Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


b 


INTERNATIONAL 





ed With He New York Times and The 'Washington Post 


ZURICH, TUESDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1985 


Algene — .AOODn 

Ammo XI 

Bohnaa 0650 Dr. 

Wgtn tilft 

Canada C$>X 

t Cyan* CEO JO 

Oimorii „ BJO DJCr. 

tv? HOP. 

✓ Finland 7.00 FM 

Front* 603 f 

• Gafisaiy — 2_50 DA^ 

- GwrtrHn SOP. 

Cm SO Dr 

ton 1I5M» 


kmri LilJCODO 

My I TOOL.* 

iordm 4»H I 

Kooro Sil 2000 

Rimoi. S 00 Fir 

Lebanon >0500 

U*o— _Lfto.US 
Lsnnt»uo_ 4 S Lft . 

MaSeiro IDS Etc 

Meta .31 Conn 

AtortXEO 45C t>. 

Nuhatenci„2J5 FL 

F**™ 170 X 


Norm: y — 7 00 NX* 

Ovor. (UDD Job 

ftmu** .90 &t 

CtO» -550 6* 

E^rfUJord-TJP. 
Sea* Aroba-600 X 

Span 110 Pttn 

SwKfcfl 70J JX-. 

Swtartni,lZ)5Fi 

Tuna iiiC Or 

Turkey — T T 60000 
OAi -450 Dun 

us mi (Ei- )-. mas 

YugadoMD- -1400 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


. . H. 

} c. ; v.'- 


..'■■■ a* 

’ , S' 


t T- ;: '• 


r . SCs. ■ 

•| sji ■■ 


■ - 
• - i -*'' 

•'j 




T " J 


■ \ 7*.'(0^ 


* ££< ; DiV 
KkNEr* 


J*s» lS S? 


^ - 


1 VT- 

' 

;a'- 

T-.'.'p 


S' 


Britain 

Cancels 






Blames Reversal 
Of Palestinians i 
(In Israel Issue 

By Marcus Etiasoa 
The Associated Press 
LONDON — Britain abruptly 
canceled talks Monday with two 
PLO representatives, saying they 
bad failed to make good a promise 
to renounce violence and recognize 
Israel's right to exist 
The surprise move dealt a blow 
to Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher’s hopes of uxyamming the 
Middle East peace process, and 
drawing the United States into 
talks with the Palestine Liberation 
Or ganiz a t ion. 

The disarray was compounded 
by conflicting reactions in the 
PLCs name 

Its London office accused Brit- 
ain of inserting “unacceptable*’ 
phrases into the planned communi- 
que. 

The Palestinian press agency 
WAFA put out an “urgent mes- 
sage" saying the London office's 
statement did not speak for the two 
PLO men or for the PLO as a 
whole. It said the PLO executive 
committee would issue an authori- 
tative statement later. 

A Thatcher aide said the prime 
minister was “extremely disap- 
pointed,” feeding she bad taken a 

S ble that, “when it came to the 
I hurdle, the PLO was not will- 
ing to fulfOL" 

The two men. Bishop Elias 
Khoury and Mohammed Mllhem, 
were to have met with the British 
foreign secretary, Sir -Geoffrey 
Howe, along with two Jordanian 
officials. Deputy Prime Minister 
Abdul-Wahab Majali and Foreign 
Minister Taher al-MasrL 
Britain was already in. the awk- 
ward position of talking to .PLO 
emissaries aftm the hijacking of the . 
A chill c Laura cruise ritin and the 




Egypt Demands Apology 
From Reagan Over Jet 


m 

m 







$ ■* . 

i® 







U.S. Still Seeks 
PLO Official 

By Ivan Srefanovic 

77k* Associated Press 

BELGRADE — Mohammed 
Abbas, the Palestine Liberation 
Organization official sought by the 
United States for allegedly master- 
minding the hijacking of an Italian 
cruise ship, has left Yugoslavia, the 
Yugoslav news agency and a PLO 
representative saia' Monday. 

Id Washington, Attorney Gener- 
al Edwin Meese 3d warned: "There 
is no safe haven as far as we're 
concerned. We’ll pursue Mr. Abbas 
as we would any other fugitive." 

Mr. Abbas flew to Yugoslavia on 
Saturday from Italy, where the au- 
thorities' said they bad no legal 
grounds to hold him. The United 
States had asked Italy and later 
Yugoslavia, to arrest him. and 
strongly protested (he Italian deci- 
sion to let him go. 



Mohammed Abbas 


Displeasure 

Emphasised 

■ By John Kifncr 

,Ven- YarA Tunes Service 

CAIRO — President Hosni Mu- 
barak demanded a public apology 
Monday for the U.S. interception 
of an Egyptian airliner to capture 
four Arabs sought in the hijacking 
or an Italian cruise liner. 

"Frankly, I am very upset." Mr. 
Mubarak said. 

Emphasizing his displeasure, he 
said that he had not read a concilia- 
tory letter from President Ronald 
Reagan delivered Sunday. 

President Mubarak on Saturday 
accused the United States of-“pi ra- 
cy," and his remarks later reflected 
both the widespread sense of hu- 
miliation and resentment here over 
the incident and the embarrass- 
ment it has caused his government. 

"There shouldn't be a personal 



strongly protested the Italian deci- A Justice Department spokes- . 

sion £ if him go. man said that the evidence, which STuf 

However, there was confusion he described as "sensitive and das- . onli -,j; na \u~ r i 

over whether Mr. Abbas, 38, had sified." had been processed by an 

indeed left Yugoslavia, which has interagency group that induded 5L lh SrEEts- if°nH 

good relations liih the PLO. repmfeS of the Defense De- ** 

Tanjug. the Yugoslav news agen- partmem and the Central Intelli- ^JdffilreSreanvconvaiieni 

cy. said Monday that Mr. Abbas, gence Agency. 

who is also known as Abu Abbas, A senior Pentagon official said ap 2i°SiH J? 

had left the country but gave no that Mr. Abbas traveled in and out f , r h „ J? 

^.APLO^taffem, of Egypt last w^k. although it was 

“I don’t know why, don't know “We believe he was heavily in- 
where, don't know how," he said, volved with this one," the official 


Amid Tight Security, Gandhi Begins London Visit TfeSffwta, fc -3K& i. * 

— . . . , , v. . where, don't know how," he said, volved with this one," the official 

the Indian prune minister, R^iv Gandhi, inspecting the tougher British measures against Sikh and Kashmiri The PLO official, who spoke at the said of Mr. Abbas, who has been 

Coldstream Guards on Monday at the Foreign Office as he" separatists living in Britain. During the visit, Britain is bedding PLO mission in Belgrade, refused associated with several other guer- 


iaddnt ambassador. Nicholas A. Veliotes. 

L u.i;zL I... -t - in an attempt to ease the strained 

fM’jsraa “ bS — ^ wo “ un - 

pride in rheir go,™- 


began his first official visit to Britain. Security for the two-day 
stop wa s intense. Mr. Gandhi appeared certain to rirnnand 


11 Sihks and Kashmiris without charges under anti-terrorism 
laws. Mr. Gandhi is due to leave Tuesday for the Bahama* 


PLO mission in Belgrade, refused associated with several other guer- 
to give his name or answer ques- rilla incidents. “We know he was 

rinne huf hp c aiH hi» cnnlrA Tat ih h^Avilv invnlvwl in rmnu nrkovc . .. J CTUlSC liDfi 


U.S., Allies: Minefield of Differing Interests 


lions, but he said he spoke for the heavily involved in many others. A WI ,^ 

‘SSMt™- — A*- gSKS 

MasaKSs - Ave^MUi,*. us - Navy 

of the PLO, he would go to the Not 


of the PLO, he would go to the Nora Boustany of The Washing- 
United States and explain the PLO ion Post reported from Beirut: 
P 05 ’ 000 - Mr. Ahhas is a veteran nf the 


jets to land in Italy. 

While Americans basked in the 
joy of finally capturing Middle 
Eastern terrorists who have kid- 


By Bernard Gwertzxnan 

. New York Tuna Service 


. , posiuon. Mr. Abbas is a veteran of the napped or killed Americans with 

oor friends over this thing." a State Department This advice has apparently been accepted. . Mr. Meese called Mr. Abbas “an Palestinian movement who aligned seeming impunity, in the Arab 
official said Sunday. because a message was sent Sunday to Mr. international criminal” and ruled himself with Yasser Arafat, the world the incident was seen as a 

Tkort* . nMkr mtlr 1 im>« miaaTp \ f. __ tiff. Tti .. .Mil itmi iXoo of ■ S *■ . 


carissaries after the hijadang of the.' • WASHINGTON'— The Reairan administra- There was talk last week of “punishing" Mubarak from Mr. Reagan offering what out any idea of immunity. 

Achillc Laura cruise sbrp and the tion’s frustratkm overthefaitoeof Ecypt, Ralv for having allowed the four hijackers of amounted to a request to bury the hatchet, a “We still want very much to ap- 

wave of anti-PLO sentiment genat ^ the Italian cruise ship to go free, .even though senior official said. The U.S. Embassy in Cairo prchend him and bring him back to 

a ted itHhe-Unitcd States. London’s jhetra »mn«th <rf thn AchilleLawo affair has ■ American tourisL ; v . isexp«wted feis^haaze publicly the U.S. desire answer the charges' against him in 

closest ally; v . . - ' flvF difKniitv nt t«miB to tvwamii* The Whitfi House Issued an 'unusually harsh for close relations with Egypt. this counffy. 1 ' Mr. Meese said. 


closest ally, v / > « ^_ ' ? nnder*cSoredthe difficulty of trying to persuade The Wlrite House issued an unusually hafsl 

Bui when the Jordanians arrived odwraadfioais tojcin in actions that they regard slaleroc p l ^Pr2®.^ Jor ? n % ^“* 6 11 
at the Foreign Office blanketed by as contiraiy4o their interests; ■ - comprehensible that the Italians let Moham 

security against possible demon- Washington’s satisfaction over the capture of "* ' 1 1 ■ 

strati ons or attack by Jewish and the four hijackers has been almost obscured by MEWS ANALYSIS 

Palestinian extremists, they were outrage at the failure of other governments to do 


statement Stmday momng, aying it was “in- s^iy. there is tittle sentiment at the State * ^“ H ? us = s P? ke ^ n l ^ 
comprehensible that the Italians let Moham- 1> - )artn) <4 t lo lel fa dispute with Italy go ** admuustraiion had been 

"* " , , , ' " ' " " beyond Sunday’s statemenL Italy has been one oonfbcting rcporison Mr. 

3NEWS ANALYSIS of the staunchest UjS. allies in recent years and L J ^?. erca ^ als 5°^ Ilf*? 


S : ‘ r 

!£•“_ i I ■ . -V* 


Jgk 


rt^nnij i puMUrtb uwuivtr w iLiu i iir wa p ja iranui uu yvet ui^vapiuitui — ucjuuu juuuaj J miuur.iiL iluj uao iaau uui. A hKoc’c ,i i ’ , , , 

strati ons or attack by Jewish and the four hijackers has been almost obscured by NEWS ANALYSIS of the staunchest UjS. allies in recent years and 

Palestinian extremisis, they were outrage at the failure of other governments to do agreed to deploy cruise missiles despite heavy j. e j^T^‘^“F nanon 11131116 

not accompanied by Mr. Milhem what, the United States befieves is necessary for med Abbas, who Washington believes may have Soviet pressure; There is also concern, as always, Mr Abha^^mMvite^f -st- 
and Bishop Khcmry. It was dear an anti-terrorist policy to be effective. masterminded the hijacking, fly to Yugoslavia, that leftists might come to power and move Italy ^ ■- 

that Britain’s initiative had gone - President Ronald Reagan was reported to fed Some officials are saying that the Italians should away from the Atlantic alliance. eunmen wh o hijacked i he halian 

awry. - - persomilly bended bythe prime minis toof be penalized insome way, even though they are Secretary of State George P. Shultz was ex- ' horary tiner Ocl7 offtheEcvotian 

Sir Geoffrey said that when Mrs. Bc^.Crm and a fewdays ago Wute an ally m the North Atlantic Treaty Organize- peeled to seek to ease the tension when be meets coast. The hijackers are afeo ac- 
Thatcher invited the dd^a t km House othaals freely assailing President -non. . .. Tuesday with Giulio Andreotti, the Italian for- cused of killing Leon KlinehoiTer 

during her visit to Jordan last Mubarak of Egypt Because Yugoslavia s obvious reluctance to dgn minister, along with other NATO foreign 69. of New York Citv 

month, Britain got “unambiguous But senior State Department officials arealso honor the U.S. request to detain Mr. Abbas, ministers in Brussels. _ „ ... ' . 

- - — * * v — ‘i- — 1 — * 1 ** — J •*- — -- - 1 — • ■ Ua Gtes Abbas Mediation 


(Continued on Page 6 . Co L 7) (Continued on Page 6, CoL 6 ) 

Italy Faces Cabinet Split 
Over Release of Abbas 


month, Britain got “unambiguous out^orotare^epanmenioiDaiusareiuso nonor me uj>. request to aetain Mr. Abbas, ministers in Brussels. 

assurances" that the PLO men cautieming that the polonies must be softened^ thn* is dso raft of retaliating against the as for Yugoslavia, it is viewed bv American 

would endorse a declaration cf “? ^ admmiswtion must accept tha wmld^ &st neutral Communist state. , , offidals M aSmforce for moderiS^^ 


W aZT L . The Associated Press 

Mr. Abbas supervised negoua- Drt . ._ _ , . . , 

tions for the surrender of the four D BOME— The decraon to free a 
gunmen who hijacked the Italian p “. e ? t ® e Liberauon Orgamzauon 
' luxury liner Ocl 7 off the Egyptian ; ffiaaJ f? * e Umted Stales 
coast The hijackers are afeo ac- h ? s .P ushed l ^ s Soeiahst-led co- 
cused of killing Leon Klinghoffer, ^ ,uon lo ? rafd a . cn f is r ll f l ™ uld 
69. of New York City threaten the survival of the coun- 

_' TIC try's longest-standing postwar gov- 

■ U.S. Cites Abbas Mediation eminent. 


would endorse a declaration cf “« 01111 H* J ™ ms ^ Qn “« "**P\ ““ ™ Q . S mmnm comnunist state. offidals 35 a “maior force for modeiition in the , U ?- said Sunday that Defense Minister Giovanni Spa- 

peace and recognition of IsraeTs °* er ¥ yvc ™SS!^f 1Ch, ^? g ^ ' ,t f^°® esl ® t ? le . Dep“t™ent officials are said to be World and as an example for other Marx- ^ supplied Italy with Iran- dolini, angry over Italy’s release of 

_r_u. . • . - Jlhes. h*vr mrfnwit rnnsirtwahnns nnrtirtilnr- mutimma ihnr the k ? cmntno fim« n»rrim_ - -.wuuuj/nmuujHmB, «r ,u.. w_t i ... . 


right to exisL 


allies, have different considerations, particular- cautioning that ibis is a sensitive time, partial- 

■Tip mkM, C--, ik- 1V.1— ,.;<L Cr I .t.. :r 1SI SuIlES. 


scripts of radio conversations that Mohammed Abbas, boycotted a 

innlr nlam> ilimn. ih. k. .J w j r .1. _ - 


?o.‘ “ Mnk«rBet“no 


meat of truth they were unwilling 
(Coatinoed oo Page 6,CoL 3) - 


Look, we can’t let things get ^to a point where soon it oould have serious repercussions for UJS. the leader in anti-terrorism policies, Egypt, Italy ^ Ncw Yor k Tunes reported Craxi's five-party coalition. 


we aBow the-Achille Lauro to put us at war with standing in the Arab world. 


(Continued on Page 6 , CoL I) 


from Washington. Mr. Spadbtiiu, a staunch sup- 

poner of Israel is the leader of the 

Republican Party, third largest in 
. , -- _ a the coalition after the Christian 

Would Shift 

Mr. Craxi convened the meeting 
_ ___ IT.^ ■ of the seven-member inner cabinet 

f» TH JLXDOnS 10 P° n tier the political implications 

of the hijacking of the Italian cruise 
on home loans would go down Acmc L*™ 0 “d its after- 


2 U.S. Researchers Win 
Nobel Medicine Prize 


Ihtiied Press International 


The doctors discovered that ath- 


STOCKHOLM — Two Amen- eroscleroas and heart attacks may 
can geneticists, Michael S. Brown stem from genetic defects in a cell 
and Joseph L. Goldstein, won the molecule called the low density E- 
1985 Nobel prize for medicine poprotan receptor, or LDL recep- 
Monday for discovering new ways tor, which affects the amount of 
to treat and prevent certain types of cholesterol in the blood. 


artery disease. 


“The discoveries made by Brown 


. Dr. Goldstein Md wicL 

ened our undostandmg of the cho- 


day make 11 “posaWe for many Jestero i metabolism^ increased 
people to have iheirst^k and hve our -po^^u^ to prevail, and 
to enjcy it, too," according to the treat aSoosclerosis and heart at- 


Nobd committee. 

' The Nobel committee cited Dr. 
Golds tan. professor and chairman 


tacks,” the committee said. 
Atherosclerosis, the most com- 


r? tom IS^ening of flre ar- 
neticsaithe University of Texas at tenes.orar^^erasrs, ls achs- 
Dallas, and Dr. Brown, a professor ease in which fatty deposits build 
in the same department. Yor their “P oajhejnotr walk of arteries, 
discoveries in “the regulation of ™ blood to**** 



Tokyo Plan Would Shift 
Spending From Exports 



Betti no Craxi 


TOKYO — Japan produced slightly and the loan ceiling would 


plans Tuesday for lower-cost home go up, they said. 


In a letter to Mr. Craxi, the Re- 11311 Democrat, have strongly de- 


loans, easier credit to buy cars and £ xacl figures were 10 be an- Pelicans criticized both the deci- fended the government's handling 
television sets and a range of other nc , unce d later. 51011 10 let Mr- Abbas leave the °f tbe hqaeking and the decision to 

consumer incentives to increase do- . .. , country Saturday on a plane for ^ el the PLO official leave with an 

rcesdc spending end S hif, speeding f — "j“ “ idc -. . . 


^STva^mcfca. seid ^ ^ -Mels 

the program, in response to threats “!£* . 

cf protectionist measures from the . JS.' ,h “P *° persuade pwple to 
United States because of Japan’s more aboul spending their 

growing trade surpluses, was ex- «eps would be introduced 

pected to create an additional $14 10 mcrease vacations by about 10 


lif ted immediately, the officials Mr. Spadolim on the mat- 

T ' j. rLjrur ,y tn The Republicans have three min- 

To -help to perauade people ro - ms - a & 30- member cabinet If 


ith Mr. Spadolizn on the mat- The deputy prime minister, Ar- 
naldo Forlani, a Christian Demo- 
: Republicans have three min- crai, met with the U.S. am b as sa- 
in uie 30-member cabinet If dor. Maxwell M. Rabb, earlier in 


■p L | nimii.fl vuifvnl^ tn »««* iwi/wyuwouo uavi^ uum mill- wav, ukl wiui Ulb U.J. aimrooau- 

isim ™ ™ 30-member cabinet. If dor. Maxwell M. Rabb, earlier in 
party withdrew, it would doom the day. Mr. Forlani said they re- 
10 the 0031111011 11131 was formed in viewed various aspects of the hi- 
by ^ ° 1983 ‘ ' jacking and its aftermath, and that 

days a year. -j-^g Republicans said they they agreed that the U.S.-Italian 


billion u domestic spending in the “ay*** year- The Republicans said thev they agreed that the U.S.-Italian 

fiscal year ending October 1986. Tracts of public land would be woukj not lend their approval to differences “should not be allowed 
The objective was to promote offered for sale to private compa- an y political or parliamentary to alter the relations of friendship 
economic growth through internal rues for development. statement endorsing the govern- and alliance between our iwo conn- 


discoveries in "the regulation 
cholesterol metabolism." 


(Cootfeoed ou Page 6 , Cot 7) 


. . The Auodmd Prat. 

Joseph L, Goldstein, left, and Michael S. Brown toasting 
each other after hearing that they won the Nobel prize. 


demand rather than through ex- 
ports, the officials said. 


The officials said about LI tril- mem’s handling of the later phases tries. 


lion yen would be invested over the of the hijacking affair. 


U.S . Reports Success in Test of New Atom Smasher 


By Boyce Rensberger 

. Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Physicists 
at the Fermi National Accelerator 
Laboratory near Chicago have suc- 


we (fid it.' We got some very spec- FennDab is funded by the UA Ed- smasher with its European counter- 
tacular cdUisiais. ergy Department and is operated parL 

“We’re looking forward to a pe- by a consortium of 10 universities The basic purpose of such ma- 
riod of fantastic discoveries,** he and three national laboratories. chines, and the motive behind a 
a d ded. * *. . ~r C...;...-. lonsstandina rntematinnal nvNlrV. 


twArA in' Aniline ft nnriv m- Jesuits of- the cofliaons, nm, the title of "world’s most pow- - ~ 

sitnriSirn itnSf^msha which were electrancaHy recorded, erful partide collider" returned to madeof - 

haw not y« ^ They the United .States from Europe. Earlier research has shown that 

infl kind 6 h^rawetftd to urobe ^ the first of thousands that are UntD now, the most powerful col- the protons and nor irons that 
fa nahite-nf expected eyentually to reveal more hdfir was one operated by Europe- ' group together to make up the at- 

rnSS JhM Tnvreufhas ««■ me about'what atoms nre made of at ah Center for Nudear Research, or om's nncleus are each composed of 
matter than anyone has ever g ^ fundamental level CERN, a consortium of European three smaller particles called 

„ , . . ,.. . ' Phvsicisis seek ever more power- nations that is Fenmlab's chief quarka. Scientists hope that Fermi- 

SuSL 1 M coffiaons, because the mSreen- conqietiwr in the world of high- ^b snew machine, the largest set- 
Sunday to the laboratory, .w-hmh a . . - .■ mcr gy physics. eottfic instrument m the world, will 


id. three national laboratories. chines, and the motive behind a 
As a result of Sunday's maiden longstanding international nWry. 


is to understand what the world is 


Under the program, domestic next three years in gas and electric- 
spending could produce an im- ity projects, 
provement of 4 trillion yen ($18.6 

billion) in the gross national prod- p 

net. which had been estimated for . TMCinr 

the year at 314 trillion yen. GNP ALIO MUMb 

measures the goods and services _ ... . , _ - . . , ... 

produced by action’s economy, ■ 

inclusive of income from operi- ***}%** f0r i - hrt £iS[ 

lions abroad. ^ behavior at his meeting wiih 

The officials said the present tar- R°nald Reagan. P^e 1 
gel of 490,000 new homes by next g The \]£, Treasury secretary 
April should now be exceeded by jays a Senate plan to e limin ate 
about 20 , 0(10 units. Interest rates tire deficit implies cuts in mlli- 


Questioned before the meeting 


research has shown that 


Paris Radio, TV Studios 


Wt 


eventually reveal whether quarks 


\ -\ • * 


auncay to me laroraionf, .» meu ii ^ ^ pack . -fa ^ energy physics. entiflc mstniment m the world, wtil 

^rtkles collide,^ ; Discoveries with the CERN col- eventually reveal whether quarks 
more likdy it is Aa tthe energy will Iider, which is situated on both •« 1 actually made of still smaller 
transform itself into new forms of sides of the French-Swiss border P^des- 


-a*: V‘- 

-* : • j 

** . :• / 


It came after seven years ofam- 

smictioa and more than a month of malta 1 that have never been, seen 


SaSiSpS^^ 1011121 ' 6 ^ . Fermilab's machine, which ere- the 1984 Nobel Prize in physics. that h« been in operation sin« 

“It finally h^^ened, as usual at at» concentrated energy by - In Sunday’s run, “the total ener- lSil^mlfr 

3 in the moraineT’ said Leon Le- huriing particles of subatomic mat- gy was 1.6 trillion dectron volts; 0l lJ ght into head-on coin- 
^Tt moving m lie which i, th^ u™ higher ao n, wd i mapnyn , movmg m 

was voytS- getting all this opposite direction, is rheworitTs than Brand XT Mr. Ledennan ™ opposite direction at the same 
equipment .lo work just right, fat., mo sr powerful particle colKder. sad, comparing the Fennilab atom (Gonfaued on Page ti, CoL 7) 


before. 

. _ Fennilab' s machine, which cre- 


neflr Geneva, brought an Italian- The FennDab collider, an im- 
Duich team of nudear scientists proved version of an accelerator 


that has been in operation since 
1971, hurls protons at nearly the 


Reuters 

PARIS — Bombs severely dam- 
aged state-run French radio and 
tdevision studios Monday in Paris, 
and responsibility was claimed by 
Direct Action, an extreme leftist 
group, to protest scheduled broad- 
casts by Jean-Marie Le Pen, a far- 
right politician. 

Police said that shortly before 
the explosions, at the main French 
radio studio and the Channel 2 
television studios, telephone calk 
of wanting were received. No one 
was injured. 


■ Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit 

to Paris is analyzed for hints of 
his behavior at his meeting with 
Ronald Reagan. Page 1 

■ The US. Treasury secretary 

says a Senate plan to eliminate 
the deficit implies cuts in mili- 
tary spending. Page 5. 

■ Britain urged that European 
industries, rather than govern- 
ments, take the lead in estab- 
lishing Eureka projects. Page 7. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ An open on the violent life of 

Malcolm X. Page 8. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Fiat seeks joint-venture ac- 
cords with U.S. and European 
automakers, despite its failure 
to agree with Ford. Ptige 15. 

SPECIAL REPORT 

■ New Yorkers now are proud 

of the city they used to love to 
hate. Rage 11 . 


Both Mr. Craxi and Foreign of the inner cabinet on whether he 
Minister Giulio Andreotti, a Chris- was expecting a governmental cri- 
sis, Mr. Forlani replied. “Let’s 
hope we could avoid it." 

[DE Mr. Rabb said they discussed the 

implications of the episode, and 
they agreed to work toward pre- 
serving the “remarkable relation- 
ship" between the two nations. 

Mr. Spadolini has been critical 
of Italy’s recent Middle East 
moves, including its strong con- 
demnation of Israel's bombing Ocl 
1 of PLO headquarters in Tunisia. 
Mr. Spadolini said he learned 
about the PLO official'll departure 
from television. 

Mr. Craxi and Mr. Andreotti 
were influential in getting the PLO 
to help negotiate an end to the iwo- 
day ship hijacking last week. 

The U.S. ambassador said he 
knew of no developments in the 
U.S. request for extradition of the 
four men who hijacked the Achille 
Lauro and who are being held in a 
Sicilian jail on murder and kidnap- 
ping charges. 

m., . . v ‘ The United States had also i&- 

NikofcuK. Baibakov was sued a warranl f or the arrest of Mr. 

replaced as Soviet eco- Abbas, charging him with piracy 
nomic planning chief af- and hostage-taking aboard the 
ter two decades. Page 2. cruise ship. An elderly American 

was murdered on the ship. 








Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 


Ml 

H« 


Gorbachev in Paris: The Implications for Reagan 


By Jim Hoagland 

H' jibing ron Post Sent ie 

PARIS — Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
go to his November summit 
meeting with President Ronald 
Reagan ready to strike a “genlie- 
men’s agreement" to leave serious 
amis control negotiations to spe- 
cialists while he and Mr. Reagan 
concentrate on achieving a climate 
of understanding that could lead to 
a second meeting. 

This assessment emerges from 
descriptions of Mr. Gorbachev's 
private meetings this month with 
President Francois Mitterrand and 
other French officials, who have 
relayed it to the United States. 

French officials also ore commu- 
nicating to Washington ajudgment 
that Mr. Gorbachev's comments 
indicated that he may prefer to give 
the appearance of having begun 
promising negotiations with Mr. 
Reagan that could be completed 
and ratified at a later meeting. 

The leader that French officials 
portray did not leave the impres- 
sion that he was prepared to put his 
full weight behind a risky effort to 
come up with a larger agreement 
that could draw fire at a Soviet 
Communist Party congress in Feb- 
ruary. 

Mr. Gorbachev, as described by 
these officials, is curious about the 
West, and prepared to cut losses 
when he sees no gain in persisting 
on matters of form and tactics, 
while sticking to a long-term strate- 
gy on substance. 



more major proposals before < 
va and will be concentratix 


| Gene- 

concentrating in- 
stead on anal y zing Mr. Reagan's 
readiness to project a public image 
of progress in dealing with the Rus- 
sians through negotiations. 

“The question now is whether 
Reagan is ready to attach his name 
to any kind of agreement with the 
Russians, even a limited one or one 
that has to do with the atmosphere 
around their talks," said an official. 
“And we do not know the answer 
to that, especially as it concerns his 
Strategic Defense Initiative;" the 
proposal for a space weapons sys- 
tem to defend against 
sites. 


ed the French from probing ambi- 
guities in the Soviet position, 
French officials say. 

Bui Mr. Gorbachev, 54, gave 
French officials the feeling that he 
has time to wait for technical prob- 
lems to Surface in SDI and for U.S. 
public opinion to begin question- 
ing its expense, rather than making 
all future contacts hostage to an 
immediate agreement, as previous 
Soviet statements have suggested. 

He showed skill in parrying the 
kind of questions that Mr. Reagan 
has said he wants to raise with Mr. 
Gorbachev in Geneva on human 
rights, Afghanistan and other sub- 
The French fed Ihey gained a i«s by reraing the other cheek, 
significant insight into Mr. Gorba- French officials say that Mr. 
cbev's willingness to settle for half Gorbachev appeared to give some 
a loaf or less, by resisting strong hints of flexibility on Afghanistan, 
overtures that the Russians had and Foreign Minister Roland Du- 
made before the visit for a joint mas, who has spoken to Secretary 
communique on SDI. Despite their of State George P. Shultz on the 
own reservations about the pro- telephone at least twice since the 


Soviet Chief 

Of Economic 


WORLD BRIEFS 



Is Replaced 


Poll Casts Doubt on U.S. Gun Laws 

WASHINGTON (LAT) — A survey of long-term prixmer^mdkata 
th^Scdve laws do not discourage handgun ownershtp by care* 
Su Z their weapons more often by theft or under-the- 
Steals £ legal purchases in legitimate stores, the Justice 

D m^TOrt h S^ST&jriday, said a sampling of 1 .874 men serving time 
for felomes in II stale prisons around the United States found., that 75 

■ MOSCOW — Nikolai K. Baiba- 

has retired Hud been replaced by 57 percent of the men bad owned a hatdgaa 

at the lime of the arrest that put them in pnson, that 32 percent of these 
guns had been stolen and that only 21 percent had been boughtftrougfa 
legitimate retail outlets. Another 26 percou were acquired m Wajk 
market deals and the others were described as gifts from family or tnends. 


The Associated Press 


Nikolai Y. Talyzrn. formerly a dep- 
uty prime minister in the national 
government, Tass said Monday. 

The announcement said that Mr. 
Talyzin. 56, had been appointed 
chairman of Gosplan, the 


planning commission, in place of Zia Cancels Visit to West Germany 


Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet Communist Party leader, 
during a news conference at the Elysee Palace on Oct 4. 


“This was tennis," not chess, said 
an official. “You can have a real 
conversation with him. It would 
have been pointless to have a get- 
acquainted session with his recent 
predecessors, but that might be a 
very useful goal with Gorbachev at 
Geneva.” 

These officials are careful act to 
predict drat the su mmi t meeting 


Nov. 19 and 20 will take this form. 
They are aware that Mr. Gorba- 
chev used his Paris visit to project a 
certain image that would be con- 
veyed to the Reagan administra- 
tion and that he may have a hidden 
agenda that would involve more 
open confrontation. 

Some officials conclude that Mr. 
Gorbachev is not likely to spring 


gram, the French did not want to 
give the Russians new ammunition. 

Lower-level Soviet officials 
pressed for the communique even 
after Mr. Gorbachev had arrived. 
But once Mr. Mitterrand had m a d e 
it clear to Mr. Gorbachev that he 
would not agree, the Soviet leader 
moved on to talks about substance, 
“without more ha g glin g over the 
communique." an official said. 

Mr. Mitterrand's strategy of 
avoiding any deep discussion of 
SDI with Mr. Gorbachev prevent- 


visit ended OcL 5, reportedly has 
died this as a potentially promising 
subject for the November meeting. 

“He looks like a man who can get 
thing s done in two months that 
took his predecessors two years to 
do,” said a French diplomat. “But 
we should not jump to the conclu- 
sion that he is therefore going to do 
greatly different things. He seems 
to have been chosen not to change 
the system, but to make it work 
better. Mr. Reagan will undoubted- 
ly remember that at Geneva." 



G il Q U S L Y HYATT 



•seen: 

!oobv’ ri\ 


Rcjjcn 

cr J>. 

■IH: t run. 'Pi 

>rc- 

iirio.i 

worle 

Lot g'ici;..' 1 



Ex 

:?criencc 

emlc 

•icryicc 

. The 

;u>:urv nr 

jji 

Rcpcn 

cy : C!i 

t ’ ;■ 

;»: rpoT-i'v. 

*Thc 

coiv.pe 

tence 

or- our B‘j.' 

■/iness 


' Cai&Prou ten 

s'ldc.'Ndrth.'lpcsai;. 

Npuciniries 3t' 

Aanean.," 

zee !j usin' aiisii 

io a*- Pe.arjY or 

ock. rails iis "he 

: Piano': Bar. Or 

n\v;nd-or. rhe 

.reimsv eourts, ' 

•/ the 'ou; door 

pool or'rhv 

s-srctiiivciv-cou 

.irned-.Firue'S 

sent re.' Hyat: Regeiicv. Delhi . 

r>ii“ v i •■>! — • ' t • rv*kf - •! _L. : v • t . 



Early Polish Vote Count Put at 77% 

Election Turnout May Be Below Warsaw's Expectations 


Return 

WARSAW — The Polish au- 
thorities indicated Monday lhal 
voting in general elections, which 
the banned Solidarity trade union 
had urged electors to boycott, may 
have been lower Lhan the govern- 
ment had hoped. 

The official spokesman. Jerzy 
Urban, said that counting was con- 
tinuing and that provisional figures 
showed that 20 million, or just un- 
der 77 percent, of the electorate 
voted Sunday. 

He said provisional returns from 
29 regions where counting was 
completed showed an average vote 
of 78 percent, compared with an 
unofficial government target of 80 
percent or more. 

Mr. Urban said earlier that the 
participation was considerably in 
excess of the 75 percent recorded to 
local elections last year. 

“The sense of the election is a 
vast acceptance by the majority of 
toe permanence of the system and 
the government’s political line," he 
said. 

The authorities campaigned for a 
higher turnout than to I9S4 as a 
signal to Soviet bloc allies and the 
West that stability was being con- 
solidated since the Solidarity crisis. 

Solidarity'sleader, Lech Walesa, 



opinion of society." He added: 
“Such ejections are not plebiscites 
for or against the authorities. They 
don’t make anyone credible and 
they do not deprive anyone of his 
credibility." 

Unofficial sources said that the 
vote to parts of Warsaw was as low 
as 30 percent and that spoiling of 
ballot papers was widespread. In- 


cov, 74. 

The replacement of Mr. Baiba- 
kov, who had held his post since 
October 1965, was seen as a Further 
move by Mikhail S. Gorbachev to 
rejuvenate the political and eco- 
nomic leadership of the country 
and boost economic performance. 

Mr. Baibakov's retirement fol- 
lowed the retirement of the former 
prime minister, Nikolai A Tik- 
honov, who was replaced SepL 27 
to that post by Mr. Gorbachev's 
ally, Nikolai !. Ryzhkov. 

Tass said that Mr. Talyzin had . 
also been appointed one of three 
first deputy prime ministers. 

Mr. Baibakov was only one of 10 
deputy prime minis ter*, and the 
elevation of Mr. Talyzin to be a 
first deputy prime minis ter indicat- 
ed that he may wield strong person- 
al influence to the effort to get the 
Soviet economy moving. 

Mr. Gorbachev has indicated 
that Gosplan may have a less domi- 
nant role in planning every detail of 
the Soviet economy and become 
more of a research body for ready- 
ing more general plans to shape 
economic strategy. 

Tass made no mention of any 
thanks given to Mr. Baibakov for 
his 20 years of service as head of 
Gosplan, indicating he could have 
been forced to take retirement as 


ISLAMABAD (Reuters) — 
President Mohammed Zia ul-Haq 
of Pakistan called off Monday a 
visit to West Germany scheduled 
for this week, as opposition in- 
creased to a bill to pardon him for 
the past eight years of martial law 
rule. 

- A Foreign Ministry spokesman 
said General Zia postponed the vis- 
it planned forOti. 16 to 19 “due to 
his commitments in the country." 
The spokesman would not inter- 
pret this but Western diplomats 
said the president, who has been 
meeting members of the National 
Assembly about the bill was con- 
cerned about its passage. The bill 
would protect General Zia against 
possible charges of treason and 
write his martial law orders into die 
constitution. 


>■ j'ft- 



Mohammed Zia ud-Haq 


Strong Quake Hits Soviet Central Asia 

MOSCOW (AP) — A strong earthquake has struck the central Asian 
republic of Tadzhikistan, leveling factories and office buildings and 
causing “loss of life," the official press agency Tass reported ;Moflday. 

It was not stated how many people were killed or injured, nor was an 
assessment of the damage provided. But the quake Sunday was described 
as strong, and the report of deaths indicated that the casualty toll might 
be heavy. 

The epicenter of the quake, and the most heavily damaged area, was 
reported to be 145 miles (230 kilometers} northeast of the Tadzhikistan 
capital of Dushanbe. The quake measured eight points on the Soviet 12- 
point scale at its epicenter, enough to cause heavy damage and loss of life. 


SLribT by Mr- Gorbachev and his allies pet 'Execution’ of 3 Russians Threatened 

their men into leading posts. 


ther side were not possible. 

Mr. Urban said the vote in 
Gdansk was 70 percent, and as high 
as 88 percent in some places. The 
authorities said the turnout was 79 
percent in Katowice and 78 percent 
to Wrodaw, both Solidarity strong- 
holds that are tightly policed. 

Roman Catholic Church sources 

£s£=5 ~ - i 

Urban admitted that only aquarter 


Tass said Mr. Baibakov would 
retire on pension, bat it gave no 
word on whether he would keep his 
seat on the Central Committee. 

Mr. Talyzin was named a deputy 
prime minister and Soviet 
sentative to the Eastern tra< 


Jerzy Urban 

said the union's provisional esti- 
mates showed a vote of 45 to - 47 
percent in the Baltic port of, 
Gdansk, and 35 percent in- Gdynia 
and 43 percent to Sopot, which are 
neighboring towns. 

Mr. Walesa also said that voting 
figures would not “show the real 


of priests did so, according to the 
authorities’ figures. 

Police in Warsaw, meanwhile, 
summoned two Solidarity advisers, 
Zbigniew Romaszewski and Jacek 
Kuroa, for a third consecutive day 
of questioning. 


made a full member of the Commu- 
nist Party’s Central Committee the 
following year. 

He graduated from Moscow’s 
Institute of Communications to 
1955 and became a doctor of ted*- 
nical services to 1970 and a profes- 
sor to 1975. 


U.K. Again Warns UNESCO 



Air crews from many countries train with visual light displays developed by Sabena. 


Sabena. 

Savoir f aire in the air. 

How Sabena air crews get 
their know why with their know how. 


To ensure that air crew trainees quickly learn to 
understand exactly what takes place when they 
operate aircraft controls, Sabena engineers de- 
vised special visual light display panels connected 
to their cockpit procedure trainer. 

So successful has the system proved that 
the air crews of a number of world airlines are 
trained with the Sabena designed cockpit trainer 
and panels. That's savoir faire. 

Sabena savoir faire has also gone to create 


their new Business Class. Enjoy the undivided 
attention of a special cabin staff, an extra wide 
range of reading matter, Sabena’s superior cui- 
sine served on special tableware and comple- 
mentary champagne, cocktails, wines and li- 
queurs served in real glasses. 

At most major airports you’ll also find a spe- 
cial quick check-in and Business Class lounge. 
Your travel agent or Sabena office has ail the details 
about Sabena ’s worldwide network. 


Make sure you’re booked aboard 


BELGIAN WORLD AIRLINES 


The Associated Press 

SOFIA — Britain warned Mon- 
day that unless reforms at UNES- 
CO continue; it will follow the 
United States’ example and with- 
draw from the organization at the 
end of the year. 

Timothy Raison, Britain’s minis- 
ter for overseas development, 
called on the general conference of 
the United Nations Educational 
Scientific and Cultural Organiza- 
tion to make significant changes to 
the agency's operations. 

In a speech, he said that Britain’s 
threat to leave was prompted by its 
belief that UNESCO was “nowhere 
sufficiently focused on the practi- 
cal development of education, sci- 
ence and culture." 

“We insist on thoroughgoing and . 

comprehensive reform,” he said. Foreign I MiniSt pr 
“without it, our intention to with- *5 

„ Is Replaced m 

meet Britain’s challenge and make 
the Sofia conference a “real vic- 
tory" for UNESCO. 

After his speech, which several 
delegates described as low-key, Mr. 

Raison said that Britain would fol- 
low through on its formal notice of 
withdrawal “unless there are strong 
signs of continued reform and 


Britain has said it will make a 
final decision after assessing the 
results of the conference, which be- 
gan Ocl 8 and ends Nov. 12. 

In his speech, Mr. Raison said 
that a group established to formu- 
late specific changes “made some 17 
progress." “Now," he said, “re- rOT IJDL6 JtC&OrCI 


BEIRUT (UPI) — A man claiming to represent the kidnappers of three 
Soviet Embassy officials told a radio station Monday that the hostages 
would be “executed" within 30 ndnuleMZhristian voice of Lebanon radio 
station reported Monday. 

The call from a man who said he was a spokesman for the Islamic 
Liberation Organization-Khaled ibn Walid Forces was made to Voice of 
Lebanon at about 2J0 PJVL, but no transcript was available, an employ- 
ee at the station said. It was the second such call the station, based in 
Christian East Beirut, had reported to 24 hours. The deadline passed 
without further developments. 

Security sources also said one of the three kidnapped men telephoned 
the Soviet Embassy and relayed the latest demands of the abductors. The 
sources, who requested anonymity, did not identify which hostage made 
the call or what the demands were; The men were abducted SqpL 30. 

Wellington Warns U.S. Over Ship Ban 

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (Reuters) —New Zealand warned the 
United States on Monday against overreacting to Wellington's ban on 
nuclear-armed or nudear-pawered warships. 

Deputy Prime Minister Geoffrey Palmer said on Radio New Zealand 
that Washington would be “very foolish" to push Wellington toward 
non a ligned status because of its anger over the ban, which has cut defense 
ties between the two nations. 

The United States has said that New Zealand risks losing its ally status 
if it passes a law banning ships that carry nuclear weapons or are nudear- 
poweretL It has said the legislation would provoke a review of the 
ANZUS treaty that links the two countries with Australia. 


onns must be made to stick. And 
they must be carried further." 

He joined other Western Euro- 
pean nations and Japan to calling 
for the creation of a permanent 
mechanism through which member 
nations would monitor the UNES- 
CO Secretariat's activities when the 
50-nation executive board is not to 
session. The board meets twice a 
year. 


Swedish Cabinet 


“If there are," he said, “we win 
be wflCng to reconsider our posi- 
tion.” 


The flavour 
of an Island 
in a single 
malt 



mmm 


smust 


SCOTCH WHISEiY 


Reuters 

STOCKHOLM Prime Minis- 
ter Olof Palme unexpectedly re- 
placed Foreign Minister Lennart 
Bodstrom, one of the most contro- 
versial members of his government, 
on Monday. 

Among several cabinet chang es 
following last month's general dec- 
dons, Mr. Palme named a former 
soda! affairs minister. Sten An- 
dersson, as the new foreign minis- 
ter. He moved Mr. Bodstrom to the 
post of education minister. 

Mr. Bodstrom, 57, a former trade 


Ecuador has broken off relations with Nicaragua. President Daniel 
Ortega Saavedra had sensed Ecuador of interfering to Nicaragua's 
internal affaire after President Le6n Febres-Cordero said Nicaragua 
should bold democratic elections. (Reuters) 

Angolan rebels said Monday 12 Soviet servicemen wire killed when two 
bombs planted by its forces exploded Tuesday to Soviet officers’ quarters 
in the central city of Huambo. (Reuters) 

A grenade killed 13 spectators at a Ptrffippfae cockfight Sunday fa the 
Mindanao Island town of Ula, officials said Monday. It left dozens 
wounded, they said. At least 18 people died there and more than 100 were 
injure d m a grenade attack on a movie house SepL 15. (AP) 

The bureau chief m Kuala Ltnnpur of the Far Eastern Economk Reriew, 
James Chad, was convicted and fined $4,166 by. a court Monday for 
receiving and publishing information contained in a classified document 
on Malaysia s proposed trade policy with China (UPI) 

Ari t c T 5tniction iwkereto Israel were sentenced to life in prison 
Monday after being convicted of strangling a Jewish teen-ager. (AP) 

Corrections 

hJJf U *! ESC0 hpdS? Provided by the United States 

™ ” 

in " d Ameri gm Sro * 

Expert on Dante Dies in U.S. 


* 


* 


« 


Theatssockmed Press 
BALTIMORE — Charles S. Sin- 


Times, Miss Klemesrud wrote for 
3u«u *jc _ — the Style department, reportin g tin 

union leader, attempted in Febru- ET"™; -f; "? Dt £ scholar besi such subjects as the women's move- 

ary to cast doubt on Swedish nrili- “fi^h translation mem and the social dum p** of the 

raiy findings that blamed the Sovi- 2L“"L, Comedy," died 1960s and 70s. 
et Union for submarine intrusions “JJJ tas ho “* a Balti- B other ^ 

into territorial waters. . . sv. , . - „ 

Mr. Bodstrdm's replacement was rj£; Singleton had taught at Bertl^ a star of silent 

the major change, which affected ""P™ University since considered the first diva 

six ministries. The only outsider E “S, 1 ** thr um® years, anema, Sunday in Rome, 

brought into the cabinet was Sven. If*!? 7 ’ wb f? 1)6 held the ^ ^ted ber age as 

Hulterstrom, 47. Social Democrat- m ltahan at Harvard. ba t Other sources said she was 
ic leader fa Sweden’s second city, ’'“dy Klemesrud, 46, “tTtvLj *5** ^ 3Ut fpvfl 

Goteborg, who becomes communi- New York Times Renorter Hi ^ Go ^“ ■ 

cajions^nutister in pbee of Rome — 

frisson. Kicmesrud, 46, a reporter for Tlv Tex as.u- , 


BftS ofcanc “^ 2 

United Nations. For most of her career at The 



Tex WBtiams, 68, the country- 
western singer, songwriter and ac- 
tor best known for his minion-sell* 
“ Smoke ' Smoke, Smoke 
Thai Cigarette," Friday in Los An- 

. Roger M. Btough, 8i f former 
ch ^™an of US: Steel Corp. who 
made headlines in 1962 because of 
a bitter dash with President John 
r. Kennedy over sted prices, Tues- 
tiayin Hawley, Pennsylvania. . 


THE BBT OF ALL POSSIBLE WORLDS 

DOLDER GRAND HOTEL, 

ZURICH 

Rood do Gendre, Dir. Kurhauatranw A5/CH-BG32 Zurich 
T«M»oofc 01/251 62 31, Telex.- S3449 grand ch 



UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 

aAOS ^«M^rars%rxxjQRArt 

*"■ *»*, Academic, Pfct fr p « i mtf . 

detailed reaume 
*or tree evaluation. 

PACWC western university 

MO N. Sepulveda BIvcL - 
Anwrtes, CaUfomki . . 
“WfcDepf.axu-XA. . < 







Page 3 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 



After the ordinary printer : 
your personal IBM printstation. 


In announcing the IBM Proprinter, 
we aren’t presenting just another 
printer. We’re giving you a sophisticated 
unit with so many different functions 
that you may call it a printstation. 

Developed by IBM for the PC, it puts 
the power of the printed word right 
next to every IBM PC, independent of 
the central printer. 

The IBM Proprinter is small in size 
and low in price, so it will fit on 
anyone’s desk-top, and within most 
people’s budgets. 

At the same time it is a quality, 
multi-feature machine that can be many 
things to many people. 

Multi-function: The IBM Proprinter 
is versatile and can be used for many 
different office tasks: producing 
drafts and reports for the secretary, 
memos for the manager, charts for the 
sales director, lists for the accountant, 
and research papers for engineers 
and scientists. 

Its graphics ability should not be 
overlooked: it will produce an excellent 
copy of your designs. 

Multi-speed: Proprinter offers 
three text modes: near letter-quality, 
text and normal, each giving a suitable 


character style and printing at speeds of 
40, 100 and 200 characters per second. 

Multi-type: These three “text 
modes” will produce up to 18 different 
combinations of text styles. 

Y,u can select from a range of typefaces 
and a choice of character sets, which 
allow you to print in various European 
languages, together with a range of 
technical symbols. 

You can even create your own alpha- 
bets and customised sets of symbols. 

Multi-feed: The IBM Proprinter 
accepts continuous forms or cut-sheet 
paper. But, unlike some other printers, 
you don’t have to change the paper tray 
each time you change the format. 

A convenient cut-sheet slot in the front 
of the machine receives notepaper, or 
even envelopes for immediate printout. 

Mini-price: The cost of buying and 
running this new IBM printstation is in 
proportion to its size - very small. 

Er further information write to 
IBM United Kingdom International 
Products Limited, West Cross House, 

2 West Cross Way, Brentford, 

Middlesex TW8 9DY, ====^=E== 

England (Telex 27748). ===rE - E 


Page 4 


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 


* 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Srlbunc, 


Pubtinbrd WtahTbvN-w Yo*k Ttaaea Mud IT* Waxtiapoo Port 


Hard Military Questions 


After six years of sharply increasing military 
budgets, those who demanded the buildup 
should have solid ground for contentment. Yet 
some are more uneasy »h«m ever. The extra 
money has in no way cured the underlying 
problems of defease organization. A trillion 
dollars seems to have bought pitifully little. 

In a notable series of speeches. Senators 
Barry Go id water and Sam Nunn have laid out 
a daunting list of what they believe is wrong 
with the defense establishment. As the chair- 
man and ranking minority member of the 
Armed Services Committee, they are princi- 
pals of Lhal establishment. All the more aston- 
ishing. therefore, for Mr. Goldwoter to say: 
“You will be shocked at the serious deficien- 
cies in the organization and procedures of the 
Department of Defense and the Congress. If 
we have to fight tomorrow, these problems will 
cause Americans to die unnecessarily. Even 
more, they may cause us to lose the fight.” 

The problems start with the longstanding 
inability of the services to work together. From 
Peari Harbor and Leyte Gulf to the Iran rescue 
mission, service rivalry has led to disaster or 
near-disaster. Even in' the invasion of Grena- 
da, ibe army's and navy's inability to cooper- 
ate extended from lack of unified command on 
the ground to incompatible radios. In battle, 
the key to interservice communication proved 
to be an AT&T credit card. The army and navy 
even held their planning sessions separately, 
with service counterparts not invited. “We 
were lucky in Grenada," says Mr. Nunn. “We 
may not be so fortunate next time." 

American military forces are supposed to be 
coordinated by “unified commanders.” like 
the commander in chief of American forces in 
Europe. [□ practice, a regional commander in 
chief has little real control over the army, navy 
and air force officers under him. since they 
also report to their service chiefs. It is the 
service chiefs, not the unified “ernes,” who 
dominate the Pentagon's budgeting. 

The service chiefs form the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff, the supreme military command under 
the president and the secretary of defense. But 
the Joint Chiefs insist on unanimity and the 
principle that no service's interests should 
be harmed. Their advice to civilian superiors 


is often fate, irrelevant and parochial. “Mem- 
bers of the Joint Chiefs." Mr. Goldwaler main- 
tains, “rarely override their individual service 
allegiances . . . The services win the tug of 
war, but the country loses.” 

The Joint Chiefs fail to set priorities for 
missions. Usually they “just accept the pro- 
grammatic plans of the services with no regard 
for costs, and call it a strategy.” Mr. Gold- 
water notes. With programs determining strat- 
egy. the services are preoccupied with business 
management, not fighting wars. Officers are 
rewarded for being managers, not warriors. 

The two senators apply their criticisms to 
military organization, not individuals. They 
also blame Congress For constant meddling, 
often to secure weapons programs. They re- 
buke the services for ordering different kinds 
of weapons, more than they can afford to buy 
at efficient tales. They note signs of a “very 
worrisome future” because the new weapons 
now in production are proving too expensive 
to buy in the quantities needed. “The faster we 
run,” says Mr. Nunn, “the ‘behinder’ we get” 

At the root of many failings is the corrupt- 
ing business of wea pons-buying. Officers ne- 
glect military arts, seeking promotion through 
procurement. The services resist civilian con- 
trol, lest they lose control over and the favor 
of contractors. The contractors hire officers, 
distribute jobs and lobby Congress so as to 
make their programs unstoppable. 

The result is paralysis: no strategic plan- 
ning, no unified command, no setting of prior- 
ities, no matching of weapons needs to mis- 
sion. Increased defense budgets have made the 
disease only worse. The minor, but visible, 
symptoms are weapons that don't work. like 
the Sergeant York guru fudged tests, contrac- 
tor crime and overpriced spare parts. David 
Packard, former deputy defense secretary and 
head of the presidential panel on defense man- 
agement. has already decided on the need Tor 
fundamental changes in weapons buying. 

As institutions Congress and the armed 
services like things just the way they are. But 
knowledgeable people in both, like Senators 
Goldwaler and Nunn, realize that a funda- 
mental cure is long past due. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Getting Voters to the Polls 


The 1984 U.S. presidential election generat- 
ed the most feverish voter registration activity 
in 20 years, much of it the result of foundation- 
funded effort The result: more than 1 1 million 
new registrants. Voter turnout increased for 
the firsL time since I960. Yet of 174 million 
eligible voters, only about 127 million were 
registered and only about 92 million actually 
voted. A new study of voter registration efforts 
last year confirms the important link between 
voter education and participation. In registra- 
tion, as elsewhere, quality counts. 

The study was done by Interface, a New 
York think tank, and what a nonpartisan ef- 
fort its figures disclose: 85 foundations gave 
almost 57 milli on to a dozen major organiza- 
tions that conducted more than 1,000 registra- 
tion drives in 44 states. Interface attributes 15 
million of aQ new registrants in 1984 to their 
efforts. That was over and above the partisan 
regis tration drives of the Democratic and Re- 
publican national parties, which added about 
eight million to the voting rolls. 

The achievement of the nonpartisan organi- 


zations was accomplished despite funding de- 
lays. inexperienced workers and “constant ten- 
sion between the need for resources in the field 
and the need for central support, materials, 
research and oversight,” Interface reports. 

Turnout did not go up nearly as much as 
registration. That is because funders empha- 
sized “high -volume registration” rather than 
quality voter education to ensure that regis- 
■ trants would go to the polls. Groups that 
stressed frequent personal contact on a year- 
round basis, like the Southwest Voter Regis- 
tration Education Project, were more success- 
ful in gening their new registrants to the polls 

The Interface researchers rightly urge that in 
future more attemion .be focused on votei 
education, particularly on local issues and in 
low-income and minority communities. Thai 
is especially worthwhile since the parties ne- 
glect local organizing. The interface report 
shows that by enlarging registration, the foun- 
dations enlarge democracy. The task now is tc 
lead eligible voters aQ the way to the water. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


After an Aerial Interception 

President Reagan was lucky — his daring 
mission went off without a hitch. That is the 
adrenalin which could send his approval rat- 
ings soaring as he prepares for next month's 
meeting with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorba- 
chev. Unfortunately, it could also open the 
door to further retaliation. For the terrorist 
philosophy will surely be: If the president of 
the United Slates can force down a plane — 
and that oF a friendly nation — why can’t we? 
— South China Morning Post (Hong Kong). 

The interception was a technical illegality, 
but did it amount to more than a “citizen’s 
arrest” followed by a handing over of known 
criminals to lawfully constituted authorities? 

— Vie Times (London). 

If the interception was conducted without 
the prior tacit understanding of Egypt, it is 
likely to be regarded as another hijacking of a 
commercial plane. The question now arises 
whether or not the U.S. action was a pertinent 
step in dealing with terrorism. The nationwide 
reaction of a superpower like the United States 


against a handful of pirates resulted in an 
action [comparable] to wielding a giant ax to 
eradicate a few flies. Such grandiose action is 
likely to please terrorists and escalate their 
activity. The more attention they receive, the 
better it serves their political purpose. The 
United States should maintain a calm posture. 
To avoid the vicious cycle of terrorism, we 
believe that any demand for extradition, which 
smacks highly of revenge, should be avoided. 

— The Mainichi Daily News (Tokyo). 

A Leader Develops in India 

Written off a year ago as a lightweight, Rajiv 
Gandhi has had an extraordinarily successful 
period as prime minister of India. He repre- 
sented continuity of Congress rule and the 
Nehru dynasty, but also change. He has 
proved a strong, clear-sighted, decent leader, 
even a statesman, who has impressed the world 
as well as many of his own people. From the 
beginning, be resolved to make the hallmark of 
his leadership conciliation and cooperation, 
and not confrontation and cynicism. 

— The Daily Telegraph {London). 


FROM OUR OCT. 15 PAGES, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Macao’s Fate Causes Concern 
PARIS — A Hong Kong resident connected 
with the attempted settlement of the Macao 
boundary dispute last year was interviewed [on 
Oct 14] with regard to the effect of the Portu- 
guese revolution upon the attitude of China 
towards Macao. He said, “The situation in 
Macao is second in importance to the over- 
throw of the monarchy. Bui any move which 
will encourage China to regain possession of 
Macao will strike a blow at every treaty to 
which China is a party. There is a far-reaching 
anti-foreign sentiment in China. Danger lies in 
any excuse that may be given by the Portu- 
guese for a move on China's part which may 
result in the repudiation of the 1888 treaty. 
Portugal ha* allowed Macao to drift from a 
state of affluence to one of decay. Tt now 
appears to Chinese eyes as a wreck of valuable 
territory by an unwelcome alien Power.” 


1935: League Strikes at Italian Credit 
GENEVA — The League of Nations opened 
its financial offensive against Italy when its 
Committee of Coordination adopted [on Ocl 
14] sweeping measures aimed at destroying 
Italian credit. Designed to make it impossible 
for Premier Mussolini to cany on his war in 
Ethiopia, the financial scheme urges member 
states to impose a total embargo on aQ govern- 
mental and commercial loans to Italy. If the 
plan succeeds, Italy will not be able to make 
any purchases in member states except on a 
basis of cash payments. The League's plan 
aims to make impossible such transactions as 
direct or indirect loans, subscriptions to loans, 
banking and other credits, issues of shares or 
other appeals for money. The plan was accept- 
ed by delegates of 50 nations in the full Com- 
mittee of Co-ordination, with only Austria and 
Hungary maintaining their reservations. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 19581982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOIS1E 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

Executive Editor RENE BON DY Deputy Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Depun Editor RIC HARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Circulation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Data* of Adverting Sales 
International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Chari evde-GauDe. 92200 NeuiOy-siir-Srine. 

France. TeL: 11 >747-1263. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Direaeur de 4r puhbcauan; Waiter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headauarters, 24-34 Hemtessy Rd.. Hoes Kong. TeL J-.WWS. Telex blliO. 
»!Lgmg^rCK:lQiin MacKktm. 63 Long Am London WC2. TeL S36A&12. Telex 26MW. 

GerL$gr w Germmv W. Imtahath Fnakxhar. 15, eOOOFrmkfmfM 71 !i)tft)V6755. Tlx. 416721. 

S.A. m copilot de i. 200.000 F. RCS Nantem B 7 32021126. Commission Panuam No 61337 
US subscription: S322 yeartv. Second-elan postage paid at Long Island Cay. NY. 1 1 101. 

V im. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved 




M birkiAy to You../ P pv WWYV Yop ; - 



I WiY WhMY , ft 

UWTeP WM.-'W 14 - 




Rendezvous With a New Spirit of Geneva? 


W ASHINGTON — President Reagan enters 
(he most critical meeting of his presidency 
□ext month with what poker players would call a 
very strong but not necessarily unbeatable hand. 

A vast miUtaiy buildup has more than restored 
parity between the superpowers. The American 
economy, while dangerously deficit-ridden is the 
long term, remains robusL Despite legislative set- 
bads, his personal popularity runs on. 

Yet, like any player in a high-stakes contest, the 
president will not come away from the table in 
Geneva with a measure of success unless he uses aD 
the cards in his hand and plays than shrewdly 
enough to keep the other fellow at the table. 

fit short, despite ail the disclaimers. President 
Reagan has little choice in Geneva but to use his 
ace in the hole, the Strategic Defense Initiative, to 
achieve his long-term aim in arms control, a sub- 
stantial reduction in Soviet offensive weapons. 

Placing it on the table does not mean abandon- 
ing research into the possibilities of strategic de- 
fense. It simply means showing readiness to con- 
sider future constraints on a program that deeply 
concerns not only the Soviet Union but also Amer- 
ica's allies. This is probably the most effective way 
to win deep cuts in offensive weapons. 

There is every reason to believe that the Rus- 
sians are HiEgnisinj? their pre-summit strategy as 
well. But if the summit meeting is to be a serious 
effort to establish a new dialogue, the United 
States can no more exclude the Strategic Defense 
Initiative from the bargaining table than the Rus- 
sians can forbid it to talk about Afghanistan or. 


By Charles McC. Mathias Jr. 

The writer is a Republican senator from Maryland. 

human rights. For one thing, American and Rus- 
sian leaders agreed to discuss space weapons along 
with intermediate and long-range aims when the 
“umbrella talks” began earlier mis year. 

Nor is it necessary at the summit for either 
side to commit itself to a specific outcome. Issues 
such as the SDI and the Anti- Ballistic Missile 
Treaty are so complex that the summit participants 
can do little more than agree on the need to define 
the boundaries of research, testing and develop- 
ment Detailed examination of the line between 
laboratory and field research, for example, would 
be delegated to arms negotiators. 

Despite the negative tone of pre-summit maneu- 
vering over the SDI and the other issues, I see 
p romising circumstances fora productive meeting. 

Mr. Reagan faces a rendezvous with history. He 
is well aware that cultivation of a more realistic 
relationship with a new generation of Soviet lead- 
era, combined with a substantive agreement to 
limit and reduce cud ear arms, would allow him to 
write his own chapter. like Dwight Eisenhower 
and Richard Nixon before him, be is measurably 
freer than Itis more liberal predecessors to over- 
come suspicions of any pact with the Russians. 

Mikhail Gorbachev.just beginning his steward- 
ship, seems to understand that the economic and 
bureaucratic Daws of the Soviet system will not be 
addressed as long as so many resources are ex- 


pended on arms. As the Pofitburo begins to lay out 
another five-year plan, he surely would prefer to 
devote more funds to the welfare of his people. 

But the serious work of preparation must take 
shape soon. As Hemy Kissinger observed: "Sum- 
mits are notoriously poor occasions for negotia- 
tion. They have a built-in detunm*, protocol 
reigns, and if they are to succeed, any major 
agreement needs to be worked out in advance.* 

Past experience does not help us to handicap 
summits in the nudear age. But there are striking 
similarities between this year’s meeting and the 
first (and last} one in Geneva, in 1955: new leaders 
in Moscow, tense relations, a reluctant President 

Eisenhower. Winston Churchill said: “It was only m AAVU AW^UUHU lUrqimflilHJ 1UV ^ 
elementary prudence for the West to learn first- safe-passage guarantee as soon as the y 
hand what sort of men were now in charge in the crime was discovered. And Egypt’s 
Kremlin and to let these new men gauge the quality confurinc response appears to ifaav 
and temper of Western l eadership ” 

The spirit of Geneva, 1955, did not end the Cold 
War ana did not salve die serious problems faced 
by both countries. Only a year later, for example, 
the Soviet Union invaded Hungary. But the sum- 
mit meeting restored dialogue between the two 
postwar giants and sent a crucial signal to the rest 
of the world that neither wanted nudear war. 

A new spirit of Geneva must begin where that 
summit left off, r ecog n izing the stalemate and 
g to lay foundations for more enduring 


A Success 
Even if One 
Got Away < 

By Tom Wicker 

N EW YORK —Inexplicably, the 
I talian government has released 
Mohammed Abbas, a major figure in 
international terrorism, apparently in 
violation of its extradition aeatywrth 
the United States and despite Prune 
Minister Bettino Craxi's personal 
pledge to President Reagan Unit Mr. 
Abbas would be hdd with the hijack- 
ers of the Achille Lauro. 

Qualified U.S. officials say they 
have evidence of Mr. Abbas's direct - 
Knifit to the ship hijack ing , and an: 
wealth of information on his past ■“ 
terrorist activities. His release is dis- ~ 
m aying. particularly in view of Italy s 
good record in fighting terrorism. 

It need not, however, dampen 
Americans' pride in the capture of _ 
the hijackers and in penetrating at ’ 
la yt what seemed to be the hzunu- t 
nity of terrorists to U.S. retaliation. 

This fl u**** does not mean the aid 
of terrorism in the Middle East — 
probably quite the opposite. And it \ 
does not mean that from now on all .. 
terrorists will be punished; that is 
possible only in special cases tike that .. 
of the Achille Lauro. It does pat 
terrorists on notice that the United ? 
States can and will act effectively . 
when circumstances make h possible^ _■ 
If, moreover, any doud of inter- 
national illegality hangs ova 1 the ac- 
tion of UJS. military planes in forcing . ; . 
down the Egyptian airliner that was.y 
carrying the four terrorists to pre- " J 
snmied freedom, it should be speedily - 
dispersed by the facts of the matter. • 
First, safe passage had been guar- 
an teed only on condition that they 
bad c ommitted no acts of violence 
while they commanded the ship. Sco- 
ond, the Egyptian goveromentby ac- 
cident or design misled Washington . ! 
as to the whereabouts of the terrorists “ 
after it became known that they had 2 
murdered an American passenger. > 
In fact, the terrorists’ murder ; 
of Leon Klingboffer invalidated the 


sand competitive but peaceful coexistence. 
That result is in tire mutual interest of both nations 
and of the world at large. 

The New York Times. 


Suddenly a New U.S. Reading of the ABM Treaty 

By Stephen S. Rosenfeld 


confuting response appears to have 
made it impossible for either the J 
United Stales or Italy to take custody 
of the terrorists by more convention- n 
ai means than the aircraft intercept v 
Irankafly, the swift U.SL military ,r 
operation may have validated earlier , 
contentions — by President Jimmy :K 
Carta during the Iranian hostagecn- 
as and Mr. Reagan during the TWA 
hijacking earlier this year — that 
practical retaliatory measures could O 
not be carried out m those cases. '$* 
This time, alert intelligence work •* 
gave what Mr. Reagan told Mr. Craxi \ 
was “reasanabte certainty” that the 
four pirates were aboard the Egyp- 7 
dan airliner. Thus they could be ap- . 

jer to the J . ~ 


W ASHINGTON — The run-up 
to the Reagan-Gorbachev 
summit is producing some high dra- 
ma within the Reagan administra- 
tion. and some high stepping in re- 
spect to the official reading of the 
Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty of 1972. 

Successive administrations, includ- 
ing this one; always read the treaty as 
banning the testing and development 
of futuristic missile-defense systems. 
But now National Security Adviser 
Robert McFariane pops out with a 
new reading permitting testing and 
development or President Reagan’s 
Strategic Defense Initiative. 

This is no matter for small quib- 
bling. In some quarters inside the 
administration, and in many outside, 
it is accepted that if some listing and 
development limits are not applied to 
defensive arms, the Russians will lose 
most if not all of their taste for limit- 
ing offensive arms. This is what the 
summit is likely to be most abouL 
At this poini things gel lawyerly. 
Having been taken around the sever- 


al tracks, I submit that the new read- 
ing is, at the least, painfully labored. 
“Agreed Statement D” can he read, 
as the administration now reads it, to 
countenance steps short of deploy- 
ment for space-based ABM systems 
and to subject only deployment prop- 
er to mutual “discussion ... and 
agreement” But Article 5 flatly bans 
attempts to “develop, test or deploy” 
such space-based systems — of which 
the SDI dearly is one 

How could an agreed statement 
seem to open a loophole For some- 
thing outlawed in an article? 

It turns out that the dispute is not 
simply over the text but over the 
negotiating record, which is secret 
Those who negotiated the treaty in- 
sist that the agreed statement — al- 
lhough admittedly it does not say so 
— was meant just to keep open a way 
to exotic variations of the fixed land- 
based systems permitted by the trea- 
ty’, not lo welcome exotic space-based 


systems. The “new reading supports 
the Reagan administrations intent to 
give the SDI lots of running room. 

Not for the first time, one is struck 
here by the reversal of Soviet and 
American positions. In the early 
1970s it was the Americans who 
wanted to restrict anti-missile work, 
on the theory that it made little sense 
to limit current models and leave the 
door open to future models. The So- 
viets, either plodding or calculating, 
were wary of writing limits without 
specifying what was bei ng limited. 

A aumber of times, evidently, the 
Soviets listened without taking ex- 
ception to expressions of American 
interest in a broad Future ban. The 
record is said to show only one occa- 
sion, whose significance is disputed, 
where the Soviets indicated (but did 
not explicitly declare! assenL 

Ln sum. Article 5 (“Each Party un- 
dertakes not to develop, lest or de- 
ploy”) is dear-cut, but the stuff of pushing the pace on the SDI is vital 

to long-term American security, then 


with little 

of innocent persons. That was 
not the casein the earlier incidents, 
and rarely will be again. . 
dispute and distrust is still that. This - JJ.S, offidalsare not saying wheth- 
is, alas, the Sovirt-American pattern. ' er Mr. Reaganwould have ordered 


For all of that politically the new 
position is a bomb. The Reagan ad- 
ministration looks two-faced in sur- 
facing on summit eve a brand new 
treaty interpretation that liberates 
the SDI, whose containment is Mos- 
cow’s summit priority. The explana- 
tion that officials did not get around 
to looking hard at the treaty until 
recently is embarrassing. The new po- 
sition cuts across professed UJS. ea- 
gerness to gun firmer Soviet compli- 
ance with the ABM treaty. It win be 
to sell to the' American public 
'to the European allies. 


the Egyptian plane shot down had it ^ 
not followed instructions to land, but 1 
the answer is almost certainly no. His : 
restraint in the past has shown that he - 
is not that kind of man: In this partic- ^ 
ular situation, how could he have 
ordered innocent persons — the ^ 
Egyptians aboard — killed after the . . 
strong language he used about the ^ 
Soviet Union's destruction of Korean - 
Air Lines flight 007 in 1983? 

Same other cautionary notes may i 
be usefuL Americans need to: 


dent Reagan has not personally 
signed off on the testing-and-devd- 
opment issue. This is, keep in mind, 
not just one more skirmish with bis 
liberal critics but possibly the make- 
or-break issue of the summit. 

If the president is convinced that 


This Switch Puts the Summit at Risk 


B OSTON — It is only a matter of 
words — a Washington word 
game, you might say. Bui the players 
are after very large stakes. If their 
gambit works, k will sabotage next 
month's Reagan-Gorbachev summit 
meeting. And they have an even more 
ambitious goal: to remove all con- 
straints on the nuclear arms race. 

For 1 3 years the Anti-Ballistic Mis- 
sile Treaty has been universally un- 
derstood to mean what it says: that 
any ABM system based in space is 
outlawed. Now the claim is that it 
means the opposite. Out is in. Down 
is up. This amazing proposition was 
publicly advanced on television on 
Ocl 6 bv President Reagan's national 
security adviser. Robert McFariane. 
He said the 1972 treaty “approved 
and authorized” development and 
testing of space-based ABM systems 
“involving new physical concepts” 
such as lasers or directed energy. 

In other words, Mr. Reagan’s “star 
wars” program can push ahead with- 
out concern about the ABM treaty. 

But just last year the Reagan ad- 
ministration said in a formal state- 
ment: “The ABM treaty prohibition 
on development, testing and deploy- 
ment of space-based ABM systems or 
components for such systems applies 
to drrected-energy technology or any 
other technology used for this pur- 
pose. Thus, when such directed -ener- 
gy programs enter the field-testing 
phase, they become constrained by 
these ABM treaty obligations.'' 

