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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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INTERNATIONAL 


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WEAThBl DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 16 


Pnblished Whh The New York Tunes and The Washington Post 


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CAIRO — Egypt refused the 
Italian cruise' ship Achffle Lanro 
permission to sail Friday from Pol 
Said after U.S. warplanes inter- 
cepted an Egyptian airliner with 
four Palestinian hijackers on • 
board.' 

The Egyptian government issued 
a statement “condemning the de- 
velopments” and voicing its “ut- 
most regret” and surprise over the 
American operation. / _ 

The four Palestinians- held more 
Alban 500 passengers and crew hos- 
' iage for more than two days and 
killed an elderly,' partially para- 
lyzed American Jew before surren- 
dering Wednesday in Port Said. 

The Egyptian government said it 
had beat trying lo hand the hijack- 
ers over for trial by the Palestine 
Liberation Organization in Tunis: 

But Tunisia refused to give the 
Egypt Air Boeing 737 permission 
to land. The plane was ' heading 
back to Cairo early Friday when 
U.S. warplanes diverted it over the 
Mediterranean. ^ 

Egyptian authorities decided 
then to bar the. AchiHe Lanro from 
leaving Port Said. The authorities 
initially told the passengers that 
they could not go ashore, police 
said, but they were allowed to leave 
later Friday afternoon 

There was no .official explana- 
tion for Cairo's’ action Western 
European diplomats said- Egypt 
possibly would keep the AdriHe 
Laura in port until its plane re- 
turned. 

[Id Port Said, the ship’s captain 
ffcold The Associated Press that the 
vessel had been granted pennissian 
to sail from Egypt at 5 A.M. Fri- 



Plane Intercept Shows Hijackers 
They 'Can’t Hide, ’ Reagan Says 


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The EgyptAir jetimer at the militar y airbase at Sigonefla, Sicily, Where it was forced to Land Friday after being intercepted. 

ers Describe Violence, Confusion 



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But the permit was revoked 
hours after the U.S. action, accord- 
ing to the captain, Gerardo de 
V Rosa. Captain de Rosa refused xp 
— comment on whether the revoca- 
' . --T. tion was & 

• -- of the Egyptian plane-Jr^ 
j'Jt Police sources said Captmn. de 
_ . AY Rosa arid -the liner’s, crew had hot 
been arrested. 

7-Y In a statement, the mnristiy said 
the government “with utmost re- 
gret was surprised by the intercep- 
tion by American planes.” ' 

Egypt, “wide condniming the 
devdcfpmenfr in. the incident, reaf- 
firms what it has jtpeatedly stated 
— that such actions will not serve 
the peace process,” it said. 

1 *TerrOTfemwfll lead to more ter- 
rorism, arid violence will breed’ 
more violence,” die statement said. 


•' By Christopher Dickey 

Wash ington Post Service 

CAIRO — “We were in the din- 
ing room ready: for our dessert, 
when suddenly , vie- heard gunshots 
and. someone .yelled, ‘Get down an 
the Hoar 1 ” said rVjola Mesldn, one 
of LZ .Am^icans who were taken 
hostage in atwetday ordeal oh the 
enuse ship AchiOe Lanro. 

What fdlbwed^was a viokau od- 
yssey that-cost die life of a 69-year- 
old American 'invalid and often 
seemed tobe leading nowhere. 

The four Palestinian hijackers, 
accprilmg fo American passengers 
at ,a hews conference Friday, 
seemed imavtadat^dHmtwhmiukive 
to makc . once ; diey c had started 
shooting 

“One mmnte they-would try lo 
be Iriod, thb next minute they 
would d%die crudest things, " Mrs. 
M esldn mid. A. 

: At one paint; Marilyn 
briEfer, whose husband was. 
was. hit with the butt of a gun when 
Y^fafledtomove as qnkkly as cme 
erf the hgkkers demaiidM. 





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(Continued on Page % CoL 5) ' 

West to Assess 
Exports With 
Military Use 

By Joseph Fitchctt - 

Jmemnlionm Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Governments in the 
Western affian ce and Japan have' 
established a system to assess the 
military potential of new technol- 
ogy lo bap keep strategically valu- 
able items from reaching the Soviet 
Union. 

The committee is to advise on 
the military uses of strategic ex- 
ports. The Reagan administration 
has urged the estabUshment of such 
a system for three years. The pro- 
posal was- accepted, in slightly 

modified form, by the -Eraopean. 
allies and Japan tius week in Paris, - 
according to sources familiar- Mih 
the proceedings. 


i;it-<»«aryi«C 

.. '.Mra M^ah'saitf the hijackers 
also tried- cJum^ to indoctrinate 
the jmsso^as, “You'knbw, “Rear 
gan no ^od^ Arafat good,’ all this 
kfitd of talk;” she said. .. 

Mosi actorarts indicatedtliat die 
hijackers probably belonged to a 
splinter faction, the Palestine Lib- 
eration Front, rather than the Pat 
estine Liberation Organization led 
by Yasser Arafat . i-. 

fit the initial' nxrmems:aher bul- 
lets from the hijackers’ automatic 
rifle fait the ceding of tire ship's 
dnung room, Mrs. Mesldn and her 
hnsbaod, Seymour, 71, a retired ac- 


countant from Memchen, New Jer- 
sey, heard groans. 

The hijackers had entered the 
dining room from the kitchen and 
had beaten two members of the 
ship's crew there, the couple said. 

; "They showed their power,” 
Mrs. Meskin said “They had hand 
grenades in tbeir hands. They re- 
moved the pins and played with 
theml” - • 

- ‘Thehqacking began Monday af- 
ter the ship left the Egyptian port 
Of Alexandria. More than 600 pas- 
sengers had gone ashore for the day 
to visit Cairo and the pyramids and 
were scheduled to rqoin the vessel 
at Port Said. 

The passengers who remained 
Bboard but were absent at lunch 
were called to the dining room by 
the gunmen. 

“We were together. 1 think 85 
passengers,” said a Belgian woman. 
She said the hijackers singled out 
the 12 Americans and the British 
passengers, but seemed most intent 
On finding Israelis. 

Anna Hoeirendnear of Austria 
heard the shots at the beginning of. 
ttijaddng and ran into a cabin, 
said she hid under the bed in 
the cabM or in the bathroom for the' 
next 62 hours! 

Hijackers herded the passengers 
from the dining room to an enter- 
tainment room on an upper deck 
and ordered them to stay there. The 
hostages slept intermittently on the 
chairs or cm the floor. 

Diplomats who boarded the ship 
Thursday said the walls of both the 
dining room and the show room 
were riddled with bullet holes, ap- 
parently from gunfire that the ter- 
rorists used to intimidate the pas- 
sengers. 

Terrorists also placed small bar- 

(Cootinued on Page 3, CoL 3) 


mili 



as the Security and Tech- 
Experts Meetings, or 
the system woold'pxovide 
expwtise on emeagthg 
jjes as they become goonr- 
afly available. Because trade con- 
trols are sensitive politically, espe- 
cially ro Japan, tire word “mOiiaiy” 
o|a s kept oat of the new group’s 

"STEM is to be informally finked 
to COCOM, the Coordinating 
Committee for Multilateral Expert 1 
Controls, winch dears technically 
sophisticated Western exports to 
Communist countries. The bead- 
quarters of STEM is to be in a - 
building supplied by the French 
government in Paris, where CO- 
COM, which has ties to the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization, is 
situated 

“Potentially, tins is the biggest 
advance in improving Western co- 
operation on strategic-trade con- 
trols since COCOM was founded 
20 years ago.” said a participant in 
tire negotiations. 

The new system would focus on 
the mffiiary applications of devej- 




*None of ns saw the actoal murder.’ 
Seymour Meskin said. When he was 
allowed to return from the foredeck, 
Mr. Klinghoffer 'was not to he found.’ 

Viola Meskin remembered hearing only 
'gunshots and a splash.’ 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

CATANIA, Sicily — Four U.S. 
Na\y fighter jets intercepted an 
Egyptian airliner carrying the four 
Palestinian hijackers of an Italian 
liner early Friday and forced it to 
land in Sicily. 

Italian police took the hijackers 
into custody, officials said. They 
were later charged with premedi- 
tated murder, kidnapping, hijack- 
ing of a ship and possession of arms 
and explosives. 

In Washington, President Ron- 
ald Reagan said at a news confer- 
ence that the operation carried the 
message to terrorists everywhere: 
“You can run but you can’t hide.” 

U.S. officials said the action had 
been carried out on ihe president's 
personal orders. 

The four U.S. Navy F-14 Tom- 
cats intercepted the EgyptAir 
Boeing 737 near the Greek island 
of Crete after it had been refused 
permission to land in Tunisia and 
Greece. The Boeing's captain 
agreed to follow the U.S. jets to 
SigQneHa, a base used by both the 
UJL Navy and the Italian Air 
Force. 

The American action brought a 
climax to a drama that started 
Monday when four Palestinian 
gunmen commandeered the Achflle 
Lauio. a 23 ,629- ton liner carrying 
more than 500 persons, off the 
Egyptian coast, and held it for two 
days. The gunmen were demanding 
the release of 50 Palestinian prison- 
ers in Israeli jails. 

The hijackers surrendered after 
Egypt gave them assurances of safe 
conduct out of the country. One 
passenger, a crippled Jewish Amer- 
ican, Leon Klinghoffer. 69, was lat- 
er reported to have been killed by 
tbegunpieu. 

The plane taking the hijackers 
and two Palestine liberation Orga- 
nization officials who had helped 
negotiated the end of the hijacking 
took off from an airfield near Cairo 
late Thursday. 

. r. In Washington, the White House 
spokesman. Larry Speakes. said 
that the jets from the aircraft carri- 
er Saratoga intercepted the Egyp- 
tian airliner “in international air 
space.” 

The operation came after the 
U.S. government had shown irrita- 
tion at Egypt’s plans to allow the 
four hijackers to leave for an undis- 
closed destination without prose- 
cuting them. Egypt said that it 
wanted to hand them over to the 
PLO for punishment. 

Aides to Prime Minister Bettino 
Cnuri of Italy said Mr. Reagan tele- 
phoned Rome shortly before raid- 

(Conthmed on Page 3, CoL 8) 



(Wnllfl 


Americans Are Jubilant 
Over Hijackers’ Capture 


Compiled by Our Sniff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Many Ameri- 
cans, frustrated by a series of hi- 
jacks and hostage-takings that have 
gone unpunished, reacted with ju- 
bilation Friday after learning that 
the hijackers or the Italian cruise 
ship Achille Laura had been cap- 
tured in a U.S. military operation. 

Newspaper headlines, comments 
by politicians and random inter- 
views indicated that many people 
felt it was about time the United 
States went after terrorists. 

“We Bag the Bums,” read the 
banns’ headline of the New York 
Daily News. In Los Angeles, the 
Herald Examiner headline said, 
“This Tune We Got ’Em.” 

Reflecting the mood of many 
congressmen. Representative Dan- 
iel A. Mica, Democrat of Florida, 
called the capture “fantastic." 

Referring to the reported killing 
by the hijackers erf Leon Klingh- 
ofler, a crippled 69-year-old Amer- 
ican Jew, Mr. Mica said, “1 hope 
they are given the swiftest possible 
trial. I hope it's fair. 1 hope they are 
all executed.” 

Senator Daniel Patrick Moyni- 
han. Democrat of New York, said. 
“Thank God we’ve won one.” 

The Senate majority leader, 
Robert J. Dole, said, “It's some- 
thing we’ve needed for a long time. 

Asked if he approved of the use 
of military aircraft to stop a com- 
mercial airliner, the Kansas Re- 
publican said: “In this case, I think- 
it was worth whatever risk might 
have been involved." 


AntirNuclear Group Is Awarded Nobel Peace Prize 


Div Bernard Lown, of Harvard Public Health School, left, 
and Dr. Yevgeni Cbazov, of Russia’s Cardiological Institute. 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

OSLO — International Physi- 
cians for the Prevention of Nuclear 
War, a worldwide federation of 
doctors and health professionals 
founded five years ago to publicize 
the dangers of mid car weapons, 
was awarded the 1985 Nobel Peace 
Prize on Friday. 

The group, which has more than 
145,000 members in 40 nations, 
was honored for its “considerable 
service to mankind by spreading 
authoritative information and by 
creating an awareness of the cata- 
strophic consequences of atomic 
warfare,” the Norwegian Nobel 
Committee said. 

The prize, worth 1.8 million 
Swedish kronor, or 5224,000, car- 
ries great prestige. A record num- 
ber of 99 candidates were consid- 
ered for the award this year. 

Previous winners indude Mother 
Teresa of Calcutta, Poland’s Soli- 
darity union leader, Lech Walesa, 
and tbe South African Anglican 
bishop, Desmond M. Tutu. 

Egil Aarvik, chairman of the se- 


lection panel of five, said “particu- 
lar importance” was attached to 
die fact that the organization, 
known informally as Doctors 
Against Nuclear War, evolved out 
of a joint initiative by medical pro- 
fessionals in the United States and 
tire Soviet Union. 

Two leading heart specialists, 
Dr. Bernard Lown, of the Harvard 
School of Public Health, and Dr. 
Yevgeni Chazov, of the Soviet 
Union's Cardiological Institute, 
found they collaborated so well in 
medical research that they decided 
to extend their common work to 
enlist other doctors in the struggle 
to abolish nuclear weapons. 

A formal exchange of letters be- 
tween the two long-time friends 
and associates provided the cata- 
lyst that led to the creation of the 
organization by six American and 
Soviet physicians, who met in Ge- 
neva in 1980 to forge a consensus 
on how to express their views de- 
spite conflicting political systems. 

The physicians drew up four 
guidelines to govern the group's 
work. They agreed to restrict their 


focus to nuclear war, to work to 
prevent such a conflict in keeping 
with professional vows to protea 
life and preserve health, to circulate 
the same factual information and 
to avoid taking positions on specif- 
ic policies of any government. 

Mr. Aarvik said the committee 
intended to invite Dr. Lown, 64. 
and Dr. Chazov, 56, to receive the 
prize on behalf of their organiza- 
tion at award ceremonies in De- 
cember. Both men share the title of 
president of the group, which 
maimains its headquarters in Bos- 
ton. 

Mr. Aarvik noted that the Soviet 
Union has boycotted Nobel cere- 
monies since the peace prize was 
bestowed on Andrei D. Sakharov, 
the dissident physicist, in 1975. Dr. 
Sakharov is now living in internal 
exile in Gorki. 250 miles (400 kilo- 
meters) east of Moscow. 

When asked if he thought Dr. 
Chazov would be allowed to at- 
tend, Mr. Aarvik responded: “It 
remains to be seen." 

However, Nobel Committee 
sources said it was appareni that 


Dr. Glazov’s leading role in the 
doctors' campaign clearly enjoyed 
the blessing of his government and 
that bis presence at the award cere- 
mony was highly probable. 

Dr. Chazov is the Soviet Union's 
most prominent cardiologist and a 
highly influential spokesman for 
the nuclear freeze movement. He 
has been a member of the Commu- 
nist Party Central Committee since 
1982 and holds the position of dep- 
uty health minister in tire govern- 
ment. 

In Geneva, where they were at- 
tending ihe fifth anniversary or 
their group's founding, Dr. Lown 
and Dr. Chazov embraced and said 
they were "overwhelmed, surprised 
and excited" by the award. 

“We physicians have a medical 
prescription — stop all nuclear ex- 
plosions,” Dr. Lown said. He urged 
President Ronald Reagan to take 
up the Soviet Union’s offer of a 
nuclear test ban. 

“The ball is now in Reagan’s 
court," Dr. Lown said. “There is no 
reason for not stopping nuclear ex- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


U.S. Panel Urges Use of Aspirin in Heart Treatment 

7 ' : ‘ By Philip M. Boffey 

. No# York Tines Service 




on to COCOM. 
COM’s deliberations Are conduct- 
ed by diplomats, who consdenuil- 
itary, commerria] and political 
factors in ‘deciding: which tedmoL 
(Continued on Page 3, Col 2) 


WASHINGTON — Heart attack victims and certain 
others who suffer heart pains could reduce the likdfliood of 
dying from finrthef heart attacks by taking an aspirin a day, 

accorcling^lo federal health officaals- 

They suggested Thursday that, in the United States, such 
aspirin treatments might save 30,000 to 50,000 lives a year. 

- Tbe health officials also said that a newly approved device 
that can be surgically implanted in patients to counteract 
severe irregularities in heartbeat might rave 10,000 to 20,000 
additional lives a year. 

Margaret M. Heckler, secretary of health and hrnnan 

services, said' that the two new developments constituted, 
“dramatic new progress against death from heart attacks.” 

She cautioned that studies reviewed by the government 
did not show whether aspirin would be effective in prevent- 
ing heart, attacks mlrealthy people. 

Dri Frank E. Young, the commissioner of food and drugs, 
advised heart. patients. to. .consult tbeir. physicians Mora 
adding «<pmn to. tMtmutme&L.He said that aspirin was 
riot asubfftitute focotber treatmeatsio prevent heart attacks. 

.The aqnrin^diip^xt to achieve- hs effect. by inhibiting 


the action of cells in the blood that play a role in clotting, 
thus reducing the danger that a dot will form and block the 
flow of blood to the heart, causing a heart attack. 

Mrs. Heckler said that the action followed a review of 
seven studies in the United Stales and elsewhere that con- 
firmed the beneficial effects of giving aspirin to some heart 
patients. The practiceis already followed by many cardiolo- 
gists. 

Mrs: Heckler, announcing new professional labeling 
guidelines for aspirin, aimed at doctors rather than consum- 
ers, indicated that one aspirin tablet a day, about 5 grains or 
325 milligr ams of aspirin, could reduce the likelihood of 
heart attack for some patients. 

said that Food and Drug Administration and industry 
scientists, assisted by advisory panels of experts, had ana- 
lyzed the seven studies, inTOWing more than 11,000 people. 

She said the studies, some of which lasted up to four years, 
were not consistent in every respect But overall results 
indicated that an aspirin a day taken by patients who had 
had previous heart attacks reduced the chance of another 
heart attack or of dying (hiring the study period by about 
ono-fifth- 

Wbereas 12 to 22 percent of tire bean patients not taking 


aspirin either had a subsequent bean attack or died in the 
period studied, the percentages were reduced by about three 
percentage points in those taking aspirin. 

Aspirin bad an even greater effect in patients suffering 
from “unstable angina,” or chest pains that had worsened 
within the past month, according to a three- month study 
conducted by the Veterans Administration, the health offi- 
cials said. In these cases, it halved the risk of progressing to a 
heart attack, or oT dying from a heart attack, from a 12- 
percent chance without aspirin to a 6-percent chance with 
aspirin. 

Federal officials said the seven studies were not “equally 
convincing" but, takes together, provided evidence of a 
“modest but worthwhile” effect in heart attack victims and a 
“more striking effect” in patients with unstable angina. 

The device whose approval was announced Thursday is an 
“implantable cardiac defibrillator,” about tire size of a deck 
of cards, and weighing 1 J pounds (680 grams). It costs 
SI 5,000 and is meant to be implanted in patients with severe 
^regularities in heartbeat, abnormally rapid heart rate, or 
uncoordinated heart muscle contractions. 

The device senses when the heart loses its normal rhythm 
and generates an electrical pulse to restore the normal pace. 


INSIDE 

■ The leader of a moderate 
South African party will meet 
with the banned African Na- 
tional Congress. Page Z 

■ Tbe Dutch government is ex- 

pected to approve the deploy- 
ment of U.S. cruise missiles 
□ext month. Page 5. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ A tapestry of mysterious ori- 
gin brings a high price in Paris. 
Souren Melikian. Page 6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Daimler-Benz AG is poised 

to buy more than 25 percent of 
AEG. Page 9. 

PERSONAL INVESTING 

The autumn roundup of inter- 
national fund performance. See 
personal investing, a monthly 
report, in Monday’s Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


On Page 3 

■ How tbe hijackers' plane was 
intercepted by the U.S. 

■ The PLO condemned the 
U.S. capture of the hijackers. 

■ A precedent exists for tire 
U.S. action: France captured 
Ben Bella in 1956. 


For many Americans, the cap- 
ture marked a turnaround from a 
series of frustrating hostage epi- 
sodes, such as the ones in which 
Iranian students held Americans at 
the embassy in Tehran from No- 
vember 1979 to January 1981 and 
tbe hijacking last summer of a 
TWA jetliner to Beirut. The abduc- 
tors usually have escaped. 

Jimmy Carter, the president 
whose last year in office was con- 
sumed with the Iranian hostage cri- 
sis, said in New York, “I think 
we’ve done a fine job." 

The capture of the hijackers of 
the Achille Laura struck a respon- 
sive chord among people inter- 
viewed Friday in New York City. 

“I think it’s great,” said .Anne 
Anderson, a secretary at a maga- 
zine office. “They are muggers and 
murderers and they are mu ggin g 
and murdering us. We were getting 
pushed around too much.” 

Vincent Montalvo, an electri- 
cian. said. “They should shoot the 
guys." 

“It’s about time that tire Reagan 
administration did something to 
combat terrorism,” said Todd 
Bentley, a model. “This is a good 
chance to show terrorists all over 
the world that we will not stand for 
it." 

Initial West European reaction 
was cautious. 

In London, the British foreign 
secretary. Sir Geoffrey Howe, said 
tbe U.S. action “surely cannot be a 
matter for regret or for anything 
other than satisfaction.'’ 

However, David Owen, leader of 
the opposition Social Democratic 
Party, was critical, saying: “Inter- 
national terrorism, abhorrent as it 
is, cannot justify states violating- 
international law whatever the 
provocation, whatever the frustra- 
tion." 

The West German Foreign Min- 
istry spokesman, Jurgen Chrobog, 
said in Bonn, "We were not partici- 
pants in this matter. But it fits ev- 
eryone's sense of justice that 
wrongdoers should be brought to 
justice.” 

The Israeli government enthusi- 
astically praised the U.S. action, 
but government officials warned 
that it would be a serious mistake 
for Italy to release Mohammed Ab- 
bas, the Palestinian guerrilla leader 
who accompanied the hijackers on 
the flight after negotiating their re- 
lease. Tbe officials said he should 
be tried for murder because they 
mat main he planned and ordered 
the hijacking. 

The Soviet Union, long a sup- 
porter or Palestinian aspirations 
fora homeland, called Tor the death 
sentence for the hijackers. 

“The crimes of terrorists, no 
maiLer where they are committed, 
must be punished most severely,” 
said Tass, the official Soviet news 
agency. Tass said, however, the 
principle must be applied uniform- 
ly and called for the United States 
to extradite two Soviet citizens who 
lulled a stewardess during a hijack- 
ing of a Soviet airliner in 1970. 

In Rabat, Morocco, King Has- 
son called off a scheduled visit to 
the United States this month be- 
cause of the “particular ioLema- 
tional conjuncture." He did not ex- 
plain further but diplomats said it 
was apparently because cif the in- 
terception of the Egyptian airliner 
and Washington's favorable reac- 
tion to Israel’s air raid on the head- 
quarters of the Palestine Liberation 
Organization in Tunis last week. 

(AP, DPI. Reuters, TIT) 


7 -'— 











WKSWrtiSrti »>»n -<VD»1> 1^. 



Page 2 


international herald tribune, saturday-sunday, October 12 - 13 , 1985 


*% 


Moderate Party Leader 
In South Africa to Meet 
With Black Rebel Group 


Reuters 

LUSAKA, Zambia — The lead- 
er of South Africa's main opposi- 
tion party, Frederich Van Zyl Slab- 
ber!, said Friday that he planned to 
hold talks here Saturday with the 
banned African National Council. 

Mr. Van Zyl Slabben. head of 
the Progressive Federal Party, said 
that he and the guerrilla organiza- 
tion would have exploratory dis- 
cussions on tension in South Afri- 
ca. He arrived in the Zambian 
capital earlier Friday. 

The African National Congress, 
the principal rebel group seeking 
the overthrow of white rule in 
South Africa, has been critical of 
Mr. Van Zyl Slabben and the Pro- 
gressive Federal Party, a moderate 
opposition group. 

The guerrilla organization, 
which is outlawed in South Africa, 
has said that Mr. Van Zyl Slabben 
opposes meaningful action aimed 
at bringing about multiracial rule 
in South Africa. It also has con- 
demned him for being a member of 
South Africa's parliament, which 
excludes blacks. 

Asked to comment on the 
group's criticism. Mr. Van Zyl 
Slabben said: "We shall have to 
find out what they mean by that.” 

Hie president of the African Na- 
tional Congress. Oliver Tambo, 
held talks last month with a group 
of influential South African busi- 
nessmen despite a public plea from 
President Pieter W. Botha. The 
meeting reflected the business com- 
munity's deep concern over vio- 
lence in South Africa's black town- 
ships. 

■ Extremist Afrikaners Meet 

Alan Cowell of The New York 
Times reported from Silkaatsnek, 
South Africa : 

On a stretch of arid scrub be- 
neath a harsh sun, 2,000 whites 
assembled to celebrate the memory 
of one of Lheir heroes and to com- 
mit themselves anew to while sepa- 
ratism and Afrikaner natio nalis m 

In pageants staged for them 
Thursday by extreme rightist 
groups, whites were depicted as a 
heroic and embattled people, fac- 
ing an onslaught of black savagery 
in a hostile world. 

A priest told the group that its 
future lay in racial purity. “This is 
the beginning,” a white leader said, 
“of the revival of the Afrikaner 
consciousness.” 

The occasion was Kruger Day, a 
public holiday that commemorates 
Paul Kruger's birth 160 years ago. 
Kruger led the Afrikaner revolt 
against the British that resulted in 
the establishment of an Indepen- 
dent Transvaal Republic in 1881. 

Traditionally, the holiday is a 
time for recalling the events that 
shaped Afrikanerdom's self-image. 
The dominant white group sees it- 
self as a nation that fought against 


great odds and adversaries, both 
blacks and the British, to establish 
its dominance and freedom from 
control by others. 

For the whites who attended the 
pageant in Silkaatsnek. 50 miles (80 
kilometers) north of Johannesburg, 
Mr. Botha is a political liberal who 
has led his people astray. 

"We reject integration in all 
forms,” said Card Boshoff, who 
leads a group called the Afrikaner 
Volkswag, or People's Guard. 

As he spoke to a group of young 
and old whites who sat below para- 
sols, a black ice-cream vendor was 
chased into the scrub by a woman 
wearing a traditional Afrikaner 
bonnet and wide-skined dress. 

“The Afrikaner people were 
called into being by God and 
throughout our tortuous history we 
see his helping hand,” Mr. Boshoff 
said. “Time and time again, he has 
reassured us and brought us back 
to our destiny, which is to fulfill our 
calling in Africa as white people.” 

To an outsider who ventured 
through the scrub to discover men 
wearing corduroy breeches and 
bandoliers in the manner of Afrika- 
ner commandos a century ago. the 
occasion might have seemed bi- 
zarre. 

But the sentiments that inspire 
Mr. Boshoff and his followers are 
those that trouble Mr. BoLha, who 
faces a rightist challenge In by-elec- 
tions OcL 30. 

“We must guard against any di- 
vision and betrayal from among 
ourselves.” Mr. Botha said Thurs- 
day in Ddareyvflle, a conservative 
settlement 150 miles west of Johan- 
nesburg. 

As 1 ,000 people watched, he ded- 
icated a memorial to the ancestors 
of South Africa's 2.8 million Afri- 
kaners. The white group is de- 
scended from Dutch settlers who 
landed at the Cape of Good Hope 
in 1652. 

Twice as many people attended 
the rally at Silkaatsnek, where 
Mossie van den Berg, a priest from 
a conservative Af rik aan s- 1 anguage 
church, spoke in stentorian tones. 

Mr. van den Berg warned his 
listeners against promiscuity. “God 
is telling us,” he said, “that a small 
people cannot become a great na- 
tion by mixing with neighboring 
people." 

■ Pofl Indicates Adamacy 

A poll published Friday indicat- 
ed that nearly two-thirds of while 
South Africans believe Lhat black- 
majority rule will never exist in 
their country, Reuters reported 
from Johannesburg. 

The survey indicated that Afri- 
kaners were more adamant than 
people of British descent in reject- 
ing the idea of black rule. 

Meanwhile, South African police 
said they shot two black men to 
death Thursday night during riots. 



WORLD BRIEFS 



yr 

Senate Backs Raising ILS. Debt Level 

WASHINGTON (Combined Dispatches) — He US. Senate has 
agreed to raise the national debt above S2 trillion, after mdodtog an 
amendment to require thefederal government to gradually shrink federal 
deficits and balance the budget by 1991. 

The Senate 'spent most of Thwsday revising details of the of the 
Gramm-Rudman-HolHngs deficit reduction, plan, which was 5m 
proved Wednesday. The lawmakers then voted, 51-37, to approve the 

Reagan administration’s request fora new debt ceding of 52£78 trillion, 
more *han double the national debt when President Ronald Reagan took 
office in 1981. '• ‘ . _ - 

On Friday, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly endorsed the 
Senate measure’s deficit-cut ting goals, while reserving judgment on the 
dftaitg of the plan. However, the debt ceiling increase will not take effect 
until the House and Senate agree on details of the amendmenLThe U.S. 
Treasury, which has run out of borrowing power and used up its cash 
reserve, remains' on the edge of insolvency. (AP,' DP& 


lt uT: ,i:, ' J 

r. 

-1 Mr * 


. 1 .’ !' l! 


Alleged Terrorists Acquitted in Rome 

ROME (AP) — A court dismissed the case Friday against fourpersons 
who were charged with plotting to commit “murders arid massacres” in 
Italy for a Middle East terrorist organization. 


Prosecutors had accused the four of belonging to the Lebanese Armed 

been -blamed i 


Women wearing Afrikaner costumes silently protest the 
policies of the ruling National Party outside a monument 


Mafpun 


in Pretoria. The women, members of the rightist Herstigte 
Nasionale Party, say the government ts too liberal 


Revolutionary Factions, which has been -blamed for attacks on U.S. and 
Israeli officials. The court dismissed the charges on the second day of the 
trial, citing a lack of evidence. Only two of thefour defendants, Josephine 
Abdo Sarkis and Mohamcd B Mansuri, were in custody. The caber two, 
who were tried in absentia, were identified as Fayes Daher Feriol and 
Jaqpdme Esber. 

The Lebanese Armed Revolnticmiy Factions daimed responsibility 
for the February 1984 slaying of Leamon R. Hunt, the U.& director- 
genera] of the multinational observer force in the Sinai. The group also 
has said it executed a series of attacks on U.S. and Israeli diplomats in 
France. 


China Can’t Accept 3d Big Trade Chip 
With Japan, Deng Tells Tokyo Aide 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

BEIJING — The Chinese leader. 
Deng Xiaoping, told Japan on Fri- 
day that his country could not ac- 
cept another large tradedefidt next 
year or it would face the prospect 
of debts on a Latin American scale, 
an official Japanese spokesman 
said. 

He said Mr. Deng told Shin taro 
Abe. the visiting Japanese foreign 
minister, during a one-hour meet- 
ing: “If the trade imbalance is seen 
only one or two years it is all right. 

“But if this trade imbalance lasts 
into the third consecutive year Chi- 
na would feel the question of debts, 
just like the case of Latin American 
countries.” 

The Japanese spokesman said he 
understood Mr. Deng to mean that 
he wanted Japan and China to bal- 
ance their trade in 1986. 

China's trade defidt with Japan 
has grown sharply over the past 
two years, widening to $2.84 billion 
in the first six months of this year, 
from $1 .25 billion in 1984. The def- 
icit results from huge imports of 
goods and technology as China car- 
ries out its modernization program. 

Japan is China's largest trading 
partner, with two-way trade total- 
ing $13.2 billion last year. 

U Peng, a deputy prime minis- 
ter. told Mr. Abe in a separate 
meeting: “Frankly speaking, there 


are some unstable factors and small 
waves in Chinese-Japanese rela- 
tions, and part of them are based in 
history," the Japanese spokesman 
said. 

“We want the Japanese side to 
understand Chinese feelings," Mr. 
Li was quoted as saying. 

Mr. Abe arrived Thursday for a 
four-day visit, in what was to be the 
first of regularly scheduled meet- 
ings with Foreign Minister Wu 
Xueqian. 

Mr. Abe's visit coincides with a 
surge of anti-Japanese feeling in 
China because of the trade imbal- 
ance and because of Prime Minister 
Yasuhiro Nakasone's Aug. 15 visit 
to the Yasukuni Shrine, which hon- 
ors 25 milli on Japanese war dead. 

China Haims the visit reflects a 
rebirth of Japanese militarism. Chi- 
nese historical accounts say Japa- 
nese troops killed 10 million Chi- 
nese and wounded 10 million 
during their occupation of China in 
die 1930s and 1940$. 

University protests denouncing 
Mr. Nakasone broke out Sept. 18, 
the 54th anniversary of Japan's in- 
vasion of northeast China. Some 
protesters called for a boycott of 
Japanese goods. 

State Councillor Gn Mu, who 
met Mr. Abe later, told him that to 
correct the trade imbalance, China 
would strictly control imports of 


Japanese household electrical ap- 
pliances and motor vehicles. 

Mr. Gu, a top planner working 
to attract investment, asked Japan 
not to cut purchases of China 's 
main exports, oil and coaL 
Mr. Abe told him it would be 
hard to sustain the imports in the 
current competitive world market. 
“But the Japanese side win make 
efforts at least to maintain the sta- 
tus quo,” the spokesman said. 

Mr. Abe said Japan wanted an 
investment protection agreement 
that would encourage further Japa- 
nese joint ventures. 

During his meeting with Mr. 
Deng, Mr. Abe was quoted as say- 
ing: “Both countries have to make 
efforts to enlarge the equilibrium of 
trade.” (Baiters. AP) 


Cease-Fire 
Negotiated 
In Sri Lanka 


Group Wins 
Nobel Prize 


(XT RICH 


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(Continued from Page l) 

plosions now. We as phystdans 
uige it as a prime priority. 1 * 

Dr. Ghazovsaid tfie prize is “rec- 
ognition of the contribution made 
by our movement It is also recog- 
nition of the correctness of our 
ideas.” 

The Nobel Committee said the 
doctors’ anti-nuclear campaign was 
particularly effective because its re- 
spected scientific work “contribute 
to an increase in the pressure of 
public opposition to the prolifera- 
tion of the atomic weapons and to a 
redefining of priorities, with great- 
er attention Being paid to health 
and other humanitarian issues.” 

Mr. Aarvik said the award cita- 
tion was not intended to demean 
the sincerity and good will of other 
anti-nuclear groups. But he 
stressed that the efforts by the doc- 
tors have proved more si g nific a nt 
because “their work is based on 
solid scientific evidence rather than 
pure emotion.” 

The committee also noted that 
the “awakening of public opinion” 
by the organization’s global impact 
“can give the present arms limita- 
tion negotiations new perspective 
and a new seriousness.” 

The cooperation shown by medi- 
cal authorities in the United Stales 
and the Soviet Union along with 
the rest of the world, provides an 
admirable example for politicians 
and diplomats, Mr. Aarvik said. 

“If this prize has any message; it 
is to say to the American and Soviet 
negotiators in Geneva that it is very 
important that they come up with a 
successful result,” said the former 
president of the Norwegian parlia- 
ment. 

All people in the world are keen 
to see disarmament become a reali- 
ty. and this peace prize underlines 
the significance of the Geneva 
talks.” Mr. Aarvik said. 

As established by the will of Al- 
fred Nobel, the inventor of dyna- 
mite, the peace prize !s awarded “to 
the person who shall have done the 
most or the best work for fraternity 
between nations, for the abolition 
or reduction of standing armies 
and for the bolding and promotion 
of peace congresses.” 


By Steven R. Weisman 

New York Tima Service 

NEW DELHI — A new cease- 
fire agreement has been negotiated 
between the government of Sri 
Lanka and leaders of one of the 
main guerrilla groups cm the island, 
the Indian government has an- 
nounced. 

Indian officials expressed hope 
Thursday that the cease-fire could 
lead to a renewal of discussions to 
achieve a political settlement to 
end nearly three years of warfare in 
Sri Lanka. 

The discussions had bogged 
. down in recent months because of 
violations of a previous cease-fire 
agreemenL Sri Lanka accused the 
guerrillas of killing policemen and 
army troops, and the guerrillas ac- 
cused the police of indiscriminate 
attacks on Tamil dvQians. 

The cease-fire accord was 
readied after the Sri Lanka govern- 
ment reportedly agreed to let the 
guerrilla group make public the 
earlier findings of a cease-fire mon- 
itoring group said to be critical of 
government actions. • 

The guerrilla group, the Edam 
National Liberation Front, is\an 
umbrella organization representing 
four guerrilla groups. This coalition 
was further understood to have re- 
ceived permission to viatSii Lanka 
prison camps where Tamil guerril- 
las are bang held. 

The word Edam refers to Tamil 
Felam. the name the guerrillas give 
to the Independent nation duty seek 
to create in Sri Lanka. 

Romesh Bhandari, the Indian 
foreign secretary, stepped up his 
mediation efforts in recent weeks, 
and this week several Tamil guerril- 
la leaders visited New Delhi for 
talks on the possible cease-fire. 

If the direct talks resume soon, 
they are expected to focus cm the 
most recent proposal of President 
J.R. Jayawardene of Sri t-anfca to 
gram more self-rule to Tamil areas. 

He preposed to set up two self- 
governing Tamil provincial coun- 
cils in the northern and eastern 
parts of the island. But T amil lead- 
ers insist lhat there be one unified 
Tamil-dorcdnaied area in the north 
and east. 

Sri Lanka, formerly known as 
Ceylon, is dominated by the Bud- 
dhist Sinhalese, who constitute 
three-quarters of the country’s 
population of 16 million. The Tam- 
il population is mainly Hindu., 


Iraqi Jets Attack Ship, Kharg Island 

BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq said its warplanes again raided Iran's Kfaa rwk 
Island oil terminal F riday »nH «kn hit an unidentifi ed ship nff the I nuring ** 
coast to tighten its 21-month blockade; 

A military spokesman, reading a statement on Iraqi state radio, said a 
“devastating raid” was carried oat against Kharg to “keep Kharg out of 
service.” The raid was the 26th reported by Iraq since mid-August The 
spokesman, who was not identified in keeping with mflilary-regplaiions, 
had earlier announced that Iraqi jets hit a “large maritime target? near 
Iran early Friday. The Iraqis usually use the term to mean a tanker. 




India May Reconsider Nuclear Option 

lli'Ur. TVTTT TTT /ITU TX_- 


NEW* DELHI (AP) — Prime 
Minis ter Rajiv Gandhi said Friday 
that India might be forced to re- 
consider its nuclear option, but 
only after there was proof that Par 
lrigtan had the bomb. 

Mr. Gandhi said at a news con- 
ference there were “a number of 
measures apart from making a 
bomb ourselves” to deter Pakistan 
from going nuclear. He did not 
elaborate, but added: “We have to 
consider our security. There is no 
question of allowing New Delhi or 
any other city in India to be flat- 

mi " U. D.UU.. - 


tened oat” He said Pakistan was 
close to developing an atomic 
bomb. . 

Mr. Gandhi said India's nudes* 
program was “entirdy in the dvQ- 
ian area” and “visible to everyone.” 




Hi- *:r v » 


Rajiv Gandhi 


3 Greenpeace Craft Sail Near Test She 


ABOARD THE FRIGATE RALNY, . Sooth Pacific (Renters) — 
Greenpeace prptester§.hayejragpd their biggest show off Fiance's nude- 

nr tKtQMhv lanni-tirniOhi^sm^l nnA - cJcjil rTT * j 


MururoaAtolL 

A French Navy tug with marine c omm andos aboard and two corvettes 
dosed in quickly Thursday when the ecologists launched a sailing born, a 
high-speed dinghy and a raft just outside the 12-mfle (20-kdometer) 
exdusion zone around Mururoa and Fangatanfa Atofls. A helicopter 
canying a military ca meram an circled the assembled vessels. However, 
the boats and the ecologists' flagship Greenpeace made no move toward 
the zone and the incident passed peacefully.' 


®fl I V£V' 

IWje* in 
Wagon 


Bomb Sills Arab-American Activist 


SANTA ANA, California (UP I) — A bomb exploded in the offices of 
an Arab-American group here Friday, killing the organization's executive 
director and injuring four persons, fire and police officials said. i 
No one immediately daimed responsibility for the bombing al the 
Arab-American Anti-Discrimination C ommitte e . Alex Odeh, 37, the 
regional director of the Washington-based group, was injured in the blast 
He died later undergoing surgery. The group’s offices were heavily 
damaged. • 

A spokesman for the Jewish Defense League, which has often been in 
conflict with the group, denied responsbility but praised the action. “The 
JDL cannot ciy about the act” said Irv Rubin, local chairman of the 
lrague- “Om- tears have all been used for the mourning of Leon KKngh- 
offer. Mr. Kinghoffer was the American Jew killed Monday ia the 
hijacking of the Italian cruise liner AdriUe Laoro off Egypt. 


>--T 


: V,- 

'-t.: 




For the Record 




^ Genera! Agreement mi Tariffs and Trade agreed Friday to a 
Nicaraguan request for a panel to investigate an economic embargo 
imposed by the United States last May. . - (Boom) 


® r ' Van-Engden, and an American colleague, - 

w J °5£ rede "* s ^ have been expdied from Afghanistan afterSS 
branded “imperialist spies,” the British Foreign Qfc^dFriday.^Pj 


Liberian Opposition 



CHURCH SERVICES 


MftfS 


CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 13 Rim do 
Ymm-Colembbr, 75006 Paris. Metro St.. 


Sulpic*. Sunday wonhip in Engfiiti 945 
cun.. Rev. A. Sow u wwvWe. TeU 607.67.02. 


PAWS SUBURBS 
EMMANU& BAPTIST CHURCH, 56 Rim du 
Bora -Raisin*, Ruell-MaliMilseft, Engitili 
speaking, evangaSeal, oO dsnom in cit iu m. 
5S. PdSr Wanhipi 1(Mj, Other activities. 
G afl Or. B.C Thomas, P caw. 749.J5J9. 


STOCKHOLM 
1MMANUS. CHURCH near city carrier. 
H «*Ry chrafiort faHowsttip. Sunday 1 1,00. 
~ L- {08} 31 6051, 161225. 


Td, 


To place on adeertUemau 
in this section 


plena# contact: 

He EUxebeth HERWOOD 
181 Aw. Oi^Cullc, 
92521 NduOr CedA France. 
TA s 7417J2.6S. 


The Associated Press 

MONROVIA. Liberia — Oppo- 
sition parties are threatening to 
boycott the first multiparty elec- 
tion in more than 130 years in this 
West African nation. 

Opponents of General Samuel 
K. Doe’s military government, 
which took power in a bloody coup 
in 1980, have placed candidates on 
the ballot for Tuesday's voting for a 
president, 26 Senate seats and 65 
House or Representatives seats. 
But they say they may tell support- 
ers not to vote if they are not al- 
lowed to monitor the counting. 

General Doe, 35, appears to be- 
lieve his National Democratic Par- 
ty of Liberia is certain to win the 
election. He reportedly has said 
that after it is over, all Liberians 
must join his party. 

General Doe was a master ser- 

S i what he overthrew die au- 
tarian government of William 
K. Tolbert m 1980. He prohibited 
political activity until the summer 
of 1984, when he promulgated' a 
new constitution and announced 
elections would'be held in late 1985 


Catalan Separatist Sentenced 


Reuters . 

MADRID — A Spanish court 
has sentenced a Catalan separatist, 
Jaume Fentfindez Cal vet, to six 
years and a day in prison for be- 
longing to the guemua group Terra 
Lliure, or Free Land, court officials 
said.' 


for a civilian government to be in- 
stalled in Januar y 1986. 

General Doe and his election 
commission barred the two most 
popular opposition parties, the 
United People’s Party andlibeiMn 
People’s Party, from appearing on 
the ballot. Three opposition parties 
managed to clear a battery of fi- 
nancial and legal hurdles to win 
ballot space before threatening to 
boycott the vote. 

“We have no intention of taHn E 

part in the process if the effect is to 

lend the process undeserved legiti- 
macy” said Jackson Doe, who is 
nmning for president on the Libe- 
ria Action Party ticket, against 
General Doe. The two men are not 
related. 

The Action Party -wants to have 
representatives present during vot- 
ing and ballot counting, asdo the 
United Party of former Informa- 
tion Minister Edward Kessdty and 
the Liberia Unification Party of- 
Gabriel KpoUeh. a teacher. 

