Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


ribunc 


lie Washington Post 


SDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 


Alpra bJHD-v bi W L_l5.l ( WJ* 

A now 105. W, Ow — omOftok 

Satan USODn Jmfan. *»H i . .» Wh 

u T m ^SW»- K mft 9 a. 2000 £*»-— -**&* 

Cnda — C$1.3 _ m a. &*rf Mod 

C«™ ttU( rji® S-dAraOB-MOE 

Benmort— UODJSr. . _ nl « Span- liOftn. 

Em* nof. 2^*5 5 - s “- 7 ® i *- 

ftfcwl JSOfM. *«*»*wl-3J0 Sc- 
hema 400 F Wo^aw-— IBs* Tunas USODw 

Cananr r _2J0OM '**> 33C * m TuA#r — T£ 6003 

&arfS*an_»r. <***» — *»»■ UX£ *K0* 

Oraa 80 Dr. Ndhori«6-17S R Ui *U (Ewr*t_ Id# 

Iron 11 j fab Nooie^—’TOK. Yupotons 2*0 D 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


W&s • 


S&L reu -, 
lit... 
in 

■a*. *.. • 

W V •• . ■ 
jrrti . . . 

4*Senr*-. 


Ortega Blames 
f Criminal Policy 9 






•- emogeocy that was imposed in addition to suppartforthegnearC-' within the military 

V - *%■ March 1982 but which was e*-<gd in - las, inrfudmg $27 miniftp in nrm- . The co mmi ace’s chairman, Sen- 
\ fi:- July 1984. The only major measure military aid approved by Congress ator Barry M. Goldwater, Republi- 
that had remained in force was a in June, the^Ohited States holds can of Arizona, said the proposals 
n- . ' r— 4 X- requirement that newspaper and xmlitaiy maneuvers near Nicaragua could be the starting point for the 


By William R. Long 

Ua Angela Times Service 

MANAGUA — P residen t Dan- ' 
iel Ortega Saavedra has announced 
the i suspension of many dvil rights- Danirf hm 
m Nicaragua because of “the UJ5. ' v* 1 ^ 1 — 

government's criminal and aggres- 
sive policy” toward the country. which Mr. Orteg 
Mr. Ortega signed a decree Ties- cent of the vote, 
day extending for a year a state of Mr. Ortega stc 


or 


on 


Senate Report 
Says joint Chiefs 
Should Disband 


By Bill Keller 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The Senate 
v . Armed Services Committee made 

Duid OrtcgaSanedni KfiiTS 

Chiefs of Staff, strcamHmng the 
which Mr. Ortega won with 67 per- Defense Department, and efevat- 


nt of the vote. mg the senior combat commanders 

Mr. Ortega said Tuesday that in in. the Held to leading positions 


requirement that newspaper and military maneuvers near Nicaragua could be the starting point for the 
magazine articles be reviewed prior that “threaten us constantly with first comprehensive emmges in how 
to publication. . direct military intervention.** the military operates since the Ei- 

Tbe new decree suspends the h- ™,vt .bar senhower administration. 



Spadolini Quits 
I talian Cabine t 
Over Hijacking 


The Associated Press 


rest Mr. Abbas arrived 30 minutes 


:• “ Sjjj stricted movement within Urn own- ^rted that the SSjam aSminilS strcsscd that they had not endorsed T) 11 , ffT 

' -S lry Privacy. Also uon faadmierf«3wk peace ef- the^ recommendatioiis. But they OlUlCt W OU] 

■■ amended are the right to organize fort*, by the Contadoragroup. s “ d *J e nuhlar y was 

•v * labor and to strike, the right Comprised of four Latin AmakSn ^ 

- Il Q ^ * working u, ^edwas^fulspendingm pea*, WASfflNGTON - A We 

^wSecn^^utborities Some members of the committee that washed ashore in Syria was 


g^tees that had beeturswred. on the Costa Rican and Honduran 
They indude the nght of free ex- borders were provoked by the 
press on. public assembly, unie- Umtcd States. Mr. Qrteca also as- 

ctnr>fad »L- -~* - • - ■ — : V. _ . 1 


Mr. Gaktwater and Senator Sam 


^ Nunn, Democrat of Georgia, the 
^ senior Democrat on the panel, 
stressed that they bad not endorsed 


A coffin containing the body of Leon Klinghoffer, the American killed during the hijacking 
of an Italian ship, was wrapped in a flag Wednesday before being flown from Syria to Italy. 

Body of Slain American Identified; 
Bullet Wounds Found in Head, Back 


ROME— The Republican Party after he had been allowed to leave 
of Defense Minister Giovanni Spa- the country, according to Defense 
dolini said Wednesday that il was Ministry sources, 
leaving Prime Minister Bettino A statement from Mr. Spadolini, 
Craxi’s coalition to protest the re- quoted by the newspaper La 
lease of a Palestinian sought by the Stamps on Wednesday, gave cre- 
United States in the hijacking of deuce to Mr. Craxi’s argument that 
the cruise ship the Achille Laura Mr. Abbas was allowed to leave 
But Mr. Craxi, a Socialist, said because the United States had 
that he did not intend to resign failed to produce the evident to 
without submitting his cabinet to a justify his arrest under Italian law. 
parliamentary vote of confidence. According to sources dose io the 
He said that he would make bis defense minister, the evidence was 
government's case to the parlia- not delivered by the U.S. govern- 
ment on Thursday. Mr. Craxi’s men l as promised by Mossad, the 
five-party coalition" holds a major- Israeli intelligence agency, 
ity in the 360-seat Chamber of The sources added that, instead 
Deputies even if the Republicans of going to the governmental and 


vote against Him 


judiciary officials concerned, the 
evidence was sent to Italian mili- 


Mr. Spadolini, a former prime cvioence was son to iiauan mui- 
minister, said that he expected that aty MtdUgjm* ^officials and was 
his party's decision w£tid bring not delivered to Mr. Craxi until late 
about the collapse of the 26-month- Monday night, 
old cabinet, Italy’s 44th postwar A Defense Ministry spokesman 
government. confirmed the existence of the evi- 

TVc Republican MAM*. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupauka comandeered the day before by prebend Mr. Abbas, who remains 

WASHINGTON — A corpse four hijackers. at large. 

at washed ashore in Syria was Attorney General Edwin Meese M dweteweri that the FRT Mr ' 

ratified Wednesday as that of 3d said the United States had “hard involved in the search for Mr s b 

»n Klinghoffer, the American evidence" to support its all^ation Abb ^ althouah the attornev een- ,adang 
n-a r .i — c — . Almas, attnougn tne anorney gen- a c 0 vemment s 


are pemritted to search homes and w »' objected to the report s blum end- 

make detentions without warrants. - Mr -. t «^a said thm meats of asm of how. ite milhaiy operates 

Hie state of emergency was im- “SffiHj!** 51 . made . Nicanmua and said the proposed changes 

posed and has been extended re- wo " c parses, would make matters worse, 

poudhr on die ground that it mi SS! Soa»r J<to W. to. ^ >» ru "“ l “ d - 


was announced after Mr. Spadolini 
and Mr. Craxi conferred lor more 


to comment on its content, which 
was termed secret. 

It was not immediaielv clear 


identified Wi 


operates Leon Klinghoffer, the American 
changes killed in the hijacking of the Achill a 


t large. , . „ ... ' ... , whether the evidence supplied to 

Mr Mmsc disclosed that the FBI ^ ^ endazed the t j xe i^ijans was the same as that 

taSSSfa 5? FT™* 0 }! han ? m i of b " rited Wednesday by VS. officials 

jadang and has refused to endwse who said that evidence in the Unit- 


Lauro cruise ship, the State De- ctfficial, Mohammed Abbas, was 


^ Slue, would prove Mr. Abbas's 


erat said ne cua not want to discuss to justify the release of Mohammed 
the specifics of any law enforce- Abbas, a Palestinian leader who the Zl 
mem siraiegcs. United States contends master- 


involved in the hh3cltine. , ’ “■ J «««*«•- add; 

KSSLgeihe mem strau^ies. Unit 

nature of the evidence. At the White House, the official, °^nd 

At the White House, a senior who spoke on condition of ano- ship. 


^ UUIOU .1 I - . . ,, — a a .. . 

At the White House, the official, minded the hijacking of the cruise fj™’ 


SS 5 SS 5 B «.wasssr » s Si^ 

ed sucrrillas. “The government and the heroic ais amounted to “open-heart u «t,r*rwMTi At the White House, a semor who spoke on condition of ano- ship. 

fTheReafian administration de- people ramKrtpSt that these ac- surgery on the Department of De- administration official disclosed nynnty, described die shipj-to-shore Mr. Spadolini has condemned It- 

nJi inrwt ti^ues of sabotaKC and political fens^ and said Lhc eristino svstem ff^shot wounds, one m in telligence gave the conversations as Virtually public aiy$ release of Mr. Abbas, who left 

United^ Scripts^ ship, broadcasts," sugg«ting it was rela- the counuy Saturday for Yugosla- 
JSedWW^S^ gWMflteSdU, Mr^dwaierVSktSISmg ££Sw!hL5£ ashore conversations between the lively easy to overhear the four Pal- via and whose whereabouts are not 


The tape, according to Italian 


himself to the hijackers as Abu 
Khaled and being greeted by them. 


acr oirperv on the 'DenRrtnvmt of De. i oc stale uepartment Sam mere aiminisurauon official disclosed nynnty, described the ship-to-shore Mr. Spadolini has condemned It- who resnond that ihev are “await- 

£ kSPZtSlSSZ SrSintemgence gave the ^nv^tkns as “vinuaUy puWk ^snSSTfr. Abbas, who left 

the “Ha« tnwn nc an vrarc nf rL*nn> ” It “d another m the back. Unitti States transcripts of ship- broadcasts, suggesting it was rela- the country Saturday for Yugosla- .. ... , , , , , 

to-shore conversations between the lively easy to overhear the fom Pal- via and wh«e whereabouts ue not SHs™ 


RandiwitfastigHtwrina iKwr punity,” he safd-. Defense Department. 

— ij 1 of their country by violating basic - In a related development, Nica- A Pentagon spokesman said 

freedoms and refuang to tolerate xaguan security agents confiscated agency officials had not had a 
— dissent,” said Larry Speakes, the the first, issue of a Roman Catholic chance to read the 645-page study. 
SEte White House spokennan. He said it Churdi newslater critical of the The repon contends that the mil- 

reflected “the Sanffinistas’ fear of Sandinist goyernmeiiL \ itaty services are preoccupied with 

v-; 5S3o their own people.”] The Interior Ministry said that it ' their own programs, leaving critical 

i-'l; The restrictions on dvil liberties had been published without autho- gaps in the strattsy, equipment and 
— were eased last year during cam- : rrorfipp «nd eftnmin eri “hi ghty po- skills needed to fi^it together. 

‘ paigning for nr wddm tifll Jitical” material. ’ ' The study’s director, James R. 

.'—11 ‘ . : . Lochtf - 3d, defended the report at a 

. .. --r “. -:c •- . - -committee hearing.~saymg the do- 

* *■■*- __ . — ' - . ’ fehse secretary was undermined by 

^ U.S. Says EC Subsidizes 

\j-ii ¥ ■■ ltaiy services to protect each oth- 

« Wheat Exports Unfairly • <SSh» 

. r. A J The review was prompted by 

..Ti;: R V Term n- “ul fanners suffer doubly — problems of inuraendoe _coordina- 


LKSCOX ueparanenu r tammiti ryn 

A Pentagon spokesman said t ^ , 

agency officials had not had a A Department official said 

chance to read the 645-page study, the body would be returned to the 
The report contends that the mil- United States, but he did not know 
itary services are'preoecupied with when. 


Achille Lauro and Mr. Abbas. 
That official said that the United 


estinians who seized the Italian known, and the failure by Mr. .., ervenc oy me leader o. Palestine 
cruise ship. Craxi and Foreign Minister Giulio ^benmon Oi^amzanon. Yasser 

« - . . Andreotti. a ChristLin Uemocmt ^ Craxi sought Mr. 


The official said the hijackers ap- WSEZ 

Mr. Abbas as wdl, including refer* partly planned «, Jry out In Mr. Abbas’s onle 

dices to him being known person- attack when the AchiUe Lauro dunng “ e “ J “ ^ ^ were ^ 

ally by the four Palestinians, now docked at Ashdod, an Israeli port ■ Evidence Went Astray surrender immediai 


Mr. Klinghoffer, 69, who was on snowing tney accepted instructions 
a vacation cruise with his wife, was from him. 
lolled on the Italian liner Oct. 8 and Mr. Meese said the United States 

his body was-dumped over the side -was “malting as wnirfh headway as 
of the ship. The vessel had been w^vpasably can” in efforts to ap- 


ally by the four Palestinians, now docked at Ashdod, an Israeli port 
in Italian custody, and information city, but “botched” the operation, 
showing they accepted instructions .. ... . . . 


Mr. Abbas, 38, is an associate of Washington Post reported from 
Yasser Arafat, the PLO chairman, Rome: 


Mr. Meesesaid the United States but y* official said the United 
is “making as much headway as 

yp<KaWy can” in efforts to ap- . (Continued on Page 7, CoL 5) 


uing the hijacking. Mr. Abbas’s orders, according to 

the source, were that the hijackers 
Evidence Went Astray surrender immediately, leave their 

c r ... , _ arms behind, prepare to abandon 

Earher. Loren Jenkins of Ihe ^ admit that their mission 
artm*™ Pos, reported from “ P “‘ .Kjadipe of iSHSp 

but a terrorist raid on the Israeli 


U.S. Says EC Subsidizes 




Arafat: Losing Ground on Both Sides 

Ship Affair Damaged PLO Chiefs Stature, Experts Say 


By Terrace Hunt 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — President 


“U.S- fanners suffer doubly — problems of interservice coordma- 
lower prices and reduced export ^on that have beset U.S. military 


volume,” the White House said. 


iems in Vietnam, Iran and 


By Thomas L Friedman 

New York Tunes Service 

JERUSALEM — Yasser Ara- 


eaefa for their own reasons: Syria designed to compound the embar- 
because it believes Mr. Arafat is rassment from the Achille Lauro 
flirting with U ^.-sponsored peace affair for Mr. Arafat as wdl as for 


— ^g(?/tmfiririy i 
and thus 


In another' development, the Grraada, the Lc» /yigeles Times slanding mroamxa, and Jordan berause it m assodate of his, Mohammed 

HutasSV ^Jfe T 2Saf!L been greatly dme^dby 4. “SSJ % 


^ The study’s authors also said his support for the very same iniria- sought by the United States as the 

W ' that the Pentagon’s long-range pol- lives. “mStennind" of the hijacking, and 

aua mus lorcmg aown wauu gram ***■ “ do 001 fl PP ear 10 heweD- SdleEasf^uS^ ° f The Syrian signal to Mr. Arafat for President Hosni Mubarak of 

u.S. MiesL He. ordered tbat Ihe - ™. . . a* hM u> avei NEVS A.XALYSK ■’■fe 


mne and cigarettes. ; ^ c^Qccted" ^^ Tteraalystssaythchqackmgrf NEWS ANALYSK™ 

Taiwan has maintained right abkrwSs. the Itahan enuse ship, combined i>tW5 AINALYbL? 

controls on inroens of these prod- The report Warned Congress for SS came in the fora of a brief 

nets thiDueh hish tariffs and dis- a. u n,het)mh'ai sV^nnifu ™ sal Monday to meet with two r rnm n-~»rr-,r 


C .~~ — ~ “t, - “ ~o — — - -J-- „„ A r ; nnr .i,., luuuuiaisu nuu sue uuuiuuuuf 

.S. vdieat He ordered that the cigarettes- only looseiy «mnectcd" to avaiL 

casebetakentointcniationfllnego- Taiwan -has ma i ntained right able resources, 
tiatians. . controls on imports of these prod- Hie report Warned Congress for 

He also accused South Korea of nets throo^hi high tariffs arid dis- a “substantial instability in defense 
denying fair protection to sp-caDed criminatory rules on distribution poHdes and programs,” and rec- 
“inteDectual prmjeny rights,” such and pricing practices, the White ommended that the House and 
as works of U^. authors, and the House said. Senate focus more on broad issues 

omission from patent law of food- .. in firing action against the EC, of miliiary policy than on minor 
staffs and ch em i cal compounds. Mr. Reagan directed Mr. Yeutter details. 

The actions were, the latest steps, co file a complaint with the General Among the report’s 91 specific 
in the prerident’a campaign to pool Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, recommendations are a call for re- 
protectionist fever in Congress in mhirfi regulates world trade. organization of the Pentagon's se- 


Egypt, all of whom are enemies of 
the Syrians. 

“The best way for the Syrians to 
undermine Arafat's relations with 


md ms- a “substantial instability in defense rrarefie n, fl tnrL n f PalesTine noun cement from Damascus on the United States and make sure 
□WUKm pohdes aod programs^ and rcc- {JESSTStStaSS. Tu^y moromg that a bodv -- chat the Americans won’t want to 

i wmte ommended that the House and wduch American officials later indude him m any peace lnitia- 

V Senate focus more on broad issues S^Wt bm atogreaily ram»li- as that of Leon Klingh- I Asha Susser, an expert 

the EC of miblary policy than on minor ^ nations - t 1TT!l h offer, a slain American tourist from on ihe PLO at the Dayan Center of 


ui Jiuuuu, JWUI9 uuui uimu. a|ed Jjjg reiatious vvitii key Arab 

d? ? Us ' . ■ - r governments. ^ the Achdle Lauro -- had washed (Continued ou Page 7, CoL 1) 

Among the report s 91 spedfic 6 . , _ _ , up on a beach near the Syrian env 

recommendations are a call for re- 9™ 811(1 , Jordan la ^f n ofTartus. 

organization of tlie Pentagon's so- “ iei J °!J!° £ l Laet twenge on Mr. Syria is a police state, the Israeli 


the face ofa merchandise-trade The United Siaies can ask the nior civilian staff to place a larger atom 1 - me i net .result appears to ibe and Arab analysts noted, and when 

deficit expected to reach $150 bil- KtticmratDandtorewtwthecom- coophasis on military missions. Tne that the Jordaman-Pa^estmian it is in the interest of the authorities 

Bon this year. plain: and issue recommendations, panel would abolish the position of i? W there the discovery of a body can 

The UA trade representative, intnm. are rewewedbvtS undersecretary for policy and af ?Pf u I t0 ** “ J«>pa«ly. ajong easily be covered up. The body 

Clayton K. Yeutter. told the Senate nations that are sumers of GATT, wonld name three new tmdenwere- T 11 * 1 "***«« dse remains of the found near Tanus certainly would 

1 Foreign Relations Committee on T _ - v v nrom with responsibility for nude- tlie cun ’ ent Middle East peace pro- n0 £ have been the first corpse to 


^ Foreign Relations Committee on T . . , UU1U mui IbOJAAUIWUtJ Am A|I»4V- r I 

Wednesday tbat the administration ar deterrence, North Atlantic Trea- ce ®* 

was woriemg on ideas on ppeaing 9 Organization defense and Die Syrira and Jordanian blows 

up foreign markets that might be .JJJSffje h!rS«*nwi nnL regional defense. agamst Mr. Arafat came m the 

offered to Congress next week. . P 5 ?? 1 f ? pm P^~ Tie Joint Chiefs of Staff would fonnof seemmgly mnocnouscom- 


up foreign markets that might be 
offered to Congress next week. . 
On the wheat exports, U.S. offi- 


tecnon for u.S. intellectual proper- 
ty.” South Korea's patent law does 


.. - , _ . . • , have suffered an unreported burial 

The Syrian and Jordanian blows inside Syria or Synan-occupied 
against Mr. Arafat came in the Lebanon. 


West to Speed Exports 
Of Technology to China 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Post Service 


U.S. evidence intended to per- port of Ashdod. 
suade the Italian authorities to ar- ■ 

Decline Seen 
InBritainas 
Irreversible 

Reuters 

LONDON — A report from an 
all-party committee of the House 
of Lords published Wednesday 
predicted irreversible economic de- 
cline, with stagnant production, 
rising inflation and ever-rising un- 
employment unless current policies 
are changed. 

“Failure to recognize these dan- 
gers now could have a devastating 
effect on the future economic and 
political stability of the nation," 
„ ** the committee of the upper house 

Yasser Arafat of Parliament said. 

' Tie committee, which included 

senior lords from Prime Minuter 

J TT . ■ _ Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative 

BO. UXDOITS Pan y. that Britain would be in 

• crisis once North Sea oil began to 
# nm out after 1 990 unless manufac- 

KfV tf) I In 1H 5) tu nng industry were revived. 
F CV V Jlllli a Leon Brittan, the minister of 

- . . . , r-v lra ^ e “d industry, rqeeted ihe re- 

for technology sales to China n . s findings . He rSponded that 

would now be approved automau- aj^ougfa ^ on hS Wl 



•Mtusvii. ^ »I 1 - - ■ || j IU 4 U 1 U L Ulb 

But far from covering up, the CHENGDU, China — Vice Ca ^,^ ° economy, investment had risen. 


.Uk SSXtariS notcover toods.backi or dmp. 

. . - _ . >*Il in ilrfRrail, mn.lllii t 


farmers lost $2 billion annually be- 
cause of EC subsidies. - 


“It is difficult to quantify the naval 
effects of these policies, especially danl , 


be abolished, leaving the chiefs of muniquis issued m Damascus and Syrians immediately announced President George Bush declared productivity had improved and ex- 

the army and air force, the chief of Amman. Bui each spoke volumes their discovery. Then, with whai Wednesday that the United Slates P°rts were at record levels. 

Mval ramman- “ f “ d B J ^ snriysls caM to- sod ia iUlieshsvo agreed ■» sposd “The report neads to bo sat in 


The subsidies have increased the where the effect is simply a decision focus 


EC's share of the worid wheat mar- J^ot to invest in Korea,” the White 
ket from less than 8 percent in the .House said. - 


early 1970s to more than 16 percent 


ause saio. . - cQ d higl 

“However, in the copyright area be eswbl 


A Joint Military Advisory Coun- Achille Lauro episode. 


mg officers would What both the Syrians and the Embassy. 
It would be made Jordanians told Mr. Arafat Accord 


wit hhi hours to the U.S. The move amounts to a vote of objeinionsT NoneTdid soTand the “S of ihe performance and 
,h„ flw . confidence in China’s economic oe w treatment of China was sup- Prospects of our economy.” 

MS modernization program, a U.S. posed to become effective as of The committee compiled its re- 
w diplomat said^It means that there Wednesday. port after taking evidence from civ- 

* ,ess fear of 011113 for tniL - Mr. Bosh made his announce- il servants and industry leaders, in- 


technology sales to China. Member Perspective," he said “if we are not 
nations were given 30 days to raise - 10 S 61 . a l °ully biased and mislead- 


*ed to become effective as of The committee compiled its re- 
ednesday. port after taking evidence from civ- 

Mr. Bosh made his announce- il servants and industry leaders, in- 


EVSBDE 


■ Indonesia is 
on dissidents. 


West German, Americans Win Nobel Science Awards 




subordinates misled him in. the 
confrontation with the radical 
group MOVE in May. Page 3. 

■Ihe goramffleat is de- 
f basing whether to resume mfli- 
taiy aid to rebels fighting the 
Angolan govcrameai. Page 4. 

■ A new conservative m a garine 
I is aimed at changing UJS. for- 
eign poBcy. ‘ Page 5. 


* V' 


SCIENCE 

■ A giant robot is ready to take 

its first steps. Pages. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ The Dow Jones industrial av- 

erage closed at -a record 
13&72. Page* 

■ tataistrift protettan in the 

United States fell 0.1 percent in 
September. . Page'ft. 

■ Inrestment bank said it plans 
to buy Beatrice Cos. Page 9. 


The Associated Pros professor at the Medical Founda- 

STOCKHOLM — Khuis von non of Buffalo, New York, and 
KHtzmg of West Germany won the Jerome Karle, 67, is a professor at 
.1985 Nobel prize in physics ihe .Ui, Naval Research Laborato- 
Wednesday for a discovery expect- ry in Washington, Nobel officials 
ed.to advance the AHticanductor said. 

i nd u s try, and two UJ>. researdiers *Tm still numb,” Professor 
were awarded the Nobel prize in Hauprman said. “I was terribly sur- 
chemistxy for their research in ays- prised. I still can’t believe il” 

tal structures. - Professor Karie was aboard a 

Professor von Hitting, 42, was trans-Atlantic flight to Washington 
cited for his discovery in 1980 of from West Germany when the an- . 
the “quantized ^g~n effect,” which nouncemem was made, 
changed thinking on bow electrical Nobd officials said the achieve- 
conductivity would briiave under nienls of the two Americans had 
varying magnetic hr fl |lgnnpe and is, flowed development of “practical 
important to tbe sennooudoctor in- instruments for determining the 
(justly. . structure of molecules within both 

‘It’s absolutely fantastic,”. he inorganic azid wganicchearrisny — 
said as he and colleagues uncorked not least within the chemistry of 


said as he and colleagues uncorked not least within the chemistry of 
champagne in Stuttgart. ‘T -just natural products.” 
can't believe it. I am very,, very “Thar work is not within dhem- 
happy to be honored like this.” isby but is important for chemis- 

Tie Royal Swedish Academy of by,” said Professor Tngvar Lindq- 
Sdentts has given the chamstiy. v »®L.a member of the Nobel 
prize to Americans fbr ihree coo- chemistry c ommi ttee, 
seottiye years. The two Americans The ai mo u n ctment said their 
are not rfwmids themselves, but work has made il possible to study 
p&ysicists. ■ chemical reactions at the molecular 

Herbert A. Hairprman, 68. is a (C ont inued on Page 7, CoL 1) 



tary purposes technology intended mem. on COCOM liberalization in eluding Lord Weinstock. managing 
for civilian use, be added. ih e capital of a Chinese province, director of Britain's General EJec- 

Approvals of licenses for tech- Sichuan, which has taken the lead trie Co., and Sir John Harvev- 
nology exports to Gbinn are often in agricultural experimentation Jones, chairman of Imperial Chem- 
ddayed in COCOM, the 15-nation and in allowing Chinese peasants icai Industries. 

Coordinating Comniuee for Mul- to £ow more crops for their own T^e iaiA d that Britain’s weak 
f0r 35 pr °H L * u, , . . export performance and high im- 

■ a, ■ Al u% We ^^f- V ° f 3 port penetration had been Sue to 

COCOM, based in Pam over- new UA consttiate in Chragdu, poor investment and cost com peti- 
sees exports of sensitive Western Mr. Bush praised that expenmen- uveness of home-produced goods, 
technology to Communist coun- ration, declaring that “here on the p^y due io a rise in the value of 
wgantzauon indudes aD great plains of China, a miracle has ^ British pound from 1977 to 
of the NATO nations except Ice- taken place.” 
land. Japan is also a member. As “We believe it is just the first of 


of the NATO nations exet 
land. Japan is also a mem 


much as 80 percent of COCOM’s many miracles," he added. "We “ Po °r u* de performance over a 
caseload now involves proposed want to work those miracles with wde spectrum of industiy has eom- 


expons to China. _ 

In a speech delivered at Sichuan Speaking to 500 students, Mr. economy," it said, “to pro- 
Universitv on the fourth day of a Bush attributed C hina ’s increased duce such a severe fall in the output 
six-day writ to China, Mr. Bush agricultural production to greater roamdacturmg that output has 
said that the United States believed freedom extended ro farmers. yet to recover to its 1979 level.” 
that the processing time in CO- “It’s very simple.” he said. Mr. Brittan said that manufac- 


bined with a period of low growth 


that the processing time in CO- 
COM should be reduced. 


yet to recover to its 1979 level." 
Mr. Brittan said that manufac- 


He said that the U.S. govern- incentive, more production. 1 


“More freedom, more food, more luring was playing a smaller part in 

iinripnriv* mArp nnv 1 ii l *ti.lri ** — !_ " "j.. ■ . i - ■ 


raem had already greatly increased 


most major industrial countries as 


technology exports to China. In recognize that your rural reforms 
198^, Mr. Bush said, the United and urban ones that followed are 
Stales approved 2,000 export li- not capitalism.” 
censes for China. By last year, he Mr. Bush noted that when he 
said, that number had almost dou- saved in China as head of the U.S. 

Ned. mission in BeiimR in 1974-75. the 


But Mr. Bush also said: “We a share of the total economy, 
tognize that your rural reforms «... , , , 

H ,,riv,n .ha. a™ Britain s trade balance in manu- 


factured goods moved into the red 
for the first time in 1983. Accord- 
ing to official statistics manufac- 


Mr. Bush said that, under new main U.S. and Chinese concern 
procedures, fewer eases would go was "to oppose Soviet hegemony." 


to COCOM and lhai all cases 
would receive speedier treatment 


mission in Beijing in 1974-75, the ^ output is now 6.5 percent 
main U.S. and Chinese concern below its 1979 level, 
was "to oppose Soviet hegemony." The committee called for lower 
“This is still important,” Mr. interest rates, higher investment 


Bush said. “But now we also have and steps against unfair trading 


it* Anoaarts nm A U.S. diplomat said that as many other important mutual interests, practices to help revive the econo- 

Professor Klaus von Kfitzmg in bis laboratory os Stuttgart, as one half or more of submissions including political interests." -my and stimulate trade 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 


New Middle Class Widens Horizons 
For India But Strains Social Fabric 



WORLD BRIEFS 


Bv Scuarr Auerbach 
Washington Past Sen-ice 

NEW DELHI — A burgeoning 

middle class, considerably larger 
than the population of France or 
West Germany, has emerged as a 
powerful social and economic force 
that holds the promise of propel- 
ling India out of the ranks of the 
world's 15 poorest countries. 

This new group numbers 70 mil- 
lion to 100 million of India's 750 


major urban centers or Bombay, espouse the Gandhi an values, tra- 
New Delhi and Madras. Their fair- dilionai in this country even if we 


lories turn out a diverse array of don’t follow them." He was refer- 
goods, such as textiles, auto parts ring to Mohandas K. Gandhi, the 


<* 


Ml 


Laxalt, Marcos Meet on Insurgency 

MANILA (Renters) — Senate Paul Lank,, a spedai emisMiyor 
President Ronald Reagan, met President Fadmand £ .Maroos hen; 


and consumer electronics. 


ascetic who sparked India’s inde- 


“They arc the critical mass that P^dence movement 


now makes it feasible to raise the Children of the newly wealthy 


standard of the half of the people in are intensifying the already strong 
India who live in poverty'.*' said competition to get into India's best 


Mani Shankar Aiyer, an aide to the schools. 


prune minister. 


In fact man y of the desires of 


million people. A.V. Pai Panan- 
diker, a social scientist galls it the 


But the political clout and free- what Mr. Pai Panandiker called die 


spending ways of this middle class “assertive, vibrant and growing 


“emerging constituency” for Prime 
Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
Mr. Gandhi shaped his budget to 
meet the demands or these people, 
who have achieved wealth in the 
past five years as the owners and 
managers of booming industries 
that have sprung up around India's 


have raised concerns that it is tear- middle class of India” seem ordi- 
ing apart India's social values, de- nary by American or West Euro pe- 


rn an ding more than its share of the 20 standards: telephones that 
fruits of the Indian economy, and work, a dependable supply of elec- 


further widening the gap between tricity, television sets, cars, air con- 
rich and poor in a country where ditioners and video recorders. 


the average income is $260 a year a 
person. 


But in an economy of scarcity 
such as India's, demands for these 


“Those who do not share in the kinds of consumer goods place ex- 
prosperity are only left with high traordinary stresses on the govern- 


Party Vole in Sooth Yemen 


costs." said Pran " Chopra of the meal's priorities for industrial de- 


Center for Policy Research. velopmem and the spending of its 

The spending of the newly foreign reserves. 

i.i... tsir ilia Mr GanithPs mother. Indira 



rrCSiQvlll AUImUU - _ ■ - _ ■ 

Wednesday to convey concern over a growing Communist insurgency m 

* AO^EmSssy spokesman would say only that Mr. LaxaJj a Nevada 
Republican and a close friend of Ml Kflpn. had met with Mr. Marcos. 
News reports had quoted one administration official as saying thttMr. 
Laxaltwould be divering “an extremely blunt message of warning . on 



palace would say nothing about the m e e ting The 
embassy spokesman said there would be no further oomment^ ftat 
Mr. Laxah, who is to return home Thursday, would not meet with 


journalists. 



8,000 Left Homeless in Soviet Quake 


ADEN. Southern Yemen — wealthy creates “stresses” for the Mr. Gandhi's mother. Indira 


The Anoottfnd Pres 


President All Nasser Mohammed 
has been reelected to a five-year 
term as secretary-general of the’ rul- 
ing Yemen Socialist Party, it was 
announced Wednesday. 


350 million Indians who live below Gandhi, built her constituency as 


an abysmally low poverty line. 

A high-ranking civil servant, a 
member of the top Hindu caste, the 


prime minister around India's 
poor, Mr. Pai Panandiker said. But 
her son. who succeeded Mrs. Gan- 


Rescuers search die rabble of a dormitory in Dhaka. 


MOSCOW (AP) — Rescue workers dug in the wreckage of a rug £ 
factory for victims of an earthquake in the republic of .Tad zh i ki st a n, 
which left more than 8,000 people homeless and caused hundreds of. 
millions. of dollars in damage, it was reported Wednesday 

More than 1,000 people were working in the factory when the earth- 
quake struck on Sunday night, one report said. Tadz hi kista n is in Soviet ■- 
Central Asia near the Chinese border. 

The reports said, there were deaths among residents of K atr a klmm and ■ 
the surrounding, area, where the quake hit hardest, but there were no , 
c asua lty figures. The newspaper Izvestia said that 8.000 of Kairakkum’s 
15,000 inhabitants were homeless. 


! s+{ 


Brahmans, said. ‘'They no longer dhi when she was assassinated a 
year ago. seems to have recognized 


100 Feared Dead as Ceding Falls in Dhaka 


the power of the new class. 

— — " — — ■ n ~ Mr. Chopra said that Mr. Gan- 

A BERRY A SEED AND A ROOT dhi “has to guard against getting 


STEEPED IN HISTORY 


pulled into” the concerns of the 
middle class and ignoring other 
problems of the country, like high 
, , r . , . . . , , illiteracy and infant mortality rates 

Jumper bemes from Northern Italy, coriander seeds and a lack of roads and sanitation 

from England and angelica root from Flanders. for India's 500,000 villages. 

These are what impart such delicate characteristics to T he prime minister's associates 
Rppfpat^r oin . r ^ ect lhc n °hon that he has aban- 

ee *^. a * e o’. ill , * doned the needs of the poor in 

Macerated in pure grain alcohol and then distilled in favor of the middle class. Mr. Gan- 

accordance with the original recipe of James Burrough, the dhi has visited some of the poorest 

romnanv's founder " ,ndia ’ s P 00 *- sometimes 

company 5 turner. surprising bureaucrats with his in- 

We haven t changed a thing. Not in 170 years. sisience on going to inaccessible 

<0=1 Were a company steeped in history. We like villages. 


United Press Inienuuiorud 

DHAKA, Bangladesh — A dormitory ceiling at 
Dhaka University collapsed Tuesday during a 
storm, trapping about 400 students under the nib- 
ble. Thirty-six bodies have been recovered, and 
officials say more than a hundred students are 
feared, dead. 

The dormitory ceiling, which was being re- 
paired, collapsed on students who were watching a 
television show. The storm was triggered by a 


cydone that struck the southwestern coast of Ban- 
gladesh. 

A 10-foot (three-meter) tidal wave accompanied 
by 60-mph (100-kph) winds inundated six islands 
Tuesday off the coast of Bangladesh near the state 
of West Bengal in India. 

Officials said a large number of fishermen were 
on several islands and were probably drowned. At 
least 20 boats and about 200 fishermen are miss- 
ing. officials said. 


Jakarta Cracking Down on Dissidents 


Budapest Meeting Ban Stirs Protest 

BUDAPEST (UPI) — The beads of several Western delegations 
atten ding a cultural forum of 35 nations met Wednesday to discuss a 
possible joint reaction to Hungary’s decision to stop a human rights 
group from meeting in Budapest. 

Sources in several of the delegations said the action was planned in 
response to the Hungarian derision but it was not immediately dear what ' 
form it would take. The cultural forum is the first to deal exclusively with 
the cultural provisions of the Helsinki Final Act, a document signed in j 
1975 by 33 European nations, the United States and Canada that pledged - 
to find ways of resolving the issues dividing Europe. 

In a last-minute move that some observers speculated was the result of 
pressure from the Soviet Union and other allies, the Hungarian govern- 
ment refused late Monday to allow the International Helsinki Federa- 
tion, a human rights group, to meet in a hotel conference room. The 
United Stales, protested saying the derision harmed the spirit of the 
Budapest cultural forum. The organizers of the alternative forum said 1 
they intended to continue their meeting at private homes. 


Many Are Ex-Officials Who Helped Suharto BuM ' 'Neu> Order’ EC Asks Pretoria to Spare Black Poet 


it that way. 

And every time you taste our London Dry 
Gin, with itsfleetingessence of juniper, 
corianderandangelica-you'll * 


like it that way too. 



r 


DnGbi 



Mr. Aiyer. the aide to Mr. Gan- 
dhi. said. “Rajiv just can't forget 
the poor" and “I don’t think any of 
those 70 million or 100 milli on” of 
the new middle class “can forget 
Lhe poor either.” 

“All we have to do,” he said, “is 
open lhe back door and see that the 
poor who live in the lanes outnum- 
ber us.” 

Mr. Aiyer said the newly created 
wealth of an enlarged middle class 
is enabling the Indian economy to 
grow at a geometric rale. “We’ve 
reached the critical mass” with 
these 70 million to 100 million peo- 
ple, he said. 

He maintained that India’s less 
privileged already are being carried 


By William Branigin launched his own bid for power, his 

WtBkmpon Past Semce gOTanmrat is cracking down on 

r .,,. DT . . , _ . . leading dissidents who were once- 

JAKARTA — President Suharto his comrades in arms. 


jvemmeot rioting and other vio- 
nce. 


PARIS (Reuters) — The Europe- 
an Community is renewing its ap- 


of Indonesia conducted a solemn 


In addition, four communists ar- peal to Soufh Africa not to execute 
rested nearly two decades ago in Benjamin Moloise, a blade activist 


They include former generals connection with the faOed coup at- and poet, a French cabinet minister 

j _ _ i . i t , ■ . ‘ hi i j w. 


ceremony early this month to com- ^ cabinet minis ters who were in- tempi have been executed in recent said Wednesday. Mr. Moloise is 

memnrate the mnnierOfl vesrenon . -r* _ . . , , j rr ■ j 


memorate the raurdeis 20 years ago s t nimen ra1 in building Mr. Suhar- months. The government says a scheduled to be hanged Friday, 
of seven top army officers durmg to ’ s order” to replace the left- long appeals process caused the de- Catherine Lahimiire, the Fre 


an abortive coup by the Commu- 
nist Party. 

To mark the same event, a gaunt. 


Catherine Lahimiire, the French 


ist regime of Indonesia’s first lay in carrying out the sentences, secretary of state for European af- 

? a „ . ( 1 ..I 1 * • < <L_. _ . . _ . .• r-r— . J xl * >L — t L- 


president, Sukarno. 


but critics suggest that some action fairs, said that the appeal, on hu- 


The chief prosecutor says that against the left was seen as neces- roanitarian grounds, was being sent 


gray-haired man in a Jakarta court- others who are to be tried indude sary to balance the crackdown on immediately to the South African 
room was ordered to bow his head Ali Sadflon, 58, a popular and the Moslem right. government. • 

for a moment of silence. The man, wealthy former commander of ma- Moderate dissidents have assert- Mrs. Lalunritre said that France 
Hartono Rekso Dharsono. 60. was fines who served as governor of 


the Moslem right. government. - 

Moderate dissidents have assert- Mrs. Lalimntre said that France 
ed that Mr. Suharto has stressed also was making a separate appeal 


once a lieutenant general and a Jakarta from 1966 to 1977; Hugeng development at the expense of de- to Pretoria not tt> go ahead with the 


pillar of the president's early days I man Santoso, 64, a retired police mocracy and that the mflhaiys execution of Mr. Moloise, who was 


in power. Now he is being tried for chief; Syafrudin Prawiranegara, a “dual function” role in government sentenced to -death for killing a 

■■Mtann ^ * V - - # A ■ . . . ® . I- 1 - TF ... -* n - _ 



allegedly inciting Moslems to rebel former prime minister: Anwar has created a totalitarian atmo- black policeman. His request for a 


against the government. The Haiyono, 62, a former member of sphere. 


upward on a tide of prosperity and charges cany a maximum penalty parliament; Suyilno Sukimo, a re- ' The ultimate target of the cam- 

of death by firing squad. tired air force marshal, and Bratan- pflign against dissidents, some of g • , o j ^ ■ j n • 

Twenty years after Mr. Suharto, ata, 57, a former minister of mines them fed. is a group of 50 promi- LOffipflllieS tO atUCfy £/UT6M X FOjeCtS 

chena litUc-knm™ anvgnenL "Sajy officjjfor. PARIS (Tim - Five Westo* Eunpan aerospace complies sud 

crushed the coup attempt jnd The ouc Mtoh comes .l a tt me mer cubmet muusters. Moslem Wednesday that they have agreed tender w^g onlTOiects 

issrjsrssJaa ■missis*! 


retrial has been rcjected. 


Benjannn Moloise 


THE GIN OF ENGLAND 


now constitute the fasteSt-rising of death by firing squad, 
class in the country. “There has Twenty years after Mr 
been an explosion of the lower mid- then a little-known arm; 
die class.” he said. crushed the coup a tie 


tired air force marshal and Bratan- 


Twenty years after Mr. Suharto, ata, 57, a former minister of mines 
then a little- known army general and energy. 


5 G>mpaiiies to Study Eureka Projects 

PARIS (1HT) ■ — Five Western European aerospace companies said 


government and mititary offidals signed al980 “rtalement of con- SSSi] 

SdiSif h® EXp 0,ted by ° dem “S. a ^ 1 1*? f Areas™ future ^ration 

radlcaIs - The statement asserted that Mr. 


could indude electronics, information 


OIL (3 MONEY 
MN THE EIGHTIES. 




ftfiSS S ^ nerS ^ of companies in studying projects. Other companies may be asked to join 


“un-lsl antic” 
's state ideol- 


partisan 


Management executives said that British Aerospace, Aeritalia of Italy. 


f AN INTERN^HOW^ HERALD TOIBO 
OIL D\1IY (XKNMIENCE 

1 JONDON.OCTQHER 24 - 25 , 1985 . 


one God, hii m ani fa nanism, nation- el abroad, get h ank loans or attend 
al unity, representative democracy official functions. 


“guided by wisdom” and soda! jus- 
tice for all 


increased sharp- Blood Type Cited in Transplant Death; 


ly last year after a violent incident MONTEREY, California (LAT) — A baby who received a heart’ 


■ ■ « T%- t I ,■» / m - | » mm Vi a BA/ n J "Y At V* VV4J U UMlLL 

Indonesia, a former Duurhcolo- in Jakarta’s Tanjung Priok water- transplant from a baboon a year ago died three weds later because of a 


■ • ■ ■ . . ■ A //.a m _ uawu* m vwvvbb jvim uivu UUVV WtvAO in a 

troph,c- decision ,o trauspto, a hem, of a diffumut blood type, 


lands spanning 3.000 ntiles (4-^X) fire on Moslem marchers demand- according to the surgeon- who performed the operation. 


!!SE “ g ? e ^ lease of fonr to match blood types between the baboon and the infant, 


"Surviving in a competitive environment", will be the theme of the sixth International Herald Tribune/ Oil 
Daily Con ference on " Oil and Money in the Eighties''. The program, designed for senior executives in energy 
and related fields, will address the key issues affecting the current energy situation and assess future trends 
and strategies. H.E Professor Dr. Subroto. Minister of Mines and Energy , Indonesia and President of the 
OPEC conference : and John S. Herrington. U.S. Energy Secretary , wUl head a distinguished group of 
speakers from Europe, the Middle East. Latin America and the United States. 


fifth i^t p 0 ^ 0 ^ nation youths. Tte .govenunem has ac- who beoune known as B^Fi^^SSS 

Bailey of the LomaLinda University 


90 percent of its 160 million people were IdSd. but dissidents «y the M^dkalCentCT naLa^ffides. J umveuaiy 

f numbCT may be more than 10a “If Baby Fae had the typeAB Wood groure” he said, instead of tbetype 

of the founding members of In the sa months foUowmg the O Mood group, “she would still be ahwtoday.” As aStofthebSod 

the nonahgned movement Indone- Sept 12. 1984 shooting, a wave of m i sm atch, he said, the infant developed antibodies to her own red Wood 
sia now is considered a major pro- bombmas and fires rocked Jakarta ^ 


bombmgs and fires rocked Jakarta cells that caused her blood to clot in her ctrcnlation. She received the 


Western force in the Third World and other cities. 


and a regional bulwark against Among the targets were a H ank 


baboon heart on Oct. 26. 1984, when she was 15 days old. 


OCTOBER 24 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: 

— Professor Dr. Subroto, Minister of Mines end Energy, 
Indonesia 

COMPETITION FOR MARKET SHARE. 

— Moderator-. Herman T. Frarssen, Former Chief Economist, 
International Energy Agency, Paris. 

— HJ. Keplinger, Charman and Chief Executive Officer, 

The Keplinger Companies, Houston. 

— Afirio Parra, Managing Director, Petroleos de Venezuela 
(UJC) SA, London. 

— Dougks Wade, Senior Energy Analyst, Shell International 
Petroleum Company Ltd, London. 

THE IMPLICATIONS OF OPEC PRODUCT IMPORTS AND 

DOWNSTREAM STRATEGIES ON THE OU. MARKETS. 

— Nader K Sultan, President, Kuweit Petroleum International 
Ltd, London. 

HOW TWO MAJOR OIL COMPANIES ARE SURVIVING 

IN A COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT. 

— Allen E. Murray, President, Mobil Corporctfion, New York. 

— Arve Johnsen, President, Statoil, Stavanger. 

PRODUCERS AND REFINBiS STRATEGIES IN AN ERA 

OF GROWING COMPETITION. 

— John R. Hcfl, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ashkmd 
Oil Incorporated, Ashland, Kentucky. 

— 5ja Mdrmnrta, General Manager, Neste Oy, Helsinki. 

— Nfcoia Mongdli, Assistant to the Executive Vice President, 
Enfe Nazionale Idrocorburi, Roma 

— Saud O. Oundlah, Manager, Supply Goorrfnation, Petrorrin 
Portia patron, Dhahran. 


OCTOBER 25 

NEW OUTLOOKS FOR UNITED STATES’ &4BW3Y POUCY. 

— The Honorable John S. Herrington, United States' Enegy 
Secretary. 

NORTH SEA OIL SfflXIORN OF TOMORROW’S 

PROSPERITY. 

— John Moore, /AP., financial Searetay to the Treasury, 

United Kingdom. 

ThC EFFECT OF FLUCTUATING OB. PRICES ON THE 

BANKING SYSTEMS, SHARE VALUES, INSTITUTIONAL 

INVESTORS AND WORLD BANK LOANS. 

— Robert B. Weaver, Senior Vice President and Global 

Petroleum Executive, The Chase Manhattan Bank, NA, N.Y. 

— Peter Gignoux, Senior Vice President, Shearson Lehman 
Brothers Ltd, London. 

— Robert L FrankSn, Founder and President, Lawrence Energy 
Assodates hcorpor a ted, Boston. 

— Ian M. Hume, Assistant Director, Energy Department, The 
World Bonk, Washington, D.C 

MEGAMERGER TR&OS AND THE FUTURE OF THE OIL 

INDUSTRY. 

— Robert F. GreenhiH, Managing Director, Morgen Stanley & 

Co. Incorporated, New York. 

NONCONVB^TIONAL OH SALES. 

— Nicholas G. VoCrte, CM Cons u ltant, London, The Hogue. 

— Charles L Ddy, Manogng Director, LM. FischeJ & Co. Lid, London. 

— Dieter Kempermcnn, Managing Director, Union Rhebafce 
Braunkohlen Kraftstoff A.G. 

— Rosemary Mcfadden, President, N.Y. Mercantie Exchange. 

CLOSING PAN& DISCUSSION OF CURR0*r ^OGY ISSUES. 

— Paul K Prcricd, President, Petroleum Econotrics Ltd. 


communism. The country also be- owned by a dose ethnic Chinese 
longs to the noncommimist Associ- associate of Mr. Suharto, a Jakarta Tjhva TsSaiil trk CvJnn : 

ation of Southeast Asian Nations department store, a Catholic semi- 18 ^ Mpet OYTian WOrfeePS 

and the Organization of Petroleum naiy, the renowned Buddhist tem- DAMASCUS (Reuters) — Libya has expelled 10 000 to 20 000 Syrian^ 5 
Evening Countries. pie of Borobudur and a tourist bus. workers in the past 10 weeks to show its displeasure over Syria’s role in i 


ation of Southeast Asian Nations department store, a Catholic senti- 
and the Organization of Petroleum narv. the renowned Buddhist tem- 


While the number oflslamic mil- At least nine persons were killed in Ldjanon, accordii^ to diplomats here. The expulsions were confirmed by 


itants is believed to be relatively these incidents. 


small Indonesian and foreign A few days after the Tanjung 


Arabsources who interviewed some of the returning workers. 

