Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


•*4 

ml 

m. 

rr 

m- 


. p '\ ^ 

s t ■ The Global Newspaper -•■ 

hDfvj; •.. Edited in Paris 

* Printed Simultaneously 

:y i*C ••CK % PaA b ***2 +-** 4 - ; 

■* wcaa-J.^^. . Kon fr Singapore, 




, 1 

•— • J 



& ““Ugi -ju 

The Hague and' 


ia j :T77 J:; . ’ r \'\r ; — - — _L_ 

'• .WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE IB 

w ■•>' -; •• • ■ • • : 

31.925 

La 1 —.. 'A. O ' 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 



JZSC»L*f 

.1 JDO U»O b *»’'— Mi 

Bahrain OilODn xJOR, hm«al 906b. 

“9«" «»*• Konya S»50M ?»»— *?■!!£ 

Canada Cl 1 JO /ZL U0 ft ** rf fcl *« 1 -*> P - 

C,vn- CIOJD ~Z"" TVS SodAroSo-aiOt 

Dnrat._.8JX) DKi. Sp« HOP** 


fcn*~ 

KridnJ 


.IWP. 


lAyo-.LDA.0JS 


,7J»Ur. 


- '• -Tv. 

V • •- 


Published With Hie New York Times and Ike Washington Post 


’JOFM b * e **«*«Tj~.<SLff. s,^rt«i_3a) SJf 

Franco o. 009. W"** 0 IQ5bc Two OjSJDn 

Gwotf-JJODM «*" »<** TorWr— .TiUOJO 

&a»ln«wi_ SOP. Mama 650 Hi UAjE _430DHi 

Gtmc* BO Dr FWhartnk_Z7S R. US.ML(Ev)_Sa£S 

Irani.... 115 M Ns*ao 170 K. Yugoitow — MD. 


■vr - 5 -'i- • 


PARIS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 


ESTABUSHED 1887 


m 

t/ 

rai‘ 

m 


I 1 

1 -ft 

T ttv- - 


t* £ *-■■■ ~- 


*>•1 *«■•■•- 

* j r~ 


i fir - !, 


*•-? V’ 

** • ■ 

sse 

«k I 

me : rr 
j i, 

S*» * •- 


var. 

M*. 
’&* 
S k: 

Wfii 

Se* 



: yyl 

' N - Tho Wodtngten Aw 


-•Tr^nlarged area slums the location of ti^U^ iiHlitary bases. 

■ SU.S. Plans Improvements 
~ifbr Bases in Philippines 


.'.r ; 

pa.. 


.-%.<■ 

t -* 

fisr* 

hr 

*1-: 

% ■- *■ 
5 *>.«• 

f.V. - 


VMV 

A« i‘ 


hr*- .•*■->■ • 

Bu ivn^E. r 
Vt^ - 

• •• 

*n .r. 

•A*: 

’iiarv > 

•H “ - ' ' 

•*•**■»" 

• 

- V “ 

r 

*• 


«5w - 

»» -• • • 

« ■•* • 

K ^t= 

-r. j... ~r 

k» 


t*-. ^ 


-Vsi'fS By David B. Ottaway ' 

•. g WASHINGTON — The De- 
• I^f'fense Deparunent plans to invest 
I billion to upgrade Clark Air 

' ^‘'■Base and Subic Bay Naval Base in 
.*~Ir£ c thc Phfljppines despite the condu- 
;vsipp of two UA, intelligence agen- 
^^cies that the government of Prea- 
'^C'dent Ferdinand E. Marcos is 
" '^headed for “catastrophe.” 

• ■ ~xz- Wary of the growing threat from 
' ~ ’ ’ --'-Communist guerriilas, however, 

^ =lhe Pentagon has began to lode for 
" j alternative Pacific sites in what 
’*• r ~ * -srcould be an SS-bDlion relocation of 
7 -^'ithe two biggest UA bases outside 
: * : c:'-:the United States, according to a 
■ Pentagon official. 

| A tTbe Central Intelligence Agency 
. the Defense Intelligence Agen- 

-•--‘‘•i^c v recently told the House Intdfi- 
<.■•24 grace and Armed Services comnrit- 
3 ~~ ,l " : ^t ees in secret briefings that present 
vns -trends in the Philippines were 
’ * ‘““really downward and very negar 
I _ ’^tive" and headed for “calasirb- 

• ggiphe,** Representative DaVe 
rr! McCurdy, Democrat (rf.Gldahcma 

- • -ru who is a member oTbotli pands, 

r.—vts, -a; said Wednesday. . 

" *'* “The intelligence cominnnity is 
rr "r ~rr> so far out ahead of the policy-mak- 
' Triers that it’s incredible,” Mrl 
, : McCurdy said. 

— raivsjto Reacting to a Senate report 

tioning die wisdom of a Iage new 
- mflitaxy investment in tite 

_ , T V Phfljppines. Assistant Secretary of 
Defrase Richard L. Anintage said 
• 'i' that “the facts as we see them are 


that we will he at those facilities at 
least until 1991.’' 

After that, Mr. Armitage said, 
“We are looking seriously at alter- 
natives.” The potential loss of the 
83-year-old bases, and their poten- 
tial conversion into Soviet facili- 
ties, is particulady worrisome to 
the. Pentagon because of the large 
Soviet naval presence at Cam Ranh 
Bay in Vietnam, oncea major ILS. 
base. 

One alternative under consider- 
ation, Mr. Armitage said, is Guam, 
which lies 1,500 miles (2,400 kilo- 
meters) east of the Philippines. An- 
other option is Tinian; an island in 
■ the northern Marianas, where the 

- United States has already leased 
more than 18,000 acres (7 ,200 hect- 
ares). 

Both are regarded as poor op- 
tions, however, because of thdr lo- 
cation, lade of devdopment, man- 
power shortages and the up to 
58-billion cost of new bases. 

A ComnmTTis t innirggncy fed by 
the New Peopled Annyhas spread 
; thfou^otit’ 'the Phi^^ides:- The 

- movaneEt amlends it ifeaves no ; ! 
i»dp .from Communist btoc na-. 
tions. 

Demands for removal of the US. 
bases are heard not only from die 
New People’s Amy but also from 
non-Commtmist opposition ele- 
.. menls in the. Batasang Pamhansa, ' 
the country’s pariiamenL 

Sevraal ministers in the Maims 
■government have called for abroga- 
(Coa&nued ooPage 5, CoL 6) 


By 

fflasAingrai Pan Serna 

■WASHINGTON — The House 
Representatives adopted and 
seat to the Senate on Thursday a 
bill that would sharply curb textile 
imports, but passage' was 28 votes 
short of the number needed to 
override an almost certain presi- 
dential veto. 

The 262-159 vote was the first 

congressional floor action in a 

wave of protectionist measures 
aimed at combating the U.S. trade 
deficit. 

The bOl, which would cut textile 
imports from the 12 leading coun- 
tries by anaverage 40 percent, had 
widespread .support in Congress 
with about two-thirds of the House 
and more than half of the Senate 
joining as cosponsors. 

Provisions m the Senate’s textile 
bill, which has not reached the 
floor, are somewhat less restrictive 
on imports. That version would im- 
pose the harshest cuts only on the 
“big three” exporters: Hong Kong. 
Taiwan and South Korea. 

The Hbn-wt&sion would cut 
shipments from most nations to 
1984 or to 1980 levels and then 
permit an increase of 1 percent or 
of 6 percent, depending on the 
growth of the nation's exports to 
the U.S. market over the past five 
years. 

Canadarand the European Com- 
munity would be exempted from 
provisions of the bOl, and special 
provisions would protect Mexico 
and Caribbean Basm nations from 
the toughest restrictions. 

The brunt of the cutbacks would 
fall on 1 1 Asian natinne and Brazil. 
Harsh rollbacks also would fall on 
specified, trade-sensitive products. 

Representative James T. Broy- 
hill, a Republican of North Caroli- 
na, one of the bill’s mam sponsors, 
acknowledged that the bm lost at 
least 30 supporters because of a 
'‘determined" lobbying campaign 
over tiie past three, weeks by the 
Reagan administration and indus- 
tries that feared they would suffer 
from retaliation if the legislation 
passed 

The bin had at least 290 cospon- 
sors, fewer, the number of votes it. 
ftg^ypdL..-'' . 

®T wSr wrong;' I - was a cospan-' 
sor” said Representative E. day 
Shaw Jr ? a. Republican of Florida, 
who ultimately voted against the 
bilL. 

Representative Sam M. Gib- 
bons, a Democrat of Florida, said: 
“The drinks are on me.” He led the 
opposition to the textile hdl on the 
House floor and indicated he re- 

(Contmned on Page 5, CoL 2) 



U.S., Mubarak 
Dispute Fate of 
Ship Hijackers 


Ccmpiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PORT SAJD, Egypt —President 
Hosni Mubarak said Thursday that 
four Palestinian hijackers" who 
seized an Italian cruise liner with 
more than 500 people aboard this 
week had left Egypt He said they 
were the responsibility of the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization. 

But there was growing contro- 
versy over their whereabouts. Mr. 
Mubarak said they had left Egypt 
shortly after they surrendered to 
the Egyptian Navy on Wednesday. 

In Washington, however, a U.S. 
official said that the hijackers did 
not leave immediately after their 
surrender but had been sem to an 
airport outside Cairo. He said that 
Egyptian authorities were prepar- 
ing to fly them to an unknown 
destination late Thursday. 

“We’re angry at the Egyptians 
and we want that flight stopped,” 
said the official, who asked not to 


President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt responds to questions about the release of the hijackers, be identified. 

Reagan Calls for Prosecution of Hijackers 


By Lou Cannon 

Washington Past Service 

CHICAGO — President Ronald 
Reagan said Thursday that the hi- 
jackers who killed an American 
aboard the Italian cruise ship 
Achflle Laura should be turned 
over “to a sovereign state” for trial 
and punishment. 

On a day that Mr. Reagan had 
intended to spend promoting his 
plan,h< * 


On Page 2 


ion plan, 
iddfe of 


in the middle of. a controversy in- 
volving the hijackers and the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization, 
which the United States does not 
recognize. 

In a news conference at O’Hare 
International Airport, Mr. Reagan 
said it would be “all right” for the 
four hijackers to be tried by the 
PLO if its leader, Yasser Arafat, 
has “kind of a national court, set up, 
like a nation, that they can bring 
diem to justice.” 

The remark caused consterna- 
tion among Reagan aides, who im- 
mediately realized that this would 
be tantamount to recognizing the 
PLO. which the United States con- 
siders a terrorist organization. 

When reporters alighted from a 
helicopter at the next stop, Robert 
G McFarlane, the national security 


■ New terrorism coincides with 
the PLO's military' decline. 

■ Why Palestinian terrorists 
killed Leon Klin gh offer, an el- 
derly cripple; remains unclear. 

■ Moslem abductors said they 
would continue to hold three 
Russians until they were sure of 
Syria's intentions in Lebanon. 

■ Two bodies discovered in 
SjTain are said to be those of 
missing Israeli seamen. 


adviser, told them that the presi- 
dent “meant that he wants the PLO 
to turn these hijackers over to com- 
petent authority for trial.” 

A few minutes later and within 
an hour of his first comments, Mr. 
Reagan held another question -and- 
answer session and withdrew his 
remarks about the PLO trying the 
hijackers. 

Speaking to reporters while visit- 
ing a pastry company, Mr. Reagan 
said that “apparently there's a little 
confusion, and maybe I'm respon- 
sible.” The president said he had 


“not meant to imply” that the PLO 
should try the hijackers. 

“I shouldn't have made a state- 
ment of that kind, mad as I am," 
Mr. Reagan said. “1 was thinking 
vengeance instead of justice.” 

“1 really believe that the PLO. if 
the hijackers are in their custody, 
should turn them over to a sover- 
eign state that would have jurisdic- 
tion and could prosecute them as 
the murderers they are,” Mr. Rea- 
gan said. 

The president’s position was 
complicated, officials said, because 
be had received “conflicting re- 
ports” on whether the hijackers had 
been released to the PLO or were 
still bang held in Egypt. 

At the Chicago airport, the presi- 
dent stud U.S. officials were "doing 
everything we can to see if they 
cannot be brought to justice.” 

“We think that no nation — re- 
sponsible nation — should give 
shelter to these people," he said, 
but "should make them available to 
whichever country has the proper 
jurisdiction for prosecution." 

Mr. Reagan said that the proper 
nation for prosecution could be the 
United States, because the mur- 
dered passenger, Leon Klin gh offer, 
was an American; Italy, because 
the ship was of Italian registry, or 


Egypt, “because the crime began" 
there. 

Asked whether he believed that 
President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt 
was lying when he said the hijack- 
ers bad been turned over to the 
PLO. he replied that he was unsure 
whether Mr. Mubarak had “the in- 
formation he should have.” 

Mr. Reagan also said that Mr. 
Mubarak, in working toward the 
release of the hostages, “did not 
know tbai a crime had been com- 
mitted.” 

He said he did not intend to use 
U.S. military action to punish the 
hijackers. 

■ Peres Charges Racism 

Prime Minister Shimon Peres of 
Israel said Thursday that Palestin- 
ians who hijacked the cruise ship 
separated Jews from the rest of the 
passengers and that the killing of 
Mr. Klin offer was motivated by 
racism. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Tel Aviv. 

“I am shocked by what hap- 
pened,” Mr. Peres said. 

The prime minister said the ter- 
rorists "In cold blood murdered an 
old man in a wheelchair just be- 
cause his same sounded Jewish. 
We will not forget this and not 
allow it to pass." 




v -i? r ' 

. V , 



■«v 


n Welles 
Dies at 70 in 


tv 





wr*w -*• 


S #»— 1 




:.r£jir 

' '"t. ” Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LOS ANGELES — Orson 
Welles, 70, the American actor and 
^ director who as a young man creai- 
^ ed and starred in the film classic 
"Citizen Kane” and terrified listen- 
ers with a radio production about a 
Martian invasion, was found dead 
Thursday at Ms home in Holly- 




oa i ^ x 



* 




«VA 




** ■ T 






• • 




rs -- 


■W* M'r .iWOOd. 

- t An official at the county coro- 

ner's office said the death “appears 
to be natural in origin.” 

Police officials said that Mr. 
Welles had been treated recently 
for what his personal physician 
said was a heart condition. . . 

Mr. Welles, perhaps best known 
for the 1941 film “Citizen Kane," 
had been a major figure in cin em a, 
theater and radio for nearly 50 
years. He has been, hailed by many 
critics as a genius, but one whose 
talents remained unfulfilled. 

The film was based on. the life of 
William Randolph Hearst, the. 
newspaper publisher. Mr. . Welles 
directed, wrote and starred in the' 
f ilm, winning an Academy Award 
for writing. He also was nominated 
for directing and acting Oscars! 

Vi Earlier, in 1938, tie frightened 
/V; many listeners with his Mercury 
yi ; jhflaier of the Air radio adaptation 
- v jb? H.G. Wells’s science Fiction fan- 
'taSy “War of the Worlds.” Many 
listeners believed the nation was 
being invaded by Martians. 

His Elm credits included “Othel- 
lo,” “The Magnificent Ainber- 
sqhs,” “The Third Man,” “A 
Touch of Evil," “The Lady from 
Shanghai*" and dozens of others. 

•_ Bui he gained, among Holly- 
wood studios, a reputation as a 
.difficult and expensive' filmmaker. 
The last 25 years of his life were 
marked by a. series of unfinished 
projects, a period when he sprat 
much of Ms time seeking financing 
for his projects. 

- Despite Ms legend-like stature as 
fa movie maker, he had not node or 
■appeared in a Hollywood-made 
motion picture since “Touch of 
Evil” in 1957. 

' For the. past decade,, he made 
what hecail^“groc^'inoney M ,^ . 
appearing in television and radio 
commercials,- -most notably ’• the 
wine advertisement in - which he-. 



Askm-Americans: A \ Model Minority 9 

Study Says They Outperform Whites in School, W ork 


UH/W7S 

Orson Welles 

made famous the. phrase “We will 
seB no wine before it$ time." 

■ Although he had played no part 
in a major motion picture for near- 
ly three decades,. Mr. Welles was 
still active, looking for film proper- 
ties to produce, direct and star in as 
recently as last^pring. 

Al Ms death, he'was working on 
a project to film Shakespeare’s 
“King Lear.": 

Mr. Welles, who resided mostly 
in Lais Vegas, remained a great fig- 
ure in the HoUywood community. 
His deep, sonorous voice and com- 
manding presence .'made him a 
commanding figure. 

George Orson Welles was bom 
May 6, 1915, in Kenosha, Wiscon- 
sin, the second son of wealthy par- 
ents. He read at 2, played the violin 
for Stravinsky ana Ravel at 7, and 
jperf tinned Shakespeare in modem 
dress at 10. By 16 ne was acting in 
Dublin. He appeared in New York, 
founding the Mercury Theater with 
John. Houseman in 1937. 

His father was an inventor and 
manufacturer who himself came 
from a rich Virginia, family. His 
mother was the former Beatrice 
Ives, who died wben he was 8 years 
Old. . . ..... 

Mr. Welles's first wife was Vir- 
ginia Nicholson, an actress. He lat- 
er married Rita Hayworth, the. film 
star. 

. After working in Europe, he re- 
turned to the. United Slates in the 
1970s with his third wife. Countess 
di Girafalco, who acted in Italian 
films asJPaola Mori. 

Mr. Welles made Ms. acting de- 

{Coa tu rn ed onPage 4, CoL 6) . . 

Yul. Brynner tfied Thursday of 
canoa 1 at fiS. Page r 4L. 


By Spencer Rich 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Asian- 
Americans in the United States, 
who now-number 5.1 million and 
are headed for 10 million by the 
rad of the. century, are in some 
ways a “model minority” that is 
“generally outperforming even the 
UR. white majority in the class- 
room and the workplace,” accord- 
ing to a study by the Population 
Reference Bureau. 

About. 21 percent of Asian- 
Amcxicans are of Chinese origin. 20 
percent are Filipino and 15 percent 
are Japanese, according to the re- 
port. Another 12 percent are Viet- 
namese, and they are also the fast- 
est-growing group. Koreans make 
up 11 percent, and 10 percent are 
Asiamlndian with small groups 
from elsewhere in Aria. 

. Earlier Asian immigrants to the 
U^. were generally poorly educat- 
ed laborers. Bui the repeal of gener- 
al racial immig ration exclusions in 
1965 coupled with a wave of politi- 
cal refugees from Asia, many of 
them better educated, has helped 
chang n that. 

The Americans of Asian origin 


do better by some measurements 
than the nation's whites and far 
better than blacks and Hispanic 
Americans, according to the report 
The latest wave of Vietnamese boat 
- people do not do as well because 
they do not have quite the educa- 
tional attainments of the first wave. 

Except for Vietnamese, the per- 
centage of Asian American males 
aged 25-29 in 1980 who completed 
Mgh school outstripped the 87 per- 
cent white rate and was far higher 
than the 74 percent black rate in 
1980, the study said. 

The figures showed 96 percent of 
Japanese, 90 percent of Chinese, 89 
percent of Filipinos, 94 percent of 
Koreans and 94 percent of Asiau- 
In dian males finish ed high school 
Vietnamese were at 76 percent. The 
figures were good, though not as 
outstanding for Asian- American 
women age 25-29. 

Among people aged 20-24, a 
quarter of whites, a fifth of blacks 
and slightly under a fifth of His- 
panics were enrolled in college or 
graduate school in 1980. For Japa- 
nes&Americans the figure was 48 
percent, for Chinese 60 percent, for 
Arian-Indiana 45 percent, Viet- 


namese 42 percent and for Koreans 
40 percent 

The 1980 census found that 35 
percent of adults age 25 and older 
among the six main Arian-Ameri- 
can groups had graduated from 
college. That was twice the propor- 
tion of whites. The study said 
Asian-Americans had “the highest 
average scores of any ethnic group 
in eluding whites on the math sec- 
tion erf the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
for college entrance." 

The 1980 census found that me- 
dian family income for the six main 
Asian- American groups was 
523,600, exceeding the median in- 
come of $20,800 for wMte families. 
The study pointed out this was 
partly because Asian-Americans 
tended to live in extended families 
and have more workers per house- 
hold. 

Even so, the study said, among 
fuH-iime individual workers, medi- 
an income for Japanese, Asian-ln- 
dian and Chinese Americans was 
higher than that for whites. 

Why are Asian-Americans, ex- 
cept for the most recent Vietnam- 
ese immigrants, doing so well? The 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 2) 


INSIDE 

■ A U.S. teachers union issued 

guidelines on AIDS in the 
schoolroom. Page 3. 

■ Congress secretly approved 
more U.S. military aid tor re- 
bels in Afghanistan. Page 4. 

WEEKEND 

■Uechtenstan’s princely ait 
treasures have gone to New 
York for an exhibition at the 
Metropolitan Museum. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Peru caBed for special UN 
talks to revamp the world mon- 
etary order and create an inter- 
national currency. Page 11. 

TOMORROW 

More than 50 artists are repre- 
sented in “German Art in the 
20th Century," the autumn ex- 
hibition at London’s Royal 
Academy. ] 



Nicholas A. Veliotes, U.S. 
ambassador to Egypt, af- 
ter visiting the cruise ship. 


Angry Diplomat 
Demands Justice 
For Hijackers 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The 
U.S. Ambassador to Egypt, 
Nicholas A. Veliotes, aban- 
doned diplomatic niceties when 
he boarded the Adulle Laura to 
confirm that an American pas- 
senger had been killed. 

The ambassador went to the 
sMp Wednesday to determine 
the fate of the Americans who 
had been held hostage. He 
learned that Leon JOinghoffer 
had been killed. Using the ship 
radio to speak to the UR. Em- 
bassy, Mr. Veliotes roared: 

“I want you to do two things: 
In my name, I want you to rail 
the foreign minister, teU him 
what we’ve learned, tell him the 
circumstances, teU Mm that in 
view of this and the fact that we, 
and presumably they didn’t, 
have those facts, we insist, that 
they prosecute those sons of 
bitches.” 

“The second thing I want 
you to pick up the phone and 
call Washington and teU them 
what we’ve done. And if they 
want to foDow it up, that’s 
fine,” he said 


Puzzle for Italy: How 4 Men Pulled Off Hijacking 


By Don A. Schanche 

Los Angeles Times Service 

ROME — How only four hijackers managed 
to commandeer the Achfll e Lauro, a luxury 
cruise liner, remains a mystery. 

.It appeared that the Palestinian gunmen 
boarded the ship io Genoa by posing as passen- 
gers and carried forged or stolen passports. 

But Italian authorities, who credited their 
low-key, pro- Palestinian approach for bringing 
a swift resolution to the crisis, acknowledged 
that they were still uncertain how the whole 
thing came about. 

Despite the air of self-congratulation here, 
some Italian bureaucrats were embarrassed 
Wednesday about how the hijackers managed to 
. take over the ship. 

In Genoa, the port police chief, Antonio Pas- 
saro, said he could not believe that the pirates 
had used false passports to board the cruise liner 
Oct 3 to begin a scheduled 12-day journey in 
the eastern Mediterranean. 

“All documents appeared to be in order," Mr. 
Passaro said. His view was supported by the 
Medoc Maritime Agency, which handled the 
boarding procedures for ihe Achflk Lauro. The 


formalities were so strict that no one could have 
boarded clandestinely, the agency's spokesman 
said. 

“There are only three accesses to the ship" for 
boarding in Genoa, the spokesman said. “There 
is a gangplank for the crew, one to bring sup- 
plies on board to the galley and a third for 
technical equipment. Gran led, many people go 
in and out, rat police surveillance is usually 

rather thorough.” 

Passengers, he said, had to pass three pass- 
port control checks. 

But it appeared that there were holes in the 
security procedures and that false passports 
may have been used to get the hijackers aboard 
in Genoa. 

Press reports in Rome said that the surveil- 
lance was “sleepy" and that il would have re- 
quired little skill to smuggle arms and explosives 
on to the ship, which carried more than 1,600 
pieces of luggage. Unlike airports, where elec- 
tronic baggage checks are common even with 
checked luggage, there was no X-ray or meial- 
de tec ting at the dock. 

According to Rome police, at least one pas- 
senger appeared to have used a stolen Argentine 
passport. 


Police said that the passport of Walter Zar- 
lenga, 23, an Argentinian, was stolen last June at 
a church hostel used by Argentinians in Rome. 

They said the passport may have been used by 
one of the passengers assigned to Cabin 82 on 
the Achille Laura's voyage; the name of Waller 
Zarienga appeared on the passenger list for tha t 
cabin. 

The ship's purser, Santo Fico, who missed the 
hijacking because he went to Cairo on a one-day 
excursion when the ship left Alexandria, said 
the cabin was occupied by “four young people 
of dark complexion who did not participate in 
the festivities on board.” 

Cabin 82 is on the port side, near the bow, of 
the second lowest and least expensive deck of 
the cruise ship. 

One of the ship’s hostesses, Nicolena Faso 
laro, told Italian television that the four ap- 
peared out erf place as they walked on the sunny 
deck. While most people were dressed for sun- 
bathing, the four were dressed for cooler weath- 
er. She said that she tried to engage one of the 
four in conversation by asking his nationalist 
and was surprised when he said he was Norwe- 
gian and abruptly ended the conversation. 


In Egypt, officials confirmed 
that an elderly American invalid 
was murdered, and his body 
thrown overboard, during the two 
days that the hijackers controlled 
the sMp. The 23,629-ton Achille 
Lauro, which had been carrying 
more than 500 persons when the 
sMp was hijacked, was in Port Said 
on Thursday. Egyptian investiga- 
tors questioned its captain. Ger- 
ardo de Rosa, port officials said. 

Speaking to Egyptian journal- 
ists, Mr. Mubarak said the hijack- 
ers were possibly in Tunisia, site of 
the PLO headquarters. Italy, mean- 
while, asked the PLO to turn the 
hijackers over to be tried for mur- 
der. The four men took over the 
ship on Monday just after it left the 
Egyptian port of Alexandria. 

The PLO, wMch condemned the 
Mjacking, denied that it had custo- 
dy of the pirates. The PLO chair- 
man, Yasser Arafat, said in a inter- 
view with an American television 
network that the hijackers were 
“under the Egyptian authorities' 
control/’ 

Some of the former hostages be- 
gan leaving the blue and white liner 
on Thursday after it sailed into 
Port Said earlier in the day, nine 
hours after the packers surren- 
dered Wednesday. Up to 51 1 peo- 
ple, including about a dozen Amer- 
icans, were held hostage. 

Captain De Rosa, 51, said the 
four pirates took over the ship at 
about 1:30 P.M. Monday, firing 
Soviet-made submachine guns and 
brandishing hand grenades and 
other explosives. He said they herd- 
ed the passengers onto a lower 
deck. 

A guerrilla came on the bridge, 
the captain said, “first fired some 
shots into the ground, screaming in 
Arabic, and then told me to head to 
Tartus” in Syria. 

“I was continually guarded on 
the bridge with a submachine gun,” 
he said. “They hoped to find asy- 
lum in Syria." 

When the Syrians refused the 
ship entry, the captain said, the 
hijackers “told me to head toward 
Libya.” 

The gunmen had claimed to be- 
long to the Palestine Liberation 
Front, one of right guerrilla groups 
in the PLO that split into pro- and 
anti-Arafat factions during a 1983 
revolt. 

President Mubarak said in Cairo 
that Egypt allowed the hijackers to 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 

Israel Asserts 
It Can Prove 
Arafat Role 

By William Claiborne 

Washington Post Service 

JERUSALEM — The director- 
general of Israel's Foreign Minis try 
said Thursday that Israeli intelli- 
gence agencies had “absolute, com- 
plete and unrefutable proof" that 
Y asser ArafaL chairman of the Pal- 
estine Liberation Organization, 
knew that the Achille Lauro was to 
be boarded by Palestinian guerril- 
las before the hijacking on Mon- 
day. 

However, the official, David 
Kimche, a former intelligence offi- 
cer, was unable to provide specific 
substantiation for his assertion. 

He said that Israel had informa- 
tion before the hijacking that Mr. 
Arafat’s mainstream d-Fatah wing 
of the PLO had made plans to 
launch terrorist operations at Israe- 
li pons. 

Mr. Arafat has denied any in- 
volvement. 

When pressed for evidence to 
support his charges, Mr. Kimche 
replied thaL the PLO chairman bad 
sent Mohammed Abbas, the leader 
of a pro- Fatah wing of the Pales- 
tine Liberation From, to Pon Said, 
Egypt, to negotiate with the hijack- 
ers. The hijacker had identified 
themselves as members of the Pal- 
estine Liberation Frank 

One of the negotiators, identified 
as Abu Khaiid and characterized as 
a senior front official, is Mr. Ab- 
bas, Mr. Kimche said, a fact that 
has not been hidden by Mr. Arafat. 
Mr. Abbas is also known as Abu 
Abbas, abu being an Arabic term 
for "father of.". 

"In our files we have a file on 
Abu Abbas as Abu Khaiid." Mr. 
Kimche said. “He has used the 
code name on previous occasions.” 

"When Arafat decided the Ital- 
ian liner episode bad to be ended, 
he called for Abu Abbas to go to 
Port Said to direct so-called negoti- 
ations with the four terrorists." Mr. 
Kimche said 

Later Mr. Kimche pointed out 
ihax Mr. Arafat turned to Abu Ab- 
bas. which he claimed to be evi- 
dence of Mr. Arafat's direct in- 
volvement “He could have turned 
to anybody," he reasoned. 

The Foreign Ministry official 
said the Palestine Liberation Front 
is financially supported by el-Fa- 
tah and has its headquarters in the 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 5) 




•.v/.V'fv;- 


i 

i 


i 

i 





TKliffl niII8SnillEMH!nt»iiiiiiiEEHiiiunu»in» m 


r 


Ye 



Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 


** 


Terrorism Surges as PLO Slips 

Young Palestinians Mounting Attacks on Own Initiative 


By William Gaiborne 

Washington Peat Servirt 

JERUSALEM — The upsurge in 
Arab terrorist attacks in Israel and 
abroad coincides with the decline 
of the Palestine Liberation Organi- 
zation as an effective military force, 
but is also traceable to many other 
developments in the past year, ac- 
cording to Israeli intelligence 
sources and terrorism experts. 

The escalation of violence, in 
which 16 Israelis have died in the 
past year, double the annual aver- 
age since 1980. preoccupies many 
Israelis of varying ideological per- 
suasion and is a source of growing 
concern for the country's security 
services. 

With the Palestinian nationalist 
movement fragmented more than 
ever, and with young .Arabs in the 
occupied West Bank and Gaza 
Strip increasingly mounting at- 
tacks on their own initiative, with- 
out direction from any central 
command, the security forces find 


themselves confronted by a new 
and more amorphous terror threat 
than before. 

Senior commanders in the Israeli 
Army concede privately that their 
task in preventing terrorism is 


The war in Lebanon 
'didn’t extinguish 
the fire of 


nationalism. It 


increased it ! 9 


Meir Axnit 


Carrillo Founds 
Parly in Spain 


Reuters 

MADRID — The former Com- 
munist leader. Santiago Carrillo, 
has broken away from the Spanish 
Communist Party after 49 years to 
found 3 splinter group. 

A spokesman at the Interior 
Ministry said Thursday that Mr. 
Carrillo had registered the Revolu- 
tionary Marxist Communist Party. 
This is the second split in Commu- 
nist ranks in two years. About 100 
top party figures left it last year to 
form a pro-Moscow party under 
the leadership of Ignacio Gallego. 

Mr. Carrillo. 70, a veteran of the 
1936-39 Civil War, was' dismissed 
from the Spanish party's central 
committee in April for opposing 
the policies of his successor, Ger- 
ardo Iglesias. 


growing more formidable and that 
Palestinian attacks against civilians 
in Israel and the occupied territo- 
ries and sensational “showpiece’' 
attacks abroad are likely to contin- 
ue to escalate. 

While the spectacular terrorist 
operations like the hijacking Tues- 
day of the Italian cruise ship 
Achille Lauro and the Trans World 
Airlines hostage crisis in Beirut in 
June command the biggest head- 
lines. Israel has been shaken more 
by a rise in hit-and-run murders of 
civilians and soldiers in Israel and 
in the occupied territories that se- 
curity sources say for the most part 
are not linked to the PLO or its 
splinter factions. 

They indude random s tabbings 
and shootings of soldiers and civil- 
ians in densely populated Arab 
towns in the West Bank and Gaza 
Strip; murders of hikers in remote 
areas on both sides of the “Green 
Line" separating Israel proper and 
the West Bank; indiscriminate fir- 
ing on public bases; and the plant- 
ing of bombs near hitchhiking sta- 
tions on highways. 

Most of the attacks date to the 
start of the joint Jordanian-PLO 


peace initiative begun earlier this 

year. 

A paradox of the Israeli invasion 
and Lhrec-year occupation of Leba- 
non is that by crushing the PLO's 
military capability and dispersing 
its fighters to Tunisia and Algeria, 
■Israel may have unwittingly con- 
tributed to the rise of home-grown 
Arab terrorism. In 1982, the year in 
which the invasion of Lebanon was 
launched, only three Israeli civil- 
ians died in terrorist attacks in Isra- 
el and the occupied, territories. 

Meir Amit. former bead of the 
Mossad external intelligence ser- 
vice, said: “The war in Lebanon 
had contradictory influences. On 
the one hand it weakened at least 
the military arm of the PLO, but on 
the other hand it strengthened the 
political side. It didn't extinguish 
the fire of nationalism. It increased 
it-" 

Israeli security officials say that 
.the defeat of the PLO and its subse- 
quent fragmentation created an at- 
titude among many young, fervent- 
ly nationalistic West Bank and 
Gaza Palestinians that they would 
so longer rdy on outside forces to 
lead the resistance to Israeli occu- 
pation, and would have to take the 
initiative themselves. 




Israe 

After Bodies of 2 Sailors^ 
Are Found in Barcelona 


Reuters 

. BARCELONA — Spanish po- 
lice believe they have have found 
the bodies of two missing Israeli 


[Mr. Feres told the Knesset’s 
Foreign Affairs and Security Com- 
mittee that the Israelis were killed 
after being lured into a Barcelona 


seamen, police sources said Thurs- apartment by^two mcn 'who had 

day. Israel has charged that the invited than for coffee, the radio 


seamen were killed by Pales tinian 
guerrillas. 

The sources said that the decom- 
posed bodies found in. a Barcelona 
apartment Wednesday were those 
of Yosef Abou, 33, and Yaacov 
Abou, 32. The two m e r chan t sea- 
men were reported missin g on 
shore leave when the Israeli cargo 
ship they had worked an, the Zim- 
-Califomifl. left port on Sunday. 
Police said the bodies, which 


reported.] 

A PLO spokesman in Madrid 
said he was not aware of the case. 

Police spokesmen said the bod- 
ies, gagged and bearing marks of 
torture with a sharp object, we%,, 
found after residents of the 
mg alerted police to a fool soaril 
coming from the apartment ■ 

The bodes had head and dust 
wounds. Telephone wires had been 
'ai ' 


*jlu Afltocioisd PtKi 

Marilyn Kfinghoffer, center, the widow of the crippled American murdered Monday by 
Palestinian terrorists, being escorted from the liner AdriQe Lauro at Port Said, Egypt 


identified definitively. An autopsy _ 

was being held to establish then Tim apartment's owner, wtoad 

ideutityrad the dale of Ihe kiUn*.. “J*””* £ 

The sources s*id a Spanish anti- 


terrorist unit was investigating. 


to a man 


, , . : _. rt tinian resident in Spain. She said 

A purponedfactton of the PLO Ac latest <*0^ tbld.her list 

Haw " ~ 1 i nlmfviM eaf f W W lPl- _ “ • . . • 


Shun Cripple Was an Unlikely Target 


Coupled with that change in atti- Hijackers Singled Out Elderly Jew, No Threat to Anybody 5 



Ifowjx JUSw^bik 91 m ® 

Est. 1911 

tell the taxi driver ''sank roo doe noo" 
5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 
Falkentmm Str. 9, MUNICH 



tnde, Israeli analysts of terrorism 
say, was tbe encouragement of 
young Pales tinians resulting from 
their perception of the success of 
Lebanese Shiite Moslem militia- 
men in driving the Israeli Army out 
of Lebanon. 

Israel's release of 1,150 Arab de- 
tainees in May in exchange for 
three Israeli soldiers captured in 
Lebanon also appears to have in- 
fluenced militant Palestinian 
youths, the experts say. 

Included in the group were 600 
Palestinians who were released to 
the occupied territories, some of 
whom were involved in the most 
notorious terrorist murders in Isra- 
el’s history. 

While the released prisoners are 
under such close surveillance that it 
is unlikely that they would be able 
to engage in terrorist acts, their 


By Lionel Barber 

Washington Peat Service 

WASHINGTON — It was a day 
of uncertainty for the friends and 
relatives of the hostages aboard the 
luxury liner Achilla Lauro, a day 
that ended with relief: except for 
the family of Leon Ktingfaoffer. 

Mr. Klinghoffer, 69, who was 
crippled, was singled out from 
among more than 500 hostages and 
killed by Palestinian terrorists. 

The reports Wednesday night 
that Mr. Klinghoffer's body had 
been dumped over the side of the 
Italian ship ended a day that had 
begun with the erroneous report 
that the hijackers had surrendered 
and all the hostages were safe. 


tbe State Department confirmed in 
a call that Mr. Klinghoffer, a Jew, 
had been murdered. 


Perhaps foremost among the 
many mysteries about the two-day 
piracy is why Mr. Klinghoffer was 
singled out by the four Palestinian 
hijackers. The retired owner of a 
Manhattan appliance shop, he was 
paralyzed on the right ride after a 
stroke five years ago that left his 
speech shirred. 

Mr. Klinghoffer was one in a 
group of 11 friends and relatives 
from New York and New Jersey, 
mostly retirees, who had booked 


called Force 17 claimed 
bflity Thursday for the 
tbe two missing Israeli seamen^ 

An telephone caller tdd an 
national news agency in Madri 
“A commando of Force -17 * 
two Zionist seamen of the Zionist 
ship California bn Oct 5." 

[The Associated Press nmorted 
from Tel Aviv that Prime Minister 
Shimon Peres said Thursday drat 
the sailors were killed in oold 


month that he was a cousin of the 
tenant- 

sources said security 
Hm shipping compa- 
thekilhngsandhad 
of the two seamen, 
has not recognized Isra- 
el, and there are no 



representatives in Spain. 
Madrid 



has pledged to establish 
diplomatic relations before general 
elections dne by October next year, 


the $1,700, 16-day cruise on the j ackers “cm a dark nigh t with a 


Before confirmation of the death 
was received, Carol Hodes, a fam- 
ily friend, offered a poignant por- 
trait of Mr. KHnghoffen 

*Tve known him for several 
years. He doesn’t hear well. He’s 
got shirred speech, and he spends a 
lot of his time in a wheelchair. He’s 
hardly a threat to anybody, and I 
can’t imagine why anybody would 
want to hurt him. " 

Phyllis YeOin, 44, whose mother, 

Sophie Chasser, 69, was one of the 
hostages said: 

1 nave mixed emotions. I am ; 

not mind meeting^ 1 tbehi- UNESCO Debates Fate of Americans 


blood, and security sources said but Foreign Minister Francisco 
they were murdered by Palestinian FemAndez Orddfiez has said that 
gunmen, possibly members of the such a move was not furthered by 
Palestine Liberation Organization, IsraeFs bombing of the PLO head- 
according to Israel Radio. quarters in Tuna last week. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Achille Lauro. 


machine gun.” 


News of Mr. Klinghoffer’s death 

“Let the party begin,'’ a jubilant 
rdeasenonetheless boosted morale ^bittier, lOmghoffer’s But 

among potentially violent Palestin- daughter, said Wednesday mom- oat Wednesday, there were con- 

flitting reports of violence aboard 
Her exuberance turned to de- the cruise ship. Mr. Klinghoffer's 
spair, then to grief Wednesday 58-year-old wife, Marilyn, appar- 
mghL After hours of uncertainty, entry was unharmed. 


ian nationalists and encouraged a 
belief that capture did not neces- 
sarily result in life imprisonment, 
Israeli terrorism experts say. 


Have a seat 


We'd like you to join our “Who's Who” of partners from nations around 
the world in everything from textiles to telecommunications equipment, 
cars and computers, stereos and ships. 

If you’re interested in dynamic growth for the future, have a seat. 


AUSTRIA, 

AUSTRALIA, 

ARGENTINA, 

* BANGLADESH, 

BARBADOS, 

BELGIUM, 

BAHRAIN, 

BOLIVIA, BRAZIL, 

BRUNEI, BURMA, CHILE, 
CAMEROON, CANADA, CHINA, 
COLOMBIA, COSTA RICA, CHAD, 
CENTRAL AFRICA, CONGO, DAHOMEY, 
DOMINICAN. REPUBLIC; DENMARK, FIJI, 
ECUADOR, ETHIOPIA, EGYPT, FINLAND, 
FRANCE, GABON, GERMANY, GUATEMALA, 
GHAI&, GREECE. GAMBIA. GUINEA , INDIA, 
gONlf-KONG, HONDURAS, IRAN, IRAQUE, 
-INDONESIA, IVORY COAST, IRELAND,.*^" 
ITALY, JAMAICA, JAPAN, JORDAN, ! 
j KENYA, KUWAIT, KYPROS, LIBYA, 

I LEBANON, LIBERIA, MALAYSIA, 
j MEXICO, MOROCCO, NIGERIA, 

P : " ' PAKISTAN,. PANAMA,- ,PAPUA,.. ...... ' 

jrw j PARAGUAY, 

C._^,.,,.PHlUPmES, PORTUGAL^- 




a// 

/L 



Kidnappers 
Say Russians 
Can’t Go Yet 


SOFIA (NYT) — The second day of the UNES(X)gene^ conference 
here .was dominated by a Soviet-led effort to dismiss American nationals 
working for the organization. The United States withdrew , from die 
organization last year. 

The Soviet effort, supported by Algeria, India and Cameroon, could 
also lead to the closing of the observer mission that the United States still 
keeps at UNESCO and to a decision to prosecute the United States 
before the International Court of Justice for nonpayment of its share of 
thisyeai's budget. ... 

The Sovi 


Soviet Union demanded Wednesday that the general conference, 
UNESCO’s supreme decision-making body, should itself quickly debate 
and decide the organization's future relationship with the United Stm0 
The Reagan administration left the United Nations Fdncfltiona), Sdot 
tific and Cultural Organization because it regards the agency as unduly 
politicized and hostile to Western values. 


The Associated Press 

BEIRUT — 

said in a statement publis! 

three Soviet hostages “until we are 5 More Blacks Killed in South Africa 

reassured of Syria s intentions^ m 
Lebanon. 

The independent. Behut newspa- 
per an-Nahar said the statement it 
received from the Islamic Libera- 
tion Qrgamzation-Khaled ibn Wa- 
lid Forces also accused the Soviet 
Union of “seizing the whole people 
of Moslem Afghanistan hostage.” 

The newspaper did not say how 
it had received the statemenL Pro- tT o in , . ___ '• 

vious claims by the group were tele- lYeW U.3. Y 16W OI ABM Pad AsSlllled 


JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) — Five South African blacks, indnding 
an inf ant, have been burned to death in violence tbe day after thousands 
packed churches to pray for an end to racial strife. 

A police spokesman said a three-week-old baby died after Ins home 
was hit by a firebomb at Umlazi township near Durban. In another attack 
at Uxnlazi, a woman was burned to death, and the drained body of a mao 
was found at Chestervflle. 

Police said Wednesday night that they found the bodies of two men 
under banting tires near Port Elizabeth, in Cape Province. 


phoned to Western news agencies, 
but 


£ 






ARABIA, 





fe-feLEONl 

U.K. 

te'ARAB 


m r 

«2| 





t their authenticity could not be. 
verified 

In its statement, which ran an 
the newspaper’s front page, the Is- 
lamic liberation Organization con- 
demned what it railed “the ugliest, 
tyranny applied on Moslems of die 
Soviet Union" and said it would 
“peraist in holding the Soviet spies 
in our possession." . . 

The Soviet hostages are Oleg . 
nrin, a cultural attach fc; Valery 
irikov, a commercial official; and 
Nikolai Svirsky, the embassy doc- 
tor. 

They were kidnapped in pre- 
dominantly Moslem West Beirut 
on Sept. 30 along with a consular 
secretary, Arkadi Katkov, whose 
was found two days later, 
the Islamic Liberation Organi- 
zation claimed responsibility for 
the abductions and demanded a 
halt to an offensve by Syrian- 
backed forces against Moslem fun- 
damentalists in tbe northern port 
ofTripolL 

A ceasc-firewas proclaimed in 
Tripoli on Oct 4. Syria, which is 
Moscow’s principal ally in 'the Mid- 
dle East dispatched 1,000 peace- 
keeping troops into the city Sunday 
to disarm tbe combatants. 

Police said Thursday that the 


WASHINGTON (WP) — The 
chairman of the.House Foreign Af- 
fairs Committee chairman, Repre- 
sentative Dante B. Fascefl, a Flori- 
da Democrat has denounced the 
Reagan administration’s new inler- 

B ion of the 1972 Anti-Ballistic 
e Treaty as “incredible" and 
said die panel would question Sec- 
retary of State George P. Shultz on 
the issue next week and hold full 
- hearings soon. 

A senior White House official 
said Tuesday that it is now admin- 
istration policy that an “agreed 
statement” attached to the 13-year- 
old treaty permits testing and de- 
velopment of ABMs using “other 
physical principles” such as lasers 
and directed- energy weapons. 
Many dements of the administra- 
tion's Strategic Defense Initiative 
.program are based on such technol- 
ogy- This position reverses legal in- 
terpretations by the Reagan ad- 
ministration and its predecessors 

since the signing of the ABM trea- 
ty- 



Oante B. Fasoefl 


defense activities which the admmj0 
istratian has been so critical ot'Jn 


c i, . . , re F cnt days." Aides to Mr. Fascdl 
Kqnwentative Fascdl said the said no one consulted Congress 


new 

arms 


SSl ^ 011 about ** n ew in twpreta tibn, 

control as embodied in the which he called “a ftmdSrental de- 


■ . — — “ “ “ Uib rTMlIrll 

with “serious and In- 


anti-ballistic missile readnng irmheations." 

*«“* tauisuaj max me g-\ 

^ Salvadoran Troops 

- 

soWhus^SuSS^dS^s^tt' b ?* T*™*!.*®* ■« 


had been nqxnted in Tripoli since 
Syria's latest intervention. 

Tbe Syrian move halted a 19-day 
battle between the Sunni Moslem 
fundaxoenufirt group known 


ft* gSSrS^-go^nment 

TavdMd.orthuSMta.xuo™. 


that OiMfi'r J L— T -t* — 




xS'i -'yA^k-ir 




\ v'f. V '■ ’• : ‘ r . 1 - ' ' ^ v '■ •• •- -• , s ^ ^ 

1 f ' rr« 

^ ^ — 11 — — • • • : ..UfA 'rt.TSL&.'r A ‘irr. 


drat Syria’s record in Lebanon 
since dvfl war broke out in 1975 
was (me of “ttying to subdue the 
Moslems other by diplomacy or 
the gnu.” 

Syria . maintains about 25,000 
troops in nrathezn and eastern. 
Lebanon. 

A month before its intervention 


Bulgarian Won’t Testify in Rome Trial 

L Anuajov, the only Bul garian in custody 
tiing with Turks and other Bulaarians tn wti 


on 


R°l 8 arianstol^ Pope John 


- — he was iD and ratetating his contention that 


m Tripoli, Syria moved 150 
and 100 in 


ImieOigence agents into __ 
Bekaa Valley city of Zahle in east- 


he had never known *««™ing ms contenooa ina 

Jhcj»P«iu I 98 ..MT. 




three 


CPY 


C.P.Q. Box 2810, 82S3 Stroui, Korp t ; 
TLX.: DAEWOO K23341 -4 


■- ■" - 7 





cm Ldranon to stop hostilities be- • w T . * 

SA SorietUnfen- 


Moslems in surrounding villages. 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


• MASIHTS. DOCTORATE 
U H 


Send dctolTed roaume 
for free evaluotliin. 


PAGHC WESIHIN UMVBK9TY 
MS N,Smlwito Btvdw 
La* Aimlca* California 

" 90049* Dept. 2t U&A. 


has not yet beat wotke^^^^* £mi ^P but a ted » 

For the Record 




is ' 


T'*. 




•>. V- 


N.; 


•45 r. 
t’ ... 




. ■ *iri U • 

i . .. 


•T: : 


'1 

«. “ ' 


'Jr- 



s 


’ Li: 


• drew the 




Anatoli Karpov, and his < 
it tnk matdh.TbuE™, 
m *«e 24-game match. 


cabmet report on Chmese-\iala^,L . - -- 

editor, Derek Davies. ysan ties, accoRfing to the tnagatme's 


(Bjuuts) 

Review* 


. 1 _(VPi)_ 






1 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 


Page 3 



Puerto Rico 
May Seal 


;• 'Mr 

mnr^c ■ 

mb *i\tt 
h»- war*-,. 

l4m e^;.- 
ftrfT-r-.- 


“*? C‘>v- 

;• ia>ii 



•V V 




P; 


I : m 


XK'i 

fV- 

BW, ? 22 

tv-* 

tes**. 

- , 

Vy r 

wcx:- 


r thrift 


tte. 


taws?-. 


>$* 
i-ld v^i 

'’■•• 2 

. ; - 

7;‘ L 
•=- -- 



LB BRIER 

— W-w<i . . ^ 


ite^ Fate of Autu 

’“'■'•'SSflb* 




ifii -• >•- : - . 
^V:- :• - 

i 

jt -.t . . 

*vr *» r.y - 
. -• > 
i v ,- r ■* ■■ 

- ■ 

i‘f “»■' : 

w <—. : 


'.'safe 




- ■— ‘..as 
’ -!'2. -■ 


Killed in Sooth! 


■>•'. ■■: ■. r . ■ ■■ x jC; 


*■ 

r. . ’ « 




of VH'l Pact.y 



». By Jon Nordhrimer \ 

•_ , • York Tima Service 

■ PONCE, Puerto Rico — Health 
officials worried about the spread 
.of disease have asked the govern- 
ment to consider sealing the floor 
of a valley where a landslide buried 
-.hundreds of victims. ... 

Die slide devastated the haiede 
itytown of Mameyes.oonh of 
’•Ate Monday, leaving its residents 
under tons of mud and rubble. 
• health officials, fearing that the 
.bodies cannot be recovered quick- 
5y. would like the valley to become 
admass grave. 

“It is one of the most, difficult 
►and delicate decisions that the 
Puerto Rican government has ever 
, .beat asked to make,” said Mayor 
lose Dapena Thompson of Ponce, 
•a city of 250,000 people on the 
'island’s southern coast “But it is a 
- decision that has to be made quick- 
ly due to the threat to the rest of the 
..co mmuni ty.* 1 

[U.S. Army searchers probed the 
nibble Thursday with dogs and 
electronic lis tening devices to de- 
termine if there were survivors, 
AJnited Press International report- 
^fed. Between 200 and 500 persons 
are believed to have died in the 
jnudslide. 

... [“After one and a half hoars of 
^searching, the dogs have not detect- 
..ed any survivors, but they appear 
Jp have detected bodies very deep 
.'inside,” said Luis Manuel Carrillo, 
a National Guard coloueL 

[A White House spokesman said 
.Thursday that President Ronald 
Reagan had decided to declare 
Puerto Rico a disaster area. The 
island is a U.S. commonwealth and 
its residents are US. citizens.] 

About 5,000 mourners gathered 
Wednesday at Ponce’s sports stadi- 
um at a memorial service for 23 
' -victims whose bodies were pulled 
: 'from the shantytown. 

In an interview Wednesday, Mr. 
t Dapena said the Mameyes hillside 
: was riddled with “defective water 
-lines and septic tanks” that had 
‘“saturated the ground with water. 
‘He said the problem had existed for 
15 years and was being investigated 
“as a factor that possibly contnbut- 
ied to the mudslide. 

7; A limestone outcrop at the top of 
'riie steep hill collapsed under die 
'weight of three days of heavy rain 
as residents slept, cradling houses 
on stilts and weak concrete founda- 
tions. The dwelling? were 
onto the valley flow to form a 
- foot (12-meter} pile about 200 
^"yards (182 meters) long ‘ 

If Governor Rafael Heraindez 
Colon decides to txun the vanity 
'“'into a mass grave, bulldozers wifi 
■push remaining- rock and earth 
from die ride of the hill to com- 
1 pletdy cover the wreckage contain- 
ing the bodies, Mr. Dapena said. 

_ Geologists also were studying a 
crack at the brow of the 700-foot 
hill to determine if. 100 dwdfings 
-'that escaped the landslide were- in 
“danger.- ! 

The National Weather- Service 
riiad issued warnings about, the pos- 
sibility of Had) floods and muds- 
lides when the rainstorm onphalhr 
riut Puerto Rico late last week. It 
^bas since developed into a tropical 
-Storm designated Isabel. 
j “But people do not heed such 
'■warning,” Mr. Dapena said. “Poor 
-people. do not realize the impor- 
~4ance Of obeying dus advice. Un- 
-fortunately, they are skeptical 
'about leaving their frames and 
/ prop e rty, unguarded-” . . 



l . . New York Picks a Fight With Professional Wrestling 


Mounters filing by the coffins of 23 landslide victims. 


U.S. Teachers Union 


*.T- 

tr 


<3Lfa^ 




.<* 


10 w 




- * 
«• 


■U.S. Casino Punished 
For Helping Gambler 

The. Associated Press 

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP, 
New Jersey — The state Casino 
^-•Control Co mmis sion has Ordered 
‘■■Caesar’s Hotel Casino in Atlantic 
iCity to shut down for a dtQr as 
p unishmeq t for helping Brian Mo- 
lony. an admitted compulrive^m- 
iricr, lose part of the $102 imth on 
be confessed embezzliug from a 
Toronto bank 

It was the first time a casino had 
been ordered shut since legalized 
'gambling began in Atlantic City in 
•1978. Caesars must dose Nov. 30, 
•'the Saturday after Thanksgiving 
Officials said that on comparable 
■days in 1983 and 1984, the casino 
: ‘took in $700,000 to $900,000. : 


. <' 


.* r 

* hr 




rLT\C 


- 


i'.f^ V 


T — ' 
•< V 

C ■' '• 

tv- 

r 1 

r 

A 

«*• 

irf 
? »>-■* 




. > > 






Alexandre Savin 

THE CASHMERE 
DESIGNER IN PARIS 


LL DESIGNS 



LL STYLES 


LL COLORS 


LL PRICES 


Front 2 to 10 plys. 

FOR LADIES AND MEN 

EXCLUSIVELY FOR 


Cashmere House 

2. rue d'Agucsscau . 
angle 60. Faubourg 5r-Honorc 
■ PARIS#* ■ 
EXPORT PRICES • 
TAX FREE 



By Kdth B. Richburg 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON— Children in- 
fected' with the AIDS virus should 
be. allowed to attend daw* only 
after a team of doctors, school offi- 
cials and parents agree tiut it is 
safe, according to guidelines re- 
leased by the National Education 
Association, the largest U.S. teach- 
ers union. ' • 

The union recommended 
Wednesday that children infected 
with acquired immune deficiency 
syndrome, dr AIDS, should not be 
allowed in school if they have via- 
ble open lesions, or if they are be^ 
Keved prone to vomiting, spitti 

nrh iting tluar da«nmi« ftm 

dren.exduded from the dassroom 
should be given alternative instruc- 
tion, the union said in its Cret pub- 
lic statement ou. the issue.' - 

Teachers infected with AIDS 
3bould be allowed to remain in 
their classrooms only after a gnnilar 
deteniii^atkm .tlmt'.th^.are not en- 
dangering students or other teach- 
ers, according to die union’s pro- 
posed standards. 

The gniddines closely follow rec- 
ommendations published in Au- 
gust by the Centers far Disease 
Control and are the first national 
standards from any education 
group dealing with AIDS in'* 
schools. . . - 

A Spokesman for the centers said. 
Wednesday that 191 children un- 
der age 13 were known to have had 
the disease; 120 of thou have died. 
Three-quarters of those cases in- 
volved infants too young to be in 
school . 

.1W teachers union’s general 
counsel, Robert Chanin, said 
-Wednesday that the organization 
was trying to strike a balance be- 
tween excluding AIDS-infected 
childreiL and, leathers from class- 


rooms and a blanket policy of al- 
lowing them into schooL 

The guidelines left open many 
questions: Recommending that 
AIDS children excluded from elate 
be given instruction in isolation 
raises the question of who should 

ihan. 

“Is it volunteers?” Mr. Chanin 
said. “Do you assign someone to do 
it? Do you get an AIDS-infected 
teacher to teach an AIDS-infected 
child?. Axe we setting up a leper 
colony?" . 

■ Process od Drugs Is Limited 

Federal health officials Wednes- 
day reported some progress toward 
developing drags to combat AIDS, 
but tbey^ warned that the quest for a 
cure was an “almost impossible 
task." The New York Times report- 
ed from Washington. 

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of 
die National Institute of Allergy 
and Infectious Diseases, said that 
leading researchers met here Mon- 
day and concluded that one prom- 
ising drag min min' administered 
intravenously For six or more 
Weeks, could block the ability of 
the AIDS vims to reproduce itself 
in the body. 

Tests done so far are designed 
primarily to determine the safety of 
the drug rather than its effective- 
ness. 

Dr. Fauci added, however, that 
the researches had also “universal- 
ly noted” that “the patients did not 
get better” while taking the drag 

AIDS attarJre the immune sys- 
tem, leaving the body defenseless 
against infections, including pneu- 
monias and certain rare cancers. 

The immune systems of AIDS 
victims who were given the drug 
did hot immediately recover. Dr. 
Fauci said, and the patients showed 
no signs of clinical improvement in 
the brief period of the tests. 


By William E Grist 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — “And is it not 
true," the witness was asked sol- 
emnly, “that the woman in ques- 
tion was stir-frying vegetables at 
the time?” 

The witness, who sat before tele- 
vision fights and a bouquet of mi- 
crophones in the vast New York 
Stale Hcaxing Room in the World 
Trade Center, answered: “Sic was. 
Someone could have been seriously 
injured.” 

The Senate Task Force on Pro- 
fessional Wrestling held a hearing 
Tuesday on a bill introduced by 
State Sena tor Abraham Be rnstein, 
Democrat of the Bronx, to ban pro- 
fessional wrestling in the state. 

The witness, Judge Daniel D. 
Lcddy Jr. of Family Court on Stat- 
• en Island, was tiling the panel erf 
senators about an incident in which 
a teen-age boy became crazed from 
watching professional wrestling 
and slapped a sleeper hold on his 
mother while she stir-fried. 

The sign in the hallway read 
“Senate Hearing on Professional 
Wrestling" and passers-by kepi 
sticking their head in die doorway 
and saying “Is this for real?" 

Indeed it was. There were all the 
trappings of real hearings: an au- 
gust panel of senators, television 
cameras, reporters, aides scurrying 
about, a few uncooperative wit- 
nesses and a few others anxious to 
spill the beans. 

“But shouldn’t they be talking 
about something else, like tinner 
or deficits?" said Vincent Fasano, 
who works in the building and 
dropped in during his lunch hour. 
“There's a lot of money in wrestling 
now. Maybe they could bdp with 
the deficit by holding wrestling 
matches in the capitol building.” 

Mr. Bernstein, who served as 
chairman of the pwv*»Fngg said 
wrestling required a suspension of 
disbelief. Some spectators, watch- 
ing wrestlers, promoters and others 
testify, said the same could be said 
of his boxing. 

Sheikh All Abdufia of Saudi 
Arabia, known to his neighbors on 
East Second Street as Al Greco, 
came to testify dressed in robe, bur- 
noose and aviator sunglasses. A 
wrestling manager, he denied all 
suggestions that the outcome of 
wrestling matches was predeter- 
mined. 

Dr. Robert E. Gould, a psychia- 
trist, testified that his studies 
showed ille gal tactics outnumbered 


legal tactics in wrestling by 3-to-l, 
and that children who watched 
wrestling were more violent than 
those who watched swimming. 
Then he said flatly, “Mr. Chair- 
man, wrestling is absolutely fixed!” 

Marge Montgomery, a member 


of Andre the Giant and other wres- 
tlers of the World Wrestling Feder- 
ation, said by idephone that he did 
not atiend because “some of these 
politicians have brains the size of 
dehydrated peas." 

A wrestler who looked in for a 


Sheikh Ali Abdulia, a manager, said that if 
New York state banned wrestling, it would 
next have to ban John Wayne war movies. 


of the audience, covered her cars, 
smiled and said: “I don’t want to 
hear this." 

Irvin Muchnick, who is writing a 
book about wrestling, said: “It’s 
like the lawyer in 'Mirade on 34th 
Street’ trying to prove there’s no 
Santa Clans." 

Burt Randolph Sugar, who 
writes books about wrestling, testi- 
fied: “Fixed? I know the outcome 
when I go to see Hamlet, too, but I 
go (O see Olivier.” 

Mr. Bernstein lamented that 
only a couple of the TOO wrestlers 
be had invited had shown up. 

Captain Lou Alb a no , manager 


few mmoles and who insisted his 
legal name was Manfred the Mani- 
ac, said he would not testify be- 
cause be might become angered by 
the fine of questioning and decide 
to body-slam some senators and 
put Mr. Bernstein in a hold called 
the double-arm bar. 

“Maybe a figure-four leg lock, 
too," he said. 

Another wrestler who showed up 
was the diminutive Kessler Ray- 
mond, the Haiti Kid, who said: 

“Certainly this bill can’t pertain to 
midget wrestling! There’s never 
been any criticism of that" 


Two former wrestlers testified 
that wrestling was fixed. 

“I was on the 10 most-hated 
wrestlers list at one time." said 
Eddy Mansfield, the Continental 
Lover, “so 1 know what I’m talking 
about.” 

Sheikh Ali Abdulia. who said he 
“has roots in Saudi Arabia." said 
that if Lhe state banned wrestling, it 
would next have to ban John 
Wayne war movies. 

Senator Anthony Masiello. a 
Democrat of Buffalo, said he did 
not quite believe the sheikh's testi- 
mony that wrestling matches were 
not predetermined, and the sheikh 
said he did not quite believe Mr. 
Masidlo’s prepared statement that 
“this task force has not predeter- 
mined anything." 

Mr. Bernstein said the foul tac- 
tics wrestling teaches youngsters 


and the anti-Americanism of such 
wrestlers as lhe Iron Sheikh of Iran 
and Nikolai Volkoff of Russia “dis- 
gust" him. 

He said lhaL seeing wrestling 
fans cheer eye-gouging reminded 
him of when a crowd yelled, 
“Jump! Jump!" when a man 
threatened to jump off the top of 
the DeWitt Clinton Hotel in Alba- 
ny. 

"Why would people do that?" he 
asked, and someone responded. 
“Was the jumper a state legisla- 
tor?" 

"Wrestling is not legitimate." 
Mr. Bernstein concluded. “It is just 
showmanship to attract attention." 

“There is some showmanship in 
everything." said the sheikh, sur- 
veying the reporters and Lhe televi- 
sion cameras, “even politics." 


San Francisco's Campton Place Hotel . . . 
Where high expectations are quietly met. 


[ust off Union Square San Francisco boasts a small, 
private and notably cheerful hotel— Campton Place, 
located just steps from one of America's premier 
shopping quarters, and only a few minutes’ walk from the 
city’s financial district it promises urban convenience 
and uncommon hospitality. 

One hundred twenty-six lovely guest rooms and 
suites, a highly acclaimed restaurant and amiable bar, 
two tasteful meeting rooms— all available to you 
with a personalized service delightfully 
evident throughout the hotel. 

Include us in your next trip to San Francisco. 


CAMPTON 

PLACE 

340 Stockton Street. San Francisco. CA 94108 
(415) 781-5555. TELEX: h77-1185 CPTN CABLE- CAMPTON 






Baume & Mercier 

GENEVE 

1830 



owont-qprde 


Gmu. wauriosKur' 


.7 ax -free for export 


aitim 


PARIS: 16, place Vendome - 1, bd de ta Madeleine 
70, fg Saint-Honore Palais des Congres, Porte Maillot 
CANNES : 19, La Croisette 






WORLDWIDE ENTERTAINMENT 



mmm 


AT C 0 L 0 NUS * 

... 





Ul pHAfELET " 

du 3 au 27 octobre 1985 

ipn r .oigneni(?rts : 

au ''>40 Hr i r'uj-jt Ci! 7500; puns o: ” h’o 19 ■> ■ '.f-i 23.7 ii 4- 

3 Ci 'j;,i r3spcncor.es . 2. rye scoaora-cosoane 75001 r-nru. 
oqi rrct-naeur 'r-i ;d i c-P one; 233 OC Ou 


Get the 
right feeling 
about 

Amsterdam 

YabYum 


VflW 


Sirigsl 295, Amsterdam 
All major credit^ cards accepted. 


WORLDWIDE 

ENTERTAINMENT 

appears every 
" Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday 

For information 
call Francoise Qfcmcnt 
in Paris on 747-12.65 
or your local 1HT 
representative 
’ (Ust in Classified 
Section) 



For worldwide financial service, you should 
look for a bank that offers you a bit more 
than just services worldwide. 


You need a bank whose interest doesn't stop 
short at your balance sheet A bank that 
takes the trouble to understand your busi- 
ness, in order to provide you with sound 
advice; and not just in financial matters. A 
bank that is large enough to offer you a com- 
plete range of financial services, yet flexible 
enough to produce tailor-made solutions to 
your international problems. 


We are Germany's second largest bank, with 
1,000 domestic branches, and over eighty 
offices worldwide. After being in international 
business for more than a century we work for 
more than 100,000 companies. They know 
what they can expect from us. A full range of 
international financial services - and a bit 
more. 



One of ihe leading banks in the world. 

Dresdner Bank AG 

Head Office: Frankfurt/Main, Fed. Rep. of Germany. 


Dresdner Barllpi 


Bank with imagination 


iriil 


4 










Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 


Congress Secretly Votes 
Another $300 Million in 


* ' r , 4 ; 4 

*. , * * ** , 

>• "ZrS - r '• " 

* . . _ . ■ : 


By Joanne Omang 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Congress 
has secretly approved another $300 
million in military aid for anti-So- 
viet rebels in A fghanis tan over the 
□ext two years, according to 
sources in the intelligence commu- 
nity. 

The funding, approved late last 
month after several weeks of heat- 
ed debate in the House and Senate 
intelligence committees, is in addi- 
tion to secret funds already appro- 
priated for fiscal 1986 and 1987. 

It is expected to be used primari- 
ly for amm nnition and s mall weap- 
ons, but part of it may be spent on a 
ground-based anti-aircraft missile 
system to battle Soviet helicopters. 

The new funding is a major in- 
crease from the reported fiscal 1 985 
total of about 5250 million, which 
at the lime was reported to make up 
the bulk of the CIA's fund for co- 
vert operations worldwide. 

The additional spending has 
prompted concern among Demo- 
crats on intelligence committees in 
the House and" the Senate over the 
scope and direction of U.S. aid to 
the rebels in Afghanistan, the 
sources said Wednesday. 

“People are seeing the potential 
of a Sl-billion-a-year program 
pretty soon." a source said. “For 
the first time there's a realization of 
that, and there's a lot of questions 
about just what are the policy im- 
plications and what are we getting 
out of this." 

Congress ha«t been unusually 
unified in backing the Afghanistan 
guerrilla resistance to Soviet occu- 
pation forces. 

Casualties have been heavy on 
both sides. Supporters of the cur- 
rent request argued that the rebels 
needed to feel confident of stable 
supplies over the next two years. 

Critics have said that much of 
the aid intended for the rebels has 
been used for graft and political 
maneuvering involving the CIA, as- 
sorted intermediaries and P akistani 
government officials who are be- 
lieved to be helping with the trans- 
fers. 

The debate was started several 
weeks ago when the Reagan admin- 
istration asked permission to fun- 
nel 5300 million to the Afghan aid 

E rogram from fiscal 1985 money 
ft unspent in a secret Defense 
Department account 

Soviet Delegates Visit China 

Feuiers 

BEIJING — The first Soviet 
parliamentary delegation to visit 
China in more than 20 years ar- 
rived here Thursday. 


Although several members of the 
House intelligence committee ar- 

S ed that ibe new funding should 

delayed until the aid program 
was reevaluated, the administra- 
tion pushed to obtain approval be- 
fore the fiscal year ended SepL 30 
and the funds reverted to the Trea- 
sury. 

The Reagan administration 
avoided the need for approval by 
the full Congress because it had 
already appropriated the funds for 
national security purposes, the 
sources said. 

But the administration’s high- 
pressure tactics annoyed some law- 
makers and led to questions about 
the sudden discovery of so much 
unspent money at a time of rising 
congressional interest in cutting de- 
fense spending. 

■ Tass Assails Afghan Aid 
The U25. decision to funnel mil- 
lions of dollars in additional covert 
military aid to rebels in Afghani- 
stan will make it impossible to end 
five years of war in that country, 
according to a Tass report from 
Moscow quoted Thursday by Unit- 
ed Press International. 

“There can be no end to the war 
while it is being artificially 
whipped up by the current Wash- 
ington a dminis tration," Tass said. 



AT THE DIVIDE — President Francois Mitterrand of 
France, center, visiting the Berlin Wall on Thursday 
with Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West Germany and 
Beilin's mayor, Eberhard Diepgen. Mr. Mitterrand laid 
a wreath honoring Germans killed fleeing to the West. 


TKb ABoeetad Pm 

s Mitterrand of 


Britain Plans to Fight Street Violence 
With New Law on Disorderly Conduct 


BLACKPOOL, England — The 
British government announced 
plans Thursday to introduce a new 
law to combat street violence after 
rioting spread to the Midlands city 
of Leicester. 

Home Secretary Douglas Hurd 
told the annual conference of the 
ruling Conservative Party that he 
would ask Parliament to include a 
new offense of “disorderly con- 
duct" in a law on public order that 
is expected to be approved soon. 

He said the new measure would 
enable police to prevent hoodlums 
from gathering in rundown housing 
projects, where most of the recent 
inner-city violence has occurred. A 
policeman was stabbed to death in 
north London on Sunday during a 
riot near a housing project 

Mr. Hurd and other speakers 
dismissed opposition claims that 
the new outbreak of urban violence 
resulted from deprivation and un- 
employment. which has almost tre- 


bled since the Conservative Party 
came to power in 1979. 

“In former times,” Mr. Hurd 
s?id. “a man might be forgiven for 
stealing to feed his starving family. 
But it is not poverty which leads 
people to bum down post offices, 
to loot television sets and video 
recorders and to make vicious at- 
tacks on the police." 

"The roots of these acts lie in 
greed and the excitement of vio- 
lence." the home secretary said. He 
spoke during a debate on public 
order on the thud day of the party 
conference. 

Most of the new wave of rioting, 
which began last month in the ma-. 
jor industrial city of Birmingham, 
has involved black youths. The vio- 
lence Wednesday night in Leices- 
ter, however, apparently was ignit- 
ed by rivalry between football fans. 

Police said that fans set Fur to 
cars and looted shops after the 
Leicester team played neighboring 
Derby County. 

Mr. Hurd, who was pelted with 


rocks when he visited an area of 
Birmin gham in which riots broke 
out last month, said police had ar- 
rested 662 people since that distur- 
bance. The Birmingham riots were 
followed by major violence in two 
districts of London and lesser dis- 
turbances in other areas. 

In arguing for the new measure, 
the home secretary said that police 
lacked adequate powers to control 
“hooligan" behavior. 

He also promised that police 
would receive aQ the equipment 
they required. 

Speakers at the debate accused 
local opposition politicians in the 
areas where there had been rioting 
of trying to provoke hatred against 
the police. 

“This time," said lain Picton, a 
Conservative member of the Great- 
er London Council from South 
London, "the criminal and political 
dements have come to the fore in 
an unholy alliance erf ultraleft and 
organized crime.” 


Yul Brynner, 
The King of 
? King and I,’ 

Is Dead at 65 


(Vew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Yul Biynner, 
65, the actor who played and re- 
played the starring role in “The 
King and I" for more than 30 years, 
dieoThursday at New York Hospi- 
tal of complications of lung cancer. 

In June, Mr. Bryaner complete 
a triumphal return engagement of 
his hit musical in New York. 

He became identified with his 
role as the haughty Siamese mon- 
arch in the musical in a way that 
few performers have been finked 
with a character. 1 

Mr. Brynner gave 4,625 perfor- 
mances as the King of Siam over 
the course oF 30 years, taking his 
final curtain call on June 30 this 
year. He won an Oscar as best actor 
for his role in the 1956 film or the 
Rodgers and Hammerstein musi- 
cal. 

Mr. Brynner was the son of a 
Mongolian mining engineer and a 
Romanian gypsy mother who died 
at his birth. At different times, be 
gave the date of his birth as July 1 1 
in 1915, 1917, 1920 and 1922. His 
father had been bora in Switzer- 
land and later secured Swiss citi- 
zenship and changed the family 
name to Brynner. 

For the first eight years of his 
life, young Yul lived in China, and 
then was sent by his father to live 
with his maternal grandmother in 
Paris, but she died soon afterward. 
He attended a Paris school for a 
time, but dropped out at 13 and 
joined a gypsy troupe as a traveling 
minstrel, then performed as a cir- 
cus acrobat 

He left that vocation only after 
he injured himself seriously — he 
said be suffered 47 fractures — in 
an accident 

After supporting himself as a 
singer and guitarist he joined a 
French troupe in 1934. He came to 
the United States in 1941 and, 
barely fluent in English, learned his 
first role — Fabian, in a touring 
company of ‘Twelfth Nighti’ — 
from a dictionary. 

His career proceeded slowly for 
the next decade. He won some 
praise for his Broadway role as the 
poet Tsai-Yong in “Lute Song" in 
1946, but he was rejected after a 
screen test at Universal in 1947 for 
looking “too Oriental." 

“The King and I" turned that 
sup pored liability into a bonanza. 
The original production played for 
1.246 performances, from 1951 to 
1954. 

Mr. Brynner went on to promi- 
nence in films. He had major roles 
in “The Ten Commandments," 



After Giiiia’s Criticism, ,u si- 
Nakasone May Cancel r 

Visit to War Dead Shrine 


YidBiyuner 

“Anastasia" “The Brothers Kara- 
mazov" and “The Magnificent Sev- 

** 

C fl . 

He was also a man who fused his 
ethnic background and political 
beliefs. In I960, he worked as spe- 
cial consultant to the UN High 
Commissioner on Refugees and 
made a television documentary of 
his visits to refugee camps in Eu- 
rope and the Middle East. 


Orson Welles 
Dies at 70 

(Continued from Page 1) 

but at the age of 16 in Dublin's 
Gate Theater, playing the part of 
the evil Duke of Wurtemberg in 
“Jew Suss." He received good no- 
tices for bis work in the 1931 pro- 
duction. 

He made his Broadway debut in 
1 934 in “Romeo and Juliet," which 
starred Catherine Cornell playing 
both the Chorus and Tybalt. 

In 1975, Mr. Welles received the 
Lifetime Achievement Award of 
the American Film Institute, and 
last year the Directors Guild gave 
him its highest honor, the D.W. 
Griffith award. He was also given, 
in 1970, a special Oscar for “super: 
lative artistry and versatility in the 
creation of motion pictures." 

In 1982 he was awarded the 
French Legion of Honor. 

(UT, AP, Reuters) 


Shooting in Kuwait Ministry 

Reuters 

KUWAIT — A man was wound- 
ed when a colleague opened fire on 
him with a machine gtm in an argu- 
ment Thursday at the Kuwait Inte- 
rior Ministry, a ministry statement 
said. It said the gunman was also 
wounded in the fort by security, 
men trying to cfisarmMm. 


By Gyde Haberman 

Mw York rimes Service 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ya- 
suhiro Nakasone, yielding to sharp 
Chinese criticism, reportedly in- 
tends to a planned visit next 
week to a Shinto shrine dedicated 
to Japan's war dead. 

Mr. Nakasone touched off unex- 
pectedly harsh denunciations in 
Beijing when he made an official 
visit to the, Yasukuni Shrine on 
Aug. 15, the anniversary of Japan's 
surrender in World War IL 

China's official Xinhua press 
agency said a week later that the 
prime minister’s action bad “pan- 
dered” to Japanese who wanted to 
deny their country's guilt for World 
War II. Last month, students 
marched through Tienanmen 
Square in Beijing,' chanting “Down 
with Nakasone" and other anti- 
Japanese slogans in one of the big- 
gest protest demonstrations there 
in years. 

Japanese newspapers reported 
Wednesday that Mr. Nakasone 
hoped to avoid prolonging the con- 
troversy by calling off another visit 
to Yasukuni scheduled for next 
week. His intention was said to 
have been relayed Tuesday night to 
members of the ruling Liberal 
Democratic Party by Takao Eujin- 
ami. the chief cabinet secretary and 
main government spokesman. 

The party members reportedly 
objected strongly to the decision. 
According to Japanese newspapers, 
they contended that the prime min- 
ister should act consistently and 
complained that Japan was giving 
an impression of succumbing to 
Chinese pressure. 

The Yasukuni Shrine, near the 
Imperial Palace grounds, honors 
nearly 25 million Japanese soldiers 
who gave their lives in the last cen- 
tury. Among those honored there, 
however, are convicted war crimi- 
nals like. Japan's wartime prime 
minister, Hiddd Tqjo. 

In the current political debate, 
officials who go to Yasukuni tend 
to find themselves accused as mili- 
tarists by anti-government critics. 

For years, governing-party poli- 
ticians sought, to deflect such 
charges by insisting that their visits 
were made as private citizens. But 
Mr. Nakasone, an ardent national- 
ist, fueled the dispute on the Aug. 
15 anniversary by becoming the 
first postwar prime minister to 
state that be had gone in his official 
capacity. 

He apparently underestimated 
the depth of feeling in China, which 
puts its war dead at more than 20 
million. Tbe sensitivity, resembled 
that shown three years ago' when 
China denounced what it said were 


distortions in Japanese textbook 
accounts of Japan's wartime occu- 
pation of Manchuria. 

Relations have been further 
■strained recently by a growing 
trade imbalance heavily in Japan's 
favor. China's trade deficit with Ja- . 
pan was Sl-2 billion in 1984. a 
figure that soared to 34 billion in 
just the first eight months of this 

■ Wu Urges Restraint on Japati ’ 

Foreign Minister Wu Xueman of . 

China told Japan on Thursday to 
"take note of the general feeling of 
the Chinese people" which gave 
rise to at least two recent anti-Ja- 
panese demonstrations, Reuters re- 
ported from Beijing. 

A spokesman for the Japanese., 
forei gn minis ter. Shin taro Abe,' 
who arrived earlier Thursday for 
talks in Beijing, said that Mr. Wu . 
called on the Japanese not to do 
anything to disturb the friendly re- 
lations between the two countries. . 

Weston diplomats interpreted 
this as a reference to' China's tall 
for Japanese leaders to refrain from - 
further official visits to the Yasu- 
kuni Shrine. 

■ Crackdown on Wall Posters 

Chinese authorities, aided by 

student supporters, have cracked 
down on an outburst of free expres- 
sion at China's leading university,, 
tearing down' or covering up wall 
posters that criticized Japan and 
called for liberty and democracy,- 
The Washington Post reported 
from Beijing. 

Amid about 200 to 250 posters 
pasted on bulletin boards at Beijing. 
University last month to protest. 
Japanese " mili tarism" and trade 
policies were a few that directly 
criticized the ruling Chinese Com-: 
munist Party. 

The posters, put up by an unde- 
termined number of students, 
stirred considerable student inter- 
est But they were visible for little 
more than a week before they bc- : 
gan to be tom down or covered 
ova. 


Marguerite Yonrcenar Is III 

. Return tjf 

BOSTON — Marguerite Your- 
cenar, 82, tbe French novelist and 
the first woman to become a mem- 
ber of the Acadfanie Franqaise, is 
ill in Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital a hospital spokesman said 
Thursday. She was admitted on 
Oct 7 and requested that no details 
be released about the nature of her 
illness. 












y GuJ Hijackers 



Egypt Says 


& 

m 

»5 

V 

ki 

rtf 

j?. 


S* 

S&. 

Wv 

Wr 

*z 

U 

V 

Jk 

:*er 


Si- 

ft? 

ftt 

W* 

S* . 

* 


* 

by 

"rt 5 " 

»S 

•-; r. 


»•: . 
hr: 




(U: - 


lfce : - 




ri-"V 



_ . X- :: 


■I-.. 

i 

■ - i. ■■ 

a. 

4 ■5™ f , 

• ... 




•*. ■ 





-** 

- 


■; 3- 

: ; . • 



.:a • 

i.: • 






*" r ‘ Ki* 



.r: - 

- 1 


. . ‘ l 



* 


74 > • 

" Jj-- 




\ -’-L Ur 


■■“-Hi * , 



. — 

■ • 



r 






If;-- 



■ — 


VT'i 

• 

. - 


■ ■ • — r — : 


• ■ '- '.i; 


"lI, 


• ; 

. . 

.. Ti-t: 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 


l) 

leave Wednesday nightoo the basis 
of a report by Captain De Rosa 

that no one had beea harmed. 

At that time, authorities did not 
kdow.that they had lrilfc d a passen- 
ger, he said. 

The Italian ambassador to 
Egypt, Giovanni Migfiuolo, who 
spent more than six hours aboard, 
the drip talking with passengers 
$nd crew in Port Said, told the 
I talian news agency ANSA in Cai- 
ro. that Leon "Klinghoffer, 69, a 
Jewish American from New -York, 
who was confined to a wheelchair, 
was murdered Tuesday afternoon. ' 

‘‘The hijackers made aH thc Brit- 
ish and American civilians lie 
down, among whom was Leon 
Klinghoffer," Mr. MigHnolo was 
quoted as saying. “The hijackers 
pushed him onto his wheelchair 
and dragged it to the side of the 
boat where, in arid blood, they shot 
him in the face. 

“The corpse was then thrown 
into the sea along with the wheel- 
chair.” 

‘ Mr. Mubarak, in his remarks in 
Cairo reported by the stale-owned 
Middle East News Agency, said: 

“Egypt did what it deemed to be 
Stn the general interest Since we 
■were told that nobody had been 
kflledor wounded, and since coon- 
tries like Italy and Germany agreed 
to our course of action to save 400 
people and the ship, we decided to 
go ahead” and let the hijackers go. 

“Five hours later we were told 
there was a murdered man and, a 
little later, a murdered woman," 
Mr. Mubarak said. He was refer- 
ring to an Austrian woman who 
had gone into hiding on the ship 
and was found Thursday morning. 

In acting the way it did, Mr. 
Mubarak said, Egypt was guided 
by the way U.S. hostages were from 
a hijacked Trans World Airlines 
plane -were saved in Beirut last 
June. 

The PLO sent three envoys to 
help to negotiate the passengers’ 
release in cooperation with Egypt 
and Italy. 

A PLO official in Tunis said the 
hijackers, who he identified as four 
Palestinians aged between 22 and 
24, originally intended to cany out 
an operation in Israel. 

“They were planning to goto Td 
' Aviv,” he said. “Why they changed 
their minds we don’t know.” 

The ship was due to slop in Ash- 
dod, Israel after leaving Egypt 

(AP, Return) 



Israel Says It Gin Prove 
Arafat Role in Hijacking 


Yasser Arafat, the Palestine. Liberation Organization -chairman, discussing the hijacking. 

Asian- Americans: A 'Model Minority 9 


(Continued from Page 1) 
study offered- no general explana- 
tion. ■ y 

- But one of the authors, Robert 
Gardner, said that part of the ex- 
planation may be mat a high pro- 
portion of the Asian immigrants to 
the U-S. since 1965 tend to come 
from the better educated, higher 
occupational classes of their home 
countries, bringing a high level of 
skills arid motivation. 

The study did suggest that the 
wHirafwwai pwt aileas, may be 
attributable to “strong parental 
pressure and support and a level of 
discipline other groups- lade.” 

- The authors quoted John Whit- 


more of the University of Michigan 
as telling U.S. News and World 
Report: “If an American child isn't 
doing well in school his parents 
■think the teacher or school has 
failed or the student just doesn't 
have iL The Asian parent's view is 
that the student isn't trying hard 
enough. Put shoulder to wheel and 
there trill be a payoff.” 

■ Tension With Blacks Gted 
American urban areas need to 
establish education and communi- 
ty erfme prevention programs to 
defuse tension between Asians and 
blades and to hdp fearful immi- 
grants shed their distrust, accord- 
ing to a report by the Philadelphia 


Human Relations Commission, 
The Associated Press reported 
from Philadelphia. 

“Many Asians fear any contact 
with blacks, thmV all blacks are 
criminals and practice violence, 
and believe that all Americans area 
threat to them — even those who 
seek to help them,” said the Rever- 
end James S. Allen Sr., the commis- 
sion chairman. 

The commission said Wednes- 
day it focused on Philadelphia, 
where members documented 38 
confrontations between blacks and 
Asians from January 1984 to July 
1985, but also studiol San Francis- 
co. New York and Los Angeles. 


MORE NEWS B»l LBS TIME 

THE WOMOIN 16 PASS 


U.S. House Votes to Curb Textile Imports 

lost 200,000 jobs since 1980. He 
said passing the textile bfll would 
signal trading partners that Ameri- 
ca wanted to preserve its industrial 
base from surging imports. 

During the debate, many con- 
gressmen listed textile mins in their 
districts that had been dosed be- 
cause of imports, which have more 
than doubled between 1980 and 
1984. 


(Continued from Plage 1) 

garded the diminished margin of 
victory for the bill as a victory. 

Overriding a presidential veto re- 
quires the votes of two-thirds of 
those castingbaDots, and, thus, the 
-number needed in any specific in- 
stance d^pduls on how many of the 
435 congressmen answer the roD 
cafl. 

President Ronald Reagan has 
moved vigorously to counter the 
aggressive congressional mood on 
trade. Mr. Reagan has four . 

speeches on trade; has unveiled bis 


own initiative, including lodging 
imfafr trade complaints himself; 
and has taken strong action to 
bring down the strong dollar, 
which is considered the major 
cause of the trade .deficit. 

“Today’s vote shows that con- 
gressional enthusiasm for self de- 
struction is waning,” said the U.S. 
trade representative, Clayton Yeut- 
ler, the main administration 
spokesman on trade. 

In pleading Tor support for the 
bill Representative Ed Jenkins, 
Democrat of Georgia, called it ‘the 
last gasp for W industry” that has 


“You can hardly find any do- 
mestically made material” on the 
shelves of U.S. retail stores, said 
Mr. Bray hilL 


(Continued from Page 1} 
PLO’s compound in Tunis, which 
was bomboi last week by Israeli 
planes. 

When asked why members of a 
pro-ArafaL faction of the Palestine 
Liberation Front would direct the 
Ship toward a Syrian port, as they 
did the first day of the crisis, Mr. 
Kimchc argued that after the plans 
went awry “they did a number of 
things that were not quite ratio- 
nal” 

Syria expelled Mr. .Arafat in 
1983 over his accusations that Da- 
mascus was fomenting rebellion 
among his guerrillas in Lebanon's 
Bekaa Valley. 

■ Arafat Awaits Word 

Edward Schumacher of The New 
York Tuna reported earlier from 
Tunis: 

Mr. Arafat said at a news confer- 
ence Wednesday that he was await- 
ing more information from his ne- 
gotiating team before saying who 
the hijackers were. 

He also said he would not go 
ahead with proposed peace talks 
involving a joint Palestinian- Jorda- 
nian team with the United States 
unless he received a “guarantee 
that the Americans are not going to 
try to assassinate me.” 

He again denied any PLO in- 
volvement in the hijacking. “It is 
our policy that we are against any 
kind of terrorism because we suffer 
from Israeli-organized terrorism.” 
he said. 