Emmet Harmon, chai ring^ ^ 
General Doe's special elections 
pommisaon, has said -the oppo- 
nents can watch voting and count- 
ing from a distance of 25 feet (8 
meters). But some of the voting and 
counting stations are small rooms, 

which means the mimitors will haw 

to stay outside. 

. The opposition panics say their 
supporters have been harassed, 
beaten and detained by local go£ 
ernmeat officials loyal to General 
Dort National Democratic Party - 
The party's secretary general Os- . 



Samuel JK. Doe 


car Q uiah. has denied it uses 
Strong-arm tactics. 

.However, Western diplomats, 
who spoke on condition of ano- 
nymity, say reports of arrests and 
“^spneat are widespread and 

wdl-documented. 

General Doe’s is the only ^ party 

live districts. 


nve districts. 

pressure from, the United » ] 
States, General Doehasrdeased 19 *'■ 

Opposition. DoEh'naiK. tn' (w w i l 


— 1 vmuaiiAlCliaSIEieiSnt IT 

Opposition, politicians m r ece n t 
weeks. - 

P** was former 
fmatme Minister EBen Johnson- 
turiCRfcJ - an* Action Party senatorial 
jaded- for sedi- 
government offi- 


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:-A s :r?»J 


■udear^j 


■aiudu, coeap nanamns, pop- 
ularly known as “Saturday 
Night Specials,” are notorious 
for shoddy mamriaTy and work- 
manship, as wdl as “inaccuracy 
and unreliability," the Maiy- 
land Court of Appeals says. 
Therefore such weapons are 
“virtually useless for the legiti- 
mate purposes of law enforce- 
ment. sport and protection” 
and are of little use io anybody 

but criminals, the state’s highest 
tribunal finds. Itiuled, 7-0, that 
makers and dealers of such 
ha ndg u ns are liable for damage 
and injury when die. guns are 
fired. 

The ruli ng applies only to 
cheap handguns and only to 
Maryland; but spokesmen on 
both sides of the gun control, 
issue say it could ’"fi wn ce rul- 
ings in similar cases in other 
states. 

a Josh Sugarman of the Na- 
tional Coalition to Ban Hand- 
guns said the ruling would frdp 
m the drive to control hand- 
guns. But Dave Warner of the 
National Rifle Association said- 
the ruling could deprive poor 
people of the means to defend 
their homes. 

Short Takes 

H.L. Mencken, the writer 
and soda! critic, wrote two 
years before his death in 1956. 


< TOPICS 

humorless and full of "hypo- - 
dwndria. 

Animal welfare authorities in 
Birmingham, " Alabama, 
checked out the Aqua Mules at 
the state fair and found fh** it 
dOCS the • ftnfmflTt fn > <iiyym il^1> 

harm to dive off & 30-foot (9- 
meter) platform into a six-foot- 
deep tank of water. The mules' 
owner. Tun Rivas -of McIn- 
tosh, Florida, said he has hem 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SIINDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 1985 


on 


"Flagrant Act of Piracy,’ 



LA 


.rah 


'A. H.L. Mencken 

) that access to his diaries be lim- 
. ited to scholarly researchers. 

Now the Maryland attorney 
general has ruled that the re- - 
. 1 quest is not legally binding. Al- - 
/ i fred A. Knopf plans to publish 
r«gp/ r ® the diaries in an. abridged ver- 
- 1 son. Scholarly researchers may 
.. ■ be the only ones reading them. 

r^/i People familiar with the diaries, 

including Mencken’s biogra- 
i!» \p or Tart pher, Carl Bode, say they are 

*' Uj . vui la. the “worst of Mencken,” flat, 

' ■ • ~ - • -s- • -■ :.,jv . ./■■ij 


- fore. He said he starts mules 
swimming when they are very 
young, then teaches than how 
to five, beginning at two feet, 
and rewards them with carrots. 
The authorities said they found 
the mules -to be <f buncn>an fat 
and wdl taken care of” 

Shorter Takes: Opened 29 
yean ago, the heavily traveled 
Connecticut Turnpike has , 
Stopped collecting tolls in an - 
effort .to reduce accidents 
caused by traffic pilwips at toll' 
booths. This will also cut state 
income byVnet $50 nrilK rm « 
year. . . . Fully 230 minion tons . 
of Mississippi mud flow into 
the Gulf of Mexico every year, 
more sediment than all other 
American rivers combined. But 
this is half what it was 35 years 
ago, the US. Geological Survey 
reports, largely because of new 
dams and no- till planting, 
winch cuts -down on soO ero- 
sion. .. . The average American 
consumed 25ii pounds ( 11. 6 ki- 
lograms) of lettuce in 19S3, ac- 
cording to the U.S. Agriculture 
Department, up from 22.4 
pounds in 1970. 


Appropriate Words * 
For All Occasions 

"These days,” observes John 
F. Berry in the Los Angeles 
Tunes, “almost everything that 
happens seems to fan into one 
of two categories: appropriate 
or inappropriate.” 

Mr. Berry writes that appro- 
priate-inappropriate “smack of 
sophistication and worldli- 
. ness." But, he says, “their use 
reflects something more subtie, 
a kind of modem moral plastic- 
ity. People these days are more 
comfortable judging things as 
appropriate or inappropriate" 
instead of “right or wrong, mor- 
al or immoral.” Mr. Berry con- 
dudes, “The two words need a 
rest, or at least less promiscuous 
use. Let us revest to a simpler 
trine when talk was straighten" 
— Compiled by 
ARTHUR fflGREE 


, Complied ty Our Slaff From Dispatches 

TUNIS —The Palestine libera- 
tion Organization “vigorously con- 
demned”, the US. interception of 
the Egyptian plane carrying the 
Achille Laura hijacker as a "fla- 
grant act of piracy” Friday night 
and demanded the release of the 
plane and its passengers. 

The PLO Executive ConnmUee, 
in a statement issued at its Tunis 
. headquarters, said President Ron- 
ald Reagan erf the United States 
was "responsible for the lives of the 
passengers" on the airliner. The 
airliner was forced by U.S. fighter 
jets to land early Friday at a North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization base 
in Sicily, 

A similar communique was is- 
sued in Dakar. Senegal, where the 
PLO chairman, Yasser Arafat, is 
visiting! . 

Earlier, in Beirut, a caller saying 
he spoke for the Palestine Libera- 
tion. Front said that the United 
States would “pay dearly” if any 
harm came to the four hijackers. 

The caller told an international 
news agency: “We hold the Ameri- 
can a dministr ation's cowboys re- 
sponsible for this act of arrogance.” 

The caller denied that the hijack- 
ers had lolled an American passen- 
ger on the ship. 

The United States has accused 
the hijackers of Itifling an invalid 
American passenger and throwing 
his body into the sea. 

At the United Nations in New 
York, the head of the PLO’s politi- 
cal department, Farouk Kaddou- 
mi, described the murder charge as 
“a big lie fabricated by the intelli- 
gence service of the United States.” 

Noting that the victim, Leon 
Klinghoffer was 69 and had bad 
heart attacks and was paralyzed, 
Mr: Kaddmnni said he wondered 
“how and why” the hijackers 
should attack or ltiQ “such an old 
person." (Reuters, AP. NYT) 

■ Evidence Linking Arafat 

Thomas L Friedman of The New 
York Times reported earlier from 
Jerusalem: 

While there is no direct evidence 
that Mr. Arafat knew of the actual 
hijacking, there is circumstantial 
evidence to suggest that Mr. Arafat 
may have had foreknowledge of an 
assault that the guerrillas planned 
on the Israeli port of Ashdod. 

. Evidence from Israeli and Arab 
sources indicates that the hijacking 
itself was not planned but that the 
four guerrillas had intended to 
mount an operation at Ashdod, the 


AdiiOe Laura's next port of call 
after Egypt. The guerrillas appar- 
ently commandeered the ship when 
their arms were discovered. 

The leader of the faction that 
carried out the operation, Moham- 
med Abbes, who is also knows as 
Abu Abbas, is a dose associate of 
Mr. Arafat and was sent by Mr. 
Arafat to deal with the hijackers. 

When relations between the PLO 
and Italy seemed jeopardized by 
the seizure of the snip and an 
American passenger was killed by 
the apparently panicked hijackers, 
. Mr. Arafat and Mr. Abbas ordered 
the hijackers to return to Port Said 
and to surrender the ship. 

This picture was pieced together 
from information provided by the 
Israeli Foreign Ministry and by 
military officials, Arab analysts in 
Beirut and a statement issued 
Thursday in Nicosia by a spokes- 
man for Abu Abbas’s faction in the 
Palestine Liberation Front. 

A copy of the statement was de- 
livered to Reuters in Nicosia and 
virtually all its main points have 
been confirmed by Israeli or Arab 
sources. 

The statement, which apologized 
to the cruise passengers lor the hi- 
jacking, was believed to be the first 
time that a Palestinian guerrilla 
group has expressed regret for an 
attack. 

According to Arab and Palestin- 
ian sources in Beirut and Nicosia, 
the gunmen had planned the as- 
sault on Ashdod in retaliation for 
the Israeli attack on (he PLO head- 
quarters in Tunis, in which about 
60 Palestinians were killed. 

The Palestinian statement in 
Nicosia said: 

“The aim of the operation was 
not to hijack the ship or its passen- 
gers or any civilian of any national- 
ity. The operation was likewise not 
aimed against states friendly to our 
people and their cause." 

In describing the ori ginal aim of 
the operation, the statement said 
that the gunmen were “to travel on 
an ordinary sea journey to Ashdod 
harbor in occupied Palestine, from 
where our comrades were to pro- 
ceed to a specified Israeli military 
target, as a reply by our people to 
fie war of extermination and ter- 
rorism against them and to avenge 
the martyrs of the Israeli raid on 
Tunis.” 

As the Nicosia statement put it, 
“Circumstances affected the course 
of the operation, namely workers 
on the ship discovered the weapons 
onboard," 


esm 


% Pentagon 


fV>’ 




. 4j- . By Bill Keller . 

1 nrail .*0” Ww M Tima Service 

• WASHINGTON-- A presideh- 
_ XT-# ■ tial commission has concluded that 
. “ fundamental changes should be 

: JT-L made in the or ganiz a tion of the 
Pentagon to correct weapon prob- 
: lems involving poor quality, high 

*- prices and long delays in puzchas- : 
■" ing. the paneTs chairman said. ■ • 

In his first extensive public com- 
men is since he was named to head 
‘ ” the commission in June, David R. 

Packard said that management re- 
• forms and new codes of conduct 

would not be enough to repair a 
1 1 system he described as “worse than 

it was 15 years ago." 

“Some structural changes are 
. necessary," Mr. Packard said, 
i \ ' - He said that while the Reagan 
administration’s military builfiip 
had improved the strength and mo- 
rale of the U.S. military, -“I think 
(he general conclusion is we should 
have gotten more for our. money.” 
~s The commission is to send detailed 

■ recommendations to President 
; Ronald Reagan early next yrtr. ■ 

-7 Mr. Packard, a former deputy 

'*■ “v secretary of defense, is the latest in 
? a series of public figures with cnxli- 

>;•*. ' ; -r ' tary credentials who have said that 

■ problems of waste and poor-com- 
- ~ a bat performance can. be traced to 
jfl . institutional defects -in the Joint 
wL Oiiefs of Staff, the Defense De- 
dpj paninent and Congress...'. 

fiSj The chainnan. of the Senate 

Armed Services jCtomriattee’ Barry ' 
LA ■ Gddwater, Republican of Arizona, 

) i and -the committee’s senior Detno- 
L ij brat. Senator ^Sam Nunn of Gear- 
‘pa, said Iasi week that such defects' 
Inad produced waste and. under- 
ftw:. -|nined the military's readiness to 

P--1*|fighL 

mug Congressional advocates of reor- 

‘ganizmg the nriKiary look to the 

preadential comimsaon as the best 

I hopcoF meeting resi stance fromthe 
i i Reagan administratios. At the Na- 

I' tional Press C3nb on Wednesday, 
Defense Secretary Caspar. W. 
pi Weinberger repeated his view of 
the Peniagon, saying “the organiza- 
tion we have is working wdl now.” 

Mr. Packard on Thursday avoids 
ed direct critidsm of Mr.Weinber- 

Lr". ger. Bul referring to his own reds- 
'■ f ' tance to changes as deputy 
/ secretary of defense in the Nixon 
administration, he said^ “It’s "rtry 
hard for the guy who’s over therein 

■ the job to admit he’s all screwed 

V'.T up. ' 

/, . The Senate Armed. Services 

f Committee is to rdease.-a study 

next week.ihai win advocaie.sweep- 
ing changes to. override feuding 


t‘A- 


■i : 


Hostages Recount Days 
Ol Violence, Confusion 


David R. Packard 


“unified” authorities such as the 
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff and the regional commanders 
who oversee military operations. It 
would streamline the Pentagon by 
partly merging the huge, separate 
d vifian and miliuuy staffs of the 
army, navy and air force and giving 
the Pentagon two-year budgets to 
allow more long-range planning. 

Mr. Packard, who has been 
briefed ' on the report by Senate 
aides, indicated tori bis commis- 
sion was considering similar 
changes. He declined to forecast 
what his 15-member panel would 
propose in the two reports it ex- 
pects to issue next year on buying 
weapons and on overall military 
organization; But he offered some 
pom ted personal conclusions, in- 
cluding these: : . . 

• The panel is examining evi- 
dence dial weapon research pro- 
jects with secret budgets are run 
more efficiently than those rim in 
pnbHc. 

• A top priority will be steps to 
speed the flow of new weapons 
from the laboratory to the field. 

• A critical goal is to provide 
greater stability for weapon pro- 
grams, which now . fluctuate with 
political trends. 


. (Continued from Page 1) 

rds that they described as gasoline 
bombs on the stage and at the en- 
trances to the show room. 

The hostages said the second day 
of the ordeal began relatively calm- 
ly, but that the hijackers' mood 
gradually grew ugly. 

Mildred Hodes, whose husband, 
Frank, had gone ashore for the Cai- 
ro tour, said that two Austrian 
Jews, the members of a British 
dance troupe, and 31 of the 12 
Americans were taken to a deck 
above the ship’s lounge and just 
below the captain’s bridge. Two of 
them said they were forced to kneel 
there. 

As the ship floated off the Syrian 
coast Tuesday afternoon, the hi- 
jackers tried through radio contacts 
•to negotiate the release of 50 Pales- 
tinian prisoners from IsraeL The 
pirates had hoped that the U.S. and 
Italian ambassadors in Damascus 
would act as mtennefiaries, but 
became impatient because of the 
slowness of the response. 

Mrs. Hodes said the hostages 
had been ordered to the upper deck 
so that British and U.S. officials 
could see them. One American, 
however, had been left behind. 

Leon Klinghoffer, 69, of New 
York, walked only with difficulty 
because of a stroke he had suffered 
six years earlier, and spent most of 
the cruise in his wheelchair. The 
Mesldns, the Hodeses, and several 
others who had taken the cruise 
were his close friends. 

According to Mrs. Hodes. Mr. 


West Agrees on Assessing Strategic Exports 


m 


Tnnu-.T.i.LlW 


(CoBtmned from Page 1) /■ 
ogies are suitable for export to 
Comm unist nations. 

: The STEM findings wiD not be 

binding on the diplomats. But, said 
a French source/^It will be difficult 
for GOCOM to ignore the. gnide- 
Knes of a military study which has 
be en ag reed cm muitilaierally." 

STEM wa$ set up . al meetings 
Tuesday and Thursday attended by 
senior trade, defense, and foreign- 
affairs officials of the 15 COCOM 
nations. Icdand, although a mem- 
ber of NATO, has no representa- 
tive in COCOM; Japan, not a 
member of.NATO, bdongsto CO- 
COM, 

No details of the agreement were 
announced ■ But participant^ , ig- 
noring their governments’ offiaul 
no-comment rule, asked for ano- 
nymity, and -outlined the new. sys- 
tem.. - . . . 

■ ; Under STEM, Paris-based rtpre- 
sentatzves of Western governments 
and -Japan would name experts to 


rniiTnn . J i : • J * 


would all be military officers or 
officials from defense ministries. 

. “We have kept the consensus 
principle which has enabled CO- 
COM to survive politically said 
another participant. But, he added, 
“Now we can at least get an agreed 
technical evaluation to help us step 
squabbling over the facts/’ 

COCOM meetings have engen- 
dered frictions among the allies as 
it tries to tackle so-called “dual- 
use” technologies in which the So- 
viet Union, for example, might seek 
to divert a civilian technology, such 
as phone switching, to a military 
purpose, such as providing a battle- 
field communications network. 

STEM is to concentrate its ef- 
forts on seven broad technologies, 
including information processing, 
telecommunications and advanced 
materials. These areas are essential- 
ly: dvflian in nature but have mili- 
tary value as well 

The plan was rejected by all of 


portant ally of the United Stales in 
winning support for the plan. The 
government of President Franks 
Mitterrand has shown increasing 
concern about Soviet industrial es- 
pionage in the West 

Joint U-S.-Frencb efforts con- 
vinced Britain of the need for more 
joint military work on the techno- 
logical needs of the Soviet military. 

"Then we teamed up on West 
Germany, and then on the last 
holdout, Japan, which was still re- 
sisting a precise work program at 
the start of Thursday’s meeting,” 
said a participant. 

In getting acceptance of the plan, 
the Reagan administration made a 
concession by agreeing to an infor- 
mal link between the military ex- 
perts’ group and COCOM. “But 
the substance of what they wanted 
is there," said a European diplo- 
mat. 

The defense establishments in 
most NATO countries have been 





Mohammed Abbas, top left, head of the Palestine Liberation Front; President Ronald 
Reagan returning to Washington from Illinois just after giving the order for the action: 
Prime Minister Bettino Craxi, above, after talks with the U.S. ambassador in Rome. 

How F-14s Intercepted Hijackers 9 Jet 

U.S. Says It Prepared to 'Take Action Against the Ship’ 


Klinghoffer and his wife originally 
were both ordered onto the fore- 
deck. Bat later, she said, one of the 
hijackers told Mr. Klinghoffer. 
“You stay. She goes.” 

Radio messages monitored Tues- 
day afternoon between the ship 
anil the port authority in Tartus, 
Syria, indicated that the hy ackers 
were growing more impatient min- 
ute by minute. Just before a 3 P.M. 
deadhne that they had set, the ter- 
rorists said an American had been 
killed. 

“None of us saw the actual mur- 
der," Mr. Meskin said. But when 
they returned to the show room 
after three hours on the foredeck, 
Mr. Klinghoffer “was not to be 
found.” 

Several European diplomats re- 
ported that the ship’s captain, Ger- 
ardo de Rosa, told them Thursday 
that he had seen Mr. Klinghoffer 
with blood on his legs and had 
heard shots on the foredeck. 

According to the diplomats. 
Captain de Rosa said he was 
warned that he, too, would be shot 
if he continued to look down from 
his post on the ship’s bridge. 

The diplomats said that a Portu- 
guese steward was the only witness 
to the killing. Italy’s ambassador to 
Egypt has been quoted as saying, 
on the basis of the hostages' ac- 
counts, that Mr. Klinghoffer was 
shot in the head and then thrown 
overboard with his wheelchair. 

Mrs. Meskin remembered only 
that she had heard “gunshots and a 
splash.” 


By Bill Keller 

.Vew York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Four VS. 
Navy F-14 fighter planes, assisted 
by two surveillance aircraft and 
two tankers, carded out Friday’s 
interception of the Egyptian 
Boring 737 carrying the hijackers 
of the Achille Laura, Secretary of 
Defense Caspar W. Weinberger has 
disclosed. 

Mr. Weinberger, briefing report- 
ers on the operation, refused to say 
whether the four F-14s from the 
aircraft carrier Saratoga had been 
prepared to use force if necessary 
to divert the Egyptian aircraft. 

In an apparent reference to U.S. 
military special operations units re- 
portedly deployed to the region. 
Mr. Weinberger disclosed that be- 
fore the hijackers of the liner sur- 
rendered, the United States was 
“prepared to take action against 
the ship.” He added, “We were 
firepared to do that, I think, effec- 
tively and successfully ” 

The defense secretary provided 
the first details of the interception. 

He said the Saratoga was steam- 
ing west in the eastern Mediterra- 
nean on a routine exercise near 
Albania when it received orders at 
about 9 P.M. local time Thursday 
to prepare for an interception. 

At about II PJvL. four swept- 
wing F-14 fighter planes took off, 
shortly before the Egyptian aircraft 
did so. Pentagon officials said two 
E-2C surveillance planes, smaller 
versions of the Aw ACS aircraft, 
had left the Saratoga earlier to 
track the Egyptian airliner. A pair 


Precedent in ’56 
For U.S. Action 

The Associated Press 

PARIS — The American in- 
terception of the plane carrying 
the hijackers of the Achille 
Laura has a precedent: In 1956, 
France took similar action to 
seize leaders of the Algerian 
revolution. 

Ahmed Ben Bella, the leader 
of the National Liberation 
Front fighting a guerrilla war to 
liberate the territory from 
French rule, and four other ma- 
jor figures of the front were fly- 
ing from Rabat. Morocco, to 
Tunis on Oct. 22, 1956. 

. French Air Force fighters in- 
tercepted the Moroccan aircraft 
and forced it to land at Algiers. 

of KA-6 tankers accompanied the 
fighter planes in case they needed 
refueling. 

Mr. Weinberger would not pro- 
vide details of how the officers 
aboard the Saratoga knew the 
Egyptian plane was leaving Cairo 
airport, or how it was certain it had 
the right plane. 

“1 would say that we had very 
good intelligence," he said. 

The fighters circled in the dark- 
ness near the island of Crete south 
of Greece, Mr. Weinberger said, 
and intercepted the Egyptian 
plane, a commercial Boeing 737 


chartered by the Egyptian govern- 
ment. at about 12:30 A.M. 

The Egyptian plane requested 
permission to land at Tunis but the 
Tunisians, acceding to a U.S. re- 
quest, refused landing rights. The 
Egyptian pilot then radioed the 
Athens aiiport for permission to 
land there, which was also denied. 

At that point, Mr. Weinberger 
said, the Egyptian aircraft “accept- 
ed the escort, so to speak,” and 
flew, flanked by the four U.S. fight- 
ers, to the Sigonella air base in 
Sicily. 

Mr. Weinberger said the planes 
landed ai Sigonella about an hour 
after the interception, carrying the 
four accused hijackers, two other 
unidentified Palestinians, four 
Egyptians and the crew of the com- 
mercial plane. 

Asked what legal authority the 
United States bad for intercepting 
a civilian aircraft over international 
waters, Mr. Weinberger retorted, "I 
would refer you to the Justice De- 
partment,” and then added: “We 
believe that there is ample legal 
authority for what was done." 

Mr. Weinberger said the United 
States asserted jurisdiction over the 
hijackers under a convention 
against the taking of hostages that 
took effect this year. 


Page 3 

U.S. Planes 
Intercept 
Hijackers 
Of Liner 

(Continued from Page 1) 

night Thursday to ask for permis- 
sion for the airliner and its U.S. 
escort to land at Sigonella. Mr. 
Craxi gave the authorization and 
the planes landed 30 minutes later. 

But the sources said that Mr. 
Craxi and Mr. Reagan differed 
over which country should have ju- 
risdiction over the hijackers. They 
said that they argued in a series of 
telephone calls over three hours be- 
fore Mr. Craxi prevailed. 

Mr. Craxi contended that Italy 
had jurisdiction because the mur- 
der was committed on an Italian 
vessel while Mr. Reagan based his 
cl aim on the fact that Mr. Klingh- 
offer was a U.S. citizen. Mr. Rea- 
gan said later that the United 
States would still press a formal 
extradition request. 

Italy’s ANSA news agency, quot- 
ing judicial sources, said the four 
hijackers were Hallah Abdullah 
Alhsan, 19, Majed Yussef al- 
Molky. 23. Abdel Atif Ibrahim. 20, 
and Hamm ad .Ali Abdullah. 23. 

Mr. Reagan praised Italy for al- 
lowing the plane to land. 

And he thanked Egypt for help- 
ing persuade the hijackers to sur- 
render. but added a mild rebuke, 
saying: “I disagreed with their dis- 
position of the terrorists.” 

Mr. Reagan said, however. thaL 
he did not want the inciden t to hurt 
relations between the two coun- 
tries. 

“The events of the past 24 
hours,” he said, “reinforce the de- 
termination of all those who enjoy 
the privileges of freedom and liber- 
ty in couniering the scourge of in- 
ternational terrorism.” 

U.S. officials said the operation 
was possible largely thanks to a 
combination of lucky circum- 
stances, but also because of in- 
creased attention and planning de- 
voted to counterterrorist tactics. 

After five years of frustration 
during which’ Mr. Reagan often 
threatened to use force against ter- 
rorists but never did, the Palestin- 
ian hijackers presented a ready tar- 
get in an area where the United 
States had military forces available. 

The guerrillas had no secure 
base, such as Beirut or Tehran, into 
which they could disappear, as did 
the authors of earlier hijackings. 

“This was a wonderful achieve- 
ment,'’ said Michael VI ah os, a pro- 
fessor at Johns Hopkins Universi- 
ty's School of Advanced 
International Studies. “What was 
striking was the fluency with which 
the United States used force, and 
used force in a way that minimized • 
the disruption to other countries in 
the area.” 

The mission did not require any 
of the sophisticated “special opera- 
tions" forces the Pentagon has as- 
sembled since 1980. 

Officials said that units of the 
counterterrorist Delta Force were 
standing by. But. except for the 
navy commandos who helped sur- 
round the plane when it landed in 
Sicily, no special forces apparently 
were used. (AP, LAT. Reuters) 


Egypt Bars Ship From Sailing 
After U.S. Intercepts Plane 


(Continued from Page I) 

It said that “a just and comprehen- 
sive peace is the only way for Mid- 
dle East stability and the security 
of all its states.” 

The statement made no attempt 

Cancer Removed 
From Reagan 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan an- 
nounced Friday that he bad ad- 
ditional cancer cells removed 
Thursday from a patch of skin 
on his nose, but that doctors 
had told him “my nose is 
clean." 

Mr. Reagan made the an- 
nouncement at a White House 
press conference to discuss 
events related to the hijacking 
of the Italian cruise ship. Not- 
ing an adhesive patch on his 
nose, Mr. Reagan opened the 
news conference by raising the 
subject himself. “Not wanting 
you to lose any sleep at night, 
let me explain the patch on my 
nose," he said. 

After the White House was 
asked in early August about a 
small scar on Mr. Reagan's 
nose, it said he had undergone 
minor surgery for the removal 
of a patch of skin cancer later 
diagnosed as basal cell carrino- 
ma. This is the most common 
form of skin cancer. 


to explain one of the mysteries of 
the hijacking drama — why Presi- 
dent Hosni Mubarak of Egypt an- 
nounced Thursday that the hijack- 
ers had left Egypt soon after 
surrendering on Wednesday, when t 
in fact they flew out more than 24 
hours later. 

The Cairo government said it did 
not know that an American had 
been killed when it negotiated an 
end to the hijacking because Cap- 
lain de Rosa bad reported that all 
the passengers were in good health. 

The ministry’s statement said 
that messages of support from 
abroad bad "led Egypt to try to 
hand over the hijackers to the PLO 
command to try them.” Although 
Tunisia originally granted the 
plane landing rights, the ministry I 
said, it later revoked them and shut 
down the Tunis airport. 

While the statement condemned 
the U.S. Navy action, its wording 
was moderate. Egyptian officials 
appeared to be avoiding action that 
would encourage anger against the 
United Slates. 

Anti -U.S. feeling has been run- 
ning high since President Ronald 
Reagan defended Israel's raid last 
week on the PLO headquarters in 
Tunis. 

Egypt, the most populous Arab 
nation, is one of Washington’s 
chief Arab allies. After Israeli, it is 
the biggest recipient of U.S. mili- 
tary and economic aid. 

“Neither ride can afford to rock 
the boat.” a West European diplo- 
mat said. “Both want to keep rela- 
tions good.” 



St- 


on how troops are equipped. emerging iedmologies ‘and on spe- when the United States initially making on" Strategic' exports, so 
• The Senate staff report, accord- dfic possible Sovid appEcarions of suggested forming a military com- they supported calls for more mill- 
ing to several people who have read them. r . 'mitteein 1982. tary expertise in COCOM delibera- 

it, will call for gwmg more power to " The STEM-; representatives . France, however, became an im- dons. 


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v 




WSWRUBfcPr! v» in 



Page 1 


SATURDAY-S UNDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 1985 


Heralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


Fubfahed With The >e« lork Tunes and The Washington Poet 


A Duty of All Nations 


The murder of an ailing American passenger 
nullified any deal to free the hijackers of the 
Achille Lauro. They have to be brought to 
trial, and the United States, Italy and Egypt 
were bound in law and decency to see to that. 

When the Egyptians appeared reluctant, it 
was entirely appropriate for the United Stales 
to remind them of the consequences of disdain 
for the lives of innocent tourists — the inev- 
itable consequence, for example, for Egypt's 
profitable tourist business. 

For a time the cowardice of the Palestinian 
gunmen seemed to be rivaled by thaL of Presi- 
dent Mubarak of Egypt when he claimed not 
to know what happened to them. He may not 
have known of the murder when he promised 
them safe passage out of Egypt, but he knew 
soon enough to detain them. And he knows 
now, despite his indecent remark that “there is 
no body and no proof." tbat Leon KJingboffer 
and his wheelchair were thrown overboard. 

Not everything is known about bow the 
hijackers left Egypt and how the United States 
caught up with them. If Egypt was finally 
persuaded to help poim the way. it will at least 
have atoned for some of the early fumbling, 

Italy’s original deal with the PLO to have 
Egypt release the hijackers in return for release 
of the ship and hostages was bad enough. No 
one was bound to honor an agreement extract- 
ed under such duress, particularly when there 
were suspicions that the PLO was itself in- 
volved in guiding the hijackers. Be that as it 
may. all deals were off when Italy's main 


condition — that no one had been harmed — 
turned out to be a lie, uttered by the ship’s 
captain with a gun to his head. 

Fast crumbling also is Yasser Arafat's pro- 
testation that the PLO bad no pan in the 
affair. As The New York Times's Thomas 
Friedman reports, the gunmen appear to be 
Mr. Arafat's allies and were probably planning 
a guerrilla raid in Israel when the ship reached 
Ashdod. Discovery of their weapons to 
have changed their plan and emboldened Mr. 
Arafat to paint himself as the outraged savior 
of innocent passengers and crew. 

But. genuine or not. the statements of 
Egypt. Italy and tbe PLO all pointed to the 
same just conclusion of this episode: Egypt 
and the PLO said they favored punishment of 
the murderers. Italy, from the moment it 
learned of the killing, asked for extradition so 
the gunmen could be charged and tried. Since 
Egypt was made the foil of tbe affair, it was 
honor bound to detain the hijackers. 

Tbe world's interest in justice in this case 
should have been self-evident throughout. As 
nations try to deny hijackers safe haven and 
landing rights, terrorists have taken to murder 
to force their way into airports and harbors. 
The citizens of every country are at risk, what- 
ever their governments’ Middle East policies. 

For once, the world has a chance to avenge 
these outrages, punish the perpetrators and 
condemn their backers. All who obstruct tbat 
chance fail their duty to mankind . 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


Dumb Dinosaurs of Old 


No point tiptoeing around the subject any 
longer: Evidence is mounting that the dino- 
saurs had the bomb. Surely everyone has by 
now at least considered the obvious possibili- 
ty. as each new scientific Finding is piled on the 
Iasi. Last week we are informed, apropos of the 
dinosaurs' rather sudden and endlessly puz- 
zling extinction some 65.000.000 years ago. 
that there seems to have been a worldwide 
firestorm at ibe time. There was also, we are 
told, a huge amount of soot everywhere seem- 
ing to come from a very dense cloud. The 
effect of the cloud and the subsequent darken- 
ing of the sky brought on a devastating global 
“winter." We had already long since heard the 
theories that tbe impact of some extraterrestri- 
al object hitting Earth had caused this darken- 
ing. Does it all begin to hang together? 

Well, ask yourself. “The worst hit region," 
said a report about the recent scientific article, 
“was between the Ural Mountains of central 
Eurasia ( SS- 18s. we surmise) and the Rocky 
Mountains (the Malms trom missile base in 
Montana, surelyl of North America, where 69 
percent of known fossil species died out.” 

Whether a prior argument had raged among 


defense-intellectual dinosaurs concerning the 
wisdom and / or morality of taking measures to 
protect some fraction of the population before 
it became fossils, we don't know. 

Our encyclopedia does remind us that the 
dinosaur race was pretty' much divided into 
two distinct camps: tbe saurischiaos (“lizard- 
hipped") and the omithischians (“bird- 
hipped"). Which ones were fust to MIRV, the 
encyclopedia does not say. Thai information, 
possibly classified, has yet to emerge. How- 
ever. it becomes increasingly clear to us that it 
is only a matter of time until we know. 

Our encyclopedia makes the well-known 
point that die dinosaurs* “intelligence, judged 
by the size of their brain cavities, was uniform- 
ly low." Holdouts against our hypothesis, and 
other spoilsports. wiQ undoubtedly argue from 
this that the saurischians and the omithischi- 
ans were too dumb to bave invented the bomb. 
But whatever intelligence it may have taken to 
invent the bomb, surely stupidity of a much 
greater order of magnitude was required to 
use it to obliterate the whole race. 

We have an open scientific mind. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


United Now Against Terror? 


At the end of a long day's journey toward 
justice, there was a good omen. The American 
F-14s that interrupted the Egyptian transport 
with four terrorists aboard took off from the 
carrier Saratoga, named after the battle that 
proved the turning point of the American 
Revolution. Let this be the turning point of a 
united West's war against terror. 

— The Pine Bluff ( Arkansas ) Commercial. 


Giang. the Vietnamese minister leading the 
delegation of his country to the United Na- 
tions. claimed during his address to the world 
assembly, hardly anything has happened to 
give credibility to has proclamation of pro- 
gress. Hanoi has shown little interest in the 
idea of proximity talks, and still acts very 
much as if the situation is “irreversible.” 

— The Bangkok Post. 


After years of seeing Uncle Sam the hapless 
victim of a host of international terrorists. 
Americans across the nation have to be walk- 
ing a little taller today. Obviously the capture 
of the hijackers is not going to end terrorism in 
the Mideast or elsewhere. Bu» action taken by 
this country may send a message to those who 
would engage in terrorism tbat their activities 
carry some measure of risk. Perhaps it will 
make them just a bit more terrorized at the 
possible consequences of their actions the next 
lime they terrorize others. 

— The Indianapolis News. 


There Vietnam Goes Again 


One is tempted to tell Vietnam. “There you 
go again.” There is a certain monotony to the 
attempt made by Vietnam every year at the 
United Nations General Assembly to pretend 
that “things are moving in the right direction.” 

We would like very much to be able to say in 
good faith, yes. peace in Kampuchea is at hand 
and an honorable and just political solution 
finally appears possible. We would love to see 
an end to the suffering of everybody — the 
Kampucheans of course, but also the Thai 
border villagers and the young soldiers of 
Vietnam. But, contrary to what Vo Dong 


A Monetary' Balancing Act 

What America needs is a lower deficit, not a 
balanced budget which would entail still fewer 
resources to tackle Third World growth and 
capita] expansion in the United States. It is all 
a delicate balancing acL The deficit and inter- 
est rates need to come down to give the dollar a 
“soft landing." but the prospect of a balanced 
budget could push the dollar back up. After 
all, if the Uaited States is such a strong magnet 
for world savings with a gargantuan deficit, it 
is not obvious that it will be any less so with a 
balanced budget in prospect which can only 
increase the “safe haven" argument for leaving 
investment in the United Slates. 

This underlines the crucial importance of 
[U.S. Treasury Secretary James] Baker's fust 
initiative, whereby the top five nations should 
intervene in the foreign exchange markets to 
prevent so-called market forces from blowing 
currencies off course. It is reassuring that Pres- 
ident Francois Mitterrand's hitherto lone call 
for a monetary conference to develop this 
initiative into a new world regime along the 
tines of Bretton Woods is at last gathering 
support, particularly in Congress. It would 
be ironic if France, having lost the battle 
(when it was forced to abort its solo dash 
for growth), should win the war. 

— The Guardian f London j. 


FROM OUR OCT. 12 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: A Third Term for Roosevelt? 
NEW YORK — The New York World says: 
“With the help of Federal office-holders, pre- 
sent and prospective, Theodore Roosevelt is 
now sole dictator of New York Republican- 
ism. He writes the platforms. He names the 
candidates. He controls the organization. Can 
anybody doubt his purpose to elbow Mr. W.H. 
Taft aside in 1 9 12 and lay claim to a third term 
as President? What another Roosevelt Admin- 
istration would mean in the way of extrava- 
gance. usurpation, lawlessness and panic may 
easily be imagined. All these evils would ap- 
pear ui due course, but they would be inciden- 
tal. His main object or passion, as recent 

speeches show, is personal absolutism. Only 
the courts have held him in check in the past. It 
is certain that the courts would receive his 
most immediate attention in the future." 


1935: Filipinos Elect First President 
PARIS — The recent election of Manuel Que- 
zon as President of the new Philippine Com- 
monwealth marks the realization of a dream 
and on ambition — the dream of national 
independence and (he personal ambition to be 
the first President or the Commonwealth and 
the first Filipino to occupy Malacanan Palace 
in Manila. Although outwardly an exponent of 
“complete, immediate and absolute indepen- 
dence," Mr. Quezon never wanted indepen- 
dence either immediately or completely. In- 
stead, he wanted full autonomy for the 
Philippines under American protection. For 
the next ten years, the Philippines will be free 
internally, but protected by American troops. 
Thechief-of-staff of the American Army, Gen- 
eral Douglas MacAnhur. is going to the is- 
lands to organize their defenses. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1932 


KATH ARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL AfiT 
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CARL GEWIRTZ 


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Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Puhbshet 

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Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Ctradatno 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Advertising Sates 
International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charles-de-Gaulle. 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine. 

Francs. TcL: (1)747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

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'S !%5. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserwd. 



IF 


Needed: A New Art 
Of Summit-Scoring 



By Raymond Price 

W ASHINGTON — Preparing write in applause lines. This is sim- 
a U-S.-Soviet summit confer- pie enough. Tt takes only half the 


ence has certain striking parallels 
with preparing for a State of the 
Union address. And one of the spe- 
cial tricks of writing a State of the 
Union is worth bearing in mind as 
November's Geneva meeting be- 
tween President Reagan and Gener- 
al Secretary Gorbachev approaches. 

Like a summit, a State of the 
Union combines high drama with 
high expectations and commands 
an enormous audience. Both are 
policy-forcing. exercises. Presidents 
and their staffs work overtime ham. 
meting out positions and reaching 
decisions so that policies get 
that might otherwise be postponed. 

Both exercises are subjected 
to intense media evaluation, as cor- 
respondents trot out their score- 
cards and declare success or failure. 
It is this — the scoring — that gives 
rise to the special trick of writing a 
State of the Union address. 

When a president delivers a State 
of the Union, the members of the 
U.S. House of Representatives and 
Senate, the cabinet, tbe Supreme 
Court and the diplomatic corps as- 
sembled before mm are a star-stud- 
ded supporting cast in a drama 
played for the 70 or 80 million peo- 
ple watching on their television sets. 


inter- 


audience. or even less, to 

nipt." (fit one side or the other of 
an emotional issue in a ringing way, 
and one side or the other of the 
chamber will burst into applause. 
Tbe issue can be abortion or taxes 
or defense or peace or whatever. 
The line can simply reiterate known, 
presidential views, it serves its pur- 
pose if it raises the correspondents' 
count of interruptions. 


The result is to heighten the dra- 


ma while lowering the quality of 
State of tbe Union addresses. 

A similar pattern is developing as 
the summit nears. Commentators 
are busily anticipating'*' 

-* — ” — i the tern 


_ ‘success or 
“failure.'’ and the terms in which 


they are doing this are quantitative 
rather than qualitative. He 


Politically, it is vital to a presi- 
at the addi 


dent that tbe address be judged a 
success. Practically, the judgment 
with the most impact will be deliv- 
ered immediately afterward by a 
handful of network commentators 
and influential newspaper writers. 
A president knows from experience 
that the form of this judgment is 
likely to be either “He was inter- 
rupted 27 times by applause; he had 
Congress in the palm of his hand” 
or “He was only applauded five 
times, so the speech was a dud.” 

So what do you do? As I learned 
while working on four of them, you 


low big a 
pile of papers can be pointed to as 
“agreements”? And will it include 
the big one — arms control? 

It is taking on a frantic, does-he- 
or-doesn’t-he, will-sbe-or-won't-she 
kind of air — with most commenta- 
tors suggesting that if only Presi- 
dent Reagan would yield on nuclear 
defenses, the summit would “suc- 
ceed.” Lost in the media melee is 
serious consideration of tbe kind of 
agreement, or of how well it serves 
the American interest 
What makes a good State of the 
Union address is not the quantity of 
applause, and what makes a suc- 
cessful summit is not tbe quantity 
— or even necessarily the subject — 
of agreements. What matters is the 
nature of agreements and their rela- 
tionship to the process itself. 

There are three key elements to 
weigh in evaluating a summit: 

• The quality of agreements, no 
matter how many or few. It is far 
better to have no agreement than a 
bad one. An arms control pact that 
left the United States less secure 
would make peace more fragile. 


r Moscow has stolen our most potent technology ! ’ 


• The assessment that each lead- 
er makes of the other's skill and 
determination. Peace will be strong- 
er if tbe Soviets leave Geneva con- 
vinced that Ronald Reagan is a 
leader not to be trifled with, and 
that in future crises it would be 
dangerous to put his wall to the 
ultimate test. The Soviets do not 
have to be convinced that the Unit- 
ed States wants peace. They know 
thaL They do have to be convinced 
constantly that they cannot profit 
from breaking the peace. 

• The degree to which it ad- 
vances the continuing s ummi t pro- 
cess. The relationship between the 
United States and the U.S.S.R. is 


unique, and uniquely vital to the 
world, f 


Summit meetings between 
the two countries’ leaders should be 
a regular, annual part of that rela- 
tionship, routinely prepared for and 
routinely conducted. To the extent 
that frenzied instant evaluations of 
success or failure can be reduced, 
the process will have better long- 
term prospects of success. 

Putting summits on a regular ba- 
sis can lower the level of frenzy and 
raise the chances of accomplish- 
ments. If next month’s meeting 


leads to an agreement to make such 
summits an annual event, that in 
itself would be a significant success, 
© 1985 Raymond Price. ■ - 


Reagan and Gorbachev Aren’t Condemned to Fail 


w 


ASHTNGTON — Most speculation about 
next month’s U.S.-Soviet summit nwring 


By James Heston 


in Geneva has been. negative if not downright 

‘ why. But 


pessimistic, and it is easy to understand why. 
an argument can be made for a little patience. 

Public diplomacy — a contradiction in terms 
— dearly fascinates Ronald Reagan and Mikhail 
Gorbachev, taking their minds off immediate 
problems at home. But the pre-summit propa- 
ganda and tbe endless analyses of personalities 
cannot reliably predict the summit's outcome 

Geneva is not merely a meeting of two men 
with different personalities, philosophies and po- 
litical techniques, but of two states at the summit 
of world power. They may disagree about how to 
deal with each other on Earth or in the stars, but 
they have a common interest in avoiding clashes 
of nuclear power and trade power, and in not 
unleashing terror and chaos in the world. 

The present gloom may bejustified, but this is 
probably a time to wait and see, and particularly 
to get the secretaries of state and defense, ana 
Robert McFarlane of the National Security 
Council off the weekend television shows for a 
while and down to a settled nuclear policy. 

So far this has not been done. The president's 
aides are giving him dozens of “position papers,” 
running to hundreds of pages, which he will 
probably never read — “fine-tuning” him, as 
they say, as if he were a machine or a fiddle. 

This is probably a bum idea. No doubt Mr. 
Reagan needs technical and political help on all 
these mysteries, but he is no negotiator, and with 
all his divided “advisers” at his side in Geneva 


tugging him this way and thaL it might not be a 
bad idea to leave him to his hopeful generalities. 

The question for President Reagan and Gener- 
al Secretary Gorbachev is not whether they will 
come to some dramatic agreement about Soviet 
offensive missiles or “star wars” defenses some- 
time in the future. It is merely whether they can 
knock off the propaganda for awhile and, after 
Geneva, get some sensible officials together to 
consider the facts and begin serious negotiations. 