Libya has expelled or laid off up to 110,000 other foreign workers; 

rnnliinino manvTimtMMB - - * .v ■ ■ > *■* 


sources say, the virtual political Priok shooting, 22 dissidents, in- including many Tunisians and Egyptians, this year followiMr^orts that 
monopoly^ Mr. Suharto s govern- eluding 16 sixers of the Petition of it^was suffering from a shortage of money because ofd^Mng ofl 


ing Golkar party and the cradc- 50 , issued a white paper- challeng- 
down on dissidents mean that Is- ing the government’s version of the 


lam is becoming the only forum for incident and calling for an inde- 


dissent. - 

“The power of political Islam in 
a formal sense has beet broken” by 


pendent fact-finding commission 
to investigate it. 


revenues. ° 

Libya is a financial supporter of many Syrian-based Palestinian 
CTOTUla groups and Palestinian sources in Syria said that Libya once 
tnreatened to 'Withdraw its diplomats from Damascus unless theeovem- 
ment of President Hafez Assad persuaded Antal, the Styriaa-backed^E 


requirements that all parties em- cent within the government about 
brace pancasQa and have their can- possible unrest during general deo- 


Such sentiments aroused con- Moslem nriHtia group, to stop attacking therefuzee canms 

m within tlw oo wrnn tf n t nlvuit • • 


didates for office approved by the dons scheduled for 1987. 


military, a Western diplomat said. The concerns have been bright- — f ■ 

Yet, he said, religion “seems to ened by a slowdown in Indonesia’s Bandoidn erf Bri^nm asked Prime Minister Wilfried Martens on 

be the one area of society that has economy, which is expected to re- Wednesday to form a new government following the election victory of 
die potential to throw up popular cord real growth in gross domestic “* center -rignt coalition, the royal palace announced. (Reuters) 


For the Record 


ZtEL'iJS'Ji" t 9™^ was Itemed Wednesday as 


itiar sentiment very quickly.” percent, compan 
Among those caught in the cur- percent last year, 
rent crackdown are Moslem Subroto, minis 
preachers a c cused of inciting anti- energy, recently p 


percent, compared with about 6 general secretary of the 

oercent last vear. news aeentnr rmnr«<«l ' ™ amaai ariy 


Subroto, minister of mines and 


news agency reported. 
Four Asian men were 


fW/L 

to kill PrimeV 



Murderer In U^b Executed 


energy, recently predicted a poten- Minister Rajiv Gandhi ofliSa ‘ 


were Sikhs. 


(AFV\; 


| To. register, plecEd owtipfeto'ctadT^ri 

j Aeregitfrdioft form today. 

■ - R^iSTKAlK^ INFOBMAllO^: . 
I .■ *r •. ; . Theparficpcaronfee s£5S5;dr #»■_ ; r 
| - equvcfeft ro a eonverftjte currency fair each .; 
f partkipert. Foes are paydstem advance^ 
B.-wKbe relumed InrfuK tor ay coo^fetian'T ;* 

J ’■ ; ; ; Hease roturn reg^ra^f^'ta^ ? , r - 

I kfernaS^HBrcfeT™^ 

f l 81 f AVBtae Gtartes<fcGaw^‘: - i-C; 

j 925ZI NeuSy Gedex, Frahas. Or iriepiigne: * 
t p3 Ij 747 1686 or triacr6ia555L-: . >■. > 


CONFERENCE LOCATION: 

Royd Garden Hotel, Kensingtan Ugh Street, LONDON W84PT. Tdephooec (441)9378000. Tdoe 
263151. A Hock af rooms has been reserved for conference partiope rt s. Please contact hotel dredty. 
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM. 

Piecse enroll lhe foiowmg poriiripcmt far lhe 00 coherence. D Check enclosed Q Please invoice. 


• The Associated Press 

MICHIGAN CITY, Indiana — 
William E. Vandiver. 37, convicted 
of murder in the 1983 stabbing 
death of his father-in-law. was elec- 
trocuted Wednesday at the state 


Soviet Said to Mistakenly Gas Afghan Troops 

United Press international 1 • - - “ 


SS’iSSgZ-SS. N £5=Si!Ka , » SElr**^? 

ssaeaess ses— s 


ei m the United States sjna the substance” in eastern Afghatistan sprayed the chemical in the May- fn Kandph Af»u ■ . ' ' 

Supreme Court allowed the stales and the attack, apparently aimed at dan area of Wardak ftroS Afghamston’s see-‘ . v . 

to restore the death penalty in Mamfc g U errilla S ..killed 30AI£ao about 16 miles f^kiloS 


SURNAWfc. 


isiamic guernuas, touea JU Arman aoout 16 miles (25 kilnmetm miW-X2.LT 


nSTNMfi. 



Tne dmlomats said they gainc 

UNIVERSITY Haitians Ilee to Embassy JSl 

degree • 7 H 

ZESSSZ -"Ztt P*ce ol Indian Jet Recorered ?\. w 

ITJSSS- SSTpJff SiSaigS SLXfe : ; cwi 


Sained control of sevnal parts J 
lhe city, including the main mar ket 


BAGS.0RS • WPStBrS-DOCTCRME 

for WoHt, A bb S o b i Tc, Lib ripu l wi f . 

- . Smd detailed rvsuma 
tar frw •valuatian. 





Ren Am b fiteoffiriof ccerfer - ■ 
ipr.in# comrenoe. 


CnV/COUNTRY,. 


PAOPC WBTBN UMVBSmr i 


outpi prime Turaday and forced The Soviet Um M has reDeatoUv - lrdand “The fast ma-! -v 

their way mto the Italian Embassy, denied the accusation. 3 jor piece of wreckage from the Air » ' • 

A guard fired shots mro the air “This mav have a wu, todia jumbo jet that crashed June' .' : 


when the Haitians broke down 


*p. 


rp 


air “This mav havp h#»« « mi™. “ tua Jtunbo jet that crashed June ' . : *■ 

of the dons, an embassy spokes- mat said, ?***':'"* ***** Wribiesfoy ■: ■ 

man satd, but no one was injured, scale Soriet^S ^ 0 f^ ^ ^ of 6,700 feet ( 2,000 









ni 


lorM, 

.fe*."-- .... . 

M it.-.:. . 

*:**. • , : 


... i?ls36, 

' 

‘ ^ 

^=i. 




*n$ 


* :r- „ 
«' >;*•: - . 
<Vr.- 
. . 

unitfrr 
f* a.;:.'r- . 

Sr .Vr--.- ■ 


- A*- 

f r-V 
(»■ V 


•- " x '\ 

' :. '.'ti 

-:}k$ 
■ • -"•‘*■11 
■ ^ 


,y:%. 

• • V-..' 

'‘if- 

■k 


«*fin 




POWDER KEG — - A fireman trying to save a tractive 
near Ventura, California as another barns beside him. 
Wildfires have destroyed 30 homes and burnt 70,000 


acres in southern California since Monday. About 1,500 
firefighters were deployed to fight die flames, which 
resulted from high fcemperatwes and erratic winds. 






U.S. Legislators Debate 
Balanced-Budget Plan 


IV&fu’tpwi Port Senite 

WASHINGTON — Forty-eight 
House members and nine senators 
on Wednesday began what are ex* 
pec ted to be contentious negotia- 
tions over a plan to mandate a 
balanced federal budget. 

Meanwhile; efforts by a House 
panel to put together a tax reform 
package appeared to have stalled 
Tuesday. 

The plan for a balanced budget 
was approved by the Senate last 
week and has been approved in 
principle, but not in detail, by the 
House. The unusually large num- 
ber of conferees will include many 
of the most powerful figures in 
both chambers, a reflection of the 
radical changes the proposal would 
make in fiscal policy. 

Under the propositi fixed targets 
would be set for deficit reductions 
Through focal 1991. and the presi- 
dent would be required to impose 
proportional cuts in spending to 


meet the targets if Congress fell 
short. 

Proposed modifications from 
House Democrats are expected to 
include allowing greater spending 
flexibility during recessions, limit 
ing presidential discretion in mak- 
ing cuts, and requiring more cut- 
backs before next year’s elections, 
when Republicans are expected to 
be hard-pressed to retain control of 
the Senate. 

The House Ways and Means 
Committee agreed Tuesday to al- 
low a new loophole in a proposed 
tax overhaul plan. Under the ex 
ception, taxpayers who did not 
itemize deductions would be al- 
lowed to continue to write off char- 
itable contributions that exceeded 
$ 100 . 

The panel then postponed work 
on its tax overhaul plan for at least 
a week, and several congressmen 
said prospects for overall House 
approval were dimming. 


- • ^ 
'VJi. 


- • 

•' v :r <4 


Mayor Assails Aides 9 Role in MOVE Crisis 

Goode Says He Was Misinformed in Showdown With Philadelphia Radicals 


. 

■ '■’SSSsA 


•loria it; <yy. 


By Lindsey Gruson 

New York Times Service 

PHILADELPHIA — Mayor W. 
Wilson Goode has said for the first 
tinie that his suhor dina fi-< mislwt 
mis informed and disobeyed him in 
the city's confrontation with the 
radical group MOVE. 

Testifying Tuesday for the sec- 
ond day before a panel he appoint- 
ed to investigate the confrontation, 
Mr. Goode said he was mistaken to 
rely on subordinates in the crisis, - 
which ended with the destruction 
It; i of a neighborhood on May 13. 

pttTr DjjWl “Knowing what I know now, I 
certainly would be more of a 
hands-on kind of person," said Mr. 
Goode, who campaigned on Ins ex- 
perience as a problem-solver and as 
an efficient manage'. “I certainly 
would pose more specific type of 
questions.” 

Immediately after the siege, in 
which the. polios bombed the 
MOVE house, the mayor repeated- 
ly accepted “full responsibility'’ for 
the city’s actions. 

Mr. Goode said he did not take 
an active part in planning the as- 
itil a f 





- ll- 


Ulv 


sault until a few minutes after 6 
P M. on May 13. about 13 hours 
after the siege of the MOVE house 
began and about 30 minutes after 
after the poKce dropped a bomb on 
h, starting a fire. 

“I gave my first order of the day, 
“Put the fire out,”’ he said. - 

“1 went though very deep emo- 
tions at that time," Mr. Goode add- 
ed. “I cried because I knew at that 
point that lives would be lost and I 
knew that homes would be de- 


stroyed and I knew, that despite all 
of our good intentions, we had on 
our hands an absolute disaster." 

The fire destroyed 61 row houses 
in the neighborhood, 

leaving 250 people homeless, and 
killed 11 people m the MOVE 
boose, including four children. 

The mayor said bethought that 
the the police commissioner, Gre- 
gore J. Sam bar, had violated his 
order to fight the fire. Mr. Sambor 
has said he ordered firefighters to 
take cover because shooting was 
continuing from mewfc the house 
and he did not want to iwdangw 
their lives. 

Mr. Goode appointed, the 11- 
member c ft w imh aann after bis ad- 
ministration was criticized for its 
handling of the crisis. He digged it 
with investigating and reporting on 
“what happened, how it happened 
and why it happened.” The ques- 
tioning of the mayor is considered 
critical in establishing the cxedflril- 

beea likt^S^jy^ihe^aVs police 
association to “the palace guard 
investigating the lung." 

Under questioning by commis- 
sion members, Mr. Goode said he 
thought he had managed the crisis 
well with the information he had at 
the time. But he said be realized in 
retrospect that his subordinates 
had not given him enough data to 
make proper derisions. Mr. Goode 
said he was first asked for pennis- 
ston to use the bomb on the MOVE 
house 17 minutes before it was 
dropped from a helicopter. He 
granted the permission. ... 



Como Prea 

W. Wilson Goode 

The mayor said he was not told 
and did. not ask for details of the 
planned assault and did not know 
that the use of explosives was part 
of the original attack plan. He also 
said at least two direct ciders had 
been disobeyed. 

Mir. Goode said he assumed in 
the confrontation that the city 
managing director at the time. Leo 
A. Brooks, would teO him “if there 
‘was anything unusual happening." 
But Mr. Brooks did not tell him the 
assault was fading or that the police 
had changed plans, Mr. Goode 
said. 

“I think the mayor has to rdyon 
his experts," said Mr. Goode, who 
watched the be ginning of the con- 
frontation on television in his 
home, 36 blocks north of the 
MOVE house; He added that as a 


.IX.- 


layman he did not think be should 
assume direct command even 
though he could hear what “sound- 
ed like a war zone oui there — a lot 
of firing." 

Mr. Goode also said that Mr. 
Sambor had violated his order not 
to involve police officers in the as- 
sault who might hold wfaai the 
mayor called a “grudge" from par- 
ticipating in a confrontation with 
the radical group at another 
MOVE bouse in 1978. Several offi- 
cers involved in that siege partici- 
pated in the assault this year. 

In the 1978 confrontation, a po- 
lice officer was killed and four offi- 
cers and four firefighters were in- 
jured, some seriously. Nine 
members of MOVE were convicted 
of third-degree murder in the slay- 
ing and sentenced to long prison 
terms. 

Three years later, other members 
of the radical group began moving 
into the house on Osage Avenue 
and harassing their neighbors in an 
attempt to pressure city officials to 
negotiate the release of imprisoned 
members. They had set up loud- 
speakers, over which they broad- 
cast diatribes, using profanities and 
threatening the lives of the mayor 
and President Ronald Reagan. 

At least one survivor of the May 
confrontation, a 1 3-year-old boy, 
has said that the police fired at 
MOVE members trying to escape 
the bunting house. That has led the 
district attorney to investigate 
whether there was a conspiracy by 
the pdice to kOl members of the 
radical group. 



CONCORD 
LA COSTA. 



Concord 1 La Costa™ Collection. 
Water-resistant, shock- resistant, quartz. Rugged yet refined. 
A timepiece of unmistakable beauty: Hand-carved 
and crafted in Switzerland. 


Geneve: Chimento 5A, Facet, Horiogerie du Rhone SA, 
Bijouicne du Grand Casino. Kunz, Jacques Zbinden 
Zurich: Barth, Brunao. Chronomeuie Beyer. Gut, Koehler, Stahel 
Lucerne: Bader, Ruckli, Santos jewels 



Zegna 

PURECASHMERE 



at 

Beale & Inman 

131 New Bond Street, London W1 

From the world s finest cashmere collection for men 
select an entire wardrobe of clothes by Ermenegildo 
Zegna. The theme this season is completely caslimere 
co-ordinated blending an harmonious array of subtle 
autumn shades. 

You may also indulge in the sheer luxury' of our 
renowned made-to-measure tailoring service 
supervised by Italian craftsmen in the elegant 
Ermenegildo Zegna shop at Beale & Inman. 

You will be made very welcome when you lisit 
Ermenegildo Zegna at Beale & Inman 
Tel: Of-629 4723 



I •* . ; : . 


h i t \1 


>f-.: 



vi ^Tlfl 


l nil' 



1986 PORTABLE DESK DIARY 

New this year, the HTs desk-top diary for 

,^eas8y i^^^riarhS^e^-^^trrTy'Bb with 
* you everywhere. Our Portable Desk Dicvy 
gives you cfl the advantages of a traditional 

desk diary— -but none of me bufle. 

Covered in luxurious sSc-grain black 
leafoer, with a padded front cover, the dby . 
bos gfrmefol corners, gold page-edges, French 
blue peper andean be peronatizea . with gift 
initials on the cover. 

A sic ribbon marker brings a full week 
to view. Plus room for personcJ nates. 




* A specid fwtfure is the l_ 
chsss book incorporated into the 

cover, whkh saves you re-writing the forma- 
tion eochyear. 

A ’rK^xlfor of oanasntrrted pages con- . 
lain d the nodical inforination our readers ^ 
have asked for with their desk ctcxy: worldwide 
holday date*, ^htemationd lime zones and dU- 
. ing codes; metric, vwighfe ard measures 
conve r sions. 

.The ideal desk drary for the executive on 
the move. The perfect jjft for friends, business - 
* contacts and CModotes. Order today. 


• For orders of five or more aritfa* qwar^efoow^twaw 


1986 POCKET DIARY 

Our dcEsic IHT Pocket Diary. SSm, compact and 
exJracxcinarSY ightweight A sffle ribbon marker 
opens 1o a fofi week erf a glance. Spedd fea- 
tures indude tyft meld comers, gold page 
edges, French blue paper in sewn birring. On 
the bade, our special TrWxanded memo sheets 
(with a refill pack of sheets suppled), and a 

step-art dpbabdfenl address section. 

Plus international holiday dates for over 
90 countries, time zones and cfcing codes, met- 
ric conversion, comparc^ve weights, measures 
and dotbing sizes, and a wine vintage chart. 

i JTeralb^^eribunr^ 


Return Order Form tee Paul Bdoer, Program Coordinator, International Herald Tribune 
c/o Dataday House, 8 Alexandra Road, London SW19 7JZ, England 


y 




Please check method df pci y menh 

□ Endosed is my check or money order for 

mrtde ta the order of Internationd 
Hendd Tnbi^(PayTtwrfci»b«mcriflm<^c^^ 
fimopean currency vkoxnet esehango ntetj 
I — J Plea* change to oAacess . nVsa aAmex 
I 1 my credit card: □ Eurocard □ Diners oMaslercnrd 


PfeaMiandnw ^copiasaf: 

- -Prioas indude postage in 6*ope. 

□ Portable Desk Diary at U^. $35 (Add S7 each postage 
outside EuropeJ 

□ Pbdoe# Diay af U5. $20 (Add $3 each postage 

outside Eoropaj 

Name 


INITIALS 


CardNa. 


Exp. Date. 


tNKQocunsq 
.Address 


Signature. 


1 ' <jty/Cbde/Coixdry . 


- 17-1^8 S 


MORE LOC/mONS. 



DBIOCAnONS. 



Success in international business has a lot to do with 
having the right connections. 

And very few banks indeed can offer you as many as 
Standard Chartered. 

As one of Britain's largest banks, and specialists in inter- 
national business, we have over 2000 branches in more than 
60 countries All linked by common systems and the latest in 
telecommunications technology. And all staffed by people co 
whom international trade is a way of life. 

The result is that when yt>u deal with Standard 
Chartered, you deal with people who understand your 


problems-and can supply solutions. 

Delayed payments become an occasional rarity, rather 
than a constant headache. 

international cash management that enables you touse 
funds more efficiently becomes a reality, rather than an 
objective. 

And whether wu need a more competitive foreign 
exchange dealing service, berter-railored trade finance, or 
more productive advice and introductions around the 
world, you'll find the service you want under one roof. 

Ours. 


Standard ^Chartered 

Direct banking, woridwide 

Standard Chartered Bank Head Office. 10 Clements Lane. London EC4N 7AB 










1? 

go- 


A 

1 B 
A 
5 A 
IOW 
d; 
14“ 
a 
15 V 

18 C 
U 

s 

17 L 
v 

19 L 

20 b 
c 

21V 

A 

22 F 

23 F 
f. 

26 'i 
0 

291 

s 

30$ 
33 Y 
35C 
e 

371 

v 

38 C 
39! 
r 

431 

461 

t 

47/ 

491 

I 


[ 


D 


An 


Ye 


EU 


Atom 
Aural 
Attie 
Bore 
Belgi 
Born 
Bros 
Bach 
Bade 
Cone 
Cosh 
Dub! 
Edln 
FIOM 
Fran 
Cmh 
ho! si 
Istoii 
Las l 
USftt 
Lornl 
Modi 
Mllai 
Mow 
Muni 
Nice 
Oslo 

Port! 

Proa 

Her* 

Rom 

Slack 

srrai 

venli 

Viem 

War: 

Zvrlc 


MH 


AnkD 

8aln 

Dam 

Join: 

Tel A 


OCI 


duck 

Sytfi» 

d-< 

Mv 


WED 

Temi 
Polr. 
PAR 
175- 
fiAH> 
Term 
5EOI 
31 — 





:y *?r. L.-' "V-i ;.j — ~ 


H 


Page 4- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 


Pyongyang Booh Praising Kim’s Son 
May Provide a Que on Succession 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORX — The announcement of an English-language biog- 
raphy of the son of Kim T1 Sung may provide a clue to a forthcoming 
change of command in North Korea,' analysts say. 

An advertisement in The New York Times described a two volume 
biography of Kim Jong IL 42, calling Him a “great hero" and a “great 
leader." Until now. only Kim II Sung. 72. who has ruled the Commu- 
nist half of the Korean'peninsula for 40 years, has been described as 
the “great leader." 

"It appears that Kim II Sung is trying to inflate the image of his son 

“ .his successor," Donald Zagoria. of Hunter College in New York, 
said Tuesday. 

The advertisemenL which appeared last week, declared that “Korea 
has given birth to one more great hero: Great leader, Kim Jong EL the 
book you have been wailing for, is now on sole." It did not say where 

the book was on sale, and North Korean diplomats at the United 
Nations mission could not say where a copy could be obtained. 

Sorinsha, the book's Japanese publisher, said 6,000 copies were 
primed for an organization of Koreans living in Japan, which appar- 
ently intends to sell them by mail. 

"This book would put a lot of Americans to sleep,” said Mr. 
Zagoria, a specialist on North Korea, who ordered his copy direct 
from Pyongyang. 


U.S. Debates Resuming Aid to Angolan Guerrillas 


By David B. Ortaway 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration is in the midst of a 
policy review on whether to resume 
US. military aid to the non-Com- 
mnnist guerrillas fighting Angola's 

Marxist government according to 
congressional and intelligence 
sources. 

The review has couched off an 
interagency debate that pits the ad- 
ministration’s global strategists, in- 
tent upon showing U.S. resolve 
against the Soviet military role in 
Angola, against “regionalists,” who 
fear U.S. aid to the guerrillas will 
end U.S. efforts to negotiate a 
peaceful settlement to the dispute 
over South-West Africa. 

The territory, also known as Na- 
mibia, is controlled by South Afri- 
ca in defiance of United Nations 
resolutions for its independence. 


The debate is taking place as the 
a dminis tration prepares for the 
Nov. 19-20 summit meeting be- 
tween Ronald Reagan and Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev. A number of policy- 
makers are arguing that now is the 
time for Washington to send a 
strong message to Moscow about 
the U.S. resolve cot only to help 
anti-Communisi guerrilla forces in 

Angola but elsewhere in the world. 

They also are arguing that Mr. 
Gorbachev is b ehind recent offen- 
sives by Soviet-allied governments 
in Afghanistan, Nicaragua and 
Ethiopia against ?nii- f fltTltTinn i sTs 
fighting in those countries and that 
the United States must respond to 
bolster its position going into the 
summit meeting. 

Opponents of such a policy say 
an open U.S. ali gnm ent with Mr. 
SavimbTs organization will inevita- 
bly draw Washington into a closer 



Uncovered a 
lead in the FT. 


Traced it 
to Singapore. 


Secured it over 
Sole Souffle 




en 

Surprise. 


Stay Executive Class at the London 
iara. Stylish rooms. Quality Service 
Secretarial back up. 

You couldn't be in a better place for 
entertaining your business 

THE 

LONDON 

TARA.*/ 

HOTELfl*fS$» 


Saa^PlaceKomMLimteMKRDitfand'^9UIB39 H 
ItopMOont 01 -937 7211 EjcikwOmi Brea BoaMBBow t ’ 01^37 Kj65. IS* 
VdW-MWw HotHrtttM W 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

INTERNATIONAL 


LH.D. Mercedes Tom Free 
Limousmes 36" & 44" 
Armoured ani and Vmousno 
Coach buih can 
Other mates 6 e»otia 


Over 100 units in stock 
World wide delivery 
Direct hom source 
D.O.T. & ERA 


Tel: London Mfl| 639 7779 
8956022 TRAS G. 


Tele* 151) 


Trasca London Ltd. 

65-67 Pork Lana London W.l. 


Switseriond-W-W. Germany 


TRANSCO 


THE LARGEST SHOWROOM 
AND STOCK IN EUROPE 

Keeping a ewwant jfijck of mere rhon 
300 brand new cars of all European + 
Japanese makes competwefy priced. 
Tax free s al es sh ipping insurance. 
Send far multicolor Free catalogue. 
Transas SA. 95 Noordekmn, 
2030 Antwerp, Belgium 
Tol 333/542 6240 Tx 35207 Tram 


JAGUAR. ROVER. MERCEDES 
BMW. SAAB. VOLVO. PORSCHE 
Best prices. Call Holland 

VAN LAARHOVEN B.V. 

PO Box 2173, 5600 CD BmSioven 
40-424055, Tlx: 51213 HHLA NL 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


EUROPORT TAX FRS CARS 

CaS far free catalog. 

Bax 12011. Rotterdam Airport. Holand. 
Tel: 010-623077. TT* 23071 B>CAR NL 


CATBPUA8-USH) 0.000 hrs - 
Trammundi I 


10000 hrs) Trrmwnundl Belaum - iMl 

Trading Co., GestehebaonZl, B-224T 

Zoersd, Bebwn. Tlx 32302. Tet 32-3- 

384 1Q54.RxJ 


C 32-3384 12 91. 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


S41 5 RETURN FROM AMSTBSJAM: 
Houston. Dalai, Mure, Atlanta 
Malibu, D awufc 30. Amsterdam / 
Hofland pCH 274041, Tehn 14635 


NYONfWAY.flSO. Ewgfa^NLY. 


West Coast S145. Pons I 


SHOPPING 


FILOFAX 

INDISPENSABLE 


Standard Rofa*, Hock or red, penan- 
eftted with 3 initiate. Still lime for Chnst- 
mea Arrryri delivery for only USS70. 
Send check ' Diner s Qub number to: 


Present Swpme. 14 Sevan Haute, 
London WC1N 38T 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


PORTUGAL 


7 DAYS INCLUSIVE TOURS 

FROM PARIS TO: 

USSON FF27DO 

ESTOIBl/CASCAiS FF2S10 


COSTA VOTE (OPORTO). FF2 461 

ALGARVE FF2810 

MADHRA FP2980 


Please Contact: 

fmh Tet 742 55 57, Tbc 220550 


15 DAYS INCLUSIVE TOURS 

FROM FRANKFURT TO: 

LISBON DM1177 


. DM1282 


E5TOR&/CASCAB 
HALFBOARD 
COSTA VERDE (OPOR!O)DM2330 

ALGARVE DM2702 

MADBRA DM2299 


Please Contact: 

Fraeikfurt 234094/7, llx 413976 


For other programs and delated 
i n format i on, ask your 


TRAVE AGENT 


HOTELS 


USA. 


TUDOR HOTEL, 304 East 42nd St, 
New York City. In fashionable, East 
Side Manha tta n, 1/2 block from UN. 
Single from doubles ham $85. 


Upon showing Iho ad- 20% discount. 
The 422951. Tel: 21 


: 212-9868800. 


FURNITURE RENTALS 


INTERNATIONAL 
FURNITURE 
RENTALS 
OF NEW YORK 


Rent Executive Quolity 
Furniture for 
Home or Office 


Suprisingfy Inexpensive 


4 Showrooms in New York Area 

Cafl (212) 421-0340 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US IMMIGRATION VISAS & Green 
Cards. Atty. Janet Sawrin. 212-564- 
8S25, 450 7th Ave., 1604, NYC 10123. 


Reserved 
for you. 


Small space 
advertising in 
the International 
Herald Tribune 
is less expensive 
than you might 
imagine. 

For price 
details call these 
numbers or 
your nearest 
IHT advertising 
representative. 


Parisv 747.46 .00 
London: 836.4802 
New York: 75L3890 
Frankfurt: 72.67J5 
Hong Kong: 5.420906 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office m New York 

330 W S6* S».. N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS AND 
(HECKS ACCEPTS) 

Private Memb*niiipi Available 


MADRID SHADOWS 

Teb 2509603 ••»••• 
BCORT SERVICE CREDIT CARDS 

* LONDON ★ 

EXECUTIVE BCORT SERVKZ 
402 0105 or 499 2225 


* AMSTERDAM * 
cum R05E - ESCORT SERVICE 
5TADHOUDBSKADE 125 

Tet 020768606 

AR1STOCATS 

London Eecert Service 

1 28 Vtfgmare St, London W.l. 

Al mopr Credt i^txdi Accepted 
Tet 437 47 41 / 4742 

12 noon ■ red night 

. HOME CLUB EUROPE ESCORT 
& Guide ServmLTet 06/589 2604. 589 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pm] 

HEATHROW 

♦London Escort Agency* 
01-609 2870 

GENEVA * BEAUTY* 

BCORT SERVICE. 022/29 SI 30 

been featured a» tfre fop L most 
■xdwrive Escort Service by 

USA & international nevn media 
inducSng radio Hid TV. 

GENEVA BCORT 

SERVICE. Tel: 46 11 58 

CAPRICE-NY 

ESCORT SERVICE M NEW YORK 
THj 212-737 3291. 

* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT SERVICE. 
EVERYWHERE YOU ARE OP GOL- 

1-813-921-7946 

Cdl free from U.S: l«M37«K 
CaH free from Honda: 1 -300-282 0052. 
Lowell Eastern welcomes you bodd 

CHEISEA ESCORT SERVICE 

51 fleauehmop Flore. London SW3. 
Tet 01 584 6513/2749 (4-12 pm) 

******G£NEVA BBT 

BCORT 5annCE 022 / 86 15 93 

MAYFAIR CLUB 

GUIDE SERVICE from 5pm 
ROTTStDAM (O) 10-254155 
THE HAGUE (0) 70-60 79 96 

*• GH4EVA-HRST .. 

Eecor* Service. Tel: 022/32 34 18 
+ Weekmid + Travel 

ZURICH 

CamEne Escort Service 

Tel: 01/252 61 74 

PARLIAMENT 

ESCORT SERVICE 

NewYork 21 2-51 7-8121 
Chicago 312-787-9059 

Major credit corf* accepted 

MISS SCANDINAVIA 
COPENHAGEN ESCORT SERVICE 
Tet 01-54 17 06 Oedi Conte 

AMSTERDAM 

EURO BCORT SBtVia 

020 - 271001 

YffiNNA ESCORT - AGENCY 

TEL: 37 52 39 

LONDON TOP BCORT SERVICE 
Heathrow. Amencon Express. 3S2 8343 

LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SERVICE 

10 KENSINGTON CHURCH ST W8 
TB.- 9379136 OR 937 0133 

AS major' credit cant accepted. 

ZURICH 

SmwCuiHhi escort + guide service 
Teh 01/57 75 96 

GENEVA -HHM BCORT SERVICE 
TeL 36 29 32 

FMNXFURT. + SUMOUMXNGS 
Oarofae i Ejforf + Travel Service. 

* JASMINE * 

AMSTERDAM ESCORT SERVICE 
020-366635 

LONDON 

B&GRAVIA 

Eiart Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 

DIANA ESCORT SBtVKS Union / 
Heafhrow / Gatwidv Ptetne ring UR 
01-381-0608. 

ZURICH 

A1EXIS ESCORT SBtVKE 

TH.- 01/47 55 82 

NEW YORK. MIA, Herat & Goferielle 

Escort Service. 212-2230870. Major 
aedt conk 

LONDON 

Portman Escort Agency 

67 Qdtem Sheet, 

London W1 

Tefc 486 3724 or 486 1158 

All major credit aadfc accepted 

LONDON MAXINE ESCORT StfvMe 
Heathratf/Geeundi Credt cords ae- 
cepted-Tef 937 4428 -I- 935 0520 

ZURICH-GENEVA 

GINGER'S ESCORT SBWKE 

TEL: 01/363 08 64 -022/34 41 86 

M&ANO + LUGANO ESCORT, guide 
SrreeJSf 1 T * 

VIENNA STUDENT ESCORT servxx. 
Contact: 83 63 04. Credit axtb ac- 
cepted 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


AMSTERDAM BERNADETTE Mete 
and Ferrate Escort Service. (0) 20- 
329716 


DUE5SHDORF- COLOGNE -BOW+- 
Eaen. Pom's Escort & travel service. 
AB craft cards. 0211-30 50 W 

VIENNA CLEOPATRA Escort Service. 
Tel: 52 73 88 or 47 70 31 

MADRID IMPACT mcort and guide 
service. MuftteiguaL 261 4)42 

V®«A YOUNG ESCORT Service. 
Contact: 83 33 71 

LONDON TSUDIE ESCORT Service. 
Tet 01-373 8849. 

LONDON ESCORT AGENCY. 
Tet 9355339. 

LONDON BCORT SERVICE. Tet 937 
6574. 

A7HB4S ESCORT AND GUIDE Ser- 
vice. Tel: 8086194. 

CHAR1ENE GENEVA GUIDE Service. 
Trt 283-397 

GENEVA - CUO ESCORT SBtVICE. 
022 / 47.47.03 

DUSSRDOW/ ESS8U COLOGIC 
DommaEscort Service 021 1/3831 41 

FRANKFURT + AREA Orstna Escort 
Service. 069/364666. Credt Cards 

LONDON LUCY GUIDE 6 ESCORT 
Sffviee 271 2889 

aaSTA. LONDON SCAM9MAV1AN 
Escort Servo. E34 0691. 

HEATHROW LONDON ESCORT 5er- 
wt TeL 994 6682. 

LONDON ONLY JAPANESE BCORT 
Service. Teli 01 821 0627. 

G4ARIENE GB4EVA GUDE Service. 
TeL 283-397 


LONDON ORIENTAL GUIDE Service 
Tet 01-243 1442 


LONDON OBCERNMG ESCORT Sir. 
vice. 1P1) W 0154. 


LONDON JAWS ESCORT AGMCY 
012430785 


MAMS SEUCTIONS ESCORT Ser- 
vice. 401 1507 Credit Cards. 


LONDON PARK LANE Ewart Service. 
Teh 01-821 0283 


5ATMJBCORT sawet NVCg0) 


946-7817; Montreal glA) 932. 

LONDON RAYSWATBL ESCORT Ser- 
«kb.T<I.01 229 0776. 


LONDON ALLIANCE Escort Service. 
Tet 381 6852 


PRIVATE ESCORT SERVICE. London 
01-2459002. 


SAMANTHA BCORT satVtCE Lon- 
don Tet 01 -328 8439. 


AMSTERDAM JEANET fecort Service 
Tub (020! 326420 or 340110. 


CAMEO ESCORT SERVICE London. 
Tet 01-607 9669/40? 4781 


FRANKFURT - PETRA Escort i. Travel 
Service. TeL 069 7 6624 05 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


MLJMCH ESCORT 5SMCE. Tet 
089/33 50 20 or 089/35 94 712 


MWBCH - WELCOME ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tet 91 84 59 

AMSTERDAM FOUR ROSES Eicon 
Service (0) 20-964376 

AMSTBtDAM KIM SIS Escort Service 
Tet 020-953892 

AMSTERDAM BARBARA BCORT 

Service. 020-954344 

BRUSSELS MJCHEUE BCORT and 
guide service. Tet 733 07 98 

DOMINA AMSTERDAM BCORT 

Guide Service. TeL (030) 762842 

FRANKFURT “TOP TBf Escort Ser- 
vice. 069/5960-52. 

RANKfURT SONJA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tet 069-68 34 42. 

FRANKFURT POLAND BCORT Ser- 
«re- Tet 069/63 41 59. 

HAMBURG - MADEMOISH1E E*ron 
Agency. 040/55 32 7M. 

KAREN ESCORT SStVKX Frratfurr. 
Tet 069/88-62-89 

LONDON BLONDE BCORT Servce 
Tel: 01-225 0368 

VIENNA ETOUE ESCORT SOVICE. 
Tel: 56 7B 55. 

BRU5SH5. CHANT Al BCORT Ser- 
vice: Tet 02/520 23 65. 

LOMX3N CARIBBEAN BCORT Ser- 
vice 01-589 0661. 

3BNEVA«ANA Female & Mate escort 
service. MubSngwJ. 022/342955. 


alliance with white-ruled South Af- 
rica and undermine the administra- 
tion's efforts to pressure Pretoria to 
reform its apartheid system. South 


Africa is presently the main suppli- 
er omer 




ffieiEHert. 
225 9499®, 


3026 


Tel: 031- 


^^.YORKExartSe^ 


«ANXRKr - EVA'S BCORT & trow 
el nerwce. Tet QW/44 77 75 


«ANXH«r JENNY ESCORT & travel 
fwvice. 069/55-72-10. Qet&t cadi. 


PRINCESS Escort 
.Gwde Seimoe. Teh 22 69 54. 


HAMKIRG . SABRINA Escort 
vwa. Trt 040/58 65 35- 


WW YORK MAiE Exon & Cud. 
Sertrao. 212-307-5942 


^W^ON DC'CAPTOL Exon 
Servo. 1203] 483-8146, 


A AREA. Sknofie'i Excirt 
Sefv **- Credit Cords. Tel: 62 84 ““ 


132 


TWNKRJRT a AREA temale & mate 

Escort Service. 62 88 05. Credit Cm di 


P««MfORIMa AfttfiEL 
fa»rt Service. 212^150899. * 


‘swr.r* Beo * r -**■ 


er of arms and the conduit for 
outside military aid to UNIT A. . . 

At least two meetings chaired by 
the National Security Council have 
been held. A Special National in- 
telligence Estimate, an in-depth 
study by the various branches of 
the intelligence community, is un- 
der way to determine the Soviet 
role, intentions and prospects in 
Angola, according to intelligence 
and congressional sources. 

At issue is whether the United 
States should provide either mili- 
tary or humanitarian aid to the 
National Union for the Total Inde- 
pendence of Angola, or UNTTA, 
led by Jonas Savunbi. 

The guerrillas, fighting in south- 
ern Angola, have been under heavy 
pressure from the Soviet-supplied 
and Cuban-aided forces erf the 
Marxist government. A subsidiary 
question is whether this aid should 
be through covert or overt U.S. 
ch annels. 

Sources said this month that 
both the CIA and Pentagon seemed 
to favor covert military aid like that 
to the rebels in Afghanistan. 

Also bong studied is the possible 
imposition of a trade embargo, af- 
fecting either U.S. exports to Ango- 
la, the importation of Angolan oil. 


or both, a step being urged on the 
administration by conservative Re- 
publican groups like the Conserva- 
tive Caucus and the American Se- 
curity Council 

The interagency review is being 
earned out under the auspices of 
the National Security CouncL The 
Central Intelligence Agency, the 
Pentagon and the NSC staff 

strongly support military aid, while 
the State Department is said to be 
just as vehemently opposing any 
shift from the current U.S. policy 
of no assistance at alL 

“We still don't think providing 
arms is the way to do it,* 1 said a 
State Department spokesman, add- 
ing, "We think negotiations is the 
way out.” 

He was referring to U.S efforts to 
resolve through negotiations the 
twin problems of the withdrawal of 
Cuban troops from Angola and in- 
dependence for Namibia. There are 
now said to be as many as 35,000 
Cuban troops in Angola, up 5,000 
from last year. 

An administration decision to 
ask Congress for overt assistance is 
likely to touch off another bitter 
debate there similar to the one over 
U.S. aid to anti-Communist forces, 
known as the “contras,” in Nicara- 
gua. 

In 1976 Congress banned aid to 
Mr. SavimbTs organization after it 
was discovered that the CIA was 
secretly funneling more than S30 


milli on in mili tary and other assis- 
tance to UNITA, which was that 
locked ura three-way civil war ulti- 
mately won by the Soviet-backed 
Popular Movement for the libera- 
tion of- Angola. Thai a me nd m ent 
was repealed by Congress in July r 

Supporters of a renewed Ameri- 
can involvement on the side of UN- 
ITA say there may.be less congres- 
sional opposition this time because 
of Soviet and Cuban involvement 
in Angola. U.S. intelligence sources 
estimate Angola has received about 
SI billion in arms from the Soviet 
Union since January 1984. 

State Department efforts to ne- 
gotiate a solution to the Namibia 
dispute, or a withdrawal of Cuban 
troops from Angola, have been un- 
successful. 

Representative Claude Pepper, a 
Democrat of Florida and chairman 
of the House Rules Committee, in- 
troduced a bill this month authoriz- 
ing the U A government to provide 
up to 527 milli on in humanitarian 
aid to UNTTA, and Senator Steve 
Symms, a Republican of Idaho, -is 
“seriously thinking” about spon- 
soring a smrilar bill in the Senate, 
according to an aide. 

“We’re waiting for word from 
the White House,” an aide to Mr. 
Pepper said. “We feel there wlD be 
significant developments in a mat- 
ter of days." 

Jercmias K_ Chitunda, UNTTA' s 
foreign affairs secretary, said in an 






Jonas Savimbi 


interview that the organization’s 
top priority was anti-tank and anti- 
aircraft weapons to counter the An- 
golan government’s jet lighters, he- 
licopter gunships and tanks 
recently supplied by the Soviet 
Union. 

He said 550 million in military 
aid would be more useful than 5100 
million in humanitarian aid. 


Peres in U.S. Amid Fading Hopes for Peace Talks 


By David K. Shipler 

New York Times Senior 

WASHINGTON — Prime Min- 
ister Shimon Peres of Israel arrived 
Wednesday in Washington amid 
doubts that peace talks would be- 
gin anytime soon among the Israe- 
lis, Jor danians and Palestinians. 

According to Middle East ex- 
perts, the obstacles remain about as 
they were before the recent round 
of terrorism and reprisal that in- 
cluded the hijacking of the Italian 
cruise ship, the Achille Lauro. 

The atmosphere created here 
when the four hijackers murdered 
an American aboard the ship has 
worked against efforts by the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization to 
gain acceptability in American 
eyes. 

In tite short run at least, this 
seems likely to lend support to Isra- 
el’s desire to exdude the PLO from 
talks. 

“I am quite content that this 
happened before negotiations 
started,” Mr. Peres said Saturday 
in an interview. “It makes every- 
thing much more dear. The only 
conclusion is that Arafat has not 
changed. Everyone was talking to 
us.abont PLO moderation, moder- 
ation. We started to think, ‘Maybe, 


ILK. Says PLO Talks Still Possible 


part of the United States, accord- 
ing to Middle East specialists. 
Most i 


Reuters 


LONDON — A British Foreign Office minister met Wednesday 
with King Hussein of Jordan as officials indicated Britain was stiQ 
open to a Jor danian -led initiative that would include the Palestine 
Liberation Organization in Middle East peace talks. 

A Foreign Office spokesman said Britain's position on the initiative 
was unchanged and that a meeting that included PLO representatives 
could take place under the “right conditions.” - 
Britain said it canceled a meeting Monday with a joint Jordanian- 
PLO delegation after one of the two PLO representatives rq'ected the 
conditions by refusing to accept part of an agreed statement that 
specifically recognized Israel’s right to exist. 


maybe.' But once again we were 
brought back to the unpleasant 
truth-” 


Yasser Arafat is chairman of the 
PLO. 

Mr. Peres's Labor Party has long 
been interested in talks with King 
Hussein of Jordan over the future 
of the West Bank and Gaza, hoping 
to exchange territory for a peace 
treaty. But the long has insisted on 
including Palestinians in a negoti- 
ating team. He also wants an inter- 
national conference to l egitimize 
any talks. 


Mr. Peres seems prepared to ac- 
commodate Hussein on the pro- 
posal for an international confer- 
ence. The Israeli prime minister 
reportedly intends to suggest to 
President Ronald Reagan that a 
conference be called. It would in- 
dude the Soviet Union and other 
permanent members of the United 
Nations. Security Council, the Jor- 
danians and Palestinians from the 
West Bank and Gaza, but not the 
PLO. 

One difficulty in starting negoti- 
ations has been a relative lade of 
vigorous, high-level. effort, on the 


t of the work on the issue has 
been handled by Richard W. Mur- 
phy, assistant secretary of state for 
the Near East and South Aria, who 
is at too low a level, according to 
one of his predecessors. Harold H. 
Saunders, now at the American En- 
terprise Institute. 

“I think we ought to play a more 
active role at a higher political lev- 
el,” said Mr. Saunders, who served 
in the Carter administration. “With 
all due respect far Richard Mur- 
phy, unless you give it some pretty 
high political backing, you can’t do 
very much.” 

Rashid Khalidi, an assistant pro- 
fessor of political science at Colum- 
bia University with dose contacts 
in the PLO, said Mr. Arafat won 
approval last summer from his as- 
sociates for endorsing coexistence 
.with Israel after a meeting between 
Mr. Murphy and the Jordanian- 
Palestinian delegation. 

Such a meeting could take place 
only if it would lead to direct nego- 
tiations, an American official said. 
But Palestinians believe the United 
States has reneged on a virtual 
commitment, Mr. Khalidi said and 
this has led to . bitterness .and an 
upsurge in terrorism.. 









Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and 

well give you an extra month of Tribs /fe with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand price 
in most European countries! 




















County 



ll-lf-'H 

FT!?! 

Austria 


'■S3 

iMuAhiJ 

ma 


■33 

■ZED 

WZ2. 

E3 



m>>] 

■E3 

E3 

111 


unn 

WEE 

mn 

1 Fronee 

mm 


K 



■»7, T T 

IKEf 

m 

E3 


E. 

KD 

a 



Dr. 


■S3 

wm 

ig.^rar-1 

^K1 

mm 

mm 

WZ3 

Ward 

K1 

n 

a 

R1 

^2 

mm 

EEE 

C3G2 

EC3 


mm 


KES 

j^jjl 


MP3! 


mm 



ME3 

ET3) 

■A... 



E3 

E ED 

■ i! 

wzn 


E3 

T-'rtl 

n 

mm3 





HZ] 




Rrtof&iop«.NartfiAfrio3.fafTTwFrandiAfricaJ 

USA, French ftfywsicLMcttaEcsl 
Si 3 hI 1741 95 


to* of Akim. Corah. U<n Anxriai,Gdf 5un| 
S| 442| ~238| 130 



Ttcralb^S Srib uncri 

To Subscription Moncner , International Herpld Tribune 
181 ,avenueChaHes<^^ Net^Cedex, France. Tel: 7470729 . TeJex.- 612832 . ■ 

Please enter, my s ubscrip tion far: ~ H 

12 months( + in □ 6 months ( + mn 3 months ( + i n | 

My check is enclosed [~] Pteore.^angemya^cardaaBunt: " 

E 3 P ■Q.SlBfBnfflnsnn I 







□ 

L_ 

L 


□ 


□ 


n 

Q 

CdrtfucouitfriuiiM ... 



E. 


Sflnatur* 


Grdwprydafc 


Nm 


Ackfrw 


Gty/Gounky 


TWfefax 


-17-1085 


I 

I 

I 

I 

I 


gh' l • * 

'Japan 


4 ' 


•F 















KSTEKK ATIOIN AL HERAIJ> TRIB^]SE 7 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 



To Alter U.S. Foreign Policy 


fcw 

H* «!.■ *\* . 

SKafV- 

- 


ssasn- 

Wetii*-- . 
*«*■* 


By Sidney Blumenthal 

K'as6»gio» P«k Sottc* 

WASHINGTON — The fintis- 
sue of The National Interest, a 
magaziiM! produced by an influeii- 
Mi group of Moconsttvatives. re- 
flects an attempt to produce a fer- 
vently ideological foreign policy. 

The neoconservatives, who are 

neo by vmne of being fonner 
““ 7 1 believe that their writings 
“f 1 P5®TOa« the groundwork for 
“* ^ oection victory <rf Presi- 
- “f 111 Ronald Reagan. According to 
.» the publication's co-editor, Owen 
Jwrnes, The National Interest will 
bap instruct a benighted adminis- 
tranon that has “a conspicuous 
void'" at its center. ' 

In the quarterly’s first issue; 
which appeared Oct 9, theneocon- 
servauve elite is summoned by the 
publisher, Irving Krutoi, to lead a 


Prizewinner 
' Takes Aim at 


“2* ^ida^^ tocreate «^ be state: Martin S. Fddflein, fonner 
earn a new Republican Party. chairman of the Council of Eco- 
trtdeanab are cou- nomic Advisers; and Jeane J. Kirk- 
£ideraU& He « the mtdleetual tu- patrick, the fonner UJS. rcpresen- 
jff- to , Repreamutive Jade F, tative to the United Natiooi. 

a- New Ycpt Republican The board . »>«> boasts wdl- 
vteWed as a; potential presidential 1 known figures associated with the 


for 


U.S. Deficit 


11I1T , m , n Democratic Party, including Samu- 

{ NEWS ANALYSIS ■ <& P. Huntington, a former Nation- 
candidate in 1988. Mr. Kristol also Council staff member; 

has been indispensable to the ere- ^CharlKKramhanimerafor- 
ationof th^^Sonot^ g ■****", '£ 
movement throu4 his influence Mon^le and a sauor editor of the 
whh conserrarire foundations, his NwRepubbc magazine, 
editorship of The PubHc Interest ■ " ^ * P™* decade ^ 
magazine, and his columns for The neoconservatiyes have moved 
Wall Street Journal : ac j CAS me political specrnim from 

“If there’s going to boa new ‘° 1 ri 8 fat * Ai^ juncture, Mr. 
publican Party." Mr. Kristol F°~ 

-said, “then it will nod- a foreign * f cdmg of diaUnsion- 

poUcy to match.’’ He said the func- ™0^ 
tion of The National' Interest was Initially, they were disflhcaoned 
' “to come op with principles and with the dream of Soviet Russia, 
ideas;" Then they were rii&flfrgdoned with 

While “the basic conflict- of our liberalism. “A neoconservative," 
times — that between the U SS R said Mr. Kristol in a well-known 
.and the United States — tsideefog- formulation, “is a liberal mugged 
Seal," be wrote, the prevailing uj. by reality.” Now tbe neocanserva- 
ideology is “naive and utopian,” tives believe they have been 
tragically inadequate in the world mugged by Mr. Reagan- * 
struggle. ... As they see it, Mr. Reagan's for- 



He defines that ideology as “lib- eagn policy has produced a series of 
era! internationalism," which was dismaying events. Although the 


Clockwise, from top, are 
Irving KristoL, Jeane J. 
Kirkpatrick, Henry A. 
Kissinger and Martin S. 
FeMstetn. 



pf f/t/J T ]] United Pro* International 

“U iffth CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts 
— Franco Modigliani, who was 
' .-.v. awarded the 1985 Nobd Memorial 
Prize in Economic Science, has de- 
.. scribed the Reagan administra- 
, ' j don’s handling of the federal defi- 
' dt as “disastrous." 

