Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats



TotZ\ 


s «■ 


t ! 






The Global- Newspaper 

Edited in Paris 
Printed Supuhaneoasl 
in 
B 

The Hasae and 


No. 31,929 


.„.?WL 


IMK 



INTERNATIONAL 



ad 15 IJOOJO — .DONfc. 

Mma -^13$. latf — _ 1^00 Ure O’**— CZDOR* 

' T H BoNon QAapg Lw^ . i^ iikMwgl — ■ 3I6 e. 

I iTil 1 1 ■ ¥ T 1 It 

iv UUv 

~ ^ » a™«,_zabiA *«* »c«. 


bw no? r^-~rnrr s-^“- 7flos * 

Und HDfM, U ™ n0o ^~3 , ■ Swwnwd.iaos* 

Modern to be Thmj 055OD« 

HC™ 1 Tvrtay TX 40003 


With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


Greafrom— SDP. **»«»■ — fcjODti UAL _ ti niu 

Gtaact 80 a NrtKrknS— 275 H. US. Ml (EmJ_J0ES 

.USfeb N«nL_ 170 K. Tugalana 7*00 


PARIS, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 






IKK' 
«* * 



* .* : 




fct w 

*■** -- 


$ -■ 
<$*■>£ 

f._. .... 

: W*;. 

rer%; 

5* VTm _ 
«» •*. ■- 


"*■■ 



By-Xou Groton ■ . • ; 

. . ^d B^ Woodward : . 

Waskbtpon Past'Sqvke ■ • 

WaSJ#GTC^ .— Preadeni 
Ronald Reagan has sent :Smftor 
Paul Laxalt to the 7 Ftnippines-wuh 

whRt OM ffdmtTHt tHrtvMi' AKfri frl 


on Rebels 


said that the ques tion Of whether 
the United States should back an 
alternative to Mr. Marcos had been 
-“discussed within the government" 
but not resolved. ; 

The Philippines was identified in- 
Watch Report, the GAquarteriy, 
as the. country with the greatest 
potential for instability among 
countries in which UJL security in- 
terests rank high- The director of 
central intelligence, William J. Ca- 
sey, and. the national security af- 
fairs advisee Robert C. McFarianc, 


Phul Laxalt 


■etc 


H 

** V 




.1 


4 , W% jj.- 


Soviet Names 
Top Planner 
To Politburo 


By Andrew Rosenthal r : 

The .Associated Press . 

MOSCOW — Mikhail S.Gorba- 
chev. added the new stateplamnng 
chief to fee Poh'tburo on Tuesday 
and criticized what he called 
- “groundless fantasies" of the past, ' 
yj e * as the Communist Party l«»A»foitp 
' met to chart the Soviet Union’s 
course for the rest of the century. 

At a full session of the party’s 
Centra] Committee, the planning 
chief, Nikolai -V. Talyzin, was 
named a nonvoting member of the 
Politburo, the Kremlin’s most pow- . 
policymaking body. The Tasr 


•of w arning " to president 
nandR Marcas i feat his regime was 
m danger of befe&ov^-thrown by 
Conunmnst insurgditsMJ> 

The official said-thzr+ssess- 

jpe^M lteVX:C^ Int& have emphasized to the president 
gpnceAgenqraiAawari.nation- ^ precarious positkm offee PhD- 

1-iSSS^OSSSSi ^offidapT ^ 

^ con^g ? “thi/'^km§Si5on , s „¥%.*** ^ ***? miu S <* 

T«m»* rnW vitr ; .&W j± jair JC h.l_ U.S. officials was underscored last 
Iran unless ULMecveukts^ MmhaerLee Kum 

Yew of Kngaporc in a meeting with 
t the Whhe House. 

thePhaxppfiws.,;^. in an interview with The Wash- 

pSa’S .eves 

detavered.io cfiondTHesaid that Jj5? 

Mri.Maiw ,wmld be mid that he a ^ s^SCT if ccononnc prob- 


ffi. mflitaiy h^ twav^lfecs in Mr. Reagan at i 
the PhiHonin«x‘; : i lnan mtervK 


■•^SOh 


-'Xi;'-. 


.■•I'iS*. 

-r, 


w as “soevwng jj) die figfa against 
the ms u rgeric^ai^tiat his. gqv- 
emmait wai too preoccupied with 
fiwanrajit gfltr^«mt fk>nv><»ic politics 
and XtOt enbbgh wife cnmhattmg 
.fee increasingly powerful New 
Peoples Army. ; 

{The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, .arid Tuesday, in 
confirming the'Laxah misriion feat 
h was “a Bttle overblown” to sng- 
gest that the’l^aicos govenunent 


lems are not resolved. 

The White House announced fee 
Laxali missi on <mj Monday after 
The Washfegton Times published 
an artide about the trip. 

Ml Laxalt, general chairman of 
the Republican Party and diair- 
man of three of Mr. Reagan’s presi- 
dential campaigns, announced in 
August that he would opt seek a 
third term b the Senate. He told 
Mr. Reagan that he would be avail- 



NATO WANTS NEW ARMS OFFER — Secretary of State George P. Shultz briefed 
NATO ministers Tuesday on preparations for next month's U-S.-Soviet sranmit talks. 
The allies pressed Washington for aims hritiatives that indude Soviet ideas. Page 4. 


Reagan Refuses 
Apology to Cairo 
For Jet Capture 


Italian Official, in Talks With Shultz, 
Stands By Decision to Free Abbas 


ed. 


was b dang er pf being overthrown, able for sensitive trouble-shooting 
United Press International rqxnl- assignments. 

Last week, Representative Dave 
McCurdy; an Oklahoma Democrat 
and member of the House Intelli- 
gence and Armed Services commit- 
tees, said feat fee CIA and fee 
Defense Intelligence Agency had 
warned feat present trends b fee 
Pbilippmes are “really downward 


[Mr. Speakes oonfrrnjed 
r. Laxalt 1 


that Mr. .Laxalt has gone to 
to meet wife Mr. Marcos but de- 
nied .that he would deliver fee 
bluntest presidential r nr?p»g p ever 
senttoanaQy..-. '.' • 
pTher preddent wanted a dose 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Past Service 

BRUSSELS — Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz of fee Unit- 
ed States said Tuesday that he and 
Foreign Minister Giulio Andreoiti 
of Italy had failed to reconcile a 
dispute over Italy’s decision to re- 
lease a PLO official accused of 
mas te rminding fee hijack of fee 
Italian ship the Achilla Lanro. 

“We disagree, we haven’t com- 
posed our differences," Mr. Shultz 


the prime minister was holding pri- 
vate political consultations.] 

Mr. Shultz and Mr. Andreotu 
met for 30 minutes Tuesday prior 
to a special session on arms control 
at fee headquarters of fee North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

Italian diplomats said Mr. An- 
dreotii explained the judicial and 
political reasons behind its govern- 
ment's decision to release Mr. Ab- 
bas. 

Italy has contended that there 


cause his detention would present 
troubles for Egypt, a friend of both 
the United States and Italy. 

Mr. Shultz called the Italian ex- 
planation “incomprehensible," ac- 
cording to an official b the I talian 
Foreign Ministry. 

“We know the United States is 
displeased," the I talian spokesman 
added, ^mt we have our reasons 
for acting the way we did." 

Mr. Shultz said he told Mr. An- 
dreoiti that Americans found it 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Pan Service 

BOISE, Idaho — President Ron- 
ald Reagan said Tuesday that he 
would “never" apologize to Egypt 
for fee interception of a civilian 
airliner carrying Palestinians who 
hijacked the Italian ship the Acbille 
Laura 

Arriving here on the first stop of 
a Middle West trip to campaign for 
Senate Republicans, Mr. Reagan 
was asked if the United Stales had 
anything to apologize for to fee 
Egyptians for fee interception. 

“Never," he responded. 

Mr. Reagan said that be would 
have no comment on fee state of 
U ^.-Egyptian relations. 

On Monday, President Hosni 
Mubarak had demanded an apolo- 
gy for the incident. 

Larry Speakes, fee White House 
spokesman, added, “We’ve said ev- 
erything we need to say.” 

Mr. Speakes said that Mr. Rea- 
gan had laid out his “rationale and 
our views" on the interception b a 
letter to Mr. Mubarak last week- 
end. Egypt, a close U.S. ally in fee 
Arab world, is second only to Israel 
as a recipient of U5. aid 

The capture of four Palestinian 
hijackers who were aboard fee 
Boeing 737 that was forced down 
by U-S. fighters last week dominat- 
ed Mr. Reagan’s day. On arrival in 
Boise, he was greeted wife a chant 
from one spectator, “Wav to go 
wife the PLO!" 

Introducing Mr. Reagan later. 
Senator Sieveo D. Symms. fee Re- 
publican incumbent, said that fee 
Sun Valley chapter of fee Veterans 
of Foreign Wars had told him to 


svnjM 


r fr» 

":sA-vswais! 






r.* :•"* 




£*r- 




m- 


news agency reported nis appoint- 
ment as 6f the p lanning aim , 
mission, or Gorolan, on Monday. - 
Also at Tuesday’s sessiop, onerof 
the last members of the Breafinev 
guard, Nikolai A. Tikhonov, fee 
former prime, minister, was retired 
from the Potiiburo. - > - 

In a speech at fee meeting. 
Gorbachev lashed out 
called a “dangerous fora’vuCtnSp 
foreign policy, and aid that“r6let- 
national developments have .ap^ 
preached a line that cahnot^be 
passed without taking mostrespon- 
able decisions." • 

“These decisions,” he said, “can- , 
not be put off without riskfegloss 
of control over fee dangerous pro- 
cesses threatening mankind’s very 
existence." 

Also at the meeting, the comOTt- 
tee approved economic pfans far 
, - 1986-90 and through the yearTOOO, 
S5i|t which will, be submitted for formal 
•* ratification by the Supreme Soviet, 
fee nominal pariiamenyat its fall 
session b late November or early 
December. - 

The party also approved a draft 
edition of its “proscam,” a general 
outiine of goals, ideology and po-. 
Iky that is to be ^proved at' a. 
party.cOTgress to bqpa Feb. 25. 

Ddails of these documents Could 
not be obtained, but Tass said that 
they would be published in fee So— 
viet press.. 

Mr. Gorbachev said fee new eco- 
nomic p lans called for industrial 
growth over the next 15 years equal' 
to what has been achieved since 
Communist power was established 
in 1917. 

HC said feat in the next five 
years, all increases in production 
would be achieved by increasing 
labor productivity. By fee year 
2000, be said, the party wanted an 
increase of 13Q percent to 150 per- 
cent over current productivity. 

■ That would require annual- in- 
creases of more than 6 percent, 
considerably higher -than the 3.8 
percent achieved in 1984. 

The party, program was drafted 
by a high-ranking committee under 
Mr. Gorbachev’s directicsL In his 

. (Continued on Page 4, CoL 4) 


fricji(i-ime( T o™ prirry^ acyv-i'gtf. t.-> gn and very negative" and headed for told a press conference in Brussels, was no proof of Mr. Abbas’s b- “very hand to understand how Italy convey this message io Mr. Reagan 

a -1_JS ■ 1- ^n..- '^TjllBCtrrthJv n - I I.. rlmm > m vVi a aC tha amiI/I fr«A rAmaArtA nrliA ! InitA^ rAnnvmtno hii^rVprc - “RnnO 


and wsjt a dme. longtime ally to 
discuss wife luiirlhe currem ^ state 
of affairs fecre md stress, the con- 
tmubg dose - jdatkm^np,” Mr. 
Peakes said. Asked if Mr: Laxalt 
was delivering a warning based on 


^catastrojfee. 

At stake b fee Philippines is the 
-security of Clark Air Base and Su- 
bic Bay Naval Base, the two biggest 
UR military installations outside 
fee Uphed Stales. The Pentagon 



•Sbfi 

letilrn» 

ji?*. 


xsW=’j 


jjse- 

jm* - : 

V' 


Sc**' 

it*:- 


UR btdligence that fee Marcos recently announced plans to invest 
' ^ -*- h - — J - j — xrf being $13 billion to upgrade fee bases. 

^ .; >Tbd United States has lease of 
thcbafceaufltS l99l, lmi Richard L. 
Acmitagc^an assistant secretary of 
defense, said feat “we are seriously 
looking at alternatives" because of 
the instability of fee Philippine 
govemmenL The potential loss of 
these bases is of concern because of 
Soviet naval presence at Cam Ranh 


-Mr^Rra^^a^S^a^essment on 
fee mood wad charity of Mr. Ma- 
as, who was elected president b 
196Sr and has remaned m office 
sboeilten. / Tram;1972 to 1982 he 
■ ruled fry martial law. 

" Reagan afemms&ation officios Bay m Vietnam. 


The controversy broke out after 
Mohammed Abbas, an ally of 
Yasser Arafat, the chairman of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization, 
was allowed to leave Rome for Yu- 
goslavia over fee wfcekend. 

[In Italy, meanwhile, there was 
no indication when discuss ions 
about fee hijacking would resume 
b the divided Italian cabinet, Reu- 
ters reported from Rome. Defense 
Minister Giovanni Spadolini had 
denounced Mr. Abbas’s release 
and boycotted a meeting Monday 
of Mr. Crari’s key cabinet officials. 

[Mr. Graxf s office said there was 
.no word on when a meeting of fee 
full cabinet would resume. It said 


volvement in the hijacking of the 
ship and the subsequent murder of 
an American passenger. 

Mr. Abbas was carrying an Iraqi 
diplomatic passport, which pur- 
portedly would have excluded him 
from prosecution. Moreover, fee 
Rome government has said, it 
could not extradite him to the 
United States because Italian law 
dots not pencil cyraditien io 
countries that practice capital pun- 
ishment. 

Mr. Andreoiti also noted that 
Italy was reluctant to hold Mr. Ab- ians new being held in Italy for 
bas following the U.S. interception carrying out the hijacking “will be 
of an Egyptian airliner transport- tried according to the law in the 
bg him and the four hijackers be- strongest way.” 


could free someone who the United 
States government is convinced 
was intimately involved b the sei- 
zure of the stop." 

“We believe there is evidence at 
hand that Abbas was pan of a 
hijacking and pan of a murder." 
Mr. Shultz said. 

Mr. Shultz said he was "glad to 
know" that the Italian government 
would indict Mr. Abbas if it deter- 
mined there was sufficient evidence 
to do so. He also expressed his “full 
confidence" that the four Palestin- 


concernbg the hijackers: “Bring 
them to justice, give them a quick 
trial, and hang 'em!" 

Mr. Reagan declared twice, 
“There is a new patriotism alive b 
our country ” He said he was proud 
of the UR Navy filers who mter- 
cepted the Egyptian plane last 
week, diverting the hijackers to Sic- 
ily. 

“They didn’t have more then an 
hour’s notice.” be said, “and yet 
out there over the Mediterranean 
with all the air traffic that’s going 
on b the area b the dark of night 
they were able to pick up the target 
plane and persuade it to land." 

Mr. Reagan put emphasis on the 



India Wins U.S. Concessions on High Tech 


Prime Mu nster Rajrv Gandhi of India and Ids British 
counterpart, Margaret Thatcher, met Tuesday in London 
to discuss ways to cooperate in fee battle against terrorists. 


By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Poet Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration has approved S49 
miflian worth of high-technology 
sales to India in fee past month and 
is considering allowbg the country 
to buy a supercomputer. 

It is the first tangible sign of a 
closer Uis-lndia relationship since 
the virit to Washington b June of 
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 

The sales, involving the most so- 

fowed for export to India under 
U3. laws, were part of several ap- 
provals over the past few months 
that enabled India to buy $894 mil- 
lion worth of American products in 
the fiscal year that ended SepL 30. 
This was nearly $400 million more 
than it was allowed to buy a year 
earlier. 

The new relationship has also 
extended to the military. Daring a 
visit b August by a high Defense 
Ministry official, India was given 
approval to buy advanced jet en- 
gines from General Electric Corp. 
feat would allow the Gandhi gov- 
ernment to build its own combat 
planes and ease its dependence on 
Soviei-i 

offi- 


-madeMiGs. 

A Reagan admini stration 


rial, referring to fee administra- 
tion's attitude toward India, said. 
“There has been a palpable differ- 
ence b the past six months.” 

The administration’s “ pretty 
strong antagonistic view has dime 
an almost 180-degree rum." the of- 
ficial said. “There's no question 
that Rajiv Gandhi’s visit turned it 
around. 

“He made a good case and all of 
a sudden the White House discov- 
ered India is an important coun- 
try," the official continued. “It is 
no longer in vogue to have a hard- 
nosed attitude on India.” 

A sign of India’s new status is fee 
serious consideration that adminis- 
tration officials are giving to the 
Gandhi request to buy a supercom- 
puter for research bn the mon- 
soons. 

There are fewer than 200 super- 
computers b fee world outride the 
U.S. national security establish- 
ment. For India to get one would 
beasymbdof fee emergence of its 
scientific research as well as of its 
new relationship wife the United 
States. The supercomputers are ca- 
pable of highly advanced and high- 
ly complex work. 

Export control laws impede fee 


transfer of technology as sophisti- 
cated as supercomputers to non- 
aligned nations such as India. 
There are also concerns that India 
could divert fee computer from 
weather research to military appli- 
cations. including fee design of nu- 
clear weapons. 

Nonetheless, said administration 
sources, India’s request has not 
been denied despite strong opposi- 
tion from officials b fee Defense 
Department who fear the technol- 
ogy could be disclosed to the Soviet 
Union. 

“It is no longer an absolute ‘no’ 
on supercomputers." said an ad- 
ministration official 

“India will get it b time," anoth- 
er official declared. “The point is, 
this purchase would never have 
been considered before" 

Mr. Gandhi is considered! likely 
to press India’s case for more so- 
phisticated technology when be 
meets President Ronald Reagan at 
the United Nations b New York 
next week. 

Another issue likely to come up 
is India’s pending request to pro- 
duce 600 small entry-level comput- 
ers over an right-year period under 
a S500- million technology transfer 


agreement with Control Data 
Corp. 

That deal has been stalled be- 
cause the United States wants In- 
dia's assurance that it will not use 
fee technology b its nuclear pro- 
gram. While fee Gandhi govern- 
ment gave such assurances on 
equipment it is buying it is reluc- 
tant to do so for computers that 
would be assembled in India. 

A French company is offering a 
similar arrangement, and there is 
an OcL 31 deadline for concluding 
the purchase from Control Data 
Corp. State Department sources 
were optimistic that fee differences 
would be resolved before then. 

The high-technology sales were 
approved for India under a memo- 
randum of undemanding signed in 
May when Commerce Secretary 
Malcolm Baldrige visited New Del- 
hi 

U.S. and Indian sources said a 
hurdle to carrying out fee agree- 
ment for fee highest level of tech- 
nology was cleared in August, after 
V.S. Arunachalam. science adviser 
to Indian's Defense Ministry, com- 
plained forcefully to fee White 
House national security adviser, 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5) 




*-J.» 




INSIDE : 

■ The pohtical skflfc of Prime 
Minister Martens and fhe Bel- 
gian desire for stability seem to 
explam Iris success. Page! 

■ A new Side Department of- 
fice is helping build jxjpulat 

S wrt for US. actions in Can- 
America. Page! 

■ Phan to revise fee Civil Ser- 
vice pension system ai* ; 
through Congress. 

ARTS/ LEISURE 
■ Sheridan 
protection of ’‘Les 
in London. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE : 

■ Gticocpsayiearn^roseW 

percent in the third quarter 
from a year earlier. Page 15. 

■National Bank of Canada of- 
fered to merge with Mercantile 
Bank, of Canada, beset wife lie 
- qtadity problems. : . 15. 

SPEOAL REPORT . 

■ Paris is a creative frame for 
France’s versatile higb-Fashian 
designers. ' : Page 9. 


Page 13. 


U.S. Financial Theorist Wins Nobel Prize 


By Steve Lohr ■ 
NtiaY erkTbtm Sinda- 

STOCKHOLM — ' Franco Mo- 

digfiani. a 67-year-old professor at 

the Massac h us e tts Institute of 
Technology, won thcNobd Memo- 
rial Prize in Economic Science on 
Tuesday for Ids pioneering work in 
analyzing fee behavior of house- 
hold savers and fee functioning of 
financial markets- . 

The five-member^dectioa com- 
mittee praised fee practical appli- 
cations of Dr. Modigtiam’s theoret- 
ical work. His- analysis of savings, 
they said, has been “extremely im- 
portant" in determining ^tbe effects 
of different types otnationfll pen- 
sum programs. 

In. addition^ Dr. MotfigfianTs 
studies, of financial markets,' they 
said, helped to lay fee foundation 
for fee aevddpmeni of the entire 
fiddofborpdrata-fimmce., 

in the reataofjtt financial mar- 
kets, one cf Dr.Modi^ifflli’s con- 
.tributions wasmiuSdyzmg tiie ef- 
fect ofacomjii^ 


structure cm a stock market’s view 
of its value: 

The conclusion of bis study, 
done with an associate, Merton 
Miller, was that the market value of 
companies had no genuine relation 
to the size and structure of their 
debts. Instead, stock market values 
are determined mainly by the ex- 
pected earnings' of enterprises in 
fee future. 

Today, the notion that investors 
focus on the fixture and that profit 
performance is their paramount 
consideration, is deemed conven- 
tional wisdom in business schools, 
corporate board rooms and on 
Wall Street 

-- But feat was not much the case 
in 1958, when the Modigfiani- 
Mfller theory was presented. 

“That is the true test of a bril- 
liant theory,” said AssarLmdbcck, 
a professor at the University of 
Stockholm and a member of the 
se lection co mmitt ee. “What is first 
a thought to be wrong is later 
shown to be obvious.” 


Furthermore, the methods em- 
ployed fry Dr. Modigliani m the 
late 1950s for determining corpo- 
rate values are, b refined form, 
used commonly now by everyone 
from executives plotting long- 
range strategy to corporate raiders 
prowling for acquisition candi- 
dates. A key technique is Dr. Mo- 
digliani’s 1958 anal ysis feat is rou- 
tinely used is figuring fee present 
value of expected future earnings. 

Dr. Modigliani’s basic research 
in savings was published in 1954 
and' has been called the life-cycle 
theory. Like his work b financial 
markets, the savings theory was 
bmlt on previous research but di- 
verged from it b significant ways. 
Dr. Modigliani was «=«««* in his 
savings research by Richard Brom- 
berg, a student of bis who died 
several years later. 

The fife-cycle theory explains 
household savings by firing it to 
individual behavior, economic 
growth and demography. The the- 
ory holds that people save for their 


retirement, but only for their own 
old age and not for their descen- 
dants as wriL 

Dr. Modigliani, who was bom in 
Rome b 1918. received a doctorate 
in jurisprudence from the Universi- 
ty of Rome in 1939 and a doctorate 
in social science from the New 
School for Social Research in New 
York m 1944. 

He came to fee United States in 
1939 with his wife, Serena, after 
fleeing the Mussolini regime, and 
was naturalized in 1946. He taught 
at Bard CoDege, fee New Jersey 
College for Women (non' Douglass 
College), the New School for Social 
Research, the University of Illinois, 
Camegie-Mdlon University and 
Northwestern University before 
going to MIT in 1962. 

The Economics Prize was estab- 
lished in 1958 as a memorial to 
Alfred B_ Nobel the Swede who 
invented dynamite, by fee Swedish 
central bank to mark its 300ih 
birthday. It was first awarded b 
1969. 



Da hu 


Franco Modigliani and his wife, Serena, outside their borne 
in Belmont, Massachusetts, after learning of the award. 


word “persuade" and the crowd 
erupted in laughter and applause. 

He did not mention U.S. frustra- 
tion over Italy’s release of another 
Palestinian, Mohammed Abbas, 
u-bo was aboard fee Egyptian 
plane. Mr. Abbas, who fee United 
States has accused of being the 
mastermind of fee Oct. 7 hijacking 
of fee Achille Laura was allowed 
by Italy to leave for Yugoslavia. 
His current whereabouts are not 
known. 

Western officials in Syria, mean- 
while, were trying to identify a 
body feat washed ashore to deter- 
mine if it was that of Leon Klingh- 
offer, 69. who was killed in fee 
hijacking. 

The body of an elderly man 
washed ashore near fee port of Tar- 

(Coo tinned on Page 4. Col. 1) 


Jordan Backs 
U.K. on Rift 
With PLO 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — King Hussein of 
Jordan said Tuesday feat fee Brit- 
ish government “acted very honor- 
ably" b canceling a high-level 
meeting wife representatives of fee 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
on Monday. 

The king supported Britain's 
contention feat it called off fee 
meeting when one of the two PLO 
representatives refused to sign a 
statement that had been agreed to 
on rejecting violence and accepting 
Israel’s right to exist. 

The PLO. b a statement issued 
Tuesday b Amman and Tunis, said 
it rejected “fee false explanations 
issued by fee British foreign secre- 
tary which increased fee complica- 
tions b the Middle East situation." 

In a television interview, Hus- 
sein, who arrived Tuesday for a 
private visit, refused to blame any 
party for fee collapse of the talks! 

“if there was a misunderstand- 
ing in terras of one member of fee 
Palestinian delegation not having 
been aware of what was happewng, 
it is certainly neither our fault nor 
anyone else’s fault and is indeed 
very regrettable," he said. 

He said he would have to reas- 
sess his peace initiative, begun in 
February wife Yasser Arafat, fee 
PLO leader. It calls for peace talks 
by a joint Jordanian-Palestinian 
delegation wife Israel but Israel 
has refused to talk to the PLO. 

“I feel when we go back to our 
pan of world," he said, “we will 
have to reassess our position, look 
at the problem once again wife fee 
PLO. with fee Palestinian people, 
wife others and see what went 
wrong and how it can be correct- 
ed." 

Meanwhile. British embassies in 
fee Middle East increased security 
in expectation of terrorist attacks 
over the cancellation of fee talks, 
Bri tarn's domestic news agency, 
Press .Association, reported. The 
Foreign Office refused comment. 

The PLO representatives, Mo- 
hammed Milhem, a PLO executive 
committee member and former 
West Bank mayor, and Bishop Eli- 
as Khoury were to have met Mon- 
day wife the foreign secretary, Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, along wife two 
Jordanian officials. Deputy Prime 
Minister Abdul-Wahab Majali and 
Foreign Minister Taher al-Masri. 

Sir Geoffrey went ahead Mon- 
day wife talks wife fee two Jorda- 
nians without the PLO members. 

Sir Geoffrey expressed disap- 
pointment Tuesday feat the talks 
had fallen through and pledged 
Britain’s support for fee “very cou- 
rageous efforts” of King Hussein to 
negotiate a Middle East settlement 

Sir Geoffrey also said newspaper 
suggestions that Bri lain had given 

in to U.S. pressure not to hold the 
talks were “absolute nonsense." 

An undersecretary in the For- 
eign Office, Malcolm Rifldnd, said, 
“I can say unequivocally and with- 
out qualification feat al no time did 
fee Americans make any represen- 
tations to us at any level to cancel 
the visit.” 

The conservative Daily Tele- 
graph, quoting U.S. congressional 
sources, said President Ronald 
Reagan “had made his views 
known to Mrs. Thatcher ‘in no un- 
certain terms.’ ’’ 

The Uaited States refuses to 
meet wife fee PLO until it recog- 
nizes Israel's right to exist and ac- 
cepts United Nations resolutions 
for settlement of fee Arab-Israeli 
situation. 

The paper said fee United States 
emphasized its view of fee talks 
after Palestinians hijacked an Ital- 
ian cruise ship, fee Achille Lauro, 
and an American was killed. 

Denis Healey, foreign affairs 
spokesman of fee opposition Labor 
Party, described fee cancellation of 
fee meeting “as an appalling diplo- 
matic shamble." 











Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 



Ro ut er* 


MATCHING STROKES IN BEIJING — Vice President George Bush of the United 
States relaxes with a glass of juice after a tennis doubles match Tuesday with Wan Li, 
right, a Chinese deputy prime minister. Mr. Bush and has partner spfit sets. In a news 
conference winding up three days of talks with Chinese leaders, Mr. Bush said that the 
United States was not in a position to help solve the issue of Taiwan despite the fact that 
U.S. support for die Nationalist-ruled island is a major irritant in relations with China. 


Election Outcome in Belgium Linked 


WORLD BRIEFS 


To Desire lor Stability, Martens’ Skills Rebel Unit Removes GoukamJ 


In Botswana, Drought but No Death 

Agricultural System , Stability Cited in Avoiding Famine 


By Clifford D. May 

New York Times Service 

GABORONE. Botswana — Fa- 
more than three years, this south- 
ern African nation has been afflict- 
ed by a severe drought that has 
killed livestock by the hundreds of 
thousands, but “no one has died as 
a result of the drought,” according 
to Emdda Mato, Botswana's co- 
ordinator of rural development. 

Aid officials here agree that 
drought in Botswana has meant 
hardship but not catastrophe, in 
contrast with many other African 
countries. Several factors apparent- 
ly have been responsible. 

Botswana has long had a reason- 
ably good “early-warning system.” 
A total of 500 small health centers 
around the country conduct peri- 
odic nutritional surveys to monitor 
•the spread and effects of hunger. 

“We were not stranded by the 
drought because we saw it com- 
ing,” Mrs. Mathe said. “People 
have not died because there have 
been timely responses.” 

Botswana also is a nation at 
peace. Unlike Ethiopia, Sudan, 
Mozambique, Chad a Augpla, Bo- 
tswana has no guerrillas to ambush 
relief tracks. The country's fanners 
also do not have an expensive mili- 
tary marimm to support. Botswa- 
na’s army has only 5,000 soldiers. 

Botswana is one of the more 
open and democratic societies on 
the African continent. A local re- 
porter who identified a famine area 
probably would not face imprison- 
ment. Corruption is not viewed as a 
problem, and most aid seems to get 
to those fa whom it is intended. 


Even conspicuous consumption 
is rare. Only President Quett K. 
Masire drives anything so grand as 
a Mercedes-Benz. 

Botswana has attracted more 
foreign aid per capita from West- 
ern countries than any other Afri- 
can nation. In 1982, Botswana re- 
ceived SI 50 a person in 
development assistance, compared 
with 56 per capita fa Soviet- 
backed Ethiopia. 

Because of the drought, though, 
much of Botswana's development 
budget has been used fa emergen- 
cy relief. Sir out of 10 people in the 
country are receiving some food 
assistance, a costly proposition in a 
country the size of France with few 
paved roads. 


On paper, at least, Botswana has 
made strides in development that 
are almost as im pressive as those 
made in relief. TTie economy has 
been growing at a substantially 
faster rate than the population. 
That is true fa few other African 
countries. 

But Botswana remains on the 
United Nations “least developed” 
hsL And the vast majority of the 
country's peasants, who are 80 per- 
cent of toe total population, nave 
yet to see the favorable statistics 
translate into a markedly higher 
standard of living fa them. 

The twin pillars of the economy, 
diamonds cattle, provide rela- 
tively little employment 


By Steven J. Dryden 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The success or 
the coalition of Prime Minister 
Wflfried Martens in elections Sun- 
day was due mainly to two factors, 
his political skills and the prefer- 
ence of Belgians fa stability over 
new economic experiments, ana- 
lysts here said. 

Mr. Martens. 49. now will form 
his sixth government as prime min- 
ister — a feat unmatched in post- 
war Belgian politics. Political ob- 
servers attribute this durability to 
his consistent policies and states- 
manlike demeanor. 

“He's not a charismatic leader,” 
said an official of his Christian 
People's Party. “People admire him 
with thrir frauds not their hearts. 
In political circles, he’s a man you 
can count on. Everybody, even in 
the opposition parties, knows 
that" 

An example of his political acu- 
ity was his earlier this 

year that Belgium would deploy 
NATO cruise nuclear missiles only 
after completing a somewhat labo- 
rious review of the aims control 
situation. 

of announcing that Bel- 
gium would deploy them after a 
highly publicized visit to the White 
House in January. Mr. Martens put 
off the decision until March. This 
gave his government time to com- 
plete last-minute consultations 
with its allies in the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization and avoid the 
appearance of miring orders from 

This approach seems to have 
benefited Mr. Martens on Sunday. 
While the Flemish Socialist Party, 
which had criticized him harshly 
for accepting the missiles, won six 
new scats in the Chamber of Depu- 
ties, his own party won an equal 
number of new seats and retained 
its position as the most powerful 
parliamentary group. Overall, his 
coalition increased its majority in 
the chamber by two. 

The limited success of the two 
Socialist parties, which was shown 


by the inability of the French- 
Speaking party to gain new seats in 
the chamber.' also demonstrated 
the cautious attitude of voters to- 
ward Socialist plans to follow a 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

risky policy of economic expan- 
sion. analysts said. 

After the recent failure of ortho- 
dox Socialist policies in France, it 
was evident to Belgian voters that 
their country could not defy the 
political realities of pursuing such 
policies, according to Peter Lud- 
low, directa of the Center fa Eu- 
ropean Policy Studies in Brussels. 

“They- would be clobbered with- 
in six months.” Mr. Ludlow said, if 
they followed strict Socialist theory 
instead of Mr. Martens' s austerity 
policies. 

But Mr. Ludlow, citing what he 
called the “ap palling problem” of 
persistent high unemployment in 
western Europe, said mat “the real 
question” raised by the outcome of 
the Belgian elections was: How 
long wm the European consensus 


about the wisdom of austerity poli- PARIS (API -- Gonkouni Ooedddhas Chadian 

des last? Popular Armed Forces, one of 11 groups m a , , ihe Pnr»„* ar 

At the moment, despite the eco- 

nomic difficulties in Western Eu- Aimed Forces delivered Tu»dayto Agnce Goukouni had been 
rope, “there is no strong stimulus to The statement did not specify whether Mr. laouxomn »» 

make people behave dramatically.” 
said David Butler, a fellow of Nuf- 
field College at Oxford Universty, 
who specializes in voter behavior. 

The smaller West European 
countries, Mr. Ludlow said, have 
shown that they are not going to 
break the consensus on austerity 


policies. But he raid it is unclear 
pati 
when the 


what 


items mil 
voters of Italy. 


. Habres faces control 


naaonai . ... * ;Kv_ 

recognize any organ he heads.” The statement, rant from . . 
SSof t£ pXaceused Mr. Gookoum of 
officials and fighters” during fighting with governm ent for« s. » yso 
berated him for meeting with a Chadian govamneut tonssaiy daring 
unsuccessful reconcfliation meeting in Addis Ababa. Ethiopia, tn January 

u u Q Tfc Goukouni created the Popular i Arm^Faces in Mjj '”2*5 

be ~ «*Mi ch-H Faya-Largeau. the northern town held b^relxds who 
taly West Ger- time to topple President Hissfene Habr^ThePopularAnnedF^^ 
many, Britain ana r ranee, go to the one of 1 1 1 fgderi4gjaiv«m 
polls over the next few years. creating GUNT. In 1980, Mr. Goukouni to 
Mr. Ludlow also noted that the Habra's forces drove him from to Uiadian 
Belgian election was the first im- forces control the northern half of Chad, and 
portant natio nal electoral test of a the south. 

NATO country committed to ao- _ tl/ . # m i 

cep ting US. missiles in “the Got- InrlcrAfi m Papal Trial GOWfiftO lHTKCY 

bachev era.” referring to to new tS _ 

Soviet leader, MSkbafl S. Gorba- ROME (AP) —The judges mmg seven m 

cfaev. the shooting of the Pope John Pani n wu 

Taking Belgium as an example, despite to death of a def e nd ant in 

Mr. Ludlow said, it appeared that Tuesday. . . 

Mr. Gorbachev’s recent efforts to BdorCdeok died Monday after suffging a heart anadctttteMamak 

influence West European opinion military prison where he was 

have had little initial effect. charges of anns and drugs smuggbng. Mr. Cekanc, 51, was chargea m 

___ I taly a lflpg wilh three other Turks and three Bulgarians with complicity in 

the alleged plot to loll the pope. • 

Court officials in Rome said the two judges and prosecutor piannea to 


r 


1 a • • Lxjurtorataajsmjuxne saw urawojuogcs Hnu 

I IqcH Amnnn’ I hl*1 fill OTIC go to Turkey in tnid-Novembcx to interrogate wimcsseswbo may have 
LtlfloII 1 1 1 1 > 1 IM LiIU. I p i. O infor mation about the aflfgpd plot. It is common practice m Italy fa 

__ courts to move to other countrire to take testimony. The magistrates in 

Subsides in East Beirut 


Renters 

BEIRUT — Fighting between ri- 
val groups wi thin Lebanon’s main 
Christian militia died down Tues- 
day after overnight dashes in East 
Borut in an apparent showdown 
over peace talks with Druze and 
Moslem militias. 

The fighting was the most seri- 
ous among Christians fa months. 
Two factions of the Christian Leb- 
anese Forces militia differ violently 
over Syria’s presence in Lebanon 


the trial already have gone to West Germany and. The Netherlands arui _ 
plan trips to Switzerland, West Germany and Bulgaria. jok 

’sf- 

word on the fate of Kasparov Wins, Takes Lead in Chess 

MOSCOW (AP) — Gary Kasparov, to challenger, won his third chess 
victory Tuesday and took a onorpaim lead over the champion, A na toli 
Karpov, in the 16th game of their world tide contest 

The wm gave Mr. Kasparov 8 .5 points to 7.5 for Mr. Karpov in the 24- 

game series, ■ 

The advantage now shifts to Mr. Kasparov in the series. If the 
r emaining eight games aid m draws, which groeeaeh player a half-point. 
East Beirut residents said the Mr. Kasparov would win the chamj»ondjip with 12S points. In theevent 
fighting started after backers of of a tie in points, Mr. Karpov would retain his tide. 

Elk Hobdka, to Lebanese Forces 

Mitterrand Backs Brazil on Debt Issue 

Moslems, seized a barracks Mon- BRASILIA (Reuters) — Presi- 


Therewasno 
the three Soviet diplomats who 
have been held by extremists since 
Sept. 30. In telephone catU Sunday 
and Monday, persons cl aiming to 
represent the kidnappers had 
threatened the imminent execution 
of all three. 


and over the divkion of political day night from mOhiamen loyal to dent Francois Mitterrand of 
power within Lebanon itself be- Samir Geagea. Mr. Geagea heads Fiance has j oined Brazilian offi- 


tween Christians and Moslems. 


Diplomacy Office Lobbies the U.S. Public 


the Lebanese Forces faction that 
opposes such accommodation. 
Clashes spread to other districts. 

There were no immediate reports 
of casualties. 

The clashes, however, appeared 


rials in asserting tot Third World 
debtor countries should not repay 
their loans at the cost of poverty, 
unemployment and recession. 

Mr. Mitterrand said Monday 
during a vial here that it was indfi- 


By Joanne Omang 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The State 
Department’s Office of Public Di- 
plomacy fa Latin America, set up 
in July 1983 with two persons, has 
developed into a 19-person office 
that spent 5935,000 last year to 
educate the public about Reagan 
adminis tration policy in the region. 

State Department officials say 
the office has made a big contribu- 
tion toward building popular sup- 
port fa US. actions m Central 
America and as such it could prove 
to be the model fa building sup- 
port fa controversial U.S. involve- 
ments in other parts of the world. 

The office’s budget figure does 


Botha Rejects New Trial 
For Radical Black Poet 


not include the salaries of eight 
professional staff members, who 
are on loan from the Defense De- 
partment, the U.S. Information 
Agency and the Agency for Inter- 
national Development as well as 
the State Department, according to 
John D. Blacken, its deputy direc- 
tor. 

Nor does it include travel ex- 
penses for those making many of 
the hundreds of speeches delivered 
last year. These expenses often are 
paid by the group that requested a 
speaker. 

The money went fa clerical 
help, for a Wang computer system 
to keep track of available speakers 
and publications, fa other travel 
and for the cost of printing and 
distributing the mountain of paper 
the office produces, Mr. Blacken 
said. 

Colonel Lany Tracy of the UJS. 
Army, who said he has made 200 
:bes in tbe past 20 months for 


“Public diplomacy is basically a 
new concept in the way foreign 
policy is made.” he said. “The 'pub- 
tic affairs office' is traditionally re- 
active to the news. There’s never 
beat an office that tries to educate 
the public the way we do.” 

He added, “I would like to see an 
office like this become a permanent 
pan of the diplomatic process, one 
for each area of the world.” 

Colonel Tracy said he prefers to 
speak to audiences that are hostile 
a made up of students in order to 
Stimulate debate and to find out 
what people's concerns are. As a 
result of such listening, he said, the 
office has given new emphasis to 
“moral issues” such as why it is 
proper to back militaiy assaults by 
guerrillas against the leftist Sandin- 
ist government of Nicaragua. 

The office’s directa. Otto J. 
Reich, 39. is a Cuban -American 
who was formerly assistant admin- 


look pains to deny published re- 
ports that their office selectively 
leaks documents to chosen report- 
ers boosting the administration's 
view. But sometimes the office will 
provide documents to friendly or- 
ganizations, which then leak tbe 
papers themselves. 

One example was a frankly 
worded secret report from the Cu- 
ban government to its international 
creditors, which Mr. Reich ac- 
knowledged he had provided to the 
Cuban- American National Foun- 
dation in May. Tbe foundation 
provided tbe document to reporters 
in June, citing a European banker 
as its source. 

The office's publications are of- 
ten the product of interagency co- 
operation engineered by Mr. 
Reich’s team and is edited fa polit- 
ical effect 


to delay a new round of peace talks feasible that developing nations 
among the frfon«K» Forces, the should have no other options than 
Druze-led Progressive Socialist recession a stagnation in the next 


Party, and AmaL the Shii te Mos- 
lem militia 

Delegates from to three militias 
were to have held a fourth round of 
talks in Damascus on Tuesday, but 
by early afternoon the Christians 
were still holding peace talks 
among themselves in Beirut. 

Mr. Hbbeika said on Sunday 
that the Syrian-sponsored talks 
were “a crucial turning pant” fa 
Lebanon and indicated he was 
ready fa an eventual end to the 
confessional system giving Chris- 
tians a predominant position in the 
state. 


15 or 20 years. 

“There is no durable solution to 
tbe foreign debt problem,” Mr. 
Mitterrand said, “without a high 
and sustained growth of the world 
economy ref orms in the inter- 
national monetary system.” 



Francois Mitterrand 


Hungary Bars Rights Group Meeting 


BUDAPEST (AP) — The authorities said. Tbesday they would not 

Helsinki Fcd» 


authorize a symposium by the in ternational Helsinki Federation for 
Human Rights, a group set up to tnonita application of the- Helsinki 

F inal Art. Rift organizers mM the meeting wnwMhe firiri ax planned tn a 

private house. ' 

The two-day meeting of the group was to have been held in a hold, but 
federation members said that die authorities had abruptly eannefrd their 
Other Christian leaders arc an- conference room reservations and had declared the symposium unantho- 
gry that Mr. Hobeika's men alone nzed. The federation is made np of haupio-rightsoveisight agairinifioBs 

3 resent their community at the in 10 Western countries. It says it also represents to interests of OKrit 
s and oppose concessions. groups in the Soviet bloc. 

nmiuwii „ Tto meeting was to comrade wiffi to Cdtural Fomin, involving to35 

A September report called “Rev- Camille Chamoun. countries who signed the Helsinki Final Act, winch opened Tuesday. The 

ution Bevond Our Bordets.” fa president and a senior Umstian cix-w-ek Cultural Forum is an out grow t h of the 1975 Final AcL which 


) 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Presi- 
dent Pieter W. Botha of South Afri- 
ca has tamed down a request fa a 
retrial of a black poet convicted of 
murdering a policeman, tbe poet's 
lawyer said Tuesday. 

Unless Mr. Botha commutes the 
death sentence imposed on Benja- 
min Moloise, he win be hanged 
Friday in Pretoria’s central prison, 
according to bis lawyer, Priscilla 
Jana. The execution would take 
place despite international appeals 
for clemency, including one from 
the United Nations Security Coun- 
cil. 

Mr. Moloise’ s mother, Pauline, 
has said that be will go to the gal- 
lows singing a freedom song prais- 
ing to African National Congress 
and its exiled leader, Oliver 
Tambo. 


Leading white businessmen and 
white opposition leaders have trav- 
eled in recent weeks to ijtsaka, 
Zambia, where the guerrilla organi- 
zation has its headquarters, to meet 
with senia figures from the organi- 
zation. Tbe African National Con- 
gress has been banned in South 
Africa fa 25 years. 

The meetings have angered Mr. 
Botha, who has called than disloy- 
al. 

Mr. Moloise, 30, was convicted 
in September 1983 of murdering a 
black policeman, PhiHipus Selepe, 
near Pretoria in 1982. 

At his trial, he initially denied 
involvement in the kflUng but 
changed his testimony later to say 
be had been present when it took 
place and had been under pressure 
from tbe African National Con- 
gress. Aft. Moloise also said he was 
a supporter of the organization and 


r enes in tee past 20 months for , W1 *> was jorawny asusuuu «unm- oiuoon oeyona uur noraera, jot r S~y stx-weat cultural i*oram a an outgrowth ot me tmai Ad, w men 

office, said to idea fa the istrata erf the Agency for Interna- example, quotes Nicaragua's in ten- P° U “°^ Q ' . 1 c T?° e . ™ defines goals on issues of security, disarmament, economic <x»perafiadfj& 

office grew out of the U.S. ex peri - tional Development for Latin or minister, Tom&s Borge Marti- JP* comessionai system ana oynan human righurin Eur ope. 

■ -- * — ’ tut e l a g e over Lebanon. ' _ 

Irish l*ublic Workers Call First Strike 


ence in Vietnam. 

“It was a serious error in Viet- 
nam to have no effort io build pop- 
ular support fa the war," Colonel 
Tracy said. “We could have worked 
better with the press to produce a 
more realistic view. 


America. nez, as saying in a 1981 speech: 

He travels frequently to Europe “This revolution goes beyond our 


and Central America to meet with 
officials, seeking their views and 
arguing in favor of the U.S. posi- 
tion. 

Mr. Reich and Colonel Tracy 


borders." But it ignores his next 
sentence: “This does not mean we 
expon our revolution. It is suffi- 
cient that they follow our exam- 
ple.” 


knows how it will end.” 


Asian Crime Gangs Are on Rise, U.S. Panel Finds 


The development came amid acknowledged helping in the plan- 
con tinned violence in nonwhite ar- tnng of the ambush m which the 
ea s In one of the worst single inci- policeman was slain. However, he 
dents reported in recent weeks, the denied that he fired the shots that 
police said that three men of mixed killed the officer, 
race were killed in a Cape Town In August, a judge granted a stay 

suburb <xi Tuesday when to police erf execution for Mr. Moloise on the 


opened fire after the men stoned a 
truck. Three other persons were 
wounded and 10 were arrested on 
charges of public violence. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Botha con- 
demned a group of white university 
students who said Tuesday that 
they planned a meeting later this 
month with members of to out- 
lawed African National Congress 
in 7nmhi» 


Vfc* er 



( AVENUE IDUISE 
l INTERIM 

207. fwaut lnulse-IBO Brussels 


ground that there was new evidence 
showing that be was under extreme 
psychological pressure when the 
iriiling took plarc. 

On Sept. 10. Miss Jana asked fa 
a retrial but was told by govern- 
ment officials on Tuesday that her 
request had been turned down by 
Mr. Botha. Technically, Mr. Botha 
still may offer clemency before to 
Friday execution. 

According to official figures, 115 
people were executed fa criminal 
offenses in South Africa last year. 


By Philip Shcnon 

JVw York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — A presiden- 
tial commission has reported that 
Asian organized crime groups 
threatened to become “fixtures m 
America’s mainstream economy in 
much the same fashion as the Ma- 
fia has become.” 

Groups in Japan and Taiwan are 
beginning to “corrupt legitimate 
segments of American society” and 
can operate in a fashion “every bit 
as sophisticated as La Cosa Nos- 
tra,” according to to panel Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan's Commission 
on Organized Crane. 

Federal officials have linked 
Asian crime groups to gambling 
extortion, prostitution, and murder 
in to United States. 

In a statement described as the 
preliminary findings erf its two-year 
investigation into organized crime, 
to commission also reported that 
the Mafia would have trouble re- 
cruiting new members in the Unit- 
ed States because of recent law- 


Dnarte Daughter Called Safe 

The Associated Press 

SAN SALVADOR — Archbish- 


enforcement efforts. The chairman 
of the commission is Judge Irving 
R. Kaufman of the U.S. Court of 
Appeals in New York. 

The panel's nine-page statement 
was released at a briefing for mem- 
bers of tbe Italian Parliamentary 
Commission on tbe Mafia, which 
was created by the Italian govern- 
ment in 1982 and is visiting the 
United States as part of its wok. 
The statement also made these 
points: 

• The American Mafia is work- 
ing closely with its Sicilian counter- 
part in heroin trafficking 

• The Sicilian Mafia, although 
expanding its efforts in the United 
States, has so far not become inti- 
mately involved in legitimate busi- 
ness a in labor unions. 

• Spain has emerged as the pri- 
mary point of entry fa cocaine 
beaded for Europe, and Italian 
crime figures are sending much of 
their money through Spam to hide 
its source. 

• Prosecutors must expand their 
efforts to isolate the Mafia's “life- 
support systems,” such as corrupt 
lawyers or financial institutions. 

According to the commission's 
statement, Asian organized crime 
groups, including the Yakuza of 


in the United States that law-en- 
forcement pressure placed on orga- 
nized crime groups in other coun- 
tries” encourages those groups to 
operate in the United States, the 
statement said. 

Tbe statement said to recent ar- 
rests of members of the Yakuza in 
Hawaii “who sought to exchange 
SI million dollars of heron fa 

handguns and rocket launcher s** 

showed that Asian criminals were 
moving into the United States. Tbe 
weapons were fa use in a gang war. 
the statement said. 

Bamboo Gang members arrested 
recently in New York and Califor- 
nia on heron trafficking charges 
might have come io the United 
States “as a response to pressure 
being placed upon this organiza- 
tion by Taiwanese law enforce- 
ment,” the statement said. 

At the briefing, James D. Har- 
mon, to commission’s executive 
director, said that the 24 families of 
the American Mafia had been bad- 
ly damaged by recent prosecutions. 
According to federal officials, 
those prosecutions have involved 
members of every maja family in 
La Cosa Nostra, as the Mafia is 
sometimes called. 

“Because of recent successes of 
law enforcement,” Mr. Hannon 


peace talks, Mr. Geagea said that 

to fighting would not be repeated. DUBLIN (Reuters) — Ireland was hit Tuesday by its first strike of 
A Christian political source said: public service workers. Sdiools and courts and most aupots were dosed 
“Hobdka won this round. No one and virtually no business was coodncted at gover n ment offices 

Unions estimated that ISQjOOQ people Jiad stayed away from their jobs 
during to 24-hour strike, and warned that tore would be further 
stoppages if the government refused to meet their demands. The police, 
who are forbidden by law from striking, were working. 

The unions want the goveriunent to did a freeze on pay fa public 
workers; to reappoint apubfic service arbitrator, apart recently dissolved 
by to government of rriroc Minister Garret FitzGerald, and to honor 
arbitration and Laba Court pay awards. The government has refused to 
pay to 10-percent pay increase awarded by to court to teachers. 


The Polish government mid Tuesday tot 78JK percent of Pbland's 26 ^ , 


United States, “the Saffian Mafia 
is not entrenched in Intimate 
business or in labor unions in this 

country," to statement said, add- m . -i n l 

mg, “The money earned by to Si- Jl OF 1116 ttCCGTfl. 
dban Mafia appears to leave the 

dfeiWe voters cast ballots in parliamentary elections on Smday, 
but Lech Walesa, leader of the banned Solidarity hba anion, said to 
ton not by way of transfer through tumoot was closer to 60 percent (AP) 

Switzerland. A lock wsfl that coHajsed Monday and is blocking all traffic through 

“The Sicilian Mafia is known to the St Lawrence Seaway w£D take several weeks to repair, Wlffiam A. 
resort to violence directed against O’Neil president of to seaway, said Tuesday. The seaway allows large 

ships to travel between to Great Lakes and to Atlantic Ocean. - (AP) 
Idris AMd WakR, 59, has been dented president of the island of 
Zanzibar, winning 61.5 percent of the vote in an election in winch he was 
unopposed, to electoral commission announced Tuesday in Dar es 
Salaam, Tanzania. He succeeds Afi Hassan Mwinyi, who has been chosen 
to replace Julios Nyerere as president of Tanzania. (Reuters) 

Lterians voted' Tuesday fa the first time since to military toedt power 
in 1980, with four parties officially permitted to contest fa to presiden- 
cy, the Senate and the House of Representatives. (AP) 


law enforcement, members of to 
judiciary, as wdl as members of the 
Italian PariiarDent when it serves 
their purposes,” it said. “Any such 
action hoe in to United States by 
to American La Cosa Nostra 
would be unthinkable.” 

The statement did not elaborate 
on this point. 


Emil Gilels, Soviet Pianist, Dies at 68 


88 of them black, two white, 24 of op Arturo Rivera y Damas said Japan and to Bamboo Gang of 

mixed race and one of Indian de- Monday tot he has received assur- Taiwan, are advancing in theranks SSytrinrf^ diflk-d? ufreouit 

of U.S. organized crime. 


scent 



***** 


HOTEL METROPOLE 
GENEVE 

A PRIVILEGED PLACE 
Tbe only Grand Hotel located in 
tbe heart of Geneva’s business 
and shopping center 

34 Qom Cfadnl Cnfau 
1211 Geneva 3 
TeU 022/211.13.44 
Telex; 421550 


an ces that President Jos£ Napoleon 
Duarte’s daughter, Ines Guadalupe 
Duarte Durln, 35, has not been 
harmed by the guerrillas who kid- 
napped her last month, according 
to a church spokesman. 


Federal officials have said tot 
these groups could someday be- 
come more powerful »ban tbe Ma- 
fia. 

“It has been the experience here 



*t tnu «no* 

BniI 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

Fw Lite. AcadtBic tr Wort Experience 

Degrees for people who want to be more effective 

tml Mcwt tn thiifJobfl or Prolwsions. 

a BACHELOR'S. MASTERS c DOCTORATE 

Dv widi/m? rtw I<4t «nd «i0Mc« C eau.. 4 >rM 

l«l» -ow* 10 b "’■•■•lar* ngmirej •iousim) 1 

COUI4*v h frftail WflPfWCrt /ite «f£crpl <(•<!«?« 

rvinr ****** T®r*n -j© ’riuiini 

Ou* TV***'*) rw'wwtfTT'iwtf irw rchwttfnreH^ 
RtdKRjuwr* itawPAv/ row •'iCv»D*flii«q vqu* jEtfr* 
■•wramni ncbfluJioma, cW*.w. o* '.rm.nar^ jt r ;. u » 


fttuneon ■ 
c«r otuau™ 


‘ JT.-5 j; Jdwn.,: rerecr ic J 


Pacific Western University 

SCMVMB StVO. LSI Aowta. CoBforala 96M* - Dipt. B . OiA. 


new members because law enforce- 
ment has shown the ability to indict 
and bring to trial to leadership.” 

But the commission said tot to 
federal government still had much 
to do. Tbe relatively recent arrival 
of members of to Sicilian Mafia 
has added to to concern. 

“Within the past several years. 
United States law enforcement has 
detected elements rf Sicilian Mafia 
families working closely with to 
American La Cosa Nostra in the 
area of heroin trafficking,” the 
panel said in its statement. 

The commission’s investigation, 
which is scheduled to end next 
year, has found tot tore are sig- 
nificant differences between to 
American and Sicilian crime 
groups. 

Unlike its counterpart in to 


international Herald Tribune the cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, rankof the world's pianist*. As Mr. 

PARIS — Emil Gflds, one of to all of whan, like Mr. Gilds, be- Tanbman wrote in 1955: “His tone 

most celebrated pianists of to last came familiar concert and record- is as solid as his -* — : •- 

ing artists in the West. 

Mr. Gilds’s UB. debut was 

made in Philadelphia, as soloist in Hie can make the (nano ring and he 
Tchaikovsky's Concerto in B fiat **"* *• *- ■’ — - 1 — * 

minor with Fngwm Ormandy and 
the Philadelphia Orc he stra. When 
the program was repeated the next 
night in New York, Howard Tank- 
man, who had heard him four years 
earlier in Florence, wrote in The 
New Yoric Times: “Last n igh t he 
swept away reservations about Us 
capacities as a poet To his bril- 
liance and temperament, he has 
added warmth and delicacy.” 

He was bon into a nma^al fam- 
ily in Odessa, on the Black Sea, and oT . , . ; 

studied at to conservatories^ there ““H“ y ^^“ed aviatton photog- 
and in Moscow. In 1933-he won af ter a long jflncss, 

fast prize in to^ All-Russia. Music^ ’ Mem P Iu s, lamessee. 

Competition, followed by a second Major Itausa] Edwin Bliss 

prize in a competition m Vienna in Wheeler of to U.S. Marine Comr 
1936, and to top prize in to Bros- 67, cominandinft general 
sds competition. in 1938. , First Marine Divisionln 

He was astern with stib - ^ it to late 1960s. Mondai^n 
by fingers and a shock of sandy heart attack in Dallas. J 

w . _ _ _ hair that fefl over Us face as he . Rkky WBson, 32. guiiaWcr ^ 

them the violinist David Oisoakh, played, but be hada powerful tech- rock group B^s, SMurd^rf 
to pianist Sviatoslav Richter, and mque that kept mm at -to front cer m New York. * 


three decades, died Monday in 
Moscow, according to an official of 
to Moscow Conservatory. Mr. Gi- 
lds, who would have been 69 Satur- 
day, was due to embark next week, 
on a concert tour in Europe. 

There was no indication of to 
cause of Us death, but the pianist’s 
agent in Geneva repeated that to. 
tour was canceled earlier by to 
Soviet concert agency because Mr. 
Gilds bad been hospitalized with a 
kidney ailment 

Mr. Gilds first came to interna- 
tional attention when Ik performed 
in Italy in 1951. When be made his 
U.S. debut in 1955, he was said tc 
have been to first important Sovi- 
et musician to go to the United 
States to perform concerts since 
Sergti Prokofiev in 1921. 

His first U-S. tour was to divi- 
dend of a Soviet-American diplo- 
matic rapprochement, and he was 
followed in subsequent seasons by 
other outstanding Soviet perform- 
ers of the same generation, _anic»g 


physique with its ^ 
peasant sturdiness. IBs fingers 
have boundless agility and contraL 
» can make to piano ring and he 
can cause it to thunder; it bends to 

hiswilL” 

His daughter, Elena, also is a 
well-known pianist and father and 
daug ht er sometimes performed 
and rec o r d ed together. 

■ Other deaths: 

. Dqdock, 77, to British 
jaagewho save his name to North- 
ern Irdands much reviled no-jurv 
courts, Monday in London. 

Hans Grfinhaff, 78, an intema- 


can- 







Ki^ht* Oroapi: 


ft 


r" sz~$> 

im 




.INTERNATIONAL Hire AT I) TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 16, 1985 


Page 3 


American TOPICS [Revision of U.S. Pensions Moves Through Congress 






HUGE LOSER — Waype Hackney and his son, Brian, 
4, showing off a pumpkin weighing dose to 500 pounds 
that was grown on their farm in New Milford, Connecti- 
cut They entered toe giant pumpkin in toe World 
Pumpkin Confederation Weigb-Off at CoHiiis, Massa- 
chusetts, but were edged out by a 515.4-pound behemoth 
that was entered by Scott Cufiy of Sharon, Connecticut. 


A Washington Club 
For Ex-Speechwriters 

Lincoln drafted his own Get- 
tysburg Address, but Calvin 
Coolidge was the first president 
to have an official speech writer. 
Or so says Wiliam Satire, the 
col umnist for The New York 
Times. He says the speechwriler 
was Judson WdHver, whom 
Mr. Safire credits for . Coo-, 
lidge’s “eloquence." 

It is not dear whether Mr. 
Wellrver was responsible for 
Coolidge’ s remark that “when 
more and more people .are 
thrown out of work, unemploy- 
ment results. ” la any case, Mr. 
Safire, a former speechwriler 
for Richard M. Nixon, and 
Hendrick Hertzberg, who wrote 
speeches for Jimmy Carter, 
have organized a Jndson Wd- 
liver Society of former presi- 
dential speedwriters; L .‘ 

The- organizational : meeting 
this month al Mr. Satire's home 
brought out about TO former 
presidential speechwriters. Per- 
haps because speechwriters sel- 
dom get the opportunity, there 
was considerable speechmak- 
ing. 

ThcrWashrngtou Post reports 
that dark Clifford,, who wrote 
speeches for Harry Truman, 
summed up the speech writer- 
president relationship when he 
said that whenever a speech- 
writer goes in to review a pro- 
jected speech by a president, the 
first thmg the president — ? any 
president — always asks is, 
“Who the hell scheduled this?” 


Short Takes 

Tired of bearing people's ex- 
cuses for not- showing up in 
church, the Reverend Gene 
Garrison of Oklahoma Gt/s 
First Baptist Church stocked a 
fountain with fish and banded 
out rods and reds to people 
who would rather be where ‘The 
fish are biting” than contem- 
plating the wages of sin. Cots 
were provided for those-, who 
like to sleep late. Pews in front 
were reserved for those who 
said they could never see or 
hear what was going on. Two 
doctors were enlisted for people 
who might feel too 31 to attend. 


And how many came? Mr. Gar- 
rison said his 1,300-seai church 
was nearly filled ' 

The Easton Airlines hourly 
shuttle between New York and 
Washington is in its 25th year 
of guanuneed seats with no res- 
ervations and on-board ticket- 
ing. Easton expected to drum 
up publicity the day a single 
passenger would be left over 
from a full Highland then flown 
in lonely splendor in a backup 
plane. The first time this hap- 
pened, the puMfliy r “f 
won't do it. You people must be 
crazy— using a whole crew and 
plane to take one guy to Wash- 
ington.” Over toeyears just five 
flights have carried a angle pas- 
senger. 

Nicknaming i-r imiiM h helps 
lead ip their capture, according 
. to Jhe police departmentin San 
Jose, California, which has 
practiced name-calling for de- 
cades. Sergeant Larry Dan- 
dreams up most of the nick- 
names, . like ‘‘Hollywood,” 
“Wigs” and “The Thriller Ser- 
geant Dair say: “Without a 
name, a detective calls & guy 
something like the ‘5-foot- II- 
inch, 160-pound gny who 
robbed the convenience suae 
three weeks ago.’ That can get 
confuting fast It’s a lot easier 
Go say “Ihe Bandanna Bandit’ - 
and have an image in mind.** 

Hialeah Race Coarae in Flor- 
ida has had problems with fla- 
mingos from the start The first 
flock imported from Cuba 50 
years ago to adorn the infield of 
the new trade promptly took 
.wing and flew, back to Havana. 
The next gamp of birds had 
their wings dipped and all was 
well until toe mid-1970s, when 
state officials changed the win- 
ter racing dates to rainy spring- 
time. Thu . conflicted with the 
flamingos' mating season and 
no birds were boro for a decade. 
The New York Times reports 
that the trade finally devised a 
sprinkling system uut fooled 
the birds into believing that the 
rainy season had begun. Mating 
and hatching have resumed. 


ARTHUR HIGB 


VOA Beaming New Shaw 
On U.S. to West Europe 


;.t. 


Rouen 

BONN — The Voice of America, 
which U. funded by the United 
^ 'States government, began , a new 
it -24-hour broadcast to Western Eu- 
q! jljf rope on Tuesday to counter what 
™ ■*. Washington feared wore “miscon- 

ceptions^ about America among 

- European youth. ■ 

. * Diaries Z. Wick, director of toe 

U.S. Information Agency, said, 

. , . • “VOA-Enrope will help correct the 

information deficit about the U.S. 
. among mflHons of young people 

y ’ who have grown up since world 
: -“Warn.” 

... The new service, called 

. . ' • VOA- Europe, marks the tost. time 
in 25 years that the radio network, 

’ . which is run by US1A, has targeted 

programs at Western Europe. 

... " Mr. Wick said that young people 

'. i ' ‘ -“may have misconceptions about 
our' country and people, a dding 
.“Some may not understand how 
. fully we share culture, vahies, tradi- 
• _ tions and a commitment to the 

common defense of freedom." _ - 
- _ Franz Stainer, a representative 

- Jj " of the Greens party in West Ger- 
*> j . many, said. “Of course, we view toe 
-:; r .j v / new broadcast as propaganda, with 

. ' a political aim.” • 

■ ?: The new service, starting in En- 

^giish, will blend news, commen- 
. « ** tary, music and emertmnment with 

: . ' ~ what Frank Scott, the VGA direo- 


. Comfi&by Our SicJJ FronDispcidia. 

WASHINGTON —Congress is 
wmking to enact a less edn^ and 
less extensive retirement system to 
replace toe 65 -year-old Qvfl Ser- 
vice pension plan for federal work- 


In the Senate, a proposal already 
has beeuapproved by toe Govera- 
«nenriil Affairs Committee,. and 
passage by toe full chamber is ex- 
pected this month. Another ver- 
sion, considered more ge ne rou s to 
federal workers, was introduced in 
toe House of Representatives this 
week, and quick approval there 

-also is expected. 

Two factors have led Congress u> 
revise toe current plan. 

Since Jan. 1, 1984, newly hired 
federal waters have been required 
to partiapale in Social Security as 
part of government efforts to keep 
that pension and disability system 
solvent. 

At the same time, there has been 
pressure from tbs Reagan adminis- 
tration to curtail the cost of federal 
workers' pensions in an. era ' of re- 
cord federal bucket deficits. 

Since 1920, the CmlSexvice Re- 
tirement System has provided such 
comfortable coverage that il is con- 


sidered one of the most attractive 
features of government employ- 
ment. 

Retirees receive an annual pen- 
sion according to a formula based 
on toe average pay of their three 
highest-earning years. 

The plan also provides for cost- 
of-living increases to match rises in 
the Consumer Trice Index and al- 
lows a worker with 30 years of 
service to retire at age 55 with full 
annuity. 

The bffl approved by toe Senate 
Governmental Affairs Committee 
is sponsored by Senators Ted Ste- 
vens, a Republican of Alaska, and 
William V. Roth, a Republican of 
Delaware. 

It would give toe 2.6 milli on fed- 
eral workers hired in 1983 or earlier 
the choice of staying in toe current 
re tirement plan, while continuing 
io pay 7 percent of tbexr salaries 
into toe Gvil Service retirement 
fund, or transferring into one of 
two new options. They would have 
until Dec 31, 1987, to make a 
choice. 

Workers hired on or after Jan. 1, 
1984, would have to choose one of 
the new options and pay the Social 
Security payroll tax, currently 7_05 
percent Both new options would 


provide smaller Civ3 Service bene- 
fits than the current program. 

Under one option, workers 
would contribute nothing toward 
Gvil Service but would have to 
work until age 62 to get full retire- 
ment benefits. 

This option world allow federal 
workers to put as much as 10 per- 
cent of their salary into tax-de- 
ferred investments, with the gov- 
ernment matching the first 5 
percent. 

The other option would allow 
employees to contribute iJ per- 
cent of their salaries to toe federal 
pension fund and retire on full 
benefits at age 55 after 30 years’ 
service. It reduces the maximum 
employee tax-deferred contribu- 
tion to 6 percent and toe govern- 
ment share to 3 percent. 

Both options would base bene- 
fits on the employee’s highest aver- 
age salary over five years, and 
would limi t cost-of-living adjust- 
ments to two percentage points less 
than the Consumer Price Index. 

Federal employee unions argue 
that the plan is too stingy. 

“We want them to come up with 
something in time, kit we don't 
want a bag of garbage,” said Vin- 
cent R. Sombrotto, president of the 


27 1 ,000-member National Associa- 
tion of Letter Carnets. “What 
we’ve seen doesn’t gjve retirees 
enough protection against rises in 
toe cost-of-living." 

Jane McMichael, political direc- 
tor of toe American Federation of 
Government Employees, said of 
toe proposal for tax-deferred in- 
vestment, “Thai favors higher-paid 
executives, but the defined benefit 
plan still has to be more generous.” 

The workers are likely to receive 
a more sympathetic hearing in the 
House Post Office and Gvil Service 
Committee. Its chairman. Repre- 
sentative W illiam D. Ford, a Dem- 
ocrat of Michigan, has joined in a 
proposal that offers more generous 
dv3 service benefits that either 
Senate option, although less than 
under toe current system. 

Under the bill introduced this 
week by Mr. Ford and Representa- 
tive Mary Rose Oakar, a Democrat 
of Ohio, wtxkezs could continue to 
retire on full benefit at age 55 after 
30 yeazs of service, at age 60 after 
20 years or at 62 after five years. 

The plan envisions a tingle plan 
for tax-deferred investment Cov- 
ered employes could invest up to 10 
percent of salary with another 3 


Pentagon Seeking Sweeping Change 
In Civil Service Pay , Grade Scales 


By Sandra Sugawara 

Wjshiagwe Pea Service 

WASHINGTON — The De- 
fense Department has asked Con- 
gress to adopt a sweeping proposal 
to replace toe federal avfl service 
pay system and grade scales with a 
pxy-lor-perfozmancc approach. 

A . document called “The Alter- 
native Federal Personnel Manage- 
ment Act of 1985,” released Sun- 
day by Representative Michael D. 
Barnes, a Democrat of Maryland, 
would give most agencies the au- 
thority to establish ibeir own classi- 
fication, pay and performance sys- 
tems. 

The agencies would be directed 
to give managers maximum flexi- 
bility to adjust salaries without the 
constraints of easting grade and 
step levels. . 

The Defense Department sent 
toe proposal to both bouses of 
Congress in June, along with a 
draft of a bin, according to Mr. 
Barnes. 

In' a letter to House Speaker 
Thomas P. O’Neill Jr., a Democrat 
of Massachusetts, the Defense De- 
partment argued that the pay-for- 
performance approach would en- 
able the government to attract and 
keep high quality and motivated 
stan. The Defense Department has 
had trouble with this in toe past. 


especially among engineers who are 
lured away to high paying jobs in 
private industry. 

The letter, from Deputy Defense 
Secretary William H. Taft 4th, 
wrote that the federal classification 
and pay system has remained rela- 
tively imriiauged since its passage 
in 1923. “Managers, personneEsts 
unrt employees tmH to agree 
toe administration of the system is 
cumbersome^ tedious and com- 
plex,” be wrote • 

The proposal was criticized by 
Mr. Barnes,, who said it “would 
politicize the' federal work force by 
allowing managers to reward politi- 
cal loyalists and penalize career 
federal employees.” 

Jt also was criticized by the Of- 
fice of Personnel Management, 
which supervises the federal job 
system. In a letter dated SepL 24. 
the office’s director, Constance 
Horner, said that the agency gener- 
ally supports a pay-for-perfor- 
mance approach, but objected to 
the Defense Department proposal 
because it would »linwn»w the 
agency’s control over the federal 
job system and disperse it among 
hundreds of smaller agencies. 

The Defense Department pro- 
posal is an extension of, pilot pro- 
jects that the U.S. Navy started in 
1980 at two research laboratories in 
Calif ornia, toe . Naval Weapons 


Center in China fake and the Na- 
val Ocean System <Vmer in San 
Diego. The experiment was de- 
signed to enable federal laborato- 
ries to compete with private indus- 
try in attracting, motivating and 
retaining qualified scientists and 
engineers. 

In the five-year experiment, 
overall salary costs have risen 5.6 
percent and new hire salaries have 
risen 11.2 percent at the two facili- 
ties. In a memorandum, the federal 
personnel office said the increase is 
“cause for concern if the system 
were expanded, in light of thepresi- 
dem’s pay freeze and the adminis- 
tration’s position on reducing the 
cost of government.” 



percent coming from toe govern- 
ment. 

■ Quick approval of the Ford-Oa- 
kar plan is expected both in com- 
mittee and in the full House. Dif- 
ferences between the two plans 
would be ironed out in a confer- 
ence committee. 

The Reagan administration sup- 
ports the Stevens-Roth proposal, 
with several reservations. Con- 
stance Horner, director of the Of- 
fice of Personnel Management, 
told a Senate subcommittee that 
the biS should allow retirement at 
age 55 for workers in physical jobs 
like law enforcement, should forbid 
the crediting of unused rick leave as 
service; and should replace toe tax- 
deferred investment plan with an- 
other savings plan with fewer tax- 
saving benefits. 

Legislators have set a deadline of 
Dec. 31 for enacting a new plan, 
and if this is not met, the approxi- 
mately 300,000 government em- 
ployees hired since Jan. 1, 1984, 
could be taxed for both toe Social 
Security and Civil Service retire- 
ment plans. This would amount to 
a payroll deduction of more than 
14 percent 

u Congress should miss the Dec. 
■31 deadline, it could extend the 
interim plan. But an aide to Mr. 
Stevens said that legislators might 
allow toe plan to expire in toe inter- 
ests of forcing a uniem compromise. 

(AP. J VP) 


leRot 


by Bww iww 



Lady'* watch, 
ultra-thin, 

quara. wanr-rMinsnt. 
Mat Mack treated stan 
and gold Maud. 

Tax-free for export 


Z7lrlontt-Cario u. 

3, avenue des Beaux- Arts 
MONTE-CARLO X 


Michael D. Barnes 


Among the riches of Beverly Hills, 
a little gem of a hotel. 


The Beverly Pavilion is one of two 
small, fashionable Beverly Hills hotels 
that are run In the European style, 
under the direct supervision or the 
proprietor himself. And we offer our jJL 
guests the ultimate Beverly Hills a 
experience: free II mo service to _ JB 
glorious Rodeo Drive. 




El Beverly Pavilion 

a Max BarU Hotel 

9360 W11shlreBhftL,Beverty Hills, CA 90212. Telex Ntx 691 366. 



AIDS Is Found to Devastate 
Brains of Some of Its Victims 


New Tor* Times Service 

NEW YORK — Evidence is 
mounting rapidly of a grim new 
dimension to acquired immune de-. 
fidency syndrome: The fatal dis- 
ease can devastate victims’ brains 
as well as their immune defense 
systems. According to doctors' esti- 
mates, 30 percent of AIDS patients 
also show symptoms of brain dis- 
ease or damage to the spinal cord. 

Some of these patients show 
dear signs of dementia, induding 
memory less, inability to plan or 
make decisions, and indifference to 
eveiythiug. Others develop partial 
paralysis, loss of mnsde coordina- 
tion or even, worse problems in con- 
trol of their bodies. 

These cases have often been puz- 
zling. The virus that causes AIDS 
has been thought to be specific in 
its onslaught, attacking key im- 


mune defense cells called T-4 lym- 
phocytes. While this attack cripples 
toe entire immunological system, 
there has been no reason to think 
toe destruction of these specialized 
cells causes damage to the brain. 

New evidence has now provided 
a persuasive explanation for some 
of the cases in which brain damage 
has occurred by showing that toe 
AIDS virus hsdf can infect brain 
cells and the central nervous sys- 
tem. 

■ LA. Education Program 

The Los Angeles school board 
has voted to begin teaching about 
AIDS in schools and to let physi- 
cians deride, on a case-by-case ba- 
sis, whether children with toe ill- 
ness should be permitted to attend 
classes, toe Los Angeles Times re- 
ported. 


tor for Europe, described as scenes 
from everyday Kfe of ordinary 
Americans. * 

Eventually, the service expected 
to broadcast in. German, Italian, 
French and Spanish, Mr. Scott 
said. He said it would start on cable 
in six West German cities and on 
FM radio in Paris. : 

Expansion to the rest of France, 
The Netherlands and Scandinavia 
is scheduled in toe near future, Mr. 

Scott added. 

He said the netwrei planned to 
cany major statements by ^Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and Secretary 
of State George P. Shnltz, plus 
commentary on Eurtqwan-XJS. is- 
sues. But he added that “one of the 
great needs we fed, here is to con- 
vey the nonpoEtical aspects of 
America." ■ 

-. - Concern over. a. rise in antnA- 
merican feding in Europe has been 
faded in recent years Vy'.demori- 
Strations against Washington’s for- 
eign .and defease pobries. 


BEST WINNING CHANCES WORLDWIDE! 


Now try the Lottery with only 
80,000 Tickets ***> 

IBbL 44,800 winners lUlL 

lip WINNING CHANCES: 1 :2 

Yes, only 80,000 tickets participate in the 121“ Austrian Lottery, 
bringing YOU ctoeer to BIG WINS like these: 

1st Prize: US $ 624,000.00 
2nd Prize: US $ 312,000.00 

3rd Prize: S 260,000.00 2 Prizes of $ 206,000.00 

2 Prizes of $156,000.00 2 Prizes of $104,000.00 

31 Prizes of $ 52,000.00 35 Prizes of $ 26,000.00 

PLUS 44,825 Other Cash Prizes up to $ 15,600.00 

Total Prize Money: $ 22,089,680.00 

• Your winning chances are the best worldwide, since one out ol 
every two tickets wins at least the cost of the ticket 

• AD winnings paid out tax-free in any currency, anywhere. 

• For your protection, the Austrian Lottery Ls under strict govern* 
ment control 

Mato a date with lucid Order now, using coupon below, your 
tfeketfs) for die 121“ Austrian National Lottery 


PROHOPP INTERNATIONAL 

the offi cial distributor tor the. Austrian National Lottery. 


29 Mariahflfer Str. 


A-1061 Vienna, Austria. 


U.S. Rapist to Pay $5 Million' f £££$[] 


L_J Ptease send 

--.—.-.mi ticketfs) at USS 438.00 each 

Half tickets) at US S 219.00 each 

Wjj^ Quarter tickets) at US S 109.50 each 

vafid for aff 22 We ekly Drawings of the 121" Austrian National 
Lottery beginning Nov. 11", 1985. F0r the malting of all winning 
fists, I add US S 12 for Overseas Airmail Postage (or US S 8 within 
Europe). " 1 ' lW ' 1 ' ■ ' lB_ 

I enclose total payment of US $ _ — 

with check payable to J. Prokopp. 


Tie Asso ci ated Pros 
NEW YORK -i- Steven 
Dculsch, 37, a wealthy Park Ave- 
nue businessman, convicted of rape 
and kidnapping. , has bees ordered 

.to pay his victim' $S nriffion for her 


Please send Anther information. 


• Address — 

% CUyfCountry nrn[a< ZT - 2P 

jl - oneeeo im tu e n yj . 

OMORROW* MAIL TODAY • WIN TOMORROW • MAIL TO 





e£ ■%. 






Page 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 


Reagan Refuses to Grant an Apology 
To Egypt Over Plane Interception 




V* 7—-.~ 


(Continued from Page 1) 
tus and was brought to Damascus 
for an autopsy and identification. 

Mr. Speakes said that he could 
not confirm that the body was that 
of Mr. Klinghoffer. 

The spokesman added that the 
United States also has “made 
known to all governments in the 
region our views on the situation 
and that we will continue to be 


Attorney General Edwin Meese 
3d and other administration offi- 
cials said Monday that the United 
States would continue efforts to 
apprehend Mr. Abbas. 


“There is no safe haven as far as 
we’re concerned," the attorney gen- 
eral said. “Well pursue Mr. Abbas 
as we would any other fugitive," 


that they had issued arrest warrants 
for three more persons in the hi- 
jacking of the AchHIe Lauro, in 
addition to the four Palestinians in 

custody. Reuters reported from 

Rome. 


keenly interested in the apprehen- 
sion" of Mr. Abbas. 