Summit meetings are not the place to negotiate 
the intricate and mystifying tangles of nuclear 
weapons. There will be too little time in a day or 
two at Geneva, too much hoopla,- too many 
interminable translations, too many state din- 
ners, press interviews and phony courtesies — 
and too little time for the definition of policies 
that Washington and Moscow could depend 
upon for the rest of the century. 

Yet summit meetings have their uses. When 
Mr. Gorbachev went to Paris, he had to listen to 
the objections of President Fran 901s Mitterrand 
and submit himself to the questions of the 
French press about tbe threat of Soviet missiles 
targeted on Paris and the violence of the Soviet 
state against its citizens who dissent and are 
jailed for iL Tbat is not much, but it is something. 

In Washington, as usual, there is honest confu- 
sion about what Mr. Gorbachev’s smiling new 
approach means and how Mr. Reagan should 
approach him at the summit. Some of the presi- 


dent’s aides regard the whole Gorbachev exercise 
as a cunning propaganda trick. Others agree that 
it may be so, but prefer to wait and see. 

Mr. Reagan is rather good at dreaming and 
switching. He does not follow Mr. Gorbachev's 
statements or even his own very carefully, which 
is not necessarily a bad thing. _ 

President Kennedy failed at his 1961 summit 
meeting with Nikita Khrushchev in Vienna part- 
ly because he paid too much attention to detail 
and tried to go it alone. He had been told that 
President Eisenhower did not impress tbe Soviet 
leaders at the summit because he always turned 
to Secretary of State John Foster Dulles for 
answers. Mr. Kennedy took on Mr. Khrushchev 
personally, sometimes without any advisers, and 
the meeting was a disaster. 

So the Reagan administration is probably 
right to discourage great expectations unwar- 
ranted by the intricacies and dangers of tbe 
problems. It may be possible to reach accommo- 
dation on some bilateral issues such as Afghani- 
stan and Nicaragua; on how to manage unfore- 
seen crises such as tbe shooting -down of (he 
South Korean airliner; and on what to do about 
airplane hijacking and the latest outbreak of 
piracy and extortion on the high seas. 

If they can agree on the procedures for con- 
tinuing the midear talks, that in itself wfll be ' 
usefuL The bet in this comer is that Geneva will 
be something of a scoreless tie: no great break- 
throughs. no great disasters, but probably a little 
better than the present gloomy predictions. 

The New York Times. 


Bye, Peggy, 
The Board 
Is for Boys 


By Rllpn Goo dman 


g OSTON — In the end, Margaret 


Mary O'Shanghnessy Heckler, 
outgoing secretary of health and hu- 
man services, was lucky to be sent to 
Dublin. Tbe way things are going, she 
might have been sent for coffee. 

As a loyal employee. Secretary 
Heckler took pretty good dictation 
from the president. But the next 
woman who becomes a secretary in 
the Reagan cabinet meetings wih 
probably be taking shorthand. 

Showcasing time at the White 
House is over. The election has come 
and gone, the gender rap anxiety 
peaked and waned and Donald Re- 
gan has gone back to tbe white male 
talent agency for his central casting. 

Betty Heilman, co-chair of tbe Re- 
publican Party, describes the change 
m atmosphere more benignly. “What 
has happened with Donald' Regan,” 
she says, “is that he's restructuring 
tbe White House so that it's more like 
a corporate board and everyone re- 
ports to him as CEO.” 

When Donald Regan was last a 
chief executive officer, of Merrill 
Lynch, there was one female manag- 
ing director. Now that Mrs. Heckler 
is following Jeane Kirkpatrick, only 
one woman will be left t he “board” of 
tins corporation: Elizabeth Dole. Mr. 
Regan must fed right at home. 

Not a single woman attends senior 
staff meetings at the White House. 
Not one regularly sits at National 
Security Meetings any more. 

Nor, since Faith Whittlesey's de- 
parture from tbe job of public liaison 
to be ambassador to Switzerland, is 
there any woman who reports direct- 
ly to the president Only Nancy Rea- 
gan has risen in mythical power as 
other women have fallen in real pow- 
er. Every time someone like Mrs. 
Heckler is removed, Nancy is trotted 
out as an invisible remover. 

In effect, Pe ggy Heckler was cast 
out (get Thee to an eml 
she was no longer nc 
Elizabeth Dole were aj 
in months- of each. 01 
when it looked as if the 
had better have a few 


Has Gout 




By Joseph Kraft 

B ONN — A local joke' has it tbat 
Helmut Kohl defected and the 
Russians sent him back because he 
didn’t know anything. But whatever 
he knows, the chancellor carries 
weight — especially in East-West ne- 
gotiations on arms control. 

Tbe West German -economy is 
coming back. Even the Social Demo- 
crats tnink Mr. KrAil will be reject- 
ed for another term in 1987. He bub- -^ 
bled -with confidence during ; an® 
interview in his office tbe other day. 

The chancellor was partiojlatiy re. 
taxed because the Palestinians bold- 
ing the Achill e Lauro had just given 
up. Germans were on the ship, and 
Mr. Kohl had been on' the. phone 
much of the previous night. He at- 
tributed tbe surrender to Egyptian 
President Hosni Mubarak.” A ssooel 
as Mubarak took charge,” he said, “I 
began to see daylight”. . 

Turning to the Federal Republic, 
Mr. Kohl characterized tt as. as in- 
dustrial power” with special political 


The chancellor dunks 
that a compromise 
between Mr. Reagan 
and Mr. Gothachev - 
can be struck. } 


influence because of its geographic 
position. He likened moving his 
country td running a supertanker. He 
said there had been a slow turnabout 
since he took power three years ago, 
with many waves sloshing over-the 
gunwales. But now the country was 
on the “right course." • 

The- economy, be said, had shown 
negative growth, rising inflation and 
mounting jobless rates when be took 
over. Now inflation was aL 2 percent 
and tbe unemployment figures were 
climbing at a slower pace. He predict- 
ed that real economic growth wbuld 
hit. 3 pocent in 1986. “It is a' slow 
recovery, but long and solid.” 

: He evoked “cultural pessimism,” 
a label pasted on West Germany 
fay many Americans. Without any 
prompting he said that if leaders al- 
ways talked about World War Q1 and 
the aid of agriculture and the loss of 
jobs, people were bound to be discon- 
tenL But attitudes changed when Tip 
leaders stressed opportunities. 

In 'response to a question as to 
whether Germans were happy, Mr. 
Kohl, unlike most of his countrymen, 
replied in the affirmative. 

In the same vein, he initiated, as 
not many Europeans do. a discussion 
of Japan. He said tbat tbe Japanese 
(fid not have more “gray matter” in 
their heads than other people They 
thought differently. To compete ef- 
fectively it was only necessary for 
Germans to think differently, too. 
Instead of thinking about vacations, 


lei f lib 




yTeii l h 


they had to think about the future. 



show and telL 


women for campaign show 
She was. as she liked to say, the 


She and 
ted with- 
in 19S3, 

iblicans 

visible 


administration’s “voice of compas- 
sion.” Her soprano was brought on 
political stage all through the cam- 
paign as a counterpoint to the Demo- 
cratic theme song about “fairness.” 

In the last five years or so Mrs. 
Heckler had a tough time finding a 
place for herself as a moderate Re- 
publican. Pro-ERA and pro-Reagan, 
she was often caught in. the middle. 
She lost re-election to Congress in 
1982 to a liberal Democrat, Barney 
Frank. Even feminist organizations 
endorsed Mr. Frank because of her 
record opposing abortion. As head of 
HHS she both toed the Reagan line 
and sometimes held the line. But con- 
servatives complained that she was 
not ideologically pure enough- 

When push came to shove, there 
was less support for P eggy Heckler 
than there had been for Labor Secre- 
tary Ray Donovan. The administra- 
tion has stopped worrying abotu the 
women's vote; Mrs. Heckler had little 
political base left in the party and 
no old-girl network in tbe adminis- 
tration. She was a goner. 

So the women’s place in this house 
is much shakier, in general the ad- 
ministration's record mi appointing 
women is better today than in tbe 
first years. In 1984, 17.4 percent of 
what tbe Congressional Quarterly 
calls major appointments went to 
women. In 19S5 the figure is holding 


at IS.5 percent. But when you look at 
the concentric circles of real power, 
the inner rings are nearly vcricL 

Faith Whittlesey, once ranking 
woman in the White House and an 
anti-ERA conservative, realized this 
as she drove away from her (Ad job on 
Pennsylvania Avenue. As die told 
The Wall Street Journal, “AD I saw 
was a sea of men coming and going in 
those cars. I began to think, maybe 
they're right- Women aren’t welcome 
in the White House:” 

Even Jeane Kirkpatrick, a soldier 
of conservative fortune, talks about 
the campaign to keep her in check: 
“One male. colleague ... said that 
I was too temperamental to hold a 


the matter of foreign policy, Mr. 
Kohl again contrasted the present 
with conditions only three years ago. 
Then, he said, pointing through the 
windows of his office, 300,000 people 
were in the streets demonstrating for 
peace: Now the scene was placid. 

Relations with America and 
France were particularly good. Some £ 
of Ins aides were troubled by the 
summary tone of a U.S. invitation to 
attend a meeting of industrial coun- 
tries at the United Nations before 
President Reagan meets General Sec- 
retary Gorbachev. Mr. Kohl waved 
that away as a misunderstanding — — a 
bagatelle when weighed against bos 
personal relations with the president. 

He was equally warm in landing 
President Frames Mitterrand for 
standing by West Germany against 
the Russians. In that context he men- 
tioned the trip that he and Mr. Mit- 
terrand made to Berlin. He said that 
no other French leader had gone to 
Berlin with his German counterpart. 

As to the Russians, Mr. Kohl 
snorted at those who consider Mr. 
Gorbachev a “fiberaL” He spoke of 
Marxism-Leninism as a doctrine not ' * 
equal tO the chaTlflngft of n yidffffl 
times. He indicated that there were 
only two ways a Communist leader 
could rule Russia — Stalin’s way, 
with the Gulag and guns ar every- 
body’s head, or Khrushchev's “gou- 
lash Communism.’’ Which way Mr. 
Gorbachev would choose, Mr. Kohl 
fdL wais still unknown. - 

But he denied that standing firm 
against Russia would necessarily 
bring bad results. He counted the 
deployment of American intermedi- 
ate-range missiles in West Germany 
last year as an asset In the same vein, 
be said that he would move before .tbe 
1987 elections to lengthen the period 
of _ required military service, 'He 
pointed out that only, about half of 
Soviet conscripts were Russian, with 
most of the rest coming from Asia. 

The latest Sonet proposals for mu- 
mal cuts in offensive missies strode 





jFr»r$. 


N>V, 




V. 




L\ : • 

J ’•* I 


.rti 


higher office. What do they mean — 
too temperamental once a month?”' 

The public attack on Mrs. Heckler 
was not about temperament but 
abriu incompetence. As she said in 
a perhaps prophetic interview, 

“There' s far more tolerance of incom- 
petent males.” It is fair to observe 

^ that , ol ‘ i **■ s* SS a r I ; ' 


£!w: 


twice as good wasn’t | 

The White House likes to say it has 
gone beyond tokenism and window- 
dressing. But today, without election 
year pressure or a safety network of 
women on the inside, even the win- 
dows are looking awfully empty. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


gam and Mr. Gorbachev can be 
shuck. Although he declined to elab- 
orate, he Said , that when he meets 
President Reagan in a fortnight be 
bave some concrete Suggestions. 
]Thfi Federal Republic,” he said, 
uas a contribution to make.” . 

. Los Angeles Times Syndicate. . 





Dutch Missile Arithmetic 


Regarding "1 Gorbachev Unveils 
Arms Reduction Plan ” (Oct. 4f‘ 

This report stated inter alia: “The 
Dutch government ha« made a decla- 
ration on the stationing of U.S. cruise 
missiles dependent on the number of 
Soviet missiles targeted on Western 
Europe.” I would like to point Out 
that the June I, 1984, decision, as 
referred -to, does not speak of tbe 
number of Soviet missiles targeted on 
Western Europe, but takes into ac- 
count the total of SS-20 missiles de- 
ployed in tbe Soviet Union, thus also 


in the Asian part Because of tb~ j.-. 

.nsjwi;*-, -r — 1 — ■. .*“* -fare, « seems to be inevitable that tbe 


mobility of those 'missiles, it makes 

™ ..o- dJl — criteria! deploy 


the Soviet Union has further’ h? W SP|S?WP “ 
creased the expansion of its SS-20 v thestgmficaiice of the 

arsenal above the number 378, which 3nnc 

were deployed on die date of th£ deployment deck 


lands shall deploy 48 cruise missiles 
arthe Woeasdrecht base.” 

' According to tbeJatesxNATO fig- 
ures, tbe Soviet Union -now has 44} 
operational missiles deployed. There- 


^ contested such an increase . 

• J-f- JONKER. ROELANTS, 

Spokesman^ 

5 of Foreign Affairs;-. 
"Hie Hague.. 




\ 



'Z.;- 








' •■' . . 1 ' '•' . .:' 


N* 




w *•. . 

*Ci 4 ' 
£"f-; ■ 


V" 

: “ lfr.IL. 


n xveaay to Approve 

J Deployment of Missiles 
•pJ 1 Despite Soviet ®6ye 

i , fl — ■% w fS% | =.*** -- -3 l, J- * * 

By James M.. Maikham includes inesiles ttrgcied'dnbdiii 

> York Times Service- Europe smd nn Arip - 

THE HAGUE — Early next Mf. v Gdrfec£^j : ^:4iscfc«oie in 
! ; s - month, the Dutch govenunentwill Paris, accgnfing,lo officials, was 
approve the deployment of Amen- preceded ~bjr messages Jo the Lub- 
can ground-launched cruise n»y- bers govennnent mdv^e-'oy^osH 
i sites despite an unusual high-level Gon : Labor Barty ombuning the - 

Soviet move to sway- it from its ^^^wal*of sow ^20s &om 

£•' decision, according to senior gov- standby alert «id plans to dismahr 

eminent officials. - tie their stMTinnaf y ma»Tlari f>n^- - ■• 

> ■ >;h The long-postponed decision by w*® 1 to study what it really 

Prime Minister Ruud Lubbers's means,” said Jacob dfe Ruita, the 
u center-right coition govenuxwat P®di defense minister. “Bulas a 
’ m.v,* • is being anxiously watched by fiownunqn .we caxmot say dun it 
: ‘ Washington a& an important skoal was the' breakthrough that we 

- £*, of NATO resolve before Preridmt ho P ftl forte fora 1" 

Ronald Reagan meets with Mikhail In an interview, Mr. de Rmter 
■■r r *\ S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, in sa ^ that the decisive question for . 

Geneva on Nov. 19. The Nether- ** Dotdh government was theto- 
" t lands win be the last of Eve West- *■! mnaber of 5S-20s deployed in 
' i em European nations to receive die Soiru* Union, which he noted 
.i U.S. medium-range missDes. - Mr. Gorbachev htededhicdtOTe- 
v- ^ k But while the Lubbers govern- veaI a hews conference in Paris. 

• : 5 . . ment plans to guarantee the de- The decision to give the ro- 
ploymtnt of 48 Tomahawk missiles for the deployment .of die 

through a five-year treaty with the crt “ 5e missiles at wiyLbase at 
’ "*Y United States, the opposition La- Woensdredil in J 988 is expected to. 
“'-s s bor Party has vowed lo -reverse the be announced in ri*e*st weekof 





s >rjiJ : 


decision if it comes to power in November, accordmgtoUutdi of- 
electkms to be held in May. Goals and Western diplomats. 

In Paris last week, Mr. Gorba- . VetMpaifiaigHwy^pprova] 
chev disclosed that the Soviet . “ “* ¥**%*Z ' “ 


,r -ai > 




, on Western Europe lo 243, winch, 

* he said, precisely accords with the a ccnt ™° ajB f*^? n 

level of June 1984. the govenm^a coalition is dearly 

_ . .. • nervous that fresh Soviet diplomat- 

racing dissent Within his own ir . inifiatT vre may .A gain inflnm^ 
Qrnstmn Democratic Party over domestic poUricsL; 
the rmssfle issue, Mr. Lubbers on «xhe country is evenly divided," 
June l l984.postponed a decision said Joris Vooihoeve, a defense ex- 
on deployment, which has (wsn pert in the-PeopIe’s Party for Free- 
fiercely opposed by leftist parties dom and Democracy, the junior 
and street protesters backed by coalition party, “It’s going to be 


Protestant church groups. 


difficult, very difficult. But if ev- 


- 


But the government vowed to erything goes well we will have it 
approve the missile deployment if signed, waled 'and delivered by 
on Nov. 1. 1985, the Soviet Union. February.’' . 
had deployed more SS-20 mi soles Since .fashioning the postpone- 
than the level of June 1984 — 378. meat derision 17 months ago, Mr. 
The latest North A tlantic Treaty Lubbers has weeded out a number 
Organization figures put the Soviet of leftist Christian Democrats who 
SS-20 arsenal at 441 missiles, which opposed deployment, giving him 


If By Joel Brinkley 
and Stephen Engelbcrg 

AV*’ York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The CIA 
failed to notify the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation when it learned 
more than a year ago that Edward 
L. Howard was considering becom- 
ing a Soviet-spy, according to gov- 
ernment officials. ^ 

Court 'records sbdw^t-'Mn- 
Howard, a former intelligence 
agency officer who is now a fugi- 
tive, told CIA employees in. Sep- 
tember 1984 that he was thinking 
about disclosing classified infor- 
mation to the Soviet Union. 

The FBI has sole responsibility 
for domestic espionage investiga- 
tions. Under federal law, the CIA 
and all other government agencies 
are supposed to report sus p ected 
- espionage to the bureau. 

It also is illegal for the CIA or 


duct surveillance' or any other ac- 
tions within the United States to ' 
thwart potential spies. 

Mr. Howard, 33, is . accused of 
giving Soviet officials details of 
American intelligence operations 
in Moscow- and has been charged 
with espionage. 

U.S. officials said the CI A told , 
the FBI nothing about Mr. Howard 
until after the bureau began ah in- 
■ vestigation this fall based cm infor- 
mation from a Soviet defector, Vi- 
laly Yurchenko, who had been a. 
senior official of the KGB, 

The bureau began its surveil- 
lance of Mr. Howard last month, 
but he slipped out of his home at 
night and is believed to have fled 
ft' the country. 

West Germany 
Arrests Merchant 
In 11th Spy Case 

The AssoeUned Press 

BONN — A West German mer- 
chant has been arrested on suspi- 
cion of spying for East Germany, 
officials said Friday. It was the sec- 
ond West German espi o nag e case 
made public in two days and the 
I lch since early August. 

Hans-Jflrgen F&rster, spokes- 
man for the federal prosecutor's . 
office, said authorities arrested the 
man Wednesday but released him 
on bail of 50,000 Deutsche marks 
{SI 8,867). Formal charges, which 
-in West Germany can come 
f months after a suspect is detai n ed, 
have not been filed against the 
man. . _ . 

The suspect, 44, is a merchant in 
the central city of GQtersloh, the 
spokesman said. His name was not 
disclosed. Mr. Forster said mvesti- 
gators found equipment in the 
man ’s apartment that is commonly 
used by secret agents, although he 
did noi specify whai it was. 

He said the man is suspected of 
having spied for East Germany 
since at hast 1982. On Thursday, 
West German authorities an- 
nounced the arrest of a neo-Nazi 
party official on suspkaon of spy- 
ing. 


Senator Patrick J. Leahy, a Dem- 
ocrat of Vermont who is deputy 
chairman of the Sdect Committee 
.on Intelligence, said Thursday: “If 
the CIA did not give the FBI ade- 
quate information about this per- 
son, that’s a bad mistake. It shows 
very, very serious problems within 
the CIA.” 

- In the- last^eW. weeks, -the CIA 
transferred the chief of its office of 
security, William Kmopish, to a 
new job with equal seniority. An 
official, said, the move had been 
planned “for some time” and was 
not related to the Howard case. 

.Mr. Howard, who worked for the 
agency from 1981 to 1983, was told 
of classified U.S. intelligence oper- 
ations in Moscow because the 
ageney was planning to assign him 
there, officials have said. 

According to a criminal com- 
plaint filed in U.S. District Court 


Howard told two current QA em- 
ployees in September 1984 that he 
had “spent hours in the vicinity of 
the Soviet Embassy trying to decide 
whether .to enter the embassy and 
disclose classified information.” 

An FBI affidavit states that , the 
conversation was held on Sept 24, 
1984. Four days before that, the 
government contends, Mr. Howard 
passed his information to Soviet 
officials in Sl Anton, Austria. 

George Lauder, a CIA spokes- 
man. said Thursday -that “action 
was taken” within ihe agency as a 
result of that conversation, “and it 
seemed to be reasonable action at 
the time.” 

• He refused to be moire specific, 
although an official said that the 
agency kept m : contact with Mr. 
Howard in Ne^ - Mexico after his 
conversation with the two CIA em- 
ployees. 

the Senate: and- House intelli- 
gence committees are investigating 
the handling. of the Howard case. A 
key issue, committee members said, 
is how the CIA and other agencies 
deal with employees who leave gov- 
ernment service with detailed, clas- 
sified knowledge about sensitive 


CYTEK?^TIOIVAL HEBALP TRIBUNE, SATUKPAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12-1 3, 1985 

Vote Boycott 
Is Urged 
By Students 
In Poland 

Umud Press hnemmumol 

WARSAW — Students at the 
Catholic University in Lublin in 
southeastern Poland Friday ___ 

for a boycott of Sunday’s pariia* The rocky Martian plain is seen in high resolution \ 
mentarv elections to protest a new 

Photos Suggest Watt 

A statement distributed among C/O 

By Thomas OToolc £«»•» 

Ruud Lubbers tcsts of students and reciore of 92 hashing, cn Post Service Earth- 

Polish univereities. WASHINGTON — Mars, a frigid desert Mars|stl 

greater control over his party. He *w c call on all the students in planet, once had enough water to cover its exploration 

has also sldflfully waited out one of our university id boycott the dec- entire surface with an ocean more than 300 

the most powerful anti-nuclear tions.” said a statement by thestu- feel (“bo® 100 meters) deep, a panel of ontynoghb 

movements in Western Europe deni governing body at the univer- American scientists said this week. venus is ux 

■ . On OcL 26, an anti-cnike pen- sity, which is the only Catholic “The pictures taken by the two Viking 
non wnh the signatures <rf about university in Eastern Europe. spacecraft in orbit around Mars tell us that fnr 

four million q teen s will be pre- Under the law, rectors can dis- Mars had as much water in geologic history h _ w 

sented to the prime minis t». The ^ students for taking pan in as Earth did,” Dr. Michael Carr of the U^. 

organizers of the petiurm drive m- flJcgal demonstrations on the cam- Geological Stuve)- said at a workshop at 

dnde the Labor Party, trade puses and summon the police to Ames Research Center in Mountain View, 

umons, church groups and even „p the rallies. California. generally at 

Princess Irene of the House of Or- a survey by the Association of _ . .. “ * 

™ YUongs pictures suggest that water lies peraturcist 

^Yet (here are signs of weariness SS Partv* beJw *** at latitudes near the Mar- {a bom mini 

in the anti-missCtewalition, and its said 37? MrSTT?oS ““ 7*“ f*ejphnel-i inleriorheai andlSOdej 

leader, Mient Jan Faber, is already 320 000 stm&ts were “undecided" «m keep it from freezing just as do under- south poles 

working on cost-deployment strat- on whether to vote Sunday, accord- 
egies. Mr. Faber and Ins Inter- ing to an unofficial report. „ 

diurch Peace Council have also Another 47.8 percent said they C„, T 

been turning their attention from would not vote or would rather not iJalVaQOl H6D61S 3EY 
the missiles lo human nghts abuses vote, the poll said. About 12.7 per- J 

m the Soviet Union and Eastern cent said, “I don’t know.” D _ , , ^ , _ „ , 

&uopc. The results of the survey were By Edward Cody The Reawn admmisti 

A week ago, the government an- carried by the underground Soli- Wash-opm Pan Service said that U.S. military ac 

nounced that it would not take part darity newspaper, Tygodnik Ma- SAN SALVADOR — Tbe Sal- 1101 proper targets m th 
in the Reagan administration's gowsze. ' vadoran rebel command, vowing lo cause, according to rules 

space weapons research program, a Lo* Walesa, a founder of the wage war against US soldiers sta- presence, thqr do n 

move that could soften the impact banned onion, has urged Poles not tioned here, announced Friday that P“ te , m combat, pe reb 
of its green light for the cruise mis- t o vote and branded the elections a capturing or killing U.S. advisers ship has masted that the 
sales. “farce” because independent can- was tbe principal objective of taiy s role as adviser and 

And, with support from Bel- didates woe not allowed to run for Thursday's attack on the main supplier makes America 
gium, it managed to convoke a die 460 seats in parliament. army training base at La Union, legitimate targets. 

NATO foreign ministers meeting Solidarity has stepped up its Fonv-two Salvadoran soldiers ““ “** °P craDon of 1 

in Brussels next Tuesday to discuss anti-election campaign, distribut- were killed in the attack. doran Armed Forces 

the al lianc e’s approach to the Rea- jng leaflets in all major cities call- “Our war plan is directed toward Training Center earned c 
gan-Gorbachev summit meeting, jng for a boycott. defeating North American imperi- °bj* 

Both countries were angered that Tbe pdice Thursday foiled a Sol- alists, and we are not waiting for wipmg out or killing the 

they had been excluded from Mr. Purify attempt to broadcast a radio the massive dispatch of their troops ^ North American mint 
Reagan’s invitation to other NATO program on the elections in the to begin fighting them," said a f 1 *- communique s 
leaders to meet in New York on center of Warsaw. A government communique read over the guenil- for them. But if v 

Dd- 24. spokesman said four persons had las’ official Radio Venceremos. J™ ® crn “i 5 ume > m 

Finally, the Lubbers government been detained. -u/- .« Rca 8 an government sh 

has stressed that to counterbalance Mr v 9 i N , h- , We have decided to come convmced once ai 

the missDe deployment, it will seek JSiv wa f on ^ onh Amencan that we do not fear the ini 

a reduction fowhatiM caUed the SlSS interventionists who aredmectmg 0 f its troops and that it c 

Neiheriands’ nuclear tasks within 001 £5“* meeuilgs ^ the war m our homeland, and we l0 make vrar on our peopl 

NSm?Ss^^^ S^^S t0pn,,D0te have derided to make war in every suffering and payi^d 
verthig ntSaSpabteDu5bF- bc ^ colt spot every circumstance they 

16 fiSter-bomhas Lo conventional ‘7 her V” s a taUang ov 5 *** “• staletnent 531(1 The guerrilla comm 

roles. the last 40 years and we came to the Thehnp pdrac t s eemed eale ulaieri vanced similar argument 

Klaas deVries, tbe Labor Party’s oooolu^on that our presence in to portray guerrilla resolve to strike took responsibility for ki 
defense spokesman, predicted a these matings would not make any at U.S. military personnel training, UJS. Marine embassy gi 
rough electoral year. sense," he said. advising and equipping the Salva- two other U.S. citizens 

“It’s all or nothing," he said. “It But a leading dissidoit who is doran Army in its five-year war Salvador sidewalk cafe Ji 

is inconceivable to me that the not linked with Solidarity, Adam against leftist insurgents of the Far- Five U.S. training adv 

Dutch Labor Party win take part in Wojciechowslti, criticized the tm- abundo Marti National Liberation present when guemlla 
a government that will deploy the derground tmion for failing to stage Front, tbe umbrella group of the tacked the training base ' 
missiles”- an rffia'ent anti-election campaign, five guemlla armies. the U.S. Embassy rec 


Page 5 







.y&y/.q-v-.-A 


Uratad Pran ImKrjao-ol 


Hie rocky Martian plain is seen in high resolution from Viking-2 in this 85-degree panorama taken during the afternoon. 

Photos Suggest Water Lies Under Desert on Mars 


By Thomas OToolc 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Mars, a frigid desert 
planet, once had enough water to cover its 
entire surface with an ocean more than 300 
feet (about 100 meters) deep, a panel of 
American scientists said this week. 

“The pictures taken by the two Viking 
spacecraft in orbit around Mars tell us that 
Mars bad as much water in geologic history 
as Earth did,” Dr. Michael Carr of the U.S. 
Geological Survey said at a workshop at 
Ames Research Center in Mountain View, 
California. 

Viking's pictures suggest that water lies 
below the surface at latitudes near the Mar- 
tian equator where the planet's interior heat 
can keep it from freezing just as do under- 


ground rivers in most temperate latitudes on 
Earth. 

Mars is the only nearby planet marked for 
exploration and possibly even colonization in 
the 21st century, in large part because it is the 
only neighboring body that can support life. 
Venus is too hot, and Earth’s moon is airless 
and waterless, 

“Suppose we want lo go to Mars someday, 
for whatever reason,” Dr. Carr said. "We 
have 10 know where we can get water.” 

“Viking has shown us,” he said, “that there 
is 10 times as much water on Mars as was 
generally accepted by scientists.” 

Mars is extremely cold. Its average tem- 
perature is 60 degrees below zero Fahrenheit 
(about minus 50 centigrade) aL its equator 
and 150 degrees below zero at its hortn and 
south poles. 


Its carbon-dioxide atmosphere is so thin 
that it blankets the planet with 100 times less 
pressure than the atmosphere that covers 
Earth, hardly enough force 10 support rain in 
its clouds or water on its surface. 

Dr. Carr said that the 20,000 close-up pic- 
tures taken by the two Viking spacecraft since 
1976 reveal canyons that are deeper, wider 
and longer than the Grand Canyon and could 
be made only by rushing rivers. They also 
show thousands of gullies formed by water or 
snow and ice. 

“If all the water that existed on Mars to 
form these channels covered its surface to- 
day.” Dr. James Pollack of the research cen- 
ter said, “it would be enough to form a global 
Martian ocean tens to hundreds of meters 
deep.’’ 


Salvador Rebels Say U.S. Advisers Are Targets 


By Edward Cody 

Washington Pan Service 

SAN SALVADOR — Tbe Sal- 
vadoran rebel command, vowing to 
wage war against U.S. soldiers sta- 
tioned here, announced Friday that 
capturing or killing U.S. advisers 
was the principal objective of 
Thursday’s attack on the main 
army training base at La Union. 
Forty-two Salvadoran soldiers 
were ’killed in the attack. 

“Our war plan is directed toward 
defeating North American imperi- 
alists, and we are not waiting for 
the massive dispatch of their troops 
to begin fighting them,” said a 
communique read over the guerril- 
las’ official Radio Venceremos. 

“We have already derided to 
make war on the North American 
interventionists who are directing 
the war in our homeland, and we 
have derided to make war in every 
spot and every circumstance they 
may be in,” the statement said. 

The broadcast seemed calculated 
to portray guemlla resolve 10 strike 
at U.S. military personnel training, 
advising and equipping the Salva- 
doran Army in its five-year war 
against leftist insurgents of the Far- 
abundo Marti National Liberation 
Front, the umbrella group of the 
five guerrilla armies. 


The Reagan administration has 
said that U.S. military advisers are 
not proper targets in the war be- 
cause, according to rules governing 
their presence, they do not partici- 
pate in combat. The rebel leader- 
ship has inqgtarf lha l (he U.S. mili - 
tary’s role as adviser and weapons 
supplier makes American soldiers 
legitimate targets. 

“In this operation of the Salva- 
doran Armed Forces Military 
Training Center carried out by our 
forces, tbe principal objective was 
wiping out or killing the group of 
10 North American military advis- 
ers,” the communique said. “We 
looked for them. But if we did not 
find »hgm this time; the Ronald 
Reagan government should be- 
come convinced once and for all 
that we do not fear the intervention 
of its troops and that it cannot try 
to make war on our people without 
suffering and paying the conse- 
quences.” 

The guerrilla command ad- 
vanced similar arguments when it 
took responsibility for killing four 
U.S. Marine embassy guards and 
two other U.S. citizens at a San 
Salvador sidewalk cafe June 19. 

Five U.S. training advisers were 
present when guerrilla forces at- 
tacked the training base Thursday, 
the U.S. Embassy reported. A 


spokesman said Friday they did 
not fire their weapons during the 
assault but had been prepared to 
do so if it had been necessary. 

The base commander. Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Joaquin Cema Flores, 
said a dozen U.S. advisers normally 
were assigned to the base, sleeping 
sometimes in a small barracks set 
aside for them and sometimes in a 
house in the nearby port of La 
Unite. 

U.S. Embassy rules prohibit ad- 
visers or others of the approximate- 
ly 120 U.S. military personnel ac- 
knowledged to be here from going 
“into areas where combat is likely 
to occur,” a spokesman said. 

Training advisers are stationed 
in most of tbe country’s 14 provin- 
cial garrisons, advising Salvadoran 
trainees and monitoring the pro- 
gram. 

■ Nicaraguan Rebels Supplied 

The head of a special State De- 
partment office said Friday that 
the United States has sent Nicara- 
guan rebels the first shipment of 
nonlethal military supplies, includ- 
ing boots, clothing and medicines, 
from $27 million approved by Con- 
gress last summer. The Associated 
Press reported from Washington. 

Robert W. Duemling, director of 
the Nicaraguan Humanitarian As- 


sistance Office, said the first sup- 
plies were flown Thursday from 
New Orleans to a location In Cen- 
tral America that he would not dis- 
close. He said his office has spent 
S980.000. 

Bosco Matamoros, spokesman 
for the chief rebel army, the Nica- 
raguan Democratic Force, con- 
firmed the shipment and added 
that it went “directly to our bases 
along the Honduran -Nicaraguan 
border, to territory controlled by 
FDN Forces." 

In July, under strong pressure 
from Mr. Reagan. Congress agreed 
to resume direct U.S. aid to rebels 
fighting Nicaragua’s leftist govern- 
ment although continuing a ban on 
lethal aid. 

From 1981 to 1984. the rebels 
were supported by an estimated 
$80 milli on in covert CIA military 
aid. 

Manuel Cordero, a senior diplo- 
mat in the Nicaraguan Embassy in 
Washington, denounced the ship- 
ment as the latest “in a long series 
of U.S. aggressions against Nicara- 
gua." 

“This logistical aid to a group of 
terrorists totally contradicts the 
publicly stated position of the U.S. 
government against slate-support- 
ed terrorism," Mr. Cordero said. 


Discover the world of interRent 


Tens of thousands of people re- 
tire each year from government or 
industry after holding positions 
that gave them- access to classified 
materials. More than 4J million 
people in government and industry 
currently nave clearance to handle 
classified information, 

Mr. Lauder, the CLA spokesman, 
. said the agency did not monitor 
former employees who were famil- 
iar with classified programs. 

“We haven’t got any proce- 
dures.” he said. “Once a 
leaves here, be is John Q. Citizen; 
just like ybn and me. We don’t keep 
a string on "them. It's strictly an FBI 
matter." 

Before leaving the agency, etn- 
. plovees are remi nded of their Obli- 
gation not to disdose classified in- 
formation and to submit anything 
they write to the agency for review 
before it is published. - ' 



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Lesotho State of Emergency 

Reuters 

MASERU. Lesotho— Lesotho’s 
prime minister, Chief Leabua Jona- 
than, has declared a state of emer- 
gency ted appealed Tor -interna- 
tional help to deal with five years of 

drought. . - 


before it u published.- ; 

DEATH NOTICE j 

Family '.and friends aririance with 
deep sortow the death of 
GEORGE 23ATOVSKI 
in Paris,ihc_dty^w&ich l aft«r2 «- 
palliations and further persecu- 
tions finally provided this anti-hero' 
of our times, with a tine home. We 
also remember his wife Jane Foster 
who died 24thSeptemfer 1979., 

• *7c> steep tc'.siea>pfrch»flce to dream". 

FifelOtn OctSbe 1985 . 



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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-5 UND A Y, OCTOBER 12-13, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


A Massive Exhibition of 20th-Century German Art 


By Max Wvkcs-Joyce 

L ONDON — “German .\n in the 
' 20th Century." the autumn ex- 
hibition at the "Royal Academy, 
which opened Friday, is a massive 
undertaking, with more than 50 
artists represented in a show of 300 
paintings and sculptures. Among 
the high points: 

LovisCorimh 1 1858- 1925) is rep- 
resented by a dozen paintings from 
the last decade of his life, including 
his final despairing cry. “Ecce 
Homo.” a presentation of Christ in 
modern dress (loaned by the 
Runs (museum of Basel). 

Alexej von Jawlensky ^ 1864- 
1941 ) was born at Torsok in White 
Russia, was an officer in the Czarist 
army from ISS4 through 1896. and 
studied art as a gentleman amateur 
at the Sl Petersburg Academy, 
where his teacher was Ilya Repin. 
He resigned his commission and 
moved to Munich, where at Anton 
Azb&’s painting school he met Vas- 
sily Kandinsky (also represented in 
this exhibition). He traveled much 
in France and Italy, in France 
meeting Matisse, who clearly influ- 
enced “Schakko with Rat Hat" 
(. 1910). one of his three paintings in 
this show. 

Although he trained in France. 
Emil Nolde (1867-1956) remained 
quin [essentially German. He suf- 
fered bitterly "from the “degener- 
ate" label: a thousand of his paint- 
ings were confiscated by the Nazis 
in 1937. In 1941. though officially 
forbidden to paint, be started jot- 
ting down ideas in watercolor on 


tiny, easily concealed scraps of pa- 
per. These Ungemalle Bilder. liter- 
ally “un painted pictures,” but usu- 
ally just called the “forbidden 
pictures," provided him with a rich 
vein of ideas when in 1945 he was 

able to paint again. He is represent- 
ed by paintings done between 1 909 
and 1931. “In the Lemon Garden" 
(1920). from the Staatsgalerie of 
Stuttgart, is typicaL 

Franz Marc (1880-1916) made 
stylized and poetically romanti- 
cized animals his chief theme. “The 
Little Yellow Horses” (1912). also 
on loan from Stuttgart, is a good 
example. 

Wilhelm Lehmbruck (1881- 
1919) was the fourth child of a targe 
mining family who won a scholar- 
ship to tbe Dtisseldorf Academy of 
Art and later went to Paris, where 
he was particularly influenced by 
Rodin and Maillol. He was more a 
modeler than a carver, the eight 
sculptures in the show are cast, 
chiefly in bronze, but one or two in 
pulverized stone, which he believed 
more faithfully represented the 
original modeling clay. With the 
war he became an orderly in a mili- 
tary hospital though he continued 
to "produce sculpture; such as the 
“Fallen Man" (1915-16). Horrified 
by the sights and sounds of his 
service, he deserted to Switzerland, 
returned to Berlin late in 1918 and 
killed himself five months later. 


After 1918 art in Germany saw a 
tremendous efflorescence, in par- 
ticular in the paintings of Kirchner 
and Beckmann. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


EXECUTIVE 
VICE PRESIDENT 
E&P OPERATIONS 


jssive independent petroleum company with large- 
scale operations overseas has an unusual opportunity for an 
experienced "take-charge” E&P operating executive. 

Background should include a geology or engineering 
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with an independent Broad experience in foreign E&P 
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work programs required. Overseas operating experience 
desirable. 


This position will be based in Texas and report to the 
president Extensive travel will be involved to maintain the 
contacts and management direction required. Candidates 
should have a proven record of strong leadership. 

Excellent compensation package. Reply iit strictest confidence to: 

President, Box D 125 
The International Herald Tribune, 

181, Ave. Charles-d e-Gaulle. 92521 NeuiBy Cedex, France, 


A non bank Financial Institution 
with offices in the United Slates, 
is seeking For its Paris office an 


international 

trader 




He will be responsible for the development of 
our US brokerage badness program in France. 


The right person would be no less than 30 years 
Id have a college degree, should have a 


old. wouic 

minimum of five years experience ata Brokers or 
in an International Financial Management Firm, 
and would have an excellent knowledge of the US 
Stock Market- 


Nationality is open: bowever, he must speak 
perfect English and have at least an excellent 
working knowledge of French. 

He will receive an excellent starting salar y plus 
commission and should be able to nave a rapid 
salary progression. Please send yoor detailed re- 
sume (in French or English), indicating your 
p resen l salary, plus a photo, to our Consultant 
who will not show us your resume until you have 
met him and authorized Him to do so. 


Please send resume under 
reference 3805-H to Mararegies 


99 




3. RUE D HAUTEVILLE - 7501® PMUS FRANCE 


A non bank Financial Institution with 
offices in the United States, is seeking for its 
Paris office an 


international 
bond portfolio 
manager 


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old. should be very strong in mathematics and 
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rience at j Stock Brokers or a Portfolio Manage- 

ever, he 


ment Firm. Nationality is open; however 
must have a perfect knowledge of English and a 
working knowledge of French. 

Excellent salary and career possibilities. 

Please send your detailed resume (in French or 
English), indicating your present salary, plus a 
photo to our Consultant who will not show us 
your resume until you have met him and autho- 
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Please send resume under 


reference 3806- H 10 Mamrfgies 




3. RUE D'HAUTEVTLLE - 75010 PARIS FRANCE 


Erast Ludwig Kirchner (1880- 


1938) is represented by 17 paint- 


of Jugendstil (the Germanic 
sion of Art Nouveau), Neo-Imf 


logs from 1999 through 1 
eluding loans from public 
collections in Amsterdam, Essen. 
Berlin. Hamburg. New York and 
Basel Initially trained as an archi- 
tect and designer, as a painter he 
came in turn under the influences 
ver- 

Neo- Impres- 
sionism. the Fauves. and primitive 
art from the Goman colonies. All 
these contributed to the evolution 
of Kirchner's style, which matured 
from about 1910. Two works in this 
exhibition exemplify the directions 
in which his painting could have 
evolved. “Girl with Cat. Franzi” 
(1909-11) combines Fauve colors 
with near-primitive figuration; 
“Olympia” (1914-15), his clothed, 
satiric versioQ of Manet’s famous 
nude, betrays his preoccupation 
with wood engraving 

Max Beckmann (1885-1950) is 
represented by 21 paintings. His 
approach to painting was refresh- 
ingly simple. Il was plainly stated 
in his lecture “On My Painting” in 
London at the New Burlington 
Galleries’ 1938 showing of the Mu- 
nich “degenerates.” “The Self is 
indeed the greatest and obscurest 
secret in the world.” he said. “I 
believe in the Self, in its eternal 
unalterable form, whose ways are 
incomprehensibly identical with 
our ways. That is why 1 am con- 
cerned with the individual the 
whole being that we call individuaL 
and my whole effort is directed 
towards understanding and por- 
traying iL” 

One way Beckmann undertook 
this individualist role was in a se- 
ries of self-portraits, three of which 
are in the snow. Others are intense- 
ly psychological portraits, of which 
the serene, predominantly green 
portrait of his wife, “Quappi and 
Parrot” (1936), is typicaL In yet 
others he achieved great poignancy 


by combining biblical, moral and 
spiritual themes with theatrical im- 


agery. Typical of these is one of his 
works. 


“The Prodigal Son” 


U. K. to Issue Comet Stamps 


.4 pence France -Press* 

LONDON — Halley 


s comet 


will be featured on a set of British 
stamps early next year, in a series 
called “Maybe Twice in a Life- 
time” designed by the cartoonist 
Ralph Steadman, the Post Office 
has announced. Another special is- 
sue will commemorate Queen Eliz- 
abeth ITs 60th birthday. 


last 
(1949). 

Probably the best-known art 
movement in Germany in the 1920s 
was that of the Neue Saehlichkeit, 
“New Realism." This was very ade- 
quately displayed and documented 
in London in a major Arts Council 
exhibition in 1978-79. Wisely, 
therefore, the organizers of the pre- 
sent show have given the move- 
ment reasonable but not over- 
whelming representation. Chief 
among tbe realists in this show are 
Christian Schad (1884-1982) and 
Otto Dix (1891-1969). 

Encouraged by his affluent fam- 
ily, Schad began to paint while a 
schoolboy. Avoiding service in 
World War I by simulating a weak 
heart, he went to Switzerland, get- 
ting involved with the early Dada 
and Surrealist movements in Zu- 
rich and inventing “Schado- 
graphs,” pictures of objects made 
on light-sensitive paper. In 1 920 he 
moved to Italy and began to paint 
portraits, frequently erotic, in the 
realist manner. Then, curiously, he 
was commissioned in 1925 to paint 
a portrait of Pope Pius XI. 

