn in sec; 

□ Another /»neai game 

□ My favorite team 

□ Send my cassciici airmail for id e each ill Europe. S 1 each 
for Mid- Fast and Africa: S * for Far Fast 

□ I live ouLsidc of Eumpe 1 add S S refundaWe deposit for 
each casscllc. 

□ Plea.NC charjje my 

□a.we.y Ovim Dei no □ icclss □.master 

Lard Mr.:_ Exp 

□ Check enclosed 

Video System- QVHS DBETA □ VIDEO JUI0 
Video Standard: □ PAL ( imm atuntrin ) 

□ American MSC □ French SEC AM 

\ame 

Address — 


Ana Code fur Germane, then- 

211-62 6066 


From Germany . dial: 

0211-626066 


HPonfTe! 

Meneabrokhtr Weg 200 ‘ 4000 DSssefdorf 30 

Federal Republic at Germany 

Telex: 8588420 



■ 



1 


■ 


t 









Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY > OCTOBER 8, 1985 


*'Y' 


ART BUCHWALD 


The Heckler Decision 

\JH ASH3NGTON — People in 
VV Washington were skeptical 


last week when the White blouse 


announced that Margaret Heckler, 
the secretary of health and human 
service, was being “promoted" 
from a cabinet post to U. S. ambas- 
sador to Ireland. 

The story circulating for the past 
month was that the president’s 
chief of staff. Donald Regan, led 
the “dump 



Heckler" move- 
ment because be 
was dissatisfied 
with her perfor- 
mance. 

The rumors of 
the secretary's 
imminent depar- 
ture were leaked 
and then denied 
by almost every- 
one who worked 
for the president 

Just as I was about to be swept 
up in the hysteria. I was calmed 
down by a White House aide who 
vigorously denied that there was 
any effort by the administration to 
force Mrs. Heckler out of her job. 

“This is what really happened," 
he told me in confidence. “The 
president has been trying for the 
better part of a year to find a new 
ambassador to Ireland. He wanted 
a person whom he could trust who 
had the ability to circulate amongst 
the ruling classes, but most of all 
someone who could speak the 1 lan- 
guage. That person would be the 
president’s eyes and ears in the 
most sensitive diplomatic post in 
the world.'’ 


Stales. But the most strategic value 
the Dublin spot has for the United 
States is that it's the ideal location 
to monitor the BBC." 

“I know that being ambassador 
to the Irish Republic is vital to our 
foreign policy, but isn't secretary of 
health and human services a more 
important position in the adminis- 
tration?" 

He laughed- “The two don’t 
compare. The secretary of HHS is 
just a figurehead. She’s only re- 
sponsible for spending $300 tril- 
lion. Her role is to see that the 
health, welfare and Social Security 
systems don’t get fouled up. A child 
could do iL On the other hand, an 
ambassador to Dublin has to be in 
daily contact with the president, 
and is personally consulted on ev- 
ery decision the White House 
makes concerning Irish linen." 

□ 


“J didn’t realize Ireland was that 
important," I said. 

The White House aide looked 
around the room before he whis- 
pered. “Everthing that floats down 
from the North Sea eventually 
winds up on the beaches of Ireland. 
It’s the perfect place to keep track 
of Irish exports to the United 


7 Million Attend Oktoberfest 

United Pros International 

MUNICH — Officials say seven 
million people attended this year’s 
Oktoberfest, which ended Sunday. 
The visitors, half of them Munich 
residents, consumed 5J million 
quarts of beer, 647,000 chickens, 
552.000 sausages and 142,000 pig 
and beef knuckles. 


“If it’s such a good job why does 
it pay $16,000 less than secretary of 
HHS?" 

“Because it’s so much cheaper to 
live abroad.” 

“How did the president persuade 
Mrs. Heckler that he was not get- 
ting rid of her?” 

“He told her the last thing Pat 
O'Brien said to him before he died 
was, ’It’s always been my dream to 
have a woman ambassador to Ire- 
land.’ " 

“And Heckler bought it?" 

“The president reads the line 
much better than I do. Reagan can 
be very persuasive when he sets his 
mind to it It’s my understanding 
Mrs. Heckler broke into tears when 
the chief started tailing to her 
about his relatives who were caught 
up in the potato famine.” 

“What else did he tell her?” 

“He said, ‘Margaret, never forget 
this. A president has 19 cabinet 
officers to serve Him , but only one 
ambassador to Ireland.* ” 

I looked at the White House 
aide. “Then you are idling me no 
one in the White House had any- 
thing to do with bouncing Mrs. 
Heckler out of her post” 

“We didn't knock her out of a 
job. All we did was give her a better 
one. This administration has never 
stopped anyone from getting 
ahead.” 


Art Buchwald, who has been on a 
leave of absence because of an ill- 
ness, has resumed his column. For 
the lime being, he is writing two 
columns a week instead of three. 


Jessica Lange: Every Role an Exercise 


By Dena Klciman 

Alter York Times Service 

N ew YORK — In the film 
“Sweet Dreams.” Jessica 
Lange plays Patsy Cline, an ebul- 
lient. freewheeling countiy-and- 
we&tera singer who struts around 
in calf-high cowboy boots and is 
unabashedly chunky. 

Lange — intensely private, ob- 
sessed about slaying slim and so 
self-conscious about her voice 
that she doesn't even sing in the 
shower — says the persona of 
Cline could not be more remote 
from herself. But it W 35 just this 
that attracted her to the pan. 

“She was direct,” said Lange in 
her hotel suite. “There was noth- 
ing hidden or neurotic or with- 
held. Those are great qualities, 
something I never played before. 
Tremendous ranges in emotion 
that last 30 to 40 seconds. Noth- 
ing harbored. Like a firecracker 
going off all the time. 1 fell that at 
this time in my life it was a good 
ex erase as a person to play this 
character.” 