How can that plain meaning have 
been transformed? By an “interpreta- 
tion” that ought to embarrass the 
most brazen lawyer in town. 

Article 3 allowed a limited number 
of fixed, land-based ABMs. Article 5 
banned development testing and de- 
ployment of “sea-based, air-based, 
space-based or mobile land-based” 
systems. .In “Agreed Statement D.“ 
the parties said they would discuss 
“specific limitations” on any new 
ABM systems "created in the future.” 
The claim is that the agreed state- 


By Anthony Lewis 

ment permits new kinds of ABM sys- 
tems unless the parties now agree to 
limit than. But the tT.S. diplomats 
who negotiated it say the purpose was 
the opposite. And the agreed state- 
ment itself begins by saying that its 
purpose is “to ensure fulfillment of 
the obligations not to deploy ABM 
systems and their components except 
as provided in Article 3.” 

An old national security hand, 
asked about the sew reading of the 
treaty, said: “You've got to admire 
their brass. They have interpreted it 
ISO degrees from its intern. 

The new reading would make the 
treaty “a dead lean,” its chief negoti- 
ator, Gerard Smith, has said. 

And the treaty will have been 
killed in a way that casts doubt on the 
point of malting any arms control 
agreements with the United States. 

Treaties are meant to be serious 
undertakings. This one was negotiat- 
ed for a purpose that all the world 
understood: to limit defensive sys- 
tems. The U.S. Senate consented to 
the treaty by a vote of 88-2. Thirteen 
years later the United States would 
be telling the world: “The terms are 
inconvenient to us now, so on second 
thought they mean nothing.'’ 

The coming summit would almost 
certainly be doomed to failure if Mr. 
Reagan now adopted the new reading 
of the ABM treaty. The meeting is to 
focus on arms control. What would 
be left to say if America had just in 
effect renounced the main existing 
arms agreement? Mikhail Gorbachev 
would nave a propaganda field day. 

For all practical purposes, the 
whole idea of arms control would be 
dead. With restraints on defensive 
systems gone, the Soviets would 
hardly proceed with their proposal to 
cut back on offensive weapons. The 
impulse would be to an all-out arms 
race, offensive and defensive. 

With consequences so serious, for 


Mr. Reagan personally and for inter- 
national security, why would anyone 
in the Reagan administration be 
poshing to read the ABM treaty out 
of existence? The answer is that the 
man who surely started this game of 
inis the 


words wants the summit to fail and 
wants all arms control to end. 


for one thing, what some may 1 
as a justified Woodthiretincss — as 
It is quietly suggested that, despite expressed in the old frontier saying, - 
the words of Mr. McFariane, Pres- “Give ’em a for trial anti string ’em 

up” — while the Achille Lauro hi- 
jackers face justice in Italian courts. 
Abhorrence of terrorism requires re- T 
sped far law, which must now be 
allowed to take its course. 

The death penalty, in fact, is not an ^ 
issue. Italy has abolished capital pun- ' ' 
ishxnent, and the hijackers could not 
be executed in the United States, ei- 
ther. The murder of Mr. Klingjboffer 
having been committed on the equi- ■ . 
valent of Italian territory, Abr aham 
Sofacr, the State Department legal 
counsel, says that the hijackers could 
he charged under U.S. Law only with - 
hostage- taking, piracy or conspiracy^, 
to do both — - none of which crimen' 
are punishable by death. 

UJS. relations with Italy and Egypt 
almost certainly will require a good 
deal of patching up. And events in 
Middle East 


he must be prepared to risk certain 
interim costs: frustration at Geneva, 
more tension abroad (although not 
the end of the world) and anew smge 
in the foreign policy debate that he 
largely stilled in the last year by turn- 
ing a diplomatic face to Moscow. 

T say this on the presumption that 
Mikhail Gorbachev docs not have 
unlimited political license and must 
produce results, in the form of some 
progress toward an aims agreement, 
if he is to sustain his ex per im ent in 


ui HUH wuuui tu BUU. U IKUUI 3U3U1W DIS CA^dilUCUl W the Middle E3SI, unlon unatety , may 

Richard Ferie, assistant secretary dealing with Mr. Reagan, whom his bestirred rather than calmed by Mr. 
of defense, is the administration's predecessors had proscribed. Reagan's retributory stroke. Terrorist 

I wonder if anyone has made the retaliation in same form is almost 
case to Mr. Reagan that he could .live attain to foQow, perhaps in ways not 
with the old American reading of the so emeu, to a U.S. counterblow. And 
ABM treaty without undercutting his the Palestine liberation Onzuriza- 
SDL The argument is that SDI to- don appears to have been besmirched 
search most necessarily go on for a " anew by same degree of complidty in 
long time and the decision to test and the Aaulle Lauro seizure. That can 
develop can prudently be deferred, only complicate any Middle East 
Meanwhile, pocket the gains from peace process that (kneads ultimate- 
deep cuts in offensive anus. Iy cm Palestinian partiopation. 

The Washington Post . ' The New York Tones. 


thinker on these issues, and 
is utterly opposed 10 arms control 
The rereading of the ABM treaty has 
the stamp of his dever mind, and of 
his ability to gel ideas through the 
bureaucracy. Bui Secretary of State 
George Shultz has not yet approved 
this idea, and there is still a chance 
that he will try to protect the presi- 
dent from this self-inflicted wound. 

The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

The Press Has Appealed 


I regret the need to point out that 
the headline ova the commentary by 
Leonard Marks, legal counsel of the 
World Press Freedom Committee, on 
your Oct- 10 editorial page created a 
false impression. No final ruling has 
been handed down yet To say, as 
your headline did, dial “The Free 
Press Has Lea* a Test Case on Licens- 
ing” misses the point that Mr. Marks 
was making — namely, that a major 
principle involving the free exercise 
of journalism is at stake in the Ste- 
phen Schmidt case still pending on 
appeal before the Inter-American 
Court of Human Rights. 

A judgment is expected before the 
end of the year and could have broad 
implications, not only for the 10 Lat- 
in American countries with licensing 
statutes on their books, but through- 
out the world. The ruling of (he 
judges should be awaited with great 
interest by those who are attached to 
preserving and extending the free- 
dom to practice journalism as a natu- 


ral expression of the right of all citi- 
zens to freedom of expression. 

RONALD KOVEN, ' 
European Liaison Representative. 
Worta Press Frecdom^ Committee. 

Paris. 


fSd r uli ng has The Air Baid on Tunis 


“IsnseTs A ir Raid on Tuni- 
sia Cannot Be Condoned" (Oa. 10): 

Lloyd N. Cutler, who was an advis- 
er to President Carter, presumably 
would not condone the UJS. bombing 
raids of World War n. Wed, be could 
be more specific about combating 
terrorists, instead of amply saying, 


Letters intended far publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Utters should be brief and 
are sidgeet to editing. We cannot 
be responsible far die return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


“We have to find a more civilized 
way.” Is he thinking of the sort d 
mffitary. action, the Carter adminis- 
tration took to try to save the Ameri- 
can hostages in Iran? His ideas are as 
unrealistic as the Carter approach. 

M. DANON. 
Lausanne. 

In response to die report “UN Vote 
Aids Bourguibar ZJJS. Says'’ (Oa. Sfr 
Nothing reflects more the utter 
weakness of U A Middle East polS 
than Secretary of State Geo™! 
Shtritafs apology to Israel for theUS 
abstention m toe UN condemnation : 
offcraeTs attack on TuriTsince 

dmt natum? And if U.S. natiSSi 

the abstentouS A 

tare* of anticipated adverae^T^- 
recant through an Israeli spoLa y 

Strife 1 aJSSL *** “ragStfc^vcry 

people America is tiym^ plac 2|3 f 

grant.' 

Behto. 


ggj 


JjJWl 




Tr^K] 




WB|| 


mm 


rrjftlill 











lane 


SIfl 






* -7- 


Me f* 




f 


1 









i 


P*gP 5 


Gon 1 ^ DefiehPUin 
, , r ^ Would Need 
s Military Cuts 

i« Angetes runts Semico 

- . WASHINGTON — James A. 

Baker 3d, the Treasury sucrctaiy, 
■.v says he believes the plan, passed by 
' - _ "O. Senate to bring the U.S’ budget 

?.;v «u» balance by 1991 on -be nude 
: .■ : W woric without raisixig taxes, but 

: that there would have to be reduc- 
lions in the military budget 

President Ronald Reagan ha$ in_ 

• . dicated that he wants the Defense 

' - department to be included in ihe 

- 'wxeinptioQs from the spending-re- 
"'"ir *^ uc ^on plan that is now before a 

• Senate- House conference co mmi t. 

. _ tee. 

Bbt during a televised interview 
. ; J • Sunday, Mr. Baker said he believed 
. that Mr. Reagan must have anrid- 
P alc ^ tbe n®ed for some cuts in 
... military spending. 

' The pending measure requires : 
: . . ■ that the deficit, estimated to have ■ 
' exceeded $200 billion ' in fiscal 

..... ■ 1985, be reduced in annnal steps 
•.. ..■until the budget is balanced- m 
7. 1991. It also mandates that the 

- . president set aside funds to meet 
•' .-.''"'the goals if the Congress Tails to 
■ ■■ \ i' acL 

. The bill would exempt from 
■'■^spending curbs the payment of 
•’ -- jfcrinripal and interest of loans, So- 
' -x dal Security retirement benefits 
c ; and disability payments, and exist- 
r. ing contracts. Most existing con- 

• '.-.'.tracts are for militaiy programs. 

: - but the bill would permit reduc- 

ticms in other raflitaiy spending 

. i. ^ “I have to say that there's no way 
."^'that you can reduce spending 
across the board when only 50 per- 
• • *ni of the budget is subject to the 
'■■^-Gramm-Rudman amendment," 

. . ' Mr. Baker said. The measure was 
" sponsored by Phil Gramm, Repub- 
- y .ican of Texas, Warren B. Ro dman, 
'Republican of New Hampshire, 

'J ~ r md Ernest F. Holiings, a Demo- 
'^ai of South Carolina. 

“When you take Social Security 
-.^‘xit and you take prior era tracts 
. -r'.axt and you take interest on the 
"• tational debt out, only 50 percent 

- • Cs subject" to cuts under the 
. ... ‘jn endrn ent, Mr. Baker said. 

' ■ - “Clearly there would have to be- 
reductions in defense,” he cratin- 
' ‘ -:ed. “But I think the president 
- .' Mist have taken that into consider' 
./ion when he embraced the tmv 



The AMackaed ften 


:-7ion when he embraced the pro* 
_■ osaL” 

Spending cuts under the plan 
. ; 'Quid wipe out “practically aft dis- 
cretionary spending,” Mr. Baker 

■^id- 


Lethal Cloud Threatens Central Florida Residents 

A freight train was derated near Lake City, Florida, wnismg a leak in a 30,000-galkm tank car 
carrying anhydrous ammonia. Hundreds of people were evacuated from their homes as gas 
- drifted across wooded bills and grazing land for 24 hours. No serious injuries were reported. 

US, Seel^ More Acc^ Prwate Da^ 

Tax, Insurance Files Would Be Checked to Verify Claims 


. By David Burnham 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration plans to ask Con- 
gress for- this legal authority to 
greatly expand the government's 
use of confidential tax data and 
give federal agencies direct access 
to information about individuals’ 
private' insurance coverage. 

Under the proposal, the lax in- 
formation would be used by the 
government to determine ihc'digi- 
bility of millions of people apply- 
ing for such widely used federal 
programs as guaranteed student 
loans and veterans* insurance. 

The access to private insurance 
records would allow federal agen- 
cies to make sure an individual was 
not eligible for privately financed 
insurance benefits before it paid a 
claim under such government pro- 
grams as Medicare. 

The government does not now 
have tbe legal authority either to 
use tax information for such pur- 


poses or to g«»n access to private 
insurance files. 

A spokesman far the Office of 
Management and Budget said that 
legislation authorizing such action 
would be sent to Congress later this 
month or early next year. 

The spokesman sard the propos- 
al was designed to “eliminate the 
drain on the federal government of 
improper and inappropriate pay- 
ments.” • 

A federal law, passed in 1976 
after congressional investigators 
discovered that President Richard 
M. Nixon and others had improp- 
erly used individuals’ tax returns, 
established the broad principle that 
tax information should be confi- 
dential. 

But the law allowed many excep- 
tions to the printiple, and in recent 
years Congress has gradually in- 
creased the amount of tax informa- 
tion that can be shared among gov- 
ernment agencies. 

The breadth of the new proposal, 
described in a summary statement 


prepared recently by tbe adminis- 
tration, has aroused the concern of 
the American Civil Liberties Union 
and both Republicans and Demo- 
crats in Congress. 

Jerry Berman, head of the 
ACLLTs Privacy and Technology 
Project, said the proposal would 
have far-reaching effects if voted 
into law. 

“It will result in a de facto na- 
tional data center in which govern- 
ment agencies w31 be able to reach 
into hundreds of different comput- 
erized files and build a personal 
dossier on any man, woman or 
child who has been selected for 
examination,'* he said. 

Representative Don Edwards, a 
California Democrat who heads 
the House Judiciary Subcommittee 
on Constitutional Rights, said the 
government “must be concerned 
about waste and fraud. 

“But in the process,” he said, 
“we may be e liminating privacy 
and personal independence of the 
American people.” 


As U.S. Farmers Suffer, So Do Towns 



By William Robbins 

New York rime* Service 

LENOX, Iowa —As small farm- 
ers in tbe United States struggle 
against a continuing economic cri- 
sis, the rural towns that dot die 
Middle West are trying to keep 


going themselves. 
The towns 3DD. 


The towns appear to be losing 
people, and with them the taxes 
that they and their businesses paid. 
For tbe people left behind, the gov- 
ernment sendees that have helped 
TO nourish tbe country way of life 
are being eroded 

• Schools have, closed in such 
places as Lebanon and Ebscn, in 
Kansas, both with populations that 
have dropped below 500. In Mar- 
shall County, Iowa, Sheriff Demid 
Gonzales has laid off half his force 
of eight deputies, al a time when 
part of his work, Foreclosure sales 
of mortgaged farms, is increasing. 

Here in Taylor County, where 
the delinquency rate of 12.98 per- 
cent on property taxes this year is 
nearly double the 6.6 percent rate 
in 1984, health services face cut- 
backs. and the county's grave! 
roads ‘‘ViD have to go back to dirt" 
according to Floyd Jobe, chairman 
of the county’s Board of Supervi- 
sors. 

The services in Iowa towns are i 
taking a double blow, with state 
financial support declining along , 
with local tax revenue. Governor j 
Terry E. Bransud recently imposed ! 
a $94 million cut or 3.S5 percent 
in srate expenditures across the i 
board, including financial support 
for local services. Other states in 
the Middle West including Ne- : 
braska and Kansas, are also seeing 
revalue fall short of projections, j 

Tbe population loss that is partly : 
behind these troubles is evident in 
such places as Lenox, a town of 
about 1,380 people. “For sale” ! 
signs dot tbe principal residential 
street In nearby Ringold County, 
Sherif r Lyle Minnick said. “A lot of 
our young people are just taking 
off, moving to places like Arizona 
and Tern where they think they 
may find work." 

Although there are "no nice, neat 
data to document what you are 
seeing," said Calvin Beale, the L\S. 
Agriculture Department’s princi- 
pal population specialist in Wash- 
ington, “I readily agree with what 1 
am hearing from a variety of 
sources. We are seeing a renewal of 
the period of loss that was inter- 
rupted in the 1970s." 

Population in the farm belt in the 
1970s grew, accompanied by a shift 
in tbe farm economy. After decades 
of lackluster performance, the 
1970s brought booming sales. The 
stimulus was soaring exports that 
resulted partly from tbe opening of 
the Soviet market to American 
crops, partly from demand general- 1 
ed by healthy European economies, 
partly from the food needs of less- 1 


developed countries and partly 
from a devalued dollar. 

Tbe farm boom, however, inflat- 
ed land values and left farmers bur- 
dened with heavy debts when the 
1980s brought gloomier times: de- 
clining prices and exports, rising 
surpluses of fans products and 
soaring interest rates. 

According to Kenneth Stone, an 
economist at Iowa State Universi- 
ty, some of the Iowa businesses 
suffering mesa are those most pa- 
tronized by fanners and thus most 
likely ;o be situated in smaller 
towns. 

Tbe 161 towns in Iowa with a 
population of 500 to 1,000 showed 
an average business decline of 10 
percent las! year. But hardest hit of 
all, Mr. Stone said, are the 250 
Iowa towns with populations below 
500, which last year showed a busi- 
ness decline of 14 percent. 

“The greatest tragedy is that the 
young people are not sucking 
around, and a lot of our small 
towns are left with disproportion- 


ate numbers of the elderly," he 
said. “They are at the point where 
they need more of those very ser- 
vices that are being cut.” 

In Bedford, the county seat of 
Taylor County, a fine old Georgian 
courthouse where few footfalls are 
heard lodes onto streets where little 
traffic moves. 

On the ground floor, Ann 
Maher, the public health adminis- 
trator, said, “I am one of the vic- 
tims,” She and her husband lost 
their own farm two years ago. 
Then, this past summer, her entire 
staff was compelled for budgetary 
reasons to work pan time for more 
than a month, and several are still 
working on a reduced schedule. 

Meanwhile, Mrs. Maher said, the 
need for the services her office pro- 
vides arc greater than ever. “A lot 
of our people have had to drop 
heal tii insurance,” she said. "They 
couldn't pay the premiums.” 

In Lenox. Michael Cheese, the 
town's one remaining grocer, 
knows well some of the reasons for 


both state and county revenue 
problems. 

“We don't have a car dealer any- 
more,” he said while driving down 
Main Street past the closed build- 
ing that recently housed a Ford 
dealership. 

He nodded toward several dark- 
ened storefronts across the street 
from the dosed dealership. “Thai 
was a beauty salon," he said. “That 
was a plumbing shop, that was an 
insurance agency and there on the 
comer was another grocery." 

“But what really hurt,” be went 
on, “were the implement dealer 
that dosed, the feed store and the 
plant that made fertilizer spread- 
ers. That's a lot of jobs, a lot of 

income gone." 

As be drove past a row of “for 
sale" signs, Mr. Cheese shook his 
head. 

“You know," he said, “when I 
came home from college in 1972. 
you could hardly find a house for 
sale in this town. Now there are 80. 
But nobody’s buying.” 


& 


Treat your clients to 

A NEW LOBBY 
NEW LOUNGE. NEW (AND 
VERY BRITISH) RESTAURANT. 
AND NEW ROOMS ON 
NEW EXECUTIVE FLOORS. 
AT A GRAND OLD ADDRESS. 


R*r avert aliens, call your 
Travel Anient, any Hilton 
International Hotel or 
Hilton Reservation Sen ice 
in Oipen/xtfien. Frankjun, 
London. Madrid Milan, 
Oslo, Paris or Stockholm. 


London Hilton on Park Lane 

WHERE THE WORLD IS AT HOME" 



petrol petrol hx-bo ond lurfjo Diesel engines, with output ranging from kW 
pony. Far personal export, pfecse contact your nearest Volvo Dealer or Vel- 


CE 60 flip EG 82j lo kW ECE 134 {hp EG 1831- Surfoce treatment includes live I 
1 Uunsl £ Diplomat 5alw. 5-405 00 Coleborg, Sweden. 












Page 0 


U.S. Judge Says Egypt 
Knew of Murder Before 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 19 85 _ 

Mubarak 


Hijackers Were Freed 


By Robert D. McFadden 

Vr»- Yorl Tm/a Service 

NEW YORK — An American 
judge who was a hostage aboard 
the cruise ship Achille Lauro said 
Sunday that the only reported wit- 
ness to the murder of an elderly 
American had given the Egyptian 
authorities a full account of the 
slaying 12 hours before Egypt re- 
leased the hijackers. 

The judge. Stanley L. Kubacki. 
who said he heard the fatal shots, 
said he also spoke Thursday to an 
Egyptian official. 

“I told him everything I knew.” 
he said. "I showed him the spot 
where Mr. Klinghoffer was shot. 
We were talkin g and he Jold me; 
‘Don't worry anymore. They are in 
prison now.” “ 

President Hosni Mubarak and 
other Egyptian officials have con- 
tended that, at the time the terror- 
ists were released Thursday night 
under a safe passage agreement ihe 
ended the hijacking. Egypt knew of 
no murder on board. 

Judge Kubacki. 70. a jurist on 
Philadelphia’s Common Pleas 
Court, said he had told the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, which de- 
briefed 15 Achille Lauro passen- 
gers when they arrived Saturday in 
the United Suites, that the chief 
bartender of the Achille Lauro told 
him he saw two terrorists shoot 
Leon Klinghoffer last Tuesday. 

• The judge, one of the four hos* 
■ tages who identified the captured 
hijackers in lineups in Sicily, said 
he did not know the bartender's 
name. The judge said the bartender 
had told him at length w hat he saw. 

While the other Americans on 
board were taken by one gunman 
onto a deck near the bow of the 
ship, two terrorists took Mr. 


Klinghoffer in his wheelchair onto 
the starboard side shortly after 1 1 
A-M. Tuesday, with the vessel off 

the coast of Syria, the judge said. 

The bartender, according to the 
judge's account, came upon the 
killing as he descended a nearby 
stairway. 

“He said he was coming down 
onto the promenade deck.'’ the 
judge said. “One of the terrorists 
shot the man in the chest Then the 

other man. with a mustache, direct- 
ed him to shoot Mr. Klinghoffer 
again. He put another bullet in 
him. He shot him in the middle of 
Lhe forehead.*' 

Late Thursday morning, after 
negotiations to end the hijacking 
were completed, the Achille Lauro 
arrived at Port Said, Egypt and 
several U.S. and Egyptian officials 
went aboard in the late morning. 
Judge Kubacki said 

An Egyptian prosecutor, he said, 
took statements about the killing 
from at least three people; the bar- 
tender. Judge Kubacki and Sey- 
mour Meskm. 71. of Union, New 
Jersey. 

“The bartender described the 
shooting,” he said “He talked to 
the Egyptian prosecutor and to 
Seymour and me. and he described 
the killing. He took the Egyptian 
prosecutor there to the spot where 
it happened. He saw the blood. It 
was the same spot Meskm and l 
pointed out.” 

Judge Kubacki and his wife said 
they were convinced that there 
were six hijackers on board, though 
they saw only four men with auto- 
matic rifles who guarded the pas- 
sengers. 

Besides these four, they said they 
believed there were at feast two 
others. 




■ •* 

«. -dv^. : 

* 7 > ' 

- " 



Demands 
An Apology 


To Have 


From U.S. 


Geoffrey Howe, Britain’s foreign minister, center, meeting with two Jordanians, Deputy 
Prime Minister Abdui-Wahab al-Majali, left and Foreign Minister Taber al-Masri. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
humiliation, an affront to Egypt's 
dignity. ... 

Coming atop the Israeli air raid 
on the Palestine Liberation Organ*- 
zaiion headquarters in Tunis, and 

President Reagan’s public state- 
ment of approval, the forcing down 
of the plane stirred a wave of anti- 
American sentiment and was a se- 
vere embarrassment for Mr. Mu- 
barak. ■ 

The Egyptian president, who is 

dependent on about S2 billion this 
year in American aid. had gone out 
on a limb backing a peace initiative 
by King Hussein of Jordan. 

" The stalled initiative received an- 
other setback Monday when Brit- 
ain decided not to meet after all 
with two Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization members who bad been 
invited by Prime Minister Marga- 
ret Thatcher during an arms-selling 


(Continued from Page 1) 
PLO chairman, when the PLO split 

m HcPbeads a faction of the Piaks- 
tine Liberation Front, the PLO 
group in which the four hq ackers 
claim membership. 

Mr. Abbas, for years identified 
with the most radical dements of 
the Palestinian movement, -was 
named to the executive committee 

of the PLO a year ago and is said to 
serve on - its 10-membcr inner cabi- 
net. 

Mr. Abbas's early identification 
was with Syria, where he spent his 
rally years and studied. His first 
ties’ to Palestinian politics and 
guerrilla actions have been traced 
to 1965, when he joined forces vnth 
a group beaded by Ahmed JebriL 

In alliance with the forces of 


Georges Habash’s Popular Front 
for the Liberation of Palestine, 
Abbas and Mr. JebriL a former 
Syrian Army officer^ were blamed 
for a series of hijacknigs and other 
incidents directed against Israel 


iin" 


Their association took (hem to 
Jordan and ultimately to Beirut, 
where they split in 1 977. Mr. Abbas 
took most of their forces with him. 

Their main disagreement seemed to 

concern allegiance with Syria. Mr. 
Jebril now heads the Syrian-haded 
Popular Front for theLIberation of 
Palestine-General Command. 


U.S. officials insist that Mr. Ab- 
bas knew and directed the Achille 
Lauro gunmen, and Israeli offici a l s 
insist that because of -the lies 
tween Mr. Arafat and Mr.: Abbas; ! 
Mr. Arafat must have known of the 
operation. 


2 Americans Win Nobel 


Britain Calls Off Talks With PLO 


trip through the Middle East 

Thus, diplomats said, Mr. Mu- 
barak's ' appearance appeared at 
least in part designed for public 
consumption, as w as his announce- 
ment Monday that the p3ot and 
crew of the Egyptian jetliner that 
was forced down would be decorat- 
ed for bravery for “gallant and he- 
roic action." 

[A U.S. official said that the Rea- 
gan letter ‘'indicates a level of un- 
derstanding" of the Egyptian posi- 
tion in trying to deliver the 
hijackers of the Achille Lauro to 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion, The Associated Press report- 
ed. Egypt had said that the hijack- 
ers would be tried by the PLO. 

[But Mr. Mubarak has said he 
fears that placing the hijackers on 
trial in Italy will “not stop the vio- 
lence,” an apparent reference to 
reprisal attacks.] 

■ Arafat Won’t Visit UN 

The United Nations General As- 
sembly. under pressure from the 
United States and other countries, 
withdrew Monday a resolution in- 
viting Mr. Arafat to attend the 40th 
anniversary session. The Associat- 
ed Press reported. 

U.S. officials had said that Presi- 
dent Reagan might have cancelled 
his participation in the ceremonies 
if Mr. Arafat attended. 

Mr. Arafat originally had not 
been invited to attend the OcL 14- 
24 ceremonies. 

But a resolution introduced by 
India and five other members of 
the nonaligned nations would have 
had the General Assembly invite 
the PLO leader and Sam Nujoma, 
president of the South-West Africa 
People's Organization, which is 
fighting South African administra- 
tion of the territory. . 


(Continued from Page 1) 
to make the declaration that we 
thought necessary," he said. 

They “were not, after aU. willing 
to associate themselves with a 
statement agreed with the Jordani- 
an members of the delegation 
which contained explicit references 
both to Israel's right to exist within 
secure and recognized borders, and 
to the right of (he Palestinians to 
self-determination." 

A British officiaL who would not 
be further identified but who was 
familiar with the prdiminaiy nego- 
tiations on the statement, said Brit- 
ish officials had received firm word 
from Jordanian officials that the 


PLO representatives would accept 
the statement's terms. 

Final agreement from the Jorda- 
nians was reached Thursday, the 
official said. 

But British officials did not have 
direct contact with the PLO repre- 
sentatives until Sunday in London 
because they fell that Jordan was 
the proper channel to obtain PLO 
assent to the statement, the official 
said. 

Asked what reasons may have 
been behind the PLO refusal to 
accept the statement the official 
indicated that death threats against 
the PLO envoys may have figured 
in their attitude. 


“The men of violence have won a 
battle," the British official said. 
“We and the Jordanians kept their 
nerve, the PLO didn’L" 


David Owen, a former foreign 
secretary who now is leader of the 
centrist Social Democratic Patty, 
called the affair “mind-boggling in- 
competence.” 


A Conservative member of Par- 
liament, Robert Adley, head of a 
pro-Jordanian parliamentary 
group, blamed immense pressure 
“by the Americans and the Zionist 
lobby in Bri tain. " and called iL “a 
monumental slap in the face to 
King Hussein" of Jordan. 


For U.S. and Its Allies, a Minefield of Conflicting Interests 


(Continued from Page 1) 
and Yugoslavia have been battling 
terrorists for years, and each asserts 
that it is adamantly opposed to 
terrorism. 

Egypt has been vigilant in guard- 
ing against bombings and assassi- 
nations by Libyan agents. Italy has 
shown skill in curbing the Red Bri- 
gades. .And Yugoslavia has carried 
on a worldwide campaign against 
Croatian nationalists and others 
opposed lo a unified Yugoslavia. 

Administration officials have 
pointed oul that it is virtually im- 
possible to persuade sovereign na- 
tions to take actions ihaL cut across 
their political and diplomatic inter- 
ests. This was evident in June, after 
the release of the last of the U.S. 


hostages from the Trans World 
Airlines plane in Beirut The Unit- 
ed States announced a plan to 
“close down” the Beirut airport by 
barring flights to and from Beirut 
and it railed on other nations to 
follow suiL 

A meeting of allied anti-terrorist 
specialists was held in Bonn and no 
other nation agreed to take part 
Each had its own reason for dedin- 
ing the U.S. proposal. France 
owned 30 percent of Lebanon's na- 
tional airline. Others did not want 
to be caught in what they feared 
might be a retaliatory Arab boycott 
of their own airlines. 

fn the case of the Achille Lauro 
and Mr. Abbas, neither Egypt Ita- 
ly nor Yugoslavia believes that its 


interests would be served by arrest- 
ing a dose aide lo Yasser Arafat 
the PLO leader. The three govern- 
ments share a belief that the PLO 
should play a central role in any 
Middle East settlement that it rep- 
resents the Palestinian people, and 
that it is nor strictly a terrorist 
group. 


should be brought to trial by the 
PLO. 


Mr. Abbas was aboard the Egyp- 
in plane that was intercepted by 


tian plane that was intercepted by 
UJ5. Navy aircraft became he had 
helped arrange the agreement that 
ended the hijacking and turned 
over the hijackers to PLO custody. 

The Egyptians contended that 
Mr. Abbas had acted honorably in 
helping to end th^ hijacking before 
more people were killed, and in 
agreeing that the four hijackers 


The Italian government had 
asked the PLO to use its influence 
to bring the hijacking to an end and 
felt indebted to Mr. Arafat's group 
and to the Egyptians, even though 
Italy ultimately agreed to try the 
four hijackers for the murder of the 
American. 


should be viewed as criminal, not 
political. 

But it is difficult for govern- 
ments to treat such a case in a 
dispassionate manner. To arrest 
Mr. Abbas would have been seen as 
a political statement against the 
FIX) and a repudiation of the Pal- 
estinian cause. This, these govern- 
ments seemed unwilling to do. 


Mr. Craw's government was un- 
willing to evoke PLO outrage by 
arresting Mr. Abbas, particularly 
when the Egyptians seemed to be 
refusing to let the Achille Lauro 
leave port until he was freed 

The United States contended 
that Mr. Abbas was the leader of 
the hijackers and that his case 


Mitterrand Is Visiting Brazil 

The Assnataed Pmr 

PARIS — President Francois 
Mitterrand left Monday on official 
visits to Brazil and Colombia. He is 
expected to discuss Brazil's S 104- 
billion foreign debt in two meetings 
with President Jos£ Sarney. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

rowed reducing blood flow mid., 
increa sing the danger that a cun 
may Mock an artery. Blockage of a 
coronary artery may cause a heart 
attack, while blockage of a vessel to 
the brain o«n cause a stroke. 

Cholesterol, taken in with fatty 
food is present in aD tissues. In 
moderation it is vital for normal 
bodily processes. 

Reached at a hotel in Boston 
where he is attending a conference 
at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. Dr. Brown, 44, said: 
“All I can say is I'm very surprised 
and honored’' 

Dr. Goldstein, 45. attending the 
same conference, said: “It's very 
exciting. I am still trying to believe 
it's true. I hope physicians and pa- 
tients will become more aware of 


the problem of cholesterol and ath- 
erosclerosis.” 

Dr. Brown and Dr. Goldstein 
first discovered the LDL receptor 
in 1973. It is a cell surface motexmle 
responsible for binding LDL parti- 
cles and removing them from the 
blood circulation. 

The critical implication of the 
two men’s work is that people with 
too few LDL receptors have high 
concentrations of cholesterol mak- 
ing than high risk targets for ath- 
erosclerosis, heart attacks an^L 
strokes, medical experts said 

Dr. Brown and Dr Goldstein 
learned that the mechanism under- 
lying severe hereditary f amilial hy- 
percholesterolemia,' which can 
cause, heart attacks even in chil- 
dren. is a complete or partial lack 
of functional LDL receptors, the 
Nobel committee said 


U.S. Tests New Atom Smasher 


(Continued turn Page 1) 
speed Antiprotons are specially 
manufactured particles of antimat- 
ter. 

When matter and antimatter 
meet, they annihila te one another 
in a burst of diergy. The Fcrmflab 
derice makes the burst vastly more 
powerful because of the energy the 
particles possess as they move at 
more than 99.99 percent the speed 
of light. • 

At the peak of the process, the 

maximum amount of energy in 

each proton is measured as one 
trillion electron volts, or 1 TeV. 
Thus the entire derice is called the 
Tevatron. 

The prodigious energy fanned in 
the Fermilab collision transmutes 
itself into sprays of new subatomic 


particles, most of which are never 
Found in nature. 


“If we can get a good look at 
those particles, we're hoping theyTl 
teach os some new physics,” said 
Roy Schwitters, a Harvard physi- 
cist working at FermOab. 

Because the partides of new 
matter form only according to the 
laws of nature, they combine in 
systematic ways. 

By studying the varietyof new 
particles, physicists hope to discov- 
er the possible combinations in 
which the fundamental units 
matter — be they quarks or somv- 
thing smaller — can be put togeth- 
er. 

The combinations will allow 
them to deduce the properties of 
the smaller particles that make 
them up.. .. . 















.'v*- 

*: V m*’ - . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1985 


Page 7 


an * \' m ^ 


A*- i 
fc* ‘ ' 


t *• 

■■* ■ ■ 


Ft • % 


■■ 

f v: 


'Ay#. 


Y'^V 


■ ■ 

”' ,! =V 
" “Ui,; 

■yy 

- 1&. 


A«r - 4/omSn* 


•- a:; 


■-7-3 


-V# 


Bin 




FirstWhite 

Soldier Dies 
In Unrest in 
South Afriea 

Canpded by Oir Staff Fran Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — A white 
soldier has been stabbed to death 
while on riot duty in eastern Cape 

E ce. andmihiary officials said 

*y that he was the first white 

soldier trilled in. 1 3 months of ami- 
apartheid violence. 

A statement by the South' Afri- 
can Defense Force sad Corporal 
Johan Scboeman was Jailed late 
Sunday afternoon in Kwazakele, a 
black township on . the outskirts of 
the city of Port Elizabeth. 

South African soldiers have been 
deployed in the country’s segregat- 
ed townships since September 1984 
to assist regular police units in put- 
ting down racial unrest. 

A Defense Force spokesman 
said Corporal Schoeman. was on - 
patrol in Kwazakele when'amob of 
several hundred blacks stoned t he 
patrol’s armored car. 

“When the attackers ran .away, a 
number of Defense Force members 
gave chase on foot," the spokesman 
said. “Corporal Schoeman was fa- 
tally stabbed in ah alley." 

Another white soldier was 
stabbed in the hand when he mnw 
to Corporal Schoeman!* aid. - 
Troops are deployed in the town- 
ships to help the police contain the 
violence, but blade leaders said the 
army presence provoked' more 
trouble. 

The leftist End tbe Conscription 
Campaign repeated its call Mon- 
day for the. withdrawal, of army 
troops from the townships. 

The group said it has “long 
warned of the presence of troops in 
South Africa’s townships, both be- 
cause they are playing, a directly 
repressive role and because it forc- 
ibly draws young conscripts into 
the conflict," 

Earlier Sunday, two blacks were 
killed in clashes near Worcester, 
also in Cape province. 

By an official count, more than 
750 people, almost all of them 
blade, have been killed in unrest 
that started 13 months ago. Most 
have been killed in dashes with 
security forces. Five whites are 
among those killed. - 
Police trying to allay white fears 
say they are increasing patrols on 
the main national high way r unning . 
east from Cape Town. 

A stone-throwing mob halted a 
car on the highway Thursday and 
threw a gasoline bomb into it, 
burning an 8-year-old white girt 
The government declined com- 
ment Monday on a weekend meet- 
ing between its. white parliamenta- 
ry opposition and the main 
guerrilla group-fighting for -bla d e 
majority rale. ■ 1 ‘ 

A four-man delegation from the 
Progressive Federal Party spent 
eight hours in talks SatuKhty .wift 
leaders of the African National 
Congress. 

A government-funded research 
body called Monday for scrapping 

in South Africa to be^assifted ae- •' 
cording to a racial category, action 
that eventually determines where 
(he person can reside and attend 
. school. . 

‘ The study by the Human Sci- 
ences Research Council said, the 
Race Classification Act of 1950’; 
was an underpinning of apartheid 
that created mistrust between ra- 
rial groups. 

The report also repeated what 
many opposition political groups 
have’ been saying —that whites will 
one day have to accept that blacks .. 
w31 have equal political rights. 

(AP, UPl, Remen) 





. George Bush, left, and Hu Yaobfing, the Communist Part}’ leader, in Beijing. 

Chinese Complain to Bush About Aid 
For Taiwan and Trade Protectionism 


Camptkd by Our Staff From Dispa t cher 

. BEIJING — Chinese leaders 
presented Vice President George 
Bush of the United States with a 
list of complaints Monday, ex- 
pressing irritation over American 
support for Taiwan, trade protec- 
tionism and delays in technology 
transfers they daun are needed for 
China's development. 

Mr. Bush responded by saying 
tbe Reagan administration was 
biding by a pledge to reduce arms 
sales to the rival Nationalist Chi- 
nese on Taiwan, fighting a protec- 
tionist mood in Congress and sup- 
porting Chinese modernization 

p lans. 

On tbe second day of a six-day 
visit to China, Mr. Bush met for 
three hours with Prime Minister 
Zhao 25yang and Foreign Minister 
Wu Xueqian. This was followed by. 
sessions with Deputy Prime Minis- 
ter Li Peng and Hu Yaobang, the 
general secretary of the Communist 
Party. • . . 

Spokesmen for both sides called 
the talks frank and friendly. 

. Ma Yuzjben of tbe Chinese For- 
eign Ministry said, “Premier Zhan 
pointed out that the question of 
Taiwan as the major obstacle in 
Sino-U.S. relations still exists, and 
there are also some questions which 


remain to be settled between the 
two countries in the economic, 
trade and technological fields.'’ 

A commentary Monday by the 
English-language government 
weekly, Beijing Renew, said Wash- 
ington’s Taiwan policy risked “seri- 
ous and potentially critical set- 
backs" in Chinese-U.S. relations. 

The lengthy commentary said 
the United States has supported 
Taiwan’s refusal to negotiate reuni- 
fication with mainland China. 

“Instead of honoring its commit- 
ments in the Aug. 17, 1982, com- 
muniqoi to progressively reduce 
arms sales to Taiwan," the com- 
mentary said, the U.S. government 
“has kepi the arms sales on a fairly 
high level." 

The United States also has been 
“conniving at or helping the estab- 
lishment of an official or semi-offi- 
cial status of Taiwan in the interna- 
tional arena, thereby creating a 
situation of two Chinas.” 

The commentary added, “The 
United States, by assuming this 
dual position, has undeniably en- 
couraged the Taiwan authorities in 
their stubborn refusal to negotiate 
with the mainlan d" 

The commentary followed blunt 
comments at a welcoming banquet 
Sunday night where Mr. Zhao told 


Mr. Bush relations were “not satis- 
factory” because of old obstacles, a 
reference to Taiwan. 

Mr. Bush emphasized the posi- 
tive side of Chinese-U.S. relations 
in his toast at an American ban- 
quet. 

“Our two great independent 
countries do not agree on every 
issue and we shouldn't expect to.” 
he said in a toast to Wan Li. senior 
deputy prime minister and the 
highest-ranking guest 

At an earlier briefing, Mr. Bush's 
press secretary. Marlin Fitzwaier, 
said the talks with Mr. Zhao fo- 
cused cm trade, particularly the 
Jndtins biE. which would slash tex- 
tile imports. 

Mr. Firewater said Mr. Bush and 
Mr. Zhao also touched on U.S. 
arms sales to Taiwan, the Nov. 19- 
20 summit meeting between Mr. 
Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev, 
the Soviet leader, and other issues. 

When the Taiwan issue arose in 
Mr. Bush’s talks with Mr. Zhao. 
Mr. Firewater said that “the vice 
president simply pointed out that 
our arms sales to Taiwan had been 
decreasing each year.” 

Sales are expected to total $760 
milli on this year, down from $780 
million in 1984. [AP. VP1) 


Philadelphia Press Strike Drags On- 

As WalkmU Enters 6th Week, City Business Languishes 


By 1 William K. Stevens 

New York Tima Service 

PHILADELPHIA — On the 
-picket hue m front of the sparkling 
white spire of the Philadelphia 
Newspaper? Inc. bidding onNorth 
Broad Street, patio fond tore has 
appeared. A supply of firewood is 
'stacked on the sidewalk. 

People no longer speak hopefully 
at the beginning of each week 
about getting next Sunday’s paper 
ouL And within the last week or so, 
many of the 4,500 employees on' 
strike against the two daOy newspa- 
pers here have started looking for 
temporary work. 

As Philadelphia’s newspaper 
strike entered its sixth week, the 
newspapers, * their employees and 
the city at large seemed to have 
settied in for a long siege. 

: Meanwide, the dty remains de- . 
prived of the morning Inquirer and 
the afternoon DaOy News, major 
sources of news and locaTadvertis- 


uasss&fgjl 


2 Charged With Murder 
Of London Policeman 

Roam 

LONDON — A boy of 14 and a 
{Wan of 26 have bear charged with 
1 the murder of apoheeman who was 
hacked to death during riots in the 
Tottenham district of northern 
London Oct 6, police said. 

A boy of 15 already is awaiting 
trial for the slaying of the police- 
man, Keith Blakelock. 


“V 


loss of that advertising has 
cost the Philadelphia economy mil- 
lions of'doUaiiy the □umber of 
Oxnxnerce says. -Job-seekers have 
lost one of; their main sources of 
information. Cultural life has been 
crippled, real-estate sales have been 
hampered, and it is much more 
difficult to notify the public of a 
loved ontfs death. 

The strike that began SepL 7 is 
the longest the newspapers have 
bad since they were purchased by 
tbe Knigbt-Ridder chain in 1 969. It 
has come dose to matching tbe six- 


week walkout in 1958, the longest 
strike in the company’s history. 

Few of those involved in the cur- 
rent strike expected it to last so 
long. Many are baffled that it con- 
tinues. since the most difficult is- 
sues in the contract negotiations 
between the papers and nine 
unions have been resolved. 

Those issues, which involved the 
introduction of automated equip- 
ment for collating tbe various sec- 
tions of the newspapers, were 
viewed by management as critical 
to the papers’ economic future. 

After agreement was reached on 
those topics and other noneconom- 
ic issues, the question of wages and 
benefits was left on the table. The 
gap between the unions’ demands 
and the newspapers’ offer has nar- 
rowed substantially in that area, 
prompting some observer?, includ- 
ing Mayor W. Wilson Goode, to 
voice optimism that a settlement 
can be readied quickly once negoti- 
ators go back to tite table. 

Negotiations were to resume 
Monday, according to Robert 
Kyler, a federal mediator. The 
most recent talks were held Oct. 6. 

Many newspaper employees and 
readers are wondering just what is 
going on. 

“We don’t know why we’re out 
here,” said a striking editor who 
joined the Inquirer shortly after 
Knight-Ridder took over. “It’s a 
puzzle to all the Guild members.” 
The Newspaper Guild, which rep- 
resents reporters, editors and other 


while-collar employees, is one of 
(he nine unions on Strike. 

Some people who are knowl- 
edgeable about the situation say 
the impasse has continued because 
the newspapers' management is de- 
termined to break a pattern that 
produced 1 1 strikes against the pa- 
pers in the last 13 years. 

Sam S. McKed. the president of 
Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., 
which publishes the two newspa- 
pers, denied that. But in an inter- 
view, be said the company has “had 
far too many strikes in the past. 

“Strikes every time we negotiate 
a contract, or every time they don’t 
like something, must end,” he said. 
“We cannot do business that way. 
If they’re going to persist in strikes, 
there’s going to be a lot of pain for 
everybody.” 

The company says it is losing 
more than $1 million a day in reve- 
nue because of the strike. The 
Chamber of Commerce said it was 
impossible to calculate the overall 
loss of business to Philadelphia, 
but it is thought to be substantial 

Cultural activities have suffered 
particularly because of the strike. 

A ran of the play “West Side 
Story” was canceled at the Forrest 
Theater because the absence of 
newspaper advertising made it dif- 
ficult to sell tickets. 

A week of performances by the 
John Curry ice-skating troupe was 
postponed until tbe end of the 
strike, and moviegoers are having 1 
trouble finding out what is playing 
where. 


Belgium 

Re-elects 

Center-Right 

Coalition 


The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — King Baudouin 
began talks with political leader? 
Monday about forming a new gov- 
ernment, after Prime Minister Wti- 
fried Manens’s center-right coali- 
tion increased its parliamentary 
majority by two seats in genera! 
elections. - v 

The monarch began his search 
for a med iat or to bead a new gov- 
ernment after the outgoing coali- 
tion resigns, said Marc van Craen. 
a spokesman for the Royal Palace. 
Until then, he said, Mr. Martens 
would remain in a caretaker capaci- 
ty. Mr. Manens, 47, was expected 
to bead a new center-right govern- 
ment. 

In Belgium, a government must 
resign, even if it wins in elections, 
to allow for the formation of a new 
one, and tbe king traditionally polls 
leaders of all ponies, even if it is a 
formality. 

The government usually is 
formed by the leader of the party 
with the largest number of seals. 
Mr. Manecs's Flemish-speaking 
Christian Social Party won 49 erf 
the 212 seats, the largest number. 

His four-party coalition of 
Christian Democrats and Conser- 
vatives, both split into Flemish and 
French-speaking camps, won 115 
seats in the 212-seat Chamber of 
Deputies, a gain of 2. 

The Socialists and an ecology 
party also gained at ihe expense erf 
other opposition groups, notably 
the Communists, nationalist par- 
ties and a small rightist anti- tax- 
ation grouping. Tbe Communists 
lost all representation. 

“The coalition was strengthened 
in this election battle,” Mr. Mar- 
tens said as the results came in late 
Sunday. “And we do not make it a 
secret that we are going to continue 
our economic recovery program.” 

In Sunday’s voting^ the opposi- 
tion Socialists won 67 seats. The 
ecologists increased their seats 
from four to nine. 

All four coalition parties ad- 
vanced except the Flemish-speak- 
ing Conservatives, who lost 6 of 
their 28 seats. Mr. Martens’? party 
won six new seats. 

The election campaign centered 
on economic and soda! policies. 
But the return of the center-right 
coalition also ensures the contin- 
ued deployment of U.S. cruise mis- 
siles by 1987. 

Tbe first 16 of 4S missiles in 
Belgium were installed in March. 
■The remaining 32 arc to be de- 
ployed in 1987. The Flemish- 
speaking Socialists, who won 32 
seats, a gain of 6, had said they 
would negotiate with Washington 
for the removal of the missiles. 

Since Mr. Martens's government 
took office in 1981, inflation has 
been halved to less than 5 percent, 
and public borrowing has dropped 
to 12 percent of the gross national 
product from 15 .5 percent in 1981. 
But unemployment has increased 
to 13.4 percent of the workforce. 


UK, Urges Europe’s Industry to Take 
Major Role in Eureka Technology 


By Axel Krause 

InurnaiionaJ Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Expressing con- 
tinued reluctance to commit gov- 
ernment funds, Britain urged Mon- 
day that West European industry 
play the leading role m establishing 
projects under Eureka, a program 
initiated by France to stimulate 
European cooperation in high tech- 
nology. 

Tbe role of government financ- 
ing for Eureka projects has 
emerged as a major uncertainty 
and a potential source of conflict 
between Britain and other govern- 
ments, particularly France and to a 
lesser degree West Germany. No 
other European administration has 
followed President Franqois Mit- 
terrand’s decision to commit gov- 
ernment funds to Eureka. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, tbe British 
foreign secretary, said that “the 
major responsibility rests on indus- 
try and on the sources of private 
finance, which are best able to 
judge what will prosper in the mar- 
ket,” 

He was addressing a conference 
of industrialists and bankers from 
18 European countries exploring 
funding for Eureka projects that 
could have both civilian and mili- 
tary applications. 

“What matters is that European 
high- technology companies should 
produce goods that their customers 
want,” Sir Geoffrey said. “Business 
judgments like this cannot be made 
by governments.” 

* He said that European govern- 
ments could provide incentives, in- 
cluding those affecting taxation, 
and press for elimination of barri- 
ers to trade and procurement with- 
in Europe. 

Sir Geoffrey avoided making any 
commitment to providing British 
government funds. “Eureka," he 
said, “is not a formula for pat an- 
swers or old-fashioned government 
handouts.” 

West German and Dutch offi- 
cials generally backed France's po- 
sition c allin g' for a strong govern- 
ment role in Eureka projects. 

At a news conference. Sir Peter 
Carey, a private banker who was 
chainnan erf the meeting, said that 
broad support was expressed by 
delegates for Sir Geoffrey’s view. 
He added, however, that partici- 
pants also urged an important role 
for governments, particularly 
through direct and indirect forms 
of financing Eureka projects, in- 
cluding favorable tax treatment. 

The most concrete proposal that 
emerged from the meeting was tbe 
establishment of “a clearinghouse'' 
for Eureka projects, comprised of 
industrialists and bankers. Sir Peter 
said. 

According to West German. 
French and British officials, about 
100 possible Eureka projects have 
been examined during the past sev- 
eral weeks and about six are ex- 
pected to be adopted officially at a 
ministerial conference in Hannover 
Nov. 5 and 6. 

Sir Geoffrey said that govern- 
ment support for Eureka has con- 
tributed to what he termed “politi- 
cal momentum.” 

Attending the London meeting 


were representatives from all 10 
members of the European Commu- 
nity, as well as Austria, Finland, 
Norway. Portugal. Spain, Sweden, 
Switzerland and Turkey. Represen- 
tatives of die EC Commission and 
the European Investment Bank 
also attended. 

Tbe specific areas that have been 
covered in preliminary discussions 
range from the development of so- 
phisticated lasers, robotics, tele- 
communications and transport, to 
highly advanced computers, new 
materials, office automation, artifi- 
cial intelligence and advanced 
computer chips. However, no pre- 
cise estimates have been made 
about what Eureka might cost. 

A French official. Yves Sillard. 
who is coordinating French indus- 
trial participation in Eureka for the 


Ministry of Research and Technol- 
ogy, said that individual projects 
could require funding over five 
years of 50 million francs to 2 bil- 
lion francs, 50 percent of which 
could be underwritten by individ- 
ual governments. France has com- 
mitted a billion francs (SI 23.4 mil- 
lion). 

In a related development on 
Monday, British Defense Ministry 
officials said tint no firm agree- 
ment had been reached with the 
United States over British partici- 
pation in the Reagan administra- 
tion's research program for space- 
based defense. 

Many of the same companies 
planning to participate in Eureka 
also are interested in bidding on 
contracts for the U.S. Strategic De- 
fense Initiative. 




Pearl-Continental Hotels 

—a world of great value 


cities 

OT° Cn n art' 


,iP° 


wst* 1 


d pesW 


sl& 



Rari-Contmenlal Hotels 

Formerly Inter-Continental Hotels 
Kcrachi-Lahore-Rau/alpindi-Peshawar 

For Central Reservations please contact 
Tel: (92) 21-515021 
Telex: 23617 PEARL PK 
Club Road. Karachi -Pakistan. 

Reservations wcMuMe ihreugh Utell International @ 



2 PORI 

Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and 
well give you an extra [ month of Tribs feewith aone-year 
subscription. Total sayings: nearly 50% off tbe newsstand price 
most European countries!. 


/idMfarMwsufeta&tn- 

■ drde the radjcadsubscrfaHoo j*ice*eSedad 
Vcidtfcrcutft Mordt 3l , If 


Courtly Cnw, 

-Twiir. 

9 B3S3 


Aulirio 



—253 

HK3 

Maun' 

WMSi 

Hi 3 

KE 


Denmcvi 


vmm 


ItXRly.’, i* 

FMonri 

■KIT 

—EH 


■CD 

Irma? 


jmprrrj 

■cm 



HS 

<B| 

n 

hcd 



■Km 

■E 



Dr. 

■EES 

—73 

mm 

1 1* m iff 

ft 




hriand 

Lkt 

■HIE 

62 

■Jg] 

Wy 

■ES 

IETTm] 

HF7o! 

HSj3 


—ii 

j^E7_^3 





IfiO 

mmm 

BHEl 





—£3 

Spon ; 

PW, 

K 

■li£5 



SXr. 

T.«0 

m 








Bw of Europe Ngrth A6im bmmr FrandlA&xz* USA, Prune* 

• sl - 32 ZI- 1741 • 95 


Raicf A6ka; Gmxfci UwiAmerin* GdFSkxasAsa 

$1 . 4*1. aa 


139 



' HcrgR^a^ eribunCTa Subscription Manager, International Herald Tribune, 

92521 NedtyCedex, France. Tda747 07 29.Tdet61283Z 

Plecse enter my subscription for: □]2monfs □ 6 months □3morths 

( 4 - T m o rthfree ] (+ 2 v«eJafrBa} {+ 1 ueekfree) 

□ Mychedc is enclosed 

Heaus charge my: □ Access □ American &p«ss □ DhersOub 
Card expiry date 1 — Sgncfure. 



□ Euroaxd □ Modercard □ Vso 



m 

35^1 l l-l ll 1 

L 

□I 

TT 


None. 


Adims. 


Gty. 


.Courtly. 


Tel 1 ; 

vacation terauenaw 

Iwlbetfevefcgfrom. 


.Telex. 


□ Ptecwsuiptnd my afa erk rip n during myobsgioe and extend ihe date {rfeywcri m i xujuing ly. 
□ ) vtoddBastoho^B tepaper senrto my vacation oddrsss. {Reese endue rtfevdiom). 


fdetesj. 


15-1045 


More like floati ng when 
you're flying 



A Most 
I comfortable 

place to rest your 

head 


Contoured support for 
the small of your bade 


the seat cushion tilts up. 


TWA's new Ambassador Class seats are a new experience. 


No other business dass has seats like 
IheseTheyYe newThe widest business 
das seats They're exclusive to TWAs 747 
Ambassador Class. 

TosainthemistoftaatPefeclJyn^axed. 

They curve to support every part of your 
bodyTherefc even a spaial legand foot rest 


Flying to and from America will never 
be the same again. You can really relaxon 
the flight Work in comfort. Sleep serenely 
Of course these seats are only six 
across. There's plenty of leg room and 
plenty of space all round 

Try Ihe newetperience offloafingacross 


the Atlantic Fly TWAs 747 Ambassador 
Class. They're Sang fitted nov^ most of our 
747 fleet will have them. 

But you can always enjoy 6-across 
seating on allow transatlantic aircraft. 
Your TWA Main Agent will tell 
you all about it 


Leading the way to the USA 


gent will tell I 












:Ti£-;vV ••-'•T.r vff- 




Page 8 



INTERISATJONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1985 



ARTS / LEISURE 

Eddy Louiss: An Organist in 'Gestation 


D lU ' 


By Martin Bernheimer 

L-'f Angela Ttnlvl Sen icf 

1 0S ANGELES — It certainly was not just another 
* opening. To celebrate the arrival of Andre Previn 
. as music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the 
city’s cultural guardians pulled out a Tew extra-musi- 
cal stops. 

Before his his first concert here could begin Thurs- 
day — at the new. welcome, civilized hour of 8 P. M. 
— there had to be celebrating on the plaza outside the 
Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Lights. TV cameras. Free 
.' “Previn &. The Los Angeles Philharmonic” buttons, 
with a heart in the middle. Serenades by the Moravian 
Trombone Choir of nearby Downey. 

After the concert, before the climactic cadences of 
the formal program could even begin to evaporate, the 
Moravians returned to their alfresco tootling, and the 
party resumed. Lights. TV cameras. Free wine and 
! mineral water Eventually, fireworks! 

And so the Previn era began. 

Predictions at this juncture may be premature, to 
say the least. Still, it seems reasonable to suggest that 
Previn will not specialize in brawny flash, as Zubin 
Mehta did. Nor will he luxuriate in mellow, old-worfd 
poetry, as was Carlo Maria Giulini's wont. 

Despite the brouhaha surrounding his debut and 
despite the glitter of the Hollywood background, 
which no one here except the maestro wants to forget. 


serious, thoughtful tough and bold, 
onic may be entering its no-nonsense 


Previn at 

The PI 

phase. 

.^SmalL, slender -and.besj*cacled. Previn does not 
create twmfosfrbman tic of images on the podium. He 
favors economic gestures over flamboyant exhorta- 
tions. He does not shrink from the ungainly motion if 
it seems useful. Without much fuss or furor, he con- 
centrates on such old-fashioned virtues as clarity, 
precision and momentum. 

la this day of matinee-idol indulgences, he seems 
content to conduct the orchestra, not the audience. 

Although he may not be a wild avant-gardist, he 
does not go out of his way to court the masses. He 
opened his debut program with a rather noisy West 
Coast premiere of Ellen Zwilicb’s ‘Celebration," con- 
tinued with some sophisticated Mozart and. for a 
finale, explored a great Russian symphony. 

The dressy first-nighters in the sold-out house 
would, no doubt, have wanted Tchaikovsky — some 
push-button weeping and wailing and sighing, some 
hum-aloog hit tunes, some comfortable orgasmic 
crashes. Previn gave them Prokofiev. 

The crowd did. of course, muster a standing ovation 
at the end. It was a proper, respectful, de rigueur 
standing ovation. It did not reflect a blitz of spontane- 
ous communal frenzy. There will be time for that, 
perhaps, later. 



f 


Th* Aooomd Prcu 

Andre Previn 


An Opera Dramatizes Violent Life of Malcolm X 


By Joseph McLelJan 

Poll 

PHILADELPHIA — Our time 


has produced few tragic heroes 
more tragic or more heroic than 
Malcolm X, who began life as Mal- 
colm Little and ended it — violent- 
. !y. abruptly — as El Hay Malik El- 
Shabazz. His life is prime material 
for opera, and that it ha> become in 
“X," first performed completely 
last week, ivnh Peter Aaronson 
conducting, at the .American Music 
Theater Festival in Philadelphia. 

“X" was. in a u ay. a family pro- 
ject. with music by Anthony Davis, 
a scenario by his brother Christo- 
pher and libretto by their cousin 
Thulani Davis, h has been given 
partial performances in workshops 
and as a work in progress, and will 
enter the repertoire of the New 
York City Opera next season. 

Despite s»?me lingering problems 
of structure and inevitable shaky 
moments on opening night, it is a 
first-class piece of work and a sig- 
nificant addition to the American 
operatic repertoire. It tells, with 
great impact, one of the significant 
stories of our time — a story whose 
material sometimes seems almost 
too strong, too overwhelming as 
pure naiTative. to bear the transfor- 
mation into a traditional an form. 

Malcolm's life can be summa- 
rized in the changing sequence of 
his names. Malcolm Little had a 
deprived, disrupted childhood, 
shattered by the violent death 
(which may or may not have been 


accidental) of his father, a member 
of Marcus Garvey’s Back-to- Africa 
movement. 

Malcolm X was bom in prison, 
when Malcolm Little encountered 
the Nation of Islam, a religion 
founded by Elijah Mohammed. He 
then renounced his “slave name" 
and the life of crime associated 
with it, became Elijah's right-hand 
man. established the newspaper 
Mohammed Speaks, transformed 
the Nation of Islam (also known as 


logical central action, which makes 
“X” sound like an oratorio rather 
than an opera. Such lines as Mal- 
colm’s “Allah does not teach us To 
suffer more and more. Allah does 
not teach us To fight white man's 
wars" trace their lineage to Han- 
del's oratorios. 

But the drama of this opera is 
well displayed in Rhoda Levine's 
staging, using simple props and the 
bodies of the performers. A row of 
chairs is transformed into a row of 


the Black Muslims) into a dynamic prison cells by having men crouch 
political and cultural force, and be- behind them, clutching the backs 
came its most prominent spokes- like bars, in the background of 
man. Too prominent. Elijah was Malcolm's interrogation scene. The 
disturbed by the attention his vig- movements of the chorus (which 
orous young disciple was attracting sings superbly) are choreographed 
and the independence of his words into richly expressive patterns. Al- 
and actions. An inevitable break mosphere is created by the con- 
came. dividing the Nation of Islam, slant presence of people only mar- 
Malcolm. seeking a purer form gjnally involved in the plot: the 
of the Islamic religion, made the police, who hover ominously on the 


traditional pilgrimage to Mecca, 
where his religious ideas were revo- 
luticnized and he took his third 
name, “a name for one reborn.” 
renounced racial separatism and 
founded the Organization for Afro- 
American Unity. He was gunned 


periphery: a reporter and photog- 
aher wl 


rap tier who dogged Malcolm's 
footsteps in his later years; mem- 
bers of the Nation of Islam, street 
people, hangers-on. 

The opening-night performance 
in Philadelphia's Walnut Street 


down by assassins while addressing Theater was marred by the loss of 


a meeting of this organization. 

How do you get ad this material 
into three 3Cis? In “X," the answer 
is that you pack it very tightly, and 
let Lhe opera run a bit longer than 
the ideal length. 

A problem with the material is 
its lack of significant romantic in- 
terest. The women in “V" are pe- 
ripheral to the political and ideo- 


Michael Stnartt, cast in the tide 
role, who became id and had to 
withdraw in the last week of re- 
hearsals.' A substitute was found in 
Avery Brooks, a professional actor, 
as well as a singer and pianist, who 
had sung parts of the opera in earli- 
er workshop presentations. During 
final rehearsals, he commuted from 
Boston, where he did television 





; \ 


By Michael Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 


to work like my voice, directly from the interior. 

Fm no inteUectuaL" 

P i AR1S — Called “one of the great organists On * e ° tbcr ' h « *» 

of our time** by the late Kenny Clarke (one of goes with Ian- 

lhe groat drummers of his time), Eddy Louiss ii 


m a 


‘period of gestation. I'm tired of jazz," he -- - . ■ _ . _ rv^t 

said “The labefnot the music.” He thought “<* »>* we P la * ^ U P 


about it and added: “Maybe also the music.** maybe, but dm 
Louiss feels very Freni. On the other hand, 

....... , ... - _ Amirir-fln c»ra>r lancmnce: the ran. that S 3ZZ uj 


since his father was bom in Martinique, there is 
that side too. And he suspects that being a 
“French jazz musician” reflects an dd-fasb- 
ioned view of the world Being a bandleader 
makes him uncomfortable, although he leads 
one. He once led a big band and he is sure he 
does not want to do that any more, but he keeps 
the arrangements filed away just in case. He is 
tired of traveling but has been looking forward 
to a tour of Africa. He doesn’t want to sing 
again, though be just might on the next album. 

In the early 1960s he sang French lyrics to 
jazz standards as a member of the Double Six. a 
vocal group that was successful in the United 
States. One week in New York was enough. He 
knows he is not “strong enough” to live in New 
York. “You have to fight continually with all 
your force over there. It's professionalism in all 
its splendor.” 


American street language; the rap, that s jazz I 
me. 

“I don't know what it is Pm looking fix - but I 
have the impression I’m only be ginning .” 

The Eddy trio: Tananarive. Madagas- 

car, Ocu 14 and 18; Reunion, OcL 21-24; Djibou- 
ti . Oct. 23-29. 

D 

The track “Rappin' Recipe” from Don Cher- 
ry’s aew album “Home Boy" (Barclay) is a 



t 

W' 




it 




perfect example of the importance of language 
rd jazz, although, in the al- 


Eddy Louiss: 


OctenilMt 

‘fm only beginning.” 


be making op the lyrics as he goes along for all 
he invests in them, though they add [up in an odd 


to music, h is word jazz, 
bum’s notes. Cherry voices doubts that, from his 
point of view, echo Louiss: “Jazz has been a 

prisoner of its own diches.” . , 

Here be has managed to combine the dichfcs way. He happened to be in Paris with a few 
of other styles into something totally clicfa£-frce. weeks off and a producer said: Hey, Don. let s 
He wrote all the songs — wmch have elements make a vocal record- 
ed reggae, “doo-wop, new wave, funk and all 


_ _ __ part Choctaw Indian, Cherry has been wan- 

U alike Jean-Luc Ponty and Michel Petruo- periods of jazz — rings them with a musky dering the world investigating what he calls 

; : i m: . i - : ■ - . l rn1l/Tnra n min* cinn^mnima lnnnrnu- 


work in the daytime. On opening 
night, he had to read some sections 
of the final act from a score — 
much of his material in that seg- 
ment. however, consists of public 
speeches. 

Ultimately, “X" is more epic 
than lyric. Anthony Davis answers 
the challenge, with music at the 
service of the words, often sub- 
merging its lyric impulses as it con- 
trols and intensifies the dramatic 
flow of the dialogue. 

He draws sparingly on the rich 
tradition of black music, mostly for 
jazz as a backdrop for Malcolm's 
early life of crime. Most other mu- 
sic in the American black tradition 
is. perhaps inappropriately, drawn 
from a Christian context. The re- 
mainder of the opera's music is 
drawn from the modern classical 
idiom bordering at times on atonai- 
ity. It is superbly functional theat- 
rical music, but it will sometimes 
leave unsatisfied the opera-lover 
who expects a show-stopping aria 
every 20 minutes or so. 

A large and expert cast (with 
most ringers taking two or more 
roles) has been assembled, includ- 
ing performers from the Metropoli- 
tan Opera’s production of “Porgy 
and Bess.” 

At least one outstanding per- 
former deserves to be mentioned. 
Thomas Young fills superbly two 
sharply contrasting roles: “Street," 
the underworld character who 
leads young Malcolm into a life of 
crime and Elijah, who leads him 
out of it. 


dani, he was unwilling to uproot. After playing 
with Garke, Sian Getz, Quincy Jones, Johnny 
Griffin and others be remained “French," but 
eventually found even Paris too continuous a 
struggle and moved in the other direction, to a 
country house near Poitiers. On the other hand: 
“Who knows? I might like to work in New York 
one day. I'm young." (He is 44.) T haven't said 
my last word." 

On the one hand, music involves “the victory 
of the subconscious over the conscious. I do not 
want to analyze beforehand. L want my fingers 


texture r eminiscent of ’Taj Mahal, and plays “universal folklore” ever since coming to promi- 
synthesizer, melodica, piano and trumpet, over- nence playing a Pakistani pocket trumpet in the 
dubbing himself. He fa mishe s an image for the late 1950s with Ornette Coleman. He married a 
mix by re calling how Thdonious Monk rose Lapp woman and lived for many years in-Swc- 
from the piano bench and danced to the impro- den. He learned Brazilian, African, Indian and 
visalions of his saxophonist. electronic instruments and played the m with 

Were it not for a journeyman rhythm section Nana Vascoocdos, Manu Dibongo. Latif Khan, 
and questionable production, this might have Lou Reed, the “father of punk,” and Talki ng 
been the album of the year. Don Cherry singing Heads. He made “powwow music" with another 


is certainly a surprise. There is an air of irreality, native American (pari Creek) Jim Pepper. 

* ' * ‘ 1 of gestation 


as though the scope of 
own without his being 


of the recording grew on its Don Cherry has been in a period i 


aware 


ordrngg 

ofiLH' 


e seems to for almost 30 years * 


DOONESBURY 


ITS 7HREB CfCLOCK/N 
THE MORNING, AND DO 
YOU KNOW WHERE TUB 
CHILDREN OF TFB SIK- 
VESARE? 

/ 


DO YOU CARE? PR. PAN 
ASHER DOES, ANDAS1HB , 
BAEf BOOMS BOSWELL,f&\ 
BAOOO&VEUS WE 
LATEST ON EVERYONE'S 
FAVORITE GENERATION! 


DOCMfifRETm 
&ER-TRENDOIP GUM 

BOOMERSUPTO DISEASE, 

ThESSVMS?WHfifS MARK: 
ON THEIR MINDS? f 



GUM 

DISEASE? 


YOU GOT 
rr,PUDE. 
Fiossm 
ISTOTAUX. 
HOT. 

V 



OKAY, PR. PAN. BE- 
SIDES GUM DISEASE, 
WmOSEARETHE 
[j B/GCHML CHILDREN 
TALKING ABOUT 
THESE DAIS? 



BOf BOOMERS PONT 
S&MTDBEABLETO 
HANDLE immGHAK. 
THEY THOUGHT 7HEY7? 
BETOUNG FOREVER. 


THEVRB TRYING RSRHH/NG: \ 
MiNOXivmawmoN&s, 
NEW HAIRSTYLES. MAM ARE 
RE6RDMN6THEBEARDS0F 
THEIR YOUTH. THIS /SNOT A 
GENERATION THA7S AGING 
GRACEFULLY., 

V 


il 

OKAY, 

THAIS 


BESIDES 

about m 


HAIR LOSS 

-7 VERES 

I 

ANDGUM 

SORT OF 

J 

DISEASE- 

A LULL. 

3 < 

{. 


* 

PPI 




PWdU 


^ :Neu i 


Own land in the great 


a 


American West 





W hat more perfect way to stake your 
claim than by purchas ing five glori- 
ous acres in fhe Colorado Rockies 
for yourself and those you love. At Sangre 
de Cristo Ranches you can still own a siz- 
able piece of America at a very modest cost 
and on easy credit terms. This is scenic land 
in one of the fastest-growing states in the 
USA, a piece of the unspoiled, romantic old 
Southwest, 

S angr e de Cristo Ranches is a subsidiary 
of Forbes Inc., publishers of the highly re- 
spected American b usiness and financial 
publication, Forbes Magazine. The land be- 
ing offered for sale to you is a part of the 
huge 258,000-acre Forbes Trinchera Ranch, 
one of the oldest of the r emaining big 
ranches in America. A sportsmen's paradise 
in all seasons for hunting, fishing, riding, 
hiking and boating. With fine skiing less than 
50 miles away, the ranch ranks among the 
world's best-known preserves for deer, elk, 
game birds and other wildlife. 

You can own majestic mo untain views of 
Trinchera Peak and Mount Blanca [higher 
than Pikes Peak) which stand as silent sen- 
tinels protecting the roiling foothills and 


valley that make up our Sangre de Cristo 

Ranches. 

The land lies about 200 miles southwest 
of Denver, just east of US Route 160 . . . the 
Navajo TraiL Its town is Historic Fort Gar- 
land, the last command of Kit Carson. 

For as little as $4,500 total cash price you 
can purchase youi own 5-acre Sangre de 

Cristo Ranch, with payments as low as $45 
monthly. 

Important money-back and exchange 
privileges backed by Fohbes Magazine's dis- 
tinguished reputation have contributed 
much to the great success of this unusual 
land offering. 



For complete de- 
tails on this won-, 
derful .opportunity, 
without obligation, 

please fill in and 
1 »ail coupon today. 


FORBES EUROPE 

LONDON SW11 3UT 
ENGLAND 




Nun, 


9“°" Pro perty Report required by Federal law and 
^Q'W’S artytNng- No Federal agency has 
JWQed the marts oe value, if any. of this prof 
Equal Cre<St and Housing Opportunity 


Mdnaa. 


Telephone^ 


W 28? 


' ^ i 

A* * 

YVV 









i- : . 




•ijL 


' ’s.y. 

">£ 

■k. >• 

:uA 


,V.i. 

jrfv 


V 


«•- 


« l*-H« -a—.-.*- 




r - 


■=fr 


*- .... 




BVTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 


Page 9 


ARTS /LEISURE 



. By Hebe Dorsey . . 