In 1935. having moved back to 
Germany, he became a shopkeeper 
and virtually abandoned art He 
returned to painting in 1943, hav- 
ing been commissioned by the city 
of Aschaffenbuxg to copy, in the 
original size, the “Stuppach Ma- 
donna” of Matthias Gritoewald. 

The show offers an enlightening 
comparison between Schad and 
Dix in their portrayals of young 
women. Schatfs “Sonja” ( 1 92$) is a 
severely realist portrait: Dix’s 
“Portrait of the Dancer Tamara 
Danischewslri” (1923) is poetical 
and romantic, and contrasts greatly 
even with other Dix works such as 
the Grosz-like "Three Prostitutes 
on the Street” (1925). 

The best-known international 
movement represented is Surreal- 
ism. as exemplified in 13 paintings 
by Max Erast (1891-1976). Tbe 
centerpiece in aesthetic signifi- 
cance is “Es lebe die liebe or Pays 
Charmant" (1923), formerly in the 
Morton D. May collection of 20th- 
century German masters and more 
recently in the Washington Univer- 
sity Gallery of Art in St. Louis. It is 
one of a series of delicate paintings, 
almost ghostlike, that Ernst pro- 


duced in the year in which, travel- 
ing under the name of M. Gondo- 
lier. conferred on him by the 
Surrealist poet Robert Desnos. be 
journeyed to Saigon to stay with 
Paul and Gala Eluaid (who later 
became Gab Dali). 

This exhibition has the salutary 
effect of demonstrating the visual 
and aesthetic illiteracy of tbe living 

• ■ « v. J. Y _ L O- 


artists included: Joseph Beuys 
; Baselitz (1938), 


(bora 1921). Georg ! 

A.R. Penck (1939) and Sigmar 
Polke (1941). Their incompetence 
is nowhere better exemplified than 
in Polke 's “Untitled: Referring to 
Max Ernst” (1981), an ill-painted 
satire on a small, beautifully craft- 
ed papier colli — “El Ies papillons 
se meuem a chanter,” one of 150 
images created in 1929 for Ernst's 
Surreal collage -novel “La Femme 
100 Tetes.” 

“ German Art in the 20th Centu- 


ry," Royal Academy of Arts, Bur- 
House. Piccadilly. 


iington House. Piccadilly. London 
Wl, through Dec ■ 22; then at the 
Neue Staatsgalerie in Stuitgprt Feb. 
8-April 27. 


Max WykesJoyce writes regular- 
ly in the IHT on London art exhiN- 



ttons. 


“The Prodigal Son” (1949) by Max Beckmann is among 300 works in London show. 


Tapestry , a Tissue of Puzzles, Brings a High Price 


International Herati Tribune 


tapes! 

JTgain their long-lost favor in the 
auction market? Avidly sought af- 


ter at the turn of the century, they 
sank into oblivion between the two 


world wars, were unsalable in the 
1950s and have attracted attention 


SOUREN MELEKIAN 


only at wide intervals since then. A 
sale conducted Oct. 4 at Drouot by 
Pierre Coraette de Saint-Cyr shows 
that some early pieces can spark 
unexpected enthusiasm. 1 

Yet the auction was not particu- 
larly impressive as a whole. For sale 
were 25 tapestries from France and 
Flanders and five modem I ranian 
rugs totally out of context. 

Among the tapestries, several 
were what Drouot' s experts labeled 
fragments, cut from larger pieces. 
Professionals had a feeling that the 
items for sale came mostly from 
dealers. The centerpiece of the sale. 


NTERMTIOm EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


AUSTRIA 



WEBSTER UNIVERSITY 

NCA (USA) Accredited Degrees 
VIENNA 


BA DEGREES in Management, Computer Studies, 
and International Studies. 

MA DEGREE in International Relations. 

MA and MBA DEGREES in Business Administration 
Management. Marketing, Computer Data 
Management, and Economics. 

Next 8-week term begins October 28, 1985. 

Dr. Robert D. Brooks, Director, Marokkanerg 16. 
Phone: (0222) 75 7592/3/4, A-1030 Vienna, Austria. 


GREAT BRITAIN 



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Other Bachelor’s degrees are available in Laws, Arts (the principal 
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Diplomas are available in Contemporary French Studies, Edu- 
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As an External Student you will have the flexibility to prepare 
privately for examinations, at your own pace and without any 
requirement to attend either a full-time or a part-time course or 
study. Registration and examination are available to appropriately 
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Enquiries to: University Entrance Requirements Officer tEC), 
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reproduced on the cover of the cat- 
alog. obviously came from a com- 
mercial source: It was seen at auc- 
tion as recently as June 24 at 
Sotheby’s in Monte Carlo; where it 
was knocked down at 215.000 
francs (now about $26,870). Last 
week it went up to 750,000 francs. 

This tapes try, which measures 
340 by 440 centimeters (132 by 171 
inches), is not one that is easily 
forgotten. Villagers in late 15th- 
century costume are dancing in an 
unusual landscape: At rite center, 
an apple tree rises from an artificial 
mound. A musician blows into a 
long oboe-like instrument as two 


brothers, in their 30s, had spent 
their lives absorbing all that dealers 
and restorers can learn about the 
craft The restoration workshop 
was developed by their father to 
such an extent that it outweighed 
the dealing side of tbe firm. 

Since 1979, the twins have taken 
the restoration business one step 


prices of Old Master- 
some consequence, or o£imp<kt 2 gg|: 
17th- and 1 Sth-cenbuy fur ' 
thefigurc.certainly seems in 
The Chevalier brothers bopc? v 
revive the market Doimmque 
there were a handful of active ; 

lectors in the world he con&£ -. 
think of only'tliree in Fnuw& Atr ’ 



further, introducing modem analy- - the Droucft sale, the atmosphere 
sis of dyes and fibers. Both broth- was hardly one of feverish competL- 


ers serve as experts at Dfouol Last 
year they took an important part in 
an exhibition at the Music Jacque- 
tnart-Andrfe. 

But however knowledgeable they 
may be where the ground has been 
couples dance around him. Other, well covered by art historians — 

characters appear at the sides. Here -essentially from the second half of 

and there some sheep are grazing the 17th century on — the Cheva- branch, Chevalier” IncTThrirjiSt 
while two peahens and their chick- tiers cannot make up for the Jacu- sale was ‘.a $60,000 tapestry woven’ 

nae regarding the earlier periods. 


don; a very good late-17th-ccriiuqr^ . 
tapestry from the Manufaptfip 
Roy ale - d'Aubusson, illustrating 
“Alexander’s Clemency/*; was i. 
bought by the Musie (FAnbussMt ^ 
for 70:000 francs. 

InMarcfa, Dominique andPjdagi- 
Chevalier inaugurated aTJew Y^fe- 


ens are improbably pecking in the 
foreground. 

Most unusual are the three-line 
captions, in block letters on a white 
ground, which hover near the char- 
acters, anticipating modem comics. 
The composition, framed by a 
Manneristic border of garland! 

The tapestry is well known to 
specialists. It belongs to a set of 
right scenes based on a French ro- 
mance, “Les amours de Gombaui 
et Macee.” Maurice Fenaflle. the 
last an historian who discussed at 
length the many puzzles surround- 
ing these tapestries, concluded that 
the cartoons that served as a model 
for the tapesuy were painted by 
Laurent Guyot, who was appointed 
painter to the king in 1610. FenaiDe 
thought Guyot was interpreting en- 
gravings by Jehan le Gere. 

There certainly are some discrep- 
ancies. The captions, with their rus- 


After the sale, Dominique Che- 
valier said he thought tite tapestry, 
he bought bad been woven in about 
1545-50. Later he said “in the sec- 
ond half of tbe 16th century.” He 
rejected a later date because tapes- 
try color schemes np longer had 
some of this piece's colors in the 
17th century. Such early tapestries 
are rare. DommiqneChevaEer has 
handled three, others from the 
Gombaut et Macfe cycle that he 


tapesuy.' 
at Beauvais in about 1670 afterjC- 
cartoon by Jean Benin. "The To- ;- 
umph of Pan” now hangs in the 
Boston Museum of rFue- -Arts,', 
which has the best collection in the 
United States.. - 


Museums aside,- Dominique . 
Chevalier said, Americans tend to 
buy tapestries for decoration, not 
as ootiEctors’ items. But he said be 
was struck by an eagerness to leant 
among the Americans he had met. 

They are , 



considers to be of the sime poiod. 

Dr^ 

in Mon^Carlo^XS^^L W of major 


The faces are naJve, the French 
texts less archaic, suggesting a dare 
well into the I7th century. The vari- 
ant was knocked down at 240,000 
francs, making Sotheby's June 
1985 price low by comparison. The 
Drouot price last week seems, by 


tic humor, are in early 16th-century contrast, astronomical. Chevalier’s 
French and include some archaistic undisguised dcKght in his purchase, 
15th-century turns. “Go, Alison however, would indicate that it is. 
and Eleyne, I shall make you sweat not. When compared with the 
in your wool since I have you as ~ 


pieces. 

N Wright Doors Auctioned 
The Metropolitan- Museum of 
Art in New York sold two sets of 
. glass-paneled doors, designed, in 
1913 by Frank Lloyd Wright, to 
unidentified buyers for $24,975 
each, and a Wright window pand. 
for SI !,100, Sunday at Sotheby’s in - 
Monte Carlo, The Associated Press 
reported. 


Ending of 'Jagged Edge’ 
Gear Despite Smokescreen 


much as I tike,” says a dancing* 
peasant as he clutches the hands of 
two women. The costumes display 
late 15th-century characteristics, 
updated here and there in 16th- 
century fashion. Inventories drawn 
up in the 1 7th century mention 
such a set of tapestries but say APSULE reviews of films re- -commando unit led by 
nothing about their period. Differ- cernly released in the United John Matrix (Schwarzenegger), 
ent opinions have been voiced States: since retired. The mmderers areled : - 

Janet Maslin of The New York a Latin American dictator(Dim . 

Times on “Jagged Edge”: Hedaya) whom Matrix once ove^- 

. Glenn Gose is convincing if a tlwew.Annedwithmadiinegttii^E' , 
trifle schoolmistressy as a glamor- hpoting knife, a rocket launcher, 
ous lawyer who falls for her diem, 


* i 


about the dating of the Gombaut et 
Macee sets, and the workshops in 
which ihcy may hare been woven. 
“Aubusson in southern France or 
Flanders” is tbe noncommital sug- 
gestion of the Drouot expert; 
“Bruges.” Sotheby’s catalogs r 
wrote more assertively in June. 


MOVIE MARQUEE 


Dominique Chevalier who bought a newspaper publisher accused of 
tiie tapestry last wedc, also came murdering his wealthy wife. The 
down on the side of Bruges; the screenplay, by Joe Esarahas, does 
rusty red of the bonto. he aid, is what it can to throw up a smoke- 
typical of that Flemish city. screen, but tbe audience will proba- 
Cbevalier and his twin brother, bly be wdl ahead of - the story’s 
Pierre, are better placed than most resolution. As the publisher, Jefl 

to pass judgm — * ’ * - 

generation des 
[her founded the Maison 


his dbows and fists and the heel of 
his hand, and a ' lovdy stewardess 
(Rae Dawn Chong), - Arnold intro- 
duces them to their maker. 


. Sheila Benson of the LdS i _ 
T i m es cm Tbe Journey of 
GamT: 

Wdl intentioned and seductively’ 



dealing in and restoring tapestries, material's negligible "demands. Pe- Whafthev will Ieam is tSat- fto* 
duri^WoridWarl fhdrfather ^Coyote wears a steady sneer as atTti SSoSlSSSi HfcSS 
ran it for almost half a century Closes courtroom opponent, and erervhndv 
before retiring in 1979. By then, the Robert Loggia, who ^lome cS everybody - wetit 

her legwork for her,.uses the liveli- 
est langua ge around. Richard Mar- 
quand directed. 

□ 


AUCTION SALES 


Important Auction Sale 
Antique watches, wrist watches, 
clocks 

Sward*]’, 2#i fa of act. '83 al 2 jun. 
fa* tbe torero, casino Aachen 
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10 p.m. (tod a % Sunday} 

We offer a rare coHectioo of nnporumr 
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Illustrated Catalogue (English and Ger- 
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about _ 

“Places in ‘the Heart," set m .. _ 
same period, managed to radftft : 

good will, brotherhood add tcadBRv 
ness; such h umanis m is mi —trig 

a Post on -common** improbable. A Chica ‘ ‘ 

aizer, Sol Gann (Ray 


ton Post on “Commando 
Arnold Schwarzenegger is back, 
mak i ng Rambo took tike a refugee 
from the Folies Bergtres. After 
three brutal murders, the director, 
Mark Lester, cuts to Arnold frol- 
icking with his little girl (Alyssa 

Milano), and there you have it 

you know that, over the next 90 
minutes, the murderers trill Vrirfonp 
the giri, and Arnold will kill them 
and sare his daughter. The victims 
were former members of a crack 


. v — v ise),isJire&\- 
aoa has to leave precipitously- ih - - : 
order to. iake a- job in a lumber - 
camp in Washington stete.TfisT4T- 
year-old daughter, Natty 'fMef- ’ 
edith Salenger),sets off. to findhhA A. 
Because it is a Disney Clny a VoS*,' 
becomes Nail’s furry chaperod. \ 
Salenger Is strarghtforward and un- 
affected, with the promise of grbw^ . 
mg into an extraordinarily beauti- 
ful Wo man "i 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURD A Y-SUND A Y, OCTOBER 12-13, 1985 


Page 7 



ARTS /LEISURE 


'Gotterdammerung’ Completes West Berlin p Ring 9 


By Hebe Dorsey 

fntemartonal H&aM Tribune 

‘—Despite his sorrow 
iVA at the recent death of Ms . 
mend and partner. Sergio GaleottL 
Oioiyo Annam came tip with a 
four-star collection. 

a f d ^ coDco 

aoa had a lot of dignit y and re-c> 

milan Fashion - " 


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tablished Annani as an -outstand- 
mg tailor. He did the ambiguous 
androgynous look first, aid can 
still do it better, than anybody ■ 

Built along simple, pared-down 
lines — short skirt or Bermuda 
shorts, silk T-shirt and big, im con- 
structed blazer — these clothes 
were soft, subtle and sophisticated. 

One secret behlud thfc deceptively 
simple formula rested in the amaz- 
ing variety of fabrics — Armani 
used 200 different ones — and the 
expen hand with which the design- 
er assembled them Kirn so many 
different landscapes. 

Another secret was the lighting 
and fluidity of these dothes, which 
had nothing stiff or rmmniA about 
them despite their inspiration. The 
combination of sheer, feather- 
weight fabrics and pared-down 
construction made them light as 
soap bubbles. 

Armani’s minimalist approach 
resulted in i m lin ed blazers with de- 
tails cut down as much as possible. 

Many had neither collar nor lapels, 
the same no-fuss, no-frill idea pre- 
vailed throughout the coBectum, 
from the simple silk T-shirts to the 
flat shoes with dear plastic sides. 

There was no jewelry, winch 
added to the starkness of the collec- 
tion. especially when Armani 
showed black. The rare accessories, 
included stiff straw helmets and 
short white gloves. 

But Armani, who said he did not 
want to be known as a designer 
who dresses women as men, intro- 
duced a lot of feminine toadies. 

Among them were small, delicate 
printed dresses, softly draped on 
the side and topped by short, 
striped tinea jackets. The strong, 
footballers' shoulders also became 
fragile when covered with flimsy 
chiffon. 

Showing much more evening 
wear than usual, Annani produced 
a new glitter, less gaudy than se- 
quins; these tiny shimmering 
specks often picked up the desi gn 
of aprint Flaying with transparen- 
cy, he often veiled shiny skirts with 
two layers of chiffon. 

Although Aimam opened with* ~ i wn • 

soff^ink.blazer tucked into a pair yr ailkfj lT|: rf l TT 


petting out in the streets, Em- 
porio Armani, a chain of 80 stores 
that carry, the Armani look 
throughout* Italy .at moderate 
prices. Last weekend the one in 
.Milan was mobbed with young 

I talians g taiidi^ig fn Itneal tfra reefr - 

ier’s desk.' This empire, begun only 
three years ago, has struck a. ns 
spoaave cord in a young public. 
^Encouraged by dus success; Ar- 
majaikul he. planned to open Em- 
poriq atprcs^dl over Europe, start- 
jng^ vfith France" aid;; West 
Germany::; , i; \ . .. 

. Tb^Gamy collection, designed 
by GanraL^Vcmce, . stolid weS, 
with sii^py suits thin ^Stcd just 

in ontie chairman 
and- true comnwiciil^m|K^' this 
collection had someth^ for every- 
body — sarongs^. .Bemrodas, cu- 
lottes, jumpsuit8, jnmi2 and maxis 
■—I- aD touted byyshcert, pointed 
spencers or kaignSmijadats. . 

• AsymmetryW^^naine of the 
game, with ^de drapes, oblique 
cuts and imeym^fengths; Fabncs 

enilbosspd'f cottons . thai 
locked likp tablecloths, abstract 
pr ints arid-rijipe/de d am silts 
mixed whhcrispwBile piquE. The 
most effective '.qrtqr. combination 
was black, gray and white. 

The second -half of the show, 
with oce4iz*iits-ail- tunics over 
tight laggings, was more matronly; 
it dragged on and on, until h lost 
some of its impact - 

Mario Valentino, a leather man-' 
ufacturer whose collection is also 
by Versace, had unusual 
nwjlndmg one that looked 
like denim and one streaked with 
sold. The favorite shape was the 
-long jacket over a slim, short skirt, 
which has been this season’s win- 
ner. 

Here and there, other people 
were showing m out-of-the-way 
places. Francesco -Ghim, 29, is a 
rich man’s son who wanted to be in 
the theater but ended up a knitwear 
designer, and manufacturer.- He 
showed m a photographer’s studio 
20 minutes outside Milan; the col- 
lection, which featured slinky knit 
dresses -with matching long cardi- 
gans, attracted Joan Bnrstem, own- 
er of the Browns boutique in Lon- 
don. 



Armaofs fluid approach. 


By James Helme Sutcliffe 

B ERLIN —The foal link in the 
Deutsche Oper’s controversial 
new production of Wagner's 
“Ring” was forged Sunday with a 
jubilantly received "Gfitterdim- 
merung.” 

For any German opera bouse 
performing nightly repertoire 
through 10 and a half 'months of the 
year, the four-opera cycle is a stren- 
uous undertaking, one that is usu- 
ally spread over Tour seasons, as is 
the current ’’Ring” in Kassd 
West Berlin’s “Ring" cycle was 
completed within 12 months, “Das 
RhemgokT in September 1984 
aroused tremendous interest for the 
visual novelty of the concept be- 
hind it. In it, the destruction of the 
old order, conceived by Wagner as 
the finale to “Die G5uerd2mmer- 
ung,” had already taken place. The 
gods had taken shelter in a spectac- 
ular “lime tunnel" and were re- 
enacting the events that led to their 
downfall so as to learn from mis- 
takes and save themselves and fu- 
ture generations. 

To many observers, the time tun- 
nel, though visually i m p r e ssi ve (it 
looks a bit like the Washington 
Metro), seemed limiting in view of 


the fact that so many of Wagner's 
scenes are nature settings, 

“Die WaDrilre,” a year ago. al- 
most caused a riot. Though Act 2 
— divided into two scenes since 
Patrice Chfcreau set the fashion in 
1976 with his centennial “Ring" at 
Bayreuth — did not convince dra- 
matically, it was during the “Ride 
of the Valkyries” at the beginning 
of Act 3 that the performance was 
all but halted by boos and heckling. 

The protest was touched off by 
the sight of the warrior maidens 
done up in black leather uniforms. 
Studs and H ump ing and 

grinding to the rhythms of the 
“Ride" and displaying a necrophil- 
ic interest in the bloodied corpses 
of battlefield heroes. Julia Varady’s 
Sieglinde got rave reviews. 

“Siegfried.” in March, found ap- 
proval for its ingenious solutions to 
the problems Wagaer posed: 
Mime's paper cutout leaves, sun, 
moon and scars as “nursery** deco- 
rations for his adopted son Sieg- 
fried (in baggy overalls), the terrify- 
ingly huge bulldozer dragon Fafner 
with three grasping shovel aims, 
and Erda’s underground computer 
cen ter controlling the fate of Earth- 
lings. Rene Kollo and Horst Hies- 
termann as Siegfried and Mime 


The Gothic Drawings of Victor Hugo 


Record Number 
Of Publishers at 


Jones, and showed mudnuore 
color than he usually does, be basi- 
cally scored with a symphony in 
gray. It may sound boring, but il 
wasn’t — at least 20 different 
shades of gray, from dark gumnetal 
to the palest icy shade. Ibe textures 
were also varied, including an un- 
usual waffled silk that looked like 
coaL 

The real Annani miracle is hap- 

DOONESBURY 




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The Assoaoltd Press 

F rankfurt — Approxi, 

. matdy 6,500 pnbtishm from 
about 80 countries have exhibitions 
at the world’s biggest annual book 
Mr. ' 

Organizers said the record num- 
ber of poblishersreprcsentcd at the 
37th fair was 7 percent higher than 
in 1984. They said 78 percent of the 
exhibitors were from abroad. 
About 320,00 books are on dis- 
played. 

The emphasis erf the fair, the or- 
ganfaeri said; was to -reawaken 
public interest in reading bodes de- 
spite the advance of electronic me- 
dia, winch the organizers said had 
reduced readerships. 

During the six-day fair. Mayor 
Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem is 
scheduled to reedve the peace prize 
awarded by the West German 
Bode Traders Association. 


A £500,000 Gift From Getty 

Kat^n 

LONDON —The American cal 
heir J. Paul Getty Jr. has donated 



£500,000 (about $700,000) to help 
expand ti^ImperiaLWar Museum 
in London^ the mnseum said Fri- 
day. Ibe museum, which houses 
collections from the two world 
wars, has appealed f or £23 million 
to build new galleries. 


By Michael Gibson 

/ werruiteonal Herald Tribune 

E | ARIS — Among the many 
events commemorating the 
death of Victor Hugo are an exhibi- 
tion at' the Petit Palais devoted to 
Hugo’s murky, Gothic and playful 
drawings, and a show at the Grand 
palais ihat attempts to give an idea 
of the man's impact on French cul- 
ture and political style. 

: Hugo churned out a stupendous 
quantity of sonorous, rhetorical 
rhyme (asked who was the greatest 
French poet, Andr6 Gide replied: 
“Victor Hugo, alas!”), produced 
vast Gothic novels with preposter- 
ous plots and in time became 
France’s republican conscience in- 
carnate. His admiration for Napo- 
leon Bonaparte was equaled only 
by his scorn for Napotton III, 
whom he called “Napoltan le pe- 
tit” 

“Victor Hugo was a madman 
who imagined he was Victor 
Hugo," was Jean Cocteau’s far- 
reaching summation. 

Ibe show at the Grand Palais 
ventures to show, in more than 900 
items (.with a catalog of dose to 900 
pages), how Hugo's figure and fan- 
tasies swept through the imagina- 
tion of the day. Busts of him at all 
ages, memorabilia, posters, paint- 
ings (most of them dreadful, or 
dreadfully funny), the instruments 
of his official canonization as liter- 
ary and political hero — all this 
stands assembled in what amounts 
to an impressive and on the whole 
amusing collection of sociological 
material. 

. “ Soldi (TEna-e, " drawings by 
Victor Hugo, Petit Palais, through 
Jan. 5; La Gloire de Victor Hugo. 
Grand Patous, through Jan 6. 

□ 

The American John De Andrea, 
the ultimate, Pygmalion, has been 
producing “hyperrealist" sculp- 
tures of nudes (mostly women) for 
-many years. His current Paris show 
is entirely composed of disconcert- 
ingly naturalistic, life-size female 
nudes. Their skin is painted with an 
absolute attention to nuance and 
detail 

• John De A ndrea, Galerie Isy Bra- 
chou 35 rue Gwknegqud, through 
Oct 31. 

a 

Alain Kirili, a French sculptor 
who lives in New York, has been 
evolving for years away from a 
minimalist premise toward a more 
complex form. He is acutely aware 
of art history and willingly refers to 
Rodin, Picasso and David Smith in 
discussing Ms work. In his current 
show there is a large bronze cast of 
what was originally a clay sculp- 
ture, an upright block more than 



Drawing by Hugo (detail). 

seven feet (two meters) high, bela- 
bored with hand and hammer 
blows and reminiscent, in a pecu- 
liar, abstract way, of Rodin’s “Bal- 
zac” (Kirili had a show at the Mu- 
see Rodin in Paris during the 
summer). But the show* is mainly 
composed of- assemblage works of 


plaster, terra-cotta, hammered 
iron, bronze and wood. “Assem- 
blage,*’ says Kirili, “conveys a de- 
light in the material and constitutes 
a son of symphony in which the 
muied sound of plaster blends, for 
instance, with the high-pitched 
tone of iron and the deeper voice of 
bronze.” The reference here is to 
some of Picasso's sculptures. Kirili 
is clearly interested in traditional 
symbolism and there are discreet 
allusions to this in his work. 

Helfcne Del prat, 28, is giving her 
first one-woman show in Paris, os- 
tensibly devoted to subjects in- 
spired by rock paintings of an 
imaginary Africa. It shows a good 
command of texture and color — 
here mostly (and effectively) mut- 
ed. 

Alain Kirili. Helene Detprat. Ga- 
lerie Adrien Maeght, 43 rue du Bac, 
through Oct 31. 

□ 

The Egyptian Adam Henein's 
nonrepresentational paintings on 
papyrus are a continuation of Eu- 
ropean abstraction of the 1950s 
and '60s but with an entirely per- 
sonal texture and a subtle color 
range that are full of serenity and 
warmth. The current exhibition is 
devoted to his recent work. 

Adam Henan, Galerie Fans. SO 
rue de TUnnersiti, through Nov. 9. 


London Film Festival Plans 
To Screen 20 British Works 


The Associated Press 

L ONDON — Twenty British 
/ films will be screened at the 
29th annual London Film Festival, 
which opens Nov. 14. 

The list indudes “Plenty,” by 
Fred Schepisi, based on the play by 
David Hare; “Shadey,” starring 
Antony Sher as a transsexual; “De- 
fense of the Realm,” a political 
thriller produced by David Putt- 
nam, who made “The Killing 
Fields” and “Chariots of Fire"; 
and Turtle Diary,” based on a 
novel by Russell Hoban, with 
screenplay by Harold Pinter. 

The festival, which falls midway 
through British Film Year, will fea- 
tures more than 150 films in eight 
cinemas, through Dec. 1. 

Robert Zemeckis's “Back to the 
Future," produced by Steven Spiel- 
berg, ana Lawrence Kasdan’s “ Sil- 
verado " are among the American 
films scheduled. 

“This year we are determined 
. . . to remove once and for all the 
quite unfair tag of being just a 
ghetto for art movies,” said the 
festival's program director, Derek 


Malcolm, film critic for The 
Guardian newspaper. 

Other films to be shown are Mi- 
chael Cimxno’s "Year of the Drag- 
on," Hector Babenco's “Kiss of the 
Spider Woman” and, the opening 
night attraction, Akira Kurosawa’s 
“Ran," which was a hit at the re- 
cent New York Him Festival 

The festival will dose with “A 
Zed and Two Noughts,” by the 
British director Peter Greenaway, 
who made The Draughtsman's 
Contract.” 

European films to be shown in- 
dude lstvan Szabo’s “Colonel 
Redl," Agnfes Varda’s “Vaga- 
bonde" and this year's Cannes 
prize-winner, “When Father Was 
Away On Business” by Emir Kus- 
rarica of Yugoslavia. 

The festival also provides an um- 
brella for several smaller festivals: 
a series on East Asian cinema and 
American independent films, and a 
jazz and blues films festival , which 
will offer “Ornette: Made In Amer- 
ica,” about Ornette Coleman and a 
film on the bandleader Artie Shaw. 


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bowled everyone over with their 
extraordinary acting and singing. 

“GOuerdammerung." by the 
same production team — Gob 
F riedrich as director. Peter Sykora 
as designer and Jesus Lopez -Co- 
bos, musical director of the Deut- 
sche Oper, presiding in the orches- 
tra pit — managed to top this 
“Ring” with a performance that 
went from strength to strength, fi- 
nally convincing the often skeptical 
Berlin audience so much that it 
cheered down the few obstinate 
booers for 10 minutes after the fi- 
nal curtain. 

Some diehard Wagnerians. who 
insist that these music dramas 
should not be performed without 
the heavier, old-style “heroic” 
voices preferred until the 1960s. 
were unhappy; but they were in the 
minority. The cast was internation- 
al and perfectly consistent, though 
tilled toward a more lyrical lighter 
kind of vocal production — one 
dial the composer preferred. 

Catarina Ligendza's bright- 
voiced, passionately portrayed, 
vulnerable BrilanhUde and the 
dark booming menace of Maiti Sal- 
minen’s bass os the evil, wire-pull- 
ing Hagen, earned off most of the 
kudos for the Scandinavian wing, 
closely followed by the Germans: 
Kollo (an underpowered Siegfried). 
Gottfried Homick (Alberich) and 
the magnetic Brigitte Fassbaender 
(Wakrame). The Americans Lenus 
Carlson and Cheryl Studer ( the dis- 
covery of last summer's Tann- 
hSuser” in Bayreuth) added sub- 
stance to that shadowy pair of 
Gibichungs, Gunther and Gutnrne. 

Lopez-Cobos's conducting had 
sweep, transparent delicacy and 
power, and was all of a piece 
throughout the six-hour evening, 
though he occasionally forgot that 
the “Gditerdamxnerung” score 
contains some of the thickest in- 
strumentation in the “Ring" and 
gave the orchestra its head, swamp- 
ing the singers. 


But it was the staging that had 
the audience humming with antici- 
pation, and not disappointed. 
From the opening scene of the 
blind Noms groping for their red 
rope of fate, through what Sykora 
coiled “the fifth-century nouveau- 
riche style” of the Gibichungs" hall 
with its inlaid, magnifying glass- 
panel wall partitions, pale puppet 
makeup and modish modem cos- 
tumes (elements that made me un- 
easy). to the spectacular lighting 
effects and atomic explosion of 
BrQnnhilde's immolation scene and 
ultimate reiurn to the expectant 
whiie-vdled figures that opened 
“Das Rhringold" a year ago. Frie- 
drich's electrifying direction made 
every movement seem inevitable. 


Particularly brilliant was his idea 
of having Hagen maintain his 
watch through the scenes that fol- 
lowed. events that his mastermind- 
ing intrigues had set in motion. 

Not since he took over the reins 
of the Deutsche Oper four seasons 
ago has Friedrich's work had such a 
unanimously positive reaction 
from the audience. 

West Berlin's “Ring" will be per- 
formed in two complete cycles, 
with the original casts, until Nov. 3. 
Requests for tickets have come in 
from all over Europe and the Unit- 
ed States, but all eight perfor- 
mances were sold out months ago. 

James Helme Sutcliffe is a Berlin- 
based critic. 


COLLECTOR’S GUIDE 



William 

Shakespeare 


1564- 1616 
.4 unique, true historic reproduction of his 

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 

Remarkably, despite the manv millions of words that William 
Shakespeare wrote, little evidence of the great Bard's handwriting 
still exists. The notable exception is his Will - the most personal and 
the richest in biographical detail of the surviving Shakespeare docu- 
ments - which clearly shows his own handwriting. 

This is now available, based on special permission to reproduce the 
original, securely protected in the Public Records Museum, London. 
You can obtain inis fascinating document as a collector's item or as a 
gift, tastefully presented as in its original folder, with a complete 
transcription" by sending your cheque (525, £17.50, SFr 55. DM 65, 
FFr 225. or equivalent, for each reproduction), indicating exact 
forwarding address, to: 


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INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 


galerie tamenaga 

18 av. Marignon - 75008 PARIS - 266.61.94 

WEISBUCH 

Octobre 

.Du lundi au samedi de 10 h a 19 h.Le dimanche de 13 h a 18 h. 


DENISE RENl 


196 Blvd. St.-Germain, 75007 PARI5 - Tel.: 22277.57 

Robert JACOBSEN 

1950-1985 

SCULPTURES 

- Vernissage Wed nes day October 16 at 7 p.m. ■ 


GALERIE ANDRE PACITTI 


174, ruedu Faubourg-Saint-Honore, 75008 PARIS - 563.75.30 

K A T O 

recenr works 

until October 31, 1985. 


Editions dumusEe rodin ■ 


RODIN’S CORRESPONDENCE 

Tome 1. 1860 • 1899 paper bound 155*240 mm, 56 ilustrchane, 252 pages PA. 150.- 
on sale at Mus6e RODIN, 77, rue de Vareme 75007 Paris Tel: 705 01 34 


GALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


, 6, Rue JeatvMermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 359.82.44 , 


GALERIE COARD 


12, rue Jacques Cailat Paris 6* - 326.99.73 

BOLIN 

Recent paintings - pastels 


From October 8 to November 9 ■. 


PARIS 


FIAC85 



October 5- 13 


Open daily . 12-8 p.m. 
Saturday, Sunday. 10 a.m--8 pm. 
Thm%da\. J0a.rn.-l l p.m 


HOLLAND 



(the netherlahds) 

37 th art and 
antiques fair 

'fe; • C 


WALLY FINDLAY =1 

Galleries International 

new yorfc ■ -Chicago - palm beach 
beverly hills - pans 


EXHIBITION 


“Light of France" 

Permanent exhibition of 
AUG8, BOUDET, BOURRIE, CANU, 

CA5S1GNHJL, CHAU RAY, FaBIEN, 

Gail, Gantner, gaveau, 
GORUfTI, HAm&OURG, KLUGE, 
LE PHO, MICHB.-HENRY, NES5I, 
VALTAT, NEUQUELMAN, SEBIRE 
SIM&AH. VK5NOLES. 


2 Ave. Matignon - Paris 8th 

7U.: ram?*, mondev rim. Htvnlar 
IBu. Id T pji.--3LiSOh.7pjn. 


H$tel George V- 723.54.00 

31 Ave. George-V - Paris 8th 

■MM. <W •ilUOuL.1 pA-UOtoOp^n. 
Soodoj 7 pjn. - 9 pjn. 


OLD MASTER PAINTINGS 

Flemish and Dutch 16th and 17th 

GALERIE CROUZET 

3, A!14e Kiesener {ground Floor) 

LE LOUVRE 
DES ANTI QU AIRES 
2, Place du Palais Royal 
75001 PARIS. Tel. (!) 297 28 37 




ET LES MONTPARNOS 

at MUSBE BOURDELLE 

16, rue Antoine Bourdelle 
M 5 Montparnasse 

Daily except Monday 
tram )0 am. to 5 A0 p.m. 

- SEPTEMBER 26 ■ NOVEMBER 3 - 




museum 
: nrinsenhoJ 


10-27 October 1985 

1 1 .00 a.m. (sunday 
I.OOp.m.Jto 5.00 p.m. 

and also tue.-and 
thu.- evenings from 
7.00 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


PARIS/ NEW YORK 


ZABRISKIE 

SCOTT RICHTER 

724 Fifth Ave, New York 

LES SOUSSANS 

37 rue Quincampoix, Pari* 


"ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES” 
"AUCTION SALES" 

appear on Saturday 










;■ -x -. > 

. V. 






W%$k 


: : 




For nearly a hundred years, the Statue of Liberty has 
stood on the edge of the New World, America’s most pow 
erful symbol of freedom and hope. Today the ravages of 
almost a century of weather and pollution have left their 
marks. Corrosion has eaten away at the iron framework. 
New holes continue to appear in the copper sheets that 
form the exterior. 

Less than a mile away, on Ellis Island where the ances- 
tors of nearly half of all Americans first stepped onto 
American soil, the Great Hall of the Immigration Center 
is a hollow ruin. Rooms are vandalized, passageways over- 
grown with vegetation, walls crumbling in decay. 

Inspiring plans have been developed to restore the 
Statue and t.o create at Ellis Island a living monument to 
the ethnic diversity of this country of immigrants. But 
unless restoration is begun now, ceremonies marking the 
hundredth anniversaries of these two landmarks in 
Americas heritage could be held in commemoration of 


national treasures that no longer exist. Sections of the 
statue have already been declared unsafe and closed to 
visitors. The 230 million dollars needed to carry out the 
work is needed now. 

All of the money must come from private donations; 
the federal government is not raising the funds. This is 
consistent with the origins of the Statue. The French 


people themselves paid for its creation. And thousands 
of American school children contributed to its construe- 
tion and to the pedestal. - 

The Statue of Liberty-EIlis Island Centennial Commis- 
sion appointed by President Reagan is asking e very . 

American business, every American citizen to join in rais- 
ing these funds. The torch of liberty is everyone’s to cherish. 

Could we hold up our heads as Americans if we allowed . 

the time to come when she can no longer hold up hers ? 

One hundred years ago school children gave their pennies 
to put her up. Your dollars can keep her from falling down. 

Send your tax deductible donations to THE LAD\; Box 1986. N.YC. 10018. Or call 1-800-USA-LADY toll free. ©1984 The Statue ef Liberty-EIlis Island Foundation 








Statistics Index 


J^®**** P-10 GeM AwnMx P« 

NY5EhWti/l«fl P.M Inlemf nms ' P. 9 

9 ”°* °" P«W MvMiwmMrv'p.10 

Cvrflnev rotH P, } Options pu 

CbmmoaHie* p iU OTC g** - 

OivMands P.M omsr mortal. 


ItelbSSribunc. 


p .15 

p.i* 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


y SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12-i& -1:985 


** 


Page 9 


economic scene 


Key Idea at Seoul: Nations 




Protectionism 
isaddingto 
thedeveloping 
world's fears. 


nomies 

By LEONARD SILK 

Sent York Tima Service 

— The key idea that came out of the Inti^natinTmi 
_ Monetary Fuad-World Bank meeting here is that nations 
free up their eccnemiesformoreefficient tee of 
resources ami that austerity alone, important as it may be 
for. countries with badgetaryinddebt problems, cannot solve the 
worlas overall debt problem. What is needed is an environment 
of weraU growth, especially in the industrial nations. 
n..rtr thflt there must be some accommodation by the 

IMF to stress long-term growth policies in addition to the more 
short- term austerity measures that it is accustomed to imposing 
as conditions for its loans. 

Virtually everyone at the meeting has acknowledged — and 
welcomed — the greater will- — 
ingness by the United States i 
to recognize that the problems 
of the poor countries are con- 
nected to its own. Further, . 

.- Treasury Secretary James A. 

Baker 3d drove home the 
point that the United States 
means to play a more active 
role in solving the debt prob- 
lem within the context of world economic growth. 

But aside from a special lending pool for sub-Saharan African 
(^countries and a U.S. proposal for a $29-b£tBon increase in 
commercial bank and multilateral institution lending to debtor 
countries over the next three years, what the conference really 
had to offer was new ideas, to solve the world’s debt problems. 

I N A SPEECH to the IMF-World Bank meeting, Jacques de 
Larosifere, the fund's managing director, mdirated he was 
amenable to the idea of looking more closely at long-term 
growth. 

Prime Minister Edward Seaga of Jamaica also drove home Ibis 
point in Seoul. “A balance must be struck so that what we gain in 
improved Financial health is not lost in reduced growth,” he said. 

Mr. Seaga added that his country had done everything that 
supply-siders or free-enterprisers could desire: It had devalued its 
currency to make its exports more competitive; it had diverted 
government programs to the private sector, even mchulwig gar- 
bage collection and hospitals; it had got rid of burdensome 
regulations, rebuilt tourism, increased agricultural output and 
exports, and reached record levels of investment 
Yet AD this had not solved the nation’s debt problems, Mr. 
Seaga admitted. For Jamaica had added $270 million in new 
foreign earnings, but had lost more than $500 million in the 
mining sector, as world commodity prices dropped and markets 
for Jamaica’s exports, especially bauxite and aluminum, felL "We 
must earn our way out of this,” Mr. Seaga said, "but we cannot do 
it unless world markets strengthen.” 

Mr. Seaga’s is the common problem of die developing world, 
w And throughout that world the threat of protectionism is adding 
“ to anxieties about its future. 

More new ideas are needed. Pakistan's finance minister, Mah- 
bubtd Haq, said that an intellectual breakthrough had been 
achieved a few years ago when research backed by the World 
Bank at Sussex University, in southeast England, had shown that 
redistribution of income could be combined with economic 
growth — by increasing the productivity of the poor, particularly 
the small farmer, and through the expansion of the public services 
of education and health. 

Now, Mr. Haq said, "We need similar, thou^ifi&if vroric on-’ 
adjustment through growth, so that from a slogan we can proceed 
to an operational policy.” It was legitimate, he said, to ask the 
question, “Must we starve our children to pay our debts?” But, he 
added, there was another legitimate question: “Must we starve 
our children to pay our defense acpendituresT* From a man 
whose country has been increasing its military spending rapidly, 
this was a daring question to pose the Seoul gathering. 

Mr. Haq noted that from i972 to 1982 the health andeduca- 

(Cootiimed on Pagel5, CoL 4) 



Crass Bates 


Oct tJ 



■ 

c 

DM. 

P-F. ' 

ILL. 

a*. 

ILF. 

IF. 

Yw 

Amsterdam 

25985 

4229 

11273 • 

3094* 

0.1448 • 

— ■ 

5554 • 

13772* 

139.13 V 

BrwsMWa) 

scans 

7X90 

tuts 

44SS 

3*1** 

1884 


2473 

25X725 * 

Fneikfiirt 

2*995 

3JS1 

— — 

3279* 

MSx. 

8871- 

4725* 

12170* 

17335* 

London ni) 

Mitt 

— 

37511 

11*450 

Z5ZUOO 

47278 

76.10 

3X741 

38145 

Milan 

179SJD 

25Z7J0 

<7450 

221.14 

— 

57875 

33J1S 

B2US. 

8745 

HvwYarfctci 

__ 

0 JOIa 

2*579 

Ml 

.179408 

278* 

. 51X0 

11785 

214X5 

Parts 

8-101 

1U3 

30508 

— 

.4522 > 

27854 

. 15X5* 

3714S 

57715* 

Tokyo 

21 5. V0 

30443 

HI 71 

2t*t 

12X0* 

22X1 

4B0.W* 

9873 


Zurich 

21833 

10791 

sin* 

3*935* 

0.1218* 

77705- 

4*47** 

. ■ 

1X172* 

TECH 

firm ■ 

L5W7 

27119 

SJ4*5 

M92.14 

24929 

449057 

1717 

T78J45 

1 SDR 

UK24V 

079247 

2JSS49 

840723 

1X0778 

1185* 

574143 

27215 

HA. 


Closing* In London ami Zurich. fixings In ottwr European cent**. New York rata at 4 PM. 
fa/ Commercial franc (b) Amounts needed to buy ana pound tc) Amounts needed to buy one 
donor !•} Units of JOO M Units of WOO fy ) Units of 1QM0 KA: natmtatbd.-HA. : not available. 
(*) To bar aae pound: SU714105 

OtherSollarValaM 

Currency per UJJ convey per IMS Qwejr Per USS Convey per UU 

Anwn. austral ana Ro. noua sms Malay, rm*. USB - inr.Hi enjo 

Adames 142H2 Greek droc. 13275 Mhlpmo 398X0 EPV-vMte 18170 

i.Aastr.scML 1BA1 Hong Kong* 77875 Korw. krone **W SwMLkrmM 7.995 

BeM.na.tr. 54.20 todhurwo* 12XT19 FULncso 7740 . -Taiwan i «.« 
BrazHcna. 00)000 lncto.nH.tati 1.121.00 Port escudo MU0 Thai baht 3L5U 

Canadian S 13688 Irish « 0XS76 SOHUrfyal 1*5 Tarktsti Bra 54190 

Chinese yuan 1046 hearts**. 1471S) «M-i 2.U UAEdhUam X6725 

Danish krone 94325 KnwnMI dinar 07M9 S>.A!r.rw>d 16144 VamboDv. 1150 

Egypt poond 133 
I SterHna: 17123 IrWi t 

Sources: Bonaue du Benetox (Brussels): Banco Commerdole Ikdlcrta (fMkm); Btmaue Mo- 
donate de Paris (Paris): Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo): IMF (SDR): BAH (dinar, rtyat, dirham). 
Other data from Reuters and AP. 



Ehtoci 

n-reMi 

ey KtofM 

dtt 



Oct. 11 




Swiss 


Fr— eh 




Dollar 

D-Mark 

- Franc 

Sterling 

Franc 

ECU 

SDR 

1 month 

8-8W 

4V*4Hl 

4-4W ; 

. it v-ii y. 