Although Reagan administra- 
tion officials have maintained that 


they have transcripts of radio con- 
versations during the hijacking that 
implicate Mr. Abbas, one official 
said Monday that sucb documents 
would not be released. But admin- 
istration officials have said the in- 
formation bas been provided to the 
Italians and the Yugoslavs as part 
of the U-S. case for his arrest and 
detention. 


15 Dead in U.S. Copter Crash 

United Pros International 

JACKSONVILLE. North Caro- 
lina — A U.S. Marine helicopter on 
a combat exercise crashed on take- 
off Tuesday from the USS Guadal- 
canal an assault helicopter ship, 
and sank into the Atlantic. An offi- 
cial said that IS of the 19 men 
aboard drowned. 


I Three Palestinians Accused 
The authorities said Tuesday 


Reagan, Weinberger Discussed Plans 
For Jet Interception on Open Radio 


New York Times Servue 


WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan and Defense Secre- 
tary Caspar W. Weinberger laid 
plans to intercept an Egyptian air- 
liner last week over an open radio 
that would have been audible to 
ham radio operators over a wide 
area, according to Pentagon and 
White House officials. 


A White House official said 
Monday that it was decided not to 
use a coded communications link 
because “time was of the essence.” 
Mr. Reagan and Mr. Weinberger 
were both airborne, and the coding 
machines in their planes were not 


compatible wi thorn time-consum- 
ing adjustments. 

The conversation become known 
after the brother of an amateur 
radio operator in Chicago called 
CBS News in New York. The caller 
said his brother had listened in as 
Mr. Reagan ordered that navy F- 1 4 
fighter pilots do “whatever it 
takes” to stop the airliner carrying 
the four hijackers of an Italian 
cruise ship, including firing a warn- 
ing shot if necessary. No shots were 
reported. 

CBS News editors said the tim- 
ing of the telephone call, hours be- 
fore the announcement of the inter- 
ception, gave the story credibility. 


Of the three, one has been de- 
tained in Genoa, where the ship’s 

cruise began. The authorities would 

not say u the other two also were 
detained already. 

In custody was a man identified 
as Kalaf Mohammed Zainab. who 
was detained on Sept. 28 for hold- 
ing two false passports. Magis- 
trates said he had been charged in 
the hijacking. 

An official said that the other 
two were a man who bought the 
ship tickets for the hijackers and 
another who is believed to have 
been part of the commando but 
who disembarked at Alexandria, 
Egypt, before the vessel was seized. 

The four hijackers who were 
aboard the Egyptian plane have 
been moved from Sicily to a maxi- 
mum-security prison at Spoleto. 

■ 2 Seized With Explosives 

Two .Arabs were arrested in 
Rome on Tuesday with bombs 
which one of them said were in- 
tended to be used against Ameri- 
cans and Israelis. Reuters reported, 
quoting the police. 

One was arrested at the Rome 
airport and the other at the central 
train terminaL Both had bombs in 
their lugg3ge. 



NATO Asks US. to Offer 
A New Arms Initiative 

Embracing Soviet Ideas 


By William Drozdiak 
lantic allies urged the United I Sum ^ 


on T uesday to come up with anns 

control initiatives that would ip- 


worth of arms control. 

Several European ministers 


STS di from the stressed during the four-hour a* 
Soviet leadership’s latest proposals, sitra that the United Stats. should 


The allies want a new initiative assume an active posture before the 
to enhance prospects for a success- summit meeting by seeking new 


ful meeting next month between ground for compromise in aims 

president Ronald Reagan and the control and not permit the soviet 


Soviet leader, M&hafl S. Gorba- Union to gain the upper band in ^ 
chev, and early progress in the Ge- public opinion as the superpower ™ 

* r t_ tn nrKmhno nMi 


neva negotiations on nuclear and most committed to presenting new 


space weapons. 


to break the stalemate in Gc- 


Secretary of State George P. neva. 

Shultz, consulting here with 10 of ^ Shultz said he shared the 


NATO’s 16 foreign ministers, also a jjj es * qualified optimism, although 
picked up strong backing from the ^ other senior administration 
allies for a “narrow interpretation 


offi cials have warned about the 


SOCIALISTS CONFER — Leopold Gratz. Austria's foreign minister and a Socialist 
Party leader, and Willy Brandt of West Germany, president of Socialist International. 


Party leader, and Willy Brandt of West Germany, president of Socialist International, 
began a two-day meeting of Socialist leaders Tuesday in Vienna. In his address, Mr. 
Brandt assailed conservative positions on rights violations in South Africa. 


of the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile “fine print” lying beneath the basic 
Treaty in the way the United Slates offer f 0 cut nuclear ars enals 


Planning Chief Named to Politburo 


pursues its research program on ^ half 

spa» weapons. “There are things that are inter- 


proach to compliance with the ac- 
cord last week, even though some 
U.S. policy-makers had argued that 


to get going. 

Several ministers, led by Hans- 
Dietrich Genscher of West Germa- 


Reagan’s Rating 
With Blacks Is Up 


New York Times Service 


Always the superb choice 



Beverly Wilshire Hotel 


Wifshire Boulevard ai Rodeo Drive. Beverly Hills. Calif. 90212 
1213)275-4282 Telex 698-220 


c lhe : l5adinifHotcbafth£WMdz 


London (01)583-3050 
Frankfurt (069)2904 71 
Hong Kong (5) 2? II 42 




London (01 ) 409-0814 
Frankfurt *069) 28 75 24 
Hong Kong (3) 68 23 35 


WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan’s approval rating 
among blacks has increased signifi- 
cantly since he took office, al- 
though most still disapprove of the 
way he is handling his job. accord- 
ing to polls conducted by The New 
York Times and CBS News. 

This year 28 percent of Ameri- 
can blacks said they approved of 
Mr. Reagan's performance, up 
from 10 percent in 1982, during a 
recession and cuts in social pro- 
grams. A large majority of blacks, 
60 percent, still disapprove of Mr. 
Reagan's job performance, but this 
is down from a high of 76 percent 
disapproval in 1982. 

Some analysts attribute the rise 
in Mr. Reagan's standing among 
blacks in general to a better econo- 
my, even though unemployment 
among blacks is about 15 percent, 
twice the national average. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
speech, the general secretary made 
ii clear that the party would drop 
many of the promises included in 
the 1961 edition, drafted under Ni- 
kita S. Khrushchev. 

Khrushchev’s party program 
vowed to “sweep imperialism away 
and bury iL" 

It listed a series of specific eco- 
nomic goals that would be reached 
in the following two decades, and 
said that communism would be 
achieved by 1980. A C ommunis t 
society, it said, would far outstrip 
VJS. industry, provide free housing 
and free transportation and elimi- 
nate hard physical labor. 

Under Leonid I. Brezhnev, the 
party recognized that Communism 
had not been achieved, but became 
mired in a debate over whether the 
Soviet Union was in a state of “real 
socialism” or “developed social- 
ism." 

“In enriching and developing the 
content of the program," Mr. Gor- 
bachev said, “we have at the same 
time critically reassessed those of 
its formulations which have not 
stood the test of lime.” 

He said die program “should be 
an exact formulation of the real 
process, explicitly spell out the 
main views and political objectives, 


be free from excessive details, 
groundless fantasies and bookish 
subtleties.” 

The party also approved a series 
of amendments to the party’s orga- 
nizational rules, but they were not 
published Tuesday. 

The elevation of Mr. Talyzin as a 
nonvoting Politburo member was 
an honor that had not been accord- 
ed his predecessor as head of Gos- 
plan. Nikolai K. Baibakov. 

It reflected Mr. Talyzin’s stature 
in the Gorbachev administration 
and suggested a more influential 
role for the p lanning agency. 


With his broad technical and bu- 
reaucratic experience, Mr. Talyzin 
■ is typical of the men who have won 
promotion under Mr. Gorbachev. 
A former communications minis- 
ter, he gained diplomatic, econom- 
ic and foreign policy experience as 
Soviet representative to the East- 
bloc economic al1ian<*» Comecon. 


a mudi broader rang* of tasting ny and LeoTtndemans of B elgium , 
and development is permissible on- urged the United States to incorpo- 


der the treaty. 

Earlier suggestions by Robert G 


rate the most promising aspects of 
the new Soviet position in an offer 


McFariane, the national security that would infuse what the Belgian 
adviser, that the administration called “a new imaginative dynam- 

- ■ - y - i _ • »i .i «#»** in rTio HonAirQ f.'illrc 


might relax its adherence to the ® Geneva talks. 


accord provisions evoked wide- The Europeans seem most en 


spread anxiety among the Europe- couraged by a new Soviet w fl li n g- 


an allies. 


Mr. Tikhonov’s retirement at 80 
completed a process that began 
SepL 27 when he stepped down as 
prune minister. 

He was a top member of Brezh- 
nev’s leadership. 


ness to push ahead with a separate 


They feared that the treaty, accord on medium range-missiles 
which is seen as one of the last is Europe if progress in that forum 


foundations of arms control would can come foster than in the other 


soon be stripped of all mea 
because , of cumulative Soviet 
U.S. violations. - 


two negotiating areas. 

Previously, the Soviet Union has 
masted that onlv an accord linking 


India Gets U.S. High Tech 


Mr. Shultz, who flew here from all three categories was possible. 
San Francisco, where he delivered a The United States and its allies 


(Continued from Page 1) 
Robert C. McFariane, and Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger. 
■ Gandhi and Thatcher Confer 
Mr. Gandhi and Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher of Britain dis- 
cussed ways of increasing coopera- 
tion against terrorists. The Associ- 
ated Press quoted officials as 
saying Tuesday in London. 

“They discussed the growth of 
organized terrorism and its impli- 
cations for peace and democracy." 
said a spokesman for Mrs. Thatch- 




■*> > a r a 


■ 


». i w , 


T f ‘ 





. W '-V A 


- M. ’ V* ’ 


[? p: r . ^ , ; "H t\ 


j j I { I ; W J v / 





y -i.y r - - 

K -y*' v . • 







er. “They agreed that experts 
should study arrangements to en- 
sure that people convicted of 
crimes of violence in either country 
should not be able to avoid extradi- 
tion by claiming that their offenses 
woe political” 

Mr. Gandhi, who is on his first 
official visit to Britain, has con- 
tended that the British government 
is not doing enough to curb the 
activities of Sikh extremists in Brit- 
ain. Sikh terrorists were responsi- 
ble for the assassination a year ago 
of Mr. Gandhi's mother when she 
was prime minister. 

The two leaders discussed other 
international., issues, including 
South Africa, during three hours of 
talks on Tuesday, Mrs. Thatcher’s , 
spokesman said. 

At a banquet Monday night, Mr. 
Gandhi urged an end to what he 
called intolerable conditions of life 
under apartheid, the policy of 
white supremacy, in South Africa. 

Britain does not support eco- 
nomic sanctions against South Af- 
rica and is likely to come under 
pressure over sanctions at the Com- 
monwealth Conference, ' which 
opens in the Bahamas on Wednes- 
day. Both Mr. Gandhi and Mrs. 
Thatcher are to attend. 


speech Monday reaffi rmin g the argued that this view held the aims 
stricter line on the treaty, said, “We talks hostage to the most in tra da- 
have designed our research pro- ble problems. The latest Soviet Di- 


gram to foil within the narrow defi- fen now appears to embrace the 
nition of ABM treaty provirions Western position. 


and we intend to keep it that way" — — 

He said the State Department’s « rr tvt 

legal adviser, Abraham D. Sofaer, tyCfieVO, V OfB W OH 
who accompanied him to the 

By Anti-UN Party 


room for varying interpretations." 
But any dedrion to develop and 


The Associated Press 

GENEVA — A nationalist party 


deploy grace weapons in response called Vigilance, which opposes 
to successful research findings. Mr. Swiss membership in the United 


Shultz emphasized, would only fol- Nations and favors radical curbs 
low “extensive consultations with on immigration, has emerged as the 


the allies and negotiation with the chief winner in the three-day Gene- 


Soviet Union." • va cantonal elections ending Sun- 

. Tuesday’s meeting wasoonvened day. ■ 


at the request of Belgium and the In final results announced Mon- 


Netherlands, wbo were annoyed at day. Vigilance increased its seats in 
being left out of, Mr, JReagan’a ,ihe 100-membqr. pmtona) pariia- 
meeting next week in New- York ment from 7 to- and now ranks 


with the leaders of six industrial- with the Liberals as one of the two 


ized democracies. 


largest parliamentary parties. Ge- 


The foreign ministers from Brit- neva is the seat of a United Nations 
ain and France did not attend the office ^ several UN agencies. 


meeting hoe Ttesday, but tky will " Vigilance and its allies in Ger- 


meet other foreign ministers in. man-speaking. Switzerland, Na- 
New York next week. ; _ - • tional Action, say that UN mem- 

European diplomats said that bership would compromise the 
while they. were reassured, by Mr:, country’s neutral status. Switzer- 
Shultz’s comments, the ad mini stra- land is a member of the nonpoliti- 
tion’s long-term policy still re- cal specialized UN agencies, and 

majned unclear. next year a national referendum 

They said the NATO meeting will be held to deride whether it 
served a useful purpose m provid- should become a full UN member. 


EVTERNATIOMAL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 





Tel. 01/21981 11 


INCREASE 

YOUR 

WORKING 

CAPITAL 


100 % 


RECEIVE 
EARNINGS OF 

280 % 


Bon Voyage. 


ON CASH 
INVESTED 


At Europcar, we’ve got something unique for those on the 
corporate fast track. 

It’s called The Worldwide Welcome. 

A new company credo dedicated to making life easier 
for you. 

Youll get the “Welcome” in nearly 3000 locations in 
110 countries. 

And it includes a lot of things you may not find with other 
car rental companies. 

Like our exclusive Super Service credit card (or other 
major credit card) which lets you pick up a. car even faster. 

And the convenience of being able to book a car anywhere 
in die world through a central reservation system in 
each country. 

Or our full range of the latest models. 

How many companies can offer you everything from sports 
cars to chauffeur-driven limousines ? We can. 


It means getting a car that won’t leave you in the lurch. 
Ours are maintained by our own trained specialists. 

The Worldwide Welcome means big things and litde things. 
Like special rates tailored to your needs. 

Or the music cassettes provided to entertain you while you 
drive. Or the free road maps to help you find the way. 

The next time you need to rent a car, call us. Or nave your 
travel agent do so. 

And turn your business trip intoa “bon voyage 


RETURNOF 

GASH 

INVESTED 

100 % 


$ Containers are high earning, 
fully insured, tangible assets 
with a 15 year working life. 

* The Transco Group is the 
world's leader in producting the 
highest annual rental return 
with the lowest commercial risk. 
4* 2000 serious investors have 
already purchased containers 

. worth over US$35 million 
which are managed by the 
Transco Group. 

4* These serious investors 
enjoy a secure US DOLLAR 
. income from participation In 
international trade. 

* DO NOT MISS THIS 
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
TO ADD CONTAINERS TO 
YOUR INVESTMENT 
PORTFOLIO. 

* For full details, without 
obligation, fill in our coupon 
today. 

TRANS 
CONTAINER 
MARKETING AG 

GeHertstrasse 18 , 

K?®^ riand 

Telex: 64446 taco ch 


The fully integrated business 
services in the center of 


Zurich - Switzerland 


offers Offices/ Conference 
Rfloros. Secnaarial/T ranslaiion, 
compL Tdeoam-Systems. 
Conipany Formation/ 
FWuciaiyTransactkais 

Execu tive Business Smyirax ag 

U ‘ toMt7 *‘* g73 (UtacopljBl CH-5WJI zaacfc 


! FOREIGN 
J CURRENCY 
I OPTIONS: NEW 



I EWm Vm Trn* r.S — i 



europcar 

rent a car 


I To; Trans Container Marketing AG 
> GeHertstrasse 18, 0+4052 Basel. Switzerland. 

I Please send me full details without obligation. 

I 1 NAME: 

tBLOoccAfmiA • 

ADDRESS; 


In the US., Latin. America ami the Poetic, it 's .Katismol Car Rented, hi Canada it's Tilden. 




oteve brothers 
and CO. \ 
F-S.C. LTD. . 

Kingston. Jamaica 1 . 
International Merchants 
°F U.S. Raw Cotton 

For price quotation**. 
pteasecaB 

1 -(21 4,)-748<8ad&. ^ 


V3K' 


U 


ur% 




I - r 


N'fi 


5 rt»‘-rk it! * 


r ‘»nwn e *ni 


T 

AiiKr 


f'tr . \amj 

i 

int'l tlit - 1 

(f» cl 

■'•‘v. plan 


IHS w 

li’ilf! hr>r. 


i inkij 

IVftVH 

ln i’*rmat 
un <i imp 
i4 H»liiuti 
And f. 

intos 
<; °niput( 
! an quit 
,nv 't‘stin 
tinder (-i 
^'ith 









• L.S * •. 

fifc 



Altaic 1.1 


- c 5>. •* 
*;»■ 


:: 


WB&Ve - 

K.tt*uv 

*** .,. 

*5fcr *, 
* *k.r 


A .*a V 


f 'J-.; — 
fen'Sc ...• 

*fi. .■ ■ 
.... 

*• -■ 
sf 

v _■■—»■ 


• ■ ■ ■i-'V J, 

■ '■'■*£& 
. *'*■ 

,r : v 

" • — -«. V; 


■i'S!: 








T. ; . ■■■ ' w ? — ■ ■ 

» ♦f4tn.ini!™ » ^ ..... '. 




iXTERNATIO.NAl HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 


Page 5 



Wie pouvons wir ensemble 
ein aeroplane fabbricato ? 

No problem ! 


. ~- r 'k 


i oppMiTnn® 


IS 

D 


s 




■ _ f .-iaaF 


; . .-c ;ii 
! ". *• •« ' 


- . V 

35*4/* 




ilS^V » 
I flp , 10 
j f.^> 

Jl "Z4 

;«C 5 / 

i * . 

» i '■■■ 


If you’re trying to get an interna- 
tional project off the ground, IBM 
has just the vehicle for you. 

It’s called International Business 
Services (IBS) and it makes light 
work of coordinating business 
operations from country to country, 
continent to continent. ■ 

Take the building of a new aircraft 
for example. With aerospace 
partners in France, Germany, Italy 
and the UJL pooling resources and 
ideas to develop and market the 
new plane. 

IBS can help them put the pieces 
together. 

Linking different data processing 
operations. 

Providing easy access to common 
information, speeding development 
and implementation of critical 
applications. 

And offering comprehensive 
on-site support wherever or 
whenever it might be needed. 

Vi^hatever the industry, whatever 
the international project, IBS 
computers, software and personnel 
can quickly help you keep overall 
investment and development 
under control. 

With country talking clearly to 
country. 


All organised for you, with valuable 
savings in the cost, time and 
complexity of installing and setting 
up a system of your own. 


A_nd with IBS, language is no 
barrier. 

A flexible software system - 
Application System - allows 
business professionals to analyse, 
present and share the same 
information with their partners, 
whilst working in their respective 
national languages. 

So project control can be 
managed on a centralised basis with 
each partner contributing data and 
profiting from the results. 

Budgeting can be controlled on 
an overall, rather than piecemeal 
basis, using the same database and 
proven project control techniques. 

Thus, for example, ensuring 
that plans for a wing sub-assembly 
developed in the U.K. get to the 
fuselage factory in Germany on time. 

Replacing a process previously 
dependant on paperwork - a 
commodity which doesn’t always 
travel well. 

With IBS computer expertise 
you can develop distribution 
management applications designed 
to check invoices, establish shipping 


dates, assess volumes of materials, 
draw up the right export documen- 
tation - in short, track the whole 
process from factory to factory, 
country to country. 

So, whether you’re working in 
aerospace or agriculture, operating 
in Europe, the U.S., Japan - or any 
other world business centre - 
you’ll find International Business 
Services can help your business fly. 

Send us the coupon or phone 
Information Network Services direct. 

Because once everyone in your 
operation is speaking a common 
language, the sky’s ==^= = 
the limit. 5 5FE. =~= 


For further details call : 

Austria (0222) 26 10 ext. 2276/2736 

Belgium (02) 720-5180 

Deti mark (02) 88 55 1 1 ext. 3776 

Finland (90)525-93-01 

France (1) 776-4343 ext. 6751 

Germany (0711)669-5557 

Italy (02) 6762 ext. 4053 

Netherlands (079)25 31 20 

Norway (02) 1 1 00 70 ext. 3 1 8/3 1 9 

Sweden (08) 793-4367 

Switzerland (01) 62 70 70 ext. 6803 

Spain (01) 431-4000 ext, 4547 

United Kingdom (01) 747-0747 

Or write to : 

| Information Network Services - Europe, Avenue Louise 523, 
I 1050 Brussels, Belgium. 


Company r. 
Position; — 
Address 


IBS offerings are provided by 
Information Network Services from IBM. 









Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 


licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


PufaUahcd With The New >0* Times «od The Wtdbiuprm Ptaa 


Three Let America Down 


TW Pnnl I Bad Business for Almost All Concerned 


Scarcely had the celebration of American 
dazing and intelligence and military prowess 
jx-gun when it was overtaken by a wave of 
bitterness over the various ways in which 
friends of the United States let it down in the 
AchOle Laura affair. American relations with 
these countries are too important to be penna- 
nently danwg.^ hut the bruising is there »"d 
almost certainly, in respect to terrorism, the 
result wiD underline a tendency toward unilat- 
eral American action in an enterprise in which 
international cooperation ought to be the rule. 

President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt pro- 
nounced himself “wounded” by the American 
interception, and he mast answer to a public 
already broadly skeptical of Egypt’s American 
tie. No one wishes to complicate life for Cai- 
ro’s struggling moderate leadership- Yet few 
can accept hs confidence that the PLO, which 
increasingly seems the political if not also the 
operational sponsor of the four terrorists, 
could be entrusted with prosecuting them. 
Surely President Mubarak could see why Pres- 
ident Reagan had to act as he did. 

From the Italians, who Eight terror on home 
ground bravely, it was not unreasonable to 
expect partnership here with their democratic 
NATO ally. But Rome deferred to its invest- 
ment in a cultivation oF the PLO — a second- 
level line of foreign policy questioned even 


within the governing, coalition. The Reagan 
administration had all too good reason to 
express — at the ungodly hour of 1:30 AJVL on 
Sunday — hs dismay at Italy’s refusal at least 
to inspect the American evidence for holding 
the accused mastermind, Mohammed Abbas. 

The United Slates has a strategic interest in 
Yugoslavia, which has even more of a strategic 
interest in the United States. But Yugoslavia, 
had a special additional reason — its own 
difficult terrorist problem, arising from ele- 
ments the Communists defeated in taking 
power — for cooperating in this instance. In 
fact, very few countries have a greater need for 
international cooperation in combating terror- 
ism. This is the consideration that Brigade set 
aside when it expedited Mr. Abbas's flight. 

All three of these countries argue that the 
requirement to engage the PLO in a search for 
a political solution remains crucial. At the 
same time, Israel has seized at the incident to 
try to pull the United States toward the view of 
the cmresit split Israeli government that the 
PLO is unfit as a partner for peace. Those who 
still see the PLO as an interlocutor, however, 
take on an extra obligation. With their interest 
and access, they should be (he first to act 
against any suggestion of PLO terrorism. In- 
stead, here, they have been the last 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Meanwhile, Another Death 


Leon Klmgboffer’s death at the hand of 
terrorists precipitated a chain of events of 
international consequence. Mr. Klinghoffer, 
however, was but one of two Americans with 
some son of Middle East connection who were 
killed savagely in recent days. The other was 
Alex Odeh, 41, of Santa Ana, California, an 
American citizen bam in a village on the 
Palestinian West Bank where his father still 
lives. Mr. Odeh was West Coast director of the 
American-Arab Anti- Discrimination Com- 
mittee. He was killed when a bomb exploded 
as be opened his office door last Friday. 

Mr. Odeh was not an incidental figure 
picked out for brutal murder simply because 
he was an American, as was Mr. Klinghoffer. 
He was evidently an intended victim, ItiUed by 
a person or persons who wanted him dead. 

It is conceivable that he was assassinated for 
engaging in his right of free speech. This is 
suggested by those who point out that the day 


before, in a television interview, be had spoken 
sympathetically of PLO Chairman Yasser 
Arafat (Friends say that he condemned terror- 
ism and the ship hijacking but that those parts 
of the interview were not broadcast) 

There is no reported suspect in the case so 
far. It is important to remember that But, 
predictably, there have been suspicions and 
allegations, one of which was denied in the 
most graceless posable way by a spokesman 
for the Jewish Defense League. In denying that 
the JDL had committed this crime, the spokes- 
man said, “I have no tears for Mr. Odeh. He 
gpt exactly what he deserves.” 

Suppositions and rumors, of coarse, are no 
substitute for facts. There is a very powerful 
public interest in the most vigorous police 
inquiry into this shocking murder. The full 
resources of the law must be brought to beat to 
locate and prosecute the killer of Alex Odeh. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


For 20th Century Justice 


Fran his Supreme Court perch. Justice Wil- 
liam Br ennan has flung an answer at conserva- 
tive critics of the court Attorney .General 
Edwin Meese complains of rulings that he says 
spring from the justices’ preferences, not con- 
stitutional principle. To which the justice re- 
plies: Stop posing as the sole champion of 
principle and admit that your arguments veil a 
program hostile to civil rights and liberties. 

It is unsettling when judges hurl thunder- 
bolts — and themselves — into political thick- 
ets. The justices, like umpires, have the hard 
task of staying aloof, even when provoked, and 
the recent forays of several justices are lamen- 
table. But Justice Brennan is normally scrupu- 
lous, and his speech at Georgetown University 
on Saturday was an impressive survey of con- 
stitutional thinking. The provocation and the 
rare response deserve attention. 

Mr. Meese set things off with scholarly- 
sounding pronouncements about the need fa 
“a jurisprudence of original intention.” By this 
he seems to mean that judges should decide 
constitutioial questions the way he thinks the 
founding fathers would have decided them. 
The trouble with such incantations is that they 
mean nothing when it comes to solving prob- 
lems unforeseen two centuries ago. 

Is a wiretap a “search,” fa which police 


need a warrant? The learned framers did not 
say. After struggling for years, the court cor- 
rectly ruled that police eavesdropping on the 
phone was indeed a “search,” within the broad 
meaning of the Fourth Amendment That is 
not some loaded, liberal interpretation intend- 
ed to foil protectors of public order. It is an 
interpretation because it has to be. Justice 
Brennan has it right: “We current justices read 
the Constitution in the only way that we can: 
as 20th-century Americans.” 

Their license to do so comes from the struc- 
ture of the Constitution and the language that 
gives it life — about freedom of speech and 
religion, security from unreasonable searches 
and seizures, and the broad power of Congress 
to regulate commerce. Justice Brennan pulls 
the veil away from Mr. Meese when he says it 
is arrogance, not deference, “to pretend that 
from our vantage we can gauge accuratel y the 
intent of the framers on application of princi- 
ple to specific, contemporary questions.” 

Did the framers intend that they be taken 
literally in a future they could not imagine? 
No, no more than we can insist on literality for 
the year 2185. What the Constitution did in- 
tend, and what aO Americans can embrace, is 
that America be governed by its precepts. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Negotiation Is Still the Goal 

The cancellation of [Monday’s] controver- 
sial meeting between Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
[British] foreign secretary, and two members 
of the Palestine Liberation Organization’s ex- 
ecutive co mmi ttee has come as only half a 
surprise. In the present climate of hostility in 
the Middle East, talks on a peace settlement 
would have appeared badly timed. For Mrs. 
Thatcher and her foreign secretary, who had 
shown considerable courage in inviting the 
Palestinian delegates to London in the face of 
strong criticism from the United States, Israel 
and the British Jewish community, the break- 


down of the meeting must come as both a 
disappointment and a relief. 

In the aid, however, all sides in the Middle 
East conflict will be forced to accept what is 
already obvious to most people in the wold — 
that no political advantage is to be gained by a 
continuation of terrorism. The events of the 
last week have certainly brought home to the 
Western democracies the need to step up inter- 
national action agai nst terrorism. Bat they 
have also underlined the urgency fa the Unit- 
ed States, and possibly the Soviet Union, to 
play an imaginative and dynamic role in push- 
ing the combatants to a negotiating table 
— The Financial Times ( London ij. 


FROM OUR OCT. 16 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Europe Shoes Mexican Horses 
NEW YORK — The Bureau of Manufactures 
is receiving from various parts of the world 
reports concerning the system in use in various 
localities fa shoeing horses. The reports pub- 
lished last month included information from a 
number of Mexican towns. The object is to 
show where Americans can send materials, or 
tools, or coal; so the reports touch upon anvils, 
vises. Hardies, tongs, hammers, ha chisels and 
forges and bellows. It is curious to see that in 
Acapulco, Mexico, Swedish nails are used. In 
Frontera, iron employed for shoeing is import- 
ed principally from England and Germany. In 
some places, as for instance San Luis PotosL 
the anvils are of English manufacture, and 
Norwegian nails and Goman tools are report- 
ed in use here. In Vera Cruz, German, Swedish 
and Bel gian nails are in some use. 


1935; Six Americans Freed in Mexico 
NOGALES, Arizona — Five American bank- 
ers and a New York publisher, on a bunting 
expedition in the Mexican province of Sonora, 
were temporarily kidnapped by Agrarian re- 
bels, who have captured Santa Ana and Ma- 
zallina and are now reported to be marching 
on Nogales, Mexico. The Americans are now 
in Nogales, Arizona, preparing to return 
home. The Americans encountered a rebel 
force, headed by General Ruiz Ybarra, who 
confiscated their guns. “The general enter- 
tained us by parading his three hundred men,” 
said Arthur D. Norcross, publisher. “We were 
not held for ransom, for our captors were not 
bandits, but Mexicans of the upper classes 
fighting fa a religious cause." The revolt in 
Sonora is directed against the religious and 
Agrarian policy of the Mexican government. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1953-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

P HIT-IP M. FOISIE Exeeuare Editor RENE BONDY Deputy Publisher 

WALTER WELLS fififtsr ALAIN LECOUR Associate Pubhskrr 

SAMUEL AfiT Deputy Editor RICH ARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

ROBERT K. McCABE Dmay Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

CARL GEWIRTZ Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Ctmdaum 

ROLFD KRANEPUHL Director of Ad v erti s i n g Safer 
Interna tkmai Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Charies-de-Gaulle. 92200 NariUy-snr-Srine. 

France. TeL: (1) 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Direaetr de la publication; Walter N. Thayer. -jtij flilL 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hennessy RtL, Hong Kong. TeL 5-285618. Telex 61170. 
ManatptaSr. UK: Robin MtcKkhon/63 Long Acre. London WC2. TeL 83641X0. Tekx 262009. TawH 

Gen. Mtr W. Germany: W. Laaerback Friedntkar. IX tQQQFmkfunlNL 71 (06P)72675X 72c 416721. . ir . „ 
S.A. au capital de 1300.000 F. RCS Neman B 73202! 126. Qmrmsskm Pariudre No. 61337. 

U.S. subscription: S322 yearly. Second <Jass postage paid at Long Island City. N.Y. 1 1101. HialtfJ 
© 1985, International Herald Tribune. AO rights roared, ■■■*“*■■ 


P ARIS — No one seems to be asking Mexico 
or the other blade holes of debt in the devel- 
oping world just what they did with the money 
they borrowed in the first place. 

The regimes which today exhort the inter- 
national banking community to stay with them, 
to lend more so they can “invest to grow, to 
repay," are the same regimes that borrowed and 
squandered a wealth of good capital which 
quickly turned to mountains of debt. 

Although I was one of those bankers scram- 
bling madly during the 1970s to lend to the 
■promising economies of the developing wold, 
I agree wholeheartedly with the critics of the 
banks. We rushed blindly along chasing a rain- 
bow we thought would lead to easy profits. 

For our eagerness and ignorance we are now 
trapped in the powerful field of a giant black 
hole. Our wayward financial vehicles are like 
fragile spaceships on a suicide course. We risk 
being obliterated by our debtors as the high-level 
government officials who met in Seoul last week 
keep us on course toward this cosmic hazard. 

The debtors’ attitude, especially that of the 
Mexicans, is that they shoulder their huge debt 
burden unfairly, as if it were not they who had 
with alacrity sought and consented to it 
While fa now they stop just short of refuting 
to repay, these governments are bent on exacting 
new “loans” that will most likely increase the 
hazard. In order to rectify earlier mistakes, we 
bankers are called to make new ones. It is aston- 
ishing that reasonable people in the official cir- 
cles of Washington and the other political and 

f inancial rapi talc ran imagine that thi s will work. 

Bad lending decisions cannot be made better 
by following me same course all over again, even 


The writer, who requested 
that his name be withheld, 
is a banker who has had 
a hand, by his own account, 
in more than $50 billion in 
developing-country debt. 

in the company of the World Bank or the IMF. 
Our painful experience has demonstrated that 
private banks are incapable of making reliable 
judgments about the risks involved in financing 
econo mi c development. Nor do we have even the 
slightest chance of influencing how a to what 
use the proceeds of the loans we make are put. 

A private bank does have such analytical tools 
and ability to control the use of loan proceeds 
when dealing with private enterprise a public 
enterprise run according to the principles of the 
market economy. We can even impose our view 
on how such enterprises should be run while they 
repay our credit. When lending to sovereign 
governments we have no such leverage. Without 
these basic tools and leverage, we have no busi- 
ness trying to finance economic development. 

Compounding the banks’ lack of control is the 
tendency toward corruption in many “new na- 
tions.” For those who were not already familiar 
with it in Mexico, last month’s earthquakes 
opened gaping fissures in the mantle of govern- 
ment propriety there. A political system berilt on 
patronage, kickbacks and bribes was tragically 
exposed by the agony of thousands of simple 
people who suffered and died under modern 
buddings whose promoters had inanagpd to cut 


comas on construction costs by bribing local 
officials who shared the spoils with superiors. 

The great sorae in national wealth brought 
about by Mexico's important oil discoveries and 

E oducuon increases in the latter 1970s should 
ve brought substantial progress in econo m ic 
development. Instead, hundreds of millions, per-, 
baps billions of ckdlarSs much of it borrowings on 
anticipated future oil earnings, slipped into the 
hands of corrupt officials and their private-sector 
cronies, who for the most part secretly shipped it . 
out of the country to avoid taxes and discovery 
by their lower-class compatriots. The steriHza- . 
Lion of this promising wealth by government 
leaders arid party officials and the interest obli- 
gatkms accumulating on the loans taken out in 
anticipation, of future ad income have left Mexi- 
co in worse shape than before the ofl boon. 

The same scenario in less dramatic terms took ' 
place in Venezuela. The Brazilian, Argentinian 
and oritean circumstances were similar, cfariac- . 
termed by ill-conceived a dishonest uses of un- 
controlled international borrowing an a massive 
scale, although without the tantalizing influence 
of a get-rich-quick oil boom. t 
The disastrous record of private financing far 
economic development shows that this is mo 
place fa banks. Only multilateral public finan- 
cial institutions can hope to impose the controls . 
on use of funds and management ot economies 
necessary to ensure that good loans are made on 

c ond iti ons that marirmw the chances of repay- 
ment and hence of productive use fa the bor- 
rowers. We should be able to expect more from 
our own leaders in virion and statesmanship than 
(hey have shown so far on such a crucial issue. 
International Herald Tribune. 


<s p y & i wni ffM p m mr i* 



\ 





a#®-. 


'Pleased to be of kelp. Now my hanker would like to talk about your delinquent mortgage payments . 5 

There Is No Need to Shut Out Mexican Workers 


L OS ANGELES — The ground 
/ had barely stopped shaking in 
Mexico when the debate began over 
the earthquakes’ effect on the politi- 
cal and financial future. 

Pessimists warned of the begin- 
ning of the end fa Mexico’s top- 
heavy government, just as the 1972 
Nicaraguan earthquake began the 
political upheavals that led to the 
overthrow of the Somaza dictator- 
ship seven years later. That is a 
possibility, especially if the endemic 
corruption of the Mexican system 
frustrates efforts to help the quake 
victims, as happened in Nicaragua 
But something good may come 
from this disaster if the United 
States government, looking at the 
mullibillion-doUar estimates of 
what it will cost Mexico to restore 
many thousands of jobs and homes, 
backs away from its pursuit of a 
xestrictionist immigration policy. 

In a painful coincidence on the 
day before the first quake hit, the 
U-S. Senate passed the latest immi- 
gration bill of Alan K. Simpson, a 
Wyoming Republican. That bill 
could have severe long-term conse- 
quences fa Mexico. Its main provi- 
sion — penalties fa employers who 
hire illegal aliens — could diy up 


By Frank Del Olmo 


the jobs that are held by migrants 
and eliminate a vital source of Mex- 
ico’s income. A similar bill, from 
Peter W. Rodino, a New Jersey 
Democrat, is pending in the House. 

Provisions in the Simpson bill 
would allow Mexicans and other 
foreigners to enter the United Stales 
to work, but only temporarily, and 
only in agriculture. A proposed 
amendment would limit the “guest 
worker” allowance to 350,000 to 
harvest perishable crops. 

Senator Simpson and other re- 
strictionists want to get the amend- 
ment out of the immigration bffl. So 
do many Latinos and labor leaders. 
But they all might take a more re- 
laxed view of guest-worker propos- 
als if they world focus on recent 
studies suggesting that illegal im- 
migration is not as big a problem 
as many Americans think. 

Last year the Census Bureau con- 
cluded that estimates by the Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service 
of 10 to 12 million illegal immi- 
grants in the country — the infa- 


about 2 million- Another recent 
study, by the National Academy of 
Sciences, concluded that a “reas- 
onable” estimate was between 1.5 
million and 3.5 million. 

Then there is the recent study by 


Mexico’s population keeps growing. 
Demographers expect that trend to 
continue into the next century, so 
the movement of people back and 
forth across tbe badcr will contin- 
ue at least until then, no matter how 
hard Washington tries to stop iL 
Far better, then, to find ways of 


the Urban Institute, winch lowed regulating die flow and eh'minating 
at the impact of Mexican- woken any abases that arise from iL 
on Southern California. It condud- There are specialists in both 
ed that they are beneficial to the countries who have come up with 
region. They help keep marginal in- proposals fa doing that — mostly 
dnstries viable ana inflationary vacations on the guest-worker idea, 
pressures down. And they have no but with more protection for the 
appreciable effect on unesnp&oy- workers- Most would allow workers' 


meat, even among mmanbes. 

cept^tbese calm assessments^ the 
immigration issue, they could star 
looking at the movement of people 
between the United Stales and 
Mexico as a problem. Then they 
could abandon the search for quick- 
fix “solutions" — whether unwieldy 
bills like Senator Simpson's a im- 
migration raids that terrorize La- 
tino fl qmnmiities to DO useful end. 

The migration of Mexican wak- 
ens is a historic phenomenal that 


to belong to unions, forexmnpk. 

An effective program to control 
Mexican migration could .not be de- 
creed by the United States aloaoe. It 
would have to be devdoped in bilat- 
eral negotiations with Mexico. 

The outpouring of money, medi- 
cine and aha relief from the Unit- 
ed Stales after the Mexican earth- 
quakes was a characteristically 
generous show of good wilL There is 
a need for equal generosity to the 
Mexican workers who help the US. 
economy and whose dollar earnings 


silent invasion” — were will go on so long as the native-born will help keep Mexico on an even 


wildly overblown. The census agen- 
cy’s research put the number at 


U.S. papulation declines while U.S. 
fields and factories need labor and 


keel wMte it tries to rebuild. 
Las Angela Tana. 


Another Liberal Republican Gives Up the Struggle 


N EW YORK — Liberal Republi- 
cans. Remember? Fiscally con- 
servative, socially liberal, inter- 
nationalist. There was a time when 
they seemed about to take over 
America. Nelson Rockefeller. 
Charles Percy. Mark Hatfield. 
Charles Mathias. Jacob Javits. Clif- 
ford Case. John Chafee. Dan Evans. 
John Lindsay. Margaret Heckler. 

They produced many of the better 
people in American politics 20 years 
ago, 15 years ago. 10 years ago. Then 
they began to fade away, c hang in g 
their convictions a bit a ending up in 
limbo somewhere between other Re- 
publicans marching to the right and 
Democrats scattering to the left If 
there is any symbol of the final de- 
cline of liberal a “moderate" or 
“progressive" Republicanism, it is 
the announcement that Charles McG 
Mathias Jr. of Maryland will not run 
for re-election to the UJS. Senate. 

He was one of them, in every way. 
Old family. Episcopal Hawsford 
College, naval officer. A fighter for 
both civil rights and balanced bud- 
gets. A bit of a dreamer. Uninterested 
in the politics of his party and, frank- 
ly, in many of the members. Popular 
with voters — he won 66 percent of 
the vote in his last run in 1980. 

It is impossible to tell whether he 
was pushed or he feD. Certainly many 
Republicans hated him. He was de- 
nounced as a “liberal swine” by one 
of the conservatives running the 1984 
Maryland Republican convention. 
Senator Strom Thurmond or South 
Carolina changed committee assign- 
ments and rules fa years to prevent 
Mr. Mathias from becoming either 
the ranking minority member or 
chairman or the Senate Judiciary 
Committee. (Ironically, ai the end. 


By Richard Reeves 


Mr. Thurmond and other Republican vative crustier than Mr. Dole ewe r 
leaders talked of changing seals and could be, visited the Senate not so 


rules again to keep Mr. Mathias from long ago, Mr. Ma thias told the old 
quitting, because a Democrat might warrior of the right: “Roman, if you 
well win his scat next year and give were still here these folks would cou- 
the Democrats control of the Senate.) sider you a dangerous liberal." 


Mr. Mathias once told me he knew . The ultimate irony is that, al- the legacy, large or smaH, left by 
he represented a wing of the party though liberal Republicans could not liberal Republicans? Democratic 
that no longer existed. He speculated survive in a conservative party, their neo-liberals. The Hew- Democrats 
that there was a “lost generation" politics was always pretty dose to the who practice Yuppie politics andtaDc 
of liberal Republicans, because the consensus politics of modern Ameri- liberal governance and fiscal couser- 
young people who would have be- ca. Their philosophic conservatism vatism are the heirs of Nelson Rocfce- 
come candidates and leaders of his and their day-to-day liberalism were - feller and Mac Mathias — and . that 


two-party politics you cannot pit 
your case to all your countrymen 
without first getting the- nomination 
of the members of your party. And 
there were no Republican national 
n ominat ions to be had far anyone to 
the left of Richard Nixon. 

Then who are the inheritors of 
the legacy, large or smaH, left by 
liberal Republicans? Democratic 
neo-liberals. The new Democrats 


wing of the party in the 1980s and certainly dorer to the center inheritance could help I 
’90s never joined in the 1960s and either George McGovern’s leftism or deal begriming in 1986. 


’70s. “They were nonstarters, mmed 
off by Vietnam and Watergate,” be 
said. “Maybe they became Demo- 
crats. Probably they just turned away 
from politics altogether.” 

That was certainly part of iL What- 
ever happened, not oily did the Re- 
publican Party became more uni- 
formly conservative, but many of its 
members veered right with a ven- 
geance. Terry Dolan, director of the 
National Conservative Political Ac- 
tion Committee, urged at last year’s 
Republican National Convention in 
Dallas that Mr. Mathias “do the par- 
ty a favor and get oul" Now be has. 

There are many ironies in his exit 
at the age of 64. The first or course, is 
the possibility that it will cost the 
Republicans control of the Senate. 
Another is that the party now has 
to invent new “liberals.” Many of 
its right-wingers are essentially nega- 
tive souls who need to hate somebody 
and are now venting their spleen on 
new “moderates” like Senate Major- 
ity Leader Robert Dole. 


Ronald Reagan's tightism. But in 


Universal Press Syndicate. 


vatism are the bars of Nelson Rocke- 
feller and Mac Mathias — and .that 


them a great- 


A Mayor’s 
Lesson in v 
Humanity 

By Flora Lewis 

F rankfurt - wy every- 
body else was absorbed with tnc 
backlash of terrorism in the new- 
ending Arab-IsraeE conflict, a po- 
imam ceremony took place here Sun- 
day morning. Teddy Koflek . jfrjj 
mayor of Jerusalem, was awarded tne 
prestigious Peace Prise of tne 

Association of German. Publishers. 
Manfred Rommel the mayor of 
Smngart and son of Erwin Rommttt 

CT*famedas the “Desert Fox,” ddiv- 
ered .xhe speech of tribute in the his- 
toric but austere PfiuIsJorche: - 
The profound symbolism of the 
event was clear to alL Teddy, , as ev- 
eryone called hrin, scarcely looked his 
usually rumpled, casual impetuous 
. sdf. He wore a dark suit with a vest 
and dark tie, his hair neatly brushed, 
his face solemnly composed. 

But he was himself. Candid as ever, 
he told the audience be had won- 
dered, “after all that has happened in 
Germany,” whether “a Jew and an 
foraejfi r*r> accept drisprize.” But be 
de ri d ed *frat reconciliation and . the 
idea of pe a c e must take precedence 
over die past For his wife, Tamar, 
and. his daughter, Osaat, it was the 
first visit to Germany. Bom in Vien- 
na in 1911, Teddy was a youthful l. 
Zionist who went early to Palestine, 

He bad chosen Mr. Rommel to 
present h im , be said, because he re- 
called tire battle of Q Alamein and 
the “great danger the German 
Army under Held Marshal Rommel 
posed, in. our part of the world. The 
irate of the Jewish people of Palestine 
seemed- mortally threatened. Who 
could have imagined then that the 
fidd marshal's son and I would meet 
in the peaceful profession of bong 
mayors? Isn’t that a symbol of peace, 
winch is ourfheme here?" 

. He spoke, of tenor, “perhaps the 
greatest enemy of our cultare, possi- 
bly a greater threat than the atom 
bomb.” He denounced Jewish terra, 
too, quoting (he formidable Golda 
Men, who said in. 1969, “Whenpeace 
comes, maybe with trine we win for- 
give the Arabs for kiDing our sons, . 
but it wffl be much harder to forgive 
them for fareiagiu to ULtheir sons.” 

Hesaid that “Jews and Arabs mast . 
five together in peace, there is no 
alternative to peace." He spoke of 
tolerance: “In the bee of the fanofr- 
a'an and intolerance which are 
mark of our. times, there is a need 
deep belief in a humanistic Jewish- 
ness ... treating aft men with the 
same respect and in the satuesunna. 
That isn’t alwaya recogn i zed, espe- 
dally amonggroops which ady thmk 
of themselves am overtook ^the injer- 
ests of others i .. -Accor ding to Jew- 
istibdie^hmnaitttyisindiviaWe.” 

. And, of coarse, he spoke, about 
Jonsakin. a, tity'iri the eye of the 
storm ctf vkdence and haired involv- 
ing Israel but noaethetess a city 
venose daBy.fifc is remarkably peace- 
ful That is no accident It has taken . . 

" constant thought and effort, constant 
struggle by its mayor against pnj 0- 
dice and fierce resentment. Teddy 
presided over ramification in 1967 
after twoyeats asmayorin the Jewish 
part of a divided Jerusalem, and has 
been re-elected f am times. 

Mi: Romrad-raade dear that this 
was the reason why Teddy was cho- > 
sen fa theawanL Even, if Jerusalem’s^ . . 
surprising serenity has noilmight a 
larger Middle East peace,.ii points 
die way and shows the possibility. 

: farad's detcraaination never to ai- 
kw the city to be divided again, no- 
te renounce, ft* sovereignty as the 
capital has been called meultimate, 
roost difficult obstacle to peace in the 
region. Bnt Teddy said that tins, too, 
coukl be overcome, perhaps by. & coo- 
coffdat with Modem and Christian 
authorities for guardianship of holy 
places, arinflar to (he Italian state’s 
concordat with the Vatican in Rome. 

Teddy explained in some detail 
how he had tried to keep the people 
of Jerusalem living rale by side at 
peace in (he meantime. It is a policy 
of smallsteps and great principles — 
equal dignity, equal humanity, equal . 
respect aesrate differences. < 

Thfr^smail steps have to do with 
schools, a sewage system, dean run- 
ning water,' recreational facilities and 
the Ore for afi. Teddy said he was 
convinced that a major dement- in 
Jerusalem’s calm was the decision to 
let Modems organize their fires in 

tbemanti^^y ove^fcmple Mount, 
site Of the great al-Aqsa Mosque, de- 
spite “unlxlierably strong pressure 
from some' Jewish dreka/^ 

Hetumed brer the S10JXX) prize to 
a fund fa encouraging contacts be- 
1 tween Jewish arid Arab youths. 

Teddy may nothare the answers to 
war and tetror, bat he knows where 
and how fib look fca (hem. It is all the 
- mare meaningful when, this is recog- 
nized through the most distinguished 

prize that a now peaoefril West Ger- ' 

many -bai to bestow, it shows that 
anguish can end and hopes can be 
fu Tnll ed, wtele hnriiao iam survives. 

The New York Times. ' ■ 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Everybody’s UN Business 

Charles Krau thammer ’s contribu- Ultimate responsibility for the fn- the last two years (here has been a 
non to the 40th anniversary ot the ture erf the United Nations is held bjr ma^ re effort fair the crimi nal 


United Nations is a mixture of mis- 
conceptions and misinformation. 
(“ United Nations: 40 Years Are 
Enough for a Verdict,*' Sept 28). As 
1 understand the intentions of the 
founders, reflected in the UN Char- 
ter, all the allied powers derided to- 
gether to establish a world body 
which would prevent war and en- 
hance international cooperation for 
the benefit of humanity as a whole. 
So nobody can claim the copyright. 

It is common knowledge that die 
United Nations is not an abstract 
institution but a reflection of therda- 
tions between states and of the com- 


the member states. They deserve crit- : worid and its political badeers lo sat- 

irism, but not ricBcnloas charges of urate Western Europe and North 


destructive propaganda, anti- Wei 
era diplomacy and anti-Semitism. 

MAREK HAGMAJER. 
Secxetary-GeaeraL 
World Federation of United 
Nations Associations. Geneva. 


anti-west- America with cocaine and heroin, 
mutism. Once the AIDS vims ' gets into an 
MATER. , intravenous drug-abating commani- 
GeneraL ty it spreads even faster than amona 
f United homosexuals. Long brio* evmS 


new “moderates" like Senate Major- plenties of the present wold. Acriti- that it would become ejadennem any 

iiy Leader Robert Dole. cal approach to the way the United country unless there was strict con- • 

When Roman Hruska, the former’ Nations functions is desirable, bnt . trolof use of blood products miMdir 
senator from Nebraska and a conser- with a view to malting it more effeo* cme. use of hypodatidc needles and 


AIDS Against NATO? 

In 1983 I wrote that, bn the evi- 
dence tbwi available, AIDS must be 
amwrf by a single slow virus, trans- . 
mitred in Woo&widi a stent incuba- 
tion period of up to right y^rs, and 
that it would become epidemic in any 
country there was strict eon- 


arc; infected with the virus, the Wfest 
would be a pushover fa the Soviets. 
Exngktymg the AIDS vims is much 
fere messy and sdf-des*nictive than 
using midear weapons or nerve ras. 

Mbcrady flai the AIDS epidari? 

could fafl tosec Its potential 

• Dr. JOHN SEALE 
• _ London. 






id’s 26 U 
inday, T 


r n A. 

large 
t (AP) 
pad of 
* he was 
Dar es 
> chosen 
Reuters) 
k power 
jresiden- 

I < AP > 


58 


b. As Mr. 
•‘His tone 
e with its ^ 
& fingers W 

d control. 

rig and be 
i bends to 


Jalso is a 
ialber and 
lerfonned 


ie British 
: to North- 
ed no-jury 


tong illness, 

jtwin Bliss 
Larine Corps, 
leral of the 
t in Vietnam 
pnday of a 

fitarist of the 
fcrdayofcan- 




f 





Page 7 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 


INSIGHTS 


FS'iN. 




m&tL . 

mm- 








■- Jr**®. 
' V;>£v 



; A homeless man sleeping in a Paris Metro station. More than 40,000 people seek shelter in the French capital «rii ™ght. 

Mounting Tide of Homelessness in Europe 




By Jo Thomas 

New York Times Service • ■ ■ ■ 

ONDON — Margaret lives' with her hus- 
band and six chil dren in a fc o n do p bcd- 
and-breakfast hotel, not the quaint sort, 
■with chintz in the acting room, hilt damp and 
■ 'bog-infested, with the dhwig room a block 
-away. - • 

The family was moved out of its apartment m 


European cl earinghouse for information, none- 
theless collected some statistics that have con- 
cerned both government and private social wel- 
fare organizations. 

In Britain, the number of homeowners more 
than six wnntla behind on mnrtgay. payments 
increased to 40,000 in 1984 from 8,000 in 1979. 

In the first quarter of this year, said Nick 
Raynford of a bowing aid center in London, 10 
at of the homeless had defaulted on their 
mortgages, more than twice as many as a 


“ project h« be- 


•cause the buDding was con tamina ted with as- 
bestos and was to be demolished. Margaret and 
: lv ; ; S - r .|; her husband, who asked that their last mmig not 
. r : 4>e used for fear of being evicted, were told to . 

*«P“t to Hve in temporary quarters for a few 
' weeIcs - - 
jvTJ J • •'Vou wait, and wait, and wait,™ said Maigfc- 7 
_■ ,-^J net, who now has been homely for 10 months^ 

• “If you only knew how long you’d be here, you’ 

' woultht’t mind." The family of eight is in two - 
■' -iise ‘hotel rooms that do not connect 

‘ ‘ In Britain, private groups that work with the ‘ 
- ~ ■■.U~Z homeless estimate that there are 140,000 people 
7-77 " like Margaret, firing hi hostels .and hotels. In 
- vj, . , p aj - s ^ private groups say at 'least 10,000 people ' 

.. _ . .""T. are livmg on the streets, in Italy, the government 
'~7“; says that one young couple in ’five have no 
,77 ' . almraatrws.bnt to five wrthjtiatjyes,' even after 
; the birth of t&& fb^dnidl 


In Italy, according to government officials at 

'Homfelessness is a blot on 
the European landscape. It 
is a disgrace to what we 
exalt as European 
civilization. It is an 
indictment of government, 
administration and people 


« - 


: .x sst ■ 
•• ■.■r'.-rs 
.. --•_• -':r. 

- -• .r.Ti\ 


. They and'ihausands of others aip part of a- ^ ®are. 

trend that is alarming governments across Eu- 
rope, a rising fide of homelessness in nations 
that over the past two generations, according to 
Peter D. Sutherland, commissioner of social 
affairs far the European Communities Canmis*' 
son, “had b^un to befieve that we were in sight 
of abolishing for good, the scourges of poverty 
-and homelessness." 

Mr. Sutherland met - recently in Cwk/Irdand, 
with delegates from the European Community 
countries in an effort to determine bow serious 
the problem is and what can be done about it 


Brendan Ryan 
Irish- senator 


the conference, census figures showed dial evic- 
tions from rental units increased by 28 percent 
from 1983 to 1984. ' 


m 


, LTHQUGH statistics are ii 

resentatives from groups that help 
-homeless throughout Europe reported a 
dramatic increase in the number of evictions, a 
i who have been. 


; _.rc: 

^ 

out of thdr homes, and a trend toward 
. ^ . seeing younger and younger people firing on the 

. - streets. 

• .... The United Nations, which has reported that 

- :i&- .. 100 mDKon people worldwide have no shelter 

: v 's - :l • whatsoever, already has raised the alarm over 
- ■j.fjZ . rthe difficulties in the Third World, where dries 
_ _ ' .. are growing at an explosive rate but shims are 

. •; ..growing twice as fast-'A city such as Sio Paolo, 

... . . -which bad a population of 23 milfion in 1950, 

.7 / •* can expect a population of 25^.miDion in the 
7 -.year 2000. 

* .. •>.-'■ - - But in the relatively wealthy nations of Eu- 

- rope, “the homeless are the segment that has no 
7-J&* statistics,” said Thomas Sfcrecht, who works with 

__ . '7^5 .. a German organization for the homeless, “£v- 

r ' 7 -• erything else is counted — ^ every cow and chidt- 

'i .-t' ' :en and piece of batter.” ' 

The conference, which voted to recommend a 


I N France, where five million to six million 
people live on incomes 'of less than $6 a 
day, uuiupplemented by welfare benefits, 
the number of vagrants seeking lodgings for the 
night in Paris rose to 40,493 in 1982 from 20,000 
in 1971. 

In Denmark, where 20,000 people are esti- 
mated to be homeless, the number -who are less 
than 30 years old has increased dramatically 
since 1980. In Paris, according to Patrick De- 
derck, who has studied the situation there, the 
average age of homdess people has been drop- 
ping by six months a year. For men, he said, it is 
now42. 

' “No European country has as great a problem 

of homdessDess as the United States does,” said 
Robert M. Hayes, a New York lawyer who 
founded the Coalition for the Homeless. “But 
none of these governments are willing to preside 
silently over the mass homelessness we now 
have in American dries.” 

Mr. Hayes, who attended the conference as 
an observer, added, “It’s dear there’s a much 
firmer commitment” by West European govern- 
ments “to stop the tide of newly homdess peo- 
ple:" 

The number of homeless people in the United 
States is in dispute, Mr. Hayes said, with esti- 


mates ranging from 500,000 to three million. 
The Department of Housing and Urban Devel- 
opment recently said the figure was no more 
than 350,000. An advocacy group for the home- 
less in New York City said Saturday that 9,000 
single adults would seek shelter from the dry 
next winter. 

The Reverend Peter McVeny, a Jesuit priest 
who works with the Center for Faith and Justice 
in Ireland, said that most of the homdess are 
unemployed or unskilled, or may have lost thdr 
homes in family disputes, but are otherwise 
ordinary people, not alcoholics or mentally 3L 

“It is not they who have the problem,” Father 
McVeny said. “The problem lies in the housing 
market, deficiencies in general housing policies, 
in social security policies, and the social injus- 
tice which creates poverty.” 

[ HOSE who are worst off, he said, “tend 
to create the stereotyped image of the 
homeless in the public’s mind.” But (be 
public must realize that “their plight is not 
solely traceable to individual failings or inade- 
quacy” but also to the “inability of the support 
systems in society to deal adequately with their 
problems at an early stage.” 

In Ireland. 3.000 people are homeless and 
20,000 others live in trailers or horse-drawn 
vans. - 

- The delegates recomrhended the abolition of 
vagrancy laws and said the lack of an address 
should not deprive a person of legal rights, 
including the right to vote. 

They asserted that people have an unequivo- 
cal right to shelter, with no time limits if they 
cannot find permanent accommodations, ana 
they urged that shelters for the homeless be 
small in size, not vast human warehouses. 

“Homelessness is a blot on the European 
landscape,” Brendan Ryan, a member of the 
Irish Senate and sponsor of legislation to pro- 
tect the homeless in Ireland, said at the meeting. 
“It is a disgrace to what we exalt as European 
civilization. It is an indictment of government, 
administration and people who do not care.'* 

In London on Saturday, Margaret stood on 
the sidewalk and watched the parked cars while 
die waited her turn at a basement kitchen with 
one stove shared by seven families. There is no 
refrigerator for the' children's milk, no place to 
wash clothes, and no place in the local st&ool for 
her 8-year-old, who has been out of school since 
the family moved 10 months ago. The family’s 
rooms, full of beds, are immaculately dean, but 
the walls axe damp, the paper and the plaster 
peeling. 

“Christmas is coming,” Margaret said. “My 
brother, who is a painter, offered to paint and 
wallpaper the children's room, but the landlord 
said, ‘No, we don’t allow that.’ ” 

She watched as her toddler, a boy, picked a 
stick from a large refuse bin full of boards and 
nails. "They run wild,” she sighed, “Wild, wild, 
out of control.” a vagrant walked by, muttering 
10 himself. 

“The man, he's mad!" shouted one of the 
children. “We’re all mad living here.” said Mar- 
garet. 


Airborne Smugglers Thrive in Nigeria 


■ y 


■ ■ ' . 


By Blaine Harden 

Washington Poa Service . 

1 AGOS — The bearded baby-clothes smug- 
gler sipped iced palm, wine in a steamy 
A back-alley saloon here and talked shop. 
. “What I fed is better to fly with than anything 
-> else is baby wear,™ said the bu s iness m an, who 
r 7travds from the Nigerian capitaT to Taiwan six 
crimes a year. 

The businessman, who is '35, explained the 


Still, flights in and out of Lagos continue to 
becrammed with fxeq a eni-flying Nigerians, like 
the baby-clothes trader, who iravd with an 
inordinate amount and exotic variety of bag- 
gage. 

'Women from tire Lagos market board Lon- 
don-bound planes wearing loose-fitting tradi- 
tional gowns. Airline attendants on the Lagos- 
to-London flight report that these women often 
travel with dried fish tied to their thighs and 
upper arms and return with similarly concealed 
bundles of frozen fish sticks, dried milk and, of 


<y 




■ x ' m Ji 


v ■ . 


■: 74$ 


advantages of baby wear for a Nigerian trader: course, baby clothes. 

A profitable haul could be stuffed in two suit- . In August, scores of London-bound traders 
Customs inspectors at the Lagos airport showed up 'at Uk Lagos airport carrying cages 
usually do not demand duty or bribes to dear containing one or two gray parrots. Until the 
booties and bibs. Mort importantly, Nigerians government clamped down, parrots purchased 
will pay a 500-pereent to 600-percent markup far about $60 in northern villages were being 
Joe baby clothes. hawked for about $300 in London. 

The nnoggler, preferred not to be quoted AjriiMOffidalsjay ihal Nigeran traders re- 
by namTisone of thousands of Nigerian irados tumog to Lagjs check mw.0) taggegc mclud- 
-»*ohe«made 1985 abater year for airlines artra and engines, video aidst^osqm^ 

Lagos. Passenger traffic is up 35 peri*nt meal, dothmg. cosmetics, processed foods and 

sp2ic parts. * 

■ At London’s Gatwidc Airport last summer, 
according to a steward for British Caledonian 
Airlines, a Lagos-bound Nigerian tried to bring 
an auto windshield aboard as hand luggage. 

. About 1 percent of passengers leaving Lagos 
have excess baggage, while more than 30 percent 
of re ranting passengers pay excess-baggage fees 
“without complaint,” said an airline executive. 

lo pay for imports. * . - Ishrat Husain, thcWorMBankrq>resmtati7 

The new preside®. Major Generel Ibrahim 

EnH<m<iG4.o fi n c e Wtat wt a t S-mortth“ecfinoinic .economic polic ies sustain the perverse incm- 
- VOSS' dcSriT £ paSTro Standi die 

• SoiS2c of exchange for luxn- ^ N *8£ nan anuggjers airborne. 

~ fy imports. This was in addhion io a law that . In attempting to force austerity on Nigeria, 
limited the amount of money a Nigerian could .government, import/ restrictions have created 
take out of the country. . . . acute-shortages and, therefore, acute demand 


.-overl 

I N a paradox that points to" the entrepro-:. 
neurial acumen of Nigerians and to warped 
incentives built into their economy, air 
«*: travel is. booming even as the oil-dependent 
.economy is in crisis. Many American arid Euro- 
,, pean banks recently have stopped doing buri- 
ness - with Nigeria beca u se the central bank -is 
; .three months behind in releasing hard currency 


for manufactured goods such as windshields 
and baby dothes. 

At the same time, government price controls 
on airline tickets and a grossly overvalued cur- 
rency that trades on the blade market at one- 
quarter of its official rate make it extraordinari- 
ly cheap to fly in and out of Nigeria. A 
round-trip Lagos- to- London excursion fare on 
Pan Am sells for 725 naira, which can be pur- 
chased on the black market here for about S 182. 

“The government's overregulation or the 
economy is creating these opportunities for pri- 
vate grin at the expense of the society in gener- 
al,™ said Mr. Husain. The traders “are not 
paying taxes,” he said, adding: “There is noway 
load industry can compete with these imported 
goods. Consumers must pay outrageous prices. 1 
tali it private affluence, public squalor." 

OR most of the 1970s, when Nigeria was 
awash with billions of dollars in oil reve- 
nue, Nigeria made little attempt to grow 
ihe -food or manufacture the goods needed for 
nearly 100 million people. During that period 
Nigeria simply bought what the country thought 
il needed. There was plenty of money to slake a 
growing taste for luxury imports. 

The oil glut of the 1980s changed all that. In 
the past five years, Nigeria’s foreign exchange 
earnings have been' cut in half. Inflation is 
running at about 40 percent, interest on foreign 
debts eats op. nearly naif of export earnings, and 
unemployment is rising. 

But through it aH many Nigerians, particu- 
larly those who live in Lagos, have maintained 
their taste for consumer goods. That is why the 
bearded smuggler can cover his air fare to Tai- 
wan, pay expenses and make what he estimates 
as a 5600 profit with just two suitcases of baby 
clothes. 


f: 


Sandinists Juggle Economic Priorities 
To Overcome U.S. Political Pressure 


M 


By Joanne Omang 

Washinpar. Fast Senu e 

ANAGUA — Among the many an- 
noying, tiresome shortages here, last 
spring’s scarcity of light bulbs was far 
and away the most demoralizing. Since the San- 
dinists took power in 1979, most of Nicaragua's 
working poor always had had at least one naked 
bulb to prove their dirt-floor cardboard shacks 
were a step above the abject povertv of their 
grandparents. 

But now when that one bulb blew there were 
no replacements, and they were left to brood in 
the dark over all their other problems, in a 
darkened dty already deprived of street lights 
by a government economy move. 

Just as die unorganized resentment over ev- 
erything else wrong here seemed about to jell for 
once on the light- bulb issue, a cargo ship arrived 
from the Soviet Union loaded with nothing but 
light bulbs. They were smaller and dimmer than 
the regular bulbs, but they worked fine and 
everybody relaxed. 

The Sandinists managaH once again to 
loosen the economic and political noose with 
which the Reagan administration hopes to 
strangle the revolution. 

U.S. policy here is based on the theory that 
military pressure from the U.S.-backed “con- 
tra™ guerrillas wall unseat the government, either 
with an ordinary military victory or by creating 
so much economic and social disruption that the 
Sandinists will be forced by tbar own people 
“to cry unde,” as President Ronald Reagan pm 
iL 

The Sandinists now let visitors know they are 
prepared to run the Nicaraguan economy into 
the ground to defy Mr. Reagan’s threatl Lest 
this seem to be mere rhetoric, they also are 
w illing to demonstrate that they are minutely 
aware of the precise level of popular resentment, 
and that they have evolved a Rube Goldberg 
defense system of controls, farce, blind eyes, 
bluff and jingoism to deal with it. 

This approach, they say, wiD keep their war 
machine operating, their people eating and their 
public services more or less in operation until 
the Yankees either give up and go away, negoti- 
ate terms recognizing the Sandmist revolution, 
or launch a full-scale invasion. There is no 
alternative, they say. 

“Our people understand very well that Ron- 
ald Reagan’s policy is to strangle us economical- 
ly until they rise up.™ said Defense Minister 
Humberto Ortega Saavedra. “But this has only 
strengthened their win to resist the United 
States. Suppose we do have to paralyze the 
country, stop the schools, live under siege condi- 
tions. Even then we win not surrender." 

Economic recovety. he said, is last on the 
Sandinist priority list, after an end to the fight- 
ing and a solution to the political turmoil that 
the war has stirred up. 

The government's severest internal critics be- 
lieve it, even as they deplore the results. “The 
Sandinists wiD never make any deal with the 


United States," said Dr. Emilio Alvarez Mon- worldwide, “the fauk of the capitalist economic 
trivan. an ophthalmologist and a leader of the system. 


largest of three splinters of the Conservative 
Party. “And the contras cannot possibly over- 
throw them. We hope that they will slowly 
moderate Lhemselves until they reach a point of 
tolerance by the United States, but we are not 
optimistic.” 

Virgilio Godov, the acerbic head of the Liber- 
al Independent Party, the permanent minority 
in the rubber-stamp Legislative Assembly, de- 
scribes Nicaragua’s internal situation as “a 
world of two levels: the visible and formal, 
where the rules are very clear and admirable; 
and the invisible world, which here is the real 
world and where the rules do not operate." 

The economy, he said, is a prime example. In 
theory, the government determines wage levels 
and controls prices, distribution and imports; 
although there are shortages everyone suffers 
equally. In practice, companies pay secret “bo- 
nuses,” which are illegal in a losing effort to 
retain good workers; prices are more than dou- 
bling every year despite the controls. Many 
services are exchanged on a barter basis; prod- 
uct distribution is handled chiefly by the black 
market, and imports are brought in almost com- 
pletely by individuals smuggling on a small scale 
while'offirials turn their backs. 

“We call it a semi-oiTIciaJ black market,” said 
a diplomatic analyst, “because they make al- 
most no effort to enforce the rules.*' 

In fact, the Sandinists bend their own rules so 
that they, too, can play. There are at least three 
legal exchange rates for dollars, depending on 
where one is and what one is buying. Anyone 
with dollars may shop at the local “diplomatic 
store™ for French wines. North American gro- 
ceries and appliances at prices reasonable by 
U.S. standards but astronomical in local terms. 

F OR example, foreigners are required to 
exchange S60 on arrival at the Managua 
airport at a rate of 28 cordobas to SI. The 
1.500-cordoba taxi ride to town therefore costs 
about 554. But aL the hold, SI will bring 630 


While the world crisis works itself through, 
however, economic news reports in the con- 
trolled media are carefully optimistic, and any- 
thing else is censored from the sole opposition 
newspaper. La Prensa. Word of new price con- 
trols on melons, a strike attempt at a furniture 
factory, the chronic gasoline shortage and a 
virus attack on the crucial cotton crop were all 
cut from recent editions. The Sandinists say that 
such stories would spark panic buying, and the 
controlled press minimizes the impact of the 
virus and praises the quality of the melons. 

I N the real world, however, anyone can drop 
by La Prensa's office and read the censored 
stories on the bulletin board, for that is 
another safety valve: It lends some validity to 
the Sandinists’ assertion that dissent is not sti- 
fled. 

In fact, dissent is carefully noted. The perva- 
sive Sandinist Defense Committees, the party 
organization headquarters on every city block 
and every rural neighborhood, have always kept 
track of everyone’s jobs, health status and pri- 
vate lives, allocating privileges and goodies 
while monitoring the decibel level of public 
grumbling and spotting potential resistance 
leaders. Resentment over economic conditions 
and the petty tyrannies of committee leaders, 
however, has risen recently to the point where 
the committees are now being reorganized “tc 
be more responsive to the community.™ said 
Interior Minister Tom&s Barge Martinez. 

He acknowledged that the committees had 
become "small centers of personal power” run 
in large port by former backers of the deposed 
dictator Anastasio Somoza who rushed to join 
the new organizations after the revolution “as a 
logical refuge to avoid punishment and repudia- 
tion™ by Lhe new leaders. The reorganization, he 
said, will consist mainly of “eliminating these 
bad people" from their jobs. The predictable 
result will be a rise in the committees' efficiency 
from the Sandmist point of view. 

It is a tacit recognition that tensions are 


cordobas, perfectly legally, so that the 1,500- mounting, but it is by no means the democrati- 


cordoba ride back to the airport costs only 
$238. On the black market, the exchange rate is 
about 800 to a dollar. 

The Sandinis ts know that the black market 
and the barter system are safety valves, supply- 
ing needs the government cannot meet, with 
exports at rock bottom because of the war (the 
Sandinist view) or because of structural mis- 
management (their critics’ view), the black mar- 
ket is just about the only source of foreign 
exchange with which to buy imports — and 
every machine, boll, spare pan, battery, drop of 
fuel and piece of paper in Nicaragua is import- 
ed. 

The leaders acknowledge that this surreal 
process has made de facto criminals out of their 
entire population, but they view it characteristi- 
cally as temporary, part of the disruption that 
precedes the revolutionary dawn. “This is not 
just a problem in Nicaragim but in all of Latin 
America,” President Daniel Onega Saavedra 
said. He attributed the phenomenon to crisis 


zation that the Reagan administration had pre- 
dicted would follow rising public discontent. As 
Mr. Godoy put it: “People are permitted to 
complain, but they can’t go any further than 
that. People worry that if they do anything, the 
army will take thar son, or their business will be 
closed or some import will be confiscated. 

“Whenever a small, organized resistance 
arises, something happens. We cannot get peo- 
ple out of their houses to a rally because we 
cannot give them a guarantee that nothing will 
happen afterward" 

By all these mechanisms, the Sandinists so far 
have avoided making any of the changes the 
Reagan administration predicted (hey would 
have to make as a result of rising pressure from 
the contras. In fact, U.S. administration offi- 
cials have noted in relation to other countries 
that Marxist governments are remarkably unre- 
sponsive to domestic complaint, so their argu- 
ment that lhe Sandinists can be forced to change 
their stripes has been curious from the outset. 


.r'T 


>,••1 





• * - : ! c . ' ’ 7 * .■ ; ’ “ • . 

J*V : :* ''/i - •> \ r :' '• - - ' 

£ 'V. •:£•••■*• * 








if ( wm 



3 


Y 


L-fcoiSEr: '5--; 


:■? 


Steatite seals — Indus Valley Civilization, 3,000 B.C. 


At Pakistan International, you’ll discover that 
our accomplishments can be traced 
to the beginning of civilization. 



^PIA 

Pakistan Intel 


Pakistan International 

Great people to fly with 


FLYING TO: ABU DHABI. AMMAN. AMSTERDAM. ATHENS. BAGHDAD. BAHRAIN. BANGKOK. BE LUNG. BOMBAY, 

CAIRO. COLOMBO. COPENHAGEN. DAMASCUS. DELHI. DHAHRAN. DHAKA. DOHA, DUBAI. FRANKFURT. 

ISTANBUL. JEDDAH. KATHMANDU, KUALA LUMPUR. KUWAIT, LONDON,. MANILA. MOSCOW, MUSCAT. NAIROBI. NEW YORK. 
PARIS, RIYADH. ROME, SANA'A. SINGAPORE. TEHRAN. TOKYO. TRIPOLI and 29 destinations within Pakistan. 

IAL(PAK)-B5 




















































































Ungaro sketches for the collections, 
above, and Valentino’s, right: 



The Skin 



By George Gndauskas 

P ARIS — AgoferB may be a grandmother at 
43, but she has The abflhy.to see through a 
child’s eyes. “I go inside the skin of people. I 
gel in,” the fashion designer said recently. 
“When I design for men, I thmk,-if I were a man, 
what would I like to wear? If I were four years old, 
what would I like to wear? 

“That’s what I try to do. It’s an exercise I’ve always 
done.** • 

So Agnis B explained the muxnatidnal oicegac of 
her ready-to-wear fashions, which she has been de- 
signing since 1976, when she’ set up in a converted 
butcher’s shop in the then-unfashionable LesHaHes . 
district of Pans. v ; - 

Moderately priced at 400 to 500 francs (abcmt -SSO 
to 560) a piece, her simple, uncluttered f ashions Have 
earned her 100 rnflUon francs so fat 1 this yeah- Her 
income in 1984 totaled 70jraIIBon francs. 

Agn£s B’s regular customers are said to indude due 
actresses Catherine Deneove/Isabefle Adjani and Jes- 
sica Lange; the singer-actors, David Dowie and Ma- 
donna; Philippe Starck, the architect, and Paloma 
Picasso. '• * 

Although Agnes B is but rare of many designers in 
this dty of fashion, she is a force in the French 
economy, so much so that President Francois Mitter- 
rand decorated her this year with the Ordie National 
du M6ritefor her service to French fashion, and to the 
French foreign trade balance. . 

The importance of French fashion in the country’s 
economy can be sceninfigares released by the F6dda- 
tion Fran^aise de la Couture du PrSl A Porter des 
Couturiers el des Crtateurs de Mode. 

In 1984, sales in France and for export totaled 12 
billion francs, with women’s ready-to-wear d o thin g 
accounting for 34 j percent, the hipest percentage, 'of 
the total Exports rose to 1.4 bUhon francs last year, 
according to the federation. . 

Sales made by affiliates and licensed representatives 
throughout the world totaled 15 billion francs, with 
women’s ready-to-wear capturing 35 percent of that 
figure. 

For the entire group of haute couture, couturiers’ 
ready-to-wear anddeagners’ ready-to-wear, the feder- 
ation said, net sales in France and'for export were 324 
billion, francs, and 17.5 bill ion francs for affiliates and . 
representatives around the world, _ •; . . . 

Agnfcs B is taking advantage of this rising spending 
in fashion. She is expanding. 

She has three boutiques for women in Paris, two in 
New York, one each in Lyons, . Aa-en-Provence, 
Montpellier and Amsterdam, and 10'in Japan. 

Soon, boutiques for women will appear in London 
and Milan. - 

New Agate B lines are also emerging to clothe 
everybody from infants and children to men and 
wintert, qnd those Wfnitrng antneriwng a Ktfle hit nicer, 
a little more expensive. 


P ARIS — Beyond the more obvious qualities 
that come to mind when thinking about this 
dty, one thing above all must be said: Paris is 
never, ever boring. Parisians are often bored, 
or at least they pretend they are, which makes one 
theorize that that could be the very reason that their 
dry is so lively. They are always trying to stir up some 
new controversy, competition or calamity to keep 
from getting bogged down in the quotidian. 

While others are drawn to the dty because of its 
irresistible melange of history, beauty and opportuni- 


” ' " " ■ » -jr, 

- *• t c.*“ - — 





",r - 1 




A short, swingy suit for toe uunei 
woman and below, body-conscious 
dressing from Claude Montana. 


suit for the Chanel 


ty, the Parisians occupy themselves with the business 
of keeping themselves amused with such activities as 
spectacular art exhibits — the one that has captured 
the imagination for the moment is the collection of 
more than 200 paintings, 158 sculptures and thou- 
sands of drawings and engravings by Picasso; extrava- 
gant social events; discovering new shops and restau- 
rants and, for the next few days, many wiD be 
preoccupied with the latest news on the fashion front 
as France’s finest offer their ideas on what women win 
want to wear next spring. On that subject the mood is 
ebullienL 

As one fashion observer noted: “La mode est a la 
mode encore which basically says it alL A renewed 
sense of exdtemeni and confidence surrounds the 
spring/ summer ready-to-wear collections, and even 
the clothes tend to reflect this spirit. 

Color, body-conscious fabrics, ultra-feminine de- 
signs, more dresses ih.m in seasons past and plenty of 
slon is what the top designers have on their minds for 
next year. Dreary colors and outsized camouflage 
layers are pass*: the body is in again. After all, women 
aren't working out to work wonders on their bodies to 
conceal them in folds of formless fabric. 

• Good news, though, from Karl Lagerfeld who offers 
an encouraging note for those whose proportions tend 
mare toward the Ruben esque than the reed. He says: 
“Hips are in. Shoulders are not important anymore. 
The big, bulky look is over. With huge shoulders 
women were competing with men, they don't need to 
prove anything anymore, not like thatl" 

He added, “By concentrating on the hips and waist 
we are putting attention on one area where men can 
never compete; men don’t have hips." (Of course 
untold numbers of women wish they didn't either, hut 
that is another story.) 

All in all an upbeat spirit permeates the dty. Practi- 
cally no one talks about socialism these days and when 
they do, his usually at some marvelous champagne- 
drenched dinner party where everyone is carefully 
coiffed, costumed and accessorized to the hilt The 
only comments seem to be that it is almost over and 
thai President Francois Mitterrand's policies are get- 
ting more like Giscard d’Estaing’s every day. Mean- 
while Raymond Bane, a presidential hopeful, sit 5 
quietly in the background watching and waiting while 
everyone talks about him —even such an unexpected 
supporter as popular song writer and singer Serge 

I jrma 

Besides, the French have never been ones to stay 
heme and dwell on the negative aspects of life when 
they can go out to some excellent little bistro or some 
newly in night spot and argue about the miseries of 
existence over good food and an excellent wine. 