Cline started singing in the tav- 
erns of northern Virginia, was 
discovered by a Nashville agent 
and performed such songs as 
“Crazy 1 ' and “Cheating Heart” at 
the Grand Ole Opry. She was 
killed at age 30 in a plane crash. 

At the heart of the film is 
Cline’s tempestuous relationship 
with her second husband, Charlie 
Dick (played in the film by Ed 
Harris), who is depicted as being 
alternately delighted and defeat- 
ed by his wife’s mounting success. 

Weighing 1 0 pounds more than 
usual, and with her hair dark 
brown and knotted with spray. 
Lange appears buxom in “Sweet 
Dreams” and far more earthy 
than the ethereal blondes she has 
portrayed in such films as ‘Toot- 
sie,” "The Postman Always Rings 
Twice’’ and “Frances." 

Remote as she said she found 
the persona of Patsy Cline — in 
particular the singer's absence of 
vanity — Lange said she identi- 
fied instantly with the self-de- 
structive streak of Cline’s roman- 
tic passions. 

She said a quest for intensity 
long plagued her romantic life: 
“It was a trap for me. AS long as it 
was passionate — either negative 
or positive — then I knew it was 
love. As long as it was extreme. 
That was its validity. As soon as 
anything became too settled, too 



pan she played as a personal «- 
When s 


erase. When she portrayed the 

actress Fiances Fenner, for ex- 
ample. the role gave her an op- 
portunity to explore the depths of 
her anger, an exercise she found 
ax once fascinating and debilitat- 
ing, and difficult on those around 
her. T‘0 never do a role like that 
again,” she said. 


Jessica Lange as the singer Patsy Cline. 


regular, too placid. I'd have to get 
in there with the Mixmaster to 
make sure firings were still cook- 
ing.” 

Lange said that since she began 
living with playwright and actor 
Sam Shepard, all that has 
changed. They usually alternate 
between Shepard’s home in New 
Mexico and Lange's log cabin on 
a lake in Minnesota, though now 
they are in New York for several 
months as Shepard mounts his 
latest play, “A Lie of the Mind.” 
Lange's 4-year-old daughter, Al- 
exandra, whose father is the 
dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov, is 
with them, as is a perfectly 
clipped standard black poodle. 
Lange is expecting another child 
in January. Although she and 
Shepard have no specific plans to 
many, she said marriage to Shep- 
ard was “an absolute possibility.” 

Lange said she came to play the 
role of Cline almost by accident. 
She had barely heard of the singer 
when her agent sent her a copy of 
Robert Getchcll's script: Lange 
said she was instantly drawn to 
Cline’s zestful, cbildHke personal- 
ity. She had also been eager to act 
in a love story. 


She said she found the part 
“liberating” because, among oth- 


er firings, it forced her to 

tersely 


Lange described her voice ; 
as “disappointing." Although in 
the soundtrack the songs are re- 
cordings by Cline, Lange would 
belt out the tunes when portray- 
ing Cline onstage. 

Beyond still photographs and 
several old television dippings of 
Cline, who died in 1963, there 
was little evidence bow she be- 
haved. Lange said she met with 
people who had known Cline, but 
“they all remember what they 
want to remember.” Almost no 
one could tell her about how 
Cline walked or whether she had 
any special quirks of expression 
or gesture. 

Cline’s mother, HD da Hensley 
(played by Anne Wedgeworth), 
provided Lange with the one de- 
tail around which she found she 
could focus Cline. It was a simple 
movement — how Cline would 
gesture behind her back to the 
musicians — but Lange said it 
helped her crystallize the charac- 
ter’s stage persona. 

Lange said she regarded every 


At one point during (he inter- 
view Shepard arrived unexpect- 
edly, arid Lange leaped to bis side 
in midsemence as u she had not 

seen himfor weeks. Oo ret urning 
she said unself -consciously that, 
whereas she once believed separa- 
tions were important in keeping 
couples together, she now has a 
lifelong commitment to “taking 
care of” Shepard and that the 
mriy area of independence they 
maintain is in thor work. Even 
when they collaborate, as they 
did in the film “Country,” “we 
don't get into explanations. It’s 
organic. Thai's how I like iL” 
Lange spoke obliquely of slow- 
ing down, of not wasting to drag 
her daughter around on location 
.now that the girl has started 
schooL She spoke of having be- 
come more selective is her choice 
of pans, about sot wanting to 
take on roles unless “something 
captures my imagination.” She 
mentioned something about haw 
ing no discipline and being fun- 
damentally lazy. Yet, in the next 
breath, she Spoke with animati on 
about plans to appear with Dane 
Keaton and Sissy Spacek in a film 
of Beth Henley’s Pulitzer Prize- 
winning play, “Crimes of (he 
Heart.” to be directed by Bruce 
Beresford. 


Although her experience pro- 
ducing “Country” was in large 
part a straggle," Lange was un- 
equivocally positive when asked 
if she ever planned to become 
involved in producing movies 
again. She said she had optioned 
the film rights to Jayne Anne 
Phillips’s novel, “Machine 
Dreams,” about a West Virginia 
couple and their two children af- 
ter the 1960s and Vietnam. She 
asked Phillips to write the screen- 
play. When the novelist declined, 
Lange, who said she had never 
written anything before, decided 
to do it herself. 

“The first draft is done ” she* 
said, looking around the room for 
a piece of wood, then rapping a 

knuckle on a glass coffee table. 


people 

[etisiting Africa 


M - ' 

. L'J-' 





dof, lead singer of the Bodmtown ized Tom Sellecfc’s lifestyle. 