9«tm . 

' IMk 

7*0 

2 month* 

8 *w*+> 

4VS-4 Hi 

4 K-4 *L 

now-nos 

lOth-lOW 

IMtk 

7 W. 

3 month* 

StihBUi 

Kl |Y 
m ■■ * pe 

4Kr4Mi 

. iu*-not 

. 10K-10W 

S Mr! H. 

70S 

4 months 

BU>M 

44-At 

4*W4h - 

jiVHWh 

WW-Wtt 

lovew 

m 

1 year: — 

BW-Stt 


4IW4.W 

11 Mr-11 «• 

.IIMrllK 

• KW 

M 


Sources: Morgan Guaranty (donor. DM. SF. pound. FFt: Uayds Bank (ECU): Reuters 
(SDR), Rata appilcotttc to Mmrbonk deposits of SI million minimum (erroutetieof). 


.Key Money Bales On. 11 


CM* Pm. 
7vs n 
715/14 • 816 
938 930 

H6 SM 
735 • 735 1 
7.17 731 

73* 737 

.7^ 735 

730 7 JD 


Unltrfl Stales 

Dlsonait Rate - 

Federal Fuads 
Prime Rah 
Brokfc-Lttnftrit 
Con Paper M-W dan 
unontn Traasorr Wfls 
unootti Treasury SHIS 
CDUWJdaw 
CD’s 4M9 days 

WmoCottboiw 
LanuardROK 
ovandaMRan 
0 m MooA httertonk 

Vmwrti mtarboDk 
4-atonHi Interbank 

Prance 

Intervention Rol* «* 9N 

CaH Meaty 97/14 9to 

Oot-montti interbank 9W W 

Inanhi httrnenk 946 97/1* 

*-me«b internet* 95/16 946. 

Britain 

Bonk 8o« Rah life lift 

CrtMener 1IU 1IM 

ri-«lnyTrsasary»ffl II VM- 111/14 

OmonBi latftMm* 11 »/» 113/39 


530 538 

460 4*5 

US 475 
4J5 435 

4J0 430 


DhesartBale 
Call Money 
amav M en em: 


S 5 
njc eWto 
— <** 


Sources: Reuters. Co mm erz b ank. 0*01 
Lyomois, Bonk* Tokyo. 


Arian Ptflir P epori U 

Oct. 11 

1 nmntti - B-846 

2 rnomtls 4H.-8fk 

3nMmms aVb-BW ■ 

4 omnttis 816-046 

iwar- W-«4 

Source: Reuters. . 


UJS.MdMyMwbetfhndi 

Oct n 

MarrtH Lynch Knotty Aneta . 
30davarnraMVMd: 7A3 

Trttrote uatarast Rate niatx: 738 * 

source: Merrill Lyncte Te/erute. . 



Ham Kona 


32535 

y u. pl • ' + 038 

Park(iUkno) 326J9 . mj* .+057 
-Enrich - - • ■ 336-n 32SJ5 - . unen 

Umdon - 32180 325*0 +0,10 

Naw.York . • . 32730 .+130 

. Xiommbouiu Paris and London attldol .flx- 
:bv*f tfeng Konp ond Ourtdh opening and 
easing prices: Mew WJr Cemex current 
contract Alt prices Ut US. Soer ounce. 

, Source: Reuters. 


nler 
Seeks to 
Expand 

Auto Firm Set 
For AEG Stake 


Ruvim 

FRANKFURT — Daimler- 
Benz AG, the West German auto- 
maker, was Friday poised to buy 
more than 25 percent of the electri- 
cal group, AEG AG. 

A spokesman for the West Ger- 
man Cartel Office said Daimler 
had applied to take a stake of more 
than 25 percent in AEG and would 
probably acquire it in several 
stages. He could not say from 
whom Daimler would buy the 
stake. 

The move comes as West Germa- 
ny's third largest electrical group is 
recovering from near collapse in 

1982. 

It also follows Daimler’s rapid 
expansion this year with major par- 
chases of aerospace and tmlitary 
contractors. 

The Stuttgart-based automaker 
announced in February that it was 
buying the half of the Munich- 
-based aero-engine producer and 
military contractor, Motoren-und 
Turbtnen-Union GmbH that it did 
not already own. 

Just four months later it won a 
battle to take control of the fami- 
ly-owned aero and space-technol- 
ogy concern, Domier GmbH. 

Trading in AEG shares was sus- 
pended Friday pending a news con- 
ference on Monday. Before the sus- 
pension, they were trading at 181 
DM ($69.62) on the Frankfurt 
Stock Exchange. 

Daimler shares, which have 
moved relentlessly higher this year, 
jumped 63 DM to dose at a record 
high of 1,042 DM. 

Frankfurt-based AEG is still on 
the road to recovery after it repaid 
creditors in September of last year 
an agreed-upon amount of 40 per- 
cent of 4.6 billion DM of debts. 
World group net profit soared 975 
percent to 397.8 million DM last 
year from only 37 mfifion DM in 

1983. 

A consortium of .24 West Ger- 
man hanks holds some 50 percent 
of ABC’s capital totaling 620 mil- 
lioitt DM. But it is barred from 
sdfihg big shareholdings until the 
end' erf this year under the terms of 
AEGY 1982 rescue program. 

. Banking sources said Friday that 
this meant the Daimler acquisition 
was unHkdy. to be possible before 
the beginning of next year. 

AEG almost went under in the 
economic recession three years ago 
and nearly palled out of the home- 
appliance market in which it had 
made its name. 


Pan Am Pact 
With United 
Gains in U.S. 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Transporta- 
tion Secretary Elizabeth Hanford 
Dole on tentatively approved on 
Friday the purchase of Pan Ameri- 
can World Airways’ Pacific Divi- 
sion by United Airiihes. 

The Justice Department opposed 
the acquisition lak month, saying it 
could "substantially reduce” com- 
petition on routes between the 
United States and Japan. 

United is already the largest U.S. 
airline, and other companies had 
also protested the proposed move. 
It was not immediately clear 
whether the Justice Department, 
whose opposition had been pre- 
sented in the form of “advice” to 
the Transportation Department, 
would try to block the acquisition. 

The purchase by United of Pan 
Am’s operations in the Pacific for 
$750 million must still get final 
approval by the Transportation 
Department, and could be over- 
turned by President Ronald Rea- 
gan. • 

United also must stfll receive 
landing rights from Asian coun- 
tries, including Japan, which may 

demand some concessions for its 
own state airline from the United 
Stales in return, according to in- 
dustry sources. United officials 
have said they woe confident that 
they would be able to get the land- 
ing rights. . 

The two airlines announced the 
agreement last April It called for 
United to pay $750 million in cash 
for 1 8 Pan Am jumbo jets and other 
facilities in the Pacific and to ab- 
sorb about 2,700 Pan Am employ- 
ees, mdoding 410 pilots. 

Mrs. Dole, in approving the 
transaction, disputed contentions 
by a number of airlines, including 
Northwest Orient, American and 
Eastern, that it would harm compe- 
tition across the lucrative market 
lin king the United States and Asia. 

. United's acquisition of Pan Am’s 
routes across the Pacific “mil not 
result in substantial lessening of . 
competition as it currently exists.” 
ihesaid. 

Tier tentative approval did not 
require specific divestiture of any 
routes" by United to another carrier 
as bad been" suggested by the Jus- 
tice Department. 

(AP, Reuters) 



\ 


Nat Income 

Umteueft annual neimcomatfl 
minions Ol Collar* 

S800- 1 ■ 


400 H 


-80 B1 ‘82 '83 84 


The New York Tmet 


Unsuccessful Richardson- Vicks Bid 
Reflects New Game Plan at Unilever 


By Steve Lohr 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — When Unilever lost the costly 
bidding war last week for Richardson- Vicks lnc^ 
the effort by the British-Duich consumer-products 
giant fit two patterns — an old one and a new one. 

The old one was that Unilever was beaten by its 
traditional nemesis, Procter & Gamble Co. The 
Cincinnati-based company's 5124-billion offer 
was approved by the Richardson- Vicks board, 
ending Unilever’s hopes of buying the Connecticut 
producer of beauty and health-care goods. 

Over the years, Procter & Gamble has consis- 
tently outshone Lever Brothers, one of Unilever’s 
big U.S. subsidiaries, in the scramble for the hefty 
markets afforded by such consumer staples as 
laundry detergent and toothpaste. 

Yet the four-week acquisition attempt by Unil- 
ever, though ultimately unsuccessful, pointed to 
the new game plan and management style there. 

Faced with stagnant markets and crimped prof- 
its in Europe, Unilever is committed to increasing 


its stake in the United States. Acquisitions are pan 
of the effort, but so are new-product introductions, 
including an expensive new effort by Lever Broth- 
ers to grab some of the detergent market, now held 
by perhaps the leading brand in the Procter & 
Gamble stable, Tide. 

Change at Unilever does not come easily or 
quickly. Sheer size is one constraint. Within the 
corporate fold there are 500 operating companies 
employing 320,000 workers in 75 countries. Unil- 
ever posted sales last year of 523 billion as pretax 
profits rose 20 percent, to the equivalent of SI. 3 
billion, at the current exchange rale of the British 
pound. 

Managing Unilever, which calls itself the 
world’s largest producer of consumer packaged 
goods, is often compared to steering a supertanker, 
meaning that shifting course s few degrees can be 
an arduous, time-consuming task. 

Moreover, the corporate traditions and ethos 
have tended to nurture conservatism. It has been 
(Continued on Page 12, CoL 5) 


IBM Profit Fell 7% in Quarter 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — International 
Business Machines Corp. said Fri- 
day that third-quarter profit fell 7 
percent from a year earuer, its third 
consecutive quarterly decline in 
.earnings. Some Wafi Street ana- 
lysts said, however, that a 9.8-per- 
cent increase in IBM’s revenues in- 
dicated underlying strength. 

John F. Akers, president and 
chief executive, said IBM's overall 
business health was sound but that 
the company remained concerned 
about “softness in the North Amer- 
ican economy” and about a slow- 
down in capital spending. 

IBM’s worldwide product ship- 
ments for the first nine months of 
1985 rose from a year earlier but 
“substantially all of the growth” 
continued to come from outside the 
United States, Mr. Akers said in a 
prepared statement. 

IBM said its net income fell to 
$1.47 billion, or $2.40 a share, from 
$1.58 billion, or $160 a share, a 
year earlier. It was IBM’s third con- 
secutive quarter of lower earnings 
relative to the year earlier. 

IBM’s revenues for the July-Sep- 
tember quarter were $11.7 billion, 
. up from $10.66 billion a year earli- 
er. 

In the first nine months of 1985, 
IBM’s profit fell 122 percent to 
S3.87bmion,or$6JI a share, from 
$4.41 billion, or $722 a share, a 



John F. Akers 

year earlier. Nine-month revenue 
rose 4.6 percent to $32.9 billion 
from $31.44 billion. 

Wall Street reacted favorably to 
the report, even though IBM’s 
earnings were at the low end of 
analysts' predictions, which had 
ranged from 52.40 a share to $2.60. 
After opening lower, IBM’s stock 
gained $1.00 a share to close at 
$125375 on the New York Stock 
Exchange. 

“There is something in it for the 
bears, there is something in it for 
the bulls, and I think the buds are 
going to win,” Peter Labe, a securi- 


Greece Devalues Drachma by 15% 


The Associated Press 

ATHENS — Greece devalued 
the drachma Friday by 15 percent 
against the U3. dollar as part of a 
package of economic austerity 
measures. 

The devaluation, which went 
into effect immediately, means that 
one dollar now buys 155.9 drach- 
mas instead of 13236 drachmas. 

In a nationwide television broad- 
cast explaining the measures, 
prime Minister Andreas Papan- 
dreou said: “We must curb our 
balance of payments deficit ... in 


order to preserve our national inde- 
pendence.” 

The devaluation, the second by 
the Socialist government in less 
ihan three years, came as no sur- 
prise. Greece’s deficit on its current 
account, which measures uade in 
goods and services as well as inter- 
est, dividends and certain transfers, 
soared to a record $21 billion in 
the first seven months of this year, 
matching the total deficit for 1984. 

Imports rose 63 -percent to S5.8 
billion over the same period while 


U.S. Government and Major Banks 
Consider International Superbank 

By Jane Seabeny 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan administration, the Federal Re- 
serve Board and major \JS. banks are conadering forming an 
international superbank to handle lending to cash-starved developing 
countries. 

The idea, part of a major initiative by U.S. officials to handle the 
Third Worid debt crisis, was seen as a way to help get money faster to 
Third Worid debtors and to make it easier for debtor countries and 
their Western lenders to negotiate new loan agreements. Treasury 
Secretary James A. Baker 3d said Thursday. 

The superbank is the brainchild of the chairman of the Federal 
Reserve, Paul A. Volcker, said Mr. Baker, who had just returned from 
the International Monetary Fund-World Bank meeting in Seoul this 
week. 

Such a bank would eliminate the current system in which private 
lending is controlled by syndicates of international banks, each of 
which must approve any new lending or renegotiation of debt. 

Officers from one or two of the major leaders would head the 
consortium, which would be subject to regulatory approval by bank- 
ing agencies. The major appeal of the superbank would be that it 
would-make management of the debt easier, Mr. Baker said. The 
problem has been that “you need so many banks to say ’yes’ before 
anyone In the syndicate will say go,” he added. 

Mr. Volcker has been frequently mentioned as a contender for the 
job of head of the World Bank when its president, A. W. Clausen, 
retires next year. However, an administration source said Thursday 
that it was unlikely that Mr. Volcker would get the job. 


exports plunged 7.9 percent to 52.6 
billion. 

In January 1983, the drachma 
was devalued by 153 percent. The 
Greek currency’s dollar value con- 
tinued to erode after the drachma 
was permitted to float in August 
1984. 

Mr. Papandreou said the devalu- 
ation would boost competitiveness 
of Greek exports in international 
markets. He pledged the country's 
old-fashioned economy would be 
restructured to produce the quality 
of goods that Greeks now pay high 
prices to import. 

Outlining the austerity package, 
the economy minister, Costas Simi- 
tis, said Greece's index-linked 
wages system, introduced in 1982, 
would be radically altered. 

Three-monthly wage increases 
will now be calculated on the basis 
of government inflation forecasts. 

Inflation in Greece is running at 
18.5 percent, more than three times 
the European Community average. 

Mr. S [mills said businessmen 
will have to pay a special one-time 
tax on profits this year, while im- 
ports will be strictly controlled and 
public spending reduced. 

Diplomatic sources said Greece 
had already sought a S4-billion 
loan from its EC partners to bridge 
the balance of payments problem. 

The sources, speaking on condi- 
tion they were not identified, said 
Greece also had requested tempo- 
rary import restrictions under Arti- 
cle 108 of the Treaty of Rome. 

That article permits temporary 
curbs on imports from other mem- 
bers of the 10-nation trading bloc 
in a balanoe-of-payments crisis, 
provided that tough corrective 
measures are applied. 

The austerity package was ex- 
pected io meet with the EC’s ap- 
proval. opening the way for grant- 
ing the loan, the sources said. 


U.S. Retail Sales 
Rose by 2.7% 
In September 


ties analyst for Drexel Burnham 
Lambert In cl, said of the report. 

IBM executives said in June that 
thev expected the company’s profit 
for' aH of 1985 to exceed 1984’s 
S10.77 per share. In its latest an- 
nouncement, IBM, which earned 
5631 a share through the firsmine 
months of this year, made no men- 
tion of whether it had revised its 
prediction. 

“I'm a little perplexed by that,” 
said Thomas Rooney of the invest- 
ment firm Donaldson Lufkin Jen- 
relle Securities Corp., who said he 
doubled that IBM could earn more 
than SI 030 a share this year. 

Mr. Labe said he expected IBM 
to make $10.80 to 510.90 a share 
this year, and another analyst. Jay 
Stevens of Dean Witter Reynolds 
Inc., forecast 510.70 a share. 

IBM said it anticipated strong 
fourth-quarter shipments of its new 
3090 series of mainframe comput- 
ers, known as the Sierra. IBM be- 
gan shipping the 3090 machines 
this summer, ahead of schedule, 
after noting that customers had put 
off decisions on purchases until 
they could compare the 3090 with 
IBM's older mainframes. 

In addition, analysis said they 
expected strong fourth-quarter re- 
sults from IBM’s new 3380 double- 
density disk drive and 3480 tape 
drive, both of which score data for 
mainframe computers. 


Compiled h Our Sicff Fnm Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — The stron- 
gest single month for auio sales in 
four years boosted U.S. retail sales 
for September 2.7 percent to S 1 202 
billion, the biggest gain since April 
the Commerce Department report- 
ed Friday. 

But wholesale prices fell 0.6 per- 
cent during the month, helped by 
the year-end clearance sales on 
1985 autos and a continuing de- 
cline in food prices, the Labor De- 
partment said in a separate report. 
It was the sharpest slide in whole- 
sale prices since January 1983. 
when they fell 0.7 percent. 

The increase in retail sales was 
the highest since April's 3.1 -per- 
cent. The gain was largely die result 
of a strong 9 .6- in crease in auto 
sales, the biggest gain since August 
1981, when sales went up 9.9 per- 
cent. 

Overall sales increased 10.9 per- 
cent from the year-earlier level. 

“The economy is continuing to 
grow and produce new jobs with 
prices falling," the White House 
spokesman, Larry Speak es. said in 
response to the new data. 

“The outlook continues to be 
rosy and win brighten even further 
if Congress can pass the president's 
lax-reform package by the end of 
the year," he added. 

But excluding auto sales, retail- 
ers saw little improvement in Sep- 
tember, although sales were 4.8 
percent above the year-earlier leveL 
After an increase of 3.5 percent in 
August, general-merchandise sales 
dropped 1.9 percent in September 
but were up 2.6 percent from the 
level of a year earlier. 

Food store sales gained 2.5 per- 
cent in September and were 5.1 
percent above a year ago. Eating 
and drinking establishments 
showed a 2.1 -percent increase in 
sales over August, and a 5.9-per- 
cent rise above September 1984. 

Lea Tyler, an economist with 
Chase Econometrics, said the car 
sales boost was “not surprising” 
but added, "We don’t expect tint 
to continue. 

“Department stores sales are dis- 
appointing. I would have expected 
them to be flat, but not to have 
gone down," she said, speculating 
that -Hurricane Gloria last month 
may have depressed sales. 


Durable-goods sales increased 
62 percent during the month, after 
a 4.6-percent gain in Angus l Those 
increases were primarily the result 
of the auto sales. 

Furniture and building materials 
were litefe changed in September 
but increased 6.1 percent and 7.8 
percent, respectively, from year- 
earlier levels. 

Sales of nondurable goods re- 
mained at about the same level as 
August but were 4.5 percent above 
the same month a year ago. 

The Labor Department's report 
on wholesale prices marked the 
third straight monthly decline in 
the government’s Producer Price 
Index. 


Chinese Growth 
Began Slowing 
In 3d Quarter 

The Associated Press 

BEIJING — China’s rapidly 
growing economy began slow- 
ing in the third quarter of this 
year because of reductions in 
capital construction and spend- 
ing, but industrial production 
still outpaced energy output, 
according to the government. 

The growth rate in the June- 
September period was 14.7 per- 
cent, down from 23.1 percent in 
the first half of the year, a depu- 
ty minister in the State Eco- 
nomic Commission, Zhao Wei 
chen, said at a commission 
meeting. His remarks were re- 
ported by Xinhua, the official 
news agency. 

Mr. Zhao attributed the suc- 
cess to a series of measures tak- 
en by the government “to con- 
trol the scope of capital 
construction and tighten funds 
for consumption," Xinhua said. 

China’s economy started 
overheating late last year be- 
cause of economic changes that 
gave local enterprises more 
freedom to spend money and 
do business. A surge in con- 
struction and consumer pur- 
chases strained transportation 
and energy resources. 


White House Nominates 
2 New Members to the Fed 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The White 
House has announced the nomina- 
tion of two new members of the 
Federal Reserve Board: Wayne D. 
Angell, a Kansas professor, banker 
and farmer, and Manuel H. John- 
son Jr. of the Treasury Depart- 
ment. 

If the appointments are con- 
firmed by the Senate, President 
Ronald Reagan will have filled a 
majority of the seats on the seven- 
member panel. He thus will proba- 
bly leave an imprint on monetary 
policy that will endure long after he 
leaves office, since a full term on 
the "board is 14 years. 

The nominations were an- 
nounced Thursday. 

Mr. Johnson, 36. now assistant 
secretary of the Treasury for eco- 
nomic policy, is a su'pply-sider 
known to favor expanding the 
monetary supply to stimulate eco- 
nomic growib. He was previously 
an associate professor of econom- 
ics at George Mason University in 
Fairfax, Virginia. 

Mr. Angell, 55. a director of the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas 
City, Missouri, has a monetarist 
orientation but describes himself as 
□ondogmatic. A professor of eco- 
nomics at Ottawa University of Ot- 
tawa, Kansas, as well as a pan-time 
fanner, he was sponsored by a fel- 
low Kansan, Senator Robert J. 
Dole, the leader of the Republican 
majority. 

Mr. Johnson will replace J. 
Charles Partee when his term ex- 
pires on Jan. 31, 1986. He was cho- 
sen for a full 14-year term. Mr. 
Angell was chosen to succeed Lyle 


E Gramley, who resigned effective 
SepL 1. Mr. Angell’s appointment 
will be for the unexpired part of 
Mr. Gramlev's term, to Jan. 31, 
1994. 

The departures could be consid- 
ered a threat to control by the Fed’s 
chairman, Paul A. Volcker, who 
took over his post in 5979. Mr. 
Gramley and Mr. Partee, both for- 
mer members of the Federal Re- 
serve staff, generally voted with 
Mr. Volcker on monetaiy policy. 

However, the two members of 
the board already selected by Mr. 
Reagan — Preston Martin, the vice 
chairman, and Martha Seger — 
have oot always supported him. 

The board’s other members are 
Henry Wailich and Emmett Rice. 

In anticipation of the pending 
appointments, some economists 
had speculated that there could be 
a shift of political power in Fed 
policy-malting that could hasten 
Mr. Volcker’s departure. His four- 
year term as chairman expires in 
August 1987. 

Thomas Thomson, chief econo- 
mist at Crocker National Bank, 
San Francisco, noted recent rumors 
of Mr. Volcker's resignation that 
repeated denials by Fed officials 
have not been able to dispel. 
“Where there is so much smoke.” 
Mr. Thompson remarked, “one 
tends to think there is some fire.” 


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RES IN DEP 

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prospectus < 
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Address . 


awxfafclr wntm mo USA. 







Dow Jones Averages 


sin 


NYSE Index 


own HW l» l " 1 M ' 

S5. ^ Ml SM SBSi ^ 





Close 

cne 

Bonds 

8059 

+ 007 

Utilities 

7 U 1 

— OOl 

Industrials 

8277 

+ 0.15 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New hibus 
New Lows 
Volume up 
V olume dawn 


dose Prev. 

1237 1 l£ 

424 47B 

367 646 

3 DI 8 sow 

1 S 3 96 

6 9 


100 . 4 W.no 

16486.140 


kioii uw Close ctive 

Composite mas 111.99 11 M + 1.88 

Industrie!! U 0 i 9 128 .W 1 M .19 + 115 

Tramp. lOtll 1 D 742 IM 7 I + 045 

Utilities 59.25 5679 was +0.97 

Finance 12345 12 MB 123.46 + 27 / 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Buy Bales -Sh+1 

NOV. e 158-805 419-558 6.100 

NOV. B - — , 56JSS t 2]wS2 t ,.106 

iSSw 6 175.104 469446 14.417 

5S3 ! 1S9443 610,963 9447 

Nil 4 170.798 663,703 14J90 

-included in die solos tigwrc 


Mondays 

JV 

i 

VS 

Ja^kng 

1 

H 


AMEX Diaries 


advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New nigh* 
New LOWS 
Volume uo 
Volume down 


date Pro*. 

343 347 

199 234 

354 238 

777 BIB 

16 18 

9 W 

3401790 
1 . 913 JUO 


Compos*!* 

industrials 

Finance 

imufonce 

utmnn 

Banks 

Trans*. 


week 
aree **> 
+ 129 29423 
, +177 29*56 
I +2.41 39084 
I + ST1 34&09 

i + 140 ao.i» 

[ + M3 >1688 

[ + 1.97 264 J 2 



124540700 



prev coruoliOatcd close 

13070X580 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

l ia The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's index 


Hleb low CIom Oitm 

was- «««iH 

“™L*S £S nS £^+087 

cSSoSle twS 19170 19729 + 387 




4 PJM. volume 
Prev. 4 fM. volume 
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24 V 1 
17 V 

AA 
9 V AG 

R 54 

S 

24 15 

14 

50 V 7 



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23 V 1 

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551*1 42 
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Dow Index Jumps 27 .52 Points 


56 V 52 
71 V 47 V 
36* 28* 
13 * 7 * 
66 * 48 
68 * 26 V 
971 a 73 
97 V: 62 
160 
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1'niitrJ Prev tuientauaiwl 

NEW YORK — The slock market rose 
sharp I v Monday as both the Dow Jones indus- 
trial average and broader market indexes 
smashed through records. The Dow rose 2732 
points, to 1.43 1.8S. its largest one-da\ gain since 
Jan. 21, 1985. 

The New York Stock Exchange index rose 
l.SS to an all-time high of 113.82 and Standard 
St Poor's 500-stock index increased 3.57 to a 
record high of 197.29. The price of an average 
share jumped 58 cents. 

Advances outpaced declines 1.193-426 
among the 1006 issues traded and Big Board 
volume rose to 126 J million shares from 1 14.9 
i million Friday. 

Analysts said three investment firm buy pro- 1 
grams propelled the market higher. They said 
the advance was all the more remarkable be- 
cause the Veterans' Day holiday Monday, 
which closed the bond market and some bonks, 
was expected to keep activity fairly subdued. 

“Lower interest rates, improved business 
prospects and awareness that there are some 
cheap slocks available have made people decide 
to invest." said George Pirrone of Dreyfus 
Corp. 

“The Dow could sail through 1.330 or 1.340 
or experience a minor pullback at that level, he 
said The latter case would afford people anoth- 
er buying opportunity, he said 

Philip Roth, a technical analyst at E.F. Hut- 
ton. said the market in the short-term is moder- 
ately overbought- About 3.000 issues have made 
net advances over the last 10 days, he said. 

He said the market is likely to have a brief 


setback sometime this week before moving 
higher again next week but that the Dow could 
rise to between 1.440 and 1,450 by year-end 

Sears. Roebuck was the most active NYSE- 
lisied issue, up -^a to 36'i. IBM followed jump- 
ing 2'« to 134 s *. 

Potlatch was third falling 2^ to 39?*. The 
company's board rqecied a 545-a-share offer by 
the Belzberg family and approved a buyback or 
up to 20 percent of its shares. Last week Pot- 
latch rose 6 points. 

Other actively traded blue chips climbed 
Weslinghouse added 1 to 44. Goodyear * to 28, 
AT&T '.i to 2 Hi. General Electric 1 to 62& and 
General Motors 1 to 681*. 

Financial and insurance issues strengthened. 
Merrill Lynch rose l to 32, Phibro-Salomon 
Brothers dimbed Hi to 41. Citicorp added 1 to 
44'*. Fust Boston jumped 2?i to 45*fc and Fed- 
eral National Mortgage Assodation edged up ■>» 
to 24!*. Marsh and McClennan was up 1 »79fc 
and Genera] Re was up Vk to 99. 

Among pharmaceuticals, Merck added 2?s to 
1 2 PL Eli Lilly and Squibb were all up. 

In food stocks. General Mills rose 2v» to 68. 
Kellogg added to 7 Pi and Heinz rose 2V« to 
30 » 4 . 

Walt Disney added 3 to 96. It reported 
fourth-quarter net or $53.7 million, or SI. 60 a 
share, compared with a loss of $64 million a 
year ago. 

Prices were higher in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 

Home Group led the Amex actives, easing s 
to 24'. 4. Dome Petroleum followed, unchanged 
at 1. Damson Oil was third, softening 'i to 3'2. 


44 ErnrsEl 274 38 13 
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26* Emtxjrl 1.4C2J 4J3 18 
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12* Enereen 184 78 10 

2! Ingicp 72 3.1 13 
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Why have Smart 

Traders Tripled 
Money Buying Our 

TiKgscepar L .".t". w ‘-? - 

■jn-4Co«rS2'i*' tr -• ; ‘ 

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mcsanfaBoier - 


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108V 108V - 
108* 108* 
46V 47* 
28* 29V 
22* 23* 
19 19% 

9U 9* 
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74 34 

9 

74 17 

9 

52 1.9 

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250 10L3 

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56 14 

18 

150 X7 

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1.92 74 

9 

150 25 

7 

154 24 

19 

178 sa 

13 

140 <2 

11 

148 109 

7 

972 123 


740 114 


776 115 


374 125 


X13 1X1 


X12 1X1 


240 127 


342 127 


ADO 124 


4.12 124 


1548 1X7 


278 115 


50 35 

13 

44 35 

93 

157H0J 


450 115 


1.40O 64 


70 35 


150 27 

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176 

17 

74 

10 

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80 



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102 

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504 

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72 

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539 

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178 

17 

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277 

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39V + V 
36V +1* 
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TV 

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19 * + V 
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iat lieport Contract far European SpamSmtde 


-. *■. '• - . . 

leading aerospace groups, Avians Marcd 
Dass a nRrlMffla:- Aviation and Aerospatiale, are likely to share a 
contract Twxth abpin $1.7 billion to design build die European 
space shuttle, inowri-as Hermes, industry sources said Friday. 

Last m o nth it seemed *h«r France’s National Center of Space 
Studies .would announce that die contract bad gone to Dassault, 
deqntera bid from Aerospatiale, which constructs the' European 
sazeUite.fcumeher Ariaoo. 

t ■ Die news that Dassault was seen as a passible winner hftpwi posh 
its sb&zesig) 12 percent on the Paris Bburse in mid-Septasber. But the 
a nnoun cement was. not made* and the dossier was sent to Prime 
. Mi n r»ler Laurent Fabius’s office the sources said 
. Drcy.saidgoyeniinciit officials nowfavored both companies siart- 
®8. a type ofvejturelqiownas a pdvpement iTmtirt iamomque, to 
design and build the craft. 

A groupment fbairet econonuque is a French legal structure that 
allows companies to form a joint on pmiTarin n fmrn whir h profits ran 



Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

DETROIT — General Motors 
on Fnday called reports that it is 
negotiating a range of partnerships 
with Fiat “pure speculation,"^, 
spite the fact that the Italian auto- 
maker said talks with GM on a 
venture outside the auto sector are 
ai an advanced stage. 

Earlier this week. Fiat broke off 
Iks on a venture with Ford 
The Wall Street Journal reported 
Friday that the talks, winch could 
include a joint venture between 
Fiat and GM*s European opera-, 
tions, were being bda in Detroit. 
Sources said the two car. makers are 
a long way from agreement. _ 
“Such stories arejnst pure specu- 
lation," said a member of GM> 
Detroit public relations staff. 

“There are negotiations, with 
General Motors but they do not 
concern the vehicle sector ” a Rat 
spokesman said. “Nothing on 
wheels.” 

^ Rat has interests in tdecom- 
muni cations, robotics, auto co m-- 
patients and aviation. 

It (Reuters, [jpiy 

Hfipadfic Lumber Rejects ■ 
: r .‘ A $ 781 -MiIlion Offer 

s -:j New York Times Service 

*■; SAN. FRANCISCO — Pacific 
^ Lumber Co. said its board rejected 
r M as inadequate an unsolicited, $781- 
million offer for Pacific by 
Maxxara Group, a U.S. paper and 
* ') printing concern. 

*■1? But the San Frandsco-based 
:! e lumber producer and welding 
equipment manufacturer left the 
- I*, door open to friendly suitors, ask- 
’ ^ ing its financial adviser, Salomon 
u (i Brothers Inc, to seek other offers. 


uc iimuw dui iot wxncn no major capital injection is necessary. • ■ 

' - No announcement on theujove is likely for several weeks while 
details of die plan are worked out, the sources iwiri . 

. Western diplomats $nd the idea of selecting rme mam erar roiriror 
for. the reuseable spacecraft nroiect had caused snch ill feeline in the 


for the reuseable spacecraft project had caused snch fl] feeling in the 
aviation and space industry that Mr. Fabhts had been forced to art 
■ 'The diplomats said the attraction of ugroup&nent d'inter£t ecanorm- 
que would be that other European aerospace companies, snch as 
Messerschnndt-Bolkow-Blohm GmbH of West Germany, could join 
ineasflyatany sragp: . 


COMPAMYNOTES 

Acorn C o mput e r Group PLC 
said a more accurate valuation of 
stocks resulted in larger 1984-85 
losses. Acorn reported apretax loss 
of £2271 rtriBion ($3135 million) 
in the year to June. 30 compared 
with a forecast £20j6-mQlion loss. . 

American Hospital Supply Corp. 
said thkd-quarter earnings fell 17 
percent from the same period a 
year earlier, .to $473 million; or 64 
cente a share, on. sales of $8413 

miTH rrn ... 

Adas Supply Co. wffl be allowed 
by the U.S. Federal Trade Com- 
mission, to act with its owners to. 
seek preferential treatment in con- 


nection with joint purchases of 
auto tires, tubes, batteries and oth- 
er pans-and accessories. 

AT&T and Philips Telecom- 
munications BV secured an order 
worth about 1 -billion Dutch guil- 
ders ($3403 million) to supply tele- 
phone lines for the Dutch post and 
telecommunications agency. 

Carlton Cosumiidcations PLC 
said it cannot understand the basis 
under the 1981 Broadcasting Act 
for the ruling by the Independent 
Broadcasting Authority, which li- 
censes com merci al broadcasting in 
Britain, that blocked Carlton’s bid 
for Thames Television PLC. 


Motorola Posts 
. $39-Miflion Loss 

Revttrs 

SCHAUMBURG, Illinois — 
Motorola Inc reported Friday a 
third-quarter loss of S39 million, or 
33 cents a share, compared with a 
year-earlier net profit of $86 mil- 
lion, or 73 cents a share. Sales ro- 
tated $130 billion, down 6 percent 
from $138 billion a year earlier. 

For the first nine-momhs, net 
totaled $28 million, or 24 cents a 
share, compared with $262 million, 
or 5231 a share, in the year-earlier 
period. Sales amounted to $4.00 
billion, down 2 percent from $4.05 
billion. 

Citing a severe reduction in de- 
mand for semiconductor and com- 
puter- related products. Motorola 
said much of the quarterly loss re- 
sulted from special one-time costs 
associated with staff reductions. 

Gdbdricb to Close Tire Plant 

The Associated Press 

AKRON, Ohio — BJ\ Good- 
rich Ca said Friday that it would 
begin shutting down its tire plant in 
Oaks, Pennsylvania, next April. 


- Fleet Hokfing5 PLC financial ad- 
visers, Kldnwon Benson LuL, said 
it sold 250,000 ordinary shares in 
United Newspapers PLC Thursday 
at 302 peace ($436) each. 

Sony Corp. will start production 
of industrial videotape recorders 
this month at a Sony Corp. of 
America plant in Florida, with an 
antidpaied.outpui of several thou- 
sand industrial VTRs a year. 

Yamaha Motor Co. will resume 
dividends with a 6-yen (2.8-cenl) 
payment in the year ending April 
30, 1986, after no dividend pay- 
ments in (he last two years. Presi- 
dent Hideto Egnchi said. 


Hoatii^Raie Notes 


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AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

-tw) AMAM Trust. SA S 1 7477 

BANK JULIUS BACK A CO. DO. 

-I a I Boanond SF HMD 

-( d ) CoOtXJT__ SF I 22 LD 0 

■ tdl Eaullaww^ S 1 TSOAOO 

-<dl Enuiaoar euraw SF 1 M 5 JXH 

-t d I EauUwer Padflc SP iaun 

-tdlGrobor SF 971 J» 

■tdl Stoekbar SF 152 U 0 

BNP INTER PUN 03 

-CwJ (manedd Fund t nssi 

-<w> iH rt rairrMK» US» s ».io 

■twl Intcrcui rucv PM DM MJS 

^wl mtereumney SfrrPrtfl c 10 .H 

• 1*1 IntarMuJty PocMtcOifar S 17 J) 

-twl Iniereouity N, Anrr.OHer_ a HUB 

BANOUE IN SC SUEZ 

-( d ) Asian Growth Fund s J 1 JJ 9 

-t*> Dtvdrtwnd 5 F BUS 

■iw) FiF-AmerleB s 1 la 9 

■l*| FIF-Euraoe S lin 

-(*1 FIF^»osHk: S 

•tai indautzMuHUMMSA % M&JU 

-Idl IndauSZMuHItianaiB— S 172.95 

4 6 1 InddMz USD IMMf) S um.fi 

BftlTAHNJAJ><?B sn. St. HeliWi J*r**» 

-(w) BrhUcBar income S OJSr 

•tW) Brlt.SMcnas.Curr S KM 

■< d I Beit, mils M an B B POtlf— ~ % 1.115 

■Cdl Bril. liUUManoaParN C 1157 

- 1*1 B* If. Am. IOC. A Pa ua s 1.101 

-tw| BrttGoM Pund S 0742 * 

-Cwi BrltMonoofurrencv C 1437 * 

-Cdl Brit, japan Dir Pert. M * 1.171 

-tw) BrlUdritv Dill Fund- t 0225 

■Id) Brit. World Ltd, Kmfl, S 7.140 

-id I Brit. Waria Team. Fwtd s ojoi 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

■ fwl CflnltM Infl __ S 4172 

■Iwl CotUtol Eta Ho SA s llio 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES} 

-<«J I Ad lera Sulim SF < 70,56 

-Id I Bond Valor Swt SF 10 A 7 S 

■I d I Bond Valor D-mark DM 113 AS 

-( d 1 Bond Valor U 5 - DOLLAR i 12271 

-C d I Bona VOIAT Van Von 1 T 724 G 0 

•Id) Canvon Voter Swt SF 119 A 0 

-Cdl Convert Valor us-oollar. s 12 s .11 

.nifnnm- SF 67 LOO 

-Cdl CS Fonds-Bonds SF 7&00 

-(01 C 5 Foods- Inn SF 111 JO 

-(dies Money Mar**] Fund aiootoo 

-Idi CSMmtv Marvel Fund _ DM 1056 J 0 

-C a>CS Money Market Fund C 1 BXL 00 

-(d) Enerala-Votor SF Ua 2 S 

-CdlUuac SF 77 »JG 

-<d) Eurooo-Vdtor SF 16 &OQ 

-Idl Podflc -Voter SF MOTS 

DRBXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
. Wlna*««r Home, 77 London wall 
LONDON EC 2 (01 920 F 7 V 7 ) 

— C*l Finsbury Grain LM S 12 LS 6 

-(ml Wlncdmtar DJver»lRed__ S 190 * 

•Cm) winchester Ftnonctal LW. _ S fSf 

-(ml Winchester Frealler S KXL 2 I 

•tw) Winchester Hold kan FF utu< 

S 1243 

-Cwl Worldwide Securities S 47 A 3 

-Iwl Worldwide SMdaJ IUO.U 

Orr INVESTMENT FFM 

-H d > Concentre DM 7 L 34 

-t-ldl Inti RenCe nfa nd DM 9135 

Duob B Harem C Lktrd Oeoree, BnrsMts 

-fml DAM CommoattY Pool S 33 BJ 00 — 

•Cml Currency & Gold Pool — —5 U 7 A 4 — 

-Cm) Winch. LHcFut. Pool 5554.00 — 

-Cm) Trans World FuL Pool 573003 — 

EBC TRUST ca< JERSEY] LTD. 

1-3 Seale SIJL He(larK 5343 U 31 
TRADED CURRENCT FUND. 

Old lint: Bid — 5 1019 -Offer SIOJW* 

5 (d ICop.: BW 5 1 LM Offer I 11 PW 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

-<d) Short Term ’A' (Acann) 5 1 JD 35 

-Cd I Short Term 'A' CD Wr) s taws 

-id) Short Term -S' (Aocum) S 1.597 

-idl Short Term 'B’(Distr) 5 09379 

■ IimI I m { 2577 

FAC MGMT. LTD. IMV. ADVISERS 

1 . Laurence Pounty Hilt ECC 0 I- 433 -M 50 


DM - Deutsche Mark; BF • BeKktm Francs: fl- Dutch Florin; LF - Luxembourg Francs; ECU - European Currency Unit; SF - Swiss Francs; a ■ asked; - Offer Prices; b - bid cnanw 
P/VS 10 toil per uiilr: NJL - No* Avdlobie; N£.- NotCommunlcatedio - New; S- suspended; S/S -Stock Spill : • - Ex-Olwidend; **• Ex-Rts; ‘"-Gross Performance index July; e. 
Radempt- Price- Ex-Cogeon; Formerly Worldwide Fund Ltd; 9 ■ Offer Price Ind. 3 % prelim, charge; ++ - daily stock price as on Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


AT A -Li '.•■vs 






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Wherever it is, we H find it. 





ts-y I*' * r ■ - . • j \ - . 

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OBL Wherever ii is. we’ll find iL Oil 
is Ihc priimo' source of energy. Ii is 
the power that moves the world and 
will be so for many years to come. 

Buu it is necessary 10 be prepared 
to wrestle this treasure from the 
earth’s most secret strongholds, using 
the latest continuously evolving tech- 
nology, and to veniure into hostile, 
inaccessible places. 

Agip, Italy's national oil company. 

took up this challenge sixty years ago. 
probing into the origins of the earth, 
experimenting with new techniques, 
and devoting to these activities 
human and economic resources that 
are always up to the difficulties id be 
overcome. 

Wherever the possibilities or 
finding oil exist. Agip is present with 
its spirit of initiative and decades of 
experience. The results achieved, 
alone or in cooperation with leading 
oil companies, in 30 countries, on 5 
continents, make Agip a reliable 
operator in any oil activity. 

Even where no-one has ever 
reached. 


vft 






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MORENEWStNifSSTWE • 

THE WOtUXWl 6 PAGE* 

. DAItftNTHElHT 


U; 


7 ; 



















Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY , OCTOBER 12-13, 1985 




HHdajfe 

AVffiX 


Qosmg 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

f id The .-bsocuued Press 


zen 

lata pktOb 

JO 



83 

lift 

16ft 

lift + ft 

i«ft 

13ft PiyGiTts 

.16 

14 

15 

57 

15ft' 

■15ft 

15ft ft 

4ft 

2ft PtyRA 




4 

3 

3 

3 


2V. PlyRB 




1 

3 Vs 

3ft 

Sft 

eft 

3 PueeEv 




59 

4 

3ft 

4 

13ft 

7ft PortSys 
lift PostiPr 



47 

25 

10ft 

10ft 

IIP* + ft 

17ft 

JO 

U 

13 

1 

lift 

lift 

14ft + ft 

jy% 

5ft PrnlrOs 




3 

6 

A 

6 

20ft 

13 PrettL s 



10 

43 

ISft 

18ft 

18ft f ft , 

Sft 

Ift 

6ft ProllBd 

ft PremRs 

AB1 



5 

63 


6ft 


raft 

6ft PresR B 

M 

85 

4 

1 

lift 

lift 

lift — ft 

«ft 

3ft Praia 



13 

36 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft— ft 

33ft 

18 PrpCTs 

1J6 

74 

13 

10 

20ft 

30ft 

20ft + ft 

33ft 

15 PrvEn s 

IA* 

74 

7 

2 

21ft 

21ft 

21ft + ft 

27ft 

ieu> Patptc 

23* 1U 


11 

20ft 

20ft 

20ft 

3*ft 

29ft PetptE 

4J7 132 


37 

33ft 

33 

33ft— ft 

23ft 

16ft Put ptO 

7M 

9.9 


200 

23ft 

Z3V» 

23ft 

au 

3ft PuntaG 




25 

4 

3ft 

4 + ft 


Richardson Bid Reflects New Unilever Game Plan 


10ft s Quabos 


7 8ft Bft Pt- 


10ft 

61% HAL 

- 18 e 1J 


7 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft— ft 

20ft 

10ft HUBC 

40a 11 

12 

1 

19ft 

19ft 

19ft + 1% 

6ft 

4ft Halifax 

JMe 

A 


7 

5ft 

Sft 

Sft 

3ft 

lft Halml 




186 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft— ft 

IV. 

11% Halml wt 




15 

lft 

lft 

lft + Vi 

9ft 

27V. 