1 : i ~ i ^ The deficit “offsets savings by 
. ’ people and leaves less money for 
^ investment," said Dr. Modigliani, a 
professor at the Massachusetts In-' 
stitute of Technology. He delivered 
his remarks Tuesday a l a news con- 
‘ ference after learning that he had 
won the award. 

• xasai* He predicted that the deficit, 

• which was estimated at about S210 

f* billion for the 1985 fiscal year, 

; would “be costly to the younger 

— generation" and recommended 

that President Ronald Reagan raise 

* Ja£ taxes and cut militaiy spending. 

' _ “The government deficit is a di- 

• r • . sastrons policy," he said. . 

[E* r - Modigliani’s comments 

. ■ -•zy drew a sharp retort from Mr. Rea- 
gan’s chief economist. Beryl W. 

■ - .~~r- Sprinkel, The Associated Press re- 

• . - - . - ported from Washington. “I’m sor- 
- - ry to say fh.it. even though he hap- 

. J T’~ _ pens to have a Nobel prize, he 
;.'.7^ happens to be wrong on. that 
. front," said Mr. %>rinkd, chairman 

. of the president's Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisers. 

[“There are people in this world' 
■" ■ 1 77“ who want bigger government,” he 
^ said. “They have a perfect right to 
r ~' z believe in larger- govanmenL- I 

don’t happen to be one. Neither’ 

does the presiden t."] 

Dr. Modigliani, an Italian native 
wbo became a naturalized U.S. citi- 
zen in 1946, was awarded the prize 
for his “pioneering analyses of sav^ 
ing and financial markets.” 

The Royal Swedish Academy of 
Sciences praised him for his study 
of household saving habits, caning 
it an ideal tool for analyzing pen- 
sion plans. 

Dr. Modighani said he hoped his 
^ award would help focus attention 
on the federal deficit, adding: “I 
think now maybe, I will speak with 
a louder voice." ' 

He said that Ins 30 years of re- 
search on savings contradicted a 
previous assumption that only the 
wealthy put money aside. Instead, 
he said, be found that everyone 
tries to save extra income for major 
expenditures and for retirement. 

Dr. Modigliani and his wife, Se- 
rena, were honored with a chain- - 
pagne toast by his colleagues, in- 
cluding Pad A. Samnelson, who 
won the economics prize in 1970. 

He said be learned he bad won 
(he award when lie received a tele- 
phone call early Tuesday morning. 

“To be awakened at 7 AAt by . 

, the secretary of the academy is the 
* best alarm dock I’ve had in a long, 
time," Dr. Modigliani said- 

U.S. Aide Quoted 
On Vietnam POWs 

Lot Angeles Times Service 
WASHINGTON — Robert C 
McFarlane. the White House na- 
tional security adviser, told busi- 
nessmen that be believes that some, 
of the 2^00 Americans still listed 
as missing in .action in Indochina 
are alive and in Vietnamese hands, 
according to a former Republican . 
congressman. 

John LeBoutillier of New York,--, 
who served on a House of Repre- 
sentatives task force on prisoners 
of war from 1981 to 1983, said that ' 
Mr. McFarlane also said that the 
/•administration had failed to re- ; 
ipTouDd an intelligence network in j 
I" Vietnam to help verify numerous 1 
. alleged sightings of POWs. 

■y Mr. LeBoutillier said he record- 
ed and later transcribed Mr. . 

. McFariane’s comments, made OcL 
9 at a gathermg of business exccn-. 

* tives and. political consultants that 
was sponsored by the columnists i 
Rowland Evans and Robert No- 


- ""-.'IT’-- ■ 




iSS?^ U.S. Servicemen Told toffide Identity Overseas You>11 always be recognised by yo ur taste in Scotc h. 


articulated by PresideQt Woodrow preadent has denounced the Soviet 
Wilson and is based cm the notions Union as an “evil empire," he end- 
of sdf-d domination and interna- cd sanctions against Poland, lifted 


tionallaw. 


the Soviet grain embargo, disas- 


Mr. Kristd writes that liberal trously withdrew from Lebanon, 
internationalism is a “myth" that and did business with Shiite Mos- 
was shattered by tbe Vietnam War lems wbo look hostages. 


According to him, the war pro- 
voked three reactions. 


Those episodes may be a pre- 
lude, in the neoconservatives’ view. 


First, he wrote, hberal interna- to the greatest betrayal of all; a 
tionalism was transformed min a debilitating arms control agree- 
self-Ioathing “isolationism" that ment with the Soviet Union, the 
stressed human rights and “Amen- moral equivalent of appeasement, 
can subordination in international That possibility fills them with dcs- 
organizations,” as reflected in the perate urgency. 


Carter administration. 


“Virtually any politician whose 


Then, there wasa revival of “old- career is in its last years," said Mr. 
fashioned, nationalist isolatio n- Harries, “is going to be extraordi- 
ism," tbe dominant outlook of the narily tempted to play it for histo- 
Defense Department and other key ry” 

parts of the Reagan adnnnisira- He contends that despite Mr. 
don. Reagan’s “general attitudes and in- 


parts of the Reagan adnnnisira- He contends that despite Mr. 
don. Reagan’s “general attitudes and in- 

Finally , a “ nationalist-umlater a- stincis," he is hdd captive by the 
fist" tendency has appeared. Mr: “old foreign policy establishment," 
Kristol said. It is characterized by including the Council on Foreign 
disdain for the North Atlantic Relations, the Carnegie Endow- 
Treaty Organization alKanr* with mem for International Peace, For- 
ungrateful Europeans and by an cign Affairs and Foreign Policy 


eagapess to go it alone. 

’‘This new conservatism,” he 
wrote, “is s«df-consck>usly ideolop- 


magazines and the State Deparl- 
he menL 

,gti Mi. Harries said the president 







cal," "es pecially when it fy*n vc to bas failed to arm himself with peo- 
“the baric conflict" with the Rus- pie wbo would provide “counter- 
sians. Mr. Kristol said the United vailing advice" and that none of the 
States “should aim to win" that ueooooservatives “has been ideally 
conflict “instead of pursuing a de- placed.” 
fensive policy that sees stalemate as Perhaps from a magazine, Mr. 
the goal" Harries reasoned, the neoconserva- 

• Mr. Kristd has assembled an im- fives can ’Till this conceptual 
pressive force for his war of ideolo- void." . 
gy. The National Interest’s board Mr. Harries is an Englishman 
of ‘ directors includes prominent turned Australian who was the for-’ 
Republicans such as Henry A. Kjs- ago policy adviser to Malcolm 
singer,' the fonner secretary of Fraser, the former Australian 


prime minister. He first came to the 
attention of American neoconser- 
vatives when be denounced tbe 
United Nations Educational, Sci- 
entific and Cultural Organization 
while serving as Australians UNES- 
CO representative and supported* 
the U5. withdrawal from the agenr 
py- 

IBs co-editor is Robert W. Tuck- 
er, a professor at Johns Hopkins 


University who calk himself “a 
genuine conservative.’’ 

Mr. Tucker fell into the neocon- 
servative orbit when an article that 
he wrote suggesting military seizure 
of the Gulf was rejected by Foreign 
Affairs. He offered the "piece to 
Commentary, which published it in 
January 1975. Since then. Com- 
mentary has published many other 
contributions from Mr. Tucker. 


Reagan Sees 
Space Shield 
As a 'Moral’ 
Obligation 

By Bernard Weinraub 

Vi*. 1 York Times Service 

MILWAUKEE — President 
Ronald Reagan has declared that I 
the administration views a UJS. 
space shield against nuclear weap- 
ons as a moral obligation that 
would improve tbe prospects for an 
arms agreement with the Soviet 
Union. 

“This program is an historic 
turning point," Mr. Reagan told an 
enthusiastic Republican audience 
Tuesday in Boise, Idaho, referring 
to his space arms program known 
as the Strategic Defense Initiative. 

“We will not bargain this re- 
search and testing program away.” 
he said, adding: 

“For the first time, energy and 
resources are being put to use in an 
attempt to find new technology 
that is aimed at saving lives. If we 
are successful, it will improve the 
opportunity for arms reduction be- 
cause missiles, no longer the ulti- 
mate weapon they* are today, will 
be more negotiable." 

Mr. Reagan's comments, on a 
daylong swing to raise money for 
Republican Senate incumbents in 
Idaho and Wisconsin, were some of 
his most pointed so far in defend- 
ing the program. 

Addressing Republican fund- 
raising rallies in Boise, during the 
day and in Milwaukee Tuesday 
night, Mr. Reagan referred to the 
space effort as "moral.*’ 

The Soviet leader. Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, has criticized the 
American space program as a de- 
stabilizing factor and indicated 
that mayor reductions in nuclear 
arsenals were unlikely unless the 
United States scrapped the pro- 
gram. 

Some members of Congress and 
military' analysts have said thaL the 
development of a space shield 
could increase tbe chance of nucle- 
ar war. 

■ NATO Support Urged 

Delegates to a NATO parlia- 
mentary assembly hare voted over- 
whelmingly in support of a propos- 
al that allows further research in 
Mr. Reagan's space program. Unit- 
ed Press international reported 
from San Francisco. 

The delegates to tbe annual 
North Atlantic Assembly voted, 
91-12, Tuesday in favor of the reso- 
lution. 

The resolution urged members of 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation to support the project and 
encouraged “agreement between 
the Soviet Union and the United 
States on the technical definitions 
of the forms of research permissible 
under terms of the ABM treaty." 


Page 5 


PHILIPS POCKET MEMO 

YOUR ELECTRONIC NOTEBOOK 

When you consider 
that you speak 7x faster 
than you write, you'll see 
the benefits of using a 
Philips fbeket Memo as cn 
electronic notebook, 
ideas, notes and reminders 
con be instantly recorded for 
reference later. 

Test a Philips Fbeket 
Memo at your office 

. .... . equipment dealer today or 

•' •- write for information. 

: . ~ V-i. '■* PHILIPS POCKET MEMO 

.. - TOiKiucnoNKNDraoac 


Pfeaso je.id tne «fofTT»3«i&n about PWips Rxtef memos 

Name Position 

Cotnpany 

Address 


Country 


PHILIPS 


PbSp i B U. D«? ii 

aJIK \fienna. beset Srosse W. Amto 


Every piece of jewelry has a story to tell. ■ 





ilias LALAoUNIS 


PARIS - 364. RUE ST-HONORE (PLACE VENDOME) 
GENEVA - 'BON GENIE". ZURICH - “GRIEDER" 
ATHENS - 6. PANEPISTIMIOU AVENUE 
HOTEL GRANDE BRETAGNE & ATHENS HILTON 
MYCONOS. CORFU. RHODES 
NEW YORK - 4 WEST 57 TH STREET & FIFTH AVENUE 


By Richard Halloran 

Ne*» York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
; armed forces have instructed mili- 
tary personnel to conceal their 
identities as much as possible when 
traveling abroad in areas of high 
. risk to protect them from terrorists. 

The Marine Corps, for instance, 
has advised marines to obtain civil- 
ian passports, hide military identi- 
fication cards, cover tattoos, wear 
nondescript dothes and to take 
other “prudent, common-sense ac- 
tions." 

Those instructions were sent out 
from Marine Corps headquarters 
last month after die murder of a 
UJS. Navy diver aboard the Trans 
World Amines plane hijacked to 


DOONESBURY 


DR. DM, WHAT ABOUT 
TMTHOUXlOUSBABt 
BOOH SUBSPECIES— 
■WEYUPPtEllSHE 
APHBNOMEMHOF 


Beirut in June and the killing of 
four Marine embassy guards in El 
Salvador in July. 

Naval officers said tbe navy had 
sent out a similar message insisting 
that navy personnel travel on U.S. 
militaiy aircraft as much as possi- 
ble. Jt said that tourist passports 
would be used unless forbidden by 
the nation to be visited. Navy per- 
sonnel were also instructed to hide 
their identities. 

A spokesman for the air force 
said -that sendee had warned air- 
men to take similar precautions. 

The army sent its message to all 
780,000 of its soldiers, a spokesman 
said, but he declined to make a 
copy available even though it was 
unclassified. A spokesman said it 


U&L, AS AN OBJECT 
OF MBW MEREST, 
THB&SNDQUesnON 
H&N REMISSION. 

\ 



followed the same format as the 
messages to the other sendees. 

Knee the bombing of a Marine 
Corps barracks in Lebanon two 
years ago, there bas been a gradual 
tightening of security at U& mili- 
tary bases around the world, ac- 
cording to officers here and outside 
Washington. 

Concrete barriers have been 
placed across roads leading to 
buikliugs that might be targets of 
terrorist attack. At some bases, 
quick reaction forces to repel an 
attack have been strengthened. 

But the officers acknowledged 
that attention to better security has 
been spotty. Visitors to military in- 
stallations around Washington, far 
instance, can still walk into some 
buildings unchecked. 

The Marine Corps message ad- 
vised that “all international travel- 
ers should consider purchasing 
tourist passports at their own ex- 
pense.” When planning trips, “ar- 
rangements should be made with- : 
out noting militaiy rank." Baggage 
should not identity the owner as a 
military person. 

Documents identifying the trav- 
deris association with the U.S. gov- 
ernment should be placed in 
checked baggage, the message said. 

“Distinctive military items" such 


VB WePtiS YZ&F&tU&fT, 

THoomitmmam 

1&LL Be BACK, PROBABLY 
mDHBFORTHEaHsnms 
SEASON. mmVSTORSr 
^APPEARM crass. 


msaps t&BBH 
UGjA CALLS? 

IvL *****’ 







DIAMONDS 


Single diamonds at wholesale prices 
by ordering direct from Antwerp, 
the world’s most important cut- 
diamond market. Give diamonds 
to the ones you love, buy for 
investment, for $our enjoyment. 

Write airmail for free price iiat 

or call tu: 

Joachim Goldenstetn 
diamantexport 
E—Mhhcd 1928 

PdftMnstwt 62, B2018 Antwen 
.Bdgtm-TeLi (323) 254.07-51. 
T«ka= 717T9 syl b. 
at the Diamond Club Bldg. 



as high-gloss shoes, flight watches 
and military rings should not be 
worn, the message said, nor should 
cowboy hats and belt buckles that 
make Americans stand out. 

“Tattoos can identify a person as 
a marine," the message said, “but 
bandages or long-sleeve shirts will 
provide initial concealment” 

Marines were advised, after 
boarding a plane, to: “Look for a 
hiding place within arm’s reach to 
conceal hems. Prepare a plan to 
dispose of or explain documents 
carried but not sanitized." 


Austrian Police Seize Heroin 

The Associated Press 

VIENNA — Austrian police 
said Wednesday they have seized 
60.5 kilograms (133 pounds) of her- 
oin and arrested 21 people in what 
is believed to be one of the biggest 
seizures of tbe drug in Europe. 


= WALLY FINDLAY ■ 

Galleries International 

new york - Chicago - palm beach 
beverly hills • parts 

EXHIBITION 


m * j 


“Light of France" 


Permanent exhibition of 
AUGE, BOUDET, BOUHBE, CANU, 
CASSfGNEUL, CHAURAY, FABEN, 
Gall, gantt'O, gaveau, 
GOttUI, KAMBOURG, KLUGE, 
LE PHO, MKH&-HB4RY. NESSI, 
VALTAT, NEUQUELMAN, SBKE 
SJMBAH,VK3N01E5. 



2 Ave. Mafia non - Paris 8th 

TIL: MS *074. imndar Am. ma m dm f 

lOanisI - 7b3a to 7 pja. 

Hotel George V- 723.54.00 
31 Ave. George-V ■ Paris 8th 

<Wla.W.lta)u»-I ba*U 0 k> 9 (lib. 



Marriott Hotels in Europe 

AMSTERDAM • ATHENS • LONDON • PARIS • VIENNA 


HOTELSoRESORTS 


for reservations: An^terdam® 1 120) 43 5112 r ftaiikiurt® (069) 28 74 92 • London (01)439 0281 • Mflan*tiP (2) 345 2009 -'Munich i89> IS 20 93 - Parish «06i 079 11 37 • Zurich ^ 101 > 302 0979 • UeU International or your Travel Agent 










PublLWd With TW New York Time* and IV Sf aahingtoo Port 



(tribune. 


Driving Down the Dollar 


According to Murphy’s Law. if aovero- 
toents can get a thing wrong, U' n '.v . ju. 
cannot the finance ministers of Ame.-Li. 
West Germany. Japan, France and Britain 
evince modest satisfaction after the first 
three weeks of their attempt to force the 
dollar down? By selling dollars on the mar- 
ket and threatening to sell more, they have 
achieved an American devaluation of about 
7 percent, and of 10 percent against the yen. 

Many, however, believe the dollar needs 
to fall about 20 percent ro make U.S. goods 
competitive and stanch the Hood of imports. 
To have tried to do this overnight could have 
created panic. With investors scrambling to 
sell the dollar and America's public stocking 
up on foreign goods to beat the price rise, an 
excessive fall in the dollar might have begun, 
strangling even the present modest growth 
of the world economy: the horror-scenario 
that some observers have long feared. 

If the experiment in dollar devaluation is 
to do more good than harm, its progress 
must be gradual but rather continuous. The 
game has only just begun and there is all to 
play for. Optimists believe that when inves- 
tors are unsure whether they want to stock 
up on the dollar any further, governments 
can nudge them out of it gently by selling 
moderate amounts of their own holdings: a 
controlled cheapening of the dollar wilL 
hopefully but not certainly, reduce the U.S. 
clamor for trade protection. 

But many believe the financial field is too 
bumpy and that governments are playing 
with one hand strapped behind their backs. 
Can governments with limited means exert 
sufficient leverage on a market where some 
$150 billion change hands in a day? More 
basically, can concerted currency interven- 
tion — the name of the game the five govern- 
ments have started — ever hope to succeed 


when (h** constellation of their individual 
bucsei •:> and monetary policies is so fun- 
ii!-c. signed as at present? Amer- 
ica needs to borrow massively abroad be- 
cause of overspending at home: Other 
countries have surplus income which they 
export because their own expenditure is 
weak. So long as this dichotomy persists, can 
the dollar fall for long? 

The borrowing needs of the U.S. govern- 
ment are not going to fall because action to 
control the budget deficit is deficient. Simi- 
larly. the needs of America's private sector 
will not fall without a new recession. So how 
can U.S. interest rates come down and stop 
sucking in the funds from abroad which' 
keep the dollar high? Only by an unwise, 
inflationary relaxation of American mone- 
tary policy: a resort to the printing press. 
This would have to be achieved over the 
dead body of Fed chai rman Paul Volcker. 

With government deficits shrinking in Eu- 
rope and Japan but not in America, concert- 
ed currency intervention risks being thwart- 
ed by unconcerted budget policies. 
Unfortunately, the Europeans and the Japa- 
nese have made it as clear as the Americans 
that little can be hoped for here. Japan, 
under pressure, is making it slightly cheaper 
for its citizens to borrow to build houses and 
buy consumer goods, but since borrowing is 
anyway unpopular among the Japanese the 
impact of this may be s mall. 

So long as basic economic policies diverge 
so greatly between major capitalist coun- 
tries, progressive cheapening of the dollar 
must depend on the readiness of the markets 
to be hypnotized — to display what Cole- 
ridge. discussing romantic poetry, called a 
willing suspension of disbelief. The financial 
community usually eschews romanticism. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


A U.S. Dilemma in Manila 


President Ronald Reagan, who sent one 
message to the Philippines a while back by 
canceling a trip of his own. has just sent 
another by dispatching a heavyweight confi- 
dante, Paul Loxait. The senator's evident mis- 
sion is to communicate U.S. anxiety over the 
way President Ferdinand E Marcos is running 
his country into the ground and. beyond that, 
to measure whether Mr. Marcos, after 20 years 
in power, has the physical health and the 
political capacity to arrest the rot. 

This is, when’ you think of it, a sorrowful 
turn. The United Slates, in the course of mak- 
ing the Philippines a colony, also made it a 
democracy, and thus never felt guilty after- 
ward. On the contrary, it felt proud, and it has 
often been insensitive to the resentments 
stirred among many Filipinos by American 
paternalism. A pattern developed in which 
successive administrations largely deferred to 
Mr. Marcos on grounds that he ran a democra- 
cy, however imperfect, and offered the United 
Stales the immensely important strategic 
benefits of the Gark and Suhic military bases. 
Only now, when the democratic aspect has 
failed to produce a solid political process and 
when indefinite access to the bases can no 
longer be taken for granted, is Washington 
being compelled to step up concern. 

The question is whether the sickness is so far 


advanced in Lhe Philippines — the poor devel- 
opment. the corruption and insurgency — that 
the very effort to anticipate a Communist 
takeover risks aggravating the disease. The 
models of Iran and Nicaragua are much on the 
American mind: in those places a belated and 
uncertain American effort to steer a friendly 
authoritarian regime toward reform was over- 
whelmed by revolution with a bitter anti- 
American flavor. American conservatives, who 
made much of Jimmy Carter’s frustrations in 
the two places, have been sensitive to the pails 
in the Philippines. Usable models of transition 
in these circumstances are in short supply. 

Some Filipino democrats, accustomed to 
dependency, believe that it is up to the United 
Slates to rig the various available sticks and 
carrots to ensure a transition to a more stable 
democratic order without Mr. Marcos and his 
hangers-on. But the Reagan administration, 
while aware that the Marcos circle's grip on 
power hinders such a transition, hesitates to 
take the responsibility for easing the Filipino 
leadership out. The administration is attentive 
to the dilemma. It will have to be exceptionally 
skillful as well. No one. least of all Mr. Marcos, 
should be in the slightest doubt that Mr. Rea- 
gan is determined to see democracy and the 
American connection endure. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Reform, Not Decline, of Communism Benefits West 


By Ronald Tiers ky 

A MHERST, Massachusetts — 
What will be at issue when 
Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorba- 
chev sit down in Geneva next 
month? Not just the specific deals 
that will or will not be made and 
later kept or not kept. 

The meeting will take the measure 
of the two leaders' societies as well 
as of their international power and 
prestige. Just as President Reagan 
represents the liberal democracies, 
so General Secretary Gorbachev 
speaks for Communism. 

The fact is that despite Mr. Gor- 
bachev’s vigor, humor and relative 
youth, the system be represents is 
f ailing around the world. 

This makes for a fundamental 
weakness in his negotiating position 
in Geneva, but it is also a good 
reason why his proposal for radical 
cuts in nuclear arsenals should be 
tested seriously. 

Look around the Communist 
world. In several states and parties, 
great reforms are under way. In Chi- 
no, Hungary and the most impor- 
tant West European Communist 
Party (in Italy), we are beginning to 
glimpse the possibility of de-Com- 
munization from within. In other 
situations — Poland, Afghanistan 
and Vietnam — Co mmunis m has 
produced political or economic di- 
saster. In Eastern Europe as a 
whole, it is evident what chaos 
would occur if the Red Army sud- 
denly disappeared. 

What remains of the Communist 
world is held together largely by 
Soviet military power. But the dan- 
gerous decay of the home base is 
apparent: The Soviet Union today is 
a model only of how a militarized 
party can maintain itself in power. 

In short, Mr. Gorbachev — how- 
ever engagingly he smiles and how- 
ever craftily he negotiates — arrives 
in Geneva as the head manager of 
an essentially bad business. 

If this is Communism’s condition, 
what should the West want from the 
summit meeting in Geneva? 

First, good agreements on arms 
control and other important issues, 
including at least tacit understand- 
ings on h uman rights. 

Second, the restoration of a work- 
ing relationship in which ‘‘linkage” 
between h uman rights issues and 
aims control becomes permanent, 
not by b lackmail but because of 
recognized reciprocity. 

Finally, and most difficult for the 
West, we should look favorably on 
Soviet reform and Communist polit- 
ical evolution, if only because ulti- 
mately it is in the West's interest. 

Those Americans who want to 
defeat the Russians at the negotiat- 
ing table rather than engage them 
are in effect denying the Kremlin’s 
interest in dealing practically with 
the United States about things that 
the United States is wanting to ob- 
tain from Moscow. Such people 
have in the past always taken a kind 
of perverse pleasure in the discovery 
that the Soviet Union was negotiat- 
ing in bad faith. 

That would be a grave mistake 
today. On the contrary, it should be 
American strategy for the summit 
meeting and afterward to test Mr. 
Gorbachev’s intentions. 




Hurricane 



He may in fact be acting in good 
faith, for Soviet domestic reform 
may well require an arms agreement 
— and not vice versa, as many West- 
erners seem to believe. 

To be sure, a vigorous Soviet 
Union will always make America 
somewhat uncomfortable. Yet 
America’s interest in the peaceful 
management of international dan- 
gers and in democratic development 
around the world suggests strongly 
that it must ultimately prefer Com- 
munism's reform to its decadence. 

For one thing, die decay of any 
nuclear power is too fearful to be 
contemplated seriously. Beyond 
this, a reformed Soviet Union might 
be inclined to compete with the 
West in economic and other ways, 
thus easing the strategic rivalry that 
is pushing American society increas- 
ingly toward militarism. 

Ronald Reagan should drive a 
hard bargain on arms control and 
apply pressure on human rights. But 
he should also convey a genuine 
interest in Soviet progress concern- 
ing domestic reforms. 

Is Mr. Gorbachev likely to pursue 
real reform? Some of the answer 
depends on America. Today Com- 
munism is obviously on a dead-end 
path of historical development and 
some Communist leaders are react- 
ing constructively. Even Soviet lead- 
ers ,—dakula ting their self-interest 
if nothing else — will sooner or later 
have to accept that the system must 
change if it is to survive at alL 

The writer is associate professor of 
political science at Amherst College, 
Massachusetts, and the author of "Ordi- 
nary Stalinism.” He contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


Timely Advice for Comrade Gorbachev 


By James Res ton 


W ASHINGTON — Here follows the text of a 
letter from the Soviet 1 
General Secretary Mikhail Gorba 
As is well known, the U.S. government is 
for your meeting with President Reagan at Geneva 
next month and is doing so with its usual awkward 
cunning. In an effort to deceive ns about its policy and 
purpose at the summit, it is putting out a senes of 
conjuring and contradictory statements, all carried by 
the captive capitalist press, radio and television. 

One day, in this wickedly calculated campaign, it has 
Caspar Weinberger from the Pentagon questioning the 
integrity of our past commitments to peace and nuclear 
arms control, and wondering whether any new agree- 
ment at Geneva would have any meaning . 

The next day, George Shultz at the State Depart- 
ment is suggesting that while our generous offers are 
“deeply flawed” there could be “real progress” at the. 
summit if only you would agree to his policies. It is 
difficult to interpret the Voice of America; there are so 
many voices speaking at once. 

Accordingly, much win depend on Ronald Reagan’s 
choice of advisers at- the summit, bat we must be 
careful. Mr. Weinberger sounds tough but is really 
rather elegant and meek. He likes to collect weapons 
but not to use them except at places like Grenada, 
whereas Mr. Shultz, “the man of reason,” prefers fewer 
weapons but might use them. 

There are many reasons that we . in the 
believe you should approach the snmmit with 
dence. Our alliance is strong. When we tell our com- 
rades in Eastern Europe what to do, they do it When 
Mr. Reagan asks his allies for a little help, they do as 
they please. Witness what is called “collective securi- 
ty," a form of common action in which Italy, Israel, 
Egypt and even our former comrades in Yugoslavia. all 
acted on their own in the latest Palestinian incidents. 

On the economic front, the Reagan administration 
now has the largest budget deficit and trade deficit in 


the history of the nation, whereas we balance our 
budget every year and are still rich enough to buy grain 
from the impoverished American farmers. ‘ 

It.has been noted here that you are now in the 
process of producing anew economicplan to guide the 
Soviet Union into the 21st century and are choosing 
younger men to seeit through. This has made a strong 
impression here, where the Reagan administration is 
wondering how to get through the next two years with a 
new team at the Federal Reserve. 

Comrade Gorbachev: Yon have asked for any sug- 
gestions about how to negotiate with the Americans at 
Geneva. We venture to propose the following: 

• Take your wife along for the ride. It hadn’t oc- 
curred to people here until recently that members of 
the Politburo had wives. And always help her down the 
steps from the plane: Mr. Reagan is very good at this. 

• It’s always wise to emphasize peace on Earth and 
in the stars, as you in Paris, but unwise to talk of 
“ditente.” That is regarded here as a deceptive French 
word that should never be used m political circles. 

• Hold a lot of press conferences, . around . noon 
Geneva time just before the evening TV news here. Mr. 
Reagan hates press conferences, especially if asked for 
details of anything you’ve been reprinting, 

• If asked about human rights, say you're all for 
them though they’re not on the agenda. 

• Say. you think these meetings are a great idea, and 
should be held every summer in the Soviet Union, and 
every water in California. -That will give the press a 
chance to live high cm thrirexpense accounts and Mr. 
Reagan a chance to get back to tire 'ranch. 

- Goe-other thing: TeB Leonid Zamyatin in the Inter- 
national Information Department not to waste too 
much propaganda on “star wars” between now and the 
beginning of November. Tie world baseball champi- 
onship is on here now, and nobody will be listening 
much to either you or Mr. Reagan until it’s over. 

The Nm .York Times. 





Strip Poker at the Treasury Speaking Softly About Racism Won’t Make Its Evil Go Away 


In its annual challenge ic Congress over the 
national debt limit, the Treasury Department 
threatened to lake off all its clothes: Unless the 
Senate quickly raised the limit, the Treasury 
said darkly, it might stop payment on all 
government checks. The Senate came around, 
passing a bill to raise the ceiling past $2 trillion 
and supposedly force a balanced budget by 
1991. But for thousands of people outside 
Washington, a U.S. government threat to cut 
them all off was cruel sport indeed. When she 
hears that her Social Security check might 
bounce, the widow living from hand to mouth 
trembles for a week. The threat unhinges small 
suppliers as well as defense contractors, bond- 
holders and millions of the struggling poor. 

There was no need to stop payments, and 
the Treasury knew it. There is always some 
rinky-dink way to scrape up more cash, as it 
recently did with a rush sale of $5 billion in 
short-term notes. What is most disturbing 
about the charade is that Deputy Secretary 
Richard Dorman. White House spokesman 
Larry Speakes and Senate Majority Leader 
Bob Dole would resort to scare tactics. 


The jrallousness did, however, highlight the 
absurdity of the debt-limit rituaL The ceiling is 
a formality based on the constitutional provi- 
sion that empowers Congress to “borrow mon- 
ey on the credit of the United States/' The 
debt ceiling frees Congress from having to 
approve each separate borrowing. 

With deficits coming every year now. battles 
over increasing the ceiling also come every 
year. But they are phony battles. Each time. 
Congress thunders about profligate spending 
— although Congress itself approved the 
spending in the first place — and the Treasury 
wails that it is running out of funds. When the 
wind dies down, the ceiling is always raised. 

There is a better way, already employed by 
the House. When it adopts the annual budget 
resolution that frames subsequent appropria- 
tions and tax bills, it simultaneously adjusts 
the debt ceiling. No hassle, no embarrassing 
votes. The crucial fiscal debate takes place 
when it should, during preparation of the bud- 
get resolution. That is the responsible way. 
Empty yet fearsome threats are noL 

— THE NE W YORK TIMES. 


y 


FROM OUR OCT. 17 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Art Dealers Arrested for Fraud 
NEW YORK — The stir caused by the recent 
arrest of Messrs. Benjamin and Henry Du- 
veen, on charges of defrauding the U.S. Gov- 
ernment of customs duties, is intensified by the 
report that the Government has derided to 
summon many notable millionaires in support 
of its case. Mr. J.D. Rockefeller, Mr. J.P. 
Morgan, Mr. George J. Gould and Senator 
William A. Clark will be among those who will 
be called to give evidence regarding prices they 
have paid for the art treasures imported by the 
Messrs. Duveen. The Collector of the Port of 
New York said: “The Messrs. Duveen are an 
importers whom we have been specially watch- 
ing. Our suspicions were made a certainty 

when I was handed an anonymous letter which 
disclosed evidence that the Consular invoices 
and the private invoices of the firm on some 
imports differed by large amounts." 


1935: Europe Ship6 Gold to America 

PARIS — The end of gold shipments From 
Europe to the United Stales does not appear 
yet to be in sight. The movement may result in 
the transfer to the United States of as much as 
$6 million of the yellow metaL The set of 
circumstances at the present time differs vastly 
from that prevailing in July and August twen- 
ty-one years ago. There is no panic in the 
London market or in our own; there is no 
blockade of the shipping lanes of the Atlantic: 
and, Europe and the rest of the world know 
that they could take out every dollar of proper- 
ty or claims to property they have in America 
in the form of gold and it would scarcely make 
a dent in the gold stocks of the country, now 
approximately $9.5 billion. The dominating 
fear is that war, should it come, would mean a 
renewal of inflation in the nations of Europe, 
with a depreciation of their currencies. 


By William Pfaff 

P ARIS — Enoch Powell, the Brit- 
ish politician, said to bis country- 
men in the 1960s that continued im- 
migration by Caribbean and Asian 
ex-subjects of Lbe British empire 
would end in “rivers of blood.” 

This statement was met with hor- 
ror and rejection by the right-think- 
ing majority of white society. Mr. 
Powell was described as a racist be- 
cause of his argument that Britain 
should limit immigration to preserve 
its racial and cultural homogeneity. 
Now that the blood is flowing in the 
streets of Britain, it is proper to say to 
Mr. Powell that he was right 
One is expected to speak softly, if 
at all, about race. Class is a correct 
distinction to draw; race is not, in 
public discourse. It is acceptable to 
blame the supposed racism of social 
and economic structure in Britain, or 
America, as in South Africa, for the 
black poor’s plight. But it is not ac- 
ceptable to say that those who riot 
and those who put down the riots, 
both find their main source of identi- 
ty and solidarity in the fart that the 
ones are black and the others, white. 

Black solidarity and a common ha- 
tred is the message of Louis Farrak- 
han, the Black M uslim leader in the 
United States, putting in extravagant 
and anti-Jewish form a message 
preached in the past by many other 
leaders of America's poor blacks. The 
Jews, who for years were the most 



BY De to Torre O In El Emctodor IBwo*o). 


generous friends of American civil 
rights organizations and movements, 
now are victims of the Black Mus- 
lims' self-identification with Israel's 
Arab victims and their fantasy of 
themselves as part of a vast Third 
World liberation movement. 

The American governing class, 
which until 20 years ago imposed its 
own system of racial apartheid upon 
American blacks, or condoned it, at 
the same time gives its support, en- 
thusiastically or grudgingly, to the 
quari-insuirectionary movement of 
South African blacks against white 
Afrikaaner power. This occurs while 


a sig ni fi c ant minority of the Ameri- 
can black population remains a job- 
less, skill-less, subproletariat, rotting 
in violence and drugs amid the lunar 
landscape of the big-city ghetto. 

South Africa is a paradox, the Afri- 
kaaners themselves victims of reb- 
ersecution in Europe. They 
the “white tribe" of southern 


survived as a white tribe holding itself 
apart. Bui they wanted black labor, 
black lands, black subordination, so 
forced black Africans into the social 
and economic structures they builL 
They thereby created a large body 


of uprooted, urbanized, oppressed 
and politicized black workers, and a 
Westernized black intelligentsia 
which now demands exactly the liber- 
ty the Afrikaaners earlier had sought 
from their own persecutors. The 
whites will not yield, not only be- 
cause that would mean the end of 
South Africa as they know it, but 
because it would also almost certain- 
ly scatd tiie country into the same 
descending spiral -of political and 
economic decline and violence fee 
rest of southern Africa has experi- 
enced since the 1950s. 

In the 1920s and 1930s, progressive 
colonial authorities in Africa admit- 
ted Western-educated and “evolved” 
blacks to full citizenship and nomi- 
nally equal rights with the ruli 
while population. The rest, the uni 
uealed indigenes, “the natives”, re- 
mained hunters and farmers in tribal 
status, under customary law, with the 
colonial authority ruling them in a 
way both exploitative and paternalis- 
tic, exacting labor and military ser- 
vice, according markets, an economic 
structure and order. 

It is an unavoidable observation, 
that Americans and Britons are doing 
much .tiie same thmg to their bladk 
minorities today. Blacks who con- 
form to the norms and values of - 
white society acquire its privileges; 
they become integrated members of"- 
it The rest are left behind in the 
ghetto. The difference is thatin colo- 
nial Africa, tribal society still had 


coherence; life within its norms was a 
m ean i ng ful -existence in an ancient 
human tradition. There is little mean- 
ing to life in a South Bronx ghetto, or 
a squalid London housing estate. 

We aiU' all -legatees of a past in 
which white men took for granted 
their right' to seize, transport, exploit 
and enslave blades, and that blades 
were their natural inferiors, a theoret- 
ical proposition implying, as de 
Tocquevflle wrote at the tune, “a vast 
limitation, if not a complete aboli- 
tion, of human liberty ” 

One understands very well the con- 
, temporary desire to deny the force of 
. racial feeling in human affairs, to 
disarm its malig n power by pretend- 
ing that conflict . of the kind we have T 
been Seeing in Britain and South Af- ' 
rica, the alienation given voice by 
Loins Farrakhan, the attitudes and 
actions of white societies confronted 
by black insurrection. are to be 
healed by bigh-mindedness, money, 
the ministrations of social workers. 

We would like to regard racial feel- 
ing as something exceptional, outside 
the norm of human affairs, incidental 
to economic or class struggle — for 
which we can imagine the solutions. 

It is not Itactnaflyhas been the most 
powerful single force for evil in mod- 
.ern tunes. We do well to tremble 
before iL Its power implies not only 
con fbct end persecution but an im- 
mense fat alism , as if our bodies them- 
selves have condemned us. 

'• « 1985 William Pfaff. 


Retirement, or die Chance to Pursue a Secret Dream? letter 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 19581982 
KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W, HUEBNER. Publisher 

Executor Editor RENE BQNDY Deputy Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Demur Editor RICHARD Ft MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director if Qradarim 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Adrertamg Sola 

International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Quriw-dfrGaollc 92200 Neuifly-sur-Sehw, 

France. TcL: (1)747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-S052. 

Direaeur de la publkttuan; Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hennessy Rd.. Hong Kong. Tel. 5-285618. Telex 61170. 

Maturing Dir. U.K.: Robin MacKidiai 63 LaqAo*. London WC2.Td8}b-4^~_Ttkx *62009, . 

Gol Mgr. W. Garnanv: B! Ltnsabadt Friedrkhstf. 15, 6000 Frankfurt/ M. 71 (069fi26?55. 7Zt 416721. 

SjL au capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Nanterre B 7 1202! 126 Commission Pariudre No. 61337. 

U.S. subscription: 5322 irarft 1 . Second-class postage paid at Long Island Cay. N.Y. 1 1101. 

C 1985. International Herald Tribane. All rights reserved 



N EW YORK — I have a sad memory of my 
father after he retired in his mid-6Qs, still in 
good health. He spent every morning poring over 
his newspaper and reading his mail much of it 
junk raaiL He even examined each coupon before 
throwing the whole lot away. 

Following lunch, he look a long nap. Then he 
went grocery shopping. He spent hours in the 
supermarket in the small town where he lived, 
comparing prices, examining new products, read- 
ing the fine print on labels. Every afternoon, he 
watched television, like a child — staring with dull 
eyes. In the evenings, he would watch m o re televi- 
sion, falling asleep by its flickering li gh» Retire- 
ment meant that time had to be endured rather 
than used. He died five years later. 

My father’s quiet shrinking from life is unfortu- 
nately typical. While efforts are bring made to 
abolish mandatory retirement at age 70, retirement 
will never be abolished- Whether college professor 
or construction worker, at a certain point the job 
becomes just too much. In interviews with retirees 
and those who study the physical and mortal 
effects of retirement one emotion predominates — 
the fear of empty time. 

Improved medical care of older porple how 
permits years of relatively healthy life after retire* 
menu what does one do with all the horns, the 


By Christopher Hallowell 

weeks and the months? My father-in-law, 77, a 
medical doctor, is dealing with' the problem. 

Grandchildren have helped solve his dilemma 
by leading him to write children's stories, an avo- 
cation that he began when his own children were 
email. His grandchildren are now the heroes and 
heroines of his writing. His appreciation /of the 
difficulty of writing for children increases whenev- 
er be reads a story to a grandchild who does -not 
greet it with instant fascination. An awareness of 
the emptiness ahead johed this man into sharpen- 
ing an old talent 

Most people are not so resourcefuL'I remember 
Jesse, a 70 -year-old woman whom I met ina senior 
citizen center in Holyoke, Massachusetts. She was 
making a figurine by filling a mold with plaster of 
Paris. She looked bored. 1 asked her if she had 
made others. “Lord, yes," she answered with jovial 
cynicism.. *Tve made about a dozen of them. I 
could do it in my sleep.” 

“Let’s face it, she added, “this is fifl-hp time 
that someone in some organization, somewhere 
concocted for us old folk to do. I get so bored I 
sometimes wish I could break 'a hip because- it' 
would be something differenL” - 


Given encouragement, Jesse would have made a 
marvelous teacher, advising people in their work- 
ing yep that if they do not prepare for the hollow 
days that retirement can brmg, boredom qmcJdy 
follows — boredom, disease and death. 

I favor doing away with mandatory retirement 
but for many people that wSjStp»toone the' 
vacant stare with which, they endure thrir later 
years. We have yet to regard retirement as an 
opportunity — a chance to change jobs, -to 
something new, to act on a secret dream. Inafew 
decades. 10 percent of thepopnlation will be 75 or 
older. They must be made aware before they retire 
that they must retire to something. 

At" the same time, society must come to terns 
with the disservice we do to retirees by casting 
than off. We can -learn much from “primitive 
cultures, whose people took to thrir riders for 
guidance and wisdom. Organizations that *n!ici 
the ddcriy as consultants and teachers should be 
given much more support. Unless ir is understood 
that retirement can odea thedcor to another life of 
.usefulness, the abolition of enforced retirement at 
70 is no more than a Band-Aid. 

Vie writer, the author of the forthcoming book 
" Growing Old, Staying. Young? contributed this 
coiiment'tb The Niro York. Tones.- ■ , 


Cities and 'Star Wars’ 

In. his opinion column, “Star Wars: 
A Dreadful Paradox" (Oct 8), Altoc 
rrye is mistaken when he writes that 
we unfortunate outcome of a strate- 

OlP nofdBBA . ■ m m ^ 



««sea vulnerability of dries becaus 
m me iaige numbers of warheads tha 
w ®*®po»nted at then. 

The strategic balance reaches it 
greate st , stability ^hso the counter 
°[ boih the Unite 

dS5^ d ? eSovictUni( « a «» 

dimed Jo almost nothing and onb 
Neither siefi 
have u any re * son to launch ar 
on the other's cities becatS 
thq^ would in tarn, lose thrir owr 

urten populations. 

- “ K . ttal danger of “star wars^ lies 
mite fori that the United Stateand 
tocSovret Union wifi never be certain 
skater the other side has ihcrinlity 
to concenmate its system on the de- 
aues, launch a first strike 
nnd protect its population. . 

_ ‘ TIMOTHY lake. 

Geneva; 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 


Page 7 






Body Found 
JnSyrials 


j 


Broadcasting System ia fte United 
has identified fiiese four men, held in Ittly, as 
Detng among those accused of iiQaddng the ItaKan 


s®yv 



cruise ship, the AchiOe Laura. They are, from left, 
Majed Youssef atMabdd, Abdel Atif Ibrahim Fatayer, 
Hammad All Abdulla, and HaDah A Mdh al-Hassan. 


on Bofli Sides 


n uih 




(CoodiHKd Eram Page 1) 

Tel Aviv University, was by tam- 
ing over Mr. KHngJtoffefs body. 
“The Syrians could have "buried the 
body, and no one would have 
known the difference.” -■ *.■ 

It is dear, said Arid Merari, an 
Israefi expert on terrorism at -Td 
Aviv University, that the Syrians 
are “enjoying the fallout horn the 
Achille Laura incident even more 
than farad ” 

“They did not produce the body 
because they have suddenly devel- 
oped a sense of morality,” he said. 
“It just all staves their purposes so 
welL” 

“They don’t like Arafat,” Mr. 
Merari continued, “and they don’t 
like the way Jordan arid Egypt have 
tried to bnng him into a dialog ue 
with the Americans. Deliv ering die 
body is a way for the Syrians to. 
drive another nail into Arafat’s cof- 
fin." 

Commentaries in the Syrian ' 
press supported this analysis, argu- 
ing that the Achille Laura incident 
and the British refusal to meet the 
two PLO representatives only 
served to expose the futility of the 
“moderate,” U.S.-oriented ap- 
proach of Mr. Arafat, King Hus- 
sein of Jordan and Mr. Mubarak, 
as opposed to the hard-fine, nation- 
alist approach of Syria. * 

While the Syrians have tried to 
use the events of the last week , to 
help nrin Mr. Arafat’s diplomatic 


standing, the Jordanians have 
viewed the events as a catastrophe, 
The signal the Jordanians -seem to 
have decided to send -the PLO 
. chairman fa that if he does not get 
his' house in .‘order and pursue a 
consistent diplomatic line, he 
stop looking to Amman to escort 
him into the peace process. 

The Jordanian signal came in the 
form of axominumqnfe issued by a 
senior official in Amman after Brit- 
ain’s foreign secretary. Sir Geoff ay 
Howe, announced that be would 
not be meeting in London with the 
two PLO ftpresmutives because 
they refused to sign a previously 
agreed-upon statement renouncing 
violence arid accepting Israel's 
right to exist. 

A spokesman for Mr. Arafat de- 
clared _ that the PLO never bad 
agreed to sign such an explicit 
statement as. a condition for the 
talks.' That view might have been 
widely accepted had not Jordan fa- 
med a statement that supported 
the British interpretation and dis- 
credited the PLO explanation. 


Mitterrand Arrives in Rio 

The Assodatid Press 

RIO DE JANEIRO — President 
Francois Mitterrand of France ar- 
rived Wednesday on the third day j 
of ah official visit to Brawl 


Lebanese Factions Work 
On a Draft of Accord 


VM 


T.'J. Ratten . ■ ■“ , 

■ - . j: BEIRUT — A 'draft accord call- - ; 

• • 1 1 v«i: ing forgradual abofitioc of Leba- 
. pod’s Cmristian-doiamated sectarn 

- v. : an power-sharii^ system appeared ' 

- - Wednesday to give fresh impetus to 

Syria’s drive, to end lO^years of 
.. : ; r- fighting between rival- Christian 
- and Moslem militias. " ‘ 

. Christian, Shiite Moslem and 

:• w;2- Druze militia representatives 
agreed Toead^r night on draft pro- 
posals for political ref arms at talks 

in Damascus with the Syrian vice 

president, Abdel Hahm Khaddam, 
as the host, a source dose to one of 1 
. ' 1 ,. r the Moslem miMas said Wednes- ■ 

(iO.WV diy - 

» The draft accord wfll, be made, 
public in about a week, after consti- 
„ v - tutional advisers have reviewed h, ; 
' ~ the source said. A national con- 
grass would then beicoaveiied to 
. approve it. 

The source said a three-year 
transitional period would lead to 
; f .'.'{S an end \o the power-sharing system 
•; l-ri- that has favored the Chnstianzm- 
norily. ' . ^ 

-?> In the interim, the Christian^ 6-5 

' ?..c advantage in the 99-seat paitia-. 

ment would be removed^ the source 

J-.' until Lebanon. was peaceful enough 

• for elections to be held. TbeywoaLd 

' - ’ -r.-‘ be the first since 1972. ; 

; Other reforms envisage a radis- 

tribution of the powers or the presi- 
: - dent and prime minister; changes 


hr the cabinet system, and the cre- 
aiioriof a senate, the source said. 

The . army, now largely split 
along sectarian lines, would be re- 
organized and rehahDiated, the 

- source eddedv • - 

President 'Amin GemayeL who 
hasbeen criticized by all three mili- 
tias^ was expected to discuss die 
draft Friday with President Hafez 
al-Assad of Syria, racial sources 
; said. . ■ - 

After visiting Mr. Gemayd on 
Tuesday, Lebanon's prime mhris- 
ter, Rashid Karami, said his cabi- 
net would meet Thursday for the 
first time sinceAug. 22. 

The agenda will indude last 
week’s Syrian Army takeover of die 
northern port of Tripoli after three 
weeks of fighting between Moslem 

- fundamentalists and Syrianbadced 
leftist militias, he said. 

- Die deployment signaled Syrian 
determination to end militia role 
throughout the country. 

• The Christian Lebanese Forces 
militia , which strongly opposed 
Syria's role in Lebanon until Ebe 
Hobeka became its leader in May, 
recently has begun cooperating 
.closely with Damascus. 

- • Mr. Hobrika is expected to visit 
•Damascus on Monday. Moslem 
militia sources did not role out re- 
ports from Damascus that he 
would meet with Lebanon’s Shiite 
leader, Nabih Bari, and die Druze 
chief, Walid Jumttat, to seal the 
draft accord. 


West German, Americans Win 
Prizes in Physics, Chemistiy 


(Confined from Page 1> 
level and see hour molecules change 
their structure under various oemm- 
’• tions. Nobel officials said the work 
of the Americans has been mstro- 

mental in the development of hun^ 
dredsof drags. 

Crystal structure is determined 
by generating a three-dimensional 
' picture of the positions of the at- 
oms, the announcement of the 
award said. The picture maps the 
, electron density within the crystaL 

% X-rays are toed to generate the 
'• picture, and scientists need to know 
how much the ray waves ate dis- 
placed is relation to eadb other, the 
award said. The degree of theirdis- 
placement is affected by electron 
density, itsaxd. 

Professor Hanptman and Profes-. 
Sor Karle were said to have devel- 
oped equation systems related to 
tna limit * rt vnfti 

worked out a procedure for solving 
their equations. 