Rats rock group, will also visit □ 

Mjdi Bmtma Faso, Niger Md ^ r „ jHian ^ mechjIlic 

contribute .0 

Ifaeir relief efforts; he said the live tknowhowtoOTmnairawd 



Aid Trust had set aside about £1 
mining (SI. 4 million) for famine 
relief in each of the four countries. 

□ , 

About 2,000 people intoned 
B uddhis t chants at the dedication 


doesn't know how to swim i 
a barrel ride over Niagara Fsffi 
ending a 20-year obsession. TTn 

not a guy to get beat,” John David 
{Vfundsy, 48, said after becoming 
the seventh daredevil to survive a 
plunge over the falls in a hand, 
and the second to do so . in two 


of North America's first “peace pa- months. M unday is on two yean’ 
goda.” “The pagoda represents a probation after a July 28 attempt to 
labor of love. It is a fitting symbol g D ov er the falls. T wouldn't have 


It is a „ , 
of peace," said Sumitra Gandhi 
IMtam i Devi, granddaughter of 
Mohandas K. Gandhi, who traveled 
from India to Leverett, Massachu- 
setts, for the dedication. The white, 
bronze-spired pagoda was built 
over the past year, largely by hand, 
with contributions from around the 
world. Itis one of 70 structures that 
the Buddhist order Nipponzan 
Myohqji has built since the bomb- 
ing of Hiroshima. 

□ 


been ahlc to live with myself if j 
had let Niagara Falls beat me,” he 
said. Encapsulated in an alunrinmn 
band 7 feet long (2 meters) and 4 
feet. wide. Monday was earned over 
Horseshoe Falls. He was arrested 
as soon as the barrel was pulled 
ashore. 

□ 


Roone Ariedge, president of 
ABC News, says he canceled a sto- 
ry on the “20-20” program that 
probed purported affairs of Mari- 
lyn Monroe with John F. Kennedy 
and Robert F. Kennedy because he 
thought the story needed more 
work. He said he also thought the 

story needed a larger context." 

Ariedge said that his long-time Jastino Diaz as lago. 

r.‘. -l.Ui— I.L TUl-l 4_ 

□ 


After a fruitless search for rela- 
tives missing in the Mexico eartfr- 
quake. Plarido Domingo has rfi 
nved in Italy to start filnririg 
Franco ZeffirefiTs version of the 
opera “Otdlo” by Giuseppe Verdi. 
“Just as in the theater, the show 
must go on,” said Zeffirelli, direct- 
ing his first full-scale opera film 
since “La Traviata.” Domingo wifi 
star opposite the Italian soprano 
Katia RIcciaeBi as Desdemona and 
the Puerto Rican bass-baritone 


friendship with Ethel 
Robert Kennedy's widow, played 
do part in his decision, which was uy Derickson, purser of the 
widely criticized. The report bad its TWA jet that was hijacked to Bd- 
origins in a recently published ml in June, has become the first 
book, “Goddess: The Secret Life of woman to receive the Silver Cross 
Marilyn Monroe,” by Anthony of Valor, awarded by the Legion of 
Strainers. Summers charged that Valor, one of the oldest U. S. veter- 
the cancellation “was a result of ans’ or ganiza tions 


r.C.-r 

i ' 
j V-C ■ - 
- rf- - . 


biased news management and po- 
litical pressure.” 


The American televirion actor 
Tom Seflecfc has settled a $36-mil- 


fe': 


Crown Prince Felipe of Spain has 
awarded President Radi Alfoushi of 
Argentina the Prince of Asturias 

iwu own mis sciuco a uo-mu- prize for promoting Iberian- Ameri- m-jY.F 
lion libel suit against the weekly can unity and strengthening do- ?&_- 
National Enquirer tabloid over two mocracy m his country. , Y*si’ ■ 

• - : vk-J 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


AID FOR MEXICO'S 
EARTHQUAKE VICTIMS 


Dm Mexican Embassy in Paris would 
oppredate land contributions on behdf 
or the National Financier o. the govern- 
mental institution m doge of Mb6 go’s 
icconifrudKxi 


Plena send your check to: 

BANQUE PAIUBAS 

17-21 Ay*. Raymond Powasfc 

7and paws 


Acct.: "Smstrfc du Mexxtue" 
No. 155598 F 


Th* Mexican Embassy thanks you far 
your soWnnty. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ISRAEL 


JHUSAUMFOR5BBCU5 ertj. W 


nr midtown 
Lower lev*!: 

tfudy. kitchen. 


about too sqjn. 
j/drang. faro ry. 

s room with own 


baih.Uwocky room& l full bathroom, 
er leva: 


Upper level: 2 master bedrooms, 
wolk-in dcatn, >d beefroom with 
shower. $650,00. Write Bax 2726. 
Herald Trtonrn. 92S21 NeuUyGedex. 
Franco 


JB2USAIEM. MUST 5HL luxury pent- 

house, with vfQfHjtwd terraces. 
UM town. living, dning, study, me- 
<£a room, ki t ch en. 3 bedrooms, 3 
baths. 5500X00. Box 2731. Herdd 
1.R2521K _ 


Tribune. 


’ NewOy Cedex, France 


PARIS* SUBURBS 


AMERICAN HOSPITAL OF PARS, 

Accredited Ui HaspN. 24-hour 
Emergency 5ervice. Engfah spoken - 
Blue Oass. 63 BkL Victor Hugo, 92202 


NEUmV SUR SBhC {10 minutes From 
'53 00. 


Etofet Phone 747: 


ALCOHOUC5 ANONYMOUS in 

Enafcfa Paris &fa*yl 634 » 65. Rome 
678 03 20. 