I werntawnai Herald tribune 
T ONDON — Long on fl® out- 
London fashion, once 
“* shuun S star of ihe swing™ 
. 60 s, now seems u> be finaBy mat- 

this tune, British Fashion Week, 

which started on Ocl 8 , has a lot of 

noopla, as weD as the be ginning of 

LONDON FASHION 


a strong infrastracmre ihat should 
help turn unruly British talent into 
a commercial success. 

The tinsel is fading oat ami the 
anarchy and flaky aide to many of 
these shows is being replaced by 
haid-sdl organization, Hdp has 
been coming from all sides. Such 
industrial finns as the Burton 
Group have set up a school of busi- 
ness management at the Royal Col- 
lege of Art. They have also helped 
finance the fashion tents at Chelsea 
Barracks, on Kingfs Road, tibax . 
the collections are being shown. 

Department stores .are increas- 
ingly opening np to yoong talents. 
Harvey Nichols last, month 
launched “Zone,” a basement of 
boutiques. Harrods spent £3 mil 
lion (S4.2 million) revamping “Way 
In.” an area that was set up in the 
late 1960s to create the right envi- 
ronment for London’s latest "bi- 
zarre designs. Inaugurated Satur- 
day with a black-tie “Golden 
Banquet,” it was decorated by the 
talented Eva Jiricna, who desi gned 
the young and with-it Joseph 
stores. In black and white high- 
tech, “Way In" is how a perfect 
setting for London’s hot new 
names: Bodymap, En glish Eccen- 
trics, Anthony Kwok and Arkitekt. ' 
The Golden Banquet ended with 
the British fashion industry awards' 
and an auction of designer sketch- 
es. 

Harrods is due.for more exten- 
sive, fashion-oriented changes. Its 
new owner, Mohammed ai-Fayed, 
who also owns the Ritz Hotel in 


Paris, v^hch-he ferought'bacfc to 
fanner splendor, said as w3D awe 
no effort or money to dust of! Har- 
rods old image and upgrade its 
fashion department One of his ma- 
jor-plans is (heating luxurious new 
boutiques for 10 top international 
designers. - i 

. Retailers such as Maries & Spen- 
. cer make s print of luring young 
talents, and the Browns boutiques 
also encourage students by taking 
their collections on enn d ffwn«it. 

The royal coD^es are also con- 
cerned 1 jy the number of young 
audenis hired away By foreign de- 
signers at tte June graduate stows, 
leaving the Britishptched at the 
post, so to. speak. The coDcges axe 
cowing aware of the need to give 
their students business experience. 
Too often, these young designers 
showed brilliant, collections that 
had no commercial follow-up. 

The British government is con- 
tinuing to give moral support: 
Prime iimaterMaignet Thatcher 
is to host her second recep ti on for 
the fashion corps at 10 Downing 
Street on Tuesday. Officials have 
also come through with what they 
think is a brand new system to put 
designers in touch with the indus- 
try. 

Tim Blythe, spokesman for Peter 
Morrisson, the new minister of 
state far industry, said that two 
weeks ago the government invested 
£30,000 in the launching, of a com- 
puter file known as “The Register 
of Apparel and Textile-Designers." 
Designers must pay a fee to regis- 
ter. A company in seed of a design- 
er wtQ only have to eaffl the regis- 
ter. Aheady 250 designen fixun all 
over the country have registered, 
Blythe said. This is a big industry: 
it employs 285,000 people and to- 
talled an estimnleA £] billion in 
exports in 1984.. 

The government also has two 
people sitting full time on the Brit- 
ish Fashion Council board. “The 
idea is to hdp them," Blythe said. 
“By bring responsive to their 
needs. Thor main problem,” he 


Holocaust Is Evoked 



ony 


By Charles McCardeli ‘ . 

Washington Pott Service ’ 

VirASHINGTON —a memori- 
•. YV ai- service of sizable propor- ; 
dons was hddat the Kennedy Cat • 
tar .Concert Hall, where the Dallas 

premiere ri Beqaihm Lee^sSyS- ** ^ ** d ^ 


cutors,” “Someone blew the sho- 
far” and- “But who emptied your 
stoes of sand?” 

In Sunday qight’s performance, 
an eqnaHy powerful voice, belong- 
ing to the mezzo-soprano Zehava 
Griy toae of the performecs of the 


phony No. 4. “Manorial Candles! 1 
" This .ambitious work, commis-i 
sioned by the DallasSymphony to 
commemorate the 40th anniversary 
of the end ofthe Holocaust, had its 
official debut last week in Dallas, 
and four more performances are 
scheduled for this season. Even at 
such an early stage in the piece's 
history, there seems little doubt 
that Lees has created an impres- 
sive, emotionally stirring sympho- 
ny, one whose programmatic impli- 
cations recall a traumatic period 
with hanowing detafl. . 

Lees began his. draft of ‘'Memo- 
rial Candles" focr years ago while 
visiting IsraeL Early on, he derided 
that vocal portions based on texts 
by- the Nrixl Prize-winning poet 
Nelly Sachs (herself a survivor of 
the Holocaust) had to be incl u ded 
In the finished product, two oF the 
three sprawling movements con- 
tain her powerful verses “That the 
persecuted may. not become perse- 

Taj Mahal Dome 
Begins to Leak 
In Heavy Rains 

The Associated Press 

EW DELHI — The main 
I dome of the Taj Mahal has 
started leaking after heavy rains, 
The limes of India said. 

The 24-meter (79 feet) white- 
marble dome developed a leak, on 
its northeastern side last week, the 
report said. The main chamber, 
which houses the grave of its build- 
er, Emperor Shah. Jahan and his 

S ueen. Mumtaz Mahal, was 
ooded. 

The water, which accumulated in 
the dark chamber, had to be con- 
stantly mopped, because there is no 
built-in dr ainag e system in the 332- 
year-old budding the paper report- 
ed. 

The latest leak has puzzled offi- 
cials because the dome is a double- 


N« 


sponrient lines. She joined forces 
with the passi on ate violin playing 
of Pinchas Zukennan. 

“Memorial Candles" gives both 
singer and violinist prominent 
roles, but always within the con- 
cept of the composer’s grand 
scheme. Lees has painted a broad 
canvas with bold strokes. Amid nu- 
merous textural changes (the work 
is heavily scored to feature brass, 
percussion and the lower strings, 
-especially the cdlos) one seldom 
loses sight of the form. The opening 
motif by the wind, for instance, 
• recurs just frequently enough and 
with just enough modification to 
ensure rarity without' monotony. 

■■ The three movements, titled 
“Visitations,” “Manifestations' 
and “Transcendence,” have anoth- 
er important connecting thread: a 
mood of desolation. Dark and 
brooding are words that only begin 
to describe the relent! ess heaping of 
. intensity upon intensity xnanifest- 
ing al times into a “wailing wall" of 
sound, winch the orchestra disman- 
tles with wrecking-ball efficiency. 
There are periods of respite. The 
cello yearningly opens “Manifesta- 
tions" with’ a fragmented Jewish 
folk song. Celesta passages add a 
magic sparkle. But sadness pre- 
vails. Even Zukerman's magnifi- 
cent playing, whether sounding an 
outraged ay against the orchestra 
or whispering a delicate harmonic 
alone, conveyed deep suffering, an 
aidless lamen t. ' 

One obvious lapse in the perfor- 
mance was that Gal could not be 
beard when the orchestra operated 
at full force. Though texts were 
provided, a better balance needs to 
be struck in the future. Gal has a 
strong, dramatically acute voice (as 
her reading of two Mozart arias 
showed in the first half of the pro- 
gram), capable of rendering a line 
Eke “Tomorrow you will be dust in 

the shoes of those to come” with 
devastating conviction. 

“Memorial Candles” is sched- 
uled to be performed on Dec. 1 1 by 
■the Winnipeg Symphony; on Feb. 
11, 1986 by the Phflhannonia Or- 


• ... kj waBed structure. Officials of the 
* Archeological Survey of India 


f^URGPf 


*T : 


Archeological survey 
stressed the leak posed no danger 
to the monument but said “every- 
thing would be done to check the 
leak.” the newspaper reported. 

Earlier studies by experts have 
reported that cracks 6 to 10 feet 
long and a few milKmeters wide 
have weakened the Taj MahaLAt 
some places small pieces of marble 
have started falling out The cracks 
are caused by the gradually subad- 
ing foundation and other stresses 
on the marble, the studies sod. 

Historical records indicate. that 
the done of the Taj Mahal had 
leaked during rains immediately af- 
ter its construction in 1653. 


NORMAN (.LAWRENCE 


the Festival Hall in London, and 
also in Houston, Atlanta and Tel 
Aviv. ' 


STORE .YOUR OLD 
PUR IN A NEW 
SILK RAINCOAT! 

Brochure on request n 

V-atTFrttti am, KYC loot*— * 



AUTHORS WANTED 
BY N.Y. PUBLISHER 

Laofino. sobridr book pubfiriw sacks mono. 
scripts of s0 -types, fiction, nc&ftown. poetry, 
jovtriia.fdioaiyad'rektew'verls.ctcNow 
aurtpa we lwnu d SmdTar free luoUet H-3 
Vantage ProM, 516 W. 34th St. New York. N.Y. 
10001 USA ' 


FOR THE BEST IN 
CHINA TRADE 
CONSULTANCY & 
EXECUTIVE 
RECRUmMENT 
YOU NEED 



4/F, Dominion Centre 
59A Queen’s Ad. East 
Hong Kong 
The: 74903 RIGGS HX 



The Silver Screen Regains Its Luster in Argentina 


*l:fg 


By David Beard 

The Associated Press 

B UENOS AIRES — Encour- 
aged by two critical and com- 
mercial successes, Argentine film- 
makers are attempting to regain the 
prominent role they once had in the 
Latin American movie industry. 

While many of Argentina’s in- 
dustries have slumped, its cinema 
has boomed. Forty-six films have 
been produced since January 1984, 
as compared with only 1 1 is 1983. 
according to Manuel Amin, direc- 
tor of the National Institute of Cin- 
ematography. 

“We arc recovering the local 
market we had lost, and now we are 
opening doors in foreign markets,” 
An tin c»»d . 

The two biggest successes have 
been “Camila" and “La Historia 
OfioaT (The Official Version), 
films that could not have been 
made with government censorship 
during Argentina's dictatorship. 

The director erf Tamila, ” Maria 
Luisa Bern berg, began f ilmin g in 


1983, the day President Raul Al- 
fonan was inaugurated, after she 
scrapped the previous govern- 
ment’s revisions in her script. 

Nominated for an Academy 
Award as best foreign film, “Ca- 
mila” is the tragic story of a priest 
who falls in love with the daughter 
of a landowner in 1 9th -century Ar- 
gentina. The most popular Argen- 
tine film in a decade, it has attract- 
ed more than two million 
filmgoers. and earned more than 
three times its $360,000 cost in this 
year's showings in the United 
States, producers said. 

“The Official Veraon,” about a 
woman's discovery that her adopt- 
ed daughter had been stolen from 
another couple, has followed the 
success of “Camila” in Latin Amer- 
ica — a market Argentina dominat- 


ed from 1940-55, when five Buenos 
Aires studios cranked out an aver- 
age of SO movies a year. 

“The Official Version” has also 
done well in Spain, Italy and Brit- 
ain, and will open in the United 
States in November, its director. 
Luis Puenzo, said. The film and its 
star, Nonna Aleandro. who was 
exiled and blacklisted during the 
military regime, have won awards 
at the Cannes, Cartagena and To- 
ronto film festivals. 

“People around the world seem 
to want well-made films about the 
reality of life in Latin America,” 
said Luis BelJaba, director of a film 
magazine in Argentina. 

Amin said success has attracted 
foreign investors and co-produc- 
tions with other countries, such as 
Argentine- French cooperation on 


Pino Solanas’s ‘Tangos, the Exile 
of Gardd,” which look an award at 
the Venice Film Festival. 

While some films receive critical 
acclaim, bread-and-butter come- 
dies and romances, such as “Await- 
ing the Chariot” and “Stolen Flow- 
ers in a Garden in Quflmes," have 
made money nationally and are 
popular in Spain and Latin Ameri- 
ca, An tin said. 

Still, Argentine movies, like all 
films, are risky investments. More 
than half the 20 Argentine films 
released this year have lost money. 
Uncertain economic conditions 
have kept the S45-million Argen- 
tine movie market from growing, 
although Antin said Argentine 
films had attracted more than twice 
the number of viewers at home in 
1985 than In 1983. 


Clingy, black cotton dress by Bodymap. 


added, “is to get their act together.” 

_ Edward Rayne, a dynamic and 
highly successful shoe manufactur- 
er, who is succeeding Cyrfl Kern as 
chairman of the British Fashion 
Council on Nov. 1, said be has 
every intention of putting substan- 


tial financial demands on the in- 
dustry. 

‘They must understand that by 
helping young talent, they will be 
helping themselves,” he said, add- 
ing that he hopes to raise $500,000 
a year for the next three years. 


DoUs Salvaged From "Wreck 

Reuters 

BILLUND, Denmark — Divers 
are salvaging vast numbers of doQs 
and toys from the Louisiana, a Ger- 
man ship that sank off Jutland’s 
North Sea coast more than 100 
years ago. Hundreds of ehma and 
porcelain dolls and spare parts 
such as arms and legs, as well as 
molds for lead toys, have been sal- 
vaged. They will eventually be ex- 
hibited here in the Legoland chil- 
dren’s park. 


Alexandre Savin the cashmere designer in Paris 

LL DESIGNS 
IX STYLES 
LL COLORS 
LL PRICES 



EXCLUSIVELY FOR 


Cashmere House 

2. rue d'Aguesseau 
angle 60. Faubourg St-Honore 

PARIS 8* 
EXPORT PRICES 
TAX FREE 



This is the complete list of all airlines 

offering three classes in ail aircraft, to 45 European destinations and worldwide: 


swissair» 



As a leading international airline, Swissair makes a practical policy of being guided not by the services 
its competitors provide, but by the wishes of its guests. Apart from the fact that Swissair is the only 
airline offering a First Class, a Business Class and an Economy Class in all its aircraft to 45 cities in 
Europe and also practically worldwide, what gets talked about most of all is the service on board. Which 
puts Swissair again at the top of the personal lists set up by more and more people travelling on business 
or as tourists. . 



NYSE Most Actives 


***• tflfrti 

^ av, 
& | 
»T J 
’Jig r 3 
«« 22* 3 

75H »% i 

SI 5 »* : 
8k 4*% i 

JS S* 3 

438} 47 4 


m + «, 

42% +1% 
35 + % 

ns +2% 

8 + ft 

21% +■ % 
4 5% -% 
2114 + b 
20% +V* 
29% 

25% + Vi 
44 +1 

44H +i% 
35 % +lft 
47 + V. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

uniKtos 

indunrials 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Higfi Law Lest Om 

indus 134039 1356.18 1BX58 1354J3 + 14J9 

Trans 449.11 6*2*0 647*2 44058 * 1111 

Util 15342 1SL8S 15101 15414 f CLM 

camp S43J* 55133 541 *3 549.70 + 6*9 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Decllfwd 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Mist'S 
now lows 

Volume up 
Volume down 


982 961 

4M 493 

479 £64 

1925 1?7B 

41 29 

20 20 

57.814-290 
11.981740 


NYSE index 


High Low Close Cfe'ge 
C&mocallc 107*4 IfeuW 107*4 + 1X8 

Indus! rials 123.73 122*3 12172 4-1X4 

Transa. 1W89 10X49 10449 4-1*0 

■ UtIHlin 5580 5586 5580 4-0X5 

Plnanea ■ 11X54 III. U 1I3J4 +1*4 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


■ay Sales 

Oct. 11 144J5D 351.1*7 

OO. 10 750317 320778 

Oct. 9 152*24 345*94 

Oct. 4 100751 364J30 

Oct. 7 140*37 345*13 

■Included In the soles flour es 


Mondays 

MSE 

Qosiie 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ lndex_ 


Advanced 
Declined 
Undew* 
Total issues 
New Highs - 
Hew lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


CUM PTBY. 
305 302 

IS SI 

272 255 

7«4 752 

11 « 

'MB ns 
1X90*00 


Composite 

industriolf 

Finenet 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Trortse. 


erase ChWe 
28425 +U0 
286.90 + «3 
37435 +1X8 
335*0 +J3B 
24584 +0*1 
30522 +1X9 
259*8 + 408 


Werf rmar 
Asa am 

27830 24787 
38036 27X59 

S IK 
y&M 

25X29 227*0 


i vm.dtiPM 

7&54&0M 

prev.6P.MvoJ 

HJ7M08 

Pr*» consaiidaied clou 

111931560 


TaWes include me nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street ami 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

t'ia The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor’s index 


Htah Low dose ora* 
Industrials 207*4 20584 207*4 +230 

TrattSP. 120.13 UUi 170*7 +114 

UlllltWs 81*3 8084 81*3 +0*2 

Finance 2131 2137 2131 +0*4 

Composite 18437 14428 18537 +2*9 



AMEX Sales 


*PXIL volume 
Prev. 4 PJVL volume 
Prcv. cons, volume 



NYSE Prices Sharply Higher 



Comp/led by Our Staff Fruit i Dispatches 

NEW YORK. — Prices were sharply and 
broadly higher at the dose of the New York 
Slock Exchange on Monday in light trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which rose 
11.87 Friday, was up 14.79 to 1J54.73. Ad- 
vances led declines by a 2-1 ratio. Volume 
amounted to about 77.4 million, down from 
96.4 million Friday. 

Prices were higher in moderate trading of 
American Stock Exchange issues. 

.Analysis said many investors were impressed 
with the market's showing late last week, when 
it rallied despite International Business Machi- 
nes's report of lower earnings for the third 
consecutive quarter. 

To some observers, that suggested that the 
market was less vulnerable to disappointing 
news on corporate profits than it had been in 
recent weeks. 

However, it was generally believed that it 
would lake at least a few more days to test that 
optimistic thesis. Monday's trading was not 
expected to register any significant message 
with so many market participants absent be- 
cause of the holiday. 

IBM stock rose \ to 126%. 

General Foods climbed J 4 to 1194. Philip 


Moms said that the legal lS-day waiting period 
had passed for its'S120-a-share tender offer to 
acquire General Foods, and that no inquiries 
had been received from government regulators 
during that time on an Li trust matters. 

Beatrice, recently rumored to be a possible 
takeover candidate, gained 1 to 42%. 

Chase Manhattan, which reported sharply 
higher third-quarter profits, added % to 54W. 

The NYSE's composite index picked up .60 
to 107.16. At the American Stock Exchange, the 
market value index rose .79 to 223.60. 


11T Telephone Gear 
Is Produced in China 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — ITT Corp. announced Mon- 
day thai production had begun in Shanghai of 
ITT System 12 telephone exchange equipment, 
an advanced digital switching system. 

Shanghai Bell Telephone Equipmen t M anu- 
facturing Co., a joint venture among ITT, the 
Belgian government and the Chinese govern- 
ment, is building the exchanges. 


sii. Dos* UAdomti 

Oiv. Via PE 100s Hist) Low Quoi.Oi-98 High Lflw Slot* 


Sb. One 

Oiv. via PE Kfc High Lew Own. eft's* 


44 V, 35 
34% 24% 
110% 79 
23% 18% 
29% 22% 
64ft 42 
153 100% 
17% 10% 
29% 18% 
54% 35% 
5% 4W 
32% 17% 
39% 28% 
24% 10 
38% 27 
25V: 170 
28% 16% 


AsWOpf 196 
AM DC* 1*0 
AMD Of 435 
AUilane i*a 
AtCvEI 258 
AilRIdl 4*0 
AMRc SI 2*0 
AiLasCp 
AlOTl *0 
AutaDI 88 
Avalon n * Se 
AVEMC 80 
Avery 80 
Avfailn 
Avne! *0 
Avon 2*0 
Aytfln 



18 42% 
379 35% 

5 111 
It 19% 
49 26% 

3493 83 

6 ISO 
<1 loat 
65 22% 

120 50% 

19 5% 

20 33% 
148 33 

4 24% 
1844 31% 
1488 25% 
4 21% 


42% 42% ■ 
34% 34% 
111 111 
19% 19% 
28 28% 
82% 83 
15D 150 
10% 1D%. 
22% 22% 
49% 50% 
5% 5% 
32% 33'A 
32% 33 
24% 24% 
30% 31% 
S 25 - 
21% 21% 


XI 

141 

19ft 

2* 

20 899 

18% 


9 50 

4ft 

4* 

37 1772 

56ft 

9* 

914 

30% 

8.1 

29 

41 

19% 

1ft 


10 275 

49% 

U 

23 

11 


559 

18% 

48 

13 228 

48ft 

8.1 

tOB 

10 52 

91 

24ft 

21 

4* 

3* 

9 8977 

1 

23% 

29ft 


■ 

8ft 


M 

19 11 

20 

1* . 

US 


.Mbtt 

1*8 

4* 13 


U 

24 

3* 8 

34 

l* 9 

*2 

XI 17 

2*0 11* 8 

7*7 1X1 

*8 

1* 18 

1*0 

X9 38 

IV7 

83 9 

1*0 

15 4 


18ft 18ft 
U Mlt+.tt 
23%2C — ft 
1% Ift + ft 
7% 7% — % 

39. . 39% + ft 
3P4 35% +1% 
4ft 5 - 
7% 7% + % 
17ft 17ft— ft 
30ft 39% + % 
U .lift 
*1 fi. 

39% 19% 
25%_25% 

23 23% + ft 

38% 48 . +1ft 
9ft 9ft 
38ft 37ft + ft 


This announcement appears as a mailer of record only. These Securities have not been registered under the 
United States Securities Act ol 1933 and may not be ottered or sold in the United Stales or to United States 
persons as part ol the distribution. These Securities have not been qualilied lor sale in Canada or any 
province or territory thereol. and may not be sold in Canada or to any resident thereol in contravention 
ot securities laws ot Canada or any province or territory l/iereot. 



Ford 


it Canada Limited 


Cdn $75,000,000 


10%% Guaranteed Notes due October 1, 1992 

Unconditionally Guaranteed as to Payment of Principal, JVemium and Interest by 

Ford Motor Credit Company 


Goldman Sachs International Corp. 


Dominion Securities Pitfield Limited 


Orion Royal Bank Limited 


Deutsche Bank Capital Markets Limited 

Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) Limited 

Banque Naiionale de Paris 

County Bank Limited 

Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 

Morgan Guaranty Ltd 

Salomon Brothers International Limited 


Wood Gundy Inc. 


Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited 
Commerzbank Aktiengesellschaft 


CIBC Limited 


Credit Suisse First Boston limited 
Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited 
Morgan Stanley International 


Sumitomo Finance International 


October, 1935 


This announcement appears as a matter ot record only These Securities have not been registered under the 
United States Securities Act ot 1933 and may not be offered or gold in the United States or to ,• 
United States persons as part ot the distribution. ■ 


Credit Lyonnais 

<£50,000,000 

10%% Notes due January 1994 


Goldman Sacha international Corp. 


Klein wort, Benson Limited 


Credit Lyonnais 


. BankAmerica Capital Markets Group 
Baring Brothers & Co., Limited 
County Bank Limited 

Girozentrale und Bank der osterreichischen Sparkassen 

Md katpedUmH . . 

Kredietbank International Group 
LTCB International Limited 
Mitsui Finance International Limited 
Morgan Guaranty Ltd 


Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited 

Banque Bruxelles Lambert SJl 
C ommera ^^ 

Credit Suisse First Boston Limited. 

International Limited 
Lloyds Merchant Bank Limited 
Merrifl 4nch Capital Markets 
Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited 


Nomura International Limited 
Shearson Lehman Brothers international 


Union 


Orion Royal Bank 

Bao * £ °* Swiberland (Security,) Li mited 


September, 1985 


*ry 














































tviir’t'.-: 



By Richard F. Shepard 


T HERE IS scwne cvideDc« of hardenrng 
of the arteries, other than those al- 
ready loog diotM witii tfafSc,Tn -an 
a ging, New York. In recent years, the 
people have started expressing affection for the 
’ town they have traditionally loved to hate. 
Unlike local boosters in other towns, New 
Yorkers have never argued about the merits of 
their city. To the contrary, they have always 
been amused by om-of-towners who bragged 
about new waterworks or about a museum that 
could fit into the checkroom of tbeMefzopoli- 
tan Museum of Art 

Nowadays, New Yorkers are more ex pr essive 
pubhdy about the virtues of the place they call 
home. Perhaps it is indeed because of agmg. At 
* 360 years dd, the city, founded by the Dutch in 
1625 as Nfcuw Amsterdam and. later taken over 
by the first alien ethnic group to get oat of hand, 
the English, is one of the oldest of American 
cities. 

After all, Rembrandt was stiD painting in the. 
Old Country when Gotham was yet a trading 
post; had he divined where the art market would 
be 300 years later, he might have visited the 
colony and dashed off a few pieces that possibly 
could have extracted even more sentimental 
dollar than his mother-country standards have. 

The imcfcaxacteristic effusion of local pride 
began about a decade ago, when the fiscal crisis 
indicated that New York was in big trouble. It 
bad committed the gravest sin in a town devoted 


to profit: New York had run out. of money, 
faced bankruptcy and, who knows, might have 
beeir arid' off to the Arabs or Japanese, who 
would take it heme with them. 

It touched off a wave of emotion worthy of a 
Peoria Rotary Chib. People actually defended 
New York in the open and deprecated the New 
York, crime jokes that they themselves had 
. spawned not long before. 

A necessary fiffip to self-esteem came in 1976, 
when New York became the focal point of the 
nation’s Bicentennial celebration. It filled the 
harbor with tall ships and fleets of the wodd and 
the sky wish pyrotechnics. 

It was remembered by sane that New York 
was the first capital erf the new United States. 
The government packed up for Philadelphia a 
year later and was the first Luge industry to 
leave, the city. Fortunately, it became the world 
capital less than two centimes later, when the 
United Nations replaced -the slaughterhouse 
district on the East River. 

This business of aging has been apparent in 
the current era as. lots of things have been 
celebrating their centennials. The Mdropolitan 
Opera and the Brooklyn Bridge have recently 
had hog bashes in honor of their coming of age. 
Next July 4, New York w2J erupt in a grand 
spectacle to celebrate the 100th birthday of 
France's gift to the United States, the Statue of 
Liberty, now swathed in scaffolding as it is 
readied for the celebration. 

Such is tire growth of local patriotism that it 
has been rumored that native New Yorkers have 
been discovered among the boatloads of tourists 


bound for the statue's little island in the bay. In 
the old days, the generality erf New Yorkers, 
unless taken there by duress, rarely visited the 
treasures that lured visitors from all pants of 
the compass. Museums and statues are always 
there, it was reasoned, and there was no rush to 
go to them. 

This was curious because New Yorkers rush 
in everything rise they do." Nowadays, when 
young New Yorkers, including those who come 
from out of town to live here and use the city 
better than the natives do, go to museums and 


Unless you are a bicyclist, bicycles rank high 
on the bate list of New Yorkers who work in 
Midtown. Cars may be daunted and some of the 
neatest, most hair-raising toreador passes are 
those made by a New York pedestrian who risks 
himself on the boms of taxis (drivers from New 
Jersey and those with MU. plates command 
more caution because they are notoriously un- 
predictable bulls of the street). 

But bicycles, unlicensed and with a sense erf 
righteousness, skim through the streets heedless 
of any human barrier. One may be cautious 


As their city ages, New Yorkers discover civic 
pride ior the city they loved to hate. 


ttsecing ventures, you can see them nisfa- 
nough at what is a New Yak pace. 


ing through at what is a New Yak pace. 

The itch to rush ahead is reflected in New 
York traffic. The city has an extensive network’ 
of pedestrian traffic signs that flash, according 
to need, “Walk” or “Don’t Walk.” Notice that 
there is nothing that says “Stop” and nobody 
does. “Don’t Walk,” when it is flashing to warn 
that the light is gong to change, translates as 
“Run" and everyone does, to get across before 
the iron curtain of vehicles intervenes. There is a 
law on the books, somewhere, that prohibits 
crossing when “Don't Walk" appears, but who- 
ever received a ticket for violation must be well 
on in years by now. 


about cars and still be bowled over by a speed- 
ing bicycle racing the wrong way down a one- 
way street. 

For all the instinct to rush. New Yorkers do a 
lot of waiting There are lines all over the place, 
usually not for necessities, as in some other 
economies, but for the good things in Hfe. Peo- 
ple wait for seats in restaurants. A restaurant 
where you don’t have to wait is probably not 
worth sitting down in. At the Second Avenue 
Deli, on the Lower East Side, the management 
often passes out noshes of chopped liver and 
other delicacies to line-slanders. 

Line-standing is a social institution, a linear 
forum where ideas are exchanged, where friend- 


ships are forged. Singles stand in line at some 
Upper East Side movie houses not so much 
because they are eager to see the picture but 
more because they may meet someone with 
whom they can forge a relationship deeper than 
agreement on the an of cinema. 

One of the most popular lines is the one that 
snakes around Father Duffy’s statue in Times 
Square. Here, one waits to buy half-price tickets 
to Broadway shows. It is the most colorful place 
in the city to wait, a cultured queue entertained 
by street musicians and mimes against the 
world-famous backdrop of a flashy square. 

It certainly beats waiting for buses or sub- 
ways, which are distinctly unpopular pastimes. 
New Yorkers hate the transportation system as 
much as they depend upon it Promises of im- 
provement come more frequently than the 
trains. Buses move in packs, followed by a long 
hiatus. There is a suspicion that the Transit 
Authority has only vaugm the route to the driver 
of the first bus and that the others have to follow 
him or get lost. 

New Yorkers love going to places where other 
people go. They flock to the parks and beaches 
to the point where one can see neither grass nor 
sand on a fine day (in winter, of a weekend, they 
even crowd ski slopes in nearby upstate resorts 
in a way that makes them look rare rush-hour 
slides rather than a lonely Alpine sport in which 
the skier communes only with the crisp snow 
and the racing winds.). 

They are loath to visit alien turf within the 
city, outside of the downtown regions that are 
for general consumption. Bronutes rarely view 


the beauties of Brooklyn; Brooklynites are un- 
likely to take in one of the great showpieces of 
the dry, the Bronx Zoo. New Yorkers who do 
not live in Queens tend to turn their noses up at 
what is becoming one of the city's most cosmo- 
politan areas, what with its large Greek and 
Asian and South American quarters; Queens, to 
these others, is known mainly as home of the 
Mets baseball team, the two airports and the 
cemeteries in which they may finally desist from 
their constant rush through life. 

New Yorkers rarely go home again. They are 
cosmopolitan, great world travelers, but they do 
not go back to the old neighborhoods where 
they grew up. Usually, this is because the old 
neighborhood is no longer there. It has been 
tom down to make way for housing projects or 
it has just worn down into an above-ground 
abandonment of the sort that archaeologists 
elsewhere spend years digging to unearth. Few 
New Yorkers have ever grown old in the same 
New York that they grew up in. 

The new surge of civic concern has given the 
preservationists leverage but, along with the 
indestructible New York accent, architectural 
self-destruction is our oldest tradition, in keep- 
ing with the profit incentive that started when 
Peter Mrnuit, of the Dutch West India Compa- 
ny, bought Manhattan from the Indians for $24. 
It was a real steal but only later did it come out 
that these particular Indians were not from 
Manhattan. For a city that changes its face 
every few decades, history is constantly re-lived 
in New York. 


in 


By Souren Melflrfan 


T CE METROPOLITAN Museum of 
Art in New Yak is one erf the most 
heavily attended museums in the 
world. On any given day, there is a 
dense crowd respectfully gazing at Rembrandt’s. 
“Aristotle contemplating the Bust of Homer" or 
wandering about its superb collection of French 
Impressionists. But few set eyes on the master- 
piece in New York of the Roma n Imperial 
period — the flat, curving silver handle to a 
large 1 dish, now lost It is so small, at 3615 
centimeters (14.2 indies), that one just passes 
. - -y by, without taking it in. 

w * Moreover, tire details that make tip its beauty 

" are nonotc. The handle is, m effect, a miniature 

scene in bas-relief. Indeed, it gives sane idea of 
what 2d-oentury book pain ting must have 
*1 .looked like in whichever part of the world itwas 

. Jjpecuted •••/ 

Although the handle is labeled “Roman," It is 
' " jji? likely to have been produced farthff East than 

Italy or Romanized Greece. The hunting seme 
.. .. displays a fed for symmetry that is mac East- 

cm than Western. A tree rising at the center 
separates a hunter, spear in hand, on his rearing 
^ vr ■ beree ai right, from another hunter at left.His 

' . \4 bust emerges behind a scalloped line of stylized 

rocks, a convention mow suggestive of Iran than 
,-t. ? • . Rome. An antelope in the foreground might 

once have been running in the deserts of Arabia 
a Central Aria, but hardly in the Italian epunr 

Details of equipment rioint to tire Middle 
... i."’*? East again, particularly the rectangular saddle 
■ 1 ' . J doth. So does the gilding technique. And while 

v’ the tunic is Greek.' the sot leather boots taper- 
^ ing to a point are in the fashion favored by the 
VM* 4 Iranian nq mari$ inefading Scythians. As the eye 

keeps traveling over the details, some of than. 
- ' bandy perceptible, such as' the flowers incised 
J , /? and drilled in the foreground, it marvels at the 

l * er * A ^ subtlety and wonders about the historical rid* 

^ die. Parthian Iran? Hellenistic Crimea? Proba- 

Wy former. . .... 

Bycotnddenoe, the Metropolitan Museum of 
. . Art acquired -another handle of the. same type 


- „ y# 
- & 


. i^A.* v 




from an Iranian dealer in 1954 and also called it 
‘Roman," While the 1954 piece is more Helle- 
nistic in appearance, there, too, details betray 
the Eastern interpretation. 

Unless the visitor is alerted to such objects, it 
i$ easy to miss them, tike most silver from the 
Ancient Wodd. Even in the museum’s beautiful 
display erf so-called “Greek and Roman silver," 
completed this year, they tend to disappear in 
the general glitter. Fortunately, the Metropoli- 
tan supplies the indispensable tool that poorer 
institutions cannot afford, a richly iQnstraied 
booklet by the chairman of the department, the 
eminent Hellenist, Dietrich von Bothmer. 

For $4.75, the newcomer can train bis eye to 
observe detail Only then should he set out to 
admire the balance of the Cycladic bowls of lire 
3dmflleniwmB.CU ponder over tire unique 7th- 
eentiny B.C bowl mm Cyprus with its mixture 
of Assyrian and Egyptian influence, or gaze at 
one of tire most beautiful Hellenistic pieces I 
know, an openwork frame in silver gift en cir- 
cling the plain bronze disc of a minor done in 
the 4th or 3d century B.C. . 

’ Once in arrive, one finds oneself wondering 
about authenticity. A silver gflt phial with Per- 
sian longs precariously perched on eagle heads 
is odd. But doubting is a necessary exercise in 
ait One starts going from one piece to a related 
piece in an effort to try and find out where the 
truth lies, comparing outlines, surface details, 
.balance, pondering over the relation of design to 
shape. In short, one teams to find the key to the 
inner logic of art. 

At that point, the visitor to the Metropolitan 
is in the appropriate frame of mind to leave 
“Greekand Roman" fllver to walk up to the 
first floor, where the display of Near Extern an 
from Iran is one of the most splendid in the 
world. A bronze vase of the 8th or 7th century 
B.C, with animals in bas-relief walking around 
as if on the walls erf sane miniature monument 
of bronze, leaves far behind any object erf that 
period and area, in any museum. The bottom is 
ntisring and yet the perfection of shape drawn in 
a single curve np to the neck is still striking. For 
such a piece. , the- museum deserves repeated 
.visits as- many and as long as for any of its 
Dntch.Mksters. 



By Jeff Jams 

Y OU CAN judge a land by what ii 
does to flour France makes it into 
ot)issani&. Italy into pasta. New 
York makes it into bagels, crusty 
and dense life-preservers of dough so heavy 
they would sink in liquid lead. Like New 
York, they are an acquired taste. And like 
New York, they are a daunting experience. 

The best bagel is a fresh bagel which can 
be bought from bakeries specializing in 
nothing bat bagris all over the city. 

Trendier bagdries offer sesame, onion, mi- 
sin, rye or pumpernickel varieties, but stick 
to plain. 

The hard part is figuring out the bagri’s 
age by any means short of carbon dating. 
Even fresh from the oven, they are never 
soft. The oily way to know whether a bagel 
is badly made or aged is if it is diy made. 

Which brings us to the Cm lesson in ba- 
gd-eating: Cut it in hall Hold the bagel in 


one hand and a knife In the other; stab at 
the edge of the bagel until you penetrate, 
then push until you see the blade in the cen- 
ter and start sawing. 

You can toast tire bagel — very lightly, 
not even enough for it to turn color, only 
enough to warm iL It is said that some peo- 
ple butter bagels; they must be outsiders. 
Kids, being Irids, like peanut butler on their 
bagels. But the bagel was bom fa cream 
cheese, an odd American dairy product that 
resembles nothing but could be described as 
brie with no character or butter from albino 

COWS. 

Fa a festival of odors, try Iox (a simple 
name fa smoked salmon) and onions atop 
the creamed cheese. Or uy something very 
New York: whitefUh salad. 

Filially, cat. Your jaws will get as much 
exercise eating (he bagel as your biceps did 
cutting it, A good bagel is thick and chewy 
and it rests in your stomach like premixed 
cement It is not a subtle or sublime plea- 
sure; nothing about New York is. Bui it is a 
pleasure indeed. 


American Food Is In 

'Cooking, the most conservative of ifae arts, is 
the last to become totally American.’ 


MiLcipufitHi kfcwwn of Art, togaa Fund, 1O0& 

Silver handle of a Roman dish, second century A.D. 

Bagels: Stick to the Plain 


By Irene Sax 

I ADORE American food." said a French 
banker with a reputation for knowing his 
way around New York. “There's Luiece. 
There's Le Cygne. And, of course, there's 
Chinatown." Until recently, European visitors 
to New Yak thought they had to go to expen- 
sive French restaurants or tacky ethnic cafes if 
they wanted to eat well. 

But fa the past year, New Yorkers have been 
having a love affair with their own American 
cuisine. In New York, it is now "in" to be 
American, and several of the city’s most popular 
restaurants are those that serve American food. 

But what is American food? asked a puzzled 
visitor. The late James Beard, widely considered 
the father of the New American Cooking, said 
that American food was “what our mother 
cooked at home." According to Barbara Kafka, 
restaurant consultant and longtime associate of 
Beard, “Jim meant that literally. American 
cooking was what you ate at home. When you 
went Out, you ate French, Italian or Chinese 
food. Except in New Orleans, which thinks of 
itself as French, there was no distinct American 
restaurant cuisine.” 

But that has changed in the past few years, 
and there is now an American haute cuisine. It 
has something to do with die availability erf 
quality produce — Wisconsin wild mushrooms, 
Florida Keys limes and Peconic Bay scallops — 
and the improvement in American wines. It has 
more, probably, to do with the new chauvinism, 
the patriotism that the world saw at the 1984 
Olympics. And it is. according to Miss Kafka, 
simply an idea whose time has come. 

“Once we thought we could buy European 
culture," she said. “During the past 50 years, we 
developed our own painting, literature, dance. 
Cooking, the most conservative of the arts, is the 
Iasi to become totally American." 

Most experts say there is no “totally Ameri- 
can” style, but a collection of regional cuisines 


created by immigrants with different culinary 
traditions. The new chefs have reconciled these 
different regional cuisines and combined them 
with classic techniques and the best native pro- 
duce to create the New American Cooking, 

Here are four new restaurants and two older 
ones where you will eat very well Amen can- 
style. 

• Huberts is spare and serious. Nothing in lie 
drab environment prepares you for the creativ- 
ity of chef-owner Lem Allison's cooking. He 
started 10 years ago in Brooklyn with reinter- 
pretations of .American classics. Now Mr. Alli- 
son is in Lower Manhattan, and his cooking has 
become more ethnic, more daring: raw Hawai- 
ian tuna with a ginger marinade. Long Island 
duck sausage with red cabbage, pirogue stuffed 
with shellfish in a watercress sauce. For the past 

few years every risk Mr. Allison has taken, every 
idea he has tried, has worked. (102 East 22nd 
Street, (212) 673-371 1, $45 prix fixe). 

• When An American Place's chef-owner, 
■Lany Forgione. trained at The Connaught in 
London, his fellow students made fun of Ameri- 
can food Now. many Europeans come to his 
tiny elegant restaurant and Mr. Forgone is 
conceded to be one of the best chefs in the city. 
His menu suns with native ingredients —fresh 
wild mallard duck from Long Island, Wilippa 
Bay knife-and-fork oysters (named fa their 
size) — combined in classic preparations. The 
wine list is all American, mainly California, with 
some vintages from the ’50s.* (969 Lexington 
Avenue, (212) 517-7600, S57 prix fixe.) 

• To New Yorkers, Jams looks like Califor- 
nia, with its open grill and red tile floor, buL to 
its owner, Melvin Waxman, it -is “the best of 
America,” serving seasonal, regional foods with 
an emphasis on grilling. The strength of the 
restaurant is in the grilled dishes such as sword- 
fish in a sauce of shallots and orange, or chicken 
thighs stuffed with American blue cheese served 
on southed wild greens. The cooking here is 
ample but innovative, and the clientele is very 

(Continued on Page 14) 




Tn - •'V. 


r# i * i 7 1 jTn 





k * ■flm] 

■ | ? [Si] u 

“■ I 

Ti 


»* 1 fi , < <*■! 





REAL ESTATE 




Mt 


$ . # 


ffc 




s 




.# 

M 














w* 


+'!* *' v, M ' ■ 





-£.>-— ■*,.«- Vt •*?: 



Ste: 




Wf 


Consider the many financial 
advantages of owning occupied 
apartments in New York's 
finest luxury buildings: 



Potential capital appreciation 

-typical of prime Manhattan 
real estate. . 




Low down payments 

and attractive terms. Favorable 
long-term institutional financing 
available up to 80 % of purchase price 


Discounts of up to 50% 

off prices of comparable 
vacant units in the same buildings. 


3 


Rental income 

every month from the tenants 
already in place. 


5 


important tax benefits 

may accrue to the overseas 
buyer. 


A sampling of Ahrens Barren’s current offerings are shown below. 
For additional information, write or call today. 


Management services available 

from a professional and 
experienced staff. 








N 


Hr*' 





K'. 

ft 


ms 


ms 



ii 

. M g * ** “ 






i. 




jmmr**.- 


Cryder Point 

162-01 Powells Cove Boulevard, 
Beechhurst, Queens 
(718)746-4661 

Occupied co-op apartments 
from s 48,813. 


Gramercy House 

235 East 22nd Street, 

New York, NY • (212) 689-4950 
Occupied co-op apartments 
from *56,881. 


Parc Vfendome 

344 West 57th Street, 
New York, NY • (212) 247-7970 
Occupied 

condominium apartments 
from *81,312. 


444 East 57th Street, 

New York. NY • (212) 247-7970 
Occupied 

condominium apartments 
. from *221^50. 





i/ 








A 








x 

.. ... 


*•• 


The Vermeer 

77 Seventh Avenue, 

New York, NY • (212) 689-4950 
Occupied co-op apartments 
from *72,902. 


The John Adam 

101 West 12th Street, 

New York, NY • (212) 689-4950 
Occupied co-op apartments 
from *70,835. 


The Colonnade 

220 East 60th Street, 
New York, NY • (212) 247-7970 
Occupied 

condominium apartments 
from *87,802. 


Glen Oaks Village 

70-39 260th Street, 

Glen Oaks, NY • (718) 343-2727 
Occupied co-op apartments 
from *36£34. 


Ottering by prospectus only. Purchasers will assume all the obligations ot a landlord, 
These expenses are not included in maintenance charges. The costs of owning 
the apartment may exceed the rent. Tenants may have the right 
to remain jn occupancy indefinitely. Brought 

to you by: 


AHRENS BARREU. 

405 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10Q2 2 * (212) 285-2020 
A division of Hanover Companies Incorporated. “ — " 





■ < 1*2 


s <• 


uriet v It 











*4 ‘ 



INTERNATIONAL'HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 


-'IT t 



.N BROADWAY, the trouble naturally 
"I ve&nz with money. Production costs 
nave skyrocketed and ticket prices 
have become astronomic. As a result, 
products are increasm^y timid about what 
they choose to bring to Broadway and theater- 
goere want to be sore of value for their $45; 

Before coming to Broadway, a stow is tried 
and tested in one of several places, ayb as 
London, an American regional thqit^ OT Off 
Broadway, or it must have a built-in boor office 
insurance, as provided by a star, director 
or playwright. 

Musicals have to be more spectacnlar, plays 
have to be more dramatic and revivals have to 
be all-star: New plays by America’s most talent- 
ed young writers, such as Lanford Wilson, Da- 
vid Rabe and David Mamet, have to prove their 
popularity as well as .their merit before they 
arrive on Broadway. '•■••• 

Valuable work still does appear in the nr **" 
marketplace, but in most cases only after long 
nurturing. Among the best of last Au- 

gust Wilson’s ^Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” be- 
gan at the Yale Repertory Theater in New 
Haven, Connecticut, William Hoffman's “As 
Is** at the Circle Repertory Company and the 
musical “Big River” at the American Repertory 
Theater in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

At the mome nt, most of the interesting pros' 
peels for Broadway are revivals: Rosemary Har- 
ris in “Hay Fever," Jeanne Moreau in “The 
Night of the Iguana," Jack Lemmon in “Long 
Days Journey Into Night” (Jason Robards’s 
return in “The Ic eman . Cometh” has already 
settled into what looks like a long run). 

Years ago, playwrights had to make then 
reputations on Broadway. Now, careers can be 
made and sustained away from Broadway. 

Sam Shepard is the outs tanding « ramp?«» M«» 
is one of America's most original and prolific 
playwrights, yet his work has never been pro- 
duced on Broadway. There is always at least one 
of his plays, new or old, on in New York; 



Page 13 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON NEW YORK 


East Village Art Grows Up 


By Jeffrey Deitch 


*A Chonis line,** above, and Jason Robards in ‘The Iceman Cometh,” below. 


‘A 

y- 

co- 

and 


2 . there are _ 

; Mind," about to open Off 
Undo' the anther's dirw i n n. the 
stars Geraldine Page, Amanda 
Harvey KeiteL •. 

The fact is that theatergoing in New York 
suffers from a fragmented personality. There 
axe those people who continue to go to Broad- 
way, but only to see the few major hits. Other 
theatergoer* who attend with a greater frequen- 
cy line up at the Times Square ticket center to 
purchase half-price seats on the day of perfor- 
mance. 

-! Then there are those. who regularly go Off 
Broadway or Off Off Broadway. Even as Broad- 
way's bister has dimmed, subscriptions axe in- 
creasing at New York’s institutional theaters. 
New York's pre-ennnent theatrical organization 
is the New York Shakespeare Festival, created 
and directed by Joseph Pfepp. At the Off Broad- 
way Public Theater, Mr. Papp presents new 
plays and, sometimes, new playwrights. 

“A Chorus Line" began its journey into per- 
petuity in a series of workshops at the Public, 
and since then, in tins theater and elsewhere, 
people hare been trying to emulate that route to 
success. Where once a musical would be tried 
out in. Boston or New Haven, now it is work- 
shopped in New York. This year’s Shakespeare 
Festival entry in the “Chorus Line" sweepstakes 
is a musical version of Charles Dickens's unfin- 
ished “Myste^ of Edwin Drood,” which has 
already tested its wings at the festival's ™"n* 
theater in. Central Park. 

One great question mark in New York theater 
is TWrfn Colter, the tome of the city's moor 
opera and dance companies as well as the New 


York Philharmonic, but only periodically a 
place fra: theater. Gregory Mosher, former arris' 
tic director of the Goodman Theater La Chicago 
and now at the Lincoln Center, has promised an 
op enin g season in the small Mhzi Newhonse 
theater. 

Attentive theatergoers subscribe to such Off 
Broadway theaters as the Circle Repertory 
Company, the home of Lanford Wilson (he 
begins the Circle season with “Talley & Son,** a 
revised play in his series about the Talley fam- 
ily). Playwrights Horizon stresses the comedic 
Upcoming at Playwrights Horizon are new 
plays bv A.R. Gurney Jr., Wendy Wassersteiu 
and Ted Tally. 

An eclectic diet awaits one at the Manhattan 
Theater Club, a company whose past successes 
include Beth Henley’s “Crimes of the Heart” 
and the musical “Ain’t Misbehavin’.” The WPA 
focuses on new American plays and, occasional- 
ly, miaqik 

New plays are also presented at the Ensemble 
Studio Theater, featuring an annual spring mar- 
athon festival of one-act works. Among the 
prize graduates is Christopher Dnrang’s “Sister 
Mary Ignatius Explains It AS for You.” Should 
a play be overlooked, the enterprising Second 
Stage lives up to its name and gives work anoth- 
er life. Charles Lodlam is the inspiration behind 
the Ridiculous Theatrical Company, lampoon- 
ing the cultural heritage in a cycle of send-ups 
that included the recent, delirious “Irma Vep." 
The City Stage Company mid (he Roundabout 
do elastics, the first specializing in weighty epics 
such as Ibsen’s “Brand,” the second in popular 
plays from the recent past, occasionally with 
name actors. 


Variety Is the Keynote of the Opera Scene 


By Tim Page 



PERA, in all its guises, thrives in Man- 
hattan. One may opt for stars arid 
spectacle at the Metropolitan Opera, 
where, in addition to the visible cast, 
choristers, orchestra members and conductor, 
nearly 100 carpenters, electricians and li ghtin g 
experts will be busy backstage, preparing for the 
rise of the gplden curtain. ... 

Or. only a mile or two away, it is possible to 
experience the first production of a worthy, 
aspiring troupe. The sets may be cardboard, the 
orchestra replaced by a piano and the voices 
culled from the local music schools, tot the 
smaller companies offer the opportunity to hear 
some unusual material: a forgotten and beauti- 
ful opera by Johann Christian Bach, an early 
work by Verdi or a modem work % a local 
composer, productions that a larger troupe 
would be unlikely to Stage- 

Financial considerations will have something 
to do with the selection erf an opera. A ticket to 
the Met may cost as much as $75, while top price 
at the smaller houses is usually SLOor S IS. . 

Still, there is a happy compromise for those 
who want to ririt the Met, but chafe auhe price: 
The company puts standing room on saleat 10 
each Saturday morning for all performances 
through the following Friday night Standing 
room in. the orchestra will cost $8, and only $5 in 
the family cirde. 

There is a limit of one ticket a person per 
performance, so if you want to bringafriend, he 
or she will have to stand in Ene with you, and all 
tickets to very popular productions, such as the 
recent “Tosca” with Luciano Pavarotti and 
Montserrat CabaHi. are gone one tour after 


they go on sale. 


i ether you sit m the dress circle or up in the 
rafters, the Metropolitan should be visite d. It 
has probably the best orchestra in New York, 


thesingmg is still, for the most part, the finest in 
the city and many of the productions are stun- 
ning. Still, some complain that the Metropolitan 
no longer attracts the most important singers. 
For example, Mr. Pavarotti’s performances 
have grow increasingly rare (“I sang a great 
deal in America for many years.” he said recent- 
ly. “Europe used to compUm”) Other stellar 
vocalists such as Joan Sutherland, Marilyn 
Horne and the great F innish baritone Jonna 
Hynnmen, make all too infrequent appearances 
• on the. Metropolitan’s stage. - . 

' - Ttf a large degree, this is because the Metro- 
politan casts its performances several years in 
advance: “We have to be more inflexible than 
other houses because we produce so many op- 
eras night after night,” James Levine, the Met’s 
music director, chief conductor and, as of 1986, 
artistic director, said in n recent interview. 

“There are two other philosophies we could 
work with. Some companies do shorter seasons 
so that each opera is an isolated event That 
saves the problem of having to have two casts. 
Still other companies intersperse ballets be- 
tween opera nights, so that there is not the same 
pressure." 

The New York City Opera should be another 
important stop for any serious operaphile. Now 
under the direction of Beverly Sills, the Gty 
Opera is an established institution that has 
dared to be creative in its programming casting 
and staging. In 19M.it presented the first New 
York performance of PhiBp Glass’s opera 
“Ajrhnalen," and it was the first opera bouse to 
stage Stephen Sondheim’s gruesome master- 
piece. “Sweeney Todd.” 

Many important singers, such as Haddo Do- 
mingo, Sherrill MDnes, Carol Vaness and Miss 
Sills, began their careers at the City Opera and 
the productions, while less grand than those at 
the Met, are not necessarily less creative. 

Right now, the City Opera Is going through 
the most difficult crisis in its 40-year history. A 


warehouse fire SepL 2 in Passaic, New Jersey, 
destroyed millions of dollars worth of costumes: 
only those in use this season survived. A fund- 
raising campaign has been established, and it is 
to be hoped that the company will soon regain 
its balance. 

The most creative of the smaller troupes is the 
Bel Canto Opera, which does three or four 
productions a year in a local high schooL 

Past successes have included Jo hann Chris- 
tian Bach's “Temistode," Franz Leh&r’s “Gin- 
dina,” and Rutland Boughtoo’s “The Imm ortal 
Hour.” Their productions are accompanied by 
small orchestras, and thesingmg is usually sltill- 
fuL 

Too many of the smaller opera groups con- 
centrate on familiar materiaL Still if the work 
bong performed appeals, it might be worth a 
visitor’s while to investigate performances by 
the Opera Ensemble of New York, After Dinner 
Opera, Opera Stage, the Chamber Opera The- 
ater of Manhattan, At the Vineyard and the 
Amato Opera. .For zarzuela, a distinctive form 
of la tin operetta, check out Repertorio EspanoL 

Golden Fleece, Limited: the Composer's 
Chamber Theater offers a special service: In the 
past decade, it has put on more than 150 works, 
many of them New York premieres, by living 
composers. 

Gilbert and Sullivan aficionados will be glad 
to know that three companies regularly perform 
the Savoy operas. The Village Light Opera 
Group’s approach is rather too cute for some 
tastes, while Light Opera of Manhattan has 
recently undergone drastic changes brought 
about by the expiration of its lease and the death 
of its founder. But the New York Gilbert and 
Sullivan Flayers are in good health, producing 
two or three works a year, sometimes featuring 
the splendid comedian John Reed, late of the 
lamented D’Oyly Carte Opera Company in 
London. 


v] 



Imagine ... 


A European Oasis of 500 
newly . decorated rooms. 
Charming dining, meeting 
and banquet . facilities. 
Spectacular room service. 
Visit the only hotel in New 
York nestled next to a serene 
private park and see for 
yourself why so many prom- 
inent travelers consider the 
unique Gramercy Park Hotel 
“their home away from home.” 


Singles $85-95 • Doubles $90-100 
Suites $115-175 

Group rates available. 

Call Gen. Mgr. Mr. Tom. O'Brien 
Major credit cards accepted 
attractive monthly ratesuvailable 


Gramercy Park Hotel 

2lst St. and Lex. Ave., NYC 10010 
[212) GR5-4320 

Tfelex: 668-755 CriUes GRAMPARK 


HOW TO OPEN 
AN OFFICE 
NEW YORK 


EITHER: 

1. Trudge from buMcflng to twritfing 

kwfOng «t raw space 

2. VtkmMinwnorarcMtoctdware- 

lor and corttacKx. 

X Spend touts pouring owrfaml- 
aire catalogue#, cvpff samples, 
tabrtc swatches and paint ctHps. 

4. Determine materials, toor plans, 
Sgntmg fixtures, location ol etee- 
titcal owlets, placement of 
equipment etc 

& Listen to repreaaniBilifes of wont 
processing wjuipmart. compu- 
ters, tscsUWle maertnea. copters, 
and Maconunwiicatlona systems: 

-X Tiy noi to low your patience 
when the furniture arrives before 
the carpet « t#d, the carpel 
amves m the wrong color and me 
otBctrtdana oont arrtve M n» 

7. Piece ads for new employees. 

X lnianflev* ah endhtsa parade of 

candidates. 

X Develop payroll accounting, bil- 
ling and operations procedures 
for your new satfl and train them 
ftyoursyswn* 

id. Do an of tie above wnfle ttfli run- 
ring your business. 


OR: 


•L Co* Headcparters Compaiues. 

2. Move into sliMy equipped, stun- 
ningly otatgned and protessiorr 
ally started office tomorrow. 


HQ Centers offer you a headache-free way of establishing an 
office. Whether you're a one-man business or a group. 

Because when you lease space with us it comes complete 
Wim a tull support staff supervised by a professional manage- 
ment team. 

And that's not alt. HQ space also includes conference rooms, 
audiovisual equipment telephone answering, word processing, 
photocopying, telex, facsimile even 800 # Services. 

So call and arrange an appointment to see your new Office. 

(212) 949-0722 

Or cut out thte ad and aand awilh your budnew CM w 

Park Awnue Atman 
237 Park Avenue 
ZMRoor 

NtwYcrk, NY 10017 




H AS THE FUN gone from the East Village? 
The unexpected closing of the Fun Gallery, 
the first and most celebrated of the East 
Village's 40 or mere vanguard art galleries, 
has caused considerable comment. 

Faced with on increased rent of $3,000 a month for 
its collapsing, unheated 10th Street storefront, the 
four-year-old gallery did not reopen this fall. 

“The an galleries here are moving toward a more 
standard presentation, and that just doesn't interest 
me,” said Patti Astor, the Fun Gallery’s co-director, in 
explaining her decision to dose. 

The Fun Gallery was aptly named. Its presentation 
of the newest art was anything but standard, and the 
gallery’s openings were unlike anything seen before. 
Teen-age graffiti writers or radio-bearing youths from 
the nearby housing projects rocked to the beat of the 
latest rap music along with Park Avenue matrons and 
an world celebrities. 

In attracting a racially integrated constituency and 
forging a style that merged the language of the' New 
York streets, the television culture erf the suburbs and 
heritage of abstract expressionism, the Fun Gallery 
created something fresh. 

Things are changing in the East Village as the 
extraordinary publicity that the an scene receives 
drives up property values and attracts more and more 
new galleries to compete for artists and collectors. 
Exhibition spaces that started as casual open studios 
are haring to learn to become professional galleries in 
order to keep their operations going. Some of the 
original East Village an promoters, such as Grade 
Mansion, have made the transition with remarkable 
assurance. 

Miss Mansion, who more than anyone else personi- 
fies the spirit of the East Village, started out as more of 
a party hostess than an entrepreneur. Now she runs an 
operation that rivals any of the large SoHo galleries in 
its professionalism. 


“It’s no longer amateur hour," commented Herbert 
Schorr, an IBM executive who, with his wife, Lenore. 
is one of the most astute collectors of the new art. 

Many East Village artists lament the increasingly 
commercial orientation of the more ambitious galler- 
ies, but the interesting result of this new professional- 
ism is that successful artists are continuing to show in 
the East Village rather than trying to “graduate" to 
SoHo or 57th Street Rodney Alan GreenblaL a Gra- 
de Mansion artist who has received acclaim for his 
deceptively naive painted sculpture, is one of several 
East Village artists who have turned down lucrative 
offers to show with established 57th Street galleries. 

“The East Village gets an amazing amount of atten- 
tion," he said, “and there’s an energy that sweeps you 
up. For a young artist, it’s the center of the universe.” 

Plenty of the original East Village spirit' has re- 
mained as Miss Mansion has professionalized her 
gallety. The fake zebra-skin floor and the oddly angled 
peach and turquoise walls of her office preserve the 
funky '60$ revival flavor that partially characterized 
the gallery’s direction. 

The changes in the East Village are not only eco- 
nomic, however, they are aesthetic as well. A slightly 
younger generation of dealers, such as Pat Hearn and 
Massimo Audiello, has established a new style that is 
far removed from the funky eclecticism of Miss Man- 
sion. There is nothing at all bohemian about Miss 
Hearn's ambitious new East Village gallery. The exhi- 
bition space that she has just finished renovating on 
9th Street near Avenue D is as pristine and elegant as 
anything in SoHo. 

The East Village is clearly in a new phase. It has 
moved well beyond the phenomenon of an amusing 
art playground that one would visit just to enjoy the 
atmosphere. It is now one of the most important 
places in the world for serious viewing of the best new 
art. Things are not becoming too serious, however. 
The young an dealers may be dressing better and 
keeping more regular hours, but they are still haring 
fun. 


Swope 


a 


a 



Madison Awanu* 
«t76tfi Street 
New Ybrfc 10021 
Cable The Carlyle NewYorit 
International Telex 6206B2 
Telephone 20-744-1*00 

A member of Lhe Sharp Grasp 
since 1967 


P 


□ 


PEARCE URSTADT 
MAYER & GREER 

Exclusive NYC. 
Luxury Rentals 

By appointment, 
contact Irim Berman 
(212) 988-0100 
135 E. 65th St., N.Y., N.Y. 10021 


FIRST ON FIFTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK'S ST. REGIS 


America's first hotel in the grand European 
tradition. New Yorks first luxury hotel on Fifth 
Avenue. First in convenience at the fashionable 
comer of 55th Street First in elegantly 
appointed guestrooms and suites. First in 
magnificent public spaces. Even the first in the 
world to mix a Bloody Mary. And, of course, first 
in service. All the reasons why the St. Regis has 
been the international traveler's first choice 
since 1904. Make it yours next trip to New York. 


COME TO SHERATON 

Hi r Pan Am Wjridftss' Rkhes. 

Scot. \b io ; COO "-aw pe* rvgni 01 ptyic'W'g 
Sr'eroiiK.rtO'efc mns Oetonj woiiC«nae 
‘Macaw onS £ ' and le&Jat rotes c**t 

Peservatrcos Can your nave) consulwni. 
*-3\a nearest stietclan Observations entice 
v ihe Si Peg* Sneiatc r. Cirecity cf 
ni''753 4500 Telex U£-3O0 


St. Regis Sheraton Hotel 

Sheraton Hotels. Inns & Resorts Worldwide 
The hospitality people of rrr 

FIFTH AVENUE & 55TH ST„ NEW YORK, NY 10022 USA 



Five succinct reasons 
why theW&ldorf =Astoria 
is Newark's 
finest luxury hotel 


Comfort. 

The kind of comfort that comes from 
investing S 11 0 mtDton in our hotel over three 
years, including our Park Avenue lobby, all 
public and private function rooms, our restau- 
rants, and our new, luxury guest rooms 

Entertainment 

The choice of entertainment you get 
from three of New York’s finest restaurants, 
offering fwittr cuisine and live grand peno music 
nighdv at Peacock Alley, hearty steaks and 
fresh seafood at Ae Bull & Bear, or gourmet 
Japanese fere at Inagiku, Sir Harry’s unique 
safari lounge, the Terrace Lounge, die popular 
Oscar's restaurant, and more. 

InnovatiorL 

The kind of innovation regarding our 
guests' unique needs that makes us the only 
hotel in the worid which hosts a nation's 
embassy, and enables us to offer privacy and 


security to visiting heads of state, as well as 
helping each of our daily guests who need the 
impossible done immediately. 


Elegance 


The unparalleled elegance of a priceless 
collection of Art Deco measures which adorns 
our hotd. And the Waldorf Towers, which has 
been the celebrated residence of a former 
president of the United States, the leaders of 
our corporate industry, a great national hero, 
and these most prominent in society and 
international diplomacy. 


Value. 



The value that comes from staying in 
New York's finest hotd, but not New York’s 
most expensive hotel. You can spend more, but 
you can't art more. 

When business or pleasure brings you to 
New York, stay at New York's finest luxury 
hotel 




Without theWaldori; it isnt Newfak 


Park Avenue at 50th Street. New York City 1 0022 -(212) 355-3000 

Or all your local Hilton Reservation Service 
A Hill an Hotel 


Telex: 66674 / 








Pa 

r 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1985 


- A SPECIAL REPORT ON NEW YORK 


Won len and Children Last 


» • 


By Linda Blandford 


nt 

HU 


T HE NEWS OF the sighting of the Ti- 
tanic has had an enormous impact on 
Not Yorkers. In part, ibis is a rare 
occasion on which the theory of pro- 
gress stiD stands up to examination. 
advance, man's curiosity and endeavor, grit and 
determination: How thrilling all that is to the 
man on the creaking and nckety M104 bus, 
jumping and jolting over the potholes of Broad- 
way, longing to bdieve that all Manhattan 's 
restless energy might have a purpose to it, be- 
yond, that is, the mere acquisition of leather 
luggage and whatever Lauren, Armani or Blass 
should correctly be packed within it 
New York, New York: The city where most 
men would rather own Mark Cross than be 
Mark Twain. 

There is, though, another fascination to the 
story of the Titanic. Watch the eyes of those 
reading yet another account of those terrifying 
hours in the columns of the morning paper. 
Time and again the guilty eyes shift and then are 
drawn back. It is all that stuff about the survi- 
vors in the lifeboats that mesmerizes: 70S, was 
it? Mainly women and children? And there is 


the rub. What valiant heroes once walked here? 

Imagine the notion of the men of yore, aristo- 
crats from the men's clubs of Manhattan, the 
rich and privileged, standing on the decks, wav- 
ing a last, brave farewell to those weaker souls 
disappearing into the black, treacherous night. 
And as the men on the M4 up Fifth Avenue mull 
over this distressing thought, their eyes drift, all 
unseeing, over the crippled, aging mass standing 
in huddles before them, clutching bags, strollers, 
babies. The idea comes back again and again: 
What chump would sacrifice himself for women 
and children first? 

On the early morning bus up Madison, crawl- 
ing toward the gilded square of private schools, 
tucked into the early East Nineties, the school- 
boys and girls chatter in a crowd. There is a 
great bustle of confident voices, tartan-checked 
uniforms, tweed jackets. High Sierra junior 
backpacks, navy gymslips, lace-up Oxfords, 
button-down haircuts, heavy metal orthodon- 
tics. 

And in the dense silence between them stand 
the office cleaners, coming home after long 
nights, riding way up higher into El Barrio and 
Harlem. Legs and ankles are swollen, faces 
heavy with fatigue: bad backs, poor circulation. 


high blood pressure — the legacy of work and 

struggle. 

What do they leach these princes in their 
58,000-a-year schools that so few stand to offer 
their seat? There is, all too often, a sense that in 
this huge, hard and uncaring city, many take its 
island image literally. Each man, each family , 
each school, each network: each its own island. 
Let not thoughts of be who shops Weber Close- 
Out Stores sully my Saks Fifth Avenue charge 
card soul. ("Welcome gifts for our scholarship 
fund auction," reads a letter from one private 
school "indude get-away vacations, limousine 
crips, video tape recorders . . . ") 

They who talk of Park Avenue, its wood- 
paneled libraries, crackling fireplaces, antique 
rugs with the family Labrador upon them, thick- 
ly swathed curtains and center-island kitchens, 
have not looked beyond to the other Park Ave- 
nue. A street or so away, just past 97th Street, 
where the subway runs into the open, that other 
Park Avenue starts: broken windows, seed)' 
buildings, menace, dirt, shabbiness, anger and 
sadness. Who do we mean, then, when we talk of 
New Yorkers? 

On those mean days, loo hot, too cold, full of 
jabbing voices, bony elbows, waiters slopping 


coffee, surly drivers hooting not in a flare of 

Lemper but in slow-burning spite — on those 
awful New York days, it is a cruel place to be. 
Shut into buildings, venturing into the openair 
only to cough, splutter and threaten, quand- 
some, twitchy, 'driven, rushing around fiercely 
for the sake of movement itself — what' an 
unattractive picture of ourselves we New York- 
ers present to outsiders. 

It is as if we wish to make true everything they 
say about us on the Coast (the other coast — and 
is there anything in between?) And that, of 
course: is pan of us, too. Is there such a thing as 
a smug New Yorker, suburban-leaf -bonfire-in- 
the- backyard smug? Probably not. Too many 
dreams, too many broken lives, too many other 
realities here, for Oat. In New York, it is hard 
not to know. 

But catch the city unawares one morning, in 
the crisp, first snow, say, shovels clanging on the 
sidewalk in the early dawn, or after a heavy 
thunderstorm when the dazzling sunshine re- 
minds us that this is, after all, a seaport. The 
winds blow up from the East or Hudson rivers, 
the sea gulls rall t all is well again. And in the 
first moments after the calm. New Yorkers 
creep out of doorways and apartment buddings 




.It *' 1 


sniff ing the air. With gladness and t hank f ul n es s 
in their hearts, they are drawn together in a 

I r - ■ - , " T. . 1 L «4 I,. wrflf f H in 


bond, in gi ving and spirit albeit expressed in 
if Manhattan way: “Sohowyadom?” 


that gruff ; 


There is a bean to New York, a huge, loving, 

return 


brawling and fierce one. It is not by chance that 
there is also an extraordinary geographical heart 
to tins overbuilt concrete’ island — the vast 
green reaches of Central Park, where the red- 
billed glebe spotters tell of hawks spiraling, of. 
lringfish er$ and mines darting into l&zy pools 
hidden beneath rich, overhanging willows. 

Here on a damp, hot summer’s day, the cheer- 
ing softball fans swill beer and layer mustard 
pickles onto their hot dogs, wonde ri ng if the 
Alpha Delis will blister Eton's Demons, as the 
salsa sways on. Around the baseball diamonds. 


there is all the paraphernalia of a. thousand 
backyards: barbecues, tables, grandfathers 
s le e ping babies crawling, children lau g hin g . 
Glimpses of Central Paxt on summer Sunday 
afternoons, when the dancers join into chains 
and chxks beneath the stable of a long-dead 
Polish king, while Greek music splutters cm a 
big black recorder; on frosty New Year room- 
ings, when boys scamper up and down snow- 
drift Hills with their tbbbggetus, while riders 
earnestly set orn around the frozen lake; late at 
night, as runners salute one another knowingly 
along (he still and deadly paths. 




All the myriad images of New Yorkers are 
true: hard and gentle, noisy and inward, full of 
contradictioiis and tantrums. And. always, al- 
ways fall of life and energy. 


Hotels: The Best Surprises of AU 


By Amy Virshup 


vice. Every inch of it is luxurious, from pale lilac 

line 34 suit 


W - HEN IN New York, you can stay 
at one of the enormous outposts of 
an international chain, and, as one 
of them promises in its ads, you will 
get "no surprises." But for those who do not 
require conference rooms or other business fa- 
cilities. there are some interesting alternatives. 
Here are four of New York's smaller hotels, 1 
ranging from just four uni is to 160. 

• Morgans, at 237 Madison Avenue bitween 
37th and 38th Streets, owned by Steve RubeJI 
and Ian Schrager of Studio 54 fame, is probably 
New York's hippest place to stay. The partners 
spent 14 months redoing the former Executive 
Hotel and they have made it as unhotel-like as 
possible. 

In the 154 rooms, which include 22 suites, six 
"loft" suites and one three-bedroom penthouse 
suite, there are low queen-size beds topped with 
duvet covers in men's shin fabrics; the head- 
boards are covered in the same materials and 
the chairs wear gray flann el suits. The rooms 
have been designed to resemble Pullman com- 
partments. Each room has cable television, a 
stereo cassette player and two phones, one in the 
bathroom. Room service is catered by Larry 
Forgione. who also runs Morgans restaurant. 
Doubles start at $150, suites at $250. (212) 686- 
0300. Telex: 288908. 

• New York's Plaza Athenee, at 37 East 64th 
Street, has doormen in dark blue uniforms, 
brass buttons and white gloves, and its two-level 
lobby has floors of Portuguese marble, thick 
Irish carpets and murals by a California artist, 
Robert Walker, that resemble the Gobelin tap- 
estry in the original Paris hoteL 
But the New York version, owned by Trusth- 
ouse Forte and opened last year, is a small hotel 
with the emphasis on luxury and personal ser- 


hallways to the 160 rooms, including 34 suites. 

Doable rooms are large, but the suites are 
enormous. The biggest is a duplex with two 
entrances and a dining room that sits eight 
comfortably. 

Doubles start at $220, suites from $500 to 
$1,500. (212) 734-9100. Telex: 6972900. 

• If your idea of the perfecL hotel is no hotel 
at all, then 1022 Lexington Avenue, at 73d 
Street and Lexington Avenue, is for you. 1022 
has only four units, three suites and one studio, 
and nothin g about this buff brownslone identi- 
fies it as a hoteL There is no lobby manager. 
Michael Hopkins will meet you at Jack's, the 
restaurant on the street level of this converted 
1870s townhouse for check-in. 