Lately, the most popular spots to see and be seen 
ininclude the rejuvenated nightclub Les Bains 
Douches, which is now supposed to be called Les 
Bains, but everyone forgets; Pastel’s and Magnetic 
Terrace for good food and piano bars (the Terrace is 
also a hot spot for brunch); Balajo on Monday nights 
for fast dancin g and the rest of the week for ballroom 
dancing — naturally the crowds reflect the atmo- 
sphere. There is also’ a nightclub, Atmosphere, which 
draws a young “kool gang" crowd. 

A new name in trendy land is Caffc de la Jatte, where 
on a good night the food is fine and so is the crowd. 
Two popular old standbys that always deliver are 
(Continued on Page 11) 


Above, Karl 


over Ms pale 
gray suit to 
emphasize the 
hip& Right, 
Yves Saint 
Laurent favors 
a neat, no- 
nonsense 
approach to 
spring. 



' ' ' - V'J-.’V ’*$ 





Jean-Panl Gaultier suggests red cross- 
country ski boots as an accessory for 
his skinny suit and ruffly petticoat. 







Stacks of AgnAs B tee-shirts. 


This is all quite a leap for the daughter and grand- 
■ daughter of conservative Versailles banisters who 
once trained at the Edrie des Beaux-Arts to become a 
mntwiw curator. 

But in running an international fashion business, 
Agnte B has the help of her second husband, Jean- 
Renfc de Fleurieu, who takes care of the financial 
aspects of the operation, in addition to managing the 
family’s farming estate. Fleurieu is assisted by 
Etienne, doe of Agnte B’s twin sons of hear first 
marriage. 

Explaining her fashion philosophy. Amis B — her 


company uses the surname initial of her first husband, 
Christian Bourgois, a publisher — said, “I prefer 
dothes to fashion! 

“I Hkc undated clothes, not clothes designed for 
today. I like clothes you can keep for years. I like very 
classic dothes, in fact, quite classic.” 

T ht* ilwilcing Tefleer« her «Hy days in the h nariess. 

what She worked for people like Dorothte Bis and 
Pierre tTAlby and found she disliked the idea of 
planned obsolescence in fashion: trimmings and de- 
tails added to designs to date each season’s offering. 

. “I would design a jacket for Pierre cTAJby, and they 
would say: T need pockets, hiring, cuffs, wider or 

narrower lapels; it’s not a real jacket.’ What they 

meant was that it should have trimmings, details, to 
make last season’s model outdated," she told a a inter- 
viewer recently. 

Agnte ]B works in classic materials such as cottons, 
woof and silk, too, but uses some nylon and rayon. 

• She. never does what other designers are doing, 
because; as she pots it, “I never go and see what they 
are doing!" 

She knows, however; what they are doing. 

Of her nearest Mil more expensive competitor, 
Kenzo, she said, “He makes funny dothes." Of the 
new look that Karl Lagerfeld designed for Chanel, it 
.could be less showy.more refined., she told The Sun- 
day. Times of London . 

“Itfs a bit obvious,” she said. 

: She is at a Loss to explain why she has no competi- 
tors ather price levd, since considerable profit seems 
to be offered, there. 

!“L dotft know, I don’t know,” she shrugged, “be- 
! cause -ifacy sell . very few dothes expensively. I sell 
Continued <ra Next Page) 




Bangles, Beads Banish Black 




P ARIS — Parisians have shrugged off those 
low-profile little black dresses and are dress- 
ing up in a fabulous array of sequined and 
lavishly embroidered gowns. After all, there 
is only so much one can do with a little black dress, 
while the possibilities of embroidery are unlimited, as 
demonstrated in the recent couture collections and at 
gli ttering balls in the Chiteau de Chantilly and the 
Optea. 

Embroidery has long been an indispensable ingredi- 
ent of the couture evening dress. Now the couturiers 
and their exclusive clientele cannot get enough of 
bangles and bugle beads. 

"Embroideries have never been as rich and sumptu- 
ous as they are now," said Jean-Guy Vermont, one of 
the handful of little known brodeurs who work closely 
with the big- name designers. “People seem to need to 
really let go and dress up to the nines." 

Swinging jet beads that move as the wearer walks 
were embroidered on lace for Saint Laurent and serve 
as accents for a sequined Dior ensemble. Lamfe at 
Givenchy glittered with large motifs of colored stones 
in the form of flowers. Large stones again provided the 
focus to a theme in gold on a Dior skirt that resembled 
abstract an. For Hanae Mori, Verm on l was inspired 
by 18th-century ironwork to create a gold-on-gold 
pattern shining with large faux sapphires. 

Bui although these master brodeurs often play a 
crucial part in the creative process of a collection, 
when tiie results are acclaimed on the runway, it is the 
designer alone who lakes a bow. 

"We are the violets of haute couture," said Francois 
Lesage. whose firm dates from 1860, when it was 
founded by Napoleon Ill's embroiderer, MichonneL 
“They can smell our perfume, but they don’t know 
where to look for the flower.” Lesage’s sequinned and 
beaded chandeliers. Boufle commodes and grandfa- 
ther docks for Karl Lagerfeld’s “Furniture” collection 
dresses were the talking point of the designer ready-to- 
wear shows for the falL 

Lesage, who claims to do 99 percent of Chanel 
embroidery' and 75 percent of Saint Laurent's, did 
cameos on a marbled background and baroque sculp- 
tures of big colored stones and velvet appliques for 
(Continued on Prise 12) 



By Jean Rafferty 



Lesage beading for a gumptious Renaissance look. 













Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 




A SPECIAL REPORT ON FRENCH FASHION 








/ 


■ne- . v.*-f 

* • * v<: 


' - ./ ! 


... - 









-■^$j 





6 


: 


' ’ •• v »? ' 

• • • v V ' • 

• 







Jewelry: Now the Fran 


■■ 




fTK<a/JnvliiaB Hurt 


P ARIS — As Coco Chanel, always a 
woman who appreciated the important 
distinction between getting dressed 
and getting noticed, .so aptly demon- 
strated, masses of baubles and beads piled on 
with insouciant abandon makes all the differ- 
ence in the world. Given the choice, heaven 
knows no woman with any sense would rather 
have a drawer full of les bijoux fantaisie than the 


real stuff; but in the world of frivolous fashion, 
f rankl y fake jewels are the most amusing little 
extrasone can find, especially now. 

Not at all shy or understated, the best of the 
best are mostly trig, always colorful, usually 
artfully designed, and the really good news is 
that they are often funny. 

Billy Boy’s papier-machfe brooch, for exam- 
ple, in the shape of. well-glossed crimson lips 


with a grin of pearls makes you sraDfi jastwfeak 
at iL Scooter’s huge gold-fink bracelet, 
enormous “gold" coins, clanks in self - 
defiance of its pricey prototype, auf 
Astuguevielle. at Comptoir tie Kit 
question: If jewelry can be made oui S 
metals, why can’t it be constructed $w*,bfe‘ 
bits of wool jersey? ■ 

— urm&£ 


Here are some of Paris' best selling 
bijoux fantaisie. Upper left. Scooter's 
“goHT coin drop earrings. Left, 
amusing accessories in felt and 
enameled metal by Chris tain 
Astuguevielle at Comptoir de Kit 
Above, Billy Boy's whimsical designs 
sold at Jansen and righ{ more “gold” 
coin interpretations from Scooter. 


f O- 



welcomes you to its new boutique 
for evening ready-to-wear 


Designing From Inside the Skin 


at 1 rue de la Paix - first floor- Paris 2* - Tel. (1) 261 58 15 


Opened since October 10 


HANAE MORI 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
many clothes, not too expensively. 
It's not their idea for clothes. I 
think clothes exist when they are 
worn, when people wear them." 

In her shops can be found teen- 
agers and grandmothers alike, 
checking out her undated designs, 
or maybejust looking for that inex- 
pensive "fun" piece. 

"For instance," she pointed to a 
rack in her workshop overlooking 
the noisy Rue de Rivoli. “I made 
zebra pants. They are 400 francs. 
You can buy them, and you can 
wear them when you like ii. 


“If you pay 2.000 francs, it’s cra- 
zy. But. if you pay 400 francs," she 
said, "it’s all right." 

Proud of seeing her fashions 
worn on the streets of Paris and 
elsewhere, Agnes B said. “I enjoy iL 
I think it's nice. 1 like h. 

“I like to see the way people wear 
them, very different, one from the 
other. But they're simple pieces, 
and they can express themselves 
with my clothes." 

Her clothing is sold only in her 
own shops, staffed by her own peo- 
ple. Part of their job is to make 
customers feel comfortable and not 


pressured into buying. Her own 
shops are preferred as sales outlets 
“because they are quite fragile, my 


clothes." 

“If you mix them with funny 
dothes, they disappear. So I prefer 
they be in the right place, quite 
simple, very often with white tiles, 
movie posters and flowers. They 
are better like that." 

“I don’t want to sell to anybody, 
anywhere," she said. 

She does sell, however, to a de- 
partment store in Japan and to 
three stores in New York, including 
Bloonringdate’s, where a weaker 


dollar against the franc is an ad- 
vantage to shoppers, “and that’s 
good for American people," she 
said. 

She also said a new line, Agnfes B 


Special, is in the works. For it, 
clothes will be done in .very fine 


BOUTIQUES 




17/ 19 avenue Montaigne - Paris-8 e 
62, faubourg Saint-Honore - Paris-8 e 



PRESENTATION OF THE OUTSTANDING 
NEN CREATIONS BY QAUM" 


clothes will be done in .very fine 
material and in clsssc shapes, such 
as a “pure cashmere jacket that you 
can keep for years." 

Asked whether a more expensive 
line would move her toward haute 
couture and the elite, she said it 
would not “But I would like to 
have that sort of fine," she added. 
“I think I would enjoy doing it" 

Agnfcs B has no plans to join the 
ready-to-wear federation, with its 
980 firms and 70,000 workers, most 
of them women. 


Agnfes B, 
right Below, 
the designer’s 
latest 
look for 
men and 



: a' 

A ^ 




, 






cnsnl 
**T FRANCE 

COUPE - RIVIERA . F 3250 

AU VASE ETRUSQUE 


11, place de la MadeMne - PARIS 8* 


She prefers an independence, al- 
lowing her to see things a bit differ- 
ently. 

“I’m like a franc tireur , someone 
who shoots down from the. roof 
when the others are . . Jar below,” 
she said. ' 


Oalumbia liftoff erf Kenn edy Space Center. 


m 







Challenger Astronaut Donald Peterson in Space. 










mm 


*':■ .r. - 


N» 9625 MifMttB 


Coach* Bags and Belts are made out of 
a remarkable full-grain leather that 
has not been covered over with paints 
or artificial scalers. 


‘v 


This leather burnishes beaurifidly, 
develops a rich-looking patina, and 
takes on character as it is worn. 


■r v'jr. 


The CoacK Store 


New York 754 Madison Avenue 
JKubm&on, D.c: 1214 Wisconsin Avenue 
Paris 23 Rue Jacob 




IpalSg 


li« 1 , ,m«i ,1-rapgi^Era 

DS3 ES fc'TCT IQ 

1 1». 


m53E!3 

I' !■ 


Love heroic adventure? Get twice as much for your money. 

Take advantage of our speaal rates for new subscribers and 
we'll give you an extra month of Tribs fee with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand price 
in most European countnes! Twice as many heroes and lots, lots 
more in the International Herald Tribune, the global newspaper. 

Mill) 

To: Subscr^ion AAaxjger, international Herald Tribune. 

181 , avenue Charles-de-Gaufe, 92521 NeuilfyCedex, Franca Tel^ 747 07 29. Tebfc6l2832. 

Please enter my s ubscri ption for: 

_ 12months( + j£^) [J 6rrKV7tfo ( + ^) Q 3monfhs ( + ^ 
Mycheckisendosed. |~ | PtecsedxvgemyCTecftcardcicoxffifc 







VL *** ov.*T r • : 


Afnencan Dinars 

icm^ bpreo Wr--l lgg- 




| LLi!LMM53BBE3M 1 W l | 
| E5aME3MEI1 ME3ggII 


Cad account nunber 


Cord expiry cfate 





*>■» ' -v }/. 1 

- ./ft: . ^ A \ . 


L'ECHO 


Gty/Gxrrtry 


16-1085 


: JAEG® FRANCE •• 

5 Faubourg St.-Honorfc, 75008 Paris. 
TeL (1) 26532.46 . • 


L 


DE LECOANET HEMANT 
’ 4 24 OCT 1985 

5 RUE LAMENNAIS VII] 

I EL 2 2 E 24 24 

P A R , c 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 198£ 


Page li 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON FRENCH FASHION 


-c • i • 








p. 

* 


c 


H 




Tr-rm AR&— Nooth«' cay in 
the world offers qrihe the . 
;R~ : samerkdmessand variety 
-* = ‘, •. of stfert fashion. 

- ^ When it comes tocrcatfvc dress-' 
mg; Paris s a panorama of pare 
Stteet thcateEMth a^ttsh,new 
prodiBciKffl every day. ■ 

In' the genealogy of street fash- . 
kmapaztiqdarlyiiiyaitm 
turiiK becomes a “look/Vwhkii. 
then evolves into a tread (after ■ -. 
^ h nioves thnM^ asaics4rf'; 
life cycles' that can indode: iriter- 
pnaaikro by major designer, - 
raoci-cff by medium-pricedHong 
Kxxig manufac t u rer, markdown 
rack and sometimes resuscitation 
in a no-iron, man-made fiber for • 

sale in the budget deparwnent). 

At the moment the ^gjelodt 
that seems to be headed ihthatdi- 
"reetkm is the long, skiany straight - 
ddrt teamed with dflwr a short- 




lv\; ' 







The Revved- Up Classics Arrive 

P ARIS — Classics will always be classics — or upbeat displays of hot pink and grass-green 
will they? Some of Paris’s most venerable jackets, oversize long-sleeved wool polo shirts 
bastions of conservatism have added a sur- long slim-knit skirts over form-fitting knit ski pa 

nrisins dose of nen to this vear’s collections. ri«*n numl* and neaeock blue and vast eentn 




P ARIS — Classics will always be classics — or 
will they? Some of Paris’s most venerable 
bastions of conservatism have added a sur- 
prising dose of pep to this year's collections. 
One can almost hear the motorcycle set revving up in 
approval over the black kathor “Perfecto" dresses 
with their metal-studded collars at Hermfcs, shrine of 
the silk-scarf brigade. 

Hermes’s 23-year-old stylist, Eric Bergere, has in- 
stilled new pizzazz and humor into the line. His black 
patent leather strapless camisole, jacket and skirt 
provided a saucy contrast to the traditional Hermfcs 
camel-hair coats and silk-scarf prints in this fall’s 
collection. 

That preppy mainstay, the Lacoste crocodile shin, 
has lost its sleeves. The new version, test-launched this 
summer and a sellout success, features the sleeves cut 
out high on the shoulder and will be back in force next 
summer. The ladies of a certain age and certain style 
who make up the stalwart Rodier clientele were 
shocked this autumn when they came in to replace 
their classic fawn jersey trousers. They were met with 


upbeat displays of hot pink and grass-green wool 
jackets, oversize long-sleeved wool polo shirts over 
long slim- knit skins over form-fitting knit ski pants in 
deep purple and peacock blue and vast geometric- 
motif pullovers in bright colors. The new look, a 
radical departure from the Rodier image, demon- 
strates Rodier's new desire to dress a “resolutely 
modem, active woman who loves life and fashion." 

It is hardly a revolution at Charvet, where elegant 
Parisian gentlemen stock up on custom-made shins. 
Nonetheless, there is a new emphasis on women, from 
the first floor's patterned silk scarves and custom- 
made shoes, to the second's shirts and nightdresses, to 
the fourth floor s low-necked, satin-collared tuxedo 
jackets paired with trousers or skirt. 

Even Celine, the kingdom of the tailored gabardine 
skirt and low-heeled moccasin, has a new kicky accent. 
They have brought out a line of leopard-look pony 
skin, including a large, leather-trimmed shopping bag. 
high-heeled boots and earrings. 

—JEAN RAFFERTY 


Fashion in the Heart of Rms 

OCTOBER 19-20-21 


arts 



Forget Detente: 
Paris Wonders 
IfRadsaG . 

Is Really Ode ; 


P ARIS — From time (o - • 
time, truly meaningful - 
events occur in the world, 
giving one pause; allowing 
a moment of reflecuoB to contem- 
plate, notso muchtbe meaning of 
life, but rather same of its mare" 
crucial nuances, F(» example, that 
burning question; Is Raisa Gorba- 
chev chic or is she merdy elegant? 
Never mind about detente, for sev- 
eral days the issue of Mrs. Gorba- 
chev’s fashion sense wasiar more 
riveting news. Should the Russian ' 
leader’s wife have worn that gray 
suit twice on one official visit— 
and in Paris of all dries? Now real- 
ly. Doesn't she own any" Hack 
stockings? And on and on . . 

Now we all knowwbat she 
brought with her to wear, but the _ 
big question is: Did she buy any- 
thing fztmi Yves Saint. Lament to 
take home? No, is the official word 
from Clara Saint at Saint "Laurent 
“But she left with her arms full of 
bottles of Opium. Shesaid it is her 
favorite perfume.” - 

— UnTIAG. JETT 


FASHION 
IN PARIS 

. A wide selection.-; 

of English; . American 

. " and Fren ch books 


A Royal 
Night 

ARES —After a day at the 
^ pices — - the Prix de TArc 
de Triompbe, to be spedf- 
Sv the race of the fall sea- 
son— a coupje hundred top names 
met later, for champagne and (tin- 
ner at jhe.- Hotel; George V. All 
mannegafc riaya lty from Saudi Ara- 


bia -of tided" English sprinkled in 
Ahe crowd!' of smart commoners 
tumedoutm their most opulent 
grand entrance gowns accessorized 
by plenty of jewelry. (Fashion 
note: Gcdd, as in sequins, embroi- 
dery, luast and pipm& is a top 
choice and it looks as if long gloves 
and wide chokers are having a.re- 
vivaL) The hot topic of conversa- 
tion was a continuation of the 
grouting that started at the race in 
the afternoon when Danid Wflden- 
stdn’s hone, Sagace, was disquali- 
fied as the big winner because Us 
jockey was charged with bumping. 
As a. result, the bumped horse. 
Rainbow Quest, was declared the 
victor, a decision that was met with 
a chorus of unsportsmanlike boos 
and hisses: 

— LEXTIIAG. JETT 




»• Jf 1 • w 


Paris Life: 
Searchfor 
New Thrills 


(Continued From Page 9) 

Casters, with its fashion-conscious 
bon-dric bon-genre radars, and 
La Maison du Caviar, with its ex- 
cellent food and mixed clientele of 
famous and/or pretty faces. 

To replenish (be wardrobes and 
keep that competitive- edge, French 
women are ever on the prowl for 
something new and different As a 
result, boutiques wax and wane in 
popularity, and around any comer 
it is possible to discover a little 
shop that did not exist two months 
before and may not exist six 
months hence as designers and re- 
tailers try to keep their fickle diems 
satisfied. 

For up-to-the-minute skirts and 
" sweaters, the place of the hour is 
Joseph Tricot; for sublime cash- 
meres, Hobbs is the place; Premier 
Eiage is a favorite spot for accesso- 
ries. Accessoire Diffusion report- 
edly has the best ballerinas in town, 
wbileStephme KeEan has gHtzy 
flats plastered with wildly colored 
sequins. For the classical due look 
that is so coveted, many women are 
running to Peggy Roche’s bou- 
tique, and for clothes best de- 
scribed as “sexy, eccentric and fun- 
ny," Yvan et Mania is not to be 
missed. 


AUBERCY 

Over 40 years 
of traditional 
perfection 




i (Fbcedch Boose) 

Honcnc PanpQp fMxHcmc) 
ZhrimXT, 53000 Bo mfcnrc 





GA 0 CWAM 

224 rue de Rivoli 
75001 Paris 
n/feL 42.60.76.07 

.“fAvaikble fcoin bur; 
< : stockand/or mailed 
anywhere in the world 


Boutiques 

NINA RICCI 

Paris 

39, Avenue MONTAIGNE 
17, Rue FRANgOIS-r 

Ready to Wear - Shopping - Week-End , 

. Sweaters, Pullovers, Scarves, Fashion Accessories, 
.Perfumes, Leather Bags, Costume Jewelry, Gifts 
FAMOUS DEPARTMENT "ROMANTIC NIGHT-WEAR* 

OPEN MONDAy TO FRIDAY (from 10 sun. to 6:30 p.m.) 
AND SATURDAY (dosed from 1 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.) 


Specialist of classic 1009F pure 
imported cashmere from 
Scotland since 54 years. 

▲NAM 

cashmere 

Different styles in various sizes and 
colors with matching accessories 
(starves, socks...) 

DUTY FREE 

Visa ■ American Express 

IS Awe. Vkrcr-Hogp, Pant It? (Emile). 
Td.. (1) 30rL67.ji 


Leather craftsmen for the best 
designer labels. 



NOVA PARK ELYSEES 

51, rue Francois-1" 75008 Paris Tel. 562.63.64 - Telex 643256 F 


ACME 

ALGO 

CERRARI 

CLAUDE PATRICK 
CLAUDE RIHA 
COCKTAIL COUTURE 

(Styliste M. TELLIN) 

DANIEL DIMER 
ELISABETH WESSEL 
FRANCK OLIVIER 
GEORGYA 
HENRI RAVOUX 

(BABOUCHKA) 

KAZA-SPORT 

KAZAZIAN 

LASSO 

NORBERT NEL 

(IDEM DE N. NEL) 

PAULETTE BURAUD 
PRINCIPE 

TREVISE COUTURE 

COLLECTION SPRING - SUMMER 86 

TRADE ONLY 


THE MOST 

■SB 




QFfKttl sptwsra 

MEUBEflOFTKE fflBfCH-AWEKCA* 
COMMITTEE FOB fttStOBATHIH 
■ BFTHSKIUf Otlffifirr 


Christian Dior, Courreges, Chanei, 
Revillon, Yves Saint-Laurent, Kenzo, 
Guy Laroche, Daniel Hechter... 
The latest French fashions year 
round at Le Printemps in Paris. Find 
the top designers on "Rue de la 
Mode", our smart in-store fashion 
street Elegant tableware by 
Christofle, Limoges, Baccarat... A 
wide selection of prestigious 
perfumes... Plus a special welcome 
for visitors to Paris : tourist 
discounts, interpreters, credit cards, 
currency exchange. 



v^nLAtt-iohiXe "Zi 


64 . Bd HoussmorMi-PcHis^ 

Metro Havre Caumortin 










Tlit Cicuivr llminr-i. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON FRENCH FASHION 


Bangles and Beads Are Banishing Black 


(Continued From Page 9) 

Saint Laurent, beaded entire dress- 
es for Dior's Gustav Klimt collec- 
tion. created Chinese porcelain mo- 
tifs for Chanel's Watteau models 
and trompe l'oeil Chanel gold 
chains for the ready-to-wear. For 
Scherrer's paisley patterns, he used 
"broken glass” mosaic beads from 
the 1920s. and for Hanae Mon. 
created a sheath of real gold de- 
rived from the gilding technique 
used on Paris's Invalides dome. Le- 
sage has done beaded versions of 
New York subway graffiti for La- 
gerfeld. 

The brodeurs bring out collec- 
tions of from 150 to 200 motifs 
twice a year before the couture col- 
lections. Each sample means 40 to 
50 hours of work The raoLifs are 
modified to the individual tastes of 
each designer, who makes a selec- 
tion from samples presented exclu- 
sively to him. Because it is too early 
to know what themes a designer 
may choose, the brodeurs must try 
to outguess the designers or stimu- 
late them to move in certain direc- 
tions. 

“We have to preview fashion. 


know where it is going,” Lesage 
said. “That is the drama. Embroi- 
dery isn't difficult- What is difficult 

is the choice of direction." 

They look for inspiration where 
the designers do. in current an 
shows, in the countries where a 
designer has traveled- “Sometimes 
I get it wrong.” Vermont admitted, 
“and have to redo motifs at the Iasi 
minute based on another painter, 
another country or a different flo- 
ral theme." 

As the collections loom, embroi- 
dery ateliers work night, day and 
weekends, putting in up to 5,000 
manhours a week, to get the proto- 
types ready. The brodeurs employ 
about 50 to 60 workers in Paris and 
an equal number outside. Among 
them is a surprising number of 
young women. “The average age at 
my Paris atelier, including me. is 
29." Lesage said. 

Materials they use include Japa- 
nese pearls, mml beads, mirrors, 
wood, cork, straw, paste stones in 
jewel colors or semi-precious 
stones like jet. tapis lazuli tur- 
quoise and coral, sequins in hun- 
dreds of shapes, such as hearts. 


-'-v ~+**'*** ; * 

. 'v -• 



of hand sewing plus hundreds more 
for the drawings and cost 400,000 
francs for the embroidery alone. 
The Saint Laurent fish-scale dress 







dik brandsma 


J 

. e 

- ’«* . 

• ' - 

•:UV ■ -r'- • 


*«'•.. ' r "‘ 


SHOWROOM HOTEL LOTTI 

SALON VENDOME OCT 17-23 
TEL 260.37.34 


Kari Lagerfeld's ultragtitten “Paris, Texas.” The dressy 
bead work is by Jean-Guy Vermont. 


lain, mother-of-pearl or iridescent embroidery sculptures. 


DIK BRANDSMA 17 RUE RICHER TEl. 5 2 3. 1 4.7 7 


junction with satin, silk, velvet, can dip at will into his impressive 
moire, lame and lace, even towel- stock acc umulated over 125 years 


Custom-tailoring: 
one of the great addresses in Paris 


Having your clothes made to measure is not just an elegant thing to do. 

Ft also makes a good deal of economic sense. 

IFJien you have a suit or a shirt custom-tailored at Lanvin , everything is 
done by hand: not only what you can see, but also all those tiny but vital 
finishing touches which you cannot . 

Today, the workshops on the Faubourg Sainl-Honore arc probably the last 
ones in Paris where you can have all your clothes, from head to feet, made to 
measure for you. There are ninety people there, and they work with the same 
attention to detail as in former times. 

If on top qf this perfection in workmanship you lake into account the unique 
quality of the fabrics, you will easily understand that a garment that costs 
two or three times as much as a ready-made one qften lasts four or five times 
as long. This simple reasoning is one that numerous people subscribe to. 


LANVIN 

15. rue du Faubourg Sainl-Honore, 75008 Paris - Tel. 265.14.40 


Not onl- 


Louis\titton . 

ly a celebrated canvas. 



V 

-bU Louis Vuitton. Beyond rhe fa- 
mous “Monogram ” canvas, Louis Vuitton 
represents a unique concept of luggage 
and accessories. 

A rare attention to detail : An authentic 
Louis \ uitton is identified by each small 
detail: hand-made handles, naturally oak- 
tanned leather, patented pick-proof locks, 
rhe luxury of leather linings... 

A commitment to quality 
With skill and imagina- 
tion, our master crafts- 


‘S. 



men choose the materials that make each 
trunk, suitcase and bag an outstanding 
example oi durability, strength and refine- 
ment. 

Expert advice: Selecting luggage is not 
an easy task. Each model (suitcase, travel- 
bag or accessory) must be chosen, or even 
custom-made, raking into consideration 
both its form and function. 
At Louis Vuitton, the staff is 
trained to offer the best direc- 
tion and assistance. 


- Discover Louis Vuitton 
at the exclusive Louis Vuitton stores: 


Paris • Nice • Monte -Carlo • London • Brussels • Geneve • Lausanne ■ Zurich • Milan 
Florence > Dusseldorf . Frankfurt • Hjmburg - Munich. 


5 LOUIS VUITTON I 

f MAUEnRAWrs % 


fdMOK EM BM . 


in lo shades of sequins and beads L 
cost S250.000. * 

Some of Vermont’s clients arrive 
with jewel cases, their drawers full 
of diamonds, sapphires, emeralds 
or rubies to inspire a matching em- 
broidery. For the wife of the emir 
of Bahrain, he designed a sapphire 
blue and crystal flower motif she 
wore with a matching sapphire and 
diamond necklace. Once he set up C> 
an atelier in the suite of a grand 
Parisian hotel as his seamstresses 
sewed one- and two-carat dia- 
monds into the centers of embroi- 
dered flowers under the watchful 

gaze of armed guards. ~~~ Ooufehao 

Usage’s price breakdown is 120 From fefr Claude Pefin, Doby Broda and Renata 

to 140 francs an hour cost price, •• ' 

which he sells for 300 to 400 francs FTTTt (• '■ 

to the designer. An embroidered m 

bodice might cost from 30,000 to If ft? X ttlM X f£# SC/# I 
60,000 Cranes; an entirely beaded 

dress like Dior’s Klim t models „ TZ i Z ^ lets including Saks Fifth Avenue, 

reaches 80,000 to 120.000 francs. By Monique de L ancon Benders and Neunan Marcos. 

The final price of a dress is usually Command of color is still her 

doable that for a small motif, less ■ ARIS — A low-profile clincher. A sensational summer *86 
for a large one. group of intensely person- “knitted linen” coat is woven in 

“That’s the difference with New 1 al Paris designers have two jacquard patterns of stars and 
York,” said Lesage, who works - R- things in common: they moons, tigers- and elephants, 
with Bill Blass, Geoffrey Beene, are all women and they design es- clowns and acrobats, typically 
Oscar de la Renta and Carolyne sentially for themselves. against a vivid yellow badegrouna. 

Roehm. “There, $1,000 of embroi- To distinguish them from prfet-4- Lame jackets and bouffant pants 



r I i}I& 


The' 


P 


„ JZ ; T 12 lets including Saks Fifth Avenue, 

By Monique de I ancon Benders and Neunan Marcos. 

C omman d of color is still her 
ARIS — A low-profile clincher. A sensational summer *86 
group of intensely person- “knitted linen” coat is woven in 
al Paris designers have two jacquard patterns of stars and 
i hin ge in common: they moons, tigers- and elephants, 




Roehm. “There, $1,000 of embroi- 


Lame jackets and bouffant pants 


triangles, squares, petals and ing, to produce classic patterns, ex- 
leaves. in brilliant or mat, porcc- quisiie trompe l'oeil or startling 


day is sold for $5,000. It makes porter and couture, trade buyers are made in emerald, tangerine, bo- 
French haute couture less expen- have come to call them the “Paris banian blue or canary yellow. 

Renata, by contrast, keys evoy- 


sive than American ready-to-wear Personals/ 


tones accented by braid and silver, Vermont travels to Czech os lova- 


gold and multi-colored threads, kia, Austria, Scandinavia and Ja- 
These arc used in imaginative con- pan in search of mate rials lifsnge 


in work done.” They may be less than household thing to tones that flatter the femi- 

Lesage is modest about the origl- names, but’Arlette Chacok, Gaude nine skin: champagne, salmon 
nality of most designs. “Sometimes Petin. Renata, Marine Bins, Doby pink, the palest nay and a vay 
I think evaythinehm* been done,” Broda and a dozen more are some- precise beige “without pink or yd- 


1 think everything has been done,” 


he said. “The only novelty is to times already better known in low,” keyed to ivory. 


ik oryet- 
praetke, 


maim n«w marriages rnatariak- T Montreal or Frankfurt than along she adds two vivid times to her 


I plus 40 tons of slock from France's 
oldest bead suppliers that he 
bought when they went out of busi- 
ness two years ago. 

Although a variety of material is 
important, it plays only a small 
part in the cost of the final embroi- 
dery, about 5 percent to 10 percent, 
according to Lesage. What pushes 
the price up are the hours of pains- 
taking hand sewing of as many as 
700,000 sequins and miles of gold, 
silver or silk thread onto a single 
dress. One dress Vermont beaded 
for Pierre Cardin weighed more 
than 20 pounds (9 kilograms). 

The minimum time spent on a 
dress is about 50 hours for an em- 
broidery at waist and cuffs, for ex- 
ample. which costs 15,000 francs 
($1,860). The maximum? “Unlimit- 
ed," Vermont said. “Most of my 
customers are even too exclusive 
for haute couture. Each dress is 
created especially for them.” A 
bridal dress destined for a petrol 
princess can consume 2,000 hours 


have made 20,000 samples and if I Paris’s Avenue Montaigne and the understated palette each season “to 


am honest, I think I have only done Faubourg Sl Honori. put a pulse beatinto the pastels" — 

15 real originals.'' Each has a clear-cut image. And this time, lacquer red arid a throb- 

His favorite embroidered dress as more , and more shoppers learn to bing gokten yeBow 
changes color from white to black rec 9S mzc 10 a **** . ^ «“? sensuality die injects 
according to the direction from designer idiom, they look each sea- into simple lmes is strongly evident 
which ills viewed son for an update of the style they for next summer in a new breed of 


Each has a clear-cut image. And this time, lacquer red and a throb- 
as more and more shoppers learn to bing golden yellow- 



according to the 
which it is viewed. 


Arietta Chacok 


To expand his limited clientele bave taken as then own. evening skirts and dresses. Star of 

(T dress 1,000, or if you coont the , Identity is what peorie are die senes is a bare-back, suntop. 
United States, 2000, women”) and ^kmg for said Arletie Chaa,k- drea m golden yellowaw^ on 
to take advantage of what he calls When they find it in my clothes, the bias with softly draped pockets,' 
“the most important museum of. *57 kee P bacfc - straight onto the stance 

embroidery m the world” of In 15 yeara. Chacok has grown to a mermaid dress. . -JV 
100,000 samples, including those die point of breaking out into inter- Claude Peon has three “Dia- 
used by Worth, Balenciaga and Qat, onal franchise operations, mant Near” boutiques open or on 
Schiaparelli, Lesage is launching a showbiz-type collections and heavy the way in Paris; arid others sched- 
lmeof limited-edition costumejew- P^haty budgets. Nevertheless, uled for Geneva and Houston: . 


C‘I dress 1,000, or if you count the , “Identity is what people ar 
i i n if«E o nnn lookmg for, said Ariette Chacok 


United Stares, 2.000, women”) and ^g for,” said Ariette Chaa,k- 
to take advantage of what he calls ^ Gnd ? 9? dodies ’ 


“the most important museum of. *9^ If^P coir ^ 
embroidery in the world" of . “ 15 yeare. Chacok has grown to 
100,000 samples, including those die point of breaking out into mter- 


elry and accessories in New York she still exemplifies Jhe mounting Althe upmarket end of the scale, 


next month. He plans another lim- importance of those “Paris Person- a recent “Diamant Non" gray ma- 
iled edition of framed samples as who. with a nummumof media rfe suit with blade. frog fasteners 


wall decoration. 


support, put maximum concentre- went to Nancy Reagan via the New 


Vermont, too, moved into decor lio “ ml ° ^ individual styling. York “Fifra” boutique, thus sweB- 


when he was asked to embroider , ... . „ . - 

the bedspread and curtains of a toward mdependence. From a Dremani Noir eveiung spec- 
princely bedroom using silver tinrdware, store in tire south of taculais for 1986 arein heavy duch- 
beads, tiny pearls and white and France, she bought 10-cent packets ess satin, with open lamMined 
silver ostrich plumes. “It wouldn’t ^ dyestoff 10 remake flea-market pleats in contrasting shades of aqua 
do for anyone ticklish," he said. peasant shirts and petticoats for green and purple, or petal pink arid 
. the summer Cdte d’Azur crowd. ice blue. But Petiri still looks after 


Determined individuality started ing the ranks of bigrname cheats. 


“Diamant Noir" evening spec- 


do for anyone ticklish,” he said. 


ice blue. Btu Petin still looks after 


IPaMRIIS look 


“The colors never came' out tire young working worn®' with clothes 
same; so I kepi re-dipping them,” designed to bndge the gap between 


Perfumes - Cosmetics - Leather Goods 
Fashion Accessories 
DUTY FREE - 40* - 
13 Avenue de f Opera PARIS 1st 9 
297.43.88 1 


she said. When Brigitte Bardot ap- city hours and disco- nights, this 
jpeared wearing a Chacok “remake” time white, bronze or black cotton 



#al P 


22?; i:'- 


on magazine covets worldwide, gabardine jackets, with short 


Marine Btras 


Chacok was off and running rieeves opening onto fan- 
Today, she creates at Biot, in the pleats with jutting podeets. 
south of France, in the center of a Mood, rather than mode 


computerized fashion empire that Doby Broda’s themes. She 

supplies stores and boutiqpies from began three wars ago with dothes 
Jeddah to Japan, and 270 U.S. out- essentially for herself, in anrale 


S te* s ^toJaiMthaped azesmid Worired ouf for her own 

p ^ V - ^ H3rt butfufl frame. Yet instantly 

Mood, ratta- that mode, deter- tirey appealed to the Paris model 
mmes Doby Broda’s themes. She pack and young movie stare. 


Watches 

and 

Jewels 


CONTRIBUTORS 


MONIQUE <to FAUCON, a Paris-based journalist, is 
Paris-based fashion editor of the New Yoik Daily News. 


RVERJGH 

Meerson 

PARIS 


_ GEORGE GUDAUSKAS, a Paris-based journalist, was an asso- 
ciate editor of Elle International magazine. " - 


ll.rueTronchet 
75008 Paris 
M 42.65.80.13 


LElniA G. JETT, a Paris-based journalist and special correspem- 
dent for the Chicago Tribune is a f o tiner mtmgg fn g edStor of. EUe 
International magazine. She coorctinated this report. 


JEAN RAFFERTY is a Paris-based journalist who writes abodt 
French interior design, lifestyle and larinpiL 


Vous Iaissez tant demotion derrien^vdus, 



™ wim ciomes , likeChand, she considers imitd- 
hersetf, m ample tiph as the most sincere fonn of 

' flattery. Recently, both , the jersey ■ . 

.. scarves that she hides inside her ‘ 

suit jackcts to drape around the 

neck and down one side, and the 1 
list, is a fOTnrer contrast cdor armbands inserted . 
Tews. mto other suits, have appeared all - : 

■over in a . matte? ;of weeks. 

sh was an asso- J3rc«es. dominate for summer : 

" _ .. : ’86, with a preference for hi gh .• 
waists and pretty drapes. Most-or- 

recua coriespcm- tiaed is (toe in linen, fitted with': 
g editor nf ptR^za flounces around neck, 

. armholes and hips. 

• It was -a keen eye for promising 

ho writes abotir malerials, that launched 

.Manne Biras into fashion. The 
- - - coarse “bure" cloth used for ■ 

• oowl ed robes of monks became her 

. fi* 8 * bargain-rate fabric, made up 1 
. into coats, capes and skirts. 

• • - ' -- bombazine, a shiny’ ■ 

cotton once used for: French rfiif. ! 

•_ dren’s school pinafores, made ; .fe- 
. B® 11 * 3 tiiat became the St. Tropez v 
summer shock wave, the next year ■ 

. V “““ while 'linen bedsheets. This 
senes of summer pants not ' 

. ... only sold to couturiers like Jean 

• Louis Schemer, Kari Lagerfeld, 
Emmanuelle Khan andJcan^ ' 
Charles de Castdbajac, but are 
cr ^j t . c ti by the flax industry as 
^P™ting off a.Jinen revival in ■ 

. ■ : ready-to-wear. ; : 

•; • O ^ is regular-- 

• i nt ™ gabardine sdting in widfri' 

•: shouldered suits with, mini -lapels, •• 

. PW^jxrekds and hfo pleatT re- 
peated m the mat ching yfe 

of heTl?86 group is^ ; 
Zr,*” 8 spencer jacket : 

- . wrajped m ^ ^ ^ 

Si JSf P^glass bnnons. In • 

• ■ wlor or three-tone jacquard, 

, tt contrasts hMiihA.u.. -TTi ... - 


't>Bi R-i 


t- , r s 


^ irj. 



“ "-X Z 


ttj»ntrasts beautifully hS 
111 bla<:k .’w«l aod 




.75007, TeL 222 6999 


/ Z, 






75006. Td 32*01H m ™l 

Noir (clmde p _ 
U Sa^aU, 7S006i td's*. 



r&SfcizihT 27 - "* '****■■ 


Mane-Martin^ 

Leader in Fashion 
European export prices . 


“ * i 

Tju > 




MadameRochas 

ROCHAS 


Wri*8Ui; 
T «Li(l)26Sti8 22, 


J.-t 


TeLi (1)222 . 
V Credit canto 








. v- -is iJ#_ \ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 




ARTS /LEISURE 



inBritain 


By Hebe Dorsey” ' 

International Herald Tribune 

r ONDON —In London, curves 
Lu are back and tfe demfcrc is 
jecommg the new erogenous zone. 
Katharine Ha m nett, the enfant jgj*_ 
ible of British fashion who ™aiU 
ler name with T-shirts covered m 

LONDONFASmON * 

jetlitical slogans, showed shredded 
Rnim shorts that revealed a good 
jit of the anatomy, while Boy of 
-lyper-Hyper, had ertwped nnms 
hat make for new demfere dtcolle- 
age. 

Just when you wondered if aD 
his was for real, a mala character 
unbled down King’s Road wearing 
i short blue skin carved out in the 
Kick m no uncertain manner. The 
ayle is said to be coming from 
London's hot dabs. 

The return to body contour, al- 
eadv seen in MHan, makes the Par- 
s designer Azzedine Alaia the 
wrongest influence around, bin the 
xxtrageous British are poshing the' 
ook to its Bunts, both on and off 
he runway. In the more avant- 
garde shows, such as Bodymap and 

fosepb Galliano, one felt the ener- 
gy or the rebellious London street 
asbions, their anger aitd strongly 
Charged sensuality. Nowhere as in 
London can one fed the intense 
relationship between rock music 
ind clothes — so much so that at 
times it was hard to decide whether 
ntuac led the fashion or fashion led 
[he music. . 

Eighteen international designers, 
including Yves Saint Laurent, Ar- 
mani and Calvin Klein, will partid- 
pate in Fashion Aid, a show to be 
odd Nov. 5 at the Royal Albert 
Hall, and later at the Palladium in 
New York, to help relieve famine in 
Africa. The London show is orga- 
nized by Harvey Goldsmith, who 
said they hoped to raise $500,000. 

The general look was long on 


long, or long-on shorLMmi-skirts 
or shorts were worn over opaque 
legs or tight leggings. Stretch cot- 
ton was the hasis of street-wise 
Rothes — simple, spony separates 
closely related, to the sweats of the 
New York . deagng- M pnim Kij- 
maK,wiwbasaned»herein Kath- 
arine Hamnett. Cotas were dark, ■ 
with black ahj gray emerging as 
the colors of the 1980s. Lx contrast, 
the explosion of bright primaries in 
Joseph Tricot’s coUection was as 
happy as a bag of confetti.:: 

The' hat revival, to the 

princess of Wales, corni'nncd, with 
young designers now involved. in 
highly complicated Dickensian 
hats adorned with cockades and 
ribbons or furled up Hke chinmey- 
sweepers’ caps. The newest hairdo, 
for both men and wonjen, was 
shaved up the sides and topped by 
a th a tch ed mass or poreupme-like 
spikes. 

Ecdesusdcal jewdiy, a la Ma- 
donna, was everywhere. Rifat Oz- 
bek’s clothes we re decorated with 
neat, GiacomettiTean gold crosses. 
Crosses were only a tame part of 
the collection of Tom Binns, whose 
outrageous pieces looked as if they 
had been fitted straight from the 
altar. The religious influence 
reread to other designers, who 
snowed sleeves made out of church 
fabrics. 

There were classic moments pro- 
vided by .the Elms' of Jean Muir, 
whose pure clothes were better 
than ever. and Patricia Lester, who 
did shimmering ralimm-c of beaded 
Fortuny pleats. Zandra Rhodes, 
who also belongs to the establish- 
ment designer comer, came op with 
a Spanish theme, and Bruce Old- 
field and the Fnmnnek J both favor- 
ites of the princess of Wales, had 
the big and formal evening dresses 
for which this OOU&try is famnna 

Swiw ifag gnwt did noL show on 
the runway, but had exciting colleo- 



Nqrrrai WoHon 


Jacket ensemble designed by Culture Shock. 


lions nevertheless. Culture Shock's 
interpretation of body contour was 
to go back to classic British tailor- 
ing, as seen in their great riding 
clothes. Designed by two Japanese 
men and a Scottish woman, these 
precise linen dothes were cut by a 
Savile Row tailor and finished by 
hand. With his third collection, the 
Turkish designer Rifat Ozbek 
f - nvagfld as a new and sensitive 
classic who gave new life to clothes 
inspired by the 1950s, Grace Kelly 
and the island of Capri. 

As ureal, knitwear and prints, 
both spinoffs of cottage industries, 
put London in a class apart and 
gave buyers a lot to buy. About 
85,000 people are knitting away in 
England, and they keep re-invent- 
ing the craft. The flowered, tapes- 
try look, launched by Scott Crolla, 
is now out — and not too soon, 
since it now extends to everything 


By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

International Herald Tribune 

E l UBLIN — The Dublin The- 
* a ter Festival, after an hiatus 
reorganization and more gener- 
ous financing, has resumed its ac- 
tivities, and this sunny autumn is 

THE DUBLIN STAGE 

presenting new native plays and die 
guest visits of foreign artists. 

The Irish contribution to the 
drama in English Las a long am} . 
honorable record, ‘Congreve, Far- 
quhar. Goldsmith, Sheridan, Bou- 
cicanlt, Wilde arid Shaw, taring 
left their mark as masters. At the 
century’s turn a fresh note in the 
language was sounded in the plays 
of Synge, Yeats, Lady Gregory and 
Lord Dunsany. James Joyce made 
a single stab at playwriting wthlaj 

DOONESBURY 

. DPP, WHY PO BEGAU&THEIR. 
YOUfm-WE 60BWHOML 
BOOMERS ARS /OENTTTYHAP 
ISOOBSeSSB? SO MUCH TO PO 
f mrnmpROB- wmwum, 

- LEMSOFASNG? MARK. V 


YOU PRESS A 38-yeARrOLP 
BABfBOOMBCfiWHeLL 
usually A mrim mm 
HEART OF mAK&m STILL 
THINKS OF HIMSELF AS 
^ A "KIP* \ 


but ponT you YEAH,ymr 
THNCMTHAV- PWSYOtfRB 
H51HEROWN fflRUNSTD 
KIPS 15 FINALLY SE&THE.F&ST 
MAKING THE BOOM- BOOMBU&RT 
GROW UP? ATMOS. t 



“Eriks,” wrought in imitation of 

Ibsen Hanptwwinti T afer ; S ean 

O’Casey, Denis Johnston and Paul 
Vincent Carroll arrived to attain 
worldwide recognition before 
World War IL There was lamenta- 
tion that the great days were gate, 
but in the 1950s the Tmh drama, 
phoenix-like, rose again in the 
works of Br endan Behan, Samuel 
Beckett, Ihpmas Murphy, Brian . 
Fnd, Tam Kibpy and Hugh Leon- 
ard. 

son a young 

dramatist of uhrmstakablegifts. He 
is Aodtan Madden, a former jour- 
nalist and theater critic, arid he is 
represented by “The Dossfeause 
‘ Waltz” (at the Ebbma Theater), an 
absorbing play in which a band of 
social outcasts, sheltering in a 
crumbling Georgian mansion hard 
by the street where Handel’s “Mes- 
siah” was first heard, seek to Eft 
themselves from the moral mire 
and misery into winch they have 
fallen. Two are quondam lawyers, 
men of superior education and 
shattered idealism, now sodden in 
drink and H repair and firing on the 
earnings of a woman of good fam- 
ily descended to prostitution and 
the thefts of a young criminal ad- 
dicted toheram. 

Madden keeps a strong grip on 
his grim thane. His' dialogue is 
forceful, his characterizations have 
an authentic ring, and the Dan- 
mier-fike darkness of the setting 
and people are shot through with 
an ironic humor that rescues the 
situations from monotony and 
melodrama. There is a superb per- 
formance by Anna Manahan as tbe 
woman and by Seamus Ford as tbe 
resigned old lawyer who philoso- 
phizes in tpellow voice as the 
squabbles thunder about him. The 
author has already enjoyed success 
in Ireland. His first play, “The 
' Midnight Door,” was Dominated as 
the best of 1983. His second, “Re- 
member Mauretania,” won tbe 
0. 2L Whitehead play competition 
last year, . and another, “Sensa- 
tions,” set in a newspaper office, 
wifi be produced by the Abbey later 
in the year. _• 

Hugh Leonard, has written 17. 
plays that have tail their premieres 
at Dublin festivals: His dramatiza- 
tion of Joyce’s “Stephen D” has 
been widely staged and filmed; his 
play “Da,” won - the Broadway 
-Tony Award, and the New York 
productions of **A life" and “The 
Act-Pair Man," were nominated for 
the same honor. 

Here he is in larlosh mood, with 
a freewheeling spoof of the Sher- 
lock Holmes yarns in “The Mask of 
Moriarty,” whose chief actor, Tom 
Baker, alternates as the detective 
»nd his arch-enemy, bent on' world 
destruction. 


This extravaganza, mocking pe- 
riod manners, costumes and Vic- 
torian novels, has been lavishly 
staged at the Gate Theater. It 
whisks from a st unnin g tableau of 
Waterloo Bridge on a foggy No- 
vember night to Holmes’s Baker 
Street di^, and from a chilling ab- 
bey crypt to a den of rice in Ume- 
house peopled by such familiars as 
Mr. Hyde, Jack-tbe-RJpper, Dori- 
an Gray and Chinese oprnm smok- 
ers. It offers an ev ening of hilarious 
merriment. 

“Souper SnffivuT . by Eoghan 
Harris, at the Abbey, has stirred 
complaints with its treatment of 
the story of a tiny fishing inlet on 
Mizca Head, West Cork, during 
the potato famine in the 1840$. The 
600 inhabitants began to starve, 
and the parish priest left to seek 
help, remaining absent for three 
months, while starvation, fever and 
a freezing winter swept the comnur- 

fidF to tworisitmg EngfisEmen, a . 
Protestant rector, and a Royal Ar- 
tillery major in charge of road con- 
struction. By spring the rector had 
made converts of the survivors, and 
in. gratitude for his efforts the con- 
verts built a church in which to 
worship. A crusade to reconvert the 
settlement failed, aud the village 
remains Protestant to this day. 

Hairis's portrait of the prosely- 
tizing rector is sympathetic; while 
the Catholic clerics are shown as 
guileful, smug and tyrannical. The 
staging benefits from Tomas Mao- 
Anna's direction, the roles are com- . 
patently played, but the play is the- 
atrically sluggish, a shrill 
discussion rather than a full-blood- 
ed drama. 

Graham Read's “Callers” (at the 
Peacock, the Abbey’s studio), is 
similarly handicapped. It, too, has 
aroused controversy, as it deals 
with a trio of Irish Republican 
Army terrorists whose prey is a 
police officer they suspect of an act 
for which he is in no way responsi- 
ble. 

Barry McGovern, following in 
the footsteps of the late Jack 
McGowran, who specialized in 
Beckett monodramas, has devised a 
vehicle for himself by adapting ex- 
cerpts from Beckett’s novels. “Mol- 
lojr and “Malone Dies," which he 
recited at the Gate last week under 
the title, “ITI Go On." 

Stewart Parker, the Ulster au- 
thor, whose charming “Spoke- 
song,” set in a Belfast bicycle shop, 
won awards in New Yak and Lon- 
don, has in “Northern Star” (pre- 
sented by the Lyric Players of Bel- 
fast) pictured the seven ages of 
Irish playwrights from Goldsmith 
to Beckett. The result is an inge- 
nious fiteraiy experiment. 

“Tent Meeting,” a product of the 
Ado’s Theater of Louisville, Ken- 


isms 




HPf.tSfSFACE 
THAFlL IT. HAVING A : 
Port GDRONAKfUt 
/ • yOURBLUE JEANS 

/ tsnmmsom 
\ 




VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT 

Wi oort. SO F. BmirQ 

BO F & 120 F - -span IZto MMOw* d Swk*. 
L'Aitn ftSaaMt, 15, r.du Jew.ZOZU?. 


AXMUO , t ~ * MUi (1* MLKS BOWL 
MaSUSJI. 17th CM: Dear. M W> & faa 
ygfaumiii 


If DAUFIW. U ldo&x.S*21 Jtt Bum kndw non 
A Jo* ladi t Mm. UM taw 
5|MiaU>AtaiF.l»)m.MiCnS'GnlL 



CRfiZY HORSE 

far and away 
the best node revue 
in the world 


= AN OLD FASHIONED = 
CHRISTMAS HOUSEPARTY 
ATARIVRSIDE 
COUNTRY ESTATE 

bworionaxl hods offer beautiful metM 
poqotfu) gofdwt, mo gii Kiirw awing. 

Monk from: Brebury Hauw, 
Brabury, Henfonl England, H 83 6 BS 


ZURICH'S BEST 


f Les Miserables’: Blazing Theatricality 


including e^tad rilies. It was re- 
placed by abstract graphics, or. in 
the case of Susan Duckworth, by 
naive English teapot motives. 

The British are also great at cre- 
ating their own prints, and have 
local painters organized in work- 
shops, designing their own collec- 
tions and selling to other designers. 
The best group is The Goth, which 
consists of four young painters, 
who did Betty Jackson's prints, 
among others. Nigel Preston 
showed big white shirts whose 
backs were painted with Michel an- 
gel o-like frescoes. 

The British collections had ex- 
ceedingly good coverage this sea- 
son. The international press corps 
was up from 30 three years ago to 
300 this season. As for overseas 
buyers, they soared from 1,000 to 
almost 4,000. 


tucky invited for a guest engage- 
ment at Gleeson Hall is an exotic 
novelty to local play-goers. 

It concerns a demented funda- 
mentalist preacher, his son, mental- 
ly shaken by war service, and his 
dim-pitied daughter, traveling in 
their trailer from the depths of the 
Bible belt to hold a revivalist meet- 
ing in Canada. A company of three 
— Levi Lee, Larry Larson and Re- 
becca Al worth — serve the word 
goings-on with relentless energy, 
unswerving determination and 
more noise than even Billy Sunday 
ever made. 

The most delightful import of 
the season is the Commedia dd- 
Farte jamboree that the Pistol tea- 
tera of Sweden has extracted from 
“Les Femmes Savantes.” Kidnap- 
ping the classic comedy, these re- 
sourceful zanies have converted it 
into a Rabelaisian uproar, and the 
fantastic costuming shifts the scene 
from 17th-century France to a nev- 
er-never land inspired by Aubrey 
Beardsley. 

The American farce “Arsenic 
and Old Lace,” revived at the Gai- 
ety, is packing tbe boose, due in 
pan to the presence of two of Ire- 
land’s most favored actresses, Siob- 
han McKenna and Maureen Pot- 
ter, as the old maids from Brooklyn 
who put old gentlemen boarders 
out of their misery by slipping them 
death-dealing wine. Written as a 
macabre mystery play, it was re- 
vised by Broadway expertise into a 
slapstick comedy that has kept au- 
diences laughing fa 40 years. 


WORLDWIDE 

ENTERTAINMENT 


li’.av qvorgt-V !?! 723 32 . 32 

PARIS -FRANCE 


By Sheridan Morley 

/ntenuaionul HeraU Tnbure 

L ONDON — We have the musi- 
* cal of the year, if not the half- 
decade, and it is at the Barbican. 
Not since Sondheim's “Sweeney 
Todd" in 1979 has there been "a 
score that soared out from the pit 

BRITISH THEATER 

with the blazing theatricality of 

“Les Miserables." 

Sweeney, too. we were once told, 
was too 'dark, too savage, too 
downbeat a theme for a musical. 
Six years on, that show has won 
more aw ards and been acclaimed in 
more opera houses than almost any 
other in tbe entire history of the 
American musical "Les Misera- 
bles,” in a brilliantly intelligent 
Royal Shakespeare Company stag- 
ing by Trevor Nunn and John 
Caird, will achieve a similar kind of 
long-term success, and anyone who 
fails to understand the reason for 
that should be locked in a cup- 
board with nothing tat the sound- 
tracks of “Starlight Express” and 
“Mutiny” for company. 

Tbe greatness of “Les Misera- 
bles" is that ii starts out, like 
“Sweeney" and “Peter Grimes" 
and fa that matter "RjgoJetto,” to 
redefine the limits of music theater. 
Like them it is through- sung, and 
like them it tackles universal 
themes of soda! and domestic hap- 
piness in terms of individual de- 
spair. 

The show first opened five years 
ago in a sports arena on the' out- 
skirts of Paris: the tape of that 
production is one I have played 
almost daily for the last few 
months, and it seems to me to con- 
sist largely of al! the marching 
songs Edith Piaf never got around 
to sin g in g There is an energy and 


an operatic intensity here that ex- 
ists in the work of no British com- 
poser past or present: the sense of a 
nation's history being channeled 
through trumpets and drums and 
guitars and violins and cellos, 

Claude-Michel Schonberg's 
score sounds even better at the Bar- 
bican than it does on record, while 
Alain Boublil’s lyrics have been til- 
lered through the translation of 
two ex-Londou drama critics. 
James Fenton (who did the recent 
and superb “Rigoletto" translation 
at the Coliseum) and Herbert 
Kreizmer (who wrote most of 
Charles Aznavour's English hits, as 
well as a couple of WesL End musi- 
cals back in the 1960s). 

Nobody here is trying to make 
some quick money in the charts, 
and nobody believes that a couple 
of songs ran make a show: this 
score has maybe 50 numbers, all of 
which fit like jigsaw pieces into a 
huge revolutionary pattern. There 
are songs of love and war and death 
and res [oration: there are patter 
songs, arias, duels and chorus num- 
bers of dazzling inventiveness and 
variety. Fa this is not the French 
■‘Oliver" or even the musical 
"Nicholas Nickelby," though it 
owes a certain debt to both. Rather 
is it a brilliantly guided tour of the 
1,300-page eternity that is Hugo's 
text, and indeed there is no way 
that in three orchestral hours we 
can ask for more than that. 

The now-traditional RSC walk- 
down is here, as is a “Third Man” 
chase through the sewers and an 
autumnal ending worthy of “Cyra- 
no” : there are even occasional 
lurches into lovable-orphan echoes 
or “Annie” and of course the result 
is episodic, fragmentary and evoca- 
tive of other shows. 

Just as John Napier's set (which 
itself looks like a tribute to the 


wonderfully carpentered sets of 
Sean Kenny) is made up of yet 
another rich and rare coUection of 
old treasures — tables, cartwheels, 
water barrels — so the whole pro- 
duction reflects what Nunn has 
learned from "Nickelby" and 
“Cats” and his Shakespeare musi- 
cals. 

There is of course a central di- 
lemma: though “Les Miserables' 
has one of the greatest books of all 
time to draw- on. it has no dialogue. 
What it has is a score, and beyond 
it some thin and sketchy character- 
izations, but no chance of any plot 
development that cannot come 
through song. Again like 
“Sweeney. 1 ' the show exists in the 
most dangerous area of the stage 
musical in that it is not about glam- 
our or success but about failure and 
hatred. 

And yet, as that score surges 
through the theater, you are made 
aware time and again of how well it 
works in English: anyone who ever 
heard Piaf sing in translation 
knows how quickly she sounded 
impossible, and the Kretzmer tri- 
umph has been to set these lyrics 
into an acceptable framework 
somewhere at ihe boundaries of 
Dkkcns and Brecht. 

"Les Miserables” is everything 
the musical theater ought to be do- 
ing. and within the inevitable limi- 
tations of its pageant there are 
some striking performances. 

The central casting here is 
strongly “Evil a”- based, since we 
get Colm Wilkinson from the origi- 
nal recording as Jean Valjean and 
Patti LuPone from the Broadway 
premiere as the doomed Famine. 

But we also get some very strong 
RSC classical support from Roger 
Allara as Jafert, plunging into the 
swollen Seine, and from Alim Arm- 


strong as the evil Thenadier, whose 
"Master of die Game" is one of the 
most instantly accessible of the 
numbers. “L«! Miserables" plays 
the next six weeks at the Barbican 
and is due for a transfer to the West 
End by Cameron Mackintosh, who 
has bon impresario behind this Pa- 
risian venture from its very begin- 
nings. 


Out at tbe Greenwich Theatre he 
runs. Alan Strachan deserves more 
credit than be has elsewhere been 
given for allowing us a rare glimpse 
of S.N. Behrman. Behnnan was 
essentially the dramatist who got 
the American theater from Henry 
James to Moss Han across the ear- 
ly years of the century. He has been 
largely forgotten now, except per- 
haps as the best chronicler of Max 
Beerbohm and Duveeu, but as a 
dramatist he had a number of 
Broadway hits, and as a screenwrit- 
er his was “Queen Christina." At 
the Greenwich is his “Biography,” 
an admittedly moribund Manhat- 
tan drama about a society painter 
deciding whether a not to reveal 
all in her memoirs. Originally 
staged in London half a century 
ago. it proved a rare flop for Laur- 
ence Olivier and Ina Claire as stars 
and NoSl Coward as a director, all 
of whom played it apparently at 
such a pace as to be largely incom- 
prehensible to an English audience 
unacquainted with the finer details 
of New York publishing ethics. 

But even now, in what 1 take to 
be a somewhat more reflective pro- 
duction with a beautifully judged 
star turn from Shelia Gish as the 
artist, the play lies moribund, de- 
stroyed by what Gilbert Miller 
once called “the cloven hoof of 
literature," which kicked Behr- 
man's dramatic sense into oblivion. 


■7 15S5 Hi'lcr, irwrrjirondi Co 



Nou\ No Stop Qoeck-OuV 
at Hilton International 
and Vista International 
Worlduide. 


Checkout 

while 

YOU SLEEP 



We've made leaving a Hilton 
International or Vista International 
hotel almost as pleasurable as stav- 
ing there. 

All you have to do is check in 
with an accepted credit card and tell 
us when you expect to leave. 

During the night, while you're 
sound asleep, we'll slip your credit 
card receipt and iremized hotel bill 
under your door. 

In the morning, ail you have to 
do is leave. No waiting on check-out 
lines, no waiting for your receipt 
to come in the mail. 

For reservations, call your travel 
agent, any Hilton International hotel 
or Hilton Reservation Service in 
Copenhagen, Frankfurt, London, 
Madrid, Milan, Oslo, Paris or 
Stockholm. 

For a copy of the Hilton 
International/Vista International 
Worldwide Directory please write 
the Hilton International office 
nearest you: 

United Kingdom: 

Hilton International Cu. 

Hilton International Kensington 
179- 199, Holland Park Avenue 
London Wll 4UL, England 
ATTN: Mr. Michael Weir 
Germany: 

Hilton international Co. 

Kaisertrasse 47 

□-6000 Frankfurt 1, W?st Germany 
ATTN; Distribution Center 
France: 

Hilton International Co 
25, Rue Cam bon 
7S001 Paris, France 
ATTN: Mr. Jean -Francois Spira 


Hilton International 


No Stop Check-Out” service is 
now offered at 90 Hilton international 
hotels in 76 cities in 44 countries: 
AUSTRALIA; Adelaide. Brisbane* Mtlbimme. 
Penh, Sydney, Sydney Airpon 
AUSTRIA: Vienna 
BAHRAIN 

BARBADOS: Bridgetown 
BELGIUM: Brussels 

BRAZIL Belem, Belo Hi irizunie. sao Paulu’ 
CANADA: Montreal Mumreal Airpon/Dorval. 
Quebec City, Saint John 1 New Brunswick ». 
Toronto, Toronto Airport, Windsor 
COLOMBIA: Bogota. Canagena 
CYPRUS: Nicosia 

EGYPT: Asm n/L uxor {Cruise ShtpM. Cairo' 
ETHIOPIA: Addis Ababa 
FRANCE- Orfy Airport f Pans i. Pans. Strasbourg 
GERMANY; bufocidorf. Mwnz, Munich 
GREECE- Athens. Corfu 

GUAM: Agana 


HOLLAND: Amsterdam. Roller dam. Schipho! 
Airport (Amsterdam) 

HONG KONG: Victoria 

HUNGARY: Budapest 

INDONESIA: Jakarta 

ISRAEL Jerusalem, Tel Aviv 

ITALY: Milan, Rome 

IVORY COAST: Abidran 

JAPAN-. Osaka," Tokyo 

KENYA: Nairobi, Tsavo VTest. i Lodges i 

KOREA: Seoul 

KUWAIT 

MADAGASCAR. Antananarivo 
MALAYSIA: Kuala Lumpur, Mating Java 
MALTA 

MOROCCO: Rabat 

PAKISTAN: Lahore 

PANAMA: Panama City 

PHILIPPINES: Manila 

PUERTO RICO: Mavaguez. San Juan 


SINGAPORE 

SRI LANKA: Colombo* 

SUDAN: Khartoum 

SWITZERLAND: Basel. Geneva. Zurich 
TAIWAN. Taipei 
THAILAND: Bangkok 
TRINIDAD- ft>n-of-Spam 
TUNISIA- TVinls 
TURKEY: Istanbul 

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: Abu Dhabi. Al Ain, 
Dubai. FulalraJt 

UNITED KINGDOM: London i Park Lane and 
Kensington ), Gatwick Airport 

UNITED STATES: Chicago t The Drake), 
HunoluliWKahala Hiiionl, Kansas City (Visu 
Internal lunai), Ne*- York i Vista Inrenuiional). 
Oklahoma City tvuta International l 
Pittsburgh' i Vista Iniernauunal ). 

Washington. D C (Visu Inrenuiional ) 

VENEZUELA: Barquiumeta. Caracas' 
•Openitift 1986 'Tiro center -cvy locations 


















p «ge 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 



Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

industrials 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Hlata Uw Last Ora. 

Indus 1336-74 1364.14 1343-63 1 3303 1 — 172 

Trans fl«305 466.00 653.91 65702 — 3.16 

Util 1504 155.16 152-95 153LM— 034 

Como SSCUO SSMO 544-83 54 7JU— iJB 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Utah* 
New Lows 
volume wo 
Volume down 


Oasa Prev. 

751 987 

730 462 

493 476 

1975 1925 

so a 

27 70 

47,077,550 
4X889,272 


NYSE Index 


Composite 
industrials 
Transc. 
u tunics 
Finance 


Utah Law Oese »%• 
107.90 107.33 107 JO —0.14 
124.10 12X39 12141 —0.11 
I0M» 104.12 104.23— 034 

WJS S2L50 S5J5 BSC 

I13J9 1W44 11147—009 


'l i~sr sjrtnmow il 


Buy Saws -Shu 

Wl 295,761 370 


53-14 1M7I 295,761 

Oct. II 146J50 251,147 

Oct. 10 IS0J17 320,778 

Oct. 9 ISXS36 345*96 

Ocf.0 1 S0.751 364J30 

■Included In me sales Houres 


Tuesday s 

MSE 

Closing 


vaLaMPJA 111,351km 

Prey.4PjA.vD). 7&54flm 

Prev consolidated dose 91775350 


Tables Include ttie nationwide prices 
an to ttoe closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Ha The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advmteod 
□Mined 
U ne honaeq 
Tefal issues 
New HUn 
New Laws 
VMMTWI4I 
Volume dawn 


251 304 

251 199 

M2 275 

7M ns 

U 11 

U 14 


Standard & Poor's Index 


industrials 
Trotisu. 
Utilities 
Finance 
Coronas! te 


Hlpi low dose amt 

30002 70705 20701—003 
171 06 1*9.25 16973 —045 


17106 16905 16973 —045 

6103 bojv sore — ai4 

2107 2108 21-69 — OX 

107.14 18544 18608 —029 


NASDAQ index 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Transp, 


dose Cove 
2B4J97 +0J2 

287.14 +024 

2751)5 + UD 
317.79 +207 

272.15 +601 
3D6.7D +108 
259.95 +B07 


I | | | ||l —ill 


4 P JA, volume 
Prev. 4 PA volume 
Prev. cons, volume 



SS'LSS? ■” “ 

£6 2Sft AMR 

»6 IWkAMRpt X1S 90 

Wft 736 APL 

41W 34* ASA 240 52 

» \Wj AVX J2 20 

7814 1916 A2P 172 Hi 


5 39 23 1216 22*— * 

2 SB 14% Wft Wft 

7 4563 40*. 39ft 39%.— % 

12 23V. 23V. 2316 
6 9th 944 914— ft 
158 38* 381ft 38ft — ft 
S 95 1216 II*. 1214+16 

7 » ?« 3fi» 24b— Hr 


4116 34%i ASA 24052 138 38b 38ft 28ft — ft 

77 10ft AVX JT 20 18 95 12b II*. 1214+96 

281* IJW A ZP 237 11 J 7 7W M 21* 24b— Hr 

60 38* AbtLab 100 15 15 1336 56% 55b 54 — b 

2H6 1966 AccoWd 00 22 17 810 23 22 22b +1V6 

Wi 12ft AoneC M XI 173 1314 12b 13 — Vi 

Jgi* 7b AcmeE J2b 4J 11 20 7ft 7fe 7ft — ft 

19 15b Ada Ex 192*100 124 18 17b 17*. + V6 

as 13ft AdmMI 02 15 7 95 17ft 17b 17b 

IS 4 _5* AdvSvs 03t 3J 31 187 14ft 14ft l«ft 

37ft 22ft AMD 36 5090 25ft 24ft 24ft— ft 

12ft 6ft Advesi .12 10 19 58 9 Bft 8ft— ft 

ISb 10 Aerflex 12 43 14ft 13ft 13ft — ft 

«% 34ft AetnLI 204 57 16 2338 44ft 44 44ft 

37ft 22ft Ah rims 120 15 9 2642 34ft 32ft 34ft +lft 

3ft 2ft A Keen 20 3ft 2ft 2ft 

57 42 AlrPrd 108 20 12 1082 54b 53ft 53ft + ft 

24ft 17ft Ah-OFrl 00 20 13 34 21ft 21ft 21ft 

Zft Ift AlMOOi .ICS 57 4ff tft 1% I* 


79'u 23ftAIaPpt 274*90 
33b 2Bft AIdP plA 192 120 
Hi* Jft AlaPdPt 07 110 
>3 45b AtaPpt «H) 110 

74 59ft AlaPof 516 110 

75 59% MaP Pt 80S 110 

24b 12b AJskAir .16 0 7 

2S 12ft Atari* s 08 10 17 

33ft soft Atoms 76 27 11 

31b 23 Vi Alcan 120 -1.9 75 

38b 27b AlccStd 100 30 12 

33 3} AlexAtv 100 J0 

30 20b Alexdr 24 

89ft 72b AllaCn 154! 20 

26ft 24ft AJffCPOf 206 IDLE 

23ft 20 V< Alglnl 100 51 

20ft 14b Akglnpf 219 110 


63 5B4i AldS (rfC 674 110 
111 106 AldS OtDISjOQ 110 

102% 101* AWSrtF 
40ft 47*1 AlidStr 212 30 
9b 3V. Aiiisai 
29% 23% ALLTL 104 60 
39b 29ft Alcoa 170 3J 
19b 11b Amax .101 


38b 29ft Amaxnt XOO 90 .... ___ ... 

34 22% AmHn 1.10 30 22 1296 3b 27b 27b— b 

140b 98b AHes pf 300 20 2 120ft s2(!ft 130ft + ft 

2% 1* AmAgr 113 lb 1ft lb + 16 

23ft 16 ABakr 10 125 33b 23ft 23b + ft 

70 53V. ABrond 190 70 B 909 56ft 55ft 56 

30b 25ft ABrdM 275 95 5 29 29 29 - b 

116% Sib A fittest 100 10 18 216 114b lit 1)6% + ft 
30b 20V. ABldM 04 30 14 15 23 32b 22b— ft 

3Bb 30b ABitfPr 04 20 14 41 25ft 25V} 25Vj 

40b 47ft Am Can X90 50 10 5S4 54 X5ft 55% 

35% 22 ACanftt 300 11 J 9 35 34% 24ft- ft 

57b 43 Atom n» IffO XI 89 49ft 49ft 49ft + ft 

30b 17b ACoeBd 220 110 15 30ft 30 20 — ft 

30b 35ft ACaoCv 351e 90 21 24ft 26ft 34ft— ft 

11 Sb ACentC 38 45 5b 5ft 5ft — ft 

57b 441i ACvan 100 10 13 1336 50ft 49ft 49b— ft 

27b 10% ADT .92 14 24 20« 27ft 24% 27ft— ft 

24b 19ft AElPw L26CI0J B 1677 21ft 20b 21M + ft 

49b 34ft Am Exp 104 X2 15 9341 42b 42b 43ft— ft 

25ft 13ft A Farm s 08 30 15 1440 24ft 23ft 23b + ft 

Sift 23ft AGnCp 100 13 9 1612 30% 30ft 30ft + ft 


16 7b AGnl wt 
96ft 64% AGnJofB550e 64 
71% 47% AGnafD 204 43 
34b 2B AHerlt 170 15 10 
13b 7ft A Hoi st 


572 U 12b 12b + ft 
33. 33 Sflft BOft +1% 

80 61ft fiBft 61 + % 

4 34ft 34 34 

30 lOte 10 ID — ft 


64b 44% A Home 200 5.1 12 5697 57% 54ft 57% + ft 

47ft 34% A Hose 1.12 U 16 5375 48ft 47b 48 + ft 

97ft 73 Amrtdi 400 70 9 522 89% 88b 89ft— ft 

91 42 AlnGrp 04 S 23 1001 91% 89b 90 — ft 

150 114 AIGppf 505 19 1 )50 150 150 

28ft 16 AMI 71 16 ID 7995 20ft 19% 2D —1% 

4b 2b AmMat 416 1 2b 3 

29 13b APresds 00 11 6 1347 16ft 15% 15ft— ft 

13ft 5 ASLFla 11 205 Tft 7 7ft + % 

18ft 12ft ASLFlPf 219 140 « 15 15 15 

15ft lift ASMa 00 65 9 182 13% 12% 13% + % 

35ft 26% AmStd 100 13 10 1404 30% 30ft 30ft + % 

47ft 35ft AmStar 04 1,1 11 805 61% 60% 60% — ft 

78 44ft AStrpiA 438 AD 804 73ft 72% 72% 

58 51 A5lrotB 600 11J 17 58 57% 50 + ft 

34ft 17% AT&T 150 50 1524542 21ft 20ft 20% — ft 

41b 33 AT&T a) 304 92 10 39% 3916 39% + Ml 

<2 34 AT&T pf 3J4 90 6 &V S 39b 40 

27% 17 AWatrs 1JOO 40 B 54 24b 24% 24b 

2Bft 14 AmHoIl 208 14J 4 M 15 J4b 14% — ft 

72ft 60ft ATrpr 504 U 48 67% 67% 67% + % 

IB 6ft ATrsc 32 12b 12 12ft— b 

89% 67% ATrun 504 7.7 24 SO m SS 

43 26ft Ameren 100 37 8 29 43% 43% 43% + % 

50 24ft AmesD JO 0 21 330 45 44% 44ft — % 

29ft 19b Atrunvk JO 33 13 283 24% 23ft 24ft +J 

2B% 18ft Amfoc 149 23% 23 23 

16 4 AmfoC _ 3 106 4ft 4ft 4ft — ft 

70% 50% AmOeO 130 0 49 P 2652 63 47b 47ft— Ur 

37b ZTft AMP 72 20 21 3268 30ft 29ft 30 + ft 

23 lift Amoco JO 23 17 76 13% 12b 12b— ft 

23M 12% Amrups II 104 22% 21% 22ft + ft 

34 22% AmSth 100 40 9 29 35% 35 35% 

45% 30 AimiSd 100 30 15 158 41ft 41 41 

4% lb AnacmP 179 Zb « 2% 

24ft 16% An too 20 1809 20 19ft 20 + ft 

27ft 19% Anchor 108 60 _ 349 24ft 24b 24ft + ft 

46% 37ft AnOay I J2 10 32 175 44 43% 44 + ft 

13b 9% AndrGr 04 10 16 14 13b 13b 13b 

27% 17 Ansellc 00 20 14 107 25b 25M, 25% 

34ft 22ft Adheres 00 ZJ « S5B7 35ft XH* 35 +7ft 


49 9 2852 
20 21 3268 

“ ” « 

30 15 15B 


45 44% 44ft— V 

24b 23b 24ft +7 
23% 23 23 

4ft 4ft 4ft -I 


34b 22b Adheres 00 ZJ l 
71b 50ft Anheupf 140 50 
19% 13ft Anlxtr M 17 1 
76% 9ft Anfhem 04 0 2 

15ft 10b Anltinv 04b 30 1 
12ft 9b Apache 78 24 1 
2 ft ApchPwt 
19b 15b APChP urtLlO 110 
74% 58 ApPw pt 8.12 117 
34ft 30 ApPwpf 418 7X7 
31ft 27’A ApPwpf 300 127 


74 10 16 14 13b 

00 20 14 107 25b 

00 ZJ 73 SW 35ft 

L40 SJ} 591 72 


76 13% 12b 12b— ft 

104 22% 21% 22ft + ft 

29 35% 35 35% 

15B 41ft 41 41 

779 2b M M4 
889 20 19ft 20 + ft 


OT* 35 +m 
49% 72 +2 

14% 1(b + % 
72% 72% + ft 
Mb 14b— ft 


30 9 1 14b Kb 14b- 

20 11 


315 18b lBft IBft-ft 

20Qz 6W6 69b 69b + % 

3 32 32 32 

IQ 38 3B 30 


39ft 15b API Dta 176110.1 17 650 17b 17ft 17ft— % 

15ft Sb ApPiMfl 56 46 12ft 12ft 72H + % 

24% 16% Arch Dll .140 7 13 1578 21ft 21% 21ft- ft 

?01b 77 ArIP pi 903a 97 200*101 101 101 - ft 

30% 74ft ArIPpf 3JB 710 2 ® 30 30 + % 

102 B2 ArIPpf HUB 107 7BT100 99ft 100 

24ft 14 ArkBst 00 20 9 350 24ft 24 24% + % 

24% 76 ATMa 70S 57 27 3016 20ft 79ft 20% + % 

ft % ArlnRt 179 fi + 

15ft lift Armada 2 11% lift 11% + ft 

lib 6% Armco 507 Sft Sb 8%— ft 

22ft 15ft Armcpt 210 110 2 18ft 10ft 10ft— ft 

24ft 13ft ArmsRtr 08 30 8 28 14% 14 14ft + ft 

m» 281* ArmWin IJO 30 9 847 35ft 34% 3J%— ft 

34ft 23 AroCP 170 Cl 10 7 29 29 29 + % 

18% 12b ArouvE as 1J Id 137 13ft 13 13% 

30% Id Artro 72 10732 43 gft 22% Eft + % 

27 15ft Arum s 00 37 9 772 25 24ft 23 + ft 

27% 17% Asarco 
37 22ft AUilOII 1 00 4.9 

45ft 37b A&hIO at 450 9.7 

44% 35 AsWOPt 376 90 . 