HAVE A NICE DAY! BOKO. Have a 
nice day! BokeL 


PORTUGAL 5S 

Holidays & Travel. 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - 
WHtaKeyser.POB2.B1 


MOVING 


ALLIED 


VAN UNB 1NTL 

OVER 1300 OWCES 
WORLDWIDE 

USA Allied Von tines Inti Carp 
[0101] 312-681-8100 


Or colt our Agency E ur o p ean offices: 

PARIS Desbordes International 
(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT sJ^uSZ 

(069) 250066 

DUSSQOORF/ RAT1NGEN 

(02102) 45023 LMJ. 

MUNICH LMj. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON 


fafl Moving 
(01) 953 3636 
Coil far AEedi free estimate 


INTERDEAN 


WHO ELSE FOR YOUR 

TIONALMCVE 


NEXT INTERNAT1 
FOR A FREE ESTIMATE CALL 


AMSTHDAM: 

ATHENS: 

BARCHjONA: 

BONN: 

BREMEN: 

BRUS585i 

CADIZ: 

RANNRKT: 

GENEVA: 

LONDON: 

MADRID: 

MANCHESTER! 

MUMO* 

NAPLES: 

PARS: 

ROME: 

V®MA: 

ZURKH 


(0711 89.93.24 
)VA1.T2.12 



CONnNEX. Smofl & medium moves, 

baggage, cm waridmte. Cal Cbar- 

keTftms 281 16 61 (near Opera). 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


PROMOTION MOZART. French Bvi- 

era Red Estate Agency. Speaafirt in 
beauttut mxxtawts and villas ham 
Coma to Menton. Nice WOO: Ploai 
Mcwet KBB7 08 20. Hold Meriden- 
P3JB1 183). Bureau du Butt M) 
3737 Telex, UwQZAH 461235 


NORMANDY. Superb Nonwady 
1A0 km Pahs. 45 km 



FACE 0£ ST LOUIS 

MsgtiEont duplex ISO sqjn. 
IBtii century bulking 

GEORGE V 

Lovely duplex, 80sq.m. + maid's room 

VUUERS 


3 rooms. 100 sc^xl. perfect cond i ti o n, 
aukfing 


EMBASSY 562 1640 


XVI ON THE PARK 

Spectacular 250 sqm. + 30 sgjn. 

terrace. 3 receptions + 2bedrocms + 

3 baths + 2 messing*. 2 maids' rooms, 
2 pqrfan p. Exospbixid decorations & 
comfort. 

BATON 704 55 55 

TBEX BATON 630 8S5F 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


BARBARA FROUNG 

Superb 60 sqjn. artist atefier, fiv 


sqja. annr owier, irwng. i 
bedroom, 7m hitti cdBngs, ewzfen 
oondeoa TeL 2Po 95 52 


8TH CHAMPS RYSES 

ARCADE DU UDO 

Lo»ely jtucfo deal for investment or 
pmiotwTt, TeL 225 64 54 


VBBAIUE CHATEAU. 1 imn. station, 
private ldh duplex on gqrdeahUi 
doss resdenas. double Ring, 4 bed- 


rooms, 3 bathrooms, paridna beep- 
Tel:_gJ»r 18 79! 


ttonol decoration. 


80UGIVAL KStDBfTIAL: Owner 
seBs trwmting renovesed 17* century 
house, 7/8 roams, 3 baths, lovely 
garden. F1J90J0Q. Tel: 193) 32 84 94 


ST GOMA1N DB PRB. 16th cent 

penthouse. 110 sqjn. 329 42 94 


SWITZERLAND 


4TH. QUA1 DES CRETINS. Pert- 
house. living, dnng, 4 bedroom, 3 
baths, office, mad's room, 1600 sqjn. 
terrace. Fantastic vfaw on Seme, De Si 
Lous and af Ptns. Vbb: Guanfian 
every day except Saturday afternoon 
md Sundays: 16 Ouai de Cdesfins, 
75004 Fare 


In the charming mountai n resort of 

IEYS1N: 
RESIDBKE LE5 

Overlooking a spterrfd Alpine panoro- 

ma. 30 mia from Montroux end Lake 

Geneva by cor. 

- yw con own qurfrty residence 
wnh mdoor swimming axi and 
Fitness fadtike in an (U 
environment for leisure and sfxxts 
6 ski. 9 alf.etii 

- Fmanongat low SF. rotes 
up to 9K mortgages. 


R e si dence le x Front . 1354 taycin 

, , _ SWITZBtLAMJ 

Td: B25] 34 11 55Tbu 456 120 RtAI CH 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LAGO MAGGfORE 
ASCONA-SWITZKLAND 

In this famous Swtss resort we offer first 


ytftnme tmd house, ft 
b the eld -Mage of Ascono 


doss 

lien _ 

other «dd viloges, overlooking the lake 
Logo Macgxjre you will fin d your 
home, rnas from SF320.000 - 
SF1 ,100,000, Mortgage at low Swiss 
. s. Free Far sale to 
r ar e r g ners. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 

VIA LOCARNO 27 A 
CH-6612 ASCONA 
Tefc CH-93-352184 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA 

AMBASSADOR PARK 


PARADISE FOR THE HAPPY FEW 


An exebehta Medirarroneon village a 

EZL 

otxmjutmk vib on reoiorm. (oca (coj- 
lion. 20 minutes From Pdma Spoaqua 


e i p ort 'm xrts. 1 to 3 bedreoms. oil with 
'|M8« (jBOuf 


large terraces. Very tiigb gea0y coo- 
strveUan and (WAiegs guseonteed. 