Repeating earlier charges, Mr. 
Arafat accused the United States of 
being involved in the Israeli bomb- 
ing last week of his headquarters, 
which he said was an attempt to kill 
him. The United States has denied 
involvement in the raid. 

He said that on Monday he sent 
a negotiating team to Egypt led by 
Hani al-Hassan and Mr. Abbas, 
both top officials in the PLO, to be 
part of a joint Egyptian-Italian- 
Palestinian negotiating team 

He said the team, using Egyptian 
Navy communications, failed to 
elicit a response from the hijackers 
daring the first 24 hours. 

He said it was only after the 
Italian liner was turned away by 
Syria and returned to a point oft 
Port Said that the hijackers re- 
sponded lo radio messages from 
the negotiating team. 

“I don't know why we succeed- 
ed, but we did,” he said, 

“It was through the complete co- 
ordination and cooperation with 


Algerian Leader Visits Toms 

The Associated Press 
TUNIS — President Chadli 
Bendjedid of Algeria arrived 
Thursday in Tunis for a short visit, 
his second to Tunisia since SepL 2. 


Egypt and Italy that we received 
this final result,” he said. 

Turning to the proposed peace 
talks, Mr. Arafat said that in addi- 
tion to die guarantee he wanted 
from the Reagan administration, 
he also had to complete discussions 
with both President Hosni Mu- 
barak of Egypt and King Hussein 
of Jordan to “reassess the situa- 
tion." 


U.S. to Invest 
In Its Bases 
In Philippines 

(Continued from Page I) 

non of the military bases agree- 
ment with Washington; the agree- 
ment comes up for review in 1989 
and for possible renegotiation in 
1991. But these requests may be 
linked to a government bid to ob- 
tain more aid from the United 
States, according to congressional 
and administration sources. 

A Soviet military presence in the 
Philippines could result in “a basic 
reversal of the strategic balance” in 
the region, Mr. Armitage said. The 
navy secretary. John F. Lehman Jr. 
said it “would be a horrendous situ- 
ation were the Soviets able to oper- 
ate out of the Philippines.” 

A report last month by the mi- 
nority staff of the Senate Armed 
Services subcommittee on military 
construction, based on a visit in 
August, found security breaches at 
both bases. At Subic Bay, the sub- 
committee staff learned that an 
armed New People's Army squad 
had camp ed inside the perimeter. 

The Senate report urged the Pen- 
tagon to delay its plan to spend 
SI 3 billion for housing, runways 
and other facilities “until greater 
certainty is established that the 
United States will continue to be a 
welcome guest." 

Mr. Armitage said he had not 
changed his assessment of last 
spring that the military struggle be- 
tween the Marcos government and 
the Communist guerrillas could 
end in a stalemate on the battlefield 
“in three to five years time” if pre- 
sent trends continued. 

“I would state that the trend in 
the Philippines is still deteriorat- 
ing.” although at “a slightly lower 
rate” in recent months, he said. 

He attributed this partly to “ru- 
dimentary improvements" in the 
performance of the Philippine 
armed forces, but more to spread- 
ing disenchantment with the New 
People's Army among a pro-Amer- 
ican Filipino population. 



Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and 
well give you an extra month of Tribs free with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand 
price in most European countries! 

^ ^ mm mm mm mm em ^ wm mm mm mm ^ wms m 

■ Tec Subscription Manager, International Herald Tribune, 

1 81 , avenue Qxjries-de-Gaulle, 92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 
Please enter my subscription for: 


□ 12monlhs 
(+1 merttifree] 

□ 6 months 
1+2 weeks free) 

□ 3 months 
(+1 week free) 

□ My check 
isendosed 



Please charge my: 

□ Access 

□ Amenccr 
Express 

□ Diners Oub 

□ Eurocard 

□ Mastercard 

□ Visa 


Speool MoAienr, bKt 

i>o»8o^^iedueed9*ioywpnoewiwrtft. n*wsrf»cr*w-.ort, 
(Sale vcWThrou^i Mari’ 31 . 1*86 1 


1HKS3 

H3 

BEES! 

AuOna 


WK3EH 

■EES 

■EE2 

Brigpjri 

B ft. 

■E53 

n 

Tl 

DemnV 

DXr. 

wmzn 



Finbnd 

FM. 

■kie 

7(0 

4U 

Frcnce 

Ff. 


(M 

359 



42 

261 

14* 

Great Bnfan 

L 

■Hill 

55 

30 

Greece 

Dr. 


103 

■7^] 

Nerharicnk 

FI 

550 

298 

166 

Ireland 

mars 

mmss 

62 

M 

My 

Ue 


MET' 2) 

Kill 


LFr. 


*&t 


Norway 

HU 


765 

en 

Ponuqaf 

Be 

■EElH 


■^1 

Span 

PlW. 



■E3 

Sweden 



795 

9KS1 

mjm hi 

432 


129 

Rea or Europe. Nonh Africa, former Frendi 

Ainca, U £j , French Pdyneiia Middte EaS 

| S| 322 1 17*1 95 



Card expry date . 


Cardamom! 

number 


. Signature. 


None. 


Address. 


Oiy. 


■ Country. 


L Tel - - „ „ „ j 






n—-' 
ft “ 


pine 


Brown Boveri advance 

frontiers with the three-phase a.c. propulsion technique 

In locomotives and 

motor-coaches for 



of Denmark and 
Norway. 


Flexibility 


The Brown Boveri three-phase ac. 
propulsion technique is flexible be- 
cause it allows the 'same locomotive 
type to be used for heavy goods trains 
and fast passenger trains, tt is a tech- 
nology of proven performance, wheth- 
er in heavily dustladen industrial air 
or the severe conditions beyond the 
Arctic Circle. 

V 

A technology for the future that led 
Danish State Railways (DSB) and Nor- 
wegian State Railways (NSB) to 
choose Brown Boveri (BBC). 

While still taking delivery of 37 diesef- 
electric locomotives with toe three- 
phase ac. propulsion system, toe 
DSB commissioned BBC to develop 
and build an initial batch of 10 ajj- 
electric tocos employing the same 
technique. So begins toe electrifica- 
tion of Denmark’s rail network. 

^ Present production by toe German/ 

f Swiss consortium, of suppliers will 


increasingly be transferred to Danish 
manufacturers under licence. 

Already in service with Norway’s NSB 
are six electric and five diesel-electric 
locomotives incorporating toe. BBC 
three-phase . ac. propulsion tech- 
nique. And 15 diesef-eiectric motor- 
coach/trailer units are on order. 

BBC piay a vital role in providing toe 
workJ with facilities for generating, 
distributing and utilizing electricity. 
Whether as main contractor, as head 
of a consortium or as consortium 
member. Brown Boveri are there. Ac- 
cepting toe challenge of the different 
the complex and the new— every day 
and everywhere. 

-By committing their worldwide re- 
sources tathe attainment of engineer- 
ing, excellence in joint enterprise with 
others, BBC are engaged inadvancing 
frontiers. 



Competent - Dependable - Worldwide 


BBC 

BROWN BOVERI 


For further information please consult your local BBC agency or write to' Switzerland: BBC Brown. Boveri & Company. Lid., P.O. Box 56. CH-S401 Baden; Federal Republic of Germany: Brown. Boveri 
.& Cre. AicUengeseilschaft, Postfach 351, D-6800 Mannheim 1; Austria: Oesterrelchische Brown Boveri-Werke AG, Postfach 184, A-HOi Vienna; Brazil: BBC Brown Boveri S.A.. Caixa postal 975. 
06000 Osasco (SP); Canada: BBC Brown Boveri Canada Inc., 2260 Place du Canada. Montreal. Que., H3B 2N2; France: BBC Brown Boveri France S A. 21, rue des Trois-Fontanot, Parc de la Defense. 
F-92024 Nanterre Cedex; Great Britain: British Brawn-Boveri Ud., Darby House. Lawn Central, GB-Teliord, Shropshire TF3 4J0; Italy: Tecnomasio italfano Brown Boveri S.p.A.. Casalla posiale 10225, 
1-20110 Milano; Norway: A/S Norsk Sektrisk & Brown Boveri, Postboks 263-Skoyen, N-0212 Oslo 2; Spain: Brown Boven de Espafla S.A.. ApartedO 36127, E-Madnd 16; USA: BBC Brown Boveri, Inc.. 
2, Gannett Drive, White Plains, N.Y. lO&W; other countries: BBC Brown. Boveri & Company. Ltd, Brawn Boveri International Group. P.O. Box 58. CH-5401 Baden. Switzerland. 


*..... r.- 


t ..* 










Ye 


El 


JUg 

Am 

Alti 

»m 

BcJ 


Bn 

Boc 

BIX 

COP 

Cm 

EMI 

Ed) 

PI* 

Fra 

Oct 

Hot 

im 

La* 

Lilt 

Lon 


Mill 

MW 

Mur 

Mia 

cm. 

Par 


Key 

Run 

Sloe 

Art 

Von 

Vler 

war 

Zurl 


Ml 


Ankj 
Bair 
Dcur 
Jen 
TM I 


o c 


Svdr 

d- 

sn- 


THU 
Pom 
MAC 
73 — 
aout 
t»- 
Tam 

SEOt 

24 - 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune. 


Published With The >n York Times and The Wanhinpuw Pud 


Dr. Baker, Do as You Say 


Dipping generously into other people's 
pockets. Treasury Secretary James Baker has 
none Lb dess shewn a welcome new concern for 

the huge debt of the developing nations. 

Until Mr. Baker took charge, the Reagan 
administration talked as if the crippling debt 
burden — well over S400 billion — was strictly 
a mailer between debtor nations and their 
private bankers. It seemed to ignore the threat 
to financial stability if one or more of the big 
debtors defaulted or broke under the strain of 
austere loan conditions. Observing only spotty 
improvement in the last three years and the 
prospect that things could well turn worse 
again. Mr. Baker is now pressing for greater 
efforts by the banks, international lending 
institutions and the debtors themselves. 

The secretary laid out a three-part program 
at the Seoul meeting of the International Mon- 
etary Fund and World Bank: “First and fore- 
most." comprehensive economic planning and 
restructuring by debtor countries. Second, 
more lending and more policy direction by the 
World Bank and regional development banks. 
Third, more loans by private banks. 

Mr. Baker may underestimate the depth of 
the problem when be urges commercial banks 
to extend S20 billion of new credits in the next 
three years. He surely overestimates the banks’ 
enthusiasm for venturing deeper into the 
swamp. He hints that the U.S. government 
might make a further contribution, but he 
promises nothing. He offers no hope at all for 


major reductions in America's budget deficit, 
which badly strains the world's economy by 
holding up the dollar’s value and interest rates. 

Still, it is progress to find the Reagan admin- 
istration no longer pretending that the mount- 
ing debt crisis does not threaten vital Ameri- 
can interests. The secretary proposes to 
involve the United States in the politics of 
other nations, both donors and debtors, and in 
the policies of private h anks and multinational 
aid agencies. Ahead of him lies much polling 
and hauling over who is to do what when. 

Because of America's budget deficit and 
congressional fatigue with foreign aid, the ad- 
ministration hopes new money can come from 
somewhere else. Recognizing that the IMF 
itself bad a deficit for the first time last year, 
Mr. Baker looks for more aid from the World 
Bank, the Inter-American Bank and other re- 
gional institutions and from private commer- 
cial banks. But be insists Lhat the borrowers 
should devise additional serious reforms. 
America's awakening should not be mistaken 
for a free lunch for overealers. 

Mr. Baker cautioned all creditor nations: 
"Sound policies and sustained, low-inflation 
growth in the industrial countries must pro- 
vide the essential foundation for a successful 
debt strategy." Back in Washington now, the 
Treasury chief needs finally to articulate a 
sound budget policy for the industrial country 
that most flagrantly violates his prescription. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


OPEC: Down but Not Out 


OPEC seems to have collapsed. It continues 
to exist as an organization, but it will no longer 
try to control the world price of oil. The 
imm ediate effects will be good For the coun- 
tries that import oil. but it will also be a test of 
their wisdom. Before the celebration begins, it 
□tight be useful to see where OPECs troubles 
came from — and ask what comes next. 

The Organization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries is the victim of a worldwide reaction 
to its ambitions. Shortages, aggravated by pan- 
ic. pushed oil prices sky-high from 1979 to 
1981. OPEC tried to hold them there. But at 
those prices, people around the world decided 
that they could get along with less oil, and for 
several years consumption fell. Last year it 
started to rise slightly again, but that did 
OPEC very little good. By then it was trying to 
cope with a rising threat on the other side of 
the equation as the new prices brought new 
wells into production to compete with the 
cartel. Mexico now produces more oil than any 
OPEC member. Britain has become a major 
exporter. There are countries — for example, 
Brazil, Egypt and India — in which the new 
production is less conspicuous but has dis- 
placed substantial amounts of imported oil 

With world consumption down and produc- 
tion tip, OPEC has been cutting exports drasti- 
cally in its struggle to keep markets tight and 


prevent prices from f alling . By this summer 
OPECs production was less than half the 1 979 
level; Saudi Arabia's was barely one-fourth. 
But with prices still soft, the OPEC govern- 
ments have decided that they cannot cut pro- 
duction any further. The attempts to enforce 
the cartel’s rules have now ended. 

The immediate prospect is more oQ at lower 
prices — possibly much lower. That is where 
the test of the industrial countries' prudence 
and policy will arise. If they simply splash the 
oil around, reverting to bad old habits and 
burning whatever becomes available because it 
is cheap, they will soon push their consump- 
tion back up to a point at which markets are 
tight and control once again resides with 
OPEC and particularly with the Saudis. Can 
you guess what will happen then? 

Earlier this year the U.S. Geological Survey 
published figures showing that the ofl reserves 
in the Gulf region are still by far the world's 
largest and that the probability of finding 
anything remotely similar elsewhere is exceed- 
ingly low. As the years pass, with every coun- 
try producing its oil at the maximum posable 
rates, the remaining reserves of accessible oil 
mil increasingly be concentrated in the Middle 
East OPEC has suffered a defeat this year that 
is severe but not necessarily finaL 

- THE WASHINGTON POST. 


New Battles of Britain 


The Britain we know from novels, films and 
television serials was, for all its class divisions, 
a law-abiding, relatively homogeneous society. 
The Britain lhat now erupts on front pages and 
news shows is sharply transformed, struggling 
with the effects of decades of decline, includ- 
ing a decline of respect for its civil institutions. 

Britain’s riots are about race without being 
race riots. The black and Asian immigrant 
populations remain relatively small, and Brit- 
ain's cities are not as strictly segregated as 
many of America’s. Poor whites and blacks 
live together, despair together and riot togeth- 
er. The affected neighborhoods suffer at least 
twice as much unemployment as the nation- 
wide average of 13 percent. Among teen-agers, 
who have been at the core of the latest vio- 
lence, expectations for a responsible, em- 
ployed adulthood are shockingly remote. 

The inner cities of Britain first erupted in 
1981. prompting new social programs and re- 
form of police methods. But the job programs 
were undermined by continued stagnation. 


The extra social spending has lost ground to 
local budget-cutting mandated by the central 
government. Even the police reforms seem to 
be crumbling under the stress of community’ 
hostility. And some of the recent official rheto- 
ric seemed almost calculated to incite. 

But Margaret Thatcher's Conservative gov- 
ernment can also blame its predecessors, now 
arrayed in Labor and Social Democratic oppo- 
sitions. The immigration that was properly 
permitted during the decolonization of the 
1930s and 1960s brought imperial subjects to 
Britain's cities just in time to make them the 
main victims of industrial contraction. Mrs. 
Thatcher has had to cope with a generously 
conceived but now unaffordable welfare state. 

More dearly even than four years ago, 
unskilled young Britons in the inner dries 
see themselves as left out of the govern- 
ment’s plans for eventual economic revival. 
As long as they do, these outbursts of violence 
are likely to be repeated. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Achille Lauro: Italian Getaway? Now the Russians Might Help 


The United Slates, which emerges as the 
hijackers' victim, will have questions for its 
Italian ally. Instead of the "diplomatic suc- 
cess” claimed by Prime Minister Bettino 
Craxi, Italy's contribution may have been to 
pretty up a "negotiated solution" that let the 
terrorists vanish unchallenged after the crime. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


Lebanon isn't safe for anyone. The kidnap- 
pings of four Soviet citizens in Beirut make 
dear that Russians have no special immuni ty. 
The White House denounced the abductions 
as "an act of terrorism" Lhat underscores the 
need for concerted anti-terrorist action by all 
nations. It was a prompt and proper reaction. 

— The Seattle Times. 


FROM OUR OCT. 11 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: U.S.-Canada Forest Fire Rages 
NEW YORK — All records in the history of 
forest fires on the Canadian-American border 
have been outdone by the disastrous outbreak 
in Minnesota and Manitoba. The dead are 
estimated at between 200 and 500, while 5.000 
people are homeless and 2,000 are missing. 
Territory a thousand square miles in extent has 
been swept by the flames. Some idea of the 
conflagration may be gained from the fact that 
the fire area was covered with dry moss eigh- 
teen inches deep. This was swallowed up by 
the flames, which swept along in masses one 
hundred feet high. Five towns have been de- 
stroyed and relief trains are being run through 
the devastated district, picking up refugees 
along the line. The fire is hardly likely to stop 
until the wind ceases or rain falls in torrents. 


1935: Real Reforms in Soviet Russia? 
PARIS — Our correspondent in Moscow re- 
cently called attention to a series of reforms in 
Soviet Russia. Family life has been restored by 
stringent laws concerning divorce; remunera- 
tion is being more apportioned in relation to 
individual merits and capacities; and private 
estate is being allotted to the peasants in small 
but sufficient size. These reforms undoubtedly 
mark a movement away from the earlier Rus- 
sian Socialist experiment. But it would be 
premature to interpret them as an evolution 
towards uncontrolled private initiative. Rather 
they seem to indicate that the present masters 
of Soviet Russia have scented a real danger for 
Russian national life in the process of kflliog 
the individual, spiritually speaking, for the 
smoother working of the state machine. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEW1RTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, PuMuker 

ExcaUnt Editor RENE BONDY Dam Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR. Associate Publisher 

Depun- Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DE5MAISON5 Director of Circulation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL birraor of . Athenians’ Sobs 
fntenwu'ooa] Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charks-de-Gauflt 92200 Ncuilhr-snr-Srinc. 

France. Tel: 1 1)747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Direaeur de la pubHcaaam Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-3* Hennessy RtL, Hong Kong TeL 5-285618. Telex 61170. 

Managing Dir. U.K.. Robin MacKtdvm. 63 long Acre. London Wd TeL 836-4801 Tekx 262009. 

Gen ;%r. W Gammy : W. LaserbaA FrieMm IS. HOOOFmkfirttM. 71 (060)726755 Tbs 416721. 

SJ. au capital de 1JOO.OQO F. RCS Nanterre B /32Q2I126. Commission Paritairt No. 61337. 

U.S. subscription: S322 yearly. Second-dass panage paid at Long Island City. N.Y. 1 1 101. 

© 1985. International Herald Tribute. All rights reserved. 




The World’s Refugees Need a Manager-Statesman 


W ASHINGTON — The hoopla 
and high protocol surrounding 
the current session of the General 
Assembly cannot obscure the fact 
that the Uni led Nations at 40 is in- 
creasingly on trial in the United 
States. UN-bashing in Congress has 
become as prevalent as U.S.-bashing 
in the United Nations, and both sides 
need to look for confidence-building 
measures to halt the trend. 

One such opportunity is at hand 
this fall — the changing of the guard 
at one of the world body's most im- 
portant agencies, the Office of the 
High Commissioner for Refugees. 

Few actions wQl more clearly sig- 
nal whether the United Nations is 
pursuing business as usual or heeding 
constructive suggestions for reform 
in its key humanitarian agencies. 

The global refugee crisis never 
ends. Often it seems to move from 
one calamity to another, as thou- 
sands and sometimes millions of 
men, women and children are forced 
to abandon hemes and countries. 

These problems are of special con- 
cent to the American people, and the 
United States is the hope of first 
resort for many refugees. But the in- 
dispensable link in international ef- 


By Alan K. Simpson and Edward M. Kennedy 

Senator Simpson, Republican of Wyoming, is chairman of the Senate 
Subcommittee on Immigration and Refugee Policy. Senator Kennedy , 
Democrat of Massachusetts, is the senior Democratic member. 


forts to alleviate their plight is the 
work of the UN high commissioner. 
With his help, tens of millions of 
refugees have survived appalling 
hardship and resumed life in dignity. 

In the 35 years since the office was 
created, refugee problems have esca- 
lated dramatically, and there is little 
prospect that the challenge wfl] ease 
in years to come. The high commis- 
sioner is now, more than ever before, 
the world community’s best means 
for responding to the needs of the 
world's 10 million refugees, including 
three and a half milli on m desperate 
circumstances in Southwest Asia and 
Pakistan and millions more in Sudan 
and other parts of Africa. 

The high commissiouer's job is a 
tough one. Refugees, by definition, 
have crossed an international border 
and are often without a government 
to defend their interests or guarantee 
their safety. Through the prestige of 
his office, the high-conmnssioner-as- 
statesman fills this gap, persuading 


governments to do the right thing , 
encouraging reluctant ministers and 
even heads of state to work together 


to ^protect basic human rights. 


Io less important, however, is the 
work of the trigh-conmri&sioner-as- 
chief- executive -— someone who 
breaks logjams when lives are on the 
tine, expedites emergency relief and 
coordinates long-term assistance. 

In our view, these two related roles 
of the hi g h commissioner are inextri- 
cably related. As the overwhelming 
human tragedies of recent times have 
shown, the politics and logistics of 
refugee relief pose some of the most 
daunting management problems in 
the world today. When the high com- 
missioner performs both important 
missions well the office gpins a stat- 
ure that can be used to deal with 
future crises and to raise funds for 
continuing operations. 

The high commissioner has pro- 
grams in 80 countries and a budget of 
$500 minio n for the current year — 


The Gorbachev Generation Seems to Be Different 


P ARIS — As Mikhail Gorbachev, his Paris 
visit completed, prepares to meet Ronald 
Reagan in Geneva, it is clear that the change in 
the way the Soviet government addresses the 


By William Pfaff 


world goes beyond mere public relations. There 


is a new skill in communication and a new 
assurance, but a new uncertainty as well, evident 
on matters of human rights. 

For the introduction of human rights ques- 
tions into the formal relations between nations, 
we have to thank the Helsinki final act of 1975. 
John J. Maresca is the one American diplomat 
who was part of those negotiations from start to 
finish, and he has just published a succinct and 
graceful account of wnat went on (“To Hel- 
s kini. " published by Duke University). As he 
writes, the novelty of the final act was that 
it introduced the principle that human rights 
questions are “a legitimate aspect of relations 
between states and that discussion of human- 
rights-rdated issues is therefore not a form of 
intervention in internal affairs." 

The Soviet negotiators seem not to have fully 


changed over the last 10 years. The old bluster 
and defiance about “hostile provocations" can 
still be heard, but Soviet officials increasingly 
have found it necessary to defend themselves by 
making reference to the Western standards that 
form the basis of the criticisms made of them. 

When Mr. Gorbachev was interviewed by 
French television on the eve of bis Paris visit, be 
evaded direct answers to human rights questions 
by asserting that economic and social “rights" 
are better defended in Russia than in the West 

From lesser figures among the new generation 
of Russian officials, a more plaintive argument 
increasingly is heard, particularly from those 
who have worked in and know the West. These 
people say lhat national custom and tradition 
have to be taken into account in criticizing their 
country. Abstract Western notions of rights and 
justice, they say, cannot be arbitrarily imposed 


on societies with an ent 


the final act ine result nas put ti 
defensive ever since. They have been steadily and 
repeatedly challenged on human rights matters 
in the formal Helsinki review meetings and other 
international forums, in nongovernmental meet- 
ings and the press, and in meetings with Western 
leaders — as m Paris, where questions on human 
rights were the one thing that agitated Mr. Gor- 
bachev. Even inside the Soviet Union, Helsinki . 
Watch groups were formed and had to be sup- 
pressed in the blaze of international publicity. 

lallence has 


The Soviet response to this challenge 


different history. 

There is something in tins, of course. Even 
if the will to reform existed in the Kremlin, one 
could not reasonably expect a set of Western 
conceptions to be taken over wholesale in a 
Russian society that has never known anything 
but autocratic government. 

The argument these Russians make, however, 
implicitly concedes the critics’ case. In the past, 
censorship, secrecy, prison or internal exile for 
dissenters were defiantly said by C ommu nists to 
be essential elements in the discipline of a great 
revolutionary movement Now these things are 
apologetically ascribed to the unfortunate histo- 


ry of a still backward country, toward which the 
rest of us should practice tokranec. 

It is an argument only indirectly made, to be 
sure. It comes from the younger and more West- 
ernized Soviet functionaries. These, however, are 
the people who, under Mikhail Gorbachev, are 
taking over leadership of the U-SiLR. from the 
old men who knew the heroic age of Lenin and 
the dark age of Statin. All but one or two of the 
old men knew only backward Russia, Bolshe- 
vism, fear, struggle. The new men know the West, 
liberal ideas, the way the rest of the world works. 

They perhaps know too much for their own 
good. We are apparently seeing, for the first time, 
Soviet intelligence and diplo mati c defectors who 
act for reasons of conscience. 

The old men found legitimacy in their partici- 
pation in the revelation and the ordeals that 
followed; in the industrial transformation of 
Russia, triumphant ventures into space and pro- 
jection of Soviet power to the open seas ana the 
revolutionary Third World. The Gorbachev gen- 
eration are postwar men who have accomplished 
nothing — as yet. They have the force of Russian 
nationalism behind them, and it is Russian na- 
tionalism that they serve. 

Is there ideological conviction as well? Mr. 
Gorbachev, in his Paris news conference, re- 
marked that ideological divergences should not 
affect interstate relations “as was the case with 
medieval fanatics." That is an odd thing for a 
Communist to say, when yon think about iL 

We are still a longway from seeing an end to 
ideology in Soviet affairs, certainly. We are not, 
perhaps, as far from it as we used to be. 

. © 1985 William Pfttf. 


Achille Lauro: Pat Answers Don’t Stop Terrorism 


W ASHINGTON — The ordeal 
of the Achille Lauro was mer- 
cifully brief, and the message is loud 
and clear Chest-thumping, lei-me- 
lell-you-how-io-do-it generalizations 
about “international terrorism" are 
worse than useless. To the degree that 
such generalizations suggest some 
sure way of ridding the world of the 
terrorist scourge, they not only de- 
ceive. They also make it harder to 
deal vdth individual terrorist acts in 
the only way you can; case by case. 
Circumstances alter coses, some- 
times drastically. The conventional 
wisdom of the armchair experts never 
seems to fit the incident at hand, 
which is why the experts are careful 
to direct their prescriptions and ana- 
lyses to the next time around. 

Last time around, for one example, 
it was an airplane. Some people said 
TWA 847 should never have beta 
allowed to land at Beirut, which is a 
lot to ask of an air traffic controller 
when a pilot says he will run out Of 
fuel in five minutes. Other tough guys 
said that once the TWA crisis was 
over, the Untied States should pro- 
claim a policy of strict sanctions 
against any country harboring hi- 
jackers or hostage-takers. Now the 
next hijacking has come and gone. 
But it was a boat, which is to soy that 
it was ai sea. So much for rules about 
safe havens for hostage* takers. 

The last time, Henry Kissinger, 
former Undersecretary of State Law- 
rence Eagleburger and the Wall 
Street Journal led a chorus proclaim- 
ing the need for an unambiguous pol- 
icy of retaliation, the only language 
terrorists understand. “What the U.S. 
policy Ought to be when this incident 
is over [is} to announce that the U.S. 


By Philip Geyelin 


The Desert 
Is Scaring 
Europeans 


By Giles Merritt 






SI - 


B RUSSELS — In the early 1980s. 
ungainly sted structures began' 

■ T tliA rlvoffr Af Cm. J! 


to spring up in the deserts of Saudi 
Arabia, Kuwait and Bahrain, These 
“cathedrals in the desert" are giam. 
petrochemical crackers, often built 
with Korean labor and American 
know-how. Today, to the anger of 
boardrooms across Europe and the 
United States, they are coming, on-# 
stream and making basic plastics and 


\ 


Trade maps project 
anintriguingnew 
world in the 1990s. 


funded almost entirely by the volun- 
tary contributions of United Nations 
members, including a one-third share 
from the United States. Other inter- 
national, national and private chari- 
ties and voluntary agencies have pro- 
grams that complement, and some- 
times complicate, the UN effort and 
multiply by several-fold the relief 
that can be directed to a crisis. In- 
evitably, the success of all these ef- 
forts depends on the foundation laid 
by the high commissioner and his 
drill in marshaling relief. 

In past appointments, the United 
Nations has chosen high commis- 
sioners with tittle need for attention 
to executive ability, but now the size 
and scope of the office have changed. 
Given the current and likely future 
need, we urge those participating in 
the present selection process to en- 
sure that the next commissioner is an 
experienced manag er as well as an 
able diplomat. A high commissioner 
who meets both standards will have 
the Strong support of the American 
people — and the enduring gratitude 
of the millions of present and future 
refugees who may indeed owe their 
very lives to him. 

The New York Times. 


fertilizers from the oil and waste gas-' 
es that the Arabs' had previously been 
flaring and watching go up in smoke. 

The cheap new chemicals from the 
Gulf represent much mere than still- 
er competition for the established 
manufacturers. They are the shape of 
things to come in a vast range of 
industries in which the world's 
hungry producers of basic commod- 
ities are now impatient to start mak- 
ing their own finished goods. 

The Gulf oil states have moved ^ 
downstream in order to add value to ™ 
their raw materials, They have creat- 
ed panic and dismay among Europe-' 
an petrochemical producers, and on 
Oct. 14 a crisis meeting is to be held 
in Brussels to cry to head off the ' 
unpleasant row that has been devel- 
oping between the European Com- , 
mutiny and Arab oil producers. . : r ' 

Both sides see the situation ashfc' 
political powder keg., so . talks tir-T 
ranged between the chairman oTtfe ■ 
Gulf Cooperation .Council , Xitmitii 
Foreign Minister Sabah 'al-Ahmijd; 
and the president of the EC .Gouhdt, 
of Ministers, Luxembourg’s FtirSgpr 
Minister Jacques Poos, will take 
place in conditions akin to secrecy,-^ 

Tempers are already badly frayed' 
by Saudi Arabia's accusations taf£ 
the EC has put up protectionist bam-'' 
ers against its burgeoning chemical; 
exports, and by muttered threap 
from the kingdom of retaliation 
against the $12 billion worth of Euro- 
pean goods imported there yearly. " 

• On the Europein side there are..! 
fears that unless the influx of highly;' 
competitive ethylene derivatives ' 
be staunched, there could be an in-^' 
dustrial collapse of devastatin 




K ons. The cheap Arab 

c 



>k>ck” plastics are likely to rob the 
Europeans of about 10 percent of 
their usual markets. That, coupled 
with the EC companies* persisting 
overcapacity of 15 percent, could un- 
leash a price war and a wave of bank- 
ruptcies in a sector that is crucial to 
Europe’s high-tech industries. 
v It is not only the Gulf states that 
mil be changing the balance of indus- 


trial power with their low-priced pet- 
rochemical feedstocks. Libya has a 


big ethylene plant coming into ser- 
vice next year; Canada and Indonesia, 
are well mi the way to becoming pet- 
rochemical superpowers; Mexico is 
embroiled in a bitter trade disputif 
with the U.S. fertilizer lobby. 

Saudi Arabia is only two-thirds of 


- 


its wa - 


iy through 
that by 199 


an investment pro- 


gram that by 1990 will have sunk $15 ^ ; 
billion into petrochemical complexes. W ' 


H: 


government from now on will retali- 
ate — time, place and target of our 
choosing," said Mr. Eagleburger. 

Not the least of what was wrong 
about this advice was lhat it already 


the rules of international behavior 
are violated, our policy’ will be one of 
swift and effective retribution." 

As recently as last February, in a 
major policy statement on terrorism. 
Secretary of State George Shultz said 
that "experience has taught us over 
the years that one of the best deter- 
rents to terrorism is the certainty that 
swift and sure measures will be taken 
against those who engage in it" - 

Experience has taught us nothing 
of the son. The United Slates has no 
firsthand experience. In every in- 
stance when it has been the target of 
terrorism (bombings of embassies as 
well as the marine compound, hos- 
tages held in Beirut or Tehran), the 
question of where and when to retali- 
ate has turned out to be too hard. 
Meanwhile, the experience of Israel 
has amply demonstrated that retalia- 
tion does not, in fact, deter. From the 
Israeli record, a case can be made 
thau if anything, retaliation incites. 

Thai is the loudest message from 
the Achille Lauro. Consider that only 
six days before it was seized, the 
Israelis had practiced what the Rea- 
gan administration preaches by send' 
mg jet bombers to pulverize the PLO 
headquarters in Tunisia. The Reagan 
White House obviously approved— 
although' It had secona thoughts 

bowef 


ai ought to be. And the Israelis had a 
right to expect approval- Only a year 
ago Mr. Shultz had pointed to Israel’s 
policy of retaliation as a model. 

“No nation has had more experi- 
ence with terrorism than Israel and 
no nation has made a greater contri- 
bution to our understanding of the 
problem and the best way to confront 
it." Mr. Shultz said at the Park Ave- 
nue Synagogue in. New York. “Isra- 
el’s contribution goes beyond the the- 
oretical Israel his won mayor battles 
in the war against terrorism in actions 
across its borders, in other conti- 
nents. and in the land of Israel itself.” 

If tiiat is not a ticket to Tunisia 
(“across its borders, in other conti- 
nents"), it is sorely a recommenda- 
tion that retaliation is the way to go. 


Yet within a week Israel was again 
the target of a hostage-taking. The 
hijackers of the Achille Lauro were 
demanding' the release of 50 or more 
Palestinians from Israeli j ails 
You do not have to connect the 
Tunisia air strike to the ship seizure 
(which may have taken more than a 


Trade pattern maps now' brag 
produced by some economists pro- 
ject an intriguing new world in the 
1990s. Europe and the United States 
are no longer shown as the big plas- 
tics producers, having been elbowed 
to the sidelines by the newcomers. 

Esso and Mobil helped to build the- 
desert petrochemical complexes as 
joint venture partners, so the Ameri- 
can position is rather better than that 
of Europe, where the industry now 
faces lasing much of its yearly Sl- 
bfllion chemical exports.. . . 

The prospect of having to 'baud' 
over to emerging nations in such a 
key -sector is viewed, with alarm in 
Europe — -yet the writing has been-on. 
the wall for more than 10 years. In. 
1973, when OPECs success brought 
to an end some 30 years of oil at $2 a. 
barrel, it also pushed products like 
naphtha from $25 a ton to $200 over- 
night, and opened the Middle East oO 
countries’ eyes to the importance of 
developing as an industrial bloc. 

The importance of the deal that' 
the Europeans must eventually make . 
with the Gulf stales goes far 




It will set a precedent for future ar- 
rangements in other sectors. Chemi- 
cals are just the first of many ad- 
vanced sectors that must, in whole or 
in part, eventually be transferred' 
across to the newly industrializing 

wedc to organize) to make the point 

feifjrs ass juSsSSsS; 


didn't, which would suggest tha? he 
was not much cowed by the arc raid; 
or, as he insists, he was not the villain. 
Either way, what the experience of 
the Achille Lauro readies us one 
more time about the tormenting and 
incredibly complicated problem of 
international terrorism is that (1) di- 
plomacy. sometimes works but (2) de- 
Wrreuce. Israeli style, does not deter. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


glance at the non-OECD nations' tofr 
tenng debt mountain' and' at the 
Tnird World’s losing hawla agains t 
death and I confirm. • £ 

So for .the industrialized countries'? 
the essential policy will be to builtf 
economic relationships that promise 
future cooperation rather than the 
sort of bitter competition that ih«rl 
more mature industries cann ot win. 

International Herald Tribune. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Some Try to Get AIDS? Henri Arrived Crowned 


about bow effusive its public approv- 


Victorian society could not defeat 
syphilis with a rule to abstain, but Dr. 

Fakiny A. Assaad of the World 
Health Organization thinks be can do 
the job with AIDS. "This is a dtsiqi^» 
that a man or a woman has to by to 
geL You have to go after it,” he says. 
rUH Health Organization to Prepare 
Worldwide Strategy to Combat AwS," 

Oct. 1.) For patients with AIDS and 
groups of peopleiri danger of getting 
U, such remarks are. an unnecessary 

A aueW ««%ofLacy 

EDZERD BRONS.MD. 

. Drift. Netherlands; 


JjjS-GOGVBfcntaiy in connection 
with Christo’s wrapping of the Pom 

g 

Hws says that HenrrlV was crowned 
m Pans. He was crowned in Chartres 

° n eHeredParis 

on March 22 of that year. 


Charlie Brown” is the answer to this ' 
insensitive, uncomprehending, and - 
'^shy-washy mrin- 
bCT of 79 across" (that is, of the- 
Peanuts cartoon aeries). WWt7! C :• 
Brown, Esquire, is for many equaOy- 
pcrplexed members of the homan 


BERNARD SINSHOEIMER. 

Boulogne-^iflancourt, France. 


philosophizer grap- 
® pyaed yet always courte-' 

w ay with the oddities, 
rfhfe. And he emerges- 1 - as-doeshiS' 




more rooa^atieally inclined buddy. 
!.™ho Suffers equally -;froro 


Good griefi. What is Bert 
fidd up to in his Sept. 2& cros^S? 


«SPV«. dreadful' name, is) — 
SjfSy ^quil and ready to I 

yet another peculiar day.- - .. ' 






L ' ' 


■ ' JAMES WHKEON. 1 : 

Issy-les-Maulineaux, Fiance. 




•lr, ; 








S3 V-: ~ • 




% 

°FV 

“> *-«»- • October 1U 1985 


B 


Lt. '•■•. 

y- ** ~-i ' 
Wrt.fi-. . 

'vAc*n * 
Vfcitkc:. * 
■;■ 4*&X-\J :; 

;':.■•«& k .• . 
>•.**?« .. 

'iVCCSJ •- 
..'ifrts:'.! :- 


\ 


s 


4 L international * I 

iteraio^feenbune 

WEEKEND 


Page 7 


Liechlenstem’s Treasures in New York 


by John Russell 


Triad,. 

ctri wji 

Knrid 


>k 

W ‘ dll. In,. 


iN 


6r. : 


* r- 4 - .. 


Ch.; ? * t 

rr .. 

■S‘sr„.._ 




'■'i.r 


EW YORK -—The Metropolitan 
Museum never hesitates to think 
big, as we all know. -Thinking big 
is not always such a great Idea, 
but there are times when, thinking lag, think- 
mg straight and thinking-brave are one and- 
the same thing and one of diem will com* 
about on Oct. 26, when the very Large loan 
exhibition .called “Lieehtenstdni The' 
Princely Collections” opens to the general 
public after weeks of members’ previews. 

Thinking big can sometimes be taVt-n liter- 
ally. in this context. The great latcRubcas 
aliarpiece, “The Assumption tif the Vmin n : 
may well be the largest Old Master pai^g ' 
ever to be brought into the Met (Before i t 
could be got safely inside, it had to be 
un era led in the street. I^xirframes had then' 
to be removed, and walls to be taken down.) 

But in. the end it is not, of course, • the 
dimensions of the “Assumption” that count 
(They are 198% inches by 1 38% inches — or 
more than 5 by 3% meters). It is the fact that 
this is Rubens’s last and largest account of a 
.subject to which he had returned again and 
y a g a i n , h is also relevant that the “Assump- 
tion," though shown briefly in Lnoone, ; 
Switzerland, in 1948, has riot been seen in 
public since and has recently been cleaned' 
for tbejueseiu exhibition with entirety hap- 


If we add to this that the exhibition also 
includes the monumental series of paintings 
by Rubens on the theme of the Roman 
consul and wampr 'Dedus Mus — once 
again, an experience without parallel in any 
museum in the United States — it will be 
dear that this exhfoitian has things to offer 
nhat have never been available in this coim- 
;^try before. N^r are they .ever Hkdy to be 
\y available again, -given- that neither the Lou- 
Y vre, the Prado nqr the Alte Pinakothek in 
■■■! Munich — tbc twfly that are com- 

» iaiuibeiis — is ever IMy to 
on sa&ha -scale to' an- American muse- 

• nm . >' ; . 

~~y ' It also has-a lot of material that tme to be 
.^leanmd^w^a^ at Even if yon are 
. • a paid ^ meruTy r of the anti-handgun Iob- 

* by, you may come away from this exhibition 
convirioed that in the righ t : maker’s 

) and/qmte 'some -time ago, the sporting g»u 
could he a thing of astonishing beauty, Bat 
you will have to work aiit a tittle, just as you 
will have to work at the jvoiy tankard carved 
in Vienna in 1676 before you identify it as 
what many qualified observers believe it to 
be — the single most important piece of 
German High Baroque ivoiy carving. 

Whereas the traditional role of the tari- 
Jcard has always been to quench thirst and 
promofe goodwill, this particular vessel has 
overtones of sinister and minit!****! brutality. 
Venus and Mars, so far fr om being comple- 
mentaries, are partners in destruction, mir- 


ror-images of one another, monsters of inge- 
nuity and depravity of whom one would find 
- it hard to say which was the worse of the two. 

Quite apart from conundrums such as 
these and many others, which call not only 
for close looking but for careful reading and 
historical cross-referral, there is the fact that 
the Liechtenstein collections as a whole are 
of a kind that does not exist in this country 
and was specific to a Europe that no longer 
exists. 

In the 1930s, the Liechtenstein collections 
had been fundamental to the great city of 
Vienna for more than 200 years. Every seri- 
ous viator wanted to get in to see them, and 
almost every serious viator succeeded. In 
general conversation, Liechtenstein was pri- 
marily the name of a family, rather than of a 
tiny principality niched somewhere between 
the hip pocket of Switzerland and the vest 
pocket of Austria. 

When the coDections were spirited out of 
Austria to Vaduz, the capital of Liechten- 
stein, in difficult and dangerous rirenm- 
stancesin the last months of World War H, it 
was not because Vaduz was an earthly para- 
dise but because Prince Franz Josef II, then 
as now the reigning prince of Liechtenstein, 
had taken care to ensure the neutrality of the 
tiny country that had belonged to his family 
since the early 18th century. 

As European family names go, not many 
were grander. Liechteasteins had been peo- 
ple of consequence in central Europe since 


v 


* 

F '' 





1368, when Johann 1 von Liechtenstein had 
become the confidant and right-hand man of 
the Habsburg Duke Albrecht HI of Austria, 
and since 1390. when Georg III von Liech- 
tenstein (formerly chancellor of the Univer- 
sity of Vienna) became Bishop of Trent, in 
Lombardy, which at that time was a Habs- 
burg fief. 

trie family never bred another bishop, but 
in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries it was 
very strong indeed in statesmen, soldiers, 
courtiers, technologists of weaponry and 
very large landowners. 

Shrewd, straight and staunch, they made 
themselves consistently indispensable to the 
crowned heads of the day — not least, by the 
unsecured and doubtless often forgiven 
loans that they were ready to put up at short 
notice. In return, whole towns, trig country 
houses, distant castles and vast stretches of 
land came their way. (As for duchies, they 
stuck to the Liecbtenstems like burrs.) In 
Bohemia, Moravia. Silesia and Lower Aus- 
tria they were everywhere, and they never 
put a foot wrong. Right up to the final 
dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire 
in 1918, they held high office at court, and 
right up to the end of World War II they had 
large holdings in Czechoslovakia, as well as 
in Austria. 

In the course of their multifarious activi- 
ties. the Liednensteins collected in an entire- 
ly personal and largely spontaneous way. 
Each generation had its own preoccupations. 
The words “overall planning” were never 
heard, and would have made no sense. It was 
never the family's intention that the collec- 
tions should end up as a living encyclopedia 
of the fine arts. What they wanted, they got, 
and that was that. 

The earliest acquisition of paintings seems 
to have occurred in 1S68. when the marvel- 
ously evocative portrait of Ladislaus. Count 
of Haag, by Hans Mielich, entered the col- 
lection. And the good news is that after a 
period when some great paintings had to be 
sold, works of art are being bought again. 
Rubens's oil sketch for his “Mars and Rhea 
Silva” is a recent arrival, for instance, and so 
is the august and austere painting by the 
early 16th-century Dutch painter He rman 
Posthumus, called “Fantastic Landscape 
With R oman Ruins.” 


I T is not for me to review the exhibition 
at this stage. But it may be worth saying 
that Dr. Reinhold Baumstark, the 
youthful director of the Liechtenstein collec- 
tions, intended from the first to plan it as 
much in operatic terms as in any more con- 
ventional ones. It begins with an overture in 
which the main themes of the exhibition are 
sounded. Act 1 proceeds in varied and pica- 
resque style until it ends with a festive and 
euphoric finale in which we turn a comer 
and come upon one of the most spectacular 
. episodes in the history of human convey- 
ance. 

We see. that is to say. the celebrated roco- 



? *r«\ ' 
Moffopofiran Muirt/m cf Ar 


Hyacinthe Rigaud's portrait of Prince Joseph Wenzel von Liechtenstein. 


“ The Golden Carriage. 


MatropoKten Mtaaw rf An 



Continued on page 9 Detail of Rubens's “Assumption of the Virgin. ” 


.r t 



by Anna Kisseigjoff 




N 




EW YORK — Trie music- televi- 
sion channel MTV may have pro- 
moted the idea of spHced-in, cut- 
up, dissociated imagery to rode 
music fans, but such ideas are nothing new 
to anyone who has followed Mcrce Cmnring- 
' L ham’s prophetic view of discon tinuity-as- 
. continuity in his choreography. 

As rock video after rock video bombards 
us in bars, restaurants, department stores, 
beauty salons, discos, boutiques and cable- 
equipped living rooms, the link between life: 
and art that Cumungham has patiently 
pointed out for 25 years no longer seems 
' . .. merely a hypothesis. What is more Cunning- 

. ham, in theory, trim rode videos in which 
music interacts with movement by dancers 
but seems unrelated to it? Or -where sound 
invades a screen with multiple messages, 
where fragmentation is. furthered by rapid 
cuts away from one image to another? In 
' short, the' dissociation behind Cunningham’s 
■' dances is felt all around us. 

Cunningham discusses his core ideas in 
' “The Dancer and the Dance,” a newly pub- 
. lished book of interviews with the avant- 
garde dancer and choreographer by a French 
arls journalist, Jacqueline Lesschaeve (Mar- 
ion Boyars Publishers, distributed, by 
Scribners. $27.50).Srnce the fundamentals of 
Cunningham's thinking are found here in 
collected form, the book is an excellent in- 
troduction to those seriously interested in 
finding out more about him. For those to 
v \ whom be is familiar, the interviews are a 
convenient restatement worked into new, 
detailed analyses of how his dances are com- 
posed. • • - 

Cunningham’s insistence on deploring dif- 
. ferent ways of viewing dance, of giving it a 
; \ nonlinear structure is, be has often declared, 
consistent with his premise that art can, even 
does, operate in the manner of life. Less-' 

* .• chaeve conducted these interview in 1977 
(some updating has been included),, long 
- before MTV came into vogue. Yet the tech- 
niques used in rock videos are merely an 
amplified .version of the discontinuity Cun- 
ningham observed in ordinary television — 
snd as we switched channels, he said, we 
become accustomed to images and ideas 
with no apparent logical connection. Dance 
too, he stated, did not have to he composed 
or viewed in a traditionally ordered way. 

And so MTV. so lo speak, has caught up - 
with Cunningham. -More to the point, Cun- 
Bingham was again a pioneer as the first 
choreographer to begin sustained video work 
as an extension of his choreography. Yes, 

, f but is it art? If WTTV is not (and it is not),, 
t there is certainly an aesthetic at work in 
Cunningham’s case. . 

It is Lesschaeve's goal, to have the chore- 
ographer explain this aesthetic in his own 
words. Trie .original 1 980 edition"of the book ■ 
was in French. This first American edition is 
said to go back to Cunningham’s tapes in' : 
English, although thereare a few-lapses. Did 
Cunningham really say “canalize” instead of 


channel? In the past, he has said that he 
attended college for one year in Washington, 
D.G —'hermit comes out University of 
Washington in Seattle. Nonetheless, there 
..are new and valuable appendixes on the 
repertory by David Vaughan. 

Cunningham’s willingness to explain bis 
coriqjositional processes for specific works is 
highly unusual. Readers unfamiliar with his 
use of chance devices whole creating a piece 
might find it hard to follow him when he 
refers to the charts he drew up, for example, 
for the 1976 Torse.” Yet in discussing how 
he- threw owns or used other chance proce- 
dures to arrive at the final spatial arrange- 
ments from these charts, to see who farad 
back or front at which time and so on, he 
stands to amaze us with the complexity be- 
hind it aH “Torse” was an extremely concen- 
. trated and densely rich piece of choreogra- 
phy — - and now we know why. 

If such analytical descriptions might seem 
dry, there is nothing dry about the dances or 
the man who created them. The irrepressible, 
-unassuming Cunningham comes through 
here with lus insistence that such procedures 
were merely a means for exploring new ways 
of moving and seeing. The result was fresh, 
not dry. 

A LONG the way, Cunningham lets us in 
f\ on his biography — a lawyer’s son 
J- A- from . Centrum, Washington, who 
wanled to study theater and fell into dancing 
with seeming inevitabHty. Unfortunately, in 
her admiration for Cunningham’s revolu- 
tionary work, Lesschaeve has a tendency to 
characterize others — namely Martha Gra- 
ham, George Balanchine. Jerome Robbins 
— as reactionary. They are not “modern" in 
her view. 

But Cimnmgh&m, whose break with Gra- 
ham's company in 1 945 pointed him toward 
a more formalist aesthetic, answers his inter- 
viewer wisely. Lesschaeve, in one passage, 

offers an inaccurate, even laughable charac- 
terization of Graham’s very American art. 

- She remarks: “Graham has been presented 
as modern, which I never felt the work was. 
What she does seems to me a mixture of 
classical and neoclassical style with very lit- 
tle added that is modem; mainly; it seems to 
me, the influence of German Expressionism, 

- Many Wigman in particular. The underlyii 
ideas are quite impoverished and not at 
new.” 

Cumungham, who has rarely looked back 
at his Graham experience, replies with a 
strikingly vibrant appraisal — bis first im- 
pressions of Graham, as she taught in her 
classes: “The tight of Graham moving 
. strong and dear inher demonstrations of an 
exercise and the force with which her danc- 
ers did the movements were impressive. Her 
ideas as'to what dancing could be about were 
certainly not the 19th-century ballet ones, 
.and the movements she. made at the time 
were not ' directly related to classical ballet 
The weight with which she herself moved — 
remarkably clear in me falls she invented — 
was' absorbing to watch. It left me with a 



, ITri i i.l. ■■ 

roraiy Drogncn 


Merce Cunningham. 

vivid sense of the power of human move- 
ment Her dance vocabulary was unique, 
although I agree with you, the forms she used 
were 19th century, each work built to a 
climax from which it fell away ” 

Yet Cunningham is noL ready to agree 
with those who took off from his own princi- 
ples that any kind of movement should be 
considered valid in dance. The Judson 
Dance Theater limited its own possibilities, 
he feds, by often using performers with no 
dance training. And today’s younger experi- 
mentalists, he feds, ofen avoid the issue he 
raised early in his own independent career: 
namely, that dance should not depend upon 
music. He praises Luanda Childs, for in- 
stance, for the “hypnotic and often beautiful 
effect” produced by her repetitive patterns 
to minimalist music. Bui again, a situation 
where dance and music “do the same,” one 
repeating the other, suggests the 1 9th centu- 
ry much more than it does the 20th.” 

Does all this sound like dogma? Certainly 
there is none in what we see on stage. Just 
this month, the Pennsylvania Ballet in Phila- 
delphia presented the world premiere of 
Cunningham's beautiful “Arcade” as part of 
the National Choreography Project. On Jan. 
31, the Paris Opera Ballet will revive “Un 
jour ou deux” which Cunningham created 
for the company’s dancers in 1973. 

How does one square Cunningham’s will- 
ingness to choreograph for ballet companies 
(as well as his own modem-dance troupe) 
with his feelings about the 19th century — a 
century in which the idiom of ballet dancers 
was refined? The truth is that training is one 
thing and an art form another. One suspects 
that Cunn in g ham is attracted to the flexibili- 
ty of ballet technique (most of his own com- 
pany studies ballet). It is a technique we see 
Cunningham increasingly re-examining. It 
opens up another movement path to explore. 
And as he tells Lesschaeve m another con- 
text, “There are a multiplicity of routes to 
travel," ■ 

® 198$ The AW IVrft Times 


Musical Comebacks in Vienna 


by David Stevens 


V IENNA — This city’s musical cal- 
endar currently includes a couple of 
stage works in the bght vein by two 
composers who had little more in 
common other than that they were Central 
European Jewish musicians who were swept 
into exQe and virtual oblivion by the Nazi 
era. 

One is Alexander von Zemlinsky, a highly 
esteemed composer, conductor and peda- 
gogue, whose comic opera “K! eider Machen 
Leute” enjoyed such a successful revival at 
the Volksoper during last spring's Vienna 
Festival that it has been held over in this 
season's repertory. The other is Paul Abra- 
ham, who had a brief but deliriously success- 
ful career as an operetta composer, and 
whose “Viktoria und Ihr Husar" was chosen 
to reopen the newly refurbished Raimund 
Theater last week. 

Zemlinsky was a key figure in the Vien- 
nese avant-garde artistic scene from the turn 
of the century. As a teacher, he briefly tu- 
tored Arnold Schoenberg, who otherwise 
was an autodidact, and his sister Mathilde 
was Schoenberg’s first wife. Another of his 
pupils was the beautiful Alma Schindler, and 
although he was by no means a handsome 
man, they were strongly attracted to each 
other until another composer-conductor en- 
tered the scene and married Alma — Gustav 
Mahler. It did not seem to affect the two 
men’s mutual professional esteem. 

^ As a conductor, Zemlinsky was the first 
Kapellmeister at the Volksoper for most of 
the first decade of the century, except for one 
season when Mahler engaged him at the 
Court Opera. When Mahler quit Vienna. 
Zemlinsky returned to the smaller bouse. In 


“Qothes Make the Man” — is based on a 
Gottfried Keller tale about a tailor's appren- 
tice who is taken for a Polish nobleman 
because of his exotic garb. Zemlinsky con- 
ducted the world premiere at the Volksoper 
in 1910. Although it is termed a “comic” 
opera or musikalische komddie, there is noth- 
ing very light about the finely tailored and 
rich orchestral part in which echoes of 
Strauss, Mahler and even Puccini could be 
heard. But — the sign of an experienced man 
of Lhe theater — the words always came 
through clearly. 

Zrmlinsky’s music did not make a come- 
back after the war, but in recent years it has 
started to be recorded and performed once 
again, along with that of other composers 
more or less of the same school. His one-act 
operas “Der Zwerg” and “Eine Florentin- 
ische Trag&die” have been successfully re- 
vived in Hamburg and London, and it looks 
as if the composer is finally emerging from 
decades of neglecL 

Abraham was bora in 1892 in Hungary, 
studied piano and composition at the Buda- 
pest academy, and composed a number of 
“serious” works before he found his talent 
for the lighter muse. “Viktoria” was at first 
unsuccessful in Budapest, but was reworked 
with a German book and became an instant 
hit in 1930 throughout the German-speaking 
lands and beyond. He followed this wiih two 
more hits, “Die Blume von Hawaii" in 1931 
and “BaB im Savoy” in late 1932, just before 
the roof fell in. 

Although he stayed in Vienna until 1938, 


he had no more successes. He fled first to 
Cuba, where he apparently eked out a living 
playing the piano, before going on to New 
York, where he slipped into poverty and 
mental illness. He died in Hamburg in 1960. 

Continued on page 9 






Zemlinsk\\ by Emil Orlik. 


1911, be went to the Deutsches Landes- 
theater in Prague, one of the German-speak- 
ing world's leading opera houses, and stayed 
for 16 years, conducting a long list of out- 
standing productions. Strav insk y, who did 
not say sudi things lightly, held Zemlinsky in 
high regard as a conductor and cited a “Mar- 
riage of Figaro” under him in Prague as the 
most satisfying opera performance he had 
ever heard. 

After Prague, he served for three years 
under Otto Klemperer at the adventurous 
Kroll Opera in Berlin, until extreme-rightist 
jtation forced it to close. He returned to 
Vienna, devoting himself largely to compos- 
ing until he emigrated in 1938 to the United 
Stares; where he died in 1942, aged 70, in 
Larchmont, New York. 

As a composer, Zemlinslty fell mto the 
crack between, traditional Romanticism and 
the extremes of 20th-century modernism. 
Although he was an ardent promoter of the 
music of Schoenberg and ms followers, he 
himself did sot go down the 12-note road. 
He never abandoned tonality, but wrote in a 
iaio-Romantk idiom that often made exotic 
and luxurious use of a large orchestra. There 
is a certain affinity to the extravagances of 
the Jugcndstil movement in art, and the 
revival of “Kleider Machen Leute” undoubt- 
edly was linked to the mammoth exhibition, 
“Dream and Reality,” on fin-de-siecle Vien- 
na that has just dosed. 

“Kidder Machen Leute” — roughly 



A scene from “ Kleider Machen Leute. ” 




Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 




Prague, City of Illusions 


by Andrew Sinclair 


P RAGUE — We flew here, looking 
for Rabbi Loew. The Jews of this 
city had always been known for 
their brilliance and wisdom. Jehuda 
Loew ben BezaleU or Rabbi Loew, acabalist. 
Scientist and alch emis t of the Renaissance, 
died in 1609. So famous wete bis experi- 
ments that he was credited with the creation 
of die Golem, the clay giant of folklore who 
rises to defend the ghetto from its persecu- 
tors, then turns on its creators because it is 
not soon reduced back to clay. 

The Golem lives because the Hebrew 
characters for Truth are engraved on its 
forehead: aleph, mem, soph. It becomes life- 
less clay when the first letter is erased, leav- 
ing the Hebrew word for Death. The Golem 


is the first Frankenstein's monster, while the 
historical Rabbi Loew is the prototype of 
Dr. Frankenstein, the maker of a monstrous 
man. The purpose is good, the creation of a 
perfect creature or a savior. The error is that 
a human being should not try to fabricate 
himself. If he does that, he will be destroyed 
by his inventions. 

Cedok, the Czechoslovak state travel 
agency, is meant to provide guides and trans- 
port for a long weekend in Prague, but a 
muted chaos controls the airport. After 
vouchers are exchanged for Grech money 
and visas are scrutinized and luggage collect- 
ed, all guides and airport buses are departed. 
So the best dung is to take a taxi to the hotel 
The taxi drivers are guides and money- 
changers anyway, running an alternative 
economy for their own profit 


The most evocative of the hotels is the 
Akron in the Old City. Dining there is like 
taking a cruise on a liner of the 1930s, 
surrounded by veneered wood and curving 
brass and dominated by a life-size bronze of 
a naked slave dancing-girl, while casual pia- 
nists tinkle out film theme tunes or “The 
Bine Danube.” The food is excellent partic- 
ularly anything to do with pork, sausage or 
dumplings, whue the cakes are sriQ made for 
the sweet tooth of Habsburg e mpre sse s. 

The Akron is within walking distance of 
the tights of the ancient city. The way to the 
Prague ghetto lies past the Tyl Theater, 
where Mozart's “Don Giovanni” had its fust 
performance, and on to the Old Town 
Square. Nothing is straight in Prague — 
streets curve and bead and slope aslant, 
walls lean, weird towers protrude and balco- 
nies jut out, oil is askew, yet harmonious in 
colors of faded red and ocher and green. The 
twin irregular spires or the Tyn Church dom- 
inate the sprawling Old Square, where a 
famous medieval dock brings out a skeleton 
Death tinkling his bell, as the Saints progress 
above two cosmic circles of tune, and the 
four Gospekrs took their heads to the c lan g 
of the strokes of the hour. By the clock is the 
Staromestske Naxnesti Caffe with the best hot 
dogs in town and slivovitz (plum brandy) on 
font ice cream. There the few Russian sol- 
diers sit, unseen by the waiters, until they 
slouch off as though they were not there. 

The Prague ghetto, the oldest and best 
preserved in Europe, is now a State Jewish 
Museum. The Old-New Synagogue was buflt 
in the late 13th century m the Gothic style 
under low arches. Surrounded by wooden 
pews, a railed almemar stands, where the 
Rabtk Loew once read the Talmud. Above it, 
a dusty red banner still hangs, the copy of 
die flag that the Holy Roman Emperor, 
Charles IV, gave the Jews of Prague to raise 
in his honor. Once it protected them without 
the need of a Golem, but it could not protect 
them against the modem Golem that came 
from Nazi Germany. In the attic of the 
the broken corpse of the real 
~is said to lie; but no one has ever 
found it to revive it. 


Time far a drink and a cake in the tavern 
of the poets, the Viola at 7 Nardi on the river 
embankment, where sad old ladies sit look- 
ing at time gone by. Then a walk over the 
Charles Bridge toward the castle on its hQl 
on the far side of the river by the green White 
Mountain, where Czech independence was 
destroyed three and a half centuries ago, and 
the Stuart Winter Queen had to flee back to 
the arms of her brother King Charles L, soon 
to lose his throne too in a civil war. Vendors 
fill the bridge, selling little pictures and amu- 
lets, leatherwork and decorated shells. 
Blackened saints dominate the parapets of 
the bridge and bless the swans in their doz- 
ens. gliding beneath. An ancient watchtower 
guards either end of the oldest river bridge in 
a European capital, from where a legendary 
skyline broods upon the past. Symbolists 
believe there is a secret in die placing of the 
spires of Prague, but all we see is mystery 
and a touch of magic. 

The way np the castle hill is steep and 
winding, but the taverns, raiitvi vinanxa, en- 
courage and refresh. Within the walls is a 
little city with a Renaissance Golden Lane of 
tiny shops, a Romanesque frarili^m of exqui- 
site simplicity as old as a miHenium, and St 
Vitus’s Cathedral, which still dances with 


3 arier*$ WencesJas ChapeL This manorial to 
the Good King of the Christmas carol is 
encrusted with semiprecious stones, set be- 
low frescoes of the royal exploits. You can 
watch him bearing winter Fuel to the old 
woman in her cottage while a page in red 
treads in his foolseps boldly. Outside, look- 
ing over Prague from a restaurant placed 
beneath the walls, we see a hawk has built its 
nest on the iron cross above the spire of one 
of the many Baroque churches that gOd and 
riirrrie the eyes. 

• For all is hidden in Prague, as we discover 
that evening. Behind its sleepy summer fa- 
cade, there are whole blocks of arcades and 
walkways, full of markets and advertise- 
ments, cinemas and theaters, bustle and ex- 


citement. It is the dosed face of Prague, its 
doppelgSnger, that other legend of two 
selves that derives from the city. Too many 
forced occupations by too many alien pow- 
ers and faiths have led the citizens of Prague 
to live behind doors, within corridors, show- 
ing nothing. 

That is confirmed when we visit the Al- 
hambra in the evening, a nightclub 
in time with two tiers of 
the dance floor beneath friezes of suggestive 
golden cupids. The show features dances 
from bet w e en the wars, the brief last period 
of true Czech independence before it col- 
lapsed before Hitler’s advance. Even the 
Golem comes on stage between the chorus 
girls, then pops apart to reveal a dwarf 
ringmaster. But the highlights are the perfor- 
mances of Czechoslovakia’s greatest illusion, 
developed in the Lanterna Magjca, where 
blade velvet drapes.back a poppet Mickey 
Mouse getting drunk on vodka and wanting 


that becomes a snake 
him There is caviar,’ 


to eat, Russia's finest gift, and good \ 
white wine,, mv * a band that plays all, , 

Id American rode times at the drop of a. 


a fluorescent i 
and tries to 
there 
local 

the old American rode times at the < 
foreign name. 

Prague is the city of magic, of Blasionvof 
things that are never what they seem to be. It ; 
has survived centuries of occupation, and ~ 
survives stiR B is the richest dry in Europe;. . 
for those who love its kge&dSyits glories and. 
its style. Go there far a good time; bat also 
far time past, and yon win come away en-; - 
crusted with the memories of its precious 
stones. And do not forget the prophecy of, 
Rabbi Loew: “The Gown is part of ther' 
belief that lasts forever. It wiflnse again at 
the end of human existence, but in quite 
different form." • •*!"' 

Andrew Sinclair, a novelist and historian - ■' 
who lira in London, wrote this article , for The 1 
New York Tones. 


The Old Jewish Cemetery. 


T HE memorials of the holocaust are 
housed by the Old Cemetery, where 
the Jews were buried for 500 years. 
Their 12,000 gravestones are surrounded by 
a concrete wafl. They seem to scrabble 
through the packed mud and weed, some- 
times a stone nail for a child’s tomb, or 
whole stone fingers with pointed tips, stone 
palms spread open, fists or thumbs of stone, 
all poking up from the earth. So many me- 
morials in such a little space. But among 
them the stone arks of such great figures as 
Mordecai Maisei and Rabbi Loew, striped 
with sunlight and the shadows of the thin 
trunks of the graveyard trees. 

By the tombs is the Klausen Synagogue, 
now a memorial to Hebrew learning and 
printing and art in the early ghetto. There 
pages of Rabbi Loew’s works are on display, 
printed from wood, blocks, symbols of the 
Golem to come. But more moving are the 
children’s drawings in the gallery above and 
in the Ceremonial Hall nearby. They were 
drawn in the concentration camp of Terezin 
where 35,000 died after the inhabitants of 
the ghetto were deported by the Nazis. These 
litrie pictures of sheep and cows, trees and 
dolls, are innocent and enduring and unen- 
durable. 




VIENNA,Konzerthaus([d:72.12.l 1). 
CONCERTS — Oct. 1 4 and 15: Alban 


RECITAL — Oct. 12: Dimitris 
Sgourcs, piano (Scarlatti). 
•StaatSOTW (td. 53240). 

BALLET — Oct 16: “Daphnis and 
Chloe" (Fokine, Ravel). 

OPERA— Oct. 12: “Maria Soiarda” 
(Donizetti). 

Oct- 14: *To5ca" (Puccini). 

Oct- 15: “Lc Nozze di Figaro” (Mo- 
zart). 

Oct. 17: “Adriadne auf Naxos” 
(Strauss). 

•Volksoper (td: 53240). 


OPERETTA— Ocl 12: “Der Bend- 
student" (MiDdckert- 
Ocl. 13: “Der Zigeunerbaron* 
(Stratus). , , 

Oct. 14: “Der Wildschfllz" (Lortzing). 
Oct. 15; ‘The Land of Smiles” (Lehfir). 
OPERA — Oct. 16: “The Bartered 
Bride" (Smetana). 


BELGIUM 


BRUSSELS, Music de Costumes et 
Den telle (id: 5 1 1.27.42). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. l:“Opera 
Costumes from 1959 to tbe Present” 
•Palais des Beaux Arts(te): 5 1230.45). 
EXHIBITION —To Dec. 22: “Span- 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


and Belgian Villages, 


ish Splendi 
1500-1700.’ 

•Musfees Royaux des Beaux-Arts de 
Bdgjqueftd: 51335.46). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: 
“Goya." 

d’Art et cTHistoire 


To Dec. 22: “Los 


Iberos.” 


Fiction * Poetry • Translations • Drama ■ Essays 

"An absolutely marvelous new title and one which should be found 
in any sized literature and general reading collection.” 

— Bill Katz, Library Journal 

“A superb publication, done with love, pride, great imagination 
and taste. ** 

— Frederic Prokosch 

2PLUS2 

A Collection of International Writing 


The current 465 page volume 
features the 1984 Nobel Laureate 
Jaroslav Seifert in an exclusive and 
major selection of his poetry and 
prose translated by Ewald Osers. 


Some other contributors to this 1985 Edition: 



Ajneya 

Tudor Arghezi 
Kenneth Bernard 
Paul Bowles 
Victor Brombert 
Margaret Browne 
Dino Buzzati 
Nancy Cardozo 
E.M. Cionm 
H. Diaz-Casamieva 


Stephen Dixon 
Russell Edson 
Desmond Egan 
Gabriel Fitzmaurice 
Stan Fogel 
Paavo Haavikko 
John Hollander 
Vladimir Kazakov 
Herbert Lomas 
J.D. McClaichy 


Naomi Shibab Nyc 
Mark O’Connor 
Heberto Padilla 
Sheenagh Pugh 
ran Claude Rcnard 
ten Sjostrand 
Gustaf Sobin 
R.S. Thomas 
Sidney Wade 
W. Wilde-Menozzi 


is 


Mylabris Press 5.A.. Case Postale 171. 1018 Lausanne. Switzerland 

Mylabris Press Ltd.. P.O. Box 20725. New York. N.Y- 10025 
Please send roe , copies of die ] 935 Edition of 2PLI5! 

S 16.00 + S 1.50 postage and handling 
Payable to Mylabris Press 


EXHIBITIONS— To Dec. 15: “Con- 
temporary Art” (Borolsky. Dokoupil, 
EckeQ. Duane. Senise). 

To Dec. 1 5 “Modern Classics" (Portin- 
ari, SegaD, Malfani). 

To Dec. 15: "The Apprentice Tourist: 
Photo6of the Amazon Region by Mau- 
reen BiriBiai and Mario de Andrade." 


SAO PAULO, 18th Biennial Celebra- 
tion (td: 572.77.22). 


HUMLERAEK, Louisiana Museum 
of Modern An (Id: 19.07.19). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. I .-“Russian 
Avant-Garde: 1910-1930" (Malc- 
vitefa, Kandcnsky, Gontjarova). 
KLAMPENBORG. Bellevue Theater 
(teL39.87.87). 

DANCE —To Oct. 20: Tbe Danish 
Dance Theater ("The Life of Dance"). 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
638.41.41). 

CONCERTS — London Symphony 
Orchestra — OcL 12: Yuri Anrooo- 
vilcfa conductor, Ban Rcchtman piano 
(Rachmaninov, Tchaikovsky). 

OcL 17: Claudio Abbado conductor, 
Peter Serlcin piano (Berg. Mahler). 


Oct 18: Elgar Howarth conductor, 
Neil Jenkins tenor (Birtwistle, Ligeti, 
Britten). 

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra — 
Oct 13: Martin Fischer-Dieskau con- 
ductor, Philip Fowke piano (Beetho- 
ven). 

Oct 15: Jukka-Pekka Saiaste conduc- 
tor, Cristina Ortiz piano (Grieg, Sibe- 
lins). 

EXHIBITIONS —To Oct 13: “The 
Piano Past and Present.” 

To Oct 20: “Gustav Mahler: The Man 
and thi- Musician." 

To Nov. 3: “Egyptian Landscapes: 
Weaving from the School of Ramses 
WissaWassef." 

To Nov. 3: “Roderic O' Cotter 
To Nov. 3: “Vera Cunningham and 
Matthew Smith." 

To Nov. 3: “Gwen John." 

•British Museum (td: 636.1535). 
EXHIBITION —To Jan. 1986: “Bud- 
dhism: Art and Faith.” 

•James Birch Fine Art (tel: 7313934), 
EXHIBITION — Through October 
“Ludana Martinez de la Rosa." 
•London Coliseum (tel: 836Bl.il). 
OPERA— Oct 12, 16. 18: “Don Car- 
los" (Verdi). 

Oct 17: “Rjgokito" (Verdi), 
itional Port 


•National 

930.1532). 


WEEKEND 


RESTAURANTS 


AN INDIAN ISLAND OF GOURMET ADVENTURE 

i 

MOORED ON THE SEINE 

- 

LE LOTT S, -a here deliahtfu! mvst erics of 

w ~ r r ' 

£■ a "tha'i" unfold. 



^ JARDLN DE SH.VL1MAR. "The Garden 


ILEDE 

of Romance ", where von can feast, on a 


KASHMIR 

buffer a; lunch and dine a la cane. 



Quai Debi!h. en face du 32. av. de New- York. 



Paris 16-. 


Telephone: 723.77. 7S/723.50.97 - Parking 

Ope 

- "1 o:’ ihd V.CCK ft -r ! iir.vh dir,r.cr. La..: Crc!_r 1 i p di 


BBT PASTUMI BQBS8T, 
PHOTOS 
SMKB) UUflUf 



TOMSSE 
Dolly TflAITEUR until midnight 
69. A». Wogrom PAMS- 17* 11 73 ? 14 79. Cl 


SHOPS 


PARFUMS 

VENDOME 

9 . Roe oe Ccsl.g'ione. 75001 Pen's. 
Tc 1 .: 0 I 260.43.94 

perfjmes • tiei . icjr.e; . farcy . 

high dais pulls - luxury r;ir eeceiietiei 

DUTY FREE - 40% - £N3_£H S?C 


HOLIDAYS 


PORTUGAL 

HOLIDAYS 

see classified 


WEEKEND 

appears every 

Friday 

For information 
call Dominique Bouvet 
in Paris 
on 747.12.65 


EXHIBITIONS — ToOct 13: “Char- 
lie Chaplin 1889-1977." 

•Royal Albert Hafl (tel: 589-82.12). 
CONCERT — Oct. 18: The Band of 
the Groiaditt Guards. The Royal Mil- 
itary Band of the Netherlands and The 
Royal Choral Society. 

• Roya l Opera House (tel: 240.10.66). 
OPERA — Oct. 12: “D Ttovatore" 
(Verdi). 

•Tate Gallery (td: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Nc 
“Pound’s Artists." 


•Musfeedn Louvreftd: 26039.26). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 6: “LeBrun 
at Versailles.” 

•Mu9fcednPetitpHlais(td: 265.12.73). 
EXHIBITION —To Jan, 5: “Soled 
d*Enc»e,” ink drawings by Victor 

•nIoco (teL 27831.83). 
EXHIBITION — Oct. 17-Nov. 16: 
“Saint Manr.” 

•Opera (td : 7423730). 

OPERA— Oct. 12, 16. 18: “Iphigfenie 
en Tamide” (Gluck). 

•Salk Favart (teL- 296.06. 1 11 
OPERETTA— Oct. 14:“LaBefleHfe- 
ov. 10: few” (Offenbach). 


MILAN, Teatro alia Scala (tel:;* 
-809L26). . 1 

CONCERTS— Oct. 16-18: Orchestra 
del Teatro alia Scala, RiccardoChaiBy • 
condnctor, Kiystian Tzmennan piano r 
(Lisa. Bruckner). ■ 

— if 


’or trait Gallery (tel: 


To Dec. 1: “Howard Hodgkin: Prints 
from 1977-1983." 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To October 22: 
“Textiles from the Wellcome Collec- 
tion: ancient and modem textiles from 
tbe Near East and Pan.” 

To Nov. 17: “Browne Mttggs: English 
Brown Salt-Glazed Stoneware." 

To Jan. 19: “Shots of Style: Great 
Fashion Photographs Chosen by Da- 
vid Baiky." 

STRATFORD-upou-AVON, Royal 
Shake spear e Theatre (tel: 295623). 
THEATER — OcL 12, 15, 16, 17: 
“Ochdlo” (Shakespeare). 

Oct 12 and 17: *As You Like It" 
(Shakespeare). 

Oct. 14: Tbe Merry Wives of Wklsoi” 
(Shakespeare). 


•SaBePleyol(td: 563.88.731 
CONCERTS —pet. 12: Ensemble 
Orchestral de Pans, Jean-Pietre Wri- 
te conductor, Naxdso Yepcs guitar 


IS: Monte Cario Philharmonic 
Orchestra, Lawrence Foster conduc- 
tor, Maria Tip© poano' (Beethoven, 
Ravel). 

•Thfeitre du Rood-Point 
(teL256.70.8Cf). 

RECITAL— O 
cdk> (Bach). 

•Wally Findlay Galleries (td: 225. 
70.74). 

EXHIBITION —To OcL 19: “Anfis- 


MONTE-CARLO, Gakrie d’Art Mo- • 
demo Le Point (td: 5038.17). 
EXHIBITION— ToOcl 19: “20Cen- 
nny Artiste,” Baltins, Magritte, Picas-.. \ 
so. 

"•Thfeitre Prin cease Grace (tel: 

253227 ). T 

CONCERT— Oct. 13: MontoCariq;. 
Philharmonic Orchestra. Lawrence^ 
Fbster conductor, Ronald Pattenon 
vtohn (Bach, Ravd). 


Oct 13: Mischa Maisky 


AMSTERDAM CO oc e r lfldwiwftd: j 

7133 AS) . 

CONCERTS— Oct. 12: Netherlands . 
Plffliar mooic Antwii Boa. 

Marba conductor (Rossini, Mozart). 1 ;/ 
Oct. 18: Concertgcbouworicest, Bex- '' 
nard Haitink conductor (BiittenX 
RCTTALS — Oct 12. Uni Poubon - 


PARIS, ADAC Gallery (tel: 
277.96 2£\ 

EXHIBITION — To pet 17: “Isa- 
belle Emmerique, Patricia Giannmi, 
Mkhd LacosL Rap had Levy, Jean- 
PienePignard.” 

•American Center (td: 3352130). 
DANCE— Oct 12: Mark Morris. 
EXHCBITION —To Nov. 30: “Wil- 
liam T. WBey." . 

•Artcurial(td: 299.16.16). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 15: ‘De 
Chirico." 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
277.1233). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: 
“Matte.” , 

To Jan. 1 : “Klee et la Masque.” 
•Espace Cardin (td: 245.6031). 
RECITAL — OcL 14: Sergio and 
Odair Assad guitar (Albeniz, Castd- 
uuevo). 

•Fcmdatioo Arthaud (td: 58236.77). 
JAZZ — Oct. 12: Simon Hanssen 
Quartet (Cage, Tallet). 

•Morgan dels Radio (eeh 524. 15. 10). 
CONCERT — Oct. 12: Nouvd Op- 
chcstxe PhDharmomque; Mardc Jau- 
owsla conductor. Jorge Boiet piano 
(Beethoven, Tchaikovsky ). 

• Mnsfee d'Art Model 
723.6137). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “Vera 


BERLIN, Deutsche .Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

OPERA— OcL 12i“DieZaubeifl0ce” 
(MozartX 

OcL 13: “Die Wallriire" (W agnerV 
Oct 14; The- Barber of Sevifle”(Kos- 
rini). 

Oct 15: “Lada di Lammermoor” - 

Fagncr). 
■““"(Lortring). 
HAMBURG, Staatsoper (tel: 
35.1535L 

BALLET — OcLl2andl5: u Mklsam- 
mer's Night Dream” (Balanchine. 
Mendelssohn). 

Oct 12 and 18:“/ 
di). 

Oct 13 and 16: “Fmal? (GaanodS. 
Oct 17: “Le Nozze di Fjgaro” (Mo- 
zart). 

MUNICH, National Theater (td:. 
22.13.16). 

OTERA— Oct 12: TXra Carlo” (Ver- 
dQ. • 

Oct 13: Tristan and Isolde" (Wag- 
ner). 

OcL Me “CardUlac” (Hmdexmth). 

Oct IS and 18; “Moses und Aaron” 


13: Margarita and Olga Mahnova 


Hrnt- 


. 15: hfitsnko SUzui: 
muiHdn 
Oct 16: 

Schumann). 


0 Stum soprano, Ha 
(Haydn, Schubert). 


‘•A Masked BalT (Ver- 


feUlNBURGH, National Museum of 
Antiquities of Scotland (tel: 
5573530). 

exhibition —To Nov. 3: “i Am 
Come Home: Treasures of Prince 
Charles Edward Stuart” 
GLASGOW, Hieatre Royal (tel: 

OPERA— Oct 12:TheMameFIutd* 
(Mozart). 


(Pucchti). 


lerne (ted: 


ITALY 


BOLOGNA. Galleria tfArte Mo- 


•Masec Chnuvalet (tek27231 .13L 
EXHIBITIONS —To OcL 27: Tes 
Grands Boulevards de Paris." 

To Nov. 15: “LedooxbyTrulsch." 
•Muste des Arts Dtooratifs (td: 
26032.14). 

EXHOBlTlON —To Nov. 30: “Life 
1946*1955." 

•Musfee du Grand Palais (tel: 
26134.10). 

EXHIBITIONS— ToOct I3:“Foire 
Internationale d’Art Cot temporain.” 
To Dec. 16: “Sir Jo ehtu Reynolds: 
1723-1792.” 

To Jan.6:^ "La Qioiredc Victor Huge" 


Galerie Trois (tel 

EMHmnTON— TQNov.9r“Antho 
nyGttibk” 

^G^»ssr Fo ”” 

EXHIBrnON^— T oOcl20:‘ 
aronimt m riu* . 

CoDeetions.” 

ZURICH C. 

OPERA— Oct 12: “Macbeth"(V^ 

Ocl 13: “TTEhshr d’Amore" (Domz« 
tiL La Bohfanr” 


EXHIBITION — To Nov. 30: “Luuri 
BerteDL” 

Teatro Comrmtnale(td: 2229.99). 
CONCERTS— Oct 12 and 13: Or- 
diesua del Teatro Comimaledt Bcdo- 
gna, Herbert Soudant conductor, 
Emaniad Ax ptano (Mozart). 
FLORENCE, Museo Airheologico 
(mi: 2132.7m. 

EXHIBTTION — To Oct 20: The 
EtnacmOw BatiBB ” 

Teatro Comncale di Pixeare (td: 
277.9236) 

OPERA — Oct 13 and 17: “Faust" 
(Gounod). 


^^yTXeFrimohneSdiattca-0 

Flj^g Durchma* 


Mweom « Art W . ' 
Jan, 5: "India!" ' i 










-V" 


» • INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11. 1985 


Page 9 

- “ - . 1 

mi m I fill* A TTT1T 

4 




I T is imcoinddeace that luxury hotels in 

the Far East consistently surpass those 
m other parts of the wold m surveys 
among business travelers. Most 
put it down to an innate Oriental 


~ ^ jTO hotd^m the front of the bode arc listed in 
r no.par&dfitr order. They’re all outstanding, 
accordingtoDavis. His own favorite is the 
Oriental inBangkok and gives hxghpniise to 
The Mandarin, in Hong Kong, theRegent in 
Sydney.-the^laza Athenie in Paris and the 
sveriy WHshire in Los Angeles. * 

Acme to the Oriental's preeminence is a 


The Regent is Sydney is a good example 
of a hotel that redly understands the busi- 
ness traveler’s needs. AH its rooms have a 
proper ded^.ttffee tdq^ones and aninlo-- 



- . .. 

ft** ^ .. 

‘ -1 "i,-. 

w . 

" -• PC* 

Hfc 7 *: . 

i.A^.cv 

• . 

• . . ■ 1 

r ri”-.* 

■ - M j' 

P* - 

- :r 

PA**?-: 

. r" ^ 


: - 

o*rf 

- ■ 4 ; j: 

V i - .. 

. 

** r-t” 



...**• 

V*: . • 


t l-.-V'?. 


■sft* 1 . 

i'Cs- 

w: 


1 *: 

' - 

4 * . 


w •* . 


r : — 

• ■-■Kit 

v .• 


.X- 

•i - - - - 



tality,*' UnKfceTnany Western TSXre ■ c ^ mbinati<m ? *«*“' “ d “P« b 

staff aa as il ihe^rc ^ ^ ^Cha°. *8“* 

Set you stay there: the" hesr decor and a high rano of staff to guests 

^Ho^Knng ^X, 1 ,- 000 for “tx room! )- ^ 

idded business guest feel Kkea\TP tntional Investor puis, it down to a hotelier's 

* In a poll of international banW puV ^a laxge.profesaonal Asian staff 

lished in the September issue offcStional 2?* ^European manner (Gennan-bom 
Investor magazine, the top five ^ mflke.ihe ideal team, 

world are in Aaa — the Oriental m Bangkok 
(rated best for. the fifth year running) the 
■Mandarin and the Regent in HongKone. 
the Okura in Tokyo and the Shangri-La m 
Singapore. The Vier Jahreszritmm Ham- 
burg was rated sixth, wh3e the best hotel in 
the Americas was the Four Season* in w««k. : 
irigton, D. rated 16th. 

• Predictably, the bankers have chosen roost 
of the famous names; the Connaught in 
London (8th), the recently refurbished Ritz.' 
in Paris (9th), the Regent in Sydney (11th), 
the Odder Grand in Zurich (12th), the 
Hassler Villa Medici in Rome (13th), the 
Imperial in Vienna 07th) and the Carlyle in 

.New York (18th). ■ - — . 

W All of these hotels are included in a short 
listtrf 50 (13of them In die Far East>m a national news service that operates on the 
new gUMc, The World s Best Business Ho- color TV. There is a fully equipped business 
ids, published this month m London (by center, ah in-house prim Shop and a wdl- 

gS&G-J? J?™*- 1 **- 571 F** stocked reference IP* 

£39.95). Edited by William Davis, a RHKcti 

author and former financial jo urnalist , the 


Homines in the 


seem 


to have the key 






fc... 


ith 


*a 




,F > 


*** . 

* -f 

I.***##** 


Jn 


> 

■I; 


guide contains full-page descriptions of 500 
business hotels in 80 countries. Davis 
claimed it took himself and six contributors 
18 months to compile and involved the 
screening of over' a thousand holds. Earf» 
entry contains a long description with an 
artist's impression and a 10-point list of key 
requirements, such as personal and business 
services, eating and drinking . . 

One of Davis’s prime considerations is 
centra] location. Apart from half a dozen of 
his favorite resort holds, which he rational- 
izes as being great for conventions (while 
adjuring, the traveler to avoid convention- 
eers), the selection has been limited to estab- 
lishments likely to provide easy access to 
appointments in major business centers. 
“We have also borne in mind that many 
businessmen consider it important to have a 
temporary address which local people regard 
as prestigious,” Davis says, 
u i Davis stresses that “what we’ve chosen is 
the best hotel in a particular place; which 
doesn't mean they’re aQ up to traditional 
standards. ThebestinTimbuktowon't mea- 
sure up to the best in Loudon. I mean, some 
of the holds in the Middle East are falling 
apart.” 

-By and large, this has been a sensible 
policy. The problenri. is the selection of bna- 


. One of Davis’s pet bates is hotels that 
maxim iz e business by encouraging people 
from outside to use their restaurants and 
bars, for which residents have to con 
"We were staying at the Waldorf in a 
suite and couldn’t get a table for breakfast, 
they said they’d been booked out for two 
days by local businessmen for breakfast 
meetings. Hoteliers should make up their 
minds whether they want to be restaurants 
or hotels." 

- This is possibly why there is a trend to- 
wards snuD luxury holds where there is less 
ride of encountering hordes of boisterous 
conventioneers. But elegant, dubby proper- 
ties with intimate service are still not easy to 
find. Davis cites the 57-room- Lancaster in 
Paris as agood example (“A real gem”), and 
the Ritz-Caritons in New York and Wash- 
ington and the Hay-Adams and the Madison 
in Washington. These have between 165 and 
370 rooms and are furnished with paintings 
and -antique furniture from Europe. John 
Coleman, proprietor of the Ritz-Caritons, is 
proud of his four-posters and milli on-dona r 
collection of old English paintings in the 
Jockey Club restaurant of his New York 
hotel David Murdock, who acquired the 
Hay-Adams in 1983, has aimed to turn it 
into the American version of an English 
country house. 

Small within big can also be beautifuL 


TRAVEL 


Ht ; 


1 

,1 -v 


A j 




*•.. 