21ft Hndymn 
12ft Hontrds 

Me 

JO 

2 

22 

1 

15 

13 

67 


23 

23 

22ft + ft 
23 — ft 

2ft 

ft Harvey 




38 

lft 

lft 

lft — ft 

» ft 

20U. Hosts- S 

.15 

A 

11 

1265 

33ft 

32ft 

33ft + ft 

43 

23ft Hasbrpf 200 

S3 


19 

37ft 

37 

37ft + ft 

41ft 

33ft Hasting 

JOa 12 

6 

6 

33ft 

33 

Eft + ft 

17ft 

12 HlthCr s 



9 

to 

15ft 

15ft 

19ft + ft 

lOft 

Sft HlihCh 



IB 

138 

8ft 

Sft 

8ft + ft 

19ft 

7ft HHilE* 



15 

69 

7ft 

7ft 

71% + ft 

15ft 

11 HelthM 

44 

52 

8 

18 

1216 

12 

12ft + 1% 

9ft 

eft HelnWr 

JOt IS 

8 

2 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft + ft 

17ft 

10 H0WCS 

.10 

J 

B 

11 

13ft 

13ft 

13ft + ft 

4 

3 Hoktar 


63 

7 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft + ft 

10ft 

lft 

3to Hellant 

S HcbnR 




42 

585 



5ft 

Tta HerstiO 



31 

20 

3ft 

3ft 

314 — ft 

4ft 

2 Hetman 




16 

2 

2 

2 

18ft 

6ft HollyCn 

24 

1J 

6 

19 

Uft 

18 

18—1% 

19 

15ft HmeGn 




1869 

16ft 

Uft 

16ft + ft 

21ft 

so Hminanfzjts 134 


143 

Zlft 

21ft 

21ft— ft 

22ft 

Uft Horml s 

54 

24 

12 

. ?4x20ft 

20ta 

20ft + ft 

12 

6ft HrnHar 



20 

83 

7 

6ft 

7 

lft 

1 HmH vrt 




49 

HA 

1 

lft + ft 

1916 

13ft HotlPtV 

150 102 

16 

31 

17ft 

17ft 

171% + ft 

6ft 

2ft HotIPwt 




10 

ift 

ift 

414 + ft 

6ft 

3% HouOT 

544182 


265 

ift 

m 

ift— ft 

18ft 

lift HovnE 



9 

11 

Uft 

14 

14 — ft 

13b. 

8ft Howl In 

25e U 

7 

n 

10ft 

10ft 

10ft + ft 

23ft 

16V* HutaelAs 

J6 

15 

12 

12 

21ft 

21ft 

21ft + ft 

241% 

15ft H ubel B 5 

J6 

14 

13 

« 

22ft 

21ft 

22ft + ft 

711% 

17ft HudGa 

JO 

22 

14 

4 

Uft 

18 

U 

fft 

6ft Husky a 

M 

52 


294 

6ft 

6ft 

6ft 


l_ 

41% 

3t% 

25ft 

13ft 

31% 

lft 

3ft 

3ft 

15ft 

Oft 

13Vh 

Bft 

10ft 

7ft 

ift 

2 

2 6ft 

22 ft 

9ft 

6ft 

ift 

2V% 

6ft 

4 

13ft 

10ft 

221% 

10ft 

444 

ft 

32ft 

20Vi 

34ft 

21ft 

15ft 

914 

24 

21ft 

19 

9ft 

29 

lift 

m 

ft 

19ft 

11 

191% 

lift 

23 

lift 

lift 

9ft 

10ft 

9ft 

514 

ISft 

12ft 

26ft 

19ft 

41ft 

27ft 

4ft 

Sft 

34ft 

24ft 

13ft 

61% 


■ 

31% ICEEn 


7 

1 

3ft 

3*. 

3ft 

551% 

28ft ICHs 


7 

154 

45ft 

44ft 

45ft + ft 

7ft 

lft ICO 


175 

74 

lft 

144 

lft— 1% 

Sft 

2ta IPM 



32 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft— ft 

w 

3ft 

3ft IRTCPS 
lft ImpGp 
ft imelnd 

Me 23 

33 

23 

19 

12 

7ft 

* 

* 1=8 


30 ImpOllg 150 


214 

36ft 

36ft 

36ft + ft 

13ft 

61% Inflaiit 


7 

154 

7 

6ft 

644— ft 1 

22V% 

11 InrtntE 

20 1.1 

22 

19 

lift 

18ft 

18ft + ft 

244 

lit instSv 


7 

■6 

lft 

lft 

lft 

13 

6ft intCtYB 

M 


17 

lift 

lift 

lift + ft 

15 

10ft Infmk 

.12b 1JI 


8 

12ft 

12ft 

12ft- ft 

414 

2ft IntBknt 



45 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft 

16ft 

5ft infHVd 


17 

10 

6ft 

ift 

ift — ft 

ift 

lVs intPret 



3 

3ft 

Sft 

3ft + ft 

10ft 

41% IntThrn 


20 

302 

4ft 

ift 

4ft 

10ft 

41% lnThrpf 



31 

4ft 

ift 

ift 

7 

5ft Jntwst 



5 

6 

6 

6 

23ft 

13ft Ionics S 


14 

28 

22ft 

22ft 

2244 + ft 

41 

19ft iroaBrt 


22 

8 

3514 

35 

35 — ft 


17V. lift Joctvn JOb 40 10 
7% 51% Jacobs 

4ft 2V. JttAm 9 

IVb '% Jet Awl 
no 5W Mtnm jnnoj 12 

61% TV. JohnPd 

lift 7 JaftnAm JO 4.1 W 

lift 6 Johnlnd 4 

7ft 3ft JmsJkn 17 


25 12ft lift 12ft + ft 
22 5ft 5H 5ft + ft 
67 4ft 4U 4ft + ft 
123 ft ft ft + K 
S 4ft 4ft Mb— ft 
2S 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
70 7ft TA 7ft — ft 
52 9 8ft Bft 

21 3ft 3 3 —ft 



41% 

lft KapokC 



2 

7 

314 

3ft 

3ft— ft | 

13 

104% KavJn 

/m is 

9 

2 

11 

11 

11 - ft 1 

ZPh 

U Ketchm 


36 

17 

52 

Uft 

T744 

18 + ft 

414 

2ft KevCaB 

3mm 

11 

4 

Sft 

3ft 

Sft 

4 

2ft KevCoA 




6 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft + ft 

1214 

t KsvPh 

20 

t 

22 

16 

186 

9 

Sft 

9 

7ft 

2ft 

2ft Key Co 
ft Kev Cowl 


6 

2 

10 

2£ ^ ^% + ft 

ift 

2V4 Klddewt 




90 

4 

3ft 

4 +14 

ift 

31% KJlern 



31 

3 

Sft 

344 

3ft— ft 

414 

31% Kinarfc 




22 

Sft 

3ft 

Sft 

5 

2ft Klrbv 




140 

216 

2*t 

2ft + ft 

5ft 

3ft KlIMfa 

2 Kleerv 



13 

6 

41% 

ift 

44% 

31% 

JOT 

.9 

48 

2ft 

2 

Ift + ft 

16ft 

1014 Knoll 



15 

142 

lift 

14ft 

lift 

30ft 

22ft KaaerC 

132 

86 

77 

57 

26ft 

26ft 

26ft 



(Continued from Page 9) 
said that the managerial corps at 
Unilever is the closest thing British 
commerce has to a civil service. 

But changing course, no matter 
how difficult, is what the company 
is in Lem on doing. 

The Richardson-Vkks takeover 
effort illustrated the more aggres- 
sive management approach now in 
i evidence at Unilever. It was a so- 
called hostile bid, replete with legal 
suits and acrimonious statements 
from some of the senior executives 
involved in the fray. Until last year, 
when it took over Brooke Bond 
Group, a big English tea marketer, 
in a contested bid, Unilever had 
traditionally shunned Tights. 

With the Richardson-Vicks tus- 
sle. it became clear that the earlier 
preference for friendly raergers had 
been cast aside. “This bid is anoth- 
er indication that the management 
is shaking things up at Unilever,” 
said David Nolder. a research part- 
ner at Scrimgeour Vickers & Co- a 
London brokerage house. Unilever, 
analysts predict, will continue 
stalking for U.S. acquisitions. 
“They’]] lick their wounds and 
come bouncing right back.” one 
analyst said. 

Company officials have said in 
the past that they were particularly 
interested in acquisitions in the 
United States that would add to 
Unilever's basic consumer-product 
areas — detergents, food and per- 
sonal-care products. At present, 
Upton tea, Pepsodent toothpaste 
and Lux bath soap are among the 
company's best-known offerings in 
the United States. 

Unilever U.S. Inc., the American 
holding company, whose major 
subsidiaries besides Lever Brothers 
are Thomas J. Upton, known for 
its leas and soups, and National 
Starch, a specialty chemical com- 


The Unilever Group 


Sales 

Unilever's 1 984 sales 
by geographical area. 
Total 1 984 sales 
were $1 6.76 billion. 


Other European 
countries 


European Economic 
Community 
countries 54% 


Asia, Australia and Other Eu 
New Zealand / — “ countrie 

11% 6 %/ 

. / North America 

c\ / 20% 


Central and South 
America 


Africa 


pony, accounts for about $3.8 bil- 
lion in sales. 

Unilever executives could not be 
reached for interviews this week. 

But analysts said that the shift in 
corporate focus and style at Unil- 
ever became apparent two or three 
years ago, and has accelerated re- 
cently. The activity in the United 
Slates is representative of the 
broader strategy of concentrating 
on fewer “core 17 businesses, selling 
off unrelated operations and ac- 
quiring with an eye toward picking 
up high- profit, branded products. 

Unilever will retain its position 


Jakarta Exports Assessed 

Reuters 

JAKARTA — The value of In- 
donesian exports under non-oil 
counter-trade agreements since the 
trade policy was instituted in Janu- 
ary 1982 totaled 51.44 billion to 
Aug. 31, the official An tarn News 
Agency reported Friday. 


in selected areas, such as specially 
chemicals, and will keep its global 
stance. But profit-making, rather 
than corporate empire-budding, is 
being pursued more aggressively at 
Unilever today than at any time in 
recent memory, analysts agreed. 

In less than two years, for exam- 
ple, Unilever has sold off two doz- 
en operations representing annual 
revenues of $23 billion. The busi- 
nesses jettisoned were a British 
poultry producer, a North Sea ferry 
line, an office products subsidiary 
and Australian timber operations. 

Unilever is run from twin bead- 
quarters in London and Rotter- 
dam. The top management unit is 
the three-member executive group 
known as the special committee. 
Today, the special committee is 
composed of two. Englishmen, Sir 
Kenneth Durham and Michael An- 
gus, and one Dutchman, Floris 
Maljers. AH three men won recog- 
nition at Unilever for taming 
around or paring back ailing opera- 
tions, often in drastic fashion. . 


It was when this team was assem- 
bled, analysis said, that the strate- 
gic changes at Unilever began in 
earnest. Sir Kenneth joined the spe- 
cial committee in 1978, Mr. Maljers 
Jn 1982 and Mr. Angus in 1983. 

China Reports 10% Rise 
In 9-Month Ofl Output 

Reuters 

BEIJING — Ch ina produced 
93.02 minimi metric tons (1023 
millin g shot tons) of crude 03 in 
the. first .nine months of 1985, lQg. 
percent mare than in the 1984 perils 
od, the Xinhua news agency said - 
Friday. 

The agency quoted a state Ecc* 
nomic Commission vice minister, 
Zhao Wctchcn. as saymg that the 
production target for 1985 was 124 
TgUHnn tons, up from 11433 mil- 
lion in 1984. He.also said that coal 
production during the nine-month' 
period was 626 miTfi on tons. 


autos tax free | INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ANTIQUES 


2ft 

11% LSH 




36 

2ft 

Sft 

Sft 

3ft 

144 La Bare 




4 

lft 

lft 

lft 

19ft 

lift Lndmk 

40 

2.1 

U 

116 

19ft 

19 

19ft + ft 

141% 

81% Laser 

31 

17 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft + ft 

13 

9 Lauren 



2 

9 

9 

9 

27ft 

1614 LearPP 

100 166 

57 

18ft 

TTft 

18ft + ft 

91% 

2ft LeePh 
Uft Latitati s 



12 

101 

6ft 

6ft 

ift— ft 

31ft 

JOt 

2 

11 

8 

30ft 

SO 

30ft— ft 

6ft 

34a LetsurT 


a 

56 

6ft 

6M 

6ft + ft 

34ft 

91% LMFPh 

JO 

»J 

u 

12 

33ft 

31ft 

33ft— ft 

31% 

11 % UfeRst 


27 

1ft 

1ft 

lft + ft 
ift + ft 

ift 

2ft Lltfld 




5 

41% 

ift 

214 

Jft Lodoe 




2 

lft 

1ft 

lft 

39ft 

27ft Lortmr 



18 

693 

36 

34ft 

35ft +llh 
lift + ft 
lift + ft 

19 

■Oft Lumax 

M 

3 27 

33 

Uft 

Uft 

141% 

8<% Lundy E 
91% Lurid 



U 

53 

Uft 

111% 

13ft 



10 

9 

lOVn 

10 

10 — ft 

14ft 

IB LVdOl 



5 

5 

lift 

141% 

lift + ft 

TO +1 

261% 

9 LynCSs 

20 

20 

7 

244 

10 

81% 

10ft 

Bft LynctiC 

20 

20 

22 

10 

10 

10 

10 


31% 

13ft 

11% 

lft- 

Sft 

8ft- 

lft 

1ft 

Bft 

844 

2ft 

2ft 

71% 

71% ■ 

a 

18ft 

it 

ft' 



ft 4ft 
13ft 7ft 
10ft 4ft 
Uft 5ft 

2 ift ins 

«ft Aft 
15ft Vft 
4ft 2ft 
3ft 1ft 
27ft 13ft 
77ft 40ft 
6 3ft 

« Tft 

214ft 97 
4 Vi 1ft 
37ft 24ft 
lift Oft 
14ft 6ft 
5ft 2ft 
6ft 4 
31 22 

2# 7ft 
8ft 4ft 
20ft 16ft 
7ft ft 
9ft 2ft 
uw aft 

28ft ^1 

i4 aft 
19ft lift 
lift 7ft 
Cft 3ft 
4 2ft 
22ft 13ft 
31ft 21ft 
10 8ft 
3ft in 


PAX FRANCE EXPORT 

85 - Pandie 944 Turbo 
84/83- JWw 91 ISC Togo 
84 - Porsche 928 Automatic 
85 - Mercedes 23 L 16S 
85 - Merctxta I9DE Automatic 
84 - Ferrari Mondal, red 
EXCEPTIONAL CH6»CE 
ME3CHXE5, BMW, F9RARJ 
Worldwide Defoty 
37 roe Dofona 750)7 Ptwn 
Tet (1] 267 49 m Tbc 641265 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, for immedato detvery 

FROM STOCK 

Bertrarara, lUpidns, buMtncft 

band, oonveraon in U5A 

RUTE INC. 

TAUNUSSTR. 52, 6000 FRANKFURT 
W Germ, M KJ&-232351, tlx 411559 


DAWAJI TRADE 

1NTL DELIVERY 

We keep a brae stock of 
most cm Brandi 
Tefc 02/648 55 13 
Tefek 65658 
42 rue Lem, 

1050 Brussels. 


TRANS AUTOMOBILE 

1ST CLASS SERVICE 

- All makes, aS models available 

■ Brand new or second hand on 

. Shipping - EPA - DOT - nwrence 

■ AO rormrilwi 

Tut 32/2/3587702. Telex 64587 
2nd hand dept.- M 32/2/3587700 
1399 O. de Waterloo. 

1180 Brussels IBekswn} 



(Continued From Rack - Page) 


LOW COST FLIGHTS I FOR SALE & WANTED 


NY ONE WAY $150. Everyday MY. . 
Wa* Coast $145. Paris 22i 9Z 90. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL | ^ 


PORTUGAL 

7 DAYS MOU9VE TOWS 

FROM PARIS TO: 

W2700 


COSTA VHU* (OPORTO) 

ALGARVE ! 1 

MADBRA J7SNW 

PkCM 

M Td: 742 55 57, The 220550 



7/8S, dak Hue. blue Mar,. 5000 ton. 
i xiw cor pricer DM66,835. AuaQuoBro 
Turbo Cwpa. 200 pE/inodei T& ZMc 
metaKc^iobO bnTPrice: DM38,865. 
Grata Staenvon 20 l_ 2600 Antwerp Bel- 
gium. Tefc (B/zl8 75 08 



Neon Cortoch 

Mae Tefc 4750659/4223214 
Tbfc 3212SO/ FEXPOR 

Far o ther pragrer m and deta i led 
rfarnaSu ask your 

TRAVH AGENT 


MBtCEDB 500 SE. Cortoct for 
IjrangtdefrjQry with cJ extras. Tefc (0) 

HEALTH SERVICES 


4ft 1ft 

Bft 
Uta 8ft 
lift 8ft 
2Jft 15ft 
23 left 
3ft 1ft 
3ft 1ft 
left lift 
22ft IZft 
8ft 5ft 
14ft 9ft 
ID Aft 
2Dft 15ft 
15ft 10ft 


UNA 
USR Ind 

Ultmta 9 

Unicarp 

Unlmar lX4elX9 
U Air Pd JAU H 
UrtCosF S SO 23 6 
U Food A .10 47 
U FoOdS 

UtMed 13 

U5AGwt 

Un/MV 21 

UnvCra 14 

UnivRs 16 

UnlvRu JDe 49 
UnvPot 


1ft 1ft 
2ft Sft 
11V. lift 
ID'A 10'i 
10ft 10ft + ft 
21ft 21ft 
21ft 21ft— ft 
lft 1ft 
lft 1ft 
M 13ft 
13ft 14ft + ft 
«• 7 + ft 

12ft i m— ft 
7 7ft— ft 
16ft 16ft— ft 
10ft 1) 


10 ft 

91% VST n 

J5e 9j 


127 

9ft 

9V 

9ft 

20 

13 VallvR S M0 

7.1 

12 

1 

19ft 

19ft 

19ft + ft 

10 

2 ft Verd 




34 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft 

23ft 

169* VtAmC 

Mb Z4 

U 

84? 

17 

lift 

17 + ft 

61% 

34% VIRfill 




26 

4)% 

4 

4 

. * 

ft Verna 




32 

s 

'% 

Tt + ta 

13ft 

Bft Vernlt 

20 

23 

13 

49 

8 ft 

Sft 

Bft— ft 

ift 

Zft Vertnfe 




22 

3ft 

3ft 

31% — ft 

104a 

5ft Vlatedi 




3 

6 ft 

6 ft 

6 ft— ft 

ift 

lft Vlnise 




24 

2 

*% 

A 

2 +1% 

10 ft 

12 vircn 

Mr 

3 

14 

2 

lift 

14ft 

lift 

66 

53ft Valnfl 




42 

65 

64ft 

65 - ft 

12 ft 

8 Vortex 

M 

in 

u 

3 

8 ft 

8 ft 

Bft 

19ft 

lift VUICCP 

60 

*A 

12 

2 

18ft 

18 

IBft + *& 

81% 

5 VyaiBt 



■ 

16 

6 'i 

6 ft 

t‘\ 



1985 OOSWXIT SALE 
Mercedes > BMW / ftndte 
500-380/280 Sa/SEC/SL 
BMW 745/635/535 
1986 MODE15 NOW AVAUAKE 
Porsche 944 Turbo / MB 300 SI 
Also pre-owned 1979/80 Porsche* 
Coil or telex Munkk W. Gmmw 
(01 89-465041 etto. Tbc 52285! 
Ameriam owned and o perated 


MBtCEDB / PORSCHE 
New/ used. Immediate delivery. Fa AVI 
TeL Germany |0j 8234-4092, Ibc 464986 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


FOR SALE & WANTS) 


3 

15ft 

Ift 

7ft 

151k 

64% 

6ft 

31% 

25ft 

1/ft 

2 «% 

191% 

20ft 

10ft 

7 

3ft 

Sft 

2 

37ft 

25ft 

16 

17ft 

Sft 

ft 

16 

10ft 

lift 

VM 

9ft 

Sft 

91% 

Sft 

40 

Uft 

Sft 

Ift 

76ft 

36 Vk 


7ft 

% 

5 

11% 

1% 


16ft 

12 

71% 

ift 

34ft 

23 


7ft Sft 
Uft 6ft 
7ft lft 
3ft 2ft 
lift 9ft 
37 29ft 
Sft 2ft 
lift S 
19ft 8ft 



18ft Wulbar 
1S WonoB 


JO 1J 13 
.14 1JM49 
.11 J 158 


hi WmCwt 

76 WshPst .ft .9 14 
13ft WRITS 1.17 6.1 18 
7 VVaHc A 70 28 4 

7ft Watsc B .16 2D 5 
2ft WthfnJ 

6ft Wedotn .I0e 1J) 7 
7ft Wedtcti 02r 2 16 
4 Wei man .14 23 6 
7 WrtdTb J02I 


23 23 
1*13 16ft 

A 

JWOSft 

186 19ft 


Me 3.1 

9 

9 

40 

22 

7 

.72*24 

S3 

20 

23 

31 

MO Jt 

13 


2 

7ft 

18 

141% 

33 

6ft 

94 

Sft 

35 

2ft 

5 

am* 

311% 

J58 

13 V. 

140 

ft 

7 

19ft 

24 

61% 

439 

3V4 

12 

lift 

3 

5ft 

17_ 

i » 
3 raft 

8 9ft 
3 51% 

i i79% 
10 lft 


1414 OEA 
ISft Ookvwt 
4 OdetAn 
4ft OdetBs 
13ft OhArt 
10ft Olsten s 
3ft Ouoenh 
4ft OrlolH B 

I Ormond 

16 OSutvns 
eft OxfrdF 

8*4 OznrftH 


12 8 
J 11 67 

5 

74 U 2 

74 1J) 30 18 

Me 1J> 14 

30 A3 5 

10 

.42 lJ IS 151 
48 U 10 47 

70 15 13 8734 


soft asm 

16ft 16ft 
Sft 5ft 
Sft 6ft 
18ft 18ft 
24 24 

Sft Sft 
4ft 4ft 
lft lft 
21ft 22V% 
13 12ft 
lift 13ft 


aft + M 

16ft + ft 
Sft 

6ft + ft 
18ft— ft 
24 

Sft— ft 

4ft 

lft 

97ft —lft 
13 + ft 

13ft — ft 


1.90a 9.0 a 
M 6.9 ID 
50 48 3 

AM 52 19 


70 17 7 
L38I 63 9 

17 

4JI0B 

JO 1J 36 
.18 8 36 

47 

imcTjn 

is 

15 

J2 18 20 
70 

• 17 * 13 „ 
20 1J 20 


4 10ft 10ft 
96 15ft I4ft 
486 Ifift 16 
132 Sft » 
1 lift lift 
1 lift lift 
180x10ft 10ft 
29 13 13 

10 9ft Mk 
6 7ft 7ft 
1 37ft 37ft 
173 72ft 21ft 

a uft lift 
35 Sft Sft 
140ttsJ®lft TOlft 
1 23ft 23ft 
3 23 23 

179 24 23ft 
77 lft lft 

i 3 ® a 

M Mft 21ft 

an rift 

27 10ft 10ft 


Sft + ft 

'ttS + ft 

5ft— ft 
17ft + ft 
lft 

36ft + ft 
Bft— ft 
Bft— ft 


10ft — ft 
14H— H 
16ft + ft 
«»— ft 
lift — ft 
lift 

STft , 

22ft +1 

’sft— ft 

w=8 

aft + ft 
ift— ft 
36ft- lft 
6ft 

21 + ft 

Sft— ft 
73ft + ft 
ZJft + ft 
Uft 

10ft— ft 


& weiiAm 
314 WelGrd 

171ft Wasco 82 1.9 II 
ft wesncp 

Sft WSTBrC IT 

8>.. Wstbr o 80 13 

6V. WO taut 

7V. WtHim n 16 

ISftWIRET 186 U 14 
Sft WsTSL S .16 I J 4 
lift WhrEns 13 

3 wick os 5 

ft WlOnwt 
90 Wlckr, pf^SO 8J 
1 WltsnB 

Tta WinnEn 37 

19ft Wlnlln 124 118 
2ft WalfHB 

lift WhWaar 82 38 7 
2ft WwtleE 68 

12 ft wwde nt 180 116 

9ft Warthn 851 
13V® Wrathr 82 .1 43 


9 8 

11 10ft 
7 13ft 

at ft 

1 2ft 
18 33 
10 IV. 
20 6 
14 lift 

1340 7ft 
43 15ft 
4 18ft 
70)5 1216 
217 12ft 
2956 4ft 
139 2 
388 39ft 
61 IV, 
45 7 
34 28ft 

2 2ft 
30 17ft 
95 Sft 
10 lift 
29 9ft 

2 18ft 


23ft 22ft- 
1&V« 16ft 
Uft ISft 

na^icsft? 

19 19ft- 

7ft 7ft 
8ft Sft - 
3ft 3ft 
9ft 9ft- 
»ft 10V. 

i A 

IQ 10 - 
13ft 13ft 
ft ft 

;k •!" 

18ft 18ft 
)2Vr in* 
12ft 12ft- 
4’ i ift 
lft 2 
27ft 

lft lft 


Place Your Classified Ad CMddy and loifly 

' la tbe^ 

INIBMATIOIIAI HBUULD IRIHQNE 

By Phonee Cdl your load BIT represertnthm wt#! year ted. You ; 
vnfl be infanMd of the cost imnedtately, and onat prepayment b 
made your ad wfl cuear uathei 48 hoars. •• 

Coal: The beoende it iWIO per fine per day + locd laws. Thera one 
251enore,siBniandipccKbtaefirtfBneond36inAafaBo*ringSnK. 
Minimum ipacn is 2 6n«- No dbbreviatiorn acoaptrd. . 

CntdR Cade: Amerieon Express Knar* Oub, Btroqad) Morier 
Card. Acaes and V«s. - - 


HartK (far -classified ontyji 
747464V. 

EUROPE 

Aresterdm 36J6-li . 
Mwm: 361«97/3«W421. 
Bamelsi 343-1899. 
Copenhagen: (01) 32 9440. 
FrsmkJurt: (069) 72-67-SS. . 

t w me : 29^94. 

Uffcaro 67-27-93/ 66-2544. " 
Unden; (01)8364802. 
Morbid: -4552871 /4553306. 
Mian: (02) 753M45. . - 
Norway: (02) 41 2953. 
Raw 679-3437. 

Swmdtn: (OBI 7569229. 

Tel Aviv: IB4H 559. 
Vienna: Contact franidurt. 

UNfTH>5TATBL 

New York: (212) 7524lfi9a 
Went Coast: (415) 362-8339. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

Bryamtar. 421599. . 


.(Dept. 3121 
Cnaan 331454 
.Gwayamrib 51 4505 
UaasWBSZ 
Panama: 69 0511 
San Jeen: 22-1055 ' 

SaiHasai 6961 555 
San feet* 852 1893 

AMPOilEAST 

Bahrain: 246303. • . 

Kuwait: 5614485. 
lebanara 341 457/8/9. 
Oa8ir: 416535. - 

Sawfl Awd d u. . 

JmhlBfc' 667-1 5IXL 
LULL Dubai 22416J. 

TAR EAST 
Bangkok: 39006-57. 


j» l,1j | 


Kaafi: 5-213691 . . 

JMnrta: 510092. 

ManBa: 81707 49. 

Seaal:7358773. 

Snpapar* 222/J7S. - 

Tarwm 752 44 25/9. 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 
Mribaana: 6908233. 
5y*fcw£929 56 39, 957432A 
Perth: 328 98 33. 

PtadArakm, Q oee nri a n d : 
369 34 53. 


ft Kf.T flU l ^ ;4 Kfv’tiHH I D x~lR ['4 I) i ») 


lm; :4 KgTrjj i 


& GUIDES 


lift lift 

9ft 7*1 


»ft si* Yank Co 


91fe 3H Zlmer 


11 l 6ft ift 4ft — 


3ta Sft 3^ + -j 


A\IE\ Highs-Lm\>ii 




Blnlu Mlg 
OxarkHldg 


CDICa 

SmlltlAOpf 


Gauldlnv Tr Halm. *n 
TcntvBkA 


BSD Baa n Blount B CastleAM ElecAudDy 

Firstoaron JumcJock n LvnctiC5vss MlsPIn 

NuctearDta Preftdla RitSauunn SecCipCs 

SterraHIthn Sun SAL TecnSwn 


: i T i 1 («'t i 

n t ljjTTTTi * t*) • P:i • rn 


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SERVICE 

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Head office in New York 
330 W. 56th St, N.Y.G 10019 USA 

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Can free from Rondo, 1400-2820891 
loi«rfl Eastern welcomes you back! 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SffiVKE 
IN NEW YORK 




LONDON 

BaGRAVlA 

Boxt SermOL 

Td: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

Portmcm Escort Agency 

67 QaUeni Street, 
londen W1 

Tel: 486 3724 or 486 1158 , 
AR moier oeA conk ea e pied 


★ LONDON ★ 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


AR1STOCATS 

London Escort Service 

128 Wtamare 5ft London W.l. 
AB moor Credt Cords Accepted 
SE 437 47 41 / ^42 
12 noon ■ inichiaiit 


** GB4EVA-F1RST ** 

DAAY ESCORT SBVKX 
Trt: 022/32 34 18 
+ .WBM) 4- TRAVH, 


ZURICH-GBJEVA 

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TH: 01/363 06 64-022/34 41 86 


ZURICH 

CmoGee Escort Service 
Tefc 01/252 61 74 


ZURICH 

Martha escort + guide service 
Tefc 01/57 75 96 


TEL 212-737 3291. HEATHROW 


PARLIAMENT 

ESCORT SERVICE 

New York 21 2-5 T7-8 121 
Chicago 312-787-9059 

Major credit cmds accepted 


* London Escort Agency* 

01-609 2870 


LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK E5CORT 5SKVKX 
212-888-1666 



MADRID INTL 


t*- JASMINE * 




MUNICH ■HJEGANOA* ESCORT 8BCUE ESCORT SBtVKZ Tefc 

Ager^y Ms 31 Ml 06 1 903022 / 903055 


* AMSTE RDAM « 

CLUB ROSE ESCORT SERVTCE 
STAOHOUDHBKAOE I2S 
Tet 020768606 


ROME OJUB HJROPEESCOW. 
S Guide ServictTei 0S/5W 2604- S89 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pte) 


GENEVA * BEAUTY* 

ESCORT SERVICE. 022/29 5T 30 











































































































W xJ'k ■ 


* \ 




iK 







-s ± :: '‘ '-'f/- *' :~''V '• 7 : . .' ' 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 1985 



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Photographs by Werner Bischof, Rent Bum, Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Elliot Erwut, Ernst Hass, Ench 

From the archives of . Magnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe in 
the immediate postwar years —striking images of a continent sh a kin g off 
:: the debris of destruction and coming to life. 

MaryBlume, the International Herald Tribune’s distinguished feature 
journalist, sets the postwar scene arid interviews many of the photographers 
in her introduction. The I.H.T. is phased to present this unique volume that 
captures a dedave epoch and commemorates die work of some of the 

v 20th century’s master photojournalism 

Here you’ll find some pf die most f amous images and faces of our 
time. Once you open its pages, you will want to spend hours poring over this 
ma^iificenUy produced collection. Truly this is a book to treasure for 

; yourself, andabeautifulgiftasfwdL 

- Avaflabjefram -the Jideraarierial Herald Tribune, Order today. ; 




-i 



■7 


L^pang , Inge Morath, Marc Riboud, David Seymour, and other Magnum photographers. % n 

■ ■■ tm WM HI WMWMWmWM ■■ licraliCS eribunc 


AFTER THE WAR WAS OVER 

International Herald Tribune, Book Di\ision. 

1S1 Ave. Charies-de-Gaulle, 92521 Neuillv Cedejt, France. 
Please check method of payment: 

□ Enclosed is my payment (in any convertible 
European currency aL current exchange rates). 

□ Please charge w da«£» dvm# nAmc\ 
my credit card. □Euwomi □Dmen □Masunaid 


□ MiMauud 


Please send me copies of After The War Was Over 

at U.S. S39.50 each, plus postage; $4,00 each in Europe; 
$12.00 each outside Europe. 


Name (in block letters) . 


Address . 


Hardcover, 

168 duotone illustrations, 
32x26cm ( 115x1 0.25in.) 


Card No.. 


Signature — 

(necesurv for acdii ant purchase*) 


Exp. date . 


City and Code . 


Country 


12-10-35 


- . L ‘ ' . >“ ■ r # ‘ jj . 








I 


1 


I 


I c ’» v 


3 

I 


1 




Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Walt street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


SR. RofHnH 120 
40 Ronrln 
n% RotnCm x0 
SV4 RotlnE s 
8% Rollins X6 
2 Roman 

II Robot 54 

24 Rarer 1.12 
7ft Romm .12 
46 Ro»ID 12» 

lOW Boy Inl i 
lov. Ruemo s 

uv, Busier 
IRS RasToo 74 
20 RyanH TJO 
22 Ryders 50 
ins Rvtond 56 
HVi Rvmer 
Ills Rvmer ptl. 1 7 


65x66 4- lb 

554, 564k— H 
Jrti 23 +5* 

hhs ibvj + is 

ins ms- n 

2 3 

lUi lift + IS 
«1>4 414, — lib 

Tfi 7ft + lb 
62'4 6256 
M'4 

1*4, 77 + % 

i«» ish 
IV lb 1M + ft 
2*!b 27ft +■ Vb ' 
27to 274. + lb 
211b 3116— lb 
16ft 1616 + IS 
lift lift 


2«V, 19ft 
14ft 0 
«ft 32ft 
38ft 21ft 
55ft «ft 
35 31ft 
47ft 77 
7ft 3 
92 68ft 


(Continued from Page 10) 


nSshw 1 « 

Norton too 35 13 
NorwSt 130 79 14 
NwitPt 5X0el05 
Novo j*s lo li 

EM ffl J » 

NYNEX 640 7.9 8 


I ZJft 23ft 23ft 

168 12ft lift 12ft +1J& 

202 37 36ft 36ft— ft 

518 23ft 22ft ZZft — ft 

BS Sift Sift 51ft 

642 26 257S 25ft — ft 

128 44ft 44 44* + H 

II n. 3ft TV. 

1506 8Tft 79ft Blft+lft 


tft 

33ft + ft 

14 + ft 

SZft + ft 
22ft— ft 
20ft + ft 
21 4- ft 

54ft + ft 

107ft +. ft 
107ft + ft 
20ft 

30 4- ft 

15 

35 + ft 

35ft— 1 
57 + ft 

26ft— VS 
*3}b + IS 
27ft + ft 

30 + ft 

65 —1 
91 — ft 

Sift 

lift + Vb 

31 + ft 

108 

74ft +lft 
23ft + ft 

Mb 

33ft + ft 
6 — ft 

1 3ft + Vb 
2Mb— ft 
26 — ft 
8ft— ft 
24 — ft 

24ft + ft 
10* 

7ft + ft 
28ft 

22ft + ft 
34ft + ft 
15ft + Vb 
33ft + ft 
48 + ft 

12ft— Vb 


* 






m 


1.92 40 a 
152 4JJ 15 
1JM 12 10 
176 26 18 
M 4J) 22 
56 19 II 
52 IB 12 
180 61 8 
M 25 B 
52 17 10 
154 36 11 
U8 ID 10 
ITOallX 
.12 40 
76 65 9 
170 35 15 
UO 45 
168 6.1 IB 
IJ» 82 
160 19 9 
60 2J 12 
1.10 11 10 
152 96 14 


70 17 18 
.16b 16 13 
11 

64* 12 13 
60 4.9 28 
150 18 136 
M 5 33 
50 45 
550 27 2B 
190 105 7 
260 115 
460 134 
452 135 
156 46 
116 76 
56 15 
22B 55 


108 


4X 

7 

27 

11 

127 

5 

111 


137 


12.9 


127 


126 


X 

7 

> 18 

13 

25 

12 

27 

11 


lISi Futures 


Season Season 
Mhiti Lew 


Open High Low Close Op. 


Grains 


4662 +52 

45.95 +ljg 

si £§ 

SS +21 

4ZJB +JH 
3960 +.1S 

4150 —65 


65.15 +U3 
6555 +163 
6665 +175 
6667 +170 
6+95 +UB 


Metals 


Livestock 


CATTLE <CME] 

40000 DXL. cents per lb. , 

6S.90 3250 Oct 6165 6160 

*765 5100 DOC 6352 *425 

6745 54J5 Feb 6170 4Z.10 

6757 5530 APT 6145 6270 

UTS 5675 jun OSe 62*5 

&5«3 5570 AUO 6040 6160 

6060 58.10 Oct 5930 5960 

Est. Sales 15750 Prew. Sales 17643 
Prev. Day Open InL 51,963 Off 14 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMEJ 
mjsoo lbs.- cents per lb. _ 

7252 5645 Oct 6447 6550 

7370 • 58.10 NOV 665S 675J 

7940 auo Jan 68.90 6972 

7170 6062 MOT 6875 6975 

71-00 6040 Apr 6840 69JS 

mra 60.10 May 6760 6775 

6050 6575 Aug 6675 67 79 

Est. Sales L575 Prev. Sales 1599 
Pm. Day Open Int. 8616 off 48 


41ft 23ft 
14ft 51b 
25ft 14 
3ft 3ft 
28ft 19 
4ft 2ft 
43ft 32V, 
13ft 9ft 
25ft 13 
13 3ft 
lift 9ft 
13VS 13 
55 29ft 
49ft 38ft 
73ft 58 
91ft 73 
73 57ft 
*8 53 

37ft 13ft 
55ft 33ft 
85 66ft 


II 92 40ft 
.117 10% 
9 23ft 
2 2ft 
7 60 23ft 

52 4ft 
16 1950 23% 
33 33 12ft 

11 145 14ft 

22 51 10ft 

107 11 
764 13ft 
24 2301 5Sft 
507 45ft 
IHtt 69ft 
70z BSft 
lOz 69 
3UOZ*4ft 
15 5 24ft 

24 19 S3 

13 61 83ft 


399* 4(Jft + ft 
10 10 — ft 

23ft 23ft— ft 
2ft 2ft 
23 23ft + ft 
4% 4% 

22% 23% +lta 

12 17 — ft 

13% 14% + ft 
10ft 10* + ft 
10ft 11 + Vb 

13 Uft 
53% 54ft +1% 
45ft 45ft 

69 69 —1 

85ft H5ft— ft 
69 69 

64ft 64ft + ft 
24ft 241b + ft 
52V* 53 + lb 

83ft 83ft + ft 


UO 
I 2.10 
160 
Pf 144 
Pf 140 
PI 7.15 

iff ** 

JS? 

t PfD 
BfE 
IPfF 
fDfG 
MM 268 
EG 264 
G pr 1X0 
Gpf 440 
G pf 4.18 
Gpf STB 
Gpf 2.17 
Gpf 263 
Gpfl27S 
Gpf 752 
Gpf 962 
lick 
lekrt 


Company Results 

Revenue ottd profits or losses, m mlllforo. ore In local 
currencies unless otherwise tnOKateH 


63 33 OuCfcO s 1.40 24 15 IBM 58ft ,57 57% + 16 

105 91 QuoOpf 956 97 lIBUMira 104 +2 

an. 16ft QuofcSO 60 +7 19 61 21ft 21% 21ft 

10W 6 Quonex 19 193 6Vb 5ft 6 

34ft 27 Qvwtar 160 57 10 185 28% 28ft Mft + ft 

26 Vs 14ft Ok Rail 740 LI 14 75 Zlft 20ft 21* + % 


9% 6 IS 

49ft 34 
40 29ft 
12 79ft 
38ft 32 
9ft 6% 
4% 31b 

19ft 12ft 
Uft Bft 
47* 31ft 
9ft Sib 
21 * 16ft 
6ft 3ft 
78ft 51ft 
17ft ?ft 
51ft 36% 
10% 5ft 
21ft 14ft 
24ft 16ft 
16% 11 
17* Bft 
12ft 7 

1* h 
43ft 27ft 
ft 4ft 
1* 
U 5ft 
% 36 
ft 17% 
23* 
52 ft 
24% 
73ft 
15ft 
22ft 
10 

32ft 
93 
17% 
11 % 
25ft 
47ft 
123% 
27* 
24ft 
26U 
21ft 
2ib 
281s 
25ft 
5ft 
16ft 
31 
18* 
27% 


2X2 

a* 

150 109 

180 

ii 

50 

25 

60 

11 

1X8 


xa 

U 

IXU 

4.1 

180 I1J 

88 

38 

1X8 

47 

154 

85 

188 

44 

250 

14 

2X8 115 

.92 

li 

74 

li 

70 

27 

150 

ao 


Currency Options 


Get IJ-. 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option & 3 Trike 

Underlying Price Colls— Lost Pots— Last 

Nov Feb May Nov Feb hot 

nun British Poamu-aentc par ssrtt. 

B Pound 135 r 9 9 OJS * s 

14141 140 r S s 265 s S 

141.01 14S 140 S * r s s 

62480 west asman Marttsceats par unit. 

DMark 37 r s s 060 6 s 

3763 39 02® s 8 r S * 

67SWOO Japapese Yen-liOtta of a cant per strtL 
JYen 44 r 9 S 060 S S 

46J4 46 140 s s r s S 

4654 47 064 S 9 r S S 

4654 48 072 S 9 r S S 

62400 Swiss Fnmcs-cents por suit. 

SFranc 44 r 9 s 075 9 s 

4588 46 042 9 9 r 9 9 

Doc Mar Jim Dec Mor Jus 

12480 Britten Pounds-ceati par anlt. 
b Pound 1T0 3i.t® r s r r 9 

14181 ITS 2565 r 1 r r t 

14181 125 15.9® r r 03 t r 

. 14181 130 11.15 r r 075 r r 

14141 135 745 r r 160 r r 

14161 140 345 r TJO 445 640 r 

14141 14S 245 r r t r • r 

50680 Canadian DqBarwsntl por PRlt. 

CDoiir 72 172 r r r r r 

7344 74 t r rJJO r r 

42408 west German Marics-cents par aait. 

DMark 32 575 r r r r r 

3763 33 r r r 063 r r 

3763 34 372 470 r 080 r r 

3763 35 2.94 365 r 0.15 r r 

3763 36 2.14 275 r 070 069 r 

3763 37 166 r r Ul r r 

3763 38 DM 145 r 144 164 r 

3763 39 040 172 r r r r 

4j5oan Japanese Yon-moths of a coni per anlt. 

JYen 39 742 r r r r r 

4*64 42 468 r r 045 r r 

4664 44 r r r r 044 r 

4664 -45 r r r 0J9 M2 r 

4664 46 162 1.98 r 072 172 r 

4564 48 047 1.16 r r r r 

42680 Swiss Froncs-cents P*r aalL 

SFranc <JB 6.13 r r r r r 

4588 43 3J0 r r t r r 

4568 44 r 378 480 (07 r r 

4568 46 1 JO r r 071 r r 

4568 4t r r 268 r r _ r 

Total cnU vaL 13684 Call openjnt ■ 1WOT 

Total pat saL 1616 Pwl open Int 129791 

r— Not traded. »—Na option offerntL 
Lost is aramlurn (purchase price). 

Source: ap. 


1 +.1S Ti 


Financia 


Stockln 


EW.WIf3 

Pr*v.Dav 

Op«nli 

it. 30893 up 295 



TO YR. TREASURY (CBTl 
o ; 1X00 prlo- pf* i 32nd3 ot TOO DCt . 

85-18 


87-13 

75-13 

DOC 85-19 85-19 

85-12 

86-2 

75-14 

Mar B4-14 8+14 

5+9 

8+ 1 1 

85-7 

74-30 

Jun 


B3-T3 

84-4 

rn-7 

5eg 


82-18 

83-11 

80-2 

Dee 


8V25 

Est.Soim 


Prev. Said 12741 



Prev. Dov Op«i int 49X52 up 1306 




dost' 

Moody's *s 

Reuters . 

DJ. Futures-*- }™ 

Com. Research Bureau. 223J0 

Moodv*s rbose tOO : DecL-3T, 1931. r ' 
p-preUmli - v; f- final 
Reuters: base W0 : S«p. 18,1931. -• 

. Dow Jones ibaselOO : Dec. 31, 1974. ; 


Previous 
9oaoof 
1J10JQ . 
11768 ' 
224.10 


Gomniwliiieg 


N.T. 