Shopping: Where Are the Real Kids? 


By Nancy McKeon 


Owned by Edward Safdie, 1022 opened in 
1983 to provide guests with a place to stay that is 
more apartment than hoteL Rooms rent by the 
month; single nights and weekends are available 
if there is a gap between long-term bookings. 
The rooms are decorated by Georgina Fair- 
bolme, who has done them in antiques, pale 
colors and lots of chintz. 


TV - Around-the-Qock 


NEW YORK — With 700 hours of television 
programming a day available on New York’s 
seven channels and cable stations, the odds 
dictate that some of it has to be good. 


But when you watch American TV, it is 


There is maid service seven days a week and a 
jacuzzi in each bathtub. 

The studio rents for $3,800 a month or S175 
daily, the most expensive suite is $6,750 a month 
or $350 daily. (212) 697-1536.) 

• The Wyndham HoteL at 42 West 58th 
Street, owned and managed by John and Su- 
zanne Mados, is “an innkeeper’s hoteL" The 
style is Old World and personal, from the com- 
fortable lobby with amply stuffed couches and 
chairs, to the manual elevators with operators 
who remember your floor. Many of the suites 
are large enough to call home. Many actors and 
actresses in for a Broadway run do just that. 

Doubles start at $95, suites at $140. (212) 753- 
3500). 


schlock you want to see. And there is plenty. 

‘ ‘The A- 


“ Hun ter" and “Hollywood Beat" and. 

Team" are prime examples of vigilante video, 
Hollywood's crude attempt to cash in on Ameri- 
cans’ fear of crime. On NBCs ’Today" morning 
news and chat show, a weatherman named Wil- 
lard is known to dress in drag. At 9 AM. you 
can see "Donahue," a talk show about lesbian 
nuns, transsexual parents and male strippers. 


Through the morning game shows and after- 
noon soap operas, if you are charitable, you will 
do what the Americans do: laugh- Then, at 5 
PM, you get two and a half hours of news. That 
sounds impressive but isn’t; you can read The 
New York Times in half the time and come out 
better informed. 

— JEFF JARVIS 


G O TO MACY’S to see visitors from 
.out of town ooh and aah over the 
wonders of the CeQar. Take a trip to 1 
Bloonungdale’s to watch wealthy 
Brazilians buy up a season’s worth of clothing. 
New Yorkers still shop in Manhat tan depart- 
ment stores, but when it comes to recreational 
shopping, the retailing giants are not where the 
action is. 

Ten years ago, Bloomingdale’s dubbed its 
youthful weekend shoppers Saturday’s Genera- 
tion. Saturday was the day devoted to browsing 
the crowded- aisles at Third Avenue and 59th 
Street. Today, those crowds spend their Satur- 
days. and a lot of the rest of tne week, in three 
different parts of a Manhattan that seems to get 
larger by the day. 

First, the New Yorkers descended on SoHo. 
This former warehouse district south of Hous- 
ton Street, bounded by Broadway on the east 
and Sixth Avenue on the west, began as a place 
for artists to live, in vast reclaimed manufactur- 
ing lofts. Fifteen years later, little remains of 
those pioneers, except that the retail shops left 
behind sell leading-edge fashions that attract an 
artsy crowd (real artists cannot afford the do th- 
ing sold in SoHo). 

David Sheekwan's oversize knits (381 West 
Broadway) are giant palettes of color. Barone’s 
cosmetics (414 West Broadway) mm the face 
into a canvas that can be shown comfortably 
only Downtown. Some of the stores themselves 
are artful. Dianne B. (426 West Broadway) is a 


be credited with reviving the entire Upper West 
Side — and giving New York its first genuine 
strolling boulevard. 

The fast fashion types buy their cotton shirts 
at Aca Joe (313 Columbus Avenue), fresh from 
Acapulco, their shoes at Kenneth Cole (353 
Columbus) and their costume jewelry from 
Ylaog-Ylang (324 Columbus). Competing with 
them are the yuppies, those lawyer and Wall, 
Street clones who make more money than their 
landlords. 

So where are the real kids? They are down on 
the stretch of Broadway that runs from 10th 
Street down to Houston Street now called 
NoHo (north of Houston Street) and centered 
on Astor Place. 

The clothing runs to the recycled. There is 
surplus at L Buss (738 Broadway), treasures 


Another! 

first visits from a lot of New* 
in March) is Herald Center, across 34th ‘ 
from Many’s at Herald Square. 


New Yorkers are still trying tofigure out what 
happened to their beloved South Street Seaport 
Once a sleepy Ettle enclave at South and Fulton 
Streets, home to the museum that preserves New 
Yak’s shipping heritage, South Street has be- 
come a Disneyland of shopping thanks to Rouse 
Crnp. And mw, in addition to -the Shops cm 
land, there is Pfer 17* built out over the East 
River and Sited wthllttk boutiques. - - 


bom the 1950s at the Antique Boutique (714 

nm tmdenfan ts 


away. 

tiny postmodern temple, all peach ana 


pink 

columns and pediments. Artwear (456 west 
Broadway) is all granite and marble. 

Evenings are the time to see Columbus Ave- 
nue at its liveliest The revival of this street from 
69th Street to 86th Street and soon beyond, can 


Broadway), truly basic basics (from 
dyed in a dozen colors to Memphis-style shirts 
to army-surplus jackets and pants at the Unique 
Clothing Warehouse (71 8 Broadway). 

Just because these, the three hottest shopping 
areas in town, came together in an almost organ- 
ic fashion, that does not mean that developers- 
think New York can live without them. Donald 
Trump decided that what the city needed was a 
very tony, high-priced shopping mall, centered 
on an atrium that would sit, just by chance, of 
course, below the mQlion-doDar condominiums 
he would be selling. Trump Tower, at Fifth 
Avenue and 56th Street, lives up to its slick 
billing. 

Nestled in. among the European designers are 
die California styles of Lina Lee, who keeps 
taking over more and more shops with her 
spirited way of patting American and European, 
fashions together. And there is Harry Winston's 
Petit Salon, with. jewelry and accessaries “start- 
ing ai the price of a midsize automobile." 


For people wtobavenotbeea to New York in 
afew years, thetemrin wfflbecompIeWy differ- 
ent Even New Yorkers returning from a week in 
the cotmtty are no longer s ur pri se d to see that 
their favorite shop has disappeared or has 
opened a branch around the comer from their 
apartment house. Itwffl not be long before New 
Yorkers as well as vision from abroad retreat 
to the giant department stores for the calm that 
comes from recognizing the landscape. 


COimtlBUTORS 


LINDA BLANDFORD, a British journal- 
ist, writes for The Guardian newspaper. 


JEFFREY DEITCH is Vice President of 
the Citibank Art Advisory Service. He is the 
American editor of Flash Art and a regular 
contributor to Art in America. 


MEL GUSSOW is a New York Tunes 
drama critic. He is the anther of “Don’t Say 
Yes Until 1 finish Talking ; A biography of 
Darryl F. -Zanuck." • r .' : : - 


METROPOLITAN TOWE R 



American Food Is In 


(Continued From Page 11) 
trendy. (154 East 79th Street (212) 772-6800, 
$45-$55.) 

• Not only does Carolina serve good food, it 
is considered the best no, the only, place to eat 
in the Theater District So book your table for 
8:30 PM, when the pre-theater crowd has gone, 
the after-theater crowd has not arrived and you 
have time for a leisurely meal of Southern re- 
gional cooking with New York pizzazz. The' 
cooking is less ambitious than at other restao- 



JEFF JARVIS is People Magazine's televi- 
sion critic. - . ... 


NANCY McKEON is a senior editor at 
New York Magazine. 


SOUREN MEZJKIAN covers the art mar- 
kets for die International Herald Tribune: 


TIM PAGE writes about music for The 
New York Times and is the host of a daily 
program on New Yorlds WMYC FM radio. 


rants, but it is very satisfying, and the desserts sticks^ Maryland crab, blade bean soup, chicken 


are bliss for those who like traditional Emit 
cobblers, layer cakes, bread puddings and short- 
cakes. (355 West 46th Street, (212) 245-0058,- 
$30.) 

■ The Coach House's host, Lem Leonides, is 
disdainful of the innovations of the New Ameri- 
can cooks and prefers to stick to (he straightfor- 
ward foods of the early settlers. In his renovated 
Greenwich Village coach house, be serves a 
cross-section of regional American foods: corn. 


pot pie, butter pecan, ice cream and 


(1 10 Waverfy Place, (212) 777-0303, ISSS)^ 


IRENE SAX writes about food for News- 
[day. New York Magazine and Food and 
/me. She is the author of “Gooks Market- 
place New York,” (101 Productions, 1984), a 
guide to shopping for food in New York. 


• If you still believe the acme of American 
codring is a perfectly grilled steak, take a csd> 
over'to Brooklyn to Peter Luger, a no-nonsense 
steak house that has been in this corner of the 
city since 1887. The waiters assume that you 
want the steak, and ask only if you want it for 
two, three or four. (178 Broadway, Brooklyn, 
(718) 387-7400, $40.) \ 


RICHARD F. SHEPARD is a New York 


Times journalist specializing in cultural 
events. He is ' “ * 


New York." 


the author of “Going Out In 


AMY VIRSHUP is ah assistant editor at 
New York Magazine: 


4 


(iirrtfi 


'lo« 


¥ 


■ T . 




Metropolitan Tower. 146 West 57 Street. 
78* stories high. The tallest most luxurious 
condominium residence in New York. 
212/432-5700. 


Builder/Developer: Harry Macklowe Real Estate Co. 
Sponsor: Carven Associates, 305 East 46 Street, NY. 
Residential Sales Agent: M.J. Rhynes, Inc. 
Occupancy: Spring 1986. 


The complete offering terms are in an offering plan 
available from the Sponsor. This offering is made in 
New York State only. 

‘The building, 716 feet tall, has 66 construction floors, 
equivalent in height to a 78-story build in g. 


Brand New 


THE KIMBERL Y 

145 £ 50th 


A Unique Hotel Suite Residence 
Perfect for the Corporate Client 


with pre-opening savings on all the magnificently 

furnished and appointed one& two bedroom suites. 


with the liberal choice of a 6 month, 

J year or 2 year lease arrangement 


offering housekeeping and executive services equal 

to that of the world's most distinguished hotels. 


while maintaining the freedoms and comforts of a private 

residence for your ultimate enjoyment and convenience. 


OCCUPANCY TO COMMENCE IN OCTOBER 85 


and for your 

Pleasure, Health & Fitness 


each suite receives a membership to the incomparable 
New York Health & Racquet Club with its nearest 
branch only two blocks away from the Kimberly 


Call or visit the model suites on site 
Seven days a week 10 a.m.-6 p m 
37lr8866 ' ‘ 


'fci 1 : 
* 




llltt "TV- 



I, 


“XU., 






,<*> 

i 








-j.-. 

►V 




AMEX orkn P.H 

AMEXMsnVMMP.U 
NYSE prices p.io 

l NYSE Metis/ lowe P U 

' Canadian Oocki pjj 

Comncv ndss p,j j 

CornmoouiH . ssi 

Dividends p_2j 


Coming* rmrts Rji’: 
FHn» rate notes p.i> 
poid mcriuKs P,is : 

•ntarest rates 'p.is 

summery P.ttf 
Options .. 

OTC Stock PJ 1 
Other markets P22 


| TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15. *985 


HcralbSSStibiroc. 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


(jv’- 'l /U*> )J£ 




FUTURES AND OPtlONS 


Silver Bear Still Growls, 


I^S/4 T?. 

• ***r. 'I.-.' . 


*. t* - 

? w - 


v/$ : 

• -■•••. v ft* 

h ' V N 


Bj JAMES STERNGOLD 

N New York Times Sennet 

hiccnLJf^™ T" A wek^after the silver, market 
tSv JFV* on neW5 0141 tlK Huxu famfly of 
wld 111051 its hoard of the metal, the 
prodaime^^ri *? sJum P- Jt seaas thatthose who 

h ^ Un 8 ^ fetura of happier days on Oct. 3, 

giarsas-SMsS 

silver has since slid back to its ■ • . .* 


d Kick? 




r- . 

■■■* 


‘ "tie/. 

"laski 




' ; “r£~ 


I ^ , ■ W OllWIgUIIUJM I* 

close on Friday of S6J26, not a . . - . ' . • - . and other European an tom 

promising start for a bull rally. Hunt famUrg sales, try to win 25 percent of the] 

Nonetheless, some analysis J . .. an market . 

have still found cause for oph- DlOnetaiy-polMy shift At a news conference be 
mism. They say that, while the haw dv«i nwilr«t speech to the Economic ( 

silver market is unlikely to ex- nav ® given marKet . _ Detroit, Mr. Agnelli me 

plode upward soon, several re- a DSvrJmlmriral Bft • Volkswagen and Cttroto, a 

cent events, includina the * pajMMMOgWBl HEL Peugeot SA. as possible t 

Hunt sales, have tilted the : 77 — ; • — with Fiau 

mMlcefs basic psychology more positively. TTi^' woo quick to S' 

add that thts mtght not show ahyresults for sc^aj moStotaS f 31 Mo to n Con > iimidi 
said that there was aslowiv crowma neramrinn thmatir aAt tu 7, ductl0n automation and noi 
wortd bo onough »»JSraW?SSG?JS5fE 

nimble investor new opportunities. • ■ ^8°®“ noted that Eu 

“The market may stUl move sideways, but what you can sav cxcctded <*“" 

now is the dowwideis limited,” said JotoH. O'Com^research a? 

55SS5 5*° ta New T-t. -Th^r^senso of S^0dd“ 0rapr ° dUC 

™ nnwomonCsaid the head 

of a major preaous-metals-tradmg operation. “The chances are percent^ ^martet,” h 
y ° U ^ hAVe hett ? r voImne and ^ bit of would tJEf l very 

interc&^o^ 1 ’ tUne ’ “ 0t "® ht away ’ could sflver more entity, an unbeatable entity, 

Fiat, second only to Volks 

I -m tub . has a 12.8-percent share c 

v-iu 1 - high-mflauon environmem of the late 1970s, the West European car sales. 
billio naire Hunt family engineered a nearly -successful at- Fiat and Ford, third in Eu 
*.• J??? to comer the silver mar keL They built a huge position, sales with 1 1.7 percent, anni 
Sr 1 TV® 0 pu f h toward $40 an ounce in 1980. But the last week that they had brol 
Federal Reserve’s anti-inflation policies and an exchmage rule year-loag tallct on rnoginj 
change were among the factors that, later in 1980, gfamnwi the European operations, 
stiver market down almost as fast as it had men- It has not risen - The negotiations had cov 
above $15 since then, averaging $8.14 an ounce last^ear and variety or possible combin 
$6.18 in the first half of 1985, according to the Silver Users - hem a joint company fora 
Association. Fiat and Ford of Europe Inc. 

The Hunts were left about as much silver as is us ed for i®”* production of autoi 
industrial and commercial purposes in an entire year wonh SI oonmmehts. 
billion less than what they paid for it, punishmg financig costs, “Fondisaveiyproudconij 

and an agreement with the Fed that they would sell their holdings Mf- Agnelli said. “Fiat is ; 

by about 1 990. The family tried to hold out for a return to higher P roud «m9»ny- When you 
prices before selling. It now appears, though, that only by their to the quesuon. of control am 
getting out of the market could more bullish conditions return. “Jf ?“• ^ thought it was fc 

One of those improvements is simply psychological. Investors. t lt .. 
especially speculators, had known, that the Hunts needed to sell m his speech, Mr. Agnelli 
their stiver sometime, and that was a depressant. “There was a ? ut a F!aI partnership wit 
legitimate concern that they might have to unload,” said Bette Japanjsc company m the tu 
Rapu^oulos, a precious-metal strategist al Prudential-Bache . 

Securities. “You didn't know when. It was an overhatig.” ' 5EfS t £ om -i ,ur £uro P ean 
Analysts also said that economic factors couTd start to work in 
favor of silver. Inflation remains' low -- producer, prices were a auton 

reoorted m Fridav. to bnvr artftninv fqTWTVi kU ■' a 8 a mst seeking performance 


reported on Friday to have actually /atierc In September — but 
there is some feeling it has bOttdmdi Put, !he analysis said. ' 
(Cbnthaied on Page 21, CoL 5) - - - 

I rVlNNimnirDn^nn 


Fiat Still 
Seeks a 
Partner 

Despite Failure 
Of Ford Talks 

The Associated Press 
DETROIT. — Gianni Agnelli, 
chairman of Fiat SpA, said Mon- 
day that despite his compaiiy's fail- 
ure to agree on a joint venture with 

Ford Motor Co^ Fiat was looking 
for similar arrangements with U.S. 
and other European automakers to 

try to win 25 percent of the Europe- 
an market . 

At a news conference before his 
speech to the Economic Club of 
Detroit, Mr. Agnelli mentioned 
Volkswagen and Citroen, a unit of 
Peugeot SA, as possible partners 
with Fiau 

He said present mtkg with Gen- 
eral Motors. Corp. regarded pro- 
duction automation and not ajoint 
venture to make cars. 

Mr. Agnelli noted that European 
production exceeded demand by 
25 million cars a year and repre- 
sented half the overproduction in 
the world. 

“I believe in Europe, if two com- 
panies get together and comer 25 
percent of the market,” he said, 
“that would make a very strong 
entity, an unbeatable entity.” 

Fiat, second only to Volkswagen, 
has a 12.8-percent share of total 
West European car sales. 

Fiat and Ford, third in European 
sales with 1 1.7 percent, announced 
last week that they had broken off 
year-loag talks on merging their 
European operations. 

. The negotiations had covered a 
variety of possible combinations, 
from a joint company formed by 
Fiat and Ford of Europe Inc. to the 
joint production of automotive 
components. 

“Ford is a vety proud company,” 
Mr. Agnelli said. “Fiat is a very 
proud company. When you come 
to the question of control and eval- 
uation, we thought it was best to 
call it off ” 

In his speech, Mr. Agnelli ruled 
out a Fiat partnership with any 
Japanese company in the near fu- 
ture. “Thetr industrial culture is 
different from our European rivih- 
zation,” hesaid. . 

He warned Japanese automakers 
against seeking performance at all 


With Sperry Unit, Ford to Make Hay 

Analysts Note Price, f M aiorPiavereinthe 


x Major Players in the 

| Good Product Fit Farm Equipment 

ivicirKe't 

'By John Holusha Ranking by 1 984 sales, in billions of 

Kew York Times Service dollars. 

DEARBORN, Michigan — While Henry Ford, ^ h - r . 

the founder of Ford Motor Co., was still alive, be ^ . :$3*5Q5 

made sure that his company kept “one foot in Ca** i intom Atinna!’ i o 9 'n 

industry and the other in &pLasi week, true international 1 .820 

to tradition, Ford planted its foot deeper into the Ma^soy-Ferguson 1438 

soil by acquiring the New Holland farm equipment ■= — ; ■ 

operation from Sperry Corp. Ford 1 .300 

Ford said Thursday that it would pay S330 . 

million in cash for the divisimi, and assume $1 10 *vcw rtqliaSKr ■ . ■■ 

million in liabilities, a total price that analysts said Deutz/ Allis 3 0.571 

was about 50 percent of the bode value or the 

division. New Holland produces baying and har- Tenneco, parent company of J 1 
vesting equipment, including combine. The busi- Case, purchased ail the assets of 

ness win be joined wuh that of Ford Tractor, a International Harvester s American 

r and European agricultural equipment 
The product lines and dealer organizations of nnerafinn «5 in F*h i qrs f nr 
the two businesses fit logether extremely weD.” =° ci 7 n?,S 

said Donald E Petersen, the chairman of Ford. mi,l ' on in . cash , ar !j ^ 70 m| Mion of 

New Holland does not make tractors. preferred stock. Revenue figures are 

For Sperry, analysts said one side effect of the estimates for the combined 1 985 
divestiture could be to make the company a more operations, 
attractive acquisition candidate. Sperry has been ‘A division of Sperry. Ford has 
occasionally rumored as a possible takeover target announced that it will buy New 
Indeed, there were reports this summer that Ford Holland for S330 million and assume 
was considering acquiring the entire company. Si 10 million in liabilities, 
after losing out to General Motors Corp. in the 2 The agricultural equipment division 
bidding for Hughes Aircraft. of Allis-Chalmers was purchased in 

Bui Ford executives said last week that their March 1 985 by a subsidiary of the 
1D A r S7s? ^,. New . Hona ^ an along; West German company Klockner- 

^ performing divifflon Humbolt-Deutz for approximately 
made Speny a more attractive prize, Michael J. ei -an million 
Creran, who follows the company Tor E.F. Hutton 

& Co M said, “Lope says the answer is yes." t>* *** w, 

Henry Ford got into the farm equipment busi- 
ness because, as a boy growing up on a farm in this Heal)’ of Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. “It’s an 
once-rural community west of Detroit, be com- industry ibai is consolidating, and I suppose Lhe 
plained about the endless drudgery of farm work, market will turn eventually.” 


Daimler-Benz 
Reveals Plans 
To Buy AEG 


CompJal by Our Sniff Freer. Dtspaiches 

STUTTGART, West Germany 


20 percent above the average price 
for an AEG AG share over the past 


— Rapidly expanding Daimler- three months on the open market, 
Benz AG cm Monday announced rumors of a possible takeover have 
plans to buy a majority stake in the pushed the stock higher in recent 
AEG AG electronics maker, a weeks. 


move that would make Daimler Lhe 
largest industrial concern in West 
Germany. 


Before trading in AEG AG stock 
was suspended on West Germany's 
eight stock exchanges Friday, use 


Best known for its Mercedes cars share price had risen to 181 DM. 
and trucks. Daimler this year has Mr. Breitschwerdi did not give a 
onbarked on an aggresave divers- specific figure for the acquisition, 
fication program. AEG AG is the h ul financial sources in Frankfurt 
third-IargesL West German electn- said j t would likely ioiai more that 

“TO;. . u . 1 -billion DM. 

The Daimler chairman. Werger c .. .. n 

Breitschwerdi. confirmed ihat S ? aj '5 e, :- Ber f 

company already has purchased acqmred a* Mumch-based aircraft 
24.9 percent of the AEG AG shares Prtf ucer and nuhtarv con, 

as one step in the acquisition pro- " a P tor Mot°^n & Turbinen 
jyajH “i k Llmon, and the family-owned Dor- 

The acquisition of a majority aeros P ace company, 
stake in AEG AG will bring the "With the majority involvement 


automaker's annual sales to neariv hi AEG AG and the acquisitions of - 


60 billion Deutsche marks (S23 bil- 
lion l and will increase its work 


MTU and Domier, Daimler-Benz 
will have a new dimension as a 


force to 295,000. Mr. Breitschwerdt company," Mr. Breitschwerdi said, 
said. News of Lhe acquisition pushed 

AEG AG is recovering from near Daimler-Benz shares 38 DM higher 
collapse in 1982. when it filed for on lh e Frankfurt Stock Exchange 


and built gadgets to ease the burden. When he 
became a world-famous industrialist, he continued 


Ann C. Knight of Paine Webber Inc. said: 
“Ford had to do something about that line of its 


insolvency protection under West 
German bankruptcy laws. Fn Sep- 
tember 1984, however, AEG AG 
successfully completed its 18- 
month court-directed debt settle- 
ment. 

Mr. Breitschwerdi said the take- 


Monday to 1.073 DM. 

The Daimler finance chief. Ed- 
ward Reuter, said there is no upper 
limit on the stake Daimler would 
take and added that after talks with 
the consortium banks he was confi- 
dent that the majority holding 


over will be accomplished in two would be obtained. AEG A 


his efforts to nub farmers* lives easier by manu- business, and the low price that they paid limits 


facturing cheap, durable tractors. 


their downside risk. There are some opportunities 


Ford is still the only major U.S. auto maker with here for the credit subsidiary as welL I expect Ford 
its own line of tractors, although Ford's annual will make more money on financing and leasing 
tractor sales of about SI J billion are dwarfed by fa* 111 equipment than manufacturing it.” 


its automotive sales of nearly 550 billion. The farm 
equipment market has been in a seemingly irre- 
versible decline since the laic 1970s, and Ford 
officials acknowledge that they have considered 
selling the tractor division. 

Instead, they now have moved in the other 
direction, broadening the division's model lineup 
by picking up New Holland 

Analysts reacted favorably to the transaction. 
“There are probably some savings to be mad* in 
distribution by consolidating dealers." said David 


The ad van rage for Sperry,, analysts said, was 
that it gpi out of a business that had' nothing to do 
with its current concentration on electronic sys- 
tems and computers. Although New Holland had 
made an operating profit of as much as 5168.8- 
million on sales ofjust over $1 billion in the year 
ending March 31, 1980, operating earnings in the 
most recent year had fallen to 534 million on sales 
of $715 million. 

“The impact on Sperry is quite positive,” said 
(Continued on Page 2L, CoL 5) 


steps. would be consolidated in Daimler's 

In the first, Daimler acquired all balance sheet as soon as the hold- 
shares offered in a recent AEG AG ing reached 50.01 percent, 
capital increase, totaling about 250 ™ 

million DM and giving the Stutt- * . new company would easily 
gart automaker a 24.9-percent ° ulsln P ** w™ 01 bl S8«t West 
stake in AEG AG German companies, Siemens and 

Under West German law, an ac- Volkswagen, which etch had sales 
quisition of 25 percent or more of a of a ‘ X)ut 45-bdlion DM last year, 
company requires approval of the Anticipation of Monday’s an- 
Federal Cartel Office. nouncement snarked a flurrv nf 


stake in AEG AG ~ German companies, Siemens and 

Under West German law, an ac- Volkswagen which etch had sales 
quisition of 25 percent or more of a of a ‘ X)ut 45-bdlion DM last year, 
company requires approval of the Anticipation of Monday’s an- 
Federal Cartel Office. nouncement sparked a flurry of 

The second step involves a direct buying on the Frankfurt Stock Ex- 
offer to AEG AG's current share- change, particularly from foreign 
holders of 170 DM for every 50- investors, and the Commerzbank 
DM par-valued share, Mr. index of 60 leading shares hit a 
Breitschwerdt said. record of 1,626.1 at middav. [Reu- 

While the 170-DM bid is about ters. AP) 


Japan Is Said to Pursue Intervention to Boost Yen 


S i •*- • *•' 

■ \ . rrc I 





-Vt" •' T *. 

\ rrDrwilUte* 


■ 

lT 




Ocr. 14 


, : 

» 

i 

DM. 


ILL; 

OUr... 

BJF.- 

»JP. 

Yea 

»' > 

‘ “ Aimtardam 

29945 

. 423 

. 11271 S* 

36945 * 

0 - 14*9 * 

i 

55 * 2 * 

13720 * 

t 3929 y 


■nsMtata) 

5 U 425 

Him 

202774 

<444 

UBB* 

, 1799*5 

__ 

.2472 

252375 * 

•-* i • 

- „ Franklttrt 

till 

ITS 

— 

327 *r 

14115 X '# 0725 * 

« 4 * 

12191 * 

U 34 S* 


, ... . . London lb) 

1.4125 

_ . 

iTsn 

114 < 2 S 

24 JSS 0 

42301 

7*225 

3MX 

304415 


- !a- 3 ' 

IJ 9273 

253200 

47555 

22144 

— 

5 * 9.14 

uses 

12343 

US 

, .. .. 

. • - ■ New York Cc> 











(Parts 

lilM 

1154 JS . 

18493 

— - ■ 

442 x 

2704 # 

TIM* 

■ 3 J 1 * 

17 * 3 * 

... «r ■ ‘ 

- - ,0 i J frakye 

2 MJD 

mn 

#IJK 

2 SJ 4 

T 2 M * 

7 M* 

39025 • 

9 BJ 5 

— 

-A- ■ 

' .. Zurich 

11 # 

MBS 

•2545 ■ 

26 M* 

ani 7 * 

72 jn» 

< 2 «*: 

— ■ 

12133 * 

4 -- 

' ~'. i 1 ECU 

8*03 

UH 7 

22096 

42271 

1,41095 

14902 

40992 

LT 0 « 

17920 * 


' 1 SDR 

- ■# ■ 

UM 24 * 

073*47 

2 J 2549 

640733 

UB 7 JB 

UK* 

51 4143 

13214 

NA 


costs, but he also cautioned against 
“occasional fits of ‘Japan-bash- 
ing.’" • 


Chase Posts 
61 %lncrease 
In Its Profit 

The Associated Press 


By Susan Chira 

New York Tima Serum 


investors, and the Commerzbank 
index of 60 leading shares hit a 
record of 1,626.1 at middav. (Reu- 
ters, AP) 

OPEC Has Idea 
To Protect Prices 


sysa? ^ * Group ° r ^ ^ ^ i 


experienced a slight rebound. A 


TOKYO — Three weeks after f 511 ??? 1 * mo ** 'dosely the extent of He said that most of the action government official who asked not 

five leading industrial nations “““wrvention— •theamraim of last week had been negative, “more to be identified, said that the Bank 
agreed to work together to weaken o 011 " 5 Ban* or Japan had in its to keep the dollar from getting of Japan's intervention last week 
the dollar, Japanese authorities are °"*J sa ?“ Ten 9' reserves wcrc stronger than to push it down; each was aimed at holding the yen to at 
continuing to intervene in currency 10 &U £ T , 1 w cunie °. c,es - tone the dollar rose to 2 18 yen, they least 21 5 to the dollar, 

markets to strengthen the yen, ac- . K ? zuo Nukazawa, director of went into the market and pushed In the longer term, the govern- 
cording to government officials toe mternational erotuuntc affmrs the yen to about 215 yen; they are ment official said, Japanese au- 
and currency traders here. aepanmentot tne iveidanren, Ja- pursuing a holding pattern and thorities hope the ven will stabilize 

Economists and traders said the 5 Ppw«ito wurness orgamza- waiting to see how the market will at a level between 200 and 210 to 
Bank of Japan would continue to Q0 fv said diaI he believed toe cen- respond.” the dollar, 

intervene at least through the end . ““ j™ sold about S I billion The effect of the intervention has But while some government offi- 


of November and perhaps until the 
end of this year. While Japanese 
government officials inasted that 
they had no specific target in min d. 


• •- -- CJosJmn In London and Zurich, fixings tn ottwr Eorootan centers. 

. tol Commercial fronc (bi Amounts netdud to buy twwpound fc} Amounts nesdud to buy one 

dollar Cl Units o/IOOM UnHsoflMOM Untts Of KUX» fLQ . ; not qvofdrSLA.c notavaHo&e. 

r ^ i: 'OtiMrlMlarVal«w 

CUTTBwnr per ujj Carrancr per Ui» C ur r en cy per U&J Currency per USJ 

. Arson, amtiul ojO Fla. markka levs Malay. riM. IASJ S. Kor.wan U923S 

--‘■All Stmts 1-<26I Greek Oroc- 13L2S Mex.pae 3MP0 Spa^^esMi 161 SO 

AHrtr.KML UZ1 HangKMti 7J9 Norw. krone 7 SU Smd. krona 7.995 

Bcta.lla.fr.. S«0 l i¥ »ae mpee 1Z0919 . PULpeie ' 17J0 Taiwan t «U3 

Brazlf crux. MIDiH . leda. nnXak i,r2ijn Parteecwta MZm Thai boat mis 

- . - - ' Canadian S UUS Irlilil 0J5576 SaMlifval MS TerUAIIni 543.90 

Odnefcvaan UMl UraiOtfiek. M7ZS0 lbg.1 Z14J UAEdUkam X673S 

Ombb krone 9Z32S Knwtatldlaar naMi - S.Afr.iwad .1AU4 Venez-beOv. MJ0 

EovpL pound 1J3 

CSfarano: L216 Irish E 

*" 1 *^ Sources: Banooe do Benelux (Brussels): Banco Commercials itatlana (Milan); Banoue No- 
donate an Paris (Paris): Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo): IMP (SDR); BAD. (dinar, rival, dirham). 
Othe r d ata from Routers and A P. 


NFW YORK rhne* Manhat. w sfKxavc iaigci in nuna, r ~~ — jz . . : , — » m 

rvwn f °Srih ?^ 10051 estimates indicatS that the offiaals , “tonaie, the bank end of last weeL 

^8*= desired ^ between 200 and sp? 1 * 3t “ptoer 51 bil- But whether t 
Iwnkmg company, said Monday 21( ft ^ ^ hon, bringing the tolal intervention sustained is beir 

that its thud-quarter profit jumped * , l0 between $2 billion and S3 bil- 


uepeuevea ine cen- respond.” thedoUar. 

Id about Sl billion The effen of the intervention has But while some government offi- 

tn the week following the five-na- been to keep traders off balance rials said they believed that Japa- 
ka* vt . .. and send the yen from 241.70 yen nese exporters were still making 

Since then, Mr. Nukazawa, other to lhe dollar before the Group of profits at current rates and could 
economists and some finance nun- Five agreement to 2 15.90 yen at the sustain an even stronger ven, ex- 
ist rv nrfirtak «trmn^ hint ,r i i. ... “ 


porters are bound to exert strong 


On Sq>L 22, representatives of 
the Unitril States, Britain, France, “^5* . . 


Peter Morgan, an economist 
with Jardine Fleming Securities, es- 
timated that bank intervention last 


upper w 

J ae tacrease was at toe upper West Germany and JaDan met in Peler Morgan, an economist 

New wilhJaj^ne Fleming Securides.es- 

.ui q^rt^bv sev- action to deal with interna- umated toat bank intervention last 

aulolhg^Ii iy American banking ^ "* — ^ «“ 

companies have geuer- ™P|j«ion of lhe slaiemeu. issued *= la^e-scale seUiug of dollars m 

any benentledfrom lower fatoesi ^ “ ^fonua 1 - 

nues, wiuch hare reduced whal it ^,9™ “* I,eG ™ , P <rfFive r 

costs them to obtain lendable ” lhal . lh ? ml f ,e ° e , w 

value oTSoUai ^ I ARGENTINE i 


tetst another SI bil- But whether the effort can be political pressure to halt any major 
! to®. total intervention sustained is being questioned. In appreciation. 

>2 billion and S3 bil- 


RIMINI, Italy — Subroto, 
the current OPEC president, 
has suggested a “limited” meet- 
ing between its 13 members and 
major independent producers 
to head off a sharp drop in oil 
prices, the OPEC news agency 
reported Monday. 

Mr. Subroto, the Indonesian 
oil minister, addressed an oil 
conference here Sunday. 

Earlier this month the Orga- 
nization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries failed to agree on 
a plan to reallocate production 
quotas among iis members. 


own lending rates as rapidly. 


Since the Sept. 22 accord, the 


Interest Rates 


?L> 


Eareewreney DefMltfl OetU 

Swiss' French • 

Dollar D-Mark Franc Etarttne Franc KU SDR 
I month MM . m-«b . 4-4th Hta-lltt . MMta .* m 

s months tUiv dVa-oe nta-im Mta-tnU - 7*. 

amoaltis sta-au 4M«b 4U«i nV7-I]ta Wfw-iow ni». 7M 

emeotht 8 m- 8*4 4ta-M imk nv>-mt iesb.iow m 

1 year Me-ffta 4 yw-4 m. - 11 fc-11 w 11 »wn lb .- 8Vii 

Sources; Morvoa Guaranty (donor. DM. SP. Pound. PP)i Uavds Bonk tdCU); Reuters. 
(SOR). Ratos applicable to interbank deposits of V million minimum (or oouhinienlJ. 


Wte-tlM 

Hfrioa 

lOft-Wti 


ii ib-ii ib ii lb-n ib 


Key Memey Botes (ku u 


rta-Utdays 
mnBllli 
lastify BINs 


CHm Pm. 

7IS 7» 

CtKL B 15/16 
»J0 ISO 

m 8v> 

Cbd. 7JB 

— 7.T7 

— 7JB 

- JJS 

- 7,46 


Aston PoUnr Biywri u 

Ott u. 

1 awatti l-IH 

I monttu Bib-Jib 

Smooths * avb-SM, 

* mo nt hs VA-tUk 

llWHP S4b-m 

Source.- Reuters. 


Clase, which is the pairat of the Bank of Japan has been one of the 
^ rd largcsi U-S- Chase most aggressive of the five central 

] Manhattan Bank of New York, banks, currency traders said. One 
said its net mowne for the three reason is that, if the move is suc- 

J e^ed Sept- 30 was $149 cessful, it might head off protec- 

million, or $3.48 a diare, compared tionist sentiment in the United 
with a profit of S93 million, or States and Europe. A stronger yen 
$1.70 a share, a year ago. might hdp cut the U.S. trade drii- 

For the first nine months. Chase • tal by m a k i n g Japanese goods more 
. said its profit rose 44.8 peroan to expensive in the United Slates and 
S414 mfliion, or 5929 a share, com- UA goods less expensive in Japan, 
pared, with S286 million, or 56.44 a Last week. Japanese finance of fi- 

share, a year earlier. rials, speaking at the conference of 

* T-i.. -j . the latentational Monetary Fund 

- °SSf D U? d - V s ^ ” -«Dd the World Bank m Seoul, 

mrome from both interest- and pledged t0 mt^varfSin 

non-interest-bear mg activities ntrrotcy markets. S 

mOTCtban offset an increase m Just J how ^ lhe Ja ese 

ironoperating expenses m the quar- have spent in the effort is dlfftoU 

to gauge: pie Bank of Japan rem- 
its latest results were favorably .finely declines to disclose any dc- 
' affected by about 58 million after toils about its intervention in cur- 
taxes as a result of changes in New rcney markets. 

York tax laws. But by examining changes in the 


UJ5- Meeej Market FitMb 

’ 0d. 14 

MerrUI Lmcti Ready amok 
X> day averaea yWd; '7 JO 
Tel er ate imarect Rate imw: Ckd 

Source: Merrill LvncK TeJemle. 


Bank Bate note 
can MOW 
♦May Treasury Bill 
*wMelliianrtKak 


mem Rate 
Can Money 
Metoy Intermit 


m «n 
. tat 07/t* 
9 S/14 tab 
tali OH 
m j 3/ifi 


in* life 
11H HH 
11 1/16 111/10 
II S/M II M2 


S S 
SH 47/1* 
M 69k 


Gold 


Han Korn . -377JS 
L a a eta boi ira ' 327m 
FarbtnsUta) 22444 
Zurich 227.10' 

LMdan 32440 

new York . — 


Get. 14 

bj*. am 

s tm +ijo 

— + 1 J 0 

NX ' - 

22MS ■ +W 

BUS + 1 jOS 

nu i* • ino 


Seeron: Raders. Cammertoank. Crtdit 


Luxembourg. Paris and London aMdal fix- 
ings/ Harm Kong and Zurich opening and 
dosing ertaa; Near York Gomen current 
contract. AH prices nt t/JL S per ounce. 
Source: Reuters. 


Markets Closed 

Many banks, Federal Reserve Slates because of a holiday. All 
offices, most . foreign-exchange financial markets were closed 
trading and some futures markets Monday in Canada. because.of , a‘, 
were closed Monday, in tbe United holiday. '' :r ' ■ 


Tirade futures 

$10 round-turn 

^ JLO commission 

No* you an trade futures commas with America's largest futures 
dbeoiut frrn for only SIS reund-turn commission . This low raie even 
allows you to place your orders drreoly to our Chicago Trading Center 
white paying onfyfor a caB to London. fOfltr food for the firett wo moaihs 
that yon are our cusiomer. Normal futures rues never exceed £34.] 

In addition to kiw commissions we offer you professional and attentive 
service. For example, our lading Obiter is opn 24 hours so you can 
place orders sod gel quotes when it's con venieiu for yon. 

' Discover tbe advantages of a discount commission Hnn aad get our 
Spend S18 rale when you open your Hading account by January 31. 1986. 
Send your name to Hans Soiulz, HaupWr.23. I>7T2aBieiicheim. West 
Germany or cal! (49)7142-41434. 

LIND-WALDOCK 


VoPFrtV 

(?H) 

.Country \H0UP5/ 


ARGENTINE 

REPUBLIC 

EXTBtNAL U25. $ BOND5 

AND 

B0N05 NOMINATTVOS 

THE WESTON 
GROUP 

£n^uines to: 

CH-1003 LAUSANNE 
2 Rne de la Paix. 
Telex: 25869. 

TeL: 021/20 1741. 


HFHiitton 

MANAGED CURRENCIES 
PROGRAM 

PBffORMANCE RESULT 
FO R BEGINNING EQUITY OF 

$ 10,000 

JANUARY 1st 1985 

HAS BECOME 

$ 28,671 
OCTOBERlrf 1985 

after all commissions 


NEXT KBUI N NOVEMBER 14th E5UE 

THBE IS NO A4AN4CB4ENT FS. 

MST PBtfOftMANCE S 
NO GUARANIS 
OF FUnjRE PERFORMANCE 

FkamartaO 

OtoMAa 

A. Mea Pmoda* 

Hl^luttDn 

43,AwwvaMorcaou 
75116 PAHS -HtANCE 
TeL 72361-51 
TtkxiSXm. 

FGRtWRB<HI&SD&JTSONlY 


WORLD-WIDE SERVICE BY 

Jet Aviation - the international leading organization for business aviation with 
a charter fleet of 46 aircraft and world-wide eleven maintenance bases offers you 
complete aircraft management purchase, sales financing, insurance, 
operation, crews, refurbishment completion, maintenance and handling 
service of professional perfection. 

Our Air-Taxi service is available to you around-the-clock: 

1 Mitsubishi 2-4 Citation 11-3 Learjet 35-1 Learjet 36 - M 

6 Falcon 10- 0 Falcon 20-7 Falcon 50 - 1 Jetstar It - 7 Gulfstream 11/111 - ” 

1 DC-9 - 1 Boeing 737 - 5 Boeing 727 - 2 Boeing 707 - 1 DC- 8/72 ursjfff 


Basel. Dussetdorf, Geneve. Kassel. Munich, Zurich Europe: 

Jeddah, Riyadh Middle East; 

Boston. MA, Morristown, NJ.. Wesi Palm Beach. FL. North America : 


Zurich (1) 8142002 
Riyadh (1)22018 88 
Boston (617)2740030 


Tlx. 59 820 
Tlx. 205 551 
Tlx. 951 195 


Orange Nassau Group 

International investments and investment services 
Offices in the Netherlands, France and the United States 


oil and gas exploration and production 
real estate development and management 


venture capital and industrial investments 


financial services and portfolio management 


25 Nassauplein, 2585 EC The Hague. Tel. (70)469670 


Annual report 1984 and additional information available upon request 










Pa«p 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 


MSE 


TcDles include fhe nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


i; Month 

Hign Low Sion 


„ Sis Clow 

Oi» •V W PE ICOs High Low Ouol. Ch'ge 


(Continued from Page 30) 


I7’k U DeiEfl 1^0 114 

M M'j DeiEot »JI 12.4 

47*. 31 DetEnl 748 1L4 

*6% ««V DMEoi IX. 123 

M* ■w , -1 Deis of 7J4 iu 

2S'h 21V DEnlF 2JS 10 7 

28% 71'. DEorR 31a 114 

77*. HV DEplQ 3.1J 12J 

27 111 2I'» DEnIP 3.12 125 

25% I] DEotB Z75 10J 

2*V 23% OE otO 3 d} 12.7 

79% 22% DE DIM 147 12.7 

J3% 77te DEorL «0O 131 

M% 7B'~, DE DlK 4.12 13.2 

21 IBVj Ocrier JO 3J 

IEV 10*. DIGIor 44 34 

ss* n\ Dic-ioct i£3 7 1 

21 14ft DiomS 1J6bll3 
»% 34** DloSnpl 4 JO M.l 
21*1 70* DlaSOf n Ms 3J 


MSI I44 j ?«■'= 
170: 73 75 

Mi 6 : 43 

1B0: 44*. 40' 


Ml* + ft 
73 - V, 
42 — ’ll 

60*. 


Mz sen sb* sat* — *. 

1 2514 2Vi 25K. 

Jl 74 25"i 35*. + Vi 

35 25% 24V 25% + % 


11 

6'< DkmaCs 

00 

32 

3 


31% Olebid j 

1 tH> 


11 

95 

65'.. Digital 
S6V Diuw] 

1 TO 

IJ 

14 

48 


16 Vo DEIs 

IX 

64 

7 

10' B 
34' .B 

4'] Dtersln 

4% Oomeg 
Ute DomRs 

.12 

9.1 

3 

9 

21% 

l6'-s Donald 

iJ, 

3.1 

10 

61 ft 


1.16 

IT 

15 

33* 


ITfl 

3.1 

14 

42V; 

321k Dover 

aa 

24 

13 


27 DowCh 

1B0 

5.1 

14 

50 



2JJ 

IV 

29% 

15V 

B'n Dovunrv 
11 Dravo 

*1) 

40 

3 

24V 

17% Drwr 

X 

4.1 

16 

21“: 

16’ . 

2M 

100 


67'- 


«1 

o 

15 

cl% 


3X 

51 

IS 

59 


450 



35% 

r* DukeP 

1M> 

7.9 

8 


?4*B 

14 te 


+ 

% 

25% 

“Si. 

254. 








27 

26 'k 

57 



JC'. 





31% 

3t“. 

31’- 

— 

V 

21% 

20 '» 

21 ‘a 

+ 


177k 

17% 

I7’k 

4- 

1 4 

31% 

31* 

31% 

— 

'i 

15% 

15% 

15% 





J6 



71% 


21‘k 




9'. 


— 


35'. 

34'. 

36% 

+ 

% *3 


143*1 117tfs Dukeot 475 S.0 
SO' : 44 'k Duke si 120 107 
77 40*. Duke Of 7 BO 10.9 

27 221k Duke pl 2.49 10 7 

351k 30la Duke Pi 135 tl.t 

ea'.. 'Oil DunBrd 270 10 

17’.'; 14V DudLI 2M 114 

IS*. IS*. OuqofA 270 12.1 

18% 13*< Duaol 2.07 11J 

18 145k Duo prK 210 IU 

20V 74*. Dvaor ?J1 115 

42*3 47 Dim pi 720 12.4 

14 l ‘i E": DvCOPI *0u 43 

27 20% DvnAm 20 B 


18 

.. 278 

U 247? 107 V 104’:. IDT 1 *: +11k 
IB 1284 69*4 88 Vi 891k +1* 
14 2I'» 21*. 211. — *1 

« ft 5'i fll 

2*5 9 8'k Sft — 

217 29ft 29% 2«ft + ■ » 
44 21% 21 211.— V 

132 55% 14* 55ft + % 
Isl 34V. 33'j 141,1 +1* 

_ 120 34'. 35*. 34 +17 

14 1094 15% 35% 35% + % 

163 J9‘i 38ft 39* ■*■ W 
1«4 27 25% 77 +1% 

3598 12% 12% 12% 

157 18% 18% 18% - % 
26 19V. 1» 19 — 'k 

40 64*. 63% 441. +1 

15 3249 SOU 58% 58": 

20 40 45% 45%— r 

344 32*. 32'- 37*. + % 
2 134% 136% 134". +4*. 
3201 751. 75% 75% + % 
2tfc 72 72 72 — 

39 24% 20% 24% 

10 33 34*. 34% 

546 74 73'- 73'* + % 

471 IP-4 lift 15% + *1 
42CT 18 17% 17% — % 

2911k 17% 14% 17% + % 
52 17 lift 10% — % 
IQOi lBii IB''; 10% + % 
SB SB 

i9 13% 13*. ir» + v 

$4 24% 24*. 24*. + V. 


43 

17% 

32*. 

28V 

20% 

12% 

S 

I’* 

22 ’% 

33V 

28% 

23% 

501; 

eOV 

15% 

32% 

32% 

18% 

11 

34% 

24% 

19'.. 

12 

5"! 

24% 
16 
0% 
78'. 
141k 
23% 
33' 3 

r-> 

5 

16'* 

32V 

20 

29% 

21% 

2% 

13% 

10ft 

21 % 

35 

4% 

2^ 

50* 

17 

14% 

34% 

24% 

28 

25* 

6 

4* 

12 ": 

43% 

17'. 

54V 


.48 

106 

JO 

104 

22i 


1.4 IB 

8.1 

IJ 15 

4J 9 
12 


29 ESC 
15V. EQKn 
23'“ E 5 vsl 
20 EsoleP 
12 Eoko 
3% EoslAir 
1% EAL <*10 
% EALwIA 
7% EsAlral 205k 
O'-k EAtr pfB 200k 
11% EAlrafC 
2H J EosfGF 
U’.: cdSlUII 
41'. esKods 
48 Eaton 

II Echlins 
20 Eckerd 
26V EdisBr 
14% EDO 
7". EdCmo 
22*. Edward 
211 j SPG ast 
13% EiTcr; 

7% Elcor 
2*. Elec* 5 
IS*. *ICt*B5 
11V] Elgin 
2 Elsclnl 
46 Ewsel 
6’k Em Rod 
7£it EmrvA 
26‘« Emhart 
16V EmcDs 

4 Emppl 

11*. Eneruen 1.B4 
EnE«C 

r EnglCo .72 
11% EnisBus Jo 
177k Enserch 140 
17*i ErtsEx n IJOe 60 
1% Ensrco 24 

»% Enlera 

15V EnloaE 250e1£9 
17% Enter in 1J4 7J 11 
19% Eaufx 4 1.14 3J 15 
2% Eavimk 


194 35*. 

no isv= 
STB 29% 
14 24% 
£0 17% 


4425 

798 

31B 

44 


10 

3% 

7 

22 


101 24% 
67 29% 


LB 

5J150 

49 

7.1 

7.06 

97 

> 

TO 

77 , a 

2;t) 

49 

13 

7640 

41% 

1.40 

70 

7 

49 

£1% 

14 

30 

ii 

7012 

12U 

104 

30 

74 

7115 

29% 

160 

50 

13 

18 

31V 

JB 

19 

13 

4 

15* 



15 

1114 

9% 

Wt 

10 

12 

171 

26% 

105 

9.7 


4 

24 Wi 

l)4| 


4 

2417 

10’. 

J6 

16 


AT 

10’- 



22 

30 

4 

ns 


73 

7 

22 

00 

bO 

12 

30 

13'* 




162 

7ft 

76D 

18 

13 

1793 

6h% 

.941 

11.1 

•3 

748 

8% 

91 

7.9 

13 

1277 

17% 

l.40b 

5.0 

9 

337 

28ft 


IJ6 

A7 


3.1 * 
20 13 
7.517* 


antk at 20J 112 


32 EatRes 
S'. Eaullec 
10*. Eromnt 
12% EssBus 
15 EsexCS 
15 Estrlne 
12% Ethyl % 
l*» wiEuanP 
2"a wlExcnpf 
3'k vIEvnotB 
33'* ExCelO 1.72 ... 
U s E«col5r IJ60II.I 
4! Exxon 3.40 6.4 


.16 1.9 

2 


3J 14 

%?! 


U 11 


37 20% 

i«k eu 

3 13--k 

£91 'j 

as 23V 

ja ^ 

72 19% 
106 2% 
21 12 % 
34 16% 
92 19% 
23 32V 
160 ~ 

4 

67 42 
294 8% 

is aF* 

45 21% 

5 ii 

7xr 

16 1% 
5 2% 
1 3 

9 41% 
IS 16% 
3962 53 V 


35% 
15% 
2S% 
24% 
17 *. 
9% 
3V 
IV 
21% 
24% 
W8 
23 
21 V 
43V 
53 
11 % 
29% 
31% 
15% 
»% 
25 V. 
74' k 
9*. 
94g 
4 

214k 
12% 
2% 
68V 
SV 
16 V 
27% 
20 % 
4*. 

13% 


35% 

15% 

29V - '• 
24% 

17*. 

9% + % 
3% + % 
11k + % 
22 + % 
24--t + V 
2?% + % 
23 

22't: + ?» 

IA'~ — 

53% 

!2Va + V 

29*. 

31*. + % 
'k 

9% + V 
26V +Uk 
14% 

10V— 1% 
10'k + V 
4 + Ik 

22 + V 

13V + % 
2% + % 
68% + 

8% + % 
77V- % 
28V 
20% 

4% 

11% + % 


,32 


22% 23 - % 
16% 17% -HV 
21 V 21% 

|?V I9ik- !k 
2% 2%- V 
12 12% 

15U 15*1-% 
18% 19 

■19 19 - % 

41*. 42 4 V 

8% S% + \1 
12% 12*. + V 
20% 21 + % 
31% 21% + % 

"•RtS 
JJS 

3 - % 
41% 41%— Mi 
16% 16% + V 
52% SJVi + Vb 


1% 

2% 

3 


70 

52 FMC 

2JU 

35 

35 

10 

63 

62ft 

86% 

73 

65'.i FMCPf 
20% FPL Go 

23 

1.96 

Z9 

80 

8 

.mi 

77* 

24* 

77* 

74 

13% 

«'» FoSCtr 

J3 

10 

"T 

9 

9* 

9V 

IJft 

20% 

10 Face! 
flih Fsircha 

X 

2.1 

1 

1 

497 

1U* 

9ft 

10% 

9V. 

37% 

at . Fa Ire Df 

300 120 


15 

28% 

28* 

Ifrft 

11V FQLrtd 

10 

16 


M 

11% 



ISV FamDI % 

JO 

.9 

23 

19 

21% 

21% 

28V 

15% For ah 

JU> 

40 

V 

V 

IB* 

IB". 

13 

8'a FovDrg 

30 

20 

20 

47 

Bb 

8% 

A': 



0 

y 

IX 

4-k 


43* 

31’ « FedlCo 

UK 

40 

10 

56 

42'« 

42% 

£!’■« 

39 

31V FedE'0 
Mft FdAAog 

160 

45 

21 

10 

2368 

71 

ilft 

35 1 A 

43 

34% 

22 'b 

14 FedNM 

li 

9 


164(1 

19* 

IHW 

2S 

14% Fed'PB 

JO 

17 

IE 

J01 

19V 

17% 

30V] 

25ft FFoopl 

2J1 

85 


31 

27'k 


25 

18ft FedRIt 

106 

6.7 

U 

II 

23% 

73V 

19* 

U’k Fdsgni 

X 

40 

14 

7 

17% 

17V 

kite 

49 FedDSt 

204 

4 J 

9 

971 

5V% 

58% 

2* 

22V. Ferro 

1.20 

45 

15 

280 

27 

26ft 

36 

25'- Fidat 

1.00 

30 

13 

32 

26 'V 

26V 


8%. 


5V FinCpA J5I 
27% 27 V Fmcoct 6J5el8.9 
6% 3'k FnSBar 
7TV la' 1 Ftresln JO iA 14 

77% 14% PtAtls it 13 ! 

43 25% FIBkSy IJ0 4.1 7 

34% 22 FBkrlS 1X0 19 U 

44% 24% FBocts 1X0 2i 12 

26% 19% FjIChiC 1J2 58 

53V 44% FChlopf SjielU 
17% 10*. FISTex .60 SJ 12 

48 V 15 F:BT,r 15£J*|4J 

19% 4 V FICfv 7 

23*. 12*. FFedAi 06b 14 9 

m> 41*i FF3 3.12 SJ B 

55% 33% Flntile 150 51 B 

34V 24V Finn; pi 137 7 9 
11% Ft Miss 24 19 9 

33V 16 FiNoInn 20 

7-s 5V FslPa 
3*. 23% FstPaol 162 9.7 
31V 25' '« FlUnRI 200 7J 15 

28'.: 17% FivaSk 88 3J 9 

JTk 19% FIVVIsc IJ0 38 10 

42% 53V Flicne 1.C0 4.0 

11 8% FrshFd X5e A 

43 2r% FltFnGM04 3.? 8 

re*. 15% FleelEn 44 15 S 

7«. 30*. Ficmng 1X0 17 13 

13% ll'o Fieri of 1.61 114 
29*. 20 FlOhlSIS .16 .7 19 


1008 - . . . 
54 33ik 32% 
IK 6V 5% 
534 18% iav 
75 55*k 24% 
344 38% 38% 
44 34V fi 

sea 38% 37% 

715 22V 22% 

‘ 46 46 


35 15V FkwtPt 


4S 1 : 

31“a 

FlaEC 


4 

zy'i 

73ft FldFrg 

116 

80 


HVi FlaSTI 

AO 

25 

21 

14V 

Flower 

.44 

2.2 

ro'.i 

44'.. 

Fluor 

40 

15 


4.'V 

=ooleC 

120 

4.1 


«“j 

Ford.Vt 

2.TO 

60 


lute 

FiDear 

106 

100 

31ft 

5*’.] 

FtHomt 

104 

12 

41 

41 

FtHow w 





FtKtWh 

44 

39 


7ft 

Fo»Phol 


5J 

17 

Poabrg 

104 

6.1 

22% 

13ft 

1£% 

9% 

FAtEPn 

FMGCn 

l.lOe 50 

vv 

rik 

FMOG 

KSeMLS 

22 ’- j 

14-9 

r-rpr/jic 

JO 

11 



Frigtrn 

JO 




Fruohl 

TO 



24 tt 

Fruhlol 



36% 

22 

Fuct-C 

.■» 

IJ 


16 


1245 

13 
15 

794 

30 

420 

48 

175 

,6 

217 

59 

28 

127 

1 

39 

5 

214 

1123 

1544 

9 

63 

130 

3 

493 

114 

104 

123 

440 

14 
6382 

ia 

773 

7 

173 

43 

46 

264 

132 

747 

862 

35 

577 

5 

208 


iiv nv 
37% J7*k 

r% 7% 

28% ?7% 
54"! 54 V 
491/t 48% 
30 29% 

8% QV. 
ST* 30*i 
6 ". 6 
27V 26*. 

&k§a 

34V 34V 
25*j 24V 
12% 12V 
36V 36V 
18% 174i 
361k 35% 
13 13 

34% 23% 
28V 27% 
38V 38V 
26V 26V 
15% 15% 
5% 5 

19V 19% 
161! 16% 
54V 54 
47 40% 

12% 12*7 
B3*i 91 
41% <T 
11% IIV 
13V 13 
25% 25V 
23% 23% 
14% 1? 
11% 11% 
10% 10 
19% 141, 
25V 25 
24% 24"; 
23% 28% 
3l’k 30*k 


+ 

24% + V 
9 V — % 
10% 

9% + % 
28V 

nv— % 

21%— V 
18ft — *• 
8% 

4% + % 
42% + % 
44ft +lft 

35 1 --. + % 
18ft + V 
irk +l'k 
27V + % 

23 V— ft 
I7*k + ft 
59"! +114 
26%— V 
26% * la 

6% — V 

33 

6% + % 
18% — ft 
24%-% 
38% + % 
34V + V 
38% + % 
22*. + % 

46 + V 

11V 

37ft + % 
7% 

28 + ft 

54ft 
49ft +1 

30 + % 

8% 

30ft 

*■•• 

26% 

27*4 — ft 

24 + V 

34 V— V 

25 - % 

12 V - ft 
36ft— ft 
17%— % 
36% +1% 

13 

24% + % 
2Bft + *1 
38 ft + V 
24% + % 
15% - ft 
5% + V 
19% 

16ft 

54 + ft 

47 + V 

12% + % 
83% +2 
41ft + ft 
11% 

13*i + 'k 
25% + ft 
23*. + % 

1? — ft 

11% — ft 
10ft + ft 
|9V 
25V 
24% 

28*. 

31 + % 


J8V 22 GAF 
37"] 27*. GA7 v 
3I'i « ft GCA 
73 -b 5* GEICC 
4V 3 DEG 
Oft JV GFCp 
weft Mft GTS 
26% 24V GTE Dl 
Nft »•« GTE at 
7% 3 GcIHou 

6ift 43ft 

37 


JO J 

1 JO 4.T 


3.16 80 
160 78 
2.43 10.6 


13 405 
13 31 

7 740 

ID 4 
149 
11 

a 823 
3 


23ft 38ft 35ft + % 

29% 29 J9V + % 

70% 9*. 10 V + % 

71ft 71V 71ft + U 
3ft 3V 3V 
4% 4% 4% 

34V] J? 39% + ft 

35Vj 35% 351, + V 

73*. 23 ft 23ft 
J% 3% J'*4 


43% Gormert 

1.48 

30 

1* 

405 

STfi 

56% 

S7“i 


20'.-] Gas Inc 


1.4 







”* Occrhl 

TOI 


76 

49 

«% 




13ft Colco 

it 

13 

10 

HD 

t /ft 

17 

17 


9% •jt.rrllC 




103 

JS 




10 Gem II 1 

.4Sf 

16 


127 

11% 

lift 

lift 


Jlft GnCors 

I.Ut 

19 

30 

J4V5 

52 

50ft 

57 

+ lft 

14% GAtny 

1 We 

9J 


35 

17% 

17% 

17% 



MMontti 
Hftn LOW 


ilOCt 


Dl« ru PE 


Si* 

IKhHWlLow 


Ctoie 

Owri.CrnK 


58ft 31% GnBtsh 1 00 
39’! 72% GCInm 00 

38 72 GC.npt 06 

TO": 7ft GnDotP 
13i; 10ft GnDev n 
jij 7V GnDrvwI 
61 *k GnDvn IjQO 
S3 Gen El 
S3 GnFds 

4*. GnHme 
III. GMOSI 5 
8ft CnHous 


84 

65'. 

119 

9*. 

18 

>3% 


120 

2-50 


1.9 10 22 53% 53ft 53%-% 

1.4 ll 246 35% 34ft 35% + ft 

IA 1 34 34 34 

10 1096 9ft 9 9V + V. 

93 lift lift 11% + % 

2 2ft 2ft 2ft + ft 
IX 7 572 68ft 47V 67ft — Vi 
1.7 12 4068 S9« 58% 594. +IV 

21 19 4629 119ft 119ft 119ft + ft 


JO IJ 
J4 14 
23'k 13*. Gnlnsi 35 -1.9 

65V 47b GnMHts Ui U 

B5 65ft GMOf iOOr 7.1 

46"] lift GMIr E jOSI .1 

SB'. 46V GMotpf SJM 9J 

0% 3 V GNC .16 

15% 10% GPU 

92ft 57 Gen Re 1-5* 

14V 6 Gnfieir 

53ft 37 GnSlonl 1J0 _ 

13V 10ft GTFlpf 1J0 I0J 

gift 62 GTFIpI 816 1&9 

4% 3*. Genscn 

19ft B G"Rod JO 

26V 18% Gensl D 1 JO 

36 28% GenuPt 1.18 

27% 20ft GaPac 80 

2»ft 23ft GpPwpI 3X0 111 

30V 25 GaPwpl 3.44 113 

31ft 27 GaPwpl 176 I7J 

23% 18% GaPwpl 156 11.7 

73 V ibv CaPwnf 1st 12.1 

26V 22 GaPwpl 2J5 10J 

Mft 55ft GaPwpl 7-fiB 115 

37% »ft Gert i-d 1J2 IS 13 

23ft 12% GerbSc .12 3 12 

28% 13% Getlv 5 

12ft 6ft GIANT 

12ft 5V GlbrFn 

27 17V GIHHIII 

67 50% Gillette 

16*. 11% G leasC 

I4i< tv GlenFd 


14 16 

1X137 

0 

4X 10 


1.1 47 

6.1 

38 13 
38 27 


6ft 

a* 

I3ft 


8$e 

lft GioMM .121 
ptl.751 


5V GlobM 

8V GIdtius 
4 1*. GldNwt 

39 16% GUSWF JO 

35 24% Gdrlcti 1X6 

SB 75 Gdrch pf 7X5 
30V 24V Goodvr lAfi 
18 V 14 V Goronj S3 
37*. 19 Gould 08 
45 36 Grace 280 

34ft 2 a% GFonars 08 
21ft 10% GIAFsl M 
lift <6% G'ArPc 
59ft 30ft GILkm 
21ft 15 GNIm 

41*. 37V GINNV 
29*. 22ft GIWFIn 
70 14ft GMP 
29% 22*. GreenT 
30% 22 Greyh 
6's 2% Graller 


110 S% SV 5% 

56 16% 16% 16% 

6 10% lBft 16ft— % 
1493 IIV 13 13 

1767 64% 63% 64% +1% 
5024 70V 69% 70V + % 

711 lift 36% 38V» +1% 

1 51% 51% 51% + v 

24 4*. 4*. 4% 

2978 ISV 14% 14% — ft 
616 B6% 83% B6V +7% 
80 9 9 9 — V 

897 38 37% 37% + V 

IQZ-12% 12% 12% + % 
100] 75 75 75 — 1% 

154 IV 3ft 3V + ft 

J77 9ft S% 9 — ft 

96 19ft 19% 19% — ft 
170 31 30% 30ft 

671 71 20% 20ft — ft 

3 24% 24ft 24% + V 
35 28 27V 2B + % 

2 29% 29ft 29ft 
27 21ft 21 21ft + ft 

9 20V 20ft 20ft 
29 25ft 25% 25% + ft 
lOOl 63ft 62ft 62ft- V 
646 35 33% 35 +1% 

406 17% 17% 17ft + ft 
241 25 25V 25ft + V 

S 1D% 10 10% + ft 

7 6% Aft 

240 20ft 19% 20ft 
3.9 13 1314 57% 65% 67 +lft 
1003 17% 16% 17% + % 
A 5 206 12% 12% 12% 

41| 1% 1% T%— % 

ft 5% 5V 5V— V 

19 515 9% 9% 9% 

148 Ift 1ft 1ft 

4 7 BZ7 34ft 34 34— ft 

SO 66 31V 31 31ft 

9.1 111k Mft BA 86ft +Ift 

50 I 4A3T 27ft 27ft 27ft + ft 
IJ 19 2A 16% IAV 16% + W 
28 3624 34ft 33V 33ft— % 

7.1 I! 221 39% 39 39% 

2J 13 94 31% 31% 31% -+ ft 

2J 8 BA 17% 17% 17% + V 

16% IA% 16% + W 


.16 0364 


X2 20 77 
200 


1240 . . 

1.00 10 13 614 61ft 61% 61% +Ift 

185ell X 3 16% 16ft 16ft— ft 

102 4J 12 130 36% 36ft 36ft 

1X0 3.9 B 2077 25% 25V 25% 

122 94 I 3 17ft 17% 17% 

6 7*3 27% 27 Z7% +1% 

1J2 5X 9 1044 26% 25% 26V + % 

. _ , . 8 822 5% 5 5 

137k 9ft GrowG s Jt U M ,12 It «% 10 + ft 

>2% 6% GaibEl XS IX 13 114 SV 7ft 8 — ft 

36% 24% Grunin 1X0 3.1 9 1704 32ft 31 Vj 33ft + % 

7ft 4 V Grunlal .16 25 58 ltt 6ft 6ft 6% + V 

77% 20 Gulltrd 08 28 11 56 

4fV 26% GllWst .90 2.0 13 3677 

AA 57 GIIWpl 575 9.1 I 

IB' e 111! GulIRs 2J 282 

lift 11% GIISIUI 1 a 4 1X1 A 2908 

55% 41 G1ISU Pf 6J4el 10 2 

M 
19 


GKSUPf 674*110 
32% 26 GlfSLI pr 3X5 127 
35ft 29V Gll&Upr 4.40 115 
20ft 14 Gulton 00 10 


24ft 24V 34ft + V 
44% 43% 44ft + % 
63ft 63ft A3 ft — ft 
I Aft 15ft lAft + % 
12% 12ft 12ft — % 
54 54 54 — ft 

29% 29V 29% 

. 32% 32% 32% — ft 

305 20ft 3Tk 20V — ft 


32ft 

32% 

1% 

11% 

42% 

15ft 

lift 

30 

20% 

21% 

46ft 

36% 

17% 

28% 

29% 

22V 
25 
11% 
30 V 
39% 
17*. 
25% 
IJft 
13% 
25 
a-i 

22% 

15% 

18% 

23ft 

30'. 

29% 

22ft 

24ft 

40% 

19% 

34 

21 

49% 

70ft 

39% 

33% 

23ft 

13% 

26ft 

73% 

37% 

57% 


% 

r 

63% 

g% 

6% 

53V 

30% 

42% 

19% 

39% 

81V 

29% 

14% 

20% 

27% 

13% 

15ft 

24 

36% 

31% 

41% 

31% 


22V HallFB 1X0 38 
24% Holbln 180 72 
ft Hallwd .03 71 
A% Hal ltd pi 06 6J 
24ft HamP s IX 13 
12% HnnJS 107a! 0 4 

17 HanJI 
16% HandlS 
IA HondH 
16% Hanna 
34% HarBrj 
21% Harlnd s 

7% HarnRh 
24% Ham pfB 300 137 
Wft Ham dK 2.13 8X 
13% HrpRws M 25 
23V Harris XS 16 
10% HarGro 
22 Harsoo 
24% Hortm* 

14ft HoitSe 
lift HawEI 
9V HavesA 
9% HazLab 
13% HlthAm 

19 HllCrPn .I8e 
10% HltUSA 
10V Hacks 
13V HedoM 

14% Heitmn 

16% Heilie 

20 Heinzs 
12% HetneC 

18 HelmP 
31ft Heraiis 

10ft Herirc s 
20 Her IIC of 1X0 
Ia Hermn n 
35 Hershv 
S>it Hessian 
28% HewlPk 
24 Hexcrl 
14% Histieor 
9V HlVoIl 
IBft Hllnbrd 
51% Hillan 
26% Hitachi 
36% Holiday 
45% HoliyS 
10% HameD 
17% HmFSD 

7 HmeGpll.10 110 
20% Hmslke JO Jl 
10 HmsIFn 00 " 
46ft Honda XOe 
53% Hartwell 2X0 
31 HrznBn 1J8 

3% Horizon 
28% HCA 00 
26 Hotelln 28» 90 
31% HouahM .96 20 
12% HouFah AS 30 
28% Houslnt 1X1 48 
67 HalntPt 6-25 7.9 
20ft HOUlnd 204 10X 

8 HouOR 
14 % HowICp 
23% Hubbrd 

9% HuHv 
12 HughTI 
irt, HughSp 
219k Human 
20% HuntMf 
26% HuttEF 
19% Hrdrcl 



I 


35% 25 
79% 74': 
11% 8V 
30 22* 

18V 15 
77% 23 


'Cind 

1A4 «J 

14 1045 

14% 

33% 

34* 

+ * 

1 CM n 

55e 3J 

>00 

li* 

15 

15 

- ft 

ICN 


73 072 

10* 

10% 

10* 

+ ft 

ICNPf 

270 90 

2 

27% 

TJVa 

27* 

+ V 

iNAln 

IX 11.] 