□esscefcters. FarexaBq>le, the.guide Hstsrtwo Some of the large chains have created sepa- 
hotds in Newcastfo-on-Tyne mEnglahri^-- ^ ratedhxuryvangs or floors for the badness 
ope of which is theHoHday lrin,not conve- - * * ~ 

meat to the city — but neglects to fist ope in 
Bern, Switzerland, which has a distinguished 
hotel the Schweizeihof, next to the train 
station. Then, as Davis points out, some 
cities, like New Orleans, have almost a ghit 
of good hotels. But does this justify listing; 
four in that city compared with only two in 
Philadelphia and one in Cleveland? And 
why list three hotels in the Channel Islands 
ana none in cities like Marseille, Toulouse; 
lille or Bremen? • - : 

In the final analysis, any guide must idly 


4r- 


u£n subjective judgments. Davis believes that 

The star system is useless because ifs so 
MOKAw different in each country. So he has avoided 

— grading in any way. “Whether a hotel seems 

. better than another largely depends on indi- 

J !~. ‘ ’ vidual tastes,” he says. Even the guide’s top 


traveler. A good example of this is the Shera- 
ton in Stockholm, which has 51 rooms cm its 
top floor with special elevator and registra- 
tion, two telephones in the room and many 
extras. A hostess will book airline tickets and 
take care of telexes and typing. 

A minor quibble is that the guide doesn’t 
always say which chain owns which of the. 
500 listed hotels (although it gives the man- 
agers’ names). According to Davis, the best 
three chains in the world are the Foot Sea- 
sons, the Mandarin and the Regent group. 
He also razes highly the Taj group in India. 
But it depends on the region. “Marriott, for 
example, has downmarket hotels in America, 
but exoeSeoi ones in the Middle East — the 
Marriott in Cano or Amman is absolutely 
one of the best hotels. And in many cases the 
Hiltons are best,” he says. ■ 


Liechtenstein 


Continued from page 7 






' - 


co state coach, or Golden Carriage, that was 
built in Paris in 1738 for Prince Joseph 
Wenzel of Liechtehstan as ambassador from 

tile Holy Roman Empire to the 'French . 

that this should ever have been .his country house da rin g the Thirty Years 

’ ' 5 — War and dreaming' of the bronzes w ” 

vanni Bologna that he had seen in 



court 

brought to tiris'countxy, let alone carried op 
the ffwnn staircase of the Met, is one of the 
marvels of modem muscology. It weighs 
? approximately 3,100 pounds. The coach 
gives a completely new dimension to the idea 
of being taken from place to place, and even 
if it cannot keep company in New York with 
the magnificent stallions from the family 
stud in Eisgrab, we can at least have a look at 
those stallions in the portraits of thanpain.tr 
ed by Johann Georg vbn H a m ilton. 

Act II is m no way an anticlimax, but these 
particular program notes; are. not going to 
give away its secrets. If there is .something to 
regret about the whole undertaking, it is that 
none of the previous princely collectors can 
come down from the Etyszan Fields to see 
what came of their ever-varied; ever- ardent 
activities. I think in particular of Prince Karl 


I (1569-1627), who so loved mysterious and 
beautiful objects Hke the perpetual calendar 
in the present show, and of Prince Kad 
Eusebius (1611-1684); virtually walled up in 


as a vexy young man. 

. Later connoisseurs come to mind, also, 
lflre Prince Johannes II (1840-1 929), who 
lived through the first great age of serious art 
history and liked nothing better than to 
travel around with Wflhdm yon Bode, the 
foremost picture-fancier of his day in Ger- 
znany, .CTje^s realty too much,” Bode said 
afterward. “The word 'breakfast' has no 
meaning for him.”) At least we have in town 
Franz Josef U, now in his 80th year, who 
knows enough about Old Master painting to 
bandy attributions even with Bode himself 
and has looked forward as much as the rest 
of ns to this exhibition. _■ 

’ e 1985 The New York Times 


Vienna 


Continued from page 7 


51 


His oprettas seem today to 
- man’s land between sub-Lchar. late Vien- 
jeretta and 1920s American musical 
y.. Since Abraham, like mast musical 
xraiedy composers, did not do his own or- 
iestrafion, it is bard to 'say how Johannes 
Fehring's arrangement for the Raimund's 
xopemng might compare with' the' original 
In any case, although many erf the hit 
;ongs sriQ live in the memories at many 


Viennese of a certain age, this is music that 
has been overtaken by time. It has neither 
the nostalgic aura of the best Viennese oper- 
ettas nor the polish of an American musical. 
And the production at the Raimund did not 
have ' the sophistication that might have 
saved the day. It a real star for the 
iftl« role and had not much to offer in the 
required exotic settings except for heavy use 
of the theater's new revolving stage. ■ 


Reports From the Underground 



(HE New York subway is hardly con- 
sidered one erf the city’s tourist 
attractions, but the situation is dif- 
ferent in some of the world’s capi- 
tals and other major cities. Correspondents 
of -The New York Times report on their 
subway systems, from the chandeliers of 
Moscow to the Aztec temple of Mexico City. 


London 


T HE first tiring you need to know is 
that it is always called the Under- 
ground and never the subway; a sub- 
way is a pedestrian passage under a street, at 
least in London. The second is that it doesn’t 
run all night, and you had better not plan on 
tiring it much before 6 A-M. or much after 
. 11:30 P.M. The third is you must hold on to 
your ticket, which is priced according to 
your destination, until the end of the ride, 
where you win be asked to surrender iL 
London’s Underground is the world’s old- 
est — the first line having been opened on 
Jan. 9, 1863 — and the world’s most exten- 
sive, with more than 250 stations, more than 
750 miles of trade and 130 giant ventilation 
fans that keep the temperature at 73 degrees 
year round. Buz by comparison with those of 
Paris, New York and Moscow, Loudon’s 
system carries relatively few people, “only” 
540 million a year. 

By common consent, the worst of the nine 
lines is the Northern, which is deep, dantr 
and dark, and the grubbiest station is Leices- 
ter Square. The Victoria line, finished in 
1971, and the Jubilee line, completed in 
1979, are the newest. In an extensive pro- 
gram of refurbishment, a number of stations 
Have been given distinct personalities, with 
19th-century wrought iron and portraits of 
Sherlock Holmes ornamenting the station at 
Baker Street, mosaics of medieval Britain at 
Charing Cross, tile cameos of Queen Vic- 
toria at Victoria Station, trendy cafes and 
boutiques at Bond Street. 

The names of the stations have always 
fascinated me. Paris has its Babylone and 
Pyramides and Austerlitz, but no name there 
has quite the eccentricity — the sheer im- 
probability — of Cockfosters or The Angel 
or Elephant and Castle. And what creatures 
must a chil d expect to encounter at Shep- 
herd’s Bush? 

— JR. W. Apple Jr. 

Bonn 

HERE are first-time visitors who ex- 
claim that tiny, slumberous Bonn 
can’t really be the capital of the most 
powerful nation in Western Europe: You can 
ride a bicyde in half an hour from one end of 
the town to the other, and a lot of people do. 
There is an airport 20 minutes away across 
the Rhine; but of course it’s shared with 
Cologne, a more plausible city. The Bonn 
train station has only two tracks. 

Yet Bonn has one undeniable attribute of 
a European capital: a subway. It is a very 
small very dean and very safe subway. Built 
in the early 1970s, it exists largely to dis- 
abuse the doubters about Bonn’s shaky capi- 
tal status. 

The capital’s subway — well, if the truth 
be told, some of it actually runs above 
ground — has 19 stations and 52 cars. It 
allegedly carries 150,000 riders a day, Much 
is half the population of Bonn, and would 
seem to mean that a lot of outsiders or 
repeaters are on board. Or that the statistic is 
inflated. These people do not spray graffiti 
on the rides of the immaculate subway cars; 
nor do they litter, or even casually throw 
pieces of paper on the ground. All these 
activities are strictly forbidden. 

The managers of the Bonn subway noted 
that plastic bus seats were bong vandalized, 
so they upholstered the seats in the subway. 
Tins is said to have an inhibiting effect on 
would-be vandals who are reluctant to mess 
up something so nice. Similarly, the main 
subway station has an unscathed collection 
of modern art hanging on its walls. 

There is one known vice practiced on the 
Bonn subway, and that is sneaking onto its 
trains without paying. About 3percent of 
riders are thought to do this. That makes 
almost 1.6 million a year. Roaming inspec- 
tors slap tough fines mi "blade” riders; the 
fines have to be paid on the spot, and if the 
violator doesn’t have the cash he is taken to 
the police station. 

— James M. Markham 


Moscow 


HE Moscow subway is almost every- 
thing people say it is: fast, comfort- 
able, frequent and virtually free of 
litter, advertising or crime. 

But what really draws the tourists are the 
stations. Each one is different, and each is a 
unique exercise in that monirmt-ntal marb le- 
an d- mosaic extravagance that for so long 
was mandatory for official Soviet architec- 
ture. The massively columned entrances, the 
iron statues of wdl-muscled peasants, the 
dazzling chandeliers and the mosaics singing 


the glories erf Soviet feats tell as much about 
the Soviet state as the architecture of the 
Kremlin tells about the days of the czars. 

A ride on the ring line that circles the old 
city center and connects with eight lines that 
stretch to the far reaches of the capital is a 
tour of high Socialist Realism. It was built in 
the early postwar years, when Soviet build- 
ing celebrated the sense of might and destiny 
that with victory over Nazi Germany. 

Along the ring line are some of Moscow’s 
more celebrated gfittering station-temples, 
each the winning entry by different teams of 






i.-' 


DOONESBURY 

mmtDB&f££50F0paiffrmAL 
&6& BUltim) m' BUTTHe 
i MQ&'FR&wrmiXOGgM 
: ws8£a,v£i£&Mim 
iSl8TOV8lfOR.yaK.U££- 


sate PROGRAMS MSSOtmW, 
Tmamrm.Ht6AM&n.nfc 
A tL A Question OF HDU) MUCH OF 
you*. SnKsOFMEMORf HOU5AC- 
m&FORsmcB,cijaLPoGb 
wn oNEANPASKimpmour 
_ • WUR.RLB. 






THXV5 CALLED 
• USERrTOLBMM. 
1h£ PROGRAM ONLY 

U5ESWK.NOW 
CLICK PDSflfflV. 
mTMA&M. 


viLTmcm 

oF&mnm. 

60HME50MB 

CDFff&ANP 

KICKBACK. 


•usez- 

500K. 




Kropotkinskaya station in Moscow. 


architects and artists: the Komsomolskaya 
station, with its red granite floors and its 
ceilings decorated in mosaic depictions of 
great Russian heroes; the Byelorusskaya sta- 
tion, gleaming with white marble col umns 
and richly tilra floors and ornamented with 
a mosaic frieze celebrating the “peaceful 
creative labor of the Byelorussian peoples," 
and the Novoslobodskaya station, one of the 
last creations of the late Alexei N. P ushkin, 
who may justly be called the Picasso of the 
Moscow underground. When opened in 
1952, the Novoslobodskaya station intro- 
duced of Art Deco to the Metro with its 
glowing stained-glass columns. 

Dusnkin was also the architect of the 
Mayakovsky station, a futuristic composi- 
tion of polished stainless steel and gray mar- 
ble that was opened in 1938. It was there, 
deep under Mayakovsky Square, that the 
annual rally markin g the anniversary of the 
October Revolution was held on Nov. 6, 
1941, when German guns were wi thin range 
of Moscow. 

Of late, Moscow- newspapers have taken to 
sniping at the administration erf the Metro 
for letting some of the trim deteriorate. The 
papers have charged that some chandeliers 
have been replaced with fluorescent fixtures, 
floor tiles have been mismatched and some 
white marble benches have disappeared. 

Moskovskaya Pravda even marshaled the 
widow of the honored Professor P ushkin to 
speak against the installation of mundane 
lighting fixtures at the Novoslobodskaya sta- 
tion. “Alexei Nikolayevich in the last years 
of his life raised this subject, so painful to 
him, more than once, but without effect, as 
time has shown," she wrote. 


The atmosphere is of the city's work ethic: 
Not much talk-, men and women bustling by. 
rushing to work as if the city's stem patron, 
St. Ambrose, would judge them hard if they 
came in late. 

The system connects mainly the northeast 
and northwest outskirts to the center of 
town. That means you will see more Ferra- 
gamo and Valentino on the vast tram and 
bus system, or in the taxis used by the city’s 
well-to-do. You won't see many factory 
workers, either, since the industries are 
largely outside the city. 

The people of the subway might be 
thought of as Milan’s silent majority, the 
clerks, salespeople and office workers who 
make this white-collar town run. 

— E. J. Dionne 


Tok yo 


• Serge Schmemann 


Mexico Gtv 


M; 


EXICO CITY'S Metro system is 
worth a visit not only in order to see 
. how clean and quiet a subway sys- 
tem can be but also to enjoy a variety of 
archaeological and cultural exhibits. The 
fare is about a third of a U. S. cent. 

At the station underneath the city’s histor- 
ic Z6calo, or central plaza, on Line 2, visitors 
can see huge, side-by-side models of the area 
in Aztec, colonial and modern times, before 
going upstairs to see bow little it has 
changed: There, in among the still mostly 
colozual buildings, is the recent excavation 
of the Aztec Templo Mayor, or main temple. 

One stop away, in the Pino Su&rez station, 
a small Aztec pyramid sits at a central point 
of the crossing between Lines 1 and 2, draw- 
ing admiring glances from even the most 
habitual local travelers. It was discovered by 
accident in 1967, when the station was being 
built, and the enure station was redesigned 
to accommodate it 

Such are the number of artifacts still un- 
der Mexico’s surface that an archaeologist 
now accompanies construction crews on all 
Metro digs. A recent find was the skeleton of 
a mammoth (close 10 the Talisman station 
on Line 4), which is expected to be recon- 
structed and put on display at the station in 
the near future. 

— Richard J. Meislin 


| HE Tokyo subway system serves as a 
reasonable metaphor for the city that 
swirls above iL The ckikatetsu, as it is 
called in Japanese, is safe, on time, brightly 
lighted and dean. Unlike the city, it is also 
well marked and reasonably priced, at least 
in central parts of town. What more could 
one ask? 

But also like the dw it serves, the Tokyo 
subway lacks, for want of a better term, a 
romantic soul. The Tokyo system is purely 
functional. Despite the velvetlike seats on 
every train, you cannot truly call the chika- 
tetsu attractive. Yes, it is clean; so is an 
operating room. Each station on the sub- 
way’s 10 Hnes looks much like all the others. 
They even sound alike: All are equipped 
with prerecorded announcements that ad- 
rise when trains are coming and urges riders 
to stand behind a white line on the platform. 

With 2.2 billion passengers a year, it is a 
terribly crowded system. By now many for- 
eigners have seen or heard about the subway 
employees who shove groaning passengers 
into cars and then peel them out like arti- 
choke leaves. In fact, those workers can be 
found only at certain hours in key commuter 
terminals. 

Stfil wherever you go. the crowding can 
be fierce. So can the rudeness, to the surprise 
of many visitors. Expect and give no quarter 
in the scramble for seats. The advice here, 
especially during peak hours, is to let the 
crowd sweep you along. To resist is to swim 
against a strong tide. Most of all be leery of 
elderly women in kimonos. They may look 
elegant and benign, but they have dartlike 
reflexes and saber-sharp elbows. 

- — Clyde Haberman 


Vienna 


Milan 


i HE subway may be the place where 
Milan best lives up to its claim 10 
being a city of Europe's north, far 
from the chaos of Naples or Palermo. 


For sightseers, Vienna’s six-year-old U- 
Bahn (the U stands for Umergrund, or un- 
derground) is useful above till because it 
takes them quickly and comfortably from 
the historical center of the city to Schdn- 
brunn Palace, once the summer residence of 
the Hapsbuig emperors, and to the Prater, 
the vast recreation area between the Danube 
River and the Danube Canal. 

The three completed routes of the still- 
expanding U-Bahn network converge at the 
Karlsplatz station, which incorporates the 
Opempassage. a sunken mall below the 
city's busiest intersection, near the State Op- 
era. 

For a visit 10 the former imperial castle 
take the U-4 line and get out at the Schon- 
brunn or Hiecring-Kennedy BrOcke stop. 



The latter is one of the more than 20 stations 
of a now nearly defunct metropolitan rail- 
way, the Stadibahn, that were designed by 
the’ fin-de-sifecle architect Otto Wagner. It is 
a Baroque rerival pavilion with Art Nouveau 
decorations and a barrel vaulL Like other 
Wagner stations (including the one on the 
Karlsplatz, which has been transformed into 
a cafe and a largely Art Nouveau museum) it 
has been lovingly restored. 

For the Prater, take the north-south IM 
line to the Praterstern. You might start from 
the Stephansplatz station, near Sl Stephen's 
Cathedral In the Stephansplatz underpass, 
near the escalators to the subway platforms, 
you will see ancient Roman columns and 
other artifacts that were unearthed during 
construction work in the 1970s. The under- 
pass also leads to the Chapel of Sl Virgil, a 
well-preserved Romanesque crypt that was 
rediscovered during the subway excavations. 

Vienna's U-Bahn has so far cost more 
than Sl billion. The stations and air-condi- 
tioned trains are clean, safe and quiet — 
especially near the State Opera, where the 
tracks are embedded in rubber to make sure 
the nimble of the trains won’t interfere with 
the music. 


— Paul Hofmann 


Beijing 


M OSCOW’S is grander, and in 
Pyongyang the statues of Kim I! 
Sung are alone worth the price of 
admission. But when China set out to build 
its first subway nearly 20 years ago, it 
achieved a distinction that was all its own. 

The Cultural Revolution was at its mad- 
cap peak Mien Mao Zedong derided lhaL 
Beijing had to have an underground railway. 
Tens of thousands of soldiers dug for three 
years, night and day, and when the subway 
was finished, in 1969, they locked the 24 
stations and went away. 

It stayed that way for several years. Then 
one day in 1974 a trip on the Beijing subway 
was added to the list of of entertainments for 
visiting dignitaries, who rode solemnly along 
15 miles of deserted track in trains empty of 
anybody but themselves. Yet the system re- 
mained about as useful and as used, as a 
Ming emperor’s tomb. 

Along with just about everthing else that 
the government touches, the subway has 
changed in recent years. With Mao In his 
mausoleum, the buzzword is practicality, 
and the subway is working fine. Last year a 
new 10-mile rectangular fine was added to 
the original east-west sweep, its stations 
more of less synonymous with the gates 
along the now-vanished city wall. 

There are many pleasures — a ride is 
inexpensive; the stations are spotless, as are 
the made-in -China cars; signs are posted in 
English, and there will be somebody who can 
speak some English on almost any car. at any 
hour of the day. 

Despite all this, subway riding has yet to 
catch on with a fair proportion of the city’s 
population of 9.5 million. Partly because the 
people who run the buses have made little 
attempt to align the bus stops with the sta- 
tions, partly because the subway is inconve- 
nient to many of the most densely inhabited 
parts of town and partly because the Chinese 
are inseparably wedded to the bicycle, the 
trains are crowded only in rush hour, and 
(hen not impossibly so. 

— John F. Bums 


Paris 


Rush hour in Tokyo. 


Bdhwd Koboi. Magnum 


T HE Paris Metro may be the only ur- 
ban transport system in the world lhat 
has transformed its passenger ticket 
into a fashion item. There are Ticket T- 
Shirts, Ticket cocktail glasses and Ticket tote 
bags, all decorated with a replica of the vivid 
yeUow-and -brown Metro ticket — to say 
nothing of Ticket wallets and briefcases and 
pens and pencils, beach blankets and coffee 
mugs, cigarette lighters and jewelry. Prices 
range from about Sl for a key chain to about 
S50 for a watch with a map of the suburban 
rail system, the RER, on its face. 

The Rigie Amonome des Transports Pari- 
siens, or RATP, which runs the city’s buses, 
subways and suburban lines, decided six or 
seven years ago to merchandise the ticket as 
a way to lure new riders. A few promotional 
items were produced as part of the cam- 
paign. No one anticipated their popularity. 

Now, the RATP runs its own gift shop at 
the Chitelet station and will open another 
shop at a station yet to be announced later 
this year. The Pnntemps department store 
has its own Ticket shop, and the items are 
sold in all the airports and train stations. 

The RATP grossed well over S1.5 million 
from Ticket items last year. The best sellers? 
Key rings, cigarette lighters, shower curtains, 
watches and, yes, men’s shorts. 

— Frank J. Pried 

C* ! The Net Ycrk Tunes 


I 








■ fc:*^ r ^ 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 


ADVERTISEMENT 


ADVERTISEMENT 


d'\ -c- ‘ • 




^em r11 

tTiheriniT 


Iaii’c lutumn Fashion much in demand among British Fashion 


London’s Autumn Fashion — 
The Direction is Just Dandy 

N ewest direction in fashion tins ‘°^ * d 

autumn 1S dandy, with clothes moving Daks jacket with patch Hardy Amies Bouriqu 
closer to the body, waisted jackets pockets, made in brown the ground floor of his 
adding the clinch to suits and skinny-leg pants 
or short tight skirts ending in riding boots. 


society way with fashion, 
much in demand among 
international jet setters. 


Cashmere hits the roof 


Jasper Conran has galloped 
home in these stakes with 
black cavalry twill jodhpurs 
topped by short red cash- 
mere and wool riding jac- 
kets. His waist length mohair 
and silk sweater adds to the 
pushy silhouette. His clothes 
can be found in London at 
Brown’s, South Molton 
Street, Simpson in Piccadilly, 
Harvey Nichols and Luci- 
enne in Knightsbridgc. 

Tapestry and paisley work 
their way into the new sophis- 
ticated aggression now felt 
strongly in a confident, but 
feminine approach to execu- 
tive dressing. Caroline 
Charles has classy paisley 
separates in her shop at 11 
Beauchamp Place and also 
brings on dinner suits, with 


pants and tuxedo-style 
jackets. 

If you want a softer look, go 
for the Betty Jackson label at 
The Beauchamp Place Shop, 
55 Beauchamp Place. Her 
cream and black crepe de 
chine skin and matching ski 
pants shriek glamour and are 
in a print by Timney Fowler, 
a textile design outfit that has 
swept to international success 
on complete originality. 

Kanga, a few doors away at 
No. 8, also plays a soft but 
elegant tune with prints. 
Brainchild of Lady Dale 
Tryon, original prints on 
washable fabrics, such as fine 
georgette or airy wool and 
acrylic mixtures, are designed 
to fit everyone, so there is 
only one size to think about. 

It's a miracle these clothes 
all wash as well and you could 
wear them to Ascot or a 
Christmas lunch. The Prin- 
cess of Wales recently hit the 
front page when she attended 
the monumental Live Aid 
Concert at Wembley Stadium 
wearing a Kanga dress. 

Simpson in Piccadilly have 
got their classic act together 
this season with plenty of 


NEED A LONDON BASE? 
Businessmen: short **r long 
term liases available on 


EXCLUSIVE CENTRAL 
LONDON RESIDENCES 


Hampton & Sons 


6 Arlington Street. St. James’s. 

London SW1A 1RB 

Tel: 01-493 8222 Telex: 25341 







THE BRITISH 
FASHION COUNCIL 
WELCOMES YOU 
TO LONDON AND 
BRITISH DESIGNER 
WEEK 


10.10.85-14.10.85 


12.10.85-15.10.85 


British Fashion Council 
Designer Show Venues 

Tent 1 and 2. 

Duke of York's Barracks. 
King's Road, 

London, SW3 


British Designer Show and 
Fashion Show Venues, 


The Pillar Hall & Apex Room. 
Olympia, 

Kensington, 

London. W14. 


For further information: 
Lynne Franks PR. 

I3S Long Acre. 

London. WC2. 
01-8367076 


For further information: 
Joanne Davies, 
Phiibeach Events Ltd. 
Warwick Road. 

London, SW5. 

01-385 1200 


British Designer Week events coordinated by The British Fashion Council 
and sponsored by: The British Fashion Council. The Burton Foundation. 
The British Clothing Industry Association, 

The Sunday Times/British Elle and Phiibeach Events. 


BRITISH FASHION COUNCIL 


TRASCO INTERNATIONAL 


L.H.D. Mercedes Tax Free 
Limousines 36" & 44" 
Armoured cars and limousines 
Coach built cars 
Other makes & exotics 



Over 100 units in stock 
World wide delivery 
Direct from source. 
D.O.T. & E P.A. 


Tel: London 1 441 (I> 629 7779 
Telx: (511 8956022 TRA5C. 


Trasco London Ltd. 

65-67 Park Lane. London Wi 


Switzerland •United Kingdom • West Germany 


smart country' style looks. 
The double-breasted long 
Daks jacket with patch 
pockets, made in brown 
herringbone tweed, goes 
dandified with a stock-tied 
cream shirt. 

Not to be be missed when 
in London is the new knit- 
wear at Inca, 45 Elizabeth 
Street, SW1. In 100% alpaca 
or sheeps wool, there is a 
dreamy selection of knits in 
soft, vegetable dyes that are 
lovely to look at the top chic. 
They are a big surprise - high 
style and low price. You can 
think downwards from £59 in 
dyed alpaca, but if its semi- 
rustic you like, it’s there also 
in waistcoats, jumpers and 
cardies at around £24. 

With roll necks topping the 
Paris look for winter, Lon- 
don's Jaeger arrives at the 
same time with a lambswool 
polo that is great value at £39. 
They also have Donegal 
tweed pants with a distinctly 
county air and a wide shoul- 
dered wrap coat in cream 
wool that is this year's alterna- 
tive to the friendly camel. 

At Burberry there is a stun- 
ning new, wide-shouldered 
raincoat that is out to catch 


the fast-r unning classic 
trench. 

Hardy Amies Boutique on 
the ground floor of his cou- 
ture house at 14 SaviJe Row, 
W1 houses his la rest ready-to- 
wear collection. This is what 
up-market dressing is all 
about - fine fabric, meticu- 
lous workmanship and above 
all, couture cut. 

His long black cashmere 
and wool coats, classic shape 
and long revers, are superb 
and also come in camel col- 
our. The customer list here 
starts with the Queen and in- 
cludes Princess Diana and 
Princess Michael of Kent, 
who like to buy the ready-to- 
wear. Regulars, too, are the 
Duchess of Roxburghe, 
Lady Lichfield, Mrs. Price, 
wife of the American Ambas- 
sador, and Mrs. Zanuck. 
Clauderte Colbert popped into 
SaviJe Row when she was 
last in London. 

The trendy set are all going 
to Bruce Oldfield’s very con- 
temporary shop at 27 Beau- 
champ Place. This delightful 
designer, showered with 
publicity since it was known 
he is a favourite of the Prin- 
cess of Wales, has a high 


Today, it’s cashmere, night 
and day. There is cartloads of 
the stuff about, and although 
the price of the yarn keeps 
rocketing, the fashionable 
keep buying it. 

At Hermes in Bond Street, 
a superb double-breasted cas- 
hmere coat with traditional 
brass buttons will set you 
back more than £1000 . . . 
but it’s a show stopper. Here, 
too, are shawls, scarves for 
men and ax the moment, there 
are some summer weight, bla- 
zer type cashmere women’s 
coats that could be an inspired 
buy at this time of year. 

Chanel, also Bond Street, 
have high chic in coats, blou- 
sons and golfer cardigans in 
cashm ere and a selection of 
pastel mufflers. 

When doing the cashmere 
crawl make a sortie down the 
Burlington Arcade, the heart 
of cashme re country. Berks 
have two shops, at Nos. 46-50 
and Nos. 20-21, and here are 
some of the best separates in 
town. Deep raglan sleeved 
ribbed jackets, slim skirts, 
slash neck sweaters and over- 
sized ribbed sweaters, all in 
100% cashmere, are exciting 
knits. 

There are Berk branches in 
Regent Street and Brompton 


T his is British Fashion Week and 
worldwide attention is on the 
country’s design talent, showing for 
spring and summer *86. 

This season the line up of designers is the 
strongest yet, with over 300 taking part. 

Star names, stylish design Kern. 


and trendsening new talents 
of the Individual Gothcs 
Show expect to beat last sea- 
son’s record total of over 9000 
buyers, 5000 of which came 
from overseas. 

A campaign over the past 
two years to consolidate the 
right platform for selling Bri- 
tish Fashion has been strongly 
backed by the British Fashion 
Council, chaired by Cyril 


The British Fashion Coun- 
cil, in existence for three 
years, has been largely res- 
ponsible for moulding the 
highly individual group of fas- 


bition organisers and. media 
representatives, projects the 
widest possible view in da 
interests of successful trading. - 

itesults speak for ‘them- 
selves as export orders rise 
and this season British fashion . 
is confident it will retain and 
improve on its increasing lead. 

Close co-operation of the 
British Government, through 
the active interest of ihe Hpji 
Peter Morrison MP, Mimsier 


hion designers into a strongly . of State for Industry, has been 
united and professional in- an invaluable factor in Britain 


das try. 

The Council, composed of 
a mixed group of top retailers, 
designers, manufacturers, 
publishers, publicists, exhi- 


laying.to rest the ghosts -of 
muddle and wastage that have . 
in the past accused the British * 
Fashion Industry of muddling; 
through. Anne Price' 


Road, and they also mail 
order. 

At Fisher in the Arcade, 
and also at Harrods, three of 
Britain’s top hand-knit desi- 
gners are to be found. Valerie 
Dunlop, Hilary Rhode and 
Brinion Heaton are interna- 
tional names. Their work is 
exquisite luxury. With a bit of 
luck you might pick up a Hea- 
ton at the Scotch House. 

Valerie Lou than, another 
top British name, is to be 
found at Noble Jones, 12-14 
Burlington Arcade. She has a 
brilliantly understated dress- 


ing gown coat in orange cash- 
mere, pants and throwaround 
capes that are the ultimate in 
keeping warm gracefully. 

Sweaters, of course, boob 
tubes for the daring and low- 
slung cashmere tops with 
1920 nostalgia give this collec- 
tion panache, but top prize 
must go to Lou than for the 


little garment around to bring 
that whiff of fashion through 
day to night. “ • / • • 

Men are well into cashmere : 
this season and Austin Reed 
have single-breasted jackets 
for £250 that have to be die. 
best value anywhere. Ttey al- 
so stock the classic Chester' 
Barry cashmere overcoats.; 1 , ! 

Anne Price 


Lunchtime, dinner, anytime 


Italians introduce dynamic 
new ideas to menswear 


It seems the English male is at last casting off his 
renowned insular attitude to new names in sartorial 
circles. The news is that international Italian house Zegna 
a name synonymous with high quality clothes for men, 
has moved into top store Fortnum and Mason with a 
range of ready-to-wear suits and accessories made in 
materials of particular excellence. Sufficient to add, 
Zegna is the biggest name in the quality market 
throughout the world. 

At the same time the Italians have brought to London 
their unique made-to-measure service and for Fortnum 
and Mason bespoke it is a first time adventure. The man 
about town looks a likely customer. 

“Many men in the world want to wear Zegna" says UK 
Managing Director, Stephen Peters “but cannot get a 
proper fit with ready-to-wear.” 

The strong, severe style that epitomises Zegna tailoring 
has already created an international market for men of 
taste who demand excellence in their wardrobe as well as 
in their homes and the cars they drive. 

Fabrics bring a new horizon to this country, woven by 
the company with a magnificent use of colour and design. 
Precise cut and immaculate accessories — knitwear, 
waistcoats and ties — have taken this family company to 
a top rating in world markets. 

Now it is Britain's turn to enjoy the excitement and fun 
that comes from the sweet touch of the best. 

The contemporary man wears a suit The sophisticated 
British male knows all about good tailoring. He grew up 
with a long tradition of the best in the world. 








T0t KNIGMISBRDGfclONDONWnX 7HN 7H£PH0l'*<pl> 236 8850; - 
Sh&oribft-Hoteh. Jms 8c ttascrtsWQridwIcta.'ftio tiospitoay poopkiof .H3C . 


FrmpnpoilrlA 


Stephen Peters, Managing Director, Zegna U.K. 


Cashmere is a permanent feature in the Zegna story. 
This precious fibre has for many years been incorporated 
in their formal and sports collections, worn by fastidious 
international customers. 

Last June, the first Ermenegjldo Zegna Cashmere 
Trophy was awarded in Inner Mongolia to the authorities 
of Etuokeqi commune, producer of the finest cashmere 
during the year. From this region of China the finest 
cashmere in the world is produced. 

For Winter ’85 Zegna has glanced for inspiration at 
Vienna at the beginning of the 20th Century, a time that 
symbolised a change away from strongly traditional 
thinking. 

Dynamic stylistic ideas have given a theme to Zegna's 
principal articles of clothing. Neat, well defined but not 
controversial. Just a lasting elegance that knows no time 
limit • •• • 





DINING OUT 




Gbeen’s 

CHAMPA(i.\E BAR 

Champagne, avsters ana edd 
ieatooct in heart ot Sr James's - 
now we hc^e a new wcticn serv- 
ing traditional nor English aches 

36 Dute V Tel OJO 4S66 




VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 

— WORLD FAMOUS JEWELLERS 


hJJJMUI:!.'.] 


W Giosuenor 1 Road. Westmnster. 
Ccsmopoitan food from Far and 
Middle East. Europe and the 
Americas Rec. by MJchefin. Gault 
MUlou. Ronay end MY Times. Mon 
- Sat reservations Tet 823 6660. 


153 New Bond Street 
London W1 
Tel: 01-491 1405 
Tlx: 266265 VLC G 


Exclusive Jewellery 
Gift Items 
and 
Watches 


at The Lowndes Thistle 
Hotel Lowndes Street. 
SWl.TeL 01-2356020. 
International cuisine in the 
heart of Belgravia. 


KEN LO'S MEMORIES 
OF CHINA 


ORMOND’S 

DeSghHul restaurant tucked away 

m St James's. Nouvefie cursne ptus 
other favourites Pnvato member- 
ship etub downstairs 
6. urmona vard SW1, off Die of 
YorV St Closed Saturday lunch and 
Sundays. Tet 930 2842 


ProbabV the most prestigious 
Chinese restaurant In Europe 
Highly mcugit ot b/ ever 150 
Chinese snd far-Ecsem deiega- 
frsns who dne here . The only 
restaurant featured try 'New Yorfr 
rimes’ ’Gourmet" and "People's 
Oaty" <>' Beiing Cwstne features afl 
4 oimav iegoris ot China Res. 
essential 67-60 Ebufy St. B^gtawa 
PAM. Tel. 01-730 7734. 


The Kanga Collection 


The washable, one size, uncrushable 
dresses designed for the travelling 
lady. 

8 Beauchamp Place London SW3 


:namp Kiace Loncw 
Tel: 01-581 1185 



iiH 


. IT Tl fll ai IriMffll 




CAROLINE CHARLES 


1 1 BEAUCHAMP PI ACf? LONDON SW3 
TEL 01-584 2521 


RENT A BETTER CAR 
FOR LESS IN THE UK 


1 1 tT-.j ina r» 

[K| [f; 


uEuExinRi 


[«;<», II 


ELEGANT DESIGNER 
CLOTHES IN BEAUTIFUL 
FABRICS 


LOTUS -MERCEDES 

BMW • ROVER • PORSCHE 


13 ' 



MM 


3ft* 


1 ’ CAR rJEAlTAL | 



VC 



m 

Ermenegildo 





















AMEX pries* p.ls 
AMEX Nshs/lMsP.15 
NYSE Prices . p_xj 
NYSE falfltH/IIMs' p.14 
donodlon stacks P.18 
Currency rotas p.n 
Commoditise P,u 
Dividends p,w 


EonUoos r«>ortrP.T7 
Fltno rata now* p,li 
Oolil n*rt*l» P.1T 
Inter#** rates .Jp.ll 
"*W smuti a t P.12 
OPflera pm 
OTC stodi - P.17 

Ottwr mortals pja 


HcralbS^Sribuiu', 


f FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11 m«T 



U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 12. 


** 


Page 11 


technology 






. S 

i:; i- 

'•'ic. 


By ANDREW POLLACK 

Tima Stake ' 

S AN FRANCISCO-^ 

driven planes in the Itoys, it was considered a great: 
forward m aviation. Now. the next major advance m 

■ am ^? t co ® ne design is a surprising one: a return to 

'.propcUers. The new engines, known as propfan «i gm^ or ultra* 
' bypass engines , promise a 40-percent to 50-percent savings 

■mfud over existing jet engines. " -7^ 

r' Boring Co. and McDonnril Douglas Carp, say they will 
have planes using such engines cm the market in the early 1990s. 
is p l a nning to test-fly a propfan eri fjfa next year and 

r . In their 1 


tests, both will 


propellers promise 
big fad savings 
over jet engines. 


$r-ry rr-s 




- (§ 


1 Douglas plans one in i 
use an engine developed by 
.General Electric Co. that had 
its first ground tests two 
' months ago. 

•[ “We’re banking a tremen- 
dous amount of money on the 
fact that everything looks 
good so far,” said Walter J. 

Orlowski, manager of Me- 

Donndl Douglas’s program to • 

develop the propfan plane. ■ 

h ■ The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is «hn 
working on such engi n es, with Lockheed Coip. as its major 
contractor, and a test flight using a Gulf stream, airplane is 
. scheduled for 1987- Others are also working on the new engines. 

: * . Propellers have always been more furi-effident than jet pro- 
. pulsion. But jets won out for commercial "aircraft because they 
■ were faster. Indeed, until the nil prieg i nc reases of the 1 970s, 

; costs were not a concent. 

• The propfan engine promises to provide the efficienc y of 
• propellers in a plane that can travel as fast as jets. Advances in 
engine and propeller design now. make possible propellers that 
‘ can-function at high speeds. 

I NDEED, the propfan propellers bear little resemblance to 
the traditional long thin sucks. The General Electric propel- 
lers are shorter and stubbier, more bent and more numerous 
t h an usual propellers. They are on the rear of the engine rather 
* than the front And they are arranged in. two rdws that rotate in 
' opposite directions. The back row takes the swM out of the air 
; caused by the front row, increasing efficiency. 

Both propellers and jet engines wink by pushing air backward, 
which thrusts -the plane forward. Rotating propellers, however, 
push a large amount of air backward relatively slowly. Jet 
engines, known as turbojets, thrust a smaller amnnnt of air 
• backward very quickly, an approach that requires more energy. 

: They do this by compressing the air, igniting it with the fori and 
! thrusting it violently out through a tnrbine and the back nozzle. 

: But since turbojets appeared, engine design has slowty been 
. : turning back toward the use of propellers. Indeed, today's jets use 
W a type of engine known as a turbofan, which combines elements 
■ of propellers and jet propulsion. 

In the tuibof an, some air still goes in the front, is compressed 
i and ignited, powers the turbine and is thrust out the bade. But 
- there is also a fan, powered by the turbine, that blows air around . 
; the engine- This bypassing air provides most of the thrust for the 
‘ plane. This all *»Ves place rnsifle a shell co v e rin g the en gine, 
which provides a duct through which the air can flow smoothly. 
t The fan, which h«s many tiny blades, thus acts like a propeller, - 
although it does sot-look like' a. propeller and is hidden from view. 

' ! by the' casing around the engine. 

But if a little air bypassing the engine adds to efficiency, why 
(Coatinmd on PMtel7« CoL 4) 


IMF, Urges 
Talks at UN 

Minister Suggests 
World Currency 

- By Hobart Rowcn 

Washington Post Service 

SEOUL — Peru reiterated 
Thursday its threat to withdraw 
from the International Monetary 
Fund, and it called for a special 
U ruled Nations conference to re-, 
vamp the world monetary order 
and create a new twtranatvinal cur- 
rency. 

But h did not announce its actual 
withdrawal, which some delegates 
had been led to expect. 

Peru’s prime minister, Luis Alva 
Castro, Mnrfrescrng the annual joint 
meeting of the IMF and World 
Bank, said austerity policies im- 
posed by the IMF in heavily in- 
debted countries had only “deep- 
ened recession and threatened 
democracy.” 

“The countries of the Third 
World are condemned to hunger in 
the name of economic balance,” he 
said, according to an unofficial 
translation, in a speech that repeat- 
edly attacked the United Stales. 

Peru, which has a foreign debt of 
about $ 13.5 billion, has emerged as 
one of the most radical of the Latin 
debtor countries in opposing the 
controls required by the IMF in 
return for loans. President Alan 
Garda* Pfcrez recently said Peru 
would Knot debt payments to 10 
percent of its export earnings. 

Mr. Garda had also said Peru 
might leave the IMF, leading to 
speculation that Mr. Alva would 
announce such a move in Ms 
speech. But he only repealed Mr. 
Garcia's earlier statement. 

Mr. Alva’s speech, one of the 
strongest public statements in the 
10 days of meetings here that end 
Friday, was applauded loudly by 
many delegates. But many of his 
proposals were considered unlikely 
to be implemented. - 

Mr. Alva said the United Na- 
. h'nnt should organize a conference 
to create a new international cur- 
rency. Me said the present system 
was inefficient and outdated. He 
also charged that the IMF saved 
only to concentrate capital in the 
United States. 

Meanwhile, early signs that pro- 

{Cooturaed Mi Page 13, CoL 1) 



Financial Corporation of America's Struggle 

A comparison ot (tie ywtd me bank receives on leans and Investments 
and me cost to it of savings and borrowings, in oer cent. 

WiUkam J. Popejoy. chairman of the Financial Corporation of America, 
has said that me company must have a spread between yields and 
costs of 2.5 percentage points to make money on its mortgage portfolio. 
15.0%" 


Tho New York Tune 


FCA Recovering , but Still Vulnerable 

A Rise in Interest Bates Conld Menace Thin Capital Base 


By Thomas G Hayes 

New York Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — Since William J. Popqoy 
succeeded Charlie w. Knapp as rhnirmnn of trou- 
bled Financial Corp. of America in August 1984, 
the company has benefited from a three-percent- 
age- point drop in short-term interest rates. That 
decline has brought record profits to many of Mr. 
Popejo/s large competitors in California. 

However, for Financial Corp. and its main sub- 
sidiary, American Savings & Loan Association — 
the largest U-S. thrift institution — it has not been 
enough. 

And the company is still vulnerable if interest 
rates head upward. Mr. Popejoy agreed with the 
projection by Jonathan E Gray, an industry ana- 
lyst with Sanford C Bernstein & Gx, drat it would 
take less than a year for a one-perceotage-pomt 
rise in short-term rates to erase Financial Corp.’s 
thin supply of capital if the co mpany did nothing 
different to generate profits or reduce interest 
expenses. 

“But if we didn't do anything, we should be 
fired,” Mr. Popqoy added. 

He noted that Financial Corp. had been collect- 
ing fees from new mortgages, employing interest 
rate swaps, hedging on interest-rate furores and 


issuing mortgage-backed securities to ease the 
threat of rising rates. 

Under Mr. Knapp, the thrift institution grew 40 
percent a year so that by the end of 1984, it ranked 
first among U-S. thrifts in terms of deposits. 

He attracted widespread attention with an un- 
usual beL As other savings and loan associations 
withdrew from the mortgage market when interest 
rates rose in the 1970s, Financial Corp.’s thrift 
subsidiary, then called State Savings & Loan, ac- 
tively issued mortgages, paying high prices in the 
market for tljr necessary funds. The yield on its 
mortgage portfolio was among the highest in the 
industry, but so was its cost of funds. 

And under Mr. Knapp, the thrift institution 
accumulated high expenses and a mountain of bad 
real-estate loans, which contributed to its subse- 
quent problems. 

In 1983. the Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion questioned the company's accounting prac- 
tices, and forced it to reduce its 1982 earnings. 

In August 1984, American Savings & Loan 
faced huge deposit outflows after the SEC forced it 
to restate its first-half earnings of S75J million to a 
loss of S79.9 million. Last April after reporting a 
staggering loss of $590.5 million for 1984, the 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 2) 


Eckerd Agrees 
To Buyout for 
$1.6 Billion 


United Pros IntenuUicwI 

CLEARWATER, Florida— Di- 
rectors of Jack Eckerd Corp., which 
fended off an unfriendly takeover 
by a Maryland drug store chain this 
summer, voted Thursday to take 
the 35-year-old company private in 
a SI. 6-billion leveraged buyout. 

The announcement Thursday af- 
ternoon came about rwo months 
after the Gearwaier-based drug 
store and retail chain posted its 
first year-end loss in many years 
and c hairman Stewart Turiey dis- 
closed the board of directors was 
studying various options, including 
a possible merger. 

The new corporation would be 
owned by management, employees, 
and Merrill Lynch Capital Part- 
ners, an investment group, Eckerd 
said. 

The Fortune 500 company 
founded by Jack Eckerd, once 
dubbed the “nation's richest drug- 
gist.” had sales of S2.5 billion last 
year but posted an $8-million loss. 

As part of the transaction, share- 
holders would get $28 a share in 
cash plus a subordinated debenture 
valued at S5. 

The company's stock, which has 
traded as high as S32.88 and as low 
as $20 in the past 52 weeks, closed 
at $29.12 Wednesday on the New 
York Stock Exchange. Trading was 
halted Thursday after the directors 
announced they had approved the 
buyout plan recommended by a 
committee of financial and legal 
advisers and outside directors, said 
company spokesman John Rad- 
ford. Before the halt of trading, the 
shares reached S29.75. up 624 
cents. 

The company announced it 
would postpone its annual meeting, 
which was supposed to be held in 
November, until December or Jan- 
uary so stockholders can vote on 
the buyout. 

Under the plan outlined Thurs- 
day, the company’s 20.27 1 employ- 
ees would be offered equity posi- 
tions in the company through an 
employee profit sharing plan. Mer- 
rill Lynch Capital Partners would 
get an option to purchase 6.6 mil- 
lion shares of stock at $33 a share. 

Mr. Turley said the board of di- 


rectors had been studying options 
for the company since July 16 with 
the help of investment banking 
firm Goldman Sachs & Co. 

He said the buyout would enable 
the firm’s managers and employees 
to “have a stake in the future of this 
company.” 

Eckerd sold its video stores and 
JByron's department store chain 
this summer as part of its strategy 
to return to its original business. It 
still has 1,547 drug stores in 15 
states, 144 Eckerd Optical stores, 
three Visionworks and seven Eck- 
erd Med-Care stores. 

The company posted losses of 
$8.3 million or 22 cents a share in 
its fiscal year ending Aug. 3. That 
compared to earning of SS5.4 mil- 
lion in 1984. 

Completion of the arrangement 
is subject to obtaining financing as 
well as stockholder approval. 

In a leveraged buyout a group, 
usually management, takes a public 
company private by buying control 
with borrowed money to be repaid 
from anticipated future revenue of 
the company. 


Few Managers 
See U*S. Upturn 

The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — Only one- 
third of top U.S. executives re- 
sponding to a survey expected 
unproved business conditions 
in the next six months, the Con- 
ference Board said Thursday. 

The 1,000 respondents indi- 
cated a lower appraisal of eco- 
nomic conditions during the 
third quarter than during the 
first six months of 1985. The 
board's index of business confi- 
dence dropped to 51 on a scale 
of 100, a point lower than in the 
second quarter and 10 below 
the first 

“The mild optimism ex- 
pressed by chief executives ear- 
lier this year has yet to be rekin- 
dled,” said Douglas Cliggott, 
the economist who adminis- 
tered the survey. 


neei 

sena 



Quarterly Net Up 23% 
| Currency Rates [ At Chemical New York 



mu 1 


F-F. 

aua* 


. On. 10 
BJ. tF- 1m 
*555* U7J3S- WHY 

7Un 210S1S* 

in* " Him i*m 


ltl_ our. 
ww* 

lata* iun 
— - m*sv unsx ran* 

07505 iun ZSBS0 4701 

57530 TOM JH1 0 31711 ' 02105 ■ 1355 

- 1557 IIM T7VM0 MS SI?*' 1U7 7UM 

Ufl 47215 x 1305 ISMS* • *7145 1752' 


I 1 

Amsterdam 1*905 4721 

B m W a ll to) 53715 7440 

15533 375. 

CM U115 _ 

17*150 153U0 ■ 

l Mew Yorfc(c) 07007 « 

‘Parts UPS JU24 

.Tokyo 

tzurlctl 117*3 3M*3 127*5 • 25755* 11717* 71*3* 4MW*' 1J043* 

h ecu am? um was &ju» umlu uw 44Jm uro man 

I SDR UM34 073255 HA 150*04 ' MjQ. . 11007 577376 17170 .'HA 

^Clot/ngsJn London and Zurich, fixing* In other European centers. Nen York rates old PJM. 
(a! C om mercial frmc tUAmovrrta D e ed ed to Buy one eaund (c) Amounts needod to buy one 
: dollar < m ) Unfit of 100 tx) umt* of MOB (Yi Unfit otHUOO NJU not oooted; KA.: not avertable. 
"J “ (9) To bar one p ou n d If SUSlAn 

OfherlMUrVshM 

fcorrsncr mr U4J Cormtcr psr U5d .Garrancr PSr U5J 
jjAran.isiiliiil ooo Ft*, markka SM Malay, rtae. 14575 

tAastraLS tM3 omkaw. rauo M r . hot 30100 

-Amir. SOUL 10J57 " HanaKaasS 77S*5 Morw. krona 7M5 

Bsta.fln.fr. 5300 Indkm rupac 110*04 PMLpsse 1740. 

Bnnffcnoc. 7.9SL00 latte . rupfcfl 1,77 1M PortotCuda 7 SUB 

CawSoai U583 IrtaBO . .0052* Sopdl TftOl •- 34505 

CMnsmvooa 30*6 Isrert sbsk. .147400 Stas.* ' 2Ji55 

ItaMkrn *4035 KinraMdtaar 07*57 SbAft-.raod 24314 

Eaypf. Poaad . 133 

ASterflm: 17093 Irish C 

Source*: Bano v a du Benelux (Bnmotol; Sanaa Commerdale ttei k ma (MPanJ; Banaue no- 
Ifionale de Peels (Ports).- Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo It IMF (SDR)} BAH (dinar, rived, tstrrxuni. 
Other data frwn Renter* and AP. 


r USJ 
0*100 
14US 
7007 

Tataanf 40.17 
TBalBakf 24545 
Tomsk ten S4350 
UAEdkDam 34725 
1450 


UeresfMis 


>■ 




“ 



■ 








Ot 

L 10 

•l 





Franca " 




Donor 

D-Mark 

Franc 

Starftafl 

Fraae 

ECU 

fM 

' 1 moorti 

M H, - 

41*410 

3 *** H. 

11*^11 Oh 



7ta 

1 3 mantes 

Bta4«* 

4MM90 

41V4V. 

uta-ira 

lOta-lOR, 

' IftrOW. 

7» 

■ 3 months 


49W-4W* 

IMS 

n wills 

lOte-IMfc 

.SHrSK 

rj c 

-■4 mantes 

BUlrSta 

***** 

4«r4>* 

liu-mo 

10 *h-11 th 

IMK 

79k 

" I veer ■ 


* *4W 

4Wr4 J H.' 

71 ta-llth 

lns-iist 

n*o 

0M 


j sources: Morgan Guaranty (dollar, DM. SF. Pound. PFls Uovds Book (BOV): Reuters 
, (SDR). Rats* oppBcobto fa krtertxwik deoaslftofsl million mlolmum (oreoulvraetfi). 


Key M— cy 



.Can P«wr»*-I7»iJan 




hmBTnBVTBOk 

ariMsm 

CDIiHYiloyi 




. wgflnggr 


OntMosM Intertask 
Smssfti Istartmk 
Unoatt lakreonk 


Intcrveafloa IWs 

am Monty 
' Ooo owaw lotartook 
'hiMMAlotarfeaBk 
MnaattitatartaRk 

BrttaM 

-Bank Baoe Kata 
caaMawy 

nHtayTnaiwYBW 
^roontti Intsrtnak 




H4ovlifcftaflk 


Ots. 10 


Tti ,7» 
OU. JBlfc 
*51 9V* 

OM -nt 
7J5 750 

771 7.17 

7 V 73* 

735 755 

740 740 


ISO UD 
445 445 

475 435 

435 425 

4M 4J0 


*ta ns 

Mi m 
97/14 *7/14 

WO 


im nvi 
1W TS 
111/14 111/W 
113rtl 117/54 


5 5 

CU 47/14 
— at 


• Source*: Reuters. Cemmenumk. CrSdk 
V LytsmaABankofrekyo. 


AaftaaDflUarBepflolto 

- ■ Ocl 10 

1 monte B-OVi 

Smonths 0ta-0«w .- . 

Bmoattis BVfa-SV. 

5 mantes ■ 5 V>-M 

I year «ta-0«.' 

Source : Rarttrs. 


E^.M— cyMartotF— i» 

as. u 

MtfrTH LyscB RMflr Ants ■ 

30 day aysraao State: . 7A3 

Tetarafs latarsteRota lafltt: 73* 

Source: Merrill Lynch. T el erat e. 


- ■ The Associated Press ■ 

NEW YORK — Chemical New 
York Coip., the sixth-laxgest UB. 
banking company, said Thursday 
that its third-quarter profit rose 
23.9 potent from the correspond- 
ing period a year ago. 

Two other large banking con- 
cerns, First Bank System Inc. of 
Minneapolis and Marine Midland 
Banks Inc of New York, also post- 
ed double-digit e8imngs gains. 

The three were the firs of the 
major UB. banking companies to 
report earnings results for the July- 
through-September period. 

James Wooden, who follows 
banking stocks for the investment 
firm of Merrill Lynch, said he had 
expected third-quarter bank earn- 
ings to be “moderate to good,” but 
said the message was not all good. 

While the interest rate environ- 
ment remains positive for bank 
earnings, Mr. Wooden noted that 
the economy remains spotty and 
the quality of some bank loans re- 
mains questionable. 

Chemical, the parent of the na- 
tion’s sbcth-largest bank. Chemical 
Bank, attributed its profit increase 
to gains on the sale of investment 
securities, strong fees for services, 
continued growth in foreign ex- 
change trading profits, a change in 
the New York tax laws and higher 
net interest income. 

For the third quarter, Chemical 
said its net income rose to $95.6 
milli on, dr $1.80 a share, from 
$77.2 milli on, or $1.42 a share, a 
year ago. 

For the first nine mouths of the 
fiscal year. Chemical said its dm 
income was up 243 ■ percent at 
$292.6 millioa. or $531 a share, 
red with $235.3 million, or 


compan 
$4.45 a share, a year ago. 

Net interest income rose 7.4 per- 
cent to $459.1 million for the quar- 
ter and 8.1 percent to $136 button 
for the nine months. 

Chemical’s noninterest expense, 
which includes salaries and rent, 
rose 13.7 percent to $3773 million 
in the quarter. 

Chemical also raised its loan loss 
provision to $106.7 million is the 


quarter from $42 million a year 
ago, and to $205.8 million for the 
nine months from $1 13.1 million a 
year ago. Such provisions directly 
reduce earnings. 

It was left with a loan loss allow- 
ance of $540.7 million, or 1.4 per- 
cent of loans outstanding on Sept. 
30, compared with an allowance of 
$4403 million, or 1.18 percent, a 
year earlier. 

The banking company said its 
results included payments of $14 
mOfion in interest from Argentine 
borrowers. 

First Bank System, which is the 
14th-largest US. banking compa- 
ny, reported its third-quarter profit 
rose 58 percent to $43.1 million, or 
$1.47 a share, from $273 million, 
or 87 cents a share, a year ago. 

For the nine months. First Bank 
said its profit rose 333 percent to 
$122.1 nriHkm, or $4.16 a share, 
from $91.4 million, or $2.82 a 
share, a year earlier. 

The company’s loan loss reserve 
totaled $210.7 million, or 133 j>er- 
cent of loans outstanding, on Sept. 
30 compared with $1623 million, 
or 133 percent of loans, a year 
earlier. 

First Bank System is the parent 
to First Bank Minneapolis, Hist 
Bank St Pazxl and 76 other banks 
and trust companies. 

Marine Midland, the parent of 
the I2tb-largest U3. bank. Marine 
Midland Bank of Buffalo, New 
York, said its third-quarter profit 
rose 153 percent to $32.0 million , 
or $137 a share, from $27.8 mil- 
lion. or S131 a share, a year ago. 

For the nine months, its profit 
rose 12.6 percent to $86.4 million, 
or $4.15 a share, from $76.8 mil- 
lion, or $3.60 a share, a year earlier. 

Strong growth in both net inter- 
est income and noninterest income 
offset higher operating expenses 
and a higher loan loss provision in 
the third quarter, Marine said. 

Its loan loss reserve was $222.6 
million, or 1.41 percent of loans 
outstanding, on Sept- 30, compared 
with $166 million, or 1.16 percent, 

a year ago. 


Gold 


Ocl JO 

AM. PJB Cktaa 

Kong Kong 3 75. 15 J25J0 -055 

LsmnftewB 2SJ5 •— —12 

Parts (1Z5KIMI 32554 33552 ' —153 

ZBrtA ■ • '33SJD 33 SM —OM 

Load oa : 32515 ’ 32X50 — US 

Maw York — 32X50 +020 

Lux em bourg. Paris and London official fix- 
ings f none Kang end Zurich opening and 
dotlno prices: MOW york'Cemex current 
contract. Alt prices In UA spot ounce. 
Source: Reuters. 




Millions of Dollars Reported Emb 

As Swiss Uncover 2 New Bank Scandals 


^Markets Closed 

? Financial markets were closed Thursday in Japan. Scuth Korea and 
‘ Taiwan for holidays. 


Uni ted Press Iittenuaioeel ■ 

GENEVA — Swiss authorities 
Thursday reported two new bank- 
ing scandals involving the reported 
embezzlement of millions of dol- 
lars inclicnt funds. 

1 In Geneva, a deputy director of 
the Lombard ana Odier private 
bank was held on charges of divert- 
ing, between 4 and 5 million Swiss 
.francs (5136 to $233 million) from 

customer accounts. 

-Justice officials said the banker, 
identified only as Jacques N. and a 


Swiss national, confessed to »*ang 
the money to build up a collection 
of art, carpets, gunc and antique 
aut o mobiles. The bank said the 
funds will be fully returned to di- 
ems. 

In Lugano, the public prosecutor 
announced the arrest of five Swiss 
fin anci er s and a search for one man 
still missing on charges of embez- 
zling “several million dollars." 
They held high positions in the Fln- 
agest com pany specializing in real- 
estate investments. 


American Express Bank 


Private banking 
with a Swiss option. 



N ow American Express Bank 
offers you the security, con- 
venience and confidentiality of a 
private account in Switzerland - 
with some important extras. 

To start with, you have your 
choice of a full spectrum ot glob- 
al banking services : accounts in 
Swiss francs or other major cur- 
rencies, investment advisory and 
asset management services, foreign 
exchange, precious metals. And 
ail are provided with American 
Express Bank’s traditional com- 
mitment to excellence. 

Secondly, your personal 
Account Officer at our Zurich or 
Geneva branches is fully com- 
mitted to handling your affairs 


Location of American 
Express Bank 
offices fa -Zurich, 
at Bahnhofitrosse 20 . 




swiftly, accurately and with ut- 
most discretion. He coordinates 
American Express Bank's world- 
wide facilities (82 offices in 
39 countries) on your behalf, 
supported by one of today’s 
most advanced telecommunica- 
tions and computer networks. 

Our private banking clients 
enjoy still another exceptional 
advantage; access to the world- 
wide investment opportunities 
available through tne American 


Express family of companies - 
offering you many additional ways 
to protect and increase your assets. 
Finally, we not only meet your 


private banking needs ; 
we also provide the 
broad range of personal 
and travel arrangements 
so valuable to the international 
client. These include American 
Express Bank Gold Card 5 ’ privi- 
leges and our exclusive round-the- 
clock Premier Services for the 
personal 3nd business travel needs 
of certain clients. 

As you see, our concept of pri- 
vate banking is truly exceptional 
in many ways. We’d be pleased 
to give you full details on how 
American Express Bank can help 
you reach your objectives. 

Visit or telephone us today: 

In Zurich, 01/21135 20, in 
Geneva, 022/32 65 80. 



American Express Bank 

Exceptional service in private banking 


Aiiu fVir H'nk Lid. 

.\ii limnianhprimiinijufli 







Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


High Low Last Cta. 


ai> au 

*Ft 41 
10 BVa 
IB 17% 
» 1? 

70 *£* 
31ft »ft 
SJV 33 
Jl'.j 7Sft 

im% izju 
io% 9% 
xrv, 37 
45ft 44ft 
44ft 44U 

3n> 2*ft 


73 — ft 

41l» —3ft 
10 +lft 
IB + 
l«b — ft 
Bing + ft 
30 'i —I >4 
33ft — *s 
»ft + 
134ft + ft 
10ft + ft 
ST. : + ft 

4514 + ft 

44ft + ft 

39ft — ft 


[Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

industrials 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open High Low .Last CM. 

Indus 132540 133133 131144 1.778 07 + 115 

Trans 641.74 6*AJ7 634.13 64232 — CL24 

U III ISAM JSXTO 15306 15108— 030 

Comp 5J&42 54101 534.93 5J903 + 0.14 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


him Low chm was 
Composite 105JS 10537 W.7S +031 

industrials 12131 12137 12131 +0.16 

Transo. 1(050 101.96 10250 + 006 

OMIlffcS SSJI SS.II S64 1 +a» 

Finance 10956 10831 109.64 + 0.94 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Talal issues 
New Hlatn 
New Lam 
Volume up 
V olume dawn 


ClMe Pre*. 

B26 855 

<55 423 

SOS 509 

1986 1986 

25 30 

45 36 


44271238 

35314310 


152526 345596 
180351 364330 
140087 365313 
144.112 3*3334 
159356 374313 


Sales *ShYt 

45594 512 


•Included tn me sale* figures 


Thursday s 

MSE 

Qosmg 


VoLot 4 PM 99,910300 I 

Prrv. 4 PM. vol 99,MMO0 i 

Pm amsondated dose 1I7J«0» 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Well Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

fia The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


amex Most Actives, 


VoL NW> J-M7 *-°* 1 1 


Advanced 
Declined 
Urttftenwed 
Total Issues 
New HUB 
New Laws 
volume up 
vaunts down 


1 1 

764 775 

5 * 

33 19 

3.16Z.U5 

1376315 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Bank* 

Tronsp. 


Close aree auo 
37932 +1.M 28131 
29037 +1.15 28X76 
36953 +138 36907 
S3 10? +0*4 3320T 
26307 +8J4 26105 
30203 +1.99 a i d 
25502 +1-05 SUB 


Winn 
BAT in 
OzorkH 

Etelnor 

Crvs tO 

DDTflEB 

OorneP 

wfckespf 

FmlHd 

hbneCn 

woupb 

Damson 

Peafrn v 

ChtMAS 

Hosbrs 


& k S2 -S 
,r iS £ +i* 

3% 3 3% * !• 

P ta £ ft 

«i w* W* 15 

23 2*8 o + g 

17 16ft ȣ* - u 

IS’.': **** — ft 

is £ 

33ft 32ft *f?8 — ™ 


Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEX Sales 


industrials 

Transo. 

Utilities 

Flnonos 

Composite 


High Lew Class CVBe 
20401 20X18 203.95 + JL13 
1*6.11 16402 16607 -JO 
8X14 7907 80.13 +000 
2103 2001 2102 + 001 

18X79 18205 18208 +806 


4 PJA. VOhMBS 
Prav. 4 P3A. volume 
Pnev. cons, volume 


amex Stock index 


22158 221.14 22108 +DJ9 


1! Month 
HtanLew! Sleek 


Sit Claw 

Div. YM. PE 100s High Low feat. Ch'oe 


34ft 16 AAR *6 25 15 
17ft Pft AGS 72 

SOft 26ft AMR 6 

23ft 18ft AMR 01 2.W 93 

14ft 7ft APL 

61ft 34ft ASA 300 5.2 

27 lift AVX 32 20 16 

28ft 19ft AZP 172 I1J 7 

60 36 +< AbtLoh 730 16 15 

25ft 19ft AGCOWd 50 15 15 

24ft 12ft AOMC .40 XI 

10ft 7ft AcrneE J2> 43 11 

19 15ft AdaE* 1.92ell.l 

20 13ft AamMI 32 1.9 7 

17ft 8ft AdvSTS 531 30 20 

37ft Hft AMO 14 

13ft 6ft Advest .12 13 19 

15ft 10 Aerfler 12 

49ft 33ft AOlnU 164 5.9 15 

57ft 53ft AelL pf 501e V 
37ft 21 Alarms 130 37 8 

3ft 7ft A Keen 

57 -43 AlrPra 1 38 17 17 

24ft 17'+ AirbFrl AO 20 12 

2ft 1U AIMoas MOP 5J 

33ft U AklP pfA302 123 

Bto 4ft AlaPdat 07 115 
106ft 96ft AlaPpf 11.00 106 

86 69ft AklP Pf *34 114 

74 59 AlaPpf 4 74 773 

75 59 AlaPpf 808 117 

24ft 12ft AlskAIr .14 0 8 

25 12ft Albrtos 38 10 14 

33ft 26ft Albans .70 2.7 11 

31ft S3ft Alcan 170 47 2S 

aft 27ft AfcaStd 100 35 12 

33 21 AlexAlx 1.00 33 

30 20ft Alexdr 25 

B9ft 72ft AllgCp 1041 10 

39ft 20ft Ala In I 1.40 57 

20ft 14ft Algfnpf 119 120 

98 85ft AlglPlCllJS 120 

34ft 27ft AllgPw 170 97 9 

23ft 14ft Allen G 30b 17 15 

23ft 15ft AlldPd II 

45 42 AMSlinn 

46ft 62 AldS pfA 4.12 43 

63 58ft AldSpfC 474 113 

111 106ft AldS pIDIZOO 11 2 

102ft 101ft AldS pfF 
bOft 47ft AlldStr 112 30 7 
9ft 3ft AllisCTi 
29ft 22ft ALLTL 1|4 67 f 

39ft 29ft Alcoa 170 17 29 

19ft 12 A max .101 

34 aft AfflHes UO 40 73 

2ft 1ft AmAsr 

Oft 16 ABokr 9 

70 53ft A Brand 370 7.1 8 

30ft 2Sft ABrdPl 275 93 

70ft 55 ABrdpf 237 4.9 

114ft 54ft ABdcst 130 13 18 

30Vk Kft ABIdM 06 37 14 

2BW 20ft ABusPr 34 25 14 

60ft 47ft AmCon 200 S3 10 

25% a AConpf 200 112 

S2ft 42 AConpf 100 63 

20» 17ft ACOPBd 270 10.9 

30ft 25ft ACopCv 237e 93 
11 4ft ACetflC 41 

57ft 44ft ACron 100 30 T3 

27ft 18ft ADT 02 35 25 
24ft 19 AElPw 2740100 B 

49ft 33ft Am Exp 136 33 14 

25ft 13ft AFoml 5 38 2.1 14 

34ft aft AGnCo 170 15 8 

16 6ft AGnlwt 
56ft 57ft AGnl pfA 5076103 
96ft 64ft AGnl pfBLSOe 73 
71ft 46 AGnpfD 234 42 

36ft a AH «1t 120 35 10 

13ft 7V. AHolst 
66ft 46ft A Home 2.90 5.1 12 

47ft 26ft AHosp 1.12 Z A 15 

97Vs 72ft Amrtch 630 75 8 

90ft 62 AlnGrp 34 5 71 

150 112ft AIGpnf 505 4.1 

28ft 14 AMI 72 17 10 

4ft Zft AmMot 
79 13% AProsd 5 50 33 4 

13ft 5 ASLFlO 11 

18ft 12ft ASLFI pf 219 143 
lift lift AShlo 00 45 9 
35ft 26ft Am5td 1 30 53 10 
67% 35ft AmStor 34 1.1 10 
78 46ft ASfr pf A 438 62 
S7V7 57 AStTOfB 600 770 

24ft 17ft AT&T 170 57 16 

4|ft 32ft AT&T pf 334 93 
42 33ft AT&T pf 374 93 


24ft 17ft AT&T 170 57 16 

4|ft 32ft AT&T pf 334 93 

42 33ft AT&T Pf 374 93 

27ft 16ft AWotrs 1J» 40 8 

13ft 10 AWatof 175 99 

13ft 11 AW05M 125 102 

20ft 14 Am Hoff 230 143 6 

72ft 40ft ATrpr 534 83 

18 6ft ATrsc 

89ft 67ft ATrun 534 72 

43 24ft Amerofl 130 30 8 

50 24ft AmesD 20 5 21 

»ft mi Arnold. 00 35 13 
aft 18ft Am toe 

16 4 Amfesc _ 3 

70ft 50>4 Amoco 330b 4.9 B 

JTft 28ft AMP 72 25 20 

a lift AmpCO JO 23 17 

aft 12ft Am reo s ia 

34 22V AmSIfl 130 4.7 9 

45ft 30 Amstad 130 4.1 14 
4ft 1ft Anacmp 


155 aft aw av + ft 

24 74ft 74ft 14ft— ft 

3036 38ft 38 38ft + ft 

6 aft aft aft + ft 

758 10 10 10 + ft 

181 38ft 38ft 38ft— ft 

278 lift lift lift— ft 

601 34ft 24 + ft 

1439 54ft 54ft Sift + ft 

31 20ft 20ft 20ft— ft 

16 13 13 13 — ft 

4 7ft 7ft 7ft 

141 17ft 17 17ft 

a 17ft 17ft 17ft 

108 14 ft 13ft 14 + ft 

6057 aft zm + ft 

U Bft Bft Bft 

156 14>A 14 14 — ft 

8241 44ft 44ft 44ft + ft 

4 55ft 5S , 1 55ft + ft 
941 32ft 31ft 32ft + ft 
JO 7ft 2ft 2H 
205 54ft 53ft S3ft — ft 
75 21ft 21ft 21ft— ft 
n ift ift ift 
30 31Vr 31 31 — ft 

17 7ft 7ft 7ft 

5QZ104 104 104 

42fc S3 83 to +1 
720= 77ft 77ft 77ft + ft 
1202 71 71 71 + ft 

41 20V: 20H 20ft + ft 

10 21 20 ft 20 ft— ft 

70 27ft Z7ft 27ft— ft 

ssa aft aft aft— ft 

70 aft 32ft 33V« + ft 

44 27ft 77>. i 27ft + ft 

40 2B\1 27ft 27ft— 7 

8 77ft 7T:t 77ft 

3271 27ft 25% 27 +17* 

4 18ft 18ft 18ft + ft 

9 94ft 93ft 94 + ft 

957 »ft 79 29ft + l l 
114 22ft 22ft 22ft 

I 16ft 16% 16ft 
1530 43 <2% 43ft 

7 62ft S2H 62ft— ft 
69 57ft 58ft 59ft— ft 

5 106V; 106 106 — ft 

13 102ft 1(0^ 102ft— ’4 

614 55V. S4ft 54ft — ft 

194 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 
154 27ft 27V» 27ft + ft 
1401 32ft 32% 32ft — ft 
I486 12ft lift 71ft— % 
288 27ft 27ft 27ft— ft 
106 1ft Ift 1ft 

25 22ft 22ft 22ft 

811 54ft 53ft 54ft + ft 
12 29ft » 29ft + ft 
7 54ft 54ft 54ft— ft 
188 175ft 115% 115ft + ft 

14 a 22ft 23 — ft 
72 25% 25a* 2S1= 

738 54ft S3 S4ft +7Vj 
IS S S + ft 
352 48 46ft 48 +lft 
to 20-+ 19ft 20 'i + ft 
12 77 V a — ft 
35 6% 6ft 6ft— ft 

737 49ft 49ft 49ft + ft 
439 26 2Sft 24 +1 

926 21 20ft 21 
S269 41ft 40ft 41 + ft 

389 23ft 23ft 23ft 
1274 28tt S aft + ft 
347 10ft 10V. 10ft + ft 
1W 5S>* 55ft 55ft 
313 75ft 74ft 751* + ft 
110 57 54ft 56ft + ft 
I 341k 34ft 34ft— ft 
60 10ft 10ft 10% + ft 
1900 56ft 56 ft 56ft + ft 
2048 44ft 44% 44ft 
339 BSft B7ft 88 + ft 

775 85ft 82% 85ft +2U 
1 143 142 143 +4ft 
12479 20 19 19ft— ft 

247 3 2ft 3 

1444 15ft 15ft 15%— ft 
44 4ft 6ft 6ft 

18 IS 14ft 14ft 

147 30ft 1J ’* m ''“ * 
6636 ^ 


Shares Close Higher on NYSE 


IJMPOffi 
man Law Slock 


12ft 12ft- ft 

30 ££ + * 


ID3 T/Vt Jr “2 3V*1 .+ u 

200= 12ft lift 12ft + ft 
102 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
147 f4Vi Mft 14ft + ft 

11 47ft 67ft 67ft— ft 

4 12ft 12ft 12ft + ft 

1 78V. 78Vj 78ft- ft 

1U 4» 421k 42ft + ft 

534 44ft 43 43ft + ft 


Anchor IMS 6.1 _ 
AnClov 1J2 XI a 
AndrGr 2* 1.7 16 


15ft 10ft Anlhnv 
12ft 9ft Apache 


45U 30 Amstad 100 *.1 14 
4ft 1ft Anacmp 
24ft 16% Anion a 

27ft 19ft Anchor IMS XI 

44ft 30ft AnClov 1J2 XI a 

13ft 9ft AndrGr 2* 1.7 16 

27ft 17 Angelic 00 20 II 
Mft 22ft Anneuss 00 2M 13 
71ft 49ft Anheu pf 300 S.l 
19ft 13ft Anlxtr 2S 1-7 17 

76ft 9 Anthem 04 A 14 

15ft 10ft Anlhnv MU « 

12ft 9ft Apache 0 % 11 

2 ft ApdiFwt 

19ft ISVk AeehPuraiO 11M 
34ft aft ApPwpf 4.18 1X1 
39ft 17ft ApIDfa 1761100 17 
15ft Sft AppIMo 55 

24ft 16% Arch On ,14b .7 12 

3(7+. 26 AriPpf 3-53 IZD 
102 82 ATlPpf 10J0 100 

24ft 14 ArkBSf 00 20 9 
24% 16 Arklo 108 SM 26 
ft % ArlnRt 

lift 4ft Armco 

22ft 15ft Armcpf 2.10 113 „ 
13ft ArmsRb MS 30 8 
aft 27ft ArmWIn 1 JO 30 9 
34ft a AtoCp 133) 43 9 
18ft 12ft ArowE 30 10 76 
30ft 14 A lire 32 10133 


30 10 76 
32 10133 


73 IS Arvlns 00 33 9 

27ft 17ft Asm cn 

37 aft AshJOII 100 40 

44ft 35 AsIllO pf X» 90 

34ft 24ft AsdDGl 1.40 4.1 11 

110ft 79 AsdDPf 435 4J 

29ft 22ft AfCvEI 258 9.9 9 

Mft 42 All Rich 400 4M 

17ft ID-* Atlas CP 

29ft 18ft Augot MO 1.9 73 

54ft 34ft AulaOl 08 10 30 

5ft 4ft Avalor n 05e 10 10 
«ft 1 7ft AVEMC 00 1.9 IS 

39ft Mft A verv 00 10 13 

38% 27 Avnet 00 1.7 21 

25ft 17ft Avon 200 ai >3 

28ft 16ft Avdln 18 


103 42ft 471k 42ft + Ml 

534 44ft 43 43ft + ft 

92 23% 22ft- ft 

54 73% 2j% 23% — ft 

113 4% 4 4 -ft 

1454 67% feft 47ft— ft 

2794 2894 271-2 28ft— ft 

58 13ft 12% 17ft + A 

IB 27ft 2l 71 — *A 

B J «% 341= 341*.— W 
38% 38ft 38% + ft 
282 2% ,2ft 2% 

324 JO 19ft 19ft— % 

72 Mft 24ft 24ft + ft 

145 43ft 43 43ft + ft 

52 73% 13ft 13% — ft 

93 74% ZPk Mft— % 

5111 14ft 33% 33ft— % 

938 71 70 70ft— ft 

108 16ft 14ft 14ft 

340 lift 10% 10ft— ft 

87 74ft 14ft 14ft— ft 

987 lift 11% lift + % 

54 *4 ft ft— ft 

225 18ft 18ft 18ft + % 

9 33 32 33 + % 

355 18 17ft 17ft- 'A 

9 12ft 12's 121k 

131f aft 20ft 20ft + ft 

4 297. 29% 29% 

2001 99 99 99 +lft 

77 24ft 23ft ar» — ft 

742 aft 19ft Mft + V 0 

45 ^ — 

146 8ft 8% 8% 

3 18% 18ft 18ft 

124 U 73% 13% + % 

104 34% 34 34% + % 

1 28ft 28ft 28ft- \k 

ia 13ft 13 13ft + Ms 

3 ZZft 22ft 27ft 

144 25 24% 25 + ft 

703 18% 17ft 17% — % 

216 Mft 32ft 33ft + ft 

1 42 42 42 + ft 

314 34ft 34 34ft — % 

20 109ft 109ft 109ft +7ft 
45 24% 26 26ft— ft 

3812 62% 42V. 42ft + ft 

ID 10ft 10% 10ft + ft 

2894 21ft 20ft 21ft— % 

J28 48% 48% 48Vi 

85 5% 5ft 5ft — ft 

32 32ft 31ft a + ft 

392 B 32Vj 32% 

709 29ft 28% 29ft 

3682 Mft Mft 24ft 

13 21ft 71ft 21ft— % 


35ft 21% 
m 13 
24% 18ft 
2ft ft 

10 Jft 

30ft 18% 
18ft lift 
lift 7ft 
23% 17% 
48 38 

aft 15% 

5ft 2 
42 4«ft 
55ft 34ft 
54ft 44% 
53ft 49ft 
47ft 30% 
33% 20% 
22% 12ft 
47 39ft 
74ft 42 
lift 13ft 
Mft 26% 
75% 47% 
27 21% 

45 35% 

13ft 8ft 
39ft 19 
25 1+lh 
4f ft 25% 
29% 14ft 
13ft 6% 
35% 23% 
Mft 11% 
27ft 50% 
34% 24% 
38% 31% 
44ft 24ft 
82% SO 
16% 12% 
58ft 35ft 
8% 1% 

11 3% 
17ft »ft 

a 24% 
24ft 19% 
44ft 31 
57 41% 

33 

4Sft 27% 

40 M% 
40ft SZft 
32% IB 
19ft 16ft 

6ft 3% 
9 3ft 
10 10 % 
21ft 14>4i 
49ft 37% 
24% 18% 
40ft 28% 
26% 19% 
34ft 13ft 
Mft 17% 
36% 33ft 
29% 14V* 
29ft 19% 
50ft 33% 
SI 36'u 
61 48% 

32 18% 

44% 38 Va 
14% 1 9V3 
10% 4ft 
44% 30 
89 66 

lift 9ft 
14ft lf% 
25ft 19ft 
31ft Mft 
64ft 43ft 
32% 51% 

28% a 

5ft I 

16% 

41 30ft 


BMC .121 
Balmco 00 20 
BkrintI .92 54 
Bailor J6 1.7 
vIBaldU 
vIBIdU Pf 
00115 . 

Bally Ml JO IJ 
BallvPk 

BlfGE S 1.7V 12 
BallPfB 400 100 
BncOns 00 X4 

Bon Tex 

Bandog 1J0 20 
BkBos 200 XI 
BkBpfA 401C 9.1 
BkBPfB S9elS 
BkNY 2J8 SJ 
BankVa 1.12 40 
BnkAm 00 50 
BkAmpf 451el2J 
BkAm pf 703el2J 
BkAmpf 208 . 
SkARiV 200 &S 
BankTr 2J0 U 
BkTrof 250 9J 
BkTrOf 422 90 
Banner jne J 

Bard 04 U 
BomGo JO 16 
BorastS 144 XO 
BarvWr 00 30 
BAS IX -12b IJ 
BaiACh J8 20 
BaxlTr J7 ZB 
BayFIn 2D 0 
BOVStG 200 80 
Bearing 100 X7 
Beal Co 100 AM 
BeatPf X38 40 
Becor M4 10 
BecfnD 120 22 
Baker 

Bekwpf 091 
BeMnH .00 X0 
BelHwl 06 10 
BellAtl 600 7.9 
BCE O 3L28 
BeUind 02 1M 
BeilSou 200 7J 
BetaAH 00 L7 
Semis 100 28 
BanfCe 248 ,50 
Benefof 4J0 11J 
Benef Pf 400 1IJ 
Benefof 53 11.1 
BeneqtnlJO 74 
D engtB 471 

MPd 24 IJ 

g&tTpfsSift 

Be ms I Cf 250 110 
Beverly J2 14 
BtOTTV 00 33 
Btacftn 

BlackO 04 30 
BICfcHP 1.92 54 
BlpIrJP 381 . , 
BlkHRs 106 40 
Boelno s 148 20 
BalseC 100 40 
BaiieC pf 500 9.1 

BoffBer .10 3 

Bordens 102 30 
BaroWb 06 A5 

iSd* 304 9.1 

ess 8B 
era's 
» a g 

BkfJS' 3^ M 


no 7ft 
9 443 21% 
>3 532 16% 
14 233 21 
97 1% 

14 5% 

13 304 29ft 

5783 16% 

11 62 10ft 

a 734J 2i ™ 

1602 45% 

11 359 a 
646 2 

10 7 49ft 

5 658 47ft 

8 54V. 

14 53% 

7 280 43ft 
B 1477 25 

5121 14ft 
7 40ft 
42 62% 
172 15V. 

12 77 27% 

6 

223 25ft 
10 <3% 

14 349 13ft 

14 215 MV* 
14 64 27% 

i§ 

J in2 2^ 
66 1455 13% 

15 24ft 

9 2 31ft 

72 8 

. S 28404 47ft 
519 81% 
52 796 13 
14 223 54 

235 2% 

72 <ft 

10 W 13'+ 

11 49 15ft 

8 858 86% 

323 a 

18 5 22% 

8 1173 J8ft 

21 744 44ft 

12 40 35ft 

9 1048 4D‘u 

10 36% 
3002 33% 
1502 22% 
139 17% 
95 5 

78 4ft 
56 370 74% 
969 lMk 
10 43% 
523 21% 
17 1147 33ft 

% 

1 7 S 

265 52 
3S 

% 426 42% 

S ZX> 29% 
1182 43% 
11 835 21% 

14 194 10ft 

7 74 37% 

502 82% 
16 11 
4 13ft 
8 45 22% 

12 S3 27% 

’§ *!!? IT 

13 ™ B 

1 fiS 1 " 


T’z 

27% + % 
15ft— % 
21 + % 
1% + % 
S%— Vi 
28ft— % 
16ft + % 

10 + ft 

»%— -k 
45 — <U 
22 + % 

Ift— ft 

49V* . 

47% +14* 
54ft — ft 
57% —7ft 
43% + % 
25 + ft 

14ft + ft 
40ft + % 

61% — ft 
15% 

aft + i* 
63% +1% 
25% + ft 
43% — % 
13% + ft 
35ft— % 
22ft + ft 
35 — ft 
17ft + ft 
6% + ft 
28% — ft 
13% + % 
24ft— % 
31ft— ft 
37ft 

41 ft— 2% 
77ft— 2ft 
1Z% 

53ft— % 
2% + % 
4ft 

J3ft — ft 
35% 

84 — ft 
29% — % 
22% 

38% 

46ft + ft 
35ft + ft 
40 + ft 

36% — ft 
Mft — ft 
aft 

17% + ft 
4% 

6% + % 
T4 — ft 
16% + % 
43 — % 
31ft— ft 
Mft + % 
74ft— ft 

IB 

18ft 

32ft + % 

a + % 

30 -eft 
43 — ft 

41=.— ft 
55 — ft 
29% + W 
42ft + ft 
21 '■ 

10'A + ft 
37% + ft 
BTft— % 

11 + ft 
13% — % 
22% 

27ft + Vt 

55 'x ♦ ft 
»%- ft 
27ft— l, 
!'•» 

27 

29 + ft 


Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — Share prices finished higher 
on the New York Stock Exchange in light trad- 
ing Thursday. 

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 135 
to 1,328.07. 

Among the 1.979 issues traded, advances out- 
paced declines 811-659. 

Volume totaled 90.910.000 shares compared 
mth 99,140.000 Wednesday. 

There is a general feeling of apathy," said 
George Pirrone of Dreyfus Corp. 

But analysts said participants are reluctant to 
sell aggressively before the release of IBM's 
third-quarter eamingc due out Friday. If those 
earnings prove somewhat stronger than expect- 
ed, the market could move higher, analysts said 
Wall Street expects IBM's third-quarter earn- 
ings of between S2.40 and S2.45 a share. 

Before the market opened, the Labor Depart- 
ment reported initial c laims for unemployment 
insurance fell 8,000 to 367,000 in the week 
ended Sept. 28. 

After the close, the Federal Reserve reported 
the nation’s basic money supply rose $5.3 bil- 
lion in the week ended Sept. 30. 

Gevriand Electric Illuminating Co. was the 
most active NYSE-listed issue, earing 'A to 23. 

Beatrice Cos. followed, falling 2 ‘4 to 41*4. 

Middle South Utilities was third, climbing 
life to 9%. A Louisiana state court judge ordered 
that the utility receive an immediate SI 13.9 
million electricity rate increase. 

Northern In diana Public Service rose % to 

10 %. 

Greyhound rose Va to 2614 after its drop 
Wednesday. The company authorized its man- 


12 Maim 

HcBtiLPa Stage 

37ft 30% BkUC 
34% 15 BwnS 
37% 24W BnM 
54 33% Brwn 

40% 28ft Brno 
40% 29ft Brslll 
19% 15ft Bund 
20 14% Bunk 

Mft 24% Burn 
48% 45 BrlNI 
79k 4% 8HM 
52 46Vj BrtN 
18ft 9ft Bum 
60 50ft Burn 
20% 11 Butlr 
6ft 1% BuflC 
14 3ft BlrfK 


Sis. Ooss 

Obi. YU. PE 1801 HMI Lew Ouai.Chg* 


34% 3414 
22 21 % 
30% 30% 
49 48% 

36 35% 

Mft 30% 
18ft 18% 
18% 18ft 
27% 27 
42% 61% 
7ft 7ft 
51% 50% 
9% 9% 
53ft 52ft 
13% 13 
Ift ft 
2% 2ft 


34% + ft 
21% — ft 
30%— % 
48% — % 
34 + ft 

30%+ ft 
18ft + ft 
18% + % 
27ft— % 
62ft— ft 
7ft 

51ft + ft 
9% + ft 
52% — ft 
13 
1ft 
2% 


29 18% CBI In 00 30 334 20 

125 48% CBS 300 15 21 773 118ft 

8ft 4ft CCX 9 49 4ft 

UP* 3M* CIGNA 200 40 35 287 54ft 

32% 26 CIGPf 275 93 47 29% 

53ft 49 CIGpf 4.10 83 W 50ft 

59% 28% CNAFri 10 27 40ft 

Ills 9ft CNAI 134 110 10 10% 

2% i§ft CRMMl Solti 10 l£ g% 
28% 21% CSX 1.16 44 9 1084 25ft 

40ft 28ft CTS 100 XI 44 29% 

12ft 7% C 3 Inc 413 107 8ft 

33% Mft Cabot .92 40 8 123 20% 
17% 8% Cqotot 13 835 14% 

25% 13% Cal Fed 08 25 S 544 19ft 

54 ft 35ft CalFdpf 4J5 103 185 46% 

21 13ft Callhfl J» 10 « 17% 

15% 12 Comml .12 0108 132 13ft 

24 15ft CRLkp 00, 1M 23ft 

6% 2% CtnoRg ,147 ,, ,148 2ft 

43ft 30% CamSPS 135 30 14 1228 42% 


00 30 334 20 

300 15 21 773 118ft 

* 49 4ft 


226*11-0 „ 104 20% 

1.16 40 V 1006 25ft 


,J ° “4,3 
.92 4M f . 