N. 

N.T. 

N. 

N.T. 

N. 

N.T. 

N. 

N.T. 

N. 

N.T. 

N. 

X 16 


DM ixitures 
Options 

•9. Onm imtt-ttSM worts, arts par « 


London. 

Commodities 


High Low M AM M Aik 

SUGAR 

Sterling per metric ton 
Dec 14026 13840 13960 14078 !»■» 14070 

Mor 14980 14670 14760 14760 14760 14760 

MOT 15280 150X0 151X0 15160 15170 15160 

A vp N.T. N.T. 157X0 15760 15780 15760 

Oct N.T. N.T. 16360 16360 140X0 16360 

Volume: 1X42 lots of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric too 
Dec 1740 1729 1736 1727 1738 1733 

Mar 1778 1765 1774 1775 17W 176B 

May 1606 1798 1600 1602 1601 1603 

JS9 3320 1622 1623 1625 626 -827 

SOP 1640 1630 1612 1640 1636 1638 

Dec 1620 1612 1610 1615 1617 1619 

Mar 1625 1625 1621 1625 1624 1620 

Volume: 3780 lots of 18 tans. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric tan 
Nov 1X35 1620 1x23 1625 1604 1605 

Jaa 1672 1654 1657 1658 16« 1643 

Mar 1704 1687 1688 1690 1471 1678 

May 1727 1712 1705 1715 1700 1707 

Jlr 1749 1734 1740 1745 1715 1730 

SOP 1770 17*0 1764 1765 1750 1765 

NOV N.T. N.T. 1740 1620 1740 1680 

Volume: 2779 tats of 5 Ians. 

GASOIL 

U6. donors per metric Me 
NOV 24860 24360 24860 24869 24550 24538 
Dec 34*73 24260 24480 34475 24480 24475 
Jan 2*550 24280 34460 24475 24375 24350 
Feb 2*375 24060 24175 2*275 34175 24150 
MOT 23360 23380 23475 23580 23125 23480 
Apl 22980 22880 22075 22860 22775 22880 
MOV 22475 22373 22460 22580 22380 22450 
JIM 22S80 22480 22480 22425 SITS 222JO 
Jty 22480 22380 22060 22275 22080 22280 
Volume: 2737 lots of 100 tans. 

Sources: Reuters ana Loudon Pet rol eu m ex- 
Change toosoU). 


Comnmlities 


Volume: 22 lafp of 100 oz. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysia! cats per kilo 


Cash Prices 


CeminetOty and umt - en 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb — ■ 17> 

Printouts *4«o 39 ft, yd _ 0X1 

Sleet bidets (PW.l.ton «}« 

Iron 2 Fdry. Pti Italian- — M* 
Sleet scrap No I Itw PtH. - 7S-74 

I firi TpttI. ^ IT 

:£==: ® 

Dnc.E. SL L. Basis, lb *35 

Patiaaawn.az - — * 8 rl?r 

Stiver N.Y.ez — 4715 

Source: AP- 


Nov 18760 18860 

Dec 18860 18968 

Jan ... 18860 18968 

Feb.. 19080 19280 

Mar 19060 19260 

Volume; 2 lots. 


BM Ask 
18480 18780 

18788 18880 
18780 18890 

MM “79060 
18960 19160 


55ft 15* Xenix 380 43 13 48)8 47ft 44% 47*— 

Sft 46ft Xerox Pf 5.45 la?! 1 54ft 54ft 54ft 

29 19ft XTRA 64 26 12 17 22lb 22ft 22ft + * 


30* 34ft ZaieCp 162 47 10 It S 

18% 7* Zapata .12 15 SS 230 S' 

57ft 31ft Zflvres 6 til D 51 


57ft 31ft Zayre * X8 9 16 
27 16* ZMlIttlE IS 

21ft 15% Zero i 32 lx 16 
37% 27ft Zurnm 1J2 19 T1 


32 47 10 19 28 27% 28 

.12 15 SS 230 B* 8ft Bft — ft 

X8 J 16 ,88 51% Sift 51% + ft 

ID 172 16ft 16'~ 14% + V. 
72 lx 14 25 tW» 19ft 19ft 

72 19 11 24 34ft Uft 34ft + ft 


NV5E Higlis-Lows 






Oct. II 

strike 

Cafe+effle 


Ptrtsdeffle 

price Dec 

Mr 

JIM 

Dec 

Mar 

JIM 

36 208 

274 

129 

024 


084 

37 178 

111 

257 

055 

094 

121 

38 073 

LSI 

2.11 

0J7 

1X2 

153 

39 0X8 

L14 

157 

151 

193 

2.15 

40 Ul 

082 

13* 

— 

— ■ 

— 

41 0.12 

052 

098 

— 

— 

— 

Etthnafec fatal mL NA 




Coll*: Thu.vel.430&oaee wt.31511 


Pell : Thu. nL 1735 apm InL 22X25 


Source: CME. 






400 

<70 


volume: 0 lots of 25 tans. 
Source; Reuters. 


Dividends 


INCREASED 

Umorce* Q 70 12-2 
1 USUAL 

O 74 12-4 
-a jo 1J-3S 
o 7i n-i ■ 
a .14 1IKU 
081 Vb 11-15 ' 
O 79 11-5 

- . Q ,56 0-13 - 
-Q 'J6 11-14 

- G JTVb- 12-2 

8 45 - 0-16 

54 ft 11-1 ' 
G X4 12-30 
• -O.T3V, 11-25 
Q 71 Vi 12-2P ' 
m amnWifr? a e uarie rtr ) m 


n 


London IVIeiais 


u InfUxdonBaJte 

LlS/Ireasuries \\ Slows in Britain 


S&PJOO 
index Options 


AVXCb 
C arp Tech 
Ebdm 
KalsCemi 
LTV52Spt 


Peta+xst 

Oct N« Dsc Jwi 
IriA 1/14 % 7/14 

1/lt S/14 % 11/16 

3/14 Ik, lh 2»/14 
1% 1 UV Ilk 

M 6% it 7ft 
- 11% - 11% 
11 % - - - 


. 

■ 

Oct. II 

PftOBQWt 


Prev. 

Otter BM 

YMd 

YUM 

»°NMb b « 7.19 7.17 

7X1 

7X4 

4-OMMIiklH 777 " 7JS 

733 

778 

■Frearwi 7X8 7X4 

U2 

■M 



Prev. 

BM Oftar . 

YMd ' 

YMd 

W-yearband TOO 6/32 W0 7/32 

ML48 

HUQ 

Source: Satamon anthers. 



Mofyfli Lncbireenr Indmc 128X4 


Change lor tbs day: + AM ' 



Averaas yWd: *J9 % 



Source; Merrot Lynch. 




The Associated Press 

LONDON — Britain's annual 






S»2{--2 










ipai+167 




















































































^CURRENCY MARKETS r i t u 

~Z r ~ ~~ . - - — — — - — - — — — Seoul lalks 

Dollar Ends Mixed in U.S. on Intervention Center on 

* Vnp 51.41 lOonThureday. The U.S. cur- response to- the intervention. It rpr 7 7 7 -v 7 

iA ~ « do ® ar r<51c y was also slightly stronger ported at 2.6672 DM in London l %/ f\f*§ ft 1 1 ohf 
loscd nnxed Friday against mqor against the Deutsche made, closmg but fdl to 2*580 DM at the dose, ^ 

up Iran 2*570 DM. whidi was stffl above TTunsdays 

ler a generally strong performance Th* riniw fin ;« -m^h. v«i> ~i nu (Cocmnaeolrora r^e 9) 

In Europe. 



«* 

*a 


MH*** 


* S»- r,r. 

r >71 , 

w 


KFW VnVY n ™~* pat ? ,es 5L411Q on Thursday. TheUJi. cur- response to-, the intervention. It y y r -m •* -T\ m 

r « do ^ ar renc y was also slightly stronger peaked at 2.6672 DM in London IM/ f\T*t ft 1 1 pf)f 

loscd nnxed Friday against mqor against the Deutsche made, closmg but fdl to 2*580 DM at the dose, ^ UWl 

^2.^575 DM; up from 2*570 DM. whidi was stffl above Dunsdays 

[er a generally strong perfonnance Die <W 1 »f fdl in New York 2*550 DM. (Continued from ™ 

111 -j . ‘ against the Swiss franco ending at In Frankfurt, the dollar was tion cxpaidinires of Third World 

JfS 35 there were r^orts- 11785 francs, from 2.1870 francs, fixed at 2*595 DM. up from Z6533 countries had fallen to 9 percent or 

Reserve rnter- And the U.S. diriericylna ground DM on Thursday. A dealer there th«r budgets from 21 percent — 

5 n m . Ncw Yoik w <l“tet the there against the French franc, «d- said, “I think the market will have while their military expenditures 

, 1 “*« r eucouragiag reports ing at 8.1100 fames, from 8.1160 to reorient itself to take the dollar rose to more than $100 billion from 

rnoui U*. retail sales and whole- francs on Thursday. lower” neat week. “Ifs becoming S7 billion. 

- ale pnoes, but the impact was Era- Earlier, Ok news about the U.S. dear that the room for the dollar to This kind of thinking about what 
, economy pushed the dollar higber climb is limited" by central bank developing countries should be 

; : ^ Retail sales rose 2.7 percent in in European t rading intervention, he added. doing to solve their own problems 

' i>eptember, while wholesale prices - ■ Currracydeaiers in Londonesti- In -London. the British pound goesbeyond the transfer of military 

dJQ.7 perccDL mated that the Fed sold morethan ended unchanged from Thursday's to social programs, reaching wnhm 

-fi lraomz was verv auiet " caix ■— *- -- — *• ‘" e oc 


i Discount Corp. of New York. 
“Most dealers were reluctant to put 
n large positions faemka three-dav 
• veekend." ; y 

' U.S. markets are dosed Monday 

. or a holiday. 

The British pound ended lower 
n New York at $1.4105, from 


the Bundesbank; sold between $50 In Paris, the U.S. currency per- 
miUion and $100 million to boy fanned strongly, ending at 8.101 
Deutsche mfryks . Ineariicr Asian French francs, up from 8.095 - 
trading, the Rant of Japan sold an francs previously, 
undisclosed amount of dollars, the In Zurich, the dollar finished at 
dealers said. ’ 2. 1835 Swiss francs, up from 2. 1793 


THE EUROMARKETS 


By Christopher Pizzey However, a trader at a VS. bank 

'l t nwnnw^ WOT Tv , „ • rioted, “The market’s been, totally 

■■ LONDON The dollar- apathetic to news, either 

'£?S l t^^S' rate ‘?° teSe ?' srodOT bad, m the pastfcw days.” 
krs of the Eurobond market again h, wd ,i 


mated that the Fed sold more than ended unchanged from Thursday’s to soda programs, reaching within 

1 fading was very. quiet,” said. $200 million to buy Japanese yen. dose, at $1.4115. Sterling was vir- government social programs as 

id Holland, vice president of The West Gennan central bank, tuaDy ignored, traders said. ■ wdL Mr. Haq said he had found 

" r VT ” ’ the Bundesbank sold between $50 In Paris, the U.S. currency per- that it took only the postponement 
million and $100 million to buy fanned, strongly, ending at 8.101 of one expensive urban hospital to 

Deutsche In eariicr Asian French francs, up from 8.095 fmaace the entire cost of anaccd- 

trading, the Bank erf Japan sold an francs previously. erated imnmnization and health* 

undisdosed amount oT doBare, the In Zurich, the dollar finished at *■” program for all the children in 
dealers said. ‘ 2.1835 Swissfrancs, up from X 1793 Pak i stan. 

The dollar rallied on the- U.S: francs on Thursday. Is u not our own responsibility 

economic news but then receded in . (UPI, AP, Reuters) » correct our distorted priorities 

and pnees before making fervent 

appeals for the correction of inter- 

BTC- national irrationalities?" Mr. Haq 

mmm asked. 

- Changes axe sweeping through 

T ry ' ■ - rwi !• the Third World today, One such 

eoate Seems to dtow Ir acting Change is the growing recognition 

that freeing up national economies 
is crucial to furthering growth. But 

However, a trader at a U*. bank bonds bang launched this week, one more idea must take root be- 
rioted, “The market’s been totally they noted. ^ • fore the development problems of 


The dollar rallied on ihe lLS. francs on 
economic news but then receded in 


Thursday. 

(UPI, 


AP, Reuters) 


Debt-Ceiling Debate Seems to Slow Trading 


ihowed very little chan ge. Friday, 
with U.S. credit markets also seem- 


. - rioted, “The market's been totally they noted. fore the development problems of 

’ll 8 * - apathetic to "wmiif news, other Most issues in the floating-rate- poor countries can be solved: the 
esec- good or bad, in the past few days.” note sector were steady, in line with idea that personal and political 
a 8ain He added Lhat became there was period Eurodollar deposit rates, freedom is Just as essential as eco- 


no reaction to Thursday’s U*. 
money-supply figures, which 


dealers said. 


nomic freedom. 


i;ngly staUol within an extreme^ 3KS 4 g 

than-expccted$5jbiIHon.theS- I I 

- ® De 81 8 tive lack of reaction to the other I 

Luropean bank noted that many data did not surprise him. I Kevenuea 

0“ new doDar-straight was ■ 

I ant to open fresh positions vmue j ‘ 

he debate continued in the United R J R^moldJ ^ Wto* States 

.. States about the raising of the fed- ™>n bOTd/orRJ. Reynolds In- . ^^vinitaia 
>-Tal debt ceilina. - dustnes Inc. The six-year issue Mtar . ms 

;; < FriSy’s^S^iroducer prri* and Pg? » P«cem and was priced at STSS^r; 

S.-e tail -sales data for September , , , . - nSmS!*_ 35 

' jailed to have any impact on the It ended on the market at a dis- P*ra»or.__ isi 
narket, dealers said. count of about 1%, within the total JJonspofnt 

Dealers added that in more nor- fees of 1% patent. The teaman- ® 

?: ,nal circumstances, the U*. eco- age* was Union Bank of Switzer- gJEJKsz - 

-iiomic data could well have land (Securities) Ltd. BvLw* 

^ prompted at least a mark-up in During the wedc, doUar-straighl op*r ^L~~ «*)5i£ 

3 wees. The Producer Price Index issues were mixed, with movements jifiL. 

'-hopped 0* percent, compared generally hunted to \A .point cm ei- FstBonksvst) 
viln forecasts mat it would be un- tber side of the previous Friday’s yiflwr. «» 
■hanged, while retail sales, exdud- closmg levds, dealers said. New- Sir shorn _ w 
^ ng car sales, were up only 0* per- issue activity was relatively slow, »**”*»» 

Z tnt with just over $750 million of new persim™_ 


Company Results 

Revenue end profits or tosses. In millions, ore In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


Fst Chicago 
3rd Poor. in 

Net inc. SM 

Per Short— un 

• IMtt IMS 


It ended on the market at a dis- wsm 


9 SO Intsrfirst 

ins mi ardQoor. ms m« 

SM (a)7Vi Net Inc. l&J gu 

un — Per Shore — 034 131 

IMS lfH f Months IMS 1M4 


jgu was uiuuu mus ui jwiiiw- oper Slwre_ — 

land (Securities) Ltd. yw . ms 

During the wedc, doUar-s traighl oper Net toisia 

issues were mixed, with movements 
generally Bunted to tt.paint on ei- Fst Bank svsti 
tber side of the previous Friday’s mcwot. ms 
closmg levds, dealers said. New- ££ shore— 1 x 7 


if •MoothC IMS 1M4 » Months 

M 074 Met Inc. io*J 3U Net Inc 

«S HM Per Shore 130 ait Per Shore — 

-S' a: lots. t9S4 nets tnd 

5 Fst City Bcp Texas ■mmw.ftwnt 

w 1H1 mqow. ms mt ll 

iVt! Net Inc. 1006 ism wouor 

H Per snore— OU 833 SiS5i‘ 

— 022 f Months ms mt NcMnc. 

— nu Mot Inc. 3135 UM Per Share — 

K m PerShom— 056 1.63 #Mortto 

ij Isj ms Quarter neUndudctootn Rovenuo 

— l T9 of SKA mlUhn f rom tots of Nel Inc. 

property. p«r Share 


303 Not Inc. 47.4 1MJ 

ait Per Shore — 071 1st 

tftd oofs to&ode goto at ao 
minion from sale ot property. 


IMS 1M4 
11300. 10660. 
1X7a 1380 
140 Ito 
IMS ISM 
31900 31.440. 
1370 6410 

631 732 


Fst Bank System 


Fst Tennessee Natl 


Inn Minerals 


with just over $750 million of new sham— 


1985 

19M 

3rd Qnar. 

1985 

198* 

43.11 

2734 

Net Inc. 

937 

082 

1X7 

a 87 

Pnr Shore _ 

181 

OM 

ms 

mt 

9 Monlh* 

IMS 

198* 

12287 

91X3 

Net inc. 

293 

363 

4.16 

282 

Per Share 

385 

234 


BUSINESS PROFILE / Barbara Thomas, from the SEC to Hong Kong 

An American Woman Joins Asia’s Banking Grib 


By Dinah Lee 

IiUrmaUonal Herald tribune 

HONG KONG — Even for a 
nonstop worker like Barbara 
Thomas, it had been a busier week 
than usual putting the finishing 
touches on her most important deal 
in Hong Kong to date, the rescue of 
one of the colony’s larger Chinese 
businesses from bankruptcy. 

But in her paneled office over- 
looking the harbor, the unflappable 
Mrs. Thomas, 39, talked with hu- 
mor several weeks ago about the 
changes in her life since she moved 
to Hong Kong two years ago to 
work for a London-based merchant 
bank, Samuel Montagu & Co. Ltd., 
while her husband Aum opened an 
office for a New York law firm. 

To those in Washington who re- 
member her as the youngest -ever 
member of the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission under Presi- 
dent Timmy Carter in 1980, her 
quick adaptation to the different 
world of British banking in London 
and the financial capitals of Asia 
will come as no surprise. 

Mis Thomas has handled with 
apparent ease ha job in Asia with 
Samuel Montagu as the first wom- 
an director of any London-based 
merchant bank and as president of 
the bank’s U.S. subsidiary, Samuel 
Montagu Holdings Inc. 

Instead of bafanufiar stomping 
grounds of Washington and New 
York, she has worked with with 
local Chinese clients and colonial 
expatriates, not to mention the en- 
trenched ranks of the City of Lon- 
don. 

She had never lived abroad be- 
fore: Like many Americans, she 
thought of Hong Kong as a place to 
shop. 

Now she spends about 65 per- 
cent of ha time in Hong Kong, 
another 25 percent of ha time in 
London and New York and about 
10 pacent in Japan. 

“I have to say, in truth, that I 
wasn’t terribly worried. Perhaps I 
ought to have been, but I wasn’t,'* 
she redected. “The hard part was 
deciding whether to go with an 
American firm or an English firm, 
and as my husband was coming 
here to setup an office, we couldn’t 
both set up new. operations. As a 
couple, we needed more structure. 
The English banks are so much 
more established here, generally 



Barbara Thomas on a lawn on Victoria Peak. 


speaking, and the learning curve 
with an international bank was 
bound to be much higher.'’ 

When she was given the chance 
to join Samuel Montagu, the full 
impact of the offer to be Britain’s 
first female merchant bank director 
eluded ba, although she freely ad- 
mits now with a smile, “Of course, 1 
think it’s terrific." 

There were, however, unexpect- 
ed surprises. “I don’t think I under- 
stand how much prejudice there is 
against women outside the United 
States," she said. “I Think England 
is about 10 years behind America 
in terms of toe position of women, 
and in that sense, it’s horrendous 
that I should be the first woman 
director and that it was only in 
1983 that I was appointed.” 

She finds that proving herself in 
toe male atmosphere of British 
banking is somewhat similar to ha 
early professional challenges in toe 
United Slates; “there’s a great 
pressure to work bard and do it 


well and be better than your male 
counterparts, toe way it was when I 
started to practice law 15 years 
ago." 

She is coming to feel a pan of toe 
dub, but she has found a warmer 
welcome from toe separate finan- 
cial circles of toe Hong Kong Chi- 
nese. 

“The Chinese do have a lot of 
respect for women in business and 
it’s not unusual to find a Chinese 
company has a woman treasurer." 
she said. “Also. I think toe fact that 
when I arrived in Hong Kong toe 
Democrats were running a woman 
for vice president was not lost on 
Hong Kong people. 

“A lot of toe Chinese are educat- 
ed m America, and their orienta- 
tion is increasingly towards Ameri- 
ca. The Chinese here may still 
perceive the British as style-setters, 
but they see America as a more 
likely place than Britain for them to 
go before 1997 when China takes 
ova Hong Kong. So America is 


t aking more prominence here in toe 
years leading up to 1997." 

When asked what she bad 
learned in Hong Kong, she ex- 
plained: “An old Chinese business- 
man told me when I first arrived 
that the Chinese view of issuing 
new stock is that his family is offer- 
ing the public a chance to invest in 
them because you believe in the 
family's management, and that 
they don't really owe toe public any 
information on the company. I 
t hink in Hong Kong, where you 
have companies run by Chinese 
families and Chinese 'investors, 
that’s right. 

“But as Chinese companies start 
looking for international capital 
they are going to have to disclose 
more to international investors." 

She calls the Hong Kong com- 
munity “small and dose-knit, but 
not dosed to newcomers." 

“Significant international finan- 
cial and government people from 

the States and the U.KL come 
through here all toe time — people 
I'm not so likdy to see at such dose 
range in New York and Washing- 
ion. I see friends of mine from toe 
State Department like Ambassador 
Richard Fairbanks, or people such 
as Nancy Reynolds, or Senator 
Jake Gam, or Joe AUbritton from 
toe Riggs Bank, and the Doles were 
through this week,” she said. 

She has an apartment atop Vic- 
toria Peak, a Chinese driver and an 
En glish nanny. 

With a two-year-old son, Lloyd, 
time is important. She has run up 
against another colonial tradition 
that dictates that everyone spend 
Sunday on a sailboat or a Chinese 
junk. “It’s essentially just a cocktail 
party that starts at 10:30 in toe 
morning and doesn't end until 5:30 
In the afternoon. We don’t go, and 
some Hong Kong people find this 
very strange.” 

Mrs. Thomas says she will stay in 
Hong Kong “as long as it’s fun and 
interesting," but already she knows 
Hong Kong is not forever. 

“I want my son to be educated in 
America, and my own career is ulti- 
mately in toe Amer ican financial 

community. I would love to go 
back tc Washington someday. 

“Of all the places I’ve lived, it's 
toe nicest," 


71* 7 7 — W 

2% 2% 37k— 14 
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Prices 


NASDAQ KICK as of 
3 pjn. N«w Yarfc Him. ‘ ■ 

Via The Associated Press 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1985 


2 

3 

4 







20 




S 

T 

s 

B- 

15 




ts 









! TO 111 M2 M3 


PEANUTS 

I ( fourteen? 


TWENTY- TWO ? 
5IXIY-THREE? 


SORRY. MAAM. 


I 2a 128 |27 las 


n 

■ 

29 

30 

■ 

N 







142 







■ 


49 

1 

S3 

54 


59 




S3 - 





BLOND IE 

PRICES ABE T 
SO HIGH < 
TVESE CAYS > 


I THINK MY MATH 
BOOK HA5 A 
CHILP-RE5I5TANTCAP! 


books 



ITAPPECTS 

EVERYONE 


VOU MEAN IT SVEN *-> 
AFFECTS VCXJ.COBA? 


% OH, YES, JULIUS AND -P WE'RE NOW USfNS *“ 
\ I ARE CUTTING I "FILET AWSNON HELPER" 


THE MASTER OF THE FORGE: 

A West African Odyssey 

By Harold C our lander. 224 pages. $16.95. 
Crown Publishers Inc, I Park Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. 10016. 

By Elizabeth Alexander 

H UNDREDS of years ago in the western 
Sudanese kingdom of Joliba, caretakers 


exist only to prccrea 
the river. 


te. - 


rhinoceros: 


SOLUTION TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE, page 15 M ' ,? as 


ACROSS 

1 Yearns 
6 Pall short 

10 Dramatis 
personae 

14 Perch 

15 Entice 

16 Kind of 
admiral 

17 Dogie catcher 

18 Algerian port 

19 Heraldic 
border 

20 J. D. Salinger 
work 

23 Owned 

24 Caravansary 

25 Use 

29 Northern 
European 

32 Perform 

35 Obstruct 

36 Curtin or 
Seymour 

37— — mater 

38 Humper- 
dinck's fairy 
opera 

41 Leave out 

42 Nelson or 
Mary Baker 

43 Upper crust 

44 Transgress 

45 Iran and Stone 

46 Faye and 
Ghostley 

47 Dunderhead 


49 Chemical 
suffix 

50 Film comedy 
team 

58 Christiania, 
today 

59 Footnote abbr. 

60 Lorelei, e.g. 

62 Thailand, 
formerly 

63 Grind grain 

64 Bring joy 

65 Scarlett's 
spread 

66 Mind 

67 Resign 

DOWN 

1 Timetable 
abbr. 

2 Arrange hair 

3 Grayish-white 

4 This, inTaxco 

5 Horse-drawn 
carriage 

6 Patterson of 
boxing fame 

7 Nimbus 

8 Persia, today 

9 Give 
temporarily 

10 Sing softly 

11 Concerning 
aircraft 

12 Garage or yard 
event 

13 Low card 

21 Voice vote 


22 Type of code 

25 Group 
character 

26*' Vice." 

TV program 

27 Like Malaya or 
I stria 

28 Keen desire 

29 Alights 

30 Griffith or 
Williams 

31 Cribbage piece 

33 Where Minos 
ruled 

34 Stories 

36 Greenstone 

37 Cold-cuts 
center 

39 Journey part 

40 Freed 

45 Simian 

46 Residue 

48 Fragrance 

49 In a strange 
way 

50 Misplaced 

51 Gobi's site 

52 V.t. P.'s car 

53 Ancient 
Hebrew month 

54 Green color 

55 Vex 

56 Apothecary's 
weight 

57 Abominable 
Snowman 

61 Bottom line, 
often 


n 




BEETLE BAILEY 

V/e'RE BACK ^ 
EARLY. I'LL BET 
WE CATCH SNA&E 
sleeping a&aiN y 


WE BETTER 

Mot/ he 

KNOWS HOW 
MAP I GET! 


it won't po him 
A BIT OF ©OOP 


rm 



ANDY CAPP 

I'LL NEVER SET 
> POOT IN THIS 
HOUSE AGAIN f ] 



‘ THAT SHOOK’ 
HER LIPA B»T‘ 


WHEN NOURASS 

RACING BAPS?? } 


in Bethssda, Maryland, a novelist and folklor- 
ist namrH Harold C our lander writes that he 
“became the djeli of Numnkeba of Naiadugp," 
the ancient folk-hero Courlander has created' 
in his latest novel. 

*The Master of the Forge" is a prose emc 
t hat follows the blacksmith Ntmuilceba an his 
1 1-year journey from his village in search of 
honor and truth. His purpose? “I do not know 
what i am looking for, only that I am living out . 
my story,” says Numnkeba, placing himself in 
a long line erf heroes questing spiritually, as 
well as physically. 

like England's Lancelot and Mali's Sun- 
diata before him. Numukeba’s venture be- 
comes an adventure, all in the name of honor 
and the faith that his “story" will guide him. 
He has cinematic encounters with evil, slays 
foes, does good deeds, and most importantly, 
augments the faith *h»t sent him oot in die first 
place. 

Numnkeba is a sober, straightfaced hero. 
His philosophy is strongly delineated and ap- 
pealing. Though Courlander lets him sound 
like a famine cookie at times, he also quietly 
prints to the larger lessons embedded in daily 
activities. Joliba is a world where ritual ana 
community are profoundly respected. This 
strong sense of wUianr»» and kinship makes 
Numnimba’s self-imposed odyssey afl the more 
poignant. 

Indeed, in ancient Johba, what goes around, 
comes around. A character is a slave one min- 
ute and a noble the next. At one print, Nunm- 
keba is changed into a dog by the wizard 
Elchuba. Courlander subtly and successfully 
challenges conventional social hierarchy 


mvisiDte, wu® 16 - j. . — i.i.ua--'- 

your heart? And **«!*“*£ tl^r 'luT.x -c 
n faim your heart, where .«- > r .- A .. the 

then? As Nunwkeba shea 

rhinoceros dropped » to - 

lay on the earth, watebrng ‘ ^ never 

Creating a world m wfccn ,,r r hc 

lived is no easy task, "Th*; . irrc> the- 
Force" is fiBed with dctai-s. £**;; k - ■ . • 

evocative of ‘'Africa 

words and a dipped, formal dicuo— *-* - • 
Mjefcsmith. forged 



C 3F 


he does not extend the challenge to the worm 
of women, who are scarcely mentioned and 


tempered it in millet water. When it w±s Jo*i- 
hefastmed it in place and hung die :vt> ‘ - 
his shoulders testing us fit. H* sla« 
him, ‘Master the armor becomes you. Nurmi 

kSi answered, ‘Iron does not turn away wtjp- 
ons because it -becomes*' but .because '- ^ 
tains the life force of the sun. And the 
answered. *Yes, Master, it is so.' 

Rw«iw the epic form is so familiar, the 
language between setting out and «-vmmg 
homemnst truly sparkle to dstir.guuJ: Jw 
^ “laS&sSSno L Bui it « steady 

and functional; while not JyncaL i* trot!, alona 
at an even gait. It can move large spaces of bine 
with a few gracefully tossed sentences. » nr. 
the effecting mae**! am Numokeba. lam here, 
Courlander places bis hero in a great tradition 
of literary cnesoTlere," of finding the central 
self through adversity. 

Men no longer venture forth on horse back uy 

search of troth. But they do wrestle with thdT 
own faith. This is neither a bona fide Afnutn 
epic nor a purely ristorical work. It is a gentle, 
quiet t«v». about a n*an “w ho understands the 
mysteries erf iron" his quest to understand 
his own Gate. 

Elizabeth Alexander leaches creative writing 
at Boston University. She wrote this review far 
The Washington Post 


WIZARD of ID 


& iVew York Times, edited by Eugene MaleskB. 

DENNIS THE MENACE "” = 





/ \w/& \ 

V&l&CtfSOAA 
A&&N TH4T 

< J 



REX MORGAN 


I'M TERRIBLY SORRY 
TD BE LATE, GRANT— 
BUT A WOMAN A 
CUSTOMER CALLED 
ME AT HOME . 
INSISTING THAT I 
DO HER HAIR THIS . 
MORNING BECAUSE 
SHE HAP A SPECIAL ] 
v LUNCHEON TO A 
ggATTEND/^^J 


LET ME HELP YOU WITH 
YOUR COAT. KAY l 
k YOU'RE OLTT OF 
BREATH ' 


I D1DNT EVEN TAKE TIME ’ 
TO GET OUT OF THIS SMOCK' 

I HAVE TO BE BACK AT THE 1 
-t SHOP IN 45 MINUTES f M 


YOU'RE NOT 
LEAVING HERE 
UNTIL YOU'VE 
7 HAP A GOOD 
I BREAKFAST.' 


fVE KAO iTUPTO/^^ WITH MAP6ARET GARFIELD 


D)^ THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
PlJWIAa by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


CAPTAIN/ CAPTAIN . 1 S 
THERE'S A BLACK HOLE 
PEAP AHEAP/ 


Unscramble these four Jumfctes, 
one tatter to each square, to form 
four ordinary wonte- 


YOMSS 




WE CANT TORN BACK/. 
THE GRAVITATIONAL PULL 
l IS TOO GREAT/ n 
\ARRRRRROHi^_/*->^ 


’axntAor - 1 


THEV JUST WENT 
WHERE NO MAN HAS 
. GONE BEFORE 


By Robert Byrne 

T > HE Nimzovich Memorial 
Tournament, hdd in Naes- 
teved. Denmark, to mark the 
50th anniwasary of the death 
of Aron Nimzovich, the great 
Latvian-Danish player, theore- 
tician and teacher, <*ndrd in a 
tie for first place anomg Walter 
Browne of Berkeley, Calif., 
Bent Larsen of Denmark and 
Rafael Vaganian of the Soviet 
Union. 

For some time now Browne's 
forte has been to mOc the 
Queen's Indian Defense of gal- 
lons of points, no matter 
whether he has Black or White. 
One can see him at it again in 
his encounter with Prering Nt- 
kriic of Yugoslavia. 

The popularity of 4 P-QR3 
against the Queen’s Indian has 
not let np. It is quite remaraka- 
ble that this prophylactic, 
which is directed against a pin 
with . . . B-N5 after N-B3, 
should give the defense such 
headaches. 

There is a tricky question 
whether the immediate ad- 
vance with 4 . . . P-Q4 has 
any more merit than the more 
usual 4 . . . B-N2; 5 N-B3, P- 
Q4. Of course, 4 . . . P-Q4 
gives the black QB greater flex- 
ibility, yet it is doubtful that 
any option other that fianchet- 
toing it would ever be exer- 
cised. 

Once Black plays 4 . . . P- 
Q4, he is committed, after 5 
PxP, to the recapture with 
5 . . . PxP, since 


CHESS 


5 . . . Nxp?; 6P-K4 gives 
Write a strong center with gam 
erf tempo. 

It would have been more 
usual for White to play 9 B-Q3, 
bat then 9 . . . JB-N2: IOO-O, 
N-B3; 11 N-K5 would let Black 
resolve the centre! tension by 
-11 . . . PkP; 12 NxN, BxN; 
13 PxP, with a very ""nimf 
advantage for 'White. Browne's 
alternative; 9 B-K2, exdnded 
<hrv possibility. 

It is not dear what Black’s 
best method for reduc ing the 
positional p re s s ur e wonM have 
been after 11 N-K5; 13 NxN, 
PxN converted the game into a 
battle tosee vriio gets tile vital 
open aueen file. 

Prooably Nikolic should 
have interpolated the exchange 
of queens with 14 . TTQxQ; 
ISKkxQ before playing IS B- 
QB3. Hien 16 P-Kfi, PxP; 17 
BxPch, K-Rl would not have 
made evident how Write could 
demonstrate any real superior- 
ity. 

Hie 14 ... B- 

QB3 let Browne gain tempos 
with 15 Q-N4 (threatening 16 
B-KR6XK-R1; 16 QR-QI. 

NtkoBc’s 19 . . . Q-RI en- 
visaged 20 . . . P-QN4, but 
after Browne's 20 B-R4L BxB; 
2i QxB to persist with 
21 , . . P-QN4? would have 
meant losing a pawn to 22 
BxBP! (22 . . . RxB?; 23 R- 
Q8ch). 

On 23 B-QS, it was of no nse. 
to play 23 . . . P-B4, since 24 
PxPe.p, RxP; 25 QxP?, QxQ; 
26 BxQ, BxB? would have in- 


vited 27 R-Q8ch. Moreover, 
23 . . . Q-Q2? would have 
proved a disaster after 24 P- 
K6! 

Thus, Nikbfic abandoned a 
pawn with 23 . . BxB; 24 
KxByQ-K2, 25 QxKP. 

After 26 . . . R-Kl. 
Browne forced the win of an- 
other pqwn by 27 Q-B2!. R- 
QBI; 28 Q-B5, R-B2 
(28 , . Q-K3; 29 QxQ.PxQ: 
30 R-Q6, R-Kl; 31 K-Bl cre- 
ates a winning rook-and-pawn 
codmg); 29 Q-Q3! 

Snoe a defense against 30 R- 
Q8dt yields WKie31 QxP with 
decisive advantage, Nikolic 
gave up. 

QMnra— tmcpiiw^ 
* «**« 'mwb iwr M . 

iaf.ffsa g 


'-'AN IMPATIENT 
DRIVER WHO 
HAS TO STOP FOR 
A TRAFFIC U&HT 
USUALLY DOES THIS 


Now arrange the clrded letters to 
form the surprise answer, aa sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer hero: 


Yesterday’s 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: RUSTY SWASH AVENUE LEDGER 
Answer, a political platform Is something a 

candidate needs when he hasn't this— 

A LEG TO STAND ON 


WEATHER 



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IOTEJtNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUKDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 1985 




Page 1 




Hapless Sues Stitt lookingfor First Victory 


•.« 3. 

¥*& rM 


^^' v n v By Midjad Janofeky 

> Nf * Y*k Times Service 

; l . : ;- ^N. NEWYORK — Splendid runner dial Eric Didoer- 
: Air': *““*• “S Temm to the. Los Angeles Rams after a 

. v ieogthy holdout and Ins 226 yards have been kS a 
' " ^ ^ reason Jw the Rams’ 5-0 start thfc season than a 
^tooted defense, which has given up only five toodt- 
. ^ 1 .Awns and the fewest pants of any team it the 

i : National Football League this season. • 

• * , That should hardly make the Rams welcome guests 

1 .1 . :or theTampa Bay Buccaneers, who are 0-5, Sunday in 


NFI WEEKEND 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

CUage Bean (5«D) at San Francisco 49ers (3-2): 
The last time they met, in the conference champion- 
ship game last season, the 49crs won easily, 23-0, in a 
game the Bears played without thdr quarterback, Jim 
McMahon, who wat injured. But the last ti™ the 
49ers faced McMahon, late in the 1983 season, the 
Bears won, 13-3, and McMahon is corrently the top- 
rated guanerb«i in the league. In many respects, this 
game is more important for the 49ers because a loss, 
coupled with a vmtoy by the Rams, would leave the 
dtfaufin? champions far off the pace in the Western 
Division. (San Francisco by 3V&.) 

Detroit liens (M) at WasUngtoa Redskins (2-3): If 
the Redskins can play with the intensity and emotion 
they bad in their victory over St. Louis, no team conid 

beat them: Not that the Lions am much of a threat 
The Lions have never won in Washington, and a 
shoddy performance in losing to Green Bay, 43-10, 
suggests tW their streak win remain intact (Washing- 

Mmnenta Vfldugs (3-2) vs. Green Bay Packers (2- 
3) at Milwaukee: Just when you give up cm the Pacfc- 


r'<*< i 


Tampa. But that aside, the Rams have encountered a the Redskins can play with the intensity and emotion 

• *■ • j _ rather unexpected development in the schedule. A they had in their victory over St. Louis, no team conld 

“ v. : victory over the Buccaneers and losses by the San tea* than. Not that the Lions as much of a threat 

-"■S' Francisco 49er$ to the Chicago Bcarsand the New The Lions have never won in Washington, and a 

Orleans Saints to the Los Angeles Raiders — not shoddy performance in losing to Green Bay, 43-10, 

impossible, in either case — would give flic Rams a suggests tiiat then sirak win remam in tact (Washing- 

i £ three-game lead in the National Conference West, ton by' d.) . .. 

j ? And the 49ers are the defending league rhaw;^ Mfinnota Vfldngs (3-2) vs. Green Bay Packers (2- 
£ Who would have thought . 3) at MBwaokee: Just whenyou give up on the Pack- 

; p Well, Fritz Shurmur, for one. He’s the Rams' defat- ers. they surprise you, as they did m crushing the 

i i, sive coordinate, the retooler. lions. That’s why they remain dangerous for the 

: A “This is an extremely big game for us," he said die - ^diigs, who : have played welL The key here is how 
other day. “By game tune, thedr 0-5 record won’t be wdl Green Bay’s offensive Sne holds off the pass rush. 
1 ' any mote significant than our 5-0." . ' With time, the Packers can make defensive backs 

; i That may be true, but the defensive he has squirm. Without it, they don’t have enough punch to 

f implemented leave the Rams in an advantageous post-", .beat anyone. (Green Bay by 4.) 

■», £ tion. Among the changes from last year are more man- . ” St. Louis Cerdhnfc (^-2) at PWad^iMa Ewjes (1- 

S _ to-man coverages with the defensive backs, more fre- 4): TheEagles, for all their problems, have, the best 

ZStgtg, quern use of six-man pass coverages, even on tome. passdef cose in the league. They are also bringing back 
second-down plays, a better rush by the defensive ' R°« Jawordri at quarterback, after he threw for three 
^^^^pfran and the return to health of the starting safeties, touchdowns as a reKever in a 23-21 loss to the Saints. 
Nolan Cromwell and Johnnie Johnson, and the defen- The Cardinals, who turned the ball over six times, five 

sive lin eman Gary Jeter. oninterceptions, m a 27-10 loss to the Redskins, have 

“Last year,” Smrmnr said, “we didn’t rfuriimgp- been playing just badly eoooghto lose this one. (St 

offenses near as much as we wanted to. We gotafime Louis by 514.) ' • ■ _ 

' cautious, playing mostly in ^nnn coverage. So we tiad ’ . INTIXCONFERENCE 

i to take it upon ourselves to be more aggressive and to New York Gtants (3-2) at Cincinnati Bengals (1-4): 

raiseoureffidency level by covering anttle tighter and Depute their 1-point loss to the Cowboys last Sunday 
rushing a little better." night, the Giants are developing a certain consistency 

f? -t. ! ■ - « ... . . ~ j_r j ^ j 



Dodgers Defeat 
Cardinals Again 
For a 2-0 Lead 


By Joseph Durso 

S'ev York limes Serrwe 

LOS ANGELES — The scenario 


sprinters came out sprinting, and it 
was a great show. 

Coleman opened the game by 


was probably fixed in the first in- lining a single to center. He 
ning: Vince Coleman and Willie promptly took a long and raenac- 
McGee, the whippets of the St. ing lead off first with McGee at baL 
Louis Cardinals, got on base for the But before Hershiser delivered one 
first time in the National League pitch to the plate, he threw six 
Championship Series. Both were times to first base, driving Coleman 
thrown out trying to steal second back each time, 
base. Finally, after nine throws to first 

And so, the Los Angeles Dodg- base and one pitcbouL Coleman 
ers shut down the highest-scoring streaked for second. But Mike 
offense in the league for the second Scioscia sprang from behind the 
straight time Thursday night. They plate firing and gunned him down 
overwhelmed the Cardinals, 8-2, at second. 


and look a two-game lead with the 
pennant only two victories away. 


McGee then hit a grounder near 

second base that Mariano Duncan 




! tighter and 


The Cardinals, who turned the ball over six times, five 
on interceptions, m a 27-10 loss to the Redskins, have 
been playing just badly enough to lose this one. (St 

Louis by 514.) - • _ 

' . INTERCONFERENCE 

New York (Sams (3-2) at Gndratati Bengals (1-4): 
Despite their 1-point loss to the Cowboys last Sunday 


WOfie McGee, caught in a rundown on a steal attempt, was finally tagged out by Greg 
Brock, the Dodger first baseman, who took the throw from second baseman Steve Sax. 

Moseby Finding His Groove for Jays 
While Royals Count on Saberhagen 


They will try to win it this week- hobbled for an error. Now, sprinter 
end in Sl f .tuic , where the teams No. 2 was leading off first. And, 
will resume the best-of -seven series after one throw over, he headed for 
Saturday with Bob Welch pitching second. 

for the Dodgers and Danny Cox This time, Scioscia called a pitch- 
uying to avert a collapse for the out, and McGee was trapped be- 
Carctinals. And the Cardinals were tween First and second and was run 
admittedly banking on the change down and ta g ged, 
of venue to restore their spirits and “It’s happened before." McGee 
their speed on the slick artificial said later in a tense locker room. 


turf of Busch Stadium. 