W* 23ft ASdDG S 7.40 4.1 II 

111 79 AsdDPt 475 4j 

23ft 18ft Alhhme 100 80 10 

29% ZZbAICrEI 25S 90 9 
44% 42 Atl Rich 400 60 


43 22ft 22% 22ft + % 
272 25 24b 25 + ft 


494 17b T7% 17ft- ft 
719 32% 32% 32b— b 
5 45ft 45ft 45ft + ft 
23 47ft 41b 41b— ft 
682 35% 34 34%— H 


151 KWft AlIRcpI 200 1.9 5 

17& 7SI& AllosCP 92 

29ft 18% Auaat 00 70 23 122 

54% 35ft AutoOt 08 1J 71 574 

5% 4% Awrlonn .35a 1M W SS 

33% 17ft AVEJAC 00 10 Id 25 - 

39b 28% A werv 00 10 13 419 33ft 33 

34% ID Avlolln 13 5 24% 241 

38% 27 Avnef JO 10 23 945 

25ft 17b Avan 200 7.9 12 6406 


28b )6ft AydSn 


ITS O 128 111ft 109ft 109ft— 1ft 
00 83 10 1 19b 79b 19b— ft 

>58 90 9 659 86ft 26 26b + % 

00 60 41B0 63b 62% 43b + b 

100 1.9 5 150b 150% 150ft + ft 

83 70ft 70% 10ft— ft 
00 10 23 122 22% 22% 22% + ft 

08 10 21 574 Sift 50ft 51 + b 

J75s 7-fl 78 54 5% 5ft 5b 

00 10 16 2533bJ3b33b+b 

00 10 13 419 33ft 33 33ft + ft 

73 5 24% 2444 24% 

JO 10 23 945 32ft 31ft 3?% + % 

100 7.9 12 4406 25% 24b 25% + % 


32 21% 21% 21% — % 


19b IMP 

$* 3S 

15 10b 

21ft 14% 
49ft 37% 
34% 18b 
40ft 29 
24b 19b 
24ft 13ft 
an* i7% 
34% 22b 
29% 14% 
32 19% 

90ft 34ft 

51 37 

61 49ft 
32 IBM 
44% 28ft 
2«b 19ft 
10b 4b 
44ft 32ft 
lift 9ft 
14ft iib 
2Sb 19b 
31ft 26ft 
ub d4% 
4b 3M 
32% 31b 


Baimca 00 20 
Bkrlntl 72 50 
Boldor 06 17 
viBaldU 
vlBldU pf 
Balls 

BollyMf 00 10 
BallyPIt _ 
BltCES 170 80 
Balt of B 400 Iftfl 
BncOns 00 30 

BonTex 

Bondoo 100 24 
BkBCB 240 4.9 
BkNV 228 50 
BonkVa 102 40 
BnkAm 00 50 
BftAftr pf 4710122 
BkAm pf 7030120 
BkAmpf 208 
BkAirty 2 00 87 
BcmKTr 270 4j 
BkTrpf 20a 90 
BkTrpf 4J22 90 
Banner .03e 0 
Sort 06 10 
BarnGp 00 30 
Barnet s 104 27 
Barvbr 00 30 
BASIX -12b 17 
Bousch J< 20 
Bo.TTr J7 18 
Bay Fin 00 .0 

essig a 

Borneo 100 40 

Beat Pf 3J8 40 

a is % 

f « 

BeilAh 600 13 
BCEb IX 
Beillnd X 10 
BeUSou 200 70 
OefoAH M 17 
Bemls 100 20 

BenfCp 200 48 
Benefpf 430 110 
Benefpf 4» 110 
Benefpf S0J M 
BanafPf 5S 110 
B-«tn 120 7-0 
Beasts 071 

tER 04 .7 

IS^fgsao 110 
BainSf pfLSO 11-4 

i5f& y 3 35 

M 30 

BICkHP 172, U 

S®R« 1-36 40 

gsa*w P 

Boto*CPtS0O M 

BoltBar <W J 

8 

bSe™ f44 89 
BOS EW 1.17 100 
BosEpr 1-46 700 
Bdwatr .72 « 
BrloSt 100 57 
artsfM j 70S 30 

BrrtPt 7-9» 50 


70 7% 

9 244 21% 

13 7H 14ft 

14 215 21b 
187 1% 

2 5% 

M && 
tl S9 10ft 
8 261 21ft 
10Z45 

11 392 22% 
135 Z 

11 517 49% 

5 107 4Bb 

7 W 43 

8 ion 2Sft 
2223 14b 

566 40% 
2 42 
40 15b 

12 IS 2796 

6 140* 64b 
241 26, 

23 44% 
14 27 13ft 

14 477x 34% 
14 2 22ft 

11 1317 » 

13 51 17% 

9 124 7b 

14 1009 M% 

67 *1 24% 

913115 42*. 

84 78b 
52 241 13 
14 523 54 

33S 2ft 
35 4% 

10 34 13% 

11 267 36ft 
8 1394 IB*. 

104 30 
19 25 23ft 

8 2312 39 
21 28 46% 

12 210 36 

10 515 42ft 

4 34ft 
it* 39 
10X186 
330Z ZZb 

84 17% 
ITS 4% 

85 7% 
54 380 14b 

1367 16b 
16 42ft 
340 71ft 
IB 314 ]» 
IB 412 24b 
25 39 17ft 

16 48H 19b 
8 34 32b 

1452 24ft 
14 1790 31ft 
14 5833 45b 
78 781 42b 

2 54b 
30 494 30b 

\\ ’SJSE 

** 4 ft 
"3k 

8 <72 22b 

12 103 2Rk 
76 3251 57% 

13 9 4 

B 151 31 


7ft 

21% — ft 

IgJ + ft 

lb 

5% — ft 


21b- ft 


49 — b 
48% + % 
42% +b 
25b + b 
14% — b 
■40%— ft 
42 + ft 

15b 

77b + % 
44% +1 
75b 

44% + % 
13ft 

+ ft 

17% — Vh 
7%— ft 
28 — ft 
13b— b 

am— % 

«ib— b 

77%— is* 
12b— ft 
53b— ft 
2 

4ft— ft 
13ft— % 
36% — % 
88 + ft 

29b— % 
239* + ft 
38b 

44% — ft 
35b— ft 
41b +7 
34ft— b 
39 —1 
186 +131 

21b— b 
17% + % 
4b— ft 
7b— ft 
13b— b 
Mb + ft 
42% — % 
21ft + b 
35% 

24 — % 
I7V1 

19ft + b 
32b + 16 
23b— % 
31 — ft 

44ft + ft 
42% 

54b— % 
30 + b 

41ft— 1 
71ft 

9ft— % 
38% + b 

13ft + ft 
22ft— ft 
_ 28% + % 
54% 54b— ft 
4 4 

30% 30ft— ft 


N.Y. Stocks Mixed as Rally Stalls 


48 lb lb lb 
20 27b 27b 27b— ft 

6 31% 31% 31% + % 

35 7b 7% 7% 

30130x 80 7W. 80 +1 

IDOZ 77 72 72 + b 

330:70 70 70 —7ft 

7 3311 20% 18 18b — 2ft 

7 85 21b 28b 21% + b 

3 538 23ft 27ft 27% — % 

5 2218 24b 24b 24ft + ft 

2 113 33% 33ft 33b 

1392 20% 27% 27b + ft 

A 25 27ft 77 77 

94 78 77ft 77ft 

1 76ft 2dft 26ft 

2074 23b 26% 27% —1 

It 18b 18% 18b 

3 94 93ft 94 


34b 28ft Alhjpw 2JD9J 9 1926 29H 29ft 29% — % 
23ft 16% AllenG 00020 15 461 23 27b 23 +b 

23% 15% AlldPd 11 115 17b 17% 17ft + b 

05 42 AUSgnn XM9 43b 43% 43b 

46ft 62 AldS pfA 4.12 60 4 64 63ft 63% + b 


11 115 17b 17% 17ft +b 
XM9 43b 43% 63b 
4.12 60 4 44 43ft 43% + b 

604 110 41 S9b 59% 59b — % 

1M 110 14 194 105% 105b— % 

2 mbUBbiozb— ft 

212 30 7 997 54 55b 55b— ft 

183 4 3b 3b— ft 

104 60 9 111 28ft 2Bft 2B% + ft 

120 13 » 2096 33% 32b 32% + % 

.101 790 12% 12% 12b + ft 

300 90 12 30ft 29ft 30ft +1% 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — A rally on the New York 
Slock Exchange stalled Tuesday, with prices 
dosing mixed in active trading. 

Prices opened higher, and n appeared that 
ihe market was ready to score its sixth consecu- 
tive gain. But the upswing faded after two 
hours, just when the Dow Jones average of 30 
industrials climbed above its record nigh of 
1,339.54, set on July 19. 

The average then fell nearly 7 points but 
trimmed the loss by the dosing bell to 3.92 
points, finishing at 1,330.81. 

Declines overall slightly trailed advances, but 
the NYSE composite index lost 0.14 to 107 JO. 
Auto, telephone and computer issues led Ihe 
losers, while several financial stocks moved 
ahead. 

Volume swelled to 1 10.35 million shares from 
78-54 million on Monday, which was a semi- 
boliday because of Columbus Day. 

Some analysts interpreted the market’s mixed 
performance as a typical “correction.’’ with 
many investors taking profits after the recent 
run-up, as opposed to a significant reversal in 
investor sentiment. 

“This was just a normal time out,” said Al- 
fred E. Goldman, vice president of A.G. Ed- 
wards & Sons Inc. in Sl Louis. “To put six days 
back to back is a little difficult.” 

However, Mr. Goldman and other observers 
expressed concern that the market’s broader 
measures have not kept pace with the recent 
surge in the Dow industrials, although they 
noted that the industrials were boosted in pan 
by the takeover-related surge in one of ihe 
average’s components. General Poods. 


Volcken Tm Staying 9 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Paul A. Volcker, chair- 
man of the Federal Reserve Board, denied flatly 
Tuesday that he would leave his post to become 
president of the World Bank. 

“Tm here. Tm staying,” Mr. Volcker said at a 
business conference sponsored by the American 
Stock Exchange. “Nothing <s forever, but that is , 
how things stand at the moment.-" 

His comment appeared to end speculation in 
recent weeks that he might resign his postal the 
U.S. central bank before his term is over in 
August 1987 to head the international financial 
institution. i 

Paraphrasing the American humorist Mark 
Twain. Mr. Volcker said: “The reports of my 
demise are greatly exaggerated.” 

Still, they said the ability of the market to 
extend its rally could hinge on whether the 
broader indexes “confirm” the gains in the blue 
chips with similar advances of their own. 

The economic backdrop showed continued 
signs of improvement Meanwhile, the Com- 
merce Department reported a 0.4-percent de- 
cline in business inventories for August, the 
largest in more than two years. 

Much of Wall Street’s attention Tuesday was 
given to third-quarter corporate timings how- 
ever, particularly in the banking sector. 

JJ 5 . Morgan rose W to S0K and Wells Fargo 
climbed 1 to 54M. 


UMoniti 

HMl Lm SMl 

28% 22 
5ft 1 

a 16% 

41 31ft 
25ft 20% 

37% 30ft 
24% 15 
32% 25 1 

56 32% 

40% 28% 

40ft 29% 

19ft 15% 

20 16% 
me, 1416 
30% Z i<A 
60ft 45 

7ft 4ft 

57 46ft 
18% 9ft 
68 51ft 
sm ir 

6ft ft 

13ft 2ft 


StaL One I liMoniti 

DN. YM- PE HBb HMi Law QuoLOiVe I Hftli Low Stock 


5b. Ckoo 

Dh.Yld.PE lOftHttiUw OooLOig 


01« 20 13 2M 


26ft 26% 
1ft 1ft 
25ft 24ft 
39ft 38% 
24ft 24ft 
35% 35 
22ft 22ft 
30 29ft 
50ft 49% 
37ft 36ft 
31% 30% 
78% 18ft 
18ft 18ft 
15% 15 


54% 33ft 

1SW 

2ft 2ft 


24% — % 
1%— ft 
25ft + % , 
38ft 
24ft 

35% + ft 
22ft- ft 
29% — ft 
58ft +lft 
37ft + ft 
31% + ft 
78% + ft 
18ft 

15ft— ft 
27ft 

63ft— ft 
7% 

53%—% 

74 + ft 

2ft“* 


08 II 4M 19ft IVH 79ft— ft 
100 20 20 692 118ft 116ft 117%— ft 
9 l» 4% 4ft 4% + ft 
200 40 37 7793 57ft 56ft 56ft + ft 
2JS 9.1 827 301* 30 30ft— ft 


“ n lift n 


CPC ini 220 40 13 i 

CP NH 100 6.1 ID 

l»ft CRUM! 2064109 

21ft CSX 1.16 45 9 0 

Ste 1J " “406 

20ft Cabot 02 42 B 

8ft Caesar 13 

17ft Cal Fed 08 20 5 I 
54% 36 CalFdPt 4J5 95 
21 13ft Calttw 0» 10 

15ft 12 Comm l .12 .9106 

28 15% CRUCB 00 

6ft Tft OnpRB .161 
43% 30ft CamSPS 105 20 IS 7 
15ft lift CUPucs 08 


78% 18ft I Bft— % 


as*** 


CRUtB 00 188 23ft 23ft 22ft 

CmpRB .144 102 T% Tft Tft— ft 

COmSps 105 20 15 2124 <3 41ft 45 +2% 

capocs 08 154 11% lift lift 

I 2J% 16ft ConPEfl JO 253 19% 19ft 19% 

228ft 751 CopCHS JS .7 17 l«6d 108 183% I83ft— «ft 

| 27ft 19ft CapHdi 07 30 9 2767 22% 21% 2T — % 

12ft 9% Carina a 08 57 9ft 9% Tft + ft 

40% 28ft Carlisle 108 30 9 2S 38ft 38ft 30ft + ft 

26% 18ft CaroFt 0B1J1O 157 23ft 23% 23ft + % 

30ft 22ft Car Per 240 100 7 259 24 25% 26 + ft 

26% 71 CarPpf 207 100 1 26% 24% 24% 

48 35ft Car+ac 2.10 50 13 44 34ft 36 36 +% 

lift 6ft Carrol 377 10 11 23 7ft 7 7ft + ft 

24% 77% CarPIrs 08 20 9 74 22ft 214k 21ft + % 

31 22ft CarfHw 102 47 16 288 24 75ft 25% 

44ft 23ft CortWI 00 10 13 29 39% 38ft 39 — ft 

18ft 12ft CascNG 100 70 7 5 16ft 16ft 16ft— ft 


22ft CarfHw 1, 
46ft 23ft CartWl 
18ft 12ft CascNG 1 
16ft 9ft CcrsMCk 
15% CSttCBf |. 
15% 12 GfTCfif . 
38% 28ft CatroT 
27% 19ft Ceco 
129ft 70ft Celansa 4 
44% 35% Cahmaf A 
10V5 /ft Cam 


100 7 259 26 25% 26 + ft 

[00 1 24% 24% 24% 

50 13 64 36ft 36 36 +% 

10 11 20 7ft 7 7ft + ft 

27 9 74 22ft 21ft 21ft + ft 

47 16 288 24 25ft 25% 

15 13 29 39% 38ft 39 — ft 

70 7 5 16ft 16ft 16ft— ft 

132 12% 12ft 12ft 
„ 1 25ft 25ft 25ft 

60 173 14ft 14% 14ft + ft 

10 8194x37% 36ft 36% + ft 

11 11 54 24ft 24ft 2f% 

15 12 381 129ft I27ftt27ft— % 
00 7 43% 43% 43% — % 


10% 7ft Canav 04* A 26 246 9% 9ft 9ft— ft 
45 34% Camel 208 55 10 30444 42% 43 4% 

aft , Centex 05 LI 10 110 23ft 23ft 23ft + ft 

27 20% CanSoW 202 8.1 7 700 25ft 25 25 — % 

31% Tift Can Hud Z» 110 6 T34 25ft 25% 25ft + % 

27ft 30ft CHudol 207*100 30 27% 27% 27%— ft 


% 16% CnllPS 104 U » 3Z! 

ft 20ft CnLoCI 208 70 7 485 

37 31% CLaElp>4.la 110 3 

13ft 8% CeMPw 100 11.1 185 133 

21% 16% CVIPS 100 90 6 2Z 

lift 2ft CentrOt 331 

12ft Bft DltrvTI 00 67 8 56 

2J% 17% Cenvfll 240 130 8 Iff 

38ft 17ft Cri-fB«l 78 XI 8 196 

00 10 28 
02 24 


38ft 17ft Crt-tOOd 
30ft Uft CtnAIr 
25% 19 
27ft 71% 

54ft 46 

9ft 7% . , 

4% 1 vIChrtC 
1ft % VlCMwt 
4% Ift vfCArtpd 
63ft 40ft dtre* 3 
48ft 39% CIWMPf 5 

56% 51ft Chose pt A 

56ft 51 Chase pTI a 
22% 16% aiefoa , 
32% 24ft Oiemcd 1, 


05 LI 10 no 23ft 23ft 23% + % 

202 8.1 7 700 25ft 25 25 — % 

276 110 6 134 25% 25% 25ft + % 

207*100 30 27% 27% 27V.— ft 

104 87 10 3Z1 18% 18ft 18ft + % 

201 70 7 485 28ft 26ft 26ft + % 

14.10 110 3 35% 35 35% + % 

100 11.1185 133 12ft 12ft 12ft- % 
MB 90 6 2Z » r«4 r«— u 
__ ..331 ft ft 4ft— % 

00 67 8 56 12 lift 12 + % 

240 137 8 Iff Iffft 18% tm— % 


196 22% 22% 22ft + % 
00 10 28 49 30% 3S 30 

SI 20 1443 2Tft 21 31% + U 

'■M 5-1 1 Z3ft 23% 23% 

2 iu assis-s** 

iS ^ 2 ». \=fS 

■ es 2ft 2ft 2ft 
140 60 6 3641 56% 55 55% + ft 

ITS 110 95 46ft 46ft 46% ~ % 

LSelZI Ml 34% 54 54 

L64emi *44 53% 52ft 53 

03 13 9 II 22 21ft 21ft 


pfBUp 

pf 605*121 


SJ 11 609 ZTft 27 


44ft 29ft Chm NY 208 60 5 3233 39ft 38ft 39 


44% 29% ChNYpt 107 40 1 38ft 31% 38% + ft 

55ft 49% PiNYaf 487* 70 4 53 53 S3 — ft 

39ft 32 Chest* 104 30 10 18 Eft 34ft 34ft + % | 

38% 31 CheSPn 200 5J 10 2772 35ft 34ft 35ft— ft 

39 29% Chevm 240 63 9 7750 39% 38ft 39 + % 


200 124 OtiMJw 105 

00% 53ft CWMI pf 
29ft 16% Oil PUT JO* 10 7 
11% 7% Chic Full J4t 30271 
58% 30% Ch riser 
13ft 6ft Chrfctn 
13ft 9% Chroma 45 


40 127% 126% 127 +1 

12 65 63% 64% +1% 

194 2B* 2P4 28% + ft 

28 Bft Bft 8ft— % 

40 54% 54 54ft— % 

23 11 11 11 

195 13% 13% 13ft— ft 


38% 25% Chrytlr 100 20 3 4794 38% 37V. 37% — ft 

77 45% Chubb .204 15 12 2340 6Bft 67 67% — ft 

63ft 50% Chubb Of JL2S 70 11 59 58% 59 + ft 

M% 13ft Churrii S 04 20 13 2334 15% 14% 14ft 

27% 21 CUcwrU 222 9.1 9 108 24ft 24% 24% + % 


51 37% ClnB*ll 3.12 60 

19ft 13% ClnGE 216 110 
74ft 60 OnGpf 900 13J 
61 40% OnGpf 704 126 

“ 60ft OnGpf 902 110 
— 75 CtnGpf IlUffl SM 

26ft 17ft On Mil 72 41 
37 29ft OrclK 04 20 
24ft 19ft Circle wi 
37 Iflft OrOtv .10 J 
30ft IS . Circus _ 


1.12 60 8 III 49% 49 49% + % I 

1.16 110 7 240 18ft 18% 10ft + % I 

IJO 13J lim 73% 70% 70%— lft 

'04 126 IKK 59 59 59 +1 i 

102 130 50c 73% 73% 73% < 

US 120 V* 85 85 85 +3% 

JZ 47 23 Z74 17% 17% 17% + % , 

04 20 11 355 30ft 30 30% 

4 20 % 20 % 20 % + % 1 
.10 J II 451 20ft 19* 2Wk + ft | 
13 301 Uft 25% 25ft— % 


51% 34% Cittern 226 SJ 615243 44% 42ft 42ft— 1ft 


100% 82% afe»pfA9J5* 90 
0% 6ft Ctoftir 71 10.1 
19% 5% Clairs * 


80 98% 90 98% + % 

83 7% 7 7% + % 

503 II W* 10ft— % 


32% 23ft ClortcE 1.10 30 32 200 30% 30% 30% — % 

14 8 CJavHs . „ 16 392 13ft 13% 13ft + % 

22% 17 OvCH 100 50 9 31 IS 17% 17%—% 

21% 20 CIvCJBf 300 90 60 20% 20ft 20ft 


64 52 Civ El pf 700 120 15060t S9% 58% 58ft 

64% 51% CIvElpf 706 130 5BzS9 59 59 — % 

14% 8% aevplc Jffl 533 MS 9ft 10 + ft 

17% 10 OvpkPf 1.111 64 17% 11% 12% + % 

ib% mcivpicpf 2 ink my. 10% + % 

43% 26% ciurox 1J6 30 13 1653 42» 41ft 42 + ft 

26% 14% CMUM JOe 10 17 39 20% 20% 20% + % 

38% 25% auotip 100 20 20 5759 39 38% 38% +1% 

2416 76% Civet Bt 103 41 n 24ft SAW 2«* +7% 

71% 9ft Coatfim 00 30 IS 56 lift lift 11% 

36% 16% COOStlS 00 IJ 10 432 30 29ft 39% + % 

40% T9 CsHpf 1.19 20 3 49 49 49 —1ft 

74ft 59ft Cocoa Z« U«W 71% 70ft 71 + ft 

21ft 10ft Coleco 7H39 21ft 20% 20% — ft 

32% 25% Column 1J0. 40 19 . 55 ^ 26ft 

28ft 22ft CotB Pal 106 40 44 10800 30ft 27ft 30ft +3% 

49ft 39ft Colappl 4J5 80 88201 48 48 48. + ft 


60% T9 CsHpf 1.19 20 

74ft 59ft Cocoa 2.96 42 14 2 

21% 10ft Coleco _ , 7 

3T% 25% Column MO. 45 19 _ 

28ft 22ft ColfiPal 106 40 4418 


24% 16% Cal Aik u 04 U 

jss^.aiES‘,00 A* 

B&.S82 53 S3 

53 48 ColGuPl 508 10.9 

48ft 45ft COIGSPf 5.13 100 
28% 24% CSOot 145 
SO 34% Com*] In 2.16 49 


554 25 24ft 24ft + ft 

709 13ft T2ft 13ft + ft 

4S 29ft reft 29ft . 

44« S9ft 50% 59ft + ft 

1076 Hft 33 3S 33% — % 

1 »% SOft SOft— ft 

1 *7% 47% 47ft + ft 

2 27 27 27 

290 44 43ft 43% 


37ft 23% CmbEn 100 3J 10 524 g% 77£ ft 

21ft B Comdla JO 10 10 293 20ft 19% 19ft 

18ft 15ft CofnMtl 06 M 17- S 1«U IBft 18% + ■* 

29ft Bft Camare .. .. 7 .715 10 W4 9% 


29ft Bft Camara 7 7 

32ft 26 CmwE 300 108 6 66 
18ft 13ft CWE Pf 1.90 110 
18ft 14% CwEpf 200 110 
76ft S9ft CwEPf 838 111 2 

24% 79ft CwEpf 207 90 
26ft 23ft CwEpf 207 11,1 
76% 59ft Cwg pf B-40 11J 
65% STft CwE at 72A 110 2 

30% 21 ComES 232 90 5 . 

» a% Comsat uo 30 10 1 
35% ms CPsyc 20 iff 18 7* 
35% 23ft Compar 00 24 8 
25ft 12ft CompSc 13 7 

45% 9Hr CMVWI 76 


06 Iff 17- 5 18% IBft 18ft + ft 

7 715 10 9% 9ft 

300 108 6 6604 20 27% 27% + ft 

1.90 110 7 |6ft T6ft 16ft 

200 110 13 17ft 17 17ft + ft 

838 12.1 20CII 69 » 69 — ft 

207 90 40 Wft 24% 24ft 

207 11,1 71 259s 25% 25% + ft 

840 110 502 71ft 71ft 71ft +1 ft 

7J4 110 20te 61 ft 41ft 41ft + ft 
252 90 5 44 26% 26% 26%— ft 
100 30 10 134 34ft 34 34ft + ft 

s ssi^ssrr** 

13 zn i 


16 Conn E 100 80 10 

22 owing m n f 
72ft Conroe 0 29 4 
ZTft ContEd 200 7.0 I 
36ft CunE Pf 405 1U 

40 ConEpf LOT 10.6 
23ft CnsFrt 1.10 30 11 
38% CittNG 202 50 9 
fMi CwmPw 
IV CnPPfQ 400 140 
33 CnPpfO 70S 140 
32ft OtPpfE 772 140 
15% CnPprV 400 150 

14 CnP prU 300 150 
74% CaPpcT 373 111 
31% CnP piH 70S 140 
14ft CnP DTP 400 150 
14% CnP or P SM 150 

9ft CnPprL 203 140 
15% UiP prs 4JB UB 
9% CnP orK 203 147 
31ft CntlCp 2 08 60 19 
74% QIC pfA 200 29 
4» Confllf 78 

% Cantll rt 

31 CntlllM 
% cniHu 

4 Cnllnfo 8 

20% Cant Tel 180 78 8 
15ft CfOofQ 71 U 
32ft CnOtpf 400 1X6 
% vICooku 

27% Conor 102 48 16 
31ft CoopI pf 290 70 
14ft CoorT.r 00 20 7 

15 Coamris 00 IJ 75 
8% CopwW 021 

17% Cpwldpt 208 130 
17% Cardura 84 30 IS 
11 Corel n 06 40 11 
30% ComGs 100 20 19 
26ft CorBIfc 180 21 
5% CnfCra J4r 10 13 
5% Craft 13 

32 Cram 100840 11 

23 CravRs 25 

17ft CrckN pf 218 110 
49ft CrckN of 263* XI 
18% CrmpK 100 XI 12 
41ft CrwnCk . . 13 

27% CrwZel 180 20 18 
43% CrZai pf 403 99 
58ft CTZBl pfC4J0 70 .. 
22ft Culfiro 80 26 17 
13 Culinets 19 

58ft CumEfi 200 13 4 
9 Currlnc 1.1OalO0 
30% CurfW 100 K 16 
33ft Cyctops 1.10 23 8 


25 18% 

30 30 
89 14ft 

651 3<ft 
100x43 
10 47% 
589 33 
7S 41% 
973 6% 
120x31% 
1 BOX 51ft 
SOte52ft 
5 28ft 
10 23ft 
72 21 
100x53 
24 26ft 
55 26 

10 15ft 
12 27% 

S 16ft 
564 am 

11 B7ft 
288 8ft 

3023 2ft 
118 50% 
713 % 

126 11 
2283 33ft 
2611 19ft 
32Qz 33 

437 38ft 
93 39% 
84 16 
1Z79 24 
11 9% 
24 1B% 
114 24% 
22 Uft 
2030 49% 
83 47ft 
92 8% 

14 9ft 
232 37ft 
3748 52 
2 IBft 
499 51ft 

31 23ft 
79 65% 

437 38ft 
123 47% 
IB 59ft 
74 lift 
1162 15ft 
31 66% 
8 10ft 

5 35ft 

6 48% 


9sr;s 

13ft 13% + V 
34 34ft- M 

43 43 — M 

47» 47ft — U 
37% 33 + VS 

41ft 41% 

6% 6% 

31ft 31% +1 
51ft 51ft 

52 53 

2B% 2B% + % 
23ft 73% + Vt 
75 25 

53 53 

26 a —ft 
26 26 + ft 

15 15ft + % 
26% 27ft + % 
Iflft 1 6ft 
39% 40 — % 
87ft 17ft— 3ft 
7% 7% — % 
2ft 2ft— % 
50ft 50% + ft 

% % + K 
10 % 11 + % 
22% 23 —ft 
18% 18% 4 % 

M % 

37ft 3814 + « 
39% JW« 

15ft 16 
23% 23% + ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
18ft 18% + ft 
24ft 34%— ft 
Uft 12ft + ft 
48 48ft +1ft 
46% 47ft + ft 
8ft Bft— % 
9% 9% 

36% 37ft + ft 
50% 50% + % 
IBft 18ft 
51ft 51ft 
23% 23% — ft 
65ft 65ft + ft 
37% 37% — ft 
4*46 47 
56% 59ft +1 
31 31 — ft 

14% W%— % 
66ft 66ft— ft 
10ft 10%— ft 
35ft 35ft- ft 
48% 48% — ft 


15ft DoliCW 06 39 
Vft Dotnonc 00 10 
Uft DonoCP 108 X3 
5% Donahr 
6% Daniel ,18b 24 
26% DartKrs 106 XI 
31 DafaGa 
4 Dafntn 
6% DtoOiu 06 30 
14ft Dovco 24 10 
29% DaVjMd J2 Z1 
14ft DavtPL ZOO llff 
51% DPLpf 7J7 1X1 
2*%. DaanFd .06 10 
24ft Dear* Ijoo 39 
20ft DdlBP 192 8J 
33% DoltoAr IjOO 20 
4ft Deltona 
24% DIxOl ■ L04 
21 DenMIs M0 — 
31ft DaSMo 100 A3 
14 Del Ed 108 110 
21ft DEPfF 205 107 
Uft DE PTR 304 112 
27ft DE PfQ 173 I2J 
21ft DEMP X12 120 
21 DEnfB 275 107 
21% DEWO 3.40 I** 
23% DEMM 302 1 
ZTft DEpiI. 4-00 1 
28ft DE OfK 4.12 132 
15% Dale or 228 119 
lift Dexter 00 4J3 
HRi DiGjar 04 30 
22ft DfGtoPf 125 7M 
Uft Dioms , 1J6U10 
34% DtaShPf 400 1 12 
20ft DtaSOf n 70* U 
6ft Diana Co JO 32 
31% DkttokSS LOO 20 
B5ft DfBlrol 
56ft Disnsv 100 10 
10ft DEIS 
4ft Dlvrsln 
6% Domes .12 
25ft DomRs 202 9.1 
16ft Donald 06 30 
43ft Donftv 1.16 XI 
2314 Dorsey 120 15 
Uft Dover 08 20 
27 DOvuCti 100 XI 
36ft Dowjn 7t 29 
Bft Damnev 
11 Drava 
17ft Dresr _ 

16ft DrevB 2Jn Ilf 
33ft Dreyfus 00 9 

40ft da Port xoo S.1 
3ift dwPntpf 300 90 
40 duPnl pf 450 9.9 
27% DukeP 200 70 
68 Duke pf 870 105 
60% Duke pt 700 100 
Uft Duke Pf 209 102 
30ft Duke Cf IBS II S3 
S0V, DunBrd 270 10 
left Duo LI 206 137 
10% Duo pfA 210 I7J 
13% Duqpf 297 129 
14ft DinjofG 110 111 
74% DOQPrK 210 1X7 
Bft DrcaPi 00a 40 
20% DvnAm 20 J 


TO 279 17 
212 141k 

7 1651 24ft 
If 126 Oft 

116 7% 

12 4781 39% 

16 3113 36ft 

329 5 

8 63 7ft 

9 69 17% 

17 049 40 

I 417 18ft 
S2IIt AOft 

19 in 39ft 
38 815 26 

t ion in 

6 2678 40ft 
48 9% 

17 1022 38 

II 718 21% 

11 111 32ft 

6 3513 14% 

74 25% 

19 26% 
32 25% 

5 25ft 
99 25% 

20 26ft 
52 27 
14 30% 
4 Jfft 
10 19ft 

11 337 21 
365 18 

38 32ft 
1857 15% 
8 36% 
364 21% 
I 8 9ft 
If 338 36% 
14 6139 108ft 
48 1661 89ft 
■» " 21 % 
5% 
784 9 
9 427 29ft 
10 136 21ft 

12 608 3* 

14 3337 35% 
19 320 40% 

3 332 2B% 

108 12% 
16 314 19 
14 19ft 

15 346 67ft 

IS 4289 59% 

1 37ft 
7 46 

8 1222 33% 
31702 82ft 
1002 72 
7 26ft 

_ U 35 

21 1661 74ft 

7 560 15ft 


11 24 13% 

12 39 25 


16% 16*i—ft 
141% 14ft — ft 
23% 24 
8 Bft- ft 
7ft 7ft— ft 

38 38ft— ft 

35% 36 + % 

4ft 5 
7ft 7ft 
17ft 17ft + ft 
39ft 39ft— ft 
18 18% 

60ft 60% — ft 

39 39ft + ft 
25% 25% + ft 
23ft 23%+ ft 
39ft 39ft— ft 

9ft Vft 
37ft 37ft + ft 
21ft 21ft— ft 
32ft 32% + ft 
14% 14% — ft 
25% 25% _ 

25% 26% + ft 

25 25ft 
25ft 25ft + ft 
25% 25ft— % 
26ft 26ft + ft 

26 Vi 24ft — % 
30% 30% + % 
31% 31% 

19% 19% — % 
30% 20% — ft 
17% 17ft 

32 32 + ft 

15% 15% — % 
36 36U + % 

2Dft 21% + % 

914 9% 

36 36 + Vi 

105% 106%— 1% 
08ft 89 — % 

R *t=s 

8% Bft 
m 29%— % 

stsats 

36% 36% + ft 
34% 34% —lft 
35 35% 

096b 39% + % 

27 28% +1% 
12 % 12 %— % 
1 Bft 18% 

19 19 

6441 65% + % 
58% 59 + % 

37% 37% 

45% 45% 

33 33% + % 

80% 82% +1% 
72 72 

26% 26% — % 
34ft 35 + % 

73ft 74ft + % 

15 15 — % 

17ft 18 + ft 

17% 17% — % 

16 16 

16% 74%— ft 
13% 13% — % 
34ft 25 + % 


39ft Wt CMAos 100 27 14 226 37ft 36ft 37 -ft 


43 29 

17ft IS 1 * 
32ft 23% 
28% 20 
20% 12 
12% 3ft 
5 1% 

2% % 

22% 7% 

2SV- 9% 
33ft 71ft 
28ft 21% 
33ft 14% 
50% 41% 

40% *0 

15ft 11 
32% 20 
32ft 36% 
18ft 14ft 
II PA 
3«ft 23ft 
34ft 21% 

19% 9ft 
IT Tft 
S% Tft 
34% 15ft 
14 17% 

9% 3 

7B% 40 
14ft 6ft 
30% 15% 
33% 20% 
32% left 
16% lift 

Bft 23 
20 lift 
29% 17ft 
31% 17ft 
.Tft Ift 
13ft 9% 

S Vb 15% 
ft 17ft 
35 19ft 
6% Tft 
27% 13% 
30ft 25% 


08 10 19 339 
EQKn IJ6 XI 29 

00 13 14 678 
EagleP IJM u i 23 
Eased 221 38 

12 2873 

EALwfO 110 

EAL WfA 142 

ESAirpf 205k 26 

EAlrpfBXMk 43 

EAlrotC 26 

EasfGF 100 X7 144 345 

EcatUN LM U l 62 
ESKOdS 2JD XI 12 8439 
Eaton 100 20 7 506 

Eetilin & 04 16 II 1448 
Eckert 104 u M 11335 
EdlsBr 100 50 13 10 

• J8 U u 860 

— 16 134 

Edward 00 11 12 210 

EPGdPf 215 9J 1 

EtToro 04* 0 |0 512 

Efcor •' 

ElecAs _ 

ElcfSP S 08 27 275 

Eltrin JO 5.9 K J? 

Elscfnl 216 

Emr.EI 200 10 13 1747 
Em Rod .941 HU JO 379 
EmrvA 00 30 12 1064 
Emhart 100b 50 9 253 
EmpDs 1J76 84 7 55 

Erwrven 104 7 A 10 10 

EnExC 186 

c natCn 72 11 ID 271 
msSos Ji ZB 13 132 

march LM 70177 hb 
nsExn MO* 60 64 

n«e 

ntara 

E 200*160 102 

Itfexln 106 70 II 72 
qutxs 1.14 16 16 33 

OUlrtlK 91 

Eamkpf 201 122 3 

Eamk d 3 


3635 3 Sft 
15% 15% 
29% 28ft 
24ft 24% 
17ft 17ft 
10 9ft 
3ft 3ft 
2% lft 
22% 22 
7Jft 24% 
29ft 29% 
23% Uft 
22% 22 
44% 42ft 

3% is 

31ft 31ft 

'ft 

10% v% 
•0'« 10 
4% 4 

22 21ft 
13% Uft 
5% 2% 
*9 48ft 
Pft Oft 
17 14% 

28% 28 
ji am 
14. 13ft 

S % 22ft 
% 18 
21ft 21% 
17ft 19% 
.2% 2ft 
12% 12 
15ft 15% 
79 IBft 
32 31ft 
3!M 3ft 
78ft IBft 
28% 28’-: 


36 + % 

15% 

28ft— % 
24V,- % 
17ft— V» 
9ft— % 
3ft 
lft 

22% + % 
24ft— % 
29% — ti 
25ft— % 
22 — Ha 

43ft— 1% 

29ft 

31ft 

lgt + % 
9ft + % 
26 — % 
24% + % 
9ft— % 
10 — % 
4 

21ft— ft 
IJ% + % 
Tft 
Uft 

Bft + % 
16ft— ft 
a _ % 
20ft + % 
14 + % 

23% + % 
18% + ft 
51% — % 
19% — % 
Tft 

12 - % 
15ft— % 
IBft — 

32 - % 

3% + V« 
181*- * 
W-9 — W 



23 GAP 08 0 1 

27X GAT X 100 41 1 
9% GCA 

54 GEICO 1J0 IA 7i 
3 GEO 
4% GF CP 

3814 GTE 176 80 I 
34% GTE Pf 200 7.1 
20% GTE pf 148 100 

43ft Gannett 108 20 19 1042 
20% GdPlite 00 10 29 146 
Tft Geortif JOI a 


38ft 37ft 
29% 29% 


20% Go Bine 00 10 29 146 

Tft Geortif JOI 2f 736 

wsac * U11i s 

10 Gem II I 00* 15 42 

37ft GnCorp 100b 30 29 1579 

f GAInv 7030 90 . 38 

Gnacsh fffff 10 10 41 

GOnm 00 10 11 432 

GnDota 10 170 

GnDevn 92 

GnDevwt 7 

41ft GnDvn 108 10 7 1200 

S3 GenEI 200 17 12 7544 

S3 GnFds 200 XI 19 3718 

4ft GnHme 7 31 

lift G Hosts 00 Iff 3 674 

8% GnHouS 04 20 6 

17ft Gnlnst 05 1.9 1780 

47ft GnMilis 204 15 7001 

65ft GMal 50Or 70 6 7230 

16Vw GMtr E 051 .1 1025 

35ft GAtotOf X75 90 2M 
46% GMolpf 500 90 11 

3ft GNC .16 30 16 23 

M3% GPU • 8 «6 

57 Gen Re 106 L8136 989 
* GnRefr 6 26 

37 GnStonl 100 47 10 814 

62 GTFI Pf X16 100 240001 

2*. GerafiO 174 

8 GnRnd .10 1.1 <7 189 

IBft Gensto 10® &B 7B 

28ft GenuPt 1.18 XB 13 239 

20% GaPac JB X9 27 4008 

23% GaPwPf 300 120 28 

25 GaPwpf X44 120 90 

27 GaPw Pf X74 TZ7 HI 

18ft GaPwpf Z06 110 T 

18% GaPwpf X52 120 8 

22 GaPw Pf Z75 100 52 

20% GertaPd 103 XB 13 262 
12% GerbSe .12 0 12 147 

lift Gdftv S .16 0375 263 

8VS GIANT 45 

S% GlbrFn 3 463 

77% GfHHffl 02 20 75 317 

50% Gillette 200 19 13 I1B 

11% GlaasC 1575 

7% GtenFd ffSu 0 5 3S6 

1% GtoMM .121 796 

S% GlabMMUSI 301 


8% GtoNuo 1* 7361 

lft GldN wt 156 

lift GldWF 00 0 8 1974 

24ft Gdrfril 70fl 5.0 220 

24% Goodvr 1-60 50 8 4155 

19 Gould 08 20 4TM 

38 Grace 200 rj II 2858 

26ft Grangr s 08 12 13 556 


12 % — % 
36ft— % 
51ft + % 
17% — ft 
36ft 
U 

24%—% 
30 +1% 

39 + % 

Z7% + % 
15ft — % 
5% — Ml 
19ft 

15ft— % 
54% + % 
46ft— ft 
12ft + % 
84 + ft 

42% + ft 
lift— % 
13 — % 
25ft 

23ft— Mi 

19 

lift 

10ft + % 
19ft— ft 
25ft + ft 
24ft— ft 
28%- ft 
30ft— ft 


‘ »$+ ft 

10 —ft 

5SU35 

lift 

ss- 1 * 

54 + ft 

ts + ft 

11^= ft 

it 

p 

r=i% 

lm + % 

IS^+ft 
85ft- ft 
9 

9* 

19ft + ft 
30ft— ft 
20ft— ft 
24V4 — % 
ZTft— ft 
29% 

21ft- % 

ms- ft 

25% + ft 
34%— % 
17% — ft 
26ft + ft 
10% + ft 

I9ft— % 
67% + % 


“Good tiling you remembered to bring die Like Magic Plant Spray. 
It never occurred to Houston that there would be aphids on Mars ” 


Like Magid” Plant Care produces are packaged in 
GrowPak™ dispensers from our Enviro-Spray Systems, 
Inc. subsidiary. GrowPak is the newest technological, 
development in pressurized packaging in 40 years. 

For our 1985 Annua! Report write: 

Grow Chemical Europe N.V., Oudesrraat8 
EL2630 Aartselaar, Belgium Dept. G 



Grow Group 

AwJgrip, Devoe, Amerftone, just three of our M famous brand names. 


12MunDi 
High Lour Stuck 


5ta. Cte* ( 12Mon0i . 

Dfv.YUPE WhNWiLuw Ouot Cfoe 1 High Low Store 


SU. Cbm 

MfHhhLpw OwLOTB* 


81% 67 Holntpf 605 70 

SSTIBW HUS 6 

20% 14% HowtCP 00 18 76 
ZTft 23ft Hubbrd 208 90 11 
13ft 9ft Huffy 00 17 12 
15ft 12 HuflftTI 08 35 
34 17% HufltaSp 02 U 12 
36ft 3i« Human 08 20 U 
31ft 20% HuntfMf 00 10 17 


102 79 7M6 78ft 23% 15ft KVW 

B39 26ft 26ft 26ft 

16 9* 9ft 9ft— ft I 

21 u% uft Uft + ft — — 

33 25 24ft 24ft— % »% ZB* LACn 

57 WJ 10ft UWr+ ft Jlft Wft LMHg 

537 12% 12% 12% — % 17% 11% LLER 

65 23 22% 23 + % 4% 1 LLCC* 

3#m sm. 28% reft— ft i% 

18 sm ■m% uft 


23% 15ft Kvsar 08 40 7 15 19ft 19% 19ft + % 


31ft 24% LM Ha 204o 95 M 
17ft ,1% LLEJf TaWff 

1% 1 LLC wf 
13% 5ft LTV 


41ft 26ft H utTE F 00 20 9 1W 33% 33ft 33%— %| 2» 8% LTVpf 


31ft 19ft Hydro! 200 00 ip 


35% 25 ICInd 104 40 U 
19ft Uft ICMfl 05* 17 
lift 8% ICN _ . 71 

30 22% ICN pf 200 90 

18% 15 INAlR 102 110) 

27% 23 IPTlmn 102* X0 
17% U% IRTPrslJD 90 7 
36% 25ft ITT Cp LOO 13 10 
68 53 ITT Pm 4LOO 5LB 

63 50 ITTpfJ 4 jOO 6.3 
45% 49 ITTPIK 4J0 XI 

64 49 JTTpfO XS® 7.8 

47 35% ITT PIN 205 4J 

<6 XI ITT Pfl 400 60 
Wft 11% lUInt .00 XI . 
34% 18 IdMnPs L72 88 9 
17 5 IdaafB 

27% 211* IJIPbwr 264 710 6 
20% 15ft llPowpf X13 112 
38ft 30% llPowpf 402 110 
36% 27 llPowpf 330 Jiff 
55 SOft llPowpf XZ1* 40 
46% 37 llPowpf 4.14*93 
40ft 39 llPowpf A47 110 
37% 28ft llPowpf 480 117 
36% 26% ITW 72 26 11 
40% 31ft ImpQmi 2.13* 5J 7 

12 7ft InwiCp 9 

15ft 9ft INCO 00 17 

68 51 InfflM pf 776 110 

76 59% IndIMpf 808 1X1 

106% 95% irafiMprain 110 
79ft M IndIMpf 215 110 
20ft 15ft IndIM pf 223 115 
30% 25% IndIMpf 303 1X5 
289* 31ft lixflG** W U I 
9% 4% Inaxcn m 

53% 39% inoerR 200 XI 17 

37% 3D InpRsf 205 47 

13% 11 lnorjec 04 37 28 

26 17ft loWSH J8I 

48% 385* InlSfpfAJS 11M 
21ft 16% Inuflca 100b 57 10 
Sk 3ft IntpRs 
26ft lift infpftsc 8 

28 IV IntoRpf 3JO 115 

SSSwKSS-lS 

9ft 7ft Innoan 0 

14% 8 IntRFn 

J9ft Uft HcpS* 2.10a) 1.) 

73% 56 lntorco 308 40 U 

13 9 Intrfsf ,00 42 11 

53ft 41 IntrBc 200 X3 8 

12% 8ft intmad 

»% 15ft Inf Ala 72 4.1 9 

138% 114 IBM 400 30 1313 
29% 16% InfCJrl 00 L5 10 


21% 10ft 
18% 14ft 
61% 30ft 
71% 15 
41% 32% 
29ft 221* 
20 14% 

29ft 22% 
SOft 22 
tft 2ft 
Uft 9ft 
17ft 6ft 
36ft 24ft 
27% 24ft 
7ft 4% 
27ft 70 
45% 26% 
18ft lift 
a i6ft 
14ft 714* 
41 30% 

32ft 26 
35% 29% 
30ft 14 


5ft + % 
9ft— ft 

3? J,* 

34ft + ft 
38ft— I 
31ft— % 
08 ZJ 8 119 17% 17ft 17% 

7 525 Uft 16% 16% + % 

IffO 10 13 914 61ft 61% 61% 

103*110 1 16ft 16ft 16ft 

102 47 12 648 36% 35ft 35ft— ft 

100 00 9 1738 26ft 25ft 26ft + ft 

172 90 8 13 8 18 18 + ft 

_ 6 385 27ft 2796 27%— ft 

1JT XI 9 use 36% 26 26 — % 

8 277 5ft 4ft 5 

a 27 15 77 10ft 10ft IffW + % 

10 13 115 Oft 7ft 8 

100 XI 9 690 3Z% 32 32— % 

280 100 2 aw* 24% 26% — ft 

3 20 56 1U 6ft 6% 6ft— % 
28 11 47 24% 24ft 24ft— % 

JO Z1 13 1332 44% 43% 43%— ft 

2J 340 16% Uft 16 — % 

100 62 114 21ft 21 Tl +lft 


34% 34 34% Wft 

15ft 14% 15 27 

10% IBft Wft— ft Uft 

Z7% 27% 27% 4% 


61% 31 LTVpf X94j . 

18% 8% LTVpf JWI 
15 1 *j LQutot Z3 

29ft 30% LoClGs IS 67 I 
Wft 6% Loforo* 00 28 
37 21% LofrOPT 204 100 

Uft 7ft Lemur* M XI 10 
4% 1% LoraS**' 3KS 


n 24ft 74 
22 3TW 31 

n% 1 

6 1 % 
3439- 5ft 
122 1 




8 17% 17% 17% + %1 13% UM Lnwtlnf 06 U 14 205 


23% 23ft— ft 
15% 15% + ft 
34% 34%—% 
09 09 +1. 


53ft 53ft— ft 98% 58 , LAN X2D Xfl 13 521 89% 89 . 89% + % 

44% 44% + ft J78 1» UmlHS .U 0 27 1823 25ft 24ft 24% + % 

30 30 44% 33% Unctm 184 40 12 363 44 43% 43ft— ft 

34ft 34ft— % 181ft 140. UnCN pf X00 17 . 2 175ft 175ft 175% +7% 

27ft 27% + % 21% 19ft UncPI Z74d 77 11 23ft 23% 23ft + ft. 

36ft 36% + ft 80 41ft LHtOB 200* 29 70 240 78ft 49ft 49%— ft 

7% 7ft— ft 51 39% Loddid JD* U 8 J73S 44% 44ft 44ft + % 

11% 12 —ft 37 27 Lucffi* M , 30 U 51 31 , 30% 30% 

48 00 +1 541* 28M L«Mf 100022 12 TWO 45ft 44ft 44%— ft 

72 72 38% 25ft Loa!cor 04 J 19 189 36 . 34% 35ft + % 

02ft 104 +1 ■ 3<% 27% LomFIn 100 40 12 8? 32ft 32ft — 1 


IntHav 1.13 30 19 2281 34 


0 %£*£*&+* ^ 

U30x 19 18 19 +1% 5091 

}Bz36 '36 36 —1 7916 

I930Z 34% 33 34% + ft 3214 

150 Oft 53ft 53ft— ft 98% 
60 44% 44% 44% + ft 27% 
910x38% 31 30 44% 

2 34% 34% 34%—% 101ft 
11 6*4 27% 27ft 27% + ft 23% 

X 327 36W 36% 36ft + % K 
9 122 7% 7% 7ft— % 51 
3546 12ft 11% 12 — % 37 
20z 61 48 41 +1 54% 

S* 72 72 72 38% 

Z10H04 102ft 104 +1 3M 

7 in* MM 78ft— ft 39% 
12 18% 18% 78% 4% 

2 29 » 29 . 20% 

8 U 25* 25ft 25ft— ft 29 
„ 133 5% 5% 5ft 54 

17 66 51ft 50ft 51ft + % 9% 

10 34 35% 33ft — ft 51 

28 11 14% Uft 14ft 52 

226 21% 21% Zl% 23ft 

12 43 42% 43 + ft 2216 

10 126 18 17ft 17%—'% 33ft 

99 446 4ft 4ft 27ft 

8 M 78% Mft 18ft— ft 31% 
23 25% 25ft 23ft 16% 

69 45ft 45ft 45ft 79% 

. 40 32ft 32% 2Zft 31ft 

■ 35 Bft IH* 8f%— % 37ft 

43 9% 9ft 9ft— % 38 

26 19ft 19 19 - 25ft 

13 958 64ft 62ft 63% + % 33% 

11 551 9% 9ft 9ft— % 25% 

8 31 «% 48% 48% 37% 

421 9ft 9% 9ft + ft 64 

9 .12 17% 17% 17% + % 31% 
1313019 129 1Z7 127%— ft 25% 
ID 472 26% 26% 26ft + ft 37% 


77f*-~ ft 25ft WftLMTPt -K IS 126 
15% + ft aft 20ft Luorppf 2J7 140 . 37 

‘ — **“ 41 LaarSe XOO. 42 * 4*4 
15 LPoRnlB 00 20 12 29 

, 25% LswvTr 100 4J 13 129 

46ft 23%. LnaEnt 02 23 19 314 41 

IBM 1% LapMas 00b U M J 15 

+ % a 16% LraPkrt 02 20 11 are 

4 2 LafiVtd . 63 T 

— ft 37 24ft LVhtpf . 12 » 

+ ft 15% 13ft LMMim LSMlff 273 TO 
15ft in* L*nnr jo Iff 10 a ill 

+ ft 34% Wft LeueMfs 3 ffl 19! 

+Tft 50% 42ft LOP 102 29 8 197 47 





-r- •> Uft LemcMf 3 

+lft 50% 42ft LOF 102 
— 1 79ft 48ft LOF pf 405 

+ * J2ft 22ft UWyCP 03 
— ft 98% 58 . Lilly 220 


273 "W* i-T* t - 
a uft 10% io% — % 
•SI 19ft 19% 19ft +.ft 
m 47 , 45% 45%—% 
14 76ft 75ft 75ft— 1 " 
56 7m, 3W6 ■* 


3 . 

si« 


IS* LantWf 204 9.7 18 721 27 


4ft 2 LomMwt 
20% 19% LomasMir 
29 27ft LdSIar . L» .47 4 
54 45% LonaSpf-507 IQS 

t% 5% ULOb . . 2 

51 35 LiLpU 

52 26% ULpfK 
23% 15% ULpfX 
' L LpfMf 

LILpfV 
ULpfU 
LILpfT 
ULpfP 
LILpfO 

LMpDs 03 20 14 
Loral . 02 10 17 


S6=» 


« LaLand .lflO J3' 
23% . J7% L0P0C 00b 01 
33% 24* LaPLpf 34HJXS 
»* 17% LaPLpf 20711X0 
37% 25% LOWvGa Z St 9J 
64, Mh Lowit X08 12 
31% 20% Lowes J6 10 


7% 

46% 46%—% 
47% 47% 

19% 19% — % 
79 , 79 — % 
»% 19ft- ft 
21% 21 %- ft 
18% 18ft 

*4 xgr hB-* 

42 385 79% 19 79% + ft 

, iS 

>8 9S-si&st+% 

}3 flS 22ft 21ft 22 + fi 


1.J* S0 U 573 IR 


lift 6% JnfHarv 
Tft 3% IntHrwl 
3% 2% IntHwfB 
60 28ft IntHpfC 
44 34 intMln 2 

41ft 24% intMutf \ 
57% 44ft infPnpr 3 
16% 9ft I riffles 


2565 7ft 6% 
205 4ft 4. 


7 + ft) 1* 
4ft + ft __ 


Lubys 00 10 22 
23ft 16ft LockvS 1.14 50 11 
16 10% Lukuns 08 30 IS 


135 34% 
2 » 22 % 
45 Wft 


K + % k* 

2Z%— ft V 

W + ft V 


1299 2ft 2% 2ft— ft 1 : . •; _ 

2 47% 47% 47% — ft ■ 

60 12 606 39ft 39% 39ft— ft 33ft 13 MACQM 
43 11 490 41ft 40ft 40% — % 4Mh »V MCA* 
X2 3579 46ft 45% 4«_ ft Tg6 


W T7 7M TTft 1«h 17% 
34ft 34% . 


54% 35ft IntNrih 208 SJ 10 460 43ft 42% 43%—% 38 28ft MDU 202 70 9 7 34% 34ft 34%— 

43% 31% IntPbGP 1J8 27 13 172 toft 39ft 40 41ft M MBI SUM 42 38% 31ft 

22 14ft intBakr . 12 60 20% 20% 20* +.* W% 11% MGMGr 04 20 41 219 IBft 17% n _ 

21% 17% intsfPw 100 90 8 44 19% 19% 19ft 27 ID ' MGMUO 08* J 552x74ft 24ft 24ft — 


22% 17% intsfPw ISO 90 8 44 19% 19% IM 

13ft 9ft IntSeen . _ 10 133 « 9ft 9ft— % 

21% 16% lowaEI ISO 90 10 114 19ft 19% 19ft + ft 


<?% 43%— % I 37* 27% lawaRS IDS 9J 


104 130 5 3m 


270141 S9ft 40 
50 30 29% 29* 

22 32* 32ft 32% 
111 50ft 3B »Vi 


m» 12%—% 

39ft 40 +1 

29% 29% 


32ft 22ft 
32% 34ft 
1% * 
11% tft 

«2% re* 

15ft 12ft 
71ft 17 
30 1** 

20% 16 
31ft 16ft 
68* 36% 

36% 21% 
12% Tft 
28% 34ft 
29% H% 
22ft 13% 
35 22ft 
18% 10% 
30ft 23 
39% 34% 
17% lift 
25% Wft 
13* 9ft 
33% 22% 
13% 9ft 
3 13 

23ft 19 
22% 10% 
15% IDft 
16% 13ft 
33* 14% 
30ft 16% 
29% 20 
27* 12% 
24* 18 
40% 31ft 
19% 10ft 

34 70 
21 16 
49% 35 
10ft 5ft 
39ft 28* 
33% 24 
23* Wft 
13ft Oft 
26ft 18% 
73ft Sift 
37% 24ft 
57* 36ft 
63% 65* 
20% 10ft 
27* 17% 

9% 7 
22% 20ft 

18 ID 
63% 40ft 
67% 53ft 

35 21 
ift 3% 

53'A a* 
30* 26 
42* 31ft 
19% 13% 
39ft 28% 


MoilFS IffO X9 
NoJWn ISO 7J 
1-Sal I wd * 60 
Mohvdpf 06 60 
HamPs 1 06 30 
MensJS 1070100 
HanJl 104a 8 3 

Handls 06 30 
HundN 06 X6 
Hanna 00 2J 
HorBrj IffO 10 
Hennas 06 Iff 
HamWi . 

Ha m rt B 300 130 
HompfCXU 7ff 
HroRwS 00 14 
Harris ff8 30 

HarGrp 

Horseo ire 40 
Hartmx ire X9 
HdJfSe ire 100 
HowEI 104 70 
Hi3¥WiA .CC® 4J 
HeaffOn 00 10 
HozLab JT 20 
HIHiAm 

HltCrt* n ,18e S 
HHUSA 

Hack* 08 20 
HuefaM 00 10 
He4Imn 08 25 
Hell* 00 10 
Hein* s 

I I . to f" 

I KIIHJb 

HeimP 06 IS 
Hencu Is 100 40 
Harm: a Ml 
HerllC pf 150 40 
Hermnn . 

Hereby L40 10 
HKStan 

HewlPk 02 J 

Hex cel 00 20 

HiSMar JO 20 
HTVolf .17 IS 
Hllnbrd .04 X3 
Hffron 100 II 
Hitachi 04* 1.1 
Holiday IffO 1.9 
HdflVS ISO u 
HamaO 
HmFSD 

H/nuGpf LID 110 
Hmstfca 00 ff 
HmstFn 00 XO 
Hondo 006 3 
Harwell XOO 30 
H ran Bn 100 XI 

bst 00 is 

Hatulln 200 90 
HoUOflM S6 27 
HouFab 08 17 
t+MHinr iffi 4S 


36* 25% 
35% 35 
1% lft 
9ft 8* 
41 40ft 
Uft Uft 
Tift 20% 
» 23 

18ft IBft 
17ft 17ft 
58ft 57% 
32ft 31% 
10ft 9% 
75 35 

27ft 26% 
17* 17* 
24 23% 

77ft 14% 
29* 29% 
32ft 32ft 
17 16* 

21ft 21% 
9* » 
25ft 25% 
13ft Uft 
13 % 11 % 
20* 19* 
16% 16% 
12* 12ft 
16% 15% 
18* 18% 
28% 28ft 
21ft 28* 
77* 17* 
19ft 19 
38% 37ft 
19% 18* 
32% 32ft 
17ft 17% 
48 43 

6 6 
31% 30% 
27% 27% 
a 19% 
lift lift 
23% 23 
68 65ft 
33% 32 
53% 53 
79 78ft 
11% 11 
am am 
9ft 5* 
75 24% 

13* 13% 
54 53ft 

&S* 

6ft 6ft 

sas* 

— 13% 
37 


ift + % 

8* 

48* + ft 

Uft 

21ft + * 
23ft 
18* 

17ft 

57% ~ * 
32 + ft 

10% + ft 

75 + ft 

27tt + ft 
17* + ft 
24 — ft 
17 + ft 

29% + ft 
32ft + % 
16% — ft 
21ft 

9*— ft 
23*+ ft 
13ft 

12 —1% 
®ft+ ft 
16% 

12ft— % 

)4* 

18* 

28%— ft 
2B%— % 
17ft— % 
Wft 

37% +% 
18*+ ft 
32ft— ft 
17* + ft 
47ft— % 

SOft— ft 
Z7* + ft 
a + ft 
in 

23 — U 
46ft— 1% 
32 + ft 

53 — % 
79 — ft 
11 — * 1 

20ft— ft 
9%— ft 
24% 

13* + * 
53ft- % 
62 + ft 

33% +* 

31ft— * 


37* 27* lowdRs 388 9S 
40 , 31 , IpalCO X04 90 
13% 9% IpcqCP J6 11 

40* 27ft IrvBnfc LM SS 
53 43 irvBkpl 4J4* 9ff 


35ft 22* JWT ■ 1.12 3S 16 

37 23ft JRIVOT M 13 10 
26M, 14 Jamswv .12 0 18 
13% 10% JaonF 103*122 _ 
47ft 34ft JffffPH 102 30 7 
77 99 JurC pf 906 13ff 

66 51ft JerCpf X12 1X7 
66 49, JerCpf 7JB 107 

18ft 14ft J*rCPf X18 120 _ 
U* 6* Juwicr 22 

- 1 JohnJn L3Q 25 


11* 2ft MGMuwt 
im irn -r n 1 •* ft MLConVn 
31* 32 + ft 11* n ML Inc n 
“ - 1 32ft Q* MB Ltd J» 

30ft IBftMacmlS 05 


242 32 31* 32 +ft 

200z 21 21 21 mi 

87 31* 31ft 31ft — .H 35ft U* 


796 32* 33* 33ft— % 55ft 3«ft MOCT 
JO 11* ir* lift w infcMadn 

1679 5% 36% 37 — * 408 31% MOpiG 
51 52* S* 52* + * 


307 79 28% 20ft 

915 RAF* 

480 46* SS 46 .— * 

5Qz 72 72 ; 72, +1 

501ta 64% 62ft 64H, +2W, 
224*62 62 67 - +1 

20 17ft 17* 77ft + ft 
234 15* 14% 14*— Ift 


^38aasac“' a 

ti*JS! 2SSJR 3: if 

19ft 10ft MonrC* .11 0 23. 

42ft 29% Mfrttai are 80 5 

ASHB&f 

23* MAPCO -UO XB 8 
3.. Monde. 

ft Morcd* - ■ - 

aw 25* MorMW IffO 50 7 
3^4 1W Morton* ffi J 31 


49% 30ft JohnJn 100 ZJ 14 3363 45* 44% « — ft 1 1T% 0% MmKC 02 00 

46ft 38% JOlmCn lffta 40 9 519 40% 40ft 48% + ft ( 77* 13% Mwkpf 1 3 XI 

52ft 50* Jtmcpf 405 M SS 53 52 53 +1 ] 100 70 MfurVtf 04 0 15 


27% 21% Jorwan IJB 4.1 18 
96% Uft JaHen s JO XT 14 
27ft 22ft JOVMfB 100 6.1 IS 


XI 18 2 24* IM 

12 14 44 25 24ft 

XI 18 871 23* 23% 


9ft 7* KDI 04 30 W 150 Bft Bft 8% 

20% 17% KLM 07u 2S 8 879 18_ OTt 17ft 
45% 33% KMIpf 400 Vff . 5S ^% 43* 4» 

41W 30% Kmart 100 -4J 10 3540 " 

77 Mft KN En a fl 

18* 12* KatcrAI .151 348 


— ft 75ft 50ft MrshM 2J0 X9 18 < 

M SS&Sr S.K'jf ' 

3% l* -MasevF ■ ■ . . 

tm 22% MfwCp 2S6 1X2 
Mwfnc un 110 


iS KS 5B 7ft 

$3 TU6 10% 10*—* 

® lift li :n , 

?S -*fft 4S* + 4 

mb 9 9 3 

re 12ft 12* 12% 

I pllis 

cot 33ft 32* 32% — % 

v strati . 

21 Uft 13*: Uft + 2/1 

ja-aasPrS 


18* 12* KabrAI .151 
20ft 14* KahCa 00 10 
78* 1516 KoKPT 1 J7 83 
lift 7* Konub .0 11 
103ft 87 Konub Pfl 102*1 10 
24ft II KClyPL X36 110 
40 32 KCPLPf 400 120 

20% 15% KCPLPf ire T2J8 
71ft 17 KCPLPf 203 llff 
« 39% KCSou IffB 2 O 
Wft 10* KCSOPf IffO 73 
19* 9* KonGE 1.18 100 
£i% re* KanPU; i « xo 
23% lift KOPLPf 2J2 100 
45 12* KotVln 

715 33* JCOtypf L46 3l6 

70 IT* Koumr .00 XI 
IBft 13* Koufpf 100 9ff 
88 73 Koufpf 80S }L7 

63 34* KdM 104 XI 

39ft 23ft Ktilwd 100 32 
2ft fk Kami 


«6-r Ji 65ft 4m Ae Mr 2 10 m -a£ 5*3 S 

w* wS-S st ajssssu i» ^ ^ 

u {} lat ltJ! 2ES5 lT . WJ lift it* 

14% I«k— ft 58* 37ft MovDStrlffi 30 10 819 KS JL,. S-. ~ 


6 16» 16ft + » 5916 43 Atovfp 20B 4J g 


Tift 

36ft + * 
IB* + * 
19*— ft 


McO*rf IJO ?3 


33ft KOIVPf 704 Xfl 
IT* KoufBT .00 11 


104 XI 16 
ire 32 7 


10 18ft 18* 18% + 

11 iw in i«*— 

• AStBfflr 

4 msa 11* nft 
8 

5 ?7 SS ?**- 

6 639 C* 3 5ft— T 

7 ig 37ft3mre + 




??CDnU .SO 10 14 It 


87 64 McOnD 704 2D I 


3** S* Mclntfl 3?g 

.^asaaa.H- *$£ 
-S h 


7* McUon 

J* McUdwf 


19ft Kuranf JO 61 11 68 19% 19% W- ft ' 

29* 23ft KvDtfl 20* 9.1 9 265 27ft 26* M*— ft 5” 

18* 9* KurrGI .04 40 _ 99 10ft W* Wft -gat 



ft kmtmc i.n ss a 

ft Kuyorp 1 JO 40 7 
KuvCon 

K*ylttf8 08 30 18 

Ktoffe.. ire X6 9 


1B1 3H 2|ft 2MU + ft 8£ 


IJB 17 9 W 

'I SS 32 

aS U S 

I2JB M ^ 

\m el IS 101 


a*’ 8 
Mil 

5® + w 

B’WP* 

2 + ft 

185 SSi,* 

§w + * 

»» §ft an? % 


KlmbCI 2J3 3ff 11 UTS 


a tft KnpMRd m zi 16 979 am mo ». +i* .gf j™ 

18% Wft Kwo 19 44 17* 17ft D* + ft 49*. Z» 

» 24ft KW 2S> M a 2U3716T<%re + ft 

22ft 12ft Kaimor X Z5 36 M lift U 13 — % pjg 

K am. ffO Xl S vm vm is*. . .. i£L YAL 


22ft 12ft Kaimor X Z5 30 

21* 15* Kopers ffO XI 

37 30ft Kaprpf 4JI0 li J 

104 Wft Keppr pnilffO 1O0 

im im Korea fffe *7 
46 36 Kroger » u li 

31 23 Kubota si* Iff <3 

24* 8 ft KUNms 00 XI IS 
67ft 28ft Kyacur S3* Iff 18 


■a ai as 'ss- s ® 06 a 33 flSS 5 gas* + Mi 

343 s ClS Mh *0 «'SSs + M 

8 0» S5a» T "| (Co^J od * 


ill- 

J=s 

* 2» 


SS-* 

a.; +* 


42M> 37* 

SS W MMRos 
33ft TSMiMWE 







































Statistics Index 


AMEX price* p.n 
AMEX fttths/lovraP.II * 
,HYSE prices Km 
MYSE hlsta/tow* P.M 
i Canadian sack! pjo 
Currency rates P.TS 
Commodities p .14 
Dividends P,14 


1 Bandno* reports P.I7 
«tn* rote notes >.tt 
GaWmortets p.ij 
rota' p.u 
Market saranerv p.h 
P.tt 

PTC stack P .19 
Otter markets J»J 0 


lieralb^jfefcrtbunc, 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 





• . • ;•> V 

• “■■'i'J,' v : 

- ■ 1 1 , 

' L- ‘ f v- • 

, *. t , - 

: 

-■SS.Xf ‘ 

- - • 

! s ‘. 

■■ ’ i .> 

: -r^ 

■ i.’ 

• :. .‘.. -tr 

-' J- -k'"' 1 ' 5 ' : J 

■ •„ .'-itCv™ 

•v £«ff 

~ , r-*hs* 

. •.■> ‘r* 

- — oiSfi* 

- -l! ' r=Tits 

. '-■Sit 
r ' : •c.BajL 

' •--Cl't 5- ?. 

••• 

' '■ --Ctt; 

7* -"w*i 

- - K;:;. 

: - fas’ 6; 


' -'• tiz 


VEDWESDAY, OCTOBER 16. 1 gtwc^ 


IKTHWATIONALMAMAOn * 

Company Rulesfor Smokers 
Increasing in Europe, U.S. 

By SHERRY BUCHANAN r ' 

International Herald Tribune 

I ONDON - 7 - “No Smoking (Anything dse you want to do is 
f zJil P”**™ a sign in the office of a 

j Lonoonrbased pnbhc relations Ena. A. survey connms- 
T T c ®y ** Tobacco Institute, which is supported by 

^he UB. tobacco industry, found that nearly one-thiid of the 
.‘^Mige .S. 001 poratiqps has some type of no-smoking policy. 

« Uj. estimates of the-effects of nansmok e rs inhaling other 
peelers smoke range from 500 to 5,000 addi tional cases of cancer 
cac k y^- Other symptoms for nonsmokers who- weak in a 
smoKo-raiea environment indude leary eyes, aUenaes and raw 
throats. U.S. nonsmokers 

have become more vociferous n , u , ; . 

and U.S. smokers seem to B anning g mrifcfng w 

have become increasingly- v- 1 

guilty about polluting thdr of- seen by many m edical 

experts as 

* Of the 445 compames that 1 /? 

remonded to the survey of the anti-prodllCtive. 

1,000 largest U.S companies - * 

listed in Fortune magazine, 32 - ... 

percent limited smoking on the job in some way and 24-percent 
had considered, but rqected, a smoking policy. Three percent of 
the companies banned smoking in work areas' and £5 percent 
forbade it anywhere on company premises. 

In Europe,, corporate attitudes vary from country to country, 
with the rights of nonsmokers in the office becoming recognized 
m countries that show the lowest smoking statistics BritamTfor 
i n stance, hayalow of 36 percent of men smokers, whores France 
has a high of 50.4 percent. 

Although there are no statistics; several British conqianies are 
introducing no-smoking policies. According to the ConrilA Na- 
tional de la Lutte Centre le Tabagisme, no French company ha g a 
smoking policy. 

“For a company to prohibit smoking in the office is an 
infringement on an indrviduaPs rights. It’s a puritanical attitude,” 
argues a French executive who is a smoker. 

AS European companies become more seariyrte to the non- 
U\ smoker’s problem, their, executives must seek the best 
-^-policy in respect both smokere. and nonsmokers. Banning 
smoking altogether is seen by many preventive mwlWin experts 
as ami-productive. 

“It’s fooHsh. You're just going to rind people rinding an excuse 
to go to the toilet every rive minutes,” says Gerry Rickards, who 
set up and ran the fitness program for Rank Xerox in London. 
One solution preferred by many European companies is to group 
people in open-plan offices according to whether they smoke or 
not 

LM Ericsson AB, the Swedish tdeconanunicalio iii grou p, hac 
no formal anti-smoking policy. But if a ravremnlcw is bothered by 
a colleague who smnVe^ the company usually- arranges for the 
-smok er to move. * 

At IT! 1 European headquarters in Brussels and at Rank Xerox 
International's European headquarters in London, people are 


^to light up in their own office. 

Themteresting thing at Rank Xerox is that, since the introduc- 
tion of the fitness program, onty 10 pendent of the 550 people 
■ wo rk ing at headquarters continue to smoke. Those 10 percent 
also correspond to those who never joined the fitness program. 

- “They are, .anti-self p resei vat iqp If youjike, dc^upned tp go 
against any established^ medical’adidce,'"Says Mr. Rickards, now 
a consultant in preventive medeeme. 

Some British companies have recently] banned smoking in the 
' office except in designated placer at designated times, since, for 
them, it was difficult if not imposritde to isolate the smokers. 

Cambridge University Press has ah open-plan, office where it 
has been impossible to keep smoke frcmi circiiialmg. . . 

The company held a vote, and a majority asked for a smoke- 
(Comfaned on Page 18, CoL 3) 




U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 14 

Page 15 


:er 





' . 


faiterest Rates 


5 moatti 

TMtar 

B-SW 

D-Mark 

45V-485. 

Swiss 
Franc 
44* . 

Sttrflna 
. lltt-lltt 

-rmdi 

rtwev. 

■cu 

. FHh 

SDI 

•dmoatta 

BKrt * W 

4IWII 

SHrJrt. . 

9 k 

utt.iiw 

JB 


SmoofM 

Btt-SU 

. 4W-4% 

49W4W'. 

11 h-ll.W 

liM-IOM 

WA U 

n*. 

imonHu 

BVb-Ht! 


- 4«r4 8»i- 

11 4b-11 *V 

nm-Km 



1 vaor 

UMU 

48W-4U 

■48W4% 

naira' 

- 11W-11 1L 

8WX. 



Soureot: Maroon Guaranty (dollar. DM* SF. pound, FFU (Joydr Bank (ECU); Reuters 
(SDR}. Ratos ooolfcabto to Interbank denoaho at SI million minimum (oromOvalent}. 


^ -Key Money Rates Oa. )S 


United 51at»s 

Ctosa 

Pros. 

■ DtecouttasM 

7Vj 

. 7» 

'Fetfejad Fowl) 

. 158 

1WK 

‘Prime Roto 

9*0 

9-59 

Broker Loaa Rote 

a* 

m 

Toni Paper w-n»dmrc 

785 

7JS 

SamnTiMory Oil Is 

7.18 

7.17 

mmmi Troownr bibs 

734 

. 7J3 

cnMiun 

740 

735 

CD's 484B days 

7M 

m 

iUrettOcnuuw 



■Lomkani Rati 

530 


OmtoHRah 

*55 

*55 

OaeteatbMefte* 

*75 


1 ,nn,|i|| I.iTmj fuml - 

xoooni rnnnxmx 


.. *?S 

'4 mooWi tnlorbanK 

4*0 

. 480 

■ Fraoce _ 
btforynfloo Rate 


9* 

■Cotifctawv 

• 9 V. 


Oae^sorek iRterteok 

9* 

95/1* 


AdaalMlwWepvsIls 

OclIS. 

Imoatfc t-M 

3 memtim B yv-By* 

smsatta BMi-lu, 

(maatta BV&.m 

lyiwr . 

Sourer: Reuters. 


ILS. Mercy Market Vmadt 

OcLlS 

Mirrin LmcK Rtatfv Aants- 
MtfavavaraBi vUM: 7JD 

Tfllorat* lalanwt Rot* Indue' 7J0 

Source; MotrHI Lynch, Tehrvto. 



Bank Base Rale 

life 

life 

Call Manor 

life 

1M4 

81ttm Tiaasarr BIB 

11 1/1* 

11 1714 


11 1714 

ns/64 




DbcomdRale 

‘ 5 

-5 

Call Meaer 
4Mar.4idecBaiik 

<fe 

■ .«* 

' 4V. 


National Batik 
Seete Mercantile 

The Associated Press 

MONTREAL — National Bank 
of Canada said it yiade an offer 
Tuesday to merge with Mercantile 
.Bank of Canada, which has been 
beset with liquidity problems after 

the collapse of two other banks. 

E d waul Lyssan, executive rice 
president for finance and control at 
National, 'said he expected a re- 
sponse within 24 hours. Both banks 
are based in Montreal. 

Nathan Bossen, chief financial 
officer at Mercantile^ refused to 
confirm or deny that »n offer had 
been made, but he said his bank 
would respond to any offer within a 
“reasonable" length erf rime. 

Although the banks «wntng < 
have been improving in recent 
months. Mercantile has been the 
victim of -& panic in the money 
markets since last month’s collapse 
of Canadian . Commercial and 
Northland banks in the province of 
Alberta. 

Like those two banks, Mercan- 
tile is hugely a wholesale bank 
dealmg in rorpoiate deposits. It 
hat ]2 branches throughout Cana- 
da, but it;plans to dose four of 
them on Ocl 19. 

National is the sixth largest Ca- 
nadian bank in terms 

of assets, which totaled 19 J billian 
Canadian dollars (S 14 billion) on 
Ocl 31. 

- Mercantile said last week that it 
was drawing support from Cana- 
da’s six largest commercial famt* 
to meet its deposit obligations. 

Mercantile issued a statement 
Monday saying that an indepen- 
dent audit last week showed that it 
was having liquidity problems and 
that it was seeking a merger with 
another bank. 

The audit erf the Mercantile’ s 
loan portfolio and operations rec- 
ommended that the bank establish 
additional reserves for potential 
loan losses, the statement said. 


Airlines Seek Growth by Acquisition Citibank^ Others 

Post Increases in 
Net for Quarter 


* x u g (triers Build 

In Canada 'Hubs’ to Compete 


By Agis Salpukas 

flew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The U.S. airline industry, 
which has straggled u> adapt to deregulation for 
six years, has entered a new phase by turning to 
quick growth through acquisiuoa. 

In the past several weeks, Piedmont Aviation 
Inc., a fast-growing carrier in the East, has forged 
an agreement to acquire Empire Airlines, a large 
regional carrier based in Syracuse, New York. 

Last week, People Express Airlines, which has 
expanded at a torrid pace, worked out an agree- 
ment to acquire Frontier Airlines, If the transac- 
tion goes through, it would catapult the low-fare 
airline from its position as the nation's 12th- largest 
carrier to fifth hugest 

In addition. Elizabeth Hanford Dole, the secre- 
tary of transportation, decided in a preliminary 
mlmg last week to allow United Airlines to acquire 
the Pacific routes of Pan American World Air- 
ways. although United may be required to give up 
its current gateway serving Seattle and Portland, 
Oregon. 

“Everybody is trying to get a broader-scope 
route network to capture passengers and hold 
them for a longer time;" said Paul Schlesinger, an 
analyst with the Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette 
Securities Corp. The trend could become “self- 
feeding,” he said. “As this progresses, it can have a 
domino effect" 

The trend stems from the broad changes 
brought by deregulation, which allows carriers to 
fly wherever they want The carriers have sought to 
hold onto passengers in the face of volatile compe- 
tition by building “hobs," where many travelers 
are brought to make connections to other destina- 
tion s on the same carrier's planes. 

Building a bub through internal growth, howev- 
er, can be costly and take a long time, because of 
the shortage of passenger gates and landing slots at 
some busy airports, such as Stapleton Internation- 
al in Denver, where Frontier is based. 



The Associated Tress Morgan said its latest results in- 

NEW YORK — Citicorp, the eluded aS39.4-miUion gain because 
largest U.S. banking company, said of a change in New York tax laws. 
Tuesday ihai double-digit growth Security Pacific, based in Los 
in its individual banking business Angeles and the seventh largest 
helped it Dost a 14-percent earnings U.S. banking company, said its 
gain in the third quarter. Analysts profit rose to SS4 million, or SI .14 a 
called the results disappointing, share, in the third quarter from 


however 


S74.8 million, or SI. 1 0- a share, a 


Separately. J.P. Morgan & Co. year earlier. 

Inc. reported a 73.9-percent profit For the first nine months, Securi- 
gain. Security Pacific Corp.'s net ty Pacific's earnings rose 12 percent 
was np 12.3 percent. Wells Fargo & to S236.7 million, or S3.22 a share, 
Co.'s earnings climbed 10.7 percent from S211.3 million, or S2.S7 a 
and Crocker National Corp.'s rose share, a year earlier. 