.U 5 


15% 11% CdPocs M 

Mft 16% CanPE B 00 

228ft 150ft CapCItS 30 .1 

27% 18 CapHdi 77 30 

12% 9% Coring B 08 

40ft 28ft Carlisle 108 X4 * 

24% 10 CaruFt 00 13 10 

30% 7F t CorP*. 200 111 7 

26% 21 CarPpf 207 1QJ „ 


7645 11% 
161 19% 
449 196 
Kg 21ft 
27 9% 

» 30% 
84 22% 
237 24 
8 25 


48 35% CarTec XI 0 50 13 333 36% 


lift 6ft Carrol 07 10 11 7] 7 

24ft 17% CarPIri 00 M I * » 

31 21% CartHw 132 46 17 3224 26% 

44% 22ft CartWI 00 13 » 68 40 

18ft 12% CoscNG 130 70 7 U 6% 

14% 9% CaslICk 778 12% 

29 15% C 5tlC Of 108k 36 2M8 

IS 1 *. 12 CstfCof .90 63 412 14% 

aw 28% CatroT so 10 8W 34% 

27% 19% Cera 36 30 11 M 25ft 

1291. 68ft Cetansn 400 30 11 223 126ft 

10% 7% Cenav 04e 0 2s 1324 9% 
45 24% Cental 238 50 9 125 Cft 

26% 18 Centax 35 1.1 10 93 Z3ft 

27 Mft Censow 202 8.1 7 75B 24% 

Mft 51% CWiHud ZM IIP 6 187 25?* 

44 36ft cm LI Dl 400 100 402 41ft 

2lft 16ft CnllPS 104 &9 10 119 18% 

29ft 20% CnLaEI 208 80 7 46 26 

37 31% CLaEI Bf AM 120 3 35% 

13% 8% CeMPw 100 100 IIU 252 13 
21% 16 CV1PS 1.90 95 6 34 Mft 

11% 2ft CenfrOt 73 4% 

12% 0% CntrvTI 00 60 8 77 11% 

23ft 17ft Cenvlll 200 1X5 8 111 17% 

»ft 15% Crt-taad JO xo ll 103 2<% 

30ft left CessAIr 00 13 » ,137 M 

, 25% 18ft Chmnln 52 20 7289 27% 

27% 20% CJirnlDf 130 53 14 aft 

54ft 45% Chm I of 400 93 46 STY 

9% 7% Cham So 00 50 15 211 8 

4% 1 y ChrlC 20 2ft 

1% WvChTwl 4 % 

I 4% Ift v Chrl Bf 15 2% 

: 63% 39 U Chase 300 7.1 5 1881 53ft 

’ 43ft J9V 4 Chose pf X2S I1J 8 Mft 

56% 50% Chase Of 655el2.l 1 54ft 

54% 51 Chase onO04e2OJ 1 gft 

22% 16% Chelsea .72 13 9 23 21% 

32% 24% Chcmea 152 50 II 176 27 

44V. 27% ChmNY 208 45 S 1049 39 

44% 27% ChNY of 107 45 9 Mft 

55% 49 ChPy of A07e 70 , 333 53% 

39ft 32 ChKPk 134 30 10 49 35 

3SW 31 ChesPn 200 5.9 la 1^ 34% 

, 39 79% ertewm 200 pJ 9 2420 

200 T24% CniMlw 103 1* ISft 

80% 53ft ChiMIPt 9 a 

.29% 16% CWPnT Jfcli 7 500 22 
11% 7% CnkFull J4I 19779 3 8% 

58% 29% ChrlsCr 13 56ft 

; 73ft 5% Chrism , ,.44 11 

13% 9% Chroma 45 1115 13ft 

SB 44 W Cnrm of 18 61 


52 20 1289 27% 

20 S3 14 23ft 

00 93 46 5tJft 

00 U 15 211 8 

20 2ft 


200 724% CWMlw 103 1« lzS”3 

80' A 53ft ChINUDf 9 « 

. 29% 16% CWPnT JOe 15 7 500 22 

11% 7% Oik Full J4I 19779 3 8% 

58% 29% ChrlsCr 13 56ft 

13ft 5% Chrism „ 44 ll 

13% 9% drama 45 1115 13ft 

5B *4% Cnrm of __ , 11 61 

38% 25% Chrvslr 100 23 3 4994 37% 

77 45% Chubb 234 35 11 587 W 

Chubb wf 2 44ft 

63ft 50% Chubb Pf 435 70 ,178 fTW 

Mft 13ft Church s M 25 13 1573 lSft 

7Tm 21 Ctlcoro 232 93 9 44 24% 

51 Mft C In Be II 3.12 00 0 16 4?ft 

19% 13ft ClnGE X16 110 7 W 1W 

74ft 58 ClnGPf 730 1X0 100:71% 

61 44ft CltlG Pf 704 fZ4 2702 59 

73 ft 58ft ClnG of fa 12J 680: 73 

36% 17% OnMH .72 40 a JC 18 

37 » CirdK .74 25 11 233 30ft 

31 18% ClrCily .10 5 10 257 19ft 

30% IS Circus 13 215 24% 

51% 33ft Clfio-n 234 53 6 6549 Oft 

T«ft 82ft Cl ks PfA 935* *5 231 9B 

8ft 6ft Ctablr 72 1X1 5 20 7ft 

19% SftCkUrSs 296 W* 

32ft 23% Clarks 1.10 XA 32 56 Mft 

- - 15 171 13 

100 55 9 28 18ft 

100 9 0 3 a% 


lZft 7ft Cla»Hs 
aw 17 civai 100 55 
3lft 20 OvCIpf 100 90 


231. 171* ClevEI 2*4 775 4 32444 23ft 

64 51% CIvElpf 700 12* Kft 

44ft 51% CIvElpf 756 123 300: 59ft 

141* Oft CtaaPk 001 58 9ft 

17% 10 Ch/PkPl 1.111 6 lift 

18ft 9% Clvokpf .931 31 10% 

43% 26ft Clara* 136 X3 13 188 41% 

29% 74% CJuhMd 2 DC 70 M >» 20 ft 

38% a% Clue ttP 100 23 19 9+2 37 

2 4ft 16ft Cluelpf 100 40 5 73' 'a 

Mft 9% Caadun 00 14 19 349 11% 

34% 16% CodStl S 00 10 10 814 28% 

74ft 59% CocaCI 196 43 1411179 70 

10% Caleco 777 18% 

3246 25ft CoWiTOi 130 45 19 1*0 Z7 

aft 22% CotaPoJ 136 5.1 a 1894 26% 

24% 19ft ColAlks *4 23 8 218 23 ft 

16% 9 ColFflsS 1030 ITi 

aft 25% Col Pen 100 40 9 1203 29% 

65% 49ft Calllnd 250 4J B 545 59% 

35% 24% CalGas 3.18 93 487 34% 

S3 45% CoIGspf 509*103 4 53 

— 2*%CSOPf X4S 3»ft 

101 CSOpf 01525 140 300x109 

101 CSOof nlS05 143 «:107V: 

488 42 


2»ft 8ft Cemdre 
12% 26 CmwE 
18% 13ft CwEM 

18% 14V, CrrEol 

I0T% 86 C 
88 64 C 

76% 59% C 
7*% 19% C 
76% S9 C 
*5% SOW C 


Z16 5.0 7 458 43 

100 3* 10 338x27% 

00 10 TO 1283 19% 

ComMli 36 20 17 56 IB% 

Cemdre 7 647 i0ft 

Cm*E 100 10.9 6 2599 28% 

Dt 130 113 79 16% 

Ol 200 11.9 14 17 

of 1130 110 14Sttfcl06% 

DIB 840 93 1002 87 

M BJB 120 »370l4»ft 

137 90 176 Tjft 

8.® 120 100Z 70 

734 110 21 0002 60% 

- J 34 24% 


30% »% CcmES 252 »5 


15% 23ft CPSYC 
35% 23% Comear 
74% 17% 

65% 9% 

39ft wv: 

M 16 
31 21% 

15% 17ft 
» 3Tu 
47 ft Jt< 

» 371 


08 1.1 37 1558 25% 

.40 20 8 30 25ft 

17 42f »ft 
4280 9% 

100 X7 14 213 37% 

150 84 10 1 K% 

2*0 8.9 9 3 2 ».* 


70 + % 

17% 118 +% 

4% 4% + % 
54% 54% + % 
29% 29%+ % 
50% 50% 

1% 1% + % 
« 48ft + ft 
10% 10% - % 
17% 17ft + ft 
47ft 48% +1% 
24% 24% — ft 

20% 2Sft + ft 

18% 19 + % 

46 46ft + % 
17% 17% + % 

13 13 

23ft 73% — Vk 
2% 2ft 
41ft 42%— % 
lift lift 
19% 19ft 
94ft 195% 

21ft 21% - ft 
9ft «ft 
30 »ft + .*■ 
22% 22% + ft 
25ft 25ft— % 

r £ +? 

20% 20ft- % 

£5!^ + % 

14 14% + ft 
12 12% — % 
25% 25%— % 

14 MU — ft 
Mft 34% + ft 
24% » 

125% 125% —1 
9 9ft— ft 

42 42%— ft 
23% +1 
24% 24% + ft 
24% 34% 

41V* 41%— 1% 
18 18% + % 
25% a + ft 

34% 34 Vi — ft 
12% U 

a 70 — % 

4% 4ft— % 
lift 11% 

17ft 17% + ft 
2J% 23% — % 
29% 29% 

21 21ft 
aw 23ft 
49% 50 + % 

7% 8 
2% 2% 
ft % 

2ft 2ft 
52% 53ft + % 
44ft 44% — % 
54% 54% 

52% 92% 

21% 21% + ft 
24ft 27 + ft 

37% 38% + ft 
38% 38% +1% 
S3ft sm + % 
34% 34%— % 
33% 3* + ft 

37% a 
24% 124% — ft 
% 61% — % 
19% —2ft 
8ft 8%— % 
55% SS%— ft 
10% 11 

1Z% 13% + % 
57% 61 +4 

34ft 37% + % 
65ft 44 + ft 

44 ft 44ft 
54ft 57ft + ft 

15 15 

23% 23% — ft 
49 49 

18% 18ft— ft 
71V, 71%— % 
5V S9 + % 
72 73 +1 

17% IB 

a 30 — % 

1B% IB*i— ft 
aft »% + ft 
41ft 43ft + % 
97% 99 — % 
7% 7% 

10ft 10% 

30ft 30% + % 
12% 13 + % 

18% 18% 

20% 20% 

22% 33 — ft 
saw 58% + ft 
57% 99% 

9ft 9ft— ft 
lift lift — % 
10ft 10ft— ft 
, 41ft 41ft— % 
a 30>4 + % 
36ft 3t?1 + ft 
aft aft + % 
10% lift + % 
28ft 28V + % 
69ft 49ft + ft 
18ft 18ft— ft 
26% »ft + ft 
2»ft aft + % 
23ft 23% — ft 
12ft 13% + % 
79 29% 

58% 58% — % 
, 34 3*ft 
53 53 + % 

26Vi 36% + ft 
107% 109 +l!k 
107% 107% 

42 43 + ft 

26% 27% + % 
1*1* 19% 

18'i 18ft + ft 

9ft 10 — ft 

27% 27ft— ft 
16ft 16ft 
16ft 16ft — ft 
104V* ini'.. + % 
87 87 — ft 

49 69ft — ft 
3% Mft + % 
70 70 + ft 

60ft 40% — ft 

26% 24% 

32% 32% — Va 
Mft 25 + % 

24ft 22hj 
24 24% + % 

9ft 9% 

30ft 371k + Va 
18% 18% + ft 
28ft 29% + Vi 
12% *“ 

Mft J*- 1 * 

4J% 43% + ft 


M-l Rises $5.3 Billion ! 

Reuters 

NEW YORK —M-l. the US. money supply 
measure that includes currency in circulation, 
travelers checks and checking, deposits, rose 
55 J billion to a seasonally adjusted 5615.0 
billion in die week ended Sept. 30, the Federal 
Reserve reported Thursday. 

The previous week's M-l level was revised to 
5609.7 billion from $609.8 billion, while the 
four-week moving average of M-l rose to 5612^ 
billion from $610.8 billion. 

M-2, the broader aggregate that indudes M- 
1. savings and small time deposits, most money 
market mutual fund shares and other items, ' 
rose $14.7 billion in the latest period to 52328.4 
trillion, while M-3, the broadest aggregate, rose 
$25 5 billion to S3. 163.3 trillion in September. 


agement to repurchase an additional 1 nnllion 
snares of its common stock. 

Semiconductor stocks weakened early in the 
session but some of the issues later recovered. 
Fust Boston analyst Jade Geraghty lowered his 
opinion of die group to a hold or neutral from a 
buy. Motorola lost 1W to 30Vi and National 
Semiconductor declined y* to 1 1 %. But Texas 
Instruments tacked on 1 to 89H and Advanced , 
Micro Devices added H to 23%. 1 

High tech issues were slightly ahead. IBM 
edged up Va to 124ft, Sperry added Vi to 48ft. 
Cray Research rose 1 to 47ft, Digital Equip - , 
ment ft to 104ft. 


KMorni 

HKtlLou Slock 

34 23ft 
47% 38% 
ftft 4% 

33% 19 
54 32ft 
31% ISH 
25% 14 
28% 14% 
28% 14% 

28ft 14% 

28ft 14% 

18% 10ft 

17 9ft 

29 15% 

18 9% 

47% 31% 

10% 4% 

4ft % 

51% 33 

2 % 

11% 4 

24% 20% 

38% 15% 

40% 32 ft 

1% % 

39 27% 

Ml 241 
41ft 31 

nr 

14ft 8% 

23% 17Ji 
27% 17% 

15ft II 
48% 30% 

49% 24‘." 

10ft 5% 

11 5% 

39% 32 
52% 23 
19% 17% 

53% 49% 

24 18% 

70 40 m 

44% 27% 

50% 43% 

45ft 50% 

35ft 22ft 
33% 13% 

88% SBft 
10 % 8 % 

38% 30% 

52ft 33% 


23% 15% 
13% 9V. 

30% 22 
9% 5% 
15 4% 

39% 34% 

76 31 

5% 4 

11% 4% 
72 14ft 
4Sft 29% 
20% 14% 
44 52% 

«0% 2J% 
33% Mft 
36% 30% 
52% 31% 
W 4ft 
44% 24% 
22% 21 
37*. 20% 
17% 14 
80 62ft 
67% 51ft 
45% 49% 
28% 22 
27% 2I'4 
27% 21 ft 
25% 21 
29ft 22% 
29% 23 
33ft 26% 
34% 27% 
116% 183 
7Mk 15% 
24 18% 

16% 10% 
21 141 ■ 
38% 34% 
21% 20ft 
11 Aft 
5Tb 31% 
125% BSft 
95 54% 

a% ia 
Aft 4% 
10% 6*1 
34% MV, 
21 16% 
61% 43 
33% 23ft 
42% 32% 
3711 26ft 
50 34ft 
2B% 8% 
15ft II 
24ft 17% 
21% lift 
67ft 12ft 
61% 46% 
40 31ft 
50 39% 

35% 27ft 
148% 113 
30% 64 

77 40% 

27 22% 

35% 30 
83 57% 
17% 13% 
16% 12Vi 
17ft 13% 
18 14 

20ft 14% 
25% 23 
62% 46 
14% 8% 
27 20% 


Hi Case 

Olv. YM. PE 1005 Htah Law OuoL Cli’o. 


1.10 30 11 
232 5* 9 

430 14* 
7.72 14.7 
400 153 
300 150 
178 150 
4.00 153 
X98 15* 
xas >55 

230 14* 

223 14* 
402 ISO 
203 15.1 
260 6* 18 


100 70 I 
430 114 


& a* 

34r 25 14 

l*0b 40 io 
23 

218 113 
2*3e 43 
130 SI 12 

100 27 17 
4*3 1O0 
:*30 80 
00 25 18 

18 

220 30 4 
1.109187 
130 14 16 
1.10 23 8 


140 32% 
229 41% 
2244 6ft 
60x 30% 
1001 52% 
200 29 
13 23% 

7 24% 
27 26 
13 25% 

15 Mft 

2 17% 

60 15% 
IB 24ft 

8 14ft 
1377 39% 

271 7% 

554 1% 

aS 50 * 

45 10% 
1181 23% 
1628 IB 1 '. 
4587 33% 

59 ft 

148 36% 

i 241 : 

311 38% 
115 16 

ir 

j 18% 

20 25 

£ J2S 

46 44% 
84 8% 
13 7% 
71 34% 

1151 <7ft 

1 19% 

218 53ft 

2 23% 
109 44ft 
427 34V, 
140 46ft 

74 56% 
42 32ft 
2917 14 
59 45 
4 18% 

3 35% 

16 47% 


11 24 17 

4S2 14 

7 216 24ft 

12 117 8% 

235 7ft 

13 3291 39% 
IS 1012 34 

259 4ft 

8 34 7ft 

9 150 16% 

14 1403 38ft 

8 333 18% 

100: 64 

19 75 3?% 

38 440 25ft 

9 60 23ft 

6 7374 38ft 

14 9% 

17 287 37ft 

11 77 21ft 

10 121 32ft 

6 IKK 14% 
6002 74% 
50: 62 
150: 60% 
24 25ft 
24 25 

5 24ft 

6 2Sft 

£5 26ft 

4 27 

15 SB's 
3 31% 
1 114 

6 19% 

12 212 21ft 
133 17ft 

1848 15% 
20 36ft 
2SS 20ft 
3 46 9ft 


i 17 
f« ■ 
24ft 
5ft- 
7ft ■ 
39ft 
34 
4% 
7ft 
14ft ■ 
38ft • 
11ft- 
64 - 
39% • 
25ft- 
23 • 

35ft • 
9ft 
37 
21 % 
32ft- 
14% ■ 
76ft < 
42 ■ 

60 % 
2Sft 
25 
Mft 
25% - 
24ft • 
26 % 
30% - 
31% - 
114 - 
19ft- 
2flft • 
17% • 
15ft- 
36ft 
20 % 

10 1M 34% 34 34%- 

14 3843 105ft 103% 104ft • 
47 1182 87% 85ft 87% ■ 

7 51 22ft 21ft 21% - 

3 14 5% 5% 5% 

907 9 5ft 9 - 

9 660 29ft 29ft 29% 

10 11 B 21 20% 7! 

15 290 52ft 52% 52ft 

IJ 82 33ft 33ft 33 

13 70 35ft 34ft 35ft 

13 23SS 35 34ft 34ft 

19 209 39 38% 39 

3 35 24ft 24ft 24ft 

% 12 % 12 % 72 % 

16 443 18% 15ft 18% - 

9 19ft 19 19ft- 

15 100 64ft 63% 63% - 

15 1732 58% SBft 58% - 
1 37 37 37 

4 47 J6ft 46ft 

8 729 37% 37% 37% 

1 131ft 131ft 131ft- 
300: 7Sft 75% 75% - 
7 DO: 72% 72% 72% ■ 
32 Mft 24ft 26ft • 
10 34% 34ft 34ft- 

20 470 77’i 71% 7T\ - 

7 505 li 74% 74ft 

not 14% 14% 14% 
150: 16% 16 16 

60= lA 16 16 - 

7 St 18ft 17ft 17ft- 

820: M 25 25 

lOOOx Sift 56ft 56ft - 
12 61 13ft 73% 13% 

12 111 2CV-. 74% 24% 


EGG .48 10 18 
EQKn 13s XI 
£ Stsf 30 70 M 
EOSIOP 10* 43 9 
Easoo *4 15 
East Air 11 

EAL wlO 
EAL wtA 
. EsAfref 235k 

BAIr ofB 1B» 
EAlrofC 

EattGF 130 53144 
Ecitlin 204 9J 8 
EMUMs 230 50 13 
Eaton 1*0 2* 7 
Ecnim 5 At 17 11 
Eckert >04 J* 14 
EdrtBr 1*0 5.1 13 
EDO 08 10 13 
Edwara 00 30 12 
= PC del 235 9.7 
EIToro Uc J II 
Elccr 34 36 
El CCA 5 22 

Eldves JX , 27 
Eta>ft 00 XI 12 

EiSS.nl 

i Emr-,EI 2*0 18 1? 
EmRod .911110 9 
Err.riA *3 2.9 13 
Emflarj l*Cb 50 9 
ErnoDs US BA 7 
Erne pf 47 9 4 
Enct^en 1.01 7* 10 

EnE*c 

cflOiCp 72 3.1 10 
EniiBuS J* 22 11 
I Enscrcn 1*0 7*178 
Enicn of S. 77e!0J 
Ensai pf1C.«3C 9.9 
EnsE’ n 100 b 63 
Ensrce 24 

Er.tsra 

Snft.E IJColSi 
i Efta.'n 1*4 7.1 11 

Eauli s : IJ 2* 16 

E=u ni 


550 34% 
109 15ft 
?2or 
60 24 

7 ir. 

1280 8ft 

5* a 
111 7ft 
30 21% 
104 24ft 
33 28% 

3 ??% 

2KH <4% 

*38 53% 
1101 lift 
9514 Jp% 
16 31% 
S3 15% 
154 2Sft 
12 24 ft 
417 13ft 
5 10 

» sf 

444 's% 
970 68 ft 
656 B% 
592 IT. 
279 27ft 
63 21ft 
5802 5 
101 13 s . 
43 la 
113 23% 
1022 16% 
251® 21% 
1540= SJ"; 
20 10o'e 
97 19% 
24 2ft 
269 12 
23 16ft 
134 19% 
33 ST : 
231 3ft 


34% 34% 
15% 15% 
27% 28% ■ 
74 24 

17ft 17ft 
8% 4ft ' 
2ft 3 
1% 1% 
21 21% 
24'. 74ft 
28'. 20% - 
22% 22ft- 
21ft 21% 
43ft 44% - 
53% 53ft- 
11': 11% 
28% 29% 
31% 31% 
15 15ft 
25 25ft 
74V. 24% 
11*. lift 
9ft ID 
4 4 - 

21% 21ft 
rift 13ft- 

67% 68 C ' 
7% 8 

17 17ft 
27": 77ft 
20% 20', 
4% 5 

12% 13% - 

2?-- . 23% " 
15 16% 

2 ! 21 % 
55 SS . 
185% 105% - 
19V* 1»% - 
2% 2%. 
11 % 12 
15ft 16 
18% 19ft 
31% J7ft ■ 
r% 3 V, 


22% 13'* 

30% 25% 
SOVi 31% 
17 8% 

14% 10% 
24 lb 12H 
34% IS 
28 15ft 
25% 12% 
6 1% 
9V2 2ft 
43% 32ft 
17% 14Vs 
54% 41 


Eamk pf 131 120 
Eamkoi 

EtjIRas 132 XI 9 
Euuftac .16 13 4 
Ertjmnr 30 Z0 T3 
EssBus 04 72 13 
EsexCt 00 33 
Eotrtne 33 4* 30 
Ethyl* *4 20 14 
vlEwanP 
vlEvarv pf 

EjcCsia 132 <2 71 
Excalsr 104O1U 
Exxon 300 65 9 


Six Clem 

lOtaHtghLw. feotaiya 


I9%— w 

29 

41ft + % 
8% + ft 
7214 + K 
20 % 

22ft 

JSft- ft 

23% 

1% 

2ft 

41%+ K 
14% + ft 
52ft 


4052 52% 


31% 32ft + Va 
4114 41ft— ft 
6% 4% + ft 
30 s . 30% — % 
52ft 52ft + % 
28 29 + % 

73% 23% — ft 
24% ?<%— % 
2Sft 25% + % 
25% 25ft + % 
24% 24ft + % 
17% 17Vk 
15 15% 

25% 26% +1 
16ft 16ft 
38 V* 39ft +1 
7ft 7% 

1ft Ift- ft 

10% 10% 

22% 21ft + ft 
17% 17ft— ft 
33 33 

% \ + % 
35ft 34% + % 
761 341 

38ft 38ft + % 
15% 15% 

22 »% + % 
Oft fft 
18% lSft + ft 
24% 25 + ft 

lift 12% + % 
45% 44% + ft 
45ft 44% + % 
&% B%— ft 
9% 95*— % 
35ft 34 — ft 
44% 47% +1 
19% IT- + ft 
53ft 53% ♦ % 
23% 23% + ft 
43% 63% — % 
35% 36%+ % 
44% 44% — % 
56ft 56ft + ft 
32 32 — 

13 14 

64% 65 + % 

18'. 1(7% 

35% 35% 

49% 49ft — ft 


FMC 230 3* 34 
FPL Go ?.« S3 7 
FobCJr 08 XD 21 
Facet 8 

Fotrchd 30 2.1 
FalrCPf 3*0 T2* 
FolrW .18 1* 9 
FomDIs 00 S 72 
Farrstot *0 X2 72 
FrWslF 7 

Fa roll 08 48 9 
FoyDro 00 13 20 
Feder* 04s .9 B 
FeatCO 104 40 9 
FedEx* 20 

FdMoa 7*0 4* 70 
FcdNM .14 S 
FedfPB 00 19 17 
FPaapf 231 B* 
FedRlf 1*6 6* 14 
FdS*nl 00 4* 14 
FedOSf 2*4 XS 8 
Ferro T0fl 4* If 
Fldcst 100 38 13 
FlnCPA 051 
FlrtCP pf 605el9.1 
FnSBar 

Flrasm 00 X4 14 
FIAIIS 08 20 .9 
FIBkSy 1*0 4J 8 
FBkFlt 100 30 14 
F Basis 100 2* 12 
Fsfdllc 132 60 . 
Fcmopf 5360110 
FCMPK3S038110 
FtBTex *0 53 11 
FtBTkpf 5*46111 
FlCItV (. 7 

FFrtAzJ *8b 23 9 
FFB 117 50 B 
Flntste IS U 7 
Flntsf pf 2J7 &1 
FtMlss 04 29 9 
FtNatnn 20 

Fst Pa 

FsJPo pf 2*2 9 J 
FlUnRI 200 70 13 
FtVOBk 08 30 10 
FtWtsc 130 38 10 
FWtaCPf 60S 770 
Rschb 100 15 
FlshFd 05a 0 
FltFnG S 132 3 J 8 
Fleet En 04 20 9 
Ftamna 100 IS 12 
FtafltSfl .16 2 18 

FlaEC -16a 0 12 
FtaPrg 116 80 8 
Flasn 00 25 13 
FlwGtn 

Fkjwer 04 12 18 
Fluor 00 15 
FooteC 120 XI 11 
FordM 200 53 3 
Ffttaar 136 100 
FtHowa 104 13 17 
FostWh 04 X9 11 
Fax Phot *8 S3 13 
Fortra IJM <3 74 
Faxmyr IS 

FUEPn l.lOe SJ 
FMGCn 

FAAOG 108021.1 5 
FrptMC *0 12 14 
Frtafrn *0 20 32 
Fruefif JO J 6 
Fruhlpf 100 70 
Fuqua 00 IJ B 


30 * 13 31. 

130 42 13 7 

7 ICO 

100 10 10 3 


120 
1106 
60 

10 .... 

41 9ft 
15 38% 
37 11% 
470 21% 
X 74ft 
15 36 
13 18% 
59 5% 

34 4% 

10 42 
2192 42% 

82 34% 
3147 18% 
13 IB 
4 24% 

59 23% 

11 17ft 
1341 54ft 

ICC 27 
10 26% 
1465 6ft 
17 32% 
65 5ft 

no 18% 

153 

60 
131 
251 

5382 
341 
3 


GE1CO 100 
GEO 

GTE* 116 
GTEpf 1 00 


Oft— ft 

34 + ft 

9% + ft 

lift 

9ft + ft 
38ft + ft 
lift— ft 
21% + % 
74ft + ft 
36 + ft 

18ft 

8%— ft 
4% + ft 
41ft + ft 
41 —1ft 
34ft + % 
18ft— ft 
17% 

26% + ft 
23% + ft 
17ft 

56ft +ft 
24% + ft 
26ft + % 
6ft + ft 
32% + % 
5ft + ft 
18ft— ft 
34ft + ft 
37ft +1 
33% +1% 
37% + ft 
21ft + ft 
46 

88 —ft 
lift — ft 
36% — % 

2& + * 

Sm 

29U 

8ft 

30ft 

6ft + ft 
26ft + ft 
27 — ft 

34 +% 
34ft + ft 
53ft— ft 
25ft +1ft 
12ft 

36 +% 

18ft— ft 

35 + ft 

23ft + ft 
26ft +1 
38 + ft 

26ft + ft 
15ft— ft 
5 —ft 

m* + ft 
16ft +1% 
54 + ft 

45ft + ft 
12ft 
88 —1 
lift 

13 + ft 


24 — % 


gft + ft 


njManfb 

KWh Low Stock 

38ft HCA 
34 Hofei In 
30ft HotnhM 
12% HauFob 
28% Hausfnf 
47 Holnfpf 
20ft Houlrjd 
8 HauOR 
14% Howl Co 
23V. Hubbrd 
9% Huffy 
i2 Huflhrr 
17% HughSp 
21% Human 
3Bft Hunhjiif 
36ft HuttfiF 
19% Hydrai 


5BL CtOM 

IQBiHlflii Low fedtartt 


8 7449 30ft 

13 18 279* 

13 175 33* 

" 24^ 37% 
154 77ft 
6 606 Mft 

13 10 

27 3 IS* 

11 144 2H6 

12 6 10% 

332 ri 

12 10 22Vi 

13 5784 S% 

17 18x28% 

9 1312 34% 
n 19 31% 


2.10014 
30B X7 13 
*0 6.1 5 

2*0 50 8 

02 40 S 
400 15 12 
00 1* 10 
1.12 3* 18 


2*0 4* 9 
400 113 
1J6 40 11 
200 S3 

100 57 10 
108 72 13 
12 

1.90 90 8 

10 

.100 90 18 
204 80 7 
231 114 
300 9J 0 
X0J 9.1 9 
36 13 12 
106 50 7 
404e 90 


29 30 +1 

27% 27ft— ft 
34% 35ft + % 
13ft 13ft— ft 
36% 27* +% 
77ft 77ft + ft 
24 26 — ft 

9% 9ft— % 
15% 15% + % 
23% 25 +1% 

18ft 10ft + % 
12% 721* + ft 

Mft 27ft +1% 

S!3S-ft 

31 31 — % 


32ft 33ft + Vk 

15% 15% 

10 I oft + ft 

26% 27 + % 

17ft I7ft— % 
23% 23ft— % 
15% 15ft + ft 
34ft 34% + % 
45ft 45ft + ft 
61ft 62ft + ft 
47 47 

as m 45 
71% lift + ft 
21ft + ft 
6% + % 
22% 

20 +ft 
34 +1 

44ft— ft 
27ft— ft 
34% — Hi. 
7ft + ft 
lift 

28*— ft 
2d +14 
5%— ft 
50% + % 
35ft + % 
14ft 
21% 

43 + ft 

17ft + ft 
4ft + ft 
18ft + * 
2Sft 

«ft-% 

■ • + ft 
ift 

19ft— ft 

im 

77ft + ft 
114% + ft 
26% — ft 
31ft + ft 

fft— ft 

42*-* 

a-* 

^=i5 

45ft— ft 

m— ft 

3?» +s 


28ft JWT s 
23% J River 


1.12 30 14 
*6 IJ 10 


GTE X14 XI 8 2142 
GTE pf Z 08 70 2 

GTE pf 208 10* 9 

Gormptl 108 73 18 1714 
Gcpinc *0 10 21 136 
GeorW 00) 26 32 

Gel CO *6 33 11 405 

GomllC _ 78 

Gomll I 08e 30 60 

GnCorp 108b X0 S ASA 

GAInv 1*3* 93 40 

GnBctfl 100 10 10 30 

GCInm *0 13 11 268 
Go Data 9 1049 

GaDmrn 343 

GnDevwt _ 22 

GnDvn 100 1* 7 5S 
GanEI 200 30 T1 2573 
GtiFds 230 11 18 925 
GnHnw 7 31 

GHostl 30 10 3 145 

GnKous 34 ZA 
Gnlrw 05 1.9 7*4 

GnMIlb 234 3* 3897 

GMot i00r 73 6 5390 
GMEs 051 .1 2394 

GNkrtpt 173 90 5 

GMolpf 500 9* 10 

GNC .16 30 16 M 
GPU 8 829 


.16 30 16 a 

8 829 ; 

I 136 1.9130 525 I 

r 6 7 

II 100 40 10 345 j 

if 130 103 1200z 

rf X 16 10.9 3001 ; 

1 252 

I .10 1.1 47 100 

g 100 60 53 1 

1 1.18 U IJ 206 


76W 
24% 
24% 
14* 
19 
38 

Mft 26ft 
21ft 15% 
18ft 14% 
54* 30% 
41% 32* 
29% 22ft 
20 13% 

29% 22% 
30% 22 
Aft 2% 
13% 9 
12% 6% 
36% 24ft 
7ft 4* 
27 % 20 

45* 24% 
18% lift 

24 18% 

14ft 11% 
41 30ly 
55% <1 
32% 25% 
3Srt 28% 
20% 14 


GaPwpfxoc 7X2 
GcPw pf 304 12* 
GaPw pf 3J6 125 
GoPw pf 236 123 
GcPwpf 2*2 121 
GaPwpf 2J5 100 
GaPwpf 700 120 
GerbPd 132 *0 
GerbSC .12 3 

Getty s .16 43 
GfAHT 
GibrFn 

GlffHIII 32 24 
Gillette 200 40 
GiecsC 

GlOTFd OSm A 
GtoblM ,ig 
GtabMpflJS 
GWNug 
GKJNwt 

GWWF 20 4 

Gdrlch 1*6 50 
Goodvr 1*0 5.9 
GomnJ *2 X3 
Gould *8 11 
Grace 240 7.1 


*2 13 19 2 

M XI 10229 

240 7.1 11 7« 

I *8 23 13 140 31 

08 Z0 8 111 lift 

6 138 15% 

100 10 12 49 S6ft 

1*2 4J 11 112 35% 

100 19 8 750 25ft 

1J2 90 8 25 17% 

4 452 25% 

132 XI 9 5681 24ft 

8 257 4ft 

S UM fl « 
IJ 12 251 8 

ISO 11 9 457 32% 

.14 27 53 119 5ft 

01 24 11 17 34* 

.90 21 IS 1414 44 

20 214 15ft 

30 U 1 19% 

104 120 6 4717 13ft 

*.40 113 10: 39 

434011* 2 S4V1 

■ 305 120 21 SOft 

■4*0 1X4 52 37% 

00 29 10 118 30ft 


Ih 

lists 

3ft— ft 
67ft + ft 

57% 

118% 

5ft + ft 
16ft 16% 

Pf* 7B 

12ft 13 — ft 
42% 43 
41 66%— ft 

32% 35 +1% 

39% 39% — Vh 
52 52, 

4% 4% 

Mft 15ft + ft 
81ft +lft 
9ft 9ft— Vk 
37 37% — ft 

75 75 

2% 2ft + Mi 
8ft 9 + ft 

20 20 — ft 
3»% 31 

20% 20ft— ft 
37 37 + ft 

34% 34ft— ft 

21 Z1 — ft 
20ft 27% + ft 
25ft 2Sft 
62% i»4— Ift 
33 33ft + ft 
14% 17ft + ft 

tt’sm 

6% AW + ft 
19ft 2B — ft 
64ft 64% + ft 
16% + % 
12% + ft 
1%— ft 

% 

2 + ft 

32H + % 
31 — ft 

33ft— % 
39ft + ft 
31 31 + ft 

17 17% + ft 

15ft 1*% + ft 
55ft 56ft +lft 
35 M% + % 
25ft 25ft + ft 
17% 17% + ft 
25% 2Sft — % 
Mft 26ft + ft 
4% 4% 

9ft 9ft 
74* 7% + % 
31% 31%—% 
5% 5%+ ft 1 
MU 24ft— ft 
43ft 43ft— ft 
15 15% + % 

19% 19% — ft 

«ftg%+ft 

54ft 54ft— 1 
29ft Xft + ft 

SS^S + ft 


HBi JopnF 1030723 
34ft Jeff PI I 1*2 30 7 
24% JerCpf 400 120 
59 JerCpf 926 130 
50 . JerCpf 8.12 1X1 
50 JerCpf .800 1ZJ 
49 JerCpf 708 1X0 
soft JerCpf H0O n* 
14ft JerCpf 118 12* 

6% JevHcr 22 

30ft JahnJn 130 30 14 
38% JohoCn 104a ** 9 
SO% JhnCpf X25 82 
21% Jorgen 100 40 19 
1BW Jastans 00 3j 14 
22% JavMlg 100 81 14 


160 29ft 
777 32% 
387 18 
24 17% 
282 44% 
IDOz 31ft 
1002 70 
34901 42ft 
lOOz 63 
130: 61 
Sfc 914ft 
31 17ft 
100 14ft 
920 43% 
57 48ft 
55 51% 
34 24% 
147 24% 
43 23ft 


2A 3S 10 
Sim 29 7 
X5D 90 
100 X* 9 


00 U 13 
204 90 9 

04 82 

1 JO «.T 
1.10 15 30 
1J0 4* 8 

08 13 18 
130 17 9 

232 30 II 
J6 j4 

^ S3 

00 XI 
1000 100 
S3e X9 
200 4* 11 
00 23 14 
J2e 10 17 
08 4* 7 


8ft 816— ft 
17ft 17% + ft 
1 45% *5% 

31ft 31%— % 
14% 15 
14% 15 —ft 
53ft Sift— 1% 
14% 14% 

7% 7% 

206k 20% + ft 
35ft 3Sft + % 
10% 10% 

19ft 19ft 
52% 53% + ft 
12% 12% 
lift 11% + ft 
34% 37 
22ft 22ft— % 
21ft 21ft— ft 
13% 14% + ft 
12 ft rob— ft 
25% 73ft— ft , 
60ft 40ft— ^ 1 ! 

35% 35% — ft | 

20% 20% 

27 27 + ft 

10ft 10ft— ft 
ZOft 789* — % 
31% 01% + ft 

14 14% + ft 

3Z% 32% — ft 
61ft 61ft + % 
33% 34 
17 17 

24% 26%— ft 
13ft 13% + % 
15ft 15%— ft 
94ft 94ft— % 
13ft. 13% 

43ft 43%+ ft 
17ft 17% + ft 
32ft 32ft— ft 
10% 19ft + ft 


22'.-. HallFB 100 XB 
!*ft HoCrtn 1*0 73 11 
% HOllwd 06 60 14 
Halved pf *6 43 
HomPs 136 30 14 
HonJS 1070100 
HonJi 104a 88 
Htxvll a *4 2* 13 
HtxkfH M li 20 
Hanna 00 ZJ 21 
HaTBrJ 100 IJ 16 
Hortnds *6 10 18 
Harnhft 22 

HompfB140 1X7 
HornnfCZU 82 
HrpRwS AO 3* 12 
Harris 01 X* 12 


HarGro 
Honco 1, 
Hartmx 1, 
HattSe 1 


01 30 (2 

138 4J 10 
138 XI 9 
100 184 11 


HawEI 1*4 70 0 
HavwA 001 <2 6 
Hcuietn 00 T* M 
Ho: Lab 32 2* M 
HifhAm 24 

HUCrPn .I8e .9 
HltUSA 

Hecks 38 72 
HeCWTA 30 1.2 
Heitrnn 08 24 7? 
Helllg 00 10 15 


HelmP 34 1* 27 

Herculs 1*0. X3 12 
Merit C i Ml 35 
Herne Pf 1*0 4J 
Herrann , 14 

Horsfyy 100 29 13 
Hessian 
Hestnpf 

HewiPk 32 0 U 

Hexcel 00 23 14 

HI Sheer 50 U B 

HiVolt .17 1* 7 

Hllnbra M 23 U 

Hilton 100 29 13 

Hitachi J4e 1.1 

Hoi wav 100 13 13 

HOllyS 100 13 72 

HotneD 26 

HmFSD 6 

HmeGpf 1.10 11 j 
20ft Hmstke 30 0 51 

10 HtmtFn 00 XI 4 

46ft Honda 00c * B 

53% HfHwell 200 33 12 

MV. HrjnBn 138 19 11 

»vy 3% Horizon 


234 2* 
1152 25% 
401 Ift 
8 8% 
748 40ft 
98x14% 
83 21ft 
364 21% 
32 15% 
B T7ft 
221 SB 
211 29ft 
*33 9g 

350 »k 

21 17ft 
544 23 
1270 16% 

114 29ft 
852 32ft 
14 17 

S "A 

a 7 ?? 4 

1404 14ft 
45 X 
1201 19ft 
251 12% 
200 16% 
361 7 8ft 

22 9ft 
321 SM 
197 29% 

95 18% 
340 19ft 
1127 37 
348 77% 

iS 3 

183 47% 
11 Aft 

14 10ft 
8134 29% 

J *** 

85 20% 

23 lift 
53 23ft 

1399 64 
1519 31ft 
538 53ft 
43 78 
»2 11% 
39 20% 
27 9ft 
730 54% 

15 13% 
1592 £2% 

937 60ft 
JD 32% 
391 Aft 


25ft a + ft 
25 2Sft— ft 
Ift 1ft 
8% 8ft 
40ft 40ft— % 
14ft 14ft— ft 
20% 2tKk + ft 
21ft 31% 

18ft 18% 

17 77ft + ft 

S7ft 57% — ft 
29 29% + ft 

9ft 9ft + ft 
Mft 24% + ft 
25% 25% 

!6ft ITU + % 
22% 23 + ft 
16 Uft + ft 
29 29ft + ft 
31ft 31ft + ft 
16% 17 
20% 21ft + ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
25 25% 

12% 12% — ft 

13% 14%—% 

19% a + u 

14ft 18ft +3% 

12ft 12% 

16ft 16V. + ft 
Mft Mft 
28U Wi 
57U 57ft— % 
28% 29 — U 

18 18 — % 

18% 18% + ft 

W-SSfc* 

flftfl 

47% 47% + ft 
6 ,6 — ft 

io 12 * _ 

28% 29U— ft 
26% 26% 

20ft 20ft— ft 
11% 11% 

23 »U + ft 
42 42% —1% 

31% 31%— ft 
52ft S3ft + % 
77 78 + % 

11% 11% + W 
28% 20% 

9% 9% 

Mft 36% + ft 
12% 12% — U 
51% S3 — ft 
59% 40 — ft 
32ft 5ft + ft 
Aft Aft 


LACtl 217 24ft 

LN He 2078,90 10 10 30% 

LLERY 2339193 335 lift 

LLCCp 22 1ft 

LTV 1618 5% 

LTVpf X29 1137 71ft 

LTV pf 3MJ 54 32 

LTVpf .941 IB 8% 

LQutot _ 23 233 12% 

LadGa 1 JO 60 8 *53 25% 

Lofarae 20 20 359 7U 

Lofrgpf 20* 100 A 22ft 

Lamurs 34 XI M 18 Bto 
LaraSM . 794 73 3ft 

Lawtlnt *6 XI 15 418 11 

LearPt 30 IJ 879 11 

LaarP Pf 207 130 « 21ft 

LearSfl 200 43 9 273 — ' 
LeortPf235 15 1 

LnRnls 00 2* 12 6 Uft 

LpSvTr 1*0 4* 13 46 5 

LdeEnt- 02 23 19 37 40ft 

LegMca 306 13 15 6 15% 

Lea PI at *2 20 11 89 26 

Lefival n 2Vk 

Lamnn UOell.1 3 i*u 
L*rmor 30 10 10 65 17% 

LPucNfS _ 3 32 19% 

LQF 132 20 0 39 47ft 

LQFPf X75 63 2 

UMvO) 32 20 14 XI 

Lilly 330 3-7 12 06 

Undid 8 .16 J 26 1764 

UlteNH 104 40 71 241 

LlncN pf 300 10 2 

LtacPl 23*0 90 7 

Litton 200e 20 ID 1120 

Lnefthd JOm 1* 8 1873 

LDctfta 00 20 74 2 

Loews s 1000 23 12 ra 
Lopfcon 5 J 18 177 

LomHrt 1.40 XJ 12 36 

LamMls 204 93 10 201 

LOmMwt 19 

lStar M 1.W 60 6 1931 

W* aB “ 2 S 

LILPtf 29900* 

LJLpfK lOOt 

LlLPfX 220 

ULpfW 20 

LlLPfV n 

ULpfU 17 

LILPfT 5 

ULpfP 5 

LILPfD _• 15 

LongOs 32 20 13 V793 

Loral *2 1* 17 388 

LoGenl *7 50 10 44 

La Land .100 xi 10 1843 

LbPOC 00b 40 a 184 

LaPLBt 430 164 *M 


LaPLOt 430 740 554 

LaPLPf 116 1X1 650 

LbuvGS 152 93 8 481 

Lowkt 200 X2 IS Iri 

LOwOS 36 L7 13 433 

Lubrd 1.16 5* 13 314 

\Z3b 7.12 IS fi £ 

LukBBS 08 3* 14 4 


Mft— ft 
30ft— % 
lift— ft 

at 

sm 

,8ft 

au-s 

7% — ft 

if* 

n — * 
20%— % 

<7% +-U 
117 —ft 
15% — ft 
32ft 

is-* 

2ft 

Ift-* 

SS=S 

sm 

» + % 
,42 — ft 

69to+2ft 

44ft 

30ft „ 
44% — ft 
J3fc + % 
33 

au 

L** 

^7%^* 
46% — % 
47ft + ft 
19ft— Ik 
19ft— ft 

S2 + ft 

T 

16ft— ft 
25% + % 
32 

lift + ft 

^=2 
28ft +1, 
20%+lft 
27 + % 

42ft 

21ft + ft 
ao%— ft 

gm 

13ft— % 


23ft IS 
49% 25ft 
34% 17ft 
Uft 10 
38 27ft 
42ft 34 
18 11% 
27 ID 
lift 21% 

l& if 

22 % 12 % 

18 Uft 
44% 30% 
28% 1% 
78% Uft 
21% 12% 


16 1515 14 15% 

42 2577 49% 48 

6 85 19% 19ft 

10 113. lift lift 

9 10? 34% Mft 

14 7*4 38 37ft 
40 109 17ft 17ft 

1002 24% MU 
4 9%. 9ft 
144 7ft 7 
48xiru if 
4 13 13 

17 »5 31 30% 

11 ISIS Cft +1 

31 lift 11 

■ g 1. 1% 

II tzft 12ft 
» Mft U 


15%— ft 
48ft + ft 

«“■* 

34% 

?*=s 

fJft+% 

S%’+i% 

n 

44 . + ft 

a 

12ft 

14 + ft 



DltaA 
I High Low Stack 


31ft— ft 

?st+S 

34ft + % 
52% + ft 


29 29 —% 

32U n%— % 
17% 17% — to 
llto Ilto— to 
43ft *4% +1to 
lift 31to 
70 70 — Ito 

61% 43 +% 

43 — to 

60ft dOVb — IVfc 
Mto Mto+lft 
17ft 17ft + to 
13% 14to + to 
43% 43ft + ft 
40ft 4M 
51ft 51ft + to 
Mto 24%+ to 
24% 24%— ft 

22ft a 


Dtv. YM. PE MkHMlUw fentChY 


17 +:« 

36ft -hf 

Sat! 

& .* 


MonrCs .11 0 1234 17ft 

imw.U .10: J 1515 Mto 


MbHoa »20 8J 5 15K Mto 

ffissan 

2 « 

MAPCO Ml » I M 3« 
136 fli 
92 32ft 


MorfMd'Utt 5* 


Marians 38 J 34 393 34ft 

MorkC 32 13 TO ?% 

Marrlat *4 * 15 M3 88% 

MrMlM 2J0 XO 17 417 47 

Mart Ml LOB 33 721 33ft 

MaryfC 061 2? 744 13 

AAatCO *4 10.15. 332 31% 




2%- 

MasCP 254 lai 111 29ft 

Matlac 1J2TL1 46 llto 

Matsu E 3k i 11 233 54% 

Mattel V 16 12*8 14% 

Motif Wf 164 10% 

Maxom • 4 1» 12% Uft 

MayDStrlJfl 17 10 430 STU SH* 

Movtg 200 XD 11 101 56 ft »% 

McOTPf 230 9* 8 23 22% 

McOrpf 20OUU . J Jto Mb 

Mcoerl 100 90 3221 18ft W 

McOU JO 23 M 14 9% 9ft 

McDtlld 00 10 14 741 45 64ft 

MCOIID 104 13 7 IJM 44ft 44ft 

McGrH 100 14 14 772 41U 4W6 

Mclnfg ' 38 27% 27ft 

McKesi 200. 53 « JW 46to 4g4 

AtaLean 12 315 7to 7to 


47*+3% 

?r™ 

SS:» 


U 9ft 9ft 
741 45 44ft 
1103 44ft 44ft 


McLean 

MUM 1-00 XB 
Mead 130 33 
Mesrux M u 


Mesrux 24 13 12 ZP 

Medbo 00 £l 14 372 

Mellon 248 30 7 144 

Meto»pf20a 90 zn 
MeMK 104 11 13 530 

MtrcSt 1J0 XI JO ' 91 
Merck 330 29 14 732 

Merdfti 100 U 13 100 

mSST JBem $ 122 5ft 


12 315 7% 7ft 
S3* 1% 1% 

9 10 26% 26% 

9 444 37ft 37to 



1 3% 

MffipfC390tt4 20k lift Mto- 

MfEpfF 8.T2 UO 100142ft 42U 
MtEPfl 032 111 50* 62 . 42 

MexFd 32*140 — 545 2ft 2 
Mlcklby 04 1* 7) 21 4% 4% 

Mklcon 2J& X4 W 2025 54 S3to 
MWSOf 1331 - 424842 9% Bto 

MldRat 130 63 53 14% 14 

MWE 276 90 11 3l.29to.2fto 

MfftnR 04 X 0 15 U Wto Mft 

MMM 3*0 4* 13 503 74% 716ft 

MlnPL 236 70 8 48 Ja 34% 

NUsnln 252 «% 3ft 

Mitel - 17B 6 5% 

Mobil 230 7* 10 3687 29ft 29% 

« i» j 77 

Mab^ 08,7 11 

MonCO XM n 73 49ft 49 

AtaRCbpOaO 4.7 2 4 f 47 

Mamtii 00 S3 a 3 15 15 

Monsai 2*0 40 10 MM 42ft 41% 

MonPw XOT 73 11 908 28 24% 

MocSt 1000 90 53 l»to TB% 

MQNY * 90 U H 8% Bto 
Moores 32 30 12 10 l|ft lift 

MoorM 106 XX 13 27 23ft 23% 

MorMpf 2*0 93 *4 27U 26% 

Morons 230 45 7 4XH 49% 48ft 
Moron pfXBAe 8J . 255 aSto 85 
MerKnd LM 30 10 47 42% 41% 

Morses 00 XI M 28 1?ft 19ft 
MtgRfy lJ9elai 10 2H li 17% 
Mortal ■ 04 10 1 *49 33% 32% 
Materta *4 11 7310915 31% »% 
{Junfnl *4 27 11 - 143 20% 20% 
Muwi. _ 11 14% 14 -• 

MaraO 100 30 12 ' 327 29% 29% 
MurrvO *0 33 11 47 nto Uft 

Murom 104 107 31 13% 13to 

MyerL.. to 7 2 


s & 

H w va . 

44ft —VC 

SZt-* 

46%+ to,- 
7%—-% 
ito— :£ 

2 Sto—U 

JPA—VTi: 

M% 

BU+’SC 1 
19% + ftz 

mw 

n»— flr 
■to-r#* 
n +,% 
77%—’% 
2ft— to 
15ft— 'to* 
5ft +,Vr 
3to %. 
JIM +ljfc 1 
62ft— lii 
62 •?; 

2 • J* 

4% . 

53% — 1 

I4 m ^ 

■S£- +Jh - 

76ft— to 

27ft ■ r 
i%— w 
49 % + il 

49 +TT 
IS + to 
41% — ft 
27% + to 
19% + % 

Bto '**+ 

26% — ft, 

49 +V 

85 —HO 
«ft + **. 
Wft +'fti 
17ft— to 

rift +4* 
Sou— ift 
20ft— ft 

&*+£ 
1BH + %■ 
I3to . . 

2 + lY 


15ft NAFCO 100 63 15 
23% HBOt 140 U 7 


Ilto NBI 9 

17% NCH 72 37 n 
29 NCNB. 132 3* 8 
23 NCR 08 27 10 
?% NLInd JO 10 
27 NUI 232 80 8 
% MVP . 

Mft NWA 00 17 24 
22 Nalco 1JD S3 12 
23% Nashua 8 

10% MtfOnT 36 17 13 
rito NafOlsf X2D 7.1 27 
84ft NOW Pf X25 £0 

NatEdu 19 

NotPG* 208 XJ 7 

‘ 

Si! sL&d 

NfctodE 02 20 » 
106 XS U 
NJSempfXOO xi " 

NiSvcin 100 xi n 

NStand 00 17 25 
Mcrco *4 50 7 
NovPw 204 93 9 
NevPnf 1*0 110 
Nevppf JJ0 HLB 
NevPpf 105 11.1 
NEJTBEI X60 80 7 
NjRsc .230 B* 9 

Hevtaal ,*« i3 25 

SSSJ 

« StaKp 1 208 110 4 

» NtaMpf 3*0 110 
Mto NlaMpf X70 113 
n% NlaMPf 405 TXT 
25% NlaMPf 523 110 
Mft NlaMpf *7**23 
2D MaMpf 256»KU 
14% NtasSn lS«123 

2^ Nl?OR sS wS 17 

IS -V* 3 

5^6^ 300 40 , 


Is BSP a? id 

B% NSPpr 434 lot 


(Omthmedon Page 14) 


I 7 6% 

1 33% +n- 

I 12% +.ft, 

19ft - J 

to i 

Mto— to. 

22% + lifc 

26 + .fti 

J#-l • 

son 

85 —1 . 

i9%— nr 

'A --L- 

«+3fc 

Bn 

49% — 

u» • 

30% 

74% + U 

av> + % 

17% 

^S+’S:- 

ss-r 

^ Ti 

4f*-*vT 

SS“ T 

40 — ft.. 

3* + £ 

12ft + %- 

i3to :Z- 
13U *ia 

Mft-ti *T 

IBS 

*GJ+ jr* 
Uft + vl 0 

m- 

mi 

44ft ^ 

SS—lft.2 


im 


n . 

m&- ■ 




* wmp^-y . 


rVJfc. 


I 












' ' r *^.7. o- • • 


vs. 


** 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER II, 1985 



Page 13 






/ • 

AIsthomtoBuy 
Cobl&Business . 
FromSprecher 

Rnuen 

AARAU, Switzerland — 
Sprecfaer &_Schuh AG said 
; Thursday that Alsthom of 
; France would acquire its high- 
; and fflediom-voltage cable bnsi- 

- nesses and its industrial plant 
construction activities, as well 
as related subsidiaries abroad. 

[_ - The company gave no value 
[for the transaction. Sprcchcr £ 

| JfScbnh would continue to oper- 

\ ale in the low-voltage cables^ 

1 ; tor and retain its switches and 
' related businesses, its engtneer- 

- ing bureau Indumation AG and 
its computer software unit Reds 
Real Lime Software AG. 

Sprecfaer & Schuh had group 
sales of 5 40- million Swiss 
francs ($248.4 million) in 1984 
and made a profit of 2 mini™ . 

francs. The 1984 net profit was 

the company's first smcc 1578. 



:.V 





^SCMOffers 
To Buy Back 
: ^f ; £kcn Stock 


OHfpOed bp Oht Juiggr Trtm Ubpateha 

MONTREAL — . Mercantile 
Rank of acknowledged 

Thur sday that jt was^etricg funds 
- from other banks after what bank- 
ing industry sources said was a frig- 
nificantpidlrHritydqjpators.’ ' 

In a Statement-Mercantile R««ir 
said it had made “alternative fund- 
ing arrangements with a number of 
banks " because its usual sources of 
.funds had been affected.- 

It said it hadagreed to an audit 
of its operations as part' of the ar- 
rangements. 

_ Ine bank attributed its difficol- 
des to uncertainty created by last 
month’s faced dosings by the fed- 
eral government of two small Al- 
berta banks, Canadian Commer- 
cial Bank of Edmonton .and 
Nor thland Bank of Calgary. - • 

Banking industry sources in To- 
ronto said about h«if of deposits in. 
Mercantile coning up fa renewal 
had been canceled. Mercantile 
deals mainly in big ooporaie de- 
posits. 

The government became con- 
cerned about Mercantile two weeks 


ago -arid asked Canada’s big six 
-banks to help out, the bank sources 
said* They said, tire banks then 
channeled more , than 300 million 

- Canadian dollars ($2195 miffion) 
imo Mercantile through interbank- 
ing deposits. 

The failure of Canadian Com- 
mercial Bank and Northland Bank. 

- were the first in Canada since 1923. 

Reports of their financial diffi- 
culties caused uproar in Parliament 
-and the country's tim^y of state 
for finance, Barbara McDougall, 
called Tor a non-partisan forum for 
senior public officials to explain 
their' actions. . . . 

(Reuters, AP) 

■ Merger Possibility 

Earlier, Douglas Martin of The 
New York Times reported from To- 
ronto: 

The six-bank effort to aid Mer- 
cantile Bank could result in the 
merger of Canada's dghtfa-largest 
bank with another bank, or the 
apportioning of its assets among a 
group of banks, analysts suggest. 

Another possibility would be to 


COMPANY NOTES 


-•u.-rsi 


Reuters 








* NEW YORK — SCMC&p.an- 
- s' nounced on Thursday that its.' 
. ,, vr ~S- board had approved a plan to buy 
• 31 8*2 million shares of its own com- 

stock at $74 a share in the 
^t latest move to prevent Hanson' 
*5% Trust PLC, a Bntish-owned con- 
’..•f glomerate, from gaining control of 
Ftr.’ the company. . 

-V !’ • Chairman Paul EEcker said the 

: board’s action “was necessitated by 

the continuing efforts of Hanson to 
' frustrate the merger agreement be- 
tween SCM and Merrill Lynch 
which was entered into for the ben- 
’ Sic/-, efti of the SCM shareholders.” 

! Merrill Lynch an nonneed 
, Wednesday that it bad derided to 
exercise its option to buy two key 
SCM businesses under a provision 
that SCM had adopted as a defense 
linst unfriendly takeovers. Mer- 

Lynch leads an investor group 

— Tl~ fc^that includes senior members of 
'***' C*rat*j SCM management that bag agreed 

[ mak e a leverage buyout of SCM. 


-Mttlian 


V CJ-wh 


Fin a leveraged buyout a group, 
usually management, takes a public 


; company private by buying control 

... Baufewith borrowed money to be repaid 

a rv»_j W "rjfrom anticipated future revenue of 
the company. 

v .' Merrill Lynch said Wednesday 
i that it exercised the lockup op- 
' tion” to buy SCM's Durkec Foods 
and its chemical pigments business 
C for $430 million and -that the trans- 
action would be completed on Oct 
18. 

Hanson has filed suit to prevent ' 
.Merrill Lynch from buying the two 


BL PLC said its Anstin-Rover 
□nit will shut down most of its 
production fro-ra Oct 28 for a week 
due to lower in the fourth 

quarter. The move was largely due 
to the introduction of rite new mod- 
el year that created distorted Au- 
gust demand. 

British Standard Chartered Bmk 

will establish its second official 
branch in Pittm by the end of the 
year, the Hong Kong bank said. 
The branch w31 be located in 
Shenzhen. 

B o ro u gh s Corp. said it intro- 
duced a series of new software 
products and enhancemeate devel- 
oped specifically for its “A” series 
of mainframe computer systems. 

Cathay Pacific Airways will exer- 
cise an option to purchase a Boeing 
747-300 extended- upper-deck jum- 
bo jet for $90 million. 

Cbyder Cop. was condemned 
by the United Auto Workers presi- 
dent, Owen Bieber, who called the 
company’s proposed economic 
package “woefully inadequate.? 
The current contract expires at 
midnig ht Tuesday. 

Consolidated Goldfields PLC 
chairman Rudolph Agnew said the 
board remained confident in Cons- 
gold’s prosperity, after Coosgdd 
reported pretax profits rose 9 per- 
cent to £124.9 tmtli mi ($162.6 m2- 
Hon)on sales up 12 percental £1.1 8 
billion m the year ended in June, 


dynamic random access memory 
business, which has contributed 
less than S percent of corporate 
sales. Intel reported a third-quarter 
loss of 3 cents a share compared 
with a 60-cent profit a year earlier. 

International C om m ercial Bank 
of Qitna, privately held, has be- 
come the first Taiwan commercial 
bank to be granted an Australian 
merchant Hanking licens e , which 
will permit Cathay Finance Inter- 
national Ltd, a fully owned subsid- 
iary, to operate in Sydney. 

MCI Coamnnhafions Corp. said 
it has reached a settlement in an 
antitrust suit brought against GTE 
Terms were not disclosed. 

Texas Air Corp. increased to $22 
a share its bid far Frontier Airlines 
Stock, marking the second time the 
company has increased its offer in 
an attempt to beat out a coalition 
bf Frontier employees. 


' **. 


' JU 

CilllW 

■MO* 


J3CA Vulnerable to Rate Rise 


* 



- *£0 


*»!' 


k L:t 




■M. 


iVt". 




■SCM businesses fa $430 milHaL 
Noting that Hanson's offer of 
$75 a share depended on SCM and 
. --Merrill Lynch scrapping their le-. 

veraged-buyout agreement, Mr. 
- Bicker said “there is no assurance 
d-that Hanson will complete its pro- 
posed tender offer.” 

The SCM plan offers $10 in cash 
d $64 in preferred stock pear 
for np to 8.2 million shares. 
Meanwhile, a spokesman fa 
^.Hanson Trust said Merrill Lynch 
agreed during a court hearing 
^ Thursday not to exercise its option 
"£■ lb take ova the two businesses un- 
til Oct 21. 

Hanson already owns 32.1 per- 
.. cent of SCM’s slock. 


> Pern Renews 
^IMF Threat 

,v ' (Coutmaed from Page 11) . 

... c. ^jApctiomsi measures put in effect by 
.^he United States and other indus- 
- trial countries may be beginning to 

- ' choke off the flow of exports from 

• •» the Third Wold were cited Thnrs- 

- . J ;.‘ day by Worid Bank trials. 

. Anne O. Kruega, Wwld Bank 
'■ ' vice president for econanics and. 
‘ research, said that prospects fa 

. sustainable world growth had 

-■ worsened in the last year. 

.. - She died a “clouding of medi- 

um-term prospects,” due mainly to 
the unexpectedly large economic 
slowdown in the United States this 
year and to weaker performances 
in Europe and Asia. This, she said, 
... v . had led to a softening of demand 
fa imports. - - 

. • v Another facta, she added, may 

' be that “protectionist measures 

■’ ' . which have often been aimed al 

* developing country exports are be- 

* " l ^hning to bite." 

: r iThus, while UJ. imports from 
~ J .^vefoping countries in the first six 

months of 1985 were 2 percent be* 

. low the 1984 figures, imports from 

vff&y other major industrial countries 
, were up 14 pocent 

Mis. Kruega conceded at a news 
. « conference that the evidence tying 

this trend to protectionism was in- 
conclusive. But she stiU asserted 

* . that the trade data, gathered by the 

* - v ; Organization fa Econanic Coop- 
. eratiat and Development, pointed 

to protectionism as a factor: 

Hundreds of the 2,151 delegates 
to the joint meeting have lrft SeoiL 
Many delegates said the high point 
/ bf the conference came Tuesday 
. V, : with a proposal by the U-S. Trea- 
, istuy Secretary, Junes A. Baker 3d, 

.. ) for renewed lending by both com- 
: merrial and multilateral develop- 
/ meat hanW to the larger debtor 
countries. 

1 Refoiing to the Baker initiative. 
Mis. Krueger said there seemed to 
be a greater realization that pros- 
pects for recovery among the major 
Latin American debtbra were close- 
ly tied to an openmarkeL 


(Contfamed from Page 11) 
largest evo for a thrift institution, 
-Hmmdal Corp. was paying as 
much as a full percentage -pmnt 
above the competition to attract 
deposits. 

Mr. Knapp described his depar- 
ture following a two-week, >6.8- 
biUion ran on deposits last year as 
voluntary, but he was said to have 
cone under pressure from federal 
regtilatpiy authorities to step aside. 
He has not bowed out of the finan- 
cial arena, however. Be now heads 
an investment concern, Trafalgar 
Holdings LuL, based in Los Ange- 
les, that has participated as an in- 
vestor insome major takeover bat- 
tles. ■' ■_ 

.Financial Corp. is pursuing a 
more conservative- course cow. In 
the. 14 months since he succeeded 
Mr. Knapp, Mr. Popqoy has 
moved qmddy to cut costs. Mr. 
Popdoy, who isthe former head of 
- the Federal Home Loan Mortgage 
Corp., and was president and chief 
executive of American Savings be- 
fore it was acquired by Financial 
Corp. in 1983, has jettisoned the 
fleet of mne corporate jets and 600 
cars, and movea the cosmjany into 
modest offices in Irvine, California. 

. He has pared the company’s an- 
nual . operating budget by nearly 
$100 Jimlioai, to $330 milfion, and 
has slashed employment to 5^K)0 
from more than 8,000. . 

Fa all his effects,' Mr. Fopgoy, 
has not been able ro deal with some 
of Financial Cos p.'s basic prob- 
lems. It is stall vulnerable to a rise in 
interest rates because about 90 per- 
cent of 'American Savings' mort- 


gage assets still cany fixed rates, 
while about 85 percent of the inter- 
est it pays on deposits and borrow- 
ings change within a year a less. 
Moreover, the company receives no 
revenue at all on $1.8 billion in 
foreclosed property and other bad 
loans. 

The Federal Home Loan Bank 
Board has said it is pleased by Mr. 
Pa)doy , s conservative stewards ‘ 
of Financial Corp., and is not 
pressing him to meet the minimum 
net worm requirement of 4 percent. 
The company’s net worth, calculat- 
ed according to regulatory require- 
ments that , include subordinated 
debt phis equity, was $303 million 
at the end of June, a barely 1 
percent of its total liabilities.. 

Bank board officials declined to 
comment on. what plans, if any, 
exist for a bailout of Financial 
Corp. if rising ’interest rates force 
losses that wipe out its capital. 

Mr. Popejqy said the company 
was on schedule in meeting his goal 
of writing $3.5 billion in new meal- 
gages, split evenly between fixed 
and adjustable rates, in 1985. It 
originated $439 million in mort- 
gages in August, putting the year's 
total at $1.8 billion. It has also sold 
nearly 5200 million of its bad loans, 
and Mr. Popejovis striving to sell a 
total of $600 million by the end of 
the year. 

Mr. Popejoy, however, can ill af- 
ford to unload the property at too 
great a discount, since a series of 
fire sales could quickly use up the 
company’s huge loss reserves. They 
stood at $449.4 million at the end 
of August, down riightly from July. 



VI*-.'- \ 


m 

htituto Finan&ario Industriale 


SooMkpar Azioni 
Corporate offioaK 25. via Maranco. Torin. 
. CafiWttCKkUra iO4jOOOilXX10QOfcJfy 
Turin i«Qtoy ol ttw Campania* no. 3ZT. Be 


27 


RESOUmONS OF SHARBttLDERS' MEETING 

Tha ortErary generd meeting of dioreholdeni held in Torino on September 26, 
1985 approved fiurid stownenlrfcr the focal year ended March 31, 1985 
Wish report a net income of lire 3 2 . 78 7^^603- 

■fhe ihtxeWders resak^ to cfatribute a dividend of lire 100 fcr each common 
share red Lire 150 far each preferred dm except far the carman and 
preferred shante braed on the oocaaon of the coptal increase to Lire 1215 b#on 

recently effected. 

Dividend wi be payable on October 17, 1985. Paynwtf, net of withholding ka, 
mA be mode upon presentation af coupon no. 7 ot the non offices and branches 
. of payfaig agents Wedhereunder, 

The shor e hjden aho rei oKied 

— to increaK the legal reserve to an amount reaching the fifth <f the oopW 
stock, by dfaebting to k Lire 3#XM)QQfl00 from the axtraonSnory reserve, 
and, far the fend yecn 198586 - 198687 - 1987-88; 

—to fbc at sevesrfae number- of Board Memfaerw 

— k» appoint re deedors mesas. Giovanni AgnaE, Umberto Agneifi, Vichei 
Domd-Wea, Gfcnfuigr Gobite, Franzo Grande Stews, GovCrti Ncsi, Ho 
Teodorari Fobbrif 

— ta confimv thei ty point men t of the statutory auditor* co rnnift a B preseri t y in 
• tiwge; . / 

10 cortfrm toe cy p o irt n ie rtf of AiHw Andenan end Co. re independent 

. audton. 

Paying agenb: 

to the Nkxherfcmda Amoerdam B otter du m Bank MV. 

In the Federal B*pub6c. of Germany, C omment faorle. 

In 5 wi oariarid: Crfedt Sun and SodM de Banque Suin. 
fa France: Lamri fftres'ft Ge. 

In Great &itain: iazprd Brothcn and Co. and S.G. WarfavrQ and Co. Ltd. . 

In Baty: ol the teocEng Bonks.' - 

iv,;. . . THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


merge the bank with a trust a 
insurance company, as would be 
posable if proposed changes in 
Canada's financial laws take effect 

“They’re going to contain the 
problem themsdves," said Ter- 
rence Sbaunessy, a vice president 
of Merrill Lynch Canada Inc., 
about the big banks. “The pros- 
peels are gening greater that the 
Merc wiD merge with someone.” 

Mercantile, which is 24.2 percent 
owned by Citicorp of New York, 
has had liquidity problems, and 
there are doubts about the quality 
of hs loan portfolio. 

Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of 
Montreal, Canadian Imperial Bank 
of Commerce, Bank of Nova Sco- 
tia, Toronto Dominion Bank and 
National Bank of Canada are 
known to be trying to compensate 
fa commercial deposits that have 
been withdrawn from Mercantile; 

Citicorp is also believed to be 
involved in helping Mercantile over 
what most term a “liquidity crisis." 

Mercantile has total assets of 
about $4.4 billion, deposits of 
about $4 billion and six branches. 


£rom£lQ5 mfition and £1.05 billion 
previously. 

Font Motor Co. has declared a 
fourth-quarter dividend of 70 cents 
a share, a record fa any quarterly 
payment by Ford. It is 10 cents 
. higher than the third quarter. 

General Motors Corp. plans to 
modernize its Tonawanda, New 
York, engine plant operated by hs 
ChrvroJ et-Pontiac-Canada group 
by spading more than $340 mil- 
lion for a plant addition and retool- 
ing. 


Xerox Changes 
Crum Officers 

Los Angela Tima Soviet 

LOS ANGELES — Xerox 
Corp., which last week reported 
losses in its insurance opera- 
tions. has announced a shake- 
up in the management of its 
Crum & Forster Inc. subsidiaiy. 

It said Melvin Howard be- 
came chairman and chief execu- 
tive of Cram & Faster, suc- 
ceeding John K. Lundber^, who 
resigned. Sidney F. Wentz, 
Crum's president, was namwi 
chief operating officer. John J. 
McGioty, formerly of Xerox, is 
the new chief financial officer. 

James J-.Cutro, Crum’s se- 
nior executive vice president, 
became vice rharrman and chief 
administrative officer. 


Ford to Buy 
Farm Unit 
From Sperry 

The Associated Press 

DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. 
announced Thursday that it will 
buy the New Holland farm ma- 
chinery division of Speny Corp. for 
$330 million and the assumption of 

$1 10 mining in liabilities. 

Donald Petersen, Fad's chair- 
man, said New Holland would be 
merged with Fold’s agricultural 
operations, already among the Ing- 
est in the United States with annual 
sales of $125 billion. 

Speny wiD retain some of New 
Holland’s liabilities. Ford said, but 
h did not give any figure. 

Mr. Petersen said Fad planned 
no immediate changes at New Hol- 
land, incl udin g in its product line- 
up. Its primary products include 
harvesting equipment such as com- 
bines and balers. 

The combination, Mr. Petersen 
said, win allow Ford to “compete 
vigorously in all segments of the 
industry.” 

New Ho lland had revenue of 
$715 million in Sperry’s fiscal year, 
which ended March 31, or 12.6 per- 
cent of Sperry’s total revenue of 
55.69 million. New Holland had a 
pretax profit of $34 million in the 
fiscal year, down from $72 millio n. 

Speny said the sale of New Hol- 
land would result in Sperry record- 
ing an aftertax loss from discontin- 
ued operations of $220 million in 
its second quarter, which ended 
Sept. 30. Sperry earned $99.5 mil- 
lion in the same quarter a year ago. 

New Holland has plants in Penn- 
sylvania and Nebraska and has op- 
erations in 10 other countries. 

Rumors that the acquisition was 
being planned surfaced early in the 
year and again after Ford lost out 
to General Motors Corp. in its bid 
to buy Hughes Aircraft Co. 

Earlier this year, Sperry held 
talks with ITT Corp. and then Bur- 
roughs Cop. about possible merg- 
ers, bin no agreements resulted. 


Renault Workers Refuse 
To Join Striking Colleagues 


Rmeo 

PARIS — Workers at two Re- 
nault auto plants continued to 


strike as an attempt by the CGT, 
and behind it the French Commu- 
nist Party, to embarrass the Social- 
smke Thursday, but employees at ist government six months before 
the rest of the French state-owned national legislative elections, 
group's factories refused to join the The Communist Party left the 

walkout. government coalition in July 1984 


The two struck plants were in 
BtHancourt and Le Mass. But in a 
blow to the Communist-1 ed CGT 
union, which has tried without suc- 
cess to stage widespread industrial 
action agamst the ruling Socialist 
government's economic and indus- 
trial policies, workers al other Re- 
nault plants largely ignored calls to 
join the strike. 

“We consulted the workers, and 
the response is dear: They are not 
ready fa a test of strength with the 
Renault manag^m en?," said an of- 
ficial of the Socialist-leaning 
CFDT union at Renault's Flins 
plant, near Paris. 

The CGT is looking increasingly 
isolated as other unions attacked 
the action a called fa new, secret, 
strike rotes. 

The walkout, which began on 
Tuesday at Le Mans and spread 
Wednesday to the Billancourt 
plant just outside Paris, was 
prompted by Renault's decision to 
cut year-end bonuses as part of a 
general plan to reduce costs to stem 
the group's heavy losses. Renault's 
losses are at present running at 
about 1 billion French francs ($125 
million) a mo nth. 

Government officials view the 


In protest over the Socialists’ eco- 
nomic policies and .a derision to cut 
rhfgieindg of jobs in riling , mostly 
state-owned industries. 

Tbe CGT organized big demon- 
strations during a visit earlier this 
week to the western Brittany region 
by President Francois Mitterrand. 

■ Soviet Accord Signed 

Renault anno) meed Wednesday 
that it had signed a 470-nriHi on- 
franc contract to supply the Soviet 
Union with machinery for modern- 
izing a car plant near Moscow. The 
contract is part of an overall accord 
reached by Renault and the Soviet 
Trade Ministry in 1983 to re-equip 
the AZLK plant to produce a new 
medium-range Moskvitch. 


AMC Offering 
8.8% Finance . 

United Press International 

DETROIT —American Mo- 
tors Corp. has joined two other 
U.S. automakers in offering 
8.8-pereent retail financing, 
with its rate applicable to loans 
of 3d months or less on 1986 
Renault Alliance and Encore 
models sold through Nov. 20. 

AMC, which is 46-percent 
owned by Renault, said 
Wednesday that buyers would 
save $645 on a three-year, 
$8,500 loan, compared with the 
same amount financed at the 
standard 1325-percent me. It 
said 9.9-percent financing 
would be offered on loans of 
between 37 and 48 months. 

Fad Mota Co. also an- 
nounced Wednesday that it 
would offer 8. 8- percent financ- 
ing on selected 1985 and 1986 
cars and trucks through Nov. 
22. General Motors Corp. made 
a similar announcement. 


CasincClub 

G»me of Skill 
AMSTERDAM 

Oudfiijdi Voorburgwal 157-159 
Tflephonf 020 - 21 44 33 



ROTTERDAM^ 
Cooliingrl 205 
Telephone 010 • 13 S9 04 


NOTICE OF PREPAYMENT 

BANQUE NATIONALS DE PARIS 

US DLRS 250,000,000 
FLOATING RATE NOTES DUE 1989 

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with clause 
«REDEMPT10N AND PREPAYMEM».« Redemption*^) of the 
terms and conditions of the Notes, Banque NationaJe de 
Paris will prepay all of the outstanding Notes at their 
principal amount on November 12, 1985 when interest on 
the Notes will cease to accrue. 

Payment of principal will be made upon presentation and 
against surrender of the Notes with all unmatured Coupons 
attached at the principal office, of Banque Nationale de 
Paris in Paris 

or, of Banque Nationale de Paris (Luxembourg) S A in 
Luxembourg 

or, of Banque Nationale de Paris PLC in London 
or, at Banque Nationale de Paris in New-York City. 
Accrued interest due November 12, 1985 wilf be paid in the 
normal manner upon presentation and against surrender 
of Coupon N° 7 on or after November 12, 1985. 

By: Banque Nationale de Paris, Paris. 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 




LONDON’S ■ MOST ■ EXCLUSIVE - NEW • ADDRESS 


PARKSAINTJAMES 


REGENT’S ' PARK 1 NW8 


London's most exciting new luxury 10-storey 
development of apartments and penthouses is 
situated on exclusive Prince Albert Road directly 
overlooking Regent's Park dose to Avenue Road. 
The apartments, which are approached via a 
sumptuous marble entrance foyer with an 
unusual waterfeatuie, all have south-feeing balconies and 
ramie views across the prettiest of London's Royal Parks. 
■hDursecurity^orteiage, underground garaging and. superb 
specification throughout 

999 year leases 


75° o SOLD 







• ESTATE AG t NTS 

LASSMANS 

ESTABLISH EDICTS 

01-409 2020 


TELEX 8951182 



Hampton & Sons 

6 Arlington Street London SVtlA 1RB | 

01-4938222 

TELEX Z5341 




JOINT - SOLE • SELLING • AGENTS 


A LUXURY DEVELOPMENT BY GABLE HOUSE PROPERTIES pic 




South of France 
Provence 

Exclusive properties for sale 
in the beautiful 'VAR QUEST* 


Vineyards, farmhouses and villas fa sale in this unknown 
coastal and country part of Provence, rich in medieval 
villages and sunny vineyards. Write now for brochure and 
property Fist to: 

Mine Luce Ghittf 

Ghfttimar Consultants SJL ^ 

2256 Route de Bandol (A2=3 

83110 SANARY-SUR-M ER > 

France. Tet (94) 29.86.64. " 

Telex: 401890 F London office: phone 01-584 6045. 


Michigan 

Modem one-story232£50 sq. ft. 
building. 35' ceilings. Cranes. 

BINSWANGER MIDWEST 

1B45 Walnut Si., Philo.. PA 49103 - 215-M8-6000 
New Yortc, NY ■ Chicago, IL - AManta, GA • Charlotte, NC 
Rglpiqti, NC - Wnwfon-Satetn, NC • Columbia, SC 
Dates. TX *Oitendo, R.-Oxtort. MS 
London • Brussels * Rotterdam • Amsterdam • Paris 

COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL REAL ESTATE 
COUNSELING • MANAGEMENT - APPRAISALS 


^CALIFORNIAN 


SuVriidM»PrabHla 

Ocean View Estate 
497 acre eetofle with 244)00 eqit. 
midtoKe just completed. 9 bedroom 
Miilea with ocean view*, halHXUSH. 
private baths, fireplaces, every con- 
ceivable luxury inducting 9 whirlpool 
tuba.- Fabulous kitchen, indoor swim- 
ming pooL Heliport at frool door. 
Lam bom. Cmgw & Beam court 
included. 40 min. coastal dm* tram 
San Ftandsco. Airport 10 min. away. 
CboudeKty Famished. ImmeduiE oc- 

$1L25Q.000, Brochure 


HARR1GAN. WIEDENHUUER Co. 
344 Ke arn y Street 
San Ftmdna, CA 94146 
1*151 434-3600 


72 ACRE WATERFRONT RESORT 
Wd-Alfentic/ Eastern Shore 
Manna Resort complete with 
taeacn-lrort motel. One 
restaurants and <wrt»ii tor 
Lodge and eonterance laedties, 
swimming pools, 9-hole goV 
course, pro shop, umms courts 

and luB montane services tor the 
135 5kp manna. Set along Die 
scene Chesapeake Say amidst 
natural sand dunes and tofctofly 
pros, the area is known tor ns 

Outstanding sailing, boating and 
fishing. 

For c o mplete 
momsaor corned 

Paul j Goofra? 

Ul Vernon Manunann 

S390 On CaunMoM na 

Mama. VA 32180 USA 
Tef 1703) 55641B0 
Tact 4977T32 



Global Vision 

As the largest full service 
real estate firm in Texas 
and the southwestern U.S., 
we provide expertise in 
property acquisitions and 
management. 


Please note specific interest 
In request to 


HENRY 5. MILLER CO., 
REALTORS' 

David Do nosky, CEO 
Corporate Headquarters: 
2001 Bryan Tower 
Dallas, Texas 75201 
214/748-8171 Tetex 732459 
Tha DrMng Fotce in fe n as Real Estate 
Partners in Service with Grubb & DHs. 


* 


SJFr. 167,000 

Nax, Central Valais. 
Switzerland. 

Summer and winter resort. 

Sold directly by owner. 

3-room apartment hoIL living- 
room, 2 bedrooms, kitchen, 
bathroom, balcony. 

A. CORVASCE 

CH - 3961 Vercorin 
Phone: 004 1 /27/5S.82.82. 


- Our next rubric oa ■ 


REAL ESTATE 
in flie South 
of fraaee 

A Manaco 

will appear on Oet. 25. 

For mformotwa, pleax a xi o m . 

Dominique Bouvet, 
IaleraetinnilHenJd Tribune, 
18L, Ate. CWetedfrCuiille, 
92521 IS'ouUy Codex 
TeL (1) 747.12.6S. 
Tdex 613 595. 





An Offering: 

Central California coastline. IMO acres of ocean vieiv 
development p ropert y with successful golf course 

San Luis Bay Estates, midway between Los Angeles and 
San Francisco, involves LOGO acres of rolling hill lerrain with an 
approved master development plan for 646 residential units. 

50 lodging units, and other commercial and recreation sites. 

San Luis's successful 18-hole resort golf course is included 
in the offering. The property is dominated by open space and 
ocean views. The weather is superb. Exceptional opportunity , 
in this highly desirable coastal area. Offered for sale by 
Leucadia National Corporation forSC million. 


5mJuisBay. 


Qualified inquiries- fhoutdlx nude through Terracur Devefapmenl Properties. 
529 East South Temple. Salt Lake City. Utah 84m. 801-521-5400 


PARK 

AVENUE 

at 59th Street 

Now available lor sublease: 

Approx. 10,000 sq. ft. 

• Tower floor • Spectacular views 
■ Many capital improvements 

Carol Nelson. Exec. V.R 984-8080 Robin Gordon 984-8335 

BROKERS PROTECTED 
EDWARD 5 CORDON COMPANY INC 
405 LEXINGTON AVENUE NEW YORK NY 10174 



Own land in the great ^ 
American West 


Five or more 
acres of 
this land can 
be yours. 
Easy credit 
terms 
available 


Here's an outstanding oppor- 
tunity to acquire a sizable 
piece of America's ranchland 
at a very modest cost. 

Sangre de Cristo Ranches Inc., the land de- 
velopment subsidiary of Forbes Magazine, 
the American financial publication, is now 
offering for sale scenic ranchland in Colorado's 
Rocky Mountains. Spectacular land for a 
homesite and a lifetime of appreciation. 
Minimum 5-acre ranch sites starting at S4,500 
Send today for fact kit and full color brochure 


FORBES EUROPE 

SANGRE DE CR1ST0 RANCHES INC. 

P.O. BOX 86, DeoL HT 
London swiisur 
ENGLAND 




Name. 