VtSTTAMUBADOR PARK AND 
BECONVWCH3 

For mftxmoticn- 

GUSERAN5JL 

CH-10« lAU&Sw^* ^mzedand 
Teh (21) 22 35 12 Tbc Sl85 MBiS Oi 


Broker Enquiries Welcome 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


| CANADA 


[ GERMANY 


| GREAT BRITAIN | 



ITALY 

VBKE UDO. fwnhhed 2 twnwoora 

^Kfcrmtesh yOg with tope garden, 
seafronf. USS300 menth. To rent Oc- 
tober ■ July. 7* 041/717402 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

AT HOME IN PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENT5 FOR RENT OK SAl£ 

&&">£*’ 563 25 60 

9TH Tl»BTt Magnificent Rving, dfa- - 
mg, 2 bedrooms, modem kitchen A 
bath, sauna beews, fireplaces, bofco- 
rty. unique. F9XXKL Tefc 720 37 99. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-aYSEES 8th 


Srodx^2 or 3-rpom usxj li u at * . 


. _ earth or more. 
tE QAROGE 359 67 97. 


( VERSAILLES 

To rent far 3 years, luxurious 10 room 
ID cars + land- 


part ra 

BAZUE 


per month. 


720 04 44 


inert for yeor or less. flQ sqm, *&h 

floor, etevafor. compl e tely cqu, 

with Snen. Bedrocrn. thing, fk^i 
krtch»>dnuna. bath, bmcony, sun, 
mod twice weddy. F8000; 7Q& 3108 


tod without inconveeeiic e, M at 
home m nice Itucfox, one bed oom 
and mare in Paris. 5CtSiM: 80 rue 
de nAtivdta, Ports 7th; 544 3P 40 


Fu*y equipped sfix&s ad 2 rooms, 
up to 4 penons. Oaiqs Bysees, ' 

■ and Montoamasse. Mod ser ■ 

Mr George; 322 82 50 


loft op a rtme rt . Get 25 - Nov 8. J8O0 
+ security, AH utities M>duded 4 
people mountain. Mod’s service pas- 
sfafa. Tet 544 73 31 


I71K NEAR PARC MONCEAU. 
Nfaefy famished 2 bedrooms, tying, 
tfining, 9lh floor, view of 6fF« Tower 
8 Saoe Coeur. Tet 563 38 59- 


bed r oom 


71 Pwo 


far s abbati c o l 


double living. 2 1 

scLFTlflOaTeL-; 


famished I 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

PubBvh your busmen message 

in the International Herald Trr- 

bamu vrtymre n rorw than a third 

of a iruKfan rea d er s wortd- 
endm, most of whom are in 

bosinmts aid industry, wR 

rood M. Joit lebjc us tParh 
613595] Ufa* 10 a.ai on- 
Mnng "x? **w can to tax you 

bads, aid y our mouo gt t wfl 

appear wrfflwr 48 hoars. The 
rate h US. $9.80 a teed 

otpxhrefont per Uno. Too mutt 

rndudo compteta aid varfK- 
t±ht bSDns oddaa. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

tacorporcMn and management kt UK, 

bta of Man, Turks, Angufa, Oarri 
Isknh, PonaracL Liberia Gfordkr and 
mast other offshore (yens. 

• Confidential advice 

• ti i m iediQ tc nvotabBty 

• Nominee serwon 

• Bearer shoes 

• Boat legtorawm 

• Acgagntm & ddmmatraliaR 

• Mail telephone S telex 
Awe m m fcmotanr beofctat from: 

MKTCaVOKATE 
SKOTCE5 LTD 
Head Office 


M Pl sa sowt , Peu^^We oF Mob 




Lgrejon Bearesentative _ 

2-5 CM Sonda^Laxton W1 
Tel 014934244. Tk 28247 5CRDN G 


FINANCIAL UMB 

AT HOME OR AT WORK 
IN THE NEIHBOAKS 


Die. FT o perttiw a 
hold dSwy'serwefo: 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MOST CONTABtSR (EASING 
COMPANES ADVHtna 


17 % - 20 % 
FIXED INCOME 
PER ANNUM 


WE DONT HAVE TO BECAUSE 
WE BELIEVE WE CAN OFFER 


MORE! 


We ere o mqor confcmr leasing com- 
pony (Founded 1973) with an excefert 
of return & service for our cfi- 


erts. We are cucrenthr manaang over 

er2jOMSoih. 


1? JXOcontdrm for over i 
WE HAVE OVBl 


$36 MILLION 


UWa MANAGBRB4T 
AM) AN AMfltAL TURN0VB 
IN EXCESS OF 


$15 MnUON 

ff you are consxjenng an immsmeni m 

contaners we suggest you contort us 

before ending your derma. 


WE PAT OUR CUEMI5 

QUARTERLY 
A GROSS D0UAB M00ME 


SHIRLSTAR 


I NTBWA TIONAL SALES 

KBZS5GRACHT534 

7017 fit AMSTBDAM 


.IBs ^g^272822 


IBEX 


(WE5CO) 

A LK Company wirh subskfiory 
ones m nanx. C 




Antsterdom. Detft, 


Bn d to ven, Gronmaen. 
Hoot lent. The rtMue. 
Heentstede. bsder,. 


Wesienaor, 


LONDON 

fiAqnry B _ trust .swmees I Company 
A domidfaticn t Ir Uer nLiBcn - 
d «* ' Bark oocoum es UAt ied l 
GrtyiL*"™*”* odvw & nabtoncs I 
^CR, W IMdegrte St. London El 7HP 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


U. S. A. 
UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 


i oddaioev 
/tech- 

tmtheitiJluxta. 

dhridand paid. Unftwtad 
pu tev ititu l AAnimun nvest- 

10,000. ennud returm 

For detatad mfarmetort 

1 2589, Hera« Triune. 92521 Newa- 
Jy Cedex, Fro nc e 


U5A 

BU5ME5SS 4 REAL ESTATE 
Business soles; cow m e ra oL indysmd & 
seskSenticd >ed estate sdes & leases. 
Property management & business de- 
vetooroenr. Write with your recpxro- 
ments & financed sua to: 

Hirson Realty & Buvneis Brokers, 

lOM PJ 


14795 Jeffrey W-jt2]ft 
' " a 92714 USA. 


Te" 7^651 -8<Hfr Thu 590194. 