The Americans win share a cash 
award of 1.8 otiQian Swedish kro- 
nor, the equivalent of about 
5225,000. The winners of the Nob# 
awards receive them Dec. 10 ia 
ceremonlesin Oslo and Stockholm. 
1 Professor von Khtzmgis a pro- 
fessor at the Max Planet Institute 
for Sofid State Research. . 

“His discoveries are of great in^ 
parlance for the next generation of ; 
electronic components,” said Pro- 
fessof Stiff Luhdqvist, rhafr™ 3 " of 
the Nobel physics committee^ . 

Semiconductors carrydectricity' 
to perform comp lex, functions in 


modem dectromc devices and are 
essential to computers and commo- 
nicatkm equipment 

Professor von Ktigmg > s discov- 
- ay permits much more precise 
'measurement of electrical resis- 
tance, according to Professor Car! 
Nonflxng, another member of the 
Nobd physics jury. 

The discovery also makes possi- 
ble more accu rate testing of theo- 
ries about electronic movements 
within atoms, he said. 

The Hall effect, which was dis- 
covered more than 100 years ago, 

. has' to do with deflection of elec- 
trons in an riectricaS c urre nt pass- 

• tag through a metal strip £f a mag- 
netic Oddis applied. 

Under extremely low tempera- 
tures and emern dy strong magnet- 
ic influence electrons can be forced 
into “ordered movement,*' the No- 
bel announcement said. 

By quantizing the movement, 
Professor von Khtisng brought it 
into the realm of quantum physics, 
a 20th-centmy theory that amounts: 
of energy change in ariaU, discreet 
quantities. 

The Nobel committee said that 
for the last decade it bad been sus- 
pectcd that so-called “Hall conduc- 
tivity" could change in steps with 
changes in the magnetic field, pro- 
ducing quantized conductivity. - 

“It was sot expec t ed, however, 
that the quantization rule would 
apply with a high accuracy “ the 
announcement said. . ' 

:P«rfess6r von IQitzui^s -experi- 
mental demonstration jn 1980 that 
it did was a “great surprise.” • 


Mr. Susser. the PLO expert, said: 
“Had the Jordanians not any- 
thing. Arafat would have been off 
the hook. I think it should be seen 
as an implicit threat to Arafat that 
the Jordanians are getting fed up 
with his tactics and may begin to 
look elsewhere far legitimate Pales- 
tinian voces to take part in negoti- 
ations. Le., West Bankas.” 

It is no accident, say Arab politi- 
cal analysts in Beirut, that since Lbe 
Israeli air strike against the PLO 
headquarters in Tunis on Oct. 1, 
the Jordanians have uttered barely 


a word of condemnation of Israel 
or the United States or raised a 
single voice in their press in sup- 
port of Mr. Arafat. 

But it is far too early to say that 
the AchiBe Lauro affair is going to 
leave Mr. Arafat permanently out 
in the cold, according to Arab ana- 
lysts of the PLO. 

An Arab editor in Beirut said. 
The bottom line for now is still 
that King Hussein needs Arafat for 
protection, and the Americans still 
believe Arafat is the key to Pales- 
tinian participation in any negotia- 
tions.” 


(Continued from Page I) 

States did not know if Mr. Arafat 
had been involved. 

Egypt allowed Mr. Abbas and 
the four hijackers to leave the coun- 
try on an Egyptian airliner, bat 
U.S. F-14 jet fighters forced the 
plane to land in Sicily. Mr. Abbas 

was permitted fay Italy to fly to 

Yugoslavia, and be has since left 
there despite UjS. requests for iris 
extradition. 

The Justice Department has 
na m ed Mr. Abbas as a conspirator 
in the hijacking and hostage-tak- 
ing. 

The Reagan administration is 
urging Italy to extradite the four 
Palestinians to the United States so 
they can be tried for the murder of 
Mr. KlinghofTer. 

_ Judicial sources in Italy say the 
pirates have denied killing anyone. 

tAP, Remersj 

■ Anti-US. Protests in Cairo 

Hundreds of university students 
defied a government ban and dem- - 
oastrated Wednesday against the 
United Slates and Israel, United 
Press International reported from 
Cairo. 

President Hosni Mubarak met 
with opposition leaders to discuss 
relations with the two nations. 

Mr. Mubarak’s meeting with 
members of all five opposition par- 
ties was his first in two years. 


PRIVATE BANKING 

IN LONDON CTsaVl 


For over 150 years we have been providing 
a professional and flexible service to those 
looking for personal and confidential 
private hanking. Ourwide range of deposit 
accounts enable customers worldwide to 
meet their exact requirements. 

* Attractive rates of interest paid on call 
and fixed term deposit accounts. 
Minimum US 55.000 or £1.000. 

^ Interest paid without deduction of tax. 

* Absolute confidentiality and security. 

* Complete range of investment services. 

* Rates quoted for all major convertible 
international currencies. 

1 A/i Fixed interest rale 
■ ! 1 *U/ * tojCULMB) 

lUi/Opaaf 1 

For information on opening an account 
please post coupon to Cnndhys Bank pic. 
13 St James's Square, London, SW1 or 
phone Cordon Coulthard on 01-930 4611. 

‘Larger amounts corn more mierest. Rate 
correct at time of going to press Different terns 
man apple for UK residents. 

igju ! Grindlays 
m Bank 
L_ 9 li Group 





■< <i.\ t 


GRINDLAYS^j) 
PRIVATE BAMKfW 


' '•/ •! 

rT- ■/ 


N /• 

I — \ ... / 1 

< Gordon Coulthard, Grindlays Bank pic. j 

i 1 3 St James's Square. London SW1 V4LF England I 

! Name - - - ! 


! Reiiislcrcd in Ensbnd: Nr> U945. 

| tefiisiercd oilke. 36 Fenchurch Street. LonJuxi EC3P2AS 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


W *- 

t.vju .‘.‘•f.v-v; • *- • 

V, v - , v 

^ v ? 

X*- 


ealth Care 
Professionals 










■ 


Wm 

mm 

■ 


0S ft 


, M . V 

rivantages of working in Saudi Arabia. ^ 


But, the truth is, whether the following are advantages depends on your 
perspective. If you’re the kind of dedicated, experienced professional we’re 
looking for, we know what your outlook will be. Which is why AMI Saudi Arabia 
Ltd. — a Saudi/U.S. joint venture which manages hospitals in Saudi Arabia — 
invites you to consider the rewards of working in: 

• A modem, 355 bed* hospital handling a diverse range of medical conditions 
that will challenge and expand your present knowledge. 

• A beautiful, mountainous area with a moderate, semi-arid climate. 

• An established, well-equipped'facilityfitaffed by a multi-national team of 
hearth care specialists. , ’ 

• A professionally stimulating atmosphere complete with negotiable term 
assignments from 1-3 years, depending on your position. 

• Saudi Arabia, offering the opportunity for capital accumulation and the r 
benefits of free housing. 

• King Fahad Hospital — - one of the most up-to-date general acute care 
facilities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. 

Opportunities now exist at King Fahad Hospital in A! Baha for professionals 
who are Board Certified, FRCS, MRCP or equivalent. Foreign experience 
preferred. 

CHIEFS OF SERVICE 

Requires a minimum of 10 years experience, including 3 years as Chief of 
Service for Anesthesiology. Pediatrics, Clinics or Radiology. 

CONSULTANT PHYSICIANS 

Opportunities are available in all specialized areas and require a minimum of 
3 years current experience in the appropriate specialty. 

GENERAL PRACTITIONERS 

Requires a minimum of 3 years current experience. 

The advantages of working at King Fahad - Hospital are clear. The 
compensation and benefits are equally as attractive. For more information 
and/or immediate consideration, call Peter Macken, Vice President, Support 
Services COLLECT at (213) 858-1125 or send your resume to: AMI Saudi 
Arabia Ltd., 9465 Wilshire Bh/d., Suite 307, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. 


A 


■■■■ 







- THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION 

- invites applications for the post of 

TECHNICAL OFFICER 

at its Headquarters in Geneva 

Duties: To carry out studios on tt» hosdxCty of tht dsvoloprwnt and Operation of 
co mm UP -assisted systems. To un de rt ake systems ondyot and to design camel** 
asenputer-asitted systems aid appEasiam, induing xrding up tadned sporificotions 
for proTonunq fay ettor ES staff or coneadud programars. To prepare tfce 
appropriate human and financial resources costings of any proposed Systems and 
appBadiani. As roqgirod, >0 vmte and parted computer progw me s. As required, to 
supervise junior programs and/or c o ot r cduoi programed. To assess new hardware 
and software produas ad to rariona&ze and doaenent rhe pareriM) relevance of these 
to WHO/ISS needs. To prepve and keep up-todw system documertotwns; these 
meted* the SysSem'Monuai tmd System User's Mamed. Ta support region/ offices and 
national inst i t u tions in their dosaproefessing related requreraents. To prepare end 
conduct adwijw in datoprooeswig. 

Minimum Quafifications: Unvenity degree atone of the eppkedioeeeet. b* 
pi a farc d dy In the fidd of computer sttenee or mfartnul m i soeece. At bad years 

experience ui the development of oppiiootiani of the datoproasung te chnology, 
mdwfing the proofed oppfepfen of data bae teduvques in tfte dcvetepmeni of a 
subUORKd infe r muu on system. Experience with mmcompulers aid le teow nmu nico- 
Itons * aka highly desrabie. &cdW tern dodge at English or french, with a good 
working biowtedge of the other. 

The safety scale ranges from U5 ML325 {sitigte] and from US Si6j6& (with depen- 
dents] net of tax per annum. 

Appkxrinra are smiled from unUdu of other sex-^jpficaiions from women ae 
eocouroged. OuoESed conddaW should send fhmr derated aimeutim vita* before 30 
November 1985 quotina ISS/85 ftx 

Personnel (MPR) 

World Health Organization 
CH-1211 Geneva 27 

Only those ooadxtoiBs under senous cxmadercaan ua be contacted. 


INTERNATIONAL 
ACCOUNTANTS / 

FIN ANCIAL ANALYSTS 

Worldwide coordination centre in Brussels requires the 
following financial staff: 

INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTANTS 

Qualified or partlr qualified, for our general accounting 
department. Full spectrum of accounting disciplines includ- 
ing final accounts preparation. 

FINANCIAL ANALYSTS 

Highly numerical partly qualified financial analysts, with 

experience in CORPORATE PLAJVMNG, BUDGETING 
and FORECASTING, required for internal and project 

analysis. A uack record in operational variance analysis is 
preferred. 

Applicants for either potation should reply in writing enclos- 
ing fail CV. and photograph to: 

BERKELEY ADMINISTRATION INC. 

283, avenue Louise, IOSO Brussels, BELGIUM 


FINANCIAL 

DIRECTOR 

A multinational financial services 
corporation seeks to recruit a qualified 
FINANCIAL DIRECTOR with broad 
international experience. 

Expertise in all financial disciplines 
coupled with a strong commercial acumen 
are prerequisites. The position will be 
based at the corporations worldwide 
coordination centre in Brussels. 


Applicants arc invited to forward full C. V. s to: 

BERKELEY ADMINISTRATION INC. 
283, avenue Louise. 1050 Brussels BELGIUM 


COMMERCIAL MANAGER 
SPAIN 

First class COMMERCIAL EXECUTIVE 

required for expansion of internatio- 
nal corporation into Spain. 

Ideal candidate will have banking 
and / or financial services back- 
ground. Good knowledge of Spanish 
essential. 


Applicants are requested to forward their C. V. 
with accompanying photograph to: 

BERKELEY ADMINISTRATION INC. 
283 Avenue Louise, 

1050 Brussels, Belgium. 


Swiss Radio International 

SBC 5.viss Bicoacajiing C&iporalion 

English Service, Berne 
requires 

A RADIO JOURNALIST 

for its current affairs programs. 

He or she must be a skilled and experienced inferviewer, translator 
and presenter. A minimum of three years in broadcasting and a 
good knowledge of German and French are essential. 

The suGcesfu! candidate will be required to work irregular hours and 
occasional weekends. Ideal age: 25 - 30. Net salary between 5 F 
45,000 and 50,000 per annum, according to age and experience. 
Full details of personal history, including photo, education, previous 
employment, telephone number plus persona) and professional 
references should be sent to: 

SWISS RADIO INTERNATIONAL, Personnel Department, 
Giacomettis*. 1, CH 3000 Bern® IS, Switzerland. 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 



IN BRIEF 

Folding Lens Used in Cataract Surgery 

emVn* 0,0 ** and inserted into the eye through a tiny 

~r l ‘OUowmg cataract surgery is safer than the implant now in use and 
Spuncantly reduces recovery time, according to Dr. Jerome Levy and 
^L^d’ony Rsacano of the New York Eye Surgery Center. 

. *°e experimental silicone Elastic Leas can be implanted through an 
®oawi one- third the size of the cm required for the standard hard Jens, 
jpe doctora said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of 
Uphtbabnofogy in San Francisco. 


SCIENCE ■_ 


Dinosaur-Size Robot With Laser Eyes Ready to Take First Steps 

/ Contpvtef t»y / fSrt}« 


topographical analyzer and a stereoscopic camera to create and photo- 
graph a color-coded topographical map of the eye, and is expected to hdp 
detect the disease in its early, symptomless stages, when proper treatment 
raay prevent the loss of right ( UPS, NYT) 

Drug lor Open-Heart Surgery T ested 

SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) — A new drug may prevent potentially 
dangerous increases in heart activity during surgery, a team of Emory 
University researchers reported. 

Or. Lars Newsome said the new drug, esmolol, is a member of the 
family of drugs called beta blockers, currently used to treat patients with 
bean disease and high blood pressure. 

Dr. Newsome noted that the drugs now in use in coronary artery 
bypass operations to control increases in heart rale and blood pressure 
remain active for long periods after the surgery and may produce serious 
side effects. He said esmolol has a period of activity lasting only a matter 
of minutes. If undesired side effects should occur with esmolol, an 
anesthesiologist has only to spot its delivery and wait a few minutes for 
the complications to vanish. 

U. S. Plans improved Wind Forecasts 

WASHINGTON (WP) — The U. S. National Oceanic and Atmo- 
spheric Administration is planning a SI 2-million network of 30 experi- 
mental radar stations that would track winds up to an altitude of 10 miles 
(16 kilometers) over nine states in central United States. 

The network, which is expected to improve the reliability of weather 
foreca sting in an area unusually vulnerable to tornados and other fast- 
forming storms, could eventually be extended to the entire country. 

Polymer Tested lor Bone Fractures 

SALT LAKE CITY (UPI) — Athletes and elderly people may benefit 
from a new technique for treating broken bones that involves the use of 
polymer clamps and plates instead of metal devices, researchers report 
. Dr. A. U. Daniels, associate professor of orfoopedic surgery at the 
University of Utah Health Sciences Center, said laboratory tests were 
nearly complete and that he planned to start experiments cm animals this 
winter. He said it would be several years before the new devices could be 
tried cm humans. 

- The researcher said the polymer damp or plate is strong and stiff 
enough to hold a broken bone in place but designed so that it mil later be 
absorbed by the body. The polymer plate has two advantages, he said: 
more complete healing than with metal plates and screws and the 
elimination of the second operation needed to remove such devices. 

Gonorrhea Strain Needs Costly Drugs 

; ATLANTA (UPI) —A gonorrhea strain highly resistant to peniriUin is 
becoming entrenched in certain areas of the United States, forcing 
doctors to switch to far more expensive drugs, federal health officials 
said. 

; Dr. Jonathan Oilman of the national Centers for Disease Control 
said the resistant strain is encountered more and more frequently by 
ians in at least three areas — South Florida, New York Gty and 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

New York Tima Senior 

W ITH a blast of exhaust smoke 
and an ear-splitting bowl, a 
three-ton robot came to life in a 
workshop at Ohio State University 
last week. 

One of its six elephantine legs, 
powerful enough to crash an auto- 
mobile but gentle enough to ma- 
nipulate a fragile cardboard box, 
tome a few dummy strides in its 
latest series of tests, practicing the 
movements that will eventually en- 
able the robot to walk. 

The builders of Ohio State's 
Adaptive Suspension Vehicle, 
(ASV) which has so far cost S5 
millio n and nearly two decades of 
researeh and development, believe 
it is almost ready to lumber out of 
the laboratory. 

The project began as a research 
exercise for developing the theory 
of robotics, and in the early years, 
financial support camd mainly 
from the National Science Founda- 
tion. But because a large walking 
robot has obvious military poten- 
tial, the Defense Department has 
been the main supporter of the pro- 
ject since 1980. 

Controlled partly by a battery of 
computers and partly by a human 
driver, the robot will walk as no 
machine has ever walked before. 

As large as a dinosaur but with 
the agility and balance of a crab or 
insect, it will maneuver through 
forests, bogs and desert sand, up 
and down steep hills, across ditches 


Hydraulic cylinders 


Computer bay 


I n f ra red 
tasar eyes 


As it turned out, some of nature’s progress wilt be SOU 
models proved less efficient than tc. , . 

had expected. The locust, fra exam- Bat with nw«y 

pie, is apparently un a bl e to benefit to meet (and cinrenflybadrea i J 
from experience. If one of a locusts gn mnnal budget of S2 nnUuw* 
forelegs encounters empty space the group foresees a 
where the insect expects to find ftri future for their prqectL 3 ®®^: 
solid ground, the leg Sails around tory . development of toe ao 




Bfl 


forelegs encounters empty space 
where the insect expects to find 
solid ground, the leg Sails around 
until it finds a suitable foothold. 
One might assum e that when an-, 
other ofthe insect’s legs arrived at 
the same spot, experience would 
guide it immediately to a safe foot- 
hold. But such is not the case, die 
leg gropes anew for a foothold, its 
owner’s feeble beam apparently 
having learned nothing from the 
previous search. 

Leg-movement coordination in 
many insects is also surprisingly 
poor, accor di n g to Vincent J. Voh 


should be 
now, after 


first, a driver will 

control the higher functions of the 
inwft inc The drivers cockpit con- 
tains a ytmlar in form to the 
control stick used in airplanes. By 
moving it forward or backward, the 
driver controls forward and reverse 
speed. The driver can override the 


nout, one of the engineers working computers control of individual 
on the Ohio robot “One of an lea movements, but since these op- 



ly, with no 


Footpad 


Pantograph log mechanism 


Motor and 
flywheel 


that pnly a hafi^fau them 
combine efficient locomotion with 

optimal stability, he said. jjf** <* “““■ 1B « CTd0 I ws 


forests, bogs and desert sand, up limbs for human patients. - Ohio State and Caraepe-Mdlon system of 
and down steep hills, across ditches Nonetheless, the robot may be University, Martin Marietta Aero- do their u 
up to nine feet (2.7 meters) wide the precursor of ma chines so inter- space and other institutions seeks many difl 
and over obstacles up to seven feet estineto the U. S. Defense Depart- to perfect the computer programs endeavor. 


machine 


plan each step it Research Projects Agency. 


takes, looking for footholds, avoid- ‘The Army has estimated that 
mg holes and making the best of about SO percent of the earth's land 
whatever terrain it has to cover. surface is inaccessible to all con- 


optimal stahQity, he said. g”** « “ iUWU *' 

li cations in prosthetic rent D ARP A- financed research at er, has the intelligence or lifelike The refection .of effi c ient gaits ; — ; — 

man patients. - Ohio State and Carnegie-Mdloa system of locomotion of ASV, nor «“■ ASV and the coordination 

University, Martin Marietta Aero- do their technologies draw from so of the maefame’s hundred or so Nuyttnu, Mott Re Rad 
space and other institutions seeks many different fields of scientific control variables have crea ted J 

to perfect tbe computer programs endeavor. problems of bewildering complex- For Cosmetic SnTgerf 

ana hardware needed to make a Defense Department money al- By for foe 16 powerful laid com- ... 8 * 

vehide frilly ^autonomous 9 ' — efr- located to the pntcis ibe vefaide cflinci But most Pm Jnt&Mt ohtmal 

pable of running cross-country or project has financed non-military of foe rotations i are : athar in hand CHICAGO Dr. Cbristopl 
along roads without human aid research along the way. Under a or m sight, the bonders bdiere. Forrest, research feCow at the U 


surface is inaccessible to all con- JL-/R. McGHEE envisions many 
ventionai vehicles, whether they non-military uses for walkers. In 


L run on wheels or tracks,” Dr. arctic tundra, where tractor treads 

IKE a bat, foe robot will use McGhee said in an interview, cause irreparable damage to local 

acoustic echoes to gauge foe prox- “That's one of foe reasons the plant life, mechanical legs would 

unity of neighboring objects. Pres- gnued forces are interested in foe provide the least harmful form of 


pable of running cross-country or project has financed non-military of the sMutions are erthor m hand CHICAGO — Dr. Christopher 
along roads without human aid research along the way. Under a or m sight, the buudeis behere. Forrest, research fellow at the Uni- 

DARPA subcontract let by Ohio ■ “Two decades ago,” Dr. veraty of Toronto, said this week 
Ur. McGHEE envisions many S ,tale University, for instance, McGhee sakL “l reafaed that a that evidence is mounting that nic- 
_ rtn nriitarv i«« far waikere In physiologists and biologists at the walking machine under antono- otmc m cigarette smoke can darrv 

Univeisily of Alberta, Canada, mira electronic control wonM re- age skin flaps often used in recon- 


' “That’s one of foe reasons the plant tife^necharicj^ would !«S movements injocosts. Because P°»er. At the tim^ no 

t anned force, an: intraKd m the LfektataJL'!! "MSPHS “ 


-* — « . . w ~ a - ailUMJ lUiVW tuw 111 SUW UtMVlVUi UU/ RAOl UlUktUUl LVIUI Ml J n * . ^ 1 7 1' ' - 

sure sensors in its footpads will asV — a vehicle that can walk traction, he said. Walkers could 8P«i walkers, scientists hoped to job. 
inform its computer brain of foe anywhere.” also replace less maneuverable ro- W “““ st ]? dies « «»ectpny»- 

nature of foe ground it is covering. Unlike early experimental walk- bots working in such hazardous en- 10 dca S n “ tnedianKai tefoi 

and a gyroscopic balance sensor jug machines, this one is built for vironments as the interior of nude- w ®lR* rs - 

will serve foe same purpose as an rough field use, carrying its own ar reactors. ni 

animal's vestibular system. Tbe ro- motor and accessories. Motive Improvements in the computer , _ _ 

bot is expected to be assure-footed force is sunolied bv a 70-horsepow- technology of the Soviet Union TaoI- Kam TmIiawiI-a 


’ Alberta, Canada, mous dectronic control would re- age akmflaps often used in recoo- 
the coordmatk® of quire a very high order of compot- jtruetive and cosmetic surgery, 
s in locusts. Because ing power. At the time, no Stem flaps foe created to cover 
sgarded as especially computers existed that could do the bones or fetodons exposed as result 


today the goal is within of an aoadent ar. smgjcal removal 


nature of foe ground it is covering. Unlike early experimental walk- bots working in such hazardous en- 
ami a gyroscopic balance sensor [^g machines, this one is built for vironments as the interior of nude- 
wul serve foe same purpose as an mu gh field use, carrying its own ar reactors, 
animal's vestibular system. Tbe ro- motor and accessories. Motive Improvements in the computer 
bot is expected to be as sure-footed rorce is supplied by a 70-horsepow- technology of the Soviet Union 
as a camd, stronger than an de- a motorcyde engine whose energy have led to important advances in 
phant and a good deal smarter than is stored by spinning a 100-pound Soviet walking machines, Dr. 
foe insects on whose mode of loco- (45_|oiogram) flywheel to a speed McGhee said, and walkers are also 
motion it is partly based. of more than 12,000 revolutions per being built in Japan, Switzerland 

To the Ohio State professors, minute. The flywheel, in turn, pow- and Liechtenstein. An eight-legged, 
Robert B. McGhee and Kenneth J. 


computer capability 


Test lor Inherited Kidney Disease Is Found 

The Associated Press nf ihw tmwvmw whn mvW gp kid- VfflBly of Qrf npl iq Fu glanii ' cud. 

S ALT LAKE CITY — Re- dialysis, an expensive proce- A report of the discovery, which 
searchers have developed a test dim? in which periodic treatments may also hdp find foe cause of the 


that could lead to ^new ttnwdi with a btood-pmff^g madiine 




Nature, a Brit- 


choice is becoming a thing of foe past," be said. “There's a potential for 
that to happen in other areas because of an increase in PFNG." 

PFNG is foe medical abbreviation for penicfllnase-producing Neis- 
seria gonorrhoeae. a type of organism that produces an enzyme that 
destroys the therapeutic effects of penicillin. Since the first case of PFNG 
was imported into foe United States in 1976, transmission has spread to 
rirtually all states and represents more than 1 JS percent of the total cases 
nationally. 


of their careers to the robot and its 
antecedents, the six-legged walker 
embodies discoveries that have sig- 
nificantly advanced the fields of 
robotics, computer control, biolo- 
gy, anatomy and even medicine. 
Systems developed for use in robot 
walking machines have found im- 


of foe machine’s legs. The vehicle's 
top speed win be only eight miles 
an hour (13 kilometers an hour). 

But it could go where foe nim- 
blest lank or off -road vehicle would 
bog down, and it could be adapted 
to move and fight on its own, wifo^ 
out a human driver or crew. Git? 


has replaced 50 human divers in foe 
construction of an underwater 
foundation for a seawall, be said. 
Other Japanese companies are con- 
sidering foe development of walk- 
ing machines as recreational off- 
road vehicles. 

None of these machines, bowev- 


is ratal unless treated py dialysis, a 
procedure that costs the U. S. gov- 
ernment $150 million a year. 

Tbe Olmss. polycystic kidney 
disease, afflicts 400,000 people in 
foe United States alone. A fraction 
of those cases, the most serious, 
ones, aooount for roughly one in 10 


The discovery, reported at a 
meeting of the American Society of 
Human Genetics, should soon al- 
low development of a test that 
would diagnose the disease before 
symptoms appear, which usually 
happens in middle age, ram of tire 
researchers, Kay Daviesaf foe Uni-'. 


There is now no treatment .for 
the aiWnt, which a marked by foe 
development of eyas in the kidney 
and other organs and winch ulti- 
matdy leads to Iridney faHure. 

The disease is-fetal, killing half 
of as victHH* fayr foe time they are 
51 . unless itey undergo dialysis. 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 




NYSE Index 


Indus 1351.93 137130 134*21 136&5B + 1749 

Trans 4SU1 MM 7 &SU2 462B0 + MB 

UNI JSL7B 15*95 15111 154J4 + 03* 

Comp 540.17 55532 54141 55147 + 599 


HWi UX» 0090 CliW 
ConuiosN* lOMt 10758 I DM3 +090 

Industrkds 134.90 13373 1U.W +1JO 

Tranap 105.14 104JB 10S.10 +0^ 

unun*s 5575 5S51 ,5575 +D^ 

Finance 1U55 11382 11155 +038 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bondi 

LWUHu 

indiHtnals 


CIbm CTM 

79JJ4 +B.1S 

7*58 +0.M 

8190 +02B 


Advancod 

963 

7S5 

Decnimf 

S33 

794 

Uncnanoad 

488 

496 

TOW IWH 

1984 

1975 

NOW Hlflta 

46 

50 

Haw Lam 

26 

27 

vo luma up 

78507440 


vwumadown 

2Z.1BX4I0 



-included in (he sales fleum 


Btnr Soles •sen 

I5ZS22 401930 «M 

12*473 29&7M 378 

14&750 381,157 1964 

15031? 331778 73) 

152.5JS 34\696 512 


, Wednesdays 
dosing 


VO Lot 4 PM 117JML8B8 

Prev.4PJM.V8L 11USLM0 

Prev GOpsolMoM dose 13M1M79 


Tables Include me nationwide prices 
up to tbe closing on wall Street and 
do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
(Mined 
UnchinNd 
Tutor issues 
New HMD 
New Laws 
Volume up 
Volume dawn 


3M 251 

204 250 

371 263 

m 744 

13 15 

It 15 

Aju&n 
U44JD0 


NASDAQ Index 


Composite 38658 -MJ1 27*128 3 172# 

Industrials 20.10 +19* 37922 369.12 

F trustee 37451 +12* 3*845 3R3J6 

Insmnce 33894 +U» 33023 26991 

Utilities 27398 +391 263.U 22059 

Banks 30895 +205 30U4 21590 

Tran 36114 +1.19 23197 23790 


Standard & Peer’s Index 


Hlgb Low Close CD 1 ** 

l "** Wo ’* SKi ?E-2 

Tramp. 171.15 1096 17195 +293 

tlHIWeS 81.17 8093 81.15 +026 

Finance 2196 2199 2195 + 0.1* 

Cornpnrtts 18790 10698 18791 +190 


AMEX Sales 


4 pjk. volume 
Prev. 4 PJW. volume 
Prev. cons, volume 


AMEX Stock index 


Dow Average Hits Record High 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on foe New York 
Stock Exchange broke their previous high 
Wednesday in active trading. 

Tbe Dow Jones industrial average, which fell 
3.92 Tuesday, was up 17.92 to 1368.72 at the 
dose, surpassing foe previous closing high of 
U59J4 set July 19. 

Advances led declines by more than 3 to 2 
among foe 1,949 issues traded. Volume amount- 
ed to about 115.062 million, compared with 
1 1 0-35 rnOlion Tuesday. 

Philip Erl anger, chief technical analyst at 
Ad vest Inc. in Hartford, Connecticut, said that 
strength was focused on foe blue-chip issues 
and that tbe broader market may not be in such 
good shape. 

The new record on the Dow “is not yet cause 
for celebration,” Mr. £r larger said 

Floor traders noted unusual strength in Gen- 
eral Electric, and a more than 3-point gain in 
Merck may have “skewed" foe Dow’s perfor- 
mance somewhat. They smd participants cov- 
ered short positions when the Dow broke the 
old high. 

Thomas Ryan Jr. of Kidder Peabody said a 
rally in tbe bond market helped move stocks 
higher. 

After foe market opened, the Federal Reserve 


Board reported that UK industrial production 
fell 0.1 percent in September. 

Beatrice Cos. was near foe top of foe active 
list and higher. Kohl berg Kravis & Roberts is 
expected to offer S45 a snare for Beatrice. 

northern Indiana Public Service was up 
slightly in active trading. 

Anheuser Busch was up sharply in active 
trading. Rumors cite Seagram or Brascam Ltd 
as a possible buyers for Anheuser Busch. 

AT&T unchanged It reported higher earn- 
ings. 

Avon Products was ahead 

Pan American World Airways was off slighl- 

ly- 

Coigate Palmolive was up amid takeover 
speculation. 

Among technology issues, IBM was off 
slightly. Digital Equipment was up modestly 
and Cray Research was moderately lower. 

Among semiconductor issues, Texas Instru- 
ments was up a bit and Motorola was off a 
fraction. 

General Motors, Ford and Chrysler were all 
weaker. 

Alter reporting lower quarterly earnings, 
TRW was lower. 

Santa Fe Southern Pacific was ahead after 
reporting higher quarterly earnings. 

Bell South was up 14 to 39Vi It repented third- 
quarter earnings of 5128, up from 51-11. 


11% 7*k 

23 IBVr 


7 *» + W 
22* +Ub 
16 + W 

IK. + Vk 
_£* + b 
2B*i + i* 
19% — Ik 
97k— Ik 
2.* + Ik 

W 22 
» 2 

40U— *» 
49, + V, 
S4U- la 
Hk 

SS + w 

2 SV » + ik 
14»» + * 
+ % 
61 W — Vi 


92 17 9 
9 12 ^ 

.12 9186 

ft 

195 29 15 

M 

98 

98 .1 17 

77 34 » 


198 39 9 « 

90 U I« 82 

290 DU 7 534 
2.10 69 T3 274 

97 19 II 27 
90 17 9 34 

12 49 17 119 
M 19 U 28 
198 TJ 7 

LStt 
50 43 
58 14 

440 34 12 
JS U 10 

giH l 

U4 W 10 

291 7J 7 
fit 119 
140 119106 
190 94 6 


9JOa95 


JS IBS 

S 

HO 39 

a 

i* 

10 59 

9 


TBlfc _9fe 
431* MW 


hrr 1 '. 


Sg 8£ SgzJ* 



seed a year from 

tbe machine will 


insect’s legs will often collide with orations are so complex and diffi- 
another of its legs,” he saicLTf we cult, he would rarely choose to take 
were to Id that happen on the ASV them (XL 

JiSBsaMsi 

«»k— d*«k— 49- 


ZS&JSSJSSSZ 

















































fte to** 
» m t* im 
tifeaft&rL: 

V-fewSb.-L: 

tor 

iwbr--* :. 
fsC**#. 
wfeflij. :■- 


S* -«UU . -,J 

te* '•• i_- 
?&*S»S v .* 
W '-•;: v; 
it i-ar *. s*. 


^.$i 


■r. 


!■:■•*. -'I'- ft,-; 

•■ - . -, k ^:. 

" i ..-. -'''|i: ' 5 1 

•.'*-*«*** 

A . 

' "' - ,•• •"’ 
-■■■-■r; *>**. 
■ ,._ . ,. '• u n 

-- 

"-■ - -iCN 
•- 


£ f nr. :: 

&£■"■ .? . 
--• ' 

3w^ - . -c 


r J: 

«*M •■<• • ■ 

eat; -.- 

r ■ 

i ,rr~ ,~. 
i .- 

V •• .’ . 


•r7'“>X? 

-a . I>, « 
-■»■• y . •*■.■ 

•cr^C 

- .• U ‘ J Drc*. 


■ ■' 

• -. ... J" 5 :-** 
" '■ - 

.. :, : 

- ‘-s®;., 
•, - * °sb» 

•• • *r.‘ .ifjjjjj, 

\.‘ r i , L 'f 3! V 


AMEX Meat P.11 Bonmw noarH pu * - . - 

AMElWW K/towsP.U PiTno rot* n«a £« 
y?* p - • co*i loorkMi p. » 

MVSBOWisrtowP.W tntorut ratos p * 

Conartpo stocks P.to Mortal sofnnorv pi 
Ctfrranevrtrttt p. t ommm p « 

p.n ©re .feck >5 

D.«Mawte P .13 OmormorM* p!u - V .._ ..: 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17,1985 7 ~ . ., 

WALL STRUT WATCH 

High-Tech Stocks Retain 
Interest Among Investors 

ByPHOtfPJL WIGGINS 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — The stocks bf several Irigh-tedwology 
companies, particularly those with specialized prod- 
ucts, continue to stir Cnthnsasm among members of 
the investment community. ' 

^Although the overall performance of high-tech equities has 
“ the past few years and some are selling well 
peiow t heir highs, analysts say that many long- and short-tain 
opportunities con n mi ff to exist. 

J t*n Westergaard, editor of Equity Research Associates and a 
specialist in emerging growth stocks, said several attractive mar- 
ket plays appeared at the three-day seminar he conducted in New 

York last week. The seminar 

brought together the mpnap*. » r V 

nwnfe rtf 1 noliTQta oav 


»r y > m w MIG JilOlUUEG- l ' | 

meats of more than 30 emeig- Analysts SHV 

ing, high-tech concerns. ___ ' . . ■ . ... 

Mr. westagaard said that many opportunities 

among the companies of par- ■ mnimm 

ucular interest were ECI Tele- . cummue 
com Ltd, which he said was tQ prin t, 
the world’s leader in circuit ■■ 

multiplication technology — " ” ~ " ~ ” 

or the ability to process additional telephone conversations »«d 
data over telephone lines that were originally dapped for 
conversation or transmission. 

“We expect a major contract to be awarded by the end of this 
month, involving the new trans- Atlantic cable system being built 
by AT&T together with the British and the French,” Mr. Wester- 
gaard said 

Mr. Westergaard also favors Gctcch, a leading supplier of on- 
hue lottery systems.. He said the company was in the running for 
the Califomia lotteiy system, which is expected to be dwtHM by 
the end of the year. 


v Disease 1 $ Fob 


A VEX V3S1WS 



O NE high-tech favorite of Roger Redmond, technology 
analyst as Piper, Jaffray & Hqpwood Inc. of Minneapolis, 
is Energy Conversion Devices, the leader in synthesizing 
amorphous materials, or disordered patterns of 
“Energy Conversion is in the process of evolving horn a pure 
research organization into accelerated cormneroauzation,'” Mr. 
Redmond said To finance this evohitinn, he adHWi tH/* «wwp«ny 
has licensed parts of its technology and has entered intojamt 
ventures with such large corporations as Sahio, American Natu- 
ral Resources, Matsushita Electric, Hitar-h^ Nippryi & 

Telephone, Nippon Steel, SBiarp. fflid Canoo- 
“This security should only be considered by the most aggres- 
sive investors.” Mr. Redmond added. He said that, for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1986, Energy Conversion should lose S3 
million to $4 million on revenues of about 545 minion, and **««♦ 
for the fiscal year 1987 it should eamfll million to$ ?, miTHrm nn 
revenues of about $70 milli on For the latest fiscal year. Energy 
Conversion lost 514.8 million on revenues of $30.1 milli on. 

Nancy Moyer, senior health-care analyst at Ladenburg^Thal- 
mann & Co., believes new technology wfll continue to be one of 
the driving forces in the rapidly changing health-care system. 

“Endo-Lase is one of the country’s leading suppliers of lasers 
for use in urology, gastroenterology, and pulmonary and general 
surgery.” Mrs. Moyer said. ‘The market for lasers in medicine is 
estimated to reach more than $1 Wllion by the caxfy 1990s. Since 
the market has achieved only a. low level of penetration, there 
should be rapid growth in the near future.” 

Mrs. Moyer said Endo-Lase’s 1985 «»mmg s would reach 50 
cents a share on sales of 522 -nriQjfoD, up from last yearfs'J^ cents a 
share on sales of $115 miflionL For T986; she aaidj thecompany 
conld earn 70 cents a riiare on sales-af S45'B^Km. •••*■'■ ■ 
Michad J. Howe, first vice president ai7Butcher & Singer, is 
c^>timistic on two high-tech issues: Ask Compute- and Interna- 
tional Mobile Machines. 

Ask Computer has had some' problems of weakening demand 
in the past six months. 

“The company manufactures products that help, customers to 
(Continued on P>ge l4, CoL 4) , 

r Gunrency Rates 


p Gunrency Rates _ 

Crons Bates Ox ns 

S s DlM. FJS. Itl_. OUr. RF. If- YH 

Aimtartkun uw .A2U IliW* Y*Jf * - CLM7J- £»? U7Ji*. t»J?T 

. - ,■ bWNMa) 54J6 7A502S 2A227S KS3SS 3J»- RMS - — - 2UXJ 2SA2- 

— ' Frankfurt zon. un — nn* i«st nuns* - w a m u i»- 

_ London Chi USB — - - xrm IIS XH1J0 U U T* M 1MB XUI 

.» 7 Moon WIN 155U0 IMS. 3HJf. ' MX - 3UU BUS UO 

-• NowYofKua — uun ztm lib iau* w w un no s 

^ PW10 B.T73 ■ list ■ loan 4JBUSX VHtk UJW« XTM3 U7- 

Tokyo TTiAfl 30A90 mM XJ1 OB’ . 7US mil*. Wfl 

Zurich 2202 nan BIBS- 24YT • H7I7* 72775* «SH • 7JO»* 

— ' 1 ECU U2S] UM 22M 474 4S 1*1* ■ 3AMS 4435W UW DUK 

1 SDR USM* 475057 2MI27 LU06 L*14M 13049 57AT7J 23325 225 JU* 

Ckxzlngstn London and Zurich. BxlnaiJnafTtr Burwon cantmn. H9W Yor* rates atJ PM. 

- (at Commercial frcmc lb) Amounts to buy an* POt*xl(c)Amouaf% a-am to bur aoe 

• .f‘‘ dotkir C) Urrftsa/ 100 (X) Unttiof MB0 (r) UnUnofjVKOfLO-- nataoatml; HA^notavaOobta. 

’• 4 1 • Thsnr OM pound: SUW.UU. ■■ 

- .’H; Otker MlarVahws 

f .> ?•;: currency pot ua* Currency nor usi currency nar UJU Currency par uaj 

NraHVoaoM UO FkL markka SMS Motor, nom. 14425 s.Kor.«an IMAO 

i : ; Ammo.* L4372 Orericdrac U400 MRHn 3900* Spm».p<M090 J42J4 

tortr.odtfw 1471 HoraKnot 779W mm-kraon 3JV7 l aod. hre n o 7SW 

fln.fr. S420 Indian ropas 710*27 MLPHa 77JS MHl 40.18 

' *?'4 B rodl crux. IMJ» Iraki. rentok I.ISjOO Port.oKndo UUO ThnlhWd 34595 

■ (T Canadian S 1J7DA Irish t .” 0W5» Saudlrtyra M51 ThrfeMflre 547 JO 

=. CUnesaynoa MSB IsraUttoL 1^7W» SUauS Z1435 . UASdYkran M73 

~f-f OMdthfcrraM 9715 KnmMdlanr 0 l 2M1 S.Afr.rcrad 17211 Yaore-BoB r. 1454 

■ayntpoond 13* 

Z. B StatHitp: 12218 Irtah C 

. iil< Sources.- Booaoe du flpnpAw (Brmamis); Banco Commercial • ttaUaoa /MOanJ; Baaouo No- 
U' ttorioie do Parte (Paris); Bank at Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDBK- 8AU (moot, rfyoL Okkara). 
ii 1 . OTttcr data from Rmufure andAP. 


MSI TUrkMfire 547 JO 
21435 . UUdAn 1473 
27211 VtoNLOeOr. 1454 


htteresf Rates 


Dollar D Mar k Franc SforUon Franc ECU SDR 
I month SStk 4V4MW 44Vk II flto-tl W nMU - B tv4h 7H 
1 month* BHrflW 4lW4«. lttolW 954W4 IMK 7to. 

3 months HW8V4 4M« ' iWB, im-119% W-kWi IMH 7 W 

& iDOaRa Sto-BH 4to-e» 4Wh 1114-m* 10IV-WH IMK 78V 

lyear m«i Jqu*.- 4^-inv I1VW1 h. . 1MU4 ‘ VM9e lx, 

Sources: Maryan Guaranty (dollar. OM. SF, PooncL FFI; Uaytte Bank (BCD); Barton 
(SDR). Rates applicable to I nt erban k depostteafet mllUon minimum (eragutuale nt X 


Key Money Bwtcw Oct. J6 

.^IMrbbIk CIom Pres. 


Kscoant SWt 
Fodond Fonds 
Prim Ban 
Brekar Loan Ran 
CM PopcrH-ITf dm 
Smooth Treasarv BUh 


Vh 7ft 

7 ISA* 71* 

951 9 JO 

su nt 

727 715 

7.17 7.18- 


Ki«UTmn K» 754 . 73* 

Ctn]H9AiK 740 740 

CDS 4Mf (ttys 740 740 


VfcgCgwmy 
[ flnhof tf Roto 
OvenuoM Koto 
Ooo Moott mtartank 

Sfltomti Hrierkoak 
frmo nl h lataftaak 


£50 £50 

NA 4B 

- . ’433 

- 4 X 

- US 


Vane ECU SDR 

■ BhrSK. 7H 

Wk IMK 7 to. 

M-kWi IMH 74* 


AriaaBolIar leyrilo 

OcLK 

loMdth . B-Mfc 

ItMoflra !«!•««. . 

3 months . . avt-mt 

«meAM« W-SH 

rear . M-H 

Source: Reuters. 


PA M—ey Market FWada 

Oct 16 

iMnW Lvncb Unto * n n 
.30 derv ovnrano vtatd: 740 

Tahrafa lo tentri Bote Indu e: 7jn 

Source: Merritt Lrnrtt Telerata. 


tot o mramu n EOM 9to no 

CaK Moony MA. .94 

Oao-rnomit UrtfctwiK W W> 

3«8ntttatartoW 914 914 

4-awatti bdcrtxpfc ISM 9tt 


Gold 


, ii (f Britain 

f,'*9 look a 

■ I rMi u. 


look Boh aoto 
QtUMoaoy- 

n-aarTrtanTTUU 
*m°Bb lohrkuuh - 


Uscount Raft 
Con Mooey 
fMoy lBRrt H. 


UK ms 
NA. 1W 

— nvM 

- it i/i* 


5 S 

NA fid 

- 4*7 


Soureapr Oerters. Ca aimn btm ' t . Critft 
Ayvnosto Bonkef Tokyo 


0*. 16 

AM. . PM. arw 
HomKooO: -32SH 32SS5 . -UO 
Lmemboara 32400 — . —US 

Paris fUJklln) 33495 324U -L 17 

Zorich mot 10232 -Mi 

LwtW 32590 32U£ . —US 

mar York — • m« -a» 

Luxembourg. Parle and London oflteW fix- 
ings; Hong Koob and Zurich opening and 
rtaelam .arhae; Hour Yet* .Cornea current 
unt ne t . AH pnceeMVAd Per ounce. 
Source: Bouton. - 


Heralb^feSribunc, 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 

* 

Beatrice Made-in- U.S.A. Tag Is Hard to Find 


U.S. Stocks 

Report, Page 8 

Page 9 


Buyout 

Proposed 

Offer Expected 
At $45 a Share 


Coasted bf Our Staff from Dupeteka 

CHICAGO — The New York 
investment banting firm of Kohl- 
berg, Kravis and - Roberts said 
-Wednesday it plans 10 offer 545 a 
share to buyout Beatrice Cos. Inc 

The announcement followed Be- 
atrice's cartier statement that a rep- 
resentative of JCohlberg, Kravis 
and the investment bouse Drexd 
Burnham h«d n^wd to tnm with 
Beatrice to propose a leveraged 
buyout of the national food and 
co nsumer -p rodnett company. 

Kohlberg said it win make a 
written proposal to Beatrice's 
board of directors proposing the 
buyout at $45 a share in cash and 
securities. Further details were not 
disclosed. . 

With an estimated 92 million 
shares outstanding, the transaction 
woald be worth about $4.14 billion. 

Trading in Beatrice stock was 
halted shortly before noon on the 
New York Stock Exchange after it 
advanced $250 to $44.75 a share. 

In its statement, Beatrice said no 
price or other derails of the pro- 
posed transaction were disclosed in 
the original notice. Beatrice also 
said it Bad advised the investment 
bank that any proposal should be 
put in writing. 

Beatrice has been the subject of 
widespread minors on Wall Street 
concerning a merger or leveraged 
buyout for the past two weeks, and 
trading in its stock has been excep- 
tionally heavy. . 

In a leveraged buyout, a compa- 
ny*s management typically teams 
up ’with an investment banker to 
buy the company’s outstanding 
shares and lake it private, with the 
transaction financed by borrowed 
funds oring future income or liqui- 
dation proceeds as collateral. 

Beatrice has sold four of its units 
recently to reduce a heavy debt 
load. 

Earlier this month, it said its cur- 
rent debt was 45 percent of capital- 
ization and that it intended to cut it 
to about 30 percent by the end of 
its fiscal year in February, in part 
through divestitures. 

Beatrice’s debt soared io$2Jb3- 
fion following its acquisition oTEs- 
matk Inc. last year for $2.7 billion. 
Among the four properties it has 
put on the block is its A vis Inc. car- 
rental unit. . (AP, UPT) 

■ SCM Takeover Srit 

Hanson Trust PLC of London, 
pursuing its takeover bid for the 
SCM Corp. sued Merrill Lynch 
Capital Markets in the Ui Dis- 
trict Court in New York Tuesday 
to prevent a group headed by Mer- 
rill Lynch bran exercising rights to 
buy two SCM businesses. The New 
Yack lanes reported. 

Merrill Lynch has argued that it 
has the right irnHw an agreement 
with SCM to buy the two business- 
es once Hanson owns a third of 
SCM. Hanson owns 3.96-million 
shares, 39.5 percent of SCM’s 
shares outstanding but only 32.1 
percent of all its stock. Hanson 
thus maintained it does not own 
enough to activate the rights. 

Hanson also asked the court to 
order Merrill Lynch to refund $9 
million to SCM that it collected 
from the Manufacturers Hanover 
Trust Conrpany, as escrow agent 
for SCM, under an agreement pro- 
viding for the payment once Han- 
son owned a third of SCM. 


Textile Imports 
Continue to 
Flood Market 

New York Times Semcc 

NEW YORK — When it 
comes to waving the flag for 
American-made goods, Sam M. 
Wahoo, who runs more than 800 
Wal-Mart discount stores, is as 
patriotic as they come. But at a 
recent apparel industry dirmrr rn 
bis honor Mr. Walton said that 
even he hurt to compromise and 
sell clothes that were made in rhe 
United States with imported ma- 
terials. 

The only thing homemade, in 
fact, about the flannel shirt that 
Mr. Walton held up as an exam- 
ple was its stitching Thai is the 
case with many more garments 
than most consumers realize. 
They range from silk bkxises to 
linen suits to woolen socks and 
sweaters. 

In addition, many of tbe tex- 
tile companies have also import- 
ed the machin ery on which they 
produce their goods. 

As congressional debate over 
limiting textile imports goes on 
and as Bob Hope appears on 
television commercials to con- 
vince consumers to boy only 
Made-in- U.S A. goods, there 
continues to be a flood of im- 
ported raw materials used in 
clothing. Some of these maierink 
would be curbed under the pro- 
posed textile bilL 

According to the Agriculture 
Department, 37 percent of the 
cotton and 62 percent of tbe 
wool used by U.S. manufacturers 
are imported. 

Tbe Commerce Department, 
reports that imports of yam and 
fabric used by all types of manu- 
facturers, including those who 
make carpets and curtains, to- 
taled nearly 3.8 billion square 
yards (3.04 bfllion square me- 
ters) in 1984. In comparison, im- 
. ports of finished garments and 
other apparel amounted to 4.7 
bfllion square yards. 