Address . 


ft f ' 











Page 14 




IhursdajS 

Qosfc^: 

Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 MOHItl 

HUgbLow Stock 


Dtv. YUL PE 


(Continued from Page 12 ) 


47 35% 

69% S3 
41% 31'* 
4% 3 
56% 301* 
23% 194. 
TO% 8 
40% 32% 
aru 21% 
55% 48<6 
3s am 
4T4 27 
741 3 

9] 68% 


NSPwpf 406 9.9 
NSPwpf 7J» 107 
H wTei JO 

S" 131 U 8 
NwtPpf 136 102 
NwStW 

Norton £00 54 13 
Norwat IMS 7J « 
Nwstpt SJOelOS 
Novo 46e lit H 
Nucor .40 3 12 

NutrfS jOSI 
NYNEX M U I 


100Z 

4002 

TIB 

UB 

1721 

2 

52 

SS9 

214 

64 

182 

146 

13 

942 


46 46 

6SVt 65% 
32 31V, 

4 3% <2 
23% 331* 
IIS 11% 
3714 37 
TPu rat 
52 51* 

26% 2 5% 
44* 44 
3* 3* 

B0 79* 


46 —1 
65V. +1* 
31 Ch 

3 - * 
42*— * 
23 '4 

11 * + * 
37 
22* 

31*—* 

26 

44 — * 
3* 

B0 


4* I* 
28Vi 16 
35*14 23* 
14* 9* 

S4V2 41* 
111* B5* 
108* 81* 
24* 30* 
22% IB* 
57 4B* 

113 105% 

no* loo* 
20* 20 
3«i* 24* 
16* 12 
34 24* 

36 27* 

40% 45 
62* 45* 
28 26 
67* 52 
29* 22V. 
31* 23* 
?3> 56 
92* 76 
16* 107k 
70 55* 

21* 17 
111* 99* 
113 100 

76* 63". 
26* 21* 
9V. 7* 

36* 28* 
10* 5* 
17* 12 
33* 26* 
27 23* 

12* 7* 
28* 20 
12* B* 
9* 6* 

33* 24 
31* 19* 
36* 23* 

S i 13 
7 28* 

51* 38* 
14* 10* 


Ookfnd 
rw* of 

OcctPol £50 75 
OcdP wt 
OcdP Pf £16 42 
OcdP pf £60 £4 
OcdP pf 4.00 £9 
OcdP Of £50 10.9 
OcdPpf 200 115 
Occlppf 625 115 
OcdP of 1550 145 
Ocd Df 1462 1£7 
ODECO 150 49 
Ooden 150 6J 
OhloEd 158 115 
OhEdof 190 1£1 
OhEOpf 440 125 
OtiEdpt 7.7* 132 
OtlEQpl 736 135 
OhEQpf 57e £5 
OhEQpl 820 112 
OhEQpf £50 135 
OhEOpr 192 132 
OtiEQ pf 9.12 135 
OtiEof 1058 114 
OhfflMr AD 16 
OhP DfB 750 115 
OhPDfC 227 115 
OftPpfATOjOO 135 
OP Pol FI 400 t£4 
OhP DIE £48 117 
Okies E £00 8.7 
OkloGpt 50 95 
Olln 150 45 
Omncre 

OnelQa 50 65 
ONEOK 256 85 
OranRk £14 82 
Orange 531 S-9 
Or lone 76 11 
OrionP 

Orion pf 50 63 
Orion pf 275 95 
OutbUM 54 £9 
OvraTr 72 £1 
OvShip 50 13 
OwenC 1.40 42 
Owenlll 150 35 
Oxford M 15 


1315 I* I* 

4 16* 16 
10 3275 33* 32* 
15 13% 13* 

6 52* S3 
1 106 lOt, 1 
4 103*503 1 

4 23 23 

29 21 vm 
457 54% 53% 
755 107*107 1 

124 106* 106*1 
“ 274 20* 

321 30* 


1643 15 M% 


14 


Sttte 30 
502 34% 34% 
JfflSfctM* SM* 
lOOrSS* 56* 
200 26% 2b* 
1000x 62* 62 U. 
312 27* 27 

S,»» 38* 

SOX 70 70 

80r 91% 91% 
56 11% 11* 
100x66* M* 
11 20* 20* 
11OZ108 108 1 
100X112*112*1 
100x72* 72* 
10 1451 22* 22% 
500Z 89k 8% 

13 670 33* 32* 
389 6% 6 
3? 35 13* 13% 

10 65 29* 29 

ID 2046 26* 25* 
16 129 9 8% 

37 24% 24 
257 10* 10* 

6 7* 7* 
225 28* 28* 

B 13A 22* 21* 
13 154 34* 34 
12 2429 15% 15 
8 282 33* 33 

ID 1069 48* 47% 

27 61 12* 13* 


37* 23* 
47% 31* 
31* 16* 
23* 13* 
14% 11% 
20% 14* 
46% 34* 
41* 24* 
10 5* 

19% 13* 
17* 13% 
82% 61* 
15 9% 

31* 23* 
36 30* 

43* 3ft* 
34 * 26% 
39 32* 

20% 
8% 4 
4 1% 

21 13* 

41* 32* 

8 3* 

19* 13* 
IB* 7 
19 11* 

7* 4 

39* 28% 
21* 14* 
2* 1* 
16% II* 
23* 13% 
11 * 6 % 
1% s 

58* 43% 
55% 44* 
27* 23 
40% 31 
78% 60% 
29* 24* 
27* 21* 
74 58* 

28* 24 

* 8 * T 
»» 2 L 

50 32* 

SEKSS 

9* 7* 
16* 10% 
44 31 

28* 24* 
17 14 

5k 3^ 

24 12* 

55 34 
46% 28 
16* 13 
36* 27% 

56 40% 

11* *»% 

10% *™, 
116 92 

61 48% 

23% 15% 
95* 72* 
26% 13% 

££32 

25% 14* 
63* 38* 
34 21* 

26% 13* 
45* 29* 
90 61* 

14* 9* 

21 17 

17* 8* 
11% 7 

13* 7% 
28* 19* 

22 12 * 

36% 24% 
1) 10* 
21* 15% 
22% 14* 
21* 15% 
24* 19 
35* 30 
34* 29* 
38* 28 
34 23* 

41% 32% 
50% 42% 
25* 18* 
41% 31 
20* 14* 
36% 16* 
59* 50* 
15 B 
47% 35* 

2* 2 
8* 8 
24% 17% 
21% 16* 
10* 6* 

9 6% 
B* 4* 

53 41 

71 52* 

8% 3* 
17% 8* 
24* 13, 
22 11* 
22% 11% 
19* 9% 

3X* 10* 
29* 22% 
32* 24* 
29 30 

40* 31* 
48 35% 

20% 16 . 
21% 17* 
73* 38 
69 55% 

69* 52* 
2* 


PHH IjOO £9 
PPG 150 £7 
PSA 50 25 
PSA dpi 1.90 9 A 
PCCAS 154 115 
PoCGE 154 105 


PcLura 

PocRes 


j05o 5 


Pocftspf ZG0 1119 
PacSd 50 £1 
PocTolu £72 85 
PpcTIn 50 35 
POdfcp ZAO BJ 
PQdfpf 457 115 
PalnWb M £2 
PalnWpf£2S 85 
Palin Be 120 £5 
PanABk 2D 19 
PonAm 
PonAvrt 

PtvuJckn 50 15 
PanhEC 250 65 
PontPr 
Paprcft 501 


tt 

113 

.14* 

34% 

14% 

_ 

% 

in 

375 

41% 

43% 

13* 



ir 

TS 

24% 

24% 

74% 




9 

20* 

20 

20% 

+ 



13 

13% 

13% 

13% 



7 

IBM 

17% 

17% 

17% 



14 

386 

42% 

43% 

47* 

+ 


75 

am 

40% 

39* 

40 

+ 

* 

13 

196 

9% 

8% 

9 

+ 

% 

16 

18% 

18% 

18% 



in 

114 

13* 

12% 

17% 

— 


8 

1U8 

69% 

68% 

59% 

+ 

* 

7 

5 

11% 

11% 

11% 



a 

370 

79 

28* 

28% 

+ 

% 


a 

34% 

34* 

34% 

+ 

% 

>4 

383 

57 

27% 

76% 

fix 

27* 

26% 

— 

* 

33 

12 

35 

34% 

36% 

— 

* 

11 

114 

37 

37 

37 

+ 

% 


ana 

7% 

7% 

7% 




IX 

7% 

7% 

7% 



19 

44 

13% 

13% 

13% 

_ 

% 

11 

285 

35% 

34% 

35 

+ 

% 

£ 

553 

6 

5% 

5% 

— 

% 


Pnrdvti 

PorkEI 

PorkDrl 

ParKH 

Parle Pn 

PotPtrl 

PoyNP 

PoyCsti 


JOB 5 12 
M 19 
1.12 35 10 
021 £6 W 

54 S3 14 
.16 15 13 
______ 50 19 38 

SSt £.’1 

PaPL £56 WA 8 
PaPLpf 450 115 
PoPLpf 850 119 
PaPLdPf£42 IV 
PaPLdPr£90 11. 

SHI* 

Pemupf u 


857 IS* IB* .... 

155 7* TU 7* + * 
73 13* 13 13* + % 

84 4* 4% 4%—* 

198 32 31% 31% - % 

81 20* 20* 10% + % 
623 2% 2* 2% +* 
166 12* 12% 

413 14 13% 


12*—* 
13*— * 


72 * * 

1972 48* 47* 
2788 47* 46% 
298 24* 24* 






PorkEI 56 25 13 
Prmlon 1.12nl4J 6 
PoryDs 

Petrie 150 35 15 
PetRs 3720142 
PetRspf 157 95 
Plrinv 90o2a8 
pfiar 158 £3 14 
PltelpO 

Phdpor 5J» 95 
PtllbrS 54 15 19 
PflflnEI £20 155 5 
PtlllE pf <450 113 
PhllEpt 780 127 
PtlllE pf B75 1£7 
PhilE Pt 151 135 
PhllE pf 1452 145 
PhllEpt 133 133 
PhllE Dl 755 139 
PMlEPf 198 135 
PhilE Pf 1595 140 
PhllE PI 750 135 
PhllSuO 132 67 12 
PhllMr 400 55 9 
Phllpln 50 25 13 
PhllPtS 1J» 85 8 
PhlPt pt 1-0*5 42 
PhHVH 50 15 13 
PtodA 5 38 9 9 

Pier I 15 

Pllsbrv 172 35 14 
Pioneer 134 S3 5 
PtanrEI Me 5 
PitnvB 130 35 II 
PitnBpf £12 27 
Ptitstn 


23* 

__ 48% 

188 16* 16* 

4840 22 m 



To + % 


PtonPtn 
PlMRS 
Plontrn 
Plnvtaov 
Pfesev 
PogoPd 
Potarid 
Pondrs 
PopTol 
Portae 
PorfGE 1.90 103 


tl 

15% 


30 13 18 
.16b 15 12 

54e £2 13 
50 49 28 
180 28138 
50 3 33 

80 45 
55a 2B 27 

.... ... 7 

PorGpf 250 113 
PorG pf 450 1X3 
PorGpf 432 133 
PoHlCtl 156 44 
PohnEI £16 75 
Pal El Df 4JN 105 
PolEI Pt 423 87 
Preml s 36 Id 
Primrk £20 55 
PdmeC 

PrlmM 3 89 2 

ProctG £60 45 
PraRss 

Prefer 140 35 
PruRCn 
PniRi n 

PSvCol £00 10.1 
P5Cel Pf £10 105 
PSInd 180 11.1 
PSinpl IJH H5 
psmpf 180 ixi 

PSIn pf 7.15 145 
PSin Pf 954 14.1 
PSvNH 
PNHptB 
PNH pfC 
PNHpfD 
PNH pfE 
PNH PIF 

pSUJmS 6 £88 104 
PSvEG ZB4 103 
PSEGpf 488 115 
PSEGpf 4J0 lid 
PSEGPf 585 113 
PSEGpf £17 113 
PSEGpf 243 113 
PSEGpf 780 114 
PSEGpf 752 114 
PSEGpf 750 113 
Publicfc 


6426 45* 44* 

364 21* 21 
m 52 51% 

3293 36% 35* 
zm M% 14* 

150x 33 33 

110X9 55 

5DZ64 64 

20 18* 10* 

1 101 101 
63 10 9* _ 

400x 56* 56* 56* + * 

74 9% 9% 9*— % 

5md09 1 09 109 —1 
70x 58 38 58 —1 

B7 19% 19% 19% + * 
2849 73 72 72*— * 

73 23% 23* 23% 

1142 1Z* 12* 12* 

243 24* 24% 24% — * 
27 25* 25* 25* 

MO 29* 29* 29* + IB 
45 22* 22* 22* + * 
694 61* 60* 60*— 1 
508 23* 22% 23* + * 

6 14* 14* 14*— * 
490 39* 39% 39* + * 

1 79 79 79 +2* 

567 13* 13% 13* + » 

27 18% IB* IB*— * 
274 16* 16% 16*— * 
144 10* TO 10 
23 M B 8* + * 

2 19% 19% 19% — * 

1097 12* 12 12*— % 

1733 35* 35* 35% + * 
1551 15% 14% 14* 

27 17* 17* 17* 

97 16* 16* 16% 

195 18* 18% IB* + * 

3 23* 23% 23% — % 
39 33% 32* 33* + * 
44 32% 32* 32* 


14 

77 

35% 

35 

35% 

9 

389 29% 
MOz *0 
533 48% 

2B% 

s% 

29 - % 
39 — ft 
40%— % 

19 

154 

am 

24% 

24% + % 

B 

28 

39% 

39* 

39% + % 

12 

2157 

15% 

15% 

15% + % 

27 

130 

34* 

34 

34 — % 

15 

1426 

57 

56% 

57 + % 

22 

109 

13* 

13% 

13% + % 

13 

5 

185 

24 

38% 

2% 

a 

38% 

2 

8 

38% — % 
2 

0 

■ 

1011 

35 

19% 

20 

19% 

19% 

19% + % 
33 + % 

11 

352 

2400Z 

9 

9 

8% 

9 

9 

9 + % 


9% aSS^ .16 Id 10 

17 ' 11% PwrP* 1 J6 128 B 
ji% ii PimeHm .12 18 15 
31% 16% Purolot 541 £7 
10% 6* Prra 8 


8% 8% 

100X 49* 49* 
100 X 66 % 66 % 
380 7% 7* 

5 15* 15* 

3 22* 22* 
8 20 19% 

2 20 * 20 * 
10 17* 17* 
7 18* IB* 

!0flz 37 37. 

340x37* 5* 
11*44* 44 
3 19* 19* 

6 21 % 21 % 
200Z6S* 68* 

1000X 66% 66% 

10x 66 66 

51 2* 2* 

266 

61 12* 12* 
13 7* 7 
216 14* 14* 
1988 12* 12 
422 17* 16* 
320 6* 6* 


ffl* + % 

!-* 
15*— * 
22* 

19% 

20*— * 
17* 

IB* 

27* + * 
27* + * 
37 —1 
37*—* 
44* + * 
19* 

21% + % 
68* 

66% + % 
66 

2* 

12* 

7 — * 
14* 

12 — * 
17% + * 
6% + * 



OunkOE 150 25 15 
QucASO 80 12 19 

SSSSTr 150 52 S 
a* Rdf 2*a 7Jt 13 


1064 58* 57 57 - 

274 21* 21% 21% ■ 

274 6* 6 6 - 

152 2BV* 2B 28 - 

27 20* 20* 20* 



5b. 

HBs HWi Law 



4KV 26* R ChWck 158b £2 23 

33* 21* RlheAM 50 13 14 

7* 2* RvrOkn 18 

36* 28* ROW™ 1.12 35 7 

42* 2S* Rahtwi 150 65 

24* 5* vIRablns 

34* 16* RochG £20 115 5 

42* 31 RedlTl £44 65 9 

2D* 18% RckCirn 
41% 27% Roetwt 1.12 35 9 
73 55% RohmH 

TO 40 Rohr In 
27V* 13% RotnCcn 
18% SVi RollnE S 
12* B% Rollins 
3* 2 Roman 

T9 tl Roper 
47 24 Rarer 

11* 7* Romm 

64* 46 ROVID 
17 10* Rovlnts 

28* 19* Rubrnds 
36 14% RussBr 

20% 15* RusToe 
31% 20 HvanH 
30* 22 Pvders 
29 17* Rvlond 

20* B* Rvmer 
13* 11* Rvmer pfl.17 


50 


M 

IJOO 

M 

M 


13 11 
10 

15 H 
. 19 
56 4JI 17 

54 U 
1.12 25 21 
.12 15 44 
129a 55! 7 
16 
17 
11 

40 10 
17 11 
£2 II 
10 14 

90 S 


144 

16 

113 

219 

311 

63 

1068 

739 

290 

376 

120 

640 

12S 

63 

105 

2416 

1643 

1401 

55 

317 

81 

60 

13 

49r 

61 

2 

28 


67* 67% 

22% 32 

3 2* 

37* 32* 
26* 35* 
7* 7* 
20* 19* 
36* 35* 
IS* 18% 
35% 34* 
65* 65% 
SB 56* 
24% 24* 
10% 9% 

11* 11* 
2 2 
If* II* 
43* 42* 
7% 7* 

63 62* 

13% 13 
26% 26% 
17 16% 

19* IB* 
■n 26% 
27* ZPt* 
21 * 21 * 
16* 16* 
11* 11* 


67% — * 
23* +1 
3 + * 

32* 

26* fr % 
7* + * 
19*— * 
3S%— * 
18% 

35*- * 
65* + * 
57% — * 
24*— * 

TO* + * 
11* 

Z 

ll%— * 
43* 

7*— * 
62% — % 
13% — 'A 
26% + * 
16* 

TO* + * 
27* 

21% + % 
16* 

II* + * 


74% 

12* 

37% 

19 

21* 

20* 

12% 

2* 

38* 

34* 

35 

21 

11* 

8* 

35% 

20* 

9% 

12* 

44 
25* 
35* 
46* 
54* 
35* 
19* 
22% 
12* 

9* 

J3% 

28* 

52* 

45* 

14* 

33 

61* 

44* 

16* 

45 

13 

16* 

16* 

27* 

5* 

44* 

21* 

22% 

32* 

39* 

31* 

18* 

40% 

16* 

26* 

401k 

»% 

40 
8* 

15* 

19* 

41 
33* 
U 
26% 
14* 
71* 
79* 
41* 

15% 

43* 

19* 

32* 

40% 

21% 

X* 

49* 

35 

9* 

27* 

23* 

26% 

44 

31 

39* 

52* 

16* 

B% 

51* 

31 

17* 

18* 

B8W 

29< 

U* 

17* 

27* 

59 

31 

G* 

72* 

23* 

23* 

18* 

50* 

23* 

16% 

31* 

35* 

11* 

3* 

20% 

12% 

36* 

26 

33% 

14 
45% 
34* 
51* 
21% 

88* 

21* 

19* 

6b 

39 

11* 

56% 

110 * 

49* 

11* 

7% 

38* 

22 

Wt* 

17% 

22% 

39% 

65* 

40* 


1.TO 5.1 8 

52 £3 TO 
172 14 7 
1JB 105 

.16 5 15 

224 BJ 8 
dOellU to 
» 
15 17 


38% SCM £00 £8 17 
9* SL ind 22 15 10 
19* SFSTeC 50 £7 14 

15 Sabine JM 5 35 

16 Safer R y £4le135 
12% SfsdBs JO 15 15 

5* SfMSc 25 

1% ShidS wt 

23% StfKlnb AO 1J 22 
24% Sntewv 
22 Soon 
17* StJaLP 
9* SPaut 
3* vlSekmt 
24* SalllcM 
2D% SDieGe 
6% SJuonB 
8* SJuonR 
31 Sandr 
28 SAnltRt 154 11 13 
23* SFbSoP 140 £1 14 
30 SaraLoo 1.44 £3 13 
50* SaroL pf £7lB 72 
27* SotWel 1.40 4.1 IS 
15* Soul RE JO 1.1 48 
16* SavElP 150 11 7 

ID* SavE Pt IJB 115 
5 Savin 

7% Savin pf >50 I £2 
21% SCANA £16 B5 0 
33 ScfirPIo 158 £4 14 
33* Schlmta I JO 15 9 
8 SeiAtl 
22* Scoalnd 
a ScotFel 
29* ScottP 
12* SCPttys 
24% SooCnt 
10* Seectpf 156 r. . 
13* SeoCptBllO 13J 
13% SooC PfC £10 m 
17* SaoLnd 58 £6 
3* SeoCo 
35* Seoorm 
is* Senoui 
22% Sea (Air 
22* SeaiPw 
29% Scars 
23* SecPacs 154 
11% SetgLt 
26* SvcCDS 
11* Shaklee 

15* Shawln 

29* Shdir 

zi stMieio 

2SVt Shrwln 
5% StioehMi 
12 ShowM __ 

14* SlerPac 156 
26* Singer 50 ... 
20* Stnarpf 158 117 
12% Skyline 58 £7 73 
20% Slattery 
7* Stnlthln 
50* SmkB 


3066 72% 71* 


.12 14 16 


11 * 11 * 
30 29* 

15* 15% 
17% 17* 
17 16% 

9 B% 

l* in 

34% 33* 

649 33% 32% 
706 22* 22 
20* 20 
10* 10 
6* 6% 
. . 33* 32% 
1100 26* 23* 
160 8% B* 

3 II 11 
» 33* 33% 
94 24* 34 
1343 3Z* 32% 
46 44% 

50* 5M 
34 33% 

IB* 18* 


10 

27 

35 

49 
1571 

50 
12 


4 

34 

3 

641 


1701 

3 

2 

2S 


52 as 19% 




50e U 18 
32 4.1 

______ 2JS 43 10 

46* Smucfcr 148 U 17 
31% SnopOn 1.16 35 12 
12* Snyder £00 116 15 


31* Sorrat 
13* SonyCfl 

22% Son Lin 

32% Source 


£00 5.9 8 
.15e .9 14 
1 JO £9 24 
£30 SS 


18% SrcCPPf 250 105 
24* SoJerln 258 9J 11 
38* Soudwn 140 12 11 
24* SfeetBk 1J0 60 10 
6% SorlPS £13t3Z2 39 
21 SColEd £16 9.1 7 

17* South Co 244 103 6 
20 SolnGss 140 75 8 
30* SNET1 222 73 10 
24* SoUnCo 122 63 
24% Soutlnd 140 £2 10 
49* South! Pf 400 75 
11% So Roy .12 .9 14 

5* Soumrfc J4b £1 4 

47 5omk Pf £78*135 
16* SwAlrl .13 5 16 


11* SwIFor 
11* SwtGas 134 
U% SwBell 
19* SwEnr 
20 SwtPS 
tl* Sporton 
15* SpecfP 
34* Sperrv 


._ 75 7 

600 74 B 
52 24 10 
148 80 9 
52 34356 


_ 102 40 9 

30* Sprinoi 152 44 15 
35* SfluarD 144 53 10 


136 £6 IB 
J!0 4J 21 
56 £9 11 
32 19 11 

I 
8 


45* Sautbb 
17% Staley 
17% SIB Put 
iflfc SIMotr __ 

39* Stt/OOh 240 4.7 
9% St PacCs 50 15 _ 
12* Standex 52 £2 10 
23* StanWk U4 34 11 
26* Starrelt 108 30 10 
9% StaM5e 130al15 
2* Sleoaa .12 40 
15* SterxtU 36 30 1 
9* StrtBcp .76 46 
25% StorlDc 130 33 15 
15* StevnJ 130 44 
25* SlwWrn 158 63 18 
10 SlkVCPflJKl 74 
37* StaneW 140 34 
24 SlancC 40 £3 
34% SlopSJm 1.10 33 
16* StarEP 1.93 55 
1* viSlurT 

S hirer 50 5 

StrtMtn JBe 44 
StrWRt 40 45 32 


58 

6% Sun El 
43* Sun Co 230 
90% SunCpf £25 
40 Sundstr 140 
5* SunMn 

3i 

14* SupVal s 
26* SupMkt 58 
12* Swank 5B 
16* Sybron 10B 
30* Svbrnpf 250 
45% Syntax 1.92 
30% Sysco £40 



_ 11% lib 

55 6* 6* 
10 72* 12U 

109 24% 24* 
631 49 48* 

2611 34* 33* 
177 II* 11* 
514 32* 32% 
941 55 54% 

472 41% 41* 
77 13 12* 

113 33* a 
14 12% 12* 
14 15* 15% 
51 15* 15% 
308 IB* 18* 
145 4* 4* 

1414 41% 41* 

12 17* 17 

300 34% 37% 
208 25 24% 

2378 32% 31* 
672 26* 25* 
31 17* 17* 

123 38% 37* 
65 13* 13* 
BA 20* 20* 

608 39* 39* 
184 25 23% 

107 34% 34* 
172V 8* B 

25 13* 13* 

56 17* 17% 
427 35* 34* 

24 32% 32* 

117 13% 13 

1 24% 24% 
B1 7% 7* 
497 65* 64* 
IB 76% 75* 
34* 34* 
__ 1«% 14* 
B46 34* 33* 
7027 16% 16* 

124 31* 30* 

30 37 36* 

5 22% 22* 
10 27 26% 

702 45 44% 

118 30* 39* 
16 6* 6* 

962 23% 23* 
ms if* 19 * 
35 24* 23% 
166 37* 37 
19 27* 27 
545 37 ]6% 

106 B 52* 
542 13* 13* 
330 7* 7* 

13 49* 49 
1B4 24* 24* 
650 12* 12 

16* 16* 
- 76* 

26 

_ _ 23* 

23 14* 14% 
231 21% 20% 
6562 49* 48% 
101 38* 37% 
267 36% 35* 
1187 68* 67* 

88 m s 29 

89 11* 19* 
75 11% 10* 

2609 46* 45% 
348 16 15* 

173 14 13* 

,3! a* ZB* 


i i* 

i 9 K 15 

’a % 

34* 34* 
9% 9* 
899 51% 50* 
1 104* 104* 
228 44% — 

% * 

584 21* 

77 41% 

236 13 
121 22* 22* 
6 35* 35* 
m *5% 65 
130 38* 37% 


381 

58 


79 _ 
533 77 
501 — 
257 






50% 30* TDK J7e J 13 37* 37* 37* + * 
36* 37* TECO £36 75 9 90 31% 31 31% + * 

12* 7* TGIF 11 60 B* 7* 7* 

21* 12% TNP 15 U f <7 TO* 18* IB* 

26* IB* TRE 100 «J 16 76 25* 24% 25* + % 

83* 66* TRW £00 38 11 55S9 80 79% 79*— % 

178*151 TRW pf 440 25 3 174% 174% 174%^ — 1% 

6% 1* vlTacBt 37 1* 1* 1* + * 

87% 52* TaftBrd 1.16 Id 15 52 M* 75% 76 + * 

71* 12* Talley .156 J> 13 2?4 17% 16% 17 - * 

23* 15 TallBY ptl 00 5.1 I 19* 19* 19* 

81 56* Tombed 320 42 14 Z87 75% 74% W% + * 

36 23% Tandy 16-2417 34* 33% 33* + * 

15% 12* TndVCft _ 14 32 14% 14* 14*— * 

68% 47% Tektrnx 100 £1 13 681 48* 47% 47% + % 

5% 2* Telcom B 8 3 2* 2*—* 

288 227 Teldvn 9 B0 2381* 235% 236 +1 

74 13* Telrate J2 23 19 155 14 13* 14 

48% 30% Telex 11 697 43* 42% 43% + * 

40% 30% Tempin 44 17 9 15 OTh 37% 3TOi— % 

45% 33* TenitoD £92 7J 13 3411 38* 37* 37*— * 

32% 17% Terdyn 9 661 IB 17* ]7%— * 

15 8% Tesoro M .40 185 10* 9% 10 — * 

27* 20% Tesor pf £16 102 14 21* 21% 21% 

40% 32* Texaco 300 BJ 32 1B27 36* 36* 36% — * 

38* 29* TxABc 152 50 B 48 29* 28% 29 — * 

44% 28% Texan 154 if 6 1409 29% TOW ffl%— f* 

39 20% TexEst 2L20 od 9 445 34* 33% 34 + * 

58% 52 TxETpf 6048105 102 57 56* 56*—* 

34% 25 Tex Ind 0Ob£7 11 IB 29% 29 29* + * 

133* B6% Tex Inst 200 £3 12 1022 89* 87* 89% +1 


Company Results 

Revanue ana proflis or lasso, fn mliiltm. ore In local 
cvrrancm unfeu ofMnWsa l nd rented. 


(Continued from Page 17 ) 


General Electric 

3rd Quor. I9B5 1984 

Revenue — sjaa 622a. 

Net Inc. 5750 5640 

Per Share 106 Ij4 

9 Months IMS 19M 

Revenue 1956a 1907a 

gel Inc. - — 1570. 143a 

Per Share £68 £59 

Intel 

M Dear. 9985 I9M 

Hryetwe — . 31V 4315 

Net Inc. (a)J4 700 

Per Share — OlM 

9 Months IMS 1984 

Revenue 1040 1010. 

Net Inc 165 1730 

Per Share — 014 150 

o: tosa . fWnen /netuc# tax 
credit at S2j million 


9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 4590 4^30 

Oaer net 277J uses 

Oner Share— 355 £96 

1984 f-monffl net etc man 
loss at SMS million from dts- 
eonNmmt operations. 

Rim National 
W Qaar. 1985 1984 

Net Inc 8.15 6J9 

Per Shore JJA 1.13 

9 Month* 1985 1984 

Net Inc 217 204 

Per Share 196 14a 

Pvnanffi nef* fnctode pains at 
mi million m sztsssm are- 
vision tor losses at 02 mil- 
lion vs fU minion and e har- 
oeaHs of 03 million vs SS 
million. 


Levi-5 trouts 


3rd Qaar. 
Revenue - 
net inc - 

9 Months 
Revenue -. 
Net Inc — 


1985 

7700 

350 

1985 

1,900 

015 


Mead 

3rd Qaar. T98S 

Revenue 9095 

Net Inc 235 

Per snare — 0J4 

9 Months 1985 

•nue iioa. 

Net Inc BOJ 

Par Snare 209 


1984 

7180 

2£5 

198* 

1.910 

39J 


1984 

708.1 

*£2 

156 

1981 

2090 

115.9 

£78 


Teledyne 


3rd Qaar. 

Revenue 

Net Inc 

Per Shore— 

9 Months 

Revenue __ 

Net inc - 

Per Share 


1985 198* 

7945 8530 

99 2 975 

051 U3 
1985 1984 

2540 2530 

4470 4884 

3824 2906 


Owens-Coralna Fiber. 
3rd Quor. 1903 me 

Revenue 8 704 8062 

Net Inc — _ 3090 34J9 

Per Share — lji 1.T8 
9Months 1988 lMe 

Revenue £340. 2068 

Net Inc 87.11 8033 

Per Share— 304 £73 

I98S nets Include gerfn at SS 
million ana ctnroe o/S2mll- 

lion In auarter and gain of a* 

million ana charae of S2 mil- 
Hon m 9 mourns. 

Owens-Illinois 
3rd near. 198s 1994 

Revenue 9710 8904 

Nel Inc 483 307 

Par Share 141 lji 

9 Moatl n 1985 1904 

Revenue __ 2J80. 2540. 

Net Inc — — 1140 903 

Per Share— 305 £43 

Raytheon 
3rd Ouor. 7 MS TOM 

Revenue 1540 1510. 

Net Inc 903 SS.9 

Per Share 1,17 101 


Ufd Telecomm. 

M Quor. I9» 19B4 

Revenue B2U 735.1 

Md inc SOU 8£9B 

Per Share— 051 001 

9 Months 1985 1904 

Revenue 2080 £100 

Net me 16105 19598 

Per Share 1.71 204 

1084 nets axetode Bain* of 
SI 1 .7 million In auarter anttot 
SI 0.9 million ht9 months from 
discontinued ad oratio ns. 


Walgreen 

4tn Qaar. 1985 19M 

Revenue— 7780 ABU 

Net Inc 2*08 260* 

Par Share 052 042 

Year 1988 TOM 

Revenue £140 £740 

Net Inc - 94.17 as. 45 

Per Share 153 109 

Waiter (Jim) 

4th Qaar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 4270 6567 

Net Inc 3853 3X72 

Per Share 175 155 

year 1985 m* 

Revenue £290 £290 

Net inc 11107 9049 

Per Share— 5.11 645 

Nets include arovlstam of 
57J million vs 560 million. 


1! Month 
H Hah Low Stock 


4% 

21* 

31% 

4* 

99% 

11* 

23 

43% 

19% 


24 

ID* 

61% 

23b 

58* 

57% 

9% 
11% 
39* 
ZT% 
21 U, 
29* 
3Db 
38 
33* 
20% 
18* 
30 
53% 
26% 
17% 
a 

17% 

■41V, 

28b 

23 

16 

34* 

32% 

71* 

14 

21* 

57% 

66* 

25% 

13* 

102 

13% 

47* 

61* 

23% 

17* 

49b 

58* 

27% 

28* 

34* 

49* 

a 

18% 

28* 

16* 

43% 

16* 

20% 

41 

17% 


00 50 
100 10 


106 


1 Teat lot 

14* TtxOGS -IB U> 
25* Tex Util 252 90 

2 Text) in 

31 Textron 100 60 

r Thock 

TrurmE s _ 

30* Thru Bet 106 40 
13* Thamln 58b 3.9 
13* TtimMed 17 
is ThrirtY 50 ii 
13% TMwIr 
S% Ttaerin 
40 Time 
14% nmpfx 
36* TlmeM _. 

46 Timken TJOo 40 
4% Titan 

8* Tiionpf 100 100 
26* Todsnp 102 
15% Tokhoa A 58 
16* TolEdls 252 
24% TolEdpf 3J2 
23* TolEd pt 3J5 
77* TolEd Pt 357 
37* TolEd Pt *2B 
15% TolEd pt £36 _ 
14* TolEd of £21 l£6 
B* Tonkas .10 5 

26 ToatRol 58b 10 
14b Trchm s 50 30 
10% ToroCo 50 20 
1 Tosco 
7% Towte 
25% TovRUl 
17 Train 
8* TWA 

13 TWA of £25 145 
18* TWA OfB £25 6J 
24% Tronsm 158 60 
T ranine £23 105 
UU TARlly 100 80 
17% TrnCda nl.12 60 
44 Transco Zldb 40 
S3 Tmscpf 307 65 
19* Tran Ex 206 115 
5* Transcn 
82 TrGpf 1002 105 

’■% TTO&8 1 “* “ 
29* Tnonwy 100 40 
28b Trnwta 58 10 
12b TwtdwtA 
15* Twldpf 100 109 
34* Travlsr £04 50 
50* Travpt 4.16 80 
22* Tricon 
7% Trtalns 
22% TrtaPc 
29* Tribune 
5% Trtcn 
13* Trlntv 

14% TrltE no .... _ 
9% TrilE Pt 1.10 6 7 
31% TUC6EP £00 7.7 
9% Tultex 58 £3 
16 TwinDs 08 S0 
30 TvcaLb 00 22 
13* Tylers 50 20 


841 3* 

1216435 18 
6 1611 27b 
189 3 
10 863 44% 
90 
25 
15 
IB 
10 


20% 

34% 

17* 


12 


194 15b 
307 19V. 


742 7* 

17 2178 56% 
16 763 19 

13 Ml 44% 
21 1 » 

92 



02 10 


358B135 
JO 0 
100 30 
04 10 
_2» 32 
50 20 
.10b 0 


13 3 4B% 

II 1089 70b 

10 72 17% 

611 

10 

25 476 

11 372 
1210 23* 

57 ir 
120 ‘ 

14 1365 

62 71* 

*7 3U 

10 766 47*, 

274 20% 

5 

,2 

12 VSS 

118 19% 
13 17* 
9 7048 42% 
46 51% 
]» 25% 
6 195 75% 

ID 111 33* 
16 157B 44% 

13 41 4% 

306 13* 

27 1367 29* 
235 17 

9 1402 38b 

13 64 14% 

10 6 18 * 

11 U1 36% 

11 135 14* 


3* 

17* 

27 

2% 

44* 

9 

20* 

34% 

17% 

15 

18% 

15* 

7 

55* 

18b 

44* 

45b 

5b 

10 

29* 

17 

19% 

28b 

29* 

36% 

02* 

18% 

17* 

21* 

48% 

19% 

17% 

3* 

7% 

32% 

17* 

22b 

15b 

33* 

27* 

20% 

11% 

17% 

49% 

58* 

20* 

4 

3% 

44% 

37 

19* 

17* 

40% 


24% 

33% 

43% 

4b 

12% 

3B 

16 

37% 

14b 

IB* 

36% 

Mb 


,** + !? 

27 — * 
2% — • % 

44% 4- % 
9 — b 
20% + * 
34% —■ Vi 
17* + % 
15 — b 

19* + % 
IS* 

7% + * 
56% +1% 
IB*— % 
44%— b 
45%— % 
5*— b 
10 

29% 

17b — * 
19% — * 
2Bb 

2B%— b 
26H— b 
32% + * 
18%— * 
17*— b 
22* +1* 
48% + % 
19*— * 
17% — b 
3% + * 
7%— b 
33 + b 

IT* 1- * 
22b— * 
15% + * 
XI* 

28 t- b 
21* + * 
12 + * 
17*— * 
■mi— * 
58*— * 
20* 

6b— * 
99 + * 

95 
10* 

64* 

37 — b 
19% — % 
17* 

41 — % 

51% 

25*— * 
34% — 1 
33%+ b 
44* + * 
4b 

13 — * 

29 + * 

16% + b 
SB — * 
14% + * 
18*— b 
36% 

14* 


u 


100 £0112 
£40 70 

16 

.U» 0 17 
2JM 90 II 


44* 

77* 


59* 37b UAL 
36* 26b UALPf 
17% 9% UCCEL 

30 23% UDCn 

24% 18* UGI 

11% 0% UNC Res 

14 10b URS 00 35 » 

21% USFG £20 60 47 

26% USGS 158 40 6 

.. _ 48* USG of 100 £7 

19% 12% UnIFrsI 00 10 12 

110% B2 UnINV £72« £5 11 

41% 33b UCamp 104 45 13 

57% 32% UnCarb £40 £4 13 

6* 4% unlanC 
19% 13% unElec 104 104 6 

40 X UnElpf 450 114 

34% 26% UnEI PfMLOO 115 
72 52* UEIOfL 000 114 

32 20% llnEI Pf £98 11 J 

20* 15 UnEI Pt £13 100 

26% 21% UnEI pf £72 105 

72 52* UEI pfH 800 11 J 

24 22 UnExa n 

52% 37b UnPaC 100 3d tl 

115* 87% UnPcpt 725 60 

70 50 Unryt pf 800 1£1 

5% 3 UnltDr 

23% TOb UnBmd 11 

33% 17b UCfeTVs .10 J 49 

42% 22% UnEnrg 24S 5J 32 

23* 13b UMIum W U 4> 

30% 23* Ulllupf £97 13-7 

19 13 UlllUPr £20 129 

31% 23 Ulllupf 400 130 
14% 10% Uillu Pt 1.90 113 

25 15% Unltlnd 00 10 8 

32* 20% UJerB s 1.16 30 11 

17* II* UtdMM 

3% 2 UPkMn 
X* 26% UfiairG 
8* 5b USKom 
42* 31* US Loos 
40b 24b USShOB 
X 22b uSSteel _ 

56* 49% USSH Pf 740*139 
S3 24% USStltf £25 70 

39% 33J"4 USTob 102 

84% 62% US West 502 

13 6% UnSIcfc 

45 X UnTech 140 
39b 31b UTchpf £55 
25 20% UnlTei 1.92 

31 25 unlT2of 1.50 

21 75b UWR 108 

32* 21 Unitrde 
20* 16 Unhrar 
X 21% UnlvFd 
23% 18* UnLeaf 
53 26* Unocal 

122% 52% Upjohn 

43 29% USLIFE 104 £0 10 

10% 9 UsIleFd SJSoS&J 
26% 21 UtOPL £32 90 13 
27% 22% UtPLnf 200 I1J) 

28* 22% UtPLPf 2J0 117 
23% 19 UtPLPf £36 117 
X 16* UtPLPf £04 117 
27 17% UtillCO 140b 64 7 

23 19 UtllC0pf244 tlj 

25* 30% UWCopf 612 120 


.12 


00 15 9 
.92 24 14 
100 £9 19 


50 10 
7j 8 
11 

30 9 
70 

90 8 
50 

7 2 II 
S 17 
40 7 

.... 64 10 
100 66 B 
IX 62 7 
210 £5 21 


1007 49* 48* 49b + % 

131 31 X* 30% + * 

224 14% 14% 14% — b 

54 24* 24* 24* 9 * 

149 Zt 21* 21* 

120 10% TO I0%— % 

IB 11* 11% 11% 

802 33* 32* 33* + % 

306 37% 37% 37* + b 

2 66 * 66 * 66 *— * 
2 14% 14% 14% + * 
11 >07% 707*107%— * 
680 36* 36b 36%— * 
1855 53% 53b 53* +1 
103 5* 5% 5% — * 

840 17* 17* 17%—* 
7901 39* 38* 39*— % 
46 33% 33% 33% + % 

700X TO 49b TO + % 

82 77 26* 26* 

26 19% 19% 19% 

1 26 26 X 

8902 48* 67 68* +1* 

7X 23% 23% 23% — * 
1051 46% 46% 46% 

X 106b 105% 106b + * 
24ta 66 65 56 +1 

27 3 3 3 

4 22% 22* 2Z% + b 
210 29% 29* 29% 

505 42* 41% 41%— * 
374 23b 23 23* + * 

13 28% 28* 28% 4- * 
30ta 17 16% 17 

2 29* 29* 29* + % 
13 14b 14b Mb 

31 20b m>& 70V. 

101 32b 31% 32b + * 
335 IS* 14% IS* 

13 3* 3* 3* 

514 29% 28% 29* + b 
668 9* 5* 5% 


37% 

.17 

32 


% 

37% 

37% 

37% 



31% 

30% 

31 



% 

53% 

53% 

53% 



* 

31 

3C% 

30% 

mm 

% 

30% 

30% 

30% 

+ 

te 

76% 

75% 

76 



% 

7% 

7% 

7% 

+ 

% 

37 

36* 

36% 


% 

33 

32% 

37% 



Vt 

21* 

20* 

71% 

♦ 

* 

26 

26 

26 

+ 

% 


X 

00 

1.12 


74 77% 17% 77% 

114 22 21% 21% 

48 28 19% 19% 

122 26 25* 25*— % 

256 21% 21* 21% + » 

SIX 28* 2B 28b — * 

1335 113b 111b 112% +1% 
419 35b 34% 35* + b 
77 tot, 70 1016 + v, 

166 23% 23* 23% + * 

2 25% 25% 25% — * 
35 26% Mb 26* — * 

4 ZZ 27% 22 + b 

IB 19b 18% 19 — % 
79 22* 21% 21% — % 

3 21% 21* 21%— % 
2 34b 34b 34b— b 


41% 

14% 

25% 

3% 

2Bb 

4% 

12b 

42% 

12* 

25% 

12 

11% 

13* 

55 

73* 

48 

27% 

56% 

85 


22% VF Coni 
5% Valero 
u valsf pf 
2b Valeyin 
19 Van Dm 
2b Varco 
6b Varco pf 
22* Vartan 
9% Vara 
13 Veeco 
3% Vendo 
9% VestSe 
TO Vestmn 
29% Viacom 
58 VoEP Pt 
S3 VoEP pt 
13* VtShCVS 
33* Vonuxt 
66* VuIcnM 


1.12 20 10 
£44 140 
100 43 7 


26 1.1 IS 
.40 £3 34 
00 £9 11 

1X0110 21 

0B .9 24 
702 110 
7 X 113 _ 

24 

2X 30 13 


233 40 . 
547 10% 
1 23% 
3 2* 
10 23b 
X 4% 
7 11% 
335 22% 
32 12b 
236 14b 
65 10% 
9 10% 
B25 13* 
3980 54 
iqoor 70 
2001 64 
SB 24% 

J 

21 83* 


39b 40 + b 

10* 10*— 'A 
23% 23% 

2* 2* 

23 23b + * 

4b 4b— * 
11% 11% — b 
22 * 22 % 

12 12* 

13b 14 + * 

10b 10b— % 
10% 10% 4 * 
13 13* 

51 53*+ * 

70 70 

63 64 —I 

24% 24% 

52* 52% — % 
82* 83* + % 


W 


U 16 
' 7 


31* 25% WICOR £42 80 9 

49 37* Wab Rot 450 10.9 

38% 25* Wadiov IX £2 9 

23b 16* WockM 00 £7 

10% 6b Woinoc 

2Hb 18% WIMrts 

IX M WIMrt pf 

30b 78% Walgm s JO 22 IS 
25% 17% WkHR3Ol0O 
39% 29 WalCS v 05 _ 

39b 26% WaHJm 100 42 
9% 7* WaltJ pf 7X0 305 

26% 17% Womco 08 30 13 
35% 1B% WmCm 
46* X* WamrL L4B 40 12 
23* 17* Washes 706 05 8 
Xb 19% WshNat IX 43 7 
24* 17% WShWt 208 lid 7 
66% 40% Waste 02 10 10 
28% Mb WatkJn J6 10 10 
12% 8b WorGos 20 13 9 
26 19* WovG of IX 70 

12* 4 WranU 
23% 16* WebfeD X 10 9 
»* 19* WelnR n 2000*012 
33* X WelsM S 
62b 41% WellsF 200 4d 7 
Xb 41 WelFPt 4J0e9J 
Xb 24 WelFM £00 lid 10 
19* 12 Wendvs 01 10 15 
27b 17 WesiCo 08 £0 13 
45* 35* WPenP Pt»50 105 
45 35 WstPlF 120 SJ U 

T4ta 9% WsWIT g IX 27 
8 Jb WnAJrL 4 

7% % WtAIrwt 

23% 10% WAIT Pf 2X 80 
8* '2* WCNA 
51 27* WCN A Pf 7J5 2L9 

Mb 5b wunlon 

32 24% WnUnpt 
S3 26 wnUpfC 

Sb 7b WnU PtS 
14% 4% WnU PfE 
47 M WUTIpf 
17% 5* WUTI pfA 

39% 34 WstgE IX 30 12 
41% 34% Westvc 1-32 15 10 
34 25% Weyerft 1 JO 49 72 

44% 35% Wevrpf £80 72 
51% 43% Weyrnr 450 
22 6% vlWhPIt 

X 14* vlWPIf ptB 
32* TO* viWhPIl Pf 
50% 37* WhhlPl £00 

32% 25* White IX 
49b 46% WhIIC pf ADD 
45* 36% WhltC pfCLf® 

34% 19b wh Kelli 
X* IMS IMiinak X 
12% 6% WletHOt 
15* 0 wilFrdn 

13% 7* wnicxG .10 

33 26b William IX 
5* 2 WlltnEI 
7% FV wilsnro .10 

38% 30 winDIx 1J4 
X* 8* Wbtnog 20 
8% 5* Winner 

8b 3% Winter J 
40* 30b W1SCEP 208 
92 75% WISE Pt £«0 

80* 63b WliE pf 7J5 
40% X* WiscPL £76 
39b 29% WIscPS 206 
40* 30* Wltoo IX 
14b 9* WolvrW 2A 

50* 33% Wolwth 2X 
4* 2% WrldAT 

84% 54* Wrtalv 108a £3 14 
4% 3% Wurltzr 

1» 10% WvleLb 0 10 E 

23% 15* Wynns X £7 B 


92 


45 9 

5.1 
6J 
70 

10 
£9 10 
36 

71 
.9 S 
40 75 

10 

II 13 
£1 8 
217 

70 B 

»J 

92 

70 9 

70 9 
40 9 
1.9 

4.1 10 


5 28* 20 28* t- * 

182 41* 41* 41* 

33S 31% 30% 31% + % 
118 22% 22b 22* + % 
118 6% 6* 6% 

5481 26* 2Sb 26b + % 

2 114 112 114 +5 

2219 23’i 22% 231k + % 
115 22% 2Zb 22% 

* 35 34% 35 + b 

716 33b 32% 33b + % 

lDfc 9* 9* 9* 

13 23b 22% 23b + % 

1734 34 37* 33% + % 

4884 34% 35% 36% + % 

287 |9% J?b 19*— * 
72 25b 24* 25* + * 
55 21% 71* 21* 

451 57% 56% 57b + b 

143 27% 22b 22% — % 

15 9 9 9 

6 20* M* 20* 

193 4* 3% 4* + * 

37B 17* 17 17 

91 19% 19 19% + * 

62 33% 33 33% + % 

66 53 52% S3 + % 

172 49b 49* 49* 

77 24* 24* 24b— b 
1521 15b 14% 15 
IB 24* 24b 24* + % 
3*43 43 43 

290 39% 39* 39% + b 
27 12 11* 12 + * 

7544 7 6* 7 +% 

2002 Z* 2 7% + H 

2» 22% 21* 22* +1% 
560 2% 2* 2*-* 

10 27* Z7 27 — * 
713 II* 11* lib— * 

TO 35 34% X + b 

2 X X X 

55 6% 6* 6* — * 

46 ii* u* ii*— % 
9 35 34 X +2 

IB 12b 12 12'i + * 

8387 37% 37 37* + b 

159 37% 37* 37% 

785 26* 24% X* + It 
166 X* X* X*— * 

12 48% 48* 48% 

125 8* 8b 6* — * 
TOz 20% 20% 20% — % 
100c 16 16 16 

540 44% 43b 44 —1 

32 29% 29% 29* — % 

1 47% 47% 47% 9 * 

2 39% 39b 39b— b 

13 25% 25% 25% — * 
TO7x 20% 20% 20* + * 
213 12% ITU 12% — b 

42 11% 11* II*— * 

14 11* 11* 11%_ * 
474 29* Xb 29%— * 

46 3* 3b 3% + * 

8 6 6 6 — * 
76 34 33* 34 + v* 

152 9* 9b 9* 

1001 6* 6 6* + * 

11 6b 6 6b + * 
456 35* 35% 35% + 'A 

2Dzn n 92 
smr- 60 * bo 80 — * 
40 Xb X* Xb 
58 36% 36% X* — * 
90 Xb 33% 33*— * 
373 12% 12* 13% 

463 49* 49* 49b — % 
61 3% 3* 3* — * 

40 81b 80 X —1* 
13 3b 3* 3b + * 
19 ll tub 10% — b 
447 19* IS* 19* -tr% 


55% 35b Xerox 
» 19% XTRA 


300 L3 13 
04 £8 11 


731 47* 46% 47* + 16 
6 22% 22% X%— * 


30 b 24% ZataCo 122 4.7 10 

18* 7b Zaaata .12 id 59 

57% 31% ZavreS 08 .9 16 

73 14b ZenlfhE TO 

31* 15% Zeros 22 14 16 

37% 22* Zurnln 1J2 £9 11 


16 Xb X 28 — b 

800 Bb 8* Bb + b 
MB SI* 50% 51* + % 
4S3 16% 16* 16%— * 
28 19* 19% 19* 

16 34% X* X* 



AVEMCQ 
Chromalpf 
Gap Inc 
ITT Cp PtK 
PepsiCo 
Triton Enpv 
W«TisMk*s 


AVXCp 
AMP Inc 
SASIX 
ElSClnl 
GanSlgnM 
IlltC list 
Lear Petri 
McLean wt 

PWHpMorr 
Tetaratelnc 
Tim ken Co 
ZenlthE 


NEW HICHS as 

BemrsCo BlDCkHRs 

CfartonMm S Comput Sd 

GleasnC GrtLokernt 

Jewel cor LaneWa ind 

SealedAlr Southind pf 

TrlranEnpf Unit Ilium 

NEW LOWS 45 


Altaian wd 
A sarcalnc 
Buttes Gas 
Ester ine 
Globiuiar 

Kauf Bread 

LeorPalcvp 

NcPCnvStr 

PaeoPred 

Terodvne 

Wean Unil 


Amwine 

BancTe«n 

ChIMIIw Cc 

GCACP 

HaatltiAm 

Kaooerj 

LsPwLt 1920 

Nttseml pt 

SfratMte 

TexAmBnen 

WeinotnRH n 


CPC loll 
Daman Co 
Gallon Ind 
LoneSIln S3 
Sarlngsind 
UnJersvBks 


AmBijJSiTpf 

BadcAm Dd| e 
C uinnet s 
Geninsl 
Hewlett Pk 
LTV525M 
McLean n 
PocSclen 
Swank inc 
TeiCamBn 
WUCaNAPf 


LLS.Fiilures 


OU JO 

Open High Law dose Chg. 


Open High Low dan aw. 


Groins 


WHEAT (CBT) , 

5000 bu minimum- dollars per Bushel, 
143* £79* Dec 305* 306* 

174* £87 Mar 113 113 

402 204 May 307* 307% 

3J2* 203 Jul £87* 209* 

£99 U4b D*c 300* 300* 

Est. Sales Prey-Soles 12087 

prev. Day Open Int. 330*3 up 163 
CORN (CBT) , , , 

IVus. ^ JSSv iSSiSS 

286 2J3 Jul £45* £47 

170 234b Sea £35* £36* 

£35* 2J0b Dec 239* £31% 

£74* £35 Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 25048 

prev.DavOeenint.123066 uolX 
SOYBEANS CCBTl _ , , 

SJOOba minimum- dollars per biNhel 
608 £99% Nov 508* 5.10* 


B 8 w-3 -a 
208% -01% 
£99* £99* —00* 


2»b 224* —02* 
236 206* -01% 

201% 202b -01b 
203% 204 -00% 

3% +00% 

£38* +00* 


679 5.11 

702 £22* 

729 5Jlb 

458 536% 

A74 535* 

438 5J2 

622 520 

503 508 

Est. Sobs 


Jan 501 5.B 

Mar 534% 535% 
May 503 S0S 
Jul 550 5J2 

Aug 551 551 

Sea SJ8 500 
NOV 554 506* 

JOfl 505 505 

Prev. Sales 26043 


505* 

5.18* 

531% 

500* 

507* 

507 

536* 

502* 

305 


505* —01* 
5.18* -00% 
531% — JIK 
501 —00* 

507% —00* 
507 

536* —00* 
533 —01 

505 —01 


Prev. Dov Open Int. 66396 uplJTt 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 
in tans- dollara aer ton 
18050 12230 Oct 14130 1<£» 


18400 12500 
16300 12700 
204-50 13000 
T6£S0 13250 
14700 13400 
14750 13550 
16700 13750 
14800 14000 
ESI. Sales 


Dec 141 JO 14330 
Jan 14200 14350 
Mar 14300 14450 
May 14450 14550 

ft ISS1S3S 

Sea 14500 14500 
Prey. Sates 22388 * 


14100 14130 
14130 14150 
14200 142 M 
14300 14300 
144.10 144.10 
I45JB3 146JKJ 
14500 14500 
144.10 144.10 
14110 


+50 

+50 

+00 

+30 

+00 

+100 

+JD 

+1.10 


Print. Dav Open int 40590 up44 


3037 ' mm 
2955 2D-14 

2907 2037 

semi 2Q55 

2705 2100 

2535 2135 

25.15 2105 

2tQ5 21.58 

2200 2150 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales I44BS 

Prev. Dev Onen Int. *S592 off 1097 

OATS (CBT) 

5000 bu minimum- dal lore PW bushta^ 
102* 131 Dae 133 L23* 

107% 134* Mar 131 131* 

103 137* May IJ4W 1J6* 

137 106 Jul 136 136% 

Est. Safes Prey. Sales 263 

Prev. Day Open int. £607 up X 



2000 

20.12 

2004 

—.12 




2002 

Tail 



E-r 1 

2000 

2000 

2006 

—.18 



2005 

2060 

2000 

— .10 



2100 

2100 

2107 

—.13 

Jut 

2160 

2160 

2105 


—JO 


21 JO 

2100 

2105 


Od 

2100 

2100 

27-52 

7160 


2160 

2160 

2100 

ZLSD 



1.19* 130 —00 

10V tl 138% —07* 
124 Vt 134* —02* 
134% 1-34% —00% 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME1 

40000 tbs.- rents north. „ 

45.90 5230 Oct 61J0 61- 


6705 

6705 

6757 5530 

6635 5625 

6500 S5J0 

6060 58.10 


5500 Dec 6230 — 
5435 Feb 4045 61J 
APT 6055 61/ 

Jun 6150 6?_ 
AUJ, 5950 


5938 


Ext. Sates 17096 Prev. Sates 22037 
Prev. Day wen Int. 51J77 up 993 


6075 6100 
6237 6302 

6035 6132 
6055 6132 

6100 6230 
59 50 5937 
59.10 5935 


+08 

+00 

+07 

+57 

+03 

+37 

+40 


4*000 Fbi- cent? per lb. 

64.15 

6405 

6300 

605 

+60 


58.10 

Nov 

AUO 

s* 

MM 

6660 

+1JB 




6800 

6705 

6865 

+58 

7100 

*41 A* 

Mar 

6805 

6605 

6700 

6805 

+05 




6800 

6847 

87 JO 

6842 

+42 


60.10 


6600 

£3 

6605 

6700 

+00 

6800 

6505 

Aim 

67 JO 

6700 

6700 

—00 

Est. Sal ea 

1601 Prev.Saies 1034 





jj Curmicy Optioi^ 


ft*. 10 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option & Strike 

undartring Price Calls- -Last Puts— Lost 

Oct dan Apr Oct Jem Apr 
63M0M Jmmaese Yet+lOOHis of a ant per unit. 

5 Franc 4B s 074 s s r 

Nov Feb May Nov Feb May 
12000 Brtttb Pfwnds-cutts per unit. 

B Pound 135 r s • s 095 ■ 

14101 140 £35 9 S r S 

14101 145 135 • S r 9 

14 101 IX 045 9 9 r S 

41580 West German Marta-anta per tuft. 

□Marie X r 5 s 014 s 

3702 37 1.17 9 9 r 9 

3702 X 063 s 9 r a 

3702 X OX Sirs 

635*000 Japanese Yen-nottw of a com par aatt. 

JYen 47 000 s s r 9 

4641 40 ax S 9 r s 

62500 Swiss Prancs-amts per noil. 

SFranc 44 r 9 s 023 9 

4506 45 r s l 051 9 

4506 46 OHS S S 100 9 

4506 47 (L54 Sirs 

□ec Mar Job Dec Mar Jam 
12500 British pounds-ccnts par aaH 
BPound 1TO 3090 r a r r 

14101 IX 720 r 


095 r 
r r 
r r 

004 OX 

005 038 


14103 W 4.10 630 r 300 065 135 

1410) 145 £15 r r 

14101 150 100 £70 r 

14101 IX 045 135 r 

50000 Canadian DoUors-rents per nR. 

CDollr TO r r 9 

7309 71 r r r 

7309 72 IX r r 023 

73m 73 000 r r ass 

73W 74 034 r r 1.19 

73M 75 *J86 r f T 

7109 76 003 9 S f 

42500 West Dermal Morics-conti per mH. 

DMnrk X r r r 002 

3702 33 r r r ft»a 

3702 X r r r 00a 

3743 35 £99 r r 017 . 

3702 X £10 £70 r 031 r 093 

3702 37 135 £16 r r 102 

3742 x 005 r r r r 

3 702 » ass 101 r 135 r 

1 M0«J French FroKs-ieihsaf a real per unit 
FFronc TOO 2300 r r r r 

123.18 1M r r 080 r r 

123-18 IX r r 5m r r 

6350008 Japanese Yan-iOHfas a< a rent per enft. 


JYen 

4601 

4601 

4641 

4641 


42 448 404 

43 £68 r 

44 £72 r 

45 £05 250 

40 «LS0 1.12 


106 


007 


030 053 

044 001 


620W Series FramcxenK per aaft. 

SFranc X 700 r r r r 

4506 42 437 r r 015 r 

4506 43 £27 r r r r 

4506 44 r r 400 046 r 

4506 45 IX r r 002 r 

4506 46 133 £24 £93 r r 193 

4506 48 r IX r r r r 

Tefal coll voL *r» CaUopaaM. TO1455 

Total put voL 30U Put open Int. toot k 

r — Not traded. 5— Ng option offered, 

Last Is premium (purchaM price). 

Soares: AP. 


HOGS (CMS) 

30000 the- ren t* perlh. „ 

S1J3 3445 Od 4400 4558 

mm 3625 Dec 4335 4435 

5047 38.10 Feb 030 4155 

473S 36.12 AW 3930 »30 

<903 39M JIM 4259 4295 

4V0S 4045 Jul 4205 4307 

f..1S H §£ mz 

4950 SOS' Dec 41.15 4T20 

Est. Scries 440V Prev. Sates 60*7 
Prev. Day Open Int. IMM no 231 
PORK. BELLI BS (CUH1 
38^Kntas.-cgto.per ^ 

7540 5506 Mar 6250 63J5 

7500 5705 May 6400 6450 

7600 5700 Jut 6500 6£40 

73.15 5550 _Aua 6£10 6330 

ESI. Sales 3086 Prev. Sales SJOO 
Prev. Dav Open Int 7011 off 71 



Food 


M 

hs 

14750 

14£70 

I IBM 

EnL 


COFFEE C CNYCSCE1 
37500 IInl- ante nor 

3E3 

13&5D Jul 142J0 14500 

iSS S«P 14240 144.10 

1%00 14200 MUD 

14250 Mar m _ 

Prev. Sat es 1497 

Prev. Day Open Int. HUMS upW 
SUOARWORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 

112000 lb*- cents per Itk M 

735 300 Jan £25 525 

*33 334 Mar 501 £78 

& 33 XT is m 

Us a SS £35 643 

33 S3? ££ J£ 

Est. Soles __ Prey 1 Sotes 1108* 
prev. Day Open int 78339 up 87 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tons-S per tan _ 

2337 1945 Dec 2227 2233 

23*2 TOM Mm* 2308 2312 

2423 mo MOV 2350 2353 

2429 MO Jul 

inn tiffi Sep Z185 MM 

XX 2055 Dec 23X 2X5 

Est. Sales 34X Prev.Salre IJ» 
Prev. Day Open Int 20341 u p» 
ORANGE JUICE CNYCEJ 
15000 Ito.- rents per lb. 

TO10O 127.18 Nov 12750 12750 

18000 12350 Jan t240O 12450 

177.50 12100 MOT 12400 12400 

16130 12258 MOV mitt 1X.TO 

157.50 12250 Jul 12200 12200 

Est- soles _ B00 Prev. soles 907 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 4074 tin 60 


vam 

1 Sx 14508 

14150 


s m 


■T229 

+259 

SS 

tis 



ntl 2105 
■ma TOm 
2313 2316 

MSB 2348 
2170 Z365 

2365 2350 


-81 

—74 

-70 

—75 



Metals 


COPPER (COMEX) 
25000 iB9.-cent9.perib. 




5845 Od 6830 —55 

Nov 6L05 . —50 

5150 DOC 6130 6155 6L10 6145 —55 

58.75 Jan 6130 — 56 

5930 Mar 6255 £255 6100 62.15 —55 

<000 May fi£85 6£B5 6235 6£50 —55 

6Q3S Jul 61338 6330 6£70 6205 —SB 

60*0 Sep- 6330 —SB 

6100 Dec 6400 6400 610 6175 

6405 Jan 6XS0 

6255 Mar 6430 6450 6450 64.25 

6250 MOV 6400 

<£2S Jul 6495 

Esf-5afes Prev.Sota 

Prev. Day Open lot. 7702* ap93 

ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

40000 lb*r rents per lb 

Od OM -J5 

Nov 4145 — J5 

nw Dec 4400 4405 43X 4358 —25 

44X Jon 44.15 —25 

4430 Mar 4175 4175 4505 4490 —35 

■mm May 4S60 —35 

4SJS5 Jul 4690 4&90 4650 46J0 -35 

4875 Sep 47J» — 25 

Dec 4895 49.18 4895 4855 -35 

Jan 
Mar 

£335 5335 May 

SDJ0 5030 Jul 5150 —35 

Est. Seles Prev. Sales 

Prev. Day Onen lot. 1052 off 28 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5300 tray a> rents per travel. 


6158 

1060 

H2S 

6*20 

mm 

7400 

7400 

70.90 

TOJtO 

m 

6620 


7000 

7650 

7300 

6635 

6305 

52.10 


TOili — ^ 
<900 — 35 


6464 

5980 

od 

6214 

822J 

4*10 SBL5 

—14 

12304. 

5980 

Nov 

Dec 

6294 

6XL5 

8260 6270 

—10 

—20 

12154 

11934 

5950 

6070 

Jan 

Mar 

6424 

6450 


—80 

-3.1 

10480 

4190 

May 

6500 

663L5 

Si SH 

— £2 

9450 

6290 

JuJ 

6610 

6644 

-70 

9404 

6210 

Sep 

6735 

6730 

6690 66U 

— £4 

7990 

6520 

Dec 


6880 

6860 684.1 

—25 

7894 

7704 

6780 

6700 

Jan 

Mar 

7030 

3 ft 


— 20 
—76 

7524 

6815 

Mar 

7160 

hr 

—76 

7460 
Est. Safes 

699 JO 

Jul 

Prev. Safes 15400 

7210 

-20 


Prev. DayOpen Int 82098 off 98 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 tray at- donors per troy at 

39300 25000 Od 32250 32250 11750 31110 —170 

37350 25750 Jan 3Z75D 32750 32030 32300 — £80 

35700 36450 Apr 32950 32&50 32400 32630 — £B8 

36300 2JSm Jul 33300 33300 33000 331.10 —300 

36000 303 JO OCt 33L59 33650 33U0 3X20 —650 

Est. Sates £195 Prev. Safes £231 
Prev. Day Open Int 12X2 up1«8 

PALLADIUM (NYME) 

TOO troy az- dollars cer az 

14150 9150 Dec 10200 TO3.TO 10800 18090 — 170 

12750 9LTO Mar 10125 10350 TO1J3 102.15 — 155 

IMCfl S1JS Jun 53200 —aw 

11300 97JO Sep . 153.10 

TO7JSS '. 10700 Dec'. ' 10300 ■ —200 

Est. solas Prov. Soles 415 

Prev. Day Open Int. 6.1 17 off 36 
GOLD (COMEX) 

ICO troy ot-dollors per troy ot 

49300 29700 Oct X5M 32500 32S0O 32560 +00 

Nov 3Z7J0 +.10 

30150 Dec 32900 32900 327 JO 329.10 +.10 

SKJffl Feb 333^9 33170 33£10 33X40 +J0 

314JD APT 3X700 337 JO 33650 33700 +.10 

32050 Jun 342J0 34£X 3410D 34200 +.10 

33100 Aua 34X80 34800 3*6J8 34690 +.10 

33500 Od 35200 35200 35100 351J0 

34200 Dec 3S50 3S6J0 35550 35690 

XSM Apr 36700 

36900 Jun 
37850 Aug 

Prev. Sate* 2X000 


3X00 
48950 
4B5JSB 
49600 
435JD 
42800 
3*570 
39300 
38800 
3*450 
38500 
Est. Sates 
Prev. Day Open irrt.123088 up 674 


+.10 

+.10 

+.10 


373X +.W 

37970 +10 


Financial 


9203 9205 -vDl 
9100 lUl 

SS 


—01 
— 0T 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI mlllloo-ptsof lOOpct 

93 07 EL77 Dec 9£75 9277 9272 9274 -03 

92JI Mar . 9201 9203 9209 9200 

9£32 ISM Jun 9206 fZM 

924J1 8800 Sip 9172 9172 

9178 SSUtS Dec 9103 9103 

9IJ9 89JB Mar 91.16* 9L75 

9103 ?&30 Jun 

Est. Sales 6266 Prev.Saies 5037 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 3X598 olT6a 
TO YR. TREASURY (CB*n 
STOO0OO Prin- PtS X 32nds Pfin pd 
87-13 75-13 Dec 85-2 SS-ll BS - 8M +7 

S6-2 75-14 Mar M 8+9 84 8+7 +5 

B5-7 Jun 8W 83-11 83-2 83+ +5 

8+4 80-7 Sea m-w +5 

83-11 80-2 Dec Bl-31 +9 

Est. sales Prev. Sates £706 

Prev. Day Open int. 66046 up 2085 


WBh 

E ft e H Sr 

i ft s ft 

Sto 62-34 Dec 67-® 68-IB 

SS S -95 SSf’a.fiUJS* 

S ?7 fl 5 ^ 3 S W 

Eshsatea “ ^.SeM, dl 

Prev. Day Open list. £971 uPl 

CERT. DEKBjTIlMMl 

9}« JJU 

^jo NO M 

91.15 8706 SeP 

*059 8804 DOC 

9005 B£2D MOT . 

E*t. Safes 4 prey.Sotes 8 

Prev. Dav Open lot. 1535 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

n ss h ” M *as. ,oa s£ ns* *103 

9157 SS Mar ^ ^ 

91.15 8673 Jun 9083 9087 

9084 H7JW Sep 9050 9051 

SaS BJ3B dSc 9017 90.18 

9004 8704 Mar 8906 8907 

89*5 8804 Jun 89.57 n& 

VIS 8909 Sep 8901 8902 

Ext. Sales 31092 Prev.Sdes 28465 
Prev. Dav open kaU2S76B UP 1025 
BRITISH POUND (MMU m<wn 

% B S^^S£^»0o« 

m MJSffjP 

CaL Solas 7551 Prev.Sdes *0S2 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 76202 upZTO 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 
soar air - 1 point equate saoon 
2566 7006 Dec 2795 JXt 

7504 09B1 HOT 72S1 7294 

7360 - . 7070 Jfim 

EitStfes 1065 Prev’sato L288 
Prev. Day Open tat. 4224 up U 
FRENCH FRANC < IMM) 

*.ffig TO j 

-iss vs -iss -isffi 

.12180 .12180 Jan .12130 .12130 

Est. Safes 8 Prev. Serfs* 

Prev. Day Open Int. 164 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) - 

S per mark-1 Pofeteguota M^O l 


71- 18 7W 
73-U 

72- 11 W-M 

71-14 71-20 
jn-26 71-2 
7T5-1 70-9 

Is 

n 

67-1 67-10 


76-10 7M8 
75-14 75-28 
7+.« 


n -V S-S 

9L54 9155 
91.18 
TO02 
9009 
90.17 


9158 9142 
*100 *ig 
TO03 toes 
9009 9050 
9007 M.17 

0905 8904 

8956 8956 

8971 8909 


17985 10020 
10900 10 935 
10890 10870 


7792 22m 

7281 7287 

7273 
7260 


.12305 

.12200 .12288 
.12130 .12130 


Til 

+11 

+17 

+U 

■*■14 
+15 
+ IH4 
+ I6J 
+16 
+16 
+17 


+13 

+15 

+16 

+16 


M 


it'' 


> -. 


—.01 

—re 




+0i 

+0i 


—v 

—30 


0867 


0971 — - 

ssm Mar 0827 08P 
Jun 


0770 0776 
0805 7810 
0844 7846 


7*18 0135 

7*2D 07S2 sea 

EsL Sates 26552 Prev. Salas 2U76 
Prev. Day Open Int 41831 up 1098 
JAPANESE YEN UMM) y 


_ rvfWP 

084738 0O4OX Mar JB4687 004696 004660 MfT2 
004765 JXH220 Jun 004700 JB04700 0O43W 00X97 
004*00 004745 . SOP 004733 004741 0CM733 004735 

W4345 -004158 DOC 004765. 

Cat. Sates KM Prev. Sates 12000 
Prev. Dav Open Int 39000 DP2077 

A771 0635 MOT MX A623 4632 

ABOO Ain Jun A7D0 4700 A677 A677 
EsL Satan 21A17 Prev.SafeS M5M 
Prev. Day Open I nL 77497 w>9Q 


-13 

-TO 

-13 

-13 


-13 
-13 
-13 
-13 ' 
-13 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CMS} 

T3D0OO MLR.- Saar LflOOtKLtt. • 
18670 12650 Nov 13570 13670 

18700 13350 Jan 14050 14060 

I9S0O 13970 Mar M£M 14660 

176AQ 14920 May 15000 190JD 

10300 14950 Jul 154.10 154.10 

17600 15290 SOP HJU 15800 

18100 15450 NOV 15370 137.10 

Est. Sates WI Prev-Satei 645 

Prev. Day Open I nt. 7064 up 29 

COTTON 2(NYCm . . . 

5£oao Ifas* rente dbt Ih. 

nS sS fic MM MAS 


135.18 135*0 
139A0 13950 
14520 14360 
15030 p | 
154.r0 
157J30 
157-TO 



f 


767S 

7000 

7005 

6550 

57 

6675 


5627 Mar 6073 6175 

3850 MOV 61.15 6163 
Jd 5?^ 6010 
5355 Od 54.15 3415 
5255 Dec 52J0 5110 
5325 Mar 


Est. Sates prey .Sates. JJ9T 

Prev. Dav Open InL 21013 > 


6405 6028 
6073 6100 
61.13 6U8 
5963 5970 
54JBS 5408 
S 55 ..5300 
3360 


n 

+03. 
+00, 
+.15 ^ 
+.15+ 
+00 ■ 


aff2 


HEATING OIL (NYME) 

8100 8105 

MSB 69-15 Dec 8055 S 3.40 

■£75 6900 Jan S£L60 81.13 

8300 Mfflt Feb 29M mm 
7800 6000 Altar 7500 7640 

7555 £800 Apr 7235 72^0 

7375 £800 MOV JIM T130 

Est. Sates Prey .Sates 12751 

Prev. Day Open InL 30093 up 1196 
CRUDE OIL (NYME3 
’.ftf bW^diUtateper btoL 
2952 3M Nov 28JO 2801 

39 JO 2300 D«C 2805 200 

2*50 308 Jan Z709 22A7 

29A6 2425 F4fa 3600 2607 

29A5 2413 Mar 2633 26A8 . 

29 AS 2303 Aar 2505 2605 

27.96 2365 May 2365 2300 

2670 Z378 -Jun 2508 25AI 

2605 2475 AUO 2 500 SSM 

Eat. Sates . Prev.Saies US41 
Prev. Day Open InL 61057 up 774 


8BL4B 8055 -170- 
8050 8055 —15# 
0030 8QA5 — 173,-. 
79.15 7908 — IXb- 
75S0 7551 — lSC-; 
7100 7£K -100- 
7150 m2 -100 


2857 2863 —03 7. 
2704 2705 - — ASb 
2704 7721 —40- 

2620 2430 —47, 

2622 . 2625 —66 
25.95 76& -M: 
2565 7525 — 05 

238 2508 —JB- 
2SM 2500 —TO 


Stock indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMC) 

Mints md cents 

20005 17570 Dec «£TS 18305 18150 

20373 TO23B Mar 18400 10506 18400 

20650 18300 Jua. 186.15 186.15 TOSJB 

-19270- WJO S*P 18770 18770 18770 

EsL Sales Prev.saies 6WW 

Prev. Day Open Int. 39078 upZ.177 
valu e uneoccbtj 

P SSSs aa 18865 Dec 18808 19060 18860 
28900 1*050 Mar W1 78 19170 19070 

Ed.50lN , Prev.Sate* 5088 - - 

Prev. Day Open TnL 7089 up 91 
NYSE COMP. IHPEXtNYFEl 
Polnteand jatfS 10L2S 18X45 

11833. 10560 Atar 10770 107.10 TOLn 

imoo 10690 Jan 1 EMITS UB05 WJO 

18970 10870 . Sep_- ■ - - • 

Est. Sales 8712 Prev. Safes 9076 
Prev.DayOpen Int. 8027 off 2 


18348 +08 

18405 +.13 - 

18675 +.10 

18875 +70 


19005 +105 
19230 +105 


1M.I0 +. 

1WJ» -+.li 
10775 +, 

10890 


Commodity- indexes 


3 


Moody's. 
Reutars. 

D_l. Futures. 


□asj Previous 

90000 f 89900 f 

1710l70 1,703.50 . 

11708 11708; 

Com. Rasaarch Bureau- . . 224.10 224.90 

Moody's : boas 100 : Dec. 31.1931. 
p- preliminary; f -final 
Routers : base 100 : Sop. 18. 1931. 

Daw Jones: base TOO : Dbc.31, 1974. 


Gommmlities 


Ocl 10 


WGAU H«« LAW Bid Art orae 

French francs per metric tea 
Dec 1780 178Q 1782 1788 + 51 

R or M!8 '-5S 1007 1409 +41 

May 1A30 1A20 1AX 1A47 +35 

Aua 1A7S I ATS 1A» 1A89 +63 

Od 1520 1500 1505 1520 +59 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1045 15TO +58 

Est. vol.: 1000 lots at 50 tarn. Prev. actual 
safes: 1480 lots. Open Interest: 20419 
COCOA 

French francs per 106 kg 
Dec £015 1075 1,974 1.9B4 —39 

Mar 2035 1.978 2000 2005 —45 

Mav N.T. N.T, £025 — —40 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2030 — —40 

Sea N.T. N.T. £035 — — X 

Dec N.T. N.T. — £055 —20 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 2055 —20 

EsL voL: 157 lots at io tans. Prev. actual 
soles: 37 lots. Open Interest: 632 
COFFEE 

French francs per HO kg 
Nov 1775 1775 1775 1781 —9 

Jon N.T. N.T, 1020 1040 UndL 

Mar 1065 1065 1070 1000 -2 

Mav 1510 1510 1505 1530 +13 

Jly 1.930 1.930 1,933 - +5 

S«P N.T. N.T. 1540 — +5 

Nov N.T. N.T. 1545 — UmSL 

Est. vat: 19 (eft of 5 tens. Prev. edued sates: 
3 lab. Open interest: 295 
Soanes: Bourse du Commerce. 


j Dividends 


Per Amt 
INCREASED 


Oct IO 

Pay Dec 


Fst Bancorp Ohio Q 75 

Fleet Find Group Q J» 

Ford Motor Co Q .70 

PPG Industries Ct 44 

Rhodes Inc Q 08 

REVERSE SPLIT 
21st Century Robotics — l-tar-4 
USUAL 


First America BkCo 

Hoover Co 
NttiwastamNstl ufe 
Ohla Mattress Co 
Orange £ Rockland 
Owens-iiilnols inc 
Pemuell Co 
TECO Energy 
Utd Carolina Bkshs 
Weyerhaeuser Co 


Source: UPl. 


a 25 
a jo 
a so 
- .10 
a 53* 
a as 
a ss 
a st 
a 2 s 
a 72* 


1M 11-25 
1-2 12-15 
IM 11-1 
12-12 11-12 
1-15 12-16 


I- 7* 12-27 
12-12 11-15 

11- 15 10-25 

10- 31 10-21 

II- 1 10-21 

12- 15 11-1 
12- US 11-29 

11- 15 11-1 
11-8 10-31 
IM 11-1 

eaemF 


EMVI Futures 
Options 

Ik GenmHUtk -726609 marts, dfnh Per mate 


ft*. 10 

Strike Cota+ente FnteSMfir 

Price Dec Mar Jim Dec Mar Jue 

36 202 248 £24 079 066 006 

37 10 US LU 60 10 10 

36 US 103 111 UH 148 145 

19 BAS I.W 147 147 103 £» 

* 0 021 479 UV — — _ 

41 a»6 008 — - — 

Estimated total rW. 7032 

Coils: weo. veL 4*2 eree m, jmj* 

Puts: Wed. VPL26M seen let. 71093 
Source: CME 


London 

Commodities 


Hieb Low Bid . Ask 

SUGAR 

Start teg per metric tan 
Dec 14160 T39A0 0*40 TOOTS 
Mar 15060 14700 14740 14708 
Mar 15400 15100 13120 15140 
Aug 15800 15800 15700 15760 
Od 16400 16400 162A0 16360 
Vot uine: 2725 tats of 50 tans. 


Ocl. 10 
Previous 
BM Art 


14000 14160 
TOBJOM90O 
15248 iota 
14900 140091 
16400 16560 



COCOA 

Sterling per metric lea 
Dec 177V 1728 1730 1733 1776 1727 

Mar 1015 1765 1767 1266 1015 1016 

May 1043 1000 1001 1003 1043 1044 

Jtv 1055 1022 1026 1027 1054 1057 

5#P 1065 1034 10X 1038 1065 1067 

DOC 1042 1017 1017 1019 1043 1045 

Mar 1050 1024 1024 1030 1048 1053 

Volume: 6776 tats of 10 tom. 


Job 
M ar 
May 

Jiy 

Sep N.T. 


COFFEE 

Sterling per metric tan 
Nov 1604 1092 1004 1601 £606 1608 

1041 1030 1040 1043 1043 10« 

1671 1063 1071 1078 107Z 1075 

1701 1095 1700 1707 1703 1705 

1721 1721 1715 1730 1727 1735 

N.T. N.T. 1730 1765 L7SB 1769 

1000 1000 1780 1000 L7TO 1020 

Volume: 1737 lots of 5 tom. 

GASOIL 

U0. daBcn per metric tea 
NOV 24873 24300 24550 Z4575 2SL2S 351 00 
Dec 25475 24L25 24400 34425 24900 24935 
Jan 24400 23900 2*375 31300 347 JU 24700 
Feb 2*100 23800 24175 24100 24500 24400 
Mar 23*00 238330 2XL2S 23400 237.00 23*00 
Apt 22000 22500 22775 22800 23073 33L00 
MOV 22500 22400 22900 0400 &60Om0O 
Jan 22400 22200 22175 22300 22500 22700 
Jly 2000 23000 22000 22200 New — 
Volume: 5011 late of 100 tom. 

Sources : Healers artd London Petroleum Ex- 
cnanom laasoHI. 



Ocl JO 


BM 

ALUMINUM 

gpStagrerh-mcten^ 

Forward 72000 721* 71800 71900 
COPPER CATHOORS (Nl#» Gradej 
IhWttagpermetrte^,^ M 

Forward 99800 9*800 W0560 108508 
COPPER CATHODES {Standard) 
■^•htaPwn-tricjgi WjB8 

91700 98*00 99100 99100 




Forward 

LEAD 

Sterttae per metHCMn 

27900 28000 
20800 TOOTS 

NICKEL 

stertog per metric tea 
spat 303000 304000 009000 309500 

Forward 307600 300000 713500 313700 

SILVER 


SPd 44000 44100 44U0 44300 

Forward 45200 45300 45500 4S60O 

Tl HI Standard) 

StBrtfag per metric ten 

seat 079500 880000 878000 879000 

Forward 870600 870800 667500 848000 

StarEm per metric mi 
Spat 44600 44700 45400 45500 

Forw a rd na nq na nq 

Source: AP. 


HO WO-KONGG OLP FUTURES 


OtLlO 


muh Law bid Art 
Od— N.T. N.T. 32500 32700 32400 22600 
Nov _ N.T. N.T. 2X7JI0 32900 32600 32800 
Dec - 33000 33000 32900 33100 33100 33000 
Feb _ N.T. N.T. 33300 33S0O 33200 33400 
Art _ N.T N.T. 337X30 33900 33600 3X00 
JM1 _ 3*200 34200 3*200 34+003*1 00 34300 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 34700 34900 34500 34700 
Volume: 24 lotaof 100 a*. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES . 
UJS e t rw— 


Oct. 


MMi Low Some Same 

JJ- T. N.T. 32SJ0 32600 

32900 32860 32900 33000 

N.T. . K.T. 33160 33460 


Oft 

K 5 

Votumc: 63 lots of 100 ok. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
’MB 


□ec. 
Jan _ 
Feb. 


AAor ... 

VHtmtMtalL 


BM Art • 

nun 1B7JM 1U0O 18600 
18700 TO80O 18600 11*00 

TO70O 18800 18600 187-50 

18800 1*000 18100 1*000 
TO9 JO T9L5D 18900 19100 


SINOAPORR RUBBER 


„ .EM A« BM M 

MSI Nov- 14<25 WL50 163.33 16400 

R5S 1 Dec- 1609 14500 14*35 16*00 

R5S2NOV- 154_50 15i» 15350 154J0 

R5S3 Nov— 152-50 15150 151 JO 152JM 

gS5 + Nov_ 1400 15000 ‘ 147J0" M9JO 

RSS5NOW- 1*800 1*300 14250 14400 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 

Malayilan ringgits per 29 tan* 

. Previous 
BM A « e - 

ma *60 420 640 

42Q m «30 670 

6M . -TOO . - 650 - TOD 

630- .710 - 670 710 

££« 660 TOO 660 70S 

Mar 450 6*0 698 690 

MOV 640 *80 640 6*0 

JUn 440 690 *40 MB 

Sep . *]a dal *30 m 

Volume : 0 late 0123 tan * 

Source: Reuters. 


Oct . 


BM 


Nov . 
Dec. 


UStlreasuries 


Ocl 10 


Offer BM Yield Yield 

703 701 . 7A6 7AT 

709 707 7J8 • 704 

749 TJO 804 803 


BM Offer YWM Ytehl 

a uo s/32 no 7/32 nus 1003 

Source; Safoaten Brothers. . 



Commodity and Unit Thu 

Coffee 4 Ssntoe.lt> 103 

Prtatdoth 64/30 38 *, vd — ' 061 

Steel bUlete (PIHJ. tan . 97308 

Irons Fdry-Phtia. ton 21 100 

steel ecrap No 1 hw Pttt - 75-74 

Lead Spat, lb — 19 

Copperetect.lt> *7-7* 

Tin (Strain), lb U177 


Year 

Ago 

102 

179 

473JM 

21 160 j 

87-W 


2MC . E.SLU Baste , lb 
Prilndluin . m ~ _ . 

Silver N.Y. esc 

Source: AP. 


m-ira 


4fl% 

*0643 

805 




Price Oct Her Dec 4oe 

IS 5 » « 

s? ft a & 

W- 1/16 % 116 1% 

m n/16% % wid 

N IftVH > - ■“ 

toM eefl leteew hue 
TeMaG * M * M .« KZ77 
Trtderit vgwae tuns . 
tag deetaUBM 

•drt T77J5 LSWT7625 Chs*I7MI + Ut 


OCt Iftr 
— 1A6 

in# 7m 
vt m 
2% n 

7% 71k 
HR Wk 


Ocl 10' 


% fm 

ism unt 
i% a 
** 5 
MA. 8%' 
to - 


U.S. G>ncem Sues, 
5 Tobacco Firms -4 


t 


MerrTO Lynch Treasury todeKUlA* 
Oteegr ter to* aom + am 
A verage ri*M: 929 % 

Sooner Morrill Upai.- " 


a lon Post Semce ‘ ■ . 

WASHINGTON - A forme, 
asbestos-products maker has gone 
to court to to force cigarette 
companies to share liability in law- 
“J*stos . workers who 
smoked and who claim to have con- ’ 
traded serious or fatal lung dis- 
ease from exposure to the mineral 
OAF Gap^a large maker of 
bufldmg materials and chemicals. 
Kbasmg theeffort on long-knoRu 
medical, evidence that smokine 
sbmply imxeases the risks of asbe^ 
tos-related Jimg cancer and other 
aisej^ss m asbestos workers. GAP 







"'WS5 


f 


Guwpe'V'#* 



















: Ux .-‘ 


M 


cW-J ^ i 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER II, 1985 



214 

1116 SunJr 

M 

2 A 

12 

i 6 

m 

20 

204 + ’i 

3 S'm 

21 Sutf/Fa 

MO U 

14 

. 2 

324 

324 

324 

134 

4 Suolruls 

20 

2-0 

8 

' 36 

1DW 


704 4- 4 

184 

114 SuptSt 

J6 

2J 

10 

57 

16 

lS’-s 

154-4 

64 

4% SuMuen 



7 

7 

44 

44 

4'l 

2Vs 

lb SwftEng 



11 

20 

14 

14 

14 

a 

194 Swtftln 

1J0 

5.1 

26 

23 

234 

234 

23 VS + 4 

7 

3 ft Svnoloy 




25 

4 

2k. 

34 

144 

64 SvstEn S 

.10 

\J 

9 

123 

74 

7 

74 + '•* 




331 SJ 71 
.16 II 18 

61 

23 lJ 12 
S 

M 2* 13 


12 

11 

JO 22 8 
30 

JOr .2368 

M 12 16 
JO 17 14 
25 


«<. T Bor 331 S3 21 

7 4 TEC .16 II 18 

44 TIE 

54 Til 61 

134a TobPrd 23 1J 12 

6V. TundBr 5 

94 TDUV M Zb 13 

2*i Teom 
14 TdiAm 

131* TcnSvm 12 

33k TrctlTD 11 

10'i Tectitri JO 22 8 
13, Techno 30 

97 felon R JOc 2368 
14 Tcltttn 

24'i TeHim M u 16 
S'i TelDin JO 32 14 
6’* Telia 25 

2’i. TeissBii 

e Twtcv ll 

22 TexCdg 120 

7U. TexAir 3 

44 TeiAE 241 5.1 23 
16% TexAE a<U7 114 
Vl TxKOO 

14 ThorEn 25 

2611: To! Ed of 425 132 
62 ToJEflonOOO 11? 

266 Tortal 29110.1 
84 TollPI o 24 
4 TolPt wt 

23 TolPI of 2-B8 104 

111* TflttTK 41 U I 
13V. Tronzon 41 M 1 
72* TrISM Mo 44 
34 TriHme 8 

JV, TrldW 17 

24 TubMcx 


37 134 

38 41* 

i im 

4 11* 
65021914 

1 2 
28 364 
105 10*1 
27 86* 

57 4*6 

5 4V. 
1 22V? 

95 17 1 * 
18 416 

5 1*4 

140 4 

6 l«i 
25l22':4 

J282 77*6 
295 316 
116 15 
128 2 


5*6 54 + 4 
7V. 7V.- U 
4'i 44 — 

6V. 6V. 

16V. 16V. 

6*k 6’>* 

154* 15*6 + '■* 
3'* 34 + U 
216 31a + 46 
134 134 — 4 
S’* S'* — Mi 
13V. 13*i + «i 

1 Mi 1": 

1864 191V6 +64 

2 2-16 
354 3516— 4 
104 101* * '•* 

V* 84— U 
4<4 A* 

4'u 4b. * V* 

224 2JW — U 

164 1616 — 'A 
4V| JV. 

19^ 1?,4_+ 4 

14 l'!i f 4 
m. 32V,- 4 
77V. 77V i fl'4 
24 34 + ’6 

’ft ’f*r* 

274 274-4 
U4 144 
1*4 1(4 
94 94 
4 4 

54 54 

V . * 21* 


Sale* Hbotm ore unofficial. Yaarly hlgns ana low, reflect 
the previous S2 weeks plus the current week, but nol the latest 
trcxHnu dav. Where a split or slock dividend arnaunlinp lo 25 
percent or mere has been paid, the year's nipn-iow range and 
dividend are Shown tor the new stock only. Unless otherwise 
noted, rotes o! dividends are annuel disbursements bases on 
the latest declaration, 
a— dividend also extralsl-sl 
d — annual rare of dividend plus stock ellvloefid./i 
c— liquidating dividend-/) 
ctd — colled Jl 
d — new vearlvlewyi 

r— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 montnaji 
g — dividend In Canadian hinds, subled to 15% non-residence 
tax. 

t — dividend declared after sdiImip or stock dividend, 
i — dividend paid this year, omitted, deterred, or no action 
taken at latest dividend meeting. 

k — dividend declared or eald Nils year, on accumulative 
issue with dividends In arrears. 

n — new issue In the past 52 weeks. The hljwloiv range begins 
with the start of trading, 
nd — next dav delivery. 

P»E — price-earning* ratio. 

r — dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 months. Plus 
slock dividend. 

s — stack spilt. Dividend begins with date of split, 
sis — sates. 

1 — dividend paid In stack In preceding 12 months, estimated 
cash value on ex-dividend or ex-dlsiribution dale, 
u— new yearly nigh, 
v— trading halted. 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized un- 
der me Bankruptcy Ad. or securities assumed by sucn com- 
panies. 

wa — when distributed, 
wl — when issued, 
ww — with warrants. 

* — ex-dh/ldend or ex-rlghts. 
xdls — e> -dlstr Ibui ion. 
xw— without warrants, 
y -ex-dividend and soles in fulL 
vld— vieicL 
i — sales In hill. 