50 percenL 


Wells Fargo, based in San Fron- 


Citicorp, Lhe parent of the sec- cisco and No. 13 in the United 
ond largest U.S. bank. Citibank, States, <=aiH its third-quarter profit 
said net income rose to S227 mil- rose to S48.6 million, or S2.12 a 
lion, or SI. 60 a share, in the July- share, from $43.8 million, or SI. SO 
through-September period from a share, a year earlier. 


Elizabeth Hanford Dole 

force. Thus, People will establish a hub almost 
instantly when the acquisition is completed. 

So far, the merger trend does not worry two 
former chairmen of the defunct Civil Aeronautics 
Board who are strong supporters of deregulation, 
Allred E. Kahn and Marvin S. Cohen. 

Mr. Cohen, who is now a lawyer in Washington, 
said the takeovers were not necessarily bad. “Take 
Frontier." be said. “In the past, it has been a pretty 
good airline. But in recent years it has not been 
producing at a level its assets should be producing 
That's just the kind of situation where the market 
operates to attract companies like People Express 
to take better advantage of the assets and provide 
better service." 


£200 million, or S 1-42 a share, a 
year earlier. 


For Lhe first nine months, its 
profit rose to S141 million, or S6. 1 2 


For the first nine months, Citi- J share< from S124 . 7 million. 'or 

<rr5c DCt r cc C 4 -r® ? ereei ) 1 10 34.94 a share, a vear earlier. 

$755 million, or S5.43 a share, from , . f .. _ _ 


S629 million, or $4.46 a share. 

The company said its net income 


Crocker, also based in San Fran- 
cisco and the I Sib largest U.S. 


from its individual banking busi- banking company, said its profit 
ness rose 34 percent to S71 Million 10 S J nul,,on from 56 a 

in the third quarter from S53 rail- ear b er - 
lion a year earlier. Institutional or For the first nine months, its 
commercial, banking business profit was S28 million in contrast 
earned S175 million, up 3 percent with a loss of S10S million a year 


in Denver where Frontier is based. Mr. Kahn, who is a professor of economics at 

People Express, for example, has been flying to C ? raeU ’ ^ a argument, noting that the 
fora year, bnilofS die carrier based in ukeov ' CT l b >' P “? le of Fronuer .^ a way of making 
Ne^tesw, hasbeen umlbte rowt a sure we ihave effecuve ccmpetttion m Denm" 
itc nSr thorn h 9 « hem rn said greater concentration could lead 


Denver for a year, but so far the carrier, based in .J 

Newark, New Jersey, has been unable to get a 
angle gate of its own there and has been forced to .-VnVl-r, ^ 
lease space from other carriers. With the Frontier 10 j es ’ 
acquisition it will get 21 gates; a fleet of efficient ueorge jame 

aircraft, which serve 55 cities, and a trained work (Gout 


Japan’s Program Is Called Limited 


By John Burgess 

Washington Post Service 


seized on the idea as a partial solu- 


assets should be producing. from £170 million a year earlier, earlier, 

situation where the market while its investment banking divi- 

npanies like People Express son earned $29 million, up 7 per- 

ge of the assets and provide cent from 527 million a year earlier. j 

The results did not" reflect the MlU 

i professor of economics at recently announced realignment in - 

r argument, noting that the the company’s core businesses. Jjj. 

Frontier “is a way of making That change will be reflected for 

competition in Denver." the first time in the fourth quarter fh l 

er concentration could lead results, Citicorp saicL 

Stephen Berman, a banking ana- 
George James, the former chief economist of the lyst for the investment firm LF. LC 

(Continued on Page 19, CoL 4) Rothschild Unterberg Towbin. trial 

said Citicorp s fee income was low- gonj 

er than he expected while overhead after 

expenses and credit-card losses inJu 

T • « i were bigger. lease 

I Lawrence Cohn, a banking ana- Stati 

. J-illllllCll lyst for Dean Witter Reynolds Inc.. juj 

said Citicorp traditionally has a t lj 
About 53.7 billion in new in- tafflpd fbe industiy in terms of the dusu 


\LU£41 Ull me lUCd iu 4 Udl LUIl hUlU- w * * vuuvu IU am 9 _ T • i. . . ■ ’ . 

Am * .hdrown Kid e problems vestment by locaI_ governments in ^ 


uin»ra J UK»i*icuwii»iu. Washington Pan Service uuu lu ureu wwti uuuc ^iuuicuo ~ — , . | f j; h | 

Banking and government TOKYO - Japan's new pro- Japan. U the Japanese con- “^^re^ects Um s^e i5!!25£j3t » 

urces have said Chiank, the sec- gram to add steam to its domestic 7116 «™P“V took a provirion 

id largest bank in the United economy is another attempt to there would be more^ for possible commercial loan losses 


States, bad been negotiating with blunt foreign criticism of its trade mand from imports and less ^omi^ww^Mfor^ronj of ^ ^ quarter _ up 

the Canadian^ government to ab- surpluses, while at the same time ivpxtc *NATV«TC brine new drSromem of about from 561 million 3 year earlier, 
sorb Mercantile into its Canadian meeting concerns of the Japanese NEWS ANAL* SIS n •. j Such orovirions rat nee eaminea. 


vubsufcaiy, tml the stmoblmg block *gLSg*g <*«! .. resources for export. Balanced "SSSSta" "-PV-IjN-W- 

trade would be fostered. Earlier, a consumer credit for purchases of U.^bankrag compa 

powers of the merged operation. Tnnan^<^ mmmrcdnn mfinml th* <airh n« televisions and cars, mes, said its net rose to S-09.' 


-.r rsx iT 

■ .IT 1 Z-A -- 


- ■ ■ • ^ ' • • I- 

Cr«M Bale* ' * " 0*15 

" 'i ;:S I a- DM. • FJFi IM_ dtt-. »J=. *F.’ von 

-Si- C!fc' Amstantom M01 iZB 1I2735* JM«»:aU71- ' 5JM* WJI* ttllv 

' " —r' BfmsebbO 4X«S 74.5425 20 l 2MB _ *i«3 5 U0K» T7J74 UjOS VMS’ 

. Frankfort . 7MD 175t 32JD- 1.055 X K7B- *m- HUB- UH« 

. London (b) I/D - — 1757* 554SS . KMJQ *3X TUBS ISM XOI 

•.at Milan 1J97JOO Z5345D DIM 2ZUS 3HJ9 SUM OtSt US 

• KawYork(C) WOTS* 24465. _ 85245 V7W1» U02 53*9 1586 215*5 

• Part* 8.1175 .11*45 3554*9 *SI*X 2.7TJ48 15JM3S* SJO «4S4« 

-.•j A& Tokyo 215J0 305*4 81*7 1 JUS- 002' 71*9 3MB* MB 

‘ "-J.. _._L" ZurlCk 2 JK 28 .3*075 KUD5 m 24.1*5 * D.W14* 72J4-. 4*521 * .1*128* 

I ECU OB3B7 05877 221(8 ' 47388 1/48UC 2*117 - 44JM 1*D 178221 

••• r. - — 1 SDR U54207 825175 2*244? 0421X5 NXL 3.WH J7J84 2X204 22R248 

M 1 'Oastoos In London and Zorich, fixings to other European cantors. New York ratal al 4 PM. 

. ■ r£&- Vo; Commercial franc lb) Amounts needed to buy one pound (Q Amount* needed to buy one 

dollar f) Units of 100 (x) Units of JAIOO (y/ annsofVSeoON.0.: not quoted; NJL; not aval tabla 
" 1 (*) To bur oner pound: SUJO AX 

Other D*Hjut VbIbm 

'cmrwcy pit UAS Corranev pur U** C u mmer per U4U . Conner par U*J 

’ * Amo-antral 080 FtaLmartdta SJ05 i Motor. M ml 7M" Su K or.wwi TOTS 

. — ~ AactraLS 1A255 Oraek^rac. 533*0 ■ Mo*.P«» 389*0- Spaa-pamto 143*0 

■ ..wjf Amtr.sdilL 18*0 HoaoKoPB* 7T W Marw.krem 7*28 SWMLkroaci 7*785 

'Th-t-'.. J5ett.na.fr. 54.10 InAmniPM 12*773 FMLpMO 17*0 Taiwan » tt.1T 

Brazflcraz. 8*40*0 ’Indo. raptah 1,121*0 Mrt«*codo 142*0 TkalboM :• 24*15 
.. Canadian* 14497 IrUfet 0*576 Saadi rfya) 3*505 TartOtt Dm 54350 

O 'Ctdiwwvuan 3*44 tsnwlilMfc. 1^70*0 Sktt.8 2.1425 . UAIdHtam 3*726 

juanWi Krone .944 Kuwait dMr 04959 S-Alr. rand 24544 V#m.boI5v. u*0 

- Eoyptpoaad V33 

PSftrttfto: 141H IrWi C 

.. r"-- * Sources: Banaue du Benelux (Brussels): Banco CammercMe (tattena (Milan); Banoue No- 

■ '> l r ttonate da Parts (Ports); Bank of Tokyo (Tideyo); IMF (SDR): BA/I (dinar. rtyoC dirham). 

■' . '- r; ' " Other data tnxn Reuters ond AP. 


Israeli Inflation 
Slows to lowest 
Rate in 4 Years 

The Associated Press 

TEL AVIV — ■ brad’s cost- 
of-living index rose by 3 percent 
in September, the lowest 
monthly inflation in four years, 
the Central Bureau of Statistics 
announced Tuesday. 

'lhe good economic news 
came after! Israel, under pres- 
sure from the United States, en- 
acted price and wage restric- 
tions to counter spiraling 
inflation that had soared to a 
record 445 percent last year. 

Themonthly rate brought the 
price rise since the beginning of 
the year to 167.8 percent, the 
bureau said. It compared with 
21.4 percent last September, 
and 3.9 percent last month. 

An austerity plan announced 
July 1 boosted prices by an av- 
erage of 25 percent and then 
froze most prices at the new 
level Wages rose 18 percent 
and then were frozen, with a 
danse permitting them to in- 
crease if the inflation rate 
climbed above 4 percent 

The shekel -was devalued by 
18.8 percent and then frozen at 
1500 to the dollar. 


U4A UW 91 Ut> » MVVUiVMk VI HWU6 — , . . _ 

Tbillion, it was estimated. Su ?J pravwons reduce earnings. 

• Relaxation on rules governing rf ¥ or ® an ’ ' or ^ ^ 

njsumer credit for purchases of U S- banking conipa- 

be limned . It could increase un- “• lcadm 8 10 inesdays pro- B U.S. Trust Subskhanes quarter from SI 20 4 million or 
ports by about S2 bmion in the Japan wiD license two U.S. banks S 1.35 a share, a year earlier, 

coming year, according to opiums- to open trust business subsidiaries For the first nine months, Mor- 

ttc government estimates, hardly by the end of the month, the first gan bad a profit of S53I.4 million, 

denungan overall surplus that hit to for «8° bfLnkin B institutions to or $5.91 a share, up 43.6 percent 

$44 billion last year. MtSKISJSSSE op^iahfnbi73 years, the Ft- from $370.1 million, or S4.17 a 

Officials in Japan predict _ that 2 ASkS-SrtESSSnT n^ce Mimsmr said Tuesday. share, a year earlier. 


the dollar’s plungelast month on citsthat began m the mid-1970s, 
foreign-exchange markets, if it /P* consists pnmarify 

hdd&wifl have ^rerealer effect on °f incentives meant tO_get tile pn- 


wStt wEzsz °p OT ^ Ja ^ in -?t vc s lheFi ' f r 53701 ^ cr w- 17 a 

Sc that hewn in thf mid^l97(k. Ministry said Tuesday. share, a year earlier. 


Industry Output 
In Britain Rose 
0.5% in August 

Reuters 

LONDON — British indus- 
trial production rose a provi- 
sional 0.5 percent in August, 
after a revised drop of 1 percent 
in July, according to figures re- 
leased Tuesday by the Central 
Statistical Office. 

July's drop was initially put 
at 1 J percenL Hie index of in- 
dustrial output for AugusL was 
4.7 percent higher than in Au- 
gust of 1984. u July, the year- 
toyear rise was 4.4 percenL 
Manufacturing output rose 
13 percent in August, after Ju- 
ly’s decline was revised to 23 
percent from 2. The index for 
manufacturing output for Au- 
gust was 1.3 percent higher than 
a year earlier. The year-to-year 
increase in July was 1.1 percent 
Coal output has continued to 
recover from the miners' strike, 
which ended in March, but oil 
and gas extraction has been low 
because of maintenance work at 
North Sea installations, the of- 
fice said. 


holds, wiD have far greater effect on 
righting the trade statistics. 


vale sector moving on housing and 


StinTthe stimulation plan made oLber construction and local gov- 

pubHc Tuesday is being welcomed ■ m J? VU v “r ■ 

ks a DOsitive me. Mike Mansfield. othcr beneficial «JUip- 


as a positive one. Mike Mansfield . r ZZ i. , , u 7 1 
the U3. ambassador, said the step ^ ^ nds * . , , 

was “very important." It also contains the plcdge thal 


Hetbeh EHayde, president of Ja S? ie l a worken i n wlU 
the American Chamber of Com- within five years, 10 more diQrs off 
merce in Japan, welcomed the mea- f[om ^)ik annually a m^or uuna- 
sures as a '^ood Gxst start," but he a where *** 


said he wanted to wait to see “how 
the Japanese people fed about iL” 


week is still common. 

Mr. Nakasone hopes that, to- 
gether with an “action program" 


Approved early Tuesday mom- W1U1 pn*™ 

ing at a joint meeting of the cabinet *at Japro enacmd Irn Jdy tc .re- 
and leaders of the governing Liber- duce tanffs and olher niaikei bam- 

al Democratic PaSy, it s^ms to «• JP 1 " ^ ^ £ P««®: 
signal a shift, howwer cautious, '«^lano° in the U rated 

away from the exports-fmt ap- ^tes, Japan s biggest foreign mar- 
p roach that has dominated think- Ke z. . . j 

mg in Japan since World War II. P° mK of lfae ncw ; 

Japan has become the world's P"®: 
third-largest economy mainly by • Increased lending and slightly 
consuming' little and re-investing lower interest rates by the govem- 
heavfly in new industry. Despite its mem-owned Housing Loan Corp., 
affluence, it runs far behind the a major source of housing finance. 
United States and Europe in basic This is supposed to result in about 
social amenities, such as housing, $23 billion in new bousing pro- 
sewage systems and park land. 

For years, Japanese have debat- • About $5 billion in additional 


jects. 

• About 55 billion in additional 


ed whether the time had come to investment in electric power and 
ease Off and enjoy some of the gas facilities in the next three years, 
Things wen: brought to a head mdudin 8 ** burying of unsightly 
this year when the U.sTgoverament overhead wires, one of the great 
and other angry trading partners blights of urban Japan. 


Sources; Reotem ComartnOon*. CrtdH 
Ltmnoh, Book at Ttatt*. 


Precision mastery since 1775 

Abraham Louis Breguet (1747-1823) 
was one of the most phenomenal watchmakers 
history has ever known. 

His genius was an overriding influence 
not only on watch-making techniques 
but also on the beauty 
of the finished objecL 


Since 1775 
Available at 

CH/MJ1V1ET 

jeweler since 1780 

Paris: 12 place Vendorae 
London; 178 New.Bond Street 
Geneva: 2 rue du Rhone 
Brussels: 82 av, Louise 
New York: 48 East 57lh Street 


Hi 


1 



Does "four Bank or 
Broker Charge $110 for 
1,000 Shares of IBM? 

Andrew Peck Does# 

A SAMPLE OF OUR VERY LOW COMMISSION RATES 

500 shares of any price stock $ 80 

1.000 shares 110 

5.000 shares -300 

10,000 shares 450 

20 options (2 1 1/2 53 

50 options (§’3 180 

If you live in Europe or the U.K. and you make your own investment 
decisions, Andrew Peck Associates will charge you much less in 
commission when you trade or invest in U.S. securities' markers. 

Our London office gives you the convenience of a U.S. discount 
broker to contact during your business day. Your calls are answered 
promptly and executed orders are reported immediately: And you 
can make payments and deliveries to your account without sending 
securities or funds to the United States. 

Accurate record keeping and custodial services are provided by 
Securities Settlement Corporation, one of The Travelers Companies. 
The Travelers is the third largest publicly owned insurance company 
in the U.S., and every account is protected for up to 10 million dollars. 

Our London office is ready to receive your inquiries. Please call 
us or return the coupon to receive our free brochure “SIMPLIFIED 
TRADING.” We look forward to hearing from you. 


ANDREW PECK/ 


ASSOCIATES, INC. 

39 Bedford Square, London WClB 3EG. England (01) 5H0-10% Telex: HS12l3fi f NH7LKIS Gi 
32 Broadway, New York, N.Y. IUU04 <212) 3h3-3770 Telex: 4240^7 (STOCKS* 
Licensed dealer in securities. 

I □ Please send me your SIMPLIFIED TRADING brochure. 


MEMBERS N’VSD. S1PC. SI.\ 










IIS. Futures 


High Low 


□sen High Low d«* Chs. 


Tap 


Doan High 1M Clog Chp. 


GNMA (CBT) 

77-4 

»J7 Iwl Jiff 7M* »B »W 

75-2 65 Sep 

Eat. Sates Prev.Satas 59 
Prey. DovOpan lot. 1970 up 14 


77-M +5 

76-K) +3 

75-21 H 

74-24 +5 


Grains 


CDF FEE CINYCSCEI 
37.500 Iba.- cents per lb. 

15040 I29JS DOC 14200 14450 

147 .75 12050 MOT 14400 14425 

14650 12(50 MOV Mi2S 74545 

14850 12550 Jul 14560 7 46J50 

14750 12275 See 14550 14550 

141JD 12850 Dec 14550 HS50 

14550 14250 Mar 

El). Sales un P rev. Sales 2339 

Prev. Day Open Ini. ima up2S2 


141.10 14207 
142JD 14421 
>4440 74544 
14550 14650 
U5J0 144JH 

’«■ i£S 


CERT. DEPOSIT <1MMI 
SlnrllUon-ptsOflOOPCt 
7237 SSJU Dec 9117 9158 9196 

9156 6656 Mar 

9140 86X3 JUn 

91.15 0754 S«p 

9059 S8J4 Dec 

9025 8820 Mar 

EsI. Sales Prev, Sofas 30 

Pro v. Dev Open in*. 1.974 up 23 


9198 +92 

9142 +93 

7123 +53 

90J0 +54 

9055 +X3 

9024 +54 


Tuesdays 


MSI. 


Closing 


Tobies HicloGe me nattonwMe prices 
up to tbe closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


237V; Z37V2 — 


SOYBEANS (CBT} 

*4*0 bu mlnlmum-dol tors par bushel 

429 ill Jon 5.15% iJTVa 

'43 322% Mar 528 SJD% 

799 5J1U. May 5J8 &40VS 

658 53616 Jig 545 SX7% 

6J4 535Vl Aug 5X5* SX5% 

6a 532 Sen SJ4 530 

63J 527 NOV 531 52494 

543 5X0% Jon 

Est. Solas Pruv. Safes 17233 

Prev. Day Open Int. 69235 off 826 


SUGAR WOULD 11 (NTCSCE) 
flZOOO Hu.- cents per to. 

72S UM Jon 550 520 

923 134 Mar 555 523 

7.15 35S Mav 521 520 

659 179 Jul i90 60S 

650 424 SW 623 623 

6-9S 422 Oct 623 6J5 

725 625 Jan 

725 451 _ Alte r 68? A55 

EsI. Safas Prev. Solas 4433 

Prev. Day Open Int. 7BJJ49 off 374 


558 527 

550 672 

669 588 

543 6JJ7 
623 623 

6.78 634 

638 
681 627 


5J13VJ 

5.16V: 

529V: +.0QV, 
52953 +0016 
546 +21 
5X5% +0095 
5J5% +02% 
133 +02 
5449} +02 


COCOA (NTCSCE} 

19 metr ic tans- suer Ion 

2337 1945 Dec 2180 2180 

2392 1955 Mar 2261 2262 

2422 I960 May 2308 2308 

342? I960 Jul 2339 2340 

2430 2JJZ3 Sen 2337 2337 

2425 2055 Dec 2325 2335 

Est- Sales Prev. Sales £766 

Prev. Day Opal ML 20499 off 116 
ORANGE JUICE INYCEI 
16000 itn.- cents per lb. 

18100 117.75 Nov 11600 119.10 


7140 2141 
2227 2230 
2277 2Z77 
2310 2310 
2337 2E7 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Sperdir-1 point eaucflssioini 

. -7566 -7DC6 Dec -7286 J796 -7282 -7210 

JS04 4981 Mar 3273 3281 -7270 -72BO 

-7360 .7070 Jun .7267 

3700 717* See .7754 

Eat. Sales 1299 Prev. Sales 901 
Prev. Oav Open Int. 4X7? up 246 


1B0X0 1U75 Jan 115. W 115.90 

177.50 11175 Mar 11110 11445 

16250 11155 May 11225 11340 

15750 11140 JUl 11200 11240 

18050 111 JO SOP 

Nov 
Jon 

16125 152.00 Mar 


Est- Sales LOT Prov. Sales 1436 
Prev. Dov Open Inf. 4413 up 3 


11600 119.10 

iiioa liiss 

11110 11435 
11225 11340 
11200 11240 
11140 
11040 
10940 
10840 


FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

3 per franc- 1 point envois KLOOOOi 

.12385 JJ9S70 Dec .12275 .12290 .12275 .12275 

.13400 .10965 Mar .12195 

.12180 .12130 Jig) .12120 

EsL Sales 63 Prev. Safes 1 

Prev. Dov Open Int- 158 


GERMAN MARK (IMM) 


Metals 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40000 lbs.- cants per lb. 

45.90 5230 Oct 6Z5S 6£S5 

67 JB 55.00 Dec 6390 63.95 

6745 5*25 Feb 6140 6177 

67.57 5530 Apr 6140 61-75 

6625 5625 Jun 6L80 62.15 

6540 5520 Aim ATS 6025 

8040 58.10 Oct 59.15 59.15 

Est. sales 14436 Prev. Sales 19459 
Prev. Day Open Int. 5342S uo531 


6145 6145 —1.50 
6135 6342 —78 

4120 6137 -.48 

61.15 6132 —38 

61-60 6130 — 32 

$920 5940 —75 

5BJS0 5880 —35 


FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 


44000 lbs.- cenls per lb. 

7JJB 5645 Oct 6525 6525 

7120 saio NOV 6635 6637 

7940 60-50 Jon 69X0 69X0 

71.70 6062 Mar 6590 6895 

71X0 6040 APT 6150 6150 

70X0 60.10 May 6690 67X0 

68.50 6575 Aug 6730 6730 

Est. Sales 1.116 Prev. Sales 1.782 
Prev. Day Open Int. 9X04 UP 77 


6475 6482 —33 

65X0 66X2 —45 

6840 6845 -Xfl 
6847 6832 +3.17 

6735 6797 —.93 

6645 mac — 40 
8730 6730 -30 


30jdoo lbs.- cents pgr lb. 

5135 3445 Oct JAM 4630 

50X5 3635 Dec 4535 4625 

5047 38.10 Feb 4442 4510 

4735 3412 APT 4035 4032 

49.05 39X0 Jun 4335 4345 

49X5 4045 Jul 4180 4430 

5190 4035 Aug 4330 4340 

41.10 38X7 Oct 3930 3995 

49JO 3837 Dec 

Est. sales 5JB6 Prev. Sales £642 
Prev. Dot Open Int. 20477 UP 223 


4545 46J0 +60 

4545 4535 +23 

4430 4432 +J0 

4035 40l57 +22 

4190 4297 —.18 

43X0 4430 +38 

4330 4330 +30 

3930 39.95 +.10 

4130 


COPPER (COMBO 

25X00 as.- cents per lb. 

61X0 5845 Oct 

60X0 60X0 Nov 

8435 58X0 Dec 4130 6135 

8430 58.75 Jan 

80X0 5930 Mar 6190 62.05 

74X0 60X0 May 6230 6230 

7440 6035 Jul 82X5 62X5 

70.90 60.90 Sen 63X0 63X0 

7030 61X0 Dec 6330 6160 

7030 64X5 Jon 

67.90 62-55 Mar 

6730 62.90 May 6440 64X0 

6630 6335 Jut 

Est. Sales Prev. Seles 1X68 

Prev. Day Open Int. 76367 uo23 
ALUMINUM (COM EX) 

40X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

Oct 

70X0 43X5 Dec 4335 4335 

76.50 44JB JtOT 

73X0 4420 (Mar 44X5 4510 

6635 45X0 May 

6345 45X5 Jul 

52.10 4835 S» 

49.10 48.95 Dec 

Jan 

Mar 

5X35 5335 May 

5030 50X0 Jul 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 150 

Prev. DavOpen Int. 1.958 up 84 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5X00 trev ez- cents per troy at 
64*X 598X Oct 

Now 

12300 S90X Dec 6315 634X 

12150 595X Jan 63SX 6380 

1193.0 607 X Mar 6465 647X 

10*82 6192 May 4552 6553 

9d5X 629X Jul 6645 6655 

940X 421 X Sen 

799X 652X Dec MLS 6905 

709 X 678X Jan 

770.0 67DX Mar 

7522 6835 May 719J 719X 

746X 499X Jul 72X5 7305 

Eif. Safes Prev. Safes £301 

Prev. Dov Open Int. 82.194 up 6 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 trey ox.- dollars per travuz. 

393X0 25800 Od 323X0 324X0 

37350 25750 Jan 326X0 32850 

357X0 26450 Apr 329X0 331X0 

36320 37100 Jul 334X0 334X0 

360X0 30350 Od 

Est. Sales 1X64 Prev. Sales 883 

Prev. Day Ooan I'll. 11908 offl 


6035 
60X0 
61X0 61X0 
61.25 
6170 61.70 
62.15 62X5 

6250 62X0 

63X0 6275 

6150 6130 
6345 
63X0 
6430 64.15 
6450 


4120 
4350 
4170 43X5 
4420 
44X5 4495 
45X5 
4635 
47X5 
4810 
4845 
49.15 
49X0 
5055 


Industrials 


6217 
6281 
A-vin A-m c 

6369 6349 
6415 6413 

4547 652? 
6645 661.7 
671.9 
689.0 687J 
69X1 
7040 
7J92 7156 
7385 7274 


322X0 321X0 
32550 9V. nn 
329X0 32870 
33400 33230 
33620 


Currency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option A Strike 

Underlying Price Calls— Last Puts— Lust 

Nov Feb May Nov Feb May 

12AM Britts* PoaiMfs-ceats oar unit. 

B Pound 135 r 1 s 0-75 0 S 

14128 145 190 s S 540 s S 

74 UB 150 030 • s r S S 

<2X08 West German Maria-cents par unit. 

DMartc 37 1X7 % S r s s 

37.51 38 0-48 S 5 0X5 s S 

6298X00 Japanese Yen-TOlhs at a cent per unit. 

JYen 45 r s s 820 s s 

46J7 47 0J4 s e r s s 

' Dec Mr Jan Dec Mar Jun 

12AM British Pounds-crut* per unit. 

BPourid 125 I62S r r r r r 

141X8 i3o 11J0 r r 0X5 r r 

14128 135 7.20 155 r IX 115 r 

14128 MD 410 UN r 3X0 625 r 

14128 145 2X5 4X0 T T r r 

14128 150 0X5 2J5 r r r r 

>4128 155 0X5 125 r r r f 


PALLADIUM (NYME) 
wo lr ay oi- dot lots per oz 
141X0 91X0 Dec 10195 1035 

127.50 7170 Mar 1(0-50 10400 

114X0 71 JO Jun 1043S 10425 

115X0 7720 Sep 105X0 10500 

107X0 107X0 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 112 
Prev. Dov Open Inl. 6.120 off 38 
GOLD (COMEX) 
lOOIrcv ac-doUonperlravaz. 

490X0 397X0 Oct 33650 32720 

32420 320X0 Nov 

489.50 301-50 Dec 3HXD 311X0 

48550 306X0 Feb 334X0 T) 1 < in 

496X0 314.70 APT 33920 340X0 

43570 320J0 Jun 342X0 343X0 

428X0 331X0 Aug 3*770 34720 

39570 335X0 Oct 

393X0 342X0 Dec 

388.40 355X0 Apr 

394.50 369X0 Jiff 375X0 37SX0 

385.00 37850 Aug 


HU 25 102X5 
>01X0 >0410 
10436 104X0 
105X0 10518 
10560 


COTTON 2 (NYCE) 
50X00 bk.- cents per lb. 






73X0 

5721 

Dec 

6027) 

4054 

6015 

4053 

+29 

7675 

5X77 

Mar 

6X90 

61X5 

6078 

61X2 


7000 

58.90 


4120 

61X0 

6120 

61,35 

+.14 

7005 

5XM 

Jul 

59.95 

60X0 

59X0 

59X7 

+X2 

6550 

5X55 

Ocl 

5403 

54.10 

54X3 

54X5 

— X3 

59J5 

467S 

<y« 

5375 

Dec 

Mar 

53X0 

53X0 

5190 

060 

—XI 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 

921 




Prev. Day Open Inf. 71471 off 8 





HEATING OIL (NYME1 






B4JS 

A8.« 

Nov 

8775 

w 25 

8245 

83.15 

+110 

B4J0 

49.15 


B2J0 


8250 

8354 

+123 

83J5 

49 JO 

87 JO 

ELI 1 ! 

8731 

8311 

+1X4 

KIRQ 

70X0 

Feb 

81X0 

81X0 

8091 

8127 

+22 

7U0 

68X0 

Mar 

77X3 

7745 

7720 

7746 

+45 

75-55 

48X0 

Apr 

7420 

7450 

7428 

74X3 

+X0 

73JS 

48X0 

May 

Nov 

Dec 

7150 

7250 

72X5 

100 

+95 

Est. Sates 


Prey. Sales 10X15 




Prev. Dav Open inf. 32*339 uol,0B5 




CRUDE OIL (NYME) 
UnObbl.- OoHarsper ML 






29.52 

74X0 


7916 

29 J6 

7914 

2934 

+28 

29 JO 

73.90 

Dec 

28-55 


78 53 

2374 

+.79 

29J0 

208 


27.97 

5R13 

77.92 

28.10 

+27 

29X4 

2425 

Feb 

27X5 

27 J8 

77X4 

Z7.S2 

+20 

27X5 

74.13 

Mar 

76.98 

27.17 

26X0 

Z7.1S 

+25 

2945 

7193 

Apr 

7663 

26X0 

2663 

2376 

+ 19 

27X6 

73X6 


2628 

2650 

2637 

2650 

+24 

1670 

7178 

Jun 

26X0 

26.16 

26X0 



27X0 

24X0 

See 

2520 


2520 

—.13 

Ext. Sales 


Prev. Soles 13X19 




Prev. Day Open Int. 49X23 up68C 





16% + VI 

1?H + % 
1918 + % 
38* + 4* 

5498 — M 
24% +1 


m— 0* 

3016— >6 

25% + * 
24% + 88 
32* + % 
316 + 16 
2816 

ZI — % 


27% 

11 * 

50 +16 

33% + to 
14*— 16 
11 * 

30* + * 
1716— 16 
10 *— * 
43% 

25* + V6 
25% 

74 +16 

27%—* 

3&-16 

}$ + S 

IS* + * 


UNttUeMH 


Stock Indexes 


Est. Sates 11X00 Prev. Sales 4X61 
Prev. Day Open lnl.123292 up 34 


32620 325X0 

327X0 
33880 329.10 
33180 3H40 
33830 337X0 
342X0 30.10 
34720 34620 
351X0 
to ai 
367.10 
37500 372X0 
37820 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 


81 million- ptsaf 100 pd. 

93X7 8527 Dec 9227 92X0 

9221 8660 Mar 7146 9247 

9232 87X1 Jun 9110 9112 

92X1 8800 Sep 9127 9128 

9128 89X5 DOC 11X 91 JO 

9129 89.58 Mar 

91X3 9050 Jim 90X3 90J3 

Est. Sales Prev. Sores 1X79 

Prev. Dov Open int. 34.144 oft 324 


DMark 34 

37.51 36 

37 J1 37 

37 J1 38 

37J7 39 

12SA00 French fr 


1X8 r r 030 r 

Marics-cente per suit. 

r r r 0X7 0X6 

r r r 0.29 r 

1-35 105 r 0J9 r 

0X4 1 JB r 1X6 r 

047 r f r £05 

a-lltbs of a cent per anlt. 


9226 9279 
9145 9147 
92X9 9111 

9125 9128 
91X5 91X7 
9120 
90X3 90X4 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME1 
point* and cents 

200X5 17520 Dec 187-30 18720 

20325 18130 Mar 18890 189.15 

20650 183X0 Jun 19050 19050 

19220 187X0 Sep 19140 191.50 

EaL Solas 66X64 Prev. Sales 50332 
Prev. Day Open Int. 58478 oft 1.168 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 

pa In Is and cents 

217X5 18860 Dec 19420 19460 

209X0 19058 Mar 196.10 19420 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 4090 

Prev. Day Open lift- 814) off 225 
NYSE CO MP- I NDEX (NYFE) 
points and cents 

11720 10120 Dec I08J0 10865 

11825 1O5J0 Mar 109 JO 109.55 

120X0 10620 Jun 110X5 HOAD 

10920 108.10 Sep 

Est. Sates 11*240 prev. Soles 8438 
Prev. Day Open Int. 8267 off 300 




> 18% t8% + % 
i 28% 2B%+ 16 
30% 30% —1% 

37 37 

40 40 

, 25% 25% + % 
98 98 +1 

13 15 

i 12* 12* 
l 28% 28* + % 

1 13% 13* + % 
. 13* 14 +16 

i 68 6R6— 16 

i 9% 9%—* 
l 4514 45* + * 
l 52* 52*—* 
14* 14*— % 
56* 57 +% 

32% 32*— 16 
18* IS*— 16 
i 15* 15* + % 
10* 10*— % 
46* 46% + * 
34 34 —I 

38 38 — V6 
38* 38%—% 
01 % 101 % + % 
32* 32% +% 

3% 3* 

49% 49% + % 
72* 13*—* 
36* 36*+ 16 
23% 23% + % 
51% 51* + * 
52 52 —1 

26* 26* + % 

81*-* 


Pf3JS «B 

0223 f 

ZEt® 

i IX 


2572 
545 
135 
J 7 Ml 
UW V 
IX 16 339 
11 13 1*7 
18 147 

X 26 4W 
69 130 

7X 9 286 

33 13 40 


23 +% 

3 + 16 

31% + * 
36* + % 
9 + * 
20% + % 
36 + * 

66 *—* 


26*—% 

70% 

11 % + % 
3 — % 
12 + * 
42 — % 
7* + % 
63*—% 
13* 

28% + 16 
,17 — * 
19% 

36% 

1 K 

16* 

11* 


12 * 

32* 

T9 

n* 

20* 1216 
72* 5% 

2* 116 


31* 25% 
35 21* 

23 17* 

It* 9* 
8* 3* 
35* 24% 


££££ 

9* 6* 

12% M6 

20 


Commodity Indexes 


H YR. TREASURY ICBIT 
SIOOXOO prin-pfs*127xjs of 100 pd 
17-13 75-13 DM 85-34 85-26 

BA-2 75-14 MOT 84-22 84-25 

05-7 74-30 Jun 

644 80-7 sen 

83-11 B0-? Dec 83-3 82-8 

EsI. Sales Prev. Sales 526 
Prev. Day Open Int. 70.112 oft 229 


FFranc 125 2X5 r r r r r 

63HLflM Ja panes e Yen-lBOths cf a ceef per wit. 

JYen « 6A5 r r r r r 

46X7 41 r 5JQ r r r r 

46X7 <2 4X0 473 r r r r 

4677 43 r 3X0 r r r r 

46J7 44 2-67 r r r r r 

4677 45 1X7 2X4 r 078 r r 

4677 46 176 1X6 r r r r 

4677 46 D.« UN r r r r 

62AM States Frono-cenH per unit. 

SFronc 42 r r r 0.13 r r 

4573 44 2X7 128 r r r r 

4573 45 1X5 £58 r 075 r r 

4573 46 171 2xs r r r r 

4573 48 0-50 176 r r r r 

Total call voL C738 Call open lot. 170X88 

Total parrel. 1X56 Pat open tot. 130X18 

r— Not traded, s— No option offered. 

Last Ik premium (purchase Price). 

Source: AP. 


85-18 85-26 
84-18 84-25 


B3-Z7 

83 

833 82-7 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
{8Pd-J10a00Bptse. 32nd* uf IBB pdl 
78-13 57-1 Dec 75-14 75-20 

77-29 57-2 Mar 7+11 74-14 

76+ 56-2 9 Jun 73-10 73-10 

7531 56-29 Sep 72+ 72-W 

74-24 SMS Dec 71+ 71-13 

74-15 56-27 Mar 70-16 70-19 

74-26 43-12 Jun 69-25 69-27 

72-27 63-4 Sep 69-4 69+ 

72-18 62-34 DM 

69-27 67 Mar 

67-2B 46-25 Jun 

Est. 5ales _ Prev. Sates 12.991 
Prev, Dov Open Iff -269.991 offl All 


Close 

(Moody's 89&40 f 

Reuters 1J00J» 

DJ. Futures 117.M 

Com. Research Bureau. 773-70 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 

P - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base loa : Sen. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Previous 
899 JO f 
1.707.80 
117X6 
222X0 


759 75-19 

74+ 74-13 

73-2 73-10 

72+ 72-ia 

71+ 71-13 

70-16 70-19 
49-24 69-27 
69-1 698 

68-17 
67-31 
67-1S 


Market Guide 


i i* 

i 14% + % 
54 " +1% 

i 22*— % 
i 20* + % 
; 21% + % 
54* + * 
187% + % 
, 107% — % 
21% + * 
38%—* 

14*—% 
35% + % 
35 + * 

27* + % 
29% — % 
68 +3 
11 * + * 
20*— * 
Z3 — % 
»% — % 
5*—* 
13% + % 
28*—% 
25% 

I*— % 
23*— % 
24* 


7*—* 
27%—* 
23* + * 
35% 

14%—% 
34%—* 
48% +1 
147 

12 *— * 


Cornmwtities 


Commodities 


Cash Prices 


Oft IS 

am 

High Law BM Ash am 
SUGAR _ 

French francs Per metric tan 
Dec 1X85 1X76 1X78 1X84 —6 

Mar 1X05 1JW 1X01 1X02 — 1 

Mav 1X30 1X30 1X31 1X38 —3 

Aim 1X80 1X80 1X71 1X81 —4 

Od 1J» 1.594 1X00 1X07 —3 

Dec K.T. N.T. 1-510 1-525 —10 

Est. voi.: 1.700 Mt of 50 tens. Prev. actual 
safes: 972 lots. Open Interest; 31X60 
COCOA 

French francs per IN kg 
Dec 1X70 1.90 1,945 1,965 —35 

Mar 1,990 1.985 1.985 — —33 

Mav N.T. N.T. £M0 - —30 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2X05 — —30 

Sep N.T. N.T. £810 - —30 

Dec N.T. N.T. — Z04B —TO 

Mar N.T. N.T. — £049 — 15 

Est. voL: 105 loti of 10 Inns. Prev. octual 
soles: SJots. Open Interest: 60) 

coffIe 

French francs Per TO ke 
NOV 1X37 1X20 1X38 1X35 + 21 

Jan IX8S tJ7t 1X64 1X86 +23 

Mar 1,900 1,900 1.905 1.925 +15 

Mav N.T. N.T. 1.930 1X60 + 20 

Jly 1-970 1X70 1X70 — +25 

Sea N.T. N.T. 1.980 - +15 

Nov N.T. N.T. 1X87 — +27 

Est. voi.: 35 lots of 5 tuns. Prev. octuol sates: 
0 lots. Open interest; 310 
Sourea: Sauna ttu Commerce. 


HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
1155 per ounce 


High LOW BM Ask 


Oc*. 15 
Pravioos 


Dec 143X0 139.00 1*20 144X0 139X0 140X0 
Mar 1S1X0 146X0 151X0 151X0 148X0 14520 
May 155X0 150X0 islao isaxo 1 51X0 151X0 

W 150X0 159X0 139X0 160X0 157X0 157X0 
162X0 16220 162X0 147X0 142X8 142X0 
Volume: 2X27 lets of SO tans. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric ten 
DM 1X34 1X87 1X10 1X12 1X3* 1X37 

Mar 1X74 1X47 1X41 7X50 1X75 1X» 

Mav 1X02 1X77 1X79 1XB0 1X01 1X03 

Jty 1X25 1X01 1X03 1X04 1X26 1XZ7 

Sep 1X30 1X12 1X12 1X13 1X35 1X3S 

Dee 1X15 1X00 1X00 1X03 1X14 1X17 

Mar 1X13 1X10 1X05 1X13 1X20 1X28 

Vp*jme: 4X62 tots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

SMriino per metric ten 
NOV 1X50 1X32 1X44 1X45 1X23 1X25 

Jun IXte 1X70 1X78 1X80 1X74 1X73 

Mar 1,719 1JC3 1.TO 1.710 1.700 1J07 

May 1?41 1.729 1.733 1?25 1?27 1,730 

Jly VS8 1J50 1J50 1JS2 1.740 1^45 

SOP 1?M 1X75 L77B 1J74 1J74 1J75 

Nov N.T. N.T. 1X70 1X30 1JS0 1X00 

Volume; £409 lots of s tons. 

GASOIL 

UX. dallm per metric tan 


CammedHy aad Unit Toe 

Coffee 4 Santa** L34 

Printdofti 64/30 31 %, yd 8X1 

Steel ba lets iPtttj.imi 47ise 

lren2Fdry.PMta_tan TIUO 

Steal scran Na i hw pm. - 73-7* 

LoodSpot,* If 

Coooer efed.lfa 45 

Tin (Straits), lb 61081 

^ivc. £. Si. l. Basle, lb UB 

Paitaalum.oi Tei-ies 

Silver N-Y.et 4X5 

Source: AP. 


D!V1 Rrtunes 
Options 


IV. Gfrnwiiiart-izUWukrij. cm pb- merit 


Nov offering 

CBOT 


•JCI I J 


B 

FUTUR ES 

MM & WB1 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 


Also Futures and 
Futures Options on 
COMEX -GOLD & SILVER 
IMM -CURRENCIES 

lartMsIntan 


15 


* ROL'Mvn.lRN 
DAY AND 
OVERNIGHT 


‘AppMet anl¥ A' nudes 
exend fag 2W cuanwA per 
calmdar month Pint 
contracts L’i round turn 


CjD nnr irf our pnifc>»kin3ls 

212-221-7138 
Trlcx. 27~ObA 


BEPUBUC CLEABOfG 
COBPOBATION 

4S2 Mh toome, Nt NT WM 

OAhmurd 

BapaMfclUopalBukalStft^A 

512 Bfftnn Cnnanori.il 


i 250X5 25575 254X0 249 JO 249 75 


I 2*620 75135 25250 Z47 Jo 7*775 

Jun 251X0 246-50 23X75 2S1X0 24525 246X0 
Feb 248X0 244X0 74L00 24550 243X0 243 JO 
Mar 248X0 24050 240X0 240.50 23550 23675 
Apl 233.75 232X0 Tri qi 7 pgi 227 JO 
Mav 23000 230X0 230X0 23100 224X022575 
Jun N.T. N.T. 226X0 22SX0 222X0 224X0 

Jhr N.T. N.T. 224X0 228X0 220X0 mm 

Vofunw: 2530 lots of 100 tans. 

2701 Sources: Reuters and London Petrol e u m Er- 
&90 efwngu (rnsoni. 

7001 
690 
4M 


Write CbBFSetUe 

Od IS 
Pets+ettle 

Price Dec Mar Jen 

Dec 

Mar 

Job 

34 1,97 £70 119 

021 

067 

MA. 

J7 IJS 106 £60 

053 

1X1 

122 

38 DJ4 US I1H 

8.98 

1X4 

145 

39 D.40 1.12 164 

143 

2X0 

£15 

4 a w u 

ffff 

— 

— 

41 0.10 0J4 Q9S 

— 


— 

Estimated total v#L 2X92 

Calls: Men. tuL BM open tat. 31224 

Puts : Men. vet. UN enea Iff. 22217 
Source: CME. 



USsTreasuries 




Dividends 


Discount Prev. 

Offer BM Yield Yield 


London Metals 


Ocl IS 

otapaav Per Ami Pay Rec 

EXTRA 

!esaurces Pension- 1 . J4 11-30 10*25 

INCREASED 

OberiWiaw Cntrts Q JO |J.jg 12+ 


NWinHI 

fmouitiMfl 

VyearMl 


7.19 7.17 7X2 7X1 

125 733 733 13S 

7X7 7X5 8JC 6X2 


RoburiWww Cntrts 
Union Bmwpru 

Untd Counties Bnep 
VF Carp 


s O JO 12-70 12+ 

- .14 1MJ 11-22 

EP 0X5 11-1 10-7T 

Q J2 12-20 12-10 

INITIAL 


Bid otfer TWd Yield 
38-year bend IS0 18/32100 70/K 10J» 1060 
Source: Sakrma t Brothers. 


- 35 11-15 10-23 

Q.12% 11-29 11+ 


MarrOI Lynch Trecnorr Indent I28J0 
Change fer me day; + an 
Average yield: *.7* a. 

Source: M erri ll Lena* 


STOCK 

Fst Fe«J| Svngs Art*. _ 5PC 8-20 
STOCK SPUT 
Union Bancorp — 2-for-I 
USUAL 


Retail Sales in Canada Rise 


EIP Microwave 
Dana Cara 
Dollar General Cora 
FANNIE MAE 
Fleming Cos. 

Fourth Final Carp 
GNMA Mtge sec Tr 
Hsiwmii me 
Hunt IJ.B.) Trans 
Hunt (JB) Transport 
Inl or -Cap Inc Sec 
inter -Cm Inn Sec 
Inter-Can Inc 5cc 
Ladd Furniture 
So Ind G ft E 


a X3 12-2 1-15 
Q 33 12-13 11-29 
O XS 11+ 10-24 
a JM 11-25 11-1 
O 35 12-10 11-20 
Q J1 12-1 11-15 
O SI -70 11-13 10-23 
q JO 12-16 11-39 
a X5 11-72 11-7 
O J5 11-22 11-7 
M .17% 11+ 10-25 

M .17 % 12-13 11-29 
M .17 % 1-10 12-27 

Q -94 ll.|5 11-1 
0 +5 12-29 11-22 


Reuters 

OTTAWA — Seasonally adjust- 
ed retail sales in Canada rose 1.6 
percent to 10.83 billion Canadian 
dollars (S7.9 billion), from 10.66 
billion dollars in July, Statistics 
Canada reported Tuesday. 


To Our Readers 


o-arewol.- m-iuuuRiiv; o-aaanertyj s-semt- 
affinal 


The S & P 100 index options 
were not available in ihis editon 
because of transmission delays. 


L12 

Z6 

3X4 

U3 

1X0 

42 

28 

LI 

XO 

U 

40 

£8 




32 + * 

24 +* 


55% 35* Xerox mo 6J 13 1925 48% 47+ 

»% 47V3 Xerox pf 545 100 504 S” lot 

29 19* XTRA M 2* 12 33 B% 22* 


I SlJlMli 
SZ&gZR, iS RIt s 


153 3SH 
2216 37% 
51 BU 
12 18* 
l«tl 26% 
5474 n* 
77 1% 

270 80 
360 18* 
17 30 . 
.544 79 


4ft 

422 50* 

T« .Sh 

! 5* 


iiS 1 ^ 

134 10- 


730 Sfli 

sra 95* 
869 3B 


MVSE H^hs-lxms 


PA 


Qdomx 

TjMimBnai r 

Uhftroba WaliMGO WUCaNA'3 




































































































' 57 ■ ; r ! ft t g : f ft ?V " 999r W v ■■ 1fWn4| 1 


•k ;•. . 

r '• >-‘x 


. = < . *-\- r S-T -4*:T- - ■ ■ • ■ 

.-- fc .-V • »r: a2_ •_ .-. 

” •; -Tv 

V ^v^4tv^- :- j 



INTERNATIONAL .HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 





► S • x 


if? :-: 


* llJ7l-+IwIUavMM^SlMrtlerCM^. S 1403l(al D.WltterWIdWMeMTrt * 1231 

• - UDO^NIUUIEM lie) Drokkpr lnmt.FvKSN.ir. $ 1117.78 


f/ iKiTcf dkia •" : -- • ADV-E RTI5EME NT — 7 — 

w . r NATION AL F.O NOS; (Quotations Su pplled by Funds Listed) Oct. 15/ 1985 

4 ;!V tin Foods hifed wttft me «xan*tan pmunmootw bcvd oafrtw vice. 

. . ? h**”* fro oueneref dvetattew tawMedzW -doOr; (w)-wt*Wyj (bUfaHnenltdn <r)-m*ul«lT< (n-immarfy. 

>• <■, \> AL MAL MAHAOKMUEMT * I *' J =~ - • -■— ■ • • , - 

v : ■ APMol Trust, it . . . w . . : ? 9{«Wt- — -,■■ — • * '1137 -Mort Uovo* hun. SlWrtter Cas^_ S 14U a) O.wttferWMWMelvtTM J 

t. • B*W K JULIUS AABRa cO-T-W ' * 1*! E«rg W"li*n n , „ t UDD NIMUIOI r » DrakKOT Inmt.FVM) N.V. I 

r, !, :' .(0? Banttm t. /inr^f °I‘ antnl - * .leieimA « B77( dl Dnvfvt AmcrtcoFuM 

-■ ‘■nlgjgwfegr— I pi KSm jg* Hvutfmn KqmHo ■ : ( 97J2 dl Drovfui Fyys wrl.. . t 

'• ,v 1/2J l2!5 er £ ,n * r *oo Vi^ StsS ^« V»>vg te<tt^omnwu. ■$ jflj» . w)Cfa»C« Japon. .1 izn wl Dreyfus imvaxmiwi i 

-: *: \:^q? I” 0 **** - EtfropeZHZT^a r *ny,y a *OM O<wJ»Tl rf *»4.1? OdUFtSX LIMITED w) TRe BCtoMUment Trust * 

-t- »,*:■{ d> Swfeo er PBdf k^ f F yBflg ! 5 ; EnMfi yAf n f r ’* »“to * mil • w) MuMeurreoot-. * 1X10 d j Eunw OM tool lent Ecu 

’ * SffiE SF»74o e£Sfc££^ oHo, ^- i — * -»« - #> OttMar Mwftm Term 1 UH wl Flat E obm F und *1 

• 1 _ — jrotjn ?ji * TOM -MponarusnaTfTn. ,. , % nra riFWya»pr»ud i 

!' BNP INTERFUHD3 af iaaoj» ■{»> ggMHvDft.grw.Tr^^u^.. » T27J5 ■ wj Jotwntw Vw -t tlfl wl FliM InconwTrora I 

•■■•;?■ -<wllntwDWMl Fund « i« a ISi BgiKfgTB"*.**** * 2X71 -<pl Pound Sutton £ WfT w{ Pometw Ihm Fr 5F 

• • »• i.lwl intercwrtncv u g" | 'tniS jgj \ • ■— * - «-» ■ "•> DtuTiawwtorn^. _DM 1US ■i-b.mAm 1 

. >•>;,-(«» Inlarcurrency Dm .Tim Sm ^S! Fund a . 31J* . wj Dofcn- Florin - FL . W57 w) Formula SdMtan Pd. SF 

•■ " / -iwl IrrtwairreneySfrtES . in5 1 SJ * l» -fwl Swjw Frunr .. — SF - HUM d Fondlralla s 

•• Inttraqulry Pacific CHW L li it J 3 i CHS? ftjna — — ^ * UJAS OFAttGE KASSAU CROUP <S 1 Gownm. 5^, F«r»d» 1 

: -'v.'-iwl intn/ouuitv N. Anw. OHwr“ * mao j2 i pwH« , 5£2d s S2? ,h ' F,t “" * W.32 F5 SSSTL Thu HustM (0701 /M7G d ) FronkMn«r inhHTtai dm 

5 5 t ttAHQUE IWDOSUBX ^ i TOM 1 FM^yartd *Fid--^_. ■ 253r Hdl B*ntB«lanlp«Hrt-t S 3XH wlHaannmtWnN.V 1 

,, Aston Growth Fund , nn, i £5?F? C*™** fAHMAS-oboup wl Hdto Funds 1 

* : •■?i-lwl Dtwrbond _... ■ ' r £ Y"*®"*gwMy8MW3 *td I Cortwn Intcmattonot S MAS w) HorUoo Fund 1 

•-* ^-twIFlF^nwrlSnZZI^^L s SS * 7A0 -id I ECU PAR £CUHB5AS mi IBEX SF 

- . .,:.|w> FIF-Burocw 2 itt? jSJ inc - 01,1 ^ « 3S6 JurlpBLJ-OM DM 1238.12 rllLA-IGB I 

■: r’ 'i-rwiFiF-PociHf — 5 irS j.7} i ncwn* «l2t -iwi oblige stion sf sx» riiuwiGS s 

•j ’ • '-!£[> IndasoMMultSofSn , ,SS GoW Awx yctanon : S 4JI JwlOBU-OOLLAR « 121130 d) IntertundSA 1 

. 1 ^ 'i-tdl indosuei mubumJS r * T JSS effiSSSfSSjjSf*® — * ,J0 4wj OBLi-YEM yissdtmo iwi inwrnwnet Furm„ l 


k!SMP'' ! ^p 

n?i 1 T27JS |-( 


% 12SA8 Id 532^ ** 1 2X71 4 w1S3Sf55b_- 

s ‘mto J2 - — *'«-* -1 w) DMtnaid Martin — 

M !iS gy^gy-grtoto Ftotd— — a ■ aijs •(«) outcn-Fiann ^ 

1 fs 3| afe± ‘.^g augr£ssra5SiP— 
* fis ^{S »aaasg!!!s=-.. , -. 3 g weasaasxs. 

.* a* 5KSBSISS™™,— 

* 7A0 -id I ecu PAR I 


- *» {Hi aFSKSMBS^-i 1 '® 

■ 5F » a» Lsr^T 555 sr c * ir ““ 

»F CJj -twl Donor Hum— -- ■ ?JJ 0 

: * iSff 4S?gg 2yJ ^ <nc€WW — r .« * 

■ «* .JUS j»j GoW AaorB cta tion ~ 1 . 5jj 

■ Vit« «iK , s;s? ,na — - 5 ,j ° 


V * s CAFlTAU INTERNATIONAL 
V' ! ,-l wl COPUOI infi Fund 

.. -IwlCdMIol Italia 


’• ... - -twi CMMiot irono 

- ; ■.■" r ‘:.;CREDiT SIIISSE C 
"■ d I Acrloctt So!sn 

•• -'fr-jdl Bonovotorsi 


“•rSUISSB OSSUE PR I CCS) 
Acrtora SiIbm r 


, rg, -)zl XTSWrSjiy-- » ntto •+IWI RBCrnncuottalFd s 2*.n (wl Kiainwon B« 

rtm ~jy? Andre UO Ipc : S 10X5* -Ww) RBCInntnconwFd. * 1»a 3 (w) KonuiGrowfl 

GAM Bost on me : S 188,12 -«dj RBC Sto^orranevRl 1 2631 

lit. J w ! 5£#S* mttoa * — t 16.13 <H« 5 ROC Norm Anwr.Fd. 1 1M (d) urtconi Fund_ 

l 0714 n wj GAM Fraac yal „„ . ... jsf iwi SKAHPIFOttto ttiTUFUJtp I4W niOT) (wl Levans* Con J 

« s\ m .-A KDn a lne - » 0731 -(wllnc,; BW » US (di U<RrtO«r 

5 «« menotionol me- a T2SJ1 -iwIAol; Bi d s s»OKtr. s «JS (wiuufund 

* ’ 7JS ‘Wg^M jygn toe.^ 6 rUA4 mMSKA IHTEIUUTIOM alltd. (mi Mogmfund n 

_ 'S!*J GAM Norm Amerka lnc.__ s 107J3 17 Devonmlro So^cnoon^r ;:/d(M0 <di MedUdanum! 


., piftlJd CmxMe_Z__I_Zir m *£ iSS -i" Trust- lfl <{dl Ftorto BdndSctocthM FL 127A7 w» NAM.F 

■- csFnn^R^ir ^5® ■WS**iSwton» IdG— i, — s— "1 10148 >(dl lntcrvoior 5P H25 (ml NSPF.l.T 

■■! .1. 3;.}S Jr? ESJSSRSt 3 . 5E .?5^S -<wj GAM Wortdhulda Inc. 3— S 17d33 -< d IJ<HHI Portfolio.., SF W32S ( d | Potiflc Horlxon 1 

■;: aJSSyltokrtS^i — " S ^,1SS ^'1* Tvcho S_A- CUm A S 11137 -(d) SJorlino Bond SaUclIon 1 mm (w) PAMCURRI Inc. 

• '? ‘i- dl CS Money M^kM fSS 'rut IS&ffi ^ «■**- -«3 1 Swte* Kcwyn Bond Sot — SF 11*37 t r | Porfon Sw. R Csl 

■• !; 2 ■i (, > Pot. Fd. Ltd. s WJB -< d ) Swtavulor Now SorWs SF 36150 ( r I Perms! voluo N.' 


. . ■-' .;' 1 L*"j 3 ; « H one T Morket Fund— DM KlMJIO B*rrv P™TSl 
" * • ‘■.*•121 Btoney Markel Fund— _ £ia345a[.|f i G.T.AsMtodSeloixf 


- : 1 ^'-1 d i E nay-valor 
' ?ijl'‘ldl gurppa-vnlor- 


M7A0 1-( d I G.T. 
7StXa|-(dl G.T. 
17075 -dlG.T. 


SE 1 125s|-(dl UMwnol 


ARB EM r ) DrakKor innsr.Pund N.V. *111728 

ffa" * * 0736 tlDwriMAnwlmr uia a Ml 

Cftm 8 - U5. - * *7 jM dl Dnwfui Fund tnrt. . * 38M 

Cto»C- Janon. . * 1X78 (wl Droyfu* imwcan t lnoni * 31.74 

IFLSX LIMITED ... wl TFo GstabtUmarrt Trust t 130 

Multtciirroocy— s 1X10 d) EunM OMtoatlem— — Ecu 6936 

OoMor Madam T«rm_— S 1133 wl Fmt Eoofe Fmxl _. . S173TU1 

Donor UonaTtrm. .. , a list r ) Fmy SIpts Ud 117732 

JotwnwoTn — » »X*l wi FlxMlnconw Trora I 1031 

PouddStorHaa , t 10.17 wl Pomcm inoo Fr. IF 1MJ0 

Pout »ene Mom.- .dm 1035 ->•&—»*<«* 1 73* 

Dutcn-Flonn FL . 1057 w) Formula SoMadten Fd. SF 6133 

Svrfsi Prune SF - HUM d I Fondlrulia S 3147 

NGG NASSAU GROUP d 1 Govwntm. S4« Fund- — — * 0737 

1570. Th* Hoou* (0701 46*670 d t Fronkl-T/uK Intwrlm DM 4447 

Mnr*£M*nIno«rt-t__ S KH wl Hauumam HMn H.V % 12230 

nuunoup M « u— w &■«<« * wia* 

Cortuo Intonutlonal S M4* wlHarUaoFund 1 12*0.71 

ECUPAR £Cli 102SAS mi IQEXhoWhiOTUfl SF 1I2AS 

OBLt-DM DM 1230.12 rllLA-IGB 8 HUH 

W I OBLIGE STION SF *S30 r JLA-lGS J HLO 

W) OBU-OOLLAR 1121150 di Interfund 5A - 1 17.W 

WlOOLI-YEN YI0S0TM0 wi infmwfcgf Fiiml.,.. ...... 1 20623 

w on li -Gulden fl 11173s d j udarmintM mul fo.cl'B’— s nut 

dlPAROiL-PUND S *353 f 1 lnt*l Sacurlti** Fund—— t 1XU 

d 1PAREU ROPE GROWTH -41051 d ItTvCIW D WS- DM SMS 

d) PaRJMTSR FUND S 1U.9I r I InvMt Allonllaum S A*l 

dlPARINTER BOND FUND SW32 r i lloltortww InH Fund SA..... a 1759 

d ) PAR US TntBt Bond *CL S‘_ * 11X01 w) Jopon S*4ctton Funa____ * 12S31 

OYALB. CAHAOA5*OB aMiGOERMSEY Iwl Jooon Poclltc Fund a 11122 

■ I RBC Omadtan Fund Ud— S M.98* Cm! J«ft«r Pm*. Inn. LWI aillSUB 

I RBC For EostOPecHlc Fd. 4 1X09 1 d I KMnwort Button inti Fd. t 214) 

{ KBCinncootta! Fd s 26.13 (wl Kiainwon Bm. Jon. Fd * U42 

RBC Intltncem* Fd. 4 l)d (w) Kona Growth Trial KWXM1M 

BC AtenXurroncy Fd I 2621 I 9M 

rbc N orm Amar. Fd. a 946 (dl uricom Fund si29un 

9MFOHO iNTLFUttp tin man) (Wl Lrvanaw ccp hpk> .. a 17x20 

inc,;BW 1 SMOmr— 5 US (di Uwrtoucr 4135150 

Accj Bid- s 559 Offer S US Iwl Luafund 4 7756 

41KA UrTERMAT tONALLTD. Iml Moonofund N.V 4 158X7 

iwonmlro SaJLcnao»4rh377-0040 f a I Mediolanum ScL Fd. 4 194* 

SHE Band Fund — 1 2X76 (>'«««» Y UPJSJjg 

SHB lnH Growth Fund S 2321 Iwl NAAT - £ HU? 

IS BANK CORP. (ISSUI PRICES) ( d 1 Nlkka Growth Packam Fd S86SQ40 

Amarlcd-Vdlw SF 48X75 (wl Nippon Fund 4 213?* 

D-Martc Bond SMrdnon— . DM 122J0 (mi NOSTEC Portfolio I4W27 

Donor Bond S afedfen— 4 1355* iwl NowtMoe invoatmtnt Fund— t 09.90 

Fiona EondSetocfluo— FL 12747 wi NAM.F - . ... 4 16557 

lnfer v B lor SF 1X25 tm) NSPF.l.T 1 1732* 

■Mwon Portfolio- _. ..... SF 09X25 ( 0 1 PocWc Horizon invt. Fd s (220.W 

5MfHno Bond SalacHan___— _t 10853 (w) PANCURRI ine. 4 2126 

Swiss Forwyn Bend SW— SF 11*37 r » Porfon Sw. R Csl G*n*va _ SF 139750 

S wis s WHor N8W Swfe8 SF 36350 If) Permol Voluo N.V 1 12*1.19 

Universal Bond Sated.—. SF 0X25 (r>Fl*toa*s 4110127 


(mi Moonafund N.V 

M0 fd) Mediolanum 5eL Fd. 

—4 2176 hiimw. 

— S 2321 Iwl NAAT . .. 

CCS) (dl Nlkka Growth PDckaMFd. 

SF 48X75 (wl Nippon Fund 

3M 12220 (ml NOSTCC Portfolio 

. S 1355* Iwl Novotec investment Fund-, 

FL 12747 wi NAM.F 

SF 1X25 (ml NSPF.l.T 

SF 09X25 (d l PocHk: Horizon invt.Fd 


HUB H d I Swlsswilor now 
1X21 l-tdl Unfeerool Band 


-jdl G.T. Asia Fi 
-id>G.T. Austro 

•v.!fi^Ki£ggA55g S? , 1J4Jft 4S|^'§SS,fS&a57Fi 

EfeSSfiffn — * 'J2S •? G.T. Honshu PtSSnEoir. 


Alla Fund 

Australia Fund 
Europe Fund— 


'5ss — 

■lm) Wlnc h B ltef PranHar .. ■ ignM Juilfir i £S! f*5i»S?fe^r* 

Jwiwi«duw«-HawfiSrzr“F? K -t nij:r^^SS?F^^z 

» 4 1X4? -Id) G.T. South adno Fund— 


Winchester Frontier ■ in 

;,^4wlWliKhes7erHa)d££rZr^FF IB 

.. ’’ i] -(wl worldwide SeeurlHes ~ | < 

; .‘*S.-(wl Worldwide Special _II_— . SIM 
j.l ‘ijfDIT INVESTMRNT PFM 

, ■* , ■*' d 1 Cnnewitrn niu, T 

J-- (il^dl infi Rentenlond DM' 9 ^ 


4 12JS -id I untworsol Fund . ■ SF 11472 (WJ PSCO Fund N.V S 13X90 

I 417- -i d I Yen Band Setectlan Y 1054240 (w> PSCO IntL N.V S 16546 

5 2X52 UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND fd I Putnam InTI Fuad 4 68.U 

= s * TX39 -(d) Amco UJLSh. SF 2375 irlPrFTech s *30. li 

euro, Small Cos. Fund 4 1485 -i d l BowHnvest SF «72S Iwl Quantum Fund N.V. S477U1 

Donor Fund — . — ‘ ...... a T436 -( d 1 Fonaa 5wH* Sh. SF 15450 (dl Renta Fund LF 3821 A0 

' s 1152 -(d) Jgpon-irrvest sf rasa td) Renttovest LF 105558 

4 1140 -jdiSantSouthAtr.Sh. SF 33400 (dl Ros«voinsurodDcooslfe— silixia 

4 2743 -< d i SI mo (stock price) — SF 21X50 Iwl RudoM Wottf Fat Fd Ltd $129140 

4 1X96 UNION INVESTMENT Frankfort (w) Samurai Portfolio SF 11465 

s 43.13 -(d) Unirenta DM 4 330 id) SClTTrch. 5A LmwnOourp- S 1X4* 

t 2240 -idlUnlfena* — — DM »ao (wl Seven Arrows Fund N.v 4 1009.95 

s 1431 -id) Unlrok DM S(135 (wl State St. Bank EouHv HdosNV 49.15 


■ •, r ; I TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

. i.T Headline.: (Ua % iai9*Offer 


- S^S-S ^'U-^ A^DBL INVEST. MCMT. INTL.XA. -(d) UNI XI NS DM 11640 (wl SSrateffY Investment Fund 4 2163 

■ -5168643 Jersov. Pp. Bax 6X Tel 05347402* Other Fnnrit (dl Syntax Ltd.-(CJassAr 4 1147 

Berne. PjO. Bax 262XTel 4101236051 «Tner f-UIKIS fw| Techno Growth Fund SF 77565 

DM AB -(d) Crets&ow (Far East) SF 1X27 (wl Adtoonds i n ve ei m tnt sFund. 4 2640 ( d 1 Thornton Australia Fd Ltd C «57 

DM 9154 -( d I CSF (Balanced). SF 2500 Iwl ActhiesMntt 1 1141 (dl Thornton HK A China—— 4 955 

JroM -( d ) littnL Bond Fund — — 4 1047 (ml Allied Ltd ; s 47S (d > Thornton Japan Fund Ltd 4 1X19 

j y*JP r* -c g > nl. Currency (14 4 2646 (wl Awulto htfentallowol Fund—. 4 16321 Iwl Tokyo Pac. Hold. (Srra) s torn 

i IS-ii r -JB) ITFTfUTMhnrtoayl S 1150 ( r I Arab FHtance bF 4 09157 (wl Tokyo Pat Hofcl N.V. 4 13X59 

;gkW‘“ -id) C7SiK«Fd(N. AMERICA)^. 4 2X01 j rlArtonp $102173 (wl Transpacific Fund $ 9159 

$73X03— JARDINE FLRMING.POB70OPDH9 Ko (wl Trusttor Inti Fd. (AEIF1 S 1023 ( d 1 TurauolS# Fww 1 11072 

-( r) -LFCumncyABoad ; 0 U» (wl Bondsetex-l»ePr;— . — , SF 05.90 Iw) Tweedy Browne n.vjCtowA— 1222691 

r( r I HonoK ong Trust— S 3454 (ml Canada GM-Morfeaoe Fd 0. V43 (wl Tweaav3n>wna (Lv.OassB $156355 

-{rl+FPodtle Income Trust — V 25.00 (di Capital Prssarv.Fd.bitL .- 0 1142 (ml Twe*dv3rowne (UJC) n.v SWOeJO 

— 110506- -jrj J.FJopan Trust Y 4720 Iwl aiodel Fond- 4 U2 (d)UNICO Fund DM 7X90 

- — *1X009 -f r 3 Japan TeamofeBy Y 1X325 Jib) Oeveiarui OttWwro Fd— $210148 (d I UNI Bond Fund — $1151X0 

“D Hrj J.F Ppcfftc Sees. ( ACC) — . 0 Isa (w) Columbia Socumtoo FL 9475 j r 1 UNI CopHoI Fond 1119042 

5 IlSH LLOYDJ BANK INTL- PO»4n.O«Mvan (r) COMETE S 81198 ( d I US Federal Saoirtfes 4 1X20 

* 1^8« -Hw) Lloyds Infi Dollar 4 11700 (w) Convert. Fd. Inn A Certs $ 1006 (wl Vanderbm Assets S 1322 

$ I.25W -Mwi Lloyds inn Europe. SF 11900 f w) Convert. F<l tnfl B Certs S 3U3 i d ) Wand Fund SA. $ 1X72 


_ -( r)JJ= Pacific Income TruN Y 2500 J di Capitol Present. Fd. bitL- 

1X506- -jrj J.FJopan Trust Y 4720 iwl aiodel Fund- 

*1X009 -f r J 3* Japan Teamolosy Y 1X325 im) CJevotand OlHhcre Fd. 

-( r ) J.F Podttc S*C5.(AC«J — — o 702 (w> Columbia Securities 

1JW1 LLOYDS BARK INTL POB 41X OrtMva n (-irnuPTS 


T- 4. hl’fS» ’£ PfeNKw % L0D49 -Hw) Lluvus lnH DMar $ 11700 w) 

^ s -w 3 i ffiiss= ie w i:i 

Li y ?. ifla aaTfggT Kr. * 2537 ^ B2-H W, 


*■ n iTFAC MGMT. LTD. |NV. ADVISERS 
; Laurence Pounty Hflt, EC4 01-6234400 


-OVDS BANK INTL, POB 43XOnovoTI IrjCOMETE.— $ 81X98 

(w) Lloyds Inf] Dollar $ 11700 (w) Convert Fd. inn A Certs $ lXM 

(w) Lloyds lm Europe. SF HW (w) Convert. Fd. mn B Certs S 3U3 

(wi Lloyds inn Growth SF 16X41 (wi Dcrfwo Japan Pond l— Y .1X416 

(wy Lloyds mn Income SF 31950 (wi D OX. s 09J97 

(w) uavds inn n. America— c 10X15 -f d ) DoUar-Baer bond Fd 5 101X00 

<w) Lloyds Inti Poctflc SF 12900 -(d) O-mark-Boor Bond Fd DM 102700 


" i ; f4{" 


These Bonds having been sold,' this onutonncemenl appears as a matter of record only. 


October 1985 




Emhart Corporation 

Farmington, Connecticut 
United States of America 

DM 175000000 

6 % % Bearer Bonds of 1985/1995 
Issue Price: 100% 


Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 


iwiss Bank Corporation 
international Limited .,3 

Bankers Trust GmbH 


Deutsche Bank 
. Aktiengesellschaft 

Banque Nationale 
- de Paris 


Dresdner Bank 
Aktleiigesellschaft 

Klemwort, Benson 
Limited 


Morgan Guaranty GmbH 


Credito Italiano 


Shearson Lehman Brothers 
International 

Sumitomo Hnance 
International 


nH *0 


AHMal Group . 

Algemene Bank Nederland N. V. 
Amro International Limited , 

Arab Banking Corporation - . 
Daus & Co. GmbH 

Bankhaus H.Auflilusor 

Baden-Wurttembeigische Bank 
AkUatgeMlfeduft 

Badisdie 

Kommonale Landesbank 
-Girozeotrale- 

Julius Baer International 
Untiled 

Banca COmmerdale Italians 

Bancs del Gottardo 

Banco di Roma per la Svizzera 

BankAmericx 
Capital Markets Group 

Bank fur Gemeinwirtodiaft 

Akbengcselbctiaft 

Bank GotzwBIer, Kura, 

Bun gener (Overseas) 
limited 

Bank Leu International Ltd. 

Bank in Liechtenstein 
AidiengeseDsduA 

Bank Mees & Hope NV 

Bank of Tokyo (Deutschland) - 
Aktiengefel itch aft 

Bank J. Vonlobel & Co. AG 
Banque Bruxelles Lambert S. A. 

Banque Franfaise 
du Commerce Exterieur 

Banque Gfnfnle 
du Luxembourg S. A. 

Banque Indosuez 

Banque Internationale 
a Luxembourg & A. 

Banque de Neuflize, ■ • 
Schlumberger, Mallet 

Banque Paribas Capita] Markets 

Barclays Merchant Bank 
Limited 

Baring Brothers & Co, 
limited 

Bayerisdie Hypotheken- . . 

und Weduel-Bank 

Aldknjaclbdull 

Bayerisdie Landesbank 
Girozentrale 

Baverische Ve reins bank 
AktlengesefbclHift 


Bear Stearns International Ltd. 

Job. Berenberg, G outer & Co. 

Bergen Bank A/S 

.Berliner Bank 
AkttengucUfchah 

Bankhaus Gebrflder Bethmann 

BHF-BANK (Sdtweiz) AG 

Bremer Landesbank ' 
KredHahstalt Oldenburg 
- Girozentrale - 

Caisse des DipAts 
et Consignations 

Chase Bank AG 

Chemical Bank 
International Group 


Citibank 

-AldiMgasollichifj 

Commerzbank 
Aktiengoselbdiaft r 

Compagnie de Banque 
et dlnvestissenMBtt, CBI 


County I 
U mlted 


Cn&dit Lyonnais 
Creditanstaft-Bankwerein . 
CSn-EHectenbank AG 

. Da'iwa Europe- : 

(Deutschland) GmbH 

Delbrflck & Co 
DC BANK 

Deutsche Genossenschattsbank 
Deutsche Girozentrale 
-Deutsche KomntuiUlbank- 

DSL Bank . 

Deutsche Siediungx- und 
Landesrentenbahk 

Dominion Securities Pitfiekl 

Limited 

European Baniditg Company 
' Untiled 

first I nte rstate Capital Markets - 

Limited 

Gefina huemational 
Limited 

Generate Bank 

Gen o$s enschaftl khe 
Zen ml bank AG - Vienna 

Girozentrale und Bznktkr 
tisierreichischen Sparfaassen ’ 

AktiengeselbKluh 


Goldman Sactu 
. International Corp. 

Hambros Bank . 

G Killed 

Hamburgische Landesbank 

- Girozentrale - 

Georg Haucfc & Sohn BanUers 
KomiiMitditacsellkhxh >uf Aktiea 

Hessische Landesbank 
— GnrozenlraJe — 

Hill Samuel & Co. 

Undted 

EF Hutton & Company 
(London) Ud. 

Industriebank von Japan 
. (Deutschland) 

Aklteugeiellscliaft 

Istituto Bancario 
San Paolo di Torino 

■Odder, Peabody International 
Limited 

ICredietbank N.V. 

Kredietbank S.A. 

Lirxem bourgeoise 

Kuwait tnleniational 
Investment Co. s.a.k. 

Kuwait Investment 
Company (S. A. K.) 

Landesbank Rhein Und- Pfalz 

- Girozentrale - 

Lloyds Merchant Bank 

Limited 

LTCB International 
liodled 

Manufacturers Hanover 
Undted 

Merck, finds & Co. 

Merrill Lynch Capital Markets . 
B. MetzJer seel. Sohn & Co. 

Mitsubishi Finance International 
Limited 

Samuel Montagu & Co. 

Uoriied 

Morgan Grenfell & Co. 

linriltd 

Morgen Stanley International 

Nederiandsche 
Middenstandfbank nv 

The Nlkko Securities Co, 
(Deutschland) GmbH 

Norddeutsdie Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Den norske Creditbank 

Osterreichische Under bank 
AlOfcnpMlbdull 

Sal. Oppenheim jt & Ge. 

Orion Royal Bank 
Limited 

PaineWebber International 

Pierson, Hddring & Pierson N.V. 

PK Christiania Bank (UK) 

Limited 

Privatbanken A/S 

Rabobank Nederland 

N.M. Rothschild & Sons 
Limited 

The Royal Bank 
of Scotland pic 

J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co. 
Limited 

Smith Barney, 

Harris Upham & Co. 

Incorporated 

Society Generate 
Strauss, Turnbull & Co. 

Limited 

Sumitomo Trust International 
United 

Svenska Handelsbanken Group 
Swiss Volksbank 
Trinkaus & Burkhardt KGaA 
Union Bank of Norway Ltd. 

Union Bank of Switzerland 
(Securities) 

Limited 

Verband SdtweLeerischer. 
Kantonaibankcn 

Verems- und Westbank 
AlolengeMHIscHaH 

S. G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 

M. M. Warburg-Brinckman n, 
Wirt* & Co. 

Westdeutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale 

Westfalen bank 
AVliengeseilKhatt 

Westpac Banking Corporation 

Wood Gundy Inc 

Wurttembergisdie 
Kommunalc Landesbank 
Girozentrale 

Yamatehi International 
(Deutschland) GmbH 


licmibdaSte^ribunc 


inl64 Countries Around theVNforld. 





IBM Unveils System to link Computers 


The Ansoaaied Preu 


ing Xerox Corp, and American Stephen B. Schwartz, an IBM rice 


NEW YORK — International Telephone & Telegraph Co., have president 


b»iuuiL nr*. . . _■ 

Some computer users who had F*-* at a 


option for customers that would 
allow them to connect their equip- 
ment with existing telephone ca- 
bles. 

That system can connect up to 72 


Business Machines Corp. intro- competing local-area networks, Some computer users who had 
duced on Tuesday major dements which are designed to improve of- contemplated buying a local-area 
of a so-called “token-ring network" flee efficiency by enabling comput- network had postponed a decision 
that allows information to be ers and otha- data-processing de- while waiting to see IBM’s product, 
shared between computers, print- vices to communicate with each IBM said the loken-ring network 
ere and other devices within a other. would initially serve its IBM PC, 


building or even a complex of Adapter components that enable 

buildings. equipment from other manufactur- 

lBMsaid U was able 10 bring out ers to be attached to the network 


Adapter components that enable Portable PC PC XT and Personal 
equipment from other manufactur- Computer AT. 


IBM said U was able to bring out ers to be attached to the network IBM's network provides da la- 
the network six months before the are available from Texas lustre- transmission speeds of 4-million 
earliest forecast. men is lux, IBM said. bits per second and features auto- 

Tniiiall y jt will work with the 


company's personal computers, be made available to vendors, 
but with' attachments the network IBM will encourage other coin- 
can communicate with other IBM panics to develop software applica- 


nts lux, IBM said. bits per second and features auto- 

Tbe network specifications will made error detection and a method 


for bypassing a failed station, tbe 
company said. 

It can connect up to 260 personal 


computers. 


tions and other hardware for its computers at once. IBM said. 


Several other companies, indud- token-ring network, according to IBM also announced a low-cost 


Workers Halt 
Strikes at 2 of 3 
Renault Plants 

Aru/eri 

PARIS — Strikes at two Renault 
auto plants in France ended Tues- 
day after Finance Minister Pierre 
Btataovoy warned the Communist- 
led CGT union that the protests 
could endanger the state-owned 
company’s future. A strike ai one 
plant continued, however. 