17% 

17% 

17% 


IPTim r 

Uh 60 

^5 

23ft 

23% 

23 ft 


IRT Pr 

IX 9J 

7 47 

15% 

IS* 

15* 

— ft 

ITT CP 

IX 19 

1014269 

JSV 

34% 

35 

+ * 

ITT pfO 

500 70 

IT 

64 

63 

64 

+2 

ITT Oil 

450 60 

5 

66 

AA 

66 

+1 

IU int 

M £1 

149 

II* 

lift 

lift 

- ft 

IdotmP 

1.72 80 

9 66 

2, ft 

21% 

21% 

— 'A 

idealB 


72 

A* 

Aft 

6% 

— ft 


10 


24ft IB 

17 5 

27ft 21% IllPowr 204 11.7 6 
20% 15 % IIPdwpI 2.13 122 
38ft 30'i 1 1 Pow at 412 11.1 
36V 27 llPow pt 378 11.1 
55 50% MPowat 221e 4.1 

40% 32 IIPowpl 407 1IJ 
36V 26% ITW .72 20 11 
40V 31% Impctim 213e X9 7 

12 7% ImulCc 

15% 9% INCO 20 10 
65 51 ImflM pf 7JB TI0 

19% 15 IndlMpf 115 11.7 
26% 21% IndIGS a 2X4 BX 8 

9V «V Inexco X71 
53% 3«% inoerR 200 XT 17 

15% 11 InerTec 04 17 20 

26 19% InldStl 281 

48 V 30% InldSI pi 4.7S 11.1 

21% 1»% Insilcn 1X06 50 10 
A% 3ft InsoRs 
26% lift InlpRsc 8 

28 19 InldR of 3X3 11.9 

35% 25V InloRpI 425 132 
9% Tk Inffean 
14V 9 IrrtRFn 

197] lAft I reuse LJOall.l 
73% 54 Inferco 3X6 

13 9 Inhist 00 

53ft 41 Intrlk 200 

12ft S% Inlmed 
24% 15% InfAlu 72 

138 V 116 IBM 4.40 

nv 16% mtem 00 

33 25 IntFlBv 1.12 

HU. 6% InlHorv 
7% 3ft InfHrwt 
3% 7% IntHwtB 
60 29% intHpfC 

34% 19 mm pid 

34 InlMln 200 


399 22% 22% 22% + V 
3Wz 17% 17% 17% — % 
150z 37 36 37 + % 

1710Z 34 33 34 — % 

75 53% 53% 53% + % 

1000: 38 37% 38 + % 

737 27% 27V 27V 
970 36V 36 36% + % 

134 7% 7% 7% 

2588 12% 11% 12% + % 
AJzSS 67 47 + % 

8 18% IB 18% + % 
17 25% 25% 23% + % 
358 5V 5% SV 

30 50% SO'A 50% + V 
15 14% 14V 14% + V 
55 21ft 21% 21% — % 
ID 43 42ft 42ft 

107 17% 17% 17% + V 

76 4% 4% 4% — % 

31 18% IBV 18% 

4 25% 25% 25% 

102 32V 32 32V + V 

102 8% 8% B%— % 

§ 9% 9% 9% 

19V 19 19 — V 

4.9 17 ID22 64% 63 63ft— V 

6.1 11 870 10 9% 9ft — % 

52 a 17 49V 46% 4B%— % 
263 9V 9% 9V — Vh 
4.1 8 13 17% 17% 17% + % 

30 1313830 728% 125% 128 +2% 

10 10 36 26% 26% 26V— Sk 

30 18 218 32% 32% 32% + V 
1875 7 6% Aft 

158 4% 4 4 

15 2% 2% 2ft 
1 48 48 48 

96 21% 71% 21% — % 
996 39ft 39% 39% + % 


60 9 _ 

40ft 24% Inf Mult 1.76 42 12 4509 41ft 38ft 41ft +3% 


57V «4V IniPapr 200 52 

16% 9V InlRcs 

54ft 35ft InlNrth 208 5X 10 

43% 31% InlpbGo 1.08 2J 13 

22 14ft InIBakr 12 

SV 17% IntstPw 1.90 93 S 

13% 9ft IntSecn 10 

21% 16 % IowdEI 1.90 9X 10 

35 25ft lowllG 2J4 80 7 

23 1 4 17 % IdwIIIdI 2J1 11X 

3Tk 27ft lowaRs 3,®0 9J 8 

4D 31 I pal co 1U U ! 
13 % TV I pot Co 26 XI 13 

40ft 271k IrvBnk t.96 52 7 

S3 43 IrvBk Of 4.74C 9X 


544 46 45% 45ft + ft 

1B6 10ft 9% 10% + ft 

315 43V 43% 43% + % 

103 40 39% 40 

31 20% 20% 20% 

9? 19ft 19V 19ft 

.25 9% 9% 9% 

1« 19% 18% 19% + % 
96 31% 31ft 31% + V 
100z 71 71 21 + % 

180 31% 31 31% + V 

161 33* 33% 33% + V 
8 lift 11V lift + V 
1584 37ft 34% 37% + % 
1 S2ft 52% S2ft — % 


35% 22% JWTs 
37 23% JRIver 

28"» 16 Jamswv 
13% 10% JapnF 
47% 34% JeftPil 
77 S9 JerC Pf 
65 4? JerC Pf 

ie% 14ft JerC of 
16ft 6% Jewiez 
49ft 30V JohnJn 
46V 38% JohnCn 
52 50% JftnC Pf 425 

27% 21% J organ 1X0 
26ft 18ft Jastcn 5 00 
77ft 72V JovMfa 100 


1.12 
06 
.12 
103*122 
152 13 
936 132 
7.88 T2X 
118 117 


57 39% 28% 28% — % 
235 32ft 32V 32ft— * 
500 16ft 17ft 1B% + % 

.46 11% 11% 11% + ft 

6&W 46% 45 46% +1% 

IQDz 71 71 71 +1 

2-HiZ 61 61 61 + ft 

.1 17V 17 V 17V— V 
192 16% 15% 15% — ft 

120 19 14 1477 45V 44% 45ft + % 

1X6Q 40 9 19 10% 60% 40% + V 

14 02V 52 52 

13 241k 24ft 24*4 — ft 
260 24% 34% 24% + V 
720 23V 23 23V + ft 


19 T6 
1.7 10 
0 10 


24 


13 Mourn 
High, low Slock 


Dtr. YM. PE 


51k. <- 

inns High Lew 


Qua.Cirge 


91 h 7ft KOI 
30ft 11% MJM 
45% 33% KM1 Of 
41 % jo% K man 100 
17 14ft KN Enn 
18% 19% KdlsrAI .151 
20ft 14% KataC* 20 
18% 15V KalC pf IJ? 

11V 7ft Katwb 00 _. 
24ft 18 KCtvPC 22* 112 
20% 15% KCPLPt 220 112 
21% 17 KCPLpf 133 11 J 
58% 39% KC5M 1X3 28 
19% 9% KanGE 1.18 ms 
41ft 32ft KonPLi 196 10 
23% 10ft KaPLpf 132 100 
23 16% KaPLpf 123 100 

45 12% KfltVlfi 
115 Uft Katvpf 
20 I2*e KautBr 
18% 13% Kaufpf 
OB 73 Kouf Pf 
63 34ft Kellogg 
39V 23ft Keilwd 

2V Kenal 
26 19V Ken ml 

29ft 23'A KyUtll 
15% 9% Kerr G I 

23V 17% KerGpf 1JD 
33* 26V KerrMc 1. 10 _ 
31% 21ft Kerens 1J0 40 
3ft 2% K*»Cpn 
15% 12 Kcvlnls .48 
37% 26ft Kldde 120 
PA 62 KidufC 460 
63ft 43V KlmbCl 132 
40% 26ft KnsftfRd 36 
18% iav Knogo 
29 94% Koger 

22V 12ft Kolmar 
21% 15% Kocers 
37 3»W KBPTPf 

16% 12% Korea 

46 36 Kroger 

37ft 75 Kubolo 
24% 8% Kuhlms 

67ft 28% Kvocer 
23V 15% Kysor 


Bft 8ft — ft 

17% 17% 17% + ft 


24 10 ID 132 

■Sle 1» 8 270 . 

400 M 57 4S* 45% 455k + % 
4J 10 1859 3ZW 31% 32% +1% 
309 15V 14*4 14% — % 
15% 14% 15 - ft 


12 

K- 


106 30 

>3 H 

BJS 110 
104 IX 

TJ0 5 j 


539 

79 15V 14% 15% + % 

10 15** 15*4 15*4 + ft 

148 6 7% 79k 

3390 21V 30% 91% + V 

11 18ft 18 19 ■ — % 

25 19% 19*4 19% + % 

56 53V 52% 5W + ft 

480 11% 11V IIV 

74 31 36*4 37 + 'A 

2 22V 22 V 22V — V 
7 21% 21% 21% + ft 
358 15% IS 15% + % 


JQ 

204 

04 


92 

a 

XS 30 
7 


30 18 
30 9 
4.9 

xa » 
22 16 

92 21 
X4 37 


200 

32 _ 

JO 11 

4X0 112 

J3e 17 
2-00 40 11 
01* IJ 44 
00 12 14 
J2e IX 18 
JO 40 7 


40% 40% 48% + % 

86 13V 13 13% 

1 15V 15V 15V 

13 75ft- 75% 75ft 

303 61*6 61 61V + % 

JM 36% 35% 3*V_+ % 

20V 2D 30 — % 

27 26% 26% — ft 

37 10ft Wft 10% 

2 18V 18V ISV + ft 

637 31V 31% 31% + ft 

41 28% 28 20V 

30 3% 3% 3% + ft 

7 14 14 14 — V 

WB7 35ft 34% 34% — ft 

3 gift 81ft 81% +6 
476 A1V 61% 61% + ft 
1322 34ft 33% 34% + % 

55 17% 17ft 17ft 

14 Z6% 26V 26% — ft 

■m 13% 13 13V 

466 15% 15% 15V + V 
life 35V 35V 35V- V 
341 14V 13V 14V + % 
343 43% 43V 43% 

1 38 38 38 +1% 

57 18% 17% 18% + % 
107 33% 33V 33% — % 
20 19% 1 9ft 19% + ft 


212 

5 

91 


2291 

194] 

.941 

120 

24 


tfiS 

194 
XI 15 
1.9 


_ 9 

1.9 

20 12 
4J 13 
. 23 19 

20b IJ 16 
02 XI 10 


.92 


10BelU 

20 IX 10 
3 

28 8 
62 

0 27 
42 12 


99% 29V LAC n 
31% 94% LN Ha 204* 90 
17ft IIV LLEPy 2J3*ltX 
4ft I LLCCp 
13ft S% LTV 
25V Bft LTV pf 
68ft 31 LTV pf 
18ft BV LTV pt 
IS 10% LQuInt 
29% 20% LodGs 
14ft 7V Lamars 
4% IV LornSss 
13% 10% Lawtlnt 06 
2Sft 10% LaarP! 20 ... 

20ft 20% LaarP pf 207 I4_J 
57V 41 LearSD 160 <1 
140 109% LearS pt 225 

21 IS LeaRnls 00 
34% 25% LswvTr 1X0 
46% 23% LeeEirt 
1SU ' 0% LegAtas 
26 16% LogPlar 

4 2 LehVcri 

37 24% LVInDf 

15% 13% Latimn 
15% 10ft Lennar 
24V 14% LeucNtS 
50% 42V LOF 122 
79% 60% LOF pf 425 
32V 22% LlblvCp .72 
90% 58 Lilly 320 
27% 12% Llmltd 5 .16 
46% 33V UncNII 1X4 
23% 19V UncPI 
88 61V Litton 

58 39% Lock ltd 

37 27 Locflte _ .. 

54ft 28% Loews s IXOaU 12 
38% 23V Loglcan 24 3 18 
36% 27% Lam Fin 100 42 12 
28ft 18% LomMt s 204 9.1 10 

ift 2 LamM wt 
20ft 19% LomasMn 
29 21V LnStar 1X0 40 6 

54 45V LoneS Pt 527 140 

9% 5V LlLCo 2 

23V 15ft LiLpfX 
22% 14% LILotW 
23% 15% LILpfV 
27V 18% LILpfU 
21% lift LILDfT 
64 41% LIL PIS 

16% 10% LILPfP 
19% 12ft LILPK) 

31ft 90% LonoDs 
37-0 23% Loral 
13ft 10% LaGenl 

38 26% La Land 
95ft 17% LaPoc 


64 38% Laws! 

31ft 31% Lowes 
25% 19% Lubrd 
37% 26% Lubvs 
21% 16% LuckyS 
16 10V Lukens 


162 94% 94 24ft— ft 

41 31 30ft 31 + V 

436 11% 11% 11% + ft 

1123 IV 1ft 1ft— ft 

1751 5% 5% 5% 

136 10ft 10% 10% 

3 31ft 31ft 31% + % 

15 8% 8% 8% + ft 

SO 13% 12V 12% 

66 25% 25 2SV 

85 7% 7% 7% — ft 

1 3ft 3% 3ft— ft 

55 IO% 10% 10% + ft 

126 10% 10% 10%— V 

30 20% 20% 20% 

67 48% 48 48 — V 

1 118ft 118% 118% +1% 
9 15V 15% 15% — % 

135 22V 32V 32V— % 

16 40V 39% 40V + V 
14 15V 15% 15*6 + % 
94 ISV 24% 24ft— IV 
45 2ft 2 2ft 

2 30% 30% 30% + % 
158 14V 14ft lift— ft 


2.OO0 

JOe 10 0 
-SO 20 14 


._ 11V lift lift + ft 
41 19% 19V 19% + ft 
245 47ft 47 47 — % 

10 76% 76% 76% + % 
36 29% 29% 29% — ft 
277 89V 88V 19V + V 
560 24ft 24ft 24% + V 
44 43 43% +1 

23 23 23 + ft 


230 

7 


224a 92 . __ _ _ . 

2X 10 1286 70% 70V 70V — 


37B6 44ft 43 V 44 V — ft 
176 30% 30V 30%— % 
825 45ft 44%' 45ft + % 
107 34% 34V 34% + ft 
267 32V 32ft 32% — % 
133 26% 26ft 26V + % 
63 3ft 2ft 3ft + ft 

a 2 d 19ft 19ft— ft 

165 2SV 2BM 2BV + % 
16 53V 53V S3V + ft 
~~ 7% 7V 7V— ft 

19% 19% 19% — ft 


588 

5 . .... 

20 19 V 19 19ft— V 

20 19% 19% 19% — V 
96 21ft 21ft 21% — V 

60 IBV 18ft IBft— % 

9 62ft 62ft 62% + % 

16 lift 14ft 14ft— % 

20 16ft 16% 16ft + ft 


J2 17 

14 

242 

2Aft 

25% 

26ft 

+1 

22 U 

17 

240 

32V 

31* 

32 

— ft 

57 5.1 

• 

10 

UV 

11V 

UV 


IX 11 

10 

411 

37ft 

33% 

32* 

+ V 

00b 42 

41 

191 

18% 

IBft 

18% 

▼ '4 

35M13L9 


87 

28% 

27ft 

27% 

- % 

207111.9 


135 

2DV 

19* 

70 

— * 

152 9A 

H 

34 

37 

76ft 

76ft 


100 12 

10 

845 

62 ft 

62ft 

67* 


36 13 

13 

320 

71* 

71V 

21* 

+ V 

1.16 16 

13 

396 

71 

70ft 

TIT* 

+ v 

M To 

21 

11 

.14 

33ft 

34 


1.16 $0 

11 

151 

22% 

22% 

22* 


M 35 

15 

10 

13% 

13* 

13% 

+ V 


M 


23ft 15 MACOM 
49% 25ft MCA s 
24% 19ft MCorp 
14% SOii MDC 
30 28ft MDU 
42% 34 MEI 
IB 11% MGMGf 


24 

100 

229 

00 

44 


27 10 MGMUa JOe X 

IIV 2ft MG Mu Hit 
3% 7 MLCmvn 
lift ll ML men 
22V 12V MB Ug 281 
38V 18% Macmls 05 
55V 38% 1.16 

MagiCF 


18 10V 

46% 31ft 


50 7 

P M 
82 

0 15 
3.9 10 
32 

. 21 
IX 16 
10 19 


7M >011 
IX! 112 
J4r 0 


4 

30 11 
42 12 
90 


20 

1X4 

100 


_ IVMgfAst,^ 2 " 
18% 10V McmlUn 20 10 
21% 12% MarUlNt 22 22 
19% 10V ManrCs .11 
42V 29% M!rHan~320 
8% 5ft vlManvi 
25% 16V wlMntd pf 
38ft 33% MAPCO 1X0 
5 3 Maratz 

2 ft Morale 
38% 25% MarMId 1X0 

r fV IB’A Marlons 28 
IV 8V MarkC J2 
17% 13V Mark Pf 12D 
TOO 70 Mania! 04 
75% 50% MrstlM 170 
44% 25V Mart MS 1X0 
14 8% MarvK -061 

36 24V Masco 06 

15V] TOft MassMT JO 
3% Ift MaS*yF 
30% 22% MasCp 
12% 10% Mas Inc 
65 V 48% Matsu E 
17ft 9V Mattel 
13V 6% Motet wt 
15% 11% Majcarn 
56% 37% MayDStr 1X8 
59V 43 Mavis 2X0 
31% 21 McOrpf 220 
30ft 16% McDerl 1X0 
10% 6% McDId 
70 50 McOnld 

87 64 McDnD 

52 37% McGrH 

50 37 McK*S5 200 

15 7% McLean 

6ft 1% McLeawt 
29% 22Tb McNeil 1X0 
44V 33 Mead 120 
24% 15V Mesnix 24 
39V 25% Medtm X0 
56ft 40% Mellon 208 
XV 24 V Mellon pf 2X0 
48ft 3SV Melvlll 104 
70 52% Merest 

117V Blft Merck 
80 48V Merdth 

36% 25ft MerLvn 
3ft 1ft MesoOf 
22 12V MesaPt 

35V 28V MesaR 
7V 5ft Mesob 
4% 2ft Mestek 
64% 51ft MIEpfl B.12 1U 
66 53 MIE pfH 822 13J 

3V 2 AtoxFd J2el5.1 
21V 17ft MhCnpf 2X5 9J 
18ft 14ft MdlER 100 "I . 
7% ift Mick TbV 06 10 X 
62ft 37% Ml data 226 
15V Bft MldSUt 1J3I 
XV 15V MldRas l.d 
XV 25ft MWE X76 
15V 10V Mi I hi R 
-86 73% MMM 

39V 27% MJnPL 
10% 3ft Mtsnlns 
8 4% Mitel 

34% 25ft Mobil 
2% ft vlMobtH 
8% 5% MadCnl 
33% 17V Motmsc 08 
13 Hi MahkOf 
53% 39% MonCo 1X51 
54 44V MonCa PfXSO 

19ft 14% Monrctt JO 
55% 40% Monsan zm 
30% 16% MonPw 2X0 
19% 15% MonSt 
1DU 7V MONY 
21% 13% Moores 

38 20 MoorM 

31 24% MOrMPf 200 90 

54V 35V Moron » 220 40 7 

47 29*i MorKnd 108 15 ID 

21 15V MlgRtV 1-79*1043 10 

X 25V Motions 04 1.9 0 

39% 24ft Mo lor la 04 

26% 19V Munfrd 04 

lift Bft Muhn; 

XV 23ft MurpO 

22% 16ft MuitvO 

14V lift MuSOm 

7% 1ft MyerL 


10 17 BS9 17% 16% 17V + % 

41 >571 48ft 47% 47% 

7.1 6 39 19V 19ft 19% 

H l + W 

U 15 313 38% 38ft 3ff%— ft 
20 41 876 18% 1H 18% + Vs 
664 24% 24% 24%-— V 
21 9ft 9V 9ft + V 
241 7ft 6% 7ft 

5 13ft 12V 

18 586 32% 31ft 32ft + % 

12 2087 44 43 44 +1 

145 lift 10ft -11 —-ft 

8 71 44% 44V 44% +-.% 

in 3 j% 3 

12% 12V 12%+Jffc. 


U 


13%- 

IBft + % t 
37V-+ Jk-4- 
5ft 5% 5%— «L 
6% 16% 16%—ft 
15ft J4V 35ft + % 


1 , , * 

46 32% 32ft 32ft + ft 

279 36 35 35% + V 

18 9V 9% 9% 

3 14% 14% 14% — ft 
41 1 89 88V 88H + ft 

447 69% 69 69% +1 

850 33% 32% 33 
1807 13% 13 13ft + ft 
W 32ft 31% 31% + ft 
12 13% 13% 13% 

364 Zft 2% 2% — ft 
6 29% 29ft 29% 

26 11% 11V lift— ft 
10 544 55ft 54% 55% — 1ft 
18 2200 15ft IS 15ft + % 
119 lift 11 11% + V 

5 13V 13 13V + % 

367 54 52% 54 +1% 

34 57% 56% 57% + A 
3 23 23 23 


IX 

320 

IX 

SO 


9J 


317 

18% 

IBV 

18% 

+ 

ft 

20 

15 

43 

V* 

Vft 

Vft 

+ 

ft 

1.4 

14 

441 

66* 

65% 

16ft 

+ 

* 

•13 

8 

VII) 

&/% 

66* 

17% 


ft 

3j 

15 

1X7 

43* 

42* 

43* 

+ 

ft 

£1 

13 

151 

46% 

46% 

46% 

+ 

V 


13 

192 

BV 

7ft 

8V 

+ 

* 



173 

2 

1* 

Ite 

+ 

ft 

37 

9 

10 

27 

26* 

77 

+ 

% 

•JJ 

II 

411 

37* 

37 

37ft 

— 

V 

10 

13 

213 

23V 

22ft 

23* 

+ 

ft 

2.1 

14 

1» 

38% 

38 

38 

— 

% 

55 

7 

671 

49ft 

40ft 

49 

— 

ft 


w 

32 13 
2.1 10 
20 16 
1.7 13 


1X9* 50 
.780132 


300 

226 


220 


2 29% 29% 2S%— ft 
34B 44V 43% 44ft +1 

70 63ft 62V 63V + V 

493 109V 109V 109% — ft 
.. .. 98 40 59% 60 + ft 

ZJ 12 3458 29ft 28 29 +1 

489 2ft Zft 2V 

1543 16 15V 15ft 

6 33V 33ft 33ft 

13 5ft Sft 5ft + ft 

4 3ft 3V 3ft + V 

4ft£ 63 63 63 +1 

310z 63ft 63 63 —1ft 

101 2ft 2 2ft 

100 21 21 21 +% 

7 17 17 17 

. __ 13 4U 4V 4V 

40 10 1140 54 52% 54 +1V 

3 2650 9V 9V 9 Vi— V 

306 16V 16 16 

B9 29ft 29% 29ft 

46 10% 10% 10% + % 

941 77ft 76% 77% +1% 

181 35% 35 35% + % 

199 3ft 3% 3%— V 

70 ,0 i]2t \ 

- 242 6V 6 6ft 

781 27ft 27V 27ft + % 

xo? 2 ift 2 

, 11 5B 50ft 49% 50ft + % 

6.1 4 49ft 49ft 49ft — ft 

50 23 50 IS IS IS — ft 

57 10 1474 43ft 42 43ft +1% 

‘ 11 " ~ “ 


I? Month 
High Lew Sleek 


Ofy. YM. PE 


Stv 

I H*h Lo- 


cate 

Owl aw 


82 


IX 

87 


18 


SX 


. 7 
90 10 
A? ? 


29% 23V Nashua 
18ft 9% NllCn* 06 
BV 23% NotDttt 220 
19% IIV NglEdii 
30ft 23% NatFGs 2X8 
34V 22% NtGrPS 
4V 2ft NtHOfn 
37% 24 Nil JS 

65 52ft Nil Pi 5X0 

32% 10% NMedE 02 

29 23V NtPreet 1X6 

IS» 10ft NISemj 

9ft 48ft NlScm pf 4X0 ... 

33ft 2TA NI5veln 1X0 10 12 

18 lift N Stand 00 27 24 

13 10 Nerco 04 50 

33ft 36 NevPw 2X4 

MV 9ft NbvSwL SO 
4 6ft 34% NEnoEl 300 80 

27% 23 NEnPpf 276 10.1 

29 24ft NJRsc 220 80 9 

29V 20ft NYSEG 306 10X 7 

35 26ft NY5Pf 3 35 110 

76V 62 NYSpt 8X0 tl.9 

29V 21 NYS n»A 302C13X 
20V 15ft NY5 Pt 2.12 110 

19 13V Newell 2) 11 11 
56ft 31% NewtMt 04 10 24 
19 12ft NewfUl 4X0071 J 5 
9*6 7% NwliIRs 74e 80 9 

46V 34V Newml IX 22 35 
3ft V Nwpark 
31% IS NiaMP 

33ft 75 NftMPif 

3S% 77 NlaMpf 

55% 42 NiABApf 

67ft 9 KlaMM 

17V 14ft NlOgStl 

10% 11% Nlcoiet 

33% 25ft NICOR 

irA 12% NOMAt 

17ft 10ft NardRs 

72% Sift NorfkSo 300 

28 8% Norltn 

48% 32V Norstr 200 50 9 
53ft 43 Neratrpf4.i9e 7X 
19 13ft Nariek X8 0 6 
40V 46ft NACoai 1.18 IX 7 
45V 31% NAPttJJ IX 01 10 
20ft 13% NEutO 102e 9.1 10 
IB 13ft NoestUT IX HL0 5 
ISft 9% MlndPS 106 1A9 9 
51% 40% NflStPW 307 70 6 

41 33% NSPwpf 4.10 10X 

87V 69 NSPwofaifJllX 
41ft 31V NorTel SO 

4% 3 NltHOtB 

56% 31% Nor tip 100 2X 9 
14% 8 NwStW 

«K& 32ft Norton 2X0 50 13 
28V 71ft Norwst IX 73 15 
55% 48ft NwktPf 50OelO0 
35 20% NOVO 26* IX II 

47V 28V Nucor 00 .9 12 

7V 3 NiftriS MSI 

93 68V NYNEX 600 7J ■ 


8 165 26% 25% 2S% 

3X 13 1017 9% 9ft 9ft 
70 27 201 30ft 30ft 30ft 

30 19% 19% 19% 

110 26 23ft 25ft— ft 

920 32V 32 33 — % 

56 3 3 J 

e wt a% aw- % 

„ 3 57ft 57ft 57ft 

20 11 1719 71V 20% 31% + ft 
]X 17 175 27ft 77% 27% 

JO 2731 11% 11V lift + V 


2X8 110 
300 110 
3.90 11X 
8.10 UX 
7.73 12.1 
lX5el30 
.12 X 

3X4 1116 
,12b X 

SX 


48 49% 49% 49% + V 
150 33 32V 33 + % 

3 14% 14% 14% — ft 

5 11% lift lift — ft 

540 30% 30ft 30%— ft 

10 MH6 10 V 10V— % 

T27 43% 43ft 43ft + V 

1 27V 27V 27V + % 

12 25% 25% 25% 

1837 25ft 25ft 25ft + V 

Ub32ft 32% 12% 

160k 73V 73V 73% +1V 
20 77% 27% 27% + % 

33 18% 18V 18% + ft 

6 17% 17% 17% 

189 50V 50% 50ft + V 

X 1B% 18V IBV— Vh 

13 9ft 8% BV- % 

721 44V 44V 44V + V 

81 1 ft I 

963 18% 18ft 15% 

1882 32 32 32 + ft 

7201 32V 31V 32V +1% 
20QZ5TV 51V 51V +1V 
1S0Z64 64 64 — ft 

X 15 14% 15 + ft 

50 12% 12% 12% + ft 
164 78V 77V 28V + V 

14 13% 13% 13% — ft 
56 L3V 12% I3V + % 

485 68% 68 68ft + ft 
Z7 10V 7% TO— % 

98 45 44 65 + ft 

100 53ft 53ft 53ft + % 
277 15Vk 14% 15ft 
13 56% 56% 56% + ft 
59 37V 32ft 32% 

51 19ft 18% 19 — V 
476 15V 15ft 15V + V 

1326 10V 10ft 18ft — ft 
119 46ft 46 46ft + V 
IDQz 36ft 38ft 38ft— ft 
20zM BO m — V 
265 32% 32 32% + % 

7 Sft 3tt 3ft + ft 

650 42% 42% 42% + ft 
91 UV 13 13% + % 

302 36% 35% 36%— ft 

306 73ft 22% 23% + ft 

20 STft 51ft 51ft— ft 

671 26ft 25% 26ft + V 

126 44% 43V 44 — V 

30 3% 3V 3V 

633 82ft Blft 82ft + V 


4% 1ft Oaklna 
36ft 25V Ookltep 102 
35V. 23ft OcclPet 200 . 

111ft 05% OedPpt 300 30 
24V 20% OcdPpf 200 10X 
22ft 18% OedPpt ZX 11X 
57 40% OcclPpf 625 110 

113 105V OcdP PT150O 140 

110ft 103ft Ocd pt 1402 130 
116 102 OcdP OfliXO 120 


514 1% 1ft 1% + ft 

40 12 71 33ft 33ft 33ft— ft 

70 10 1505 33% 33ft 33% + % 
1 108% 108% 108% +2% 
4 22% 22% 22% + ft 

3 21 21 21 

171 54V 54ft 56% + ft 

156 107V 107 107 — % 

68 107V 107V 107ft + % 
50:113ft 113ft 113ft +Tft 


28% 20 ODECO 1.00 4X 17 15S8 21 20ft 21 + ft 

34V 24% Ogden IX SS 18 176 30% XV 38ft + ft 

16ft 12% OhioEd 1M12J I “ ' 


34 25ft Ofl Ed Of 190 120 
28 26 OtiEd n( 07* 7-6 

29ft 22V Oh Ed Df 300 125 

31% 23ft OH Ed PT 3.92 13.1 

16V 13ft OtiEd W IX 11X 

92V 76 OhEpf 1008 110 

16% 10% OhMatr A0 30 15 

60V 55ft OhPpfC 7X 110 

111ft 99V OtlPplAlAja 13X 
26% 21ft OklaGE 2X0 RA 10 

36V 28% Otin IX 40 13 

10ft 5V Omncre 
17% 12 Oneida X 40 39 

33V 26% ONEOK 206 80 10 .. .. 

39 22ft OranRk 2.14 B0 10 1023 26 

12% 7V Orarwe 03t 6.0 16 154 8% 

76 3J 
87 


OrlonC 


2Bft 2D __ 

25V 23 OrlonC pfl.12 
12V Bft OrionP 
9% 6ft Orion pf X 


60 


1143 15 14% 15 

190: 31ft X 31ft +1% 
£11 26 26 » — % 

39 28 27ft 27ft— V 
23 30V X X 

40 15V 15 15V + ft 

50: 91 91 91 

19 IIV lift 11V 

lOltz 66 66 66 —1 

130zlfF? IX IX 

235 23ft 22ft 23ft— % 
422 33% 33 33ft— ft 

446 6ft 5% 6 

25 13% 13ft 13% 

36 28% 28% 28% 

25V 25*6— V 

_ ... 8% 8% + ft 

95 24% 23V 23V — V 

20 24V 24ft 26V + ft 

126 Itfft 10V IBV 

3 7% 7% 7%— ft 


33% 24 Orion M 

7J5 

9.7 


R 


77% 

7RV 

+ 

ft 

31% 19% OutbdM 

.64 

70 

n 

41 


77% 

77ft 

+ 

ft 

36ft 23% OwmTr 

.77 

70 

14 

UH 


34% 

35* 

+ 

* 


20 

30 

12 

74 

15 

14ft 

15 

— 

ft 

- K _T. . -1 

IX 

41 

8 

772 

V* 

33% 

34% 

+ 

% 

51% 38% Owenlll 

IX 

30 

9 

R51 

48 

47% 

47* 

— 

ft 


M 

35 

27 

IX 

12* 

12* 

12* 

+ 

* 


37ft 23ft PHH IX 2X M 

47V 31ft PPG 1J6 4fl 10 

31ft 16% PSA i0 23 If 

23ft 13% PSA daf 1.90 88 

14V 11 V PocAS IX 11.1 

20V 14% PacGE 

46V 34% PacLta 

41ft 24ft PeLum 

10 5% PacRes .... _ 

19V 13ft PocRspf 2X0 11X 
17ft 12V PacSci X 11 10 


583 34% Sift 34% + % 
850 44V 43% 44V + ft 
139 26 2SV 25V + ft 
15 21ft 20ft 21ft +1 ; 
21 13% 13V 13% 

889 17% 17% 17% 

.. . _ .. 76 42ft 41% 42ft 

IX 3X 25 1284 411 V 39V 40 . 

X5e 0 13 19 9 8% 9 +ft 

6 18V 18ft 18ft- V 

340 13 12% 13 + V 


IJ4 100 7 
106 BJ 13 


82V 62V PacTele £72 80 B 1920 71ft 69% 71ft +1% 

15 9V PacTIn A0 30 7 27 11% 11% 11% + % 

31% 23ft PadfCD 200 80 8 3712 28%2B%2S% + ft 
36 30% PodlPt 4X7 ItJ 39 3S 34ft 34% + % 

43ft 26ft PcdnWb M 2.1 17 2263 ZBV 27V 28 + % 

~ 80 777. 26V 26ft 24% + % 

30 31 34 34% 3C% 14V 



SX 


34ft 25% Pa1nWpf2JS 
39 32% PalmBc 1 JO 

40ft 20V PanABfc - .70 
8% 4 PonAm 
4 1% PanAwt 

21 13% Pandck n 30 

4lft 32% PonhEC 230 
B 3ft PantPr 
19% 13% Paprcft 
18ft 7 Pardvn 
19 lift ParkEl 
7ft 4 PortiDH 
39V» 28V ParkH 
21% 14% PorkPn 
2ft 1ft PatPtn 
16V lift PavNP 
23% 13V PavCsIi 
-lift 6V Peabdy- 30 
IV % Penoo 
58% 43% PenCen 
sv 44% Penney 206 
27% 23ft PaPL 206 100 
40V 31V PaPL nf 400 11 J 
40ft 32 PaPL Bf 400 1Z1 
27ft 21% PaPL dert.90 11X 
74 59ft PaPL »r 000 12J 
28ft 24V PaPLdDrtJS 110 
31 V 26% PaPLdpr3-75 120 
103 MV PaPL nrli.no 187 
109 99 Pa P L nr 1 "JO 120 

70% 55 PaPL nr &00 nx 
74ft 61 PaPL W 870 12J 
41ft 34 Penwtt Z20 5X 12 
25% X Panwat IX 
50 32V Penrual 2J0 

10% 13% PeooEn IX 
24% 14 V PepBvs 28 
63V 39% PepsiCo 1J0 
30ft 21% PerkEl 06 _ 

9ft 7% Prrrrton 1.12*147 6 
16ft 10V PervDs 
44 31 Petrie IX 30 15 

28% 24% PetRs 3J2el4X 
17 14 PetRs of 107 90 

6 2V Ptrlnv X0e27J 
33% 34% Pfizer IX 
24 12% PhelPD 


8 1085 37ft 37 37% + % 

23824 TO 7ft TO + V 


60 11 1743 


1398 |% 3 3M 

10 19 315 13% 13ft 13% + V 

18% 18ft IBft— ft 
TV 7ft TV + V 
13% 12% 1Z%— " 
4ft 4V 4ft + ._ 
.. 32ft 31V 31%— V 

59 20% 38ft 20% + ft 

183 2% 2M 2% + ft 

111 12Vh 12 12 — V 

- 529 14V 14ft 14V 

TJ 28- 572 lift 10% 11 ' + V 

. ffl 3 ft _ft 
19 709 49V 48% 49ft + % 
977 47ft 46% 47ft + % 
597 34ft 24 V 24% + V 
4te 17ft 37ft 37ft— ft 
150:37% 37 37ft 

4 26V 26V 26V 

130Z69V 69 69 —1ft 

15 28V 28ft 2BV + ft 
6 30ft XV 30ft + ft 
57QzIQ2ft 102ft 102ft 
207510 104 104 —1 

550: 67ft 66 67ft +1 
JOz 71ft 71ft 71ft 
23D 37ft 36% 37 — ft 

5 23 23 23 - ft 

691 47% 47ft 47% — ft 

111 16 15ft 15% — % 

48 23 22ft 23 +% 

28 12 2415 64V 63% 64 + % 

20 13 632 23V 23% 23* 

151 7V 7% 7% 

196 15V 14% 14%—% 
46 42% 42% 42V + ft 
10 26ft 26V 26ft 
5 16% 16% 16% — ft 
19 3V 3ft 3V + ft 

30 14 8165 *6 43% 43ft— % 

489 21V 21ft 21ft— ft 


7.0 
40 20 
7.7 6 
.9 19 


53 34 Ph*ip pr 5X0 90 147 52 51ft 52 + ft 

46V 29 PhlbrS 04 10 21 3687 3IPh 37ft 38% + % 

16% 13V PhilaEI 239 150 5 1683 MV 14 14V + ft 

33 26ft PhllEM 430 13B 


82 11 


6J 
?0 11 
4X 13 
45 13 
74 I 


. 10 

IJ 11 


7.1 

lJ»a 90 

x 10.1 10 

.02 40 12 
1-04 45 13 


391 28ft 28 28V + ft 

51 19 18% 18% 

60 8% 8% 8V— % 

10 18% 18% 18%— % 

29 23% 23% S% 

10 26% 26% 26% 

2954 50V 49% 50V +1» 

35 42 41ft a 

54 18% 17% 17% — ft 

... _ 886 34 V 33ft 33V 

20 14 2245 32V 31 32% +1% 

17 10 384 20V 20% 20% — % 

32 UV 14V 14V 

15 27% 29% 29% + % 

10 10% 18V IBV 

24 13% 13% 13% + % 

95 3% 2 2% + V 


1X0 13 12 
00 3J II 
1 M 1IU 


N 


40 18 
3J 14 
6X 15 


21ft 15% NAFCO IX 60 15 
36% 23% NBOS IX 81 7 
20V 11% NBI 
44% 31 NCNB 
M 24 NCR 
13V 9ft MLfnd 
T% ft NVF 
59ft 35ft NWA 
28% 22 Nates 


47 16V 16 16 

30 34% 33% 33%— V 

„ 9 173 12ft 12V UV— V 

102 30 8 383,38% 38 38%+% 

08 20 11 5059 34V 32 36% +2% 

17 £J« lift HV 77ft +- ft 

. 79 Ml S % 

10 25 1715 56 55 55% +1 

53 12 75 23% 221k 23% + % 


30 


.90 

IX 



HEPUBLSK TUNESSEN 

M1NISTERIUM FUR VOLKSWIRTSCHAFT 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 

Eekazuitgabe betr. Versdiiebrag des Eiiftaigstenairis 
der intemationalen Airssdefeitnmg N. P. 3759 

MASCHiNELLE AUSRCSTtMC FtR DIE WERKANLAGE ZL R 
fertigung von forderba.ndalzen. 

Dir Kr'iffntir^ tli-r Au.i'« hrrihunp; N. P 37 iW. die fflr den 1 1. September, 
lUHS vrirprwi'Ju'ii war, in auf iji'n 31. (ih tuber, iy8S wenaduAen worden 
mid findrl uni 'MK1 lllir in dw Salic di-i Krumw dit b Di mil inn di»i 
At'lui*, 21. 'Ml Unilamii in Tutiie-irn Hot I. 



BUSINESS /FiNANCE 

IGGER 
IFTTER 

The Trib’s business section is now 
bigger and better than ever. 

And once a month look for the 
review of the world of investment: 

PERSONAL 

INVESTING 


56 

69 

lift 

10ft 

61 

10 % 

116 


40% PhllEM ?.U0 120 
54V PhllEM 875 130 
9V PhllEM 101 130 
8% PhllEM IX 130 
49V PMIE M 7X5 119 
8% PhllEM IX 130 
“ Phi IE pf 1525 13X 


74 59 PhllE M 900 114 

61 » PhllE pf 700 10J 

X 48 PhllE M 7JJ 14X 
2JV 15V PhllSuh 1J2 AX 12 
95% 72 PhllMr M U 5 
26V 14% Phflptn X 20 13 
18% 11 V PWlPli'lX 81 B 
25V S* PhiPtot 1X4* 42 

aft 20% PWIVH X 10 13 

' ~ «£.* X X 7 

leNG 202 70 11 


35% 23V PI 
34 25* P 

2SV 14% P 

63ft 38V P 


15 
2J 14 
5J 5 
0 


A5oi3 30 
IX 10.1 7 


1 

... Itsbrv 172 
34 27ft Pioneer 1J4 
26V 13ft PIOWEI .06 
45ft 31 PltnvB IX 

90 61ft PHnB Df Z12 

lift 9% PliWn 
Jl 17 PlanPt n 
17% 9ft PlanRs 30 
IIV 7 Ptanfm 
*3% 7*6 Playboy 

22 12 PopoPd 

MV 24V PoforW 
16ft 10ft Pamirs 
21% 15V PooTal 
22V 14% Porrec 

21% 15ft PartGE 

35% 30% PorG of 4.40 123 
34% 30% PorGW 433 133 
38% 28 PottfCh IJ* 40 14 
34 23% Palm El Z16 7J 9 

41% 31% Prhnrk 2JO 50 I 
20% 14ft PrlmeC 

36V 16% PrimM* JO 

59% 50% ProetG UD 45 IJ 
IS 8 PrdR* $ 22 

47V 35ft Proler IX 30 15 
ZM 2 PruRCn 
8% 8 PruRI n 
MV 17% PSvCol 2X0 9.9 8 

21V 16% PSCalM 2.10 100 

10% 6% PSInd IX 1T0 18 

8% 7 P5lnM 

S3 41 PSInpf 

63 x ram pf 

8% 3ft PSvNH 
17V 8%b PNHptB 
24ft 13 PNH«fC 
22V 11% PNHptE 
199k 9% PNHpfF 
20% 10% PNHDfG 
29ft 22% PSvNM 2XB 180 
32ft 24% PSvjEG 184 181 
49V 39 PSEGM 5J8 1U 
20% 16% PSEG M X17 110 
23V 17% PSEGM 203 110 
109 96% PSEGM112S 110 

4% 2% PU&IC*. 

K PuWckrt 
15V 9V PUfOk) .16 10 10 
8*6 6 PR Com 4 

T7 1TV PuaetP 1J6 110 .§ 
21% 11 Pum.Hm .12 IX 15 
319b 16V Purotot 041 L5 
WV 6% Pin 7 


10Oz 33 32ft 33 +2 
290: 55V 55 HV + % 
150: 65ft 64 65ft +1V 
36 IBft 10% I0%— ft 
66 . 99k 9V 9% + % 
430:07 56ft 56ft 
56 9ft 9% 9ft 
7ttlI0ft 110ft 110% +lft 
20171 71 71 + ft 

201 5BV 58V 58% +1 
lfe 55ft 55ft S5ft 
X 19ft 19V 19V* + V 
1380 73% 73 73ft + % 
591 24 23% 239k 

2790 lift 12V 13% 

62 » 24% 24%— % 

29 25% 25ft 2Sft 

295 30V X 30V + % 

16 31 30% 31 

22 23% 22ft 22% 

321 61V 61 61ft + ft 
888 34 23V 24 + V 

14 15V 15ft 15% — % 
38 11 1087 &m 39% 40% + V 

2J 1 79 79 79 

682 14 13% 14 + ft 

122 19 18V 18V— V 

_. IJ 19 23Z 17% 16ft 17% + V 
.16b 10 13 A 10* 10% 10* 

12 99 Bft 8% 8ft + % 

X 5X 28 X 12V lift 12 — ft 

IX 2X139 4531 36V 35% 3AV +1 

X 0 33 342 lift 14% 14%— ft 

XD 45 64 17* 17% 17V 

33 17 16% 16% + ft 

262 18ft 18% IBft + % 

17 33 32V 33 + ft 

B 32V 32ft 32V + V 

110 35ft 35ft 35ft 
B83 29ft 29ft 29ft + V 

21 40% XV 4ff% + V 

13 3474 IAV 15ft I6K + V 
0 27 316 34ft 34 34ft + ft 

956 57% 57 57% + V 

111 lift 13ft 13% + ft 

3 39 39 39 

152 2% 2 2 

63 8% 8 8 

600 20V 20 TBVa 

3 X% 20% 20% 

198 8ft SV Sft— ft 

460: 8% 8% Bft— V 
100* so S 8 
500x 59ft 59V 59ft 
3 139 7% 7ft 7% + ft 

2 15V ISft 15V + % 

1 22ft 22ft 22% + V 

3 20% 20% 20% 

8 17% 17% 17% 

25 18V ISft 18% + ft 
9 IBS 27ft 27% 27% 

7 1761 28V 37% 28% + % 
llOQz 44V 46V 46V + *4 
. 184 19V 19 V 19V — % 

. 4 21ft 21ft 21ft— V 

18OJS-06 104 1.06 +4 

04 2ft 2ft 2ft 
250 + 

50 12ft 13% 12%— ft 

4 7ft 7 7 

337 15% 14% 15ft + V 
441 lift 11% lift— ft 
190 18% 17% 18% +1 

85 6% Sft ift— % 


IX 130 
7.15 140 
852 140 


63 33 DuokOe IX 20 15 417 57% 57% 57% 

23V 16ft QuahSO X 37 19 386 21ft 21V 21ft + % 

10» 5ft Ouanex 19 138 6 5ft 6 

34V 27 Qunfar IX £7 10 1534 28% 28 28 — % 

Sft lift QfcReH J4a 1.1 14 117 22ft 71V 22ft +- ft 


X4j 

1X6 


ax 90 
4X0 3X 
105 90 


06 


J4 SX 
M3 94 


*8 S" 


fV 6% RBlnd 
49ft 34 RCA 
X 29% RCA of 
112 80 RCA Of 

38ft 32% RCA of 
9% 6V RLC 
4V 3% RPC 
HV 12% RTE 
14% 8% g<kJI« 

47V 31ft RaisPur IX 
m 5% Ronwd 
21V 16ft gaweo. 

6% 2ft RamnO 
78ft 51% Ravcm 
17ft 9ft Ravmfc 
53ft 36V Ravttm 
WH 5% HeadHI .... ... 

21ft 14% Rd net Of 2.12 K2 
24ft 16% RdBat M XT2>1I0 
16% 11 RltRef IJJelOJ 
17% 8% RecnEo 
12% 7 Bedmn X 19 
12% BV Reece 
IV Regal 
43% 27% teidiC X 20 
Uft 4ft ResAIr 
2 IV RmAwl 
12V 5ft RdOvp* M 3J 
49*6 36 ReoNY IX 30 
27V 23V RNYptClD 110 
34ft 24% ReoBk IX 50 
30 23%RS5ofin 73 
24% 15ft RrfCM 07 IA 
30% 22% RSVCO X 3.1 » I 
97% 10% Rewme 2 .. 

55% 30ft Fevion 1X4 30 II 


0 12 6V 6V 6V 

20 12 3746 45ft 44% 4Sft + ft 


210:38% 37ft 37ft— ft 
3 104 V 104V 1841k + V 
7 38% 38V 38* 


12 

137 

7 

6% 

4ft 


36 

4 

3% 

3%—* 

IB 

47 

18% 

18* 

1**- ft 

ia 

62T 

lift 

14% 

14% + % 

15 

348 

45 

44ft 

45 

54 JJ8J 

7% 

7% 

7% . 

9 

23 

17* 

16* 

16% 


61 

M 

3* 

3V— * 

» 

944 

67ft 

66 

67* + * 


12 

10V 

rev 

IBV— * 

11 

319 

48ft 

48* 

48*— V 


1563 

6% 

Aft 

6% + ft 


4 

lF 

IS 

15 


1 

lift 

16ft 

16ft 

10 

7 

13* 

13 

13 

14 

787 

9 

0% 

9 +.* 

14 

38 

7ft 

7% 

7% 

32 

22 

11 

10* 

10 

10ft + % 

13 

61 

33ft 

33* 

33*-.% 

S 

[934 

TOO 

10ft 

2Vk 

9* 

.2* 

ID + ft 
2ft +* 


12 Month 

KWiLdw Slack 


DW. YM. PE 


98V 93 RvtnpfB _ 

24% 17% RexhfTi JO 
16% HV Rexnrd 04 
32ft Hft RevnlnklX 
50 47% RtVln M 4.10 

112% I03ft Rttyinpf 
130V raw RtyinpfTMi 10.1 
41V 28V RevMN IX 3X 
87 63 RevMpf 400 60 

26% 24ft RevM pf 200 80 
48% 26% RdtVCfc IXU 
33ft 31ft RlteAhJ X 
7ft 2ft RwrOkn 
36% Uft RoMitW 1.12 30 
41ft 25ft RoMsn IX 6.1 
24% 5ft trlRo«ns_„ 

249b 16% RoebG £30 100 
42 Ml 31 RechTI 204 60 
20% IBV flckClrn 
41% 27% RocJcwt 1.12 
73 55% RofnnH 120 

70 X Rohrln 

27V 14 RalnCm AO 

18V 5ft RoltnEs 
>2 % b% Ret Km M 

3Vz 2 Roman 

19 11 Roper M 

47 24 Rarer 1.12 

11% 7% Rowan .12 
64ft 46 Roy ID 3J9e SJ 
17 10% Royints 

2Bft 19% RabmOk 
26 14% RunBr 

20V 15% RueTog .74 
31V 20% RyanH IX 
30% 22 Ryders X 
29 18ft Rvtond M 
20ft Sft Rymer 


£1 15 
11 ' 
50 
80 


511 98V 97ft 97*.+ » 
5 22V 22V 22% 


50 

20 20 
10 44 
7 
16 
IB 
11 

3 9 ID 

3J 11 

2.1 II 

at i4 

5 


2 

1 lm 109*6 1W*6 + ft 

200 raft ia ia —ft 

J5T 34 an* 33»— v* 
- 5 73 73 73 

1 26 26 36 — 

1444 481b 47ft 68.. + ft 

‘ 23ft 21% 2^ + V 

2% Sft 2% „ 

17 32ft 3» g%- * 

16 26ft 24V Wfi . 

'IS oSft ^5 iSi?v 

520 35% 35ft 35ft— % 

» S» 3S fov-ft 

R-'M ’Bt ’K + % 

641 lift It* I’* „ 

24» 42ft 4M4 «ft + ft 
<3 7% 7ft 7ft — V 

1784 63ft 62% <»+.* 
227 13V 12ft 13V 
227 28V £% » +1,. 

» 17% 17 17% + ft 

17 19% TJV 19ft 

3 27 27 27 — Vh 

682 28% 27% 28ft + % 

99 21% 21% 21% + % 

19 16% 16% 16% — ft 


23 . 

33 14 1460 
17 101 
7 


12 9 

“IS 

IX 33 
19 
40 16 


100 20 17 

777 

32 10 ID 

18 

X 20 15 


X 0 36 

35 

141 H 16 

29 

30 10 15 

162 

25 

33 

95 

X 10 22 

143 


277 72V 72V 72ft— V 

^ ^ J?V+1 
_ 15ft 15% 15ft + ft 
29 17% 17ft 17% 

7W 22% 21% 21%-% 
14 -2B& 20ft 20V ^ 

44 10ft 10 18 — ft 

97 6% 4% 6ft + V 

.14 XV1871 33ft^ft33+% 

224 17 8 807 2S% 25ft 25% 

XOelS 10 » 8% 8% Bk- ft 

X 10 18 1711 33% 33% XT* 

30 SAnltm 1X4 8X 13 43 24% 24ft 2gi + ft 

35% 23% SFeSoP IX 11 14 1620 32% 32% 32% 

46ft 31% SoroLte 104 3J 13 88a 45% 45% «%— V 

Sift 30ft 5oroLpr 191 e 73 280 51 51 51 + % 

4.1 IS " 


74V 40% 9CM 
U% TOSLInd 
32% 19ft SPSTec 
19 IS SoMne 
21V 16 SabnRy 
2B% 12V SMBs 
12% 5% SfeOSC 

2% IV Sfgd5wt 
38% 23V SofKIna 
34% 25% Sefewy 
31 22 Saoa 

23 17% SfJoLP 

11% 9% 5 Paul 
8% 3% vt Solan t 

35% 24% SalheM 
2B% 20% SDieGS 
9% 6*6 SJuanB 
31 Sandr 


1JD 5X B 
02 20 10 
U3 U 7 
IX 100 


SgtWel IX .. . 

19% 15ft Saul RE 30 T.l 47 

22V 17V SawEfP IX 8.1 7 

23% 18V SavE A 104 60 

12ft 10% SavE Pf 1J8 1L1 

9ft 5 Savin 
13V 9% Savin pf ISO 123 

20ft 21V 5CANA 2.16 SJ 8 

52ft 34*6 SchrPto IX 30 14 

45% 33% SdlRnb IX 30 9 

14% B SdAtl .12 IX 17 
33 23V Scan I ltd J6I 13 

61ft 53 ScatFef JOe U 10 

44ft 29V ScottP 

16% 12ft Sen ttys __ ... 

45 24V Sea Oat A2 10 

13 10% Seaatf 106 110 

16% 13% SeaC PfB 2.10 132 

16% 13% SeoC ptCIVO 112 

27ft 17% 5eaLnd AO 20 

5ft 3% SaaCo 
44% 35% Setwrm 

21ft 15ft Seoguf 

34V 22V SealAIr 

32% 22% SealPw 

m-a 33 Sears — 

M7% 97 Soars pf 9X8* 80 

31% 24% SecPoC>10( 4-9 

18% 11% seisLf 

40V 26% SvcCPS 

lift 11% Shakwe 

26% 16 Sftowht 

40ft 29ft SfwtJT 

30V 21 ShelGIa 

40 25ft Shrwin 

8% 5V Shoetwn 


15ft 12 Showbt X 47 12 
19% 14% SlerPac IX- 90 9 

41 26% Singer AO 13 9 

33% 28V SllWTPf 3X0 .03 

18 12V Skyline AO 33 73 

14% 7% Smlthln 02 40 

71% 50% SrnkB 280 40 10 

79% 47% Smuckr 

41% 31V SnapOn 

15% 12% Snyder 


43ft nft sanat 


1J0 

300 


30 24 

80 


19ft 13ft sanyCa 
32% 22V SooLin 

«»V 33V Source 

23V .IBV SrcCPPf 200 100 
30ft 24ft SoJerln 208 9X 12 
49ft 38ft Saudwn IX Z2 ll 
35 24% SoetBk IX 19 10 

9ft 6V So*tPS -2.13t32J 39 
27% ZIft SCal Ed 116 9J 7 
23% 17% South Co 2X4 100 6 
26V 20ft SoJnGs* IX 70 I 
44 31V SNET1 737 73 10 

27V 22ft 5oRy Pf 200 98 
31 2fft SoUaCa U2 U 
39ft 24V Souttnd IX 27 10 
S3 49ft Sound Pf 4X 75 
16% 11V SoRoy J2 


34V 34 14V + V 

18ft lift IBft u 

l«fc I9V 19V— ft 

20% 20% 2D%— ft 

lift IIV lift + ft 

6% 6ft 6V + V 
12V 12V 12V 
24% 24% 24% + ft 
._ 49V 48% 49ft + % 
1643 34% 34 34% + V 

175 IIV lift !!% + V 
235 32% 32V 32% + ft 

.. 27 55% 55% 55% 

U4 19 10 1077 42V 41V 42ft + ft 

52 40 ID 152 13 12% 13 + ft 

- “ 63 33% 33ft 33V + ft 

7 12% 12% 12% 

15% 15% 15% 

16 ISV 15% 

18V 18ft 18V + V 

4V 4ft 4V + % 
41% 41V 41ft 

17V 17V 17V + ft 

33% 33% 33V + ft 

._ 24% 24% 24%— % 
3803 33% 32% 33% +1U 
101 105% 105ft 105% + % 
474 27% 27 27% + % 

30 17V 17V 17V + ft 
127 . 40% 39V 40V +1V 
192 13% 13% 13* + ft 
44 22ft 21 ft 22 +lft 
1610 39% 38% 39% +% 
135 24% 34ft 24% — V 
129 36% 35% 36V + % 
73 VH Bft Bft 
82 12% 12V 12V— ft 
■ 158 T7V 17V 17% + % 
197 34% 34ft 34V- V 
7 33 32V 32V— ft 

55 13% 13ft 13W— ft 
108 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
5Z7 66% 65V 66V + V 
36 7BV 77ft 78ft +1V 
114 34V 34ft 34V + V 
96 14% lift 14% + V 
1669 34ft 34% 36%+. 1b 


X IJ 12 
19 

04 10 11 
IX 4.1 8 

1.74 5J 9 


3 
1 

18 

4 
8 

45 

2 

170 

412 


5 

11 

687 

63 

651 

4 

83 

48 


7 -4 


AO 10 19 
.72 SJ 21 
00 Z7 7 
205* 4J 7 
X 12 6 
.92 20 12 
10 


IX 10 18 
1.16 30 12 
2X 137 14 
200 50 8 


.15* ~A li 1778 16V 16* iMk— 


SV 5% Soumrtc Jib 3X 
51ft 47 Somkpf 6JB*13J 
31 1 7ft SwAirt .13 X 16 

17% lift SrttFor 
18ft 12 SwtGas 


26% 70 

f™I 

23% 17V stalev 

-2TO 17V SIBPtlt- 

18ft 10ft StMotr. 

50% 39% StdOOh 

76 71V SOOhpf 375 £2 

ZJ% TO StPocCe X 20 8 

16V 12ft Stands* 02 17 ID 

31% 23% StonWk 104 10 11 

36 26% Stomrtt -IX IX 11 

lift 9% StaMSe 
3% 2% Stem 
28V 15% Sfercflf 
12V 9V StrIBCP 
37ft 26ft SterlDa 
26 15% StevnJ 


11 30% 30ft 3m .. 
24 37% 37 37%+% 

1 22 % 22 % . 22 % 

22 27ft 27ft 27ft + H 
160 45% 44V 44V— % 
91 30ft XV 30ft 
9 6% 6% 6% + ft 
4036 23% 23V 23%— V 
5217 19% 19% 19V + ft 
42 24% 24ft 24% 

59 X 37% 30 + ft 

. 3. 24ft ,26V 26ft + ft 
» 27% 27 27 

806 37% 36% 37% + ft 
157 53V 32% 53V + % 
488 13V 13ft 13ft— % 

14 Jft ' 49 49ft + V 

BRiaV* 

181 17 V 17 V 17 % + % 

IPiFII 

IX <1 15 37 —1 

104 £1 11 X 35 % 35 ft 35 % + V 
70 69 ft 70 +1 

f 20to 20 20ft— ft 

■■ 19 % - 19 % 



1 J 6 25 U 
X 40 21 
. 56 -23 11 
J 2 . 2 J 12 
2 X 6.1 8 


lJOallA 
.12 4X 
36 3J TO 
J6 60 9 
IX ‘ 

IX 


._ 40 

33V 25ft SfwWm UB 50 19 

14 10 StkVCjpf IX. 70 

45% 38 StaraW IX 30 9 

34% 24 SteneC M 20 12 

51ft 34V StopShp 1.10 il ia 

21V 16ft StorEa IX 93 14 

4V 1ft vIS tor T 
80% XV Storer 
21% 17 strtMtn 
19ft 14V StrUM 
6V m Suov5h 
39 28% SunCh 

11% <6% StmEI 
54V SunCo 200 40 11 


2.1 

40 12 


110% 90V 5unCpf 735 

49ft 40 Swndsfr IX 

lift Sft SunMn 
7V 7 SunMpf 1.1* 1U 
30% 31 . SunTrsf IX 30 10 

22 lift SapVal 5 17 

48% 20 SupMkt 08 1.1 12 

17V. 12V Swank AO 30 19 

22V 16ft Svbrwi IX 4J 14 

16ft 10% SymeCp 14 

65% 45V Syntax 

49ft XV Sysco 


-tS-ia ja-2^% 

iff 16V 15V 16ft- ft 
122 14ft 14 14 

39 2BV 28% 28V + ft 

26 36ft 36 , 36V + V 

25 10% 10ft TOfe 

44 3 2% 3 

4 19% 19% I9H + ft 
_ , 7 11V 11% 11%. 

30 15 3649 36% 35% 36ft — V 

86 25V 25 25% 

245 29ft 28V » +1% 

370* 12V 12V 12V + ft 

26 42 41ft 42 + ft 

59 26% X 26 + ft 

47 35% 34* 35% + * 

42 19V 19ft 19V + ft 

421 2 1% TO . 

204 am 88* 88V +* 

121 18 17% 17V + ft 

149 17% 17% 17V + ft 

IDS ift 4V 4% . 

A0 10 U .119 34V 34ft 34ft— ft 
21 9V 9 9V + V 
225 52% 51V 52V 
1 107ft 107ft 107ft +lft 
147 44ft 44- 44ft + % 
im 4ft 6% Aft • 
283 7ft 7% 7ft + ft 
132 33 32% X + ft 

TO 20% 20% 206k ■ . - 
775 42V 41ft 42* + ft 

13 12% 12V 12V— ft 

265 22ft 22ft '22*-+ ft 
. 193 Tift 10V Tift + V 

1.92 2J 14 1492 66ft 65% 64V + ft 

200 6.1 17 128 39V ' 31* 3916 + * 


A0 X 
-82* 40 
X 40 32 


50* 30% TDK 
36% 27ft TECO 
12% 7% TG1F 
2T% 12V TfJP 
26% 18ft TRE 
83ft 68 TRW 
6V 1ft vlTacBt 


J7e J 22 37* 37 37 — V 

206 70 9 .203 31ft 31ft 31ft + * 

12. 15 8* 7% Sft + ft 

IX 67 9 TT lift 10* 10V + ft 

IX 44 16 204 25% 25 2Sft— ft 

100 17 II 2150 40V 80* 80V + ft 

• |J JjtyL I4| 

87* 52ft TaftBrd 1.16 10 16 92 77V 76ft 77% +7% 

21ft 12ft Tolftv .1* .9 13 1» 17V 17ft 17ft— U 

23ft 15, Talley MIX £1 18 HV 19ft T9ft 

4.1 M 39 77ft 77 77*— * 

17 4347 35* 34% 34* + ft 

13 24 14% 14ft lift 

U 13 - — 

8 

. r 

20 U 
11 

IJ 9 

73 D 


382 49% 48% 49% +1% 
5 3 3 3 + ft 

^^^ft 

1 S6 35 3* 41 * 

2M 38* 37V 37V— ft 


s 

ja T&mSi ix 

5* 2ft Tetenm 
Z78V2& TeMvn . . 

24 1TO Tel rate X 
48V 30V T*(ex 
40% 31ft Temp in m 
4 SV 33ft Termca 199 _ 

104* 94 Tencpr 11X 107 

32% 17ft Terdvn 10 1412 IBV 17V 18* + 

15 8% Tesam . .X .4L1 m 10 9% TO 

27* 20* Teeorpf 116 WJ 30 21ft 21ft 21*- ft 

40V 32ft Texaco IX JX 33 3310 37% 36% 37ft + ft 

1.52 £3 9 42 29 2SV 2SU 

106 15 4 411 28ft XV 2M 

MOT, 33V- * 
J0b 13 11 37 X 29ft 30 + ft 

2X 11 13 1927 94* 89V 94 +4 

-T* .?* 3% 

.18 VO 12 •" — 

JO 10 16 
202 92 6 


.188 183* 103* 103* + £ 


12 Month 
mmi Le* S«w» 


Bft. YB. PC 


Owe 
Omlow 


i £& M,, ssas ss tH 
RUffia.a*T(.sE^** 

27 V JS V* W0.TI4 
St# Txf CrfOC ? o iu - 5- 20 20 

• JrsS! £as .ssas*®::? 

X » 11 ’5v ^ 

* «. v *2 st -a 

“^ 25 2722 M% »% + *• 

02 10 I! 3 « ttft 17 ft ft 

415 22 % 32 V 23 V 

TYBAM. 2JS 14* nTgfc W- lJV— ft 



36% UV Treftms 
17% 10% ToroCo 
s 1 Toa» 

17* 7* Towle 

9££1BU! 

S* J* tSZ* 

i% 5 K tIKP IX 14 773 SH n* a%-Vfc 
SS 17ft TrnlJK 22 10 ” 

14 11* TARIte IX 80 8* 

21* 17% TmCda nl_M £J 7 
S7V 44 Tranaco 2-Mb44 10 


57V 44 TlWHO _ -- a , 
AAft 53 TmCPt 307 .ft 


25% 19ft TranEji 236 «0 

££ * T?WM IX HUJ * 
13% WA Tr wOh » 

47 n 2fft Trorw 10 an 
41* 28V Tnwu AO .10 12 
2J% 12V TwWwtA 
34% 2H6 TwWM 2XC AJ 
T79k 15% Twtd M IX TOT 
49V 34V Travter 204 


SB* 50% Trnw M fU W 
27% 32% Triton 14*00 
30 21% TriCnM 2X 90 

zaft 7% Train*.. -X 0 7 
34* 23 TrloPC IX 3X 10 
49ft 29ft Tribune 04 10 U 
6% 4 Trlcntr 01e 90 7 

a 5% TiiCO X 3.1 13 

18% 12ft Trltrty 3ffl -19 

39ft 14% TrttEno -IDb A 26 

17 9% TrifEM I.IO *9 

43% 31% TuesEP TOO 70 9 

16ft 9V Tub*. . M SH 

20V 16 TwtnDi X 4.9 10 


17 21ft 21* 

20 12* 12 -12 
5 17* 17* 17ft 
826 49% 48% 4t . — ft 
404 snk Sift 50ft_ft 

230-20% 30%. 20V .. 
160 f ft 6 4% + * 

4. 25 ..35 25 .+.* 

3 MW HM 1» 

617 40 44* 4 S + V 

717 37* 36% 37 + ft 
24 19ft 19* 'lift 
1 33V 32V 32V 

-1 17V T7V-T7V— ft 

40 10 3192 42V 41% 42% +| 


41 X TvcaLb 
17V 12* Tylers 


X 11 11 
X 28 11 


45 STft 51% 52* + ft 
102 25«' 25fe 25ft _ * 
A 26V 36V W + ft 
68 26*.SV> 26*+. ft 

15 33V S' 33V + ft 

336 46 45V 4SV + V 

I Sft Sft ‘5ft + ft 

16 4ft 6% 6ft- ft 

71 13 12V 13% 

134 28% 27* 27ft— 1 
42 16% 15V ISft— ft 
762. 38V 37V 38V + ft 
-J M% 14V MV— * 
S 18V IBV 18<u + V 
309.37% 37V 37V + ft 
55 14ft 14* Uft 




.5 . v7 . 

9> r * 

9T. 


i*- 


u 


** ” 17 
.Ute 0 17 
204 94 TT 


ao as n 

330 60 49 

IX 40 7 

X 10 12 
272*25 11 


59* 39* UAL . 

36* 27* UALM. 

77* 10* UCCEL 

30 23V UOCfl 

04* 18% UGI 

11V 0V11N CBes 
14 10V URS 

38V 22* USFG 

44* 26ft USGa. 

19% 12% UniFrat 

110% >2* UnINV 

41% 33V UComp ... 

57% 32% UnCorb U0 

6* 4% UnlooC . 

19V * T3% UnEItC - 104 M 

34V 26% UnEI MMU» 120 

72 52* UElpfL 8M 117 

32 20V UnElM 7M YL5 

20* 15 UnEl pf 203 11.1 

26% 21ft UnEl of 737 100 

X 49 UnEl Pf 704 12.1 

72 52* UEItrfH SX 12.1 

24 22 UnEmn 


IX 20116 UTS 51ft 50% 51V +.V 


176 32 31V 32 + V 

189 15 14% Mft— ft 

134 25 24* & +ft 

82 21% Z1 * 21ft— V 
7* 10 W» TO.— n 

65 lift 11V lift.' 

731 34ft 32* 34ft + V 
235 39 38V -38ft + ft 

42 14% UV Mft + V 

12101ft 108ft 18818 + ft 

IX 40 12 HU 34* 36 36 - ft 

3 19V 19* 19ft— ft * 
19 26V 26 26V + ft 

6290Z64" 61* 61*— Ift 
IOOZ6AV 64V 66V 

102 23ft Sft 23ft + * 



S2V 37V UnPOC. IX 17 12 1734 .X* 46ft «V +Tft 


11 


M2 0 


115* 87V UnPcpf 705 60 

70 SO UnrytPf 8X 123 

SV 3 OnflOr ■ 

23ft 10V UnBmd . 

IS 9% UBrdpf 

33ft 17 V UQjTV 5 .18 . 0 47 

42% 22% UnEorg 208 £9 32 
23% UV UIHum - 2X 84 4 
30% 23% UUhlpf 307 .07 
31ft 23* Ullhipf 4X 1X6 

14% II* Ulltepf IX 136 

25- 15% Unttlnd X 20 8 

43* 35% Unitlnn 33 0 37 

32% 20V UJwBs L16 30 12: 

17* n* UtdMM 

3% 7 UPkMn 

38* 27 UaoirG 

8* 5V USHom 

42* 31* USLso* 

40V 34V USShoe 

33 22V USSteet ... _ 

56* 49% USSHM 70O81U 
33 24* USSttpf 225 73 

39% 30V USTob IX £5 18 
B44h 64* USWeat £72 70 8 
U Aft UnSICk. - - 12 
45 34 . UnTech 10 U H 

39V UTcbPt 255 70 

25 20* UnlTef 102 0J f 

21 15V UWR 

31* 21 Umtrde 
20* 16 Italwar 
30 J1V UnlvFd 
23ft 18* UnLeaf 
53 26* Unocal 


._. 7.1 11 
30 J 17 
X AO 7 
1.12 40 10 
IX -47. 8 
130 43 J 

21ft Z5 23 

43 X. USiJFE IX 20 18 
18% 9 UstfaFd UBalOJ 
26% 21 UtOPL 202 *0 12 
27% 22V UfPLpt 320 >00 
23ft T9 -UtPLpf 206 107 
2S 36ft UtPLpf 2X 100 
27 17* UIHKo 100b 60 7 


12 107 106V NT + ft 

HSte 66 66 66 

30 3* 3 - a* 

164 2ZV1.32 .22 — ft 

182 17ft 17 17ft + ft 
128 29% 27% 29ft + % 
435 42* 42* 42% + % 
470 24* 23* 23* + * 
11 29 29 29 + ft 

3 29* 29ft 29ft 

1 U .14 .14 

34 20* 2014 20ft + * 
1* 42* 42* 42* 

320 34% 32* 34% +2 
X 15ft 15V 15ft . 

S 3* 3 3 

516 30* 29* 3ffft +ft 
57® 5% 5* 5% 

106 32* 32V 32V + % 
_ . 453 - 39% 38ft- 19V + % 

38 20 2 387 31ft 30ft 31ft + V 
2B 53% 53% S3ft- ft 
2S IIV 30% 31V + V 
179 31 30* 31 + * 

718 77V 76ft 76* + ft 

2 -7*- 7ft 7% + U. 

-835 37% 36% 37% + ft 
141 33% 33ft 33%+ V 
928 22 21* 22 + * 

96 11 17% 18 + ft 

87 21% 21% 21*— * 
44 20ft 20* 28* + V 
X 25% 25% 25% . 

36 21* -21% 21* 

1178 28ft 28* 28*— ft 
670 114V 113*114 +ft 
272 36 35V 36 + V 

£3KS5gr* 
i? r s* i*--* 


X 20 P 
- 02 2J T4 
IX 


VT 5 » 


- 2 19V 19V 19*+ V , 

91 21% 21ft 21*- * J) ... • 


41% 22% VF Com 1.12 73 11 
Mft 5ft Value 
25% 14 voter pf 304 140 
0* zv VateVln 
28V 19 VtmOnt LOO 42 7 
4% 2K Vara 
uv 6V varco of - 
42ft 22*.VOrian . 26 1.1 M. 
U* . 9%. Vara- • JO- 30 34 
25% 13 Veeco At 23 TT 

11- ' 3%'Venda 22 

11% 9%VMt3> IJOalOJ 
1»JI- VMmo 


143 41 40% 41 + * 

443 IBV 9% 10V + V 
3’ 23ft 23ft 23* + ft 
18. . 2% J* 2* 

40 23ft 23* 23% + ft 
. 82 4ft 4* «ft+ ft 
32 12_ ».«,.+ ft 
710- Zlft 23% 23ft •- 
81 iIBb- lift 12*+ * 
.161 14% 14 14% + ft 

1 87 Wft lffV 10ft + * 

•n Tift ii n 

244 -li* n 13 — * 


55% 29 ft Vtocam X 0 24 1279 55V 54V .54V— * 

3»vrvaEP m sx rar wS* 45* 45* 


-iSj" 1 


49*' 

73* SO VaEPM 737 110 
91% 72 VaEPpf 9J5 110 
73 3 VaEnfJ 7 32 1L2 

27ft T3n.VtstWVS 16 

56ft 33* Vo mod 25 

85 66* VutenM 180 30 U 


1W 70 70 TO +1 

10: 85V 85ft B5ft + ft 
1Q0Z 69 69 49 

100 25ft 24ft 25ft + ft 
43 Sift 53V 54* +1* 
2U 83* 83V 83V- V 


W 


31* Znt/WICOR 202 80 10 
38% 25* WachOY UB : 11 .9 
23* 16* Wockht X 26 
10ft 6V WahlaC 
28V 18% MftMrts ■ 

30V .19 WatsmE X 11 15 
25% 17ft WkHRspUO 
299k 29 WOtCSv . A5 
39V 27 WattJm IX 
26% 17% Wamco 20 
35% 19% WraCm 
46* 31 MtamrL IX 
23% 17* WaihGs IX 
28V 2DV VtehNat IX 
24* 17% WEhWt ' 

66%. 40ft waste 


.1? 28%' 28V Wj + ft 


10 16 
40 7 
17 13 



10 10 
22 9 

70 . 