94 34 Zlmer OSi 23 34 3 4 34 


AMEX Higlis-LcMs 



AmTrE/ pr 
OiarkHldg 


Armairnintl 

CrrstalOil 

Dig icon wt 

MncGregor 

SaxonOIIDvn 

Texscan 


GouldlnvTr mooo B 


BowVoilev Coesrmj CoolevProo n 

DamsEnpvA DamsEngvB Detmed 

HIlhExt InlThor pf LvnchCSvs s 

NuclearDio Pioneer Sy 5FMCon> 

ScealreRsn SecConCo SierraHlthn 

TurnerBrd n KV ebb Del un 


The Daily Source for 
International Investors. 


cralbSSribuncw^ 


, mum 
. > 




30 34 3% 34 
T17 45V* 4416 444— 4 


M 134 

1 114 
14 114 
19 10*6 
9 1066 
<7 334 
44 31 
14 27 
21 194 

2 214 
1 10 

8 204 
21 1816 
13 174 
78 164 
5 194 
37 18 
2 94 
21 264 
TSU 4111. 

125k 45% 
70 14 

51 374 
21 64 


134 134 
114 114—4 
ii im + 4 
104 104 
104 104 + 4 
33 334 

304 31 

27 27 —4 

184 1856 — 4 
314 214 
10 II +H 
204 204 + 4 
174 174 
174 174— 4 
164 164— 4 
194 194 + 4 
174 174 — 4 
94 94 
264 264 + 4 
914 4V4- 1 

364 364— 4 
64 64 


OIL<g?M0NEY 

MNIHEEKHITESl 

IlAN INTEIiNOTINAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
^OILIMIYCQNFERENCE 

^NDO\OaOHER24-25,1985L 


— ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 


Oct. 10/1985 


Net asset vatue oootottoasar* supplied hv lh* Foods Dated with the oxcepflon of some qootes based pa issue Plica. 

The marginal symbols Indicate fr equency of g uu t ullum sapptled: td> -daily; (w) -weekly; CM-bf-monthlyj (rj-regalariy; OJ-breantarty. 


and related fields, u'ill address the key issues affecting the current energy situation and assess future trends 
and strategies. H.E Professor Dr. Subroto, Minister of Mines and Energy, Indonesia and President of the 
OPEC conference, and John S. Herrington, U.S. Energy Secretary, will head a distinguished group of 
speakers from Europe, the Middle East, Latin America and the United States. 

OCTOBER 24 OCTOBER 25 





KEYNOTE ADDRESS; 

— Professor Dr. Subroto, Minister of Mines and Energy, 
Indonesia. 

COMPETITION FOR MARKET SHARE. 

— Moderator: Herman T. Franssen, Former Chief Eoonomist, 
Intemationd Energy Agency, Paris. 

— HF. KepSnger, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, 

The Keptinger Companies, Houston. 

— AErio Parra, Managing Director, Petrdeos de Venezuela 
(UJC.) SA, London. 

— Douglas Wade, Senior Energy Analyst, Shell Inter nctfiond 
Petroleum Company Ltd., London. 

THE IMPLICATIONS OF OPEC PRODUCT IMPORTS AND 
DOWNSTREAM STRATEGIES ON THE OIL MARKETS. 

— Nader K Sutton, President, Kuwait Petroleum International 
Ltd., London. 

HOW TWO MAJOR OIL COMPANIES ARE SURVIVING 
IN A COMPETITIVE BvIVlRONMENT. 

— Aflen E. Murray, President, Mob2 Corporation, New York. 
— An* Johnsen, President, Stated, Stavanger. 

PRODUCERS AND REHNBTS STRATEGIES IN AN B?A 
OF GROWING COMPETITION. 

— John R. Hdl, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ashland 
Oil Incorporated, Ashland, Kentucky. 

— Eja Mcrfrnfvirto, General Manager, Neste Oy, Hdsmki. 

— Nicola Mongefi, Assistant to the Executive Vice President, 

Enfe Nazionde Idrocorburi, Rome. 

— Saud O. Oundlah, Manager, Supply Coord nation, Betromin 
Participation, Dhahran. 


NEW OUTLOOKS FOR UNITH) STATES’ ETsERGY POLICY. 

— The Honorable John S. Herrington, United States' Energy 
Secretary. 

NORTH SEA OIL; 5ffl>CORN OF TOMORROW’S 

PROSPERITY. 

— John Moore, M.P., Ftncndd Secretary to the Treasury, 

U nited Kingdom. 

THE EFFECT OF FLUCTUATING OIL PRICK ON THE 

BANKING SYSTEMS, SHARE VALUES, INSTITUTIONAL 

INVESTORS AND WORLD BANK LOANS. 

— Robert B. Weaver, Senior Vice President and Global 

Petroleum Executive, The Chase Manhattan Bank, NA, N.Y. 

— Peter Gignoux, Senior Vice President, Shearson Lehman 
Brothers Ltd, London. 

— Robert L Franklin, Founder and President, Lawrence Energy 
Associates Incorporated, Boston. 

— Icn M Hume, Assistcnt Director, Energy Department, The 
World Bank, W a s h i ng t o n, D.C 

MEGAMERGER TREND5 AND THE FUTURE OF THE OIL 

INDUSTRY. 

— Robert F. GreenhiB, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley & 

Co. Incorporated, New York. 

NONCONVENTIONAL OIL SALK. 

— Nicholas G. Vaftte, Oil Consultant, London, The Hac^je. 

— Charles L Daly, Managing Director, LM fischel & Co. Ltd, London. 

— Dieter Kempermann, Managing Director, Union Rheinbche 
Braunkohlen Krafistoff AG. 

— Rosemary Mrfadden, President, N.Y. Mercantile Excharge. 

CLOSING PANS. DISCUSSION OF CURREN T ENERGY ISSUES. 

— Paul H. Frankel, President, Petroleum Economics Ltd 


iiT fy.v \t '[i'Ct tot aT i i y ( fViTTr: 


CONFERENCE LOCATION; 

Royd Gcrdsn Hcttd, Kensington High Street, LONDON W8 4PT. Telephone; (441 ] 937 8000. Telex; 
263151. A block of roams has been reserved for conference partidperfa. Please contact hotel dredly. 

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM. 

Please enroll the fpflcwng participant tor (he oil conference. O Check enclosed. □ Please invoce. 
SURNAME 


posrm. 


OTY/OOUNIW:. 

tas+toe 


T 1-10-85 


















































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 




i: 


* . 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 


CREAT BRITAIN 


LOftDON Keratogton, fines «m 
London From lorae terrace. 
Top flow, 4 bedroom, 2/3 bah- 
roortk 1»15 kitchen. 2 lcx-ge recep- 
tion*. 1 30x21. Uons facing over 
HgBmd fat 65 year, £280.000 Tel 
4939941. w e e ken d; & gw; 6704703 


UJNDOH AND COUNTRY Property 
Seeker* wfl search togh & bur for 
your ideoi home, give advice & pro- 
8fe» punches# to corapbfon. A com- 
service for buy or overseas 
■ London 203 6044. 


pinto se 

□oyer*- 1 


GREECE 


VIILA at faba EpkJavros next to sea. 
Aboi* 130 km to Athens. 4.000 sqjn. 2 
readmoes. Mam residence rased 
above 250 sqjs. tonne ose r faote n 
sea lounge, drtng, 4 b e d core, 2 
WCi/ihower. krtaien. storeroom. 
Anwar - ground floor; 2 bedrooms, 
kitchen. shower, cor part. 1st floor, 
large bedroom, WC/shower, 30 
sqjn. kxinga. Beautiful terraced gar- 
dens. vniary of fruit trees, sw tuning 
pod 6J0 x 450m. Steps down to sea 
{Trail jetty. Tel: Athens 7244202 


MYKONOS 601000 sqjn. on the fam- 
ous paradise bead* Idfa far any 
type of development. Offers from 
OSOjOOQ. Contact;' Mr. T.Masourfdes. 
morning office horn. Tet Athens 
32224». 


. Tbt 210923 


HYDRA TOP VIEW MAD. TWsqm 
plants, trees, astems. May. June. Teh 
5)221 21 94 41 W. Germany 


IRELAND 


CORK AIRPORT MOTEL 20 rooms on 
3 acres, daw to erty. £500,000. Cob. 
tore Code Ireland 96)616 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


SWTTZBUAND 


Foreig n er* con buy 5TUEHOS/ APART- 
MENTS > CHALETS. LAKE GENEVA - 
MONTHEUX or in these world frnous 
resorts : QI ANS-MOMTANA. IB 

Dunasrs, vaai% vuiars. 

JURA & rngn of GSf AADL From 
SFllOjQOQ. ftrotgogei 60% M 6W% 


KVACSA 

S3 MambrOaA 0+1202 GENEV A 
TeL 022/341540. Telex: 22030 


VALAIS / SWITZERLAND 

CRAMS - MONTANA 

THYON, IB COELOMS 
5T LUC, VAL D’ANMJVISSS 
Flats and dedets 25 to 150 jq.m. 

1 To 5 roams. Credt 60%. Interest role 
6V 5%. Duration 15 year*. 
Ownen^afcktn. Direct sofa. 

VAL PROMOTION S-A. 

ID. Ave du Mid, 0+1950 SION 
TeL 41-27/23 34 95 


LAKE GENEVA + LUGANO, Mon- 
tneux. Gstoad region, loama, eta. 
Foreignen con buy mognfficert new 
evartmens/ diatets/ vflm. Sgdooe. 
Sums residency possible. H SEBOLD 
SA. Tour Grise 6, CH 1 007 Lausarme 
21 /2S2611. Lugano office 91 -687648 


TTALY 


PORTO BtCOtE. STOW BUUI FarBy 
house arranged as 2 setf-cantcened 
a p a rtmen ts to deep 7 with 4 bath- 
rooms. named for year-round firing, 
well insulated with exceSert hearing & 


economic to run. 210 sqjn. & lam 
wide terrace & cpotatanwely 4j0wt 
sg.ii* gardeni laid. Situated ut kneiy 
urttpon vdey with panoramic views 
over vdage and 5pmh forts. Tde- 
phonn before 10 am or after 7 pm 
Holy 564 833852. 


ROME • Immedctefy avcAdbfe in cert- 
trd loaador* 50 sol ol gue i u m rf . 45 


scl m. tomtom. S5QAHT by .owner, 
Wnfc 


vw.-w! ttt GSL Canon*. 314 Mark* 
Ave., Boonton, Ml 07005 USA 


MONACO 


FOR SALE - RARE 
TOWNHOUSE 
MONTH CARLO 

650 *qjn. living space, 920 sqjn. kmd 
Luxurious fittings, ft, large garage. 

For further fifcrmatl on oantoc t 
MTHIMBMA (Exidutnrc Sole Agents) 
Monte-Carlo iek(93) 50 66 84 
Telex: 469477 


MONTE-CARLO 


Pnvate mansion, near Monaco Prince 
Palace. P an orami c sea view. 

TeL (9^ 30 46 54. 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


South 16th private road 
ART DECO TOWNHOUSE 


3 ra cepticre, 3 bedroom^ terrace. 
very good condition, sines oarden. 
R^do.ootl Write to SpeetTr,ref. 1 185; 
7bs rue Pave de Grigion, 94320 TTns. 


USA GENERAL 


FLORIDA- 15 unit efficiency apartment 
motel wdh pool & manager s house, 
lent for absentee owner 
if dwred. Contort Robert 
r, e/o John t Make. 506 Ut- 
toeu Lake Wanh, FLA 3346a 
Mrpap- 


FOR SALE- Es i cfcfc h ed 10 sude hotel 
the “Emerald Gty fan". Great down- 
town location. "3 blodo to new con- 
vention center.” Turn Lay operation. 
US$600,000. Contact CWUJW 
Owners. 1521 Bellevue Ave. Seattle; 
WA 98122. (206j 587-6565. 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


new york arr 

Arir Are. 

Mne Ana 2 bed ro o m / 2 truth 


EXQUISITE 
APARTMENT 
IN N.Y. 


NEAR ENA, 16th 

HIGH CLASS BUILDING 
Double Svma, 2 hedroorav bedroom & 
washroom. BO sqjn. + 50 sqjn. garden 
+ parking. 

CHU. 720 92 35. 


RUE COGNAC-JAY 


235 sqjn. u p ro tmenf. 7 room* 3 balta, 
laundry room, study, Idchen. 2 pertngs 
+ mod's studio & room, 2 ado*. 
Price: F6.000.00Q- RTS: 265 47 13 



Modern aprot- 
+ Sbedooms 
. kitchen + ter- 
F1 ,9001000. Tek 


I7TH PONT CARDfhtT. 32 sqm. sfu- 
do. 2nd floor, low dupes, American 
latdwn. both, wc, totjwdual pro cm- 
trd heebna, beam*. F350 JXO. (Met 
767 40 OOat 5077 or home 766 12 84 


SEVRB/VRlf D’AVRAY, near sto- 
fion, loveh’ 5/6badroom vBo, 500 
sqjn. garden. R^OOMO. No agents. 
Teh 53401 46 or P476 51 44T 


7TH RUE DE UUE 2 roam newly 
redone, Idtdwi* shower, wc, 55 sqm., 
15 m. adras, Dtredaee buflwa 
alar. FB25JXtt 329 5808 / 261 2355 


TIM, MVALR3E5, exceptional W 
rooms, siperb reception*, panels, 
high adings, bakxmy, fifepla nn . Jus- 
iAdpncefreh5670H6qr524884T 



OOEOK B eUM flf 21 sqm. stuefo 
-1- imaam.AH comfort* F400JXJQ. 
Teh 354 0150. 


AVEMJi DTTAJJE 36 sqm. sludcj, 

34th floor, ttemendous viaw an Pans, 

porting- &75J0Q. Teh H) 503 33 06 


WEST FA8B - ST. G8UHAIPL Apcrt- 

roert bu» 1792 'sto dewb'. Teh 451 
36 41 evemng*. 


MARAIS. Large Aida, faom_ south, 
both, dtchenette. F300.000. «7 5282 


51R CONTRESCARPL SmJ studio, 
fdly equipped. F330LM0i 535 3/33 


20 MWS FROM PASS. 60 ho. en- 
dceed chateau. Abo rent. 975 8560 


PORTUGAL 


WE OFFBl FDR THE very reduced 

prior of S55JM0 far a vay exdusve 
vila an the shores af Portugal l 
Woken Tet 31-30940084 


SPAIN 


CHARMING VILLA for safe 40 km 
from Woo. Overlooking Portugal 
Built 1950 by cuWtmdng ordxted. 
Mealy located, pnvfeged dmae. 
Slone manor hm«e. central hedin^ 
Stone fireplace, 4 baths, large rooms 
amid flowers, vegetable gqrdere. «► 
oeflent fast, atna trees, vineyard & 
superb wins. 20.000 sqjn. done 
wtdied-in kmd, 5 run* frtm sea & 
river beaches. Separate office & 4- 
stone guest house. Shmtes. 


underground wine _ 

dwnnefa, abundort water, modern 
farm were* md tractor, lded retee- 


Bax 


iuot.be 

4feVjg° 


L ExsOerf opportinty. P.O. 


far farther W ortmdon 


COSTA BRAVA SMA SOALmog- 

watvpaaL 20 bnta aoff cause. 50 


bn to' Gerono airport. Ms. Mart, 
AtanwfGucNK* 17-/8arc 


rfl o r ia lon B 06034 


FOB SALE DKECrtY from owner 

1.598 sqjn. oner plot on Gpkjen 
AMe, 5 rains from center of Mubefla. 

beautiful sea ad mouffon vwws. 

US$9 0 per sq.m. or neorest tet (34- 
52} 778782 after 9$sn 




SWITZERLAND 


LAGO MAGG40RE 
ASCONA-SWITZBUAND 

In this famous Swusrespt we offer firU 

dass cpartm enti and houses, matt 

obewe the old vffloge rf ^eonoandm 


after okJ vrfcjge*. ovukxdbngflie lake 
Laoo M uma om. you vm nod 


sn.toojoo. Mortgage* ,cd low Swas 
irttrvs* n». Free fef » w 
Fufti^Nrs. 

EMBiAlD-HOME LTD 

VIA LOCARN O 27 .A 

CH-66I2 ASCONA 
Tek 04-93-152184 


G5TAA0 / SWnzHgLAND 
Central, ksanous, newly tedt. 

3 bedroom + faing room, hwoee 


end thong <wa modern Mtm 
Cfawt to ski area. 

For father detail caft 
jMphom Hotel - 030 / 4 45 45. 


0FF9H3 BY OWNER. WE ARE RBO- 
CAT1NG. MUST MOVE WIMN 1 
MONTH! Rue one-of-c-fand apert- 
tnen#. Everything flows from beautiful 
11 x 20 antruxe goflery. Ugh criing. 
17 x 28 kving roam with wood-bum na 
firndace. Moster bedroom is 14 x 23 
with ha & hen baths & (fressmg room* 
2nd betfroam mn be den or <f rang 
roam. Al new large breedhtaking eat- 
in-windowed kitchen with haSan fled 
floor & etegufl wedkin pa*y doseL 
fVivata storoga bn in besement. FuBy 
or condtexied. Original architectural 
data!* low i mi ntenmi iB inducing 
electric. Please cofl owner far Further 
dUak. Seen by appointment only, from 
lOam-Upm. 

(212) 486-5359 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA 

COMMERCIAL 
& INDUSTRIAL 


TOOK IEASED 51 .000 sq. ft. biAfcw. 

£6«M, iavS 


North Carol na 

payment El 35M. 10% net rerun, ffem 
305-893-1036. Boat 6107*5, N. Mon. 
R.322SIUSA. 


SHOPPING CBunoi Waslwigtor 

DC area AAA tena ncy, guorentegd 
return* Ms Hffl (7031 522 1343. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


BAHAMAS 


LYTOHJ-CAY, BdwmB. Four bed- 

room house November to Acml. miri- 
2 waeki, fair staffed 4 


CANADA 


TORONTO, CANADA - LUXURY. 
FvJy Furnthed ond eqwpped I & 2 
bedroom sUts* 5upenor service* 

Short/kxm ter m rer fci* Market Sudes 

80 Front 5L Brot. Ste. 222, Toronto 
M5E 1T4 Conodo. (41 6) 862-1096 


GREAT BRITAIN 


MAYFAK W1 OFF Graven* 
Square, prestijpou* fu*y furnished 
□partmert to let StucSos & 1 b ed com 
flats awAibte from £210-2375 per 
week. Situated in a cfaef r e siderrtfa 
location near Mvble Arch & Oxford 
Street. These e portmen h are set in a 
newly refurbished Mock, cqqe ooc h ed 
by hemdsome wrought-iron gates 4 a 
matte courtyard, bach up a tm ert is 
fgffy aqumped to a luxury sXncfard. 
Minimum 1 m 6 month* Contact: K«th 
Cordate Gtoves. 43 North Auddey 
Street Grwwnor Square- L ondon 
W1Y2 aQ. 01-629 6604. Tdrrx: 27839 


UJXURY EXECUTIVE APAKTMBfTS. 
Krightsbridge/Oioboa Over 100 
fafly serviced stuck*, 1 & 2 bedroom 
ixxjiiaent* AD modern convenienas. 
Minimum stay 22 days. Pnces from 


£145 per weac Plane contact Lor- 
i Yew 


rone Young, NGH A p re fl u ents, Nd 
Gwym House, Sfaane Ave; London 
SW3. Tek 01-589 1 105. Tbt »5B17 G. 


OOilRAL LONDON - Executive ser- 
vice apartm en t s in new buUncn, 
comfortably furnished rod fuRy 
equipped body mad service (Man 


through Fri JCdor TV. Phone for bro 

cwfinic — 


)$81342orwnfePresid«- 


Dal Estates (Mayf^ rjbe L 1 Unrversity 


St, London 1 


lOMXJNPCARBUCKMGHAMFd- 
aee. Scoerfaly furnished kuary 2 -bed- 
room flat far short term (1 week - 3 
months) rental 5650/ week rndudng 
transpeirtatnn to ana from arport ff 
- - 1 Ut. KnWit, tdlLK. 


8621 20or 0935 74753. 


EATON PLACE, LONDON SW1 
house, newly tnodenized & fumahed 
by inferior dedjjwr, 2 double bed- 
rooms, 2 bathroom. 1 enaete (in 
marbleL dnrn roam, targe reception, 
fafly equipped tachea iff. 
£9n/weeL lei0836 212806 


LUXURY SOVICED HATS M Kerv 
sngten is the dteinative to expensive 
hotel accommodation. Contact Aw- 
deh & Camany, 21/23 Gcife, 
London WlSi. Tek (01) 589 2956. 
Telex 418216 


LONDON MARBLE AROl. near, self- 
catering luxury 2-bedroom flats; fdy 
eqinfqjeri awr TV, knen aid trie- 
phone* 050X450 per week. Craw- 
ford Hdiday Ftafs, 33 Gowford 
Street. London WL 01-4026165. 


NYC 435tory CONDO 

Dog HeumcBikjcjId Tower 

240 EAST 47lh ST. 

1 Block To United Nations 

.WECrACUAK- 

1. 2. 3. & 4 Bedroom Apartments 
InvnectcSe Ocatpcrcy 
New Full Service Bui*ig V 


S wi umw i g Pool HetAh dub and 
‘ ling Services Avadable 


n^wRpAPACTMB^TS 

ARE ALSO AVAEABLE 
For Info Cdl 212-759-8844 
Sat, Sun 10-5; Man la fri 94 


UJXURY. NYC DU HEX penthpuw 
aondornnium. The pedi af sopfedetf- 
ed NY living, a spedocufar one af a 
kind Mia penthouse, 2 bedoams 
pta* den, formal lining roam, 3 fal 
bath* 2 huge terroces pkn a wrap 
oround bdwny provide views north, 
sMlfa west & east A vwxiderfal 
apartment far both kving and a 
laming. Al $1,250,001 Cal Ahrssc 
GeSebter tt Oy Lvinc 212-420SB8 
or residence 212-9*3089. Telex: 
669251 MDIR. 


NEW YORK enr 

CHflRAL PAW SOUTH . 
Otamxng pedotere 1 b edr oo m h a 
fafly serviced biding. High floor. 
sunrnr Southom exposure. Magrancent 
condition, fiAy renovded. Asia 
S295.000. Finroong dkiwed. Mrente- 
i 5650.48. 

CM Owner 212-581-0223 


QEGANT HI STORIC 19-ROOM En- 
gflsh Tudor Morskxi nestled privately 
an 26 ocrasiusl iranutea west Cokxo- 
do Spnng* Numerous p osdh rities ex- 
ist far pesond estate, carporexe re- 
treat. buwmss ve nt ire deper dne i on 
*oning vmoncBS. Conpcls brochv^ 
avafabie. Price 5TJQ0JXH. Bonyo 
MeGomty, VAN SCHAACX 8. CO, 
4760 FSnfridge, Colorado Spnng* 
CO 609(37 


WYOMING RANCH farrished ready 
to go. Near Cody entrance to Yeflow- 
stone Park an Shoshone Forest. River 
frontage. Specta aLar view of m oun- 
tains end hoy medow. Abounds in 
wilrfcfa. Winter rroge of Rocky Mcwrv 
tan 5h«ep. Perfect far faroly or quest 
ranch. Very private yet ve ry accej ssh 

to “fteSd TSim?ra21 

Neuily Cnde* France 


MAMARONECX, N.Y. 

2000 sqit rifree cmdomniufiB to lea» 
far 3-5 yew* at 518 sqJt. Can suixfivide 

rod w J conoder scie. Newty converted 

Wsroric bukfna ciuple parking conve- 
nendy located CacXact: 

Aroe Dinisei of Jason Afcals Rodty. 
Larchcnont, NY. Tek 1914) 8343505. 
In Switzerlcnd, tek (<2| 64 35 4a 


LUXURY I BBXOOM au r xfa mi i tm 
Over 1000 sqjr.l bedroom, IK bath 
condo with dking area. South expo 
sure with terrace,, iacuzxi tub in — 
ter bath. Forth* 


Contort AJyssa GeSebter at 
212-4208888 


or residence 212- 

>. Tribe 669251 MOIIL 


NYC PAW AVE. Murrey HRI pesdo- 
wre. Oxxmrody eppoi n ted Ameri- 
can basement cf prenmr secure bidd- 
ing. Hoar to caing boofcdtav es . 
mroy vtaadai eobinels. Custom wh- 
dovn, OB- mncStiroing, Murphy bed. 

S135J00 . To se e, cdl 212-5»fl323 
far qxwfiiMit. 


BVBtHOUSE. One of NYCs finest 

bufldmg* North, south & east view* 

o n ,Ban ft w. 14 ro ams, 4 master 

bed corns. 6 both* 3 molds room* 


vtvi wcpKjao. rngn noar-iro 


Dondtian. $3-5 n Ji o n . Moiv-fr L cal 
2127599145. 


BRONXV1UE. NY - quart vdk»e one 

iq. tale, 28 tan. Iran NYC Famous 
school K-12. Gracious homes & coop 
opm tinenCL Write for txochure. Deed 
Red E s tate . 120Kroft Ave, Brorennle. 
NY I Km (7141,3374)900. We are 
retoaitian soeooxst* 


USA BASED lim KAITOR: Anroe 

Le VoSant [speaks Bnok sfa French. 
Getrailrepr wintering FREFERBHJ 
PROPSITIS. WC knmber RECS. 
Offiae C203) Home pH 

322 85 flat 2716 Long Ridge Rd 
Sanford CT 06903. 


SW THE SUMMIT. Keystone. Copper 

Mojitom. fbectoreidge. A-Sosn. 
Fnsco. Colorado- 3 bedroom* 2 bath- 
rooms. 2 south facing deck* 1260 
soil. Newly deorxeted S§h600. Tek 
{Aberdeen. Scottaxj] 44224 867252 


DARIB4 A NEW CANAAN Comerti- 

cut. Executive type home* fax rare & 

sole. Beasont N.Y. GlY suburb. 
French spoken. Naa a rnv sd e conmc- 

rion* Cal Tfabetls R-E. 20365S7724. 


COUNTRY UVR4G N.Y. E 69TT1. 

Modern Aiptex, 2 bedroom, 2 barfs. 
1400 ski, ft. with 1000+ green gtn- 
derepo£*U5S550JW. 21?73*7»a 


TEW YORK GTY- ExceBent kwftro. 

77fli & Atocksan. 1 bedroom, tedeco- 
ntri»0|H Ui (303) 7B9-1280; 


UJXURY RIRMSHH) APAJTTMB4T5. 
FuBy serviced, dxsias of Moyfar or 
' to Kemincton Pdace. From 


I to £550 per week. 3 months to 2 
year* Mountanon Managemmrf Ltd 
01-491 2626. Telex: 299 lgy 


SW1 FULLY RJRM9SD flat avaUde 
far company let. 1 yar minimum. 3 
bedrooms 2 berthroom* fafly 


I brawl, firing roam, seper- 
eta Tel: 


■ roam. £500 per wed* 
1-730 0560 or 01-937 8320 


BS« A BUTCHOFF. A Icege selection 
of propertie s in St. John's Wood 
Regents Pork, Swas Crttage. Haro- 
ttead & emreon* 6 morrfis +. Tel 
01-586 7561. Tlx 883168 ACOG 


IOMX9N. For flie best furmshed Arts 
rod homes. Const* me SpebcAsis: 
FHSps. Kay and lewis. Tet SouA af 
Fork 352 811L North of Fart 722 
5135. Tain 27fU6 RE5CE G. 


TOWNHOUSE, SYDNEY ST, Chri- 


tecif km ry ftnnhed 3 b e c k wB . 3 
bamrooms. 


, 2 fhg/wii , kitch en, por- 
den A garage. Rent £750 weddy. 
tarwrexn 6 morffa hit. 01-644 5048 


on. Luxur y ht mahed 
flots, Ameriaxi kitchens. E280/svaeii- 
steen 4 or £175/week - sterol 2. Tek 
084421 2204 or 01-486 3415(1 


1 2204 or 01-486 3415 (UK) 


FOR FURNSW) LETTINGS M S.W. 

London, Surrey & Berkshire. Contact 
MAYS. Oxshcm (037 2B4) 3811 UK. 
Tries: 89551 IZ. 


JOHN BIRCH has 20 yeas e x perance 

in Rental*. Long or short tenrooes. 

Central & suburban London & Aber- 
deen. Birch & Go. 01 4993802. 


BfMfAM t REEVES LETTMG Office 

whether looking far a home - or have 
a property to let m N.W. London ad 
spe oefats 01-435 96B1. 


ORBS t CO. ExceBent Sebdiro af 

Houses & Pets far rentd in Nortfa 
Northwest & Gentid London. Tek 01 - 
625 8611. 


MTBtNATJONAL EXECUTIVES / Vis- 

itors to London - for 


don - far quality fumahed 
& houses ari HurtersJjan- 
7316. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


SPAIN 


OBFBEATE (UN UM« THE SUN, 

MarbeBa, 4 b e iktxen . 4 bath vRa. 

Private twx n remg pool & garden. 


Great «ewsJJSS350 per weriu Col 

-I5- 


Alfaroo (34-52) 83 35 ' 


SWITZERLAND 


GBCVA. From 18/10 to 2/11/85, res- 
■dertta treo nety o ld city, lovely 
furnished iqjte lewtf, 2 bedrooms, 
south facing snrf lerroee. PombSty 5 
people. Tet (41) 22-4773.45 


USA 


Brand New 


THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 


A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 


offering 


pre-opening savings on 
mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 


featuring 


Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


Executive Services Available 


Model Suites 


(212) 371-8866 


to Co- 


MIAMJ, FLORIDA 

nfaboan & Lrfin Anwnca 

offices, businea address hri office 

service, business r e pr e sentatives. Tek 

305-5763310. Thu 264805 ABSC 


NYC FURBISHED STUDIO 3rd floor 

East 60'*S1 500/month. Tel: Evenings 
212734-2235. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


2 PROFESSIONAL MEN seek Rome 
upu ihignt Feb. &/or March. Posable 
trade 2 bedroom Province! mvn opart- 
merit. Reply Box 1552, Provincrtc 
Mass 02657 or at 1 6 1>-487-2936. 


TO RENT JULY/ AUGUST 1986. Pro 
vence or Burgundy via with at lead 6 
bedrooms. Write 919 Arole Way, Lae 
Angeles. CA 90077. 


WANTS) PARS RAT to rent/share 
far 1 year, angle US womro. excel- 
lent reference s . Tel: fans 387 62 69 


LAWYER seeks mimum 4 room* m 
!6Th/7th. Tek Paris S25 01 59 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECLTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


TRAVEL EXECUTIVE, Cara based, re- 
quired by fearing ariemcAcnd tour 
operator hrotfinq 15,000 Amencro 
cserta throughout Egypt annuofly.Ap- 
pBcortf must be fluent in English and 
Arabic rod mud be able to oversee 
ril nqxrft af yyami ig tour arinnis- 
trotian. Write with resume and sdary 
history to John CatuE, Vice Freydert 
Eastern Me J te no neon. travelers frv 
ternoriond, 97 Syngrou Ave, Athens 
117-45 Greece 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


B4DUSTR1AL PSYCHOLOGIST MJL, 
Gcrmro/Engksh. seelc 


go u tiro in [tewmri manogenetf to 


ana. Can offer ertenrite «rt 7 
business mperience -I- up to dote 

imowledge of personnel systems, re- 

munorotoo + assessment. Coll Vien- 

na: 36 82 30 or write: L Hochfeflner, 
KnrocBqasse 12/3, 1190 Vienna 


ELITE EX-SFBQAL FORCES Nam vrt 

seeks dient* DELTA term highly 
trained. 9 yeoi lop inti, private expe- 
rience. profesriandERi assured, res- 
cue, courier, bodyguard, etc. CortocJ 
baht Foot Ire BlJW-1754 or Sin* 
221, 13014 North Dale Mabry. Tam- 
pa HA 33618 USA. 


US OTlZEN.MAlE,B.BA liter n eoonal 

flusness. e xp erie n ced in ides, adver- 


tumg, adnsrmtration. Frrochrie oper- 
Mdoto fiast/Africcu'Saxxfno- 


roon* m 

via seels m o n oge rueitf postal Free 
to travel / rriooote. Contact: JL Pit 
tel, Souridas 68, Kolonab. 115-21 
G reec e . AlheraTcL 214 297 


GENERAL POSTTIOSS 
AVAILABLE 


BRB4HAM OFFBUUXURY RATS / 

homes to let / far sale in London. Tet 
01-431 3171. Trisx 8952387 G. 


MAYEABt, UJXURY APARTMENTS. 

Fanar Properties. Tek London 01-629 
1788. Teter 263001 FANR UK G. 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HCUSMG CENTRE &V. 

Deluxe renfcfc. Vrteriussrr. 174, 
Amsterdam. 020621234 or 623K2. 


PETER BRUM MAKBAAIBXJ 

hrtT Hones Ser v ice R e nt e Jj 

Tel: 020-768022. 


ITALY 


MOAN FURMSHB) APAKTMH4T to 

let S900 monthly. Loreton 870 0512. 


MOROCCO, 


MAKSAXHH PALMaAE. 6 fans 

center. 2 vAas m exotic garden, heat- 
ed pod. sleep s 6 & 2/4/3350 a $175 


per week. WormTOgn PO B« 5 77, 
Marrowch. 


. Tek A3190I 


PARES AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-BYSSS 8th 


Studi^^or 3*po<n opo rtmq n t. 


: month or more. 

IE CUUHDGE 3S9 67 97. 


SHORTTERM STAY. Advantages af o 

hotel wittoxS nconvenfenoes, fed at 

home to rear sturio* one beriroom 

and mere in Pars. SORHJM: 80 roe 
de lUreveraife. Paris 7ft; 5*4 39 40 


STUDIO ETOIIfa 36 sant, B tit. Mm- 

nr. F400G- BEAU80URGT% sqjn, 
large, co£ne F4S00 ISH+. 2 roam, 
gum? F30QQ Td: 50 1 9384/ 353 0373 


TRIG, sue SERE. 35 kms West Paris. 

haute & garden, Evxig 3 bed- 

rootns, farnehed re not. 970 65 43. 


MAR PANTtCON - 1) dupbu. gar 
den, J1300/marth. a ehormina 2- 
room up ril Apnl 1. Td: 33) 64 03. 


SHORT TOM IN LATIN OUAKTBt 

No ogera* Tek 329 38 83. 


7Hi MVAUDB Dwilexpari farnMieiL 

Short rfang term MSgfe 55T 3234 


STH. Mast 

nqvdpnd. 


week. < 


NO AG&IT. Charm ng hgh dan far- 

nuhed rea oi tmeri. greixya. 257 04 14. 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


MONCEAU 


View gn F arit, te gh doss, 
Piod-aJefm, fSBJO + rttaraes 
Lmng + bed r otxn F8J00 + dxxger 
Tek 563 68 38 


UXlVKlBiCS. Ody 15 km from 
Pori* vmy beautiful houses with gre- 
den F9ta> per marih far 137 iqJtt 
KAUFMAN & BRQAD Td. 9 58 K 17 
from 10 roi to 7 pm, Thursday to 
Monday. RN ISAEoute de Versafles. 

mawioMufe 


OVBSEAS POSITIONS. Hundreds al 

top payng posrfions avdlobfe Tax 
free mcome* Attractive benefits. Op- 

p ortur ih e i far ail atzusedon* free 

deta4* Oversees fenotoyraem Ser- 
vices. De^rf. HT, P.0 Bax 440, Town 
af Mount Boyd, Quebec. Canada 
H3P3C7. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


YOUNG WELL EDUCATED LADY 

seeks on wte t e sri ng job. Lrogucges: 
German. Encish. Freidi one Sved 
tfv Contact A. Hdper, HcWe Z CH- 
5000 Aroau. Tek Swteeriond 064.-241 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS WANTED 


atGUSH COUPLE early farce seek 

position Frroee. Mareenonee house 

and garden. Husband aha chauffeur, 
hrodymee. Wife exceflem fua fly 
coota housekeeper and dild tarxJer. 
Write to Havas ferte-Crofo 1892-4. 
rue de» In* MC 98000 Monaoo 


ENGLISH NAM4SS A mothers' helps 

Nash Agency, 53 Church M, Have. 
Sussex. UK. Tet Bnritton (gjj 29044 


ALTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 


TTC CAR STOPPING 
SPEOAIL51S 

PABS m 22 

CAM4E5/NK2 193) 3 

FflANKFtsa (061 a 

BONN / COLOGNE P22§ 
STUTTGART JDTOT 

MUNICH DM 1 

B«MSHAVH4 
NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
LOS ANGBfS 
MONTREAL 


Prices Fall as Fears Ease on Iranian, Soviet Oil 


JD471J 43063 

mg 695 7061 
931 7605 
(213 568 9288 
(514 866 668' 


AGENTS WORLD WIDE 
leave it to us to bang it to you 


RtANKRJRT/MAIN-W. Germany. H. 
hormron GmbH Tel: 069-44SR1. 
Hek^jp oil over Europe Ara/rojea* 


ALTO CONVERSION 


The 


SURECONVERT * 
nfeet way to Inpart a 

, sai ear into the USA 

Worldwide Amenc ro insurer 
provides 00 required tosurroce 


ond^^jwnmees your cor wd 


... govenimed strodards 

or your noney. bade toriuring 
converaon COST. 

Write or phene for free brochure. 
GERMANY KB 69-7152425 or 


m 7031 / 223059 

AMERICAN 


. Mn LENDEKWRITBS 

CberfindfflJ 7678 
D-6000 Frankfurt /Main 


B*A / DOT 


CONVERStOffi 

* CifitOOB brokeroge.'bonring service 

* Pki-up & defrery ro y where to the 

Eastern US & Texas 

* ProfessKind work using oriy the 

highest quofey cota p roen i s 

* Gu u roteed ffA / DOT apermd 
CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS INC, 

2294 NarBi Pm Rd, Hatfield 
PA- 19440, USA Tet 2TS 8226852 
Telex 4971917-CHAMP 


DOT/ EPA CONVERSIONS 


Shipping, bonring. insironce. 
Door to door service Europe 
to USA, occeptroce gnoron tee ri 
Eurapero Automotive CompSance, 
Senpoststrod 117, 2S86HC 
Jhe Kpc Holcnd. 
PhonelBpb557245 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


MERCEDES 


IN STOCK IN OUR SHOWR OOM 
I IN SCHB3AM (ROTTHOJAM), 
BRAND NEW A» READY TO GO: 


IX 280 SE 
1X 500 51 
13X 500 sa 
2X 500 SEC 
JAGUAR 
SOV. 4.2 


ANIHOre/DOBiON 
CLARET/ BISCUIT 
REGB4T/DOBX1N 
CRANBORY/DOESKM 
ANTaOfC/GRET 
ANTaoPE/asajTr 


E.A.S-SCHIEDAM 


By Bob Hagcrty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Prices of crude oil 
have slumped in the past week as 
fears of short-term scarcity have 
abated. 

Traders were worried a week ago 
that Iraqi bombing had almost 
entirely cut off Iranian exports of 
crude oil and that a drop in Soviet 
exports of heating oil would pinch 
the European market. But both Ira- 
nian crude oil and Soviet heating 
oil have been flowing into the mar- 
ket again, traders say. 

Brent crude, the most widely 
traded North Sea variety, was 
quoted late Thursday at about 
S273Q a barrel for November de- 
livery. That is down from 528 
Wednesday and S28.75 last Thurs- 
day. 

On the New York Mercantile 


Exchange, West Texas Imermedi- The organization, whewe 13 ^^Sessingf ' 

ate crude futures for November de- members produce about a thud of mg. People 1 

livery closed Thursday at $28.65, the oil consumed in the non-Com- themselves to reauty. 
down fiom $28.98 at the dose munist countnes, tailed to agree on TTiat reality. Mr. uaVlfl-wesi 

Wednesday and $2931 last Thins- how to deal with demands by six said, is that OPEC cannot enforce 
day. members for higher production rigid rules at a time of economic 

r- | , . . . . , quotas. crisis for many of its members. He 

Several traders said they could fjj-pria might have to exceed 

see no dear direction for the mar- In addition, Saudi Arabia con- as ^Tfarrels a dav that it 

ket in the short term. “We’ve set the finned that it had begun offering 5£fesSd! 

™gr*iri-rfnnt tnofusioo, discounts to cerium cusIom^i^. the country would inform OPEC. 


i ; 


susjjc iut uuiguiuam wnuusioo, aiscounus locwuuu uuatuun.^. , ~ ,ij mform OrttJ. 

said Peter Gignou*. a senior energy til recently, the kingdom had been the country would mionn u 
futures specialist at Sheaison Leh- the only OPEC member that insist- As one way to attract oe. 


man Brothers Inc. in London. ed on applying official prices, a said. Nigeria is oou»tamg wnetn-> 
Rut must trod*** «^nnfn ivurich P 0 ^ that sent buyers scrambling er to offer “netback sales. Under 
But nmst traders remam bearish j££v hcre for cfaeap^ aude. such sales, recently adopted by the 

for the longer term, expecting the Cinrlfc crude oil is pneed low 

market to be weighed down by fur- EvC n some OPEC ministers con- enough to ensure a profit on sales, 

ther increases in supply from Saudi c^ed that they were unable to of ou products after taking inti- 
Arabia, Iraq, Nigeria and other abide by their pricing and prodac- account the costs of refining ant 
members of the Oiganuation of don rules. transport. 

Petroleum Exporting Countries. , . 

Last week’s inconclusive meeting “We had for some time tended to Smceibe Saudis began using nei- 
of OPEC ministers in Vienna deep- play the ostrich,” said Tam David- backs, Mr. David- West saji tnat 
ened that pasrimiCTn West, the Nigerian o3 minister, in . has now become a standard. 


| Floating-Rate Notes 


Od. lo 


Dollar 


/MO L 


Anted IrWiH 
Alltel irirtin 
AJlMd Irish 17 
AJrted iricn Pert 
Arab Bku Corvfl/W 
AHroJIcPtaSWte 
AutoetetosH 
BcaCamn IMte 
Boa Nai Luvoro »I 
BcoDIRoraoBm 
BcoDUtereoll 
BcaSrotoStarHan 
BwwtaA BkOKWNvl 
Boa Cora RIMlter) 


nk 1M2WJ5 10005 

TK T7-H M0JMlM.lt 

•tt Ml WJ9 10043 
h 20-11 W75 9725 
»> 1(43 KM MJ* 
h. toil Moanouo 
ftt 07-ir 99JI MU* 
■ o*-n nit tea at 
no *MN0Miau< 
7W 09-n M 99 At 
nma-Mna wj« 
IB. 29-11 WJl 9941 


BK Boston WjOa I 


H 1UM9B25 9SJS 
M ggCiir 


HOUAND 

‘S^RAYBAFOSnVEG 408 
RHONE 010-378444 
TELEX 23757 EURO NL 


TRASCO 

INTHNATIONAL 


liLD. Mor e de* Tax Freo 
Lanxiwies 36 " & 44” 
Annoured cars and Kreousnei 
Coach buh car* 

©her mrtw & exota 


Ovur 100 urari to stack 
World wide defivery 
Diracl From soixae 
D.O.T. & EPA. 


(dr. tendon |44in | 629 7779 
Tote* (51) 8956&Z2 TRAS G. 


Bk Greece n A 
Bk Greece 93/V7 
Bk intend 19 
BLlrtorodfl 
Bit Montreal 99 
Bk Montreal M 
Bk Montruoi 91 
BkNne York to 
Bk Nava Sootio 0/91 
Bk Nova Scotia 9* 

Bk Tokyo 93 
Bk Tokyo 17 
Bk Tokyo FeMB/Yl 
Bk Tokyo DK9B791 
Bankarnerkzi OTJ 90 
Broken Trod tt> 
Bonkers Trust M 
8ti Cctatal 90 
Bed Fin 17/91 
Bafl 97 
Bbl InltS 
Hwf9 
BW Inl91 IMttrfy) 

Bq lndasu«l99 
Bue«9 

Btce 97 ( COD) 
BiosOdte 
B fee Jan* 

Btce 99 

Bq lndasuex*7fCao) 
BOP9S 
Bro 97 (Cool 
Bro8S/» 

Broiorto 
Blip 99 
Bap 19 
BnoH/91 
Bop JuM 
BroBS(Mfniv) 

Bq ParlxBPcra 

Bq WanraB9/M 

Barclays Bk Poranew 

BarrtaysO/S9S 

Bardovs 0/5 Pore 

BordayiO/SM 

Belgium Pop 

BetetemDortf/MMih 

BMetamfll IMttdy) 

Helgtum M/05 IMtti) 

Betafcnn JuStB 

BeroroBkM/91 

Belgium M/M 

MotamOd99/M 

Cczz9fl 

CccoQS 

Cncn 90/95 

Oil 91 

CntOC 

CBKfSAStMMVI 

CkcMM 

Obcfonmivl 

ObcU 

OjrWtS«.M 
Central Int 97/09 


9«ft 


7ta 

Itt 


Stt 

«N 


(A 


Ttt 

Stt 

IVl 


■HV99J0 99*0 ■ 
iwri MBtxma 
\wa nso tvs 

13-03 9*4 tea 

29-11 neaaea.15 
2Mi WJ5 laajg 

26- 12 100JSMU5 
29- K) IfltfiilOLTl 
31-19 100931 01 JD 
15-10 99 JO 995* 
31-W 1004010090 
13-01 100451 00 J5 
24-10 WU»mi5 

■■2M1 naeemz 

M oorntflojoiotato 
Ibis an 10127100.17 

■■3»n 9993 10013 

II- 12 9991 10012 

27- 12 KXOnOta32 

13-11 10090100 JO 

9941 160.12 
03-02 9790 9610 
T7-J2 10OJJ1B6X3 
muicui 
■■ 17-10 99.97 10917 
Bov 30431901716997 
■M »12 1090(100.15 
li^1B-U 9940 99 JO 
■ 30-10 NUH19915 
ZM1 9919 1K19 

13- 03 KXU4100A4 

14- 11 99.75 9915 
6042 WUtafl.49 
14-10 9930 9940 
31-19 160041*914 
0-11 11906952 

7W 05-12 9919 16909 
890 Q41 BOJ6HXU6 
Ito 6443 W1.151CU5 
Itt 2241 WB0W919 
N 17-116974 9914 
Btt 1M3 TKJS1I0J5 
M0 BMZ2 16007300.17 

PV BM1 9915 9975 
tPe 31-01 M1J71I1J2 
ftt 01-tl MBS3W94J 
BK M43 KB.HTB0J4 
■H U42 H91 119971 
MU 13-12 10913KD73 
11% M2 H960H91I 
(IS 27-11 9933 9943 
■h 1741 6941 99JI 
M 19-19 10900 160 J3 
Bl (641 109041H.U 
in . minui 
n 1242 1994416934 
K 15-11 109016915 
4 69-12 109071 09 T7 

Itt 24-10 1090010925 
Mb 12-11 10aj3110Q.il 
Itt 104D99J9 69J9 
Itt 2*41 1BQE1KU2 
Mb 39-11 9939 99.15 
Mb 21-91 1094610945 
m 26-11 6995 69.65 ■ 


ttt 


Btt 


9912512-11 9935 10965 


CTOtnol 92/95 

Chase Mro 0/9 63 

Cham Mm Cora 69 

Own Mro Core Oo 

ChemfcnlW 

Chemtcol94{WklY> 

a wB Bpikfi 

ChrtsttMO BtcM 

DftcoraOS 

citfesreAotottavktv) 

cmraraSeuM 

OttaarnPtopK 

CHkoras? 

Ortavaw 

Ortenrppore 

aiteorePtao«7 

Cwrwrtca97 

riumne elite *•-*-— 
lilUillllHH Llm T-fuMr 

CocnmentkMovW 
Comm ura Montreal *1 
Comp Fin dcWMM 
CokkJI Of erorno 93 
Ccf 64/96 

cxtnns 

Cd 97 IMttrfy) 

Ccf 92 

Cromt 97/92 
Cr RtecferSS/93 
Cr Foncter OC197 
Cr For Export 92 
CrLvamrtafS/M 
Cr Lreanate 90/77 
CrLvronots 19/64 
CrLyronoh 91/95 
CrLvmnots99 
GrLremalsJoaR/M 
CrLvonnolx97(Cap) 
CrLyoonatoOO 
CrLvannatsJunn/N 
Cr ftattanal 69 
Cr Nattonal *0/64 
Cr National 60 
CrMHonsMTW 
Crerttanrtottte 
CrltaBonof2 
DaBcN Kroaya9* 

Deng 6*799 Uftthtv) 

Den Norsk# Mov99 
Dm Norsk* DecM 


8tt 


Bb 

8tt 


416 


M 


6tt 

«6b 


Btt 

ns 


Btt 


Dromart Od *V99 
Denraork 99/64 
DteEnte (Jest 92/94 
DresteerFlo93 
DrssOntr Fin 19 
Dresdner Fin 92 

EtdorateNpcW 

Edf 99 

E<3 97 iMttttV) 

End 00/05 (MttrtvJ 
End On 
Eab99 
Eaf 90 
Etc 90 

Exterior lot 91/95 
FCrrevW95(MlMY) 
FemMo 92/66 
reiiiwIoMavfl 
Rnkawte iMttUyl 
FkaiWi Paper 6B/65 
7W Boston 9U6» 
Fim Bk Svst 94 
First Bklvst 97 
First QUCOOO 97 
Fks>Chtmgo92 
First CNcaaeM 
First Gty Term 95 
Flirt Inter 95 
Ford 91 

Fortune S+L 62 
Full lot 94m 
Genfinaxr 49/92 
. Mxsice62/94 
Gib 99 
Gib 92 


02-01 69 J2 9932 

31-01 1605519645 

05-13 >00.33160.16 
0-11 V9J5 T9 95 
27-72 nosieu 
I 27-11 9945 WJi 
13-u tsameoia 

[ 06JJ3 K030VJ075 
25-11 »942 9932 
M-ll 9999 9935 
79-12 9942 9932 
34-10 16084100.14 
*01 9942 9932 
i2-n meoitort) 
15-H993B 10)39 

s-* Moramu 

27-12 9990 9125 
71*11 WUBmB 

20 - 11 uoLimtak 
1M3 9940 9939 
12-11 9932 6942 
Zt-tt KM IKM 

mU 2403 1904610Q.il 
Btt 09-04 WU510B25 
Mb 2743 9934 9944 
943 W4t 6691 MM 
ttt 12-12 1993710947 
Tm m itn?<: 
I Mb W1 I6966MLI0 

■ 9241 MO4B10OJO 
1964110071 

0604 100.1416026 
0901 021110033 
29-11 MOttWUM 
27-12 W056T604S 

21- 01 10OjnOO45 
■■ 07-11 9942 9972 

?tt i»4i loosomio 
Mb 1W2 1064(10674 
Btt 2141 WB39 0632 
ftt 11-83 109.1910079 
9425 2042 109.12100.17 
Mb 1341 UB25K635 
Itt 27-03 10095100.15 
7tt 95-12 9979 9949 
ftt 13-11 10B33T6033 
I ftt 19-12 W0JKW8.W 

■ 13-11 9935 11939 
19-12 9935 MEL5D 
09-01 lOOOOMOM 
15-10 rniinui 
M5raaJ4K*M 
2941 H002W.12 

2M0 T01-06T01.M 

29-11 9932 HUE 
2742 1061710027 

2563 100.1016075 

2742 1099MSUB 
■■ 1(439936 10096 
634 2M1 9931 9941 
M BMnamnsozi 

Itt 17-12 9940 9936 
Itt 15436MB 10999 
76b (Ml K44 9949 
7* 23-12 99.65 10095 
Btt 3703 96 JB HUB 
Mb 2642 10*06109-15 


Itt 

Btt 


ttt 

Mb 


Itt 


■tt 

Itt 

Itt 

Mb 

86k 


6J22S IS-M 9635 9945 


25-W 6940 9935 I 
9*35 18995 
ftt 29-11 9Mf 9979 
Btt U-11 9949 9935 
Itt 29-11 WJH 9943 
Btt 07-11 99J4 99J5 
B7975TS-11 997# 9940 

■tt 21-11 9979 99J9 

itt 22-19 9269 Mil 
Btt 95-12 6943 6933 
ttt 15-n Haanoaia 
•tt 24-10 9940 9930 
ttt 1541 16OJ210B72 
■31-T2 109.181 0D7S 
22-61 UBTHSOTl 

0-11 1000519015 

11-12 TeO59M049 


Itt 


Gz&Pera 
orefo 
Giro 91 

GtAimrN15t5av92 

G96Mrtire 92/65 

Grindknrs92 

GrtortanW 

Gt Western 19/fl - 

HWSomarito 

Hfll Saanicf Peru 

HlmanoflrtS 

Haw Kona Pop 

Hydro 91 IMMyl 

HVTOOlSCMtNv) 

Id 61 

lafand 95/90 

ladonrafa 61/62 

KM Nov« 

tretoad 94/99 

lreknd67 

IratandM 

I w e toi e r to 

tntama-92 

IMV69 

Holy 29/94 

Italy 95 

C Han 67 

jp Monro 97 

KspFtGn 

KamtaiOyK 

KtahMort Ben 91 

KtdmrarT DttiM 

Ktekwiarl Ben tare 

Korea OtvBkto/W 

Koran ExrtiBkBSrti 

LtaOBlnS+tW 

UaycMBkPBn* 

LkwJsM 

Uoydi62 

LteWteM 

Lire is 

LtcbU 

Lk±62 

Matorrtaft/09 
Moiovsto 90715 (MHl) 
MmantoAmB/92 
Mrtaysto DertS/92 


9 

■tt 


Btt 

Itt 


9tt 

■tt 


u-nHHB 

2M1 WUOWUOl 

27-12 1K.951D145 

1744 W42 9932 
05-12 6659 9U5 
27431604610051 
_JR 041 nS5BUS40 
ttt 2*43 «Ji nM 
itt 2742 1SOJQUOJB 
MB 29-11 MSB 9650 
I 34-19 9945 9935 
1442 6977 6947 
■ 199I6M69X 
615 06-nnU19M.lt 
Btt 1541 9975 HUS 
Itt 1241 9MD 9940 
Mfe 99419995 MIS 
•tt 2W1 109350020 
•tt 17-0 062210613 
Btt 3642UODROOJ2 
Itt 1KH 100MZW0J2 

S | 12-11 9944 9195 
■ 11429959 6946 

S B 0*43 IDOJNIOOJA 

B imi mama 

■ 22-16 6952 6943 
ft IMBWUSMe 
M 2941 noenoui 

m 9MB >004110071 


*u watonsjg 
ZteSIOOJCWDJO 

*11 6975 1141 

05-12 9950 M5D 


NmHaiN 
ManHmflMMyl 
Mro MUM 
MarMUOl 
Mar MH 95 
MeBroBfcfi 

BSEmSkPera 

MkllrodBk (fare Novi 
Midland M92 
MkBtxxl M89 
Midhart Nil 92 
Midland torn 

Midland Int 99 
Mitsui Fin 97 (Oro) 
Mitsui Flo 94 
MunGranMltt 
MtaBkDon92 
Mali 97 (Cap) 


Itt 12-1 2 9946 99 JO 1 
I 69-12 uunauo 
6tt 3W9 HUHttR 
Itt 9(42 MOSBNBJf 
6tt a-ta wojtieojj* 
Mb i4-u naoo ' 

Mb 17-12 9939 16045 

a B 29-11 taunoua 

■ 10-12 99429931 
Htt 1544 99.14 69* 
Btt 09449935 HUB 
Itt 65-12 9939 UUS 
Itt 2902 109421900 
Btt BMW 9970 9MB 
Itt *11 1931 HUB 
ttt 1M2 9130 9945 
Mb 0941 T0UZHBJ2 
8tt »-a 1000510005 
Btt 19-12 99.97 0047 

tv. *11 raumiojt 

Mb 19-12 99461971 
Mb 1663 9944 9934 
Mb 2901 HUSMUS 
Itt *121905310943 
I 09-n 1804010030 
ttt 21-19 1902210943 
■ 8M53 WUmOQTB 
26-70 91X1 9952 ■ 


Btt 


Itt 

M 


Not Bk Detroit 91 
run Bk 99794 


Hat Comm l 

Nat Wert Perp (A) 
Hal Wert Ptrp(BI 
Nal West Fin 91 
Noi West Fin 95 
Nat West 94 
Nat West Fin 92 
Not Wert Fla prop 
NrntoOr ft 
New Zealand 17 
Hz Steel Darn 
Nippon CrM - 
Nordic lot 91 
Otd>85 
OftM 
Olb 95/99 

OMmareMtoktell 
DHshnMMaott 
Ptnstn 91/94 
ROC 97 

FkBankroM/91 

(Brt)M 


l£ 


174) 9935 100.15 
19-129935 19175 
3941 9947 99J7 
3M29U5HB.H 
13-12 9972 9942 
*01 9943 9993 
1V9B90J9 UU9 
21-01X09910940 
U-H KB.U1067I 

U-X H0.1D092S 

*WWUSW12S 

23-11 1003510145 

2740 I0947NOJ7 
OWN M61O0BJ5 

*12XU|MLB 

14419935 HIM 

IMI 9975 TBL25 

29-n uxmoiauo 
*11 nORHUBD 


1 91 


NreBkDaltaafT 
Rlx: 05 


Itt 


45-12 19BJ316922 

2M1 XO4B0O.15 

Z74B9M9XQM 

12- 12 9972 9M2 

19-12 9935 MU5 

13- 11 M0J6H62I 

Z743HM3U9S 

*11 9949 99* 

67-11 9945 9935 


■oNom 91/93 
Saram mtFbrte 
5amm torn 9t/0t 
Saawa tart Flan 
SOQmBFtaAOrtl 

■.TmndlFteQecM 

SeWtaodJntn 

SacPadBc97 

5ecPacffic62 

BwirtCnff 

5ntJ* 

MM 99/63 
Me lot It 
Ste tot 91 
SocGai6B/fS 
Soc Gan Marti 
SocGaaNavW 
5ocGen97 
Sncfatl 
5Mto 92/97 
5aaiB95(NHUyl 
Spain etna 
Moll 
Stand CbmTM 
Stood Otari 91 
Stand Otari Marti 
ShtadOtartMtonalrti 
SW-i-aiiAteatfNis 
State Bk Urtkrir 
SMWtemaTri«rt» 
... \ >« 
to 

was ■- 
62/05 (MM V) 
69/66 

9140 

Sweden Perp 
TrMyo Kobe 97 (Cart 
TOtvO 92/64 
Tafcuufn 92/94 
TakuutaCaafT 
TaEl Asia 94/99 
Taraamf2 
Tore TM 92/99 
Tvs 94/04 
UbNaraavfl 
UbNanmy* 
utaKtaadom 60/92 
HNbFaraort 
WrtMFaraaff 
Westpocf7 (Crot 
Wtas Ore 91 
World Bk Item 
MMdBkllflU ; 
Vototautnu 91/96 
Yakatwma 97 (QW 
ill 


Btt 


Btt 


M-IO MBWBM?~ 

B-nHaamaz: 

ttm uwei 
Ml H0J7UL47 : 

1902 9933 10042 

96b 1549 9975 19059.' 
Ttt *13 99559945 
Itt M«3 1005410646 
21-11 6649 9930 
0241 9654 9974 
97-11 9959 69.12 
39-19 6935 10076 


Btt 


Btt 

Btt 




1*12 ie»4710.\.-' C 
*12 6675 10625 
94-03 1094110025 


•tt 

Itt 

Btt 

lib 

Itt 


1 043 m«106SS 
0-11 UUB1MJB 
*03 10072160431 
4-I1MM9 

*03 9945 
2»dzrt6t^BI 

»u uxusnais 


\fgggj£ : 


S3SSS5 


... *u ' _ 

Itt 11-03 MB* 

Itt 0301 9940 9981 
9% 0HI TrtUOTOOJO. 
Mb *71 9MB HUB ' 
ft 1202 10630M03D 
Mb *40 9949 IMS - 
76b 05-12 100*9100. U. 
76b 19019942 9947 ' 
H-M 9944 9944 

*11 9U4 9936 


*11 MU0MOM 
■■ KNJW Dam 


I 

Btt 


10901 ttMMN 

*11 99 JO 9940 ■ 
*11 7092910020 . 
*93 1093BMB4B- 
9904 M0LOSMO.15 ) 
1H2MU6H0JI 
MBUUIHW i 
15-12 I0622WU2 . 
*129649 6975 : . 
23-05 9940 6M9 
2102 9975 9975 • 
B701 6«» 9936 -. 
27-12 99J0 9940 . 
0-11 9MB 9941- . 

1902 9932 964} 

ttjn lMnaiM 


748437*12 69 J6 9630 
I ML90' 


748 2M19UBI 
Btt .92041697310933 
ft IMI 9941 9941 
•4 15«| 1094919079 


Non Dollar 


AfBBkf* 

Bk Montreal 94 - 
a Nova Sarto « 
tt. Tokyo tortO 
BqlndOOOKfl 

CTtSra»/6i 
Cam neH 
Cr Procter 10 
GrNaBoaot 91/95 


HoMaxB/192 
III 94 

intaodfl ’ 


iLieyai Bum 96 
MtoBk Dm 94/69: 
MluBk DM 91/94 


Utt *11 MM5M945 - . 

u* zr-u mmui 

21019936 1HA . 
11* 23-11 N0J2M042 
ii* u-ii nmu 
l*b- H672M642 . 
111b 15-1! 96406970 Jt 

hk 33-nmuzmszm: 
mi 0901 1093519943T 
»% tt-unusnsis. 
11* 22-11 1003510041 ■ 
IMS 1701 9941 1971 ; 
T2tt 1500160721663)-; 
11% U-Tl HUOIBBJO ' 

n* ommasme * 

116b 2541 106U16B74 


I9h tt-M 1093610040 -t 
116b 9901 1094710937. 1 


Nrdtanwkte B4.65 
New Zealand 67 


5aci 69/63 

Shnu CbartftsPora- 
YorfaHrr int 91/64 - 


12 07-11 TflOBSOail 

II* toM 9643-6673 1 
m> 14.116674 6944 \ 
n% toll 9930 99 JB «. 
12ft 3430 106721014} , 
.11* to« 9443 6772 -1 

rm ftiiuunuo T 


•i 


Soon* : OmrUt Sutsae-Ftrst Bosten Ut, 
London 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRANSCO 


TW IARGE5T SHOWROOM 
AND STOCK IN EUROPE 
Konprng a 03004 stack of more ffsel 
300 brand now axsef dl Bxopoan + 


Jrqxxiese makes cDrroetrvefy price d . 
T« frw srrimhslilppiofl i r mi r ai ca. 
Sand for muftieafiir Tree rnktliUB6 


Trx*co SA, 95 Noortfafaro. 
7030 Atrfwrop. Baigfani 
Tol 323/542 fr240Tx 35 707 Tits 


Trasoa London Ltd. 

6667 Per* Lroe, London W.l. 


SmUei Imd-UK-W. Gernxxiy 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FRS AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 


AND 


SAVE 


WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG OR 
FREE BUY-&ACX FOLDS! TO: 
SWPSCE B.V. P.0. 80*7563. 1118 ZH 
Anoterdam Arart Tlie Nettwrlrods. 
Phare P20115TO3 Teley. 12568 


SWS1DE Int, 576 Fifth Avenue. 
7th Poor. Nov* Vorir. N.Y. 10(336 . J5a. 
Phone (212) 869-4484. Tefe* 427965 


SHPSDE SA. Otauisro de Wovra 
445. 10-40 Brussels. Belgium. 
Phone: (02)5499052. Tele? 63290 


NICE tNTBUGSCT HOSTESS 24 Lon- 

don based looks far opentags. Inter- 
ested ei buanas and art. rree to 
travel TeL 01 225 03 68 3pm- 12. 


BC OTTZBl ffaenr to Sparsdi, cn^nh, 

French and German, ly^nn & lylcr. 

seeks port ui inll caneany. Reasecdl 

Geneve 31 67 (K 


SOmSTKATB) FRB4CH CTL. so- 

ad Rip erionee. Poem in German is 


seeking on rterestinq posmon to Lon- 

dcn.m 01-235 15». 


SOfmsnC ATg. ATTRACT IVE. Irtri- 
tgenr. educated, nknasord lady 

PA / travel a xnp cm on seeks pesnon. 

Tefe London pi) 4SJ 85 7B. 


YOUNG WOMAN SEEKS emptay- 

menr unportunrty. Ambtoous. attrac- 

tive, boatosh bul n ot boring. MA 
London 01 370 3271. 


YOUNG SAPAN£5£ model. mJhkn- 

gud. wel te ove fl ad seels int e resting 


en vy rnent Tokyo. 538 15 90 Tokyo. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


UINF9VC SEBG for AMERICAN 
mirtCKVE FfiiMS n PAJ3S: 


English, Betgicn, Dutch or German 
socetroes. knawriedqe a* French re- 
quared, Encfch -Jtartha rsi 6&iguc/ 
MfexoK. wme cr chant 138 Avenue 
Victor Hugo, 75114 Pens, France Teh 
727 61 ffl. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


TUIl TIME POSITION For a um - 

mar with ci muwnirm af 2 jerm pro- 


feBiand emenence m ebbol pro- 
^ammtog. Knowladae of Fort: an and 

other progrronxng farqvcgawoM 

be preferred. Gross sdary PW00. 

ivoriong papers requned. Reply -nth 

curncuun vitae: Bin 2833. He'dd 
Tribune, ^2521 Naufllv Cede/. Frcnce 


DOMESTIC 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 


EXCAUBUR 


The "afl new” 1985 Senes V taafiburs 
at now avodode. 


These aretf* mast iuxuraus Eudfaurs 
ever bufl. Ccndy teother irftnon 
end countless other reafares ate itcfad- 
•d in our pnces. 


We cm provide the Slandrod 305 CJ. 
engine m odel or Ihe high O uipul 350 
CT high performance model 


For more a formation, ad 


Monte Carlo 33 {93! 25 63 91 
' : 479550 AUTO MC 


or refer 


Cars of 
Copenhagen 

TAX FREE 


» Ir J ern uiM n J Sides 

• Worldwide DeJrw«t> 

• European Pnoe Leaders 

• Tel. £T 45 1 37 78 CO 

• Tete* 19932 DK 


55 Vadroffave D1.-19Q0 
CPH V.O&WAK 


MERCEDES SPECIALISTS 

FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 

1985 Modrti mEto^unt 


2BO 51. 280 SSL 500 SO, loOSL 

1986 Modrts from Stack: 
280E. 3O0E. 3005L. 260 SE. 300 
30OSEI. SOO SL 500 SB, 500 S 
Shpmenl 8 dekvery veariowde. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MAINZai (ANDSTTL 191 

D-6000 F8ANKRJRT/M 

THr «n 69-73 30 6! 

TUL 414018 


1985 OGSWXJT SA1E 
Mercedes 7 BMW / fbrjdie 

500/3807280 SavSECVa 

BMW 745/635/535 
1986 MOOas NOW AVAOABIE 
Porsche 944 Turbo / MB 3U0 9. 

Aka preouMBd 1979/80 Panches 


Caff or te lex Munich, W. Gernxxiy 

: 522851 


O) 89-465041 at 42. Tbc ! 

AmteKan < 


■wirt and B fn i ul ed 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCJC, for ewnecfc te d el v er y 

FROM STOCK 


RUTEINC 


TAUNUSSTR. 53, dOOOfRANKRJRT 

W Genu, trt (0)69-232351. tlx 411559 


TAX FRS CARS 
P.CT. 

Afl mdies, dl modek, brand new 
tfnSdeTlv, 2016 AiVwerp, Beidum 
r A3?231 5# 00. Tlx 35546PHOOT B 
Send USS5 far eclafag 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 


Since 1972. wqnri n ced car tender far 
Mercedes, Porsche, BMW. Jaguar, bn- 
medtata de&ver>- . lrrc»rt/ expert, U5. 
DOT A B*A, shateig far Ians/ ond 
better. Oaamrte Mdtm GmbH, 
Tcretaegentr. I 4 Durad faf, W . 
Genbroy (D) 211-434646, *c 85V374. 


1985 ROU5-ROYCE 9VR 
1985 ASTON, MARTIN VOLANTE 

far rot by oumw. 

Teli Franre 33 (93J 25 £3 91 


TRANSMUMM KGRM 21 Gmtel- 

B-2241 Zoenel, Antwerp. Td: 


3w£!i(L54 Tlx 32302 Tramto B. fa 
skxfc ALL TYPS, hCW & USB3. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


FOR SALE; JAGUAR XJ6 

42 Sovereign, new LHD. sage green, 
douten lecrtar, aufaraatk; draond- 


uusb, suToor a ooy wnosn. 
Tax-free DM62,000 
Tek Mr. Here Wok-oven 
Holcnd (0) 3402-41076 ’ 


NEW AMBHCAN CARS 


Jf you wortd Bm man w krmdUon 
abort how to purdxne any new /mari- 
can car far Euiaaean defivay. wflh dfl 
fomohw awplrtod cal 

France P5 25 63 91 


NEW PEUGEOT, bud Rarer. Range 

tover, Toyota. 4*4, tropiad specs. 
Bntta. Zorvtabaon IB, Mttnriuun- 
brartt Haflrod (0p6445i92, ibt 47082 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


20 YEARS AUTO-GRANfit 
RUUte Garmon cro dbder offers new 
AtoaritoBMW.JfaricHfa9rnri._Tii; 
(0] 731-40033, 4x712861 AUTEX 


AUTOMOBILES 


PRESTIGE CARS to site. Porsche Gar- 

rera Cabrietei "86 tax free, Mercedes 
280 SL Cciviafet "85 lax free. Ferro*; 
30B G15 -8Z Tek Mam Brun, (1MV - 
31 40 85 Plain. V* 


19SS ROUS ROYQE G0RNK2C- 

Whita urii magnofa hide. 2JX0 
. iris*, better than new. Presently an 
HWttterti 930IOWF. Cal 212-644- 
0123 USA Moftm9 la i 


AUTO RENTALS 


OIAHC JB4T A CAR. Preifige can 

wSh phone: fab Sprit, Mcraxfa, 

‘ •, BMW, fitaouentosnal an 


rfion Charrori.75008 Fore. Tet 
rtri«(S3®97FCHARCXL 


7203040 Telex 6 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 


ESCORT 

SBMCE 

USA ft WORLDWIDE 

Head office to New Jfart 
330 W. 56th St, N Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 


MAX» CRHXT CARPS AND 
OCOCS ACOPTH) 
Private NUrnbervhip* Araflcflte 


Tbi* i 


mag i 

bero teaturad a« 


USA 6 intem ufi erwd newi meefia 
indudfag rtrie rod TV. 


* USA ft TRANSWORLD 


A-AMER/CAN 


ESGOST SBWICE. 
EVERYWH5K YOU ARE OR GO!- 

1-813-921-7946 

Cal free from US: 1-800-2374)892 
Cal free from Banda I-800-282-0892. 
Lowell Eastern we to n ei you badtl 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 


IN NEW YORK 


TBL: 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 


COUPLE (N MANHATTAN. 1 chid & 

1 tee in Feb. requre au par. Light 
hairtekeepnig mduded. but con d -eora 
are ided for nrtt penar. flfas be 
notvsmofcer & mSrng n stay a iw 
mien af 2 yeraV Plecae lend phero. 
So* 2890. Kerrid Tnbunr. ‘92521 
Ncuty Cede. Farce 


NANNY, Frendi mother Icmx & 
sceoVaog Encloh required far Mddfe 
borfern rorniy la acre fro 9 tl 5 vem. 
la son uruiiarouely. 67 Mmnor Way. 
Onslow 'Ubg e, Gad fcrd Surrey. Tel. 
England Q$t3jQ3B35 


ENGLISH EXPERTS 

w ' Sf jSaiSST6&JS , '“ 

t ROLLS-ROYCE 
IN. BH drive, ftew & PteOwned 
a norierpmww m Imparl 'Export. 
Qocwnentanm. thippng etc. 

USA out merniry 
Tate advantage tfi cur ft^ e mirce . 


HUGHS MOTOR COMPANY 
TU 41254 HUGie G. 


escort sama 

TO KB4SINGTON CHURCH ST, W8 
TE-- 937 9136 OR 9379133 
AR nqar nA arris, o rrep t ri . 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Servic e . 

Tel: 736 5877. 


★ LONDON ★ 


EXECUTIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
01-229 2300 or 0I-2?9 4794 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ESCORTS A GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

LONDON 

Portman Escort Agency 

67 CWtem Street, 

London WI 

Tab 486 3724 er 486 1)58 

Al motor credit orods ocrepled 

ZURICH 

Scemoiflip rocer! + rotate arovhe 
Tel: 01/57 75 96 

CHEUSEA BCORT SERVIOE. 

51 Beauchamp Place, London SW3. 
Tefc 01 584 6513/^49 (4-12 prcj 

******GB€VA BEST 

BCORT SSIV1CL 022 / 86 15 95 

MADRID INTL 

ESCORT SKVICE _ 

TEL- 2456548. CREDIT CARDS 

ARISTOCATS 

London Etcort Service 

128 Wignore St, London W.l. 

All metro Cre* Cords Accepted 
tS- 437 <7 41 7 4742 

12 noon - otd right 


Town & Country 

BCQRT SERVICE 

TEL CHKAGO (312) 649-5869 

** ZURICH 558720 ** 

PRIVATE TOURISM OUDE SSVEE 

HEATHROW 

♦London Escort Agency* 

01-609 2870 

VSNNA ESCORT - AGENCY- 
THr 37 52 39 . 

★ MADRID * 

TA5IE ESCORT SBMCE 

TSU 411 72 57. CARDS 

LONDON TOP ESCORT SMCF 
Headeato Araricroi faxwe. 352 8343 

REGENCY NY 

WORtDWRX ESCORT SERVICE 
212-838-8027 or 753-1864 

+ JASMINE ^ 

AM5TBSSAM ESCORT SERVICE 
Q2D-366655 



MADRO SHADOWS 

Tek 2SO9603 ♦»«**♦. 
ESCORT SERVICE. CREDIT CARDS 

MAYFAIR CLUB 

CUBE SERVICE bam Spm 
ROTTERDAM (0) 10-254155 

THE HAGUE { 6 } 70-60 79 96 



AMSTERDAM 

CUB ROSE ESCORT SHVtCE 
STADHOUOOSKAOE 125 

Tab 020-768606 

uli 1 w *¥ 1 r 


ROME CUB BJROffi ESCORT 

A Guide SrortBeMt 06/589 2404.589 
1146 (Fran 4 pm Id 10 pn} 

ki l i'- |ll ‘i'| , v-'T^ i T 

ZU RICH-GENEVA 

GWGarS BCOKT SBMCE. 
70:01/3630864-022/3441 86 


GBCVA * BEAUTY* 

ESCORT SERVICE. 022/29 51 30 

UMTON MAXRC.E5CORT Sroviro, 

Heodxow/GrowicfcCra* end* aa- 
repted. Tek 937 4428 + 935 090 

ZURICH 

Garafioe Boot* Service 

Tek 01/252 61 74 

GB4EVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tek 46 11 58 


t. T lVV 


t fa ^t ’• ™ 

ZURICH 

A1£XS ESCORT SSVKE 

TEL 01/47 55 82 







AMSTERDAM 

EURO ESCORT SERVICE 

020 - 271001 





APPLE * MADRID 

ESCORT SERVICE 

OBIT CARDS. 2330319 


LOMX3N ESCORT 5KV1CE. Tet 937 

«ff4. 

L r rT jr *rVifiaifl 


C*-vA--nrAV^I?1?!- 

E^v^^uKiaagiJ 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


CHAUENE GBCVA GUDESenfo 

Tet 283-397 


MMOI SUPREME EKOKT Service; 

Tet. 089/4486038 


SHH0UBTF5 E5COST 

London 01-859 0485. 


SBMCE 


TWNKfUKT -EVA'S EfCOn A 

efeenrica. TeL 069/44 77 75 




fSAMCHJKTA AREA. Senna's Escort 
Sennre. CrecB Corda Tek 62 84 32 


igBaftwafla 


■aWNOWfAlSUBES^ 


■gMreawregrogfr 


■aM^wrsECMfAomcy 


*^ D *S,^Sf?°!?, ESCC * r sw 

rtcftjOT 1 507 Credit Crotfa. 




TO TBT Escort Se,, 

vto*. 069 / 59 - 40 - 5 Z 


t BAH MOW LONDON 

vice. TeL 994 6682. 


ESCORT Sro- 


LONDON ONLY JAPANESE ESraiS 

Srorire. Tet 01 821 0627. 


LONDON BAYSWj 

vice. TeL 01 229 


8 R U SMS. CHANTAL BCOKT San 

Via: Tel: 02/520 23 65. 


I « B « - vwmw ESCORT Seri 
wro. TeL 91 84 39 - 


“¥N»CH - «CHAan*te Eicort W 
wee. Trt: 089/99 24 18 . ^ 


Amsterdam rms roses 

Sarv»maa»M376 




TCHLaW “nd 

— TeL 733 07 98 


MnBMK aaaS 

|Gi»de Service. Teh Ban 7«S?S L 


mwKfva/ 

Service. ■■ 


safe 






AN J Wifi? NATASOU 
haart Sronre. Tet mdSflTi?”* 


Tet 


326420 or 340110 ' 


IMNKHJRT 


Service. 


HAMBURG - 






t 




M 

iiDkZL 

23?SP 

m 


- PHVA7T E5CORT 
Gwfe Setwce. Tet 91 tO\A 


"SSI RJBSK*--i 


t 


I 






rWU \^Dj 


f 














































































• '•** • Jfr- ^ r.- v • :rS-i~TS? r«v. 



Page 17 


68 Higher in U.S., Europe Trade 






*tr 


9 *m. 


fc^iei 




*S "8 


H* 

*■ * „ 

« -r-* •■ 

Uttr* ~i 

&%:- 
in* ■■ 
»*-*. . 


•»■* 

\er-* i 

* .* ■ a i 
l . 
f-« 

* ‘.e 

->I te:- 
; » , 
T ■* 
T -4 : 
»:» fj 
If " 5 
.-* A - 
■v ■> 
t-w * 
AM * 

* s : 

■ * * 


H V"w 


Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatcher 

"H* dollar 

York and European trading against 
most major currencies. 

de ** ribed fading hi 
New York as relatively quiet 

Traders noted that the dollar's 


al action by the central banks. Tn 

11 k last coupk of days the threat of 
intervention has receded,'* said 
Earl Johnson of Hards tfany in 
Ouc^o. "The scope of imerven- 
non nav dearly not matebed the 

4j He added, “The Europeans 
* l ^ ficd , with **“ doQar around 
160, and the Japanese must do 


§*!?“* *8®?ist d^J^xaneac- yeit. -United States I or Columbus Day, 
endmg m New Xodt al.2I5.4Q. t» the dealera said, 
fixwi 215:00 on Wednesday. .. Traders saw no immediate sign 

-earlier m Enrqpewr trading, of the dollar bieddng but of a 
toditts ; reported that . strong com- range erf 163 to 166 DM osr of the 
mstaai baying pasted the dollar -imAm ^haWng off its lackluster 
higher. tone of this week. 

As in the Umted States, traders Late dollar rates in London, 
described traefing as mrieL compared ■with late Wednesday’s 

Currency dealers thr. -m*A*r levels, were 16550 DM, up from 
.was mQtSy bullish on the dollar 2^460; 11765 Swiss francs, • up 
despite Hairing feare of inteCTen- from 11680, and 8.0800 French 
don by central hanW francs, up from 8 j0425. 

Tie British pooed-oded * ■ w 
$1.4115 m London, down from cJS 

**“«■ from 

Wednesday’s dose of 1,735, - 


BBOTe to get the dollar down a" sig- Wednesday’s late iateoflf^illt Jo^^ venn 8 «> 11793 francs at 

nincani amount sminsr ih. . # ri/vnW, t m.j : “6 cuse. 


f- 


aificam amount against the yen.' 

The British pound closed at 
$1.4110, down from S1.4145 on 
Wednesday in New York. 

The US, unit ended at 16570 
Deutsche marks, up from 2.6540 
DM. The dollar finished at 8.1160 
French francs, up from 8*0855 
francs previously, and at 11870 
Swiss francs, up from 11800. 

The American currency also 


was down, however, from Wednes- 
day's dose in Tokyo of 217.85 yen. 

Tokyo markets woe closed for a 
nation al holiday, but there were 
rumors that (he Bank of Japan sold 
dollars on exchanges elsewhere in 
Asia, the dealers said. Tbere were 
qo reports of intervendaii-by Euro- 
pean central banks.' 

Trading was light in advance of 
the long holiday weekend in the 


In Frankfurt, the dollar opened 

at 165 DM, up ready a pfennig 

from Wednesday's dose erf 16418, 
and moved Tnghw at the midaftei- 
noon firing to 16533 DM. 

The dollar also rose in Paris at 
the opening Thursday to 8.087 
French francs from Wednesday's 
8.048 dose, and was later fixed ct31 
higher at 8.095 francs. 

(AP.UPI) 


China’s Reserves 
Called Sufficient 

Roam 

BEUING — The president 
of the People's Bank of China 
has said the counties Foreign 
exchange reserves were sum* 
dent to hack its foreign trade, 
Radio Beijing said Thursday. 

The radio quoted the presi- 
dent, Chen Muhua, as saying 
that China’s foreign trade bal- 
ance had improved in the third 
quarter after a deficit of S6.4 
billion in the first half. 

Foreign bankers say that 
China's foreign exchange re- 
serves have fallen to between $7 
billion and $8 billion, down 
from $11 2 billion at the end of 
March and a record $16.6 bil- 
lion at the end of September 
1984. 


Adams Earned Nigerian National Petroleum Chief 


By Brenda Erdmann 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Nigerian National 
Petroleum Corp. has named Aret 
Adams as acting managing director 
after a top-ievd shakeup at the 
state oil company. 

Hie culmination of the changes 
came last week with the resignation 
of Chief Festus Marinbo, manag- 
ing director, and several other top 
executives. Chief Mariaho was well 
regarded as a technician and ad- 
ministrator, but he had 

with Nigeria's oil minister, Tam 
David-West, over who should have 
day-to-day control of the company, 
industry sources in Lagos said. 

Chief Marinbo was a longtime 
associate of Major General Mo- 
hammed Bohan, who was deposed 


in August. The new military gov- 
ernment reappointed Mr. David- 
West as oil minister. 

Mr. Adams previously was a 
general m ana ge r, responsible for 
exploration and production at 
NNPC 

KMG, the international account- 


EUROBONDS 


limited Andd Concern About U.S. Debt 


Propellers 

Are in Vogue 

(Coutinoed from Page 11) 
not build a bigger fan to bypass ing firm, has named Paul Boschma 
even more air, achieving yet more as its chairman. As head of the 
efficiency? firm’s worldwide operations, Mr. 

Tins is the idea behind the “ul- Boschma su cc e ed s Reinhard Goer- 
tra-high bypass" engine. But as the drier, who was the group's first 
fan becomes Larger. -it becomes chairman for six years. Mr. 
more practical to use fewer, larger Boschma formerly was chairman of 
blades rather than many tiny ones, the Groupe d‘ Etudes. John Kiric- 
And the larger the fan gets, the Patrick of KMG Thomson McLin- 
bigger the shell, or duct, around the lock steps down as chairman of 
engine gets, until it becomes so KMG's region No. 1, which in- 
heavy it must be discarded. Hence, dudes Europe, Africa and the Mid- 
GE calls its engine an “unducted die East, and win be replaced by 


.■ h 


«i 


■"> : 



ally unchanged Thursday after, an 
exceptionally quiet day, dealers 
said. 

One dollar- straight trader at a 
Continental bank said, “It’s been a 
desperately dull day. There’s hard- 
ly. been any professional, and cer- 
tainly no retail, interest" He added 
that professionals seemed unwill- 
ing to leave the sidelines while the 
question of raising the U_S. debt 
cefling remained unresolved 

Only one new doDar-straight is- 
sue was launched during the day, a 
SKXVnrillion bond for Dayton- 
-HudsonCorp. 

r The 10-year issue pays 10% per- 
cent and was priced at 99^ percent. 
The lead manager, Goldman Sarh< 
International Corp_, said it was the 


. By Christopher Pizzcy company's first-offering on the Eu- Australia Ltd. was increased by the 
Reuters robond market It ended on the lead manager, J. Henry Schroder 

LONDON — Most sectors of wjien-issued market at a cBscount Wagg & Co. to 30 million Austra- _ ^ ^ 

tte Eurobond matket ended virtu- “ about 114, comfortably within Man dollars from the original 25 fan" engine. In any case, the fan John Gath of KMG Jespeisens, 

aUv imrfmnaed Thnrsrfav the total fees of 2 percent million . again looks like a propter and is who is also president of the Danish 

One feature in the when-issued - The increase did not affect the back out in the open. Institute. Bill Morrison, executive 

market was the strength of when-issued-market price for the While most people see potential partner of KMG Thomson McLin- 

Wednesday's S7Q-milBon equity issue, winch ended unchanged at a for the new engines, problems re- lock, was appointed to the central 

warrants issue for To^u Corp. An discount of 134. It pays 1414 percent main. management committee of KMG. 

official at Nomura International oyer five years and was priced at One potential problem is the Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. of 
Lt<L. the lead manager, commented 100%. noise caused by the propellers. New York has appointed Didier 

that ‘fit’s flying.” The par-priced Trading in the U.S. convertible which could disturb passengers as Chari et to the new post of assistant 

bond jumped Thursday to end at market was again dominated by well as those living near airports, general manager of the Paris office. 

104% bid compared with Wednes- Sperial-shuarion stocks, with the 7- There are also potential safety Mr. Chariet continues to have re- 

day's dose of around 100% bid. percent bond due 2000 for Viacom problems from vibrations that can sponsibility for the banking divi- 
Thefloatmg-rate-note sectorwas International one of the day's most weaken the fuselage or from on- son in Paris and as a member of 

very quiet with prices aiding main - active features, dealers said. shielded propeller Wades. the managing board of Morgan & 

ly unchanged, dealers noted The bond rose to a hi gh erf about Further, the propfan seems best Cie. SA, Morgan's French mer- 

3 11 during the day before dropping 
bade to end slighdy above Wednes- 
day's close at 108. Viacom’s shares 
have been firm on Wall Street for 
the past couple of days on takeover 
rumors. 


“There’s not much I can say, the 
market’s dead at the moment and 
that's iC* one trader at a British 
bank said. . 

In the Austrahan-dallar market, 
Wednesday’s issue for Sanwa Bank 


suited now for smaller planes, such chant banking arm. In addition, 
as those with 100 to 200 seats, with Brian Triuon has been appointed 
the engines mounted near the tafl. executive director-trading, and 
It will be far more difficult to use Philip O’Rorke executive director- 
such engines on larger planes, such sales, at Morgan Guaranty Gilts 


Imperial Chemical Industries 
PLC, Britain's larger, chemical 
company, said William F. Madden, 
a director of its petrochemicals and 
plastics division, is to be the next 
president of 1CI Japan. He be- 
comes president-elect on OcL 1, 

1986, and takes ova on Jan. 1, 

1987, from Stanley A. RidgweU, 
who is retiring. 

Procter & Gamble Ltd., the Brit- 
ish arm of the U.S. household and 
personal products concern, Procter 
& Gamble Co., has appointed Ter- 
ry A. Spybey to its board. He con- 
tinues as manager, industrial chem- 
icals- Europe. 

Lloyds Bank International Ltd., 
London, said Paul Brown, director 
of its European division, has taken 
on additional responsibility for op- 
erations in the Middle East and 
Africa. He takes over those duties 
from Brian Ashby, who was named 
general manager, organization de- 
velopment, at Lloyds Bank PLC. In 
his new post, Mr. Ashby will have 

responsibilities related to the merg- 
er of Lloyds Bank and Lloyds Bank 
International. In addition, Lloyds 
Merchant Bank has appointed 
Martin Cruitenden a managing di- 
rector. He will have responsibility 
for financial and risk control, per- 
sonnel. information technology, 
operations and support services. 
His post is new. For the past year. 


he has been general manager, spe- 
cial duties, of Lloyds Bank with 
responsibilities related io the merg- 
er. 