C.C.M. LTD 


Ccnpanes termed UX & waddvnde 
indudms Isle of Mau Turks & Cocos. 
Angulo, Parana ad Liberia 


Far Further Btformcfion, please esnfort 
usafi -5 Upper Church 5r, Douglas, bfe 
of Man. via Grant Britan , tat CtenlaJ 
{0624 23731 itt 627900 CCM lOMa 


OOSEOUTS at OVBtUNS 
Cash paid immtdrtely. targe qwta- 
Mi needed far 5008 s»es- decou* 
depmmwnt stores & drug dam. Send 


carturas. pices & quarttoes. Aftre Eric 
WhOe. c/a Mar - 


-- Morrow Partners. B W. 37th 
a, mV. NY 10018 USA. 


U^JL BU5VCS5. SpeewSsts « USA 
barney l i/<m ments and tmnejro- 
poa. Coctod 1 Airctervrtcroc, r.C, 
60 State St., Boston, MA 02109 ISA. 
Tet 617-523-7330 or teSe* 951014 
FfiSIBOSTON. 


UMGUE OPPORTUNITY- 


no o>>w sfap *rth Sue . _ 

sport* eoven^e. To be ofwwd deSy 

on mint to nomhere. A LtiMm* 

hp# rf i wt rVrmrw wkVW* i f< 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FINEST RWSTMBtr NEWSLETTHL 


Switzerland. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


wtn 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED MC 
ILSJk. * WCBU3WR3E 


Aeompfef* personc4& busnes servfos 
CEfcdKto rf 


tcienied vwsaBe & rraitifrigud 
irxfivkfaab For aO scoot £ 


212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 
330 W. 5filh St, N.Y.C 10019 
■Servw- 


ISIABI OWC^JBET.) trqned in d 

Owwg 


eombot areas. Offering tnaimg pro- 

DRBTB ond meant/ services. Cotad 
C o mbat . PA Bob, 2181 tQryetf Yam 
G" 2S0CD Wad. Tlx: 341118 WIV t 
For atf6376 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPOB. 

report . 12 countries wxtined. De- 
taST WMA. 45 
Suta 56. CmnsL 


tews- WMA. 45 LyrvDtartl Ti 
Hong Kong. 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


Principality of Monaco 

Corameraol premia far sole n the 


carter of Marts- Ccxb (15&3X1 
to choice) iaed far 


SS: 


For further datoib 


IJ. 


contact 


26 fas 6d Pfinoesso Qxxfatte 
ffatisCdh MC 98000 Musiinn 

Tefc (95 50 66 00. Trfn 479417 MC 


OFFICE SERVICES 


ETOfiE 


rrmhcd 

ncnrcc 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 

IN ZURICH 

fully fntfgsated 
BUS t^S 5SVKB 


CLQ5ETO WANOAL 

Offices i Cbrrferenee Rooms 


fteitabed . 

Trterfione / Telex / Mofl Services 
Word rrooassna / Trondahon 
\mXfTtcotPf ro* motion 

utwJxtiwu. emet 


32 Rennwwa 048001 Zurich 
Tab 01 7 2M6ni. “ ‘ 


^■MMTbc 612656 MOF 

M£MSS worio-wbx^B 
BUS»«SS CmtXB 


ZUR)CH*ZURJCH-ZURICH 


T>€ RNANQAL CBJTW 

• YOU8 INTEGRATED BUSINESS 
S6W1CE5 COMPAQ 

• YOUR Offltt AWAY FROM HQfi® 
tsrrioMi Servtaee Coneolt Corp. 


Sohnhofarane 52, 048023 Zurich. 
Tel 01/211 92 OMbi 813 062 BSIC 


tom Office JNM8& iaa, 

AN5WSBNG_ SSMCE. stgrewry. 

fry® 2tn!oay. 


fi u i ch , raefeov, 
Td.PXt-.eOfK9i. 


IMPETUS • ZURKM * 252 76 21. 

THOhff / T&£X ! THfGRAMS. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTIMENTS 


EARN 2S% SHORT IBM OteMWOrf 
paper. kwwtmM gnrarteod. ABnd 
UJTfO Box 422, Fteruatowg. W- 
gxH 22801 UiA. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


Year beef boy. 

fine demands many price npge 
a lowest , wholesale prioas 


Anwep 


_ demand world. 
h4 gwnrt •*. 

Far hm pne* fat wrHe 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


lSTHPTE DE VBISAIUB. Beautiful 

new large tvmg, ,3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 
sunny, goroge, F9000. 720 3799 


VIEW NOTRE DAME A SBfttowsh- 


og snrfo. Owner, FnrxjJSffl 71 39 
Vor 71 02 68 or Pens 6333254. - 


SHORT TERM M LATIN QUARTHt 

No ogerts. Tek 329 38 83. 


91 - DRAVHL h&e resxfentirf, smrf 
3-rcxnn home. 5 fan Oriy. 942 6817 


INVALIDS, LUXURY HAT, MOO per 
day, phone, TV, fffS 704 » 27 


NEUWY, hitfi.dt* 

bath, an < 


btehen. 

7675. 


QUAI D’ORSAY. Houseboat. 3 oafans. 