Officials at the Le Mans factory, 
200 kilometers (128 miles) west of 
Paris, said management and unions 
agreed on an peaceful evacuation 
of the factory by occupying mem- 
bers of the CGT to end a weeklong 
stoppage- 

Earlier on Tuesday CGT strikers 
decided to resume work at the 
smaller Choisy le Roi factory south 
of Paris. But the BOlancourt plant 
outside Paris remained strike- 
bound. 

Mr. Berigovoy repeated govern- 
ment charges that the protest, 
prompted by planned cuts m year- 
end bonuses, had political under- 
tones. 


Domestic Auto Sales in U.S. 
Dropped 10% in Last Period 


DO YOU HAVE 
FUNDS TO 
DEPOSIT? 

.in ii.i-.lis iivi ;k\) ,*l i>iu 

!.,r L-L-'.E hull-. ..Ik-I .ii;i J.'ir. 
j". in-, u, ill: ||i.’ lnli.lM IC|! ti.VI U<V' 

jll injjof <-urrrnrK-> harvrILccJ 

i-r.-'-i pjnl us-lri’i In non-n-^iilrnls 

du hiildrit hjnl ihur^o 

I uvcmhixir^ nilt-. of 
o.nftdi’iilulii, ^pplv 

nmili'lmcii jl jJvicr 

ifllptlxni - mlc (lunli-s 


Tdephnne cr «>mc taday tc cut 
cuuonn service depanment 
for mote infprmjnon 


The Associated Press 

DETROIT — Domestic car sales 
declined 10.1 percent in the United 
States in early October compared 
with a year earlier, the seven major 
U.S. automakers reported Tuesday. 

The decline was attributed to the 
expiration of most special financ- 
ing offers and rebates, which 
cleared out stocks of 198S cars and 
pushed September sales to record 
levels. 

In tbe Oct. 1-10 period, only 
Chiysler Corp. among the Big 
Three reported a year-to-year gain, 
selling 292 percent more cars than 
in the comparable period a year 
earlier. General Motors Corp.’s 
sales were down 14.8 percent and 
Ford Motor Co.'s declined 14.8 
percent. 

Among the smaller producers, 
.American Honda Motor Co. re- 
ported that sales fell 35.7 percent. 
American Motors Corp.’s sales 
were down 32J percent and Volks- 
wagen of America Inc.'s were up 
433 percent! 

“Chrysler’s sales probably were 
way up because their incentive fi- 


nancing programs lasted three days 
longer than GM's and Ford’s. It's 
probable there were some added 
Chrysler sales in anticipation of a 
possible strike at Chrysler.” said 
Gary Glaser, an automotive indus- 
try analyst at First Boston Corp. in 
New York. 

Total sales for the Oct. 1-10 peri- 
od came to 202,002 compared with 
224,792 a vear earlier. 


Union Bank of Norway 
International S. A. 

I’.l). Iid\ fif.7 - IK. K.Hjlc'atd Kn>al 
1 -ilii « 1 u win hour); 

(di-phtinc: 47 6X 73-1 


ATLANTA INTERNATIONAL 
INVESTMENT SYMPOSIUM 
November 4-6/ 1 985 - Atlanta/ Georgia 

Meet the I coders and explore investment opportunities 

Atlanta Mayor Andrew J. Yeung 
Robert P. Forrestcd- Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta 
Pierre J J.G. Hueb o r - Wibna International 
John J. Huntz, Jr. - Arthur Young A Company 
G.W. McCarter - Eastern Airlines, Inc. 

Atlanta Economic Call: 

Development C or poration (404) 658-7000 
Telex: 154111 OCOMUT 

AEDC 




Honda Motor 


Prom* 

Par ADR . 


1981 1986 

776,170. 677.170. 

37.21 ft 2959a 

383 322 


(Jilted Stoles 


Anttr. Cyanamld 


Net income . 
Par Share _ 


19*5 1984 

OKU 1641 

340 474 

072 0.98 


9 Man*. 1985 19*4 

Revenue l*sa 2440. 

Net Income _____ 1104 145.1 

Per Share 244 3J7 

Quarter nets Include gains ot SSS million vs 

S^J million. 

Automatic Data Processing 

lit o k 1986 1I*S 

Revenue 270J 2344 

Net income— 102 154 

Per Share 052 M4 


3rd Qimr. 
nm Income . 
Per Shore — 

9 Man*. 

Net Income . 
Per Shore — 


Crocker National 


3rd Om. 

Met income. 



CRI 

International 

and 

Shell Oil Company 

have formed a joint venture. . . 

CRI 

Ventures, Inc. 

An entrepreneurial approach 
to the needs of 
the petroleum refining 
and 

chemical industries 


CAPITAL STRATEGY 
FUND LIMITED 

Gartmons Fund Managers 
International Limited 
6 Caledonia Place, St Helier 
jersey Cl - Tel: 0534 27301 
Telex: 4192030 


Fund 

Price 

Yfeld(%) 

Sterling Dep. 

£ 

\SJ26 

10J4 

UJ4 Depant 

$ 

1/M 

7.10 

DM Deposit 

DM 

5.127 

155 

Yen Deposit 

Yen 

5155 

5 3A 

5wjV. Dep. 

SFr. 

5.108 

2A0 

N. Ameriam 

$ 

1-05 

050 

Japan 

s 

2JQI 

QA1 

Basin 

s 

1.45 

0.60 

W. Growth 

s 

1 A2 

050 

British 

£ 


200 

Sterling Gilt 

£ 

\t» 

1(125 

InH. high income 

S 

1j04 

1U» 

Yen Canv. Bond 

Yen 

166*00 

330 


9i" '' ? 


- Prices ot 1UWKL 


THE TOP FRENCH QUALITY FIRMS 


Comite Colbert 


Guedain: L^endary Perfumers 


Bruno Giry, Chief Executive Officer 


Shalimar, Jicky (soon to celebrate 
its centenary), I’Hcure Bleue, Mit- 
souko, N ahem a, Chamade. . . the 

magical names of these great per- 
fumes testify to the legendary suc- 
cess of one of die world’s greatest 
perfumers: the house of Guerlain. 

Today, 157 years after Pieirc-Fran- 
Cois-Pascal Guerlain founded the 
first modem perfume house in 
1828, Guerlain can proudly claim 
seven of the world's best-selling 
fragrances. 

"Great perfumes arc like beautiful 
women,” says Jcan-Paul Guerlain, the current 
family "nose." "They don’t go out of fashion." 
To Bruno Giry, president and chief executive 
officer of Guerlain since 1981 and a company 
vercran of 23 years, Gucrlain’s success is reflected 
in the prestige of the French fragrance industry as 
a whole. "Perfumery is originally a French busi- 
ness,*’ he says, "so I would L'kr to underline the 
importance char the Daman es Rencontres Inter- 
nationales de la Parfumcric, being held in Paris 
this week, have for our profession.” 

A potent blend of inherent talent— through five 
generations each Guerlain fragrance has been 
composed by a member of the Emily— and busi- 
ness acumen has enabled this family concern ro 
successfully maintain Its leadership in a market 
where a perfume launch coses a minimum of $10 
million and which is increasingly dominated by 
giant international conglomerates. Turnover last 



year was $150 million, an increase 
of 20 percent over 1983. This year's 
European launch of a new make-up 

line and the Derby fragrance range 
for men is expected to push coral 
turnover up another 25 percent 

in 1985. 

"French perfume manufacturers 
were French export pioneere,” says 
Giry. Named court perfumer Ew 
Napoleon III afrer creating 1’Eau de 
Cologne Imperialc for Empress Eu- 
genic in 1855, Guerlain was soon 
supplying most of the dazzling Eu- 
ropean courts ana now realizes 75 percent of sales 
in 110 foreign markets. 

Shalimar, invented in 1925, is their best seller, 
while Jardins dc Bagatelle, launched in 1983, is 
selling" extremely wdL 

Beauty, as well as fragrance, has been a Guerlain 
concern since 1904 when la Creme Secret dc 
Bonne Femme was introduced. Ir is still sold 
today in the same blue opaline jar. Issima and 
Ultra-Sport skin care treatments and the new 
make-up line, launched last month in Japan, now 
represent 25 percent of the business. 

Research and creativity, quality and stria distribu- 
tion control, expansion abroad, adaptability to 
changes: These are the tenets which Giry deems 
essential to Gucriain’s continued success. "We 
can only compete with the large corporations by 
remaining different and maintaining the distinc- 
tive "Guerlain style," 


•AN ASSOCIATION OF THE MOST PRESTIGIOUS NAMES OF THE FRENCH ’ART DE VtVRE 1 , 2BIS RUE DE LA flAUME. TSOftf PARIS 


AN ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE COMITE COLBERT i 


! £■•& *si : 









BUSINESSPEOPLE 


Gunn Is Named an Executive Director of B&C 


. By Brenda Erdmann 

Iiuemaiatal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — British & Com- 
monwealth Shipping Co„ a trans- 
port and financial-services hniriing 
company, announced Tuesday the 
appointment of John Gunn as an 
executive director, enlarging the 
board to nine members. 

Mr. Gunn, 43, resigned late last 
month as chief executive of Exco 
International PLC. a fast-growing 
concern involved in money broker- 
age and other financial services. An 
Exco source said Mr. Gunn was 
more eager than other directors to 
diversify the company, which he 
helped round in 1979. 

B&C which recorded net profit 
of £32.6 million ($46 million) in 
1984, owns about 21 percent of 
Exco and has interests in air trans- 
port, shipping, aviation-support 
services, office equipment ana fund 
management. 

Gillette Co-, the Boston-based 
maker of shaving and personal- 
care products, has named Lome R. 
Waxiax an executive vice president. 
He continues as chair m an of the 
West Germany-based Braun AG 
subsidiary. 

Finanziaria BrmceBes Lambert 
(I tafia) SpA of Milan has appointed 
Giovanni Giardina managing di- 
rector. 

WiL Grace & Ox, the New 
York-based concern that has inter- 
ests in chemicals, natural resources, 
res tauran ts and retailing, has ap- 
pointed Rolf Genssler a director. 


Mr. Genssler is a managing direc- 
tor of Friedrich Flick Indus triever- 
waltung KGaA, which owns 26 
percent of Grace and is also the 
holding company for West Germa- 
ny’s Flick industrial group. 

Lloyds Bank PLC said its inter- 
national banking division has set 
up a support team, based in Lon- 
don. for its operations in Latin 
America and the Far East. The 
iMm is beaded by Julian Avery, as 
principal manager. He was princi- 
pal manager. Latin America divi- 
sion- Three regional coordinators 
were also appointed: Mervin Phil- 
lips, Anthony Vowles and Peter 
Nestor-Sherman. 

Shearson Irishman Brothers In- 
ternational Inc in London has 
named Jacques P. Gelardin chair- 
man. Mr. Gelardin win oversee the 
group’s growing presence in the 
Eurobond market and its invest- 
ment banking services to clients in 
London and throughout Europe 
He joined the firm's London opera- 
tion in 1982 as a managing director 
with responsibility for internation- 
al capital markets business. 

Citicorp has named Pradeep Ka- 
shyap head of its investment bank- 
ing activities in the Middle East 
and Africa. Mr. Kashyap will con- 
tinue to hold regional treasury re- 
sponsibilities for Gtibank. He has 
been treasurer for the Middle East 
and Africa since 1982- 

U idled Biscuits (Holdings) PLC 
has named Bob Clarke group chief 
executive. The appointment makes 


Mr. Clarke heir-apparent to Sir 
Hector Iain g, 62, chairman and 
chief executive. Mr. Clarke was 
managing director of the compa- 
ny’s main subsidiary, United Bis- 
cuits (UK). 

RJ. Reynolds Industries Inc. has 
named H.F. Powell president of the 
international division of its Na- 
bisco Brands Inc. unit, filling a va- 
cancy. 

Hombkmer Fischer & Co, the 
New York-based securities and 
commodities brokerage, has 
opened an office in Zurich and 
nam«J Walter G. Tanner as man- 
aging director. 


Royal NedDoyd Group NV, the 

Dutch shipping concern, has 
pamari Jan -Dam manag ing director 
of its new London-based subsid- 
iary, NedEoyd UK Ltd-, which will 
begin operations Jan. 1. Mr. Dam 
currently is manag in g director of 
Nedlloyd Rijneu Binnenvaarc 
Rowan Doffing (UK) Ltd. said it 
has opened an office in London, 
which will be headed by Paul L. 
Kelly, who previously was in the 
Houston headquarters of the par- 
ent, Rowan Cos, as vice president, 
industry and government relations. 
Rowan is an offshore drilling con- 
tractor. 


Tuesday^ 

MEX 


101* 7ft FrtBdm aeu a j 5 » ■ 

mu S FrtHBn 15 M J# JP* J££ it 

30 14ft Frledts 32 lfl W »»£ gJJ- £ 
2314 inn PratHd _ 70 254 2 Hk ZJVk 2314 + w 

mm FrtA*t .mu jm J 4 * 21- IF* 1 £ 

T2V. Mi. Furvn JO IS 21 489 11 10ft 11 + ft 


Closing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing an WOU Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Corporate Rules for Smokers 


(Cbatinned from Page 15) 
free office. The company banned 
smoking in the office in June ex- 
cept for a designated lounge. 

“We had to find a place other 
than the car park or the toilets 
where people could smoke. There 
was one partitioned office avail- 
able. So we dosed it off compleUy,” 
says AJC Wilson. To ease any 
withdrawal pains, the company 
phased smoking out over a period 
of three months by prohibiting 
smoking before 10.30 AM for a 
month, then before noon, then be- 
fore 4:30 PM and finally the ban 
went into effect. 

The company now considers 
time spent in the smoking lounge as 


recreational time. Mr. Wilson esti- i 
mates that perhaps 12 people out of 
285 have had real problems coping. 

There are other problems with 
harming smoking: 

• Some companies do not bother 
to take a vote among their employ- 
ees. 

• Some make a deal with the 
unions in the factory, but not 
among the administrative staff. 

• Others ban smoking only in 
the open part of the office, dis- 
criminating against those who have 
no private office. Smoking be- 
comes an executive perk. 

Increasingly, British companies 
are advertising for nonsmoking 
staff. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ORIDREN’S NURSE / MMM, 
very araoWe with chicken, inteEgent 
calm arl, lovely penanokty. free now. 
Fry Soil CanUta*. 7 9 

(Mnt Herts. Tel. 0252 315369. UK 
licensed 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX 


AUTOS TAX FREE l AUTO CONVERSION 



AUTOMOBILES 


MN METRO TKXFORD FRAZER 

g » od edben, tov toJeoge, super or, 
tSi bather interior, URiEnmsed, IW3, 
cafcng £6,000. quids sde. 

Two 300 SR 6JJ MERCH3E5, ful ex- 
tras, about 54,000 miles. Each excelent 

tendhon, UK hmod, RHD, dr<onci- 

tioned, adana E6JOOO each, quidi sale. 
Please asB Athens 4134(177 
or 418-2835 office hours. 


AUTO RENTALS 



AUTO SHIPPING 


Worldwide Cw Shipping 
TRANSSHIP GniibH 
Bgm.-Sfiudt-Str. 58/60 
2800 Bremen 1 

Tefe (0)421/14264 Thu 246584 Tim 0 
Bei dm Mudhren 91 
2000 Hamburg 11 

Tat (0)40/373703 Tfae 214944 Tim D 
abo DOT/B’A + bond in USA 
Member of AtCA Wtnhington 



FRANCO 

BRITANNIC 

TAX FRE CARS 

ROLLS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

JAGUAR 

ROVH? 

RANGE & LAND ROVER 
European delivery 

21 Ave Weber 
75116 PARIS 
TI:(1)757 50 80 
Telex: 620 420 


TRASCO 

INTHNATIONAL 

LH.D. Mercedes Tax Free 
Uamuanes 36” & 44" 
Armoured Cars and fauouanei 
Coach buB con 
Other makes & exotics 

Over 100 urvb m stock 
World wide delivery 
Diect from sauce 
D.O.T. & EPA 

Teh London (441 (1) 629 7779 
Telex (51) 8956022 TEAS G. 

Trajco London Ltd. 

65-67 Park Lane, London W.l. 

Swiberiixi«HJK-W. Germary 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTI DELIVERY 

We keep a largetfodc of 
mow oar brondi 
Tel: 02/6*8 55 13 
Tefe* 66658 
42 rue Lens, 

1050 Brussels. 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 

S nee 1972, ewerienced cor trader for 
Mercedes, Porsche, BMW, Jaguar- hn- 
nie dw te delivery. Import/ export, U5. 
DOT & EPA, di pp ing for tourist and 
dealer. Ooecmwide Motors GmbH, 
Te n l e c a e ra tr. 8, 4 Dunsaddorf, W. 
Gentler P) 21^-434646, Ax 8587374. 


TRANSCAR 17 av de Friadkmd. 75008 
Paris. Tot 2256444. Nan 839533. 
Antwerp: 233 99 85. Comtes 39 43 44 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


1985 CLOSE-OUT SALE 
Mercedes / BMW/ Por*he 
500/380/280 5B75EC/SL 
8MW 745/635/535 
1986 MODUS NOW AVAILABLE 
Porsche 944 Tuba / MB 300 SL 
Abo mourned 1979/80 Pondws 
Cafl or telex Munich W. Germany 
10] 89-405047 or 42. 7hc 522851 

Am eri ca n owned end operated 





TRANS AUTOMOBRE 
1st oass sanncE 

- All iteAes, ofl models arakrblo 

- Brand new or second hand cars 

- Shipping - EPA - DOT - in su rance 

- Al fam di ti u 

Tek 32/2/3587702. Telex 64587 
2nd hoid daplu Tek 32/2/3587700 
1599 Ch de Wottrioo, 

1180 Brtsneb (Belgonj 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE FROM STOCK 

Best service, shipping, li nuiia a, 

RUTEINC. 

TAUNU55TK. 52, 6000 HUMOUR? 
W Germ.. M (0)89-232351, lb 411559 


EUROPORT TAX 
FREE CARS 

Gt i or write far free coltdoo. 
Boas 12011 

KoMerdon Airport, Hefland 

ToMM lMZOT 
Telex 25071 EPCAR NL 


TAX FRS CARS 
P.C.T. 

Al matin dl motMx brand new 
Hrtfisriea. 147. 3018 Artwora, Mgrtn 
Tel: 3/231 5$00.Tb35546PHC/&TB 
Send USt5 far cokfag 


TRANSMUNDI BOGR1M, 21 GesteL 

sebocev. 3-2241 Zoersd Antwerp. Tek 
03-384.1054 Tb 323® Tranim & In 
stodc ALL TYPE, NEW & USED. 


TAX Free con, dl mokes & models 
ATX. NV, Ankerrui 22. 2000 Antwerp, 
Belgium. Tel 03/231 16 53 Tx 31535 


• SUECONVBtf * 

Tbo safest way to import a 
European cm brie fee U5Jk. 
Worldwide Ameriaxi insurer 
provides dl required nuance 
and gua r ante e ! your cor wfl 
pass dl 116. government s ta ndard! 
or your money back indudeig 
cowonron cost. 

Write or phone far free brochure. 
GERMANY JO) 69-7152425 or 
mroi / 223059 

AMERICAN INTI UWERWRfTRS 
OberSndau 7678 
04000 fhorfcfurt/Atam 


EPA / DOT 

CONVBSION5 

* Custom brcksroge/bondliig service 

* Pick-up & defray tmywheni in the 

Eastani U.S. & Texas 

* Prafeswond work using only the 
Nghest quefey a x i uau iiatil s 

* Guaranteed B*A / DOT approve! 
CHAMPAGNE IMPOSTS ImL, 

2294 North Ptmn KiL, Hatfield, 
PA. 1 944KV USA Teb 21 5 822 6852 
Telex 4971917-CHAMP 


& GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 
330 W. 56rh St, N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CABCS AND 
CHECKS ACCBTH3 
Private Membersh ip ! Avtxfafaie 

Thri oward-winnipfl s ervic e ha 
been f erri u red a fee tea A mad 
exefes h re Escort Service by 
USA 6 eriernafiortal news w ide 
(ndmfiog radio mid TV. 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMER/CAN 

pernor SERVICE. 
EvaYWHmYOUAfi£0« GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Call free tram U-Sj 1-8Mh2374BP2 
Cedi free From Honda 1-800-282-0892. 
lowed Eastern wekxxnw you badd 


NEW YORK CITY 

EXCURSIONS 

SCOUT 5BMCE 
EXCLUSIVE & EXPENSIVE 
7 DAY5 - MAJOR CARDS 

(212) 517-7803 


PARLIAMENT 

Esoocr sravicE 

New York 212-517-8121 
Oticago 312-787-9059 

Major oedtf cmdi gaxqried 


LONDON 


OW 0 nrfe oeMpled. 


REGENCY NY 

VunBiDMDE ESCORT SBVICE 
or 753-1864 


LONDON 

BBXtRAVIA 

Escort Sendee. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


Foriman Escort Agency 

67 Oaten Street, 
London W1 

Tefc 486 3724 or 486 1158 
Al major credit earth nrypt ed 


★ LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SZSVICE 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


AWSTOCATS 



HEATHROW 

* London Escort Agency* 

01-609 2870 


CAPRiCE-NY 

ESCORT SERVICE W 9CW YORK 
TB-i 211-737 3291. 



* JASMINE * 


ZURICH 


ZUR1CH-GENEVA 

GMOHCS ESCORT SBtVICE. 
TB-- 01/363 08 64-022/3441 86 


Tet 2509603 *.*.** 

ESCORT SBtVICE. GRBXT CARDS 


CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE. 

51 Baaudianip Place, London SW3. 
Tel: 01 584 651 3/2^49 (4.12 pm] 


******GBIEVA best 

ESCORT SatViCE. 022 / 86 15 95 



*• O ORVA - flHS T ** 

Excart Soroka. -Tel: 022/32 34 10 
+ Weekend + Travel 

MAYFAIR CLUB m ~ 

GUIDE SBtVICE fawn Spa * * ZURICH 558720 * * 

ROTTERDAM JO) 10-2541S5 Private Taericm Guide Service 
THE HAGUE <0] 70-60 79 96 


* AMSTB8QAM • 

CHIB ROSE - ESCORT SERVICE 
5TADHOUDERSKADE 12S 
Tut 020768606 


VENNA ESCORT - AG84CY 
1EL 37 52 39 


LONDON TOP ESCORT SHMCE 
Heathrow. Alteram bqren. 353 8343 


ROME OUB BIROPE ESCORT 
& Guide ServicaTel: 06/589 3604- 5 W 
1146 (from 4 pm la 10 pm] 


GENEVA * BEAUTY* 

ESCORT SERVICE. 022/29 51 30 


GENEVA ESCORT 

SBtVICE. Tel: 46 11 58 


Tel: 36 29 32 


PH W 
19* 19* 4- V, 
2416 24M 4*'fr 

im 17W +.« 

> v* 

-8fe BV.— Vb 
44k 44t' 

« 5 + Vk 

rx* 7fe 

, SS T 2S^ tt 


Domma Escort Service 071 1 / 38 31 41 


LONDON BLONDE ESCORT Senriex 
Teh 01-225 0368 


MADEMOBB1E ESCORT AGB4CY 

Hcnfeura 040/55 32 914. 




BRUSSEU. CHANTAL ESCORT Ser- 
vice; Tet 02/530 23 65. 



NEW YORK Escort Service. 

212-4849887. 




2416 

1616 OEA 



12 

14 

2B 

19ft 

19ft— ft 

22ft 

15ft Ookwd 

JM 

A 

11 

30 

171k 

1716 

T7ft + ft. 


4 OdelAn 




4 




16ft 

4ft OdetBs 




1 

6ft 

4ft 

4ft 

1916 

13ft ObArt 

J4 

13 


2 

15ft 

18ft 

Wft + ft 

27ft 

18ft OMHis 

J4 

1JB 

19 

74 

24 

2316 

2316— ft 

7ft 

3ft OOklM 




5 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 

25ft 

14 OSutvna 

-42 

17 

15 

W 

23 


2»— %5f 

14ft 

Aft OxfnJF 

■821 4J 

10 

9 

13 

13 

13 

14% 

•16 OzorkH 

JO 

1-4 

14 

2214 

t4ft 

13ft 

14 


7ft 3KWTC 19 

’IC JK^wt - 71 " 

im rnwuiHi § 

U0 78 WxriPsr M S 13 
20W 13=14 WRIT * 1,17 U 17 
llffil 7 Watte A JO 29 4 

"2 SiwfflSF ” 5 

m? 1 W SvitM pf 242 UL3 
m w ebP u n 

S' S&SMsl? -JOeli 7 

12 7V WeAich JB3m 1 16 
KH 4M Wetmon .14 23 - 4 
91b 7 WeWTb m 

14 , n Weldtm 11 

UVk tft Weilaa 4 

4 216 WefGrd 

^ W " 

MV. Mb WMBrC 11 

» wwa-e JO 13 


19 INb 
134V 10 
1216 916 

i2K> m 
121k fftt 
34 30» 

33tM 2BVti 
29W 234k 
7**k ion 
22tk 1644 
2*va im 
2tfk IM 

li aw 

23 1716 

20* 14Mt 
me 1416 
21 16& 
asv. i4*k 
114k file 

2M6 14 
41M> 32ft 


40ft 32ft 
8ft 5ft 
30V> 17ft 
lift 6ft 

m 

5ft 2ft 
45ft 35ft 
2416 15ft 
2ft ft 
2416 10ft 
Uft 9ft 

"St 3 

12ft Oft 
4ft 2ft 

ft ft 
9ft Mb 
lift 7ft 
17ft lift 
2ft 1ft 


1.10 M ^ 

50 

IM 2M 40 

228 m 9 

133 256 IB 

JM135 2 M 


lift ma wxtbrs JO 13 

15ft 5ft WDtoin 

231k 7ft WIHntr n 16 

- 2116 191b WIRET U u U 
13ft 6ft WltSLl .16 1J ? 
24ft - lift wnrEm 14 

3R Vvn^Hwt ‘ 5 

23ft Wft Wlrtlrf 234 11.1 
I 5ft 2ft WwdeE n 

17ft 12ft wwdepnao 126 
22ft 9% Worttta an 
21ft 12ft Wralhr so .1 42 


M 5ft 
9 23- 
ZT22 14ft 

3B IM 

57 B 
33 3ft 

14x 9ft 

S “t* 4 

23 4ft 
1 8ft 
32 10ft 
78 14ft 

4 1ft 

Ji 

81 
.211 lift 
37S5 fW 
53 3 

435x29V. 

'R-B 

3 18ft 


7 7 - ft 

7ft B — ft 
3ft 3ft + ft 

^ l \ + * 

■m 

4ft 4ft 

i£i SJ + ifc 

3# 

1ft ^ft 

it 

i? 4 Ft" 

E 

Wft 13ft 
4ft 416 

ZDV« 20U + Vk 




Tamerurto veiwi™ 


































































































































s 

** * 


■ : 

• . INTERI^T^ HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 | 

fZJj 

T2^ )^\ 

* 

[ Page 19 

CURRENCY NtiUUSVS 


i 

f I . TT C AS 13 — T\ 


- riL.LJ if 

1 





espite German Intervention 

! | Cwrpifa/ Our SuffFnm Dmdcho 

i | j T 3“ dol]ar rose central banks? Mr Soriaaii 

^°P?“ ™t»TOer««lto5nite^S 
st statistics indi- 


Lrrowth by Acquisition: Li.&. Airlines Develop 


(Coatijwed from Page 15) For less than the cost of one new 

Air Transport Association, the Boeing 737-300, which sells for 

to see, bow far we can posh the lire, from 1,794.00, and 215.65 Jap- U.S. industrv uade group, projects about S14 million. Piedmont in 

CBUlUl nonlra " U. J r . *<■ * .1 r-‘\- in ■» n : ,1 : > 


anese yen, from 214.S5. 


i but dealers said tradera if VS. gave 


- Dealas in Lcmdcm said Tuesday 

, . , . idq]< ^ “ euapboally q»« day. 

vxntial bank P ° SSil>Ie basic- *Tbe market is wrtnaDynoneads- 

N " r „ rJ . L _ * bounded signifirantfy. Jbe Com- tent,” one commented. Demand soltant. estimated that the 85 other a - 

i,urrency dealers said West Gear- Deoartinent .00 Tbuisday for dollars was being countered by carriers certified by the Federal quick delivery of new planes. “We 

anvs central Kant rh* u — a., wul iiaw t*c ___*z ”1 . ; u k«.~. a*. L_j_« ^ 


that in the next five years, the 12 creased its flights at the airport to 
major U.S. carriers will shrink to 170 a day, from 6 . Mr. McGuire 
six to eight and win control 85 to 90 noted that if Piedmont had tried to 
percent of the traffic build op the hub by itself it would 

Mr. James, now an aviation con- have taken years. 

A major constraint is getting 


•» w 

*'3t 

Vi 


Oa. 15 


Dollar 


* t: 


* ■* 


, - | L — '■v»,VSl- _ . - f IW M W UM 8 WM t/BUAfi WWIWW VJ UUUCia WTU1KU UJ USE rHWl«i uwiia, Ul ut» 

snanys central bank, the B nodes- WL ^ J ^ 506 ds prtB min a i y estimate continued concern about central Aviation Administration would nave 45 aircraft on order,' 

■<“ ; ??!?*' ■i? lcrv E aed by sdEng about tord-qrartcr performance bank intervention, leading to stale- consolidate into 20 to 30. McGuire said, “but it will rake us 

*" i ^ mmiofl. But keen demand, par- - of the gross n a tional product, the mate, he $uuL He said that often the only way 

•* - “ ijculany among corporations eager mcasa ’ fe of economic ao t T^n/Un i^ rvmnX - 1 __*j of for smaller airlines to compete is 

i^buyd^atcuntmtodS 0 wt y* through mergers. 

: v' evcn . Respite Tbc department jxrewxaty esti- at MmdaV’s do«L Besides building up large hubs, 

i £ .he intervention, dealers said. mated that the GN p*n>seara i 8 - * • * . . the major carriers can offa fre- 

; Albert Soria, a vice president Percent animal pace hetwem jpjy In other trading in Europe Tucs- quern-flier programs with morenu- 
' 1 l ‘“d foreign exchange msm**** a t *nd September. Analysts said a big da ^ > P*® d< ^ ar ' ms fi*®* at 2.6613 merous and more attractive desti- 
iss Bank Corp. in New York, HP wa ™ revision could spur a mfly PM in Frankfurt, np dightly from nations. In addition, they have 
id the market was still testing the bitheddlar, ■ • Monday's 2656 DM; at 8.1175 more clout with travd agents, who 

ji^ of ihe carnal bbfc* In New Yoric,thcBntiih pound 

i :* i^-Snce the United States, Britain, dosed at $14135, np stightly from m bXm i 792.75 * Milan, 

■-ranee, Japan and West Germany S1.41QS Friday, after the (Vi bimb nc ’ 

5 ’vi d on SepL 22 to work toward Day holiday on Monday. • 

dollar, traders have Other New. York rates for the 
:. ; ieen attempting to discover what dollar: 26665 Deutsche marks; w> 

■ ? * •_ 


three years to get them. That’s not 
as quick as we’d like to move." 

Up to now, most major airlines 
have been content to form market- 
ing agreements with commuter air- 
lines. Under the agreements, the 
smaller carriers feed passengers to 
the major carriers in return for the 
large airlines steering passengers to 
the commuter lines to get to smaller 
cities. 

Not having an equity position. 


however, carries the risk -that a 
commuter line trill sever its ties and 
perhaps ally itself with a competi- 
tor who offers a better deal 
Pennsylvania Commuter Air- 
lines Inc., one of eight airlines asso- 
ciated with USAir through its Alle- 
gheny Commuter system, was 
purchased by the airline early this 
year after its founder retired. 
USAir relies heavily cm commuter 
lines 10 feed its flights- 


Mentality 

Continental Airlines and East- 
ern are among the major airlines 
that have considered mergers with 
large and regional carriers. 

Frank Lorenzo of Texas Air 
Corp.. the parent of Continental, 
had put in a tender offer of up to 
$22 a share for Frontier, only to be 
outbid by People Express, which 
offered $24. 



-In Zorich, the dollar closed at 
21828- Swiss francs, slightly up 
from Monday's 21800. 

In Tokyo, the dollar closed at 


“The activity today was 


. . r JUS 0 * 2,1860 Swiss fraacs - 215.90 yen, from 21490 yen on 
mainly, from 21785; and 1,798.00 Italian Monday. (AP, Roden) 

IfHE EUROMARKETS ~ 

j Attention Is Focused Again on New Issues 


lUMr/Met 

account for 70 percent of the tick- 

CIS SOld. MiMtriiniT 

„ Amad irfcn Pern 

The move by Piedmont and Peo- £££,”* 
pie could pressure such primarily 
East Coast carriers as USAir, East- 
cm and Delta to consider acquis- ISwlwlr?™ 
lions to expand into new markets 
and protect existing routes. ~ 

And Northwest Airlines has said 
that it may seek a merger with a 
major domestic carrier if United 
gets the Pan Am routes. Northwest 
has argued that United, with its 
extensive domestic route network, 
could provide a large number of 
passengers to its Pacific routes. 

That, in nun, could force North- 


BeaCen>t7(MiNy! 
Bk Boston 00 (Cap) 
BkCraecsfl/M 
BkGrtOOtKVW 

aurskun 

Bk inhmn 
Bh. Montreal 90 
BkMamrtalH 
BkHaMroom 
BkHewYorfcM 
Bk novo Scotia tt/YJ 
Bk Hava Scotia H 
SkTtokwn 
BfcTokVOP 
BfcTttTOFcMLVT 
Bk Tokv« DetJVn 
BankomerlcD 0/5 *# 
Bankers Trust 0B 


* i‘: By Christopher Pizzey mained little changed from Mon- bad been strong HmimH for ih e west, the largest U.S. carrier to the sort*-, t£5SS 
. Reuters day's dosing, dealers said. Activity issue. Pacific, out of major overseas mar- Mmn 

: ^ \ , LONDON — Attention in the was mainly focused on recent per- The Mortgage Bank of Denmark !***■ SSumjs 

'iRirobond market again centered petual issues, (hey added. issued a 1 5-oillion-yen bond pay- A source dose to Eastern said KSwiMmtn 

i r ’Tuesday on new issues, with prices Ln the dollar- straight sector, fog 6V5 percent over seven years that Eastern and Northwest have j&>$ esijezn 

.. >,»f seasoned issues showing few ma- Ford Motor Credit Co', issued $150 and priced at 10214. The had man- already had »«!*< on whether a a** w 1 a*» 

i b or changes, dealers said. Once million in bonds paying lOVi per- ager was Nomura International merger would be beneficial to the bSjS 

l a jtgain, a variety of new issues were cent a year over six years and Ltd. It was launched too late to 

:: f '.aunched, although unlike Mon - 1 priced at 10014. The lead manag er trade actively. 

was Goldman Sachs Internationa] Also launched late in the day was 
Corp. The issue ended within the a 25-billion-yen dual-currency 
1% parent total fees at a discount bond issue for the U5. S tuden t 
of about 1% bid. Loan Marketing Association, usu- 

.. . Sun Capital Corp. issued $100 ally called Sallie Mae. The targeted a rr 

itigpd by Morgan Guaranty Ltd, million in bonds guaranteed by Sun issue pays 8 percent over 10 years Mr. Schlesinger of the merger 
s ^ point over the six-month Co. The five-year bonds pay 10 was priced at 101& It will be trend. What the airlines are buymg 
i - ^ondon interbank offered rate, but percent and 1 were pri ced at 9914. redeemed for $136 mflHoa, giving now. he said, “is market presence 

trlifter^ two years investors may The lead man ager was Credit an effective exchange rate of 18342 and to some extent assets." 

Suisse First Boston Ltd. The issue y® to the dollar. Dcm McGuire, rice president of 

ended bn the market at a discount In the Japanese convertible sec- public relations for Piedmont, said 
of about 114 bid, comfortably with-- tor, the expected 5100-million that when the airline, based in Win- 
in the total fees of 1)4 percent. bond issue for the Dai-lchi Kangyo ston-Salem, North Carolina, was 
Monday’s novel yen-linked issue Bank was launched with an indicat- 
for the Long-Term Credit Bank of ed coupon of 2% percent The issue 

Japan Finance NV was raised to matures in March 2001 and was . _ r ^ 

. . _ SL 20 million from the initial $100 quoted at a discount of % bid, in- ed to buy a large commuter line, 

; ■ fading picked up during the after- million. The lead manager, Bankers side the 144 percent selling conces- Henson Aviation, which already 

; Kioon, although most issues re- Trust International, said that there sion. had a hub there. 


. | lay, most were denominated in 
. 1 ^JS. doflars, they added. 

■ ,, ^j:_Tbe Korea Exchange Bank is- 
jilted $100 million in floating-rate 
] .totes. The 15-year issue, lead-man- 


Witch into three-year notes paying 
jflfi point over six-month Libor. 
r j *r The issue was quoted on the mar- 
_ , * tret at 98.80, inade the total fees of 
; ' i f-35 basis points. Dealers generally 
~ 'raid that the bulk of the no t es 
" ii'vould be placed in theTar East 
Lt Seasoned floating-rate-note 


carriers. William Wren, vice presi- 
dent for public relations at North- 
west, said the airline would have no 
comment Jerry Cosley, vice presi- 
dent of public relations for Eastern, 
also had no comment 
“Anything can happen." said 


seeking to build up a hub at Balti- 
morc- Washington International 
Airport several years ago, it dedd- 


Bteff 
BqlnOMuNCTICon) 
BnoT5 
Bne«7tc ao) 

BflpfSm 

Bapti/W 

BnpW 

Bwlf 

Bnptt/7l 

BnaJam 

BnpKS lUMv) 

BqParlbatPtna 

MWormtlfiU 

BaretovC Bk Peroom 

Barctov»o/5« 

BanJovs O/S Pm» 

Barclays O.'SBI 

Bctatun p«rp 

Betatam Dee*f/W*stri 

BaUuniDSisunivl 
8rt*anOM5iM»l 
B M ptoa i JuHB 
BaraMiBkH/n 
Bctahim 9 tn* 

BrWum OcttWtM 

Cca>n 

CcckU 

CncaM/T5 

CnltO 

CM DO 

ObcH/BS (MBIlyl 

fiv-yui 

aocHiwuvi 

abcM 

CartwetS-HL?* 
Ootral lnt97/00 
CeMnm«i/f5 
CnonManaem 


CouwaHul Bid Asfcd 

7*. D-13 «« I0u£A 
IK ■ 

l-i 8M1W»iac^ 
BV. X-tlt*JS«J5 
iKJwanu 
ey. am wasr.xjo 
r- 07-ti run iso 

* w-niDoirroD^ 

r« s-inotmioen 
19 , w-n «« wst, 
iT/toa-u nil wji 
iv, s-wnsutm 

Of TI-CJ rJ5 ms 

Bh 

BJJ 1M3 laaiJIKJ^I 
SVi iro M50 «7I 
Ml 1M2«US«JI 

n ;Boar.x.ii 

S-K 2T-01 WJi 1X53 
7H. 2D- 12 I30JCHCJ3 
SVw !MJ 13SUS8HKU8 
r% st-;s lotLWBtn 
h. ■ mim 
9*w 3T-i7 lOCimaCTJ 
I.) Vi-Cl 100MI007A 
Dtk 'Ar'z 

SH 3KI1 lOOXIDCa 
** aw: KKJOiXkJ 
M IMJ KDCT00.]: 
X>-:2 99 y; MOD 
ll-;i«99l iolds 
&n IC022100JJ 
1>II VOOav3DJ2 

w^: ;dc.i: 

IC-C2 9750 9SJ0 
IJ-IT 10CJ01MU5 
I MM I0C.141XJ4 

*9.9* 10CJM 

2*43 VK71 10151 

23- 13 IXJHIOaVS 
1001 <*J>C 99 JD 
33-13 lOODCflOUS 
H-CT 99.98 13638 
13-C3 U622iDU3 

. . IB-:: 99J7 9917 
ITU DK2 13LC12L50 
S'. :S-:3 9953 9tsS 
n 3J-1! 130JM130.V4 

r.t c-n iou6to65» 

T*. 05-73 9951 13COB 
PK. TM1 loomoo 13 
W-C3 lr.UlOIJi 
3M7 99.98 IXUB 

995; nx 

11- 12 73(1721X52 
M3 :x£710617 
03-01 99.92 1X92 
3V-C1 IC7J 770197 
01-17 1365C73D50 
0M3 7X151X25 
mu looinxr 
13-12 IX U130 It 
2502 1X9C1X1S 
27-11 995? 90 J9 
17-C1 99J3 9993 
1515 ixxrxt} 
0901 lGDXflKU 
tl-U 1X181X28 

12- C2 1X441X5* 
15-1] ixismis 
09-12 1DQ£7I0tU7 

24- 13 lOOJBlOLB 
12-11 anal 13 
2M0 9990 1X90 
24-C1 130161X14 
33-11 99.15 99 JO 
2141 laUClOOiS 
2311 9993 19093 

1912512-11 9955 1D095 
C41 9995 995S 
8S1 3141 10053106*5 


Bvu 

Ilk 

P* 

8 *. 

IS 

19* 

BV 

99, 

S'i 

K, 

14 


80S 

1 *. 

r. 

Id. 

8 % 

f. 

n> 

9k, 

B*. 

m* 

IK 
■ « 
tl 

o. 

8 N 

M. 

8-3 

n 

IS 

t 

»«k 

IS 

Bk 

n 

IS 

M. 

Ita 


IssMr/Mot. 

One Mon Cm 09 
Chase Man Cm Oo 
Own teat 9* 
CiwmicsiMtMlY) 
Cnrinuiki Bkfi 

CftrtsJiaaiflBkW 

Cticm05 

Citicorp AiiaMWUr) 

Chart* UtH 

QtlSIlDPMM 

CUKDrpf7 

Citism 34 

OiKurpPerp 

CMemPi»97 

Comurta 97 

CamitMRHFntf 

C Miuia ijufc Moyg? 

Omni Uro Msutml 91 

Comp CuiOs ni**tU 

Council Ol Europe 93 

Cctb<9l 

CctWiW 

COt 94 

CdWtMmiy] 

Cd» 

Ceome 87/92 
Cr Do Nora 97 
Cr Fatstpr 88*93 
Cr Fender 0097 
Cr Far E*POrl*2 
CrLyomaU 93/94 
Cr Lvonnats 90/77 
Cr LyonnolS 89/94 
Cr Lvannati 91/95 
Cr Lirnnco 99 
Cr Lvannaii Jan92/95 
Cr LvormcU 97 lCob) 
Cr L munch 60 
Cr Lyanrats Jun92/9e 
Cr NDitenaiH 
Cr Nartenal 98/94 
Cr Nations' OD 
CrHHansmi94 

CrKfitratoh 9* 

Cr im<ane92 
DouchJ Kaiiavaot 
Dona 94/99 (ABt&hr) 

D«i Norsk* Noirt# 

Den NoruuDecOD 
Denmark JonUAC 
oemporkoassno 

Denmark 99 /W 
Die Enwoest 92/9* 
Dresdner Fin 93 
Oresaner Finn 
Dresaner Fin 92 
EhUroOO Nuc 89 
Ed 99 

EcH 97 (MINy) 

EneIDS.D5<MIIUvl 

Enel Oc 

Eon 93 

EalfC 

Ercoo 

En»rlorlnt91'94 
Ferrsvie 95 iMBilyl 
Ferro-irie 92/99 
Femsvie may 97 
Finland 90 IMIMvl 
Finnish Pacer 90/*5 
Flrsl Boston 9 17*1 
First Bk SyC9* 
HrOBk5vst97 
First Ou'coaa97 
First Cntcooo 91 
First Cnicosa 94 
First City Texas 95 
Firs liner 95 
Ford 91 

Fortune S+L *2 
Fall In) fi/9e 
Senf1n3nce8f/92 
Genfmance 92il94 
Gz&89 
r.mr 
QxbPerp 
Get) 94 


IU 

IS 

I*. 

Kk 

BI- 

BS. 

M 

M 

7*v 

n 

BVl 

IS 

h 

lit 

8*9 

IS 

I'& 

IS 

Bis 

IS 

Eh 


IS 

844 

IS 

Ilk 

■A 

7% 

IS 

8k. 


ComtlNCrt BM Altai 

Eh Q5-Q 10OB21X.12 
13-11 99B7 99.97 
27-12 MOIOBJI 
27-11 9855 99.10 

13- 11 9950 1RUS 
U43 1X081X35 
25-11 9902 99.92 

14- 11 9U5 99.11 

H-12 9901 99.94 
H-10 180051X15 
1041*9^9952 
72-12 itnjwmw 
- 9900 H050 

3i-io too-wmi? 
27-12 WOO was 
71-11 0008100.11 

20- 41 100.1510023 
043 9900 99.90 
12-11 9938 99 J8 
ZV10 99JM 10004 
2S43 10008108.18 
094* >06141063* 
2743 98.98 lOCXtS 
27-03 9934 9904 

143 104*1061101X10 
IV. 12-12 100371 0647 
1441 99 J* 1004* 
1X0010625 
IS 12-11 100.B3J00.il 
8 V. (241 100001X10 
Ua 114* 10640100311 
tat 09441X141X24 
0841 1X1310023 
29-11 10693101 X 
27-12 1065110041 
2141 106331060 
07-1 1 9942 9932 
IB-01 10OWW0L19 

14- 12 106591X49 
2V41 1X2210631 

Ft* 1143 1X181X20 
6425 2042 1X121X17 
is. mi 106251X35 
8k. 7742 106041X1* 
7*. 05-12 WJ2 99* 
IS. 13-11 1002310633 
tat 09-12 100/071X17 
Bh 13-11 99.95 10650 
Bh 19-12 99* 18650 
Bh 0941 100X1X10 
Bh - U63V10049 

BV» 1942 106771X87 
8s. 2941 100421X12 
9kk 21-1010149101.19 
Iv 39-11 106081X13 
8k. 2742 1X1910629 
IV 2642 1X101X35 
SB. 2747 1D6911DE01 
89* 1443 99-97 1X07 
53* 23-11 9931 99AI 
X* 0343 1X101X20 
8W 17-12 XX 99* 
81* 2443 9** 10000 
7*k 884199.40 9934 
71* 23-12 99 J* 10604 
81* 304399* 10009 
ih 2042 loom 0618 
6225 • »54 99*4 

81/0025-10 f>X WX 
BV 3041 99* U0JG 
Bvy 29-11 99 * 9930 
8*. 13-11 99* nit 
IV 29-11 MJ9 9949 
BV 07-11 9945 9915 
L2B7SU-1I 9948 99X 

21- 11 99X 106X 

22- H 92X 94X 
Oft-17 WOO 99.90 

15- 11 106S01XN 
24-10 9912 99.92 
1541 1X1210622 
31-12 100061X11 
2241 1062010630 
IM1 1X051X15 
11 -12 1KLMM670 
14-11 9650 99X 
29-11 1D1XH1X 


81* 

IS 

IV 

x* 

IS 

■k* 

Bh 

IS 

IS 

9 

Bk* 



inocr/Mot. 

CtamoaNut Bid Askd 

Juoer/Moi. 

Coupon Mexi BJd Aikd 




8UJ4/W 

Ik 


CiAnwr^nSlSavn 

Bft 

■77’ iTTtriT* 


8 

XII 1X2770032 



F'.f- L^l 

50IMC Ini Fin SB 






Soma Ini Fin 94/04 

94 

7*41 1X3710047 




Samw ini Fin 92 

6 vw 



6 ft 

i r i ll 



94J5 1X50 



B ?tr. rrftfn® 

Sand) FlnDtc93 

7ft 

23-12 J9J5 99JS 

HHI Sound Peru 

ta* 

Kir n-iytvM 

Sealland ln)93 

Ik 

7+03 lOOSBlao+B 

Htenane 91 /« 



SrtPoc«c97 





■'"'in -i~^R 

S6tPodflc92 

Bft 

0241 99*0 99X 




5hawini/tCarp97 



Hyaro X(Mttay) 








I^TvctR 

Seat 90/93 


2+1] 99.96 ICO® 




Sftlfflta 

8 ft 

03-12 100X1X33 

Indonesia 3S/SQI 









Sac Gen 90/95 

BV* 

0443 1X001X25 

IfMondWl* 



SdcCcitmsrti 

8 % 











Sec Gen 97 


■ I Jik J iV + H. /kT^H 




SncbfS 

Bft 






W I 

KrTi* . '* ■ » rrlVVT^H 

Italy « 

9ft 


SealnOS IMltdvl 

BV* 


Italy 19/94 



iealn 88/93 

Bh 







Vr2k J* 

C item 57 



Siond Chon 94 






Stand Chan 91 

8 to 

70-11 TOLWIUJO 




Stand Chart MflrtO 

BH 

1143 TOM 




Stand Chon HUsmotai 


0341 94X 49+5 



*7 






r*\ ;’;tnfr;iv® 

stoic BK Indie B7 

P. 

29-11 Wifi 100X 



ifr String 

SumWIW TSI 92/94 

8 ft 

1342 lOQJOKXLH 

Korea Dev Bk 86/19 


I' b 1 1 

SundnmUibaiiVknfT 





■:n 

Sweden X 

7** 




f] f J i , i, 






7ft .M,, .VtX 












1 ^ 1 1 

Sweden 9J/BJ 






Sweden P»rp 






Tahra Kabc97ICap) 





■ AVI IM 

Talyo 92/84 

Bft 

70-11 100201X30 



g jfi irW'-uM 






Lvt:r-i;rTM 

TakunlnCaeiT7 


0944 ISO 14100*4 



t-rl 

Tolul Asia 14/99 





iJTJT’X 

Turnom92 






Tovo Tsl 9J/V9 



MalavstaXT! 


1 

Tvo 94/04 









Mm Hon 94 



UBMorwayto 












Wells Forgo 47 





I ’t ■ • ( ■ 

Weils Forgo 92 






WMb Fargo 97 

hv 


AMtanBkta 



westpac 97 iCoe) 

IV 

1847 99 JB 94X 




WmsGlynTI 






world Bk Fere 




Ffftt* . v n : B 

world Bk 84/94 

7JS 

2911 4820 4890 




Yokohama 41/4, 






Yokohama »7 (Cop) 



Midland Intfl 



Zenlralspkass 91 

lft 








Ml tail Fln97 iCap) 
AMtBil Fin ft 

Bh 

M. 

lift 

| Non Dollar i 

MonGrmtaiiU 

Wg Bk Den 92 

fh 

yii 

Ittocr/MoL 

Coupon Next Bid Atfcd 




Abbey Natlonol 92/00 





1 ^ r I 1 1 ■ 

A/UBka97 

lift 





Bk MonireolU 

lift 27-12 1X4010050 




8 k Nova SCOrtcM 


3141 99 J 8 1XX 




Bk Tokyo *8/90 



Nai West Fbi 91 


FiT r.l* 

Bainaosuez91 




1 H j ■ VT’ it. 

8etOulm«4 





■■■ >M .(I ik H 

■MiannkiT] 






atlcon>Bt/9i 



Nat West Fla Pam 



Crane 9t 




l^frnfUrrr,™ 

Cr Fonoer Qfl 


Hew Zeokml 17 



Cr National 91/45 

1146 

1+12 <005410064 




Denmark 9J/9J 






HamasB/S« 

lift 0744 44J8 *4 JB 


9 




II • t yj • ■ ft 

OkBU 



Ireland 93 

lito 1+11 100J71X77 




Ireland 44 





LktvdsE wo 9n 

lito 2+11 IX161S0J6 




Mlg Bk Den 94/99 

I 2 to 

1+10 IBUBIDOJa 




Mto B 6 Den 41/«4 

lito 0941 1XS0IBIX 





12 





Natlonv4deBJ.4S 

lift 

9+44 94+3 9923 




New Zealand 97 

It*. 

1+11 9926 99 M 




RtaB 

lito 0+11 XX 99J0 

Rente 91 

M. 


sna 90/93 

12ft 3+10 10092 MIX 

Rio 94 


Stand Chan sn Pern 

lift 

1+12 47 JS 9800 

Hep Bk DottaS 97 

M 

20-11 WX «»JD 

Yorkshire im« 1/44 

lift 22-12 100201 0030 

ROPNvQf 

Bh 

I9-D99X H0X 




RCDNVH 

lift 

1341 94 JS 100X 


ROCK 

Ilk 

17-11 9fJ4 99.94 

Lorxson 




Tuesday’s - 

OTC 

Prices 


NASDAQ priCM os Of 
3 pjn. New York Hme. 

Via The Associated Press. 


’.-3 Mown • 
.Htoti Law Mod. 


Saba In JUI 

Pl».m TOi HWi Low IPX-OiVe 


•1934 11 ADCT1 
IBM: Ok* AEL 
IM. IfMrAFG 
736 ASK 
14 AamRt 
234 Acad In 
Th Acrirtn 
17V. AcuRay 
IV* AdacLb 

r 

3 Aeautm 


:\S 

113k 


-a- S' 4 

. q 171* 13V) AflBih 

* 23V* 1515 AecyR S 

• .'.VTA 934 AlrMd 

“ 1834 734 AlrWlSC 

' 281. AlexB 
T5Si Alflfi 
43fe Alnorex 
Vt 1034 AfesW 
' 15 AllaoBv 

179* AIMBfl 
136 Albwt 
«to AlpMic 
63* Alta* 

1M AmaKt 
AWAIrl 
63* AmAstv 
14% 103* ABnfcr 
14V* lOHi AmCayr 
946 53* A Conti 

32k* 1716 ARelca 
3715 28% A Groat 

• V US 03* AmlnLf 

' ? 12» SMi AMosnt 
7 1934 1016 AMS S 

« V 364* 27V* ANf Ins 
•• r- 7k* 2k* APtryG 

- - 341A 16V, AmSK 

. 15 716 AmSft % 

; -. 6 % ASolar 

- . llh h ASurv 

44V* 259* Amrlrs U0 
.'- M 17 Ainnwst 
i 8k* 336 A moan 

‘ 29V6 1»W ArnskB 

, 201A 14k* Ainpll 6 
. f - 1534 10 An logic 
k 15V* Bk* Ananm 
3936 13V* Andrew 
_ — ' 109* 69* Apaaoe 

^ 30V, 9V, ApotoC 
— ^ 31k*. 14V6 AnpleC 
...273* 121k ApIBto* 
.-J-B19W 11 AoldCm 
. "■ X 17V* ApIdAU 

• 7 TVS 33* Archive 

• •• 2234 1516 AraaS/ 

> 40V* WVfc Arcfi 
‘ 9 6 Artel 

- 1616 1036 AsdHst 

..19 53* Axtrazv 

■> 22 VS 1316 A rear 
27 1536 AttAm - 

•. 43V, 25V* AHrtBe 

- *- 149* BH AflnFd 

■f 14 8V* AllFln 

. . 30 104* Alt RMS 

16k* 29* AlScATS 

123* 43* AirfTrT 

^10 21* Autmtx 

. 73* 4U, Auxtan 

13V6 336 A wav 

31 6 AvntGr 

259* J7V* Avntefc 

- - 20 1516 Avatar 

. 203* 13V* AvVatCP 



616 
1336 + 16 

A — Ml 

2016 + V* 
22 — VS 
ms + V* 
109* + 36 
9V* 

27W + VS 
1» + 36 


3V* + 16 
5V1 + 36 

■BV* . 
736 + 16 
209* + <U 

171* + W 
M — V* 


51V* 40 BBOO £20 45 X 
16 634 BRCom __ 23 

2 TV* 1434 BancoW 20 5A ;19 
35 23 BcpHw U 6 +4 118 
12 516 BXdK _ .. S 

TIV* ol* EkmoH » U # 

5T6 30V* BKNE S UJ jU 411 
1216 87* BkMAm 150 IBB . JJ 

149* 9V* Bankvt B 

1016 12 k* Banta s 26 14 35 

10’A 636 BqnoilD B 

1316 6 BsTnA 3 

1516 7 BosAm 1AH122 » 

40 3i<6 BselF . .20a Zj :® 


601 * 3846 BOVBks 2 A 0 a 4l 


“38V6 


x" . 


9 6 Bendy 

L W* 5V4 BnchCf 
..." 1 SH Bxium 
2*16 3016 Betz Lb 

20 1M* BiaB 
9U, b la Bear 
9<6 BTndty t 
3«* BtoftH 
4V6 Blooen 
1 BiOSTC 
6 BMcR . 
5 B Inline 

393* 2*16 BootBn 
2J Hi 153k BabEv 
11 BoItTc 

27 11V* Bast Be 

11 BstnFC 
B«. BraeCp 
316 Brenco 

3k BrwTom 

S Brunos 
203* 131*1 gmhn 

21 is BurrBr 
m 3 Bus&itd 


u 

15V* 

996 

10 *i 

TV* 

in* 

u 


25 
16 
73* 
"49* 
16 V* 


.12 1 S 


1.32 13 


1.50 5J> 
30b L4 
.16 16 
J2 3J0 

jao i j 

.12 3J 


386 

78 
17 
47 

537 

39 

.61 

34 

M74 

41 

145 

5 

S3 

Si 

282 

24 

79 
328 

14 

47 

$ 

"1 

706 


49 4036 

73* 7 
16 16 
XH6 SOU 
9V» 89k 

93* 91* 
463* 4516 
9V* 916 

143* T4Mi 
15 1436 

8*6 83* 

1134 Ilk* 
B36 Bit 
33 321* 

53k* 52V* 
6V* 6J6 
916. 9V1 
1236 123* 
31 . »5 
15V* 1496 
159* 15J6 

^ 53* 

1 ^ 
6 * t « 

BV 6 BV 6 
am* am* 
2U6 20V* 
6 V* 616. 
24V* 24V* 
24V* 23V* 
12 

■I*-* 

1436 14f* 
13V* 13 
17 t6V6 
*H tfli 


.49 +n* 

7V6 

16 +3* 

J 2 -V 6 

916 — fi 

m + S 

^ + {6 
iiv*— y, 

c: 

6 ®— J 6 

9V6— V* 
1236 

31 +V* 

1496 

1516 + 16 
Wk + «ft 

^=S 

*■ 

24V6 — V* 
24 +3* 
HR 

3U— V* 
1 

1496 

13*— VS 

17 + J* 
61*— V* 




21V* IMS CDrySc 
113* 7V4 CalAUe 
-6 246 Caisiva 

Ms JVS CallonP 
8VfcCalny • 

34VS 1616 CanonG 

53* 316 QareerC 
13V6 5S Carernk , 

MU as Snort • t 

2136 ?V* Caseyss «g 

13 5V* Omars — 

35k* 23V6 CirtrBc U0 

19V* -B Contour 471 

57 3S*.WM iU»U 4J 
>81* 1146 CBrtlS S ' .. . 34 . 

31k* 17W CFdBk f 54 U' 8 

«* iv* cirmik * 



714. 7 

. 416. 4 . 

M -19 
5V6 491 
10 • « 
MW. 199k 

’Jv* S 6 

2V* 23k 

13% WV* 
2136 21" 

UV6 16— 
M W 
11k* .99* 
151* 1436 
MS* 143b 

3MS 

24V* VU 

•3 3 




— Vk 
+ Ml 


S 

IE 

i-s 

UV*— V* 

TTt 

16V6— V* 

1^+36 
-1X6— 96 
1434 +36 
11)6 .+ VS 
31. -+* 

3 - + 3* 


12 Month 
HtahLow Stack 


Sola In 

Dlv. Vkt IX* Mkh 


Net 

Law 2 PAL Qflpe 


.12 


U3 
91 

U. 1 

i 

A0 2.1 40 

10W 


16V* B3* CetUS 222 

636 2k* OnwEn : 92 

22 1536 ChoonS JO J9 

Z1V* 11 V 6 ChkPnt. 

Tl 636 Chk Ten 
3134 1836 OtLwn J 8 17 
BV* 33* Omw 
15 - 9 V* diryE 
15*6 B* ChlQis 
31 343S Oil Poet 

10 k* 4 ** ainmr 
1936 11 ChrOwt 
1114 51* Oyron 
341* 1036 Cipher 
12 k* 596-aprtco 
716 4 Orcan 

239b 143* CbSGa Jk 4.1 
iFW 1/04 3j0 

Ta • t 

_JV 6 25 ’CtzUtB' lM S3 
1496 -916 CltvF-d 40 33 
33k* 203* OYtiCe Mb 28 

«sa§aKh- ■“ w 

21 V* 1634 OevtRt UOO 1M 
2*36 434 atmms 
19V6 1336 CoastF 
20V6 9 CobeLb 
*81* 243S CocaBtl 56a 12 
iBU TJU Cawr 
4V* 136 caaenlc 

2 H 6 13 Cbbernt .. 

636 236 CatabR - 
15V* 83 * CotaoH 
20V* 1536 CoirTie 
219* U CataNt 
141*. ta* Comar * 

309* 1196 earnest 
1536 -1036 Canjdhj 
49* TH. Comdlal . . . 

*316 33 cmertc 2.10 5>int 
4316 23V6 CmceU UM 24 185 
13 916 CmlSn JSOaU 174 

31V* 23k* CmWTI 140 54- 1 

534 1 CemAm __ 391 

3016 15V* Comlnd M 14 1701 
1236 736 ComSy s JBBm S S3* 
34 T33* OnpCds 

1136 4 Compaq 
25V* 1416 CnwCrs 
436. 236 Campus 
1516 596 CCTC 
30 163* OnaAs 

13k* 9 CmpOt 
81*. 336 CptErtf 
1236 516 CmrtH 

99k 536 Owldn 

»* Ski CmoLR 
69k 216 CnwtM 
1016 6 Vi CmPPds 
19V* 91* CmTfks 
1136 43b Cmpotn 
8 11* Cptcft 

1D36 6 Comshr 
93* 6 , Concptt 
27 1236 CnCap , 

IBM 1416 COmR 1480114 16 

2634 1214 CCflpS 116 149 751 
89b «* ConFbr 40 

5436.3234 CnPapS 148 £0 154 

8 V 6 136 Consul ^ 1179 

42 29 CnttBC TMb 53 17 

IBU su-atHHs 
8 ,4 OLar 

111* 43k Con wot 

2116 125* Comma . 

53b 3* CoorBla 

6 Us 236 CoplLsr 
2216 14V* Coots B 
49 , 161* Copvtel 
1816.-4 GorCMTI 
in* 636 conns 
6036 3936 Cores! 

'k'-BSSES 

1734 10k4 CrtcBrt 
16V* 10 V* Cronus 
2934 20 V. CrosTr 

3136 181* CutlnFr . 

2816 1516 CuhJtn I.. SO ' 22 176 

27 1814 CVcarr 112 


15k* 149k 149k— V* 
33b 31* 336 + V* 
2116 209b 2116 
151* 1436 1516 + k* 
8 V* 816 BV*— V* 
2136 2216 
816 

— 16 



« 


1416 13i 13^— 34 

«16 


18}*— V 6 
2016 +34 


M 43 AM 
230 

.12 4 914 

.16 \3 176x 
134 


496 

.1796 
1J 461 




M A 


224 

3J7 

38 

34 


.12 U 


57V 
229 
539 
28 

J® 
248 
16 
9 
83 

240 155 1253 


4 
16 
680 
750 
499 
2934 
40 24 1245 
428 
100 
542 

248 44 618 

205 

. 7X1 
.14 U 16 
52 

M 34 740 
13 

JB U a> 
M 43 24 


HI* 

' 2716— V6 
9V* + 36 
19U +V* 
936— 16 
1696— V* 

jx + S 

9V* 

716 
1196 + 16 
836 
8 +16 
2S6— 16 
7Vk— V* 
1736 
5V*+ It 
191 
91*— V* 
7 +1* 

15V* + W 
1436 — 34 
14V* + V* 
51* + V* 
49U + V4 
i 2V6+ V6 
3914 + U 
BVS— V* 
tab 
716— V* 

ill 

16**— V* 
41 —2 

93* +3* 
54 +** 

IV*— 16 
33* 
1036— 34 
T5V* + 16 
2314—1* 
13 

3114+1* 

22VS 

27)4 +136 
20 — V* 


17** 

436 

1114 

3016 

371*' 

SOU* 

746 

229* 

1436 

914 

25 

516 

8k* 

736 

191* 

191* 

301* 

3)6 

79* 

iSS 

1534 

1514 

3H4 

as ) 6 

ant 

3636 
2046 
27 
13 
1 9- 
1934 
25V» 
1216 
159k 
614 
2834 


7 DBA 
■234 DDI 
61* DEP 
A DSC 
201* DXsvSy 
211* DotosF 
4V6 DmnBlo 
IS Dotcnis 34 
M4 DtalO 
3V* DtSwtcti 

11 DottCP 
216 SfOSttl 
41* Datum 
516 Dawson 

934 Deb5hs JO 
996 DedsD 

2Nb DekXA .72 

16 DertOUS 

i* Deneler 
taSDentMd 
71* OiaaPr 
■ 3V* Dtaonc 
19 DSoean 
Vh D toned 
1214 OtatCm 
n Dtonex 
15U DirGnl 
2616 Duma 

12 OrcftH 

16M. DOVkOB 
91* Driontz on 
936 Drextr . 
Ill* DreyOr 
14)4 OunkOS J4 
91* Durlran • Ji 
994 DlirFM * .15 
31* Dynscn 
1536 DvnfcHC 


30 

VM 

30 


39 
72 
27 
5548 
; 3312 

25 

in 
is ran 


109 

25 

34 

u s 

u ^ 
39 
384 
33 
684 
22 
170 
174 

19 

11 310 

17 25 

■1j4 6- 

44 40 

10 10 
8 
85 

U 218 

5J 27 

1J 445 
37 
58 


1416 1334 
29k 236 

11 1034 

59* 59* 

25 23V, 

2916 2814 
616 4 . 

. 16 154* 

« 9kk 
5U 54* 

5k* 51* 
17V, n 
u n«* 

29VS 2916 
116 1. 
16 

61* 59k 
131* 13 
31* 3 
1336 Wk 

29V* ^ 
32 313S 

181* U 
3216 32 
15 141* 

29V6 19V* 
V* 10 
1? 1636 

18)6 18 

» 

27V* 27 


1416 + V* 
234 

11 +16 
51* — 3k 
23)4 — 9k 

au — 1 
616 + 16 
16 +16 
91k— 16 
53k— lk 
25U + 16 
29* 

416 + V* 
5V* 

n 

114k— 1* 
2916 
116+16 


*■* 


a— i* 

13 +16 

3V* 

1334 + V* 
4 
29 

■32 +36 
1016— 16 
3216 + to 
Mb _ 
m + fc 
10 — V* 
ifto 

1836 + 16 
23Vk + Vk 

Wfc . . 
into— 3* 
546— Vk 
27k* 



9V* 916 ... 

% ** Vh- 

11 103k 109k 

14) 6 149k 
79* 79* 

79a 73* 

1134 1134 

1114 11* 

is ue 

15) 6 131* 

79* 7 
MV* 14 
8 736 

6 6 
99* 93k 

17V* 16V* 

189b 111* 

1134 UK 
83* ' 


91* + to 
— to 


11 EvnSirt 

7Vk EMBvfC, 


85*26 1079 
40 

320 


a 


■SuSS 

m* loib 


am + v* 
93* + ft 
149* 

79* + 16 
73*— 3k 
1134- 16 
816 
lito 

153*— V* 
15to 

15 +3* 
7k* — 9* 

.bis 

1836 + fi 
111*- to 

74*— 4* 
tti — V* 
&9* + n 
i»k + 1 * 
11V* + 34 


• 5U .FDP. ’.. 
-SVk M6I-- ' 
rn Fa*. Reel 
JOV* KormP . 


54 

285 - 
248 ' 
.228 


816 736 

ns « 

ill* 104* 


HU 

946— V* 

11 * 

nv* + to 


12 Monin 
HMLm Stock 


Sales In Net 

Dlv. YU. 1BB» High Low 3 PAV. Ch'oe 


681* 45V* FnnG 176 38 1863 


23V* 12)6 FedGac 
8 43* Firefly 

1736 7 FIbroni 
344* 21 U EdkTI 1J2 4 A 
56 33V* FHttiTi 180 28 

381* 21V* Float* M 18 
1816 12V* Flltrtk M 4.1 
63* 316 Find CO JO 5L0 
93* 53k Flnomx 
154b 7k* Flniaim 
33 21V* FAIaBk L12 20 

321* 23V* FtAFIn JO 26 
27k* 155k FtATns 
19 113* FICotF 

2916 2M4 FComr 
934 436 FtCsnt 
1516 103k FE xec 
191* 8 ■ FFCoiS 
2916 15U FtFnCn JO 6J 
SOM SOW FtFnMS 

am xu FtFiBk 

36V* 27*0 FJerN 

66 2796 FMdB 

4234 2134 FWtCJn* 

401* 253k FRBGa 

81 193S FtSvFfe 

26 1796 FSecC 

429* 2B9k FTenn 

44to 313k FttUnC 

81* 2 Ftakrv 


130 SA 
IjOOtUO 


... t5 

1J0 5JJ 

uo u 

1 140 3J 
1/08 17 
JO 2J 
UO SJ 
1J0 4J 
1.12 25 


638 

227 

188 

7 

24 

31 

6 

9 

293 

17 

173 

19 
314 

10 

73 

12 

670 

16 

17* 

20 

144 

54 

126 

103 

12 

247 

184 

2834 

89 


■El 


At 

4.1 

U 


30 

U 

70 

dito 

26)4 FlaNFl 

JO 

2.1 

798 

129* 

Sto FlowSk 



215k 

416 




445 

lito 

1216 FUon A 

J09 

J 

159* 

■TiaJ 

T2 FUon B 

JU 

A 

12s 


23(4 For Am 

M 

33 

23 


1316 FarestO 

1J0 

09 

766 


I2K> ForthF 
lft Forms 



25 




2B1 


Jtt 

3 

1105* 


4to Foster 

.10 

Z1 

193 


lta* Fremnf 

J8 

2J 

202 


* 1- 9 



532 



J2 

1J9 

125 


593k 3BV* 
1734 ms 
4k* 436 
\6Vk 16k* 
29U 29 
54V* 53V* 
38 37V* 

141* 14V* 

4 4 
6Vk SVk 

15 IS 
3116 a» 
80V* 30V* 
2 » 253k 
1516 15U 
221b 213* 
7k* 7 
141* 139* 
1736 179* 
1334 13 
1816 179* 
29V* 289* 
363k 365* 
54V* 539* 
379* 37 
40U 40 

38)6 2816 
1946 1916 
3796 3736 
3916 381* 
2k* 

1196 1136 
209b 201* 
3916 381* 
113b 1116 
4k* 39h 
1734 17U 
1734 1715 
MVS 2936 
141* 1336 
19V* 19 
2k* 2 
91k 89k 

5 4* 
2446 24 

546 SVk 
163S 163k 


594k +llk 
171k + Mi 
49* 

1616 + Ik 
29—16 
54V* +1 
37V*— Vi 
149* 

,r-“ 

253k— to 
796 + 

W! 

U — ^ 131m 
1816 +1* 
29 +34 

3616 + 14 
539*— 11* 
371* + V* 

40 

28U 

1*9* + to 
373S— kk 
389* + 3k 
216— Vk 
1114- to 
203k 
3894 
1196 

179* + 16 
17U— to 
30U + V* 
141* + 36 

B9b— to 
49k 

24V* + 9k 
SVk— to 
loto 


IZ O I 

!» 

3ft GTS 



50 

416 

4to 

416 

16V6 

9ft Galileo 



26 

lito 

lift 

lift— ft 

lito 


.» 

TJ 

27 

6ft 

M 

41*— ft 

56to 

28)4 Genet di 



801 

49 

47ft 

IT'S — 1 

BVh 

5 Genets 



1649 

7to 

7ft 

7ft + to 

109* 

1)h Genra 



298 

3 

Sto 

2ft 

25 

VS GaFBk 



382 

34ft 

24)6 

24ft + to 

■oto 


JX 

U 

94 

7ft 

IVi 

7ft + to 

20* 

14 GttKGt 

34 

u 

854 

17VS 

16 

l6Vk— lft 

2Bto 

14 GigaTr 



40 

Mto 

13ft 

15ft 

Uto 

I2to Gotaas 



52 

1416 

lito 

141* . 

22 - 

9ft GoH 



10 

2216 

Tito 

2Zft + to 

lito 

14V* GouldP 

-76 

49 

168 

I5to 

lift 

15V* + V* 

15)6 


.44 

29 

87 

ISto 

lift 

15V. + U 

134k 

5 Grphls 



48 

12ft 

12ft 

t2to— 14 

Bto 

4 GrrtvSc 



3115 

71* 

/ft 

7ft + Vi 

22 

10)6 GWSDV 

JSr 2J 

77 

20 

19ft 

20 + ft 

Uto 

8 GtSoFd 



189 

101* 

IIP* 

IM* + ft 

is)* 

8 Gtach 



3U 

13ft 

I3V* 

13ft + to 

l* 


sat 


16 

13U 

% 

!3fc + 

15)4 

to GHBdC 

5J0C 

783 

ft 

to— ft 





H 



1 

24Vk 

ISto HBO 

JO 

1J 

1459 

20V* 

Mto 

20 to— to 

lift 

7 HCC 

JIM 

J 

45 

9ft 

9ft 

9to— to 

2216 

lito Haber 



38 

21ft 

21ft 

21ft- to 

716 

3V6 Hadcn. 



36 

4)6 

4to 

4ft + ft 

3V6 

■ ■R.__ 1 



225 

3 

2ft 

2ft + to 

lBto 


.10 

J 

276 

17ft 

1/ft 

171* + ft 

2Mk 

16.. KoroGs 

M 

15 

V 

16 

16 

16 -ft 

3414 

2416 HrrfNt 

1J3 

W 

566 

30U 

29ft 

30 + ft 

into 

516 HcHiws 

JO 

25 

3 

8to 

8 

Bto + V* 

13 

6ft HO «'< B 

.141 


192 

8 

7ft 

7ft— ft 

11 

lft Htthln 


5 

2to 

2to 

TV* 

5V* 

Ito HlthOvn 



74 

2ft 

2ft 

2)4— V* 

ZBk 

14)6 HcttgAS 

.16 

3 

153 

17ft 

16U 

)7to +lto 

24to 

Uto HchgB* 

JO 

J 

131 

17ft 

!6V* 

17ft +1 

80* 

3ft HaSiilT 



17 

Sto 

5 

5to + to 

27ft 

15ft Halts 



3 

lift 

75ft 

15ft 

28ft 


J92 

27 

13 

54ft 

34U 

34ft + 16 

Ttafc 

17 HlberCd 

1XOO 47 

169 

21V* 

2114 

21V* + ft 

Oft 

* Hfckam 



12 

10ft 

U 

10 

12 VI 

Sto Hagan 



123 

59k 

sv* 

5V* — to 

31 

101* HrnFAz 



152 

X 

X 

30 

10V* 

2ft HmecH 



290 


3ft 

3to— ft 

25ft 

1516 Honlnd 

J4 

2J 

ID 

2S 

24ft 

24ft 

36 

23to Hoover 

U0 

2725964 

4416 

39 

44ft +Bft 





4 

4Vl 



33V* 

13ft HwBNJ 



1356 

33V* 

3ZM 

32to— V* 

28U 

1BV* HwtifJB 

■Wl 

A 

3923 

221* 

21to 

22V* + ft 


7ft Ek.lv in 



54 

12ft 

12ft 

12ft— to 

249* 

15ft HntgBs 

14 

37 

78 

23V* 

23 

23 

299h 




228 

X 

27ft 

27ft— ft 

Uto 

4ft Hvnonx 



220 

lift 

II 

11 

1 




1 



1 

25 



S 

1254 

35ft 

33ft 

34 — t* 

uto 

■//i’ll *tH 



343 

12ft 

I TV* 

1216 + V* 

7V* 




1452 

6to 

&U 

6ft + ft 


IN 1 







. 716 

2ft IJKMTOP 



64 

Sto 

3V* 

39k 

4916 

31ft 1MMN 

UO 

33 

331 

49ft 


48ft— ft 

32 




1653 

24)4 

2416 

34V* 

25ft 

12V* Indira 



109 

13)4 

Uft 

13ft + ft 

33V* 




234 

21<6 

19ft 

2116 +1 

lito 




541 

4ft 

4to 

4to- v* 

15 

Bft IntgDv 



392 

12 

nv* 

nv* + ft 

53V* 

10U !^° 



» 

3ft 

1314 

3ft 

12V* 

13ft +1V* 

33)6 

20ft Intel 



4490 

2lfc 

2316 

23)4- to 

9% 

3ft intlSy 
lft IntrTM 



1370 

4M 

4 

4 

D* 



6 

216 

lft 

Ito 

15)6 

6to intend 



5 

lift 

Wft 

lift 

l£V* 

6V* intrfFIr 


1J 

74 

13ft 

12ft 

13 + ft 


21 Intgphs 



518) 

2716 

25ft 


7016 




14! 

Bft 

lift 

696 

3316 

rTrin^ril 



563 

w 

lift 

12 + ft 

Uto 

5ft Intrmtr 



83 

PS 

Sto 

5ft— ft 

17)4 

8 intam 



1281 

9Vk 

9 

9Vk + to 

18V* 




iB 

Oft 

an 

Bto- Vk 








Uto 

7ft mtues 



219 

ISto 

uto 

IS + to 

t2 

3V. 

AM InMobll 

T5 iris 



255 

478 

% 

71* 

3 

T 7 *"* 

25)4 

9ft ITCps 



218 

23to 

73 

23to + ft 

Mto 

6to Iomega 
916 liomdx 



2S26 

lito 

into 

lito + ft 

Uto 



31?8 

Uto 

121* 

Mto + 16 


3ft IM 






1- ' J 1 

1» 

9to JBRsts 

.16 

U 

241 

10 

9 ft 

10 + to 

8to 

216 jodmaT 



T14 

Sto 

Sft 

3§r* 

4116 

25ft JockUa 



759 

331* 

33ft 

27ft 




233 


19U 


Sft 





Sto 

5ft + to 

23ft 

1416 Jerlee 

.12 

J 

1179 

21)4 

2lft 

21 V* 

716 

3ft Jwilchl 

1 


11 

5to 

SV5 

Sft 

Vffii 




23 

m 

7to 

7to— Mi 

Wto 

9ft JUM8 



% 

iBto 

18 

IBU.— to 

20V* 

13ft Justin - 

JO 

26 

ISto 

IW* 

ism + to 






K 



t 


341* 

13V* KLAl 



1787 

18M> 

18, 

9 

4ft tCVPtir 



84 

Ito 

Bft 

33 

20ft Komai 

M 

2.1 

56 

Tito 

31>4 

241* 

131* Koratr 



182 

ISto 

15V* 

1716 

VOW Kmler 

3$ 


125 

lift 

T !3! 

10)6 

ito Kavdan 



28 

Vto 

8ft 

dike 

38to Kiev 

7J0 

34 

1974 

sm 

53ft 

41ft 

27ft KvChU 

1X0 

26 

21 

3D* 

X 

Ito 

41* Kgvmc 



167 

616 

6 

11 

AftXevTm 



25 

7ft 

7to 

IM* 

2ft KJmbrt 



100 

Sto 

Sto 

211* 

13 Khutor 

J6 

J 

1058 

w 

17V* 

14ft 

4)4 Krov 

M 

J 

91 

7to 

UM 

stv* 

ID Kruger 
Jto j&fcfte 

ll 

25 

1J 

202 

367 

13ft 

9to 

17V* 

91k 


1816 + 9* 
BVi + to 
31V* 

154*- to 
113k + U 
9to + to 
+ 14 

3X0 

6 + to 
7to + to 
3to + to 
ITH+to 


IS Month 
HhdtLow stock 


Salts in Net 

Wv. Yta IMs H«w Low 3 PM Cti'ae 


c 




L 



| 

1116 




48 

67* 

61* 

Ate— 1* 

1016 

9ft LSI Log 



T437 

IBU 

ire. 