**lt is a myth that all imports 
are garments,” said Margaret A. 
GflUam, a tortile analyst at First 
Boston Corp. 


Tf xtf as From Abr oad 

Amual mpons cl yams. Uvics ms itoKwfian«Qiis non^aowaliexUin - 

m tman-rt mm y*a*. 


Job. through Aug. 


Industry Output 
In U.S. Declined 
0.1% for Month 






I I l 11 1 

0 -SI '62 ’S3 -84 85 

. pkam com* ana aeet wana mm « n» Binonn of nw. *oto» 
n Soyca CwwiaD w mMi l 


There are manv reasons that 
lgYijle m il ls, apparel manufac- 
turers and conveners — who buy- 
gray doth abroad and dye or 
print the material according to 
customer specification — import 
a substantial amount of fiber, 
yam and fabric. 

For some companies the im- 
ports are cheaper than s imilar 
American raw material <l They 
say it is the only way to compete 
with imported appard that now 1 
controls 43 percent of the U.S. 
market. 

The after-tax earnings of the 
United States textile industry fell 
to S445 million, or 1.7 percent of 
sales, in the first half of this year, 
from $921 million, or 3.6 percent 
of sales, in the first half of 1984, 
and an estimated 250 textile fac- 
tories have dosed in tbe past five 
years. 

Tbe companies that import 
textiles buy for defensive reasons 
to improve bottom-line figures, 
said Carlos FJ. Moore, execu- 
tive vice president of the Ameri- 
can Textile Manufacturers Insti- 
tute, tbe industry trade 
association. 

Other industry officials say 
companies shop abroad because 


It* Nr» totk Inn 

sometimes tbe fabrics that de- 
signers prefer can be found no- 
where else. “Companies initially 
may have gone abroad to save 
money,” said Mr. Gilliam of 
First Boston. “But now they go 
to the Far East to get certain 
fabrics. Domestic milk don't 
come out with innovative fab- 
rics.” 

Burlington Industries. Springs 
Industries and Cannon Mills Co. 
import specialized goods such as 
flannel sheets because they say it 
does not pay to make the capital 
investment necessary to produce 
such goods. 

In further playing down the 
significance of importing raw 
materials, textile industry offi- 
cials say that the purchase of 
such rnniffrials abroad is neither 
new nor confined to the textile 
industry. The practice is wide- 
spread, for example, in the auto 
and computer industries. 

In addition to the fabrics 
bought abroad, much of tbe $1.9 
billion of machinery that textile 
companies have acquired to 
modernize their plants has come 
from overseas. “The only avail- 
able labor-saving machinery is 
(Continued on Page 14, CoL 5) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dhpaufits 

WASHINGTON — industrial 
production in the United States fell 
0. 1 percent in September —slowed 
by a 2.1-percent drop in automo- 
tive products — to keep the in- 
crease for 12 months at a sluggish 

1.1 percent, tbe Federal Reserve 
reported Wednesday. 

The Fed revised its production 
growth figures for July and August, 
showing a 0.6-percent increase for 
August instead of a 0.3- percent in- 
crease and a 0.2-percent drop for 
July instead of no change. 

For September, the Fed reported 
declines in consumer goods and 
business equipment and gains in 
the production of defense and 
space equipment, construction sup- 
plies and some materials. 

Tbe overall output of consumer 
goods fell 0.3 percent in September, 
reflecting a reduction in durable 
goods such as automobiles and 
home appliances. Nondurable 
goods, such as clothing and food, 
were unchanged from August. 

Production of automotive prod- 
ucts fell 2.1 percent after a sharp 
63- percent gain in August and a 
3.9-percent advance in July. Autos 
were assembled at an annual rate of 

8.1 million units for September, 
compared with an 83-percent rate 
in August. 

On Tuesday, automobile makers 
reported a sharp drop in domestic 
car sales for early October. The 
expiration of special sales incen- 
tives by the major U.S. automakers 
at the end of September led to the 
decline. 

Consumer goods for the home, 
including appliances, also declined 
in September, leaving production 
at a level more than 5 percent be- 
low a year ago. 

Business equipment production 
declined 03 percent for September, 
while construction supplies rose 03 
percent, the seventh consecutive 
monthly increase. 

Raw materials production was 
unchanged for September. 


Strike End Leaves Renault Head in Powerful Role 


By Axel Krause 

fniemarionaJ Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Chairman Georges 
Besse has emerged with his author- 
ity greatly enhanced to pursue 
changes at Renault following the 
end of a weeklong strike at two 
plants, company and industry 
sources said Wednesday. 

“Mr. Besse came out on top be- 
cause he showed firmness and cor- 
rectly assessed the mood of French 
labor,” said a senior executive of 
tbe Peugeot SA automobile group, 
which is privately owned. Renault 
is a state-owned automaker. 

Mr. Besse refused to negotiate 
with union leaders who had sought 
to open companywide talks on in- 
creasing wages and reinstating cuts 
announced last month in Renault's 
bonus plan 

An industrialist by training and 
previous experience with a fond- 
ness for secrecy, Mr. Besse re- 
frained from making any public 
statements on the dispute. 

Most important, according to a 
senior Renault executive, he had 
concluded in advance that the vast 
majority of Renault workers op- 
posed strike action. 

“He was secretive, tough and de- 
termined to keep the talks local- 



Georges Besse 


ized, and in the end, it worked,” the 
executive said. He and other Re- 
nault executives emphasized that 
less than 1,000 workers were actu- 
ally on strike and blocking opera- 
tions in plants that employed a to- 
tal of about 16300 people. 

The main loser in the strike ac- 
tions, which began last Tuesday at 
three Renault plants, was the Com- 
munist-led General Confederation 
of Labor. 


The CGT has attacked Mr. 
Besse's plans, including layoffs, to 
restore Renault to profitability. 
The CGT also has been seeking to 
embarrass the government of 
Prime Minister Laurent Fabius, 
which is facing parliamentary elec- 
tions on March 16. 

The Communist Party’s political 
bureau decided at a meeting Ocl 
JO to start a tough labor action 
against Renault, the daily newspa- 
per Le Monde reported in its edi- 
tions dated Oct. 17. 

Also on Ocl 10, the Socialist- 
leaning French Confederation of 
Democratic Labor, the CFDT, had 
officially declined to join the CGT. 
Renault workers “are not ready for 
a test of strength with the Renault 
m a n a g em e nt,” a CFDT official 
said. 

Since last Thursday, several 
thousand workers at the three 
plants have signed petitions in fa- 
vor of returning to work. 

Indeed, many industry execu- 
tives and observers said they re- 
garded tbe end of the strike Tues- 
day as a major turning point in 
French management-labor rela- 
tions, reflecting what one executive 
described 35 “a sensible, pragmatic 


approach among Renault workers, 
showing a new understanding of 
the problems facing burin ess." 

The CGT organized the strikes 
initially at Le Mans, Choisy-le-Roi 
and at the Billancourt plant near 
Paris. Union leaders repeatedly 
urged workers at other Renault 
plants to join in the stoppage, but 
they did not. 

By Wednesday, only Billancourt 
remained occupied by workers, fol- 
lowing resumption of normal oper- 
ations at the other two plants, com- 
pany spokesmen said. 

Negotiations with union leaders 
to end the strike at Bill an court con- 
tinued Wednesday. The company 
expects it to be over by the end of 
the week. 

Settlement of tbe dispute also 
reflected a shift in French worker 
attitudes that go beyond Renault 

What surfaced in the dispute was 
a new, pragmatic and nonideologi- 
cal approach to management rela- 
tions, industry and union leaders 
said. 

Straggles against management 
have become much more complex, 
“and will require greater objectiv- 
ity and some pulling back,” a CGT 
worker at Renault told .the daily 
newspaper liberation. 


Tbe weakness this year in indus- 
trial production has been attribut- 
ed to a flood of imports. The for- 
eign competition, aided by the 
Strength of the dollar, has fed to 
growing demands in Congress for 
trade barriers. 

The Reagan a dminis tration has 
sought to derail demands for pro- 
tection with its own program to 
force the country’s trading partners 
to buy more U 3. exports. 

Tbe slowdown in car soles was 
announced Tuesday as the Com- 
merce Department reported that 
business inventories fell 0.4 percent 
in August, the biggest drop in more 
than two years. (UPl. AP) 


Canadian Banks 
In Agreement 
About Merger 

Return 

MONTREAL — National 
Bank of Canada and Mercan- 
tile Bank of Canada said 
Wednesday that an agreement 
in principle bad been reached to 
merge through a share ex- 
change. 

Mercantile common shares 
would be exchanged for 2 mil- 
lion common shares plus 2 mil- 
lion second preferred shares of 
the merged bank. National 
Bank and Mercantile said. 

A National Bank official said 
the merger would most likely 
take effect in December. 

The merged banks would op- 
erate under the name National 
Bank of Canada, the banks 
said 

Mercantile Bank, Canada’s 
eighth largest and owned 24 
percent by Citibank NA, an- 
nounced Monday that it would 
seek a merger with another 
bank after confirming that it 
had experienced funding prob- 
lems related to the recent fail- 
ure of two banks in western 
Canada. 

National Bank is Canada's j 
sixth largest 1 


Add 

pleasure 
to a top 
investment 


Be our partner in thepurchase 
of a vineyard estate in 

ST ESTEPHE 

(Medoc - France) 

Your dividends will be a 
share of the wine production. 

Minimum investment : 

FF : 100.000 

lb have Ml information please 
send your card to : 

O FBED 

123, Av. de la Falencerie 
loll LUXEMBOURG 


United Technologies, MBB Discuss Joint Venture 


By Warren Geder 

Tntemananal Htraid Trlbme 

NEW YORK — United Tech- 
nologies Carp, and Messersdnxrio- 
Bdlkow-Blomn GmbH, die West 
German aerospace company, are 
discussing a jam t venture in auto- 
motive electronics, sources at Unit- 
ed Technologies said Wednesday. 

The venture, to be based in West 
Germany, would be the third re- 
cent linking of the automotive and 
high-technology industries, after 
Gmeial Motors Ca's plans to take 
rarer Hughes Aircraft Co. and the 
merger agreement between the 
West G erman antnmaVffr Daimler- 
Benz AG and electronic group 
AEG AG. 

Talks have been going on for 
sevanl months but are still at a 
preliminary stage. But sources sug- 
gested that a letter of intent could 
be signed by the end of the year. 
Officials at both companies do- 
dined to disclose details of the dis- 
cussions. 

Sources dose to the talks said the 
proposed venture with MBB would 
seek to incorporate United Tech- 


nologies’ existing automotive-elec- 
tronics operations in West Germa- 
ny. United Technologies is a maj or 
pans supplier to the U3. auto in- 
dustry. 

One of those operations is Tele- 
f unken Ekctrorrik, in which United 
Technologies and AEG each own a 
49-percent stake. Now that Daim- 
ler is set to buy a majority of AEG, 
sources said, it is questionable 
whether Daimler is willing to sell 
its stake in Telefunken Electrortik 
to the proposed joint venture. 

Industry sources, who asked not 
to be identififd raid other obsta- 
cles remain, including recent set- 
backs at a United Technologies 
subsidiary, Mostek, a semiconduc- 
tor manufacturer that would sup- 
ply the joint venture. 

United Technologies is develop- 
ing a cabling system known as 
“multiplexing.'’ which is aimed at 
reducing the number of wires need- 
ed to connect the growing number 
of instruments and devices in new 
car models. Such a system would 
reduce auto weight and the space 
required for wiring. 


The recent flurry of merger activ- 
ity between automakers and elec- 
tronic-pans producers reflects a 
desire by both to trim production 
casts and diversify operations. It 
also is seen as part of a marketing 
strategy to appeal to car buyers’ 
growing appetite for high-technol- 
ogy features. 

John Lawson, auto industry ana- 
lyst at the London-based Data Re- 
sources Inc., said the market for 
automotive electronics “is not that 
larae, but it’s a specialist market 
with high value.” He said recent 
steps by GM and Daimler to secure 
their own suppliers would put pres- 
sure rat companies such as United 
Technologies “not to lose their 
technological advantages.” 

Mr. Lawson said that United 
Technologies’ interest in a joint 
venture with MBB could thus be 
seen as a defensive move. He ex- 
pressed some skepticism, however, 
about MBB's role in the automo- 
tive field. 

“United Technologies has been a 




Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo P aci fi c Hokfings N.V. 

on Oct. 14, 1985: U.S. $138.59. 

listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Ptanoft, Hridriag A Pferaon MM, 

M arongradit 214,1016 BS A matodn . 


leader in North America in supply- 
ing driver-information manage- 
ment systems,” he said. “Apparent- 
ly. they haven't got tbe clout to do 
that independently in Europe, but 
Tm not sure MBB would be able to 
add mudi to that in the automotive 
sphere.” 

United Technolopes is known to 
be interested in expanding its role 
as a electronic-parts supplier to 
West German and other European 
car makers — a market already 
crowded with such established 
companies as West Germany’s 
Bosch GmbH and Siemens AG. 
Daimler-Benz's potential in this 
market has been enhanced by its 
acquisition of AEG and Doraier 
GmbH, the diversified West Ger- 
man aerospace and electronics ! 
group. 

Hans Arm Vogels, president of 
MBB. and Harry J. Gray, chief 
executive officer of United Tech- 
nologies, are known to have dis- 
CUSSed a wide range of areas for 
cooperation. 


AEROLEASING geneva 


CORUM 





Your Swiss Connection 

to professionalism and reliability In business aviation 
Our own fleet of 10 modern jets is ready to serve you anytime, 
anywhere. Ail Dassault Falcon and Learjet models available. 


For further deoils, please call : 
Hood Office: Geneva 
Ph Q21 9845 10 Tlx 289 186 


Zurich Ph (1)8143700 Tlx S6192 
Milan Ph R) 2784 32 Tlx 335 475 
Madrid Ph (1) 259 3224 Tlx 44192 


r - r ' 

/t* ^ 
'*» 

.-~F' 


ROMULUS. A model registered by Coaim in 1966 
and always in fashion. Now in an ultra-slim, quartz, 
water-resistant version. Four sizes. In 18 carat gold 
or platinum. 

. *i Corum watches are on view at the finest jewellers For the 
2E address of the one nearest you or for a brochure, write 

jjl or phone 10 : France, S_A. Michel Niarquin. 177, Bd de 

W CirtriL, 94100 Satnt-Maur, id. W889J6.36 - Germany. 
- — Awtria, HnUand, Helmut Tenet GmbH. Hemneh-Heinc- 

Allee4. D-4000 DiisseMorf. tel 021 1. 320.446 - Great Britain. Saunders 
& Shepherd Lid- 1. Bleeding Hean Yard. Grcville Street, London 
EClN 8SJ, tel. 01-405.2hW - Italy. Corum Italia di Amedeo Medu- 
Fol*. Via TilO Vjgndli 44. 20146 Milan, id. 242.77. W - Other countries 
CORUM. 2300 Lu Cha ux -de- Fonda. Switzerland, id. 1U/28.66.A6. 


r l ' V 

j j#: 1 









INTERNATIONAL 


Wednesdays 

NISE 

. Qoshg 


Toblw Include Hie nationwide prices 
op to the dosing on Wall Street 
«w da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


im ibmi 
61 61 
61% 61% 

»}*- 
25V*- 
Z» • 
M- 
914- 
3816 ■ 
216b 
32%- 
14% 


40 
42 
106 
a 
sc 

tot 350 95 
I Of 4JS0 9JS 
P 240 TO 

of oto ma 

Pf 750 115 
D) un W2 
v/i 


SSiS 

2566—1 

24% — % 

2S% — Vb 
26tt — Vb 
27 + Vb 

38% — V, 
31 Vb 316% — - Vb 
191b 19% 

19% 20 — V6 
17% » + l* 

31% 31Tb— lb 
ISVi 15% — Vb 
35% 361b- lb 
21% 

916 

35% — lb 
107% +11* 
B9% +% 
21 — % 
J% 

m— i* 
30V* + Vb 
22 + Vb 

55% + U 
34% 
33%— 1 
35% + 1* 
40 + % 

20% + % 
12% + Vb 
19 + % 

lWb— Vb 
65% +% 
59% + U 
37—% 
45% + 16 
33% + % 
76 + % 

71 —I 
26% 

34% — % 
94% + Vb 
76 + I* 

74% + % 
15% +% 
14H+ % 
17% + % 
15% 

57%— % 
U%— V6 
24% — % 


m 




56 U 14 
54 15 20 
JO 13 n S3 
1J» 17 16 193 

,56 17 20 57 

23 615 
140 115 60 

2.13 73 376 

40 14 12 SI 
JS 37 12 705 
10 


ft 




ja 

17 

240 

» A 

76 

16 

48 

X6 

1J1 

4J 

675 

7.9 

264 ion 
174eI8.1 

40 

28 

238 

97 

.40 

37 

A 

40 

72 

U 

M 

24 

50 

17 

JO 

24 

200 

65 


r 26% + % 

25% + % 
1 % 1 % + % 
5% 9b* + % 

40% — % 
14V. + Vb 
21 — % 
23% + 16 
10% + % 
17V* + % 
57%— % 
32%+ % 
10% 

25% + % 
27V. 

17% + Vb 
23% — % 
15% +1% 
29% 

32% + Vb 
16% 

21% + Vb 
9H 

25% + Vb 
13% 

11 —1 
20% + % 
16% — % 
12% 

IS%— % 
1916 + % 
2816 + % 
29% + % 
15 + % 

19% 

37% — 16 
19% + % 
34 +1% 

17% + 16 

a + % 

10'i. 

30% — % 
38% +1 
20% + % 
11%— 16 
23% + % 
65%—% 
33% +1% 
5314 + 16 
79 

11 % + % 
20% + % 
9% + 16 
24%— % 
14 + % 
55% « 

61 —1 
34% +1 
6% 

31% + % 
27% — VI 
3616 + % 
13% + % 
37% + % 
79 +14 
26% 

9% 

14% 

74% + % 
10% + % 
12% — Vb 
22 % — % 
20 — % 
29 + % 

33% - % 
31 + V* 






44 

13 

28 

9 

41 

/ 

10 

14 

26 

12 

SJ 

8 

13 


54 

12 

48 



4+. 


34% 

15% + Vb 
10% + % 
27% 

17% + Vb 
23% — % 
15%- Vi 
34Tb + % 

63 
65% 

64 
47% 

66 

11% + 16 
21 % 

616 + % 


15 % — 1 % 
34% 

53 V. 

28 + .'A 

*7% + * 
1216 + 16 
5fl 

10416 + 16 


r 

17% + Vb 
4% + % 
19 + % 

25% 

32% + V* 
BVb— % 
IB + % 
19 m* + % 
63% 63% + % 
9% 9%— % 
48% 48%— I* 
9V. 9% 

17% 11 + % 
127% 129 +1 

26% 26% 

33 V. 33% + % 
Mb 7 

4% 4V6 + % 
2% 2% 

47% 47% 

26% 26% - Vk 
38% 38% — % 
3916 39% — IV. 
45% 46% + % 
10% 10% + % 
42% 42% — % 
80 n +3% 
EL 9i +i 
39% 4016 + 16 
21 21 + * 
lWb 19%— % 
20% 20% + % 
9'4 9%- % 
19% 19% 

32 32% + % 

2 ! 21 
3114 32 + % 
33% 31% 

11% 11% + % 
36% 37% + % 


M 

17 


41 

7J 

6 

3J 

* 

79 

9 

1J 

IS 

24 

41 

14 


J 


28 



*rHr 







ifr 




r Sin f& 
JU u 
270 113 
pi zest u& 
Pf OO 117 
Pf 440 1X1 
Pi 448 1X0 
Pf 7 j 00 129 
Pf 035 135 
Pf 1*41 1X4 
pf U3 113 
PI 7*S 1X9 
Pf 178 127 
T7.12 144 
im 127 
7.75 118 
172 65 
400 57 
40 25 
1JD0 7 3 
IJMt 47 
40 1J 
78 7 

232 75 




stmm 

1561 16% 
579 36% 
3844 50% 
HZ 14% 

^■38% 
2% 
8% 
20% 
SOW, 
8% 
8% 
8% 
50% 
66 
39% 
7% 
22% 


40 S 
JO* 45 
JO 45 32 


230 45 11 
225 11 
1J0 4.1 11 


109'A + % 
36% + % 


s*%- » 

Abb + Vi 




28% 20% — % 
26% 2g* + % 

2316 24% + % 
22% 22% + % 
36% 35 + % 

3Sf £2 

34% 34% + % 
35% 36% + % 
19% »% + % 
24 V. 24% + % 
21% 31% — % 
39% 60% +1% 

17% 17% + % 

54 54%+ % 

49 49% 


63 33 QuakOl 140 24 16 2874 59V6 56 59 +2% 

ZF% 16% QuakSO JO 34 20 647 22% 21% 23% + Vb 

10% 5% Queue* 19 191 6 5% 5% + % 

34% 77 QiMStor 140 54 10 128 29 2B% 79 + % 

26% 14% QkRdl 74a 1.1 14 209 21% ZlVb 71%— % 


35% 

22% JYVT S 

1.12 

40 

16 

188 

28% 

28 

28 - % 


37 

23% JRWor 

56 

U 

10 

117 

33% 

32% 

33V* + % 


28% 

16 Jamiwv 

.12 

J 

10 

280 

18% 

18% 

18% 


13% 

10% JopnF 

1430122 


133 

11% 

11% 

1146 


47% 

34V* JoRPlI 

152 

3J 

7 

897 

46% 

«% 

46% + % 

■w 

66 

31% J crept 

X12 1X0 


luOz 62% 

62% 

62% —1% 


66% 

51% JorCpt 

BJOO 126 


100:63% 

63% 

63% 

19 

101 

81 JvCpf 

I1J8 11.1 


06002100 

99% 

99% +5 


18% 

14% JBTCPI 

218 126 


40 

17% 

17% 

17% — V* 


16% 

6% Jewtcr 



72 

45 

13 

14% 

14% + 14 


49V* 

3014 JohrtJn 

150 

U 

15 

4568 

45*. 

45 

45% + % 


46% 

38% JotaiCn 

lJ6a 45 

9 

808 

41% 

41 

41% + % 


53 

30% JhnCpf 

475 

77 


13 

53% 

33% 

53% + % 


27% 

21% Jaroon 

1J00 

41 

IB 

2 

34'* 

24% 

24% — % 


36% 

18% JOStOTT S 

JO 

12 

14 

27 

34% 

24% 

24% 


17% 

3216 JuvMfa 

140 

41 

14 

361 

23% 

23 

23 — % 



70 J 

13 

170 40 

t 

250 43 


1J0 1 A 

IS 

X16 XI 
248 146 


148 26 

19 

JO 1*6 

Z 

701 

2 

56 37 

11 

-40c X4 


ijobxo z 

153B 97 
IJO 1J 

10 

JO 1*4 

11 



IJO u 

7 

270 35 


250 21 


70 17 
74 24 

3 

75 15 


224 35 
SJOr 77 

6 

JSf .1 


173 9*4 
SL00 97 


.16 3*4 


1J6 1 J 138 

IJO 45 
U0 102 

11 

416 UU 


.10 1.1 

47 

UO 40 
1.18 18 

14 

JO XB 

V 

3J0 127 
144 125 


176 }29 
256 117 


252 122 
275 108 


? jo m 

772 123 



19% + % 
36% — % 


U8 60 15 
140 40 7 

.72 34 12 
1.32 34 9 
J8 25 12 
JO 14 
232 U 8 


vM* 


1400 BJ 


!J» 10 

12 

50 28 

24 

54 57 

7 

2J4 97 

10 

150 11J 


175 117 


511 43 

9 

350 U 

7 

220 85 

9 

256 1DJ 

7 

375 1U 


OBO 121 


3528127 


212 115 


X7S 127 


50 28 

11 

54 17 

26 

400*317 

5 

74b 85 

9 

IJO 22 

36 


w, 


29% TPJl 
31% 24% 
17% 1116 
4% 1 

IV6 1 
114 5% 

25% 8% 
68% 31 
1816 816 
IS 10% 
29% 20% 
1016 6% 

27 7114 

14% 716 

4% 1% 

13% 10% 
2316 10% 

28 V* 20 

57% 41 
11 15 

34 ft 23% 
46% 23% 
18% 8% 

36 16% 

4 2 

V 24% L 
15% 13% tj 


P 152 47 
it 250 73 
wt 

pf 250 11J 
Pf 230 11J 
Pt 675 11J 
pfliSO 145 
462 134 
450 127 
IJO 47 
1J0 60 
1J8 127 
440 129 
444 12.9 
456 1341 
754 127 
292 b 94 
350 124 
197 133 
150 114 
644 129 
048 115 
227 11.1 
400 124 
848 117 
776 117 
ZOO 84 
40 94 
150 46 



15 

SS 

13% 

5% 

% 40 
16 14% 

% 36% 
4516 
4% 

m 
26% 
15% T 
16% T 
. 26% Ti 
24U Ti 
23% 
27% 
15% 
15% 
0% 

36 

1416 

10 % 


36 34% + % 

15% 15% + % 
24% 2SVb+ V6 
42% 42% 

39% 39% — 16 
12 12% + 16 
t * +» 
Z% 3 + % 
25%. 26% + % 
2% 2V6 

1^1^-^ 
11% 11% 

34 34 + % 

416 m~ % 

m in*— % 


32St+% 


44% 36% WBvr 
51% 46% WBrr 


36% 36%—% 

M£3»HS 


3J3 

SJ 33 

A 26 660 

67 29 

7J 9 358 
22 14 87 

49 ID 31 

21 n 67 

10 11 66 


48% 48V6 48% + % 
9% ■%*» + % 
U 74 » +» 

43% <3 43%— U 

30 39% 30 + % 
76 23% 26 + % 

Z1V. ZW6 ZT16 + V* 
□% 12% 1216 
1116 11% 

11% 1116— % 
29% 30%+ « 

.916 9% + % 

a m— % 

£& + W 
« •- >3% +Hb 

£ H2— ■ 16 

36% 36%+ % 

sssr* 

49% 50V. + % 
3% 3% + Vb 
79% 79%— % 


iSit 

10% 18% 


27 

71% 15% Zeros 
37% 33%2uml 




AMEXHighsiov^ 


59% 391* UAL 1J0 20115 1940 50% 4916 50% + % AmTrExpr 

36% 27% UAL Pf 240 77 »0 11 U 39% 31 — V. Curtk*Brn 

17% 10% UCCEL 17 STS 15% 13 15H + % MocwB 

30 Z» UDCn ,15e 5 17 43 25 2616 26%—% wSlcoEnt 

36V) 18Vb UGI 206 95 11 40 21% 71% 21%— VS 


CteFsfBcp 
Gould l ny Tr 
. PsSPLpfD 


CUPstSSOp 

SS& 3 


HEW LOWS 11 


Company Results 


BSN - 

GTICorp 

MldiGenl 

RotlfffDrlJI 

WBbnOBlun 


2®*Ent A C MmoC rn 

5££2U “ Drt - 


Dr mars 

SSS&m 

Turmrsnin 


Ht w n ue and pnats or tosses. m millions, arm ftHacof 
cumada untsss otherwise MnM 


British North Sea Oil Output 
Recovers From S umme r Slump 


S«4m Rswra art unoffldaL Yearly liiafts oner lows rafted 

IMpnnrfcM 52 wtM&spkstbB currant wm*. but not+tiBlatas* 

frodJnu day. Whsni a *>OT or dock dividend aroounttno lo K 
panaaito rnwrahna bran wnW. Itie year* MgtHnwrwmirt 
ahrMand are *mm for ttw new stock only. Untes omerwtn 

o—dlvbJenanteo «xtra U 171 

b— cniuOl rate ardhrMendi piu* itocfc dMdana/1 

c— Hteddoftna dwidml/l 

cm— ccmedTt 

4 — n«w warty lowTl 

•-dyMm MW or Bold bt oread tea llmonitiui 

a — dlvIiiaM In Dnadtan ftncla,sub(ecf to 15» nan-rashtencB 


tivf+S 


^d^cHlwkpm^or^dlvbtend. 
rin UL MIf 1 ffJ5g* dtferrad, or no action 


The Associated Press 


LONDON — Britain’s North Sea oil output 
has recovered from its summer slump, reaching 


16 million barrels a day in September, Petro- 
leum Information Service said Wednesday. 

British production showed a 150,000 barreJ- 
a-day increase over September last year and was 
the highest since April. North Sea output was 
restrained during the s umm er by maintenance 
work. According to Petroleum Information, 
Norway's North Sea fields have again stepped 
up production, with output averaging almost 
854,000 barrels a day despite persistent prob- 
lems in the Valhall field. 


wHh ttw start Of 1 
nd— and day do 
P/n— p rig Bort 


orpaW this V»cr. on CHcumuioftw 
tf P *—fca. The hfpfiMow rnuBo bBuba 


I or paid In procadlne 12 1 


s — dock app. DiwWond bastat wflh data of ipiit ■ 


cam or wf to fr ttMri fon 

u — mw Viorty Ugh. 
v— trodmoMM. 

Mssssssasssasss 

wd — own tust v tao i Bd: • 

wf— HtembteiMd. 

kW kftt kOTttltS. 


*dte~r«»<Hatr«mt1on. 

xw— WW W W k rants. 
Y—ox-dlvtatnd and Milos In full. 
yW— v%*t 

z— ■dahCuH. 























































































‘ J-, \ „ » 

V • •; 

...... - • t; 


*■- 

«* - 

*» ** 


BUSINESS ROUNDU P 

AT&T Reports 19 % Rise in Rurnwiga 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 


Page 11 


*■ * ■ 

= ^¥-. 
: 0-1 


■ m 


■ 5 

\ ^ ;»! 
‘ j i:8' 

:: ; m 


:■ & 


The Asrodared Press 

NEW YORK — American Tde- 

co ™; ^ 19 percent in the thiid 
TnSS. fro ® a ^er. but 

Alar's chairman, Charles L. 
Brown^ said he was not satisfied 
with the improve men t. 

AT&T reported net income in 
theihree months ended Sept. 30 of 

* S, n Si? n ' 01 33 cents a share, on 
I.U63 billion average shares oot- 
pndmg. compared with S3I7 bfl- 
“jg* °r 28 cents a share, with 1.019 
bflhon shares outstanding in the 
third quarter of 1984. 

Revenue totaled $8.9 billion in 
U« quarter, up 11 percent from S8 
billion in 1984’s third quarter. 

The company said the third- 
quarter results included a write- 
down of the value of some obsolete 
equipment and inventory, snrfr as 
older business phone systems, 
which reduced earnings by $97 mri 
lioo, or 9 cents a share. 

Partly offsetting the write-down 
was an adjustment for tax ex- 
penses, which improved earnings 
by $30 mflHon, or 3 cents a share. 


Mr. Brown said tfa twn-mngg per- 
formanoe ^represents an improve- 
ment, but still Mis short of oor 


He sa^lhrt after the 1984 dives- 
titure of its Bell System operating 
companies, AT&T “tuned from 
what was a stable well-defined 
uacfc into a new and much more 
twisting path in which the gong 
has been difficult at times," 

“This eaily part of the journey is 
uphill as we knew it would be." he 
said. - 

For the first nine months, AT&T 
had net income of $12 billion, or 
S1.05 per common share, on 1.054 
billion .shares outstanding Reve- 
nue in. the. first nine* months 
amounted to $25.8 bUEoa. 

From January through Septem- 
ber 1984, net income wasSl billion, 
or 91 cents a share and there were 
1.002 billion shares outstanding. 
Revenue in that period totaled 
$24.8 bffion. 

I BeB Earnings 
Southwestern Bell Corp. report- 
ed on Wednesday net income of 
$2442 million for the third quarter, 
compared with S2424 ntiflion in 


Continental Illinois Reports 
Earnings of $35.8 Million 


r 

'll 

: -5 

' :HE 

‘ ~ 3lV 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

CHICAGO — Continental Illi- 
nois Corp. on Wednesday reported 
third-quarter net income of $35.8 
million, or 13. cents a common 
share, compared with $372 mil- 
lion, or 13 cents a common share, 
in the second quarter. 

Continental said comparison of 
results of the third quarter of 1985 
with the third quarter of 1984 was 
not meaningful because of the re- 
structuring that occurred in Sep- 
tember 1984. It had previously re- 
ported third-quarter 1984 net was 
$4 million, or one cent a share. 

For the first nine jnontlut of 
1985, net income totaled SLI24 
million, or 40 cents & share. 

Assets averaged $25.1 billion in 
the third quarter, compared with 
$25.7 billion in the second quarter. 
Loan volume in the quarter aver- 
aged $212 billion, down about $12 
bull on from the second quarter. 

“In the year since the restructur- 
ing. we have made substantial pro- 
gress in reducing our dependence 
on special funding arrangements, 
although our earnings continue to 
suffer from the premiums we pay 
for funds.” said John R Swearin- 
gen, chairman and chief executive 
officer. 

Last year. Continental was using 
supplemental borrowings from the 
Federal Reserve and special bank 
funding facility of more than $9 


billion. On SepL 30. supplemental 
borrowing was less than $1 WBion, 
Mr. Swearingen said. 

W illiam S. Ogden, chairman and 
chief executive officer of the corpo- 
ration's Continental Barfly aid 
Continental has had relatively flat 
■ quarterly results in the past year, 
during a time of soft loan demand 
and problems in ce rta in sectors of 
the world economy. Continental’s 
primary capital ratio, however, in- 
creased during the quarter and re- 
mains one of the strongest of the 
mayor banks, he said. 

In New York, Bankers Trust 
New York Ccxp. reported Wednes- 
day that third-quarter earnings 
were $952 miTHrm, a 192-percent 
increase from $79.8 millio n in the 
third quarter of 1984. 

Per-share earning c were $2.75, 
compared with ‘ $2.46. Assets 
amounted to $47 bOBoo. up from 
$45.1 billion, and loans of $24.6 
billion, as against S23.8 billion. 

The third-quarter net a 

S 133-mOtion after-tax gain relat- 
ing to New York City and state tax 
law changes. 

Republic New York Corp. re- 


far the third quarter, a 4L6-percent 
increase from $18.8 iwtiinn. Per- 
share earnings amounted to SL52, 
as against SI 28. 

(UPI, Raaers) 


- the third quarter of 19S4, United 
Tress International reported 

Revenues for the three months 
ended Sept 30 were $129 billion, 
up from $1.84 biDion a year earlier. 

‘ Earnings per share were S2.45, 
down from $2^7 in the year-earlier 
period. The drop reflected an addi- 
tional 12 milli on shares issued in 
the company's dividend reinvest- 
ment plan and various employee 
stockpfcms. 

The corporation's largest subsid- 
iary, Southwestern Bell Telephone, 
benefited in the third quarter from 
continued growth in customer 
lines, increased connection fees 
from long-distance companies and 
cost-containment efforts, said Zane 
E Baines, chairman and chief ex- 
ecutive officer. 

Ameritech — winch includes Illi- 
nois Bell, Indiana BeH, Michigan 
Bell, Ohio BeQ and Wisconsin Bell 
— reported third-quarter earnings 
of $2852 mini mi, or $2.92 per 
share, up 7.1 percent from the like 
period a year ago. For the third 
quarter of 1984, Ameritech report- 
ed $2662 million in earnings, or 
$2.72 per share. 

COMPANY NOTES 

Associated Hotels Ltd. of Hoag 
Kong has asked that trading in its 
shares be suspended until Monday 
on Hong Kong’s four stock ex- 
changes, pending a court ruling on 
its planned reorganization, a stock 
exchange spokesman said. A Hong 
Kong coon will hear a petition to 
approve the planned restructuring. 

Quett, Peabody A Co., the fiftb- 
largesi U2. apparel company, said 
a group of investors led by the 
California. businessman, Paul A 
Btherian. had beguna $40-a-share 
cash tender offer for the-common 
and preferred shares not already 
owned by the group. The offer was 
valued at S258.9 million. 

Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. has 
been told by an appeals court in 
Philadelphia to pay 5233,500 in 
damages to a couple who alleged 
that a broker had “churned” their 
commodity account — making 
transactions primarily to collect 
brokers fees — losing thousands of . 
dollars. A Pennsylvania Superior , 
Court upheld the compensatory , 
and punitive damages. 

Dresdner Bank AG of Frankfurt j 
said it would have no comment on , 
reports that his negotiating a joint 
venture with Banco de Vizcaya SA . 
of Bilbao. Citing Madrid banking 
sources, Reuters reported last week 
that Dresdner wanted to acquire an < 
equity stake in one of the Spanish * 
banking group's member banks. i 
Eastern Airlines has included i 
Philadelphia- Florida routes in a 
599-fare offer and dropped restric- J 
turns on purchasing tickets, the lat- < 


Fiat Says 
Talks Still 
On in U.S. 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Fiat SpA is 
continuing discussions with all 
the U.S. automakers on sub- 
jects “in many areas," including 
a possible John venture, Um- 
berto Agnelli, vice chairman, 
said Wednesday. 

The company has a tentative 
agreement with General Mo- 
tors Corp. for GM to lake a 
minority stake of Fiat's Comau 
Division, in the United Stales, 
but be listed no other specific 
developments. “We’re trying to 
identify with the manufacturers 
economies that would be posi- 
tive for both companies,” he 
said. 

He said "different views on 
some things” led to the recent 
breakdown of talks on some 
sort of a combination with Ford 
Motor Gx, but he said that 



U.S. Indicts Bank of New England 


Umberto Agnelli 

talks continue with the major 
U2. car makers. 

He said Fiat has been rWmg 
the U.S. m a r ket for a posable 
entry of its t-mria cars, and 
“acceptability has been posi- 
tive.” 

If any Landas are to be sold 

in the United States, it would 
not be in the mmwijaf* future, 
he said. 


est move in the Miami-based carri- 
er’s fare war with Pan American 
World Airways. 

Fujitsu Ltd- the Tokyo-based 
computer manufacturer, said IBM 
Corp. has filed a complaint with 
the American Arbitration Associa- 
tion demanding damage from Fu- 
jitsu for allegedly copying software 
not covered by a 1983 IBM-Fujitsu 
agreement. A Fujitsu spokesman 
said the company does not believe 
it breached the contract with IBM 

LJoyds Bank PLC said it has sold 
14.06 million ordinary shares in 
Royal Bank of Scotland Group 
PLC as pan of its agreement with 
the British government to cut its 
stakefrom 21 3 percent to not more ' 
than 16.4 percent. The bank did not 
identify the buyer or provide the 
purchase price. 

Nissan Motor Co. of Tokyo said 
it plans to invest £27 milli on 
(538.07 million) in a Aah» of new 
dealerships across Britain. Nissan 
said the expansion is needed be- 
cause of the new Sunderland plant, 
which is expected to produce 
24.000 cars a year tiring kits im- 
ported from Japan. 

Pengot SA the French automak- 
er, has signed an agreement with 
China to build a large truck plant 
in which the Chinese public will be 
allowed to buy a 10-percent share. 
The S792-million project near the 
southern city of Canton will pro- 
duce 15,000 light trucks a year. 


Sanko Tanker Co. a wholly 
owned subsidiary of Sanko Steam- 
ship Co., has been negotiating the 
sale of six of its tankers since it 
went into liquidation in early Sep- 
tember, industry’ sources said. A 
Sanko Steamship spokesman de- 
clined to comment on reports that 
that theGekko Maru had been sold 
and that five other tankers were 
likely to be offered soon. 

Sony Corp. said that in January, 
it would begin production of 41- 
inch (105-centimeter) color video 
projection television receivers for 
household use. It said it initially 
would produce 2,000 units a month 
at its plant in San Diego, Califor- 
nia. 

ADVERTISEMENT 

XEROX CORPORATION 

(CDR’a) 

The undersigned minmw, ihat as from 

23 th October 1985 ai Kas-AsaocLatie 
N-V_, Spnislnu 172. Amsterdam, 
div-cpjio- 46 of the CDRs Xerox 
Corpormrion, eaefa iwr. 1 share, 
will be payable with Dfis. 1^89 net 
fdiv. per record-dale 09.06.1985; gross 
5 -.75 pjh.) after deduction of i5% 
USA-ux - S -.1125 - Dfk. -23 per 
CDR. Div.cps. belonging to non-resi- ' 
dents of The Netherlands will be paid ■ 
after deduction of an additional 15% ' 
USA-lax <- $-.1125 - DO*. -23) wixb ! 
Dfis. L56net- 

AM5TERDAM DEPOSITARY ' 
COMPANY N.V. | 

Amsterdam, 9th October, 1985. 


By Fox Butterfield 

New York Times Service 

BOSTON — The Bank of New 
England, along with one of its offi- 
cers and two tellers, has been in- 
dicted by a federal grand jury for 
helping a convicted gambler with- 
draw large amounts of cash with- 
out reporting it to the govenunent. 

According to the U.S. attorney, 
William F. Weld, the Bank of New 
England participated in an unlaw- 
ful scheme to allow James V. 
McDonough to withdraw $817,000 
from his account at a Boston 
branch from May 1983 to July 1984 
without filing the currency-transac- 
tion reports required by the Inter- 
nal Revenue Service. 

Under a federal law designed to 

help federal law enforcement agen- 
cies trace cash illicitly generated by 
organized crime through narcotics. 
gamMing and loan -sharking, banks 
must file the reports for all cash 
transactions of more than SI 0.000. 

The indictment Tuesday charged 
that a head idler at the bank's 
branch in the Prudential Center, a 
large office and retail complex, had 
accepted four envelopes each con- 
taining $100 from Mr. McDon- 
ough. as well as bottles of wine at 
Christmas. At least five other tell- 
ers and customer service represen- 
tatives in the branch also took 
cash-filled envelopes from Mr. 
McDonough, the indictment said. 

The indictment cited the accep- 
tance of the money as evidence of 
the scheme but did not charge brib- 
ery. 

Richard D. Driscoll, president of 
the Bank of New England, con- 
tended Tuesday that his bank “nev- 
er willfully violated any banking 
laws.” Mr. Driscoll also insisted 
that he believed all the Bank of 
New England's employees were in- 
nocent and said that the bank 


would pay their legal expenses. All 
bank employees indicted still are 
working at die bank. 

The indicLment grows out of a 
major federal investigation in Bos- 
ton into how well banks in the 
region had complied with the cur- 
rency reporting law. Last February, 
the Bank of Boston pleaded guilty 
to failing to report $1.22 billion in 
international cash transfers, mostly 
with Swiss banks. 

A few days later, a former teller 
at a branch of the Bank of Boston 
disclosed that for yean the bank 
had accepted brown paper bags 
filled with cash from members of 
the Angiulo family, a group now on 
trial in federal court here for being 
the leaders of organized crime in 
the city. The Bank of Boston’s in- 
dictment has led to a series of dis- 
closures by other banks around the 
country about their own failure to 
comply with the currency reporting 
law. 

Mr. McDonough, who also was 
charged in Tuesday’s indictment, 
originally was convicted on loan- 
sharking charges in 1976 and 
served one year in prison, accord- 
ing to state law enforcement offi- 
cials.ln 1978, be also was convicted 
on gambling charges and received a 
suspended sentence, the sources 
said. 

Last April. Mr. McDonough and 
seven other people were indicted by 
a Suffolk County. Massachusetts, 
grand jury for reportedly operating 
a computerized bookmaking syndi- 
cate that look sports bets from all 
over the country. 

At the time, New man A. Flana- 
gan, the Suffolk County district at- 
torney, described Mr. McDooough 
as the “mastermind” of “the most 
da borate and technologically so- 
phisticated" bookmaking opera- 
tion ever uncovered in the Boston 
area and said he “laundered” his 


proceeds through an unnamed 
bank. 

Mr. McDonough, 51, was arrest- 
ed Tuesday at his home, Mr. Weld 
said. 

A bey issue in the case seemed to 
be how Mr. McDonough withdrew 
the cash from his account at the 
Bank of New England. Mr. Dris- 
coll said that Mr. McDonough had 
more than one account at the Pru- 
dential Center branch and would 
often take out amounts of just less 
than $10,000 from each of these 
accounts. 

Mr. Driscoll said that the banks' 
lawyers had examined these trans- 
actions and concluded that since 
they were not a single withdrawal 
of more than 510,000. they did not 
constitute a violation of the Law. 

“For seven months, we have 
looked at the same information the 
U.S. attorney has.” Mr. Driscoll 
said. “We are sympathetic with the 
US. attorney's attempt to enlist 
banks in fighting organized crime." 
But in this case, he said. “We think 
he’s wrong.” 

“In no case did we willfully dis- 
obey the law," Mr. Driscoll insist- 
ed. “We simply made a mistake.” 

The government has contended 
in previous cases that if a customer 
deposits or withdraws large 
amounts of money totaling more 
than 510,000 from the same branch 
in one day it constitutes one trans- 
action under the law and must be 
reported. 

The bank officer. Carol S. Co- 
hen, the former branch manager 
and now an assistant rice presi- 
dent, was only charged with one 
count of perjury for falsely telling 
the federal grand jury that she had 
not been reprimanded by senior 
bank officials for failing to file the 
Currency transaction reports. 


vSs irS ! Worldwide Transport & Energy 

m nt in irlitirinml IlK. - ^1- » 


Nedlloyd Group, Houtlaan 21, 301 6 DA Rotterdam. The Netherlands 
Telephone number: (01 0) 1 7791 1 . Telex number: 27087 ndgr nl 



Learn why 

now is the time 
to invest in 
technology shares 

worldwide. 


Sd/Tfech S.A. offers: investments in technology 
companies ; internationally diversified portfolio; 
professional management by three investment 
advisers, representing each of the regions in 
which the fund invests. 

Sd/Tech S. A. is managed by three of the 
world’s foremost investment advisory firms— 
Merrill Lynch Asset Management, Inc., Nomura 
Capital Management, Inc. and Lombard Odier 
International Portfolio Management, Ltd. The 
investment managers cover the US., Japan and 
Western Europe, respectively. They are assisted 
in the evaluation of new scientific directions by 
Sd/Tfeclis Scientific Advisory Council. The 
managers can commit portions of the fund’s 
assets wherever in the world they find the right 
mix of technological innovation and attractive 
investment climate. However, assets will be 
invested primarily in the U.S., Japan and Europe. 

Merrill Lynch believes the purchase of the 
Sd/Tech S.A. fund is an attractive opportunity 
for investors to anticipate potential growth of 
technology shares in a portfolio managed by 
well known international investment advisers. 
For more information and a prospectus, simply 
return the coupon or contact the Merrill Lynch 
office nearest you. 


STEBTA 1 




r~Mail to: Merrill Lynch Europe. 

I Kaye Wiltshire, 

68-70 Boulevard de la Pelrusse, 
L-2320 Luxembourg, 
i Telephone £52) 495156 


Please send me more information on Sci/Tech S.A. 
including a copy of the audited annual accounts at 
March 31, 1985 and a prospectus that contains charges, 
fees, and other expenses. I will read it carefully before 
I invest or send money. 


Address- 


Business Phone. 


j Home Phone f 

1 Merrill lynch customers, please give name and office address J 
of financial consultant I 

Lr==™-J 

Subscriptions are only valid il made on the basis uf I he fund's curreni pnwpei iu» aromi- 
panied by ils annual report Inr the period ended March 31.19*5 Thfwrnjieriai.scjr.iisi.i,* 
obtained al the iund's regrsrrred office. 2 Boulevard Royal. Luxembourg 
CI9H5 Merrill Lyncft. Pierce. Fenner & vnilh Inc Member SIPiV. 



Merrill Lynch 



wMAn 


Floalii^Rate Notes 


Dollar 


* fi 

I & 


4 Bfcl 

. Bfc) 

1 »1 


ga lists 

ga Inf w 

bm intn r*Mt4ri 


mm 


-rraa 


mm 




luu 


vrri¥n-M 




IP 


ULSL Futures 


Season 

Season 

Oct. 16 

Htgn 

LOW 

Open HMti Low Close Chg. 


imen iiidte 






as. 

Hteb 

LOW 


Open 

HfBtl 

Law 

Owe 

7+00 

575S 

JM 

am 

050 

6+70 

057 

+J0 

7X15 

55JB 

Aim 

6450 

6+80 

6+00 

6457 

+37 

EM. Sate* 


Pttev. Sates 3/43 




Prnv. Day Open mL 7/10 attics 





Non Dollar 




Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 

S/00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
i+tva it n Dee unvy 3/7*. 

3J4V9 1*7 Mar 3/9 114 

+02 W Mniffi X0SI+ 

X72Vs 163 Jul ZBZW 184 

in 2*7 Sea 

3J»VS 194* _Doe 2. MW 2.9S 
Esl. Sales Prw. Sales 1/61 

Prow. Dor Open Int. 24999 off 46 
CORN (CBTI 

1000 bu minimum- doitors per bushel 
IK 114W Dee lint 119* 

197 134W Mar 231* 123* 

191* 131 Mav 139 1 « 

1M 133 Jill X4I* 142Va 

170 2J4* Sod 132W U2W 

139W 270* .Dee 128 128W 

1/4* Sr 835 Mar 137* 237V, 

Cal. Sales Prow. Sates 21164 

Prev.DavOponini.125,112 wUtl 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

5/00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
+48 499* NOV 5.00 itJl 

479 111 JOn 114 114W 

7/2 122W Mar 124 537* 

735 531* May 537 137* 

U) 534* JUI S44 SA4W 

174 S3SW Auo Sfl 144 

13 532 sea 132* 134 

132 137 Nov 13195 132* . 