Electronic Data Systems has ap- 
pointed John Harris to the new 

C of general manager of EDS 
n KK, effective Jan. 1. John 
Hubert will succeed Mr. Harris in 
London as director of the business 
development group, which EDS re- 
cently formed to market its com- 
puter systems integration services 
to multinational companies. Mr. 
Hubert previously was head of 
Concern Computing & Communi- 
cations at Unileva. EDS is a unit 
of General Motors Corp- 
Hong Leong Securities Co. of 
Hong Kong has appointed Graham 
J. Margot an executive director. 
Barclays Bank PLC said Derk 

Pefly. a vice chai rman, has been 

appointed a deputy chairman from 
Jan. L following the retirement of 
Frank Dolling. Mr. Dolling re- 
mains a Barclays director. Andrew 
Buxton, while continuing as a vice 
chairman of Barclays Bank, will 
succeed Mr. Dolling as chairman of 
Barclays Merchant Bank. 

Merrill Lynch & Co. said David 
Rochester, director, international 
strategy and market p lannin g, at 
Merrill Lynch International in 
New York, is moving to London to 
become a managing director of 


Company Results 

Revenue and profits or losses. In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


United Stales 
Abbot Laboratories 


Bank of New York 


Chemical New York 


as the Boeing 747. 


Ltd. in London. 


3rd Quar. 

1985 

1981 

Revenue - ■ 

8225 

7315 

Net Inc 

106J 

9143 

Per Snore 

059 

050 

9 Mourns 

ins 

1984 

Revenue 

2A10. 

2550. 

Net Inc 

323.93 

2795 

Per Shorn 

2.70 

232 

Amer. Hospital Suppfy 

3rd Qoar. 

198S 

1*81 

Revenue 

8415 

8495 

Net |nc 

475 

54.9 

Per Share 

044 

057 

9 Month* 

1985 

1981 

Revenue 

2Joa 

Z570. 

Net inc 

150.6 

17S.9 

Per Share 

256 

258 

Amer. President Cos 

3rd Quar. 

1985 

1984 

Revenue 

3015 

23SA 

Net inc 

145 

385 

Per Share 

058 

251 

T Month* 

198S 

1*84 

Revenue ■■ 

8414 

6841 

Net Inc 

385 

B15 

Per Share 

155 

448 


3rd Qear. 

1985 

1984 

3rd Qoar. 

I9U 

1984 

Net Inc 

3250 

2493 

Net inc 

9Sj6 

775 

Per Share. 

1.45 

152 

Per Share 

1.76 

158 

9 Months 

1985 

1*84 

9 Mon Ills 

1985 

1984 

Net inc 

9468 

7957 

Net Inc 

2924 

2355 

Per Share 

454 

196 

Per Share 

557 

450 


Barnett Books Florida 
3rd Quar. ms lfM 


Ner Inc. 

Per Snare— 
IMmMi 

Net Inc. 

Per She re 


32 & 

099 

ins 

2JQ 


2&J 

ass 

int 

tta 

ZM 


Certain-Teed 


Colt Industries 
3rd Quar. lies 1IM 

Revenue 434* 05 5 

Net Inc. 30.1 300 

Pur Share 1JD 1.44 

) Meath! ins 1*84 

Revenue 1.380. 1400. 

Net me. 107.9 99.9 

Per Share 5M 4J* 

IW 9-montn net Includes 
credit of S*£ million. 


1915 

im 

Consolidated Papers 

304.1 

mo 

3rd Quar. 

1985 

1984 

185 

167 

Revenue 

171.9 

1646 

193 

0.17 

Net inc 

23.91 

1654 

1985 

1904 

Per Share 

1.10 

057 

8485 

915J 

) Mon tin 

198S 

1*84 

435 

29.7 

Revenue — 

5445 

5135 

2.18 

1-47 

Net Inc 

8054 

5490 



Per Shore—. 

350 

241 


3rd Quar. 

Revenue 

Net Inc. 

Per snore 

9 Months 

Revenue 

Net Inc. 

Per Share __ 


K5* '!££ ,nctvae charge of Per share results restated tor 
SIB million. J-tor-1 «V/f in Dec. 


Merrill Lynch Europe. Mr. Roch- 
ester has also been appointed chief 
executive officer of Merrill Lynch 
UK Securities. In his new post, Mr. 
Rochester’s initial responsibilities 
mil be to develop and manage in- 
stitutional sales and trading erf UK 
equities as Merrill Lynch prepares 
for membership of the London 
Stock Exchange in 1986, as well as 
institutional sales and trading of 
other foreign equities in Britain, 
Europe and the Middle East. He 
subsequently will have additional 
responsibility for US products. 

ASEA AB, the Swedish electrical 
and electronics engineering con- 
cern, said Per Danfors has been 
appointed head of its expanding 
U.S. power systems business. 
Goran Lindahl has been appointed 
general manager of ASEA Trans- 
mission, succeeding Mr. Danfors. 
Mr. 1 Jndahl will be based in 
A SEA's Vast eras. Sweden, head of- 
fice. Sune Karlsson, previously 
general manager erf the transformer 
division of ASEA GmbH in West 
Germany, lakes ova Mr. Lindahl's 
duties as general manage r of ASEA 
Transformers in Ludvnka, Sweden. 

Petrofina (U.K.) Ltd. has elected 
Christopher Chaiaway and Jean- 
Pi erre Amory to its board. Mr. 
Chaiaway is vice chairman of Ori- 
on Royal Bank Ltd. and Mr. 
Amory is chairman and chief exec- 
utive of Petrofina SA the Brussels- 
based parent The British unit also 
said Rene Thiers has become its 
general mana ger, exploration-pro- 
duction, succeeding Jean- Pi erre 
Prudot D' A vigny, who has joined 
the exploration-production depart- 
ment of the head office. Peter John- 
son has been named general man- 
ager, operations, for Petrofina 
(UK), succeeding Paul Derrick, 
who retired Simon Howonb has 
become the unit's general manager, 
sales, succeeding Ian McIntosh, 
who also retired. Mr. Thiers was 
vice president exploration-produc- 
tion, at American Petrofina. Mr 
Johnson and Mr. Howorth were 
assistant general managers in their 
respective departments. 

Incbcape PLC the British trad- 
ing group, said George Turnbull, 
group manag ing director, will be- 
come group chief executive on Jan. 
]. succeeding Sir David Orr, who 
will continue as chairman. 


e - - 

•4 ' - 

» Jt 

A ... .• 

* . f 
Ik ••• • 
•*.*. - 

* ■ 

* I • - 

if- 


Thursday^ 

ore 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices os of 

3 pm. Mew York time. • 

Via The Associated Press 


Fil l * 

'■ 


a Month 
high Low Slock 

Sdeiln . Hft 

Dtv. VkL IDfc HlBtl Low 3 PM. Chile 


J 

A 



T6^ AomRf 


WA 

13% 


_ Acudln 

- • < “ MM»r TVs Acslrtn 
• • .r-.a - 28- 17Vt AcuRov 



JO 7J1 


SU S 500 

001 


iaw law 

T3*k 13W 

low ian u 
aw rw aw 
law ia is — 

We FA Th 

low row row 
26W as 26 
iw iw iw— w 

8 7W 7W— W 

Mt 0W ?W + W 


al 


-• 23W 

^ •’ ...» MW 


f 


... r.j. Et 




" - t 


3 Aenutm 

JO 


56 

3* 


3* +ft 

13ft AIIBsh 

5 A 

236 

14ft 

14ft 

HS . 

15ft AbcvRb 
9V AJrMd 

t 


IS 

19 

18W 

1BW— 1 

,10e 15 

13 

10ft 

10 

13 

7* AlrWHc 



39 

T2ft 

T2W 

12W— W 

28V Alex B 

150 

17 

51 

38 

37* 37V— W 

14* A] fin 



« 

20* 

2DW 

2BW.+ W 

4* Atporex 

.10i 


5* 

5ft 

5*+ W 

lov AleaW 

5 

330 

21 

20* 

Sfft + ft 

IS AilcaBv 

A0 

14 

295. 

16ft 

16ft 

16V + ft 

17ft AJWBn 
1* Allnet 

M 

45 


row 

3ft 

18* 

3 

IBft 

3ft + ft 

4ft AloMIC 



198 

.5W 

4ft 

4ft— W 

6ft AltU 



148 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft 


M 

13 

35 

T4W 13* 

13* 

J 



1717 

9W 

8ft 

r+a 


t 


120 

7 

Sft 


k 

fr.'j ' 

» .* ■ 


o* i:*-'- 


*»■ 


t# V-' ■ 

■. *; : T- 

f- '* 

**’- . 

v — 

• " 
e* “ 

^cr-- 

* -■ 


10W ABnkr 
10W AmCorr 
5W AConll 
13 AF<JSL 
AW AmFrsf 
16W AFkttcs 
3m AGreei 
aw Amlni-f 

5Vk AMagnl 
10W AMS 4 
27W ANMns 
3VS APhyG 
1£W AmSec 
7W AmSft S 
IW ASolor 
K ASuro 
2SW Anartr a 
ldW Amrwst 
3W Amoan 
1AW AmsAB 

AmPds 

rw An logic 

7W Anorwi 
13ft Andnw 
«W Apooea 
9W ApSoC 
MW ApatoC 
lift ApIBIoS 
il ApWCm 
17ft ApWMt 
B ApUSlr 
3W Archlvo 
row Arno5v 

iBft ArtzB 
6 ATM 
KM AsdHst 
5ft Astrasv 
row Atcor 
15ft AttAm 
25ft AHntBc 
Oft AraiFd 
BW An Fin 
19ft AflRas* 
2ft AtSeArs 
14ft AhudOc 
4ft AutTrT 
4ft Aulmtx 
4W Anim 

3W Avacm 

6 AvnlGr 
17ft Avntek 
15W Avatar 
13ft AWojCp 
4 AzKM 


SO 42 A 
1* 
54 

AO 44 • 15 
t 12 
30 2J 203 
58 Z0 381 
^10 19 43 

5 
30 

1.0B 3L0 93 

120 

UB 17 134- 
28 
341 
60 

1.60 U 990 
29 
213 

ljOO 37 91 

JO 23 19 

. 83 
a 

723 

.14 L4 74- 
11755 
11176 
7105 
32 
432 
1 
7 
13 

50b in 7& 
.12 "a 1505 ’ 

« 40 

M Z2 1 

A0 1J 4 

50 14 25 

| 

393 

17 

t 31 

477 
41 
471 
• 7 

.671 
12 
147 

JO 47 50 


lift 11* 11*— ft 
lift lift lift— W 

a* aw aw— ft 

14 13W 13W 

8 8 8 
29* 2ffiA »ft +1* 
29ft 28* 29ft 
urn low mil + ft 
ftW 6W 6W 

ibw row i8W + w 

35ft 35ft 35ft 
3W 3 3W + ft 
2B 27ft 27* — W 
*W 9ft 9ft 
IW 1ft lft— ft 
ft ft ft— .ft 
33 32* 33- + W 

25ft 24* 25 + W, 

8ft 814 IW - 
27ft 26ft 27ft + ft 
17W 17W 17W + ft- 
UW lift lift 
12* 12W 12* 

15ft 14ft 15 —ft 
10ft 9* 9ft— W 
11* 10W- lift +1* 
16 14ft Uft +.* 
20 18 IBft— 1* 

11* lift 11* 

18ft IB 18ft + W 
Oft 8ft Hft+ft 
4ft 4* 


18ft 18 
39* 39* 
6ft 6W 
14* 14M 
6U 6 
3J SB 
22 22 
37* 37ft 
10W 10ft 
9ft 9W 
27 26* 

10ft 1DW 
15 .14* 

4* 4ft 
4ft .4 
«ft 4ft 
8 7ft 
8 7ft 
IBft 18* 
I7W 17W 
J4W 13ft 
4ft 4ft 


18ft—* 
39* +■ ft 
6W — W 
Mft + * 
6W + ft 
20 ■+ W 
22 

37ft + W 
10ft + ft 
9ft 
26* 

10ft + ft 

15 + W 

4ft— W 

21= JS 

a .4"* 
8 + ft 
18ft + ft 
17U. 

13ft— * 
4W 


B 


39* 06DO 

7 .BRCooi 
14* Batumi 
22W BcpHw 

5W Banctcc 
6ft BencH . 
Wi BKNES 
8* BkMAffl 
m SankVt 
Oft Bantas, 

6 BlTnA 
T BsosAjh 
31W BsalF 
38ft BavBJU 
6ft Bayly 
5ft BndiCI 
I7W Bonhan 
29ft Betz Lb 
10* Bis B 
3ft B to Rot 
4W BhMOO 
] BhHTC 
6 BlatcR 
5 Blrdlnc 
26W BootBn 
15ft BebEv . 
6* BoItTc 
lift Bm«< 
IT BstnFC 
B* BraeCp 
3ft Bronco 
ft BrwTom 

8 Brunos 
Iff* BultdTl 
13ft Bmjnn 
IS BurrBr . 
2 TV BMA5 

3 , Baslnld 


2.20 U 


SO S3 
06 44 


32 

3 
6 
2 
11 

JO 85 44 

» « J» 

1JB 105 11 

J6 2A “lis 

51 

041124 27 

.800 15 6- 

-}MO 46 319 
.12 20 115 
20 
1Z7 

02 44 246 

■ • 547 

. & 

10 

40 
27 
67 


1J0 3J 

JOB 14 


J2 3.0 
Atm 1J 


JIB 
55 

.12 14 ‘ 38 

2S9 

86 

W 

iou 


.16 .14 


1JD4 AO 


47ft 47ft 
7W 7W 
15ft Tift 
30* 30* 
8ft 8* 
9ft 9W 
a* 43W 
9ft 9ft 
13* 13ft 
15ft 14* 
11* lift 
S* 8* 
37ft 

53 51* 

6ft 6, 
9* ?W 
13% 12* 
30ft 30W 
15 M* 
-5* 5W 
. itRS m 
2 * 2 
4* 4* 
8W 8ft 
J0W 29* 
20W 19* 
Aft J* 
24 nv» 
22 21ft 
12 11* 
3* 3* 
1 * 
14 13* 

!SS 

16ft lift 
26* 26W 
6H 6ft 


47Va 

7W— ft 
15* 

■30* + ft 
8* + ft 
9*.+ ft 
* 

13* + ft 
15 — W 
IT*— W 
Jft + M 
3ZVi . 
52 + ft 

6 — * 

9W 

12*— ft 
30*— W 
14* 

5W— ft 
10 —ft 
2ft + ft 
6ft 

8ft- W 
SiVd + ft 
20W 
6* 

23* + * 

22. + ft 

12 + W 

X ■ 

14 + ft 

20 

13ft— ft 
16ft— ft 
26W— ft. 
4ft 


r ' ftA' 



UMOnOi • .. 

hIbJiUw Slack 


Satata 

DJv. Ykt 10Cn .Hk* 


Nat 

Low 3 PAiOm 


19ft 8 Cenfcor 
57 34* Cen Be 2JSb XB 

IBft 11* CBtflSt 
31ft 17ft CFtfBkS J4 34 
6* 1* Cermlfc 
16ft BWCetut . . 

CW 3ft aiapEn 

22 15 QKsrmS JX 1J 

21V. 1IW CTitPnt . . 

11 . 6* CBkTch 


31* ir£ ChLwn 


M If 



tRt XM 1L8 
IS 


JA 45 3243 


.U J 

.16 15 


8ft 3* Chemac 
15* BftCMCM 

31 26* ChlPac* 

10ft 6M ainmr 
TO* -n. , ChrDwt 
11* 5ft Chvran. 

'54* *10* aphtfr ' 

12ft 6 

7W 4 

.a; & 

40ft 27* 

38ft 24* 

3*2% 

28* 22ft 
T9W 12* 

21ft 16W 
34* 4* ^ 

T9W imeoastF 
20W 9 CobeLb 

48ft 24* CocaBtl Jta U 
row I2W Carar 
4ft 1% COflMlIc 
26* 13 Cotwmt 
6ft 2* CotabR 
15ft Bft Cotatwn 
6ft 4 Collins 
36W 24* CoJLiAC 1J» X2 
20* MW Col rTle 
21* U ColoNT 
14ft 4* Comer s 

20* 11* Contest 

15* 10W Comma 
4* l* Camdlol 
43W 32 enteric 2.10 SJ 
43 23W Cmceu. UJ4 25 

13 9* anise 50a 82 

5* l ComAm 
30W 16ft Comlnd 58 14 
12* 7* ComSvs JBe 4 
24 13* CmoCds 

11* 3* Compaq 
25ft 14W CmuCr s M 20 
4U 2V Compus 
15W 5* CCTC 

38 16 CmpAs 

13ft 9 CmpDt 
12* SW CmptH 
9* S* One tan 
8ft 5* CmpLR 
6ft 2ft CmptM 

row 4ft Cmppff s 

19ft 9ft CmTsks 
11 W 4* Cmpotn 
10* 6 Cnmwr 

9ft ■ 6 Concpft 
27 MVi CnCOP 
18ft 14W CCOoR 
MV 13* CCopS 2.16 165 
<ft a* ConFbr ■ - 
54* 32ft CnPicns 148 35 
5ft SftConxPd M 25 
8U 2ft Consul „ 

42 29 CntlBc 254053 

18W 8W CWHM* 

B- 4 diliar 
13 ■ 4ft a»vat 
2116 12ft Convne 
5* IW CoprBlD 
22W 14ft CaorsB 
49 -16ft Copytal 

row 6 Carcom 
11* 6* Cordis 
60* 37* CoraSt 
5 T* Corvus 
7ft 3ft Cosmo 
17* 30W CricBri 
29* 20* CreiTr 
U ■ 9 CwnSk 

34* 16ft Cramp 

32 Tift CultoFr 
28W 15* Cutums 
27. MW cvenro 




58 5 


.12 15 


240 17.1 
158olU 


40- 24 


248 47 


.M 13 
50 35 

50 17 
St <2 
50 24 


196 17ft 
4 54ft 

494 IBft 

- 34 24* 

4 3 
14ft 

316 
28 
14ft 
8* 
28 

1423 r 

25ft 

126 8ft 

24 18* 

ft 

^ £ 

25 40 

23 36ft 

430 10* 

259 • 32 

258 24W 

6 16ft 

43 17* 

187' 24 

81 18ft 

41' ini 

32 -44W 
21 
99 

356 14 

297 4* 

75 lift 

5 4* 

3 31ft 

1124 20ft 

16* 
37 11 

333 19ft 

37 11 

128 2* 

101 37* 

un 41ft 

237 9* 

23 IW 

410 26ft 

164 8W 

3130 9* 

313 15* 

47 3ft 

161 6ft 

60S Z1 

52 9ft 

366 11* 

1032 8* 

33 7* 

200 2 * 

489 7. 

a law 

6 5ft 

59 9W 

U , 7 

302 14* 

28 row 

414 13* 

31 6* 

1102 49ft 

to m 

11 

13 38* 

114 8ft 

61 4W 

1515 7ft 

tS ^ 

^6 38 

62 8 

658 9W 

-34 ' 53* 

197 1* 

18 3* 

6 11 * 

33 22* 

' 4 13U 

1 29 

12 22* 

21 . 21ft 

12 21W 


17 17ft + W 

54 54 

row row 
24* 24* 

2* 2ft 
14ft 14ft + ft 
3ft 3W + ft 
19* 50 + ft 

M 14 — W 
BW BW— W 
19ft 20 + * 
8ft IW + ft 
8* 9 + W 
25 25ft 
I 8* + W 
18ft T8W — W 
6* • 7ft + W 
>214 12* + W 
6 6 
5* 6 

T7W 17* 4-* 
3316 33ft -+ ft 
39* 40 +■» 

36ft 34ft + ft 
10W 10* + W 
31* 31*— ft 
23* 24 W— W 
15V 16ft +* 
.17 17 

23 2TW — 1 
17* II —ft 
18ft Iff* 

43* 44W 

13* 14 
4W 4* 

10* lift 
4* 4ft— ft 
31ft 31ft + W 
19 19* + * 

16ft 16* + ft 
11 11 + W 

18* 19ft + * 

VVr* 

36ft 36*— IW 
40ft 41ft +* 
9ft 9*— ft 
1ft lft 
26ft 26ft + W 

1 8 — W 
ihvj iBft 

8* 9 —ft 
15ft 15* + ft 
3 3W 
6* 6* 

-20ft MW— W 
9ft 9ft— * 
II* lift 
M BW- 
7* 7* • 

2ft 2ft— ft 
6* 7 + ft 

18 18W + ft 

5* 5* 

8* 9W + *- 
6* 6*— ft 
13* 14 — tt 
14* 15 — * 
12* 12* — ft 
6* 6*— W 
4BW 48*— 1 
3» 3W 

2 2W— ft 

3Bft 38V + W 

BW BW — ft 
4ft 4ft 
7W 7W 
12* 72* — W 
lft 1ft— fi 
16 16ft— ft 

37ft 38ft 
7* 7* 

9ft 9W 
53W 53W— ft 
1* IW + ft 
3ft 3ft 
10* 11* 

22* 22ft- ft 
13 13 

29 29 — ft 

22* 22*— W 
30ft 21ft + ft 
20ft 20ft — W 


T7ft 

4* 

lift 

wu 

37ft' 

30ft 

7* 

100 

22* 

74* 

9W 

22 * 

5ft 

8ft 

7* 

-19ft 

19ft 

30ft 

3ft 

7* 

9ft 

14* 

5* 

15* 

lift 

30* 

36* 

39* 

.36* 

37 

« . 
19* 
2Sft 
12ft 
IS* 
6ft 
38* 


7 DBA. 

2* DO) 

6VH DEP 
5 DSC 
20W DolsySy 

20ft Doles F 

4ft DntnBio 
83 DartGP ... 
11V Datcrds M 

11 Dattcp 

2W Pta8» 

4* Datum ■ 

5ft Dawson 
9* DabShs JO 
9* DicfeD 
30* DeklbA 32 
-* Doltaus 
ft Dewier 
4* DanTMd 
7* DkroPr 
2ft Dfoione 
10 Dkean 
3ft Dianed • 
row □ totem 
23: Diowx 
14* DirGnl 
23ft DomB 
16W DoyIDB 58 
m Dnoclr 
lift Drawer 
14* DunfcDs 24 
9ft Dull ran 56 
9* DurPII 6 J5 
3ft DYMC/1 
t6ft Dyntenc 


.13 


JO 

150 


21 

56 

4 . 
4412 

.1 w 

-15 139 

681 
37 
330 
2 
30 
40 

U UD 
25 93 

692 
62 
■ 2 
1179 
12 . 
66 
290 
U 

U 51 
35 337 
45 222 
28 
47 

U 124 . 
U 6 
14 31 

47 

164 


row WW 13* — ft 

2* 2* 2*— ft 
.10* 10* 10W— ft 
5* 5* 5* 

22V 21ft 22* +1 
3D 30 30 

5% 5% 

104 100ft 104 +3ft 

16ft 16ft row 
8* 8ft 8*.+ ft 
5ft 5ft 5W + ft 
24V 22ft -34ft +TV 
. 2* 2* 2W- ft 

6* 6ft ttk + ft 
. 5ft 5ft 5ft 
-17 17 17 — ft 

II* lift 11* 

28* 28ft 28* 

% T * ^ 
6ft 6 6ft + ft 
12* 12* 12* 

■ 2* 2* 2ft 

13ft 13ft 13ft + W 
3W 3* 3* 

■ 28V 27ft 28ft +1 
30* SOW 30* + ft 

ink «ft ink— ft 

31* 31* 31* + ft 
. 19* 19* 19* 

17 16* 16* 

IBft 18 18ft + ft 
23 22ft 22* 

10* 10* ID*— ft 
10ft 10* 10ft + ft 
5ft 5ft 5ft + ft 
27 38ft 2fi* + ft 


1716 8ft EC I TCB 

15 5ft E IP 
5* <ft EaetTI 
ll* 5ft EnrtCal 

12V 7W ElCUlC 

16 13ft EtPOf 
11* .6* Elan . 

ft'SSSSBp 

28* 9ft Etcattll 
19* 6* EleftucI 
19ft 13* 

14- 4V1 

11* "*■* 

14ft 6* Emnair 
14* 5* Inmtot 
8* 5ft Endvco. 
17ft 6* EndoLs 
36 • 15* Engpiy 
18* 7* enPad 

21* 18 EiUoBI 
3DW 8ft Equal . 
*W 5* Entail • 
48ft 25* frfcTI 
19ft 11 EVnSuT 
16ft 5ft .Exoutr 


19 

.13 25 29 

180 
321 

154 22 122 
5M 15 116 

153 115 267 

105 
82 

140 
56 
227 
41 
229 
386 
241 
. ID 

1136 
216 
• 61 

xv, i 

106 


9* 9ft 

% ‘* 
lift to* 
33* 33 

a « 

14. 13* 

. 8 7* 

a 7ft 
9 Bft 

n* \m 

16* 15* 
row row 

% V 

14ft 14 
7W 6ft 
6 6 
9ft 9W 
17* 16ft 
lift IBft 

■7 Oft 
25ft 25ft 
17*. T7 
10ft 10 


9ft— ft 

V 

11 

33 —ft 
9* 

9* 

13ft + ft 
7ft 

9 + ft 
II —ft 
16ft + ft 
ISW + * 
row— w 

6ft— * 

14ft 

7 

6 + ft 
9ft 4-* 
16*— ft 
18ft — * 
12W + W 
Bft— ft 
6* — * 
2«— 1 
17 

10 —ft 


. F 


16ft- ffft PMJ- ■ ‘ 2M 

3ft ]%J=omRest ■ 3B2 

Eft 10ft- FflfmF ' , . 160 

&Sft''4SW-FTmG - TU6 .35 2456 


9* 9V. 

1* lft 
.IW 10* 
58* 57ft 


Sf-# 

10ft— * 

58*- * 


[ 12 Month 



Sole* in 




f HlohLow Stack 

Dhr. Yld. 

100* 

ihm 

jew 

I pja op 

23* 

12W FedGPS 



476 

wrr r* 

left 

17* 


4ft Feraftu 



99 

Hv* n 



17V 

7 Ftbrans 



86 


row 


*■ i.i - n 

137 

46 

152 


m 

28V + ft 

■ N 

33 FifthTs 

1 Ml 

30 

22 


w* 


Ira" 

21ft Float# 

68 

15 

18 


37* 

37W + * 


12* Flltfflc 

50 

Al 

34 




Sft 

3V Finalca 

50 

55 

5 




9V 

15W 

Sft Flnamx 
Bft Rntsan 



296 

736 

6W 

14ft 

6 

14ft 

lft-* 

33 

2TW FAIaBk 

1.12 

35 




32* 

23 FtAFln 

-80 

25 

11 

30* 



27W 

m f • j j rViTTi 



37 

■i-r i 


25ft— W 


fllL^ra j| 



3 




29 Vi 

ra* 1 

150 53 
I50el45 

66 

21* 


21 — * 

9V 

6V FiQmt 

37 



38W 

16* FDataR 



3 




row 

10 FExec 



566 



hs 

19ft 

7* FFCalB 



2 



26ft 

14ft FFFtM 

50b 15 

4 



29W 

15V FIFnCP 

50 

35 

20 . 




20ft 

10W FtFnMS 



2 


■ri. j 

k; 



54 

15 

37 

K l || 

B/7' i 

36* 

Z7W F JerN 

150 

Al 

36 


ft . 


27ft FMdB 

«s 

2 S 

4 



42V 

21 FNtcini 

35 

9 

36ft 


36W— W 


25ft FRBGa 

158 

27 

141 

40 

39* 

40 + W 

28* + W 

31 


itf 

25 

163 

28ft 

row 

26 


SJ 

303 




ira^i 

i . .i-ci .ira 

150 

45 

46 

37ft 

37ft 

Sft + ft 

44V 


1.12 

35 

544 

36ft 


8* 

2ft Ftokey 



309 

2* 

7ft 


Iff* 

10* Flexstt 

M 

a 

12 

n 

lift 

nv— u 

22ft 

14ft FlaFdl 

50 

1584 




41ft 

26* FtaNFl 

50 

2.1 

44 

38V 

38* 


19ft 

7V FlowS s 



102 

1/W 

17 

17*—* 

17ft 

10* Fluracb 

58 

25 

104 

1«W 

M* 

14* 

4ft 

3 Fonarb 



399 

4* 

3ft 

4 + * 

18* 

1ZW F Lion A 

at 

5 

134 




19W 

12 FLtonB 

jii 

A 

58 

17* 

17ft 


34ft 

22* Far Am 

.96 

35 

18 

29V 

29* 



ft ; », w . J 

150 

7.1 

65 

14* 

I3W 


K3 

ft V < !r J ■ rnjB 



114 

449 

19ft 

2* 

W TO- ft 

10V 

6 Forum 

56t 

J 

578 




8 

4ft Faster 

.10 

21 

54 

4ft 

4W 

4V 

29V 

14ft F remit 

58 

21 

43 




14V 

5ft Fuarck 



995 

Sft 

5ft 


16ft 

11V FulrHB 

52 

25 

9 

16ft 

16ft 

16ft 

| 




J 



1 

in 


.10 

15 

67 

6ft 

6ft 


56ft 

28V GenetCh 



544 

4SW 

43* 


Bft 

5 Genets 



245 

7* 

6ft 

7* + * 


lft Cenex 



207 

2* 



25 

10ft 

lft GaFBk 
4W GerMds 

J» 

1.1 

143 

64 

24 ft 
7V 

24ft 

7* 

24ft 

7*— * 


16 GlbsGS 

54 

15 

627 

IB* 



■UxJ 

12* Gotaas 



207 

14* 

W 


22 

9V Gatt 



23 

Zlft 

71V 

21V 

KiZI 

14* GouldP 

.76 

55 

75 




15V 

10W Groat 

M 

25 

120 

15ft 

15ft 

15V + V 


5 Grnhl » 



15 

11 

11 


Bft 

4 GrphSc 



1159 

7 



22 

10ft GWSav 

58T 23 

25 




Oft 

8 GtSoFd 



117 

9V 

Bft 

9V + * 


8 Gtech 



341 

13* 


13* + ft 

■Ura 

I3W Guiltid 

JBe 


2 

13| 

TO 

13^+ W 

| row 

ft GMBdc 1550C 


1 

|| Bill 



H 



1 

fed 

15ft HBO 

50 

15 

1706 

im 


rrrri 


7 HCC 

56 

5 

21 

9ft 



l.d J 

lift Haber 



47 

21V 



3V 

2 Hudson 



40 

2V 

7ft 

2ft 

IV 

wv 

* HaleSy a 
12ft HcrnOIl 

.10 

5 

no 

50 

ft 

17 

ft 

17 

ft 

17 + * 


24 HrttNt 

152 

55 

158 

30 

29V 

29ft 

■m 

5* Hortftws 

50 

25 

4 

8 

8 

1 

13 

6V HowkB- 

■Ml 


20 

SV 

a 

8 — W 


i'll 



25 

2* 

2* 

Z* 


Bl, 



859 

3ft 

2ft 

2ft 


Vra 

.16 

15 

58 

16* 

16 

16W + W 


ITm J i * 1 

JOS 

5 

33 

16* 

16W 

16* + W 

■j j 




16 

5 

5 

5 — V 


15V Henx _ 



28 

15V 

lift 

15ft + ft 

24V 

13V 

17 HtajrCp 

1-lKb 45 

13 

1 

21* 

10 

21 

10 

21 

10 — * 

I2W 

3* Hoaan 



98 

5ft 

S* 

5*— * 

21 

10ft HmFAz 




29ft 

29ft 

29ft— V. 


2ft Hmecft 



15 

4 

3V 

3V 



54 

25 

68 

23* 

2SW 

25* + * 


23 Hoover 

150 

Al 


29W 

27 

2 9 +a* 

sv. 

3* Horzind 



12 .. 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 

iWlLvI 

13W HwSNJ 



2130 

33W 

27ft 

33V +5ft 

txJ 


.IN 

A 

51 . 

22V 

21V 

22* + * 

14ft 

7ft Huts Its 



2 

I2W 

12W 

12W 

B- ■ 

15ft Unto Be 

54 

35 

152 

23V 

23 

23V 


12* Hvbrifc 



1658 

28 

27ft 

28 + * 

KTl 

4ft Hypottx 
5ft HytekM 



21 

ID 

11 

6V 

10W 

row 







1 HE 



■■■■■ 

HH 

ran 

— | [ 

rov 

7U ILC 



116 

■71 

Pd 

piraj 

33V 

16V (MS* 

.16 

S 

[46? 

33V 

PTrl 

p 1 T J 

■ 1 

7* ISC 



279 

12* 

us 

12 — * 










4 imtaiex 



118 

4* 

4ft 

4W— * 

7W 

2V Inacnw 



21 

3ft 

3* 

3ft- * 

till 

3IW ItafiN 

liO 

35 

20 

4/* 

6/W 

47* + W 

32 

20 IntaRsc 



7 

MW 

24W 

MW 










M* Jraimw 



119 

21* 

T9V4 

20V— ft 


w..i ra 



106 

4ft 

4W 

4W- * 

■nfei 

■ ^ .ra ftii ", 



102 

10* 

10 

10 

4U 

23* 

3 intaGon 
10V ISSCO 



22 

3W 

11V 

3* 

11 

3*— * 
11 


22 Intel 


11903 

22* 

TOW 

21V— IW 


Sft Intt5v 



82 

4 

3ft 

3ft 


IW InhTiI 



4 

2* 

2 

2 

5 ttitinu 



34 




B, .. m 

6* IntrlFlr 

.16 

U 

14 





21 IntODtis 



1391 

25* 

23W 

as +2* 


■rtyra fji i’ i n ; • ' ( | 



26 

Aft 

6ft 

6ft 





261 

lift 

lift 

ii* 


IK! ■ ffi iimiJ 



5 

Aft 

6% 

Aft 


8 intdto 



33 

lft 

r 

Bft 









lift InlKlne 



22 

17* 

17 

17ft— ft 


Wi. ■ l [TT 3 ra . j ■ 



281 

14* 

U* 

14* + W 

Ipl 




247 

360 

ft 

BW 

1ft 

Bft 

lft- ft 


W6 IT Cos 



542 

22V 

32 

22V + * 





956 

BW 

9 

9ft + * 

ral> 

■ i ll 



490 





3ft Itet 



311 

8 

7ft 


1 IO 

■■■IH 


■* 




■il 

15V 

9* JBRStS 

.14 

15 

9» 

10W 

ID* 

low + w 

flft 

3ft Jackpot 



2 

Sft 

Sft 

Sft- ft 

41W 

25V JadtU* 



215 

33V 

33 

33V + * 

27V 

14ft JainWtr 



66 

T 

17V 

I7V + * 

SW 

4ft JefMarl 



749 

4* 

4W— V 

23ft 

UW Jon CO 

.12 

5 

276 

21* 

20ft 

21* + V 

TM 

3ft JonlcW 

1 


19 

Sft 

5ft 

fft 









20* 

13W Junta 

50 

25 

87 

16ft 

16ft 

16* 

| 



1 




1 

24* 

13* KLAS 



703 

17* 

16* 

Ifift— V 

8* 

4W KVPhr 



23 

aw 

a 

BW 4 Vi 

32 

2016 Kamon 

It 

Z1 

17 

32 

31* 

31ft- * 

24* 

13* Karehr 



2S 

16 

15ft 

15ft 

17V 10W Kinder 

551 


316 

UW 

IBft 11W + W 


cv Kavaen 



407 

44 



8ft 

61W 

38* Kema . 
36* KyCnU 




S + ft 

8* 

4* Hove* 



-u 

Sft 

Sft 

11 

6V KeyTrn 



238 

7ft 

7* 

7* 

21* 

13 Ktader 

56 

J 

1669 

17W 

16ft 

17V + ft 

MV 

4ft kray- 

56 

5 

337 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 


9* Kruocr 

A 

13 

410 

22* 

lift 

12 + ft 

39ft 




9W 

8* 







I IH 

■■Hrai^i 

tm 

HI 


ram 

■ra 


ii* 

5W LDBmk 



571 

7ft 

6ft 

6ft— W 

1BU 

9ft LSI Lob 



1270 

15W 

15 

l» 


1 12 Month 



Soles bi 



Met 

1 Mton low suck 

Dft. YKL 

I00l 

HlBtl 

Law 

I PM. OHM 

23* 

10 LTX 



41 

UW 

row 

rov 

19* 

8V Lo Petes 


17 

T7W 

17 

17 

47V 

30* LaZ By 

140 

30 

10 

47* 

47W 

47W + W 

20ft 

12* U>d Fra 

16 

5 

149 

2n* 

19ft 

19V + ft 

IB* 

11 Laidlw 

.20 

1.4 

249 

15 

row 

14* 

17 

11* LamaT 

80 

5.1 

22 

1.9M 

15* 

ISft + ft 

17 


M 

44 

9 

IS* 

15* 

15* 

59V 

35 LaneCa 

92 

13 

5 

53 

59* 

S3 

32 

21W Lawsns 

32 

1.1 

39 

TRW 

38W 

28V 

7ft 

4ft LeeOto 



311 

5W 

5 

5ft + ft 

15* 

8W UHner 



2 

10 

10 

10 

97* 

4ft LewtsP 

38b 42 

43 

ft 

Aft 


4 




iro 

TV 

2V- ft 

4W 

lft LexMta 



ro 

7W 

3W 

SW 

MW 

17* Llefirt 
38* Lflrws 

St 

4 

5 

19ft 

19V 

19ft + ft 

46V 

JA 

S 

2 

46W 

46W 

46V + * 

7* 

4ft LfeCem 



437 

6ft 

5ft 

6W + W 

20V 

lift UlyTul 

JO 

15 

575 

16V 

16 

JTift 

38* 

18ft Lin Bud 


U10 

37ft 

36ft 

36V 

27* LlncTei 

2.30 

45 

83 

33* 

XI* 

33W 

4* 


16 

35 

2 

5M 

Ml 

Sft 

49* 

21V UzOas 

35 

S 

1105 

40* 

39* 

40W 

row 

20W LonaF 

MB 

54 

11 

34 

7.1* 

23*— V 

33V 

15* Lotas 



4213 

18W 

16* 

18 +1W 

29 

7ft Lvphos 



334 

21U 

20* 

21ft + * 

1“ 




M 



1 

14V 

6V MBI 



44 

7* 

7 

7* + W 

lift 

4ft MCI 



2741 

8* 

BW 

BW — ft 

9* 

3* MPSI* 



29 

4W 

4V 

4V + W 

26 

15 MT5S 

34 

14 

B0 

UVl 

17 

17* + W 

32W 

13* MTV 



351 

JMl 

3Tft 

31ft— W 

17* 

9* MackTr 



188 

row 

10ft 

rov 

27ft 

21 W MadGE 

228 

9.1 

16 

25* 

25 

2 8W— ft 

10 

7V MalRt 



ig 

Sft 

BW 

14V 

7ft Malrtts 

51e 

1IW 

lift 

lift 

16* 

7* MarSd 



898 

8* 

BW 

Bft + V 

24* 

17V Manltw 

50 

39 

196 

20ft 

20* 

ro* — w 

72W 

40 MfnN 

X48 

19 

32 

63V 

63 

63* 

19* 


JO 

13 

3 

17* 

1/* 

17* 

9 

raltliMi ml 



2 

3ft 

Sft 

3ft 

13V 

4W Marat 



no 

10 

9V 

9W— V 

37* 

IB* AArldN s 

150 

15 

183 

29* 


28ft 

26* 

■<7i. a 



228 

20* 

20 

20* + :* 

6V 




547 

2W 

2ft 

2ft- ft 

MV 




4499 

18 

16ft 

17ft +lft 

14* 

6* 

8V Moxwel 
3ft MayPt 



14 

23 


« 


5ft 

3* MavnOl 



72 

5ft 

5* 

5ft + ft 

38* 

30* McCrin 

58 

17 

105 

32* 

32W 

32W 

M* 

10ft Me Fori 



26 

11 

11 

11 

11* 

6 ffiadex 

55 

4 

56 

9W 

9 

9 — W 

ID* 

4 MedCre 



26 

5 

4ft 

5 + ft 

20* 




430 

14 

13V 

13V- ft 

30* 

13 AftntrG 



4771 

15W 

14* 

15V + ft 

39ft 

27* MarcBc 

1.92 

54 

64 

35* 

35W 

35ft + ft 

as* 

frfiVraJ/ !i*hH 

UJ 

25 

12 

60* 

60* 

60* 

22 




ID 

13ft 


13ft— ft 

3aw 

22 luraacs un 

54 

61 

33W 

33* 

X*— ft 

■ 1 


-76 

19 

103 

19V 

19ft 

19*— ft 





101 

12V 

12ft 

12ft + ft 

17ft 

BV MetrFn 

50b 35 

149 

lift 

■ IjJ 

t ill 

36 

UW Mlcom 



601 

14* 

Si 


5V 

lft MlcrD 



204 

2W 

2V 

11V 

5V MIcrMk 



22 

A 

5ft 

A + ft 

.7* 

4ft MIcrdv 

56 

15 

53 

5ft 

5V 

Sft 

30ft 

Sft MlcrTc 



3196 

5* 

4ft 

5 — * 

9 




69 

6 

5V 

SV— ft 

6ft 

3* MIcSntS 



124 

6* 

6 

6 - ft 

7* 

■ . 1 . * 1 ^ 



16 

3 

2ft 

2ft— ft 

41* 

Fir', wjv 

M4 

34 

272 

36 

JSft 

36 +* 

8 

Jr j 



101 

Aft 

Aft 

6ft 

27ft 

1 1 j W,v f 1 1. la ■ 

At 

12 

337 

ro 

19ft 

!9ft— ft 

44 

ffcC'wXllllpii | 

M 

1J 

3399 

39ft 

38ft 

39ft- * 

5* 

■ uW '/'ii' 



87 

2W 

2* 

2W + ft 

27V 




228 

ro 

19* 

20 

16ft 

7* MGask 

5le 

.1 

51 

Hft 

fl 

8ft 

12ft 

6 NtauCB 



38 

12 

lift 

lift— ft 

20ft 

13 Modlnes 

58 

45 

ro 

17 

16ft 

17 

rov 

6 McHedr 



17 

7V 

7* 

7* 

3»* 

26W Molex 

53 

.1 

43 

29W 


29V— V 

22 

14 Mtmta 

JSe 1J 

14 

20V 

20 

row 

13Vfa 

iw 



14 

17'4 

IUJ 

■ hlTl 

Ir.TllI 
I r T ■« 

34 

24ft ManuC 

140 

45 

44 

31* 

sow 

31 + V 

20* 

14ft MorFla 

51 


3 

17 

17 

17 — W 

14 

9 Marka 

.16 

14 

3 

UW 

1IW 

nw— w 

22* 


48 

25 

63 

18 W 

IB 


7ft 




31 

3 

2ft 

ra 

15V 

12* Atatab 

JO 

25 

169 

15* 

15 

1SV 

i|yj 


.10 

3 

1529 

IS 

14ft 

IS 

r^ra 

■^^ra 


■FHH 

rara 


■Mill 

9 

3V NCAC0 



86 

4* 

4 

4 — V 

*v 

2* NMS 



57 

4* 

4 

4ft + ft 

11V 




IS 

9* 

9* 

9* 

ira^i 

n iMvinri 

M 

33 

81 

25* 

25 

25* + V 



250 

45 

321 

44* 

44 

ri'XM'TI 



30 

l.l 

44 

17ft 

17ft 

If TTI 

14V 



13 

54 

13V 

13V 


36 

12 NHIIC S 

541 

J 

66 

13* 

13 

13W + ft 

7ft 

4* NtLumD 



5 

5* 

5* 


5V 

2 NMIcm 



69 

lft 

2ft 

2V + ft 

9W 

2W Houale 



110 

2ft 

2* 



JO 

19 


Aft 



11* 




103 

6 

5V 

6 + V 

9* 




108 

5ft 

5ft 

5* 

27ft 

IrdiESitl 



3S78 

21ft 

» 

31ft +IW 

36* 

2PH Naufrg s. 



8 

32 

32 

32 +1 

12* 




11 

Bft 

Bft 

Sft 

34 

23* NE Bus 

53 

?J 

10 

25 

23* 

23* — 1* 

30* 


50 

17 

307 

3V* 

29W 

29W 

30V 


1.130 45 

22 

28 

27V 

28 

17ft 

9 m-MBk 

554 

J 

94 

14W 

14ft 

14V + ft 

SOW 

18 Newt 

54 

J 

51 

19* 

19 

T9 


IW NwPh 
1* NlColB 
Aft Nike B 




lift 

rov 


7ft 

| 


17 

lft 

1* 

1*— ft 

14V 

40 

19 

1910 

14ft 

M 

14 

21* 


56 

4.1 

3 

It* 

14W 

It* 

52* 

28W Nordstr 

44 

111 

284 

4VW 

44 

45* +1V 

47 

28* Nra&3s 

J2I 

J 

1 

46* 

46* 

46*— ft 















7* 


17ft 

6W Neartv 



448 

15 

14ft 

14V 

20* 

15 NwNG 

144 

83 

10 

I/ft 

l/Vr 

17ft + W 

33* 

18V NwtFns 

58 

15 

II 

2/W 

2/ft 

27V + ft 

36* 

lurtTruiwra 

50 

14 

182 

22* 

33 

22* + ft 



7.10 

94 

6 

22H 

2fft 

27ft + ft 

55ft 

39ft Novell 

158 

22 

37 

49* 

4* 


7 




107 

SW 

5* 

Sft 

9* 




991 

5W 

4V 

5W + V 

15ft 


44 

19 

71 

H 

14* 

15 + ft 

10* 

AW NutrIF 



5 

9* 

9* 

•ft- ft 

13V 

4W NuMeds 



330 

7ft 

7 

7ft 

■ ran 


raft? 

■Erass 


IB 

■■rail 

s 




75 

2ft 

3* 

2ft— ft 

17* 

row Odltos 



54 

11 

rov 

row- w 

44V 

32* CcilGp 

159 

17 

72 

41 

48W 

40ft- V 

ra ?£ j 


250 

4.9 

80 

47 

66V 

56V- ft 

ra~’l 

II L»«]P 

34 

62 

77V 

27* 

27* 

41V 


E 1 

24 

275 

29* 

29 

29 — W 

22W 

H ITM*. 

28 

21ft 


jlft , 

26 + V 



J9e 15 

1 

SAW 

LTj 

9* 




6 

6 

6 

19W 




66 

13W 

13 

13 

48V 

22* CcslcR 



135 

24* 

26 

ro* 

19W 

12ft Ortonc 



33 

13ft 

13ft 

13ft— V* 





70 

6* 

6 

6 

8 




549 

Aft 

6 

4W— ft 

20 

12* Oshirm 

JO 

14 

7 

12W 

12*4 




174 

9J 

8 

30 

X 

X . + ft 

15 




3 

10 

9* 

9ft— ft 

- 16V 

B OwtiM's 

58 

15 

7 

lift 

IS* 

15ft- ft 

5ft 

W Oxeco 



262 

ft 

V 

ft 







■■II 

32W 


M3 

43 

1004 

row 

27ft 

28ft + ft 

53* 

39W Paccar 

IJOa 17 

me 

44 

43V 

43V— W 

ISft 

7 PaeFH 



55 

row 

ia* 

10V + ft 

15 

10W PocTel 

50 

to 

9 

13ft 

ra 

13W + W 

14V 




14 

13* 

13* 

13ft— W 



.13 

28 

77 

6V 

6* 

6* 





49 

19 

1BV 

18ft— ft 

19* 

11* ParkOh 

50 

U 


18* 

12V 

13 4- V 





283 

iffi 

5 


12V 

5ft P«SHr. 

t 


5 

11* 

lift— ft 

saw 




31 

T7W 

17* 

17V + W 

22* 

9ft PebhHC 



288 

14V 

13* 

14* + ft 


12 Mortal 
HlohLow Stock 


Sows In Nei 

Olv. YM. 1001 Htoh LOW 1 PAL ChlM 


row 


-06 

5 

205 

7* 

7ft 

7ft— ft 

35 

FTBBm ! i • 

2J0 

7J 

3 

30V 

30V 

30V 

31V 

;,|,v ill 

41 

25 

15 

26* 

26 

26 — ft 

15ft 


JHr 

J 


tow 

9W 

lffta +1 

30* 

_rra j li'Jlrfl 

1.12 

4J 

ll 

25 

24* 

25 + * 

13* 

4 Phrmct 



I’ll 

TV 

7ft 

7V 

12W 

7W PSFS 

.IM 1J 


Bft 

7ft 

BW — ft 

17ft 

14W PhllGI 

JDe 3J 

700 

15ft 

15* 

15*— ft 

7 

2 PhnxAm 



15 

2W 

2ft 

2ft 

28ft 

17V PicSav 



10 

M 


23V 

24W 

16* PlcCafe 

A0 

23 

28 

22W 

23W 

22V + V 

‘4M. 

27W Plan HI 

.92 

23 

27 

32W 

3j 

aw + w 

K 

7 PkxrSt 

.12 

IA 

23 

BV 

8* 

8* 


BW PoFolk 



1 

It* 

11* 

11*— ft 

2 

16* PICvMO 



812 

1BW 

17V 

row + w 


21 Perex 



59 

22ft 

22V 

22ft + ft 

p? 

IV Powell 



23 

2ft 

2 

2 


9W Powrtcs 



19 

TOW 

10* 

IB* — W 


5W PwConv 



95 

11 

10V 

10ft 

iT. 

19* Preccst 

.12 

A 

39 

30* 

29V 

30V + * 

9 

4ft PrpdLs 



134 

8 

7* 

TV- W 

7V 

3 Priam 



252 

3ft 

3* 

3ft + ft 

16V 

7W PrtcCm* 


45 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft 

66 

3*w PriceCo 



488 

56W 

55ft 

56W +1 

21V 

« Prtiwuc 



84 

lift 

11* 

lift + ft 

6 

4ft ProdOp 

.16 

33 

2 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 

42 

20ft PraoCs 

.12 

J 

35 

X 

35* 

34 + ft 

15ft 


M0 

9.9 

25 

12W 

12ft 


’SI? 




52 

17* 

17ft 


7ft 

3% Puifann 



734 

6ft 

6* 

6*— ft 

SAW 

IW* PurtBn 

M 

15 

39 

23 

aw 

22V 


15* 

8ft QMS 



29 

9* 

9W 

9* + ft 

9ft 

3ft Quadra 



134 

7* 

6V 


aw 

16V Quantm 



788 

20 

19* 


5ft 

2ft QuestM 



371 

4* 



13W 

8W Quixote 



448 

12ft 

12V 

12V— W 

12ft 

7W Quotrn 



10307 

lift 

row 

lift + W 





R 



| 

14V 

5 1 * RAX 

-Ole 

J 

400 

5V 

SW 

5W 

IBft 

11V RPMs 

-62 

43 

281 

14* 

14 

14* + W 





384 

lift 

10ft 


■in 

■ 



55 

9* 

vw 


10V 

5ft Rodion 



7 

7* 

7* 

7* 

7ft 

2ft Rouen 



12 

4ft 

a 




150 

35 

174 

28V 

2D* 

28ft 


12* RovEn 

JA 

M 

22 

18V 

1BV 

T8V — * 


■ i.j. .-ra 



44 


IV 






48 

19ft 

19 

19V — W 


5* Recotn 



119 

8W 

8 

B* + ft 


25V RedknL 

M 

24 

13 

27 

V 






83 

10ft 

10* 

10* 



JO 

3.7 

IX 

5* 

5ft 

Sft 


QlB. Tra 

.12 

.9 

1 

14 

14 


■ v; 

4* Rellob 



17 

Aft 

4ft 


■M” 


.16 

15 

50 

Sft 

8ft 

8ft— ft 


■ >,~i . ‘ _J e 1 1 f 1 B 



495 

10ft 

9ft 


T7* 

11V RestrSv 



15 

17W 

16ft 

17 + ft 

14* 

7 Reuieri 

.15e 20 

14 

7ft 

7ft 



17* ReutrH 

Joe i _o 

1 

26* 

26* 


41V 

29 Rev Rev 

M4 

3J 

244 

37* 

37 

J7W 

15V 

9V Rhodes 

34 

U 

25 

14* 

row 

row + ft 





1287 




22ft 

12ft RICAEI S 



35 

21* 

rn 

20V— ft 

SuTfl 

10V Rival 

50 

4.9 

IX 

14ft 

left 

16ft 

till 


UW 

35 

427 

29 

28* 

28V 

16* 

11 RobNira 

M 

5 

33 

12* 

I2W 

12V— ft 


B* RobVsn 



119 

9ft 

BV 

SV— ft 


16ft Rouses 

£4 

2J 


23 

22V 


lift 

3* HoviRs 



320 

3ft 

3V 

3W — ft 


n Rust Pel 



14 

12V 

12ft 


l«w 

11W RvanFs 



IX 

14* 

15V 

16* + * 

| 






■■ 



16 7* SAY Ind 

row io* sci sv 

19ta ID* SEI 


6o 

115 

41 


10ft 10U 10ft + ft 

12ft 11* 12 
19 18* 10* — W 


11V 

6 SFE 

- 10 r 15 

112 

7 

Aft 

6ft 


16 SRI 

50 




18 


70ft 

6* Sotscds 

ro 

1J 

Lzra 

17 

16V 

17 + ft 

44ft 


1.60 

43 

tnm 

30 

37* 

37ft 

23 

lift SafHtrti 



273 

17* 

14* 

17 + W 

16 

7W StJude 



32 

14V 

14* 

14*— W 

Tift 

39W StPoul 

350 

tA 

ia 

68ft 

67V 

67V 

Aft 

rw SoiQoi 



in 

5V 

i* 

Sft 

rov 

4* San Bar 



15 

5 

4* 

4V— W 






52* 

52 


TOW 

I0W SBkPSS 


23 

26 

19V 

19* 


rov 




39 

8 



if Vi 

TDft ScanTr 



29 

15* 

15W 

15% + W 

1JV 

Sft Scherer 

32 

26 

10 

12* 

12* 

12* 

FJ 

15V SdtliuA 

M 

M 

IX 

rasa 

XV 

XV + ft 

Wu J 

3V. ScJMIc 



ro 

3ft 

3ft 

3* — ft 


IS 

30V 

Oft 

8* 

4* 

Bft 


SdSH 

7 sate* 

4 Sea Go) 
4 Seagate 
lft SecTap 
1* SEEQ 


40 

132 

84 

1186 

30 

107 


8 

8 * 
4 Li 

5* 

3 

2ft 


8 

Bft 

4ft 

5ft 

1* 

2 


B* 

4ft — ft 

Sft + ft 

1* + ft 

2 




p 1 







Bi*' -r.iir-iB 



ETTh 






> | 














V-2’1 











[j] 

b ' fl 










k.tl 









L 1 





BT~rH 


ifVii 











31* 21W Shonevs 
16 io ShonSos 
low 4* silicon 
17ft 9ft silicons 
20ft 11* SlllcVal 

3 tft ii* sniou 

11* 4ft SlltOC 


102 

139 

249 

37 

94 

748 

<3 


25ft 34* 25 + ft 
lift 10ft lift 
4ft 4* 4* 

low io mv* 

13* 13 13ft— ft 

18ft IB IBft — ft 
i 4ft 4ft — W 






















TiTTH 






Pl'.fl 

















LJ 













clfllft.ra 











ft I'H 



rl L'r 

/ i? 
















P->1 







fT 5 yfllTflra 









hU 











Kvl 

V-wk 



t -'Y- T-'I’P 



tt™ 














171 
















p. J 

fkTt] 





ia 








'•* ¥ 







/■ 


i^.ii 


■rtfl 






ti'l 

Hj 

r^m 





(ft 3ft SlataG 
7ft 4ft Stefeor 
IBft 11 StewS tv 
25 17Vi Stwlnl 
Bft 5ft SUM 
18ft BW Strata! 
38ft 29ft StfWCI S 
23ft 13 Strvkrs 
171* 100ft Suborn 
69 38* SubrB 

4* 2ft Summo 
14* 7V. SymtHI 

ft SunCsl . 
4ft SunMed 
7* SunSkv 
3 Suprtex 
8 SvmbT 
6W Svniedi 
_ . 2ft SvnliTx 
18* lift svseon 
»W 13 SvASOC 
7W 3ft S vat in 
11* 6* Svsinip 
25ft 13* Svstraf 


.15b 16 


32 il 


M U 


158 1.1 
152 19 


2ft 

Hft 

10* 

5* 

14 

14ft 

5M 


29 

2 

25 

13 
22 

496 

2 

1549 
19 
185 

97 

.10 15 1170 
82 
4 
1 

196 

14 
297 
100 

50 U IS 
45 
S3 
100 
6 


58 A 


4* 4ft 4ft — ft 
5ft 5ft 5ft 
lift 15ft 15* 

23ft 23. 23 

6ft 6* 6ft 

16 IS* 16 + * 

34 33* 33W — * 

19 18ft 19 + ft 
153* 152 1S3 +* 
65* 65* 65* + * 
I* 2% 2* , 

8* 7* 8* + * 
1* l'« IW 

B* 8* ff* 

7* 7* 7* 

3* 3ft 3ft 
8ft 8* Bft- ft 
10* 10ft 10*— ft 
3* 3ft 3ft — ft 
17ft 17ft 17ft 

12 * 13* law— * 

Sft 5* Sft + ft 

10ft to* 10* 

21* 21* 21* 


1J Montll 
High Low Slock 


Sam In Net 

D«v. vtd. IPOs High Low 1 PAL Otoe 







T 



1 

\wm 

8 TBC 



1 

9 

9 

9 — V 

Iran 

13 TCACb 

.16 

J 

1 

23 

23 

23 

IkH 

3ft Toe'/ tv i 


81 

3* 

3ft 

3* 

IF IM 




30*1 

14ft 

13ft 

14ft + * 
3* + ft 

av 

2ft Tondon 



3029 

3ft 

2ft 

22 

11 Telco 



53 

UV 

UV 

11* 

34W 

18W TIcmA 



238 

30ft 

30* 

30V- ft 

12ft 




989 

8 

7V 

7V — ft 

25 

13* Teiecrd 

J2 

U 

113 

23* 

22% 

23* + V 

19ft 

Bft Teioci s 



IB48 

lbft 

TO 

Igj + ft 

4U 

IV Teivld 



572 

2 

20 

8* Telatis 



168 

9 

av 

9 

17* 

9ft Teixon s 



127 

14V 

14* 

14* 

12*. 

3ft TermDt 

t 

39 

4 

TV 

4 

ISft 

B* ThexPr 



53 

9ft 

9ft 

TV 

13ft 

28ft 

lift Wi 



64 

167 

nw 

27V 

4£ 

lift 

26ft 

14ft 




101 

AW 

6* 



5V ThouTr 



437 

95 

ss 

e 


14 

8* TmeFib 



2V 

13ft 

TO 

TO-vf 

2ft 

W r.ororv 



IX 

* 

17ft 

B Tofus 



800 

13* 

UV 

13 + ft 

30 

7V TollSv S 



7 

26* 

26* 

26* 

17V 



14 

11V 

II 

11 + V 

12ft 




37 


7ft 

7ft— ft 

row 

20 Tru&Jo 

AO 

15 

17 

22 

22* + * 

m 




U 



1 

24W 

ro uslic s 

50 

35 

10 

23ft 

23ft 

23ft— * 

24W 

13* UTL 


.9 

260 

13V 

13* 

13V + ft 

20W 

5 Ultrsv 

86c 

57 

7* 

7 

7 

X* 

I0W Ungmn 



1577 

14* 

13 

13ft + ft 

I3W 

TV Unlfl 



441 

13 

12* 

12V + ft 

1 


1591 

4.1 

11 

27* 

26V 

26V— V 


IjillliP-Pn 

IJ» 

11 

39 

48V 

48 

48 V +1V 

IKitTj 


56 

J 

126 

21V 

20V 

21 

1 

iLufintca 

.iSr 15 

36 

9V 

9 

9* 


r rl 1 r- 

158 

ts 

2S4 

21ft 

21ft 

21ft 


6 UFnGra 



25 

7ft 

7V 

7ft + ft 

22W 

lift UFstFd 



67 

left 

16ft 

14ft + V 

■KJ 

I I I j ll 

15412X4 

65 

7W 

/ 

7 - W 

WM 




68 

Sft 

5 ft 

Sf— ft 

32 

H Cfnr J 

150 

35 

116 

26* 

25ft 

26% + W 

4ft 

lft US Cap 



172 

3* 

3 

3 


2* USDsgn 
UW U5HCS 



16 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft— ft 

33V 

88 

J 

8722 

2SW 

25 

27V +2* 

Sft 

3W US Shell 

.12 

23 

45 

4 V 

4* 

4ft — V 

■ .1 

10ft USSur 

JOe 18 

19 

16* 

16 V 

16ft + % 

ran 

25W USTrs 

MO 

3 A 

595 

35 

34W 

35 + * 

ran 


ro 

18 

572 

IP* 

19 

19* 

24ft 

14ft UnTelev 



5 

24ft 

24* 

24* 

4$W 

XW UVaBs 

154 

4.1 

77 

40* 

4UW 

40W 

22 

13W UnvFm 



16 

IBft 

IBW 

IBft + ft 

■ .1 

«V UnuHIt 

t 


1414 

12ft 

lift 

12ft + ft 

13 

5V UFSBk 



26 

10* 

10 

10* + W 

6W 

3V Uscaf 

ro 

11 

84 

5ft 

Sft 

5* 

| 




V 



1 

9ft 

4V VU 



166 

SV 

Sft 

5ft 

14* 

7W VL5I 



205 

UV 

10ft 

10ft— V 


4* VMX 



1038 

4V 

4* 

4V 

lift 

7 VSE 

Ite 13 

6 

9* 

9* 

9* + V 

20V 

6 Valid Lu 



963 

eft 

6V 

6* 

22ft 

8W ValFSL 



43 

15ft 

15ft 

15ft + ft 

42W 

26* ValNM 

iro 

3J 

194 

37* 

37* 

37ft 

18V 

11V Van Dus 

AO 

22 

3 

17ft 

I/ft 

17ft 

15W 




88 


5* 


Aft 

2ft Ventre* 



2020 

Sft 

5 

5% + ft 

28V 

13V V tcorn 

.12e 

3 

921 

17 

16 

17 + ft 

14V 

7ft VledeFr 

-22e 25 

199 

7V 

7ft 

TV- ft 

14* 

9* VUdra 



12 

UV 

lift 

11V— * 

row 

13V Vlratek 



136 

18V 

18 

18V 4- ft 





398 

7V 

7* 

7ft + ft 

22 

rov vaKlnf 



30 

IT* 

17V 

17V 

1 



W 



1 



.96 

SJ 

30 

18* 

IBW 

1BV — W 


10 *al»C e 

J4 

1.9 

2 

12* 

17* 

12* + W 


5 1 u WlkrTel 



43 

9* 

9W 

9W— V 


15V WshE 

1.76 

BJ 

128 

21ft 

20ft 

21ft + V 

H Lb 



2 A 

14 

24ft 

24* 

Mft + ft 

16ft 

I0W WMSB 



279 

12 

11* 

lift + V 

ra.^ 

Sft Wewelk 



X 

Aft 

Aft 

Aft 

UW 

10* Webo 

JO 

lb 

8 

11 

10* 

11 + ft 

■ in 

6ft WestFn 



116 

17 

IAU 

17 + V 





11 

14ft 

Uft 

14ft— ft 






UV 



17* 

5 WstwCs 



334 

8V 

Bft 

aft— v 



.98 

XI 

156 

31V 

31* 










13* 

3 Wtaram 



245 

4* 

3ft 

4 — * 

raiia 

L U 

\hS 

35 

218 

46V 

45V 

45V— V 

■ i 

KT/Il Jra 



423 

13V 

17V 

13W +• % 

17V 




2 

16* 

16* 

16* + V 

iev 

4ft wtisnF 



182 

6* 

6* 

6VS— * 


P i 'M .i 1 1 - rTTyM 







ra>ro 



40 


15 

14V 

IS 

rarj 


50 

58 

6 

12 

12 

!? 

ran 

2iv won no 

54 

25 

126 

25 

24% 


3042 

2TV Wynton 

50 

35 

B 

Z3W 

Z7% 

37* 

1 ■ ■ 



g'Ml? 



M 1 

VW 




41 

2V 

2V. 

2% 

13V 

5W xicor 



83 

7 

AV 

Oft 

17V 

row xidex 



624 

12 

IIV 

lift + ft 

i mm 

rarararaiv 




i^B 

■Hi ■ 

21ft 

14V YIowF 8 

54 

17 

43 

20ft 

20* 

20ft ♦ v 

I 



: 









737 

20 

19 

19* 

13V 


Aba 35 

121 

12* 

12 

12* + V 


2W zile< 



45 

TVi 

2% 

2* 

12 




42 

SV 

5 


15V 

e* Zondvn 

881 

3 

176 

ISft 

10* 

10ft + V 




of International Herald 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 

Tiib ads work. 


ahb^T 


jT ‘ 










































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER II, 1985 


PEANUTS 


<3 




■ 

14 





R 

IS 

IS 




17 






18 


10 



1 

20 




_ 

1 

21 


22 



23 





24 



■ 

■ 

■ 

2b 



■ 

28 

27 




31 

& 

33 



34 





1 

3b 




37 

3B 






39 

40 



R 

41 






42 

43 



44 





1 

45 

46 



47 




48 




S2 

53 

54 



■ 

55 

56 




1 

M 





69 






60 

61 




■ 

62 





1 

63 

64 




53 






6tt 


TrfE MEETING OF THE 
CACTUS CLUB WILL 
COME TO ORPER. ... 


THE SECRETARY WILL 




l rib irwxi wviuk. , 

READ THE MINUTE 5 OF THAT WE PURCHASE A 
THE LAST MEETING COMPUTER TO RES' TRACK 
__ OF OUR MEMBERSHIP " 


"A 5 U 6 GE 5 T 0 N WAS MADE * AFTER THE LAUGHTER 
THAT WE PURCHASE A PIEP DOWN. WE HAD 
COMPUTER TO KEEP TRACK REFRESHMENTS " 


books 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


I/O-// '{■ 






By John McPhee. 293 pages. $ 15 . 95 . 
Farrar Straus & Giroux, 19 Union Square 
West, New York, N. Y. 10003 . 

Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupc 


brings are the details of the news, and as usual 
his writing is a minefield of amusing and cm > . 
ous trivia. Scientists who trap ; New Jersey* 
black bears for tracking purposes have found 
that the best bait » use ^.any-yatftty of 
Dunkin’ Donut seasoned with; a Bttle ami? 
extract. “That drives the bears 
ments one biolopst- _ 
Justasyoucantdlabearsagebyse^ing 
one of its teeth, you can judge the ieogtfc^fa 


BLONDIE 


B ACKWARD prcwess is the theme of the human pregnane _ „ . f - • 

eight pieces by John McPhee collected in from the pubic Gone to the far «fe:;of ti* 
“Tabteof (Stents.*’ Written for The New uteres and allowing a week per rauspete. 
Yorker between 1981 and 1984, they bring “It’s so consistent 


WANT TO HEAR WV 
s -r NEW RIDDLE, *• 
\ MR.0UMSTEAO ) 


WHAT GOES 
► c f t f- DUMP, 
99-0LW1P? 


ACROSS 


I " le 

tyran!” 

5 Crisp toast 

10 Britisher's 
omega 

13 M. Marceau. 
e.g- 

14 Short-necked 
fowl 

15 Crabby 
fiddler? 

16 Start of a 
quotation from 
PubiiliusSyrus 

19 Gel 

20 Fertile soil 

21 Summon 

22 Salary 

24 Before, to 
Browning 

25 Gerundial 
suffix 

26 Agnate 

31 Fit of 

shivering 

34 Moroccan 
capital 

35 Harem roam 

36 Middle of the 
quotation 

40 Modem art 

41 Pony-express 
method 

42 “If My 

Way." 1913 
classic 

43 Lightest 
known 
substance 

45 Rand rooter? 


47 Legal principle 

48 End of the 
quotation 

52 Feces for 
grooms 

55 Rhone feeder 

57 Part of an aho 

58 “Dear Lord 

and 

Whittier 

61 Gobs 

62 Staggering 

63 Nautical 
direction 

64 Foreign: 
Comb, form 

65 Zola's 

“La ■' 

66 Incline 


io< 1 1 as 

23 Painter 
Mondrian 

24 Coupd' 

26 Joyful song 

27 in a skillful 
way 

28 French tennis 
star 

29 Seaport inSE 
Spam 

30 She portrayed 
Grace Kelly 

31 Nurse in 
Nanking 

32 Sanguinary 

33 Manipulated 

34 Guide for 

* conduct 



I CAN'T IMAGINE 




ACEWIPH?E 
► WITH A i 
WOODEN LEG 


news of old professions being rediscovered, — r „ . . =. 

obsolete technologies becoming viable again, “Even God is on the metiK system. 


.ring “It’s so consistent it's uncanny” says Thv Ann 
£of Dorney of Skowhegan, Maine. Writes Mdftre, 




of enHftngw wd animal species repop 
their old habitats, and of people findu 
ways to live in what remains of the 
American wilderness. 

Even McPhee himself goes back to 


paring The snowmobile has made winteseqqyabfc 

og new for the natives of -Mufr- 
North reaches, a fact that seems at odds, wife- tfch 
machine’s reputation as. a curse on ^aanns^' 
the fu- .And, according to McPhee, “In a paper cup, 


BEETLE BAILEY 


Ha.' ha; you guys look U 

FUNNY WHEN YOU'VE BEEN | 


ON BIVOUAC A FEW WEEKS | 
Without shaviN© ? 


1 Collect 

2 Dr. I.Q.? 

3 String fellow? 

4 Rep.'s 
colleague 

5 Robust 

6 Brought into 
harmony 

7 Louts 

8 Unhappy 
interjection 

9W.W. II 
conveyance 

10 Nil 

11 Actor Estrada 
or Rhodes 

12 Treat, in a way 

15 Not at all 

17 Valley 

18 Till now 


37 Lindsay's C? 

collaborator ^ST}\ 

38 Mil. groups 

39 Succeeds * \nv c t pp 

44 Conservatives tArr 



WATCH 

IT 




Even McPhee himself goes back to the fu- .And, according to McPtee, In a paper cup, 
tore, in a way. In “Open Man,” he sketches gasoline bums quietly ana does not bUzcup m 
some moments in the promising political ca- your face," an assertion I do not intend;!© test 
reer of the wninr senator from New Jersey, Bill unless I absolutely have to.. 

Bradley, who 30 years and 18 McPhee books What .does blaze up hl your face are, the 
ago, as a basketball star at Princeton Universi- pyrot echnics that these e ncoun ters with . the 
ty, became the subject of McPbee's first pub- world set off in McPfaee’s' verbs! xxhagfoatioii. 
lichwi work. “A Sense of Where You Are." He has not yet fuDy recovered from_thcinfatu- 

The news that these pieces bring is hearten- ation with geology that produced his L5thaiwi 
ing, particularly if. you happen to be a nature- J6th books, “B asi n and Kange”(J981)ai)d' a Tii 
loving traditionalist Black bears arereanhabit- Suspect Terrain" (1983). The. title“TabJeof . 
in g New Jersey without posing any threat to its Contents” may have been inspired by tfic jjp- 
buman population (“A Textbook Place for tion of a plateau or landscape fulLof whatever 
Bears") and moose are once f>gri n thriving in has given the author satisfaction. lit any case, 
Maine (“North of the C P. Line"). Certain' the text itself contains occasional phrases like 
young doctors, rebelling against what they see “a gorge of Precambriaa a mph i b olite" and “a 
as the oveispeciatization of modern medicine, comiche along a high outcrop." ;; ■ ' 

are embracing what has oxymoronically been But elsewhere, the masonry rf mx jjld 'Vic- 
defined as the “comprehensive specialty" of torian stone mansion- “is grouted irith day- 
family practice, and are cheerfully making light." Blown-down birch trees, scen.fromihp 
bouse calls (“Heirs of General Practice"). air, looked Ekeshibbed cigarettes after ateen-. 

In “Ice Pond," McPhee describes how the age party." One black bear, whea-heisiabbefift 


1 . 4 * 




gjg 

Vi^aT-- 


hero of his 10th book — Theodore B. Taylor of with an anesthetic, begins “to nod like a dimier 
“The Curve of Binding Energy" (1973) — has guest, 1 * and when he first wakes op again wall^ 
turned his thoughts fromnudear weapons to a off “tike an alumnus at a reunion."' 
cheaper energy source, or what be calls a metb- ty a passage inspired ty some landscape that 

od of “harvesting the cold of winter for rise in suggests to turn “tire narcotic glens of Burgnn- 
summer." Behold, it works! dy, McPhee writes, “New Jerstymay' be the 

And in “Munhydro” — for my money the sliest state in the union. for New Jetseyihas 
most exciting piece in the collection —we see hiddenitsBorgyndys while eoncmiraiingbodi 
how a 1978 congressional decision to require its visitors and its supreme ugShesa in one 
regional power companies to boy electricity narrow band, moving rmHions of people* day 
from anyone who produces it, hasled to the in one side and. out the other throngh scenes 
rerival of the small-scale hydroelectric Indus- that suggest gunshot wounds, m an i nfected 
try, in what McPhee describes paradoxically as Unde Sam." • . in,-. 


45 Conclusion 

46 Approving 
Theban god? 

48 An epic clout? 

49 Roman official 

50 Naperv 

31 Vanished 

52 Tunisian city 

53 Hawthorne 
offering 

54 Like of 

bricks 

55 Irate 

56 The southwest 
wind 

59 Pack or trade 
follower 

60 “Krazy " 


YOUVEGEEN 
THE LAST . 

> OF me. -< 

[MOUTHY-! ) 




-.y-y 


“a generally in viable feverish rush for riches.” In the last piece in the book, “North cf the 

But just as important as the news McPhee C P. line," Jhc describes his- encounters With 

: ; — an aerial game warden ftr wn jHairia oriKyhap- 

Solution to Previous Puzzle • pens to have the same name. The warden had 

once written a tetter to The New Yorfarconi- 


W IZARD of ID 


Solutiofi to Previous Puzzle 


v? New York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 




f IVWNT 

action ,#? 

V IVMlTT 
koUT! / 


myo w vk& 
■voxKwm 

'&£03&#CVt& 


\d\ 


mk 


_mws 

l^¥lN 
mve- , 



Wm 




REX MORGAN 


YOUR CHANCES OF GETTING 
OFF COCAINE A EE NOT GOOP^ 
WITHOUT PROFESSIONAL HELP. 
CLAUDIA i IT WILL MEAN FOUR ^ 
TO SIX WEEKS IN A DRUG ^ 

> “^TREATMENT FACILITY (M 

fi r‘~r iw i ■Mill mrcW 


I*M ONLY SUGGESTING WHAT I J 
FIRMLY BELIEVE IS IN YOUR ^ 
BEST INTEREST/ I DON'T WANT 
YOU TO GO HOME FROM HERE ( 

I WANT YOU TO GO DIRECTLY TO. 
A TREATMENT CENTER / mT 


BQB □□□□ □□□□□ 
ECDD □□□□ OHHBQ 
OGEE 0QDB □□□□□ 

onannsua □□□□□□ 
bee aaaaQanaaa 
aaaoa see 
BGQB ao HaaaQasa 
ECjBE ded qdeq 
EEEEQBED EQQEQI3 
S0C1 □□□□□ 
□□□□□□□□□□ Q03 
E3BQD3S 9QQQQHIQS 
□□ana aaoH □□□□ 
□DDEO E3E1BB □□□□ 
□□EDS BBE □ □□□ 


plaining half-jojdngly that its reporter .'Vi4s a&- 
mg the warden’s nanK. At the cnarf “Nortb of 
the C P. linn" the author writes that whenty 
thinks of his friend the warden. “Ferny himTirc 
world" in the way “that one is. sometimw: 
drawn to be another person or live the life trf a 
charactcrcncountered inafictkm. ,1 '~ . 

“ Time and again,” tin- piece oondndes, 
“when I Himk ot him- and such thoughts' riart 
running through nry mind, 1 invariably find 









nmdf wislting that 1 were John McPhee. 1 ^ 
hfany.readers of.“Table of Contents" trill end 


Many readcrs of.“TaHe of Contents" will end 
up feding that way about both tty author and 
hissubjecL . 




Christopher Lehmana-Haupt is on the staff of 
TheNewYorklimes. 


Msh (a. i 


BRIDGE 


LET ME jfl 
TRY IT rr 

on ay/C 

OWN, DR. 
MORGAN {. 


W MAY 1 U 
B DISCUSS 1 
^ IT WITH 
BRADY BEFORE 
GIVING YOU > 
► MY -< 
H ANSWER”? 1 




By Alan Truscotr .. led another qjade, hoping.tliat loser was discarded from the 
^ ,. , , v*. East had begun with two spade dosed hand. A spade was 

the diagramed deal, the honors, ot if he had. failed to ndlcd, and «he lead.of the last 
v-ropenmg bid. of two di?- unblock with a doubleton trump squeezed West in 
monas was conventional, As h was. West feQ spades and diamonds to bring 
showing a three-suited hand -^ faffin ^ w overtake ^ home the game. * 
wth 1M5 hgward pomte. queen with the long to cash the 
South eventually pushed onto ^ 

^ V S Cl ^ Whi %T C ? t S[ Now South was home, for S^“ 87 

right because, the East-West .i,- mt.CC, Ik : *8 

contractof fourbeartswasdue , ^°* 1 • ' *akbj 

to succeed. . . ■ north . west east ila 

West led the heart ace and *sm ||JI|j(j -sQ4 

shifted to a trump. South won *K63 aoSt? Illllfll 

with the kins, cashed the ace. *8 k? .?!..• 


EP6M&1 


"GoaY ! 1 HOPE L DON'T GROW AS m AST 0 U ! 
TO ALWAYS BE AFRAID OF FALU NG ■ ’ 


GARFIELD 


THERE ARE H(JG 6 
AND THERE ARE HOGS 


BUT THERE ARE NO HOGS 
LIKE BEAR HUGS> 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henrt Amok) and Bob Lae 


«}.. . ■ . . - - 


Unscram bta these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to torm 
tow ortfinary words. 


CLOAV 


UPYTT 



faNLa«>^iniri 


- . I 

“S' .V,' 

—z-e'-jse 




fo'MtS fcfryyfr.* 

<■ *-• , 

* v **?!5iiSSpry 




JW BW?S 


| l£i 1D8S United F«abra Syncficafle.tnc 


West led the heart ace and 
shifted to a trump. South won 
with the king, cashed the ace, 
and took note of West’s heart 
discard. West’s failure to shift 
to spades suggested that East 
had at least one honor in the 
suit • : . 

South now had a very good 
idea of the distribution. He 
drew the missing tramp and 
cashed the ace. of diamonds 


WEST 
♦ K J 
«?« 

0 Q97 


mill 

♦— 

SOUTH 
*S 
9 — • 

* J 10 8 

♦ 10 8 


The forced heart return was 


~ I and the ace of spades. Now he ruffed in dummy, as the spade 


NORTH (D) 

* A 10 8 r 
?8 

C-K832 

*AKSJ 

WEST ... EAST ifa 

lii!§ 111 

*< • J«3 

SOUTH 

* 532 . 

OQ 

O A J 10 8 

* Q 10 8 7 5 . 

Bw* sides were vtfaenfcle: The 

bidding: 

North Earn South West 

2 0 3 V Pm Pass 

DM- Pass 14 4 9- 

Pass Peas 3* Pass 

Pass Pass > 

West ted the hean ece. 


^REBOA 


LENETS 


DENORM 


A SMALL BOY 
MIGHT WEAR OUT 
EVERYTHIN©, 
INCLUDING THI©. 


World Stock Markets 




Via Agence France- Presse Oct. 10 

Closing pruts in local carrmrirs unless otherwise indi c ated. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, ee sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Amsterdam 


Prtnf answer here: HIS 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: EATEN GOOSE VERMIN EYELID 


Answer What some people do when they hold a 
conversation— NEVER LET GO 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


AJ*nrvo 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Be (erode 

Barfl it 

Brussels 

BacMnsst 

Budapest 

Copenhagen 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

24 7* 16 61 fr 

16 41 12 54 O 

26 79 16 S» (r 

24 75 II 55 cl 

17 A3 V 48 o 

IS 5V II 52 sh 

17 A3 10 W Cl 

21 ra 7 45 cl 

If M 10 SO a 


Bane non 
Beilina 
Mona Kona 
Manila 
New Demi 
Seoul 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Taipei 


16 61 10 50 no Tokyo 

25 77 18 64 d . 

14 ai io so o AFRICA 


Costa Del Sal 

25 

77 

18 

64 

d 

Dublin 

16 

»1 

10 

50 

0 

Edinburgh 

15 

59 

7 

45 

r 

Florence 

24 

75 

to. 

1 50 

Fr 

Frank furl 

17 

63 

10 

50 

Cl 

Geneva 

19 

66 

$ 

41 

fr 

Helsinki 

13 

55 

s 

46 

el 

Istanbul 

— 

a— 

13 

55 

no 

Las Palmas 

26 

79 

Z 1 

70 

fr 

Lisbon 

26 

79 

16 

61 

fr 

London 

18 

64 

10 

50 

0 

Madrid 

24 

75 

8 

46 

Ir 

Milan 

21 

70 

11 

52 

fr 

MOSCOW 

14 

S 7 

9 

48 

0 

Mtutidi 

14 

57 

7 

45 

0 

Nice 

34 

75 

16 

61 

ef 

Oslo 

14 

57 

8 

46 

d 

Paris 

H 

68 

11 

S 3 

fr 

Pragge 

13 

55 

7 

45 

r 

ReyklavIK 

* 

39 

0 

32 

d 

Rome 

26 

TV 

M 

57 

Ir 

Stockholm 

11 

52 

7 

45 

a 

Strasbourg 

18 

64 

11 

52 

a 

Venice 

23 

73 

13 

55 

fr 

Vienna 

16 

61 

9 

48 

0 

Warsaw 

12 

54 

6 

43 

0 


31 88 24 75 St 

2 S 77 12 54 O 

29 84 25 77 O 

27 II 19 66 0 

27 8 t 20 48 d 

19 66 14 61 r 

28 57 23 73 St 

32 9 g U 73 O 

33 91 26 79 fo 

25 77 19 66 fr 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

Attorn Rubber 
Amro EHsnk 
SVG 

Buehrmonn T 

Calond HkJo 

Elsevler-NDU 

Fewer 

Gist Brocades 

Heineken 

Haoaevens 

KLM 

Noor dm 

Nat Nedder 

Nedllavd 

oce Vender G 

Pakhaed 

Pumps 

Raboco 

Redamco 

Rollnco 

Rarenio 

fioval Dutch 

Unilever 

Van Onimeren 

VMF Stork 

VNU 


HodltlPf 770 795 BOC Group 

Htwchst SO 232 Boots 

Hooch 134 137 Bowoiw Indus 

HDrtnn 3 UJ 210 J 0 BP 

Hussel 384 192 Brit Home SI 

IWKA 297 298 Brit Telecom 

Kail* Salt 37050 37 A 80 Bril Aennooce 

Karst adt 262 277 Brlloll 

Koufhol J 16 J 0 313 BTR 

Kloeckner H-D 290 291 BurmcM 

Kloecfcner Werhe 7450 7 BJ 0 Cable Wireless 
Kruno Stahl 735 13850 Codbwrr Schw 

Llndo 552 565 Charter Cons 

Lufthansa 228 231 Commercial U 

WAN 17950 182 Cons Gold 

Monne&moim 221 JO 22950 Courtaulds 

Muench RuM> 1905 1875 DcloetY 

Nix dart 566 57150 Oe Beers* 

PKI 681 688 Dtrtlllers 

Porsche 12*0 T 27 B Dr I e Ion tel n 


Ftal ' 
Gener al i 
IFI 

I to Ice men 1 1 

Itolgos 

nalmablllarl 

WodiobancD 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 



Rlnascente 

w Ime 

£ i^a 

313 Stei 



Thomson CSF 
i Total 


£5 577 Bouaainvttie 

229 22750 Caslemoln* 


Apefl Index : FLA. 
Previous : 19X23 
CAC Index : 20650 
Previous : 205JS 


384 


Brit Home SI 

297 

39B 

Brit Telecom 

370X0 374X0 

Bril Aerasooce 

262 

277 

Brlloll 

316X0 

318 

BTR 

290 

291 

Burman 


Kruno StofiJ 
Linde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Monnesmonn 
Muench Ruec* 
NIxdort 
PKI 

Porsche 

Preu»ag 

PWA 

Rwe 

Rhvfnmetall 

scnerlftg 

5EL 

Siemens 

Thyssen 

VetM 


303 MIB Current Index : 1770 

T92 Previous : 1784 

425 

215 

IS 1 r»fa 

£? Air Ueulde 509 

jif AtSthom AH. 298 

m Av DOSSOUH 1100 

jS Borneo Ire 425 

?£ BIC 440 

is Bofiproki 1370 


Cold Stereo* 
DBS 

Fraser Neave 

Haw Par 

Indtcone 

Mol Bonking 

OCBC 

OU8 

OUB 

ShanovWa 
SI me Darby 
5 'core Land 
SUore Press 
S Steamship 
St Trod Ins 
United Overseas 
UOB 


2j05 2 

8 . I 

458 ASS 

Comolco W 2 

CRA 8 SM 

CSR 3Ji 170 

Don too 253 252 

1 Elders Ixl 355 195 

ICI Australia 220 230 

Moeeltan 239 • 230 , 

, _ MIM 250 254 

, i Myer . 170. X60 , 

^ “S Not AubI Bank A72 432 1 

, * . * News Cant 8 JJ0 

“0 N Broken Hill 250 255 

HI J-ll Poseidon . . 330 350 

ow Cool Trust • 152 150 

5^3 «-15 Santos 556 530 

2J3 Thomas Matton ZAS 241 

Ag JJ-O- western Mining l» 184 

S Westpoc Banking £26 5.12 

4” «■” Woods kte 130 130 

6 A TO AU Ord t p art e s Index : HUM 

035 034 Previous : 102356 

3X4 3X6 


Canadian stocks ; 


^8 A 

.iroo5S5S , AF 


39 UVs 37 VH-SIW 

88U 8 8W+-W 

280 275 235 —7 

* 339 fc 33 M am ... 


TXT 1X5 
352 353 


Strolti Times led Index : 76151 Adfo 


258X0 

261 

Fhons 

143X0 142.10 

FreeStGed 

20920 

214 

GEC 

365 

302 

Gen Accident 

535 

511 

GKN 

322X0 

323 

Glaxo c 

596 

607 

Grand Mel 


S SI 

*1726 5172 * 

aw 35i xTyr? 