~)94« 


3 srfoons, f9000 net. 720 94 1 


16IH. Wnq + 2 bedrooms, charm, 
sun. RUUD. Owr 


. Owner tefc 508 19 B8 


PARK AREA UNFURNISHED 


HARRIHt HOUSE HUN7HS. let us do 
your footwt Cofl C5U the Na 1 
relocation service far the ffaris area 
and Western stixjrbs. Tel: 7S 1110 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


EXCHANGE 1 8B3SOOM (toartment 

or*. 53 10634 


Paris for stuefio in New Yo 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


TRAVB. EXECUTIVE, Caro based, re- 

quired by leading international tour 

pficont mat be Ruent and 

Art toic end w rat be d de.lp oragee 
of unit s rf xuxiwig taw odnxno- 
trebon. Write veto resume and salary 


history to John CauB, Ite Ifresidept 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


ATTN. PROOUCERS/ t istr ibrt on cine- 
mo, TV. Qurffied. Inrfvidurf. MA 


p™ own, rnsnen, uermar^. 
Available tar respeefttote poddon. 


Conwtar rfj qpportunrtiei. Writa tac 
AMJ’.nef: 5B6/0, 40 nie Ofciar de 
Senes. 75015 Pcxts who wffl forward 


Eastern Merftarrartaan, Travelers 
tarortionoL 97 Syngas Ave, Athens 
117-45 Greece 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


HITE EX-SPECIAL FORCE Ncxn vet 
seeks dwnw. DQTA team highly 
traned. 9 years top mtl. private expe- 
rience, prrfi—ionie fa p assured- tes- 
cue, courier, bodw u urd etc Contact 
Ught Foot Inc. 8IS969-1754 or Suite 
22). 13014 Noah Drfe Mrfjry, Taro- 
pa. FIA 33618 USA. 


(XNERAL 

POSITIONS WaNTH) 


OUTSTANDING YOUNG Marketing 

mce efred 


Exeartrve. 5 yeas experience 

“ M8A, faly bSt^urf French / 
‘ serfs chdenspng pon ton in 


growth onertea aontao- 
rry. Write t oTte 2 812^H erxid Tri- 


bune, 92521 Neufly 


France 


YOtMG JAPANBE model, muKDri- 
guaL weltrovefled seeks i te iB ^u ig 
■ Tokyo. 588 15 90 Tokyo. 


NKRM1BIIGBIT HOSTESS 24 Lon- 
don based nob for openitn. Intar- 
ested >n buBowss and at Tree to 
hovel. Tefc 01 225 03 68 3pra-12. 


EMPLOYMENT 


* ili-r- 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Ail PMR female only needitd kmed- 
ately for dddoore, haasekeepmg. 
AAist fan* vita. Prefer French spoak- 
ing. VfiB accept short term. Sanre- 
sume eagnu b Sen, 1254 ffedmonf 
Ave. N£, Aticmta. GA 30309, indude 
your telephone number. 


k :r 

■Ts.-.: 


NANNY, • fien* mrfhar tone & 
“ -for&Wdle 


required 


EC CrnZEN, tiuert m 5panidi Engfah, 
IVenai and Gernxm, typing & 1 
seen past in inf 1 company, 

Geneva! 31 67 02 


MAE M SEEKS, POSITION as Person- 
rf Asashmt to Intenutoonul Budness- 
Wkw f*one Tristan. London 
01-980 9532 


SOPHISTICATED ntfSICH'GBa, so- 
orf rftedw .^Gs raxtn^ 


YOIBIG RMH PA, forowr roodeL 
wei edrated A experienced in both 


EDUCATIONAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE ... 


WANTH), EXffiHBta TWL Amen- 
aw.to teach French buarwsmen. 
- paper* regumed Cdl week- 
63 66 Parit-- 


IANOUAGE SCHOOL 

■ far u ' 


•need Enofah teachers ... 
hoorsArarfc. LAL 772 4241 


to 30 


upto . 
ifrarit 


to sort 

Qwfaec 

England 


frawy to core for girl 5 years, 
tmmeaairty . 67 Horn Way, 
rVRag^GjiKdrel Surrey. TA 


a 


Domestic 
POSITIONS WANTED 


Sy St 


lorm 


NANME/GOVEDCSS. agBd 36. 


very refchfe ond ccgctoie with chit 
_dnKrof alages, laghly reco 


Coraultartr. _ 
shot, Honft, UK. lrf:( 
Ecensod 


reconxnended 
free now. Fry 
'l St, Aida- 
3lSM9.UK 


Puerto Rh 


NOKMkGBKY, engle. Engfah sperfe- 


menr. rtorwortong, consoemiaus i 
VWSng to troveL 
Offer tet The Advertisw. 094)2 Sim 
Urn Tower, Singapore 0820 


PAGE 16 , 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


; -. ... 

PONCE ?... 
*faawfi.i.; .. 
L- 1.. .’ 


International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


EXPORT DIWSION OF (LS. 
MULTINATIONAL LOCATED 
SAWT-OUBfTIN-Pf-yvaiNB 


ENGUSH-FRDiCH 
BIUNGUAL SECRETARY 

(FRENCH MOTHSt TONGUE) 


working vrith snrf group ofhghfy en- 
ergetic txchiBcrf export O tan oge n , 
ploying a tey role in toe development 
af our toenbfic instalment export sales. 


, ; . Exp e nancoT Scft 

Acrmrvsfrnhdn npof/eipod, 

spondenoe mostiy En^sh, IBM 
fxoaasor. Apple 2 


corns 

word 


Fteate write to 

. MWJPORESJL 
Senna du FferscneJ 
78882 Soml-QueaScv&vYv»fcn« Cedex 
f r j nc e 


AMAX3SFRM 

of svn consuuwos 

swefa to recruit for its 
Puns office IBM. an 


OFFICE MANAGER 


to control supplier & dent 
supnrwse 


DO pemarel & tearnoe budgets. 

~ ‘ ndrarantfi. 


An excellent salary a offered 

dates with mitw mui 10 years experi- 
ence. a ged 35 Czt HOI, of 

good common s«f». ra rt homed orgo- 
mation skft and obit 1 o temu 

thonty vvriVi toci 93 d iptemocy. 