“Bui I don’t remember when. I 


“We're capable of winning four went on a hit-and-run play, and 
in a row,” said Whiiey Herzog, the they pitched oul" 

Cardinal manager. “We had the The Cardinals opened the scor- 


INTERCONFERENCE By John Fcinstdn a Canadian flag or something wav- weather might be a problem. For w to 8 I?fi^eK,ith one dowu and 

New York Gluts (3-2) at Gncnmati Bengals (1-4): P<*i Service ing. These people think tins is the the third straight dayf Kansas City Tommv^lrJilkS d £Sw 

Despite their 1-point loss to the Cowboys last Sunday KANSAS CITY, Missouri — Olympics or something, m be glad was hit with heavy rain Thursday. Anodes ^ obliged bv throwing a wild pitch on 

night, the Giants are developing a certain consistency When Lloyd Moseby stepped into to go home and see Old Glory fly- causing flooding around the city. the Tand 1 count to Jack Clark, 

m offense, defense and *r£otibn that should serv£ the batter’s box in the^ering ing.” The iemperatu£ never got muA i L w 

ttlMI «dl Dmrtlvnnt FnirimVg Thpiriwarnff-ncm- olnnm ■■ TMnntn'e A 1 X.1, dTI Fnhrmhnl flfi. PeeU picked iff OT thrown OUt ID CVjee 




i The results have been encouraging. This week the 
Rams have the sixth-best rated defensein the league, 
J and they rank among die better defensive with 
I 21 sacks, eight interceptions and a 51-percent pass- 
I completion rate by opposing quarterbacks. - 


j 21 sacks, eight interceptions and a 51-percent pass- Bengals, who have scored more points — 149 — than 
I completion rate by opposing quarterbacks. - til but two other teams Thar record reflects the less 

1 All of which sounds like mere bad news for the fortunate chcmnstance that they have given up more 
| Buccaneers. (Harrah’s Reno Race & Sports Book has points — 166 — than any other team. {New York by 
* made the Runs fift-point favorites.) 1-) 


in offense, defense and emotion that should serve the batter’s box in the gathering ing-” The temperature never got much been S ckedofr m n 

them wdl over the next few weeks. Thai new offensive gloom at Toronto’s Exhibition Sta- A moment later, when a New above 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4 de- Sesame irmina hSoreYou relv cm 

prowess should especially come in bandy against the dium, he was an angry young man. York writer made reference to the gnees Centigrade). Friday’s forecast That’s 

Bengals, who have scored more points — 149 — than Moments earlier, in the top of Royals' 10-game rywsmson losing is a chance of more ram with night- ’ 


obliged by throwing a wild pitch on 
the 2-and-2 count to Jack Clark, 


Moments earlier, in the top of Royals’ 10-game pwawa™ loving 
the 10th i n n i ng on Wednesday, streak, Brett screamed several ob- 




AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
frSfr Buffalo BOk (0-5) at New Englmd Patriots (2-3fh 

sr.V^l The Bills, weak in all p hases «nd go ing nowfaerej 

P <* at a good time for the Patriots, who beat them, 17-14, 

1 need to windfall from contention. They fwebeea 

scoring fewer than three touchdowns a j pme, hut 

■ - ^ : Buffalo's defense is porous enou^i to exploit, as the 
i • Colts did last Sunday in winning, 49-17. (New En- 
v \ i • gland by 10.) " • 

JC ± .k pevelmd Browns (3-2) at Houston Oflere (1-4): 
ijjPti^eniie Kosar, the rookie quarterback, will probably 
V* Ip sunt for the Browns because of an injury to Gary 
- •_ Danielson. His timing could have been a lot worse. 
— — — _^The Oilers, losing all of their last four games, have 


the same inning before. You rely on home from second. 

SP^ you live dangerously. Thai’s Now the Cardinals had one run, 
Whigol us here.” bul that all. And in the bottom 

nme temperatures m the low 40s. yh e Cardinals got here by win- of the third, the Dodgers broke out 
The World Series, which will jqj games out of 162 played, with three and snatched the lead, 
ten in the American League park, jjjg best record in the big leagues. Steve Sax led with a one-out sin- 
11 not begin until Ocl 19 even if They also stole 314 bases and gle through the middle, and Andu- 


Sff 816 ^ JKfc Mosebyhad made adiving stab at sceniries at him. Even Quiseubeny, The World Series, which will ning 101 games oS of 162 played, with three ^nd snatched the lead, 

points — 166 — than any other team. (New York by Frank White s anting hue dm*, the laid-back relief pitcher, was up- open in the American League park, best record in the big leagued Steve Sax led with a one-out sin- 

1 > . ^ •’ ^ „ ihii the umpire Dave Phillips ruled tighL When someone asked him wffl not begin until Ocl 19 even if They also stole 314 tases and gle through the middle, and Andu- 

ITUalkn^ Stedm (2^ at DaBas Cowb^(4-l): that Mwebyhad trapped the ball about shortstop Onix Conoroaon s both championship series take few- scored 747 runs. But in two nights jar tried to keep him close. Instead, 

IWaBowing theDolphms to score on a final drive, the and Willie Wilsra scored togive failiire to throw out Fernandez on a er than seven games to complete. - m Dodger Stadium, they have sip- he threw theball past first base. 

Sttto pve the appqmmce of a team imapable of ^ Kansas Qty Royals a 5-4 lead, routine ground ban to stan the ]en one base and have been out- and Sax raced to third. Then Her- 

wmnmg when it matters. They also let the previous Moseby got a hit and the Bine 10th, Quisenberry also snapped ■ Umpire Strike Averted scored P to 3 shiser chopped a high-bounce sin- 

game get away. So with onty one victory in the last Jays went onto wdn and rake a 2-0 ^ Vhai do yaawntmctD do. Paul Range, a National League They finally energized their of- gle over T^Pendkton, who was 

cririctemywmmmKsrhesaid. fcn« in lie early mnmp Th U r«by playing m do* a, third. M d th. 


get away. So with only one victory in the last Jays went on to win and rake a 2-0 


Moseby got a hit and the Bine 10th, Quisenberry also snapped. 


four games, they may not be in the proper spirits to lead in the be 
beat the Cowboys, who have the top-rated offense in League Cham 
the National Conference and a defense that leads the “ju we had 
league with 14 interceptions. (Dallas by 6.) “it would haw 

New Orieans Safaris (3-2) at Los Angeles Raiders (3- rake. I was j 
2): The Saints have never won four consecutive games, chance to hit. 
Never. With a victory over the Raiders, they could. Is Moseby is, 
one possible? Yes. Is one probable? No. The Raiders prototype Bit 


lead in the best-of-seven American 
League Championship Series. 


_ T t . . . Jen one base and have been out- and Sax raced to third. Then Her- 

■ Umpire Strike Averted ^red. 12 to 3. shiser chopped a high-bounce sin- 

PmiI R a nge, a National League They finally energized their of- gle over Terry Pendleton, who was 
umpire, has declared that major f en se in the early innings Thursday playing in dose at third, and the 
league umpires will work all play- night and seemed readv to explode Cardinals’ lead was gone. 


“No way. We’ve been through a 1 “8 ue J u ?P u ^ wore an piay- night and seemed ready to explode Cardinals’ lead was gone. 

*® st ’ Moseby raid, year t og ether Tm not going World Senes games, indi- against the Dodger starter, Orel Duncan lined to center for the 

^t would have been awful tough to TlJTIc .v. i >. •? ° eatme that a threatened strike over n... .i.~. i-r. r e «^-, n w n >,t n..t Anyt„;,r 


to^banvb^yintheback." ranng that a threatened stnke over Hershiser. But thev left five run- second oul But before Andujar got 

rake. I was just glad to get the . the expanded league playoff format ncrs on basc ^ thfee innings and the third, Ken Landreaux doubled 

?? Ce Jf h ? L - u ^ been averted, The Associated paid the price: The Dodgers Sored to left center for a 2-1 lead and Bill 

Moseby if m many ways, the Hawser, now 0-1 1 as a playoff reported from Los Angeles. fh«* mne in the third inninc and Madlock sineled to make it 3-1. 


to left center for a 2-1 lead and Bill 


Press reported from Los Angeles, three runs in the thir d innin g and Madlock singled to make it 3-1. 


one possible? Yes. Is one probable? No. The Raiders prototype Blue Jay. He is roung m a n a g er, let the pressure show, T3T7ii ^Tm^lnthTFrZt 

have been exerting enough rush these drns to (25), swk (37 stolen bases) and Talking about Concepcion's rms- ™ev < 5 agreed to work .all !°.^ e ro f ^ Jc ^' 

rive most qpp^ig qiurterbam- trouble. Andthe powaful (18 ^home runs). He L also cue. which was ruled a hit Howser iCh 0 ^’/^t y hi? l^h 

Stints’ quaS^d? Dave Wflson, wffl be operating Si exedlit center fidder. shook bis head. TSJmI “JifS £ 

wilboutSj^^dlo ? , the tan.’, kadipg nyriver. to “tee Mt my tatt" h aid. Tf Smcd frASnal Lilt Everybody agreed that the 


without 


tack, Dave WQson. wffl be operating 
Goodlow, the team’s leading receiver. 


in each of the last three games. Korar also has the, * who was injured in the last game and is out for the major leagues after having been the you can't make plays like thar , you 


One innin g later, Scioscia led 
with a bunt and was safe when 
Darrell Porter fell down chasing II 
And Greg Brock nailed Andujar’s 
]-and-l Ditch into the right-field 


- JN advantage of a rushing offense that leads the confer- 

racc and a defense that has yiddrri three touchdowns 
u i \ in a game only race this season. (Cleveland by H/k) 


season. (L06 Angeli 
Aflati Falcons 


1 .'in a game only race this season. (Clevdand by 2ife) Wth Steve Bartkowsld 

ar - -J JJaiser Broncos (3'2}*fJa4hp*p6fe Colts (2-3);% ^DavK^ArcherorBob H< 
'v jfcur— j lone; as the Colts’ off ensivestzenrih is thdr Kroand" Harinz lost both startii 


914.) 

at Seattle Sealants (3-2): 


No. 2 pick in the entire draft in can’t win these games. We 
1 978. He is bright and funny. After handed it right over to them. 1 


wffl be in our favor." 

The umpires had threatened to 


kUr-^ijlong as the Colts’ cfflfenrive strtngtii is thrir 
| game, they wffl have trouUe beating a team! 


l 


v \ 


j" „ j Broncos, who lead the conference with 151 points. The 
: - i Broncos have won three of their last four, with John 

j. *). 4y jElway making great strides at quarterback. The Bron- 
- cos are not without thdr wedenenes^ a porous db- 
r fense, among them. But the Colts’ defense does not 

v - appear to be capable of slowing down Ehvay enough 
j j jforthem to win. (Denver by 5 ».) •• ' 

j . Kansas City Chiefs (3-2) at San Diego Onrgas (2- 
; /A i ± 3): The Oiargers are 0-2 at home this, season and 
~ ' aren’t doing murk more ih«n completing a lot of 

-passes. That happens routinely, like losing But the 

~ . . , J^hargers may have one advantage i» that their defense 

- > i Vas played smpiisinglywell agmst tfaepass in thelast 

/ two games, and the Chiefs have been experiencing 

- ’ difficulty in all phases erf their offense. (Kauisas Gty 

\ V 


rod " Having lost both Starting comexbacks, TCamy John- certain he was that he 1 
the son md James Britt, three weeks ago. the Falcons have . catch cm White’s ball 


ri^en up. 10 touchdown passes and ne 
mg yards. The Seahawks haven’t pla 


alcons have . catch on White's balL squarely on pitcher Bret Saberha- 

1,000 pass- Then he paused, smiled and said, gen’s very narrow shoulders. At 21, 
particulaiiy “So, like I said, the ump made a he is a 20-game winner, a Cy Young 


expanded to a best-of-seven games 
this year. 


Everybody agreed that the 1-and-l pitch into the right-field 
Dodgers had won the opening seats for a borne run. 
game because Fernando Valen- The Dodgers padded their lead 
zuela and Tom Niedenfuer had with a run in the fifth. Landreaux 
stopped the St Louis rabbits. Cole- led off with his second double, to 
man, who set a rookie record bv the same spot as the first, and one 
stealing 1 10 bases, went 0 for 4 out later Andujar walked Pedro 
Wednesday night and didn't hit the Guerrero intentionally. Mike Mar- 


weflm recentweeks,butthey won't have to to win this great calL All the umps are great candidate. 


one. (Seattle by 14.) 


MONDAY NIGHT 


human beings." “I know the gmatian," he said three games, which until this year 

In the end, the call was mooL calmly. “We always seem to dig would have constituted a complete 

“Doesn’t matter now," White holes for oursdves. Nothing is easy playoff. 


Th™ „«u- -fr«. bal1 0111 of the infidcL McGee, who shall drove in the run with a single 

sl0 * e 56 bases “d led the league in to left, taking second on the throw 
SrPS? Won hitting with a J53 average, went 0 home as Guerrero went to third. 

for 4 and struck out times. ^dujar was now on. of .he 
The Dodgers’ chances of keeping 8?™^ haying ri ven . u P six runs on 


Miami Doipitins (4-1) at New York Jets (4-1): Rare- said. “I thought he missed it, but with this team. I just have to go out The National League president, them off the bases looked pretty 
fy have these two teams met on such even terms. The they won. We blew the game any- and pitch well Friday and hope we Chub Feeney, confirmed Range's good Thursday night, too. Her- 


DctoMiss have been playing at a typical levd of way.” get g< 

performance, one that could be enhanced by the While Moseby and his team- They 
recent acquisition of Hugh Green, a much-needed mates filled their dubbouse with Me 
outside linebacker. But such a lofty position is rda- loud music and laughter tl 
tively new to the Jets, who have shown a vast improve- were an angry, frustrated 
meet in their defense, particulaiiy against the pass. “This .doesn't even fe 
Continued improvement might &vc. than a chance to playoff,” George Brett 
beat the Dolphins. (Miami by 314.) “Every time I look up son 


We’re still not out of it assessment of the talks, saying, “It shiser came into the game with a 
have to win four games.” looks Hire it’s settled. We’ll either record of 19 and 3, he had won I ! 


with Moseby shrugged when he heard have an arbitration by the end of straight at home and he hadn't lost 
jyals that. “It’s true, no doubt about it," next week or a settlement" anywhere since July 7 in Sl Louis. 


were an angry, frustrated bunch, he said. “But Eight now, I'd much When asked if the umpires By contrast, Andujar won his 20th 

“Ibis doesn't even fed like a rather be us than them." would definitely work all posisea- game on Aug. 23 and then won 

playoff,” George Brett snapped. With aD the concern about frigid son games, Feeney responded, only once in bis next nine starts. 
“Every time I loc& op someone has weather in Toronto, it is here where “That’s righL" But despite the omens, tl 


But despite the omens, the 


eight hits in 4% innings. Rick. Hor- 
ton came on in relief and got out of 
the innin g 

The Dodgers scored twice more 
in the sixth. With two out, Duncan 
doubled, and Landreaux walked. 
Madlock then singled up the mid- 
dle for one run. and Guerrero fol- 
lowed with a single to left for the 
second. 


I J 

J is 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Martin ReportedlyD^ 

KANSAS CITY, Missouri (NYT) — An investigation into two bar 
incidents involving Billy Martin, the manager of the New York Yankees, 


„> “things he shouldn’t be doing," a Yankee source famifiar with the' 
„• • investigation has declared 

“It looks like in both cases Billy was in places where he shouldn’t be," 


. the source said “It's always something he shouldn’t be doing. Like in the 
l h fight with Whitson, it dkm’t say he started the fight, but he didn’t walk 
c-away and instead be pursued It” There was no nmnediaie indication 
whether the outcome of the investigation would affect Martin’s status as 
manager. 

When the Yankees were in Baltimore to play the Orioles SepL 20-22, 
c Martin became involved in a shoving incident with a man be had been 
1 •; drinking with and on the next nigh*- was. involved in a fight with Ed 
r - Whitson, a Yankee pitcher. Martm suffered a broken right arm and 
‘ cracked ribs m the Whitscni firiit. 

l- : Braves Appoint Tanner as Manager 

ATLANTA (AF) — The Atlanta Braves have appointed ChuckTanner 
,v as manag er for the next five years. Tanner, who was fired Monday after 
right seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates, replaces Bobby Wine, who took 
. over as manager of the baseball dub in AngusL 

Ted Turner, owner of the Braves, said that John Mullen would remain 
l - r as general mnirng fa- “right now, the way things are.” But he added that 
r ■ Tanner “will have a lot of control" Contract terms were not disclosed 

- - Semifinals Set Up in Federation Cup 

TOYOTA, Japan (AP) — Czechoslovakia swept two singles and one 
; doubles match against Hungary, while Bulgaria beat Britain, 2rl, in 
t' ijfrida/s quarterfinals of the Federation Cup tennis tournament, the 
;> ' Women’s equivalent of the Davis Cup national team tournament for men.. 
V 1 Czechoslovakia, seeded No. I, vnfl ptey fourth-seeded Bulgaria, and 
. the United States, seeded No. 2, wffl meet third-seeded Australia in 
Saturday’s semifmals. The U.S. team beat Argentina, 2-1, and Australia 
: downed Italy, 3-0, in quarterfinal matches Thursday.. 

: ; The U-S- is playing the eight-day Federation Cup tournament 
.•' a without Chris Evert Lloyd and Martina Navratilova, die worlffs two tqp- 
•' . ranked women players. Zina Garrison, the wodd’s sixth- rank ed player, 
leads the Americans this year. 


cjfiiday’s 
!' "omen’s 



SCOREBOARD 

Baseball [ | 
Playoff Box Score Na 


Hocke^ 


National Hockey League Standings 


McG«e cf 
Herr 2 b 
J Clark 1 b 
Vans I vie rt 
Praam 3 b 
Porter c 
OSmltti ss 
Andukjr o 

Horton o 
CcnmpbtH p 
Broun pti 
Day lev p 
L ahti p 
J ronsn Pti 
Totals 

StXoub 
Lot AnaslPt 


Robertson, right, assisted on the play. The 


Ttw AoaedcMd Pras 

: Sabre goalie, Tom Barrasso. Torrie 
defeated the Sabres in Buffalo, 5-4. 


Gretzky Helps Oilers Capture Openei 


NATIONAL LEAGUE: GAME 2 
ST. LOUIS LOS ANGELES 

abrbM abriiM 

Coteman H 5 0 2 1 Dunam ss 4 0 10 

<•1 McG«« d 5 110 Andesn pr 110 0 

Harr 2 b 3 0 10 Londrx cf 4 2 3 1 

JCIork 1 b 3 0 10 Modlck 3 b 5 0 3 3 

Vans I vie rt 3 0 0 0 Bailor 3 b 0 0 0 0 

Praam 3 b 4 110 Gvarrpr if 3 0 11 

Porter c 2 0 0 0 Manual rt 4 0 11 

OSmltti ss 4 0 2 0 Scioscia c 3 110 

Annular a 2 0 0 0 Brock lb 4 112 

Horton p GOOD Sax 2 S 4110 

Cafflpbtf p 0 0 0 0 Hershbr p 4 111 
Braun pti 1 0 0 0 
Day lev p 0 0 0 0 
Lahrl p D D 0 D 

Jronsn pti 10 0 0 

Totals 33 2 I 1 Totals Him 
SLLoub 001 000 001 — 2 

LBS Anartas 003 212 OOx— t 

Gama Wtanioo RBt — Landreaux ( 1 >. 

E — Duncan. Ando lor. DP— st Louis 1 . Las 
Anoolas 1 . LOB— SrLouis 9 . Los Anook* 0 . 
2 b— HPT, Land ream Z Duncaa HR — Brock 
111 . 

IP H R ER BB SO 

SL LOUIS 

AnthikW LO -1 410 B 6 6 t t 

Horton 11-3 1 2 2 3 0 

Campbell 1-3 2 0 0 0 1 

Davitv 1 0 0 0 0 0 

Lahti I 2 0 0 0 1 

Los Angelos 

HarsMior W. 1-0 V B 3 2 5 4 

WF-WersMier. PB— Porter. T— art*. A— 
«1W 

POSTSEASON SCHEDULE 
Laoouc Cbamplocixtilp series 
Tuesday. Oct I 
Toronto 6 . Kansas City i 

Wednesday. Od. 0 
Toronto 6 . Kansas aiv S 
Las Angeles 4 , St. Louis 1 

Thursday. Oa. 10 
LOS Ahseico a. St. Louis 2 
Friday, Oct. 11 

Toronto (AioxandP' 17 - 10 ) at Kansas City 
(Sabomooen 30-41 

Saturday, oo. 12 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pts GF GA 
New Jersey 1 0 0 2 6 5 

N.Y. Honours 1 0 0 2 4 2 

SLY. Islanders 0 0 0 0 0 0 

Philadelphia 0 1 0 0 5 6 

Pittsburgh 0 1 0 0 3 5 

Washington 0 1 0 0 2 4 


Boston 

Hartford 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Buffalo 


Adams Division 
1 0 0 
1 0 0 
i a o 
i o a 
D i o 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 

Detroll 0 0 116 6 

Minnesota 001166 

St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 

Chicago 0 1 0 0 2 6 

Toronto 0 10 0 1 3 

Simrttie Division 

Edmonton 1 0 0 3 4 3 

Vancouver 1 0 0 2 6 5 

Coiaarv 0 o o o o o 

Loa Angeles 0 1 0 0 5 6 

Winnipeg 0 1 0 0 3 4 

THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Montreal 3 fl 3-5 

Pittsburgh 2 O 1—4 

Robinson ( 1 ). Datilln ( 11 . Green Ml. Nos- 
luna 7 12 ): Bullard 111 . Lemleus ( 1 ), Hus- 
kowskl 11 ). Shots on goal: Montreal Ion Me- 
lodic) 1 M-U— 33 ; Pittsburgh {on Roy) 
11 - 7 -B— 27 . 

Washington 1 0 1—2 

NLY. Rangers 1 I 2—4 


Transition 


BASKETBALL 

Notional Basketball Association 
INDIANA— Signed wav man Tlsdalo, tor- 
word to a tour-year contract. 

HOCKEY 

NaUonal Hackev Leaoae 
LEAGUE— Pined Mike Keenan, head coach 


Pavfrilch 1 1 1. Gagner f l ) # R Idley 1 1 ), B rooke 
Cl ); Gustofsson 2 (21. Shots on goal : Washing- 
ton (on Vanblesbrouck) B-13-0— 29; N.Y. 
Rangers (on Rlgglnl 9-3-13—25. 

Toronto 0 0 1—1 

Boston i o 2—1 

Simmer (I). Lhiseman (II. Kluzak (1); 
Court nail (1). Shots on goal: Toronto (on 
Keans) 1IKJ-B— 21; Boston (on Edwards) 12- 
10-14-36. 

Hartford 1 I 1—5 

Buffalo 3 0 1-4 

Dlneen2 (21, Tippett (II. Malone ill, Crow- 
lord (11: Tucker (1). Houslev (l). Perreault 
(1 ). Andreychuk (1 1. Shots on goal : Hartford 
(on Barrasso) 10-9-0—27; Buffalo (onLlut) 13- 
12-8 — 32. 

CMcogo 0 l 1—2 

Quebec 2 2 3-6 

A. Stostnv (II. Glllls 2 (21, P. Stastnv (1). 
Cole (1). Delorme ID; Sutter |)|, Fraser ill. 
Shots on goat: Chicago (on Gosselln) 9-45 — 
21: Quebec ion Bonnet-man] 4-13-13—30. 
New Jersey o 2 4-6 

Philadelphia 3 I T — S 

Higgins (It.lUacLean (l>.Geene3f3). Lud- 
vig (1): Sin Halo ID. Kerr 2 <71, Proea (1). 
Ekluna ID. Shots on goal: New Jersey (on 
Urianer ah) 6-IS-9— 30; Philadelphia (on 
Cnevrler) 13-15-10- 3& 

Minnesota a 2 4 P—4 

Detroit 0 5 l 0—6 

Nilsson ID.McKeanev fl). Acton 11). Berg- 
land 3 121. Stolen ID: Doles ill. Ogrodnlck 
(1). achockl 2 (21. Kfima <11, Gallant ill. 
Shots on goal: Minnesota (on Mlcalef IH7-21- 
4—45; Detroit ion Beauorei 3-31-131—37. 
Winnipeg 0 I 3—3 

Edmonton i i 2—4 

Gretskv 2 12). Anderson (D.McTavIsh (1): 
Boschman (11. Small (1). Hawerchuk (I). 
Shots on goal; Wlnnioeg (on Funn 10-16-13— 
39; Edmonton (on Howard! 14-B-9— 31. 

Vancouver 1 3 M 

Los Angeles 1 T 3—5 

Pelersan 111. Lanthler (I). Hall 2 (21. Tam- 
belilni (D. Bellana (D; Williams Cli. Taylor 
(D. Dionne (D. Nicnails (D. Redmond (D. 
Shots oa goal; Vancouver (on Janccyk) n- 1 S- 
8—34; Lin Angeles (on Hr odour I 16-7-14 — 37. 


United Press International 


In other opening games, it was 


, The P™ “““I 0 a. un. at. 

unutes and five fighting majors Sunday, oa. 13 


1987 Tour de France to Start in Berlin 

PARIS (UPI) —The 1987 Tour de France bicyde race wffl b^in in . Thursday night by scoring two 
West Berlin and have the prokjgue and three wages in West Germany goals and an assist in leading the 
before the race readies France, Tour officials have a nn ounced. . defending Stanley Cup champion 


EDMONTON, Alberta — NewJersey 6, Philadelphia 5; New minutes and five fighting mqors 
Wayne Gretzky began the 1985-86 York Rangers 4. Washington 2; for each team. 

National Hockey League season in Quebec 6, Chicago 2; Hartford 5, Although on the losing side, the 
typically outstanding fashion Buffalo 4; Boston 3, Toronto 1; Jels ’ C03i ^ Lo^ was not 


Los Anootoc (Wolen 1341 at si. Louis (Co* pnuaaeipnia, and Ted Sator, need coach o< 

ftieN.Y. Ronswn,51000ooiecetoraDraMlby 

Taranto at Kansas City both teams during on Oct. I exhibition wmo. 


NHL FOCI'S 


sfore the race readies France, Tour officials have announced. . defending Stanley Cup champion Montreal 5, Pittsburgh 3: Vancou- „ V 03 ? 1 faail “W.™ “ e 

Felix Levitan, a Tour official, said Thuraday lhat West Berlin, which Edmtmttm Oilers to a 4-3 victory ^ a Los Angdes 5; and Detroit 6, S ave me tomght, he 

m k* rim dibVth fermion nn t a ervwionr tl *. <;t3rt smee Amsterdam held over the Winmoes Jets. z said. It was tremendous. We bad 


will be the ddith foreign city to sponsor the start smee Amsterdam bdd over the Winnipeg Jets. 

the prologue m 1 954, would encourage “undemanding between peoples" • -jt was a very big game for us 


j u • and may hdp persuade narintial teatus from Eastern Bloc countries to - because we were psychologically 

’ .L.— T— • ... ry 


Minnesota 6. 


participate in the Tour. . - 

For fhe Record 

The Nafimal Basketball Association has selected Seattle as tibeausfior 
the 1987 All-Star game. 

Chrence Rose 3ih t an 8-undcraar 64 Thuradtw to take :a'rae-s£roke 
lead over^ Craig Stadler in. tite raenmgtound of a PQA gtdf tournament in 
Lake Boena \fista, Florida. . , (AF) 


up for it," said Gretzky, who par- 
ticipated in a 10-mmute laser fight pearance as an Ofler, and first since Z'IZl" "" ™ ““ " ^ 
show prior to the lifting of the serving a yearlong jail sentence for s 

Stanley Cup banner. “The win for drunken driving. Laurie Bosdumm, Doug Smail 

Seatfie as the site for the Jets tonight would have given MacTavtsh fired the game-win- and Dale Hawerchuk screed for the 
(AP) them a lift aU year. We play them ning goal at llz55 of the third peri- Jets, who trailed 1-0 after one peri- 
to talreapoe-stroke .three limes in the first month, so if od on a 40-foot slap shot through a od and 2-1 after 40 mimues. Glenn 
A golf tournament in -we can win three, we should take a maze of players and past the Win- Anderson scored the other Edmon- 
, j (AP) good lead on them." mpeg goalie, Brian Hayward. ton goal 


for each uam- x-Konsos Clrv at Taranto 

Lfl* AIVMH Bt SL LOUll 

Although oa the losing side, the Monday, oo. u 

Jets’ coach, Barry Long, was not x ' Los Anad ”“Li!‘ 

j- i j TUCSOOVi O CL IS 

tOO disappointed. (.Kansas City at Toronto 

I can t fault anybody with the x4L louh at lo* Angom 
effort they gave me tonight," he Mtanm city m Toronto 
said “It was iremjndous. W= had 
lots of chances, but we are not mi necessary} 
game-sharp yeL I fed if we were world series begins oct. i» 
playing any other club, we would - ■■ 

have won." The Jets had 39 shots u « »11 


tbeN.Y. RongerLSlOOOoeiKetoraDraMlby . 

bdtn leoms during on Ott 1 exhlbllion Wffli. £ 61H11S 

Suspended Eton Malonev of the Rangers for 

tnrna games. Flnad N.Y. Rangers Dan M>- 

lonev and Tony Fettrtn 1400. and Mark Os- |?a — furt 

borne. James Patrick, 5«ye Patrick. Mike l WvIalHUl 
Allison, Terry Klolsengor, Barry Beck. To- «,i*Becnciiisi e 

Sandstrom, Kleii semueisson ond 

Gaarea McPhee *200 apiece tor their pgrtld- w 

pollan In the brawl. Rn«l Phllgdelphto Fly- CrechartoyaWa ItoL Haagary. M 

ers Undsov Carson and Bab Frees* 1300. and Helena 5uka»a. Cieet«»lapvakia.def. Csllio 
Ores Smyth, Dove Poulin. Kevin McCarthy. Barlas, Hungary, 6-7 (5-7). 6-2, 6-2; Hona 
Brad ManSh, Dave Brawn. Ed Hospodar.Mur- Manciikaya, Ciechoslavakio, def. Andrea 
ray Craven ana Ricfl Sutter S200 s piece tor Temesvari, Hungary. 6-3. 6-4; Regina Marsi- 
tholr participation In the brawl. Sumindod leave- Andrea Hsiloove. Ciecnasiavakia. dot. 
Kan Danovto.Btensefnan.o1 New Jersey tor Bartos-Temewarl. 6-4. 6-1 


Basketball 


enegomeond fined nim tor Sfflo lor his norHei- 
Patton with the Manhelm team In West Ger- 
many without league approval. 


Bulgaria del. Britain, 2-1 
Kalerlfta Maleeva, Bulgaria, del. Jo Durie. 
Britain, 6-2, 6-& 6-6: Monuela Maleeva. Bul- 


HBA PRES EASON 

TmrMatns Results 
Nn* Jersey ItXL Now York W 
Houston 113, Dallas 103 
DMtveC lie, San Antonlp 111 
Portland tae. Golden state I* 
Utan lot. Seattle 90 
LA. Clippers lie, Soerorwtto in 


BOSTON— Stoned Alain Cole, defenseman, oario. det. Annabel Croft, Brlioln. e-2. 6-2. 
HARTFORD— Assuned Jack Brownscni- Crofl-Durledef. it. (iraneevo-M. Maleeva. who 


die. aefensertMn. io Binanomton of tne Ameri- 
can Hockey League. 

N.Y, ISLANDERS— Sen) Alan Kerr, rigm 
wine, to Springfield of the American Hockey 
League. 

N.Y. RANGERS— Sent Ran Scott. goattgnd- 
er, to Now Haven of the AHL Signed Terry 
Kletsinoer. goaltender. 


European Soccer 


WEFT GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 

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POSTCARD 


Shows of Vienna’s Past 


By David Stevens 

InlmuuiortaJ Herald Tribune 

V IENNA — The mammoth 
‘Dream and Reality" exhibi- 
tion on tum-of- th e-cen turv Vienna 
ended Sunday, seen tty more than 
600.000 people since its opening in 
April and besieged in its final days 
by hordes of last-minute visitors. 
But two other exhibitions in town 
that could be seen without fighting 
crowds supplemented the big show 
at the KXinstlerhaus in some ways. 

In th« richly decorated ninin hall 
of the Nalionalbibliothefc. an exhi- 
bition (through Oct. 20) is devoted 
to the composer Alban Berg to 
mark the 100th anniversary of his 
birth. So entangled and overlap- 
ping was Vienna's artistic and in- 
tellectual life during the SO years of 
Berg's life that many of the individ- 
ual items could easily have been 
included in ihe “Dream and Reali- 
ty" show, which amply represented 
die city's musical life with sections 
on Mahler, Schoenberg. Berg. We- 
bern and lesser known figures such 
as Joseph Matthias Hauer, Alexan- 
der von Zemlinsky and Franz 
Schreker. 

For instance, the centerpiece of 
the show at the KHosUerhaus was 
the restoration of the almost leg- 
endary “Beethoven Frieze" of Gus- 
tav Klimt, created for an exhibition 
at the Secession in 1902. and not 
seen in public since. But the poster 
for that 1902 show was at the Berg 
exhibition. It was done by Alfred 
Roller, best known as the set de- 
signer for most of the historic pro- 
ductions at the Opera during Mah- 
ler's directorship, and is a good 
example of the stylistic shifts in the 
arts at the time. ' 

Almost next door, the Albertina 
has a show through Dec. 8 entitled 
“Die Kunst vom Stein." which is 
nothing less than the history of 
lithography from its invention in 
the late 1 8th century by Aloys Sen- 
efelder to the present. It includes 
rich documentation on the techni- 
cal aspects of lithography, its use 
by artists and an exhibition of the 
works of almost ISO artists, drawn 
in large part from the Albertina’s 
collection. 


The farces, satires and parodies 
of the Viennese actor and dramatist 
Johann Nestroy ( 1 802-62) are bare- 
ly known outside the German-lan- 
guage theater world, unless you 
count “Hello Dolly," a musical ad- 


aptation of Thornton Wilder’s 
“The Matchmaker," which was an 
adaptation of Wilder's earlier “The 
Merchant of Yonkers.” itself a Tree 
adaptation of a Nestroy farce. 

In Vienna, however, Nestroy is a 
staple of the theatrical diet, per- 
haps as much because of bis sharp- 
ly observed and wittily expressed 
understanding of human — and 
especially Viennese — foibles as for 
his almost Offenbachian satiric 
sense. There have been two new 
Nestroy productions already this 
season, both of plays that are not 
often staged and that date from the 
period during and just after the 
1848 revolution that, in Vienna, 
ended the Metternich era but 
quickly led to another period of 
repression. y 

“Freihdi in KrahwinkeT was 
written during the period when the 
uprising was in full swing, and it is 
full of revolutionary high spirits, 
most of them expressed by the part 
Nestroy wrote for himself, the jour- 
nalist Eberhard Ultra. Franz 
Morak plays the part exuberantly, 
particularly in the scenes in which 
he appears in various disguises, 
ranging from a boisterous cossack 
to Metternich himself. Horst 
Zankl's production at the Burg- 
theater was a celebration of the 
revolutionary spirit and the musi- 
cal adaptation by Hansgeorg Koch 
bordered on the operatic, but some 
of the best acting came from veter- 
ans in the cast portraying comic 
reactionary figures. 

Even rarer is “Der Alien Mann 
mit der J ungen Frau," which was 
written about a year later, after the 
forces of reaction had come back to 
Vienna with a vengeance. One as- 
pect of this was theater censorship, 
so that this play was not done until 
1890, and then in bowdlerized 
form, and is still hardly ever staged. 

Nes troy’s underlying seriousness 
is closer to the surface in this play, 
which operates on two levels. On a 
personal level it is about the bitter- 
sweet marital stresses of a man of 
GO married to a girl of 20. On a 
social level it is mil of acrid, and 
still timely, observations on human 
frailty and political perversity. 

Too bad Nestroy cannot be ex- 
ported as easily as a Sachertortc. 


Art Buchwold has resumed his col- 
umn after a leave of absence but will 
be writing two times a week instead 
of three. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURD A Y-SUND AY » OCTOBER 12-13,1985 


Take a Leap: Parachuting for Thrills 


By Ivcr Peterson 

flew York Tima Seme 

F ORT COLLINS, Colorado 
— In 1797 a Frenchman. 
R. J. Gamerin, leaped from a bal- 
loon while he was harnessed to a 
big silk canopy he called a para- 
chute. which can be translated 
roughly as “prevent-falL” 
Gamerin did it for sport, and, 
as such, jumping from Ugh places 
has developed a considerable fol- 
lowing. In the United States it has 
become known as sky diving be- 
cause most jumpers do not open 
their parachutes until late in the 
plunge. Forty thousand Ameri- 
cans are estimated to have leaped 
from planes at least once in 
peacetime. 

[There are more than 20.000 
sky-divers in France and an aver- 
age of eight deaths a year from 
the sport, according to the Feder- 
ation Frangai.se de Parachuiisme. 
In Britain there are 35,000 partic- 
ipants with an average of 35 fatal- 
ities a year, and in Wert Germany 
about 8,500 participants with 10 
deaths a year, according to the 
F&d&ration A6ronautique Inter- 
nationale. In Italy there are 3,000 
sky-divers and two to three fatal 
accidents a year, according to the 
Aerociub d 'Italia.] 

Most sky divers apparently 
perform the feat once and brag 
about it from then on, one jump- 
master said. The sport has been 
plagued by its reputation as a 
risky, even foolhardy activity. 

Yet it’s that sense of risk con- 
tributes to the thrill of a sport 
that “is like flying your own 
body," as Tim Monsees, head of 
Sky's West Parachute Center in 
Fort Collins, put it. 

“Everybody’s different,” Mon- 
sees said. “Some people are still 
scared after SO jumps, but for 
them the thrill and excite meat of 
being up there outweigh the anxi- 
ety, and that's what keeps them 
coming back." 

On SepL 29, a planeload of sky 
divers crashed on takeoff in 
Georgia, killing 16 jumpers and 
the pilot. While most descriptions 
of the crash called it a sky-diving 
accident, defenders of the sport 
disagreed. 

“The people who were killed 
weren’t sky divers at that point; 
they were passengers." said Mi- 
chael Trailer, publisher of Sky 
Diving magazine. “A basketball 



Bnm McAJfe*er/Th« hWYori Tb*» 

Sky diver Tim Monsees: Excitement outweighs anxiety. 


team could crash on its way to a 
game. Would you call that a bas- 
ketball accident?" 

Precise figures on sky-diving 
fatalities in the United States are 
hard to come by. Truffer said that 
35 to 40 people a year died in 
accidents after the/ left the plane 
— and that those are the only 
accidents that should be linked 
directly to the sport. 


Sky-diving equipment has 
evolved from the heavy, round- 
canopy military surplus chutes 
that pioneers of the sport began 
using in the early 1950s to light, 
wing-shaped chutes. 

The use of the parachute has 
also attracted an occasional crim- 
inal On SepL 10, Andrew C. 
Thornton 2d was found dead, still 
hooked to a reserve parachute 


that had malfunctioned, in Knox- 
ville, Tennessee, with 75 pounds 
of nearly pure cocaine strapped 
to his body. Police say Thornton, 
a former narcotics' detective, 
brought the drug in from South 

America. 

In 1971 the hijacker who called 
himself D. B. Copper comman- 
deered a Northwest Orient 727 
jetliner and forced a Landing at 
Seattle, where he was given 
$200,000 in S20 bills. With the 
money in a sack, he jumped from 
the plane over Washington state. 
Part of the money was found, but 
he never was. 

At the request of the National 
Transportation Safety Board, the 
FBI joined in the investigation of 
the SepL 29 crash. Sugar, which 
can destroy an engine, had been 
found in the plane's fueL The 
Knoxville News Sentinel newspa- 
per quoted a government drug 
agent as saying the plane's owner 
had botched a cocaine delivery 
and was killed in the crash in 
revenge by Colombian smugglers. 

The same plane was nearly in- 
volved in a crash earlier, in up- 
state New York. Truffer said it 
took special training to fly a sky 
divers' plane and followers of the 
sport ought to assure themselves 
or the pool’s experience. 

“It’s cheapest to fill it with as 
many jumpers as you can," he 
said of a typical sky-diving flight 
“The pilot fills it to near gross 
weight he flies it with the door 
removed, which is noisier and 
colder than he’s used to, and un- 
less he has had the proper train- 
ing and checkout if he has a 
problem he can get into trouble.” 

Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion regulations on the sport are 
primarily concerned with the 
safety and property of people on 
the ground, notin the air. Other 
regulations require that all para- 
chutes for sky diving meet a stan-, 
dard, that reserve chutes be re-' 
packed every 1 20 days by a rigger 
licensed by the FAA, and that 
everyone in a plane flying with 
the door removed wear an ap- 
proved chute. 

On April 17. 1981, that last rule 
saved the life of the pilot of a 
small plane for Sky’s West sky 
divers that was struck by a twin- 
engine commuter plane not far 
from Fort Collins. Two jumpers 
were killed in the collision; all 13 
(A the commuter plane died. 



PEOPLE 

Dylan’s Doubts as Poet 


Though be named himself after 
Dylan Thomas, the singer-song- 
writer Bob Dylan said in bis first 
television, interview in 20 years that 
he wasn’t sure he qualified as a 
poet Dylan told the ABC net- 
work’s “20-20," program: “1 don't 
know if Td call myself a poet or 
not I would like to but I'm not 
really qualified. I don't know what 
yon know, Robert Frost or Keats or 
T. S. EEot would really think of ray 
stuff.” The fonner Robert Zimmer- 
man, known for his often enigmatic 
lyrics, also said he wasn't wild 
about the words of the charity 
fund-raising song “We Are the 
World.” “I wasn’t so convinced 
about the message of the song, to 
tell yon the truth. I don't mink 
people can save themselves." 

• □ 

The singer Engelbert Humper- 
dinck says a combination ofa sinus 
infection, bronchitis, laryngitis and 
pharyngitis kept him from per- 
forming a series of concerts in Indi- 
anapolis in 1982. Testifying in Leb- 
anon, Indiana,' in a suit filed 
agains t him by Starlight Musicals 
Inc., Humperdinck, 49,- said: “I 
only cancel when 1 am desperately 
ill and can’t walk onstage." Judge 


Brandmeier, a disc jockey. Bgne* 
said die was taping “We re All Cra- 
zy ’bout Chicago" because it was 
“something light and 
We've seem a lot of strife and fight- 
ing and turmoil in this city and 
people are awfully sick of it” 

□ ■ 

A woman with a reputation asa 
nonstop talker has raised £100 
(about $140) for her town’s soccer 
fpytn by shutting up for five hours. 
Glenys Tipton of Halesowen, En- 
gland, said that after she had to 
have jaw surgery, she bad trouble 
persuading her friends that the af- 


fliction had not been cansea dy **71 
garrulity. So she set up a collection 
box and refused to Buk to anyone. 
Five hours later she told reporters- 
“I know I am a chatterbox. But 1 
was determined to prove to every- 
one that my hospital visit had noth- 
ing to do with talking too much, 
and I could stop if I wanted.” 


Byron Janis says his disclosure 
last February that he had a crip- 
pling form of arthritis changed his 
life. “A great burden had b«zx lift- j 
ed from my shoulders," the concert I 
pianist was quoted as saying in Pa- 


singer's testimony. 

□ 

Robert Duvall put his hands cm 
his hips, took' a deep breath and 
convulsed his fellow students at 


naa gone into moing my secret. mi ■ 
a - White House concert Feb. 25, J 

jams disdosed that be had psoriat- f 

kr arthritis. He said he had con- - 
sealed his condition because fcfljr 
didn't want people pitying him. 1 
Despite the disease, he plays 50 
concerts a year. “The doctors were 

I T 1 J _r .11 *» L. I 


convulsed his fellow students at ‘ “*55^ 

mercenary school by saying: “I ^ “The doctors wwe 

love the smell of tear gas in the amazed that I coold play at all he 

morning." The actor — famous for sa *“- . 

the tine “I love the smell of napalm □ 

in the morning” from the Vietnam 

film “Apocalypse Now” — was The Rereread Jerry Fahtefl says 
preparing for a film role as amerce- contributions to his television.' 
□ary. At Frank Camper’s The Mer- evangelism fell $1 mfiBoa in the! 
cenary School near Birmingham, weeks after his trip to South Africa.’: 
Alabama, be spent several days “That was over a fivo-week period 
dodging tear gas and training m when we were called bigots and 
hand-to-hand combat The school everything else in the madia," he 
attracted national attention be- add, “but that money has long 
cause three Sikh terrorists charged since come bade.” FalweH fotmdd 
in a plot to assassinate Prime Mht- of the conservative group Mart 
ister Rajir Ghmfi of India had Majority, visited South Africa • 
trained there. August and was criticized fori 

I-. comments against divesting 

holdings in South Africa i 
Former Mayor Jane Dyne of against the blade leader B bf 
Chicago, tooling up a campaign to De&®sssj Tote. In NashviHe, Tr 
regain the office in 1987, Can be nessee, to dedicate a new Baptist 
seen rocking and rolling in a video church sanctuary, Falwell said be 
by a local band called Johnny and planned another trip to South Afri- 
the Leisure Suits, led by Jonathon ca next month. - 


PERSONALS 


CHARLES WILSON COWAN, 

Iota of Victoria, Butch Colombo 

Your PVafesskxial UabAty Insurer has 
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ogbnd you. and a runber of altars 
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Your Insurer urgently requres yaw oo- 
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Vrit an provide the Standard 305 CJ.' 
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