17ft + to 

23to 

io ltx 



32 

lift 

mv 

lift + U 

191* 

Bft Ld PetdS 


321 

17 

16ft 

17 + to 

47)6 

31 <6 1 «7 By 

140 

30 

13 

47U 

47V* 

47U— ■) 

20** 

12ft Lad Fen 

16 

£ 

129 

20ft 

19)1 

19ft 

1BV* 

11 LOidlw 

ja 

1.4 

92 

141* 

14 

MW — U 

T7 


m 

5.2 

8 

15U 

15U 

T5W 

T7 


am 

43 

115 

16 

15ft 

16 + W 

59ft 

35V* LaneCd 

9T 

1 J 

4 

53 

5Pi* 

53 + H 

32 

32 

1.1 

28 

2815 

mu 

28ft 

7ft 

4ft LeeOto 


170 

i 

5ft 

5V* 

4 




159 

2ft 

*-R 

4to 

1ft LaxWfa 



503 

2ft 

7U 

24 W 

I7U Uebrt 

.07 

J 


20V* 

20 

20% + V 

46ft 

38V* Ulrtvs 

J4 

S 

2 

46ft 

46U 

46ft 




57 

6ft 


6 

20ft 

lift LtlvTul- 

JO 

1J 

2620 

17’k 

16ft 

16ft + ft 

381* 

ISto LlrtBrfl 
27U. LlneTel 



ESA 

36ft 

35ft 

35V- Vi 

3616 


+5 


33ft 

xrs 

33ft 

ta* 

4ft Ltodbro 

.16 

29 

46 

5ft 

51* 

Sto . 

491* 

21ft LUCta 6 

JS 

J 

473 

43U 

42 

42W— 1 

25ft 


1 JS 

SJ 

169 

24 ft 

ZHb 

24ft + ft 

33ft 




1951 

19 

171* 

17ft— to 

29 

7ft LypttaS 



672 

22)* 

21 to 

21ft— % 

m 




M 



1 

14ft 

lift 





1* 

7U 

Bto 


7 MCI 



raw 

9. + ft 

7Vi 




s 

6ft 

Aft 

6ft— v> 

9V* 

3V* MPSI s 



269 

4ft 

4W 

4to— ft 

26 

15 MTSs 
13ft MTV 

34 

U 

15 

I8U 

17ft 

18% +1 

32U 



404 

21ft 

31V* 

31ft + ft 


9ft MackTr 



4242 

llFk 

10ft 

10ft + to 

■‘Li 

21ft MadGE 

2J8 

9.1 

30 

2 Pi 

25ft 

251*— W 

9ft 

7ft /wallK 



92 

Sft 

Bto 

Sft— to 

14ft 

r»|i 1 

Xle 

13 

liu 

11 u 

11% 

1AU 




360 

9ft 

Vft 

9to— to 

24to 

JO 

35 

1 

20ft 

20ft 

20ft 

34ft 

20ft MfrsN 

248 

11 

22X 

32 

31ft 

31ft 

19V* 


JU 

1J 

4 

17 

17 

IZ. 

9 




1 

3ft 

3ft 

Sto— to 

13ft 

,6ft Morost 



4 

10ft 

10 

ID 

37ft 

1X0 

33 

332 


SOU 

30ft + to 

261* 

7ft Mscols 



95 

Kl'Sj 

20U 

20% — % 

6ft 




963 

2to 

2 


34ft 

24ft MatrxS 

.10 

J 

277 

30 

29 

29ft + V 

24ft 




2316 

18V* 

17-> 

IB — % 

14V* 




1 

13 

13 

'm 

6Vk 

Wk May PI 



1114 

Sft 


Sft 




18 

Sft 

5% 

381* 


JS 

26 

88 

33ft 

JJU 

33to + ft 

14ft 

10ft Me Fad 



448 

lift 

lift 

lift + ft 

lift 

6 Medex 

J5 

J 

27 

9U 

9 

9 — lu 

10 




157 

51* 

4to 

5 + to 

201* 




673 

14ft 

14'i 

Mto + to 


13 MentrG 



1678 

16’* 

lift 

15Vs— ft 



1J2 

5J 

68 

35ft 

35ft 

3Sft + to 


1 fTlyuml 

U8 

1£ 

13 

K+J 

«’* 

60V* 

22 

Hi+T 



10 


12ft 

12ft- to 

36ft 

23V* MrdBcl 1J0 

54 

90 


331* 

33ft 

221* 

IhrWTTTTtn 

30 

18 

172 

20U 

20 

20 — to 

21ft 

ccfJMriTi 



5 

17ft 

12ft 

12ft 

IT** 

Sft MetrFn 

10b 33 

94 

161* 

16 

lAto— to 

36 

lift Micam 



1130 

15ft 

» 

1SU „ 

Sft 




459 

3U 







5 7 'e 

6ft 

5)1 

7ft 

KsTI.'FT-m 

Ot 

IX 

32 

6 

Wk 

5ft — to 

30ft 




1561 

5U 

4 to 

5 — to 

9 




224 

5ft 

Sft 

S’* + to 

«h 

3V* MJcSms 



» 

5ft 

Sto 

Sft 

7ft 

,2ft MdPcA 



25 

3 

2'.* 

2ft— to 


17ft am st Fa 
24ft MidlBk 




20 



41ft 

\3A 

14 

29 

37 

36ft 

36ft 

8 

3 MdwAIr 



379 

4ft 

4ft 

Aft 

27ft 


M 

2J 

A7D 

19ft 

18ft 

16V* — ft 

6ft 

SI 



5 

3to 

3ft 

He — to 

44 

48 

13 

174 

40ft 

39ft 

40 

5ft 

lft Minlscr 



63 

TS 

2ft 

TV* 

■yj 




586 

20 



■ 1 

7Vi MGask 

XI l 

.1 

37 

BV* 

8U 

BW— % 

■ f 'll 

6 MablCB 



659 

12 





JB 

40 

42 

17ft 

1/ 

17 — to 

10ft 




165 

BV, 

7ft 

7ft— ■* 

39>* 


J3 


249 

32ft 

31V 

32 + ft 

22 


JSe 1.7 

38 

23ft 

J0U 

20ft + V* 

131* 




31 

12ft 

121* 

lift + 1* 





942 




34 

|L j' 

1J0 

45 

14 

31ft 

31ft 

31ft— to 

XU 

JI 


1 

17 



14 


.16 

1J 

B 

1IU 



22ft 


JS 

26 

59 

18ft 

IBU 


7ft 

,2ft Maselev 



263 

3 



15ft 




15ft 




lift My Ian s 

.18 

3 

5544 

lift 

lift 

ISto + to 

1 



N 



1 





25 

A 

4 

4 





37 

4'.* 

t 

ito + to 





26 

Oft 

9to 

9to 


IMk NBnTex 
30V* NflCtv 


3J 

90 

2Sto 

25 

25 


2J0 

43 

583 

46 








18ft 



14ft 


J4 

21 

524 

14W 

13ft 

M — to 

36 


J4I 

J 

66 

13ft 


131* 

7ft 




1 

51* 

5V* 

3iS+ to 

Sft 




409 

30* 

3 






2V* 



01* 

6ft NWT 
Sft Nefton 

JO 

29 

11 

336 

7 

7 








916 




01 

5ft 

5ft 

5to- to 

■ /r*l 

14ft NlwkSs 



1497 

23 

21 to 

21ft— ft 

E- p .y> j 




5 

r 

32 






10 



9 



JO 

27 

14 

29to 

27ft 

291* + W 



1.129 3.4 

145 

38ft 

28to 


17ft 


USe 

J 

74 

ISft 

15ft 


30to 


J6 

3 

A2 

20 

19ft 

20 

14 

lft NwnPh 



375 

137* 

lift 

in)*— to 

74* 

lft NiCala 

t 


205 

lft 

Ito 

Ito 

14ft 

6ft Nike B 

JO 

2J 

1295 

14)S 

lift 

I4to— Vi 






left 








47ft 



47 

ZSV* NrefcBx 

3% 

J 

4 

461* 

46ft 

461* + !6 

S 




242 

7 

6ft 

67*- to 

1!M* 

5 NAtlin 



61 

7ft 

/ft 

7to + U 

17ft 




1727 

lito 

lift 

14VS— % 

20U 

15 NwNG 

144 

t3 

57 

iTto 

17ft 

17»* + to 

331* 

J8 

SJ 

23 

29U 

284* 




JO 

35 

513 

23 

22ft 

22to— to 

24ft 

lift NwstPS 

2.10 

9J 

39 

M'A 

22% 

2T.1 + to 

Wto 

39ft Ndxoll 

IjOB 

21 

181 

52U 

SI 

51% — ft 

7 




172 

5’X 

Sft 

5% + to 

916 




28 

51* 

5ft 

Sft- V* 

15ft 


J4 

29 

163 

15U 

14ft 

15% + ft 

101* 




io 




13ft 

6ft NuMod* 



35 

B 

7to 


| 



O 



1 

4ft 




IB 

2to 

2to 

2to 

171* 

101* Ocllla i 



106 

10ft 

tou 

low— % 

46ft 

•7ft 


1X8 

280 

26 

48 

1842 

41 

581* 

SB 

58ft +1 

32ft 

19ft OMKnl* UO 

3J 

80 

28 

27ft 


«l)b 

23 OSdSDk 

34 

28 

49 


33 

3Sto + ft 

22U 

19 OUS DfC 2J0 110 

32 

21ft 

21ft 

21ft + % 

26ft 

131* OncBee 

390 li 

132 

26 

25ft 

25ft— to 

9<6 




18 

6U 

6 

6 

1+6 

12ft OollcC 



772 

ISto 

13ft 

]?ft + to 

48ft 

1916 

22ft QpHcS 
12ft Orhanc 



510 

77 

27U. 

131* 

13ft 

131* 

Bl* 




910 

K* 

6ft 






873 

4’i 

5ft 

6 + ft 

20 


.2(1 

16 

15 

12ft 

l? v . 

12ft- % 

34ft 

26ft OttrTP 

176 

W 

m 

31to 

30to 

31 to + to 

U 

■W Dv/Eyp 



90 

Oft 

9to 







,s s 

15ft 


516 

U Dxoeo 



m 

ft 

ft 

1 P — 1 


i: Month 
Nigh low Stock 


Sole* in 

Dt«. Yta. loos High 


Net 

low 3 PM. arge 


3490 101* 

'l 

12U 510 
1816 73h 
221 * «9k 
10to 514 
25 24V* 

3116 203b 
ISto 71k 
Ml* 234k 
131* 4 

12U 7U 
17V* 14U, 
616 2 
2Stk 1734 
24U 161* 
37V* 2716 
UPS 7 
15 814 

3434 14V* 
29 21 

39k 136 

IS)* 916 
119k 516 
3734 19V* 
9 5 

73. 3 
16'6 7U 
66 3616 

21)4 0 
6 4to 

42 203k 

153* 11)6 
19k* 131k 
74k 39* 
2 Mb 1296 


JO 4J 
t 


Panspb 
ParkOti 
PatntM 
PaulHr 
Payctix 
PeokHC 

PeaGtd J4 J 
PonaEn 220 13 
Pernors J8 25 
PeopEx JSr S 
PMtlW 1.12 43 
Phrmct 

PSFS .10e U 
PtsllGI JO* 3J 

PhnxAm 
PlcSav 
PlcCate 
PlanHI 
PlonSt 
Pofalk 
PicyMcr 

PtM+X 
Powell 
Powrtcs 
PwConv 
ProcCst 
PrpdLg 
Priam 
PrlcCfti l 
PrloeCo 
Ptarcn x 

ProdOp .16 3J 
ProaCs .12 3 

ProutTr 1J0 102 
Provln 
PiilLmn 

PuriBn JO 1J 


JO 27 
.92 2J 
.12 1J 


.12 J 


350 

Tito 

20ft 

21 + 

ft 

8 

13U 

13% 

13% — 

% 

50 

sv* 

Sft 

sft- 

to 

80 

lift 

11 

ii — 

ft 

5 

17V* 

171* 

17V* 


257 

141* 

14ft 

lift— 

% 

319 

7ft 

7ft 

TV* 


5 

30 

30 

30 


86 

27% 

26ft 

27 


628 

in* 

10ft 

iow— 

% 

176 

25 

24 V* 

25 


322 

8 

7ft 

7ft 


1190 

8ft 

8% 

Bft 


597 

157k 

15ft 

ISft 


52 

2% 

2ft 

2% + 

to 

405 

3 4ft 

241* 

2490 + 

to 

13 

22ft 

22ft 

27ft— 

to 

340 

33V* 

33 

33V. — 

% 

87 

iv* 

BM 

Bto 


161 

lift 

lito 

IIV* 


3298 

22% 

lift 

18ft -2M 


23W 

23V* 

23% 


35 

2ft 

2 

2ft + 

to 

£ 

lot* 

101* 

lta* 


92 

11% 

11 

11 — 

% 

77 

32% 

31ft 

31ft- 

ft 

101 

7ft 

7to 

7ft + 

ft 

79 

3)6 

3ft 

3ft 


335 

10ft 

9ft 

10% + 

to 

1046 

60 

58V* 

50ft— 1 

29 

lift 

lito 

lift + 

Vk 

19 

ito 

4ft 

4ft 


114 

3t 

35ft 

35ft — 

% 

92 

lift 

lift 

lift 


99 

17ft 

17ft 

17ft + 

to 

3047 

7ft 

6% 

7 + 

to 

6 

23 

23 

23 



L_ 




a 



1 

Wto 

Ito QMS 



238 

9ft 

9 

• — % 

9ft 




551 

7ft 

•ft 

7to + V* 

13ft 

9. QuakCs 

JS 

3.9 

47 

10% 

9ft 

9W— % 

32% 




398 

22V* 

21 to 

Tito— 1 

Sft 

m QuestM 



141 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 

Uto 




177 

14 

13V* 

13% + % 

12ft 

7U Qgatra 



7601 

12ft 

lift 

lift— % 

1 




R 



1 

14 

5% RAX 

Xle 

J 

518 

Sft 

5 

5M 

18ft 

12 RPMs 

J3 

+1 

3S2x 

15 

M% 

15 + to 

I6U 

ta* RudSre 



740 

73ft 

12ft 

Wto — % 

14ft 

6ft Rodin T 



115 

10% 

9ft 

10 — % 

/ft 




75 

4ft 

4 

4 

33% 

20ft Rainr s 

1X0 

34 

580 

29ft 

29ft 

29ft 

20% 

12to RavEn 

Ji 

13 

4 

19 

IBft 

18% 

7U 

Ito RerflCr 



38 

2 

lft 

lft 

23ft 

17% Raatma 



2 

19ft 

IVI* 

19to — % 

10% 

SV* Recotn 



203 

8to 

8% 

Bft + V* 

35ft 

25ft RedknL 

M 

13 

182 

28 

27to 

27ft 

12ft 




852 

111* 

10ft 

lift + % 

7ft 

5% Racy El 

30 

33 

41 

5ft 

54* 

5ft- to 

20W 

n Reals s 

.12 

J 

II 

MW 

14 

14% + ft 

12ft 

4ft H-.llaO 



27 

4to 

4ft 

ito 

10% 

19k RfiAuto 

.16 

1J 

54 

9ft 

lift 

9V* + V* 

20% 

9ft RnHItti 



596 

11 

10ft 

11 + ft 

1/to 

lift RestrSy 



24 

17% 

17 

17% + ft 

16% 


-15e 2X 

32B 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

29ft 

171* ReutrH 

J6e IX 

16 

26ft 

26% 

26% — to 

*34, 

29 ReyRav 

1J4 

3.4 

34 

37to 

3/ 

37 

15% 

9ft Rhodes 

J2 

2.1 

423 

15% 

Uft 

15% + ft 

10 

3% RibUms 



700 

7ft 

/ 

7—1* 

22ft 

12ft Rich Eli 



7 

21% 

20ft 

20ft 

171* 

10ft Rival 

JO 

43 

30 

16ft 

16% 

16% — to 

33ft 

24ft RoadSv 

1X0 

3J 

241 

29to 

29 

29 — % 

16V* 

11 RobNuo 

X6 

J 

67 

12ft 

12% 

12ft 

13% 

Bft RofaVsn 



137 

9ft 

9 

9ft + % 

24to 


J4 

22 

25 

24to 

24% 

24ft + % 

13 

8 RavPlm 



4 

9to 

9M 

9to — to 

10ft 

31* RoviRs 



28 

3ft 

3W 

39* + to 

in* 




125 

lift 

111* 

lift— ft 

19% 

11% RvenFs 



104 

18 

17% 

IB + ft 

in 







1 


II Month 
HWI Low Sleek 


Seles In 

Dlv. YKL lOOs High 


Mel 

3 PM. Qi-ge 


ltak 6U Svniech 
53k 2V* Synlrex 
2616 1016 SvAxoc 
716 3V* Svfflln 
Ills 6)h Svslnlg 
25V* 13)4 Systml 


109 

51 

268 

192 

22 

J 54 


11 IMS 103S— to 
33k 3to 3to 

lito lot* tow + to 

Sto 534 SU 
10U IBU 10U 
23 23 23 


14 

8 TBC 



IX 

9% 

91* 

9% 

25% 

13 TCACb 

.16 

J 

64 

24% 

24% 

24% + to 

71* 

Sft TacViv s 



X 

3to 

Sto 

31* 

28ft 

12ft Tandem 




ISto 

ISto 

15% 

3% — to 

8% 

2ft Tondati 



2951 

Jto 

3to 

22 

10% Telco 



77 

u% 

lito 

lito- % 

34% 

Wto TiemA 

1 


605 

3>to 

21 


12ft 

6ft Tel Plus 



643 

24% 

7ft 

25 

131* Trtecrd 

J2 

IJ 

235 

23% 

24 - U 

Wto 

8ft Tel pets 



3164 

18ft 

I7M 

1B1* + ft 





265 

7to 

2 

2 

20 

Bto T elate. 



455 

lift 

in 

10% + % 

171* 

9% return* 



900 

15% 

14% 

15% + ft 

11% 

3% TermOl 

t 


45 

4 

3% 

4 + % 

1% 

Bto TnerPr 



245 

9% 

9% 

4%— to 

6% Ttirmds 




11 

11 

11 

28ft 

14% ThrdN s 



IX 

27% 

27 

27% 

Uto 

5ft Ttxjrtec 



503 

6% 

6 

6% + % 

2*to 

5% ThouTr 



8*2 

sa 

jft 

6ft— to 

lift 

6to TimeEn 



119 

Bft + % 

14 

8to T me Fib 



IX 

13% 

13to 

13JJ-V* 

2ft 

% Tlprarv 



16 

to 

s 

I/ft 

8 Tofus 



446 

12ft 

111* 

lift- % 

X 

7% TollSv £ 



7 

Uto 

75 

2*>to +1 

17% 

10 TnakAu 



13 

11% 

10% 

li% + to 

12ft 

6% TriadSy 







XU 

X TrusJo 

JO 

1J 

X 

23 

22 

23 + % 


15 

2034 

9V* 

63« 

41k 

•to 


3516 

53to 

154k 

1434 

n* 


Sis PNCs U5 4J 441 
3«4 Paccar IJOg 27 83 

7 PoeFSt 243 

1W PocTiri JO tO 13 
wv* PoeePn .... in 
6 PoncMac .13 If 34 


VVi 28 ft 
44 43V. 

ms lot* 

lito 13 

T 


29 — 96 

41 +16 

10)6 + 1 * 

1316 + to 

13 VS 

6)4- Vk 


16 7)4 SAY Ind 

IBU 103k SCI Sv 
191* 11 SEI 
11)4 6 SFE 
a '6 SRI 
203k Sasecds 
44 *k 29 Safeco 
23 113* SafMIttl 

16 716 StJiide 

753* 3»to SlPaul 
b3k 2ku Sol Cot 
wv* < W San Bar 
9 5V* SatelSv 

53V, 3Hu ServnF 

2014 11 SBkPS S 
IMS 616 ScanOp 

lato 103k ScanTr 

1396 83* Scherer 

2Sto 1534 SchlmA 
ta* 3 to SclMJc 
7 SdSfl 
7 Sdtex 
334 SeoGal 

4 seasoiv 

11* SecTog 
... 11* SEED 

2kto 16 Set Dei 
w 51* Samlcn 
1036 6 Sensor 
169* into SvcMer 
25 Vj i7i* Svmsts 
23 139* Service 

79k 416 5 vc Fret 
IB 12V6 EevQak 

37to 23V* ShrMed 
89V. 29V6 Sftvwnt 
2QT* 129* Shelby s 
141* 7%k5heldls 
319k 319k Sitaoevs 
16 10 ShenSos 

mu «»« Silken 
17Vk 91* Silicons 

si* in* sinevbi 

241* 11)6 Slllou 

in* 4to sinec 
iW* lito sinipln 
I5U 11 SlMlns 
3414 I2to Sinters 
129k 83* Skipper 
4 to 19k SmithL 
54 31V* Society 

219k lito SoctvSv 
10V* ft)h Softedi 
21% lito SoltwA 
299* 18)4 SonocPS 
27V* 1414 SonrFd 
6 VS 4 Soitosp 

33 209* SlhdFn 
28H t6)k Soutrst 

91* 6 Sovran 
319* 22), Sovran s 
tkto «k Speedy 
2816 8)4 Socrron 

VS 53* SpccCH 
in* 13)6 SMra 
16 31* StarSrs 

99* 5 SlbfBM 
30 1P)i Steady 
23 to 1116 SIOMIC 
27 19 Stonhos 

34 V, 19 Stasis s 

6to SloteG 
79* 4)* Steiger 
IIV* lito Slows tv 
25 179* SfWIItt 

flto 59k 511(61 
18V* M. Stroms 
381* 501* Sh-wCTs 
23V* 139* Strvkr e 

171 v* 101 Subaru 
69 39 SubrB 
4)4 3to Sutnma 
Ita* 714 SumtHI 

ato )* sutcn 

53“ 3 Suortex 

14 9 SvmbT 


927 

425 

29 

. 10 r U ji 
M 4A » 
JO 1.1 2670 
1J0 4.1 1776 
5 

61 

34» 4J 1561 
Z» 
24 

.12 1.9 12 

1J6 14 9 

J4 2J 55 
153 

34 

J2 2J 09 
JO 1J 150* 
126 
5 

812 

644 

1729 

24 

455 

JO 4J 35 

X 

JH J 581 
JO J 2303 
JO 4J 1493 
I 2 

8 

.16 1J 53 
JS 1J 689 
1J8 4i 

.16 .9 


1116 101k lito + to 
I2to 11)6 lito 
1*16 19 19—16 

7)6 7 7 

lito IB 18—16 
1816 17)4 18 + 1* 

38to 3830 383k 
18 17V* 171*— '6 

1M4 149* I4>k + to 
69V4 689k 69 + H 
S3* 53k 5to + to 

» 516 5)4 + 16 
616 6V> 6U + to 

53 52V* 52to + to 

an* i*to i9to— to 
B3k BVh B3k + to 
ISto 15 IS 
13)6 !2to 13to— to 
23)6 2Jto 233i 
3)6 3to 33* + to 
7)4 7)4 7)4 

Bto 7)6 BU + 16 


416 4 

6 5) 6 

J34 IV* 
2Vk 2 
1*94 19 
6 6 

74i 7)2 


4<6 
5)6 

13k— to 
avi + i* 
i* + u 
6 — to 
TVs 


355 
94 
119 
304 
9 
823 
267 
84 
47 
1 W 
26 
3 

286 
J 3563 
477 

1J4 19 74 

39 

a 

642 
165 
2 
ID* 
71 
629 
358 
555 

37 
712 

J7 !J 100 
2 
67 

38 
176 
S <0 

53 


.15 


JO 17 


Jfl 


JB 25 
JS* 2J 

52 U 
M 3.7 
.10 1 J 


a 2 J 

1J0 3J 


I JO ss 

M 10 1734 

.15b 3JS 108 

6 

30 

n ii i 

72 

1995 

M 23 50 

48 

1J8 1.1 46 

1J2 2J 163 

in 

.10 12 2371 

an 

6 

194 


1316 12Vt 1314 + 34 
lBto IBU ISto + Dl 
19V* 19to 19V*— V* 
tat 43* tab- to 
IMk HI* 163* + to 
34w m. 34to + to 
37)4 37V* 37VS— to 
ISto 18to ISto— U 
10)6 lOto idu — to 

25)4 25)6 2Sto + Vi 
lito 103k lito + U 
5 4)b 4to 

lito lOto ioib + to 
IJto 13 13 - to 

Xu 19)4 l*to 
s 4!k m 
14 13to U + to 
lito 1116 lito— to 
MV. 14to 14V* 
lOU 9)4 lOto + )* 
5ft 21* 294 

kps ters cru 
211* 2ito 2ito + to 
7to 71* TVS— to 
13H 13)* IT*— U 
a 27V* 27)b — to 
17V* 17V* 171* — to 
43* 4VS 4to — V* 

Tito 2ito aito , 
16V* 16to 16to + to 
6)4 6to 6to 
253* 25V* 253* + to 
163k 16V. 1M6 — 1* 
Wfl 19)4 19)6— to 
7V* 6to 7 
14V* 14V9 14to— to 
6to 6 to 6to — to 
7to 79k 7to 
29)6 29 291* + to 

I4to 133k 133*— V* 
22 V* 22 3 + to 


30 Vk 
4U + to 
5to + to 
15 
23 
n* 


30V6 X 
414 4V* 

5VS Sto 
15 15 

23 23. 

4 VS 6)« 

1BV* 17)4 18 
BK> 33V. 33to — to 
»I6 19V* 20U + 34 

156 155 ISto - Vl 

68 67J& 67ft + to 

TVs 2to VS— V* 

% % Sf-to 


2416 

2416 

XU 

23V* 

ID* 

29to 

Dft 

253* 

lift 

2 Bto 

II 

2294 

14)6 

» 

K tak 

ft 

33)6 

sv* 

22to 

37to 

25U 

243* 

XU 

22 

Xto 

13 

tto 


18 USLICs 
13to UTL 

5 Ultrsv 
10)4 Ungmn 

7) 6 Unifl 
1416 UnPIn tr 
22V* UnTBc s 
lift UACm s 

8) 4 UBAIkk 

21to UBCol 

6 UFnGre 
113* UPSIFQ 

6U UCrdn 

7v* uprosa 
2)* US Ant 
213* USBCF 
lft US CUP 
2to USDson 
11U USHCs 
3U US Shell 
10)* US Sur 
2SU USTrs 
17U listom 
14ft UnTelev 
32V* UVoBs 
I4U UnvFrn 
*)4 UltvHlf 
6)6 UFSfik 
316 USOOl 


JO 31 


Mo J 


um 40 

130 3.1 
06 3 

.15 r l J 
108 43 


1 J4t20J 


22 
187 
87 
1098 
317 

a 

596 
382 
72 
80 
l 

43 
65 
II 
99 

1O0 17 224 
42 
110 

08 J 3078' 
.12 27 48 

JOe 1.9 398 

T-20 14 22 

30 1.1 1442 
30 

1J4 41 136 

236 
420 
0 

30 SJ 56 


234k 233* 
13* 13V* 
7to 716 
15)4 I5H 
13)* 131k 
2Tb 27V. 
40’S 48 
22)4 22 
9 tPi 
22to 21ft 
7V. 7u 
17to 1714 

'I? ’I 

27)4 27 
Zft 24k 
3 3 

29)t 28 
4)k 4VV 
16 15ft 
3516 344b 
1916 19 
24)4 24V* 
40*, 40to 
19 IBM 
13to 124k 
10)6 10 U 
5to SVk 


234k 

13)4 + U 
7to + to 
ISto— to 
13to 

27V. + 1* 
4BU 

223* + 4k 
8ft + to 
22Vk + to 
7U — to 
17U— to 
7to + 4* 

sF-tf 

27ft + U 
24* — '4 
3 + to 
70 — 1U 

44k 
15ft 

as'b + u 

19 

24V* + ft 

w*— ■* 

19 + to 

12)4—14 
10V. + u 
5)»— Vk 


9ft 

4% VLI 



300 

5% 

Sto 

5% + % 

141* 

7% VLSI 



246 

lift 

111* 

11V* 

12 

4ft VMX 



47 

4% 

4ft 

4% + to 

lift 

7 V5E 

-lie 1J 

2 

Bft 

Bft 

Bft 

20% 

A ValkJLg 



1208 

7V* 

6ft 

Aft — % 

27ft 

8% VolFSL 



36 

15V* 

15ft 

IS)*— V* 

42% 

XV* ValNtt 

I JO 

11 

269 

38ft 

38ft 

38ft 

341* 

19% ValLn 

.40 

10 

16 

3D to 

20 

xv* + to 

18% 

11% Van Dus 

JO 

2J 

37 

179* 

I7to 

17V* — ■* 

15% 

5% Vanzett 



IS 

5ft 

5% 

s% + to 

6% 

Sft Vent rex 



711 

5% 

5ft 

5V* + K 

28% 

13% VI corp 

.12* 

J 

493 

17% 

17ft 

17ft 

Mto 

7ft VledeFr 

J2e 23 

67 

7ft 

71* 

7ft 

MV* 

9to Viking 



100 

12 

lito 

12 + % 

20% 

13% viratek 



176 

19% 

IBM 

19 — % 

12V* 

5% voOavl 



251 

Bft 

B 

Bto + to 

22 

14% Voltlitf 



276 

17V* 

17 ■ 

17 


W 


XU 

17ft WD 40 

.96 

53 

96 

18 

17% 

18 + % 

le% 

10 WalbC* 

24 

19 

27 

Wto 

12% 

12to + % 

13% 

5% WlkrTel 




91* 

9% 

9% — % 

26% 

16 WihE 

1.76 

ai 

to 

21% 

21V* 

21% + to 

26to 

Mto WF5LE 

JO 

2J 

112 

X% 

X 

25% + ft 













X 

61* 

6ft 

6ft 


lOto Webb 

JO 

3J 

T39 

lito 

11 

11% + % 









17% 

5U WstFSL 



40 

14ft 

141* 

14ft 

10% 

5% WMIcTc 




7 

7 

7 

14% 

4 to WITIA £ 







21% 

15V* WntorC 

JO 

23 

IX 

17% 

17to 

17% + V. 







BW 

Bft— to 

34% 

22% We lira 




» 

31% 

21% — 1* 





AS 

3ft 

3V* 

3to— to 

13V* 

3 Wldcom 



665 

4% 

4% 

4% — % 

48% 

29% witimi 

US 

17 

425 

45% 

45 

45to— ft 

15ft 

7ft WTIIAL 



649 

13ft 

13ft 

13ft— to 

10% 

4ft WllsnF 





ito 


7ft 

3to Wlnamr 




4 

3% 

3to 


14ft wiserO 

JO 

4X 

73 

15to 

14% 

151* + ft 

21% 

uu woodna 

JO 

5X 

12 

12% 

12 

12 — % 

29VS 

21 to Iftfortno 

J4 

7J 

Itt 

25V* 

75 

25 + ft 

9ft 

6% Writer 

.159 

IJ 

2 

BVl 

Sto 

BV* 

301* 

21% Wyman 

M 

3J 

309 

23 

22V* 

22to 


11 x 1 

9% 



2ft 

7ft 

Zft + Vk 

13% 

5% Xlcor 

389 

7ft 

7V. 

7% 

17% 

10% Xldey 

1173 

13V* 

13V. 

13ft 



r 



| 

21to 

14% YlewF 5 

34 2J 4915 

23% 

31ft 

X + u 

1 z I 

Xto 

5% Z44US 

1424 

20 

19% 

19ft- ft 

13% 

ioi* Ziegler 

J80 4X 3 

12 

13 

13 

40% 

31 ZlonUf 

1J6 U 292 

40 

39% 

40 + ft 

7% 



2ft 

2ft 


12 

3% Zivod 

147 

6ft 

vu 

Ato + ft 

15% 

6M Zondvn 

XI .7 44 

11 

10% 

1D%— to 


Wfaeeling-Pittsburgfa Readies 
Tentative Accord With Union 

United Press International 

PITTSBURGH — Negotiators for the Unit- 
ed Steelworkers union reached a tentative con- 
tract agreement Tuesday with Wheeling- Pitts- 
burgh Sled Corp. that' could end an §7-day 
strike by 8,200 employees. 

The agreement was announced after the 
union's bargaining committee approved it by a 
J3-to-6 vote and recommended that the rank- 
and-file approve it. The offer includes SI 8 an 
hour more in wages and benefits, a profit- 
sharing plan, union representation on the com- 
pany's board and an unspecified number of 
layoffs. 




•- .-."v . 








Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 



PEANUTS 

' I'M OUR \ 
SCHOOL 1 
BOOK J 
REVIEWER / c 


BOOKS 



I NED TO CHECK YOUR 
NOVEL TO SEE IF IT'S 
SUITABLE FOR OUR 
SCHOOL LIBRARY 


“Rats! "cried 
the hero. 


CONTAINS’ 

MILO 

PROfANrTVJ> 




BLONDIE 

AXEXANDB3S F 
NEW H (STORY > I 
TEACHER CHEWS LJ 
TOBACCO RIGHT IN. 
THE GLASSR3GM i 


TEsHRlBt-E L 


A ALREADY 1 

CALLED US' 

*7 PRINCIPAL./ 


HIS PHTNCIWM- SAYS 

s- rr will- stop 

USMAB3IATEL-Y .* 


ACROSS 

1 Barren 
Alaskan island 

5 Actor Aheme 

10 What Trevino 
drives 

14 "Le Roi d’Ys" 
composer 

15 Valuable pelt 

16 Capital of 
Western 
Samoa 

17 Increase in 
value 

19 Lively 

20 Hudson 

am temporary 

21 Winner over 
A.E.S. 

22 Flooring 
pieces 

23 Reason fora 
facelift 

26 Youths’ 
outdoor org. 

29 Dedicated and 

serious 

30 Sonny's sibling 

33 Horrifies 

3S Comment 
expansively 

37 The cat’s 
whiskers 

38 Gigantic 

39 Buckeye's 
neighbor 

43 Rootlet 

46 Dutch , 

hybrid tree 

47 Aseptic 

49 Perpetually, to 
Peacock 


50 Spotted West- 
ern horses 

53 In a wrathful way 

55Qty. 

56 Skiers’ shelter 

60 Pier or tapir 

61 Belongs; 
relates 

63 Boswell was 
one 

64 River near 
Valence 

65 City map 

66 Six: Comb, 
form 

67 Laconic 

68 Homophone 
for sight 

DOWN 

1 Wings fora 
Harpyia 

2 Dips bait 
lightly 

3 Graian or 

Node 

4 Asian 

peninsula 

5 Physics 
student's deg. 

6 Super Bowl 
winners: 1977, 
1981 and 1984 

7 Nigerian dry 

8 Modified 

9 Maiden-name 
indicator 

10 Fundamental 

11 Roast-pork 
accompaniment 

12 Calabrian cash 

13 Medieval 
melodies 


tSST” BEETLE BAILEY 

SSSj^r WHY AREYfcTU \ 

r ilm container PUTTING Y OUR I 

ite of Lee’s WlFEfe S' "‘‘V 

PICTURE jmk ) 

ih the Jig? A ( 

hiager I7RAWE [ 

^indyCity. for A 1 


18 Eject 

22 Blasters' 
materials 

24«* joey” 

25 Chemical 
suffix 

26 Shower 

27 Film container 

28 Site of Lee’s 
surrender 

31 Soho fireplace 

32 Take the helm 

34 Onager 

36 Windy City, for 
short 

40 TV program: 
1965-66 

41 J.F.K. info 

42 Convalescent's 
Setback 

43 Destructive 
mobs 

44 Smith and 
Pacino 

45 Distributed at 
bridge 

48 Boisterous one 

51 Mar del . 

Argentine 

resort 

52 Lathers 

53 Common camp 
chow 

54 Thrice minus 
twice 

57 Timor town 

58 Mini-biter 

59 Botardo’s 
patron 

61 £yot 

62 Pawnee's 
cousin 



Doctor *3 
ORPERS 


HE TOLP ME TO 
REST MY EYES 
EVERY RAY 



ANDY CAPP 


GCODGAfrUE, 

, PET? t — ’ 


WE SUFFERED* 

. OURVNCRSr 
>“ DEFEAT IN < 
FfV£ YEARS “) 


AND ON TOP OF THAT ' 
THEDOCS^Srii-BE j 
OUTOF ACTION FOR -f 
L, .THREE WEEKS 


NEVER MlND j 
NOT T 1 WORRY 


ALL'S WELL THAT 
r ENCSWTTH A ■< 
GOOD EDOZE-tlP 


WIZARD of ID 


£» New York Tones, edited by Eugene Maieska. 

DENNISTHE MENACE 




M 


JWOFA 

V\VVfcMCN& 

, mo,Tm?A 


m? 


-mmeemmat jasr 
&mmm iMFu&at Aim aw 
< sam/w& 



& 


REX MORGAN 




t 


r THERE'S NO ANSWER 'J 
TT WOULD BE JUST LIKE 
VfWtff TO PUT ME IN HERE 
V WHILE HE GOES OUT Y 
Lfca AND HAS A GOOD J 
mnrnr-T time t 


r QOpD EVENING, MBS. 

61 SHOP / I'M MRS. LAWRENCE 

ANP WILL BE ATTENDING / 

"t-t vou tonight/ 


inimnminiiiinniimit 


P attending metJ 
•* what you A 

REALLY MEAN IS 
THAT YOU'RE HERE ; 
ID WATCH ME/ WELL, 

„ 1 PONT NEED ANY- 1 
S- ONE TO WATCH | 
T MS. BECAUSE I'M : 
S- NOT STAYING t J 
T I’M SfGN/NG W 
L_V MY RELEASE/ J 


10-16 ' - B| 

*MYTE^O^SATOTHEVO^tSRaW3,Bin'Wf 

DAS) SAYS its crooked.* 


|B(VDUY 


GARFIELD 


Unscramble thaw tour JumMea, 
one letter to each square, to lonr. 
ftxx ordinary words. 


INYPP 


CROWE 


RETAUN 


ROYLOP 


THAT SCRAMBLE! WORD SAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


TRoaa big Hots 
'tflHiv m» always 

t makinfla 


ARE VOU ASHAMED OF VOUR 
— v NEW 6ERGARFJELP? 




WHAT GIVES)] 
MOD THAT { 
V, IDEA? J 


Ijfwbwfs 


A CALCULATOR 
IS A DEVICE 
USED E5Y THESE. 

■— — ■ > 

Now arrsnoB the circled tellers to 
tonn me surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by me above cartoon. 


Wirld Slock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Oct. 15 

Dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indic a t e d. 


{Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: LARVA VtSOfl POTTER COLUMN 
Answer Some men can't be trusted too far— 
or m la— TOO NEAR 


WEATHER 


Yesterday’s 


EUROPE 


Bderade 

Baffin 

Brnssals 

Bucborast 


pnhHn 

Bdlntnrgfi 

nnranca 


HeUMU 

Istanbul 
Los Palme* 
Lisbon 


£S&vW 12 £ to * r NORTH AMERICA 
rSw 21 70 10 » cl AnePoroga 6 43 0 32 r 

Stockbolni ” SJ 0 32 O Aflooto 38 12 19 66 sh 

|25£a«r» 11 » ‘ « Boston » 16 11 a sii 

\leaiae Tfl 04 0 4* fr cnicaeo W « J « ff 

XJSjno 14 61 7 45 d 21 70 -2 38 tr 

XJTISL * * S 11 * 17 43 12 54 PC 

U 59 S 41 d Hondo In 31 « 21 70 fr 

MIDDLE east 1 « ” I? S 

*25° ]( n 1< U O I, 12 3 " S k 

“*2™ no Montreal U S7 9 48 d 

5£^!x 3SS 24 75 M 57 fr Nassau 2 SS 5 5 Z. 

a 82 W » lr WOW YOffc 22 72 17 43 Ml 

TolAirfv « “ son Froodsco 27 81 12 54 fr 

OCEANIA ScoHio ]4 61 ID 50 d 

— u ii id SO ci Toronto 15 B 44 pc 

Avctiyq si $0 16 I? o Wtontonten « £ h 55 pc 

•rmeomt: pc^V doudv: r-mln; 

SSSSmj nrWMi sl^wmy. 

WGBHEiMn 

m 1*-B W’ snMkwVORK: Rain. TemA 17-11 163-52). 
wfc m - 10 »4-S). »0*»E: Cloudy. Tomn, 24—12 

PARIS: Pewt. Temp. « w/ , TojB&M-Bttl -4*1. 


HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 


C 


c 

F 



C 

F 

C 

F 





fid 

lr 


31 

88 

24 

75 

d 



11 

52 

r 

tilling 

16 

61 

10 

50 

cl 



11 

52 

d 

Hen,; Kong 

29 

#4 

26 

79 

O 



13 

a 

d 

fctooJIa 

29 

84 

25 

77 

Bt 




36 

r 

Moss* DelW 

31 

ae 

19 

« 

tr 

IS 


11 

52 

d 

S®®:sl 

24 

75 

10 

50 

O 




SO 

O 

ElKiJWSral 

25 

77 

17 

43 

O 



1 

3 * 

Cll 

Singapore 

32 

90 

25 

77 

a 





d 

Tatael 

33 

91 

25 

77 

d 

IS 

SI 

« 

43 

Cl 

Tokyo 


M 

12 

64 

d 

27 

81 

18 

84 

lr 

no 

AFRICA 






Id 

dl 

12 

54 

0 


28 

82 

13 

55 

fr 


a 



fr 




_ 


na 


03 



0 


— 

— 

— 



na 



6 




— 

_ 

— 

— 

na 







— 

— 

— 


na 





r 


29 

84 

21 

» 

a 

27 

81 



fr 


— 

— 

— 

— 

na 

23 

73 


01 

fr 

Tods 

26 


17 

63 

Cl 











24 

75 

7 

45 

lr 

LATIN AMERICA 



]« 

M 

10 

SO 

fr 

Buenos Aim 

20 

48 

14 

57 

0 






Caracai 




66 

d 

24 

79 

IS 

S9 

O 

Lima 

Mexico CUy 

26 

79 

10 

» 

PC 

15 

59 

9 

48 

O 

Rloda Jandra 

— 

— 

“ 


no 

W 

12 

57 

54 

10 

40 

50 

r 

NORTH AMERICA 




32 

O 


28 

82 

19 

66 

Stl 


O 


1 * 

46 

11 

52 

Stl 


fr 


19 

66 

B 

46 

tr 


d 


21 

70 

-2 

a 

lr 


5 h 


17 

61 

12 

54 

pc 


d 

Konotolu 

31 

88 

21 

70 






81 


70 





34 

93 

?4 

6 t 


39 

d 



to 

23 

73 



O 


12 

54 


34 

PC 


na 



57 

9 

48 

d 

57 

tr 


30 

86 

22 

72 



tr 


22 

72 

17 

43 

rii 





81 

12 

54 




aearila 


61 


50 



d 

Toronto 




46 

PC 


ABN 

ACF Hold lira 234 

AEGON « 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A ‘□am Rubber 
Amro Bank 

bvo 

Burhrmcsin T 
Coland HUB 
Ehfcwlor-NDU 

Fahker 
Gist Broeades 
Hdneken 
Hoodowjns 
KLM 
Haarden 
Nat Noddor 
NOdllovd 
OtX Vainter G 
Pakhoed 
Philips 

Rofcoco 
Radomco 

Rollnco 
Roranto 
Roval Dutch 
llniievor 
Van Omnraron 
VMF Slark 
VNU 

ANPXBS Gcol Index : 71448 
previous : mm 


A rhed 

Bekaen 
Cock orlll 
Cobeoa 
EBES 

GB-InmrBM 

GBL 

Gevaoii 

Hoboken 

intercom 

Krediamank 

Polrafino 
Soc Generate 
Safina 

Sotvay 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Untrs 

VtamoMonroane 

Current Stock index ; 
prevlovt : 2(4265 


Fhadifarl 


Hochtief 
HOOOtSt 
Koesdi 
Horton 
Mussel 
IWKA 
Kali + Sab 
Korefmtr 
Koulhot 

Kloodcner H-D 
Klaeduier Weriue 
KrunnSlahl 
Undo 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Monocsmann 
Muonch Ruock. 

Nixdorl 
PKI 

Porsche 
Preusxra 
PWA 
RWE 

Rhelnmetoll 

Schortna 
5EL 
Siemens 
Thyssen 
Voba 

Vdkswooanwerk 
Wei la 

Commerzbank index : 1S32A0 
Previous : 1826.10 


HhmMStert 
Kloof 
NedDank 
PnaSleyn 
RuSPiOf 
SA Brews 
SI Helena 
Sasai 

West HokBng 


3450 £30 
3000 2925 
300 STS 
2275 2225 
1160 1168 
6400 4300 
2350 2300 
743 760 

3400 3300 
■55 BSD 
7730 7600 


Shell 

5TC 

SM Chattered 
Sun Alliance 
Tale ana Lyle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
T.l. Group 
Trotohmr He 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever C 
United BIsarifs 
Vickers 
Woo (worth 


tn m 

74 78 

449 447 

471 471 

470 471 

2D 2H 

3S7 341 

394 407 

35* 335 

138 13B 

1*6 198 

10% 10 19/32 
176 178 

300 305 

505 503 


THE OBEDIENT WIFE 


By Julia O'Faokdn. 230 pages. $17.95. 
Carroll & Graf Publishers Inc., 260 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10010 L 

Reviewed by William Frost 

T HREE decades ago, in a memorable short 
story, Sean O'Faolaui dealt skillfully with 
the impingement of celibacy on a growing 
comradeship, between two young monks and 
two young nuns during a Gaelic- studying sum- 
mer session, in the Irish mountains in the early 
1920s. Today we have Julia OTadUdn (pro- 
nounced “Oh-FAY-lV). Sean's daughter, 
skillfully dealing with the impingement on celi- 
bacy of a growing companionship between a 
young priest, a married parishioner with five 
children, and her secular-minded friend Carla, 
central figure of this new novel 
Why Sybil Steele — the Steeles have given 

§ p sex, not wanting more kids after the firet 
ve — should imagine that an affair with a 
vir ginal male presumably as ignorant of birth- 
control techniques as she must be herself could 
result in anything but five mare sequences of 
“petty meannesses . . . squabbles - - . ri- 
valries, egotism . . . every one grabbing what 
they can” (the very things she objects to in her 
home life, the thing that has driven her into 
church wide and her husband, Terry, into 
nightly radio broadcasting to get out of the 
house) — why she should imagine this is a real 


The third OTaobdn specialtv is a deft hand 
with titles. “The Man Who Invented Sin. 
Sean's name for the abowe-menuoned short 
story (and for a 1948 collection), neatly recalls 
S Twain's “The Man Who Cammed Had- 
levbufB," while “The Obedient Wife wouM 


Nowhere City." 

William Frosts “John Dryden: Dramatist. 
Satirist, Translator,'' is seheebudd to be published 
early next year by AMS Press. He wrote this 
review for the Los Angdes Times. 


BEST SELLERS * 

The New York. Tun** 

THi at fa buod on nrwroCnom axnri&a 2fi00 bootawo 
itanugtoa the United Stain. Weeks oo list arc not saowni} 


T* <441 Wrab 

WcA WttkooUP 

1 TEXAS, by Jxmes A. Mk h ra cr — * 

2 LAKE WOBEGON DAYS, by Garaon 

KeBIor - * L 

3 LUCKY, by Jackie Coffins 2 » 

4 THE ACX3DENTAI. TOURIST. by Annc ^ ^ 

5 SifiJELETON CREW, lw S«dbra~CBK — 3 V 

6 THE TWO MRS GRENVILLES, by 

Donnnkk Duane . — — * , 

7 CONTACT, by Carl Stttn — > 

S A MAGGOT, by JohoFbwte * - s 

* THE SECRETS OF HARRY BRIGHT. 

by Joseph Wa ro ba ugh 15 - 


Glen, apparently to borrow it far an erotic 
encounter not yet even suspected (far from 
contemplated) by the priest. Lea 
The two OTaolains have in common a 
strong interest in setting. Sean's misty moun- 
tains, finely rendered in the shon story, won- 
derfully foreshadow Julia's sure touch with the 
Glen world, where religious freaks (or Salan- 
ists* covens?) disembowel pet rabbits or cmeQy 
crucify cats on cactuses, while half-wild 13- 
year-old gamines build tree houses beyond 
Carla’s chain link fence to share with. Carla’s 
son Maurizio, whom an Iranian schoolmate at 
the Los Angeles French lycde has invited htxne 
to share Aladdin’s Olympic-sizc pool beside 
the familYs French-style chateau complete 
with spiked gates and private shooting gallery. 


Sofadkm to Previous Puzzle 


QESQD □□ E3Q SQQQQ 
DBQD □□□□ □□□HQ 

bbbe nans □□□□□ 
□EBBaQaannaa 
□osnaa aanaao 
□□□a aaanaaa 
□eq anaaa annoa 
deqe aaaas snaa 
DEQE0 □□□□□ □□□ 
HEaonaa aaoa 
□Gasaa aaaaaa 
Haaaanaaaana 

QDEQQ 33DQ DQQS 

deded aan □ aana 

eecigq anao □□□□ 


10/16/BSl 


JVE, by Lany McMurtry 
DEADLY SIN. by Law- 


11 THE FOURTH DEADLY SIN. by Law- 

rence Saadm — — — 9 

12 AFTER THE REUNION, by Rwm Jatfc II 

13 THE IMMIGRANTS DAUGHTER, by 

Howard Fa» ... !*■ 

14 THE CIDER HOUSE RULES, by John _ 

Irviza — . — 13 

15 THE RED FOX, by Anthony Hyde 10 

NONWCnON 

1 ELVIS AND ME, by Priscilla Beaulieu 

Presley with Seadta Hansson — — I 

2 DANCING IN THE LIGHT, by Sbiricy 

MacLabtc 2 

3 YEAGER; An Amotnouaptqr, by Check 

Yeager ud Leo Janos ... — 3 

4 lOCOCC/e An Autobiography, by Lee la- 

OKCX with WvQiim Novak 4 

5 LAST WISH, by Boiy Rdfin 3 

6 a passion For excellence, by 

Tom Peters and Nan cy Am to — ' 7 

7 RE-2NVEN72NO THE CORTORA- 

TION, bf Into Nmriritt and PaniriaAbHr- 
dene - - - ' - « — 8 

8 COMMON GROUND, by J.AmhooyLo- 

fcaa ; 9 

9 SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES. 

by CoddcII Cowan and Mdvyn Kinder — . .6 

10 ON THE ROAD WITH CHARLES XUR- 

ALT. by Qiarict Kmb .. — — 

U LIVING WITH THE KENNEDYS. by 
Mareji Cbmiy : 14 

12 GODDESS, by Axdhaoy Sumaaen — 16 

Glock 10 

14 THE AMATEURS, try DwMKdbentaiB 12 

15 CONFESSIONS OF AHOQKER.by Bob 

Hope with Dwayne Neriaud 13 

ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 FIT FOR LIFE, by .Harvey Diamond and 

Marital Diamond — — — . I 

2 DR. BERGER'S IMMUNE POWER 

DIET, by Snort M. Berner — — 2 

3 WOMEN WHO LOVE TOO MUCH, by 

Robin Norwood — 3 

4 WEBSTER'S NINTH NEW . COLLE- 
GIATE DICTIONARY - 5 

5 THE FRUGAL ■ GOURMET, by Jeff 

Smith 4 


By Alan Truscotx 

O N die diagramed deal, 
South opened one spade 
in third positioiL His partner, 
bid two dubs, the Drary con- 
vention, to find out if the open- 
ing bid was based on full val- 
ues. It was, as the two-heait 
rebid revealed. 

Now, North bid four spades, 
knowing that his diamond void 
was word* several Dicks. South 
followed with six spades, 
knowing dim his diamond void 
was worth several tricks. They 
were both quite, quite wrong. 
The opening lead of the dia- 
tnonri king produced an imme- 
diate surprise for all four play- 
ers: a ruff and shift at the firm 
trick. It was not as useful to 
South as it might have been, ■ 
for be had no automatic loser. 
There were three potential los- 


F.T.3B Index : 182390 
Prevloat : 1MB 
fi.T^SJIM Index : 132890 
PravfMU ; 132198 


Caldstoraao 

DBS 

FrmorNeaw 
How Par 
Ineftcaea 
i Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

Slianarl-la 
Slme Darbv 
S'poro Land 
i 5*004* Press 
55ieamsRiP 
St Tradhra 
United Overooas 
UOB 

Strati nines |nd I 
previous : Ttrja 


a a 

set sx 

2.13 2.13 
287 28* 
5.70 545 

115 8115 
292 272 
220 220 
KU3. — 
131 190 

231 118 
695 4 

N.Q. ax 
299 3 

194 133 

348 338 


Compo si te Slock Index : 1218J6 
PranoH : 11*738 


NOdb 


A3 Corn 
AIUkLLvow 
A frakl Am Gold 
Ass Bril Foods 
Asa Dairies 
Barela n 
Bass 
BAT. 


1,^25 (88 -m.roicro: «w. 


AEG-Tctefunksn 
Alhan* vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Boyer 

Bay Hypo Bonk 
Bov VeretirtOank 
BBC 

BHF-8onlc 

BMW 

Cammsrzbonk 
Coni Gumml 
Daimler-Benz 
Daswssa 

Deutsche Baocock 
Deutsctw Bank 
Dresdner Bar* 
GHH 
H a r po n ei* 


214 Suw. 
MB* 167B 
427 414 

2S7 2S390 
241.90 23S90 
447 441 JD 
444 440 

279 28190 
378 388 

500 488 

25AS0 744JO 
147 14070 
1073 1073 
456 457 

17698 174 

408 649 

34250 33790 
197 193 

355 3SS 


Bk Esst Asia 
Chfluna Kara 

China Light 

Green Island 
Hang 5ona Bank 
Henderson 
CWna Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shotra Bank 
HK Toloetione 
HK Yaamahri 
HK Whorl 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hyson 
Inn City 
Jarame 

Jardlne Sac 
Kowloon Molar 
Miramar Hotel 
New world 
SHK Props 
Sletux 

i 5wlre Podlic A 
1 Tat Cheung 
Wan Ktwona 
wing On Co 
Wbisor 
World inri 


AECI 

Anglo Amer ica n 

Anglo Am Gold 

Barlows 

Sfnaor 

Huftefci 

DeBoers 

Drletanteln 

Elands 


2190 7190 
1870 1890 

14.10 15.90 
B 8.10 

4295 4190 
tr«; vrx 
1030 10.70 
7.95 7.W 

1U0 1190 
3390 3390 
495 435 

7.10 7 

8.70 &3S 

3 115 

7.05 APD 

25.70 2590 

0.61 040 

0.98 598 

12.70 12J0 

1440 1470 
*75 990 

44 4490 
775 795 
1180 1240 
290 235 

2570 2490 
t.H 174 
085 095 

197 193 

4*5 490 

230 2.15 


800 790 

ibto inn 
1140 1105 
1500 1475 
77W 7425 

ins 1280 
sase 5ioo 

U75 1738 


, BlCC 
BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boats 

Bowoter Indus 
BP 

Bril Home St 
Bril Telecom 
Brit aerospace 
Brltoii 
BTR 
Bumrah 
; Cable Wireless 
Cadbury Sctvw 
Charter Cans 
Commercial U 
Cons Gold 
Caurtaulds 
Dalgetv 
i De Beers < 
Disinters 
Drletanteln 
Flsons 
Free St Ged 
GEC 

Gen Accident 

GKN 

Glaxo t 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

Imperial Group 
i Jaguar 
Land Securities 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
i Lonrho 
Lucas 

Marks and Sp 
M etal Bov 
Midland Bank 
not west Bank 
P and a 
Pilklngton 
Plessav 
Prudential 
Roan Elect 
Rundloiiletn 
Rank 
Reed mil 
Reuters 

Roval Dutch t 44 
RTZ 

SoaictU 

Solnsbury 
Sears Holdings 


Slllfe Slltk 

270 375 

543M 14316 

232 234 

138 143 

399 394 

602 407 

363 246 

306 304 

230 230 

33 33 

544 
287 
198 
311 
543 

453 

210 

380 
311 
618 
142 
2SW 
238 
439 
148 

441 
453 
4Z3 

SI 7=U. 

368 
5219* 

170 
424 
249 

13'5 i; 

345 
468 
303 
*20 
201 

381 
642 
207 
284 

317 317 

4*7 4*4 

427 *19 

151 151 

415 413 

167 164 

399 394 

/r» JVr 

442 

434 <4P 

271 27* 

134 134 

714 7T4 

154 156 

SHIP STBVs 

418 420 

689 694 

310 312 

\ 5176444 35/64 j 
SS4 567 ! 

690 680 , 

336 340 1 

111 108<h 


| Banco Comm 
CMifrole 
doahotals 
Credited 
Erldonla 
Formllolki 
Flat 

Gonerall 

IFI 

Itataementl 

I taigas 

Italmoblllarl 

Madlobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascordo 

SIP 

SME 

Sola 

StandO 

Slot 


34890 2S2U 
3451 0560 
11200 1 1550 
3200 3200 
10950 11099 
12806 12800 
4510 4595 
43150 64000 
10568 10700 
47750 48100 
I860 1833 
128500128400 
131500 132900 
2299 2363 
7461 757S 

3050 3102 
107500108400 
927 936 

2691 27X5 
1415 1440 
3785 3816 
14700 14540 
3655 3130 


Mia Current index : 7741 
Previom : 1765 


Air Lkudde 
A 1st horn AIL 
Av Dassault 
Bancalre 
BIC 

Borraram 

Bouygues 

BSN-GD 

Corrrtour 

Chargours 

Club Med 

Qartv 

Darner 

I E if -Aquitaine 
Europe 1 
Gen Eaux 
Hochelte 
LotaT-ge Coo 
Learand 
Lasleur 

rtTreal 

Mewteli 

Metro 

Merlin 

Mlchetln 

Moot Heonossv 

Moulinex 

Occktemale 

Pentad Rie 

PwtHor 


Prlntemas 

Radlotochn 

Rodoute 
Rounet uclaf 
Sanod 

Skis Rosstonol 
T#le«80>n 
Thomv» C5F 
Total 

CaC Index: 211 JO 
previous : 2WJS 


275 
326 321 

1425 1378 
1468 1435 

563 561 

1175 1160 

248S 2460 
S17 818 

245 23950 


AGA 121 129 

Alta Laval 1*6 195 

A sea 286 285 

Astra m 432 

Atlas Copco 122 121 

Boltden 180 NA 

Electrolux 142 140 

Ericsson 192 194 

Esaene 340 335 

Handetatranken 18$ 181 

Phormacla 747 147 

Saab-Scanlo NJJ. — 

Sandvlk 490 490 

Skanska NXJ. 91 

SKR 296 234 

SwudlshMatctl 212 210 

Volvo 212 2T3 

AffaermarMee index : 2T&58 
Prevloas : 876J8 


Bougainville 

Castlemolne 

Coles 

Coma tan 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

Elders Ixl 

ICI Australia 

Magellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Nat Ausi Bank 
News Carp 
I N Broken Hill 
Posei d on 
aid coal Trust 
Santos 

Thomas Nation 
western Mining 
Westpac Banking 
woodside 


Akai 

Asahl Cham 

Asahl Gtasu 

Bank of Tokyo 

Bridgestone 

Canon 

Casio 

Cltah 

Dal Nkpgan Print 
Do; m Haute 

Dolwo Securltlas 
Forme 

Full Bonk 

Fun photo 


Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi CoMe 
Honda 

Japan Atr Une» 
Knifing 
Koneal Power 
Kowas«*r Steal 
K irin Bn wienr 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
/Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu Elec works 
MltwbMil Bank 
Mitsubishi Cbam 
MtHBtSMEteC 
. Mitsubishi Heavy 
MlteuWmi Oorp 
Mitsui <nd Co 

AAltsukOdil 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nlkko Sec 
Nippon Kogaku 
Nippon OU 
Nippon SUM 
Nippon Yusan 
Nhm 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Pioneer 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Shlmazu ^ 

Shlnetau Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 

Sumitomo Ctwm 

Suml tame Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Talsd Corp 
Taiaho Marine 
Takedo Own 
TDK 
Tellln 

Toklo Marine 

Tokyo Elec Power 
Tappan Printing 
To ray Ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

YdmakhlSec 

Nikkei/ D~l. Index: 13 
prevtoH : taB!7JW 
Hew index : leeut 
p r eele u e : 1B79J3 


BRIDGE 


as, and he had. to avoid two of 
than. 

Dummy ruffed, and a drib . 
was thrown from the dosed 
hand, the trump finesse suc- 
ceeded, and as it happened, the 

contract was now safe. But 
Saudi did not know tins, and 

marif - ^ piny thnt tna-rrmir^ri 

his chances. • 

Instead of singly finessing 
in both side suits, he cashed 
die spade ace and the aoe and 
king of hearts. If both players 
had followed and the queen 
did not appear, he would have 
played a third round with ex.- 
cdknt prospects: West zzughi 
be end^jlayed, or East might 
be forced to break dubs. At 
worst he wonld have beta able 
to fallback on the dub finesse. 

The actual result was anridi- 
matic: the heart queen fell 

. T ar —i a ' Oa.15] 
CiMta&n stacks u£a AP 


doableton, and South mis- 
guessed how to pbty die dubs 
ten an overtrick. Bat he had 
made hb slam, and had a story 
to tdl about duplication of 
vends. 


NORTH <D> - 
«Q J743 

oi»a»] 

fr— 

*KI»2 

WEST EAST- “l 

♦8 6X8 ' 

?r«|- 9Q4 . 

OKQJ8738 fr«.U9843 
4SQ4, 4MA7S " 

SOUTH 
♦ AMISS 

. . OAJK^S 

fr — 

*AJ«3 

Both akta wera vulactable. Tbe 


l* FIB 2V ] 

1 ♦ pm - a* i 

PBM Pub 
W rit Jrid fbs drimfltaif Ugg. 


75Z1 AbH Pres . 
loOAcfclondp 
3530 Ann! cot 
200 Agra Ind A 
2605 Alt Energy 
11 12s A lta Not 


I5510SCRM 
15534 BC PttoO# 
630 Bnsuwk 
4350 BudO CoO 
12806 CAE 
3490CCLBF 
4600 Ccd Fry 
12»Canweaof 
4200 C Nor West 
300C Pockra 
253 Can Trust 
300C rung 
63059 Cl Bk.Com 
96099 CTIraAf 
1700 C Util B 
■ loo Coro 
lOOCeksieso 
SOOCtoanmp 
4350 Cantrl TT 
200 CHUM 
nawiw 
COOCDbtaA 
65700 CD I*® Bf 
26435 CTL Bonk 
UBOOCowko R 
2100 Conran A 

4850 Crown* 

4300 Czar Res 
21863 Doan Dev 
400 Boon A - 
•774 Denison A p 
3582Danrian Bf 
2130 Oovnlcua 
260Dlcknan Af 
nuotoferans 
37122 Dofoaoo 
MODonatKie 
2230 OU Pont A 



Credit SirtsH 

Etectramrft 

HoMaraank 

intanflsaMml 

Jacob Sudhard 

Jalmoll 

Lands Gyr 

Moavenpfc* 

Nestte 

oertlhon-a 


SeWndlar 

Sulzor 423 __ 

Survafllonea 4500 44Qo | 

Swissair IMS t«S 

SBC Al* « 

swbs Ratraurance 

Swiss Vdkstxxik 

U nto Bo nk I 

Winterthur S300 S3H , 

Zurtetl Ins 3400 3410 

SBC tadax : 51940 
provtos : 514JD 


I HjCU <101 onMi HJL: not 
[ available; xd: a»dvktoa 


10000 GeUtcarOf. 
4000 Grad G 
6100 GL Forex* 

ion at Pacific 
92BGravhnd 


tBSK-' 


. 24Vh 
16. 
823 22Kt 
812* T34k 
a DM 2946 
S7M 71A 

S9 W» 

1W»» 14M 
M7V» 1716 

IPI 

sim n 

*5L 

8W6 9 * 
345 340 

au o 

7 6rir 
3Wt ISM 

«fc- w 


S3DJ6 30 
sink 1116 
C2T 2056 




300 MICC 
53800 MCtoMX 
ism Maritime 1 - 
yuSMartendri 


S3436 3446 
04 16 

SU M 
823V. 72 
me sky 
senk 42 
814 13U 

»161h 1616 

SI5U MM 
S37H- 26 W 
81346 1346 
S1116 11 Hi 
sag me 
817 1646 

SMVi 16Ui 

W-'W 
34D-- 335 - 


17—1 
1 ■■1M6+ 1* 

\ 1F6-H 
1 8VV ■ 

> 1710+ M 

1 1386+ Vk 
t 1846+16 
1 916— 16 

1 32Hr+.46 

400 ■ + S- 
r. 12*6 + 86 
190—2 
.18 16 
345 +W 
375 

1 16V6+ M 
9 . + V6 
' M6— «. 

220 +4 

> 23 V5 

> 12»+*6 

. Ss*s : 

2346+1 
1 ^ 

tm+ m 

> JH6+ 16 

fw— 16 
1 1716 

> 1646+16 

' 1 ^* * 

MB- 16 
1 3916+ 1 
916+ 16 
. A6“'Vl 
. M6+ Hi 

1 946+46 

270 — J 
1 1M 
,**+16 

3K —10 
375 —10 . 

1 1316— 16 

> 1246— 1A 

6—16 
1 486+16 

1 - 486+ 16 
1 3416 
16+ 16 

! 2OT6+ )5 

746+46 

1 19 + 16 

> 1446+ 16 

1 IS* 

r 1116—16 

1 " 

[— 

: «-» 

W4+ 1 
1 34V>+46 
1 234k + M 
29 

1146+46 
1 31 +1 

'20+16 
1 2546+ Mi 

' 

M 

2216+ W 
I 046 
42Hi+ 16 
1 U + 6 
1 1«4+ 16 ' 
i 1514+ !6' 

> 27 —16 ridta 
1 - 1346 + y> 

1 1116 + 16 

t an- -+ 4k 

1 1416+16 
: U16+ 16 


Sim 1746 
81916 19V, 
823 23 

52616 2616 
SI 446 14% 
SlSWi 15 
86 A 
81846 18S6 
39 36 

8846 M6 
276 272 
S 34 'JOB, 

SIM 1316 
SIOMt 94b 
*34/, 341+ 
S17UT 164k 
S2D46 2046 
82244 22H, 
82446 2416 

81316 1266 
83016 m 
JWfc 946 
811 11 
835 35 

490 490 

82716 27V6 
S9«i 916 
823*6 21 
*74* 746 

SUH 12 
SIS 27 
822 23 

820 1946 

. 209 20S 

235 Z3S" 
819 14V4 

SW» 14K, 
«« 1346 
S31W, 31 

HI »46 

52216 22 
*2716 73 
KQ4fc 2346 
Wi 946 
310 250 

525% U46 
»» 

330 335 

fv. 2SV6 

J* ^ 

sn 13 
-812*6 1216 

4M 4Q0 
*546 5% 

*1946 N 

Hf 4 I W, ‘ 

m m 

1U55AC3 


1 71b + 46 
1916+ 16 
23+16 

MW— 16 
1446— 16 
.1516 . 
516—16 
18*4 + 16 
36—2 r . 
B46— J6 1 
273 —2 - 

33W.+ 16 
13M + -16 
10 —46 
3416— .16 
17 

2944— lb 
• 2216 
3*46— 16 
*45 +10 

846+ 16 
1316+46 
38 +06 
946+ ta 

” +5 

4TO —» 
2716+46 
V16 + \6 

W16 +.16 
2*6+ 16 

S +4 

UVb + * 

13% - 

fi+b 
2X16 + 16 

22S+ * 

2246— % 

946— >6 

290 

HV6+-V, 
KVr-+fc 
330 +5 

tht?/’ 

,«6+ A - 

l 3 m + ? 

546+ 16 
IWk+lta 
1346— 1+ 

13 + Vb 
MW+ % 
1J6+ (6 
. ■ + 16 


'''SS Prw riaoM 

“*>■90 3A1B.10 



, S»6^ c SR ?£ 

sj»6 iavuwv5 +v * 
g*6 rak— 1* 

HW «16 + V? 

ait nw iiS** 

1446 1446— Vfa 

WH K IQIjL JL a? 

ssssSsIS 

*® 1946 H 


>07.93 


111*— lb 

14* 


aagSfea'gjto 



\^>ll 


I 






TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 



l He Irtcfy Putting a House in Order 9 


‘ LONDON dwnld qualify bKndf d dttl far English dubs for their ghastly, but exclusion of the national team Ted Croker. the English FA sec- 

\ pools ho— -f n ? xt snminer* a W orld Cap. mtenmoeot, hooBgpn foflowings, would be unfair, premature, dims- retaiy, has even more arguments of 

'' ora can Abroad, she half expects to be ban- which smash life and property, and trous. convenience. He talks of the “mev- 

w, uan smi mace or break half ished thc ve^ M cU^fn^ kidc- yet absolve the national team. Could profit (the FA makes habit praudke because of the 




it* *>»»" 




, manageable tune. A time for ad- 
' ■; ministiators, in cold deliberation, 

1 7 ;|Jso deprive a coon try’s righ t even to 
; start a competition, 
j), In all probability, England will 
experience the difference from 
S > Wednesday to Thursday Ai hniw, 


ftr ' ' ■» 


=**' • ’ 

'* 

*r 'i*- : 

ssi ■- .«• t-. 

LiW-* i’: 


nation of o rganized soccer will 
have no defense against her expul- 
sion from Europe. 

Every derision made in the after* 
math'of last May's Heysd Stadium 
tragedy points to that condusibn. 
What would be the logic of banning 


a* IW 4WUMH«J QMO 

up from Lancaster Gate, the Lon- 
don headquarters of the English 
Football Association. With the 
same voice dm preempted the ban 
on English clubs by withdrawing 
them so soon after the 39 deaths in 
Brussels, the FA now bleats that 


U B*J "LUU U1HUUMI our 

ish youth — and having claimed 
with justification that soccer was 
the victim, not the cause, of inner- 
city ills — tic FA now pleads with 
UEFA to ignore Handswonh and 
Brixion and Tottenham as “having 
nothing to do with footbaJL" 


:WS 


In#" - 

*■». 

k". t 


. By Gary Pomerantz 

. -i; Washingun Pou Service 

:: 4 :«! san francisco — T he o»- 

i » cago Bears have taken on the air of 
;; ^ j sultans, replete with swagger and 
• : s'-i sweat 

• 15 The Bears dismantled the San 
: ■. e -\ Francisco 49ers, 26-10, Sunday at 
: j ^ Candlestick Park; reducing the de- 
j V fending National Football League 
1 1 j champions to a 3-3 paperweight 
-.i'l&nd leaving the nimble 49er quar- 
. - i !■ terback, Joe Montana, in a seven- 
■ y sack heap. 

Late Sunday, Montana was 
; ■ l asked if he’d beau hurt in the game, 
:■ 7 7 < and the most valuable player of the 
' ’ j; 1985 Super Bowl said, *No. The 
•: ' j. Refrigerator [defensive tackle Wil- 

~ . jj*. liam Perry] fell on my bead, but Tin 
- all right” 

Just like that, the Bears are 6-0 
if and operating as smoothly as the 
ii, Daley administration in its prime, 
j i l Ten minutes before kickoff, Chi- 

?r cago's general manager. Jerry 
:l Vainua, had said, “If we win this 
: j‘ game, then we truly are a load in 
) f ' the NFL, and it means we have to 
•; : 1 j' be reckoned with." 

. ,j V Said Dan Hampton, the aH-pro 
V. defensive tackle, “The only campe- 
: • tition we have right now is qur- 
. [• selves, X don't thiA if we play bar 
; I*, game that anybody can stay with 

' " ; V US." 


7 ; How is it that the Bears have 
, , ? ■! Vtaken such sturdy shape, so quick- 

- ; h«riy? • 

I • : First and foremost, thdr leagued 
, best defense of 1984 has become 

even better this season with bafl- 

— L_ hawking rogues named Fentik, 
:r Dent, Singletary and Hampton. 

. - ?j; . Sure, aD-pro safety Todd Bell 
: and linebacker A1 Hams remain 
^ contract holdouts, but thdr re^iec-' 
.;** live replacements, Dave Duerson 
; and mlber Marshall, have made - 
: several key plays, and Vainisi says 

■IS 1 the chances are not good that dtber 
Harris or BeQ w31 return this sea- 
•. . jf’i son. 

[■■■ That doesn’t seem to matter. The. 

Bears hdd Tampa Bay rpnmng. 
back James Wilder, then the 
.tjV league’s leading rusher, to 29 yards 
■ : ) : J on 18 carries. 

. - . They hdd the 49ers to 183 total 
' yards, lowest in Coach BED Walsh’s 

i f - six seasons. 

li.fl And how about the fact that the 
: offenses of Walsh and the Red- 

.* ^ skins’ Joe Gibbs — two coaches of 
. ' point-scoring renown — combined 


far a total of one :Toochdown 
against the Bears? ----- 

Then there is the continuing evo- 
lution of Coach MikelXtka, now in 
his fourth season. Only two years 
ago, .Ditka was so smiy that he 
ordered his spetiaLleahrf hit men 
to“^t” DecroiUddcerEdfie Mur- 
ray, whom Ditto './thought was 
shcwvboaring. 

Another thne, .Ditkx punched a 
locker after a defeat and broke a 
bone in his hand. (And late Sun- 
day, not Long-after the team plane 
had landed back in Chicago, Ditta 
was arrested aqd charged with driv- 
ing white intoxicated.) - 

In the 1960vDitka was the fa- 
voritc tooglwt-oiu tight end of the 
Bears’ founder and coach, George 

Halas 

But nowadays, players and 
coaches say Ditta has lassoed his 
emotions. He’ sin-control, they say, 
and whining helps plenty. 

It is also irrefutable that the big- 
gest improvement in the 1985 
Bears, who lost to the 49ers, 23-0, 
in last January’s conference title 
game, is quarterback Jim McMa- 


McMahon, who missed seven 
games last year with a lacerated 
kidney, has avoided major injury 
thus far, and the results have been 
overwhelming. McMahon seems to 
have readied a levd-headed, big- 
play maturity, albeit with spiked 
hair and pink polka-dot sunglasses 
that make you wooderif he’s Cyndi 
Laupcr’s big brother. ' 

“The biggest difference in this 
team has been the maturing of the 
offense,'* said VamuL Suddenly the 
league's top rushing game over the 
past two years — which possesses 
the league’s all-time top rasher, 
Walter Payton — is complemented 
with a passing game. 

It could be that the emergence of 
third-year receiver Dennis McKin- 
non bias made a superior producer 
cl trackman-mraed-receiver WtHie 
GanlL Or it could be vice versa. 
McKinnon has caught half of Mo- 
Mahon’s 10 touchdown passes, and 
Gault had four catches far 34 yards 
or longer. 

Most likely, it has been the emer- 
gence of McMahon that has made 
superior producers of both these 
receivers, unlike his backup, Steve 
Fuller, McMahon can throw deep. 





Coach Mike Dttka of the Chicago Bears. 


and can throw into the end zone, 
too. 

Linebacker Mike Singletary said 
the turning point of this season 
came in week 3, when McMahon 
threw three toudidown passes in 
the third period to rally die Bears to 
a 33-24 victory at Minnesota. 

Jim Hart, a former Cardinal and 
Redskin quarterback who now 
does color commentary on radio 
for Bears games, recalled, “Jim was 
hurt, and nobody expected him to 
play that night. 

“His first pass goes for a touch- 
down. His second pass goes for a 
touchdown, and his third pass 
should have gone for a toudidown. 

“He’s a Billy Kilmer type. He’s 
brash like Billy. He’s got guts Hke 
Billy," Hart said. “And he throws a 
better spiral.” 

Quarterback has been like a hole 
in the middle of the Bears' dough- 
nut for years. A franchise full of 
rays named Butkus, Sayers and 
Payton went 21 years without win- 
ning a playoff game, because, in 
large part, of ineffective passers. 

□ 

Payton is the player carrying the 
tradition, if not always thefootbalL 
He has been compared with the 
Cubs’ Fmi» Tianifc in that he 
spent much of his career as a super- 
star surrounded by wnnwiritwc 
Since Payton arrived in 1975, the 
Bears are 77-76. 

Although Payton has averaged 
just 70 yards rushing per game this 
season, it was he who carried the 
ball 18 times for 88 yards in Sun- 
day’s second half. He finished with 
132 yards rushing and scored the 
game-breaking 17-yard touchdown 
with less than four minutes left. 

These Bears talk proudly of Mc- 
Mahon’s toughness, of rookie lack- 
er Kevin Butler’s accuracy (14-of- 
18 in field-goal tries) and of the 
defense’s indomitable wilL But 
they love to talk most about Pay- 
ton’s smarts. 

In a game earlier this season, 
Payton walked off the field, appar- 
ently suffering from an eye injury. 
The trainer looked at his eye as be 
helped Payton off the field. 

Only later was it learned that 
Payton had injured Ms ribs — not 
his eye — arid that he was play- 
acting so the opposing defense 
wouldn't zero in on his ribs when 
he returned to the game; 

And you thought the guy could 
only run, catch, pass and block. 


ch °J j . , ,<r 

l-JiA 


Page 21 




Dome. A in. wey oon t seem 
troubles away. Ours is the other 
way ’round.” Precisely, Mr. Cro- 
ker. 

Adds his boss, Chairman Bert 
MOlichip: “I know we have put our 
house u order, and whatever 
UEFA thinks , we would not be 
hading an England K'wtrrri 
by hooligans before we entered" 
Nice to hear. Impossible to sub- 
stantiate. 

I appreciate that, for this argu- 
ment, the FA wishes to divorce 
itself from the dubs. Yet although 
crowds have become drastically re- 
duced post- Heysd and although 
hooliganism is less evident, the 
house-in-order theory turned sour 
in my own city 10 days ago. 

It was then that Manchester 
United after 10 straight victories, 
slumped to a draw at Luton. Man- 
chester's hooligans couldn't take it. 
A bunch of them, always that an- 
con tained minority, poured off the 
trains into nearby shopping cen- 
tres, drank their fill and started 
smashing up properly and using 
broken beer glassses on the faces of 
innocent citizens. Some order. 

As an En glishman, I fear that to 
invite the old coun&y into the next 
European tournament may be 
more of a disaster than to block our 

S th. Violence, regrettably, has not 
i our sodety, and games in West- 
ern Europe, with duty-free liquor 
and waiting confrontation, are just 
too damned dose. 

The only way to “put our house 
in order" has long seemed to 
change the constitution, to prevent 
by government decree the louts 
from supping aboard ferries under 
the union jack. 

But hasn’t the British govern- 
ment always protected toe ‘in- 
alienable right” of its citizens to 
travel? Well, NeB MacFariane, the 
minister for sport, always did 
He, you'll recall spent his four- 
year term stonewalling and deny- 
ing that a hooligan problem of con- 
sequence existed. He departed in 
the recriminations over Brussels; 
Richard Ttacey has been in office 
barely a couple of minutes, and 
presto, the government is seeking 
ways to tamper with inalienable 
rights. 