Send CV + phrtO 
letter + srfary n 
AOJL. 132 Awede 


htetdwntten 
fa 

75017 ton*. 


MUL71UNGUAL 

EXECUTIVE 

SECRETARY 


hast 


af EM5 m are rfwayi 
for real pr o fesBono h with « 
yem »penenee cf waiting 


wrfi ChronnBti as we6 « MonograDf 
xapomTii* 


ectors of mulfaticn rf composes. 

cancfidaes should be fluent at at ieosf 2 

from 60 

countries sound the ucfkJ rueke use of 
aw ssricif when they are swding 


ies* md 


td As 


corffatatoaRy, m Engfah or 


Send 


CV, photo, srfcnr leawreaemn 

• number under ref. 5D to 


prwite priori* 

EMS c/o ICA, 3, roe rfHautewfc. 
75010 Pare, Ftm 


SECRETARIAL . 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


FAST GROWMG 
AMERICAN COMPANY 

in the computer field. 
Mooted center Faro, 



German or , 

shorthand r«n«*d Cxp e n e me iovrord 
procESBig and miaas an asset. Bright, 
pwfcve, antoitious, «aMe with a 
good presunhAon. The ewfidate will 
iron a young and ayncxnic Wan. Mati- 
voong srfory + bonut Send CV.. pho- 
to ond tetto to Box 2820, Herald 
Trtoune. 92521 NeuBy Cedex, France 


HOTBSE CACCUBL 
pour soente inter nahonefe Pons 86ma 


. petit s#an- 
cumtaasonces trfex ap pred te 
" " prteenfntiixi, ttoxte A 

r . rrirf 14-JO 6 1W0. 

nro e wite remuneration pour anS- 


date adbpxM. Adresser o, ttooto st 


ADIA 


TEMPORARY WORK 
UROBULY SffiCS 
MJNOUAL SECRETARY 
Engfah mother I 
Word processor (VW . 

' ‘ 106 ter rue St ’ 

Tefc 293 50 02 


SBQOR SECRET ART wgerfty re- 

quired for admissions offset rf Inti 
University. Excsfent secrcienaf ririb, 
well organized md mo ti va ted , knovrf- 
•cfae rf wont processor and tefex on 
adrortoge. as weB as q ipleaart per- 
sonotty to erioy deang with sto- 
denb. Worxpvmdar dud nafionofify 
tsenfirf, . rat nore_ e fe rmat i on, 
ptease write to; C Baflems SehSler 
KStooerf -3 Water 

P0 Eood, London gl jg 


ADVBU1SW0 AGENCY 

■fans Mi serfs 

SECRETARY (Pastime) 

B£njd Engfah/French 

DuteteSwachboord ^.lyfting. 


Serrf C-V & trfary desred to 
MAP, 20 rue St Lazar a, 73009 Pbris 


WTHU4A71WAI BANK 


M Y 

coRsned rf^enth. 

Water 6AH, 12 PL Vendffi. Pens 1st 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Ig^TWNALOWANIZATlON 
based m Plans s erfs two |W tior bflfa- 

gjTSgMfas 

SiagSE.'SSfSSJlS: 

June. 92S2I NeuBy c5k 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


SECRETARIES 

OVERSEAS 


Ifeoughprf the unrid we introduce <S- 
•rts to ferfcdass MMaries whose Sn- 

' 5S^2 tB « ,sla,sho '* w 

r*t tested. It you we on em- 
Efayer, port al us for the tor adme. 
tiwxetarMi - ctA as to anonew an into, 
vww m London. 


k ?^ r ?rf io (“l Seaetaries 
17 Wooden W1 

■ . Tefc 01-491 7100 
- "•owtownt Consjfrmls. 


_TOUNGUAl - 
_ , .Pgomv T Asisr ANT . 
pORto. Genptei French nationd, 32. 

Y2521 N«Sy Cedex, France 


e*pwTtoced 

travel. Paris 208 80 85. 


wflSng^tBl 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


RAND5TAD 


■UNGUAL AG88CY 


SMdafaed in 
ffighfe QuaCfied 


758 12 40 


Temporanr Office 
rename! 


GERMAN EXKUTTVE StCRCTART, 
™~~ n B u rf. expenence vrith 
«ri with in tonapa mi overuo^, b 


/■ 


fort/Moin 


y . (8 ywtei expenmeej 
mteresting and chafenowg posibert 
WWW- .wfeto to work 
Urd and travsL Serious oners cnly, 
Tribune. 9^ 

Nou»y Cedex. Fronce 


rMcnc. .' 

Ga’e -. 
A a vrre ; 

».* ' 
-- - 

" !, lk»CC V _■ 
'ft hji 

^ l£ *cc 

- 

'■ ; 

^ :.r 

®sv-. ■;* 

■I ij,. 

A 


TMMfGUAL Secretary. Arabic / En- 

L. jT*** W1 ^ a — W^°"- 


jmwoi 




j^CWr,. . 
:>n 

jMs " 

jiii 


lOOKWGfOR TOP BRMGUAL t 

igaaassaai i 


MULTMWUAirsaSEtARY seeks 

?srg^| ra,a,ntarin ^ 


free to trovel Paris 7841 


vsEaoKWb t 

noonjob/r^ticSSffll^te 


3SK.-. r 

- 

1 

he*. . . . 

’J.t ‘ ' 


Soo4t6 intern oHonafo de services 
recherche, pour asdsler son 

«feroarr«JMRKTEu R g§merai 


UNE SECRETAIRE 
DE DIRECTION 

BIUNGUE ANGLAIS 


09 “• ^ 


. u tts:^n . 


RK‘. 


t. 



a-. ; 




K; 

ts 


Si" ir.-r’-'-f --