543 S40W Jan 

Ed. Sates Prev. sates 19399 

Prev. Day Open Int 49397 ue62 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 tons- dollars dot ten 
160.50 12230 Od 14150 14050 

18430 12140 Dec 14130 14150 

14330 12730 Jon 14150 14150 

20450 13030 Mar 14L2D U4J0 

14350 13150 Mav 14530 14150 

14730 13438 Jul 14430 14180 

14750 IJil Aua 14738 14730 


UZ 33514 +51* 
339 113* +32* 

US 354 +/B* 

2J0W 234* +JBD 
2505 +3BW 
BMW UM +51 


2.18W 2.15* 
231 W 231* ■ 
2J6W UM 
241* 24 1W 
131* 131* ■ 
237VJ zaw 
237* 237* 


4.97W 4.99* —33* 
211* 213* —33* 
X24VS 536* — 32* 
535 £34* — 37W 

542 5X3 —73 

54SW 542VS —33 

532* S33W —32 
£30 SJT* —31* 
S43W —51 


. _ Sep 14730 14730 

14830 14030 Oct 14630 14430 

14430 14230 Dee 14550 14550 

Esf. Sales Prev. Soles 10.146 

Prev.DavOren Int. 41,161 up 301 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

60000 u»- <M ion par 1 00 lbs. 

3037 19X5 Oct 19/5 19/5 

2955 19/0 Dec 1936 1950 

2937 I960 Jan 1957 1948 

2850 2030 Mar 1935 2036 

77.46 20.40 MOV 2037 26/5 

2535 2050 Ji/ 2CL75 2030 

25.15 2035 Auo 2055 2030 

2435 2035 Sep 2QJ5 2030 

2230 • 20.90 Oct 

2135 20-90 Dec 2030 2030 

Est. Sains Prew. Soles ixsio 

Prev. Oav Open Int. 44359 up 444 
OATS (CBT) 

5300 bu minimum- dot lars per bushel 
132W 1.17* Dec 7.16* 7.7 7Vi 

157* 1.24V; Mar 126 131* 

153 127VJ Mav 132* 132* 

137 124 Jul 132 132 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 1390 

prev. Day Open int. 3398 oft 26 


rf'r 




m 




Champion Posts Dedine 
In 3dhQoarter Income 

United Pros International 

STAMFORD, Connecticut — 
Champion International Corp. re- 


ter net income declined S.7 percent 
to $37.9 milli on, from $40 2 million 
for the third quarter of 1984. 

Sales were $1.3 billion, up 18 
percent from 51.1 billion a year 
earlier. Champion, a building ma- 
terials and paper products compa- 
ny, said the results reflected both 
the acquisition of St. Regis Corp. in 
late 1 984 and the subsequent di- 
vesting of numerous operations. 


13950 14030 —1.10 
146/0 14050 —150 
141/0 1036 — 150 
14110 14140 —1.10 
14450 14430 — JO 

14550 14630 
14630 14430 —150 
14630 14620 —30 

14630 14630 —50 

14550 14550 —50 


1930 1935 —.15 

1925 19/2 +31 

19/5 1952 +31 

1952 2038 
2020 20/2 —31 

2050 2L7S —37 

ni« 38 

2075 2B50 —35 

tom —55 

2070 2070 —20 


l.Utt 7.151* —22 
1341b 124* —31* 
120* 120* —31* 
130* 120* — 31W 


COFFEE C (NYCSCfi) 

37500 Jta-eBiBspwtb. 

150/0 1292S Dec 14250 W3/0 

14975 12050 Mar 145.10 74630 

74850 13130 May W62D 14730 

14830 13550 Jul MAS) 14735 

14750 13275 Sip 

14550 13830 Dec MUD MASS 

14530 14150 Mar 

Est. Sales 2324 Prev. Sates 144* 
Wren P ar o mui mt. 1A384 attar 
SUOABWORLD 11 tNYCSCE) 
1110NI&6.- rents per ml 

775 IDS Jan 530 £30 

933 134 Mar 169 574 

7J5 158 Mar 5*6 530 

A/9 379 Jul 637 

660 434 Sep +23 620 

635 432 Oct 631 636 

735 625 Jan __ 

7JBS 4/1 Mar ASS, *» 

Est. Sates Prey. Sates 9701 

Prwv.DaYOpeoML 72533 UP 503 

COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tens-Sperlw 

2337 1945 Dec 2M2 2164 

2392 1955 Mar 2230 2147 

2422 I960 May 2279 2290 

2429 1960 Jul Z313 2322 

IS tg §£ 

^!SSopa,.^ r 5sS? , Snif 4 

ORANGE JUICE cures) 

1 6300 Bn.- cents per Hi 
18130 11775 NN 119/0 11970 

78030 11475 Jan 11633 11+40 

17750 11275 Mar 11530 11520 

16350 11175 Mov 113.90 11430 

15750 111/0 Jul Ilia 11350 

70050 11150 Sep 

• Nov 

Jan 

BUS 15230 Mar 

Est. Sates UOO Prev. Sates 77B 

Prev. Doy Open Int 4387 up 74 


142/S 143.18 
144/0 45J0 

!S8 gS 

47Jj/ 

,4un as 


665 571 

620 SB 


A10 
6/5 AA5 


11830 11875 

ra'&S 

m 33 

1175 

1875 

10975 

10875 


Livestock 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Oct. 16, 1985 

Net asset value Quotations am supplied by the Fuads listed with tee exception of some quotes based an Issue pries. 

Tbe morainal symbols Indicate frequency of quotations supplied: (dJ - Oallr; Cerl- B— Mr/ Cbl-tW-monta/y, (r) - nrtta tarty,- ti) - (rreaetortr. 



CATTLE (CME) 







01003 itzs- cents oer lb. 






6+90 

5230 

Oct 

61/S 

+1/0 


61/S 

+40 

055 

55/0 

Dec 

6X12 

6X85 

63/7 

61 00 

+38 

0/S 

5435 

Feb 

41.15 

61.75 

61/5 

6130 

+33 

00 

5530 

Apr 

61.15 

6133 

61.15 

61/5 

+33 

6+25 

5+25 

Jun 

61/5 

4?nn 

6140 

tt net 

+30 

45.40 

5530 

§Sf 

5945 

60.10 

5945 

3932 

+.12 

60/0 

58.10 

5870 

5890 

580 

5875 

— zs 

Esl. Soles 


Prev. Sate* 17/21 




Prev. Day Open Ini. 52/95 off 730 




FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 





4+000 lbs.- cents per Ih. 





+38 

7252 

56/5 

Oct 

6445 

65/0 

6445 

6X20 

7130 

5810 

Nov 

6+85 

6+40 

+555 

6+27 

+35 

79/0 

6X50 

Jan 

6820 

6830 

S3 

6870 

+35 

71 3U 

60/2 

Mar 

6830 

6885 

6870 

+.» 

71 M 

60/0 

Apr 

67.90 

6825 

0/S 

6825 

+38 

70/0 

60.10 

May 

6+55 

6+70 

S3 

6+65 


6850 

+535 

Auo 

6750 

6750 

0/5 

+.15 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 1,121 




Prev.Dav Open Int. 9/58 up 54 





HOGS (CME) 







JQZQQ (bs.- cents p& (6. 






51.75 

3+45 

Oct 

4+75 

4745 

4+40 

4730 

+JD 

50-85 

3+35 

Dec 

4<«n 

4650 

4X80 

4642 

+0 

50-47 

3810 

Feb 

4+75 

+555 

4+75 

4547 

+35 

4735 

3+13 

Apr 

4057 

41/5 

4057 

4035 

+38 

49.05 

39/0 

Jun 

430 

4345 

«XM 

4X15 

+.W 

49/S 

40.45 

Jul 

44oa 

4435 

44/0 

4437 

+Z7 

5130 

4025 

Alta 

4X20 

4330 

S3 

4X37 

+.17 

41.10 

3807 

Oct 

ennn 

4812 

40.17 

31 

4950 

3837 

Dec 




4I3S 

Est. Safes 


Prev. Sales +698 




Prev. Dar opart Int. 30234 off 253 




PORK BELLIES (CME) 
38000 lbs.- cents per lb. 






7+20 

55.75 

Feb 

6522 

6630 

6X10 

6810 

+J3 

7+40 

S/5 

Mar 

+553 

6650 

6X25 

6+32 

+1/5 

75/0 

0/5 

May 

6+70 

0.10 

6+20 

030 

+ZS 


Currency Options 


OtL IS 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Optica A Strike 

Underlying Price Calls— Last Puts— Last 

New Feb Mar Nov Feb May 
I2JM British Pooedfccenfs per eniL 
B Pound 135 r » S 075 S e 

. 14138 145 130 S S 5/0 S t 

Mim 150 0 30 3 4 r S 1 

52-500 West German fcterks-esms per unit. 

- DMork 37 137 s s r s S 

3751 31 0.48 s i U ■ a 

UKnjom Japanese Yeo-lOOths of a end per bpIL 
JYen 45 r s s 030 5 S 

4637 47 054 s 1 r S S 

Dec Mar Jim Dec Mar Jun 
12500 Brttlsb Pouodvceaft per anil. 

B Pound 125 1635 r r r r r 

14138 130 1150 r r 0/5 r r 

14138 135 730 S/S r 155 435 r 

14130 1-J) 4.10 630 r 140 635 

141 3 145 LOS 430 r r r 

14131 150 035 255 r r r 

1413B 155 035 175 t r r 

nm C naoffl a n l Dol tar b fto per uelt. 

CDollr 72 1JS r r 030 r 

6230* West German Marto-ceate per anil. 

DMlorti 34 r r r 037 836 

37.51 36 r r r 039 r 

37J1 37 135 235 T 059 r 

3737 31 W 13 r 136 r 

37-51 39 0/7 r T r 235 

125/00 Praocb Prencs-lOibsof o cant par unit. 

FFranc 125 205 r r r r 

A2SO098 JatMN Y-o-TOOttis of a cent per unit. 

JYen « 635 r r r r 

4637 41 r 550 r r r 

4637 42 4/0 472 T r r 

4637 43 r 100 r r r 

6437 44 in. r r r r 

4637 45 177 2/4 r 031 r 

4437 46 136 1.96 r r r 

4637 41 0.46 1/4 r r r 

6 1 . 5 00 Swiss Froncs-cwm per uelt. 

SFronc 42 r . T T 812 t 

4573 4* 2/7 338 r r r 

4573 45 1.75 250 r 075 r 

4572 46 TJ1 205 • r r r 

4573 48 0 50 1 36 T r T 

Total con YOL 4338 Call open tat. 178488 

Total put voL 1.954 Put open hit. 13A41I 

r — Not traded, s — No option offered. 

Last Is premium (purchase price). 

Source; AP. 





Industrials 






US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- pti of 1 BO pet 
93.07 B577 Dec 9210 9215 

9271 B6Z0 Mar 92,49 9252 

9232 87 JTI Jun 92.13 9237 

92JJ1 8EJ10 Sep 9179 9179 

9178 09/5 DOC 9153 9153 

• *139 B9J8 Mar 9176 9176 

•1/3 9650 Jun 9895 *095 

Eat. Sales Prev. Sales - 8ZM 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 34709 up 565 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBTI 
SlOOOOOPlin- pts&3axtsof KMPCt 
B7-13 75-13 Dec 85-26 86-6 

86-2 75-14 Mar 84-26 85/ 

85-7 7+30 Jun 84-3 84-7 

9*3 »7 5cp 

83-11 804 Dec 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 4712 

Prev. DayOpen lot 69JB5 Sf H27 . 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) , 
lipct-sioo/oo-pts Aaands Of TOO Pd) „ 
78-13 57/ Dec 75-18 75-31 

77-2 9 57-2 A tor 7+14 74-25 


77-29 57-2 . 

76- 6 5+29 Jun 7M 73-22 

7531 5+29 Sep. 72-14 72-21 

7+34 5+25 Dec 71-16 71-24 

7+15 5+27 Mar 70-19 70-30 

7+26 63-12 Jun 70-2 70-6 

72-27 63-4 Sep 69-7 69-16 

72-y Ml Dec 

69-27 67 Mcf 

67-38 6+2S Jun 

Est Sales Prev. Sales 81539 
Pruv. Day Open Mt3f8WS on 1/08 
ONMA(CBT) 

IWO/OO prin-pt3&32ndsat ItOpct 

77- 10 5+4 Dec 77-11 77-29 

7+10 58-2T Mar 7+20 7+29 

75-21 5B3S Jun 76 76-9 


*279 9284 
9X47 9252 
92.12 *236 

*U9 ruts 

9150 9154 
*136 *138 
*895 run 


8544 864 
8+» 6J-4 
834* 8+6 
A3-11 
82-18 


75-17 75-38 
7+11 7644 
7W 73-21 
72-10 72-21 
7V14 n-M 
7B-79 7H8 
»-2? 7M 
6M 69-16 
0-20 
68-18 
0-26 


77-11 77-25 
7+12 7+28 
7+2) 7+4 


Stack Indexes 


(indexes annplted diprtty before market dam 
SP COMP. INDEX fCME) 
paints awl cents 

29085 17550 Dec M6J8 18810 18638 1035" 

20X75 18230 Mar 18830 1B9Z5 10/5 18930 

2DA50 18X90 Jun 189/8 19850 TBI35 19050 

19270 1030 Sep 1*200 1*230 19208 11200 

Est Sams Prwv. Safes SA24I 

P/«v. Day Oven Int. 59J03 up 831 - 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points 4* id rents ...... 

21735 18860 . DSC 19X63 19438 1921)0 1900 

299/0 19850 Mar 19X25 1*6/0 19430 196/0 

Est. Sate* Prev. Sotos A5B6 

Prev. Day Open hit, 8528 up 179 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFEI 

points and cents * 

TT730 10120 Doc 10X5 1088S WJB HB35 

11875 10550 Mar 109.15 109/5 10878 109/0 

12000 T0630 Jun " 10925 11053 109/5 11855 

10970 10810 SOP THUD 11030 11830 HOBO 

Est.Sata* Prev. Sates 11340 

Prev. Day Open lot. &60* affi/58 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Mootfy-s — : — muxt 
RbuIbts. ■■■ „ ■, 170X20 

DJ.Foturos. — - . . . NA 

Com. Research Bureau- . NA 
Moody’S : base 100 ; Dec. 31; 1931.' . 
p- preliminary; f -final 
Reuters j base 10(1 : Sep. IB, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31.1774, 


Market Gu 


Previous 
n*Mf . 
IJOOjOO . 
117X4 Y' 




New York Morcnnt 
Kansas atr Board 
Mew York fHituras 


DM- Deutsche Mark; BF - Belgium Francs; FL - Dutch Florin; LF - Luxembourg Francs; ECU • European Currency Unit; SF • Swiss Francs: a - asked; +- Offer Prh»s;b- Wd change 
P/V *10 to $1 Per unit; NA - Nal Available; NX. - NotCammunlcalediO - New; S • suspended; S/S - Stock Split; * ■ Ex-Dividend; *• • E*-Rts; *** - Grass Pertermonce Index July; • - 
Radempl- Price- Ex-Cauaon; - Formerly Worldwide Fund Ltd; @ - Offer Price did. 3% prelim, charge: ++ -dolly stock ertae as on Amsterdam Stack E* chance 


CAISSE NATIONALE DES AUTOROUTES 

US$ 30 MIO. 830% 1976/86 

Le (patritoie amortasemait au 15.1 1.1985, pour lequel une somme de 
USS 6 mio. est p revue, a fie effect ur par lirage au Mrt, le 04,10.85. 

[Vumeros des litres «oitis au tinge: 

1.001 a 2.000 

3.001 i 4,000 

11.001 a 12.000 

14.001 A 15.000 

laooi a 19.000 
2a001 a 29.000 

La o bligatio ns tiieee au sort ceeeeroot de porter imeret le 15 norembre 
1965 et Beronl remboureabiea au pair, coupons 15.11.1986 attaches. 

Monlaal restani cn circulation aprh I'anmrtiesemeui au 1S».1 1.1985- 
USS 6 mio. 

Numeros des litres lira prfeedenunent el non encore presenles au rembour- 
semefit 


Beahoiii we H i 15.11.I984-- N°* 21 a 22 indus 

131 

154 a 173 inclus 
176 a 180 inclus 
185 a 189 incite, 
550 a 554 inclus 
710 J 711 inclus 
717 a 719 inclus 
733 3 739 indus 

741 

759 a 760 indue 
9.049 A 9.051 indus 
9.086 i 9.098 inclus 

ubonreement au 15.1 1-1982 - N°* 8.681 a 8.684 inclus 

89901 8992 indus 
12.492 a 12.501 indiR 
_ 12.692 a 12.697 indus 

12.757 a 12.810 indus 
20299 a 20.306 indus 

L’ACENT FINANCIER 

CREDIT INDHSTRIEL D’ ALSACE ET DE LORRAINE 
Snctumle de Lusembourg. 


Remboareement au 15.1 1-1982 - N°* 


STITaii Wm B fSKHS S SI aiJCI » 


Societe d "Laves tissement a Capital Variable 
37, rue iNolre-Dame, Luxembourg 
R-C, Luxembourg B 22250 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

A dividend of US$0.02 per share will be paid on or after October 3U. 
1985 lo shareholders of reoml on October 17. 1985 a?aire-l rurrender 
of coupon No. I. 

Bv order <4 (he Board uf Directors 


London 

Commodities 


Oct 16 

Chao Prrriom 
Htol* Low BW Ask BM Ask 

SUGAR 

Storflog por nelrlc ton 
Dec 14X40 13X60 13SJ0 1)420 14330 144/0 

M or 151/0 14X00 143/0 UXH) TS1/0 T51/0 

May 154/0 14730 147/0 147/0 154/0 154/0 

Aug N.T. N.T. 1S2JX) I53JM 16Qjia 

Oct 164/0 164/0 15800 1CT/0 142/0 1030 

Volume; 2306 lots of SO tans. 

COCOA 

Sterling pot metric ton 
Dec 1JW WHO 1303 1.704 1,710 1312 

Mar 1,759 1.745 1352 1353 134B 1.750 

MOT 1300 137S 1.7TO 13/4 1370 1.780 

JIT 1/1* 1/00 t/05 1/08 1/03 1/04 

Sep 1/20 1/10 1/17 1/19 1/12 1/13 

Dec 1 1/05 1395 I ZOO 1/02 1/03 1/03 

Mar N.T. N T. 1Z0S U10 1/05 1/13 

Volume: 3J13 lots oi to ions 


COFFEE 

StarBng per metric ton 
Nor 1/77 1/51 1/57 

Jan 1314 1/90 1/98 

Mot 1343 1321 1.725 

MOV 1374 1338 1359 

JtV 1393 1359 1.770 

Sec 1/10 1375 13XJ 

NOV N.T. N.T. 1/15 


Gomnmlities 


Asirftfl 

Commodities 


Cidi Prices 


Hl—ii nv, -a, — , HONG-4CONG GOLD FUTURES 

SUGAR HW LOW BM Ask Oreo | uJJMTMBce 

French tnwes per metric ten 
Dec 1/09 1J8S 1391 1395 + 12 

Mar 1/25 1/05 1/05 1/10 +6 

MOV 1/60 - 1/60 1/36 1/45 +7 

Aug 1/94 1/85 1/75 1/90 +7 

Od 1/20 1/00 1/0S 1/15 +7 

Dec 1/60 JJ25 7-575 IMS +13 

EsL voL: 2300 lots at 90 tens. Prey, actual 
sates: 1.983 lots. Open interest: 2X156 


1/58 1/44 1/45 
1.700 1Z7B 1/80 
1329 1308 1.710 
1.710 1333 1335 
13BS 1350 1352 
1/11 1370 1374 
1/60 1370 1/20 


ftyrap Apart; 

Kjrdkfhank SA Luxembouipeoise. 
43. Boulevard Royal 
Luxembourg 


Fidelity 

.International. 


U.S. $100,000,000 
<!» National Westminster Bank PLC 
Floating Rate Capital Notes 1994 


In accordance with the provisions of ihe Notes, notice 
is hereby given that for the six months interest period 
from 16th October. 1985 to 16th April. 1986 the Notes 
will carry an Interest Rate of per annum. The 

interest payable on the relevant interest payment date. 
16th April, 1986 against Coupon No. 14 will be 
U.S. $43-29. 

By Morgan Guaranty' Trust Company of New York. London 
Agent Bank 


volume: 4318 tote of 5 tens. 

GASOIL 

U3. Poll art por metric ten 
NOV 299.00 255/0 2S635 2S6JD 25535 25+00 
DM 25+25 2S2.M 257-50 25235 25235 2S2/0 
Jan 25435 25U50 25035 251/0 25035 2S1Z0 
Fob 25X00 247-00 M7JXJ 747/0 74100 T<3_5D 
Mar 244/0 24135 239/0 240/0 2*300 24050 
API 237/0 231/0 73135 23135 23X50 233/0 
May 72B50 728/0 227/0 27850 230/0 231/0 
Jun 229/0 229/0 225/0 23+00 22+00 228-00 
JfV asm 275.50 225/0 22+50 22400 228/0 
Volume; 2/11 late of 100 Ions. 

Sources; Re ute rs ana London Pet r oleum £>■ 
cMwe toasolil. 


Ijondon Metals 


aeu Prertetrt 

Bid Aik BM Ask 

ALUMINUM 

Steel Ina Pte metric tan 

soar 68+00 <67/0 68+00 *87/0 

Forward 708/0 709JM 708410 709/0 

COPPER CATHODES (Hteb Grodo) 

Sterling per metric tan 

Seal 9+9/0 970/0 969/0 970/0 

Forwrd 99150 99X00 9*1/0 99100 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Starling per metric tan 

spot *48410 950/0 *48/0 9S0JH 

Forward 97SJB0 977.00 975/0 977/0 

LEAD 

Starting per metric ten 
seat 28 1 -SO 2B2/0 28150 28X00 

Forward 2BSZ0 28400 28550 78+00 

NICKEL . 

Stertlna per metric tan 

Seat XI 5. BO 3 02530 JO) 5 ft? JP2SOO 

Forward 3055.00 3065/0 305800 30454X1 

SILVER 


DMRtiures 
: Options 

(K Gwi»v4*>*-iaav gxmadtnr e 


ttrflu CaBipflaMte 


Oct l 

ffiili rniu 

Price Me 

Mar 

Jun 

Dec 

rwrami 

Mar ji 

* ij» 

249 

in 

0/1 

034 0J 

£ MA. 

132 

245 

042 

Lll U 

X 043 

140 

■Dr 

1.12 

1-3 13 

39 HA. 

1M 

147 

139 

2J4 X3 

40 815 

931 

1J7 


— N. 

41 80S 

UO 

00 

— 

— U 


Dhidends 


%£ 1SS !fcS M 

RSS 2 NOV_ 15X50 13+M T5435 1H-75 

RSS 3 Nov_ 15150 IBS 1035 

RSS4Nav_ 14750 14*A 14835 19875 

RSS 5 Wav _ U2S0 M4J0 14335 U5JS 

KUALA UIMPUR PALM OIL 


(iSulreasuries 


m 


soot 44X50 44350 44250 44350 

Forward 454/0 45+50 45450 45450 

tin (snnaardi 
Sterikis pa- m etric h» 

Spat 879000 880000 879800 880000 

Forward B6B5jn B6904H 54+5/0 869000 

ZINC 

Sterling per metric ten 

Scot 43+0! 438.00 43+00 43+00 

Source: AP. 


kL 

Q 

Z5» 

O 

AS 

§ 

.10 
79 V* 

Q .19 W 

Q 

M 

B 

33 

Q 

75 

Q 

34 

o 

45 

a 

35 

a 

49 

M 

.15 

e 

.11 

Q 

J7 

a 

79 

§ 

.19 

.10 

0 

Z5 

Q 

JM 

Q 

J28 



3 PtanfhMB 770 7.18 

Mtairtkba 734 731 

. 7AA 

771 

* ™ 

742 

1-ncrb« 745 7/2 

I 

'800 

772 

80 



Prey. 

■« after 

30- year bwid 10026^2 tam/a 

YteM 

1033 

View 

1X56 

Source: Salomon Brothers. 


MorrM Lench Trenrery index: 

CTmbim form* day: ++» 

Averpanyteld: 9.76 * 

12800 



Source: Merritt Lynch. 





















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 






S3 1334 SlrlExt. JB 1J 7 
lift M StorlSfl .1*4 21 23 

2ft \ft SinrtW 

7 3ft SvfflUE 

11 7 SunCtV 

21?* lift SunJr M 12 13 
3S'A 31V. SucrFU A4B 1J 15 
lft ft SuPCra 
1 3ft i SutflrtdJ J IJ 1 

lift lift 5uprSr .to 23 10 

*ft «w Susauen 7 

3ft 114 SwftEng 9 

38 19ft Swift HI ljn A9 as 

7 3ft Snioluy 

lift Aft SvtiEns .10 14 o 


M 22 13 
Mb 1J 15 

3 U 8 
2a to 


lift Mft— ft 
Bft 8H + ft 
3 2ft— ft 
4* 5 + ft 

8ft Btt — ft 
an* 3ift + ft 

33ft 34ft + ft 
1 1 

10ft 11 + ft 

15ft 16 — ft 
4ft 4ft 
lft tft— '4 
23ft 2414 + ft 
3ft 2ft 
7 7 -ft 


71ft 

7ft 

CD! 


B 

W 

71ft 

71ft 

21ft + ft 

17ft 

5ft 

CM! CO 


19 

1771 

IBft 

Ul 

H -ft 

2ft 

lft 

CMXOr 



9 


1ft 

1ft 

19ft 

14ft 

CRS 

J4 21 

11 

1 

15ft 

15ft 

15ft 

9ft 


CSS n 



6 


Bft 


MW 

V 



14 

19 


fft 

9ft 

UU, 

4ft 

frKrftA 


5 

19 


6ft 


Mft 

10ft 

coJte 

us mi 

9 

115 

17ft 

12ft- 

12ft + ft 


39ft 

31ft KnGipf 

450 122 


IBOz 37 

36 

37 +1ft 

4ft 

1ft KOPokC 


2 

173 

3ft 

3 

3ft + ft 
12ft— ft 

Uft 

10 Kavco 

20 15 

7 

1 

12ft 

12ft 

13 

117ft KayJn 

.20* IS 

9 

11 

lift 

lift 

lift + ft 

127 

9ft KearW 

M 12 

17 

10 

12ft 

12ft 

12ft— ft 

23ft 

14 Kilcftm 

.A5t 12 

IT 

134 

20 ft 

19ft 

20’A +1ft 

4ft 

2ft KOVCoB 

.151 4 J 

6 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft— ft 

4 

7ft KeyCoA 

-.15* 54 

18 

5 

3 

3 


12ft 

B KayPti 

JO 23 

15 

5«8 

Bft 

8ft 

Bft- ft 



9ft 3ft z/mer .051 47 4 3ft 3ft 




Industriekreditbank Reports 


Continued Success in 1984/85 


\,^ r 


, i* jjjfii 


■ c ft. 





Industriekreditbank (IKB), a unique West German commercial bank specializing in me- 
dium and long-term corporate lending, is pleased to report another successful business 
year in 1984/85. 

IKB's customer base ranges from smaller and medium-sized companies to large multi- 
national corporations. Refinancing rests on the solid foundation of its own medium and 
long-term bonds,- SD certificates (Schuldscheine), and borrowing from public sector 
institutions, insurance companies, and private investors. 

, Interest Income and Profit Up 

Net interest income increased by a favorable 4.6% to DM 205.8 million, with the oper- 
ating results also growing. After allowing for appropriate allocations to risk provisions 
and a DM 12 million transfer to the reserves - the same amount as in the previous 
year - net income again totalled DM 243 million. The dividend remained unchanged at 
DM 730 per DM. 5Q share. 

• Capital Base Remains Strong 

With paid-in capital at DM 162.0 million and reserves up 3.4% to DM 3663 million, net 
worth at fiscal year-end amounted to DM 5283 million - 3.66% of the balance sheet 
total (compared with 3.81% the previous year). : 

, Ongoing Solid Performance 

In an overall atmosphere of.general economic recovery in West Germany, 1KB was able 
to expand its market position substantially, with total loan commitments (including 
those of the wbolly-owned Luxembourg subsidiary, Industriebank International S.A.) 
growing by 27.7% to DM 3.4. billion. Long-term lending continued to be the main focus 
of activity, with loans maturing in 10 years or more accounting for a full 62% of new loans 
■extended -up from 52% the previous year: The balance sheet total increased by 6.6% to 
DM 14,4 billion. IKB continued to expand its interbank business, again increasing the 
number of international partners. 

^ Subsidiaries Report Continued Success 

The wholly-owned Euro-subsidiary in Luxembourg, Industriebank International S.A., 
again strengthened its market share, with operating results rising by 12%. Net profit was 
up from DM 1.6 million to DM 2 million, and was fully retained. The balance sheet total 
amounted to DM 1.1 billion at fiscal year-end. 

Despite the overall downward (rend in leasing, 1KB Leasing GmbH was nevertheless 
able to expand gross leasing income by 14_2% to DM 197 millioa 
IKB Consult GmbH continued to build up its position. Based on orders, we anticipate 
increased consulting volume for the current .fiscal year. 

Through IKB West Berlin office, we actively participate in special government programs 
promoting investment in Berlin where the Bank has strong links of long standing. The 
share of IKB’S overall business volume accounted for by this office is rising as the out- 
look for Berlin’s economy continues to look promising. 


Business Development 1949/50 - 1984/85 




W80 1*484 l*»85 


as of March 3 1 mpecutcl} 

-) increase parih resulting 
from merger wiift Deutsche Indusirrchnnk 


Summary Balance Sheet as of March 31, 1985*) 



Assets 

DM million 

Liabilities 

DM million 

>6 

Cash items and checks 

873 

Liabilities to banks 

4,852.7 


Claims on banks 

2345.6 

of which long-term . . . 

.... 3,688.6 


of which long-term 

925.1 

Liabilities to other creditors 

.. .. 2,416.5 

14 

Securities 

633.2 

of which long-term . . 

2,401.7 


Claims on customers 

11,001.8 

Bonds 

6.176.9 

I.* 

of which long-term — 

10374.5 

Provisions 

132.3 


Investments 

105.5 


162.0 


Own bonds 

42.1 

Capital reserves 

366.3 

II 

Other assets 

224.9 

Distributable profit 

24.3 




Other liabilities 

309.4 


Total assets 

• 14,440.4 

Total liabilities 

. . 14,440.4 


Endorsements. 
Guarantees. .. 


Summary Income Statement for 1984/85 


Expenses 


DM million Revenue 


DM million 


Interest and similar expenses ... . 927.0 Interest and similar revenue from 


Loan loss provision and write-offs 54.4 

Personnel expenses 56.9 

Other operating expenses 23.1 

Taxes 46.8 

Other expenses 8.6 

Net income 363 


lending and money market 

business 

Current income from securities, 
government-inscribed debt and 

investments ... 

Other revenue 


►/Our Annual Report with complete financial statements certified b.v outside auditors is available 
on request (write to: Industriekreditbank AG. P. O. Box 11 18, D-4000 Dusseldorf, West Germany). 
Complete financial statements are also published in the official Bundesanzeiger No. 198, issue 
October 22, 1985. 

Industriekreditbank AG 
Deutsche Industriebank 

a 

Committed to Enterprise 

Dusseldorf - Berlin - Frankfurt - Hamburg ■ Munich - Stuttgart 
In Luxembourg: Industriebank International S.A. 





























Page 14 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 


Dollar Strengthens on Commercial Demand 


The A floriated Press 

LONDON — The dollar rose 
a^aion afi major European curren- 
cies Wednesday in response to 
strong commercial demand and 
government figures on U.S. indus- 
trial production that were better 
than expected. 

. The dollar rose despite interven- 
tion by central banks, which have 
agreed to try to keep the dollar's 
value down to curb protectionist 
sentiment in the United States. 

The U.S. Federal Reserve Board 
said Wednesday that industrial 
production fell 0.1 percent in Sep- 
tember. Many currency dealers bad 
expected a decline of 0.2 percent. 
The Fed also revised August's fig- 
ures to show a 0.6-percem increase 
in output rather than the 03-per- 
cent increase originally reported 

Banking sources in Frankfurt 
said the West German central 


bank, the Bundesbank, sold about 
$130 milli on on the open market to 
stem the dollar’s rise. 

Other European central banks 
sold modest amounts of dollars, 
and the Fed sold an undisclosed 
number of dollars in Tokyo and 
then in New York, the sources said. 
Eariier, currency dealers reported 
that the Bank of Japan sold a small 
amount of dollars m Asia. 

“The demand for dollars just 
wouldn't go away,” a Frankfurt 
dealer “Eventually, the mar- 
ket decided that the dollar was go- 
ing to rise, regardless of what the 
central banks do." 

One dealer said the market was 
shrugging off feais of extensive and 
concerted intervention by central 
banks. 

Another dealer said, “A couple 
of hundred million dollars won't 
impress the market any longer. 


11 x 7 have to intervene at the tune 
of $3 billion to 54 billion if they 


really want to achieve anything” 
Market attention was focused oi 


France Shores 
Trade Deficit 
For September 


Textile Imports Are Continuing to Flood the U.S* Market 


(Cootinned from Page?) 

foreign," said Robert L. Thompson 


of Springs Industries in Fort Mill, 
South Carolina. 


Greater consumer awareness is Union would tike imported raw jobs directly affected, 
one of the goals of Crafted With materials to be su bstan tiall y re- Basically- the textile legbuuon. 
Pride in the U.SA Council Inchon duced, its members are opmms&c has not y* passed atm 

-1_ .L_. __ J .1 : .. .. limrfM) . . 1 1: material list- 


Market attention was focused on 
revised third-quarter figures for the 
U.S. gross national product due 
Thursday, the dealers said. Many 
dealers said they expected the 
growth rate to be revised to 3.7 
percent, up from last month’s 2.8- 
percent “flash” estimate. 

Anoiher Frankfurt dealer said: 
“If the GNP tomorrow meets ex- 
pectations. then we could see mas- 
sive intervention to knock the dol- 
lar down. If the numbers are as 
good as expectations, they'll have 
to do something or the dollar will 
takeoff.” 

In London, the pound dosed at 
SI .4085, down from $1,412 Tues- 
day. 

In Tokyo, the dollar closed at 
216.40, up from 215.90. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Chrysler Issue Offers 'Multiplier’ Formula 


Reuters 

PARIS — France's seasonal- 

S r adjusted September trade 
efidt was 2.62 billion francs 
(S322.7 mQtion), a sharp deteri- 
oration from August when 
there was a 4- million -franc sur- 
plus, the Trade Ministry an- 
nounced Wednesday. 

Unadjusted, the deficit was 
3.68 billion francs after a 177- 
million surplus in August. 

Adjusted, imports in Septem- 
ber totaled 7933-biltion francs 
compared with 74.92 bOGon in i 
August, while exports were 
76.72 billion after 7432 billion 
a month earlier. 

The September figure 
brought the adjusted trade defi- 
cit through the first nine 
months of 1985 to 20.85 billion 
francs, versus a revised 1984 
nine-month figure estimated at 
19.1 billion francs. 

The ministry revised the 
method for calcuiari-ng trade 
balance this year, making com- 
parisons with 1 984 misleading. 


South Carolina. 

Consumers have long been 
aware that much of their garments 
came from overseas. But now, be- 
cause of legislation enacted last 
year, they can find the o rigin of the 


textile k 
the Boh 


been the principal retail spokesman tenrational trade director of the 


for the campaign. 

Organized labor has 


union, said. 


Qrvvnoses to maxc lu* — - -- - 

SSswasasa 


raw materials on a garment's labeL pla in ed that mucb itupuneo miuo- continue io oc an ”■« >*»• bin m"— rr— — • „ limits 

Clothing that carries the Made-in- rial could be domestically pro- n pi «™, be said, because “nwanbere lation would imtrarequoia^ 
U-S.A. label must be manufactured duced. While the Amalgamated feel very strongly against tins prac- on certain natural “Ucts, sum 


has long com- Imports of raw ma te ri al s will Hong Kong. 
imported male- continue to be an issue with the and Taiwan. In aomum. 


only with U.S. raw materials. 


Clothing and Textiles Workers tire.” 


against this prac- on certain natural fibers, 
“They see their raw ramie and tinea. 


Britain 


Hawker Slddeley Group 
is* Half IMS im« 

Revenu* 777JOO 7460 

Prefer* Net— 71 8 65.1 

Par Stare MM 0.177 


Company Results 


4M.V sou 
ix* 0 x 0 

OS7 037 


m 


United States 
Alexander & Baldwin 
3rd Boar. IMS 19M 


Revenue and profits or losses, In mHlkms, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


Net lac. 

Par Short — 


143ft 1.14ft 

35 35 


Revenue 131.4 1355 

Net Inc. 2U 207 

Per Stare 1.15 107 

9 Months 1785 1*M 

Revenue 3758 15JJ 

Hef Inc. 643 503 

Per Stare 146 271 


Ccmfl Illinois 
am poor. i«as 

Met Inc. 3&| 


* Moettn 

1985 

IfM 

9 Months 

1919 

19M 

1984 Revenue — 

34NL 

am 

Revenue — 

1X70. 

1400. 

_ Not Inc 

27SX 

229.5 

Net inc 

1063 

1074 

Per Stare— 

3X4 

240 

Per Stare— 

£11 

£85 


» Mouths 

Net me - 


Hunt! ns Ion Bcuresbonn MCI ConranmJcntloiM 


AT&T 

Haw. IMS 1984 


1994 results not omsMdMk. 


Revenue tm 4010. 

Net Inc. W 3178 

Per Stare 0X3 US 

9 Mouths 1985 1984 

Revenue 25790. 34780. 

Net inc. 1.17ft 180ft 

Per Shore 186 081 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — The Eurobond 
market saw yet another novel issue 
Wednesday, a dollar straight for 
Chrysler Financial Corp. that was 
issued luting the “multipliex" for- 
mula, dealers said. 

The SlOO-million bond issue 
pays 10% percent a year over seven 
years and was priced at par. In the 
first five years, the investor may 
elect to receive interest payments in 
new bonds mcirwrf of cash. The 
new bonds will rank equally with 
the existing issue. 

Dealers said this “multiplier” 
formula has been used with issues 
in the United States before, but this 
is the first time that such a bond 
has been issued in the Eurobond 
market 

The lead manager for the issue 
was Swiss Bank Corp. Internation- 
al. It ended on the mark et outside 
its total 1% percent fees at a dis- 
count of about lYt bid. Dealers said 
that at the time of issue, the bond 
yielded, on a straight-line baas, 
about 71 basis points over equiva- 
lent U.S. Treasury bills. One trader 
said, “without the multiplier for- 


mula, Chrysler would normally ex- 
pect to pay at least 100 basis points 
over Treasuries to get a successful 
issue." 


In the secondary dollar-straight 
market, prices edged ahead by K or 
Yt point in moderate trading, al- 
though dealers said that retail ac- 
counts were still sidelined. 


General Motors Acceptance 
Corp. issued S250 million in 


straight bonds paying 10% percent 
a year over seven years and priced 


a year over seven years and priced 
at 9W4. The lead manager was 
Morgan Stanley International and 
the issue ended at a discount of 1%, 
compared with total fees of 1 % per- 
cent. 

The floating-rate- note sector saw 
a SlOO-million collateralized issue 
for the Arizona-based unit of Brit- 
ain's Heron Corp.. Pima Savings & 
Loan Association. It pays 5/16 
point over the three-month London 
interbank offered rate and is sub- 
ject 10 a maximum coupon of 1316 
percent after the first three years of 
its 10-year life. 

Dealers said that trading was nol 
particularly active in the notes. The 
issue was led by Salomon Brothers 
International, which quoted the is- 


sue within its total fees of 45 basis 
points at a discount of about 37 
basis points. 

In the secondary market, trading 
tended to be centered on a few 
selected issues, dealers said. Period 
Eurodollar deposit rates ended un- 
changed from Tuesday's closing 
levels after a quiet session. 

In other sectors, Nikko Securi- 
ties Co. (Europe) Ltd. lead-man- 
aged a 70-tniUion-Canadiaii-doIlar 
bond issue for Jaccs Co., the Japa- 
nese consumer-credit company. It 
pays 10tt percent a year over five 
years and was priced at 101ft. The 
lead manager quoted the issue at a 
discount of 116. compared with its 
total fees of 1% percent. 

The expected 100 million Euro- 
pean currency units of 10-year 
bonds for Centrale N ucleaire Euro- 
peene & Neutrons Rapides SA 
emerged with a 9-percent coupon. 
The lead manager was Society Gen- 
erale and the issue finished at a 
discount of 1%, compared with the 
total fees of 2 percent. 

In the Japanese convertible sec- 
tor, dealers said that the recent 
switch by investors out of domes- 
tics and into blue-chip issues con- 
tinued Wednesday. 


High Tech 
Still Appeals 


Bankers Trust N.Y. 
3rd Qaar. 1985 1984 

Nat liM. 757 778 

Par Stare — 275 246 

9 Months 1985 17M 

Net inc. 7740 2258 

Par Stare — 083 788 

ItBSouartornctlndudes eatn 
of S1U mutton 


cpc mri 

3rd Qaar. ms ifM 

Revenue 1850. 1.12ft 

Oper Net 497 521 

Opot Share— 183 187 

t Month* 1785 1984 

Revenue 213ft 387ft 

oper Nat „ 1254 13*7 

Oper Stare- 258 284 

IW nets exclude charge of 

saSJmnaon 



1905 

IfM 


1985 

1*M 

Net Income _ 

138 

118 


669X 

476X 

Per Shore — 

046 

041 


303 



1985 

1904 

Per Share 

ftU 

0X3 

Net Income - 

3X3 

314 


1980 

19M 

Per Stare — 

149 


Revenue — 

142ft 

144ft 

Per share results adjusted 
tar Mv-I milt In July. 

Net inc 

Par Stare— 

049 

0X0 


Nortnam Trust 
MOW. 19*5 198* 

Nat Inc. __ 102 SJ7 

Par Stare 187 08* 

7 Month* ms 19M 

Nat Inc 221 1*8 

Par Share 488 3.12 


PdDlSVC 

drdOoor. 


Nat inc 

Par Star* — 
* Months 


a i sa 

lot 18« 


Par Stare — 


UHL 218ft 
«CI5 371M 
215 222 


Raoablfc 


Dun & Bradsfreet 
Manor. 1989 198* 


(Continued from Page 9) 
improve production efficiencies, 
and we expect that demand for 
Ask’s systems will improve as the 
manufacturing sector picks up 
steam,” Mr. Howe said. “For fiscal 
1986 ended June 30, earnings 
should parallel the 1985 fiscal year 
of 65 cents a share, with 1987 earn- 
ings climbing to the Sl-a-share 
rangp.” 

On the speculative side, Mr. 
Howe finds International Mobile 
Machines attractive in the long 
term. “It has a very advanced digi- 
tal wireless telephone technology, 
which is generations beyond most 
present technology,” he said. 

International Mobile is moving 
from a development stage to being 
a supplier of an advanced wireless 
system called the Ultrapbone, 
which is bong evaluated by several 
of the independent telephone and 
Bell regjonals, Mr. Howe added. 


BdlMUtll 

M Quor. 1985 198* 


Rnotin 270ft 2400. 

Net Inc 3864 3268 

Par Shore 188 1.11 

f Month* 198S 1984 

Revenue 78HL 7800. 

Nat InC — MOO. 8M4 

PM- Stare 380 386 


Revenue 6747 «»4 

Net Inc - 77.1 678 

Par Stare 181 080 

7 Madia 1985 198* 

Revenue 1.960. 1 73ft 

Opot Nat 2224 1HL1 

oper Stare— 2.92 280 

1*84 9-montti net excludes 
gains Of SMBS million 


Ethyl 

MQaar. 1989 1984 


Champion inn 
3rd Quar. 1989 19M 

Revenue 1830. 1.130. 

Net Inc 3784 4082 

Par Shore — 037 046 

9 Months 1989 19M 

Revenue *SKL X43U. 

Nat Inc 125J04 10941 

Per Stare 182 178 

Per stare resum after pre- 
ferred aMOontts. 


Net Inc 35.1 338 

Per stare 095 083- 

9 Months 1985 198* 

Revenue 1.17ft 1890. 

Net Inc 798 937 

Per Share . 189 1.19 

IMS t-maoth net Includes 
charge of 52V mutton. 


' Kaiser Aluminum 
Manor., 1989 198* 

Revenue 5264 M&» 

Oper Lass — 148 107 

f Months 1989 198* 

Revenue 182ft i860. 

Oper Net (01434 409 

Oper Stars — 093 

a: lass. !9tS nets exclude 
tosses of XL3 mUHoa ta Quar- 
tet and of ssls million to t 
months from discontin u ed 
operations. 

Kopoers 

HOW. 1989 1984 

Revenue 5124 w 

Oper Net — iu 248 
Oper Shor«_ 066 . US 
* Months 1985 198* 

Revenue • 1750. 1730. 

Oper Net 117 283 

Oper Stare— 041 aw 
Nets exclude oain of 33 amts 
a stare » has of 7 cants to 
auarten ana toes of 39 cents 
us gain of 11 cents In 9 
months. MiPmanthnot ot oe 
exdudes toss of J3C2 mUIfba. 


TOSS nets kKdudm goto of SS&3 
mutton. 


Revenue IJJft 8MX 

Net Inc 474 414 

Par Stare 103 090 

9 Months ,1* 1J8* 

Revenue 153ft 20ft 

Nal Inc 1812 imj 

Par Stare 4X0 £41 


Nat lac 

Par Stare — 
9 Months 
Marine 


New York 
1903 IfM 

ft ft 

VS MX 

48* <17 


Rohm A Haas 


Merck 

WdCherr. 1905. 

19M 

OMo Edison 


3rd Quar. 
Revenue 




3rd Qaar. 

IM 

IVM 



1361 

1289 

Revenue 





191 

146 

Noting 






1904 




Revenue 




12 Means - 





4065 

3774 

Stewsnue — 

172ft 


POT Share — 

Per Stare 

S46 

5.13 

Per Share— 

243 

286. 

Scott 


474.1 4844 

344 384 


uS VSx 


Msrsai CJJ»J 
MOaar. 1989 198* 

Nal Inc 3094 1204 

Per Stare 2X1 1X5 

9 Month* 1989 198* 

Nat Inc 5314 378.1 

Par Share 9X1 4.17 

mSnattlnctudeoalnafSKA 

ntUUan 


PacMc Uabtlns 


Revenue UtUL 1,13ft 

Nat Inc 021 (a)lt-O 

Per Shore 0X1 — 


SS‘_ i5S5 £3 
ft ft 


Mertae TMofeof 
Mar. 1984 1915 


f Maaths IMS PM 

Revenue 149ft 243ft 

Nat Inc — 943 MX 

Par Stare 240 243 

a: lass. 


9 Months ™ 

no v m ue — 372SL iwn. 

Not inc W1-S 13T1 

Per Stare — 381 2X1 


Grace (W.RJ 
3rd Qaar. 1985 198* 

Revenue 173ft 1490 l 

Net Inc 24*4 3492 

Per Stare — 847 067 

9 Months 1985 19S4 

Revenue 585ft 4.99ft 

Net Inc 102.16 14196 

Per Stare 196 273 


Cbesebrough Pond’s JfM xatn 1985 iff* 

3rd Quor. 1985 1984 Revenue 5850. 4.99ft 

Revenue 7460 4104 Net Inc 102.16 14196 

Oper Not 2147 3190 Per Stare 196 273 

Oper Stare— 042 092 

» Months 1985 1984 Honeywell 

Revenue— sain, l.llft m n_ imj imi 

OPOT Stare- 173 171 ^ 557 9X3 

Pw shorv IJM ]^py 

Chicago A Ntti Western 9 u»b. i*m 

3rd Qaar. 1985 198* Revenue cm 4J2ft 

Revenue 2239 2214 Net Inc 1544 2078 

Net inc 5X0 1740 Par Share 138 442 


Ubbey-Owens Ford 
M Qaar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 479 8 4229 

Net Inc 147 UX 

Per Stare — 1X6 182 

9 Meath* ms IfM 

Revenue 1.41ft 1X30. 

N«t Ita 55l5 5X5 

Par Stare — 481 4J7 

mu nets hiduefe goto of SLS 
million. 


Nat Inc — 3475 3SX 
Per Stare — 073 041 
TVB4 net todudes gate ofSLS 
million from dtscoofimmd op- 
o rations. 


. PepsiCo 

JrdQnar. 1985 IfM 

Revenue 2X7ft UHL 

Oper Net m3 1114 

Oper Stare- US L17 


Security Pacific 
3rd Soar. 1*8* «** 

Mat Inc MX 

Per Shore 1.1* UB 

9 Mentha MS IfM 

Hot Inc 236? 21 13 

POT Shore — 382 2X7 

par stare resum odlwstod 
tortHbr-tsominJOn 


Chicago A 
3rd Qaar. 
Revenue — 

Net Inc 

Per Shore 

f Months 
Ravenna ■ ■ - 

Net Inc 

per Stare — 
a: tare 


Ntti Western 
1985 IfM 
2239 221.0 

S.3® 17M 

0X3 1X9 

1985 19M 

6705 6769 

(a] 5X8 30X5 

— 1.90 


Lukens 

3rd Quar. 1989 

Revenue 1094 

Nat Income- 1X7 

Par Share 087 

9 Months 1985 

Revenue 321X 

Net Income . 2X8 

Per Stare— 040 


NaHoaal Gypsum 
Manor. 1*85 IfM 

Revenue 4660 44 9X 

Net Inc — 311 218 

Per Share 193 181 

9 Months 1985 IfM 

Revenue 777ft 171ft 

Net Inc - 966 814 

Per Stare 4.16 34f 

Per ohara results odtasfed 
for 3-for-2 split. 


Oper Net 315.1 1094 

Ooer Share— 134 £00 

TPM NmNA oat Includes 
ebarve of 3X2 mtt/ion. 


SlKrwio-WUllanis 


Pfbsr 

MOW. im 1906 

Revenue TXtft *844 

Net Inc — 1559 1219 

F ■or Stare 092 . oxo 

f Mantta IMS IfM 

Rnem 2970 l £900. 

Nat Inc 4404 3417 

Per Share 241 220 

Rasidts restated. 