Tracey spoke last week of work- 
ing the diplomatic channels be- 
tween England and Mexico to in- 
sure, through a screening process at 
•the visa stage, that loots with previ- 
ous convictions do not fly the flag 
at the next World Cup. 

Mexico, a world away, would 
have thinned out the numbers by 
sheer distance and expense alone. 
But if England's soccer is to be 
welcomed nearer to home, the sub- 
stitution of Tracey for MacFariane 
and evidence that there is at last the 
political will to put the safety of 
others before a thug’s protective 
charter will prove the fust step in a 
long rehabilitation. 

Soccer — the game — can then 
be debated 



i- •“tiiA.v 






EeuMvUMad Praa Iwwi w nonul 


Cterie Smith hitting the game- winner: ‘I keep hearing that Tm not an offensive ballplayer/ 

Cardinals Win on Homer in 9th 


By Thomas Boswell 

Washington Pail Serrice 

ST. LOUIS — Ozzte Smith, the littlest St. Louis 
Cardinal, the hand-springing acrobat of defense who 
couldn’t hit a ball over a fence left-handed if you let 
him toss it up himself, beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 
out of a playoff game, and maybe a pennant, with a 
home run in the ninth innin g here Monday. 

In right seasons. Smith has 13 home runs. Never, 
not in 3,001 at-bats. had he hit one left-handed — until 
he flat crushed a belt-buckle fastball from Tom Nie- 
denfuer. who is 6-foot-5 and weighs 230 pounds (1.95 
meters, 104 kilograms). 

When his hooking drive finished its assault and 
battery on a concrete pillar above the fence in the 

NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYOFFS 

right-field corner, the Cardinals had won, 3-2 — the 
same margin by which they now lead the best-of-seven 
National League pennant series. 

“I’m dumbstruck,” said Los Angeles Manager Tom 
Lasorda. “In baseball you learn one thing: Never 
expect the unexpected. ... 1 just don’t understand.” 

The Cardinals win tell you it was poetic justice, 
virtue rewarded. The S2-mfllion-a-year Smith both 
leads and epitomizes the team with his defense, speed, 
brains, intensity, prickly pride and cocky daring “He 
deserves this because he works his bran out every 
day,” said Tommy Herr, who had a two-run first- 
inning double: none other than Smith — ignoring a 
coach's stop sign — carried home the second ran on 
Herr’s hiL 

The Dodgers will spit in your eye and tell you 
Monday’s ending was the rottenest fluke that ever 
threatened to decide a pennant. Niedenfuers pitch 
was a textbook jam. “I’ve given up trying to figure 
things out in this game,” said a disgusted Mike Sci os- 
da, the Los Angeles catcher. 

U Smith, at 150 pounds the lightest regular in the 
major leagues, was heroic, what was Fernando 
Valenzuela? 

Before the Dodger left-handed ace got an out, two 
Cardinal runs were home and a man was on third 
base; he’d walked the first two batters of the game and 
had thrown a pickoff into center field. 

Yet Valenzuela left after right innings with a 2-2 tie, 
thanks to a two-run 'round-the-foul-pole homer by 
Bill Madlock off Bob Forsch in the fourth inning. Six 
times Valenzuela, who walked a league championship- 
series record right, stranded runners in scoring 
position. 


Lasorda broke every rule of managing in leaving 
Valenzuela in the game. The ancient rale is: “Always 
let your starter work out of two jams, sometimes three, 
never four. For Hall of Famers, add one.” But six? 

Through the tense late innings, the Cardinal bullpen 
of Ken Dayiey. Todd Worrell and winner Jeff Lahti 
ran up 5% shutout innin gs. 

Lasorda critics moaned for innings that Niedenfuer 
should be in the game as Valenzuela threw line-drive 
outs. So much for second-guessing. Valenzuela threw 
132 pitches; Niedenfuer threw only seven. McGee 
popped up, but Smith had wicked swings on the first 
two pitches, fouling both back. 

Said Tito Landrum, whom the Cardinals started in 
left field once more for Vince Coleman, “We were all 
buzzing about those cuts.” 

Smith took a ball and then took Niedenfuer down- 
town. Smith did not do his famous hand-spring tum- 
bling routine as he ran the bases — “there were too 
many Redbirds around home plate for me to think of 
that,” he said of the huge welcoming committee. 

As a tMm the Cardinals are easily slighted, almost 
grumpy about their lack of fame. Smith is, too. “I keep 
hearing that I'm not an offensive ballplayer. We listen 
to aD uese negatives,” said Smith, who hit .276 this 
year with 54 runs batted in. 65 walks. 31 steals, 22 
doubles and six homers. 

“I’ve been pumping iron eveiy winter to work on my 
strength. ... 1 was trying to get an extra-base hit on 
that ai-bat to get in scoring position, though I never 
thought of a home ran.” 

The Dodgers have much to roe, but Monday’s 
seventh inning had to haunt their flight west. With two 
on and none out, Steve Sax faced reliever Worrell who 
threw three balls as Sax turned to sacrifice. 

“He looked wild, like he hadn't wanned up 
enough," said lasorda, who then put the take sign on 
twice. On the second take on 3-1, Sax squared, show- 
ing “bunt” — a mistake. That allowed Worrell to lay 
the ball in, since a bunt was what he wanted at that 
point Showing “hit" might have helped prompt ball 
four. Sax stra ck out swinging on a foil-count fastball 

Lasorda then let Valenzuela bat for himself. The 
pitcher grounded to the mound and Mariano Duncan 
fouled out. 

Now, the Cardinals are in Los Angeles for games 
Wednesday, and if, necessary, Thursday. In Game 6 
they will face Orel Hershiser. Said Lasorda: “I don't 
think they can beat him.” 

Sl Louis has two 20-game winners ready: Joaquin 
Andujar will go on Wednesday, with John Tudor in 
reserve for Game 7. 


fc WM* 


SCOREBOARD 

Hockey | 

NHL Standings 


Baseball 

Playoff Box Score Playoff Schedule 


WALES CONFERENCE 
. Patrick DMdM 

W L T PH GF GA 


»V - 
«*. -.■# 

.<£•• •- 

r r.-.- 


Now Jersey 
' PtofhxMptila 
t ’• NY tskmtvs 
NY Ranaer& 
— ' putsburati 
■ Washington 

: £[ Boston 
; - Quebec 
• Hartford 
Buffalo 
« Montreal 


3 0 0 < 13 ■ 

3 I 0 4 13 10 

3 1 1 0 2 7 0 

t 2 0 2 0 13 

0 2 0 0 S * 

, 0 3 0.0 S 12 

Adam* DfvUloe 

3 0 0 * 19 5 

3 0 0 <15 4 

2 0 0 4 13 ‘ 6 

2 10 4 14 0 

2 10 4 13 12 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris DMstan 


UK--, m?-- * 

St ' •’ 

<e 

e » 
t **■* 

9 ‘ 

1? " ■»*-: — «■ 
E- 

** ■ . 


f . »•* 


St. Louis 

1 

1 

• 

2 

7 

9 

Toronto 

1 

2 

0 


6 

8 

Minnesota 

0 

1 

1 

1 

0 

14 

Demur 

a 

2 

1 

1 

r 

21 

Oilcaao 

0 3 0 

Smvbw Dtvtsloa 

0 

5 

17 

Co tom 

2 

0 

0 

4 ' 

17 

5 

Edmonton 

2 

0 

0 

4 

10 

4 

Vancouver 

2 

1 

0 

4 

13 

11 

Las Angeles 

0 

3 

0- 

0 

11 

20 

winntpn 

O 

3 

0 

0 

I 

17 


; £**" . « 
-s 

■#--» -■ - V 

i 19 


- 

. fefc ' >*• 


.4*- *■ * 

- i. 

■* : + -* .*• 


t V**.* 


•• -±m ‘ 





fyy- , sr-t 


MONDAY'S RESULTS 
Detroit 1 0 0—1 

Buffalo 1-2. 3—4 

Housley (2), Rufl (2), Hamel (1). Tucker 2 
(3), Perreault t2) ; Gaitont (2). State on ueab 
Detroit (an Barrasso) 9 ■0 4 —38: Buffalo (on 
Mo) 9-10-17— 44. 

N.Y. Wooden . 0.0 3—1 

Vancouver 1- 1 *-* 

Han Ql.Tantl C2),Lanmrer CU.Skrikani; 
Bossy (2), Ralfev (1). Shots on oaal: N.Y. 
Islanders (on Bradocfr) M-9— «; Vancouver 
(on Smith) 1MM-31. 


i Transition 

BASEBALL 

.' ■ American Leoom 

: H TEXAS — Asstened Luis Pulol®, catcher, to 

Oklahoma City of the American Association. 

National Loam 

t ATLANTA— Hired A1 Monc noi r. Tony Bw- 

-Krone and Bob Skinner as coacft*L 
■ ", BASKETBALL 

Nontwal B as k etb al l AesodaHeo 
BOSTON — Waived Tracy MHcMlL Board. 
MILWAUKEE— Waived Andro Good*, for- 
/ wans. 

, ' , PHOENIX— Waived Alvin Scott forward. 

/, PHILADELPHIA— Released Dory! Lloyd, 

forward. Sloned Paul Thompson, forward. 

SAN ANTONIO— Stoned' More lovaroaL 
forward, and Wes Matthews, award. 

/ FOOTBALL 

NoMoatu Foon*ffl Loom 
KANSAS CITY— Wo had MHw Dawson, 

nose tackle. Placed LowtoCooPOr.llnobaelter. 

/ on Injured reserve. 

If MINNESOTA— A nnounced Ihof Fran Tar- 

kentan Carl Pohlad and Irwin Jocebt haya 
1 J acqulrad a <8 percent share In the dufc . 
f N.Y. JETS — Activated Bab Crabto. One- 

' backer. Placed Hor(y HamlMn. sototv, on 

- ‘ Inlurod rooerwe, 

«f HOCKEY 

NaHonoi Heefcrr L*ob» 
t, QU E bec— T rodod OanW Bouchard «**• 

.**, tender, to Wlmdasa tor future eoasMeratta*. 

4 WINNIPEG— Sent More . Bohrenrt. eoal- 

: > tender, ana Wade CamahMI and Peter Too- 
;<• tomettL defensemen, to' stieiB i aoke of fhe 
<’1 American Hockey lmrua 


NATIONAL LEAGUE: GAMS S 
LOS ANGELES ■ - . ST. LOUIS 

afartiM ' e&rbbi 

OunoBim Joee McGee cf 3100 

Landrx cf 4 1 2 O'OSmHh ss J2)1 

. Otwrrer If . 4111 Herr 3b .4012 

JMmflck 3b A 1 T 2-JOar* 1b 2 0 10 

Marshal rf 3 0 O 0 Cedeao rl 3 0 0 0. 

■ Sfdasda c 3 010 Land run u 3 0 0 0 

Brock lb 1 0 0 0. Pndftn 3b 40 10 

Cabell lb 3 010 Porter c 2 D 0 0 

Ntodnfur p 0 0 0 0 Fanch a 0 0 0 0 

Sax 2b -.3 0 0 0 Davtev ». 20 10 

Valerate p . 3 0 0 0 Worrell p 0 0 0 0 

Matnk 1b (DOS BHarpr nb 10 0 0 

LaMlp 0000 

Totals 3# I S 3 Totals • Mill 

Sdosda safe on c a ft3 ior‘»- Im orfen mc a 
LOS A n as tas oee 3oe eoe— 2 

SL Loots ' 2Si He *01— s 

One out when wfnnlno ran scored. Game- 
wftmlna RBI— OJSmlth til. E-Vahmxuala, 
Porter. DP— StLouts 2. LOB — Los Anoefes 5. 

■ SL Louis 10.2* — Herr, penatofim. NR— Mod- 
lock (2). oamlth.il). SR— Landrum (1). S— 
ForsdL CLSmtih. 

IP M R EH BB SO 


Vatonzlo - S 4 2 2 t 7 

Niedofuer LAI - 1-311100 

. St. Loots 

Forsch 3V3 3 2 2 2 0 

Davtev 224 -2 0 0 1 T 

Worrell 2 o 0 0 o . l 

LahH w.m 1 ooooo 

Davtev pitched to 2 bottom In the 7th. WP— 
Valenzuela T— 2iSL A-AHL 


Tennis 


Pro Leaders 


Oil [llflQf 

1, Ivon Lendl, UGTjm. 7. John McEnroe, 
VOUCH. 3. Mats WTtander, 1527 XO. 4 Jbnmv 
ConnonUWA O L S. Boris Backer. S3414BS. L. 
Antai Jarryd, SttUN. 7. Tim AMvafta. 
32BXW2. A Tomas SmkL 2282^49. 9. Stefan 
edbora 3277,1 Si. 10, Yamfcfc Noah, szmaoi- 
Comaeter E a afc to g s 

1, Ivon Land). 1UA0oolBts.2Jabn McEnm 
143.14.3. Mat* wttondor. 1114L4. JhMfnv Con- 
nors.leO/47-5, (llol Boris Bsekor and Yannick 
Noah, 02S.T, KevHvCunwi. «U7. L Stefan 
. EdtMTBr 57 J7. 9, Anders JaiYVd, 5L35, IB, 
Andres Gomtz, 4»A7. 

Toer Petals 

LJohn MeEnnw,&U3.2. ivm LaodLX3*LX 
MOW WUander.asNL 4. JHnmv Connors, 2AS«. 
5, Boris Becker, W03.L Yannick koah.lj22.7, 

Stefan E*erB,1^n. & Anders JorryaiAia.?, 
Mltaslav Medr, Urt. Itt. Tomas SmW, URL , 
WOMEN • 

Bandogs’ 

L Mar tino Niwramowa, SL1 SUOf. 2, Ort 
Evert uovd. S774.f42. X Nona MandHkova, 
9S0Mf7. 4 Heleno Sukawo. surjB. i Pam 
Snrtver# S323A83. 4 daudhi KohdS-XllSCtV 
ODLSfi. 7. Zina Garrtoea, S22Mt3>2, Kofhv 
jankaCsiKLMk f, Kathy RLnoWL*l7H17.10. 
Steffi Graf, BS7JB7. 

• Tour Petals • 

v Chris evemJovazna INtorttao Novra- 
tUovo, wa X Paen Sbrtver. 1220.4 Ctoudto 
Xtonte-Kftscft, uaa S, 33na Garrison, 1180. & 
Heoa MondOkawi. WO-7, MMMlo Ma l eeva. 
fds^Sten CratsuL*. Kamv rmoiolmo. m 
' Gabrleta SobaHnl, S9S.*'. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
(SL Louts loads sertab 3-2) 
Ocl ft Lot Aneetes 4, Sl Louts 1 
Ocl 10: Lae Anoetes 8, St. Louis 2 
Oct. 12: SL Laois 4 Los Anootas 2 
Ocl 13: Si. Louis -1% Las Anoeies 2 
OcL 14: SL Louis 3. Lai Angelos 2 
OcL is: St. Louts or Los Angeles 
x-OdL 17: SL Louis at Los Angola 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 
(Taranto leads series, H) 
Oct. C Toronto 4 Kansas CHv 1 
Oct. 9: Toronto A Kansas City S 
Oct. 11: Kansas City 4 Toronto 5 
Oct. 12: Toronto 1 Kansas City 1 
Ocl. 13: Kansas CIV Z Toronto 0 
Oct 15: Kansas CHv at Toronto 
x-Oct. 18: Kansas City at Toronto 
(K-lf necessary! 


Golf 

PGA Leaders 


Loaders oo the Prafestlooal Goiters AssocL 
attoa Tour Kronen the Won Disney Classic. 
wMcS ended OCL 12: 

EARNINGS 

L Paler Thomson 3349474 

2. Lee Elder 2SKMS 

-X Miller Barber . 238374 

4. Oon January 337319 

5. Gene Uttttr ittKBl 

4 Bllhr Casper 149JH4 

7. Gov Brewer 144386 

8.. Arnold Palmer 131,928 

9. Orville Moody 121,093 

UL Harold Harm! no 115334 

SCORING 

l.Oon Poolev. 7IL40.2, Larmv Wadklnt, XWB 
3. Corey PavUuJ0A9. 4 Ray Ftovd, 70JS, 5. 
John Mimaffey. 7055. 6. Larry Mte,708S. 7, 
Calvin Peete 7071. S. Roger MaHMe. 7I1JEL 9, 
Paww Stewart 7039. ia Crata Stadier, 70JO. 
AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
l.Andv Bean, 270S.2, Fred Couptas,274J.i 
Gres Norrram, 2784 4 Joey Mndelar. 274J. 5. 
GrogTwlaga.27LS.6iTDmWotson.Z743.7^im 
Oentand Tara Pumer.272f_9. Dan POM.272JL 
14 Lon Makle r 27U. 

DRIVING PERCENTAGE M FAIRWAY 
- 1, Colvin Peele. JOT. 2. David Edwards. J00. 
OJack Renner, 772. 4. Mike ReM. 770 5. Lurry 
NeteML3SX8.0avld PratL J44.7,Tlm Norm. 
342. 4 Tom Kite. J38. 9, Hate Irwbv J3S. 10 
Alton Milter. J35. 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
L Jack Nlcklaus and Join MahaKov, J14 O 
Bruce Uetzke, JM. 4. Calvin Poet*. JOT. % 
Andy Bean, 308. 4 Corey Ravin, Jto. 7. Don 
■PohL 302. 4 Roger Maltofft 301. 9. Wayne 
LevL MX 14 Dave Barr, A97. 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
1, Grata Startler. 2481 X Bobby Oaracett 
2072.1 n»y Floyd. 2077.4. Mike DonakL 2105. 
X Prank Conner, 2087. A Brad Pobrt 29 JL 7. 
George Burns. 29.02. B, Bob Tway and Rex 
-CaMwoU. IBM. 10. Kon Green, 29JJ9. 

PERCENTAGE OF 5UB4>AR HOLES 
1, Croto 5todlvr.il 8.1 Lonnvwtrfklrts.^ 14. 

1 Tom Watson. 308. 4 ROV FloWI, MX S, Hal 
Sutton otto AndvBem, 304 7,Don Pootay,30l 

B, Tso-Cbund Oien and Lorry Nelson, .202. 1ft 

Fred Couples. 3HL 

EAGLES 

' 1. Lorry Rlnker, U. Z Coney Pnvtn. U. 1 
PtmipBlackiniir. JoateModdond Jowsmde- 
tar, 11. 4 Fred Quotas, DavM Graham and 
Pavne Stewart 11 9, Nine tied 1 with 9. 


Football 

Selected U.S. CoDege Conference Standings 


Minnesota 

M]ctitapn_. 

Iowa 
OtUa SL 

Illinois 

Purdue 

Indiana 

Mich. SI. 

Wisconsin 

Nrtrrwstm 


Arizona 
Oregon 
UCLA . 
Wash. St. 
South. Cal 
Arte. St. 
Oregon St. 
Stanford 
California 


Fioriao 

Alahama ■ 

Kentucky 

Georgia 

Auburn 

LSU 

Tennessee 
Mbs. St. 
Vanderbilt 

MiSStaSlppI 


Bavlor 

Arkansas 

Texes aam 

Texas 

SMU 

Rico 

rHAifllMl 

TCU 

Texas Tech 


BIG TEN 

Con f erence AH Games 
w l T pis OP WLT Pts OP 
2 8 0 86 25 4 1 0 183 89 
200 84 6 500 131 21 
2 0 0 50 44 5 0 0 221 <7 
1 1 0 78 30 4 1 0 170 90 
110 E 9 2 3 0 118155 

1 1 0 45 89 2 2 0 147 135 
110 3355 4 1 0 148 135 
020 31 88 230 4099 

0 2 0 19 58 3 2 0 124113 
020 17 47 230 99 128 
PACIFIC-10 

Conference All Games 
WLT Pis OP W LT Pts OP 
300 48 39 420 117113 

2 0 0 35 34 4 1 0 99 54 

2 1 0 100 M 2 3 0117170 
2 10 M 47 4 1 1 175113 
220 100 73 240 189185 
110 83 24 2 2 0 98 54 

110 41 40 3 2 0 105 79 

120 21 117 240 98301 
020 3779 1 4 0 134 te5 
040 8894 240 155 147 

SOUTHEASTERN 

Conference All Games 
WLT PIS OP W L T Pts OP 
300 7332 401 138 S3 
200 8038 410145 75 

1 0 0 33 19 4 1 0 128 74 

1 1 0 85 41 4 1 0 137 09 

110 61 3* 410 198 90 
110 49 27 3 1 0 89 43 

1 1 0 48 37 2 1 1 IBS 92 
020 <1 89 420 147134 

02 0 27 09 2 4 0 91188 

0 2 0 21 90 2 3 1 102157 
SOUTHWEST 
C o nference All Games 
WLTPtsOPWLTPlsOP 

3 0 0 78 35 5 1 0 149 S3 
200 71 7 5 0 0 164 39 
208 7143 418 157 93 

1 0 0 44 16 3 1 0 110 01 
110 7042 220 111 93 

1 1 0 50 71 2 30 116208 

0 2 0 37 87 1 4 0 122154 
0 3 0 48131 23 0 102186 
090 3409 330 11S144 


Maryland 
G& Tech 
VI rvln la 
n .Carolina 
Ciemson 
NXaroSt. 
Duke 
WkPorest 


Oklahoma 
Colorado 
Nebraska 
lawa SL 
OLlaJL 
Kansas 
Missouri 
Kansas 51. 


ATLANTIC COAST 

Conference All Games 
WLTPtsOPWLTPlsOP 
100 31 17 320 108 70 
310 8845 4 1 0 110 62 
210 0554 32013888 
110 3445 320 119 94 
1 1 0 30 38 2 30 70101 
12 0 SI 78 1 5 0 99 ITS 

0 1 0 14 37 2 3 0 113115 

0 2 0 31 54 3 3 0 144 129 

BIG EIGHT 

Conference All Games 
WLTPtsOPWLTPlsOP 
100 41 e 3 0 0 88 20 
10 0 » 7 4 1 0 109 83 

10 0 34 24 4 1 0 200 73 

1 0 0 22 21 3 2 0 72118 

0 1 0 3* 34 4 1 0 135 83 

0 1 0 21 22 4 2 0 197119 

010 738 050 98181 

0 1 0 8 41 0 5 0 £4 113 


College Top 20s 

The top 28 Hams In TU Associated Press 
college football poll (drat-ptees votes In m> 
rantheses, u n ion recordv MM points Mud 
an 30-19-18, ate* and last week's raaklags): 

Record Pis Pvs 

1. Iowa (27) 544 1.148 1 

2. Michigan (20) 5-04 1,728 3 

X Oklahoma 112) 344 1.124 2 

A Arkansas 544 938 6 

X Florida 44-1 905 7 

A Penn state (1) 544 902 8 

7. Nebraska 4-14 888 9 

0. Auburn 4-14 777 12 

9. Brigham Young *14 (45 h 

Ik Air Farce 844 824 to 

11. Ohio stole 4-14 522 15 

12. Oklahoma State 4-14 493 S 

IX Florida State 4-14 459 4 

14. Barter 5-14 373 » 


IVY LEAGUE 
Conference All Games 



WLT Pt* OP WLT Pts OP 

Penn 

3 0 0 

73 34 

3 1 0 

76 

75 

Harvard 

2 0 0 

89 34 

2 1 0 

9J 

58 

Yota 

1 0 0 

ID 9 

2 1 0 

45 

83 

Princeton 

2 1 0 

41 20 

2 2 0 

54 

54 

Brown 

1 2 0 

40 27 

3 2 0 

72 

54 

Dartmouth 

0 1 0 

3 10 

04 0 

52104 

Cornell 

0 7 0 

23 30 

0 4 0 

48 

88 

Columbia 

0 3 0 

31 12a 

0 4 0 

31 14A 

MAJOR INDEPENDENTS 




Army 

Penn St. 

MtainLFia. 

Florida 5L 

W.VIralnla 

SJUUss. 

Pittsburgh 

MomptvSt. 

Temale 

5.Caro(lna 

Syracuse 

Boston Col. 


W L T Pts OP 
5 0 0 213 55 

S 0 0 100 80 

1 0 111 80 

1 O’ I2S 114 

1 1 108 78 

7 0 140 87 

2 1 138 98 

2 2 140 104 

3 0 137 117 

3 0 135 148 

2 0 99 54 


NFL Standings 


N.Y. Jets 
Miami 

New England 
ind tana polls 
Buffalo 

Cleveland 

Qndruwtl 

Pittsburgh 

Houston 

Denver 
LA. Rolden 

Seattle 
Kansas CHv 
San Diego 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
East 

WLT Pet. PF PA 
eta 5 10 JQ3 143 84 


4 2 0 Ml 1*5 108 

3 3 0 500 104 118 

2 4 0 .333 109 138 

0 8 0 M0 W 163 

Central 

4 2 0 Ml 114 87 

2 4 0 .333 184 196 

2 4 D .333 139 108 

1 5 0 .187 75 128 

West 

4 2 0 Ml 18* 131 

4 2 0 Ml 138 113 

4 2 0 MJ 184 189 

3 3 0 500 141 135 

3 3 0 JOO 152 Ia2 


CFL Standings 

Eastern DtvMoa 

W L T PF PA Pts 
Montreal 6 7 0 237 279 12 

Ottawa 6 7 0 228 341 12 

Hamilton 8 • • 0 320 294 12 

Toronto 4 9 0 28S 344 8 

Western DtrUioe 


IS. Manama 

4-1-0 

384 10 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


14. Georgia 

4-1-0 

338 11 


East 




17. LSU 

3-14) 

212 20 

Dal lew 

5 

1 

0 

A33 159 

99 

18. UCLA 

4-1-1 

182 - 

N.Y. Giants 

3 

■ 3 

0 

300 143 

115 

19. Army 

M4 

148 — 

St. Louis 

3 

3 

0 

5M 145 

183 

20. Tennessee 

2-1-1 

141 14 

woonlnsiDn 

3 

3 

0 

£00 97 

134 


Phliodctoflia 

2 

4 

0 

-333 88 

90 

logo (first-place votes, records la parentiw- 


Central 




m; total Mint!, based on IJtor Brit Macs. 14 

Oilcaao 

6 

0 

0 

1X00 189 

90 

lor second, ate, and tost Mem rankings): 

Detroit 

3 

3 

0 

300 103 

138 

1 . Iowa (181 (54» 


575 1 

Green Bov 

3 

3 

II 

JOO 137 

140 

X Oklahoma (14) 04)1 


572 2 

Minnesota 

3 

3 

0 

JOO 137 

123 

X Michigan (111 (M) 


554 3 

Tamua Bay 

0 

6 

0 

M0 112 

177 

4, Pena State (Mi 


458 6 


West 




5. Arkansas (54) 


430 7 

LA- Rams 

6 

0 

0 

1X00 133 

89 

A. Nebraska (4-1) 


403 f 

New Orisons 

3 

3 

0 

500 128 

155 

7. Aa&urn (4*11 


351 11 

Son Francisco 

3 

3 

0 

JM 155 

117 


a Drionam Young (5-11 


6 0 .000 120 192 


Winnipeg 

11 

3 

0 

435 

218 

22 

9. Air Faroe (8-0) 

283 

12 

Mondays Result 

Brit amt) 

10 

3 

0 

379 

250 

20 

to. onto state (4-u 

175 

15 

N.Y. Jets 23, Miami 7 

Edmonton 

* 

4 

0 

348 

290 

18 

11. Florida State (4-1) 

143 

4 


SaskatctMi 

5 

9 

0 

276 

290 

10 

12. Oklahoma State (4-1) 

124 

5 

oer.20 

CtOoerv 

3 

18 

0 

224 

332 

6 

13. Baylor (5-1) 

108 

18 

aneinixwl at Houston 


Monday* RaaaNis 
Hamilton 51, S a s ka tchewan U 
Calgary 28. Toronto 17 


Basketball 


MBA PRESEASON 
Monday!* Rooms 

Dallas 98, wa<t> melon 78 
Phoenix 122. Oilcaao 119 
l— A. Laksri Uf, LA. CD peers 120 


U. Alabama (4-1) 102 8 

14. Georgia (4-1) 102 17 

U. UCLA (4-1-1) 94 16 

17. Louisiana store (3-u 49 19 

18. Toxos (MJ 30 14 

19. T0M10HM (3-1-11 18 13 

2B Army (SO) 14 z 

2a Arizona (4-1) 14 2 

(z-unronked Iasi week) 

(Teams on NCAA or axderence probation 
era Ineligible lor me Moan and national 
cnamphuuntoconsiaoroitonbr uPi.Curreat- 
rv on probat ion ora Florida and Southern 
Methodist.) 


Dellas at PhltedoiohMi 
indtanapells gt Buffo to 
LA Raiders al Cleveland 
LA. Rams at Kansas City 
Now Orleans at Alton to 
washout on at N.Y. GKmn 
SL Louis at Pittsburgh 
Son OMn at Minnesota 
Son Francisco at Detroit 

N.Y. Jets at New England 
Seattle pi Denver 
Tampa Bay at Miami 

Dd. 21 

Green Bov at Chicago 





Hold It 

Rusty Guilbeau, left and Johnny Lynn, here shackling Tony 
Nathan, were part of an inspired defense that helped the New 
York Jets down Miami, 23-7, Monday night- The Dolphins were 
held to 200 yards in total offense (Dan Marino was 13-of-23 
passing for 136 yards, his lowest output ever). Meanwhile. Free- 
man McNeil gained 178 yards to take over the NFL rushing lead. 


Sabres Stick It to Wings 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches fj r holding. Ruffs goal C3tne when 

BUFFALO, New York — Jim he tipped a Gilles Hamel shot past 
Scboenfeld has his Buffalo Sabres goal tender Ed Mio to break a 1-1 
playing the kind of tough, aggres- tie. 

sive hockey he used to play when he Phil Housley had given the Sa- 

_____ bres Lhe lead at 8:11 of the first 

NHL FOCLiS period; four seconds after Burr 

was an all-star defenseman for the want off for holdrag, Houslay loot 

«£SSM55S- S3SS 

a 6-1 victory over" Detroit past Buffalo goal tender Tom Bar- 

ESS" fehMSSM 

the A^mlhated u» pall away. 

way we want to go is we scored with “Things we ve been working on 

a minute to go,” said Schoenfeld, at came to fnuuon tonight, Schoen- 
33 the NHL's youngest coach. He Md said, 
was referring to Tucker’s second “The first game we were sloppy, 
goal of the game, which catne with a lot of early mistakes. Tonight was 
47 seconds remaining. ,r We kepi a solid effort throughout” Buffalo 
attacking.” held Detroit score! es on eight pow- 

With Detroit’s Shawn Burr off er-play opportunities. 









Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1985 


* 


OBSERVER 


Taxi! Taxi! Hey, Taxi! 


Russell Baker 
EW YORK— 6:10 PAL 
iLZ you mi a taxi around 
Tai minutes I’ve been 
here on Third Avenue at 
Street waving at cabs, aD of 
which are occupied. Hundreds of 
f every last one occupied. Ed. 
Youd think there'd be one cab 
?®P*y- It’s statistically inevitable, 

zsn e it? 

. OJL, in New York nothing is 
inevitable. One cab wouldn’t help 
anyhow. Look down Third Avenue. 
Ed. I count 17 people ou this side of 
the street waving at oncoming tax- 
is, all occupied. That doesn't count 
the people waving across the street. 

Also it doesn’t count that lag, 
dangerous-looking fellow on the 
corner to our left. When I came 
here and started waving he was 
already standing over there waving 
at occupied cabs. I can tdl from the 
daggers in his eyes that he thinks I 
cut ahead of him in the cab line, 
which 1 did probably, but so what, 
since there aren’t going to be any 
free cabs reaching this comer be- 
fore Thanksgiving? 

Ed, would you give him one of 
your nice big winning smiles? He is 
probably coming over here to plant 
himself ahead of me so he can beat 
me ou! in the event an empty cab 
decides to pass up all those 17 peo- 
ple waving down the avenue and 
stop at this comer, but a nice smile 
from the mayor might change his 

mind if he's thinkin g of punching 
my nose. 

□ 


6:35 P.M. 

In looking for an empty cab I 
think we were smart, Ed, to walk up 
39th Street to Lexington Avenue, 
down Lexington to 36 th Street, up 
36th to Park, down Part to 34th 
Street, and across 34th to Fifth Av- 
enue. That way we satisfied our- 
selves that while there aren’t any 
empty cabs at Third Avenue and 
39th, neither are there any empty 


Guinness Book’s New Edition 

United Press International 


NEW YORK — A Chicago cou- 
ple who kissed for 17 days, 10 
hours, two Canadians who rode a 
roller coaster for 503 hours, and a 
2,107-pound (957-kilogram) pan- 
cab: flipped by a helicopter are 
among new entries in the 1986 
Guinness Book of World Records. 


cabs in the whole nine-block area. 

What's more, Ed, we got far 
away from that dangerous-looking 
guy who scowled in rage when you 
smiled 

6:40 P.M. 

Let's count our blessings. Ed. At 
least it isn’t raining. If it were rain- 
ing, there still wouldn’t be any cabs 
to take us to Bleecker and Sullivan 
Streets either, and what’s more, we 
would now be soaking wet 

As the mayor, Ed, you could 
start an improved publicity cam- 
paign with the slogan, *T especially 
love New York when it isn’t rain- 
ing.” 

6:50 PJd. 

Well, how about, “I love New 
York even though you can’t get a 
cab there, because the drought lets 
you get where you want to go with- 
out getting your feet wet”? 

6:53 PAL 

Sure I'm slowing down, Ed. If 
you'd been hit with an oncoming 
shoulder the way that All- Ameri- 
can linebacker pedestrian laid it 
into me back there at 29th Street, 
you'd be slowing down too. 

As mayor, Ed, can’t you use a 
little pull and get an ambulance to 
take us to Bleecker Street? 

□ 

6:55 PAL 

You are right about the bus, Ed. 
We should have taken the bus to 
stan with. Then we wouldn’t have 
had to walk all the way to 23d 
Street, me with two ribs busted by 
that linebacker so proud of his pe- 
destrianhood back there at 29th 
StrceL 

Hey, Ed, bow can you tell which 
of these many variously numbered 
Fifth Avenue buses go to Bleecker 
and Sullivan Street: Chi Fifth Ave- 
nue, Ed, Fifth Avenue for gosh 
sake — on Fifth Avenue at least 
you could nail up a few bus maps 
on the lampposts, couldn’L vou? 

7:07 P.M. 

O.K_, so I guessed wrong, Ed. So 
we could have ended up on the 
Bowery if I hadn’t felt the bus tak- 
ing that sharp turn to the East, but 
I did feel it, didn’t I? So we’ve got 
only eighL more blocks to walk. 

7:15 PAL 

Ed, baby, how’re you doin’? 

7-JO P.M. 

Sure you are. Ed, sure you are, 
and my question is: How come, 
with so much greatness all over 
town, you can never gel a cab here 
until you don’t need one? 


New York Times Service 


Writer A. S. Byatt Sits for a 'Still Life’ 


By Kachy Stephen 

L ONDON — In the home of Antonia Byan 

• — an tmderpublidzed but highly re- 
spected English novelist — there is an air of 
serious thoughts, an atmosphere of intellectu- 
ality. But there are also si pis of family life in 
progress in the suburban home in Putney: 
The dpg has scratched a round hole in the 
carpet, a child's handmade ralfn dar hangs 
crookedly on a peg. 

Antonia Susan Byatt manages to weave 
these two levels of her existence into dense 
and complex novels that have made her one 
of the most highly regarded British novelists 
since World War IL 
Anthony Burgess thought her 1978 novel, 
“The Virgin in the Garden,” a masterpiece. It 
ensured her a place in the rarefied tradition of 
modern British authors who attack big 
themes — living examples of whom indude 
Iris Murdoch, William Golding and Burgess. 

Now A.SL Byatt, as she is published in 
Britain (but not in the United States), has 
completed an eagerly awaited sequel to “The 
Virgin.” Called “Still Life,” it was published 
in June by Chatto & Windus/The Hogarth 
Press ixr London and is being issued in the 
United States by Scribner this month. 

“My mind works extremely slow,” she said, 
as though apologizing for the seven-year gap 
between the two books. Her first novel “The 
Game,” was published in the 1960s. 

Byatt, almost 50, sat bolt upright in a chair 
in hex living room, talking in a ’measured and 
precise voice; she almost never misspeaks or 
starts a sentence over. It is dear that she is a 
lover of language and married to words. 

She has devoted her professional life to 
books, as a literary critic who until recently 
taught literature at London University and as 
the author of three novels filled with literary 
allusions and tributes to great British writers. 

“I never really considered anything other 
than reading and writing. 1 grew up very 
asthmatic ana read like crazy in bed. It never 
occurred to me that if you read that much you 
wouldn’t want to write.” 

Byatt has been willing to ignore the possi- 
bility of popular success to write the son of 
novels that interest her most. Some critics fed 
that she is too ambitious in what she has 
attempted in her novels, that she would be 
better off if she came down to earth. Byatt is 
unmoved by this criticism. “If you read 
what’s really good, you ought to at least have 
a go. I wiD get things wrong, of count” 
She admitted she had been a very En glish 
— as opposed to international — writer. The 
Virgin in the Garden” could be put in a time 
capsule to record En g lish middle-class pro- 
vincial life in the 1950s. 

Despite the grand traditions of En glish 
letters, Byan does not see her obsessive En- 
glishness as an entirely positive state. 

“What 1 think about being English is being 
currently preoccupied with rather small 
things and the tremendous weight of the past, 
ha my writing, I do leave things out now that 1 



Writer Byatt: “A compulsion.’ 


would have unhesitatingly put in or 30 
years ago because I thmk people will think 
they’re just English.” 

She has turned this concern, with small 
things to her advantage in “Still Life.” The 
title took on layers of meaning as she wrote, 
she said. She was interested in exploring the 
“still life” expressed by physical objects in 
contrast to the complex, animated life of 
human beings. 

“In Freud's myth the peace of the inani- 
mate came before the striving of life,” a 
character says in the novel Byatt said she felt 
that human beings longed for the stasis, rest 
and peace evident in Wordsworth’s “rocks 
and stones and trees," tire fascination with 
the precooscious world. 

“But there is no stasis,” Byatt added. “It’s 
just what we desire: a striving for the peace 
described in that epigraph from Proust which 
r put in the beginning of the novel, ‘hi 
beami . . . dans la vie profonde des “natures 
mortes” ’ — the very deep life that lies at the 
bottom of still life paintings.” 

The still life in art is the second meaning 
Byatt has developed, using van Gogh as land 
of guiding spirit, a symbol for the electricity 
and excitement of body and mind “Van 
Gqgh paints still lifes with a kind of fury. 
They’re full of terrible life;” Byatt said Part 
of “Still Life” is set in Provence, where van 
Gogh painted some of his most animated and 
colorful work. 

“Frederica saw the long ridges of dusty 

gTspflS 1 She saw the unshadowed earth in 
yellow light, more vines, new shoots of what 
she did not recognize as young maize. Later, 
traveling knowledgeably south at thirty, at 
forty, full of accrued wisdom about good 
little places. . . . Cafe Rentiers and long- 
vanished sand dunes she tried to remember 


the surprises, only half experienced that day, 
of that land to her nnexpecting eyes." 

Frederica is the ruddle child of the Potter 
family, whose storv began in “The Virgin of 
the Garden.” “Still Life,” whose story is self- 
contained, concentrates on the adventures of 
Frederica as she comes of age, travels to 
Provence and goes to Cambridge University; 
and, as a counterpoint, on the more inward- 
loolting life of her older sister, Stephanie, who 
marries a curate, gives birth — in a scene to 
which Byatt has devoted the best of her 
descriptive powers — and becomes the focus 
of the book’s central tragedy. 

Critics have observed that Byatt is particu- 
larly adept at writing aboat grief and the 
diffic ulties of life. She says her life has been 
divided in half: tire time before her 9-year-old 
son, Charles, was lolled in an accident, and 
the time after. Her writing has provided a 
way of helping work through her grief. 

Antonia Byatt was brought op in York- 
shire in an intellectual family, the daughter of 
*& judge. She has one daughter from her first 
marriage and two with her present husband. 

Antonia Byatt’s younger sister is Margaret 
Drabble, whose reputation as a novelist has 
proven an unavoidable point of comparison 
for Byatt Both sisters attended a Quaker 
school, which Byatt believes helped establish 
the values are reflected in her novels. 

“I was taught by the Quakers that you 
ought to want nothing. And I was taught by 
the Quakers to believe this kind of still, inner 
voice which has no personality. I mean they 
worship in silence; they empty everything 
ouL 1 hadn’t connected it before, but some- 
thing to do with the Quaker silence is also the 
sort of stillness in the middle of 'Still Life.' ” 

She has not maintained bar religious be- 
liefs, but does say, “I Ted terribly in need of a 
God who created things and a land of driving 
intelligence. And I suppose this goes back to 
the center of ‘Still Life.' One would like to be 
able to see into the life at things, as someone 
said. One would like to be able to see into 
what moves, both the stars and tiny things, 
and one would like it to be intelligent and 
purposive.” 

In the middle of this conversation, a tiny 
kitten entered the room and began a teeter- 
ing, playful progress down the dark green 
carpet The conversation broke, and Byatt 
went to get a beautifully organized notebook 
for a new novel to illustrate how she works. 
“The new novel is called ‘Possession,’ ” she 
said. “It will be about Browning.” 

She took a moment to show one of the 
rooms in which she writes, a dining room that 
would fill with sun on fair days. 

“Writing is a drive,” she said. “It’s a com- 
pulsion. At the same time it’s hung about 
with all sorts of leaden weights of despair and 
anxiety for me. I'm sure some of that has to 
do with my aster.” 


Kathy Stephen is a London-based journalist 
who specializes in cultural affairs. 


PEOPLE 


America’s Richest Man 


The richest person in the United 
States drives a pickup truck and 
owns a <4mln (if discount stores in 
small towns in the Sun Beit. Ac- 
cording to a survey published by 
Forbes Magazine on Monday, Sam 
Walton. 67, of Benton viHe, Arkan- 
sas, is worth $2.8 trillion and has ■ 
overtaken Gordon Getty as the 
wealthiest American. Walton owns 
the 745-store Wal-Mart chain, . 
which last year did business of $6.4 
billion. The magazine listed 42 
fust-time entries in its annual com- 
pilation of the 400 richest Ameri- 
cans, whose net worth tops $150 
nriHian. Getty, son of the oil mag- 
nate J. Pad Getty, led the 1984 list 
with a net worth of $4,1 bUHon. but 
ranked 15th this year. Her is not 
even among the billionaires, be- 
cause of the Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice’s Sl.l billion tax hill on last 
year’s sale of Getty Oil to Texaco 
and bis own tentative agreement to 
relinquish sole control of the family 
trust. Second in the rankings, with 
an estimated net worth of $1.8 bil- 
lion, is Henry Ross Perot, 55, who 
founded Electronic Data Systems 
in 1962 on $1,000 and sold his 46- 
percent stake in the company to 
General Motors Corp. in 1984 for 
cash and stock now worth $1.5 bil- 
lion. Perot ranked fourth last year. 
David Packard, who founded an 
electronics firm with WtSam R. 
Hewlett with only $595, stands 
third because of his 17-percent 
share in Hewlett-Packard, worth 
more than $1.5 trillion. A number 



fc* 


- ’*» 


Sam Walton 


_ in Nashville, Tennessee, from 
the Country Music Association. 
His award broke a three-year bold 
cm the top honor by Alabama, a 
four-piece band who sought an un- 
precedented fourth straight selec- 
tion. Skaggs’s band also was voted 
top instrumental group. George 
Strait, a former foreman of a Texas 
cattle ranch, won vocalist of 


of the oil-rich, including Annul 
i of Ocdc 


catue ranen, won mare vocam* w ; 4 
the year and album of the year fort 
“Does -Fort Worth Ever Cross} A/. 1 * 
Your Mind?* The motiwr-daughf' * 
ter duo, the Judds, also were doubfc \ 
vamu^winmngsui^eof theyear \ 

d I 


Hammer, chairman 


a dental 


Petroleum Corp-, and four Rocke- 
fellers left the list, five Rockefel- 
lers remain on die list, which in- 
cludes 14 billionaires. The 
combined fortunes of tire 400 total 
$134 trillion. Only 165 staned with- 
out significant inheritances. Four- 
teen are immigraiifs, 78 are women, 
and at least eight did not finish 
high scbooL Many of the rich are 
notveiy well known. James Jaeger, 
at 37 the youngest of the self-nude 
rich, earned $175 nrillkm with 
automotive radar detectors. Max 
Palevsky, 61, is a computer design- 
er trim made $200 million. Philip 
Hampson Knight used to sell sneak- 
ers. He still docs, in a way: He owns 
$195-miHion wrath of Nike. 

□ 


for “Why Not Me?” and vocal 
group of the year. Reha McEntire I 
was voted female vocaHst of the } 
year for the second straight time. 

. D 

Queen EXzabedt H is to be the 
first British monarch to viat China. 

She and hex husband. Prince PbSp, 

64. are to visit Qrina next year 
from OcL 12 to 18, and Hong Kong 
from Oct 21 to- 23, Buckingham 
Palace announced Monday. The 
queen, 59, last visited Hoag Kong 
in 1975. 

* □ 



-'5 


gga&B 




Ricky Skaggs, who dropped out 
of high school in the 12th grade to 
play music full time, won the enter- 
tainer of the year award Monday 


Jacques Cousteau’s experimental 
wind ship Alcyone sailed Monday 
from Norfolk, “ - 
around-the-wbrid‘ 
include stops at majors 
centers. The ship mid its five-ma£\2i 
crew will spend the next two years 
conducting marine research aw! 
testing the 103-foot (31 -amter) ves- 
sel's wind propulsion system, 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


AlCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS m 
fogfaMJeris (daffy) 634 59 65. Rome 


HAVE A MCE DAY1 BOKEL Hava a 

nca dnyl BofccL 


PORTUGAL SEE 
Hofidays & Travel. 


SUN. NX TIMES - Eurqet drSvery. 

2, BMXX>&ubh&. 


Write Keysra, FOB 2. 1 


MOVING 


GLOBAL 


YOUR BBT CHOKE 
FOR WORLDWIDE MOVING 


AM5IHDAM 

BOGOTA 


BRUS8HS 

CAIRO 

CARACAS 

HtANMUn 

HONGKONG 

JAKARTA 

LONDON 

MAMA 
MEXICO CITY 
PARIS 
QUITO 
STOCKHOLM 

SINGAPORE 

TOKYO 

USA 



358 009 
I0SJ 21011 
.-.422151 
2l) 582 376 

997 4321 

... 854 837 
9fal 511 79 74 
*34 87 20 
525 898 
... 755 8794 
65)264 4311 
3) 707 0471 
800) 223 2460 


A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 


WHY USE AGENTS? 


The Boa Service An m the 


largest Worldwide Mover 
CALL PA1 


LOtTOON W 578 66 11 


-PARIS (3) 036 63 11 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


LOUVEdENNES, beautiful house, big 
Jraatodmbm 
Yet 527 55 35 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


HANGING GARDEN 

Fbg. Sl Homme [Mabgnan) 

112 SQM. DUPLEX 

2 b e tinxxm . 2 baths, d ecorated. 
CHARM. 720 05 46 


FA1SANDBUE 


fied-a-terre, furrmhed, impeccable, 
perking. FSpOOOOO. OP11M &203 0S 


PEAR IB ST-HONORE 
Nko buffeting, otevator, leceplio n 
room, 1 bedroom, high ceffing. 

Para 2» 65 06. 


PONT NBJF. Cbmp«iy deaSng in nsal 
estate ie& bidding, dred, excopiioiv 
d titurion on quays overiookmg lb 
de la Gte. Ground Hoar. Rafted out 
to restaur raU + 400 sqm vacant. 
F9,5OOD0a TeL 326 98 6? 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


URGWT SALE for health raawra, «- 


tde nod to putfc peril with 

n r»H norm Monte 


trees. On wd known 
Corfu. Inviolate view qwer madfavte 
dtoteav gh*ng onto sea ided far swt 
rating, yachting, tennis, gaff ete. 
Equipmert mid construction of highest 
quality. SutaUe as hotel cbec or rest 
home. Write Haws 1882, 4 me des 
he. MC 98000 Monaco or nffex 469 
87 q MCS Ccrto extension 1882 


FASMONABIE MOUGBtS. Secluded 
280 stun. FYovenqte vffla an a 4800 
tqjn. tandtocmd gemden with pool, 
pool home & bcrbeaje.70 sq.ni. me*. 
zDnine. Wboden beans & ratique 
eerthenwrae libs t hr oughout. 
F3_2 KJ j 000l GaH MARK far details. 
SSI, 47. La Croisetto - 06400 CANNES. 
Teh P3) 38 19 19 


URGENT. Inheritance: Margin, lovely 
estate, 370 sqm Svbg space, very rice 
reception roans. Guest house; 6000 
site. paV, swimming pool, pool 
house. FYomofion Maxarf, Bureaux du 
RuH, 1 Promenade des AngUs. 06000 
hSoe. Tet93 88 37 37, tSwIMMO- 
ZAB 461235. 


COTE D’AZUR, Beaufeu sur Mer, 
'bourgeois' 1 vSa, 9/10 rooms, facing 
south open stow. F3, 100.000. fVonso- 
han Manet. Bureaux duRuhl.1 Prom- 
enade des Anglces, 06000 Mau Tnfc 
193) 88 37 37 TfalMMOZAR 461ZS5. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


OOTi D’AZUR. 600 VU1AS far sole 
from fJSOfiOO to SHOjOOOfiCtt What- 
ever your KtOe, whatever your bud- 
get, SUPER SHACK INTERNATIONAL 
Carnes has the vRa vow desire. In fad 
now is a poikuiariy odymtogeous 
tvne lo invest in o Cote D'Azur prop- 
erty. find out why by crfng MARK cr 

BCB on (93) 35 19 19, we mate 
dreams come hue! SSI, 47, La Oo>- 
sette - 06400 CANNES. 


CANNES.. Turn of the century vOa, 
ov eri ool dr ^ the dd port cndthaGpL 
selte. 300 xun. an 3 levels. Triple 
recaptio n 4 bedrooms, J with mo 
2 

Nee* 


pnea at fSXOJOOO. SSL 47. LoCrS- 
,06405CANPeS= (93)^819 


setter I 


'19 


COI! CTAZUIL Promenade des Anfl- 
laa, very nice 3 rooms, 1 05 iqm. Svmg 
roam 35, terrace, excmniand pan- 
oramic view, FI ,200.000. Promotion 
Mann, Hotel Merdmn, 06000 Nice. 
Tel 93 Bl 4B 80. Telex <61235. 


ITALY 


TUSCANY - UICCA 
hj p ot ton l 17th century historical castle 
with monumemd garden, some af rel- 
evant revenue. 1400 iqjn. to be tnms- 
fomed oe hotel, residence, coi ug e, cGn- 
ic. Far sab by 

HnUOARA TOSCANA SPA 
Via Gina Cdppmi 26 
50121 Feenze - hdy 


9 nun] woflong dbhn 
. Cm Asm 6 - 462171 Florence 
55 - 220249. 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


NEW YORK CITY COOP 
63rd/ PARK 
Exquisite budefay. 8 rooms complete 1 / 
renovated mderngt bdhs. Centred orr 
condtianing. Modem apfAcmces. Mir- 
be Roots, upholstered wals, wood 
bur l in o firyaoe, teatafujjy funeshed, 
and *So t» fvmshod. 50% ftmmcmg 
dfawe d . Ma in tenance S95Q a month. 

& 6 niBon, C cM or tlx Mt Lesfa Fern, 
(nointnuff 

Tet 212-8408660; Tk 237770. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LAGO MAGGfORE 
ASCONA-SWITZERLAND 

in this famous Swiss resort we offer first 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


SWITZERLAND 


das* apartments and homes. Bob 
ctoate the dd vilage of Anna aid in 


SF1 ,100,000. Mortpoges a low Swim 
s. Free far 


sob to 


mtoras rales. 

Foreigners. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 

VIA LOCARNO 27 A 
04-6612 ASCQNA 
Tet 0^93-352184 


LAKE GBCVA AND 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Foraignert con buy bvety 14m ti n et its 
with mognfficnnt views of Ldta Geneva 

fas Drublerets, Chateau cfOex near 
Gskmd, faytoL Price* from SF123JXX1. 
Mertg^es irato 65% at 6W% mtaest. 
GLOBE PLAN SJC 
Av Mon Repos 24, 

04-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland. 
Tet pi) 2? 15 12 Toe 25785 MBJS 
EeNttsbed Since 1970 


LAKE GENEVA 4- LUGANO, Mon- 
trmn, Gstaad region, Locarno, ate. 
Forcignm con buy magraficent new 
raxxtmerte/diatots/vaios. Bn dioiceL 
Swiss residency possfaie. H SEBOLD 
S>s Tour Gnu 6, CH 1007 Lcuecnw 
21/25261 1, Lugano office 91-687648 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


CANADA 


TORONTO, CANADA ■ LUXURY. 
Fuflv famhhed and eqwpped 1 & 2 


bedroom suites. Soper nr 

) rentals. Marker Suites 


Short/long terra 

80 Front 5t East, Sw. 222, Toronra 
M5E 1T4 Canada (416) 862-1096 


Brand New 


THE EXCELSIOR 


A Unique 

Hold Suite 
Residence 


Featuring 

1-, 2-, and 3- 
Bedroom Suites 


All Magnificently 
Furnished With Luxuriously 
Appointed Kitchens & Baths 


Offering 

RewSng far Foreigners 
fiscal Advantages 
Unique Setting 


fmi T . l Lu 

uiviumiraii iw 

Sports «d Lsisare 


f r r w ■ 

wroniRiB root 


24 Hour MteSari Aubfance 
Exeaithre Services AvaUMe 
Modsl Suites 


SWITZBlAND PU 63-514)4 
HE BON PORT 
1820 MONTHEUX 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

8 Ave.de Manae 
75008 Paris 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
562-7899 


AT HOME IN PAMS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOB KBIT OR SALE 

Hans'- 563 25 60 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


USA 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 


74 CHAMPS-ELY5EE5 8fh 


ShnSoi 2 or 3-room tymlmen t 
One month or mors. 

IE OAJUDGE 359 67 97. 


BASTILLE LOFT 


3 bedrooms. 2 baths. FT5 jOOQl 
T el: 563 68 38 


SHORT TERM STAY. Adwmragei of a 

hate! without meonweresnew. fael <* 
home in nice tiudas one bedroom 
aid mare in Paris. SORBJM- 80 rw 

de rUnhraratt. Peris 7ifa 544 39 4Q 


TRINITE 325 09 29 

Muysfcau 4 rooms, rouna F7500 


SHORT TBM M LATIN QUARTER 
N o ogent s. Teh 329 38 83. 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


MUETTE - LUXURY 

Doubb famg, 2 bedrooms. 


garage. F07QO. 
let 563 68 38 


3rd MARAIS. Nev Pioasso Manum. 
kxgo reception. 2 bs duom t, psHecr 
corxfitiorCdnrocter, P9900tSSl777 


A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 

affmg 


pre-opening savings on 
6 ma, 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studo, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


Executive Services Available 
Model Suites 

( 212 ) 371-8866 


GREAT BRITAIN 


BKENHAM LUXURY FLATS / 
haroa to lei / far s etom Lon don. Tet 
01-431 3191. Trim 8952387 G. 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN 

LUXURY FURMSHS APAKIMBm. 
fdh s erviaed, chain of Mayfira or 
adjownt to touingtan Paloae. From 
£300 to £550 per weefc. 3 motel* to 2 
yens, AtoantaiRon Matageraert Ud 
ul-491 2626. Telex: 299l8ST 

LARGE LUXURY MAYFAK Rat, 
drinnig rocra. btohen, bathroom, 
twinboraoom. Lift, porterage, long cr 
short let, ided far buunets person 
retiring norvhteef ahnoniiero in 
heart or lawn. Tali 01-493 Z295, 

LONDON. For the best fumehed flats 
and houses: Corraif the Spedabts: 
PWffp*. Kny and Lews. Teh South of 
Poric 352 81U, North of Park 722 
5135. Telex 27M6RESDEG. 

CHBSEA/KMGHT5BUDGE modem 
house furrahod to high straxkmi 3 
double bedrooms, 2 bcdhroc™, lap* 
Sveta Idtchen/dHina bolcanies,g» 
rage, ^irien £600/ w«^ 01 ^490^3 

HOLLAND 

Renftiouse International 
020448751 (4 tines) 

Nederitavan 19-21, Amdendam 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

YOUNG WOMAN, wrafdhg, setea 
room & both in private home, parafeB- 
te bkhen, <A ccxnfarts, ftjris 7A. 
About F1500. TeL Frtnce (3) 997 02 
03 from lOaoi 

EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 

US CITIZEN, MA14 B£A. Intemcteon- 
al Buriwas. wpenenced in »M. < qd- 
•ertaita. nrlmueilroixta. rnanavse 

oporahons, MidJe Eotf/Africa/Scarv 
tfaicivia. Seeks mraiageftient position. 
Free to Irovte / rekxMte. Coniact; Ji, 
PHtte, Soiddbt 68, KotoaaU 115 21. 
Gfi, Athern, Greece - Tbc 214297 


EMPLOYMENT 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

MRS OKMMZA7ION seeks cleric 
far aoBOwEng warit. Seme Hindi 
r squired. Sony F041I per raondv 
Written opptcuhexi with photo sfemrid 
fai mm let Peaonnel Section, 4- rue 
Jeon Key, 75734 Paris Codex 15 , be- 
fore 23710/85 

URGBfT. Profaniand idee womrat far 
a Iroffree dmp in Path. Mkemum 5 
: years auarianca, faSngixi Pfaato 
coteachforis 720 84 20. 

ONE8AL 

POSITIONS WANTED 

: S33 iSSr&£T£S; 

Job in Genera ora 

Private Security Agent 

large bytaw Me Security 

Governess/ Secretary ■ 

(Gaawte/frwKh/EngBdtl 

Wnto tot B 18-115433, Wkhas, 
CH-12U Geneva 3. 

YOUNG OXFORD LAW grodaate. 
mole, seeb foB time woric n Paris. 
Craidnvo, wil coriidir anything. Box. " 

41926^ LnT, 63 Long Aero, tixtdon. 

NEH> A DYNAMIC Pubfic bitendl 
fienrti, 23. bfcraxd, ewtefantpreiorv 
tation, Seefa ritakengnapociliga USA 
• Europe, free to travel Tel Rone c 
081 762025 

MCEMTBllG84rHOSieS24ion- 
don basral bate far openings. Inter- , 
ested et busnera and art- free -to 
IrawL Ttet 01 225 03 6B 3pm-12 

SOFHBnCATBJ nBNCH GW, wo- 
od experience.' fiuete in, German k 
seekfag an interasteBpaetiaainLoo- . 
don. iSl 01-235 1537. 

SOPHBnCAlttlL ATTRACTIVE vtef- 
Bgent, educated, fetorootionte lody 

PA / travel cewpenion seeta podfioa _ 
Teh tijndco (01)56 86 78. 

LADY, 37, 9US part time wort m 
hmateoeaparVcompamon or sponsor 
for 1 yera whfa itewroig to re tape. 
Tet Ufc 01-674 5897 

YOUNG JAPANESE raoddL ineSo- 

gU4 wel kardfad setea DriraesSsg 
aavueete Tokyo. 58815 90 Tokyo. 

SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


LOOKMG FOt TOP BRMQUALper- 
ronpelT CaB the ragiarii GR INigmM. 
MnUsnurf 758 »30 Paris 


EMPLOYMENT 




I 


SECKEl'ARtAL 
poarnoNS available 


Ml savxx ORGAMEZAnOM 

wn q uum LuvjuBon GoavunaBni 

o<Sa» in Cetteal finis h loaftog far an 
Bigfah m other tornter Junior bkjsF 
ttnrtfr waritia A# Guraptmi Kroctar 
cf Mayo war’s dhpnrtuiirt. Bode id- 
a i w rt ora l y piaa & mned of 
folttktogrfMr^oMlkateSta 
fajnin whhmedin-hHfaywoiloI (he 
office. Seme of humor, dxxoioa & 
drodgory and w ome ora <fahncl nd- 


CVfa Bae 2B«); Hen« 
Wbarur, 92521 MmsK Cod ek. 
France, as soon ro powAht , J ' » 1 


IP M IIV I U V U MAI PO 

has a vacancy far o Ww g o ol seato 

lory w4h motfwr toegue^Bf 

gfiiibcx1hatdab*qjriedfle,ofwOld 
^roceni^ ndm an adiafepfL 


qiiresdiorlbond lypistfE^ih me 
or totem, Marians howto' 
hendtPhoae «* 747 12 l_ 
4327 front Hla3D atp -f 1230pm 


EDUCATICNAI,. 1 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 






NnqiCR» i rasniqN 


5 degree 
•rice ora r*- 
AironAMato- 


- 486 DSG/WE 
Alin Karo n Pm npfaiei 
APO W 09286 USA 


‘4 


DOMESTIC 
. POSRHOP® WANTED 


Strow. 


otS 


PAGE 18 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


ATJBdTtON EXECUTIVES 


In the International HenJd fri- 
bone, where marm than a tbtd 
at a mSBon loaders nrarftf- 
•mde, m eet at whom mo m 
bat**** and industry, w« 
road it Jad tela* ns f Amis 
613S95J batons 10 ant, sp- 
urring that wo eon tele* you 
back, mtd your message wm. 
appear w&bt 49 boon. The 
rate h US. S 9.80 or loot 
equivalent per One You ami 
bSode en S g det e and verifi- 
able bOKna address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE A UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

Incorporation end nanagMewtim UC 
Me of Man, Tarfa, Anguaki, Otomd 
Gfaotorand 


• Irotterfcdo awA**y 


• Boat leu is lralioni 
a AaxrurtwraS. aiawifn 


Ml 




Ido of Mar 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS PARTNBi WANTS) 


Successful enkrepreneur [Ui d faen ) in- 
tends to open o small restaurant/right- 
dub in the Fra- Eas t . Bangkok, Chang 
Mra ftratend or JdartQ Indonesia 
would be preferred l ouA ons. I wil sup. 

£ ihe eppird and expertise. I need a 
I bumatai or woman at a part- 
ner who a familiar vrith load laws, rag- 
uh6am and aAure. The successful erav 
dkiate wd own a peraentoge of the 
business. Incelcfition to Bit, the imSvid- 
ud wffl aha oaisf in the m ram gemawl of 
the op erob u iL Please send detaile d re- 
sume and badiground history (include □ 
photoyapN ratnal Kx 
M-D.G. 

P.a BOX 5TI 
RICHMOND. VA 23298 
U.SJL. 


YES1 Invest in one of Anmm'i meat 
iexafing technologicnl bra 
through* in the nuf ndwtry. Over 
XfiOOn* trees pfraited in 19B4. 
Projected annual income eventuedy 
reaches 52%. firodottog trees brown 
la live aver 100 was. 

WEIS' ENaUIRES KVTTHJ. 
Material anAkle in Engfah, Famch 
'German. Box 2358, Herald Tribune, 
192521 Neuifly Cecbx, F ran c e 


INDIA ’86 

A SEMINAR IN LONDON 
AND DELHI 


Business K Investme nt 
in Indfa, January 1 


II nights Shwafon Hotels, New York, 
London. Deh, Taj Mohd at fuB moon. 
Into Republic Day Parade & London 
sales 

l Kerry.*? dt mduswe, lax d edutoble 


Telex , 


2-5 

” »44. Tht 28247 SCS 


Tel 01-493 4244. Tb. : 


SC5LDN G 


ARMYSWUBt 
TTSuqr array e qujpm ent 

2 AJ Unds « amrowtoi 

3 Formula for roaldng RJLP. IxAet 

* E Jm. 

■ suppSertfar 


fa' 

Attn, Mr Joinw Gna 


Attn MT jam 

115 S^ A 

Foe 5953082 


Ftoces strictly Sorted. Discounl before 
15 Nov 85: SteiSng Westminster hutid 
41 Wtrtehc*. London SW1 0ia3?2922 
or USA (BOO) 2624777 or 203 659 64X 


LONDON 

fiduciary & trust services I Company 
farmahons & donwAabon I h rorrxterx s; 
d kn I Bank accounts estdbisnad I 
General bushws advice & OBtaanoe I 
JPOL 17 VWdegate 9. Ltmdon El 7HP 
fS 01 377 1474. Tic 893911 G 


YOUR AOBtT IN MOROCCO 

SGHAMASCH MAROC SA 

Write: 44 Aro Hasson 5eghk 
CowWoncn 01, Morocco 
Cal: 272604, 272652. 222221 
Thu 22901 


International Business Message Center 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES ? 


I - US$7,950 


THS RNANCIAL T1MB 
RJBOPFS BUSNBS5 NEWSMfER 
operates a ipecid dobvery tervice in 
lie Central Athern raea of Greece raid 
in the fatewing ones in Spent* 


Modnd - Barcelona - Bteaa 
Far farther detarh, please con ta ct: 


John Coley. F.T. FrodrfutVtek 75980 
Bil Boyatiri, tel: Athens 722 3469 or 
Infl Pre» Servwe. Madrid, rofa 7339548 
No F.T. ... No C om m e n t 


BAHAMAS 

BUS HBS COh ittCnONS 
Incorporation and management of 
u ompratoe; m nstonqe with resort, in- 
duUnd and qnb 


CM benefits and lax conc es aonsr red 
estate ides and management; Govern- 
meat ta me* r e-nyoicin g offshore 
banUng, trust, NiwOneit and trade 

transoetxans. 

Fu ianbd Mmagement CarpcraBon Ltd 
284 Boy Street, P.O. Box N-4826 
Ntnsou Bdwmas 
Ph. (B09) 325-1126 or 322-8549 


WE ISSUE LETTBtS OF CXHXT 
from reofor luii. 

We confirm L/Ci from Third World. 
Have promissory notes lap 100 bento, 
took far Lenders. Tde 4181971. 
Tebu 241176. Demo, Grow*. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


INTBMATIONAL OHGHORE 
COMPANY INCORPORATIONS 
FROM £110 

Comprehensive Admnoiinrian- 

Naafaee sennas. Powers of Attorney. 
Begtsterad dfioes* Telex, t d ephaw. 
maJ farwprcfing. 

Mend B eseo rS i 
Bdkxurrie house, 
SunmerhiL 
Ue of Man. 

Tel: J0S241 2802020240-28933 
Trdmc 628352 Island G. 


RESDB4CY IMMIGRATION 
NATURALIZATION 

Government outhorced Bwestmert 
programs sepeoSarty besutnod 
far person seeking fati riJnenship 
dona or new homel o nd. 


MO HTBINATIONAL 
P.O. Bax 361 P.O. Bax 263 
London N1IXJ Mrabdfa (Malaga) 
United Ksnadran Span 

slpiW mr* 


THE UK AS A TAX HAVEN. An n. 
creasing number of multwvtoonafc 
are decavering iha sufatonttd bene- 
fits to be derived by usng the UK as q 
fax hewen. The Sta nl ey Davs argon. 
cation is recogm yn d as the leadng 

expert in dm jpeciaEzed fidd. As an 

introduction so our services well be 
pleased to send yc*j. without obUgo- 

lion ra coet. ora Ihroe^xxl reprat: TV 

UK as a Tin Horn. Why nor eoreoa 
Stanley Davis (Company Services] 
UtL, 124-128 Gty Bead, London EOV 
2NL Teh 01 2 » 51. Telex 21957 
DAVE G. 


YOUB 

SOUTH AMBUCA SPECIALIST 
Provides you with information on real 
etoats attach / ogenh. res i denc e per. 
me. atom cslxp. spead requests, via 
arm nepresenronon m South America 
In Europe: 

KAROPARI ImmoUerhAniaae 
u. V ertBttt fa nrogei, GmbH 
Apotteiratrasu 11. D- 5000 Cologne I. 
Tel BSD -221-55 18 21 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


INVESTMENTS 
SS OUR AD ON 
PAGE 4 

TRANS CONTAINER 
MARKETING AG 


YOUB OWN COMPANY IN 

SWITZERLAND 

ZURICH - ZUG - LUZERN 
From SF50D per annum, up. 
Canfidesa. Boaentr. 36. OidSOO Zug. 
Tet 004142 21 32 88. Tbt 864 913T 

A Present For Your Son 


nAGRANOS 
OPIUM, CHLOC, OSCAR 
Men naliond whol es alef rin xxx iei m 
the USA toth e xce llent fin on c x i bode- 
mg h fadattg far the above plui Estec 
loader, Aremp Logorfeld & mare. Cal 
214-24fr.l651. Tlx, 506176 MV fauer- 
prises, or wntfc P.CX Bax 529 Adduce, 
Texes 75001 . u ttent Rj w Mr. rerirint 


PANAMA COMPANIES with nrannee 
Directors raid c o nfidante! Swiss or 
Luxembrajrg brart aocouni fanned in 
48 hours. Swss branch office opened 
for tax-free trading. A n onymous terra 
deposits. Foreign exchange & buEan 
diatom. Matox. 10 ftrt Place. St. 
James's, London SW1. Tat 629 S26. 


BUSINESS FOR SALE - IM4, heart of 
Haul PrcMraa, vary old "bcsfide" 
f!4lh century ) , POO syi s, + lltrh eO- 
are garden park. 7 bedrooms. J 
comforts. Reemwau 40 seen. Calm & 
superb mew. Ind guide books. Inter- 
noMnd efieraela. FIJOOJJOO. ” 


(16-321 36 7064 


CAPITAL AVAIIABIE- Reputable in- 
vesfar/irxxtoger interest e o in mvosl- 
mo CMxld in new, exdtmg, easnOMt- 
a«y feesile ooricepls. Pteroe send 
detrali in strictest confidence to John 
S. Shannon. 9801 CoSro Ave, Bd 
Harbour, HA 33154 USA 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


COMPUT HtS fa r bimnan or personal 
use. Consultant services, sales, export. 
Gntomized jrogrammaig. Major 
brands - lowest pnees. Any quantity. 
Export pasdih. Mr. Lawrence, Peris 

163 2989 7(1 


Tlx 213B2Z Tel (1) 563 1 


348 


A NEW FRENCH ORGANIZATION 
offers nsi i itnanB in business negotia- 
tions & contracts in inti & ratoond 
fieltfa heavy & Sgh* irxKaJry.tSstrftiu- 
hon & consumer soles. BJT. 4 rue 
PWtera. 75011 Paris or the 214037 
under ref. BJ.T. 


NY 8USME55MAN w* successful 
ittX soles, i li ra fa ting A avitoion bade* 
graued seeks opportjnfy to repraent 
£/« coortd foT bueness m NY. 


Strang uxe i ug wnmtf jM ^ fluratl 4 


fatoubgm. '21275 7! 
510)1X6291 Mr. Steft 


tlx, 


REMBRANDT AVIATION NY offers 
Lnar Jetu IQngAiri & other high gud- 
■ty baaness ararafl. Let SEMffiANDT 
help you find the aircraft tadraed for 
your rosdfic needs. Cell Bob Hamer 
NOW (* 21 2-333-3602; telex: 5101 
003291. 


PRIVATE MVE5TORS 

m hxyative deds .. 

(nxninijm returns 305(4 imite 
mem ber cnplieafons. Details from 
Secretory, PS. Box 185, Key West. 
FLA 33041 USA. 


fiFHCKNT, RESOURSBU.' French 
lady, blngual, to r e pr es ent you in 
Per®. 5oad & innate u s w t ra i o s ex- 
penence, inatwralhy, top references. 
Bax 2806, Hradd T/Svne. 92521 
NeraBy Cedex. France. 


MARXITJNG CONSULTANTS. Sates 
& purcha en g Tvtcai worldwide. Ex- 
perienced personnel solve yaur setos 
or punjhm ng praUtota. UA INC 
Bax 222831. Cermet. CA 93922 USA 
or call 40642441999, 


(*W UNE OF COSMETICS available 
for fcladc women. Territorial uv ral abte 
wo r l d wi d e. In ter ested pr m cmc b en- 
quire: Presidenl BBC Inc, 310 faaad- 
woylawience. New Ygrii 11559 USA 


BORDEAUX WINS — OVINORD, 
10 tue Marioe. 92110 CMw, frcnce. 
Tel: (I) 730 30 54 Ac StliSS HJTA. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


HERBAL MEDICINES. Larged ratal 
herbafats in UJt offer unique booted 
rraige satoble worldwide sefa. Mr. 
Milton, Cathay of Baumemaulh Lid 
Cleveland Ed. Bournemouth, 8H1, UK 


ABOVE AVERAGE RETURN an Euro- 
market placenenb combined with 
cwrency ircraadiam. Unxted refa G- 

geg^teblicta.POBa, 


RORflXA-TEkAS MotS Home lots 
from SI 5 JOO. Rmurti Sw udira i A guar. 
antec Reply EngfirfiJ French, Germcn, 
Hotair See 8715 CH5610 WoNov 
/ZurkK 


PANAMA UBHHA. CORPORATIONS 
from U5S4Q0 avai obto n ow. Tel 
P624I 2024a Telex: 62B3S2 GLAND 
GTivioljq. 


SOLING OIEMICA1S. Solvents & lab- 

oratory equipment. Univenoi Otemi- 

Sfe£3&F u - r,mmi ” 


FINANCIAL aSTBBPRBlBRt fanafira 

cd phases. Would Bee to warit cfcedfy 
far lender. On commission. P.O. Bax 
262. Rtverdcto, NY 10471 USA. 


If YOU ARE LOOKING far a rapro- 
sraUcdve in Japan, then we can hdp. 
Write HennanosMiwaSA.rUBcfAr- 
pert 32. CH-2503 Senne, ^ 


FASWON ACOESSOUES, to ntetratto 

Canada. Contact Mr. Oranv PO Bee 


951. Staten A. Htedton, Cratada 
1W3P9. Tim 061 -8568. 


OPFBB FOR SALE: Different arirand 

Swatch models 1985. Your quotation 
in detent Mnbmea 700 pieced toM- 
Boumotei, the KBOH 5721 0. 


DYNAMIC AMBUCAN IDEA notch 

finenod bailing far European mar- 
ket. Bar 2868. Ante Tribune, 92521 
Neraffy Cedex, France 


BNANCMG MORTGAGES fiduciary 

services, xw es tate nb and accouei. 

Cot imtestatoni office DT Mr. Wyn- 
gorade, Belgfan 32»/3D9»l 


OWNER SHIS in Paris SHs smell 3 floor 
ExAfing. Ground floor butcher shop. 
Top loooasen. Wnto Mne SoasTw 
Ate Jean Jaraw. 75019 Pm. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


LOW COST RES8304CY & 
in fitad haveov Apphr for fal 
1» PCX Bt» 85, PcxJENg. Id* cf Man. 


BANKING AW Investment Advisors 
wanted - roc Aitf co rgm iia on. 1FK- 73 
New Bowl St, London Wl, Engfarri 


2ND PASSPORT 35 countess. GMCJ 
■ 26 Kleomenou. 106 76 Athens Greecel 


BM AN) COMPACT save thoraraxh 
$SS- USA (30Q 949-4184 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


MTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOP1E 

UNUMHBMNC 
UAA. A WCNUIIIMDE 


A compteta peraond & bueness service 
p raV eSng a unique colle cti on or 


tdented, vraettla & rauM ngjd 


indWtduoh far aB : 


212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, NJTjC. 10019 
. Service RepraiMnMivM 
Needed Waridwide. 


BUSNBS5 SBfVICfiS 1UXEMOUR0, 
Acco raei ng / Company Fcrnatens & 
Management / Seateiaid / T elepho n e 
/ Telax / Mail 7 Office space far rart. 
Fraser, 12-14 Bd rfAvrandxny 1160 
Luxentoarag. Tel 352/492153. 7fa 1433 


PRIVATE DETECTIVE SCAWMAWIAI 


and n nfantC caff Norway: 24 hours 
02- 42 7214. Ac 78949 gem 


■ 42 72 14, Ac 78949 agent. Mamsg- 
er G. Refctov, farmer poSce/aranr offi- 
cer. waridwide. BtabSihwd 196fL Past 
toieiTKterax<raget4.N4n54Cdo1. 


LONDON OmCS BASE, mdtea ocL 
dress / trix p hone qrawrino. Fulsec- 
retorial bmMp-serviro& AD Types 
Bantess Senicet. 480 firiham Rood. 
SW6,Tefc 01-381 1292. ; 

HOW TO GET A Aid PASSPORT, 
■wort - 12 cDutiteet anehaed. Dm 
«» WMA, 45 Lyndhraif Terrace, 
Sate 57. Certret Hong Kang. 


BUSINESS SERVICES I CffFICE SERVICES 


MEXICO - NOMH-SOUTH-CnM 
Amerien, PR,lxronero setet, Mexican 
rep, fluent Write Cervraitei 

Savedra 4Q, Guodctojraq Mewax 


TIME TO BUY OOU1749 paperatea 
atebsis. Detail. WMfa «X^dhunt 
Tee. Srite 57. Hong Kriag. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


CASH FARMS to buy US. real 
to 40% JmIow mate; For 


mefieeDr. 


on write DACq 1168 Tour- 
■, Newbury tofc. CA9I32BL 


ARBITRAGE- PRIME BANK caber- 
dL Tet London 373 2955 / 373 2648 
7930 2422 7 385 5*92. Telex 8951622 
TARRGO G UK 


DOUKE YOUR MONET in 30 months 
| / Guaranteed. Contra* flOC. lama I 
Poric. Texas 76634. Tbc 7973fiaiiii 


DIAMONDS 


fin* 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 


cf lowest wbafesolle prices 
rfirad ham Anhwrp 
■r of the tSesnand world. 

Fid gueneUee. 

For free price fat write 


HNHB-2018 Antwerp 


Brig wra - Tet^2 31234 07 51 
Tbc 71779 sylh. At the Diamond Gub. 


Herat of A n t w e r p Diamond irtdus try 


CMFT1CE SERVICES 


GB®vA, wu ^sygr* ss 

KK 5 Kte <to Own, .1 307 rr 

"52 (32) 86 W^flx. 428388 KBS 


Meff eBkm. 
phonto, tdex, seertfurioi services. 
Contoctt Mm Busiest Ceteec. Teh 

5179211 (12teesLTb6 61344 8 




Snce 1957 LST. provides — . 

l- 5 roe OArtoit 


Yolur OflFktt in Germany 

_we are “At Your tereke" . 


* ™5r**j 3p ? d «fRoro far the short 
^ I”? orffi fenfl term. 

• h*HTKUfaitoly frraned ofGce end. 


proftodondteff your tfapewd. 

a *P°- 

_ rata riomiafe for Germaw/Euraoe. 


- - ^pep o- 

9 ° smK *! on cmSotr 


Urol 

tierooHats an HabbauwBrafc * 

6000 Frcraffrar am Mate 1 


61 


Telefax: 69-59 S7 70 
Tefex: 414561 - . 


your jnstant omc^ 

FRANKFURT/ MAIN 


Wfa equipped. 

Own prating place. 

WORLD-WIDE 
BUSMBS CENIRES 


HtaejMiinr ABee 2 - 10 


_Frodo Show Cetera. 
ftgnfcfarhfhL 90- 

Tbc 4185297. WWBC D 


.NEW M MAORI) 
■OQUBMltal 

GfMOMUMNOHOia 

• fi^egrap p^f offa , ^ 

^ Pwmrawte ho^' 
MuWnntd wterfai 


Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de rEvangile, 7501 8 Paris 

t 



f) 



e ^ 






I