28ft 30V WottUn J6 
12% M WovCos X 
26 19* WayGpt )X 

12% 3ft WeanU 
23% 14* WebbD X IJ 
20% 19 WelnR n2OJ3O*03J 
34% 22 WeteMs ' 19 

62V 43 WMlsF 2X 40' '7 
29V .TO* WelFM 2X 110 .10 
19* 12 Wendv s 01 
27V 17 WatfCo X 
45 M mtPtP 232 SA U 


'569 32 -31%. 

37 23V 22* 

133 6ft 
3196 27V 

734 2J% 

10. 22ft‘22% __ 

.28 35 34ft 34ft 
XS 34ft 33ft 34ft + ft 
«- 23ft. ZJV 23* + ft 
1644 34 33- ,34,+ft 

4.1 12 6«7 35ft 34* 35V+1V 
8J 8 -99 19* WW TO*— V 
4A 7 186 25 aift TMte 
2X 1 10 7 70 21% 21* 71* 

02 10 19 1656 596k 57% '58ft +2 


3V WnAIrL 
2ji % WtAh-wt 
24ft 10ft WAIrpf 2X 70 
.8* 2* WCNA 

26 WCNApt7JS 270 


65 22ft TO* 22*— V 
17 9 ■ 8* „ 9 > 

1 20ft 20* 20* + * 
14 4% .. Xk^ «h + ft 
1207 17*-. 17V. lTO + ft 
36 19% 19% 19H + * 
62 3SV 35. S: -+!6 
SO 53*' 51% 53*.+ ft 

92 24* 23% 24*+ ft 

10 15 2101 15V:m 15V + V 
1.9 13 • 36 24% 74% Mft -' 

X J9ft-09* 3TO— * 




37ft 28% TxABc 
44ft 28 TurCm 
39 26%TaxEiit 
Mft 25 Texlnd 
U3* UV Tex Inst 
4% . 1 . Tea Ini 
21% 14* TexOGe 
35V 28ft TxPoc 
31* 25* TexUlU 
4ft '2 Texflln. 

89% 31 .Textron IX 30 10 
45 34 Textrpf 2X 42 

11* Sft Tlwck N 

3B 24* Thockpf 415 152 

X. 18 ThrmEs 25 

43V 30* ThmBet 106 30 u 

IB« 15. Thomln 08b 30 10 

IBft 13V ThnWHed AO 13 17 

22* 18* Thrifty - 40 32 D 

24 13ft Tldwtr .90 £7 


4«3 TO 17ft li + V 
29 9* 29* 29V— V 
1 53 ^ 27V. + V 

^ 1 + ’ 

OTk g% 27ft 
192 TOft 3D* 20ft + v 
16 3Sft 35 as* + ft 
,10 18 17% 17* + * 

iS If* 1 * 

340 19* 19 17 — * 

4*0 15V 15% 15% 


Sate* Hourrn are tmefflekiL Yeortv high* and lews retted 
hroatng day. Where a spill ar stock dividend amounting to 25 

peiycnt o r more has been pom, the yean tug twlaw ranee MM 

«vwnd« stwwn ter the new stack only. Unten otherwise 
noted, rates of dteidencis are annual disbursements baaed an 
the latest declaration. ~« gasefl 

a — dividend also extra |s)yi 
b— annual rate at Svldentfpluj stock dlvidendJi 
e - IteuldAtlns dMdendJl 

ud — cohm/i 

d— newvegrly lowt/l 

*”5'S!^ deCj0rBd n«cedl«9 IJ months* 

^-dividend in Canadian tuads. Mteerto ISKtwn+vshtence 

! tu»c*c»r«m ettlai- scHtt-w stock ctlvTdMd. 

L.“rr^££r" — » 

nd — nest day tfenvery. • • - 

PTC— pricjMKjmlnsrs ralta. 

« n«rtta.-Ph» 

S— Stock split. Ohridead begins with dote of spilt * 
its— sales. 

^ ^ ee dhte 12momnc.weHmnt t n 
cosh votueen ea+Hvldend or ex^latrlbufioadata. 
u— new veartv high, 
v— trading halted, 

^ k . rUCteV ^ ' r * caJtf «Yihte ar belno 

duttei Bankruptcy Act. m'seanttlaa asiuniedbvSS^gm- 

wd — often dUtrthuled. 

wl — when Issued. 



51 

133 97% WPacl 

33 5ft WUnfcxi 

52 24* WnUrtpf 

*V 2V WnllpfS 

14% 4%WnUDfE 
47 20 WUTIPf 

17% 5* WUTIMA 
39* 24 WstaE IX 
41% 34* Wtedvc IX 

34 36 W eyerti IX 40 22 
JMk'WBvrpf 2 X 70 

51% Wtevrar. 4X 9J 

22 6% vlWhPtt 

Mi M-* 

34% 19V Wbitabl 
24* 18% Whtttak 
12% 6% Wtetridt 

15* 8 whired 
13% - 7* WIUocG . _ _ 

”5* T M - °' 15 

^ -.-"J 

8 *. 3% Winter J- . 

?. 

»?»&■■» « » 
M 9* WatvrW 
SO* 34* Wolwth 
4* 2% WrWAr 
8« 54* Wrtely 

£,aa 

23% 15* Wynns 


513272 8 7% fc-.+ .V 

873 2%; 2%-'»+* 
688 25% XW-Xfi+lV 
323 2% 2* 2* ’ .• 

2 26 26 26 . . 

1 126- 126' 126 
435 11% II* 11*—. *. 
1 33* TO* 33*— * 
34- 6%. 6*- « + V 
28 11 V 10* ll. — V 
1 34* 34* 34*— U 


65 12* 12* 12*- 

II 12 .6326 38% 38- 30*. + * 

30 10 M 37 - 36V 37 + V 

322 26* 26* 26* + ft 

X '38% 30V 38*-+ V 
27 “41* *48V- 4»* • 

9 .--.ifa 8*— » 
Mb 21 D . - 21 — 1 . 

280r 15* 15* % ■ 

40 44 43% 4»— * 

264 29* 29* ® + ft 



IX 40 
.04 10 


a J2- auv-u*— * 

305 30* 2TOJ*''.. . 
243 3* 3* Jft . 

45 33% j3» 33ft: _• 
321 9 %XS.?% + H 
371 6 * Aft . 6 ft . ■ 

■ 20 6 Vr 6 * ■ 6 % +.V 
178 36 * 36 ‘ M* + V 
31 36 * 36 . 36 ft 


TO 35* 34V J3*.+l* 
_ 217 12* Ufc 12* + V 

IX 40 11 1558 58% 49ft »„ + S 
119 3% -J*- 3* +. * 

100a 2J 14 X aOVr-Wft ■Bt*>+ * 
• .- • 17 3V- a*. 3*.-. 

23. 20 26 79 n - 11 ,;lt • . 

X 12 a X 19 :1Mlr ]aft— V 


a? 5«nw , 3X 60 13 4637 47* «V 44ft- ft 

47* tempfUS TOO 1 54% 54% 54%.+. ft 

29 19% XTRA 04 20 11 11 22% 32% 22ft— ft. 


30V 2«* ZaleCp ' 
18% 7V Zooata 
J7% 32% Zavrei 

Sw. z*rt*fe 
71* 15ft Zaras 
37% 23% 2 temfn . 


IX 4J 10 43 28% 27ft TO* + * 

02 10 59 294 8% K. JW+% 

•48 .9 17 768 53V 51% 3»+l* 

• .,-10 -350 lift- T6% M&+ * 
02 JJ 16 111 19* 19V Uft— % 
IX 20 IT US 34% 34* 34%+ H 




NEW HKUtS 


Am Baker 

AssdpGds 
OoytanHms 
Cp 


GriLakeint 

JoteiCnM 

PepilCo 

SpumndM 

ToroCo 

WMAte2p| 


Amax-JM ■ 

Bandy 

CtniHecFn 

HowMKp 

•*®B0Pr®d 


ADT - 

AssdDGpf- 

Coiaca 
FtHawPoa 
ftmfaod ■ 

SSBt 

UiHt Ilium 


'AraSlortrpfB 



NEWLOWS TO 


ApptdDatn . 
Coruna o. 
j'CwiPrtB- 

sss? • 


Asarco lac 
CftMllcm 
FteetwEn 
MLCoovn 

Smtthtntr 


- BanttAmadlP 
ETTwm- 
HeantiAm 
Pocsaen , 
SyfwCp . 


j AME\ HijjisloHs 


AmTrcxon 
Goutdlnv Tr 
Telon Rnch 


Wt* tttoMs - n 

<DtCo' ; 

SmtlhAOS 
Wei ico Ent 

9 g*y<>p. €stevM- . 

iSScS&r* jumpJ ockn 

-Stemtapnon , 


•- 




.9 y -V* - 

v;t £ dT«r.. 


















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 


Page 17 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 





Glaxo Pretax Profit Soared 57% on Year 


.^ 4 VtaliaSuires 

jj-V"'-' Anom- 

5ME } — Ordinary share s of 
equivalent to 15.38 per- 
.. j£ie&tal voting capital 
‘tejnffctrd to. existing pri- - 1 
^^.Balders of preferred stock . j 
SP^^jnktdleK Noy ember s 
squ^fcssaid Mon- -J 

Sfeabt 120 million ordi- 
'ixt.the airlirw com.-" ’ 

56 qm tsf each, on $he basis . 

‘ sh&ef for-eve^'fivi? j>re- 

d sh^e^b^d. ■/; 

e itaban'-’state ‘industrial^ 

f TO^trfebm’ 1 limustriaJerot-- 
IRI, holds more than 99 percent 
of Alitalia's ordinary share cap- 
ital. Stockbrokers say its share ! 
in preferred capital is less than I 
62 percent. IRI said it could cot \ 
confirm the terms of the offer. ! 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Glaxo Holdings 
■ PLC said Monday that its pretax 
profit soared 57.4 percent in the 
fiscal year ended June 30 as sales of 
its Zantac anti-ulcer treatment and 
" -other new drugs continued to 
,boom. r . - 

Glaxo posted pretax profit of 
£402.9 million ($568.2 million), up 
_$0m £256 trillion -a year earlier. 
:£«Ib result; waif, moderately below 
..jsaicy forecasts, and Glaxo shares 
pence Monday to close at 
V Si&i&apiece on the London Stock 


.cxiaumgj. *-ri. 

was £26pa million, up 
: .*$8' pereeift*f|qni fff&J million. 
^fl^^gldbi : for'’.tfe^fltest year in- 
^ rinded in extr^tfmnary loss of 
£12.9 milli on on the sale of certain 
subsidiaries. Earnings per share 
: jumped to 75.5 pence from 45.8 
, pence. 

Sales were £1.41 billion, up 17.5 
i percent from £12 billion. Exdud- 


COMPAHY NOTES 

Baxter Travenol Laboratories 
Inc. said its third-quarter gross 
profit as a percent of sales declined 
to 40.9 percent down from 422 
percent m the same period a year 
ago. Its third-quarter earnings rose 
to $47 million from 539.7 million in 
the 1984 period. 

Broken HID Pty. chose County 
Bank Ltd. as lead manager of a 
financing package totaling SI bil- 
lion for BHP Finance Ltd The 
package consists of an underwrit- 
ten note issuance facility for S700 
million and a nan-underwritten 
Eurocommercial paper program 
forS30Q million. Financing is guar- 
anteed by BHP. 

Eastern Airlines Inc. has begun 
offering 599 one-way fares on 
flights between New York and 
Philadelphia and seven Florida cit- 
ies. The one-way fare is based on 
roundtrip travel originating before 
Dec. 15 on Mondays through 
Thursdays. The Florida dries are 
Daytona Beach. Fort Lauderdale, 
Miami, Melbourne, Tampa. Orlan- 
do and West Palm Beach. 

Freedom Newspapers Inc.'s 
shareholders rqected a second of- 
fer by Harry R Holes, who owns 
one-third of its stock, to purchase 
remaining shares of the family- 
owned media chain. He offered 598 
a share, or about $920 million. 

Korean Air has ordered two Air- 
bus A-300 wide-bodied cargo jets 
from Airbus Industrie to replace 
Boeing 707 aircraft The planes, to 
be powered by General Electric 
CF6-50C2 engines, are for use on 
Far Eastern routes and mil be de- 
livered in mid- 1986. 

Mim Holdings Ltd. announced a 


net profit of 182 million Austra- 
lian dollars ($12.7 million) for the 
12 weeks ended Sept 15 compared 
with a 1 4-million -dollar loss a year 
earlier after sales rose to 320.9 mil- 
lion dollars from 259.6 milli on dol- 
lars. 

John Mowtem & Co. plans to 
offer up to 30 percent of Mowlem 
Technology to the VS. public by 
year's end. The company expects 
its subsidiary to command a mar- 
ket capitalization of £40 millioa to 
£50 million (556.4 million to $70.5 
million). 

Voest- Alpine AG. in association 
with Scbdmann Siemag AG, has 
been awarded a S 10- million con- 
tract to provide rolling equipment 
for a mini steel mill in Australia’s 
Queensland state, said Broken Hill 
Pty. 

World Co., a Japanese textile and 
attire group, has acquired a 75- 
percent share in the French fashion 
company Chantal Thomass Cre- 
ation. Chantal Thomass reported a 
loss of 3 million francs (currently 
$370,000) last year on sales of 35 
million francs. 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

FWCBAT9.I08S: 
A: IIS DOLLAR CASH $1049 

Bi MULTICURRENCY CASH SI 139 

G DOLLAR BONDS $1154 

D, MULTICURRENCY BCND5 S1221 

& SIBLING ASSET £11.12 

FCDBGN & COOMAL 
MANAGEMB'JT IIBSEY) LIMITED 
14 MUUZASTB SnEET.STjej8UBSEY.Cl 
TEL 053427351 THEt 4192063 

FOR OTHER F tC FUNDS, SHE 
RfTBlNATIONAL FUNDS UST 


ing sales by Vcstric LuL, a drug- 
wholesaling subsidiary that- was 
sold last spring, Glaxo’s sales were 
up 30 percent. 

Sales of Zantac grew sharply to. 
£430 milli on from £250 nrilfioni 
Analysts estimated that the drug 
accounted for almost half of 
Glaxo's operating profit of £361.4 
million. In the United States, 

Founder of Kaypro 
To Be Replaced by Son 

The Associated Press 

SO LANA BEACH, California 
— Kaypro Carp., suffering through 
a second year of slumping comput- 
er sales, said Monday that its 
founder, Andrew, F. Kay, wDl step 
down as president and be replaced 
by his son, David. 

David Kay, 40, has been vice 
president for marketing and prod- 
uct development since 1980. 


Glaxo said, Zantac's market share 
is about 42 percent. 

For all other pharmaceutical 
products, sales grew about 15 per- 
cent. Analysts died strong perfor- 
mances. from antibiotic and respi- 
ratory drugs. 

Glaxo's growth will slow mod- 
estly in the current year as Zantac 
begins to level off in some major 
markets, analysts say. Robin Gil- 
bert, a partner at the London stock- 
brokerage of James Capel & Co., 
forecast pretax profit of £510 mil- 
lion. At de Zoete & Bevan, Stephen 
Poll predicted £520 million. 

The company announced a final 
dividend of 14 pence a share, mak- 
ing a total for the year of 20 pence, 
up from 13 pence a year before. 

Glaxo also said it planned to 
make a free issue of shares on the 
bads of one new share for each one 
currently held. The company said it 
mil seek shareholder approval for 
the move at its meeting, 

scheduled for Dec. 9 in London. 


Dusseldorf Bank 

Sets Issue Price 

Reuters 

DUSSELDORF — Trinkaus 
& Burkhardt KGaA, a West 
German merchant bank, has set 
a 190-Deutsche-mark (S7I.44) I 
issue price per nominal 50-DM 
share for the flotation of 23 per- 
cent or its 90-million- DM nom- 
inal share capital, a company 
spokesman said Monday. 

The flotation, which will 
raise an effective 79 million 
DM for die bank, win be (gen 

17, with stock excftaogeiLtiiig 
on Ocl 25. The flotation in- 
vdvesaround 20 million DM of 
the bank's nominal capital. 

The bank made a group net 
profit of 25.7 taiUioa DM in 
1984, up from 20 J million a 
year earlier, according to a pro- 
spectus. 


Fleet Board Backs New Offer From United 


By Bob Hagerty 

huenahanet Herald Tribune 
LONDON — Fleet Holdings 
PLCs board said late Monday that 
it would recommend that share- 
holders accept a takeover bid of 
£317 million (5447 nnBkm) from 
United Newspapers PLC 
The bid, announced early Man- 
day, represents a sharp increase 
from United's previous offer of 
about £270 million, which was vig- 
orously opposed by Fleet's board. 

The planned takeover would cre- 
ate one of Europe's largest publish- 
ing companies. Fleet publishes the 
Express and Star tabloid newspa- 
pers, various trade publications 


and a small string of regional news- 
papers. 

United publishes Punch maga- 
zine; the Yorkshire Post and nu- 
merous trade publications and ad- 
vertising sheets. Last year. United 
derived about half of its operating 
profit from the United States, 
where the company owns trade 
journals and PR Newswire. which 
electronically distributes public re- 
lations matoiaL 

United's new offer calls for ex- 


share price late Monday of 290 


pence, the exchange is valued at 
about 363 pence per Flwi share. As 
an alternative. United is ofiCTing 
375 pence in cash for each Fleet 
share. 

In pmiring its final offer. United 
forecast that its pretax profit in 
19SS will total at least £3 1 mulion, 
up from £26.7 million in 1984. 
Heet to a specific 

forecast for the fiscal year ending 
next June 30 but predicted that its 
pretax profit would exceed last 
year’s £Z&5 million. 

United, a l on g with associates, al- 
rea dy controls about 41 percent of 
Fleet’s shares. 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only 


New public issue 


October 1985 



EUROPEAN ECONOMIC 
COMMUNITY 

BF 4,000,000,000 

10.25% Bonds due October 11, 1992 
Issue price: 100.30 percent 

Co-ordinated by 

BANQUE DU BENELUX 

Lead Managed by 

Banque du Benelux S.A. 

Societe Nationale de Credit a PIndustrie S.A. 

Managed by 

Bank Ippa n.v. 

Banque Nagelmackers s.a. 

Credit General s.a. de Banque 
Chase Banque de Commerce 

Royal Bank of Canada (Belgium) s.a. 
Societe Generate Alsacienne de Banque 


The” Bamboo 




/ 

f 

A 


y V r i > I 

•"«N . sih'tt* 


N^ .’f a •; > -V. 

WK: 











Mondays 

AMEX 

Closing; 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on wall street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I in The Asstoinh'd Press 


13 Month 
High LOW Stock 


lOfeHMtLow Quot.afte 


IM Com on I 
13b CMarce JO 
273* CWIntf 
4V* CareE B 
av. CareE A 
7M Catalan 86125.1 
I4M CastlA Mb 54 
TVb CasFa 330a 7J 
2 Cniind 
sv» cenilwi 
10b centse l -57c 13.1 
UM CtryBu .. ,, 

5b Cerec 20 28 13 
lb ChmeH 27 

l}t j ChmoP 27 54 SS 


let* ChIMAS .16 J U 

let* ChlR* I Mo A-1 II 

»M CMDVB , _ 

ISM Chilhi 5 .17 5 28 


UVj Citadel 

IBM CltFsl 1.000 3J 
201* CtvGaS 130 3.9 
Win ClarmI 1.93 b 4.7 
M'h Clonwl ASb Z3 


.17 S 39 

A 

1.000 13 * 

130 1? 9 


IT* Clopavs .14 1.1 17 
3 vs Coonirr „ 

Co no JO 2.1 9 
lb ColFwts 
9ft Com led A 


• 7 

4<~ ADI n 









A5i AL LODI 









A, V'C 


.7 

u 




16 — '-* 


2H AM mil 



9 




4 — '* 

■ SS 

A7M ATT Fd 

557e 7.0 




TflM 

79H + ", 


8 *2 AcmeU 

J2 






9b 

1 IB 1 - 

95. Action 



1 1 




lot* + n 

A 

IM ACton 







IV* + t» 


1'1 AdmRs 







3'.* + M 



IA 

A 

17 



25M 

2t-'.* + Va 



JB 

Ia 

12 

724 

17M 

17 

ir-« + b 


r.i. 51b 
r.- »b 
is 

.f.. 13b 
v .. 3b 
•i KB 1 * 
■- •" Aft 

r *’» 


4 Aeronc 

39 X 3 AhlPhs 40 14 
Sft A.rEap 
A Air Cal 

«b ArCalnt 1 JO 101 
ft Alomco 
ASM Almilon 
A AltnW 
5M Aloha 

«'i AlDham .05 j 
!■ Alir> 

30 Alcoa ot 3 75 1 IJ 
17’. AlroCt 
Z-. Am ar.l .08 27 
10M Amdahl JO 17 
S '- 3 Amedeo OS 14 

A'-a Am Blit IS 14 


13 5 S 

17 445h 45 ! 

28 aft 4 


248 9% 

A4 12. 


142 

25009 33M 
nt 341* 
1 3 

382 12b 

Ze AM 

41 n 
25 a 


S 5 

45b 44% + ft 

A AS* 

94* 91* + M 

lit. lit* 
t- ft + M 
83'7 8JV* — IS 
AM Aft + '« 
7b 7M + b 
9M l«lt3 
v, ft — ■■ 
33b 33M * b 
24 24ft 
3 3 + ft 

111 * 12 + ft 

A 1 . AV. 

10t* II + M 


8W Coniine .10 
AM Cameo 
AM CompD 
4 Vi CmoCn 

517 OPPFd 13 

145* Cneniri JO 15 12 
A** Connlv 8 

Ijv, conrCp 7 

5M Coiwst 94 

lft Conawt 
4«* Corn or. 

ConOCwl 

1AW CnStW n 21 

7ft vICorriA 4 

81* viCflIApf 
17ft ContMtl 8 

IB*. Conwstn 
18 Coolevn 
75* CosCrn l 9 

V* CosCr wt 
9ft CntrM n 

Tv* CrstFo JSC 1-S 10 
255* Cross IJ< 4 J 15 
24 1* CrowIM 1.00a Z? 8 


II AH 
1 ISM 
I 13H 
I 17V; 
154 95s 


in in 
15V* 1SV* 
341* IS 
7 7 

1 7 

2M 35* 
IS 1SV* 
2flb »b- 
4 4 

55* ft* 
11M 12 
l&n iavs- 

7 ?% 

in im- 

13** 135* 
18b 19** 
1*5* 1*41- 
7V4 7b 
SOM 31*4 
2051 2454 ■ 
31 311* 

3H* 31’* 
40M 415* 
3AM 365*- 
145* 15 
45* 45* 

95* 95* 

31 4 
tosii aw. 
05* 95* 

115* 115*. 

8 8 - 
J TV* 
AM AM 

15M 1ST* 
13M 13M • 
17V; 17Vj 
«b 9M- 
47* S 
451 5 


101* 73* Frledm J8b 38 13 

133* S FrlesE n IS 

2A 141* Frisch S J2 143 19 

OT* TOM FmtHd 70 

Mb 41* FrlA Wl .171 13 
12b AM FurVtl JO 1.9 20 


2 8 B H — v* 
90 8M SV* 85* + Vi 
10 EM 22M EM — 'A 


70 217 2314 231* 231* 

.171 1J 102 14 13% 14 + ft 

JO 1.9 20 20 101* 1092 101* 


9ft CmCP 
7H CrCPB 
9* CrulcR 
M CrvstO 
135. Cubic 


*35* 

205. AEvpwl 





J7M 

79M 

32M +2 ,, « 










10M 




/ 


*M 

4 '-4 



4M A Israel 



4 

3 

AM 

AM 

AM + M 

IBM 

11** AMzaa 


13 

JT 


135., 

IJ'T 



12'* AMteB 


*J 

17 


12t: 

12*. 


S'- a 

1* AMBId 




Ia2 

*tj 

4M 








•I'd 

4’« 


62'* 

47'* APell 

ZOO 

as 

’! 

3 

S3 

S2 r i 

52M— b 

15H 

12'5 AProc 


18 

11 

14"! 

I4U 


B 1 * 

A'- AmRItv 



4 

3 

in 


7H + '* 


J9 IJ 12 
.92 10 11 


40 ?M 

ia ion 

719 33W 
2 34 
S IS 
4 lit* 
A6 M 
1005 r* 
54 22H 

8 ^ 


2tP* 21M + M 
135* I3M- Vi 
1AM 1AM— M 
20 1* 21 + M 

115* 11M— b 
IBM IBM. 

9Va 9«* 

9H 10M + M 
33b 33b 
34 34 + b 

15 IS + U. 
it* im— v* 
S 5* 
n in + n 

2iv» 225* +1V* 

79^30^+1 


TV* u., 
33k Ifa 
7M 35* 
19*9 11M 
195* 13 
143* BV* 
13 9 

554 4M 
27H 16b 
93* 29b 
31 M 18V} 
AM 354 
34M 9 V, 

3t* II* 
4b TH 
Zb )k* 

39M 77b 
19 10 'A 

!4V> 8 fi 

139b 91* 

141* 10 
2AM at* 


USB 

La Bara 

LaPnt 

UndSnn JO 

Lndmk JO 

Law 

Lauren 

LOlKOO 

LeorPP 3JD0 

LeePh 

Lehigh o JOI 
LelsurT 
LbiFPh JO 

UlsRSS 

uina 

Lodse 

Lorlmr 

Lumex JJ S 

LundvE 

Lurla 

Lvdai 

LvnCSc JO 


33 73* 

3 1M 
33 4 
ID 1BU 
12 19 
49 95* 

5 9 

2 St* 
27 185* 
113 AM 
2 30M 
360 6b 
5 33b 
709 154 

I 4b 

SS 15A 
929 SAM 
22 I4M 
4A 12 
09 10t* 
95 T4M 
144 10M 


TV* 21* ■ 
!M IT* 
3M 3M- 
IB IBM ' 
IBM 18M- 
9b 95* 

9 9 
St* SV*. 

IBtt 1BV3- 
AM AM 
30 1* 30M- 
AV* AM- 
33b 33b- 
lb 154 
4b 4b- 
It* 11*. 
SA SAM 
Mb 14b- 
1134 12 

10 105 * 
14M 145* 
?n iob ■ 


ll’l ARovI n 
3 ASciE 


53 

<9H 

A<ODun 

12 

53t» 

S3Vi 

46 V, 

u 

A >on pr 


46M 

4AM 

7 

5'-: 

A «on SC 

1« 

7 

AM 

3W 

IM 

AmccH 

Ot U 1 108 

2 

IM 

A 

41. 

AtWal 

IB 10 

ST, 

5n 

sm 

2’-- 

AndJCt 

20 

2M 

2 1 '. 

lfl'.*j 

5b 

Ansles 

ID 

6b 

Ab 

25* 

*a 

viAnal v 

i: 

1'. 

1 

6b 

3M 

ArooPI 

8a3 

JM 

3H 


5'* Arie» n 
4b Armlrn 
5‘ . Armel -j 
17'. Arundl 


3M — v* 
S3'.* + M 
4AM— v* 
7 + M 

2 + I* 

Pi- H 
7b — H 
6b— t* 
Tb + t* 
35* 

6 

4b — *.* 
SV* — b 


7*m 



22 

77 

9t'i 

7 

«M + 

13'* 

9b Asire< 


12 

2 

12'; 

171; 

12V* 





4.U 

IM 



l*i 

N AdsCM 



47 

% 

M 

M 

4^ 




2 

3". 

3b 


19'1 

135* Ai-ondl 

80 

5J 13 

1 

15 

15 

15 + 


4* : 

3'i 

B*T in 

15o 4.C 

A 

S78J 

3b 

3d 

3b 

JSM 

UL 

SD..VS 


2* 

16 

21 M 

21'* 

21M + Vi 

3'; 


&R7 


t 

IA 

2b 

7b 

Zb 

IS - -. 

W. 

5 ' 14 



42 

10 

9b 

9=S + '.* 

TO'. 

3 

3oifiw5 

J2a 35 


3 

9b 


ft* 

4H 


Bal.Mtvl 


122 

2-'-4 

:v* 

2b + M 

26b 

92'. 

BonFd 

Z43e «a 


12 

25b 

25’. 

2Ti— H 

7'* 

'<b 

Sanitr? 



3 

AM 

AM 

AM— M 

®l* 

ir‘ 

Sri. Bid 

JO 4.« 

10 

IA 

Bte 

8Vb 

OH + b 

4-« 


BarnEn 


16 

7 

3'b 

3M 

3Vi + H 

V'.'c 

A'i 

Bomwl 

JO 11 


1 

AM 

AM 

AM - V* 

6'* 

4 

3 a.'/RG 



20 

4'.. 

4<* 

4ta 

!?-« 

!0'. 

0 crv:h 

J71 3.1 

19 

*3 

11% 

I1M 

11H + M 


4b 

seird 



5 

9M 

«M 

«M 

22 : 

I0M 

=-+r<2=r*- 

160 lAfl 


15 

lJVj 

11'. 

II'.— '. 

4b 


&9l|ro/l 



45 

M 


2k 


jet 4j 
J2 U 10 
JO 23-9 

jo 3a/ 


J2t SA II 
11 
88 

JO 123 

SO 

45 

JO .9 22 


JO J 15 
10 


S3 lb 
5 74b 
2A2 854 

558 TV, 
394 Jb 

4 197* 
1A 22b 

146 11M 
20 A 
70 2M 
11 1SV* 
222 lb 

8 4H 

65 8b 
170 13b 
11 9M 
7 7 

5 6b 
76 32’* 

45 


741 AT* 
17 3 


486 2 

1 

228 141* 


IM 154 + I* 
74M 24b 
8b BM — 

7 7V* 

35* 334 — v* 

19M 19M + '* 

nv. 22 b 
11M 11H— M 
A 6+1* 

2M 2M + V* 
155* ISM 
in 13*— v* 
4 41* + '* 

BM 8b 
I3M 13V*— b 
9** 9M + M 
7 7 

Ab Ab — <* 

32’* 37V* + v* 

Ht « 

61 61V* + 54 

I'M V* 


44 26 II 
40b 29 15 
J7e 10 9 

ffii 29 17 


13M I4M + M 

1<* 1H 

17V* 17b + b 
13b ISM — ’* 
13b 13b 
70 28 + H 


32M 20 ’i BeraSr 
I4Va 2U* BlcCa 
24M 21’-* Sink Ml 
1* 95-, BioR A 5 

25 !4b BICU10S 

IVs ’u Slock. = 
1914 T1 Blount A 
I»t: IT: BleunlB 
22 IT. Solar P i 
ir- Bewval 

5-. 2‘i 5 : vrrir 


J2 1J 13 
.72 ZJ 10 

1.00 4.1 IT 

IS 

JO 13 » 


JS 3.8 12 
.40 3J 12 


12"' Sovue 44 2,7 

Sricnc 1«0 

;v.. BrnFA l£0 30 9 

26 BrnFB 1.C0 22 10 

3b BmFof JO ICO 

25, Buckhn 
3b Buckhot JO 11.1 

4 l , Busnn 


345 lob 25*t 26V* 

15 33M 33V* 33b — M 

9 245* 24t> 24V* 

10 13b 13‘* 13b 

8 JSM 75 1 * 2SM + '* 

2 M M M 

19 111 I1M I1M + '* 

16 lib 11M lib- H 

164 13b 13 13M + b 

' 1 10 «M 10 

42 4 3*» 4 + '* 
3P 14b 16'. i 14b + V* 
22 23’* 235* 23-* + i* 


J3M 33’* 
37'* 37V* 




T9 

16 

8Vi 

A 

BH + b 

32 

2J 


SI 

14b 

141* 

14b + U 

Ifl 

40 

AV* 

6b 

6H + 'A 



11 

375 


5b 

A'* + b 



14 

21 

7V* 

7V* 

2Vi + '4 

1.09 

45 

V 

8 

20M 

70'A 

205* + % 

L9AC2Z1 

7 

4 

TIM 

31Vj 

31 H— H 

.12 



144 

13b 

13.. 

13b 




308 

ft 

ft 

M + b 

1.40 

7J 


4 

195* 

19M 

195*— M 

41 

33 

AH 

AM 

6V* 




274 

3b 

3H 

3b 

JOe 



5 

11 

ion 

11 


7 

9 

SM 

sn 

SM + b 




33 

101 

16M 

!6g 16*e 



A 

IB 

9Vi 

9 

9 + ft 




4 

M 

5* 

5* 

JOe 11 

9 

33 

13 

I2M 

13 + i* 



9 

7 

9b 

9b 

9b- V* 

LOO 1 7-0 


15 

A'* 

SM 

5M- b 

AO 

Z3 

7 

8 

17M 

17M 

17M- l* 

JO 

2J 

33 

BB9 

9b 

9 

9V. + -f. 

A0b45 

13 

69 

IP* 

BM 

Bb 


4 4 — t* 

27* 3 

4 Vs 4 Vs— b 

A 1 * AV* 


75. CDl 8 

S'-. CMI CP 19 

r* cm<co 

Bb CSS n 

c CoesNJ 1A 

4 t CaaleA S 

105c Cal RE 1J3 104 B 
185. Calma I 64 11 23 
3'» Canon n 2J 

: Calinwl 

T',7 Calorop JOi 5J It 
11 Ccmso — 1® 9 


8 

10 

!lb 

21 

21b + >4 

19 

12» 

I0M 

10'* 

10M— M 


A 

IM 

lb 

IM 


1 

Bb 

8b 

Bb- '4 

16 

17 

»’-* 

9M 

9M- b 

S 

2 

At: 

AH 

AH 

B 

46 

12b 

12 

12'4 

23 

2i 

3 

29b 28V. 29 'A +l!i 

*5> s 5? ^ 


11 9M 91* 93* + ’* 

7 155; I5M 155* + V* 


1ZM 

Ob FPA 



44 

t 

I0H 

lfl'j* 

10M 

23b 

1AM Fofaind 

40 

11 

7 

B 

17M 

19M 

19M 

I5M 

A FalrFIn 



30 

4 

14M 

14b 

AM 

19 

ISM Fartvpl 
3b Fldata 

.«7t 

19 


38 

16V« 

16 

Wft 

10M 




5A 

AM 

AH 

AM + b 

15V* 

11 FWymB 

JO 

68 

10 

39 

UM 

IIM 

lib + M 

20b 

9M Fslcrpn 

50 

48 

3 

4 

I0VJ 

10V* 

iot* + v* 

15b 

IIM FlsehP 

JV8t 

52 

19 

22 

13M 

13 

13 

IB 

AM FllcGE 



4 

54 

10 

9b 

10 + M 

29 

23M FtTGEBlAOO 

148 


3 

s* 

EM 

27b 

Si 4 

43M 

30M 

28M FlaRck 
21 Fluke 

.70 1.9 

urn ao 

7 

9 

17 

58 

225 

22M 

37b 

EM + V 

14M 

AM Foodrm 



s 

77 

11M 

IIM 

IIM- M 

9M 

55* FHlIIIG 



18 

15 

A 

5%i 

A + b 

32V* 

12V* ForestL 



30 

114 

25b 

IM 

24M + M 

2 

b Fotonit 




77 

lb 

lb + V* 

7M 

4b FrdHIV 



208 

103 

AM 

Ab 

6b— Vi 

26 

14 FreaEI 



15 

24 

21 

21 

21 



1636 

AM 

ISV*— V* 


135* + M 
SAM 


B 

3M ICEEn 



> 

20 

4V* 

4 

4** + b 

5SM 

29 ICHs 



7 

SB 

ASM 

44M 

45 — ’A 

7M 

IM ICO 



175 

1 

114 

!5A 

ib 

3M 

2V* IPM 




22 

2ft 

2b 

2Vs + b 

9 

3b IRTCPS 



33 

64 

7M 

7M 

7 1 * — Vi 

A 

A'A 155 

.12 

28 


A 

4b 

4b 

4M + ft 

2ft 

2b 

IM ImaGO 
b Implnd 

87e 28 


5 

5 


F & 

V* 1 

40b 

30 ImpOll a ISO 



10A 

37M 

37V* 

37M + M 

13b 

AM Inflghl 



7 

IE 

7 

AM 

7 + ft 

2b 

IM IrtslSv 



> 

2325 

IM 

IV; 

lb + ft 

3 

3V« Iiu5vpf 

JSMD8 


5 

2M 

2M 

2b— V* 

13 

AM InfCtvg 

M 



25 

115* 

11V* 

lib 

15 

10M intmk 

■12b 1J) 


3 

12M 

12M 

12M + ft 

ab 

3b IntBknt 




138 

3M 

3b 

3M 

IM 

b InIBkwt 




15 

M 

ft 

ft 

16b 

55* inlHyd 



17 

62 

6M 

A'A 

Ab 

11M 

9b IIP 

.96 

9J 

61 

9 

IBM 

10M 

105* 

7H 

3V* InlPwr 



35 

5 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 

4 b 

IV* InlPral 




7 

3M 

3 Vi 

3ft— ft 

10b 

AM IntThrn 



20 

219 

5 

4b 

4b 

10b 

4M InThrpf 




3 

4ft 

4M 

45* + Vi 

Eb 

13M Ionics a 



14 

50 

23b 

22M 

Sb + ft 

41 

20 iroaBrd 



22 

12 

35 

34ft 

35 


17b 11b Jnclvn 50D4.1 9 14 12b 12b 12b — H 


7b S’* Jacobs 
4M 2'A Jet Am 
1W '* JelAwf 


93* SM Jetran JltlM 12 45 6b 7M + M 


At* 2b John Pd 


11H 7 JahnAm JO A1 10 217 7V* 7b 7b 

UM A Johnlnd 4 14 OT* 8b Bb— V* 

7b 3 JmpJkn 17 17 3 7V, 3 


39V* 31b 
4** It* 
16b 10 
13 10M 

1SV* 9b 
a* 14 
4b 2M 


KnGsaf 4J0 I2J 
KcpokC „ . 


12b B 
4M 2b 


KavCp JO U 7 
KavJ n JOe 1J1 9 
KeorNt .40 11 17 
Kefchtn J5t 1A 17 
KevCoB JOe BJ 11 
KevPh jo 2J IA 


lob lab 
30 V* 22b 


KevPh 

Kiddewi 

Kinark 

Kirby 

KltAMa 

KfeerV 

KnoU 


615 9 

212 41* 


35V: 35V} 

3b 3M + M 
12V* 12V* 

11 11 
12b I2U 

’Si* ’SS + * 

•b 8M— V* 
3'* 31* -c- 1* 
3v* av* 

2M 2b 
4M 4M 
2V* 2V* 


KooerC 2-32 BJ 76 


14 b 145*— V* 
26V* 26b— 'k 


3M 2 
21M 8M 
13V* BS 
15b lit* 
11b 8b 
231* 15b 
21 1AM 
vu lb 
2b lb 
16b Ilk* 
EM 12M 
8V% 5b 
-14V* 91* 

m AM 
20b 15M 
15b 10V* 


U5R ind 

Ultmie 9 

UnJcorp 

UnlePPf J5 SO 
Unlmar IMoUJl 
UAirPd 54b 25 tS 

UnColF S 50 23 A 

U Food A .10 62 
U FoodB 

uiMod n 

USAGwt 

UnltetV 30 

UnvCm 14 

UnlvRs 14 

UnlvRu JOe SJJ . 
Un«Pat 


2 A 2* 
111 11V* 11b 
IV i ob 10b 
IS 13 13 

so im* m 
1 214* 21M 
1 71b 2Tb 
* It* 11* 
7 S TM IM 
36 13M U 
S ISM UV 
30 AM AM 
12 13H 121* 
J 7» 7h 
15 1AM 14 . 
38 lib IN* 


JM + n 
im 

1DM + v* 
n -b 
lOTii— V* 
2i n + m 

IM 

13M+ U 
19M-.+ b 
AM— V* 
129* + M 
7b + Vi 
14 - M 
lib + W 


JSe*J 27 9M 9b 9b 

« liU 8 24M 24 V* JAM + M 
27 91* 91* -9M+ b 
40b 24 9 244 17 TAM MM— M 
21 49* 3M 4M + M 

JO 14 13 27 BM. SV* BM— M 

79 3M -3M 3M 

2 AM AM AM— V* 

TO 1Q.-.-.& 49* 4M 

2 2 2-2 

.40 46. IT . IA BM Sb 8b + M 

J044T2 3 IBM 18b IBM + b 

• 1 AM AM AM 


W 

40 Ut 13 
.14 TOMB 


m sm sb + v* 
22V 2Zb Z» 

1AM 14 14b — V* 

VMM 

8Vk 1 8 + V* 


Nation 


23 109 IMblOSM- b 
IS 19b 18b 19 — H 
3 8b . 8b 8b + M 
228 » M 3M + b 


. .Me 1.1 7 
.029 J T7 
.U 13 A 
JOI 

11 

4 


156 U 14 
JA 1J 4 
14 


' 76 TOb ItiVa 109* + M 
1 AV* AV* St* + Vi 
. T 8 0 .e 

8 10b 10V* IDV* + V* 
50 ISb ISM 19b +1M 

28 ft V M 
36 33M 33 33 

II lb 1b lb + H 
. 32 A -SM A 
26 11M 111* lib + b 
339 7Vi 7 7b + b 
- 50 16b 13b 16b + Vi 
as IBM TSt* lBb 
133 12b 12b 12b— V* 
T382 13V* 12b 13W + M 
15 2V* 2M 2V* + k* 
2m 4b 4ti- 4b 


. ' 36 
134 11.1 
53 10 7 

48 

L88 117 
TO . 

M .1 43 

II- 

JSf. ; .... 


a 4b- 4b 

IM 2 

29M 29b 29b + b 
lb 1 It*— M 
7 Ab 'AM — b 
20b 20b 20b — b 
T7b 17b 17b— b 
3V* 3b 3M 
14b Mb- Mb— b 
-9b 9b 9b — !* 
1854 WM 18b 
6b 4b 4b 
. -3b 3b 3M 




'tf 5^ 


- iY ■&&&& 



a’jl'.rrC- 


W. -Jr 


j 


l&z: 


Mm 







- • 

- ■ 



rt-r 


v - - <V; 


r I'&if 

5‘ . 1 " v’T' ’ - 

r . -a- 7 .-'..'.'Z-* :rv . vv, +--.-. ■ 

• • *1 - TV- “• „ u . 


: ; 






MAINTAINING THE MOST MODERN FLEET IN THE WORLD 
REQUIRES A HEALTHY SUPPLY OF DOM PERIGNON. 







S/NGAPORF AIRL/HFS 



A.S our inflight service sets the standard that even other airlines talk about, it should come as no surprise that we are celebrating our recent acquiation ofbver a billion dollars ot new 

































**;• 
•5w «■. 


r r% 

. - &* I*.. 


* _r*s 

• )k- 

- *-• l._. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 



Com* Med Md «u 


On. H 


Dollar 


r . *■* - 1 , 
h H ‘ : 
k *v - 
c 

6 <« > 

ft. r\ ■ 

* -'■* "f . 

V ¥ V 

M • - 

- ... 

“<4. 

*• * 

* 9 ‘ ... . 

k . „ 

4 .-V • x. 
fc i < ■• ■ 
ft < < •... 


■tncr/iw. 

MfaJirithH 
Allied Irish;} 
JjnMkhhD 

MJM Irish Pam 

wwfflcBCon>nrM 

« ttrt.lcF inaww 

JlrtWWnsB 

Ba>Cnmq](Bi« 

Sen Naz Lowjrnq 
gcsDCftomaMm 

BcoSpuaMrUofl 

BmVofcBkaoMraiy} 

Bjeaner 

BkGmniiiM 

SSSS8* 

BfcMenSfm?*# 

MMantmlK 

BkMpntnfom 

BfcMew Verity 

BJNra* Sana 88/73 
BhNmasaxtafi 
Bk Tokyo 

Bk Tokyo g7 

Bk Tokyo FtiKH/71 
gfc Tokyo DedBffi 
g«*ora«lfloOK*6 
Bankers TnatSD 
Banters Trial *4 
Bll Capital 94 
Ban Fm am 
Min 
BM l(il-9S 
BN lain 
BMimnUMMv) 
Balndosusz** 

BoeW 

Bice «7 1 cos] 
Bfceoan 
BfeeJanU 
Bfcew 

Bq InaaswKfflCaBl 
8 no 15 
BnpW (Cftp) 

Boo KISS 

BnpBtm 

Bm>9* 

Boon 

Bnam 

BreiJoWs 
BnpQSCMtMyi 
Bq Parttm Pern 
BqWBnra 89/74 
Bqrcj nirt Bk Perwrau 
Bor£lnv*0/S4S 
Borders Ora Peru 
Barclays O/S 04 
Belgium Perp 
B tjBhnn DtcW/Di ftWi 
Brighxn DO UMNv) 
BsjBjum 0MB I MltiJ 
Belgium ju us 

Began Bk 0/91 

Mohan M/m 

Betghnn OeK9/M 

CoarM 

CcctfiS 

CncoW/K 

CntSO 

CntWJ 

CJOeOWOSIMWvl 

C8sc20M 

abcMIWkty) 


Co-iran Next Ud Aikd 
u.13 *9.98 MLIB 

» vtzsS 

& Sil*»«55 

R SS3&S& 
£ SBSSSSft 
R-3S3RW- 

Bh^nojoTwo 

E WS52 

£* lWOlOaiHWB 

& ESS"** 

MMdlUi 
E 5JJMM01D11S 
■Jfc 2M1 99JJ loose 
nil tt-umuoiDuo 
Jj »-» UUlttttfS 
*A 3V70 ltAKBtn JD 
2^ ■ fUt ** ja 
Mh 3M0 MUOlumg 
M Wl lBUSlHUS 
J* 2*-W UCUDHBB.1S 
M awu MUMIOUS -. 
ft* 0MB 10030100*1 
M B-U 10QD7IHL17 
»-« 99.93 loom 
Bk 11.13 9MS mss 
27-1? 1HUJKU3I 
. 13-11 I90Z21HLO 
* stJB iflo.li : 
W £0-02 *7-50 9L00 . 

17:12 MU31IXU3 
Bk 1144 100.1/10034 I 

■ to,. 17-w mi -fas? 

** $4-m lflBsmsssr 
*? JO-12 HU010U5 
Bk 18-11 49*19937 
Be JO-10 1DM31PLU 
>10 2MI 90.** tOOJN 
» 13-03 100271 00JH 

M 10-11 99JJ «_flS 

0«a 1013*101^9 
Bk IHB 99J5 WiJ 
M 31-M UOMOO.M 
Bk 13-12 UIU410IU4 

7* 0S-13 9*Jd IftUO 

>* 12.11 TOO310BJ3 
BM3W.UI0134 
B4 33H*tMI00J» 
ft* 17-10 

•* IVniOUtUBM 

«k 0*02 10007100.17 
«> 820IWJSW3S 
n 31-01 lOUSHUO 
Bq si-11 iflosmauo 
IVw Bs-sn 100J4U034 
W, rHO I00.721MS 
Bk Q-n TttUJ;®13 
Bk 28-02 lOQJOIOaiO 
Bk 27-11 9VS» WJ» 

& 17-01 9*30 ** JO 
Bl 1S-U lOBJMUaU 
»k 0991 IDOJMIOO.14 
««> 11-W W0L1IUO2I 
ft** 1242 1004/1 HJ4 
fk 15-11 HUSU0.15 - 
# 0M2 WLB100.17 

M 2/-I0 100JUU02S 

Bk 12-n wuaoaio 

»k 2MJWJ1WJS 
Bk 2*41 10002100.12 
Bk JO-11 fCliffJO 


Obc*4 

Cr'kr«W4.K ." 

amr- 

ChoMManonn 
OmtMMCwvftf 
Ouse Man Con* Oo ' 
atmtodW . 

ChtmfceJ M (imM 

-OvUkMdDBkVT 

ssr 1 .'', 

OUoornPtapu 

□ncorn** 

Cmarnftm . i 

CDlanviwf) -• h 
Cowrtco*? . K 

ComawMMFbM* no 
-CDnunribkHwl* Pn 
OtanUffeMMircalfl- n. 
CoraoFbUJeWywtii u 
8®.”"“”’’ s 
MwISunivj R 

Go 91 La 

Cmwp/w - tu, 

gFMdwScW ... Bk 

pForenwm m 

. R 

is® » 

CrLvomKdsf* BM 

pLvonnt* jonK/94 - EW 
pLwonoU97(Cflp} ilk 
Cr LvanatsOO 7M 

p Uranus JonWW- tv. 
pManoeem n.. 

pNaHsaoiH/M - - n. 

emu w 

W % 

- 

MnNonkcNOMf «K 

DM Norsk* DecM' . . Bk 
Denmark JMMt By 

Penmork Oq BS/M . to. 

■agsg».»- r- 

W wdnt rFln9a 'Bk.- 

******* R 

|Of7(MMyl Mk 

SSS ,5 .“ M r 

E W B* 

s s? 

90 7M. 

Exwiorirtfink Tla 

WmvJetyuuhM ' Ih 

Fkmmtnm to. 

FarrevlaMavf? «m 

FIOaad90(MMrl Bk 

nmbh Poser 90M*. to. 

Flat Banaa *vm - m . 

Rnl ftkSvKH Bk 

F1r«BkM*7 Ik, 

FtraCMcaoo*7. ' Bk 
Pint CMcobo*2 UH 

First ChfcogaM Bk 

«nt City Tern W Stb 

First Infer « K 

Forrifl M 


25-1 

49*4 
0 99*8 



IE 

riff 




d 

S 

± 

SIM 

21.1 

£ 


Eg 


i 


Fwtua*S+LW 
PBlIimtUM - 
GMhwniBm. 
MkenlW 
fian 
Gan 
GaPani 
OsMft.' - ■ 

Giro 91 

ffl*n*rHiW5e**2 
nwestomw/n 
GrtnohnsW 
GrtndkairsM 
cnumtsuiinM 
HMSomaBW 
. HtUSarrmelPm 
HhMootim 
HenKoadPfni 
Hydro 02 Mnbhr) 
iMroOJ(Mmtv) 

Id 91 . 

lertmdwm 
iKtonMan/ci 
WNgwftft 
lraiemaks/9* ' . 
IrelendW 
Ireland */ 
BWMer9t . 

. Inehnern 
Hgtvff 
iMvim* 

Hair as 
CHohftJ 
Jo Manas 97 
KopFtsn 
. Kendra Or fj 
KBbw«rTBea*l 
Ktetawon Ben ** 
KlebnnrtBenPere . 
KeraeOevBkH/19 
Kano Exo BkftSMS 
Lincoln 841.1* 

Lloyds Bk Fwg 
- uofdifl - 

Llevcft92 

Liowbo/ 

LTChtS 

Udi ft* 

Lid) 72 

MStovdoU/DV 

MakmMOons(AWi) 

MakmkiAinf/n 

MotoydoD«d9792 

MatarsiaM/n 

Mahnrsla 00/B 

Mon Hen 9/ 

MonHanMtWkl*) 

Mar MUM 

MerMUW 

Mnr Mid 9* 

MeHsn BkM 
Midland Bk Fen 
MhflaMBkPenHm 
MkKandiatn 
Midland ml 0* 
Mkltartl IrtU 
MkactadiMfi 
Mlflandlidft 
Mitsui Fin *r (Coo) 
MttoUtPiaM . . 
ManGraeWlt* 

Mia Bk Den *2 
NB&mcoaj 
Hat Bk D*lratt94 
Nat Comm Bk MUM 
Not Wur Pen (A> 
HatWMPerpIBl 
mi wen Fin 91 
Nat West Fin OS 
Nat West 9* . 

NU MMSl Flo *2 
Ndt MMd Fla Pen 
MSMOvM 
New Zealand 87 
Nz Steel Dtv 92 
NlneanCrM 
Nordic min 
Okbl6 
UbU 


7T 





i&\ 


Uiii 

i3S 


Redemption Notice 

National and Grindlays Bank Limited 

7%% Capital Bonds 1987 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Deed dated 
November 29, 197 2 under which the abovedesignated Boms are issued, J1 ,456.000 aggregate 
principal amount of .such Bonds of the following distinctive n ambers has been drawn for the 
annual redemption instalment on November 15, 1985 l herein sometimes referred to as the 
annual redemption date): 


*1 .000 COUPON BONDS 



" 7 ,% 


* I' Jf& 

’hitb 


•-••• <3 


4»11 7X!7 
4914 7330 
-MS& 7335 
4956 7*W 
5310 7340 
5363 7341 
53S4 7343 
5370 7TUM 
55411 7357 
5565 7369 
5621 7374 
5641 73S7 
5680 7308 
5682 7571 
5660 7578 
5679 7581 
57*3 7804 

5749 7808 

5750 7809 
5858 7630 
5879 7628 
5884 7634 
5886 7837 
5918. 7840 
5932 7042 
5833 7052 
6827 7858 
6*33 7662 
6941 7065 
5945 7866 
5055 7680 
6081 7698 
6068 7707 
8090 7710 
6127 7711 
8142 7713 
6230 7717 

6289 7718 

6290 7719 
6436 7720 

- 6437 7729. 
6138 .7732 
8439 7740 
8448 7742 
6450 7746 
8462 7752 
6471 7770 
ttttS 7788 
6493 .7789 
6496 7792 
6504 7801 
6518 7W» 
6S20 7808 
8522 7814 
8633 7K23 
6534 - 7837 
6577 7846 
8695 70*7 
8596 7«4« 
5800 7849 
6802 7860 
8618 7861 
WHO 7860 
0821 7871 

8835 7892 
8640 7883 . 
8659 7900 
6686 7901 
6867 7907 
.6888 7900 

6671 7910 

6672 7*11 
6677 7916 
6692 ■ 7*28 
6734 7038 
8741 7940 
8772 .7949 
8776 7*52 
67H4 7957 
0878 7991 
8980 7994 
6907 h056 
7284 8067 
7287' 8061 
7288 8071 
7292 8078 
7306 8080 
7314 9081 
7321 8086 

: 7323 8086 
7334 8087 


MI90 9710 
8094 9711 

8097 9718 

81(0 9725 

8111 9733 

8114 9738 

81 IB 9738 
. 8128 9776 

8181 9779 

8137 9781 

8141 9790 

8142 9793 

8148 9794 

8162 9800 

8164 9811 

8184 9813 

8190 9617 

8203 9818 

8206 9826 
tell 9881 
8218 9638 V 

8224 9642 

8235 9646 

tCSIT 9671 
&SU 9874 
8248 9080 

8251 9664 

8266 9882 

8258 9935 

8259 9937 

0290 9940 

8291 9941 

«S2 9943 

0323 9944 

8324 9945 

8326 9947 

8327 9900 

8336 . 9982 

8337 9984 
8367 ' 9993 
8381 10000 
8363 10002 
8365 10017. 
8367 10019. 
8491 10024 
.8492 10028 

8498 100S2 

8499 10042 

8511 1004G . 

8513 10048 

8514 10054 

8515 10067 
6519 10063 
8525 10065 
0548 10068 
8562 10078 
8566 10081 
8666- 10062 

8570 10083 

8571 10086 

8573 10099 
8581 1 11098. 
8B8E 1O100 . 
0584 10106" 
8796 10107 
8798 lOlOtt - 
8008 10 US 
9177 10TT0 

9179 10111 
9100 10112 

9182 10119 

9183 10125 
9185 V01S6 
*243 V&V» 
9253 10129 . 
9255 10142 
9268 10150 
9294 10172 ' 
9312 - J0177 
9313 . 10178 : 
M1& 101*6 : 
9325 10200 
9637 10208 
9648 10212 ‘ ; 
9652 10218 : 
MTS 10219 1 
9678 10221 I 
M79 10228 ! 
9693 10242 : 
9700 10281 ! 
9702 10264 1 


I 13081 17653 
l 13083 17868 
i 1808V 17878 
I 13100 17880 
i 13101 18102 
t 13102 18108 
I 13111 18108 
i .13207 18128 
L 1324* 18596 
I 13290 18597 
r 13253 18804 
I 13333 19013 
I 13334 18726 
1 13411 18737 
! 13414 . 18761 
I 13486 18763 
I 13445 18778 

> 13460 18775 

> 13485 18790 
’ 13471 18794 

13511 18787 
13927 18789 
18531 18791 
I 13532 18900 
. 13888 18802 
i- 13534 18905* 

> - 13S92 18809 
I 13593 18813 
’ 13590 18814 

l 13602 18869 
13605 18927 
: 13606 18930 
I 13607 . 18945 

> 13*50 19385 
1.13651 19368 
i 13653 19384 

13744 1*387 
13751 1*388 
1*75(2 mao 
; 13750 19503 
13765 19904 
13796 19609 
13801 19610 
73302 19511 
13806 19612 
18816 19513 
13828 19518 
13844 19526 
-13050 19540 
13862 19545 
. 13890 19549 
13892 19550 
13907 20114 
13984 20128 
14008- 30181 
"14009 20170 
140X0 20331 
14011 20334 
14028 20346 
14032 20370 
1404* 20401 
.14061 20414 
14119 30421 
14122 20422 
14167 30430 
14186 20471 
14189 20472 
' 14200 20479 
1421* 20405 
14233 20791 
14338 30804 
14241 20815 
14244 20833 
14248 2B834 
. 14247 20840 
14291 20847 
14332 20848 
14342 20861 
I 4345 20863 
14352 20863 
10289 20*67 
17321 20888 
17376 20874 
17378 2087* 
17385 21924 
17387. 21*67 
17391 21991 

17399 21996 

17400 21997 
17596 21999 
17639 22005 


! 23030 23964 
i 23041 23966 
i 23048 23968 
! 23089 24171 
> 23092 24189 
I 23095 24190 
I 28096 2421N 
: 23100 24237 
I 23108 24240 
I 23111 24242 
» 23m 24244 
i 23115 24265 
■ 23120 24289 
1 23127 36061 
I 23135 25060 
23143 250E9 
23151 25009 
23159 25078 
23] 88 25001 
33177 20087 
2317* 25001 
23180 25095 
12183 25105 
23349 35110 
23355 25125 
23365 25154 
23367 25158 
33370 26182 
23373 35187 
23378 35178 
23384 25188 
23387 26300 
23442 25201 
33451 25203 
23464 35210 
23485 25311 
23488 25313 
23506 25331 
23531 25343 
23523 25343 
23537 25357 
23628 35358 
23535 25381 

23543 25303 

23544 25385 

23546 25444 

23547 254-15 
23649 25448 

23550 25400 

23551 25465 
23567 25480 
23558 25508 
23585 25309 
23589 

23593 25524 
23587 25538 
23600 25550 

23604 26663 

23605 26508 
23B20 25670 
23846 25622 
23857 25831 
23659 25641 . 
23687 35649 
33894 25652 
33704 26601 
23711 35664 
23734 25666 
23733 25670 
33745 25073 
33759 25679 
23786 20706 
23767 25715 
23878 25720 
33086 25725 
330*9 25733 
33901 25740 
23903 25743 
33904 25746 
23905 25750 
S911 12.76ft 
23934 26707 

. 23935 25701 
23838 25783 
23939 2S817 
23941. 25032 
33844 25035 
23946 35041 
23047 25845 

23949 25846 

23950 25852 S 



Payment of. the redemption price of the Bonds specified above will be made on the annual 
redemption date at the redemption price of 100 percent of the principal amount thereof, (a ) at the 
Corporate Trust -Services Department, of Citibank. N.A. (formerly First National City Bank), 
the Principal Paying Agent under the Trust Deed referred ro above. No. 1 1 1 Wall Street, in the 
Borough of Manhattan, The Gey of New- York or (b) subject to any Jaws or regulations applicable 
thereto, at the main offices of Citibank. N.A. in Amsterdam, Frankfurt/Main. London. Paris. 
Brussels, and Gticorp (Luxembourg) S.A. in Luxembourg, and the principal offices of Lloyds 
Bank International Limited [ formerly Lloyds St Bolsa International Bank Limited) in Amsterdam. 
Lloyds Bank International (Belgium) S.A. (formerly Lloyds Bank (Belgium) S.A.) in Brussels. 
Lloyds Bank Limited in London and Lloyds Bank International ( France) Limited ( formerly Lloyds 
Batik Europe Limited) in Paris. Payments at the offices referred to in (b) above will be made by a 
United States dollar check drawn on a bank in New York City, or by a transfer ro a United States 
dollar account mamtained bv the payee with a bank in New York City, on November 15. 1985. 
On and after the annual redemption date, interest on the said Bonds will cease to accrue, and. 
upon presentation arid surrender of such Bonds with ail coupons appertaining thereto maturing 
after the date fixed for redemption, payment will be made-at the said redemption price out of 
funds to be deposited with the Principal Paying Agent. The amount of any missing unmatured 
.cowwris will be deducted from the sum due for payment. 

Cpuponsdue November 1 5. 1985 should be detached and presented for payment in the usual 
mariner. f 

Withholding of 20% of gross redemption proceeds of any payment made within the United 
States nay be required by the Interest and Dividend Compliance Act of 1 983 unless the Paying 
Agent has the correct tax identification number (social security or employer identification number! 
or Exemption Certificate of the payee. Please furnish a properly completed Form W-9 or 
Exemption Certificate or. equivalent when presenting your Securities. 

GRINDLAYS BANK pJ.c. 
I formerly NATIONAL AND GRINDLAYS BANK LIMITED) 
By CITIBANK, N.A. u Principal Paying Agent 

Octcfcer 14. 5985 f 


aonm 

OttttnnMinbigff 

OthtMMMMM 

Pbeflitim 

•PqeW 

Pk BaokwiHrt! 
OvM'nhxitftBatife 

RMfqfl 

RadBhOaUnW 

buck 

RUIUT4 

SattmnafUtl 
lamwmtfuiH 
Sanaa intFMM/Bt 

Sanwlnififlf? 
Scflodl FHIW13 
SandiFutOcctt 
50000041.1141 
Sec Pacific *7 
Sec Pacific 47 
SwwnwtGKl'W 
Sad 88 
Scaitt/n 

SlelntV 

Sfeiattl 

SakOcnWftS 

SaeCwMarW 

SocGenNavM 

SacOenW 

Snttfl 

Scran »7^7 

SwUlKIMW*-! 

Soalnara 

Icom 44 
Straw Chart ft 
Sranadranfl 
Stand dorr Mart# 
Stand OWr! Mtonal til 
SM+Cnt AtteWNt* 
State 5k i nan rr 
SiMiUomoTstttrtt 
SanatvaDAcmkent? 
Sweaen 00 
Sweden *0 

Sweden 9MSUM6M 
Sweden tw» 

Sweden nm 
Sweden Perp 
7oi*o Robe*? icofll 
Taiya 42/0/ 
Takuabi42/4/ 
TatuolnCflaff 
TakaiAskiMnt 
Teuton « 

TevoTtt 92/94 
TvdM/H 
Ub Norway 41 

OSMwwoyW 

Utd Kingdom 40/9? 
nomFoawi7 
wells Fargo 92 
Welts Faroe ft 
WcsnxK47(Cap) 
WmsChnW 
World Bk Perp 
world 6k at 144 
Yofconoma 41/w 
Yokohama 47 (Cod) 
Zentratw*asf4t 


ADVERTlSEftM 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supf 








U 1985 


Mat an«t vtthM matoUaas are umdlad tnr tM Funds IKIM with tne eneuwian gf soma awatas based on ISM« Prtca. 

Thg morainal srottaic Indicate frrawancy of OBatalloas seFFlMitd] -dalty ; iwi -wackir; (hi-en-monthtv; trj > r*«ii tarty; (ij - irrtya io rly. 


AL UAL MANAOEMEHT 

-Iwi Ai-Mol Tni».5A 

BANK JULIUS Baer c co. lm 

.HIIiMftWM 

■(oi Cwvnor ... _ 

-Id! Faaiihfw W»a. 

(dl EoaDov EureM < 

(d! Eautooer Pacific . _ 

-INlCHM# 

■1C) iigcuer 
BNP IKTBftFUNDS 
•lw| ifiterMnd Fund — 

■Iwi iniarcurreney US5 

-(wl Intercurrencv OM 1 

■1 w > InteccureoWY iterilng 

-I*) Inter eaulty Pod lie Otter 


-Iwi Ftc Anomie— 
* 174.47 (w)PLC European. 
. -Iwi F&C Oriental 


S 11J7 l-tr-i * 
S 1400 
i 39X3 


SF Bt9JtO FID6UTY FOB 47B. Homfltwi Bermuda -n» 
£F laoiW -(ml American Volun Common— 1 90J8 -(wl 

. JltZUBO -imiAmer values Cum,Pfief 1 164.17 OIU 

SF IHi An -Id) FiOBiitv Airrar. Assets 8 MMS -Iwi 

5F13D4LOO -i ell Fidelity AustrgJlo Fund s 12X6 -Iwt 

. SF 774d0 -td] Fidelity Discovery Fund— S 1037 ^wj 

5F 153L0B -tdlFWelttvDlr.Svm.Tr S 127/17 -tw) 

■Id I Fidelity For East Fund. t 3XS9 -(wl 

^ S 12548 -Id I Fldedtv Inn. Fund S «7A1 -Iwi 

- % 16.10 -Id) Fldelltv Orient Fund S 3U7 -iwi 

DM »-2S -Id) Fidelity Frontier Fund ft 1144 -tw» 

_ £ law ■( Bl Fidelity Pacific Fund II51.W — 

- ft IIJII -Id I FldelltY 5pd Grawtn Fd. ft 1S.1B 


Jwl Interesultv N.Amer. Offer __ s lojal-ia 1 Fkteiifv World Fund. 


BAttOUE 1ND05UE? 

■Id) Allen Growth Fung 

-Iwi Divorbond 

■tw> Fi F-Amerlea 

-l»vl FtF-Europe 

■Iwi FIF-Pudfic. _ 

■t Cl I Irntoum My!IIHA« A - 

-td I Indasuez SAultiecnes B_ 
-Id) inSMUezUSD (Wuw.Fi. 


BRITANNI AJ»OB 271, Sf. Melrtr. Jeney 

-(wl Brlt.Doltar Jncome 5 0, 

-Iwi Sr it A Mnnoo-Curr j 

•I d > Bril. intLft MenagAarti i 

-(dj grit, imixwioncn Pont r 

-(wjBrif.Am.lnt 4FdLT3 ft 

>(») BritXkne Fund 5 a. 


_ FORBE5 PO B4S7 GRAND CAYMAN 
ft 11*9 London Aonnt 01-864-3013 

SF BSLB5 -Iwi Dollar ineome ft 7M 

1 1 6M •(« I Forties Hiun me. Wit fb c .954 -lw) 

5 12*1 -tw) Gold inceme ft 631 -(wl 

ft 1430 ■( wj Gqm AopreeJatiofi S *31 -fw>08 

ft 10Si4 -I mi Sirs leak: T rota no I 1*0 -(wiOB 

ft ITUS CEFINOR FUNDS. ■Iwi OBI 

ft 1031*2 -(wl Eo»t invKlmeni Fund S 384.76 -IdlPA 

v -twIScatrisi world Fund C 11AT8 -(o I PA 

0*82* -(wl State St. American . . s loILOo -tdJPA 

19.13 London : 01 -49 1 4230. Geneva :4l-22£5530 -(dlPA 

1.1U GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. (d|PA 
iiSiV pb 119, St PetBT Port. Guernsey. 0481-28715 ROYAL 


* 151.73 
ft 16.18 
8 3487* 


M wl Scoltisi world Fund. 


-twj BrtLM3noo.Curr*ney_ 
-Id) BrIL Japan Dir Pert. R 
■(wl BnlJersey Gin Firtd^ 
•( e J Bril, wens Lets. Fuae . 


1*78 -fwl FuturGAM 5A_ 
0.784* -twj Gam ArMiraae m 
1/34* -(wl GAMcrica Ins— 
1.181 >(w> GAM Australia In 
0325 -(i* I GAM Boston Inc. 
1.144 GAM Ermlloae- 


■( d I Bril. Wa-ld Teetir. Fund ft 07051-IwlGAM Franc-vol 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-(wlCooiira tnt'i Puna 

-(wl CooiTai Italia 5A 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES! 
-Idl Actions Sulwes ______ j 

-( d I Bond valor Swt S 

-Id! Bond Vcdor D-mark dj 

•id] Bend Valor u Sr DOLLAR __ 

-(d) Bond VaLcr Yen Yen 

-tat convert valor Swf s 


S 10437 -+(w) R 
S 135.17 H-lwl Rl 
ft 136.10 -4-lwl R 

ft 1D1SA 4I»I R 

ft 106.13 —4-101 Rl 
s IA13 -+IMI Rl 
5F 11178 SKANDI 
ft 77.71 -t-Knr 
ft 128.71 
ft 114*4 
ft 10733 | ir 


•(d) Convert VQtor US COLLAR, ft 12&44 Mwl 


-(wl GAM tfona Kong int ft 77.71 

_ 8 4132 -(*} GAM Intematunol inc. ft 128.71 

_ S ilia -Iwi GAM Jaoanine. ft 114*4 

ESI -(wl GAM North Amerlat inc. ft 10733 1. 

SF 420*0 -(w> GAM N. America unit Trust- 10735 a -(1 

SF 108*0 -|W| GAM Pod lie !r>C I 129*7 ■(« 

DM 114.14 -iwi gam Pens. & cnor. Wortaw, _ 100.90 p swis 

_ ft ITUS -(wl GAM Peru. A char. u.K. Fd. 98.00 e -Id] 

Yen 11113*0 -(WlGAMWnt ft 114*8 -(dl 

SF 12030 -<m) GAM Stneapore/fltaiav ine s 4832 (o) 


•IdlConosee 5F 474*0 -I w) GAM Systems inc 

•< d 1 C5 Foods- Bends SF 7*00 -(w) SAM Worldwide Inc 

-Id) CS Fenotrlr.it SF 11235 -<w] GAM Trche SLA. Class A _ 

-(d)C5 Money Market Fund > IDraop O.T. M ANAGEMENT (UK1 LM. 
-I a ICS Manev Market Fund _ CM I3&U30 -{dj Berry Poc. Fd. 

-< d 1 C5 Money Merkel Fund (1033*0 -ir ) G.T. Anpiled SeJenee 

-Id I Enersie- Valor SF 14L2S -(d) G.T. Asean HJC. GwttuFd— 

-Id) Ussec SF 780*0 Mdl G.T. Asia Fund 

-( d > rurMfrUnw sf IW3S -ifll G.T. Australia 1^ 

-{dl Paetile -Velar SF 14150 -(dl G.T. Europe Fund 

O REXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC -lw) G.T. Euro, Small Cos. Funs 

winchester House. 77 London Wall -( r) G T. Dollar Fund 

LONDON EG {31 9209797) -( a 1 G.T. Bond Fund 

-twl Flns&urv GrouoLttf ft 124.56 -Id 1 G.T. Global Technlgv Fa_ 

-lm) Winchester Diversified ft 19*4 -( a I G.7. Honshu Polhflnaw 

•(ml Winchester FlnanracE Ltd. S 9*9 ■( a ) G.T. Investment Fund 

-4 ml winchester Frontier 9 10338 -l ■ l G.T. Japan Small Ca.Fund 

-lw] Winchester Holdings FF 10534 -t r ) G.T. Tecnnalaav Fund 

S 1243 -Id) G.T. Soutn Chino Fund 

7*3 HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGM1 


Start A Inti Unit Trust— 141*0* p U a I 


Pfri 9 

■irl6.T.i 
-(d ) G.T. • 


Non Dollar 


Caveon Nest Bid AjAd 



SF 144*5 -(d) G.T. Asean HJC. GwttuFd 

sf 780*0 -id) G.T. Asia Fund 

5P 1419*5 -i 0 1 G.T. Australia Fund 

SF 141*0 -Id I G.T. Europe Fund 

r INC -( w) G.T. Euro. Small Cos Fund . 