Net inc 29.1 2SJ 

Par Share 18* 1.11 

9 Mounts IMS IfM 

Revanue utft >X7ft 

Net IOC 613 359 

Par Stare 239 £43 


SmHhCA8>J 


MQuar. 

Revenue - 
Oper Net . 


Hospital Cp America 
3rd a mb’. 1985 IfM 

Revenue ITSO. 1X00. 

Net Inc 765 69.1 

Par Share 0X6 078 


McGraw-Hill 


f Months 
Revenue . 


Revanue— 3899 

Nat inc 434 

Par Share 0X6 


1985 

1984 

PPG Industries 

717 

663 

3rd Qaar. 

IMS 

HM 

072 

045 

Revenue 

1X90. 

1X40 



Net Inc 

73# 

747 



Par Stare 

U1 

uo 

IMA 

TM.1 

* Months 

UK 


1X2 

17* 

Revanue 

£350. 

379ft 


3 fhf nets exclude gala ofSXJ 
rnttUon. 


Nat Inc • 3437 23*9 

Par Stare — 3X4 


Revenue 204* 1178 

Oper Net — 292 181 

Oper Share— 031 0.17 

tMeolhi ' 1*05 IMS 
Revenue— .6827 6744 

Oner Net — 28 S 2ZX9 

Opot Shorn— 248 3X8 

Nets exclude gain of 
J399XH0 US lata arsi 1 ntHBan 
In auaiarond gain of SO mff- 
Boa vs loasotSta/mgaon to# 
months from tOacottflnuad 
up m uttu i t s . - - 




























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 



U.S> Official Says Japan 


By John Burgess “ Until last spring, telephone 

ati C A«27w,2?‘? adei,e * oti ' ( ¥ Is , lattr d«ctered that most tecfc- 

ator aiar^l Wednesday that Ja- meal bansew to satesbadbeen re- 




moon g larger sales of foreign racfio 
equipment m Japan. ■ ■ 

^“They ftmkttjjogs are fine just 

SPtS are ^ ■»- John J. 

Jr, group vice presi- 
dent erf the Washington- based 
EJeciromc Industries Associa tion 
ana an adviser to a UJS. delegation 
that completed two days ofdSEs- 
sons here on Tuesday. 

■ , The U-& Congress is co nsideftfio 
ft legislation that would limit Jap£ 
nese wlecommunkaiions sates in 
the United States unless Japan is 
perceived to have as open a market 
as the United States. 

Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka- 
^ W 5006 a PP eart to he especially can- 
cemed that Japan create an imngft 
Gf good-faith negotiating as he pre- 
pares to leave later this month for a 
visit toNewYodc and Washington. 

A semor official at Japan’s Min- 
istry of Posts and T rJgr r YrriTTTr i ^r'ft . 
tions Wednesday night f»W. “W e 
have only just arrived at specific 
talking points; tins is just the start- 
ing position." 

Mr. McDonnell and another 
American involved in the talks, 
which have gone through four ses- 
sons since June, cnnunH that 210 
/J/Vj T h significant progress has been made. 

lb. The Japanese official declined to 
discuss specifics of Tuesday’s talks,, 
but he said that his side proposed 
h?.] that Japan would accept UjLtest 
:> - data if h had been verified by the 
U.S. Federal Commnni cations 
ii ii5jj. Commission. 

Mr. McDonnell said this idea 
S 3 ;' was the .only significant offering 
from Japan in two dmrs of discus- 
t sions. He called it “ahnost insult- 
^ • mg,” saying that the FCC does not 
have the capability to provide such 
verification. 


similar concessions with radio 
equipment; in which they fed U.S. 
manufacturers are particularly 
competitive. 

At issue this week were not con- 
sumer hems sodj as ttanastorradi- 
os but advanced telecommunica- 
tions gear in vriach the U.S. is often 
far ahead of Japan in commensal' 
application — car telephones, 
pocket pagen and radio-based data 
transmitters, for example. 

Mr. McDonnell estimated die 
market here for mobile equipment 
. could eventually grow from the 
current $500 arilHon. or so a yeario 
about $2 billion if die government 
would loosen regulations iind ap- 
prove new types of equipment for 
sale. He sakTU-S. companies might 
get 20 percent of those satesi. 

The UJS. complains that a wide 
variety of equipment that Japanese, 
companies now sdl in the United 
States — pocket pagers that display 
lengthy messages rather than just 
beep, for instance — cannot be sold 
in Japan became monopoly com- 
panies ft nd % government have 
not approved diem. • 

In the talks this week, U.S. nego- 
tiators argued for an H-poistplan .. 
that provides for radial changes in 
regulations that govern radio- r 


of radio frequencies. 

theUmtri^tates wants toshnjtffy 
standards and. scrap Tides 
which Japanese ofnri«l< must in- 
spect inmvidnal pieces of equip' 
menu Companies should be able to 
certify that they are meeting the 
standards, the Americans contend. 


Economic Talks 
BetweenEC \ 
ASEAN Opening 

Rnaen 

BANGKOK —The Europe- 
an Community and the Associ- 
ation of Southeast Asian Na- 
tions begin talks Thursday 
foensed on expanded economic 
cooperation. 

ASEAN is seeking preferen- 
tial treatment for exports 10 Eu- 
rope, while the EC is Looking 
for new investment opportuni- 
ties in Southeast Asia, confer- 
ence sources said. 

One ASEAN source said nei- 
ther group expects any major 
agreement and there probably 
will not be a communique. 

. EC figures show trade with 
ASEAN nations grew 60 per- 
cent between 1980 and 1984 to 
reach S16J2 billion last year. 
The EC posted a SI 87-million 


Sources said both groups will 
reaffirm support for extending 
the muliifiber arrangement, 
which expires in July. 

ASEAN is expected to renew 
its call for access to the Europe- 
an Investment Bank and press 
for more privileges for com- 
modities under the ECs system. 

Other topics include trade 
protectionism, international 
debt, investments, commod- 
ities, technology transfers and 
the promotion of tourism and 
control of drug trafficking. 


ransit Companies Battle for Slice of $ 




m/ssifiirtmiuni 


Pie 


Bv Kyle Jaraurd 

InienoMwI Herald Tribune 

DALLAS — Two years after 
Dallas citizens declared indepen- 
dence from ibe tyranny of traffic 
jams by voting to raise taxes for 
mass transit, internationally known 
transit companies are now compet- 
ing for a slice of the action. The 
city's planned SlOJ-biSion mass 
transit project is one of the largest 
public works undertakings in the 
United States, and will be built 
with almost no federal money. 

As the 26-year project gets under 
way, manufacturers vying to sup- 
ply rail cars for the Dallas system 
include Alsthoro-Atiaatique SA 
and the Francorail consortium of 
France, Duewag AG of West Ger- 
many, and Tokyo Car Coip„ Ka- 
wasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. and 
Hitachi Ltd. of Japan, officials at 
the Dallas Area Rapid Transit 
(DART) said. Contract bidding is 
now in process. 

“We’re seeing a lot of interna- 
tional involvement. There will be 
stiff competition among the com- 
panies." said Stewart M. Scott, 53, 
bead of planning, development and 
; design for D.ARTs rail system. A 
contract for the first 100 or 318 
vehicles, estimated to cost 5700,000 
to 5900,000 each, will be awarded 
within a year. Total cost for the rail 
system is set at 53.86 billion. 

This is Mr. Scott's third major 
mass-transit project. He was depu- 
ty project director for ibe 53-bi2Uon 
transit. system in Hong Kong and, 
more recently, director of Singa- 
pore’s 52.5-bilfion project. 


"I think it's a very exciting pros- 
pect to build a transit system in 
America," Mr. Scott said “Ameri- 
ca is a big new challenge. And Dal- 
las is an exciting place where peo- 
ple are enthusiastic about 
everything.” 

Although the Dallas rail system 
will Cover an area of some 900 
square miles (2330 square kilome- 
ters), Mr. ScoU said laying rails 
here wifi be easier than in the more 
densely populated and smaiW ur- 
ban centers of the Far East. 

DART also has selected a less 
expensive and easier- to-insiall 
light-rail system powered through 
wires above the cars, instead of a 
heavy-rail system in which the cars 
are driven through a third rail in 
the tracks. Tunneling will be limit- 
ed to a few downtown sections and 
under a major freeway in the north- 
ern suburbs. The rest of die track 
will be on or above the ground. 

DART'S rail engineers are Par- 
sons, Brinckerhoff, Quade & 
Douglas, Inc. and DeLeuw, Gather 
& Co., both major U A rail consult- 
ing firms. 

Dallas may be setting a trend for 
the future of mass transit in the 
United States, DART officials 
said. No other modem American 
rity has ever built a mass-transit 
system without 80-percent financ- 
ing from the federal government. 
Tax revenue and fares will pay for 
more than 95 percent of the project. 
The federal government will fond 5 
percent. 

The lack of federal money is ac- 
tually a hdp, Mr. Scott said. 


“By separating ourselves from a 
source of funds that can be cut off 
very quickly, we can afford to plan 
ihe system over a longer period," 
Because federal money is allotted 
in batches, planning often suffers, 
he added, with lines bring built one 
at a time “that don't go anywhere," 
and fall short of public "expecta- 
tions. 

By taking out loans against an- 
ticipated tax revenues, DART will 
be able to build the rail lines con- 
currently and integrate them more 
efficiently. 

The turn to mass transit is a 
major leap for Dallas residents, 
who always thought that they could 
live with awesome traffic. When a 
transit proposal was put to the bal- 
lot in 1980 it failed 2 to 1, and few 
were surprised 

“My car. my gun. my horse" 
were the city’s bywords. 

But old Dallas has been 
swamped with newcomers. In their 
search for upward mobility, they 
discovered that lateral mobility 
means a daily battle on the free- 
ways. Because many of them come 
from parts of the country that have 
mass transit, they welcome some- 
thing more than cars or a few bat- 
tered buses. 

Moves toward mass transit be- 
gan three years ago, when rity lead- 
ers formed a transit agency and 
launched a drive to sell voters on a 
solution. The agency held some 100 
public meetings, gathered more 
than 700 businesses to participate 
in a community education cam- 
paign and mailed out more than a 


million brochures explaining op- 
tions for a transit system. 

Not only did the agency find that 
the people wanted mass transit, but 
that they were ready to pay for it 
out of their own pockets. When a 
referendum was called in 1983, the 
citizens of Dallas and 13 suburbs 
passed a one-cent sales tax hike on 
themselves. 

Nearly 60 percent of the voters 
favored an expansion of the bus 
system, construction of an right- 
mile ( 12 . 8 -kiIometer) subway 
downtown and 147 miles of above- 
ground commuter rati. Two more 
suburbs recently voted to join 
DART. 

“Because of the population 
growth in Dallas and in the north- 
ern suburbs, we knew we were go- 
ing to have serious difficulties with 
traffic problems,” said AdJene 
Harrison, DART'S chairman. 
"And we knew that the Reagan 
administration was not going to be 
giving much money for rati. Had 
we planned a system using federal 
funds, there would have been no 
way to get it off the ground.” 

Mrs. Harrison, former mayor 
pro tem and regional director of the 
Environmental Protection Agency, 
said the public had a big hand in 
getting the project started. “We 
spent over a year going to meetings. 
We sat and talked to people and 
asked them what they wanted,” she 
said. Based on such meetings, 
DART will design the system 
through consensus. 

Inspired by a what some cal] no- 
blesse oblige, important savings are 


foreseen as Dallas developers do- 
nate property for rail right-of-way 
and propose joint development on 
some of the 83 stations planned. 
Major Dallas-based companies in- 
clude Southland Corp^ Trammel] . 
Crow Cb, Diamond Shamrock 
Corp., Caltex Petroleum Corp_ 
Hunt Oil Co- Texas Instruments 
Inc. and American Airlines. 

The developers enviflon rail fines 
that service their commercial and 
residential centers. 

Further savings are expected to 
result from a European-type honor' 
system in fare collection. Riders 
will buy tickets from machines, 
thus eliminating ticket agents, vid- 
eo surveillance and barriers. 

When the system is completed in 
2010 , it will be toe second biggest in 
the United States — after New 
York's 230-miJe subway — and is 
expected to carry half a million 
riders daily. The Dallas-area popu- 
lation is projected to grow from 1.4 
million today to 25 million by 
2010. 

While enthusiasm for the project . 
has now outpaced opposition, there 
was some initial dissent from fiscal 
conservatives who opposed the tax 
increase and said that mass tran- 
sit's popularity was largely hype 
generated by the transit agency". 

DART pinned those complaints 
on “people opposed to taxes peri- 
od." Said Mre. Harrison: “One of 
the antagonists is a million- 
aire. 1 said to him, ‘You don't care 
what it is, you just don't believe in 
taxes.' And he said, ‘Yes, ma'am.' ” 


Trendy U.S. Parents 
like Japanese Strollers 





: By Susan Grira 

V« York Tima Service 

'f*- OSAKA, Japan — A small Japa- 

• . id? nese company has come up with a 

, product that perfectly suits the 

temper of the rtm« and a new 
. dd‘J group of eager, anxious and affin- 
’ ” ’= ■ ent parents: an upscale baby stroll- 

- - ~ : e er. 

- -' r — ,r - The strollers, made by Aprica 

’*-•?- Kassai Inc^ are bulkier man some. 

- competitors and, at 5200 and up, a 

••• h>t more expensive. They have 

i shock absorbers, special pads, to 

r.r. 2 . keep the baby dry and comfortable 

and extra-wide seats. 

“Other strollers arc good for 

mothers ” said Eiyn Nitta. sales 
manager and a director of Aprica. 
“Our strollers are good for babies." 

Aprica sells more than 200,000 
strollers a year to the United Stales, 
with most of them headed to New 
York and Beverly Hills, California. 

The company has about an 8 - 
percent share of the American bahy 
Stroll er market, and last year’s 
511.6 ntiDion in U.S. sales account 
L-for 20 pescent of itspretax profits 
JroF 51.8 million. The company, 
which employs 250 people in Japan 
and 130 overaeas, had total sales of 
550 million in the fiscal year e n ded 
July of this year; its net income was 
$ 888 , 000 . 

Things were not always this 
flush. “When Aprica first tried to 

S note its stroDera to American 
ers six years ago,” Mr. Nitta 
recalled, "they took one look at the 
price tag and refused even to listen 
to Aprica’s sales pitch.” As other 
Japanese companies had done be- 
fore, Aprica persevered. Bat at die 
insistence of Aprica’s founder and 
president, Kenzo Kassai, the com- 
pany built its U.S. business in an 
unconventional fashion for a Japa- 
nese company — starting at the top 
ftof the market, rather than the bot- 
'‘tom. 

Although Aprica strollers were 
several times as expensive as com- 
peting models when they made 
their debut in the U.S. market in 
1980, Mr. Kassai resisted advice to 
cm prices. Nor was he willing to 
forgo profits, unlike other Japanese 
manufacturers just breaking into 
foreign markets. 

“Taiwanese strollers sold at 
519.80 and had an established 
share in the market,” Mr. Kassai 
said. “The highest price on the mar- 
ket was 558, and dealers said we 
should seQ our stroller fa 558. But 
it cost 550 just to make our stroller, 
and 58 wouldn’t cover our freight 
cost or profit to distributors.” 

Mr. Kassai reasoned that con- 
sumers would pay more for a pre- 
mium product And m contrast to 
the years when Japanese manufac- 
J Was had to build a reputation for 

Quality, “Made in Japan” was prac- 
dH U trcaHy synonymous with quality, 
goods whet Aprica entered the 
. Jf :' m OS. market. 

Mr. Kassai decided to bypass 
, £ department stores, and persuaded 
V about 20 shops specializing in high- 
,-r • quality infant products to give 
space to Aprica strollers. He then 
dispatched Aprica sales staff to ex- . 
; ’’J plain the virtues of the strollers 

directly to customers, hi 1981, the 
Jjp company sold 50,000 strollers, and 
' • “ by 1983 sales had taken off. -biding 

_ ■•' r 200,000 last year. Aprica now is 

reaching out to mass marketers 
.-' such as Sears, Roebuck & Co. and 
i J-C. Penney Co. 

i ’ " . r “Aptka didn’t start out to pro- 
duce an expensive stroller," Mr. 
Kassai said. "We derided to pro- 
duce a stroller for the sake of the 
baby.” 

Mr. Kassai, 59 r is a slight, cner- 
gpdemau whose earnestness about - 
. ■ mfants is an but overpowering. He 
i. 1< ? founded his company in 1947, after 


faring for juvenile ddmquenxs.in 
the years thm followed Japan’s de- 
feat in World War IL At mat time, 
he said, he resolved to leave a fam- 
ily business imHmfart nri ng 
f u r niture and weak instead on 
products far chtidren. 

- The then-named Tf» gq» Inn’s 
first stroOer. essentially a huge seat 
that folded up into a box about the 
size of a typewriter, did not catch 
bp in Japan. So Mr. Kassai, like 
: other Japanese companies, looked 
abroad for inspiration. He settled 
on Italy, where the R&ffaele Gior- 
dani company was ™Kng high- 
. fashion strollers in bright dwngnw 
colors. 

- Forafime,‘Mr. Kassai imported 
Gkadam strollers and sold mem in 
Japan. But Mr. Kassai felt that he 
could do more to adapt strollers to 
infants’ needs. So he assembled a 
team of Japanese doctors to re- 
search infant development and see 
if any of the Tesolts could be ap- 
plied to manufacturing. The doc- 
tors worked for seven years, and 
their research team became a per- 
manent part of the company. 

Modi of the research centered 
on babies’ hips. Mr. Nitta, the 
Aprica sales manager, said that 
doctors and health centers routine- 
ly teach Japanese mothers to diaper 
a child not by lifting up the tegs, 
but by poshing up toe bottom or 
the hip, so as not to risk dislocating 
the hip joint. 

A pediatrician in New York, Mi- 
chael Traister, said that “dislocated 
hips are relatively common in ba- 
bies.” He said, however, that “no 
one really knows what causes toe 
problem, but it is not usually the 
result of the stroller or diapering 
practices.” ' 

. Aprica Kassai, toe renamed 
company, then hired Isabelle He- 
bey, toe French interior designer 
whose projects include the Con- 
corde jet, to hdp with the actual 
design of toe stroller. Tie result 
was a product both sturdy and 
fashionable, with attention to de- 
tail and quality. 

In Japanese^ ' baby strollers are 
called “baby cars,” and indeed it 
sometimes seems as though Arnica 
is setting cars instead of strollers. 
The company offers new models 
and colors every year — ■ it hopes 
that parents wifi buy two strollers 
per Aild. And toe battery of tests 
to which Aprica subjects its strx>B- 
. ers at its factory in rural Nara pre- 
fecture, about an hour from down- 
town Osaka, recalls the stringent 
tests’ required for cars. Aprica 
strollers are baked and frozen in 

large ovens, dropped from heights, 
smashed with weights and run 
through a test course on a nearby 
mountainous road. 

. Aprica now, commands a40-per- 
cent share of Japan’s market, W 
Mr. Kassai said the investment in 
devdoping the stroller ^ was so great 
that cmlyxn the last four years nave 
the stroOeis. become profitable. In 
order to increase sales, Mr. Kassai 
said, Aprica had to inaricet abroad. 
Exports to 45 countries now make 
up 38 percent of AnricaV total sales 
of bflKcm yen ($113 miltionl 

Even other stroller manufactur- 
ers find little fault with Apneas. 
Andrews Madaren Ltd. of Britain 
has for years manufactured a fight, 
portable stroller dial folds up like 
an umbrefla- Alan Nash, sales di- 
rector for Andrews Madaren, said 
their stroller sdls for half the price 
of Apneas but reaQy does not com- 
pete with Aprica. “Ours is a totally 
different concept,” he said. "Their 
prodoefrb much nxHCSophisticat- - 
cd nnd has caught toe public's f*<H- 
tori eye. .Tbey^e not something 
there." ■ , 








•1 u - 

\\ :Ht> 

: ^ 



X 


% \\ 


'■ Aj:- \\ -v 
• ^ 

% 3 

' . ^ Y 


' % 
N ? Vl <» > - 

•V : J 

4 J -v 

v, Vw- 

■Mk: 

; V,. 

i' 

'?<?■■■ 



* * . , 



. . ’ ‘ -”v 


- ' • ; 


.4 •• ; **.. 

- • '•/> 

\ 

Y, V.. v. - 




v.:- 

Y'n s 


■ ■■ " '- V 

V. \- ‘V*, 

“•• • \ v;y\ 





.... vw.,- 
r,\ : 

, ....Wit j 



IF YOU KNEW HOW MUCH CONFIDENCE REPUBLIC’S CLIENTS HAVE IN THEIR BANK, YOU’D BE PHONING REPUBLIC TOO 


Republic National Bank of New York. Tradition a i banking in an age of change. 


i-jLvv 1 • « - !■ i _■ ■ - 1 




H.v'ili /. :«n. ri /.| a 


■M.AI-I7/-1 Ol K 









TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 


UNLE5S.0FC0UR5E,V0U^E; 
WATCHING SATURDAY i 
MORNING CARTOONS- t 


BOOKS 


CHAPLIN: His Life and Art 


o%' 


By David Robinson. 792 pages. S24.95. 
McGraw-ffiU Book Co, 1221 Avenue of the 
Americas, New York, N. Y. 10020. 


CHARLIE CHAPLIN 


“Chaplin" is full of dates, itineraries. tnoa > 
vuy sums and other bits of factual cj/onM- 
tion. We are told hour many feet of film 
an shot on a particular movie, who was in i roe 
audience at which premiere, how maiqrtaicra 
were required for a gWen scent h WJg 
such pictures as “The Gold Rush. “Qty 
Ligbts?"Mcriem Tunes," "The Great Pug- 
_ J " ,Kle minstakiQK 3p- 


WHEN I OPING SOMEONE 

AWRONSORCSt.I r 1 

HM€ TO EAT rcLL+S 
IT MYSa_l= rd-X 


X'U_ HA/E THE T 
i HOBO HASH r*' 


VOU CAN BET I'LL 
GET THIS ONE r' 
— -i RIGHT/ 


By Maurice Bessy. 438 pages. S50. 

Harper & Row, Publishers Inc, 10 East 53d 
Street, New York, N. Y. 10022 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 


tor" and “Limdkht," th» painstakmg ap- 
proach makes for ohm fasci n a tin g accounts™ 

how various ideas evol 


rt A LL ray pictures," Charles Spencer 
TTL Chaplin once observed, “are built 
around the idea of getting me in trouble and so 
giving me the chance to be desperately serious 
m ray attempt to appear as a normal little 
gen tleman. That is why, no matter bow desper- 
ate the predicament is, I am always very much 
in earnest about clutching my cane, stnughtcn- 
mg my derby hat and fixing my tie, even 
though I have just landed on my head." 


ACROSS 

1 Eden discard 
5 Loser to Joe 
Louis: Sept. 
1939 

11 Boardwalk 
investments 

13 Aperture for 
ventilation 

14 Franc fraction 

15 Narrates anew 

16 Elbow 

17 Branches 

19 Came to earth 

29 Greek letters 

21 Stone 

22 Dispenser of 
T.L.C. 

24 This may incur 
vigorish 

25 “It's raining 


47 A Dumas 

48 boy (hero 

sandwich) 

4S Beds sans 
heads 

51 Homophone 
for sense 


io/i //as 

13 Accouter 

14 Piranha 

18 Opposite of the 
Pac- 
21 Cinch 
23 Fit; 
convenient 


BEETLE BAILEY 


52 Lizards seen in 25 Grati ana’s 


Yucatan 

54 Puts on a par 
with 

56 " as doth 

the Bee": 
Dickinson 

57Groupoffbur 

58 Ancient 
ascetic 

59 Dewey , 

Faulkner girl 


milieu 

26 Prescience of a 
sort 




NOW THATfe WHAT 
X CALL A TOSSED . 
SALADjOv, 


Chaplin’s creation of that normal little gen- 
tleman Charlie, the sad, sweet tramp, with his 


28 Eur. language 
36 Baseball stat 


Love man 

27 Two-tailed flag 

29 Went Dutch 

33 “Ape and 

A. Huxley 

35 Fred 

FI in tst one's 
daughter 

37 More 
unearthly 

38 Most foxy 

39 Assemble by 
summons 

42 Baltique, e.g. 

43 He has sticky 
ringers 

46 Indefinite 
quantity 

<£> New Yo rk 


1 Throng 

2 Some Holy 
Roman 
Empire rulers 

3 Bridle strap 

4 Shade tree 

5 Illusory 
prospect of 
profit 

6 Tate display 

7 Clip fleece 

8 Turnpike 
charges 

9 A friend of 
Kukla 

10 Relax 

11 Partlets' place 

12 This makes a 
comic less 


31 Basic and 
potent 

32 Like 
Goldsmith’s 
village 

34 Ending fora 
cardinal point 

36 Bridge 
builder's 
concern 

40 Kierorkeeve 

41 Beginning 

43 Robes of office 

44 Units of time 

45 Angry 

47 Oyster’s 






rTTTfll 


ANDY CAPP 


and his bravely chucbed little cane, ensured bis 
place as one of his age's premier artists, a comic 
genius whose idiosyncratic alloy of laughter 
and sentiment indelibly captured humanity’s 
tragicomic struggles with fate. It also ensured 
Chaplin’s spectacular rise within the fledgling 
movie industry — by the age of 25, the impov- 
erished English, comedian would become the 
most popular performer in the world. The story 
of hisremarkable career and life is the subject 

rice ^essyi a^Dfl^ 1 Robinson’s authorized 
biography. 


p poor ■ 
LITTLE, 
DEVIL-, 


I Cl MS OM» Mm» Naanpapara. LM 
DM. by N«WI Anaitca Eyndcjna 


LOOK 
ON THE 
BRIGHT, 
■ SIDE. < 

per ) 


Z WISH HE'D RUCK fTlN. 
> ATjHTS age, being 
'SELECTED 3UST /MEANS 
, THE HORRIBLE . — - 
v-f RDSSlBttJTYOF J 
BEING "V 

3|f substituted) ^ 


Robinson, the film critic for The Times of 
London apparently had access to Chaplin's 
private archive of working papers and letters, 
and he says he has used these materials to write 
a book that serves, in part, to complement “My 
Autobiography," Chaplin’s 1964 account of 


his life. Robinson said his research “only 
served to heighten regard for the powers of 


8 Turnpike 48 Calumet, for 

charges (me 

9 A friend of 50 Suffix with 

Kukla filament 

10 Relax 51 Pleasingly 

LI Partlets' place attractive 

12 This makes a 53 Dwarf : Comb, 

comic less form 

comic 55 Math proof 

Times, edited by Eugate Male ska. 


served to heighten regard for the powers of 
Chaplin's memory and the honesty of his re- 
cord," but he also points out that the autobiog- 
raphy left significant gaps: many friends ana 
colleagues were excluded from it, and Chaplin 
was reticent about his films and working mkh- 
ods. 


WIZARD of ID 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


£M-nt,IF 

Y0U<5& 

worm 
MOW- , 


r ioumi, ' 

WZ TW1S?~ 

cmm<m 


WfoeroF -m cfflL. 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 







REX MORGAN 


i.'V " >1 










FIRST MY HUSBAND PUTS 
ME IH HERE AMD THEN FAYS 
YOU TO WATCH ME WHILE 4 
HE’S OUT RUNNING ABOUND 
TO SOME SINGLE SABS/ 


^ I WAS | 
CALLED HERE - 
BY DR. MORGAN 
> NOT YOUR 
HUSBAND, MRS. 
BISHOP f 


ITS THE SAME II 
THING i THEY'RE l\ 
WORKING ** 
TOGETHER i THEY'RE 
TRYING TO PUT /HE 
& AWAY.' m rf 


IT WAS YOUR HUSBAND 
WHO SAVED YOU FROM t 
DROWNING IN THE TUB * 
EARLIER TODAY, YMSNT 
ITT FROM WHAT I UNDER 
STAND, HE LOVES YOU 


DEE30 aanan annoi 
a ghe saoiaQ □□□□ 
EJBQEHBDEIDB □□□□ 
qeqqq □□□ sanaas 

nQQ3n[unciH3 
□□a sqoqbehi □□□ 
□□□□aoo EiQaaaaa 

QEQE GH30H 

CEEEO03 □□□DHHD 
Bon □o3ana3 aoa 
□□□□aaHQaa 

□Earaa □□n aaaag 
DEUDQ DOQaQQQElEDa 
oehq naaaQ anno 
cede aaasB qhdq 


piuiLU uitura iw « i 

how various ideas evolved, gag by gag , secre cy 
scene, and how Chaplin’s overall tectimque 
developed from an improvisatory approach to 
a highly scripted one. Robinson traces im 
sources of Chaplin’s mature comedic an io me 
British mime shows and music haB traditions 
of his youth. He places Chaplin’s ananabc 
innovations within a historical context, unlike 
such critics as Walter K«t and AimW Baan, 
however, Robinson offers no original insights 
into the films. Even his tentative observations 
about Chaplin's techniques seem flat and obv»- 
■ ous in comparison with statements by Cn apnn - 

When it comes to Chaplin’s private fife, 
Robinson’s refusal to analyze sit uation s or rot 
oift dn ernnentar y evidence becom es even m ore 
obvious and annoying. Instead of venturing ws 
impression of Chaplin's personality, he q uotes 

at length and seemingly at random — “Om 

newspaper articles and other people’s reminis- 
cences. Instead of dr! mealing the imaginat ive 
transactions that occurred between Chaplin s 
life and art, he settles Far plodding lists of facts. 
When Chaplin, now a great star, returns to 
London, where he’d spent a dismal, Dickensi- 
an childhood, Robinson merely records what 
he saw and where he went, concluding simply, 
“Now be was quite content to be a celebrity, an 
immortal among (as he called them) the im- 
mortals." The death of Chaplin’s first chfld, 
and his subsequent decision to make "The 
Kid" with Jackie Coogan, elicit a similar verbal 
shrug: It would be “presumptuous," Robinson 
contends, to suggest connections between the 
two events. 

Although we learn that Qtaplin was left- 
handed, that he was a terrific tennis player, 
that he wore green suits when he was in a fool 
mood, and that his favorite words were "inef- 
fable" and “concupiscence," Robinson never 
goes beyond such surface details to show us the 
mmr mini 

If the problem with Robinson's book is its 
lack of a point of view, the problem with 
Bessy's “Charlie Chaplin” is its decidedly self- 
serving texL The author, a former director of 
the Cannes film festival who got to know 
Chaplin in Hollywood, not only idles heavily 
m his omT renrimsceaces (one section has 
' Bessy comforting a bitter, almost distraught 
Chaplin over the poor reaction to “Monsieur 
Verdoux"), but also sets them down in embar- 
rassing. hyperbolic prose: "Charles Cha pKn, 
the man behind the persona, was bom under 
the sign of Aries," writes Besty, adding, “He 
led, as we know, a tumultuous life — and we 
recall that Aries is also the sign of conflict and 
contradictions." . 

Happily, the. bulk of “Charlie Chapfin" is 
not text, but ptetnres, and while there are some 
curious omissions — “The. Great Dictator" 
chapter, for instance, is missing shots of the 
famous balloon sequence — these stills from 
the fflms form a delightful visual record of the 
director's magic, though they are no substitute 
for the movies thexnsdves. 


Michiko Kakutani is an the staff of The New 
York Tones. 


A GOCS3 HUNTING D06. JUST YESTERDAY HE 
TREED A SWRR0W.TW0 BLUE JAfc AN' A CAT 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble theee lour JumbtoB, 
one letter to each square, to torn 
four ordkwy words. 


WARLC 




RINOAT 

1 Now arrange Uw circled letters to 

form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 

^ rm ^ Tnur 

(Answers tomorrow) 

I jianUes: NIPPY COWER NATURE POORLY 


Yesterday* 


Answer A calculator Is a device used by these— 
PEOPLE WHO COUNT 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

P 



C 

F 

C 

F 



27 

SI 

14 

81 

Ir 

Bon-okok 

31 

88 

25 

77 

o 


IS 

59 

11 

52 

o 

Belling 





0 



81 

12 

54 

o 

Hnaa Kona 

31 

88 

24 

75 

fr 


23 

73 

13 

56 

el 

Manila 

33 

91 

25 

77 

cl 


11 

52 

4 

43 

el 

f&swDoN 

33 

to 

20 

48 

Ir 



SB 

3 

37 

r 

Sees! 

18 

44 

12 

54 

o 


M 

37 

11 

52 

a 

Mwiuteisf 

34 

n 

18 

44 

r 



55 

7 

45 

a 

Singapore 





o 


14 

57 

7 

45 

d 

TnlaM 

32 

90 

25 

77 

fr 


13 

55 

5 

41 

a 

Tokyo 

21 

70 

11 

52 

a 

Casta DM Sal 
DaMln 

25 

11 

SZ 

8 

43 

fr 

AFRICA 






EeSWSturBSs 

15 






27 

81 




Florence 







28 

82 



fr 

FrocHdurl 

13 




cf 


20 

48 




®aa»eya 







27 

81 

17 



Helsinki 

13 






29 

84 

17 

83 

Ir 

istanlwl 












Las nomas 

28 











Usboa 

23 





Tonis 

25 


15 





57 



a 





24 

75 

■ 

48 

d 

LATIN AMERICA 





















Buenos Aires 

18 

44 

12 

54 

d 


» 

50 

3 

37 

fr 

Caracas 




88 

d 




14 

57 

fr 



— 


“ 

DO 













Furls 

18 

84 

11 

52 

Ir 

mode Janeiro 

_ 

— 

— 


no 


narki crane 

Room 

St ucfcHa tm 

Strasbourg 

Wales 

Vienna 


l 34 Ir 

10 50 sh 

12 54 Ir 

S 44 d 

B 46 fr 

9 48 Cl 

7 43 a 

I 34 a 

0 *4 It 


WORTH AMERICA 


Zurich 13 35 8 *0 fr 

MIPPLE EAST 

Ankara 13 55 3 43 cl 

Bairn! » n » u o 

Damascus 28 83 3 37 fr 

Jf u sntara 74 75 10 50 Ir 

TalAwfV 28 79 IS 59 Ir 

OCEANIA 

Auckland IS 59 B 4* cl 

SvdMV 14 75 17 83 d 

ct-daudy; fo-fooav: Fr-lalr; Mall; 
sh-shawirs; sw-snaw; sMtocnw. 


AnawnnM 3 

An ante 27 

Boston 18 

CkMaro 17 

Donrsr 21 

natron 15 

Hanoi Mb 30 

Kavstoa 28 

Los Angol a* 29 

Miami 31 

Mlanaaoalls 13 

Maalroal 13 

Nnm 31 

How York 20 

Son Francisco 24 

Saattla 18 

Taraala 18 

WastUnaMM 25 

ixiwi-cort; oc-oortiy > 


THURSDAY’S FORECAST — CHANNEL! EIIOM. 

17“ 2 183—3*1. LONDON: Ctoudr. Toma. 15—10 is? —SOI- MADRID: Fah;. 
Tew. 23 — 7 (77 — 43). HEW YORK: «H. Tama. - W (It— ML MAW. 
Fair. Temp. 18 — 9 (44 — 48). ROME: Fair. Temp. 22— ;11J72— 52). TEL A VIV. 
No- ZURICH: Fair. Tamo. 14— 5 Ml —411. BANGKOK: JkJmdBiTiwmLTojiw. 
32 — 35 IN- 77). HOW KONO: Cksrfv. Toms. W— » 
snowera. Temp. 31 — 24 IM— 75). SEOUL: Fair. .Toma. If—13MA— SSL 
Singapore: Fair, Toma. 31 - 25 (M— 77). TOKYO; Snowars. Temp. 21 — 11 
170 — 52). 


AEG-TaWunken 

Allianz vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Bayer 

Bay Hypo Bank 
Bay VorelMOank 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Camnwrzbonk 
Coni Gum mi 

Dot ml*r- Bern 








t 

*6- 

£ 





Deutsche Babeocfc 
DWJtidw Bank 
Dresdner Bank 
GHH 


































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 


SPORTS 





::'*s 


'■'-sfe 


1^ 


lioyals Defeat Blue Jays, 5-3; Series Goes to Decisive 7th Game 

ByJohn Bernstein J5®J| lands their ace, mjghrjnstbe rt&dytobreak loose, ooi and got it and it got up inio the He crushed Alexander’s 1-0 fast- the series, was coming op. Howser 

Washingzcm Post Service paw Suai, mw ffljr, "Save ns^ -*■ They lathed then, but nobody's wind and went oat" Said Rett: ball to the alley in right-center* the wanted him gone. Cliff Johnson. 

TORONTO — On Tuesdav Sa ^_ a ® en7 ,*“° w “ teugbmg now. Biancalana singfed “Wjnd-ttown. not wmd-Wown — ball landing one bop short of the pinch hitting for Oliver, singled m a 

night,, the Toronto Blue Jays had ^ the ^ the second, but it was in theaxth who cares? It was a home run. warning track. Sundberg scored run. 

their second rfi an r r u> c l in A their * es °; ® that he tamed the guffaws into That's all that matters*” . easily, and when rightfidder Jesse When Black threw a wild pitch, 

first American League pennant. — • **st-<R-sevea leagoctiuc gasps. It mattered because, in the sixth. Barfield bobbled the ball while Johnson wish u> second and Willie 

Thaw h. A , -rZZST. senes ever. - niftnis it nn liiannUn* n«il (n 1 TncllltV lit tkrrvt Ttww 091 Artp 



first American League pennant. 1<rst o*st-ot-«vai leagoctiue gasps. It mattered because, in the sixth. Barfield bobbled the ball while Johnson went to second and Willie 

They had true Toronto weather a Kncs CWr picking it up, Biancalana went to Upshaw to third. There was one 

± t SS AMERICAN LEAGUE PLAYOFFS jL ™ a to -l 

SStSSftrSEta 'fStTSPOlS 0 *** Howffir mighlhav, pinch hit for 

r r^^^Ppop^MWdMaik ^ and Alexander, had been strugling. Biancalana. “We had a one-nm mguDMXL” Biancalana said. “I “No wav," he said. “1 don’t walk 

Se KarL^f^n^ v 1, *a* S C f ^L“ d 001 BnddyBiancabna sgkwc ^ pitch j c^d hit.” Smith thinking paid off -Bdl popped to 

^ iXSZtJ&Kim gr^reLer Dennis Lamp with SS^iriu peeped 


fct toerican League jtoanMt. 

They had true Toronto weather, a . . 
blustery, icy evening in Exhibition “We aren’t the most 
Stadium: they -had 37,557 fans we may not have the best 
pnmed. But stiD they lost • ’ players, hut when we haws to win 
They lost to people named MaA weseemtofindaway towin,”said 



American League cha^ mjo; 
seriesis now headed IfarWe 
day night's decisive g ^me . ■ » 
The Blue Jays win pm the 


given us nothing in this series, but I 


thebase- 


lf the Royals do win, they win tbe ptoe,” Cox said. “Brett went Sundberg on second and one cm. 
send this ready-uxdcbmc dty 

into a state of shock. Tuesday’s ' — • — 

fans came in a festive mood, ready mT . A _ . _ ' 



uujd uuw jji « icauvc WUI, lepiv HT* A T% A V * 

Nixon Agrees to Be Arbiter 

ner on base. But it was to m> avail -w- ■wr ' • 4 T Vr 

»2fflSirQ£ Jn Umpires Wage Dispute 



’BmImbUPI 

Garth loig 

...After striking out to end Game & 


ner on base. But ii.was to no avail 
“We’re a little frustrated,” said the 
Toronto manager, Bobby Cox. 
“We just have to hope we get the 
bag hits tomorrow.” 

Kansas City got some of its big 
Game 6 hits from those whom they 
expect to produce: Hal McRae 
drove in the first two runs with a 
first-inning wi gfe mm! a fourth-in- 
ning double. And George Brett had 
a fifth-inning homer off Doyle Al- 
exander — who has raven op three 
homers and adouhfe to Rett in 
this series. . ' 

But the grinds deciding hit came 
from a man even less hkdy to be a 
hitting hero than St Louts Cardi- 
nal shortstop Ozzie Smith was on 
Monday: Roland America (Buddy) 
Biancalana Jr., he of the .188 bat- 
ting average, the one homeron and 
six runs batted in during the regu- 
lar season. 

Biancalana has become a base- 
ball cult figure because of a recent 
spoof in winch David Leoennan, 
the NBC-TV late-night comedian, 
chronicled Biancalana’s “chase” of 
Pete Rose’s all-time record for hits. 
Biancalana, who is 25. has 56 career 
hits. Before Game 6. Kansas City 
Manager Dick Howser joked that 
Smith’s home ran might just have 
been an omen, that Biancalana 


By Robert McG. Thomas Jr. 

Alw York Timet Service 

NEW YORK — Former President Richard M. Nixon has agreed to 
arbitrate a dispute over how much extra money the umpires will get 
for working this year’s major-league playoffs. 

The surprise selection, which was made last Saturday, was an- 
nounced Monday night in Toronto by Phyllis Merhige^ director of 
public relations for the American League. 

The selection headed off a threatened strike by the umpires over 
how much they will get for working the league title series, which this 
year were expanded from a Lhrcc-of-fivc to a four-of-seven format. 
The umpires had threatened to work only the first five games, accor- 
ding to their contract if there was no agreement on the extra money. 

Undo: the terms of a joint decision to submit the dispute to arbi- 
tration, the leagues and the umpires have agreed to abide by the figure 
Nixon comes up with. He is expected to hold a hearing late this wed. 

Last season the umpires strude the first three American Lpag»» 
playoff games and the first four of the National League. The leagues 
used minor-league umpires until the regulars returned after Commis- 
sioner Peter Ueberroth agreed to arbitrate the dispute. That settle- 
ment called for a payment of $10,000 for each of the 12 umpires who 
worked the games and a $160,000 contribution to a pool Tor distribu- 
tion among the other umpires. 

Nixon, an avid sports fan, was chosen because of his close associa- 
tions with prominent baseball figures, including Bobby Brown, the 
American League president, and Richie Phillips, the head of the 
Major League Umpires Association. 

& 1966, while be was a lawyer in New York Giy and presumed to 
be at the end of his political career following his defeat in a California 
gubernatorial race, Nixon had been considered for the post of general 
counsel of the Major League Baseball Players Association, but was 
rejected by Marvin Miller, the association's executive director. 


That was the last hit the Royals Barfield on, but Tony Fernandez 
would get; Lamp overpowered grounded into a double play. Black 
themihereu of the way, even strik- walked Damaso Garda and Lloyd 
ing out Bren in the eighth. So, it Moseby, but got Garth Icrg to tap 
was left up to (he Kansas City back to him. 
pitching, just the way Howser likes In the eighth, Johnson singled 
iL “People asked me about starting again, but mack got Cedi Fielder 
Gubicza,” he said. “Bui that gave to pop to right and struck out 
me the luxury of Black in the bull- WhitL Finally, in the ninth, Fer- 
pen. 1 thought Mark would give us nandez reached first when Black 
a good game." was slow getting off the mound on 

Gubicza was good enough. He a grounder wide of first, and with 
had runners cm first and third in two down, Moseby singled. Enter 
the first inning and got Ranee Mul- Quisenbeny. 
timkstohitutoanm-scoringdou- “The way Buddy was going, I 
ble play. He had fiisi- and- third two didn't think I’d get in,” he said. “J 
innings later and a g ain escaped was glad to get the chance. But the 
with only one run. When Gubicza last thing I expected was a strike- 
put men on first and second with out. 1 don't strike people out.” But 
one ont in the sixth, Howser he struck out lorg, ending the 


brought in Black. 


game. And Toronto’s fans went 


“I was just glad logo as far as I home in a daze. There was to be a 
did,” Gubicza said. “I knew in that Game 7. 
situation, BLackie was coming in.” Wearing a T-shirt that read. 
Black came in because Al Oliver, “We're Not Great, We Jus’ Flay 
the left-handed design taed hitter Great,” McRae said: “Now the 
who has two game-winning hits in pressure is on everyone.” 



■mz, -• 




Th* Auocand Press 


Kansas Gty shortstop Buddy Biancalana had become a du- 
bious cult figure, bat after his run-scoring double in the sixth 
inning of Game 6, he's no longer just another pretty glove. 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 

Playoff Box Score 


Football 

National Football League Leaders 


NFL dub Owners Want Expanded Drug Testing 


KANSAS CITY TORONTO 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 


Esiason. Cln. 


aorbM 

aarhM 


TOTAL OFFENSE 


Krlea Sea 

LSmllti if 

5 0 11 Garcia 3b 

3 110 


Yards 

Rush 

Pass 

Plunkett. Rndrs 

Uones If 

GOOD Maseev cf 

4 13 1 

San Diego 

2353 

475 

1857 

O'Brien, Jets 

Wllian d 

4 110 Mullnks 3b 

30 0 0 

Miami 

2244 

608 

1646 

Kenney, K.C 

Brett 3b 

3 2 11 Glare 3 d 

2 00 0 

Denver 

2245 

734 

1511 

Danielson, Ciev. 

McRae an 

5 0 3 2 Uesnaw lb 

3 00 0 

Cleveland 

3194 

1023 

1172 

Marine. Mki. 

Sherldn rl 

4 0 0 0 Oliver oh 

2 0 0 0 

Seattle 

7143 

570 

1573 

Malone. Pitt. 

Balbanl lb 

4 0 0 0 CJhnui A 

2 0 3 1 

Jels 

2074 

743 

1131 


Sunaarg c 

3 10 0 GBeii If 

4 0 0 0 

Pittsburgh 

2046 

TO* 

1262 


White 3b 

3 0 0 0 Whin c 

3 00 0 

Cincinnati 

3038 

m 

13S6 

McNeil. Jets 

Bloncin ss 

4 13 1 Fielder Ph 

13 0 0 

New England 1930 

645 

1385 

Allen, Raiders 


Hearron e 

0 0 0 0 

Raiders 

1911 

670 

1341 

Warner. Sea 


Barfield rf 

4 0 0 0 

Kansas Cllv 

1665 

496 

1369 

Mack, Clev. 


Feranai is 

4 12 0 

iMUanaooni 

1833 

ITS 

958 

B*». Bull. 

Totals 

35 5 I 5 Totals 

34 1 I 3 

Buffalo 

1722 

476 

1246 

. 

Kansas Clfr 

101 013 

000— S 

Houston 

1441 

620 

831 


Toronto 

m on 

000— 3 


TOTAL DEFENSE 


Lament. Sea. 


133 » ns 10 3 

217 129 1624 15 7 

103 71 003 3 3 

IM 103 1201 6 3 

193 105 1513 10 7 

134 76 939 I 9 

:ie 130 1 549 0 7 

IBS 95 1193 13 6 

nothin 

ATT YDS AVG LG TO 
134 645 4Jk 69 2 


Compiled by Our Siaf] From Zhspaiches 

NEW YORK — Commissioner NFL NOTES 

Pete RozeDc of the said Tuesday , . , . . , 

that several National Football . a refere nce. to the recent trial 

League team owners want more. ^ nusbtngh mvotving axame use 


show that they are dean of drug pleted a 56-yard pass to Irving 
involvement’’ ■ Fryar at the did of the half. He 

“I really don’t expect the [NFL ' opened the third quarter by moving 
players’] union to fight very hard the team 80 yards on 8 plays for a 
against it,” said Tex Schramm, touchdown. ' 


ConMvMnlns RBI— Brett (31. 

E— Femomuz. Barfield, Brett. DP — tawv Jels 
sets City 1 LOB— Kansas CHv L Toronto 9. Raiders 
3D— ^ Garcia. McRae. Fernandez. Biancalana. Cleveland 
LStnlth. HR— Brett <31. S— wniRu Pltrstxirafi 

New England 


Yards Rmn Pass cnrMnsn. Rdrs 
1640 541 109« Bell. Btftf. 

1696 953 1143 James. SuD. 

1710 573 1137 StaHwarltl. Pin. 

1725 719 1006 

I 70S 636 1149 


13* 

6*5 

4JI 

69 

134 

516 

A3 

20 

113 

483 

43 

23 

67 

447 

5.1 

61 

110 

*12 

3.7 

18 

Receivers 



NO 

VDS 

AVG LG 

36 

533 

14B 

40 

15 

376 

ia.7 

33 

35 

233 

SJ 

21 

3* 

420 

IZ4 

60 

33 

403 

122 

37 


Gkmtc 

Washington 

Rams 

Phliodelptila 

Dallas 

Chicago 

San Francisco 

Green Bay 

Minnesota 

Tampa Bey 

New Orleans 

St. Louis 

Detrail 

Atlanta 


frequent mandatory drag testing “^or'kague baseball players, president of the Dallas Cowboys. By the final gun, Gfogan had 

for their players written into the ^“*1* *“ d things “It seems that all sports are going completed 15 of 19 passes for 282 

new collective bargaining agree- 0“ fix** “ y e a nwoff toward this way. People know that yards. Only once before had be 

rpmi -■ effect on all . other sports.” with all of the things we are doing completed a higher percentage of . 