Prevlees : 764X7 


Thyssen 142 i47jo gre 

Vbbo 256 256 Gumness 

Votkswapenwefic 32450 33950 GUS 

Welle 666 u/> Hanson 

Commerzbank index : issut iS*** 1 ^ 


pravfooa : TS965B 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Cm Town 

CasdUanea 

Hamm 

Logos 

NelraM 

Tunis 


28 82 14 57 


ANPXSS Gen! index : 211.10 
Previoas : 211X0 


22 72 18 64 tr 

23 72 17 «] el 

21 » 13 55 d 

30 86 20 68 o 

20 68 16 61 cl 


Tunis 26 J9 17 63 Cl 

LATIH AMERICA 


Beenes Aires 21 70 — — fr 

Caro cos V li a a d 

Lima 20 68 IS 59 a 

Mexico arr 25 77 15 5» cl 

Ufa de Janeiro — — — — no 


NORTH AMERICA 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Bel rot 
Damascus 

Jerusalem 

Tel Aviv 


11 52 7 AS a 

lfl 64 II 52 0 SK 

33 73 t3 55 fr SK5o 

16 61 9 4$ a 

12 54 0 43 o gSEu 

- - “ « ™ Ml >U 

VST Houston 

~ — L, , „ . Los Angeles 

21 70 4 39 fr Miami 

27 81 24 75 cl Minneapolis 

26 79 14 57 fr Montreal 

23 73 15 59 d Nassau 

26 70 17 63 Cl New York 


Ml a n o n pu lls 
Montreal 
Nossoo 
New York 


7 45 1 34 d 

M tt 16 61 pc 

20 68 11 55 r 

14 57 8 46 r 

16 61 1 34 cl 

10 64 14 57 r 

31 88 24 75 fr 

30 B6 20 60 pc 

23 73 13 55 PC 

31 88 24 75 PC 

7 45 -1 30 pc 

16 61 13 55 Cl 

30 80 23 73 fr 

24 »3 15 59 PC 


Sk East Asia 20 

I . - Cheung Kong 1350 

Rmwafc, | China Uont 16 

I m tatvyn | Green i^nd 8.10 

Arbed^ 1730 1710 {SEiSS 8 "* fig 

SKlI ‘SS ‘US lS 

CoSS si JS HK Electric 7#5 

EBeT ™ ™ HK Realty A 11X0 

GB-i^o-bm S ^ HKlSS’ ^ 

Gcvaert “g g Kf^Bonk 

J**ok« 5180 5190 HKYwSmeT 2JQ 

intercom 2410 7470 fS 

Kredlctbank 9100 9100 9* 

Pffrofino *340 6280 HufchWhompca to 

Sac Generate 1905 1875 nSS 

sZES, 3S sss s sec ll 

Traction Elec sws $5 

Unera S3 Ptw ^°SS l ? c ' eJ 

Vtellle Msnhsnr 8100 8159 shjTpSS^ 

SBSKSJr" 11 " 2 ^ 

rmw.auai Toi Cheung 1.84 

. Wah Kwong 0X3 

I L, J 1 . 1 vrtwOnCB 1X8 

Frankfurt ! winsor aoo 

I 1 World 1 an 2.175 

AEG-T eldunken 165 168 . 

Allianz Vers 1640 1660 hangSenglndn. 1589.13 


Arbed 

Bekoert 

CocNerlll 

Cofcope 

EBES 

GB-inno-BM 

G8L 

Gcvaert 

Hoboken 

intercom 

Krcdlc thank 

Perroflna 

Sac Generate 

Soflno 

Soivav 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

VMIIe Msnlagnr 


OCEANIA 


SoBFraodKO 20 68 10 SO 


Auckland 

Sydney 


17 63 It 52 


21 70 16 61 Ir Washington 


ei-efoudv; ftMoopv: Ir-falr: n-hatl: severe 
sh-snowers; sw-snan; si^fannv. 


U II 5 41 
20 60 13 55 
r 01 15 59 


»; ac-oortlv aeuay: r^aini 


FRIDAYS FORECAST — CNAHNSL: SllahtlV ChOPOV. FRANKFURT: Fair. 
Temu. 22 — 6 172 — 43). LONDON: Cloudy. Temp. 10 — 10 (64 —501. MADRID: 
Fair. Temp. 25— v (77 — 48). new YORK: Rain. Temp, u— 10 fii— 50). 
PARIS: Fair. Tem& 23 — 7 (73—45). ROME: Fair. Tma 27— 15 ioi— 591. 
TEL AVIV; NA. ZURICH: Fair. Temp. 23 — 5 (73 — 41). BANGKOK: 
Thunderstorms. 30 — 25 (86 — 771. HONG KONG: Cloudy. Temp. 29—25 
(84 — 77). MANILA: Showers. Tcmn. 30 — 24 (86 — 751. SEOUL: No. 
SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Temp. 31—24 (88 — 75). TOKYO: Showers. 
Temo. 24— 19 175—661. 


AEG-T eldunken 

Allianz Vers 

All a no 

BASF 

Bayer 

Bov Hvpo Bane 
Bar Verebabank 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BM W 

Commerzbank 
Coni Gemmi 
Daimler-Benz 
Desussa _ 


imperial Group 
Jaguar 

I LmdSecurtlles 

Lesoi General 
Lloyds Bonk 
20 21 Lenrbo 

1850 Mm Lueas 

16 15X0 50 

8.10 AM y *tol Bo x 
41,75 41 JO Midland Bank 

Uto 220 Nat west Bank 
10x0 i oxo 19 and 0 

tS 8 Pllklnoton 
11X0 II JO PteMCV . . 
ti <n 24 Prndentlot 
445 445 Rocol Elect 
7XB 7 Rondfontein 
8X5 A78 Rortk 
123 120 R«9 Inti 
t9? 6.95 Reuters 
to 2620 Rtmd Dutch c 
060 n*7 RTZ 
(L77 057 Soolehi 
12X0 I2J0 Sdnsbury 
1420 142D Sears HdMiiMs 
9X5 SM 
43X0 44I50 STC 
7X0 7X0 5W Chartered 
12J0 1228 Su? Alliance 
250 2X5 Toteond Lyle 
2428 2428 

1.94 1.97 Thorn EMI 

0X3 0X3 T -l- Grouo 

1X8 1X3 Tr o ta t ga r Hse 
4X0 *35 THF 

2.175 2.175 JJItTamar 

Unilever i I 
589. U United Biscuits 
Vickers 
WMiwarth 


DM «5w 

154 IH 

i/M Mtn lAmtCI 

S m EII-AgulWr>e 

3W 13 35/64 gv^l] 

Ka ^ naowm 

TO So , L 222E 1 C0B 

TOO WO 

206 210 }£*™ 

379 381 ^£2“.. 

641 642 

702 203 iSSrtto 

285 272 JWJJS,- 

311 354 

zju 47B ever nerntessy 

5,9 j|I Moulinex 

ta ™ Occktentate 

j** wo Pernod die 

164 1»4 

52 & SSEU 

431 425 SSMu-a, 

2S8 253 532^^“ 

126 128 »?g. n ., mn t 

699 609 jkhWtePlw 


Astra 

Atlas Copco 
B o 1 1 den 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 
ESSelte 

Handelsbanken 

Pbarmoda 

Saab- Scoria 

Sondvlk 

SLonsko 

SKF 

SweoishMotCh 


129 

ns 

20T 

196 

286 

289 

415 

406 

123 

123 

100 

N XI. 

142 

142 

205 

209 

345 

tea 

180 


173 

173 

N.Q. 

— 

495 

500 

92X0 

93 

236 

23* 

212 

214 

218 

220 


Alusulsse 
Aulophon 
Bank Leu 
Brown Boven 
aba Gel by 


4350 4340 
710 70 S 

6150 61 7 S 
3725 3725 
1690 16 M 
3425 3373 
2955 2920 
3390 3410 
NA — 
3025 2990 
7500 7375 
3275 3250 
2130 2120 
5050 5000 
7425 7475 
1500 1470 
9973 9850 

M45 M30 


5208 k 2 l»k 20 ft 
*1816 18V> 18IA 
*19 119k 19 


UMlPacWAJiin *1316' T3M 13U.4-14 


*tOS Pamour 
TinfPceiConP 
1000 Pembina 


1T04* TOW-KJi 

53446 34Vi 


*17%k 17J6 17*6— Vk 175 Pine Potat 
S13A. 1344 1364— Vk 10970 Placer 
» » 1» 18H— te 12213 Provtae - 

l«OQu«Sfvwiio 

S3Wi 30 30 — 1 2367 Redpath 

455 —10 1M ReedSt 1 So 
STJT* 1 ,]2iU 1216 . . 55 Ropers A 

IR, 192 +2 ]05 Roman 

55 w ,15^ 500 Rothm an 

5? 333 131S0 Sceptre 

390 390 390 —5 600Scoff*t 

Sl«b 16W 1636+ Vk 10560 Sears Con 
W4 834—1% 24031 Shell Can 

58M pv SM l62i2Sherrttt 
213 J02 212 — 2 100 Slater B f 


16212 StMTTitT 
.100 Slater Bt 


^*-^1 1100 Southom 


JI2Vk T2VS 12W 


*971 Spar Aero t 


529V* 29V, 29Vr+ Vf I 87<2SteteoA 


Sotzer 422 <27 

SurveUkvice 4500 4375 

Swtaalr 1495 1475 

SBC . 479 473 

Swfjs Reinsurance 2238 230 

Swiss VtHKsbank 2QS0 2035 

Un fan Bank 4300 4210 

Winterthur 5325 5375 

Zurich Ins 2430 2440 


164 164 

510 496 

3*4 38« 

652 643 

431 425 

258 253 

126 128 

699 689 

144 144 

577VJ 575Vi 

413 413 

679 668 

312 309 

<5 44 

554 552 

675 680 

330 330 

106 106 

701 6)8 

82 82 

444 442 

466 M3 

473 480 

270 268 

357 364 

390 388 

345 348 

137 138 

303 205 

10 13/22101*64 
178 177 

298 290 

481 486 


*654 ' /0ly ° » 730 

637 630 AffoersvaerMea Index : 379X1 
42* *21 Prrrtep* : m* 

377 374 


264 2*9 I 

3UX0 314 I 

1425 1395 1 

1400 1419 ACI 

561 565 ANZ 

1205 
3478 


1 SBC index : 5VX8 

2X8 2X3 Preview* : Slilt 
520 5,14 

15 N.Q.: net mated: na.: not 
*30 3X2 available; xd: tx -dividend. 


, .914 Tex Con 

l:a S? To T D" 1 Bk 
«0Tar*tnrBl 
2500 Traders A r 
,J]60Trn»Mt 
13600 Trinity Res 


HSU 1* 16 — Vk 26*Sulptro 

Jim 111k 11?k 1675 Taro 

«5 25 25 -Vk IS^TedcCorA 

Mite 21 te 2tte— Vk raOTeckBI 

S34M| 34 u, 34V.— Vi ,,,.71* Tex Can 
*43 43 43 IgraThomNA 

S36 3516 36 ’ Tor Dm Bk 

*54 .9 9U 4500 Torstar b t 
*16M 1« 1M . 2S00 Traders A f 

M*S 14Vfc l«Vfc+to ,ll*0Trn»JM 
JG » 13600 Trinity Res 

«4te 141% 141%— 14 «0« TrnAltO UA 

S914 9V* 91% — kl 42720 TrCBn PL 

j*te 5H. 514— Ik 14129 Trl mac -- 

*** . 9 — Ik 

270 270 — 8 *4TO0 Trlaec A f 

Sim 13V* TT4— V* 30650 Turbo - 

2014 2014- S .aOWUnlaorpAI. 
M0 215 215 —5 18116 U Entprtse 

*0 365 375 + 5 »0U KetlO 

imji ravk+w 


te ,25S? UMpora A i 
5. 

5 BffiU K*no 
7575 Veretl a f 
ia 4550 wardotr 
2 500weWwoa 
w ■ .7* 00 Westmin • 

™ 701477 WODdwfl A 


. su e J*n ..4*n— *-7*, 
S17V1 1714 1714 +J m 
S2IH. 21 21 . -~ytr; 

S22W 22Vk 221k— 7 14 
. S25te 25 : 25 
440 440 440- 4 

*13 1216 1214— te 

S37I4 3714 3714 +-W 
tit 10 U +•» 
STOW 101k 10to— 1* 
OS 3414 35 -%te 
S5te 485 498 —TO 

S26te tote tote • 

*914 9te 91%-te 
*2314 23 23 —te 

. S7te ‘ 714 7te • 

STI 11 - It — .}% 
*1314 1314 VM+'te 
S 25 te - 2514 2514 — «* 
*20 1914 28 +,W 

202 202 202 
510 -18 18 —te 

SJite 14 ik 14 H- te 
*1314 13 te i».+.te 
*31 3014 30%1 • 

Ml 2DH 2014— "te 

Mite zite -ai^te 

S27IA 271% 2714—. te 
*2294 22Vz 23te+ » 
PP% 914 984+ te 

m 320 320 +40 

12514 25 2S — J* 
»«4 tote tote— v* 
330 - 320 - 330- +18 
HO 19Mt 20 
125. • 2414 2414— * 

*9 48 49 +1 




S6te : 6 Ki *W— » 
*12te 12 12W+ te 


| . 


58te SM Ste— * 


waraotr sia ^I7y»— te . 

W eldw oq *1414 1414 16 »— te;. 

Westrn ln S 13 W-U . 13 - — 

si 9*4 in*. m *+^8 

YVEtegr *724 7te . 7te ?.’• 

Total soles HJ3A2B2 sham 


Si S^*«S«3S 

2H* 2314+14 YV Bear 

B g+2 • Totalsol 

Mi4 m*— v, 

%£L T*38..nd«t: 






The Daily Source for 
International Investors. 


Devi sd» Bonk 
Dresdner Bank 
GHH 
Haraener 


4M *34 Previous : 1587X9 Vickers 298 

238 2*130 weeiworm «1 

“i 1 1 sir- 

776X0 279X0 AACarp I1H4 *1184 a *'’* 

355 262 Allied- Lyons 288 280 "*»*»»•««> 

48050 485 Anglo Am Gold 56214 S6Jlu 

229X0 236X0 Ass Brit Foods 2M 232 | 

1SAX0 158 Ass Dairies 140 . ISO MBaOO 

979 988X0 Barclays 397 389 ‘ 

*55 454X0 Boil 601 *02 Barren Comm gn 

15 '7^50 BAT. 267 265 Central* 37W 

477 462 Bttdsm SO »6 CigatMct* 11670 

316 31BX0 B1CC 2 a 220 CfWdUdl 3200 

193 197 BL B 32 erkkrUa 11390 

350 toe: Blue are# 523 521 iFormltirifa 13150 


tSribu&fi 




m, 2084+1% — — 

m 7Vi I 

18te 1814+ wo 

1414 M 

1614 17 1 — 

Iivfc — 14 Sates Slack - 

IjJJ llte + u, 48314 Bank Mont 

3B BSSSSS 

*f «r“ ft-jssar- 

j j 

iL. 3 L.T J? 


M w ti eal 


Htgta Low e)6M CW5- 
52944: 291% 291k— * 


Deulscha Babcock 17317*50 1 BJLT. 


M7 662 Bccchaai 
316 318X0 B1CC 
193 197 ! BL 

350 360 : Blue Clroe 


orv 25810 
37M 3772 
11670 11190 
3H» 3320 
1T290 11300 
13150 13475 . 


513 12Vittte-te b 

*13 Hto np4— V4 1 * * 1 . . 

*rao-mn»+- 

S15W I5te.is»+tt ^ 

SUM. WV4 19Vr— J4 «¥: ‘ 

nm -imiite-te >r. ■ 


ni«'imi»+ 

tIM ISte 1 SH+ 


1744 i9U»+£lMrn SSTA5J? S»te Wtet'lBte— V* 

3^ IT now SEttST* Sllte im uw- te 

mi hSL M m slaw us* i«*-te 

to* to Vr ~ ' i iro 5 BrfE5!J& na 171% me te 

to to — V tta SKS22? nv » 1Wfc 2 

ss.'ltii .=***-* 

2 1 feiS 'SS 

m JheGl ob 
HE! Ke »w 

TO* 1716 — Vk 
Wte 19V6+ 3 -■ 

221* 2214— S 

at* 81 '* 

l»k^44: 

^ 1BV4+U 


■fc. ^ * K 


v Sr?- ^ - 


The Global # 








P 


^ 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 


Page 19 


ist a u 




r-* «■ 

sefipr 

fV -c- 



tffcw’ ■ - 

*5, 

w?w& .... 
te *4t: 


V “-“A. 




'rr*-5?( 


w?4r-^. 

It vt , 







Enrol Christie knocked down Mark Kaytarin a spontaneous street scuffle in London. 
The boxers were bolding a photo session to promote thdr eOndnattH* boot set for Nov. 5. 

British Contenders Brawl on Street 


United Press International . 

LONDON — • Two of Britain's ldjr middle- - 
weights could sot wait to get into the ring and 
brawled on a London street Wednesday. They 
could face stiff punishment. 

Marie Kaylor and Errol Christie, who areschod- 
uled to meet Nov. 5 in an eliminator boot for the 
British middleweight title, came to grips with each 
other at a photo cadi on Wednesday. After alleged- 
ly trading insults; the fists came out and the pair 
grappled on the ground. 

The two were ’finally separated by Herd Gra- 
ham, the British middleweight champion, who is 
scheduled to defend his tifle against etiicx Kaylor 
or Christie. 

The British Boring Board of Control has fre- 
quently taken a dim view of hooters who fight 


outride the ring, and the two could face a ban or 
eancrfla ti oq of their tide eliminator. 

"We will certainly be wanting to secure all the 
information we can as to what happened, 1 * a Board 
spokesman said. 

■ WBC Strips Spinks of Title 
The World Baring Councilhas stripped Michael 
Spinks of his WBC fight heavyweight world title on 
grounds that be violated a rale on champions 
holding only one division title at a time. The 
Associated Press reported from Bangkok 
The WBC had demanded that Spmks drop one 
of his titles following his victory over Larry 
Holmes last month for the International Boring 
Federation heavyweight championship. Spinks re- 
maios world light heavyweight champion of the 
Wodd Boring Association and the IBF. 


Baseball 


Tennis 


Playoff Box Scores Postseason Schedule Federation Gup 


NATIONAL LEAGUE: GAME 1 


LEMUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES 


STXfHIIS 

LOT ANGELES 

• TaeiOnvi OcL 8 


abrhbi 

abrhbi 

Toronto Kamos aty 1 

1 Colemon If 

4 0 8 0 Duncan sa 

4 0-00 

Wedaesdny. OcL 9 

, McGee cf 

4 0 0 0 CabaD lb 

4 00 0. 

Toronto L Kansas CWy 5 

. Herr 2b 

3 0 10 Modkk 3b 

4 2 10 

Los Angelas A St. Louis 1 . 

J Clark lb 

3 0 10 Guerra r H 

3 12 1. 

Thursday, OcL W 

, . Cedeno rf 

4 0 0 0 Marshal rf 

4 0 0 0 

SL Utott Modular 71-11) at Los Anastas 

. Woman p 

0 0 0 0 Setosda c 

4 111 

(Hershiser 19-3L 

-Pixfltn 3b 

4 12 0 Mhfmto cf 

3 0 11 

. Friday. OcL fl 

A Porter e 

4 0 10 Lamfrx cf 

10 0 0 

Taranto (Alexander 17-10) at Kansas City 

-osmito q 

4 0 2 0 5cw 2b 

30 2 1 

(Satertwoan 204); 

• Tudor p 

2 0 0 0 vatonzia p~ 

2 0 10 

Saturday, Oct tt| 

. Davtov P 

0 0 0 0 Nlodnfur p 

0 0 0 0 

Laa Angolas (Welch 1M) at St. Louis (Cox 

. Lnarm oh 

10 11 


1W>. 

Canute! p 

00 0 0 


Toronto at Kansas City. 

VanStyk rf 

0 00 0 


Saadoy, OcL n 

.Total* 

33 1 S 1 Totals 

Rill 

zHKansas aty at Taranto 

StXouIs 

888 MM 

180—1 

Los Angeles at St. Louis 

- Las Angeles 

088 103 

OOP— 4 

Mood ay, Oct. 14 


(At Toyota, Japan) 
Britain dot. Japan. 3-1 


Coma Wburtoo RBI — Oacrrerc ft). 

. E — Pendleton. DP— Cos Anoota* 1. LOB— 
• St-LOulS 7. Las Angeles L SB— Hon*, Madlock, 
Sax. SB— OSmHti, Madlock, Guerrero 2. *— 
vatenxuata. 

IP H RER BB SO 


Tudor UM 
Dev lev 
COmpCiell 


52-3 7.4 3 1 3 

1-3 e 0 0 a 0 

1 1 0 0 0 0. 

1 0 0 O 0 0 


- -Valencia W,14> <1-3 7 1 1 2 « 

Ntednfuer S.1 1H 1 0 0-0 2 

Campbell pitctied ta 1 batter In the" 8th. 
WP— WorrelL T— 2;<2. A-4s 

AMERICAN LEAMJt: SAME 1 . . 
i - KANSAS CITY TORONTO 

abrhbi obrhbt 

LSmltti IE S ft 0 0 Garda Si S 0 0 0 

. r< , -Witten cf 5 2 3 2 Mono* ct S 2 2 1 

■ Rprett 3b 4 0 0 0 GSell H 3 3 01 

mcRm dh 3 0 2 0 CJhnan dh Jill, 

'white 3b 4 0 2 l LTbrtn pr 0 100 

Bataenl lb 5 0 0 0 Odvof dn 2 0 11 

;• -Money rt 2 1 0 0 BorfleM rf 40 12 

Stieridn rf 1 1 11 Upshaw 1b -4 010. 

’ Sundbro e 4 0 11 Giorg 3b 3 010 

Blondn a 2 110 Multda 3b 1.0 1 0 

-Dion Ph B 000 Whitt C 4 0 00- 

, "CiKeain 0 0 0 0 Fernndz ■> 3110. 

’Totals 37 518 S Total! 17*18* 

•, Kansas at» R! MOW l-J 

Toronto 808 1B2 818 3— « 

Ten out when wutnlna run earned. 

- Sane wmh rbi— O liver n». 

E— Brett. SufldtefS, BaUoni. DP— Kansas 
1 CJtvl, Toronto 1.-LM — KcsaaiCIty 7, Toron- 
to 5. 2h— Sondbery, CJohnson. HR— Wilson 
(1). Sheridan (11- SB— Masobv (U.WIfamXU. 
V - B laneolona sf— GB eft. 

IP N R ER BB 50 

K«na aty . . 

Block 7 5 3 2 1 5 

’Outenbry UM . 1H S 3 1 0 2 

Toronto 

'■Kay 3 W 7 3 3 1 2 

• Lamp 32-3 0 0 0 0 3 

? Laveiie 0- 0 0 0 1 0 

I Menke W.VO 3 3 2 2 2 4 


31- 3 T 3 

32- 3 0 0 

0-0 0 
3 3 2 


m 


Lovett* pitched to 1 batter (n 8th. 
HBP^-OBellBy Btock. WR-Btack.T- 
A-3A029. 


Soccer 


world cup QUAUrrme 
Eoro ae ai i Grows 
(At Co pen hag en) 
Denmork 0, Switzerland 0 . 


. x-Lm A ng ele s at St Louis 

Tuesday, oct. 15 
x-Kansas City at Toronto 

wedneedcry, OcL K 
x-SL Louis at Lae Angela * - • 

x -Kansas aty at Toronto 

Tbanday, OdL 17 ■ 

* x-8L Louis Cardinals at Los Anaeles 
(x-tt ■ necess ar y)’ 

WORLD SERIES BEGINS OCT. W 


Transition 


DETROIT— Waived Rusty Kuntt, outfield- 
er, and Mickey Mahler and Bob Stoddard, 
pitcher*. PtircftasedThe ounhuu l s of Brian 
Denman and Paul vetat,p<lctwf^froin Nash- 
villa at the American Association. Torned 
owarttiecoafrads of Dwtaht Lowery, catcher, 
and Pedro Chavez. Infletder, to Nashville. 

Motleacd Loom* . 

CINCINNATI— Announced toe resignation 
of Greg Rlddoctv director of minor league 
dubs. effadlvo Dec. 11..- 

BA3KETBALL 

National Bosk et bo B AsoocteUon 
. CHICAGO- R e ceived q-lW secmuH-ound 
draft pick from Portland In exchange tor 
waiving toe right of first refusal on freeagenl 
Caldwell Jones, center. . . 

. L4LLAKBRB— Traded £art Janas, Dealer* 
tarward, to Sen Antonia tor future censlder- 
attons. . -• 

PHOENIX— Signed DewJn Dun-ant tor- 
word. 

FOOTBALL 

_ t-w—iti— c mh mh League' 
SASKATCHEWA N A eou lred Be rnar d 
Quartos; Quarterback, tram- Ottawa for Stu 
Fraser, receiver, arid a fourth-round draft 
choice In HM. 

NaOoaal Football Loagne 
CLEVELAND— PtOCOd Frad Banks, wide 
receiver, on Mured reserve. Resigned OJD. 
Hoooont defensive bock. 

OENVER-Ptoeed Stove Foley, safety, w 
Mured -reserve. - 

KANSAS CITY— Ptacea Matt Hertori h oH , 
offensive lackl» an Inluiitd reserve. 

•LA, RAMS— Traded Mike Barber, ftaht 
enetto Upriver far an un di s cl osed dra ft choi ce 
tn-WSA H xtonttf Jim LowHfln. Ilnehodar.- 
SEATTLE— signed Anare Hardy. nwUng 
bade. PlooadDtm Oaprtiliik,rartnfn0 bock, an 
Inluiwd reserve. • • ’ 

TAMPA .BAY— Traded .ttuaft Groan, Rne- 
baefcer, to Miami In e xt hanee tor Rrst- and 
second-round Mtactians in the 1M draft 


Australia def. Italy- 3-0 
United States def. Argentina, 2-1 

MBITS TOURNAMENT 
(At East Ruthertord, New jersey) 
Final 

Ivan Lendl. Czechoslovakia def. John 
McEnroe, UA, 7-5. 6-4. 

Censokdtoa 

Jimmy Connors, UX def. Andres Gamez, 
Ecuador. 74 BX 


Basketball 


NBA Preseason 

WEDNESDAYS RESULTS 

. Washington 101. Boston 95 
■ Detroit 134. Indiana 121 
Cleveland 121, Mitwaukae 114 
Denver 12L Utah 106 
1 SacrtBiienlo 132, LA. enppan OS 


Dodgers 

Valenzuela, 
OtherFatsoes, 
Defeat Cards 

By Thomas Boswell 

Washington Post Service 

LOS ANGELES — Fernando 
Valenzuela, Bill Madlock, Pedro 
Guerrero, Mike Sdosda and Tom 
Niedenfuer — all candidates for a 
health dob membership — struck a 
Now for blubber here Wednesday 
evening in Dodger Stadium. 

These walking endorsements for 
tacos, spareriDs and linguine 
opened the National League play- 
offs with a 4-1 victory, making hash 
of the lean and hungry Sl Tonis 
Cardinals, a team with about two 
percent body fat 

The f^arrttnalii may haw stolen 

314 bases this season. The Cardi- 
nals may cover more ground than a 
Dash flood. But this time they were 
no match for Tommy Lasorda’s 
pleasingly plump legion. 

Valenzuela, rolling his eyes to 
the heavens, got the victory with 6% 
innings of sweaty labor. He did not 
allow a run until the seventh. But 
by then his husky mates bad built a 
4-0 lead, knocking out trim John 
Tudor, the Cardinals’ ace who had 
gone 20-1 since June 1. 

Madlock, the four-time batting 
champion, scored the first two 
runs. Guerrero, the league slugging 
champion, drove in the first run 
and scored another. Sdosda drove 
in a nodal ran. And the eight-out 
save went to Tom Niedenfuer. 

Lasorda gets kudos for picking 
Valenzuela for tins Game I start 
The extra-large Mexican had won 
only one game in six weeks. La- 
sorda, however, trusts left-handers 
with an appetite. 

“Fernando has made me manag- 
er of the year three times,’' Lasorda 
said. “He’s a winner . . . tough, 
tough in the big games.” 

The Cardinals were left to spin 
their wheels as Vince Coleman and 
Wilde McGee, the lead off speed- 
sters, each went hitless in four trips. 
McGee strode out three times. The 
Dodgers won the theft war, 2-1, as 
Madlock and Guerrero showed 
that thick Iks can chum, too. 

The Cardinal defense was an 
opening-night embarrassment. 
Teny Pendleton, who got picked 
off by Valenzuela, made an error 
that led to an nm earned run. He 
also accidentally threw the ball off 
Tudor’s back on a bizarre run-scor- 
ing bunt play. 

Perhaps most important, Ozrie 
Smith, the fulcrum of the Sl Louis , 
defense, botched a tough play in 
the hole that Manager WHtey Her- 
zog said “he sucks up 99 percent erf 
the time.” That rare double to 
shortstop was a key to a three-run 
sixth that broke open the game. 

The Dodgers, who were planning 
to send Orel Hershiser (19-3) 
against Joaquin Andrrjar (21-12) 
here Thursday night, nicked Tudor 
for a cheap run in the fifth. Pendle- 
ton booted a tough, half-hop 
grounder by Madlock, who stole 
second and scored on a bloop hit 
by Guerrero. 

In the disas trous sixth, the nib- 
bling turned into an orgy. 

Madlock’s grounder deflected 
off Smith’s Gold dove for two 
bases. After Guerrero was walked 
intentionally, Mike Marshall Hied 
out. 

Sdosda, at 225 pounds (102 ki- 
lograms) the team heavyweight 
who takes a fierce kidding about 
bis waistline, slapped a dean, first- 
pitch single to center for a 2-0 lead 
that left men at the comers. 

“That was the big hit," Herzog 
said. 

Next came a dazing Cardinals- 
like play that Herzog said he had 
never seen before. With two out. 
Candy Maldonado laid down a 
deft bunt toward third for an RBI 
hit. Injury was nearly added to in- 
sult as Pendleton’s throw from 
third toward the {date nailed Tudor 
squarely on the right elbow. 

“Hell be all right,” growled Her- 
zog. ‘Tie don’t pitch that arm." 

How did Maldonado dream up ; 
such an impromptu play? He 
didn’L 

Lasorda, who had seen Pendle- i 
ton playing deep, stood in the 
Dodgers dugout screaming, “To- '< 
que, toque, toque,” winch is Span- ' 
ish for “bunt.” “He never turned 1 


Win Playoff Opener; Jays Are 24) 

Sloppy Royals Let Game 
Slip Away in 10th Inning 



The M bb R J Pm 

NO CATCH — Lloyd Moseby appeared to make an 
outfield catch for the Blue Jays in ore 10th inning but an 
umpire ruled that die ball touched ground and was trapped. 



around, so 1 didn’t think he beard 
me,” said Lasorda, who speaks flu- 
ent Spanish. “I knew Porter and 
Pendleton didn't speak Spanish.” 
He was referring to Darryl Porter, 
the catcher. 

“It's a play you don’t expect,” 
Maldonado said. Tve seen Pete 
Rose do it before.” 

”1 think we could have gotten the 
r unn er at either home Or first 
base,” said Herzog, ruffled perhaps 
that the Dodgers would dare to 
turn a speed attack on his Rnnnin' 
Redbirds. “But it was a surprise.” 

Sensing Tudor's pain, Steve Sax 
then bit the next pitch to left center 
for a run-scoring double that drove 
Tudor from the JhQL 

The C-nrdinnU manag er! only one 
real rally against Valenzuela. 

In the seventh, Pendleton, Smith 
and piTuth hitter Tito Landrum all 
singled for a run. Lasorda, knowing 
how Valenzuela’s stamina has fad- 


ed in recent weeks, was quick to 
call Niedenfuer. 

On one pitch, Coleman, who hit 
into only three double plays all 
season, grounded into a double 
play. 

A nice cutting edge lies just be- 
low the surface of this playoff. The 
Dodgers, from owner Peter O’Mal- 
ley on down, do not like the Cardi- 
nals or their old boss, Augje Busch. 
It’s a case of baseball’s most power- 
ful progressive moderates feeling 
frustrated and angered by the 
game's key arch -conservative. 

It is no secret that the Dodgers 
think, that both the strike of 1981 
and the firing of Bowie Kuhn as 
commissioner were plots hatched 
very near Ihe elbow of Busch. The 
Dodgers fought both wars in ihe 
game's back rooms and lost both. 

The Dodgers were so bitter that, 
in the aftermath of Kuhn’s can- 
ning, they banned Bosch beer at 
Dodger Stadium. 


By John Feinstein 

Washington Past Service 

TORONTO — The Kansas City 
Royals added another bizarre 
chapter to their dismal postseason 
record on Wednesday. On an eerie 
afternoon in Exhibition Stadium, 
with the temperature dropping by 
the inning and rain threatening 
throughout, the Royals made al- 
most every mistake imaginable and 
gave the Toronto Blue Jays the sec- 
ond game of this year's American 
Lea gu e Championship Series, 6-5, 
in 10 innings. 

The victory gave Toronto a 2-0 
lead in ihe besi-of-seven series, 

with the next three games to be 
played in Kansas City beginning 
Friday night. 

“We can’t just roll over and die,” 
said Willie Wilson, who hit a two- 
run home run early and scored the 
go-ahead run late. “We just gave 
them too much today. We should 
have won the game.” 

The game bad just about every- 
thing a baseball game can have — 
except good basebalL The Royals 
led, 3-0; trailed, 4-3, going into' the 
ninth and then tied it at 4; led, 5-4, 
in the 10th and finally lost when A1 
Oliver grounded a single into left 
field to score Lloyd Moseby. 

Moseby bad driven in Tony Fer- 
nandez with the tying run a mo- 
ment earlier and then taken second 
when Steve Balboni could not han- 
dle Dan Quisenberry’s pickoff 
throw — a lob toss that glanced off 
Balboui's glove and rolled away. 

It was also Moseby who was in- 
volved in the game’s strangest play 
in the top of the 10th. With two out 
and Wilson on second, Frank 
White hit a sinking line drive to 
center field. Moseby charged the 
ball and appeared to pick it right 
off his shoetops. 

The ball almost came out of Mo- 
seby’s glove but he came up hold- 
ing it to show he had made the 
catch. Second base umpire Ted 
Hendry, who was right near the 
play, spread his hands to indicate 
he could not make a call and point- 
ed toward crew chief Dave Phillips, 
who was working the right field 
foul line. Phillips ran over and gave 
the safe sign, indicating the ball 
had been trapped. 

AD the while, Moseby was- still 
holding the ball and Wilson was 
scoring to give the Royals a 5-4 
lead. 

“1 know I caught the basebalL" 
Moseby said. “With the wet Geld, if 
I had trapped it, yon would have 
seen it hit the turf. The ump an the 
play said he missed it, that he 
couldn’t see the ball Then the oth- 
er guy comes running and says I 
missed it by a mile.” 

The Blue Jays won because the 
Royals kept giving the game away. 
Coining in, Kansas City had lost 10 
straight postseason games since the 
1980 World Series. In seven post- 
season games under Dick Howser, 
they were 0-7, had never had a lead 
and had never hit a home run. Now 
Howser is 0-11, counting three 
losses when he was the Yankees’ 
manager. 

Wilson overcame the other two 
"nevers" in the top of the third, 
driving an 0-2 pitch from Toronto 
starter Jimmy Key deep into the 
left field seats. That gave the 
Royals a 2-0 lead. Buddy Bianca- 
lana having led off the inning with 
a single. 

The Royals extended the lead to 
3-0 in the fourth. Key walked Dar- 
ryl Motley and Jim Sundberg hit a 
screamer of a line drive to right- 
center for a double, scoring Motley. 
After Bianca] ana sacrificed, Lon- 
nie South smashed a pitch into the 
left-field seats — about three feet 
fouL 

That was enough for Manager 
Bobby Cox. He yanked Key and 
brought in Dennis Lamp. It was his 
best move of the day. Lamp got 
Smith on a grounder, holding 
Sundberg at third, and Wilson on a 
pop to right. He then pitched three 
more perfect innings while the Blue 
Jays chipped back. 

For a while, it did not seem that 
Lamp's performance would matter. 
The Royals' starter, Bad Black, did 
not give up a hit during the first 
three innings. In the fourth, he gave 
up his first hit and first run with 


help from his third baseman. 
George Bren. 

Brett, who was zero- for-f our 
Wednesday after a three-for-four 
opener, was handcuffed by George 
Bell’s one-out hopper to him at 
third. He backed up on the balL 
booted it and Bell was on. A mo- 
ment later. Cliff Johnson hit a 
ground ball past third into the left- 
field corner. Bell ran through third 
base coach Jimmy Williams’ stop 
sign and scored to make it 3-1. 

“He gave me a stop?" Bell said. 
“I never saw it. 1 was flying. We 
needed runs.” 

They got two more in the fifth 
and Bell was in (he middle of it 
again. Black had two men out and 
an 0-1 count on Bell when he 
plunked him with a curve ball that 
got away. Bell started toward 
Black, pointing and gesturing as if 
he wanted to start something. 

“He hit me once before and I 
wasn’t going to take it,” Bell said. 
“I got two kids, I don't let anybody 
mess with me. 1 don't like the gny. 
He's really stupid.” 

Black is certainly not so stupid 
that he would hit Bell intentionally 
to bring up the tying ran. “Why 
would I do that?” Black asked. 
“Why would I hit him with a cum? 
1 didn’t even listen to what he said 
1 just wanted to get the next guy." 

The next guy was Johnson. He 
singled That brought up Jesse Bar- 
field Black then threw a mid pitch, 
moving both runners up. With 
Johnson in scoring position, Cox 
sent out Lou Thornton to run for 

him 

Barfield sent a seeing-eye single 
up the middle and both runners 
scored to make it 3-3. “If he didn't 
hit me, they win ihe game,” Bell 
said 

Probably correct. Except the 
Royals find ways to lose these 
games By the eighth, each manager 
had his ace reliever in the game, 
Qmsenbeny for Kansas City, Tom 
Henke for Toronto. 

This is when the game began to 
get strange- 

Moseby began it all with a single 
to left. With Bell hitting, Moseby 
stole second and kept right on go- 
ing to third when Sundberg’s low 
throw skipped past both second 
baseman White and shortstop 
Biancalana into center field 

Suddenly. Moseby was on third 
Bell brought him home one pitch 
later with a fly to the warning track 
in right. That made it 4-3 and it 
looked like the Blue Jays were 
home free. 

But Howser sent Pat Sheridan up 
to bit for Darryl Modey leading off 
the ninth. Sheridan, who had not 
hit a home run since June, slammed 
a hanging breaking pitch from 
Henke over the right field fence; 4- 
4 and extra innings. 


Empty Seats 
Hurt Scalpers 
In Toronto 

United Press International 

TORONTO — Some seats at 
Toronto's Exhibition Stadium 
were empty for the first Ameri- 
can League playoff game be- 
cause other major league clubs 
and baseball officials returned 
about 2,000 tickets at the last 
moment The returned tickets 
were put on sale only Monday. 

“Scalpers are left with hand- 
fuls of tickets,” said a Toronto 
police sergeant “They’re just 
eating them.” Tuesday’s atten- 
dance was 39,115; the stadium 
seats 43,737. Attendance at 
Wednesday afternoon’s game 
was 34,029. 

George Holm, Toronto’s di- 
rector of ticket operations, died 
as another problem the price of 
postseason tickets, which 
ranged from S15 for general ad- 
mission seats, normally about 
S3, to $25 for better seats, regu- 
larly sold for about S7.6S. 

Holm said he was surprised 
that some regular-season ticket 
holders did not order for post- 
season play. 


VANTAGE POINT/ Dave Anderson 


The Latin Connection — An Old Baseball Story Comes to Life in Toronto 


■ . . Ifew York Tunes Service 

TORONTO — He found die second 
baseman on a soccer field. He knew the 
shortstop from the time the boy was 10 
years old. He urged that the left fielder be 
chosen despite a bad bade. And now 43- 
year-old Epy Guerrero, the Blue Jays’ chief 
scout in the Dominican Republic and once 
a minor-league third baseman, is watching 
Damaso Garda, Tony Fernandez and 
George Bed help lift the Toronto Blue Jays 
into a 24) lead in the American League 
championship series that resumes Friday 
night in Kansas City. 

“The Dominican Republic,” the scout 
was saying, “feels a part of Toronto. Look 
at all the people who came up here.” 

About 300 visitors from the Caribbean 
country were here Wednesday when the 
Blue Jays rallied for a 6-5 victory. 

It’s the oldest story in baseball — a scout 
discovering a youngster who develops into 
a big leaguer. 

But it's a story that seldom occurs now. 
Ever since baseball instittued its draft of 
U-S. prospeets, a scout can recommend a 
player but that player can’t be signed un- 
less drafted. Outside the United States, 
however, a scoot is still a scout, as Guerre- 
ro is in the Dominican Republic where 
baseball's draft doesn’t apply. 


Of the three Blue Jay regulars from the 
Dominican Republic, only their 27-year- 
old second baseman. Garda, knew of To- 
ronto as a youngster. As a soccer player 

who would compete in the Pan-Am 
Games, Ik arrived here on a jetliner 11 
years ago to go to nearby Oshawa for a 
tournament. The next year Guerrero took 
him aside after a soccer game. 

“I had him run a 60-yard dash, I timed 
him in 6.5 seconds,” the scout recalled “I 
asked him to play catch long distance, he 
showed a good aim. But then I try to find a 
position for him. 1 decided on second 


At the time Guerrro was scouting for the 

Yankees, who signed Garda and assigned 
him to O&eonta where his manager was 
Mike Ferraro, later the Yankees’ third- 
base coach and now the Royals’ third-base 
coach. In his first 13 games in the New 
York-Pom League, the 18-year-dd second 
baseman made 15 errors, mostly on hurried 
throws. 

“Everything was the first time,” Garda 
recalled, "but Mflre Ferraro worked with 
me. He told me to relax, that the ball is 
faster than the nmner. I didn’t know that. I 
had never played organized baseball be- 
fore, only soccer." 

In the 1978 and 1979 seasons, Garcia 


joined the Yankees for a few games, then 
he was traded to the Blue Jays along with 
Chris Chambliss and Paul Mira bells in a 
deal for Rkk Cerone, Tom Underwood 
and Ted W2bonL 

“Damaso’s father wanted him to go to 
college,” Guerrero said, “but when I want- 
ed to sign him, Damaso asked his father. 
‘Give me two years in baseball' In two 
years, Damaso was on his way ” 

Guerrero, meanwhile, was on his way to 
the Blue Jays, where he would work for Pat 
Gillidc, their executive vice president who 
had known of Garcia as the Yankees’ di- 
rector of player development. And in 1 979, 
for delrvoy the next season, Guerrero 
signed Fernandez, then 17 years old. 

“From when I was 10, 1 would go to 
Spy’s clinics and shag, I was always a 
shortstop,” Fernandez said. “One day Epy 
told me, ‘Your father is blessed because 
when you grow up, I will sign you.’ But 
until then I had never heard of Toronto. 
My team was Gncnmati with Cesar Ge- 
ronimo, another DommicaiL” 

Guerrero remembered giving the bare- 
foot shortstop 15 pesos occasionally for 
shagging grounders at baseball clinics. 

“ I gave him baseballs, gloves a ad bats 
too,” the scout said. “When he kept grow- 
ing, I knew he was going to be a ballplayer. 


And whenever 1 had a tryout in Macons, he 

was there." 

San Pedro de Macoris, a Dominican city 
of about 80.000, has produced more than a 
dozen major-league players. 

“As soon as boys can walk in Macons, 
they are playing baseball.” Guerrero said. 
‘And they are playing 12 months a year. 
They just play, play, play. Either baseball 
or games with a rubber ball and a stick. 
That is why so many good ballplayers 
come from there. Damaso is from Moca, 
but most of the Dominicans are from Ma- 
cons." 

Bell was originally signed by the Atlanta 
Braves' organization, then played in the 
Philadelphia Phillies’ farm system before 
bang botched by a bad back 

“But in Mncoris one day I saw a guy 
hitting home runs in batting practice. t 
Guerrero said. “I asked Tomas Santana, 
my bird-dog scout, ‘Who is that guy? and 
he told me, ‘George Bell, but he’s bun, the 
Phillies don't think he’ll ever play again.’ I 
called Pat GilUdc and told him that if the 
Phillies don’t protect George, take him. Pat 
sent his assistant, A1 LaMacchia, down to 
look at Geotge in a game. First tiwu» up, 
George hit a home ran.” 

Late in 1980 the Blue Jays drafted Bell 


off the Oklahoma City roster, a Phillies’ 
farm. This season the 25-year-old left field- 
er hit 28 homers and drove in 95 runs after 

having hit 26 homers with 86 runs batted in 
a year ago. 

“I never heard of Toronto the city until 
the Blue Jays drafted me," said Bell, whose 
maternal great-grandmother was English 
and whose parents are from Nevis, a Brit- 
ish island in the Caribbean. “1 knew about 
Lake Ontario because in school we learned 
of the Great Lakes, but not Toronto itself.” 

Many people in Toronto, of course, had 
never heard of San Pedro de Macons until 
Guerrero began delivering his players. An- 
other arrived this season — Manny Lee, a 
20-year-old utility infielder. 

“And there is another player on the 
way,” Guerrero was saying now with a 
smile. “Remember this name — Silvcsire 
Campusano, a center fielder. He hit 21 
home runs in Double A at Knoxville this 
year. And he is only 18 years old. In the 
Dominican Republic, people like to say 
that every 10 years God throws an angel to 
the world. SDvestre Campusano is that an* 
gel” 

But now the three Blue Jay regulars from 
the Dominican Republic are angels in To- 
ronto. 










Page 20 


EVTERNATXONAJL H£RALX> TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Vi ulgarity , in Its Place 


By Russel] Baker 
T1TASHINGTON — Ai age 12 

yy or so I first beard the lyncs to 
what ihen seemed to me a dirty 
song about Columbus. Nowadays I 
would call it a bawdy song, but, 
bawdy or dirty, the lyrics will not 
be set forth here. In these matters I 
follow the principles suggested by 
the notorious beer baron and arbi- 
ter of taste, Dutch Schultz. 

Meyer Berger of The New York 
Times once wrote a story calling 
Schultz, among other things, “a 
pushover for blondes.” When 
Schultz objected, Berger reminded 
him that he had raM hrm<frif a 
pushover for blondes. 

“That is beside the pernt,” said 
Schultz. “I only remember it made 
me feel bad when I saw it in The 
Times. I don't thinfc ‘pushover for a 
blonde’ is any kind of language to 
write for a newspaper lute The 
Tunes.” 

Colleagues later had Schultz shot 
dead for bad political judgment — 
to wit, planning to murder a special 
prosecutor named Thomas E. Dew- 
ey — but on the matter of vulgar 
language he was thoroughly sound. 
Seeing it printed in a family news- 
paper makes you feel bad. 

□ 

On the other hand, hearing It 
sung in the park by another 12- 
year-old, as I first heard this vulgar 
song about Christopher Columbus, 
merely makes you fed that you 
have beat present at one of life's 
spicier moments. 

Not until college did I hear that 
scandalous song again. There it was 
being sung in a fraternity house. 
Hearing it a gain gave me no plea- 
sure. 

This may have been because it 
seemed almost childishly innocent 
compared to so many songs heard 
in the military during World War 
EL More likely, it was because there 
was something embarrassing in 
seeing grown men — college men, 
for heaven’s sake! — singing that 
old childhood Columbus song un- 
der the misapprehension that they 
were bong daring. 

1 certainly was not embarrassed 
by hearing it sung on a campus and 
in a fraternity house. Song reper- 
tories among most students of my 
acquaintance induded thick batch- 
es of mildly salacious to downright 
filthy material A good percentage 
of it was lyrically superior to the 
plodding and dreary popular song 


lyrics of ibe day. Consider, for ex- 
ample: 

“The queen of Spain was an am- 
orous Jane, a lascivious wench was 
she.” Now there is an elegant start 
on anybody’s song lyric. 

□ 

These old songs had lain dor- 
mant in my skull for years until a 
few weeks ago when a well-mean- 
ing group, Ira by worried mothers, 
began raising a hullabaloo about 
what was quickly dubbed "pom 
rock." They had delected vulgar 
and obscene lyrics in rock music 
and were putting heat on the music 
industry to cut it oul 

1 was a ipa7«fi that these women 
could understand anything that 
rock performers ring. Nevertheless, 
I will take the mothers’ word that it 
is raunchy stuff. 

Beyond that, I have trouble get- 
ting alarmed about it. Vulgarity is 
as American as a sawed-off shot- 
gun, to vary DashieQ Hammett’s 
phrase. Forty years ago, radio mu- 
sk was so closely investigated for 
double-entendre that songs as in- 
nocent as Fats Waller’s “Hold 
Tight" were kept off the air. At the 
same time, though, children in the 
park were singing “Christopher 
Colombo” while adolescents were 
off at war bawling songs that would 
have undone Aunt Pearl's perma- 
nent wain. 

Music censorship on the radio 
was silly and a failure if its purpose 
was to protect American, youth 
from musical exposure to obscene 
vulgarity. In the years immediately 
after World War 11, late-night sa- 
loon life in the United Slates was 
boisterous with youth crying for 
the piano player to render “Roll 
Me Over,” “I Used To Work In 
Chicago" and rimilar harmless vul- 
garities for group singing. 

It is reassuring to know that cen- 
sorship cannot diminish our 
youth's capacity to enjoy vulgarity 
"to the fullest, for surely vulgar ana 
obscene performances should not 
be tolerated in any public medium 
where the comfort of the general 
audience will be disturbed by a 
breakdown in decorum. 

The Dutch Schultz principle is as 
applicable to music as it is to news- 
papers. There is some music that, 
when you hear it performed in cir- 
cumstances where nobody is acting 
ashamed, makes you feel bad. 

New York Times. Service 


Donald McIntyre 

As a Wagnerian Heldenbariton, He Leads 
A Hectic, Nomadic Existence 


By Andrew Clark 

Z URICH — Last mouth the 
Dutchman held pride of 
place; this month it is Hans 
Sachs, and for much of the rest of 
the season It will be Wotan. 
Somewhere in the background 
are Donald McIntyre's other es- 
tablished Wagner roles, and a 
mew recording of “Parsifal'' based 
on the Welsh National Opera 
production has just brought his 
Gunremonz to an international 
audience for the first >rmg 
Wagner’s musk has dominated 
McIntyre's career since be began 
singing Heldenbariion roles 20 
years ago. There followed an un- 
broken run of IS summers at Bay- 
reuth, where his repertoire en- 
compassed as many major roles 
as any other singe* 1 in the festi- 
val's history. Now considered one 
of the most dependable and expe- 
rienced bass-baritones on the in- 
ternational opera stage, McIntyre 
is free to choose where and what 
be sings. 

A year ago it was Zurich to ring 
bis first Hans Sachs in “Die Mei- 
sterringer von Nflmberg." After 
this month’s revival of the pro- 
duction, he goes to the Vienna 
State Opera for “Die Walkure," 
and his Wotan will also be heard 
in Paris early next year in a con- 
cert cycle of the “Ring” conduct- 
ed by Marefc JanowskL He has 
also been e ngaged by James Le- 
vine to sing in the new “Ring” 
planned by the Metropolitan Op- 
era in New York. 

it is a hectic, nomadic exis- 
tence, with up to nine months a 
year spent away from his home in 
England, but McIntyre seems to 
thrive on the pressure. He is a 
youthful fit and energetic 50, 
with an accent that reflects his 
New TaalanH background. 

Bayreuth looms large in his 
conversation: Until his last festi- 
val there in 1981, McIntyre 
worked with many of the most 
famous postwar conductors and 
stage directors. Rudolf Kempe, 
who recommended him, was “the 
only conductor I knew who suc- 
ceeded in making the orchestra 
follow the dynamic markings in 
the score exactly as Wagner had 
written them.” McIntyre's audi- 


tion at Bayreuth came within 
months of WI eland Wagner’s 
death in 1966; his subsequent re- 
lationship with the composer's 
other grandson, Wolfgang, pro- 
vided the strongest thread in his 
Bayreuth experience and led to 
his singing Wotan throughout the 
five-year run of the “Ring” pro- 
duction by Patrice Ch&eau. 

“My relations with Wolfgang 
have always been good. He has 
started so many singers off — 
that is one of his greatest 
strengths and contributions. He 
has -an ability to hear your good 
qualities even if you give a bad 
audition, and to hear you in one 
role and cast you imaginatively in 
another. He is still doing that 
with a younger generation of 
singers today. And it is only 
someone with his courage who 
could weather the storm of pro- 
test that arose over the Chtreau 
’Ring,’ f think he's the only opera 
administrator in the world who 
would back a venture like that 
against all the odds. 

“It is the most exciting thing I 
have ever been in, and it bad the 
sort of effect on the audience that 
1 think any performance of the 
‘Ring’ should have. In the first 
year, we had three-quarters of an 
hour booing at the end, but in 
subsequent years people came to 
realize just how good it was. 

“The role of Wotan is the guts 
of the ‘Ring' because it personi- 
fies the conflict between the pow- 
er of love and the power of force 
— in a political sense. You can 
take that problem to whatever 
situation you like: How do you 
organize yourself and how do you 
act in your den liny with the 
world? As a member of the cast, it 
is not your job to provide the 
solution. You are there to present 
the problem and get the audience 
to think deeply on the subject. 
We all like to avoid the issue. But 
Wagner confronts you with it — 
that’s why so many people run 
away from his music and the feel- 
ings it expresses." 

McIntyre thinks of himself as a 
bass: 10 years ago, he tried the 
title role of Vendi's “Macbeth” 
and found it.suited his voice and 
temperament until the final aria. 



Donald McIntyre as Hans Sachs. 


which proved too high. Telra- 
mund in Wagner's “Lohengrin” 
is his limit now, and even there he 
says his effectiveness in the role's 
higher reaches depends to a large 
degree on the conductor’s contra 
of phrasing, tempo and orchestral 
dynamics. 

Nevertheless, McIntyre reck- 
ons he has his voice better under 
control now than at any point in 
his career. To maintain his Hel- 
denbariton repertoire, he realizes 
he has to stay fit, t aking the ex- 
ample of ringers like Birgit Nils- 
son and Hans Hotter, who con- 
tinued their careers well into their 
60s because they had the physical 
strength to carry them through. 
McIntyre works in the garden, 
plays twinig and chops down 
trees. He will move soon with his 
wife and three daughters to a 100- 
acre (40-hectare) farm they have 
bought south of London. 


He would like to product an 
opera, to teach, and to add Mus- 
■’s “Boris Godunov” and 
: one or two other roles to 
repertoire. His next major 
challenge is the role of Roan, 
which he sings for tire first time at 
Marseille this season. He has al- 
ways sung fizairo in “Fidelia"; 
what attracts him to the bass part 
of Rocco — as with Macbeth, 
Wotan and the tide role of Hin- 
demith's “Cardfllac” — is- Che 
character’s two opposing rides. 

“Pizarro is all blade, Leonora 
all white. Rocco is the only char- 
acter who is two-sided. Like some 
of the Wagnerian characters Pm 
associated with, he has a dilem- 
ma. That is what makwc him in- 
teresting.” 

AjukewQark is a journalist and 
musk critic based in Switzerland. 


PEOPLE 


’Mac’ Sinatra Is Back 


After a 14-month absence from 

Atlantic City. spurred by what be 
said was an insulting remark from a 
New Jersey state official, Frank 
Sinatra sang krad and dear that 
“Mac is bade m town” before a seH- 
out casino audience in his home 
state. At the show's start, the audi- 
ence chuckled when Sinatra asked, 
“Where lave you been?" but the 
singer said little else to the 550 
people who paid $50 a ticket to see 
him. His biggest ovation of the eve- 
ning came after the “Mac is back in 
town” line from “Mac the Knife." 
Sinatra, a Hoboken native; has an 
entertainment and advertising con- 
tract with the Golden Nugget com- 
pany and has appeared at its Las 
Vegas casino chuing his setf-im- 
posed absence from New Jersey, fit 
August 1984, Sinatra vowed never 
again to perform in New Jersey 
after Caw Control Comnrission- 
er Joel Jacobson called him an “ob- 
noxious bully” for demanding that 
a Golden Nugget blackjack dealer 
rive him and Dean MHutin cards 
from a hand-held deck. New Jersey 
law requires that dealers distribute 
cards from a plastic container. 
Martin and Sinatra apologized to 
of firigls, they were on- - 
aware of the law and offered to pay 
fines imposed on the casino em- 
ployees involved in the incident. 


Four-year-old Janie Garin, the 
Irish boy who two months ago be- 
came the world’s youngest heart- 
lung transplant patient, has left a 
hospital in London and flown 
home to Dublin. He rode out of the 
hospital on a tricycle. . 

□ 

The popularity of movies Etc 
“Rambo: First Blood Part IT sug- 
gests that there’s sochetimig wrong 
in the United States, according to 
Judith Crist, movie reviewer fra: TV 
Guide magazine. Crist, who was at 
Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, 
to deliver a speech,' called 
“Rambo” brainless and despicable 
and said she was not sure why such 
movies- were so popular. “Perhaps 
there is a frustration in the senes 
of hostage situations we’ve had, the 
economic conditions which may 

not be as good as we had thought,* 
rite said. There may be something 
quite wrong at the heart: of the 
country, something lacking. A need 
for fairy tales — ‘Well go out and 
we’ll bash and well smash.* ” 


As for another film no* in the 
headlines. Jeaa-Lnc Godard 5 
“Ha3 Mary.” Crist said cntics of 

the fihn. such as Pope Jote Paul u. 

h vd riven it a boost- "It was the 
most sophomoric, ample-minded 
movie — ramble, dumb, boring 
movie,” she said. “If they’d have 
just shut their mouths, it would 
have died the death it deserves. 

O 

The actress Katherine Hepburn, 
tile television interviewer Barbara 
Writers and the 1984 Democratic 
vice-presidential candidate; Geral- 
(fine Ferraro, top the Ladies* Homey 
Journal's list of the United States sj 1 
most admired women. Nancy Rea- 
gan finished fifth m the Journal s 
poll, behind the actress Jane 
Fonda. 

□ 

Princess Anne, visiting the Brit- 
ish Army’s School of Infantry at 
Warminster, proved she could 
.shoot and drive an armored per- 
■ sound carrier as weQ as the troops. 

Tbc 35-ycar-old daughter of Queen 
n fired a 30mm cannon 
mounted on the vehicle, scoring 
several direct hits on targets up to 
-1,000 yards away. She also drove 
the 24-ton carrier over a rugged 
two-nrDe course, then fired the 
army’s new SA-80 rifle and a ma- 
chine gun, scoring hits on 
distant targets. “I would have her 
m my battalion any day,” said t£ 
weapons instructor. Sergeant Da- '* ( 
rid ESrd. “For marks, I would give y 
her 9 oat of 10 ” ■ { , 

■ - a 

First from 29 countries 
have accepted Nancy Reagan’s in- 
vitation to attend a meeting on 
dkug abuse Oct 21 at the United 
Nasons. Ebme Crispin, Mrs. Rea- 
gan’s press secretary, sard the meet- 
ing would focus on education, pre- 
vention and treatment programs. It 
is a follow-up to the First Ladies 
Conference on Drug Abuse held ur 
April at the White House and in 
Atlanta. The first ladies who have 
accepted the invitation so far repre- 
smt-Austria, Bangladesh, Bdgtran,' ' 
Cambodia, Cape Verde, Costa 
Rica, Cypres, Dominican 'Repub- 
lic, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Fin- 
land, Gabon,. Gambia. Greece, 
Grenada, Iceland, Ireland, Jordan, 
Mauritius, Nicaragua, Pakistan, 
Philippines, Portugal, Saint Lucia, 
Senegal, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Tur- 
key and Zaire. 

’ V ' iff 


O A 




Reserved 
tor you. 

Small space 
advertising in 
the International 
Herald Tribune 
is less expensive 
than you might 
imagine. 

For price 
details call these 
numbers or 
your nearest 
IHT advertising 
representative. 

Paris: 747.46.00 
London: 836.4802 
New Ycxfc 7523890 
Frankfurt: 716735 
Hong Kong: 5.420906 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ABE YQUB ANCESTORS 
FROM GERMANY 
hi foe oWen (toys, the hofcfe fevnies 
hod a Fanriy coat of arm. Did you 
know ihai ewn today foere me ntfora 
crfpeqpte vfoa are probably entitled la 
a ramify coat of mil a? We wsS seoth 
for you- hnnddic coat of arms in our 
anew* libraries or design - vrihn the 
strictly hcroUc rules - yaw new unique 
fanfly coot erf orms. which y ou. then 
engrave mto your ring or have printed 
an your lettertiwxL 
Please write or a* 

Insttat* erf Hertridte Research 
Madenfr. 83, 4 f\ieieefdorf 
W. Germray. (0) 211-36 WI 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


■KXIAir PRIVATE DETECTIVE 
FRANCE S OVERSEAS. Cci 24 hours 
4988 O B4. The 790586 GOV attn 
LOU- 36 yearn of experience, contact* 
woridwk Write Residence In 
ChorttenB, SfflOO POtTBS, FRANCE, 

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS ei 
Bngfcfr Paris IdaM 634 3? 6i tan* 


HAVE A MCE DAY! BOKB. Have a 

mm day! BofaeL 


PERSONALS 


HAPPY UETHOAY TO GAL Hope 
^e ^J urope. Welcome to 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN LINES INTI 

OVER 1300OFHCB 
WORLDWIDE 

USA Ailed Van line* Infl Carp 
(0101) 312-68T-8TOO 

Or call aur Agency European offices: 

PARIS Desfa md es Inter im fia mri 

fOI) 343 33 64 

FRANKFURT sJ&ttS 

(069) 250066 

DUSSHDCXff/RATINGEN 

(09102) 45023 IMS. 

MUNICH LMS. 

(089) 142344 

LONDON 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSELS: ztegto sjl 

(02) 425 66 14 

geneva 

(0221 32 64 40 
Cal for Mod's free estimate 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE FOR YOUR 

Nscr international move 

FOR A HS£ ESTIMATE CALL 


AMSTERDAM 

ATHBtt: 

BARCELONA: 

BONK: 

BREMEN: 

BRUSSELS: 

CADIZ: 

FRANKFURT: 

GENEVA: 

LONDON: 

MADRID: 

MANCHESTER: 

MUNCH: 

MAP1S: 

PAHS: 

ROME: 

VHWA: 

ZURICH: 


07 T) 89.93.24 

01) 961.12-12 
0316523111 
■R41 166062 

0421)170591 

02) 720.95.63 
956)863144 
O619OI2001 
022)43. 35 .30 
H 46 1.4 1.41 

671JMJO 

1)7072016 

9)1415036 

■■17801622 

5) 0249000 

06) 5269342 

0222)955520 
■1363. 20.00 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOR THE NATURE 

INTERNATIONAL 
REAL ESTATE 

TURN TO RAGE 13 


CANADA 


EXCBIUNT MVBTMSNT 
EtfabEshed amen farm far *cfe 100 km 
rvxtficnst of Edmonton. Alberto, Cana- 
da. Good budefru plus 50,000 faucial 
ymn storage. 1 OSD aaes at $650 CDN 
per acre with modern fine of equipment 

at 5400X100 CDH Sefing due to health. 

Cofl 403437-5856 or -Site to 
George Chebuk, 473M39fo St. 
E dmonton, Aftseno, Canada T6H 3Z1 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

AUSTRALIA 

SUFRERS PARADISE. Gemtewjns res- 
denen. Upstmri 2 bedrooms + firing 
room, 1-bedroom flat + firing room. 
Downstaire butlers apstment, double 
garage & large office roace. Oose to 
Jupiters task to. U5525BA0Q. fir im- 
mKCaie icrfe. Tefex owner AA 721 1 1. 

CARIBBEAN 

MARTINIQUE. Waterfront 2oae,liifr 

45 ft. Ering/drina area with mmhto 
floors. 4 ar-candmoned bedrooms & 
bathe, + stadSa. 2 krtrftem, aoroge. 
Acfiocent to ftemond HateE Nwe: 
SSO Joa 20 Brook to* Great Neck, 
NY 1 1023 USA 516-487-6750, 

CORSICA 

CORSICA - AJACCIO 

170 ha briefing land tfiredly at sea- 
side. FlB/sanu FuU debris & Be by 
AEJ, 38 Bdde Cburcelto*. 75017 Ptaris 
mONE (1) 267 58 24 

PggggH 



| FRENCH PROVINCES 


% 

I 


3 

3 

Q 


BUY A DREAM AND WIN A FORTUNE! 


Now try the Lottery with only 
80,000 Tickets Akti* 

44,900 winners 

WINNING CHANCES: 1 :2 Wf 

Yes, only 80,000 tickets participate in the 121 11 Austrian Lottery, 
bringing YOU closer to BIG WINS like these: 

1st Prize: US$ 624,000.00 
2nd Prize: US $ 312,000.00 

3rd Prize: $ 260,000.00 2 Prizes of S 208,000.00 

2 Prizes of $ 156,000.00 2 Prizes of $ 104,000.00 

31 Prizes of $ 52,000.00 35 Prizes of $ 26,000.00 

PLUS 44,825 Other Cash Prizes up to $ 15,600.00 

Total Prize Money: $ 22,089,680.00 

• Your winning chances are the best worldwide, since one out of 
every two tickets wins at least the cost of trie ticket. 

• Ail winnings paid out tax-free In any currency, anywhere. 

• For your protection, the Austrian Lottery is under strict govern- 
ment control. 

Makeadate with lucklWrite today, using coupon, forbrochure and 
ticket application form 

to 


PROKOPP INTERNATIONAL 

official efistrawitor for the Au strian National Lottery. 

29 MariahOfer Stn (Since 1913) A-1061 Vienna, Austria. 

Please send me a brochure and ticket application form for the 
1 21 « Austrian National Lottery. 

Name_ 


e 


Address 


City/Country 


shGityA 

^bw» 


2. ie_ 


MAIL TODAY* WIN TOMORROW • MAIL TODAY* 


ft 

c 

O 

s 

£ 


AUVERGNE. UNUSUAL 1 9th awwy 
endased estate in center of rite Bo- 
maec part of Auvergne, 30 bn soutfi 
Oermont-ferrand. 3 stoejn, vwy 
macioiB anm aiQB ho >, dr aw wig 100m. 
fvmg room, fennel obsn^ room, 4 
bedrooms. Photos on request. 
HOODOO negrtirfjle. Rn o narw owfl. 
□bte Write flax 3827, Herald Tribune, 
9252) Neufc> Cede*, France or by 
appoirtment (7) B93 19 01. 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

VH1EFRANCHE 

CAPFBRAT 

NOT FAR FROM MONTE-CARLO 
Magnificent tokriy restored property 
for sole, overtoofano hGee and tap Fer- 
ro*. 6 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms, heated 
pao/ ( 3JSOO w fo*Wy knboapmd 
gofoern iwith double gcroge. 

For furffier details ptxre contort: 

AGHM 

26 Bd Pnncece Ohariatte 

MC 98000 MONACO 

Tet f?3) 50 66 00 Tbe 479417 MC . 

INTBMATKMAL AGENCY 

COTE D’AZUR 

Marvelous VdtM 

Ston*-bu3i rifia in lovely surroundings 
to d* woe of Grosso, large maqtian 
room, 5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, ave- 
kfoers apartment. Very large pool, 
dbout 2 acres garden. View on sea 
FiOOO^Oa Bet 2103 Hfelriy recom- 
mended by. 

iUWi TAYLOR SA 

55 La Crofflotte 

06^00 Comes 

Tet (93) 38 00 66. Telex: 47D2ZTF 

con D'AZUR 

VBrfCE 

Noe property, firing room, study, 5 
bedroom^ 5 whs, 2500 sam. land- 
scaped garden, healed poaLnauium- 
ic sea view. 

F7DX^0a 

06480 La Cofle Sur Loup 

Tel: (95 32 83 40 

COTE D’AZUR 
CANNB / MOUGINS 

Ertraonlnory afciert, eKhsrveiy in 
mmelous pork (13,000 sam) with view 
af the Bay of Cmries. Obtain your flat 
in a fantastic country house. Swimning 
pool [15 x 25m), tennn court with flood 
fight nstaAriian, batfaeque. sauna, mo- 
tor yacht avrriakfrL Prices from 
DM7,600 per sq^ Golfing posaMties 
|>MD». Idonnotan Ifroini: 
fletse AG. Jtasffaefi )4 

0+8867 hfefenirnen, Swfoufijnd 

CAP FISRAT 

One of the most desirobtoproperhes of 
foe pennsutor indwfrng 5 bedroamed 
vfts, cmnter's ocuumnodotKMv go- 
rage, padong. driveway, heated swue- 
mmn pool w8i poofiiouse. Beouriul so- 
dueled gradan, owning new. 

JOHN^YLOT iA 

1 orange Albert ler 

F 06230 SASVT JEAN CAP FBSAT 

Tel (93) 01 24 24 

COTE D'AZUR 

CAT D'ANTBES 

Attioctira vilas on Cap cfAntfoes are 
always vary toifiht after. Here is one 
very cfose to the sea comaieiu oft 

3 reception rooms, 4 bedrooms, 3 bath- 
rooms, urtA shaded gmden. Pool & 
pool house. View on seo. FllSOiDD. 
hef: & Apply: 

JOHN TAYLOR SA 

55 La CrcisetJe 

06400 Cranes 

Tet (93) 38 00 66. Tate* 47D921F 


dreseetg^garaBg. P2j650fXD 

cAmmumm 93/01 23 32 

06230 CAP fBUIAT 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


DAMMA87M Bl GOBI (15 nw& 
Charles da Gaufle Airport) mpfao 
wooded area. 1-toiml l® iqJlfc 
.house, 3 bedroom, Bring, dning, 
large Dceomeni. 2-car garage. Late 
scaped gotten 2J00 sqm Heated 
pooL GreeiAouse. Wri te fa ffie- 
moedeer, 9 Rte d'Qllns ( 77230 Dan- 
mortiivmCoele / (6)003(15 01. 


MHREVAL VH1AGE 
OF HAUT DC CAGNES 
Duplex house, 80 xun. overlooking 
bay of Caimu. ID nwAn from Nrca 
Airport, 3 kmt from the sea F5U0000. 
Con lad (93) 73 1534 or Poris 325 6779 


FABRON: Mtgnificenl gportmen^vib 
4/5 roans, 125 iqjiL3tl sqjn. Bring, 
100 iqjn. terraces, 300 iqjn saiart- 
um, equipped kitchen, feiry-tde view, 
go-age. FI ,550.000. Promotion Mo- 
net, Hotel Merdnrc 1 Romenode 
dm Angica, 06000 hfa: 7331 40 aa 


SOUTH OF TRANCE necr Grasse, 
boootiful Provencal vJa, indecent 
m a hAe rs house con be sold s*. 
nattily, 2 ha, wiwnmg pool, covered 
barbecue, 6 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. 
4 WCs. IVieo F3J0Oju)O negotiable. 
(93) 74 5763 or 43 18 Of 


in his near Artibei, faring southeast, 
grace comfort, bring roo m, frqiac e, 

baths, swmnma pool, barbecue. 


I HOUR TO NICE AIRPORT, Pro- 

vengrf estate with droreOer, pan- 
arcinic views. CM modernized ns, 
enlaced 175 sane, 1 1 ha k»xJ ofcve 
grows. FT JDREoa {94} 76 6) 68. 


rire, 45 ha. daman of woods said 
meadows, A dHeieni groups of 
bouses, fwo of wrtdr ar- a 

rastarad.F3JOO.OOa Tel (3) 


ICE Newly bt* 

bcmSj pool pan- 
A mountains. 
S2B0 joa (93] 34 03 66 / » 24 49. 


vito, 4 bedrooms, 3 1 


International Business Message Center 


ATJBMON EXECUTIVES 

Puitfuh yoor buiinamtrm 


ki tbm JrrtemaMbnaf HorvbcII- 

bun*, wtennnorrAateM 

of a nd ftn readers woM- 
wi do, mm i at whom arm In 
butiaaa and industry, wfl 
rood U. Jaot talon us (Pans 
6 J 35951 batata 10 tom., ev 
utring mat wm can Max you 

bark, tmd your mas u r p a wU 

appear within 48 ham*. Thm 
rata h U S. 59.80 or load 
rairmteif Mr fine. Yea aunt 
Inchtdm campiahr turd mriS- 
ablabBSng uikk o t s. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FINANCIAL T1MK 
subscrip tion D EUvarr 
IN SWITZERLAND 

The F.T. up erme s early morning day of 
pubfi oa han delivery services Her sub- 
scribers in the fdtawing ones: 

BASH. - GENEVA - LUGANO - 
ZURKH 6 LAUSANNE 

Fa- de tafe on these grace s and for 
iurfhtfr information, con tap: 

Peter La-aster. F.T. S wit c e ri a i e t 
Tei, Genevajjg^ W 04 or 

FINANCIAL TIMES 
EU ROM’s BUSINESS NEWSPAPER 


MONEY TREES ? 

YES Invert in one rf America's most 
technotegieQl break- 
in the put mfcisey Over 
... _ nuf nees planted m 1934. 
P ixq e cle d annum income eventucSy 
reaches 52%. Producing trees known 
la Bva ewer 100 yarns. 

BROKERS’ BtatimES INVITO. 
Material ewafcbte m Engtsh, French, 
German. Bon 2356. Herald Tribune, 
92521 Neudfy Cede*, France 


MM 


i bva 


I - US$7,950 


PANAMA IBERIA. CORPORATIONS 
from U5S400 w Jel 

(0622) 2024(1. Tele*. 628352 tSIAK) 

bT^wa 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


CANADA 

IMMIGRATION AM) WVESTMB4T 
Far complete information 
Contact: DART INVEST ltd. 
attrt Jean Dora. IV eri d ein 
1981 McGSI CcSsge. Sute 458 
.... - — 2W9 


USA 

BUSINESSES 6 REAL ESTATE 
Burnt td«,- a xa n aud . nkntnel & 
r ea d en ti ul real estate sales & leases. 
Property mmgmer* & busmesa de- 
wtapment. write with your reqrira- 
mem & financial nea to 
Hirion Realty & Business Brokers, 
14795 Jeffrey Rd.^210. 

trvme. Cafiforma 92714 USA. 

Tel 7f 4451-8030; Tfic ®»194. 


100 PERCENT BSE 
BTUIATO M ONLY 4 YEARS 

Shore hofcfcig s avafabte m USS. 
Stnrtng. Swrij Fiona, units of 
LtSSlLXX) or emrivatenr. 

1e Pre du Cerf - rrahnfaz 3, 

B 4880 Scq, 

Tel, 32 87 


, ,005EOUTS OR OVBBJNS 
Ccnh paid immetiatefy- taroe quanti- 
Mi needed tar 5000 Bores- ctecount 
department stores & drag crioins. Send 
pKtvres, prees 8, quentbea. Atah Eric 

Wnee,c'o Morrow Partners, 8 W. 37th 
SL. NV. NV TOOTS USA. fix: 666141 
REGCY NY; Tet 212 S94-577B. 


nSTOBUTORS WANTH). AweBes- 
tabfishad firm ei New Twlr Oty seeks 
agents •' donibuton for thee high 
quaSry 'Newhan' bremd blended bga- 

nrttes, mode «i USA. ArtrocBve terms 

oWerad. hter e s te d porta with enm- 

potent tyganeo n cri may oontaffifris- 

whim ASed Cgrp. £ lB5M(]daan Ave^ 
Nmw York, N.Y. 1&JI6 Tel: (2121 53? 
6971 Tbc 42551 3 NEWHAN 


wax appanwerr-iMuryam. 

no crime shp with live wortd-wxte 
eporo coveroge. To be operated daiy 
on Qwjes to nosrhere. A tmited teim- 
oer of partia pattorc avdoUe. Coll 

Mr.Maaa3(S5»-a593USA. 


2W PASSPORT 35 countries. CMC. 
26 KJmrn«iou, 106 76 Athens Grata 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FOUWMG MEMBStS required for 

sfce>a ttme-shne de*t scheme. 
Write to Side No. 707. 7th floor, 
Johor Tower, JoSan Greia. Jahore 
Bdira. Johara. Motayac 


BM ATW=40jm XT-F2S/XX) memory 
/hard driueL Few 3877186, 


1 86,69pm 


BUSINESS SERVIOS 


wn 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMITH) INC 
UJJL 6 WORLDWIDE 

A complete personal 6 bueness service 
fsovaSng a ungtH cnfleaor of 
trfe««Cvifid*a mubSngud 
mcfividiiflb for oS sodal & ^ 

j u j ■„ 1 ' 

pfocnoaon^ cxxxdkxo. 

212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th Sr, N.Y.C 100)9 

Service BepraKnfcrives 

NeededWmUvride. 


BUSlMgS SBW1CES L U XEMBOURG 

Accounting / Caapany Fonndnra & 

Managunrer*/ Saavkrki / Tdef drone 

' Tele* / Mai / Office space far rert. 


_ rs 

Luxembourg. Tel 352>'492153. 


Riser, 12-14 Bd jAvrandia, 1160 

>’492153. Tte 1433 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT. 

I - 12 axmfries analyzed. De- 
WMA. 45 Lyndhunt Ti 
1, Hang Kang. 


Sute 56. Central, 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


OmCE BUHJMNG 
WASHINGTON, DC AREA 
25% mterest in o new biriUna for US 
S55ftfl0tt 7&fl» «. it. First cGs, total 
koiue OpprorinKAery 6nAoa For de- 
nh, etff or vwite 

WAITER BURNS 
8EGG INTBMATIONAL 
7T2I Wiseonrin A*t, N.W. 

Ste. lt», WroJv. DC 20007 

Tdt (2(0) 9446434 or The 440036 


CAPITA! AVAUAB1E for viable pro. 
tedi. Dwri fop i Bm irgg fot. 57 Av. F. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


WVKTMENOr OPPORnffRTY. Anwt- 

iaan real estate, devefapmenl Am a 
racking the services of stack securities 
sates wganizdiora or indviduab. WB 

interaew in any E u ropecm capud. 

Contact EJCflfa 4 ' 


it. 1 550 Ni. Loop 41 OjSuVe Z1 1, 
San AntoniaTBcraUSA 78209. Tdt 
(512) B22-4438. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

Rra d um ondi ei aiy price tenge 
ef lowest wtateidc prices 
drop front Antwerp 
center of the diamond world. 
Ful geartmtee. 

Far free price Est write 
Joachim Onlitenrtelii 


Estabislted 1928 
FeBaianstraat 62. 8-2010 Antwerp 
Betewn ■ Tetp2 31 234 Iff 51 
Tie ?ttn iyi b. Altbe t>cmaod Qub. 
Heart erf Antwerp Diamond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


GENEVA 

FuByeq«i| 
auonf 

toned 


KBS, 5 Rie de _ 

T eh (22) 86 17 33, 


KAS5TB45 BUSVC55 
SKY1CES 

offices to rate. DomicE* 
telefax, phone}, seae* 
tales 


1207 Geneva 
428388 KBS 


BJBO BUS&eSS CENTER 
62 Kme ttw i u c h t. 1015 CS Amsurdmn 
Tet 312026 57 49 Telex 16181 
World-Wide Acrinss Centra 


YOUR OffiCE M PARIS: IBEX, 

ANSWERING SERVKE, secretary, 
errands, mafixw, be «IH/day. 
Tut. PAT: 6099595. 


PAWS ADDRESS, Chanvis- 
Sm* 1957 LSJ*. provides me* 

rneesna rooms. 5 roe cTArtatf, 

.TefcW 


75008.' 


? 47 04. The 642504. 


YOUR OFFICE Hrf 

etex 

Germany 


J, phono, telex. Tet 83* 
52l4ft7,W, 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


MONTE CARLO. WeB located 50 
KUrt- office, retBonabte rent Teh af- 
flee hattrsp^ 30 <B 21 Naa0MS. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PBOVINCES 


NK6 X trim from carport, fop M 
uni pmt f, 1500 sqjn.gorden, beouli- 
W riew, twig, (fining, 2 bed + 
boihrocnv WBefland fflX) 275344 


EXCS’nONAL CANNB, Gflwnte. 
Thel»R4bedroosnapartnwntinCi> 
fifomie, said by the owner. Price 
US|1JX)OJOO:(W| 634011 after 7 pm 

YOUR CONTACT M PROVMCEL 
Haases with dioroder. Otanteg 
nropnrtiss. Estates. Ernie uARCB't 
fr B, 13532 STrfffiMTJXJWF 
VENCE Cecfoic Tel (90) 9201 


OOTE D’AZUR. EZE7MBL Munifi- 

cent wsrferiront estate, luxurious, riBo 
aid numerous cxiibuddbigS- Private 
booth and qua, 3200 Tel: ra 
01 50 97.Tetex: 479S31MC Set BE 


NORMANDY. 

style stale, 140 



Superb Nooncndy 
0 bn Paris, 45 km 
tfixa 8 bed- 
. ernes, iba rale. 
after B pm 504 37 6a 


NKE-PIACE MOZART. Very high 

doss residence, splendid 374 roams, 
115 klbl, gcrage, (bring south 
FI ,370,000. Promotion Mazatb Place 
Meeart, 06000 Nfre. Tel [93)87 OS 20. 


RMCUIOVB tAKESBE plot with fauU- 

ing penwm an French edge of 

Lda> Geneva Often, m emw- of 
USSI25J10a Bax 41918, LRT, 63 
Lang Am, London, 1AOE 9JH. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CRIMES CAUFw in wy trauaui 
buMng, 80 stjm perthomc, tOsq Jn. 
terracaUge pon^ poaL temef, mar- 
vekui view an eeq, islands, maus- 
tains. No Agetei Bax 2B28, Herdd 
Tribune, 92521 N«x8y Cud«. Frirna 


GERMANY 


GBtMANY MUNKH MEAr Large 
modem 10 acre es ttnfckrf property 
suikfote for mettpurpose exMririd 
use wifo easy acoes to mdor frame 
route. Property consuls oft fl) Main 
bidring l^SHOsQ. ft, hdoht 26 ft, 09 
AdcHpnal aoadnd 8j600 £ 
ft- bright 13 Cl. (3) Aoother atkidied 
bmkteig 4200 hrij* 13 ft. 
SeneiM 3 story warehouse ZJOOsq. 

• 2 story gflsae uriring 
' Bax 2819, Hwata 
■ByGufe^ftanoe 
YOUR ESTA1E AQB4T M MUNKH 
burira in wrftmg toe Jobe SduriBer, 
Owxi GmbH, Brenner Sr. 3, D-0000 
Munich 2. 


ft. per feral (S 2 ste 
4 JBQ sq. ft. Ody I 
Tribune, 92521 Neoi 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDCHCHEUEA, SWi .Lowly per 
riod hewse ei quet street off Cadogan 
5qum«, beoufiftny rspontfea & n- 
deoerraed, 3 bedroot m , 2 b athroom s , 
2 reentries, large luxury fckhen- 
/kreddmt roam, i4#ty room, ftartry, 
secluded gadem Jacuzzi & go* lag. 
fires. £34$00Q. TetOl^O 


BUYING IONDON 
■semdi &buyforH 
01-370 37^d 


property^ We 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 




GREAT BRITAIN 


ISQOfrSMMt UNION NWn, En- 
gland. Out sfcm rfina eppaturity. to. 
purdvMafanowNasnTerranrari- 
dtira nrick The Pat. Own etaming 
enrtfen, poaenper m ood gauge. 
Glorious, westerly views from almoin 
TOomsj ecufly ns.raioged fardf oaam- 
muriu tem only n eri to s from the US 
Srind, the ay 8> West End & within 
40 miimtas from London report. 4/5 
beck edtring knrth master rtife. 3 
Mlh^ 2/3 reaeptiaiB vAh brerfhtalt- 
ing mk, kihriert, doak. plus Isjdil 
staff/teenager flat - 2 roans, litemn 
&baih. Econorricoly priced for ««»■ 
cbe sate. SWOrofor zm3W- 
. GH0SVB4(Xfrff9NA110NALteii 
London 586 0068 (or telex 895S46) 
OCUB^ UNXMjma A sl 4> 
uanfid period house in a p ri me resfi 
dentid tacafiartdase to foe renowned 
Holtons'- flefretsshedtoan impactn- 
bte stwsdcrd with large & aegmit 
roams. Orawag roam, Aing room, 
siwljr, conservoforr. master bedroom 
with foresHia araa&enaiite baiK 3/4 
further bade ft both, tatdray doak v. 
nmn,.calriQ_gn oetri i rf neosng^ 

PI) 


f] 

\i 


. i & Staff, 
5402 


PAGE 16 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


f 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ACCESS USA 

, Ore Way Round Trip 
New York FI 500 PWU 

bx Angeles F2400 F460Q 

CKceno F2320 F3590 

Miami F2750 W90 

Oricmfa F2650 F3990 

DaHas F3430 F5170 

FI 890 F3C80 

red more desteiaiiora _ 

15* cfiscauat on lrt das 
PAMS tab 111 221 46 94 
(Cor. Uc. 1502) 


KXN> THE WORLD from 586a 
Cheapest iu:-s worldwide. MAu 
Travri, Dannak 


lewd. Tel: m 274041. Telex 14635 ■ 


NYOPffi WAYST5CL Erarycby N.Y.- 

WW Coast ST45. Paris 22 92 W. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


PORTUGAL 

1 DAYS MODSIVE TOURS 

FROM LONDON TO: 

USBdL- £23S 


STORK/ C4SCAE £216 

COSTA VBtDE (OK3KTOJ_£191 

ALGARVE £185 

MADOKA £212 

Ffease Cortacti 
London. Tel 4933873, Tlx 265653 


FROM ZURICH TO: 


LISBON- 


-SFI040 


E5TORH/CA5CA1S Sn057 

COSTA VBOE (OPORTOj ■'1120 

ALGARVE SHOW 

MADBRA SF1090 

Phase Contact: 

35741 a The 27709 KEP 


Fix otter proftre and dekikd 
mfrvinerien, tefc yaw 

TRAVR AGENT 


SPRING BSD MIGRATION. Seottab' 

Ki 




BUOY 1SSAH. an the beach. Apart- 

mmn, 10 min* away from Tel Aw. 2 
fgfiy neteriiad ream, UUnedtoL ra- 

860 ll?tSilH8BtWL«ai® 

Golden flnari '■ . 


FOR THE FEATURE 

WEEKEND 

TURN TO PAGE SW 


HBIA5 YAOOMG. Yaftt Qnten. 
AeodemiasTS, Attests 10671, Greece. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


COVINGTON HARDEE'S spectacular 
■vffla Uo Cokmnas Mhos on the Coda 
Dei Sd<_ )4 freer, from Mdga Ml 
Airport « ovriUrfe far rnntd from 
Nov. 1. fora naentr 84. SBucried an 


ptateau 1500 ft rtbora and 6 uries 
bade from the Metfitentneat, 5 bed- 
roona, 4 ballis, trim, dWng «t Wed 
for 2 couptm wflh or wtharidUdren 
Lcrae pool & ganfen. Rert SSOO/am- 
pte / week W«I r <ft8dran free. Dfe- 

countt maabdblo for rentab in escea 

trfl month. Mid sotIce. Contact Mr. 
Hoedee, P.O. Bax 746 Washmgta^ 
a. OOfe; Tel. 20386^7486 nkft 
office 200 Fwfc A ra. 213972 9500. 

finvest contact a gran t John Asb- 

wtrrriFuanarofa Tet 34-&3358.TeL 
ex 77226 tOM. 


HOTELS 


MBS- HOTBDUMMr-VraOME 

* wNN, 79 raooB wfrh bed^ ertfiro 
hr ranavated. la heart of flora, dose 
Concorde / Triferies. Cc*n & comfort. 
Fran F36n. 3 rue Mgnt Thrixv. florii 
let. Tri: 260 32 lbe 213492f 1 


HOTELS 


FRANCE 


PABS - Hom Mratapb ■ * *fBi 10 

Awe. E. Zola, 1-28 roam flats, bath, 
Jateheg, fridge. Tel: 577 72 Oft 


GREAT BRITAIN 


EKN P1AZA BOTH, LONDON - 




tridptecnW/fi rooms bath / show- 
*r 7 TV 7 telepc-ore / rotfo l hair 
Bertaurort/ bw / souno / 

« Quean s G^London SW7. 


refrOI-m6Itl. 


7162a. 


SWITZERLAND 


GRAI® HOia EUROPE 




'la collection' 

\toC^&Arpds 

ftris 



VAN CLEEF& ARPELS 

LONDON 


fmprime par Offprint, 73 rue de rEvangile, 75018 Paris 




f