I -(r) G.T. Dollar Fund 

-( d 1 G.T. Bond Fund 



ft 101*4 -(d) 
ft 17033 -Id) 
ft 112*7 -Id) 
-(dl 

ft 107T -(d) 

1 1173 -(d) 

S 1232 -(d) 

1 4.17* -(dl 

S 2833 UN1C 
S 1237 -(dl 
_£ 1473 -(dl 

ft 1144 -id) . 
ft 1131 -Id) 

S 1133 -Id) 
ft 27*7 -[ d ) 
ft 18*1 UNIO 
S 43.13 -< d l 
S 22*7 -Id) _ 
ft 1432 -Id) 


7*3 HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MCMT. IHT[_ SA. (-< d ) 
4*3 Jersey- PX>. Box 63. Til 0534 74029 

Berne, P-O. Bax 2422. T61 4131 2240S1 ] 

231 -( 0 ) Crasseow ( Far East) SF 

137 -Id I CSF [Balanced) SF 

-1 a ) Irani. Bond Fund—— S 

*** -i d > im. Currency U* ft 

**• -Id) ITF Fd (Teamokwv) ft 

*— -(d)O'SeasFd(N. AMERICA)— ft 
— JARDINE FLEMING, FOB 70 GPO He 

-( r) J.F Currencv&Bond ft 

-I r ) j.F Hono Kong Trust S 

-1 r) J,F Poa He Income Trust V 

-1 r 1 J.F Jaoan Trust— 




ft 28473 
ft 800*5 


5 s * ■ Mcrk; ®, F ' Belgium Francs; FL- Dutch Florin: LF - Lukemhaurg Francs; ECU - European Currency Unit; SF - Swiss Francs; o -asked; + - Offer Prtas.b- bid change 

p- V *10 to SI per unit; KA. ■ Nat Avaihsoia; N.C ■ NcrtCommunlcoted;o - New; S - suspend m3: S/S - Slock Spilt; - - Ex-DIvlaend; •• - Ex-Rts; — - Grass Performance index July; e . 
Reaemnl- Pricn- E > -Coupon: »• ■ Farmertv Worldwide Fund Ltd; 9 ■ OHer Price Ind. 35. prelim. Charge: ++ - aollv stock price PS on Amsterdam Slack £ xchanse 



27 YEARS4&MGNG TIME! 


For over a quarter of a century 
Atwood Richards has been 
the oldest and largest barter 
company in the United States. 
Atwood Richards has 
reciprocal barter networks 
nationally and internationally. 

Whether money actually 
slops or just continues to 
devaluate— BARTER retains its 
value and is the alternate 
method for buying and 
selling. 

□ Atwood Richards will buy 
your excess or overstocked 
inventory positions. 

□ Atwood Richards will buy 
your unused manufacturing 
capability. 

□ Atwood Richards will buy 
your corporate jet, boat, real 
estate, warehouse or 
office building. 

□ Atwood Richards will buy 
complete divisions or 
subsidiaries that you want 
to divest. 

□ Atwood Richards wifi buy 
consumer, agricultural or 
industrial products os well as 
raw materials and chemicals. 


o Atwood Richards is a 
corporate BARTER firm that 
trades with American and 
off-shore corporations— 
not individuals. 

□ Atwood Richards will 
generate incremental sales 
for your corporation . . . 

—increase your 
revenue line; 

—create new areas of 
distribution; 

—improve on existing 
client relations; 

—assist in establishing 
stronger domestic and 
international markets. 

□ Atwood Richards gives your 
corporation the competitive 
advantage it's looking for! 

□ Atwood Richards is not a 
broker or an agent. 

□ Atwood Richards is a PRINCIPAL 
that buys and sells for its own 
account— and can make an 
immediate commitment to 
purchase. Atwood Richards 
takes a risk position. 

□ Minimum transactions... 

$1 million. Information 
available upon request. 




r/O P'.C *- z A -■ U v iRTESS 


Atwood Richards 99 Park Avenue • New York, N.Y. 10016 

Interchange &A.R.L. H rue La Bofitie, 75008 Rirls. France -T4l, 265-6260 


(212) 490-1414 










Pqge-20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBE IS E. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 


EC, Gull Slates to Hold Talks on Economic Cooperation I US. figures 


Cumpthrd hr Our Suit? Frvnt Dispjickct 

LUXEMBOURG — The Euro- 
pcas Community and a group or 
sixiGutf states agreed Monday to 
, opes talks on an economic cooper- 
ation agreement. 

■ Ministers of the EC and the Gulf 
Cooperation Council said in a pre- 

■ pared statement that the aim of the 
negotiations was to conclude a 
■'cohiprehensive. mutually benefi- 
cial agreement to foster the broad- 
est commercial and economic co- 
operation." 


They said they will hold prepara- 
tory high-level talks to explore is- 
sues to be covered. No date was set 
for opening the negotiations. 

The ministerial meeting here fol- 
lowed years of exploratory contacts 
between the two groups. The EC is 
seeking to improve industrial coop- 
era lion and promote trade with the 
Gulf. 

The talks here were the rust the 
six-nation Gulf council had held 
with countries other than Arab or 
nonaligned states. 


•Relations between the two 
groups deteriorated recently when 
the EC imposed a 135-percent 
duty on methanol and polyethyl- 
ene. which are produced in Saudi 
and Kuwaiti petrochemical plants. 
The issue was discussed here. 

Kuwait's foreign minister, Sabah 
al-Ahmed al-Saboh, who led the 
Gulf delegation, called on the EC 
representatives to allow freer ac- 
cess to their markets. 

The Gulf states — Bahrain, Ku- 
wait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia 


and the United Arab Emirates — 
are major oil suppliers to the Euro- 
pean Community, though their 
share has declined as the impor- 
tance of North Sea oD has grown. 

Last year, the Arab states ex- 
ported S14 billion worth of goods, 
including oil. to the EC. 

The Gulf is the EC’s third-big- 
gest market after the United States 
and the European Free Trade As- 
sociation, taking about $20 billion 
worth of goods a year. 

(AP,- Reuters) 


1 I HUM 



SJSKW s™ open HW L««, Oow CUB. 

| Groins J 

fTfftill 

sa, ss* __ 


29Z1A 2224 —JMPU 
234 2J4K —jam 
2JTtt tn +am6 
2414 2+3 +9oyy 
W 2324 4jxm 
TjnVi 12B4 +JM» 
2364 238 +91 


S BS 5Sr«?W ,, BL sis rat 

is ra: srttLgrgh-g 

ts fg* 

IS 538 Mow 597 531 sxt 531 



Sensed Season __ UU| . rios* 

High Law Open Hsn low 

41 10 3&07 Oct XX 3*90 X77 XJ7 
S*n SS/ 3c 4130 4130 4130 4130 

Ew Prav.SoMS U19 

SWS4 UP443 

PORK bELUBStCMST 

’vrvnt 

J3.15 jJJJj 14U(J )<a40 14240 

Qrt.saw sau, Pnw.sg« «73 

Prev. Dav Open InL 7349 eft 9 


ORANGE juice onran 

wm » nairas 

I Ifllli^ 

1*135 1CTM Mar _ WM0 

CjLSalH PrBV.SnlH ei 

Pnv.DayOpralnl. 4400 i*> 35 

f Metals 


s*B 2 " 5 K 2 ° 

HWi L0W 


Own HW» 


sS vs SS 

ISSSRopaimLW* w«Z 

BRITISH nqUBDOMMI 


iMm l«w lJWO * 

I CANADIAN 


BKcSAK'xbw 

raeHCH 

*12400 .10985 MW 

SSS .HH> jun.-as 8 

BMS»o«- , HE™ ,fc Wan 

JBS7 2971 EM m 

3040 Mor J83B 
3335 Jan 

iSieMtawir 


tm Cta* 

SS SS 


19030 M2S 


II 

J2«3 J» 


.12240 .123 

.WHO 
.121 IS 


ts H 

jSi, 


Dfls. 60,000,000.- 
10V4% bearer Notes of 1980 
due 1984/1987 
Of 

N.V. NEDERLANDSE GASUNIE 

SECOND ANNUAL REDEMPTION 
INSTALMENT 

Notes belonging to Redemption Group No. 3 
will be redeemed on and after 

NOVEMBER 15, 1985 

in accordance with the drawing effected on 
October 4. 1983 pursuant to the Terms 
and Conc&fans. 


Paying Agents. _ 

Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank NV 
Algemene Bank Nederland NY 
Bank Mees & Hope NV 
Pierson, HeWring & Pierson NY 
in Amsterdam 
Swiss Bank Corporation 
in Basel 

Commerzbank AkttongasaUscfiaft 

in FrankturttMam 
and 

Banque G 6 n 6 rale du Luxembourg SJV. 
in Luxembourg 


RiPUBUQUE TUNISIENNE 

MINISTERS DE L-6CONOMIE NATIONAL 
COMPAGNIE DES PHOSPHATES DE GAFSA 

MIS K BEPOKT BE L'APPEL DUFfSES lHTEUUTlOtUL IP P 375 S 

la direction a» achate 2130 Metlaow TUNIS1E. 


£3 S* 

IS SA0V, „J«« e y0« l |t Sff * SMth SM Vi 

Open llWSW 



14030 141.10 —l-M 
14030 14190 —JO 
141.U M2« -JO 
14230 14330 —M 
UUO 114QD — Jo 

1MU US30 -IX 
14450 14420 — l3 
14350 14450 —50 

14250 14250 
142100 14350 



SOYBEAN OIL ICBTI ^ 

» S 3 355 8 | S| 

SBUM 2022 Mar 2013 2BJB 

»_45 2SJ2 MW 2050 

mi 2151 Jut 2055 21.15 

25.15 21-10 Aug 21.15 2135 

24JQ5 21.15 Sep 21.15 21.1S 

■n nn 21.10 Oct 

2,JH pSEsoH » 1S443 
prav.DavOpanlnl. 45J32 up 1.121 

IS* BS Bffl™ 

I pt«v!dS O pen Int. X7% oMO 


I9J5 IPtf 
1945 1952 

1955 1950 

20.10 2035 
2050 2077 

2053 21-15 
21 JM 2135 
1UJ 21-15 
21.12 
2L10 


U7VA 1.U -vOMA 
l rww. 137 — jDDw 

iSS 1 - 5 * -Jaw. 

132W —JKPA 


REPUBLIC OF TUNISIA 

MINISTRY FOR THE NATIONAL ECONOMY 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 

Notice of Bostponenent of the International Invitatiii 
to Tender N. P. 3759 

mechanical equipment for 

THE MANUFACTURING PLANT OF ROLLERS 
FOR CONVEYOR BELTS. 


Livestock 


COPPSR tCOMEXt 

f SS SSS 4150 4U0 

DUO M !& OM 

?as ss ssp ss ss 

7050 con SOP 

?0^£8 AUa OBC 

7TJJD 6455 Jon 

6750 6255 NUT 

SS SS joi 

S35o-n.»g3.^ 

ALUMINUM (COMBO 

40*00 bm.- cm pot lb- 

OCX 

7IUH 4335 DK 43JS 4400 

S3 S3 iSSr Mm mm 

SS SS 5T S38 SS 

52-10 4*^ S» 

49.10 4855 DK 

Jon 
MV 

ct -w 5335 MOV 

prow. Dov Opm lot 1574 op 31 
’ SILVER ICOMBO ■ „ 

W 5£r«sara ,tw ffi5 6245 
12300 5903 D*C 6315 5340 

IBS S 5& 6go 0 SS5 

% ass 5^ SS8 SS 

SnS S ^ ms 6520 

^5 Sll i&. 

7S2JJ 68LS MOV 

JS&m m * pSi-Sote. M34 
I pSv^cv opan lilt. n.i» w>*“ 


6050 

6150 

as 
sg as 

6255 6300 



^sssss =s 


SWI SS FliA WCj»*!!SL.« nn nBl 

a - MMJU? 

tmgiJSASMCiir 


MOB JOBS — JJ 

=s 


industrials. 



rbember 15. 1985 


-SI IliflLOUUU DAP imw— - ' - 

1985, at 09.00 houre at die 
2130 MetloouL Tunisia*'. 


-, EMPtX)VMEW — 1 INTERNATIONAL classified 

, DOMESTIC I . 

TOSmONS WANTED 



(Continued From Back Page) 

AUTOS TAX FREE AUTOS TAX FREE AUTO CONVERSION 

MERCEDES SPECIALISTS EXCAUBUR 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 

far ao gar*. , . The mcnl hwurio m faa*W6 evr b uilt . '^y^^SS^oor'fflrwSf 

WlfaAh-l&HleSa?. Co ^aly^-iterxsiondcourtte 


1985 Moddhtf Dtaonl I 

280 St. 280 $£ 500 S^SOO SL 

aaSliftacfljg 

Shipment & dmwy vmtdwide. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MJUNZBl lAMSTV. 191 
D-6000 RtAMCRgT/M 
IB: 10) 69-73 M *1 
tub 414018 


RANSCO 


Choire of itonckrd 305 CL enmne or 
the High Output 3*0.™^, 

1985 CLOSE-OUT SALE 
Mercedes / BMW / Porache 
500/380/280 S8L/SEE/SI 
BMW 745/635/535 
1986 M 00 HS NOW AVMABIE 
Ponche 944 Turtfi / MB 300 SL 


* SURECONVBI * 

Ihe lafest wnrta « 

Bmp«B car mfa the USA. 
Worldwide American insurer 
provides <d required nuurwee 
aid guarentaes your enr vrfl 
pass aU US- Bovernment rfarefarrk 
or your money bode inducing 

* conversion cat. 

Write or phone for free brad***- 
GERMANY JO) 69-7152425 Or 
( 0 ) 7031 / 223039 ^^ 
ambhcan intl uwnwHTBts 

Oberfndau 76-78 , 

D 4 Q 00 Fronkfwt/Moin 


Leave it » us to bring 4 toy«w 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

•INTERNATIONAL 

LKD. Mercedes Tax-Free 
Limo u sines 36 " & 4 4 _ 

, Aitnoured cars ora finimaew 
Coadi built cars 
]• Other tndttjs & exota 

Over 100 un* in dock 
World wide delivery 
, Direct from source 
. D.O.T. & EJA 


Wfar S MS' h g jkjy - 

Tnaws SA, » iv y — 

ret n&MltSEftx mSS’tw 

NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, far immediate delivery 

mm stock 


BMW /8D/OW/W ■■ 

'XUZ’SaiSIISwF LEGAL SERVICES 

e 8 VS 8 ffiRSgo “olSW'SS HUB 

SBhra.A-.MAac.om 

LOW COST FLIGHTS 

TracEng Co, Gesteh eboar izL 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

PORTUGAL 

7 DAYS MOU9VC TOURS 

FROM PARIS TO: 

USBON -KS2 

ccmPH f rASTAlS - ffMTO 

O0STAmE^POBO).mM1 

ALGARVE -—23*12 

MADBRA — f¥7980 

Please Contact: 

Paris Tel: 742 55 57, The 220550 

FROM ZURICH TO: 

|Koqm__ SF1O40 

^ORJl7CASCAB^:gM7 

C0CTA VERDE (OTOKTO)~SF|120 

ALGARVE — S2S 

- MADBRA ,571090 

" Please Contact -- 

Geneva 357410k Thu 27709 ICH» 

" For other proyams erd detdled 
r infonnc*an, csk your 

*• TRAVE AGENT 


CATTLE (CMB) 

^tbs-ogteoernL ^ ^ 

47.85 5550 Dec 64JZ5 MB 

4X45 SOS FOP g.15 

67J7 500 Apr 62.10 

5655 Jun 

4&40 5fi3fl AIM 6050 6077 

40*0 53-19 Oct 59.35 59 J5 

E^sales 19J36 Prev. Sales 1B£7 
PrcnrJXiV Open Int 5M94 UP 1.131 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMEJ 
44^-cgjtePerta. 

SS - 3S SS? S3 S3 

71 JB Sm Mr MR 69-97 

7iao 6iu« hot mja «j8 

RLffil 4010 May 6775 67^ 

6050 6575 Aua &X 6J-5U 

Eel. Sales 1AM . Prev-gale*. JTIR 
prev. Dav Open Int. 1927 will 

HOGS fCMEI 

^iPS.-ceMsP-r^ ^ ^ 

S0JS 3635 Dec 45JB 46.60 

%% 3S8gg 

2S 2S tt SS Si 

51.90 4025 AllO OJQ 4115 


im 8258- +J3 

OS 64JB — m 
61j6B 61-M —X 

6150 4L90 —.19 
*2.10 1231 — 25 

*0JO 6035 —.15 

WJ5 59J5 -JS 


65.15 6555 -MS 
44.10 6647 — 70 

STD 69JD5 -45 

4OB0 69.™ — -52 

lEo 6098 -M 
6745 67M —M 

ax am —ss 


4540 4540 -XL 
4545 4572 -JO 

Mfflt 4442 +.10 

*25 +.15 

SS Sis +.™ 

JI45 4X92 —JO 
4275 43JQ +.15 



Oil 60 A 6 
629.1 

430.1 *335 

6375 
6430 646 J 
4520 4 CT 7 

® a& 

•“ SK 

2070 
7106 
- 7304 


■m lyi 32090 
mS 326.10 
32900 3294 D 
T TlM t 

33850 317.90 




COTTON 2Q«YCg„ 

*ss mrft 5K8 SS 

7675 SSJ7 mur >-373 >&M 

?SS 3S IT SiS Si 

SS SS OK SUI0 5303 

4*75 5175 MOT ' . „ 

EsT. 5alee Prw-Sotee W®. 

Pnrv. Dav Open InL 2U29 upWI 
HBATmaofLGmm ■ 

*affi* e ssrg : ra g» 

tuen 49.15 Dec 817U S&25 

6?i? Jpn 5I-« KS 


13340 UU6 +-» 

?S 31 gS =3 


.. n 

4880 MW 


7 U 0 7 UV 

7 lS 7 U 5 


I pnivlDavOecii 
CRUDE qn-CNyME). 

29 J0 23M Dec «« 2M8 

»JD 2478 Jon 2745 27.87 

3946 2475 F=etl 26M VX 

»e£|| 


99 J2 «» +-g 

ssg a 
wj5 gjs 

5195 519 * +JB 
5340 - 


8170 njg +■« 

JL30 8221 +-S 

ji 1G nJS +-M 
7,S loS 4-U» 

SS +u* 

7280 7343 +U03 

7L45 7145 + A5 


ACCESS USA 


HOTELS 



Gurrency Options 


Get li 

PHIL ADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

^^rwa^Perw't. 

14101 140 r 5 i 245 * 

14101 145 170 sirs 

62 J 00 9*est German Murto-centt ner unit. 

% a* l l r l 

USUne jmreeej. M or-ceei^eWr. f 

MJ 4 46 * 5 S » 

4A5I 47 CL64 * S r 5 

4454 48 0-32 % » r a 

^R-ocohPr-*. , 025 . 

^ V M-r f 

a, poondvcenti per unit 
no 37 X -8 r I t r 

115 2585 r » r r 

125 1590 r r 02u r 

130 ll !3 r r ?S I 

135 7 i» r r 1 -“ v 

140 IB r IX 405 LRI 

MS 205 r r r r 

Man DoOwf-ceet* per wilt. 

72 122 r r r r 

74 r r r loo r 

German MurllKOitl W WUL 

m I 3 li ! B : 

i I S 3 : 3 2 

3783 




• Tet London 
' Telex (51) 8 


629 7779 
TRASG. 


Wm STO CK gpA / DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

'nTSTTSl- * Ootaim brttorage^ba^O^ 

RUTE INC. * Pkfcup 8. doSwy cnywhere m the 

nLSJL wooRAremm _ *£***■. ^ ^ 


. Traco London Ud. 

6*47 Pert Lone. London W.l. 

' Switariand-IK-W. Germany 


Wgivmxm . - 

— * GiSronteed ff A /_DOT (MTOV 

nmnPORT TAX HH CARS .CHAMW^ IMPORTS^ 


EUROPORT TAX TREE CARS 

Cell for free centoa. o??ai5£uSATefc^S 8226852 

“■’SSJ^inr^aAW 



PALLADIUM (NY6AE7 

r^WST'Sc un;* mm > 

]uS 91J0 35T itnoo iSS 1 

11500 97 2D Sep 

wras 10700 Dec 

Eat. 3o tea Prrv.Sak* 379 

Prev. Dav Open Int. US> up64 
GOLD (COMIDO 

33630 3 

E m 33000 33040 : 

mSS Feb moo xgx 

49680 31490 APT 33880 33080 

JjSJD 3209s Jun 30.48 3080 ; 

/COM 33100 AW 3090 34790 : 

S S M 357 JO 357 JO J 

S3 &S.5SS 

prev. Day Open inL12X368 uaTB 

[ Flnanciql 

US T. BILLStlMM) 

85 « S[ %£ 

mn mm Sep 9125 7176 

9 L 78 K SS JJ- 4 S 9146 

91 J? 89 . 58 - Mor 9 LU 91.18 

EeLMIes WU ° Preu.Solee 6954 
Prev. Day Open Int. 34468 up 575 

H YR. TREASURirtan „ . 

nnuwo win- ol* A 3 »»ds oi 100 oct 
B 7-13 79*13 Dec 85-11 

BM 75-14 MW 86*12 84-22 

85-7 7+30 jun 

H 4 80-7 3 ei» 

m-ll 80-2 Dee . 

E^Tsales __ 

Prev. Dav open Int. 7M41 wt 
US TREAWIW aojtw (CBT1 
(6 pet-51 DtUD0-Pt5 A 32l*»* rf IMP^ 
78-13 57-8 Dec 7S8 75-M 

77-29 57-2 MW »31 74-7 

76-6 56*29 Jun 72-30 796 

7521 56-29 SCP 

74-24 56-25 DK TV* Tl-12 

74- 15 56-27 Mur 

»46 63-12 Jl» 

7227 634 £*P 

7213 62-24 Dec 

62M S-25 .Jun . ^l^^- TO 

Eat. Salas Prev. Solos 8UDD 

prev. Dflry Open lnL27X502 xasZm 

«SSSBm!vpte&»J*M1tl0pet 

7 M M ^ ^ 

75- 17 50-25 Jun 759 75-17 

Prev. Dov Open Int. 3956 off! 


10050 1 DL 75 


2BJ5 2905 +-M 

%% M ^ 

2493 27 JD +■»* 
2*JS2 2685 +41 

S50 26J0 +2? 

Sm 2680 +J1 

BJB S3S +J4 


9175 9176 
9241 no 
mm 9206 
91 J 5 9 U 5 
9145 9145 
91.W n.ia 
9092 


85-11 IB-22 
84-12 8+21 
63-23 
82-28 
02-3 


754 75-13 

73-30 T+-7 . 
7MB 734 
724 

71-8 TV 12 
7®-1? 
69-28 
657 

653 

67-19 67-20 


77 77*6 

7* 767 

757 75-17 

• 74-21 


I stock Inde^ 

SP COMP. IMDCXtCMSJ 

P £j%F 1 %sm Dec HK90 Bit 1K1 

SS 182-30 Mor WB g*S 

» 6 S» 18390 JUO WAS* ™J“ ^ 

192-70 18788 Sop WOJpO m* WM 

EsL Sales 56w«7 PrUV.SgMtt5*4 

Prey. Day Open tut-. 59438 
VALUE UHRCKCan 

^jyhand^ j-jjb ^ 

ftv. Dn Open lot. M66W113 
NYSE COMP. WDRXCMYFO 

1UJ5 18590 Mar W40 Wl 
J 5 M® 10690 ' Jun THUS 1HU5 W«. 
109 JO 108.W _Sep 

Fst^4" MX Pruv-Soina MJN . 
Prev. Dov Opan Int. *96/ up 493 


t 


167 Jt +150 
tain +190 
fits +L 50 
19195 +U 0 


rasssus va 


MMB +LM 

199 J5 +LW 
TNJO +LU 

lllS +T.W 


CommodttY Intfexfes 


ciom 

MoodV*& — — maa f 

Reuters ■ . W®*** 

DJ. Future* * 1746 

Corn. Research Bureau- 22240 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, W31. 
p - preliminary; f- final . . 

Reuters : base «» .-Seprimr 
Daw Jones : base TOO : Dec 31,19/4. 

| Market Guide- ~ 

cbt; : aooae6 B owtrqr i wim. ' 

CMRs a* 0 BQ Meranflte &ectramw 

■MM; Intamattanol Moneta ry Mj™* 

OfCW^.Mwcp^ EKte™ 

iiYCSCE: Roe Yurt Cocoa Sueor. coffee t 

JJyCT; t“w Ynrt E«3iOTe 


Previous 
899 SO f 
1,708.16 
117JS 
22X70 


jircscE: See YaSTcocoa Su gar, CBt tee Exdianue 

KYCT; Wta* E«3iOTe 

Comex: CowiniodWv E ndiaw+Nre YnrK 

NTME? Mew York AMrcantit. Extriane* 

KCBT: mm»os City Bawd ^ 

ntoe: Hew York Futures Exdwoe 


The Global 
Newspaper. 


TJ's 


^ -r 1 
^-4 . , 


Cash Prices 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 


ESCORTS & GUIDES ! ESCORTS & 


. ESCORT 

SERVICE 

(SA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office m New 'Yurt 
330 W. 56tfi St„ MY.C 10019 USA 

1 212-765-7896 
.* 212-765-7754 

MAJOR gffCMW AW) 

•xdodve bcort S ervice by^ 

m t£S?5£SK!*° 


* USA A TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

EWRYW^YC^SffiOR GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Ccti bM from ILXs l-800-237-<®92 
GiB free from Porid* l-flOO-S Z-OtS Z 
Lowed Eastern WcauvB you bockl 


CAPRICE 

escort skvice 

M NEW YORK 
TEL: 212-737 3291. 


4 = , 


Portman Escort Agency 
a Chitam Sheet, 

London W1 

Tel: 48* 3724 ar 486 1158 
AS ra^or aecB an* ue w p l ea 


★ LONDON ★ 

je nvsnnk. 


AR1STOCATS 

12S W^or^^L^ ^W-l- 
12 noon - mdnghl 


HEATHROW 

* London Escort Agency* 

01-609 2870 



ZURICH 


AMSTKDAM 

BJRO ESCORT SERVICE 

020 - 271001 




cowmodllyand Unit 

Coffee 4 Santa. ib_ 

Prtntdorh 64/30 38M.VU- 
Steel biltatafPItt.l, tan — 
iron 2 Fdrv.Ptilta- Ion — 
Steel scroo No 1 nvy Pitt. . 

Lead Spot. »— 

Copper elect. ID 

Tin (Strolls). » 

Zinc. E.SLL. Bails, tb — 

PQllodimn, az , 

Silver N.Y. oi 

Source: AP. 


DM Futures 
Options 

W. GennoB AoU-GUW mate ca* Mr mar* 


Hm BE CMto-SeMte PifcSeiiie 

srfs ssr g? s £? fis 

S i£ £05 262 055 1£ 1J6 

31 174 193 2.11 Jill 141 1J8 

39 040 Lll 147 146 291 2J0 


36 

l.« 

2+8 

37 

196 

29 * 

38 

094 

1 J 3 

X 

040 

Lll 

*0 

020 

098 

41 

0.10 

05 * 


■jssswsaeifsa 

MADRID INT’L 

ESCORT SERVICE EnoCdi, French. Gmnstai. Sfxmn 

m* tEESS. am cuax £gxa= pgg | a sr aa. 

G»*VA - HBfl«ESCTRT SBTVKE 

* JASMINE * Tefc 34 29 32 

AMSTBd^gcgsanncx 


EaNniaM total vet 2Jt8 
Con*: Fit vqL 19)5 open W. 3UII 
Puts : FrL vaL 1400 open W. 22411 
Source: CMC. 


SET 

1 MANAGEMENT 

UULEJsjv. GENEVA 6 LVJ5ANNH 

We offer all types, of financial, 
management, and tax shelter 
services. Our strategic invest- 
ment progr a m will offer mini- 
mum risk, with maximum 
■.profit, plus our bi-monthly 
New Ttechnology for Investors 
newsletter. Both programs are 
yours at no charge or obliga- 
tion - fill in the coupon and 
mail today. 


I would like to receive the FIMA 
\ Complimentary Investment 

Service, 

! FIMA FINANCES ET 
. MANAGEMENT SJV. 

I BOITE POSTALE 820 

1 121 1 Geneva l | 

SWITZERLAND * 


CommSiities 


HW Low BH Art ClfM 

F^icfc francs per metric ion • 

Dm UH 1985 1985 1950 —1 

MW 14® 1-351 3^ ~1 

May 14B 14* 1 4^ }-4*> — | 

aS 1905 14KJ 1495 1^ -8 

B. vaL: T9M tart p i g ta na . Prey, octwal 

wales; 1915 Iota. Open t n tereaP. 2R989 

iffi *1 

Mov N-T. H.T. JOT — -10 

J|y N.T. N.T. 2305 — —5 

SS. H.T. H.T. 2940 — —5 

Dec H.T. H.T. — M75 —5 

Mar N.T. M.T. — UB5 —5 

Btf.voL:3tatao* l0tona.Prev.octiMl aoleK 

5 lots. Open Interest: 603 
COFFEE 

1^7 +4 

A « J?: ^ g r, 

ST S:t: K 98 IS 

sin N.T. N.T. 1955 I99S +15 

hS, NX St! I960 1988 UnctL 

Eat. voL: 0 lota of 5 tons. Prev. actual soles: 
16 lots. Open Interest: 310 
Source: Bouraatu Commerce. 


Dividends 



Oct U 

Per 

Amt Pur 

Rec 



10-11 


.10 1W 1042 


92 12-31 

12-6 





13-3 


.10 11-ra 10-25 


96 12-2 



M 11-15 



-45 12-15 



.17 11-11 

10-3S 




Q 

M 12-30 

I2-* 


Close PravleuB 
High Low W AP BM Auk 

SUGAR 

SI si Hup »er metric toe 
DK 13940 139 JO ISMO 140M 13940 14020 
Mar 148JH 147.00 14UH 14190 14740 14749 
Mar 151-40 151-00 15140 151 JO 15140 1ST -68 
AM N-T- N.T. 15790 157 JO 157-4015740 
Oct 16290 16290 16290 16180 16390 16390 
Votuine: 2S2 lata of SO tore. 

COCOA , , 

SMrBnu per metric tea 
Dec 1740 L735 1936 1OT 1^6 1 -737 

Mar V78 L773 1975 1974 1974 1975 

JWay 1906 U00 1901 1903 1900 1JU 

jiT ijS i«6 im 1 0 1 JB 

Sen 19» 1933 1935 1938 lj^ 1940 

Dec 1916 1913 1914 1917 1910 2915 

Mar NX K.T. 1920 1920 1921 1935 

vatoma: 19H lota of ™ tare 

COFFEE _ 

itarilnu per metric tan 

Nov 1926 1922 1923 U25 1923 19B 

MW 1910 1987 1900 1907 1488 14W 

T iS-BS S 88-B5-B8 

up 1975 1960 1974 1975 1964 1966 

Nm N.T. NX 1980 1908 I960 1938 
Volume; W7 tala ol 5 tare 

basoil 

UJL Honors pw metric ton 
MOV 29090 248J5 24*90 34795 24890 34890 
Dec 24895 24695 247 JO 24795 24690 24625 
Jton 2*790 2449S 245JS 24690 244J# 2JW 
Fab 24495 2*390 243JB 24350 24195 2G23 
Mar 23695 22495 ZB90 

S3 SSSmS 227J0 23850 228J3338J0 
Mav NT N.T 23400 22595 22+50 23590 
Mb sres* arena 22290 22490 31490 22495 
jty SasS 22190 23890 22290 220J0 22295 
VMume: 1935 tola at UO lore 

Sources: Reuter* am! LenUoti Pmrroloirm Sx- 

coone teaaoHl. 


London Metals 




rr'.rtrf- ' r.rjmr 

• • Trr*.iTre- 








'Mwm 









\ 


oeanol: uHswahrt 

annuel 

Source: UPI. 


i^osau 


jp U Ite M in 

— I/U 1/14 W 7J14 

— uuw » i ire 

** a 

# * 1 » * 

1 flh « 14 7* 

ism — li* — ii* 

— “me — — — - 




4 Asian Nations 
ToFigttU.S.Bfli 

Reuters 

SEOUL — South Korea will 
work with Hong Kong, Taiwan and 
Singapore to develop strategies to 
fight a U.S. tall sharply cutting ten- 


aaaiiaEawsa 






























»*ft »47- 


tr^e^rr . 

-TE* 1 v, ' 


■ (•Iferr ■t ji1l! - 

... . 

• jr -... 


..■CTO- 

r -fc.su - 

*<*»■•■ —i „ • 


ft***.* w* 

4 



■*; - 

'fOi .. 

SfTV 




» J * . 

■ . '. -''..St 

'• ... 



.• - i : : 


+ -VS 

^ i - 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 




/C^ 


1 aX^ 


Page 21 


Dollar Moves little in Oniet Europe Trade 

Cottaded he n~~ t u . ' . A 


<?"**** OtarSiaff From Dtepcnchts 
LONDON — The dollar drifted 
lower or remained unchanged 
mqor currencies in quiet 
European trading on Monday. 

. jB e -was virtually 

“ao, said a currency dealer in 
Frankfurt, noting that US. banks 

m 4 ° I ‘ £c Column Etay 

_ The cuiren^ was fixed in Frank- 

furt at 2.656 DM, down slightly 
from 2.6595 DM late Friday. 

n!t I tv?' 0 ^ rO j closed at 

214 90 yen, down from 215 JO yen 
at the end Friday. Later, in Lon- 

???%« dolllar quoted at 

215 JO yen. 

In London, the British pound 

SiffA- 41 * Mond »y 

$1.41 15 Fndav at the dose. 

Dealers said the West German 
central bank, the Bundesbank, in- 


tervened by seliing between $5 nril- 
uon and $10 minimi is lhc open 
market to calm a raid rally by the 
dollar. Other* dealers put the 
amount at 516.1 million. • 

Tte dealers predicted the inier- 
veadOD would cammae later in the 
week. 

A Frankfurt dealer said;. 
“Iuere’s a willingness to buy the 
dollar higher backed by some com- 
mercial demand. WeSc Kkdy to 
keep testing the upper Hauls cm 
thedolbuvbal the central banks are 
likely to intervene each tune the 
^oUar gcts to 2.6650 marks.” ■ 

Although. the threat of central 
bank intervention in the afiennath 
of the Sept. 22 five-nation agree- 
ment to push the dollar, down has 
limited the currency’s potential for 
farther gains, it has beat supported 
by expectations of buoyant US. 
economic data later this week. 

The U.S. Commerce „ Depart- 
ment was expected iq reviseits esti- 
mate of thud-quarter growth in 
gross national product to 3 ktb- 3 J 


percent from a prdhmnary 2 JJ per- 
cent, when new data is released on 
Thursday, dealers in London said. 
Gross national product measures a 
country’s total output of goods and 
services. . 

U.S. industrial production fig- 
ures, due on Wednesday, were ex- 
pected to show little change in Sep- 
tember, the dealers added 

In Zurich, the dollar ended Mon- 
day at Z18 Swiss francs, down 
slightly from 2.1835 at the close 
Fnday. 

In Paris, the afternoon fixing pat 
tho dollar at 8.J04 French francs, 
marginally up from Friday’s 8.101 
dosing. 

In Milan, the dollar was fixed 
Monday at 1,192.75 Italian lire, 
slightly off on Friday’s 1,795.20. 

The dollar's loss against the 
Dutch guilder in Amsterdam was 
to 25945 at Monday’s fixing, from 
2.9985 at Friday’s dose. In Brus- 
sels, the movement was to 53.8625 
Belgian francs, down from 54.0375. 
(AP, Reuters) 


Sinclair Car 
Goes Into 
Receivership 


the euromarkets 


New Issues Appear in a Variety of Currencies 

By Christopher Pizzey to the dollar, but the redemption point over three-month Libor 


i /-YknvNvi f? • amount would be cut proportion- thereafter. 

~ - lssl f s m a atdy if the rate isbdow 169 yen to Lead manager for the issue was 

variety of currencies were themain the dollar. Morgan Guaranty Ltd. Trading ex- 

°L a Qraet days. trading in The bookrunner for the issue was -warrants the dollar note ended at 

Eurobonds on Monday, dealers Bankers Trust Tmemarirmai and jt about 100.05, compared with the 
^ . ended on the market at a discount 100.10 issue price and 15-basis- 


thereafter. 

Lead manager for the issue was 
Morgan Guaranty Ltd. Trading a- 


»i|l • . . wuw uu mcuiuuL di uikuuii 

f l ? sues °f about IK, compared writ the point total fees, 

today; we didn t see much business total fees of 2 percent. Snmit«mn 


Sumitomo Corp. issued a 52-mD- 


at aU,” a secondaiy-market trader ^ _ . . lkm-ECU bond pasina 8 K percent 

said. She noted that floating-rate *** &******* a year overseveTySS and^S 

notes and dollar straights Sided fore jmerged with wanmrts at- ^ ^ pEwSfitf 
A*, unchanged, with VS. credit mar- taefaed excusable uitoan Europe- j^Ji taildBI SSitadSim 
■5 * • kets doscd for Columbus Day **-c^«cy-anit floater, dealers 1 ^ n was fed-managed^sS- 

i'iS’ hollda y- ****• d£ti Gfcntetle. 

; ?,-r The day’s only dollar-straight The $200-mflKdu issue was for Also in the ECU sector, Oct. 7s 
bond incorporated a unique feature CridhFooder and pays the higher issue feu- the European Coal and 
whereby the redemption amount of the one-month London inter- Sted Communi ty was raised to 100 
JpN would be cut if the dollar exchange bank offered rate flat or the six- njnw ECU from the initial 80’ 
~ — . rate is below 169 yen at maturity, month London interbank bid rate million. Despite the increase, the 
The SlOO-million bond was for phis 5 basis points, using the “mis- bond remaned within the ltt per- 
- r-. the Long-Term Credit Bank of la- -match” formula. cent coocesaon at a dis- 

;g?: pan Finance NV. It pays 111* per- It carries 200,000 warrants, count of*. 

" p; “p 1 a year and was paced at lOHt. priced at $37 each, which are exer- Sumitomo Metal Industries Lid. 

The issue would be redeemed for dsable into a 10-year ECU floater issued a 20-bDlion-yen bond pay- 
$100 million in 1995 if the yen/dol- paying 1/16 paint over six-month mg 6 % percent a year over five 
e ;. laf exc han g e is rate above 169 yen Libor in the first year and 1/16 years and priced at lOlVi. 


d£tfc Gfcnirale. 

»f for Also in die ECU sector, Oct. 7s 
ugher issue for the European Coal and 
rater- Sted Community was raised to 100 


With Sperry Unit, Ford Hopes to Make Hay 


LONDON — Sinclair Vehicles 
LkL, the company set tip by the 
inventor Sr Clive' Sinclair to pro- 
duce a battery-powered car with 
three wheels, announced Monday 
that it had gone into receivership 
owing nearly SI million. 

The company said that two re- 
ceivers had bom appointed and 
that a statement of iu condition 
would be issued soon. 

The suuemem “is expected to 
show outstanding commitments to 
a total of 110 suppliers of around 
£700.000,” or 5987,000, the compa- 
ny said. 

Production of the C5 car stepped 
in August, seven months after Sin- 
clair introduced it. A spokesman 
said Monday that output would 
resume but gave uo date. 

The vehicle, with a top speed of 
20 mpb (32 Itilometers per hour) 
and a range of about 20 miles bo- 
tween battery recharges, got a cool 
public reception and sales were be- 
low target. 

The British Safety Council de- 
nounced the single-passenger C5, 
which sold for about £400. as an 
“unsafe folly car." 

Sinclair Vehicles said a separate 
company. Sinclair Vehicles Sales, 
was' involved in sales and develop- 
ment of the CIO, a new enclosed 
two-seater capable of up to 40 mph, 
and the C15, describal as an aero- 
dynamic four-seater. 

Sir Give, who acknowledges that 
he is a better inventor than busi- 
nessman, used about £7 million of 
his own money to set up Sinclair 
Vehicles. 

He also has problems with the 
separate, larger Sinclair Research 
Ltd, founded in 1979, which has 
been battling a sales slump in the 
home-computer industry. 

Sinclair Research owes about 
£15 million to creditors, including 
Barclays Bank PLC. Citibank, 
Thom EMI PLC and Timex Corpi 
In August, the company an- 
nounced that its creditors had 
agreed to provide continued funds 
to see it through its financial crisis. 


(Continued from Page 15) 

Mr. Geran of E.F. Hutton. “You 
have an SSG0-m2Hoo asset that is 
not generating enough profit to jus- 
tify the investment. This frees up 
cash to put into the computer busi- 
ness, which demands a lot of cash.” 

Gerald G. Ptobst, Sperry's chair- 
man. said, “The sale of New Hol- 
land to Ford will permit Sperry to 
aggressively expand its electronic 
systems product and marketing 
strategy, while making New Hol- 
land a major part of a full-line farm 
and industrial-equipment maker.” 

Sperry said it would record an 


aftertax loss of S220 million, or 
$3.86 a share, on the transaction in 
the quarter that ended Sept. 30. 

If Ford’s agricultural roots ex- 
tend well into the previous century. 
New Holland’s are almost as deep. 
It was established in 1895 in the 
fanning town of New Holland in 
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 
and for years made small gasoline 
engines to run machinery and gen- 
erate electricity at isolated farms. It 
turned to balers and other special- 
ized farm machinery in the 1930s, 
and was acquired by Sperry in 
1947. 


Silver Slips Its Straiijacket 


(Continued from Page 25) 

The federal government’s impor- 
tant recent strategy switch to try to 
bring the dollar lower signifies that 
holding the line on inflation is not 
the chief policy goal any longer. 
The easier monetary policy that the 
government’s dollar strategy sug- 
gests is also likely to spur economic 
activity, which should increase 
commercial demand for silver. 
“When you take all the factors 


Industry Aide Says 
ILK. Pay Is High 

Reusers 

LONDON — Unit labor costs 
are rising and unless pay settle- 
ments fall. Britain's ability to com- 
pete in world markets will be 
threatened, the director-general of 
the Confederation of British Indus- 
try said Monday. 

Unit labor costs in Britain are 65 
percent higher than a a year ago. 
according to a statement by Ter- 
ence Beckett. U.S. costs are up 3 
percent, but in West Germany they 
have fallen 2 percent and in Japan 
they are down 1 percent. 

The stock brokerage. Phillips & 
Drew, in its annual review of pros- 
pects for settlements and earnings 
over the next 12 months, said that 
for more than two years the under- 
lying rate of growth in average 
earnings had been within a range of 
75 - 10-8 percent, much higher than 
in most industrialized countries. 


together, what they really mean is 
that silver is released from its s trail- 
jacket.” Miss Raptopoulos said. 
“Now. it’s probably going to move 
more in sync with the dollar and 
other metals, rather than lagging as 
it has” This also means that, 
should the dollar for some reason 
rebound, silver prices could be 
forced downward, too. 

From a technical perspective, 
Mr. O’Connell said that there were 
also mildly positive signals. The 
comments by the Hunt family 
spokesman that most of the silver 
bad been sold, and the market’s 
brief rally, did not by themselves 
signify a market turnaround. But, 
he said, they may have indicated 
that the market has established a 
firm bottom at about the S 6 level 

“h suggests that the market put a 
foot down at 56, that you have 
good support there now,” Mr. 
O’Connell said. “We used to con- 
rider the bottom to be closer to $5. 
So you can consider new* possibili- 
ties with this market.’* 


Italian Output Down 5.6% 

The Asssseuued Press 

ROME — Italy’s industrial pro- 
duction in August was down 5.6 
percent from the same month last 
year, after a 56.3-percent drop 
from July to August, the state sta- 
tistical institute, fstat, said Mon- 
day. The unadjusted output rate 
generally falls dramatically in Au- 
gust, when many plants dose for 
vacation. 


Ford executives said Lbey made 
the acquisition without any antici- 
pation of an early improvement in 
sales to farmers. “There are no 
signs of an immediate pickup ” said 
Robert F. Moglia, who heads the 
tractor division. “We are not plan- 
ning for a stronger market." 

Bui adding New Holland’s com- 
bines and other equipment will 
broaden Ford’s product line, both 
in the United States and overseas, 
Ford's executives said. “This 
makes us a strong enuy in an in- 
dustry that is consolidating," said 
Philip H. Benton, executive vice 
president for diversified products. 

The combined operation will 
have annual sales of about 52 bil- 
lion. and will rank second or third 
in the American farm equipment 
market, they said. Deere &. Co. is 
the industiy leader. 


Farm equipment analysts have 
said demand probably will not be- 
gin to recover until the latter part 
of the decade. They said the prob- 
lems some fanners have been hav- 
ing paying their debts have not en- 
couraged bankers to extend credit. 

They added that new farming 
techniques have reduced the 
amount the soil is tilled, lessening 
the need for tractors. 

Nevertheless, they note that the 
most efficient farmers are heavily 
mechanized and need to replace 
their equipment as it ages. 

As Henry Ford wrote of his farm 
boyhood: “My earliest recollection 
is that, considering the results, 
there was too much work on the 
place. Even when very young, i 
suspected that much might be done 
in a better way.” 


Gwripany Results 

Revenue and protits or tosses, to millions, ore In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


Australia 

MIM Holdings 
Itfouor. ms 19M 

Rivwiut. 320.BS IStSt 

Profits ILlSIalUOS 

a; loss. 

Britain 

Glaxo Holdings 
Ftac.Year 1985 1984 

Revenue I.4J0. 1.200. 

ProHJ , . 402.9 2S*n 

Per Shore — &?» iL4» 

Canada 

Steinberg 

FtULYeor 1985 1984 

Revenue 3.91 [L 1390. 

Profits 71*3 t&W 

Per Share 4.19 DM 

United Slates 

Adv. Micro Devices 
2nd Otar. 1985 1984 

Revenue lffl.1 2S7.1 

Net Inc (0)15.3 42.1 

Per Shore — — 0.72 

1st HoH 1985 1984 

Revenue — 2787 49! J 

Net Inc (0)143 90J 

Per Stare — — ijs 

a: loss. 

Amsouth Bancorp 


ftd Quar. 

1985 

1984 

Met inc 

11.7 

958 

Per Shore — 

U5 

CL9I 

9 Month* 

1985 

1984 

Net Inc 

325 

779 

Per Share 

107 

257 


Archer Danfelds MM. 
1st Quar. 1984 1985 

Net Inc 50.52 3U4 

Per Stare 050 0J1 

Per share results adlustea 
for 5^. stack dividend void m 
Sept. 


Baxter Travenol 


Ini Quar. 
Revenue _ 
Net Inc _ 
Per Snare. 
9 Months 
Revenue — 
Net Inc 


Boise Cascade 
3rd Quar. 1985 

Revenue 934J3 

Met inc 20j 


1985 

1984 

3rd Quar. 

1985 

1984 

519.1 

465.9 

Revenue — 

9095 

6625 

475 

J9J 

Net inc — 

41.1 

485 

032 

028 

Per snare 

on 

086 

1985 

1984 

9 Month* 

1985 

1984 

1520 

1J40 

Revenue 

2J30. 

2.700. 

1295 

1225 

Net Inc 

1355 

1425 

088 

087 

Per Shore — 

2X0 

253 


V Months 
Revenue . 
Net me _ 


teas nets Include gam of 13 
centso snare and atone of It 
cents. 

Burlington Northern 
am Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 2.130 ixffl. 

Net Inc no A 7417 

Per Stare 251 1.90 

f Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 6580. 0970 

Net me 4485 417.4 

Per snore 6.08 ttO 

Chase Manhattan 
3rd Quar. 1985 1984 

Net Inc 149,42 9X01 

Per Shore _ 348 1.70 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Net inc 414.14 235.71 

Perstar*_ 959 6M 
I9&5 quarter net includes stain 
of sa million. 

Corning Gloss Works 
3rd Quar. 19SS 1984 

Revenue 474.5 soa.1 

Oper Net 97 15.1 

ooer Snare— 053 036 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 1500. 1520. 

Ooer Net 79.1 744 

Ooer Share- 157 172 

loaf nen Include chcrne of 
S4&) million and vain ot 130? 
million. Per share results ad- 
lusted tor 2 -tor- 1 spin In jon 


1985 

1984 

3rd Quar. 

1985 

1984 

mo 

9610 

Revenue 

TULA 

U1X 

205 

32 J 

Net Inc 

SJ7 

249 

055 

1.13 

Per Stare 

091 

057 

1985 

1984 

7 Macrth* 

1985 

1984 

2500. 

2.900 

Revenue 

4020 

3881 

055 

94.1 

Net Inc 

7.19 

5J2 

25* 

024 

Pur Stare— 

221 

155 


Echlin 

4th Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 2055 174.7 

Net Inc. 125 ll.i 

Per 5nare_~ 050 057 

Year 1985 1984 

Revenue 7714 48 *5 

Net Inc *54 OM 

Per Share 1.10 154 

Per snore results ad lusted 
for 2- (or- 1 spiff ta Aug. 

B-Syafems 

3rd Quar. 1985 19M 

Revenue 24X1 195* 

Net inc 1C4 145 

Per Stare— 048 048 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 7015 400J9 

Mel Inc 444 455 

Per Stare — 14* 149 

JPS4 9-month net Includes 
gain of S 2 ! million from sate. 

Gt Northern Nekoosa 
3rd Osar. 1985 1984 


Revenue — 

Net Inc 

Per Snare, 
f Months 
Revenue ~ 
Net Inc — 


475J 4725 

94 384 

058 1.17 

1985 1984 

1450. 1410. 

357 95.9 


Per Snare 158 346 

Per share results offer pre- 
ferred dividends. 


Mondays 

ore 


(Vices 


NASDAQ PH css as of 
3 pjn. New York time. 

Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
mail lam Slack 

16 Vj M.Cetue 
06 3U CtepEn 
i 'lB* CtannS 
life 11W CWuPnt 
11 M6 ChkTU) 
3114 10% ChLwn 
0% 3% Chemex 
15% 8fe OlTOli 
31 24% OlIPocS 

lOfe ife Cbronr 
ms .11 ChrOwt 

T1V4 jfe Omen 
44% 25fe Onto* 
3ife 10% Cipher 
12% 5% CJortco 
7% 4 Ciran 
23% 16% ClzSGt 
35% 23% CtaFM 


DJv. YW. 1D0* High Let* 3 PM. Oil* 


12 Month 
MehLow Stack 


So let in Net 

Dlv. YkL IDO* High Lou 3 PM. Old* 


12 Month 

I Han Low Stack 


Dhr. Yd- 5 ?DCn' l> Hiflti Low 3 PM. Chde 


100 

132 

50 .14 312 

w 

58 17 1144 
TB74 
% 

.12* 5 20 

t HI 


15 14% 
3% 3% 
21 20 % 
14% Mfe 

4s& 


14%—% 
3% + % 
20% 4- % 
14% + fe 

22 % +1 

s%% 


1E% lf% 

7% 7th 
3716 36% 

] vs: 


12 Month 
High Law stock 


19% 11 


CJJv. YkL in 


% AamRt 
2% Acad In 
7fe Acelrtn 

ftasas 


50 W 13 
54 7 10 


Ths SloN 

Newspaps 


Mfe 9% 

1B% 7% A 
39% 28% AlexB 
34 15% Alfhl 

24fe 10% AMW 
22% 15 Alien Bv 
26% 17% A! Id Bn 
1% A Ihwt 


\ 

\ 



13% Amenst 
17% 4% AWAlrt 
17 6% AmAdv 

1*% 10% ABotcr 
14% 10% Am Carr 
9% 5% AContt 
17% U AFrtSL 
8% Cfe ARlPrst 
32 17% AFMCS 

12% 5% AMagnt 
19% .10% AMS J 
36% .27% ANti 
7% 2% A 
34% 16% 

15 TA AmS 


1% ASotar 
1% K ASuru 
44% 25% Amrtrs 
36 17 Atnnwt 

8% 3% Amocn 
29% 16% ArrwkB 
20% 14% Ampd S 
15% 10 Anloolc 
15% 8% Anorer 
39% 13% Andrew 
10% 6% Aeoaw 
30% 9% AptHOC 

31% 14% ApPteC 
27% TOhAptMas 
19% ll ApfdCtn 
36 17VL ApkJMt 
7% 3% Archive 

22% 15% ArooSy 
40% 18% ATUB 
16% 10% Aid Hat 
9 5% AjfroBV 


50 55 39 

' t • 860 

£ 

140 17 25 

19 

.109 S 28 
40 24 IB 
54 44 133 
82 

3 

44 XI 5 
7481 
t 7 

-50 4.1 245 

83 

- 40 ! 44 14 

50 IS 4S2 
35- 20 1032 
40 19 96 

T7 
8 

158 10 37 

248 

152 16 32 

10 
1375 
182 

T40 47 570 

20 
73 

UH 35 28 

5, *3 |g 

■ M U 4« 
5298 
670 
43 
348 
21 
67 

JObXO 74 
.12 9 544 


189h 11% 
19% 19% 
9% 9 

it n ' 
2% 2% 
link 9% 
26% 25% 

1% m 

8 7% 

10% 9% 

3fe 3% 
15- 14% 
18% T7% 
10% W% 
13 72% 

30% 38 
19% 19% 
21% 21% 
17V. 17 
19% 18% 
3% 3% 
5% . 5% 
70% 9% 
.14 14 

9% .9 
6% 6% 
12% n 
11% 11% 
8% 8% 
nw. i» 
8% 1 
32% 3T* 
2W6 29% 
10% 10% 
6% 6 
19%. 19% 
35% 35% 
4% 3Va 
28% 21 

8 ^ 
. 33 S 

25% 24% 
0% 1% 


18% + % 
19% . 

i!* + S 
in.— iw 

a 

10 +% 
1 % + % 
15 

17% — % 
. 10 % + % 
13 +% 

19% 

21% +% 
17 

19% + 16 
3% + % 

u +.% 

9% + % 
6 % + % 
T 2 % + % 
11 % + % 

tsr* 

8 % 

31%—* 
29%—% 
10 % — * 

. 6* 

19fe + % 
35% + % 
<* -V-% 
38* 

T=$ 

34 +16 

25 — % 

2 Mk— % 
I7V6 + * 

12%—* I 

1246 

15 

10 % + % 
12 % + % 
16*+ % 


9* City Fed 
20 % CfyMQt 
22* aorta 

•380 

rm coostp 

is Cohtnrt 
2* Cotab R 
6% Cotaoen 
4 Collins 
15* CoIrTle 
15 CotoNt 
4% Comar* 
11% Com cat 
IS* Cantata 
T% Comdloi 
33 Cmortc 
23* DneeU 
9* 

23% 

16% Coailnd 
716 
>3* „ 

4 Cnmoao 
74* CmpCri 


UM. " ^ 

156 53 U 
40 35 338 
J8&2J 41 

58 34 197 

200 114’ 14 


7* 

36* 

14 + * 

6 % + * 

mt + * 

33% + * 

Tt't 




163 

104 

37 

152 40 212 
140 3J) 25 

JUS 
40 4.1 6 


140 10 19 

140 37 47 

US 27 38 

50 2J 840 
1.10 54 106 

140 42 44 

1.12 29 661 
171 

I « J 

50 21 199 


17% 

4% — * 
16% 

29%+ * 
S3* +1 
38 +* 

14% — % 

6 — % 
14* + % 
31% I 
30% 

75V.— % 
«% + %, 
7 — % 
38 — % 
13% + * 
17* + % 
21 — % 
26* 

36 + 16- 

54 

37% +1%. 
48% 

2ff%— 4k 
19% — % 

M% + % 
2 % + * 
12 + % 
* 20 % 

% 18% 


27-i 10 
19% 0* 

47* 31% 
21% 12% 
18% 11 
17 11% 

' T7 14 
59* 35% 
32 21* 

7% 4% 
15% 1% 
9% 6% 

J% ft 

34* 17% 
46* 31% 
7% 4% 

20* IT* 
31% 18% 
6% 4% 
49% 2t* 
25* 30* 
.'33* 15* 
26* 19 
» 7% 


LTX 

Lo Pete* 

LaZ By 

LadFrn 

Latdtw 

LamaT 

Lmcast 

LoneCo 

Lawns 

LeeDto 

Leinor 

Lewlsp 

Lexicon 

Cental a 

Lletsrt 

Lltnvs 

LleCcrn 

LtlvTuI 

UnBrd 

Urtahru 

LizOas 

LongF 

Lotus 

Lynten 

Lvatioi 


140 29 1 

.16 J 36 
70 1.4 T74 

JO 52 10 

48 13 15 

72 17 10 

72 1.1 4 

52 
19 

286 Al 114 
188 
19 

57 4 34 

24 4 12 

53 

70 15 llg 
450 

.16 29 19 

75 £ 223 

128 £4 70 

2021 
1 

625 


11 % 11 % 
16% 16% 
47% 47% 
20% 19T* 
14% 14 
>5% IS* 
14 15* 

52% 52% 
21% 28% 
SVi 5% 
9% 9% 
7 6% 

2 % 2 * 
2 % 2 % 
20% 20 
46% 46% 
6 % 6 
16* 16% 
37% 36% 
5% 5% 
42* 41% 
24 23% 

18* 17 
23% 23% 
21 % 21 % 


11% + * 
16% + % 
47% + * 
19% — % 
14% 

15*— % 
15* 

52% + % 

5% 

s% + % 
9 % — % 

& + S 
2% 

20 + * 
46% — % 
6 — % 
16% + % 
36%— % 
5% + % 
42% + % 
23*— * 
18% +1% 
23% + % 
21% 4- * 


7% + * 

S-S 

17* 

31% 

10 % 

25’fc + % 
8 *—* 
11 — * 


17 Month 
HjehLge Stuck 

30% 23% 

13% 4 
12* 7* 

17% 14% 
ft* 2 
28% 17* 

34* 16% 

37% 27* 

10* 7 
IS 8* 

34* 16% 

29 21 

3% 1* 

15% 9% 

11% S* 

37* 19% 


16* 7* 
66 36% 

21* 9 

J ^ 

15% 11* 


15% 8% QMS 
9% 3% Quodrx 

13* 9 QuakCe 
32* 16* Quentin 
5% 2% QuestM 
13% B* Quixote 
12% 7* Quotm 


Sales in Net 

DHr. Yta. 100? High Lew 3 PM Cirte 


1.12 45 24 

415 

,10e U 343 
-S0e 32 244 
11 
S3 

50 27 8 

.92 25 B06 
.12 15 276 
27 
550 
26 
6 
79 
33 

.12 5 74 


25 24% 

8% 7* 
8 % 8 % 
15% 15% 
2 % 2 % 
24% 24% 
22* 22% 
33* 32% 
8 * 8 % 
11% life 
20% 18% 
23* 23% 
2 2 
10 * 10 % 
11 % 11 
33 32% 

7% 7% 
3* 3% 
9* *% 
59* 57% 
11 % 11 % 
4% 4% 
36 35% 

12 n% 

IS 17* 
6 % 6 % 


25 

7*— % 
5% 

15% + % 
2% 

24% 

22 %— % 
33* + * 
8 * 

11 % 

20 % +2 
23* 

2 — % 
10 % 

II 

37% 

55' w 

59% +2 
11 % + % 
4% 

36 + * 

11 % 

17% 

6 % + % 


14 5* 

18% 12 
16* 8% 

14* 6* 

ID* 5% 

7% 2% 

33* 20% 

20* 12% 

7* 1% 

23% 17* 

10 * sw 

35* 25* 

12 % 3* 

7* 5* 

12% 4% 

10% 7% 

M* 9% 

17% 11* 

16% 7 

29* 17% 

<3* 29 
15* 9* 

10 3% 

22 % 12 % 

17% 10* 

JT* 34* 

16% 11 
13* 8 % 

34% 16% 

13 8, 

10 % 3% 

18% 11 Rust Pel 
19* 11* RvanFs 



9% 9* 9*— * 
7% 6* efc— * 
10 * ID 10* + * 
22* 21 22 + * 
4% 4% 4% 

13% 12* 13* + % 
12 * 11 * 12 — * 


Die 2 109 
52 43 B0 
1057 
114 
1 

13 

UO 35 256 
M 13 14 

319 

14 

73 

54 23 12 

421 

JO 35 209 


.ISe 25 54 

Jfto 1.0 16 

134 XI 7 
32 23 106 

423 
20 

JO 43 45 

150 14 273 
56 5 7 

54 22 290 


5* 5* 
14% 14* 
12% 12* 
10 9* 

7 to 7% 
4% 4 
29% 29* 
18* 18% 
2 1* 
19% 19% 
8* 8% 
28 27% 

11 % 10 % 
5% 5% 
4% 4% 
9* 8* 

10* 10% 
17 16% 

7% 7% 
26 % 26 % 
37 37 

14% 14% 
7 6% 

20* 20* 
16% 16* 
29* 29 
12% 12% 
9% 0 

24% 23% 
9% 9% 
3% 3* 
12 % 11 * 
17* 16* 


5*- * 
14% + * 
12 % + % 
9* + * 
7% 

4 - % 
29* 

18* + * 
2 + * 
19% 

8 * + W 
28 + * 
11 t % 

5% — % 
4% + % 
■% 

10 % + % 
16% 

7% — ta 
26% — % 
37 — % 
141k 

7 + % 

20 *- % 
16 % + % 
29 

12 % + * 
9% ♦ % 
24* + * 
9% 

3*— % 
12% 

17* +1 


— * 

— % 


19 
7 

18 

17 + % 

38% + % 
17* 

14% 

68 % + % 
5% + * 
5% + * 
5* 

51* + * 
19% + * 
8 * + % 
■’ — * 
+1 
+ % 


12 Month 
High Lew Stack 

a It Tele 
34* 19% Tlcn 
12% 6% TelP 
25 13% Tela 

19% 1% Telp 
4* 1* Triv 

20 8% Tela 

17% 9* Teix 
11* 3* Terr 
1S% BM> Thai 
13% 6* Thn 
28% 14* Tnrc 
14% 5% Thar 
29% 5* Tim 
15* 6% Turn 
14 8% Tme 

2% * Tlpr 

17% 8 Tolu 
17* 10 Trai 
12% 6* Tha 
30* 20 Tnu 


»* T 

23% 10* 
13* 7* 

29% 14* 
25% 11% 
11 % 8 * 
28% 21% 
11 A 
22 * 11 % 
14* 6* 

"A % 

32 21% 

4% 1% 

6 2 % 
33* 11* 
5% 3* 

22 % 10 % 
37% 25* 
25* 17* 
24% 14% 
48* 32% 
21 14* 

20* 9* 
13 6* 

6* 3* 


Soles In Net 

Plv. YML 100s High Low 3 PAL Old* 


214 

t 504 

831 

J2 U 169 
642 
91 
241 
335 

t 29 

221 
153 
no 
125 
1453 
39 
2 
131 
165 
5 
ID 

50 1J 18 


JO 35 125 
J60 J .,99 


1591 4.1 30 

Sri* ’S 

US 4.9 22 

159 
76 

1541234 5 

15 
154 

150 17 231 
1 

33 

JS J 649 
.12 28 134 
-30O 1.9 441 

UO 35 250 

JO 1.1 3 

81 

154 41 64 

3 
517 
17 

J it 32 


11 * in 
31% 30% 
7% 7* 
24* 23* 
17% 16% 
2% 2 
TO* 10 
15% 14% 
3* 3* 
9% m 
11% 10% 
27* 27 
6% 6 
6* 6% 
B% 7* 

,3* ng 

12% 12 
in 10 * 

8 7% 

22* 22% 


23* 23% 
13* 13% 
7* 7% 
15% IS 
13% 17* 
36* 26* 
22% 71* 
9 8* 

22 21% 
7% 7* 
17* 17 
7 7 

10* 10* 
5* 5% 
27% 26* 
2% 2% 
2% 2% 
28% 27* 
4% 4* 
16* 15* 
35* 35 
19% 1* 
24% 24% 
40% 40* 
18% 18% 
13% 12* 
10 * 10 
5% 5% 


9% 4* 
14% 7* 

12 4% 

11% 7 
20 * 6 . 
22% 8* 
42* 26% 
18* 11* 
IS* 5* 
6% 2% 
28* 13* 
14% 7% 

14% 9% 

20* 12* 
12% .5* 
22 14* 


VLI 

VLSI 

VMX 

VSE .1*0 

ValMLU 

VolFSL 

voinh uo : 

Von Dus 50 ; 
von teti 
Venire* 

Vlcorp .12e 
Vie doFr 22b 
VIkino 
virotek 

Vodovi 

Voltlnf 


25* 17% 
13* 5* 
25* 1« 

26 Va 14% 
16% 10% 
V* 6 
14* 10% 
10 % 6 % 
17* 5* 

10* 5* 

14* 4% 

17% SVi 
34* 22* 
6% 2* 
13% 3 
a* 29* 
15% 7% 
10* 4% 

7% 3% 
24* 14% 
21* 11* 
29% 21% 
30% 71* 


9* 1% Xebec 

13* 5* XI cor 

17* 10* Xitax 


1.76 XI 17 

M 25 4 

176 
4 

50 35 87 

17 
21 
96 
43 

428 

58 11 22 

52 
449 

155 35 44 

836 
48 

531 279 

5 41 53 

60 W 5 

54 25 67 

JO 35 7 


5* 5% 
11 % 11 
4* 4% 
8% 87k 
6% 6% 
15% 15% 
38% 38* 
17% 17% 
59k 5% 

5% S% 
17% 17* 
7* 7% 

12 % 11 * 
19% 18* 
8* B% 
17% 17 


17* 17% 
9% 9% 
21 % 21 % 
24% 24% 
12 * 12 % 
6% 6% 
11* ID* 
17* 17 
14% 14% 
7 6% 

11 * 11 % 
o% a* 
31% 31% 
3% 3% 
4% 3% 
45% 45* 
13% 13% 
6 S% 
3% 3* 
IS 14* 
12 * 12 * 
25% 24% 
22% 22% 


11* + % 
31% + * 
7*+ % 
24* + % 
17* + % 
2 

10* + % 
IS 

3*— * 
9* + % 
11 — % 
27%— % 
6% + % 
6% 

8 + * 

12% — % 
10*- * 
77k— % 
22* + % 


23%— % 
13% 

7* 

15% +% 
13% + % 
26* 

22% + % 
8* — * 
22 + % 
7*— % 
17* + % 
7 — * 
10* + * 
5%— % 
27 + % 

2%— * 
Z%— % 

VS 

159k— % 
35 + * 

19 

24% + * 
40*— * 
18% + % 
12*— * 
10* 

5%— % 


5% + % 
11* 

4% 

B9k— % 
6% + % 
15% + % 
38% + * 
17% — % 
5% — * 
5% 

17% — % 
7% 

11* 

19* + * 
8* + * 
17* — * 


17* 

9% — % 
21% + % 
34% — % 

12% 4 % 
6%— % 
11* + % 
17* + % 
14% 

7 f * 
11% + % 
8% + % 
31% + % 
3%— * 
4% + % 
45*— * 
13* + % 
5%— % 
3*— % 
14*— * 
12* + * 
24% — % 
22% — * 


2* 2% 2* + k 

7% 6% 7* f * 

12 % 12 12 % + % 


+ % 

+ * 
4%— * 
13*— % 
11 

14* + % 

9% + % 
2* + ft 
47 + * 

21% — % 
7* + % 
13% - % 
17%— » 
4% 

21% 

6% 

25% 

16% 

1B% -t-ltt 
7 + * 

14% — * 
6% + % 
7 + ft 

29 + % 

13% + * 
21*— % 
30*— ft 
4ft 
5* 

15 

23 - % 
Oft— * 
IB +T 
33*— * 
19% + ft 
5S —I 

66% 62* 4-1* 
2% 2*- ft 

ft VS 

7% 7* + ^ 

tern 8% 
m in— * 
3ft 3ft—* 
17* 17* 

10% 10% — 1* 
S% 5* 
ia* 10* 

22% 23 + * 


21ft 

14* YlowF* 

54 

25 

1104 

21* 

204k 

21% -el | 

i - .. * - ZJ 

38% 

5* Zen Lbs 



% 

19ft 

11 

19* +1* 

40* 


156 

24 

39% 

39* 

39% 

7* 

2* Zttel 



S3 

2% 

2% 

2% — % 

12 

3* Zlvoct 



115 

5% 

5* 

S% + % 

15* 

6% Zondvn 

OBI 

3 


11 

10% 



2Sft 13 TCACb .16 
7% 3% ToeVivs 
28% 12% Tandem 
8* 2% Tondon 

ll fft TeCem 


24% 23% 24% +1 
3% 3% 3%— ft 
15% 14% ISft + % 
3% 3ft 3% + ft 
11 10% 11 + % 


To our Readers 
in the Netherlands. 

We would like to hear 
from you. 

Since the International 
Herald Tribune began printing 
in The Hague in October 19S3, 
we have sought to ensure 
delivery of the paper to news- 
stands and subscribers early 
every morning throughout 
The Netherlands. 

If you are having any 
difficulty obtaining the 
International Herald Tribune 
in a timely manner, please 
contact our distributor 
Edipress International 
Bloemendaaleweg 224 
Postbus 1 1 1 
2050 AC Overveen 
TeL: 023 25 29 69 
Tdex: 41833. 

ftfralfeSgrtbunc 






















Pc Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 


FWTT 


|9 110 lit |1 2 Il3 


PEANUTS 

I know the Answer ! 

IT UA5 HENRY VEEl 


|2B I 29 


C sr 

Pi . _ 
m 37 



HENRY y. 5IR ... 
NOT HENRY VEE. 


f ANP ANOTHER PUPIL 
1 SINKS SLOWLY BENEATH 
f _ HRDE5K... 


BOOKS 


BLONDIE 

i f euv-m© 
A CAR/ > 


I THE WIPE AND KIDS WILL- 
CAUL YOU THE 
H GREATEST ^ 


; BUT I'M 
r NOT < 
MARtae?, 


I MEANT «/ 
r WIPE AND^/ 
KIDS r 


ACROSS 

1 Tool handle 
5 Commanded 
9 Clear sky 

14 Epithet of 
Athena 

15 Havoc 

15 Fissile rock 
17 Lascivious 
look 

IS time 

(never) 

19 Lukewarm 

20 Masters 

champ: 1979 

23 Military 
command 

24 Gantry and Rice 
28 Hawaiian 

goose 

30 Supporting 
column shaped 
like a man 

31 Nile menace 
34 Transit patron 
38 Upper crust 
37 Frosty 
39Radials 

41 Type of gin 

42 Carries 
44 Sample 

46 Goof 

47 Certain 
handicapped 
persons 

49 Market 

51 Business-letter 
adverb 

52 Lamented 


55 Packers' 
founder 

SQLinguine.e.g. 

63 Khayy&m 

64 Photographer 
Moratn 

65 Dostoyevsky's 

“The ” 

68 Lab liquid 

67 Wild carrot or 
fennel 

68 Art form 

60 Crazes 

78 Snake eyes 

DOWN 

1 Have 

mind to 

2 Attu native 

3 Drive off, old 
style 

4 Buster Crabbe 
role 

5 out (act 

boldly) 

6 Jam 
ingredient 

7 Feast 

8 Chemical 
compound 

9 Winwoodor 
Parsons 

IQ Rising warm- 
air columns 

11 Chance 

12 New Haven 
student 

13 Flushed 

21 River to the 
North Sea 


22 Michele Or 


25 Author Zola 

26 Helicopter 
part 

27 Nasty look 

29 Emulates 
William A. 
White 

30 Lock 

31 Gee follower 

32 Tally 

33 Fisherman of 
note 

35 Baseball star 

38 Radar, e.g. 

40 Airplane 
attendants 

43 Place 

45 Ancient 
kingdom 

48 Nei Cher’s 
partner 

50 Sexuality 

53 Ulyanov 

54 Two-under-par 
feat 

55 Contests 

57 Dawdle 

58 Village People 
hitsong 

59 back 

(relaxed) 

80 Figure in 
“Charlotte's 
Web” 

61 He wrote "The 
College 
Widow" 

62 Transgress 


saw 


BEETLE BAILEY 


»-■ 




IO-& *. 5 



ANDY CAPP 


r BRACE > 
MDURSELR 
L GEAR- j 




WIZARD of TD 


OH. NO: 1 “OPE 
. SHE IS NT . 
> GOIN'TDH 
SHOW ME UP.' , 


( NOTMVMISSUSA 
K. SHEAUMOYS ) 
^ WEIGHS 'ER -s 
WCRDS CAREFLB.Cf . 
>- BEFORE 
(SHESP6AXS-) 


©sSswr. 