“You bear a lot of owners want- Said Miami Dolphin Owner Jo- . withtestingnow, we rejustscratchr passes (9 of 11 in a 1983 game - 

ing to make it part of the collective sept Robbie: “The players are role *ng the surface.” against the New York Jets), and his 


ing to make it part of the collective seph Robbie: “The players are role ing the surface.” 
har gnitring . . . rd Hke-.to see it, models and, with the compensation But Gene Upshaw, executive di- yardage total represented the 10th- 
too,” RozeUe said, as the owners they’re, receiving, they owe it to doctor of the players’ associa ti on, highest of his career, 
convened for two days of meetings, themselves and to the public to said he had “visited 17 teams and I □ 

. .. _ . ‘ don’t see any reason to believe that Of the three teams with 0-6 re~ 

— players are ready for mandatory cords, two still have the coaches 

OllATirrn TiTlTT^TlC* testing. We have a policy in place who started the season, Dan Hen- 

Ml In I Knl If and we don’t plan on malrirtg any ning of the Atlanta Falcons and 

x u M : changes now. When the contract Leeman Bennett of the Tampa Bay 

. ' " 1 ! ' comes up in 1987, then we’ll sit Buccaneers. The Buffalo Bills, who 

W fomumv SwPiIpyi Ton Tim dowi and decide what we want to have lost 20 of then -last 22 regular 

vv ■ wa rm a n y, uiVcU.cn lop Uip uCCUb -do. season gam^c, made a coaching 

LONDON (AP) — West Geramy and Sweden, who dash in the final ^8® two weeks ago. 

of the T985 Davis Cup tennis tournament Dec. 20-22 in Stuttgart, were . 

seeded to meet again in next year’s final when the draw fozthe 1986 ^^e^etesmbaseballbas- 

conmctition was made here Wednesday. playra to be given a urmalysrt dur- ketball and most other sports, foot- 



IP 

H 

R ER BB SO 

Denver 

1936 

647 

1289 

Roov, Mia 

33 

1051 

63 

*5J 

Kama* City 







Houston 

2089 

971 

II1B 

Stark, Ind. 

26 

11M 

68 

*5.7 

Gubicza WJ-0 

51-3 

4 

3 

3 

3 

3 

Kansas City 

2115 

600 

1507 

Malsleienka SJJ. 

33 

1505 

63 

456 

Black 

31-3 

4 

0 

0 

3 

3 

Seattle 

2118 

664 

1454 

Camarilla, N.E. 

41 

I860 

75 

*5.4 

Quhnbrv 5,1 

1-3 

0 

a 

0 

0 

1 

Miami 

3129 

909 

1230 

1 Johnson. Hou. 

36 

1614 

62 

444 

Toronto 







Indiana palls 

2130 

786 

1344 

Pllflt Returners 



AJSiesandr UM 

5M 

7 

$ 

5 

3 

6 

Buffalo 

2269 

1044 

1225 

NO YDS AVG 

LG 

TD 

- Lama 

33-3 

1 

0 

0 

1 

S 

Son Diego 

2418 

163 

1S47 

Walker. Roars 

IS 

212 1*4. 

26 

0 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


FOutS. S-D. 
Herrmann, a.D. 


petition was made here Wednesday. ing'jtoV «aoau ana mosi outer spans,! 

atGermany is paired wi± Mexico in the 1986 opening Toand,whfle SJZJSSSLSSSJi. 

Sweden wffl meet Dumnk; both seeded teams will pj^uway. pl^yw may alsobe tested for cfaem- w face with the prospect of sea 


*k face 
season- 


vs. United Sia 

via vs. Soviet Umoo, India vs. Chechoslovakia, Italy vs. Paragiuy. AH ^3;^" ""*'**"“."* 
wtHid group opening matches will be played March 7-9. • p« ^ 

Abdnl-Jabbar, Lakers Agree on Pact 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the National 5SS5^3BftSn? rS 

Basketball Association’s ah- trine fending scorer with 33^62 points, has jJSJL ^ 
readied an oral agreement with the Los Angeles Lakers to extend his J2. oWyoff^ 5 ™ ^ 

mflliTO annual contract through the 1986-87 season, the team announced Gmeral Manager George Young 

n ^ tv*., T-UU-- ., 50 .v- of the New York Giants said his 


permitted. men defiberatdy try to get the 

D quarterback? 

On Wednesday, the owners were Dan Fonts, the artist who plays 
to decide on the use. of (devised quarterback for the San Diego 
instant replays to aid officials on 
questionable calls. If approved, the 


WP— Alexander, GutXcza. Bkm. T— 3:11 Cincinnati 
A— 37J57. 


Playoff Schedule 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
[St. Louis taflAs serlt*. 3: 2) 
Od. «! LUfl Angelas A St. LowlS 1 
Ocl. 10: Las Angelas 8. SL Louis 3 
Oct. 12: SI. Louis 4. Las Angeles 3 
OCt. 13: St. Louis 12. Los Angolas 2 
Oc». 14: St Louis 3, Las Angola* 2 
Oct. 15: St Louis at Las Angeles 
x-Oct. 17: SI. Louis at Las Angeles 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
(Series tied. 3: 3) 

Ocl. 9: Toronto A Kansas Cirr 1 
Oct. 9: Toronto A Kansas City S 
Ocl. II: Kansas a tv «. Toronto S 
Oct. 13: Toronto 3. Kansas Ctrv 1 
OcL 13: Kansas Cllv Z Toronto 0 
Oct. 19: Kansas Cllv S. Taranto 3 
Oct. 16: Kansas atv at Toronia 

WORLD SERIES 
Oct 19: at American League 
Oct. 30: at American League 
Oct. 33: at National League 
Oct. 23: at Motional League 
x-Oct 24: at National League 
. x-oct. at: at A men cor Leaoue 
x-Oct. 27: at American League 
(»-lt necessary I 


3439 

INDIVIDUAL 

Qaartarwidu 


174* Frvar. N.E. 
Linos. Pitt, 
uni. Buff. 


, ”, , McMofun. Oil. 

“ ® “ 1 BortkawsLl. All, 

« VX xl M ? Montana. S.F. 

® Li Simms, Gionis 

fS ? jaworskL Phil. 

,2J 37 3 Kramer. Minn. 

pwliiri rilrkwv ft a 

N ° YA ?“ S L0N ? Z G . BroX'^s 

S !S M «7 DMhl *- Dfl "- 

fr ,!r! “ umtaH. stu- 


* Wilder. TE. 

DorseH, DdlL 
J n Rings. All. 

, Povlon. Oil. 

‘ Riggins. W*n. 


TOTAL DEPEN5E 

Ygras Rush Pass 

1537 551 «86 

1620 583 1037 

1665 524 1141 

1731 7«7 934 

1868 555 1313 

1890 513 1377 

10 1913 771 1142 

3006 673 1334 

3063 767 1296 

3066 751 1315 

7143 698 1444 

2156 1012 1146 

3289 1063 1337 

3397 72 2 1575 

INDIVIDUAL 
Quarterbacks 
ATT COM YDS TD INT 
li. 154 71 1380 10 6 

611. Ill 69 738 S 1 

3D1 123 1433 ID S 

IS 209 111 17*5 11 7 

II. 101 57 678 6 3 


ATT COM YDS TD INT -Mntgmrv. Rdre 


75 1084 10 
73 930 4 


201 I1J 
90 11J 

99 I1J 
84 ItLS 


3D1 123 1433 10 S 

209 111 17*5 11 7 

101 57 678 6 3 

204 11* 14*8 10 8 

143 75 «** 8 5 

142 85 1103 5 7 

317 129 1437 B 9 

174 91 1226 8 6 

ROllteri 

ATT YDS AVG LG TD 
144 575 4j0 24 3 

115 557 43 35 2 

128 535 43 33 2 

90 423 4.7 26 4 

89 At 46 SI 5 

Receivers 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 


Kicks If Returners 
NO YDS AVG 


European Soceer 


Tusker. Hou. 

15 

411 

27.4 

53 

0 

VJoftnsrt. On. 

9 

232 

254 

36 

a 

Moriin, Cln. 

15 

371 

2*7 

43 

0 

Starring, N.E. 

18 

425 

216 

S3 

0 

James. 5.D. 

T1 

255 

23J 

46 

0 


Wilder, T.B. 

35 

216 

S3 

17 

Craig. S.F. 

34 

415 

124 

46 

Monk. wash. 

33 

290 

8-8 

31 

Hill. DalL 

32 

*51 

14.1 

49 

Cotale. DalL 

32 

386 

12.1 

13 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING S 

OROUP 2 

Czechoslovokla 2. Sweden I Brooks. Cln. 

Points: Eosl Germany II; Portugal 8; Swe- Paige, Jels 


Scoring (Touchdowns) 

TD Rush Roe Ret Pfs 


den, docttaskiYOkla 7; Malta 1. 

GROUP! 

Romania 0. Northern Ireland I 
GROUP 6 

Norway 1. Denmark 5 
Soviet Union 2, Ireland 0 


Points: Denmark 9; Soviet union 8; Swlt- Leativ, Jels 
zeriond 7: trelond t>; Norway *. Breech. Cln. 

Remaining Matches: Oct. 30. Soviet Union 
vs. Nor wav: Nay. 13. Switzerland vs. Norway, NAT 

Ireland vs. Danmark. 


INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
Greece 0. Bulgaria 2 


Tumor, Sea. 7 0 7 

Upas. Pin. 6 0s 

Byner, Ctev. 5 4 1 

Scaring (Kicking) 
PAT FG 

Kurils. Den. 16-19 13-16 

Lowery, K.C. 19-15 12-13 

Revelz. Mia. . 16-16 11-13 



NO 

YDS LONG 

AVG 

Lanoeia, Giants 

29 

1312 

68 

454 

Saxo. Doll. 

21 

1216 

57 

*511 

Coleman. Minn. 

27 

1302 

63 

44J 

Hotelier. Rams 

32 

1424 

67 

44 J 

Garda, TJ3. 

26 

1148 

61 

444 

Punt Returner* 




NO YDS AVG 

LG 

TD 


Elfard. Rams 
. - o. Bright. TE. 

« P « Sion ley. G.B. 
T? “ McCukv. Gnls 
„ "I Jenkins, wsn. 


22-23 H 51 « 


11 313 19A 

11 133 1IJ7 

11 118 10J 

19 195 TOJ 

« « IU 

Kickoff 

NO YDS AVG 
9 396 329 


Transition 


. • . , UIS 1 1 U1 wuuu, UiC l uii i p i Mica in raw*, umuj- Auuuivauwu. »iw rruurr am in .oiinnol 

i 1 # hostile aU-timc playoff scoring reewdof 4,550 points, has been named andkSl 

’ the NBA s most valuable player sax times. 


Quotable 


al games and local games. There 
can't be that kind of favoritism. 
Also, I don’t want the official to 
think that there is a higher author- 
ity in the game than him. * 1 
□ 

Sid Gflhnan, the Hall of Faxner 


• Australian PrterTluMnsoo, leading money winner on the seakss golf y ^ n 
uw : on Ms worldwde travels: “I was tjarmed by the of ^an, annum, the Hall of Famer 



T> • BASEBALL 

OOXing Notional Leaeoe 

— 52. . ATLANTA— Named Willie Slorgeir ilrsr 

base 03001 and bluing Instructor. 

Divisional Ratings 

The Ring magazine rating* Ibrovoh Oef. 13 01 scouting and Sieve Noworyta assistant dl- 
(WBA ebampion-a; WBC cbamploa-c.- IBF rector O* mln W leagues and Plover develop. 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


Rhymes. Mnn. 

13 

382 

29.4 

55 

0 





Monroe. S.F. 

11 

283 

23J 

40 

0 

TOTAL OFFENSE 


Free mil. TE. 

20 

507 

2S.4 

58 

0 


Yards 

Rush 

Pass 

Martin. NO. 

12 

298 

24J) 

*9 

0 

Dallas 

2352 

741 

1*11 

Scaring (Touchdown*! 



Cnicago 

2340 

899 

1441 

, 

TD Rush Rec 

Rei 

PIS 

Giants 

2231 

660 

1571 

Crate. s.F. 


8 

4 4 

0 

48 

San Francisco 

2134 

824 

1310 

McKinnon. Chi. 


6 

0 6 

0 

36 

SI. Louis 

19*7 

733 

1264 

Brown, Minn. 


5 

3 2 

0 

30 

Green Bay 

1934 

893 

1043 

Dickerson. Rams 


5 

5 0 

0 

30 

Washington 

1931 

1098 

■30 

Part an. an. 


5 

4 1 

0 

30 

Minnesota 

1904 

566 

1338 

Scoring (Kicking! 



Atlanta • 

1880 

765 

1115 



PAT 

FG 

Le Pts 

Tampa Bor 

1850 

600 

1250 

Butler, Chi. 


31-21 

14-18 

38 

63 

New Orleans 

1833 

. 71 ® 

1117 

Sesrficn. Doll. 


I8-1B 

11-18 

S3 

51 

Rams 

1729 

788 

941 

Andersen. NjO. 


12-13 

IMS 

55 

48 

Philadelphia 

i6sa 

707 

973 

Luekhurst, AIL 


11-11 

13-12 

52 

47 

Detroit 

1604 

485 

1119 

Aiklnson, Glams 


9.JD 

9-12 

49 

43 


Chamnioa-I; WBA and WBC diumien-z) : 

HEAVYWEIGHT: Chomoton: Mldioet 
Spinks. U5. 1. PHikien Thomas-c. Ui 3. Lorry 
Holmes. U -S. 3, Ttm wimerspoaa Ui. a Tony 
Tubte-a. US. 5. Greg Page, UE. 

CRUISER WEIGHT: OwrmUoo: Bernard 


ment. 

OAKLAND— Announced It will not exercise 
its ootion on designated hitler Dusty Baker. 
BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 
CL EVLEAND— Stoned John Boalev. point 


U.S. College Team and Individual Leaders 


BootoiK, U5. 1. Dwight Muhammad Qawi-a. Quorfl ,D 0 muttlyoar contract. Auburn 

UJS. 2. Eddie Mustafa Munammad. UE. 3. NEW JERSEY Reached a com root agree- Nebraska 
Alamo Rat II H. U5. 4. Carlos DeLeon. Puerto rnen » w1m Wko GmlnskL cenier. flrignam 1 


Rica 5. Piet Crous, South Africa. 

LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT: Championship 
vacant. 1, Marvin Johnson. U5. 2. Prince 


HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 
BUFFALO— Traded Bob Sauva. aoaltend- 


Brignam Young 
Miami (Flal 
'Purdue 


Mama Mohammad, Ghana, iwiltie Edworcb. oT.iootlengotoratniriLroutidPieii inttie 1986 Wasnineton St. 
VIA. 4. EOdle Davis. S. Joon-Mori6 Emote. «hlrv draft. Indiana 


DETROIT— Signed Sieve Vzerman, cenier, Kansas 


TEAM OFFENSE SladHn, Va 11 II kl 2J0 

Total Belli. Fresno 13 11 SUt, 7J20 

Ploys Yds Yds pg All-Purpose Running 

395 2S33 SOSA Rush Pec PR k'OR Yds YdsPo 

304 2483 4«U MeCarim. Nvr 557 167 73 728 1024 VKZ 

ung Itb 3950 *91.7 Jacksn. Aubrn 991 0 0 0 991 1983 

I 373 244 1 488-3 Palmer. Tempi 966 89 0 6* 1139 1898 

404 2366 4713 Cherrv. Oregon 104 123 0 205 933 166.4 

362 2349 4698 GJvins. La vile 74 323 138 547 1002 1808 

St. *63 2808 4688 interceptions 

*23 2338 4656 . G No Yd* TD IPG 


MIDDLEWEIGHT: Chomoloa: Marvelous » 0 seven-vear comma. 


40* 2366 *73J Cherrv. Oregon 
362 2349 «69A Glvins. Lavlle 
463 2808 *68-0 
*23 2338 *656 . 

*46 3742 457J1 Walker. E Caro 


UE.*.DohU fc UJ i . i l«ro,Graham.Br l «,. _ c^EGE 

six touchdown passes since Gul- Hanford FHxnn junior middleweight: champion: fairleigh DiCKiNsofi-Named c 

man joined the Eagles last weds at Thomas Hearns-c.UE.l.JolwMugtibl.Ugan. Gregory asslslani baskelball coach. 

Npvj OrlrnnC I net mnnth da. 2. AiUkeMcCaHum-a.U-S.1 Canos Santos. 

V, _ Orlea ns. L -ESt ^niQ, Pu*rto Rloo. 4, Dovev HWore. Ui 5. Mork ■— * — 

Jaworski had been so ineffective Chargers, will be out a month or MeoaL us. r* 1 

that Philadelphia replaced him more with the knee injury he suf- welterweight.- cMnoionsBbi«acan>. Jj.OCK.eY 

wilh a roolda, RandaU Cunaing- toed Sept 29 «heo hit on two ; 1 

Bam. successive plays by the Cleveland ua. 5 . siman Brawn, ua ]\HJ. Stan (linos 

□ Browne JUNIOR WELTERWEIGHT; Chcmptoo- b 

When the New York Giants Jort When qaenioaed, Oavaland 


Marvin Hogler** U.S. I. John Mugabt, Upon. PITTSBUHGrH— Named Rloc Ketioe dlrec- 

aa. 3, James Studar. ua. X James Ktaienen. tar ol pro scouting. 

UE,4.Doti Leo. U J. 5. Hercrt Granam, Britain. COLLEGE 

JUNIOR MIDDLEWEIGHT: Champion: FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON— Named Den- Oklahoma 


TEAM DEFENSE 
Total 


Nordiques Stay Unbeaten ^ 

_ . V with a toolde, Randall 


■\ _ . . , - while limiting the opposition to a ham. successive plays by ibe Cleveland 

total of five goals in four games. □ . Browns. 

•■* QUEBEC CITY —The Quebec Quebec defenseman Nonnand When the New York Giants lost When questioned, Q eve! and 
Nordiques are playing opportums- Rochefort opened - the scoring at a dose one to Cincinnati on Sun- comerback Hanford Dixon siud: 
optinnstic hpekey in the young 13-27 of the first period when he day, 35-30, Coach BQ1 Parcells “If the Raiders or Bears were play- 
^National Hodcey League season. . a shot from the slot bat got said: “Nobody got anything done ing and knocked Fouts out of the 
l “Going so farm the playoffs tot the rebound and pushed if behind today — I mean nobody." Appar- game, do you think people would 
• season surely gives us more eonfi- goalie Mflce Lint. On apowerplay eotly included in his indictment' be calling it a fluke?” He was say- 
? dence, and other teams respect us eariy in the second period, Peter was quartffback Phil Simms, who ing, in other wordvthat it was no 
1 — ----- . Stastny beat Lhit after gatheringin had just passed for 513 yards— the aeddent. 

1VRT imrrTSS the reboand of a sbtai by his broth- second-most in NFL history. A week before the game, Cieve- 


WELTERWEIGHT; Cboraptonsoto voCUJil. 
1. Donald Curry -a l, US. 2. Milton MCCrorv-c. 
UA. 1 Tommy Avon, u S. *. Mourle* Blacker, 
US. 5. Simon Brawn, US 
JUNIOR WELTERWEIGHT; CBcmato m 
sWp yaamL I. Lonnie Smlttx, US. Z utxjiao 
Sacoo-o. Argealla.3, BUI Casteila, lii. 4. Ron- 
nie Side Ms. U-S- 5. Aaron Pryor. UE. 


Hocke] 

N tft . S tandings 


Central Mien. 
Arkansas 
Mlcfiioan 
iov»a Slat* 
Southern CoL 
UH*a 

Memohis Si. 

Florida 

Auburn 


368 •wm *56.4 wnife. Term 
ENSE Thurman, So Cal 

Phi loot. SoCaro 

PloyB-Yd* Yailto NorlhnatrvOre 51 
IfO 363 12143 
252 809 502JZ 

320 1014 3188 Colbert. Auburn 
290 1100 2200 

373 1332 3*6.4 ELSmllh. Miss 
340 1077 7693 Wlncfwsrr. OklO 
365 1340 3698 Lilli#- IIP 


75 0 IJ3 
*0 0 I4H 
48 1 1X0 
82 0 83 
H I K 


381 1698 3838 
337 1419 2636 

293 1425 2858 Tucker, uian 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pli CF GA 


INDIVIDUAL 
Total Often** 

>05 Alto YOSBO 


NHL POOJS 


the rdxxmd of a shot by his broth- second-most in NFL history. A week before the game, Cfeve- 

er. Cincmnati Coach Sam Wyehe land Coach Marty Schouenheimer 

The Nordiques made it 34) at seemed to have a better handle on put together a red of Fouts's great- 


nwn* nnur w «id- Anton Stastnv . Ui<UJ r 11 M uauuic uu pui wgeiner area oi routs s great* 

h^Goals and assisurf 5:50 ^ **““ Mtoa Wp««i «n est pfeysand showed it to his team, 

who scored two go als a na assisted received a 2-on-l break- baD games,” be said. “The two Jt got then- attention. “You always 


T^ - sw&y P*** itom ;?aul and dungs that win baDgames are big try to get a key plaver'wi of the 
I victory over Hartford here Tues* w t - th T ^ nl ° anA rv-il 


. „ . r. beat Liut with a low shot on the plays and turnovers. 

short side. □ 

Brent Ashton, who completes a . Anton Stastny’s second goal Perhaps the. most remarkable 
line with Stasmy brothers Petet rarrvi at 1 1:47 of the final period; performance Sunday was turned in 
and Anton, agreed. “We finished fc took a behind-the-net feed from by Steve Grogan, the New England 
wdl tot year and it just seems to be his brother and pumped one in Patriot backup quarterback who 
carrying on," he said. “We're play- from the slot. hadn’t taken a snap since the third 

m 8T as a team and everybody is Goal lender Mario Gossdm, who game of last seasonand ended up 
a»tributmR.” blanked Toronto on Saturday, was having one of his best games ever. 


days and turnovers. game," said Dixon . “You want to 

□ - do it legally” he added. “And we 

Perhaps the. most remarkable di<J it legally.” 
lerformance Sunday was turned in ' That sort of thing doesn’t hap- 
ly Steve Grogan, the New England pm often in baseball. It doesn't 


victory was Quebec’s fourth beaten on a power play by Joigen Grogan, an 1 Ith-year veteran, 
rar, while the Whalers, the Pederson with 2:16 left in the entered the game toe in die second 


mgT as a team and everybody is Goal ten 

*f contributing” ' Wanked T 

!_■' _ The victoy was Quebec’s fourth .beaten on 
in a row, while the Whalers, the Petlerson 
>• only team unbeaten in exhibition game. 

• play, took ihdr first loss of the year Gossdir 

against two victories. ataboutl 

4 The Nordiqiies have, shown, a usually 
fine blend of offense and defense,' said. Tvo 


Gossdm wasn’t particularly up- by- Brace Smith and left with a * ucac me xuies agamsi mu m preseason 

set about his lost bid foe a shutoot separated left shoulder. The score the NFL, to be sure, and they are rndtaw «, Bonon w 
one per year,” he was >0, Buffala at the time. After enforced by officials who used to 
dy had one, so Tm fumbling the first snap and being play the game. But few are former mUwoww tw, urhi til or 
mt tte resL" sacked on the second, Grogan com- quarterbacks. (WP. LAT, NYT) piwni* ha doiios m 


Patriot backup quarter Pack who happen often in basketball, which 
hadn't taken a snap since the third jg played only as vigorously as hu- 
gaxne of last season and ended up mans ran play It when not wearing 
having one of his best games ever, helmets and shoulder pads. Only in 
Grogan, an 1 Ith-year veteran, boxing and football, it seems, is 
entered the game toe in the second there a rationale of “trying to gel a 
quarter after Tony Eason was hit key player out of the game” 
by Brace Smith and left with a There are rules against that in 


Olflutt-& Mexico. 3. Rodcy LockrWr. U£1 
Mario MorTIner, Mexico. *■ AJfroda Lavno, 
Panama. 5, Roger Maywaoitw. u.S. 


LaPorte. Puena Rica 4, Marcos VHknom. 541 

Mflklco. 5. Jaefcw Board. U8 
JUNIOR FEATHERWEIGHT: CnmMeiw SL , 
shlg vacant. 1. victor Calielas4. Puerro Rica. Toronto 
2,LupaPlnl(ir-&Mexlea.3,JuaiM8ca,U^.4 Oeirslt 
Lorts Stecca Italy. S, Jaime Garza. U-S, MMrtouoto 
BANTAMWEIGHT: CmhboIim: Rlcbard CHJcagg 
SoBdevoLa, US, 1. Jlra wwanatie, Jaoan. 2. 

Mlgggl Laro-c. CotomMa. 1> Kaosal Galaxy. Catoary 
Thalia nd *. GoOv Canlzsles, U.5. S. Daniel Virion Ion 
Zaragoza, Mexico. Vancouver 


el BenwLMexlaa.lHiiarl6lapa1»4i,Pana- 
ma.4.Joe* OUvo, U8. s, Svoor Babv (Was. 
US. 


New Jersey 

3 

D 

p 

6 

13 

B 

Everett. Purdue 

1810 

7J 

362J 

Philadelphia 


1 

a 

4 

13 

10 

Basra B vu 

3840 

7 A 

mo 

NY IcJanOara 

i 

1 

0 

2 

7 

■ 

Norsetn. Kansas 

1986 

7.1 

311 .0 

ny Ronpers 

i 

3 

0 

n 

8 

13 

Pave, Stanld 

1622 

6 J) 

324.4 

Pittsburgh 

l 

3 

0 

2 

8 

11 

TrxRoOmn. Term 

1169 

7J 

292-3 

Washington 

0 

3 

0 

0 

5 

12 


Rush Ing 



Adams Dtvtekm 





Car Yds Aw Yds gg 

Quebec 

4 

0 

o 

8 

IV 

5 

Jackson. Auburn 

138 W1 

73 

198-2 

Boston 

3 

0 

0 

6 

IP 

5 

Palmer, Temple 

189 9e6 

5.1 

161-0 

Hart torn 

3 

i 

0 

4 

14 

10 

Thomas, OklaSi 

140 747 

S3 

1494 

Buffalo 

2 

1 

0 

4 

16 

s 

White. MktiSi 

155 711 

4j4 

1422 

Montreal 

2 

i 

0 

4 

13 

13 

Duoard. SMU 

72 493 

64 

1233 


Punt ReluriH 

Na.VdsTD Avg 
Tucker, uian 10 381 ) 2f.i 

SctUNSOes, Srrcse 10 190 i 19 jo 

Londa- Army 9 !M 0 16.7 

Green. Duke 6 98 0 I6J 

Melcoll. Texos 13 196 0 15.1 

Kickoff Returns 

NO Yas TD Avg 
Glvins. Lsvito 16 547 7 343 

TJacrson. Go $ lit D 313 

CallMua Fulrln 7 317 1 31.0 

Tucker, Ulah 13 367 1 30J . 

Johnson. UTEP 13 361 1 30.1 


CFL Leaders 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris DtvfaUoo 
lb 110 3 

0 13 0 3 

1 0 2 11 

wig 0 2 111 

o 0 3 0 0 

troytbn Division 
y 2 0 0 4 1 


B Shu la, Alatxna 
21 Bell. Fla 
17 Lana, lowa 
17 KarsoMs, oniosi 
Tn-HoDnsn, Twin 


PMdng 

Rating Kennera. woe 
AttCaYasTas pis Passagiia. B.c. 
76 90 738 7 174.9 Ruoff, Hflm 
130 79 1103 10 1638 Dixon. Earn 
159 106 1388 1$ 159J Hay. Cal 
113 70 958 10 1588 
134 81 1116 8 1S2S 

Reeelvlog Reaves. Wag 

Gnu t\ Yds Cl oa Jenkins, B.C. 


5CORING 

TD C FG 5 PIS 
0 40 3« TB ITS 
0 J7 26 21 156 
a 78 26 21 137 
C 39 70 13 113 
0 19 25 54 109 
RUSHING 

No Yds Avg TD 
341 1313 58 l 
173 894 52 6 


Basketbal 


scoring at feast four goals a game not worried about the resL 


jy had one, so Tm fumbling the first 


sacked on the 


and being 

ogan corn- 


new Jersey 113. Son AMorto ill 
Houston lift. Pni lode loti la 133 


Vancouver 2 10 4 13 11 

Muster. Slanto 


5 

45 430 

94 

Hobart, Ham 

95 778 83 6 

Las Angeles 0 3 0 0 It 20 

D. Wiliams, ill 


5 

*1 538 

SJ 

O unison. Edm 

99 630 SA 8 

Winnipeg 0 3 0 0 8 17 

Garter, Purdue 
Bvfiuiiii Ore ST 


5 

37 400 
4* m 

7/* 

73 

waifs. OH 

7B 533 68 4 

pAre mft 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

Zeno, Tuione 


6 

*0 593 

e •*7 

6.7 


rMuino 

ah com Yds IC td 

Minnesota 18 1-9 


Scoring 




Clrmenls. wpg 

387 740 3471 17 15 

Pittsburgh 8 0 1-9 


TD KP FG PB PIPS 

Dewall. EC 

404 249 3461 10 20 

sneaden (11. Chotxrt Ml. ruckawsli 131,- 

Jackson. Auburn 

IO 

0 

a so 

124 

Poepas. Sosk 

409 2*5 3110 16 8 

Bellows (li.GranomflJ.siieHMBeei! Min- 

VWille. BwIGrn 

n 

0 

0 te 

no 

Dunlpen Earn 

357 Sl« JIM 19 |6 

nesota tan Nunachei b-6-io— 2*; Pittsburgh 

Du pa rd. SMU 

7 

D 

0 42 

103 

Barnes, Mil 

376 322 2943 20 11 

(on Beaupre) 7*18-25. 

Tonev. TenAAM 

7 

0 

0 43 

103 


RECEIVING 

Hariiont 0 1 1—1 

BMlL Fresno 

0 

19 11 52 

10.4 


No Yds Avg td 

Qfwftec 1 2 1—4 


Field Goals 



Fernandez, b.c 

01 1483 1 73 to 

Rochefort 12», pjhastnv 12), A-5taBrtv 3 


FGA 

FG Pel FGPG 

Bavd, WOO 

65 1185 1&2 11 

{2},Pettersenf2i.3iwnenoaai: Hartford fan 

war lev. kv 

14 

13 

.99* 

no 

Popiawski, woo 

68 1140 14.9 4 

GOtaelln} 4-3-13—19: Quebec (on Liut) 11-18- 

Zendefas. Art* 

17 

13 

JO* 

040 

Greer, Tar 

65 1071 145 8 

12-33. 

DlettrteaBaflSr 

17 

14 

434 

243 

Eigoard, Sasfc 

70 1053 15a 3 











Page 1* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


No Place for Dumping DlCtbllStCrS 






r.-'CdtiM 

mm 


people 

The FBFs Disney World 


m 


can'l diaxse of in tbe United 
States. 

“I would like to purchase a 25- 
inch TV set," 

“You came to the right place. 
Simple Simon has the best video 
bargains in (he city.” 

“What do 1 do with my «wt 
oner 

“Anything you like. We never 
tell a customer 
what to do with 
his TV set." 

“Will you give 
me a trade- in"” 

“You’re kid- 
ding. Da you 
know how many 
TV sets in the 
U. S. are thrown 
out every day?" 

“Would you 
haul it away if I BochwaM 
buy the new oner 

“I may be simple, but I'm not 
crazy. Thousands and thousands of 
people are stuck with aging TV 
sets. They can’t sell than, they 
can't give them away, and they 
can't throw them out. Garbage men 
don’t even want them.” 

□ 

“So what does one do with the 
old seir 


“The same thing you do with 
nuclear waste. Find a deep hole in 
Sooth Carolina and bury it.” 

“1 can't even lift my TV.'* 

“Then soak it with gasoline and 
set a match to it." 

“In the living room?” 

“If it will make you feel better, 
do it in the kitchen. Look mister, 
there is something you have to un- 


Some ' Want to Be Buried in Pasta,’ 
Others Can’t Resist Pecan Pie . 
Or Poori and Paratha 


j. Edgar Hoover kept watch on 
movies made by Walt Disney to 
ensure they did not depict FBI 
agents as foolish, and the boittil 
nwmiiHwt Disney to make changes 
m the movies “Moon Pilot" and 
“That Dam Cat." Hoover consid- 
ered Disney a friend and a contact, 
but felt betrayed when bumbling 
characters identified as federal se- 
curity agents in “Moon mot,” a 
1962 film, were referred to as FBI 
agents by movie reviewers, accord- 
ing to Tbe Arizona Republic. The 
newspaper died an FBI file it ob- 
tained through a Freedom of Infor- 
mation Act request. “Moon PDot" 
inchidsd scenes of incompetent 
FBI agents losing surveillance on 
an Air Fence pilot chosen to ride in 
a rocket to the moon, the file stat- 
ed. After receiving a summary of 
the script. Hoover directed agents 
to tell Disney “the bureau will 
strongly object to any portrayal of 
the FBI in this film.” Disney bowed 
to the bureau's wishes and said he 
would diimge the bnmbUng offi- 
cials to federal security agents in 
the fi 7m, ft i f bnng h be thought tbe 
fhimg e would be “unrealistic,** a 
memo in the file stated. When the 
studio announced plans to produce 
“That Darn Cat,” Disney notified 
the bureau that be intended to 
make the movie from the book, 
“Undercover Cat,” wind) was writ- 
ten by a framer FBI agent. Gordon 
Gordon and bis wife, Mikfeed The 
movie revolved around the stray cf 
a large cat enlisted by the FBI to 
solve a bank robbery and kidnap- 
ping of a teller. An August 1963 
inwnn in ihe FBI file comp lained 
about the potential nyyimpiimm. 
tary treatment of the FBI and Gor- 
don’s capitalizing on bis former af- 
filiation to further Us own personal 

motives. In Angost 1964, a memo 
from the Los Angeles office to 
Hoover quoted an “established 
source at the Disney studios" who 
said the screenplay for the movie 
would depict *Yhe FBI in a most 
complimentary manner.” . . . 
Penthouse ma gariiig says that the 
bureau also kept a file on the late 
Rode Hudson containing inform- 
ers' reports that tbe actor was a 
homosexual. Tbe magazine quotes 
an FBI file from “a confidential 
informant” that he had had “an 
affair” with the star and from per- 
sonal knowledge knew Hudson was 
a homosexual. Hudson was not the 
subject of an investigation. When 
Johme Gibson, FBI spokesman. 


bassi 


By Enid Nemy 

New York Times Service 


dercumd The greatest thing about 
America is ibai you can buy the 


N EW YORK — Talk to Anne 
Meara about diets and all 



America is that you can buy the 
newest appliances known to man. 
The worst thing about it is that you 
can't get rid of the old ones. Once 
you own a fridge, a washing ma- 
chine or a TV set you’re stuck with 
it for the rest of your life. That’s 
why you see so many of them on 
people's back porches.” 

“1 have a mind to keep my old 
TV and have it fixed. How much 
would it cost?" 

“Five hundred and fifty dollars.” 

“You haven’t even seen it yet.” 

“Every TV set costs S550 to fix.” 

“For that kind of money 1 could 
buy a new one.” 

“1 know. That’s why we charge 
$550 to repair the old one.” 

-□ ‘ 


Tlintstones’ Fete 
25th Anniversary 


United Press International 

L OS ANGELES — The actors 
rind actresses whose voices 
brought the Flints tones cartoon 
characters to life celebrated tbe 
prehistoric family’s 25 years in tele- 
vision with a “Yabba Dabba Doo” 
at a Hollywood gala. 

Actors dressed as Fred and Wil- 
ma Flimstone and their neighbors 
Barney and Betty Rubble stepped 
out of a motorized replica of their 
Stone Age limo Monday in the 
glare of camera lights at the Ran- 
cho La Brea Tar Pits museum, 
whose foyer was redecorated to 
look like a neolithic cave. Watering 
holes offered such delicacies as bar- 
ren of brontosaurus and primeval 
veggies. 

William Hanna and Joseph Bar- 
bera created “The Flints tones,” the 
first adult animated cartoon series 
on U. S. prime-time television. 


“Perhaps 1 could donate my TV 
set to a senior citizens’ home or an 
orphana g e." 

“I wouldn’t try it. They’ve been 
stung with too many second-hand 
sets, and they're not about to ac- 
cept a used one. Why don’t youjust 
‘put yours in tbe attic and forget 
about it like everybody else does?” 

“We don’t have any room. Our 
old stove is in the attic and, come to 
think of it, so is tbe sink that came 
with the house.” 

“Listen. I'm busy. Do you want 
the TV or don’t you?” 

“Yes, I do if you could just give 
me some idea how we can move the 
other one out.’’ 

“If I could tell you that Fd be 
able to sell twice as many new TV 
sets.” 

O 


“What if I told you I’d be willing 
to pay to get rid of the old set? How 
much would you charge?” 

“Where do you liver 
“Wesley Heights, off New Mexi- 
co and Cathedral” 

“It will cost exactly $550.” 

“But that's as much as you'll 
charge me to fix it!” 

“Mister, we don’t make any 
money hauling away sets. We just 
do it to beautify America.” 


1^1 Meara about diets and all 
she can think about is eating. In 
fact, it doesn’t take much to sepa- 
rate Meara and her good inten- 
tions, just good pasta, some bread 
to sop up the sauce, white or dark 
chocolate and maybe some hot 
fudge sauce over ice cream with a 
dollop of butterscotch thrown in. 

“I want to be buried in pasta.” 
said Meant, who is filming “My 
Utd? Girl” with James Earl 
Jones and Geraldine Page and 
who said she was getting hungry 
even as she was talking. “Pasta is 
my downfall, particularly angel 
hair marinara.” 

Meara allowed that temptation 
might seek out other people to 
wreak havoc with their diets, but 
it didn’t have far to go to look for 
her — she was already there, 
waiting for iL 

“When I was commuting to the 
West Coast to do ‘Archie Bun- 
ker’s Place,* I tried to fly Ameri- 
can Airlines because they had a 
sundae on their dinner flight." 
she said. 

At this paint in the conversa- 
tion. Meara said she was really 
starving, but she wanted to ex- 
plain that she wasn’t a completely 
lost cause. 

“They had whipped cream 
too,” siw said, “but I didn’t take 
that.” 

On the other hand, “anything 
with whipped cream” is Mary 
Ann Restivo’s Waterloo — choc- 
olate mousse, souffles, “pecan 
and any kind of pie, you name iL” 

Restivo. the designer and presi- 
dent of the fashion concern bear- 
ing her name, said the end of a 
meal usually spelled the end of 
her diet. 

“I can’t give up wonderful des- 
serts,” she said. 

The desserts have to be Italian 
to lead Doris Sassower astray. 

“They’re beyond my power to 
cope,” said Sassower, a lawyer in 
While Plains, New York, who 
specializes in divorce and custody 
matters. 


Her favorites were, she said, 
“beyond description,” but she 
tried valiantly. 

“Ricotla cheese cake with 
chocolate morsels baked in it,” 
she said. “And tiramuu. a sponge 
cake concoction with mascarpone 
cheese, cocoa and espresso, laced 
with liqueur. And then there’s 
tartuffo, a rich ice cream with al- 
monds, semisweet chocolate. 
Grand Marnier and cherries.” 

Ice cream, ice cream and more 
ice cream, said Pat Koch Thaler, 
the assistant dean, division of 
arts, sciences and humanities at 
the School of Continuing Educa- 
tion, New York University. 

“Butter pecan would really be 
my downfall, especially with but- 
terscotch sauce,” said Thaler, 
who is Mayor Edward I. Koch's 
sister but wouldn't budge off her 
diet for his favorite, Chinese 
food. “If there wasn’t any ice 
cream around, really good 
cheesecake, apple pie, pastries, 
fniir tarts — rd go off my diet in 
a flash for anything sweet” 

Red meat is Barnard Straus's 
downfall when be is watching cal- 
ories. Straus is a vice president of 
L. F. Rothschild, Unierbexg, 
Tow bin, tbe investment banking 
firm. 

“Sirloin steaks,” he began, 
“porterhouse steaks, lamb 
chops." He paused to ruminate: 
“They're the most delicious 
thing s in tbe world.” 

Put Joanna Simon, the opera 
singer, and Indian food together 
and let tbe scale register trim! it 
may. 

“1 love all the curries and the 
breads, poori, paratha and aloo- 
paratka, that fabulous bread 
stuffed with potatoes,” she said, 
sounding as though she was sing- 
ing a beautiful aria.” 

The aria went on.“I love rice, 
too,” she said. “That isn’t sup- 
posed to be so bad, but to eat rice 
without daL which is like a lentil 
soup, is crazy.” 

Bran muffins with raisins, and 
warm and doughy bread “with a 
real crunchy crust” are enough to 
make Barbara Munves give up 









it m 







* ■/ .. : ■ . 


Actress Anne Meara: Pass tbe angel hair marinara. 


the ghost when it comes to diet- 
ing. 

Munves, tbe president of 
James II Galleries, which deals 
in antiques, said that usu- 
ally a mainstay of diets, were also 
a hazard because she considered a 
dressing without oil an abomina- 
tion. 

It was all a question of what 
mood he was in, said Glenn Bira- 
baum, the owner of Mortimer’s 
Restaurant. Despite bis constant 
proximity to food. Birabaitm said 
only a few things templed him. 

“Potatoes,” he said without 
hesitation. “All kinds of potatoes, 
especially lyonnaise. And very 
good bread — that’s some combi- 
nation." 

Break a diet? Never, said Vic- 
tor Borge, who has been enter- 
taining audiences around the 
world for more than 50 years. 

Borge said he bad an iron wiB 


once he made up his mind to do 
something. For instance, 10 years 
ago be gave op his three-to-four- 
pack-a-day cigarette habit 
“I just decided that my body 
had been good to me and that 1 
was doing a very foolish tiling — 
I never smoked another ciga- 
rette,” he said. “I take a puff of 


one before every performance 
and 1 walk onstage blowing oat 
tbe smoke, and it’s always tempt- 
ing but that’s all” 

As for food, he said, he fol- 
lowed an invariable procedure 
when it was necessary to least 


temptation. 

“I just look at the dinner roll or 
hamburger or chocolate cake 
sternly and I say to them: T know 
yon. fve tasted you thousands of 
times, but you’re not going to get 
me this time.”* 

And, he concluded trium- 
phantly, “They don’t” 


was asked why the FBI kepi such a 
rile, he said the bureau would have 
no commeuL 

□ 


The singer Diana Rom, 41. w* 
offered a role in the TV senes Dal- 
las.” but she reportedly turned it 
down to play wife to tire man who 
is playing a stoning role in her me. 
Ross said she plans to many the 
Norwegian shipping tycoon Arne 
Naess, 47, a divorced fuuier ot 
three who recently led an expedi- 
tion to ti?** summit of Mount Ever- 
est, The New York Post reported. 

■ □ 




Yoko Ooo's donation of marble 
slabs, pews and an iron chandelier 
m.fce np one of the most unusual 
gifts the Salvation Anpy has .re- 
ceived, but the org a n izati on says it 
is grateful. Pieces of a marbtecha- 
peC narrowed rrom Sl Joseph Irmr- 
mary m 1980, when the hospital 
was demolish «!, were donated to 
die Lom a wDe branch for whatever 
purpose it chose; said MqH* WB- 
farw Thomas. “We’re glad to have 
it,” Thomas said. The chipd will 
be auctioned off on Saturday. A 
trick group named Riring Sun 
bought the disassembled chapd 
and gave it to the Beatk John Len- 
non his wife, sometime before 
Lennon was shot fatally in Decem- 
ber 1980, the auctioneer, Stuart 
Levy, said Yoko One’s lawyers no- 
tified Salvation Army officials in 
August that the chapel was theirs. 

“We assume she got tired of paying 

die storage,” Levy said. 


fltufnrre magamn- hn^ensvader- 

abiy changed its taste in men. Last 
year the magazine chose the singer 
MidaeL Jackson, the “androgy- 
nous thriller,” as its man oF the 
year, but for 1985 it is going with a 
fittie rougher image, Don Johnson 
of the “Warn Vice” TV series. 
Glamour gushingly described 
Johnson as a “pink-pan ts'd bad 
boy” who posomfies ^postmodern 
'macho ... a vital, primal male 
with predatory eyes, a warm, se- 
ductive male and a stubborn TU- 

do-whatever-I-damn-wefl-please’ 
three-d ay ' stubble/* Other winners 
of the past decade include Sam 
Sheym<Tom Sefedt, Mkk lag- 
gee, Rkhmi Gere, Alan Alda, John 
lYsrotta, Woody Allen, Sylvester 
StaBooe and Warren Beatty. 


1 


MOVING 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ALLIED 

VAN LINES INTL 


OVBl 1300 OfflCES 

woauniMK 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


Hobdays & TrawL 


GREAT BRITAIN 


USA Afired Van Unas Infl Corp 
(01011 312-481-8100 

Or cal aur Agency European M eafc 

PARIS Deefaortfae b ite matfaord 
(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKRJCT 

uosaeSimtMwisEH 

(02102)45023 IMS. 

MUNICH utt 

(OS9) 142244 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE’ 


km Moving 
(01) 953 3434 
Call far Afatft f™* estimate 




Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 






LONDON. For Ae bed furndted flats 
and hornet. Consult the SpnaaSstu 


PhJSpa. Kay and Lewis. Tnfc Saudi of 
PbrV352 flllL North of Poi 722 
5135. Telex 27846 BESIDE G. 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CW1K AY. 
Deluxe renk*L VaferiusBr. 174, 
Amsterdam. (00421234 a 623222. 


offering 

pre-opening savings on 
6 ma, 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1-Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and dl with 
luxuriously (^pointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


Executive Services Available 


Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


condrotH 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE LUCERNE 


cpsimres & penthouses »nlh an wfor- 


gages at low Swiss interest ndes. 
Free for tele to fo re ign**. 


r * | r ■ >7 ’ ! k 1 1 j 


Dorfoir. 01-8872 Wee— n SO 
Tel; 0158-431778. 

Tbe 876062 HOAtt 04 


teg 

m 



trjnhi 



CONTMEX. Sm* & .medum nw«. 
baoaoa*. ton worldwide. CoS Chcr- 

EtSs 2B1 18 81 Ner Open* 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SUBSCRIBE 
to the 

INTERNATIONAL 


HERALD 

TRIBUNE 


AN) SAW. 

As a new t u fa afc er to the 
international Herald Tr&xrrm, 
you con tore up to half 



nafe m US $9.80 or load 
eq u h ra lmit per fine. You must 

inch/ dm complet e ewrd «nS- 

atleMBra «&**-. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTDCOMPANES 


tneorporafian and u 
Me of Man, Turks, 


the newsstand price i ro nin g 
an your country of rudenc e- 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


CANADA 


For detail 

an Hu special introductory offer, 
write •* 


Sff S oi i eatp B—ii Dc jiudm et iL 
181. Avenue Oxefoe de G o uK . 
92200 We u Wy — S yne, hence. 
Ortrfi Me 747-07-29 



M ASIA AMS PAOnC 
contac t aur bed t fc inbutar an 




.some j f 

fetor” 

FSe 


AVBtAGE PBOHT 
OVER THE LAST TWO YEABS: 21% 
Trade record aodtedby a wel blown 
nercotod cudt company. No mar. 
gpi cab up to irrtid nveiiiuem. 


Far firdw in fan w* 
GOLD hflli 


Loutcm. Tel: 004121/20 38 31. 
Buenos Aik T eh 00541/313 61 46. 
To receive a brochure free of charge. 
Write: GOTO HBA GROUP 
Rue du Lion D or 4 
1003 lauKsne, Switi e riond. 
Broher e nq a nu in vi ted 


FINANCIAL TIMES 



YOUR AGENT M MOROCCO 

SCHAMASCH MAROC SA 

Write: 42, Arte Hasan Sogtv 
O awhtancD 01. Morocco 
Crdfc 272604, 272652. 222221 
Tbe 22901 


WE B5UE IETTBIS OF QBXT 
front maw bonfo. 

We oodirm LSCi from Third World. 


MTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMTEDMC. 
U-SJL 4 WOHDWDE 


Tel: 69-59 00 61 
Teiefae6W9y 70 
Tutac 414561 . 


20123 Mibsi. Tel 49B2251 or 
34527)1, Tales 316329 
PMB: BOS115 Avenue Vteor Hugo 
75116 Porte. Ta L- S02 18 00. 

Telex. 62QB93F. 

ROME: Via Sovota 7B, 0019B Rome. 
Tet 85 32 41 or 644 00 70 . 

Tele*. 613458 

ZUBCH: EMnwag 32, 8001 Zuddi 
Tet (DJI 274 6111 
Tefac 812656 or 012981. 


*0 pronisaty nates top 100 banks, 
look for Lenders. Tet 4181971. 


look for Lenders. Tet 4181971. 
TeJek 241176, Deni* Greece. 


A co mpl ete personal & bedn— Mnnce 
provcS re a unque mflection of 


proving a cf 

hJW»u. vanoaw » wnnM 
indhnduob fa ol food S 





Tefac 812656 or 812981. 

MIDDLE EAST 

DUBAh P.O. Ban ISIS DNATa 
Arfae CteOte, Dubai, UA£ 
Tat 214565 Tefae4S711 

ASA 


JS5?’* 

MW HATtONAL 

■obnul raanoiis 
TUESDAYS 

fa he BIT OawBed Section. 


fae n tpotewe ml nmu g e ment of 
anpxiet afanenoe vteh resort, in- 
dntrid wid art-buanes projects with 

CB benefih aid tex mnetoor^ real 
atata sate cad natogmei^ Go>tem- 
ment kernes retetiaidn^ affihare 
bartang, Inal. inv M n i e ni and node 


When in Home: 
PALAZZO AL VBABKJ 
Luxury apartment heme wkh rurnsned 
flats, aveafabte for 1 week aid more 


Pha* 6794325. 6793450. 
Write: Via del Veidbro 16, 
00186 Borne. 


IOOON 

Rdudary & trat sennas I Company 
formation, & dcnsaTOian I MemOgn- 
d tar I Bait aooaures egtabUied I 
General busies adviee & iteni I 
ffCR, 17 WidegrteSf, London El 7HP 
Tet 01 377W4. Ac 893911 G 


Bn onoal M unjuvn wt Gorparrfen lid 
284 Bay Sfreet. P.O. Bax M4826 

Nassau. Bdana 

Ph. |809) 325-1126 or 3228549 



MSMON ACCES500ES. to mtoort la 
Geads. Canted Mr. Ormai PO Box 
951, SMtei K HanBten, Canada 
1BN 3P9 The 061-6566. 




agency- Vint 


'OR More 
classifieds 


gj hW'L'm-M