' -AN 1 NEVER EVER ' 
GMES SHORT WEXfrTTj 




® New Torfc Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


OtWCZAHP 
TIME FOP 

TMC- \Jrrd 


FflP0tr4L 

PISCPCTONIS 

msec wt cavern 
wp&teemm 


■W(A¥& 

4MFRH? 



THE FLAMINGO’S SMILE: 
Reflections in Natural History 

By Stephen Jay Gould 476 pages. $17.95. 
W. W. Norton & Co. Inc, 500 Fifth A venue. 
New York, N. Y. I0II0. 

Reviewed by Jeremy Bernstein 

I BELIEVE that if someone were to read me 
any three sentences from a random essay by 
Stephen Jay Gould I could identify the author. 

thing thatjliould has written fix popular con- 
sumption during the last decade, bat it is 
mostly because, along with a few writers on 
science such as Lewis Thomas and John 
McPhee. Gould has developed — he probably 
always had — a very particular voice. 

In the Erst place, his writing never strays 
very far away from his fields of special compe- 
tence *— paleontology, biology and geology. 
One will never End a Gould essay on, far 
example, the theory of elementary particles. (I 
wish some of my physicist colleagues would 
exercise the same restraint when they, far ex- 
ample, attempt to apply the most naive quan- 
tum mechanics to a biological system Eke the 
human bcamV. 

In the second place almost aif of his essays 
begin with some odd fact, e^, the fact that 
when a flamingo feeds, it appears to smQe 
because ft turns its head upside down to eat. 
This odd fact, Gould then shows, fits into a 
Large and important gen eral law; the flamin- 
go's inverted behavior has associated with it a 
whole set of evolutionary inversions. The fla- 
mingo’s lower jaw has evolved to behave like a 
“nonnaT bird's upper jaw. 

Finally, Gould’s essays, even the most tech- 
nical of them, have to no with the splendor of 
life in all its moltifoliate forms — a subject that 
could occupy a lifetime. 

In “The Flamingo’s Smile," bis best and 
tidiest collecti o n of essays to date, all the 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


oebe aansQB ana 

□GOD 0E33PDH QQH 
□£□□□□□□□□□ BH0 
EDHHciB Qaaaaa 
QQ0D 

□□□□□ ana anaaa 
□Etna naanoo □□□ 
□CHE aaann mwnm 
mnrc ananan qqqq 
□ehhiki aas aaaaa 
□□an aaaa 
seqsgiq nnniaaa 
bed aaQaanaanaa 
□bd amaiaDiQ □□□□ 
BBQ aQBQOB EK3IDQ 


10/15/85 


aspects of the Gould voice are on i display - He is 
sSwng-of a baseball nut; m these essays te 
has piawag ed to offer a novel expUmahoo of 
whytbereare no more -400 J?!? 

do with the “professonabzahon of die game. 
Both the lowest and the highest battingavex- 
ages are moving closer to the man became 
every aspect oT the game h3S J**?®- 

Gould sees in this an analogy to the evolution 
of lire forms. When certain life forms ate 
introduced, they vary in all sons of ways, iney 
experiment in the production of what used to 
be n» nwH “sports," or mutants. Most of these 
experiments fafl. “When systems first arise, 
they probe the limits of possibility. Many vari- 
ations don’t work; the best solutions eme rge. 
arvt variation As systems regular- 

ize, their variation decreases.’' No more Ted 
Williamses. . „ . 

If I Have a cavil about this collection it is an 
editorial and generic one. These essays w 
appeared as columns in Natural History maga- 
zine. Having done such books myself, I am au 
in favor of collecting essays that have appeared 
over a span of several years in magazine s, but it 
does pose problems. Once haying w ritten 
smryMHmg, one might decide that it was wrong 
or badly expressed. What to do from the point 
of view of a collection? Two solutions arc 


runs the risk of producing something like 
Douglas Hofstadter’s “Metamagi cal Themas," 
whkmhas been rendered all but unreadable by 
pilin g postscript on postscript, outweighing 
and often contradicting the original essays. 


Surely, no <me who reads a collection of 
essays lute Gould’s or Hofstadter’s cares if an 
essay in the book deviates from the original. 
What one cares about is the final product, 
which should represent the best thinking and 
writing the author is capable of when the bode 
is being written. Happily, Gould, unlike Hof- 
stadtex, uses postsenpting relatively sparingly. 

As Gould tdls ns m the preface, for the last 
few years, be has beeo fighting a deadly form 
of cancer. Nothing in these essays shows any 
trace of this struggle. I look forward, and for a 
long time to came, to reading more essays by 
Stephen Gould. 

Jeremy Bemstem’s latest book is “Three De- 
greesAiwve Zero," a profile of science at Ameri- 
can Telephone A Tetegraph. . . 

United Press International 

BEIJING — Chinese scholars celebrated the 
2436th anniversary of the birth of Ccmfucius 
and proposed that the philosopher 1 s theories 
be widely taught mQunese schools. The schol- 
ars, including Kong Demao, a 77th-generatkxr 
direct descendant of Confucius (551-479 B.C), 
gathered in Beijing for a seminar and birthday 
celebration, die Xinhua News Agency said 



REX MORGAN 


I THOUGHT THAT WHEW J 
CLAUDIA HANDED YOU “ 
THAT ENVELOPE WITH THE 
TWO GRAMS OF COCAINE, 
IT PROVED THAT SHE A 
WANTED TO GET OFF THE 
w STUFF, OR. MORGAN l -A 


V THAT WAS 20 
MINUTES AGO, SKAD*' 

. RIGHT NOW SHrS A 

Y PROBABLY ANGRY ^ 
WITH HERSELF FOR J 

r HAVING DONE SO l A 
BUT SHE REALLY ^ 
HAD NO CHOICE ! M 


MAYBE BRADY IS HOME BY NOW I 
I'LL INSIST THAT HE BRING ME SOME 
CLOTHES SO I CAN GET OUT OF j 
B-T HERE TONIGHT i ] 1! Mill I| mm 


Sr 






Ieos25&j 


*MR.WiiS 0M SAID l'MTHE Best FINASLER 
HE EVER SAW | WHAlS A FINASLER 2 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Hwul Arnold and Bota Lsb 


mm 


WHA?/ 


.THESE CANOPV BEDS TAKE. 
1 SO/V\€ GETTING OStP TD J 


Uncrambfe ttwse fqur Jumbfos, 
one totter to each sqdtoB, to lonn 
tour ordhiaiy words. 


AVARL 


ROIVS 


PROTTE 


UNMOLC 




IJWCWY5 


By Robert Byrne 

A sparkling innovative 
gambit by Gary Kasparov 
enabled him to obtain an ef- 
fortless draw in the 12th game 
of his world championship 
chess match with Anatoly Kar- 
pov. 

At the halfway pant of the 
match, Kasparov, at the age of 
22 the youngest challenger, and 
Karpov, the 34-year-oia chant- 
pion, are tied at 6-6. 

While draws do not hefo the 
challenger, there is consider- 
able psychological advantage 
in stopping a man cold when be 
has White and the advantage of 
the first move, which is just 
what Kasparov did. Moreover, 
such creative gambit play al- 
ways carries with it an implicit 
message of defiance and confi- 
dence, qualities no one likes to 
see in an opponent 

Kasparov had not used the 
Tumanov Variation of the Si- 
cilian Defense, 2 . . . P-K 3 
and 4 . . . N-QB3, since his 
debacle against Karpov in the 
third game of their first title 
match a year ago. The idea in 5 
N-N5 is that after 5 . . . P- 


CHESS 

Q3 to prevent N-Q6ch, White 
sets up the Maroczy bind with 
6P-QB4. 

On 7 . . . P-QR3, the natu- 
ral-looking 8 N-Q4 has long 
been supposed to permit Blade 
a good game after 8 . . . B- 
K2; 9B-K2, 00:10 0-0, B- 


16 PxP, R.-Q1; 17 WJB4, P- 
QN4. Yet any Hue that requires 
as many sharp tactical finesses 
as this one is study ripe for 
remvestigation. ’ 

In any case, the standard re- 
treat is 8 N-R3. just as dic stan- 
dard response to this has been 
8 . . . B-K2. But Kasparov 
shockingly introduced a bril- 
liant new gambit with 
8 . . . P-Q4I? 

Any attempt at a refutation 
would demand that White bmg 
on to the extra pawn, after 
.11 ... B-N5, by 12 P-B3. 
However, it would seem that 
then 12 . . . B-KB4; 13 0-0, 
B-B4ch; 14 K-Rl, OO; IS B- 
KN5, P-N4; 16 B-N3. N-Q6! 
would be more rha^ adequate 
for Black. 



Ftwaptwkkm . ■ 

Karpov does not osnally fed 
called upon to take a risky, 
dogmatic standpoint when 
faced with a surprise gambit, as 
be once again showed by his 
careful but tepid 12 B-K2. Af- 
ter 18 . . . Ok), White did not 
even have hs normal slight 
opening ini tiaiive and the play^- f, 
ers agreed to a draw. 


f&- gras? 

■J» ^ S3S* 1 
SSS. H.-gS 


Print answer hem: 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


(Answers tomorrow) 


\\brid Stock Marians 

Via Agence France-Presse Oct. 14 

dosing prices in local currencies unless ctherxue indicated. 


Yasi onlay's I Jumbles: GUI^MY SURLY HEALTH GOVERN 
I Answer Ttie “one mat got away” would have been 
bigger If the fisherman had this— 
LONGER ARMS 


WEATHER 


HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

c 

F 


77 

11 

33 

73 

a 

73 

73 

7 

45 

fr 

30 

M 

35 

77 

fr 

33 

VI 

34 

75 

0 

30 

BA 

IV 

A 6 

fr 

20 

A> 

10 

SO 

Cl 

2 D 

tf 

17 

A 3 

* 

31 

H 

2 d 

75 

e 

33 

VI 

24 

73 

fr 

W 

AO 

15 

5 V 

Ci 

at 

7 V 

14 

57 

0 


— 

1 « 

A 1 

no 

23 

73 

12 

54 

Cl 

25 

77 

17 

A 3 

fr 

79 

M 

M 

A 1 

Cl 

— 

— 

34 

75 

fr 

30 

BA 

14 

57 

a 

27 

B 1 

17 

A 3 

d 


i.|. / JfWJ 



Wwitruj Ocl 


SW ine i<Mh+ v. 

a*i“ <1* iu5 . 

SSf Ifi* 1«w+ Vta 


SJ5 i7w+ m 


ir I 


lUYestozs 










































On 



***M*r.; s 
J* *W* a- - 
rw* *ir ." 
A ta*c r 
P* *** !fe .. . 

w?. . . 

&WW - . 

''*r i v»:> 
i ; s.- 


INTORNAT10NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1985 

SPORTS 




Page 23 


3 •„ s i ■ i 1 , 

V\; r, 






fflte! - 

^ffVECr. - 
»: 

fc&J ilt- 

•'<&«f! r :*.--: 
* ‘ >4".* 

factiv .-_ 

JBlOfc'ri: .:■ 

W- 

-l*v.:t' .. 

«* 1 'ftft* 
&»- f»-V 



Cards Tie Series by Routing Dodgers, 12-2 


'jinHL 


'ISR.TJV . . 



• : a; 

! tsNr*. 


. 


•. r 

•• • ' '*<. 

I*-.*’ . . 


»Fj| . 

" ■ 

r‘ '• 


.... 

" V k 

i Sl.02 



- - ' : 5W 


' - .0% '• 

V;- ’ 

•• ;“"a 

■ ",X- 

, ■ 

”... 1. 

• 

, t ( " • S .J 

1 

: ..... 

- ; ’ . C. 





By Thomas Boswell 

H'aOiwi^foo ftur $yma> 

ST. LOUIS — Sunday evening 
began with tears, screams and ter- 
ror for the Sl Louis Cardinals. It 
ended with laughter. 

Two hours Wore game time. 
Cardinal speedster Vince Coleman 
was carried off the Held shrieking, 
afraid his left leg was broken, after 
a bizarre accident in which be was 
pinned under a rolling 1 .200-pound 
motorized tarpaulin/ 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

The accident occurred at the end 
of batting practice as the grounds 
crew prepared to cover the field in a 
light rain, using an automatic, re- 
tractable system that rolls the tarp 
over the infield on a long metal 
cylinder. 

Coleman had trotted in from the 
outfield and then turned to throw 
his glove to a teammate when the 


mechanism was raised from below 
ground level on the first-base side 
of home plate. The cylinder appar- 
ently rolled up behind him while 
Coleman wasn’t looking, knocked 
him down and ran up his left leg, 
causing scrapes and bruises. 

But before Game 4 of the Na- 
tional League playoffs was an hour 
old, both Coleman and his team- 
mates were snickering. The Cardi- 
nals had scored a playoff-record 
nine runs in the second inning; not 


Jackson, Royals Hold Off Jays 


Breaks of the Game 

Loniue Smith opened the Kansas Gry first with a double, stole 
third (above) when Garth Iorg was late in taking ratr-fr er Ernje 
Wntts throw and scored the eventual winning jun on George 
Brett’s groundouL Late in the game a frustrated long (right) 
smashed a rubber bat on the step® of the Toronto dugouL 
Meanwhile, in St. Louis, speedster Vince Coleman was laid low 
after his leg was ca u g h t under a heavy tarpaulin cylinder; he 
missed the game, but his Cardinals dismantled the Dodgere, 12-2. 


talrtnrtJnmd ften Inun mud 






■-'■'■Mir : 

"--■56; 

* - V?-.. . . 

■ 'j g . 








Ihe Anuouml Prats 




RtufwvUnned fna litornaond 


HS 

» t 


Unbeaten Bears Manhandle 49ers, 26-10 


tied by Our Staff Fn>m Dupacha ihat all during the offseason and TD late in the first hall and Spen- “We were confident when we were 
^ FRANCISCO — The Chi- tbc preseason.” . cer plunging over from a yard out in the huddle on that last drive. 

Bears entered Candlestick ‘We were beaten about as badly to cap the scoring. This isn’t a game for doubters.” 

C TmHprrf/xoc 4naWt tliAil(Lhn- a ■ • m • < ^ . It time Cam HImaV T>>n<laiv T2 Cftmto 11* In I <v 


f Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches that all during the ClffseaSOQ and 

SAN FRANCISCO — The Chi- the preseason.” . 
pago Bears entered Candlestick ‘“We were beaten about as badly 
Pane as underdogs against the49ers as we ever have been." said Cbach 
ipn Sunday and exited as the favor- Bill Walsh. 

.{‘tes to win the Super Bond. u,., . - .. •' ; 

9 Behind superlative efforts by ■ T?* >*" '™;wodj MDp .on- 
I heir offensiveand defensive lines, shrps. -■ Y<» an’t >hat ™>y 
L he Bean remained unbeaten with from ns. Put there un twy way 


It was San Diego’s first division- Raiders 23, Saints 13: In Los 
al victory in 12 games, dating to a Angeles, Marcus Allen rushed for 
decision over the Chiefs on Dec. II, 107 yards and two touchdowns in a 


Broncos 15, Colts Mk In India- 
napolis, Rick Kariis kicked three 
field goals and John Sway hit 17 of 


• : NFL ROUNDUP 

--acting quarterback Joe Montana 
. Irieven times. Walter Payton had 
: .,..wo touchdown runs and Kevin 
" . ‘-Sutler booted four field goals. 

Y; ; “1 give oor offensive and defen- 
; .-Aye lines all the credit,” said win- 
. -*ing quarterback Jim McMahoru 
'/We controlled the line of scrim- 


. . iw w,- wui uit ijuun ouwl u\ir i I " • « : uluaiuu uvcruic\.uicibuuua. ii. iu/ yaiua auu iwu luuluuuwid m a 

Sl Behind superlative efforts by cl T” e T.Z'lltK!!; 1981 3:33 SP“ of *e first half, and 

| heir offensive and defensive lines, rjjP 8, ’ * ' o 0 ? f? 11 1 aw *y Seahawks 30, Falcons 26c In Se- Marc Wilson threw for an msur- 

■ he Bears remained unbeaten with ,ron V ' ‘“l ^ u *““ re 1 “X wa Y attle, the Seahawks fell behind vie- ance score in the fourth quarter to 

t convincing 26-10 decision over toryiess Atlanta but raffled on lift the Raiders to their third 

‘he National- Football League ■ * 2h j; JV **!! D»ve Krieg’ 5 fourth scoringpass of stnugftt .victory. 

- -hampion 49eis. - - ■ . ’ SS*SSSLSESS55 d - a,t the day, a 12-yarferto PaiS^nri SKw* 15. Colts Wfc In India- 

Chicago avenged a 23-0 loss to ve ^ f avera ^ c l 9° tba1 ' teara - with 35 seconds left in the game, napdis, Rick Kariis kicked three 

t ian Francisco in last season’s Na- ■ Bwgals35,C3«ats30:lnCincin- Krieg, who hit 33 of 51 passes for Gad goals and John Eway hit 17 of 

Y ional Conference title game by Boomer Esiason threw three 405 yards in aU, took Seattle 86 36 passes for 239 yards to help 

passes to help the Ben- yards in 16 plays in the final drive. Denver get past the Colts. 

^ NFI HAITNIYITV gafato victory — despite the sec- There were four touchdowns, a Hway set up a touchdown with a 

v ntLi nUlliUlr ond-most prolific passing game in fidd goal and a safety in the final 45-yard completion and also 

■ - .league history by New Yoric quar- quarter. “We gave up the lead, but rushed for 49 yards, keeping drives 

j -acktng quajiCTback Joe Montana terback Pbd Simm s. • we didn’t quit and die,” said Sear alive with dashes of 22 and 15 yards 

-*seven trm«. Walter Payton had <rTmm« set three team marks as hawk running back Curt Warner, in the third quarter. (AP, UPI) 
wWO touchdown runs ■ and Kevin l nii ■ trui at\ nt « _ r nr 

■y : -3utebooted foor field giak 

. : ,:ive tas aD credit,- aid ah- ^ 

SSSAftltitSS 1 Baseball ~| | Hockey ~ 

ESaaSH ******»«• mLs^^ 

£ -mbeaten dubs at 64. The Bears * 7n Trt0W . .. «««•.«« « walos confersnce 


in the third quarter. (AP, UPI) 


By John Fcinstein 

t Washington Post Service 

KANSAS CITY, Missouri — 
The Toronto Blue Jays lost Sunday 
and headed for home. The Kansas 
City Royals won and were thankful 
to be following them. 

Danny Jackson’s 2-9. eight-hit 
shutout of the Blue Jays cut Toron- 
to's lead in the American League 
championship series to three games 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

to two. The teams return to Toron- 
to on Tuesday with the Blue Jays 
trying, again, to clinch their first 
pennant while Kansas City- tries to 
stretch the series to a decisive sev- 
enth game. 

Said Royal second baseman 
Frank White: “We’re still down to 
our last straw, but at least now we 
have them thinking.” 

Indeed. “If we can’t win one out 
of two in Toronto, we don’t deserve 
to be in the World Series," said 
Blue Jay rightfielder Jesse Barfield. 

Jackson, a 15-year-old left- 
hander. had an up-and-down year 
that reached bottom when he lost 
five of six starts in September. But 
in the last week of the regular sea- 
son. he pitched the game against 
California that put the Royals in 
first place for good. “I just went out 
and tried to pitch like I did against 
the Angels.” he said. “I’m glad it all 
worked out.” 

It did because the Royals’ ane- 
mic hitters ran themselves into two 
runs early against left-hander Jim- 
my Key. In the firsl innin g, Lonnie 
Smith fl-for-13 in the series) led off 
With a sharp double^ into the left 
field comer and stole third on a 1-1 
pitch. He might have been "Out if 
. third baseman Garth Iorg had 
scrambled back to the bag in time 
to take the throw from catcher Er- 
nie Whitt. 

- Smith's steal created a run. After 
iWjUie Wilson struck out. George 
Brett (0-for-4 since his one-man 
.show: in Game 3) bit a high bouncer 
To Slfonstop Tony Fernandez. Had 
Fernandez played the ball flawless- 
ly, be might have had a play at the 
plat& But the ball stuck in his glove 
for a split-second and Smith scored 
what turned out to be the game- 
winner. l 

“We just went out loose.” Brett 
said. “Nobody expected us to con- 
tinue the season past today. The 
pressure was on them. We just 


needed to make a couple of things 
happen and get Danny a couple 
runs.’’ 

White led off the second i nning. 
He used to bun; often, but during 
the last two years, hilling in the 
middle of the lineup, be has swung 
for extra-base hits. “But I still al- 
ways check third base when I come 
up.” White said. “Most guys down 
there still keep me honest. But I 
looked down and he {Iorg] was 
back.” 

Iorg fielded the bunt cleanly but 
had no chance to get White: who at 
35 still runs swiftly. Up came Steve 
Balboni ( I -for- 14 in the series) and 
hit a line shoL to left White took 
third, barely beating George Bell's 
throw. A moment later, Darryl 
Motley lifted a fly to deep center 
and White scored. 

The rest was left to Jackson. He 
was severely tested in the middle 
three innings, but in each instance 
Toronto came up empty. 

Bell led off the fourth with a 
angle. On Cliff Johnson's single to 
left. Bell challenged Smith's notori- 
ously weak arm. but Smith threw a 
one-hop strike to Brett at third 
base. 

Bell slid. Brett tagged. Umpire 


Dale Ford said out. The Blue Jays 
argued long and loud, but instead 
of first-and- third and nooui.it was 
man on first and one out. Jackson 
pitched out of it. 

In the fifth, the Blue lays had no 
excuses. Iorg singled and Whitt 
doubled him to third. Jackson was 
in deep trouble, but not for long. 
Fernandez hit a weak grounder to 
r BretL, who threw him out, runners 
holding. 

Damaso Garcia popped to 
White and Llovd Moseby, one of 
Saturday's heroes, grounded weak- 
ly to second for the third oul 

There was one more chance, in 
the sixth. First, Wilson ran down 
and backhanded Bell's leadoff 
screamer to the center-field warn- 
ing track. That became vital when 
the Blue Jays loaded the bases with 
two out on Barfield's single, Willie 
Upshaw's single and Iorg’s walk. 
That brought up Whitt who hit the 
first pitch on the ground to second. 
That was it; Jackson set Toronto 
down in order over the final three 
innings. 

So the Royals have at least one 
more plane ride, one more off-day 
workout and one more chance to 
beat the Blue Jays in Canada. 


Czechoslovaks Win Cup 

The Associated Press 

■ TOYOTA, Japan — Led by Hana MancDikova, the Czechoslovak 
women's tennis team completed a rain-delayed victory over the 
United States here Monday to win the Federation Cup for the third 
consecutive year. 

Leading Kathy Jordan. 7-5. 3-0. when rain halted their match on 
Sunday, Mandlikova needed only 10 minutes and four games to nail 
down a 6-1 second-set victory that clinched the cup. 

The Czechoslovak team received 570,000 while the U.S. took home 
535,000. Australia and Bulgaria shared third place in the 38-nation 
tournament. 

Mandlikova, ranked third in the world, broke serve and then held 
her own for a 5-0 lead before Jordan, ranked 15th in the world, held at 
love. But the Czechoslovak star wrapped up the match with an 
excellent passing shot and a smash. 

The Czechoslovaks had taken a 1-0 lead on Sunday when Helena 
Sukova beat Elise Burgjn, 6-3, 6-7 (6-8). 6-4. They wound up with a 2- 
1 victory after losing Monday's doubles. Jordan and Burgm beating 
Regina Marsikova and Andrea Holikova, 6-2, 6-3. 

Monday’s singles victory was Mandlikova's 25 th against four 
defeats in Federation Cup' play, the third-best victory total after 
Virginia Wade’s 36-19 and Even Lloyd's 28-0. 

The United States, playing without Chris Evert Uoyd and Martina 
Navratilova, the world's two top-ranked women players, had won the 
cup seven consecutive times before the Czechoslovak siring started in 
1983. 


only were they on the way to a 12-2 
laugher that evened the best-of-sev- 
ai series at two games apiece, but 
by then everybody knew Coleman’s 
injuries were no worse than if he'd 
taken an awkward slide into second 
base. 

With only a few bruises and 
scrapes, Coleman was questionable 
for Monday’s Game 5, when Fer- 
nando Valenzuela was to face the 
Cardinals’ Bob Forsch. But Man- 
ager Whitey Herzog said. “ Vince’ll 
probably play Wednesday" in Los 
Angeles! 

Coleman's replacement in left 
field was the veteran Tito Lan- 
drum, who tied playoff records 
with four hits in a game and two 
hits in an inning. He and Terry 
Pendleton each drove in three runs, 
Jack Gark had three bits and John 
T udor nailed down the victory with 
seven innings of three-hit pitching, 
maned only by' a Bill Madlock 
home run. 

Gark singled to start the Sl 
L ouis second inning Cesar Ce- 
deno's smash to Madlock's left at 
third base should have been field- 
ed, perhaps for a double play; but 
the hot low hopper went through 
untouched. Landrum grounded a 
single up the middle (shonstop 
Mariano Duncan was a foot shy 
with his lunge). 

Ill listrating how the Dodgers 
made 166 regular-season errors, 
cenierfielder Candy Maldonado 
threw to the wrong base — third — 
allowing Landrum to take second. 
Pendleton followed with an RBI 
groimdout to second that would 
have been a perfect double plav 
ball. 

In one inning the Cardinals had 
hit three balls that their defense 
might have turned into six outs. 
The Dodgers had gotten one oul 
That’s the essence of what creates 
big innings — that and walks to 
No. 8 hitters. Yes. Jerry Reuss 
walked Tommy Nieto. 

Pitcher Tudor laid down a miser- 
able bunt back to the mound; 
Reuss should have been able to 
shovel the ball to the plate in time 
to get Landrum by 10 feeL But 
Reuss got tangled up and Left the 
ball lying dead on the carpet be- 
hind him. 

In aU, Reuss's error created sev- 
en unearned runs. After a Willie 
McGee flyout, Ozzie Smith singled 
off Duncan's glove, scoring Nieto. 
Tommy Herr drilled a hit to right, 
scoring Tudor and sending Reuss 
to the safety of the showers. Hello 
Rick Honey cu CL maker or records. 

Fust, Honeycutt got Gark in the 
books as the first man to get two 
bits in one inning of a National 
League playoff game. His single to 
center scored Smith. After Cedeno 
walked to load the bases, Landrum 
drove in a run with a chop hit to 
short. Pendleton then hit a stinging 
liner over second base to make the 
body count 9-0. 

The Cardinals had scored two 
more runs in one inning than they 
had in their first 27 innings of the 
playoffs. Thereafter, nothing of sig- 
nificance was likely to occur. Noth- 
ing did. 


IARD 


Baseball 


Hockei 


Football 


Transition 


’? Lead the NFC Central by three . ... _ , , 

\ - /tames: the 49exs fell to 3-3, three -J^SSn! 0 1 mc ? D ™ K *’, Shnms Duncan ■» 

• names behind the Rams in the ^ ^ Whcn w look at the game An**i » 
'qpc West films, all HI see is what 1 screwed 

The Bears moved to a 164) lead “P;" . , emu » 

rnd never were challenged bv an Jutting Ins first eight passes (two Modi'* 3b 
Anemic 49er offense. Montana f°r scores)- Esiason kd his team to 
* -Massed for only 160 yards on 17 a 21-0 lead against .the NJT-s. top- scwctoc 
"/ximpletions in 29 attempts, and rated defense. mUma!* 

<■ >an Francisco runners managed a Chargers 31, Odets 20: In San buck t* 
votal of only 67 yards. . Diego, backup quarterback Mark sn* 36 

:• McMahon, who missed the Hemnann, acquired in the offsea- 
’championship game with a kidney son from Indianapolis and playing ouiuo p 
njuiy, completed 18 of 31 passes for the injured Dan Fonts, threw mo* 1 ®* l( 

- Sr 186 yards and had an mlercep- two touchdown passes and went 6- ™ a ‘* no . 

: ’pin returned 43 yards for a touch- for-6 in an 80-yard drive io the go- 
■. lown by Carlton Williamson. • ahead score as the Chargers got can» win 


line Cincinn ati also sacked Simms 

TTf iT NATIONAL LEAGUE: GAME 4 

seven times for 70 yards in losses. ^ anoelu st.louis 


NHL Standings 


NFL S tandings 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
East 


i‘_'xnnpietioos in 29 attempts, and 

* San Francisco runners managed a 
\ rotal of only 67 yards. 

•• McMahon, who missed the 
c hampionship game with a kidney 
njuiy, completed 18 of 31 passes 
- Sr 186 yards and had an mlercep- 
: -pin returned 43 yards for a touch- 

• lown by Carlton Williamson. 


Chicago’s offensive line opened past Kansas Gty. Hemnann 


nassive holes for Payton, who ran 


Vor 132 yards on 24 carries. “When yards. 

.- he 49ers beat us last year, they- - Former United States Football 


ished 26-for-36 in passing for 320 

yards. • ip 


afarliM afarkM 

Dunoon n 2 0 0 0 McGm cf Silo' Now J entry 

Andm u 10 0.0 OSmttii n 5121 ptillwtalpMa 

CoMI lb 4 0 0 0 H«rr 3b . 4 1 1 2 NY Islareter 

G<icfT«r If 40 1 I J Clark lb S 3 3 1 NY Rangen 

CDka p 0 0 0 0 OKfanp rf 2 2 2 0 PIHsburah 

Madldc 3b 3 111 VdnSIvk rf 3 1 T 1 WOStUnoton 
Bailor 3b 1 0 0 0 Landrm If 5 14 3 

Marshal rf' 4 0 1 0 Pndltn 3b 40 13 Boston 

Sclnscta c 1 00 fl Nieto c 3 10 0 Quebec 

Yomr c 3 0 0 0 Tudor a 2 10 0 Hartford 

MMndooF 3 0 0 0 Jromn pft 1 00 0 Montreal 

BnK* ah 1 0 0 0 Horton a 0 0 0 0 Buffalo 

Sax 2b 3 0 10 Campbal p 0 0 0 0 CAMI 

Rems P 0 0 0 0 

Honaycn p o o o 0 SL Louts 

Casino p 2 0 0 0 Toronto 

Maluszfc If 11 If Detrnll 

Totals 32 1 5 2 Tows 3C 111511 Mlnrmsota 
LOS Anwtet 0M 0M lVt— 2 CWCOBO 

SLLOMS HO 1TD 01X— T2 

Game Winning RBI — Landrum (1), Calgary 
E— Rous*. Maldonado. LOB— Los Anpsles Edmonton 
5, sLLouls 7. 2B — Cedeno. McGee, Sax. HR— Vancouver 
Madlock (1). OF— Herr. • Los Anpeles 

■ a u „ Wlnnlpoo 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pis GF GA 


ubrbbl W L T Pis G 

5 110 Nsw JarsoY 3 0 0 4 

5 1 2 T PMIadolpMa 2 10 4 

4 112 NY Islanders 10 0 2 

SU1 KY Rangers 1202 

2 2 2 0 PIHsbureft 0 2 0 0 

3 111 wasninston 0 3 0 0 

5143 Adams Divtsieo 

4 0 13 Boston 3 0 0 i 

3 10 0 Quebec 3 0 0 5 

2 10 0 Hartford 2 0 0 4 

1 0 0 0 Montreal 2 10 4 

0 0 0 0 Buffalo 110 2 

0 0 0 0 CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 

Nunns Division 

SL Louts 110 2 

Toronto 12 0 2 

Detron 0 111 

30111511 Mlnrmsota 0 111 

la no— 2 ChlcoBO 0 3 0 0 

s gi«_n SmyltM Division 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
East 

W L T Pet PF PA 


Miami 
N.Y. Jets 
New England 
Indianapolis 
Buffalo 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

Pittsoureti 

Houston 

Denver 
LA. Raiders 
Seattle 
Kansas atv 
Eon Dleoa 


4 1 0 M0 138 as 

4 10 -BOO 120 77 

3 3 0 JOC 104 11a 

2 4 0 .333 1W 138 

0 4 0 MO M 163 

Central 

4 J 0 -M7 114 87 

2 4 0 .333 104 194 

2 4 0 ^33 129 108 

1 5 0 .147 7S 12fl 

West 

4 2 0 M7 166 131 

4 2 0 .647 138 113 

4 2 0 A47 144 149 

3 3 0 JHM 141 125 

3 3 0 500 152 142 


Dalles 

5 

1 

a 

.833 159 

99 

N.Y. Giants 

3 

3 

a 

-MO 143 

ns 

SL Louis 

3 

3 

0 

500 145 

183 

wasnington 

3 

3 

a 

500 97 

136 

Phnadetehte 

7 4 

Central 

0 

.333 84 

90 

Qilcoga 

6 

0 

0 

lAOO 189 

98 

Detroit 

3 

3 

0 

500 103 

138 

Green Bay 

3 

3 

a 

500 137 

140 

Minnesota 

3 

3 

0 

500 137 

123 

Tampa Bov 

O 4 
West 

0 

500 112 

177 

l—A. Rams 

6 

0 

D 

1500 133 

89 

New Orleans 

3 

3 

0 

500 126 

155 

San Prancisoo 

3 

3 

0 

500 155 

117 

Alton la 

0 

8 

0 

500 120 

192 


Golf 


he 49ers beat us last year, they- - Former United States Football 
.‘/lidn’t show much courtesy or dig- League stare . Tim Spencer and 
jity,” Payton said. “They said neg- . Gary Anderson scored their ' first 
iti vc things about our offense after NFL touchdowns for the winners, 
hutting us out We thought about Aqderson scrambling for a 6-yard 
■1’ ' 

Devils Take 3d in a Roio 


H RBRU SD 


i Football LOS Aneeles 

League stare . Tim Spencer and 
Gary Anderson scored then-' first coatiio 
NFL touchdowns for the winners, cdioz 


StXeuls 

Tudor W,l-1 7 3 112 5 

Horton - 12 119 1 

Campbell I 0 a 0 0 1 

Hanevartt Pitched to 4 batters bi second. 
T— 2:47. A— 53J08. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — The lang-ma- 
; igned New Jersey Devils won some 
; National Hockey League respect 
Mere Sunday night. 

"The Devils are coming on,” said 
.*■ 'lew York Ranger Coach Ted Sa- 
; ot^ after Rich Preston’s 30-foot 
; Ashot beat Terry Kletsmger at: 
.- :41 of overtime to lift New Jersey 
-o its third straight victory, 3-2, 
rver the Rangers. 


’^Wadkins Equals 
Course Record, 


“Their improvement is good for Toronto 
the division," said Salon. “It wffl GofCta a 
force evtxybody to play quality Mosobv ct 
hockey every game." gboh k 

So far. New Jersey has played Barfle* rf 
quality hockey. Its 3-0 record — upsttaw id 
against Philadelphia, Washington * 

Fleutar pti 

NHL FOCUS T ' mndl “ 

■ . — Totals 

and the Rangere,;all Patrick Divi- T ^ ronto 
sion rivals — equals (he beft start Kumtatv 
in the history of the franduse, 


AMERICAN LEAGUE; GAME 5 
ORONTO KANSAS CITY 

abrhbf abrfibl 

arc ta 2b 4 0 0 0 LSaiHta If 4 13 0 

losaby cf 4 0 0 0 LJanes If 0 0 0 0 

iBotl H 4 0 2 0 Wilson cf 4 0 0 D 

Jtoun dh 4 0 10 Brrtt 3b 3 0 0 1 

arflefd rf 4 0 10 McRas dh 4 0 0 0 

pshaw ID 4 0 10 White 2D 3 12 0 

loro 3b 3 0 10 Balboni U> 3 0 2 0 

rhllt c - 3 0 1 a Mol lev rf 10 11 
tektar ptl t 0 0 0 SMfMt rf I 0 0 0 

trands ss 3 010 Sundbre c 3 0 0 0 

Blancm sx 3 0 0 0 
Stale 34 B ■ 0 Total* Bill 

stunt® . 080 000 OSD- 0 

areas atv in on nex— 3 

Gome Wins [no RBI — Bretl (11. 


, „ . SUNDAYS RESULTS 

J ! Cal oarr 2 4 J—9 

' Loj Anoeies • 2 0-0 

* ; Otto Cl I. Rtesbrouah? (2j.Su<er 2 OLCavet- 

v Uni (1). Kramni (2L Pattareen (11. Bourasols 
, . (I); Gallev 121. Williams (2). Shots on osal: 

i , Catsary ion Eliatl 10-10-14—34; im Anoeies 
r I (on Lenwlln) 8-134-24. 

“ ‘ Pfuioaetpofa 1 1 3-4 

wnsMpwi o n Oli—l 

Pnwp 2 (4), Rich Sutler (1L Tockeft |1)j 
Gartner! 131. Station peal: Pblladslphla Ion 
E 5 Jensen) 7-M— 24; woshJnaton (on Ltad- 
f be rob) 13-8-12—33. 

abrfibl Tsrepfa 1 4 0— 5 

4 13 0 ddeaea 1 0 0—1 

0000 dark 2 (2), Thomas (!)• Fergus (l).Frvcer 
4 0 0 0 U); Fraser (3). Studs aa goal: Toronto (on 

3 0 0 1 Bannermofi) 9-I3-4-2S; Chleaoa (en Bern. 

4 0 0 0 hard!) s-22-11— 41. 

3 13 0 SL Louis 0 3 0—1 

3 0 2 0. Edmonton 0 3 >—4 

10)1 Anderson (21, Kurrl 2 U). mkamn (1). 

1 0 0 0 Scmenko III. Me«ier(l); Mullen 2 (3J, Brian 

3 00 0 Sutter (1). Stats HgcMi.-Sf, Louis (an Meog) 
3 0 0 0 10-7-0—24; Edmonton (onMJlfen) 4-15-tO-JI. 
v 2 1 2 Mew Jereev 2 0 8 1—3 

ago— 0 n-v. Raagen l • 1 0—2 

oox— 2 Bridgman III. Ludvig (2). Preston (1); 

sandstrom (1), Heiminon OJ. Short oa goal: 


Top flnisbere and eandoas ot the Walt Dis- 
ney Classic, watch ended Sunday m Hie par-72 
Magnolia coarse in Lake Buena Vtsto, Rod- 
da: 

Loony wotfldn*. $71400 *8-47^0-43—247 

Mike Donald, tamo 664944-87—248 

Scott Koch. S2&200 494347-89 — 248 

Payne Stewart. S17400 69-49-65-6t — 5*5 

Gary Koch. ST7^00 48-40-7243—240 

Gary McCord. SU400 4748-7041—271 

Andy Bean, *11400 70484848-272 

D. Hammond. *11,600 70884847—273 

Crate Sladler, $11400 65-704*49—273 

Don Poaley, SlI^OO 70444948-273 

Mar* McC umber. S9JOO 49004847—274 

Jb« S toman, S7J0O 70474948—274 

Clarence Rose. »J00 44-71-7747—274 

Danny Edwards. £7.200 70-704448—275 

Joey Slndetor, S7J00 71484*48-275 


which moved from Colorado in cwyj. 2 »— QaeM.LSmirtuwmtt.sa— Lsmitn 
-1981 - m. SF-Altoltey. 

Pneston tock a pass from Dave TMaa tp M * efcBHS0 
Pidiclte,' carried the oudt into the k*v lw si -3 b j 3 1 3 

Ranker uu near the ritthl-wina Actaf • a^a 0 0 0 0 a 


j vjUU 1 oC Ranger zone near the right-wing - ,M 800 

■ ■ W7r tv* /i 10 boards and blasted a shot .from a ojoekKo w.vo 9 boo 

Wins Disney Golf shaip angle that bounced off Klei- 

: LAKE BUENA VISTA, Florid, 

- ■ :^^SS535iS SSfS Playoff Schedule 

Sunday to overcome a five-siroke rr 1 * Cbcvacr » wh0 , national league 

*• tot w , w shots, many from point-blank (senes Bed , mj 

. ,M fiat and wm the Walt Disney. - - oct. 9 r u»« Angete. 4 , », uut* i 

.Classic golf UHirnameni by one - • oct. 10 : lw Ano*hs 0 , ». lhh* i 

• . - :hoL The Rangers had tied the game. oa. w: sl lmn a u» »wi« a 

^FiniAuig with a 267 total, Wad? W°aypoMrriiiyg^M l7:47al S * Sf’s^ ’ 

<’ 3ns had seven birdies and an eagle the imrd penod when Mane us- oet. is: si. lbui« at Anoeies 

n matching the Magnolia couSc- borne W Raimo Hrimmco^bo ™ s^^LreAn«j« 
{fecord, which bad been serin 1973 Jw Cbevncr toward bim before rreroMo aacn serin, 3-2} 

ns?#!' Hubert Green. firing a 15-foot snot into the net. oa. b; Toronto a. Kamos atr 1 

Third-round leader Scott Hoch .“Ifsagpod win forus— areal .'-22: n- T £S^ ahfZrtaSA 

J'aP'. 1 ’*. flUdM -Oct. 11. Kwaps Ofy A Toronlo 5 


DP— Toronto L LOB— Toronto S. Kansas New J««V (on KWsInoer) 4-M-T-44J N.Y. 
lty5.2B— GB«M,LSn>|lh,WMtf.9B— LSalllti ROtaW ton Chmrler) 11-4-12-3— 3i 
]. #F — Motley. Montreal 0 1 V- 2 

IP H R PR HB SO fc ** t0 " 1 3 *~ 7 

Taremn Pedwsan (3). Sl8W»r2 (JLBouraw 2 (2), 

‘TZ s 1-3 Baais N *8 n, tolt(lJ,Mi<klteton{2>;McPhw<11.Nas- 

zr la-i s d l J \ Tttux y* 1 

nk, 7-11-8—24, Boston (on Roy) MMD-Sf. 

KOMO* cny Qiwtar 1 l 

jpcfceon w.vo 9 b o o i 6 XzzTL, ; ' r; 

T_3:21 n-ntniit Winnipeg 2 9 0-2 

Show (1). Hoove (1 ), Hunter 12), Eos tes (1 J, 

AMenan (2>i Ellen (1), Amtel <T). Short m 

„ „ _ , oort! Quebec (oo Hsywordl 8*12—26; win- 

'isvnff vhpflnip t*» awteny) 14-13-4-34. 


Ken Brown. *7.200 
Lon Hinkle. 55AU 
Wayne Grady. 35MB 
P. Jaconsen. SUMO 
Ronnie Black. s&MO 
BUI Kronen, SSMO 
Jim Thorpe. SJU60 
Larry Nerton. S5JI40 
Nick Fates. 51040 
Glbbv Gilbert. SX52Q 
CnrH Perry. SUSP 
Tam Kin, sitbo 
P at McGowan, S2JB0 

Hotter Majttte. 5Z780 
Loren Roberts, sztbo 
D avid FroU. OJtO 
Mark PttHLS2JM 
Hal Sutton, 52J80 
Pet U nosey. 5151S 
Mika ReU. 51,05 
Run Cochran, 51J3S 
John Monoftev, S1.WS 
Ron Stmac, SIJ1S 
Lorry Mlat, 51.935 


48474943—247 
66494447—248 
49434749-248 
494945-84—249 
8848-7943— 2*9 

6748- 7041—271 
70484848—272 
70484847—273 
65-704949—273 
70484948-273 
69*704047—274 
73474948—274 
44-71-7247—274 
70-704948—275 
71 68 68 48- 275 
44-7146-73—275 
49-714749—276 
704947-70—276 
70-71-4946—276 
72484749—276 
74474449-276 
7146.7148—276 
*9.714749—274 

70- 704749—276 
4949-7049—277 

6749- 7547 — 778 
704747-74-278 
604940-73-279 
6749-72-70-27B 
7049-7247—278 
6649-70-78 — 7X 
0749-71-71—278 

71- 7446-67-278 

72- 714749— 3W 
<7-7049-73-279 
484849-76-779 
70-7048-71 — 279 
7048-10-71—279 
7246-70-73-279 


Sunday's Ream* 
New Enaiand 14, Buffalo 3 
Oevetand 21, Houston t 
Wash too ton 24, Del roll 3 
LA. Rams 31, Tampa Bar 27 
Green Bay 20, Minnesota 17 
Philadelphia 30, St. Louis 7 
Dallas 27. Pittsburgh 13 
Denver 15. inaionapolls 10 
Cincinnati 35. N.Y. Gtonis 30 
LA. Raiders 23. New Orleans 13 
San Dleso 31. Kansas City 20 
Chicooe 76, San Frandsca 10 
Seattle 30. Aflania 26 

Mondays Game 
Miami at N.Y. Jels 


BASEBALL 
American League 

BALTIMORE— Released Rich Dover and 
Lena Sakata, lnflelOers,and Joe Nolan, catch- 
er. 

BOSTON— Announced that Bill Fiscner, 
Wall Hrfnlak. Joe Morgan and Rene Lache- 
mann, andm. have been retained (or the 
1986 season. 

MINNESOTA— Released John Castlna In- 
ti elder. Sent Mark. Brown and Tom Klawltler, 
nhehers. and Mike Strn house, outfielder, to 
Toledo of the International League. Pur- 
chased Eric Broersma and Les Straker. pitch- 
ers. and Mark Davidson and Ale* Marie. out- 
ffeidere. 

OAKLAND— Retil red Jackie Moore, man- 
ager; Wes Stock, pitching coach, and Bob 
D Idler and Dave McKay, coaches. 

NaNonoi League 

ATLANTA— Signed Ken OberkteU. Infield- 
er, to a four-veor cenlract. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 

DALLAS— Waived Bubba Jennings and 
Dennis Nutt, guards, end Eddie Smith, fur- 
ward. 

DETROIT— Stoned walker Russell, guard, 
to a mulil-YBar contract. 

MILWAUKEE— Released Paul Thompson, 
avoid. 

NEW JERSEY— Waived Nivel Miguel, 
guard. 

PORTLAND — Stoned Caldwell Jones, cen- 


ter. Cut Joe Aiunsen ana Perry Young, for- 
wards. 

SACRAMENTO— Waived Joe Binlgn. for- 
ward. 

SEATTLE— Waived Rolando Lamb and 
Gene Smith, guards, and Anthony Teacher, 
forward. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 

DETROIT— Claimed Pat Howell, guard, on 
waivers from Houston. Activated Don Greco, 
offensive guard. Cut Pat Howell, offensive 
guard. Pioced Martin Moos, defensive ena. on 
Hie inlured reserve list. 

HOUSTON— Signed Doug Smith, defensive 
lineman. Pieced Dean Sieinkunier, offensive 
lineman, on Inlured reserve. Activated Doua 
Smith, defensive tackle. 

N.Y. G i ANTS— Claimed Vvfo Kab. Iteht 
end. Irom waivers. 

N.Y. JET5— Waived Ron Fourot, lineback- 
er. Activated Daviin Mullen, defensive Dock. 

ST. LOUIS— Placed Elais Grooms, defen- 
sive lineman, on Inlured reserve. Activated 
Jeff Griffin, cornerback. 

COLLEGE 

ARIZONA STATE— Named Lionel Hollins 
and Herb LI vsev, assistant basketball coach- 
es. 

EAST TEXAS STATE — Announces mo re- 
tlremeni of Ernest Hawkins, head football 
coach, to take effect al the end of the current 
season. 



Soccer 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
(Series Bed, 2-2) 

Oct. 9: Lot Angeles 4, St, Loots 1 
Oct. 18; Lee Angeteo 0, st. Louis 2 


Tennis 


7) tied for second at 268. 


more comfortable.” ' . (UPI, AP) 


FEDERATION CUP 
(At Toyota, Japan) 

FINALS 

dot United States, 2.1 
Helene Sukova, Cmctimlovokte. dot. Elise 
Buret n. U.L, (-3, 6-7 (44). 84.- Hana Mandii- 
tawo. Czechoslovakia dal Katftv Jordan, U 
748-1 ; jonwnand Buroin def. Regina Marai- 
kova and And m Hollkom 4-Z 0i 

WOMSITS TOURNAMENT 
CAt imnaaonoas) 

Final 

Bonnie Gadusnfc (2). UA. def. Pom Court 
U>, (ii, 44. ti 


SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Las Palmas Z Valencia 0 
Fotert: Real Madrid J2; AHeflce Bilbao IT; 
GHan 10; Trtragoaa valladoild 9 s Sevilla 8; 
Barcelona, Atteilea Madrid, Real Socledad 7; 
Santander, Valencia. Cadiz 6; Espanri. Bofb, 
LW Palmw S; Hercules, Otesuna 4; Celia 1 


Basketball 


NBA PRESEASON 
Sandfly's Resrifs 
PhUadetoMfl 117 , a»omo iu 
B oston 121, New Jersey 110 
Milwaukee TI2, Detroit 96 
New York IS, Son Antonia 92 
Ponland 117, Seattle 113 


Wherever you live in the woHd, vou can see the NFL 
came of your choice every week, jusi Jays after the action. 
How? PonTel, ihe NFLs overseas licensee since 1980, 
videotapes all NTL games in ihe VS. and distributes copies 
of alt games to fit ail the world's video standards. 

Each tape contains the complete, uncut game you want, 
i plus highlights of other games to give you 3 hours of NFL 
j action every week. 

ORDER BY PH 0 HE 

Just pick up the phone, and you can enjoya luxury not 
available to anyone living in the U5. Any NFL Mine' you 
want, week after week in your mailbox. Keep each cassette 
forseren days, and return it in the handy re-usable mailing 
pouch. Easy! convenient, economical. ' 

LOWER PRICES 

And for lp85, prices have been lowered again. Half 
the regular season, S complete Mutes, plus higftlighcs of 
many other games, for just $ 139. 

Additional games each week just S 10 each. So order 
now and join the thousands worldwide who will catch Pon- 
Tel's NFL this year! I 

FREE MFL SCHEDOLE j 

If you order by this Friday, youtl receive a team-by- 
team NFL schedule absolutely 1 ‘free. Pay with vour credit ; 
card and the first game is sent the same day.' ; 


1FL FOOTBALL 


SEE YOUR TEAM PLAY 
A EVERY WEEK! 


ORDER BY PHOME OR TELEX HMD 
CHARGE YOURSUBSCRIPTIOM TO YOUR 
MAJOR CREDIT CARD. OR SOD THIS 
COUPOH TODAY WITH YOOR CHECK OR CREDIT 
CARD AUTHORIZATION. 

□ Yes. Send me R complfto >Fl games, plus highlights of mher 1 
jfcnes. «n renal nsseties for «n|5 s ljfl. I want u s« 9*. 1 

□ PonTd G»IW of ih* B'reL 

Dm* fgvortie nam — . 

□ Yes. Send me a second complete game each peek tor nnh S (0 ; 
each. I warn (o see 

□ Aopiher giwi game I 

O Wj bvnrile lrmn j 

□ Send mj asxn« arniuil lur 50 e each in Europe; 5 1 each lor ! 

Uld-Eau and Africa-. S 2 for Far Essl ! 

□ iiiveoulsideaf Europe laddSRrehmdablrdrpMiiforeachnsxne ! 

□ Please charge my I 

□ AMEX □ VISA □ EURO O \CCESS □ M^STEB I 

□ Chech encluMd. I 

Video S)5iem: DlTiS DbETA □ VIDEO 2000 I 

lTdeo SMdani. □ PAL (most wertrie) 

□ American NTSC O french SECaH I 


Area Code for Germany, then; 

211-fliMf 


From Germane, dal- 

02II-5Z50M 


RPnfly 

MSnmthnhJto* meg 2H - 8000 tHhueldarf 3$ 
Men! KepttUk of Btrnuay 
Wm: i 598420 






Page 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


Communist Charisma 


Murray Burnett: Can Creator Play It Again, Rick? 


PEOPLE 


\\7ASHTNGTON —The While 
jV House has been stewing over 
the successful public relations cam- 
paign of Mikhail Gorbachev. 

U. S. Soviet specialists were 
called in last week to deal with 
what has become known in diplo- 
matic circles as the “Commie 
Charm Factor." 

“Gentlemen, we're faced with 
something far 


more dangerous 
than Soviet mis- 
siles. The Rus- 
sians are making 
an all-out effort 
to win over Eu- 


rope through 
charisma " 



“You exag- m 

u'hv h mfW 

then why is _ . . . 

Gorbachev 1 get- Budiwahl 
tjn|, a better press than Princess 

“Everyone gets a better press 
than Princess DL" 

“Nevertheless. Gorbachev has 
made a remarkable impression on 
the media. This proves what Mike 
Denver has been saying for some 
time — all it takes to be the leader 
of a superpower is a smile on your 
face, a shine cm your shoes and a 


stale who talk., to the media, and 
they believe everything be tells 
them." 

“It can’t last. Everyone knows 
the more you make yourself avail- 
able to the media the quicker they 
turn on you. 1 give him six months 
bfefore the press starts kicking him 
around.” 

“We can't waiL Reagan and 
Gorbachev are going to meet in 
November and the big thing people 
will be watching is their charisma. 
And once they observe the two 
side-by-side the world will decide 
who is really the true Communica- 
tor. 1 don't think 1 have to tell you, 
the U. S. president cannot affoid to 
come in second." 

“Ronnie had charisma before 
Mikhail was bom." 

“Yes. bm Goriachev has iron 
wall behind his charisma.” 

“I thought Gromyko said he had 
iron teeth.” 

“It doesn’t matter. Mikhail is a 
very shifty guy who knows how to 
make a lot of points with people in 
Western Europe. He's playing the 
media like a balalaika." 


By David Margolick 

New York Timex Service 






N EW YORK — To Murray Burnett, it 
is as much a custody battle as a con- 


1^1 is as much a custody battle as a con- 
tractual dispute. He is fighting Warner 
Brothers for control of his children, who 
include Rick, an expatriate American cafe 
owner in Casablanca, a piano player 
named Sam and a host of others, with 
names like Victor Laszlo, Ugarte and 
Strasser. 

Forty-five years ago. as a young man 
who had just seen Hitler's Europe Etrsi- 
hand. Burnett, with Joan Alison, wrote a 
play called “Everybody Comes to Rick’s." 

It was a cautionary tale, a warning that, 
as fascism marched forward, good men and 
women everywhere had to take a stand. 

The play never made it to Broadway, in 
part because producers balked over sugges- 
tions that Rick and the woman he nad 
loved years earlier in Paris slept together 
when she went to Casablanca. Instead, it 
was purchased by Warner's for $20,000 — 
a record at the time. 

For (he Filmmaker, it was a wise invest- 
ment. “Casablanca," in which Humphrey 


- rv. 


gpod tailor to mate sure your pants 
have a crease in them.” 


“There's more to it than that. 
The reason Gorbachev has been so 
successful is that he is a new act. 
and everyone warns to read about 
him. And why shouldn't they? He's 
the only Kremlin bass in 20 years 
who won't fall over while he's giv- 
ing a speech. But the thing mat 
makes him dangerous, gentlemen, 
is that he's the first Soviet head of 


Doges Palace Painting 
Reinstalled in Venice 


The Asxodoied Press 

VENICE — “II Paradiso" by the 
school of Jacopo Tintoretto, was 
returned to the Doges Palace after 
three years of restoration. 

The" Itith-cennuy painting. 82 
feet by 26 feet (25 by 8 meters) was 
rehung in the palace's Grand 
Council Room on Saturday. Inter- 
national grants to the “Save Venice 
Foundation’* totaling about 
$100,000 paid for its restoration. 


“Gorbachev may have a certain 
Bolshie charm but he can't tell sto- 
ries like the president.” 

“Don't be too sure. 1 understand 
Gorbachev has been collecting Po- 
lish stories for the past uree 
months." 

“What would be wrong if the 
president just grabbed a micro- 
phone and said, Tt's my mite and I 
paid for if?" 

“That works in New Hampshire 
but not in Geneva." 

“What about Mrs. Gorbachev?" 

“We don’t have to worry. Nancy 
has ordered a whole new outfit for 
the summit. It’s no contest." 

“Says you. The reporters have 
been going gaga over Raisa." 

“That's because she hasn't had 
any serious competition. Raisa 
might win a tea party contest, but 
when it comes to evening wear 
Nancy w3J bmy her." 

□ 


“Mrs. Gorbachev is not our 
problem. Mikhail is the issue. 
We've never dealt with a Commie 
who looks like the chairman of an 
American oil company." 

“What do we do?" 

“Let Reagan be Reagan, and 
Gorbachev be Gorbachev. Ill put 
my money on the president’s tailor 
any day of the week." 


Sydney Greens Creel played Burnett’s char- 
acters. won the Academy Award for Best 
Picture in 1943, and it remains part of film 
folklore. For Burnett, the deal has been 
nothing but a source of frustration. 

Two years ago, after Warner's produced 
a short-lived television series based on the 
movie, Burnett filed suit against the com- 
pany in State Supreme Court in Manhat- 
tan. 

Citing cases involving Dashiell Ham- 
mett’s Sam Spade and characters in Mar- 
garet Mitchell’s “Gone With the Wind," he 
said Ik still owned his characters, although 
he sold the play in which they appeared. 

“These characters are part of me, and I 
have a great regard for them — even Ugar- 
te," he said, referring to the scoundrel who 
brought the fateful “letters of transit" to 
Rick's Cafe Amfricain. “I want them 
back." 

Donald S. Zakarin of Pryor, Cashman. 
Sherman & Flynn, the lawyer representing 
Warner’s, said that Burnett had been “paid 
fairly and fully for his contribution to ‘Ca- 
sablanca’ ” and that, “legally and factually. 
this case is dear-cut." 

Burnett faces serious legal obs lades if he 
is to prevail, none more formidable than 
the contract he signed with Warners. 

It provided that he and Alison “give, 
grant, bargain, sell, assi gn, transfer and set 
over” to the film company all rights “of 
every kind and character whatsoever, 
whether or not now known, recognized or 
contemplated, for all purposes whatso- 
ever." Alison is a party to the suit, but she 
is ill and not active in the litigation. 

Just as that grant allowed them to alter 




Jodi Mann ta g/Tlia Now York Tan 

Murray Burnett with “Casablanca* poster. 


Burnett’s characters — ■ Use Lund, the Nor- 
wegian woman played by Bergman in the 
movie, was an American named Lois Mer- 
edith in the play; Rick, a bachelor in the 
movie, was a lapsed lawyer with two chil- 
dren by a prior marriage in the play, and 
Major Strasser had been promoted from 
the play, where he was a captain — it 
authorized them to use those characters in 
later Casablanca clones. 


There have been two such productions, a 
1955 version in which Casablanca is infest- 
ed with Soviet spies looking for nuclear 
secrets, and a 1983 series starring David 
Soul as Rick and Scatman Cro there as 
Sam. 


Six weeks after the last episode of the 
series was broadcast, Burnett filed a $60- 
mHUoa lawsuit charging Warner's with 
breach of contract, misappropriation and 
cheapening the value of his characters. 

Two New York courts have ruled against 
Him. This year. Justice John A. K. Bradley 
of State Supreme Court is Manhattan de- 


clared that the dispute was covered bv 
federal copyright law and belonged in fed- 


federal copyright law and belonged in fed- 
eral court “Plaintiffs may play it again, but 
they must do it in United States District 
Court," be wrote. 


Burnett appealed the decision, only to 
have the Appellate Division of State Su- 
preme Court throw out the case this 
month. Burnett’s rights were not infringed, 
the First Judicial Department of the divi- 
sion ruled unanimously, because be had 
retained no rights at all. 

His lawyers, Michael Zissu and Patricia 
Murphy, who are handling the case on a 
contingent-fee basis, recently decided to 
take the case to the Court of Appeals, the 
state’s highest' court. 

Burnett, 72, who later wrote radio scripts 
for Marlene Dietrich and works for the 
Corporation for Entertainment and Learn- 
ing in Manhattan, conceded there was 
more at stake in the case than owning a few 
fictitional characters. 

Under federal law, the copyright will 
revert to him in a few years, ami he will be 
free to complete his sequel to “Everybody 
Comes to Rick’s” — its first 15 pages have 
long beat sitting in his desk drawer. 

In the sequel, be said, he wanted to 
remind everyone of his long-forgotten role 
in the creation of aclasric — a movie that 
for many years he has found painful to see. 

Burnett and his collaborator wrote “Ev- 
eryone Comes to Rick’s" in a six-week 
stretch in the summer ofl940. when he was 


on vacation from teaching at Central Com- 
mercial High School in Manhattan. 

“As Tone Goes By," originally part of a 
Broadway revue called “Everybody’s Wel- 
come.” was a song Burnett bad fust beard 
as a Cornel] undergraduate lOyeare eariier. 

Hie authors invented the notion of let- 
ters of transit — ■ documents signed by 
General Maxim* Weygand of Vicby 
France providing safe passage ont of Casa- 
blanca — while browsing in Bergdarf 
Goodman. The play, originally set in Lis- 
bon, was moved to a place 

Burnett has never seen. 

Shortly after the play was written, Cariy 
Wharton and Martin Gabd took an option 
to produce iL The effort foundered, howev- 
er, over the suggestion that Use — Lois in 
the play — had slept with Rick in Casa- 
blanca in order to obtain the letters of 
transit Wharton said she was “as dead set 
against it as anyone with an open mind can 
be.” 

In January 1942, the- writer's agent, 
Anne Watkins, sold “Everybody Comes to 
Rick’s" to Warner’s for $20,000. It was an 
extraordinarily high sum to be paid to two 
young writers — the studio had paid Ham- 
mett $8,000 for “The Maltese Falcon" — 
and Burnett signed the contract without 
even reading iL 

The aathorc of the movie script, Johns 
and Philip Epstein and Howard Koch, 
added many of the film’s famous lines: 
“Round op the usual suspects," “This 
could be the start of a beautiful friend- 
ship," and “Here's looking at you. Kid." 

Warner’s lawyers assist Burnett suffered 
no monetary loss at ah, because the movie 
gave his characters the only value they ever 
really had. 

“The characters were totally unknown to 
the world prior to ’Casablanca,’ ” the law- 
yers say in court papers. “Whatever value 
exists In the characters was created by 
Warner." 

Over the yeans, Burnett said, he has been 
approached by many people, inriiitling the 
film director John Cassavetes, seeking to 


To Earthquake Survivors 
Placid o Domingo* who lost four 
dose r elati ves in the Mexico City 
earthquake, plans to leave the > Op- 
era circuit for a year. “I ana asking 
every theater in the world to gw 
me cme year’s leave of 
starting immediately," he told Tne 
Sunday Times of London- “I plan 

roarve a whole year of conceits tor 

survivors of the earthquake. The 
Spanish tenor, who emigrated to 

Mstico as a child, said he hopes to 

rive 40 concerts and raise S8 mu- - 
Son to provide bousing for about 
200 f Bushes living in the building 
wberehis relatives died on Sept- 19. 

□ * 




against a Rater Werner Rsas- 
Mnder play with anti-Semitic over- 


tones has been rejected, a spokes- 
man for the Frankfurt prosecutor’s - 
office said. Jochen Schroers said 
there was no legal basis for rac i al 
p bM T w s against the direc- 
tors of the play, “Der M&ll, die 
Stadt and der Tod/'fGarbage, City 
and Death)" which premieres Ocl 
31 in Frankfurt. He called the play 
“a wa± of an that cannot be for- 
bidden.” The West Berlin Jewish 
Cultural Forum filed the complaint 
against the duectwCfindier Rfflfc, 
hit dramatic adviser and stage di- 
rector. The main figure, referred to 
as “The Rich Jew," is a land specu- 
lator who murders a prostitute at 
the end of the play. r‘ 


purchase sequel lights to the play. 
He tried to write a sequel but i 


He tried to write a sequel out never 
completed it -r in part, he said, because he 
feared it would, provoke a lawsuit by 
Warner's and he could not afford a lawyer 
to defend him. 

His sequel has Rick running a bar. in 
Estoril outride Lisbon, sometime after 
World War H Although Renault, the 
French police officer portrayed in the mov- 
ie by Claude Rains, reappears, Use never 
does, nor. said Burnett, could she. 


Msfisbr Rostropovich, 58, the 
Sovict-bcra cello virtuoso and mu- 
sic director of the National Sym- 
phony Orchestra of Washington 
since 1977, was given the Albert 
Schweitzer Musk Award mi Sun- 
day for “a He’s work d edicated to 
music and derated to humanity’’ 
by the Creo Society, a nonprofit 
organization that sponsors baiefits 
in the arts and 


“Look, things change," he explained. “It 
s a star-crossed romance, doubly star- 


was a star-crossed romance, doubly star- 
crossed when she went off with Laszlo. I 
mean, it’s like my first wife. If I saw her 
today — and I haven't seen her far years — 
l would look at her and say, Tt’s oyer.' ” 


— the only child of Albert Schwert- 
xer, the theakgiaa and medical 
missionary — presented the award 
to Rostropovich after be conducted 
a National ^pmho&y concert at 
Lincoln Centers Avery- Fisher 
HaR ... Mayer Teddy noOek of 
Jerusalem, awarded the Frankfurt 
Book Fan’s 1985 peace prize on 
Sunday, said he would use the 
25,000-Deutsche-nurk (59,400) 
prize money to foster uztderstand- 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


SUBSCRIBE 
to the 

INTRNATIONAL 




HERALD 


COTE D'AZUR 

CAP D*ANHBES 
Lovely «la wflb dura 
JStqja. tat, 60 sqm. kumgffr 
ttxjttwodng terrace, equipped 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 






PARIS & SUBURBS 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


SWITZERLAND 




TRIBUNE 


AM) SAVE 

As a new subscriber to the 
International Herald Tribune, 
you eon save up to half 
the newMtand m depend ^ 
on your country of re si dence. 


Far detaib 

on this spead introductory offer, 
write to 


W SafaeoripHcm De uu t uw w L 
181, A venge 

92300 Meo g y e ue S ei ne. Fitmce. 
Or tek Pane 747-07-29 


M ASIA AND PACIHC 


Contact our toed dstobutor on 


International Herald Trfaqoe 
1005 Tai Sana Cormnerckd BuMoh 
24-34Hem» ee»y Rood 
HOW KONG 
Tel: HC 5-286726 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
Engfeh Ms (dofly) 434 » 65. Rone 



COTE D’AZUR, VJkrfranchc superb 
view of hay. 4 large luxurious roooa, 
modem, kin" terraayfaring south, 
large ga uge. P135D.00Q- Promotion 
AwThScb Manrt (WOO Nee. 
Tel (93) H7 08 20. TeVa hrnnaajr 
461235 



AVENUE FOCH 

Modern hiking, very high drra, 
420 sqjtu, salon, dining room, study, 
library, 5 bedrooms, 5 dressings. 5 
baths, 2 partings, 2 raids' rooms, 24- 
hour guaram. 

BATON 704 55 55 

met BATON 630855F 




SUNNY SOUTHERN SWtlZBtLANDj 


dost Reception, 3 bedrooms 
pm*. 

Cabinet Ravier 577 95 10 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO CENIR 


EXCEPTIONAL 
ON QUA! Of SHME 

, faong or s? unns 

Pentoouse. Evmg, cErang, 4 bedroom:, 3 
bath*, office, mods room, 1600 
fantastic wow aver Pori 
isiJr Guadkm 


X Hwh dens residence, 
125 sqjo, doable bring + 2 bed- 
room, 2 baths, bdeon y , double expo- 
sition, 3rd floor, parting. Passjfcffiy 2 
moke duplex another apartment 

Teb 5781967. 



NEAR AVE. POOL Sumptuous 6- 
room, 200 sqjn. on private road 1st 
floor. 2 mods' rooms, Hf. ftrtwJ 
mnrHi oti. [No ogenerf. id 50T 71 06 
from noon to 6 ml 


or: The RestFagmo Kvo tago in the South - 
om area of the Lobe Lugano with aport- 
raonh 5? sqjn. ■ >3Dsqjn. -h bdeories. 
Abo overlooking lake end m ou ntain s . 
Best location on the lake in ai dd 

SSlSa. Sf 4a$ 45ft Mm» 
gages at tow Swiss Merest rates, bee 
lor sate to far rign ers. 


Embassy Service 

fl Am. oe Mamina 
75008 Paris 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT M PARIS 
562-7899 


74 CHAMPS-AYSSS 8th 

Studio, 2 or 3-room c^M tme n t . 
One month or monk. 


ALMA, 400 5Q-M- 


Kgh dan apeetea 

SEA VIEW 


Ijverg area 300 sun. 

Prrio & private gsdet* 700 sqju. 
Afl modem con du it s 


ST CLOUD 



EMERALD - HOME LTD. 

Via G. Cotton 3, CH-A900 Lagans 


5T GBtMAM DCS PUB. 16th amt. 


Tbc 73612 HOME Of 


Near American School rendentid,| perthouse, 110 3294294 

modem haute on 3 levels 


for firif aMafr canAscft 
MTHtMEOIA 
fa d eeh m Sale Agents 

Tet (93) 506684 -Man 469477 


modem houte on 3 levels 
! 1 HKACE 5 , VIEW ON RMH 51 
_ re«ptK^5b«JiOoms,2lolchens. 

PE HAVRLAJ4^6 Q2 606 0 
or 741 35 28 evenings. 


SWITZERLAND 


In the ch cming iiuatkin resort of 

LEY5M 




FA1SANDBUE 



International Business Message Center 


RESIDENCE LES FRENES 

cx ^fe 0 *^l ovterrfd Abino panto* J No <«erts. T*fc3» 38 83. 

“H NqMg r ojwa mb 

- you am own quality residences 
with indoor swimmmg pool end 
fitness foo ttes ei cm ideal 
env iro nment fix leisure and sports 

(Jd. goK, del 

. fiumangot tow SF. rides 
up to 80% mortgages. 

PUom contact; 

Ita e i dtowai lee ftm*ra 1B54 Laytin 

Teh (025) 3G1S^t^61 20 BLAIOt l PARIS AJREA UNFURNISHED 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES | OFFICE SERVICES 


U. S. A. 


BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 


, MALLORCA 
Your Office in Germany **M!s*oor park 


UNUM/7SDWC. 
IJJLA- 8 WORLDWBJE 




ALLIED 


VAN LINES INTI 

ova 1300 OWE 
WORLDWIDE 

USA AKedVcm line* lnt*1 Corp 
(0101) 312-881-8100 


OPPORTUNITIES 


Or cod our Agency Europocm offices; 

PARIS Deotiwrtee fa tam afibnal 

(01) 343 U 64 




FRANKFURT * J52J5SZ 



FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


(069) 250066 

DUSSBDORF/RAT1NGEN 

(02102) 45023 LIAS. 

MUNICH LIAS. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON 


DIAMONDS 




WON M*! Moving 

(01) 953 3636 . 

Coll far AJfecfs free earn* 


LONDON 

nduovy & trust services ! Company 
lormotioni L damtaialicn t Uitemation- 
nC m I Sank accounts estobfahed ! 
General busman advice & ossetonce 1 


JPCR, 17 WidagaM St, London ET 7 HP 
l3 01 377 1 551 ffc B93911 G 


fetabfehed 1920 







AeBiaimstroat 62 8-2018 Artfwerp 
Belg ium - TetpZ 31234 07 51 


Belg i um . Tet pZ 31234 07 51 
The 7T779 syl h. At the Dnsnond Chib. 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


UNIQUE UA. / WORID PA1H4T. 
successful rnr accessory with proven 

92S2I Neuflv Cedes, Frtmce 







i.. | J 


mm 



wo are “AJ Year Service” 

• Gomptota office services at two 
prestifp adtkosSM. 

• Fully equipped offices for toe short 


irofessional staff at your cfepasaL ap artments. 1 to 3 bedrooms, a3 vrilti 
Con bo bgofly used os your crnpO' large terrooi. Very bfgb qudity con- 
rale domic* far Germany /Europe, * " - - - - - 


rate dorarie for Germany /Europe, 
• Your busme n operation con start 
im me tf i nte fy. 


Irim Burin eer Services GmbH 

LaircD-Haus om Haldiausmparfc 
JustnanHrma 22 

6000 Franld a tt an Mom 1 


Tet 69-59 00 61 
Tvfcfa* 699? 57 70 
Telex: 414561 


cowa zp^g boom 

SECRETARIAT - TQEX 

TEL: PARIS (T) 727 IS 39 


MONTE CARLO 
228 SOM. onfKXSMCE 

lor sale m hnunaus 
(sr-oondifianed buWng 
For furttn- detmh plecee contact 

AGB3I 

26 bo Ed fr i n cess e Onfafle 
MC 98000 Mona 
Teh ( 93 ) 50 MM M« 4 ?H 17 MC 


^^ 2* \J5£>